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Sot, i?s|.U 

Have You Purchased Materials at Lower Prices Than Are Now Ruling? Do You 

Know How Much is Coming to You on LiOntracts 
Made Before the Advance? Keep a Record of All Contract Purchases — Thoroughly Explained and Illustrated- See 
f^e 71. Other Important Features in RegulHr Departments. Retail, page 71; Wholesale, page 77; in ths Work- 
aiop with the^Operative Baker, page 83; Cracker, page 101. A complete list of the contents of this issue on page S. 



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Usiwd Monthly by Wm. R. Gregory Co. 
16«2 Woolwortb Bnlldlng, Now York, N. T. 



PaONE Ctnti 



Volume 33 



APRIL, 1916 



Number 1 



CONTENTS 



The Art of Making Pie-Crust 

Everybody's Keeping a-Boosting for the National Convention 
Two California "Raisin Days" This Year ----- 

Editorial -- 

Too Many Exhibitions -- 

Purchase Records for Retail Bakers ------ 

Completing the Bread-Selling Circle - 

Importance and Value of Knowing and Understanding Your Costs 

How to Make Easter Buns 

With the Trade in England - - 

Tales of a Traveler - - 

Some Reminiscences of a Lifetime Spent in the Baking Bui 



EDITORIAL. 
Adolpb Boettler 
A PecQllar SnggeBtion . 
"•-a Many Eihlbltlona . 






RETAIL. 

furcbntie Uecofda for Retail BakerH , 

Trade GMlers for the Live Baker 

How to Stlmnlate the Bread frade When Bual 

neRB Is DdII 

WHOLBS4LB. 

Completing tbe Bread-SelllDB Clrele . 

Imporlance and Value -' " * — — 

slandlDK Your Cost 
IN TRE WORKSHOP. 



Hard Qonds 



Inquiries — Keeping Maeblne-Maili' 



Open 
Bhcul 



... r Blacnit Trade Marka . 
National Blucult Co.'s Year . 
Loose-WlieH Earnings Decrease . 
Choice Cracker Reclpea 
Some RemlnlacencB of a Lltetlmt 
Baking Business 



Freler Unterrlcht faer Baecker 
Flelschmann Bnecker-K.-TI.-B. 
Im Wiener Prater . 
Verelnlgle 



I 30. StlftnugrfeBt 



Iltnst 



to Erect tlBO.OOO Plant In Cleveland 
c Coast Convention Dates . 
rrade Marks (or Bnkery Prortuels 
itlon of Bennett Oven Co. , 
;eB In the Hubhard Oven Co. 

.J"e'_^'!"* " 



TrI-Stat. 



> Exhibit . 



Bakers Kicking In Pennsylvania . 

Reufer Party to Salt Lahe CoDTention 

Death of Adolpb Boettler . 

William C. Lnu. Prominent Baker. Dies 

Preparing lor rd Exhibit at Omaha . 

New England Trl-Stnte Convention Dates 

Bakers Exhibit In Cleyeland 

Chicago Opens Continuation Class Tor Bo 

H, M. Baohman In Charge . 

Charles Lanti Reti^ns from EaBtern Trip . 






Baker 



DiBQ 



Tbe BnklDg Indiix 

General Baking 
With theTrade I 



Coming Conventloos 
Model BnSory at Food Show 
Death of Harry Fox 
MflBsacbusetts Bakers Dine . 



f Cost of Production 
and ProgreflH . 
n Cane Sugar" . 
Annual Statement . 
V England . 

> PrOBpprIng , 



1 W. S, Travis . 



6i 
63 
65 
69 
69 



en 



a year. Canada $1.50 a 



SDBSCKXPTIOn PKXCX— United States and PoeiesBiong, Mexico and Cuba tl-00 a 

Foreign Countrieg in Postal Union $2.00. 

GA u -nOH— Do not pay solicitors, unless tbey pteaentviriUen atUtority, with date, tiom the pahiishen to collect money. 

IKVnCE TO ADVBltTISElU— To insare insertion, all copy, cuts, etc., for changes o( re^lar advertisenients in 

Bakeks Rbtibw should reach us NOT LATER than the 15tli OF THE MONTH preceding date of publication. 

The first advertising forms close promptly on this date 

NEW or ADDITIONAL advertising not to occupy fixed position, can be inserted in a special form up lo the 20ih. 



Members of the New York Trade Press Association 

Bnttnd at tk» Nnt Yark ftKt QBiee at Svxmd-slam Maii UatUr. CopyngU U 



Member Audit Bureau of Circulation 

\ by WtiL, R. Gr*terv Co., Nna York, all n^Ab mrmd. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



AfriIu 1916 



A Studebaker costs less to run 



— it rarely has to take a vacation 



Delivery Car 

*875 



Half 'loD Sulion Waf on - | 875 
Half-Ion Opaa Esprs'u 850 

One-toti Opan Ejcprait 1200 

Ono-ton Stake Bodr - - 1250 
le-PBuangar *Bii> ■ • • 1400 
AU /Vice* F. O. B. Dttroit 



One of ihe biggest reasons for the 
national popularitj of this Stude- 
baker Deliveiy Car h1 $875 is its 
RELIABILITY. A baker knows 
that wben he buys it, he buys a 
36S-d»y-in-the-yeHr car- a car that 
needs little attention- no nursing 
and rarely has to take a vacation 
for repairs. 

The reason is simply that this 
Studebaker Is not a pleasure car 
adapted for delivery uses, but is a 
DELIVERY ear designed for de- 
livery purposes and built by a 
manubcturer who for 64 yeara has 
been in close touch with the re- 
tailer's delivery problems. 

It is built to cover longer routes— at 
higher speeds than'your horses can 
ever make It is built to run smooth- 
over icy pavements or softrnmg 



asphalt. It is built to be driven 
by ■ men who may not be a me- 
chanic — who may not know much 
of a car and who has to have a 
simple, easily-opetated vehicle. It 
is built to carry its FULL capacity 
anywhere at any time. And with 
■II this, it is built to coat less to no 
—less for tires, fuels and oils — IcM 
tor layolb and replacomentfi. 

It sums up not only Studebaker's 
of delivery experience, but 
rich experience of building 
more than 22 B, 000 pleasure car*. 
And from any angle - Service- 
capacity — speed — endurance 
—ECONOMY or quality of manu- 
facture, it stands aa the GREAT 
value of the market. See Ihe Stude- 
baker dealer or write for facts that 
have shown tbousandaofm 



Studcb 



64-year 



STUDEBAKER 

South Bend, Ind. Detroit. Mich. WdkeniUe, Ont. 

Addreti all Corretpondenct to Detroit 



, Google 



Miitmil Keclproclly— ■■&!« it In BaKRes Rivibw." 



Apin, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 




Providing a Bond of Trade Sympathy 

T is assumed by the readers ot" a Trade Paper, that the editor knows overj 
advertiser and is familiar with his products. If not, he should be; as a mat- 
ter of fact, he is. And this.contidence of the subscriber has a good deal to 
do with holding the editor to his task, A great many magazines publish 
anything that "listens good," and the publisher hopes it is all right. If it 
isn't all right, he doesn't want to know about it, and isn't thankful when 
he is told. With the Trade Paper, the editor cannot countenance "ex- 
plosives" in his ads. If he does he loses subscribers, and if he hasn't sub- 
scribers he cannot expect advertisements. And without advertisements he cannot produce 
the best paper. For advertisements not only bring money that buys gasoline, but the sub- 
scriber prizes the Trade Paper on account of the fact that it advertises the machinery, and 
the goods he needs, and also tells the truth about them. 

It will thus be seen that editor, advertiser, and subscriber, occupy a close triangular 
family relation. Their interests are mutual. If the Trade paper did not help the subscriber 
up the incline plane towards success, it would not and could not exist. 

"Each for all, and all for each," is fast becoming the universal slogan. "From every 
man according to his ability, to every man according to his need," is the new evangel. 

There is no such thing as distinct interests, apart from each other. The manufac- 
turer needs the miner, the miner the manufacturer; they both need the farmer, and we need 
them all. 

One may be a hewer of wood or a drawer of water, another a captain of an indus- 
try. One may be a toiler in the valley, and still another in the observatory on the mountain 
top. reading the signs of the times. But their success hangs upon their co-operation — their 
reciprocity — their inter-relation. 

True progress is only possible where there is mutuality and co-operation — where we 
see the seeming paradox of individual liberty harnessed to the car of common weal. 

The principle of alternating motion is as applicable to the life of the individual as 
it is to mechanics. 

We grow by giving. Power comes from knowledge. Knowledge is absorption and 
ejection— -taking in and giving out. It is a process of interaction. 

Thus we get to know each other, to understand the differences of individual, inimi- 
cal, and communal interests — to have confidence and to combine. This is the foundation 
principle upon which we raise the structure of social and commercial prosperity. 

The buccaneer is banished from business. The merchant realizes that according to 
the quality of his goods, so will his business prosper. 

And the purchaser, recognizing that the merchant knows this, and proving by actual 
purchase and test that he lives up to his principles, gives him his business. 

I have said that we are breaking away from distrust of our fellows. That is true; 
but we still find people whom it is a task to induce to believe this. 

The vast majority of people, though, see that the man who advertises his commodi- 
ties or service as "quality" must produce them— else his successful days are numbered. And 
if he provide products that fill the bill, then he and they benefit. 

No Trade Paper will publish punk publicity. The Trade Paper is a publication 
wherein can be found ideas, plans and information. 

The reason is that its subscribers are alert and progressive — alive to their possibili- 
ties and to the good things in the world of science and invention. 

I know no better medium for the exchange of ideas than the Trade Paper. Its pages 
bristle with interesting facts, and pulse with intense humanism and understanding. 

The task of the advertiser in the Trade Paper is made a pleasant one by reason of 
the intelligent receptivity of the subscriber. The subscriber and advertiser recognize the 
benefit of business reciprocity, and fully appreciate the friendship based upon it. 

They know each other's needs — that they need each other for their individual growth. 

They acknowledge the distinct services to each other. 

Whether you call this sentiment or something else, yet it is the very essence of suc- 
cess, producing results otherwise unattainable. 

The Trade Paper has made giant strides. Its intimacy and strength with its sub- 
scribers and contributors is remarkable. But its great achievement, to my mind, is the 
creation of a bond of sympathy, mutuality and understanding between its subscribers and 
advertisers that is unique. 

And we do business with our friends — our enemies will not trade with us, anyway. 



C,noole 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April. 1916 



A FEW lIOllBllTa WITH OnR ADVERTISBR8 



Armour &■ Co., Chicago, III. — At tliis time of the 
year prices of eggs are lowest and quality highest. 
For this reason bakers desiring to "get in" right would 
do well to consult this concern for their year's supply. 
Armour's Frozen Eggs are under constant refrigera- 
tion and the buyer orders them out as wanted. This 
1 also makes baking butter of quality. 



Bennett Oven Co., Battle Creek, Mick. — The incorpo- 
rators of this concern, having twenty-five years' exper- 
ience in the manufacturing and selling of portable 
ovens, have severed their connections with a large 
oven concern and are now constructing modem ovens 
with many improved features. Announcement of their 
s appears in the advertising pages of this issue. 



W. K. John Co., Chicago and New York. — "Rico" is 
a trade name of products for use in cake making manu- 
factured by this well known specialty house. They 
have a very attractive proposition to make bakers inter- 
ested in box cake. A coupon for your convenience ap- 
pears on page gz of this issue, if filled out and mailed 
direct to W. K. Jahn Co., full particulars will be sent 

The American Oven & Machine Co., of Chicago. 
III., has just issued a new catalogue advertising the 
"New Era" mixer. They would be pleased to send a 



copy of this catalogue to any baker, upon request. 
It is a well-printed booklet, and gives a clear exposi- 
tion of the features of the "New Era" mixer. 

Crescent Milling Co., Fairfax, Minn. — Fairfax and 
Golden Cream brands of spring wheat flour are ground 
from wheat selected from a line of 155 country ele- 
vators owned and operated by this mill. This insures 
flour of quality. The mill has a daily capacity of 600 

Lincoln Electric Co., Cleveland, Ohio. — This company 
is the manufacturer of the famous "Lincoln Motors" 
used extensively on motor driven bakers' machinery. 
The manufacturers claim their motors will work under 
bake shop conditions without special care or attention. 
It is also claimed by the Lincoln Electric Co. that one 
of their standard motors has been operated under 
water for nearly three years without damage to wind- 
ings. 

H. L. Schroeder, Chicago, 111. — Woodenware of every 
description for use in the bakery is made under the 
personal supervision of Mr. Schroeder in a factory 
that contains the most modern and economical equip- 
ment for this purpose. This insures the baker of get- 
ting the most for his money. 



PLYMCO 



™*'*''- Dr. Teller, of the Columbus Laboratories, Chicago, 

at the National Convention, Richmond, Va., in his 
splendid address, emphasized the Great Value of 
Boiled Starch in Bread, now conveniently sold in dry 
form as 

Processed Cereal or PLYMCO 
as Yeast Food 

Prof. Jago, in his Book of Bread, classifies it with 
Potatoes as Bread Improvers. 

Bakers, in order to pull through this period of high 
priced material, are compelled to practice economy. 

PLYMCO will Save you Money and give you a 
Better Loaf of Bread, Box Cake, Macaroons and 
lujtK Crullers, also Rolls and Coffee Cakes. 

WRITE FOR FREE SAMPLE AND INSTRUCTIONS 

PLYMOUTH MILLING CO. Le Mars. Iowa 

Branches: Emery & Co., Melrose. Mass.; Loub Arnstrong it Co., Postal Telegraph BIdg.. Chicago 



Let tbem koo 



that TOD read tbe ida. Id Baubd Bhtidi 



A.iOOglC 



ApKIZ^ 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



lido 
mnla 



-WlTlY 



It really does make bread belter. It is a product 
which, added in the douRh, makes a balanced ration 
which will take the place of bread and milk. The Lactic 
acid in buttermilk is oi great value also in he ping the 
fermentation. It increases the protein contained in the 
bread, also the (at. Bread in which Semi-Sol is used 
remain) fresher for a longer period than ordinary bread. 
It is moi-e easily digested because of the fact thai Lactic 
acid stimulates the fermentation, thus pr.iducing a 
greater amount of soluble protein, and ani>ther import- 
ant item in this time of high-priced floui^by adding 
from seven to twelve pounds of Semi-Sol Buttermilk to 
a barrel mix, if you are not now using milk, you will 
increase the water- absorbing power of the dough from 
twelve to eighteen per cent. 

Prominent Authorities Praise It 

Read these statements of several prominent author- 
ities published in the Feb. issue of Bakers Review: 

DR. ROBERrWAHUsays: "It has been recognized 
that this acid (Lactic acid) is of considerable importance 
in baking, inasmuch as it acts upwn certain ingredients 
in the tlour, otherwise insoluble in water, and this is val- 
uable as food for the yeasi, thus resulting in better 
fermentation. " 

WM. JAGO, says: "Lactic acid peptonizes the pro- 
teins bringing them into a condition more adapted for 
the nutrition of yeast." 

A disinterested expert whb has been experimenting 
with Semi-Sol Buttermilk, says: "The time will come 
when pure cultures oE yeast and Lactic acid bacteria will 
be generally employed in the bakerv; the result of ef- 
fecting an all around improvement m the quality of the 
bread uid not leB>t of it* fUvor." 

Try It Yourself 

However, Mr. Baker, we do not ask you to accept 
verbatim the words of these parties. Make a test your- 
self. If you will send us your present formula telling 
us the kind of shop you operate, whether you use sponge 
or plain straight dough, how much flour you use in a 
mix, we will send a sample to suit your formula and sue- 
g-est how to use our Semi-Sol to best advantage. If the 
results do not bear out what we have said about your 
product we wil> not expect you to do business with us 
we have so much confidence that you will be pleased 
that we are willing to take a chance in sending you a 
sufficient sample for you to give the product a real 

S»imI f»T a tamplm and faU partiealara today, 

CONSOLIDATED PRODUCTS CO. 

1029 West Adams St. CHICAGO. ILL 




This Trade Mark 
Is The Symbol of Quality 

— Ask your jobber for wooden- 
ware that bears my trade-mark 
— then you are sure of getting 
the best. 

Schroeder Quality 
Schroeder Service 
Highest Quality 
Best Service 

a combination that cannot be equaled 
when it comes to manufacturing and 
selling of peel blades and other wooden- 
ware used by the baker. 

Schroeder Peels are made of the 
best seasoned lumber, put together with 
steel plate and steel pins which are not 
visible on the peel. The rivets which 
are put through the plates and the 
wood are of copper, clinched on both 
sides. These peels will not warp or 
split as easily as one piece peel. 

Our stocks are at all 
times kept complete 
as possible, conse- 
quently orders are 
filled and shipped 
promptly. 

May we send you our booklet? 

H. L. Schroeder 

3512 Carroll Ave. 
Chicago Illinois 



_c 



TwM u adTwUMMMt Id Bakbm Bsmw. 



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BAKERS REVIEW 



JOHNSON'S CHERRIES 
WILL SELL YOUR CAKES AND COOKIES 

When placed in your cakes and cookies JOHNSON'S 
CHEIRRIEIS will add an appeal they would not otherwise have. 

When eaten they will cause a lasting impression of the 
quality of your goods on the consumer. A pleased customer is 
your best asset. 

Because of their deep red, wholesome looking appearance, 
their tenderness and luscious taste JOHNSON'S CHERRIES will 
aeate trade for you. 

They are building business for others — why don't you 
try them? 

Whole or Piece* In Pails or Kegs 



* tbat roD raad tbe tda. In Bixww Biraw. 



°Wi?SW^^'S^fe^ 



Aran,. 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



E©iiiiii]i©itih 0'w®m Coimpmsij 

Sidney and G. H. Bennett wish to announce 
to the baking industry the formation 
of the above named Company 

Our past twenty years' experience in the manufac- 
turing and selling of sectional ovens has proved to 
the baker that we know how to build the best Sec- 
tional Ovens suitable for Bread, Cake and Pastry. 

■ Our present oven embodies the best principles of 
m'^dern oven construction with many added, up-to- 
date improvements. We urge all bakers contem- 
plating purchasing an oven to write us getting 
information on our General Pijrpose Oven before 
placing their orders. 

Fair dealing and satisfaction guaranteed. 

Bennett Oven Company 

aaSBY BENNETT. PrmmtUitt G. H. BENNETT. Vtem-PrMkUnt 

Battle Creek, Michigan 



I 

; 

Where economy in space and cost of production are the two principal itenu 

~ ' ' --■—■-•- ,j„„ iniulled I Praminent btkam all ovw the ctranbr h«»e ln>t*Jlwl tb* 

two will b< I "HuBhea" becmuH It la eltan. eeonomiuL Knd !■ ouilj eon 

(tleship to ba I trolied— maklna it mow sffldent than anj other tjrpa onn 

I on the market. 
Afny we haom th» prioiUgm of (femonafrodnf it< oalam (0 YOUT 

Hugheg Electric Heating Co^ 211.231 W. SchiUer Street, Chicago 

TtU *Bt f9a reMi Baum Bhtiiw. 



BAKERS R E VI , W 



April, 1916 



Granulated 

Nut Meats 

FLAVORED WALNUTS 



ALL 
READY FOR USE 



More Economical 

THAN WALNUTS 

More 
Convenient For Use 

THAN WALNUTS 

Costs Less 

THAN WALNUTS 
SEND FOR 

CAKE RECIPE AND 
SAMPLE! 

NOW!!! 

PACKED IN 

5S lb. CASES 22c. per lb. 

SMALLER PACKAGES 25c. 

S. GUMPERT & CO. 

BUSH TERMINAL 
BROOKLYN N. Y. 



IM tlMa featv out 7M IM4 Uw Ma. la Bakih Baraw, 



April, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



B ST 

ON 

W ILS 



MUi.. 




RECH- MARBAKER CO. 
\AGON MAKERS 
PHILA.-B\. 



,u..nG00fj[C 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apkil, 1916 



Why waste your time and money 
with a treacherous make-shift oven? 



The 

Tnuble-Proof 

Oven 

that will 

shorten your 

hours, save 

your fuel 

and build up 

your business. 

Sold under a 

written 
guarantee of 

perfect 
satisfaction. 



Extra heavy 

fire briclt 
construction 
throughout. 

Nothing to 
wear out or 
bum out 
except an 
occasional 
grate bar. 



THE UNIVEItSAL PATENT STEAM OVEN 
Continuous baiting— Continuous satisfaction. 

The Universal has done more than any other oven in assisting ambitious retail 
bakers to reach out for a profitable bread business. No matter what price you pay, 
you cannot buy a better bread oven than the Universal. It is an oven for a life- 
time and our reputation is always in evidence, insuring you unequalled service and 
a square deal at all times. 



The most popular 
oven In the world for 

all around baking. 

Thousands of bakers 

everywhere have 

sung Its praises. 

It stands today 

without a serious 

competitor. 



An oven that 

boats oaslly, evenly 

and rapidly. 

It holds the heat 

Inside and works 

day and night 

with 
very lltUe rest. 



THE MIDDLEBV INSIDE FURNACE OVEN 
"A brick oven that can tf movwl" 



For baking a complete line of goods in the same oven, you cannot get an oven 
that approaches the Middleby for genuine satisfaction. 

Let us send you catalogue of the Universal or Middleby, or both. 
MANUFACTURED BY 

The Middleby Oven Company 

41-43 PARK ROW NEW YORK 



will belp all ■round If yoa msntloii Bakbu Ritiiw. 



yGOOglf 



April, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Ovens and Accessories 


Poet 




Page 




Albreckt, F. J., Pittsburgh, Pa. 


25 


Middleby Oven Co., New York, N. Y 


14 


American Peel Co.. Chicago. lU. 




Middleby-MarshaU Oven Co.. Chicago. RL 


IS-19 


Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co.. Pitts., Pa. 


16 


National Oven Co., Beacon, N. Y. 


22 


Bennett Oven Co., BattU Creek. Mich. 




Petersen Oven Co. , Chicago, BL 


25 


Btodsett Co., G. S., Burlington. Vt. 


24 


Reid PortabU Oven Co.. Buffalo, N. Y. 


24 


Day Co., J. H.. Cincinnati, Ohio 




Roberts Portable Oven Co., Chicago, liL 


23-25 


Duhrkop Oven Co., New York, N. Y. 


21 


SchaUer Oven Co., Albert, Rochester, N. Y. 


22 


Fish. A. J, & Co.. Chicago, IlL 


17 


Standard Oven Co. . Pittsburgh, Pa. 


15 


Hubbard Oven Co. , New York, N Y. Front 


cover 




20 


Hughes Electric Heating Co., Chicago. III. 




Zahner Mfg. Co. , Kansas City, Mo. 


20 


Meek Oven Co., Newburyport, Mass.. 


20 


Zaubitz. August, New York, N. Y. 


24 



lD«t DMBtloa Buaua Baraw. Nnt m4. 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



What )areil hsulatinj 
Are Doing in die Wagner 




NONPAREIL Insulating Brick produce results like these because they are ten times 
better nonconductors of heat than (ire brick or red brick. Full information as to 
what diey are and how diey are installed in ovens, is given in the booklet, "G)mfOTt 
and EccMiomy in the Bakery." A copy of the booklet and a sample brick will be sent, 
free of charge, on request. 

Ask for ihtm today. 

Armstrong Cork & Insulation Company, '*• pT;^^??? ^ 



Aprii,. igio BAKERS REVIEW 



1 rndTertlBCDHnt la Uiuus Uitisw. 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW Amu, 1916 



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Afmi, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 

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BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



A GOOD BAKER 
REQUIRES A GOOD OVEN 

Zahner Ovens 

Ar* in Satisfactory Service Wherever 
Good Bread and P»*try ia Sold 



ThTM SIm*, far CmI, Wo«d o 



dnceded by bakers who know, to be the heaviest and 
brst-put-together Poriable Bake Oven maile. Special Gal- 
vanized Charcoal Iron body. Insulated with two inches of 
Asbestos Wood packed under pressure. Cast iron racks. 
Regulating dampers. Accurate ihermometer. Hand- for Red, 
wrought-iron self-tightening door catches. Revolving 
grates and three-inch tile lining in fire lio.t of coal ovens. 
All hand made, no machine work in 'ts construction. 



Write for Catalocua 14 



ZAHNER MFG. 

KANSAS CITY. U "^ A. 



CO. 



We Know 
the Needs 
of Baking 



able ^inv Temperature 
Measuring Instruments 
for every baking re- 
quirements. 
We are specialiats la 
„„ , ., „ the manufacture of 

' "CrS:! H»,MT,p.Th.,ino,n. 

eiets, KecordillK and 
Index Thermometers, Automatic Tem- 
•wronir* and PreMUfe Regulators, Mercury- 
id Absolute Pressure Gauges, 
Item Thermometers, Hydrom- 
irmo-Electric and Radiation 

—Every Instrument bearing 
lakes honest claim to supremacy 
ir^f manufacturing step is carefully 
i in detail, applications carefully 



TtMHaM Divixon 

fqy/cr Instrament Covqxmiat 
Rocnester N.V. 

LligltizedbyGoOgl 



I raad tbe ids. In BiKua Karisw. 



.^pltlL, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



, Google 



3AKERS REVIEW 



AFB2L, igi6 



Scaler 
Bailer 
Proofer 
Molder 
Racks 
Rack- 
Ovens 

Of course 



Saving 

with 

Rack Ovens 

90% Labor 

60 to 80% 

Floor Space 

50% Fuel 

Peel Ovens 

For 
AU-'roand 

Baking 



NATIONAL OVEN COMPANY 



New Englaiid Acancy 
H. C. W. YOUNG, 81 Hanover St, Boatoo, Mu*. 



Beacon, N, Y. 



2 DhU* Deck Oto* i Bi tiue lwl at Am 



SCHALLER DOUBLE DECK. Th>aitlT<i< 



Walnutport, Pa., June 30th 1915 
The Albert Sctaaller Oven Co. 

Gentlemen: 
The Double Deck oven you constructed for us last fall it 
a wonderful oven. We are gamine trade daily, and we 
are making tplendid bread and calces, ind pretty soon 
we shall need an additional Schaller oven. 

J. FRITZINGER. 



Mr. R. H. Wool of Ithica. N. Y., after using a Schaller 
oven for 6 years, highly recommended the same to the Sun 
Baking Co. of Auburn, N. Y., with very satisfactory results 
to ourselves as well as the Sun Baking Co. Keeping up the 
good work, Mr. Wool ordered 2 large Schaller ovens to be 
erected in hia strictly modem new factory. TW* ia a raaisa 1 

Dn not overlook the Sehaller Doable Dock ovoa — we 
Cesstnicled 21 of then ia this di7 in the peal 3 Toara. 



Write for our Catalogue, describmg the construdkiii of the Schaller Single and Double Deck Oraas 
in detail, n cuts and drawings. 

The Albert Schaller Oven Co., 55 Averill Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 



yCoogle 



BAKERf; REVIEW 






Are You Prepared? 

Preparedness for war and preparedness for business are two different things. At best, preparedness 
for war represents a destructive condition while busint^ss preparedness in every sense is constructive. 

Saccessful bakers know the meaning of preparedness. They realize that public patronaice is conferred upon the baker 
who is best prepared to meet the demands of the public. The hakers who are satisfied to merely exist without any 
thoughts as to how they can improve the q lality of their goods or increase the efficiency of their equipment are placing 
themselves in the open against the attaclc of competiiion, and unless you can meet competition on an e>4ual footing: you 
are sure to he on the losing side, 

FORTIFY YOUR BUSINESS AGAINST COMPETITION 

Bakera who use Black Diamond Ovens are prejiared to meet the most severe competition because no matter how large 
the opposing force may be the Black Diamond Oven baker is prepared to more than hold his own. With one of these 
ovens you can produce the highest quality of bake goods at the lowest possible cost for fuel and repairs. 

J you that they represent Rreater value than any other oven on the 



Roberts Portable Oven Co. 

2016 N. Major Avenue, Chicago 



N*w EngUind Sailing Agant: 

H. a W. YOUNa 
61 Haaov«r Sl^ BmIod, Man. 



BRANTFORD OVEN & RACK CO^ 
BraBtfotd, OnL 
MEMBER NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MASTER BAKERS 




ROBERTS BAKE SHOP APPLIANCES 



Latmr costs have already advanced to such an extent that no baker 
can afford to overlook the advantages of time and labor savmg 
appliances. A little leak here and there amounts to a big figure 
in the course of a year. Roberts bake-shop appliances will pay 
for themselves in a short time because they eliminate all lost motion 
and unnecessary steps. Appliance catalog sent free on request 




Lst Uwa know tliat jod nad tba ads. In I 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



Scaler 
Bailer 








Saving 

with 

Rack Ovens 


Proofer 








90% Ubor 


Molder 
Racb 
Rack- 
Ovens 

a cour«e 








60 to 80% 

Floor Space 

50% Fuel 

Peel Ovens 

For 
All-'ronnd 

Baking 




SCOTT BROS, miACA, N. 




NATIONAL 


OVEN 


COMPANY 


New Engl-od Acancy 
H. G. W. YOUNG, 61 H.n«« St, Botton, M.... 




Beacon, N. Y. 



2 DaabU DkIi Oto* esHtneUd M Am 



Walnutport. Pa., June 30th 1915 
The Albert Schaller Oven Co. 

Gentlemen: 
The Double Deck oven you constructed for ua lost fall ii 
a wonderful oven. We are gaining trade daily, and wt 
are making iplendid bread and cakes, and pretty soor 
we thaU need an additional Schaller oven. 

J. FRITZINGER. 



Mr. R. H. Wool of Ithica, N. Y., after using a Schaller 
oven for 6 years, highly recommended the same to the Sun 
Baking Co. of Auburn, N. Y., with venr satisfactory results 
to ourvelves as well as the Sun Baking Co. Keeping up the 
good work, Mr. Wool ordered 2 large Schaller ovens to be 
erected in his strictly modem new factory. Tkw* ii a t«mm I 

Da not orarlook tke Scballor DoobU Dock ot«b— we 



Write for our Catalogue, doscribing the coutnidian of the Schaller Single and Double Deck Onos 
m <letul, iu cut! and drawings. 

The Albert Schaller Oven Co., 55 Averill Ave., Rocheiter, N. Y. 



BAKER? REVIEW 







Are You Prepared? 

Preparedness for war and preparedness for business are two different things. At best, preparedness 
for war represents a destructive condition while business preparedness in every sense is constructive. 

Saccessful bakers know the meaning of preparedness. They realize that public patronage is conferred upon the baker 
who is best prepared to meet the demands of the public. The bakers who are satisfied to merely exist without any 
thoughts as to how they can improve the qiality of their goods or increase the efficiency of their equipment are placing 
themselves in the open af;ainst the attack of competiiion, and unless you can meet competition on an enual footing you 
are sure to he on the losing side. 

FORTIFY YOUR BUSINESS AGAINST COMPETITION 

Bakers who use Black Diamond Ovens are prepared to meet the most severe competition because no matter how large 
the opposing force may be the Black Diamond Oven baker is prepared to more than hold his own. With one of these 
ovens you can produce the highest quality of bake goods at the lowest possible cost for fuel and repairs. 

ralue than any other oven on the 



Roberts Portable Oven Co. 

2016 N. Major Avenue, Chicago 



New Encbud Sallint Agent: 
H. a W. YOUNG. 

., BoalOD, Maa*. 

MEMBEIt NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MASTER BAKERS 



BRANTFORD OVEN & RACK CO., 
Brantf ofd, Ont. 




ROBERTS BAKE SHOP APPUANCES 



Labor costs have already advanced to such an extent that no baker 
can afford to overlook the advantages of time and labor savmg 
appliances. A little leak here and there amounts to a tug figure 
in the course of a year. Roberts bake shop appliances will pay 
(or themselves in a short time because they eliminate all lost motion 
and unnecessary steps. Appliance catalog sent free on request 




Lat tb«M know that yon Nad tba ■ 



BAKERS REVIEW 



«M«i 



Reid Portable Oven 

is the lowest in price, most easttjt managed, 
greatest saver of fuel and the most satufactory 
portable oven on the market. Tbey save time 
and labor. They have a enccessful record of 
over tweaty years and are warranted to give 
complete satisfaction. 



REID PORTABLE OVEN COr 
619 Main 8U - Buffalo. N. 




lectric h Graphite Pyrometers 

•nrrwi ancl rtiiMhle for 



AUGUST ZAUBITZ, Sole Mfr. and Patentee 

- 1 M-n Cliff Blr»»l. NKW VltKK 



TlltvlMDi .Con OMtlon 

S. G. BAUER & SON 

MANrPACTURRRfl OF 

STORE RXTURBS. BAKERS' PEELS 

Kb^uIIbi Traaaha, TtaKf niiaw 0*i 
Bmd aaMl ■«<•■ Boix 
Fw^n aad OMm 44S.444 Bar! HtH** 



April, 1916 



A Baker's Library SHOULD contain 

CIENANDT'S 20TI1 CENTURY BOOK 



A Veritable Mine of Redpes for Novel, 
Attractive, Salable Goods. 

Send for Illustrated Circular. 
2d Edition. Price 96. OO 

FRITZ L. GIENANDT 

112 Muudiwtti An. BOSTON, MASS. 



BAKERS REVIEW 

BdyiBi N*v Tirk, 



N. T. 



/// Was a Baker I Would Use a Blodgett Oven 
And I Just as Soon Tell You Why 

FIRST. — Because its construction ts such that it produces perfect combustion 
and a saving in fuel of from 20?^ to 40%. 

SECOND, — Because it is so skillfully and thoroughly insulated that it will bake 
ni re food, with the same amount of fuel, than any oven yet produced. 

THIRD, — Because each baking surface is provided with an independent door, 
which, when opened, furms a horizontal shelf. This arrangement 
facilitate-^ the placing in or removing of articles to and from the 
oven, and insures a much less loss of heat than by the use of the 
large swing doors. 

FOURTH. — Because there is no waste baking surface, no dark corners or space 
that can not be utilized. 

FIFTH. — Because it is so simple in operation. One damper at the top of the 
oven regulates the air supply, disposes of the products of combus- 
tion, and ventilates the oven. 

We want you to have the BLODGETT OVEN LITERA TURE. Write us for any 
particular information you may desire. 

THE G. S. BLODGETT CO., Burlington. Vt.. U."S.A. 



will help all aiouud U 70D D 



aUoD Dakbkb Rit 



yGuUylt 



Apwl, 1916 



ARMLEDER 
BAKER WAGONS 



ARMLEDER 



THBf COST LESS 
THEYUWKBCnBI 
TNETWHtUIWiei 
IDOOIWIIISIIISKia 
OWIENIEIITTEDnS 
PDOnPTSHIPflENT 
303$mfS£SIZES 
WIIITC FDD FREE 
UOPMX CATALOG 



1129 PLUM ST. 
CINCINNATI O. 



OVEN PrROMET 

r«r Brtek w PvrtabI* Bak* 



BELL I Glut ISM Eat^ laS4 

Bake Ovens of All Kinds 

Adaptad for B«kariM, Hotah, ate. Dvplicato 

Grkia*, Lining! and SpaciaL Fumaca Brick. 

Pjrromatart, llloniinatar*, Gai Bnmar*, and a ConlwBKtiMi 

Hpatar knd Slaamar for StaanuDt Bt«ad, 

Vnih wUck Hot Wktar can ba hkd in 1 mimmtt and Staaa 

in 1 H winntM. 



For 
Wmiii 
Fire 



For 
Cat 



BAKE OVEN GA3 BURNER, SEVEN SIZES 

Wbw ardvlBa l«n«r rtat* inttk ud width af «tm. ladda 

Writ* for daKriBUaa ud prica Urt 

FRANCIS J. ALBRECHT 
1 14< PENN AVE , BUT P. L L ttfU PITTSBUSGH. PA. 



The insialiaiion of ago^d ovea has helped more in the eslabhshment of many 
successful bakeries than any other factor. Let the Condon Baking Co. tell you why 
their plant is equipped with 

RETERSEIN OVENS 



THE 



Batlny at PBTBRSEN Onn* aneUd for Condon Bnlclns Co.. ChulHtoD. S. C. 

PETERSEN OVENS are built only by Extern 0ffi«: 

PETERSEN OVEN COMPANY "" ""^^ ^"'^ new york. n. y. 

ESTABLISHED 1879 Vfuttm Office: 

Main Office. 112 W. Adams St., CHICAGO, ILL. sos Putfic Baiidiog, san PRANasco, cal. 

Lrt tbcB kDow that jeo read tb* ada. In Bucaaa Bannw. 



BAKERS REVIEW Atbl, 1916 




THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS 
OF EXPERIENCE 



PmUnted May O. 19M-Oct. 4. ISID-Ju 



The Best There Is— Is The Best To Have 

The comers are rounded — 

— no dirt or grease can collect 
The "Elkco" spreaders are strong — 

— The pans keep in shape 
The "ELkco" curved steel protection plates are stuidy 

The peel cannot injure the end pan 
The ^vrapped strapping is sanitary 

No rivet spots on loaf. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 



I help all ■roand l( jod nwDtloD Bakw (ttrnw. 



, Google 



April, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Pans and Racks 



Hearth Bread Pan Co., New York. N. V. 
Hnis, W. G. &■ Sons, PhiUuUlpkia, Pa. 
laburg Brothers, New York, N. V. 



Pas-e 
29 



Katainger Co., Edward, Chkago, 111. 
Lockwood Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Maag Co., The August, Baltimore, Md. 



Union Sanitary Rack Mfg. Co. Albion. Mick. 21 



Page 
26 
SO 
28 



PANSl PANSl PANS! 
Every Size — Every Style 

QUALITY THE BEST 

JABURG BROTHERS 

NEW YORK 

Main Office: tO>14 Leonard Street 



The Trough That Will Increase 
Your Dough 



She 



UN 



Cracker 
and Biscuit Pans 



ESTABLISHED I860 



} t « « 1 P a B 



Our itMl pant ■ 

■ bI of a tinifon _ 

1 tough, durable atefl ; tbey arf bound with S-i6 bu, 
electrically welded rodi and are suaranteed abtolntely 
flat and free from bncklea. We will guarantee thcM 
pant to wear longer and give better ferrice than aay 
other pan on the market 

W. G. Henis' Sons & Co. 



ll<.l347H3«MieAKMe PHUMpUi,rL 

bigilized by Google 



1 Baksb* Karnw. Nnff wd. 



BAKERS REVIEW ApuL, 1916 



JJde 

Cfndu^mlm. 



or" the 



PATENTED JAN. iLlO-J -PATENTS PENDING O/ A/ /^ /^ 

BREAD PANS A-^W 




dnction 
of the 

Kleen-Kriist R.VETLESS "Steel-Shod" Bread Pan 

sDOtted and crippled loaves of bread were unavoidable. 

The bread came from the pans misshapen and "spotted" wherever a rivet had been used in 
the construction of the pan. 

Kleen-Krast Rivetless "Steel-Shod" Bread Pans 

are a departure from the old style of constructing bread pans in sets, embodying the ' 'Steel-Shod" 
feature with a numbrr of additiunal points of merit. 

1. The use of all rivets on the inside of the pans have been done away with — insuring a clean, 
spotless loaf. This feature alone should commend its use to u-^ets of the old style riveted pan. 

2. The heavy, unsightly grease and dirt collecting "strap" has been done away with, and in 
its place a strong steel rod is used binding the. pans together, and at the same time serving as a 
rim for each pan. This construction (see cut) is the most rigid and sanitary ever devised and 
materially decreases the weight of each set. 

3. The bracing used between each pan is a part of the pans themselves, and ts so constructed 
as to absolutely prevent any distorted or misshapen loaves. 

4. "Steel-Shod" means the placing of sheets of steel in the outer f.ice of the end pans in 
the set, absolutely armor-plating the surface and steering the peel underneath instead of smashing 
holes in the tin- 

A free sample set of Kleen-Knut RivetleH "Steel-Shf>d" Bread pans is yours (or the asking. 
Send for it now and see how they will improve the appearance of vour bread and save you 
money. These pans are made in every size and style with square or rounded bottom edges. 

AUGUST 




■^TEEIhAHOD" fHtv« 



Xk^ AUGUST C'^ 
i tie MAAG V^O* 

107 Sharp St BALTIMORE, MD. 



t Id . BiKBBa Raviaw. 



Apul, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



Now You Can Bake Better Hearth Bread 



(Patent Applied For. Pfeil Design.) 

— ^with this Hearth Bread Shell 

THE illustration above represents the greatest advance in bread pan or shell construction 
that has been made during the last 20 years. It will revolutionize the method of baking 
hearth bread. It cuts the cost of baking Rye, Vienna, French or any other kind of hearth 
bread in half and permits of a better color and appearance. Eliminates bulged or 
crippled loaves 

Scnfes — Improves — 

Savet 50 per cent, of labor and tune Improves color and shape' of the loaf 

Eliminatei meal dusting Amplifies peelinc 

Saves space in the oven Proofed and baked in the shell. 
Saves the expense of crippled loaves 

This hearth bread shell can be used in any oven. Portable, Brick, Oldfashion, Revolving. 
Patent or Traveling. Are inexpensive and durable. Every shop where hearth bread is 
baked has immediate need for this shell. 

Try a Sample Dozen 

To demonstrate the efficiency, economy and advantages 
of this new Hearth Shell, send $2 50 for a trial dozen 
5-cent size. Money will be refunded if not satisfactory. 

HEARTH BREAD PAN COMPANY 

Room 313, WHITEHALL BLDG. :: NEW YORK CITY 



L«t tbem knon tbit ron read the idi. In I 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



BREAD PANS 



Here we illustrate three vitally important features of 
the shock-absorber bread pan. The "Shock-Absorber" 
feature, from a point of economy, means that your 
pans will last twice as lon^ as heretofore. It acts as a 
guide for the peel, guidinr the blade underneath the 
pan and relieving the shock of contact with the side of 
the pan. 

Longer Pan Service 

The shock absorber feature insures reduced costs in 
pan up-keep. Then, too, you get a better loaf since no 
rivets are used in the construction of the shock-ab- 
sorber pan, therefore a spotted loaf is impossible. And 
again, they are more sanitary, since the spacing be- 
tween the pans, which is accomplished by a sanitary 
wire brace, permits of easy and quick cleaning. No 
dirt or grease can accumulate. 

Let Us Prove This to You 



We are anxious to have all bakers know the superior 
quality of shock-absorbei' pans, but unless we have the 
opportunity to prove our claims we cannot accom- 



Jo. 2 — "Lap clinch" strap- 
ping. No rivets used 



Juit ntolloD [Uebrb Bitik 



yGeagle- 



Apro, 1916 BAKERS 




REVIEW 31 


Boxes and Baskets 


Page Page 


HUtde &■ Dauck Paper Co., Sandusky, 0. 32 Puffer-Hubbard Mj% Co., Minneapolis. Minn. 31 


Lewis Co., G. B., Watertown, Wts. 32 Sefton Manufacturing Co., Chicago, lU. 31 










Deliver your bread in 

HUBBARD'S 
Folding: Delivery Boxes 


What you want — 




that's the 




THE SANITARY WAY 


fundamental 






idea back of 






the 






Sefton 






Bread 






Box. 






1 \/ou want a box that's air-tight, 

1 J strong, light, sanitary; a box that 

will carry bread safely, cleanly, 








Our wooden FOLDING DELIVERY BOXES are de- 
■ifrned to take the place o( trays or baikets in the 
ddiver> wagons or auto trucki. They arc proving to b« 


cheaply. This is it. 




ment over the old method of delivery. Get our caU- 
logue "Economy of Space." 


You want a box that's as well made 




Puffer-Hubbard Mfg. Co. 


as a box can be made; you 11 get it, 




2«05 2IMh Street, South 


when you use the Sefton Bread Box. 
Send for our booklet,— 




MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 




"sefton your bread"; 




SCO Different Recipes 


you 11 find it really helpful. 




F«B™.d.C.kiP«ir,,P.ddiini.&,.» J.,,- ..»...». 


^*Ask your paper jobber. " 




MikiBg of Cudi... .tc b 


The Sefton Mfg. Co. 




Malzbender'» Practical 

RECIPE BOOK 


13HW.35thSt. Chicago, 111. 




WbkkaUo gin. hbu) on D«or.ii>« Cakct. G«n>u >Dd Amocu SirW. 
Gal roar copr frcMn 

BAKERS REVIEW "SfTo^S?" 






MANUFACTURERS OF 


Show Cases and Store Fixtures 


Goebel & Diesness 


SmJ hr catalogat. 437^439 NORTH DEARBORN ST., CHICAGO. ILL. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



ApKiL, 19 16 



HINDE S DAUCH PAPER CO. 

NEW YORK, 100 HUDSON ST.. N . Y. 221 WATER ST. SANDUSKY, OHIO. 



LEWIS SHIPPING BOXES 

TWO KINDS 

LEWIS rfEETBOXES 



Tk« Lewi* W«ru 
Wnd ni Wiri B» is 

the result of twenty 
years of manufac- 
turing ^experience. 
Shipped in the 
knock down if de- 
sired, saving two- 
thirds freight— The 
past year was the 
biggest in its his- 
tory—It is more 
popular than ever 
— Increased Rales 
in the face of in- 
creasing competi- 
tion proves its 



Tbt Maw Lewii Sled B«i is the must pr<iclical and the lowest- 
cost steel box on the market. P'umished only in set up form- 
inside painted white or grey enamel— construction similar to 
woven wood and wire l)Ox, except that Bessemer sheet steel 
is substituted for llie woven wood and wire material, 

BOTH KINDS 

hm.m tbe tollowlns excliulve fature>:-The Pulti 
Ceraw The Pnijactid Front Top Cornw "' 
Dhk* Tb< 7-8 i-ch Wood BoundirrBrK 



-Th. D«ii.(.-Pr 



ly CeW* kad Dnisiu— 



G. B. LEWIS CO, Watertown, Wis. 




PROTECT DELIVERIES AND SHIP- 
MENTS OF YOUR BREAD BY USING 
SAFETY SEALS. 

THEY ARE INEXPENSIVE— PRO- 
HIBIT TAMPERING WITH YOUR 
GOODS. 
THE USE OF OUR SEALS INSURES 
DELIVERY OF YOUR PRODUCTS IN 
SAFE CONDITION. 

Chicago Car Seal Co. 

407 N. Green St. CHICAGO, ILL. 




AraiL, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



Jaat mcDlloD Bakibh ItEV 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



707o 



•t the BREAD consumed is baked 
It home because the housewife 
thinks it cleaner and better than the 
bakers' loaf. 



April, 1916 



A Wrapped Loaf 

■•tisfies her as to its cleanliness and 
teads to convince her that the 
quality is superior. 

Ask for samples and prices of 
wrappers manufactured by us 
Some are waxed both sides; others 
one side only, so as to permit the use 
of cum tape; others may be sealed 
with heat without string or tape; 
also in rolls or sheets for wrapping 
by machine. 

IllUiniU WAXED & PARCHMENT 
UIllUll PAPER COMPANY 

HAMBURG 

SUSSEX CO., NEW JERSEY 

BRANCH OFFICES 

277 Broadway, New Yorit 

413 North 2nd St., St. Louis, Mo. 

77 Bedford St, Bonon, Miss. 

AGENTS 

Graner & Beckwith, 25 W. 2nd St., Cincinnati, O. 

Matkinal Paper Co., 257-263 Decatur St., Atlanu, Ga. (Soathero 

Repreaentatives.) 
lUr Baker, William Alden Smith Building. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

(Agent for the States of Michigan, Indiana and Ohio.) 
American Sales Agencies Co., San Francisco, Cal 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
SCHOOL FOR BAKERS AND MILLERS 

NEXT REGULAR COURSE commences on March 6th, 
and will Ihoroughly equip the praaical man in the funda- 
mentals of Chemistrv, Physics, F-ermeniaiion, Microscopy, 
Pure Yeast Culture, Bacterioioey, Baking Materials, Bak- 
ing TechnoIoKy, including Blending and Bleaching of 
Flours, as well as Practical Baking in the Model Bakery of 
the School, Hygiene, Sanitation, Bookkeeping and 
Accounting. 

For complete catalogne ttddreM 

SIEBEL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

9S0-9S2 MonUM StrMI CHICAGO. ILL. 

Associate Member of the National Ass'n of Master Baken. 



Paul Richard's Pastry Book 

EtpteiaBy Adaptmd far HaM and Catmring frwrf— 

THE MOST COMF>LETE BOOK OF ITS KIND. THOR- 
OUGHLY PRACTICAL AND UP-TO-DATE. 
CONVENIENTLY INDEXED. 



>D the loUowiog nbjccti: Fniil JcUea Mid 

Uakinc Pane* and FiUw- Cake BakiDg— 

-- Creuim ItM. PjwcW tic.— Breeds Rolli. 

omia m Hatd—dJaen' Price LiA. 



PRICE «2.00-FCMt SALE BY 

BAKERS REVIEW "ffifc'W?*?^ 



The Unclean Way 




Dirty and Stah Fresh and Clean 

Waxed Bred Raps 

Of ETorr DaacriptioB, Plain or Prialod 
Prompt Snviem, QaaBty laid Kgh* PrieaM Oar Motto 

rENTRAL STATES 




ALL KINDS OF WAXED PAPER PRODUCTS 

Central Waxed Paper &>. 

731-33-35 West Vsn Bnren S(. CHICAGO 



Twai 



la BiKiaa Rariaw. 



AreiL, 1916 



FAKERS REVIEW 



Dry Milk, Malt Extract 


Pag, 

35 

36 

. 39 

4i 


and Egg 


Products 


MaltEztnet 

Pag, 
Advance Malt Products Co., Chicago, III 41 
Amtrican Diamali Co., Cincinnati, 0. 44 

Crown Maltose Co., Chicago, m. S7 
MoU-Diastase Co.,NewVork,N.Y. . 36 
Michel Mfg. Co.. Milwaukee. Wis. 40 


Dry Milk 

Dry Milt Co., New York, N. Y. 
Ekenterg Co., Cortland, N. Y. 
MerreU Soule Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 

hhn Layton Co.. New York. N. Y. 



Twenty 40-QL Cans In One Barrel 



The cleanest, easiest, most sanitary 
and most satisfactory way of using skim- 
med milk for bread-making is to use 
"Milcora." 

MILCORA is an advanced, im- 
proved dry milki It is flaky — not pow- 
dery — and does not cake or lump. 

It makes a bread that for color, texture and 
flavor is unsurpassed. Is thoroughly sterilized, never 
produces sour doughs, has no odor. 



Perhaps you've tried some cheap 
product and have condemned all dry 
milks because you were disappointed. If 
you used a poor flour would you con- 
demn all floursf 

Try MILCORA. We'll send you a 
free working sample. And if you want 
a butter fat dry milk, order CREMORA — with 5?, 
lOX, or more butter — just the percentage you want 
for your bread or cake. Write for sample today. 



THE DRY MILK CO. 



11 Pine Street 



NEW YORK CITY 




Jott nwDttoB B&uu Rmti 



BAKERS REVIEW 




the Benefit of Bakers 

itain a department of baking technology which is daily 
ortant analytical and laboratory research work to deter- 
better ways and means to improve bread. The^ services 
is department are at the command of all bakere [wbo de- 
:o know the true relation of 

OP MALT EXTRACT 

—to bread. In a booklet pub- 
lished for your interests we de- 
scribe many vitally important 
subjects that all bakers should 
know who use malt. It will be 
a pleasure for us to mail you a 
copy for your perusal. In the 
meantime, why not try OP Malt 



MALT-DIASTASE COMPANY, 79 Wall St., New York 



Toronto, Cuwda 




Ckenf lor 

"The Milk Powder with the Milk Flavor' 

is made at low temperatures by the 

Elkenberg Vacuum Process 

of which we are the exclusive owners in America 
not by a 

Spray Process 

That's why we retain in our powder the real milk flavor 

So that a less quantity can be used with satisfactory results 

Safety — Economy 



The Ekenberg Co. 



Cortland, N. Y. 



Twas m idvcTttiemeDt Id Bakibi Ritibw. 



April, 1916 , BAKERS REVIEW 



Digitized by 



WUI Ii*l9 til aronnd If joa mnUoo Bakbb^ Bbtibw. 



Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



QusJity Supreme 

Absolute Uniformity 

* Perfect Fermentation 

Valuable Yeast Food 
Most Elconomical 

P. Ballantine & Sons 

Malt Extract Department Newark, N. J. 




FOUND— 

An Opportunity 

which it will pay bakers to investigate and grasp. Fritz L. Gienandt, cake expert and 
author of the famous "Twentieth Century Book for the Progressive Baker," has perfected 
formulas for Silver, Gold, Spice and Chocolate Slice Cakes which are taking the country 
by storm. They are called 

Cak-o-pur-fection 

The Famous 100% Profit "SUce Cakes'* 

Every formula is original, and can't be equalled. Anyone can make these cakes, and the nature of tht 
formula is such that the men in your shop can make the cakes and still be ignorant of their secret. 

They keep fresh indefinitely, look appetizing and are good sellers. No stale returns. No crust 
■ No waste. Icing keeps fresh and soft as long as the cakes. The manufacture of these cakes will show 
a profit you never dreamed possible in your cake shop. 

Tke General Baking Co. of Boston is seUins froni 5,000 to 8,000 of these slices daily. 

IVriie for prices for certain exclusive territories. Prices for the, Four Formulas S25.00. Wood lined tins . 
furnished at tke foUoTvins prices: $12.00 for 1 doz.; $22.00 for 2 dois.; $30.00 for-3 doz., f.oi. Boston. 

Don't Delay— Write Today. 

FRITZ L. GIENANDT 

192 Massachueetts Avenue 



Boston, Mass. 



llDtaal BecipiDcUr— "Saw It In B&K«a Rbtibi 



ApKii, 1916 BAKEkS REVIEW 



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BAKERS REVIEW AnUL, 1916 

Mechel's Pnre Food Products Will Stand Government Inspection 
DIASTO DIASTO 

The Malt with the High 
The Genuine and Always Diutatic Pow«r 

Reliable Malt nour ("O" ^'^ '"''?«> 

DIASTO Mu.t be Good P'^™ ". }" » ^'V.' "' 

lU Own wntbout a Smgle 

If « often imitated— Competitor 

Read what die Trade has to saj: 

Riditand in the U. S. PaUnt Office. 
A pM«url*aBla Cnlsn*r wtUn: 

' Speakiot dC the RaUtivs Value of Liquid Halt Extract and DIASTO (malt Oour) for baklni porpoaH, we an In a pa«Kloa to aw that 
DIASTO la fai auperior for brawj bakina: punwH* than Liquid Halt Extiaet. 

BakatamwtBDltelcesfBaadwilbtluidullialallMalt Floanaraalika,ar that Mall Flonrb Malt Flonri a* tUa ia a jiwat Btataka. 

For tiM paat £0 rear* we luve aa«j all tha maliaa of Halt Flour and Liquid Halt Extract! obtainabU. but ualUwr of th* fixtneta or Flour ooold 
in anr way bacomnandvlth DIASTO far reiulta. DIASTO Imalt BiFurHa cbaapar and riT«.icallent i-"'l'--hi->< »■""» *" •n™—! v- ••>- 
Liquid Halt BitiBCt. Aa !• Malt Flmir, DIASTO la in a claw of in awB w' ' - ■ ' 



Aa Okia Cnatanar wi 



onlr in brand, bat In awaat Eooda, aueh a« CoRaa Oaka. Rolla and Burn, with nod raanlti. Iha 
It food and n ' - - 



._ . tomaVathadooahtoo rich, whila DIASTO fumlahaaa batter raait food and nuUtaa it 

IlBhtv. Another advantata la that I emu take auch rich doiwhaTeiT Tooiw, aa the Rolta. Buna and UoITaaCak* will oOBMaloBS faatar In tha proirf- 
rooiB. and the axpaniion In tha 0**d la remarkably tmd. 

Packed ta 176 lb tMrrali; 70 lb drnmi; 26 lb pwli. 

CHAS. MECHEL MFa COMPANY, Sole Manufacturer*, MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 



All Bakers traveling this highvray are 
saving money in view of the nigh price 
of sugars. Are you one of them? 

CORN PRODUCTS REFINING COMPANY 

Whitehall BuUding New York 

n,,i.i,.rfh.A ,nnolf 

Hvtlial RMlprocltr— "Saw It In Bakm RaTHW.' 



April, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 

SJiniRIIIH 



A ONE-SIDED diet is neither healthy for people nor for 
yeasL Yeasts that grow on sugars alone soon lose their 
strength. They require nitrogenous and mineral feeds as well. 




THE NEW BREAD IMPROVER IN DRY FORM 

answers all three reqiiiremaits. 

ENZYMO contaiDi tugat and sugar forming bodies. 

ENZYMO (umiiheE nitrogenous matter in the form most easily and quickly taken up by 
the yeast. 

ENZYMO gives mineral food because of its high ash content ' 

These are some of the reasons why ENZYMO saves yeast and gjves greater gas evolution 
with less sUgar in the dough. 

The balanced yeast diet guaraDtees a ttiong unifotm fermentation. 

Healthy fermentatioD means even texture, tenderness, 'good volume, and rich bloom in the 
bread. 

Write foi particulars today. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

Advance Malt Products Co. 

305 S. LasaUe St Chicago, 111. 

WUl iMlp aU arotind It joa PMnthin Buciu R>mw. 



BAKEKS REVIEW 



Apkil, 1916 



FOOTE & JENKS' 

Concentrated Pare Flavors of the Citrus Fruits 
LEMON and ORANGE 

having the insoluble, indigestible terpcnes (turpentine) meciianically separated, will not bake out. 

■VNOT UKE ANY OTHERS-VS 

PURE VANILLA, AND SUBSTITUTE SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR USE OF BAKERS 

Write for descriptive Price List and Manual on "Flavoring and Seasoning Food Products." 

FOOTE & JENKS ... Jackson, Michigan 

AHOciata Hambcn of tba National AaaoclaUim of Huter Bakraa. 



JSX7Z>SIX«XOX«. QXT.A.XJX7T- 

FLAVORING EXTRACTS & ESSENCES 



Try our 
ExtntcU, 
Euencet, 
Etc. 

will alwayi uu 



UMtaii. 

toaaadhMirnl 
riawlK CmnlnM 



$].MHt4.MKrl. 



H.FucHs sariiar, 



GIENANDT'S 

20th Century Book of Redpes 

The Bett Book for AU 'Round 
Bolnr uul Putry Cook : 



BAKERS REVIEW 

Woolworth Bide New York, N. Y. 



One Moment, Mr. Batcer 




Thm 


The 
OUMtthod 


Up-to-Daf 
MthoJ 


Slow, 


Quick. Sani- 


Unsanitary, 




tary. Less 


Costly 




Expensive 


STORAGF. EGGS versus LAYTON'S EGGS 

Yen take big chances. Yon take no chance*. 
Yoi have muRy and other faulty •»■ No riiki. Absolute Parity 
to contend with—: Guaranteed. 

— ttaie, labor and money labor and money 

WASTKD SAVED 

Wm glmOy m»d fmB pmticmbm 


THE JOHN LAYTON 


COMPANY 


Pedfic Gout Office: 510 Battery St., Sen Frencuco, Cal. 


90 Weet Street, New York, N. Y. 

, — ,-,, — .III 1 r' ,.i,. 



Id Baebbi Bitibw. 



April, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Here's the Profit 
! Maker and Trade 
Winner for Wide- 
Awake Bakers 

T. A. FAULDS CO/S TAFACO CAKE 

Wesupply everything but Labor— Fjciu— and ShorleninjE and there's big profit In Box Cake 
Making when you use FAULD'S CONCENTRATED BOX CAKE MIXTURE which comes in four 
varieties: Gold, Silver, Chocolate, and Creole. Here are the cold facts:— 



We lell you a barrel of Concert' 
trated Box Cake Mixture and charge 
you $25.00— S% cash discount if paid in 
10 days, makes the price $23.75. 

We give you with every barrel of Box 
Cake mixture 630 Box Cartons, 630 Wax 
Paper Wrappers. 630 Seals. Milk Product, 
Butter Flavor, and Icing Powder enough 
to manufacture 630 box cakes. 

Each barrel of Concentrated 
Box Cake Mixture weighs 210 
pounds. 

The total output of one barrel of 
mixture is 630 cakes. 

Sold at wholesale for 8 cents 
per box means . $50.40 

Sold at retail for 10 cents per 
box means . 63.00 



Now for the material cost to 
the baker in producing 630 
box cakes. 

You will use one barrel of mixture $23.75 
You will use 44 pounds of Com- 
pound Lsurd at 8 cents . 3.52 
You will use 22 pounds of eggs 

at 20 cenU .... 4.40 
You will use 24 pounds of Icing 

Sugar at 6}4 cents. 1.56 

Making a total cost of $3323 
for 630 10 cent Box Cakes. Approxi- 
mately S% per box. 

Net profit per BbL, -_ _ __ 
retail - - $29.77 



Net profit per BbL, 
wholesale 



17.17 



YOU CAN MEET COMPETITION, WE WILL START YOU RIGHT 

Here is our Special proposition: 

Mail us your check for $16.50 and we will forward, charges prepaid to your address our trial 
ofler of one-half barrel of our Concentrated cake mixture in two varieties of your selection, and six 
special box cake pans. Also 315 cake boxes, 315 wax paper wrappers, 3^15 cake seals, milk product 
and butter flavor, and icinfl powder. This will make you 315-10 cent cakes complete. After a folr 
trial if you are satisfied with our product we >^ill give you exclusive rights for your dty. 

We allow freight on all shipments of two or more barrels. Goods positively sold only in barrel 
or half barrel lots. 

WRITE US TODAY 

T. A. FAULDS CO., 196 State St., Boston, Mass. 



Ijtt them know that 7011 raad tba ada. Id BAEsaa BiTiaw. Diciitized by 



Vjoogie 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



Twenty-four years have gone by since 
MALT EXTRACT 

was first introduced in this country. For some fifteen years it was used in a 
haphazard manner and only now and then as interest was aroused by another 
call of the Malt Salesman. 
The growth of the use of Malt during the last nine years has been wonderful. 

DIAMALT 

has played an important part in standardizing methods of use. We made one quality 
DlAMALT when we started and have made the same qualitj', and only one quality day in 
and day out ever since. It's a dependable Malt. 

Booklet and Sample sent on request. Demon- 
strations can be made by our representatives if 
sufficient time is given to arrange details. 

Write Today 



The American Diamalt Company 



Warehouses Located in the Larger Cities to Provide 
for Prompt Distribution 




Win help all atonnd IT 70B tMoUon Buna Banaw. 



Google 



Apbil, 1916 



DDi: 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Dnn[=inDi: 



ID 



kt Qs PiitTou on ThcRigbt Track 



If you are now having trouble with your box cake question — if you have 
not succeeded in winning over the bulk of the package cake business in your 
town -wc can help you do it! 

Package cake is the best leader any baker can have. It will open up new 
channels of trade, will win him a wider patronage, and will earn for him the 
reputation of a quality baker. The best package cake is made with the best 
materials 

"JO-LO" Specialties for Bakers 

Years of experimenting and a thorough knowledge of the .actual need of 
package cake ingredients has enabled us to put out. the following high grade 
specialties : 

"JO-LO" SNOW-WHITE f This is the combination needed 

"JO-LO" DRY EGG J for the baking of package cake. 

"JO-LO" EMULSIONS 1 plus the flavoring, flour and 

"JO-LO" SPICES L shortening. 

Lei us do for you what we have done for many other bakers. Our representative will 
demonstrate and show you just how to make the cake; give you valuable advice and 
assistance ; and the trial will cost you nothing. 

Cut the Coupon to the Right 

—mail it today, and you will receive by return mail full particulars o( our package 
cake proposilion and details of how our representative will demonstrate i 



□ D 
DD 



JOE LOWE CO. 

303 Greenwich Street 
New York, N. Y. 




^ - - Joe Lowe Co., 

^ 303 Greenwich St., 
^ New York, N. Y.. 

^^ Gentlemen : 

Please send me full particu- 
lars regarding your package 
cake specialties and let me know 
when yOu can arrange to send your 
representative. 



Address 
iState ... 



;GoD^[ 



Wlu kup ui UDttwl U reti B 



BAKERS REVIEW Apml, 1916 



1 If 70a meotloD Baebbs 



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Apml, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



HENRY mode: 

Google 



78-90 VANDAM STREET, 313-321 HUDSON STREET, 
NEW YORK 



BAKERS REVI E W 



April, 1916 



THE ORIGINAL 


READ 


3 Types 


When Shall 


3 Speed 


1 

We 

1 


Cake Mixers 


Ship Yours? 


Mod<l D Trp«, 1>1S 




The Read Machinery Co., York, Pa. 



Look Ahead 

The live baker of today is building for 
tomorrow. Efficiency and economy now 
mean increased business and increased 
profits then. No mistaken principles 
there, for they have been worked out by 
the country's prosperous bakers. Many 
of these have installed 

American Bakery Equipment 

For really efficient work it can't be beat. 
The American Divider does not kill the 
dough; the American Rounder rounds up 
the dough with a perfect skin, and the 
American Proofer is another profit maker 
for the baker 

However, the best way to get a real Hne 
on our productions is to see them in 
actual operation in the country's bake- 
shops. A few bakers (at least) in your 
district have American equipment. Do ' 
you want their names ? Write. 

American Bakers' Machinery Gi. 

9tk aod Clinton SU. St Low, Ho. 



A Most Profitable Business 

isthatof the bakerwho hitched up to the GEM Dough- 
nut Machine. This little wonder is now in constant use 
in most of the country's big bakeries. 



turn out tb* ft 



tiM rl^t Mnpw»- 
tnn It will lUTK 
(all falm. WUhtDc 

In root vfforta t* 
IwMdttlw t»d% 



This machine will cut 120 to 140 doughnuts a minute, SO that von 
can fill ordinary Icettles holding from three to four doten, last 
ertouffh that you cannot tell whidi one of the doughnuts wag turned 
into the hot grease first or which one was turned in last; they all 
cook done at the same time. Will Yon Hkt* OnaT 

BAUM & SCHOEL 

Manufactxtrers WATERLOO, IOWA 



Will belp all around If ron mantlon BiKaaa Raraw. 



ApBi, 1916 BAKERS 


REVIEW 49 


Machinery 


and Equipment 


Alltn & Cc.J. W.. Chicaeo, lU. 


Page 

5S 


Page 
JaMrg Brothers, New York, N. Y. 49 1 


Amtrican Bakers Mack. Co., Si. Louis, Mo. 


4S 


Johnson Co., H. A., Boston, Mass. See Index 


Am. Overt & Mck. Co., Chicago Inside front cover 
Baum &■ Se/toei, Waterho, Iowa 48 
Champion Mach. a.,Joliel, Itt. 53 
CoOome Mfg. Co.. Ckieago, lU. See Index 


Koenig-Ketler Co., Lancaster, Pa, See Index 

Lynn-Superior Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 52 

Mills & Bro., Tkos., Phila., Pa., Inside back cover 

Pneumatic Scale Corp., Ltd., Norfolk Downs, 

Mass. 54 


Day Co., J. H., Cincinnati, Ohio 


56 


Read Machinery Co. , York, Pa. 4S 


Duuhess Tool Co., FiskkiU-on-H«dson, N. Y. 


50 


RockweU Co., L. A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 53 


General Etectric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 




Thomson Machine Co., BellevilU, N.J. 55 


GottschaUt Sf Co., ReedsviUe, Pa. 


54 


Triumph Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 56 


Hanm, P. D. Philadelphia, Pa. 


59 


Union Wrapping Mac. CcJoUet. III. 52 


Hayssen Mfg. Co., Shetoygan, Wis. 


58 


Werner & Pfeiderer Co., Saginaw, Mich. 60 


The Hoian Mfg. Co., Troy, Ohio 


51 


Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co. , Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1 



These Rolls Have Taken the Country by Storm J 



GOOD FOR CAKES TOO 



n» Kil^e Knut Boll Pus, TvenD- 



Han An th* Pu> Ttut BkIi* Sudwlch BolU 



i of «mch roU; 4 Inehfli Id dimmeler 



JABURG BROTHERS io_Le2nardit New York 



WUl bal» all Monnd U ron iMBtl*n Baxiu Bmmr. 



BAKERS REVIEW April, 1916 



No. 3—4 pocket Automatic Dough Divider. Scales from 10 to 26 
ozs. and turns out from 2800 to 3800 loaves per hour. Belt or motor 
drive. We make larger or smaller sizes. 

Re-orders and What 
They Mean 

Every baker knows that the success of his business depends on re- 
orders. Something is wrong if customers do not come back. One 
must bring others, and to secure the others, the one sale must be satis- 
factory and beneficial to the buyer. 

If the most careful buyers in the field having thoroughly tried the 
goods, come back for more, it means that the goods are unquestionably 
satisfactory and beneficial. * 

A list of our sales shows a very large 

proportion of repeat orders — in fact 

''Our Sales Tell The TaleT 



DUTCHESS TOOL COMPANY 

Beacon, N. Y. 



April. 1916 BAKERb REV1E\V 



will belp all BtoDDd If TOU mentdoD Bikmbi Rbtiiw. 



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BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



3,500 Loavos 


or 


600 Ooz. Buns Por Hour 


Some Record! 








Isn't it? But that's 








just what the 








Union Combi 
Bread & Bun R 








doe.— Md does well. Simple- 
compact — practicalljr setf-cIeaiUDg— 
loaves to double — and requires < 
horsepower to operate. 

AllthUatasavii 
50% in first c. 








Are you enough inlerijted in moderu an 
method! to write today for full farticui 








The Union Wrapping B 

Joliet, Illiooia 












■ . '.rr.'jr-—^ 


utput-Small Outlay 








iring proposition to the baker 
but it is not too much to 
expect from dependable 








"L-S" Equipment 








You are assured of a doush 
mixer of enviable reputation, 
and dry. silky dough with the 
maximum yield. 
Calce and egg operations are 
made easy, and costs cut to the 
low notch with the Four-speed 
"L-S" cake mixer. 
No time lost in lifting and sift- 
ing flour in the old hand method 
of make- ready. 

Let machines do your hard n 
work— Zf/ gimi machints do it— | 
let them be"L-S" make and vou 1 
will prosper. Send a card to(U^. | 


CmeMtmtk. OWo. 

^^ : 1 



Ltt thaai knew tlimt 70Q xtmA tlw adi. In "'it—^ Banaw. 



April, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 

THE CHAMP 
Long Loaf Moi 

The only mouldinj; it 
on the market, built i 
using babbitt. V 
"Hyatt" Roller B 
throughout. 
Has patented feature: 
no other machine ( 
market has. 
Only moulder t h a 
mould more than oi 
loaf without use of an 
sion device. 
Injures the dough le: 
any other make. f.C 
quickly adjusted to U 
size loaf; capacity o 
loaves per hour. 
Write us for full infoi 
regarding the latest n 
on the market. 
Under no obliga- 
tions to us what- 
ever. 

Champion 
Machinery 



Company 
JoUe' 



Uet, Ul. 



Rockwell's Time-Tested Bakery Machinery 

Bim.T BY THE OUOST ESTABLISHED MANUFACTUREM O* THE UMITED STATES ESTABLISHED U7« 



S. C u s h m a r 

Sons, New Y o K Robt. A. Johnston 

N. Y.. write: f Co., Milwaukee. 

'•We have us Wis., write: 

last two years feedmg two large 

it hasn't failec mixers and it gives i- 

a single day." excellent satisfac- ; 

=^=== tion. We would 

^ _ , _ I n' t part with it for 

^ ^''dcWfSi I twice its cost." 

DNgfaWxen What others have 

t_ ^ to say about this 

■ Ueb7 Uie machine mailed 

SUb Bnmi upon request. 

Cb. ^ „ 



ROCKWELL'S, RELIABLE. DOUGH HIX^ EXtXLSlOR CAKE HACHINB 

wtau(nBi thmtiboat. 

.iBtaad tada bctMrmndqnlikac HtriiMMA 

BvA.Orii^d.^AnU.L..^ in-iiifi^^Vtothio^^lii: ^ o, l-d or with w oth» n-eUn.. 

C01CPL.KXB VLOUB HAXOLtNGSTSTEMBOUBSPBCLAXTT FOB INFOBUATION AJf D C AT AIX>OU> WBTIS TO 
I A ROr*IC WPI I f O F<"™"ly Fowler & Rockwell, 430-32-34 Smith St., BrBoklyn. M. Y. 



• of ComphU Lbf vfBtAmry Maelliit»ty 



BnttoD BAHia Birnw. NnlT mt. 



,,Gouy[e 



BAKERS REVIEW April, 1916 



The Standard Pan Cleaning 
and Greasbg Machine 

is made to clean and grease pans of all 
sizes and shapes— with the uniform per- 
fection impossible by hand work — and it 
saves time, money and trouble. Used 
in most of the successful bakeries in this 
country — and the only machine of its 
kind. 

On this machine, one-half pound of 
lard will grease at least 2,000 pans, with 
a UNIFORM PERFECTION un- 
approached by any other method. 

W}wn do you want yours? 

GOTTSCHALK&CO.,inc. 

Reedsville, Pa. 



THE RIGHT WRAP 

IS MADE BY 

The 

Pneumatic-Standard 

Bread Wrapping 

Machine 

Right because it is ma 
Right because it looks 
Right because it works 
Write for right particuli 



PNEUMATIC SCAl 

Main Office and Pac 
Chicago New York 

W. AC.PdRtIn, 14 



Let tbem koow that roa read the ada. Id Bakcbs Umtikw. 



yGuuylt 



Apwj, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



The Thomson Standard Loaf Moulder 

is the ORIGINAL and the LEADER. It has been the leader for 12 years. 

WHY? 

Because the PRINCIPLE is correct; QUALITY of 
loaf produced is perfect CAPACITY large enough 
for any requirement (up to 6,000 per hour) and 
because of its DURABILITY. 

Many machines are in operation today on which more than 25 
MILLION loaves have been moulded. 

Now is the time at the beginning of this New Year for YOU to begin 
the saving in time, labor and money this machine will effect for you if you 
wiU only let it WILL YOU? 

A postal will bring you full information. 
MaU it NOW. 

REMEMBER 

We furnish complete AUTOMATIC OUTFITS 
and FLOUR HANDLING EQUIPMENT. 

Let us quote on your needs. 

Get ready for the big business that is coming. 



THOMSON MACHINE COMPANY 

MAIN OFFICE «.d WORKS THE HOUSE OF SERVICE CHICAGO OFFICE 

BELLEVIIXE, NEW J£RSEY joriN J. HOPPIN, Preiident 9iS Firat National Bank BuildiDf 

Largttt Mtmt^achir»tt of Baktn' Mathinery, Excluncaty, in America. 

George E. <iowd7, Soathern RepresenUtiTe, 0079 College St, JacksonviUe, Fla. 

Member National Association of Master Bakers 



Let tbcm know thai tdu read the adi. la BtKBia Rbtikw. 



yGUU^jli! 



BAKERS REVIEW April, 1916 



The Standard Pan Cleaning 
and Greasmg Machine 

is made to clean and grease pans of all 
sizes and shapes — with the uniform per- 
fection impossible by hand work — and it 
saves time, money and trouble. Used 
in most of the successful bakeries in this 
country — and the only machine of its 
kind. 

On this machine, one-half pound of 
lard will grease at least 2,000 pans, with 
a UNIFORM PERFECTION un- 
approached by any other method. 

When do you want yours? 

GOTTSCHALK&CO.,inc. 

ReedsviUe, Pa. 



THE RIGHT WRAP 

IS MADE BY 

The 

Pneumatic-Standard 

Bread Wrapping 

Machine 

Right because it is ma 
Right because it looks 
Right because it works 
Write for right parliculi 



PNEUMATIC SCAl 

izedbyGOUyle 



Main Office and Pac 
Chicago New York 



W. ft C. Pantrn, 14 

Let tbem know tb>t roa nad tba adi. Id Baksbs Kbtibw. 



Anil, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



The Thomson Standard Loaf Moulder 

is the ORIGINAL and the LEADER. It has been the leader for 12 years. 

WHY? 

Because the PRINCIPLE is correct; QUALITY of 
loaf produced is perfect; CAPACITY large enough 
for any requirement (up to 6,000 per hour) and 
because of its DURABILITY. 

Many machines are in operation today on which more than 25 
MILLION loaves have been moulded. 

Now is the time at the beginning of this New Year for YOU to be^n 
the savuig in time, labor and money this machine will effect for you if you 
wUI only let it WILL YOU? 

A postal will bring you full information. 
Mail it NOW. 

REMEMBER 

We furnish complete AUTOMATIC OUTFITS 
and FLOUR HANDLING EQUIPMENT. 

Let us quote on your needs. 

Get ready for the big business that is coming. 



THOMSON MACHINE COMPANY 

HA1N OFFICE ..d WORKS THE HOUSE OF SERVICE Chicago office 

BELLEVILLE. NEW JERSEY jqhN J. HOPPIN, Pr««id«.>t 9»6 Fif.t NkUon.1 B»k Bi>ild>i>f 

Largtat Manafaelarmi* of BtJmn' Maehintry, Exelanvaty, in America. 

George E. Cowdjr, Sontbem RepieaenUtiTe, 3079 College St, J«clttoii*ille, FU. 

Member National Association of Master Bakers 



t tbcm knov that jou read the ada. in Btuaa Rbtiiw. 



:eJt,GUUy[l 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apul, 1916 



Here is the Latest Type 

Triumph Dough Mixer 

Safety First 
Friction Drive 



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Finished in Sanitary, White enamel. 
Fitted with pulley or motor, ^as or 

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Two extension pulleys on motor drive. 



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Mixer can be started or stopped with- 
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Note plain, simple design. 
Uses less power — gives increased yield. 
Bronze stuffing boxes. All cut gears. 
Motor is covered — is easily cleaned. 
One price — no extra charges asked. 



fFrite today for prices or ask our 

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Place Your Order Now 



The Triumph Mfg. Co. 

3400-3408 Spring Grove Avenue 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 



T National Aaod 



t you read tLe a 



.Cooalc 



Ann, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



What Wm. C. Davis says about his Six Autocars: 

"Their chief advantage is to cover territory no horse 
could possibly reach — that means new business" — is 
the way Wm. C. Davis, Hcane Bakeries, Camden, 
N. J. sizes up Autocar Motor Vehicles. 

He uses six Autocars, one of which averages about 
60 miles a day. 

Autocars are used by well-known bakeries in the 
leading cities and our found to be prompt, economical 
and reliable at all times. 

Write for illustrated catalog C and list of more than 3,000 
concerns using Autocars in every line of business. 

Chassis Price $1650 

THE AUTOCAR COMPANY 

Ardmore, Pa. 

EBtablished 1897 MOTOR DELIVERY CAR SPECIALISTS 



will help all uruuiitl ir 70a L 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, lyio 



The 
New Model 

HAYSSEN 

Bread 
Wrapping 
Machine 

Wraps 1,800 loaves per hour. Requires but one operator. Is adjustable to different size 
loaves. Can be furnished with Automatic Coupon Insert Attachment which places coupons 
or advertising matter, singly and automatically, into each package. 

More than 150 HAYSSEN machines in operation in bakeries. 
Shipped on 30 days' trial 

Writ» for facta about th» N«io Mod»l Machinm 

HAYSSEN MFG. CO. Sheboygan, wis. 



We're here on the job 
in your interests 

We do notonly"handle 
everything for the 
baker in the way of 
supplies, tools and 
utensils" but we also 
render our customers 
every possible service. 

We are at your service 

J. W. ALLEN & CO. 

110-118 PrariaSt CHICAGO, ILL. 



Every Baker's Problem: 

"How Can 1 bcreaie the Sale of My Bread?" 

e book of "recipea" for 
; of bread or any other 

a for the asking, 
jria of amali consequence 
ired to the problem of 
LSine the sale of your 
Bigger sale* rtehitt 
the cost of production 

margin of pront per 
loaf. 
f This little book. 
"Hance Hand- Book of 
Business Boosters" it 
is called, tells you how 
to hold and win pat- 
ronage against all com- 
petition— lella you how 
akera and business men 
)ne iti and are now doing 

1 ne methods are just as feas- 

Thia Book Talla Yon Hawl ibie for the little bakery as the 

large one —for the large bakery 

as the little one. 

Only one bakery in each community and surrounding 

terriiory can secure the right to use these plans. 

Which Wai It Be? Yon or YonrCompetitQr? 

Write for the book and then decide. 

J. W. HANCE FOUNDRY CO. 

WESTERVILLE, OHIO 



'Tw»« an •d*ertiHemi 



Arm., 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



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3 



BAKERS REVIEW 




PICTURES DON'T LIE? 

This is an expression made by lots of people, but we believe 
they are misinformed. How often have you looked at the 
photo of a friend and found same flattered him greatly. Why? 
Because the view taken is of his best appearance. This 
scheme is used a great deal by manufacturers to show their 
goods to the best advantage and oftentimes makes a hit with 
the baker. The picture looks O. K., but does the outfit live 
up to wliat appearances indicate? We tiave lots of good 
pictures of good working machinery for the baker. They are 
yours for the asking. Furthermore, when we sell you a 
machbie or oven by the picture we guarantee same to be as 
good and better than the picture. We don't ask you to sign 
a contract that ties you so tightly that you can't get your 
breath. If we had to do that we would not want your iHisi- 
ness. We don't try to catch you by certain terms and 
promises, but we do guarantee to live up to our written 
promises as i>er contract' Our pictures don't lie. We cannot 
afford to have them lie because we liave a reputation to sus- 
tain tliat is worth everything to us. We make and sell 
Machinery and Ovens and can equip your plant complete. 
Hie largest manufocturers in the world because we make the 
best only. 



WERNER & PFLEIDERER CO. 

SAGINAW. MICHIGAN 
EMIL STAEHLE, General Manager 



Branch Offices; 
New York 






Js^ 



ovc 



NS « -T MACI 



MACHINEftY 



t jort read the adi. Id Bikiib Sbtw 



ijr)igitjzed by 



Google 



Capjrtgbt. 1Q1« t 



. R. Gregory Co, 



Vol XXXlll 



NEW YORK, APRIL, 1916 



No. I 



The Art of Making Pie-Crust 

Written Especially for Bakers Review h Emit Braun, Expert Consulting Baker 



"Now good digestion wait on appetite, 
"And health on both." 

IT IS a soggy or raw-bottom crust or the tough, shoe-leather- 
like or fluffy, sandy-top crust which makes the pie indi- 
gtitible, and almost uneatable. No matter how palatable the fil- 
ling, if the crust is not tender, flaky and well-baked, the pie it 
1 culinary failure. 

As Dr. James W. Gray expressed his opinion in an article 
in the American Health /ourwa/ :— "There are pies and there 
are pies. The average honie-made pie, owing to improper equip- 
ment and baking facilities, is almost invariably a disease-carrier 
or breeder instead of a health help. The pies offered by some 
of the smaller bakeries as evidence of their constructive ability 
art even worse. In every targe city fortunately, there are large 
ronccms which have reduced pie-making to an exact science, and 
whose product is not only appetizing but is deserving of all 
praises from a health standpoint. Eat pie if you would be 
healthy, not only as a dessert at dinner, but eat it for breakfast, 
if your appetite craves it. Eat it morning, noon and night, it 
cannot harm you. Let the children have it, when they will." 

Now bakers, cheer up ; there is nothing unhealthy or despic- 
able about your pies; you do not have to have a big modern 
pie factory in a large city either ; your shop may be located 
in the small country town, as long as you make good pies, 
making a good tender crust principally, and giving it a good, 
ihorough baking. 

A good, strong hard-wheat bread flour does not make the 
best pie-crust. However, if you have to use it, be sure and blend 
it with one-third soft winter wheat flour, and blend it thoroughly 
while you are at it. The ideal pie flour for the baker is a 
short, rich, dry, soft winter patent or pastry flour, and nut 
gronnd too fine. A soft winter clear flour, although alright for 
mouses work or for cookies and plain cakes, will not make a 
Rood lender crust. It might do to mix it uitli Iwo-thirds 'pring 
patent if compelled to use a soft clear flour. 

Of course, let me tell you, some good, delicious home-made 
pies are made from some of the popular family patent flours. 
Some women make good bread, cakes and pies from the same 
flour (family). But they do not have to sell their baked goods, 
or (iKure on yield or labor. The baker, however, shovild be 
able to know how to select a rich, short, winter pastry flour 
fspecially for pie crust. Or he may blend a rich, short, spring 
or Kansas patent with a good soft winter patent or straight for 
pie-ctust 

The cost of the flour is, like in the other branches a secondary 
natter, because when you have the right kind of flour you can 
cut down on the amount of shortening. Quality is what counts. 

Before you start using a new lot of flour or changing the 
brand, a test should be made, and flour for pies should be 



seasoned in a dry, airy room for a month or more, if possible. 
Avoid any flour that feels damp or clammy, and be sure to 
have it sifted before mixing your pie dough. On the other 
hand, flour for pie-dough should be cooled first just before 
the shortening is mixed with it, because if the flour is warm,' 
that also helps to make the dough tough and rubbery. 
SHOKTENINC 

The main point here also is quality. No maner if butter, lard, 
or compound is used, it should be sweet, fresh and firm. A 
pie baker told me recently, that he changed his shortening and 
is using two ounces less to every pound of flour and gets a 
better crust. By using a richer shortening, which usually means 
•- more solid shortening, it makes a firm dough and therefore 
takes a little more water, so you get the same amount of dough, 
in weight, as before you cut down on the shortening. 

And reducing two ounces on every 12 ounces, or an average 
of 15 per cent., you can afford to pay 15 per cent, more for 
the richer shortening, without increasing the cost of the dough. 

I will give you a few formulas for the top and bottom crusts, 
but it is still the same old story; the best materials alone will 
not produce the best or even satisfactory goods, if not handled, 
blended or mixed with skill and care. 

Pure leaf lard makes a good crust, but some bakers think 
lard is lard. That is a mistake. Lard is often oily, gritty and 
soft and even gray, or it often has a strong "hog" odor. Such 
lard should be rejected, as a good solid compound is preferable. 
In fact, there are a number of rich shortenings or compounds 
besides lard, which make a rich flaky crust and therefore are 
worth a fair trial and comparison without prejudice. But, as 
with flour, the shortenins should be kept in a cool place. Usual- 
ly two separate douphs are made for top and bottom crust. 

SALT 

Some bakers dissolve the salt with the water, but I believe 
you bring out the flavor of the crust better by mixing the salt 
dry with the flour. Of course it must be blended in well 
before the shortening is added, and the safest way is to sieve 
it with the flour. Use only dry, flaky, pure, sweet f^alt ; do not 
think any old salt is good enough. 

Water must be ice cold at all times and should be fresh 
drawn and free from any odor. If ice has to be used in hot 
weather see that no pieces are left in the dough to melt after 
the dough is mixed. Water should always be measured before- 
hand for your pie dough the same as the flour and shortening. 
This is important becau'ie if you go on pouring water on ny 
guessing at it, the dou^h is bound to get overworked and tough 
before you get it at the right stiffness. 

If you know the itrenRth of your flour and the consistency 
of your shortening, there is no reason why you should not know"* 
the exact amount of water to be used. 



62 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



Some bakers use z pounds or i quart of water to 4 pounds of 
flour, but if the flour takes up that much water for covers or 
top crust doughs, the flour is too strong, in my opinion. For 
the bottom, where less sbortenins is used, the above amount is 
about right. 

You should also know how much dough it takes for a top 

and bottom of different size pies. For instance, we Agure. say : 

Top crust for 20c pie — 7 ois. 

14c " — S ozs, 

5c " —2 ozs 

Bottom crust for 20c " — 6 ozs. 



14c 



—5 ozs. 



If the mixing is done by hand be sure to break up the lard 
by just rubbing shortening and flour gently together between 
the hands until it is all free of large lumps. 

The mixing needs particular care. Some bakers use the regu- 
lar dough mixer for mixing the dough, but to get a short clear 
dough, you must not mix too large n batch at one time, so 
the blades of the mixer can shake it up well the snme as when 
mixed by hand. It will also pay you tu go to the extra trouble 
and double the dough over, press out into several pieces and 
lay one on top of each other, which will help to make it more 
flaky, tike puff paste. 

Of course the dough for bottom crust is not made so rich 
as for the top, but I do not believe in working it to make it 
purposely tough like some bakers do. 

Now one of the^ most important rules is :^to have the mater- 
ials — flour, water and shortening cold, and if possible do the 
mixing in a cool place, same as puff paste. As soon as mixed, 
the pie dough should be taken to a cool place, if possible in the 
refrigerator, and let it rest over night or as long as possible. 

When Mrs. Kane, who became famous as the baker of the 
$3,000 pie, was asked by a reporter as to what she ascribed the 
secrets of her success in piemaking. her reply was -.—"To friem- 
ing Ihe cnul." 

FOXHtn^AS F>» PIE CRUST 

Fos COVERS (20c pies) 

Floor 30 lbs. 

Lard - !5 lbs. 

Botter 5 lbs. 

Salt ii lb. 

Water 12 lbs, or 6 quarts 

62<^ ponndi 
po> COVERS (cheaper) 

Flour ..,, 30 lbs. 

Lard . 13 lbs. 

Butterine 5 lbs. 

Salt 10 ois 

Water 7 qts. 

FOk COVERS (compound) 

Flour 30 lbs. 

Compound 20 lbs. (solid) 

Salt II ozs. 

Water 6J4 to 7 qts. 

FOR BOTTOM CRUST (cheaper) 

Flour 30 lbs. 

Lard or Cocnp 12 lbs. 

Salt 9 ozs. 

Water 13 to 14 lbs, (6<^ to 7 qts.) 

FOR BOTTOM CRUST 

Flour 30 lbs. 

Lard or iximp. 15 lbs. (solid) 

Salt 10 07S. 

Water 13 lbs. (6!4 qts.) 

CRUST FOR SOFT PIES 

Use from 9 to 10 ounces of shortening to each pound of 
flour, salt, and a half pint water. 



Pr«pwrtBg tor th« Oklahoma Convaattra 

The officers of the Oklahoma Master Bakers' Association 
are making things hum out their way in preparation for the 
ninth annual convention of their association, which will b« held 
in Tulsa, Okta., April 25th, 26th, and 27th. An especially at- 
tractive program has been arranged ; the speakers are of known 
merit, and the entertainment features also will make Tulsa an 
attractive center during the three days of the conventron. 

The program committee includes Otto B. Schmidt, of Okla- 
homa City, as chairman, and C. E. Lahman, of Tulsa, and J, B, 
Compton of El Reno. The committee that will have charge of 
the entertainment features includes: W. E. Fox, of Tulsa, who 
is chairman ; Arthur Little, of Kiefer, and C, G. Busken, of 
Oklahoma City, J, C. Dean, of Shawnee, and Charles Trcmblay, 
of Oklahoma City, comprise the membership committee, which 
is persistently gunning for new members. The oFRcers of the 
Oklahoma association are; J. B. Compton, El Reno, president; 
C. E. Lahman, Tulsa, vice-president; J. C. Dean, Shawnee, 
treasurer, and Otto B, Schmidt, Oklahoma City, secretary, 
Arthur Little, of Kiefer ; J, W, Bonewitz, of Hobarl, and W, E 
Fox, of Tulsa, ^rc the three members of the executive com- 

THE COHVENTIOH PBXKmAU 
TUESDAY, APRIL 25 9:30 A. M. SHARP 

Executive committee meeting. 

AFTERNOON SESSION, 2 P. M. 

Convention called to order by President J. B. Compton. 

Address of welcome. Mayor of Tulsa. 

Response, Secretary O. B. Schmidt, of Oklahoma City. 

President's annual address. 

Greetings from National and other associations. 

Reading of communications. 

Appointment of committees. 

Placing of question box. 

EVENING— 5:^ p. M, 
Auto ride around the city and visit to oil fields. 

SECOND DAY, WEDNESDAY— 9 :30 A, M, 

Convention called to order. 

Report of committees. 

Address by representatives of the National Association. 

Address by F. C. Stadelhofer of St. Louis, representing the 
American Diamalt company; subject: "Closer Supervision 
of Raw Material in the Bake Shop." 

Address by C. E. Wernig, representing The Fleischmann com- 
pany, Cincinnati. 

AFTERNOON SESSION — FOR MASTER BAKERS ONLY 

Meeting called to order 2 p. m. 

Address by C. E. Lahman, of the Middle West Baking company, 
Tulsa, Okla, 

EVENING 6 P. U, 

Entertainment and dance on the roof garden of Brady hotel, 

THIRD DAY — 9:30 A, M., THURSDAY 

Convention called to order. 

Paper by Fred Miller, salesmanager of Enid Mill and Elevator, 

Enid. Okla. 
Address by W. Fletcher, representing Thomson Machine com- 
pany, Belleville, N. J. 
(kneral discussion.— Every Man Do His Best. 

AFTERNOON SESSION— 2 P. M 
Convention called to order; opening of question box; answered 

by C E. Wernig. CJeneral discussion. 
Report of executive committee. 
Nomination and election of officers. 
Selection of meeting place for 1917. 
Installation of new officers. Adjournment, 

EVENING— 7 P- M, 

Banquet on roof garden of Brady hotel tendered by the Yukon 
Mill and Elevator company to the master bakers and asso- 
ciate members. 

IJance on roof garden. 

Ladies will be taken care of by the ladie 



Vmrnm Braad to niostrata Sarmon 

On Sunday. March 5, one thousand miniature loaves of 
bread uere civen away at the Immanual Baptist Church in 
Chicago, through the pastor. Rev. Johnston Myers. The loaves 
were donated by the Schuize Baking Co, to illustrate the pastor's 
text, which was; "I am the bread of life." The text was printed 
on tis"iiie paper which was wrapped around each loaf. 



Apul, 1916 



BAKERS REV IE W 



Everybody's Keeping A-Boosting for 
the National Convention— Are You ? 



nlGHT NOW! Have you made up your mind lo attend 
^ the National Convention al Salt Lake Cily the week of 
August 7th. You haven't? Well, look out! W. E. Long, 
chairman of the convention promotion committee is after 
you, and — well, let him speak for himself: 
SAY, OLD UA.W, YOU'VE EARNED A REST WHEN ARE 
YOU GOING TO TAKE ITT 
Maybe next year? Did you say? 

Get out! You've been handing yourself that "maybe" stuff 
since Hector was a little pup. 

The road to Hoopela is paved with next-year's intentions. 
The hospitals, the sanitariums, the graveyards are full of 
were-going- to- do-it- fellows who never did. 
Too busy, did you say? 

Listen — There's going to be a whole lot of business left 
when you and I have shipped our cables. 

Too much on the job without complete change of scenery 
DOW and then, is making an old man of yourself before your 
time — is making you stale, narrow — cutting you down to forty 
horse power push when you ought to have eighty. 

Maybe it's putting wrinkles of care in your face — you 
know if it is. 

There's an old saying "Run your business, or your business 
will run you" — and you've simply failed to keep on top if 
you can't stop for that rest. Your business is running you — 
and it's going to run you in the ground, though it runs your 
profits up into the thousands. 

And frankly, what's the use, old top? What's it getting 
you? It isn't getting you the fun you ought to be having 
here on old mother earth, and it certainly isn't going to gain 
you a more highly polished crown hereafter. 

LOOK HERE, OLD TOP— HERE'S WHAT I'M DRIV- 
ING AT. IS THERE ONE REAL REASON WHY YOU 
CAN'T TAKE THE TRIP TO SALT LAKE— WHY YOU 
CANT SIT IN ON THE BIGGEST, GRANDEST. BAK- 
ER'S CONVENTION IN HISTORY? 

Is there any real reason why you shouldn't join the live 
ones, shouldn't enjoy yourself, shouldn't get the ktnks out 
of your tired head, get the hurry and the hustle out of your 
system, and get that REST? 

Your business wont go to the dogs. The boys at the bak- 
ery will take special pride in seeing that things are kept up to 
snufF — they'll beat the regular standard a little if possible. 
You'll get ten dollars worth of good ideas from the con- 
vention for every one dollar that you spend on the trip. 

The trip itself is one of the most popular to vacationers — 
the wonderful Rockies, famous Pike's Peak, and side trips 
through Yellow Stone Park, or on to the coast if you want 

Any trip through the Rockies is wonderful— but this trip 
from start to finish will be a humdinger, with its good fel- 
lows, its spirit of fraternal ism, its something-doing-every- 
mnute activity— it's the trip of a life time. 

The busier you are, the more you need the trip. You'll 
rome back feeling like a king. You'll have new pep, new 
ideas, and take it from me, you'll be tickled to death that you 
just np and did it 

Special trains will leave Chicago Friday evening, August 
4th arriving Salt Lake City, Monday, August 7th. This will 
give ample time to make the trip, attend the convention in- 
cluding side trip to Yellow Stone Park, if desired, or go on 
to California and the Pacific Northwest and return to your 
business before opening of school, September sth. 



Reservations and all information regarding train service, 
etc.. may be had by communicating with Mr. J. M. Bell, 
secretary of the National Association of Master Bakers, 
Royal Insurance BIdg., Chicago. 

W. E. Long, Chairman, Promotion Committee. 
Salt Lake's Early Days 

On a warm July day in 1847, Brigham Young and his band 
ot followers came down Emigration Canyon and found spread 
out before them a great lake, and a great gray valley; but 
Brigham Young, as he looked uion the desert said: "This 
is the place:" and down upon the sagebrush plain the little 
band came, made camp and almost immediately began work. 
Within a month the city was laid out; the streets and blocks 
planned, and farms platted. The immensity of the country 
inspired the pioneers to draft everything on a large plan, 
there was no need for crowding and so the blocks were made 
10 acres large and the streets very wide and the farms platted 
from five to 20 acres. 

Grubbing of sage brush and preparation of the land was im- 
mediately begun and no crop was ever more thankfully 
harvested than that of the first year when so many disasters 
had almost caused the entire loss of it.^ On top of the toil 
and hardship a plague of grasshoppers almost destroyed the 
vegetation so laborously cultivated and if it had not been for 
the timely aid of a large flock of sea gulls from the Great 
Salt Lake, it is no telling what might have happened to 
the pioneers. The gulls fell upon the invaders and killed 
them all and then returned to the lake. A monument to the 
sea gull now stands in the Temple grounds and the bird 
is sacred in Utah. 

The great task of building a temple was also begun and 
forty years later saw the accomplishment of this feat The 
granite was hauled from the quarries southeast of the city, 
for this edifice which is i86^ feet long and 99 feet wide. Its 
{greatest height is 232 feet to the top of the figure which sur- 
mounts the central eastern tower. The cost of this temple 
was about $4,000,000. Here the sacred rites of the Mormon 
belief are performed; and no visitors are ever permitted to 
enter the Temple. The Temple grounds are open to visitors at 
all times, however. 

The pioneers endured eveyr hardship that is ever attendant 
upon pioneering, but their hard work and persistence won. 
and the foundations of a great city and state were laid. 

Many old buildings are still in use which attest to their 
remarkable sustantialness. Among these are the Salt Lake 
Theatre. Amelia Palace (or Gardo House), Social Hall, Lion 
and Bee Hive Houses. These are replete with historical in- 
terest and are some of the place "to see" in Salt Lake. 
General Exhibition Abandoned 

The executive committee of the National Association has 
decided against making the effort to hold an exhibition in 
connection with the Salt Lake convention. That is to say, 
the sub-committee which was delegated in Atlanta to inves- 
tigate the matter with full power to act, has decided that in 
view of all the circumstances, it is best to abandon the pro- 
ject. 

The decision was reluctantly reached, however, because 
it was felt that the first National Convention west of the 
Missouri River ought to have all the features possible, and 
because it is beheved that a western exhibition would result 
in opening a new field for many associate members. 

The referendum letter on the subject sent from the secre- 
tary's office lo the associate members resulted in about an 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



equal division of replies between afRrmative and negative — 
for and against. However, a majority of members whose 
exhibits would be heavy or bulky dissented from the sug- 
gestion, some of them very strongly; and chiefly for that 
reason the plan has been abandoned, although some of these 
objectors had changed their attitude after further representa- 
tions were made. 

INDIVIDUAL EXHIBITS ENCOURAGED 

"On the other hand," states W. E. Long, "we do not hesi- 
tate to recommend to business houses supplying the baker's 
trade, and especially the oven and machinery houses, that a 
National Convention held for the first time in the far west 
offers an excellent opportunity to make a display of their pro- 
ducts to the western bakers, who will no doubt attend in large 
numbers. The next ten years are going to witness a tre- 
mendous development in the baking business west of the 
Missouri River, 

"There is no lack of adequate housing in Salt Lake City 
for either a limited or a general exhibit; and we shall be glad 
to furnish information and such general aid as we may, to 
any group of prospective exhibitors who may desire to con- 
sider the subject. We are able to advise you that the Chi- 
cargo, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. Co., which will handle our 
special passenger trains west from Chicago, have otTered to 
receive combination exhibition shipments for car-load trans- 
shipment west from Chicago and return. 

A FUTURE PERMANENT EXHIBIT 

"The suggestion made by several of our members (which 
has indeed been frequently discussed by the committee), that 
onr National Convention be held annually in the same central 
metropolis, for the express purpose of making an annual, or 
even a permanent exhibit possible, is perhaps almost ready 
for serious consideration by the association, but would prob- 
ably not carry for some years to come. 

BREAD EXHIBIT AT SALT LAKE CITY 

"There is another sort of exhibit which can be held at Salt 
Lake City, and to which we may now give more attention if 
it is the sense of our Regular Members that we do SO. The 
Bread Exhibit in Columbus, brought together at the eleventh 
hour without much plan, and carried out with little or no 
formality or object, other than to give members the oppor- 
tunity of comparison, was generally regarded as having paid 
good dividends of profitable information on a comparatively 
small investment of effort made to gather and conduct it. 

"Is there any reason why a bread exhibit, laid out on a 
broader and more definite plan, and prepared far enough in 
advance to insure lis complete success, should not be a high- 
ly desirable feature of this year's National Convention? Let 
us hear from you on this, and in replying, say what you think 
the general character and purpose of the exhibit should be — 
whether for competition or merely for opportunity of com- 
parison — and if for competition, how it should be conducted 
and judged, and shall there be prizes or simply honors?" 

Greatest "Get Together" Bakers' Convention in History 

That's the promise of those who are planners-Jn-ehief of 
the coming event to which all bakerydom ts looking forward. 

Conventions of the past have resulted in a notable fur- 
therance of friendliness and co-operation among bakers, but 
the group spirit has predominated. 

The bakers from each section have traveled together — have 
stopped at the same hotel, and to a large degree have spent 
their days and evenings together. 

They have the finest kind of times, they go back full of 
ideas and proud as peacocks that they are members of the 
great baking industry. 

But their circle of acquaintances — except for a perfunctory 
hand shake, a "glad-to-meet-you"-and-pass-on sort of intro- 
duction — is not greatly widened. And right here it is where 
the Salt Lake Convention will surely score a great big hit 
and go down in history as a wonderful "get together" con- 



All the Eastern and Middle West bakers will take the spec- 
ial train at Chicago or St. Louis. 

Salt Lake is 42 hours from Chicago — 34 hours from St. 
Louis — and take it from one who knows, those hours on the 
train will be golden hours in more ways than one, I( you 
ever took a long train trip you know the reason why. The 
spirit of friendliness just fills the air after the restraint of the 
first half day or so has worii off. You can enter the train a 
stranger to all, but you simply can't finish the trip a. stranger 
still. You'll just naturally get to know everybody, and, mind 
you, we are talking about just an ordinary trip. 

On the epoch-making convention special this spirit will be 
increased a hundred-fold. It will be everybody's aim and 
ambition to get acquainted from the word "go." 

This spirit will be aided and abetted by a long list of the 
national figures in the baking industry — men who know al- 
most everybody — men tike Burns, McDonald, Long, Freund. 
Stern, Korn, Stude, Fisher, Joe Bell, Roy Nafziger, Harry 
Meyer and a dozen others. Famous themselves as good 
mixers and good fellows, these men will soon have everybody 
rubbing elbows, getting acquainted and threshing out their 
opinions and ideas. 

By the time Salt Lake is reached there'll be a unity of 
thought, a spirit of harmony and enthusiasm that no previous 
convention has seen. 

There'll be a "go" to the meetings, a one-niindedness of 
purpose — that will result in accomplishment which will make 
1916 known as a red letter convention for many years. 

Decide now to make the trip — make a bunch of new friends 
— get closer to your speaking acquaintances — and enjoy one 
of the bulliest times of your life. 

Be sure to bring the wife. It will be a life time's event for 
her. Along the route arc some of America's most famous 
points of interest— Denver, Pike's Peak and Colorado resorts 
almost without number, 

Yellowstone Park will be taken in by large numbers of 
the leading bakers — that's one reason for the early conven- 
tion date. You see Yellowstone closes Sept. ist. So do most 
of the mountain resorts. 

Never before have you had the chance for such a wonder- 
ful trip, a wonderful vacation, a wonderful convention — three 
inducements for one fare. 

Special trains will leave Chicago, Friday evening, August 
4th, arriving at Salt Lake City, Monday, August 7th. This 
will give ample time to make the trip, attend the convention, 
including side trip to Yellow Stone Park, if desired, or go on 
including side trip to Yellowstone Park, if desired, or go on 
to California or Pacific Northwest, and return to your busi- 
ness before opening of school, Sept. 5th. 

Convention headquarters have been established at the new 

Hotel Utah, one of the famous hotels of the country, where 

250 rooms have been reserved for regular members. A card 

list of hotels and rates will be issued in due season. 

♦ « * 

Ward to ETMt $1S0,000 Plant 
In Cleveland 

The Ward Baking Co, completed negotiations last month for 
the purchase of a three-acre parcel of land on the north side 
of Perkins Ave., N, E., just west of East 40th Street, Cleve- 
land, where the Wardf; contemplate the erection of one of the 
largest baking plants in Ohio. 

The property has a Z37-foot frontage on Perkins avenue run- 
ing northward al the same width to a depth of about 400 
feet, connected up to Kelley avenue with a piece 40 by 132 feet, 
and to E, 38th street with two pieces 74 by 70 feet each. The 
figure to be paid for the land, it was stated, is to be around 
$50,000. 

It is understood that approximately $150,000 is to be spent 
on the erection of the new plant, which will b« of the Ward 
standard of t'' , . ■. . 



April, 191O 



BAKERS , REVIEW 



Two CaUfomia "Raisin Days" This 
Year— April 28 and 29, the Dates 



A PRIL 28 and 2q — remember the dates, Mr. Baker — will be 
** celebrated as California "raisin days" this year. Bakers 
througliout the coimtry are making plans to take advantage of 
the opportunities for increased raisin-bread business that will 
be presented through the advertising and other activities of the 
California Associated Raisin Company. The raisin days are 
not the affair of the company, but is a celebration by all the 
raisin growers of California. During the month of April there 
will be waged a tremendous nationai advertising campaign, which 
should bring excellent results to all makers of baked products 
containing raisins. 

Id past years bakers generally have found it advantageous to 
co-operate in the campaign for big business on Raisin Day. 
The national advertising has been a helpful influence toward an 
increased demand : and the personal co-operation extended by 
the California Associated Raisin Company, has helped the bakers 
to cash in on the advertising. 

Of course, the growers have a selfish reason for pushing the 
sale of all foods containing raisins, but that is no reason why the 
bakers themselves should not participate in the profits and in- 
creased business that are being developed. 

The C&lifomia raisin industry has made tremendous strides 
during the past thirty years. The annual crop in that State is 
now about three times as large as that of Spain ; and about Oo 
per cent, of the California crop is grown in Fresno county alone. 
Last year it is estimated that the entire California crop amounted 
to 25CU)00,ooo pounds. This unquestionably could be increased 
if the demand warranted it. As a matter of fact, however, it is 
the practice to produce only enough raisins to supply the existing 
demand. In this connection it is interesting to note that as the 
domestic crop has increased, the importations of raisins have 
correspondingly decreased. In 1885 the imports amounted to 
over 38,00(^000 pounds; in 1915 they were less than 3,000,000. 

Raisin day is an annual holiday in CaUfomia and is celebrated 
throughout the raisin-growing district. In the city of Fresno 
there is a pageant and suitable exercises in honor of the oc- 



We publish in this issue a number of tested recipes, furnished 
by the California Association Raisin Company, which should be 
good sellers for bakers throughout the country. 

California Raisin Bread— With Seeded Raioini 

STRAIGHT DOUGH FOSHULA— BABKEL MIX 

Ingredients Weight 

Spring Wheat Patent Flour 196 lbs. 

Water (60 quarts) 120 " 

California Raisins 90 " 

Connpressed Yeast 2J4 " 

Milk Powder 8 " 

Salt 354 " 

Sugar 3J4 " 

Malt Extract C60') 2 

Lard 4ii " 

Temperahire after mixing of dough. 80° F. 

RECORD FOR FERMENTATION 

Dough made at g :oo P. M. 

First rising at 7 :45 " 

Second rising at 9 :oo " 

Third rising at 9 ;30 " 

Goes to bench ro :oo " 

BENCH RECORD 

Total weight of ingredients 430 lbs. 

Loss during fermentation 4^ " 

Actual dough on hand 4255^ " 

Loaves scaled 18 ounces to oven 

T-rtal amount of loaves produced 378.2 



THE SUB OF FAN TO USE 

Top Depth Bottom 

9M/i i^ 8jix35^ 

This formula recommended after exhaustive scientific and 
practical investigations made by the Siebel Institute of Tech- 
nology of Chicago. 

California Raiain Bread Made With California Raisins 

ONE-HALF BARREL OF FLOUR — THIS BREAD IS BEST MADE OVER THE 
STRAIGHT-DOUGH METHOD 

spring Patent Flour .80 lbs, 'Sweet condensed 

Winter Patent Flour . 18 " milk S!-S lbs. 

Water (30 quarts) . .60 " Shortening zY* " 

California Raisins . . .45 " 'Salt ij4 " 

Compressed yeast iji " Sugar ij4 " 

Malt extract I lb. 

Make a straight dough in the usual manner. Dissolve yeast 
and malt extract in two quarts of water and' set aside for ten 
minutes. Put the milk, sugar, salt and the remainder of the 
water in the trough. When the whole is thoroughly dissolved 
let in the flour gradually and mix until the whole is clear, then 
add the yeast and malt mixture, and when well incorporated 
add the melted lard. The raisins are added shortly before the 
dough is finished mixing. The temperature of the dough should 
not be below 78 degrees Fahrenheit nor above 83 degrees 
Fahrenheit. A dough made at this temperature should be readr 
in 4ii hours time for the fermentation and then ready for the 

REOMD F<Ht PESMENTATIOir 

The respective time for this straight dough to acquire its neces- 
sary proof is as follows: 

First rising 2^ hours 

Second rising i " 

Third rising S4 " 

To bench 'A " 



Total time 4i4 hours 

When the dough is ready, proceed to scale eighteen (18) 
ounces and be certain to round up the pieces and allow them to 
rest from 10 to 15 minutes before moulding into shape. Give the 
loaves short proof before baking and use moderate amount of 
steam in oven. The oven heat should not be below 360 degrees 
Fahenheit nor above 430 degrees Fahrenheit, as the loaves will 
brown too fast. 

BENCH RKOan 

Total weight of ingredients 216^ lbs. 

Loss during fermentation 2 " 

Actual dough on hand 2i4Ji " 

Loaves scaled 18 ounces. 

Total amount of loaves produced 187.1 

SIZE OF FAN TO BE USED — ALL INSHtE MEASUREMENTS 

Top Depth Bottom 

9M'A 3H Sy*x3^ 

*When using fresh or powdered milk the quantity of sugar 
must be doubled. 

•When working with hard water increase the yeast by one- 
quarter pound and reduce the salt by one-quarter pound. 

STRAIGHT -DOUGH METHOD 

Spring Patent Flour .40 lbs. "Sweet condensed milk 2^ lbs. 

Winter Patent Flour 9 " Compressed yeast . . 8 oz. 

Water (15 quarts) ..30 " *Salt u " 

California Raisins . . .22 " Sugar 12 " 

Shortening i!4 " Malt extract Q " 

Make a ^traifiht dough in the usual manner. Dissolve the yeasi 

and malt extract in two quarts of water and set aside for ten 



66 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



minutes. Put the milk, sugar, salt and the remainder of the 
water in the trough. When the whole is dissolved let ui the 
flour gradually and mix until the whole is clear, then add the 
jreast and malt mixture, and when well incorporated add the 
melted lard. The raisins are added shortly before the dough 
it finished mixing. The temperature of the dough should not 
be below 78 degrees Fahrenheit nor above 82 degrees Fahren- 
heit. A dough made at this temperature should be ready in 3^ 
to 4 hours for the fermentation and then ready for the bench. 

BECOSD FOB FEBMENTATIOM 
The respective lime for this straight dough to acquire its 
necessary proof is as follows : 

First rising 2% hours 

Second rising i " 

Third rising l4 " 

To bench <A 



Total time 4 hours 

When the dough is ready, proceed to scale eighteen (18) 
ounces and be certain to round up the pieces and allow them to 
rest from 10 to 15 minutes before moulding into shape. Give the 
loaves short proof before baking and use moderate amount of 
steam in oven. The oven heat should not be below 360 degrees 
Fahrenhrit nor above 430 degrees Fahrenheit, as the loaves will 
brown too fast. 

BKNCH lEomD 

Total weight of ingredients 107^ lbs 

Loss during fermentation i " 

Actual dough on hand 106M " 

Loaves scaled to oven 18 oz. 

Total amount of loaves produced 94 J4 

SUE OF PAN TO BE USEI»— ALL INSmB MEASUREMENTS 

Top Depth Bottom 

9X4H 3H 854x3^ 

•When using fresh or powdered milk the quantity of sugar 
must be doubled. 

*When working with hard water increase the yeast by one- 
half pound and reduce the salt by one-quarter pound. 



Rmisin Coffee Cake — With California Raisins 



2 doi. 






Patent Floor 32 lbs. Eggs 

Fresh Milk 8 qts. Salt 

Water 4 qts. Yeast 

Butter 3 lbs. Raisins 20 lbs. 

Sugar 4 Hw. Flavor 1 01. 

Set a light warm sponge, with 4 quarts of water and 4 quarts 
of milk, together with the yeast and necessary flour to make a 
medium stiff dough. 

When ready add the eggs and sugar, well beaten, as also the 
desired flavoring ; break up the sponge, add the flour, mix one- 
half and pour in the melted butter and make a smooth dough 
(rather slack) . 

Allow the dough to rise to full proof, knock down and lay 
together well, allow to rest for one-half hour, or until nearly 
full proof again. 

Calif omta Raisin I4e 
UPPER CRUST RorroM cHt'sn 

4^ lbs. soft flour A'/i lb::, flour 

2ii lbs. shortening 2 lbs. shortening 

1 Qt. ice water i ■ qt. ice water 

ij4 oz. salt 154 oi. sah 

Break up the shortening with the flour, being careful that it 
is not broken up too finely. Little lumps of shortening should 
be plainly visible throughout the mixture. These are the basis 
of forming the leavening and make a flaky crust. 

When this is done, add the ice water (all ingredients should 
be kept cool), as it will readily take to forming an easy working 
dough. This must be done with very little handling, and not 
even mixed thoroughly, as the mixture has to undergo some 
further handling before being spread upon the pie 



The first point in pie lies in the filler, or thickness for the 
fruit. Yon may make a filler as follows: 

Take pearl tapioca, grind same to fine meal like corn meal, 
and scale off two pounds. Put this into a kettle with six pounds , 
of sugar and twelve quarts of water. Set on fire and stir until 
the milk appearance disappears, when the mixture is finished. 

It is well to remember that this should never boil but merely 
acquire a glossy appearance. 

Now, take a reasonable amount of this so-called filler and 
mix it with the fruit. 

Another way to prepare the raisins and filling at one and 
the same time is as follows: 

Take eight pounds of raisins, six quarts of water, and 10 
ounces of tapioca and four pounds of sugar. Put the water, 
tapioca and sugar on the fire and treat as befoie, until it be- 
comes clear. Next add the raisins, and if it is the desire to 
make an extra good filling, add the juice of a couple of lemons 
and a little cinnamon. Allow this to cool, when it will tnake a 
very desirable raisin pie filling. 

White and Yellow Potind Cake— With California Raisins 
At 35c per pound 

WHITE YELLOW 

Soft Winter Wheat Soft Winter Wheat 

Flour 8^ lbs. Flour 8M lbs 

2-3 Butter, 1-3 Lard.. 554 lbs. 2-3 Butter, 1-3 Lard . 5}4 lbs. 

Powdered Sugar 7J4 lbs. Powdered Sugar 7^ lbs. 

Raisins 25 lbs. Raisins 35 lbs. 

White of E«gs 654 lbs. Whole Eggs 6Ji lbs. 

Flavor to suit taste. Flavor to suit taste. 

White and YeUow Pound Cake— With California Raidas 

At 40c per ptmttd 

WHtlK YELLOW 

Soft Winter Wheat Soft Winter Wheat 

Flour 8 lbs. Plour 8 lbs. 

Sweet Butter 7% lbs. Sweet Butter 754 lbs. 

Powdered Sugar — jii lbs. Powdered Sugar .... 75$ lbs 

White of Eggs 7J4 lbs. Whole Eggs 7Ji lbs. 

Raisins 25 lbs. Raisins 25 lbs. 

Flavor to suit taste. Flavor to suit taste. 

Slab Cake— With California Raisins 

In the production of Slab Cake, the baker pays special at- 
tention to the appearance, texture, flavor, and especially so. 
quality. 

For this purpose a mixed flour, composed of three parts ol 
winter wheat (cake flour) and one part of rice flour is em- 
ployed, the rice flour having the advantage of giving a better 
grain and whiter crumb, and also admitting the use of a larger 
quantity of milk, and thereby obtaining greater returns. 

Other cereal flours, such as corn or potato, can be substituted 
for the rice flour in equal quantities, with good results. 

The most important factor is the* correct mixing of the cake 
itself. It shall not be too stiff, as this would cause the cake to 
be coarse and dry. while too soft mixtures are just as bad, caus- 
ing the raisins to sink to the bottom of the cake. 

With reference to the latter, it must be added that the raisins 
should come into the dough in as dry a condition as possible. 

Slab cake should be baked in an oven in which the heat does 
not exceed 280 to 300 degrees F. 

From a perusal and careful consideration of the above, a bet- 
ter conception of the following formula will be attained. 

FORMULA FOR SLAB CAKE 

25 lbs. of flour (mixed as above described) 
la lbs. of sugar (powdered or granulated). 
6 lbs. of butter (or half lard and butter), 
J^ oz. lemon flavor. 10 lbs. of raisins, 

1 oz. egg color. 2 lbs. of orange peel. 
ft'A qts, of milk. 1 oz. of salt 

2 ors bicarbonate of soda 4 ois. of cream of tartar 



April, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



The procedure of mixing should be similar to that employed 
with any other cake. 

The butter is creamed up with the sugar and salt, whereas 
the soda is dissolved in the milk and added to the egg color, 
after which it is all mixed again. Next sift the cream of tartar 
in the flour and add to the above. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Pacific Coast ConvantloB Oatas 

A joint meeting of ihe Executive Committees of the Pacific 
Northwest Master Bakers' Association and the Oregon Masler 
Bakers' Association was held at the Imperial Hotel, Portland, 
Oregon, recently to arrange the final details of the 
joint annual convention to be held in Tacotna, on May 
23rd, 24th and 25lh. Members of the Washington Committee 
from Chehalist Spokane, and about fourteen bakers from 
Tacoma, were in attendance. This was the first "Get-together" 
meeting since 1914, when the Oregon bakers withdrew from 
the Pacific Northwest and formed their own organization, and 
therefore this meeting probably was of greater importance than 
anything that has happened recently in the trade in the far 
West 

The final details were arranged and Ihe Tacoma bakers prom- 
ise a convention the equal of which has never been known on 
the Coast. Tacoma is a beautiful little city, ideally situated 
to make entertaining novel as well as delightful. Arrangements 
were made to get speakers of prominence to discuss subjects of 
interest to the trade, and methods of strengthening both organi- 
zations were di*cussed. 

The committee meeting was followed by one of the most 
delightful banquets ever given the bakers of the Northwest. 
TIus is the first banquet since Oregon and Washington went 
"Dry." Short talks were made by numerous bakers, probably 
the most important of which were by I>avid Ackerman, of Spo- 
kane. Wash. ; Wm. Matthaei, of Tacoma ; Wm., and the "Young- 
est baker," Wm. McPhearson, of Tacoma. Mr. Ackerman spoke 
on "Discounts in the Baking Business," pointing out the im- 
possibility of giving discounts and why it is unnecessary. Ac- 
cording to him, there "Ain't no sech animal!'' Mr. Matthaei 
told of "The Ten Cent Loaf and its use as a trade builder. 
The speaker of the evening, C. W. Robinson, Asst. District At- 
torney for Multnomah County, made a strong talk for "Orftani- 
zation" There were about sixty in attendance. 
« « * 

Wavr Ttada Marks for Bakary Products 

The following new trade marks for bakery products have been 
applied lor at the U. S. Patent Office ; 

Ser. No. 86,709.— Words Try Me, for bread, by George Mei- 
lahn. Burlington, Iowa, 

Ser. No. 89,292. — Words Hertndten's Fresh-Loaf, only in con- 
nection with a certain drawn mark, for bread, by Charles Heren- 
deen Milling Co., Chicago, III. 

Ser- No 89,881.— Word Bond, tor bread, by General Baking 
Co., New York. N. Y. 

Ser. No. 91,497.— Word fim, for bread, by Haller Baking 
Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ser. No. 91,773— Words Happy Child, for cookies, by Loose- 
Wiles Biscuit Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Ser. No. 91,821. — Words Buster Brown, for cakes and cookies, 
by Iten Biscuit Co., Omaha, Neb. 

Ser. No, 91,822,— Word Brownies, for cakes and cookies, by 
Iten Biscuit Co, Omaha, Neb. 

Ser. No. 92,005.— Words Bran Nulrine, for bread, by Schulze 
Baking Co.. Chicago, 111. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

One of the best bakeries in New Mexico is conducted ai 
108 Galestes Street, Santa Fe, by Amado Gutierrez Senor 
Gutierrez, who is a Mexican by birth, is a high-grade busi- 
ness man, and conducts a shop that is up-to-date in nil its 
appointments. 



FOrmatioii of Banaatt Ovaa Co. 

The incorporation of the Bennett Oven Company, under 

the laws of the State of Michigan, was announced about the 

middle of March. The autorized capital stock of the new 

company is $40,000. The new firm 

has purchased a large concrete 

plant with a floor space of 45,000 

square feet in Battle Creek, Mich. 

Machinery is now being installed, 

and it is expected that the plant will 

I be ready for operation about May i. 

I A photographic reproduction of the 

plant is shown herewith. 

Sidney Bennett, whose resignation 
from the presidency of the Hubbard 
Oven Co. was announced recently, is 
president of the new company; his 
brother. Glover H. Bennett, who al- 
io wu aifociated with the Hubbard 
vice-president: D. S, Croyden 
secretary. 



SIDNEY BENNETT 



Oven Co 
C. P. Brc 



Se-u! Plant of the Bmnetl Ovr» Co. im Battle Creek 

The Bennett Oven Company will engage in the manu- 
facture of several types of ovens. AH of the members of the 
new concern were associated with the Hubbard Oven Co., and 
they know the oven business thoroughly, and from every 
angle. Their friends prtdict for them a big success in their 
new venture. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Changas in tha Hubbard Ovaa <^ 

Many changes were made last month in the personnel of 
the Hubbard Oven Co., one of the largest oven concerns in 
the country. Sidney Bennett, president and Glover H. Ben- 
nett, secretary, sold their stock in 
and resigned from the company in 
order to organize a new company 
under their own name. Sidney Ben- 
nett became president after the death 
of his brother, Herbert O. Bennett, 
about a year ago. He had been as- 
sociated with the Hubbard Oven 
Co, for about twenty years, while his 
brother. G. H. Bennett, has been a 
member of the Hubbard organiza- 
tion for about seventeen years. 

Mrs, Herbert O. Bennett, widow __ 

of the late H, O Bennett, and owner arthur fosdvkk 

of the controlling interest in the 

Hubbard Oven Co,, has been elected president, to succeed 
Sidney Ik-mictt, Arthur Fosdyke, who became eastern 
manager upon the elevation of Sidney Bennett to the presi- 
dency, has been chosen to take hold of the general manage- 
ment, Mr. Fosdyke was a close associate of H. O. Bennett 
for several years previous to the latter's death, and he expects 
to follow the established policies of the firm. He has made 
many friends in the trade; is highly respected, and bas the 
ability to make a success of his new J«?\jQOQ[C 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



Brsad Ingrcdteats Bill In N«w York 

Senator James J. Walker, of New York, and Assembly- 
man William S. Coffey, of Westechester, have introduced in 
New York State Legislature what is known as the Walker- 
CoSey bill. It is a proposed amendment to the health law 
and provides that "bread manufactured to he sold by the 
loaf shall be made from one or more of the following sub- 
stances: Wheat flour, rye flour, corn flour, lard, vegetable 
oils, butter, sugar, malt extract, corn syrup, salt, yeast, water, 
milk, corn sugar, eereal flakes and any other substance com- 
monly sold at retail as food." 

Mr. Coffey, one of the sponsors for the bill is reported to 
have said in an interview that "during the investigations last 
year on the rise of bread prices in New York, one formula 
was produced for makng bread which called for twenty- 
four percent, of calcium of sulphate, twenty-five per cent, of 
sodium chloride, twelve per cent, of ammonium chloride, and 
just thirty-nine per cent, of flour." 

The New York State Association of Master Bakers is 
fostering the proposed legislation which, according to present 
indications, will be passed. 



WIU the Balnn Pay for InspttctloaT 

In his annual report issued recently, R, M. Allen, Kentucky 
State Food Commissioner, stated that the bakers had sug- 
gested regular inspection of their shops, the bakers them- 
selves to co-operate in paying the costs of inspection. Ken- 
tucky bakers want inspection of their shops, but there is 
at least one baker in the Sute who does not believe in the 
practicability of the arrangement suggested by Mr. Allen; 
this baker's tiame is Martin DeVries; his location is Bowling 
Green, Kentucky., and he is secretary of the Kentucky As- 
sociation of Master Bakers. Mr, DeVries writes: 

"Regarding a co-operative system of inspection of bakeries, 
as advocated by Mr. R. M. Allen, formerly food commission- 
er in Kentucky, and the work of State ofhcials to be paid 
for by the bakers themselves, I have not heard of such a 
transaction. Only one baker has asked my opinion on this 
matter, and his idea was to the effect that such an inspector 
should be a practical baker. 

"I am opposed to such laws. The State of Kentucky is 
full of inspectors of all sorts. Many are politicians who have 
little knowledge of the work they are doing. We bakers pay 
taxes the same as other merchants. 

"Wc Kentucky bakers believe in having our plants in- 
spected by a competent man, who should be paid by the State 
as other inspectors are paid" 



R««d Xam«s Sammury of Balwshop "Lmw 

The Read Machinery Co., of York, Pa., has sent out to the 
trade in Pennsylvania folders showing a summary of the 
Pennsylvania bakeshop regulations. The firm has also issued a 
number of posters, to be hung in the bakeshops. The poster 
informs the employes and others having access to the shop that 
"The State Law Prohibits Smoking, Tobacco Chewing, Spitting, 
and other Unsanitary Acts in This Room." Copies of this 
poster will be ^ent free upon request to the Read Machinery 



B«k*n of Two Norada Cltlos Organizo 

At 3 meeting of hakers of Reno and Sparks in Reno recently, 
the Master Bakers' Association of Reno was formed with J. H. 
Crowley, of Sparks, president, and F. K. Unsworth, of the 
Palace Bakery, of Reno, secretary-treasurer. Every baker of 
the two cities with one exception, has joined the organization, 
and from now on the members will produce bread of uniform 
:!?(■ and weiRht. 



Tri-St«M to RST* Ezhlbtt 

At a meeting held in Toledo on March 7, the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Tri-State Master Bakers' Association decided to 
hold an exhibition of machinery, supplies, etc., in connection 
with the Tri-State convention, which will be held at Toledo, 
June 6. 7, and 8, The decision was hastened in view of the fact 
that it has been decided not to hold an official exhibition iu 
connection with the National convention at Salt Lake City. 

The Exhibition Committee consists of Wade D. Holland, 
chairman ; George Brinkman, 102 Michigan Street, Toledo, Ohio, 
secretary, and George Pickard, Gus, Lay, Linton Fallfs, and E. 
Mc Daniels. 

The committee have secured the Terminal Auditorium in 
Toledo. This building is less than lo-minutes walk from the 
hotel headquarters. The floor space is all on the ground floor, 
and amounts to 50,000 square feet. The price for space is $50 
per booth, 10x10 feet, or $40 per booth of two or more are 
taken. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

ladvstrlal Rartew 

Sweeney & KirchoS have opened the Palace Bakery in their 
new concrete building on National Highway, Oatman, Arizona. 
Up-to-date equipment has been installed throughout. 

Ray Arnold, formerly of Edna, Kansas, has opened a bakery 
in the Windrem building, Augusta Ave., Oxford, Iowa. 

M. E. Richeal has opened up a new bakery in Pomeroy, Iowa. 

Mrs. S. B. Gray has opened up a new bakery and tea parlor 
at 1909 Cumberland Ave., Middleboro, Ky. She will bake and 
sell bread, cake, doughnuts, puddings, potato chips, and candy, 
and will serve tea. 

A. Poquette and H. Newman have opened a bakery on Oak 
Street, Manistique, Mich. 

Rummage & Son have purchased the bakery business in Law- 
son, Mo., from George F. Blazak. 

Goldsberry & Schweizer have purchased Thelen's bakery and 
cafe in Osceola, Neb. G, B. Goldsberry has been foreman for 
the Butter Nut Bread Co., at Lincoln, Neb., for the past two 
years. The new firm will put in a new front and floor, and then 
will install an up-to-date bakery and cafe. 

Mrs. E. Roosevelt has opened a home bakery at Collings & 
Richey Aves., West Collingswood, N, J. 
4 4 •!> 

Bakan Kicking In Pannsylvanla 

A strong movement is being fostered by the master bakers of 
Philadelphia, backed by representatives of the craft in Pitts- 
burgh, Lancaster, Reading, Scranton, Harrisburg, and other lead- 
ing cities in Pennsylvania, to have the industrial commission of 
the department of Labor and Industry of the State, to modify 
the drastic provisions governing cellar bakeshops. The revised 
regulation would permit cellar bakeshops that are seven feet 
high, lighted entirely by electricity, or any illuminant that does 
not consume oxygen, providing approved ventilation is installed 
Now a cellar bakery, more than half-a-story below the ground, 
will not be tolerated. A public hearing was given on March 
16, It is said that the June convention of the Pennsylvania Mas- 
ter Bakers' Association will take up the subject in all its aspects. 

♦ ♦ * 

RantoT Party to Salt Laka Convantlon 

.\nimated by his two successful attempts to chaperon parties 
to National conventions, George P. Reuter is at it again. He 
is already getting after the bakers and allied trade members to 
join in a sociable party to the Salt Lake City convention. Those 
who went to Richmond or to Columbus via the Reuter siiecials 
ran never forget his genial supervision of the appointments: 
,ind it is expected that the Renter Salt Lake special will not 
be lacking in anything worth while, A number have already 
signified their intention of going "the Reuter way," so, 
Kasterncrs, if you want to get further particulars, ask George 
r. Router, whose address is 79 Wall Street. New York, N, Y, 




EDITORIAL 



Charlaa 8. Tboatpsoa, Bdltor 




Adolph BOttttUr 

IN THE death of Adolph Boettler, St. Louis, the 
baking industry has lost one of its most success- 
ful and best-liked members; one who has been in- 
timately associated with practically every progressive 
movement in the baking business for the past 15 years, 
and one who contributed largely, through his own 
zealous efEorts, to the modern developments in the 
bakery business of to-day. 

Like many others of the largest bakers in the United 
States, Mr. Boettler started at the bottom and through 
hard work gradually climbed to the top. He came to 
America from Germany when eleven years old; and 
when only nineteen he engaged in the baking business 
with his brother-in-taw in St. Louis. This business, 
through careful management, was soon successful and 
in 18S3 it was incorporated under the name of the 
Welle-Boettler Bakery Co., which afterward became 
widely known. 

From its inception the National Association of 
Master Bakers always counted upon Mr. Boettler as 
one of its most willing and enthusiastic workers, and 
later he became president of this organization. In 
1907, Mr. Boettler was elected president of the Ameri- 
can Bakery Co., the first large combinationof its kind 
formed in this country, an ofhce which he held up to 
his death. 

Notwithstanding the high place which he achieved 
for himself in the baking industry, Mr. Boettler always 
remained one of the most democratic members of his 
trade, never losing interest in the various gatherings qf 
the trade organizations which he invariably attended 
and "mixed" with the boys. A baker of the old school 
and one of the most representative and successful of 
the new school epitomizes his career. 



A PacnlUr Snggcstton 

BAKERS, as a class, have been called upon many 
times to pay more than their legitimate share of 
taxes to help support the communities and 
states in which they are situated. Now they are ask- 
ed, by the former pure food commissioner of Ken- 
tucky, to pay the cost of inspecting their shops. And, 
he adds, the suggestion came from the bakers them- 
selves. He says: "The bakers propose that they pay 
a tax of $5 for the retail, and $ro for the wholesale 
baker. A system of such fees can be arranged so as 
to work no burden on anyone, and, in my judgment, 
accumulate the money necessary to the enforcement of 
the act, and the benefits derived from the trade from 
the constructive enforcement of the act will afford it 



weight from the small cost contributed by each to the 
maintenance of the work," 

After we had carefully read the above, we decided 
to ask the bakers of Kentucky as to the truth of the 
assertion that the bakers themselves had asked to 
pay the costs of inspection. The secretary of the Ken- 
tucky Master Bakers' Association replied: "We Ken- 
tucky bakers believe in having our plants inspected by 
a competent man who is paid by the State as other 
inspectors are paid. Wt pay taxes the same as other 
mercliants." 

The inspection of bakeries is entirely a community 
proposition. Inspections are made primarily to bene- 
fit all the people; and in this case particularly the 
beneficiaries should share equally with the bakers the 
costs of inspection. In other words, the inspectors' 
salaries and expenses should be borne by the State. 
We hope that the bakers of Kentucky, through their 
State organization, will earnestly protest any action 
embodying Mr. Alien's suggestion that the bakers pay. 
The taxation burdens of the baker are heavy enough ; 
why have them added to with unnecessary discrimina- 
tion? 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Too Many BxMbltlonB 

FOUR exhibitions this year, and all within a period 
of less than seven weeks. Whew ! First, the 
Southeastern, at Macon, May i to 4; then Texas, 
at Waco, May 2 to 4. After a lapse of several weeks 
the Tri-State opens at Toledo, June 6 to 8 ; and a week 
later the Trans-Mississippi completes the quartet at 
Omaha. 

As for the exhibitors, "of course all the prominent 
concerns will be there; they will have to be," even 
though the expense will be out of all proportion to the 
results. 

For many years the associate members of most bak- 
ers' associations were asked to contribute "their share" 
— the whole — of the entertainment expenses of the 
conventions in the trade. Recently there has develop- 
ed strong opposition to that plan, so now we shall 
hear of exhibitions, "the intention being merely to de- 
rive sufficient funds to defray the expenses of the 
coming convention, by giving value received in space, 
to those desiring to take part in the exhibit." Which 
is just another form of hold-up; and the baker finally 
pays, for the exhibition costs are charged directly to 
the expense of doing business. 

The bakers who attend conventions should be both 
financially able and inclined to pay their own expenses. 
If they are not, they should stay at home. To request 
others to pay, is similar to asking for charity ; and it 
isn't fair to those who do not participate in the enter- 
tainment, and who are probably less able to afford 
paying than arc those who secure the benefits. 



■JO 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apul, 1 916 



1 "hi: policy of asking others to pay the cost of pro- 
ducing a bakers' convention, is a poor one, to say the 
least. It is not conducive to increasing the self-re- 
spect of the bakers, and it is likely to cause a feeling 
of soreness among those who do not relish being held 
up. The only organization that undertook to sound 
thi- feeling of the trade regarding an exhibit this year, 
found that about fifty per cent, of the replies were op- 
posed to the project. Other organizations should 
quickly perceive the point 

"Pay your own way" should be the motto of every 
baker who attends a convention, and of every associa- 
tion that undertakes to conduct a convention. 

BAKERS Review believes that an occasional exhibi- 
tion held at some central point is of great educational 
value to the trade generally, but sooner or later it 
must be realized that too many exhibitions are bad for 
all concerned. 

To the exhibitions already planned Bakers Review 
wishes every success, but before planning future ex- 
hibitions it may be well to consider carefully the points - 
we have endeavored to emphasize above. 



DMth Of Adolph Bottttter 

Adolph Boettler, preaiijent of the American Bakery Co., St. 
Louis, and president of the National Association of Master 
Bakers in igo6-7, died of a throat disease at his home in St. 
Louis on March 19. He was 62 
years old and had been suffer- 
ing from the malady since last 
November. 

Boettler's rise lo the head of 
one of the largest baking com- 
panies in the United States was 
rapid. Born in Germany, he came 
to the United States al the age 
of 14 years. For five years he 
worked as apprentice in a book- 
binding shop. At the age of 19 
years he became a partner of 
his brother-in-law, A. F. Welle, 
then president of the Uammouth 
Baking Company. In 1883 Boet- 
tler became vice-president of the 
company when it incorporated un- 
Aeoi™ Botrrio, j„ ^^ „„, ^^ „,, w.llcBo.i 

tier Baking Company. He was made president of the American 
Bakery Company in 1906 when the Welle-Boettler Compan) 
was taken over by the American Bakery Company. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Augusta Muhs Boettler, 10 
whom he was married thirty-seven years ago; a son, Albert A, 
Boettler, an insurance broker, and a daughter, Mrs. Lettie 
Schopp. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

WlllUin C Lan, Pntmlnant Baker Otes 

Acute appendicitis was the cause of the death, last week, of 
William C, Lau, of Columbus, and one of the Ijrominent bakers 
of Ohio. A striking figure at Stale and National conventions, 
Mr. Lau was known throughout the country. He was one of 
the big factors in the success of local arrangements for the 
National convention in Columbus last year. 

Mr. Lan had been in the bakery business all of his life. He 
formerly owned bakcshops in Glen Rock, Steelton, and Gold; 
borough. Pa. He started in Columbus about four years ago. 

Mr. I^u was 48 years of age. Beside his widow, he is sui 
vived by a son. Benjamin R, Lau, 



PrcparlBg for an Exhibit at Omaha 

Preparations for the first annual convention of the Trans- 
Mississippi bakers are now under full steam and the commit- 
tees at Omaha are shaping up a campaign to make the con- 
vention the biggest and best ever. The exhibit committee 
headed by C. W. Ortman with J. M. Gillan as manager is 
sending out plans of the convention hall and space is being taken 
by many of the leading manufacturers throughout the country 
at a rapid rate. Booths being sold at $25, $30, $40 and (50 each. 
Of the space available on the entire main floor of the audi- 
torium, the committee reports that about half is already spoken 
for and there is no doubt that this first big exhibit held in the 
West will be a winner. The program committee composed of 
Messrs. Rushton, Larrimer and Hoffmann are reported to have 
big things in store for the edification and entertainment of those 
attending and the committee on arrangements are laying plans 
for unusual things to happen in the auditorium building during 
the idle moments. The hotels of the city are well prepared to 
care for those attending and promise positively that there will 
be no raise in their regular rates. 

♦ • ♦ 

N«w England Trl-8t*ta C^vantlon Datas 

At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the New Eng- 
land Tri-State Master Bakers' Association, held at the American 
House, Boston, on Thursday, March 9th, it was unanimously 
voted to Iiold the annual convention of the association at Port- 
land, Maine, October nth and 12th. It was brought up at the 
meeting that the association should invite an exhibition of 
bakery machinery and products, but no action was taken on thr 
motion, 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Bakan Exhibit In Claraland 

The Cleveland Progressive Master Bakers' Association was 
very much in evidence at the Women's Exposition, which was 
held at the Coliseum, Cleveland, March 6th to nth. The mem- 
bers had a booth where samples o( bread and cake were given 
away. Goods were not made at the show, but were supplied 
by various members in turn. The committee in charge of the 
arrangements in behalf of the master bakers included: Edward 
Rupp, chairman; Frank Knoth, Henry Weber, Ed. Luthart, Nick 
Brandt, and John Nickol. 

Bruce & West, The Zipp Manufacturing Co., The Miller- 
Eberhart Co., and The Wm. Edwards Co.. exhibited bakers' 
machinery in motion, and various supplies, extracts, icings, flout, 

The Star Baking Co. also had a booth, from which they 
i;ave away samples of bread. They exhibited one of their 
wagons, with a life-size model of a horse in the shafts. 

A crowd of women and children were to be seen around these 
booths at all times while the show was open. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Chicago Opans Contlnnatloa Clan 

A class of bakers' apprentices has been opened at the Lane 
Technical School in Chicago, with an initial registration of about 
izo pupils. The boys will be taught to take care of bread 
troubles, including rope; and will learn other features of the 
bread and cake baking also. Courses in chemistry and yeast 
manufacture wilt be included. Frank Haffner, of the Chicago 
bakers' union, and Ernest J Vieser, an icing expert, are in 
I'harRe of the instruction, 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

H. M. Bachman In Chicago 

Last month we noted in the columns of Bakers Review that 
the Champion Machinery Co., of Jolief, III., had opened a new 
office in Chicago. We are informed that H. M. Bachman will 
be in charge of this office, which is located at-J75 West Jjackscm 
Boulevard. Chicago, III. jnii zt (: DvL^OOQLC 



Retail 



^ Oviural informatlonT a*ws and 

Vl^helptal artlctes of sp*ctal in- 

tUKst to tlM Rotall Bakor and 

thoso who doslro to koop postod 

on this hranch of tho trado. 



H«w% ItotaU AdvartUag, BnsliwsB llMW>g« M«nt and Pmetleal I 



■ o< ItetaU Sabjacts 



Purchase Records for Retail Bakers 

Fifth of a Series of Articles on Retail Bakery Accountine. Written Esfiecially jor Bakers Review h Rudolph Krebs 



lllHlLE most men realiie the importance of keying some sort 
" of records of incoming and outgoing cash, few a.ppre- 
cialc the fact that merchandise is just as valuable as cash, and 
may small bakers have no records at all of the amount of 
merchandise they receive and consume. 

In building a system for a retail bakery we are hampered 
more or less by the fact that the little fellow makes many varie- 
ttcj of cakes, bread and rolls. Usually the amount of each 
baking is so small that to attempt the organisation of a regulai 
cost accounting system would result in a surplus of accounting 
Koards. Tlie system described below is so simple that all the 
^formation required can be obtained without any great effort 
and at the same time it is comprehensive enough to (how 
where the goods purchased have been used. 

To start at the verj- bcRinning, let ns consider the order rec- 
ord first: 



be ordered. It is impossible to check a bill through twice for 
the same item, as the check mark in the last column shows 
whether or not a bill has been paid. 















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ORDER RECORD, PIMM B I 

In this order record the lirst column is headed Merchandise, 
second Date Wanted. When the need for goods is seen a 
memorandum is made of the kind of goods and the date re- 
quired. In the third column, headed Quotations, are listed the 
prices of the difierent jobbers. The next four columns show 
whom the goods are bought from, the price agreed upon, quan- 
tity ordered and date delivery is to be made. The next column 
sbows the date goods are received, and the last column is used 
for checking bills. 

The £rst item shown, patent flour, is needed by the Itth of 
December. The baker has a contract with J, M. Greer for 
these goods, and 28 sacks are ordered up for delivery on the 
loth of the month. As these are received the date and initials 
of the party receiving same are put in the Received column, 
md when the bill comes to hand later on the items are checked 
brongh in the Bill Received column. 

We note that two prices have been quoted on the next item, 
oraway seed, and the order has been given to S. Marks at I3j4c 
pa pound. This item has also been received. 

By merely glancing at these records we can see what items 
have been ordered and not delivered, and what items are still to 



FKOU. 



RECEIVKD 



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', FORM B 2, a, b and c 
For those who do not care to keep a record of quotations and 
goods ordered, the small "Received" slip shown is a convenient 
form for handling purchase receipts. Spaces are provided on 
this slip for the date, name of seller, and the different goods 
received, with the initials of the party signing for same. The 
incoming bills ar^ of course, checked against these. This 
naturally does not Rive as perfect a check as the order record, 
as it does not ^how any delivery time or price agreed upon, or 
goods ordered but not delivered. 

STOCK RECORD, FORM B 3 a, b and c 
On the Stock Record, forms B 3 a, b and c, are entered the 
date, name of firm, quantity, price and amount of goods re- 
ceived of each separate kmd used in the bakery. These are 
indexed alphabetically, the records being, of course taken from 
the original hills. This is a convenient way to check up the* 
amount of even,' kind of merchandise used during any period, 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apkil, 1916 

pound, to be taken before December 31, 1915. la the column 
lieaded Amount the total amount bought, 30 tubs, is catered. 
The three columns headed Deliveries show the date and quantity 
of eacli separate delivery and the total amount delivered to 
date. The last column shows the balance still to be delivered. 
Thus, in Oct. J4th we see that 17 tubs have been delivered and 13 
are stilt to be delivered. At the bottom a note is made when 
the last lot is delivered and the cards are then filed away for 
future reference. 



^_«.^ZW 



Dcpt ::;{*.'— c^ 4f*-^^~J 




and will enable a man to place contracts for goods with a fair 
idea of how long they will last; it also shows the fluctuation of 
prices from year to year. 

In form 633, popy seed, we note that five separate purchases 
of this commodity have been made during the month of Ni 
ber, 1915. The total amount bought during the month was 
540 pounds the price paid for same, $98.25. 



CONTRACT KECORDS, FORMS 4 a, b and c 
We have here a simple means of keeping track of the various 
items bought ahead and deliveries made on account of same. It 
is just as important for a man to know, when he buys 200 
barrels of flour at $5.85 a barrel, that gets 200 barrels at that 
price, and not 160 at the price agreed upon and the balance 
at a higher rate 

In form 643 we note thai on the loth of January we bought 
from Kahn, Lewis & Co. 30 tubs of baking butter at 24c a 



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Form B4b shows that of the 200 barrels of flour bought from 
J. M. Greer, 160 have been delivered and 40 are still undelivered. 

Form B4C shows that of the 6 tubs of butter bought for the 
lunch room, none have yet been delivered. 

PURCHASE JOURNAL, FORM B5 

This is one of the books of original entry. Entries are made 
in this book from the original bills, which have been checked 
as to quantity and price. Each bill is numbered in sequence 
and the ntimber of the bill is placed in the first column, date in 
the next column, name of firm in the next space, and the total 
amount of bill in the money column beaded Amount. 

We have five other columns, namely General Ledger, Bakery 
Expense & Merchandise and Store Expense & Merchandise. 
These are called analytical columns and save a great deal of 
time, as will be seen later, in charging items to the separate 
accounts. 

After the total amount has been entered in the first money 
column the bill is analyzed in order to ascertain which account 
it should be charged to. The first item. No. 5?i, received on 
Dec. loth from J. M. Greer is, we will say, flour amounting to 
$117.00. As flour is used in the bakery in the manufacture of 
goods, we place the amount, $117.00, in the column headed 
Bakery Merchandise. 

The next item. No. 572, received on the 21st from S. L. Jone^ 
amount $11.00, we will say is wrapping paper and twine, and u 
to be used in the store. Naturally it would not be proper to 
charge this to the bakery as it is not used there, nor would it 
be proper to charge it to Store Merchandise as we reserve this 
account for goods sold in the store. Paper is an expense item 
and the amount is to be placed in the column headed "Store 
Expenses." 

No. 573, Kahn, Lewis & Co., amount $5.00, may be a purchase 
of pans and utensils for the bakery. This is not merchandise 
as it is not to be sold there. It is, therefore, chargeable to the 
Bakery Expense account. 

No. S74. National Biscuit Co.. amount $2.00. would most likely 
be a purchase of crackers. This is merchandise bought for the 
store and sold there. 

The last item, No. 576, is a bill from the Consolidated Gas 
Co. It may be for light in the store or bakery, or for heat or 
power in the bakery or lunch room, if there is one. If you have 
one meter for the entire place and gas is used in the different 
departments the total amoimt would have to be sub-divided and 
charged to each account affected. A note has been made 
alongside Ihi? entry to the effect that the expense has (leen 



Apkil, 1 916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



incurred for the baker}'- H we have an account for bakery 
light, heat and power it should be charged direct to that account 
in the general ledger, and the number of the page on which this 
account appears is to be noted alongside same. If, however, we 
desire to do so, we can charge this directly to Bakery Expense. 
In such a case, the amount, $25.00, would be placed in the Bak- 
ery Ebdpense column and not in the General Ledger column. 

At the end of the month the various columns are footed up. 
The first shows our total purchases for the month, and is 
credited to the controlling account in the General Ledger marked 
'Accounts Payable." The items in the next column (General 
Ledger) have been posted direct through the month and a check 
mark is placed under this column. 

The amounts for Bakery and Store Expense and Merchandise 
are charged to their respective accounts. The total footings of 
the last five columns would naturally he the same as the total of 
the Amount column, as every time an entry is made in the 
first column it has also been put in one of the others. 

In the February article we had on the credit side of the 
Cash Book (form Asb) a column headed Accounts Payable, 
showing the amounts that had been paid on the various charge 
bills. As we go along through the month we can keep in touch 
with general conditions by watching the total amount of goods 
received to date (in the Purchase Journal), the amount paid on 
account (in the Cash Book), fluctuations in the amount of cash 
on hand, and in other balance sbeet items. While this system 
does not show the profit or loss accurately every day. it is the 
best the small retail baker can afFord. 









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PUBCHASE LEDGES, FOBMs B6a, b and c 
A firm having many creditors keeps the records of purchases 
and payments in a separate book, called the Purchase Ledger. 
A loose leaf book is usually the best for this purpose, as it 
permits of the removal of all closed accounts and saves a great 
deal of labor. 



Form B6a is the account of Kahn, Lewis & Co. On the credit 
side are entered from the PurchaK Journal all purchases made 
from them. We post from the Purchase Journal items No. 573 
and 575 on the 23rd and 31st respectively, to the account in the 
Purchase Ledger. 

Payments are entered on the debit side. Thus we note that 
J. M. Greer received from us on Dec. ist check No. 372, amount 
$17.00. As each separate bill is paid we check off the purchase 
item and the payment to show which payment has been made 
for each individual bill. It is easy enough to glance over and 
see what payment A or B is for. Any items on the credit side 
that have no letter beside them we know are unpaid. The item 
in the Purchase Journal No. 571 on Dec. loth, $117.00, is entered 
as shown. 

The account of S. L, Jones is the same as the previous two, 
except for the fact that one payment has been made for all 
the bills for the month of November, $67.50- 

Records like the above are suitable for the small retail baker, 
giving most of the information he needs without any great ex- 
pense or labor, L.arge establishments naturally require a more 
detailed system. 

Many business men lo^ sight of the fact that merchandise 
is equivalent to cash, and while they may have check protectors, 
bonded cashiers, monthly audits of the cash book, and many 
other safeguards to prevent the loss of cash, raw materials 
are bought and used without adequate records being kept It 
is just as easy to lose merchandise by theft or carelessness as 
it is to have cash funds misappropriated. 
« « 4 

Chat. XiABts Rctnnu from Esstem TMp 

Charles Lantz, well-known to bakers throughout the country 
as general representative of the Sparks Milling Co., of Alton, 
111., recently returned to his headquarters in Chicago from a 
successful trip through the central and eastern states. He re- 
ports good business on Mor-doH Flour. Mr. Lantz states that 
some of the large bakers and jobbers in the parts he visited 
have accumulated stocks of flour on hand. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

I*oii1st111« Bakers Dlicius Cost of 

Production 

The Louisville Master Bakers' Association held a well at- 
tended meeting on Saturday evening, March 4, at which a num- 
ber of interesting topics were discussed concerning the cost of 
prodoclon. Arguments brought out showed that the actual 
cost of material at market prices tor one pound of dough were 
in the neighborhood of two and one-sixlh cents without figiiring 
the cost of labor or marketing. Labor has increased in cost 
considerably during the past few year?, a good journeyman bak- 
tr now receiving about $2.50 per day whereas ten years ago he 
received $1.50 per day. Theodore Von Bokerm, as chairman of 
the entertainment committee, is workinp on plans for the an- 
niversary meeting which will be held during the week following 
Easter. Arrangements are being made to hold a big euchre M. 
which all of the bakers' wive' and families will be present. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apul, 1916 



Trade Getters for the Live Baker 



Third Article in a Series by Frank Farrington* 



23. BEST ADVESnSEMENT CONTEST 
Interest in the store and in its stock may be increased 
greatly by oflering a series of priies for the best advertise- 
ments submitted in a contest. Make the conditions that the 
advertisements shall be suitable for use in newspaper space 
of your regular size, that they shall tell deBnitely about some 
one or more lines of goods you sell, quoting prices if possi- 
ble. Let one of the conditions be that the advertisements 
will be judged 10 some degree on a basb of the familiarity 
Ihey show with your store and stock. You can afford to 
make the prizes well worth while and to go into the contest 
with a good deal of a splui^e since the development of any 
considerable interest on the part of the public will mean 
many visits to your store, much consideration of its fea- 
tures and a great deal of talk all through the contest aa well 
as afterwards about the matter. Include in your explanations 
such information as the size of the space, the number of 
words of copy needed, the necessity for writing on only 
one side of the paper and writing plainly. While this contest 
might be made to appeal only to school children it would be 
worth while to make it open to all. An important thing in this as 
in other prize contests is to have a considerable number 
of secondary prizes so that people will be led to try with the 
feeling that though they may not have any chance of winning 
the chief prize, they will probably get something. 

24. AUVE WINDOW BELPS 

Motion of course attracts attention in a window, and any- 
thing alive is particularly likely to Stop the passer by. A 
good way to capitalize this fact is to engage two or three 
small boys and dress them in suits in imitation of teddy bears 
or other animals, and put them in the window to show your 
goods. Instruct the youngsters not to spend their time all 
in fooling, but allow them to do enough of that to keep the 
people outside looking. Have them work mainly at holding 
up goods or show cards before the observers. If the window 
is small, one boy may be all you can work at one time. In 
a large window there might be three. Their identity should 
be kepi a secret as that will help to keep the people guessing. 
They can call attention by motions to any special features 
you want to emphasize about the goods. Suits can be se- 
cured at a large toy store. A good arrangement of the win- 
dow in this case is to put the goods on shelves at the back 
or ends and leave the floor clear for the "animals." They 
can lake down articles from the shelves as needed It may be 
necessary for someone to stand behind the background and 
give the boys instructions as they work. 

25. MIS-SPELLED WOHB CONTEST 
In each weekly advertisement of the weekly newspaper, 
or in the daily paper on occasions place several purposely 
mis-spelled words. Offer a prize to each person finding all 
of them in any advertisement or in every advertisement for 
a certain number of issues. Give articles from the store 
as prizes, and make an offer that a coupon good for a certain 
amount of rebate on a purchase amounting to a dollar or 
more, will be given to everyone finding any spelling mis- 
takes in any adveriisment. Have it understood that no per- 
son can use more than one of these coupons on any one pur- 
chase and that the balance of the payment must be spot 

26. THE CHILDREK'S STOKE 

Even the store that sells nothing the children want to buy, 
can afford to take pains to make the children like to come 



■CoprriKht. 191S. by Pnak FarriiiKton 



there. This will result in its being easier for their mothers 
and fathers to shop there when they have to have the chil- 
dren with them, and if you are going to stay in business ten 
years, that is long enough for the children to become buyers 
themselves. Call children by their names; at all events don't 
call them "Sonny" and "Sis." When they are not alone you 
will hear their names if you listen and if they are alone you 
can ask. Oder occasional prizes for which the youngsters 
can compete, such as for the best figure of a cat cut out of 
black paper; the most words made out of the store's name; 
the best set of reasons why they like to come to your store, 
etc. Take pains with all children and show them anything 
they want to see. When they come on errands, wait on 
them promptly because they feel that their time is valuable 
to them and they don't like to stand around a store. They 
have a keen sense of the injustice of their being crowded out 
of their turn by some older person. Don't be satisfied with 
merely treating them as well as others do. Specialize in 
this and see if yon cannot develop the reputation for being 
the children's friend, and then advertise the fact that yours 
is the "Children's Store," and that you want them to come 
at all times, alone or with their parents, and that children 
sent there on errands will be given as careful service aa their 
parents. You cannot emphasize the "Children's Store" of 
course as a name when you do not sell and feature children's 
goods; but you can keep impressing the fact on the minds 
of the public that it is nevertheless a store where the chil- 
dren are really wanted. This means that your store will be 
popular with all. 

27. EXHIBITING A CUKIOSITV 

Almost any merchant can secure the loan of a beautiful 
painting or of some object of timely interest, or he can rent 
some such article from a source outside of his city. The 
properly handled exhibition of this in the store may be made 
to draw large crowds of people who will thus be shown the 
store and stock, and the plan affords a chance to get into 
the store those who otherwise never come there, people who are 
the regular customers of some other store. This article 
should if possible be displayed in a room by itself, and if 
there is no separate room available, in a screened off space. 
The line of approach to it should be past the most attractive 
stock you have to offer, with prices and descriptive cards 
in plenty. If the store and the town are large enough and 
the article shown of sufficient importance to keep people 
coming in considerable numbers air day, the exhibit may last 
all the time, but in most instances it will be better to exhibit 
only for certain hours in order that people may come in a 
crowd at the time. This makes it necessary to line them up 
and they may have to move slowly with the line through the 
store, thus having more time to see the goods you have ar- 
ranged to tempt them. There should be no effort to crowd 
people into making purchases when they come thus to see 
an exhibit. Let them feel comfortable and at ease as mere 
visitors, giving them a chance however to buy if they feel 
inclined. Of course the event should be well advertised be- 
cause its success depends upon a good attendance. 

28. AnvERTISMENT READING 

Make this standing offer in regard to your newspaper ad- 
vertising. Say that to anyone who will bring in a clipping 
of one of your advertisements pasted on a sheet of paper with 
a statement on the back, saying "This advertisement was read 
to me by So-and-so," and signed by ten adults in as many 
families; you will give a certain s 



Apul, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



75 



tad put on them a sign reading, "Ask me about these 

Henry." The request may mention the goods by name. The 
"Henry" represents the signature, wherein you use your first 
name. It is the distinct and unexpected personal touch that 
attracts attention and people who are not primarily interest- 
ed in the goods, will ask just because the sign tells them to 
do so Some will ask in a joking way, but all you care is 
that they ask. It is up to salesmanship to make the results 
Mt is factory, 

30. STOBG SINGING 

Such has become the popularity of Community Singing, 
where the general public are asked to come together in 
some open air spa.ce in the town and there, led by a com- 
petent musician and perhaps by a band, sing patriotic and 
popular songs, that the idea may be carried into store plans. 
This might be particularly effective in cold weather in towns 
whpre the outdoor singing has been conducted during the 
warm months. Carry out the idea by announcing that on a 
certain afternoon, or evening business will be suspended tem- 
porarily for singing which wilt be led by some competent 
person. The songs may be sung in five minute intervals and 
business may go on between the songs. There should be 
iome good accompaniment with piano or orchestra pieces. 
The public should be urged to come for the occasion and 
make sure of having at least enough singers to guarantee 
the success of the event. It may be necessary to have extra 
assistants to keep the crowd in good order. The event may 
be made successful in getting into the store people who arc 
not in the habit of coming there, who perhaps do not know 
ibout your store at all. 

31. CAMP rin. girls' benefit 

The interest and help of the members of such an organiza- 
tion can be of great value to a store and the following is a 
good way of enlisting it. OflFer to give the Camp Fire girls 
1 certain percentage of the sales on some special day on 
which they are to help in selling goods in the store. Have 



the whole membership come to the store in their camp fire 
costumes and do such things as they can do in the way of 
helping customers, carrying parcels inside the store and out, 
carrying change, wrapping goods, etc. If possible arrange 
a little reception space where the public may be received by 
the girls and visit with (hem if they have time. In a big 
store the girls might serve tea and wafers. Let the girls 
be sent around town with small parcels and on any possible 
errands. Their appearance on the street will remind folks 
of the fact that that day is your Camp Fire Day. The girls 
will naturally urge their friends to come and make purchases. 
If the store is not large enough to take care of the whole 
membership, have them present in relays, a third in the fore- 
noon, another third in the afternoon and the rest in the 
evening. If for any reason you do not want the public to 
know what your sales are for that day, do not mention the 
percentage the girls are to get except in making arrange- 
ments with their head who is to keep the figure confidential. 
Hence the gross amount received by the girls as a "benefit" 
will not indicate what your sales were. The same plan 
could be carried out with the Boy Scouts, and many stores 
have worked similarly with charitable organizations, giving 
ten per cent, of their receipts to the organization. 
3a, MONEY BACK DAY 

Great interest can be aroused by a store advertising that 
all money taken in on a certain day of some month is to be 
refunded to customers. Of course the date is not given but 
is selected by lot at the end of the month, or the date may be 
selected in advance and placed in a sealed envelope in neutral 
hands until the month is up. The advertising of the plan 
should be kept up throughout the month. One dealer of 
my acquaintance has for a long time made it his practice to 
select one day in each month as Money-Back Day and it has 
proved very profitable in increasing his trade. The postal 
authorities have sometimes refused to allow advertising 
of this plan to go through the mails, claiming that it belongs 
in the lottery classification. 



How to Stimulate the Bread Trade 
When Business is Dull 

Some Varieties of Breed that Pay and Get Popular 
Written Especially for Bakers Review by a Champion Gold Medallist and Cup Winner 
IN THE preceding article the preliminary points to be observed 
' in making brown and malt breads were touched upon, and 
1 general . summing up was reached as follows, viz., that plenty 
of yeast, cool liquors, short doughs and thorough cooking are 
needed for palatable, nourishing and good textured brown 
breads. 

The different types of brown bread were described in that 
article, and formulas are now given for a few of the everyday 

Brown or wheatmeal bread is very different to malt breads, 
ind as a general rule, contains no enriching ingredients. In 
Kood-sized bakeries it is made up in quarter and half sack 
batches, and where the daily trade in white bread is, say, ten 
or twelve sacks, about half a sack of plain brown bread is made. 
■\ good formula for such a quantity is as follows : 
[40 lbs. wheatmeal aVi lbs. yeast 

9 gals, water (go lbs.) 2^ lbs. salt 



lalt flour 

Mode :— Tip the meal in one end of a small trough or into 
die machine, as the tase may be. Dissolve the yeast and malt 
extract or malt flour in about half a gallon of the water at 
about 85° Fahr. and the salt in the remaining water, which 
mast be at a suitable heat to bring the dough to between 75 deg. 
and 80 deg. when it is made. 



There are various rules for determining the heal of the 
water for doughing purposes, but one of the easiest is to allow 
the water to be just about as much warmer than the required 
heat of the dough as the flour falls short of the latter. Thus, 
the dough is wanted at eighty degrees and the flour is fonod to 
be 65° ; therefore it is obvious that the water must be at least 
30° hotter than the flour, viz., 95°. The mixture ot water and 
flour, the one at 95° and the other at 65° will just about give the 
desired result. 

To be exact in this respect, the quantities mixed should be 
equal : in practice, however, there is much more cooler flour 
tlian warmer water, therefore the tendency would be to lose the 
heat; but this is counterbalanced in hand made doughs by the 
heat imparted to it in making, while in machine made dough the 
loss of heat by the contact with the cold metal is always allowed 
for, especially in the case of the first of a succession of doughs. 

The dough is then well mixed and here it is well to remem- 
ber that no half measures will do, and that the dough must be 
properly made ; no "slinging together," but equally as much 
dusting, folding and stretching as in the case of white dough. 

Take any line of goods you want people to find out more 
about, goods you want to introduce, for instance. Make a 
good display of these in a conspicuous place in the store 



76 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



l.el this dough lay for an hour to clear ; and ihen cut it back 
well and dust it up properly. 

In about 20 minutes it will be thrown out and scaled, the 
pieces being handed up in the ordinary way and then moulded 
to the shape of the tins that are being used. Tin brown bread 
is Invariably made in preference to any other shapes, as it is 
much more attractive, both to look at and for cutting purposes. 
The proving must be carefully watched, as a little too much is 
fatal for good-textured brown bread, and it must also be 
remembered that, as a cooler oven is needed, the bread will 
"grow" a bit in baking. Any definite time for the later stages 
is difficult to specify, but must be left to the judgment of the 
baker. One point is important, viz., that the bread must not 
be proved in too much steam but a moist heat is desirable. 

The baking, as previously remarked, must be thorough, or 
the bread will fail in cutting qualities; but, if it be properly 
carried out, the moisture will be retained and the keepmg proper- 
ties considerably improved. 

An addition of a few pounds of good strong white flour is 
frequently made to the above dough, and will result in a some- 
what bulkier loaf— about 20 pounds is the average quantity for a 
half sack batch — it should be well mixed through the meal 
before the liquor is added. 

The quantity of water given is approximate and must always 
be finally decided by the baker, as various meals will be found to 
be much stronger and softer, in fact, the same brands varj' from 



In the ilhistralion given below, four types of brown and malt- 
ed breads are shown. 



fruited Mall Plain Brown or Malted Brown Malted Loaf 
Loaf IVhoUmcal L,oaf Loaf Under Tin 

The fruited malt loaf is a big favorite in Rond class districts 
and i» now being more frequently sold as .1 wrapped loaf. 

A big trade is done by several wholesale Lakers with bread 
of this type, which, on account of ihc difficulty of baking, is 
often neglected by the very small baktr'. who prefer to buy 
it ready wrapped for retail trade. While in its ideal form, this 
sort of bread is baked very slowly at a low temperature so as 
lo be extremely moist and possess considerable keeping proper- 
ties — three weeks is quite a reasonable time — Were are many 
modified forms in which it can be made from the small bakers' 
point of view with the advantage that he can sell it as his own 
make and not be just an agent for a proprietary article. 

Here is a formula for a fruited loaf which will give every 
satisfaction. 

2 gals, water (zo lbs.) 8 oz, lard or margarine 

6 oz. powdered milk 8 lbs. currants or raisins 

12 oz. yeast 4 d- malt flour 

g oz. salt 30-32 lbs. malted meal 

Mode : — Place the meal into a suitable-sized bowl, add the 
fruit, salt and milk powder, then rub in the fat. Whisk the 



yeast and mall flour down in about a quart of the liquor and let 
ihe balance of (he latter be taken up at such a heat as to give 
a temperature of about 80 degrees when the dough is made. Mix 
the dough well, and let it remain for 45 minutes, then knock it 
up properly and cover down again for a further half hour, 
when it will be ready for scaling. These loaves are usually 
made in round or oval pans, at about 1 lb. each, and need careful 
proving and rather slow cooking. They can be washed over 
eitiier before or after baking as preferred. 

UALTD) BEOWN LOAVES 

2 gals, water (20 lbs.) 8 oz. lard or margarine 

6 ot. powdered milk 8 oz. golden syrup 

12 oz, yeast 24 lbs, malted meal 

8 oz. salt 3 oz. malt extract 

Mode : — As described in the previous formula, dissolving tlie 
s>rup with the yeast and malt. Let the dough prove for an hour, 
knock it back well and in another fifteen minutes it can be 
scaled at the required weights. The pieces will be moulded and 
left a few minutes to recover slightly, then re-moulded to the 
shape of the tins being used. Prove in a comfortable tempera- 
ture without steam, it is usually sulGcient to cover the loaves 
with a damp cloth covered again with a dry one to keep in the 
moisture. One pound loaves should be baked at least an hour, 
the heat being a good deal less than for white loaves. 

The fourth loaf depicted is of the under tin or sandwich 
type, and is the form in which such patent breads as Bermaline, 
Carr's Malt, etc., are usually made. It is a very attractive loaf 
provided that the tin is the proper size to hold an amount of 
dough that will fill it out when proved to the point at which an 
even, good -textured crumb is secured. 

The dough can be of the same type as the upright loaf, though 
it is advisable to have it a little stiffer to avoid contraction 
after baking. The tins should have small holes in the bottoms 
or they will often "lift" during baking owing to the imprisoned 
air. They will usually be baked on trays especially if the o\en 
carries a good bottom heat, and must, like (he other kinds_ be 
well baked. 

In addition to the larger loaves described, several varieties 
of small bread especially suitable for the tea table are made in 
some districts. The shapes can be any of those illustrated last 
month in the milk bread section of these articles. For a small 
quantity use the following dough : 
2 qts. water (5 lbs.) 3 oz, salt 

4 oz, powdered milk 4 ot. yeast 

6 oz, lard or butter 3-9 lbs. meat 

4 oz, syrup i oz. malt extract 

Mode :^Make up as described previously and let the dough lie 
for an hour. Scale in V/i hours from making and mould into the 
required shapes allowing from two to three ounces for each 
roll. Prove to a nice size, eps wash carefully and bake in a 

Another type of special digestive malt bread is given below, 
containinB chemicals in addition to yeast, which results in quite 
a different eating bread possessing distinct dietary qualitie. 

2 qts. water (5 lbs.) 2 oz. cream powder 

3 oz. yeast iVi oz. carb. soda 
3 oz. sugar I oz. malt flour 
3 oz. milk powder 4 oz, (at 

2 oz. salt 8 lbs, wheatmeal 4 oz. golden syrup 

Mode : — Weigh the meal, sieve the salt, chemicals and milk 
powder on it, and rub in the fat. Dissolve the yeast, sugar, 
syrups and malt in the water at about 90-9S degrees, and well 
mix the dough. The fermentation must be kept down in this 
case owing to the action of the chemicals in the bread. An 
hour from making the dough is quite sufficient to the scaling 
stage and the proofing must be kept low as the bread will ex- 
pand a good deal in baking. This type ol bread is sometimes 
dusted thickly with flour or meal before baking. Any kind of 
rolls or typical tin or coburg shapes can be made from this 
dough, the bread from which will appeal to many palates, as it 
i^ of a lighter nature than most of the brown and malt breads. 



Wholesale 



iortlM basT ^akr 
•r ot Uwg« atfalts. 
nam and pntb* 



A Qvuuxwl Rartew cit tbm VHiolttsal* TnUI* and I>lsGiusii»B of Pcactlcal PtoU«bu 



Completing the Bread-Selling Circle 

Campaign to Consumer and Dealer is Inadeguate Unless Wagon Men Are Interested Also 
Written for Bakers Review by G. D. Grain, Jr. 



THE chief problem of the wholesale baker who is (rying 
to increase sales is to get all o( the factors involved 
working together to the best advantage. 

He spends money for advertising, so as to interest the 
consumer; he works out a special "deal" for the grocer and 
other retailers, so as to have their co-operation and interest; 
hut, strange to say, the wagon man, the direct representative 
of ihe baker, is often overlooked, and possibilities for increas- 
ing the effectiveness of the campaign are not taken ad- 
vantage of. 

The complete selling circle must take into account the 
wifon man as well as the retail distributor and the consumer; 
for while it is possible to put on a successful campaign with- 
out having the full co-operation of the drivers, there is no 
grtting away from (he proposition that better results can al- 
ways be obtained if their interest and enthusiasm have been 

EVIDENCE OF THE WAGON MEN's IMPORTANCE 

The importance of this feature can be evidenced in 
another way, and that is by comparing the expenditure in- 
volved. The concern which is compelled to go into the daily 
newspapers with large space in order to get all of the possible 
ronsumers of its product interested is certainly spending big 
money; and if samples for free distribution are put in the 
hands of the dealers, who are after given their regular profit 
on goods handled in this way, that also means a big outlay 
of money. 

If the expenditure of an exceedingly small percentage of 
what must be appropriated to get the ball rolling in the man- 
ner suggested will hook up the wagon-men to the campaign 
«ifectively, it is certainly good business to authorize it. In 
(act, it is folly not to do so, considering how little it will 
lake to turn the trick, and how much more resultful the 
campaign may be if the direct representatives of the baker 
take the proper amount of interest in the campaign. 

Just because the wagon men have to handle what may be 
regarded as the purely mechanical features of the business, 
the actual distribution of the goods from the plant to the 
bo«s and cases of the retailers, their possibilities along con- 
structive selling lines may easily be forgotten. But they are 
there; and no matter whether the baker may regard his out- 
side men as high-grade in regard to selling ability, or fit only 
!or the simplest tasks, there is an opportunity to work up a 
plan of co-operation that will help at every step of the way. 

One of the simplest and at the same time most effective 
w»ys to get the wagon-men interested in increasing thir sales 
is to conduct a prize contest at the time that a campaign 
may be running. It is possible that such a contest might 
work at other times as well; but just now the point to be 



3 take 



stressed is that it is wise to get them interested in the general 
proposition of pushing the special campaign as hard as Ihey 
can, even if they arc not given an injection of pepper at any 
other time. 

A certain baker, who has managed his own busin 
well that he has had to build a couple of large plants t 
care of its steady increase, is of the opinion that a contest 
in which the men have a chance to add to their earnings is 
one of the best possible stimulants to the business. 

THE CONTEST STIMULATES ENEBGV 

"I should consider any special campaign of ours far from 
complete," he asserted, "if the wagon-men were not included 
by means of some special offer. We devote a lot of atten- 
tion to making the plan attractive to the consumer and the 
dealer; and it is just as important, in my opinion, that some- 
thing be done to insure the hearty co-operation of our driv- 
ers, who after all are our salesmen, even though their selling 
work is usually of the most elementary nature. However, 
thy arc capable of being trained to do better work, and one 
way to get their interest aroused is by offering prizes in con- 
nection with a campaign which the bakery may be putting 

This wholesaler is of the opinion that it is not wise to have 
prizes hung up right along, believing that the idea would 
soon lose its novelty and interest; on the other hand, the 
average bakery is working along about the same lines all the 
time, and a regular system of bonus payments to those whose 
records showed that they were doing the best work, might 
help to keep interest up continuously, instead of concentrat- 
ing it during the periods when the company was going after 
new business by means of general advertising and special 
work with the dealer. 

Another point to be taken into consideration in planning 
the use of prizes with the wagon-men is that they : 
all on the same fooling, to start with. Some of the me 
longer or better routes, and to say that the prizes would go 
to those making the greatest increase, in dollars and cents, 
would not be fair to the men with less prosperous sections 
to work in, whose sales opportunities would consequently be 
more restricted. The percentage plan of figuring increases 
thus appears to be the most equitable, although if the number 
of prizes used is great enough there could be awards for gross 
as well as percentage increases. 

There should certainly be a sufficient number of prizes 
hung up to make each man feel that he had a good chance to 
get something. The number will vary with the number of 
wagons the bakery is using, but there should be enough to 
enable 15 per cent, or more of the men to share in Ihe 
awards. The greater the number of prizes given, the more 






7S 



BAKERS REVIEW 



fcitthusiasm and hard work will be brought obL And as the 
.object is to get the wagon-men as a whole to bring all the 
increased pressure they can to bear on the retailers, it is well 
to remember that the contest should be planned along lines 
lliat will interest everybody. 

Cash is the most generally desirable prize material, be- 
cause every man will appreciate an award of that kind. The 
principal prizes should therefore be given in money, while 
the minor ones might be in merchandise, as a better showing 
can usually be made with a limited amount of money when 
converted into goods than otherwise. But the amount of 
money appropriated can be varied to suit the size of the busi- 
ness, the extent of the campaign and other factors which 
each baker is in the best position to decide for himself. 

The duration of the prize contest is another feature of the 
proposition which should not be lost sight of. Ordinarily a 
contest should not be so long as to risk loss of interest on 
the part of thdse participating; on the other hands, it should 
be coincident with the general campaign. Usually a month 
will cover the work of introducing a new line and getting 
distribution, as under those conditions, provided the goods 
have been properly introduced by advertising to the public 
and the dealers, the proposition should be a familiar feature 
of the situation. That means that the price contest for the 
wagon-men should be made to run about that long. 

TWO WEEKS TO A MONTH ABOtTT RIGHT FOB A PRME CONTEST 

Bakers interviewed in this regard expressed themselves as 
believing that anywhere from two weeks to a month was about 
the right period. Less than two weeks would hardly give the 
men a chance to get into their stride, and to develop all of 
the prospects which they might have been working up in the 
meantime; and longer than a month would dull the keen edge 
of their enthusiasm, and make it more difficult to keep the 
tension and the interest up. 

After all, while offering cash prizes and thus providing a 
material consideration is necessary, the real feature is getting 
the men into the correct mental condition. That is, it is 
their enthusiasm and hearty co-operation that the baker 
must secure, rather than simply a selfish and sordid desire 
to get the additional money. Thus something more than the 
prizes themselves are needed. Meetings should be held, to dis- 
cuss the progress of the campaign; information regarding the 



April, 1916 

advertising should be put in the hands of the men, so as to 
give their interest something to feed upon; and every feature 
of importance should be made use of, so that the men can 
"warm up" gradually to the proposition, and be inclined to 
talk the advertised line to the dealers of their own volition, 
rather than because they have been instructed to do so. 

A baker who has put over many a successful selling cam- 
paign, and who is regarded in his own community as one of 
the most progressive members of the trade, emphasized re- 
cently the importance of winning the co-operation of the 
wagon- men in a special drive for new business, such as is 
frequently put on by a large wholesale bakery. 

"We have found that while it is impossible to get lOo per 
cent efficiency out of these men," he said, "it is easily prac- 
ticable to bring about a marked increase in sales, no matter 
what the proposition advertised may be. It may be a new 
size or shape of loaf; a new kind of bread, such as salt- 
rising, that we have not marketed before; a specialty in the 
way of a cake, or something of that sort; but, no matter what 
the item, getting the men really interested through offering 
a bonus or prize of some kind always plays a part in making 
for the increased business that is desired. 

VITAL THAT WACOM UEN PUT IN THEIE BFST LICKS 

"In this connection a very important point is that while 
the big drive is on, with lots of money being spent for ad- 
vertising and in other ways, it is vital that the wagon men 
put in their best licks. In other words, we must get distribu- 
tion in the shortest possible time, and it is up to them to ac- 
complish it If their interest has been stimulated by a chance 
at attractive cash prizes, we can rely upon this important 
feature of the work being properly attended to, and thus the 
stage set, as it were, for successful application of the ad- 
vertising. Retail distribution is the fundamental element, afor 
unless that is provided much of the value of the advertising 
will be lost 

"That is another reason why we try to make our plan at- 
tractive in some way to the dealer, so that he will be ready to 
co-operate with 'is. In short, we have three factors to con- 
sider—our own representatives, the dealer and the public, and 
any sales plan that does not take account of all of these is 
sure to fall short." 



TlM Baking Industry and Pio fli ' — 

"Chicago Master Bakers' Association" Calls for Technical 
Education 

Among the trades supplying the daily necessaries of life, the 
1)aking industry particularly has in recent years, placed its opera- 
lions and methods, more and more upon a scientific basis re- 
quiring technical knowledge that can be acquired only by study. 
Baking and its products are subjected to the most rigid criti- 
cism, for it is well known that here we have to deal with an 
art purely domestic in its origin, and still a favored occupation 
of the industrious housewife who is not otherwise too much en* 
Raged, unless she feels assured that the bread supplied bj' the 
baker is always of the same good quality and pleasant taste, 
meeting all requirements as to volume, texture and odor. 

There is no room for Ruess-work in a bakery plant operated 
upon scientific principle. "Accident" is eliminated, lor the baker 
is fully acquainted with the many chemical changes that take 
place in his wares from the moment the dough is mixed, until 
the finished loaf reaches the consumer. Selecting the proper 
materials and applying proper baking methods, he is always in 
a position to satisfy the demands of the fastidious American 
liousewife by the quality, appearance and taste of his product. 

The study of technical science heretofore has not met with 
that general interest among the baking industry that prevailed 
in many other branches of trade. The Chicago Master Bakers' 
Association, an organization of progressive bakers and business 



s thorough ii 



men, have developed a scientific course 

The course for bakery operations established at the Siebel 
Institute of Technology was found, upon investigation, to meet 
all expectations, teaching, as it does, science, theory and practice, 
of the trade on the broadest scale in the lecture rooms, laborator- 
ies and experimental baking and milling plants at the spadous 
Institute buildings, 960-962 Montana street, Chicago, 111. 

The Master Bakers' Association petitioned the Institute to 
conduct a special course for their members, twenty-five of whom 
enrolled their names as students. This request was acceded to, 
and the course is now well in progress. Many of the most 
prominent and active members of the association are in attend- 
ance, and judging from the great interest manifested by them 
in the various studies taken up, they seem to realize more and 
more the correctness of their step, and to expect the most favor- 
able results for their future business success therefrom. 
* "♦ ♦ 
H«w Blscnlt TtmOm HUks 

The following new trade marks for biscuit have been applied 
tor at the U. S. Patent Office : 

Ser. No. 91,227 — Word Yo-Ho, with suitable illustration, for 
pilot wafers, by Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co., New York, N. Y„ and 
Kansas City, Mo, ^^ i 

Ser. No. 91,944— word Iris, for bif^tftt^jjiQlg^iaill^iscuit 
Co., Jersey City, N. J., and New York, N. Y. O 



AfUL, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Importance and Value of Knowing and 
Understanding Your Costs 



(Hole: The following was prepared by L. V. Estes, Inc., of 
Chicago, under the direaion of the National Association of Mas- 
ter Bakers. It is Letter No. i of a Cost Accounting Series, to 
be issued from the same source. It indicates that the N. A. 
U. B. is aiming to be of tangible, constructive service to the 
American bakers.] 

rtUT of a quarter of a million of incorporated businesses in the 
" United States, over 190,000 make less than $5,000.00 a year 
and more than 100,000 make nothing at all. Such are the facts 
recently disclosed by a national canvass undertaken by the Fed- 
oa) Trade Commission. The record for unincorporated busi- 
nesses may be assumed to be similar. 

A large majority of the* 100,000 that make nothing at all are 
doomed to fail eventually. Let us quote from the actual record 
of <me typical American city of about 35,000 population in the 
middle west, which shall be nameless. 

In 1885 this city had thirty-three factories, nineteen retail 
groceries and seven wholesale or jobbing establishments. Thir^ 
of lie factories, all of the retail and five of the wholesale estab- 
liduaents doing business in 1885, have broken down and made 
way for others. 

Why this high rate of business mortality? The trouble was 
nc* with the city, whic" was and still is prg^perous, 
progressive and growing community. The city was all right. 
The business failures were due to weakness in the businesses 
themselves. A detailed analysis of this list of failures showed 
that a majority of them were due, not to lack of capital, over- 
bojing or poor location, but to bad aecounltng. 

Backed by such facts as these we do not hesitate to assert 
that no competitive business, however small, can long endure 
without a thorough and accurate system of accounting and 
cost records. Such records are just as indispensable to the 
success of a business as charts and compass to a ship at sea. 
Tiey show the location of the shoals that threaten disaster; 
ihey indicate the channels in which the water is deep and safe; 
th«y point surely and steadily the course to be followed. 

Edward N. Hurley, vice-chairman of the Federal Trade Com- 
mission, has pointed out the importance of this subject in the 
'allowing words : — 

The fact must be admitted that in order to put a selling price 
00 a product a manufacturer must first know what it costs to 
manufacture and sell it. When business was done on a large 
petentage of profit this was not so essential, but in most lines 
of industry to-day the large percentage of profit has passed. 
Manofacturers are working on smaller margins and must abso- 
hitely know what their goods cost. Any unreliable method of 
Mnving at cost figures, with margins of profit so close, must 
be eliminated. 

It is a fact wet! understood among business men that the 
geatral demoralization in a large number of industries has been 
onsed by firms who cut prices not knowing what their goods 
wtnally cost to manufacture: and the cost of selling, which is 
«|Mlly important, is almost wholly lost sight 01. 

A maimfacturer who does not know viith a close degree of 
tcariuy ishat it costs him to produce the different articles he 
^imfaehires and what il costs him to sell them, is not in a 
tonlion to inlelltgenlly meet competition, and invites business 



Many of the larger manufacturers have thorough cost ac- 
Monting systems, which they recognize as necessary in order to 
nve them the information essential to successful management. 
^ the other hand, the numter of smaller manufacturers who 
"»c no adequate cost accounting systems, and who price their 
KoMs arbitrarily, is amazing. 

Pnprr accounting for the smaller manufacturer is most 
rjifrtat It is necessary for his success that he know on what 
"£? ^rt'cle he is making a fair profit and on what he is 
™*mf only a narrow margin of profit or losing money. If he 



has this information he can concentrate on the manufacture and 
sale of the product on which the profits are satisfactory. 

Whole industries, in many instances, are suffering from a gen- 
eral lack of intelligent knowledge of costs. 

We believe the baking industry is suffering from this general 
lack. No baking establishment, however small, can afford to 
operate on the hit or miss plan. AH the problems that hove to 
be met in the largest bakeries are present in the smtdler plants 
and must have careful consideration. 

No baker can determine profits from the cash in his drawer 
or the balance at his bank. He must consider fixed salaries 
for himself and the members of his family; interest on his in- 
vestment; and annual depredation of his buildings, machinery, 
fixtures, delivery equipment, etc. 

He must employ accurate methods of stock keeping and charg- 
ing of materials; must inventory his assets at regular intervals; 
and must consider other factors which he may have thought 
would affect only the largest concerns. 

The most important thing is to get all these elements of 
expense into costs, and then to sell at a fair profit above that 

More thought, rather than harder work, is necessary for 
success in modem business. Among the premature failures dis- 
closed by the Federal Trade Commission canvass, were many 
of the hardest working and apparently most deserving men. 
They worked loo hard and thought loo little. They stayed on 
the job from early till late; they never took a real vacation, 
some of them not even an occasional outing; they scrimped on 
their living expenses so as to leave as much capital as possible 
in the business ; in short they made themselves literal slaves to 
their business. And yet they failed. Why? Because they over- 
looked the first essential of business success — a common-sense, 
business-like system of accounting and cost records. 

The purpose of this series of letters is to assist members of 
the National Association of Master Bakers to put the industr> 
on a fundamentally sound basis so far as the leading haiard of 
business (lade of accounting and cost records) is concerned. It 
is anticipated that members will examine their own businesses 
in the light of these statements, and that many will come to 
realize their truth and act accordingly. 



A New Book on ''Cuban Cane Sngar^ 

"Cuban Cane Sugar" is the title of a little book by Robert 
Wiles recently published, that should prove attractive, not 
only to investors and prospective investors in the great 
sugar industry in our neighboring Island Republic, but also 
to all sugar users, as it tells in an interesting fashion, with- 
out technicality, of the vastness and importance of the cane 
sugar industry in Cuba. The style of Mr. Wiles' narrative 
is very entertaining, and reveals the development of an in- 
dustry of astonishing magnitude. This development is due 
largely to the infusion of American capital recently on a 
large scale. 

The book demonstrates that the production of Cuban 
Sugar is one of the world's largest single enterprises, and 
that more American capital is now being invested in it than 
in any industry outside of the United States. 

The statistics given in the book arc reliable and it becomes, 
therefore, a valuable hand book to investors. 

published by The Bobbs-Merrill Company, of Indian*^ 
p^ copy. 



apolis and New York, and is sold at 75 c 



IE V I E W 



April, ig[6 



OttBvral BaUag Co.*s Jlntinal StatvmMit 

The General Baking Company, $M,oOo,ooo bakery corporation, 
has issued its annual statement to the stockholders of the 
company, whicii shows a net profit for the year of $3£2,325.5g. 

President W. H. Collins has issued the following statement: 

To The Stock holdebs : — 

The balance sheet of the company as at December 25, 1915, 
and the profit and loss account for the year endin;; that date 
is submitted herewith : 

The net profit for the year after making full pro- 
vision for depreciation of the company's plants 
and property and after deducting bond and 
other interest, amounts to $ 322,iiS-20 

To this should be added the surplus at December 
26, igi^, of 



Making a total of 

Dividends have been paid on the 
preferred stock as follows: ' 
April I, igis 1% $59,250.01 

July I, 191S 1% 59.250a 

Oct. I, 1915 1% 59.250a 

Jan. I, 1916 1% .S9.2so,oc 



$1,205,173.5) 



Leaving undisturbed surplu) 
25. 191S. of 



8,173-58 



The net profits for the year are equivalent to 544% on the 
preferred stock of the company, out of which dividends ag- 
gregating 4% were paid for the year. The accumulated dividends 
on the preferred stock now amount to I3J4%. and deducting 
the amount of this from the undistributed surplus leaves 5,3% 
for the common stock of the company. 

The sum of $209,012.28 was charged off against the profits for 
depreciation of the plants of the company, thus continuing the 
policy which has been adopted since the inception of the com- 
pany of making a liberal provision for depreciation. The re- 
-serves for depreciation have now reached the sum of $661,663.10, 
as shown on the accompanying balance sheet, all of which lias 
been created out of the earnings of the company. 

The profits of the past year were adversely affected by the 
high cost of flour and other materials. The sales increased sat- 
isfactorily and with economies made in the operating expenses, 
this high cost was overcome lo a large extent. Unlike many 
other industries, it is, however, not possible to meet an increase 
in raw material with an increase in the selling price. With 
the prolongation of the European war, the great demand for 
wheat and flour will no doubt continue and correspondingly high 
prices will prevail, so that the baking industry will, on the whole, 
he under disadvantages while these conditions exist. 

Our bakery at Wheeling, W. Vs.. was destroyed bj- fire 
towards the close of the year, but the property was full\- pro- 
tected by insurance and immediate steps were taken to safe- 
guard the business from disturbance. The plant is again in 
operation by the erection of a temnorary structure ana pwns are 
now being prepared for the establishment of an entirely new 
bakery in that locality. 

The company has purchased an additional bakery in Rochester, 
N. Y., to take the place of one the lease of which was shortly 
to expire. Apart from this, the expenditure during the past 
year for additions and improvements of a permanent nature 
was of little consequence. The company has arranged to erect 
a new bakery at Steubenvllle, Ohio, which will shortly be in 
operation. 

The secured gold notes, amounting to $400,000, due on March 
I, 1915, were all paid off at maturity and the General Baking 
Company bonds, held as collateral, were released and are now 
m the company's tr Asury. 



Mattonal Blseolt Co.'* Tui 

Even though remarkable conditions in the baking industry 
caused a marked falling off in the earnings of many firms, the 
National Biscuit Co., the largest flour -consuming concern in 
America, was able to earn a margin over the 7 per cent, divi- 
dends on both common and preferred stocks. 

It is understood that the volume of sales showed a decline 
of about 5 per cent., but this is regarded as extremely small in 
view of the generally depressed business conditions over the 
greater part of the year. 

For the fiscal year ended January 31, 1916, nei applicable to 
dividends was $4,129,791 against $4,520,402 in the previous year. 
While this was a decline of $390,611 or 8.6 per cent, the balance 
for the common stock after 7 per cent, dividends on the pre- 
ferred and the usual depreciation charges of $300,000 was equiva- 
lent to S.18 per cent. 

The earnings and dividend record of the National Biscuit 
Co. for the past four years follows : 

1915-16 1914-15 1913-14 1912-13 

•Profits .$4.'20.79I $4,520,402 $5,168,018 $4,539,379 

Dividends ... 3.782,835 3.782,835 3,782.835 .I.78233S 

Surplus 346.956 737,567 1.385.183 756,544 

P & L surp . 14,772,796 14,425,839 13,688,272 12,303,089 
Earnd on com 8.18% 9.52% ii.74'^f 9.59^ 

• After deducting $300,000 depreciation. 

The financial strength of the company and its steady expansion 
over the period is further brought out in the following table. 
showing the growth of working capital : 

1916 1915 1914 1913 

Cash .$4,158,418 $4,593,900 $3,463,985 S3.9I0,.^78 

Stks&secs.. 1.117459 815,254 909.948 785,486 

Ace rec 3.196,259 3,240,235 3.532,333 3.168,356 

5.546,043 5,280.84s 5,510,415 5,225,060 



Tot cur ns. $14,018,179 $13,930,234 $13416,681 $13,089,280 

Ace. pay 411,958 350,281 465,165 485,816 

Wkg cap.... $13,606,321 $13,579,953 $12,951416 $12,593,464 

The National Biscuit Co. expended something over $600,000 
on plant extensions and improvements last year. 



Iiooss-Wltes BurnlBSB Dttcrsaa* 

The year 1915 showed a decrease of $326,527 in the net profit* 
of the Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co., as compared with 1914. The 
annual statement of the company shows net profits of $386,271 
for 1915; for the previous year the amount was $712,798; for 
1913, $792,236. Operations for the year ending December 31 
compare as follows : 

1915 1914 1913 

Net Profits $386,271 $712,798 $792,236 

Miscel, Income 36,099 18,379 60.144 

Totals $422,371 , $731,177 $852,380 

General expenses 54,574 68,625 68,816 

Special publicity exp 137,786 132.153 175,000 

Interest 107,467 26,897 6,750 

Net $122,543 $503,502 $601,814 

1st pref. dividends 344,050 ,150,000 350,000 

2d pref. dividends 140,000 140,000 

Surplus *$22I,507 $13,502 $111,814 

• Deficit. 

In his report to the stockholders, President Loose says : "At 
no time within the last thirty-five years have outside influences 
had such a marked effect upon the prices of all raw materials 
entering into the company's products — the prices of such com- 
modities as flour, sugar, shortening, chocolate a"d other in- 
gredients, having reached almost unheard of high levels. Your 



APiiL. 1916 

lEiKiors were reluctant to disturb prices of its commodities, and, 
ilittoogh the disappointment of hopes of an earlier termination 
ai the war and restoration of more normal prices for raw 
miterial fiaally compelled a very moderate increase in the 
stlling price of box or bulk goods, the benefit of those increases 
vcre not reflected to any great extent in the year's operation. 
Yoar directors have deemed it advisable to suspend for the year 
the regular provision it has heretofore been the policy of the 
forapanr to make for depreciation, and as a consequence no 
rharge appears under this head for 1915." 



With tlM Trmd« in BBgUnd 

|By our Correspondent) 

NOW that the Government has taken up in earnest the question 
of freightage, there has been a great deal of questioning 
liifly, one way or another, on the Government's actions in re- 
mrd to their entry into the wheat market. A contract has been 
(onchided for the purchase of a certain amount of Rumanian 
inahi which will be spread over a period of several months, the 
graia to be held at the Government's disposal in Rumania and 
exported after the war, or as soon as export facilities permit. 
Tie rates of freight, says Mr. Runciman, now being paid on 
Kheai from North America, whence almost all the imported 
vhtat being offered for current delivery in this country is de- 
rived, represent about 20 per cert, of the value of the wheat 
in this country. The rates of freightage from Australia repre- 
sent about 30 per cent, of the current value of imported wheat 
in English ports. The freight on a ton of wheat from the former 
rtpresents about one-sixth, and the freight from the latter about 
one-fourth of the value of the bread made from a ton of wheat. 
It must be remembered, however, that the freight on the wheat 
covers the carriage not only of that part of the wheat which is 
made into bread, but also of the offals produced in milling the 

A conference of the millers in this country has just been 
h«ld, when some strong remarks were uttered aneni the Gov- 
tmnient's actions. The meeting was not allowed to be reported 
—at least, not that portion of it dealing with the safeguards 
ukeo by the Government to maintain adequate Stocks of wheat. 
'JfiMinj;" commenting on the pseudo-secret buying by the Gov- 
tmment in the open market, and holding the wheat thus bought, 

If the present inflation oE prices continues, the proletariat of 
this country, who have been repeatedly told that the world's 
htrvest is the largest ever known, will not lay the blame on 
Lord Selbome or Mr. Runciman, nor on the speculators in 
Amerii^ nor the wheat dealers in Canada, nor the farmers of 
Ai^enlina, nor even the shipowners of this country, but on 
those who seem immediately responsible for the high prices, 
we mean the bakers and millers. Already we see in the news- 
papers articles slating that the rise in the price of bread must 
'top. We tell our readers plainly that it is they who will be 
hlamed if the result of the Government scheme of wheat stor- 
age is to send up prices still further, and so to make the loaf 
dearer. They had better consider whether, in the unhappy 
event of anything like a bread riot, they will be able to persu- 
ade an angry crowd that the fact that bread is approaching lod. 
and 1/- a loaf is due not to the baker and not to the miller, 
bot to the fact that the Government have mishandled the situa- 
tion in this country and induced a speculative fever in America. 
That is not the sort of explanation that will go down with peo- 
ple who are ignorant of the whole facts of the case, especially 
laving regard to the attitude which has been adopted by mem- 
bers of the Government in their public references to millers ever 
5iiice the beginning of the war. « * * « * 

We are as certain as we are of anything that the millers and 
merchants would have provided the country with wheat, and 
had the market been left alone the British consumer would have 
l>cen several million pounds in pocket. It would have been per- 
fectly legitimate for the Government to say to the trade "if 
yon allow reserves and stotjcs to go below the minimum we shall 
coniinandeer all stocks, establish a monopoly, and import for 
oursdves." That would have been perfectly fair and reasonable. 
What is neither fair nor reasonable is for the Government to 
nttcrfcre and dislocate a trade, to send the market up shillings a 



BAKERS REVIEW 



quarter, to arouse a speculative mania in America, and then for 
the President of the Board of Trade to insinuate that the rise 
in prices is in some way due to millers, who are only being held 
in check by the sagacious heads of the Board of Trade and the 
Board of Agriculture. 

This shows the feeling of the milling trade on the matter, and 
the journal proceeds to suggest several schemes, particularly 
two, which, if adopted would have been far better than the 
Government's plans ; i. e., either the building np of a reserve of 
English wheat, or of leaving it to the millers and merchants 
themselves to carry extra stocks, at the same time insuring 
them against more than a certain loss, and thus avoiding the in- 
tervention of the Government in any wheat market. 

A CUKIOUS CASE OP UHDERSELUNG 

And from wheat we turn to bread, and the price thereof. 
Rather a curious complaint was uttered the other day in regard 
to underselling. Some bakers complained that they were being 
imdersold, not by bakers, but by the sale of loaves set aside 
from one of the internment camps, this bread being sold at 4 
rents a loaf. An explanation was offered that many of the 
prisoners did not touch their rations, as they Iiad food sent 
them from friends. The rise in the price to 10 cents, has, on 
the whole, been accepted in a matter-of-fact way by the public, 
whilst in some quarters it is asserted that this price is unwar- 
rantable, and the baker ought to produce the loaf, and with 
profit, for a trifle under 14 cents. This is, of course, absurd, 
and only a newspaper bluff, but nevertheless, such sayings do not 
help the baker in his difficult task. Why, flour alone is over 
100 per cent, higher in price than before the war ! 

Although 19 cents is the price generally for the 4-lb. loaf, 
there is a remarkable varience up and down the country, as the 
following table will show : 

London — 

N.andN.W i&y, cents Lanes and Cheshire. 17!^ " 

E. and N. E 18 " Midlands 17 

S. E 18V2 " Eastern Counties . .17 " 

S, W i8/i " Southern Counties .18 

W. and W. C iQ " Scotland 17^ " 

N. Counties and S. W. Counties and 

Yorks 18 cents Wales 17 

or on an average for Gt, Britain of 175^ cents. The above 
figures are compiled from ofhcial tables published each month, 
and are therefore only partially, correct. For instance, in Wick 
the loaf is 20 cents; Dublin 18 cents and Belfast 17 cents; Aber- 
deen 15 and 16 cents, Dundee 17 cents, Edinburgh iS cents 
and Glasgow 16 and 17 cents. The Glasgow grocers, by the 
way, are complaining of the profit they receive for selling bread. 
One man stated at a meeting of the association that he was 
actually losing $2.50 per week on his bread sales. The grocers 
wanted the bakers to go back to the old-fashioned way under 
which the bakers sold the bread to the shop-keepers at the 
retail price, and then gave a 10 per cent, discount on the sales. 
This the bakers could not agree to, and the grocers thereupon 
decided to put on a half-cent when the loaf was wrapped and 
sent out. But why bother about it at all! The Belfast bak- 
ers' association have quite a good way of fixing the price 
of bread and cakes. They have a scale-list which, of course, has 
to be altered whenever a rise is warranted. A committee Ol 
investigation is appointed, who make tests of the various goods 
on the list, and ascertain the percentage of profit existing 
weights represent. The results are often a revelation, and in 
consequence, the manufacture of a number of articles which 
show an unprofitable margin, are discontinued. A weight- 
testing scheme also helps this scheme. The secretary of the 
association calls without notice, but during the same week, at 
the factories of the members, and the goodi he selects arc 
weighed in his presence, and a tabulated memorandum of the 
results are presented to the monthly meeting of the association. 
It appears to the writer that this is a scheme worthy of adoption . 



BA KERS REVIE W 



April, 1916 



generally and would thus save a lot of underselling not only in 
bread, but smalls and fancies generally. 

NO NATIONAL CONFERENCE THIS YEAR 

There will be no conference again this year of our National 
Association, but probably a meeting held in London in June on 
similar lines to last year. The Scottish association will also 
probably meet again in Edinurgh as last year. At the last 
council meeting of the former a long discussion ensued on the 
admittance or otherwise, of women to the National School. 
They have never encouraged female trade students at the school, 
but owing to the extraordinary circumstances there are only 
about two students now attending the classes. Alter a lot of talk 
about females ousting male tabor from the bakeries, it was de- 
cided to admit females for training, subject to the limitation that 
such students were connected with the trade, or that it was their 
intention to work for the trade. 

MILLERS DOMINATING THE BAKERS 

Another matter, which is also receiving attention in America, 
was considered, namely the relation between the miller and the 
baker. One member said that it was no use unlinking the fact 
that the millers were dominating the bakers, and would dom- 
inate them more and more. He would not be surprised if the 
millers, knowing the financial position of some of the bakers 
was not very grand, would soon be demanding that before one 
sack was delivered under a contract it must be paid for. The 
positon between the baker and the miller to-day was intoler- 
able. He contended that it was passible for the baker to get 
his own terms from the miller, as he could, and if one man could 
stand alone and compel the miller to supply him with flour 
on his own terms, surely the association could dictate to the 
millers the terms upon which they could buy. 

These strong remarks were the outcome of a proposition 
that the association get into communication with the millers' 
association for the purpose of considermg the question of a 
joint Hour boueht note. 

THE COST OF BREAD DELIVERY 

The question of delivery of bread is still agitating the minds 
of bakers up and down the country. Opinions differ so vastly 
as to the cost to the baker to deliver that it seems as if the 
bakers, on the whole, do not take this great matter into con- 
sideration when fixing the price of bread. Some reckon it 
costs a cent a loaf others two cents, whilst others put it at ¥1.50 
per sack. Naturally it depends upon the extent of the rounds. 
It is cheaper to deliver within a radius of a mile than five 
miles, as some openly declare they have to deliver. A well- 
known member of the trade here, discussing the matter, said 
that even if a baker lost 50 per cent, of his trade through 
stopping delivery, he was in as good a financial position as he 
was before. He suggested that a number should combine and 
open a bread shop or bread depot on the collective principle, 
thus doing away with the multiplicity of shops. But to opine 
that by stopping delivery it would mean releasing, in London 
alone, some 20,000 men for the army, or the releasing of thou- 
sands of faeriers, and saddlers for other services, is nonsense. 
However, the subject is being thoroughly discussed in all its 
bearings at association meetings, and if it does no other good, it 
will open the eyes of many to the cost of delivery, which item 
they had not taken much count of. 

Here is a little tale on the other side of the question, as 
given by one of our country daily papers. 

The lady of the house said to the errand boy: "Will jrou 
tell Mr. X to send you round early in the morning with this 
order?" — "It's no use asking me to give 'im a message, missis. 
I'm fed up. It's 'arf past eight now, and he wants me back 
at eight in the morning. I'm going straight back now. I'll 
throw his blooming basket over his yard wall. I can get 
double money on munitions and 'elp the old country a bit, so 
I'm chucking the bakery. 



Bakers' R*clprocal Ezchuig* Progpffring 

Bnice Dodson, manager of the Reciprocal Exchange, Kansas 
City, Mo., has issued the annual report of the Exchange, which 
is in strong financial Condition. 

The Reciprocal Exchange during the past fifteen years has 
returned to policyholders over $1,000,000 in cash savings, the 
average saving effected during that time having been about 40 
per cent, of the usual cost of their instirance. In addition to 
this, it has during the same period paid for fire losses over 
$1,000,000, and accumulated assets which at the present time 
amount to another million dollars. 

The Reciprocal Exchange caters to ice manufacturers, ice 
cream manufacturers, launderers, publishers, and brewers, KS 
well as bakers. The bakers are grouped with the launderers 
and publishers. The resources and liabilities of this group on 
December 31, 1915, were as fallows; 

RESOURCES 

United States Bonds $ 5,000.00 

State Bonds 7,34Q.oo 

County Bonds 19,625.00 

Municipal Bonds 76,871.25 

Guarantee Fund 129,200.00 

Net Deposits in Course of Collection . 13,060^0 

Cash in Banks S4t307.i5 

LIABIUTIES $305^1=70 

Fire Losses in Process of Adjustment . . $ 1,050.00 
Surplus and Reinsurance Reserve 304,362.70 



¥305,412.70 

KECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

November I, igos, to December 31, 1915. 

Receipts : 

Net deposits credited to Subscribers $674,048.56 
Net interest, less Taxes, Advisory 

Committee and Legal Expenses 6,763.53 

Guarantee Fund i2g,acoxx> 



DisbursemeHts : 

Losses Paid 

Losses in Process of Adjustment . 



$Sio,oi3.ti 

$280,270.57 
1,050.00 



Returned to Subscribers : 

Savings returned in cash to policy 

holders $224,338.84 



$505.64941 
Surplus. Reserve and Guaranlee Fund : $304,362.70 



$S 10,012. 1 1 
-Above figures are net after deducting re- 
and 2$% fixed expense of administration. 
This is a mighty good record, and the bakers who participate 
in the benefits of the Reciprocal Exchange are to be congratv- 
The advisory committee of the Exchange includes Jay Burns, 
president of the N. A. M. B. ; Samuel F. McE)onald, vice-preri- 
dent of the N. A. M. B., and B. Howard Smith, of Kansas 
City, Mo., who is a former president of the N. A. M. B. 
* * * 

Jnltni Nlclaa Mot*s to th« Coast 

Julius Niclas, of the Chicago firm of Julius Niclas & Co., 
who is known throughout the country for his long-time 
connection with the baking trade Jn the manufacture and 
sale of cake ornaments, etc., has secured a beautiful bungalow 
in Los Angeles, Cal,, where he intends to make his perman- 
ent home. Mr. Niclas expects to move to Los Angeles i 
June, and his many friends on the coast/^ 
welcome. Digitized by V 



,r<S(30'gt!?''" 



In The Workshopl^^v^^^ 



Iftdpcs, Formulas and Practical DiscnssSou of every day problcns in th« workroom 



The Safety Movement in Bakeries 

Eighth of a Series of Practical Articles, Written }or Baiers Review, by C. J. Kremer 



STXAM BOILESS AND STEAM 

DEVICES for generating steam are to be found in practically 
all bakeries. They range from a, tea kettle to the spout 
of which a hose is attached, to high-pressure boilers of a type 
■■hieh embodies the best practice in boiler construction of to- 
day. In all are elements of danger often all out of proportion 
to the size of the boiler. Indeed, it may be safely assumed that 
more people are injured by comparatively small boilers than by 
large and pretentious ones. In the minds of many people boiler 
jcddents are confined to boiler explosions. This is an erroneous 
idea. The term that should be used is "Boiler Failures." All 
explosions are failures, but not all failures are explosions and 
many an explosion took place because there was a failure first. 

Perhaps the best way to work for safety along these lines Is 
to explain, as well as we may, Steam. The baker who fully 
imderstands boilers and steam usually uses due care; he knows 
that they are willing and efGcienI servants when properly con- 
fined and used but may become tremendous agents for destruc- 
tion when not vigilantly, carefully and intelligently cared for 
and tended to. 

When water is heated to 212° F. it vaporizes, and turns into 
steam— at sea level. There is a difference at different altitudes, 
bat for the present notes we may ignore that phase. In an open 
vessel we can not raise the temperature of water above the boil- 
ing point — 212' F. no matter how much heat we apply. All the 
heat is used up in turning water into steam^and goes off with 
the steam. This heat— stored, so to speak, in the steam— forces 
the molecsle of water apart, and causes them to occupy a much 
larger space than they did when their temperature was less than 
2\2° F. One pint (one pound) of water to be turned into 
steam requires as much heat as it takes to melt three pounds of 
steel or thirteen pounds of gold. This same pint of water when 
converted into steam will expand to 1&45 pints or two hundred 
and five ^ gallons. 

In a closed vessel such as a boiler, the steam presses in 
every direction with force and we call this force or energy 
pressure and adopt the term "pounds" to express the force. 
One pound- of steam means that steam confined in the boiler 
presses with a force equal to one pound in weight against 
a surface one inch square. 

The pressure which may be attained is limited only by the 
strength of the boiler. There is do boiler made nor can there 
be one made that can not be disrupted by confining water there- 
in and ^plying heat to it. 

It is evident that, if a tremendous force is confined and 
suddenly released, great harm may be done by it. He who is 
in the way of escaping steam is as sure to be injured as he 
cho is struck by. a bullet dischai^ed out of a rifle or by a 
stone falling from a distance on him. 

Steam at one hundred pounds of pressure is compressed to 
about one-eighth part of its normal volume and when pressure 
is taken off will instantly expand and burn whoever it may en- 
velope. Its greatest danger, however, does not lie in such ex- 



pansion, nor in the fact that it travels with the velocity of d 
rifle bullet, but in the heat chiefly confined in the water and 
prevented from turning the water into steam by the pressure. 
When the steam gauge registers one hundred pounds of pres- 
sure the water and steam in the boiler has a temperature of 
about 337° F. ; at fifty pounds it is 298°. If the boiler is rup- 
tured and the pressure removed 
the water into steam as quickly 
up and will tear everything in i 
disruption confined within the 
be compared to 
ing and trying 



lessened this heat will turn 
powder or dynamite flashes 
way. Indeed, the forces Of 
: walls of a boiler may well 
fearful giant fettered and bound, but strain- 
free. If the boiler 



gives out the fiery giant is released and spreads wreckage and 
destruction in his path. In a work on modem steam boilers 



Fig. 1. — Madison, Wis. — Wrecked wall; place in factory where 
boUer was set is marked with an X. 



the author, speaking of the destructive force of a good-sized 
boiler exploding, says; 'The muzzle energy of a la-in,, 50- 
calibre Vickers-Maxim gun is officially given as 53^100 ft. tons. 
Firing an 850-ib. projectile the shot will pass through four 
i2-in. wrought iron plates and bury itself more than 4 in. deep 
in the fifth. The muzzle energy of our boiler is 280,000 ft. 
tons or more than five times as much. 

"Once more, if we imagine the boiler set on end and its effort 
concentrated upon the discharge of a projectile weighing a ton, 
the initial force would be suflicient to send it vertically upwards 
to a height of 53 miles." 

Lest a baker think, "Oh, my boiler is a small one, it doe'; 
not hold much water and there isn't much danger," let it l.e 
stated distinctly right here that eight gallons of vjoter (32 quarts. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apkil, 1916 



or Uis Ihati three failt) at from sixty to seventy pounds of 
pressure contotiu as much energy as does one pound of gun- 
powder. 

There are just three things necessary to wreck and kill; they 
are: first, a closed vessel such as a boiler; second, a quantity 
of water in this boiler, and third, a fire below the water. The 
fire generates the energy (force); the closed boiler confines it, 
and the water yields and stores it up. When the pressure in the 



for emergency pressures resulting from carelessness of attend- 
ants or from failure of relief attachments to work. 

(2) They mre often not properly taken care of, so that 
boilers and fittings deteriorate rapidly without the damage be- 
coming apparent. 

(3) They are at times in charge of unskilled attendants who 
liave little or no knowledge concerning the possibilities of 

(4) They are frequently not correctly installed. 

The safety attachment may be out of order and inoperative. 
In bakeries especially there is no utensil more abused, and 
handled and cared for with less regard for safety and less un- 
derstanding than the boiler. 



from factory. 

boiler becomes greater than the strength of tlie confining steel 
or iron at its weakest point it tears it as a mighty body of 
water which had been held back by a dam bursts the retaining 
e and rushes forth, carrying death and destruction with 



Before boiler plate was in the market huge boilers were made 
of sections of cast iron bolted together. The evolution of 
boiler construction is very interesting but far beyond the scope 
of these notes. Many states require boilers to be constructed 
according to certain specifications and that they be tested and 
inspected before they are put in service. The proper construc- 
tion of bailers h of great importance and a baker should specify 
in his contract for a boiler that it conform to the established 
standards with a liberal margin for safely. Insurance com- 
panies will, as a rule, gladly furnish specifications and their 
inspectors may often be consulted to good advantage. 

It never pays, nor is it ever safe to install a boiler that is 
too small, that must be "crowded" to do the work. Boiler mak- 
ing has almost become an exact science, and there is no excuse 
for a boiler unfit to give the service that is likely to be required 
of it in a bakery. 



There are vark>us 
ought to be attached 
are intended to help 
would be hard to s; 



devices which promote safety and which 
to every boiler. They were designed and 
js control the forces within the boiler. Il 
v which is most important; they are all 



D CASES IN POINT 

on took place in a bakery here recently, 
installed for the sole purpose of fur- 
nishiuK steam for one oven failed, partially wrecking the shop, 
killing one man and seriously injuring another. The direct 
cause of the explosion was never ascertained as the man who 
tended it was killed. 

The illustrations show a boiler failure which occurred Feb- 
ruary 7, 19IS, at 10 A.- M. (Sunday morning) when there was 
not supposed to be any pressure on the boiler. 

The boiler was only 30 inches in diameter and of the upright 
type such as found in most bakeries. It did a damage of about 
$20,000,00, but on account of it being Sunday no person was 
hurt. 

The boiler was used to furnish steam to a heating coil; the 
safety valve was supposed to be set so as to give relief at 65 
pounds pressure. The failure started near a rivet at the bot- 
tom (mud ring) of llie boiler on the inside, A V-shaped piece 
of metal was torn from the inside cylinder, bent backwards over 
the fire and against the crown sheet. There was considerable 
force; the boiler was projected through the roof of the building, 
over telegraph and telephone poles and wires without doing any 
injury to them, across railroad tracks about a distance of 200 
feel from where it originally stood. 

It was stripped of all its fittings and so far as known none 
nave been recovered. 

CAUSES OF BOILEB FAILURES 

It is often impossible to ascertain the exact and direct cause 
for a boiler failure due to the destruction it effects. Some of 
the most frequent causes may be mentioned. 

(i) Boilers used in bakeries are often designed for rather 
low pressure and an adequate margin of safety is not provided 



^•ff- 3- — Another view of the tcrecked building. Boiler lies in 
swamp about 75 f,-el hack from where litis picture was 
taken. 

essential to safety. A water glass, water gauges, pressure gauges, 
safety valve and check valve on feed pipe are indispensable. 
Probably the first requirement to have a boiler safe is plenty of 
water. The water glass ought to show the correct level of the 
water in the boiler. In Germany it is required that the point 
below which water must not be permitted to sink be strikingly 
and distinctly marked on the glass. It would be wise for every 
baker to follow this requirement. Some men have turned water 
in a boiler when none was to be seen in the glass and Hvtd 



April, 1916 

to lelt the story, but not all. A fellow relating his experience to 
iM said: "There was no water in the glass, I turned on the 
injector, and then ran and prayed like hetl." 

Connections between boiler and water glass may become 
clogged and for this reason water gauges must also be attached 
io as to have a double check. There should not be less than 
two, preferably three. Many high-grade boilers are equipped 
with fusible plugs and low water alarms which sound a warning 
when water sinks below safe level. The steam gauge indicates 
on a dial the pressure within the boiler ; it shows the stress and 
strab and turmoil within. The safety valve is intended to open 
and give relief when a certain pressure in the boiler has been 

Formerly lever valves with weights were used. The lever is 
narked at certain points with a number which indicates the pres- 
sure in the boiler that will open the valve when the weight is 
placed at that particular point. This safely valve has fallen 
somewhat info disuse beause Jt is easily tampered with. Pop 
safety valves are now chiefly used. These are kept closed by 
the pressure of a stiff coil spring which gives way when a cer- 
lain pressure has been reached, giving relief to the boiler and 
sounding an alarm at the same time. 

In many bakeries boilers are fed directly from the public water 
9'stem and feed pipes are connected directly to water service. 
The pressure of the service is relied upon to force water into 
the boiler. In all such cases a check valve should be placed 
into feed pipe near the boiler. It is evident that if the pressure 
in the boiler is greater than the water pressure on the mains, 
boiler can not be fed. Not only tliat, the water in the boiler may 
be forced back into service pipes, possibly into the mains or 
out of cold water faucets in the bakery. The crown sheet and 
the flues may then become red hot and serious trouble is sure to 
follow. 

It cannot be too strongly urged that all the fittings must be 
free from defects and adapted for the service that is expected 
o( them. They also must be attached correctly. What good 
is a water glass if it is stuffed up at one end with the packing 
and does not indicate the true water level in the boiler? Safety 
valves should be of ample size and kept in good working order. 
It is absolutely necessary that pressure gauges be correct and 
trustworthy. They should be tested from lime to time as they 
may get out of order. 

THE FEED WATEB 

Usually a baker has not much choice as to the water to be 
used in his boiler, he therefore should study the water he is 
using, as that has a great influence upon the safety and life 
of the boiler. Practically all water contains some mineral sub- 
stances held in solution, the steam, however, can not carry off 
any of the mineral constituents; these are left in the boiler 
and form sediment and scale therein. Scale varies greatly in 
composition but its chief constituents according to authorities 
are: sulphate of. lime and carbonate of magnesia; chloride of 
magnesia and sulpliale of magnesia also occur and are particu- 
larly objectionable as ihey are very corrosive and attack the 
metal of the boiler. Scale may so encrust the plates and flues 
of the boiler as to prevent the water from coming into contact 
with the metal, this then becomes red hot and burns. Thus a 
boiler may be burnt up but still not "steam" as well as it ought 
lo and the same amount of heat or Are may produce different 
results in boilers that are apparently alike. 

Another trouble that is likely to be caused by impure water 
should be mentioned. Scale or sediment may be forced into 
the openings leading to water glass so that this does not indi- 
cate the true water level; the seat of the safety valve may 
become crowded and stuck so that it fails lo open when the pres- 
sure becomes too great; sediment may lodge in the check valve 
on the intake pipe and permit water to be forced out of boiler. 
Most boilers are fitted with a bottom blow oft valve and pipe. 
!kale or sediment may lodge below seat of valve and permit 
water lo escape unnoticed into drain, "Low water" is perhaps 
the most serious danger that threatens the safely of a boiler. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



85 



He who expects that guards may be made which protect agamst 
boiler accidents is doomed to be disappointed. The only guards 
that can be suggested are care, cleanliness, order and good sense. 
No baker should permit any person to meddle with the boiler 
unless he is fully satisfied that the man understands the rudi- 
ments and dangers of steam. 

The Industrial Commission publishes ihe followmg rules for 
boiler attendants : 



1st: — Immediately upon entering the boiler room ; 
beyond a doubt, whether the water in the boiler is at the proper 
level. 

2nd : — In case of low water with fire in the furnace do not 
draw the fire, as this will intensify the heat and make matters 
worse, but immediately cover the Are with ashes or fresh coal 
(wet ashes or slack coal preferred) and close the ash doors. 
Do not under any circumstances, turn on the feed water or 
touch the safety valve. LET ALL the steam outlets RENfAIN 
as they are until the boiler has cooled off. 

3rd :— See to it that all connections to the water column are 
free. Prove the water glass reading by occasional blowing. 

4th : — Keep boiler clean and dry on outside. E)o not allow 
wet ashes to accumulate around the water legs or other parts of 
boiler. Do not allow water from leaking joints or other sources 
to come in contact with boiler. Failure to observe these rules 
will cause corrosion. 



Fig. 4. — Ciiils for Heating Walcr May Become Dangerous. 

Sth :— Leaks no matter how slight, should be repaired imme- 
diately, otherwise they will become worse and cause corrosion 
and grooving. 

6th :— Keep boiler clean internally. Do not allow scale, mud 
or oily matter to settle on the fire sheets, as it may cause the 
sheets to become burnt, bagged or buckled ; also rupture and ex- 
plosion may result, 

7th : — Cause the safety valves to blow at least once every 
Iwenly-four hours. They somelimes stick. Care should there- 
fore, be exercised to keep them in good working order. If the 
safety valve is not blowing freely when the pressure gauge in- 
dicates Ihe stipulated pressure allowed in the inspection certifi- 
cate the cause sliould be ascertained immediately. 

Sth ; — The blow-off valyes should be opened wide for a mo- 
ment daily. This will aid in keeping boiler and blow-off pipe 
clean, but NEVER open the blow-off valve or cock with a jerk, 
as it is liable to let go and cause a serious accident. 

9lh:— Bags should be repaired immediately. If not down too 
far and the metal is sound, they can sometimes be driven back, 
otherwise it will be necessary to cut out and patch. 

lOth: — In case of foaming, close the throttle and open the 
fire doors for a few minutes, when the water will usually settle 
and the proper height may be ascertained. The trouble, if 
caused by dirty water, can easily be overcome by feeding and 
blowing. Where there is a surface blow it can be used to good 
advantage. 

nth: — Do not blow off under pressure when intending to 
clean out, as the heat of the boiler and the brickwork will bake 
the mud and scale on the shell and tubes, making it extremely 
difficult to remove. Allow the boiler and brickwork to cool. 
Boiler should then be drained and thoroughly cleaned and 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apul, 191& 



washed out both from the top and bottom. Boiler should be 
cleaned out at intervals frequent enough to keep it dean and 
free from scale. 

i2th ; — E)o not close the damper entirely with fire in the fur- 
nace, as gas is habte to accumulate in the combustion chamber 
or tubes and cause an explosion. 

13th:— Keep all connections and appurtenances in good work- 
ing order and keep everything about the boiler room clean and 
neat. In case of accident keep cool but act promptly and with 
precision. 

A few words of warning as to hot water heaters such as are 
connected with many bake ovens may be said. For these water 
is heated in a coil of pipes exposed to the fire and the hot gases 
of the oven. As the water is heated it travels into a boiler or 
more properly speaking, a tank made out of galvanised iron 
placed on top or at side of oven. As long as there is an abund- 
ant supply of cold water there is no danger, but if for some rea- 
son the flow of cold water to the tank should be stopped all the 
dangers spoken of in the beginning arise. Cases have happened 
where water supply froze and severe explosions occurred. The 



supply valve should never be closed unless for repairs in the 
system and if it is closed the hot water faucets should be left 
open so that any steam which may be formed will find an outlet. 
After a supply valve has been closed great care must be exer- 
cised not to turn cold water into hot pipes, let the coil get cold 
if you have any reason to think it is empty. 

About a year ago there was a man severly scalded by steam 
in a bakery here. They had live steam in the bakery anl a 
hose connected to a nipple. The hose was used for steiming 
out cans, heating water and it came handy in many ways. The 
supply pipe came down a wall at the side of the sink. About 
4^ feet from the floor was an L with the nipple to which the 
hose was attached. The baker opened the valve, there n-as 
considerable pressure, the hose blew off from the nipple, the 
steam blew against the baker, through the thin garments he 
wore and burnt him severely from his chest to his knees. If 
any one has a hose connected to a nipple run straight do'An : 
some day the hose will blow off. Make sure that the steam will 
not scald any one if it does. 



How to Make Easter Buns 



Written for Bakers Review 



THOUGH many attempts have been made to decry the popu- 
larity of the Good Friday or "hot-cross" bun, the custom of 
making them is still observed and periodically worries the baker 
whose trade is of such a character as to require them. 

There have been several points from which an attack has 
been made upon the custom. The medical men have said that, 
from a dietetic standpoint, buns were not desirable; the bakers 
themselves said that a lot of work was entailed in the manu- 
facture and very little or no return was possible; the bakers 
employed have coipplained of the work and also of their small 
share of the return in the shape of extra pay. 

One might have supposed that these joint attacks would 
have resulted in a natural if not a hasty death of the practice 
of making buns at Easter time; and the fact that this is not 
the case just goes to show what a hold these habits and customs 
have upon our daily life. 

With the medical point of view we are not much concerned, 
because there are very many directions in which the same 
charge, even if it be true, could be made. With the question of 
a lot of work and little profit we are more at home, because 
it is only another illustration of the charge often brought 
against the baker, viz., working for nothing. It is certain that, 
given an adequate return, the baker would have no objection 
to bun-making, and it is a duty he owes to the trade and also 
to his employees to ensure this. 

He must get such a price for the goods as to enable him to 
pay his men adequately for their work and then leave him a 
good margin for his outlay and trouble. The sooner the baker 
makes it plain to the public that he is m business for just the 
same reason as other people are and not for philanthropy, the 
sooner the trade will be lifted on to a higher plane of respecta- 
bility; both for the work-people and the employer. 

A practical system for making Easter buns is described here, 
which, if properly carried out, will go far towards abolishing 
the faults outlined above. 

Absolute efficiency of working must be a sine qua non, and this 
will cover both speed and working processes. A system of 
ferment and dough making is recommended for bun making. 
A straight doughing system is undoubtedly better for most other 



small and properly cleaned. The fat can be either good soft 
margarine or a vegetable fat. A soft moist sugar will do ver>' 
well and a liquid mixed spice should be used. Regarding a 
system of working, the first things to study is the proving ca- 
pacity of the bakery, as on this will depend the speed at which 
the buns can be turned out. The cupboard kind, with racks to 
fit the trays, and either a gas ring, or a jet of steam from the 
boiler to provide the necessary heat will be found quite satis- 
factory. Another point to be home in mind is that of having 
just enough bun dough to fill your trays, and just enough trays- 
to fill your provers. 

By this plan, the risks of spoiling dough and over proving are 
absolutely avoided. You can follow on with successive batches,, 
knowing exactly where you are all the time. 

The baking is not much trouble, as every bun baker know: 
it is the proving accommodation which presents the difficulty, 
and very f^ bakeries cannot bake the buns if they are ready. 

For example, suppose proving space is available for 50 trays,, 
each holding 40 buns, a piece of dough to make 2,000 buns 
will be needed. Allowing them to weigh i^i ounces each, 3,000 
ounces or 187^^ lbs. dough will comprise the batch. Here is a 
formula that will produce that quantity. 



qls. C50 lbs.) wat 
2J4 lbs. yeast 

lb, malt extract 
lbs. liquid egg 
lbs, sugar 
lbs. flour 
. 2^ lbs. powdered mil 



\70 



10 lbs, fat 

10 lbs. sugar 

>o lbs, currants 

3^ lbs. peel 

4. oz. bun essence 

2 oz. lemon essence 

3 oz. egg coloring 
8 oz. salt 

lbs. flour 



Mode i — Set off the ferment in a large tub by taking up the 
water at about lob degrees. Take out about a couple of quarts 
and dissolve the yeast and malt in it. Put the liquid egg, the 
milk powder and the sugar in the remainder and dissolve, then 
the yeast, liquor and add the 10 lbs. flour. Cover this 



goods, but time is saved by using a ferment nere. Good buns down till it has nicely dropped, which should take about 45 
can be made by a straight dough, but more time and more yeast 

A little care on the score of ingredients is also needed. The 
flour should be a good, strong brand or blend and it may be 
taken that if it will make good bread it will make good buns 
The yeast should be a fast-working variety and fruit should b* 



minutes, during which time the doughing ingredients can be 
got ready. Put tne flour into a small trough, add the salt, rub 
in the fat and mix the fruit into the whole. When the ferment 
is ready, dissolve the sugar and essences in it and mix the dough. 
Coyer it down for an hour and give it a good turning and dust- 
ing up. In another hour it will be ready for weighing off, which 



April, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



87 



can be best done by means oi a divider. Mould them on the 
greased trays, partly prove, and cross with either tin or wooden 
crosses. Finishing the proving is a matter of judgment and a 
very hot oven is needed for the baking. They are usually 
wished while hot with a strong syrup or a gelatine or weak 
custard wash. 

When a big output has to be faced the matter of a succession 
of latches must be studied. 

If a duplicate set of trays is available the next lot of dough 
can be coming along and as soon as the first batch is in the 
provers the next can be divided and moulded. If not, the plan 
to follow is to mould the buns on board or trays; or failing a 



sufficient supply of these can be packed all around. the tables- 
and covered with light cloths. When half proved the trays will 
be available again, and they can be at once crossed and placed 
to prove and the next dough treated in the same way. Slight 
differences are of course permissible, but the writer has not 
found the system outlined above to fail if it be properly car- 
ried out, while the primary idea is realized, viz., commercial util- 
ity and bakery efficiency. The matter of costing and pricing is 
naturally a matter for the individual to fix for himself, but a 
good plan is to secure that the manufacturing expenses as far 
as the actual ingredients are concerned do not exceed fifty per 
cent, of the selling return. 



Answers to Inquiries on Many 
Problems of the Bakers 



Tikis department is open to any and all of out readers who wish to secure information on any phase of the baking 

business. In requesting answers to inquiries, please give full name and address, act for 

publication, but as evidence of good faith 



Keeping Hacfaine-Made Hard Goods from Checking or 
Breaking 
Can you give the reason for some mackine-made hard goods 
checking, in other words, breaking. I observe that some goods 
break in cold weather and the same goods will not break in 
warm weather— hAYXX, Va. 

There are different theories as to what causes the checking 
of crackers. Some people claim that frost affects the goods, 
makiag them more liable to check in cold weather than in warm 
weather. 

Sufficient to know that they do, and the question is how to find 
a remedy. 

With molasses goods, it can generally be overcome by heating 
the molasses to 120 degrees Fahr,, hot enough to dissolve all 
saccharin matter, but should be allowed to coot to 80 degrees 
before mixing, for if used too hot it is liable to make a dry 
cake. 

With sugar hard goods, two quarts of glycerine used to a 
barrel of flour will generally overcome the tendency to check. 

Hard Tack 
Would you kindly send me a good recipe for a good hard 
totk. We ore in a town where there is a lot of hard lack 
shipped in. — B. H., Mont. 



Hard tack is made simply with flour and water, without 
salt It is usually made from the straight grade of winter 
wheat flour. 

To one barrel of flour ust nine gallons of warm water, making 
a stiff dough. It ts cut square with a soda cutter and baked 
in a solid oven. When drawn from the oven it is placed where 
it is hot and. allowed to dry thoroughly before packing. 

If the amount is too targe, make half or quarter the amount. 

Tremble With Loaves Cracking Open at Sides 
/ am having a little trouble with my bread, and thought I 
mould inquire and see if you could show me where the trouble 
Hei. The trouble is, my bread, after being placed in the oven, 
breaks open on one side of the loaf, deforming the loaf and 
"akiHg it look small. My formula is: I set my sponge at ten 
or eleven P. JU.. using 8 oz. yeast and 8 quarts water, I do not 
Ktigk my flour but make a medium stiff sponge. For dough 
! use i quarts more water, 14 ox. salt, I'/i lbs. sugar, and flour. 



I make my dough at half past five A. M. The sponge sits about 
yYt hours before being used. I weigh my loaves 14 os. I am 
through making my dough at six A. M.; at 7:3a I take out 
of trough and work up. At S:0o I have finished. I then put in 
proof box with steam, and al g-.yt put in oven, with a short 
proof. The trouble is worse with a full proof. The loaves im- 
prove but the trouble does not disappear entirely. The loaves 
seem to crack open on one side as though the pan wasn't greased 
and it slicks to pan and in raising it bursts open. I am using 
a Middleby oven tvitkout steam. Am using a spring wheal 
ftour.^J. K., Iowa. 

ANSWER 

As you say you are using 8 oz. of y^st to 8 qts. of water 
for making sponge, and you allow this sponge to stand 7ji hours, 
it must be too old altogether and this might be the cause of 
your loaf cracking. I presume it is impossible for you to 
make any change in the time. We would advise to use only 
4 or. yeast to your sponge, and add 4 oz. more while malting 
your dough. Your sponge will be ready in 7J^ hours anyhow, 
and the 4 oz. more of yeast added to the dough will hasten the 
fermenting period of same, so that you can have fresh bread at 
the time you desire. Try this, and in case this should not 
overcome your trouble, write again, and we will make further 
suggestions. 

German Lebkiichen — Soda Biscuits 

I would like to have a good recipe for the German Leb- 
kuchen and Soda Biscuits.— ii. R., N. Y. 

ANSWEB 

First of all you should make a stock dough. 

STOCK DOUGH FOS CEBMAN HONEY CAKES AND LEBKUCHBN 

Boil Up 30 pounds of honey with 15 pounds of molasses sev- 
eral times; strain this through a fine sieve into a bowl. Now 
grind and dissolve thoroughly 6 oz. of potash in a little water 
and add same to the boiled honey and molasses after the same 
has cooled off to a luke-warm state. Then sift in enough cake 
flour to make a medium soft dough. With the flour sift in 
spices as desired. Place this dough in barrel or tube and store 
away in cellar, A better quality of cakes will be obtained if 
all honey is used and finely chopped citron and almonds are 

THE HANDLING OF GERMAN HONEY CAKES AND I,EBKtJCHEN 

Grind and dissolve i}4 oz. of ammonia with the yolks of 4 
eggs. Break off 15 pounds of the above stock dough, after 



S8 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



same has rested for two or three months, and work the dis- 
solved ammonia into same. If you have a dough brake, let 
this machine do the work. Work thoroughly. Roll out about 
1-3 of an inch thick; cut out in desired shape, and wash with 
milk or glue water. Prick the larger cakes with a fork. Bake 
in an over of about 350 degrees F. It is advisable to bake a 
trial first to ascertain whether the dough will rise sufficieniiy; 
if not, add a little more dissolved ammonia. 

GENERAT. RULES FOX GEKUAN HONEY CAKES AND LEBKUCHEN 

Always sift the spices with the flour. Dissolve soda, ammonia 
or potash thoroughly in water or milk. Take the softest winter 
wheat flour you can obtain. If you use New Orleans (light 
colored) molasses, add <;ome darker molasses to it, or color 
i^ame with sugar color. This is the proper wiiy to find out the 
quality of the molasses: Take a little molasses in a cup, add 
a pinch of soda to it, and stir this up. If the molasses raises 
up and foams, and looks brown, and smells good, the molasses 
is of Ai quality. If, however, it looks green when mixed with 
the soda, it is poor quality and will smell like soap. When 
storing away slock dough, have same covered well. Mix the 
dough with only part of the rising ingredients such as potash or 
»Ium. Add soda or ammonia just before using the dough. A 
dough brake will do fine work for mixing latter ingredients. 
Do not have this machine going too fast and look out for your 

SODA BISCUIT 

3 lbs. flour 2 oz. cream of tartar 

4 oz. sugar I oz. soda 
6 oz. lard I qt. milk 

a little salt 
Mix the sugar with the lard; sift in the flour with the cream 
of tartar and rub all together well. Dissolve the soda in the 
milk and add the same to the mixture, working same thor- 
oughly. Roll out the dough ^ inch thick, cut out with a round 
cutter, place the biscuit on pan, and bake in hot oven with 
open damper. You may put the biscuits singly, or closely to 
gether on the pan; just as you desire. 

Marahmallow Roll— Star Jumblei 

Am getting Bakers Review regularly, and have been trying 

to find a good recipe for marshmallow roll, and one for stat 

iumbUs. There are many calls for these two items at my 

bakery, but the recipes I have are not very good. — E. D., Mich. 

ANSWER 

We are giving you the formulas of two good marshmallow 
fillings and also ihe formulas of four different rolls. Every one 
of them, upon being introduced, usually proves to be a good 
seller. 

MARSHMALLOW HLUNG (l) 

Dissolve Vj pound of gelatine in z quarts of hot water; add 
10 pounds finely sifted powdered sugar and 2 pounds glucose; 
beat up all together; add 'A ounce cream tartar when nearly 
finished beating; flavor with vanilla. The mass must be beaten 
rather rapidly, but as soon as it begins to be flufly, stop beating. 

MARSHMALLOW nLLIt4C (2) 

Soak 6 ounces of gelatine in i^ quarts of water, then heat 
to dissolve it ; beat this up with jyi pounds finely sifted powder 
sugar; 1 to i^ pounds of glucose can be added if it is desired 
that the mixture be more elastic; when about half beaten add ^ 
ounce cream tartar; beat mass as rapidly as possible and stop 
doing so as soon as the mixture becomes fluffy. Flavor with 
vanilla. A cake machine is absolutely necessary to make either 
one of the above fillings. 

JAPANESE UAR3B HALLOW ROLL 

H Qt' eggwhites ^ oz. cream tartar 

\i lb. sugar (granulated) 9 oz, flour 

18 oz. powdered sugar melted chocolate 

.3 oz. cornstarch vanilla flavor 



Beat up the eggwhites to a snow, adding the granulated sugar 
gradually; then sift in the other ingredients; color half of this 
mixture with the melted chocolate; take two bags, each contain- 
ing a rather large plain tube, filling one of the bags with plain 
and the other with chocolate mixture, drawing out lengthwise 
on heavily greased and papered pans the white mixture and the 
chocolate mixture alternately. This will make one sheet. Bake 
and fill the same as other marshmallow rolls. When cool ice 
with marshmallow filling and sprinkle with shredded cocoanut. 
Cut in medium pieces. 

CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW ROLL 

Bake of t lb. jelly roll mixture — colored with chocolate paste 
or powder — 2 equal sheets on heavily greased pans; after baked, 
turn same over, spread with marshmallow filling thickly; roll 
the sheet up while warm ; when cooled, ice with chocolate and 
cut in pieces of the desired size. 

LEMON MARSHMALLOW BOLL 
II' oz. powdered sugar j oz. baking powder 

10 eggs or 20 yolks lemon flavor 

^ pts. milk 2 lbs. flour 

Mix all but the flour and baking powder together, sifting in 
the latter at the last. Bake the same as chocolate marshmallow 
roll, but ice with yellow icing. Bake in two sheets. 



HITE MARSHMALLOW ROLL 



I II). sugar 
'A lb. butter 
8 eggwhites (beat 
a froth) 



14 pt. milk 
1 lb. flour 
'A oz. baking powder 
vanilla flavor 



Cream the butter and sugar, add the milk and flour and last 
the beaten eggwhites; beat until quite tight; finish as for 
chocolate marshmallow roll, but ice with white icing. Bake in 

STAR JUMELKS 

1 lb. sugar 1-3 oz. soda 

14 oz. butter and lard 2-3 07. cream tartar 

2 lbs. flour 5 eggs 

Yi pt. milk vanilla, mace 

Rub sugar, butter and lard, add eggs gradually, then pour 
in the milk. Sift in the flour but do not work too hard ; dress 
the jumbles up with star tube on lightly greased anud dusted 
pans; before baking let jumbles dry a trifle. Bake in a rather 
hot oven. 

Old-Pashioned Drop Cake« 

We bake the old-fashioned drop cake, but it seems that it 

does not prove to be what it should. Could you give us a 

formula for an old-fashioned drop cake to be sold at eight 

cents per dozenf—T. B. C, Pa. 



No doubt the formula for drop cake in the "American Cake 
Baker" will please you. These cakes, however, are sold usually 
for 10 cents the dozen. Instead of cutting the' quality we 
would advise you to cut the size of the cakes a little. The 
direction of the formula states that you will get three pans, 
24 cakes on each pan, from same. Would suggest that you 
pun 30 on each pan if you have to sell them for 8 cents the 

Do not fail to try to make those Bridge Buns on page to. 
These cakes are very easy to make and, as a rule, are fine sel- 
lers. They look about the same as drop cake, but the fornmla 
is much cheaper. You may eventually use same for old- 
fashioned drop cake. 



THE BAKERIES OF AMERICA 

Ptttsonal Visits and Inspcctioiu of M»chtn« Shops by • Pzmctlcal Bakor 



By Olio Werlin, 
Editorial Associate Bj 
Review 



Cleveland, Ohio 

{Concluded) 
Uaz Jensch, 4170 Pearl Rd. — Mr. Jeiiscli has 
(he honor of having the finest and most up-to- 
date bakery in South Brooklyn, The shop ms 
well as the store are up-to-date and a model in 
regard of equipment and sanitary condition. The 
shop is well equipped with machines. We find a 
complete Read outfit consisting of cake mixer, 
dough .machine, sifter, water and tempering tank 
and flour scale. The cleanliness is really sur- 
prismg and this progressive and Up-to-date bak- 
er can not be commended too highly for keeping 
{tore and shop in such a splendid condition. Mr. 
/ensch employs four bakers. He also has a 
stand on the public market. But everything is 
sold retail. Needless to say, the goods produced 
are high grade. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Elyria, Ohio 
C. L. Renouard, 226 Bath 5"(,— When I came to 
Elyria I asked one of those "town sports" for 
the largest and leading baker. This gentleman 
replied, that they have five bakers in town, but 
the one doing the business is C, L, Renouard. 
No wonder, lie is the most progressive baker 
and has the best equipped shop. The shop is also 
one of the best as far as sanitary conditions are 
concerned. It is well ventilated, airy and sunlit. Not 
less than nine windows allow good, pure air to flow into the 
the working place. We find the following machines there : a 
Superior dough mixer with sifter, a Triumph moulding machine 
and a cake machine of the same make, also a bun divider and a 
Haum & Schoel fried cake machine. The baking Is done in a 
Hubbard Germ an -American oven. Four bakers are employed 
and three wagons are out. Sell wholesale and retail. Produce 
the best line of goods in Elyria. The wrapping of the bread is 
done with a Simplex Sealer. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Lorain«, Ohio 

Star Bakery, H. Essi'' Prof., 522 W. 22nd 5(.— Mr. Essig is. 
as far as the baking trade is concerned, the man "of the hour," 
(he leadine baker in Lorain. He started 18 years ago, in a 
comparatively small way. First he did the baking alone, then 
after he had finished with baking he went on the wagon to sell 
the bread he baked. However, he realized the value of modern 
machinery, and owing to his progressiveness he h^ the best 
equipped and most efRcient shop in Lorainc and outpoints not 
only every other baker in this city, but, he does more business 
than the other seven bakers together, as far as bread is con- 
cerned. His spotless and absolutely sanitary shop is equipped 
with the following up-to-date machines : A Triumph mixer 
with sifter, a Dutchess 2-pocket automatic dough divider: an 
automatic conveyor brings the scaled and divided dough pieces 
into a Zerah bailer ; the rounded up loaves are proofed in a 
revolving proof clo?et, then thev go into a Thomson mouldinn 
machine. The proofing of the bread is done in up-to-date proof 
boxes. After the bread is baked, it is wraoped in a Colvin 
sealer. The bread department is separated from the cake siiop, 
which has its own oven. Here we find a Peerless cake 
mixer, a cake mixer operate'' by hand, and a nie trimmer. 
Bake about 200 pies daily. Six bakers are emoloyed ; three wag- 
ons and one auto truck are used for the delivery of thctgoods. 
Sell wholesale and retail. Mr. Essig is a fine, amiable gentle- 
man, arid has the writer's best wishes for continued success. 

♦ * * 
Sandusky, Ohio 

Urr. C. Frank. 834 Columbus. — ^The Udy has been doing bus- 
iness for a number of years. She employs two bakers and has 
a delivery auto out. In the shop is a cookie dropping machine 
and I dough mixer. Main trade is bread and cookies. Produce 
a nke line of goods. Sell some groceries in connection with 
the baked goods. 

A. R. Singler, 156 £. Water. — It was on a Saturday morning 
when I called on Mr. Singler; really not the best time to see 



such a busy place as Mr. Singler's bakery. How- 
ever, 1 had a chance to get into the shop and 
convince mysdf that it is furnished with all 
kinds of modern machinery and is truly a 
model place in regard of sanitary conditions and 
modern etjuipment. I found the following ma- 
chines In full swing : A 2-pocket automatic dough 
divider, a rounder, these two machines having 
been furnished by the American Bakers' Machin- 
ery Co., St. Louis, Mo. ; further a Day dough 
mixer, with a Champion automatic outfit, a Day 
icing machine, a Triumph moulder, a Champion 
cake machine and a Van Houlen bun divider. 
The baking is done in three ovens ; three wagons 
are out. Ten bakers are employed. Sell whole- 
sale and retail and do also a fine shipping trade. 
The wrapping of bread is done in a Simplex seal- 
er. Thc^present bread output is Tfxo loaves ol 
bread daily. Mr. Singler started to bake in i8g6 
and the machines were added gradually. Owing 
to the high quality of goods produced by this 
firm, the trade of the bakery is steadily increas- 
ing. Mr. Singler as well as the foreman of 
this magnificent bakery, A. Guendelsberger, are 
interested readers of Bakebs Review. 

Ceo. J. Rosskopf, iig Third 5(.— For seven 
years this gentleman has conducted on his own 
property a grocery store. Three years ago, he 
thought it would be well if he opened a bakery and 
bake his own goods. First, the balked goods were carried 
out in a hand basket, then a real pushcart was necessary; to- 
day, a delivery truck does the work. And so it was with the 
machinery, first, a Champion mixer, then a cookie dropping 
machine of the same make and then a Triumph cake mixer 
were installed. The baking is done in a Middleby-Marshall 
oven. The shop, which is a sunlit building, is a model of clean- 
liness, well ventilated, and Mr. Rosskopf is always eager to keep 
same in the pink of sanitary condition, I can not help to men- 
tion Mr. Rosskopf's daughter, Miss Clara, not only that she is 



a charming young ladv and keeps order and is active in the store. 
but that she has a good deal of her father's progressiveness. 
Just as a "starter" I asked her If she also reads Bakcrs Review, 
which is, by the way, the first trade paper they ordered when 
they started in the baking business. She said "yes." Not sat- 
isfied, I asked her what she thinks of the many advertise- 
ments she sees in our paper. To my surprise she assured rae, 
that the advertisements interest her just as much as the reading 
matter, as it shows the progress in the baking trade. Very 
good, young lady! The writer of this wishes your progressive 
"Papa" that, as time passes, his business may increase to such 



BAKERS REVIEW 



an extent, that instead of the two bakers he employs now, 
twenty may be kept busy. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Tiffin, Ohio 

Tkt Grill Baking Co.. 131 5. WaskingloH.—The Grill Bakinsr 
Co. succeeded the Grammes Bkg. Co., which was founded 
in 186s. The bakery is therefore the oldest in Tiffin. Under 
former as well as under the present management the aim of 
the firm has been and is, to serve the public best. It is one of 
those old reliable firms with modem ideas and business methods. 
In the shop is a Day dough mixer and sifter; in the cake shop, 
which is separate from the bread department, is a Read cake 
machine. The baking in this department is done in a Hu- 
bard Gennan- American oven, while the bread bakers use 
an old style brick oven. Both shops are strikingly clean 
and the goods produced are of superlative quali^. Alto- 
gether 19 people are employed, including seven bakers. The 
present bread output amounts to 3,500 loaves a day, with a 
full line of cakes. Sell wholesale as well as retail and have a 
fine shipping trade. In connection with the bakery is a general 
grocery store. Part of the bread is wrapped. 

Rebefj Bros. Bakery. 2J Ma^U.—Here ig another of Tiffin's 
old reliable and progressive bakeries. The Rebel Bros., who 
are known by everybody in Tiffin, owing to their nice tasting 
cookies and bread, are in business 18 years. The store and 
shop are a model of cleanliness. In the retail store, an enor- 
mous lot of cookies and bread are most tastefully displayed. 
In the shop, which is equipped with a Triumph mixer, two 
bakers are employed. Two wagons are on the road. Sell 
wholesale and retail. 

William Schaeftr, 12 IVentx.—Two years ago, during the flood, 
Mr, Schsefer sulTered heavy financial losses. His bakeiy was 
near the river, and of course completely under water. Only a 
short time before the flood, they built a fine Petersen oven at 
a cost of $t,ioo. After the fiood, he sold the remains of this 
oven for six dollars. Not only the oven, but also a large 
quantity of flour and other materials, and the building itself, 
were demolished. A Day mixer is about the only survivor of 
the great flood. This mixer has been fixed up, and is still 
doing duty. All this hard luck did not discourage Mr. Schaefer. 
He leased another place (the present bakerv) and started to bake 
again. This spring, so Mrs. Schaefer told me, they will again 
build their own b^ery, but in a safer niace this time. Mr. 
Schaefer has been doing business in Tiffin for 12 years and 
employs three bakers, has a few wagons out, sells wholesale and 
retail, and also does some shipping. The main trade h bread 
of fine quality. The present output is about 2,000 loaves daily. 

Idtal Bakery, Mrs. Bertha Lambri/jht, 273 5". Wash'nzion.— 
Mrs. Bertha Lambright, an energetic and at the same time 
progressive lady, bought the haVery on December, 1914. and is 
conducting same in a very superior manner. The lady is active 
in the store and also has a fine knowledge of our trade. She 
employs first-class bakers and showed me proudly the bread 
baked by her bakers. I must say, it is a fine- like-vcl vet- feeling, 
loaf of bread. She employs three bakers, has two wagons out 
sells retail, wholesale and also has some shipping trade. The 
shop is equipped with a dou^h mixer. The present output on 
bread is about 1,200 loaves a day. besides a nice line of cookies, 
pies and bread. Store and shop are in excellent condition. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Fostorla, Ohio 

Chas. Pfau, Foslorta. O.— This gentleman was in his present 
place about 3 months, but he has been in the baking trade for 
the last three years in Fostoria. Without over doing it, it may 
he said, that he ts one of the most succes^fid bakers in northern 
Ohio. In the remarkable time of three years, he has established 
a bakery, and built up such a fine trade for same, that every fair- 
minded man must congratulate him for the splendid showing he 
has made. The shop of the bakery Is, in rectard of sanitary 
condition and modern equipment, truly a model place. I found 
following machines in this place: A cake mixer, a doueh brake, 
dough machine and cookie dropning machine furnished by the 
Triumph Co., of Cincinnati, O, The moulding machine was fur- 
nished by the Peerless Bread Machine Co.. of Sidney. O. The 
bakinff is done in a portable and a Kosickv oven. Employed 
are four bakers. One delivery auto is out. Also does a fine ship- 
ning trade. The present bread output i« about 1.800 to 2.000 
loaves a day, and a fine, complete line of cakes. The bread is 
wrapped in a Simplex sealer. The retail store is most attractive 
and modemly furnished, while the goods are very advantageously 
disniayed. 

Jacob Gerlingtr, Fostoria, O. — The largest baker in this pro- 
Hressive city is Mr. Gerlincer. He has been in the baking busi- 
ness in Fostoria about eicht years. Guess I will have to travel 
many, many miles before I find two such wide-awake bakers a^ 
Mr. Gerlinper and Mr, Pfau in a city of the size of Fostoria. 
Prnie of Ohio's cities are cverflooded with grocers baking their 
ov n bread and pies, and calling themselves "Home Bakers. The 
<|iiHlity of the goods produced by these home bakers Is to be clas- 



April, 1916 

sified as "rotten" and the progressive baker can wipe out those 
"Sweet Home Bakers" by turning out a superior line of goods as 
the bakers in Fostoria and Tifim do. Not one grocer in these 
cities is trying to put that ''home stuff" over. Th^ all buy theu 
bread. Mr. Gerlinfier^s shop and store is somethmg so refine«L 
that the stranger is really surprised to find such a store uid 
shop in a city of 9,500 souls. Many a baker would say, thu 
uid pay to keep such a model place in this town. 



fine line of goods. Fostoria's main industries are glass and 
pottery works and not many millionaires are living there; only 
working people. I can not help deviating from the subject, but 
I heard so often the old excuse, "it won't pay in this towa" 
Now Mr. Gerlinger's shop is, as mentioned before, finely cQnip- 
ped with modern machinery. Three years ago, he rebuilt it. 
The cake and bread shop are separated from each other. In the 
cake shop we find a Champion cake mixer and a cookie drop- 
ping machine of the same make. The baking in this department 
is done in a brick oven of the old style. 

The bread shop is furnished with a Champion 2-pocket auto- 
matic dough divider, a Day moulding machine, a Day mixer 
with a sifting and tank outfit and a bun divider. The proofing 
is done in a Champion proof closet. The bread is baked in a 
Standard oven. Improvements usually seen only in very Ivge 
plants can be found here. There is, for one instance, an electric 
flonr hoist, elevator, huge electric fan and the latest word in 
sanitary racks, pan cleaning tables, etc. For the convenience 
of the bakers there is a fine dressing room equipped with shower 
baths, washstands, steel lockers, etc. They also pump their 
own well water from an artesian well. Seven bakers are em- 
ployed and two wagons and one auto are out. Sell retail and 
wholesale; also do some shipping. The baked bread is wrapped 
in a Union wrapping machine. Bake about sojooo loaves weekly, 
besides a fine line of cakes, etc. The beautiful retail store is 
elegantly and modemly fnrnished and must be considered one of 
the finest in northern Ohio. 

* * * 
Toledo, Ohio 

Louis Schauss. 131 1 Detroit Ave. — ^Mr. Schauss, a young 
gentleman, is conducting two bakeries in Toledo, one at the 
above address, and the other at 3263 Monroe St. Without donbt, 
he is one oE the most progressive bakers in Toledo. Both 
shops are in the pink of condition in regard tb sanitary pre- 
caution as welt as to high-class of goods produced. The sh<Hi 
in Detroit Ave., which is the main place, is equipped with 
Lynn-Superior cake mixer and a Day dough mixer. 'The baking 
is done in a Hubbard German- American oven. The Monroe 
St. place Is furnished with a Lynn-Superior cake mixer. The 
baking is also done in a Hubbard German-American oven. Mr. 
Schauss confines his business to retail trade and everything is sold 
over the counter. He has been in business seven years and 
employs four bakers. Mr. Schauss is only 29 years old, and 
always on the lookout for improvements. 

tValdon Bros., S04, Dorr 5i.— Two men do the baking in this 
place. In the shop is a Read cake and dough mixer. Have one 
delivery auto out. Bake a nice little line of goods. Sell only 
retail, and have a branch store on 504 Dorr St but do the 
baking only in the first mentioned place. Bake a complete 
line of goods. 

Herman Bremfoerder, 2601 Detroit Ave. — Mr. Bremfoerder 
has been in business in Toledo for 16 years. He built 0ie 
present place about four years ago, and it may be said it is 
one of "Toledo's model bakeries. The shop is a real sunlit build- 
ing, well ventilated and strikingly clean and sanitary. It is 
equipped with a Day mixer and a Triumph cake machine. 
The baking is done in a Kosicky oven fired with coke, and in 
a Hubbard oven, fired with gaS. The basement is an ideal 
stock room. Four bakers are employed. Everything is sold 
over the counter — retail. No wagons are out. Mr. Bremfoerder 
does a fine store trade and sells on a Saturday about $150 worth 
of goods over the counter. Bakes a full line of high-grade 
bread, pies and cakes. 

/. H. Meinert & Son, 2126 Monroe St, — Mr. Meinert has been 
doing business in the same place for the last 13 years. Bakes 
only cakes. In the shop is a Triumph cake mixer. Make also 
their own ice cream. The machinery outfit costs $iOj000. 
Three men are employed. Only fancy cakes are baked, and 
everything is sold retail. Store and shop are in fine condition. 

The Toledo Bread Co.. 538 North 5t.~The Toledo Bread 
Co. was founded ten years ago, and has been rebuilt several 
times. It is now Toledo's most up-to-date bread plant The 
location of the different departments in the plant, as well as 
the building itself, is very similar to the Youngstown plant of 
'hp same company. Every department is on the ground floor, 
lieht, airy and well equipped with modem machines. The de- 
nTTtmenls are separated from each other by means of slide 
doors. The upper halves of these doors are of glass, which 
enables the foremen to overlook the entire plant from every 



Aful, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



9> 



comer of the place. For instance, if he is in the wrapping 
room he is able to look into the shop, mixing room, etc This 
enables bim to have all employees under steady control. On the 
left from the entrance are the offices, drivers' counting room; 
tbn come the loading and shipping room, wrapping room, the 
oke department, make up room, and the mixmg room, llie 
Di*i(e-up room is furnished with the following machines: an 
antomatic dough divider (4 pocket), a rounder, extension mould- 
er, automatic proofer and a Van Houten roll divider. With 
the exception of the moulder, which is of the Thomson make, 
ill machines in this department were fumish'ed by the Werner & 
Pflciderer Co., Saginaw, Mich. In the mixing room we find two 
high-speed mixers, one a 4-bbl. and one s-bbl. capacity, with 
utomatic flour scale and tempering tank. Here also is the 
flour blending and sifting outfit. All this apparatus was 
foniished by the W. & P. Co. In the cake shop we find a Day 
egg clipper, and a Triumph cake mixer. The baking In this 
dcputnient is done in a Marshall oven. The bread bakers 
DM 6 Duhrkop ovens fired from die rear. The wrapping of 
ibe bread is done in a Hayssen wrapping machine. The firm's 
special is Butter Krust bread and Butter Krust package cakes. 
These cakes were introducd onlv a short time ago, and the 
soceeM achieved was more than tne firm ever expected. At the 
time I visited the plant they turned out more than 3,500 package 
aka a day. The bread output is about 35,ocx> loaves daily, the 
<^dty bung saooo. Everything is sold on a strictly wholesale 
basi} aiid fine shipping trade is done. They ship bread to points 
]jo miles distant from Toledo. Employed are 60 people, including 
JO bakers. Ten wagons are out The stable is separated from 
the main building. For the convenience of the bakers we find 
dressing rooms equipped with shower baths, individual steel 
loclcers, etc. I can not help to mention again, that this plant 
1) right uf> to the mark and the goods produced are of super- 
hlive merit. The officers of this progressive firm are: Wade 
D. Holland, president; F, C Hoehler, vice-president; H, W. 
Cnmmings, secretary, and W. C, Carr, treasurer. 

Tkt Seyfang Baking Co., 810 Lafayette St.— The old reliable 
Seyfang Co. was founded some 50 years ago. The building 
occupied by this firm has the shape of a T. The size of the 
building is 62 feet on Lafayette St.. 51 feet on Ontario St., and 
172 feet on Michigan St., and it is three stories high. The 
prodacts of this firm are of different character. They bake 
bread, cakes, crackers, macaroni and noodles. Macaroni ana 
noodles are not in my line, therefore we overlook those de- 
partments and start right in with the bread department. I 
found it up-to-date, and well equiped with modern machines. 
Following machines are in this shop : a dottgh mixer, equipped 
with sifter and tempering tank; a two-pocket automatic dough 
divider, a rounder, a moulder, an automatic proofer with 
loadintf device, and a Van Houten roll divider. All machines 
with the exception of the sifter, which is furnished by the Day 
Co, were furnished by the Champion Co., Joliet, III. The 
baking Is done in four Petersen and two reel ovens. The fore- 
man. 0. P. Gooding, by the way an old friend of our paper, 
could not give me the name of same. If I am not mistaken, the 
two reel ovens were also furnished by the Champion Co. The 
wrapping of the bread is done in two hand sealers. The sealers 
were furnished by the Simplex Manufacturing Co., Fulton, N. Y. 
The cracker, noodle and macaroni departments are strictly 
•eparated, and also furnished with up-to-date machinery. The 
bread output amounts to 10.000 loaves a day; 400 doz. rolls 
are made daily ; loO doi. doughnuts. The cracker department pro- 
duces 2,^00 pounds of crackers, while the macaroni output 
anonnts to i.ooo pounds a day. Employed in the bread shop alone 
ire nme bakers. 14 wagons and one auto are out, Ever\-thing is 
>old strictly wholesale. Some shopping trade is done also. The 
firai also has its own power plant, and pumT>s their own well 
water from an artesian well, 362 feet deep. This water is pure 
and so nice to drink, that over 62 families and offices get their 
drinking water from the Seyfang Baking Co,, and carry it home 
in pails. The shops of all departments are exceedingly clean and 
sanitary, and the reputation of the old reliable Sevfang Co. is 
unsurpassed. The names of the officers are as follows: Mr. 
Seyfang, president; Charles Turner, treasurer; C. A. Suder, 
Mcreiary: George Nettlcman, vire-presldent ; C P. Kelley, 
A. S. Ashley, and Jno. T. Sheriff, advisory board. Max A. 
Nowlin is general manager. 

Huclnatsr, N. H. 
Normand Bros.. 25 Laval 5/,- This ii one of Manchester's 
model plants, baking bread excl'>sively. The brothers started to 
ln*e U years a<ro. In 1012 thev built un their present plant. 
The dough and mixing room Is on the ton floor. Here I found a 
Trinmnh and a Day No. 2 mixer. The Triumph mixer is 
fpupped with a sifter and flour scale made bv the sa-rie com- 
^y: they also made the iron troughs I saw in this room. 
The shop is located on the lower floor. Here we see a Triumph 
^■pocket dough divider, a Thomsnn mo-tldfr. and a revolving 
"fwit doiet also made by the Tho-nson nennle. Iht baking 
li done in a Duhrkop oven covered with white tiles. The broth- 



ers have a perfect right to be proud of their plant as I found 
it in a condition so immaculately clean, that even the most rwid 
housewife could not find anything to "kick" about. Twenty-nve 
people are employed, including eight bakers. Bak; 45.000 loaves 
of bread a week. The baked bread is wrapped in a Union wrap- 
pei. Seven wagons are out. The specliilty of this firm is 
''Edgeworth" bread. Sell wholesale and retail, A first class 
line of goods is produced in this model plant. 

Crtscent Food &. Provision Co., 154 Bridge St. — The ownej" ol 
this place is Mr. Grifiin, a gentleman who has been in business 
in Manchester for ten years. It is a large general store with 
a tine line of goods. Four years ago it became necessary to move 
into larger quarters owing to the increasing popularity of the 
enterprise. The bakery of the Crescent Co, has a fine, sanitary 
shop in which two bakers are employed. Here we find a Thoro- 
bred dough mixer. The baking is done in a Middleby oven. Uno 
delivery wagon is out Bake a full line of bread and caxes. 
About 40 bbls, of flour is used weekly. The appearance of 
store and shop, I mention this again, is itrikingly clean, and the 
best materials are used in producing the baked goods. 

Thomas Eagan, 140 Central St. — Here we meet a fine, amiable 
gentleman, owning a neat and clean bakery which compares 
favorably with the best I have seen. The lousiness was founded 
about 25 years ago. The owner of this old, reliable bakery 
employs six bakers, and has three wagons out. The store, or 
better, store and shop, are marvels of cleanliness. A Snt- 
class line of goods is produced by Mr. Eagan. I can not help but 
take this occasion to admit that it is somewhat difficult for me 
to describe the shops of the leading bakers of Manchester, as 
I found every shop a model one in regard of sanitary conditions 
as well as of the high grade quality of goods produoed in same. 
I do not hesitate to say, that not every housewife is in a posi- 
tion to compete with these bakers in regard of cleanliness. 

Edwin Coss. 89 Hanover St. — Mr, Goss owns the present 
nlace for :^y/ years. Five bakers are employed and turn out a 
line of goods of superlative merit The baking is done in a 
Middleby oven. The shop is exceedinnly clean and sanitary. 
The store is admirably located and all the goods are sold over 
the counter. Mr, Goss also makes his own ice cream and serves 
same in the store. Consume about 13 bbis, of flour a week. 

Cote Bros., 610 Main St. — When I came down the street to 
visit Cote Bros., I saw four snow-white-dressed bakers who are 
employed in said bakery taking a rest in front of the house. 
This was the first good impression I had of this excellent plant. 
Clean bakers, clean shop — and so it was. The shop is a marvel 
of cleanliness, airy, well ventilated and well equipped with mod- 
em machinery. Without belittling any other baker in Man- 
chester, I must say, that it is the most efficient plant in this city. 
Well, let us visit the bakery. 

On the top floor we find the mixing and dough room equipped 
with a Lynn-Superior and a Triumph mixer. The mixers are 
furnished with flour and water scale also sifter, made by the 
J. H. Day Co. The iron troughs were also made by the Triumph 
Co. From this room the dough slides down through a dou^ 
chute into an automatic dough divider (2-pocket) of the Triumph 
make. Then they go into a Zerah bailer ; after this the rounded- 
up dough pieces are given time to proof in a Zerah revolving 
proof closet. A Thomson moulder attends to the moulding of 
the bread. The bread is baked in two Petersen ovens. We 
further find a pan greaser and cleaner made by the Gottschalh 
Co., and a Van Houten roll divider. There are also many minor 
improvements to be found in the shop. Every machine has its 
individual motor, and is as spic and span as though it were 
bought only yesterday. Employed are 25 people, among them 
cisht bakers. Five wagons and one auto truck are out Sell 
wholesale and retail. Ship also 40 boxes of bread everv dav to 
distant points. The loaves are wrapped in a hand sealer. The 
snecials are "Butter Kriist" and "Luxury" brands, furnished by 
(he Schuize Advertising Service, of Chicago, Young Mr. Cote 
sooke very highly about their "Specials." I saw Cote's "Butter 
Krust" bread advertised on the back of the street car transfers 
in this city. The output amounts to 30,000 loaves a week. Only 
bresd Is baked, and it is needless to sav that it is of superlative 
quality. The firm was tou.ided 28 years ago. I can not help to 
repeat that the cleanliness of the plant is most striking. 

County & Dahlherg, 250 Laurel 5t.— Another one of Man- 
chester's fairy bakeries 1 A place so clean, neat and attractive 
that one Is nearly compelled to buy. goods out of this bakery. 
County & Dahlberg started to bake on the West Side about 
18 years ago. One and one-half years aeo they built the present 
bakery, equipped same nicely with machines, and are now turn- 
ing out a fine and tempting line of «oods. "The shop is equipped 
with a Champion cake mixer, a Thomson moulder, a revolving 
proof box of the same make, and a Day dough mixer with' 
sifter. The baking is done in a Petersen oven covered with 
white tiles, Emnloved are six bakers. Two wairons are out. 
Bake a hiKh-prade line of bread, cakes and pies. Consume about 
60 bbls, of flour a week. The floor of this bakery is of white 
wood, everything is painted in mill white; every bench and 
trough is on wheels, in short— a fairy bakery. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Now^'s the Time to Contract 

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Use Armour's Baking Butter. We can supply you 
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ARMOUR^COMPANY Chicago 



Tell 'cm TOD (onnd It — in Bakibi RaviBW. 




.\rsiL, 19 1 6 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Tales of a Traveler 



By Otto Werlin, Special Editorial Associate of Bakers Review 



AFTER a voyage of eighteen hours on the S. S. "Olivette" of 
the P. S: O. Line through the Gulf of Mexico, warmed by 
breeies from the tropics, I reached Tampa, Fla. A holiday spirit 
pervaded the whole city, all was bustle and commotion, and ] 
sooa learned that this was the first day of the Tampa Fair, or 
"Gasparilla" week. Gasparilla was a noted pirate and terror of 
the Southern seas, having headquarters at Bocca Grande, eighty 
miles south of Tampa. Thousands of tourists streamed into the 
city to be present at the festivities, and I am strongly inclined to 
believe that many hotel and boarding house keepers wished to re- 
mind the visitors very forcibly of Gasparilla the rohber, judging 
fnsn the prices charged during Gasparilla week. 

CITSAN BAKESS OFFEK FKEE BKEAD EVEKY SATURDAY — IN TAMPA 

Tampa is a very attractive town, having a population of about 
lUMa It is an important railroad terminus and port of entry, 
dtuattd on Tampa Bay, 2g miles from the Gulf of Mexico. The 
diitf manufacturmg industry is connected with the tobacco pro- 
ihKts, moll of tbe tobacco coming from Cuba. Nearly one third 
of the population are Cubans. Thete are eighteen bakers in 
Tampa, seven of which are Amerioins and the rest Cubans 
Tbe Americans are prc^rcssive and have nicely equipped shops, 
whereas the Cubans do not appreciate the value of modern bake- 
Aaf machinery and their bread output is of a very cheap and in- 
ferior quality. Just think of it I They have to employ Union 
hbor, paying a foreman $20.00 and the second hand $i6xxi per 
week. An ordinary ten-cent loaf of bread they scale at twenty 
omces; selling it at seven cents, and more often at six cents, 
wh<desale. But this is not all. They still have more to offer. 
Every Saturday the consumer receives an amount of bread free 
tqaivalent to that which he purchases on a week day, or, in other 
words, he pays for bread six days of the week and the seventh he 
does not pay anything for it. The grocer receives two pounds of 
bread free every week. 1 had a hard time interviewing those 
Cuban paneho^ as they speak no English, "Plenty much worka, 
but maka no moneta" was all they could tell me without an in- 
terpreter. Had they been able to tell me in English what their 
bearts felt in Spanish then I could tell our readers more about 
thii type of baker. There seems to be keen competition among 
the Americans bakers. They sell a 14-oz. loaf for five cents and 
1 IJ-M. loaf for ten cents, and are now starting in to give pre- 
miums also. 

LADY BAKESS SPEND WINTEBS IN ST. PrTEESBURG— SUMMEKS 
ELSEWHERE 

Another steamer trip of about two hours brought me to St. 
Petersburg, the city of sunshine. This noted winter resort is 
indebted to its location for its wonderful climate. It is the south- 
enmiost point and beauty spot of the Pihellas Peninsula, which 
extends out from the west coast of Florida between the Gulf ol 
Uexico and Tampa Bay. This city has a population of 6,000. 
I tonld find only one bona fide baker in St. Petersburg, but five 
Wies eng^« in the baking trade during the winter season only. 
CHi, Woman ! thou hast certainly business instinct. These ladies 
comUne business with pleasure ; they come from the North, 
OJiio, Indiana, etc., engage in baking for a few months, then re- 
Omi to their homes with sunburnt cheeks and well- filled purses 
md leave our bona fide baker friend to supply the demand during 
4e dull season. Equal rights for women ! Well then, let them 
ihop^ for a license and taxes, just as the baker has to pay who 
keep] his shop going throughout the year. 

LAKELAND THE CHEAPEST BREAD TOWN IN FLORIDA 

From St. Petersburg I went back to Tampa, where I boarded 
» train for Lakeland, the cheapest bread town in Florida. This 
i) a fairly prosperous little town of about 5.000 people, located in 
iIm ipidst of the well-known citrus fruit section. Large phosphate 



works are near this town. Although the town is fairly pros- 
perous, not so the three Iceland bakers, who have plenty o! 
work, but little money. Two of these bakers scale the five cent 
loaf at 14 ounces, and sell twenty-seven loaves for one dollar, 
retail, that is the customer receives twenty-seven loaves for a dol- 
lar, entitling him to twenty-seven loaves of bread, to be taken as 
desired, throughout the year, unless the b^er becomes bankrupt, 
in which case he could find sympathy in only one place, that is — 
the dictionary. It was a puzzle to me how bread could be sold 
so cheap in Lakeland, when the price of flour had again risen to 
almost $8.00 per bbl. 

KISSIMllEE BAKEBS DOING WELL AT PAU RICES 

From Lakeland I went to Kissimmee, a beautiful little town 
with a population of about 2,600. The two bakers here do a fine 
business and get a f^r price for their bread. 

BAKERS IN ORLANDO SCALE LOAVES AT 22 AND 12 OUNCES 

Orlando was my next stop, and there is no more beautiful city 
in the sunny State of Florida. It is situated in the heart of the 
famous thousand lake region, the most lovely* and healthful sec* 
tion of the State. Three bakers with well equipped shops cater 
to the wants of the 5,000 in habitants with a fair line of goods. 
They scale their ten-cent loaves to 22 ounces and their five-cent 
k>aves to 12 ounces, allowing 20 percent discount to the wholesale 

From Orlando I took a flying trip throngh the following 
towns: Ocalo, Gainsvillc and Lake City in Florida, Valdosta, 
Thomasville and Albany in Georgia. 

AN OCALA BAKQl'S BIC SUCCESS BY ADVERTISING 

In Ocalo, a small town about 102 miles southwest of Jackson- 
ville, there are three bakers; however, one, Mr. Carter, a pro- . 
gressive man, does practically two-thirds of the business. He ^ 
told me with evident pride of the remarkable success he had : 
achieved in seven months with his special "Butter-Nut Bread." 1 
Before advertising it, he baked only ten lo-cent loaves per day, ; 
but now he bakes 500 daily. 

A GAINESVILLE baker's BIC DRIVE ON I0-<:ENT BREAD ' 

Gainesville is also a fine town of about 6,500 inhabitants. Two 
fine bakeries are here. The Eatmor Baking Co. the leading bak- 
ery has also had remarkable success with its ten-cent bread. 
Eight months ago they baked only five-cent loaves, but since 
advertising the "Butter-Nut" bread, most of the trade is on 
ten-cent loaves, very little on the five-cent site. I mention 
this fact, as the bakers everywhere are trying to get rid of 
the five-cent loaf, but some say it cannot be done. The pro- 
prietor of the "Eatmor," however, is of the opinion that it 
can, and says that he has not only dispensed with the five-cent 
loaf, but has increased his trade in general. 

Lake City, with a population of 6,000, was the last place visited 
in Florida. It has only one baker 

CONDITION OF THE TRADE IN FLORIDA 

Just a few remarks about the State of Florida and the bakers 
located there. I have visited fifteen cities and interviewed every 
boss baker in them. The trip consumed fourteen days and cover- 
ed 1,100 miles. In most of the towns I found wide-awake bakers 
who realized the fact that the first man who starts an up-to-date 
bakery will rule the place, so far as the baking trade is concerned. 
Quite a few of the enterprising bakers are preparing to take this 
course. I never traveled in a State where so many bakers told 
me that they were going to start an up-to-date bakery in their 
town. Not only are the larger bakers on the look-out for im- 
provements, but the smaller baker is also on the alert for modern 
methods, as far as their circumstances will permit. Florida is a 
very beautiful State with tropical vegetation. The animals found ^ 
here are of the class that exist in the tropics. Wherever the eye 



94 



BAKERS REV I E W 



April, 1916 



rests, it is greeted with palm and orange groves, [lalmettos and 
maenolias, oaks and pines. There is hardly a more beautiful 
sight than an orange tree decked in glossy, dark green leaves and 
laden with golden fruit. 

VALDOSTA TKAIW NOT PK0GKES3IVE 

Valdosta was my first stop in Georgia, and the first thing that 
struck me was the absence of the beautiful palm forests, which 
are as much a feature of the State of Florida, as arc the northern 
woods of New England. Valdosta is a town of about 8,000 with 
two bakers, who, however, cannot be termed "progressive." A 
fz-oz. loaf sells for three and a half cents, and a zf-oz. loaf for 



ROOM FOR 1 

Thomasville and Albany, Ga. wete the next points visited. 
Thomasvilte has a population of 7,000. One of the two bakers 
here told me that he has a quantity of cheap flour on hand and 
is therefore able to scale his bread 2 ounces more than his com- 
petitor, but he got "my goat" in such a way that I forgot to ask 
him how much he really scaled the bread. Therits room for 
improvement in the stores of both of these bakers. 

NO BAKER IN ALBANY, A TOWN OF 8,0OO INHABITANTS 

There is not one baker in Albany, although it has a population 
'of about 8,006, The bread is shipped froni Macon or' Atlanta. 
Oh! t forgot, there was a baker there a' few weeks ago. but he 
was obl^gtld to close his doors. 



.ety 



, M(\<;ONriES FORTUNATE IN HAVING 

I was asking myself the question, "What is the trouble with thi 
Georgia. bakery?" when conditions suddenly change in Mgcon, ; 
city of approximately 50,000 inhabitants. It is an important tradt 
center on the Ocmulgee River, which has a fall of about 
feet seven miles above the city, furnishing immense power. Il 
is also a railroad center and lies in the center of a fastly develop- 
ing cotton ^district. It has extensive cotton manufacturies and i: 



one of the most important inland cotton markets in the U. S. 
Macon is a model city. This being a prohibition town, demon 
rum has been driven out, and the moving picture films are sub- 
jected to a most rigorous censorship, and woe unto any movie 
man who would risk throwing on the screens any scenes that 
might offend the scruples of the good "Maconites." 

Let us now visit the bakers. To my surprise I found only two 
bakers here. About three years ago, before the opening of tljt 
largest bakery here, there were five others, of the good old type, 
but they soon had to give way to the more modern and progres- 
sive bakers, the Sears Sanitary Baking Co. and Merkel's Bakery, 
and our readers will readily understand why this change took 
place if they will read the detailed description of these plants 
which will appear in a later issue of Bakers Review. I 
would mention further that as sure as water runs down hill the 
same fate awaits the other bakers of Georgia, who will not con- 
form to the times and adopt modem methods. .1 

While in Macon I noticed a unique advertisement in. the. dailies 
of a physician who claims that although he has the large)^ prac- 
tice in the city, he has brought fewer cases to the undertafce^ than 
any of his competitors.- .,. 

Although I do not question the ability of our medical friend, 
I am of the opinion, that , if it is a fact that the cuortality is low- 
er in Macon than in any other city itv Georgia; it is largdy due 
to the high quality of the output of the two .bakers mentioned 
above, whicji is produped under the most sanitary: conditions. 
"Jtemova tl^e cause and you, destroy the eAect," which is the 
deadly efFect of- home-baked bread and .biscuits in.this. case. 

. ALL OF THE BAKEfiS IN AUGUSTA ABE LIVE -WUtES ., 

. . A si^-hour trip on the Central Georgia R. R. usuall>>. takes, the 
^avefei fro^ Macon to Augusta, a distance .o£ about -I3p miles. 
but due to my customary "luck", it took, me eight hours, as^the 
engine broke down. The fastest train makes, twenty-five oiiles 
art hour, and while in Georgia 1 found but one train running on 



CLEANLINESS 

In (he me of 

Pan Cleaning and Greasing 
Machines 

ImpottiUc until the advent of the 

— ^UNIVERSAL — 

which u 
SANITARY-REVERSIBLE— ADJUSTABLE 



FAIRFAX 

AND 

GOLDEN 
CREAM 

"THE FLOURS 
OF QUALtTY" 

Strong: Bakers' Patents 

Our Wheat, for grinding mix- 
ture, is selected from a line of 
155 Country Elevator* owned 
and operated by us. 

Our motto— "Quality." 

Writ» ■>( for tait^Aua and quotation* 

CRESCENT MILLING CO. 

DAILY CAPACITY SOO BBLS. 

Fairfax. Minn. 

HERMAN F. WRIGHT, Mu»(*r 



e adi. Id Uaebrs krtir><. 



tV 



Aim^ 1 916 

jdiedule time, and that train I, of course — missed. It is a most 
comical sight, when looking out of the window of the train, to 
itt a darkey seated on a wagon behind two mutes making for a 
tiain, you can easily imagine the gait — Well, one gets there all 
ihe same, even if a little belated. Augusta is a very "sociable" 
dty. It has a population of 43,000 and is at the head of naviga- 
liop of the Savannah River and carries on a large cotton trade. 
Its mills, run by a system of water-power canals, produce more 
onbleached cotton than any other city in the U. S. There are 
four bakers in Augusta, every one of them a live wire. One of 
the bakers caters to the wholesale and shipping trade and is about 
10 open one of the finest bakeries in the South. They are all buy- 
ing machinery to keep their shops abreast with the times, and 
I think there will be more bakery machinery shipped to Augusta 
in the next year that to any other city of its size in the States. A 
rity law has been passed which provides for the wrapping of 
bread. Bread is scaled at 13 ounces for the five-cent loaf, twen- 
ty-eight loaves being sold for a dollar, wholesale. Far more 
five-cent than ten-cent loaves are baked in this city. There is 
keea'cotilpetltion amoug the bakeri''of Augusta, ii^b produce a 
iJDf line o£ goods. ->■ 



BAKERS REVIEW 



95 



-!■ ■ ATU^NTA CITIIENS PBEPEK QUALITY to QUANTirV^ 

From Augusta 1 went to Atlanta, the capital of the State, a 
bae, modem, prosperous city, as well as a commercial and indus- 
trial center. It is also an important railroad terminus, and the 
largest wholesale distributing point of the south eastern states. 
It bas extensive manuiactories of cotton,, fertilizers and patent 
medicines. Although the South is "dry," one can buy patent 
nwdicines containing 18% alcohol I Whiskey has 40%, This is 
driving the devil out with Beelzebub. While on this matter, and 
knowing that some bakers often like to indulge in something a 
irifle-stronger thwi water for a change, I will relate the follow- 
ing little anecdote : 

While in Georgia I w^s invited to dinner one day by one of my 
Soathern friends. Mine host .lauded the "prohibition" which 
tTcvails in the Southern States, telling me that he also voted 
"■(Jfy." IinaSine my surprise when one bottle of "Budweiser"was 
followed by another at the repast, and upon my inquiring how it 
was possible under the prevailing conditions to have so much beer 
in his house, he offered the following solution : ''I have two sons, 
rach over twenty-one years of age. The law allows such citizens 
wenty-four bottles of beer a month. I am, therefore, in a posi- 
tion to receive 72 bottles each month. I am glad that they have 
not formed such a bad habit and that their father alone has this 
depraved taste." No wonder that he voted "dry." I could re- 
cite many more incidents of this nature, but fearing that my 
feaders may become thirsty I will continue the narrative of my 

Atlanta is the chief distributing point for the Nothern and 
Western manufacturies. The great staples of its trade are cot- 
ton and tobacco. It has a population of about 156,000 and was 
founded in I&io. The chief point of interest in the history of 
Atlanta is its siege and capture (Sept. and, 1864) by Genera! 
Shennan, who, after holding the city two months, began his fam- 
ous "March to the Sea." There are sixteen bakers here, among 
which are four wholesalers, one being the originator of the 
American package cakes. The rest are retailers. The bakers 
produce a fine line of goods, the bread being of an especially 
good quality. The prices they obtain are fair. 1 really could 
not delect any underselling in this city, and the Atlanta public 
Kerns to prefer quality to quantity. A ten-cent loaf scales 
about 24 ounces, while the five-cent loaf scales 12 ounces, and 
wholesales at eight and four cents, respectively. Among tlie bak- 
ers in Atlanta there is one who specializes in gluten bread, I 
noticed a sign in a show-window on South Broad St. It read 
'Hygienic Diabetic Bread Co." I entered the store to obtain 
further particulars. An elderly lady, who said she was the ori- 
einator and owner of the Hygienic and Diabetic Bread Co., 
greeted me. I imparted to her the object of my visit, but she ap- 
peared tmwilling to give me any Information, fearing, I presume, 
ibal 1 would acquire the "secret" of her gluten bread, but upon 



telling her that I merely wished to know the history and not the 
formula of her famous gluten bread, she became more sociable 
and invited me to take a seat, which I gladly accepted. On a 
little side table three pairs of glasses were lying; no doubt they 
were of different degrees of strength. She selected one pair, 
cleaned them carefully, and adjusted them to her eyes, and look- 
ed me over from bow to stem. I will be frank and say that I do 
not think she liked my face. She then related the following: 

HISTORY OF THE FAMOUS ATLANTA GLUTEN BREAD 

"My only child, a little girl, was very ill and the doctors said 
she would not live unless she underwent an operation. She 
could not even digest a raw egg. Not consenting to an operation 
I sent her to a sanitorium where they specialize in the Gluten 
cure." As I never heard of such a cure 1 looked at her in some 
astonishment, and was still more surprised to hear her say that 
in three weeks the child who had been sick unto death had ful- 
ly recovered on a gluten diet. "This first gave me the idea to 
incorporate gluten in bread, but," she said, "gluten is a hard 
thing to get. Finally a man came along and told me where I 
could obtain it, and after I knew where to get gluten, I took lect- 
ures on the subject." This was father a strong dose for the to 
swallow, and so I said: "Lady, where did yoo take ICctufei in 
Gluten?" She hesitated a trifle, changed her glasses for a strong- 
er pair (I suppose) measured me again from top to toe, and said 
very complacently: "At Kellogg's in Sattle Creek." She''con- 
tinued : "'Yes, I went home and experimented in baking ^loten 
bread, and wasted many a baYrel of glntcn imtil the bread reach- 
'ed the perfection stage'." "How did you hit upon' the idei' of 
making a business of it?" I next inquired. "Weill 1 gave away 
a great deal of gluten bre^d and cured so many people that the 
doctor said it would be a benefit to humanity if I made a busi- 
ness of baking this gluten bread and selling it," "How much do 
you scale your bread, Madam?" "Eleven ounces," was the reply. 
"How much do you charge for a loaf?" 1 then asked. "Ten 
cents,," she said. Providence gave me the idea to bake the bread 
in order to benefit my fellowmen. As I was pondering about the 
high price of this bread and began to question the brotherly (or 
rather sisterly) love of this self-terihed benefactress to humanity, 
I thought of the little daughter whose life had been saved 
through partaking of gluten bread, and adjusting my necktie, 
I suddenly said : "Madam, I hope your daughter, who owes 
her life to your gluten bread, is Still alive, and that I may 
have the pleasure of meeting her." Hereupon this elderly lady 
removed her glasses, took the third (and strongest) pair from 
the table, adjusted them, and replied in a long drawn-out tone— 
"NO! My daughter is very much alive, however, she weighs 
over 200 pounds, but you can't see her, for she lives out of 
tow , and, by the way, is married and has two children." This 
statement I did not question in the least, and noticing some pies 
doughnuts and buns in the store I inquired whether these also 
were made of gluten, to which she replied: "I make those 
of half gluten and half flour." "Has your bread any other 
special features," I asked, curiously. "Yes," she said, very (»m- 
posedly, "It is a great fat reducer, and at the same time a 
great fat increaser." I almost fell from my chair with aston- 
ishment, but she continued with the greatest self-composure, "If 
you want to reduce your fat, eat it toasted; but if you want 
to increase your weight, eat it in its natural form. Furthermore 
(now, listen tat ladies!) if you wish to reduce, it will reduce 
your fat without leaving any wrinkles." 

Welt, this was sufficient for me, and the hour of reckoning 
had come. Assuming a very wise expression, I asked suddenly : 
"My good lady, what is gluten?" This unexpected question 
evidently embarrassed her. After a slight pause I repeated my 
question, and she then slowly answered : "You know gluten 
is some thing which many people do not know much about." 
(Some answer) "Well!" I said, "never mind what other people 
think about it, tell me what you think about it!" As she 
failed to make any response I gave a little lecture on giuten. 
"You told me," 1 said, "that you use barrels of gluten. This is 
impossible for the reason that there is no glutati 
I)i:ji:zec oy ' 



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96 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, [916 



filled in a barrel. Flour, as every chemist will tell y 
fully 65 per cent, starch; gliadin and gluten, two nitroRenous 
substances are present in about equal proportions, and 
when tiniied with water, they form gluten, comprising 
about 10 to 12% of the flour. My dear madam," I said with a 
winning smile, "this is a very interesting point, tiluten is im- 
portant in bread, but tliere ' is no gluten whatever in flour as 
gluten; it is the result of the chemical action when the water 
is added to make the dough, uniting the gliaden and glutenin. 
No wonder you say gluten is hard to get. I wish 1 could see 
some of your gluten in barrels," and then I made an attempt 
to enter the bake shop, but her peremptory interference left 
me no choice in the matter. As I had made clear to her, how- 
ever, that she had not "hood-winked" me, 1 withdrew with a 
very superior smile, while a sympathetic female friend of hers 
who had listened to our conversation, remarked, as I went out 
of the door : "f thought he was no good as soon as I saw him." 

Our readers will probably think that I have given them a 
"yam," but the Atlanta bakers well know their "gluten" bakery. 
For the moral of the above—I am reminded of the words ot 
P. T, Bamum. The bread which this woman sells is made ol 
graham flour, or, I will say, half graham and half white. That 
the owner of this bakety has more business acumen than 
Christian love is evidenced by the fact that she demands for her 
bread double the standard price asked by most other bakers, and 
she gets it, too. 

After this I went to the hotel, packed my trunk, aimed tor the 
railroad station, and boarded a train for Birminghaili. Soon 
afterward I was in my berth, when it started to rain, and as the 
rain beat against the window panes of my berth, it seemed to 
me as if the very heavens were weeping over the stupidity of the 
"Gluten Eaters." 

WHOLESALnS CONTROL SITUATION IN BIIMINCHAH 

Birmingham is a city with a population of about 134,000 in- 
habitants, and is the largest city in the State of Alabama. Situ- 
ated in ^e heart of the greatest coal, iron and lime stone dis- 
trict of the South, it has extensive blast furnaces, coke-ovens, 
coal mine, stone quarries and rolling mills. Three huge coal 
fields, aggregating over g,00O square miles, with some sixty 
seams, more than half of them workable, lie near the city, the 
nearest deposits being only four miles from the city. The city 
is built partly upon the slope of Red Mountain, named from 
its outcrop of hemitite iron ore, which extends many miles 
in every direction. There are twenty-two bakers in Birming- 
ham, among whom are three wholesalers. One wholesaler turns 
out about 25,000 to 30,000 loaves of bread and about 8,000 pack' 
age cakes daily, and no doubt has the lion's share of the business. 
The prevailing conditions for the retailer are very unsatisfac- 
tory. Home-made goods are said to be the cause. These may 
influence the trade somewhat, but in my opinion there are more 
potent reasons. Birmingham is a city of modern shops — or 
stores, but I regret to say, not bake-shops, as they are the 
most inferior in Birmingham. Were 1 not to say so, anyone 
who is at all familiar with Birmingham, could justly criticise 
me for distorting facts. The store proper and bakeshop usually 
occupy one space, being divided by a partition, the hake-shop 
being poorly ventilated, so that all the steam and odor from 
the ovens and baked goods pass into the store. I have been in 
stores in which the air was positively suffocating from the 
fumes of doughnut grease. In regard to the quality of the 
goods — it is better to be silent. That the people of Birmingham 
appreciate a good quality of cake and bread, is evidenced by the 
phenominal success of the wholesalers. The rents in Birming- 
ham are fairly high. A bakery on a fairly good thoroughfare 
rents at $70.00 monthly. The bread scales about the same as in 
Atlanta. 

ALL OF Tuscaloosa's bakers prospering 

Tuscaloosa, Ala., was my next stop. It is about seventy mites 
west of Birmingham, and is located in the midst of a rich min- 
eral n"d lumber district In a population of about 12,000 there 
arc only four bakers. Every one seems to be prospering, and I 



found some of the bakers turning out the finest line of goods 
that I have seen in the South. We have here our friend, J. 
Hardin, whose cake foreman, R. E. North, introduced package 
cakes with marvelous success and is thinking of marketing his 
package cake proposition to other bakers in the near future. 
The son of Duncan May is the undisputed leader in the ice 
cream and fancy cake line. This gentleman very strenuously 



of many bakers that the small towns of the 
South are a poor field for the finer grade of baked goods. Otto 
Marie, on 23rd Ave., is also doing a very satisfactory business. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Detroit^ N*w BalMxy Firm 

Joseph Mills, for many years manager of various plants for 
the Ward Baking Co., latterly in the Ward Brooklyn plant, and 
Albert D. Fox, for neary twelve years superintendent of the 
Perfection Biscuit Co, in Fort Wayne, Ind,. have organized the 
Mills-Fox Baking Co., a $50,000 corporation, to do business in 
Detroit. Mich. The new firm will erect a modem plant at Fourth 
St Merrick streets, Detroit. 



numr«U Lnadw^ to W. S. Travis 

A farewell luncheon was tendered to Walter S. Travis on 
March ist upon his leaving the Werner & Pfleidcrer 
Co. to become one of the directing heads of a Bridgeport 
(Conn.) bread firm. Mr. Travis had been associated with the 
Werner & Pfleiderer Co. for over eight years, during which 
time he had endeared himself to many members of the allied 
trades; so the occasion was one of good fellowship. I. F. White, 
now Eastern manager of the Petersen Oven Co., and George 
Mahla, of the Werner & Pfleiderer Co., two old associates 
of Mr. Travis, acted as hosts. There were fourteen present at 
the luncheon, at the Bericman Cafe, Beekman Street and Park 
Row, New York City. Mr. Travis was the recipient of many 
good wishes for his future success. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

nnuicl&l Motes 

The General Baking Company reports for the year ended 
Dec. 25, 1915, net income of $741,015. a decline of $15O;701 
from the revenue of 1914. A balance of $85335 remained 
after dividends had been paid on the preferred stock, a decline 
of $123,095. 

♦ * * 

Formsr Bakor SoUlag Hactalnory 

Fred Wagner, formerly head of the R. Wagner Bakery Co, of 
Louisville, Ky., has accepted a position with the Triumph Man- 
ufacturing Co., of Cincinnati, and will travel through Kentuckv- 
and the South. 

•fr * « 

Bates now with Consolidated Prodvcta Co. 

Albert L. Bates has resigned his position with the SchuUe 
Baking Co., of Chicago, III., and accepted an offer to go with 
the Consolidated Products Co., to introduce their new product, 
condensed buttermilk to the baking trade. Mr. Bates has been 
manager of one of Schulie's plants in Chicago, and has been 
with the Schulie Co, for five years. 

He is strongly interested in condensed buttermilk and feels 
he has something fine to show to his friends among the bakers. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Toxas Bakan to Bold Exhibit 

The Master Bakers of the State of Texas meeting in con- 
vention at Waco, Texas, May 2. 3 and 4th, 1916, have arranged 
for an exhibit of bakers' supplies and machinery and invite 
exhibits from all houses interested. It is said that space will 
be very reasonable and the convention is assured of a large 
attendance. Inquiry as to cost of space for exhibits should be 
referred to Chas. Vincent, Wac(^ TtxfrC ^ 
Digi:zec oy V 



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April, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



97 



Trams-BIUstsslppl Convention Plana 

The Trans- Mississippi Convention, which is to be held in 
Omaha, Neb., is to be one of the most unique conventions ever 
held by the bakers in this country. . 

It is the plan to hold the convention in Omaha's large con- 
veolioii hall, having the association meetings surrounded by 
booths of exhibitors, thus bringing together in one great meet- 
ing all features of interest to the bakers. 

Already many large manufacturers have signified that it is 
thnr intention to make the Trans-Mississippi convention their 
sbow ground, and wide interest is being shown in the approved 

The Ak-Sat-Ben Governors have named Monday night, June 
12th, as bakers' night at the Den, and they are making ready 
to get even with the bakers for the small-sized loaves of bread 
ihey have been getting for the past two years. 

Jl is understood that all the big railroads leading into Omaha 
are to feature the Trans-Mississippi Bakers' Convention, their 
advertising having already been mailed. 

The program committee have nearly completed the attractions, 
and white they are not saying anything — their smiles would 
infer some big surprises. 

The Omaha Master Bakers' Club has always been one of the 
live-wire clubs of the country, and it is plainly evident that they 
are behind this first Trans- Mississippi Convention, as any one 



1 making ihe meeting a big '■ 



i being 



drawn into service. 

We believe that every baker in the middle West should attend 
this big convention, and that he should bring his wife and family, 
as they will also find entertainment has been arranged for every 
minute they spend In Omaha. 

The convention dates are June 12th- 13th -14th. 



Coming CcmTontlona 

April 25-27— Oklahoma Annual, at Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

May 1-4 — Southeastern Annual, at Macon, Ga. 

May 2-4 — Texas Annual, at Waco, Texas. 

May 9-11— Illinois Annual, at Springfield, 111. 

June 6-S— Tri-Slate (Ohio, Indiana and Michigan) Annual, 

at Toledo, Ohio. 
June 12-14— Pennsylvania Annual, at York, Pa. 
June 12-15 — Trans-Mississippi Convention (Iowa, Kansas, 

Missouri, and Nebraska), at Omaha, Neb. 
June 13 — California Annual, at Oakland, Cal. 
June 26-27— New York State Annual, at the Bronx, New 

York City. 
Atigusl 7-11— National, at Salt Lake Citj% Utah. 
October 10-12— Wisconsin Annual. 



MOUI--L BAKERY AT FOOD SHOW 



t five machines formed part of the equipment of the Model Bukeshop exhibited by Jabtirg Brothers of Nevi York at the 
National Food Exposition held at Grand Central Palace in March. Another feature of the Jaburg Exhibit was a display 
of their widely advertised Blue Jay Pare Food Products. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, [916 



Choice Cracker Recipes 

Written for Bakers Review h Gluto 



(Continued on page 103) 

Olnten Bread 

Recipes have beea given from time to time in Bakess Review 
for gluten bread, wliich, to my mind, would not make a bread 
that could rightly be called gluten but would make a very nice 
whole wheat bread. A person suffering from the dreadful 
disease, diabetes should not be allowed to eat bread made in 
that manner. 

In some states a standard is set for gluten flour. That of 
New Hampshire, which is before me, states that it must contain 
at least thirty per cent, of protein and not over forty-eight 
per cent, of starch. 

In most all cities a gluten flour can be bought containing at 
least thirty-five per cent, of protein and a nice loaf of bread can 
be made from it as follows ; 

To five pounds of flour add one ounce of salt, three ounces 
lard, one and one-half ounces yeast and two quarts of water. 
Make a clear dough, at a temperature of 85 degrees Fahr. Knead 
thoroughly and let it lay three hours to rise. Scale it off, sixteen 
ounces to a loaf, place it in pans and let prove until it fills the 
pans. Bake in a good heat. This amount of dough will make 
nine loaves and retails at fifteen cents per loaf. 

The flour is made by washing the starch from wheat flour ; it 
is then allowed to precipitate, after which it is dried and sold. 

The gluten* which remains is a small portion of the flour, 
resembling rubber when wet, and is dried in a vacuum dryer and 
reground into flour. This flour contains about 70 per cent, of 
proteids but is too tough, when made into a dough, to work. It 
is therefore mixed with a spring wheat flour in a proportion 
that gives thirty-five per cent, proteids : a per cent, that is recom- 
mended by physicians for ordinary cases of diabetes. 
Choice Biscuit Kecipea 
Honey Fniit Cake 

1 bbl. short cake flour b gals. N. O. molasses 
16 lbs. lard 18 oz. salt 

6 qts. eggs. 3 lbs, bicarbonate of soda 

4 qts. swCet milk I lb. cinnamon 

\2 gals, honey 8 02. ground mace 

100 lbs. currants 
Pour all the ingredients, except the flour and soda, into the 
mixer. Turn on the power and mix them all thoroughly. Dump 
in the flour and sift in the soda while mixing. Make a clear 
dough and run on a soft cake machine with a bar die. Bake 
in a medium cool oven. 
ICED Honey Bars 

Iced H»ne3r Bars 

t bbl. short cake flour 14 gals, honey 

10 lbs. light brown sugar 3 lbs. bicarbonate of soda 

10 lbs. lard 24 oz. ammonia 

6 qts. eggs 20 oz. salt 

2 qts, water 4 oi- lemon oil 

Meat the Iioney to too degrees Fahr. and cream it with the 
sugar, lard, salt and lemon oil. Beat in the eggs and add the 
ammonia dissolved in water. Dump in the flour and while mix- 
ing, sift in the soda. 

Run through the bar attachment on a panning machine and 
bake in a cool oven with a small quantity of steam. Ice with soft 
icing. 

Honejr Jumblea 
I bbl. cake flour 3 lbs, bicarbonate of soda 

8 lbs. lard 18 

14 gals, honey 20 

I gal. eggs 12 



2 gals, water 3 01. lemon oil 

Make a dough the same as for Honey Bars and run on a soft 
cake machine with a jumble die. Bake in a cool oven with little 
steam. Sell plain or iced. 

Vanilla Creams 
150 lbs. cake flour ^ gal. honey 

112 lbs. powdered sugar 20 oz. bicarbonate of soda 

25 lbs. butter 20 oz. ammonia 

25 lbs. lard 12 oz. salt 

3 gals, eggs 8 oz. tartaric acid 

8 gals, sweet milk 2 oz. egg color 

3 qts. vanilla extract 
Cream the sugar, butter and lard and beat in the eggs, a few 
at a time, then the honey, vanilla, salt and color. Dissolve the 
ammonia in the milk, add and dump in the flour and sift in the 
soda and acid while mixing. Make a good cle^r dough and run 
on a soft cake machine with one and one-half inch die. Bake 
in a moderate heat. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Death of Harry Fox, oaa of Country's Iiar> 
gast Flonr Bnyars 

Harry Fox, who conducted a flour brokerage office at 623 
Postal Telegraph Building, Chicago, died March 9. Mr. Fox 
also acted as flour buyer for the Biscuit and Cracker Manufac- 
turers' Association, in which capacity he was one of the largest 
buyers of flour in the United States. 

Mr. Fox was a well-known figure in the commercial world for 
many years. He was an expert on flour and baking, was well 
posted on the chemistry of flours, and was also an authority on 
the country's pure food laws. An able speaker, Mr. Fox w^v 
instrumental in the success of many gatherings of the trade. He 
was a good friend, always ready to give of his time and exper- 
ience to those who needed guiding. Society circles also wel- 
comed his personality, and he was a 32nd degree Mason, a 
Knight Templar, and a Shriner. 

Mr. Fox was bom in London, England. He is survived by 
seven sons and three daughters : Arthur G. Albert D., Charles 
R.. H. W., Alfred W., Walter M, Dr. Edward P, Rose C, 
Emily M., and Lucy R. His bu^ess will be continued by Iris 
son, Arthur G. Fox, who has been associated with him. : 
. ♦ * ♦.■.■,, 

llassachosattB Bakers IMna 

The Master Bakers' As^sociation of Massachuse^s hdd its 
annual banquet and dance on March 9 at the Americaii. House, ' 
Boston. 

The principal speaker was Louis K. Liggett, president of tie 
Boston Chamber of Commerce, who scored the selfishaess of 
the business men of Boston who are tying up the railroad 
freight situation. Hf said that business men seem to prefer 
to pay demurrage an'd keep their goods in freight cars rathtr 
than to deliver to customers or pay storage. He asserted tlni 
the bakers are vitally affected by the situation and suggested 
that they co-operate with other agencies in order to relieve the 
congestion. 

L. M. Scott, of St. Johnsbury, Vt., president of the New Eng- 
land Tri-State Mastei' Bakers' Association, was also an inter- 
esting speaker, Charles H. Gretter, president of the Massachu- 
setts Association, acted i 



The Loose-Wiles Biscuit Company earned a net revenue of 
$422,371 last year, compared with $635,654 the year before, » 
decrease of $213,283. 



Aran, igi6 



BAKERS REVIEW 



APRIL 






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17 



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c 



CAUFORNIA RAISIN DAYS 

Are You Ready For Them With This? 



April 28 and 29 are 
Raisin Days through- 
out the nation. Tlie 
Raisin Growers of Cal- 
ifornia are behind a big 
campaign that will 
make everybody think 
about raisins these two 



days. Our Saturday 
Evening Post Page for 
April is devoted to these 
Raisin Days. Take ad- 
vantage of all this in- 
terest in raisins to get 
people to eat 



California Raisin Bread 

Made with Sun-Maid Raisins and San-Maid Raisin Specialties 
,tiow's Your Chance Special Helps 



^I'is means increased business for you. Wfaen 
people once eat tt.is national bread, baked after the 
special recipe which we furnish you free, they come 
back for more. It's raisin bread that's new to tbem 
because it contains plenty of Sun-Maid raisins- 
Bakers all over the country have opened up a new 
field of business and profit with this Raisin Bread 
and Sun-Maid Raisin Specialties. 



Write to our nearest office 
for special helps that will tie ybu 
up with the activity in raisins on 
these big days— posters, col6red 
posters, etc. 

Do it now. 



California Associated Raisin Co. 



Meant Bldi. 
Chicago 



Memberthip 6,000 Grower* 
FRESNO, CALIF. 



113 Hudson St. 
New York 



L«t (bem know that joa raad tbe ada. I 



BixEES Bariiw. 



DigitJzedby VjOOy I 



B A K i: R S REVIEW 



y Google 



Cracker aking 

An Impartial Snxvay of tha Crackar Industry throngbont tha World 



Some Reminiscences of a Lifetime Spent in the 
Baking Business 

By Thomas S. Ollive, Vice-President of the National Biscuit Co. 



Editob's Note: The N. B. C, official house organ of the 
National Biscuit Co., recently published the following from 
[he pen of the man who is reputed to be the oldest biscuit 
baker in the country. The illustrations as well as the story 
are of peculiar interest to cracker bakers of the present day.) 

SOME people say that I am the oldest biscuit baker in the 
country and maybe I am. In any event, 1 started to 
bake biscuit at the age of fifteen and I have been in the bis- 
cuit business ever since. As I am eighty years old now, 1 
»m thus credited with sixty-five years spent in the industry. 

I was born in Liverpool, England, on May 17th, 1835. 
When I was ten years old our family came to America and 
my father started a small cracker factory in New York City. 
In 1850, when I was fifteen, I started to work for him. 

New York, then, as now, was a large city, as cities went in 
ibat time, but it was confined to the lower or southern end 
of Manhattan Island. Fiftieth Street was far up-town and 
beyond that was open country. Had any one prophesied 
then that the city was destined to be the largest city in the 
world and that in fifty years it would have more than four 
millions of people within its borders, he would have been 
laughed to scorn. 

EIGHT CSACKEK BAKESS IN NEW YORK CITV IN 185O 

The business of cracker baking in the country was also 
in it infancy. In the year 1850 there were but eight cracker 
bakers in New York City: Speir & Company in Pine Street; 
Sanford & Goodwin in South Street; J. T. Wilson & Company 
in Dutch Street 1 Johnson & Treadwell in Beekman Street ; 
Erastus Titus in Waishington Street ; Parr & Company in Mott 
Street; I. & J. McGay in Forsyth Street and Joseph Bruen in 
Delancey Street. 

All these bakers made the same line of goods with the ex- 
ception of Joseph Bruen, who specialized in oyster or butter 
crackers. His product, made entirely by hand, was of An- 
asual excellence and was used by all Oyster Houses, the 
then prevailing designation for restaurants and eating places. 
Each day he would deliver the crackers fresh from the ovens 
to his customers. Wearing a long-tailed coat and high silk 
hat, he would drive his two-wheeled cart about town making 
deliveries as ordered. The crackers were put up in cotton 
cloth bags, each bag holding seven pounds. "Joe" Bruen was 
a picturesque figure, a character indeed, whom everyone 
knew. 

My earliest recollections go no farther back than 1850, at 
which time there were but five principal kinds of crackers 
manufactured; namely, the butter or oyster cracker, the soda 
cracker, the sugar cracker, the ginger snap and the pilot 
cracker (more commonly known as ship bread), this latter 



being made in larg? quantities to supply the sailing vessels, 
it being their only staple food for long voyages. I well re- 
member helping to stock ships' lockers with these crackers. 
The extra supply was carried in hogsheads and barrels. By 
far the largest part of the output of nearly all the old bakeries 
consisted of pilot crackers. 

Hand labor was used exclusively in making the butter and 
sugar crackers, but we had machines to cut the soda and 



V 

pilot crackers, making use of hand labor in mixing and pre- 
paring the dough. In those days we began to work at four 
o'clock in the afternoon, with the minimum amount of time 
for breakfast and dinner. I am glad to say, though, that this 
custom did not prevail long. 

Butter crackers were made by taking one or two barrels 
of flour of the best grade and adding about fifteen pounds 
of butter and fifteen pounds of lard to each barrel These 
ingredients were then mixed by hand in a wooden trough 



I02 



JAKERS REV IE W 



April, 1916 



with the necessary amount of waicr and salt until the dough 
reached the proper clearness. 

A canvas was then spread over the dough and it was 
treaded into a solid mass, after which it was taken to the 
1>rake.'' This consisted of a circular or square platform 
bavins > tons stick (nicknamed a "horse") attached to an 
iron Bwivel in the rear. The different workmen took turns 
in jumping upon this "horse" and so kneading the dough. 
It was pretty strenuous work. 

When the dough had attained the right consistency it was 
cut by hand into squares, placed on a bench and cut again, 
this time into strips two feet long and two inches wide. 
Hicse strips were shaped by hand into long thin rolls and 



cutting was done by a machine worked by hand power. The 
baking was done on the bottom of the oven. Ginger snaps 
and sugar crackers were baked in pans. Crackers were de- 
livered in barrels, boxes and seven-pound bags. We never 
carried stock. 

In the spring of 1S5S I went to San Francisco to become 
foreman for Deith & Starr, one of the two bakeries on the 
Coast. About the only product manufactured by these bakers 
was pilot crackers, made in the same manner as in the East 
Deith & Starr, however, put out a soda cracker of superior 
quality, butter being the only shortening used. 

Two years later I crossed the Sierra Nevada Mountains 
and located at Yreka in the beautiful Valley of the Shasta 
in Northern California, where I engaged in business for my- 
self. On the backs of mutes, at an expense of twenty cents 
per pound freight, I packed a cracker-cutting machine over 
the mountains. It was the first cracker machine ever seen 
in that territory. 

At Yreka the only crackers we baked were soda crackers, 
which we sold at twenty-five cents a pound. We also baked 
pies, which we made with dried fruits. For these we re- 
ceived fifty cents apiece. Our flour we got from a mill in 
the Shasta Valley, at a cost of eight dollars per barrel, or 



Our Civil War gave great impetus to the cracker-baking industry 
in this country since it created a tremendous demand for 
hardtack, or army bread. This picture shows how it was 
baked in those days. 

these in turn were transformed into small balls a little larger 
than marbles by dexterous manipulation of the fingers. The 
balls were moulded on the table by the palm of the hand into 
the desired shape. In some cases they were placed on long 
wooden splints and set in the oven. 

The process of mixing dough for pilot and soda crackers 
was identical with the process I have described, but the 



This picture (as well as the one above) showing U. S. Army 
inspectors examining hardtack intended for the Northern 
forces, is a reproduction of a wood-cut published originally 
in Harper's H^eekty in 1861. 



This old drawing shows a scene in a cracker factory about the 

year 1810, conveys an excellent idea of the manner of 

operation of the brake to which Mr. Otlive alludes. The 

man in the picture is riding the famous "horse." This brake 

device was invented before 1800 and remained in use for 

about 75 years. 

(our dollars a bund red- weight. Our lard came from Oregon 

and cost twelve cents a pound. We had a small tile oven 

and we did all our own work. 

There were wonderful opportunities in California for crack- 
er bakers, but unfortunately my state of health forbade my 
remaining and so, in the Spring of i860, I returned to New 
York. 

THE FIRST REEL OVEK 

In New York I found that Mr. E. O. BrinekerhofI (a 
school teacher who had successfully graduated to the busi- 
ness of cracker baking) had moved his bakery in my ab- 
sence from Madison Street to Grand Street and there com- 
pleted the erection of the first reel oven, the invention of 
Hosea Ball. 

This oven eventually proved successful, but only after the 
greatest of difficulties and a burden of expense which bank- 
rupted Mr. Brinckerhoff. Ultimately, however, he prospered 
and paid every dollar he owed with interest at seven per 



Apwl, 1916 

cent Ut. BrinckerhofI was the first baker in New York 
City to produce a high grade soda cracker and because of it 
he built up a wonderful reputation. 

On my arrival from the Coast I opened a "bake shop" of 
my own in New York City at 14th Street and Third Avenue. 
Shortly after the Civil War broke out and we who were en- 
gaged in the business of baking crackers were very busy 
making hardtack for the army. Those were busy times in- 
deed. 

Id 1868 I became a member of the firm of BrinckerhofI & 
Company. Machinery was beginning to be improved and 
consequently to play a more important part in the produc- 
lion of crackers. Of course it also resulted in extending our 
list of products. 

The old method of selling crackers through wagon drivers 
on a commission basis still prevailed, the era of the tra.veling 
salesman not having dawned. The commission to the driver 
was 10 per cent., no goods being returnable except by reason 
of fault in manufacture. Boxes, barrels and bags were all 
charged for. The firm name in stencil on the box or barrel 
was the only mark of identification. The average price of 
soda crackers to the drix'ers at that time was from six to nine 
cents per pound, dependent upon the market price of flour. 
The other varieties of crackers sold anywhere from ten to 
twelve cents per pound. 

In 1872 (he firm of Belcher & Larabee of Albany, New 
York, installed a set of English machines for cutting. At 
Ihe same time they introduced English hard sweet biscuit 
of which the variety known as "Cornhill" became very popu- 
lar, wholesaling at 18 cents per pound. Supply seldom equall- 
ed demand and it was often necessary to wait long periods 
for deliveries. 

TME HRST DOUGH MIXES 

About this same time the dough-mixing machine also came 
mto use. When the first machines were sent to this country 
from England, Mr. John Holmes accompanied them as the 
practical baker and he produced crackers of excellent quality, 
which became very popular and made him very successful. 

In 1875 I took a trip to Europe, and while in Great Bri- 
tain had the pleasure of a visit to the Carlisle Biscuit Fac- 
tory at Carlisle, England. When I called, I staled my con- 
nections and my desire to learn their methods. I was re- 
ceived most courteously and was invited to make a thorough 
inspection of the factory, which I did. I found the methods 
of manufacture to be very efficient, but not superior to the 
methods then in operation on this side of the Atlantic. 

TTie variety of biscuit products continued to increase. Some 
of the new varieties were fruit biscuit, water thin biscuit and 
1 variety of sweet goods which came to be known to the 
trade as the "cookie line." About this same time marketing 
methods for biscuit began to show changes, tin cans coming 
into prominence for the first time. The use of labels and 
registered names also came to have rapid growth. 

In 1880 Mr. Holmes left Larabee & Company and the firm 



BAKERS REVIEW 



103 



of Holmes & Coutts was founded. Its beat known product 
was Sea Foam Biscuit. In 1885 the firm of Vanderveer & 
Holmes was formed and began business in Vesey Street, 
making a specialty of labeled goods and extending the line 
of cookie varieties. Mr. D. M. Holmes about this time in- 
vented a machine for the cutting of soft dough which brought 
about a great advance in the manufacturing process. At this 
time, also, the jumble variety of biscuit came into prominence 
and popularity. 

In 1890 the New York Biscuit Company was founded and 
from this time until the time of the formation of the Nation- 
al Biscuit Company in 1898, improvements in baking methods 
gradually increased. 

The formation of the National Biscuit Company resulted 
in practically a new biscuit industry, so thorough was the re- 
volution which took place. ' Crackers thade their appearance 



Mr. John Bogai, an inspector of baked product in tht Ttnth 
Avenue Factory, New York, now in his eighty-first year. 
He used to work for Mr. OlUve. He has been employed 
in the biscuit business continuously for more than sixty 

in the dust, dirt, moisture and odor proof In-er-seal Trade 
Mark package. The products were given distinctive trade 
names. A country-wide advertising campaign was engaged 
in to secure national distribution, to tell people about crack- 
ers and the new idea of selling them, thereby 'to increase 
their popularity and their consumption. These and the other 
advance steps taken by the National Biscuit Company as- 
sured the progressive success of the industry. 

{Cracker Department Continued on page 98) 



Ev«7tlung in 
Cutters 



CUTTERS 



Nothing But 
Cutters 




Engliat; 

»tBU 

((IiittjrH 

A Specialty 

SHOAF CUTTER COMPANY - 




Indianapolis, Ind. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April. 1916 



Choose With Care Your Chocolate 

The coaring of your confectioiu are ini' 
pottant: they reach the palate fint and 
on them depcDclt m large neanire the 
deliciout ta*te of your gootk. To thii end 

WALTER BAKER & CO.'S 

Liquor Chocolates 

and Coatings 

are prepared (oc the varied u>e> ctf baken and 
oonfectKnen— sweetened and iinawe«l- 
ened; light, meoiom and dark— to wit 
your requirementa. All of lhe*e Chocolatei. 
whatever the diffenoce of color oc flavor, aie 
absolutely pure, tmooth to ure, and poMeai 
dtat unitoRnky 10 Decewaiy for confediooen' me. 

Stnd for *ampl** and pricem 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

Estebliiked 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 




■o. 270 

We make 

BAKBRS WAGONS 

In ten patterns and 23 slzea. 

WRITE FOR CA TALOCUE AND PRICES. 

S^tf AMERICAN WAGON CO. 

8th &nd Sycamor* Sla. CINCINNATI. OHIO 



we SELL QUALITY NOT ADVERTISING 

BUGSTAOUT 

(jvor A Foisom 
Kilb NothiDf Bit Cockroaches Try Before Tou Pay 

S Um. Hut DD aiiprova]. 12.25. PricM on Imrsar quutitjea on ■ppUeatlm. 

MORISRITE MFG. CO. 

ImMl (iMn. Om BLCWMFIELD. N. J. lltU, Mm. fno 



-BOOKS FOR BAKERS- 

We handle a Complete Line of 
^BAKERS BOOKS 



Writ* H« twt lUt and prtem» 
BAKERS REVIEW Woolwortk Bidg., New Yoifc, N. Y. 



Bread labels 

|i7C. per 1,000 

IN LOTS OF ItMM 
MlBh Grade Ubel* of orlEinal dulsn or lype effect In onecolar. 

24 HOUR SERVICE 

Send for CitaloR 

Geo. L. Blackburn 

Bread Label Specialist 
817 Mictiigan Ave. DETROIT, MICH. 





DEUTSCHER TEIL 

Vcnias BatictaM — RcMpt* — FaeharUkal 

Der Wert modemer Hilfsmaschinen fuer 
den mittleren und kleinen Baecker 



Von Albert Maybi 



E8 kann keloe Frage mebr seto, wir lefaea beute iiu Zelt- 
alter der Technik, und wer Torw&rtaktMiHuea will, d«r muse 
iIA der Xecfanlk anpMsen, moss Ihre Dmingenscbaftea slcb 
in Nntie macben. eonst flbertiolt Ibn dl« Zelt, wlrft Hin bel 
Sttte imd veTDTlellt edn Strebeo nod alte seine Mtlben lur 
llnfrwbtbBrkelt, da sle den erfidgloaeu Versacb darstellen, 
vtiea dea Strom der Entwlddnng scliwlnimen va woUeo. Was 
■btf die Bmuisenscbaft der Technlk fflr una BtLcker bedentet, 
dn liflBt sidi In dem elnen Begrlff der Bftckerelbllfsmascblnen 
TTwiminrnfnirrn Nur mitt Umen und dupcb sle kOnnen wlr In 
nsa^en Tagen den Erfolg an unaere Betrfebe knflpten, 4)tine 
4t slad wir cum mlnde»ten dem alcberen wlrtschaftllcben 
Ifiiaerfolg verfallen. 

WIe nun die B&ckereibilfMiiaw^ liken die hlare McbtnuK 
ii^eben. In der alcb die te<dmla<±e Seite unaerea B&ckerel- 
benifei fortentwlckeU bat und nodi imioer fortentwkkelt, bo 
hIemi ate audi ebenao klar, waa wlr eu tun baben, um den 
wlrtsdiartlicben Erfolg onaerer Betriebe slcbercuatellea. Frei- 
]ldi den Orossbetrlebn braucbt men dies oicbt erst anselnan- 
demiietien ; sle baben den elgeneu Vorlell ISngst erkanot und 
nutien die HlIfsmaBcblneu wettgebend aus, and aos dlesem 
Gnnide slnd ale ebeo eln so Keftlbrlicber Konkumeot der klel- 
ofsi QQd mItClereu BScberelen geworden. die alcb nicbt Im 
ghkhen Masse derselbeu HllfsniLttel bedlenen. Wenn das niclit 
bald anders wird, dann werden die kleinen Backereten seblless- 
llcb gam aus deui WlrtscbaCtslelien nnseree Volkes rerscbwln- 
dcD. Die kletne BUckerel tod heute. die kclne maschlDellen 
HDfooiItlel auwendet, arbelt unwirtscbaftllcb und dlrekt mlt 
Verlnst, wenn dies aucb Tlellelcht ulcbt Qberall so deutllcb 
In die Eracbelnung tritt, da <maii in Holcben FKllen ebeu die 
dgene Arbeit des Melsters wle die Zlitsen filr das vlellelcbt 
ereibte Anscbartnngskapital elofach gurnlcht in Recbnung 
ttetlt und frota let, wenn man das karge r.eben, den Lohn und 
die Ulete nebat den Recbnungen tflr Mehl nnd Feuemng etc. 
benosbolen kann, WlrtEcbaf^licb arbeiten beisst al>er, dass 
(un Belnen Betrieb ao fUbrt, dass er eitien wirklii^hen nod an- 
Ktanlicben Gewlnn erbrlngt und Jede Arbett, die dies nlcbt 
leUtet, tst Im Grunde eine wirtscbaftllcbe Vergeudung ron 
TolkBrelchtnm und Volkskraft, denn auf unserer Arbeit be- 
mht unscr Voikswoblstacd. Unser ganzer deutscber NaMo- 
ntlreicblnm Ist erarbeltet nnd wlrd durdi Arbeit gemebrt; 
Venn man das einmat Iiedenkt, dann wird man erkennen, dass 
We Aitelt. die niebt elnen Uebersehuss, also etnen Gewlnn 
bringt, dnnlose Vergeudung bedeutet und weetlos let. 

^'OD ist aber festznstellen, daes uiisere Arbeit kelneeweg^ 
10 mnrirtsohatlllcli zu seln braudite, wenn wlr nur die prak- 
tle«4*n MIttei zur ratlonellen Ausj^estaltung unserer Arbeit 
iWit TeraacblilSBigen. Der Bewels llegt eben darln, dass dle- 
i«l((D B&pker^en uns wirtschaftllcb berabdrUcken. die mil 
lUeo Bil&mitteln der modernen BSckereltecbnlk wlrken. 
i^* Bt+eilen retttatiel oder wlrtscbafllkii unA erzlelen etner 
Gcbin darcb Ibte Arbeitsmetboden, trotss der nledrlgen Preise. 



'aum 

An den nledrlgen Verkaursprelsen alleln liegt es also nl(^(, 
wenn wir nicbt tiesteben kOnneu. An elne HeranfBetsung der 
Prelse ist aucb gamlcbt to denken ; denn eben Jen* Betriebe, 
die wlrtschafUicb gDustlger gestelH slnd, dikderen die Prelae, 
mlUdHieii sle bel Ibrer Arbrit bestebeo kSnnen nnd wlr kSnnen 
kelne bSheren Praise enlelen, well wlr sonat die Kundscbaft 
verlleren wOrden. 

Oft and Tlel ist darUber nacbgedadit worden und die man- 
uigfalC^st^i Wege slnd Torgeecblagen worden, wle man wohl 
die Tettenf^reiae erbftben kSnate, um elne bessere Wlrt- 
sctaaftlicbkelt eu ersMen. Alle Mlttel baben slcb als nnxu- 
l&ngllcb erwleoen, alle Versucbe sind fetalgeschlagen und alle 
Wege su diesem Zlel erwleaen slcb als Irrwege. Icta will bier 
ntdit atle Jene Bestrebungen anfzlUilen, will nkU alle Uel- 
nnngen ut>d Gegeomelnnagea wlederbolen; aus praktlscbrai 
GrUnden will Icb bier aber etnen B^rifC berausgreifen und 
belencbten, der In alien Jenen Beetrebungen elne Rotle ^ielte, 
selten rlcbtlg verstanden wurde und fOr unser Tbema von 
Wlcfatlgkelt let. da eln rlcbtlges Terst&ndnis dieses Begrlffes 
una maiKtice wtrd erkeonen lasseu, was wlr bei alien nnse- 
ren wirtscbaftlicben Bestrebuagen Uberseben und docb nle 
ausaer acbt laseen dtlrften. Es Ist der Begrlff „angemes8ener 
Prelse" filr unsere Produkte, 

Wir lelsten alle Arl»lt, das ist einmal rlcfatig. Ebenso 
ric^itig let es aucb, dass Im wirtscbaftlicben Leben }ede Ar1>elt 
Ibren angemesBenen Lobn fordem kann und ertialten soil. 
Dass belsst also, dass wlr, da unsere Produkte das Ergebnis 
unserer Arbeit slnd, flit unsere Produkte elnen angeniessenen 
Lobn, also elnen angemessenen Verkauf^rels zu fordem be- 
recbtigt sind. Die Gesamtbelt. fUr die wir arbeiten, 1st uns 
dies Bctanldlg und darf es uns nli^it weigem, darf es uns bU- 
ligerweise nlcbt weigem. Soweit Ist alles recbt gat und rlcb- 
tlg, und wlr werden glanben, bier ein^i unwlderlegUcken 
Rechtsaneprucb geltend macben zu kOnnen, selbst wenn wlr 
fordem mtlssten, dass der 9taat als Scblrmberr unserer Tolks- 
nlrtsdiaft uns zu Hllfe kommen soUe, um uns In dieeer oder 
Jener Form Jene angemessenen Verkaufsprelse zu sicbem. Wlr 
werden aber eine weitere klelne Krwttgung anzustellcn baben 
und werden dann scbnell genug elnseben, dass unser Becbts- 
grund auf recbt unslcberer Grundlage rubt. dass wlr elner 
Ttliischung uns blngeben, wenn wlr glauben, auf dlesem Wege 
elne Abbilfe unserer wlrtschaftllchen Misere zu finden. 

Von elnem ecbten und etlcbbaltlgen Saize muss man er- 
warten. dass er sidi aucb umkebren lasse und dann ebenfalls 
wabr blelhe. Haben wlr also gesagt, dass Jede Arbeit Ibre 
ausrejchende LObnung erwaiten kSnue, so mOssen wlr aucb 
sagen k^nnen. dass man f[|r elnen bestlmmten Lobn elne ans- 
relchende und aiigeniescene Arbeit, flir uns also Lelstung 
Oder Ware. lu Uefern bat. Die Blchtlgkelt wlrd niemand be- 
slreiten; Ibre praktlscbe Anwendung eelgt uns aber seltsame 
E>rgebnissc. Es bestebt nlimllch keln Zwelfel, dass man elne 
Arheit zweckmlisslg rerricbtui kann oder unaweckmAsBlK, und 



106 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, iqi6 



das E^«bnls win) sl«fa In belden Fltllen dan;b die wirklicb 
errelcbte T^lstung dartutr. Nun 1st aber nicht die Arbeit die 
Haapbtache, sondern die durcb die Arbeit erzlelte Lelstung. 
So kaun elnen bestlmmten Lobn aucb nur der verlaDgeo, der 
elne besttuimte praktlscbe Lelstnng wirklicb vollbrtDgt Das 
wotlen wlr uun elnmal auf aosere Verbllltiilaae anwenden. 

TJnsere Arbeit sescbiebt Id der Backslube und die durdi 
die Arbeit erzlelte Lelstung sefgt stcb Id der Meoge der Pro- 
dnkte, die wlr durch unsere Arbeit Id eluer beatlDunten Ar- 
beltssett beratelleD, eel es durcb elgene Kriirte, sel es dnrcb 
die bezabKen Kllfskrafte unseier Gebilfen. Ueberall wo 
Krsrte ausgenutzt werden, da gescblebt es durcb die Arbeits- 
melhode Oder Arbelteweiae, auf die es also weauitlicb an- 
kommt. Wlrd elne Arbeit Eweckmilsslg ausgefHhrt, so Ut die 
Arbeltawelee gut und praktlscb. wlrd sle alier unzweckmilsalg 
ausgefUhrt. so 1st die Metbode nnpraktiach und verkebrt 
Aacb bier entscbeidet das durcb die Arbeit erzlelte Ergebnls. 
Nun haben wir uds ganz elnfacb zu frugen. 1st die Arbelts- 

' welse, welcbe wlr tlben, praktlacb oder nlcht ; d. h. wlrd durcb 
sle die bUcbste BeCrlebsIeistung oder Betrtet>sauabeute erzlelt 
Oder nicbt? Die Antwort Mnnen wlr nur durcb Verglelch 
flnden. So fragen wlr also welter: Erzlelen wlr mit unseren 
Ki^rien nod HllfcuiUtcIn, durcb Unsere Arbeltswelse also, 
nfetaran LeletDDg wie andere Betrlebe, die andere HUfsmittel, 
beaonders mecbanlscbe HUfsmittel, auwendeit? Arbeitet, tail 
«lnem Wert gesagt, unser Betrleb bllUger als andere 7- Die Aot- 
wort 1st recht lelcbt, sle lautet glatt : Nein '. 

Wllrde uDSere Arbeltsweiae die bllllgcre seln, So kSnnte 
-uus nlemand 'K-onknrreuE bleten. wlr mUesten also den Gross- 
betrleben uud alien den Betrieben; die mlt HUfsmaecbiuen ar- 
belten, welt llberlegen seln und wlrtscbaftllcb besser arbelten, 
als sle. Da dies aber, wIe Jeder Bilcker welss, nictat der Fall 
1st, so dnrfen wtr aucb auf der anderen Selte uiis ntohi 
scheuen, daraua miltig die Folgen zu zteben. die ehen daraur 
lilnaualBuren, daaa wlr anerkeonen mttssen, unsere Atb^lte- 
metbode arf wnpraktlscb. Unsere Klagen lassen slcb In die- 
setn Llcbte dahin festtegen, dass wlr beklagen, uds werde die 
ewecklos vergeudete Arbeltalast nlcbt rergiltet. DftR uini eino 
unangenetame Featstellun^ seln; aber wlr sollen leilenkoii 
dass wlr nlemals auf elne BeEsernng boffen kfiuneu. weiin 
vir una nlcbt zuror Qber den Scbaden klar geworden alnd. 
TJnd wlr kSnnen dlese Wahrbelt umso eber rertragen, ala es 
wirklicb Mlttel glbt, durph die wlr unaere wlrtscbaftliche 
T^ge sebr verbessem kOnnen. Docta darUber muss Elarbeit 
seln, dass dieae Besserung nur durch eln Mlttel niflgllcb Isl. 
nUmllcb dadurcb, dass wlr unsere Arbeit ratlonell gestalten. 
ale zweckmKsaig ausnutzen. Im Ubrigen aber lebrt una die 
tiescblchte der wlrtscbaftllchen FJntwlcklnng alter Zellen, dass 
ea recht gtelcbgtiltig 1st, ob wlr elne Wahrhelt anerkennen 
■Oder nlcbt, sle selber wlrd durch unaer Meluen. Denken uml 
WIlDBchen nlcht geAndert, ale bestebt In slcb selliat und Ibre 
Folgen tre4en nnwelgerllch und unepblltllcb zufage. Wer slcb 
dem Oeaetz nlcbt fflgt, der geht ohne Ouade zn Grunde. wer 
aber Ini EInklang mlt Ibm blelbt, der kommt vnrwilrts nnd bat 
Erfolge auf Jedem WIrtachaftagehlet. Wohl gemerkt, das sage 
nlcbt Ich, daa sagt die Erfahmng und dQs I.ehen ; und Jeder 
kann die Probe auf das Esemnel maeben. 

Kommen wlr nacb dem Gesagten aiif den Begrlff der .,an- 
Keme9i>enen Prelse" zurllck, so flnden wlr Folgendes: IJn frelen 
Spiel der wlrtscbaftllchen Grflfte, wle es die Grundlage unae- 
res benllgen Wlrtscbnftslebens blldel, lat der anBen>es!*iie 
Prels filr elne I»elRtung — also fUr die Produkte unaerer 
Backstuhe — derjenige, der bel praktlscbster nnd vollkom' 
inenater Arbellswelse einen Gewinn Uber die blosee Entloh- 

. nuug der Arbeit binans nocb einscbllessL Man nennt den Ge- 
winn Uher die Arbellaentlobnung blnaus deshalb fucb den Vn- 
[emehmer?etTlntt ; dlesen muss der Melster erzlelen, wenn aein 
WIrken wlrtsdiaftllcb geaund seln aoU, So gescblebt es alao 
mlt Becbt, dass- der angentepseue Prels fUr die Backstube slcb 
darnacb reg^t. wle die Arbeit eln«n Gewinn elbscbllesst, wenn 
lie mlt alien modernen Hllfsmlttelu auBKefUhrt wlrd. Ist es 
aJ>w mSglicb, dass eln Betrlebt der slcb dlese modernen HilfB- 



mltlel dlenstbar ma-dit, wle es tatsHctallch der Fall 1st, elnoi 
bllllgeren Prels auawlirft, als Itan der klelne Bicker, der slcb 
der Hllftmaacblnen nidit bedient, fordern musa, so wlrd der 
nledrigere Prels docb Lmmer der angemesaene seln. Man kano 
dag^en aucU nichta StUbbaltigea eluwenden, da das Grund- 
geaetz aller Volkswlrtachaft verlangt, dasa alle nnd Jede A^ 
belt elnes Volkes ratlonell ausgenutsi werde nnd kelne KrOfte 
vergeudet n-erden solleu. Wolien wlr also nlrtschartllcb TOr- 
wilrtakommen und soil una die Zelt mit Ibm Entwicfclang 
nicbt zugmnde rlcbten, so mtisaen wir selber ebenfalla uns die 
modernen HUfsmittel elner praktlscb arbeitenden Backstube 
zu Nutze machen, Denn nur wenn wlr dies tiia wlrd nnser 
Betrleb ebenfatis bel den nation aliikonomlsdien und auf der 
ratlonellen Arbeltsansnutzung slcb grlindenden „angeiueesenen 
Pre I sen" elnen wtrtachaftlicb blnreicbendeD UnterDefamerge- 
winn erzlelen. Nnr anf dleae Weise werden wir unsere wlrt- 
acbaftllcbe Existenz auf elne sollde Grundlage stellen kOnnen. 

Kommen wlr auf das praktische Feld nnserer wlrtscbaft- 
llchen Kilmpfe, so haben wlr Foigendes vor Angeo: Es Ist 
Tatsac'he, dass die Grossbetriebe bllllger arbelten und una da- 
lier tel glelcher Lcistuug eiue scharte* wlrtacbaftliche 'Raa- 
knrreciJ bleten. Wainim arbelten sle abet bllllger Sle baben 
rtti' die Hohprodukte dleaelben Unkoaten Wle wlr; denn audi 
'wlr^fiimen ja durcb daa Mlttel der BezugsgeboaaensdiaftAi Im 
Grosaeh einkaufen und dleoelben Vortelle anf dlesebi Oe&tete 
haben. Rte'bezahlen dteselben LSbne und Abgmben,' wieirlr. 
I'nd wo imer elne kleine Verscbiebung In dleseu' Ansfttaben zn 
lihseteii Tnguiisten eintrltt. da Unsere 'Betrlet)«' kleln^r Bind, 
90 lat dies docb nlcbt ko erbeblich, daas* dadurcb alleiii "die 
MQgMchkelt der bestebenden acbarfeii wfrtscbaf tllcb'eil fion- 
knrreiiz begrUndet werden kSnnte. Eb mnss also' notWfendIg 
elnen welteren Faktor geben, der die Arlifeltswelse ' In den 
griisaeren Betrieben verbllligt und dsnilt die BetrlebsuUkO^a 
berabsetzt. Denn da alle anderen TJnkosten' tllr den klelnea 
ivie den grosseu Backbetrleb glelch oder nahezU glelcb eliHl, 
fn kann der herausgewlrtscbaftete Gewinn hUf durch bine 
llerabselzung der Betrletsunkosten. berelnkummen. Dlea n'Ird 
iiler wleder nur durrh elne rotlonelle ArbeltsWeise m6it1Icb"Ke- 
uMirbl werden kiinnen. 

In der Tat sebeu wlr Ja aucb, daSs die VerblUignug der 
Artwtt die Quelle der KcMikurrenzruhtgkeit der GroesMlckei«leD 
1st, nnd wlr erkennen ancb. dass dlese Verbllllgung der Ar- 
beit durcb die weltgebendate Auanulznng der tecbnlschen 
Illlfsmlttel durchgefUhrt wlrd. Wolien wlr also glelcbe wirt- 
achaftllcbe Bedtngungen fUr uns gewlnnen und ebenao bllllg 
arbeften. so mUssen aucb wlr die teoimlschen Hllfamiltel der 
Backstnlie ebenao weltgebend fUr nnseren klelneren B«trleti 
ausnutzen. lat dies mOgllcb? 

Vor einigen JabfDebnten war man vlellelcbt Im Zwelfel, 
ob man dieae Frage bejaben oder verneinen mllsee; beute glbt 
es kelnen Zwelfel mebr. man mnss sle restlos bejahen. Dank 
der herrorragenden Leistungen nnserer BUckereimas^lilnen- 
tecbnih Ist es den In Frage kommenden Fabrlken durch die 
Tllchtlgkeit Ibrer KonstruktOre nnd Ingenleure gelungen, alle 
ffir die Backstuhe wirklicb praktischen und arbeltsparenden 
lliirsmaschlnen In alien GroEBen und fllr Jede T^iatnog glelcb 
gut und brauchbar herzusfeilen. Der wlrtachaftllobe Betrleb 
elner Bilckerelmaacblne, Bel es nnu Sleb-, Knet-, Misch-, Telg- 
lell-, Telgwirk- oder aonstlge Maschlne, Ist gemdas dem An-* 
scbaffungsprets so kalkullert. daaa ea an slch glelchgOttlg lat, 
ob ea slcb uui elne grosse Miscbine flir elnen Slassenbetrleb 
handelt oder um elne gauz klelne Maschlne deraelben Art fflr 
die ktelns'e Backstube auf dem l^ande. Daa lat Ja eben der 
groEEe Vorteli fllr den mittieren und klelnen Backbetrleb. dass 
er fbr seine Backstube elne den Jewells vorllegenden VerbiUt- 
nissen entsprecbende Maacbine erballen kann, die In Ibrer 
IjelatunspfiUilgkelt und in der Kostenfrage dasaelbe bedeutet. 
wle die Maschlne fUr den Grossbetrleb der Gross- und Kon- 
sumtilckerel. Er kann also durch die raltonctle Aunnutsung 
der HUfsmittel der Bilckertitecbnlk seine Arbeit In genau der 
selben Welae verbUllgen und aelue Betrletwankosten gwaa ao 
berabsetzen wie der Grossbetrleb. Nuiu' 
Digitized by V 






Apul, 1916 

sehen, dasa die Qruudiage Aer gansen Kookurreni der QroBs- 
betrlebe In eben dleser Eerabsetzung der BetrlebBunkosten 
lag: Bind wtr also lu der Lage unsere BetrlebBunkosten ebeo- 
falls DDd In glelcher Wetse herabzueelzen, ao sind wlr auc^ 
In Totlem Masee den genannten Betrleben im Sinne Ibrer Kon- 
knirenz gewachsen. 

Wlr boben also talBilcUloh die MSgllchkclt, durcb die An- 
ireDdimx der mechanlscben Hllfsmlttel der Bilckereltecbnlk 
am UDseren Betrleben elnen angemeGsenen Unternebmerge- 
Kliin berausznwlrtschafteD, und dadurcb kOunen wlr unsere 
wlrtscbarilldie Ezlstens nnbedlngt sh;ber stellen. Wlr brau- 
Aeii kelne Konkorrenz mebr bu (Qrchten; dena wlr haben die 
Gen-lBsbelt, dass die Grossbetrlebe aacb nlcbt billiger Ibre 
Produfcte berstellen kUnneo, und Oeld fortvrerfen, das wollen 
und kOnnen Jene erst recht nlcht. 

Bedlngnng fUr diese Geeundnng uuserer wlrtscbaBtUcbeii 
Verbkltnlsse Ist allerdlngs, daes wlr nns mlt Ernst uqi die 
ledinlscben Hllf^uittel der modernen Backetube kflmmern 
nod sle BQCb verwendea, Ttem ktelnen nod mlttleren Bilcker 
kann nur ^nf^eraten werden, daas er elcb durch dlft.Fact^zelt- 
RChrirt auf die besten nnd prakHsclisten dleser Hllfstpittel 
■nfDierkBain tmH^ben lilsst die dort bescbrlebea warden, dass 
•erslfji femer an ilaod der Prtlalisten Uba'' KObtett uHterrlfh- 
tet, slcb dnrcb die Flrmen Qber dte Lelstnng nnd Wlrkungs- 
wetoe aufkiaren nUSt nnd bofcbe BttTfebe besucbt, wo er die 
pnkllsohe Benutzung und 4ie Wlrkungswefse der Mascliineu 
In Aogenscbeln nebmen kaim^ Handelt der Melster bo, dann 
wird er bald den Wert der modirnen Hllfsmascbinen ftir.den . 
Dilttleren nnil bleinen BUdtm- ^kennea nnd Bleb den Wrt- 
■diartlictien Vortell dleser HIlfBrnittel zu eigen niactaen. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



107 



FMl«r UntferVlcht tii<tr Ba«ck*r 

In der Scbnte Ko. 4, an Fulton Avenue und 173. Strasse 
|Bn>nx>, Kew York, werden In KQr26 FOrtbllduDgsktaEsen fUr 
Bicker veranstaltet, wo Unterrlcht Im Backen, In Engllscb pnd. 
In Bttrgerlebre gegeben wlrd. 

Die SiAulstunden sind ron 3 bis 5 Vht NacbniKtaKH. 



FlsiBdunmnii BacdMr-K^U^B. 

Am 2ft. Februar fand liu Terrace Garden ein Ballfest uu- 
ler den Auqilzlen des Flelscbmann Bilcker-E.-U.-B. nnd der 
DrlTers' Association statt, welcbes slcb elner grosseo BetelU- 
pinK erfreute. 



Vereins Berichte 



Im Wiener Prater 

Alle Besucbet des WohltUtlgkeits-Baears, welcber Im Madl- 
wn Sqnare Garden, ^"ew York, ktlrzllcb staltfand. strflurten 
nacb dem „Wiener Cafe" im Prater. Das Oescbitft bittbte und 
die Erfolge tlbertrafen alle Erwartungen. 

Die Firma Jabnrg Bros. Ileferte den Kaffee: Scbokolnde 
warde aucb In grossen Mengen geetlftet. Das Qeb!t«k und 
■pnellgen Proliant stlftete die Firma Flelscbmann. 

Der Domen-Vereln der Oesterreicblscben Geseliscbaft liat 
slcb grosses Lob erworben Utter den Rlesenerfolg dlcsee I'n- 
ternehmens. 



Varalnlgta Baackcrmatster, N. T. 

Die Jfthrllcbe Gen eral versa ntmlung fand am 8. Milrz In 
der HilDnercfaor-Balle statt Nacb Eriedlgnng der lanfenden 
OcKMfle und Unterbreltong der JabresberlcUe wurden die 
Beamten CQr das laufende Gesctailftsjabr gew&blt. 

Wdterftlbning des Arl>eltsbureaua wnrde denmUclist be- 
qrrodien und man entschloss slch, dasselbe belzubebalten. 

Die Woblttttlgkelts-Bazar-Angelesenbeit kajn sodann an 
ik Belbb Unter anderem berlcbtete das Baza r-^Ifpml tee seine 
Pllne nber den Betrleb de« Wiener Cafes. 



Die Wablresnltate ergaben: Adam Uetz, PrUsldent; Herm. 
Graft 1. Vlze-PrlUldent ; John Pacanorl, 2. Vlze-Prftsident; 
Cbas. Fritz, Protokoll-SekretHr; Aug. Pfaustlel, Flnanz-Sekm- 
tKr; Peter Tbeobald, Schatzmeister ; Max Strasser, Srgeaut- 



Festgnus sam 30. StUtnngafast das 
Biackarmalstar-Varatiis St. L«ali, Mo. 

Der folgende Prolog von Herrn Geo. Voges wurde von 
Fr&uieln Else Hartmann bel Gelegenbelt des 30. Stlftungs- 
festes des St. Louis BUckemie later- Vereins, welcbes am 2. Feb- 
ruar In Planters Hotel abgehalten wurde, vor elner groesen 
\'ersammlung mlt vlel Gescbick vorgetragen : 

Willkommen beut', Ihr Frennde nnd Kollegen, 
nacb drelsElgJilbrlger Arbeit seid gegrUsst! 
Slolz leltete eudi des Oewerbes Segen, 
auf dass Ihr (reudlg. wohlverdleut geniesst 
dde Frtlcbte Jener Saaten, die elnst streuteu 
so <inancbe Brflder. die der Tod erellt', 
die slcb ult eucb der Arbeit elnst erfreuten, 
(tie zum Gemclnwobl Jeder gem getellt. 
' Nur wenlge aoch beut' auf Erden -walleu. 
die elnst den Orundgtein legten zn dem Bau, . < 
nud wie die etolzen Silnlen alter Ballen 
ragen em])or nocb ku des Hlmmels Blau. 
wiihrend la Ibrem ^ehatten neuea Walten 
der Zeitgeist fflr dle'Ziibunft ausgestreut, ^ 

so elnie slcb der Nachwuehs mlt den Alten. 
dnrcb Junge Tatkraft wurd' der Bau erneut, 
auf daea er durcb Jabrbundert bestAe. 
wie bet der Vilter alter Melstergilde ' 
das Bttckermelsterbanner freudig wehe, 
ge&(Atltzt mlt des Gewerbes relnem SchUde. 
Was Gutes sle gscbaffen. Likkt zurlicke 
und lernt erkennen, es war wobi gemelnt ' 

lu dea Gewerbes Wobl, zu eurem GlUcke 
hat Kollegialltat. eucb froh verelnL ' 

Welch' scbdner Gelst herrscht hlec in eurer Mltte. 
wie wobl bertlbrt die brOderllche Art, 
bier berrschet froh, nacb ecbter Biicker8ltt«. 
Lust, Frende. stolz iqlt dem Benif gepart. 
Wo diese (reudlg. treullch slch verblnden, 
eln schSnes Streben euch zum Oanzeo eint, ' 

da mlisBen slch Eollegen frilhllch flnden 
und blelben eng geschlossen aucb verelnt 
I«ast alien Keld und alle Selbstsucht schwlnden, 
tellt euch Erfahrung gegenseltlg mlt, 
zu Hlir und Rat lasst stels fcerelt euch flnden, 
das 1st des bOcfasten Zieles rechter Scbritt. 
Xur wenn In diesem Geisle Ibr verbunden, 
Kfinnet ibr sorglos in die Zukunft scbau'n, 
dann wird der schSne Bund nlcbt Uberwunden, 
wlrd wavb^en. blithen und slch aufwilrts bau'n. 
Wenn i<b es heut' als euer Schutzgelst wage, 
die besten Wllnscbe freudig darzubrlngen 
zu eurem- drelsBlgJilhrlgen Stiftungstage, 
uiag es In eurer Herzeii Tlefe dringeu. ' 

Es 1st mein Stolz, von Herz zu Herz lu spredien, 
liaut freudig fort an eurem achSnen Werke, 
und wenn derelnst vom Stamm die Aeate brechen, 
tiring' Junges Rets die alte Kraft und Stilrke. 
Dann wlrd der Zeitgeist stolz den Namen graben 
.,Backermelster- Vereins" Ins Buch der Zeit, 
die Achtung des Gewerbes wird erhaben 
dem komtnenden Gefchlecbte stolz gewelbt. 
So bldbe fort und lassC der Arbeit Segen 
im Gelst dSs Fortscbrltts euer FUhrer seln. 
er lelte euch auf alien euren Wegen, 
sehOtz' des Gewerl»s 1 



3 herrllchen Y**?'"- ("Xf^O Ip 



BAKERS REVIEW April, 1916 



Braun's Correspondence Course For Bakers 

My Personal Attention To Each Student, Backed Up By Forty Years 
Of Practical Experience And ScientiHc Study, Are The Main Factors 
Which Make This Course So Valuable To Every Baker 



Bakery Owner in Minnesota Town Doubles His Business 



Enclosed [deaie find SIO.OO for the Ian payment of your Course with which I am well pleased. 

I sent for the chemical — •'=■ -■ — -■ ■-' • --■-• -' -i — •- — — 

Since I followed your ii 



i sent for the chemical outfit you auggeaiea and am makins experiments right along which are very interesting. 



Giotcn Tests Alone Worth Mort Than The Price Of Coarse 

Since we changed our bread formulas according to your instructions and methods, our bread sales bave in- 
creased over 15 per cent per week, which is surprising at this time of the year. 

Latek— Your illustrated instructions for testing and judging gluten are worth the price of the whole course. 
Please send me 50 extra gluten record sheets ana binder, as I am going to keep the records on file. 



Good Words From Supcrftitendcnt Of Indiana Wholesale Balicry 

Your lessons received and am well pleased with both chemical and practical instructions. 

Later— I enclose application and check for young man who is working for us and who takes our profession 
seriously, and is anxious to advance himself, and I know your instivctions and advice will be of everlasting benefit 
to any baker, young or old. 



Yoon^ Man In Charge Of Mixhig Room (Pennsytvanta) 

1 followed your instructions for French Sticks and Rolls and got fine results, and we are now supplying large 
hotels every day. 

I sent you a report on the tests I made with our water according to your instructions in chemical lesson No. S. 
The study of your lessons is a pleasure, because they are so interesting. 



Young Baker In Small Kansas Town Offered Position In Laboratory Of Hour Mill 

I am making better bread now than I have ever made, thanks to your Course for Bakers, for it has surely 
been a great benefit to me and wo'th niBny times the p-ica of the coun*. 

One of the mills wrote to me that thev cOuld give me a position in their laboraiory, as I made some tests of 
their flour and they were well pleased with my report. 



Young Chicago Baker Says "Course Is Wonderful" 

As a student o( your Course on Baking I feel grateful for your instructions and can say that I have been and 
n being benef.ied greaily. Am having better results with my doughs and have done away »ith guesswork. 
I can truthfully say it is wonde fuJ. 
I Lhank you for the personal interest you are taking in me towards my advancement. 



Will lie pleated to furnish Names and Addresses of these Bakers, and many more, who will be 
glad to tell you what my course has done for them. 

Write for Prospectus and Terms Have Strntent* now in 17 Statn and in Canada 

Address EMIL BRAUN 

Corrupom/ence School for Bahen DAYTON, OHIO 

JdM •neatloii Bakbbs Kinaw. Naff ■ad. 



AnuL, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



FLOUR 



IMrsctmy of Xisadlng Mills and Dlstrilmton Who 8«U to Bakon Dlzoet 



Spring Wlwat Ronr Page 

Barber Milting Company, Minneapolis, Minn. J 14 

Bay State Milling Co., Winona, Minn, 116 

Big Diamond Mills Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 120 

s^ampbell Milling Co., L. G., Owatonna, Minn. 116 

Coombs MUUng Co.. W. A., Cold-water, Mick. 109 
Crescent Milling Co. , Fairfax, Minn. 

EagU Roller MiU Co.. New Ulm, Minn. 112 

La Grange Mills. Red Wing, Minn. 114 

Listman MiU Co.. La Crosse, Wis. 118 

National Milling Co., Toledo, Ohio 114 

National Milling Co., The, Minneapolis, Minn. 118 

New Prague Flouring MiU Co., New Prague, HI 

New Ulm Roller Mills Co., New Ulm, Minn. 109 

Phoenix Mill Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 118 

Pillsbury Flour Mills Co., Minneapolis, Back Cover 

Rtd Wing Milting Co., Red Wing, Minn. 110 

RusselirMilUr Mlg.. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 113 

Sparks Milling Co., Alton, lU., 120 

Skeff eld-King Mlg. Co., Minneapolis. Minn. 120 

B. Stem & Son, Milwaukee, Wis. 122 

Tennant &■ Hoyt, Lake City, Minn. 115 

Washburn-Crosby Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 123 

Weils Flour Milting Co.. Wells. Minn. 115 



Ry* Floor 

Bhdgett Milting Co.,JanesviUe, Wis. 
Eagle Roller MiU Co., New Ulm, Minn. 

Wlatur Wltoat Flour 

Coombs Milting Co., W. A., Coldwater, Mick. 
National Milting Co., Toledo. Ohio 



Page 
118 
112 



109 
114 



Hunter MiUing Co.. Weltington, Kans. 121 

International MiU & Elev. Co., Sterling, Kans. 121 

Ismert-Hincke Milting Co., Kansas City 119 

Kansas MiUing &■ Export Co.. Kansas City 121 

Larabee Flour Mills Co., Hutckinson. Kans. 117 

Watitut Creek MiUing Co.. Great Bend, Kans. 119 



Mayflower MUls, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 115 

Wlt(»lo Whomt noor 

Potter & WrigkHngton , Boston. Mass. 116 



118 



Sweet Co., W. L., New York, N. Y. 



Bakers are Imited to wrUe to any of the ahooe Concenufor Baking Samples and Prkex 



Red Jacket 

Patent Flour 

Qaality Guaranteed 

We also manufacture all grades 
of Rye Flour, both pure and 
blended. 

New Ulm Roller Mill Co. 

New Ulm* Minn. 



B AC 

That's the Spring 
Wheat Patent—It 
is guaranteed to 
please discriminat- 
ing bakers who 
want good flour. 



Writm or Win 



Will balp all araand If jon nuitio* Bai 



W. A. Coombs Milling Co. 

CoUwater, Michigaii 

— bigilized by Google 



, Google 



Apui, igre BAKERS REVIEW 



The Public's 
Verdict 



On the quality of your bread is what determines 
your success and the extent of it. 

You may make an ordinary quality of bread and 
enjoy an ordinary trade drawn from people who are 
easily saiistied. 

, Make a better loaf of bread and you get the trade 
of the particular and discriminating people who influence 
all others. 



Seal Of Minnesota 

"Thm great flour of the great flour state" 

Will make this better loaf for you and you can then get 
both classes of people and enioy a larger and more 
profitable business. 

It's simple, but many miss the point just the same. 

Shall we discuss it by letter? 



New Prague Flouring Mill Company 

' New Prague, Minnesota 

Awodkta Hambar NMioul A* oeUticai of Uuta Baken 



CiongI 



BAKERS REVIEW Amil. 1916 



The story of Gold Coin Flour is a story of returns; 
the telling values of its water -absorbing strength ac- 
count for its customer-absorbing power. Big returns 
m quantity of bread to the barrel and in quality of 
nourishment m the loaf are the natural outcome of the 
great sanitary and scientific care mthe milling of this flour. 



EAGLE ROLLER MILL COMPANY, NEW ULM, MINNESOTA 

DrnTOrAOTI. •ri_>FWS,(H»B...d. B^ „J C.r. Prrf«U 1000 B.„d. n™i« &,««, 2,000,000 B«U. 



CABLE ADDRESS, "EACIE," KEW ULM 

UwnbBr National Aiwdrntion of Mmar B«lwra 



T.II '.n rem FouDd It — In Bakuib Rimw. 



AMiL, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



, Google 

i 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apkil, 1916 




A G>mer Stone is Usually 
Built to be Permanent 



The good reputation and high quality of 
Corner Stone Flour have been continuous 
since 1877, and, if the wishes of our cus- 
tomers are to be granted, will last for- 
ever. Comer Stone Flour will make a 
solid and strong foundation for your 
business. It is made of the best Min- 
nesota and Dakota Hard Spring Wheat. 
Write for baking samples and prices — 



Kwad tk§ SampU 
andyou'Ubuya Car 

La Grange Mills 



Red Wing 



Minnesota 



CORNER STONE FLOUR 



IWhil 



.®UT 



used in baking gives that much desired texture; greatest 
customer satisfaction being the result. ^ Made in the 
famous Cataract Mills of Minneapolis since 1 87 1 — 
almost half a century of flour satisfaction given to the 
better bakers — it's popularity is constantly increasing. 

Why don't you get a sample of White Satin and 
test it in your shop under your own conditions? You 
will then see that you can bake better bread and the flour 
to use is White Satin. 

May we send you a sample and prices? 

BARBER MILLING CO 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Let then know ttial jon read tbe adi. la BiKMlB Ritibw 



April, 1916 



MAKERS REVIEW 




ALL HANDS 
POINT TO 




"THE QUALITY MARK' 



ThU 



Cokr 
Stnutt 



For Bakers It's a Money Maker 




WELLS FLOUR 
MILLING CO., 

WELLS, MDOI. 




Get out of the rat of day-in, day-out baking 
of the Mine old goods you have always sold to 
the same old customers who have always bought— 
with the exception of those who have died, moved 
away or have transf ened theii tiade dsewhere. Bake 

Brown Bread 

There is not enough of it made. 
If yoa specialized oa it you would have sold more-. 
Customers like it, and would be willing to pay a 
good price for the real article. Bake it with 

Bond's noston |~«i 
rown Dread rlOUr 

Fot thirty years the standard Boston Brovm Bread 
flour — made under the directions .oT its inventor all 
that time. Let us know the nam* of your su^qJy 
bouse. 

Start- Writm-Nowl 

The Mayflower Mills 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 



ProprUtow Band CmMttI MOU 



yntui Bedprodtr— "Saw It U Bmna Bmaw." 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



Old Grist Mill 

FLOUR 

«f the 

Entire Wheat 

Makes the beat lo&f of 

Health Bread 

>00 Pramiam Br«»d Wr*pp«ra with •vry 

BafT*l. TK« a«* of th«»e Wr»pp*ra 

will draw euataoMra 

TRY THEM 

B«gln ftl Ofko* to IMO Utd BOt* th* 
imer—m* In yovr tra.do 

POHER & WRIGHTINGTON 

BOSTON. 
MASS. 



, Google 



April, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 




Is the "fastest-growing" flour made in Kansas. Larabee now has mills 
capable of turning out 3,500 barrels daily. It's because of the German 
process being used in Larabee's mills that we're growing so fast. We're 
turning out good flour. 

Larabee's Best has the quality, it's always uniform, and the firm of 
Larabee stands back of the goods with its widely-known service. 
Perhaps some day a better flour than Larabee's Best will be made. If so, 
it will, in all probability, be made by Larabee. 

Just try a car; we believe you will like it so well you will always use 
Larabee's Best. 

May we hear from you, with request for baking sample and prices. 

THE LARABEE FLOUR MILLS CO. 
HUTCHINSON, KANSAS 



F. D. LARABEE, P»«idant: 
AUG. J. BULTE. Viea-PruidMil 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, igib 



COSTS CENTS — SAVES DOLURS 

DORCHESTER 

PEAR.L MEAL 

Keeps Your Bread Moist and Sweet. Made 
from White Southern Flint Corn. Cost a Little 
More Than Others and is Much Hetter. Tell 
Your Jobber You Want Jt. 

W. U SWEET & CO. 

PRODUCE EXCHANGE • N. Y CITY 



All VMM of 



RYE FLOUR 



Know that we make the best on the market 
It's your loss if you have never tried it. Bet- 
ter get our samples and quotations. 

THE BLODGEn ■ILLINB CO. 

JANESVILLC. WIS. 



lUMLEGHT 

Qaality Patent 
"Shines above all others** 



Qaeen of Patent Flourt 
FOR BAKERS USE 



Unsurpassed as quantity and quality BREAD VIELDERS. 
If you are nnt acquainted with these fluurs ask for samples 
and prices loday. Under new management. 

Mill remodeled. Increased capacity. 

THE NATIONAL MILLING CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

H'. W. REMINGTON. Pmidmnt and Maaagar 



PHOENIX 


FLOUR 


A STRONG SPRING WHEAT 




GRANULAR FLOUR. 


1 fiftj year*. 


Jmt the Kind BAKERS Like 


Write us for Munple and prices. 


PHOENIX IMtILL CO. - - - 


Minneapolis, Minn. 



WIN btip all >roao<I II ;ou mentloo Bakbbs Riviii 



Aren, 1916 BAKERSREVIEW 

ISMERT-HINCKE MILLING CO. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

MILL AND SELL FLOUR THAT IS: 

— Always uniform. 

— Manufactured in one of the largest mills. 

— Milled from the best wheat. 

— Especially adapted for bakers' use. 

—Absorbs more water. 

THUNDERBOLT 

IS THE BRAND 



iiiiiiiDiMniiiiiiiiuiiim 



*'' I 'HE twentieth century baker — and the successful baker — 
know that the famous Turkey wheat flour of Kansas 
not only gives yield and quality, but flavor as well. 

"VELVET is one of the best Turkey wheat flours 
produced." 

Write for sample and quotations. 

• THE WALNUT CREEK 
MILLING COMPANY 

Great Bend Kansas 



Twu ID ■dTcrtlMmuit In Dikbib Rbtuw. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



COSTS CENTS — SIVES OOLURS 

DORCHESTER 

PEAR.L MEAL 

Keeps Your Bread Moist and Sweet. Made 
from White Southern Flint Corn. Cost a Little 
More Than Others and is Much Better. Tell 
Your Jobber You Want It. 

W. U SWEET & CO. 

PRODUCE EXCHANGE • N. Y CITY 



All Umn 0f 



RYE FLOUR 



Know that we make the best on the market. 
It's your loss if you have never tried it. Bet* 
ter get our samples and quotations. 

THE BLODBEH ■ILLINB CO. 

JANESVILLi:. WIS. 



lUMLIGHT 

Quality Patent 
**Shme8 above all others" 



EMPEE 



Queen of Patent Flottr* 
FOR BAKERS USE 



Unsurpassed as quantity and quality BREAD YIELDERS, 
If you are not acquainted with these flours ask for samples 
and prices toddy. Under new management. 

Mill remodeled. Increased capacity. 



THE NATIONAL MILLING CO., 



W. W. REMING TON, Ptiidmat and Manager 



Minneapolis, Minn. 



PHOENIX 


FLOUR 


A STRONG SPRING WHEAT 




GRANULAR FLOUR. 


fifty yean. 


Ju.t the Kind BAKERS Like 


Write us for Munple and pricet. 


PHOENIX MILL CO. - - - 


Minneapolis, Minn. 



will brlp all around If ;ou meDttoD Bakbbb Riview. 



Google 



Apwi, 1916 BAKERSREVIEW 



ISMERT-HINCKE MILLING CO. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

MILL AND SELL FLOUR THAT IS: 

— Always uniform. 

— Manufactured in one of the largest mills. 

— Milled from the best wheat. 

— Especially adapted for bakers' use. 

—Absorbs more water. 

THUNDERBOLT 

IS THE BRAND 

<*■ I "HE twentieth century baker — and the successful baker — 
know that the famous Turkey wheat flour of Kansas 
not only gives yield and quality, but flavor as well. 

"VELVET is one of the best Turkey wheat flours 
produced." 

Write for sample and quotations. 

• THE WALNUT CREEK 
MILLING COMPANY 
Great Bend Kansas 

Twu AH adTertlaunent Id Dixais Bbtuw. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apul, 1916 



— ^and he baked 
the best bread. 

He had not been disceroing in the 
selection of flour until a brother baker 
drew his attention to its importance. 
Then he tried 

HOR-DOH 

77b* balMTs' perfect flour 

Of course he's satisfied — his bread is 
of the best — his trade is constantly grow- 
ing. Why don't you, too, try MOR-DOH? 
May we send samples and prices? 

SPARKS MILLING CO. 

ALTON, ILLINOIS 



y^zizszsznrn — l\ z i i : z : ztttt^ 



^ FLOUR/ 



The Keystone of Better Baking 

Do you really want to bake better bread — to do a larger business? It 
IS in your power to do so. GOLD MEDAL flour is milled from the 
choicest wheat — in a most modern mill by skilled millers. The result 
is a flour that can be the foundation for better business if you so will it. 

Mety we »end you a $ample ? 

SHEFFIELD-KING MILUNG COMPANY 

H. H. KING, President 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 



BRANCH OFFICES 

PhHaddphla Agents New York Agents Ptttsbargh Agenb 

Cm. H>r * U. SmhI Kvifbn * Sw " ' ' ' 

312 Prolan Eick4B(* 



HcCaiktr-Wmit. c*. 



New England-Agents 

Cm. W. CsDicr-' 
8> Broad St., Bailaa, HaM. 



\ l^nimniii\ 



Jntt mMUon Bixbib Bnuw. NdA mA. 



Minn urmy 



S R E V I E W 121 

:!mmiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;»niiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;////,ii^ 



^S^ 



=^^ 



TURKEY MRO WHEAT 




Prepare for better basinets with 
Thoro-Bread Flonr 

Ym wUI aak* rom bnmwt paw if roa xioiit Qaalitr m 
VMI dana. and what bttlar Bour a thna lo incur* Qjali^ thu 
Tlnra-BraMl? Wa Uka onlr the bat Torker hard wlwu ud mik* 
k bio Am bMl Bour we know (uw, whkh innrfei tbai daliciMii Saror 
■ ]rgv bnad which eaa be brought about only b)r tha um ol Turfccr 
haid wheal Bear. Yai^ oH Prnue for betta buau« — ok Thora- 
BiaxlFlaw. 

Aak for mampl— and qaotatioita 



liHennlloiul Mills i Elevator - 



Sterling Ku. 



hunISrs 







We make Hunter's 
Flyer— The flour 
that's always right. 
You bake it into 
bread that's always 
ri4ht. See the 
point? 

Try a SampU 



f 



HUNTEftmiUNGCO. 

•WCLLIM&TON • KQN5 A3" 



^//iniiiiiiHiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiifiuiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiii»vv<> 




■"■'iiiiiiiii" I I iiimimiiimiii iiiiiiiu iiiii iiiim ii iimiimi i i ii i i im i n. 






Kansas Milling & Export Co. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 



BAKERS REVIEW Aron, 1916 



New Binders 

For Bakers Revie^r 

How often have you wished to read an article in some back copy of our 
journal only to find that copy lost or mutilated? After testing a number 
of diffprent binders we have succeeded at last in securing a really practical 
binder, and our readers can now have BAKERS REVIEW in the form of 
a handsomely bound book, ready to refer to at any time. 
The binding is as simple as sticking papers on an ordinary file. The binder 
has the appearance of a regular bound book. The cover is of vellum de 
luxe; the name stamped in real gold leaf. The binder makes a richly bound 
volume that will be a handsome addition to your library. By special 
arrangement we can furnish you with this binder for 

Only $1.00 

The binder will be sent promptly, all charffes prepaid, upon 
receipt of price. Order now while you have it in mind. 

BAKERS REVIEW, Wooiworth Bidg., NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Let tbem know tbat r«B read tbc mda. In lUxats Barnir. 



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BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



You Need this Information 

These books contain the condensed ex- 
perience and practical knowledge of a number 
of the best experts in the three allied tines. 
Baker, Confectioner and Caterer, systemati- 
cally arranged, and clearly and attractively 
presented. 



1: Cbflmlckl AaratlDff A|vitt; Coiif«etioa«l7 



-__ntad Gooda. baklns pomtar*. 

■••.llewBndSrniDiiPMtMud Ptntim: Cimeken and BIkdIU: '-■•-— 

-^-B ud Fralt Goods; Slab CakH. ShortbrHd. (te.; '~- 



... r«. Mc; y*ut mud Fniaii- 

■■ini; ui—u ud BrHd-Bakinr: Msltimd Fkm Bunu. 

VOUME n 

Spadal Bridih CUu« of Bmd; Garnuui uid athar C<ntlii*ntal Bmida: 

T«aM FWI( and Br«d Imcnvai " - . .- 

Matiariala: CoBFaetliRiarj Goodi. 




VOLUME VI 

Bak«T Fltttuca a 

taMlow op narliM rapoi 



250 lllaatrationa, many in color* 
Prksa $11.00, Cxproaa Prspaid 



BAKERS REVIEW. 



New York, N. T. 



Nto Vnrh, V. T. 
CoeloMd li tlS.00 tor lat of Uodcrn BakM, CoofseUonai * 
OMnt, kIx toIdbcs. 



TRADE BOOKS 

Selected ky the 

BAKERS REVIEW 



MODSRK BAKSR. OONrECTTONVB AND CArBRMK. 

Uoit CQiuplptc work prer laaued [or the Bakerr Tnd*. 
Bli Imricr TolnaM. IQ li^chn by T Inchei, nearlr UOO 
pacM, 100 plntM and ICO oCUer lllnRtraUnni. PilM |UJi 

BBCKKTS OF BREAD UAKINO. Bf Bmll Bnna. 

A tniiiinnj or inoni>7-MTliiK lugrrxtiuui aud form ebMti 
tor unBll and larxe bakcrlea. Price LU 

PRIMCIPLB0 OF BRKAD MAKING. Bjr Wm. Jaco. 

An eleiDentnrj work In which. Derertbrlraa, maor dHkVIt 
prablcDia are cle«r)r jret almplj ciplalDed. Price Jl 

MLMMMHTARY PRINC1PIJC8 OF BBBAD HAKIMS. Br Dr. 

Aa tbe Eltle iDd^tea. a rndlraeDtarr bnt lelaDtiaG tTMt- 

lae. Price Ui 

AIX ABOVT PABTRT. Bj Hania M Borella. 

--'—"- treatlae od tbe inbject of paatry malt- 

A prartlcali Uldatrated nuindiil. Prlc« IM 

OAXBB AND HOW TO HAKB TUBU. Br rni T. TIa* 

Tbe Alpba aod Omer* ef cake makloc. Bnndrada aC 

redpea. Price IM 

OAKX niCORATIOK. Br Brant Scbalba. 

PbotOK^apblcallr repradacvd. full alia deatcaa af cake 
tap*, alilM and ornamenta wltb explanatorr text. Prtee.. LW 
mW 8VBTBM FOR HAKINO BREAD. Br Rabart Walla. 

OlTM ttia neireat mitbod* of inaklni braad b? baad and 



BIVB BAKER, Br Frill U Glraaadt. 
} II 111 ■! ration* and 1.000 Talitahle rwlifaa. 1 



GENERAL SHOP GOODS. By -Ma^trrntBB." 

CniilalQ* over 400 recipe* of nil kludii. Price UN 

PKACTICAL HINTS ON PLODR. Br W. T. Rata*. 

WrlllfD Id a (Iniple, direct *trle — Dot troin tba cbmlafe 

rtcnpohit Price Ml 

AMERICAN CAKR BAKER. Br Oils Werila. 

Moat up-to-date collecElou of cake recipe* 1 

Price 

CHEAP BI8CCIT8. Br J. White 

TrralliiK tbe anliject of factorr blacolt*. Prii 
BiaCCITa KOR IIAKERB. Rr Fred T. Vine. 

Ci'iitaliiB S24 pracllcal recipe* *nd 111 llli 
TBE TRADR-S CAKE BOOK. Br T. Frrry L«wl*. 

Niiiueroti* recliie* nlth colored lllui ~ ~~ 

Dp-lo-dute cake*. Price 

noVRE PIPING. 

Tlie oulr conplete work 



on tba meat 



Ftsar* Piping pnbUshad. 



I.KAVENINO AOKNTB. Br Rlehard N. Hart, B. S. 

V<>nHt. Lniven, Snlt-nialns l-'erinpiilntluii, Dakliia F 
Aerated Drend. Milk I'uwder. Price 



bolllov made 
CAKE DRCORATiON. Rr R. <-*-tmn. 

Conlalna man]' Tsluable Idea* and ntcnatlona. PriM.. ! 
THE HODRRN PRAOTICAI. CONFECTIONER. Br W. a 

Snnnd and pmctlral redpea and advice for tba maklnf aC 

buna, cnkee. blamlla, tee*. Jelllea, etc. Price 

TBCHNOLOnV OF BRKAD HAKING. Br Wat. Jaco Bad Vm. 

Chetnliitry and Analjila of Material* y*«4 In bread mak- 

iiiK milt coiifectl'viiCT;. I'rico < 

l_CAKKB, Rr P. Han 



IleHpe*. dlrecttooa. *aK8e*tloaa oaefal 1 



CAKEB AND BDNB. Br Rabert Well*. 



the OtTinan and BiiKllab Lani 

PABTRV BOOK. Br Paal Rlrhardi 

Eapedally adapted tor Uolel ■ 



Price . 
LOUR CONFRCTIONRK. By RabeH Weil*. 

all kinds of cbrap cake*, blsntt*, *t«. Prle* 
PRACTICAL ItF.riPB BOOK. 

mill paatrr eooka la 



id C*tertD(. Prlca . 



OIDEI lY TTTLE AND KANE OF AOTIOR 
REMrTTANCE NOCT ACCONFANV OHEI 



Bakers 

WHlnrth Bide. 



Review 

Digi:zec oydlltW TBBK WT 



t ran read tba ada. Id Baki 



BAKERS REVIEW 



I 







Baker V' Machinlry- 



"Keep Your Shop 



AND YOUR 
SHOP WILL 



Keep You** 



In these compelitlye. times, "Keepings Shop .-Profitably" means 
Modern Machinery dud Modern- Methods. The Jaburg combination 
shown below will do all and more than- tHe "arrow points" claim. 




indng by hwid 45 nia- 
B. Br in*ctiiBe 15 
Ifluwi. -The qiuKij i* 



The ElevUot uvi Cod- 
Tcjai doe* (ll ihe Hmrd 
Work of (ifiiot. Ii(tiii| and 
dnoiping (he Bour idlo ibc 



Tbc SifUr ticn Bour 

iroD iaparitir*- prki >ko 

greata abMirplion oi 



Tbe PowerM Elecirk 
Motor pTci jMi cheap. 



The Jaburg Combination of Machines 

Let Ua 5mii/ You Full ParticuUirs 



JABURG BROTHERS 



10-14 Leonard Sl 



NEW YORK 



WoODtNWARE -.SiSOigjj- 



jfeST O REHRi XTjaj^y SJ, 



;! A K F-: R S RE V I E W 



April, 1916 






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APBIL, I916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



American Peel Co. 1S& 

901-903 W. North Ave.. Chicago. Ill; 

TV 

Used by the Best Bakers 

in the Countiy 

Sold by AU Baker's Supply Houses 



AD. SEIDEL & SONS 

Manufaeturcn and Jobbers of all 

Bakers' Supplies 

124M7 GaifieU Atc., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 



Iki 



le "SEIDEL" u a nMW of 
QDAUTT, SERVICE ud SATISFACTIOM 



"CLEANED OUT THE 
RATS ENTIRELY" 

Stys the Mystic Milling Company, 
Sioux City, Iowa, in writing of the 
results obtaint^d by using 

THE RED CROSS RAT 
and MOrnE EMBALMER 

Hundreds of bakers have 
found our embalmer to 
eliminate their rats and 
mice and you can do the 

Our "Money Back 1( 
Dissatisfied" policy pro- 
Write for particulars. 

The Felix Girard Co. 

(INCORPORATED) 

2)16 4tli Avenue. South 
MINN6AP0LIS, KINN. 



circumstances is a full grown man's job. 
But if your sales machinery is weak— lacks 
force — driving power — then your sales 
problem is a hard one. For more busi- 
ness, hitch your sales department to 
Cruver Sales Building Service for Whole- 
sale Bakers — the strongest sales force 
operating in the trade today. 

Cruver Sales BuildingService 

For Wholesale Bakers 

It's a new idea in sales-increasing 
methods for bakers— it is a convincing 
personal appeal idea that makes every 
member of the family insist upon buying 
your bread. It is boosting the sales of 10c 
bread in a startling manner and creating 
10c bread business where there was none 
before. Let us tell you some of the speci- 
fic cases where our service is increasing old 
business and building new business. 

Do You Want The Facts? 

If you do, the coupon below will 
bring them to you without obligation. 
Why not All it in and slip it in the mail 
now — while it is in your mind. 

Cruver Mfg. 
Company 

2456 JackBOD Blvd. 
Chicago, ill. 

Member N»tion»l ArtMCia- \ IS^iiJl" 




BAKERS REVIEW 



Roloco Works Wonders 

It is the greatest of all dough batch in- 
gredients — insuring uniform fcrmcnta :ion. 

RoloM) will replace sugar, and every other sugary compound 
and malt extract, in any bread dough, pound for 
pound—and COSTS NO MORE. 

Roloco in addition to doing everthing that sugar, and every 
other sugary compound and malt extract can do in the 
dough, enables the baker to produce a larger loaf from 
a given amount of dough, or the- same volume with 
less dough 

Roloco keeps the bread moist longer than when sugar, sugary 
compounds or malt extracts are used. 

Roloco improves the gluten quality of all flourr, and makes 
possible the use of flours which would not otherwise 
make salable bread when sugar, sugary compounds or 
malt extracts are use''. 

Roloco cuts dowD the amount of yeast necessary. 



Thete ire not tkcorica : but facta demanitntcd in the daily 
uie at ROLOCO by ihouundi of tbc biggest bakMi. 

Order ■ five-gallon tin,' and teit it foi jpouraclf. 

The Corby Company 

Stolion K Wuhintlon, D. C 



iDAinrnl 



[Roi nr.o I ROLOCO hroL0C0¥R0L0C0Trolocoi 



Jait maotlou Dakkbb Ritiiw. Naff Md. 



, Google 



n A K F R S REV! F. \V 



We Back Our Delivery Service 
With an Insured Guarantee. 

To make ZASurance doubly sure; and your pro- 
tection doubly strong, we issue this indemnify- 
ing policy with every Corby Yeast contract. 



You don't have to worry, either about the delivery of 
Corby Yeast; or the quality of it. There is no service 
lilie the Corby Service — direct, certain, satisfactory. 

The Corby Company 

Statton K Washington, D. C. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 
'Twu ao advertSiement Id BiKiam Ebtibw. O 



ijo 



iiAKERS review- 



April, 1916 




i 



i 






Three Months' Course 

In Bakiiig, Milling, Pure Yeast Culture, TechniciJ 

Gintrol of Baking Operations, Baking 

Engineering, New Wahl Processes 

\nU. BE GIVEN BY THE 

Wahl Efficiency Institute 

OF 

Baking Technology 

Commencing April 20th, 2916 

What Out Studento Say: 

"An hour spent at the Institute is worth a week in the shop." 
"One point I learned is worth my whole tuition. Competition is compar- 
atively easy now." 
"The investment for my education at the Institute has already paid me 
several hundred per cent, profit. 




f 701] menClau Basehs I 



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.Aphil, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



TEAR OFF AND HAIL TO THE NEAREST "UOUID" BRAPiCH 

I I Quote us on Caibonic Acid Gat. 



r I Send 1916 supply calaloK- 

□ Give paiticulara of new reduced 
. . prices on fruits and syrups. 

Uutaal Rcdprodtr— "S*w It In Bakssb Rbtiiw." 



j'Google 



*S3 .- - - . IJ A K i: R S R f- V 1 E \V Amil, 1916 



Digitized by V 



Untiul Reel priKttT— "Saw It In Bazbbb Ritikw." 



AP8IU I9'6 



BAKERS REVIEW 



emRLBS HIRSeHMUNN 



C wil wl ll WMW^ Catann, Balun. Restanrants. 

Hotals, Etc 

CAKE OWIANEtm AND TKIMHINOS 

HEW YORK, M. Y. 



W.W.WILCOX MFG.CO. 

MAHUrACTUUM 

I BAKERS' CHECKS 
I METAL CHECKS of aU kfada 
BADGES 

CHKACO 



WINKLER-GRIMM 

Bakery Wagon* 

COST LESS 



They are Built to Last LONGER 



Writm for Catalogam 32-E on 
Bakmry Wagona 

WINKLER-GRIMM CORP. 

* pOTB*rlr WbdilH BraL Mfi. C«. 

2300 Linden Ave. So. Bend, Ind. 



If there is any doubt in your mind about the 
accuracy of these statements, read what these 
bakers say obout the matter: 



BaklBc Co.. Lawnne*. Uiu.: "UiukilM sitli 



Colbome Pie Machines V^ll Cut Labor 
CofU for ANY Baker ^'"ilt'^c^r -«''»SSi'*y' 

in labor, doush. duidnc flauraiul tiraa by atitit Colboiiie Fie Ifa- • 
chiaerr. and every Colbome machine ii aoU on that ffuanmtee. ^ 

Get this Book— / 

"Making Money Out of Piei'* ^ iJf».'"co.' 

W* have a moat Intenetlnc little book for free dii- ^ 160 W. DiTl 
tributlon amonr baken. It will put aar baker ont . r alon a 1 1 e e t. 
the toad ta prodt who niadi it, and I* tail of facta ^ Cblcnva. 
and flKorea about ple-maklDS, The coupon to .' 8«Dd ua a FRBK 
the riBhtor ■ poitcard will brinslt. / copy of your Den 

. booklet. "Making 
X Money Ont of Plea.' 

COLBORNE I«FG. CO. / ^^X,^'^ ■"" *'•" 

160 W. DivUioa St jf '''™ 

r rout Slgntture 

Chicago / city 

^ Stnet . 



Let tbciD kDow that ron read ths adi. In BAKSta EiTiBtr. 



Digit JzecJ' by 



■|34 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



ICE CREAM IS A BIG MONEY MAKER 
DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS 



ARE YOU EQUIPPED 
TO GET YOUR SHARE 
OF THIS BUSINESS? 



If not, get in touch with 
us and we will show you 
how to make a big profit 
on a small investnrent dur- 
ing the summer months — 
when the regular Bakery 
Line is rather slow. 



THE TYSON 

ModeV'C Horieontal40 Quart Brine Ice 

Cream Freezer, Belt Drive, with 

Fruit Hopper 




OUR PRODUCTS 

Tyson and Miller-Tyson Brine 
Ice Cream Freezers, Mixers, 
Tyson Pumps and Brine Pro- 
ducers 



THE TYSON JUNIOR 

20 Quart Horizontal Brine Ice Cream Freezer, Belt Drive. 

This cut shows Pump, Brine Box and Freezer 

in one unit — patented 

THE MILLER PASTEURIZING MACHINE CO. 

201-225 9TH STREET. S. W.. CANTON. OHIO 



1 ■dTertlwuDeDt 1 



;\PtlL" 1916 



MAKERS REVIEW 



ASK YOUR FLOUR DEALER FOR 
v^ icui %. ^ ""^ ^-^^ 



CAH OR J; HUSIiY 






't//"-^^-^^' 



BRANDS OF FLOUR 



Wanted: 

Specialty to Manufacture 

A machine shop capable of employing 700 men and equipped with large 
power plant, electric lighting and electric power, compressed air, electric travel- 
ing cranes, and ample machine tool equipment, wishes to take up the manu- 
facture of some specialty, other than munitions, in large quantities. Has a 
large, modern iron foundry. 

Is now engaged in the manufacture of high grade machine tools, and 
works exclusively to close limits. Not inlerested in a contract for small parts 
of any kind, excepting as a part of a large assembly. 

The equipment comprises lathes from 16' to 48' swing, various types and 
sizes of turret lathes, planers from 30*xlO' to 60''x40', radial drills, upright 
drills, including extra heavy modern type, various sizes and types of milling 
machines, gear cutters, hobbers, key-way cutters, automatics. 



No objection to adding to the equipment 
ample capital to handle a large contract. 



s may s 



1 profitable. Has 



H. M. Manu, c/o J. Walter Thompson Co. 
44.60 East 23d Street New York CHy 



Tell '«■>■ TOO fonod It — In Bakibi I 



yGoo^k 



■36 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Aful, 1916 



Howard Flour Tests 

Tell at a glance the 
Qualities of Flour 
for Baking purposes 

The Howard Practical Tests 
are now Imitated, but are 
Unattainable Elsewhere, 

We have tested flour for 29 
years. 

Does experience mean any- 
thing? 

Writm for thtcriptwe price lut 0/ our 
popalar aehethiU C. T. A W, UtU, 

The HowardWheat & Flonr 
Testing Laboratory 

MimMapoli*, Mtnncwta 



Wahl Efficiency Institute forBaking 

INSTITUTE OF BAKING TECHNOLOGY 

CooNM !■ BAKING, MUlmc, Par. Y«ut Cidlar^ 

Taclinical Control at Bakini OparkHoni, 

Bakiii( EB^inaariag 

Ahm n iM w A otj compldioa of thii eoum ■ Atfftm at muMf 
b«kw i> gno. 

Onl^ lIuMe NudcDti *rith at lev* two twi o( pnctical csperi- 
•Dcs will b« recanuModcd to matfa bakar poatiaw. 

lutHitc rw Technical Contnl oT BaUi^ Operitioiis 

JboraloriM: Cbeakiil fitnli] - - - 
Taclmicil. Tatmg, iar ^ 



Ceaaoltatioa BBrfSw Repotta iw 
eooMfiiiDt techniul baking opn 
■ibfikiaUllKB' 



Thii 

J btnd manufacturing 

all ihe countrki of Eunpa and 

Effidancy lnv*ctia>u In (.._ 

sncea si lbs lupEC 

furaub baking c^Mcti 

when uM eridcal fram 



BaUnl Boearcli InsUtote 

TUi Intitule labon (ot iba ■dTaDccaunt of bakms and of«i tbc 
b^Bg iaia^ ibe W«hl Procaaa conntmg of a natuni melbod 
to ftvttwl tba italana of bt«ad. Pure Non-dinta collure ycaN 
capccialljF adaplabfa wr braad making. Lactic fomcBt ptoc«« to 
pKTanI all brnd djaaaaw and to ilMifteB tb* time of fermmtilioii. 

Om SoMliM will work to mItc any technical problen in the 
bakng tnduN>T. 

WnO 'or Catalogue 

WAHL EFFICIENCY INSTITUTE 

Office: 327 South U S«llo SL CHICAGO 



Dead Sliot tir. Front 

win MtBn BOBv if BOt Mlkfaeton. Ifa 
CockroMh Tfano. Sold E imy wlwro tor thn 
Uat 26 jTMm. Emy bos fwnrantMd. 
OaUB, B.a.Q 




Mr. B. t . . 

Maadtac DMd Bbot aa br far tba bMt Uri. la hat, «M v^ M 
mAVOm tint bu baao an tha Bariiat. 

PBRRT HICHOLB, 




B. Howard Smith, c-—*-" 

Kan$aa City, Mo. 

Orta 

Jafannr b«a_ 1-1 Wncdi Bt- Kaw Tsk' 

J. lOUMnJi. laa. n n ■ BL, BaabiB. 

Ad. 8«ld«l A 800%^ U4f QartM Ava- ChkMNL 

Ckaadan-PattarBaMA and BiidaiB%iB_ Haw TaA. 

P ia ib iftOa^Ia dlan a n llaaBdLoaiaiSa. 

Oaa. OvMrrtBAaaa* Savriha, Naw (Maaaa, aad 

HI Aaattn A*a. Ohkaaa, DL 
8. Boinr, Ull Tfcan Bt, MladalpMa. Fa. 
BalMw' A OmteSSMn- Bala* Ba«M, ni«.4tk St. 

LoaAB««ln.OaHf. 
Omaha Bakan Smpir Co. Onalaa Nab. 



The Cost of Home Made Bread 

kee|Mp4ce widi Atl ot the coouncrdid baker when Bos 
priceiuehigh. Letuihe{pYOUwinoiilb)riiMr»«G()aoB- 
ickl buriiig> Low priced Sou k aoly one pent m profil- 
aUe bread maldng. W« can ihow you bow to wt* <m Bam. 



In our (cbool of baking we leacb flour from A to Zibnlwa 
do not tlop tbere. Flour alone doea not make bread. We 
teach about yeatt, nigart, iboctenmi agcnU, m3k, mak «- 
tracti, water, wannA and die purpote eacb Mnre> ■ bread. 

Take a few minutn' time NOW and write w foe 



The Columbos Laboratories « "wa »«e »„ cucit. 



Summer Course for Millers and Bakers 

Dnriaa Mar. Jma, Mr aad Aa«iirt a iinclal aaminar anna wtU be 
olTarad pattieularlr sultahla tor tkciH ■)» hava oaver had any tachnfeal 
O^nlDC and who can atFord tba tlma darina the aammar. 

To cbnnlati tfai* ipecUl aumner coarta will oH>tr aaplandld opporto- 
ni^ to ravlflw jtait itudr and to baeoma familiar with tha iIKiat in>d«ni 
■Dtthodi and eqnlpniant. 

thrir daaarvjns ebamlita and promiaJnit amployeaa to Im traJnsd to do 
eaurm«of a HhDrl'rpfHod wLltincrsaaayour abLUty aiid aaniaff powor 



INVESTIGATE thixi 



a Diac. 









OperUhrc Hlllcr and Biker UkaraMrlti, 

727 B. S, WoihI 3|., CUeaao. Ul. 
Klodly farnlah ma with all available Inramation r 



.1 Radprodt; — "Saw It In Bmna BaTtaw." 



Ann, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Clcvssified Advertisemervts 



n*nl« tindar ihla h«a.d 3 «*nt« k word. 



HELP WANTED 



Aft, New York Gtj. Telepbone aoB4- 
Laax. Member of the Bo» Bakert' 
Anodatwn of Muihattati. Write or 
■ire jroar want*. 



OALESMAN.— To handle the vtry best 
J tine of machinery and equipmeni 
DOW offered to the t»ker, either nn a 
commissioa basis or otherwise. Actdress 
C Im care Baxxm Revtew, Woolworth 
BIdg., New York. J10 






WANTED.— Salesman 
line for bakers c 
talis. Address Von Hohenward, care 
Baeiss Review, Woolworth Bldg., 
New Yort L9 



SITUATIONS WANTED 



BAKERS SUPPLIED prompttr for 
■U MCtioni by John A. Sdioen- 
«ktfi Bakers ExchaoK^ 1575 Second 
Atc, New York Gty. Telqihone 3084- 
LcDox. Member of the Boss Bakers' 
Anodation of Manhattan. Write or 
wire roar wants. 



POSITION WANTED. — Manager 
r with 13 years' experience in bak- 
ery business, bread and cakes, 4 years 
as manager with larger concern. Sober 
and reliable. Would prefer Southern 
or Western State. Address W. R., care 
Bakebs Review, 1642 Woolworth Bldg., 
K. Y. M? 



POSITION WANTED. — Foreman. 
1 first class, wants position with re- 
liable firm. Large up-to-date bakery 
preferred with modem machinery. Am 
strictly sober and reliable, in position at 
present Address Svend Sorenson, 
New York Ave., Second sth Str, 
Jamaica, L I.. N. Y. M8 



SITUATION WANTED — Superin- 
U tendent— Position with reliable firm. 
Ten years experience in large and 
small bakeries. Good executive ability 
to manage men. Address M. G., care of 
Bakebs Review, Woolworth Bldg., New 
York. N. Y. Ml 



BAKBIES FOB SALE OR RENT 

FOR SALE.— Only bakery in college 
town of 5,000 people. Doing busi- 
ness of about $1200.00 a month. Own- 
er desires outside employment, and will 
idl stock and equipment for $2600. Ad- 
dress The Russell Real Estate Co.. Og- 
dcndnrg, N. Y. M2 



FOR SALE.— or will sell working in- 
terest in one of the most modem 
and best equipped bakeries in South 
Carolina. A growing concern doing 
a large business extending over three 
States. Also good retail business in 
growing city of 44,000 population. Only 
one other bakery in city. Just moved in 
new plant located in heart of business 
district. Building 60 x 127, two-story 
brick. Equipped with most modern au- 
tomatic machinery and two new patent 
ovens. Reason for selling, owner must 
retire from active management on ac- 
count of failinK health. If interested, 
address "Opportunity," care Bakers Re- 
view, 1642 Woolworth Bldg., New York, 
N. V. M4 

FOR SALE.— Up-to-date bakery, com- 
pletely equipped. Good location in 
residential section. Ejitrance from two 
streets, lot 50 x 170. Must be sold at 
once. Inquire Attorney Daniel S. Flinn, 
iig State St.. Albany, N. Y. Mio 

pXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY.— 
C For rent a fully equipped bakery 
with a fifty thousand ]Warly business 
thiown in; equipment at cost and stock 
a> inventory. Lock Box 934. Buffalo, 
y V, Mn 

FOR SALE. — Bakery, doing fine busi- 
ness, located in the heart of the 
business district of Bremerton, Wash- 
ington, P. S. Navy Yard. Reason for 
selling is to retire. Lunch and ice cream 
parlor will be disconnected if so de- 
sired. Splendid opportunity for the 
right man. May be had at the price 
of the fixtures. (ACT QUICK). P. O. 
Box 338, Bremerton, Wash. Mo 

pOR SALE.— Well equipped wholesale 
r and retail bakery in Iowa, city of 
30,000. doing good business, has A. No. 
t Patent oven, good mixer and mould- 
er; strictly up-to-date in all particulars. 
Address F. Z., care of Bakers Review, 
1642 Woolworth Bldg,, New York, 
N, V. M12 

BAKERY WANTED 

ANTED INFORMATION regard- 

tng good bakery for sale. R. G. 

LJst, Minneapolis, Minn. M6 

MACHINERY. Etc., FOR SALE 

NO REASONABLE OFFER refuted, 
about fifty different (tylei betters 
and mixing machines for cake work, 
alt good for certain classes of work; 
twelve good second-hand dousb mix- 
ers, both single and doable arm ; brakes 
and other bakers' machinefy. When 
writing state yonr preference of make. 
Read Machinery Company, York, Pa. 

FOR SALE.~A RtAerts PorUble 
Oven double deck, No, 80. capacity 
250. Cheap. Address Model Bakery, 
225 Chestnut St.. Morgantown, W, Va. 
M3 



FOR SALE 
Closing out our entire stock, we offer 
for immediate acceptance 

NEW MACHINERY 
2 Champion Moulders, 
2 Champion Box Cake Machines No 

i}^, including dies, 
I Union Wrapping .Mach. Co.'s Comb. 

Rounder — with single phase, 60 

cycle motor, 
1 30 part Glaser (Bench) Roll Divider, 
I Paragon Spraying Machine, 
lyi hp. single phase, 60 cycle motor, 
I Miller Sealing Machine. 

SECOND HAND MACHINERY 
I j-pocket Champion Divider with Sep' 

a rating device, 
I 2-bbl. Champion Mixer, belt driven, 
1 i-bbl. Superior Mixer, double arm, 
I s hp., d,c., 500 volt motor, 
1 Streeter Bread Sheer, 
I 4-speed Peerless Cake Mixer. 
1 Sturma Egg Beater, 
I Carroll Sealer, 
I No. 3 Middleby Oven 
I Union Wrapping Machine, 110 volts. 
I i-bbl. Dav Mixer, belt drive, 
1 3-bbl. Westermain Mixer, belt drive. 
1 4 hp. Vertical Boiler, 
I 4 hp. Steam Engine. 

Any reasonable offer accepted. Write 
to-day. The E. A, Saenger Company. 
Buffalo, N, Y. M5 

PHILADELPHIA DOUGH DIVIDER 
EXCHANGE 

FOR SALE— Used Machinery. Dough 
Dividers, many makes ; sizes to suit 
your shop and capacity. One to six 
pocket. 

— ALSO— 
Portable Ovens Dough Mixers 
Complete Ice CreamFlour Sifters 

Outfits Clipper Beaters 

Shipping Baskets Cake Mixers 
Racks Dough Brakes 

Pans Ice Crushers 

Troughs Freezers 

Pony Mixers Cans 

Roll Dividers Tubs, etc 

7'homson Moulders Electric Motors 
Gas Engines 

Everything for the baker. Two car- 
loads used machinery for sale. Very 
low price. Write to-day. 
PHILADELPHIA DOUGH DIVIDER 
EXCHANGE 

Bourse Building, Philadelphia, P:( 
■ L14 

FOR SALE.— A BARGAIN DOUGH 
DIVIDER— no voll, altematitic 
current. For sale by Carl Rindt, The 
Seelbach, Louisville, Ky. KS 

MISCELLANEOUS 

BEST CASH PRICE paid for i40-lh. 
jnte flour bags, and cotton Boui 
bag*. William Ross & Co., 411 North 
Peoria St.. Chieam. III. 

WANTED.— The address of all bak- 
ers who can use HONEY DUE 
HONEY at 5 cents per pound, two six- 
ty-pound cans to case, discount in car 
lots. H. G. Quirin, Bellevue, Ohw. J? 



BAKERS REVIEW 



[ROLOCO] 



Roloco Works Wonders 

It is the {reatest of all doujk batch in- 
gredients — insuring uniform fermenta aon. 

Roloco will replace sugar, and every other sugary compound 
and matt extract, in any bread dough, pound for 
pound— and COSTS NO MORE. 

Roloco in addition to doing everthing that sugar, and every 
other sugary compound and malt extract can do in the 
dough, enables the baker to produce a larger loaf from 
a given amount of dough, or the same volume with 
less dough 

Roloco keeps the bread moist longer than when sugar, sugary 
compounds or malt extracts are used. 

Roloco improves the gluten quality of all flour?, and makes 
possible the use of flours which would not otherwise 
make salable bread when sugar, sugary compounds or 
malt extracts arc use''. 

Roloco cuts down the amount of yeast necessary. 



Th«M are not ihcorie*; but ficti 4emoDitraie(l in the daily 
ute of ROLOCO by ikouHndi of the bilgert ifkmn. 



Order ■ fivc-falkm tin,- and teM il for younelf. 

The Corby Company 

Sbiion K W»hinctan, D. C 



r BAi nfnm nni nr.n h kiilucu ■ ituLOCO M ROLOCO ■ROLOCOI 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



Jnit mwitlon Bajubb B.*ikw. 



n A K K R S R F. V I I" \V 



We Back Our DeBveiy Service 
With an Insured Guareintee. 

To make assurance doubly sure; and your pro- 
tection doubly strong, we issue this indemnify- 
ing policy with every Corby Yeast contract. 



You don't have to worry, either about the detivery of 
Corby Yeast; or the quality of it. There is no service 
lijie the Corby Service — direct, certain, satisfactory. 

The Corby Company 

Station K Washington, D. C. 

Digitized by ^OOQ IC 
'Twu an ■drerUiement In BiEims Bivibw. j j ^ 



April, 1916 







I 

! 



Three Months* Course 

In Baking, Milling, Pure Yeast Culture, Technical 

Control of Baking Operations, Baking 

Engineering, New Wahl Processes 

WILL BE GIVEN BY THE 

Wahl Efhciency Institute 

OF 

Baking Technology 

Commencing April 10th, 1916 

What Our Stu^enU Say: 

"An hour spent at the Institute is worth a week in the shop." 
"One point I learned is worth my whole tuition. Competition is compar- 
atively easy now." 
"The investment for my education at the Institute has already paid 
several hundred per cent, profit. 



i 




1 mention Bihehh Ritiew. 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



TEAB OFF AND HAIL TO THE NEABEST "UOUID" BRANCH 

D *S£.'?'.".«.rn?.*°'-"'"°- □ S.n.m...pp„c.,^o.. 

□ Qoote uB on ft.' complete l — l Give particulars of new reduced 

outfit, for immediat* delivery, LJ price* on fcuits and ayrup*. 

Uatnal Redprodtr— "Saw It In Baubb Riti>w.' 



Digitized by 



Google 



(j» - . II A K li R S R i: V r E W ApuL, 1916 



, Google 



Uotoal BacIpriMrltr— "Saw It Id Bakms Rbtikw." 



.\PKIL, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



eiMRLE S HlRS eHMaNW 

Cm O Kito n m^ Cateran, Baken, Rsstaonota. 

Hotds, Btc 

CAKE OBNAHENTS AND TRIMHINOS 

NEW YORK. N. V. 



W.W.WILCOX MFG.CO. 

HAMUPACTUItlM 

I BAKERS' CHECKS 
I METAL CHECKS of all kmdi 
BADGES 

CnCAGO 



WINKLER-GRIMM 

Bakery Wasons 

COST LESS 

Because 

They are BuUt to La»t LONGER 



Writ* for Catalogtn 32'E on 
BtJtty Wagoia 

WINKLER-GRIMM CORP. 

*■ ForavlT Wlaklar BroL Mf(. Co. 

2300 Linden Ave. So. Bend, Ind. 



Colboma Pie Machines Will Cut Labor I 
Coita for ANY Bak«r '^t^T^S^.^^J'^^ y 

/ 

^ CDlt«Iur 

y M(g. Co, 

W* luTa ■ moat IntercadiiB litCl* book tor fras dl*- > 160 W. DlTl 
tributloD kiDoiiE baken. It will put anr bakar mt • r aloD Street. 
tba road to praat who readi it. and i> full of facta X Cbloso. 
and flaunt about Dle-nalcins. The coupon to .' Send us a FRBK 
the rlshtorapoatcard wllJ brinslt. / copf of your new 

J' booklet. "UaklD| 

COLBORNE MFG. CO. / .KV"-"'""'^''" 

r Firm 

^ Your SiKQ'ture 

ChicBgO / city 

X Stieet . 



Coib for ANY Baker 

in Ubor. dough, duadna flour _, __. 

Get thu Book— 

"Making Money Out of Pies" 



160 W. DiTuion St. 



Let tbem know tbat ran re«d tba adt. L 



Bakbbi Brtuw. 



W 0"WI .^^ . . . . 

" '"Kgitiza-bvvj'OOg-le- 



BAKERS REVIEW 



ICE CREAM IS A BIG MONEY MAKER 
DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS 




ARE YOU EQUIPPED 
TO GET YOUR SHARE 
OF THIS BUSINESS? 


THE TYSON 


If not, get in touch with 
us and we will show you 
how to make a big profit 
on a small investment dur- 
ing the summer months— 
when the regular Bakery 
Line is rather slow. 


ModeV'C HoHzontal40 Quart Bnne Ice 

Cream Freezer, Belt Drive, with 

Fruit Hopper 

PATENTED 




1 .| 


OUR PRODUCTS 

Tyson and Miller-Tyson Brine 
Ice Cream Freezers, Mixers, 
Tyson Pumps and Brine Pro- 
ducers 




THE MILLER PASTE 

201-225 9TH STREE 


THE TYSON JUNIOR 

JO Quart Horisofital Brinr let Cream Freezer. BiU Drive. 

This cut shows Pump, Brine Box and Freezer 

in one K«i/— patented 

URIZING MACHINE CO. 

r, S. W.. CANTON, OHIO 



'Twai •■) advcitfsniiiciit ia BiESBa Ubt 



Apsil, 1916 



RAKERS REVIEW 



ASK YOUR FLOUR DEALER FOR 

'^" 1»6 % i^/^ 196 ^\ 



CAHOR^ HlJSIiY 



BRANDS OF 



FLOUR 



Wanted: 

Specialty to Manufacture 

A machine shop capable of employing 700 men and equipped with large 
power plant, electric lighting ami electric power, compressed air, electric travel- 
ing cranes, and ample machine tool equipment, wishes to take up the manu- 
facture of some specialCY> other ihan munitions, in large quantities. Has .1 
large, modern iron foundry. 

Is now engaged in the manufacture of high grade machine tools, and 
works exclusively to close limits. Not interested in a contract for small parts 
of any kind, excepting as a part of a targe assembly. 

The equipment comprises lathes from 16" to 48* swing, various types and 
sizes of turret lathes, planers from 30"xlO' to ()0"x40', radial drills, upright 
drills, including extra heavy modern type, various sizes and types of milling 
machines, gear cutters, bobbers, key-way cutters, automatics. 



No objection to adding to the equipment as r 
ample capital to handle a large contract. 



Address all correspondence t 



lays 



1 profitable. Has 



H. M. Manst, c/o J. Walter Thompson Co. 
44.60 East 23d Street New York Qty 

Till 'em jtm fonod It — la BiKaia Bamv. 



bigltizedbyGuUylt 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apsil, 1916 



Howard Flour Tests 

Tell at a glance the 
Qualities of Flour 
for Baking purposes 

The Howard Practical Tests 
are now Imitated, but are 
Unattainable Elsewhere^ : 

We halre tested flour for 29 
years. 

Does experience mean any- 
thing? 

Writm for deBcriptioe price Bat of oar 
popahn KhaduU C. T. A W, tewta. 

The HowardWheat& Hour 
Testinur Laboratory 



Wahl EfHciency Institute forBaking 

INSTITUTE OF BAKING TECHNOLOGY 

M ia BAKING, MUUng, Pur* Y«ut Ci 
Tachniod Cantrol of B«kin( Op«r«lioB>, 



ly coBplcliM ot ibii eoune ■ dcpea oi uaNa 
I of pntcticd ^ieri> 

luUtDtc for Technical Contrel of BaUn| Opentioiis 

Lkboratofi*!: Ckeiuul, Biologiutl, Miciaicopkal, PhncaL 
Tecluiul, TeMing, for the oiunnuliaB of all ouleriau tad 

CaMtdtatioB Bnnm: Repiati it 



■ ki ilei aU the 



"^ 



iW il wi* pnwihlf lo obuiii in all ibe cfluntric* of Eipop* 



nifaduriDB 



Elfiateacr Inapsctioii: In caie ot 
fnch ai a rngitiiriy f. 

litn DcfiartnwM maf „ ^ - - .- 

Id dettfiaiDC the caoN; whea ool evident (iob l*bantcic]r at- 

BaUni Bcseartk InsUmte 

TU* iMlitule labon (ot lb* adTaocaBcol oi baking and oSen the 
baUag indn^ ibe Wahl Procaaa cmiaiaing of a natmat metbod 
to ptereal dw ildeinfl of brewL Pure NoO'cluila culture yeart 
fitpfrriaUx adapUblc lor bread making, Lactic (eiaent pracea to 
pKTCBl all bread diieaig and lo ibottoi the time of lermentiliDo. 

On Scientiil will woik lo uItb any technical problem in the 

(frrfr Or Catalogue 

WAHL EFFICIENCY INSTITUTE 

OfficK 3ZT Sonib L> 5*ll« SL CHICAGO 

Hntnal Baelproeltr— 



Dead Shot ^. Front 

WID Mtan meoar If not ■■Wf*"*T If • 

CockrMch TIma. Sold EvwywlMr* for tk« 

Ual 25 7«*n. Erarj box punntMd. 

Oolden. &a.Oaa« 

DaainK-Tba but of "DMdShot" ron aant na ■ ihoet wkBa 

— ^■-' - . - - 1,^ wpHaMka 




Swd for OlHtntod 1 

B. Howard Smith, •^-S^*- 

Kanatu Ci fy. Mo. 

dto 

Jabnt Bna, 1-t Voatt Bt„ New Tort' 
3. WMMKir, loa^ m »umw St.. BcMaai. 
Ai StUtI A Saaa, 1S<I flartdl Am- CU^ia. 
te^aB-PMM, BaMb aad Hndaiani„ New Tvfc. 

Obaa. P— fy. D a k eia' Snppliaa, Nav Ortwia, and 

<U AhHb Ivau CUeHO.nL 
8. Bam. !«» Tk—StTphhaJiljhta. Pa. 
Bak«n OoatelkMn'aalea Bonaa. mw. Mb Bt. 

Lea Anaalw. GaW. 
Omaha Bakan Bnpplr Co. Omaha Nab. 



The Cost of Home Made Bread 

keep* p«ce wjdi dut of lk« commocul baker when flov 
pricei ue high. Let ut be|p YOU win out by mor* e« »o»- 
ic«l buyng. Low pnced Bout it only one point ii pro&t 
■ble bread making. We can diow you bow to lave oa Boar, 
■ugai and other bgredienti. 

In ouricboolafbakingweleachBourfroai AtoZibotwe 
do not tfop there. Flow alone does not make bieaid. We 
teach about yeait, mgan, ihortedng agenta, milk, nak ex- 
tiacti. water, warmth and the purpote each lerrea in brand. 

Take a few minittea' time NOW and write m for 



The Columbus Uboratories 'ntum. «■ aist: 



SummerCourse for Millersand Bakers 



Durlna Mar. Jua, Jnlyuid Aaanal a apeelai nmi 
offatad partieulailT lultabla fortliaH whohave never h 
tiafninff and who can afford the tlm* darloff tba aiuBDie 

To ehnniit* ttaii ipeclal lummar csnrra willoff< 



r tacholea) 



id ID beeoinii familiar with tba a 



^liandld oj 

IfprnmL '"" " '•"■■*' —"■ 

Lars* mlUsn and baken will make a judicimu f nTaatmant lu aandiiv 
thdr daaervlnK chamiati and prmnlBins empkoreea to ba trained to da 
"BisEer Thins*" with gnatar lueeeH and ecanomr. 

ipeclal tl 



•eof a 






I opportunity i 



'OUT ability and oamliis power 
unodialely and prepare yearaaU 



Openilvc Miller asd Biker UkoratDriu, 

717 B. S. Wood St.. Chieaeo, III. 
Kindly fumlah me with all available Information nUtlTe I 
montha. or we«k» apecial aiinuaer ea 



T It In Baxaaa Ravinr." 



r\:vooglc 



Arm, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Cldcssified Advertisements 



HELP WANTED 



BAKERS SUPPLIED promptly for 
dn Kctioiia by John A. Schoen- 
Mfetr*! Bikers Exchange, 1575 Second 
Kit, New Yoric Oty. Telephone ao84- 
Uoox. Member of the Bois Baker*' 
tMooalaoo of Manhattan. Write or 
aire yonr wanta. 



(;ALESMAN.— To handle the very best 
J lioe of machinery and equipment 
now offered to the baker, either on a 
coffliniuion basis or otherwise. Address 
C L, care Bakiss Review, Woolworth 
Bldg, New York. Jio 

WANTED.— Salesman to carry side- 
line for bakers on commission 
basis. Address Von Hohenward, care 
Baeexs Review, Woolworth Bldg., 
New York. L9 



SITUATIONS WANTED 



BAKERS SUPPLIED promptly for 
aU Mctions by John A. Scboen* 
tdKT'i Bakers ExchanK i^S Second 
Ave, New York Gtar. Telephone aoSi- 
Lenox. Member of the Bom Bakerr 
Anociation of Manhattan. Write or 



POSITION WANTED. — Manager 
r with 13 years' experience in bak- 
ery bnsinesS, bread and cakes, 4 years 
» manager with larger concern. Sober 
and reliable. Would prefer Southern 
or Western State. Address W. R., care 
BAKEia Review, 1642 Woolworth Bldg., 
N. Y. M7 



POSITION WANTED. — Foreman, 
r first class, wants position with re- 
Ijjble firm. Large up-to-date bakery 
preferred with modern machinery. Am 
strictly sober and reliable, in position at 
prcstnL Address Svend Sorenson, 
New York Ave., Second 5th Str., 
Jamaica, U I., N. Y. M8 



SITUATION WANTED — Supertn- 
O tendent— Position with reliable firm. 
Ten years experience in large and 
mtall bakeries. Good executive ability 
to manage men. Address M. G„ care of 
Bakeks Review, Woolworth Bldg., New 
York. N. Y. Mi 



MKBHES FOR SAU OR BENT 



PR SALE.— Only bakery in college 
town of 5.000 people. Doing biisi- 
ncM of about $1200.00 a month. Own- 
er desires outside employment, and will 
sell stock and equipment for $3600. Ad- 
dress The Russell Real Estate Co., Og- 
densborg, N. Y. Ma 



FOR SALE.— or will sell working in- 
terest is one of the most modem 
and best equipped bakeries in South 
Carolina. A growing concern doing 
a large business extending over three 
States. Also good retail business in 
growing city of 44,000 population. Only 
one other bakery in city. Just moved in 
new plant located in heart of business 
district. Building 60 x 127, two-slory 
brick. Equipped with most modern au- 
tomatic machinery and two new patent 
ovens. Reason for selling, owner must 
retire from active management on ac- 
count of failing heahh. If interested, 
address "Opporiunitv," care Bakebs Re- 
view, 1642 Woolworth Bldg., New York, 
N. Y. M4 

FOR SALE.— Up-to-date bakery, com- 
pletely equipped. Good location in 
residential section. Entrance from two 
streets, lot 50 x 170. Must be sold at 
once. Inquire Attorney Daniel S. Flinn, 
lit) State St.. Albany. N. V. Mio 

EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY.— 
For rent a fully equipped bakery 
with a fifty thousand yearly business 
thtown in; equipment at cost and stock 
at inventory. Lock Box 934, Buffalo. 
N' Y. Mn 

FOR SALE. — Bakery, doing fine busi- 
ness, located in the heart of the 
business district of Bremerton, Wash- 
ington, P. S. Navy Yard. Reason for 
selling is to retire. Lunch and ice cream 
parlor will be disconnected if so de- 
sired. Splendid opportunity for the 
right man. May be had at the price 
of the fixtures. (ACT QUICK). P. O, 
Box 338. Bremerton. Wash. Mo 

pOR SALE.— Well equipped wholesale 
r and retail bakery in Iowa, city of 
30.0CO. doing good business, has A. No. 
I Patent oven, good mixer and mould- 
er; strictly up-to-date in all particulars. 
Address F. Z., care of Bakers Review, 
1642 Woolworth Bldg., New York, 
N. Y. M12 

BAKERY WANTED 

ANTED INFORMATION regard- 

ing good balcery for sale. R. G. 

List, Minneapolis, Minn. M6 

MACHINERY, Etc.. FOR SALE 



O REASONABLE OFFER refused, 
about 6f^ different styles beaten 
and mixing machines for cake work, 
all good for certain daues of work; 
twelve good lecmd-hand dough mix- 
ers, both single and double arm ; brakes 
and other bakers' machinery. When 
writing state your preference of make. 
Read Machinery Company, York, Pa, 



N 



pOR SALE.— A Roberts Portable 
r Oven double deck. No. 80, capacit>' 
250. Cheap. Address Model Bakerj-, 
225 Chestnut St., Morgantown. W. Va. 
Mj 



FOR SALE 
Closing out our entire stock, we offer 

for immediate acceptance 

NEW MACHINERY 

2 Champion Moulders, 

2 Champion Box Cake Machines No. 
If4. including dies, 

1 Union Wrapping ,Mach. Co.'s Comb 
Rounder — with single phase, 60 
cycle motor, 

I 30 part Glaser (Bench) Roll Divider. 

I Paragon Spraving Machine, 

1^4 lip- single phase, Co cycle motor. 

I Miller Sealing Machine. 

SECOND HAND MACHINERY 

I 3-pocket Champion Divider with sep- 
arating device, 

I z-bbl. Champion Mixer, belt driven, 

t I-bbl. Superior Mixer, double arm. 

I 5 hp., d.c. 500 volt motor, 

I Streeter Bread Slicer. 

1 4-speed Peerless Cake Mixer. 

1 Slurma Egg Beater. 

T Carroll Sealer, 

I No. 3 Middleby Oven 

I Union Wrapping Machine, 110 volts, 

1 i-bbl. Dav Mixer, belt drive, 

I 3-bbl. Westermain Mixer, belt drive, 

I 4 hp. Vertical Boiler, 

I 4 hp. Steam Engine. 
Any reasonable offer accepted. Write 

to-day. The E. A, Saenger Company. 

Buffalo. N, Y. M5 

t'HILADELPHIA DOUGH DIVIDER 

EXCHANGE 

FOR SALE— Used Machinery. Dough 



— ALSO— 
Portable Ovens Dough Mixers 

Complete Ice CreamFlour Sifters 

Outfits Clipper Beaters 

Shipping Baskets Cake Mixers 
Racks Dou^ Brakes 

Pans Ice Crushers 

Troughs Freezers 

Pony Mixers Cans 

Roll Dividers Tubs, etc. 

Thomson Moulders Electric Motors 
Gas Engines 

Everything for the baker. Two car- 
loads used machinery for sale. Very 



COR SALE.— A BARGAIN DOUGH 
r DIVIDER— no volt. alMmating 
current. For sale bv Carl Rindt. The 
Seelbach, LoutsvUle, Ky. KS 

MlSCELLANEoi^ 

BEST CASH PRICE paid for 140-tb. 
jate flour bags, and cotton floui 
tags. William Ross & Co., 411 North 
Peoria St.. Chieaffo. 111. 



W 



J ANTED.— The address of all bak- 
ers who can use HONEY DUE 
HONEY at 5 cents per pound, two six- 
ty'pound cans to case, discount in car 
lots. H. G. Quirin, Bellevue, CMtio. J7 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Apkil, lOiO 




For page numbers of adveitiseis see "Index to AdTertisements" on Ust paga. 



ADVXBTIBINO 

Ulrror PiintlDZ Co., SMlBmuioo, Uleb. 
ScbnUe Adr. Senlcs, Cblcaca. Ill 

AI.MOND FASTK, BTC. 
Belde, Heurr. New York. 

ARCHITECTS 
l-'aoler Co., C. D.. Plttsburcb, Pa. 
Atat at Supvlv HvvMtm. 



S— oln JAuMiur* and THiU. 



Alao at SKfipIy Html*. 
BOXaa (BHIFPINO) 
Hind* * Daneb Paper Co., Santfoak;. O. 
Jaban Brotbera, New York. 
Lewla. a. B. Co., WaUrtowo. WU. 
Pnlter-Hnbbard MlB- Co., UtDneapotl*. 

Hlnn. 
■artoQ Mfg. Co.. chleaKo, III. 



Dar. J- H. Co.. CIdcIddbU, O. 
Hanon, Pembroke D^ Pblladelpt 
Itjan-Soperlar Co., Clndnnatl, L. 
aoefcweli; L. A. Co.. Brooklfn, N. Y. 



Wortier 4 PBelderoT Co., Haglaaw'. lileb. 

St aUe JtfwAtiHTv atid TosJ*. 

BREAD OBDMBIMO MACBIMC 

Dar, J. B. Co., CtDclnDBtl, O. 

m- . na.i.. — J (^__ Ba(1naw, Ulcb. 



Werner A Pflelder 



BBKAD I^BBI^ 

Blaekbam, Oeo. L., Detroit, Mich. 
Minor Prlntlaf Co., Kalamaaoo, Mich. 
NatloDat BlndrnB Mac. Co., New Tor 
N. T. 



M?rt? 



Newark ^maoe Farelimeut A PaBcr Co., 

New York, N. Y. 
Dnloii Waxed and Parcbment Paper Co.. 

Hamburg, N. J. 

CAKE MACHINERY 

CbemnioD Mecblnery Co., Jollet, 111 
Dar. J. H. Co.,'Cliictnnatl, Ublo. 
Barton, ppisbrnke Ti.. I'hilartrlnhia, Pa. 
Hobart Mfg. Co., Tbe Troy. Ohio. 
Jaburg Brulheri, New Vork. 
Lockvood Utg, Co,. Cincinnati, Oblo. 
tfillB, Tboa. A Bro.. Phlliidelpbla. Pa. 
Bead MacblnerT Co.. York. Pa. 
ThomeoD Mnchfne Co.. BelleTllIc N. J. 
WenieF A Pfletderer Co., BBglnaw, Mich. 



Mm at att Siipplv Hou. 



CONFECTIONERS' AND 
BCPPLIEB 

FsuldB Co., T. A.. BoBtOD, MasB. 
Oampert A Co., a,, BruukJyu. S. Y. 
HlrBcbmBBn. Chaa., N»w York. 
JohnaoD, B. A., Co.. nnelnn. Mbko. 

8 Hilt. The Ang.. Co., Rattlmore, M4. 
!ll>. ItoB.. A Bro„ PblUdelphU, Pa. 



[ DlVlUUIUi 

AmerlcBD Bakera Macbluerj Co., SL LouU. 

Uo. 
CbaDiploD HHchlner; Co.. JoUet, ;j. 
I>Utcbeiu Tool Co.. Beacou, N. i'. 
Jaburg Brothere. New York. 
Lrnn-Superlor Co- Cincinnati, O. 
Bead UacbloerT Co., Kork, Pa. 
Tliomaoa UHcblne Co., BellerUle, N. J. 
Triumph Ulg. Co., ClDCiOBatl, O. 
Werner A Pllelderer Co„ Bagloaw, Ulcb. 

DOUUHMCT APFABATD8 
Beam A Scboel. Witter loo. la. 
BDOCATIONAI. 
Colnmbni Lnboratorlea. Chirago, III 
Selbel InstltQte of Tecbnologr. Chicago. 
Operative Miller Lihoralnrli^. Chlcagu. III. 

EOn PRODCCTB 
Armour A Co., Chicago. 111. 
Ur7 Ullk CO., New York, 
.[nburg Brother!, New York. 
Carton Co., Tbe John. New York, 
MorrBll Bnnlf Co.. Ktii™— V V 
ELECTBICAI. AFFARATGS AND 
SCPFLIES 
General Electric Co., ScbeoectBdy, N. Y. 
WeatlDghoDBe Electric A Ufg. Co., Pltta- 
burgb. Pa. 

ELECTRIC OVENS 
Hughes Electric Heating Co., Chicago, 111. 



Mirror Prlntlnr Ca.. KnUmnKna, Uleh. 
EXTERHI N AT O R8 

Glrard Co., Felli, Mlneapolf 



I'o. 



•IIXIKI 



Fiicha. B., New York. 
Jabnrg Brotbpr*. New York. 
AJb at Sutrplv Hovmt. 
FIXTCREB 

Bnucr. S. C. A Son. nrooklro. ^ 
(Inpbel A Dlnnmli. CbifVgn. 
Jnlmrir Brnthpni. .New York. 



Uar&ower Mltla Co., Knrt Wajne, iDd. 
Com Mem, Kenlnr , EM. 

Sweet, W. L., Co.. New York. 

Bar Btate Hlltlng'co., "winona, Hlnn. 
Blodgett Hllliog Co., JaneBTllle, WU. 
Bweet. W. L. A Co., New York. 
Stem A Bon. B.. Milwaukee, Wia. 

Bpring Wbeat Ffonr 
Barber Milling Co., MlnnentMillB, Minn, 
Bnr Htate Milling Co., Winona. Minn. 
Big Diamond MllTe Co., MlnneapollB. Ulnn. 
Bln(lg*tt Mllllnir Co.. JnneflTllle, Wla, 
Camnbetl, L, O., Milling Co., Bloomlag 

Pntlrle. Minn. 
Crescent MllllrB Co., Fslrfai, Ulnn. 
Bagle Roller Mill Co.. N.>n' Ulm, Minn. 
Ln Orange Milts, Red Wing, Mrnn. 
I.Utm-n ^fTl1 Co.. T.,* Crn-<». wm. 
National Milling Co.. Toledo, Ohio. 
National Milling Co.. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Now Prague t'lonrlng UUl Co., Mew 

New 'Ij^ Roller Mill Co., New Dim, 

Mtnn. 
Phoenix Milt Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Plllalmrr Klour Mills i.<i., Mlmiespolli, 

MInr.. 
PlrmoDth Milling Co., Le Mors, Iowa. 
l<<-d Wing Mlllliig Co., Iii'd Wing, Minn. 
ItiiBSell Miller MIg. Co., Mllll1pnn"l1^<. MlQu. 
Sliefflelrt King MIg. Co.. Mlitnenpnlts, Minn. 
Stern A Bonn, B., Mllwnnhee, Xvia. 
Teimant A Hoyt, Iiike Cllr. Minn. 
Waalihnm Croal<r Co., Mlnnpapolle. Minn. 
Wells Flour MIlllnB Co., Wella, MlDn. 



Potter A Wrightlngton, Charleslown MaM 



& Elev, Co., sterling. 

Ismert-Hlncke MIg. Co., Kansas CltT. Mo. 
KanasK MH. A Rxn. O-... Kan.na fi.T. Mo 
I.amliee Flour Mills, HntcblnBOii. Kaasaa. 
«"n-ki MIlllnB Cn.. Alton, 111. 
Walnnt Creek MlBlng Co., Great Bend. 



It. Howi 



, Mo. 



Morlarite Mfg. Co., UloomQeld, N. J. 
AImo at all Sapviv Him—. 
IN8UJ.ATINO BRICK 
Armstrong Cork A insulatloD Co.. Pllts- 
bargb, Pa. 

■.ABOBATOKIBB 
Colnmltaa labors to rlra. Chicago. IIL 
Howard Wheat and Flour Testing l^boii- 

tory. UlnnenpullB. M.'nn. 
Operative Miller niid Baker Laboratorle.', 

Chicago, 111. 
Selbel Institute of Tecbnologr, Chicago, 

Wahl Bfflclencr Institute, Chicago, IIL 
MACHINEBY AND TOOl^S 



Champion Much In err Co., JoUaC 111. 

Liar, J. U. Co, anduaab. O. 

Dutchess Tool Co- Beseon, N. Y. 

Gottscbalk A Co.. BeedsrlUe. Pa. 

Hsrton, Pembroke D., PblladelpUa. Fs. 

Jnborg Brothem. New York, 

Keen Ig- Keller Co., Lancaater, Pa. 

Lockwood Mfg. Co., Onclnnatl, Uhto, 

Lrnn-Bnperlor Co., aoclansU, O, 

Miiag, The Ang. Co., Baltimore, Hd. 

Mills, ThoB. A Bro.. Pblladelphls, Pa. 

Keod Maeblnerr Co., York, Pa, 

Rnehwell. L. A,. Co., Brooklyn, N, Y. 

Thomson Machine Co., BellarUlat M. J 

TrIniDph Mfg, Co., ClndnnBtL O. 

Werner A Pflelrierer Co.. Saslasw, Mlrli 
MAI.T EXTRAOTH 

Advance Malt Products Co., Chicago, III 

AtnerlCND Ulsmslt Co.. Clndnnatl, O. 

Rn11nntlT<P. P.. A Bon-. Newark. N. 7 

Crown Maltose Co., Chicago, 111. 

M)i1l-Dln<ilnBe Co.. New Vnrk. 

Mechet Mfg. Cn,. Phsa.. Mllwanka*. Wto 
UTLK PnWDBB 

Drr Milk Co., New York. 

Kkenherg Co.. Cortbrntl, N. Y. 

Gumpcrt A Co.. B., Brooklrn. N. Y. 

Jaburg Brotbera, New York. 

Uerrefl Sonle Co., RTraenie. N. T. 
MINOR HEAT 

Jabnrg Brothers, New Tork. 

MIXING MACHINES 

Oreo A Machine Co.. Cblcage. 



111. 



r Co., Jollet, in. 



Dar. J. n, Co.. clndnnatl, O. 
DntchMis Tonl Co.. Beseon, N, T. 
Ofttlsehalk A Co., Beedsrllle. Pa. 
Barton. Pembroke D.. Philadelphia, Ps. 
,Tnhurir Brolhora, New York. 
The Rnhart Mfg. Co.. Troy. Oblo. 
Loekwond Mfg. Co.. Cindnnatl, Ohio. 
LTnn-Snperlor Co.. ClndnnsH, O. 
Mllla. Thoa.. A Bro,, Phlladelpbla, Pa. 
Reari Machinery Co., York, Pa. 
Rnekwell. T,. A., Co.. Brooklyn. N. T, 
«... ,.._. n- Bellerllle, N. J. 



MOLniNO MACHTNES 
Champion Mnchlnery Co.. Jollet, IIL 
Thnmann Mflrblne ("o.. Belle^lle. N. J. 
Trloroph Mfg. Co.. OnHnnatl. O. 



Oeneml Flertrle Cn.. fii-heneetailT, 
I.lPonIn Kl"ctrlc Co.. Clevelnnd, Oli 
WestlngbODfle Elec. A Mfg. Co 



Dnhrkop Oren Co.. New Tork. 
rtsh. A. J.. A Co., Wilworlh. Wis. 
Nfltlonal Oren rn,, Bpth^u. N, T. 
PnlPTT-en Orpn Co., CbfcitH". III. 
Rtanrlntil Ovpo Co., Plttalmrrh. Pa 
Werner A Pflelrierer Co.. Rngtnaw. Ul«t. 



Werner A Pfle 



lerer Co., Saginaw, HM 



Ami, igi(> 

Ubnclit. F. J., Pittsburgh, Fa. 
UiLcHw Tool Co.. Umvuu, ^. X. 
UaliMfd Orao Co., New lork and Cli 

)[wt Oven Co.. Newbaryport, Mass. 
IIUU, TbuB., * Bro., Ptillad»ltililB. Pa. 
Tijlor Insiruuipnt Co.. lloGl]eBt.!r, M. 
Ziittlti. Adk-. New York. N. Y. 



3AKERS REVIEW 



Portable 
Btnoex u'pn (.nmpuay, Hntiie >.ri>ei[, 
Ukidgilt Cu., U. S., BurlliiKtOD. VU 



.Mk-Ji 



nib, A. J.. * Co., Wa1wor._, 

BDbtnrd Otbd Co., New Vort and Clil 

Hee* (Ivpn Co.. New liiirr port, MasB. 

MMdlebyUaraball Oreo Co.. Cbtcaco, IJI 

JlHdlrt7 Otbd Co., New York, N. T. 

Brid Portable Oven Co., BnlTnla, N. Y. 

RolKiti Portable Oven Co., CblraKO, III. 

Trlompb Mfg. Co.. Cincinnati. O. 

riiati Mre, Co.. Kanaai CItT. Ho. 
RmI BBd Batarr Oveni 

Ounplon HaehlDerT Co.. JoUet, III. 

mi, A. J.. * Co., Walwortb. wli. 

Hanoi. Ppmbroke D.. Phlladelpbla, Pa. 

PAPBB 

.Sh Waand Faptr. 

PANS 

Htartb Pan Bread Co., New York. N. Y. 

HtBli. W. O. * Bom Co., Plilla., Pi. 

Jabirr Brothen, New York, 

KaWnfer. Bdvard, Co., Cblcago. III. 

Lwkwood Vtg. Co., ClnelDnatl. O. 

Hau, Tke Ads., Co.. Baltimore, Kid. 

Mfrt Onn Co.. Nen-bnryport. Hatm. 

lima, Thoa., * Bro.. Pbfladelpbla. Pa 
PBBL BI.ADK* 
1 Pcet Co.. Cbleaao. Ill 
' " V Bob, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

—I, Mew fork. 

_ Br«.. Pblladrlpbla, Pa 

Srliri>ed»r. R^J[^. Cbl cnKO. III. 



r. B. C, A Bob 
rr BroUwn, Hi 
. Thoa.. A Bm 



JokaioD, R. A.. Co.. Bnaton. Haia. 

put MAORINBBT 
Cslbenie Mfr. fn.. Chlmffo. 111. 
PKRinvM* 

fliiit*. J. W., Foniwlry Co.. Weitervlllp. 



r PriDttug OiT 



oo. Uicb. 



Brauu, Bmll, Daftou, Oblo. 
GleLaudl, l>'rlta L.. Uuituu, Maaa. 
KAVK8, TlltCHa, UTC. 
Daf, J. 11. Co.. ClucliiUBll, O. 
Uerloo, Pembroke D.. PLilJadelpbla, Pa. 
Jaburg Brolbcra, New lork. 
JobDsun. H. A., Co.. IIobiuii, Mbbb. 
Katiinser Co., Ed.. Cblcnso. 111. 
Locknuod Htg. Co., ClriduuBtl. OblO, 
L]'UD-Su]>erlor Co.. rincliiniili. il 
Mrek Uvea Co.. Newburyport, Uaas. 
Bead Macbliierr Co.. Vurk, I'a. 
Koberia t'orlable Oven Co., CblcBKO, 111. 
Trlnmpb litg. Co^ Ctoclnnati, O. 
Uuloii SaoiUrj Back Utg. Co., AlblOD, 

MIcb. 
Werner A PBalderer Co.. 8aglBaw, Ulcb. 

BAI8IN8 
OaUfomla Associated Raisin Co.. Fresno, 

CalU. 

BOON DEBS 
I'dIod WrappluK Mac. Co.. Jollet, III. 

HACK CLEAN KHtl 
Tbomiou Uaeblne Co., Bellerllle. H. J. 



Ltd., NorfDlk 



TbomsoD UncMoe Co^ Belleville. N. «. 
Werner A Pflridm-r Co.. Rntrtnaw, Ulcb. 

BBAUNQ MACRINBI 
Mirror PrlntlDt Co.. Kalamaaoo, Hleb. 

SBAI^ 
Chicago Car Seal Co., Cbiceco, III. 



Goebal A DleaDeai. Cbtenro, Itt. 
JabOrK Brolhera. N«r York. 

SODA FOUNTAINS 
LKluld Carbonic Co.. Cblcago, III. 

BTOVB8 
.Tnhnson. H. A.. Co.. BoRton. Haas. 
Kntainnr Co., Bd.. Ctaleairo. III. 
Meek Oren Co., Newbnryport, Mass. 
MIHs, Thoa., A Bro., PhlladalpbU, Pa. 



Mhuk, Tbe Aug., Co., Ualllmore, Hd. 
UlJla. Tbua., A Bro., Pblladelphla. Pa. 
Seltlel, Ad A Bnus, Cbleago, IIL 



Taylor Inatruuient Co.. itocbeater. N. ! 
Aug. ZaublU, New York, N, X. 
TKUCK8 {Uolor) 
Anto Car Co., Ardmore. Pa. 
Studebaker Corpora tloo, Indlaoapi 

OTBNSIJLS 

Jaburg Brolhera. New York. 
Ki-UHiieer Co., Kd., Chicago. Ill 
Mills. Tboi.. A Bro., PblladelphlH. Pa 
Lockuood MIg. Co., CloelDoatl. uhlo. 
Afn at aU SuppJv Hottatt. 



TTAXBD FAFsna 

il Waxed Paper Co., CblcsKo, III. 

Vegetable Parchioent Co., ■*!- 

■inaaoo, Hlcb. 
Mirror Printing Co.. Kalamaaoo, Ueh. 
Newark PnrilBDe ParchineDt A Paper C«.. 

New York. 
Union Waxed A ParcbmeBt Paper Co.. 
Hambnrg, N. J. 

wRAPPiNo uAOHnnca 

Hayasen Mfg. Co., ghehoygan. Wis 

P Deo ma tic Scale Corp.. Ltd., Norfolk 



r Comp.'Veast'Co.. Mllwankee. WH. 



• Malt ProdnelB < 



Plymouth Milling Co., Le ijara,' Iowa. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS 




S>km A Conf aetkoarB Co . . . 
BOa. Waltar, A Co.. Ltd_. 

SdkBtfaw. P., ASona 

BubwlUItins Co 

BBV,a C A Son 

BiimASchori 

BajStateMIUiigCo 

BfiuHn Otbd CofnpanT- - . . 

Bii Dtamend HUli Co 

Bktkbam. Gao. L. 

BUiMtCo.. O. 8 .. 

BMamMItUngCo. 

EriBB, BmU 

Bnym Guide. 



Cililirni* AHKciated Rai*[n Co M 

Cuahridaa Mf B. Co. IIS 

Cm»h(5,L.G.. Milling Co. UB 

CtotraJ Waiad Paper Co _. B4 

ChunpkmHaiAlnerTCa _.. 6S 

GUeaaoCv ScalCo K 

Colbonw Mfs. Co ,- - - Va 

Ohimbtv Labmstoriea 138 

Cnui^idatcd Pndacta Co, 9 

CooleyCo., C. D _.._ 

Csmbt. W. A., HUUng Ca 109 

CwbrYaaitCa US129 

Con ProdDcta Ref. Co. *0 

Cn»nt Hilling Co.- -- H 

CnwDHaltoaaCo.. _ _. BT 

<^imrHtg. Co 121 

Oar, J. a. Co-.TBa..... -. £8 

[>iTllnk Co _ 3t 

D«takoe oven Co _ 21 

I>iitdMH Tool Co 50 

E^BaDnlGIICo___ 112 



PWw^iinann Co^ Tba, Inc. . . 



CottMUialk A Co ]\..l''"" H 

GampntACo., 8. - - 11 

Hanca, J. W.. FoaidryCo. GS 

Haitui, PambrokeD 19 

Harnen Mfg. Co. BB 



Hinda A Daueh Paper Co. . . 



i Flour TeatIng Lalm- 



HuntarMimngCo-.. 



Jaburg Brathara _._ 2T-4»-I2li 



iiinger Co., Edward... 



Ia Grange Milli.---.- 

Lanbm Flour Mlll> Co. . 
LAjrton Co.. The John. . 
Lewli. G. B., Co 



Lockwood Mfg. Co . 
Lowe Company, Joe - 

Lrnn-Suprrior Co 

Haag. The Aug. Co 

Malt-Dlastue Co 

Mayflower Hilli 

-' ->] Mfg. Co., Chat 



Maak Ovan Co. M 







































PetaraanOven Co 


IE 


pll!3SiWS^»b-ii:;::::;::::;-.;:;sakaZ 
















... a 








































SehnUa Adr. S^rtce 


































































Union Sanitary RaikMtg. Co 


... n 














...i» 































-S^;:;;;::5-@0C)§fe 



BAKERS REVIEW 



April, 1916 



«IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Conducted for thi BmaAt of It* Patron* and Proapeedve Fan* 

^t\}ttl%t Sahiug (Satn(iant! 



r n WEST MONROE STREET, CHICAGO 



Attention — Bakers of Schulze Brands 

We have prepared for your benefit and carry an immense stock of 
Advertising Material— compXete in every detail — for bakers of the 
following brands of bread: 



BUTTER-NUT 

PAN-DANDY 

LUXURY 



BUTTER-KRUST 
BIG-DANDY 10c. 
PRINCE HENRY RYE 



LUXURY 10c CAKE 



The Advertising consists of Bill Board Posters— Indoor and Outdoor Signs 
— Store and Window Display — Newspaper Campaigns— Novelties for Clerks 
and Proprietors — Material for House Distribution — Bread Enclosures — 
Novelties to Attract and Influence the Children. 

Don't Spend a Dollar I We Save You Money 



For Any Advertising Until You 
Consult With Us 



Through Our Tremendous 
Puidiasing Power 



TTle SCHULZE ADVERTISING SERVICE 

IS YOUR SERVICE— IT STANDS FOR VOU— IS CONDUCTED FOR YOU. 
NOT OCCASIONALLY BUT CONSISTENTLY AND ALL THE TIME 
—ALWAYS ON TAP. SE^O) FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



WOULD YOV LIKE TO BAKE THE SCHULZE BRANDS IN YOUR TOWN? 
EASY MONEY FOR THE BAKER WHO DOES 



O^Of Av^raotf Inrr^Aft^ •" T™o Years in the Prices of Thirty Different Raw Materials 
CD/0 /average *""*=*«= Used in the Bakeshop. That Means Close Figuring, Doesn't It? 
Read Mr. Krebs' Article on Page 63 — It is Based on Actual Experience in the Baking Business, See Regular 
Departments for Other Important Features — Retail, page 6.3; Wholesale, page 69; In the Workshop with the 
Operative Baker, page 75; Cracker, page 93. A complete list of the contents oj this issue on page 5. 



, Google 
I 



RAK-PPC PTTVIFW 



5 



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BAKERS REVIEW 



«IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



CoDductsl for the Bsneflt of Ita Fatmn* and PTMPactlv« PkUtHii by tbc 

&tifni^t Vaktttg (Sam)iang 

a«Hn] Offlcu: TS WEST MONROE STREET. CHICAGO 

Attention — Bakers of Schulze Brands 



We have prepared for your benefit and carry an immense stock of 
Advertising Material — complete in every detail — for bakers of the 
following brands of bread: 



BUTTER-NUT 

PAN-DANDY 

LUXURY 



BUTTER-KRUST 
BIG-DANDY 10c. 
PRINCE HENRY RYE 



LUXURY 10c. CAKE 



The Advertising consists of Bill Board Posters — Indoor and Outdoor Signs 
— Store and Window Display — Newspaper Campaigns— Novelties for Clerks 
and Proprietors — Material for House Distribution — Bread Enclosures — 
Novelties to Attract and Influence the Children. 

Don't Spend a Dollar I We Save You Money 



For Any Advertising Until You 
Consult With Us 



Through Our Tremendous 
Purchasing Power 



7%. SCHULZE ADVERTISING SERVICE 

IS YOUR SERVICE— IT STANDS FOR YOU-IS CONDUCTED FOR YOU, 
NOT OCCASIONALLY BUT CONSISTENTLY AND ALL THE TIME 
-ALWAYS ON TAP. SEND FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



WOULD YOU LIKE TO BAKE THE SCHULZE BRANDS IN YOUR TOWN? 
EASY MONEY FOR THE BAKER WHO DOES 



9(?ftt» Air^rsia^ In/*r<»aaA ^^ Two Years in the Prices of Thirty Different Raw Materials 
CD/0 rtvcragc *"^* *=*"'= Used in the Bakeshop. That Means Close Figuring, Doesn't II? 
Read Mr. Krebs' Article on Page 63 — It is Based on Actual Experience In the Baking Business. See Regular 
Departments for Other Important Features— Retail, page 63; Wholesale, page 69; In the Workshop with the 
Operative Baker, page 75; Cracker, page 93. A complete list of the contents oj this issue on page H. 



(_ _ ( 

MUID HONTHLT BY THE WM. K. CRECORY CO» NEW YORK, ti 

All the News fc 



^-•^-"' MAY, 



, Google 



ureau of Statietioa 



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lunMI llonttaly by Wm. R. Ongory Co. 
1642 WoolwarthBnUdliig, N*w Toxk, N.T. 

ClMS. B. Tliompcoa, Pr«ild*at and Ovaaral Managax 

TELSPHONE, NEW YORK OFFICE, BASCLAY !UI 
WESTERN OFFICE, A. S. FURIES, MARQVETTE BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL. 
PHONE Cantral tttt 



Volume 33 



MAY, 1916 



Number 2 



CONTENTS 

Practical and Technical Studies of the Baking Industry in Europe 
Closer Supervision of Raw Materials in the Bakeshop - 
A Message to the Live Ones in the Baking Industry - 

Preparing for Big Omaha Convention - 

Editorial __.. 



p«g* 

53 
55 
57 
59 
6i 



63 



Material and Labor Costs 

Possibilities in Pineapple Cake and Pie - - - 

Fool-Proof Device to Control Mixers - - 74 

Bakers Machinery and Its Benefits - ■ - - - - .-,- . . 77 

The Necessity and Great Value of Yeast Foods in Bread 85 

Trade Topics in England --..---86 

A Study of the Food Value in Cakes 89 

Page ^ _ ^__^ ^_ P«« 



BDITOBIAL. 

lacreoHlnfc Costs 
Home-Uadp Bread I 
WhyJ 



lion si Education 



1 Is Dull .... 

Material anil Labor CoM In Ihe I 
PoBHlbtlltle^ In Plueapplp. Cake si 
WHOLESALE. 
The Art of Maklnff Pie-Crust . 
How to Coach Sal^mra to Combli 

With doles .... 
"Safety Flrnt" In Biiyltit; Flonr . 



The Rnfety MnTcment In Bafcerlt 
Bakprn" Machlncrj- ntid its Bern- 
.tuBwem to Inqulrlwi ou Many P 



The 



KBlty and Orei 



Valnp 



In noad 1 
A Study of tlip Food Value Id Cakes . 
Bohemian Sour Rye Bread . 
CRACKER, 
Tbe Blseult-Baklns World . 
Choliv Formnlns for the Blaralt Bnk 



OewPi 



techolsohe nnd kntturelle Stud 
das Bneck(>re1- iinil Kondltor 



VerelDgte Baeckermelatoi Ton New York . 
Bronx Baeckermelster-Vereingnng, New York 
Brooklyn QerinaB Boaa Baeckar Biialtiaaa Absd. 
OencbaertBTerband der Baeckermelsler Brooklyn 
Znr Bebenlgung .... 
QBNBRAL NEWS. 

Stone DatlDK HIa Cakes . 
Bakeries of America 
New Yeast Concern In Pbiladelpblu 
New Pennsylvania ReEnlatlons . 
South Dakota Bakers Meet . 
Trade Topics from EnBland 



orka purchase Plah 



Chi 



alon of Guaranty Legend 
■rs Celebrate 

Ted from Food Products 
rles S. ilbarpe New Eastern Manager 



SI. Louis Bakers Bowling Club . 
New Machluerf Firm In SI. Louis . 
Biff Wagner Bakery Open . 
Biscuit and Cracker Manufacturers . 
Remember the TrI-Stflte Convention , 
Illinois Prepnrlng . . . . 

Bread Law Killed . . . . 

Krauae Starts New Firm . 
A Novel AdvertlBlUK 9cbeme 
Albany. Ga.. Has a BIe Baker . 
Studebaker Truck Endorsed 
A Big Rye-Bread Contract . 
... .„ ^_.-j._a Orphans Hnnip 






SUBSCKIPTIOH PIUCB— United States and FosscHions, Mexico and Cuba (1.00 a year. Canada $1.50 a year. 

Foreign Countries in Postal Union $2.00. 

CAUTIOH — Do not pay solicitors, unless they present ivriAM aK/iif>n'/>, with date, from the publishers to collect money. 

HOnCB TO AD V MtTWEHM— To insure insertion, all copy, cuts, etc., for changes of regular advertisenients in 

Bakkks Review should reach us NOT LATER than the 15th OF THE MONTH preceding date of publication. 

The first advertising forms close promptly on this date 

NEW or ADDITIONAL advertising not to occupy fixed position, can be inserted in a special form up to the 20th. 

Member Audit Bureau of Cireulaiion 

tv Wm.lt. QncvTM Co., S*m YorKattriakt u — n tt d . 



Members of the New York Trade Press Association 

Bnfnd a* M« Mw Turk POtl Q0le« 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1 916 



Delivery Car 

*875 



Hidf-ton Statian W*«on 
Half-ton ^»en EzpreM 
One-ton Op«n Elzpreu 
One-ton Sl«lw Bodr 
16- 



■But 
AU Pric— F. O. B. DttroU 



1200 
1290 
1400 



load, room and carrying capacity 
it gives more mileage per gallon 
of gasoline than any other car, 
we believe. And it is another 
example of what it means to 
buy a car backed by that won- 
derful experience of Studebaker. 
For 64 years Studebaker has been 
dealing with retailers' delivery 
problems. Studebaker knows them 
thoroughly — knows the service that 
is expected, the kind of packages, loads 
and routes that must be handled, the 
kind of streets that must be traveled. 



the motor car so thoroughly, has been 
able to produce a motor so exactly 
fitted to a Delivery Car and its needs 
that it is a marvel of efficiency 
and ECONOMY. 

This same Studebaker experience 
makes this Delivery Car at $875 the 
ideal car for bakers' use—a car built 
not only to run at low operating cost, . 
but to give service of the highest type 
— to be simple, easy ,to ' drive and.- 
RELIABLE. This is the car that . 
has cut delivery costs for thousands. 
See the Studebaker dealer or vmte. 
for further information. 



South Bend, Ind. 



STUDEBAKER 



Detroit, Mich. WalkervUle. Out 

AMrmt* all Carmpondence to Detroit 



I R«elpn>clt7— "Saw It Id Bakibb Rbt 



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JUv, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



The Service of the Trade 
Paper 

slHE heir-apparent to the British throne has for his crest three ostrich plumes. 
And on an intertwining scroll is the motto, "Ich Dien." Which being in- 
terpreted means, "I serve." The heir-apparent to the American soverign 
has for his coat-of-arms, three base ball bats, rampant, on a field of emer- 
ald. And underneath are the words, "Ischi Beble" — "I should worry!" 

Both sentiments express two vital principles; work and play, service and 
recreation. And this combination, broadly speaking, meet life's contingen- 
cies, and is full of possibilities. Anything that contributes to healthier 
bodies, purer thoughts, better work and service, is desirable; and we purpose to show the 
Trade Paper performs that function. 

That only is sacred which serves. 

Wc live in the age of the progressives — though it may include Republicans, Demo- 
crats, Prohibitionists, Socialists and what-not. 

Every day thousands of dollars worth of machinery is junked to make, way for up-to- 
date equipment. We live right-up-to-the-minute, and even borrow of to-morrow. 

And the Trade Paper mirrors the minds of the progressive thinker, and breathes the 
spirit of the age. Its pages are full of instruction and information, the result of specialized 
knowledge and research. 

The editorial department of the Trade Paper is in the hands of experts, who have their 
fingers upon the pulse of human thought and activity. Its pages are full of facts — facts that 
bring home truths — facts that expose falsehood — facts that spell success. 

There is a vim, verve and vitality in the Trade Paper that is peculiarly its own. There 
is a sympathy and understanding permeating it that is unique, an intimacy that makes it a 
personal friend. 

Right here is where the Trade Paper has its source of power. It gathers together, in- 
forms and reflects the things which may be applied to specific, individual need. 

As a means of encouragement and inspiration, the Trade Paper is invaluable. The 
subscriber who reads it, and chews and digests its varied menu, will become stronger and 
more robust. Both he and his business will benefit. 

The policy of the Trade Paper is founded upon scientific knowledge and common 
sense, and its business conducted on the ethical principles of morality. It is accurate and re- 
liable, honest and straight- forward. 

The Trade Paper does not deal in superficialities. It does not merely scratch the sur- 
face, it digs deep down into the heart of the things. It is intensely practical, and has 
quality, tone and depth. 

There is a vitality of thought running through its pages, which comes from the dynamo 
of truth. And it is illuminated by a steady, clear flame of utiHty and service. 

Perhaps the great charm of the Trade Paper lies in the fact that its articles are brief, 
bright and brotherly. 

It is tedious to have to wade through columns of words — just words. 

"O, monstrous!" cried the fat Knight, "but one half -penny worth of bread to this in- 
tolerable deal of sack!" 



iAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



A FEW MOMEWTS WITH ODR ADVERTISERS 



The Waterproof Paper & Board Co., Cincinnali, 
Ohio. — Ad attractive advertisement printed in colors 
elsewhere in this issue, states that Zebra Striped Wrap- 
pers for bread purposes prevent mold, allow ventila- 
tion and eliminate mustiness, yet cost no more than 
ordinary wrappers. To prove this claim, the manufac- 
turers are willing to send samples of the paper for 
testing purposes. A coupon for your convenience is 
printed on page 84C. 

Krause Importing Co., New York, N. K.-— After 
spending fifteen years on the road for a large bakers' 
specialty concern, the head of the Krause Importing 
Co. is well equipped to render service of value to bait- 
ers, especially those interested in Box Cake proposition. 
"Krimco" is the trade name under which products of 
this concern will be sold to the bakers trade. 

Peerless Wire Goods Co., Lafayette, Ind. — A line of 
wire goods for the bakery is made by this concern that 
no baker of quality goods can afford to be .without, 
is the claim of the manufacturer. A very handsome 
catalogue showing their wares will be sent those mak- 
ing inquiry. 

Chas. Roffmatm, Inc., New York, N. K.— Full par- 
ticulars regarding a steam boiler manufactured by this 
concern is published in another part of this issue, and 
it would be well for interested bakers to write for 
further particulars and arrange for a demonstration. 



B. f, Freymark Machine Co., St. Louis, Mo— A 
steamer that fits any oven, simple to install, economical, 
burns gas at a cost of $1.50 to $2.00 a month, is manu- 
tactured by this concern. This boiler gets up steam 
in twenty minutes and supplies hot water and heat to 
the bakery. A descriptive circular will be sent those 
interested. 

The French China Co., Sebring, O/iw.— Again this 
concern is ready to serve the baker, this time with 
Bluebird China Ware (design patented). This china- 
ware is very popular among those using same for 
premium purposes. An interesting proposition will be 
made you by the French China Co. if you will send 
them your name. 

W. D. Hussung, St. Louis, Mo.— No greater annoy- 
ance to the baker is that when his shop is infested with 
roaches and ants, A powder that will rid your baker>- 
of these pests is manufactured by W. D. Hussung and 
known as the Geti Cockroach Powder. 

Bee Hive Paper Box Co., Indianapolis, /»d.— Twenty 
regular sizes of folding paper boxes for cakes, pics, 
lunches, etc., ready for printing in one or more colors, 
is carried in stock by this concern. This enables them 
to fill your orders promptly and at a very reasonable 
price. If you will write for samples and prices, stat- 
ing measurements and quantity desired, they will be 
sent you promptly. 



Plymouth Milling Co. 

Om« and Mills 

LE MARS. IOWA. U. S. A. 

Chkiio Office 

LOUSAIMSnONGiCO. 

«ll P«U1 Tcktraph Ud|. 

EMEIV i CO.. Melrose. Miss. 

Ibtrlbaun bf NcwEitUid 
WRITE far Fna Samph and Itutntetami 



PLYMCO 



An Intmr^ting Story For TTkmc That Rmad 

A iBiye New England bakery was in trouble and asked 
our Mr, Bartholomae to kindly help them out. 

The bread showed signs of weak flour and a weak fer- 
mentation. The bread in place of rising, falling in the oven. 

Mr. Bartholomae using the tame flour and formula ex- 
cepting 1 pound lesa yeast, but 1 pound more malt extract, 
added his patent ferment made of PLYMCO, malt extract 
and yeast, to the regular dougli. 

PRESTO! The dough was ready at the same time as 
theirs in spite of 1 pound leu yeast, and instead of looking 
dead and heavy, it wai full of life, with great bubbles 
everywhere. 

In place of dropping it rote nicety in the oven, the 
bread having a fine bloom, cruat and flavor, besides it 
showed a larger sridd of 57 cents. 

We con do thm aamt for you 

PLYMCO It also splendid for Rolls, Coffee Cake, Cruller*, 

Box Cakes, Drop Cakes and Macaroons 



Let tlisni know that jon iMd tbi ada. In Baxbbb Bmnmw. 



?^?= 



M 



aV, ■9"6 



BAKERS REVIEW 






Silver Fishes 

Cockroaches & Ants j 



No need of telling you about 

them, YOU KNOW 
what an annoyance they are! 

GETZ Cockroach Powder 

Will Kill Them! 

No danger to Humaiu or Animals 
It hH M> di»ag'**Bl>l* odot to aff act jrour bakery f ooda> 

Thrifty bakers will find our goods the 
cheapest in the long run as two appli- 
cations a year are usually enough to 
keep out Cockroaches. For Silver 
Fishes and Ants it is necessary to use 
powder more often. 

5 lb. can* $3.25, 10 lb. cans $6.00 

Getz Patent Blowers 25c each 

MamifactarMi *im1 anUi bj 

W. D. HUSSUNG 

1 139 Pine Stmt St. Loiib, Mo. 

F^trwmrdimg eharg— prmpaid on i^ ordmrm 





Thmre Are QaaUtiea In 

SEMI-SOL BUTTERMILK 

That maka it necessary In the maklni; of better bread. 

The Lactic Acid in SEMI-SOL Increases ttae nutritive 
valna of the bread, and helps along the fermentatloii 
of the dough. 

SBMI-SOL bKreases the water- absorbing power of the 
dough. 

It makes bread remain fresh for a longer period than 
ordinary bread. 

Can we prove these facts? Surely. If you will send us 
your present formula, tellbiE us the kiai of shop you 
operate, whether you use sponge or plain strafght 
dough, and how much Hour you use In a mix, we will 
send a sample of SEMI-SOL to suit your formula, and 
saggeat how to use It to best advantage. Then try It 
out yonrseU, In your own shop. Can anything be fairer? 
mUb yoa Aooe it in mind— Jo it now 

Consolidated Products Co. 
1029 West Adams St Chicago, lU. 



Schroeder 



Peel Blades 

represent the highest 
development of peel 
blade manufacture. 



Only carefully selected wood 
is used in the constrhction. 
This is thoroughly seasoned 
to guard against warping and 
splitting. Steel plates and 
steel pins hold the blade and 
handle firmly together, while 
copper rivets, clinched on 
both sides are used to fasten 
the plates on the wood. The 
finished product is a peel 
blade which 

WILL NOT 
WARP OR SPUT 

If ypu £ire losing money be- 
cause of the breaking of peel 
blades you should investigate 
the Schroeder product. 

Our catalogue of baker's 
quality woodenware should be 
of interest to you. 

Shall we send it ? 



He La Schroeder 

3512 CarroU Ave. 
Chicago Illinois 



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BAKERS REVIEW Mav, 1916 

I 



JOHNSON'S CHERRIES 
WILL SELL YOUR CAKES AND COOKIES 

When placed in your cakes and cookies JOHNSON'S 
CHEIRRIEIS will add an appeal they would not otherwise have. 

When eaten they will cause a lasting impression of the 
quality of your goods on the consumer. A pleased customer is 
your best asset. 

Because of their deep red, wholesome looking appearance, 
their tenderness and luscious taste JOHNSON'S CHERRIES will 
aeate trade for you. 

They are building business for others — why don't you 
try them? 

Whole or Pieces In Path or Kega 



t tkam know tftat roa raad tbe U*. in Bakibb Binaw. 



yGuU^ll 



May, 1916 



BAKEKS REVIEW 



Why 

PAY FOR WATER 

Make your own 

Vanilla Flavoring 

5 gallon* cost $7.21 

or 

$1.45 per gallon 



Directions 

DISSOLVE: 

t Ibi. VHYL al $3.S0 pir lb. - - $1.00 

3 Ibi. tipr at 1: pir lb il 

4 1-2 (all- mm ntn. 

5 1-8 Gallons 
Flavoring Cost $7.2 1 

Send for a 

2 lb. Bottio ot VANYL at 
$3.50 por lb. 

">tMy Mvad Is Mtnoy Eamd" 

S. GUMPERT & CO. 

BUSH TERMINAL 
BROOKLYN N. Y. 



Jmt mntloD Bakebi 



Rbtiiw. Nnir Ml) 



y Google 



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BAKERS REVIEW 


May, 1916 


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WHEELS 







RfTH-flAKBAKER CO. 

VAGON riAKERS 

PHIL A.- PA. 








llntDRl Ewdproolty— "Bbw It In BtMama R«tiBw." DigitJzec 


byCjOogle 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Ovens and Accessories 


Page 
1 Cover 


Albnckt, F. J. , PittsHrgk, Pa. 


Page 
20 


MiddUby Oven Co., New York, N. Y 

Inside Fron 


Anurican Peel Co., Chieago, lU. 




Middleiy-Marskali Oven Co, Chicago, lU. 


16-17 


Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co., Pitts., Pa. 


14 


National Oven Co., Beacon, N. Y. 


" 


Bennttt Oven Co., Battte Creek, Mick. 


19 


Petersen Oven Co. , Chicago, III. 


19 


BUdgett Co., G. S., Burlington, Vt. 


20 


Rlid Portable Oven Co., Buffalo, N. V. 


20 


Day Co., J. //., Cincinnati, Ohio 




Roberts Portable Oven Co., Chieago, IlL 


20-21 


Dukrkop Oven Co., New York, N. Y. 


15 


Schaller Oven Co., Albert, Rochester, N. Y. 
Standard Oven Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 


22 
13 


Hubbard Oven Co., New York, N. Y. Front cover 


Taylor Instrument Co., Rochester, N. Y. 


IS 


Hughes Electric Heating Co., Chicago, lU. 


IS 


Zahner Mfg. Co. , Kansas City, Mo. 




Meek Oven Co., Newburyport, Mass. 


IS 


ZauiUt, August, New York, N. Y. 


20 



jDit mantlon B*UIS Ritiiw. Nnff led. 



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BAKERS REVIEW ' Mav, 1916 



Ow Wemar A Pflalderar and three Pelensii ovana ioaaliited vith Nonpareil I 
Fltchburx Btkior Comp&nv, Fltchfaors, Ham. 



Don't Let Your Ovens Steal Your Profits 

by allowing them to waste valuable heat through the walls, tops and 
bottoms. Tests have shown that the fuel consumption can be de- 
creased 15% to 20%, or more, if the ovens are properly protected 
against loss of heat by radiation with 

Nonpareil Insulating Brick 

For Bake Ovens 

This is not strange when you reaUze Nonpareil Insulating Brick are com- 

that they are ten times better noncon- posed principally of kieselguhr (dia- 

ductors of heat than ordinary brick. tomaceous earth), an excellent non- 

In other words one 4^-inch course of conductor of heat. They are light in 

Nonpareil Brick will keep as much weight — 1^ poundseach forthestand- 

heat in the oven as will 45 inches of ard9x4j^x2)^ inch size-easy to handle 

fire brick or red brick. In addition and install, and are moderate in cost, 

to the fuel saving, the baking rooms Under ordinary conditions Nonpareil 

will be kept much cooler. This is InsulatingBrickwillpayforthemselves 

quite an item in the summer. in a year or less, in heat saved. 



Pull Information and Sample on Request 

Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co., ^?^bu^gS" 



154 Twenty-fourth St. 
PA. 



n LiB«a ud Naii|wr«il Cfnlcboard f«r 



MutoBl Reclptoclty— "Saw It Id Bakiih RbtHw." 



y Google 



Mav, I9i6 BAKEiRS REVIEW 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



, Google 



B A*K ERS REVIEW 



r 



Middleby-Marshall Ovens lead all others in popularity. There are more sold than 
any other on the market. They are "business building" and "profit producing" 
ovens because they fulfill the requirements of the modern baker. 

Our illustrated catalog contains information of interest to you. Send for it now. It 
may mean the first step toward a bigger and better business. 

MIDDLEBY-MARSHALL OVEN CO. 

CHICAGO. 762 W. Adams Street ST. LOUIS, 604 S. Sixth Street 

For S>U in N*w EnfUnd by For Sale in Pacific Coatl St«(«« by 

MIDDLEBY OVEN MANUFACTURING CO. EL CARL BANK 

2S4 STATE STREET BOSTON, MASS. 997 Mcnwdnock Block. San FrancUco, CaL 



Tall •«> m t««d BiKMi Bnnaw. Digitized by VjOU^ IC 



II A K E R S REVIEW May, 1916 



i 

Where economy in space and cost of production are the two principal items 



._, .„ • oth«r two will be 

BMd on th* California, which ii tlw lint battluhlii to Im 
propallad by alKtridty. 

May MM ht»* th* ptinUmfm of 4i 



Hugheg Electric Heating Co^ 211-231 W. Schiller Street, Chicago 



1 BlKtBB RiTIE 



May, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



Wait For This Oven 



Sidney and G. H. Bennett announce the 
formation of the Bennett Oven Company 

Our past twenty years' experience in the manufacturing and seliing of 
sectional ovens has proved to the baker that we know how to build 
the best Sectional Ovens suitable for BREAD, CAKE and PASTRY 

Our present oven embodies the best principles of 
modern oven construction with many added up-to- 
date improvements. 

We urge all bakers contemplating purchasing an 
oven to write us for information on our GENERAL 
PURPOSE. OVEN before placing their order. 

'*■ '. ■ Write Ub Today- 

BENNETT OVEN COMPiANY 

SIDNEY BENNETT, Pr«. C Ureek, ICh... G. H. BENNETT. Vi»-P«.. 



The successful baker uses the best ovens, not because he can afford I THE PETERSEN 
to pay the price but because he cannot afford to do without them. | U the oven you need 



ftc vf Ike lUlcrlci sf KTERSEN WMc Ma«l »Mr Ovcu nttUif trtcted fw The FKlfnltr bkli| C*., )■ their PhJIiddphli. Pi., PliM 
PETERSEN OVENS are built only by Ewiem Office: 

THE PETERSEN OVEN COMPANY "'"^ ™'™" ^'""'"^ '*^* ^""^ ^- ^ 

ESTABLISHED 1879 Western Office : 

Habi Office: 112 W. Adams St. CHICAGO, ILL. . 508 Pacific Building, san pRANasco, cal. 



r tbi[ ri»i r«ad the ada. In Bixna Binaw. Digitized by 



Gooc^lt^ ' 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Reid Pertable Oven 

ts tie lowest in price, tnost easily managtd, 
greatest saver offiul and the most satis fae tor jf 
portable oven on the market. They save tlnM 
and labor. They have a succesBful record of 
ovei twenty years and are warranted to |;1t« 
oomplete satisfaction. 

P'or puipbM ud mca UK addTM* 



REID PORTABLE OVEN CO 
«I9 Main St. • Buffalo, H. 



May, 1916 




e lectric it Graphite Pyrometers 



F- 

■ Absolutelr rorrect ami darable (or 
■■4 Indicating tbe »ict beat In Bake 
Oveni. Bailable for aoy (trie of 
ovcDi. Uore accarate than a slaaa 
tbuiuuiiHtar which bnalu. H«m don't. Hod*r- 
■ta In prioK both Moda. and dniabi* for roan. 

AUGUST ZAUBITZ, Sole Mfr. and Patentee 

■atabUahad ISTt N-tT COM Bl r aat. NBW TOBK 



IVEN PYROIET' 




BELL i Gnuit 1«M Eat, ltS4 

PHONES ) Flak St-r. Rm. 

Bake Ovens of All Kinds 

Ad«pt«d for Bakmiaa, Hotala, ate. Dnplkato 

Gratea, Uaio«> and Specwl Fnmac* Arick. 

Pjromutmn, llluminatora, Gu Bamara, and a Combiaatiaa 

Hcalar and Stsamar for StaanUDg Braad, 

With whick Hot WaUr can ba had in 1 unvta and Staan 

in 1 IJ minntea. 



Fn 
WdiiiI 
Fire 



Foi 
Cn 



•AKI OVEN GAS BURNEK. SEVEN SIZES 

Whoa ardwiMt V«n«r ateN haw* aad wUtt of an^ laaUa 

Witta tmr i»»laaaa uJ w*— IW 

FRANCIS J. ALBRECHT 

1146PENNAVE..MWP. LLtcpM FITTSBUKGH, FA. 



/// Was a Baker I Would Use 
a Blodgett Oven And I Just as 
Soon Tell You Why 



fTHII!) 


ill constni 


rtion 


is such 


that 


it prodnces 


irfeci 


combustion 


and 


a saving 




fuel of from 


% to 


iO%. 











SECOND.- Because it is su skilltully and thoroughly insulated 
that it will bake more food, with the same amotint of 
fuel, than any oven yet produced. 

THIRD. -~ Because each baking surface is provided with an 
independent door which, when opened, forms a 
horizontal shelf. This arrangement facilitates the 
placing in or removing oi articles to and from 
the 'oven, and insures a much less loss of heat than 
by the use of the large swing doors. 

FOURTH.- -Because there is no waste baking surface, no dark 
corners or space that can not be utilized 

FIFTH, Because it is so simple in operation. One damper 



We want you to have the BLODGETT OVEN 
LITERATURE. Write us for any par- 
ticular information you may desire. 

THE G. S. BLODGETT CO., Burlington, Vt., U. S. A. 



LM them know that jva read tbe ada. In BiKaas Bnnw. 



TCJ 



Mav, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 









ul 



Are you going to buy a new oven ? 
Are you going to make a snap judg- 
ment Selection, or are you going 
to investigate the leading ovens and 
tbea choose the best value for your 
purpose ? 

67 no means overlook Black Dia- 
mond Ovens. They are the biggest 
value of all portable ovens. For 
fuel and labor economy and satis' 
factory baking they are unequaled 

You can easily get the facts con 
ceming Black Diamond Ovens 
They are in use all over the country. 
Some are right close to you. Ask 
any baker who uses one, or better 
still write to a dozen bakers. We 
will gladly furnish you with a big 
list of users. We will also send you 
our complete catalog and detailed 
inforaiation. Write us now. 



Roberts Bake Shop Appliances have 
increased in popularity by leaps and 
bounds. The reason for this is that 
they are of practical and durable con- 
struction. Every appliance in our 
big line is designed by experts, men 
who know bake shop conditions and 
requirements. 

No one can question the economy 
of efficiency and there is nothing 
that will add more to the efficiency 
of your shop than Roberts Ap- 
pliances. 

If there are any profit leaks in your 
present methods you should correct 
them now. Our appliance catalog 
will help you solve the problem. 
You are welcome to a copy free. 



Ilillilillllllll IIIIIIIilllllllliiillllMilliil 

i Portable Oven Co. 

16 N. M>jor Ave., CHICAGO 




W[I] help .11 .rouDd If jou tD.DtloD B.k... IEbtikw. 



y Google 



UAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Scaler 
Bailer 
Proofer 
Molder 
Racks 
Rack- 
Ovens 

Of courae 



Saving 

with 

Rack Orens 

90% Labor 

60 to 80% 

Floor Space 

30% Fuel 

Peel Ovens 

For 
AU-'rmmd 

Baking 



SCOTT BROS, ITHACA. N. Y. 



NATIONAL OVEN COMPANY 



N«w EdcImmI Aganer 
H. a W. YOUNG, 61 H>Dovm- St^ Botton, Mui. 



Beacon, N. Y. 



2 DvubU Dack Oraaa Bn mt ni eted al 



aCHALLER DOUBLE DECK. Tl»«ilr<x 



Walnutport, Pa.. June 30th 1915 
The Albert Schaller Oven Co. 

Gentlemen: 
The EKHible Deck oven you constructed Cor us last fall ii 
a wonderful oven. We are gaining trade daily, and w< 
: making splendid bread and cakes, and pretty 31 



we ^aii need an additional Schatler o 



. FRIT21NGER. 



Mr. R. H. Wool of Ithica, N. Y., after using a Schaller 
oven for 6 years, highly recommended the same to the Sun 
Baking Co. of Auburn, N. Y., with veiy satisfactory result! 
to ourselves as well as the Sun Baking Co. Keeping up the 
good work, Mr. Wool ordered 2 large Schaller ovens to be 
erected in his strictly modem new factory. Tkra ii 1 tt»»»% I 

Do not orarloak tbv Schallar Double Deck 1 
Conitniclml 21 of tbem in thi* aXj in tho pa* 



Write for out Catalogue, describbg the conttructkm of the Schaller Single and Double Deck Ovens 
in detail, in cuts and drawings. 

The Albert Schaller Oven Co., 55 Averill Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 



llntsiil Ilfctprnrllr— "Bsw II In BkXns 1 



, Google 



Hav, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Pans and Racks 



Htnis, W. G. & Sons, Pkiladelpkia, Pa. 
labitrg Brothers^ New York. N. V. 
Katxmger Co., Edward, Chicago, III. 



Page ^ Page 

23 Maag Co., The August, Baltimore, Md. 25 

23 Peerless Wire Goods Co., Lafayette, Ind. See Index 

24 Union Sanitary Rack Mfg. Co. Albion, Mick. 23 



Perfect Bread Pans 

Gef Our Qaotational 

JABURG BROTHERS 

Main Office: I»I4 Leonard Street New York 



The 

Union 

Sanitaty 



irougn 



should be in every bakery which considers 
cleanliness vital to its success. It is con- 
structed of high grade steel, welded to- 
gether smoothly, eliminating germ-holding 
cracks — and finished with a lasting white 



Our catalogue should interest you if 
you want racks, shelves and other supplies 
of the better kind. 



SHALL WE SEND IT? 




Union Sanitary 
Racl(Mfg.Co. 



Cracker 
and Biscuit Pans 

ESTABLISHED l»60 



■ 1 P « ■ 



Onr iteel puii are made from a ipecially preptr«4 
iteel, of a aniform gauge, with a imootb inriacc a>4 
of a tou^, durable (teel; tbey arc bovad with 5-16 in*, 
electricallv welded rods and are goaratiteed abMhitdy 
flat and free from bnddet. We will goatatitee thcM 
pan* to wear longer and gire better tervice than taj 
other pan on the market. 

W. G. Henis' Sons & Co. 



a advertlwiiiaal tn Biksbs BartEw. 



ll<.l34;.|3«MttAKUC PUI^|Ul.Pa. 

— biyi..„.., Google 



J AKER S REVIEW 



. May, 1916 




THE RESULT OF 28 YEARS 
OF EXPERIENCE 



Patanted Mar 22. IMS-Oet. 4, UlO-Jkn. ZO. leit-Other P4teDta Pradlnt 

The Best There Is— Is The Best To Have 

The comers are rounded — 

— no dirt or grease can collect 
The "Ekco" spreaders are strong — 

— The pans keep in shape 
The "Ekco" curved steel protection plates are sturdy 

The peel cannot injure the end pan 
The ^vrapped strapping is sanitary 

No rivet spots on loaf. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 




1 HlKBKH KBTiair 



Googl( 



May, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 

LEEN-KRUST^T 



RIVET LESS 



, REp.U.S. PAX OFF 

STEEL- SHOD ^ 

FATENTEO JAN. il.lOl-* -FWENTS PENDING C7I 

BREAD PANS 1^' 



•9 \^nunnni/ mft 



Dntilthe 
btro- 
daction 
of the 

Kleen-Krust Rivetless "Steel-Shod" Bread Pan 

spotted and crippled loaves of bread were unavoidable. 

The bread came from the pans misshapen and "spotted" wherever a rivet had been used in 
the construction of the pan. 

Kleen-Krust Rivetless "Steel-Shod" Bread Pans 

are a departure from the old style of constructing bread pans in sets, embodying the' "Steel-Shod" 
feature with a number of additional points of merit. 

1. The use of all rivets on the inside of the pans have been done away with — iosurinE a clean, 
spotless loaf. This feature alone should commend its use to users of the old style riveted pan. 

2. The heavy, unsightly grease and dirt collecting "strap" has been done away with, and in 
its place a strong steel rod is used binding the pans together, and at the same time serving as a 
rim for each pan. This construction (see cut) is the most rigid and sanitary ever devised and 
materially decreases the weight of each set. 

3. The bracing used between each pan is a part of the pans themselves, and is so constructed 
as to absolutely prevent any distorted or misshapen loaves. 

4. "Steel-Shod" means the placing of sheets of steel in the outer face of the end pans in 
the set, absolutely armor-plating the surface and steering the peel underneath instead of smashing 
holes in the tin. 

A free sample set of Kl«en>Knut RivetleM "Steel-Shod" Bread pans is yours for the asking. 
Send for it now and see how they will improve the appearance of your bread and save you 
money. These pans are made in every size and style with square or rounded bottom edges. 




Xk^ AUGUST r-^ 

1 ne MAAG v^o. 

107 Sharp St BALTIMORE, MD. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1 916 



HINDE S DAUCH PAPER CO. 

NEW YORK. 100 hDdSON ST. N. Y. 221 WATER ST. SANDUSKY. OHIO. 



LEWIS SHIPPING BOXES 



TWO KINDS 

LEWIS sfrri! BOXES 

TW Uwii W>TCB 
WMd ui Wir* Bm is 

the result o£ twenty 
years of manufac- 
turing experience. 
Shipped in the 
knoclt down if de- 
sired, saving two- 
thirds freight— The 
past year was ttie 
Di^geat in its his- 
tory— II is morf 
' popular (han evei 
— Increased salei 
in the face oi in- 
creasing competi- 
tion_ p I oves its 

Tbt New Lewi) Sled Bai is the most practical and the lowest- 
cost steel box on the market. Furnished only in set up (orm- 
inside painted white or grey enamel— construction similar to 
woven wood and wire box. except that Bessemer sheet steel 
is substituted for the woven wood and wire material. 

BOTH KINDS 

■Pml Laddn« 



biTB the followiiiE I 
C«n*r-Tka ~ ' 
Dniea-Th* 



-Tha P>t< 



L> Caubini 



Fnnibhad PiJuImI ud LM 
Writa (or Prica* SUia 
in woTsB woo<i And win 



IDT Colon and Dasiiaa— 
r ataal atTla. or both. 



G. B, LEWIS CO, Watertown, Wis. 

Hcmbet nuloDid AaucUUsn of Muter Biken 



■Dtlon Baxibb Rbtibit. NdK wd. 



i 



Guard Your Bread 

while in transit from tampeiing 
— insure unmolested deliveries 
by using 

Bread Box and Basket Seals 

They eliminate the unceitainty 
of safe deliveries and protect 
your business interests by savbg 
your customers from disappoint- 
ment in shipments. 

They cost little — they save much 

Chicago Car Seal Co. 

407 N. Green Street CHICAGO. ILL 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Boxes and Baskets 



HituU &■ Dauch Paper Co., Sandusky, 0. 
Lewis Co., G. B., Watertovm, Wis. 



Page 
26 
26 



Puffer-Huibard Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Se/ton Manufacturing Co., Chicago, lit. 



Page 



Good bread boxes are economical; 
and they're easy to get if you order 

Sefton 
Bread Boxes 

You couldn't make a better bread 
box than this one, if you made your 
own boxes. It's based on your ideas 
of efficiently packing and shipping 
good bread. A single service box — 
serviceable, sanitary 

Sand for our booklat, "saftoB jrmir bretul"; 
and aik joiar paper jofcbar 

The Sefton Mfg. Co. 

1311 W. 35th Street Chicago, lU. 



SHOW CASES 

GOEBEL & DIESNESS 



Deliver your bread in 

HUBBARD'S 
Folding Delivery Boxes 

THE SANITARY WAY 



Our wooden FOLDING DELIVERY BOXES are de- 
Btgned to take the place of trayi or baskets in the ^ 
delivery wagons or auto trucks. They are proving to be " 
more sanitary, more convenient, and a vast improve- 
ment over [he old method of delivery. Get our cata- 
logue "Economy of Space," 

Puffer-Hubbard Mfg. Co. 

2605 2tith Street, South 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 



500 Different 

For Bnail Cake. Partrr. PndifiDp. Gcowi. 
lea CraaM. SonfleM and lalnmaliM About 
CiBBas Frah, Piewoin lA Saaw, Makiag 



Recipes 

$2.00 



Malzbender't 

RECIPE 



Practical 

BOOK 



Whieb alio gim Uab on Decoraliiig Cakei, GcmMa and Anaotcaa Slfla. 

En*ry Raapa Printad Both m EaglUh and GamwA. 

Gat jronr copj from 

BAKERS REVIEW Ti'SZ' Sf?°- 



BAKERY FIXTURES 



AT REASONABLE PRICES 

437-439 N. Dearborn Si. 



CHICAGO, ILL 



1 BitKBDH lUriKW. 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



70°A 



•f the BREAD consumed is baked 
at home because the housewife 
. thinks it cleaner and better than the 
bakcn' loaf. 



May, 1916 



Kalamazoo Vegetable 
Parchment Company 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 

Manufacturers of high 
grade parchment and 
waxed paper. 



A Wrapped Loaf 

■atisfiei her as to its cleanliness and 
tends to convince her that the 
quality is superior. 

Ask for samples and prices of 

wrappers manufactured by us 
Some are w^xed both sides; others 
•ne side only, so as to permit the use 
of fum tape; others may be sealed 
with heat without string or tape; 
also in rolls or sheets for wrapping 
by machine. 

IINinN WAXED & PARCHMENT 
UnilUni PAPER COMPANY 

HAMBURG 

SUSSEX CO., NEW JERSEY 

BRANCH OFFICES 

277 Broadway, New York 

413 North 2nd St., St. Louis, Mo. 

77 Bedford St., Boiton, Mui. 

AGENTS 

Grwier & Beckwitk, ZS W. Znd St., Cincinnati, O. 

NadMial Paper Co., ZS7-Z63 Decator St., Atlanta, Ga. (Soatbem 

RepreMntatirea. ) 
R«r Baker, William Alden Smith Building, Grand Rapida, Mich. 

(Agent lor the States of Michigan, Indiana and Ohio. ) 
Aaafican Salei Agenciei Co., San Franciico, Cal 

TWBi an ailfartlMnwnt 1 



Paul Richard's Pastry Book 

Ev««itdfy Adaptmd for Hottl mtd Catering Tradta 

THE MOST COMnXTE BOOK OF ITS KIND. THOR- 
OUGHLY FRACnCAL AND UP-TaOATE. 
CONVENIENTLY INDEXED. 

f— >.;— ckpaitnwati on Aa loUowing aibircti: Fndt JcDici md 
Pmer*w— Pa«i7 wd Fie Maki^ Parte* aiid FiUw~CakeB^iBt— 
PuiMiM ud SMK«r-lce 0«m^ lot. PMclif^ Eic— Bn«k Rolb. 
Bum, Elc-Cudr M4kiHtaiKl MiKelUaeoai Rccipa— Bread Ecaa- 
onici in Hatel CiHitri' Price Lirt. 

PRICE »2.00-FOR SALE BY 

BAKERS REVIEW ""^^^^^ 



The Unclsan Way 



Dirty and Stale 



The Sanitary^WcQ^ 



Fresh and Clean 



Waxed Bred Raps 

Of Etsit Daacription, Plain or Printed 

Prompt Smrwicm, QoaSty and Righ* Friema Oar Mb«* 

CENTRAL STATES 




ALL KINDS OF WAXED PAPER PRODUCTS 

Central Waxed Paper Co. 

731-33-35 Wul Van Bnrcn St CHICAGO 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Dry Milk, Malt Extract 
and Egg Products 



Blalt: 

Advance Mali Products Co., Chicago, III 
Amtrican DiamaU Co., Cincinnaii, 0. 
P. BaHantine & Son, Newark, N. J. 
Crmm Maltose Co. , Chicago, lU. 
i(eck*l Mfg. Co.. Milwaukee, Wis. 



Page 
3S 


DrylUIk 

Dry Milk Co.. New York, N. Y. 


Page 
S5 


34 


Ekettberg Co., CortUmd, N. ¥. 


30 


JO 


MerreU SouU Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 




BggPzodnetl 






Armmr S Co., Chicago, III. 


29 


See Index 


lokn LayUn Co., New York, N. Y. 


42 



^1 



Now's the Time to Contract 

For Your Years' Supply of 

• Frozen 

Spring Quality All Year 'Round m1a\^\^^ 

Contract now — while prices are lowest and quality highest. Buy your year** supply. 
We keep the eggs under constant refrigeration and you order them out as wanted. 
No market changes — no loss — no waste. Every egg full-hodied, selected quality. No 
weak, watery stock to bake out in the oven. We can furnish all yolks, all whites 
or whole eggs. Write for particalara. 

Use Armour's Baking Butter, We can supply you 
throughout the year with high-grade stock at right prices. 

ARMOUR^COMPANY Chicago 

Ifiitaal It«clptoclt7— *V«w It U Bixmu Banmr.'* 




BAKERS REVIEW May, 1916 



£kenflor 

"The Milk Powder with the Mill; Flavor" 

is made at low temperatures by the 

Ekenberg Vacuum Process 

of which we are the exclusive owners in America 
not by a 

Spray Process 

That's why we retain in our powder the real milk flavor 

So that a less quantity can be used with satisfactory results 

Safety— Economy 

The Ekenberg Co. Cortland, N. Y. 




Quality Supreme 

Absolute Uniformity 

,,^ * Perfect Fermentation 

\^ Valuable Yeast Food 
Most Economical 

P. BeJlantine & Sons 

Malt Extract Department Newark, N. J. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 
Mnnil BMlvr««ttr~"8«w U la Buns Ssraw." 



May, I9i6 B A K E R S R E V I E W 



will b*lp all aronnd If ron manUOD Biki 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



FOOTE & JENKS' 

Concentrated Pure Flavors of the Citrus Fruits 
LEMON and ORANGE 

having the insoluble, indigestible teri>enes (turpentine) mechanically separated, «riU not bake onL 

WNOT LIKE ANY OTHERS-^M 

PiatE VANILLA, AND SUBSTirUTE SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR USE OF BAKERS 

Write for descriptive Price List and Manual on "Flavoring and Seasoning Food Products." 

FOOTE & JENKS ... Jackson, Michigan 

AuoetBte Uamben of tha Natioiwl AHOcfatlon of Huter Bakm. 



FUVORING EXTRACTS & ESSENCES 

SI>ECIAI TIBS: 
WnMhUM 



Bucncct, 
Etc 



tl.HKM.HNCk. 
Trad* KHk IM h«~(M. U. i. 

H. FUCHS KWHS 



GIENANDT'S 

20th Century Book of Redpes 

The B«tt Book for All 'Round 
Baker and Pa«try Cook ; : : 

Writw hrpmtkwbm 

BAKERS REVIEW 

Wooiworth Bldi. Ne» York, N. Y. 



One Moment, Mr. Baker 



Thm 
OU Method 

Slow, 

Unsanitary, 

Costly 



7Aa 

Up-to-Dalm 

Method 

Quick, Sani- 
tary, Less 
Expensive 



STORAGE EGGS versus LAYTON'S EGGS 



Yon take big chancet. 

YoD have motty and other lanlty eggi 
to contend with — : 
Remit, ipoiled goodi — lost trade 
—time, labior and mone; 



B aapplr whola 



Utmd by mcMt ■uccaasfnl bakara. Ba o 



Yon take n 

No rialu. Abaolnte Purity 

Guaranteed. 

Re lull. Increased trade — time 

labor and money 

SAVED 
«na, Mvanrtad white* «r yolka. 



(TED 



THE JOHN LAYTON COMPANY 

Pacific Coa«t Office: S 10 Battery St, San Franduo, CaL 90 West Street, New York, N. Y. 



1 adTertlcement In BiKsaa Bma 



Digitized by 



Google 



MAt; I9l6' BAKERS REVIE-VV 



THIS MUST INTEREST YOU 

There is a difference in price at present in favor of 
Argo Com Sugar (The Ideal Bread Sugar) of 2i4c. 
per pound. Are you availing yourself of this 
opportunity? 

CORN PRODUCTS REFINING COMPANY 

17 Battery Place New York 

Will belp ■!! trouDd If yon mentlOD Bakibs Bktjmw. ' " '^' ' '■''" ^^^'*-'^^'^ 



BAKERSREViEW May. 1916 



dull and uninteresting. 

To succeed one must give value, and a loaf of bread made with 

DIAMALT 

as an aid, helps materially to produce a Quality Loaf. 

If you have never used DIAMALT you should not delay another 
day, but stop now and investigate. Profit by the experience of a host 
of bakers, who have tried 

DIAMALT 

and who stand ready to say it is doing what we claim for it. 
A Botnple is yours for the asking. 

The American Diamalt Company 

Service Department 
308 W. 4th St. Cincinnati, O. 

Warehoa»eM located in the larger Cities 
to provide for prompt Distribution. 



1 adrertlMuitDt In Bauu* Rbtibw. 



, Google 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



ll II 



PURE MALT FLDUR 



THE ONLY GUARANTEED PURE MALT 
FLOUR ON THE MARKET 

One pound MALZO does the work of two pounds malt 
extract in all baking uses. 

MALZO contains ^% moisture, malt extracts contain up 
to 27%. Why pay for water? 

MALZO gives the bread better color and more nourish- 
ment than malt extract at a saving of money. 

Can you afford to miss this opportunity to improve 
quality and reduce cost. 



Oar Bread Improver 




Sole Manufacturers 

ADVANCE MALT 
PRODUCTS CO. 

305 South La Salle Street 
CHICAGO 



is now used successfully in 
ntany large bakeries 



Advance Malt Products Co., 

305 S. LaSalle Street, 
Chicago, 111. 
Gentlemen : — 

Please send me one pound FREE sample of 
MALZO sufficient for a one barrel baking. 

Name 

Address 

State 

(Enclose business cord if possible) 



UDtul R«elpToctt7— "Baw It in Baxsm Bmtuw." 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Here's the Profit 


Maker and Trade 
Winner for Wide- 
Awake Bakers 

T. A. FAULDS CO/S TAFACO CAKE 

We supply everything but Labor— Egas-and Shortening and there's big profit In Box Cake 
Making when you use FAULD'S CONCENTRATED BOX CAKE MIXTURE which conies In four 
varieties: Gold, Silver, Chocolate, and Creole. Here are the cold facts:— 

^'. '^ ^^, • .^"'^ °' Coneen- Now for the material cost to 
^Xi^StMT^tZfrJl^a^ '*« *«*- '•" P"-lucing 630 
10 days, makes the price $23.75. box Cakes. 

We give you with every barrel of Box Vou will use one barrel of mixture $23.75 
Cake mixture 630 Box Cartons^ 630 Wax You wiU uhs 44 pounds of Com- 
Paper Wrappers, 630 Seals, Mdk Product, pound Lard at 8 cents . 3.52 
Butter Flavor, and Icing Powder enough » .n «» 1 e 
to muiuf»:ture 630 box cakes. ^o" ^i" "^ *^ P"™"^ "' '"' ^ ^„ 

at 20 cenU .... 4.40 

Each barrel of Concentrated You will use 24 pounds of Icing 
Box Cake Mixture weighs 210 Sugar at 6>J cents. . . 1.S6 
pounds. Making a total cost of $3323 

„ , , ... for 630 10 cent Box Cakes. Approzi- 

m^'r. U «0°"cS;i's."'' ""• *^ '' ■""'" *^ "" "^^ 

Sold at wholesale for 8 cenU ^«' f"''' P" ^'- Ma 77 
perboxmeuis . . . $50.40 '«*'»« " - •*»•" 

Sold at retaU for 10 cents per Net profit per Bbl, ,_ ,_ 
box means 63.00 wholesale - Ifsif 

YOU CAN MEET COMPETITION, WE WILL START YOU RIGHT 


Here is our Special proposition: 

Mail us your check for $16.50 and we will forward, charges prepaid to your address our trial 
ofier of one-half barrel of our Concentrated cake mixture in two varieties of your selection, and six 
special box cake pans. Also 315 cake boxes, 315 wax paper wrappers, 315 cake seals, milk product 
and butter flavor, and icinA powder. This will make you 315-10 cent cakes complete. After a fair 
trial if you are satisfied with our product we will give you exclusive rights for your city, 

or half barrel lots. 

WKITK US TODAY 

T. A. FAULDS CO., 196 State St., Boston, Mass. 



B know tbmt roa nad tli* ads. la Baksm Bbtibw. 



>1»», I9"6 



BAKERS REVIEW 



r 



Machinery and Equipment 



Page 
AUen & Co.J. W.. Chicago. lU. 48 

Amtfican Bakers Mask. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 41 

Baum Gr Sckoel, Waterloo, Iowa 28 

Ckampion Mach. Co.,JoHet, III. 42 

CoWonte Mfs- Co., Chicago, lU. See Index 

4$ 
43 
51 
44 
50 



Day Co., J. H., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Dutchess Tool Co., Fishkill-on-Hudsott, N. Y. 
General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. V. 
Gatlschaik & Co., ReedsvilU, Pa. 
Norton, P. D. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hayssen Mfg. Co., Sheboygan, Wis. 
The Hobart Mfg. Co., Troy, Ohio 



Page 
Jaburg Brothers, New York, N. Y. 37-45 

Johnson Co., H. A., Boston, Mass. See Index 

Koeni^-Keller Co., Lancaster, Pa. 39 

Miller Pasteurizing Mach. Co., Canton, O. 47 

Mills & Bro., Thos., Phila., Pa., Inside back cover 

Pneumatic Scale Corp., Ltd., Norfolk Downs, 

Mass. 44 

Read Machinery Co. , York, Pa. 38 

RockweU Co., L. A., Brooklyn, N Y. 42 

Thomson Machine Co., Belleville, N.J. 40 

Triumph Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 46 

Union Wrapping Mac. Co. , JoUet. III. 40 

Werner & Pfieiderer Co., Saginaw, Mich. 52 
WesHnghouse Electric & Mfg. Co, , IHtisburgh, Pa. 



If You Bake in These States 
it will pay you to write for our 

Special Offer On 
New Era Dough Mixer 



Connecticut 
Delaware 
Washington, D. C. 
Maine 
Maryland 
Massacliusetts 
New Hampshire 
Washington 



New Jersey 
New Yorlc 
Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
Vermont 
Virginia 
Alabama 
California 



Florida 

Mississippi 

South Carolina 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Texas 

Oregon 



JABURG BROTHERS lO Leonard St., New York 

jedbyGOOyL 



Will balp all uoand If jtya mratloii Biksbs Bariaw. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



THE ORIGINAL READ 



May, 1916 



3 Types 



3 Speed 



Cake Mixers 



When Shall 



We 



Ship Yours? 



>d*l D Type, 191S 



The Read Machinery Co., York, Pa. 



BOOKS FOR BAKERS 



The Editor of Bakers Review Highly Recom- 
mends the Following Books As A Valuable 
Asset to Any Bakery, No Baker's Library is 
Complete Without Them. 

Secrets of Bretid Making 

Bj EMIL BRAUN 

Price . . $1.10 
Malzbender's Practical Recipe 
Book 



Price . . $2.00 

tV« WiU Gladly SanJ Any or Att of thu Aboom 
BoohM Upon Racmipt of Priea, Exprui Prapaid 

BAKERS REVIEW 



Woohvortli Bld^. 



New York. N. Y. 



Will belp all >roiiiid U 700 auttloB Baubs Bitibw. 



Digitized by V-tQOQ LC 



May, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 

The Universal Way The Sanitary Way 

I T^:«,^-«^1 PAN CLEANING AND 

universal greasing machine 



PATENTED APRIL 4th, 1916 



The only machine for the purpose bo constructed that Brushes 
are removeable for cleaning by unmenuig in hot water 

Entire Machine Cleaned in Half an Hour, which Means Sanitation 
Par Excellence 



ADJUSTABLE I" rt*!,?"^ "' ■ '\°* p\°. ■ k, 

•' crush width of 25 inches obtainable 

REVERSIBLE dotation of brushes changed at will, thus assuring 
retention of shape, even wear and longer life 

Satisfactory Results Guaranteed ■ MAIL THIS COUPON NOW 

I Th« KMBig-Keller Co. 



Mail copy of your Catalogue describing Universal 
Cleaning and Greasing Machine, also price on 



Belt or Motor Drive ■ S30 E. IGng St, Uncutar, P«. 

I Gantknieii:— 

The Koenig-Keller Co. I ' 

530 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. ■ *■""• 

I City 



Will b«lp Kll uonnd It yon i 



BAKERS R'EVIEW May, 1916 



3,500 Loaves or 600 Ooz. Buns Per Hour 

Some Record! 

Isn't it? But that's 
just what the 

Union Combi 

Bread & Bun R > 

does — and does well. Simile- 
compact — piicdcaUy seU-cleaning— 
loaves to double — and leqinres < 
horsepower to operate. 

All this at a savii 
&0% in first o 

Art you enough in Wetted in modern an 
methods to write today for -full particv, 
have mlhoul oblieattHg yourself. 

The Union Wrapping 

JoUet, IlliaoU 



The Thomson Standard Loaf Moulder 

Is the ORIGINAL and the LEADER. It has been the leader for 12 years. ' 

WHY? Because the PRINCIPLE is correct; the QUAUTY 
of loaf produced is perfect; CAPACITY large 
enough for any requirement up to (6,000 per hour) 
and because of its DURABILITY. 
Many machines are in operation today on which more than 25 
MILLION loaves have been moulded. 

Now is the time at the beginning of this New Year for YOU to 
begin the saving in time, labor afid money this machine will effect for 
you if you will only let it. WILL YOU? 

A postal will bring you full information. Mail it NOW. 
REMEMBER-We furnish complete AUTOMATIC OUTFITS 
and FLOUR HANDLING EQUIPMENT. 
Let us quote on your needs. 
Get ready for the big business that is coming. 

THOMSON MACHINE CO. 

MAIN OFFICE and WORKS TBS HOUSE OF SERVICE Chicago office 

BELLEVILLE, NEW JERSEY jqhN J. HOPPIN, Pruident 9tS FinI Nfttioul Bank BdIUIbk 

Largtat Manafaetar^rt of Bakara' Machiiwry, Exelanoafy, in Am»ricti. 

George B. Gowdy, Southern RepreientAtire, 1079 College St., JacluonTille, Pla. 

Member National Association of Master Bakers 

Let them know that jan re«d tb« >di. In B^Kiaa Rbtiiw. 



May, 1916 



R 



BAKERS REVIEW 



A 



« « 


} j 


: i 


\ \ 


♦ ♦ 

♦ 


t 1 

♦ 
* 


1 i 


i t 


t J 


a 



American 

Divider and Rpunder 

Choose your Machine, like you would 
your Friends. Do not have one that 
isn't worth keeping always, and that 
you won't grow to like better every 
day. 

Some of Our Friends 

Jay Burns Baking Co. - - -, - - Omaha, Nebr. 

Memphis Bread Co - - - - - Memphis, Tenn. 

Freund Bakery of American Bakeries Co. • - St. Louis, Mo, 

Atlas Bread Co. - - Milwaukee, Wis. 

Texas Bread Co. - - Houston, Texas 

Nafziger Bakinj; Co. - • . - . . Kansas City 

F. H. Hohengartrn, Home Bakery - - - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Welle-Boetllcr Bakery - St. Louis, Mo. 

Heydt Bakery Co. - ----- St. Louis. Mo. 

Connelly Haking Co. - - ... Springfield, 111. 

Hartmann Bros. Bakery ... . . Springfield, 111. 

Manewal Baking Co. E. St. Louis, III. 

Indianapolis Baking Co. Indianapolis, Ind. 

United Bread Co, Tcre Haute. Ind. 

Model Bakery, C. O. Schweickhardt .... Burlington, Iowa 

H. Korn Baking Co. Davenport, Iowa 

American Baking Co. Louisville, Ky. 

Grocers Baking Co. Louisville. Ky. 

College Hill Bakery, G. L. Jordan .... Topeka, Kans. 

H. Weil Baking Co. New Orleans, La. 

Schmidt's Vienna Bakery Baltimore, Md. 

General Baking Co. - Boston, Mass. 

Pope Baking Co. Detroit, Mich. 

Sanitary Bread Co. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Consumers Bread Co. - - - - . Kansas City, Mo. 

The Final Test — Ask Any User of "American Equipment" 

American Bakers Machinery Co. 

9th and Clinton Streets ST. LOUIS, MO. 



:l bflip an aroiuid It joa mention Bixsia Bbtiiw. 



■A 



BAKERS REVIEW Mav, 1916 



"Here is the mixer 

that has stood the test for 
twenty-eight years. Has 
all cut gears. Gears guard- 
ed to comply with laws of 
each stale. Substantially 
built Made in sizes from 
% to 10 bbl. size, both 
belt and motor driven 
types. 

Have records of 
Champion mixers being in 
actual service for twenty- 
five years. Write for list 
of users in your vicinity. 
Prices quoted on request. 
If motor drive desired, 
give motor specifications 
which you can obtain from 
your Electric Power Co. 
Manufacturers of complete 
line of machinery for the 
Bakery. ' ' 

Champion Machincij 



JoUet, niinois Chicago Representative: H. M. BACHMAN 

Room 231, 175 W. Jkckaon Blvd. 



Rockwell's Time-Tested Bakery Machinery 

BUILT BY THE OLDEST ESTABUSHED MANUFACTURERS IN THE UNITED STATES ESTABLISHED tSTB 



S. Cushmai 

Sons, New Y c ft Robt. A. Johnston 

N- Y., write: H Co., Milwaukee, 

"We have U! '' wis., write: 
this machine ■.„ c ■ t^ 

and night for Your Sifter is 

last two years feedmg two large 

it hasn't faile( mixers and it gives 

a single day." excellent satisfac- 

=^=^=^^= tion. We would 

n' t part with it for 
twice its cost," 
DoigfalGzen What others have 



20 RockweU 



to say about this 
machine mailed 



m ose by the 

Shnb Bread upon request. 

Co. 



ROCKWELL'SORiClNALCOMBINEDSUTER. ROCKWELL'S REUABLE DOUGH MIXER EXCELSIOR CAKE MACHINB 
ELEVATOR ud FEEDER SimplMt uid nun donbla mBchJu on th* 

In nUulu tb* Down a tb* bladi immodlBUlr ^ ^Mid oc with uv - w-h— ~..-m~. 

OOBAFLBTB FLOUB HAXDLINa BT8TBM8 OUn 8PBCIALTT FOB EN FOB M ATION AIfDCATAI.O£)CX WBITSIO 

LA ©^"V^lf \A/FI I CC\ F"onnerly Fowler & Rockwell, 430-32-34 Smith St, Brooklyn. M Y. 



X^oogfe 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



No. 3—4 pocket Automatic Dough Divider. Scales from 10 to 26 
0Z8. and turns out from 2800 to 3800 loaves per hour. Belt or motor 
drive. We make larger or smaller sizes. 

Re-orders and What 
They Mean 

Every baker knows that the success of his business depends on re- 
orders. Something is wrong if customers do not come back. One 
must bring others, and to secure the others, the one sale must be satis- 
factory and beneficial to the buyer. 

If the most careful buyers in the field having thoroughly tried the 
goods, come back for more, it means that the goods are unquestionably 
satisfactory and beneficial. - - - 

A list of our sales shows a very large 

proportion of repeat orders — in fact 

"Our Sales Tell The TaleP 



DUTCHESS TOOL COMPANY 

Beacon, N. Y. 



Tell iam yoa (onnd It — la I 



BAKERS REVIEW May, 1916 



Standard Pan Cleaning and Greasing Machine 

SINCE BREAD WRAPPING has be- 
come almost a universal custom and 
law. it is very important that your 
bread shall have a Spotless Cn»t» so that the 
housewife will not be disappointed when she 
removes the wrapper. 

Your bread will be clean and free from 
specks and spots if you use the Standard Pan 
Cleaning and Greasing Machine to clean and 
grease your pans. 

The work will also be done with 
a uniform perfection impossible by any 
other method. 

You owe it to yourself to investigate. 

Send for our catalog — Do It Now. 



GOTTSCHALK & COMPANY. Inc. 
Reedsville, Pa. 



iiwIthWlb-lmrd 



THE RIGHT WRAP 

IS MADE BY 

The 

Pneumatic-Standard 

Bread Wrapping 

Machine 

Right because it is ma 
Right because it looks 
Right because it works 
Write for right particul 

PNEUMATIC SCAl 

Mala Office and Foe 
Chicago New York 

W. & C. Pantln, H. _„.. , , _.. ^^ 

L^oa 

L«t tli«m koow tliat jvu r««d tb* ad*. In Bakmb* Ubtisw. 



VI AC H 1 N E R ■> - 



5u PPl-l KS 



THESE ROLLS HAVE TAKEN THE 
COUNTRY BY STORM 



n» miutntw ■ KoU Bakad Id tb 



One Baker Bought 

2300 Frame» 

of Pans 



Thia nhutntea tb* Ziiipto 



Here Are the Pans They Are Baked In 



m Aiv th* Puu That Bake Sandwich 
Twentr-fow to tba Sat 
• IJO Par Sal sT 24 



Sandwich Roll Pan to the Left 

Wc are the originators of thia pan. Makes 
a uniform, well shaped roll for edB, ham 
and olher sandwichea. The rolls in these 
pans take up less room in the oven, and be- 
cause pans hold the dough theyftive a better 
proof, and enable the baker to use less 
dough and get the same results. 

Size of cup on top, 4 inches wide, 3V inches 
wide at botiom and H inch deep, with 
rounded edge. Siie of frame over ail, 27)j 
by 13V ■"■ Twenty-four cups to the frame. 

"Kropie Knut*' Rdl Pan to the Right 

Be the first in your territory to bake these 
rolls. This pan bakes twenty-four rolls to 
the frame, just like the illustration above. 
Size of each pan or division, 3>ix2 inches. 
Size of frame over all. ZlMx 12 inches. Can 
also be used to to bake cakes to sell at 2 or 
3 for 5 cents. 

Price $1.50 Per Frame 

{EITHER STYLE) 

Oldlr dinct or throDEh tha dealer In 



»I.SO Par Sal of 24 



Recipes for These Rolls FREE On Request 



FACTORIES: 
» BroonM St, N«w York, 



JABURG BROTHERS 



WAREHOUSES: 
1.3 Worth SL, N«w York 
14 Laonud SL. New York 



10>12 Leonard Street 



Wooden wa<r ^^S^^gg 




Will belp all aroaad K 70a 11 



I BAKias Rbtibw. 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, igib 



Day Dough Moulder 

Gioe» tkr«€ timet thm aervice 
of any otbmr moulding machine 

Costs no more than others 



. It speeds up the dough handling 
system at its slowest point and permits 
a 20 per cent, increase in output. Com- 
pactly built of the best material and is 
practically noiseless. It is the latest 
and best moulder made. 

A bakmr naarf not mofta a dough to tnit Afi 
moaidar, nor fro^ a moulder to Mail hi* dyf»T*nt 
dougha. A Day Doa^h Moaldar wUi givt bmtt 
pomhU moalding from a itraighl doagh or 
apongw doagh, ttiff doagh or tiaeh doagh, an 
oU doagh or ^oon( doagh. 

Ask for detailed description and price. 

^^*J.H.Day Company 

1144 Harrison Ave., Cmciimati, 0. 



Here is the Latest Type 

Triumph Dough Mixer 

Safety First 
Friction Drive 



Built in One to Four Barrel sizes. 
Finished in Sanitary, White enamel. 
Fitted with pulley or motor, jgas or 

gasoline engine. 
Two extension pulleys on motor drive. 



To avoid accidents — all gears enclosed. 
Mixer can be started or stopped with- 
out shutting off power. 
Note plain, simple design. 
Uses less power — gives increased jneld. 
Bronze stuffing boxes. All cut gears. 
Motor is covered — is easily cleaned. 
One price — no extra charges asked. 



Write today for prices or ask our 

Representative 

Place Your Order Now 

The Triumph Mfg. Co. 

3400-3408 Spring Grove Avenue 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Mtmbtr Nalumal A 



H of MaattT Batcm 



t TOO read tlic ads. I 



vGoogl 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



ICE CREAM IS A BIG MONEY MAKER 
DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS 



THE TYSON 

Model" C HonecHtal40 Quart Bnne Ice 

Cream Freezer, Belt Drive, with 

Fruit Hopper 

PATENTED 



OUR PRODUCTS 

Tyson and Miller-Tyson Brine 
Ice Cream Freezers, Mixers, 
Tyson Pumps and Brine Pro- 
ducers 



ARE YOU EQUIPPED 
TO GET YOUR SHARE 
OF THIS BUSINESS? 



If not, get in touch with 
us and we will show '"you 
how to make a big profit 
on a small investment dur- 
ing the summer months — 
when the regular Bakery 
Line is rather slow. 



L 



THE TYSON JUNIOR 

20 Quart Horizontal Brine Ice Cream Freezer, Belt Drive. 

This cut shows Pump, Brine Box and Freezer 

in one unit — patented 



THE MILLER PASTEURIZING MACHINE CO. 

201-225 9TH STREET. S. W., CANTON. OHIO 



'Twu an adTartUameDt la Bah 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



The 
New Model 

HAYSSEN 

Bread 
Wrapping 
Machine 

Wr^s 1,800 loaves per hour. Requires but one operator. 1$ adjustable to different dze 
loaves. Can be furnished with Automatic Coupon Insert Attachment which places coupons 
or advertising lAatter, singly and automatically, into each package. 

More than 150 HAYSSEN machines in operation in bakeries. 
Shipped on 30 days* trial 

Write for facts about the New Model Machine 



HAYSSEN MFG. CO. 



SHEBOYGAN, WIS. 



BAKERS 

Supplies, Tools and Utensils 



When you are In the market for 
supplies, tools or utensils. It Is well 
to consider besides quality the ser- 
vice to which you are entitled. 
No matter what your wants we can 
supply you — and the service we ex- 
tend will make you a Ilfe-lonr cus- 
tomer. 

May we Aooe a trial order? 



J. W. ALLEN & CO. 

110-118 Peoria St CHICAGO, ILL. 



your buiinets, n free fot the asking. Shall we atnd iff 

J. W. Hance Foundry O). 

Wnteryille, O. 



n adTWUMment Id BiKiaa Ritiiw. 



yGuu^Il 



May, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



The Crane Ice Cream Co. 
Use Four Autocars 

The Crjine Ice Cream Company of Philadelphia, 
have had four Autocars in service since 1913. 
They average 50 to 60 miles per day and 
make it possible to handle catering orders 25 
miles from the city, carrying the men and all 
necessary supplies. 



Write for illustrated catalog C and list of more than 3,000 
concerns using Autocars in every line of business. 

Chassis Price $1650 

THE AUTOCAR COMPANY 

Ardmore, Pa. 

EiUblished 1897 MOTOR DELIVERY CAR SPECIALISTS 



1 ■drwUMDMot In BitT»i» Bmnmw, 



y*^oogie 



so 


BAKERS 


REVIEW May, 1916 


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****, I9i6 



BAKERS REVIEW 






Have t 

At" 

WithG 
ton contrc 
your fingei 

Push bu 
where — i 
Safet 
secui 
meth 
only 

Til 
dripp 
tors! 
is ass 
duct. 

Iti 

allth 

the 

equip 

Ot 

feryc 
vicinity. 



General Electric Company 



AlluU, Qa. 
Salllmore, Ud. 
BlnnliiKliam. Ala. 
Boston, Uiu. 
Bnirdo, N. - 
Batte. UoDt. 
CbuleatoD. ... 
Cbarlotte. N. C. 
<%atUni>0|- ~- 



Clereliad, Ohio 
Coin m bo 1. OMo 
Da 7 too, Oblo 



, Conn. St. [dul*. Ho. 



Dm ilolum. 
Dulutb, MlD 






ADDRESS NEAREST OFFICE 



Port Warne. lad. 
Harttord, Conn, 
lad Una po 111, Ind. 



Niann Falli. N. Y. 

Omalia. N«b. 

PtalladPlDlila. P. 

Plttaliiirsli. Pa. 

PDMIand. Ore. 

ProvldencA, B. 



Va. Elinlra. N. T. Jackaonville. Fla. ^_^ Iionlsrll!*, Kj. 

Toplln. Uo. /S^ MemphU. Tenn. 

Kanana CItr. Uo. iBED UllwankM, Wla. 
KnoiTlIle. Tenn. ^QfW Mlnneapolla, Ulan, mcumuiiu, 

Loa Angelea, Cal. -^ Naati»tfle. Tann. Rocheiter. ^ 

For WehiBan Bualneu »rer tn Gananl Electric Corapaiir of HlchCiui. Datnit, llieh. 
For TuBL Oklahcna ud Ariiona bDilDM r«f *r to SoutbwHt Owianl EUctric Contianr (foniMrlr HotMoo KImMo Ca.\ Dallaa. 
Bl Paioi HoDitoD and OklahoDia Citr. For Canadian buiinMi nfar tn Canadian Ganaial EUetiic Canpanr. Ltd.. TaroDtiL Ont. 
Motor Avencici in All Larse Citlaa and Towns. 



Bchpnectadr. N. T. 
Seattle, Waib. 
Spokane. Waah. 
Bprlnsfleld, MaM. 
Syncuae, N. T. 
Toledo. Ohio 
Waablnston, D. C 
TonnKatown, Ohio. 



Let tbem k<i 



1 



1' tbat roQ read Ibe ada. In Binu* IIbtibw. 

Digitized by 



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iAKERS REVIEW 




PICTURES DON'T LIE? 

This is an expression made by lots of people, but we believe 
they are misinformed. How often have you looked at the 
photo of a friend and found same flattered him greatly. Why? 
Because the view taken Is of his best appearance. This 
scheme is used a great deal by manu&cturers to show their 
goods to the best advantage and oftentimes makes a hit with 
the bak«r. The picture looks O. K., but does the outfit live 
up to what a|>pearances indicate? We have tots of good 
pictures of good working machinery for the baker. They are 
yours for the asking. Furthermore, when we sell you a 
machine or oven by the picture we guarantee same to be as 
good and better than the picture. We don't ask you to sign 
a contract that ties you so tightly that you can't get your 
breath. If we had to do that we would not want your busi- 
ness. We don't try to catch you by certain terms and 
promises, but we do guarantee to live up to our written 
promisesaspercontract. Our pictures don't lie. We cannot 
afford to have them He because we have a reputation to sus- 
tain that is worth everything to us. We make and sell 
Machin^y and Ovens and can equip your plant complete. 
The largest manufitcturers in the world because we make the 
' best only. 



WERNER & PFLEIDERER CO. 

SAGINAW, MICHIGAN 
EMIL STAEHLE, General Manager 



Branch Offices; 
New York 



ovkns 




IIS7 

MACH}J«EI¥Yj 



Let tbem know that ;oa read I 



Digitized by VjOOy It 



Copyrisbt. Wie b; Wm. R. Qr^gor; Co, 



Vol XXXlIl 



NEW YORK, MAY, 1916 



Practical and Technical Studies of the 
Baking Industry in Europe 

By L. C. KlUteng, Isle of Laesoe, Denmark, on His Trip Around the World, 1912-1918 



jEditor's Note : One of the most interesting visitors to our 
office in many moons was the author of this article who in 1912 
slarttd on a trip around the world which he expects to complete 
in August igi8. Mr. Klilteng is a competent Danish-pastry maker, 
md he has already demonstrated his abilities in Rancher's, 
Washington, (where some of his handiwork graced the tables 
at the wedding of President and Mrs. Wilson). While in Kew 
York, lie demonstrated at Gertner's bakery, Broadway, which 
supplies dining rooms owned by Herman Gertner. Mr, Klitteng 
has credentials of the highest order, and he will prove to be an 
interesting personality to all colleagues whom he may meet while 
on his iourney across this continent. We believe he will finrt 
much to interest him in this country, and hope his experience! 
with America's bakers will cause him to conclude that on th; 
nhole, the bakers here are the best in the world. 

We bespeak for Mr. Klitteng a hearty reception in this country! 
"llfHAT is meant by studies in our industry?" This question 
" was once asked me by a boss baker with whom 
1 was discussing trade conditions in the respective coun- 
tries [.had visited. It is regrettable that there are men in our line 
who believe that after an apprenticeship of four or five years, 1 
journeyman service of several years, and then the establishing 
of one's self in business, there is nothing further to learn in the 
profession and that one has completed his vocational study. This 
fart in itself demonstrated how very backward the baking indus- 
try still is and that many shops are still operated according to 
Tery old-fashioned methods, even in these advanced times. Hap- 
pily, however, in the past ten to fifteen years decided progress 
has been made along many lines in our industry, which is to b'j 
athibttted in no small measure to many trade schools which 
have been established in many countries, where practical, tech- 
nical mstruction is given, and where the young baker gains know- 
ledge on many points which he was never taught during h'S 
apprenticeship, although his employer *may have given the appren- 
tice the best possible training according to his opinion. But this 
does not suffice in these times. In these days it is necessary, so to 
speak, to look through "scientific eyes," and — as we all know- 
science was not much of a factor in the old-time bake shop. 

Of course, tlie best and most practical training is that which is 
obt^ed in going from city to city, and even from country to 
country, and working in the different shops, becoming acquainted 
with the various methods of operation, the use of modem baking 
Baclunery, and seeing the equipment of the respective plants. 
The methods of operation often vary under diflerent climatic con- 
ditions; then, too, the experience the young baker has irv.a 
dose intercourse with different peoples is educational. However, 
it is veiy often impossible for the young baker to take such ex- 
tended wanderings no matter how great his "Wanderlust" may 



be, for traveling is expensive and money is usually one of the 
smallest possessions of the apprentice baker. Nevertheless, as a 
very young man I decided to learn my trade from A to Z, and 
to travel the world over to study baking conditions in foreign 
lands as well as at home. I will soon complete the eighteenth 
year of my journeyings and will describe a few of my observa- 
tions of the leading cities of Europe, particularly London, Parii. 
Vienna, Berlin, Petrograd and Warsaw. 

BAKIN'G TRADE CO.VDITIONS IN PETROGRAll 

I arrived in what was then St. Petersburg, during the wintei 
of 190?, after an eighteen-hour train trip from the pretty little 
town of Hclsingfors in Finland. Upon arriving in "holy" Russia 
1 realized the fact that I had failed to take into consideration the 
severity of the Russian winter. The thermometer pointed at 
40 degrees below zero, Fahrenheit, My high hat, my thin shoes, 
and light overcoat were quickly exchanged for more suitable ap- 
parel. In Finland I had made the acquaintance of a traveling 
representative of one of the large flour mills in central Russia, 
and we now journeyed together, I spoke no Russian, but, as 
he had a slight knowledge of the German language, we managed 
to get along nicely. As his position brought him in contact with 
the baking trade, he very kindly introduced me to various bakers, 
and I was soon installed in a Russian bake shop giving practical 
demonstrations in the art of Danish baking, my traveling com- 
panion acting as interpreter. 

My first impression of a Russian bakeshop was something horri- 
ble. I had never been in such a dirty, grimy shop before. The 
ovens, all of which were in operation, emitted a thick cloud of 
smoke permeating the entire premises ; smoking lamps were plac- 
ed on all tables and troughs of dough. The ordinary lamp with 
glass chimney was not used there, but a lamp filled with thick 
Russian petroleum with a wick inserted, which gave out a Stream 
of smoke even more disagreeable than that of the ovens. A table 
with the necessary raw materials was placed at my disposal, and I 
commenced my work ; after making my doughs I placed the 
cakes on the pans to raise. While busy at the ovens I had put my 
watch and gold chain near a box at the comer of my table. Af- 
ter I had finished I noticed that my watch and chain were gone — 
in a word — they were stolen ; to my inquiries they replied that 1 
must have left them at the hotel, but I am confident that the 
next day these articles of mine took the form of battles of 
vodka. However, what was of more importance, my demonstra- 
tions were a success and realised large sales in many bakeries. 
The Russians are great lovers of fine pastry and fruit tarts 
and the amount produced and consumed in St. Petersburg is 
almost incredible. Theflour produced in this country has great 
strength, and the yeast Jg exceptionally good, while the butter 
and fruit fillings are really very fine. When I again visited 



54 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Mav, 1916 



St. Petersburg in 1913 there was a "strike" on in the trade. 
This, however, was scarcely noticeable, as labor organizations 
find very little recognition in Russia, and the population is so 
enormous that il is always a very easy matter to refill the ranks 
— and for a mere song. The highest paid workmen are those 
employed in the Kurland bakeries, o£ which there are a num- 
ber in St. Petersburg, these receiving about 60 rubles monthly, 



not including board or lodging. The second and third grade 
baker receives from 40 to 50 rubles. This money was used 
mostly for the purchase of vodka. This vodka drinking habit 
had become so serious that many journeyman -bakers possessed 
no other clothing than their dirty working clothes; often, too, 
during the "ofF-hours," they sleep in the bakeries, as the rooms 
are warm, bed rooms in Russia never being heated, for which 
reason they also take their meals in the bake shop. The food 
is mostly served in large, wooden bowls, while five or six 
men sit about and eat from one receptacle with horn spoons. 
The money that is not spent for vodka is used for the purchase 
of cigarettes. Every Russian workman smokes a large amount 
of cigarettes, not only during his "off-time," but during working 
hours. The latter is prohibited by the health department, but 
what cares the Russian for laws or regulations. The phrase 
that but little law exists in Russia has more than passing sig- 
nificance. 



In Warsaw condit: 
European civilization 
the bake shops. Mikli 
having 



seen in Europe, and the output, partiailarly rolls and white 
breads surpass in quality even the Vienna white breads. 
The goods of Joseph Breunig, SJngerstreet, Vienna, cannot 
compete with those of Robert Heil in Berlin, although Vienna 
is considered to hold the world championship for its baked 
goods, why, I am unable to explain. I must admit, however, 
that their pastry and confectionery productions are of the very 
highest order, in quality and style approaching those of Rum- 
pel mayer in Paris. 

rumpelmayer's m paws — finest in f.uhope 

Of Rumpelmayer I will say only a few words. This is un- 
doubtedly the finest bakery and confectionery in Europe, yes, 
I may say, in the world. I had the pleasure of giving a prac- 
tical demonstration of my work there, and I am proud to 3Xf 
that they now regularly carry a line of Danish baked goods, 
which has found great favor with the Parisians. 

The Vienna Bakery in Paris, in which I also made practical 
demonstrations, has been completely destroyed since the first 
year of the present war, the windows having been smashed, 
the marble buffets with contents being dragged in to the streets 
and the whole interior being ransacked. 

LONDON HAS WOBLD's LABCEST BAKING PLAJST 

The largest baking plant in the world is unquestionably in 
London ; this, however, is not exclusively a bakery or confec- 
tionery, but it supplies its own restaurants, as is the custom with 
many London bakeries, Lyon's in London is as widely known as are 
Krupp's guns in Essen, Germany, There are 14,000 people em- 
ployed, 1,000 of whom are engaged solely in the packing and 
delivery departments for distribution in various parts of the 
world's largest citj-. Hill & Son, an establishment of consider- 
able size, specializes in bread, while Harrod on Brompton Road 
has acquired a reputation for its fine cakes, pastry and tea. 
This bakery is largely patronized by the aristocracy and at the, 
time I was in England delivered large quantities of baked goods 
to the palace. 

If time and space allowed I could go into fuller details on 
this subject, but 1 hope to have the pleasut 
further contributions to Bakers Review as I 
trip around the globe. 

BAKED FOR THE president's W 

My first demonstration in the United States was at Rauscher's 
in Washington, where I baked a line of fine Danish pastry for 
the wedding of President and Mrs. Wilson last December. I 
have found the quality of the raw materials here, particularly 
the butter, to far exceed my expectations. As to yeast, 1 have 
used Fleischmann's for many years, the first time at North 



CONDITIONS I 

IS are much better. The influence ot 
i more perceptible everywhere, also in 
1 bakery in Warsaw is a mammoth plant, 
c. The population of this city is about 
1,000,000, and in making comparisons I might mention that 
Mikler's in Warsaw is about on a par with the Ward Baking 
Company in New York. On the fine, broad street, Nou-y Swial, 
is Lapinski's renowned bakery and confectionery, where t also 
gave a practical demonstration and succeeded in introducing 
Danish baked goods. The quality of Lapinski's output is of a 
higher grade than that of Mikler's; indeed, it compares very 
favorably with the products of the best shops in Vienna and 
Berlin. 

BERLIN SHOPS IN FRONT RANKS OF TRADE 

As to Berlin, we must admit that the bake shops there are 
conducted according to the most advanced methods and have 
the most modern equipment. Take for instance, the establish- 
ment of Robert Heil, Koeniglicher Hofbaecker, in Dorotheen- 
strasse. This ts one of the most up-to-date bakeries I have 



p of Mr. Kliltetig's Handiwork ,aKe_0(?f@^\&ot 



May, 1916 



DAKERS REVIEW 



55 



Cipe, where 1 obtained a package from the baker of a tourist 
flcamer cnitsing in the Northern water, and last summer while 
in the West Indies I received a package fortnightly from a 
ncamer plying in those waters, and whether in the north land 
or in the tropks the quality was always very satisfactory. 

The technical equipment, ovens, etc., of the baking plants of 
tbe United States, as well as the scientific and sanitary methods 
of operation, are of the most modem t>-pe. 

In regard to my trip around the world 1 will say in further 
detail that the time estimated for same was about six years, 
i. e, from my departure from Copenhasen on August 17th, 1912 
until my return to Denmark, August 14th, 1918, on which date 
I trpett to celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of my entre 
into the baking trade, and will retire to my residence on the 
■anall ideal island of Laesoe in Cattef-at, where I hope to find 



the necessary seclusion to write a detailed account of the ex- 
periences of my trip and observations of the bakeries and con- 
fectioneries that I have visited in the different countries on my 
qjourney around the globe. These will later be compiled in an 
illustrated volume which I hope to have published in several 
languages. 

My itinerary is as follows : Copenhagen to Sweden, Finland, 
Russia, Poland, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France, Bel- 
gium, England, the Danish islands of St. Thomas and St. Croix 
in the West Indies, New York, Chicago as well as other large 
cities in the United States and Canada, then from San Francisco 
or Vancouver via Honolulu to Tokio, Yokohama, Vladivostock, 
Peking, Shanghai, Singapore, then to Borneo, Sumatra, Java to 
Australia, returning via Siam, India, Ceylon, Arabia, Egypt, 
Greece, Turkey, Italy, Hnngary to Copenhagen. 



Closer Supervision of Raw Materials 
in the Bakeshop 



By F. C. Stadelkofer* 



requested by the general manager of the firm I was 

working for, at that time, the largest bakery in the middle 

west, to take stock of all raw mater- 

©ials on hand. As natural as this was, 
it was nevertheless a surprise, as I 
had then already been a number of 
years with the firm, and such a re- 
quest had never been made before. 
However, I soon realized the impor- 
tance of it. The following year we 
look stock twice, and to-day, so far 
as I know, it is taken quarterly. 
This taking stock for the first time 
certainly proved to be a revelation. 
What we discovered that time was a 

F. C Stahelhofk, •'»°« •"'' " ""■ ■''"■ ■ «"'"« •» 

say that similar conditions exist to- 
day in eighty per cent, of all bakeries in the United States. 
Wc found goods of all description on shelves and in the store 
loom in the cellar, which were so old that they were spoiled. 
Others had deterialed in strength and flavor, so we had 
to use twice the regular quantity to get, at the best, doubtful 

Gentlemen, it is my belief, if we could take stock simul- 
taneously in every bakeshop in the United States, we would 
find enough half-spoiled and spoiled stuff, the value of which 
would feed every hungry mouth in Poland, for the duration 
of the pKsent war. 

CAKE MATEUALS BOCCHT BECKLESSLV AND HANDLED CARCIXSSLV 

Of course, these conditions apply mostly to the cake shops 
wbere the articles used for manufacture are more numerous 
and lor that matter also more costly. Such conditions indi- 
cate reckless buying and careless handling of goods, as well 
as help. It is one of the commonest arguments encountered, 
'Well if I could be in the shop myself continually, these 
things would not happen" or "It makes no difference what I 
bur, my baker or bakers will use it as they see fit." You 
nuj as well let your men handle your cash .register in- 
discriminately, as well as your raw material. It is absolutely 
necessary that you have control over your help as far as the 
iw of raw materials go. 

*Paper Read at the Oklahoma Master Bakers' Convention. 



ir way of handling ingredients for the 
bread department. These had been scaled by a special man 
for that purpose. We now changed our way of scaling. We 
got several platform scales, put our full bills on them, and 
scaled backwards. For illustration, a bill of lard weighing 
net, 482 lbs., instead of weighing out of this in various 
buckets onto the scale for individual batches, we set the scale 
back, say 12 pounds, took enough out to make the scale 
balance, and kept on until the bill was empty. If ever you 
make this test, you will find that you will be from ten to 
fifteen pounds ahead of the game. This applies to every 
other ingredient used in bread, and besides gives you a better 
check on the correct net weight of the package as the tare 
will have to correspond with that which was marked on the 
package. I have seen this system adopted in several large 
shops with good results. 

PLATFORM SCALES A NECESSITY 

But no matter how small a business is, it should not be 
without a platform scale on which every package is weighed 
that comes in. All guess work in the shop should be elim- 
inated, formulas should not be changed without you being 
consulted. Suggestions from a journeyman in whom you 
can trust may frequently lead you to change your formula 
with the result to reduce the cost. But on the other hand, 
allowing your men to use the raw materials as they see 
fit, will eventually force you out of business. 

The increased and steadily advancing cost of raw materials 
should and will teach you to wake up to the realization that 
your profits are dwindling to a mere nothing. 

There is something radically wrong in the baking industry. 
For several years we hear from all sides about the high cost 
of living. Everything is advancing except bread. The bak- 
ery business is good everywhere, but the general cry is, 
"There is no money in it." We hear this everywhere, noth- 
ing like this ever happened before, we don't know what to 
do." Now is not that the best reason in the world why you 
should learn quickly what is best to do, and then do it? Why 
is this the case? Whose fault is it? Surely not the public's. 
The public will eat bread no matter what it costs, and it wants 
good bread and cakes, therefore give it. to them, but exact 
your pound, for surely nobody earns it more than the baker. 

A SPLENDID AID TO BUVING 

When you begin to understand the immense value of con- 
trol of raw material, you wilt find it a splendid educator for 
buying, for then you will commence to buy only the best.C. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



You will stop buying substitutes of doubt'ful value, and stock 
up your shelves and closets with stuff which eventually finds 
its way onto the garbage pile. Pure high grade raw materials 
mean high grade goods, and high grade goods are, in the 
end, always the cheapest. 

Take for instance, spices and extracts, a spoonful of Saigon 
cinnamon at 80 cents a pound goes for further than a fist 
full of Zanzibar cinnamon at 25 cents a pound. A teaspoon 
of genuine vanilla extract goes further than a dash out of an 
open gallon bottle of so-called vanilla flavor. Aside from the 
improvements in the finished product. 

The exercise of such control of raw materials will also 
bring about the proper buying of it. That is, the buying of 
the right kind and at the right time, and furthermore, it will 
make you keep your pencil to hand, and make you figure the 
cost of your production. 

You cannot make two kinds of goods, cheap and bad, or 
expensive and good, it won't work. It is a serious mistake, 
and bad policy to cut down on ingredients. When you find 
that the raw materials for a certain piece of gcods are getting 
too high, the only proper procedure is to cut the size, in- 
crease the price, or quit making it. Allow me to give you 
just one example about one kind of sweet goods. Are you 
aware of the fact that every one of you making sweet dough- 
nuts, are losing money on them just now, if you sell them at 
the usual price of ten cents a dozen? It you will try it, you 
will find that it takes one gallon of oil to fry twelve dozen 
doughnuts at ninety cents a gallon. And you will have to 
have this oil just right, for if it is the least bit cold, you 
cannot fry more than ten dozen. The result surrly does not 
need any further explanation. 

Let me illustrate by a few iiRures how necessary it is for 
the small man. who has no machinery, to keep his pencil busy 
in regards to bread. Let us figure as a basis, the flour to be 
$6.00 per barrel. You set, approximately, 320 pounds of dough 
from it. Scaled at 13 ounces per loaf, this makes 386 loaves. 
These, sold al 4 cents, would net $1544, 

Approximate cost of raw material $7.50 

Cost of wages 20% of raw material 1,87 

Cost of selling and delivery, 20% of raw material 1,^7 
Rent, fuel, light, insurance, and depreciation, 20% 

of raw material 1,87 

Total $13,11 

This leaves, apparently, a profit of $2.33 per barrel, or a little 
over 14 per cent,, with which we could be safely satisfied, if 
it were not for the fact that we must not forget, the losses of 
scaling by hand, and the stale proposition, which reduces the 
last figure materially. 

The man selling for 3^c to-day, is practically working for 
charity. If you go over your books for a year, you will find that 
these figures are conservative. Very frequently, I hear a baker 
say that a cake mix costs him $1,00. and that he gets $1,75 out 
of it. So, consequently, he makes 75c where if he would add 
45 per cent to the cost of his raw material, he would get much 
closer to the real truth of his profit. 

Close supervision of your own raw strength and ability, and 
confidence in yourself, will poll you off the narrow gauge, and 
put you on the broad gauge to success. Thus will you get the 
pick of the business, and not what is left. And not by watching 
and imitatmg the other fellow who is slowly but surely strang- 
ling himself to death. 

THE NECESSITY FOR CONSERVATION 

After all this, there is one more feature which may be classed 
under this heading. That is, the conservation of strength, health 
and energy. How easy it is, to get on the wrong track in this 
line will at once loom up to all of us, when we think back for 
twenty years, only- That time, we all thought it was impossible 
to get a day's work out without using most of the day to do it, 
and speaking of a day, I mean it as what it is figured for on 



the calendar, namely twenty-four hours. All of the older ontj 
here, have among their memories, recollections of over taxation 
of energy in by-gone days, which are almost incredible. 

The relentless wheels of progress, plus the awakening of 
ourselves, has swept these conditions away, and are placing tlie 
baking industry on a par with any other. Scientific researches 
have proved beyond a doubt that a man can accomplish tnwe 
per hour when he works a reasonable number of them per day, 
than when he works unreasonable hours. The bakers have been 
slower at coming to a recognition of these truths than other 
craftsmen, and some are still thinking and acting aking the 
old lines, but wherever you find these, you find them dull, un- 
satisfied and unprogressive. You don't find any enthusiajin 
when you talk and boost for a convention of this kind. Yet, 
gentlemen, the strides we have made in the last twenty years 
are splendid, and it is my opinion that it is impossible for an 
individual to block progress in any line of business. Just ai 
impossible as for an individual drop of water to resist its mil- 
lions of brothers in going over the brink of Niagara Falls, 

Close supervision of the physical raw materials of which our 
own bodies consist, means better health. Better health meaas 
better efficiency. Better efficiency means better work. And il 
these, and all other things are blended into an harmonious 
whole, it means satisfaction and contentment to ourselves, anil 
a benefit to human society. 



Mm In Itetal Costs 

Flour and other materials used in baked goods are not the 
only items used by the baker that have been jumping in price. 
Even the raw materials which are utilized in the manufacture 
of various appliances for bakers have taken a sky-ward turn. 
As usual, "on account of the war," the cost of iron, steel, lin- 
plale, copper, galvanized ware, and similar metals has advanced 
far beyond normal; and some of the bakers' appliance manufac- 
turers have had a difficult time getting some of their supplies 
even at the higher prices. 

The advanced prices on bakers' pans, tools, utensils, etc, 
uould seem to be inevitable under these conditions. 

Furthermore, bulletins issued J)y U. S, Steel interests and other 
larpe concerns would lead us to believe that even after the war 
stops, there will be a long period during which top price? 
will be paid for all kinds of metal. Many mills are reported 
"sold" for several years to come, and it Is said that peace re- 
quirements for metal wares of all kinds will be enormous 
for the purposes of reconstruction and the rebuilding of all in- 



Modlfy Decision on Oiuuranty Iiogond 

Labels of food and drug products containing the guaranty 
legend and serial number issued under the Food and Drugs 
Act, which were printed prior to May 5, 1914, may be used until 
May I, 1918, according to Food Inspection Decision 167. This 
decision, which is signed by the Acting Secretary of jhe Treas- 
ury, the Secretary of Agriculture, and the Acting Secretary of 
Commerce, was issued after the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture had held a hearing on the subject and made an investiga- 
tion of the number of labels bearing the guaranty legend and 
serial number which remains unused in the hands of the various 
branches of the food and drug industries. It was found that 
manufacturers and dealers in food and drugs products gen- 
erally have removed the guaranty legend and the serial number 
from labels printed since the adoption of the amendment to ihc 
regulations for (he enforcement oi the act on May 5, 19Mt 
prohibiting their future use, but that some manufacturers have 
on hand large numbers of labels, costing thousands of dollars, 
printed in good faith under previous regulations authorizing the 
use of the guaranty legend antf the serial, number, . which tbey 
have not been able to use in the tRn^anq«f^-^)}'Y^/^''*K regu- 
larions. Digi:zec oy ^ 



Mav, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



A Message to The Live Ones in The 
Baking Industry 

Whether You Go To The Convention At Salt Lake Or Not, You Should Read This Article 



THERE are two fundamental objects with the conventions 
of^ny business or fraternal organization. The meeting 
oi the Uaster Bakers' Association to be held in Salt Lake 
City next August, will assemble the men prominent and 
skilled in this industry. The assembling of members of this 
orginization for the purpose of exchanging ideas, reviewing 
[he progress which has been made, and perfecting measures 
which will anticipate the forward strides on which the busi- 
ness must travel to keep abreast with 20th Century ideas, 
makes the convention the melting pot for the best talents 
that the organization possesses. 

There ia, however, another consideration of importance in 
ctmnection with any meeting; i.e. the sight-seeing and educa- 
tional possibilities represented in the convention city and its 
environs. As Salt Lake City in tradition, beauty and ideal 
surroundings is without a counterpart in America, we find 
that both these convention requisites admirably take care of 
any selection that has been made for the igi6 meeting. 

The official roads have been selected and special trains 



with ( 



i embodying the r 



advanced construe- 

These trains will be 

r the Chicago, Milwau- 

'enver over the line of 

> Salt Lake City on the 



I the Chicago, Milwaukee 



equipped 

tion known in the car builders a 
operated from Chicago to Omaha c 
kee & St Paul Railway; Omaha K 
the Union Pacific; and from Denve. 
plcluresque Denver & Rio Grande. 

The firs! lap of the journey 
& St Paul Ry., carries the traveler across the most fertili 
*nd productive areas of the Mississippi Valley. Those por- 
tions of the S^tes of Illinois and Iowa flanking the line of 
this company are noted for their prodigious yields of corn and 
high caliber live stock, and trim farm houses and huge barns 
dotted along the landscape unmistakably proclaim the opu- 
lence of the farmer. 

West from Omaha, the itinerary contemplates the use of 
the Union Pacific. This historic artery of Commerce which 
was completed in 1869, was America's first transcontinental 
railroad. As far as the vision will carry on both sides of the 
railroad, the traveler finds wealth and plenty manifest in the 
fertile areas of Nebraska. 

The trains schedule contemplated provides departure from 
Denver via the D. & R. G. R. R. shortly after midnight. This 
arrangement will permit those attending the convention to 
see the best of the D. & R. G.'s famed attractions in day- 
light The splendor of the canyons, mountains and passes 
where the stupendous beauty of these miglity ramparts hurl 
themselves at the gaze, leaves the awestruck traveler with 
little room to question the right of th D. & R. G. to use its 
high-sounding appellation, "The Scenic Line of the World." 

The time of the special train tentatively decided on con- 
lemplates departure from Pueblo at 6 A. M. The monster 
■tee! works and magnetic springs of this city are its famous 
features. About two hours later the train enters Canon 
Qty, immediately west from here, the line winds its way 
through the zig-zag labyrinth of the Royal Gorge. The in- 
trinsic beauty of this tortuous path where the granite walls 

make a sheer rise of thousands of feet, and a tumbling river 

IS the traveling companion of the Master Bakers' Special, 

impresses on the mind some of America's most beautiful 

Pressing westward through this maze of mountain splen- 
dor, we pass through Salida, Buena Vista and Malta before 
rtaching the Tennessee Pass, where the line attains an 
altitude of over ten thousand feet Making a gradual descent 



from Tennessee Pass, Glen wood Springs is reached at about 
4 o'clock in the afternoon. The afternoon and evening will 
be spent at this resort. Here amid one of natures most 
lovely spots is located the beautiful Colorado Hotel where ar- 
rangements have been made to Stop for dinner and dance. 
This will be the only break in the journey from Chicago to 
Salt Lake. ^Th ere are splendid hotel accommodations and 
magnificently appointed bath houses, and one of the most 
wonderful natural swimming pools in the world where out- 
door baths may be enjoyed summer and winter in water heat- 
ed and mineralized by kindly nature. 

SALT LAKE CITY AND ItS SUUOUNDINGS 
Salt Lake City is in a nook, or elbow, on the western slope of 
Wasatch mountains. The Jordanriver passes through the western 
part of tlie city on its way from Utah Lake to Great Salt 
Lake. Numerous snow-fed streams of pure water find their 
way through the valley to the river and lake from magnificent 
mountain gorges, giving a water supply unequaled for purity 
and sufficient in quantity to supply many times the present 
population. 

Almost within sight from the streets of the city are moun- 
tain dells of rare beauty and attractive summer resorts beside 
mountain lakes that for beauty rival any spot between the 
seas. One may have in the Salt Lake Valley the unique ex- 
perience of visiting banks of perpetual snow, gathering fruit 
and flowers and taking a "salt water bath," all within the 
space of a few hours. No other spot is able to offer Ihe salt 
air of the ocean, the refreshing breezes of the mountains 
and the matchless dry atmosphere which makes the West 
famous. 



Sta-Gull Monument m^'S^^^>' 



fioogle 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Nature has aided man in making Salt Lake City one of the 
most beautiful in all the world. Overlooking a great valley, 
with the shimmering water of the inland sea at its feet, no 
better spot on which to build a city tould have been found 
in all the West. From the University campus, several hun- 
dred feet higher than the business portions of the city, one 
has a view the beauty of which will cling to him as long as 
memory lasts. At his feet are the broad, tree-lined streets of 
the city, with neat and attractive homes. Here and there a 
great mansion or a lofty steeple towers above the foliage. 
Further on are stately office buildings, with the magnificent 
City and County building in the midst of a beautiful park to 
the south and the world-famous Mormon Temple on the 
north. To the east are the richly colored slopes of the 
Wasatch Mountains and beyond are great mountain peaks, 
many of them more than ten thousand feet above sea level, 
wearing their caps of snow. To the west, flashing in the sun- 
light like a mighty gem, is Great Salt Lake, more than eight 
times larger than the Dead Sea of Palestine and with water 
so dense that the human body cannot sink in it. The sunsets 
across the lake are most beautiful and have been the inspira- 
tion of some of the gems of America's greatest artists. 

A ride through the city does not dispel the impression gained 
on the heights above. The streets are broad and well kept, 
many of them paved their entire length. An abundant water 
supply makes it possible to keep the surrounding of all dwellings 
green and masses of flowers greet the eye. Roses bloom in 
Salt Lake City from June until November. 

The business portion of the city is washed daily, so that no 
dust offends. Streams of mountain water flow in the cutters on 
both sides of the street. Splendid buildings, one of them the 
tallest business structure between the Missouri River and the 
Pacific Coast, are on the principal streets and between them are 
well kept business blocks with attractive shop windows. 

This is the city itself. But Salt Lake City is only part of the 
glory of the' region. It is here that the tourist should come on 
his way to visit the Yellowstone National Park, the world's 
wonderland. In the rugged stretches of San Juan county, Utah, 
he will find another wonderland, containing the world's great- 
est natural bridges, one of which has an arch so high that the 
greatest ship that ever sailed the seas could pass beneath it with- 
out dipping the pennant on its topmast. Here also the tourist 
would find the relics of the Cliff Dwellers, who passed from 
the earth centuries ago, and he might employ himself trying 
to trace their unknown history from the hieroglyphics and 
utensils left behind. 

The round trip fare from Chicago will be $45-00 to Salt Lake 
City. On tickets through from Chicago to Yellowstone Park 
the fare is only one dollar more or $46,00. Remember to order 
your ticket through to Yellowstone Park if you intend to go 
there after the convention as the local fare from Salt Lake City 
to Yellowstone Park is $17.00 while the rate on through tickets 
is only one dollar more. 

The Pullman rates are $8.50 for double lower berth Chicago 
to Salt Lake City. A full section including upper and lower 
berth is $15,30 Chicago to Salt Lake City. 

A compartment with private wash room and containing sleep- 
ing accommodations for three or four persons $24,00 from 
Chicago to Salt Lake City, 

A drawing room, which gives even more commodious ac- 
commodations with sleeping room for as many as five persons 
costs $30,00 from Chicago to Salt Lake City. 

All meals in dining cars. 

For rates to the California or Pacific Northwest with choice 
of routes going or retummg from Salt Lake may be had by 
writing to J. M. Bell, National Secretary. 

Hotel reservations may also be arranged through the Secre- 
tary's office. 

Make your reservations early. 

W. E. Long, Chairman, Promotion Committee. 



. Jewish BakcTB C«l«brttt« 

The Master Bakers' Federation, an organization of Jewish 
master bakers with headquarters in New York City, celebrated 
its first anniversary on April 19, The official publication of the 
association, The Mediator, participated in the celebration, which 
consisted of an entertainment, reception and ball. There were 
more than a thousand members and their friends in attendance, 
and Progress Casino, on Avenue A, was well-crowded. 

Many of the prominent city officials were present to lend a 
light political touch to the aSair. Joseph J, Hartigan, commis- 
sioner of weights and measures. Judge Wadhams, Attorney En- 
wood M. Rabenold, and Editor Morse M. Frankel delivered ad- 
dresses. Among the visitors were : George S. Ward, president 
of the Ward Baking Co, ; W, S. Corby, president of the Corby 
Co,, with a corps of Corby representatives ; Frank W, Meyer, of 
The Fleischmann Co.; John Jaburg, Jr,, of Jaburg Brothers; 
George P. Renter, vice-president of the Malt- Diastase Co.; A. J. 
Gunderman, president of the New York State Association of 
Master Bakers; Max Strasser, honorary president of the State 
organization; George £. Millspaugh, Bronx master baker, and 
Wm. H, Thomas, of Bakers Review, 

Morse M, Frankel, editor of The Mediator, was presented 
with a beautiful loving cup, for his earnest and efficient services 
in behalf of the association since its inception. 

WANT ARBITRATION WITH THE UNION 

One of the principal purposes of the Federation is to have 
differences between the master and journeyman bakers fairly 
arbitrated. In order to place themselves thoroughly on record 
on this proposition, the members of the Federation adopted the 
following resolution. 

Be rr Resolved: That upon this occasion of its first annivers- 
ary, the Master Bakers' Federation re-affinns its earnest advo- 
cacy of the principle of arbitration as the only effective safe- 
guard against protracted disputes between employer and em- 

The master bakers assembled here, representing a united and 
unanimous Hebrew baking industry in New York City, declare 
their entire readiness to contract with the respective organiza- 
tions representing the bakery workers, and by such contracts to 
obligate themselves to pay the prevailing rates of wa^es which 
range from $21 to $35 per week, to abide by the conditions im- 
posed in such contracts including a nine hour day, and ten 
holidays each year with pay, and steady work all year, with 
the exception of the Passover holiday week when no bread is 
baked. 

In return, the master bakers simply ask that a provision be 
inserted in these contracts whereby m the event of a dispute 
arising in connection with any of the contract terms or per- 
formance, the controversy shall be submitted to a Joint Board or 
Committee of Arbitration composed of representatives from the 
employers and employees, and an impartial chairman with pow- 
er to make a determination or recommendation in the premises; 

Be it FiiHTHER Resolved that copy of this resolution be trans- 
mitted to the secretary of each association representing the em- 
ployees for their favorable consideration. 

Be it Ft'RTHER Resolved that the $10 exacted from each em- 
ployer by the employee's association at the beginning of each 
year when these employers sign the agreements of the labor 
associations are only another form of extortion from those who 
are helpless, and that we use every honorable effort to put an end 
to this blackmail. 



Saponin Barred From Food Prodvcta 

The addition of saponin to food mixtures which are sold for 
use in place of white of eggs is regarded by the Bureau of 
Chemistry of the Department of Agriculture as constituting 
adulteration wlhin the meaning of the Food and Drugs Act. In 
"Service and Regulatory Announcements No. i?" it is stated 
that the practice is usually adopted for the purpose of concealing 
inferiority and that therefore it comes within the definition of 
adulteration in the Food and Drugs Act. Saponin is used exten- 
sively in so-called substitutes for white of egg for the pHrpoie 
of producing foam and thus giving the articles a fictitious ap- 
pearance of body and therefore of food value. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Preparing for Big Omaha Convention 



Tk bakers of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska are out 
10 break a record this year. They have combined to make 
thf 6rs[ Trans -Mississippi convention and exhibition, a mem- 
onblc event in the trade. 

The bakers and other good people of Omaha are now per- 
fMling plans for the taking care of a large number of visitors 
ai the gathering which will be held at the Omaha auditorium 

JUM U to 15. 

The following message from Frank RushCon, of Rosedale, 
Kansas, to the master bakers of his State is indicative of the 
oilhusiastn shown in behalf of the convention, which it is be- 
lieved will be one of the best in the trade's history. Consider 
Mr. Ruston's message : 

'As the time is near at hand for the holding of the greatest 
State convention that has ever been held in the middle West, 
I appeal to you to try and make your arrangements so that you 
can attend and be able to lend all your support to the making 
of the greatest combined State convention that has ever been 
held. 

The advantages of this convention are such that it will be 
possible for you to have the opportunity of receiving informa- 
tion by your attendance, that is utterly impossible to get at a 
single State convention; the exhibition feature is well worth 
what it will cost to make the trip, as nearly all of the large 
mann facta re rs of bakery machinery will have exhibits there. 

The best speakers and most advanced men in the bakery 
business will be there to tell you what they know of the bakery 
business and how Ihey have made their success ; this matter 
in itself is opportunity seldom afforded the small baker. We 
know just how you feel about getting away from your busi- 
ness, it seems hard to do so because you have not got the habit. 
"Now, fellow master bakers, throw off the yoke and get 
ready for this convention, be sure and go— it will make a new 
master baker of you. This is a big thing to say, but it is the 
Imth and by all means think of one thing— if Kansas can grow 
the best wheat and make the best flour, it is certainly the 
saster bakers' fault in the State of Kansas if we cannot bake 
the best bread. l«t's all go to Omaha and show the committee 
that has worked hard to get up the best convention that will 
be held this year that we appreciate their untiring efforts and 
ihaE Kansas is not only on the map, but that it is the one big 
State in the baking industry to-day. If in doubt or needing 
mformation, write me to-day, but by all means go to Omaha on 
June 12-13-14 and 15." 

Mr. Rushton was the first president of the Kansas association, 
and is one of the brightest association workers in the land, so 
he knows whereof he speaks. Here is the convention program ; 
kwk it over. It should tempt every baker in (he four States: 

Program 



WEDNESDAV. JUNE I4TH— 10 A. M. 

Question Box. 

Paper by Leo Mulgrew, Dubuque, la. 
Discussed by Henry Hohengarten, St l^uis, Mo. 
Paper by Harry Gobrecht, Chicago, 111. 
Discussed by Chas. H. Allstedt, Waterloo, la. 
Paper by Jay Bums, President N. A. M. B., "A Greater Na- 
tional Association of the Baking Industry." 
At 2:30 P. M. 
Sectional meetings of different Stale Associations. 



P. F. Petersen, 
Chairman 



T. F. Nauchtin, 
Secretary 



THURSDAY, JUNE ISTH — 9:30 A. U. 

Paper by Harry Boeckenhoff, Des Moines la. : "Profitable Re- 
Discussed by Chas. Ortman, Omaha, Neb. 
Paper— by A. T. Seeley, Lincoln, Neb.— "Profit on Retail Wag- 
Discussed by M. Hoffmann, St. Louis, Mo. 
Discussions of questions. 
Unfinished Business. 
New Business. 
Report of Committees. 
Report of Secretary and Treasurer. 
Nomination of Officers, 
Election of Officers. 
Selection of Meeting Place for 1917. 
Introduction of New Officers. 

It is promised that the convention will work positively on 
schedule time. A wonderful exhibition has been arranged, which 
should be of interest to every baker. 

The local entertainment committee is arranging special enter- 
tainment for the ladies and something unsual is promised for 
the evening entertainment at the auditorium. 



Initiation Ceremon>-. Ak-Sar-Ben Den. 

TUESilAY JUNE I3TH— lO A, M, 

Opening of Exhibition and Convention. 
Address of welcome by Hon. Mayor Jas, Dahlman. 
Response by President P. F. Petersen. 

Greetings from the National Association, represented by Fred 
S. Freund, St. Louis. 
CiiettinRs of the different Associations, 
President's Address. 
Appointment of Committees. 
Reading of Communications, 
P'Pw by Frank Rushton, Rosedale, Kans. 
Dijeotsion led by Fred S. Freund, St. Louis, Mo. 
P»fer by F. C. Stadelhofer, St. Louis, Mo.— "Odds and Ends 
About the Baking Industry." 
DtKosstd by Jacob Schouten, Keokuk, la. 



Charles 8. Sharp* New Eastern Manager 

Arthur Fosdyke, the genial general manager of the Hubbard 
Oven Company, hied himself to New York on a flying trip 
last month, and improved the occasion by promoting Charles 
S. Sharpe to the management of the New York office. Mr. 
Sharpe has been associated with the Eastern department for the 
past five years, and has been a conscientious, hard-working, and 
successful representative of the Hubbard interests, and one of 
the most popular oven salesmen in the East. His promotion is 
well -de served. 

Mr. Fosdyke reports business in excellent condition, and we 
are sure that under his able management, the Hubbard Oven Co. 
will continue to grow and prosper. His genial, yet forceful, 
personality has earned him many well-wishers in the trade. 



6o 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Illinois Preparing 

The following are some of the items in the uncompleted pro- 
gram for the Illinois Master Bakers' Convention to be held in 
Springfield May g, lo, and ii, igi6 

The convention will open Tuesday afternoon at i :30. 

The National Association will be represented by Treasurer 
Fred S. Freund, St. Louis, and besides the greetings and re- 
ports of officers as usual at the first session, there will be an 
address by Theodore Soellinger, E. St. Louis, and another ad- 
dress on "Retail Cake-Making Problems." The name of the 
speaker has not been announced owing to an upset of perfected 
arrangements. 

The evening session will present the assistant pure food com- 
missioner, John B. Newman, and possibly Commissioner W. Scott 
Mathews. This will be followed by the ceremonials of the Salty 
Order of Pretzels in charge of Master Little Twist Arthur Fos- 
dyke. 

The morning and afternoon sessions for Wednesday will be 
"For Bakers Only." The report of the Committee on Educa- 
tion for Bakers will be presented and given full and careful 
discussion. Addresses will be given on "Education for Bakers," 
and "Goods from Baker to Consumer," "Improved Methods of 
Br?ad Making," and "The Strength qi Wheat Flour." A dis- 
cussion will be conducted on the subject "Essentials to the 
Success of a Retail Bakery." The speaker.-i will be as follows, 
so far as can be announced: Prof S. W. Parr, Chemistry De- 
partment, University of Illinois ; Prof. C. H. Bailey, University 
of Minnesota and also of the faculty of Dunwoody Institute, 
Minneapolis ; J. Fleetwood Connelly, Springfield, and W., H. 
Kein, Rockford, a past president of the association. The even- 
ing session will be open to every one and a beautifully illus- 
trated stereopticon lecture by Prof. LeEngwell, Chicago, which 
has been arranged for under the auspices of the National Asso- 
ciation of Master Bakers, will be presented ; this will be followed 
by an entertainment and lunch. It is hoped that National Secre- 
tary Bell will also be present at this time. 

Thursday morning the last session will be held. This will be 
open for bakers only. An address by Prof. Bailey is arranged 
for and one by a very prominent baker of a neighboring state 
is in discussion with sincere hopes of a successful issue. Prom- 
inent members of the association will take part in this closing 
session to make it one of the strongest of the whole convention. 

The present ofScefs of the. Illinois association are: President, 
Andrew Schneider, Areola; vice-president, Chas. A. Paesch, 
Chicago; secretary, E. T. Clissold, Chicago; treasurer, George 
Geissler, Joliet; Executive Committee — George Grimm, Peoria; 
Herman Kind, Elgin; B. H. Dahlheimer, Chicago, and J. C. 
Gmelich, Peoria (president 1915); Advisory, J. H. Chapman, 
Chicago. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

St. I^uls Bakcri Bowling Club 

At one of their recent weekly bowling evenings at the Planters 
Hotel Bowling Alleys, the bakers had several visitors who 
watched the games. Among those present were John Baker, Sr., 
Peter, Derlein, John Hoerr, F, H. Hohengarten, H, J. Hart- 
mann, S. Farmer, Fred Freund, A. S. Purves, of the Bakehs 
Review, and T. Whittig, bakery architect. One of the features 
of the evening was a match between Fred Freund and Peter 
Derlein, and another between Derlein and John Hoerr ; as usual 
Peter was successful in getting several hits. He was in great 



Romomlwr th* Trl-Stato 

Big Convention and Exhibition at Toledo, Jui 
7 and 8. It will be worth your while to come. 



May, 1916 

Biscolt and Crackar llannflactnron 

The officers of the Biscuit and Cracker Manufacturers" As- 
sociation have decided upon June 2a to Z2 as the dates on which' 
the annual convention of that organization will be held. Head- 
quarters will be established at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago. 
Secretary W. M, Brownell and the program committee are pre- 
paring the program which will be announced later. 



Big Wagnar Bakary Opan 

Every grocer, restauranteur, and general dealer in the city of 
Detroit was invited to the opening of the mammoth bakery of 
the Wagner Baking Company in that city. The week begin- 
ning April 33rd, and ending April 28, was known as "dealers' 
week," and the dealers in the beautiful lake city flocked to see the 
newest and biggest bakery in the State — it has a capacity of 
250,000 loaves daily. 

The Detroit Retail Grocers' Association was extended a 
special invitation, which is reproduced herewith. It was done 
on heavy paneled wood, 42 inches square, and was hand-painted 
in red and gold. 



The man standing beside the invitation is S. 0. Lindeman, 
the well known bakery advertising expert. Mr, Lindeman super- 
vises the advertising of the Wagner company. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Naw Macblnary Firm In St. Louis 

St. Louis has a new bakers' machinery firm, Becker-Hart- 
mann is the name of the new firm which was established on 
April I. John H. Becker has been manager of the St. Louis 
sales agency of the Read Machinery Co, for five or six years, 
while H. J. Hartmann, the other partner, was formerly with 
the American Bakers' Machinery Co., of St. Louis, The new 
firm will engage in the sale of bakers' machinery of every 
description in the Central and Southern States. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

N. E. Gourly, of Havre, Mont., has installed a Champion 
divider, moulder, rounder, and cake machine recently purchased 
from E. Recht, representative of the Champion Machinery Com- 
pany, Joliet, 111. Mr. Recht has just returned to headqinulers 
from a trip to Montana, and reports business flourishing tn that 
Stale. 




EDITORIAL 



Cliarltts m. ThompBoa, Bdltov 




IncrMuliig Coits 

DURING the past two years there has been an 
average increase o£ twenty-five per cent, in the 
costs of thirty different materials used in the 
shop. This conclusion is based on a thorough investi- 
gation by a prominent accountant, as outlined on 
another page of this issue. Mr. Krebs is familiar with 
bakeshop costs, so that he knows whereof he speaks. 

But has the average baker acquainted himself with 
the facts? 

He hasn't because he does not keep a graphic record 
ol his costs. He doesn't know where he is at. If the 
cost had risen fifty per cent, instead of twenty-five, 
he would probably feel a dull, pressing ache in the 
vicinity of his bank account; he would realize that 
materials had increased in price, but he coldn't tell 
how much. 

It is the lack of exact information on rising costs 
that is causing the baker many anxious moments. He 
is worried because there is more going out than there 
is coming in ; and he does not intelligently undertake 
to determine why. If he had kept a record of each 
purchase with information as to the price, etc., where 
it could be easily found, the knowledge thus gained 
would enable him to identify every fluctuation in price. 
Knowing the exact cost, Mr, Baker would be able to 
increase the price of his goods, or to decrease their 
size, to a point commensurate with reasonable business 
practice. 

Read Mr. Krebs' article. It should lead many bak- 
ers to determine their position in these days of rising 
costs. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Bonw-Mad* Bread In England 

THE bakers of England are up against a peculiar 
situation. Recently advertisemertts have ap- 
peared in the public press urging housewives to 
return to their early drudgery — baking at home. Prac- 
tically all of the bread consumed in England is the pro- 
duct of the commercial bakery ; but war-conditions 
have encouraged a sort of inclination towards "home- 
baked." However, it has been proved to the satisfac- 
tion of many people who have tried kitchen baking, 
that commercially-baked bread is more economical, 
therefore members of the trade in England are not 
worried as to their future position. But they are wor- 
ried over, possibilities of bankruptcy under the present 
condition of the materia! and labor market. 

Let us hasten the day when home-baking will be a 
thing of the past in this country ; when bakers' bread 



will have become so superior and economical, that 
housewives will not attempt to continue an unequal 
competition. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Why? 

WE HAVE looked into the matter quite care- 
fully, but we have never been able to fathom 
why most bakers scale their ten-cent loaves 
less than twice the weight of the five-cent size. Many 
bakers give fourteen ounces for a nickel, and twenty- 
six for ten cents; or thirteen ounces for five, and 
twenty-four for ten; or twelve and twenty-two. At 
the same time they are trying to educate the public to 
the fact that the dime loaf is the better buy. 

Why should a customer, accustomed to pay five 
cents for a unit of bread, be expected to pay ten cents 
for a loaf less than twice the size of the smaller? 

It is claimed that the ten-cent loaf is the better of the 
two. True, but the manufacturing cost of the lesser- 
size is practically as great as it is on the larger; it is 
easier to sell one of the ten-cent variety than it is to 
sell two at five; the big loaf is a step towards increas- 
ing the consumption of bread ; the unit sold for five 
cents becomes stale more quickly than the one sold for 
ten cents ; therefore ten-cent trade is more satisfactory 
to the baker. Q>nsidering the situation in this light, 
why does the baker try to attract the housewife to the 
five-cent size? 

A good ten-cent loaf, sold right and advertised right, 
is the salvation of the bread trade. But, put it up to 
the housewife in such a way that she will he unable 
to find any loop-hole in favor of the continued use of 
the five-cent loaf ; in other words, make her completely 
satisfied that she is getting full value in the loaf that 
you are trying to sell. 



Fadaral Aid for Vocational Education 

BAKERS are urged to do everything in their power 
to help in the adoption of a referendum recently 
submitted to the members of the Chamber of 
Commerce of the United States to secure Federal aid 
for vocational education. The following recommenda- 
tions are made : 

Liberal Federal appropriations for promotion of vo- 
cational education in the United States; 

That Federal appropriations should be allotted 

among the states upon a uniform basis and should bear 

a uniform relation to appropriations made by the states 

for like purposes; ^ 

The creation of a Federal board, to be representa* 



62 



BAKERS REVIEW 



tive of the interests vitally concerned and to be com- 
pensated sufficiently to command great ability; 

That the Federal board should be required to ap- 
point advisory committees of five members each, repre- 
senting industry, commerce, labor, agriculture, home- 
making, and general or vocational education. 

Well-trained bakers are a future necessity, and it is 
well that we conserve the interests of the industry by 
creating as many intelligent operatives as possible. 
And the aid of the Federal government should be en- 
listed in the making of better workmen, for better 
workmen will make this country a better place to work 
and. live in. 



May, 1916 

Kraui* Starts VImw Ftm 

J. W. Krauje, who for fifteen years 
has been associated with the Joe lowe 
Company, the well-known specialty 
house of New York, has severed hii 
Connection with that firm to engage 
in business on his own account under 
the name, Krause Importing Company, 
manufacturers and importers of bak- 
ers' and confectioners' specialties. Ur. 
Krause will have an office at 90-Q2 
West Broadway, New York City. 



ConawrcUl DIsmu* 

J J •-COMMERCIAL DISEASE" is a new term for 
I a long-standing condition. It is still in ex- 

^^ istencc in the baking industry. Pessimism 
— knocking-^what could be worse? Pessimism eats 
away at enterprise ; knocking tries to stop enterprise. 
Pessimism can't find anything good in anything new; 
knocking tries to eliminate the good by talking about 
the bad. In many respects the knocker is worse than 
the pessimist, because he tries to tear down what has 
been built up by the efforts of another. 

The continued prevalence of the pessimist and the 
knocker retards maximum progress in the baking in- 
dustry. 



Bnad Irfiw Kilted 

The New York State Senate, by a vote of 30 to 18; rejected the 
Walker-Coffey bill, which was intended primarily to canse the 
labeling of all bread which contained ingredients not specified 
in the bill, or "not commonly sold at retail as food." 



StndcbalMr Trucks Endorssd 

Endorsement of the new Studebaker delivery trucks is shown 
in the recent purchases made by the U. S. Mail Department. 
Initial purchases called for 14 of the half-ton models for Phila- 
delphia, 10 for Chicago, 9 for Indianapolis, and 4 for St. Louis. 

The selection of Studebakers was the result of exhaustive tests 
of a number of leading makes of trucks. 

The Studebakers to be used in the government mail service 
are of standard mechanical construction and arc fitted with the 
regulation type of body used in the mail department. 

In addition to the half-ton models, the Studebaker Corporation 
this year is offering a line of one-ton trucks. Both types are 
proving popular with bakers all over the country. In fact, the 
demand has forced a tripling of the output, which is fixed at 
10,000 vehicles for 1916, thus placing the Studebaker Corporation 
as the largest builders of commercial cars of similar capacities. 

The line of half-ton Studebakers includes the panel delivery, 
$875: open express, $850; station and baggage wagon, $875. 
One ton models are: open express, $iaoo; stake body, $1250. 16- 
passenger, $1400. 

« * « 

The students at the Siebel Institute, Chicago, recently visited 
the magnificent plant of the Peter Schoenhofen Brewing Co., 
Chicago, where they were enabled to obtain a very good idea 
of the brewing process to observe how closely it is identified 
with the production of malt extracts, and with the fermentation 
proceii. 



A Novsl Adwrtlsing SchciB* 

A baker in an Eastern city who wished to push his goodi 
hit upon a novel advertising scheme to start them going, the 
goods being of a character that a start was all that they 
needed. Of course, he first of all dressed his windows care- 
fully with his goods and this started them oflf to some extent 
and once tried the people began to repeat, but the way he 
followed up this window advertising and introduced the 
goods to the people of his section is really quite novel. 

He took a number of regular bakers' bags and on eich 
he typewrote the following: — 

// vow are particular about the kind of cake you eat, if yw 
feel that the best ts the only kind to buy, it will pay you to call 



for s 



e of 



The Modern Cakes 

Home Made 

"they're clean and pure — that's sure' 

They are made on the premises of only absolutely pure material 



We I 



all. 



Why Not Try a BagfuilT 
Then he folded up each bag and put it in an envelope with 
his return card printed in the corner. These he sent to those 
on his mailing list under two-cent postage. The result was 
by far greater than he had ever dared hope for. The day 
after he mailed them out people began to come in and say 
that they had received the bag with his ad on, and they did 
more than come in, they bought. The plan worked so well 
that he bought a small machine by means of which he could 
run off any number of bags in imitation of typewriting at a 
great saving of time. Then he covered the entire section 
where his store was located and the results were as great as 

From time to time he sends another bag to those on his 
mailing list calling attention to some new kind of cake he 
has added or to some special feature connected with the 
making of cake and the net result of this persistent adver- 
tising is that his goods are firmly entrenched in the good 
will of the people and he has built tip a good business in 



Albany, 0«n Has a Big aak«r 

In "Tales of a Traveler," on page 94 of our April issue. Otto 
Werlin said, in regard to the trade in Albany, Ga. : "There is 
not one baker in Albany, although it has a population of about 
8,000." We are informed that C. W. Rawson has been in the 
baking business in that city for the last twenty-five to thirty 
years, and that he turns out on an average about 2500 loaves a 
day, and about 3700 loaves on a recent Saturday. 




^r General Informatloii, news and 
^l^helpfnl articles of special In- 
terest to the Retail Baker and 
those iNTho desire to keep posted 
on tfUs branch of the trade. 



AMMtetlon Mawsr lUtaU J 



nt and Psaetlcal Btacn— toiui of Katall Snbjacts 



Material and Labor Costs in the 

Retail Bakery 

^th of a Series of A rticles on Retail Bakery Accounting. Written Especially for Bakers Review by Rudolph Krebs 

ONE of the things that is tending gradually to force many and the increase on the other nine was 40 per cent, and under, 

bakers to keep books is the present steady increase in the The weighted average of the thirty showed an increase of 23 

price of raw materials, which have gone up about 25 per cent, per cent, from February, J914, to February, 1916. 

ihring the past two years.* Let us see what this increase means in actual work. A baker 

'Note. — This figure is taken from a comparison of the prices doing a business of $2,ocxi.oo a month, using raw materials of 

of thirty standard materials used in the bakery manufacturing about $1,000.00, with salaries and expenses $goo.oo, will have a 

1 miscellaneous line of bread and cake. Of the thirty items profit of $100.00 a month. 

cumined, the price on five remained even from February, 1914, Merchandise $i,ooaoo 

to February, 1916. On two there was a decrease and on the other Salaries and expenses 900.00 

Jj u increase. Profit 100.00 

Od two of the latter this increase was over loo per cent. , 

Twelve of them had gone up from 40 per cent, to 60 per cent. Sales for month $3,000.00 



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BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



At the end of two years, however, his merchandise cost has 
gone up 2$fo, and this would mean a loss of $i5ox)0 a month. 



Merchandise $1,25000 

Salaries and expenses goo.oo 



Sales for month $2,000.00 

Now, he may be as wise as Solomon but if he has no records 
to show the quantities of merchandise used each month he may 
continue to sell goods this way until his bank account is cleaned 
out or his creditors cut short his activities. 



Merchandise $1,350.00 

Salaries and expenses 9004X> 

Profit , 100X30 



«3TK-y 



Sales for month $2,250x10 

Most tikely, he will be about half way between these two 
points. His sales may drop off a trifle if he raises the price, 
as his customers may only have a certain purchasing power; 
that is to say, he may have 400 customers who can afford to 
spend $5-00 each per month for bread and cake. Then, if he 
raises the price on his goods he will sell a smaller quantity, and 
of course, the proportion of his salaries and expenses will be 
larger. On the other hand, if he decreases the quantity of ma- 
terials in his goods some people will have to buy more in order 
to satisfy their needs. This will result in an increase in his 
sales and a corresponding decrease in the proportion of salaries 
and expenses. 
J!!. The well-posted baker finds the happy medium and raises the 
price of such articles as he can sell at the higher figure, econ- 
omizes on other things, and is sure of keeping his profits in the 
right place. It is a general habit among business men to hold 
off when prices are rising and sell goods at the old figures. 
Competition and the fear that the next fellow will take away 
his customers cause him to hold on in the hope that prices will 
go doWn again. As a matter of fact, the trend for centuries 
has been upward, although of course there are times when, 
during business depressions, etc., prices lapse a trifle. These 
are, however, only temporary. 

In the last article we showed how a record of the purchases 
for a month could be kept and sub-divided. In order to arrive 
at the percentage of materials used in the finished product we 
must have a record of the goods manufactured. When goods 
are only retailed over the counter the total of the daily sales 
gives us of course the total manufactured, allowing for stale 
goods. If, however, there is a lunch department we must 
arrive at the total manufactuxes in some other way. 

Form 3 is a manufacturing total sheet, showing in separate 
columns the amount of each and every item manufactured. These 
are sub-divided to show the various prices. In the extreme left 
there is a space for rolls selling at 6 for 5c. In the first column, 
that for seeded Vienna rolls, we see that 144 of these have been 
manufactured on Nov. 20th. 900 Vienna rolls have been manu- 
factured, 36 twist rolls, etc. The separate items in each division 
are totaled and the selling price calculated and brought over to 
the columns at the right headed "No. — @ Amount." 

Form 3A is a cake slip for the same purpose, but having rorai 
for only one batch of each kind. This form Is cheaper and 
more convenient when only one lot is manufactured during the 

The totals of these two slips, added together, shows the amotmt 

■i'l of goods manufactured during the day to be $go.oo. This serves 

j-° as a check on the sales if all sales are of the one kind. 

^"^ These sheets can also be used at any future date to show the 

~7jr kinds of goods manufactured during different seasons, holidays, 

°'^- etc., and in this way prevents the making up of a lot of goods 

ZZ. that cannot be sold. 

Goods Manufactured 



With a proper knowledge of his accounts as he goes along 
he could cut down the materials so that his expenses and in- 
come would be about as outlined below: 

Merchandise (using 80% of the quantity 

formerly used at the old price) $1,000.00 

Salaries and expenses 900.00 

Profit loojxi 



Nov., 


1915 






Sun. 


M 




$84.00 


Mon, 


11 




70.00 


Tues. 


ift 


■ 


65-00 


Wed. 






55.00 


Thur. 






fe.oo 


Fri. 






80.00 


Sat. 


20 

... 


Total for week 


90.00 




-^JO^:??.^ 



Sale: 



for the month $2,000.00 

fact u red 



Ur, if he desired, he could raise the price of his n 
tuods, which would leave his profits about as folloi 



The total of the two previous sheets is entered in a single 
column journal and totaled weekly as shown in form 3B. We 
note that the amount for Nov, 20th taken from the cake and 
bread slips mentioned above, has been entered as shown — "Sat- 



BAKERS REVIEW 




vday, 20th $90.00. Adding up the daily amounts we get the total 
^ the -week, namely $504.00. 

THE PAYROLL 
Another item that looms large in the monthly cost is the pay- 
roll. Labor, as well as merchandise, is getting more costly and 
I™ business man should know what he is getting for the money 
lit expends in this direction. He must have something to tell 
"im how valuable his machinery is ; somethinf; which aids him 
WmAing improvements so that he knows, if he invests $i,ooo.cb 
>n a machine that he saves more than that in the cost of labor 
wflhin a specified time. 

Payroll for Week Ending November ao, 1915 
Name Rate Time Amount Store Bakery 



Alex 




6 days 














20.00 




20.00 


;ohn 


1700 


6 days 


17.00 




17.00 




18.00 




18.00 




18,00 


Maty 


6.00 


6 days 


6.00 


6.00 






8.00 


3 days 








Edward 


7.00 




7.00 


7.00 




David 


9.00 


6 days 




9.00 






$98.00 


$26x» 


$72.00 



In a five or six column figuring book (form 3C), we enter our 
payroll week by week. The cahimns are practically self-explana- 
tory. First the name of the employee is entered, in the second 
column his weekly rate, in the third column the time he has put 
in, and fourth the total amount due him. Other columns are 
for the analysis of the payroll, separately totaled up into store 
salaries, bakery salaries, and any other divisions that may be 
deared. If a man has 70 departments he can easily tell just 
what his payroll expense is in each, and how it varies. 

Summary of Manufacturing 



W^orfing 


Goods manufactured 


$504.00 


Hot. 20 


Total payroll 


72.00 




Total days worked 


24 




Averse pay per day 

Average goods mfd. for $1.00 pay 






isa 




Average goods mfd. per man per day 





From the figures in the Goods Manufactured and Payroll 
■"I we are enabled to make up the analysis or summary of 
■Wlacturing shown in form 3D. The first item, goods manu- 



factured, shows the total of the manufactures during the week. 
On the next line we enter the total payroll and on the third 
line the number of days worked. Dividing the total payroll, 
$72,00, by the number of days worked, 24, we arrive at 
the average pay per day, $3.00. Dividing the goods manufactured 
by the total payroll we find the amount of goods manufactured 
tor each dollar of our manufacturing payroll, namely, $700 
worth. The total of the goods manufactured, divided by the 
total number of days worked, 24, gives us the average amount 
each baker has manufactured per day. 

These summaries in themselves give us a good idea of our 
labor manufacturing cost. After we have kept these for a year 
we can chart them as shown in form 3E and get a good idea 
of any variations in labor cost. 

In the above chart we notice that for the year 1914 (lower 
line) the goods manufactured for each dollar of the bakers pay- 
roll ran about $6.00, with a slight increase from September on. 
During the year 1915, however, each man manufactured on the 
average over $7.00 worth daily. 

Figures of this sort are more conclusive evidence of the value 
of men and machinery than any rule of thumb decisions. A man 
who has these facts before him can tell exactly what his men 
are doing. He need not watch them nor hire any one to keep 
watch over them. He may be in Honolulu or at the North Pole 
and still be able to keep in touch with conditons better than the 
man on the spot who relies merely on his own judgment. Should 
this labor cost go up he can dig down, locate the reasons, and 
apply the remedy. Mere superficial appearances of activity can- 
not deceive a man who reasons according to cold facts. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

A Big Rys-BrMd Contract 

William B. Fink, of 6 Harrison Street, recently closed the 
biggest contract ever made on a rye-bread process. He sold 
the rights on his "Wunderbar" process, covering fourteen cities, 
to the General Baking Company; other cities in which the Gen- 
eral Baking Company controlled plants were already taken care 
of by other firms. 

"Wunderbar" is a patented method for keeping lye bread 
moist. Mr. Fink was able to demonstrate the process to the 
satisfaction of the powers that be in the "General" organization. 

The City Baking Company, Baltimore, the Preihofer Baking 
Company, and about forty other prominent concerns are using 
the "Wunderbar" process. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



How to Stimulate the Bread Trade 
When Business is Dull 



Some Varieties of Bread That Pay and Get Popular 
Written Especially for Bakers Review h a Champion Gold Medallist and CuP Winner 



{Continued from April Issue. Page 76) 

THOUGH Vienna bread is very largely made for the hotel 
and restaurant trade there is no reason why such an ap- 
petising type of bread should not be equally as popular for 
the ordinary retail trade. A belter price can be obtained for 
it, and the weight is less than for the heavier types of bread 
so that it could very well be made a big item in any trade 
campaign for extending the popularity of bread generally. 

A good deal of misconception as to the manufacture of 
Vienna bread exists among bakers in many districts. It is 
often supposed that special ovens and appliances are neces- 
sary in order that the special outside finish, which is the 
outstanding feature of Vienna bread, may be obtained. On 
the matter of ovens a good deal could be said, and while a 
proper Vienna oven is a distinct acquisition when a lot of 
the bread has to be made, there is the drawback that it can- 
not very well be used for any other kinds of bread or small 

The details of the principles governing an orthodox Vienna 
oven are too lengthy to fully describe, but may be briefly 
summed up in the statement that it is built with the sole 
sloping upwards from the door in such a manner that any 
point from half to two thirds of the oven length is above the 
level of the door. This means, in consequence, that before 
any steam can escape, it must get to the door level and in 
doing this, must pass over any bread that may be in the oven 
With the result that the oven door may be opened any num- 
ber of times without the escape of much steam. 

This type of oven is but little used, however, and, as re- 
marked, it is quite an error to think that first class Vienna 
bread cannot be turned out from ordinary steam ovens. 
What is essential, however, is a steam boiler which many 
bakeries already possess, and which by means of a perforated 
pipe projecting across the oven can easily be adapted for 
injecting steam for glazing Vienna bread What is also es- 
sential is smartness in getting the rolls or loaves into the 
oven, so as the dough Is brought into contact with the steam 
before the latter is spent. 

Many bakers already employ small vertical boilers to im- 
prove the appearance of their ordinary bread, but to obtain 
the necessary glaze on Vienna bread, a different method of 
working has to be adopted. The usual method of setting 
the bread and turning on the steam must give way to the 
steam being turned on while the loaves or rolls are being 
set; then turned full on for a few minutes after the oven 
is closed, and afterwards turned off, so as the bread may fin- 
ish baking in a dryer heal. 

Many ordinary ovens are fitted with the Vienna type of 
door, which is an advantage, as the lesser space the steam 
has to escape while the bread is being set, the better the glaz- 
ing will be effected. 

The chief characteristics of Vienna bread are as follows: — 
The glazed external finish; the crispness of the crust; the 
creaminess of the crumb; and the delicious flavor resulting 
from the former qualities. 

The glazing, then, is produced by bringing the green or 
moist surface of the dough into contact with a certain amount 
of pressure steam. Ordinary steam, such as may be ob- 
tained from cans or kettles of water is of very little use as 
the necessary gelatinizing is not effected. The crust crispness 



is produced both by the making and the baking of the bread. 
Proper, healthy fermentation, with plenty of tearing, folding 
and stretching of the dough will assist in this direction, and 
the crispness is helped by the after treatment of the dough 
in the baking. 

The immediate effect of filling an oven with steam is to 
temper the heat and afterwards reduce it considerably. This, 
on the face of it will soften the crust and as crbpness it re- 
quired it is obvious that some method must be adopted to 
ensure this. 

As previously mentioned, however, the effect of a moist 
dough coming into contact with the steam is the glazing of 
the crust; which is accomplished almost immediately the 
bread is placed in the oven, so that any amount of steam 
after the first few minutes will have no effect upon it beyond 
tempering the oven heat. There is no reason why the Steam 
cannot be turned off after a few minutes injection or if the 
pipes are only fitted to one oven, the bread can be removed 
to another for drying and another lot glazed as before. By 
one or other of these means the crispness is obtained and 
care must always be taken to bake the bread properly, or it 
will be tough and leathery instead of crisp and short eating. 

With thcsp two points studied, however, this second quality 
can be obtained. 



Creaminess of crumb may broadly be obtained by the use 
of suitable enriching ingredients, of which the moat im- 
portant are butler and milk. Too much of either of these 
will make the bread unpalatable, and much more difficult to 
get crisp. Of course, the effect of both butter and milk 
differs very little as either is equivalent to added fat The 
resulting bread, however, usually proves that it is better to 
use half milk and half water, also some added fat, than all 
milk and no added fat, as full cream milk always has a some- 
what binding effect upon the dough. The fat may be butter, 
lard, margarine, or vegetable oil, according to the respective 
qualities of bread being made. While for certain types of 
Vienna bread, there is nothing like butter for flavor, for other 
sorts either of the fats mentioned will do very well. 

The particular flavor of the bread is obtained by the use of 
a high grade flour, and here the judgment of the baker must 
be exercised; as some flours give much better results than 
others; though equally as high grade flour may often be used 
and the flavor of the bread spoiled by improper working de- 
tails. Having obtained a suitable flour the fermentation miut 



Mh, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



67 



b« prop«rly carried out in order that the best result may be 
obt^ned from it. 

This leads to the question of making up suitable doughs, 
etc, and while it was formerly thought that either a fer- 
ment or sponging system was essential for proper bread o( 
thijlype, it is now generally admitted that a straight dough- 
ng iyslem is quite satisfactory. 

Htre is a foundation dough, from which bread of the fine 
healthy looking character shown in the accompanying cut 
guy be made. The quantity of flour given is approximate 
ind must be finally determined according to the strength of 
jodividiial brands used. The temperature of the liquor al- 
low) for a normal heat of say 60 degrees in the flour. 
8q». (» lbs,) milk and water 35-40 lbs. 6our 

li ou. yeast. 8 ozs. fat 

3 015 sugar 8 ozs. salt 

Malt extract 

Half fresh milk and half water can be taken up at 100 
dcg. Fahr. The yeast, malt sugar and salt can be dissolved 
in tfiis, Ihe fat rubbed into the flour and the dough thorough- 
ly nu:]r The point emphasized regarding the folding and 
(trctcbiDg must not be lost sight of. Cover it down for an 
hour, and then thoroughly tear, fold and stretch it again. 
Ut it rest another half hour and repeat the process. In 
lao hoors from making it may be weighed off and handed 
up and when recovered must be moulded to the required 
shapes, then proved ready for baking. Various means are 
adopted for proving the larger loaves, but about the easiest 
a 10 prove them on slightly dusted boards, covered over 
with damp cloths, and when ready for baking, splash them 
with water if the skin is at all dry. Great care is required 
not to over prove this kind of bread or it will not spring 
properly in the oven. The steam will have to be ready at 
ihc same time as the proved loaves. A "head" of steam at 
i; to 20 lbs. pressure is needed for a small batch and must 
be turned on slightly till the oven is fairly full of steam, 
•hen the loaves must be "run in" as fast as possible still 
liteping the steam on lightly. As soon as the door is shut, 
inni on the full supply of steam for about five minutes and 



then shut off, when the bread may be treated as suggested 
above in the paragraph dealing with crispness. 

For smaller shapes as twists, crescents, rosettes, etc., a 
richer dough is generally used. About 5 lbs. of the above 
dough can be taken, four or five ounces of good flavored 
butter rubbed well into it and then the whole can be tightened 
to a proper consistency with flour and allowed to properly 
recover before being shaped, etc. The foundation dough 
given above is for a total time of about 2!^ hours to the oven, 
which will be found to give good results, but may not be a 
suitable time for some businesses. 

For example, it may sometimes be necessary to get rolls 
out at very short notice. Here is a formula that will pro- 
duce excellent rolls in an hour ready proved for the oven: 

5 lbs. milk and water, ijo deg. F. t^ oz. salt 

6 oz. yeast 2 oz. fat 

2 oz. sugar 9 lbs. flour 

The yeast should be in this case be dissolved in a very little 
water at about 100 deg., together with the sugar and malt 
if the latter is used. The fat will be rubbed into the flour, 
and a little of the mixture added to the remaining liquor at 
the higher temperature, to form a batter. The yeast liquor 
may then be mixed in and the dough made up with the rest 
of the Sour, This must lay about 20 minutes, be knocked 
up, rest another ten minutes and at about 35 minutes the 
dough can be scaled, moulded, set to prove and will easily 
be ready for baking in an hour from mixing the dough. 

A dough to he ready in about three and a half hours from 
mixing can be made with the foundation dough first given, 
but with 10 ounces yeast and 3 ounces sugar, the times being 
i}4 hours to the first knock up and ayi hours to the weighing 
off stage. 

A still longer dough — 5 hours to the oven — will be made 
in just the same way and proportions but with only 7 ounces 
of yeast and 2 ounces of sugar, while here the respective 
times will be i^ hours to knocking up, 3 hours to the second 
turning, and 4 hours to weighing off before moulding and 
proving. 



BohMDlaB Sonr Ry* Bread 

t*'iU yon please Imblish a recipe for Bohemian Sour Rye 
flfwrf-W. A. S., O. 

ANSWER 

la the first place, it is necessary to prepare a sour dough. 
Sooie old-tiiDe bakers are of the opinion that no yeast should 
fo into a tour-bread dough, but nowadays, when time means 
wweT, the baker is compelled to use some yeast, and this will do 
no harm either to the quality or to the flavor of the bread. 

To prepare a sour dough, use 2 quarts of warm water, and 2 
oa. yeast, and make a medium stiff dough with pure rye flour ; 6 
to 7 pounds of flour should be sufficient. This dough must have 
82 to 83 degrees F. A buttertub or any other clean wooden tub 
of tfiij size will do to make this dough in. When this dough is 
inad^ cover it with a thin layer of rye flour and shet aside in a 
>arm place. When the dough is well raised and starts to drop, 
which will be in about four to five hours, put on two more 
qoarti of warm water and about 4 ounces of caraway seed 
(which latter should be pounded in mortar or crushed with a 
hard rolling pin), then make another dough with pure rye flour 
of tbe same consistency as before. When this has raised again 
» the drop, put it in your trough, but leave about 3 to 4 pounds 
of it in the tub as a starter for a new sour dough. In the sour 
doQgh you have put in your trough put 2 gallons warm water 
wd 4 OM. yeast and make a sponge with rye flour not quite as 
itifi as the sour dough before. When this is raised again to 
the drop put on the same amount of water you used for the 
'poon, and figure 3^ ozs. of salt to each gallon of water you 
^Md aht^cther and make a stifi dough, but this time use all com- 
'WO "lieat flour ( a good clear or 'straight"). As soon as this 



dough shows life scale it up and mould. If you wish to use 
caraway seed in your bread put it all in the sponge, this will 
give a stronger flavor, than if only put in the dough. 

We said "when the spong is raised to the drop" — that means 
when it flattens on the top and starts to drop, but in case it 
should have dropped one or two inches before dough can be 
made, which can be seen on the edge of the trough, one or two 
quarts more water most be used for doughmaking, otherwise the 
dough will bake old. 

Care must be taken in baking this bread, as plenty of steam 
must be in the oven while the bread is being put in, but as soon 
as the steam starts to press onto the bread, the damper and oven 
door must be opened to let the steam escape, otherwise the bread 
will crack; therefore, if you have many loaves it is advisable 
to put them in the oven in several batches 1 close the damper ai 
soon as tbe steam has escaped, then work up new steam, and 
put the next batch in, repeating the previous operation. 

We also suggested leaving 3 to 4 pounds of sour dough in the 
tub as a starter for a new dough : to this you must add imme- 
diately 2 to 3 quarts warm water and 3 to 4 ozs. crushed cara- 
way seed, and make a new sour dough, which you can use 
afterwards for a sponge For a new batch of bread just as stated 
before. The main part in obtaining goods results is, to keep 
this sour dough always working; that means as soon as it is 
raised to the drop, put on some more water and work in some 
rye flour, so that it never gets old or real sour. In case this 
sour dough becomes weak or too old, it is advisable to start 
a new sour dough altogether as explained at the b^inning of 
this article, or sometimes the addition of a little yeast to a fresh 
sour will do the tridt. -^ ,^ .-r .^ 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Possibilities in Pineapple Cake and Pie 



/^F ALL fruits that are served or used in cakes and pies, the 
" pineapple comes on the table very nearly in perfect natural 
condition and flavor. It is for this reason that the pineapple 
olTers to the baker an unusual opportunity to extend his busi- 

Consider the extraordinary combination that gives the pine- 
apple its delightful flavor. Just enough of the sweet; just 
enough of the tart, to satisfy the most discriminating taste. And 
this flavor is brought to the surface best through the medium of 
cakes and pies. Just think of a pineapple pie about an inch 
in thickness, from which the juice is trying to escape, and 
which, when cut, seems to plead silently but eloquently even 
to the dispeptic to "come on and eat." Pineapple pie is, indeed, 
a tempting morsel. 

But it must be made right. The baker who attempts to cut 
the quality of his pineapple products, soon finds that branch of 
his business doesn't pay. The baker who does believe in quality, 
usually chooses canned Hawaiian pineapple. The Hawaiian pine- 
apple has almost monopolized the trade in this fruit because 
nowhere else does the smooth Cayenne pineapple grow to such 
perfection for a world supply as in the Hawaiian Island. In 
all other countries it has deep-set eyes, and a more or less 
woody fibre. 

Furthermore, bakers may be assured that the Hawaiian pine- 
apple-canning industry is conducted under the most stringent 
sanitary regulations, and all the work but sorting the fruit for 
grades is done by machinery. The Hawaiian pineapple is allowed 
to ripen on the plant, and in twenty minutes from the time it is 
cut it is in the can. On account of its ripening on the plant, 
the sugar is precipitated in the lower part, which becomes a 
rich creamy yellow. 

For the purpose of aiding the bakers of this country to push 
the sale of pineapple goodies, one of Bakers Remew's experts 
has worked out some formulas, which our friends may adapt 
to suit their own requirements. 

I — Pineapple Filling for Pies 

I qt. canned Hawaiian pineapple, 

J^ lb. sugar (or more if desired). 

Put in clean vessel and add one oz. of cornstarch dissolved in 
!4 pt. water. Bring lo boil and stir in cornstarch. 
II — Pineapple Meringue 

For mountain cakes, pineapple slices, etc. 

I qt. egg whites. 

Put in a machine beater. Add I'A lbs. granulated sugar. Now 
boil one qt. Hawaiian grated pineapple and 2^/3 lbs of clean 
granulated sugar to a thread or about 235°. While your meringue 
is stiff in machine pour in your sugar and Hawaiian grated pine- 
apple. This may also be done as follows: 

Drain off your Hawaiian pineapple and bring the juice and 
2j4 lbs. sugar and water enough to cover 247°. After your 
eggwhite is beaten stiff put the Hawaiian pineapple in the sugar 
and then pour it into your machine with the meringue, allowing 
it to run slowly. This may be used for meringue pies, etc. 

Ill — Hawaiian Pineapple Layer Cakes 
I lb. sugar 2 ozs. butter (melted) 

iH lbs. cake flour i 01. baking powder 

6 eggs '/i lb. Hawaiian grated pineapple 

Sift flour and sugar and baking powder in clean bowl. Add 
eggs, pineapple and melted butter. Mix all ingredients together. 
Fill in layen pans 4 ozs. to each' layer and bake in moderate 
oven. After cooled fill with drained Hawaiian grated pine- 
apple. Now make an icing as follows ; 

Drain oft some grated pineapple. Mix 4X sugar enough 
in pineapple to make an icing. Warm in hot water bath until 
luke warm and then ice your layer cakes. 

IV — Hawaiian Pineapple and Strawberry Pie 

I can crushed Hawaiian I qt. strawberries (picked 

pineapple and washed) 

I lb granulated sugar 



Put in clean vessel and bring to boil. Then put in cornstarch 
enough to thicken a little. Line out dishes with piecrust, fill in 
with above filling, cut some strips with checker knife and lay 
over your pie. Bake in hot oven. This filling may also be 
used for food tarts. 

V — Hawaiian Pineapple Souffle 

Take a dish (oblong), lay out with lady fingers on bottom, 
fill with Hawaiian pineapple ice cream. Put on ice to freeie 
Separate 7 eggs; beat whites very stifli; add 2 ozs. sugar, then 
gradually stir in yolks. Now spread this over your ice cream; 
dress up with ornamenting bag, fancy designs around edge ar.d 
put your platter in finely chopped ice and shove very quickly 
into a very hot oven to give it a little brown color. 
VI — Pineapple Short Cake 

Make biscuit dough out of following: 
lyi lbs. flour I pt milk 

i'/i ozs. baking powder 3 cts. butter 

2 ozs. sugar 

Pin out dough ; make layers thickness you desire. Bake in 
hot oven. Split in two, fill in Hawaiian crushed pineapple and 
decorate top with Hawaiian pineapple meringue. Now place 
some Hawaiian sliced pineapple on top. 

VII — Hawaiian Pineapple Marahmallow 
I qt. Hawaiian pineapple 4 lbs. sugar 

Boil to 250°. Dissolve yi lb. gelatine in ^ qt. water. Beat 
one quart eggwhites to stiff froth, adding i lb. sugar, in machine. 
When meringue is stiff, add the cooked sugar and Hawaiian 
pineapple and then the gelatine. Let machine run about $ more 
minute<i, 

VIII— Hawaiian Pineapple Tapioca 

Soak ij4 lbs. tapioca over night. Boil with t lb. sugar until 
soft, add juice of one lemon and juice of one orange and z 
cans of crushed Hawaiian pineapple. Fill in glasses and put in 
ice box to cool. 

IX — Pineapple Jam 
4 qts. Hawaiian pineapple 4 lbs. granulated sugar 

(canned and grated) 

Put into clean vessel, constantly stirring over fire for about 
10 to IS minutes. Add 4 ozs. powdered tapioca (dissolved). 
Remove from fire and use for coffee cake oi" for any kind of 
fancy tart, 

X — Hawaiian Pineapple Bnttercream 

Cream I lb. sweet butter with I'/i lbs. 4X sugar until very 
light ; add ^ lb. Hawaiian grated and drained pineapple. Now 
dress 'on pineapple layers (recipe No. HI). 



Coming Conventions 

May 1-4 — Southeastern Annual, at Macon, Ga. 

May 2-4 — Texas Annual, at Waco, Texas. 

May 9-11 — Illinois Annual, at Springfield, III. 

May 23-25 — Potomac States Annual, at Washington, D. C. 

June 6-8— Tri-Siate (Ohio, Indiana and Michigan) Annual, 
at Toledo, Ohio. 

June 12-14 — Pennsylvania Annual, at York, Pa. 

June 12-15 — Trans- Mississippi Convention (Iowa, Kansas, 
Missouri, and Nebraslca), at Omaha, Neb. 

June 13 — California Annual, at Oakland, Cal. 

June 20-22— Biscuit and Cracker Manufacturers' Annual, at Ho- 
tel Sherman, Chicago, III. 

June 26-27— New York State Annual, at the Bronx, New 
York City. 

August 7-1 1— National, at Salt Lake City, Utah. 

October lo-ii — Wisconsin Annual. 

October 10-12— New England Tri-StatK ^Annual, ati Portland, 
M". iig, zrc :,s CjOOgle 



Wholesale 



(ortlM 



•«p«clab)r 



•r oi laxg* afteln. 
Ham and pvob* 



flftetttriuff SlalMs. 



A Qvamnl Itertew of tlw Whotosato Trmd* and IHscvsslons of Practical Probloms 

The Art of Making Pie-Crust 

Written Especially for Bakers Review by Emit Braun, Ex&eri Consulting Baker 



HWING discussed plain crusts for pies, we had better take 
up the subject of plain fillings, before we have any- 
thiag to say about puff paste and other fancy crusts. 

Pie-fillmgs 

There are two distinct species of our favored American 
pastry; the covered pie (with top crust) and the open pie 
<wilb only bottom crust). The fillings of course are prepared 
ucoidingly. The cranberry pie, however, is in a class by it- 
mH. It is an imitation of the French pastry tart, the strips of 
pufipaste covering the tart being replaced by strips of plain 
cnuL 

For the covered friiit pies fresh fruit is to be preferred, as 
Ion; as procurable, during the seasons. In winter, when 
ihtrc are no fresh fruits, with the exception possibly of ap< 
plei, the best results are obtainable from the use of high- 
qiulitjF canned fruits and berries, because they possess a 
greater proportion of the true flavor, and also retain a good 
percentage of the original juice of the fruit. This, of course, 
is of great value in preparing the various fillings. 

How to prepare the evaporated or dryed fruits was ex- 
pliiDcd in article II, in the March number. 

Cmnned Fruits 
Of course the amount of juice varies in different fruits, 
trtn in different brands of the same kind of fruit; therefore 
Mine judgment must be used regarding the amount of sugar 
ud cornstarch or other thickener to be added. Some salt 
should be used in &ny pie tilling, as this brings out the 
flavor better. 

The pie-eating public of course expects plenty of filling in 
its pies, consequently the baker cannot afford to use the 
frail without the juice, and must prepare it in some way. 
Allow six to eight ounces of sugar to each quart of juice and 
1 pinch of salt. Bring this to a boil and add two to three 
onnces cornstarch dissolved in sufficient water to thicken it. 
Set away lo cool. The fruit itself is mixed with the neces- 
sary amount of sugar and when the pies are filled, the thick- 
tntd juice is poured over. 

Of course, for wholesale trade the cost of the pie filling 
must be figured still closer, especially when sugar is as high 
ai at the present time. As stated, the pie consumer expects 
1 lat pie, and the grocer or cheap lunch room proprietor 
«ry seldom considers the increased cost of raw materials the 
pie baker may be up against. They expect the same-sized pie 
lot the same money. In consequence the wholesale pie baker 
who caters to such trade is compelled to find some way to 
Ontet the increased cost of sugar or other raw material, the 
norgin o( profits at no time being in comparison with the 
"onty the grocer or restaurant man makes on the sale of 
'"•rj ^ he buys from the baker. In many cases the baker 



is even expected to exchange left-over pies. The only way 
oul for the pie baker is to use more filler, which means less - 
fruit, and in addition a substitution of some glucose for part 
of the sugar. 

Although such substitution is not to be encouraged, for 
some classes of trade where the motto is "Pies are Pies," it 
cannot be avoided. A pretty good filler to add to all kinds 
of canned pie fruits is the apple peel filler given in the 
March article. If you have no green apple peelings to make 
this stock from, the following will do in its place. Take a one 
gallon can of apples and one gallon water and boil the apples 
to a pulp. Then add two pounds sugar and three pounds 
glucose, pour in i^ pounds dissolved cornstarch or two 
pounds of tapioca or rice flour, and two ounces salt; stir un- 
til the mass thickens, then set away to cool. You can use as 
much of this filler as you wish to any kind of canned fruit, 
berries, rhubarb or raisens. Of course some of the fruit may 
require the addition of some extra sugar, before filling the 
pies. You may also improve the filler, by adding the juice 
of a few lemons after you take it from the fire. 

Fresh Rhubarb Pie 

Rhubarb usually opens the season of the fresh-fruit pies. 
Beg your pardon, rhubarb is not exactly a fruit, nor a berry; 
but to stop all embarrassing questioning, the culinary ency- 
clopediea simply calls rhubarb the "pie plant." Therefore 
rhubarb coming in the market plentiful from now on, we will 
start with the preparing of rhubarb filling. 

Unless you get some very young or hot-house-raised pie 
plant, it must be peeled. Although the skin of rhubarb is 
very thin, it is almost as tough as a hemp rope and must be 
stripped. The easiest way is to cut off the bottom of each 
stalk and tear off one string after another. Then cut the 
stalks into small pieces, according to their thickness. Some 
judgment should be used to cut the pieces to about uniform 
size, so there will be no chance of finding some half-cooked 
pieces in the pie, by the time the crust is baked. 

Rhubarb Pie No. t 

To each quart of rhubarb add i^ pound of sugar, ^ tea- 
spoonful cinnamon, 1-6 teaspoonful salt, and two or three 
ounces of soft cake flour. If the rhubarb is somewhat 
tough and old, it might require a few minutes cooking. Do 
not roll the bottom crust too thin, and sprinkle some more 
ffour over the bottom crust, before putting in the filling. 
Some prefer cracker or cake crumbs to flour, but I have found 
that a soft, starchy flour and the juice will form a smooth, 
soft jelly, during the baking. After filling the pies, sprinkle 
over with some more sugar according to the/ai4ness of tke 
™l"8- Digrzeo ovCOOQle 



70 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Rhubarb FUlinK No. a 

Peel and cut the rhubarb as described above the day before 
using it and mix with granulated or soft sugar (or a mixture 
of bolh) figuring one pound to i>j pounds to the pound of 
peeled rhubarb. Next morning strain off the juice and bring 
it to a boil, then stir into it dissolved cornstarch, using three 
to four ounces to the quart of juice. When it starts to thicken, 
take ofl the fire, and add the rhubarb. Let the filling cool 
ofl. Before puting on the top crust, sprinkle with more 
sugar, mixed with a dash of cinnamon. 

Gooseberries are treated the same as rlnibarb. 

Cherry Pie 

Cherries should always be stoned or pitted. They do not 

require so much sugar, in fact cherry pic should not be 

made as sweet as other pics. No extra flavoring is re- 

FrMh Berry Pies 

If fruit pies are to be transported, or if they are to be 
packed in lunch pails, I recommend the same method as 
given for rhubarb pie No. z; however, a little water may be 
added to moisten the sugar. These pies will cut like jelly. 

If you can get the price for your pies, a small piece of 
butter placed into each pie, before the top crust is put on, will 
improve its delicacy. 

HuckelberricB or Blueberries 
are always improved by mixing them with some finely chop- 
ped, apples. Even some filler made from apple juice (see 
article No. ii in March number) will give a little tartness to 
this kind of berry, 

Gre«n Apple Pie 

Just because apple pie is always the favorite, and in demand 
by far in excess of any other two or three kinds of pie at 
any season of the year, it should be given all the more care 
and attention. But the contrary is often the case. It goes 
without saying, that not every apple makes a good pie. Pie 
apples are not picked out on account of their appetizing, pol- 
ished skin, or tempting red cheeks. A good-flavo:ed, solid, hard, 
cooking apple makes the ideal pie. The mo^t popular kinds are 
the Baldwins. Spitienlwrgs and GreeninKS, 



May, [916 

If the time can possibly be spared, the apples should be sliced, 
instead of being chipped up like hash. Then they should be 
thoroughly mixed with part of the sugar required to sweeten 
tnem, a little water to moisten the sugar, and a sprinkling ol 
soft flour. The rest of the sugar is spread over the top, with 
the spices mixed in. But the flavoring must by all means be 
used sparingly, just sufficient to give the baked pie a suggestion 
of added flavor. 

Too much cinnamon or any other spice is worse, tlian if it were 
left out altogether. 

Another very common fault is too hot an oven, leaving the 
apples half raw, and the bottom underbaked 

Remember the beautiful quotation of Henry Ward Beecher: 

"Not that the appie is longer apple. It, too, has become trans- 
formed, and the final pie though born of apple, sugar, nutm^ 
and lemon, is none of these, but a compound ideal of them all, 
refined, purified and hy fire fixed in blissful terfection," 

DR1EI> APPLES FOB MINCE MEAT 

Subscriber from New Jersey asks ; "How much dried applet 
u ill I use for mince meat to take the place of ten pounds of 
fresh apples?" 

AnstLtr.—it >oii want to substitute dried apples for 10 pounds 
of fresh apples you want to use about 3 pounds of dried apples 
and 5 to 6 quarts of water, or, say, for each pound of dry 
apples allow V/i to 2 quarts of water. 

As slices are rather tough to cut up into small pieces 1 would 
advise you to throw them into boiling water and parbcul just 
enough to get them tender. 

Then pour the apple water off and add it to the mince meat 
and cut the slices fine. They are, however, usually more tart 
than green or fresh apples, therefore you would do better to 
mix them with brown sugar after they are parboiled and cut 
up. Allow one pound of sugar for one pound of dry apples. 

Let them stand as long as possible before adding to the other 
ingredients. To make them even better flavored, I would advise 
you to add the yellow rind of one or two lemons to the water 
you parboil the apples in. 

Adding a pinch of salt to the apples also brings out the flavor 



How to Coach Salesmen to Combine 
Collections Witli Sales 

How a Baking Company Co-ordinates the Efforts of the Credit and the Sales Department 

as Told in Printers' Ink 

By Elmer /„ Cline. Sales and Advertising Manager, Taggert Baking Company, Indianapolis 



ONE of our salesmen had on his territory an old account 
that had been outstanding more than a year. He was a 
good salesman, and the sight of this unpaid account on his 
monthly credit reports stuck out like a sore thumb. First, 
because for a year he had been unable to sell this concern 
anything, because of the unpaid bills. Second, to keep his 
record clean he felt that he must get it charged off the 
book in justice to himself — and about the only way out seem- 
ed to be to collect the money. 

This man did not let himself develop a headache over the 
account, however. While he was a member of the sales de- 
partment, he remembered that our firm has a crddit depart- 
ment that is there just as much to help him as anything 
else, and which is versed in the diplomatic handling of credits 
and collections. Accordingly he put bis head together with 
the credit manager as our salesmen are encouraged to do in 
search of suggestions and advice. Together they sized up the 
situation, and figured on ways of meeting it. The credit man 



found that the salesman had his Saturday afternoons free. 
Why not put in this spare time, he suggested, by visiting the 
dealer and laying the matter before him frankly? Take the 
whole afternoon, if necessary. Explain to the retailer just 
what this unpaid account means to his business standing. 
Make him a proposition that he pay something on account, 
say Ss a week, until it was wiped out. 

The salesman acted on this suggestion. Instead of over- 
whelming the dealer with a full statement of his entire in- 
debtedness at once, he suggested that the dealer pay off the 
account in weekly installments. The first Saturday after- 
noon he called, he returned with a five dollar bill, and, with 
one hiatus, the payments continued on a weekly basis un- 
til the slate was cleaned up. 

This story is told here to emphasize the results we are ob- 
taining in educating our salesmen to the fact that the whole 
organization stands back of them, and to encourage them to 
co-operate with the various departments in making their sales 



May, 1916 



efforts more efficienl. "Selling the salesmen" i: 
tjpression around our office, and by it we mean just what we 
say. We havf practiced for several years the policy of giving 
every new idea or plan to our salesmen in a finished and com- 
pltte form. We try to present it to them in a graphic, com- 
prehensive way, with every detail worked out as far as pos- 
sible. Wc feel that wc must make them understand it and 
believe in it, and enthuse over it, just as we will expect them 
to make their customers understand, believe and enthuse to 
ihe point of giving an order. This is what we mean by 
"Selling the Salesmen," and our continued effort is to keep 
ihem sold by constantly co-operating and working with them. 
To secure such co-operation from them, we do not want them 
simply to agree with us that an idea is good, but we want 
ihem lo fight for it as something of their own. 

BEAJUNU OF COLLECTIONS ON SALES 

In our selling plan there are these three links: 
! Advertising. 
;. Salesmen. 

3. Credits and Collections. 

la planning our sales promotion work, we do not divorce 
our advertising, selling and credits. We call the triple com- 
biaation under the single head of a sales campaign. This puts 
Ihe responsibility of its success immediately upon the should- 
ers of our salesmen. We show them that, to succeed, our 
siles campaign rests not only with the salesman's individual 
(fforts in securing orders, but also upon the advertising 
which we do to help him make the sale. And then we 
tiiiphasize the third and all-important feature in rounding 
OQI the complete cycle of the sale — that of getting the money, 
which is the real object of the first two-thirds of the sales 
plan. To make the plan a success as a whole, we impress on 
Ihem the necessity of their best co-operation in cementing 
these three factors into a telling sales campaign. 

To this end we aim to gain and retain the confidence of our 
salesmen by practicing what we preach. We carry out this 
idea of co-operation and enthusiasm in our inner office or- 
ganization. The men in the credit and sales departments pull 
together. Everyone is as keen after sales as he is after col- 
lections and our advertising and so around. Wc all have be- 
rore us constantly the one thought of selling our men the 
Taggart Idea." To imbue the men with this spirit requires 
a certain amount of educational work, and in presenting them 
wiih new ideas, we try to impress them with the reasons back 
ri the ideas. 

Kor instance, we have accomplished splendid results 
ihrough sales contests. These contests are planned with the 
idea of bringing the salesmen closer to the various depart- 
ments with which they are associated. They are carried out 
on a point basis, pertinent suggestions about our advertising, 
selling and credits and pointers on securing credit informa- 
tion and prompt collections counting as important point 

These contests are valuable in getting the salesmen to think 
about their work and anxious to get every ounce of co-opera- 
lion they can. 

By one of these contests last year we developed some sur- 
prisingly good collectors among our salesmen. A feature of 
this contest was the rule that too points would be added each 
week to the score of the man with the lowest percentage of 
outstanding accounts in proportion to sales. This put the 
men on their mettle, and eager to keep all their accounts paid 
up to dale, and anxious to secure every bit of co-operation 
itiey could get from the credit department. We grouped the 
men by pairs to tune up their sporting blood when they were 
running close together, and each was trying to hold the lead 
or lake it away from one another. 

CSEDIT MAN GOES OUT WITH SALESMAN 

In one of the meetings the credit manager announced that 
he woald be glad to go out with any salesman and assist him 
•n the firing line. A number of them took advantage of his 



BAKERS REVIEW 



offer, and it proved a more effective way of enlisting their 
co-operation than if he had accompanied them on his own 



This sort of co-operation proved very valuable, not only 
because' it made the men eager to keep all their accounts col- 
lected up to date, but during the contest we cleaned up a 
number of old dead ones that had been all but charged off the 

We are constantly carrying out this educational work in 
our regular sales meetings, in which discussions about credits 
and collections always play an important part. Not only do 
we have talks by the credit manager on various phases of 
the credit problem, but the salesmen themselves tell their 
own experiences in clearing up old accounts, and of what 
assistance the credit department has been to them. For ex- 
ample, in one of these meetings a salesman related the fol- 
lowing instance. 

"X & V, the best account I had in Hopeville, that is, the 
best account in point of volume of business they gave me, 
had always been a source of annoyance to the credit depart- 
ment and a bugbear to myself, because they would allow their 
account to run from sixty to ninety days past due. When- 
ever I was finally pressed to the point of presenting my state- 
ment, it was always of such size that it invariably caused X 
to rave. Never after making a collection could I get another 

"To keep my sales up, I always avoided collecting until 
told unmistakably by the credit department that the account 
must be paid and the regular comission of the order on pay 
day was never overlooked by the sales manager. As this 
was my best buyer in town I found myself dreading to call 
on them, for it might mean turning down the order and 
losing the account if I failed to collect, and if I did collect, 
I could expect no order. 

"At a joint session between the credit manager, sales mana- 
ger and myself, following one of these pay days with no or- 
der it was determined that I should go in with a stiff upper 
lip and accept no more business from this firm unless the ac- 
count was paid right up to date. 'Money First' was my 
slogan, and to my surprise, on my following trip when I 
presented X my statement in a way that I felt showed him 
that I expected the money, before saying a word about taking 
an order, it must have looked so small to him, as compared 
with what he was accustomed to paying me, that he brought 
out his wallet and paid me in cash, and turning to his stock 
gave me one of the largest orders that I have ever shipped to 

"That certainly taught me a lesson, that put bone in 
my spine, and I will tell you, boys, it was easier next time, 
and has never been hard since, and if you want more busi- 
ness out of your present customers, never let them get in on 
you or the house. X & Y are buying more of me to-day 
than they ever did before, and I know I am getting some of 
the business that was going to the other fellow." 

Experience talk such as this one always have an unusually 
stimulative effect on the men. 

Besides these regular staff meetings, in the general letters 
going out to salesmen we are continually coaching them in 
the salient features of credits and collections as a part of good 
salesmanship. Here, for instance, are sample paragraphs 
from such letters: 

"Collectors: Watch your collections closely. Do not miss 
getting the money whenever you can, and especially when it 

"The salesman who cannot collect the money is it bad at 
the salesman who can not get the orders. Let's keep our col- 
lections up close. 



"Credit Cards: We want to caution you about making out 
your credit cards. Do not get over-enthusiastic and boost . 
the stock of a man's store because he has given you an order. 



72 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Be very careful in determining the value of a man's stock sod 
his general conditions. Size up the situation and make out a 
notation when you are in his store. Do not rely upon your 
memory and leave these cards to be made out in the even- 
ing. Very often the reports that come in on the credit cards 
from the salesmen, and the references which we run down 
on these new accounts are so vastly different that we often 
feel that we are running a pretty stiff risk in making ship- 
ments; not so much because the man is not good, but be- 
cause there seems to be such a wide range of difference as 
to his stock, responsibility, etc. 

"It's better to miss a train than a collection." 

"The qualifications of good salesmanship consist not only 
in getting orders, but getting business: and business means 
selling goods and getting the money for them. We cannot 
impress too strongly the importance of watching your col- 
lections." 

We try at all times, as I have said already, to make the 
■alesmen a part of our organization. And to show the extent 
of the co-operation our efforts are succeeding in getting from 
our men in credit matters, let mc quote extracts from letters 
sent in by the salesmen on the road: 

"The account of X at Blanktown has just come to my at- 
tention. Suggest for 'safety's sake,' go for him strong. He 
is in very bad shape." 

"With to-day's collections I am sending check from X & Z 
of Blanktown. I am skeptical of it. If it is returned, bluff 
him strong and ask him for other bills he has not paid." 

"Please advise me as to the credit rating of the following 
.prospective customers, whom T expect to call upon Monday 



"Will you write the following customers, whose account! 
1 note from my ledger are past due? Mail these letters so 
they will arrive the day previous to my calling on them, and 
make it plain and emphatic that these accounts must be paid 
on my next visit. Vou also might suggest what the neglect 
of their accounts means to their credit standing, etc. I want 
to get the money when I see them again, and believe a letter 
of his kind preceding me will help some." 

We have linked up our salesmen and dealers through the 
medium of our house organ, "Sales Force." In this we take 
up directly with the dealers subjects that are of common in- 
terest not only to the dealer, but the salesmen; the advan- 
tages of cash business, of good credit standing, etc We are 
constantly expanding along the idea of greater knowledge 
and closer co-operation with the salesmen and the various 
departments that go to make up their work. And the more 
we expand, the more the business grows. We are a great 
deal like the old story of the Western farmers who said: "I 
buy land to raise corn, to feed pigs, to sell, to buy more 
land, to raise more corn, to feed more pigs, to " ge 

as far as you like; it is an unending circle of ever -increasing 
dimensions and each operation is essential to the other. 

Many a good salesman is spoiled and can kill a territory 
for collections and credit for the lack of co-operation from 
those to whom he is responsible; the sales manager and the 
credit manager. Sometimes it is through indilTerence or lack 
of nerve, but more often it is through ignorance, and the loo 
common impression that an order from z dead beat is ot 
some value to the house or credit to himself. Salesmen must 
not only be told, but they must be taught to realize that 
prompt collections mean more business; that goods not paid 
for are only half sold, and that the credit department b not 
a destructive, but a constructive factor in sales promotion. 



'Safety First" in Buying Flour 

By Fred Miller, Sales Manager, Enid (Okla.) Mill and Elevator Co.* 



IN THE first half of the season of the crop of 1915 three 
prominent flour mills went into the hands of receivers. 
These mills looked at the crop, and the visible supply, and de- 
cided that they would sell all the flour they could sell and trust 
to luck to B't the wheat at a price which would mean a profit, 
and they trusted to a false friend. Luck was against them and 
they failed. Bakers who bought flour became creditors for 
the' amount of the advance, and of course, they also lost. The 
mills were shut down and contracts were not fulfilled. 

In the first half of the 1914 crop season millers were caught, 
but for small amounts, and hastily buying what wheat was 
short, they covered sales, and delivered flour at contract price 
after the advance. As the season advanced, and wheat became 
high, bakers bought flour for future delivery just the same, and 
when the drop of $3.00 per barrel came late in the spring, some 
of them failed to order out the flour, were sued by the mills, 
and paid for their folly. 

The item I am driving at is this: The miller, if careful, can 
quote a price such that he can buy and carry the wheat to grind 
into Sour, and make his profit, whether the market goes up or 
down, for he can always get judgment against any baker who 
tries to repudiate his contract; but the baker is a chip on the 
ocean. He may win, and luckily, when there is no war, wheat 
is usually higher as the season advances, but at this time, ana 
for several years to come, until the world settles down again, 

*Paper read at the Oklahoma Master Bakers' Convention. 



he is playing against odds if he agrees lo take flour without 
having sold his bread. The miller buys and' sells the same day, 
and has a profit. The baker buys. If the price advances he 
wins; if not, he will lose; and if some bakers were to take now 
the flour they have hought, and failmg to borrow enough to 
carry it were forced to sell, they would be bankrupts. This item 
is written on March 11, 1916, with wheat at the bottom of a 
drop that means practically $1.50 per barrel on flour. 

GETTING CAUGHT ON THE UABRET 

When the decline of March ist came this year a jobber in 
North Carolina was found to have flour bought amounting to 
30,000 barrels, although his nominal sales were but 10,000 a year. 
A baker in Georgia was found to have flour bought under signed 
contracts from nine different mills amounting to his capacity 
for three and one.-balf years. A merchant in Geor^ had a car 
on track March 15th from Missouri and another from Nebraska. 
Our salesman talked with the salesman from Missouri and the 
jobber who sold the car from Nebraska and was advised in both 
cases that the merchant claimed the flour was not up to grade. 
He will have to pay for both cars, in all probability. 

A jobber in Georgia was advertising by circular letters all 
through February before the dr*^ in price, that he had flour 
bought under the market and could sell the highly advertised 
brands of three mills at 50c per barrel under mill prices. He 
could, and did, and the mill shut down and watched while he 
supplied their good customers at less money than they oouM 
take. But the drop caught the jobber. He's broke. Like tbt 



Mav, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



73 



yict, he could buy, but not sell, and his friend, Luck, played 
Un false. 

Wheat goes up and down according to rules that never work 
tKk( alike, and without the power to decide the selling price oi 
bread, the baker runs the maximum risk when he buys a quan- 
tiix af flour, which if he misses his guess, may tause the loss of 
all. On the other hand, he may buy a month's supply at a time 
with the knowledge that he can protect himself with the slow* 
etis of the change in price of bread, and each night can sleep 
with the assurance that he has made a gain for the day, and 
iht day's work is well done. Safety First. 

The test of good flour in America is ash. A baker in Massa- 
chusetts about the time the war broke out was figuring with 
us, and with a Kansas mill, and they got the order for 22,000 
bairels because their ash was .35!^ and ours was .37. In a 
\i\a talk with the chemist, I was told we were attempting to 
meet a 60 per cent, patent with a 70 per cent. Very few bakers 
use ihis short a patent. Very few are as particular of ash, 
bill this is one, and there are several in my acquaintance. When 
you comt to the people, the demand is always ash. The flour 
must be white, and fluffy. Ten years ago, an 80 per cent, patent 
wa) good enough. To-day it is not. Every up-to-date baker 
knows that the patent is the clean white flour, with a certain per- 
ceoL of gluten ; that the straight contains more gluten and more 
ash, and that the first clear contains still more gluten and more 
uh. He also knows that if he can get the clear from the same 
piteat that shows a nice analysis, he is sure of good results for a 
dpster, and we have one customer in the East who insists 
on our guarantee that bis purchase of a straight, split into a 
patent and clear, shall bring him the identical clear we take 
oat of his patent and that the patent equal the analysis guar- 
intet. 

BAKESS SHOUUI NOT SPECULATE 

The position of the American and of the foreign baker is, 
then, one based on different Government policy as to specula- 
dcB, and on diSerent requirements of the people; but that ought 
not to alter the sound financial principles of business. It mat- 
ters not whether a man is in business in Tulsa, or in Singapore, 
his basic principles ought to be the same. One of the first things 
asked a young man in making a bond to a bond company is, 
"Do you speculate in options?" One of the main reasons ^ven 
by Bradstreets for the failure of 93 per cent, of all the men 
who enter business is speculation, the only graver reason being 
creditt. There is no stigma on speculation. Everybody does 
it, more or less, and some countries even yet run lotteries, but 
when you come to a banker, or a bond company, or a rating 
agency, it is a different matter. Why? Because these people 
are those who deal in facts as they find them and are satisfied 
to add 3 percentage to cost for profit in regular trade channels 
—with the accent on the percentage in the case of the banker. 
With the idea, then, that the safe policy is the soundest for 
the baker, let me show you what is asked when a baker buys 
flour. He says to the miller, "I will buy from you so many 
barrels per month for two, six or twelve months as the case may 
be, at a price, you to ship on the loth of each month." In the 
majority of cases, a delay in shipment is asked. This may be 
because the baker is tempeted to order in other flour, or because 
he missed his guess on requirements, but it is true that it nearly 
always occurs. I get this from nearly seventeen years at a sales 
manager's desk. Those who buy when the market is very low 
appear to miss their guess on requirements less often than those 
who buy at the top. For some reason flour and bread business 
gets very dull when the flour is sold at a high price and the 
market drops, but, of course, the lighter demand is the cause of 
Ihe drop. Now the miller ha? stored the wheat, and borrowed 
"iut money, and figured his run on the steady demand of these 

[ coBtiacls. If the mill has made an effort 10 secure a large 

volurat of baker trade,, the delay to a large number of cars 

; will be serious. In the case of the recent decline of about a dol- 



lar a barrel, the stopping of all shipments by the "one car at a 
time" grocery store trade of Oklahoma shut down several of the 
mills who worked mainly on that class of trade. There is no 
demand for flour when the market breaks. New business is not 
done and salesmen are called in. Now suppose a baker is not 
financially strong, and the mill crowds shipment, or turns the 
matter to an attorney in case they are not di posed to wait. 
Look at the imnattiral and unnecessary condition. How much 
l>ellrr it would be, had a car at a time been bought, and then the 
crade of the flour would be alright. That's another peculiar 
thing about a declining market. For some reason the flour 
always goes bad, and hardly ever comes up to sample if the 
price has declined a couple of hundred dollars a car. 

To return to the present time : The decline last year was 
about $600.00 a car. The decline in February this year was 
$300.00 a car. The baker who bought spring requirements this 
year in January-, and there were many, is in bad shape for profit. 
Turn now to the banker. Study his methods. Study his divi- 
dends. Turn to the miller,^ Study the methods of those who 
are recognized by the milling trade as conservative millers. 
They buy the wheat and sell the flour to-day. The price is the 
wheat, plus the cost of manufacture, plus the freight and the 
profit. That's it— take it or let alone. If you take it, the miller 
will buy the wheat and his profit will be secure. You will be the 
gambler and it is necessary for the price to advance if you win. 

WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN 

I am not an advocate of preparedness nor of Bryanism, and 
am not of a mind to depart in any way from the subject, and I 
do not want you to think that what follows is in favor or 
against either, but I want to show you the position this country 
could get in, and that mighty easily. The amount of wheat 
raised in 1913 was 763^80,000 bushels. Of this, the amount 
exported was 145,590,349 bushels. The amount of wheat raised 
in 1914 was 891,017,000 bushels, and the amount of this ex- 
ported was 332465,000 bushels. The amount of wheat raised 
in 1915 was 1,011,505,000 bushels, and the amount exported will 
probably be 367,000,000 bushels. The percentage of home con- 
sumption of the 1913 crop was 81 per cent., and of the 1914 
crop 63 per cent., and of the 1915 crop 63 per cent, (estimated). 
Now let us suppose that the same nature of differences should 
spring up with Britain that has with Germany, and the chip 
should be knocked off, and the nation be at war, and suppose 
that Japan on the West should join in. This is no idle dream ; 
it is quite a possibility and much stranger things have happened 
in history. You all remember that in the last three months prac- 
tically all the merchant marine of the Pacific has been turned 
over to Japanese owned lines, and of the Atlantic, the majority 
have been owned by the [Norway, Mexico, Gulf Line,] the Hol- 
land-American Line, and the British Lines, Now if the Lines 
of Japan and Britain are closed to us, the poor little Holland is 
bottled up behind Britain, and her ship owners are commanded 
what to do, what would be the price of wheat to the Oklahoma 
farmer? In my preliminary talk I have said that there was 
reported in Uarch enough wheat to feed the world a year if 
we do not raise any this year, and it ts a fact that there is 
enough wheat in the Southwest to feed us all and a big crop 
growing. Suppose that this condition I have stated should arise, 
and the baker had a year's flour bought. The world is at war 
and before the present crop is harvested the Western Hemisphere 
may be as deep in the mud as the Eastern is in the mire. Is 
this a time to sign up for the cost of material for even as long 
as three months ? 

St;CCESTS HEDGING ON PURCHASES 

Now here is my solution of the bakery business done on 
speculative principles, and I recogniie that in nearly each fall 
there is a time when flour can be bought for less than in the 
spring. That is why I am stating it. Let the baker do just 
what the miller does— buy the wheat. Why? Because he will 
get all the benefits, and practically none of the hazards of buy- 
ing the flour. Yon can't sell flour when t 
Digi:zec oy ^ 



L CIIC lLcl2flLU3 Ul UUy- 



74 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



You can't give it away at anywhere near a price. You can't get 
out of your contract — the miller will make you take it if you 
try — and you can't keep your competitor from putting in more 
ounces or lowering the price of bread ; but you can sell wheat. 
You can sell it in any quantity and in the time it takes to 
telegraph. The instant you say so, it is sold and you are out 
of the mistake that you made in judgment. Now every baker 
has a miller friend who will boy for him this wheat. The price 
in all the big southwest is based on Chicago December in the 
fall and Chicago May in the spring, and to buy the option wheat 
is the same as to buy the flour. The amount of money required 
is not great. $50,00 will margin the amount of wheat required 
for a car of flour, and protect it against a decline of five cents 
a bushel, and if you are satisfied that the price is as low as 
it can get, you ought not to miss it over five cents a bushel. 
A deposit of %200<X3 will buy the wheat covering the flour for 
most average shops for the fall, and then you are independent. 
You need not ask the miller to delay the shipment, or complain 
of the quality, for you will have yourself to thank and to blame, 
either way it goes. Fifty dollars is the loss on a car of flour 
at a decline of five cents a bushel on wheat, and fifty dollars 



buy the same amount of wheat, but there is no actual k>si 
is the amount a commission broker will charge as deposit to 
unless the market declines and if it advances you win, so it is 
even chances, with the edge on the side of no arguments, r* 
misunderstandings, no under-grade flour, and the privilege oE 
buying the car when you want it and where you please. You 
are not under obligations to use a flour in December that you 
liked in July, or to buy from a miller in June who y«u feel in 
your heart stung you in March, and as fast as you dispose ot 
the flour and buy a new car, you sell oft the wheat. Now doesn't 
that look and sound reasonable? There probably isn't a baker 
here who has not, some time or other, used flour that cost him 
more than the prevailing market price, and the baker who -an 
get out of his system this desire to gamble is first to be ad- 
mired, while the second is he who is wise enough to do what 
the miller does — buy the wheat, knowing it is a cash asset and 
salable the instant sale is desired. The third is last — always 
was, and always will be last, that is to say the baker who boys 
a lot of flour, signs a contract, and then trusts to Jupiter, 
Mars or some other false god to raise cain enough to advance 
the price — Safety First. 



Fool Proof Device to Control Mixers 



THE following communication, from Bryan D. Pinkney, 
consulting engineer of Newport, Ky., relates to a device 
the need for which has been felt for a long time in the bak- 
ing industry, and which it is hoped will make safer instru- 
ments for the bakers who insist on "taking chances." 
To the editor of Bakers Review: 

Sir; — Mr. Kremer's article on the "Safety Uovement in 
Bakeries," in the March issue of Bakers Review, is the most 
humanistic, and at the same time ablest, article on dough- 
mixer precaution I have ever read. 

The "appeal to reason" is fittingly illustrated by Figs, t 



mwuM .w. «.<» 



to; for, for the price of some 
>r even the life, of a bum&n 



and 2 in the article referred 
safety device, the maiming, 
being is sacrificed. 

I realized the importance of some "fool-proof device in 
connection with dough-mixing machinery several years ago, 
and have always recommended the automatic breaking of a 
switch the instant the mixer started to tilt or dump. This, of 
course, is not feasible with belt-driven machinery, and this in 




my opinion is one more reason added to the list for the 
abandonment of belt drives, that is as prime movers, in the 
bake shop. 

Fastening or connecting the automatic' control to the cover 
has ever appeared to the writer a crude makeshift, for what 
connection is there between the cover and an automatic shut- 
off device? Mr. Kremer, however, ably remarks that "some 
bakers seem to think that they must poke their hands in the 
dough, feel of it to find out whether the mixture is on its job 
of mixing." No case has reached the writer wherein « baker 
was injured while "feeling" the dough while the mixing bowl 
was in an upright position. The cases have all dealt with the 
dumping, and the cleaning of the mixer blade. 

Two illustrations were shown depicting safety devices for 
dough mixers, each making the cover the sole agent of con- 
trol. Permit me to draw your attention to an automatic 
safety stop that was designed by The Triumph Ufg. Ca 
several months ago. In this arrangement the controlling 
factor for breaking the electric connection is the dumping 
of the mixer, for the instant the mixer leaves the vertical 
position the electric current "goes on a strike" (to MSe Kr. 
Kremer's remark). 

I will make reference to the enclosed picture. "A" is the 
push button control-station, which is automatic only as long 
as the automatic cut-off switch "B" is closed, and this is 
normally closed when the mixer is in an upright position. 
The instant the mixer starts to tilt the automatic cut-off 
switch "B" is opened and the control- station "A" becomes a 
manually-operated starter, and the mixer will run only as 
as you press the start button, stopping the instant your 
finger-pressure is released. The whole apparatus is control- 
led primarilly with a self-starter "C," and the absence of 
loose wires and lever arrangements make it an ideal, and 
Strictly safe, safety device. The cover is added for cleamli- 

I would like to see the day when our legislators also con- 
sider the human factor, and put the baker's liberty and life 
above the dollar value by compelling manufacturers to equip 
their machinery with every safety device known to human 
skill. 

Respectfully yours, 

Bryan D. Pinkney, 
Consulting Engineer. 



Newport, Ky. 



In The Worksho pSSvS^ 

iMipas, Fonmlas and Practical Dliciusloiu of avary day proUanu in tha wwriccoom 



The Safety Movement in Bakeries 

Ninth of a Series of Practical Articles, Written Jor Bakers Review, by C. J. Kremer 



FIRE PROTECTION 
ClltE, no doubt, is one of the most prolific producers of in- 
' juries and deaths, and perhaps the most destructive agency 
(fie safety movement has to deal with. We can easily im- 
agine the terror with which fire may have been regarded by 
primitive men in the dark ages of a remote past, and how it 
came to be regarded as a friend if it was properly watched 
and taken care of. Indeed human culture, the civilization of 
mankiod, may be said to have begun with fire. It was one 
of the chief duties of women to bear burning brands always 
with them and to protect and foster the family hre; thus she 
bad an endless task imposed upon her. When families began 
to live together in groups the idea of having a perpetual com- 
mon fire was conceived and carried out. This fire was main- 
tained in a public place and it was made the duty of one per- 
son to guard iL The guardians of the tribal fire may be as- 
sumed to have been the first government officials that were 
inpported by the tribe or community. In Rome the public 
fire was kept in the temple of Vesta, the godess of the hearth 
and the home. A new fire was kindled every year, and it was 
; watdied over day and night by the vestal virgins; and to let 
it die out of itself was considered a national calamity. 

It is as necessary now as it ever was to watch fire constantly, ' 
not for fear of its dying out, but on account of its great de- 
Mnittive force. 
The damage done by fire annually runs in to enormous 
; nooBts. In Wisconsin alone it amounts to over %%fi(X>fXXi.OQ. 
Toe insurance premiums paid are another burden voluntarily as- , 
nmed. Nearly every communis has its organization of fire , 
fighters; the clang of fire engines is sure to be heard on our 
streets from time to time. 

Bakers pay their full share of all expense connected with 
tre tmard. Their insurance rate is rather high ; to increase ' 
their safety regarding fire hazards means to decrease their over- 
bead expense. 
r A bulletin issued by the Industrial Commission of Wisconsin, 

,; from which some of the following items are taken up, says : 
'Fire protection means first carefulness and cleanliness," and 
J, again, "Most fires are due to lack of care plus lack of clean- 
liness." We may expect a basement in which excelsior, waste 
. I paper, old rags, baskets, boxes, and junk are allowed to ac- 
■ immnlate, to be burnt out sooner or later. 
^ The Triai^le Waist Company fire. New York, in which 145 

, lives were lost, started from a cigarette thrown on to scrap 
material. 
It often does not need even a match to start a fire. If rags 
''I ■ or waste with greasy oils are left about, oxidation takes place 
^' and beat is generated. It takes but little heat to ignite certain 
^ gases; and when the heat in the pile of waste reaches a certain 
** temperature, ignition takes place and we have spontaneous com- 
bnstioa. Uany serious fires iiave had their origin in this way. 

In notes such as these, only the high spots regarding fire can 

be mentinied. Most large cities have a regular inspection sys- 

* . tem and 4ere are laws governing fire escapes, fire walls, doors. 



etc., which should be strictly observed. Every boiler, furnace and 
oven should be placed on a fire-proof floor, projecting at least 
two feet on all sides. If any such Boor rests on or is in contact 
with any combustible material then the fire proof floor should be 
at least three inches thick and should be hollow. The air spaces 
-should be open at both ends so as to permit a free circulation 
of air therein. When this is done the air travels through the 
fire proof slab and keeps its temperature down. Hollow tile 
or pipe open at both ends can be used. When solid material such 
as brick walls, concrete, etc., is exposed to intense heat, the heat 
in the course of time strikes through the solid material to the 
wood bei**. The writer bad an experience along this line. A 
baker he was working for built an oven on the first floor. It 
was the ordinary inside-fired brick oven, but as the building 
was not built to carry extra loads, planks were used to support 
the hearth. On top of the planks was nearly two feet of brick 
and sand, the hearth tile being laid on the sand.. Things went 
along very nicely for several months. Finely' there was an 
odor of charring wood about the premises which we could not 
locate. One night I noticed that some tUc had sunken near 
the mouth of oven. I called the boss's attention to the matter. 
Me was sleeping on the second floor, but he would not get up 
and said: "If you can't do anything , about it, I can't either." 
We put our sugar buns on pans and before making bread dough 
my helper stepped outside for a moment, but came bad£ and 
reported "the cellar below is smoking very mu«h." In another 
moment flames burst forth. I went up stairs again: "Boss, you 
will have to get up now, the house is afire." 'Did he get up 
then? He did. The kitchen girl' was quite peevish when' I 
woke her but all got out safely. 

What had happened was this: The planks had become over- 
heated, had smouldered for several days and finally burnt 
through. Then the floor below started to burn and the fire 
reached the cellar. Here there was plenty of air, and things 
went humming. We had a good fire department, however, which 
promptly responded to my alarm. When the smoke cleared away 
all we needed was a new oven, a new floor, new sidewalls and 
other minor things. Of course, if a stove or furnace stands on 
legs (which should be at least six inches high) air spaces are 
not required, but all such fixtures should he placed on stove 
boards made of sheet metal or asbestos. There is always danger 
when a stove, furnace, oven or boiler is placed near a combustible 
wall or partition. It is well to remember that if a wooden parti- 
tion gets so warm so as to feel uncomfortably hot to the hand, it 
ought to be protected. A metal shield, with an air space of, say, 
four inches behind it, offers a good protection ; or quarter 
inch asbestos board covered with galvanized iron may be used. 
Some bakers try to use asbestos boards without the sheet metal, 
but this is not satisfactory, as the asbestos is easily damaged 
and when torn or punctured is inefficient. 



These have caused many fires and should be taken care of. 
Every smoke pipe passing through a non~fireproof partition, fioor f] 



BAKERS REVIEW 



or ceiling should be encased with incombustible material at least 
four inches thick or with a double safety thimble with at least 
one inch of air space between the rings, and the outer ring 
should be covered with asbestos. The double ring is of no value, 
however, unless it is kept free from dirl. To insure safety no 
smoke pipe should be placed nearer to any wall or partition o( 
combustible material than the diameter of the pipe, nor nearer 
to any wood ceiling than one and one half times its diameter 
unless combustible material is protected by ^ inch asbestos 
board, covered with galvanized iron. No wood joist should be 
left in contact with a chimney. 

STEAM PIPES 
Steam pipes, even under low pressure, are a real fire hazard. 
They are apt to cause the formation of charcoal when in contact 
with wood and eventually cause a fire. The same holds good 
for hot air pipes in bakeries, where hot-air furnaces are used 
for heating purposes. 

UGHTS 

Gas and oil lights should be kept at least 6 inches from any 
combustible door, partition or wall and at least 2 feet from any 
wood ceiling unless protected by a hood. Many cities require 
now that swinging brackets be provided with a guard or stop so 
that lights cannot get nearer than 6 inches to combustible ma- ' 
lerials. 

SEUI-FIKEPKOOF PARTITIONS 

Some bakers may be interested to learn how to construct fire- 
proof partitions and ceilings for fried-cake rooms, ceilings over 
fire places of ovens, or other places where there is danger of 
fire. The following specifications are given for semi-fireproof 
partitions, etc., by the Industrial Commission of Wisconsin. 

Semi-Fireproof Partition. A semi-fireproof partition shall be 
constructed of not less than 1^x3^ inch studding, spaced not 
more than 16 inches center to center, with the 3^ inch dimen- 
sion at right angles with the plane of the wall, and having the 
following protection on both sides of the partition : 

(i> metal lath and at least fj inch of Portland cement 
or gypsum plaster ; or 

(2) good quality plaster board at least % inch thick, 
covered with sheet metal; or 

(3) K inch asbestos board, covered with at least }4 inch 
Portland cement or gypsum plaster, or with sheet metal ; 
or two layers of ^ inch asbestos board, breaking joints; 
or 

C4) the space between studding may be filled with i^ 

proved incombustible material, the partition being plastered 

with Portland cement or gypsum plaster on metal lath; or 

Semi-Fireproof Ceiling. A semi-fireproof ceiling shall be con- 

ttmcted of not less than i>i inch joists, spaced not more than 

16 inchu center to center, protected on the under side the same 

as specified for a semi-fireproof partition. 

FKOFES EXITS 

Perhaps no baker allows his insurance policies to lapse. If 
his old policy expires at noon the 15th day of May, 1916, he sees 
to it that a new policy goes into effect at noon of the same day 
so that he is not without protection against fire for one minute. 
Neither should he permit the entrances to fire escapes (if he has 
any to be obstructed, nor the exits the help must use in case ol 
fire to become clogged or barricaded. In all places where peo- 
ple are employed more than one exit should be provided and 
kept free. It is little short of a crime to lock employes in a room 
and in many states it is prohibited by law. I have seen cellar 
bakeries that are man traps: often only one narrow and sleep 
inside stairway was the sole means of escape ; the windows 
could not be opened; besides they were barred by a heavy 
screen and the area space (if there was one) was covered by 
an iron grating. What chance has a workman if a fire should 
break out which would block the stairway? The probability 
is that he would perish like a rat in its hole. 

The possibility of a fire should be discussed by every pro- 
prietor of a bakery with his help. Not only are available exits 
to be impressed upon the workmen, but in a way they are to 
be told what to do in a case of fire. Much damage is done 
and many people are injured because they lose their heads. It 
may seem to be a rather poor joke to say: "In case of fire 
keep cool above all things," but it is most important that all 



May, 1916 



who have to do with a fire do not get excited but act promptly 
and with good judgment. Thoughtful men also provide handy 
means by which an incipient fire may be extinguished before it 
gains much headway and so considerable damage may be avoided. 
Chief among those are sprinkler systems. Insurance companies 
hold well designed automatic sprinkler systems in high regard 
and make material reductions in premiums whenever they are 
installed. These reductions in a short time often more th^m 
pay for the cost of the installation of an efHcient, aihple sprink- 
ler system. Standpipes with hose connections are also often the 
means of preventing serious damage. Unlined hose is very sat- 
isfactory in buildings where it is used in rare emergencies as 
it is cheaper and does not deteriorate as rapidly; but it is not 
suitable for continuous or frequent use. Chemical fire ex- 
tinguishers ought to be in every bakery; they often prevent 
serious blazes. It is important to have them recharged from 
time to time so as to be sure of their efliciency in case of need. 
As a rule, local fire chiefs and fire underwriters are able and 
willing to give valuable pointers in this regard. 

A fire can often be smothered with damp sand and wet saw- 
dust. Fried cake rooms in many good bakeries hvae a liberal 
supply of these materials available and handy for emergency 
use. Fire pails which must be kept filled ani^ not used for 
any other purpose are very desirable. Whatever means are 
provided for extingushing a fire should always be in plain sight 

Over and over again in these articles cleanliness and care- 
fulness have been mentioned as first essentials to safety, without 
these safety devices be they ever so costly and elaborate avail 
but little. A striking bulletin has been published by a casualty 
company. It is reproduced and the writer sincerely hopes that 
it will be carefully read and never be forgotten. 



Who Ami? 

I am more powerful than the combined armies oi 
the world. 

I have destroyed more men than all the wars In 
the world. 

I am more deadly than bullets and I have wrecked 
more homes than the mightiest of siege guns. 

I steal, in the United States alone, over $300,000^)00 

I spare no one, and I find my victims among the 
rich and poor alike; the young and old; the strong 
and the weak ; widows and orphans know me. 

I loom up to such proportions that I cast my shadow 
over every field of labor, from the turning of the 
grindstone to the moving of every railroad train. 

I massacre thousands upon thousands of wage earn- 
ers in a year, 

1 lurk in unseen places and do most of my work 
silently. Yon are warned against me, but you heed 

I am relentless. I am everywhere ; in the home, on 
the streets, in the factory, at railroad crossings, and 
on the sea. 

I bring sickness, degradation and yet few seek to 

I destroy, crush or maim; I give nothing, but take all. 
1 am your worst enemy. 

I AM CARELESSNESS! 



StOB* Dating His Calws 

An innovation which should interest manufacturers of pack- 
ages for box cakes has been put in effect by the F, O. Stone 
Baking Company, of Atlanta, Ga. Provision has been made on 
the bottom of the wrappers for placing a date, which will mailc 
the limit of time to which the contents are guaranteed good. 



May, 1916 



J AKERS REVIEW 



Bakers' Machinery and its Benefits 

By W. F. Fletcher, of the Thomson Machine Company* 



THE manufacturers of bakery machinery have played a very 
*■ important part in bringing the baking business up to its 
pr«sent stale of efficiency, for without machinery, it 19 diffi- 
cult to see how present-day baking could have attained such 
successes. 

Machinery has to a very great extent eliminated the old 
fashioned set-in-his-way9 baker, whose chief endeavor was to 
nuke an impression that bread baking was a secret process, 
and that he alone was master of the situation by knowing this 
process, and whenever any ideas or changes were suggested 
10 him, it was his nature to assume an antagonistic altitude 
towards anyone offering same, believing thai his theories 
were the only ones lo go by, and any deviation from this 
was entirely wrong. 

This kind of a baker was boss before machinery came into 
use, and the proprietor bad lillle to say, but when machinery 
came into use, there developed different conditions, which 
opened up a field for the younger and more intelligent and 
progressive man, who was willing to take advantage of oppor- 
tunities, looking towards system and improved methods over 
the old superstitious ideas, and in this manner there has de- 
veloped many processes by which bread is made that are im- 
provements over the old, in quality, uniformity, and at a less 
cost of production than before. 

Uanufacturera of machinery have been the leading causes 
in bringing this about, for whenever machinery entered the 
bakery which was dominated by the old fashioned kind of 
baker, one or the other had to vacate, and at the present 
time, machinery is holding down the job. 

Uachinery has so far justified the claims of the manufac- 
turers as to ihe reduction in cost of labor, that the bakers' 
union in the city of Chicago grants a working time of eight 
hours to the employee where machinery is in use, and nine 
hours' time to the employer operating without machinery. 

One of the most retarding influences in the baking business 
lo-day is the "boss baker," who feels that he must be gov- 
erned by the wishes of his foreman, or employees, when it 
conies to an issue relating to system in his plant, which is 
one of the hardest problems that the machine man has to 
confront 

The "boss baker" who is too timid to make an effort to 
manage his own business, fearing that his bakers will get mad 
and quit him, should be brought around to the proper way of 
thinking, for the time may not be far off when he will find 
his position as that of "boss," reversed to that of employee. 

FEW BAKEUES WITHOUT MACHINES OPEXATE AT A FBOFIT 

The bakeries now being operated without machines at a 
profit arc very few, and could increase their profits if ma- 
chines were being used. 

The largest bakeries could not operate at a profit at the 
present time and under present conditions without machinery. 
Machinery enables the master baker to inaugurate system 
in his pbnt, places him in an independent position as to in- 
competent and unsatisfactory help, and no bakery operating 
(Kclnsively by hand can possibly be classed as "sanitary," 

The mixing of doughs by hand is unsanitary, as compared 
when mixed by a machine. The moulding up of loaves by 
hand i) unsanitary, as compared when moulded by machine. 

The mixing, scaling, and moulding of the doughs in a 
l»al«ry where the temperature is high, and employees per- 
ipirt cannot be sanitary under the hand system. 

When machinery is installed waste is eliminated, and sys- 
'«<■ is established, which all goes to improve quality. 
^Mle in the bakery not only means unsanitary conditions, 

'P»pw read at Ihe Oklahoma Master Bakers' Convention 



but is a direct detriment to the quality of goods, as an exces- 
sive amount of material used above what formula calls for 
is injurious to quality of goods. 

The mixing of doughs should be accomplished by first 
knowing absorption of flour, then by adding the required 
amount of water to every one hundred pounds of flour, as 
per absorption ratio with salt, mall, yeast, and such other in- 
gredients as used and in this manner arrive at a uniform 
result. 

When the baker places so much water in the mixer or 
trough and adds such flour as he believes proper, to make 
dough, he has no accurate system as more or less flour may 
be used than intended according to his yeast, malt, salt, etc, 
with no perceptible difference in texture of dough as to 
stiffness. 

The division or weighing off of loaves is of i^nportance, 
as loaves unevenly scaled cannot bake out uniform and will 
not prove uniformly in accordance with the size, mould, or 
pan used. 

The hand-moulded loaf is made by folding from front, 
then from back, then each end is folded lo center, the back 
part then brought forWard, and seam closed, then rolled out 
to length and smoothness. 

A loaf moulded in this manner has the gas cells wadded, 
is solid in places, and loose in others, and what old gases are 
left in the loaf must remain there during the proofing per- 
iod before going to oven, which afTect quality. 

The machine -moulded loaf passes through a set of rolls, 
which elongates the gas cells equally distributing same, and 
conditioning the piece of dough first, then rolls it into a 
spiral coil before it enters drum of machine, and passes be- 
tween drum and cconpression plate which finishes the loaf by 
closing seam. This insures uniform texture from center to 
surface, as gases are uniformly distributed throughout the 
loaf, giving uniform fermentation during the proofing period. 

The baker knows it is best after punching or the working 
down of a dough, to pull same over from side of trough, 
as this conditions the dough, secures a better and quicker 
expansion the next time up than if he juit simply punches the 
dough down and did not pull it over from side. 

This feature ■■ one of Ihe most important when moulding 
up a loaf of bread, as the dough when ready to mould into 
loaves has arrived at the proper age and when being moulded 
into loaves greater care should be given this operation than 
the punching down of doughs beforehand, by having such 
gases as remain in the loaf equally distributed, insuring ■ 
more uniform quality of grade, color and flavor. 

The baker should be advised that the first requirements 
looking towards the production of bread should be a good 
oven, then a mixer, and then a loaf-moulding machine, and if 
his business is large enough to justify the investment, he 
should then add a divider, rounder, and some sort of a proof- 
er that will enable him to reduce his labor cost. 

What Machinery WiU Do 

For the ordinary baker making from 500 to 2,000 loaves of 
bread a day, if equipped with a good bread oven, dough 
mixer and loaf moulder, he can operate with one good head 
man, or foreman, and use other help than journey-man bak- 
ers, and in this manner reduce his cost of labor, get away 
from having to employ the regulation type of journey-man 
baker, be able to lake care of any extra business which 
comes up at times, without putting on extra help, should an 
employee not show up, as does happen occasionally; he is 
not put lo the former inconveniences that he had prior to in- 
stalling a moulding machine. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



The Pie That Gets 

The Extra Nickel 

is made with 

9i ^ Crushed 
or Grated 

Hawaiian Pineapple 

THE progressive baker will find 
in Libby's Crushed or Grated 
Havyaiian Pineapple just the de- 
licious pie material necessary to gain 




Ubby, M^Nein & Ubby - Chicago 

H'rite for Mince Meat tjaotationM today. 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Answers to Inquiries on Many 
Problems of the Bakers 



This department is open to any and all of our readers who wish to secure information on any phase of the baking 

business. In requesting answers to inquiries, please give full name and address, not for 

publication, but as evidence of good faith 



Cnut of Bread Getting Hard 

/ am having trouble with the crust of my bread getting 
kard. As soon as it comes from the oven it gels hard and will 
tot soften up. In a day's time ifs so kard that you can not 
put a dent in it.. When it is cut it crumbles and will not get 
Ike right color. The dough is mode at 80 degrees after thorough 
mating ami baked at 450 digrees; straight dough. — J. G. Y., Pa. 
ANSWER 

If you want us to give you advice as to how to overcome 
your trouble, you must give us full particulars about your meth- 
ods; after the few points you give us, it is still impossible to 
get at Ike cause of your trouble. 

Getting ai Large 1 

/* it possible to gel as large a loaf using machinery, thai 
is, a divider, rounder, automatic froofer, and moulder, as can 
U obtained xvitk ail hand work? 

Tke folloteiMg is a three-barrel mix, which I am now using: 
i bbls. Montana hard wheal 13^ lbs. Sugar 
flour 13^ lbs. lard 

44 Vlt- water 9 lbs. powdered skim n,ilk 

jH ttf. Yeast 6 lbs. Diamalt 

9 At. Salt 

ICAta haudHttg this dough I mix it the usual way, mixing 
atont 15 minutes after all ingredients are itt. The temperature 
when put in trough is 80 degrees. I allow it to come up the 
first time until it will recede to the touch, then allow it to raise 
one lumr for the second punch, then give it three half-hour 
fnthes and take the dough to the divider ten minutes after 
tlte last punch. 

Using this same mix and handling the dough by hand we 
get a much larger loaf; in fact, I think there is too great a dif- 
ferenct. Hown'er, the grain of the machine loaf is much finer 
h%t the loaf has a tendency to be too firm and hard and the 
iKxl day is quite firm. 

Is there any way we can improve on our method or of ad- 
ding ingredients to gel a larger loaf with the machinesf — 
G. V. H,, Wash. 

ANSWER 

Allow your dough at least ^ of an hour after the second 
punch, and take it to the divider instead of giving it three 
half-hour punches. The machines will work your dough firmer 
<lua if everything were done by hand, and for this reason the 
dough must be taken younger. 

In case this does not help, use I lb. more yeast and i lb. more 
alt to your three'bbl. mix, and take the dough as young as 
mtntioned above. 

Please let us know how you make out, we are always anxious 
to looK how our suggestions work. 

Keeping Tute in Cookfes for Six Months 

Piiait ItU me how to keep the taste in cookies for about 
"* MMfht. Does salt in the cookies preserve Ihem and cause 
Ifcmio remain taslyf—\. M. M„ California. 



moistness. In short, they will turn stale as you have to expose 
them to the air. They would he different, however, if you 
pack them in containers, such as tin cans. These containers, 
if hermetically sealed, will preserve the moistness and also 
the flavor of cookies for a long time. Whether or no it 
would pay you to put up common cookies in this way is another 
question. Salt has nothing to do with preserving the taste. 
A little salt is taken only when all lard is used in order to 
give the cookies a better taste. 

* * ♦ 

Would you please publish a receipe for Butler Ring Dough 
and also directions to roll them up.—W. A. S., Ohio. 
answek 

The recipe you are calling for, is Icnown as yeast-raised pastry. 
Yon should have no trouble whatever to obtain the desired 
results. A little experience is necessary, however, at in every 
other formula tried for the first time. 

YEAST RAISED PASTRY 

Use coffee cake dough of medium stiffness. Take about six 
pounds of this dough and roll into a square of 13 x 18 inches 
and set into a cool place for about a half hour. Then roll 
out, same as for puff paste, placing the bntter upon it in 
little lumps, distribtited all over Ute surface of the dough. F<M 
up the edges of the dough to enclose butter, handling the same 
as in making puff paste. Now roll out into I'/i inch thickness, 
fold in three parts and roll out again; set in a cool place and 
allow to rest for another half hour. Then repeat the rolling, 
giving it two more turns; let raise again 15 minutes, and tbe 
pastry is ready for use. 

We are giving you two formulas of coffee cake dough. We 
may mention that a ten-cent ring made out of yeast raised 
pastry should be scaled not more than 10 oz. When rolling in 
the butter for the first time, bestrew same with raisins and cin- 
namon sugar. Bake in same way as you would common coffee 
rings. 

couuoh coffee dough 
mam: with sponge 

Scale oR 6 lbs. sponge, work this through with I qt. luke 
warm milk ; then add i lb. brown sugar, i lb. butter and lard, 
about I oz. salt, vanilla flavor and mace; mix this with as much 
flour as necessary to a medium dough; let the dough rise and 
it is then ready for use. A little egg coloring may be added to 
the milk. 

STRAIGHT COFFEE CAKE DOUGH 

For every quart of luke warm milk or water use about i oz. 
yeast, 10 to 14 oz. brown sugar, 10 to 14 or. butter and lard, 
I oz. salt, vanilla and mace; color the water or milk with 
egg coloring; mix all to a medium dough with as much flour as 
necessary; after the dough has raised a second time it is ready 



/ am enclosing a recipe for Box Cake which I use but it does 
not seem to be as light and lasty as it should be. Could you 
tell me what is wrong or give me a recipe to bfiuadi by hotldf 



be-madt by hoMT 

s LjOOgTe 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Cold Cake 
I gl. eggt 4 *«■ «nt starch •. ^^ ^^^ 

4 lbs. sugar 4 Oss. strong flour j- crfj», 

4 o»j. mirt powder 3 lbs. butter or lard ) 

1 OS. tall flavor 

1 qt. water add 

4 lbs. strong flour •, 

4 OSS, sugar V sifl and add 

I OS. baking powder ' 
Also how much milk should I add to the cornstarch for boiling 
as referred to by Theodore C. Barlholomae, in Bakers Review 
of December, 1915, page 89 (The Box Cake Question) .—A. 
P T,, N. J. 



We arc indebted to Theo. C. Bartholomae for the following 

CORKECTED RECIPE 
1 qt. eggs 4 ois. milk powder 

4 lbs. powdered sugar flavor 

4 lbs. winter flour, if very weak though and the cake does not 
stand up well in the oven, you may use 1-3 patent flour, i az. 
baking powder — sift and add. 

Cream part of the 4 lbs. of powdered sugar, 4 ois. starch (you 
can get this already prepared in one of several preparations ad- 
vertised in Bakebs Review), iJ^ lbs. of buHer if you desire a 
good butter flavored cake, as lard, on account of the Box Cake 
being wrapped tightly, leaves a disagreeable taste in the mouth 
(read my article), i qt. and J4 pt. water, or more if too firm. 

Of course you may use 4 ozs. of starch and boil it with part 
of your sugar and nulk the evening before you make your cake, 
as it has to be thoroughly cooled before Jt is creamed in with 
the butter, but one of the ready-prepared products similar to 
Plymco, being boiled starch in dry form, relieves you of all this 
mess and works just as successfully. 

Great care must be taken so your milk in creaming does not 
get very warm; it may also be advisable, as one large Box Cake 
maker does, to beat the eggs fairly light with part of the pow- 
dered sugar. Kindly let us know how this mix has turned out? 

DevU'a Food Cake — Icing 

/ am tending you under separate cover a sample of devil's 

food cake tht siae of mhtch is 8 inches in diameter and about 

4 inches high when teed. Would you be kind enough to furnish 
me viilk recipe for same, also recipe for icing used on some. 

Is it possible to sell a cake of this kind at that site at 25 cenU 
and make a reasonable profitf I would also like a recipe for 
using icing powder, also marshmelloxii powder. 

Is this cake made by hand or machinef — C. H. L., Pa. 

ANSWER 

Your sample of cake is made as follows: 
I lb. tugar ■ ^ pt ntillc 

1% Ibi. flour (winter wheat 2-3 oz. baking powder 

or soft spring patent) ^ lb. melted butter or any 

6 eggs other shortening 

vanilla flavor 
2 ozs. chocolate liquor (melted) 
Fill in 4 X S in. pans well greased and dusted. Use about five 
(5) ozs. to each pan. Bake in moderate oven. 

ICING 

5 lbs. granulated sugar i^ lbs. gluco>:c 
Put in a clean vessel, water enough to cover, wash down on 

sides and boil to 238°. Put on marble slab and let cool until 
hike warm. Beat 10 eggwhites to a stiff froth, add I lb. XXXX 
sugar. Now cream your sugar with spatula until it begins to 
get white. Then stir in your meringue and work until stiff 
and smooth. Cover with damp doth, add a good vanilla flavor. 
Now warm this up in hot water bath, add sufficient water (that 
is, very little) lo soften. Fill your cakes with this filling and 
also ice with the same. You may flavor and color to suit. This 
will keep soft and moist a verv long time. You can easily sell 



this cake for 25 cents and make a good profit. As to idmg pow- 
der, your jobber will furnish you with the dewred recipe, u 
I do not know the strength of your icing powder. 

Your marshmellow powder, we presume, is gelatine. 
4 lbs. sugar I lb. glucose 

Boil to 258°. First put enough water on it to cover. Wash 
down on sides. Dissolve 2 ozs. gelatine in I^ pts. water. Now 
put this in machine and heat. Whip I pt. of egg white to very 
stiff froth, gradually beating in i lb. of XXXX sugar. Now while 
your mixture is warm beat in your eggwhite. 

While warm spread over your cake. 
Oven Troubles 

Please tell me in your next month's issue what is the matter 
with my oven. It don't seem lo hold the heat. Is the arch too 
high or loo lowT It is 34 inches. The oven is a German brick 
oven. I had it rebuilt and a cement wall put around it and since 
thai it loses the heat so that I can't bake more than one ovenfui 
of bread with one fire. The bottom does not get warm, so I cas^l 
gel the bread baked on the bottom.—}. O., MiNN. 

ANSWER 

Our only advice is, that you should let a good bakers' oven 
builder examine your oven. It seems as if there is something 
wrong with the draught. 

Boston Cream Ke 

Please furnish me with a recipe for Boston Cream Pie.^ 
C. H. K, Pa. 

ANSWER 
Pies are made either of sponge cake, jelly roll or wine 
cake mixture. We would advise taking wine «jte mixture. 
Bake in deep pie plates, grease and dust the same lightly. For 
IOC pies seven to eight ounces of dough are sufficient After 
baking allow to cool a little, then cut the cake in half horizontal- 
ly, and fill either with vanilla cream or the less expensive 
cream fillmg; then cover with top layer of cake and dust with 
fine powdered sugar. 

VANILLA (XEAU 

I lb. sugar 6 oz. cornstarch 

3 qts. milk vanilla 

6 eggs a little butter 

Bring milk, sugar and a little butter to a boil; dissolve the 

cornstarch in a little milk and mix with eggs thoroughly; pour 

this into the boiling milk, stirring constantly until it reaches 

the proper consistency; let the cream cool and then add vanilla. 

Italian and French Bread 

Can you give me a formula for making Italian and French 
Bread. I hove had a sample of the latter kind and it tastes very 
sow. 

I have a few customers that demand that kind and are tend- 
ing for it on the outside but would buy it from me if I made it. 
They say mine is too good and thai they ate too nmch of it. — 
G. F. N., Net, 

ANSWER 

Here are two formulas for a very small batch, which you 
can multiply if necessary. 

Make a sponge from 3 quarts warm water, t oz. yeast, and 
enough flour to make a soft batter; let this get ready twice, that 
means let it rise and drop, and rise and drop again, without 
interfering with it; then put on i more quart water, 3 ozs. salt 
and make a dough of medium stiffness; let this dough rise once, 
and then work it up. 

We would not advise you to let your bread become sour; just 
make it this way, and there will be hope that you please your 
customers. 

There is another way to produce this bread as follows : 

Take an old piece of dough from the previous batch (about 
five pounds) ; on this put two quarts of water and work it fine. 
then add enough flour to make a soft sponge. Let this rise and 
drop fully, then put on another quart water and 2 ozs. salt and 
make a medium stiff dough. Let this rise once and work up. 
Perhaps this formula will suit better — just try it, if you are 

In case this is not what you want, let us know, and we will 
give you a formula on the ferment basis, but then yon must 
notify us how lariie a batch ypu ^ish to make. 



THE BAKERIES OF A MERICA 

Pergonal Vlitts and Inspacttons of Machlna Shops by a Practical Baker 



Hanchcatcr, New Hampshire 

(Continued) 
y'nurt & Vadnais, 640 Harvard St. — Vinert & 
Vadnais have been in business four years and 
in this short period of time have built up a trade 
Ihat places them among the leading bakers of 
New Hampshire, It was a pleasure for me to 
inspect the shop of this bakery in which a clean* 
liness prevails that can not be surpassed. No 
millionaire can have a cleaner kitchen than the 
{))op of these two gentlemen. It is a sunlit bak- 
ery (like all Manchester bakeries), having nine 
■indows through which God's pure air can enter. 
In this fine and sanitary bakery only bread ii 
baked- The output amounts to 19,000 loaves week- 
ly, and about 100 bbls. o£ flour is consumed. In 
the shop I saw a Champion mixer and a Thom- 
ioa moulder. The baking is done in a Petersen 
oven. The baked bread is wrapped in two hand 
tcalers. Four wagons are out, and seven bakers 
are employed. There is no doubt that Vinert & 
Vadttais have the old saying, "Cleanliness is next 
ID Godliness" for their motto. 



By Otto Werlin, 
Ediloriat Associate Ba 



Lowell, Mail. 
Frtd C Stoddard, 791 Central.— iir. Stoddard 
owns a neat. corner store. He does the baking 
akme, and turns out a fine line of goods. Store and shop are 
Hrikmgly clean, and everything is kept sanitar;^. In the shop we 
find a Lynn- Superior dough mixer. The baking is done in an 
old-fashioned brick oven. Everything is sold over the counter. 
In connection with the bakery is a nice grocery. Mr. Stoddard 
hi owned this place for five years and is certainly doing fine. 

Witliam Scally, s Davis Square. — Two bakeries are owned by 
courteous Mr. Scally, one, the main place, at the address men- 
lioDed above, and one at 547 Central St In the first shop the 
proprietor and a helper do the baking. In this shop Is a Read 
dough and cake machine. The bakine is done in an Ordway 
oven. On Central St one charming lady baker is employed, but 
no machines are necessary, as most of the baking is done on 
Davij Square. A full line of bread, pies and csiices is baked 
Foder most sanitary conditions. ' 

Borrtll Baking Co., 328 Broadxoay.—Tvia men and a bo}; do 
ihe baking in this place, which is nicely equipped with machines. 
I found a Triumph outfit consisting of dough and cake mixers, 
also sifter, and a Thomson extension moulder. The baking is 
done in two old-fashioned ovens. The main trade seems to be 
bread. Sell wholesale and retail. 

}<tmts Webster, 345 Weslford i"*.— This is a verj; clean bak- 
ery, employing two men. In the shop is a dou^h mixer as well 
as a cake machine made by the Day Co. I think they are the 
lirst machines made by these people. Bakes a little bit of every- 
thing. Sells retail only. Has a fine store in which also station- 
ery, candy, etc., is sold. 

C. M. Barlow, 202-206 Middlesex St.—hlr. Barlow, a fine and 
amiable gentleman, owns one of the finest and largest bakery 
itora in Lowell. He did business for eight years at 162 Mid- 
dlesex St. and moved into his present quarters a short time ago. 
In his spotless shop he employs four bakers, turning out a high 
grade line of bread, pies and cakes. The baking is done in an 
Ordway oven. The store is not only one of the most attractive, 
bat also one of the largest bakery stores in Lowell. A full line 
dI delicatessen goods is also sold in same. Three sales ladies 
are kept busy serving the customers. Sell wholesale and retail, 
fl. /. Begin, 475 Moody St. — Mr. Begin, a very courteous gentle- 
<B*>i, has an exceedingly clean and neat shop. He employs ten 
Teople altogether ; among them are four bakers. The shop is 
equipped with a Lynn-Superior dough mixer with tempering tank 
Md a Thomson extension moulder. The baking is done in two 
jM-stjle brick ovens. Onlv bread of the highest quality is 
["Hd. The baked bread is stored away in closets in order to 
JMt same moist and also free from dust. Five wagons are 
kept busy. Sells wholesale and retail. No store trade. Mr 
™sin. who has been in the baking business 
"« wwid largest baker in Lowell, 



they are! The first few words I ever wrote in 
French, and it means in English: "We invite 
everybody to visit our baking department." As 
we find in Lowell, Mass., just as many French- 
men as there arc Germans in Hoboken, Mr. Vin- 
cent, a very amiable Frenchman himself, has 
placed two signs, one in French, and the other 
one in United States, in his store to invite the 
public to visit his baking department, which he 
opened about six months previous to my visit. 
This demonstrates fully that Mr. Vincent does 
not fear any criticism, but rather invites it. He 
really has nothing to fear, as his place is up to 
the mark, clean and sanitary, and he has a right 
to be proud of his model bakery Three bakers 
are employed in the shop. The baking is done in 
two Ordway ovens. The goods produced, bread 
as well as cakes, are of superlative quality and 
most skillfully displayed by the lady in the Store, 
which is by the way the finest and most attractive 
KEBS store in this part of the city. Everything is sold 
retail. Mr. iVncent has the writer's best wishes 
for success. 

J. R. Eldridge, 220 Chelmsford St.— Mr. Eld- 
ridge has been on the same place and doing fine 
business for the past ten years. He is a very good baker himself 
and employs also another baker. Bakes in an Ordway oven. The 
line of goods produced is to be compared very favorably with 
the best in Lowell. Mr, Eldridge also gets a fine price for his 
baked goods, .Every dozen cookies sells for la cents, and the 
pies cost 12 cents each. Nothing is delivered, everything is sold 
over the counter, retail. Store and shop are strikingly clean and 
in the best of condition. 



of J. A. W. Vincenl's Bakery, Lowell, Mass. 



J. K. 
Famam's 



this bakery. In fact, Mr. Farnam cannot be c 
mended too highly for keeping his shop in such splendid con- 
dition. Not a bit of dust or dirt can be seen either on the floor, 
which is lined with linoleum, or on the barrels, covers or othei 
utensils. Every bread pan and pie plate is cleaned and washed 
before putting away in the closet where they are kept free from 
all dust. A neatness prevails in this shop which is hard to 
describe. "And I have kept this place in the same condition 
from the day I started, and that was some 18 years ago," Mr. 
Farnam told me with apparent pride. This gentleman caters 
only to high-class family trade and also supplies church parties 
with the necessary bread, pies and doughnuts. The shop is 



BAKERS REVIEW 



D. L. Page Co. Building, Lowell, Mass. — Nole the Clock 
equipped with a Peerless 4-speed cake machine. The baking 
is done in a gas oven. Mr. Farnam and his wife do the baking. 
A tempting Une o£ goods is produced in this liitle "fairy liaK- 
ery." 

D. J. Hart, 77 Saiem St.— Mr. Hart operates two places, one 
at the above mentioned address, and one at soo Merrimack St, 
The place on Salem St. is the main bakery and is equipped with 
a Read dough mixer and a cake machine of the same make. 
The baking is done in an Ordway oven No. 5- The shop on 
Merrimack St. has no machines. Ail together seven bakers are 
employed. Everything is sold retail and over the counter. Mr. 
Hart, a very amiable gentleman, has been in business Ji jears 
and has built up a hne reputation owing to the high quality of 
his goods. Stores and shops of both places are in the best of 
condition, and the tempting tine of goods is most attractively 
displayed in same. The main trade seems to be cakes. The 
name of Hart stands for quality goods in Lowell. 

The Johnston Bros, in Loweli, Mass. — This is one of the old- 
est baker families in Lowell. Mr. Johnston started in business 
some 25 years ago at i;; E. Merrimack St. This place is now 
operated successfully by James Johnston, a son of the former 
proprietor. The day I called at this bakery, they were busily 
engaged installing a brand new Hobart cake mixer in the shop. 
The baking is done in a Knight portable oven. Matthew Johnston, 
a brother of James J., has a nice flourishing bakery at 621 
Broadway. He does the baking with one helper, and has a 
fine Store trade, while the third brother, Alexander, is doing 
well at 467 Lawrence St. This fientleman has owned liis bakery 
for eight years, and does the baking with a helper. The shop i" 
equipped with a Triumph cake and a Day dough mixer. The 



May, 191b 

baking is done in an old-fashioned brick oven. Every one of 
the Johnston brothers turns out a superior line of goods. Es- 
pecially their cake line is oraiseworlhy. The brothers canfine 
themselves to store trade only and have no wagons. 

D. L. Page Co., 16-20 Merrimack .S/.— About half a century 
ago, D. L. Page leturned with the victorious northern army af- 
ter^ serving honorably through the entire Civil War, and opened 
a little candy kitchen in Lowell. Fifteen years later he opened 
a restaurant, still keeping up his candy kitchen. In conrection 
with this he also did some catering. Business still continued to 
increase and the D. L, Page Co. was formed. Three years ago, 
the company built an absolutely fire-proof building, four stories 
high and with a basement. This building is located in the heart 
ofthe city at a point where every car !me crosses. The entire 
building with the beautiful terra cotta front is occupied to the 
D. L. Page Co, It is an eating place of peculiar excellence. 
But not only is it the best restaurant in the city, it is also the lead- 
ing candy shop, the leading caterer and the leading baker in Low- 
ell. The firm commenced to do its own baking as soon as it enter- 
ed the restaurant business. To-day it has undoubtedly one of 
the finest equipped bake shops in the city of Lowell. 

The shop is located on the top floor, I saw the following machines 
in same: One Day mixer with sifter, a Dutchess 2-pocket dough 
divider, a Day moulder, a Zerah bailer, a Van Houten roll divi- 
der, a Champion cookie dropper, a Day egg beater, a Carroll clip- 
per, and a revolving proof closet. The baking is done in two 
double ovens built by the National Oven Co,, of Fishkill Landing, 
N. Y. The sidewalls of same are covered with tiles. For the con- 
venience of the bakers we find a dressing room equipped with 
shower baths, individual lockers, wash stands.etc In one corner 
is an ice box, 8x8 feet, holding the eggs, butter, etc., tised during 
the day. The ice box is cooled by means of cold air, furnished 
from their own refrigerating plant, located in the basement. On 
the same floor we find three more little departments, the choco- 
late shop, the doughnut kitchen, and the pie room. In the choco- 
late shop all the fine chocolate bonbons are made ; in the pie room 
two lady bakers tr.ake about a 100 pies a day, while in the dough- 
nut kitchen the crullers are produced. 



Makf-nf Hoc 



■ in D. L. Page Co. Bakery, Lou'etl, Mass. 



I the Page Bakery 



On the third ffoor we find the vegetable kitchen, the general 
stock room and the candy shop. In the candy shop I met D. JU. 
Page, a jovial old gentleman a little over 70 years young, dir- 
ecting the making of eandv for the Christmas season. As L, C. 
McLeon. the manager of tne company told me, Mr. Page works 
during the first part of 'he winter season every year. Of course 
this department is also equipped with the latest machines in this 
line. 

On the second floor we find the kitchen, in which ten cooks are 
employed. Here we also find an ice box cooled by the refrigerator 
in the cellar. The elegantly furnished dining room with a seating 
capacity for 160 people is also on the same floor. On the first 
floor, we find a lunch room and the finest retail bakery store in * 
the city (in which ice cream and candy is also sold) and the 

The basement is utilized by the ice cream department, butcher 
shop and general storage room. The latest word in freezing ma- 
chines can be seen here. The frozen cream is stored away in a 
refrigerator which has a temperature of 5 below zero. Another 
refrigerator, not quite so cold, is for the storing of pie fruit, etc, 
while still another is for the soft drinks, such as grape juice, 



Uav, 1916 



BAKERS RE VI EW 



ginger ale. etc. Here I noiiced a warning placed by the head ot 
the soda d^artment, who put il up after a few bottles of ginger 
sle "mysteriously" disappeared. It reads like this: "Warning! It 
you drink Ginger Ale you are spotted ! Look out !" In the base- 
ment we find two refrigerating plants, one is a 12-ton and the 
other (for reserve) is an 8-ton refrigerator. In the stock room 
about tl2,ooo worth ot goods are stored. The sanitary condition 
of every one of the aforementioned departments is unsurpassable. 
The cleanliness prevailing in every comer of the building is 
most striking. 1 have seen many similar plants during my 
travels, clean and sanitary, but I have not seen a cleaner place 
thui tjie one ot the D. L, Page Co. in Lowell. Mass. 

In all departments, 120 people are employed; among them are 
fourteen bakers. The bread output amounts to 4.500 loaves a 
*«k; also a full line ot rolls, cakes, etc. Everything is sold 
f^'ail. Only a high grade line ot goods is produced and the 
°*5t materials obtainable are used in the production of the 
^I'H goods. 

"r. Page uses a huge Seth Thomas clock for advertising 
j^rposes. This clock was purchased about three years ago at 
rii^^Pense of 51,000. Above the dial of the clock, we find the 
fOj^^ of the firm, while beneath the dial, from all four sides of 
^^, are sliding cards, indicating the changes in the weather. 
W forecasted by the official weather bureau in Washington. Un 
ill; foot of the dock is an immense barometer. .As mentioned 
before, Mr. Page's place is situated in the heart of the city, and 
thousands of passersby direct their eyes to the clock to get the 
correct time, (o the barometer and weather cards, and last but 
not least, to the name of the progressive firm, reminding them 
th»l the D. L. Page Co. does everything in its power to serve 
the public in the best possible way. 



Lynn, Mau. 

Geo. Chaplin, 455 Eisex S'l.— Everybody who knows Mr. Chap- 
lin likes him. Only six months ago he opened a little bakery 
in connection with a grocery store. Mr. Chaplin is proud 
ol the success he obtained in this remarkably short time. He 
■jys he built up a nice trade. The gas oven he vises 
for baking he built himself. There is not the slightest 



1 will be successful in his chosen line 
e to turn out a tempting line of goods 

F. A. Whitney, 76 Lewis St.— On Lewis street I askeo one of 
Lynn's ever-smiling cops for the location of the next baker. 
Whereas he replied, if you want to see one ot the finest bake 
shops in Lynn, take the first baker to your right. And really 
the cop was right. But I would like to add, it is not only 
the finest retail store in Lynn, but one of the finest in Mas- 
sachusetts. Yes sir, some bakery! The store is one of the 
most refined and elegantly laid out stores I have seen. The 
floors of the windows are lined with enamel tiles; the show 
cases, fixtures, etc.. are the last word in this line. On the 
wall we find a sign for "suggestions." SUding cards with the 
names of a number of cakes as suggestions for the day give 
the customers a clear view ot the assortment of cakes they 
have on hand. This does awav with the old-fashioned sign 
pinned on cakes, which are often greasy after handling a few 
limes, thus giving them an unsanitary appearance. The cash 
register in this store represents an investment of $485.00, We 
also find two nickeled boxes, with steam device, for Boston 
beans and brown bread. These "Boston Specials" are served 
hot from the store. 

The shop is kept in the same way as the store, strikingly 
clean, light, airy and with many windows, a sunlit shop in 
every sense of the word. Here we find a brand new Triumph 
combination outfit consisting of dough mixer and cake ma- 
chine, "The baking is done in an Ordway oven with white 
side walls. Two men do the baking in this model place, and 
a superior line of goods is produced. Everything is sold 
over the counter. Mr. Whitney started in business at 262 
Summer street on October 5, 1898; in September. 1903. he 
moved to Commercial and Summer streets. In December, 
1914, he sold out this place, and on September 20, IQ15, he 
re-entered business at his present location. 76 Lewis street. 

H. J. Schmidt, 131 Broad St. — In Mr, Schmidt's place, an 
exceedingly fine line of cakes and bread is baked. The ap- 
pearance of this bakery is wholesome and inviting. Mr. 
Schmidt, a kind gentleman, has been in business 25 years. 
He employs two bakers. In the shop is a Triumph cake mix- 
er. The baking is done in an Ordway oven. Sell everything 
over the counter, retail. The fine sanitary condition of Mr. 
Schmidt's bakery can not be commended too highly. 



LYNN-SUPERIOR MACHINERY 

dable because of attention to 

>]o part is too small to receive 

t rigid test and inspection. 

3u buy an "L-S" outfit you 

get full value for every 

dollar — honest machinery 

at honest prices. 

The Thorobred Dough Mixer 
has been a leader for years be- 
cause it stands hard work prob- 
ably better than any other. 
Bakers everywhere know this. 

The "L-S" Four- Speed Cake 
mixer has all the improvements 
on any other besides out exclu- 
sive features. By this is meant 
no breakage of, gears or paddles 
and the fastest action obtain- 
able. 



If you want machinery that 
will really do your work as it 



,hould be done, write us today. 



tHie I^fim-Siip<rior Gmpani/ 



CiiwtauMtt. OklO. 



Just mnitloD BiKBiB RsTiaw. Nott wd. 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



The Bluebird brin^ happi- 
ness, according to Maeter- 
linck's story, and this is 
proved true by ihe delight 
of Ihe woman who gecures 
a Bluebird set. 



}ery Woman 
wes the 
uebird 

liar dinner ware decora- 
remium use — 



Ware 



I artistic taste of every one 
us for a Bluebird dinner set, 
epartment stores that handle 
lird. 

t advantagm of thtM 
popularity 



yiay for our proposition 

3MPANY 

SEBRING, OHIO 



lOc Worth of Cake m 
an Attractive Package 

That** what bring* 

^^ your customers back .^ 

IF YOUR GOODS ARE MADE RIGHT— THEY WILL BE IF YOU 

USE RI-CO PRODUCTS 

Put an assortment of Honey Fruit —White — Gold and Spice 
watch your customers wait on tbemsetvesl They know die cake is 
that it has not beoi exposed to dust or handled and Aat it can be 
being crushed. SiBnd the coupon for fall information. 

To get the dioies out, you must put goodness in — 



RI-CO 

Pure White 



RI-CO 

Whole Dry E%% 



RI-CO 

Emulsions 



THE W. K. JAHN CO. 



483 Greenwich St 
NEW YORK 



130 No. Franklin St. 
CHICAGO 



Untaal Redprocitr— "Saw It Id BjIuui Bbvibw." 




RI. 



Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



84a 



Trade Getters for the Live Baker 

Fourth Article in a Series by Frank Farrington* 



3J. Pay Envelope Idea 

n for merchants to use advertising space 
on pay envelopes of local manufacturers, sometimes going 
so far as to supply the envelopes free for the privilege of 
using this space. In using an advertisement in this space, it 
(night be worked something as follows: "One of the dollars 
inside is worth more than the rest. It is the dollar you bring 

10 Blank's stoTe and pay for " Then go on with a brief 

description of the items mentioned and with the reasons why 
they are better worth a dollar than anything else the dollar 
would buy. 

36. Getting Prospects' Names 
Most merchants would willingly give something to know 
the names of a number of prospective purchasers of im- 
portant items in their lines. It is possible to uncover these 
up a circular addressed to school children, saying you will 
prospects by offering a premium for such information. Get 
give a base ball or a doll, or some other attractive article 
1 youngster of twelve or fourteen would like, to anyone 
bringing the names of friends or relatives who might become 
customers. If you are afraid the children will take advantage 
ol you, give them merely a nominal souvenir for the name 
and offer the more valuable present when you have secured 
the customers. These circulars may be distributed amongst 
ihe children as they come out of school. The circular may 
contain a coupon with a ruled space in which the prospect's 
name may be filled in. 

37. Honejr in Packages 
K run may be started on a line of popular 'priced goods 
■hat have a large sale, by inserting in an occasional package 
a lilver "quarter" and seeing that the prize packages are 
handed out to people who will be likely to spread the news. 
0( course you cannot promise or advertise that a premium 
is regularly placed with the goods, but leave it to the cus- 
tomers to draw their own conclusions, maintaining a discreet 
silence on your part. If the impression gets abroad that the 
premium is placed there by the manufacturers without ad- 
vertising it, you c^not be expected to refuse to supply the 
increased demand for the goods. 

3S. Advertisement Scrap Book 
In order to stimulate interest in the store's advertisements, 
ii is a good plan to offer a prize, or several of them, for the 
hfst scrap book made of your store advertisements. The 
requirements for the prize winner should be that it be the 
most complete collection and that it present the advertise- 
ments in the best arrangement and with the best two-line 
comment under each. The scrap books to be displayed in the 
store window when the prize awards are announced, but to 
be returned afterward to the owners so they may give the 
store ihe benefit to be gained by the books being shown 
among friends and acquaintances. Announce a committee of 
judgts to be made up of disinterested parties, perhaps a news- 
paper man, and an advertising man and a practical printer. 
39. Numbers in the Windows 
By placing arbitrary numbers on articles shown in the 
windows and by placing there a sign asking that customers 
who want to see those goods, ask for Ihem by number, you 
"like it easy for anyone to walk into the store and indicate 
lo the clerk what he or she wants to see. without the some- 
limes difFicult necessity of making the salesperson understand 
just what particular item in the window is meant. When 
number cards are prepared for this purpose, they may be 
used over and over again. After the window is trimmed 
It will not take long to put in the cards. Then a list should 

•Copyright, 1916, by Frank Farrington. 



be made up of the items with the corresponding numbers on 
it. This list may be duplicated and a copy placed wherever 
desired in the store. 

40. Hourly Sale 

A way of stretching a limited supply of a certain bargain 
so it will last all day, is to oiier the goods on a basis of a cer- 
tain number being sold each hour. That is to say, beginning 
with eight o'clock in the morning, five, ten or fifteen of the 
item would be sold; at nine o'clock a similar lot would be 
placed on sale, and so on up to closing time or as long as 
the supply lasted. Of course any left over from one hour 
might be sold during the next hour. The plan can be varied 
to suit the store needs and conditions. This plan is indicated 
when there is a certaintyof the demand for some exceptional 
bargain exceeding the available supply. The statement that 
only a limited number of an article will be sold each hour 
or during a certain period, will of itself stimulate the de- 
mand somewhat. 

41. Paying for Reading 

There are various methods of paying the recipient of your 
circular for reading it. One of them is to enclose a brand 
new penny with the circular, staling it is sent to pay for a 
minute of the person's time. Another is to send a check for 
one cent for the same purpose. A cent a minute, you can 
claim is paying for the reader's time on a basis of $6 a day 
for a ten hour day. Of course it is likely to take the reader 
more than a minute to read the advertisement, but it is up 
to the advertisement itself to hold the attention that is gain- 
ed by this plan. A circular headed, "Here is a pay for a 
minute of your time," will be pretty sure to be read when the 
money is right there to make it a spot cash deal. 
43. "Bakers' Doien" Sale 

This is nothing more or less than a sale for a special 
day or week during which the store gives thirteen to the 
dozen. If a careful examination of the stock discovers any 
items which you absolutely cannot include in this offer, make 
exceptions of them, stating the fact in the advertising. The 
best values under the plan should be shown in the windows 
and featured in every way possible. At the same time a 
"17 ounces to the pound" offer might be put in force. The 
two work together, and while they do not attract attention 
perhaps because of a tremendous price concession, they do 
attract attention by reason of their novelty, and they repre- 
sent an actual saving that careful shoppers will notice. 
43. Making PiUars Work 

Where there is a large post or pillar in the store, it can of 
course be made to carry a show case of some kind if there 
is room, but in many instances the space is lacking for a 
case. If the pillar is covered with a plate glass mirror on 
each side, it will be found that it will become an attractive 
fixture and a part of the equipment that will attract attention 
and help to give the store individuality. This may be the 
case even if the pillar happens to be in the window. Where 
the pillar is circular, if it is large enough, it may be worth 
while to put convex mirrors around it, thus making it an 
amusing feature and one that people will come to see, bring- 
ing their friends and particularly the children. 
44. Advertising Philosopher 

If you can get the service of a clever chap in your town 
to write a snappy little two or three line paragraph of a 
semi-philosophical nature to run in your advertisement, you 
have an opportunity to increase the number of regular read- 
ers of what you have to say, and to make regular readers 
out of the casual ones. The little piece of pagent comment 
should be of local interest, applying to some local condition 
to a well known local celebrity. Such matter.. 



84b 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May. 191 6 



is appeariDK all the time in the feature "columns" in most 
daily papers. Adams' "Conning Tower" is one of the most 
conspicuous examples, "The Line o' Type" is another. The 
paragraph should always occupy the same position in the 
ndvertisement, and it will be desirable to call attention to it 
at first by reading notices throughout the paper. Get the 
public started reading this and talking about it and they will 
continue to look for it, and it is safe to say they will see the 
rest of your advertiiement too. 

45. The Hyttcrioiu Photograph 
From a local photographer get a photograph of some well 
known man who will not object to such use of his picture, 
his permission being secured first, of course. Take a sharp 
knife and cut out such portions of the features as will spoil 
tbe complete likeness and yet leave enough to give certain 
pronounced characteristics of countenance. Mount the picture 
on a large card and display it in a frame in the window with 
the oRer of a prize to everyone who will come in and give 
the right name of the original. In order that the name 
may not become public property when the first right guess 
is registered, have each guesser fill out a blank giving his 
guess. These blanks are to be saved and the correct guessers 
notified later, when the contest ends, to call and get their 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Statement of the Ownership, Hanagement, Circulation, etc. 

Required by the Act of Congreaa of August 34, iQia 
of Bakers Review, published monthly at New York, N. Y. for 
April I, igi6. 
Stote of New York 1 
County of New York j **" 

Before me, a notary public, in and for the State and county 
aforesaid, personally appeared Chas. B. Thompson who, having 
been duly sworn according to law, deposes aud says that he is 
the Business Manager of the Bakess Review and that the 
following is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, a true 
statement of the ownership, management, etc., of the aforesaid 
publication for the date shown in the above caption, required 
by the Act of August 24, 1913, embodied in section 443, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, to 
wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, 
managuig editor and business manager are : 

Name of Post Office Address 

Publisher — Wm. R. Gregory Co., 233 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y. 

Editor— Chas. B. Thompson, 233 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Managing Editor — Chas, B. Thompson, 333 Broadway, New 
Yort N. Y. 

Business Manager, Chas. B. Thompson, 233 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. 

2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses of indi- 
vidual owners, or, if a corporation, give its name and the names 
and addresses of stockholders owning or holding I per cent, or 
more of the total amount of stock.) Wm. R. Gregory Co., 233 
Broadway, New York, N. Y. ; Chas. B. Thompson, 233 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y.; Geo. A. Zabriskie, Produce Exchange, New 
York, N. Y. ; A. M. Gregory, Montclair, N, J. ; A. F. Langdon, 
London, England; J. A. McCarthy, Philadelphia, Pa. ; S. Levine, 
1146 43rd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; M. Gregory, Montclair, N, J.; 
F. H. Price. 3 So. William St., New York, N. Y.. and H. A. 
Oswald. Union Hill. N. J. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other securi- 
ty holders owning or holding i per cent or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: (If there 
are none, so state.) None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the names of 
the owners, stockholders, and security holders if any, contam 
not only the list of stockholders and security holders as they ap- 
pear upon the books of the company but also, in cases where the 
stockholder or security- holder appears upon the books of the 



company as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is acting, 
is given ; also that the said two paragraphs contam statements 
embracing affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the cir- 
cumstances and conditions under which stockholders and securi- 
ty holders who do not appear upon the books of the company as 
trustees, hold stock and securities in a capacity other that of a 
bona fide owner; and this affiant has no reason to believe that 
any other person, association, or corporation has any interest 
direct or indirect in the said stock, bonds, or other securities 
than as so stated by him. 

5. That the average number of copies of each issue of this 
publication sold or distributed, through the mails or otherwise, 
to paid subscribers during the six months preceding the date 
shown above is — (This information is required from daily pub- 
lications only.) 

Chas. B. Thompson, 
Business Manager 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 20th day of Marcii. 



1 916. 



(s. 



I.) 



(My 



Si HON Levine. 
expires March 3(\ 1916.) 



N«w T«ast CoBCttm la PhUadslpliia 

Philadelphia is to have a new compressed yeast factory. 
The intention is to have a capacity of 8,000 pounds of bakers' 
yeast daily, with denatured commercial alcohol as a by-prod- 
uct. A Delaware charter, capitalized at a half-million dollars 
has been obtained, under the incorporate title of The Phila- 
delphia Yeast Manufacturing Company, and the old abandon- 
ed Muller brewery plant and its location at Thirty-first and 
Jefferson Streets has been secured by this new organization, 
and it is understood that $200,000 is to be spent in com- 
pleting the modern plant and equipping it with every up-to- 
date facility, and no less than 23000 pounds of corn, rye and 
wheat will be consumed in the production of 4,000 pounds 
of compressed yeast. July ist is fixed as the opening for 
this enterprise. Otto Wolf, vice-president of the Northwest- 
ern National Bank, and a well-known engineer, is the presi- 
dent; G. W. Bergner, of the Bergner and Engel Brewing 
Company, treasurer; C. B. Wolf, secretary, and G. W. B. 
Fletcher, of the Mitchell ani Fletcher grocery firm, and Will- 
iam Wallace of the Penn Grains and Feed Company, are 
directors. 

* « * 

New Pcaasyl-ranla RsgvlatloBS 

A revised hakeshop code for Pennsylvania has been adopted 
by the Industrial Board of the Department of Labor & Industry 
of that State. The Board has designated a standard which is 
designated as a "Gold Medal Sunlit Shop." The standard for 
this shop requires it to be at least ten feet in height, wholly 
above ground, well lighted, and well ventilated. The bakers art 
to be given regular medical inspection, and all modem methods 
are to be employed to insure clean and sanitary results for 
both the workers and the consumers of the bakeries' products. 

After July I, igi6, all cellar and basement bakeshops shall 
be illuminated by electricity, or by an itiuminant which does not 
consume oxygen, and shall be ventilated by an improved system. 
After January I, IQ20, all cellar and basement bakeshops not 
conforming to such standards shall be discontinued, according to 
the regulations set forth by the Industrial Board. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Bonth Dakota Bakan Mmt 

The Master Bakers' Association of South Dakota met re- 
cently at Watertown, and elected the following officers : President, 
L. W. Balsiger, of Watertown, vice-president ; George C. Slater, 
of Aberdeen; secretary and treasurer, C. W. Anthony, of Sioux 
Falls; executive committee, A. W. Hopkins, of Huron, for 
three years; Sidney Drew, of Sioux Fails* for two lean and 
J, F, Runche. of Madison, for one yW-^OOQlC 




M«v, 1916 BAKERSREVIEW 84c 

— I I 11 — II " — " • " 'I — " " — I I 1 1=71 

IN SUMMER, REMEMBER THAT 

ZEBRA STRIPED 
WRAPPERS 

fatcnttd Feb. IS, 1916, No. 1171461 

PREVENT MOULD 
ALLOW VENTILATION 
ELIMINATE jMUSTINESS 
Yet Cost No More Than Ordinary Wrappers 



Samples sent Aflual .service 

for testing has proven 

if requested their value 



IVhat Zebra Stripes Did in Actual Servke 

Auga'it 14, 1914, 
. . , Our Laboratory reports that the Zebra wrapper undoubtedly 
ventilates the loaf and keeps down the musty smell mor« than the ali-wax 
wrapper. They present the result of their test, a portion of which shows that 
mould appeared on the all-wax wrapper loaf after six days, while no mould 
appeared on the loaf, which was wrapped in the Zebra Stripe paperin the same 
length of time. . . . 

The Waterproof ! send us ■■Free" Zebra 

X^ I Wrappers tor testing in our 

Paper &: Board Co. Vr2 

WAXED PAPER MANUFACTURERS I '^''5' 



J 427-439 East Sixth Street : Cincinnati, Ohio 



State 



n i 1 1—^ 1 I I I f — 11— 1 1 — I I ii^:^3 ir— 1 1— : —ir ± 

■TWM in ■aTerOMmeot Id Bikmm Rirnv. Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



'8' 



BAKERS REVIEW 



KRIMCO Products Are The Best 

We Do Not Only Say So But All Our Trade Do 

Let us help you improve your bread business by putting in our famous 
(SERAPH BRAND) package cakes. Some of the leading bakers throughout the 
United States are recommending our products, as the very best. Our formulas are 
very simple and we will gladly furnish them to you upon request. We only give 
them to one concern in each town. This is for your own protection. Your profit 
on the cakes will surprise you. Our best recommendation are the very many satis- 
fied customers we have. 

SERAPH BRAND Angel Whip 
SERAPH BRAND Whole Egg 
SERAPH BRAND Pure Flavorings 
SERAPH BRAND Spices 

These Products are Absolutely Pure 

If you are at present baking package cake and your cost of production is Coo 
high we will give you the benefit of our many years experience with package cakes, 
or if your neighbor is putting out a cake superior to yours let us know and we will 
be only too pleased to put you right. 



Our proposition is not how cheap a cake can you produce but how good a 
cake can you produce and keep the cost down so as to leave you a reasonable profit. 

We are not guided by the high markets owing to the war. We are neutral 
and so are our prices. Write us for full information. We will gladly send our 
demonstrator to start you free of charge. 

KRAUSE IMPORTING CO., Inc. 

90 and 92 WEST BROADWAY 
NEW VORK CITY 



Matnal Reelprocltr— "Shw Ii 



BAKERS REVIEW 



The Necessity and Great Value 
Yeast Foods in Good Bread 



of 



By Theodore C. Bartholomae* 



The writer, and no doubt many others, have been asked 
this question many times by bakers of an inquiring turn of 
mind; — "Why should I use malt, corn sugar, rice or corn- 
meal in its uncooked or processed (dry) 
form, when I am using the best oi 
flour? I should not think that all ot 
these substitutes (as he erroneously 
I calls them) would make better bread 
\ and would only constitute an added ex- 

irse, at the present time of 
/ writing, such cases are becoming rarer, 
but there are yet many bakers left who 
are asking this question, and it is natur- 
al that the answer thereto has been 
worked out sufficiently, thai the above 
itioned types, classified as "Yeast 
Foods" by men who DO know, have :n- 
n there by the sheer weight of their 




BARTHOLOMAE I 



vaded the market and r 
efficiency and utility. 

Take for instance, matt extract. In the early part of our 
twentieth century, it was practically unknown by the average 
baker, until an aggressive campaign of education was waged 
by enterprising manufacturers, and now malt extract is 
practically universally used. Of course, here and there we 
find some doubting Thomas's, but that does not stop the 
wheels of progress. When the writer was in this campaign, 
his daily portion was to hear the words, "Oh it's only dope." 

Thank God, the dope stage has passed and one seldom 
hears this ignorantly ill-meant slang. 

I may state right here, though, to the honor of the average 
baker, that he may be at times slow to grasp a new idea, but 
if presented in the right light, letting him see the honest mo- 
tive behind, i. e., the bettering of his bread, he will gladly 
give it a trial so that he may feel convinced. If this were not 
so, how is it possible to find so many up-to-lhe-minule bak- 
eries, even small ones, in this country? That certainly proves 
the high intelligence of the baking craft, when with- 
in the last ten or fifteen years it made such astounding pro- 
gress. 

Naturally the baker wants to be shown, as a good many 
are from Missouri, but if intelligently demonstrated to him, 
why he is there, right there, you bet. 

I hear many salesmen complain that it is so hard to sell 
to. the bakers, that they are an unappreciative lot, but I do 
not find it so, for to the writer it is a sincere joy and pleasure, 
and no one knows the thrill one feels, when on his return 
to the bakery, where one has suggested inproved methods, 
one finds a real improvement in the bread and a smiling customer, 
yea a friend for all time, for after all there must be a mutual 
understanding ripening into true friendship between buyer 
and seller if both shall prosper, notwithstanding the saying 
that "business is a cold-blooded proposition". But, I am 
getting away from my subject 

Tire above argument that in using good flour (though this 
is not always possible or the case, for reasons given below) 
one does not need any malt extract, and other yeast foods, 
can be successfully answered. 

First, by the actual good results achieved in shops where 
they hav^ been intelligently used. 

•Copyrighted — all rights reserved. 



Second, being endorsed by the leading lights in bakerdom, 
such as Prof. Wm. Jago of England, Dr. Teller of Chicago, 
and other luminaries. 

Third, necessitated by the deterioration of the soils, pro- 
ducing no better flour than the improverished soil can give. 

This last reason is one to which I shall give the most at- 
tention, as the other two reasons are self-explanatory and 
self-evident, though in passing I may quote that besides malt 
extract, potatoes, (of course boiled), corn and rice meal, boil- 
ed or processed, (in dry form) are classified by Prof. Jago as 
"Bread Improvers". Dr. Teller also laid great stress in his 
lecture, to the National Association at Richmond, Va., en the 
great value of gelatinized starch of potatoes, rice and corn, 
as sugar producers or "Yeast Foods." 

Now we all know that if any starch, where the grains have 
been broken up by the gelatinization or cooking, is mixed with 
malt extract at as suitable temperature, "Diastasis" sets in and 
through this the starch is convercd into maltose and dex- 
trine, or malt sugar, which, of course, is the finest food on 
earth for the hard working yeastcell. Why? Because 
Mother Nature feeds the tiny embryo plant or germ in the 
womb of her cereal or arbor children, on maltose; this she 
accomplishes by converting through that mysterious and 
wonderful law, "Diastasis," the starch grains, into maltose 
and dextrine; from this the little embryo plant or tree gets 
its food, or it would perish within the womb of the mother 
kernel, and you and I could not exist, as there would be no 
trees nor grains, grasses, etc., of any kind, and man and beast 
would perish and disappear from the earth. 

This argument should settle the question forever, why mal- 
tose is a better food than sugar, simply because Nature thus 
feeds her cereal and arbor children, and yeast is more or less 
a plant. It's Natures' way and you can not improve on good 
old "Mother Nature." 

Sugar has to be split into glucose first, before the yeast 
can assimilate it. . Why then put this extra labor on the al- 
ready overworked yeastcell, when "Maltose," whether pro- 
duced by malt extract alone or in conjunction with gelatin- 
ized starch, is at once assimilated by the protoplasm of the 
yeastcell. 

Again returning to my statement above, that the deteriora- 
tion of our soils produces a flour greatly impaired in strength 
and nourishing quality, the writer may be permitted to quote 
a telegram published by a Portland, Ore. paper, such being 
sent by the United Press News Service, as a short synopsis 
of a lecture the writer gave at one of the Annual Conventions 
of the Pacific Coast Master Bakers' Association held in Berk- 
eley, California, to wit: — 

Berkely, July 27th — "The problem ot food supply in this 
country will be acute within another 'generation unless some 
plan is conceived to improve the quality of wheat, according 
to Theodore C. Bartholomae of Chicago, who addressed the 
Master Bakers' of the Pacific Coast at their annual meeting 
here Sunday. He rebuked the American farmers for their 
misuse of the land and said; "The day of vengeance is at 
hand and the earth refuses to be longer abused, and tn place 
of growing fifty fold, she only now gives five or ten fold and 
often less than that. The phosphates and nitrates so neces- 
sary for plant life have been exhausted and wheat raised on 
such starved-out land is almost devoid of protein and gluten." 

This lecture was also published by two oi the leading San 
Francisco dailies by reason, as the reporte^ 
Digitized by V 



rGoogi^ 



84d BAKERSREVIEW Mav, 1916 



KRIMCO Products Are The Best 

We Do Not Only Say So But All Our Trade Do 

Let us help you improve your bread business by putting in our famous 
(SERAPH BRAND) package cakes. Some of the leading bakers throughout the 
United States are recommending our products, as the very best. Our formulas are 
very simple and we will gladly furnish them to you upon request. We only give 
them to one concern in each town. This is for your own protection. Your profit 
on the cakes will surprise you. Our best recommendation are the very many satis- 
fied customers we have. 

SERAPH BRAND Angel Whip 
SERAPH BRAND Whole Egg 
SERAPH BRAND Pure Flavorings 
SERAPH BRAND Spices 

These Products are Absolutely Pure 

If you are at present baking package cake and your cost of production is too 
high we will give you the benefit of our many years experience with package cakes, 
or if your neighbor is putting out a cake superior to yours let us know and we will 
be only too pleased to put you right. 



Our proposition is not how cheap a cake can you produce but how good a 
cake can you produce and keep the cost down so as to leave you a reasonable profit. 

We are not guided by the high markets owing to the war. We are neutral 
and so are our prices. Write us for full information. We will gladly send our 
demonstrator to start you free of charge. 

KRAUSE IMPORTING CO., Inc. 

90 and 92 WEST BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 



MutoBl Reciprocity — 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



The Necessity and Great Value of 
Yeast Foods in Good Bread 



By Theodore C. Bartholottiae* 



Phe writer, and no doubt many others, have been asked 
is question many times by bakers of an inquiring turn of 
md : — "Why should I use malt, corn sugar, rice or corn- 
meal in its uncooked or processed (dry) 
form, when I am using the best of 
flour? I should not think that all ol 
these substitutes (as he erroneously 
L calls them) would make better bread 
I and would only constitute an added ex- 
I pense." 

. the present time of 

/ writing, such cases are becoming rarer, 

but there are yet many bakers left who 




e asking thi; 



ques 






al that the answer thereto has been 
worked out sufficiently, that the above 
IBK). c. BAKTHOtOMAE mentioned types, classified as "Yeast 
Foods" by men who DO know, have in- 
vaded the market and remain there by the sheer weight of their 
tffidency and utility. 

Take for instance, malt extract In the early part of our 
twentieth century, it was practically unknown by the average 
baker, until an aggressive campaign of education was waged 
by enterprising manufacturers, and now malt extract is 
practically universally used. Of course, here and there we 
find some doubting Thomas's, but that does not stop the 
wheels of progress. When the writer was in this campaign, 
htj daily portion was to hear the words, "Oh it's only dope." 

Thank God, the dope stage has passed and one seldom 
hears this ignorantly ill-meant slang. 

I may state right here, though, to the honor of the average 
baker, (hat he may be at times slow to grasp a new idea, but 
if presented in the right light, letting him see the honest mo- 
tive behind, i. e., the bettering of his bread, he will gladly 
give it a trial so that he may fee! convinced. If this were not 
so, how is it possible to find so many up-to-the-minute bak- 
eries, even small ones, in this country? That certainly proves 
the high intelligence of the baking craft, when with- 
m the last ten or fifteen years it made such astounding pro- 
pess. 

Naturally the baker wants to be shown, as a good many 
ire from Missouri, but if intelligently demonstrated to him, 
why he is there, right there, you bet. 

I hear many salesmen complain that it is so hard to sell 
to the bakers, that they are an unappreciative lot, but I do 
not find it so. for to the writer it is a sincere joy and pleasure, 
and no one knows the thrill one feels, when on his return 
to the bakery, where one has suggested inproved methods, 
one linds a real improvement in the bread and a smiling customer, 
jea a friend for all time, for after all there must be a mutual 
understanding ripening into true friendship between buyer 
and seller if both shall prosper, notwithstanding the saying 
that "business is a cold-blooded proposition". But, I am 
getting away from my subject. 

The above argument that in using good flour (though this 
is not always possible or the case, for reasons given below) 
one does not need any malt extract, and other yeast foods, 
can be successfully answered. 

First, by the actual good results achieved in shops where 
they hav( been intelligently used. 

•Copyrighted— all rights reserved. 



Second, being endorsed by the leading lights in bakerdom, 
such as Prof. Wm. Jago of England, Dr. Teller of Chicago, 
and other luminaries. 

Third, necessitated by the deterioration of the soils, pro- 
ducing no better flour than the improverished soil can give. 

This last reason is one to which I shall give the most at- 
tention, as the other two reasons are self-explanatory and 
self-evident, though in passing I may quote that besides malt 
extract, potatoes, (of course boiled), corn and rice meal, boil- 
ed or processed, (in dry form) are classified by Prof. Jagb as 
"Bread Improvers". Dr. Teller also laid great stress in his 
lecture to the National Association at Richmond, Va., en the 
great value of gelatinized starch of potatoes, rice and corn, 
as sugar producers or "Yeast Foods." 

Now we all know that if any starch, where the grains have 
been broken up by the gelatinization or cooking, is mixed with 
malt extract at as suitable temperature, "Diastasis" sc4s in and 
through this the starch is convered into maltose and dex- 
trine, or malt sugar, which, of course, is the finest food on 
earth for the hard working yeastcell. Why? Because 
Mother Nature feeds the tiny embryo plant or germ in the 
womb of her cereal or arbor children, on maltose; this she 
accomplishes by converting through that mysterious and 
wonderful law, "Diastasis," the starch grains, into maltose 
and dextrine; from this the little embryo plant or tree gets 
its food, or it would perish within the womb of the mother 
kernel, and you and I could not exist, as there would be no 
trees nor grains, grasses, etc., of any kind, and man and beast 
would perish and disappear from the earth. 

This argument should settle the question forever, why mal- 
tose is a better food than sugar, simply because Nature thus 
feeds her cereal and arbor children, and yeast is more or less 
a plant. It's Natures' way and you can not improve on good 
old "Mother Nature." 

Sugar has to be split into glucose first, before the yeast 
can assimilate it. . Why then put this extra labor on the al- 
ready overworked yeastcell, when "Maltose," whether pro- 
duced by malt extract alone or in conjunction with gelatin- 
ized starch, is at once assimilated by the protoplasm of the 
yeastcell. 

Again returning to my statement above, that the deteriora- 
tion of our soils produces a flour greatly impaired in strength 
and nourishing quality, the writer may be permitted to quote 
a telegram published by a Portland, Ore. paper, such being 
sent by the United Press News Service, as a short synopsis 
of a lecture the writer gave at one of the Annual Conventions 
of the Pacific Coast Master Bakers' Association held in Berk- 
eley, California, to witL— 

Berkely, July 27th — "The problem of food supply in this 
country will be acute within another -generation unless some 
plan is conceived to improve the quality of wheat, according 
to Theodore C. Bartholomae of Chicago, who addressed the 
Master Bakers' of the Pacific Coast at their annual meeting 
here Sunday. He rebuked the American farmers for their 
misuse of the land and said: "The day of vengeance is at 
hand and the earth refuses to be longer abused, and in place 
of growing fifty fold, she only now gives Ave or ten fold and 
often less than that. The phosphates and nitrates so neces- 
sary for plant life have been exhausted and wheat raised on 
such starved-out land is almost devoid of protein and gluten." 

This lecture was also published by two of the leading San 
Francisco dailies by reason, as the reporter! 
Digi:zec oy V 



res5§f^ 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May. 1916 



meeting divined it, and they are surely some diviners, of its 
being a word of warning to our agriculturists. 

James Hill, the then president of the Great Northern Rail- 
road followed this lone cry in the wilderness a half a year 
later with the same message, and this of course created a 
great sensation in this country at the time, he being of such 
an over-powering personality and a man of great im- 
portance in our railroad, commercial and financial world, as 
compared to the writer's humble position in public life. 

In the southern part of Germany, where during his earlier 
career, the writer was connected with the then leading in- 
dustry in Germany, the sugarbeet industry, and as a divers- 
ion having had charge of the daily reports from our agricult- 
ural department, the factory also diversing a little in a cul- 
tivation of 2,500 acres of land, the writer was astonished as 
to the marvelous system in keeping up the full productive 
power of the soil. Each fall, after the harvest — we prac- 
tised a 7 year rotational crop system — the same grains, also 
sugarbeets were only raised in the same soil every 7 years, 
our chemists analyzed the soil and then furnished our farm 
superintendent. "Herr Inspector", we called him, a formula 
showing what fertilizers should be used in order to bring 
back the soil to its full bearing capacity and strength. Dur- 
ing those seven years clover was also raised in order to add 
nitrogen to the soil, which the clover extracts from the air, 
and an absolute rest of one year was given the land, with two 
plowings during this rcstperiod. 

■ This is the secret why Germany can now, although cut off 
from foreign food supply through the British blockade, feed 
her people and cannot be starved out. "Efficiency and 



Thoroughness' is the magic word. If I remember rightly we 
raised as high as 70 bushels of wheal to the acre, this state- 
ment having been verified lately by my father. 

I think 1 have my point qliite clear, why "Yeast Foods" 
a.re now an absolute necessity and in closing this brings to 
my mind the good old times 35 years ago, when the writer 
first started to learn the blessed baking trade. Sugar, lard 
and milk were then almost unknown in the making of bread, 
for the simple reason that the virgin soil of our western 
prairies, although winter flour was mostly used in the later 
seventies and early eighties, produced a flour that did not 
need these things. Since that time, based on the writer's 
personal experience in the western country, wheat has been 
grown in the same soil without rest to the land or ever hav- 
ing seen any fertilizer for the last 35 to 40 years. Some day, 
when land becomes scarcer and our farms smaller our Ameri- 
can farmers will use the - same German thoroughness and 
many of our troubles will have ceased, and there will be no 
more starved- out land producing starved-out flour. 

N. B. — Proofs, many of these, can be furnished that gela- 
tinized starches, whether of flour, potatoes, maize, rice, etc., 
constitute a valuable Yeast Food, by reason, that just as 
quickly as such starches — the grains having been broken as 
Stated above through gelatinization come into contact with 
warm water, yeast and malt extract, a great saving in the 
time of the dough to the bench or Yeast will be effected. 

Why? Because the yeast has first been fed before it en- 
ters a straight dough, and like a good fellow goes to work at 
once, having had a good breakfast to- start in for its day's 
job. at times a tough me at that ! 



Trade Topics From England 



By Our Correspondent 



tN the March issue of the Review, mention was made that 
I the London operatives were seeking another 5/- increase 
to their wages, over and above the 3/- bonus already granted. 
As the bosses could not agree, the matter was submitted to Board 
of Trade arbitration, and has resulted in an award of l/- only. 
Needless to say the men are not satisfied, but they have no 
help for it. The London district secretary has publicly announced 
that the men went to the Employers' Joint Committee meeting 
and they were heckled a great deal, and subsequently told that ttie 
time was inopportune. What they advocated was not overtime, 
but lesser hours and a higher wage, considering their work and 
how important a tr?de theirs was — one which the general public 
could not do without. When they come to consider that car- 
penters were receiving i/- per hour, plasterers more, and the 
pointers lid., whilst the operative baker was only receiving 8d., 
it seemed very unfair. There had been no increase during the 
last three years [they forget the 3/- bonus.] Such is the men's 
side of the question, butthe bosses — well, we need not say any 
more, you can draw your own conclusions. 

TBYIHG TO ABOLISH NIGHT WORK 

Another matter which is agitating the minds of the journey- 
men is the question of night-work : surely also a most inoppor- 
tune time for consideration. The secretary said that the aboli- 
tion of night work was most important, for he believed that the 
great mass of the men of the trade preferred day work to 
night work, which gave them the opportunities of not only family 
life, but social intercourse with men in other trade, which was 
at present denied them. The biggest difficulty in the abolition of 
night work, he thought, laid in London, They were told that 
the general public would not agree to have their hot rolls and 
bread done away with ; well, it was a thing they would have 
to educate the general public up to, and he did not think there 
would be much difliciilty in their so doing. They must see that 



liiey also had their Sundays, It was said that the public then 
would not have bread for the Monday, which could be made on 
the Saturday. They knew that much of the bread that was made 
in the factories was, although the public were under the belief 
that it was new bread, was not anything of the kind. It woulo 
not only be a London effort, but a national one, and it could 
he done if they educated the public in regard to the question. 
Evidently they think the time ripe for a wholesale disorgani- 
zation of the trade, but they are mistaken, for the bosses are 
yet strong enough to dictate terms, and if they were not there 
are other means of bringing them to reason. 

What about women bakers? The Borough Polytechnic In- 
stitute (the National School of Bakery section) is advertising 
war emergency classes for women, consisting of a special course 
of breadmaking and confectionery extending for three months. 
These classes are only to be open to women already working, or 
who intend to work in the breadmaking and confectionery trades. 
Already several masters have women working in the bakery, and 
our illustrated dailies recently had pages of pictures showing 
women at work, from the lifting of the sacks of fiour lo the 
drawing of the baked loaves. And what is more, pictures are 
even being shown on the screen of one of London's largest 
variety theatres of women at work in the bakehouse. One of 
these employers of women says that he is confident that in a 
couple of months two girls will be quite compttent to replact 
one man. What a compliment to the journeyman who has 
spent years in the trade! "The great difficulty that has hitherto 
prevented women from acting as bread bakers," says this em- 
ployer, "is that their wrists are not strong enough to stand the 
strain of moulding the bread." He is therefore giving up the 
making of many of the fancy shapes, and confining his attention 
to the plainer varieties, such as tins and cottages. The women 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



TO THE TRADE 

This Institute having dispensed with the services of Mr. Otto J. Freed, is 
therefore not responsible for any negotiations he may enter into in our behalf. 

Our Baking and Milling Department will henceforth be in charge of Mr. 
W. A. Gordon, of the Baking and Milling Department, Bureau of Chemistry, 
Washington, D. C. 

SIEBEL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

960-962 Montana Streat Chicago, llllnola 



American Peel Co. Iss: 

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Tk 

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Used by the Best Bakers 
in the Country 

Sold by All Baker's Supply Houses 



MECKEL'S 

PREPARED 

Cruller or Fried Cake Flour 



CONTAWS 

Flour, Eggs, Milk, Sugar, Shortening. 
Spices, Flavor and Baking Powder 



Delicious, Home Made Crullers or 
Fried Cakes Instantly. 
S Pounds Mechel's Cruller or Fried 
Cake Flour and I Quart Water yield 
at least 10 Dozen Delicious Home 
Made Fried Cakes 

No Worry— No Failaroa 



Packed in l7S-lb. t uraU and 120-lb Drumi 



Chas. Mechel Mfg. Co. 



331-333 4th St. 



Milwaukee, Wis. 



Folding Paper Boxes 

For Cakei , Pies, Lunches, Etc. 

20 Regular Sizes in stock ready for Printing 
in one or more colors. 

Large quantities of Special Sizes made to 
order. Ask for samples and prices stating 
measurements and quantity wanted. 
MANUFACTURED BY 

BEE HIVE PAPER BOX CO. 

621-625 S. DeUwm St INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



The Peerless Ideal Galvaniied Iron Bread Raftfc, 
which has solid malleable iron corners, reinforced with steel 
plates, giving it a neat appearance and doubling the 
strength. Mounted on 4 in. bait bearing casters, and has 
remijvableshclves. Cheaperlhan our standard rack. Sizes: 
24x66, ten shelves; and 28x66, nine shelves. Shipped knocked 
down, saving freight. We a!so manufacture Shelving, 
Pan Trucks. Wire Delivery Baskets. Pie Cases. Pie Car. 
riera, Proof Boxes. Cookie Racks, etc. Manufactured 
only by the 

PEEBLESS WIKE GOODS CO. 



a yon rttA BAKims Rivi 



Lafayette, Indiana 

Digitized by VjOO 



r 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 191 6 



dcierve all thanks for coming forward so splendidly, but bake- 
house work is hardly suitable for women — that is, the major por- 
tion of it. Home baking and professional baking are not on 
similar lines, although according to some there is very little 
difference, except that money is saved by home baking. But 
is it? We think not, and rather incline to believe the young 
lady who wrote to one of our evening papers that she is not 
able to make her bread more cheaply than she buys it. She says 
it costs her one shilling and eightpence for 8 lbs. 6 ozs. of bread, 
which works out at ninepence halfpenny for 4 lbs. ; the price of 
bread in London to-day. And she does not put anything for 
labor, etc. Then again, a lady who started baldng at the age of 
fifteen and considers herself a good work woman, cannot obtain 
a situation anywhere. Strange, isn't it; with all this talk of short- 
age of labor. 

WOMEN URGED TO BAKE AT HOME 

Herewith is an advertisement which is appearing in all of our 
dailies. But what price the loaf? Really, it is not the style 
we are in the habit of making, and one is afraid that it is not 
a striking advertisement for home-made bread. Writers are 



Free by Post 

How to Make and Bake 
Home Made Bread. 

Br HELEN BDDBN 



fuD iattnlctiMU >t lo the m^Hg uhI luking of Bread m hapi 
with iDiDe practical ulEffeiliani ai lo ihe bnl way to make HodK' 
and Mamwlule. m ccntaised in this valuable blllc boel. 1 1 will In 
by poit OD application (a poilord will do) lo :— 



also saying that "home-made bread is not so white as bakers' 
bread, because the latter is almost always rendered so by the 
use ^f alum." The old, old libel on the poor baker I One 
baker also advises people to make their bread of "two-thirds 
flour, and one-third potatoes." Good luck to the loaf! 

TALK OF KEDUaNG BREAD FKICES 

Already there is much talk of a reduction in the price fol- 
lowing the recent falls in wheat prices. When will the public, 
and bakers also for that matter, realize the difference between 
wheat and flour prices? The price in London has not been 
raised uniformly, for in many districts it was at gd. (18 cents) 
whilst other districts and the large companies were selling at 
O^d. )i9 cents). Now it is proposed by some to sell it at pd. 



over the counter, but 9^d. when delivered. There has been a fall 
in spot wheat during the week of about a dollar for oversea varie- 
ties, brought about, as one well-known Mark Lane authority says 
by "outside speculation." 

Another equally well known factor says: "the surprise, how- 
ever, was that the panic took hold of operators on this side of 
the Atlantic, whereas it was expected that America would be 
the first to take alarm. Undoubtedly, politics and the improved 
shipments caused the fright The shipments this last week were 
bigger than for a very long time. The American market, on 
the contrary, has advanced on the week, and the advance in 
normal times would have been considered quite a substantial 
one, being about is. per quarter. Likewise, the official price of 
American flour, although the same on the week, was advanced 
in this morning's papers five points. Since the slump here there 
is much better feeling in America with higher quotations. There 
was also a better feeling at the close of market here." 

Whatever the cause, bakers must not be in a hurry to lower 
their prices, for many of them have not been getting full price, 
and they should rather keep their price steady and let others 
who care come down to them. But who ever knew the trade to 
be firm at a particular price? There always will be undersellers 



AiOTtcan BSscnlt Wortu PnrcluuM PUat 

The American Biscuit Works, Inc., have purchased the two 
buildings of the Crampton & Belden Co., at the upper end of 
Green Island, near Troy, N. Y. The company decided to waive 
its option on the Trojah Laundry Company plant on Center 
Island, near Troy. 

The plant and equipment, including immediate alterations, is 
valued at $50,000; the ovens and machinery to be installed, 
$45,000; the motor trucks and other delivery equipment, $15,000; 
working capital, $90,000; representing $200,000. The authorized 
capital stock of the company is $1,000,000, divided into $500,000 
of 7% cumulative preferred, and $500^000 common, 

Hartwell B. Grubbs, formerly secretary of the Biscuit & 
Cracker Manufacturers' Association, is president of the new 
company; Thomas C. Boswell is vice-president, and Bei^jamin 
I. Houghton, of New York, is secretary and treasurer. The 
directorate includes the president and vice-president and : John 
J. Hartigan, W. J. Roche, James Thomson, and Charles H. 



Mahy of the employes of the Chicago plant of the National 
Biscuit Company have gone on strike in sympathy with the strik- 
ers at the New York plant of the company. 



The Food ValiM In Cakos 

(.Concluded from page 90) 
The required proteins would be contained in 55.6 ozs. of 
this bread, the fat present in this quantity being 0.41 ozs., 
and the carbohydrates being 26.3 ozs. Here again there is 
a deficiency of fat, and an excess of carbohydrates, but the 
sugar only forms about 9 per cent of the carbohydrates, 
against almost 50 per cent, in sponge cake and fruit cake. 
The necessary heat units could be obtained from 42 ozs. of 
this bread, which would have a shortage of proteins, but to 
nothing like the same extent as shown by the cakes. 

CONCLUSION 

The writer having already reached the limit of space likely 
to be permitted for such a novel article as. this is obliged to 
close long before the possibilities of his subject are ex- 
hausted, but if what he has written has made any points 
clearer to his readers, or induced a desire on their part to 
study the subject more in detail, the articlf-^llbave jf 
some useful purpose.— 



>re m detail, the article-'mll have svved 
-Brilish B<av.z.,^ ), LjOOQTC 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



A Study of the Food Value in Cakes 



Y W. Crossley, Assoc. R. C. S. /., F. I. C. 



A I THE present time one can scarcely peruse a paper or 
periodical without finding a contribution on some phase 
or other of the food question. We are given recipes free, 
gratis, and for nothing, on how to prepare six-course dinners 
at a cost of a few cents per head; told this, that, or the other 
food cannot be surpassed for its nourishing qualities, and ad- 
vised generally on how to live well at a cost of next to noth- 
ing per annum. A very casual glance shows that a great deal 
of such information on food, though given with the best of 
intentions, is based on a very slight knowledge of what is 
and what is not food as understood by the scientific man. In 
the following short article the writer has endeavored to deal 
briefly with this subject in as non-technical language as he 

DEFINITION OS FOOD 

Food may be defined as any substance which, when intro- 
duced into the living organism, can, when digested and as- 
similated, maintain the structure and activities of the body; 
and a complete food for a living body is one that contains 
all the elements which enter into the tissues, juices, and 
secretions of the body, and those needed for the chemical 
changes connected with its functional activities. 

The elements which together form a complete food may 
be divided into four great classes: — 

(1) Proteins. 

(3) Fats. 

(3} Carbohydrates. 

(4) Water, and the various mineral substances found in 
the animal body. 

Examples of each of these classes which will be familiar 
to readers are: — 

(i) White of egg and the gluten of flour. 

(2) Butter. 

(3) Starch and sugar. 

(4) The various salts such as the phosphates occuring in 
flour, and common salt. 

It would serve no useful purpose to differentiate the vari- 
ous proteins, fats, etc.; suffice it to say that while the first 
three of these great classes can take the place of each other 
for some purposes, each class has certain functions which can 
be most effectively carried out hy it alone in the animal 
economy. The proteins contribute to the formation and re- 
pair of the tissues and fluids of the body, especially of the ni- 
trogenous tissues (muscles, etc), and they also regulate the 
absorption and utilisation of oxygen, and thus fill an impor- 
tant part in the chemistry of nutrition. Similarly, it is found 
that while one important function of fat is, hy its combustion, 
to ensure the body temperature being kept up and mechanical 
-work being done, inother function is to lessen the rate of 
breaking up of the proteins, and thus act as protein savers. 
Fat also enters into the composition of certain tissues. The 
carbohydrates, unlike fats, do not enter into the composition 
of the tissues, although they are found in some fluids of the 
body, but, like fats, they have the power of lessening tissue 
waste. The principal function of carbohydrates is, however, 
to serve as sources of energy — i.e., for the production of heat 
and mechanical work. The fourth class of foods' — mineral 
substances and water — are just as important to the body 
economy as the more prominent proteins, fats, and carbohy- 
drates. One has only to 'remember in this connection that 
bones contain more than half their weight of calcium phos- 
phates, that sodium chloride (common salt) is present in all 
the tissues and fluids of the body, to see how essential min- 
eral substances are in the bodily economy. Most readers 



have probably never before looked upon water as a food, but 
it is really a very important one. Roughly speaking, water 
forms about 60 per cent, of the human body, from which it 
is being continually lost through the skin and lungs and in 
the excretions. It is essentially requisite in the processes of 
digestion and absorption as a solvent for the various food 
substances, and as a vehicle for the removal of the waste 
products produced in the body. The amount of water called 
for depends principally upon bodily temperature and bodily 
labor, but the temperature of the surrounding air and its 
humidity, and the nature and amount of solid food taken, also 
have their influence on the quantity called for. 

If the reader has closely followed the foregoing he will 
now have some idea of what is meant by the word "food," 
the various classes included in the generic term, and the func- 
tion of each class in the bodily economy; but it will probably 
make matters clearer if the writer goes rather more fully into 
one or two points connected with the functions of the vari- 
ous classes. As indicated previously, the three classes — pro- 
teins, fats, and carbohydrates — can, for some purposes and 
with certain limitations, take the place of each other. Thus 
in the production of energy, fats and carbohydrates may be 
looked upon as interchangeable, and both can also act as 
protein savers, but neither fats nor carbohydrates can take 
the place of proteins in certain of their functions. It is clear 
that since muscular tissues contain nitrogen, the building up 
of such tissues and the material required to supply their 
wastage must of necessity also contain nitrogen, and that . 
this nitrogen must be in such a form as to be utilisable by 
the body — i.e., in the form of proteins. Since neither fats 
nor carbohydrates contain nitrogen, these bodies cannot take 
the place of proteins for the purposes named. In other 
words, the food taken into the system must contain such an 
amount of protein as is necessary for the above purpose. Be- 
sides serving this purpose, proteins can in case of necessity 
also serves as sources of energy; that is, take, the place of 
fats and carbohydrates. The human body, however, is so 
constituted that so far as the production of energy is con- 
cerned fats and carbohydrates carry out this function much 
more efficiently than do the proteins, hence the necessity for 
the inclusion of fats and carbohydrates in the food taken into 
the system. A very fair idea of the comparative energy-pro- 
ducing power of the proteins, fats, and carbohydrates may be 
obtained by burning the same quantities of these bodies and 
measuring the heat liberated. This has been accurately as- 
certained by a number of experimentalists, and it has been 
found that taking as a unit the amount of heat required to 
raise I gram of water (28.35 grams equals I oz.) from o deg. 
C. to I deg. C, that I gram of starch on combustion yields 
4,200 units, I gram of vegetable protein 5,900 units, and i 
gram of fat or oil 9,300 units. It should, however, be borne 
in mind that while these figures accurately represent the 
energy-producing powers of starch, protein, and fat outside 
the body, owing to the combustion of these substances in the 
body being never complete, due allowances must be made 
when using these figures for the valuation of any given food. 
Careful experiments have shown that the amount of food re- 
quired daily by an average man doing an average amount of 
work is such as will yield on combustion 3,000,000 of the 
heat units referred to above. To give a concrete illustration 
of what this means, it may be mentioned that the daily con- 
sumption of about 2^ lbs. of bread would yield this amount 
of energy. 

Were the human body a mere machine, and the food called 
for so much fuel, the problem of food supply would be a 



90 BAKERS 

very simple one, but this is not the case. The human body, 
so far as it is a machine, is a very delicate mechanism, and is 
by no means content to receive its fuel in the exact form 
which may be indicated from the view-point of fnel value 
only; for, if that were the case, it is obvious that the best 
form of fuel would be fat, owing to its liberating more heat 
per unit weight than either protein or starch. The human 
digestive system cannot, however, deal effectively with such 
an amount of fat, and a considerable excess of fat taken into 
the system promptly illustrates the above point by producing 
a so-called bilious attack. The digestive system shows a 
simitar antipathy to the presence of an excessive amount of 
sugar in the food taken, and it is found that the digestion of 
the average man cannot deal comfortably with more than 4 
ozs. to 5 ozs. of sugar daily. The digestion of sugar is re- 
latively so rapid that assimilation and storage in the liver 
cannot keep pace with the absorption if taken in excess, and 
such excess passes out of the system unchanged. This not 
only means waste, but it also puts an undue strain on the 
excretory organs, one effective indication being excessive 
fermentation in the stomach and intestines. Starch, on the 
other hand, compares very favorably with both tat and sugar 
as regards the amount that can be effectively used in the 
system, and an average man doing a fair day's work can 
digest without discomfort about 1.25 lbs. daily for several 
days. 

STANDAXD DIET 

Considerations such as the above, and accurate experi- 
ments made to determine the potential energy the foods in- 
gested must possess to preserve physiological equilibrium 
(shown by the body weight remaining normal on a given 
weight of food), have established the amount of food requir- 
ed daily by the individual, and the amounts of each class of 
food indicated. Such a standard daily diet for a man doing 
ordinary work is given below: — 

Ois. 

Proteins 4.31 

Fat 35.5 

Carbohydrates II.71 

Salts 1.00 

Total water free food 20.55 

VWHI VALUE or CAKES 

Having now arrived at some idea of what is meant by food, 
the nature of the bodies w^ich serve the purpose of food, 
why these bodies should be present in fairly definite pro- 
portions, and the amount of food required daily, the reader 
will be in a position to appreciate the factors involved when 
considering cakes from the point of view of food value. 
Owing to the difficulty of dealing with a subject of this im- 
portance in the limits entailed by a single article, lack of 
time, and the singularly small amount of data available to 
illustrate the various points with actual examples, this por- 
tion of the subject can necessarily only be dealt with in a 
scrappy fashion. Thus as regards data, while there are large 
numbers of analysis of bread available, the writer knows 
of no published analyses of such things as fruit cakes, etc. 
It is true there are hundreds of recipes to be found, and it is 
possible to calculate more or less accurately the composition 
of the finished cakes in terms of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, 
etc., but seeing very little investigation work has been done 
on the changes in composition during the baking of cakes, 
it is highly probable that such calculated analysis will have 
an accuracy of the "less" order rather than the "more." For 
these reasons then, the writer cannot deal adequately with 
his subject by taking types of the different classes of cakes, 
giving their analyses, and working out scientifically their 
actual value as food, and he has consequently confined him- 
self to the consideration of a sponge sandwich, made from 
a standard formula, and which he has had occasion to analyze 
in the course of professional work, and of a fruit cake, the 



REVIEW 



May, 1916 



probable analysis of which he has calculated from the form- 
ula. Only the sponge portion of the cake was analysed, and 
the following results were obtained: — 

Per Cent. 

Moisture 18.70 

Proteids 784 

Fat 2.76 

Cane Sugar 30.89 

Dextrose 2.60 

Starch .' 3S-8i 

Ash 1.40 



By a brief consideration of this analysis some interesting 
facts may be gathered on the position of such a sponge 
cake from the point of view of food value. Thus, if the 
reader will glance back he will see that the system calls for 
4.31 ozs, of proteins daily, and that a shortage of proteins 
cannot be balanced by an extra supply of either fats or car- 
bohydrates. A simple calculation shows that if it were neces- 
sary to obtain this amount of protein from sponge cake only 
54.8 ozs. would have to be eaten— and digested; the fat pre- 
sent would be I-S ozs., and the carbohydrates 38 ozs.. of which 
almost half would be sugar. In other words, there would be 
a deficiency of tat and a large excess of carbohydrates. 
Looking at the matter from another side — that of the energy 
standard, we have seen that the daily requirements are 
equivalent to 3,000,000 heat units, and calculation shows that 
this energy could be obtained from 30 ozs. of sponge cake, 
but such an amount would show a serious shortage of both 
proteids and fats. 

Similar principles to the foregoing, when applied to the 
consideration of a frutt cake, also proves interesting. The 
analysis given is about what one would expect from a fruit 
cake, the quantities given being 21 lbs. flour, 6 ozs. powder, 
sultans, 3'/i lbs. currants, 2 lbs. peel, 40 eggs, color, etc 
Calculating from the average composition of the various in- 
gredients the analysis would show approximately these re- 
sults:— 

Per Cent. 

Moisture 20.3 

Proteids 6.5 

Fat t&s 

Cane Sugar 19.2 

Dextrose 7.0 

Starch 29.0 

Ash 1.5 

loaoo 

The necessary proteins, 4.31 oz., would be contained in 

66,3 ozs, of this cake, and would be associated with 10.9 ozs. 

of fat, and 36.6 ozs. of carbohydrates, about half being sugar. 

Here, as in the case of sponge cake, there is a large excess of 

carbohydrates, but unlike the sponge, this cake shows no 

deficiency in fat, but a large excess. The necessary 3,000,000 

heat units could be obtained from 25.5 ozs. of this cake, but, 

as with sponge cake, the proteins in this amount of cake 

would be considerably below the requirements of the system. 

An analysis of ordinary household bread recently made by 

the writer, is appended. The following results were obtained : — 

Per Cent 

Moisture 42.93 

Proteins 7.73 



Fat 0.74 

Sugar and soluble carbohydrates 4.64 

Starch 42.72 

Lactic Acid o.ii 



5%po®g'e 



May, 1 916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Americans Now Are Elating 

RAISINS IN BREAD 

The California Associated Raisin Company, com- 
posed of 8,000 growers in the heart of the raisin growing 
district, have taught the nation the value of this great 
fruit food and have made a nation want it. 

Most of this new demand for raisins is for 

CAUFORNIA RAISIN BREAD 

Made with SUN-MAID Raisin* 



— a new treat for people who 
thought they never cared for 
raisin bread before. This bread 
is delicious because it is made 
with these delicious raisins and 
because it uses so 
many of them, follow- 
ing the formula which 
we supply free to 
bakers everywhere. 



SUN-MAID Spedaltiet 

And thousands of bakers 
throughout the country have 
taken other advantages of this 
new demand for an old fruit 
staple by putting out 
raisin specials — new 
sorts and kinds, newly 
attractive, newly de- 
licious. 



Let us tell you what other bakers are doing and let us help you do the 
same. Here is a great big new and permanent feature of your business growing 
up and getting bigger every day. Grow up with it. 

Don't wait until you are only a trailer. 

California Associated Raisin Co. 



Hearst BIdg. 
Chicago 



Membmnhip, 8000 GroWBn 
FRESNO, CALIF. 



113 Hudson Street 
New York 



Mutual Redproctt}— "Saw It In Bm 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



, Google 



Cracker aking 

^ 

An Impartial Somy of tbm Cracker Industry throngbont Ilia World 



The Biscuit-Baking World 

Seme Biscuit-Wares of the Warring Countries— Reel Origin of the "Hot Cross Series"— Biscuitdom Extras 
{By L. Lodian, Manhattan'] 



BISCUIT vEssus "cracker" 

rHE word biscuit is always preferable to use instead of 
"cracker". Note that all the biscuit concerns throughout 
\mcrica use the word bucuit in their firm-names. 
Biscuit is internationally understandable— that is, at once com- 
ircfaended in any country ; whereas "cracker" is only understood 
D America. In the British domains, the word cracker refers 
'0 one of those Christmas elongated paper-wrapped packages 
whkh young folks have fun over (used largely for Xmas-tree 
adonunent), by each pulling at a slim interior tab at the ends till 
it goes "bang I" These are the real yule-tide bon-bons. They 
are also called "snappers". Then the little package is opened for 
its two or three small sweets, and the printed good-luck motto- 

A contemporary recently printed a brief consular-report of these 
British snap-candies, the consul calling them by their correct 
Anglia name of "crackers" ; and the redaktor "fell to" and headed 
the extract, "demand for crackers" (as if biscuits were meant). 
But the context showed the error, as it referred to the crackers 
containmg the printed mottos et al. in side. As if biscuits 
would be baked with printed slips in the interior I 

Uoral: "Get the habit" of speaking correct American, and 
always write and say biscuit. Let the confusing "cracker" fall 
into desuetude ! 

THE OUGIN OF THE "hot CKOSs" UNES 

The crusades of nigh a millennium ago, lasted through a couple 
of centuries : there were seven or eight in all, — and the infidel 
Turk got the best of all of 'em, and has kept the gentiles' holy- 
land to this day. 

But the crusaders brought back to Europe many ideas of 
utility, copied from the Arabs— as the windmill, the pharm- 
acopoeia, the sugar-cane, fruit-preservation by sun-drying, and a 
host of other innovations. 

One route followed was through the country of Armenia, 
and it was noticed the people made a daily bread for the home 
with the cross (-f) marked both sides. This form is still fol- 
lowed to the present day; and there are a number of Armenian 
lakeries in Manhattan who bake thus for their own colony- 
folks here. Hence we are able to show a few of their products 
in this still-surviving form of the earliest-known crossed bread- 
5tuffs. The crossing is even carried into some firm-priced fruit- 
paste cake-lines, as the part-marzipan one illustrated, retaiing at 
3K per. (The Italians have smaller-sized crossed fruit-paste 

There are three other forms of crossed-breads affected by 
th« Armenian nationality — a dime-size about 30 centimeters 
(= 1 ft,) diam., and about i inch thick; a 3-cent size; and an 
oblong Me retailing at a nickel. They are too cumbrous to 



illustrate. The latter was probably, many centuries ago, cross- 
shaped (like the near-east cross-shaped biscuitry illus-kribed a 
year ago), and lapsed into the oblong shape — remaining about 
2j4 c'm'rs thick— for convenience sake. Then there is a small 
5-crossed dryish milk-bread retailing at a nickel. 

Singular detail to note : All these last -mentioned cross-marked 
bread-wares are multi-crossed — that is, they have (vve closely- 
paralel lines which make up the cross in each direction. Thi^ is 
simulative of the five fingers of the crucified outstretched hands 
of the Christ, and of the five digits of the e 



The cross is also used on the dally oat-bread disks of the north- 
British people, although its significance has been lost sight of in 
the purely utilitarian notion that the cross is there to facilitate 
division of the oat flat-bread into the familiar triangular -shaped 
pieces as illustrated in the "breads of all nations" opuscule in the 
Bakers Review of March, '13. 



The BiBCttit-Baking World 

l( Left: Crossed hard- Center Top : "Biscuits At Right, 
lack daily breads of with handles": an Carbon- 
Armenia, showing ob- arabik hard-lack line, 
■verse cmd reverse. The sesami-seed-covered. 
crossing is always both Center Bottom : Crossed 
sides. This originated fruit-paste pi 
the "hot cross". {See sapan of the near-east 
article.) (Levant.) 

Digi:zeG oy ^ 



iaed "stales" 
for the far- 
of the 
Paris bitcuit- 



yGcS^le- 



94 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



In the museum of NapoH are semi-petrified cross-breads, a 
couple of tnillcQiums old, taken from the ovens unearthed at 
Pompeii, but they have of course no relisious significance. In 
fact, the cross exists on monuments dating three milleniums be- 
fore the christian era; it required the "incident" of Calvary to 
give it religious significance. 

Armenia:; 1 ;ikeries know not of biscuitry as we know it; their 
thin daily breads dry to a hard-tack in a day,— and these are 
their biscuits". But they are credited with having given to the 
world the faith-significance of crossed-breads. 

From Asia-Minor the surviving returned crusaders brooght de- 
tails of the crossed breads of some of the Christian sects, and the 
idea "kot on", but was limited mostly to once-a-year observation 
in the bakery, and to single lines crossng. 

CARBONIZED BREAPSTUFFS 

In the past, have been illus-skribed the institution known a< 
biscuit-carbon (charcoal biscuits) of Paris, regularly made since 
nigh a century. They have been an item of import to America for 
the past half-century. High-enough in price always ($J4 the J4- 
Ib. can), they have in the last 18 months sky-rocketed to double 
that figure— $! the ^-Ib, "The war", of course I. Yet they are 
not easily obtainable at even this elevated charge of $4 per lb. 
A Beekman-str. importer is alternately "in" and "out" of them. 

It is a wonder some of our own biscuit factories don't look 
inK> this simple manufacture of charcoal -biscuits. Yet none of 
them know of even the demand for the biscuit-carbon — "never 
saw or ever heard tell of them". 

Carbonized "stales" reduced to flour are used by the Paris 
fabriks. The carbonizatbn is perfect. Break a carbonized 
"stale" in two, and you will find the whole interior a jet-black, 
without odor or taste. In the group-photo this month, are 
shown specimens of this carbonized breadware. 

To the French chef, the small carbonized "stales" have a certain 
utility used as they are. "High" game or meats which are boiled, 
are deprived of the taste of taintedness when three or four or 
more of the carbonized leaflets are dropped into the boiling 
medium. The remarkable affinity of carbon for absorbing eman- 
ations or odors, causes the taint to make a "b-line" for those 
floating featherweight bread-carbons. Then they are cast aude 
for chicken- or piggie- feed (thereis little or nothing wasted in 
the French cuisine), although having scant food-value. 

That carbonized breadware is perfectly cleanly to handle, and 
may be carried around in a white-smock pocket without leaving a 

BEAN-FT«UR BISCUITBV 

Replying to a Duluth subscriber as to where the Niponese bean- 
flour wafery may be obtained, — (itlus-skribed p. 101, Feb.) — , 
try any Japanese store in the cities, showing the picture. If they 
haven't the goods at hand, they can promptly inform where the 
biscuitry m^ be procured, or would probably get it at once, on 
order, from the big oriental importers as at Seattle, the Golden- 
Gate, or Portland. 

BEMABKABLE PEBSISTENCV OF ANTIQUATFJ>ISM IN SOME BISCUIT- 
BAKEKIES 

Apropos of the illustration in the April issue, of the curious old 
print showing the ancient "brake" and "horse" used in kneading, 
readers may be interested to learn there are still a number of them 
in use right along, almost every day of the year, round Mulberry- 
plaza region and the "pikolo Italia" quarters thereabouts, in some 
of the squat basement bakeries. En passant, I have often stopped 
for a few moments to observe the antiquated process, through the 
part-Opened basement-door (if ajar). 

A big-diameter bambu-pole (about 4-5 in. diam.) is always used 
by preference. This "kavallo" ("horse") presses directly on to 
the dough being kneaded ; there is no "spread of kanvas" between 
"kavallo" and "pasta" (dough). 



With all the modem machinery available for every need of the 
bakery, it is surprising these relics of the past persist in a city 
like Manhattan. Yet there is a special import of those long-length 
big-diameter bambu-poles for this very purpose — kneading dough; 
and the "kavallos" ("horse") can be obtained any day at about a 
$ per. One will last for years. There is also a trade in them 
from Manhattan to bakeries in other cities throughout the Union, 
Of course they all go to foreign-colony bakeries in the federation. 
It is doubtful if a single American baker makes use of one. 

Some day, en passant, a photograph will be secured of this 
still-in-daily -use antiquated "horse" dough-kneader always "on the 
job" in divers of the cellar-bakeries almost under the shadow of 
the biggest municipal building of the globe. 

BISCUITS WITH HANOLES 

These are mostly hard-tack breadstufifs from Italia and Osmani. 
The "handle" is for convenient stringing and drying out of the 
breadware, and for sale from juttlng-out wall-sticks in the native 
hard-tack bazars. The one illustrated is sesami-seed-covered 
(white) ; others have a sprinkling of poppy-seeds (black). 

The Italians have a far more picturesque variety of these 
biskoti with handles, at prices ranging from a nickel to a $}^ per, 
according to the size, and number of red-dyed duck-eggs inbedded 
and baked into them. 'Round eastertide they are made and sold 
by miriads of thousands. This is really a biskoti -hardtack, slight- 
ly sweetened. Some extra-studded handled-biskot-, wilfi confeti 
adornments, retail at from $1 to ^ per, and are a favorite Easter- 
gift from the fiamato (bo) to his fianxala (prospectiv), who i; 
usually far from being a "belle" — hence the word "prospectiv". 

The latin Italianos may be rated the cleverest and most versatile 
biskoti-konfeti bakers of the globe. Some of their "take-offs" of 
bridal-cakes — throughoot, to the core, of the purest cristalized- 
fruit-studded confectionery — are "poems" of daintiness which it 
would not be within the ability of any American cake- or biscait- 
or pastry-bakery to duplicate, 

BISCtllT-BSEADSTUFFS EXHIBIT AT SALT-LAKE 

'Tis over a score years since visiting the Utah capital — round- 
aboutedly en-route to Mexico, the Golden-Gate, the Antipodes, the 
Ganges, Nipon, and via Cibiria overland to Europe and so bade 
to the Hudson; and, since, I've seen enough of the breadstuffs of 
'most all climes to warrant suggesting to the committee a unique 
restricted exhibit limited to just the unknown in biscuit- and bread 
-dom (excluding all generally-known types). This exhibit of the 
bread-"queers" of all nations could be limited to a couple-score 
spedmens, and would be rated "the thing" of the convention. 
Has never been "done" before in history at an exposition, 
so far as is known. One of the committee's office- 
messengers could round up the collection among the numerous 
foreign-colony bakeries and importeries of the chjefer cities of the 
U.-S., as Chicago, or Manhattan. 

All these national biscuitries and hard-tacks of the universe 
have been lavishly illus-skribed in this monthly since March, '13; 
so it is just a matter of refering to the file for a selection. All the 
goods will "keep" and remain intact (barring breakage) indefi- 
nitely. 

* * * 

Frank Etghm* Iteslgiw 

Frank Eighme, for five years manager of the Whiteside 
Bakery Co., of Louisville, Ky., recently severed his connec- 
tion with the concern, his resignation taking effect on April 
I. G, C, Maratta, of the sales department, has been placed in 
charge temporarily until the new manager is named. It is 
understood that Mr, Eighme has gone East to make arrange- 
ments whereby he will take over the management of one of 
the big Eastern corporations. Some months ago it was an- 
nounced that Mr. Eighme was to become manager of the 
Grocers' Baking Co., of Boston. This announcement was lat- 
er denied by T, H. Best, manager of that company. It is also 
rumored that he has been offered attractive positions in 
two other large cities. 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Choice Formulas for the Biscuit Baker 



By Glttto 



XXX Crackers 
These are sponEe crackers. In quality they are mid-way 
between common and butter crackers, 
5 bbls. strong winter wheat flour 10 lbs. salt 
la 01s. compressed yeast 28 gals, water 

110 lbs. lard 4 I bs. bicarbonate of soda 

Set a sponge in the afternoon with twenty-two gallons water, 
the yeast and two barrels of flour. Have the water at a tem- 
perature that will make the sponge 80 degrees Fahr. after mix- 
ing. Let it lay in the mixer over night and the following morn- 
ing make a dough by adding the lard, salt and six gallons warm 
water. Turn on the power and break it up. well before adding 
the flour. After the flour is in and while mixing, sift the soda 
orer the dough. Make the dough clear and bake a trial to 
ucertain if the amount of soda is correct. If so, empty from 
the mixer into a trough, cover carefully and let it lay and 
prove up light. It should take about two hours. Run on a 
cracker machine, one-eighth of an inch thick and cut with 
1 two-inch round cutter. Pee! up and bake on the oven bottom 
in a good heat and dry out well in the oven. 

MoUaaea CookieB 
1 bbl. short flour 18 ozs.salt 

10 gals. N. O. molasses 16 ozs, ginger 

I gal, water 3 gals, honey 

y) lbs. lard 4 lbs. bicarbonate of soda 

Heat the molasses and honey to lOO degrees Fahr,, pour into 
a mixer and add the lard and water. Turn on the power and 
beat well together. Sift the soda, salt and ginger into the 
flour, add and make a clear smooth dough. Run on a panning 
machine and cut with a large round scalloped cutter. Bake in a 
good heat with steam. 

MolasBH Gems 
1 b1, short flour i gal, water 

to lbs. C sugar 2 lbs. salt 

30 lbs. lard 4 lbs. bicarbonate of soda 

Q gals, molasses 8 ozs. ammonia 

Heat the molasses to 100 degrees Fahr. and sift the sugar 
into the flour with the salt and soda. Four the molasses into 
a mixer and throw in the lard and add the ammonia dissolved 
in the water. Stir well together and dump in the flour. Mix 
nntil clear and smooth and run on panning machine with as 
little dust as possible. Cut with a three inch, round, scalloped 
cutter. Bake in a good heat with steam in the oven, 

Bg{ Jumble 
150 lbs, short flour 30 ozs, ammonia 

80 lbs, powdered sugar 6 ozs. bicarbonate of soda 

12 lbs, butter 12 ozs, salt 

ao lbs. lard 4 gals, sweet milk 

2J4 gals, eggs 3 ozs, lemon oil 



1 a soft cake 



3 gals, com syrup 
30 o 



;. bicarbonate of soda 



Cream the sugar, butter and lard and beat 
then the salt and lemon oil. Dissolve t 
and sift the soda into the flour. Dump into tl 
as little as possible to clear the dough. Rui 
machine with a jumble die and bake in a quick 

Macaroon Snaps 
140 lbs. short flour 
56 lbs. almond meal 
35 lbs. macar 
30 lbs, lard 28 ozs, salt 

100 lbs. fine granulated sugar 1 gal. eggs 

8 gals, sweet milk 
Cream the sugar and tard and beat in the eggs, corn syrup 
and cocoanut. Dissolve the ammonia, ;oda and salt in the milk, 
add and stir well. Sift the almond meal into the flour, dump 
into the mixer and make a clear dough. Run on a soft cake 
machine with a one-inch die and bake in a fairly good heat. 

Lemon Drops 
100 lbs. short flour d gals, sweet milk 

65 lbs. powdered sugar 10 ozs. salt 

3 lbs. butter 10 ozs. bicarbonate of soda 

10 lbs, lard 4 Ois, ammonia 

I gal, eggs 4 ozs. lemon oil 

Cream the sugar, butter and lard. Beat in the eggs and add 
the lemon oil. Dissolve the soda, salt and ammonia in the 
milk: add and after stirring all together dump in the flour and 
just clear the dough. Run on a soft cake machine with one- 
half inch die. Bake in good heat. 

Chocolate Dropa 
TOO lbs. short flour 10 lbs. melted chocolate 

g lbs. butter jy, gals, milk 

g lbs. lard 12 ois. salt 

65 lbs, powdered sugar 12 ozs. bicarbonate of soda 

I gal. eggs 2 ozs. ammonia 

4 ozs. vanilla extract 
Cream the sugar, butter and lard. Beat in the tggs and choco- 
late and proceed the same as for lemon drops. 
BnKHah CoSee ' 



1 bbl. short flour 
80 lbs. C. sugar 
60 lbs. lard 

2 gals, eggs 

g gals. N. O. molasses 






. salt 

1. bicarbonate of soda 



. allspice 



lemon oil 

Cream the sugar and lard and beat in the eggs and molasses. 
Dissolve the salt in water and add with the lemon oil. Sift the 
spices and soda into the flour and make a clear, smooth dough. 
Run on a soft cake machine with a two-inch die and bake in a 



Everything In 
CUTTERS 







Special Design* 
Submitted On Request 

Ingliat; 



Made For Any Style 
Cracker Machine 



A Speciiilty 
SHOAF CUTTER COMPANY - 




Indianapolis, Ind. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Grand Prize '"'"Sfr&./SS'' 



Choose With Care Your Chocolate 

The coatmgt of your coofectioni ace im- 
potUnt: they reach the palate fint and 
on them dependi in luge meuure the 
delicioiu totte trf your goodt. To thii end 

WALTER BAKER & CO.'S 

Liquor Chocolates 

and Coatings 

•re prepared loc the varied utes of baken and 
confectionen — aweetened and uiuweet- 
•ned; light, medhun and dark — 10 ndi 
your tequiremeots. All of theae Chocolatet. 
whatever the dtfennce of oJor 01 Bavcv, are 
abcolntely pure, Hnoodi to ure, and poNe» 
dtal iMuf<»inilr to nccCMaty for confectioners' use. 

Smd for Bomplmm and pricmt 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

EttaUitlieil 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 




Do you intend making box cake, 
pound cake and sponge cake 
specialties this season, 

or have you already started and become 
discouraged with the results. 

Then STOP - LOOK - LISTEN 

to our latest proposition, the most liberal 
one ever offered to the bakers in this 
country. 

Here it is — It will start you right 
It is not expensive 

Mail us your checic for S'O-OO and we will 
send prepaid to your address, a complete outfit 
tor making tiox cake, pound cake, and sponge 
cake specialties consisting of: — 

4 ntM b» ai» pui Z Ibi. Tsfac* Icbg Pmrdw 
8IU. Kaki.Pw-FNtin IH b«M, miU, ud wuad 

5 ft*. Fbnr-M wnfftn 
" S ipwUI f nahs 



These fonnulas ii 
slice, gold, chocolate 
and sponge cake. 

Wm gatirantee our goods 



1 oun WH built on valae EiTJns. VALUE is 
th* faitMt ETowins ipaciiJlT b«H in Amet- 
" f our pndactB. ind the 



Tbi« iraat In 
tb* thine tLktual... 

Ie«. VALUE ud PimiTY , __ 

a«unlffDod uidfdllcUnt ■•zricvof ibe I»UH It vhmt jo'- — ,_.... 

and that' ■ what job nt. wban jm bar FAULD3' PRODUCI3. 

Addnn all lattwi to 
Sptcialljr D»p4iTtmmt 

T. A. FAULDS CO. 

196 State Street Boston, Mass. 



Bakes by, Hot Air Circnktioii 

All Parts Alike— Top, Bottom and Sides 

Equally Perfect for Bread or Pastry 

Address Department C 

ZAHNER MFG. CO. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

Ask for "14 Oven Opportunities." Mailed Free. 



Let tbcm know tbat yon read tbe ada. Id Bakmbi Bariaw. 



j'^jOOQI 



DEUTSCHER TEIL 

Vmwiiis B«richt« — ]tex«pt« — Facbartlk*! 



Praktische, technische und kulturelle 

Studien ueber das Baeckerei- und 

Konditorei-Gewerbe in Europa 

Von Baecker-Consulent L. C. Kiitteag, Insel Laeso, Daenemark. 
{Auf seiner Studienreise urn die Welt 1912—1916.) 



^Studien, wus helset Studien In uuserem Facbe?" niesu 
Worte sprach elumal ein BUckermeiBter zd mlr, als Ich mit 
Ibm tlber die verarbtc^enen VerhUltnlsse In den LHnderu, die 
Icb danials besucht hatte, dlskutierte. 

Eb lat IiertauMlich, daae ee I'achleute giht, die der Aualclit 
dod, d&s8 inan nlchts luebr hlnzulernen linnn, wens man vier 
Ills Hlnf Jabre In selnem Fache gelernt, mebrere Jalire als 6e- 
Mlle gen^^eitct uad flcbliesellcb Beln elgeitee OeBchttft etabllert 
bat, — ea ist Jeducb sebr bezriclinend, dass selbst in unserer 
bocbentwii.-belten Zelt daa BiickerK^werlic In vlelen Hlnalcbteu 
nacti altertflnOlcben Metboden gefUbrt und betrieben wlrd. 

In den Ictzten Kebn Oder r<1nrzebn Jabren sind, erfren- 
Ucberweitie, In dleser BeKlebnng bedeateude Aendeningen er- 



Eine denlsche Baeckerei 
folgt, und nicbt zum wenlRsten baben dazu die vielen gnten 
ractwcbnlen, dip In KnltiirUndem elngeriebtet wurden, beige- 
tnigcn. In Bolchen Schulen erhait der Junge Mann elnen Be- 
ftift voD vielen Dinj^n, von denen er rorber gar keine Abnuug 
iHtte, speclell wnnn der Meteter. bei welchem er gelemt bat, 
■Itkonaervativ war und glanbte, aeinem Lehrllng die vortreff- 
Ik-bsten Informatlonen gegeben zu baben. In Jetzlger Zeit 
onm man In selnem Oewerbe aueb der Fachwlsitenscliaft den 
EchQbrenden Plats eintftumen, und mlt dleeer lat — das weiss 
woM Jeder — in einer BaohBtnbe nleht vlel loB. 

Wobl die bedeuttndsten ersprieaBlicbeten Erfolge erzlelt 
man selbstveratBndtlcli. weun man uacb fremden Lftndeim und 
SiidteB gebt nnd die mitnnter sehr weit verBcbiedenen Rob' 
Moffe und teebniscben Anlagen keiinen lemt ; aucb Hind die 



klimatisoben VerbAltnlsse von bervorragender Bedeutang, und 
kutturell geaehen, niHi^ht nian die besteii Beobachtungen au 
Ort und Stelle, bel pei's6nlicher Berfthrung mlt den Bewobneni 
der ver^chiedenrn Stildte, I.fi.uder und Weltthelle. Selbatre- 
dend iat nicbt Jeder In der Ijage, derartlge Eelsen bu unter- 
Debmen, wenn aucb LuBt und Mut dazu vorbanden sind, denn 
das erforderllcbe Kapltal lat biil Jiingen BSckeraleuten be- 
k'anntlich nur In gertngem Masse vorbanden. Seit melner 
frUbeaten Jugend hnbe ich es mlr ale Zlel ge«etzt, inein Facb 
grltndllob kennen zu lemen und ee tlberall in der Welt zu stn- 
dloren, nnd sebr bald werde ich mein zwanzigates Reisejabr 
erreirben ; es ist Iclcbt begreifllcb, dase nuui In einem so groB- 
sen Zeltruum vlel erlebt und vlel erlemt. -> 

GemHsR der Ueberscbrift dieses Artlkels will icb nunmebr 
(Iber meine Beobacbtungen und Erfahnmsen In den verscbie- 
denen BAckerelen der GroasstAdte lOuropas erzOblen, mlt be- 
sonderer Bcrllcksichtlgung von Iiondon, Paris, Wien, Berlin, 
8t, Petersburg (Petrograd) und Warschau. 

Im Winter 1907 ging ich zum ersten Hale fiber Helslng- 
totB, die ai-biinc Stadt in Finland, nach SL Petersburg. Die 
Fuhrt dnuerte IS Stnnden im 8cbnellzug, und als icb frdb 
mocgens das beillge Rnssland erreicbte, war die K&lte, mit der 
ich leider nicbt gereobnet batte, geradezn entsetslicb. Daa 
Iliermometpr zelgte 40 Grad r«lBlua, was mit Zylinderhut, 
dUnnen Schuben und lelcbteui l.'eberzieber unverelnbar Ist; 
icb muBste inich sofort mlt mebr zweckmSi^sigem russiecben 
Gewand ausrdsten. 

In clnera Hotel In Finland batte icb die Bekanntscbaft 
eines Verkiiufers elner der grtisaten, Ira Innem Russlands ge- 
legenen MUhten gemacbt, und da er deutscb Bpracb, konntoi 
wlr uns Klemllch gut vprsUlndigen, denn der niBsischen 
Sprache war Ich nlcht mHcbtlg, In seiner Elgeiischaft als 
MehlverkKufer batte er selbstverstAndlicb die beeteu Bezlebun- 
Ken In Bftckerkrelsen, und es dauerte aucb nicbt iange, bevor 
icL mich In einer rnssiscbe Backstube eingestellt babe, um da- 
fclbst meine dftulscben GeMc-ke vorzufUbren. Mlt dem Inhs- 
iier konnte icb mlch nur durcb den MeblverkSufer, der als 
Dolmetsch runglerte, verstllndigen. 

Der Bliidruck, den die Backstube macbte, war geradezu 
t-kelerregend ; alles atarrte von SChmnIz und elne dicke Bauch- 
wolke lagei'te titier dem ganzen Iiohal ; Uber alien TrOgen und 
Tiwlien waren mit rueelscbem dfcken RrdOl geftlllte Lampen 
angebracbt, und der Elaucb dle&er Lampen war nocb unertrftg- 
llchet wie der Qnalm imd Genicb der Feuerung. 

Sobnid Icb die niStigeu Robwaren und melnen elgenen 
'Jlscb lintte. ging meine Arbeit rascta von statten; icb macbte 
ii^eln GehKcb, stellte ee anf Blecbe und setzte es dann zur 
uabrung auf. WRhrend Icb beiin Ofen beBchftrtigt war, liatte 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



deserve alt thanks for coming forward so splendidly, but bake- 
house work is hardly suitable for women — that is, the major por- 
tion of it. Home baking and professional baking are not on 
similar lines, although according to some there is very little 
difference, except that money is saved by home baking. But 
is it? We think not, and rather incline to believe the young 
lady who wrote to one of our evening papers that she is not 
able to make her bread more cheaply than she buys it. She says 
it costs her one shilling and eightpence for 8 lbs. 6 ozs. of bread, 
which works out at ninepence halfpenny for 4 lbs. ; the price of 
bread in London to-day. And she does not put anything for 
labor, etc. Then again, a lady who started baking at the age of 
fifteen and considers herself a good work woman, cannot obtain 
a situation anywhere. Strange, isn't it, with all this talk of short- 
age of labor. 

WOMEN URGED TO BAKE AT HOME 

Herewith is an advertisement which is appearing in all of our 

dailies. But what price the loaf? Really, it is not the style 

we are in the habit of making, and one is afraid that it is not 

a striking advertisement for home-made bread. Writers are 



Fret 



by Post 



How to Make and Bake 
Home Made Bread. 

Br HBLBN EOOEN 



and ManniUdc, ut conliined in thii valuable NlUe boel. 
bypsit 00 ippticalioa (• postcard will do) lo: — 



also saying that "home-made bread is not so white as bakers' 
bread, because the latter is almost always rendered so by the 
use ^f alum." The old, old libel on the poor baker I One 
baker also advises people to make their bread of "two-thirds 
flour, and one-third potatoes." Good luck to the loaf! 



TALK OF EEDUaNG BREAD PRICES 

Already there is much talk of a reduction in 



the I 



; fol- 



lowing the recent falls in wheat prices. When will the public, 
and bakers also for that matter, realize the difference between 
wheat and flour prices? The price in London has not been 
raised uniformly, for in many districts it was at 9d. (18 cents) 
whilst other districts and the large companies were selling at 
g^d. )iQ cents). Now it is proposed by some to sell it at 9d. 



over the counter, but 9V^d. when delivered. There has been a fall 
in spot wheat during the week of about a dollar for oversea varie- 
ties, brought about, as one well-known Mark Lane authority says 
by "outside speculation." 

Another equally well known factor says: "the surprise, how- 
ever, was that the panic took hold of operators on this side of 
the Atlantic, whereas it was expected that America would be 
the first to take alarm. Undoubtedly, politics and the improved 
shipments caused the fright. The shipments this last week were 
bigger than for a very long time. The American market, on 
the contrary, has advanced on the week, and the advance in 
normal times would have been considered quite a substantial 
one, being about is, per quarter. Likewise, the official price of 
American flour, although the same on the week, was advanced 
in this morning's papers five points. Since the slump here there 
is much better feeling in America with higher quotations. There 
was also a better feeling at the close of market here." 

Whatever the cause, bakers must not be in a hurry to lower 
their prices, for many of them have not been getting full price, 
and they should rather keep their price steady and let others 
who care come down to them. But who ever knew the trade to 
be firm at a particular price? There always will be undersellcrs 



Aawrlcaa BlscvSt Works Pnichas* Plant 

The American Biscuit Works, Inc., have purchased the two 
buildings of the Crampton & Belden Co., at the upper end of 
Green Island, near Troy, N. Y. The company decided to waive 
its option on the Trojaii Laundry Company plant on Center 
Island, near Troy. 

The plant and equipment, including immediate alterations, is 
valued at $50,000; the ovens and machinery to be installed, 
$45,000; the motor trucks and other delivery equipment, $15,000; 
working capital, $go,ooo ; representing $200,000. The authorized 
capital stock of the company is $1,000,000, divided into $500,000 
of 7% cumulative preferred, and $500,000 common. 

Hart well B. Grubbs, formerly secretary of the Biscu*t & 
Cracker Manufacturers' Association, is president of the new 
company; Thomas C. Boswell is vice-president, and Beijjamin 
L Houghton, of New York, is secretary and treasurer. The 
directorate includes the president and vice-president and : John 
J. Hartigan, W. J. Roche, James Thomson, and Charles H. 



Manv of the employes of the Chicago plant of the National 
Biscuit Company have gone on strike in sympathy with the strik- 
ers at the New York plant of the company. 



Tin Food Valoo In Cakoa 

iConctuded from page 90) 
The required proteins would be contained in 55.6 ozs. of 
this bread, the fat present in this quantity being 0.41 ois.. 
and the carbohydrates being 26.3 ozs. Here again there ia 
a deficiency of fat, and an excess of carbohydrates, but the 
sugar only forms about 9 per cent, of the carbohydrates, 
against almost 50 per cent, in sponge cake and fruit cake. 
The necessary heat units could be obtained from 42 ozs. of 
this bread, which would have a shortage of proteins, but to 
nothing like the same extent as shown by the cakes. 

CONCLUSION 

The writer having already reached the limit of space likely 
to be permitted for such a novel article as. this is obliged to 
close long before the possibilities of his subject are ex- 
hausted, but if what he has written has made any pointa 
clearer to his readers, or induced a desire on their part to 
study the subject more in detail, the article/wUlJiavc sefv 
some useful purpose.— flrififfc Baker. 



le/wUl have setved 

Google 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



A Study of the Food Value in Cakes 



By W. Crosstey, Assoc. R. C. S. L, F. I. C. 



Ar THE present time one can scarcely peruse a paper or 
periodical without finding a contribution on some phase 
or other of the food question. We are given recipes free, 
gratis, and for nothing, on how to prepare six-course dinaers 
a.t a cost of a few cents per head; told this, that, or the other 
food cannot be surpassed for its nourishing qualities, and ad- 
vised generally on how to live well at a cost of next to noth- 
ing per annum. A very casual glance shows that a great deal 
of such information on food, though given with the best of 
intentions, is based on a very slight knowledge of what is 
and what is not food as understood by the scientific man. In 
the following short article the writer has endeavored to deal 
briefly with this subject in as non-technical language as he 
can: 

DEFINITION OF FOOD 

Food may be defined as any substance which, when intro- 
duced into the living organism, can, when digested and as- 
similated, maintain the structure and activities of the body; 
and a complete food for a living body is one that contains 
all the elements which enter into the tissues, juices, and 
secretions of the body, and those needed for the chemical 
changes connected with its functional activities. 

The elements which together form a complete food may 
be divided into four great classes: — 

(i) Proteins. 

(2) Fats. 

(3) Carbohydrates. 

(4) Water, and the various mineral substances found in 
the animal body. 

Examples of each of these classes which will be familiar 
to readers are: — 

(i) White of egg and the gluten of flour. 

(2) Butter. 

(3) Starch and sugar. 

(4) The various salts such as the phosphates occuring in 
flour, and common salt 

It would serve no useful purpose to differentiate the vari- 
ous proteins, fats, etc.; suffice it to say that while the first 
three of these great classes can take the place of each other 
for some purposes, each class has certain functions which can 
be most effectively carried out by it alone in the animal 
economy. The proteins contribute to the formation and re- 
pair of the tissues and fluids of the body, especially of the ni- 
trogenous tissues (muscles, etc.), and they also regulate the 
absorption and utilisation of oxygen, and thus fill an impor- 
tant part in the chemistry of nutrition. Similarly, it is found 
that while one important function of fat is, by its combustion, 
to ensure the body temperature being kept up and mechanical 
work being done, inother function is to lessen the rate of 
breaking up of the proteins, and thus act as protein savers. 
Fat also enters into the composition of certain tissues. The 
carbohydrates, unlike fats, do not enter into the composition 
of the tissues, although they are found in some fluids of the 
body, but, like fats, they have the power of lessening tissue 
waste. The principal function of carbohydrates is, however, 
to serve as sources of energy— -i.e., for the production of heat 
and mechanical work. The fourth class of foods — mineral 
substances and water — are just as important to the body 
economy as the more prominent proteins, fats, and carbohy- 
drates. One has only to 'remember in this connection that 
bones contain more than half their weight of calcium phos- 
phates, that sodium chloride (common salt) is present in all 
the tissues and fluids of the body, to see how essential min- 
eral substances are in the bodily economy. Most readers 



have probably never before looked upon water as a food, but 
it is really a very important one. Roughly speaking, water 
forms about 60 per cent of the human body, from which it 
is being continually lost through the skin and lungs and in 
the excretions. It is essentially requisite in the processes of 
digestion and absorption as a solvent for the various food 
substances, and as a vehicle for the removal of the waste 
products produced in the body. The amount of water called 
for depends principally upon bodily temperature and bodily 
labor, but the temperature of the surrounding air and its 
humidity, and the nature and amount of solid food taken, also 
have their influence on the quantity called for. 

If the reader has closely followed the foregoing he will 
now have some idea of what is meant by the word "food," 
the various classes included in the generic term, and the fnnc- 
tion of each class in the bodily economy; but it will probably 
make matters clearer if the writer goes rather more fully into 
one Or two points connected with the functions of the vari- 
ous classes. As indicated previously, the three classes — pro- 
teins, fats, and carbohydrates — can, for some purposes and 
with certain limitations, take the place of each other. Thus 
in the production of energy, fats and carbohydrates may be 
looked upon as interchangeable, and both can also act as 
protein savers, but neither fats nor carbohydrates can take 
the place of proteins in certain of their functions. It is clear 
that since muscular tissues contain nitrogen, the building up 
of such tissues and the material required to supply their 
wastage must of necessity also contain nitrogen, and that . 
this nitrogen must be in such a form as to be utilisable by 
the body — i.e., in the form of proteins. Since neither fats 
nor carbohydrates contain nitrogen, these bodies cannot take 
the place of proteins for the purposes named. In other 
words, the food taken into the system must contain such an 
amount of protein as is necessary for the above purpose. Be- 
sides serving this purpose, proteins can in case of necessity 
also serves as sources of energy; that is, take> the place of 
fats and carbohydrates. The human body, however, is so 
constituted that so far as the production of energy is con- 
cerned fats and carbohydrates carry out this function much 
more efficiently than do the proteins, hence the necessity for 
the inclusion of fats and carbohydrates in the food taken into 
the system. A very fair idea of the comparative energy-pro- 
ducing power of the proteins, fats, and carbohydrates may be 
obtained by burning the same quantities of these bodies and 
measuring the heat liberated. This has been accurately as- 
certained by a number of experimentalists, and it has been 
found that taking as a unit the amount of heat required to 
raise I gram of water (28.35 grams equals 1 02.) from o deg. 
C. to I deg. C, that 1 gram of stardi on combustion yields 
4,200 units, I gram of vegetable protein 5,900 units, and i 
gram of fat or oil 9,300 units. It should, however, be borne 
in mind that while these figures accurately represent the 
energy-producing powers of starch, protein, and fat outside 
the body, owing to the combustion of these substances in the 
body being never complete, due allowances must be made 
when using these figures for the valuation of any given food. 
Careful experiments have shown that the amount of food re- 
quired daily by an average man doing an average amount of 
work is such as will yield on combustion 3,000,000 of the 
heat units referred to above. To give a concrete illustration 
of what this means, it may be mentioned that the daily con- 
sumption of about syi lbs. of bread would yield this amount 
of energy. 

Were the human body a mere machine, and the food called 
for so much fuel, the problem of food supply would be a 



90 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Mav, 1916 



very simple one, but this is not the case. The human body, 
so far as it is a machine, is a very delicate mechanism, aad is 
by no means content to receive its fuel in the exact form 
which may be indicated from the view-point of fuel value 
only; for, if that were the case, it is obvious that the best 
form of fuel would be fat, owing to its liberating more heat 
per unit weight than either protein or starch. The human 
digestive system cannot, however, deal effectively with such 
an amount of fat, and a considerable excess of fat taken into 
the system promptly illustrates the above point by producing 
a so-called bilious attack. The digestive system shows a 
similar antipathy to the presence of an excessive amount of 
sugar in the food taken, and it is found that the digestion of 
tbt average man cannot deal comfortably with more than 4 
ozs. to 5 ozs. of sugar daily. The digestion of sugar is re- 
latively so rapid that assimilation and storage in the liver 
cannot keep pace with the absorption if taken in excess, and 
such excess passes out of the system unchanged. This not 
only means waste, but it also puts an undue Strain on the 
excretory organs, one effective indication being excessive 
fermentation in the stomach and intestines. Starch, on the 
other hand, compares very favorably with both fat and sugar 
as regards the amount that can be effectively used in the 
system, and an average man doing a fair day's work can 
digest without discomfort about 1.25 lbs. daily for several 

STANDABP WET 

Considerations such as the above, and accurate experi- 
ments made to determine the potential energy the foods in- 
gested must possess to preserve physiological equilibrium 
(shown by the body weight remaining normal on a given 
weight of food), have established the amount of food requir- 
ed daily by the individual, and the amounts of each class of 
food indicated. Such a standard daily diet for a man doing 
ordinary work is given below: — 

Ozs. 
Proteins 4.31 



Fat . 



- 3-S.' 



Carbohydrates 1 1.71 

Salts i.oo 



Total water free food 20.55 



Having now arrived at some idea of what is meant by food, 
the nature of the bodies wtiich serve the purpose of food, 
why these bodies should be present in fairly definite pro- 
portions, and the amount of food required daily, the reader 
will be in a position to appreciate the factors involved when 
considering cakes from the point of view of food value. 
Owing to the difficulty of dealing with a subject of this im- 
portance in the limits entailed by a single article, lack of 
time, and the singularly small amount of data available to 
illustrate the various points with actual examples, this por- 
tion of -the subject can necessarily only be dealt with in a 
scrappy fashion. Thus as regards data, while there are large 
numbers of analysis of bread available, the writer knows 
of no published analyses of such things as fruit cakes, etc. 
It is true there are hundreds of recipes to be found, and it is 
possible to calculate more or less accurately the composition 
of the finished cakes in terms of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, 
etc., but seeing very little investigation work has been done 
on the changes in composition during the baking of cakes, 
it is highly probable that such calculated analysis will have 
an accuracy of the "less" order rather than the "more." For 
these reasons then, the writer cannot deal adequately with 
his subject by taking types of the different classes of cakes, 
giving their analyses, and working out scientifically their 
actual value as food, and he has consequently confined him- 
self to the consideration of a sponge sandwich, made from 
a standard formula, and which he has had occasion to analyze 
in the course of professional work, and of a fruit cake, the 



probable analysis of which he has calculated from the form- 
ula. Only the sponge portion of the cake was analysed, and 
the following results were obtained: — 

Per Cent. 

Moisture 18.70 

Proteids 7.84 

Fat 2.76 

Cane Sugar 30-8!> 

Dextrose 2.60 

Surch ' 35.81 

Ash 1.40 

100.00 
By a brief consideration of this analysis some interesting 
facts may be gathered on the position of such a sponge 
cake from the point of view of food value. Thus, if the 
reader will glance back he will see that the system calls for 
4.31 ozs. of proteins daily, and that a shortage of proteins 
cannot be balanced by an extra supply of either fats or car- 
bohydrates. A simple calculation shows that if it were neces- 
sary to obtain this amount of protein from sponge cake only 
54.8 ozs. would have to be ealen — and digested; the fat pre- 
sent would be i.s ozs,, and the carbohydrates 38 ozs., of which 
almost half would be sugar. In other words, there would be 
a deficiency of fat and a large excess of carbohydrates. 
Looking at the matter from another side — that of ihe energy 
standard, we have seen that the daily requirements are 
equivalent to 3,000,000 heat units, and calculation shows that 
this energy could be obtained from 30 ozs. of sponge cake, 
but such an amount would show a serious shortage of both 
proteids and fats. 

Similar principles to the foregoing, when applied to the 
consideration of a fruit cake, also proves interesting. The 
analysis given is about what one would expect from a fruit 
cake, the quantities given being 31 lbs. flour, 6 ozs. powder, 
sultans, y/i lbs. currants, 2 lbs. peel, 40 eggs, color, etc. 
Calculating from the average composition of the various in- 
gredients the analysis would show approximately these re- 
sults: — 

Per Cent. 

Moisture 20.3 

Proteids 6.5 

Fat 16.5 

Cane Sugar 19.2 

Dextrose 7.0 

Starch 29.0 

Ash 1.5 

loaoo 

The necessary proteins, 4.31 oz„ would be contained in 

66.3 ozs, of this cake, and would be associated with 10.9 ozi, 

of fat, and 36,6 ozs. of carbohydrates, about half being sugar. 

Here, as in the case of sponge cake, there is a large excess of 

carbohydrates, but unlike the sponge, this cake shows no 

deficiency in fat, but a large excess. The necessary 3,000,000 

heat units could be obtained from 25.5 ozs. of this cake, but, 

as with sponge cake, the proteins in this amount of cake 

would be considerably below the requirements of the system. 

An analysis of ordinary household bread recently made by 

the writer, is appended. The following results were obtained : — 

Per Cent. 

Moisture 42,93 

Proteins 7.73 

Fat 0.74 

Sugar and soluble carbohydrates 4.64 

Starch 42.72 

Lactic Acid 0,11 



Ash 



db^Go@g[e 



May, 19 1 6 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Americans Now Are Elating 

RAISINS IN BREAD 

The California Associated Raisin Company, com- 
posed of 8,000 growers in the heart of the raisin growing 
district, have taught the nation the value of this great 
fruit food and have made a nation want it. 

Most of this new demand for raisins is for 

CALIFORNIA RAISIN BREAD 

Made with SUN-MAID Raisins 



— a new treat for people who 
thought they never cared for 
raisin bread before. This bread 
is delicious because it is made 
with these delicious raisins and 
because it uses so 
many of them, follow- 
ing the formula which 
we supply free to 
bakers everywhere. 



SUN-MAID :^>ecialties 

And thousands of bakers 
throughout the country have 
taken other advantages of this 
new demand for an old fruit 
staple by putting out 
raisin specials — new 
sorts and kinds, newly 
attractive, newly de- 
licious. 



Let us tell you what other bakers are doing and let us help you do the 
same. Here is a great big new and permanent feature of your business growing 
up and getting bigger every day. Grow up with it. 

Don't wait until you are only a trailer. 

California Associated Raisin Co. 



Meant Bldf. 
Chicago 



Memb€T$hip, 8000 Grown 
FRESNO, CALIF. 



113 Hudson Street 
New York 



MntDal acdprodtr— "8«w tt In Bin 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May,-I9i6 



, Google 



Cracker aking 

An iB^artlal Survey of the Cracker Industry tfironghoat ths Worid 



The Biscuit-Baking World 

Seme Biscuit-Wares of the Warring Countries— Real Origin of the "Hot Cross Series"— Biscuitdom Extras 
{_By L. Lodian, Manhattan] 



BISCUIT VERSUS CRACKEK 

fHE word biscuit is always preferable I 



instead of 
"cracker". Note that all the biscuit concerns throughout 
Wcrica use the word biscuit in their firm-names. 

Biicuil is internationally understandable— that is, at once com- 
irehended in any country; whereas "cracker" is only understood 
in America. In the British domains, the word cracker refers 
'0 one of those Christmas elongated paper-wrapped packages 
which young: folks have fun over (used largely for Xmas-tree 
adornment), by each pulling at a slim interior tab at the ends till 
it goes "bang!" These are the real yule-lide bon-bons. They 
are also called "snappers". Then the little package is opened for 
its two or three small sweets, and the printed good-luck motto- 

A contemporary recently printed a brief consular- report of these 
British snap-candies, the consul calling them by their correct 
Anglia name of "crackers" ; and the redaktor "fell to" and headed 
the extract, "demand for crackers" (as if biscuits were meant). 
Bnt the context showed the error, as it referred to the crackers 
containing the printed mottos et al. in side. As if biscuits 
would be baked with printed slips in the interior ! 

Moral : "Get the habit" of speaking correct American, and 
always write and say biscuil. Let the confusing "cracker" fall 
into desuetude ! 

THE OBIGIN OP TKE "HOT CROSS" UHES 

The crusades of nigh a millennium ago, lasted through a couple 
of centuries: there were seven or eight in all, — and the infidel 
Turk got the best of all of 'em, and has kept the gentiles' holy- 
land to this day. 

But the crusaders brought back to Europe many ideas of 
utility, copied from the Arabs — as the windmill, the pharm- 
acopoeia, the sugar-cane, fruit-preservation by sun-drying, and a 
host of other innovations. 

One route followed was through the country of Armenia, 
and it was noticed the people made a daily bread for the home 
with the cross (+) marked both sides. This form is still fol- 
lowed to the present day; and there are a number of Armenian 
bakeries in Manhattan who bake thus for their own colony- 
folks here. Hence we are able to show a few of their products 
in this still-surviving form of the earliest-known crossed bread- 
stuffs. The crossing is even carried into some firm-priced fruit- 
paste cake-lines, as the part-marzipan one illustrated, retailng at 
30C per, (The Italians have smaller-sized crossed fruit-paste 
warea.) 

There are three other forms of crossed-breads affected by 
the Armenian nationality — a dime- size about 30 centimeters 
(= I ft.) diatn., and about I inch thick; a 3-cent size; and an 
oblong size retailing at a nickel. They are too cumbrous to 



illustrate. The latter 
shaped (like the near- 
year ago), and lapsed 
ayi c'm'rs thick- 
S-crossed dryish 



probably, many centuries ago, cross- 
cross-shaped biscuitry illus-kribed a 
1 the oblong shape — remaining about 
sake. Then there is a small 
{tailing at a nickel. 
Singular detail to note ; All these last-mentione^ cross-marked 
bread-wares are multi-crossed — that is, they have five closely- 
paralel lines which make up the cross in each direction. This is 
simulative of the five fingers of the crucified outstretched hands 
of the Christ, and of the five digits of the e 



The cross is also used on the daily oat-bread disks of the north- 
British people, although its significance has been lost sight of in 
the purely utilitarian nation that the cross is there to facilitate 
division of the oal flat-bread into the familiar triangular- shaped 
pieces as illustrated in the "breads of all nations" opuscule in the 
Bakess Review of March, '13. 



The Biscuit-Baking World 
At Left: Crossed hard- Center Top: "Biscuits A I Right, 
tack daily breads of with handles": an Carbon- 
Armenia, showing ob- arabtk hard-tack tine, ised "stales" 
verse and reverse. The sesami-seed-covered. for the far- 

crossing is always both Center Bottom : Crossed ina of the 
sides. This originated fruit-paste part-mar- Paris biscuil- 
the "hot cross". (See zapan of the near-east^ c harb on. 
.r&fc.) "•'""Bl^itizedbyCjC^f,;^ "- 



SM 



Id th« museum of Napoli are semi-pel rified cross-breads, a 
couple of milleniums old. taken from the ovens unearthed at 
Pompeii, but they have of course no religious significance. In 
fact, the cross exists on monuments dating three milleniums be- 
fore the christian era ; it required the "incident" of Calvary to 
give it religious significance. 

Armeni;;r: I jikeries know not of biscuitry as we know it; their 
thin daily breads dry to a hard-tack in a day. — and these are 
their biscuits". But they are credited with having given to the 
world the faith- significance of crossed-breads. 

From Asia-Minor the surviving returned crusaders brought de- 
tails of the crossed breads of some of the Christian sects, and the 
idea "kot on", but was limited mostly to once-a-year observation 
in the bakery, and to single lines crossng. 

CAitBONIzED BKEAOSTUFFS 

In the past, have been illus-skribed the institution known a* 
biseuU-carbon (charcoal biscuits) of Paris, regularly made since 
nigh a century. They have been an item of import to America for 
the past half-century. High-enough in price always ($J^ the ^- 
Ib. can), they have in the last i8 months sky-rocketed to double 
that figure— $1 the J^-lb, "The war", of course !- Yet they are 
not easily obtainable at even this elevated charge of $4 per lb. 
A Beekman-str. importer is alternately "in" and "out" of Ihem. 

It is a wonder some of our own biscuit factories don't loot 
into this simple manufacture of charcoal-biscuits. Yet none of 
them know of even the demand for the biscuit-carbon — "never 
saw or ever heard tell of them". 

Carbonized "stales" reduced to flour are used by the Paris 
fabrits. The carbonization is perfect. Break a carbonized 
"stale" in two, and you will find the whole mterior a jet-black, 
without odor or taste. In the group-photo this month, are 
shown specimens of this carbonized breadware. 

To the French chef, the small carbonized "stales" have a certain 
utility used as they are. "High" game or meats which are boiled, 
are deprived of the taste of talntedness when three or four or 
more of the carbonized loaflets are dropped into the boilnig 
medium. The remarkable affinity of carbon for absorbing eman- 
ations or odors, causes the taint to make a "b-lme" for those 
floating featherweight bread -carbons. Then they are cast aside 
for chicken- or piggie- feed (there-is little or nothing wasted in 
the French cuisine), although having scant food-value. 

That carbonized breadware is perfectly cleanly to handle, ami 
may be carried around in a white-smock pocket without leaving a 

BEAN-F1J3UR BlSCUmtV 

Replying to a Duluth subscriber as to where the Niponese bean- 
fiour wafery may be obtained, — (illus-skribed p. lOI, Feb.) — , 
try any Japanese store in the cities, showing the picture. If they 
haven't the goods at hand, they can promptly inform where the 
biscuitry m!^ be procured, or would probably get it at once, on 
order, from the big oriental importers as at Seattle, the Golden- 
Gate, or Portland. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



hemabkable pefsistency of antiquatpdism in some biscuit- 
bakexies 

Apropos of the illustration in the April issue, of the curious old 
print showing the ancient "brake" and "horse" used in kneading, 
readers may be interested to learn there are still a number of them 
in use right along, almost every day of the year, round Mulberry- 
plaza region and the "pikolo Italia" quarters thereabouts, in some 
of the squat basement bakeries. En passant, I have often stopped 
for a few moments to observe the antiquated process, through the 
part-opened basement-door (if ajar). 

A big-diameter hambii-pole (about 4-5 in. diam.) is always used 
by preference. This "kavallo" ("horse") presses directly on to 
the dough being kneaded ; there is no "spread of kanvas" between 
"kavallo" and "pasta" (dough). 



With all the modern machinery available for every need of the 
bakery, it is surprising these relics of the past persist in a city 
like Manhattan. Yet there is a special import of those long-length 
big-diameter bambu-pcdes for this very purpose — kneading dough ; 
and the "kavallos" ("horse") can be obtained any day at about a 
$ per. One will last for years. There is also a trade in them 
from Manhattan to bakeries in other cities throughout the Union. 
Of course they all go to foreign -colony bakeries in the federation. 
It is doubtful if a single American baker makes use of one. 

Some day, en passant, a photograph will be secured of this 
still-in-daily-use antiquated "horse" dough-kneader always "on the 
job" in divers of the cellar-bakeries almost under the shadow of 
the biggest municipal building of the globe. 

BISCUITS WITH HANDLES 

These are mostly hard-tack breadstu£Fs from Italia and Osmani. 
The "handle" is for convenient stringing and drying out of the 
breadware, and for sale from jutting-out wall-sticks ui the native 
hard-tack bazars. The one illustrated is sesami-secd-covered 
(white) ; others have a sprinkling of poppy-seeds (black). 

The Italians have a far more picturesque variety of these 
biskoti with handles, at prices ranging from a nickel to a $^ per, 
according to the size, and number of red-dyed duck-eggs inbedded 
and baked into them. 'Round eastertide they are made and sold 
by miriads of thousands. This is really a biskoti-hardtack, slight- 
ly sweetened. Some extra-studded handled -biskot-. with confeti 
adornments, retail at from $1 to $2 per, and are a favorite Easter- 
gift from the fiamato (bo) to his fianxata (prospectiv). who is 
usually far from being a "belle" — hence (he word "prospectiv". 

The latin Italianos may be rated the cleverest and most versatile 
biskoti-konfeti bakers of the globe. Some of their "take-offs" of 
bridal-cakes — throughout, to the core, of the purest cristalized- 
fruit-studded confectionery — are "poems" of daintiness which tt 
would not be within the ability of any American cake- or btscuit- 
or pastry-bakery to duplicate. 



■Tis ovei 

aboutedly en-route to Mexico, the Golden-Gale, the Antipodes, the 
Ganges. Nipon. and via Cibiria overland to Europe and SO back 
to the Hudson; and. since, I've seen enough of the breadstuffs of 
'most all climes to warrant suggesting to the committee a unique 
restricted exhibit limited to just the unknown in biscuit- and bread 
-dom (excluding all generally-known types). This exhibit of the 
bread -"queers" of all nations could be limited to a couple-score 
specimens, and would be rated "the thing" of the conventirai. 
Has never been "done" before m history at an exposition, 
so far as is known. One of the committee's office- 
messengers could round up the collection among the numerous 
foreign -coltmy bakeries and importeries of the chiefer cities of the 
U.-S.. as Chicago, or Manhattan. 

All these national biscuitries and hard-tacks of the universe 
l^ve been lavishly illus-skribed in this monthly since March, '13; 
so it is just a matter of refering to the file for a selection. All the 
goods will "keep" and remain intact (barring breakage) indefi- 
nitely. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Frank Blghm* Raslgns 

Frank Eighme, for five years manager of the Whiteside 
Bakery Co., of Louisville, Ky., recently severed his connec- 
tion with the concern, his resignation taking effect on April 
I. G. C. Maratta, of the sales department, has been placed in 
charge temporarily until the new manager is named. It is 
understood that Mr. Eighme has gone East to make arrange- 
ments whereby lie will take over the management of one of 
the big Eastern corporations. Some months ago it was an- 
nounced that Mr. Eighme was to become manager of the 
Grocers' Baking Co., of Boston. This announcement was lat- 
er denied by T. H. Best, manager of that company. It is also 
rumored that he has been offered attractive positions in 
two other large cittei. 



May, 1916 



i A K E R S REVIEW 



Choice Formuias for the Biscuit Baker 



By Gluto 



XXX Crackers 
These are sponge crackers. In quality they are mid-way 
between common and butter crackers. 
5 bbls. strong winter wheat flour lo lbs. salt 
12 ois. compressed yeast 28 gals, water 

no lbs. lard 4 1 bs. bicarbonate of soda 

Set a sponge in the afternoon with twenty-two gallons water, 
the yeast and two barrels of flour. Have the water at a tern- - 
perature that will make the sponge 80 degrees Fahr. after mix- 
ing. Let it lay in the mixer over night and the following morn- 
ing make a dough by adding the lard, salt and six gallons warm 
water. Turn on the power and break it up. well before adding 
the flour. After the flour is in and while mixing, sift the soda 
over the dough. Make the dough clear and bake a trial to 
ascertain if the amount of soda is correct. If so, empty from 
the mixer into a trough, cover carefully and let it lay and 
prove up light. It should take about two hours. Run on a 
cracker machine, one-eighth of an inch thick and cut with 
a two-inch round cutter. Peel up and bake on the oven bottom 
in a good heat and dry out well in the oven. 

Molasses CookieB 
I bbl. short flour 18 ozs.salt 



10 gals. N. O. molasses 

30 lbs. lard 

Heat the molasses and honey 
a mixer and add the lard and water. 
beat well together. Sift the soda. 



16 ozs. ginger 

2 gals, honey 

4 tbs. bicarbonate of soda 

100 degrees Fahr., pour into 

Turn on the power and 

lit and ginger into the 



flour, add and make a clear smooth dough. Run on a panning 
machine and cut with a large round scalloped cutter. Bake in a 
good heat with steam, 

Holuaei Gems 
1 bl. short flour i gal. water 

60 lbs. C sugar 2 lbs. salt 

30 lbs. lard 4 lbs. bicarbonate of soda 

9 gals, molasses 8 ozs. ammonia 

Heat the molasses lo 100 degrees Fahr. and sift the sugar 
into the flour with the salt and soda. Pour the molasses into 
I mixer and throw in the lard and add the ammonia dissolved 
in the water. Stir well together and dump in the flour. Uix 
imtil clear and smooth and run on panning machine with as 
Uttlc dust as possible. Cut with a three inch, round, scalloped 
cutter. Bake in a good heat with steam In the oven. 

Egg Jumble 
150 lbs. short flour 20 ozs. ammonia 

So lbs. powdered sugar 6 ozs. bicarbonate of soda 

13 lbs. butter tz ozs. salt 

30 lbs. lard 4 gals, sweet milk 

2]A gals, eggs 3 ozs. lemon oil 



the eggs slowly, 
the milk 



the r 






24 ozs. bicarbonate of soda 



Cream the sugar, butter and lard and be: 
then the salt and lemon oil. Dissolve the 
and sift the soda into the flour. Dump int 
as little as possible to clear the dough. Run 
machine with a jumble die and bake in a quick c 

Macaroon Snaps 
140 lbs. short flour 3 gals, cor 

56 lbs. almond meal 
35 lbs. 
30 lbs. lard 

100 lbs. fine granulated sugar i gal. eggs 

8 gals, sweet milk 
Cream the sugar and lard and beat in the eggs, corn syrup 
and cocoanut. Dissolve the ammonia, t.oA& and salt in the milk, 
add and stir well. Sift the almond meal into ihe flour, dump 
into the mixer and make a clear dough. Run on a soft cake 
machine with a one-inch die and bake in a fairly good heat. 

Lemon Drops 
100 lbs. short flour ft gals, sweet milk 

65 lbs. powdered sugar 10 ozs. salt 

S lbs. butter 10 ozs. bicarbonate of soda 

10 lbs. lard 4 ozs- ammonia 

I gal. eggs .1 ozs. lemon oil 

Cream the sugar, butter and lard. Beat in the eggs and add 
the lemon oil. Dissolve the soda, salt and ammonia in the 
milk : add and after stirring all together dump in the flour and 
just clear the dough. Run on a soft cake machine with one- 
half inch die. Bake in good heat. 

Chocolate Drops 
too lbs. short flour 10 lbs. melted chocolate 

Q lbs. butter 7^ gals, milk 

g lbs. lard 12 ozs. salt 

65 lbs. powdered sugar 12 ozs. bicarbonate of soda 

I gal. eggs 2 ozs. ammonia 

4 ozs. vanilla extract 
Cream the sugar, butter and lard. Beat in the eggs and choco- 
late and proceed the same as for lemon drops. 
English Coffee 
I bbl. short flour I gal. water 

fio lbs. C. sugar m ozs. salt 

60 lbs. lard .16 ozs. bicarbonate of soda 



9 gals. N. O. molasses 



. len 



1 oil 



:. allspice 



Cream the sugar and lard and beat in the eggs and molasses. 
Dissolve the salt in water and add with the lemon oil. Sift the 
spices and soda into the flour and make a clear, smooth dough. 
Run on a soft cake machine with a two-inch die and bake in a 
moderate oven. 



Everything In 
CUTTERS 



Special Designs 
Submitted On Request 



Made For Any Style 
Cracker Machine 






£ngltal( 
fflutterH 

A Specialty 




SHOAF CUTTER COMPANY 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Grand Prize '""SSL.^^'* 



Choose With Care Your Chocolate 

The cofttiiigi o( your confectioiu are im- 
portant: they KKh the palate &nt and 
OQ them dependt m large meanire the 
deKdout taate of your goods. To this end 

WALTER BAKER & CO.'S 

Liquor Chocolates 

and Coatings 

are prepaied for the varied u*et of baken and 
coofectionat— sweetened and untweet- 
•ned; light, tneonim and dark— to wit 
your lequirementt. All of theic Chocolates, 
whatever die difioencc 4^ color 01 flavor, are 
absolutely pure, moodi to ure, and pohcn 
that unifonnity 10 neceMaiy (or confectionen' me. 

5«n</ for Mompln and pricn 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

Eatabliaked 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 




Do you intend making box cake, 
pound cake and sponge cake 
specialties this season, 

or have you already started and become 
discouraged with the results. 

Then STOP - LOOK - LISTEN 

to our latest proposition, the most liberal 
one ever offered to the bakers in this 
country. 

Here it is—It will start you right 
It is not expensive 

Mail us your check for $10.00 and we will 
send prepaid to your address, a complete outfit 
for making box cake, pound cake, and sponge 
cake specialties consisting of: — 

4 ipecU b«i uka pu> 2 tb«. Talac* Idag Pawto 
SIbi. Kaki-r«r-FKtiN IM bnM, uaU, aad w»>d 

5 O*. n>T*r-H mrptn 
5 lb*. HtO-O-lbbt S *pMld (WBilu 

These formulaa include the celebrated silver 
slice, gold, chocolate and creole, pound cake 
and sponge cake. 

We gucn-antee our goodt 

Tbia STMt baiiiiaii ■ f onn wu built on tbIds (fvlns. VALUE >■ 
tba thins ^t make* thi* tba UBtaM snwins apaclBlly heVH In Amer- 
ica. VALUB ud PURITY In tlia lukins t>t our produetfc uul the 
VK»nl Eood «nd sfllclant Hrrlee of the houH 1> vhat y on c m aiiMet 
Ed^t^lit ion cat wbai> you buy FAULDS' PRODUCrrS. 

Addnai all lettera lo 

Spadatty Dm p a r t m mHt 

T. A. FAULDS CO. 

196 State Street Boston, Mass. 



Bakes by, Hot Air Circulatioii 

All Parts Alike— Top, Bottom and Sides 

Equally Perfect for Bread or Pastry 

Address Department C 

ZAHNER MFG. CO. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Ask for "14 Oven Opportunities," Mailed Free. 



Let tbMu kDow that j<m read tb* ads. in BAKiaa Bmnw. 



, Google 



DEUTSCHER TEIL 

Vaniiu BwlckM — Iteaepta — FaduortUnl 



Praktische, technische und kulturelle 

Studien ueber das Baeckerei- und 

Konditorei-Gewerbe in Europa 

Ven Baecker-Consulent L. C. Klitteng, Insel Laeso, Daenemark. 
( A uf seiner Studienreise um die Welt 1912—1916.) 

nStadlen, wns heiast Studien la uuserem Facte?" Dleee 
Worte sprach elutnal eln Bilckermelster eu mlr, aJa Icb mlt 
Ibm flber die verR^^talpdeuea VerhSItnisae in den Uodem, die 
kh daniBls beeucht hatte, diakuUerte. 

Eb lat l>e<1auerli<Mi, dasa es Facbleute glbC, die der Analctit 
ilnd, daM inen nlctata luebr hlnzulemen kann, wenn man vier 
Ub Ctlnl Jabre In seinem Facbe gclernt, nielirere Jabre als Oe- 
Nlle gearbettPt uad aoblieRBlicb sein elgenee Oesdi&ft etabllert 
tat, — es trt Jeducb sebr bez^cbnend. dass selbst in unserer 
liocbentn-Ii.'kelten Zelt daa QilckerKewerlie in vlelen Hinsicbteii 
nach altertllmllchen Metboden gefQhrt und betrietten wtrd. 

In (Ten Ictztea celm odpr fdnfzebn Jabrcn Bind, erfren- 
llchenvelBe, in dieaer Be^iebnng l>edeutende Aenderungen er- 



Eine deutsche Baeckerei 
To^t, und nlcbt mm wenigsten linl>eii dazu die vielen guten 
racluchnlen, die In Knltiiriandem dngertcbtet wurden, beige- 
tnigeQ. In aolchen Scbuien erhUlt der Junge Uann elnen Be- 
prlff Ton Tlelen Dini^en, von denoi er rnrber gar keine Abnnng 
lattt^ Bpeclell wenn der Melster. bei welcliem er gelernt hat, 
althonservativ war und glaubte, selnein Lebrllng die vortreff- 
Drbsten Informatdonen gegeben zu batten. In Jetziger Zeit 
tuDM man In seinem Oewerl>e aucb der Faf^wlasenschaft deu 
EeMbreDden Plate einrftumen, und mit dieeer ist — das weiati 
fflU Jeder — In einer Bncbstnbe nloht vlel los. 

Wobl die bedeut^ndsten eraprlesslichsten Erfolge erzielt 
ntan Klbatversttlndllrti. wean man nach fremden LKndem und 
Slldtea gebt und die mitunt«r sebr weit rerscbledenen Roh- 
Moffe and tectinl^cben Aniagen kenncn lemt; aucb xind die 



klimatiscben VerliltltniBse von bervorragender Bedeutimg, und 
kulturell geseben. niacbt uian die l>eeten Roobacbtungen au 
Ort und Stelle, bet persunlicber Bertlhrung mit den Bewolmem 
der versohledencn StEldte, lender und Weltthelle. SelhBtre- 
dend ist nicht Jedcr In der lAge, derartige Reiaen zu unter- 
nebmen, wenn aucb Lust und Mnt dazu rorbanden stud, denn 
dae ertorderlicbe KapiUl lat bel Jnngen Bllcbereleuten be- 
kanntlicb nnr in gertngem Haase vortianden. Selt meiner 
rrdbeoten Jngend babe ii^h es mir ala Ziel gesetzt, mein Facb 
gfllndllcb kennen zu lemen und ee ilberall in der Welt zu stn- 
dicren, imd aebr bald werde Icb meln Ewansigstee Reiaejabr 
errelcben ; es let Icicbt begrelfllcb, dasa man In einem so gros- 
sen Zeitraum vitl eriebt und vlel erlerot. •, 

OemAm der Ueberacbrlft dieses Attlkela will icb nunmebr 
liber nielne Beobarhtungen und Erfabrnngen in den veracbie- 
denen Bllckereien der arossetUdte Europas erzUilen, mlt be- 
sonderer Bcrflcksicbtlgung tod r»ndon, Paris, Wlen, Berlin, 
St. Fetershurg <Pctmgrad) und WarstbRU, 

Im Winter 1907 glng Icb ziim ersten Male liber Helslng- 
rors, die i«-tinne Stadt in Finland, nacb St. Petersburg. Die 
Fubrt dnuerte IS Stnitden im Scbuellzug, und als Icb rrilb 
uior%rns das beillge Ruaaland errelcbte, war die K&lte, mit der 
icb lelder nicbt gerwbnet hatte, peradezu entsetzllcb. Das 
Ibermometer zelste 40 Grad Helslua, was mlt Zyttnderbut, 
dilnnen Schuben iind lelcbteui I.'cberzleher unverelnbar ist; 
icL mnsste mlch sufort mit mebr xweckmilssigem russlscben 
Oewand ausriisten. 

In clnem Hotel in Finland batte icb die Bekanntscbafc 
eines VerkEiurerM einei- der gritssten, im Innem Ruselands ge- 
iegenrai MUblen gemacht, und da er dentscb sprach, konnten 
wir una /iemltch gut verstfindlgeu, deun der russlscben 
^pracbe war icb nlcbt mQchtlg. In seiner RigenRchaft als 
Meblverkflnfer batte er selbstverstAndllcb die besten Bezlehnn- 
gen in Btlchei-krelsen. und es dauerte aucb nicbt lange, bevor 
Icb mlcb in einer rusaiscbe Backatut>e eingeeteilt lube, um da- 
selbst melne dfinlscben GebJieke vorzufflbren. Mlt dem Inba- 
lier konnte icb mich nur durcb den Mehlverkaufer, der als 
Dolmetscb fungierte, verstfindigen. 

Der Eliidmck, den die Backstnbe macbte. war geradezu 
ekelerregend ; alles starrte von ScSimuiz uud eine dicke Haueh- 
wolke lagevte tlt«r dem ganzen Lokal : ilber alien TrOgen und 
Tlscben wuren mit rnssiscbem dicben Rrdol gefUltte Lampen 
angebracht, und der Ilaucb dieser Ijimpen war noch nnertr&g- 
licber wle der Qualm nnd Qerncb der Feuemng. 

Sobald Ich die nOtigen Robwaren und meinen eigenen 
Tlscb batte, ging meine Arbeit raacb von statten ; ich macbte 
meln Gel^Htk, stellte es anf Blecbe nnd eetzte ee dann znr 
OUhning auf, WItbrend icb belm Ofen bescbBftlgt war, hatte 



98 



BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



Icli melne L'lir niit goldener Kt^ttu auf luelueu Arbeltstlscli 
lilBter elne klelne Roalnenkist^ Kelegt. von wo sle nacb kurzer 
Z*lt auf Nl miner wlederseben vemohwunden — gestoblen — 
war. NatUrlicb bnt Dieniaud etwas rou der llbr geeeben und 
icb konote Dic-htH tun; der Meistei' erkmrte dem Dolmelach. 
dnwi Ich die t;br slcLerlii-h In melueni Hotel vergesaen bStte. 
Wabrscbelulitb wurde die I'br schou am iitlcbsten Tage gegen 
elDlge Flascheu Wtitkl uuigetausotit. 

Dfls von ralr verwendete Mebl war iiusBeist krtlftlg, die 
Uefe war liesonderfl gut, und sowobl Butter ala die Frucht- 
ftJllungen \i'Hren anngezeichnet, Bodasx niein Oeliitck cinen rels- 
Moden AbHiitz fand, deun die Rustien Ileben giitee Oeb^ck, und 
die FabrlhalJou von felnen Fnictottorten In SL PeOersburf; l8t 
auaserurdeultlcli si'o^' 

Wtllirend nielner Jutzlgen WeltrelHe — iiii Jabre 1912 — 
kam k-h noobiimls nu<:b St. Petersburg und tilieb daselbst ei- 
ulge Wocbon. OhwobI die Arbeiter aiu i^trlke waren, merkte 
uiUD TCenlg davi>ii. denn Ibre Organ lEiationeu eplelen daselbst 
keine Rolle ui)d rur sebr gertngea Kntgelt hekommt man genU- 
gend Ijcuti?. Die liestl-ezahlteii Arbeiter rtndet man in den kttr- 
ISudlBOhen Riickereleii deren es sehr v[ele In St- Petersburg 
a'bt: die ei-stnn Krllfre bekommtn ilrkn 60 Itubel per Monat, 
die weiteren AO iind 3(i Rubel, mllRseii Jetlotli davon Kost und 
Wohnnng hestrelten. In den andereii Bilckerelen, in denen die 



Eine daenische Torle 
Arl»eiter lOist iiixl Wobnuug erbalten, ist ilir Gebalt 14 bis 1.1 
Kubel monallleli. nnd dlexes Geld wlrd Kum Einkauf von Wut- 
ki benutzt: viele Arbeiter baben keine anderen Anzttge bIb die 
nniiagllcb sohinutzlzpii Klelder, die sie bei der Arbeif tragen. 
Auch Bclilafen die meieten In den Bltckerellokalen, da ale bier 
WHrine Itaben, wiihrcnd Ibve etgenen ScblafrUume niemals ge- 
iielzt sind : aiK'b nebmen sle daselbst Ibre Mablz«lteu eln. Das 
IJi«>en wird n)ei8ten8 In groasen holzemen SchUsseln augerich- 
tel nnd Fflnf bU neolie Mann ewen Ibr Oerstenbrel mlt Ixilfeln 
a-.iB einer Sphilssel. Paa nach Einkauf von Wutki Qbrlggeblie- 
tiene Geld wlrd ftir Zlgaretten verwendet. Jeder russlscbe Ar- 
beiter taucbt ZIgaretten in grosser Menge, und zwar auch 
wBbrend der Arbeit, otiwohl dies von der Gesundbelts-Kommls- 
sliin verboten 1st ; aber der Russe schert sich um keln Gesetx 
nnd tut wiiB er Till. Dies ist keine leere Phrase; Recbt und 
Gesetz existieren filr den Russen nicbt : vom bochsten Beam- 
ten Ms ziiiu uiedriKSteu I..iufjungeii geht Jeder selnen Weg. In 
eIner Welse, wie es Iti ketnetii nnderrn T.ande stattflndeii 

III Wamrtiaii sind die ^ erbUltnlsae duch eln wenig befwer. 
— ich rede voji der Zeit vor dem' .tetztgen Weltbrteg. Man 
sipbt bier, d.iss eiiro|>illsche Zlvilisatlon viel uiehr Einnusa zu 
haben aehlen, und bemerkr dies anoh In den BHckereien. Mlk- 
iers Bfltkerei In Wars<*bnn bat elnen kolosaalen Betrleb mit 
cli^enen DampfniObten u, s. w.. und man kJinnte sle beinabe mlt 
der Ward Rnkliig Ho. In New York vergleichen. In der gros' 
fen Hanptstranse Nowy t^wlat liegt die felne Bftckerei und 
Grosahnnditoret von Laplnskl. und zur Zelt als lob dori ar1>el- 



tele uad nietne diiniacheu GebSoke elnftlbrte, babe Icb eb^so 
felne GebXckc geaeben wte je in Berlin oder Wien. 

Was Derllo anbetrirTL. so sind die BHckereien dort Im All- 
gemelnea niusterbart eingerichtet, z. B. die kbnigtlcbe Hof- 
Utickerel von Robert Hell in der DorotbeeDstraaae. Ules ist 
cfue der modematen, die icb je gesehen luibe, und die daaelbst 
aergeatellten Waren. apezlell Semmein und andere Weissge- 
i.iicke. Ubertretfen n>elner Melnung nach die Wiener B^ke 
roiitrodukte. Joseph Breunlg in der Slngerstraaee in Wlen 
Pteht nlcbt nuf dersell'en HJibe wie Robert Hell in Berlin; va- 
rum Wien selnen Weltruf genlesst, kanu Ich nlcbt aagen. Die 
Kitndltoreien dawlbst Ilefern allerdlngs wlrkllch felne Aii)eit 

In Qnatltnt wie In Qescbmack baben dlese Kondltorrioi 
.^ehnlichkelt mlt Rnmpelmeyer In Parla; dies Ist unatreitig 
die felnste Kouditorei In ICnropa, icb glaube, in der ganz«i 
Welt. Ich babe dort meine d)lnlsi:hen Gebilcke vorgefUhrt and 
bin Btolx darauf, dasa gerade diese lOirmn nach melnem Unter- 
richt dlese GehHcke permanMit in Ihrem I,4iden znm Verkauf 
lial, welcbe bel den Parleerinnen sebr bellebt sind. 

Die ..Boulangerle Vlenudise", bei der Icb ebenfeUs war, 
Ist Jetzt zerstilrt : bel nictuem letzten Besucbe In Paris, 29. 
Jull bla IS. August 1014, war der r^nden zM'trDmmert, die Fo- 
ster elntcexcblagen. Marmorbuffete und andere Elnrlcbtaoga- 
gegenstande vernichtel und auf die Strasse gcworfen. 

London bat wohl den grOeaten BAckerellKtrieb der Welt; 
Jedocb glbt ee keine apezlellen BUckereien nnd Konditoreloi. 
denn belde sind rait den Beataurants In tiondons mellenlangen 
PtrassHi verelnlgt. T-yon'a In London 1st in der ganzen Wdt 
ebenao gut bekannt wie Krupp's Kanonen von Eaeen. Dteae 
BUckerel hesoblirtigt 14,000 Peraonen, von Aeaai 1000 daa 
Brot und die OebHcke ftlr die verschledenen Servierungsstel- 
len In alien Tellen der Rleaenstadt za verpacken haben. 

Hill' & S!on lat elne spezleUe Brotbllckerei von anaebnllcber 

Harrod's in Rrompton Road lat weltbekannt fUr T^ne 
Pastry; seine .,'rea and Cakes" Bind hochgeschtttit von d«- 
engllBchen Arlstokratle. und elne groBae Menge Gebftck glng 
;^ur Zelt, ala Ich dort war, In dAB KtinigSBchloss. 

Der Ilaum eriaubt ea mlr nlcbt, all' das zu erzHbleu. was 
Icli aul melnen wdten Fahrten gesebMi und' gelemt, oder In so 
eiugebender Welse die PachverbAltulBse zu sdilldem, wie Idi 
sle gefunden. Hoffentlfch bckomnie icb noch Sfters Gelegen- 
lielt, weltere Sklzzen (Ibei- uidne Erfahrungen in der Baken' 
Review zu vcrrirfentllL'hen. Jetzt handelt es ^cb bel oilr, die 
iimerikHnl.tchen Verha.l1nfs0e eiiigciieud ZU studleren, und da 
Rlcherlicb viel Interesenntes daselbst zu seben seln wlrd, will 
ich melne tUeslgen Erfahrungen sp&terbin zu Papier brlngen. 

Vorerst inleressiert es nilch spezlell bier In den VereJnlgteo 
Staaten die verachiedenen Bohwaren kennen 7.u lernea. Bel 
utelner ersten Backprobe in Waabington. D. C, als Icb bel der 
Confeotionery Rausriber fUr das Hoch»eltBuifthl von Praaldeat 
Wilson und GemabHu dHn'isches GebHck martite, bemerkte tch. 
dass daa ameFlkaulscbe Robmatertal m«ine dreiatesten Er- 
wartungen betreffs Quallt^t (ibertraf. Mehl und Batter slod 
hocbfeln, und Fle!sclmiann"s Hefe, die Ich Bcbon am Nordtap 
und in Westlndlen versncht hatte. 1st Uber alles Lob erhaben: 
Tropen. Techniscbe EJInrlchlungen In den Bftckerelen An»erl- 
dle Kraft der Hefe Ist dleaelbe, ob Im Msmeer oder In den 
kas. sowie der Ofeiihau. steben auf der HQbe der Zeft. 



Owtenddk 

Mlt Wirkung vom G. M&n wurde in Oesterrelch die Bel 
luengung von 20 Prozeiit Malamehl bel der gewerbsmSsBlgen 
Brothers tel lung verordnet. Wo bereJts die Verwendung vtm 
Kartoffelniehl oder Kartoffelbrel vorgescbrieben Ist, venma- 
ilert sicli die bel zu menge nde Malsmenge entsprechend. Der 
Mais muss in etUcheu Bezlrken bis €0 Prozent, In anderen Be- 
zirken bla 70 Prozent ausgeinablen werden. Im Vorjabr inirde 
er bis S2 Prozent ausgemahlen. — Deutsche BOcker- u. Kon- 
dJ tor- Fa chz*4tu n g. 



sLiOOgle 



Mav, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 

Vereins-Berichte 



99 



T«I«lBigl« BB«lilKIII»>llf K TOB 1I«W To A 

Die HoDalsvereamuitung des oUgeo Verelua, welche atu 
Ulriwoch, den 12. April, Id der MKimerohor-Halle uirt«r deiu 
Vorsllu.' des Herrii Max Strasaer abgehalten wurde. erfreuie 
slcb elues sebr guten Besti<4)ee. Herr L. C. EUtteng, der dilul- 
scbe Sai'bverst&iidilge Id der BackwarenbraDCtae und Welt- 
rdseiMte, lilelt «lDen bJktist InteressaMen Vortrsg tiber die 
Hiclierel- UDd KondltorelverhMltnlBae In verschledmen I.&ndern 
Enropas. 

Das Bazar-Koniltee eretattete eiiieu B«iicht, wonach der 
N'ei[o-lletrBf( der Wiener Bttckerel In deiu ttlrzUcta abgeiialte- 
len Wohltatigbeke-Bazar. der hn Madison Square (iard«n 
^ttfaod. slch Huf $8,098.06 belief. 



■iBBZ BaackttmalstBi^VarsliiigBBg, Ifavr Tork 

111 fc^tlng'B Casino land am MVttwtx^ den 18. April, elne 
MHWen versa m nil ni% der oblgen Vereinigung stati, woeetbst 
Sdiricte gegen den Oeeetzentwurf, die Abscbaffung aller 
Fibiikbetriebe In l*enemeUli)lu»ern besprochen wurden, Jede 
KtelD-Bftekerel nilt n&mlicb unter die KlaseeubeselcfaDUug 
..Fubrihlietrleh", nach elnem berelts beatebenden Geeetze. 



Uel der Genera I versauiui lung und Beauiteowahl der oben 
;,-eoaimteD Aaeodallon am 12. April wurde Henry Sleget als 
Oberbanpt dee Verelna erltoren und dem blaberlgen Prftsldenten 
Uta Oraf fUr eeliie treuen Dlenste der Dank des Verelns aus- 
^esprocben. Wieder gew&blt wurden Vlae-Prftsldent Cbarlect 
.Anders, ProtokolI-SekretKr Henry Arcblnal, Pinanz-SekreCfir 
a. Arras (zum 22. Male) und SchatamelBter F. Seybold. 



OMA»«ftsv«rbaad d«r BaaekurHttlMcr BtooUjb 

later dem Vorsltz des PrSsldeuteu Karl Bsallug land elne 
Sitinng dee GeschHftsverbandea der Backemielster am 4. April 
In der Arlon-Halle, Brooklyn, statt. GrTosees Intereese fanden 
die Mlllellnngen von Herm Albln E. Plarre Uber die tetzthln 
aWttgehabten Veriiandlvuigen In Albany betreffs der soge^ 
oanDteu ..Walker-Coffey-BlU", der etwa SCO Backermelster ans 
■lien Telien des Staates, vlele Chemlker und A«rzte belw«ihn- 
icD. Der GeeetiTorBcblag, welchcr aut (Ue Inl-tiatlve des 
Staatoverbandee der Bftckermelster zaHlcksaftlhren 1st, sdirelbt 
brtuimitlldi vor, dass In FUIen, wo beim Brotbacken aasser 
den ToTgeechrlebeDen Snbatanzen aucb andere, vom Gesetz nli^ht 
verbotaie Beatandt«lle verwandt werien. dJeae Cxtrazugalien 
anf dem Brote vermerkt werd^ sollen. (Dfse Vorlage wurde 
Inzwisctmi vom Staatssenat abgelehnt.) 

Herr John Jacob Schmidt, der Lebrer der BUcker-Facli- 
Bcbnle Ton Mnrray Hill, rlchtete an die Broofclyner daa Er- 
snrtieii. in ibrem Bestreben, elne derartlge Faebschnle In Brook- 
lyn lu befrrllnden. forlEufabren. 



Znr B«h*nlgnng 

Inter dem TItel ..EUn neues Krlegsgebot" wurde In den 
ZeugeDzlmmern, den iQ&ngen und Tteppenhilusern der pfaizl- 
schen Gerlcbtsgebtlude folgende Mabnuiig aufgebftngt: 1. Httte 
dtch vor Prozeasen, dn kennat vlellelcbt den Aofang, aber niebt 
*s Ende. 2, Geh' nJcht am Jede Kleinigkfdt znm Gerlcht, du 
Kparet vlel Zelt. Geld und Verdruss. 3. Hast du elnen recht- 
ililien Ptrelt. m prOte, ob nlcbt anch beiro Oegner eln gut Tell 



Recht, lat. 4. Versucbe vor einem I'rozees zuerst eine gBtllche 
SchUcbtung und lass aucb den Oegner m W«rt komman, dann 
kl&rt Btdi vleles auf. 5. L'Dtemlmm dIcMb, waa delnem G«g- 
ner mir scfaaden kann, dlr aber nlchts nlltat, 6. Sage delnon 
Oegner nle, er h&tte gelogen. 7. Sa^ delnem Oegner nie, er 
batte betrogen. 8, HOre auf den Rlcbter, wenn er ram Ver- 
gl€dch rat, er nwlnt ea gut mlt dlr. 9. Mactae deine VertrUge 
ateis scbriPtllch und leee eret genau durcb, waa du unter- 
Bchr^bst. dann vermelnleBt du IJnklarhelt und bast Bewelse. 
Nur was du bewelsen kannat, gilt vor Gerictat. 10. Trelbe den 
Gegser nlclit cum ftuaaersten, du welsat nldvt, ob dn nlcbt eln- 
mal seiner bedarfst. — Deutsche Backer- und Kondltor-Facb- 
Mltung. 



ARMLEDER 
BAKER WAGONS 



THBf COST LESS 
DIEtrUlOKBCnED 

mErwoiuiMBi 
zooomcmisiiiSKio 

OOnVENIEIITTBiflS 
PDONITailPnENT 
3(13SmESeSIZES 
WHITE FDR FKE 
UOMCEOnAUM 



ARMLEDER. 



A Baker'« Libisij SHOULD contain 

GlENANDrS 20TH CENTURY BOOK 



A Veritable Mine of Recipes for Novel, 
Attractive, Salable Goods. 

Stnd for lUustraUd Circular. 
2d Edition. Price 96. OO 

FRITZ L. GIENANDT 

1S2 MiWKknetb An. BOSTON. MASS. 



BAKERS REVIEW 

BdUtai Haw T*rk, H. 



JAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



No. 630 

W« make 

BAKERS WAGOHS 

In tan patterns and 23 slzas. 

If KITE FOR CA TALOOVF. AND FRICES 

Tlw AMERICAN WAGON CO. 

•Oi and Syeamor* Sta. CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Youl Competltot 



battar broad with a 

Freymark 
Bakers 
Steamer 

T»a an; ovao, almpU t 
initalL labor uvins. ao 
nomlca]; bumi ffat at cm 
of tl.60 to K.OO a mont 
■Dd (a ufo-t«Ud to IC 



utaaaTul iDpiillea bot w>- 
tarudbnttobakar]'. 

Wltb the rreymark Ba- 
kara Scoamar you can baka 
battor bmd and todnee 



B. F. FREyMARX 
MACBINE CO. 

aiMNarkct Stmt 
ST. urns m. 



FOUND— 



An Opportunity 

which it will pay bakerB to investigate and grasp. Fritz L. Gienandt, cake expert and 
author of the famous "Twentieth Century Book for the Progressive Baker," has perfected 
formulas for Silver, Gold, Spice and Chocolate Slice Cakes which are taking the country 
by storm. They are called 

Cak-o-pur-fection 

7%e Famom 100% Profit "Slice Ctiket" 

Every formula is original, and can't be equalled. Anyone can make these cakes, and the nature of the 
formula is such that the men in your shop can make the cakes and still be ignorant of their secret. 

They keep fresh indefinitely, look appetizing and are good sellers. No stale returns. No crust. 
No waste. .Tcing keeps fresh and soft as long as the cakes. The manufacture of these cakes will show 
a profit you never dreamed possible in your cake shop. 

The GMwral Baking Co. of Boiton it selling from 5,000 to 8.000 of these iliceB daily. 

IVritt for prices for certain exclusive territories. Prices for the Four Formulas $25.00. Wood lined titts 
furmtked ai the foUowing prices .■ $12. 00 for 1 doz. ; $22. W for 2 doz. ; $30.00 for 3 dot., f^.b. BosUm. 

Don*t Delay— Writ* Today. 

FRITZ L. GIENANDT 

192 Masaachusetta Avenue Boaton, Maaa. 



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6(?^OT0 trmC5 TkK OOOGM THCiT 

nflKcs iHe eocAO that rwkes we 
SAues iH«r nriAKes tme BusfNessi 

nrn \[7/f^^r^ nil r iimc (n 



Tall 'em 700 nad bakiu rmtuw. Digitized by 



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May, I9l6 B A K E R S R E V I E W 



Our Capacity 
For Taking Pains 

is unlimited, and that is why you can depend on our 
service and the quality of our flour. 

Things done in your shop, you can watch yourself 
and know they are being properly attended to; but you 
can't go to the mill and watch the flour that is being 
made for you. 

It is good business, therefore, to get your main 
supply from a mill large enough to supply every demand 
you make on it promptly, and so watchful of its own 
affairs that you can absolutely depend on the quality of 
its flour. 

Seal of Minnesota 

"Thu Crmat Hoar «f tlu Croat Hoar Stala^' 

frees you from all anxiety on each of these points. It 
is made in a mill of large capacity which grinds regularly 
day after day under the ever watchful care of experts 
who do not guess at anything. 

We have been growing, too. An indication that 
old customers stay with us year after year and that new 
ones are joining them. 

We want you to. know our flour and our service. 
We would like an opportunity to study and supply 
your needs. Let us hear from you. 

New Prague Flouring Mill Company 

New Prague, Minn. 

AHoeiatF MBabn NktJoaal AHod>.tion of Muter Bakan. 



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Get the PROFIT-FACTS 
About BIG-PROFIT FLOUR 

1. Five to tweftty more loaves to the barrel. 

2. *'0»ota" is the best Spring patent for 
bread quality. 

3. Blending "Cuttw't Beat" Winter patent 
improves color and flavor. 

4. The flour can cost tnore yet the bread 
cost less. 

5. Bake more loaves for less money, sell 
more for more money. 

Let us send you baking samples which will 
enable you to demonstrate these profit-points 
about our flours — or, at least, write for the facts 
that mean bigger money for baker and flour 
merchant alike. 

Also get our Weekly Market Bulletin. 

THE NATIONAL MILLING CO. 

The Strategic Millers TOLEDO. OHIO 



A Comer Stone is Usually 
Built to be Permanent 



The good reputation and high quality of 
Corner Stone Flour have been continuous 
since 1877, and, if the wishes of our cus- 
tomers are to be granted, will last for- 
ever Comer Stone Flour wilhmake a 
solid and strong foundation (or your 
business. It -is made of the best Min- 
nesota and Dakota Hard Spring Wheat. 
Write for baking samples and prices-- 
now. 

Kiuad tks SampU 
Midyou'UkuyaCar 

La Grange MiUs 

Red Wing 



CORNER STONE FLOUR 



Wlhiift® Saiftm FIl©iuir 

used in baking gives that much desired texture; greatest 
customer satisfaction being the result. Q Made in the 
famous Cataract Mills of Minneapolis since 1871 — 
almost half a century of flour satisfaction given to the 
better bakers — it's popularity is constantly increasing. 

Why don't you get a sample of White Satin and 
test it in your shop under your own conditions? You 
will then see that you can bake better bread and the flour 
to use is White Satin. 

May me send you a sample and prices? 

BARBER MILLING CO. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



t Umb know th«t yM nad tk* mi*. Id Buom B«nnr 



Mil, 1916 B A K E K S 


REVIEW K 


^^ ALL HANDS j^ 




GOLDEN 


^8^ POINT TO ySr 


CREAM 


"THE QUALITY MARK" 


AND 

FAIRFAX 


TkU Color 


"THE FLOURS 
OF QUALITY" 


Diifomit; Sbenitb 


Strong Bakers* Patents 




Our Wheat, for grinding mix- 
• ture, is selected from a line of 
155 Country Elevaton owned 
and operated by us. 

Our motto — "Quality." 


For Bakers It's a Money Maker 


^J^ WELLS FLOUR ^^ 
^^9 MILUNG CO.. K^^ 


CRESCENT MILLING CO. 

DAILY CAPACITY W» BBLS. 

Fairfax. Minn. 

HERMAN F. WRIGHT, Mauitr 












Second and Revised Edition 




SECRETS 




of BREAD 




MAKING 




ByEmUBraim 




is now ready for distribution 




We are now able to fill 
orders for this useful 
book. Avoid disappoint- 
ment by ordering your 
copy now. 




Price $.110 Postpaid 




BAKERS REVIEW 

Woolworth BIdg. New York 



Motnal Boetprodtr— '^w It !■ BuaM Biraw." 



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May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 




BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 191 6 



eOSTS CERTS — SHES OOLUIS 

DORCHESTER 

PEAR.L MEAL 

Keeps Your Bread Moist and Sweet. Made 
bom White Southera Flint Corn. Cost a Little 
More Than Othen and is Much Better. Tell 
Your Jobber You Want It. 

W. U SWEET & CO. 

PRODUCE EXCHANGE N. Y CITY 



AUUmratff 



RYE FLOUR 



Know that we make the best on the maricet 
It's your loss if you have never tried it. Bet- 
ter get our samples and quotations. 

THE BLODflEn ilLLINB CO. 

JANCSVILLE, WIS. 



lUMLHGHT 

Qaality Patent 
**Shines above all others** 



EMPIRES! 

Qncen of Patent Flour* 
FOR BAKERS USE 



Unsurpassed as quantity and quality BREAD YIELDERS. 
If you are not acquainted with these flours ask for samples 
and prices today. Under new management. 

Mill remodeled. Increased capacity, 

THE NATIONAL MILLING CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

W. W. REMINGTON, PrmtiJml md MaitafT 



PHOENIX 


FLOUR 


A STRONG SPRING WHEAT 




GRANULAR FLOUR. 1 


fifty yean. 


JurttheiCmil BAKERS Like 


Write us for sample and price*. 


PHOENIX MILL CO. - - - 


Minneapolis, Minn. 



will help all anniiUl \t jod oicDllon BAKika Baniw, 



M»i, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 

ISMERT-HINCKE MILLING CO. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

MILL AND SELL FLOUR THAT IS: 

— Always uniform. 

—Manufactured in one of the largest mills. 
—Milled from the best wheat. 
—Especially adapted for bakers' use. 
— Absorbs more water. 

THUNDERBOLT 

75 THE BRAND 

ALWAYS UNIFORM 

To be sure that your flour, if handled the same way, will 
always turn out the same quaHty bread, is essential to suc- 
cessful and profitable baking. 
Positive uniformity can be depended upon in 



The Great K an e a a Flour 

Made from the Hard Turkey Wheat, it possesses won- 
derful bloom and flavor, and has a yield producing 
quality which wins over every baker wherever tried. 
A sample will prove our assertions. Shall we send it? 

Walnut Creek Milung Company 

great bend, kansas 

sZna Ban«« Digitized by VjOOy It^ 



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BAKERS REVIEW May, 1916 



I liElp all uouDd II 70a n 



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MM, 19"' 



BAKERS REVIEW 




z„: ..Google 



IlDtuI HadprocUr— "Saw It !■ Bauh Ra*iaw." D\{ 



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JtAY, I916 



:][: 



.KERS REVIEW 



DnncunDc 



3DL 



U 



Let Os PutTim on Ikfii^ Tradi 



If you are now having trouble with your box cake question — if you have 
not succeeded in winning over the bulk of the package cake business in your 
town -we can help you do it I 

Package cake is the best leader any baker can have. It will open up new 
channels of trade, will win him a wider patronage, and will earn for htm the 
reputation of a quality baker. The best package cake is made with the best 



DC 
DC 



materials— 



"JO-LO" Specialties for Bakers 



Years of experimenting and a thorough knowledge of the .actual need of 
package cake ingredients has enabled us to put out, the following high grade 
specialties : 

"JO-LO" SNOWrW-aiTE, f This is the combination needed 
"JO-LO" DRY EGG J for the baking of package cake, 

"JO-LO" EMULSIONS 1 plus the flavoring, flour and 
"JO-LO" SPICES L shortening. 

Let us do for you what we have done for many otner bakers. Our represenlative ivill 
demonstrate and show you just how to make the cake; give you valuable advice and 
assistance; and the trial will cost you nothing. 

Cut the Coupon to the Right 

— mall it today, and you will receive by return mail full particulars of our package 
cake proposition and details of how our representative will demonstrate in your 



JOE LOWE CO. 

303 Greenwich Street 
New York, N. Y. 




- - Joe Lowe Co., 

^ 303 Greenv^ch St., 
^ New York. N. Y., 

^^ Gentlemen : 

Please send me full particu- 
lars regarding your package 
cake specialties, and let me know 
when you can arrange to send your 
representative. 



Address 
State ... 



Goo^lt.' 



jDd ir you mentloD Binu Ranaw. Digitized by 



i: A K i: R S R E V I E \V 



MaV, 1916 



Hill bclp nil around ir Tou meBllou Diei 



I Retiiit. Digitized by 



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May, 1916 



i A K E R S REVIEW 



BREAD 
LABELS 



At Reasonable 
Prices 



THE RED CROSS RAT 
=i MOUSE EMBALMER 



Guaranteed to Clean Out 
Ail Rats and Mice in One 
Nighty leaving No After 
Odor — or Money Refunded 



The Mystic Milling Co. 
says: "We have given your 
rat and mouse embalmera fair 
trial and it seems to have 
cleaned out the rats almost 
entirely." 

Could you have a better 
testimonial? 

If you are troubled with 
rats or mice, you should get 
in touch with us. 



FELIX GIRARD CO. 



2116 4th At*., South 



Incorporated 
MINNEAPOUS, MINN 



nentloD BiKEns Review. 



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BAKERS REVIEW 



May, 1916 



>my 
Baking. 



1 1 



that 



!^0 replaces 
VherQ sugar 
t— and with 



:ru8t of beauti- 
erfect interior 



innot DOW use 
o conditioDB 



developing 
day reward 
Factured or 
' once, and 
ztracts, you 
extracts are 



gton, D. C. 



r 



\ BizavB RiTlRW. Noff acd. 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 







{♦J 



Insured Delivery 



The First National Fire Insurance G>nipany 
of the United States zigrees to pay to any customer 
of ours $100.00 in cash if they suffer loss by 
reason of the delayed delivery of G>rby Yeast. 

Their minute investigations proved- - 

That in nearly ten years there hasiV^ been a 
single disappointed customer — 

And that the biggest bakers in the country 
prefer this direct-from-f actory-to-bakery system 
of ours, and would not be dependent zigain upon 
a local yeast iig«it, any more than they would 
be satisfied NOW with yeast that must be de- 
livered every day. 



Of course our delivery system is possible be- 
cause of the strength and purity of our Yeast. 
If you have never tried Corby Yeast we will 
be glad to send you a sample upon request. 



The Corby Company 

Washington, D. C. 










lw::i 



Mutual Beclpiodtr — "Saw It iu BAuaa Ravi aw." 



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BAKERS REVIEW Mav, I91C 



MY LATEST BLUE-BIRD-BUSINESS-BUILDER 

—BRAN BREAD— 



//ere indemd U a large profit for »matt inveMtment 

— Lindeman— 



y?wvyiW*t>ta«v«py^ 




^^JF 



flftire Bran Bread made from ^Famous T?ecip^ 

RCV/iOLDS BAKina CO. C0LU/1BUS,0. 

In preBeiitlng my latest "Blue-Bird-BuBlneeB-Ballder" Tbere 1h abaolutelj no doubt ■■ to the value of BBAM 

I bave tbe extreme sntUrnclloD of knowlog tbat it has BREAD as a "Henltb Food Producl." And br mion of 

■Irendr received tbe "O. K." of same of America's fore- the fact tbat several of tbe Inrge "Breakfast Food" tac- 

moat bnkers, sod tbns, la recommeudlng It to 70D, I am lories are Don advertising "BKAN" us i delkloua and 

Dot depetidlDK entirely upoa my own JudKment as to Its bealtbtul breakfast dlsb, tbe worth of tbis prodnct la bclae 

value. most tborougblr brouKBt to the attention of the general 

□Qbllc. 
Tbe name— "HBART-E- LOAF" Is dlstloctly descrlp 

tlve of the peculiar nualltles of tbls bread, and wblle I farnlsb tbe formnlB, advise yon where to buy tba 

there may be baked In your city other ordinary Bran proper dour (or tell you how to get It througb your 

Bread, there will be but ONE bread kQOwu as "HEART-E- regular dealer), and In addition supply yon with the 

LOAF," BDd you have tbe opportunity of baklns that loaf necesanry advertlBlng copy, snd suggastlve tdeaa for 



If you a 



'rketlng't^la "bread. 



When tbat has been done, 
r Bales, you know In advance 



Initial Inves 



t you are Dot required to pay uutU after your sales bare reached a certain point. 

._ limited to tbe coat of the wrappcrH. nnd the re trlst ration fee charged by me for grantloK yon 

the right to use exclusively in jour territory, tbe registered trade mark— "HKAItT-E-LOAF." 

Write for further attractive particulars 



S. O. LINDEMAN .Richmond. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



Uutual Reciprocity— "Saw It In BiRims Rkvirw." 



^itti,igi6 BAKERS REVIEW 



CHARLES ROFFMANN, Inc. 

PRACTICAL ARTICLES OF MERIT 
FOR THE BAKING INDUSTRY 



p. O. Penn. Terminal No. 88, New York City, U, S. A. 

The Bakers' Ideal Steatn Boiler 

This boiler we have had constructed for the bread and roll bakery 

IT is constructed by an able and reliable company, of the best, safest and most 
serviceable material, thoroughly riveted and caulked, provided with ample size 
grates, fire box and fire doors. Will burn any kind of fuel and make steam 
quickly and economically. 

The Bakers' 'Ideal Steam Boiler is built to carry safely as high as 40 pounds 
steam pressure with a supply of about 24 gallons of water. While being used the 
water must always show in the gauge glass and the water gauge cocks must always 
be open. 

The Bakers' Ideal Steam Boiler can stand anywhere in the shop, out of 
the way, and only needs to be connected to a smoke pipe, water pipe, and to have 
fittings attached. It is then ready for service. Aoy plumber or steam fitter can 
continue the steam pipe to the ovens, proofing cabinets, store radiator, etc., etc. 
it occupies a floor space of about 24 inches in diameter, and is about 60 inches high, 
and weighs about 400 pounds. By removing the smoke hood from the top it is easy 
to clean the tubes, which for good service and economy should bedone every month. 

By the addition of the Bakers* Ideal Steam Boiler to a bakery plant, ample 
steam can be conveniently bad for ovens, proofing cabinets, to supply heat for cook- 
ing, store radiator, etc. , etc, , at a minimum cost. There is no end of comfort and 
service that can be derived from this boiler, and the cost of mEtintainance depends 
on the service required. 

The oven man saves the labor and time of washing each peel full, or pan full, 
as it goes into the oven, as with this Bakers' Ideal Steam Boiler he can have ample 
moisture in the oven for any kind of bread or "roll baking. 

In our experience with this boiler for years we have found 10 to 20 pounds 
steam pressure sufficient. 

The Bakers* Ideal Steam Boiler will save repairing of the hearth many times. 
We consider the Bakers' Ideal Steam Boiler thfe most important accessory in any 
bread and roll bakery, where beauty of the finished product is required. 

This type of boiler we can furnish to supply a bakery of one oven or of any 
number of ovens. 

Having the option to May 31st, 1916, to order the construction of these boilers 
at a very reasonable price, we suggest an early inquiry as to price, terms and delivery. 



We are demonttrating this boiler at 558 W. 36th St., New York City, [nspection Invited 
CHARLES ROFFMANN, Inc. 



will beip all around If you mention Bixna Biniw. 



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May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



eiMRLBS HIRSeHMnNN 



fii lw l l tt iwli, Cateran, Baken, RMtanniitt. 

Hotds, Btc. 

CAKE OBNAHENTS AND TRIHMINOS 

u> mtwij - ■ new YORK, w. v. 



W.W.WILCOX MFG.CO. 



BAKERS' CHECKS 

METAL CHECKS of aU kinifa 
BADGES 

CHICAGO 



WINKLER-GRIMM 

Bakery Wagons 

COST LESS 

Because 

They are Built to Last LONGER 



WriU for CotaUgam 32-E on 
BiAaty Wagtuu 

WINKLER-GRIMM CORP. 

Fanarir WlnkUr Bn*. Mfa. Co. 

2300 Linden Ave. So. Bend, Ind. 



Colborne Pie Machines Save Doagh / 

Fnr ANY Ralc«r "^^"^ '* "*> ^^^" making / 

dough, dusting flour, labor and time by using ^ 
Colbome Pie MacliineTy and every Colbome pie .' S**""?" 
machine or device is sold witli that guarantee X 

(jet I nil Book — f St.. Chioco- 

"Making Money Out of Pies" / ^»™i "• • "«» 

Web»veiiniiinintar«tinsl<ttlabaak ' " 

dittHbutiiin •monr balieri. It will patuiT >' , 
baker an tb* rirtt road to els pnOtilf b« X ' 
will md it. It l> full of (acta Md Hriiw « Th 
■bout pie^mAkliii. Tha eonpon to the ' 
rlrhtorapoitcardwlllbrinslttoyau. / Firm. 

COLBORNE MFG. CO. / ci,,.... 

15SW. Diviiln St., CHICAGO / Strart... 



LM tbem kDow that jaa read tk« adi. tn I 



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B AiKER'S; R:E:VX£W 



W^Y- ,W(ft 



The Facts About Arkady 

told in a truthful, fair-minded editorial by Edward A. Rumely, Editor of the New York Evening Mail, in its issue 
of March 30, 1916: 

MR. RUMELY'S LETTER TO MR. WARD 

March 30, 1916. 
My Dear Mr. Ward: I send you herewith an editorial from today's "Mail." This comes from my heart. 
Your work has appealed to me and I have heard a great deal regarding it. 

Yours very truly, 
MR. GEORGE S. WARD, EDWARD A. RUMELY, 

President, Ward Baking Company, N. Y. City. Managing Vice-President, New York Evening Mail. 

The Editorial 

Abuse of Legislative Power 



' It la onFortuiiate tbut tbrougb malice or Isnarance dlacaverlea or 
derelopmenCs tbat t?iid to benellt bamnnlty otlen are oppoBed U not 
attaokiKl. Wb?n Ellas Howe tDtroduo^d tbe neirlng: macblne tbe cr; 
went forth tbat it meuDt ruin to ivomen wba earoed a llvellbood 
with tbolp needlee. HargrenTea. who Invented the aplnnlDg Jenny, 
was assailed bv moba and driven from hla borne. Arkwrlgbt. wbo 
InTented the aplDnlng frame, not only was threatened by tbe blindl; 
■tapld. but tbe cloth makera, wbo were to beceSt moat tbroQKb hU 
geaiva, did tbelr atmoat Co destroy him. WUhoat tbe bowIiir ma- 
chine and the mUdd aplodle this world woold be In a and Hz for 
clothes today. 

We are prone to think we have grown beyond the narrow Tlsioa 
Of an age alon' to aee the worth of thlnga that mark human progreaa. 
bat loioetlmes It aeema we are mlatakea. 

Brep^ Is termed the ataff of life. Anrtbina that tenda to ImproTe 
It or lesaen lla coat la of vast Importance to toe human race. WKhIa 
the last few years the largest bread making ooneera In America 
made n most Important discovery. It has plnnta In Manhattan. In 
Braoklyn, In Boaton, In Cleveland, In Chicago and elaewt 



The 



It means therefore that 






1 of tbe n 



emplojM evsry li . 

bring Ita product np to the hlghpsl 

nation-wide. It thought It bad atta 

Occaalonally It got complaints from pairons wno ii 
».-.. — J ^ .. ^...-jgp ^]jg^ ^jjg bread they got 



tbe art of bread making t 
--■"-rd. lis reputation wa 
'fectloQ. 



Cleveland aald Ibeli 



In Plttahnrgb was different. 



bread by exactly the __ 

Unch to tbelr surprise, they found It did not make the aame oread. 
In everytblng there was uniformity as to Ingredients, except In one 
reapecL That was In tbe water mixed with the flour to make tbe 

The factory staffs of tbe great bread company were unable to 
solve the inyatery of why the breada differed, so the company sub- 
mitted the problem to Rol>ert Kennedy Duncan, bead of tbe Mellon 
iQStllute of Industrial Besearcb of the University ot Pittsburgh. 

Science reveals things that puEiled man for centuries. The 
world has marveled nt the rlcbneas of the Oobelin ttpeatrles and 
wondered why aome other looms have not prodnced their eqnnl. 
btit now we know t^at to the peculiar propertlog Id the waters of 
tbe narrow stream called the Blpvre more man to the genius Ot Jehan 
Oobelin must be credited tbe glorious dyes ot Gobelin. 

So. too, we know that to tbe waters of the Trent more tban to 
tbe brewers ate due tbe excellence of tbe Burton ale. and on tbe 
waters of Isnr more than on tbe brewers of Munich rests the 
rame of Mnncben beera. 

The scientists of tbe Mellon Institute found that tbe diversity In 
tbe result of tbe brerfH made In the vactous plants of the company 
-) tbe '■--- ■ "-- -' ■ ---■ — — '•-- — '-- 



Is In . _ _ , 

yeast food process discovered by tbe 1 
reduces this wnste to 3 per cent. *~ 
much additional food In the loaf. 

Tbe American wheat crop Is approximately 1,000.000,000 bushels. 

To add 2 per cent, to Its food value '~ - ' ■" — ~ 

economy that benefita every man. won 

Hereafter there will be no •li"- 

brpad company makes In Cl..,..„_, _._ _ _ 

and elsewhere In Its many plants. Science baa shown tbe way to 
make the perfect loat, to correct the variations tbat otherwise we 
conld not understand. In honor of Prof. Duncan bis name baa been 
given the process be discovered. It bus been patented and will be 
known OS tbe Arkady— bis Initials being B. K. D. 

Through Ignorance or malice tbe discovery o( ProL Dnncin li 
being fought. Just as were other great discoveries. In this State 
oppoaillon has taken a moat outrageoDS form. A bill Introdnced into 
the teglalature by Senator Walker— 

"to amend tbe public uenlth law, In relation to the manufacture 

prescribes that — 

"Bread manufactured to be sold by the loaf shall be made from 
one or more of tbe following substances: Wheat flour, rye, Coro 
flour. lard, vegetable oils, batter, angar, malt extract, corn ayrup. 
salt, yeast, water, milk, corn sugar, cereal flakes and any other 
substance commonly sold at retail as food" 

Then It goea on to say : 

"Bread In tbe manufacture of'whieb materials other tban tbooe 
apeclfled • • • are added shall have aBlxed thereto a latwl nnon 
whicb aba 11 be distinctly and conaplcuously printed In atralgbt 

tarallel tines of plain, uncondenaed, legible typ« In Gothic letters not 
■sa tban one-fourth of an locb high. In tbe Engluh language, wsll 
spaced on a plain ground, a statement Indicating the preeanee of 
such other materials. ■ • •" 

Dr. H. W. Wiley, tbe world's leading pure food expert, bus 
this bin Is "utterly vicious." Other oinclai pure food experts to 
whom the bill bas been referred agree with Dr. Wiley, 

It Is understand able that makers ol yeast should not be pleeied 
with the discovery of Prof. Duncan. Hla process, while ot in- 
estimable value to the public, will reduce the soles of yeast. 

It Is understandable that tbe hundred a of sniall bakera wbo 
make breAd according to their varying and Individual Ideaa and 
without regard to sclentlllc research, and In aome Instances wltboat 
so much respect for byglene as Is dealrable, tbould ba antagonlatle. 
A larger and a better lost by a great company means less patronaga 
for them. 

But It Is shocking that the legislature of the State of New ToTk 
should lend Itself to a scheme, engineered by business rlTala to 
Injure or destroy a company that has done a great and worthy 
service for all the people. 

To force Ibis company to put such a label on Ita product ta 
Senator Walker's bill specified Is nothing short of an attctopt to 
brand the product as Impure. 

Tbe legislators who seek to do this are as Uwleas and Tloleot 
as tbe members of tbe mobs tbat destroyed tbe spinning ]«nn; at 
Hargreaves and who drove Arkwrlgbt out of Lancashire. 

Tbey are making theuiselves tbe toofs ot men who would 
practice a sort ot commercial lyncb law. 

I. 11. — I. — ...... of decency and Justice tbej will kill tke 



If they have 
■ t bin. 



Tbey may and tbey should eubmit tbe subject to men competent 
to decide. Such a body should be composed ot scientist ■ — men 
who have given years of study to the matter of pure too " 



used. Such V 
quality ot bread. 

They studied wheat as only scientists can Study. The studied 
yeasL They studied baking In ul Its stages. They analysed and 
tbey experimented week after week and month after month. They 
left notRing undone. They worked until they found what was ex- 
actly right, and bovlng found it they reported. 

Yeast Is a plant and feeda upon tbe almpler compounds In 
nature. Calcium sulphate la a yeaat food. The aclentlata prepared 
H formula ot such mineral yeast foods as would bring perfection 
In reaalts. 

It Is from tbe mineral content In our food that we make bone 
and teeth just as from otber forms ot tood we make blood and Ila- 
aae, Tbe body Is In a constant state of disintegration and replen- 
ishing. 

Tbe use of calcium sulphate In tbe right quantity makes It 
necessary to have only bait tbe yenst to leaven bread that would be 
retiulred If Teast food were not present. Where yeast food Is lacking 
and a larger amount of yeast la used, carbonic acid Is produced 
before the gluten Is conditioned and ready to be expanded. Tbat or suppressed, 

means loss ot nutriment. 

The Ward Baking Company often the Arkady Process to all engaged in the baking industry who wish to make 
belter bread. We will be pleased to answer all letters of inquh? and to arrange for the use of the Arkady Process 
with any baker who is interested. GEORGE S. WARD, 

Adv. President, Ward Baking Company. 

Juat mratioD Baukb Bbti.w. Naff wd. 



May, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



ASK YOUR FLOUR DEALER FOR 

CAFI OR^ HUSKY 



% n & G ^' 






BRANDS OF FLOUR 



Wanted: 



Specialty to Manufacture 

A machine shop capable of employing 700 men and equipped with large 
power plant, electric lighting and electric power, compressed air, electric travel- 
ing cranes, and ample machine tool equipment, wishes to take up the manu- 
facture of some specialty, other than munitions, in large quantities. Has a 
large, modern iron foundry. 

Is now engaged in the manufacture of high grade machine tools, and 
works exclusively to close limits. Not interested in a contract for small parts 
of any kind, excepting as a part of a large assembly. 

The equipment comprises lathes from 16' to 48* swing, various types and 
sizes of turret lathes, planers from 30*x 10* to 60'x40', radial drills, upright 
drills, including extra heavy modern type, various sizes and types of milling 
machines, gear cutters, hobbers, key-way cutters, automatics. 



No objection to adding to the equipment as may s 
ample capital to handle a large contract. 

Address all correspondence to 



1 profitable. Has 



H. M. Manu, c/o J. Walter Thompson Co. 
44-60 East 23d Street New York Qty 



uCOQQ 



E roD tonod It — Id Biei 



136 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Howard Flour Tests 

Tell at « glance the Quiltlcs of Floor tor BaUnt Porposcs 

TAe Howard Praetieai TtsU are now Imi- 
tated, hut are UnattaimabU Elsewhere 
We have teited Bour foi 29 yean. 
Doei experieace mean anything? 
WrHm f^T d»»cripHM pfiem lit «f tmr poputmr 
*clMdmb C. T. A W. t—U 

The Howard Wheat & Flour 
Teiting Laboratory 

MinneiMpoli* " -c MiiuiMota 



Our Clskssified Department 

CONTAINS BARGAINS IN 
SECOND-HAND MACHINERY 

Read Page 137 For Particulars 



S. G. BAUER & SON 

HAKUTACrOBBBI Or 

STORB PIXTURBS. BAKBRS' PBBLS 



Wahl Efficiency Institute for Baking 

INSTITUTE OF BAKING TECHNOLOGY 



BAIONG, MilUnv, Par* Yaut CnllOM, 
Tcduucal Coatrol of BaUnt OparatioBs, 
Bakfng Enginaorini 

AftK MtwlTtwy coapladoa of thii csune ■ tkpe* oi muta 

OrIj tboM Mndnli indi il IbbM two ton of pncdcal open- 
macM w3l 1m recoanwadcd to mMta baker poMlioa*. 

itstttite tor Techntul CMtrsl of BaUng Operations 

L*l>«r»t««iaM ChMir«l, Biolopca), MittoKOfacal, PfanicaL 
TeduucaL Toting, (or ih* wumwilion of all nMleiiau hkI 

CoMoltatioa BnrsKlw Repoiti iuued on an* technical qnotioB 

.. »„L_:..i L-i Mratioiu. Thii department bai 

coBcemng brand maiwiirtMrina 
lall the eoaokia of EiKop* and 



n in file* aU the 



r fadlT pro 
\1 be callec 



s o{ ihe kupee- 
it eridcat EioB labotatocr <>- 



taUni lesearct InstltnU 

TUi IntilUe labon for iha adranceoeot (A bakin) and o9en ibe 
baking iBduMty ibe Wahl Proeaaa siuiiting of a natural mdhod 
to pcereol iba tfaleina of bteML Pure Noe'dwler culture ya^ 
•tpedallr adaptable tor bread makm^ Lactic fsaaal ptoccM to 
Btercot all bread Ji wi ea aod to iborten the ume of fetmcatation. 



anjF teelmieal problem ia the 



pcereat all bread ifaw u ea 
Ob Scienliil will vrork to wli 

IVritt 'or Cataiogtu 

WAHL EFFICIENCY INSTITUTE 

Office: 32r Smtth La Sail. SL CHICAGO 



Ma», 1916 



Dead Shot ^. Front 

Wn MbvB nMMjr if aot eatbfeetarr. Il^n 
CoeknMch Tima. SoU ETarywhera fer tk« 
hat 2B yaan. Evary bas |— laataaJ 

Daai BlR-n* bin of "DMd Shot" y« hM 
AdenrtUnc roe eUmad. Inudetwottan 



It J WTTj-iaim mTfi rt^nj— vi. n-i.i 



Dad Bbet aa by br tka bast aaA. In 




Pat >p fat two and foor 






B. Howard Smith. °-^ 

Katuaa City, Mo. 

Orto 

Jabaic Brae- 1-1 WeMfa St. He* Teric' 

J. HddMrTJr, Ine. Mr - " 1 

A^ (Mdal • Bbb. tMI Oeiflrid Atcu ChlawsL 

(haadan-Peltae, BaeA ead Ha^oaBIa, Mmt T«k. 

BMlIre « Oe^ ladtaaapoUn Hrf iMlnmi. 

Chea. DMBerr. Beken* BnptiUi^ New OHiena. ead 

a4 Awdn ire. GUnao, m. 
8. Barnr, UungnnlraiedalpUB, Tm. 
Bakarn OaataMBeaM'adaa Bonae. aa W. ttfe K. 

Lee fai— IM. OaW. 
Omaha Bakin Bepplr Co. OmahaNeb. 



The Cost of Home Made Bread 

kecfx p»ce widi dtat of die commctciBl bkker v^mb flew 
pficea ue high. Let mhclp YOU win oul by mot* ec«Mw 
icm) iniyins. Low pnced Sour it bnly one poial ■■ praCl> 
^e bread making. We can thow yoa bow to mt« oa flow. 
Mini and odier ingredienti. 

In our (cbool of baking we teach Sour from A to Z,balwt 
do not tfop ibere. Fkiur alone does not make braaid. We 
teach about ycMt, tugan, ahortaung agents, mflk, mak e»- 
tract*, water, warmth and the purpose each Mfrei ■ bread. 

Take ■ few minute** time NOW and write m fn 



The Cohimbas Laboratories '■ *** «^ '^ "-» 



Summer Course for BAKERS 

Dariaa Mar. Jona, JbIt and Aeawt a itiaclal lutiunBr coBna wfll be 
ofTeradpamcularlyinltablefortha** who have new had any t*-hf'l-' 
tnlninc and wbo can altori tbe tliiH dariiiK tha ■omiDar. 

T^ BakeiT ebamlsta this special is 



, , ,__t>tud;Bod to tx 

LodfvD matbodi and oQtilpment. 
Lari:* bakan will make i 



their daaarvinK c. 
"Blssar Thlnx*" i 

A noa inTc 



liiina employees to tntialDedte 



Operative Nlller aid Baker Laberatarkt, 

721 South Wood St.. Chieafe, ID. 
Kindlr furniah me with all arallable lofonnatioii i 
mootha. or weeka aoedal an 



Hntoal Hndprodty— "Saw It ta Bixmaa Benew." 



sLjOO^IC 



Hav, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Clscssified Advertisemervts 



No advcittMnunt aoeaptcd for !•■> th«n 50 a«ntt 
1A« right » apsa ^1 Uttarm mMr*mmd ia Itm omrm mmd a4i«*« to torwmrd oaly UgittaimU * 
M adrarUaemSDM is Ihlm dapsrtat«at. 



HELP WANTED 



D an MCtiaas by John A. S^ioen- 
Ktv*! Bdcen Exduuige, 1575 Secoml 
, New Voft City. Telephone J084- 
ax. Honber of the Bom Balnn' 
' I of Muihattau. Write or 



1: ALESUAN.— To handle the ver> beit 
J Ikte of machinery and equipmeni 
■s* offered to the Inker, either nn a 
ceaananon baiiis or otherwise. Address 
C U, care Baxebs Review, Woolworth 
BUf, New York. Jio 

WANTED.— Experienced salesman to 
tall on bakers, hotels and restau- 
nuiti with well known product in Cen- 
tral and Eastern States. Prefer one 
vitfa at least some bake shop experience. 
Permanent salaried position to right 
man. State age and experience in first 
letlw. Address G. P., care of Bakers 
Rehew, 1643 Woolworth BIdg., New 
York City, N3 



SITUATIONS WANTED 



aU aectiOB* by John A. 

idRr'i Bakers Exchanib t^5 Second 
Ave, New York Gbr. Tdepbone 3084- 
Lkmuc Member of the Bom Bakers' 
of Manhattan. Write or 



H» SAUOBBENT 



n 



;0a SALE.— Up-to-date bakery in an 
koB and steel town of 22,000 in 
Peaujlrania, doing a business of $300 
to isna a week. Price $12,000 including 

ivterty. Address K. O., care of Bak- 
ns RxfiKW, 1642 Woolworth Bldg., 
Hew York City. Ni 



p6It SALE.— Bakery in town of 8,000, 
r doiag business $12,000 a year, good 
kicatkM. Want to sell two-thirds or 
whale fbce. Terms cash. Address T. 
R, CMC of Bak£bs Review, 1642 Wool- 
war* BHg., New York City. N2 



BAKERY FOR SALE.— Twin eities. 
Have patent oven, machinery, three 
waceaa. Doing good business. Want 
to set M other business. Address F. Y., 
an •( Bakebs Review, 1642 Wool- 
worth BWg., New York City. N5 



QAKKY 
town I 



II paying in good payroll 
1,000. Price I550. No 
) delivery. Li vmg rooms. 
I. Ualden Bakery, Mal- 



FOR SALE.— or will sell working in- 
terest in one of the most modem 
and best equipped bakeries in South 
Carolina. A growing concern doing 
a large business extending over three 
States. Also good retail business in 
growing city of 44,000 population. Only 



district. Building 60 x 127, two-story 
brick. Equipped with most modern au- 
tomatic machinery and two new patent 
ovens. Reason for selling, owner must 
retire from active management on ac- 
count of failing health. If interested, 
address "Opportunity," care Bakebs Re- 
view, 1642 Woolworth BIdg., New York, 
N. Y. M4 

FOR SALE.— Up-to-date bakery, com- 
pletely equipped. Good location in 
residential section. Entrance from two 
streets, lot 50 x 170. Must be sold at 
once. Inquire Attorney Daniel 5. Flinn, 
iig State St., Albany, N. Y. Mio 

FOR SALR— Bakery, doing fine busi- 
ness, located in the heart of the 
business district of Bremerton, Wash- 
ington, P. S. Navy Yard. Reason for 
selling is to retire. Lunch and ice cream 
{iarlor will be disconnected if so de- 
sired. Splendid opportunity for the 
right man. May be had at the price 
of the fixtures. (ACT QUICK). P.O. 
Box 338, Bremerton, Wash. M9 

PR SALE.~Well equipped wholesale 
and retail bakery in Iowa, city of 
30,000, doing good business, has A. No. 
I Patent oven, good mixer and mould- 
er; strictly up-to-date in all particulars. 
Address F. Z., care of Bakebs Review, 
1642 Woolworth BIdg,, New York, 
N. Y. M12 



BAKERY WANTED 



^A 



(ANTED INFORMATION regard- 

' ing good bakery for sale. R. G. 

List, Minneapolis, Minn. U6 

MACHINERY, Etc., FOR SALE 

FOR SALE.— One Jitney Bun Machine 
and 300 pans. The Greissell Bread 

Company, Flint, Michigan, N4 

NO reasonable;, offer refused, 
about fifty different styles beaUr* 
and mixing machines for cake work, 
all good for certain classes of work; 
twelve good second-hand dough mix- 
ers, both single and double arm; brake* 
and other bakeri' machinery. When 
writing state your preference of make. 
Read Machinery Company, York, Pa. 

FOR SALE.— A Roberts Portable 
Oven double deck. No. 80, capacity 
250, Cheap. Address Model Bakery, 
22s Chestnut St., Morgantown, W. Va. 
M3 



FOR SALE 
Closing out our entire stock, we offer 

for immediate acceptance 

NEW MACHINERY 

3 Champion Moulders, 

3 Champion Box Cake Machines No, 
1^, including dies, 

1 Union Wrapping Mach. Co.'s Comb, 
Rounder — with single phase, te 
cycle motor, 

I % part Glaser (Bench) Roll Divider. 

I Paragon Spraying Machine, 

i^ lip. single phase, 60 cycle motor, 

1 Miller Sealing Machine, 

SECOND HAND MACHINERY 

r 3-pocket Champion Divider with sep- 
arating device, 

I 2-bbI. Champion , Mixer, belt driven, 

I i-bbl. Superior Mixer, double arm, 

I S hp,, d,c., 500 volt motor, 

I Streeter Bread Slicer, 

I 4-speed Peerless C^e Mixer, 

I Sturma Egg Beater, 

I Carroll Sealer, 

I No. 3 Middleby Oven 

1' Union Wrapping Machine, 110 volts, 

t i-bbl. Day Mixer, belt drive, 

I 3-bbl. Westermain Mixer, belt drive, 

I 4 hp. Vertical Boiler, 

1 4 hp. Steam, Engine. 
Any reasonable offer accepted. Write 

to-day. The E. A. Saenger Company, 

Buffalo, NY., Ms 

PHILADELPHIA DOUGH DIVIDER 
EXCHANGE 

FOR SALE— Used Machinery. Dough 
Dividers, many makes; sixes to siul 
your shop and capacity. One to an 
pocket. 

—ALSO-: 
Portable Ovens Dough Mixers 
Complete Ice CreamFlour Sifters 

Outfits Clipper Beaters 

Shipping Baskets Cake Mixers 
Radcs Dough Brakes 

Pans Ice Crushers 

Troughs Freezers 

Pony Mixers Cans 

Roll Dividers Tubs, etc. 

Thomson Moulders Electric Motors 
Gas Engines 

Everything for the baker. Two car- 
loads used machinery for sale. Very 
low price. Write to-day. 
PHILADELPHIA DOUGH DIVIDER 
EXCHANGE 

Bourse Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



W^ 



MISCELLANEOUS 

r ANTED,— A Copland Depositlag 
' Machine. State particulars as to 
siie, etc. Reply to T. C, care of Bak- 
ers Review, Woolworth BIdg., New 
York City. N6 

BEST CASH PRICE paid for 140-lb. 
jute flour bags, and cotton flow 
bags- William Ross ft Co., 411 HorA 
Peoria St. Chieairo, III 

r ANTED.— The address of all bak- 
ers who can use HONEY DUE 
HONEY at 5 cents per pound, two sfai- 
ty-pound cans to case, discount ■■ car-> 
lots. H. G. Qtiirin, Bellevue, Ohkk J7- 



W 



BAKERS REVIEW 



BUYERS' GUIDE 



May, 1916 



For p>te nnniberi of adTertiieiB lee "Index to AdTertiMments" on last p*ge. 



ADVBBTMINO 

". o., y 

— Jnl Ct., , 

■ebnlM Adf. Benloe. Cblcago, III 

AI^OND PASTB, BTO. 
BMi; B*Dr7, New Xork. 

ABC RITE CT8 
Caoler Co., C. D., FlttiburKb, Pa. 
Alta at Supphf Himmt. 



WUcox Mfc. Cd., W. W., CblcftKO, IlL 
•LBNDtNO MACHINEBT 

CtuuDDloD IficblDcrr Co., JuIlM, in. 
Da7. 3- H. Co.. Cincinnati. O. 
Jabnn Brother!, New York. 
Bend llBcblner* Co., York, Pa. 
Tbomaon Haeblne Co.. Bellrvllle. N. J. 
Wmdst ft Pflelderer Co.. Saxlnaw, Ulch. 
Sh also M«Un*rv oiui Toolt. 
BOILRRB (STEAM) 
Frermark Macblne Co., B. F.. St. Iionla, 

Roffmann. Inc.. Cbaa.. New York. N. Y. 

BOWLB 
KatalDKer Co., &d., ChlpiKo. III. 
JabnTC Brothera. "ew York. 
UUlB,7rboa. A Bto.. Phlladelpbla, Pa. 
AUo at ShvpIv Himmt. 



JabnrB Brotbera, New Yori. 
Lewla. G. B. Co., Watertown, WU. 
PuSw-Hubbard Ulg. Cd„ HtnoupoUa, 

lUnn. 
Barton lllg. Co., ^bleafn. III. 

BOXES (FOLDINQ PA FEB) 
Bee Hive Paper Box Co.. Indlanapolta, !nd. 
PnSer-HDbbaid tUg. Co.. lUnnaapolU, 



Dar. J. H. Co., ClnclDoatl, O. 
Harton, Pcmbrok* D., Pblladelpbla, Pa. 
Bockwoll, L. A. Co., Brooklrn. N. Y. 
Wornec ft Pllelderer Co., Bavlnaw, lUeb. 
Sf aito' Maehintrv and TaaU. 
BBEAD OEDMBINO HACHIirB 
D«r. 3- B. Co. Clndnnatl, O. 
Warner ft POdderar Co., Sactnaw, lUeb. 

BBEAD I.ABBI^ 
Wttoi PrintlnK Co., Ealamaaoo, Hleb. 
National Blndfna Mac. Co., New York, 
N. T. 

BREAD SDGAB 
Corn Prodocta ReflolnB Co., New York. 



table Parebment Co., Kal- 



Nowark FarafllD* ParchtneDt ft Paper Co., 

New York, N. Y. 
Dnlon Waiad and Parebment Paper Co.. 

HambDra. N. J. 
Waterproof Paper ft Board Co.. Cincinnati, 

Oblo. 

CAKE ItACHINBBY 



I'lphla, Pa. 



Hobart* uif. ~Co., The' TroVT ooio. 
Jabora Brotbera. New York. 
MIllB. Tboa. ft Bro., PhlladeljibU, Pa. 
Scad HacblneiT Co„ York, Pa. 
Thomaon Ifacblne Co.. Bellertlle, M. 3. 
Wamar ft PIMderer Co., Ba^naw, HIch 



Aim at ait Sttpfly Hm—t. 



Baker, Walter ft Co.. 
Haa*. 

OONROTIOHBRS' AND BAKBB8> 
BUrrUBS 

Panlda Co., T. A., Beaton, Haai. 
Onmpert ft Co^ 8., Brooklrn. N. T. 
HlrMbmaan. Cbaa.. N*w fork. 
■ • -. A., Co.. - - 



CBACKEB COTTEBS 

SLoat Cutter Co., ludlaDopolla, Ind. 

CBACKEB MACUINEBY 
Cbamplon Uacbluerr Co., Jolle*, 111. 
Bartoo. Pembrok* D„ Pblladelpbla, Pa. 
Boekwell Co., I.. A., Brookljn, N. X. 
DOUOH DIV1DEB8 



. Bakera Uacblneir Co.. St. LOHla. 

Cbampioa Haebluerr Co., Joliet, :'A 
Dntcbeaa Tool Co., Beacon, N. i. 
JaboTK Brotbera, New York, 
Reed Uacblnery Co^ York, Fa. 
TbomaoD Machine Co.. BellcrUle. N. J. 
Trlamph MCic. Co., Cincinnati, O. 



_elbel Institute of Tecbnologr, Cblcaso, 
Operative Miller Laboratorlea, Cblea)tu. ill. 

BOO PBODDCTB 
Armour & Co., Oilcn^o. lil. 
Jabnrg Brotbera. Neiv York. 
Layton Co., Tlie John. New York. 
Merrell Bonis Co.. ftyracnae. N. Y. 
ELEOTBICAL APFABATBB AND 
BCPPUBB 
General Electric Co., Bchenectad;. N. Y. 
Lincoln Electric Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
WeStlnehaUHe Blectric ft Mr^. Co., Pltta- 
hnrgb. Pa. 

KUCTBIC OVENS 
anghee Electric Heotlng Co.. Chicago. III. 



GIrard Co.. Felli. MlDenpoIlB. Minn 
IIii.HHlne. W. D.. SI. I.ouls, Mo. 

BXTRACTH AND rOLOBS 
Koote ft Jenka, Jackaon, Mlcb. 
Tnchg, H., New Ynrk. 
.labiirg ItratbrrB. Neir York. 
AlK <U Supplu Hovta. 
FIXTtlREtt 
llniier. ». C. * Bon. nrooklyu, N. Y 
Gocbel & Dleaneaa. Chicago. 
Jabnrg Brotbera, New York. 

Alto m SKm COttt and SUpplv Bou—t 

Can Haal. HamlBr. Bto. 

Sweet, W. L., Co.. New York, 
Bra — 



Barber Ulllinc Co., MlnneapoUa, Ulnn. 
Bfljr State Milling Co., Winona, Ulnn. 
BlK Diamond MUTa Co., Hlnneapolla, Ulnn. 
Blodgett Milling Co.. JaneaTllIe, Wla. 
Campbell, L. a.. Milling Co., Blooming 

Prairie. Minn. 
Crescent Milling Co., Fairfax, Minn. 
Eagle Roller Mill Co.. New Utm. Ulnn. 
La Orange Ullla. Red Wing, Ulnn. 
LlHtmnnliini Co., La CmiKte, Wla. 
NbHoubI Milling Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
National HIlHng Co.. Hlnneapolla, Mind. 
New Prague Vloaring Ulll Co., Now 

Pragne, Ulnn. 
New ifW Boiler UUI 



Minn. 



New UlB. 



Plymonth Milling Co., Le-Mara, Iowa. 
Red Wing Hilling Co., Red Wing. Minn. 
Bniaell Ulller Mlg. Co., MInnenpoTla. Minn. 
Sbcflleld King Mis, Co.. MInneannllB, Ulnn. 
Slern ft Bona. 8., Ullwankee, Wfa. 
Tennant ft Ho7t. Lake City, Ulan. 
Waihbnm Croahr Co.. Hlnneapolla. Mlon. 
WeltB Floor Hilling Co., Wella, Minn. 

Whole Wheal Pear 
Old Oriat Mill, Cbarleatown, Haas. 
Potter ft Wrlgbtlngton. Cbarleatown Uaaa. 

wlntw Wheat Flaar 
Coomba Milling Co., Coldwater, Ulcb. 
Hunter Ullltne Co., Wi>11ingtnn, Rana. 
■ '-^o1 Mill ft Elev. Co., Sterling, 



Kamn 

lamert-HIncke MIr. Co., 
Kannaa Mil. A RiO. Co 
I.nmhee FInur Mills, Hi 



Kansaa CItY. Mo. 



Miller . 

Ohio. 
HIIU, Thoa., ft Bro., PblUdelpUa. Fa. 

INSECT FOWDEB, Bia 
B. Howard Smith. Saoaaa CItj. Ha. 
Iluaslng. W. U., St. Loala, Uo. 
Aha M alt Sutmly HouM. 
INSULATING BBIOK 
Armitroug Cork ft Inialatlon Co., nna- 
bnrgh, Pa. 
I^ 

.Inmbna Labo 

oward Wheat and Flour Testing Labori- 
tory, MinneapoUa, M'nn. 
OperatlTc Miller nnd Baker UiboratorKt. 

Chicago. 111. 
Selbel luBtttute of Technologr, Oikage, 

Wabl BQclencr Inatltule. Cblcago, Itl. 
UACHINERY AMD TOO!,* 

Tht /oUowinff Conctmt Matufacturt Mtaekimmt 

of ail kindtfor Baktriii. 
American ^Bakeri UBCbtnarr Oe.. K 



Jollat, III. 



-. _. Co, Cin'dnnak, O. 

Dntcheaa Toot Co., Beacon. N, 

Freymark Machine Co., B. F, 



^ -,., ClndnnatL O. 

a.oenIg- Keller Co., Lancaater, Pa. 
Mnsg, The Ang. Co., Baltimore, Ud. 
MUla, Thoa. ft Bro., phlladelpbla. Pa 
Read Machinery Co., York, Pa. 
Rockwell L. A., Co., Brooklrn. N. T 
RolTmann. Inc.. Chas., New York. N. V 
Tbomaon Uaeblne Co.. BelleriUa. M. J. 
Triumph Mfg. Co.. Cincinnati. O. 

It. 1 n^^flp^, f.„^ Baalnaw, 

ALT EBTBAOTR 

_. ProdDcta Co.. Cblcaco. 111. 

Amerlcnn Diamalt Co., Cincinnati. O. 
BnllnntlKf. P.. ft Bona. Newark N. J 
CrowD Maltose Co., Chicago, IIL 
Hecbel Ufg. Co.. Chai.. Mllwankaak Wk. 

UII,K POWDBB 
Bkenberg Co.. Cnrtland, V. Y. 
Onmpert & Co.. B.. Brooklyn, N. T. 
Jabnrg Brotbera. New York. 
Uerrefl Sonle Co.. Byraniae. N. T. 

UINOB HKAT 
Jabnrg Brotbera. New York. 

MIXJNQ MACHINBa 
Champion Hnchlnery Co.. Jotlet, III. 
Par. J. H. Co.. Clndnnstl, O 
Dutctieea Tool Co., Beacon, N. Y. 
Qottachalk ft Co.. Reedarllle. Pa. 
Barton. Pembroke D.. Pblladelphla, Pa. 
Jabnrg Brotbera. New York. 
The Hobart Ufg. Co.. Tror. OMo. 
Lynn- Superior Co.. Cincinnati, O. 
Ullla, Thoa.. ft Bro., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Read Uaeblnerr Co., York. Pa. 
Rockwell. I.. A,. Ca, Brookim, H. T. 



Tfaomion' Macblna~'Ca..~Beli<rrlUk it. j. 
Trlompb Uff. Co., ClBclBBatL OUo. 
Wemet ft PDeMerer Co., Saginaw, mck 



uoLniNo wAommn 

Champion MBcblurr Co.. JoUet, m. 
TbomaoD Mnchlne Co.. Belleville. If. J. 
Trinnpb Mfg. Co.. Cincinnati, O. 

HOTOIIS 
General RIeetrle Co., Seheneetadr. H. T. 
Lincoln RIectrk Co.. Clereland, Obto. 
WestlDgbonne Blee. ft Ufg. Co.., PMa- 

NOTKLTIBS 

Cmier Mfg. Co.. Chicago. IIL 
French China Co., Bebrlng. D. 
OLEOMA HO A RINB 
Jaborg Brotbera. New York. 



Dnhrknp Oven Co.. N«r Tnrk. 
Ftah. A. J., ft Co., Walwonh. Wta 
Nallonal Otpd Co.. Beacon. N. T. 
Peteraen Otpb Co., Chicago. Ill 
Standard Oren Co.. IMttabnrgh. Vm. 
Werner ft Pflelderer Co.. flagloaw. 

Draw PlaU 
Werner ft Pflelderer Co.. 8agtna*r, 



Tint- 



Tnn1 Co.. 



Hai, 1916 



5 AKERS RE V IE V/ 



Altreilit, F, J^ Plttabureh, Pa. 
mtcMH Tool Co., Uhwjuu, >. E. 
HltolMnl Otsu Co., Nan York and < 



Krt*S^ei 



_ _ _a Co.. Newburjport, Masi. 
. I, Tboa., * Bro., PblladelpUla. Pa. 
Tillor luaCrumeut Co.. Hocbem^r, U. V. 
biUt*. Auk.. New York, N. Z. 

Fartable 
Bonnet Otsd Compac)', Uuttle Creek, Mlcb. 
BMcett Co., G. &., BnrllustOQ, Vl. 



HibliMd ( 



I Co.. New York and 1 



Uwk Dven Co., Newburrport, Maaa. 
Hlddlebr-Haraliall Oveo Co.. Cblcago. III. 
MUdlebT Otm Co., New Tork, N. X. 
Sdd Poitablo Oren Co.. Buffalo. N. T. 
Bobena Portable Oreo Co., ChleaBO, III. 
Trlampb litg. Co.. CI net on «tl, O. 
Eabaer Htit. COm Kaoaaa Cltr, Uo. 

Bed aod Botarr Ovcna 
diaiDploD IfaeblnerT Co.. Jollet, III. 
BartoD, Pembroke D.. PbUadelphla. Pa. 
FAFBH 
St Waxed Paptr. 
PANS 
HnU, W. a. * Bona Co., Pblla.. Pa. 
Jabnrf BrotkeTa, New Xork. 
KlUnaer, Bdward. Co.. Cblcafo, 111. 
Haai. ^he Adk.. Co., Baltimore, Ud. 
Meek O'eD Co., Newbtiryport Masg. 
Ulla, Thoa., A Bro.. PhlladetpbU. Fa. 

FKBI. BI^ADCa 
i««Tlcan Pee) Co., Cblearo, tIL 
Bantr, B. C, * Sod. Brooklrn, N. T. 
libarg Brotberi, Kew Tork. 
una, Thoa.. ft Bro.. PMIadpipbia. Pa 
Scbroeder. H. L., Cblcaco. IIL 

FIX FII.I.I1VGB 
Iibnion, H. A., Co., Boaton. Uaaa. 

FIB HAORINBBT 
Ctlbone Mfr Co., CMcaKO. 111. 

FINE APPLES 
LIbbT, MrNellt & Llbby, Cblcaffo. Ill 

pRBitiir>i8 

French Cblira Co.. SebriqR. O, 
flahce. J. W., Foondrr Co., WeaterTllle, 
Ohio. 



lUrror PriDtias <■ 



PBlNTtMO 



, luJamaaoo, Ulcb. 



PSBLIOATIONS 



Olebandt. toTlta 1 

RACKS, TBCCKB, STO. 

Da;, J. U. Co., ClnduDHtl, O. 
HartoD, Pembroke D., puiladelpbla. Pa. 
Jaburg Brotliera, New York. ■ 

Jobnaon. U. A., Co.. Boaluu. Maaa. 
KaUloser Co.. Bd.. Chicago. IIL 
Peerloas Wire Goods Co., Lafayette, Ind. 
Mwk Oven Co., Newburyport, Maaa. 
Bead Uacbluery Co., i'urk, Pa. 
Uuberta Portable Otco Co., CblcagO, IIL 
Triumpb MIg. Co^ Clnelnnatl, O. 
Uuiou Sanltair Baek Utg. Co., Albion. 

HIcb. 
Weruer ft POelderer Co.. Sactnair, Ueb. 

BAISINS 
OalltottiU Awociated Ralaln Co., PreaDO. 

CalU. 

BODNDBBS 

UdIoo Wrapping Mac. Co., Jollet, 111. 

SACK OUUNBBS 
TbomaoQ Uacblne Co.. Bellefllle, N. J. 



Pneumatic Scnle Corp.. Ltd., Norfolk 

DoiTDB. Maan. 
Trtampb Mfg. Co., CtacInDatl, O. 
Tbomaon Unchloe Co., Bellerllle, N. J. 
Werner ft Fflelderer Co., Soglnaw, Ulcb. 

SEALlNa MACHINES 
Mirror PrlotlDg Co,. Ralamaaoo, Mlcb. 

SEALS 
Cbicago Car Seel Co., Cblcaco, 111. 

SHOW OAHBB 
Baoer, 8. C, ft Boa, Brooklya. N. I. 
Ooebel ft Dleaceaa, CblcnKO. IIL 
Jabnrg Brolbera, New Tork. 



Hpek OVen Co., Newburyport, Maaa. 
Mllla, Tboa., ft Bro., Pblladelpbla. Pa. 

SFPFLT HODBEB 
Allen ft Co., J. W., Cblcago, 111. 



Jabnra Brothera, Naw Tork. 



Roberta Portable Oyen Co., Cblcaga, II 



S.'* 



Taylor Inatrumi ^,., _, 

Auk- Zaablti, New York. N. ' 
T BUCKS (Uotar) 
Auto Car Co., Ardmore, Pa. 
Stndebakec Corporation, IndianapoUa, 
lud. 

nTXNSII,8 
Jabnrg Brothera, New York. 
Kntaluaer Co., Ed., Cbieago, la 
MUla. Tboa., ft Bro., PtdUdelpbIa, Pa. 
AI» at all Sutiplr Houtt. 
WAOOMB 
American Wagon Co., Tbfc Cincinnati, O. 
Armleder Co., O^ ClneinDati. Oblo. 



lud. 

WAXBD PAPBBS 

Central Waxed Paper Co., Chicago. IIL 
Kalamaioo Taf«table Parcbment Co., Kal- 

amaaoo, Ufeb. 
Ulrror Printing Co,, Ealamaaoo, Mich. 
Newark Paralltiie Parcbment A Papw Co_ 



Parcbment paper C*.. 
, Cincinnati. 



Hamburg. _.. ,. 
Waterproof Paper ft Board 

Oblo. 

WBAPFING UAOHINBB 
Hayaaen Mfg. Co., Bheborgnr ~' 



Wla. 



Poenmatle Scale Corp. 

Downa. Mags. 
Dnion Wrapping Mac. Co., Jollet, IIL 

TKA8T 
Corby Teaat Co., Waiblngton, I>. C. 
Ptelfebmann Co., Tbe, New Tork. 
Bed Star Comp. Teaat Co.. HilwaukM, WU. 
TEABT FOOn 
nee Malt_FrDdnctB_ Co.,_ Cblcago, IIL 



Plymoutb Milling Co., Le iJi 



. Cblcago, hL 
Chicago, 111. 

-- -'-1, Iowa. 





-s" 






BnaftiSchod 


M 


»i»,,Sra:S!'::;;;::;: 

BM(MC<L.G. B 









INDEX 

AdrucaUattProdueta Co _.. EG 

Altawbl, P.J JO 

AllnftCa., J. W 48 

Aawtiean Bakera' Hacbinery Co. 41 

Imvicaa Diamalt Co. - 8« 

Amirlcan PaalCa 8T 

Anoicao Wagon Co.. The IW 

AimltdnCe.,0 - — - 99 

ArauHir ft Co.. 29 

AimMnoK Cork ft InaolatioD Co 14 

AotoCaiCo - - 48 

Bikanft Confactlonen Co U1 

Bikar, WaHar, ft Co., Ltd. " 
Mhi&P„ftSoBa 

utraiiuCo 

',S.C ftSOB 

iftSchod 

tata Wiling Ce 

lirePaiwr BoitCo.... 
ft Oran Ccsnoaoy.--. 

iaowBd Hilla Co 

•HCol. G. B 

•ttlfilUngCa 

wGnldL- 

OdlonlaAaaoeiaUd RaidDCo ..- tl 

CHabrUga Hf g. Co. 110 

CaB>li^L.Q..UilUDgCo. ins 

CBtralWaMd Paper Co— t& 

CtaODlco KacUnery Co. 41 

OricagoCar SaalCo K 

ConnnaHfg. Co I« 

GohmbiBLabantonea - IH 

OiiBHBdated Prodoeta Co. ft 

CaalCTOa.. C. D. 

Cna&t, W. A., Hntluc Co.- - 101 

CwbrTHatCa US- 129 

GimPtodacUltaf.Ca. - W 

Craaee&t Hilling Co.- lOT 

Grswn BaltiaaCo SI 

OanrUfg.Ca 1ST 

On.l.U„C9..Thm - 4» 

Dohfhop OnnCo - 16 

Datehaat Tool Co ^ 43 

fa^BoOarlDIlCo 104 

nuBbaigC(L SO 

'^MfcT A S6-S« 

hMaAJnkt __!""."""".""" B2 



TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



Francb China Co. 



Fv«™.rkMaohin<:-ci.vo.B.:;:.: 


_:;;::::::i» 


























H»j™anMfg.Co. 

gffi:5"oTi«..ci:::;:::::: 


4£ 

(0 

48 

"ITI.'.'M El 









..Front Cover 



trnwrt-HinekaMilUngCo. 


HI 










Katzfnger Co. Edward 


- »a 




Md 




!2r«V&'-'"-.:::::;::;;::::: 


tt 















rhulug, Co. .. 
Bl Ofg. Co.. Cb 



Middleby Oven 

Miliar FutannnnR Mac. t. 

Mi]ii.T)io^aiftBTO 

Minor Printing Co 

Natioaal Binding Mac. Co... 



iiida Front Cover 
..Inilde iiack Cover 






NBwPragne Flouring Mill l3o... 

NewOim Roller Mill Co. 

Old Griit Mill 

Opentiva Miller and Baker LaboratoHea... 

^t^n'oten c^ _.;"::::::::;:::::;::::; 

Phoenix Mill Co 

Piilabary Flour Millfc Bai&l 

Plymouth Milling Co _... 

Pntnunatie Scale C«p., Ltd... 
Fottsr ft Wrighting- - - 



itington. .. 

1 Mfg. Co.. 

Bead Uachlnarr Ca. 



Rech-UarbakerCo.. 



Reid FortMbla Oves Co. 

Roberta PortahlaOvan Co 

Rockwan. L A., Co. 



Setton Mfg. Co _ M 

SaibdIoatitate<rfTeehn(ikw7 ET 

"■—-W-KIng Milling Co. lit 




, J.Waller. C 

ThoDuan HaehinaCo 40 

Triomph Mfg. Co - - 41 

Union Sanitary Rack Mfg. Co tS 

Union Waxed A Parchment Paper Co._ U 



WllEoi Co., W. W. 
Winkler-Grlmn " 
Zahner Mfg. Co. 
Zanbita, Aogoi 



BAKERS REVIEW 

lEEfflEEiiQQEDMQCMffl 



May, 1916 



"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



CondneUd for the Bmedt ot It* Patioaa ltd Ptnp«etit« Patno* by tl 

i^cIfuliCt Baking (Sdinpanjr 

GnmlOfHcHi T6 WEST MONROE STREET, CHICACO 



Attention — Bakers of Schuize Brands 



We have prepared for your benefit and carry an immense stock of 
Advertising Material — complete in every detail — for bakers of tfie 
following brands of bread: 



BUTTER-NUT 

PAN-DANDY 

LUXURY 



BUTTER-KRUST 
BIG-DANDY 10c. 
PRINCE HENRY RYE 



LUXURY 10c. CAKE 

The Advertising consists of Bill Board Posters— Indoor and Outdoor Signs 
— Store and Window Display^Newspaper Campaigns— Novelties for Clerks 
and Proprietors — Material for House Distribution — Bread Enclosures — 
Novelties to Attract and Influence the Children. 



Don't Spend a Dollar 

For Any Advertising Until You 
Consult With Us 



We Save You Money 

Through Our Tremendous 
Purchasing Power 



The SCHULZE ADVERTISING SERVICE 

IS YOUR SBRVICB— IT STANDS FOR YOU— IS CONDUCTED FOR YOU, 
NOT OCCASIONALLY BUT CONSISTENTLY AND ALL THE TIME 
—ALWAYS ON TAP. SEND FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



WOULD YOU LIKE TO BAKE THE SCHULZE BRANDS IN YOUR TOWN? 
EASY MONEY FOR THE BAKER WHO DOES 



r 



rriNVFNTIONS During This Month Five of the Largest Gatherings of Bakers 

LVii V tn 1 HJ110 ^.,j ^^ jjgij j^y ji^g Tri-State— Trans-Mississippi— Pennsylvania 

-California and the New York State Associations— Be Present at One of These Meetings and Take Part in the 

Deliberations So Essential to the Successful Baker. See Regular Departments for Other Important Features. 



All the News for all the Trade. 



SSfSJT' JUNE, 1916 "V^I^SSi 



, Google 



«IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



th* Baneflt of Ita Fatrooi mnd Pnaiwetlve Patrou br th* 

^tifttlst Baking ^ampunyi 

CaHnlOffkw 76 WEST MONROE STREET. CHICAGO 



Attention — Bakers of Schulze Brands 



' We have prepared for your benefit and carry an immense stock of 
Advertising Material— complete in every detail — for bakers of the 
following brands of bread: 



BUTTER-NUT 

PAN-DANDY 

LUXURY 



BUTTER-KRUST 
BIG-DANDY 10c. 
PRINCE HENRY RYE 



LUXURY 10c CAKE 

The Advertising consists of Bill Board Posters — Indoor and Outdoor Signs 
— Store and Window Display^Newspaper Campaigns— Novelties for Clerks 
and Proprietors — Material for House Distribution — Bread Enclosures — 
Novelties to Attract and Influence the Children. 



Don't Spend a Dollar 

For Any Advertising UntU You 
Consult With Us 



We Save You Money 

Through Our Tremendous 
Purchasing Power 



The SCHULZE ADVERTISING SERVICE 

IS YOUR SERVICE-rr STANDS FOR YOU— IS CONDUCTED FOR YOU. 
NOT OCCASIONALLY BUT CONSISTENTLY AND ALL THE TIME 
—ALWAYS ON TAP. SEND FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



WOULD YOU LIKE TO BAKE THE SCHULZE BRANDS IN YOUR TOWN? 
EASY MONEY FOR THE BAKER WHO DOES 



CONVENTIONS — LJunng Ihis Month rive of fhe Largest Gathenngs of Bakers 
will be held by the Tri-State — Trans-Mississippi— Pennsylvania 

-California and the New York State Associations— Be Present at One of These Meetings and Take Part in the 
Deliberations So Essential to the Successful Baker. See Regular Departments for Other Important Features. 



All the News for all the Trade. 



JUNE, 1916 -^^^ 



, Google 



April 12, lull 

U-ift of 

Mass. Bureau of Btatistioe 



y Google 



ImMd Monthly by Wm. R. Oi«goiy Co. 
le«Z WoolwoithBnlldlng, Mow York, H.T. 



paOHS cti 



Volume 33 



JUNE, 1916 



Number 3 



CONTENTS 



Pis* 



Five Big Conventions of Master Bakers — 

Southeastern Bakers Convene in Macon - - , - - - -■ - 65 

Potomac States' First Convention Held in Washington ----- 66 

" - r.'". - 73 

- ^ - 76 

- - - 90 
53 

55 



Illinois Convention at Springfield - - - -,-:<, i- 

Sixteenth Anoual Convention of the Texas Association - - - 
Oklahoma Master Bakers Meet at Tulsa - - - ' - 
What Bakers Owe to the Salesman --------- 

Reasons for Figuring Costs Accurately in the Small Bakery . - - 

Program for National Convention in Tentative Form 

A Greater National Association of the Baking Industry ... - 
From Small Local Bakery to National Institution in Less Than Two Years 
Winning the Housewife to Bakers' Bread ..----- 



EDITORIAL. 

OppottODltlea tor tbe Hetall Baker 
RETAIL. 

Prodnctloa and SslUni Coati In tbe Retail E 



How UDcb iDsurance Money la Waated . 
Bakers' AdvettlslDg 9tanta . . . . 
IN THB WORKSHOP. 
Tbe Amerlean Pie— All Abant Mln«e Pie . 
e Tbon^hta on Baking . 



Some Tbonahta on Baking 

Anawera to laqnlriee— Dog Btscult: TelveC Cake: 
Dn Yeaat; Bffect of Add PboaphsCe on 



tlie o( Main In Bread: Wine Dropa or i 

Flcmr and the Flnlabed Loaf 
CRACKER BAKTNO. 

Firing a Reel Oren for BiBcult BtklDg 

Choice ReclpM tor the Blaonlt Baker . 

Oddities of the BlacuIC Baking World . 
OBNBBAL NBWS. 

Kentucky Conrentlon October IT and IK . 

Rotsry Clnbs to Hold Bakery eeetlon . 



Tbe Trl -State Procrai 
CalUomla Bakers pr«naL__, 
Jay Bams od PtclUc Coaat 






CalUomla Bakers 

Jay Bams od P«e 

Coming CoDTMitlaDs 

Big Field for Conunerelal C 

^repariag (or the Pennay'- 

-4ew Knighton Represenla 

TmDS-Ulaalaalppl Program . . . . 

New York State Convention . . . . 

Louisville Celebratea 

Bakers' and Millers' Tecbnlcsl Club . 
Stone to Start In Dallas . . . . 

Obituary— F, J. B. Koberta 

Baker Wins Fight 

PatHck Now Sole Owner nf Blodgett Buslm 

Clndnnatl Bakers' Lidlea . . . . 

End of Contlunatlon-Claaa Term . 

St. LouU M, B. Singing Society . 

St. Loula Msater Bakers- Ladles' Society . 

St. Louis Aasoolatlon 

Another Permanent Seere" 



New Jersey Convention June 7 . 

Bakeries ot America 

1 the Trade In England 



tten Blacnlt CompaDtes Merge— tS.OOO.OC 
DeaK"" 



( Herman Shomaker 



ind Powcisiona, Mexico and Cuba 11.00 a y«ar. Canada fl.SO a 
Foreign CoumrieB it "----' "---- — ' "" 

>t pay solicilora, unles* they present vrriittM autiority,vith date, from the publishers to collect money. 

TBKnSBRS — To insure insertion, all copy, cuts, etc., lor changes of regular advertisements ir> 

Bakers RevieW' should reach us NOT LATER than tbe ISth OF THE MONTH preceding dale of publication. 

The first advertising forms close promptly on this date 

NEW or ADDiTf ONAL advertising not to occupy fixed position, can be inserted in a special form up 10 the ZOth. 



Members of tht New York Trade Pregs AtsoeioAtm 

Kntan t atSim Hub Yoi* Pout C»e* at 34e»%A-elam Uial MatUr. OwripMll 



Member Audit Bureau of Circulation 

Wm.R. OrtBarn Cv., Nm r«rh all ripAte ruHwd. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



A Studebaker cuts the Cost 



— it covers much 
LONGER routes 

Dobbin and his stablemates are lucky if 
they make over 18 to 20 miles a day. This 
Studebaker Delivery car at $875, according 
to retailers who are using it, averages 50 
to 80 miles a day. 

This simply means that it covers loiter 
routes and cuts down the cost of every de- 
livery that you make — not to mention the 
business-gettit^ side of it — the fact that 
on those longer routes a Studebaker can go 
into the outlying districts, give better sub- 
urban delivery service and bring patrons of 
less prc^ressive merchants to YOUR store. 

This Stad*b«k«T Delivery Car Is not ■ loorlng car 
decigrn adapted for delWeiy puipoeea— bat a DB- 
LIVERV cal bunt aapecially foi DEI.IVERY use*. 

It haa the power of any ton or two ion truck — y«t 
ramarkable ECONOMY of fuel and oils. It is the 
rinplest car on the tnsiket — easiest to drive. 

It coats little at the start — and is surprisingly low 
In ittainienance expense. And from the day you 
start it off on your delivery routes. It not only gives 
BETTER service bat cuts down the coat of avery 

ir write us and let ue tall 



STUDEBAKER 



AMrtMM a»A 



Walkwvilla, OnL 
f lo Dtnit 



Delivery Car 
i07C 



Bdt-Uo Open Eipreii $SSO 



Rslf-bM Stilida Wafea $875 Om-Im Opei EipM* |I2M 
AH PHe— F.O.B. Datroit 



Om4m Stske BaJy «12» l*-Ps*Mi«<r Vh tUm 




JtiKE. I9i6 BAKERS REVIEW 



'fThe Chap Who Inquires Gets to Know" 

I £ live in an age of investigation and interrogation, hence the success of the 

man who furnishes the truth and those who absorb it. And when you 

have no imagination and no initiative, you are lad— also lead — you don't 

radiate. It is this imagination, fancy, gift of visioning that spells success. 

The dreamers are the workers. "I could be bounded in a nut-shell were 

it not that I have had dreams," said Hamlet. A man who wants to know 

the whyness of the wherefore or the thusness of the this, is in the line of 

evolution — of advancement. When he begins to think his hide begins to 

crack, his muscles to expand— he becomes a white hope! And, gee! What a wallop "why" 

has! Try it on the next little sock-sure champion of canned philosophy you meet and watch 

him whine, wiggle, wilt and take the count 

There are three ways to attain knowledge; To ask, to be told, to find out for yourself. 

The first depends upon your assimilation, the next upon the skill with which the inci- 
sion is made, and the last upon your perspicacity and perspicuity. 

And not one of these processes alone can give you knowledge. They must be used 
in combination. You must be a seeker, a learner, and a doer. 

No man lives to himself alone — we are part of all we have met. 

The man who asks gets to know. The man, who, when told takes notice, grows. The 
man who works, wins. 

His imagination, investigation and interrogation give him inspiration — the inspiration 
born of usefulness. 

He stands erect upon his feet, stretching forward to seize every opportunity for ad- 
vancement. 

Our prehistoric ancestors, before the formation of language, used to make known 
their wants by signs. 

When they were happy they danced the Tango — when they were mad they raised 
Cain. 

But with the growth of centuries, language of speech was evolved, and men began to 
hide their real feelings under a cloak of phrases and not a few to lie like some sophisticated 
lawyers. 

Then came the printing press, the phonograph, the movies, osteopathy, and the player- 
piano. 

All these things are the outcome of the eternal query "why ?" — the result of imagina- 
tion, interrogation, investigation and work. 

They are educators. 

And the Trade Paper is probably the most alive to the urgency of education, and the 
gratification of the mental needs of its readers, than any other press production. 

It asks, absorbs, gives. 

Thousands of Trade Paper subscribers are receiving mental uplift and renewing their 
courage by its means. 

The Trade Paper is the leader, the reflector of the Trade world. 

The Trade Paper is the Pathe Weekly of the subscriber. 

It gives vivid character sketches of the passing great. It takes extensive tours over 
the fields of science, business and invention. It teaches by living, moving word-pictures the 
reasons for the failures and causes of success. 

Show me the company a man keeps and I will tell you what he is. Show me a man 
who subscribes to and reads his Trade Paper faithfully and you show me a man who will 
"show ME," — a man alive, alert, ambitious, successful. 

He has learned to ask, to seek, and to find. The Trade Paper is his guide, his en- 
cyclopedia, his friend. 

HE is the why of the Trade Paper, and the Trade Paper could not exist otherwise. 

And the Trade Paper subscriber in turn provides the gist. 

Go to school to the men who know how. 

The why of the Trade Paper is co-operation, the greatest force in the world to-day. 

It exemplifies unity of purpose, of endeavor, of achievement. The getting together and 
pulling together — the elimination of imperfections and the materializing of ideas and ideals. , 
Thoroughly read your Trade Paper. 



.Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



JtjNE, 1916 



A FEW MOMEirW WITH OUR ADTBRTISnUi 

be located at 56th Ave. and Taylor street, where they 
have built a commodious factory which is modem in 
every respect. A number of new machines have been 
purchased which will enable the firm to take care of 
three times the amount of their present business. A 
' new addition to the company is the appointment of 
R. C. Constantine as vice-president in charge of the 
sales department. This gentleman is well knows to 
the baking trade throughout the countr]', 

E. P. Kent &■ Son, Maroa, III.— An attractive display 
case in a bakery is a salesman of very much importance, 
especially if it is sanitary and can be moved to any 
part of the store. This concern makes portable sani- 
tary display cases that occupy floor space of 20 x 30 
inches and can display goods that ordinarily require 
24j^ feet of counter space. Prices and catalogue will 
be sent those making inquiry. 

Armstrong Cork Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. — This concern 
has issued a new booklet on "Nonpareil High-Pressure 
Covering for Heated Surfaces." In this publication the 
subject of insulation for high-pressure and superheat- 
ed-steam lines is handled in detail. The company has 
made tests by which they have been able to fix defin- 
itely the heat losses from various sizes of pipe, both 
covered and -uncovered. These figures and others of 
interest are tabulated in the booklet, which will be 
sent upon request to anyone who may desire a copy. 

Hughes Electric Heating Co., Chicago, III. — This 
cdncern has just secured contracts for the bake-oven 
equipment for the new Edgewater Beach Hotel in Chi- 
cago, also the Illinois Athletic Qub. The Edgewater 
Beach Hotel is one of the fashionable family hotels 
on the North Side in Chicago, and they have adopted 
electricity for bread and pastry baking. The Illinois 
Athletic Club is remodeling their entire bakeshop. They 
will use two ovens, one for pastry, and the other for 
bread and rolls. 



The officials of the Vim Motor Truck Company fig- 
ured that 85 per cent, of all delivery problems could 
be cared for by delivery cars of one-half-ton capacity, 
"What is it merchants want in the way of a dclivet; 
unit, and how can their desire be answered?" was the 
question asked. 

The retail baker's wants is to deliver a great number 
of light units in an effectual economical way, which 
can only be done with a light delivery wagon capahle 
of standing the stress of commercial work, with its try' 
ing prerequisites. 

It has been definitely proved that small, light vehicles 
are less costly to operate, especially m connection with 
the short hauls between stops, gasoline consumption is 
less, the cost of tires decreases with their size and re- 
pairs and parts run into less money. The starting and 
stopping costs more with the larger truck than the 
smaller and the smaller truck is easier to pilot through 
heavy traffic. 

Concentration has became the slogan at the Vim 
works, concentration in buying, in planning, in produc- 
ing, in distribution as well as in service. 

One of the largest exclusive producers of motor 
trucks in the world is the proud distinction which the 
Vim Motor Truck Company now enjoys and it has 
been gained after a period of only slightly more than 
two years. There is only one Vim chassis, but there 
are several different body models suited for most any 
business. Of course, the bakers' delivery problem has 
been considered, and models for bakers have met with 
success. See the Vim advertisement on another page 
of thii issue. 

Central Waxed Paper Co., Chicago. — This concern is 
vacating its present quarters owing to the large in- 
crease in their business, and from June I they will 



Plymouth Milling Co. 

omce and Mills 

LE MARS, IOWA, U. S. A. 

Chkago Office 

LOUIS ABMSTBOIIGi CO. 

Ill Puul Ttlcgripli Hd|. 

EMEiy i CO., Melrose, Mass. 

■btribitcn br New England 
WHITE for Fra* Samph and Inatrmtitma 



IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT ON 

PLYMCO 



A CARLOAD user oi PLYMCO in the east asked whether 
PLYMCO would wony the dough in Summer like some of 
the other processed cereals, by heating the doughs and age- 
ing them more quickly. 

WIRES WERE IMMEDIATELY SENT 

to some of the representative BAKERS in the country, and 
answers were received by wire from all but one. 



to a barrel of flour. Have 
I Large Bakery in Chicago 

2. We use the same amount of PLYMCO in SUMMER as in WINTER, 

with satisfactory results. From a Large Bakery in Milwaukee 

3. Used PLYMCO all last Summer. Had no difficulty. 

4. PLYMCO works EQUALLY as well in SUMMER as in WINTER. 

Have never had rope in bread or any other trouble from the use 
of PLYMCO. 

5. A superintendent of a large bakery in Philadelphia, states that 

PLYMCO KEEPS THE DOUGH more sweet and healthy than 
dough WITHOUT PLYMCO. Say f^meo alm«. Sn£NDiD 
FOR BOX CAKES. 



V Google 



JTOE, !9i6 BAKERS R^yiBW 



14,000 aserM in every line of tmtinet* 
Utroaghoat the United State* endone 
the VIM. 

BECAUSE— 

|.— Thcbrt COM B aMaokhia^j low and the upkeq) cxccediiigljF 

bhIL Price* are $693 >ad $725. 
2.— Tbcn are ■» eitrai to buj, it b fullj equippwi. Pricei are $695 

and $725. 
i. — It kai 106 cubic feel ot calTfint tpact. 
4.— b Juiijiinai u im eicen of an; Mt Id whidi it '» nibjictcd. 
5.— It pnt 20 oi more milei to every galloD of laaoline. 
6.— It will improve ttM appaaraace asd the aeriice of jooi 

i-*~ $695 Complete, F. 0. B Phila. 



, Google 



,B AKERS REVIEW June, 1916 

Notice wytc 

«iumcl tteel sidet 

and 

wkite aiamel 

brick front, with 

coal lun DBdeincath 

to keep coal 

from spreading 

over floor 



H. A. JOHNSON CO. 

•KUo 1 V-IIN riniiizedb, Google 



will help all aroDod U jron mMiUoii Baku* Betibw. 



JrNE. 1916 




No. 63. P.I. Tnick 



No. 48. Style "C" K; Rick 



No. 37. Doughnul D.uning CibiKI 



Why— 

do enterprising 
and successful 
bakers use 
Union Sanitary 
Ekjuipment? 

Because- — 

this equipment facili- 
tates handling the 
goods from oven to 
show case and is of 
the utmost importance 
in observing the strict 
sanitary measures that 
typify every well-kept 
shop. 

You 

should use this equip- 
ment because your 
better business judg- 
ment demands it. 

Complete Catalog 
Sent On Request 

Union Sanitary 
Rack Mfg. Co. 



No. 41. Portable Pioot Boi 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



It's the 
way you 
display 
p= your goods — — 

thai decides the quantity and quality of your 
business. Neat, attractive, clean and sanitary dis- 
play cases draw customers — especially the 



Portable Sanitary 
IKsplay Case 



Wa balld thi> eu* in all 
woodl toDUKli any wood 

moMtip imiiud<aCt jliti>- 

WriMNOWforkUds- 

MJbudpricH 

E,P, KEITUOI 

MAROA,ILL. 




Raid Psrtable Oven 

is tkt lowest in priet, most tasily m t a n mg m l , 
grtmttat saver of/utl and tkt mast satis fmUwy 
pertaiU mvm m tks market. Thay ht* tloM 
aad labor. They hav« a taccMsful raeari •< 
over twenty years and are warranted t* glre 
«omplete satisfaction. 



REID PORTABLE OVEN Ca 

•19 Main 81* - Buffalo, N. Y 




Jcctric k Graphite Pyrometers 

AbMlnteIr correct and dnnbia for 
IndlcatlDK the exact heat In Bake 
Oveni. Suitable lor anj atjle ol 



AUGUST ZAUBITZ, Sole Mfr. and Patentee 

BitablUhed ISn W-K ClUT Btnel. NEW TORK 



OVEN PYROiETERS 

P*r Brlek er Pertabia Bak* Ovens 




Patent Applied Far 

Better Baking 
By the 
Better Method 

C Every successful baker realizes 
the advantages of gas over coal or 
coke with their dirt, soot and un- 
sanitary factors. 

C We have appHed the advan- 
tageous quahties of gas to the St. 
Louis Brick Baking Oven, offering 
an improvement over every other 
type of oven heretofore manufac- 
tured. The St. Louis may be heated 
with surprising rapidity holding its 
heat at the proper temperature for 
5 or 6 hours after the gas has been 
turned off. It gives satisfact'ory re- 
sults in all lines of baking being also 
adaptable to steam baking. 
C Other features such as a built-in 
thermometer, full view of baking 
while oven is in operation, unusual 
means of heat distribution and cir- 
culation, and low rate of fuel con- 
sumption are worth looking into. 

A full description with 
prices yrili be mailed on 
receipt of your inquiry 

ST. LOUIS GAS 
BRICK OVEN CO. 

4920 Easton Avenue 

St. Louis, Mo. 



will belp all arovnd U ron i 



June, 191 6 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Ovens and Accessories 


- 

Pan 




Page 




Albreckt, F. /., Pittsburgh, Pa. 


22 


Middleby Oven Co., New York, N. Y. 


15 


American Peel Co., Chicago, III. 




Middleby-MarshaU Oven Co., Chicago, lU. 


IS-19 


Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co., Pitts., Pa. 


14 


National Oven Co., Beacon, N. Y. 


23 


Bennett Oven Co., Battle Creek, Mick. 




Petersen Oven Co. , Chicago, III. 


19 


Blodgett Co., G. S., Burlington, Vt. 
Day Co., J. H., Cincinnati, OfUo 
Duhrkop Oven Co., New York, N. Y. 


22 
IS 


Reid Portable Oven Co., Buffalo, N. K 
Roberts Portable Oven Co., Chicago, lU. 
St. Louis Gas Brick Oven Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
SchalUr Oven Co., Albert, Rochester, N. Y. 


12 

12-21 

12 

23 


Hubbard Oven Co., New'York, N. Y. 


16-17 


Standard Oven Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 


13 


Hughes EUctric Heating Co. , Chicago, lU. 


20 


Taylor Instrument Co., Rochester, N. Y. 


20 


Johnson Co., H. A., Boston, Mass. 


10 


Zahner Mfg. Co.. Kansas City. Mo. 




Meek Oven Co., Newburyport, Masi. 


20 


Zaubits, August, New York, N. Y. 


12 



Jait DMntlDD B&K«B Sbtibw. NdS wd. 



, Google 



BAKERS REV TE W Jo»E, 1916 



Four WaniBC A Pflsfdn-ar Onni InialiUd witb NoDpu*!! IiuuUtiDB Brick, Utwrty Balilns Companx. Pittabursh. Pm. 

Approved by the Oven Builders 

The builders who are striving continually to make their 
ovens more efficient, heartily recommend the use of Non- 
pareil Brick. Why? Because 

Nonpareil Insulating Brick 

For Bake Ovens 

reduce the amount of heat lost from the Due to their composition, Nonpareil 
walls, tops and bottoms, by 60%, or more. Insulating Brick are ten times better non- 
This lowers the fuel consumption, in- conductors of heat than fire brick or com- 
creases production, gives more uniform men brick. Furthermore, they are easy 
temperatures, and keeps cooler baking to handle and install, are light in weight, 
rooms. • 1^ pounds each, yet will withstand crush- 
It is results such as these that enabled ing loads of more than ten tons per square 
the Werner & Pfleiderer Company, Bake foot. Nonpareil Brick are reasonable in 
Oven Builders, Saginaw, Mich., to write: price and, in most cases, the savings they 
"We have now used your (Nonpareil) afTect wiU pay for their cost in a year or less. 

insulating bricks for some time, and the t^ n ■ r ]• , xr -■ 

very fact that we continue using same. FiiH information regarding Nonpareil 

ought to convince you that they fulfill Insulating Brick and a large sample will be 

all claims you make regarding them." cheerfully SCnt On request. 

Why Not Writm Today? 

Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co., '^^St^^'t 

WUl bBlp aU arotiDd If jm mnttoD Bunu Bmaw. ilCJi: zee oy VjOLJy It 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIICW 



The Universal 
Patent Steam Oven 

For bakers who want a heavy bread 
trade, no better oven can be made. It 
bakes in a dependable way at all times 
and turns out goods that will surely in- 
crease your business. Ifyou are face to 
face with sharp competition the Univer- 
sal will assist materially placing the 
odds in your favor. 

Wrilm Today for Catalog 

The Middleby 
Inside Furnace Oven 

For all-around baking this oven is about 
100% efficient because it is made on the 
right principle for perfect heat control. 
Thick heavy walls hold the heat, save the 
fuel and keep your shop cool. In use 
everywhere. 

Wri»* Today for Catalog and Prtcos 



Middleby Oven Company 

41.45 Park Row New York 



n adTtrtUaniMit In Bikmi 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW June, ,916 



DinBi Kseiproeiir — 



, Google 



;uNE, I9i6 BAKERS REVIEW 



— and if s the GERMAN-AMERICAN— an oven whose sectional construction 
permits of erection or moving without tearing out the side of a building. 

YOUR BUSINESS IS GROWING— suppose that you are to move 

into new and larger quartet^ if your oven is a GERMAN-AMERICAN or 

HUBBARD you can take it down and set it up again in a few hours' time 

i and WITHOUT LOSS OF A BAKING. That one feature alone is a dis- 

I tinct advantage. It saves money, time, worry and makes you independent 

of the landlord. 

i economy and increased production of goods. For instance, the 
I ability to bake the full line of goods from bread to cold-oven goods 
J other words, the GERMAN-AMERICAN OVEN may be used 
<i as required and also the GERMAN-AMERICAN may be used 
l-AMERICAN may be raised to bread baking temperature in four 

O V erwr 

tes you ever found in the old fashioned oven with those of the continuous brick oven, 

led in the shortest possible time because every part of the GERMAN-AMERICAN 
I ready to show you the better way to better baking and have information that is of 
()on actual conditions and our opinions result from careful study. 

' COM R A IN ^" 



W York Kansas City 

tarr RonAmvAv 116 West 8th Street 



JUlt mCDtlOB BlKMa BITIBW. NdK nd. 



, Google 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



Prosperity Waits For No Man! 

Prosperity is here. Are you getting your share of it? If not, 
why not? 

You cannot reap the benefits, of prosperity unless you are able to 
meet the demands of prosperity. The bakers who are cashing in 
on the prosperous condition which now prevails the country 
over are the bakers who have sufficient equipment to produce 
quality bake goods 

efficiently and econ- Model "C^ 

omically. 

The best time to 
make money is when 
people have money 
to spend. Every- 
where throughout 
the country the de- 
mand for labor ex- 
ceeds the supply. 
This means that not 
only are the labor- 
ing classes prosper- 
ous but the people 
who employ labor 
as well. 

But big business does 
not necessarily mean big 
profits. \i you are one 
of the bakers who are 
paying heavy toll to an 
old worn out, expensive 
to operate, and ineffi- 
cient oven you are 
allowing profits which 
rightfully belong to you 
to slip through your 
fingers. Stop this waste 
now. 



Digitized by ^OOQ IC 



Ju-VE, igi6 



B A KERS REVIEW 



Be Successful 

The first step towards success in the baking business is to install 
a successful dven. If you are using an., anti-successful oven we 
say to you in all iearnestness, install a Middleby- Marshall Oven 
and then observe the difference in your profits, in the quality of 
your bake goods and in the amount of yoiir fuel and repair bills. 

' Middleby- Marshall Ovens are successful ovens. This is the ver- 
dict of the thousands upon thousands of bakers who use them. 
There is a style and size to meet your individual requirements 

-no matter how big or how little your business is. 



MOBEL 9 

Uk»h>ll CoDtinuvui Sirii* Ovu. 
hekvy. Wiil alKi ' - - - 



y dunbla. Mads far fro 



rboilt. ThouHndiini 



brick ovan an th 



MODEL C 

Hicidtebr-limhall Booble Ovan. 

Wd. D<n, oka 
il taOffmetioa. 



•ntinb' 



Get our big illustrated Catalogue now 

We want to show you why Middleby-Marshall Ovens are suc- 
cessful ovens. We want to give you an abundance of evidence so 
that there will be no doubt in your mind as to their superiority. 
All that we ask you to do is to write for particulars. You will 
obligate yourself in no way. Write us now even though you do 
not figure on buying a new oven at present. 

Middleby-Msu'shall Oven Co. 



ThaLuKt 

CHICAGO, 762 W. Adams St. 

For Ski* in N*w EnvUnd SUta* by 

MIDDLEBY OVEN MFG. CO. 

2S4 SUIe St., BmIm. Mau. 



'■' OT«ni in the World 

ST. LOUIS, 604 S. Sixth St 

For Sale in Psafic CoMt Stalei by 
E. CARL BANK 

..Su PruciKa, Cd. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



We Know 
the Needs 
of Baking 



I and meet them squarely 
I with accurate, service- 
able 9hw Temperature 
Measuring Instruments 
for every baking re- 
quirements. 
We are specialists in 
^ ., „ Ibe manufHCture of 

' ^l^^ H&MTypeThermom- 

etets. Recording and 
Index Thermometers, Automatic Teni- 
nerature and Presaure Regulators, Mercury 
id Absolute Pressure Gauges, 
Stem Thermometers. Hydriom- 
:rmo-Elecirlc and Radiation 

— Every Instrument bearing 
nakes honest claim to supremacy 
try manufacturinjc step is carefully 
t In detail, appbcations carefully 

ilem ap to tu. Oar Mrvlce li prompt and 
lettlon* uid llterslim free. Commuid 



TliamM IMvtSMn 




Where economy in ipace and coit of production are the two principal itenu 

■ bains {niUllnl I Promintnt token all ov« tlw country ban InitallHl the 

btr two wfit be I "HushH- bKaDH it <• cleui. seoKoiTilul. ud i> auUr ooo 

battleahlp to be I trolled —Duikins it more elHeieDt than snr otber type snn 

ila oalam to YOU? 



TwDof tbee* Hoshn Electric Bake Oi 
on the SuperdreedoonKht "ArilOD*" and the 
uead on the CaUfmia. whleb ia the fin 
propelled bj eleeCrleity. 

May IPS haom tha prMltgt 



Hughes Electric Heating Co^ 211^31 W. SchUler Strfset. Chicago 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVlliW 



The Creed of Every Baker Should Be Quality, Cleanlineii and Efficiency For Profit 

BLACK DIAMOND OVENS 



Om DKk-Tm DKk-TbrH Dack 



There are four factors which should be considered in the purchase of an oven. We 
j classify them as follows: 

EFFICIENCY Black DiamondOvens represent one hundred per cent efficiency. 
They hold the heat, bake uniformly and are easy to operate. 

ECONOMY Less fuel is required to maintain a high baking heat in Black 

Diamond ovens than in any other oven of equal capacity. 

DURABILITY Black Diamond Ovens are substantially constructed of the best 
materials. They are known the world over as lifetime ovens. 

PRICE There is more value in Black Diamond Ovens than in any other 

oven on the market. They have no frills or fancy fixings which 
add to their cost but which add nothing to their utility. Buy 
a Black Diamond Oven and you will save money. 

ROBERTS APPLIANCES 

The same standard of quality which is maintained in Black 
Diamond Ovens is also to be found in Roberts Appliances., 
If you aim for the highest efficiency in your bake shop you 
should use Roberts Appliances. They are the best. Send for 
Appliance Catalogue. 

Roberts Portable Oven Company 



2016 North Major Avenue, CHICAGO 



BRAtrrFORD OVEN * RACK CO . BRANTFORD. ONT. 



Naw Easlud Saltini A|*M: 



ir Stnal. BOSTON. MASS. 



jQst meotlau BlKtBa Kievii 



BAKERS REVIEW 



JUKB, 1916 



It's the I 
way you 
display 
^ your goods — — 

that decides the quantity and quality of your 
business. Neat, attractive, clean and sanitary dis- 
play cases draw customers — especially the 



Portable Sanitary 
[Ksplay Case 





Reid Partable Oven 

it tkt lowest in price, most tatUy ma n mg td, 
gremtttt saver pf/uel and the most satiifm^ry 
portaile #»m on the market. They wKfm lka« 
aod labor. They have a laccoiafifl raeorl W 
ov«r twanty years and are warranted t* glre 
eo^plete aatlsfaction. 



REID PORTABLE OVEN CO, 

«I9 Main St. - Buffalo, N. Y 




iectric k Graphite Pyrometers 

_..rMt and dDtmbto (or 

Indlcatlna the eiict b»l In Bake 
ulUble for BQj atyle of 



AUGUST ZAUBITZ, Sole Mfr. and Patentee 



OVEN PYROMETERS 

Far Kriek er Portabia Bake Ovens 




POnt AppUhI For 

Better Baking 
By the 
Better Method 

C Every successful baker realizes 
the advantages of gas over coal or 
coke with their dirt, soot and un- 
sanitary factors. 

C We have applied the advan- 
tageous qualities of gas to the St. 
Louis Brick Baking Oven, offering 
an improvement over every other 
type of oven heretofore manufac- 
tured. The St. Louis may be heated 
with Burprising rapidity holding its 
heat at the proper temperature for 
5 or 6 hours after the gas has been 
turned off. Itgives satisfacfory re- 
sults in all lines of baking being also 
adaptable to steam baking. 
C Other features such as a built-in 
thermometer, full view of baking 
while oven is in operation, unusual 
means of heat distribution and cir- 
culation, and low rate of fuel con- 
sumption are worth looking into. 

A full description with 
prices will be mailed on 
receipt of your inquiry 

ST. LOUIS GAS 
BRICK OVEN CO. 

4920 Easton Avenue 

St. Louis, Mo. 



will belp all aronnd tf jdd mantloti Bakmrs Rbthw. 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Ovens and Accessories 


Page 




Page 




Mbrtchl. F. J.. PUIsbursh. Pa. 


22 


MidMeh Oven Co., New York, N. Y. 


15 


Anuruan Peel Co., Chicago. III. 




MiddUby-MarskaU Oven Co., Chicago, lU. 


IS-II 


Armstrong Cork &■ Insulation Co., Pitts., Pa. 


14 


National Oven Co., Beaton, N. Y. 


23 


Bennett Oven Co., Battle Creek, Mick. 




Petersen Oven Co., Chicago, III. 


19 


Blodgett Co., G. S. , Burlington, Vt. 
Day Co., J. H., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Dukrkof Oven Co., New York, N. Y. 


22 
15 


Reid Portable Oven Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Roberts Portable Oven Co., Chicago, III. 
St. Louis Gas Brick Oven Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Schaller Oven Co., Albert, Rochester, N. Y. 


12 

12-21 

12 

23 


11 HMard Oven Co. , Neui 'Yori, N. Y. 


16-n 


Standard Oven Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 


13 


11 Hughes Electric Heating Co. , Chicago, III 


20 


Taylor Instrument Co. . Rochester, N. Y. 


20 


Johnson Co., H. A., Boston. Mass. 


10 


Zahner Mfg. Co. . Kansas City, Mo. 




11 Meek Oven Co., Newburyport, Masi. 


20 


Zasibitz, August, New York, N. Y. 


12 



I Bakirs BlTlaw. Ntiff Md. 



, Google 



BAKERS REV IE ,W Junb, 1916 



Four Wamer * PRatdam Ovani InanUtwl with Nonpanll InaoUtins Brick. Libarty Bakins Compuy, Plttibursh, Pa. 

Approved by the Oven Builders 

The builders who are striving continually to make their 
ovens more efficient, heartily recommend the use of Non- 
pareil Brick. Why? Because 

Nonpareil Insulating Brick 

For Bake Ovens 

reduce the amount of heat lost from the Due to their composition, Nonpareil 
walls, tops and bottoms, by 60%, or more. Insulating Brick are ten times better non- 
This lowers the fuel consumption, in- conductors of heat than fire brick or com- 
creases production, gives more uniform mon brick. Furthermore, they are easy 
temperatures, and keeps cooler baking to handle and install, are light in weight, 
rooms. Ij^ pounds each, yet will withstand crush- 
It is results such as these that enabled ing loads of more than ten tons per square 
the Werner & Pfleiderer Company, Bake foot. Nonpareil Brick are reasonable in 
Oven Builders, Saginaw, Mich., to write: price and, in most cases, the savings they 
"We have now used your (Noopareii) affect will pay fof their cost in a yearor less. 

insulating bricks for some time, and the f^ n . c ■ , j- , xt •! 

very fact that we continue using same, F"" information regardmg Nonpareil 

ought to convince you that they fulfill Insulatiug Brick and 3 large sample will be 

alt claims you make regarding them," cheerfully SCUt On reqUCSt. 

Why Not Write Today? 

Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co., ^^'J^^^IVa. 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIICW 



The Universal 
Patent Steam Oven 

For bakers who want a heavy bread 
trade, no better oven can be made. It 
bakes in a dependable way at all times 
and turns out goods that will surely in- 
crease your business. If you are face to 
lace with sharp competition the Univei- 
sal will assist materially placing the 
odds in your favor. 

Writa Todmy for Catalog 

The Middleby 
Inside Furnace Oven 

For all-around baking this oven is about 
100% efficient because it is made on the 
right principle for perfect heat control. 
Thick heavy walls hold the heat, save the 
fuel and keep your shop cool. In use 
everywhere. 

HVi'a Today for CaUdog and Pricaa 



Middleby Oven Company 

41-45 Park Row N«w York 



y Google 



B A K E R S R E V I E W June, 1916 



I 



N OTHER HUBBARD OVEN features will be found facton 
GERMAN- AMERICAN is remarkably flexible possessing i 
in two hours' time. You can work it "coming and going.' 
while heating up — you can maintain a high temperature as I 
as it is cooling down. Another distinctive advantage— the GERMJ 
hours-FROM A STONE COLD OVEN at that. 

Hubbard 

are the sources from which good, substantial profits flow — they combine all the good fe 
but without a dirty baking hearth or other disadvantages. 

NO HOT SPOTS — and should any slight baking defects appear they may be coi 
or HUBBARD Oven is accessible. PROGRESSIVE BAKERS— we are alw 
real value to you. Put your baking problems up to us — our suggestions are always bas« 

HUBBARD OVET 

Philadelphia CHICAGO 

« West 7th Street 1138 BeLDEN AvENUE 26i 

„ i. I. >.<«. .™..- Digitized b, GOOg le 



Juke, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



—and if s the GERMAN-AMERICAN— an oven whose sectional construction 
permits of erection or moving without tearing out the side of a building. 

YOUR BUSINESS IS GROWING— suppose that you are to move 
into new and larger quarters, if your oven is a GERMAN-AMERICAN or 
HUBBARD you can take it down and set it up again in a few hours' time 
and WITHOUT LOSS OF A BAKING. That one feature alone U a dis- 
tinct advantage. It saves money, time, worry and makes you independent 
of the landlord. 

i economy and increased production of goods. For instance, the 
(ability to bake the full line of goods from bread to cold-oven goods 
Bother words, the GERMAN-AMERICAN OVEN may be used 
i as required and also the GERMAN- AMERICAN may be used 
(■AMERICAN may be raised to bread baking temperature in four 

O V erwr 

ks you ever found in the old fashioned oven with those of the continuous brick oven, 

led in the shortest possible time because every part of the GERMAN-AMERICAN 
i ready to show you the better way to better baking and have information that is of 
(ion acttial conditions and our opinions result from careful study. 



f C O M R A IN V 

tw York Kansas City 

■ST BbOAOWAY ' '6 West 8th Street 




Jan mentloB Bakikb Rbvibw. Nnff ml 



Google 



i8 "J" ,' BAKERSREVIEW June, 1916 

llik Model "B" liiPIIM 



> lUKIIH ItKVIKV 



, Google 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Be Successful 



MODEL C 

Hiil'dtebyMBmhall BotftiliF Ovan. 
■ — ■' bd%pylM'wi^ tw> 



The first step towards success in the baking business is to install 
a successful dven. If you are using aa. anti-successful oven we 
say to you in all iearnestness, install a Middleby- Marshall Oven 
and then observe the difference in your profits, in the quality of 
your bake goods and in the amount of your fuel and repair bills^ 

Middleby- Marshall Ovens are successful ovens. This is the ver- 
dict of the thousands upon thousands of bakers who use them. 
There is a style and size to meet your individual requirements 
- no matter bow big or how little your business is. 

MODEL A MODEL?"' .. ' 

HhMlebr Inilda Furawx Oven. Uu*h*ll CoBtlon^vs BriijfOvm. 

' Tha idaal ovM for lU 'round baV. For tb* balur wboM bnad kadsU 

In*. OnB Brins will bal» Hvonl *^'^- WIU alio ylw ^ bMt »f 

run. <rf b«d .nd th... yoBt ok. IJ^^^'rSj^llSSi ^J2 ch^lir^Brtirtf^" phi _. 

Budputrr. Rae(«nizad thi world „d very dor«hlB. lUda tor front and PMtW wftht^KluturutionT 

om u the bait iDiide Cnraacs oven or rau flrlns. The moat modeni Raquirei nnnll'ipBca. Tkis moK 

ever built. Thoaundi In uu. brick oven on Ihn market. popular ovMi mlide. 

Get our big illustrated Catalogue now 

We want to show you why Middleby-Marshall Ovens are suc- 
cessful ovens. We want to give you an abundanceof evidence so 
that there will be no doubt in your mind as to their superiority. 
All that we ask you to do is to write for particulars. You will 
obligate yourself in no way. Write us now even though you do 
not figure on buying a new oven at present. 

Middleby-Marshall Oven Co. 

Tfa* LargMt Maonfactorar* of Bak«ra' OrtBa in th« World 

CHICAGO. 762 W. Adunt St. 



F«c Sal* in Naw England Statea b^ 
MIDDLEBY OVEN MFa CO. 

284 Slate St.. Baltaa. Mm*. 



ST. LOUIS, 604 S. Sixth St 

For Sala in Pacffic CtMUl Stata* br 
E. CARL BANK 

kBMt-.SuFruclu*. Cal. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



We Know 
the Needs 
of Baking 



I and meet them squarely 
I with accurate, service- 
able 9f Temperature 
Measuring Instruments 
for every baking re- 
quirements. 
We are apeclallsta In 
. ,. ^ ^^ . . ™ the manufacture of 

' ^^ H&MTypeThermom- 

^^ eiera, Hecording and 

Index Thermometera, Automatic Tem- 
perature and Preaaure Regulators, Mercury 
Vacuum and Abaolute Preaaure Gauge*, 
Engraved Stem Thermometera, Hydrom- 
etera, Tbermo-Electrlc and Radiation 
Pyrometera. 

Mark thla:— Every Inatrument bearing 
HAH JfaK makes honeat cisim to aupremacy 




■nnrwtloiu and literature free. Comauij 






I 

Where economy in space and cost of production are the two principal item* 



BtlallMI 
Knar iwo will be 
: bBttleibip to be 



Afay tea Aa«a tAa privUug* of A 

Hughes Electric Heating Co^ 



> (« YOVT 
Schiller Street, 



Chicago 



Jn>t men I Ion 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



The Creed of Eveir Baker Should Be Quality, Cleanlinesi and Efficiency For Profit 

BLACK DIAMOND OVENS 



Oaa DKk-Tm DKk~Tbn* Deck 



There are four factors which should be considered in the purchase of an oven. ' 
classify them as follows: 

EFFICIENCY Black DiamondOvens represent one hundred per cent efficiency. 
They hold the heat, bake uniformly and are easy to operate. 

ECONOMY Less fuel is required to maintain a high baking heat in Black 

Diamond ovens than in any other oven of equal capacity. 

DURABILITY Black Diamond Ovens are substantially constructed of the best 
materials. They are known the world over as lifetime ovens. 

PRICE There is more value in Black Diamond Ovens than in any other 

oven on the market. They have no frills or fancy fixings which 
add to their cost but which add nothing to their utility. Buy 
a Black Diamond Oven and you will save money. 



ROBERTS APPLIANCES 

The same standard of quality which is maintained in Black 
Diamond Ovens is also to be found in Roberts Appliances. 
If you aim for the highest efficiency in your bake shop you 
should use Roberts Appliances. They are the best. Send for 
Appliance Catalogue. 



Roberts Portable Oven Company 

2016 North Major Avenue, CHICAGO 




H G W YOUrfG, < 



ir StTHt, BOSTON, MASS, 



jQst meotlau Bikbbh Kkvie 



BAKERS REVIEW 



We Know 
the Needs 
of Baking 



Iftp, B«ll ConWMd tat Your 



and meet them squarely 
with accurate, service- 
able ?™ Temperature 
Measuring; Instruments 
for every baking re- 
quirements. 
We are specialists In 
the manufacture of 
H&MTypeThermom- 
eieiB, Hecordinic and 
Index Thermomelera. Automatic Tem- 
perature and Pressure Regulatora, Mercury 
Vacuum and Absolute Pressure Gauges, 
Engraved Stem Thermometers, Hydrom- 
etera, Thermo-Electrlc and Radiation 
Pyrometers. 

Mark this: — Every Instrument bearinE 
HftM Jftet makes honest claim to supremacy 
because every manufacturing step is carefully 
worked out In detail, applications carefully 
studied. 

Pat tour problem np to oi. Onr itrvice Is proapt and 
-flctcnt, lonBatlDiu and lilcralarc tree. Command 



TfteHSM CNvtiion 







Where economy in space and cost of production are the two principal items 

TmottbHaHnctaHElKtricBakeOvsiu an beins initalted I Prominent bKken all ovar tb« cnanliT hava InitaUad tlia 

on th* Suprndnadnooslit ATinaa" and the otbar two will be "Huvbaa" baauH it ii clean, eeonomleal, and ii aaaily aco 

uaad DD tfa* California, wbicb la the Ant battkablp ta be I troUod— makins it more rfHcient than anr other type oT«i 

propelled by eleetrleltr. I on the market. 

May torn ham thm prMUgu of dtntonttratutg ita oo/im to YOU? 

Hughes Electric Heating Co^ 211-231 W. Schiller Street, Chicago 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



The Creed of Every Baker Should Be Qnality, CleaDlinesi and Efficiencj For Profit 

BLACK DIAMOND OVENS 



B Deck— Tbna Dk 



There are four factors which should be considered in the purchase of an oven. We 
classify them as follows: 

EFFICIENCY Black DiamondOvens represent one hundred per cent efficiency. 
They hold the heat, bake uniformly and are easy to operate. 

ECONOMY Less fuel is required to maintain a high baking heat in Black 
Diamond ovens than in any other oven of equal capacity. 

DURABILITY Black Diamond Ovens are substantially constructed of the best 
materials. They are known the world over as lifetime ovens. 

PRICE There is more value in Black Diamond Ovens than in any other 

oven on the market. They have no frills or fancy fixings which 
add to their cost but which add nothing to their utility. Buy 
a Black Diamond Oven and you will save money. 



ROBERTS APPLIANCES 

The same standard of quality which is maintained in Black 
Diamond Ovens is also to be found in Roberts .appliances. 
If you aim for the highest efficiency in your bake shop you 
should use Roberts Appliances. They are the best. Send for 
Appliance Catalogue. 




Roberts Portable Oven Company 

2016 North Major Avenue, CHICAGO 

Cuadlu MmiMfaelunn 
■RANTFORD OVEN * RACK CO , BRANTFORD, ONT. 



Just mepttou Bakbbk itEviK 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



Youf Compelilor 

USES STEAM 



That i> th* ptocer n 
b^c. It tint tha 



Freymark 
Bakers 
Steamer 

iiutelL labor tavlmti •o- 
nomlcal; bums armi at eo«t 
of ll.U to tE.MI m moDtb 
■nd la aafa-Mttcd M ICO 

CaU ataain op in SO min- 
ataa and lupplfaa bat wa- 
tar and haat to bakery. 

WItb tha Pnmiark Ba- 
kan Slaamar jaa can bak* 
battM bmd and rednea 
•xpnuaa. baeaiua at It* 
anmtrictad qh. 

Sball wa Hod onr daa- 
eriptlTe dreular! WrIU 

B. F. FREYMABK 

MACHINE CO. 

2109 Narktt Stmt 

ST. LOUIl. HO. 





PHONES iFiak Mr, Raa. 


Est. ISS4 1 


Bake Ovens of All Kinds \ 


Pyro. 
Wtk 


Gnt«>, Limnc* asd 


S|Md«l ForBM. 'Brick. 

rforSto.-i>«Br.«l, 

b* h«d !■ 1 Baato Mid SIMM 
MiDUtM. 


which Mot W*t«-«u 


Fdi 




1 


M 




Fw 


File 




Cn 




BAKI OVEN GAS BURNER. SEVEN SIZES 


Wb...nlari.«l»f.«-*IM.lM«tk«rf>rM&af«*a^l>aU. 1 




FRANCIS J 


ALBRECHT 


lt46PENNAVE.,M«>P. LLIcpM PITTSBURGH, PA. 1 



T'Ae Dependable 
Blodgett Oven 

has back of it 70 years of Service. 
It has become a finished perfected 
article, and is the biggest value of 
all portable ovens. 

They are made in 7 sizes and bum 
Coal, Wood, Natural or Artificial 
Gas. 

Send for a list of Bakers using our 
Ovens and for our regular Blodgett 
Oven Literature. 

The G. S. Blodgett Co. 

Burlington, Vt, 



a htiuw (bal juu rctd tb« ada. 1 



BUIBH RSdBW. 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Scaler 
Bailer 
Proofer 
Moldet 
Racks 
Rack- 
Ovens 

Of 



Saving 

with 

Rack Orent 

90% Labor 

60 to 80% 

noor Space 

50% Fuel 

Peel Ovens 

For 

AU-*romtd 

BaUng 



SCOTT BROS„ rrUACA. N. Y. 

NATIONAL OVEN COMPANY 



Naw Enclmnd AgMtcy 
H. G. W. YOUNG, 81 Huwrer SU BortMi, Hmi. 



Beacon, N. Y. 



aOMUaDwikOTn 

NaUoul SokBwi^ Htww. lonh kui-. 

SCHALLER DOUBLE DECK. Tlw obIf othi hr tb< 
whalM^* rmd raUll Iwlui, adns bvt mm hvm. 

Walnutport, Pa.. June30tb 1915 
The Albert Schaller Oven Co. 

Gentlemen: 
The Doable Deck oven you constructed for us last fall ii 
i wonderful oven. We are gaining' trade daily, and we 
an making splendid bread and cakes, and pretty soon 
«c shall need an additional Schaller oven. 

J. FR1T21NGER. 



Mr. R. H. Wool of Ithica, N. Y., after using a Schaller 
oven for 6 yvara, highly recommended the same to the Sun 
Baking Co. of Auburn, N. Y., with vetj satisfactory results 
to ourselves as well as the Sun Baking Co- Keeping up the 
good work, Mr. Wool ordered 2 large Schaller ovens to be 
erected in bis strictly modern new factory. TW« it ■ rauM I 

Do not oTwIiKik tin Sckallw DonbU Deck oron— wa 
conatnictMl 21 of thani ki this eilj in tha put 3 srear*. 



Wiite for our Catalogue, descrying the construction of the Schaller Single and Double Deck Ovens 
in detail, b cuts and dnwings. 

The Albert Schaller Oven Co., 55 Averill Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

edbyGuUvle 



HntuI Ractprocltr— "flaw It In BlKna Revikw" 



BAKERS REVIEW June, 1916 



KLEEN-KRUST-^^ — 
"STEEL-SHOD" W?" 

FWTENTED JAN. iI.19l-> -mTENTS PENDING C^ A/ /^ /^ 

BREAD PANS M^.^ 




Unta the 
Intro- 
duction 
of the 

Kleen-Krist Rivetless "Steel-Sbod" Bread Pan 

sDotted and crippled loaves of bread were unavoidable. 

The bread came from the pans misshapen and "spotted" wherever a rivet had been used in 
the construction of the pan. 

Kleen-Krust Rivetless "Steel-Shod" Bread Pans 

are a departure from the old style of constructing bread pans in sets, embodying the "Steel-Shod" 
feature with a number of additional points of merit. 

1. The use of all rivets on the inside of the pans have been done away with — insuring a clean, 
spotless loaf. This feature alone should commend its use to users of the old style riveted pan. 

2. The heavy, unsightly grease and dirt collecting "strap" has been done away with, and in 
its place a strong steel rod is used binding the pans together, and at the same time serving as a 
rinA for each pan. This construction (see cut) ts the most rigid and sanitary ever devised and 
materially decreases the weight of each set. 

3. The bracing used between each pan is a part of the pans themselves, and is so constructed 
as to absolutely prevent any distorted or misshapen loaves. 

4. "Steel-Shod" means the placing of sheets of steel in the outer face of the end pans in 
the set, absolutely armor-plating the surface and steering the peel underneath instead of smashing 
holes in the tin. 

A free sample set of Kleen^Knut Rrretlets "Steel-Shod" Bread pans is yours for the asking. 
Send for it now and see how they wilt improve the appearance of your bread and save you 
money. These pans are made in every size and style with square or rounded bottom edges. 




XU^ AUGUST r*^ 
1 lie MAAG VxO. 



107 Sharp St BALTIMORE, MD. 



rviOOVB: 



Il'NE. 1916 MAKERS REVIEW 



Pans and Racks 



Pagi Pag, 

HoH.,W.G.&,S«n,.Pkil^,pkia.Pa. 35 M^s Co.. n, A.^,, BaUm^. Md. 24 

lalmre Brother!. N,w York. N.Y. 25 P,erU,, Wir, Cwds Co.. U/vea. M. 25 

Kateinger Co.. Edward. Chicago, III. See Index Union Sanirayy Rack Mfg. Co. Albion. Mick. It 



Perfect Bread Pans 

Ge< Out Qaotatioru! 

JABURG BROTHERS 

Main Office: 10-I4 Leonard Street New York 



The Peerless Ideal Galvaniied Iron Bread Rack, 
which has solid malleable iron corners, reinforced with steel 
plates, f^iving it a neat appearance and doubling Ihe 
strength. Mounted on 4 in, ball bearing casters, and has 
removable shelves. Cheaper than our standard rack. Siies; 
24x66, ten shelves; and ZSx6f>, nine shelves. Shipped knocked 
down, saving freight. We also manufacture Shelving, 
PanTrucks, Wire Delivery Baskets, Pie Cases. Pie Car- 
Proof Boxes, Cookie Racks, etc. Manufactured 



only by the 

PEEBLESS WIRE GOODS CO. 



Ufayette, Indiana 



Cracker 
and Biscuit Pans 



ESTABLISHED IS60 



Our steel pani are made from a specially preparad 
■teel, of a uniform gauee, with a Bfiiooth lur&ce aad 
of a tongfa, dnrable itecf; thej are hound with 5-16 bu. 
electricaTly welded ri>df and are guaranteed ahiolntdj 
flat and free from buckles. We will guarantee tbcaa 
pans to wear longer and give better service than an? 
other pan on the market. 

W. G. Henis' Sons & Co. 

Mamfactnrar* 

No. 1347-1349 MieATaue PhiladclphU. Pa. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



HINDE S DAUCH PAPER CO. 

NEW YORK, 100 HUDSON ST., N . Y. 221 WATER ST, SANDUSKY, OHIO. 



Paul Richard's Pastry Book 

EaptHoBy Adapted for Holml and Ctitmrb^t Trad— 

THE MOST CXJMPLETE BOOK OF ITS KIND. THOR- 

OUGHLY PRACnCAL AND UP-TO-DATE. 

CONVENIENTLY INDEXED. 



1 the ioUowiDg Kibjccti: Frak JeUiM *ai 



PreMnct— PMtiT ud FSe MaU^ PmM aod Fiilbai— Cake Bakiw— 
" '" id Sweet— Ice Cifot. \ca, PuDcbo. Etc.— ^ewl*, RolU, 
— Cbd^ Makipa (ad I 
n Hold— CMaen' Prica L 



Puddiiw MK 
BUDI, Eic- 



: OeaoM Ice*, PuDcttei, Uc.^Biewl*, I 

] Macdluwoui Rcc^ict — Brevl Ecoa- 



PRICE »2.00-FOR SALE BY 

BAKERS REVIEW "S^V^^STcS?*^ 



1 Kalamazoo Vegetable 1 


1 Parchment Company 1 


1 Kalamazoo, Michigan | 


, Manufacturers of high 


1 grade parchment and ' 


1 waxed paper. 1 




r*. t/nc/.«n wa, ^^^xED BREAD and '^^ ^"""^ ^^ 

CAKE WRAPPERS 

NOT COMPULSORY-BUT DESIRABLE 

I.et the consumer have his bread as clean as when it leaves 
Dirty md Stale the oven Freth onj Chan 

We manufacture all grades (or roll machines or hand wrapping. Let Us Figure Your Requirement*. 

PROMPT SERVtCE-^QUAltrr- fUGHT PRICES 

CENTRAL WAXED PAPER CO. 



TwM aa BdTartlHmeDt In Bii 



Chicago, III 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Boxes and Baskets 



Bet Hive Paper Box Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Hiitde 6- Dauck Paper Co., Sandusky, 0. 
Lewis Co., G. B,, Waiertown, Wis. 



26 



Puffer-Hubbard Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Mimt. 
Seflon Manufacturins Co., Chicago, lU. 



Page 
Zl 
27 



"sefton" your bread 

You want good boxes for 
good bread; the packages 
have a good deal to do with 
building a reputation for your 
product. 

The easiest way to get the best boxes 
is to get Sefton boxes. The Sefton 
Bread Box is a box made especially 
for bread; and it's a good one. 



We're glad to 
send you informa- 
tion about the 
clean packing and 
shipping of bread; 
n o cost — worth 
reading. 



The Sefton Mfg. Co. 

1311 Weat 35th Street 
CHICAGO, ILU 



Deliver your bread In 

HUBBARD'S 
Folding Delivery Boxes 

THE SANITARY WAY 



Our wooden FOLDING DELIVERY BOXES are de- 
■iened to take the place of traya or baskets in the 
delivery wagons or auto Inicks. They are proving to b« 
more sanitary, more convenient, and a vast improve- 
ment over the old method of delivery. Get our cata- 
logue "Economy of Space." 

Puffer-Hubbard Mfg. Co. 

2605 26th Street, Sooth 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 



FOLDING PAPER BOXES 

FOR CAKES, PIES, LUNCHES, ETC. 

20 Regular Sizes in 
stock ready for 
Priming in one or 

Large quantities of 
Special Sizes made 
to order. Ask for 
samples and prices 
stating measure- 
ments and quantity 
wanted. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

BEE HIVE PAPER BOX CO. 

621-625 S. Delaware St. INDIANAPOUS, IND. 



SHOW CASES 



BAKERY FIXTURES 



GOEBEL & DIESNESS 



437-439 N. Denrborn St. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



11 A K E R S R E V I E W 



707° 



June. 1916 



•f the BREAD consumed is baked 
at home because the housewife 
thinks it cleaner and better than the 
bakera' loaf. 



A Wrapped Loaf 

■atiifics.her as to its cleanliness and 
tcads to convince her that the 
quality is superior. 

Ask for samples and prices of 
wrappers manufactured by us 
Some are waxed both sides; others 
•DC side only, so as to permit the use 
of gum tape; others may be sealed 
with heat without string or tape; 
also in rolls or sheets for wrapping 
by machine. 



IINinN WAXED & PARCHMENT 
UlllUni PAPER COMPANY 



HAMBURG 



LEWIS SHIPPING BOXES 

TWO KINDS 

LEWIS ^"ITITBOXES 



TkLmri. 


W.TM 


WmJ aid Wire 




the result of t 




years of ma 




turing- expe 




knock down 


the 


t de- 


sired, saving 




thirds freight 


-Thc 


past year w 
biggest in i 




« \m- 


tory~It is 




popular than 


ev»r 


—Increased 




in the face of in- 


creasing CO 


nped. 



Tk N«w Lcwii SimI Bn is the most practical and the lowest- 
cost steel box on the market. Furnished only In set up form- 
inside painted while or grey enamel — construction similar lo 
woven wood and wire box, except that Bessemer sheet steel 
is substituted for the woven woodjand wire material. 

BOTH'KINDS 

bare tba tolbwInK cicliuivc featarea:— Th* Palant CenbiBaUaB Hiaia Md 
Canwr-Tka Prsjactad Fraiit Tap Conat-Tha Damaaa-Prsof Lacldai 
Da»ic»-Tha7-aiBeh ""--'" ^ " 



4udar7 Bracaa 



G. B. LEWIS CO^ Watertown, WU. 



CO., 



NEW JERSEY 



BRANCH OFFICES 

277 Broadway, New York 

413 North Znd St., St. Ixiuia, Mo. 

77 Bedford St., Bottwj, Mass. 

AGENTS 

Graner & Beckwith, 25 W. 2nd St., Cincinnati, O. 

NatiMiBl Paper Co., 257-263 Decatur St., Atlanta, Ga. (Southerr 

Rcpreientativea.) 
R«y Bkker, William Atden Smith Building, Grand Rapids, Mich 

(Agent for the Statei of Michigan, Indiana and Ohio.) 
Amwican Salfei Agenciei Co., San Francisco, Cal 



Guard Your Bread 

while in transit from, tampering 
— insure unmolested deliveries 
by using 

Bread Box and Basket Seals 

They eliminate the uncertainly 
of safe deliveries and protect 
your business interests by saving 
your customers from disappoint- 
ment in shipments. 

They cost little — they save much 

Chicago Car Seal Co. 

407 N. Green Street CHICAGO. ILL 



■drertiMineot Id Bieirb Ritibw. 



f=%5^ 



IV.NE, 191 6 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Dry Milk, Malt Extract 
and Egg Products 



Italt Extract 

Advance Mali Products Co., Chicago, III 
American Diamalt Co., Cincinnati, 0. 
P. BallOjUim & Son, Newark, N. J. 
Crovm Maltose Co. , Chicago, III. 
Meckel Mfz. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 



Dry MUk 



Page 




Pag, 


3S 


Dry Mitt Co.. Nm York, N. Y. 


35 


34 


Eitnirre Co., CortUmd, N. Y. 


30 


30 


MirriU Souk Co., Syracmi. N. Y. 




Egg Pvodncts 






Armour 3 Co., Chicago, III. 


19 


Set Inda 


lohn Laylon Co.. Niw York, N. Y. 


.5? 



No^v's the Time to Contract 



^1 



For Your Years' Supply of 

• Frozen 

Spring Quality All Year 'Round JliK^V^^ 

Contract now — while prices are loweit and quality highest Buy your ymar's supply. 
We keep the eggs under constant refrigeration and you order them out as wanted. 
No market changes — no loss — no waste. Every egg full-bodied, selected quality. No 
weak, watery stock to bake out in the oven. We can furnish all yolks, all whites 
or whole eggs. Write for particularg. 

Use Armour's Baking Batter. We can supply you 
throughout the year with high-grade stock at right prices. 

ARMOUR^COMPANY Chicago 



)f ittiMl B«elpMcltr— 




BAKERS REVIEW JUKE, 1916 



£kenflor 

"The Milk Powder with the Milk Flavor" 

is made at low temperatures by the 

Ekenberg Vacuum Process 

of which we are the exclusive owners in America 
not by a 

Spray Process 

That's why we retain in our powder the real milk flavor 

So that a less quantity can be used with satisfactory results 

Safety — Economy 

The Ekenberg Co. Cortland, N. Y. 



BALLANTINE'S MALT EXTRACT is used by bakers who realize its value in producing 
bread of good quality, richness and high nutritive value. Ballantine's causes perfect 
fermentation, is a valuable yeast food and is cheaper to use than any substitute ever 
offered. Write for further information and a sample. 

P. BALLANTINE & SONS Til^J^? Newark, N. J. 



June, 1916 




he very best kind of sugar for bread 
baking purposes 

IT IS NOT a secret formula which leaves the baker in the dark as to what he 
is putting in his bread. Buy Crown Maltose and know that you 
are simply using the sugar which is without equal in bread. 
IT IS the ideal yeast food and will produce a mots/ loaf with an appetiz- 
ing flavor, a silky texture anH flne^ trrain nci-fprf hlnnm anH 

volume. Buy Crown Maltose fc 
IT IS NOT a Malt flour, or Malt Extract. 

tion of mineral salts, glucose, ar 

Maltose for Quality and Quantil 
IT IS a pure, and unadulterated, straig 

by-product), guaranteed by us t( 

conformity, with all state and r 

chances — buy Crown Maltose. 
IT IS NOT a liquid. Crown Maltose is a 

dry sugar; You therefore have 

no water to pay for. Buy 

Crown Maltose and get your 

money's worth. 
IT IS guaranteed to satisfy. 
Write for sample and particulars. 

CROWN MALTOSE COMPANY 

116-m S. Great St, 

CHICAGO 



li. 




WUl b«lv lU araul U 



BAKERS REVIEW 



JUMl, 1916 



PUT PURE FLAVORS IN YOUR GOODS 

Foote & Jenks' Concentrated Extracts of Lemon and Orange are guaranteed to be 
absolutely pure- The insoluble terpenes (turpentine) having been removed, these ■ 
flavors will make your goods digestible and highly palatable. 

Our Pure Extract of Vanilla is guaranteed to be not less than 10 per cent, bean 
strength. 

Don't spoil your goods by using inferior flavors — Foote & Jenks' are guaranteed 
to be absolutely pure. 

Our price list and manual, "Flavoring and Seasoning Food Products," 
should interest you. Why not send for it ? 



FOOTE & JENKS 



Jackson, Mich. 



FUVORING EXTRACTS & ESSENCES 



TTyour 
Extracts, 
Etsence*, 



once and you 
will alway* use 
{hem. They 
are Incompar- 
able. 



SPECIALTIES: 



bi«OHa.iltRra 



|].i(tit4.llia>. 



H. FUCHS SBBS 



Ettabluhmtl twmnty-fiom ymarr, 

AD. SEIDEL & SONS 

Manufacturen and Jobbers of all 

Bakers' Supplies 

124M7 GufieU An., CHIMGO, U. S. A. 



■i"SEIDEL"Ui<n>b<ilof 
QUAUn, SERVICE ud SATISFACTICM 



One Moment, Mr. Baker 



The 
Old Method 

Slow, 

Unsanitary, 

Costly 



The 

Up-to-Datm 

Method 

Quick, Sani- 
tary, Less 
Expensive 



STORAGE EGGS ver»u» LAYTON'S EGGS 



Yoa take big chances. 

Yon have mnaty and other faulty eggs 
to contend with — ; 
Result, spoiled goods— lost trade 



You take n 

No risks. Absolute Purity 

Guaranteed. 

Result, Increased trade— time 

labor and money 



I, Mparated iriiitu or jolk*. 



I auccasaful bakers. Be c 



WiB ifi€idly Mmnd Ml partietUatm 

THE JOHN LAYTON COMPANY 

Pacific Cout Office: 510 BattaT St., San Fraacinn, Gal. 90 Waat Street, New Yorii, N. Y. 

- t ,000 IP 



Twas an adTerttiemeat Id BASaas Bbtimw. 



June, 1916 



D A K E R S R E V I ]■; W 



TO THE 

BREAD 
BAKERS:- 



Is the high price of sugar interfering with your profits? 

(1) If the above question interests you, permit us to show you how you can 
overcome this difliculty by immediately using ARGO CORN SUGAR, "The Ideal 
Bread Sugar". 

(2) It is used in the same manner and in the same formula as any other sugar 
in bread making. 

(3) It sells at 2>^c. per pound less than other sugars. 

CORN PRODUCTS REFINING CO., 17 Battery Place, New York 



10c Worth of Cake in 
an AttractiTe Package 



That'* what bring* 

yoar cottomen back 

IF YOUR GOODS ARE MADE RIGHT— THEY WILL BE IF YOU 

USE RI'CO PRODUCTS 

Put an assortment of Honey Fruit —White — Gold and Spice 

watch your outomen wait on themselveal They know the cake is 

diat it has not been exposed to dust or handled and that it can be carried 

bang crushed. Send the coupon for fall information. 

To get the dimes out, you must put goodness in — 

RI-CO RI-CO RI-CO 

Pure White Whole Dry Egre Emulsions 

THE W. K. JAHN CO. 



4S3 GiceDwich St. 
NEW YORK 



130 No. Franklin St. 
CHICAGO 



Mutual Reclprocltr — 




BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 




T^^nv 



It's Not Only In Appearance 

That Diamalt improves bread so wonderfully. 

Besides the beautiful brown, golden crust, the fine, even, snow- 
white texture, and the perfect grain. 



Diamalt Gives Bread 



A delicious flavor — A pleasing aroma — Ana far greater Digestive 
Qualities. 

It does not cost any more to bake with Diamalt — It costs less. 

Write us for a Sample and find out why. 

THE AMERICAN DIAMALT CO. 

Sample Department CINCINNATI, OHIO 



WIU balp all arontid If jau i 



1 Bakbu Swnrw, 



fim\t14.-t*t\»lT'« 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



ONE POUND 



H I 



PURE MALT FLDLIR 



DOES THE WORK 

of two pounds of malt extract in all bread formulas 

The only malt product ever offered the 

American Baker on a guaranteed 

analysis basis 



Our Guarantee is backed by our bond 



Sole Manufacturers 

ADVANCE MALT PRODUCTS CO. 

305 S. LaSalle Street Chicago, III. 



Advance Malt Producb Co., 

305 S. LaSalle Street, 

Chicago. 111. 

Gentlemen: — 

Please send me one pound FREE sample of 
MALZO sufficient for a one barrel baking. 

Name 

Address 

State - 

{^Enclose liusiness card if possible) 



Win lM)p all woimd If Ton mantloB lUKau Rariiw. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 




Sem-i-Sol 
Buttermilk 



What it is 



What it does 



"SEM-I-SOL" is simply condensed but- 
termilk—mixed with water in propor- 
tions of one pound of "SEM-I-SOL" to 
six of water produces seven pounds of 
the purest and richest buttermilk. 

"SEM-I-SOL" gives to the white loaf of 
bread what it lacks in a sufficient and 
highly essential food value-PROTEIN- 
White bread alone as a food is what is 
commonly termed, an unbalanced ration 
—"SEM-I-SOL" supplies the balance. 
Read farther. 

Consolidated 
Products Company 

1029 West Adams St., 
_ ^ Chicago, III. „, , 



pVERY BAKER of quality goods 
u»es buttermilk but he is paying 
more for his buttermilk than what 
"SEM-I-SOL" will cost him— and 
"SEM-1-SOL" is better for him to 
use. 

"SEM-I-SOL" requires but little 
storage space and.by adding from 5 
to 7>2 pounds of it to a barrel mix 
the water absorbing power of the 
dough is increased from 10^ to 12% 
— an economic factor. It imparts a 
zest and richness to the loaf making 
it altogether, an ideal food. 

Better and Cheaper Than Sweet 
MUk— because "SEM-I-SOL" con- 
sists of sweet milk soVids pius laclic 
acid. If "sweet milk results" are 
desired the lactic acid may be neut- 
ralized in, say I pound of "SEM-I- 
SOL" by adding H ounce of bi-car- 
bonate of soda thus forming 1 ounce 
of tactic salt. This acts as a leaven- 
ing agent during the process of bak- 
ing, liberating ^ ounce of carbon 
dioxide gas and leaving ^ ounce of 
sodium lactate. 

Improve Your Rye Bread 

without additional cost. Use "SEM- 
I-SOL" and you will get a larger, 
better loaf, full of life, not tough and 
soggy. 

"SEM-I-SOL" produces a far 
greater yield as it causes the bread 
to take on more moisture and rye to 
stay moist longer. Use from two to 
three pounds of "SEM-I-SOL" to a 
barrel mix and you will be agreeably 
surprised at the results. 

You, progressive bakers realize 
that a good bread with the taste that 
suits all alike has the greatest adver- 
tising value known. Kdk can make 
that loaf Aad cut down the cost of pro- 
duction by using "SEM-I-SOL." 

Try "SEM-I-SOL" FREE— try it 
in one of your batches. We will fur- 
nish the sample and all necessary in- 
structions as to its use -untkout obli- 
gating you in any way. 

Write todar for Ih* unvl«-^itswiU 



s Bsnair. Nnlf Md. 



June, 1916 



B A K ERS' REVIEW 




'<^. 



.1 ,..GooQle 



3AKERS- REVIEW June. 1916 



Let tbem know tbat ron k*^ the idi. In Bak>bi Bbtiiw. 



, Google 



yoNi, '9'6 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Machinery and Equipment 



Page 

Alien &■ Co.,/. W., Chicago, lU. 49 

Atufican Bakers Mack. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 4S 

Bmm & Sckoel, Waierloo, Iowa 40 

Champion Mack. Co.,JoUet. lU. 44 

Coibtme Mfg. Co., Chicago, III. Sre Index 

D^ Co., J. H., Cincinnaii, Ohio 4a 

rhiUhess Tool Co., FiskkiU-on-Hudson, N. Y. 45 
General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

GotUckalk Sr Co., ReedsviUe, Pa. 46 

ffMion, P. D. Philadelphia, Pa. 30 

ffoyssen Mfg. Co., Sheboygan, Wis. 42 
rhe Hobart Mfg. Co., Troy, Ohio 



Page 
Jabttrg Brothers, New York, N. Y. 47 

Johnson Co., H. A., Boston, Mass. See Index 

Koenig-KeUer Co., Lancaster, Pa. 41 

LytiU'Superior Co., Cincinnati, 0. 39 

Mills & Bro., Thos., Pkila., Pa., Inside back cover 

Pneumatic Scale Corp., Ltd., Norfolk Downs, 

Mass. 46 
Read Machinery Co., York, Pa. 40 

RockweU Co., L. A.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 44 

Thomson Machine Co,, BelleviUe. N.J. 49 

Triumph Mfg. Co., Cincinnaii, Ohio 43 

Union Wrapping Mac. Co.,JolietJU. 42 

Werner & Pfleiderer Co., Saginaw, Mich. 52 



Jmrt BintteD BAXva Bimw. Naff Md. 



, Google 



iAKERS RKVEEW 



June, 1916 



"POOR GOODS ARE DEAR AT ANY PRICE' 

READ MACHINES 



Co«t a lltUe more at flrst» but are cheap In the long run 

The Read Machinery Co., York, Pa. 



BOOKS FOR BAKERS 



The Editor of Bakers Review Highly Recom- 
mends the Following Books As A Valuable 
Asset to Any Bakery. No Baker's Library is 
Complete Without Them. 

Secrets of Bread Making 

Br EMU, BRAUN 

Price . . $1.10 

Malzbender's Practical Recipe 

Book 



Price . . $2.00 

W» ma Ctadty Stnd Any or All of tht Aboom 
Book» Upon Rucmipt of Prico, ExprmtM Prmpaid 

BAKERS REVIEW 



Woolworth Bld^. 



New York, N. Y. 



Will b«lp all trouDd If 70U n 



1 Bakibi Riruw. 



/ . 



BAKERS REVIEW 



, Google 



Uotaal BeclprocltT — "Saw It In B&v3>a Raraw. 



! BAKERSREVIEW 


Juke, 1916 


Union Combination 
Bread & Bun Ri 


-■ 


is perfected to such a 
high degree that it 




Rounds 3,500 U 
600 Doz. Buns F 




and in the performance of 
shows its thoroughness. 




It requires only ^ horse pc 
ate— is practically self-clean 
compactly and ruggedly, 1 
floor space and is self adjustii 




And It CosU Less Than 
Price Of Othei 




The Union Wrapping Machine G>., 


Joliet, Dlinois 



The 
New Model 

HAYSSEN 

Bread 
Wrapping 
Machine 

Wraps 1,800 loaves per hour. Requires but one operator, b adjustable to different size 
loaves. Can be furnished with Automatic Coupon Insert Attadiment which places coupons 
or advertising matter, singly and automatically, into each padcage. 

More than ISO HAYSSEN machines in operation in bakeries. 
Shipped on 30 days' trial 

Wrilm for fact* about tlw New Modal Machina 

HAYSSEN MFG. CO. Sheboygan, wis. 

win kdp m u«amd It roa ■i rt lw Baksu Bavmr. 



Joke. 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 




American 

Divider and Rounder 

Choose your Machine, like you would 
your Friends. Do not have one that 
isn't worth keeping always, and that 
you won't grow to like better every 

Some of Our Friends 

Jay Burns Baking Co. Omaha, Nebr. 

Memphis Bread Co. ----- - Memphis, Tenn. 

Freund Bakery of American Bakeries Co. - - - St. Louis, Mo, 

Atlas Bread Co. ------- Milwaukee, Wis. 

Texas Bread Co. - - Houston, Texas 

Nafziger Baking Co. Kansas City, Mo. 

F. H. Hohengarten, Home Bakery - - - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Wclle-Boettler Bakery ------ St. Louis, Mo. 

Heydt Bakery Co, -St, Louis, Mo. 

Connelly Baking Co. Springfield, 111. 

Hartmann Bros. Bakery ------ Springfield, 111. 

Manewal Baking Co E, St. Louis, 111, 

Indianapolis Baking Co. Indianapolis, Ind. 

United Bread Co. ------ - Terre Haute, Ind. 

Model Bakery, C, O. Schweickhardt - - - - Burlington, Iowa 

H. Korn Baking Co. -' Davenport, Iowa 

American Baking Co. ------- Louisville, Ky. 

Grocers Baking Co. - Louisville, Ky. 

College Hill Bakery, G. L. Jordan - - - - Topeka, Kans. 

H. Weil Baking Co. New Orleans, La. 

Schmidt's Vienna Bakery Baltimore, Md. 

General Baking Co. - -* Boston, Mass. 

Pope Baking Co. - - Detroit, Mich. 

Sanitary Bread Co. ------- Minneapolis, Minn. 

Consumers Bread Co. - - Kansas City, Mo. 

The Final Test — Ask Any User of "American Equipment" 

American Bakers Machinery Co. 

9th and Clinton Streeto ST. LOUIS, MO. 





t 

I 



Untnal Reetproeltj — "Saw It In BinBS Bimw." 



_)ini:zec oy VJ* 



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iAKERS REVIEW June, 1916 



"Here is the mixer 

that has stood the test for 
twenty-eight years. Has 
all cut gears. Gears guard- 
ed to comply with laws of 
each state. Substantially 
built. Made in sizes from 
J^ to 10 bbl. size, both 
belt and motor driven 
types. 

Have records of| 
Champion mixers being in 
actual service for twenty- 
five years. Write for list 
of users in your vicinity. 
Prices quoted on request. 
If motor drive desired, 
give motor specifications 
which you can obtain from 
your Electric Power Co. 
Manufacturers of complete 
line of machinery for the 
Bakery." 

Champion Machine, j 



JolieL Illinois Chicago Representative: H. M. BACHMAN 

Roam 23 1 , 1 7E W. Jackion Blvd. 



Rockwell's Time-Tested Bakery Machinery 

BUILT BY THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED HANUFACTURERS IN THE UNITED STATES ESTABLISHED ISTS 



S. Cushma 

Sons, NewY. tt Robt. A. Johnston 

N- Y-. w'te; W Co., Milwaukee, 

We have u V wis., write: 

this machine ,^, r- ■ , ^ 

and night foi *Your Sifter is 

last two years feeding two large 

it hasn't faile mixers and it gives 

a single day. " excellent satisfac- 

=^=^ lion. We would 

«. B 1 n n' t part with it for 

» «•*«" .wice its cost." 

Doi^Mixm What others have 

, j_ I to s*y about this 

mueb7 the machine mailed 

Skdb Brutd ' upon request. 

Co. ^^^^_ 



ROCKWELL'SOIUGINALCOHBiNEDSIFTER. KOCKWELL'S RELIABLE DOUGH MDCER EXCELSIOR CAKE MACHINB 
ELEVATOR ud FEEDER Slmpl^rt ud nMt dnnbto mMhliH on tlw 

FU«rt*4K».k3.»10 ,„;iEiXi'S:rSi;^S?h'S.^1S*uS5: Qu«~.t«Hodob.t<«ru.danl«fc«Pw H >W 

t<* «l M l ug UH paw on tM dIhh iiYiTTKn lataly h* i^na or ^itt, «»■» «i*k** ■n>^hiM 
Bmrlk.Orl.hd..dAnid.U«iill in bmb <rf MoWmt to th« oi««Mt. Wr tmna « -mKh »anM^ mmeMa,. 

COHPLBTB FLOITB HAIfDLrNO SYSTEMS OUR 8PBCIALTT POR INFORMATION AND CATALOG CS WRITS TO 

LA DfV^I^AVPI I C*C% Formerly Fowler & Rockwell, 430-32-34 Smith St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A, aSXjX^T^ W EJ^Lt \A<J, Mmafaetunn ^ CempUlm Linm i^ Bakmry Machmmry 

jDit tWDttOn BAXntB BlTUW. NdIT Md. 



June, 19 iC 



11 A K K R S REVIEW 



Summer Heat 



and Bakers 



Men in "fine fettle" working under conditions wliich 
promote and Iceep tliem in good humour, mean big- 
ger, better profits. 

Summer heat and the monotony of handworl< are not 
conducive to most profitable production. 
They induce carelessness and inaccuracy which means 
waste. 

A DUTCHESS Automatic Dough Divider will elimi- 
nate this, and will be for you a reliable, unfailing ser- 
vant, accurate, efficient and untiring in all seasons 
and will make work in your shop a pleasure. 
Hundreds of bakers are enjoying the profits produced 
through the use of these machines— so should you. 

"Our Sales Tell The Tale !" 



DUTCHESS TOOL COMPANY 

Beacon, N. Y. 



n 70a roand It — In [UmiM Rkviki 



BAKERS REVI E W 



June, 191b 



"The Auto Dough Mixer" 

Pal»«t«d In tha United States and All Faralsa Ceuntriaa 

» guaranteed to mcreaie row |»ofita and 
the quality o( your bread ineipective of 
any mixer you are now usng. It baa 
proven to be 

THE KING 
OF DOUGH MIXERS 

The lateM and bed machine on the 
market In a daat by itteU aa to yield 
and gluten davdopment. The only 
mixer in the vrarid that develops 
every pwticle of the batch in 
the nutchine. 

Sngle arm, revenible, vaiiabte qteed. 
Any ipeed from 3 fo 46 revohitiona a 
minule. 

Developt the ^uten quickly, witbout 
gimding the dough to death and de- 

itroyrog the flavM. 

Semi for oar uUlog— It's free 

GOTTSCHALK&CO. 
Reedsville, Pa. 



THE RIGHT WRAP 

IS MADE BY 

The 

Pneumatic-Standard 

Bread Wrapping 

Macliine 

Right because it is ma 
Right because it looks 
Right because it works 

Write for right particuh 

PNEUMATIC SCAI 

Main Office and Pad 
Chicago New York 

W. & C. PanUn, 14'. __ _ 

U 
Let ibem kuow <hat ton read th* ada. is Bixaaa Hamw. 



l yCoOgk 



June, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



4} 



' Ship 
Mq 
AnotliQr 

Mixor 
InrrnQdiatol 



U'~r'HIS machine is, in a great measure, responsible for the increase in my business— it has 
I helped me f?jake better bread and more of it. " 

* "I need another New Era to take care of the increased demand for my goods; 

my confidence in this machine tg born of actual experi- 
ence with it and the knowledge that it turns out bread good 
enough to make customers come back for more." 

Are you this baker? Are you one of the thousands who 
h&ve put their confidence in the New Era — the machine that is 
pretty nearly as essential to real good bread as good flour? 

The New Era is diflFerent from other dough mixing 
machines in the form and movement of the mixing arms. This 
"difference" is covered by strong, protecting, United States 
patents to guard you and us against infringements. 

There's a Jaburg Man coming your way. A card to us 
NOW will arrange for his personal call and information that 
will kelp your business to grow. He'll tell you about New Era 
Mixers and other Jaburg specialties for the Baker. 



JABURG BROTHERS 



10-14 Leonard 
New York 



St. 




Will belp lit arouDd U ran 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



Day Dough Moulder 

Givea three timet the aervice 
of any other moulding machine 

Costs no more than others 

It speeds up the doug^h handling 
system at its slowest point and permits 
a 20 per cent, increase in output. Com- 
pactly built of the best material and is 
practically noiseless. It is the latest 
and best moulder made. 

A bakar naud not maku a dough lo tait hi* 
moalduT, nor bay a moaldmr to mit hia d^mront 
doagha. A Day Doagh Moaldmr wUt fnM btt 
poanUa moulding from a atrmght dettgh or 
apongm doagh, atiff dovgh or alack det^h, on 
mU dough or yoang doagh. 

Ask for detailed description and price. 

^^'J.H.Day Company 

1144 Harriion Ave., Cincinnati, 0. 



Here is the Latest Type 

Triumph Dough Mixer 

Safety First 
Friction Drive 



Built in One to Four Barrel sizes. 
Finished in Sanitary, White enamel. 
Fitted with pulley or motor, jgas or 

gasoline engine. 
Two extension pulleys on motor drive. 



To avoid accidents — all gears enclosed. 
Mixer can be started or stopped with- 
out shutting off power. 
Note plain, simple design. 
Uses less power — gives increased yield. 
Bronze stuffing boxes. All cut gears. 
Motor is covered — is easily cleaned. 
One price — no extra charges asked. 



Write today for prices or ask our 

Representative 

Place Your Order Now 



The Triumph Mfg. Co. 

3400.3408 Spring Grove Avenue 
aNCINNATI, OHIO 

Mimber Nalivtiai AmoeiaUoii of Jtfuter Baktrt 



hrt tlipm knr 



t TOD TMiil the ailii, in Bkk 



^Oig^^^^^^^ 



_ Jlne, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW 



1 



BAKERS 

Supplies, Tools and Utensils 



When you are in the market for 
supplies, tools or utensils, it Is well 
to consider besides quality the ser- 
vice to which you are entitled. 
No matter what your wants we can 
supply you — and the service we ex- 
tend will make you a tife-longf cus- 
tomer. 

May we have a trial order? 



J. W. ALLEN & CO. 

110.118 Peoria St CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mounlad «a Ckbioct for PorUble U*« 

Summer Time is Roll Time 

The orders we have received for our Combina- 
tion Roll Moulder indicate that bakers every- 
where are preparing for a big Summer rush on 
rolls. You too should be prepared to handle 
this increased business with 

A Thomson Standard 

Combination Roll Moulder 

This machine is- constructed of the best ma- 
terials and is thoroughly practical in design. 
It can be furnistied in two styles, for mounting 
on the bench or placed on a cabinet for port- 
able use. 

Large Variety— Great Capacity 

With this machine you can make many styles 
and sizes of rolls and at a capacity of 200 do^ten 
per hour. A boy can operate it and the cost 
is only about SO. 25 for the day's run. 

Wiitm U» Today — stating; tkt stylt mackine 
you Tvaitt also the rolls you tuish to make and 
■we ■will sendfull particulars and prict at once 



THOMSON MACHINE CO. 

THE HOUSE OF SERVICE 

JohhJ.Hdppih. Pmldent 

Hatn ones and Worln. Ballmill^ New J«rHy 

LbtshI MaBofHtBtvn at Bakwi* MuUa«7, EsctodTalr, 

Gwnvc E. GoirdT. Soatharn RapnunUtive. ZOTS Calt*s« St.. 
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BAKERS REVIEW June, 1916 






I ^ 



will balp tP ■ronDd U ron mentloa Bin 



Joke, 1916 BAKERS REVIEW 



/ 



Ort Bros. Cover Country Routes 
Around Midland, Md., Regularly 
With the Autocar. They say: 

"Our Autocar covers 28 to 30 miles every 
day, rain, hail or snow. We have what we 
have been looking for — a motor truck that 
will go day after day without trouble and at 
small expense." 

^ 1 Write for illustrated catalog C and list of over 3,000 

\ concerns using Autocais in every line of business. 

Chassis $1650 

THE AUTOCAR COMPANY 

Ardmore, Pa. 

Enablislied 1897 MOTOR DELIVERY CAR SPECIALISTS 



TwM an adrwtlMnMit In Bixna Rbtibw. 



yGuuyle 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 19 i6 




PICTURES DON'T LIE? 

This is an expression made by lots of people, but we believe 
they are tnisbiformed. How often have you looked at the 
photo of a friend and found same flattered him greatly. Why? 
Because the view taken is of his best appearance. This 
scheme is used a great deal by manufacturers to show their 
goods to the best advantage and oftentimes makes a hit with 
the baker. The [ricture looks O. K., but does the outfit live 
up to what appearances indicate? We have lots of good 
pictures of good worldng machinery for the baker. They are 
yours for the asking. Furthermore, when we sell you a 
machine or oven by the picture we guarantee same to be as 
good and better than the picture. We don't ask you to sign 
a contract that ties you so tightly that you can't get your 
breath. If we had to do that we would not want your busi- 
ness. We don't try to catch you by certain terms and 
promises, but we do guarantee to live up to our written 
promises as per contract. Our pictures don't lie. We cannot 
afford to have them lie because we have a reputation to sus- 
tabi that is worth everything to us. We make and sell 
Machinery and Ovens and can equip your plant complete. 
The largest manufacturers in the worid because we make the 
best only. 



WERNER & PFLEIDERER CO. 

SAGINAW, MICHIGAN 

EMIL STAEHLE, General Manager 



Branch Offices: 
New York 



San Prancbco 



^ mmm mMW^mm - 

OVCNS J ' MACHmEtV. 



1^ --^- 



Let tb«n know tbat rou raad tb« •<!•. la B4B«aa B«*irw. 



Copjrlgbl. 1010 br Wm. R. Grecory Co, 



Vol. xxxm 



NEW YORK, JUNE, 1916 



No. 3 



What Bakers Owe to the Salesman 



By Otto WeriiH 



dreamed a dream, and dreaming, 



"Oiif Mtghl a drum 
dreamed he died, 
And straighlway to the pearly gates his siti-stained spirit hied. 
And there before the saints he stood vnlk down-cast head and 

"My record's pretty rank," he said, "I guess I'm bound below. 

I've smoked a lot and drank a lot; confess all I must. 

And flirted, too, and then, besides. Great Heavens, how I've 

cussed." 
The good St. Peter looked at hitn with kindly smiling eyes, 
But shook his head. "Don't ask," said he, "a mansion in the 

The sinner bowed, and, in this strain, the aged saint began : 
"You've gotten up at 4 a. m. and chased the train a mile, 
Amid the train crew's gibes and jeers a-sounding all the while. 
And then you found, as usual, the time card playing its tricks, 
Vau've chased the wrong train once again and yours goes out 

at 6. 
You've spent your life at bad hotels and eaten still worse meals. 
With oleo and waiter girls all running down at the heels; 
You've had your letters sent astray; your trunks have wandered. 

With porters, clerks, and baggagemen you're in a constant .stew; 
And once a month you'd see your wife. Now, tell me, is il so?" 
"It is," replied the drummer, as he took his hal to go, 
"Ah, well," said the good St. Peter, as he opened the portal 

"I'm very glad to see you, .tir, just kindly step inside. 

We'll try and make you happy here, we'll do the best we can. 

You've served your time in hell, for you have been a traveling 

White on a trip through the beautiful State of Florida, 1 wa» 
mvohintarily reminded of the above lines, due to the following 
incideot : 

i entered the bakery of Mr, V, located in D. and was greeted 
by his "better half." The lady, however, spied the "grip" which 
I was carrying about with me, and immediately mistook me foi 
a salesman. "Whenever I see one of those things," she said in 
a harsh tone of voice, pointing to my grip, "I know that means 
trouble." I then remarked that I was not looking for trouble 
and presented my card. The expression of her face changed at 
once, she Invited me into the parlor, and asked me to be seated. 
Before I could recover from my surprise at her changed attitude, 
she related that she and her husband had been in the office ol 
Bakeis Review not a great while since in the hope of meeting 
me there. While she was speaking her husband .entered, and 
upon seeing me, exclaimed, shaking hands most heartily, "Hello ! 
Olio!", and there before me stood a former fellow- workman, 
and you can believe it that we were both glad to meet once 
again. We reminisced, herelating how he left New York, set- 



tled in Florida, married and opened a bakery, and belonging to 
the targe family of readers of Bakeks Review, had ascertained 
the fact that I had changed my vocation from a baker to a 
traveling man, that I was studying trade conditions throughout 
the States and presenting my observations through the columns 
of Bakers Review, This happy meeting, however, had been 
almost frustrated, for bis wife, spying my portfolio, mistook me 
for a — salesman. 

The foregoing verses describe the troubles of a "knight of the 
grip," yet only partially so, as the salesman has still other incon- 
veniences to combat. Just as thenotorious "mother-in-law" is 
the eternal target for sarcasm and small jokes, so is the sales- 
man a target for doubtful joking, and sometimes even of deri- 
sion. He is rarely received kindly by bakers. Often he is re- 
fiarded by them as a necessary evil — necessary because unavoid- 
able, but nevertheless an evil. 

As I have often been taken for a salesman by bakers 1 have 
also come in for a share of the "joyous welcome" which awaits 
them. I therefore resolved to write an article from practical 
experience in regard to "What Bakers Owe to the Salesman," 

Without doubt the baker owes him much. In many instances 
the salesman offers an investment which means a far greater 
profit to you than it does to him or the firm he represents. Take, 
for instance, a bake-shop machine salesman ! This man almost 
talks his head off before he sells you a machine. I have met 
bakers who have told me that if it had not been for this or 
that salesman they would not yet have even a dough-mixer, while 
now their bakeshops are equipped with modern machinery, and 
they would not part with same unless it could be replaced. They 
harvest with full hands the benefits of modern machinery, but, 
as stated before, had it not been for the persistency of Salesman 
A or B, they would not even have a dough mixer. I leave it 
to any fair-minded baker to answer the question, as to who de- 
rives the larger profits from these hake-shop machines, the sales- 
man, the manufacturer or the baker himself? 

There are bakers, however, who hate the salesman as the devil 
does holy water. Suppose a baker should close his doors to all 
salesmen, how much would he learn of the work of the outside 
world? How many profitable opportunities would he not miss? 
I recollect the time when malt extracts, milk powders, etc., were 
not as popular in the hake-shop as they are to-day, and when 
the salesman called on the baker and made practical demonstra- 
tions of the benefits to be derived from these and other articles. 
For a long time the bakers would joke with them, not realizing 
that by their use they could bake a loaf of bread far superior 
to the housewife's home-made bread, and that it greatly in- 
creased the sale of bread in general. Again I ask who derived 
the greater benefit from the very first order of powdered milk 
or malt extract, the salesman, the manufacturer or the baker? 

It is an undisputed fact that the traveling salesman is a sort 



54 



BAKERS REVIEW 



June, 1916 



01 "walking encyclopedia," a source of information second only 
to the trade paper. The salesman is usually a very keen observ- 
er and quick to perceive improvements in machinery, methods 
of operation, etc., and is always ready to impart such informa- 
tion to the baker and to further the baker's interests whenever 
possible. That his main object is to obtain orders, is under- 
stood, as this is his vocation, but should certainly be no reason 
for not treating him courteously, even if the goods he offers 
are not desirable. 

Unfortunately, there are many bakers who consider the sales- 
man as nothing but a "sleek article," simply out on "the make," 
seeking to shear his victim of his cash, whether or not his 
goods are of any value to the purchaser. No, Bakers, the sales- 
man is a man who works hard to make an honest living, and 
if you are broad-minded enough to study him a little closer you 
will find that he is remarkably like yourselves. You are the boss 
and if'hii wares do not interest you, the privilege is yours to 
refuse them, but it is to your advantage to show the salesman 
the same consideration and courtesy that you would like to 
receive if you were in his place. The man on the road appre- 
ciates courtesy more than you or others because it is shown htm 
so rarely. There may be, of course,' a few tactless, insistent 
salesmen, who make themselves obnoxious, who do not deserve 
consideration, but I believe that every baker will admit that 
salesmen in general are gentlemen, that they are tactful and 
possess a wonderful amount of patience, ofteri discussing at 
Ifreat length the advantages of an article which would bring a 
large profit to the baker and but a small one to themselves, but 
still the baker turns a deaf ear. Very often the salesman is 
made to wait an unreasonable length of time before being grant- 
ed an interview by a baker. How could you expect to see a 
smiling face if one has to wait a half hour or longer? Anyone 
would become disgruntled under these circumstances. If the 
baker is not willing to see the salesman, let him say so frankly, 
and do not waste his time, as his "time is money" as well as 
the baker's. 

If the goods offered do not appeal to the baker, then dismiss 
the salesman politely, as he may again be in your town and 
may have an attractive article of value to you. Of course, there 
are many bakers who treat the salesman with due consideration, 
but there are many others who do not, and who should show 
him more courtesy, for 

He is a jolty fellow. 

Giving you a glad hello! 

With his winning, helpful way 

As he travels day by day. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Kentucky Convcntton Octolwr 17 and 18 

The Executive Committee of the Kentucky Master Bakers' 
Association met in Louisville recently and selected October 17 
to 18 as the dates for the annual convention to be held at 
Paducah. George Tomppert, of Louisville, was appointed chair- 
man of the Program and Badge Committee ; add Frank Kircl|pfF, 
of Paducah, Ky., chairpian of the Entertainment Committee. 
Charles Pfeffer and John Bums, the Committee on Constitution 
and By-Laws, made a report at the meeting which was presided 
over by President J. A. Flaherty, of Covington. All members 
were present with the exception of Wm, Traxell, of Maysville. 

* * * 

Rotary Clubs to Bold Bakoty Section 

At the convention of Internationni Rotary Clubs to be held at 
Cincinnati during the week of July 16. there will be a special 
meeting of the bakers' supply trade section, which is being or- 
ganized and is under the direction of John Jabiirp, Jr., of New 
York, as chairman, and Harry l.ockwood, of Cincinnati, as vice- 
chairman. 

The bakers also will have a special section with John Korn, 
of Quincj'. 111., as chairman, and Ben S. Weil, of Ci 
Ohio, as vice-chairman. 



Tho Tri-Stat* Program 

The program for the third tri-state convention of the Ohio, 
Indiana and Michigan state associations has just been announced. 
The convention will be held in Toledo, Ohb, June 6, 7 and 8. 
Herb is the program : 

BuBtnCBi Program 
Tuesday, June 6th, 1916—9 A. M. 
Convention called lo order by President E. D. Strain. 
Address of welcome by Mayor Milroy, of Toledo, Ohio. 
Response to the Mayor's address by W. E. Sheill. 
Reading of communications and greetings from other assoda- 

President's Annual Address. 

Reading of minutes of the previous meetings by the serteury. 

Reading of new Constitution for adoption. 

Report of committees. 

Treasurer's report 

Address, Subject: "Bread Making Methods," by Julius E. Wihl- 

fahrt. 
Address, Subject: "Shop Management and Bakery Products," 

by Harry J. Gobrecht. 
Discussion after each address. 
Question Box. 

Wednesday, June Jih, 1916—9 A. M 
Convention called to order by President E. H. Strau. 
Unfinished business of the previous day. 

Address, Subject: 'Bakery Accounting Methods," oy J. J Hen- 
Address, Subject: "Sales Promotion," by S. W. Tredway. 
Discussion after each address. 
Question Box (continued). 

Thursday, June 8th, 1916—9 A. M. 
Convention called to order by President E. D. Strain. 
Unfinished business of the previous day. 
Address, Subject: "The Baker's Paradise," by Wm. Bruce Lef- 

fingwell. 

Nomination and election of officers for the ensuing year. 
Selection of next convention city. 
Installation of new officers. 
Adjournment. 

Entcrtaiiunent Program 

Tuesday, June 6, 1916—2:30 P. M. 

Ladies leave Terminal Building for trip through the Lake Side 

Biscuit Company plant. Each lady will be presented with an 

elegant souvenir. 

Tuesday, June 6, 1916— 8 P. M. 
Grand reception and dance at Terminal Auditorium. 

Wednesday, June 7, 1916— -^ W. . 
Shopping tour or go as you please. 

Wednesday, /unt 7. 1916—2 P. M. 
Automobile trip to The Woman's Building where luncheon 
will be served and then to the Toledo Art Museum and Fort 
Meigs, returning to the city at 5 o'clock. 

Wednesday, June j, 1916— 8 P.M.. 
Moonlight ride for all on Lake Erie. 

Thursday, June 8, 1916--^, M. 
Shopping tour or go as you please. 

Thursday. June 8, 1916—4 P. M. 

35-mile trolley ride along river, Bay and Lake to Toledo Beacii 

for luncheon. Every one invited. Cars will return every half 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

California Bakan Praparlag 

The annual convention of the California Master Bakers* Asso- 
ciation will be held in Oakland, Cal., next month. The Hold 
Oakland will be convention headquarters. J. Wittenberg is chair- 
man of the local committee on arrangements. 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Reasons for Figuring Costs Accurately 
in the Small Bakery 

By J. A. Winkelmatt, Memphis, Tenn.* 

'THERE are couDtless convincing reasons "Why a Small Bak- oil made an exit in pvi and machine greasing, while 30 pound) 

'' er Should Figure Costs," but the wisdom of a Solomon of compound and several gallons of oil melted into the troughs, 

would be taxed to satisfactorily explain why a baker, large or When the returns were all tabulated, the sweet doughs dis- 

small, does not figure them. closed an unending clamor for raisins, citron, butler, eggs, mace, 

• Perhaps the situation may well be cinnamon, nuts, granulated and powdered sugars, etc. Previous 
likened unto the man who knew 999 to this time, in vagrant efforts to occasionally estimate the in- 
good reasons why he shouldn't take a gredient and expense cost of a mix, some of these Items were 
drink, but who, when in the mood to entirely overlooked, while the others were recorded far below 
indulge, could never think of a single amounts of actual consumption, and with the inevitable invisible 
one of them. loss entirely ignored. 
Unless one knows the truth of hii The situation confronting this surprised baker provoked deep 
business, there will always be an ele- thinking. The thinking begot courage, and an immediate ad- 
ment of vexatious doubt about it vance of half a cent per loaf, in the wholesale price, was the 
Viewed from the present standpoint result. The office now supplies the shop with an individual 
of the abnormal ingredient market, it batch sheet for each dough, which accordingly produce, ap- 
would seem that self-preservation proximately, the amount of bread desired, and with the result of 
would impress the necessity ol some uniformity of product. The business of this particular baker 
I \ WiNKELUAN get-together movement of cost figur- having doubled since systematizing, he is substantially of the 
ing. opinion that there is every reason "Why a Small Baker Should 
ISui there is some sort of explanation for every situation. Figure Costs." For it is the direct path from "rut" to progress 
'I'his thought recalls a recent visit to an insane asylum. While — a safe and sure road to profit — the one broad avenue to the 
conducting our party through various departments of the insti- goal of success. 

nition, the guide occasionally referred to the ward in which the the iupoktance or system in the shop 

violent males were quartered. Upon reaching this location, the System sets an example of economy for employes. They 

visitors were surprised to see the keeper sitting quietly among readily enter into its spirit, rendering co-operation that is mu- 

them. peacefully reading. tually beneficial to all concerned. 

One of the party made bold to ask "If he didn't think he was ]„ a jniall shop, where no system existed, a sponge cake was 

exposing himself to attack by one of the dangerous men?" being made, from a cheap mixture, the output of which was 

"No, there is no fear that any one of these people will molest hom ten to twelve daily, selling at ten cents each. The baker 

'"^' was taken ill, and a substitute employed. The new man improved 

"But." continued the visitor, "suppose they should alt get to- ihe quality of this particular mix by the use of eggs. The ap- 

s™crr pearance was the same, but the taste vastly enhanced. Patrons 

"My friend, there is absolutely no danger whatever, of all readily delected the improvement, and sales leaped from a 

thest inmates ever getting together— why, man, they're craiy." dozen to 200 daily, to the neglect of other lines. One day the 

Failing to systematize, the baker plods in darkness, and nee- proprietor suggested that the cost of this sponge cake be figured. 

essarily is in ignorance of valuable details vital to the very and was amazed to discover that the total of ingredients alone 

life of his affairs. showed a loss of two cents per cake, the consumers reaping the 

AN OBJECT LESSON dividend from his contribution of labor, overhead, etc. 

An object lesson in this regard is emphasized in the case of ^his particuiar baker soon became absorbed in thoiiglit, and 

a man conducting a combination cake and bread business, and *•« st"dy evoked figuring that resulted in an increase of selling 

whose output, some few years since, averaged about $2,000 pet P""'"* '" general. And the moral is, that he commenced to 

month in cake, and 160,000 single counts in bread. ""^^ money. 

Bookkeeping consisted solely of a cash and check book, while system is economical in upkeep 
employes of the two departments dived into supplies with a Many bakers refrain from the installation of a cost accpuntine 
tree hand; with no attempt whatever at checking. System was system, fearing the work involved, and attendant expense, 
su^ested, and with its installation came revelation. When the routine is once in effect, the whole matter is surpris- 
Previously a daily blanket bread order was handed the fore- ingly economical as to upkeep, while the results are beyond corn- 
man, and it was executed in "hit-or-miss" fashion, with the re- putation. The main thing is lo keep an accurate record of oul- 
sult of an overage of hundreds of loaves one day, and perhaps put and of ingredients used. Then, when the overhead, labor 
an equal shortage the day following, and expense items are arrived at, it is plain sailing. It is not 
A month's trial of systematization gave my friend a distinct necessary to figure daily the cost of each batch, A simple plan 
shock. He had been so busy night and day doing a little ol is to go over your baking list and figure the cost of each article 
everything that nothing received proper attention. He suddenly produced. For example, take a batch of cakes in which, perhaps, 
woke up to the fact that 1400 pounds of flour had vanished in the following ingredients were incorporated: 

thirty days through the medium of machine and bench dusting ; lO lbs. Butter $i,go 

ilm ;8o pounds more had flittered hence in mixing room dust, 1 oz. Baking Powder , 01 

while 2300 pounds — more than 3 per cent, of total flour used 10 lbs, F.ggs 1,95 

for month — took flight in invisible loss. Another eye-opener 10 lbs. Flour 3J 

was (fic fact that lOo pounds of pure lard and 10 Rallons of 10 lbs. Granulated Sugar .62 

-^ ""■" Dfgii,zedbyGt)OgIe 

"Paper Read at the Southeastern Masters Bakers" Convention, a total of $4,82 



56 



BAKERS review- 



June, 10"^ 



This batch produces, s;iy, a fiiiislied product selling at $9.50. 
Therefore, we find a cliarye against this sellinn price, of: 

Ingredients 5l5t 

Labor, say 13 

Overhead, say 5 

Cake expense, sa>- 7 . 

A manufnc luring total of 76% 

Then add seMing expense, say 6% 

And yoit have a total expense of 82% 

Such figures may be tabulated upon an individual card, suitably 
printed, with names of various ingredients thereon, and may 
be gone over occasional!}', when material prices fluctuate. If it 
then be ascertained that certain lines are unproductive, the proper 
remedy may be applied. Either discontinue the manufacture ot 
such articles, reduce size or weight, change the formula, or slap 
on the "Sustaining pedal"— the safe refuge — by increasing the 

A business may manufacture, daily, a few lines, the loss upon 
which in a year's lime, will assume amazing proportions. For 
instance, in a large Ohio city, a fair-sized concern, which, in 
general results, had made some money for years, featured, prof- 
itably in its retail store (based upon volume of sales), an excel- 
lent five-cent mince pie. One of the wagon salesmen, operatmg 
a route weak in bread output, gradually made up the deficiency 
— gross — by pushing these pies— at 40 cents per dozen push. 

There was constant shrinkage in the cash balance of this firm, 
and an expert was employed to install system. Analyzation 
proved that the route just referred to — notwithstanding its 
large returns — was absorbing the greater portion of the profits 
of the other wagons. Figuring disclosed the fact that there 
was an actual net loss of twelve cents on every dozen sold— 
and the man was sure some pusher of dozens. 

The firm in question never, for a moment, considered that so 
small an article as a five-cent pie could play such havoc, and 
permitted this species of brilliant merchandising to maintain for 
many months, simply through failure to count the cost. 

It is hardly necessary to add that pie pushing, on that plan, 
was immediately discontinued, 

THE TIME CONTBIEUTH) i¥ BAKEKS' FAMIUKS 

It is a lamentable fact that many small bakers give scant con- 
sideration to valuable time contributed by their wives 
and families. 

They perform tasks, at times, much more satisfactorily than 
hired help, and frequently when it is impossible to obtain out- 
siders to assume the awkward hours necessitated by the require- 
ments of tlie average small baker. Such labor should have fair 
measure when computing the cost of product. 

Figuring costs will not only determine you to c-eck ingredients 
against production, but will suggest caution in eliminating shrink- 
age at the onset by the careful checking and weighing of all 
supplies received. Oversight al this point is a 100 per cent, loss, 
pocketed by carelessness. 

THE IMIflBTANCE OF CHFX:KING 

A few weeks ago an item of citron, billed at 106 pounds, at- 
tracted attention. This ingredient was packed in four cartons, 
ea<:h plainly labeled 24 lbs. net. The total weight, including 
tare, was exactly 100 pounds. Each carton weighed three. pounds 
— a total tare of twelve pounds. Had that bill been carelessly 
passed — the price was isc^z.^o would have been paid for some- 
thing never received. The same invoice developed a shortage 
in caraway seed of four pounds, at 14c. 

The total shortage in this bill amounted to $J.i6. Gentlemen, 
how many times is this experience duplicated in the course of a 
year in your various establishments? And how much bread and 
cake must you sell to counteract the amount involved in such 
unnecessary waste? 

The same underlying principles form the small baker's business 
as those of our mammoth department stores, factories, and rail- 
roads — the desire for profits. Kone of us is in business just be- 



cause the great mass of people must eat, nor are we up :inii ;it 
it daily merely to be doing something, but rather from a -iense 
of self-preservation — to secure for ourselves some ot the lux- 
uries of this world. 

A man's business grows. It becomes larger, whether thron^li 
location, community, necessity, or the superiority of product. 
Gradually complications arise— more capital is needed. On the 
other hand, the establishment fails to come up to the expected 
for opposite reasons than those just named. This, too, reeiiiires 
serious attention — a mobilization of forces, financial, physical and 
— above all — mental. 

In a large Pennsylvania city three brothers fell heir lo a bak- 
ery. The eldest was administrator of the estate, and manager 
of the plant. One brother was bookkeeper, the other a wagon 
salesman. In the shop were four workmen who had each 
operated individual bakeries, and had failed. Their s1t|r-shod 
methods, together with rising cost of materials, almost presented 
the institution with a receivership, as the concern rapidly floated 
into debt. The bookkeeping brother wanted system, while the 
one on the wagon demanded excessive size — to compete with 
cheap trade — as well as quality and. bloom, to olTset up-to-date 
competition — two extremes that do not dwell in practical har- 

A cost system was installed by an expert, who quickly analyzed 
conditions. He found that some of the wagons were being operat- 
ed at a loss, particularly that of the brother who prided himself 
upon a business of $250 to $275 a week. Digging into costs 
disclosed the fact that much of the cake-shop product was mar- 
keted at a loss. This knowledge stimulated the business, through 
an increase in the proper lineSj and the drivers were taught lo 
hustle for the right kind of sales. 

This concern soon began to make monej-. The brother man- 
ager ceased to worry about things that never materialized, ^'ilh 
a clearer vision, and more useful energy, he was enabled to 
renew his efforts with added zest, resulting in that temperament 
so essential to real success — a happier frame of mind. 

System, to the smaller baker — whose situation is in no wi'^e 
different from that of his larger and more successful competitor 
— means to know exactly what he is doing. It means for him 
to realize just where best to employ his energy, for in the in- 
telligent application of same he must of necessity forsie ahead 
for belter results. 

RETTAIL DAKES LTSITALLV TOO LENIENT 

As a rule, the smaller baker, considering himself "boss" i? apt 
to be too lenient. The leaks are not properly observed, while 
indifferent help consumes too much of the profit, unless properly 
checked. 

A good employe readily detects the drift into which a business 
gravitates. When lacking confidence, he consequently loses 
interest, and — seeks another job. 

The man without system, worries about what "system" will 
cost, and the supposed trouble. He is afraid of the work. 

The man with system is alert to the times. He does not worry 
himself over imaginations, but he decidedly does worry the things 
that do not produce, hence gets there. 

There is abundant space for the progressive baker. However, 
he who drags behind is enshouded in eclipse of his own making. 
He places a millstone about his own neck, to be finally consumed 
by livelier competition. 

Some of you gentlemen can no doubt cite instances in limes 
past, where comfortable fortunes have been made in the baking 
business where absolutely no system predominated. But, could 
such experiences be repeated to-day? Could you invade a new 
field successfully unless fortified with the intelligent conditions 
prevailing there? It would, indeed, be a hopeless task. 

Bread shipping is the most deceptive feature of the baking 
business. Like "stealing second," it is usually a delusion and a 
^nare. A small Michigan town presents the case of a man who 
shipped forty loaves, twice a week, to a nearby resort, and who 
was all kinds ot "chesty" over the achievement. The considera- 
tion was the munificent sum of $140, prepaid. The container 



[lne, 1916 



BAKERS REVIEW. 



57 



was a sugar barrel, worth 15 cents, covered by a jiiie sack valued 
at 7 cents, and the expressage 30 cents. The ingredients cost 
figared 63 cents — a total expense of $1.15— with no allowance for 
shipping and shop labor, overhead, etc. When it was suggested 
ihit these items should be considered, this shipping genius 
couldn't see it. All he could see was a clear profit of 25 cents, 
as "The rent, insurance, taxes, and the like, had to be paid any- 
way, while he and his two boys did all the work." 

This line of action is something like the Texas negro who 
'topped up" selling turkeys for $1.00 that cost him $1.15 each, 
and whose response to all amazed inquiries was, "Yes, but look 
ai Ihc business I'm doing." 

THE BIG EXPENSE IN' SHIPPING BREAD 

Gentlemen, do those of you who indulge in the delights ot 
bread shipping realize that no other branch of the business exacts 
a greater toil of expense? Among which is the cost, loss and 
life (or rather death) of baskets, together with tags, invoices, 
bookkeeping, expressage out and return on empties, labor in- 
volved in packing, and in keeping track of outstanding con- 
tainers. Not forgetting postage and statements, the luxury of 
bad accounts, and the expense of an occasional misdirected pack- 
age. This burdensome tribute thoroughly punctures the returns 
from a forty-toaf shipment. "But, just look at the business 

A cost system spells efficiency. It brings out, forcibly, both the 
''•ak and strong points of any business. The leaks and waste 
'^present profits— the life blood of business, which, if allowed 
'° ** frittered away, will stagnate or paralyze. 

the small bakers do not figure costs, and know what amount 
( money it will take to produce what they sell, the chances are 
ihat when the great future unfolds- itself, we shall still find 
iheiti cist^sed as small bakers. 

If you do not know how much money you are making, what 
method will you pursue to figure your losses? 

Science teaches us there is nothing new under the sun, and 
that the so-called new discoveries are but the application of 
natural Jaws and elements. The combination being simplicity' 
itself, the wonder is that some one "had not thought of it 
fwforc." 

A cost system will reveal a number of things about your 
I'usiness that will astonish and astound you. It, too, is so sim- 
ple, that you will ask: "Why hadn't 1 seen these things be 

It is truly the great educator that brings directly home the 
ml knowledge of what you are doing. It is the liberator from 
1\u chains of worry and uncertainty, and places the small baker 
upon the road of self-confidence, aggressiveness and success. 

Business is for real men. It is a survival of the fittest, and 
no baker can make profits by estimating or guessing costs. A 
cost system is truly the master key that unlocks the doors that 
taw hidden costly leaks and waste— it is the searchlight that 
uncovers those dark forms of worry, despair and failure, be- 
cau^ it unfailingly points to a thorough, intimate knowledge of 
liatiness, and ultimately leads to success. 

SUCCESSFUL BAKERS FIGURE COSTS 

Two men started in the baking business at the same time in a 

Southern town, within a short distance of each other. One 

figured costs, under which guidance his business prospered. The 

other man was so busy underselling his competitor that "he 

)u« didn't have time to figure." His only recourse was cheap- 

tning of product, which path led him to bankruptcy, while in-* 

telligent application brought prosperity to the man who 

ed both price and quality. 

The successful bakers, the men who have made n 

ftifmselves, as well as accumulating money, are the 

figurt costs. No elaborate system is necessary, but O 

know, to a reasonable certainty, just what he is doing. 

The first question in any business crisis is: 'What has all this 
been costing?" "How can we meet the emergency?" Without 
a cost accounting system one is upon an uncharted sea. There 



may be rocks ahead, and the good bark of the unthinking bak- 
er goes to pieces on the shoals — the bankrupt couri. 

Arouse yourself from that comatose condition superinduced 
by the feeling of self-satisfaction and conceit. Your trade has 
not given you a gg-year franchise on their business. Nor is it 
sacred unto you. Unforeseen condition may arise. It may be 
freaky, daring competition, intended to attract attention to a 
new arrival. New blood may he transfused into the atrophied 
veins of one whom you thought a fossil. Such conditions can 
only be met fairly and squarely to your own interests, and to 
that of your trade, by some measure that counts the cost. 

It is a psychological truth that everyone likes a successful 
man, or that lliey prefer doing business with a growing concern. 
And when you can command that public impression of success 
and growth of your business, it will gain a momentum sure and 
lasting. All men should be masters of their fates. And a 
business is analogous to life itself. It must have a preceptor 
unfailing in times of need. The guilding hand must act with 
precision, controlled by a perfect knowledge of possibilities. 

Put it down on paper. Make a record of it. You keep account 
of what your customers buy, providing the credits are good. 
Surely you say that is a business essential. Now, then, to follow 
that thought, "It is a business essential" to a logical conclusion, 
isn't it just as necessary to know how much it costs to produce 
1,000 loaves of bread, or a batch of cakes, as it is to keep a 
record of accounts? By the way, how would you know what 
would be a fair selling price if you didn't know the cost of 
batches? Guess at it? Flour may have taken an upward shoot, 
lard and oil advanced, sugar and other ingredients soaring. 
These are all vital elements. Put it down on paper. Figure it 
out. There will be many interesting revelations. 

The light of knowledge that will come to you wi)l be like 
that which came to Paul, on the road to Damascus, Powerfully, 
convincing, and it, too, will convert you. 

Loosen the shackles of uncertainty and ignorance that hold 
\ou in the mire of worry and discontent. Embrace the new 
creed— "KNOW YOUR BUSINESS." Possess the knowledge. 
confidence and security that you are making profits instead ol 
shouldering losses, 

* * * 

Jay Bnnu on Pacific Coast 

Ja> fiurns, president of the National Association of Master 
Bakers, has been in California for the past week calling on the 
leading master bakers of Los Angeles and San Francisco. At 
Los Angeles he was tendered a reception on the evening of May 
16th; and on the evening of May 20th he was received by the 
-San Francisco bakers at the St, Francis Hotel, From San Fran- 
cisco, President Burns went to Tacoma, Wasli,, to attend the 
convention of the Pacific Northwest Master Bakers' Association 
in that city. From Tacoma, Mr, Burns noes to Salt Lake City. 



Coadag ConvontlOBs 

and Michigan) Annual, 



t Schwaben Hall, 593 Springfield 



Kansas, 



:s who 
should 



/une 6-&-Tri-Stale (Ohio, I 
at Toledo, Ohio, 

June 7— New Jersey Annual, ; 
Ave,, Newark. 

June 12-14 — Pennsylvania Annual, at York, Pa. 

June 12-15— Trans- Mississippi Convention (loi 
Missouri, and Nebraska), at Omaha, Neb, 

June 13 — California Annual, at Oakland, Gal. 

June 20-22— Biscuit and Cracker Manufacturers' Annual, at Ho- 
tel Sherman, Chicago, 111, 

June 26-27.— New York Slate Annual, at the Bronx, New 
York City. 

August 7-11— National, at Salt Lake City, Utah. 

October lo-II — Wisconsin Annual. 

October 10-12— New England Tri-State, Annual, at Portland, 

October 17-18— Kentucky AnniiF.Hagfftdttclhr'OOy IC 



BAKERS REVIEW 



Program for National Convention in 
Tentative Form 



THE program committee of which Henry W. Stude, of Hous- 
ton, Texas, Is chairman this year, has announced in a gen- 
eral way the proposed make-up of the National convention pro- 
gram, which will bear directly upon two principal aspects of the 
baking industry in this country to-day, viz. The necessity, from 
a success point of view, of more accurate and reliable knowledge 
as a basis for business operations, versus dreams and guess- 
work ; and the direct practical advantage to the industry, indi- 
vidual and collective, of hearty and unreserved co-operation of 
bakers in their various orgnizations, and of the organizations 
with each other, 

(a) In the first group there will be a discussion under the 
general topic of Ten-Cent Bread .and why it is believed to be 
the next big step to take in meeting the steady advancement ot 
costs. If this belief is well-founded, and a general agreement 
can be reached within the near future, it will require a large 
co-operative campaign, first to secure the data to prove or dis- 
prove it, and second, it realize on it, if proved. 

(b) The committee is going to provide a speaker of national 
reputation (and has the matter up with him at the present time) 
who will talk to us in plain layman's language on the much 
neglected but vastly important subject to the commercial baker, 
of Raw Material Tests, and it is desired that this address shall 
be a practical instruction in the simpler tests which the average 
small and medium class baker should employ regularly in his 
business, but does not, to anything like the extent he should. 

The effect of a development in this respect would be imme- 
diately seen and felt, not only in the improvement of product and 
sales, but in reduction of bakeshop troubles, and the improve- 
ment in supplies offered the bakers. 

(t) The very important trade question (now before Congress 
as embodied in the so-called Stevens bill), of the manufactur- 
ers' right to insist upon the maintenance of a standard "re- 
sale" (in the case of the baker "retail") price for standard 
products, and how this question affects the baking industry, will 
be fully explained. Bakers do not seem generally to recognize 
the full significance of this subject and its growing effect on 
their business. 

(d) The importance, nay, the absolute necessity of cost- 
keeping records to the baker who is unwilling to fail and drag 
down his immediatte competitors with him, will be covered in a 
helpful and constructive way. 

(e) The welfare of employes, their encouragement to more 
intelligent effort and greater loyalty by considerate treatment, 
will be discussed as a now recognized and generally conceded, 
but largely undeveloped resource of the modern bakery employ- 
er, the practice of which should be much wider spread than it is, 

PBEPAEINC FOB THE FUTURE 

Then under the second general head there will be talk^ 
(chiefly by the olBcers of the association, followed by a full 
and free discussion), of how the industry must prepare itself 
to meet the future, which will undoubtedly unfold problems that 
will require all of our business ingenuity and courage to meet 
and to solve, and which no individual nor group of individuals, 
nor state, nor yet group-state associations of bakers, can hope 
to meet and solve by themselves successfully. Some large ideas 
will be advanced as to how some of the more probable and 
discernible of these problems may be met in advance, by taking 
the field ahead of trouble, and building up our national de- 
fense, until the industry shall be prepared to meet any but the 
most unexpected issue. 

The convention will undoubtedly have the pleasure of hearing 
from some representative Western baker, a statement of in- 



dustrial conditions in his section of the country, which ought 
to be of real incidental interest to the wide-awake business men 
who will attend. We hope that many of these Western bakers 
will be heard from the floor. It is their convention to a larpe 

A PAY AS YOU ENTER LUNCHEON 

The program committee has several partially undeveloped con- 
vention features in mind, which are intended to foster, to tlx 
utmost, a proper convention spirit. 

One of them is a pay-as-you enter luncheon, on the first day 
of the convention after arrival, at the headquarters hotel. The 
ticket which each member will receive for his 50c or 75c will 
designate his seat and he must sit in it. The chairs will be 
grouped around tables accommodating about eight each, and the 
ticket numbers will be so arranged that each member will lunch 
and chat with seven other members whom he may never haVe 
met before. If he doesn't enlarge his circle of acquaintanceship 
is will not be the fault of the committee. ' 

Executive meetings fok active and associate membess 

There wilt be but one session on Wednesday, an executive 
session, and tt will start at ten o'clock and last until there is 
nothing left to talk about. While this session is on there mil 
be another attended by associate members only. Mr. Stude will 
call this second meeting to order, explain its object, and turn 
it over to some chairman named by the meeting. Its object 
will be to provide associate members with a convenient oppor- 
tunity to discuss among themselves, in executive session of 
their own membership, any subject that may interest them a> 
members of the National Association, and to take any steps 
they may consider desirable, or formulate the expression ol 
any views they may desire to present. • 

For as Mr. Stude says in a letter to the undersigned on this 
subject: "It is my impression that when we invite a man to be- 
come an associate member we want that membership to mean 
something ; at least something more than the right to buy "food 
and licker" for the regular member. 

In general, it may be staled that the cardinal fault of the 
Columbus program will not be repeated at Salt Lake, The 
program will not be over-crowded, and there will be plenty ol 
time for discussion. We want everybody to feel free lo enter 
into the discussion if the spirit moves him and he has something 
to contribute; and so far as our program speakers are con- 
cerned, we hope that all of them will leave off the frills and 
apologies, and get into the meat of their talks without unneces- 
sary delay, 

SoiB*tUng Mora Aboat Salt I.aln City 
By Jessie E. Karkeel 

The famous Mormon Temple is not the only buildinj: 01 
historical interest in Salt Lake City; there are quite a number of 
others. Most of them are old, of course, but they were so 
strongly built and are so well preserved that you would never 
guess their age except, perhaps, for the architecture. 

One of the oldest of these buildings is the Salt Lake Theatre. 
w^ich brings to mind the fact that Salt Lake City is, and al- 
ways has been since its settlement, the biggest show town for 
its size {130,000) in the United Slates. 

But, in regard to the buildings, there are in Temple Square, 
in addition to the famed temple (upon which you may look, 
but may not enter unless you are of the faith) the Tabernacle 
and the Assembly Hall. 

The Tabernacle is unique, in the true sense of that much 
abused word, and it is open to the public. The shape of it i^ 
odd, for one thing, being a huge elliptic with seals enougii for 



June, 1916 



BAKERS R E \' I 1; W 



g,ooo people; and then, when the structure was built nails were 
worth their weight in gold, so wooden pegs were used. Ol 
mtirst, repairs these days are made with iron nails and modem 
nuterials, but the original construction had nary a nail. 

A pin dropped on the floor of the big auditorium can be heard 
ill over the room ; and because the acoustics are so neatly per- 
ftct. absolute silence is required during the free organ recitals 
^ven every day at noon, except Sundays, during the summer 
snsoD. The doors are locked so that the musician shall not be 
disturbed, and that the wonderful harmony from the organ may 
not be dissipated. This organ was constructed by Utah artisans 
fiom native material and is one of the finest in the country. It 
has been "gone over" many times, and is even now being reno- 
vated, and the improvement is expected to make the instrument 
more wonderful than ever. 

The Assembly Hall is a gray granite building, used for con- 
certs, religious meetings, etc, for which the Tabernacle might 
be too cpmmodious. 

Temple Square is surrounded by a 15 foot wall, a gate on each 
iour sides and visitors are permitted to enter during the day; 
1 bureau of information answers all questions and a guide 
conducts the stranger over the grounds and through the Taber- 

East a block or so is a long, many gabled gray stone build- 
ing known as the Lion House ; here are the offices of the Mor- 
mon church, and across the street is Amelia Palace, the former 
home of Brigham Young's favorite wife. 

In this neighborhood is Social Hall, the first theatre built in 
Salt Lake, and the Salt Lake Theatre which was 54 years old 
March S, I916. This theatre is one of the oldest theatres in the 
United States, it has never been rebuilt and has always been 
the leading playhouse of the city. 

An example of Salt Lake's progress along theatrical lines is 
The American Theatre, built exclusively for motion pictures at 
a cost of $183,000. It is a magnificently furnished and equipped 
theatre and in addition to the pictures makes a feature of high 
(laj) music; a twenty piece orchestra, and a musical library of 
over 3,000 complete orchestrations, make this possible. There is 
no theatre in the country equal to it, unless perhaps it is The 
Strand in New York City. The Empress is another line play- 
house recently converted into a movie theatre ; there are a dozen 
or more other photoplay houses, end a splendid stock company 
holds forth at The Wilkes ; and no matter what night you go, 
or (0 what show you go, every house Is always filled, for Salt 
Lake is a city that has been trained since infancy to enjoy the 
(rood things of life, and the theatre, music and dancing find 
many willing devotees. 



Big Field For Comiiwrclal Curs 
In Smalter Cltl«s 

The theory that the market . for commercial cars is restricted 
prelly much to large cities is disproved in figures compiled 
by the Studebaker Corporation and announced through Henry 
T. Myers, sales manager of the commercial car division. 

"Commercial car sales in towns from 5,00a to 50,000 inhab- 
itants are considerably greater in proportion to the population 
than in the large cities, says Mr. Myers. "We can name in- 
stances even where Studebaker commercial car sales in certain 
^mall towns have been in excess of pleasure cdr sales during 
the past four months. 

"There are several Studebaker commercial car dealers who 
in the past three months have sold between ten and twenty-five 
commercial cars in towns of not over 35,000 population. One 
dealer who lives in a town of a population of some 35.000 people 
has sold as many commercial cars to merchants in various trades, 
as the total sales of each of three large branches. 

"Selling commercial cars is not a matter of location or popu- 
lation. It is wholly a matter of getting out and going after com- 
mercial car business along well defined and systematic lines." 



59 

Prsparlng For Tho Pcmisylvaata Con- 
vention 

The pr(^ram for the eighth annual convention of the Penn- 
sylvania Master Bakers' Association is now complete. The 
sessions will be held at the Colonial Hotel, York, Pa., on June 
12, 13 and 14. The local arrangements committee has practicalN 
finished its preliminary work, and they now await the call to 
order. Here is the program : 

Monday, June I2th 

8 P. M.— Reception and Dance at Colonial Hotel. 

Tuesday, June i^lh 

9 A. M. — Convention called to order by President Holm Haller, 

Altoona. 

Address of Welcome by Mayor Hugentiigter. 

Response by Treasurer W. A. King, Wilkes-Barre. 

Reports of President, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Address : "Refrigeration," by Thomas Shipley. 

Address: "Bakery Legislation," by John Price Jackson, Chair- 
man, Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry. 

Address ; "Cakes as a Side Line," by Horace W. Crider, Home- 
stead, Pa. 

Greetings from the N. A. M. B., by W. E. Long, Chicago. 

Illustrated Lecture, by W. B. Leffingwell. 

Nominations for Officers and Place of Meeting for 1917. 
While the men are in session the ladies will meet in the main 

parlor of the hotel and form an auxiliary organization. 
In the afternoon there will be a motor ride through beautiful 

York County in cars contributed by the Pullman Automobile Co.. 

of York, Pa., leaving Center Square about 3 P. M. This ride 

will include a visit to Glen Rock and the bakers' machinery plant 

of the Read Machinery Co., where light refreshments will be 

served. The party will return to York about 6 o'clock. In the 

evening there will be cards, music and dancing in the ballroom 

of the Colonial Hotel. 

Wednesday, June i^ih 

9 A. M. — Convention called to order. 

Address by Max Strasser, Honorary President of the New York 
Slate Association of Master Bakers, on "Needs of the Mod- 
em Merchant Baker" 

Address on the Bakers' Home, by A. W. Kley, Phoenixville, 
Pa. 

Address: "Benefits of the Trade Paper to the Small Baker." by 
Albert Klopfer, New York. 

Address by J. E. Wihlfahrt, New York. 

Question Box. 

Address: "What Machinery Has Done for the Baker," bt- H. 
Read, President of the Read Machinery Co.. York, Pa. 

Election of Officers. 

Report of Committees. 

Adjournment. 

Wednesday afternoon, following the adjournment of the busi- 
ness meeting, the time will be devoted to amusements. In the 

evening the annual banquet will be held at the Hotel Colonial. 
On Thursday arrangements have been made for a side trip 

to the Battlefield of Gettysburg by automobile, leaving York 

about 9 A. M. This is a beautiful and inspiring trip and every 

one should take advantage of the opportunity to visit this historic 

field. Luncheon can be served at the Eagle Hotel or Hotel 

Gettysburg at your individual expense. 
4f * If 

Noir Knighton Roprosontottvo 

Earl L. Reifsnyder has become associated with Samuel Knigh- 
ton & Son, the well-known flour merchants of New York City, 
for whom he will travel in New York Slate territory. Knighton 
& Son have expanded considerably in the past year, and are now 
one of New York's largest flour -merchandising concerns. 

Samuel Knighton, senior member of the firm, returned on 
May 23 from a month's trip throughout the Western wheat- 
growing territory, including the States of Illinois, Missouri, 
Kansas. Oklahoma, Iowa, Nebraska, Minnesota and North and 

Sou* Dakou. -„,„. ,3, „ GooQ le 



!akl;rs review 



June, 1316 



Trant-lltulnlppi Program 

The committee liaving in charge the program for the Eorlhcom- 
ing Trails-Mississippi master bakers' convention, liave announceU 
an excellent series of talkj and discussions that will make the 
convention one oi the most interesting of the year. The conven- 
tion will be held in Omaha, Neb., June 12 to 15, Arrangements 
are almost complete also for the exhibit o£ bakers' machinerj- 
and appliances thai will be one of the big features of the mnet- 
ing. The bakers of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraitka are 
working harmoniously to make their Arst joint convention a big 

The following program has been announced: 
Monday, June I2tk — First Day 
10 A, M. — Executive Committee meeting. Registration and En- 
rollment of Members. 

8 P. M,— Initiation Ceremony. Ak-Sar-Ben Den. 

Tuesday, June 13/A — Second Day 

9 A. M. — Registration and Enrollment of Members, 

10 A, M.— Opening of Exhibition and Conventi<»]. Address of 

Welcome by Hon. Mayor Jas. Dahlman. 

Response by President P, F. Petersen. 

Greetings from the National Association, represented by Fred 
Freund, St. Louis, 

Greetings from the different Associations. 

President's Address. 

Appointment of Committees. 

Reading of communications. 

Paper by Frank Rushton, Rosedale, Kans, 

Discussion led by Fred Freund, St. Louis, Mo. 

Paper by F. C. Stadelhofer, St. Louis, Mo., "Odds and Ends 
About the Baking Industry." 

Discussed by Jacob Schouten, Keokuk, la. 

Wednesday, June i^lk — Third Day 

9:30 A. M. — Registration and Enrollment of Members. 

Question Box. . 

Paper by Leon Mulgrew, Dubuque, la. 

Discussed by Henry Hohengarten, St. Louis, Mo. 

Paper by Harry Gobrecht, Chicago, 111, 

Discussed by Chas. II. Allstedt, Waterloo, la. 

Paper by Jay Burns. "A Greater National Association of the 
Baking Industry." 

2:30 P. M,— Sectional meetings of different State Associations. 
Thursday, June 15th — Fourth Day 

9:30 A. M.— Paper by Harry Boeckenhoff, Des Moines, In., 
"Profitable Retailing." 

Discussed by Chas. Ortman, Omaha, Neb. 

Paper by A. T. Seeley, Lincoln, Neb., "Profit on Retail Wagons." 

Discussed by M. HotTmann, of St, Louis, Mo, 

Discussions of questions. 

"Wonders of Western Amerira." Illustrated lecture by W. B. 
LelBngwell. 

Unfinished business. 

New business. 

Report of Committees. 

Report of Secretary and Treasurer, 

Nominations of Officers. 

Election of Officers. 

Selection of meeting place for igi?. 

Introduction of new officers. 

(Adjournment.) 

Convention will work positively on schedule time. A wonderful 
exhibition has been arranged, which should be of interest 
to every baker. 

The local Ejitertainment Committee is arranging special enter- 
tainment for the ladies and something unusual is prom- 
ised for the evening entertainment at the Auditorium.. 



LonlsTlll* C«l«l>ratet 

The Louisville Master Bakers' Association celebrated its eighth 
anniversary with a big entertainment held at Turner's Hall on 
the evening of April 25. The anniversary day falls on the twen- 



t;--second, but was postponed until May 2 on account of Easter 
and later changed. There were about 175 people p«esent include 
ing bakers and members of their families. J, H. Jones presided. 
as toastmaster. Interesting talks were delivered by the president 
and past presidents of the organization on the work of the local 
and State organizations, and by member; of the ladies' auxiliary 
club. Refreshments, dancing, etc., added to the pleasures ot 

+ ♦ ♦ 

ttmw York Stete ConvantioB 

The executive committee of the New York State Association 
of Master Bakers have decided upon an unusually interesting 
program for the annual convention of that organization, which 
will be held at Ebling's Casino, Borough of the Bronx, New 
York City, June 26, 27 and 28. The program has been arranged 
as follows: 

June 2ftlh, 10 :oo A. M. 
Opening of Convention by President, Adolph J. Gundormann, 
Address of Welcome by Honorable Douglas Mathewson, Presi- 
dent of Borough of Bronx, 
Response. 

Roll Call of Delegates. 
Reading minutes of 20th Convention. 
Report of President. 
Report of Secretary, 
Report of Treasurer. 
Appointment of Committees on Credentials and Auditing of 

Address by Lucius P. Brown, Director of the Bureau of Food 
4 Drugs, Department of Health, City of New York : "Mod- 
ern Ideas in Bread Making." 

Address by Mr Bachmann: "Modern Cake-Baking, Especially 
in Reference to Package Cakes," 

Adddress by John H, Haaren, Associate City Superintendent of 
the Board of Education, City of New York: "What New 
York City is Doing to Develop Competent Workmen." 

Address by Henry E, Jenkins, District Supt. in charge of Even- 
ing Schools of the Board of Education, City of New York: 
"Continuation Work in Evening Schools." 

Address by Morris E. Siegei, Principal, Murray Hill Evening 
Trade School, City of New York : "The Continuation Class 
for Bakers at the Murray Hill Evening Trade School." 

Reports of Committees on Credentials and Auditing of books. 

Opening of question box. Answers, 

Discussion of the addresses made during the day. 

After adjoitrmnenl the delegates tvill visit in a body Ike Bak- 
ers' Trade School of the City of New York, which ivill he in 

operation for the benefit of the delegates. 

Tuesday, June ^ih, 10 :oo A. M. 

Address by Dr. Edward P. McKeefe, of the Department ot 
Agriculture, State of New York: "Butter Spices and Fla- 
voring Extracts." 

Address by Henry Ftuegelmann, Attorney for the New York 
Merchant Bakers' Security Association: "Mutual Interest 
and Protection Rendered by Master Bakers' Associations." 

Address by Walter Scheppelmann, ex-bakery inspector of the 
State of Kentucky : "Bakery Inspection from the Viewpoint 
of a Practical Baker and State Bakery Inspector." 

Report of standing committees. 

Opening of question box. Answers. 

Discussion of addresses held during the day. 

Wednesday, June 28/fc, 10:00 A. JW. 

Recommendations from Executive Committee. 

"The per capita tax for the ensuing year to be $2«o" and 
"The convention of 1917 to be held in the City of New York, 
in conjunction with an exhibition," 

Reports and recommendations from local associations. 

Miscellaneous business. 

Election of officers for the ensuing yei 

Installation of officers. 

Adjournment, n,r,iiiv=H h 



Google 




EDITORIAL 



Charlaa B. Tkompsoa, BAitox 




Opportunttlss for th* Itetall Baku- 

NEVER before in the history of the bread business 
have the opportunities for the retail baker 
been greater than at the present time. We 
hear a great deal about the big wholesale bakers com- 
ing into small towns and liking away the business of 
the little fellow, and we will continue to hear a great 
deal about this until the retail baker awakens to his 
opportunities. 

The problem is a very simple one. Wholesale bak- 
ers are selling their bread in small local communities 
for the simple reason that they are selling better bread 
than the local baker whose business they are getting. 
Wholesale bakers are not selling much bread in any 
community where there is an up-to-date retail baker 
furnishing his home trade with a good product. 

The writer visited a small city in the South re- 
cently where there are two bakers complaining loud- 
ly about the competition of the wholesale baker who 
had begun a few weeks previous to ship his bread in 
their town. We made inquiries in about twenty lead- 
ing homes and the universal verdict was that they had 
been forced to buy their inferior quality loaf for many 
years and they regarded it as a blessing to be able to 
buy the superior loaf furnished by the wholesale baker. 
An examination of the bread furnished by the local 
bakers fully substantiated the claim of the housewives. 
The bread was extremely poor. 

These two bakers have had an opportunity in this 
city for the past ten years to furnish their customers 
good bread but have not done so. Now that the buy- 
ers of their product in their own town have been given 
an opportunity to secure something better it is abso- 
lutely foolish for them to complain or seek "remedies" 
for their protection. Their only alternative is to make 
their bread so good that the housewives will prefer it 
to the other kind. 

Since the year "one," country newspapers through- 
out the world have been constantly preaching, "pa- 
tronize home products," but all the weighty opinions 
of thousands of rural editors through all these years 
have been of no avail. The only way to make the 
buyer patronize home industry is for the home con- 
cern to give them a product as good as they can buy 
elsewhere. In hundreds of cities up-to-date progres- 
sive retail bakers are not having the slightest difficulty 
in doing big business on this basis notwithstanding 
competition of the wholesale baker. Likewise in hun- 
dreds of cities we see unsuccessful bakers struggling 
for a bare existence because they have not awakened 
to this fact 



Make good bread and better bread than the whole- 
sale baker and you will not worry a great deal about 
his competition. 

We have before us a newspaper clipping from a pro- 
gressive little town in Illinois which says: "The groc- 
ers of this city and the bakers have made a deal by 
which no bread will be sold at the stores here except 
that baked in the town." 

Do the bakers of this city really imagine that this 
little agreement is going to solve their problems and 
make them successful business men? Rest assured it 
will not. Nothing could more antagonize the buyers 
of bread in this town than the mere fact of being told 
arbitrarily in this way that the bakers themselves have 
made it impossible for them to buy an out-of-town pro- 
duct In the end the good will of the housewife could 
have been won very easily and the consumption of the 
baker's product increased more materially if the bak- 
ers had made up their minds to make better bread 
instead of entering into an agreement of this kind. 

Along similar lines wc have read with much interest 
a newspaper dispatch from .So. Norwalk, Conn., in 
which it is stated in big headlines that "The Wards 
take $36,400 from here yearly." Hence, it is proposed 
to levy high tax upon the out-of-town bread and 
thereby save the local bakers. 

This will never work. The local bakers must hold 
their business strictly on the merits of their product 
or they will lose it No scheme has yet been devised 
that will stop competition on any basis other than this. 

In reality, the average loaf of bread sold by the 
wholesale baker to-day ought to prove easy competi- 
tion for the first-class retail baker. The wholesalers 
have talked cleanliness and modern methods in their 
shop until this no longer is of compelling buying in- 
terest to the consumer. Furthermore, the wholesalers 
have so standardized their product that it has on the 
whole largely lost its individuality. The retail baker 
can make a loaf possessing individuality which the 
standardized loaf of the wholesaler can never over- 
come. 

A writer in the New York "Tribune," a well-known 
housewife, gives the gist of the arguments which ac- 
curately sums up the opportunities of the retailer, as 
follows : 

Did you ever really taste bread ? 

I mean, taste it with an appreciation of its own deli- 
cious distinctive flavor, not merely as an accessory to 
other food. 

Few of us have any conception of the real taste of 
bread, because we mix our foods until the individual 
flavor of each one is lost. Yet each kind of bread has 



BAKERS R E \' I K \V 



June, 1916 



a flavor of its own, sufficient to tempt the most caprici- 
ous appetite, if only we could bring ourselves to re- 
gard our daily bread as a deiicacy instead of a com- 
monplace. 

Try a piece of bread and butter by itself as a treat, 
not as a background to the meal, and see how it goes. 
You will find that good French bread has a sweetness 
more subtle than any cake, that a crispy crust of 
graham bread is as richly flavored as a nut ; that Vien- 
na bread, whole wheat bread and rye bread are all dis- 
tinct in the matter of taste, and that each one, when 
eaten with sweet fresh butter, is worthy of being re- 
garded as a dish by itself. 

Now the housewife knows, even if the baker does 
not, that the average little nickel loaf shipped around 
the country by wholesalers does not meet all of the 
above requirements, especially as to flavor. Likewise, 
a great deal of bread made by retailers may be tried 
by the above standard and found badly wanting. 

The retailer who makes his bread so good and tasty 
that it is worthy of being regarded as " a dish by it- 
self" has little to worry about. 



Bakcn' and MU«r>* Technical Clnb 

The regular bi-monthly meeting of the Bakers' and Millers' 
Technical Club was held at the Hotel Sherman, Chicago, Mon- 
day eveniDK, May 15th, 1916. 

There was a discussion of the points raised by Mr. Breng:le'i 
address at the last meeting. Mr. Brengle had discussed the 
cake question, and discussed some of the irregularities observed 
by the baker in the preparation of his chocolates as well as 
icings. Mr. Jaekel gave quite a talk on Sponge Doughs and 
endeavored to show by his experience and observations that 
sponge doughs are preferable to straight doughs. 

In the course of the discussion the question of the influences 
of different types of yeast and sugars on the quality of the 
fermentation as also the volume of the loaf were taken up, 
together with the merits and demerits of the use of salt, which 
resulted iii the conclusion that a series of practical tests will be 
made by both Mr. Jaekel and Mr. Miller at their respective 
bakeries at a seasonable time, so as to bring the products there- 
of at the next meeting, for further discussion. 

Definite plans were adopted relative to the discussion on 
Cakes, for the pursuance of scientific methods which depend upon 
the results of the deliberations of the previous meeting, and 
these will be carried out by Mr. Brengle, for the purpose of a 
report at the next meeting at which it was also decided to in- 
vite the members of the present course at the Siebel Institute 
of Technology. 

It was the general consensus of opinion that these meetings 
are proving more and more profitable, demonstrating in a 
very practical manner the very effective results attainable by 
the application of science to practic 
themselves very much indebted to thi 
of the Siebel Institute for the great in 
in these meetings. 



, and the members 
members of the Faculty 
■rest which they manitesi 



i Paesch, Secretary. 



Ston* to Stut In Dallas 

F. 0, Stone, president of the F. O, Stone Baking Company, 
with plants in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Atlanta, Ga,, has decided to 
locate a third plant in Dallas, Texas. A new plant is now being 
erected at Thomas, Phelps and McKinney avenues, Dallas. The 
building will be 75 x 80 feet and two stories high. The plant 
will have an initial capacity of 300 of Stone's famous package 
cakes per tiour. 



Frank John Sagnr Robtrte 

Frank John Segur Roberts, proprietor of the Roberts Portable 
Oven Company, Chicago, passed away on Saturday morning. 
May 6, 1916, in his 65th year He was bom in Toronto. Canada, 
September I, 1851. 

Mr. Roberts had been seriously ill only a day or so. and his 
death was a great shock to his acquaintances. He was known 
as the dean of tne portable oven business He came from To- 
ronto with the late H. O. Bennett, and in the early days was 
associated with Mr. Bennett in the establishment and initial 
building up of the Hubbard Portable Oven Co, 

In 1898 he began business for himself under the title of the 
Roberts Portable Oven Co., and was the patentee of the "Black 
Diamond" oven. 

Mr. Roberts was a conservative man, and did many good 
works quietly. Hundreds of bakers throughout the country have 
felt his kindness and can look back to the days when Frank 
Roberts helped them. 

Mr, Roberts was prominent in the manufacturing business and 
his fairness has won for him a permanent place among the lead- 
ing concerns in this industry. 

He is survived by a wife and a sister. 

The funeral was held at Toronto. Canada, Monday, May 8th. 
1916, 



Bakar Wins fight 

The John J, Nissen Baking Co., of Portland, Maine, has won 
a suit brought against it by George D, Tucker of that city who 
had sought to recover $5,000 from the company, claiming thai 
he bit onto a tooth in one of Nissen's chop suey cakes, and that 
he was made ill by the discovery. 

The Nissen Company regarded the suit as a case of black- 
mail, so, even though it was a disagreeable case to fight, they 
decided to allow it to come to public trial. 

The grocer from whom Tucker had purchased the cake stated 
in court that the toolh shown to the jury was not the same 
as that shown by Tucker soon after the ( 
had bitten onto it, Digi: zee oy ^ 



Xft^fe" 



Retail 



LOwwral Informatloii, imws uid 
Iwlpflta artlclu of ipoctal tn- 
ter«st to tlM Rotall Bakor and 
thoBO who dosiro to koop postod 
on this branch of tho trado. 



Awe«totto« H«wi, ItetaU A<v«(tlalna» 1 



t and Practical IMacaialoBs 9I Ratall Svb|*cts 



Production jsuid Selling Costs in the 
Retail Bakery 

Seventh of a Series of Articles on Retail Bakery Accounting. Written Especially for Bakers Review by Rudolph Krebs 



BAKERS have the habit of fixing their prices on goods ia 
accordance with their competitors' prices, and without any 
regard at all for actual cost of production and selling. If Jones 
sells a i4-ounce loaf of bread (or 5c Brown figures he must do 
Che same. He says: "If Jones can sell a 14-ounce loaf for a 
oickel, and make money on it, 1 guess I can, too." 

He never stops to figure whether the 14-ounce loaf costs him 
SC to make and sell, or whether it costs him 4c or 6c. He wants 
to make a profit but he disregards the fundamental rule of busi- 
ness — that in order to secure a profit, a specified amount must 
be added to the cost of the merchandise. 

Grocers and other retailers of a like nature have an easier 
problem. They do not have to figure cost of manufacturing. 
They buy an article at a specified price and then only need wor- 
ry aboat the cost' of selling. The baker ts about the only busi- 
ness man of his type. He manufactures and sells a large as- 
sortment of goods, and the small price of each individual article 
makes any rough cost estimate almost worthless. The great 
number of separate items make it rather hard for him to secure 
accurate cost figures, and so he goes ahead selling some lines 
at a loss, others at a profit, and usually not knowing too much, 
to say the least, about his total profits or losses. 

Selling certain lines at a loss is at time advisable in order 
to bring in trade, when it is done for a special purpose and with 
the knowledge that the goods are sold at a loss. In many lines 
outside of the bakery trade sta