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Full text of "The banyan"

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LIBRARY 
Brigham Young University 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/banyan1914brig 



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To my children gathered here, 

These my student boys and girls, 
Who have always been so dear — 

These with golden hair in curls, 
In the freshness of their youth ; 

These with hair like raven's wing, 
Who have heard the call of truth, 

And my praises love to sing ; 
These my girls with hair of gray. 

And my boys with wrinkled brow 
Who have loved in youthful day 

And are true and faithful now — 
Greetings bring I to you all ; 

May you ever faithful be. 
Blossoms that will never fall 

From our dear old Banvan-tree. 



Life is like a lover's song. 

To such boys and girls as you ; 
I am happy all day long, 

When my boys are brave and true, 
When my girls are chaste and sweet, 

As the roses in their bloom, 
Then the thorns that prick their feet 

And the sorrow and the gloom 
Will be changed to sweetest joy : 

All the world will seem to say : 
"Happy girls and blessed boys, 

Be forever what you may." 
See our dear old White and Blue 

Waving in the morning light. 
You will never be untrue 

To those colors fair and bright. 



See our Temple on the hill, 
White and stainless as a dove ; 

It awakes this joyous thrill. 
Born of loyalty and love. 

May that Temple be the home 

Of your children, strong and brave ; 

While beneath its sheltering dome 
May they learn the truths that save. 

Greetings bring I to you all ; 

May you ever faithful be. 
Blossoms that will never fall 

From our dear old Banvan-tree. 



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Page 

Uncle Jesse 9 

Poem, by Prof. Osmond 10 

•"Work-togetherness." by Pres. Brimhall. . . . 12 

A. C. Nelson ( In memoriam ) 14 

Faculty 17 

B. T. Higgs 41 

Seniors 42 

Juniors 54 

Sophomores ^6 

Freshmen 68 

High School 81 

Class of 1014 83 

Class of 1915 91 

Class of 1916 95 

Class of 1917 99 

Training School 103 

The Old Cedar. Aretta Young 107 

Art Pictures 108 

Events of the Year 113 

School Organizations 145 

Athletics 159 

( >ur Business Friends 172 



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"Work-togetherness" is service of the highest form. 

The "work-togetherness" of dollars spells capital, and drives the wheels of 
financial enterprise to the highest summits of material success. 

The "work-togetherness" of minds constructs Republics and plans progress 
in a manner incomparable with all the efforts of the "scatter-brainness" of the 
world. 

The "work-togetherness" of heart gives to the state, patriotism ; to the school. 
loyalty ; to the church, devotion : and to the home, felicity. 

The foundation of the "work-togetherness" of dollars must be laid in fru- 
gality : capital comes to him only who spends less than he earns. 

The "work-togetherness" of heart is fostered in the family circle through sac- 
rifice and appreciation. It manifests itself in a high degree where there is co-oper- 
ative consideration for each other*s tasks, a sharing of each other's triumphs, and 
the holding sacred of each other's rights. A young man just coming into citizen- 
ship, said to his father, "Father, while I am not convinced that there is harm in the 
act itself, I will not go "joy-riding" on the Sabbath day, because I can not afford to 
tear down what you are trying to build up — a reverence for the Sabbath." "Work- 
togetherness" of heart had won its way in that household. 

Every applause that he joins, every college song he sings, every cheer he gives. 
every response of his soul to the call for reverence at devotion, adds to the student's 
power of "work-togetherness" of heart. 

Today "Old Glory" waves from the windows and porches of private resi- 
dences, and from the tops of business houses and public buildings. All over the 
land the starry banner is unfurled. The display is a signal that our whole nation 
is engaged in the "work-togetherness" of heart protesting against an insult to 
our flag. 

We go to church to learn, but more to love. It is a place of spiritual recre- 
ation, where strife is never welcomed — a place in which there are no seats for 
covetousness or vanity ; hate has not even standing room ; and where mortals may 
become, through the "work-togetherness" of the heart, most nearly like that One 
who is the object of their worship. God's promise is kept, "Where two or three 
are gathered together in my name, as touching one thing, behold, there will I be 
in the midst of them." Such worship has always been the "work-togetherness" of 
God and men. — Geo. H. Brimhall. 



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Andrew Clarence Nelson was born January 20, 1864, in Ephraim, San- 
pete County, Utah. 

In the fall of 1884 he entered the Brigham Young Academy, and was 
graduated from the normal course on the 23rd of May, 1890. A. C. Nelson's 
name is found on the commencement program of 1890, the normal topic 
having been assigned to him. His address gave earnest of the cleverness 
that later characterized his public addresses and after-dinner speeches. 

After leaving the B. Y. Academy he had charge of the L. D. S. Sem- 
inary at Manti, and on November, 1896, was elected superintendent of 
schools in Sanpete County, which position he held until January, 1901, 
when he took the oath of office as state superintendent of public instruction. 
For fourteen years he held this position, discharging his official duties until 
the eleventh hour. He passed to his reward on the 26th day of Decem- 
ber, 1913. 

Devotion to work, intelligent sympathy towards good men and good 
measures, many of which measures he was instrumental in helping through 
legislative bodies, are qualities for which he is known. 

In and out of his native state he made many warm friends. Affability 
was of the very air that he breathed. There sat by his side in those days 
at the old warehouse, Professor and Mrs. R. R. Lyman, Dr. George W. 
Middleton, Professor A. C. Lund, Dean E. S. Hinckley, and many other 
representative persons, all of whom cherish his sacred memorv and his 
heartening smile. 



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Man has two selves : His best and 
his worst self. The best and the 
greatest thing that any man or set of 
men can do is to make us think and act 
with our best self in the background as 
dictator. The B. Y. U. smothers the 
worst and vitalizes the best in us. — 
W. H. Boyle. 

Helen Keller — the inspiration of the 
year ! Her appearance outdistanced 
all the efforts of her biographers in 
depicting her loveliness of being, mir- 
aculousness of accomplishment, and 
beauty of soul. Helen Keller — the in- 
carnation of the good. — Earl J. Glade. 

Probably the most important event 
of the year was the completion of the 
Ladies* Gymnasium, making it possi- 
ble to control more perfectly our so- 
ciables, and enabling us to put B. Y. 
U. education into our dances. — H. 
Fletcher. 



The greatest single event of the year 
was the Helen Keller lecture. The 
spiritual response to Miss Keller was 
made possible by the latent spiritual 
power of this school. — /. C. Swenson. 

An increasing appreciation of our 
theological studies and a keener sense 
of responsibility to search for better 
methods of establishing those attitudes 
through which may be realized the un- 
ceasing growth and the vigor and 
sweetness of genuine religious living 
has marked the year. — W. H. Cham- 
berlin. 



Our first contest, in track events, 
with an outside team, was in 1910, 
when we met Stanford. Though de- 
feated, we scored some points. The 
year 1914 marks our first intellectual 
contests with out of state teams. We 
have won. — Alice Reynolds. 



Our inter-state debates were the 
most important feature of the year 
1913-1914.— Eugene L. Roberts. 

The love that our students have for 
their Alma Mater is remarkable. One 
cannot remain in school for a single 
day without feeling its ennobling in- 
fluence. It is their loyalty to the school 
and their unanimity of interest in 
times of need that carry the White and 
Blue to victory in every field of battle. 
— Einar Anderson. 

The B. Y. U. Music Department has 
twenty-six representative students 
teaching school music. A similar num- 
ber of choir leaders are doing splendid 
community service. It numbers among 
its singers several in important places 
in opera in Europe and America. Its 
weekly recitals by teachers and pupils 
have disseminated as much culture as 
any organization in the West. — A. C. 
Lund. 



The most important trend of the 
school this year has been the recogniz- 
ing by the students of the truth of the 
saying, "What I most need is some one 
to keep me at my best," and their look- 
ing upon the faculty from that point of 
view. — Geo. H. Brimhall. 

This University develops the best in 
the individual. What we all need is 
something to keep us at our best. What 
is this something? A careful analysis 
of the situation reveals its presence in 
the atmosphere. We call it the spirit 
of the school. — Amos N. Merrill. 

One of the most important move- 
ments of the present school year has 
been the establishment, for the first 
time in our history, of debating rela- 
tions with universities outside of our 
state. It has given an added stimulus 
to this school activity. — Christen Jen- 
sen. 




COXJLE'SHB BU2;KM£f Q 









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GEORGE H. BRIMHALL, B. Pd., D. Sc. D., 
President. 



"A man take him for all in all." 
"'He loves the people." 









EDWARD H. HOLT, B. Pd.. Secretary 

"I hold ambition of so airy and light a 
quality that it is but a shad""'-, shadow.'' 







JOHN E. HAYES, Registrar 



"Though I am nut naturally honest, I 
m so sometimes by chance." 






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'Would he were fatter; he hears n 
lUsic; seldom lie smiles." 















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JOHN C. SWENSON, A. B., 
Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

"Rightly to be great is not to stir with- 
out great argument." 



MAY WARD, A. B., 
Professor of Domestic Science. 

'Look how we can, or sad, or merrily, 
Interpretation will misquote our looks. 





ERNEST D. PARTRIDGE, B. S., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

"We must every one be a man of his 

own fancy." 



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ALFRED OSMOND, A. B 
Professor of English. 



"There's nothing to be got now-a-day 
unless thou canst tisli for it." 




CHARLES E. MAW, A. B., 
Professor of Chemistry. 

"He is well paid that is well satisfied 









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AMOS N. MERRILL, B. S., M. S., 
Professor of Agriculture. 

"Your gentleness shall force, raor 
than your force move us to gentleness 



VILATE ELLIOTT, B. Pd., 
Professor of Domestic Art. 

"There is more owing her than is paid. 
and more -hall he paid than she'll dc 
mand." 





EARL J. GLADE, A. B., 
Professor of Accounting. 

He speaks plain cannon, lire and 
ike and hounce." 




WILLIAM H. BOYLE, A. B., 
Head of Academic Department. 
Assistant Professor in English. 

"He can't flatter, he.' — an honest ma 

md plain — he must speak truth." 




EDWIN H. SMART, A. B., 
Professor of Horticulture. 

■'His life is gentle, and the elements so 

nixed in him that nature may Stand up 
md Bay t<> all the world- this is a man." 





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ARETTA YOUNG, B. Pd., 
Assistant Professor of Education. 

"She finds tongues in trees, books in 
the running brooks, sermons in stones, 
and good in everything." 



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HARVEY FLETCHER, Ph. D., 
Professor of Physics. 

"I have no spur to prick the sides of 
ny intent but only vaulting ambition." 



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Professor of Fine and Correlated Arts. 

Doomed for a certain time to walk the 



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W. H. CHAMBERLAIN, A. M., 
Professor of Psychology and Philosophy. 

"The dearest friend, the kindest man; 
The best conditioned and unweuried 
spirit." 




CHRISTEN JENSEN, A. M., 
Professor of History and Government. 

"In peace there's nothing so becomes 
a man as modest stillness and humility." 




OLIVE Y. GILCHRIST, 
Critic and Grade Teacher. 



"There's a divinity that shapes our 
ends, rough hew them how we will." 




1 







ROBERT SAUER, 
Professor of Music (Wind Instruments). 

"What's in a name?" 



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MOSES GUDMUNDSON, 
Professor of Music (Violin). 



"Whose nature is so far from doing harm 
that he suspects none." 




CHARLES R. JOHNSON, 
Professor of Music (Voice, Piano). 



'Music oft hath such a charm to mak 

bad good." 





ANDREW B. CHRISTENSEN, A. B. 
Professor of Biblical History and Liter- 



"He hath a wisdom that doth guide his 
valor to act in safety." 



HERMESE PETERSON. 
Critic and Grade Teacher. 



"A rarer spirit never did steer humanity. 





JAMES L. BARKER, A. B., Lie. es Let., 
Professor of Modern Languages. 

"Away with him, away with him! 
He speaks Latin!" 










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WILLIAM J. SNOW, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of History. 

"What he has, he gives." 





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LOTTIE HARRIS, A. B., 
Instructor in Domestic Science. 



'Let not the music of her speech bewitch 
you." 



HANS ANDERSON, 
Instructor in Ironwork. 



"I go to use my hands and not my 
tongue." 





EUGENE L. ROBERTS. 
Professor of Physical Education. 



'I dare do all that may become a man: 
Who dares d< i more is hoik-." 






BEATRICE CAMP, 

Instructor in Physical Education and 

Oral Expression. 

"In sooth I know not why 1 am so sad." 









ORSON D. CAMPBELL. 

Assistant Professor of Fine Arts and 

Drafting. 

"All hi- mind is bent on holiness, 
His chamnions are— the prophets and 
apostles." 






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CARL F. EYRING, A. B., 
Instructor in Physics. 



"From his cradle he was a scholar, and a 
good one." 





FERN CHIPMAN, 
Instructor in Domestic Science. 

"She's beautiful; and therefore to be 

wooed: 
She's a woman: therefore to be won." 



FRED BUSS, A. B., 
Instructor in Geology and Physiography. 

"The force of his own merit makes his 
way." 





CHARLES H. CARROLL, A. B., 

Professor of Mathematics. 



"Here's a dear and true industr 
friend." 












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ANDREW S. GIBBONS, A. B., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

"Forsooth, a great mathematician. 




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EMMA EVANS, 
Instructor in Typewriting. 

To be or not to be, that is the question. 








LIZZIE LINDSAY, 
Critic and Grade Teacher. 



'One that excels." 



BENT F. LARSEN, A. B., 
Art and Manual Training. 

"Here's a gentleman, a friend of mine." 





THATCHER C. JONES, 
Instructor in Accounting. 

'A true knight, not yet mature." 



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ALBERT E. HUISH, 
Instructor in Woodwork 



'1 cannot draw a cart, nor eat dried oats: 
If it be a man's work I'll do it." 




FANNIE McLEAN, B. Pd., 
Critic and Grade Teacher. 




ARTHUR VANCE, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary 

Science. 

'The gravity and stillness of your 
tith the world has noted." 



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J. RALPH WILKINS, 
Critic and Grade Teacher. 



A most excellent young man 

























HATTIE WALKER, 

Secretary to President, and Instructor in 

Shorthand. 

"Her sunny locks hang on her temples 
like a golden fleece." 



HERALD CLARK, 
Instructor in Accounting. 



"I have not seen so likely an ambass 
dor of love." 



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LEONA BILLINGS, 
Instructor in Shorthand and Typewriting. 

"Some that smile have in their hearts, 
I fear, millions of mischief." 




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EARL J. GLADE, Provo. 

Major — Commerce. 

Second vice-president of Senior Class. 

Head of department of Business Education, 

B. Y L" 
President of Business department, N. E. A., 

1914. 
Manager Students' Supply Association. 
President B. Y. U. Deutscher Verein. 
Will remain with I!. Y. I". 



HENRY ALDOUS DIXON, Provo. 

Maji ir — German. 

Honor man in debating. 1914. 

Baseball manager one year. 

Will teach in Weber Stake Academy. 









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MURRAY OSWALD HAYES, 
Pleasant Grove. 

Major— Physics. 

Instructor in Latin, B. Y. U.. one year. 

Will teach in Richfield. 






S. D. MOORE, JR., Payson. 

Major — Chemistry. 
Will teach in Rexburg, Idaho. 




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FERNANDA EYRING, 
Colonia Juarez, Mexico. 

Major — Home Economics. 
Secretary of Student Body . 
Will teach the coming year in the 
B. Y. U. 



H. LORENZO REID, Vernal. 

Major — Sociology and Economics. 
Taught several years in Uintah Stake 
Academy. 




79 




EINAR ANDERSON, 
Salt Lake City. 

Major — Mathematics and Physics, 
(.lass President 1912 and 1913. 
President of Studenty Body, 1913-1914. 



LESTER GREENWOOD, Central. 

Major — Agriculture. 
Honor man in athletics. 

Taught Agriculture at Paris. Ida., one year. 
Will teach in Ileber. 










DAVID J. WILSON, Midway. 

Major — History and Government, 

President of Senior Class. 

Honor man in three inter-collegiate 

bates. 
Debating manager. 

President of Student Body two years. 
Member of Dramatic Club. 

Will teach in Weber Stake Academy. 



THOMAS C. ROMNEY, 
Colonia Juarez, Mexico. 

Major — History and Government. 
Former member faculty. Juarez Stake 

Academy. 
Principal Knight Academy. Canada. 

1914—. 







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PAUL E. NELSON, Sandy. 

Major — Psychology. 

Taught at B. Y. C. two years. 



J. A. OLLERTON, Parowan. 

Major — Chemistry. 

Taught in Beaver and Parowan Public 
Schools. 












LOTTIE HARRIS, Provo. 

Major — Domestic Science. 

First vice-president of Senior Class. 

Director Domestic Science, B. Y. U. 



CHARLES E. McCLELLAN, 
Colonia Juarez, Chin., Mex. 

Major — Education. 

Former member faculty Juarez Stake Acad- 
emy. 

Instructor in English in B. Y. U. two years. 

Secretary and treasurer, Senior Class. 

Honors in "White and Blue" story contest. 
1913. 

Editor "Banyan," 1914. 

Supt. Rigby Schools, Idaho, 1914—. 




££. 







VERN C. DALBY, Levari, Utah. 

Major — History and Government. 
Will teach next year in Malad, Idaho. 




MRS. JULIA B. JENSEN, Prcvo. 

Major — English. 

Instructor in English in B. Y. U. two 

years. 
Won honor in story contest, 1914. 
Associate Editor "Banyan," 1911. 




CHARLES SCHWENCKE, Samoa. 

Major — Biology. 

Honor man in six intercollegiate debates. 

Editor of "White and Bine" two years. 
Medal winner in oratory. 






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:E WHO are leaving the gates of our old Alma Mater at this Com- 
mencement to volunteer our services in the ever-raging conflict of life 
feel a quiet sorrow at the parting, but our hearts are so expanded 
with gratitude for the loving care and broad instruction we have 
received, and for the faith, hope, and courage that have been inculcated into our 
souls by our dear old College, that we are glad to go out as her representatives. 
We hope that we may be able, through applying the truths now in our possession, 
to nourish to active life the germs of love of God and men that are latent in the 
human soul, to awaken the spirit of social service, and to enforce determination 
to do good on every hand, that our communities may become as large and united 
families with love, service, and perfection as their mottoes. Again we do not 
altogether feel that we are saying good-bye to our great educational parent, for 
we feel that we shall always be members of the 1!. Y. C. Our hearts will often 
long for the loving association of our dear old teachers and fellow-students, but it 
is the fixed determination of the class of 1914 that the spirit of the B. Y. U. shall 
ever burn fervently within our breasts. We will fight for her as of old and like a 
true lover of his country will pray for her and will rush back to her whenever pos- 
sible. We all hope to meet with you and sing our dear old songs at least once 
each year. 

It is with pride that we extend our hands to say an revoir for a short time, 
for we are proud of our great school and proud of the record we leave behind. 
The class of 1914 has always stood for scholarship and social service. Every class 
member leaves a class record of which he is modestly proud, and a glance over the 
attainments of our Alma Mater for the past eight years will show that the class 
of 1914 has been busily engaged in the service of the school since first the "seedy" 
bunch of rural recruits entered the secondary schools. Finally, the 1914s have 
stood for the ideals of this dear old school, and not one member is tainted by any 
act that will haunt him when he advocates these same principles to others. 

We leave with our Alma Mater our benediction ; we go forth to disseminate 
the light we have received as children of the B. Y. I"., and we pledge ourselves 
to the service of our fellowmen. We shall always be members of the College 
which has so enriched our lives. We go "with malice towards none, with charity 
for all. with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right." We go full 
of hope ; we go to lead, and we say : "< Sod bless and guard the B. Y. U." 



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JUNIOR SENIORS AND SENIORS' JUNIORS. 




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WALTER BURGNER, 

Col. Juarez, Mex. 



WARREN ALLRED, 

Fountain Green. 



BARRY HARRIS, 

Provo. 



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GEORGE W. PAGE, 

Payson, Utah. 

H-12-S 

Future Secretary of Agriculture. 




RAY GARDNER, 

Salem, Utah. 

H-12-S 

Builder of mansions. 




HARMON GUBLER, 

Santa Cbra, Utah. 

Branch Normal, Cedar City, '11. 

A non-conformist. 



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WINFORD A. PAXTON, 

Kanosh, Utah. 

?-H. S. 

A benedict making good. 




STANLEY WANLASS, 

Lehi, Utah. 

Lehi High, '12. 

Bible philosopher and critic. 




WAYNE B. HALES, 

Enreka, Utah. 

Eureka High, '12. 

Class president. Y man. Cross country 

champion. 








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J. EDWARD JOHNSON, 

Benjamin, Utah. 
H-ll-S 
A man to the core. Original and of stron 
personality. 





































N. E. BROWN, 

Circleville, Utah 

H-12-S 

S'>ph courtier. 




FRANK BECKSTEAD, 

H-12-S 
Second vice president of his class 




VERNIE O. KNUDSEN, 

Provo, Utah. 

H-12-S 

Absorber of calcluus and physics 




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VIVIAN PARKINSON, 


EDNA PERKEL, 


Preston, Idaho. 


Provo. Utah. 


H-12-S 


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First vice president. A social leader. 


Persistent and energetic worker 





MABEL REYNOLDS, 

Springville, Utah. 

Springville High. 

( (ptimistic, sees beauty in everything. 



MERLINE ROYLANCE, 

Provo, Utah. 

H-12-S 

Accomplished, sincere, and pleasant. 







EMERALD STOUT, 

Juarez, Mexico. 

Juarez Academy, '12. 

Six feet tall — every inch a man. 




LESTER TAYLOR, 
Provo, Utah. 
H-12-S 
The man with the goods 










ETHEL TAYLOR, 
H-12-S 

Common sense flavored with good cheer. 














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LOTHIELD YOUNG, 

Provo, Utah. 

H-12-S 

A thorough student. Masters fundamentals. 




ELMARION NICHOLES, 


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American Fork. 




H-12-S 


Sings, and plays basketball. 


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JAMES BULLOCK, 


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Provo, Utah. 
H-12-S 


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Class standard bearer and political boss. 


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ELWOOD BACHMAN, 

Provo, Utah. 

H-ll-S 

Motor cyclist and wireless telegraph wizard. 




LELAND J. FARRER, 

Provo. 
Rival to Pierpont Morgan. 




LUCILE HARVEY, 

Pleasant Grove. 
Artistically Artist.;. 




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PAY BECK, 

Spring City, Utah 



LENORA HUISH 
Payson, Utah. 



EDWIN BAIRD 

Provo, Utah. 



HORACE E. MONSON 

Pleasant Grove. Utah. 



SADIE CURTIS 

Richfield, Utah. 



MIGNON JOHNSON 

Provo, Utah. 













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RHODA GREENWOOD, 
Central, Utah. 



HAZEL THOMAS, 

Heber, Utah. 



CHLOE MURDOCK, 

Heber, Utah. 



jay McAllister, 

Manti, Utah. 



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ERNEST ROWLEY, 
Mexico. 



WILL EVANS, 

Springville, Utah 



LAEL IRVINE, 
Provo, Utah. 










HAZEL JONES, 
Prove, Utah, 



JESSE GREENE, 

American Fork, Utah. 



LOUISA HOWARD, 

Huntington. Utah. 



EFFIE JENSEN, 
Idaho Falls, Idaho. 



EUGENIA CANDLAND, 
Nephi, Utah. 



GLADYS FARRER, 

Provo. Utah. 







ATHOL E. LATER, 
Rigby, Idaho. 



LILLIAN HOLMES, 
Provo, Utah. 



J. R. GARDNER, 

Salem, Utah. 



EFFIE EVANS, 
Provo, Utah. 



ETHEL HICKEN, 

Heber, Utah. 



ARNOLD E. JOHNSON, 

Lovell, Wyo. 




n 






^£°3>3<>#_ 



1 




wm 



ALBERT SOUTHWICK, 

Provo, Utah. 



LOIS SMITH, 

Provo, Utah. 



ORA BAILEY, 

Provo. Utah. 



ROLLO CALLOWAY, 

Provo, Utah. 



H. R. ATKIN, 

St. George, Utah 



EZMA LEWIS, 

Park City, Utah. 




^ 




^^^ J 







D. C. DUKE, 

Heber, Utah. 



ADA HOWE, 
Provo. Utah. 



FORREST GLAZIER, 

Provo, Utah. 



MERLE SNYDER, 

Provo, Utah. 



ORLENA HYDE, 

Provo, Utah. 



CLEON DALBY, 

Rexburg, Idaho. 



&S* 



*&L 




J. W. RANDALL 

Ogden, Utah. 



DELIA FARNSWORTH 

Kanab, Utah. 



JESSE STOTT 

Meadow, Utah. 



EDA CROPPER 
Hinckley, Utah. 




4 




ARNOLD E. ROBINSON, 

Provo, Utah 



JOSEPH DAY, 

Fairview, Utah. 



HAZEL JOHNSON, 
Kanab, Utah 



LUCY PHILLIPS, 

Springville, Utah. 



i. 



MARGARET DUSENBER3Y, 

Provo, Utah. 



NETTIE HAWLEY, 

Central, Utah. 





MATTIE WOODBURY, 

St. George, Utah. 



BERNICE STRINGHAM 

Provo, Utah. 



ELLA HAFEN, 

Santa Clara, Utah 



BELVA COB, 

Fairview, Utah 




RUFUS JACOBSON, 

Provo, Utah. 



MILTON CHIPMAN. 

American Fork, Utah. 



JAMES STRATTON, 

Provo, Utah. 



VIRGIL E. NELSON, 
Sandy, Utah. 



ROBERT H. HINCKLEY, 

Provo, Utah. 



WAYNE PERRY, 

Springville. Utah. 



m 






?W 







J. Give Davis, Aca. 
W. L. Berry, Aca. 
Weston Oaks, .leu. 
(Class fres.) 



Aha Redd, Aca. 
Merle Murdock, Aca. 
Aha Love, Aca. 



Harold Davis, Aca. 
Mary Herbert, Aca. 
Ruth Blake 



Ray Knight, Agr. 
Thos. L. Clark. Aca 
Elsie Booth, Aca. 




Hazel Bryce, Com. Louis Brandley, Aca. 

Wallace Anderson, Aca. La Real Jones 

S. X. Daniels \Ym. Sorensen, Com. 



Milton Marshall. Music 
Margaret Carroll 
Stanley Clark. Aca. 



Vanesse Harris, Aca. 
Eva Keeler, Aca. 
Elva Wells, ./r.i. 




Ora Chipman, Aca. 
Stella Gerber, Aca. 
Edwin Bliss 



Philip Skinner, Agr. 
Jos. Carroll, Aca. 
Ernest Knudson, Aca. 
86 



Mabel Monson, Aca. 
Arden Hunt, Aca. 
Sterling Earkenbrak 



Jennie Kerr, Aca. 

Lynn Orser 

Jennie Hugh, Music 




Vinna Haws. Aca. 
Leon Robertson, Aca. 
Elsie Talmage, Aca. 



P. A. Nielson, Aca. 

Alva Curtis, Aca. 
Delia Bischoff, Aca. 



Lisle Lindsay, Aca. 
Edna Herbert, Act. 
Elray Lewis, Aca. 



Eugene Horton, Aca. 
Laura Freeman, Art 
Athel Fitzgerald, Aca. 




Lula Chipman Marion Harris Marie Spafford, Art Orea Bean 




HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES, 1914, IN DRAMATIC AND OTHER POSES. 




Stanley Cheever 
Carl vie Hinckley 



Joseph Freckleton 
Orson Slack 

Gertrude Reynolds 
Clifford Pierpont 

Albert Peterson 
Elaine Hyde 
Georgia Billings 
Margaret Smoot 



Lester Ashton 
G. W. Averett 
Glenn Banks 
Myrtle Barrett 
Earl Bent 
Clara Bestelmeyer 
Kate Bestelmeyer 
Freeman Bird 
Merrill Bird 
Grover Miller 



Back Row, frcm left to right: 
Lee A. Bean Glenn Crandall 

Landrum Kitchen Earl YanWagoner 

Ephraim Valgardson 

Second Row: 
David Daley Preal Sabin 

Hattie Jenkins Melvin Russell 

Third Row: 
Ray Freckelton Miles Hales 

Loran Powelson Mary Hartley 

Bottom Row: 
Irvin Scntt Inez McDonald 

Eva Billings Yilate Daley 

Edda Anderson William Oliver 

Dolores Dalby Cora Murdock 

ThoSH Why L>').d i^-j'. r J-=r "1m Plct^ra 



Eva Black 
Edwin Bodilv 
Stanley Bonnett 
Edgar Calder 
Marian Covington 
L. O. Crowther 
Earl Curtis 
Claude Downs 
Harold Dunn 



Clem Evre 
Mary Fowers 
H. A. Fowler 
Karl Frisby 
Yanese Harris 
La Rhea Hoover 
Lorus Holdaway 
Marguerite Huish 
David Hunter 



Orvil Anderson 
T. L. Burridge 



Flossie Anderson 
Margaret Reid 

Josephine Scott 



Earl YYoolsey 
Gladys Graham 
Jennie Harding 



Edna Jensen 
Marcus Johnson 
Eva Jones 
Joy Jones 
Lorin Jones 
Rachel Kartchner 
Blanche Langford 
Reya Lewis 
Weber Lund 




C hades Blake 
Keifer Sauls 
Harvey Safford 

Frank Gardner 
John Stagg 

\rthur D. Taylor 

Walter Daw 
Waldo Parry 
leanie Holt 

Ralph Bullock 
Joyce Udall 
Ray Stringham 

Bert Fisher 

Mildenhall John 
A. W. Morrison 
Virginia Kelson 
Helen Newell 
Mary Newell 
Eugene Xicholes 
Floyd Xielson 
Irvin Oldroyd 
Preston Ollerton 
Tressa Ollerton 



Tow Row, from left to right: 
George Knight Eula Fletcher 

Williamelia Coleman Orvil Olson 
Don E. Clark Alta Jensen 

Second Row: 
Winnie Clyde Geneva Roberts 

Carl Hortin Bernice Davis 

Third Row: 
Julia Taylor Mary Huber 

Glenn Gardner Ira Beddo 

Cloa Berr}- Vivian Hutchinson 

John Jones Merrill Winters 

Bottom Row: 
Ruth Taylor Otto L. Anderson 

Floyd Eyre Algie Eggertson 

Reva Lewis Karl G. Udall 

Those Who Did Not Get la Picture 



Lvlas Olsen 
Cfora Olsen 
Lorin Passey 
Barbara Paxman 
Leila Phillips 
John A. Ray 
Maynie Riches 
Catherine Richards 
Martha Roberts 



M. K. Roberts 
M. L. Robin-, .n 
Erma Romney 
Daisan Ross 
Mack Roundy 
James Sellers 
Joseph Soelberg 
LeRoy Staheli 
B. S. Stringham 



B. Manning Jolley 
Bernard Bradshaw 



Theresa Stewart 
Stanley Duffin 

Laila John 
Heloise Day 
i Eenry Jones 



Roy Purcell 
R. N. Cooper 
Rachel Tavlor 



Reid Swenson 
Ethel Thomas 
Glenn Thurman 
R. V. Twelve- 
Edgar Williams 
Irene Willis 
Kenenth Winn 
Ida Wright 
l llga \\ underlv 




MEMBERS OF THIRD YEAR CLASS WHEN NOT IN SCHOOL. 

94 















Christa Anderso 

Carlie Adams 
Alton Brimhall 
Lucile Brady 
Elva Chipman 
Doris Clayton 
Lora Dunn 
Klara Young 



Verda Egbert 
Cora Garff 
Violet Harris 
Ireta Harris 
Inez Hurst 
Florence Holt 
Pearl Johnson 



Matta Johnson 
Estella Manwaring 
Sylvia Murdock 
Martha Meldrum 
La Rue Mix 
Lily Nainoa 
Felma Nesbit 



Leatha Smith 
Adelia Stowell 
Emma Smith 
Dora Slack 
Vena Sward 
Catherine Whiting 
Nettie Winterton 



Ma-JllUS oi Giliriii Who 'JJld 2?oi Q^r i n phmjj 



Vetta Alger 
Ruth Bean 
Mabel Bischoff 
Pearl Brown 
Haze! Whittaker 



Mida Billings 
Hester Chamberlin 
Klea Foutz 
Ada Helquist 
Edith Wilson 



Cornelia Jacobsen 
Maude King 
Alta Leetham 
Jeanette McMurrin 



Genevieve Parry 
Xarvel Sattord 
Maude Spencer 
Myrteen Thurmond 




v* 5. * t? tf '/ 









w* v* 



>B ■■■-.. 



Leland W. Redd 
Harry Nielson 
John R. Adams 
Ray Brown 
Enos Brimhall 
Edwin Booth 
Elmer Bnckner 
Earl Clements 
Earl Crutis 
Eewis Crandall 
Grant Crandall 
Leland Cook 
Wilford Egbert 



Clarence Greer 
Lester Green 
C. R. Green 
Carl Harris 
Lewis Harris 
Orson Harris 
Clyde Holladay 
Charles Hyde 
Rex Johnson 
Leland H. Jones 
Will Kartchner 
Fred Knight 
Clyde Lambert 



John Lundell 
Grover Lesueur 
Woodruff Mangum 
Spencer Madsen 
Roy Meldrum 
Grant Murdock 
Mercer Markham 
Harry Nielson 
Ralph Nielson 
Henry Nelson 
Vernon Nuttall 
Lynn Phelps 
Wilford Russon 



Reuben Radmall 
Mack Rozelle 
Marion Ray 
Ellis Straw 
Eugene Stowell 
Heber Slack 
Roy Stubbs 
Paul Vincent 
E. C. Whitehead 
Earl Whitlock 
Albert Wickman 
Angus Wilcox 



Mames ©I 'Bayz T/Tii© Dlifl Hy! C»e4 im Plciwsre 



Earl Anderson 
Darrel Brown 
Wesley Beckstead 
Kenneth Cluff 
Elmer Decker 



Raymond Esplin 
Stanley Griffiths 
Lewis Griffiths 
William Holt 
Bert Johnson 



David Keeler 
Roland Lindsay 
Geo. E. Meecham 
Preston McDonald 



J. G. Olsen 
Jay Redd 
Dell Smith 
Arthur VViis 





&\ J\ . A* F 


t« Hi' 5 






- Vy :, i#^*/* 


f>$ JJJLi^- - 


Mj33! 


* 








- 








** 



Fern Broadbent 
Beulah Bunnell 
Leona Bunnell 
Lucile Clayson 
Verona Cox 
Vilate Dunn 
Lacy Edwards 
Pearl O. Emery 
Ada Wliittnker 



Elsie Ferguson 
Zoe Fletcher 
Alice Foote 
Maurine Goodridge 
Zetella Goodridge 
Ruth Goodrich 
Mary Greer 
Lavieve Huish 



Ltla Jacobson 
Lila Jolley 
Veroma Jones 
Fannie Jordan 
Furnessia Knudsen 
Leah Lewis 
Annie Little 
Ruth Partridge 



Aline Philios 
Zina Rawlings 
LaPriel Reese 
Pearl Rnobins 
Daphne Smitii 
Emma Spafford 
Laura Staheli 
Elva Tiffinv 




g&£gfe 



v f F I ? f * • 



Marion Baker 
Selvoy Boyer 
Lorin Brady 
Paul Brimhall 
Denzil Carter 
Edwin Chamberlin 
Earl Dastrup 
Feramorz Decker 
Heber Done 
Frank Dugan 



Albert Ellison 
Ward Esplin 
E. L. Gerber 
Que Graham 
George Harris 
Radcliffe Henrie 
Jed Herbert 
Glenden Houtz 
L. R. Ivans 
Lyman Kartcbner 



Ralph Keeler 
Marion Lauritzen 
Roy Lytle 
Hayward Marshall 
Claude Murdock 
Howard Roberts 
B. S. Robertson 
Frank Romney 
Frank Sainsbury 
J. E. Stein 



Lyal Stringham 
Donald Stubbs 
Albert Taylor 
Alden Taylor 
Frank Taylor 
Lynn Taylor 
Earl Thompson 
Maysell Tietjen 
Leland Tanner 
Eddie Young 









-i j tij\ 'mm ci ^citoQiL ^allium- © 




■■— — ■— ■— ■ I 





T5i®n ch-xom^lnj: <A passing jbsits 

Dm ycaidST gre^ri ilis/itls^— 
^ J liy sirsmtj-Si oi illim.bj i'hj micihiii 'cjaarl), 

'Wall 'i/yorin a jiioiisi^cii's "y iritis.. 



Aretta Young 



J-\ symbol, 'ifiic/u cci paileiri iaiif-h — 
'I J iiy Duisi'jf^Gliadj s'iiaii'BTincj airms 

Wi£hs3a:n fling ioxicj iira strsss oi yazczz 
jv.mil eirasl cjirilh oi stoarms. 




■ I 





Ma j gS£h-2£)£h, 3.32L3 

ijtmclayj 2VIay 25Lh 
Baccalaureate Sermon — Elder David 0. McKay, College Hall, S p. rn. 
'J J ui£;Li3j6 May -zz/ili 
Senior Class Exercises — Maeser Memorial Hall. S p. m. 
Iftsdsib^^y, May 23JLh 
Exhibit Day and Alumni Reunion. 
Class Day Exercises — Secondary School Graduates. 
i a i Program in College Hall. 9 a. m. 
(b) Presentation of Aztec Fountain. 10 a. m. 
Band Concert, on High School Campus, 11 :00 to 12:30. 
Viewing of Department Exhibits from 9:00 to 12:30. 
Parade of Live Stock from 11:15 to 12:30. 
General Alumni Reunion, 2:30 p. m., in College Hall. 
Alumni Class Reunions, 4:00 to 6:00 p. m. 
Alumni Banquet, 6:00 p. m., in Library. 
Ai i mm Ball, 9:00 p. m., "Y" Gymnasium. 

Band Concert and American Flag Illumination. Maeser Memorial Building. 
from 8:00 to 9:00 p. m. 

Tjimsflay, May 2&£h 
Thirty-Seventh Commencement Exercises, College Hall. 10:00 a. m. 

Pa-ocjiram 

Music Double Quartette 

Invocation 

Sacred Solo Lynn Gibb 

Annual Report of Presidency 

Music String Quartette 

Commencement Address Arthur L. Beeley 

Solo Clarinda Holman 

Conferring of Degrees and Awarding of Diplomas 

Duet -Prof. Lund and Mabel Hone 

Sentiments School Officials 

Music. "Spinning Song" I Wagner ) Ladies' Chorus 

Benedicts in 



<gfia©a&ta tar 332,3 am<ffl 3,1)14 



j^priij asaa 



Fri. 18 — Alma Richards leaves for Phil- 
adelphia to enter the intercol- 
legiate meets of the East. Di- 
rector Roberts accompanies 
him. 

Sat. 19— Athletic Carnival is held. 13s 
H. S. take first place. 

Mon. 21— The Class of 1913 H. S. begins 
the erection of the Aztec foun- 
tain west of the high school 
building. 

Tues. 22 — David Wilson, the Y's sena- 
tor, introduces a bill in Con- 
gress asking that his state be 
pensioned for being the only 
Republican state in the Union. 

Wed. 23 — Alma arrives in Philadelphia. 
His weak constitution is se- 
verely upset, but it is reported 
that he will recover. 

Thur. 2-1 — Xothin' ever happens on 
Thursday worth makin' a fuss 
over. 

Fri. 25 — 191 4's H. S. class entertains at 
a dancing party. 

Sat. 2(5 — Annual spring track and field 
meet is won by the 15s H. S. 
Alma wins high jump in meet 
at Philadelphia. 

Mon. 28 — The air is delicious in its 
freshness: buds bursting; 
flowers beginning to paint the 
laughing soil ; blue-birds are 
mating — so are the students. 

Tues. 29 — Surprise party is given Pro- 
fessor Swenson. 

Wed. 30 — The wind whistled. 



Thur. 1- 



-"What is so sweet and dear 
as a prosperous morn in 
May?" 



Fri. 
Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Thur. 



2 — May party in the Gym. 

5 — Campaign opens for the nom- 
ination of the Student Body 
officers for next year. Pro- 
gressives ami Unionists draw 
swords. 

6 — Governor Spry addresses the 
Student Body.' 

7 — The campaign gets warmer. 
Jim Bullock, platform pounder 
of the Progressives, orates in 
a manner that puts Bryan to 
shame. 

8— The 13s H. S. Dramatic Club 
appears before the foot-lights 
in one of Utah County's sub- 
urban villages — "The best 
show ever played in Maple- 
ton." 

9 — Jex oratorical contest is won 
by Inez Scott. The under- 
classmen of the college enter- 
tain the Seniors at a grand 
ball in the Gym. Election day. 
Einar Anderson is elected 
president of the Student Bodv 
for 1913-14. with Merline 
Roylance and Lester Taylor 
as vice-presidents. 



Mon. 12 — Unionists still sulky over the 
election. 



Fri. 




J. jisii 






3. GL QLASjg 





HERE were big boys in overalls and there were buxom lasses in the 
same apparel; there were red bandana on tender necks and straw 
piles on soft Lops. Indeed, four hayracks full of more Goshenesque 
progeny of old colonial hay seed never breathed Provo Canyon 
ozone 1 Oh, no! It was not Ringling Brothers' side show going to 
Heber: it was simply the "V" summer school on its way to Tim- 
The bloomers and over-allettes, so much in evidence, were simply 
a precaution against the amorous advances of the clinging oak and 
vine. Besides, if the ladies had worn hobbles on this eventful trip, 
tin- account might have been written in memoriam with customary dark com- 
plexioned type embellishment'-. 

A jollier crowd it would be difficult to find. From Director Roberts, with 
his sun-burnt nasal promontory, to dear little Miss Billings in her brown trousers; 
from Brother McClellan, the protector of the Nymphs, to Mademoiselle Lois 
of the Linger Longers, it was one affable bunch. 

How we ever hauled our provisions to the quaking-aspen grove. I am won- 
dering yet. It would have been equally easy to have gone up the face of the 
old mountain. 

The camp in the grove was an interesting sight. It was a regular gypss 
"hang-out" with all accessories — crazy quilts and dented frying-pans. 

The night before the climb saw the brightest bonfire ever built at the foot of 
old "Tim." Never were the girls so gloriously beautiful as then. The lights and 
shadows played upon their faces in such a way as to make the boys shift just a 
little nearer. Who will ever forget that bonfire program — that music and 
those stories? There was something about it all in the great out-of-doors that 
makes the evening impossible to forget. Once in a while, as the embers were 
low. one would notice a timid little face glance into the darkness behind, to be 
absolutely sure that an African lion was not about to spring. And once in a while 
a big, rough face, that needed the attention of a barber, would do the same thing. 

That night all of the girls in the party were protected by the sturdiest pine 
on the hillside, in the coziest out-door bedroom ever devised. The boys hid 
themselves away as best they could, and that was pretty good for boys. 

At daybreak the climb began. For six hours the cavalcade worked its way 
upward. It was Hannibal crossing the Alps. After the first big eminence had 
been mounted, the climbers sat clown to luncheon. Of all the strength-giving 
morsels that ever passed the vicinity of the human palate, surely these were the 
daintiest and the best. 

The final climb over ice and snow brought the crowd to the saddle of Tim- 
panogos. It was wonderful to be so near the heavens. One felt that one could 
almost see every city on the globe. One felt a great deal better, sitting than 
standing. 

The climb to the monument was shuddering. It required steady nerves and 
good eves, but was made without mishap. 

Coming down, the glacier served as a delightful coasting track. Bloomers 
and trousers were the only toboggans at hand, however, and a mile a minute 
trip upon them, first upon the anterior and then upon posterior surfaces, gave 
sensations that were unique in that they were neither hot nor cold, but both. 
I have seen Dore's pictures of the suffering in Dante's Inferno, but nothing there 
compared with the grimaces executed during the awful descents of these human 
toboggan-. . 

That night the camp extended a hearty welcome: the fire and food did their 
share toward making this hike to Mount Timpanogos, without question, the most 
plea-ant one in years. 



Tues. 13 — Something might have hap- 
pened had this been Friday, 
the 13th. 

Wed. 1-1 — 14s H. S. win last debate of 
the inter-class series, thereby 
winning pennant. 

Thur. 15 — Einar embarrassed at receiv- 
ing attention of the girls — per- 
haps he won some candy on 

the election. 

Fri. 16 — The boys in blue cross bats 
with the Crimson nine, and 
win to the tune of 7 to 1. 
"Chas. Comisky of the White 
Socks," nee Don Johnson, and 
"Shot-gun" Garrick heroes of 
the day. 

Sat. 17— The State Track and Field 
Meet at Salt Lake City. "U" 
gets first place ; "Y" and U. A. 
C. tie for second. Score: U, 
47; B. Y. U. and U. A. C, 
each 39. 

Mon. 19 — Two of the freshmen buy 
straw hats in Zion because 
they were in the window. A. 
C. U. and B. Y. U. dual meet 
at Provo. Another tie. 

Tues. 20 — David's splendid work as 
president of the Student Body 
is recognized by Board of 
Control, who have a genuine 
"spead" at Merline's. and pre- 
sent him with a beautiful srold 



Thur. 22 — Advice from the professors : 
Don't let your nerves get on 
the outside of your clothes — 
finals will be held next week." 

Fri. 23 — Student Body makes final fin- 
ancial report. The athletes 
get "Ys". "Y" ball most suc- 
cessful party of the year. 

Sat. 24 — Picture shows not patronized 
tonight. A little cramming 
being done. 

Sun. 25 — Baccalaureate Sermon deliv- 
ered by Elder David O. Mc- 
Kay, in College Hall. 

Mon. 26 — Rejuvenation of lessons learn- 
ed in the fall. — And the end is 
not yet. 

Tues. 27 — Senior Day. Program in Col- 
lege Hall : automobile swing 
out through the country ; 
banqueted by Domestic Sci- 
ence Department ; grand ball 
in the evening. James P. 
Clayton wins gold medal in 
final typewriting contest. 

Wed. 28 — Exhibit Day : Alumni Reunion 
and Banquet : Presentation of 
Aztec fountain by the 13s H. 
S. Band concert and Amer- 
ican flag illumination at the 
Maeser Memorial building. 
Alumni Ball in the evening. 

Thur. 29 — Commencement Dav. Con- 
ferring of degrees and award- 
ing of diplomas. Mizpah. 




-Girls all don spring duds- 
trvinsr to outdo nature. 



gWMMmm. school 

Mon. 2 — Summer semester starts. 

Tues. 3 — Some of the professors decide 
to hold their classes at 6 a. m. 
so they can go fishing in the 
afternoon. 

Wed. -I — Arthur Beeley, embassador 
from Utah, leaves for a two- 
year sojourn in his native land, 
"merrie" England. 

Thur. 5 — Listen, my children, and vou 
shall hear of the midnight ride 
of — Schwencke and ? 









Fri. 6— $45.00 for one ride!— and if 
the horse hadn't "went" home 



Mon. 9 — "Then like the finger of a 
friend. 
Soft tapping on the pane, 
The swift drops fell, the day 
had end. 
In mystery and rain." 

Tues. 10 — The rainbow smiled on us. 

"Wed. 11 — The roses that unfold with 
June make the University 
grounds a land of enchant- 
ment. 

Thur. 12 — The Dean is getting close to 
Nature — via an onion patch on 
the farm. 

Fri. 13 — The expected did not happen. 

Sat. 1-! — Professors Osmond and Holt 
decorate their horse's head 
with flags before leaving for 
the canyi >n. 

Sun. 15 — "A bare-foot boy with pole 
and pin, 
Can draw full many a good 
fish in." 

Mon. 16 — One of Lowell's perfect days. 

Tues. 17 — A starry night of dreams un- 
told. 

Wed. 18 — Book store opens for ten min- 
utes. Summer school faculty 
all buy a package of gum. 

Thur. l'» — Jimmie Bullock and Lee Far- 
rer leave for Oregon on a 
grafting expedition, loaded 
with pedler's licenses and hot 
air. 

Fri. 20 — Tick-tock, tick-tock, counts the 
non-Lnionist emplove in the 
H. S. hall. 



.Mon. 23 — Prof. Higgs returns from 
"off-capping" to the Pacific, 

and claims the girls in Utah 
are as beautiful as those he 
saw in the Xat Goodwin cafe 
at Ocean Park. 

Tues. 2-1 — A clean slate for everybody. 

Weil. 25 — Please refrain from unseemly 
mirth while perusing these 
pages. 

Thur. 26— R 



Fri. 



Mon. 



annng. 

27 — Gym. tournament. Won by 
by the "giants." Still more 
rain. 

30 — Maori chieftains entertain the 
summer school students. Hik- 
ers, led by Coach Roberts, go 
to the lake — "heap big time." 



Tues. 1 — Oberhansley and Romney, 
landscape artists, finish mutil- 
ating the ornamental trees on 
the high school campus. 

\\ ed. 2 — And lo. the book agents are 
seen to crawl from the bump- 
ers of the fast freight from 
Oregon. 

Thur. 3 — "Fierce" fiinal exams close 
the first term of the summer 
semester. 

Fri. 4 — "Safe and sane" is the celebra- 
tion in Provo. Brother Hayes 
sets off one fire-cracker and it 
is heard from the asylum to 
the lake. 

Mon. 7 — X. E. A. holds opening ses- 
sion. The faculty and students 
are trying to find themselves 
in a "great city." 

Tues. 8 — B. Y. U. Arts Exhibit draws 
enthusiastic crowd of X. E. A. 
visitors. 

Wed. 9 — Algie Eggertsen wins gold 
medal for prize essay on 
"Peace." delivered in Salt 
Lake City, before the X. E. A. 



Thur. 10 — Salt Lake too hot for 
Schwencke — "I love thy meet- 
ings, \. E. A., but ( ) you 

tennis." 

Fri. 11 — Professor Glade is made presi- 
dent of the Business Section 
of the National Education As- 
sociation for 1914. and will 
take charge of that department 
at St. Paul next summer. 

Mon. 1-1 — Second term of the summer 
school opens. 

Tues. 15 — Gym class takes "hike" to the 
east mountain preparatory to 
climbing Mt. Timpanogos. 

Wed. 16 — Prof. Osmond spends the day 
fishing in the Aztec fountain. 

Thur. 17 — Second "conditioning" walk 
of the gym class. "Mellie and 
his'n" do their "conditioning" 
in the evening. 

Fri. 18 — Sixty Nymphs, Aztecs. Lin- 
gerlongers and black sheep, 
sleep soundly in the profound 
peace of the forest at the foot 
of old "Tim" preparatory to 
the climb. 

Sat. 19 — The sublime heights are reach- 
ed without a mishap. One has 
not seen America until the 
dizzy alpine heights of Utah's 
greatest mountain have been 
climbed. 

Sun. 20 — "Hikers," rested( ?) and hap- 
py, reach home. 

Mon. 21 — Same old classes, same old 
teachers, same old buildings, 
same old tennis court still in 
use. 

Tues. 22 — Prof. Glade was seen saunter- 
ing around the halls as usual, 
with his hands in his pockets. 

Wed. 23 — Glen receives word that Law- 
rence is improving — sea-sick- 
ness didn't kill him. 

Thur. 24 — A quiet day dedicated to the 
memory of Utah's heroic men 
and women of 1847. 

Fri. 25 — One holiday calls for another, 
but the "profs." don't think so. 



Those who studied during this month 
were too tired to do anything 
else. 11. V. U. high school 
buildings the only cool place 
in Provo. 



\Xm\. 8 — Registration day. Mayor C. 
F. Decker extends a hearty 
welcome to students and 
teachers. 

Thur. 9 — Class work begins. A dizzy 
day for the Freshmen. 

Fri. 10 — The faculty holds a handshake 
in the Ladies' Gym. Roberts, 
at the reception : "Orchestra, 
please play that dance where 
you waltz a little and then stop 
and hold hands." 

Mon. 13 — Sophomores organize. Loren 
Anderson elected class presi- 
dent. 



Tues. 1- 



Wed. 15- 



Thur. 15- 



Fri. 17- 



-Freshman class hold 
wow. 



a pow- 



-Associated collegians organ- 
ize. Aldous Dixon elected 
president. 

-Founder's Day Celebration in 
course of preparation. 

-The 38th anniversary of the 
founding of the 15. Y. U. is 
celebrated by street pageant. 
The "movies" tret us. 



Mon. 20 — Olympic Alma sends greetings 
from Cornell. 







Tues. -1 — High School boys who had 
their clothes drenched in the 
tug-of-war take them oft" the 
line, and are crowded with 
pressing engagements. 

Wed. 22 — Second issue of White and 
Blue comes out. Edifying ed- 
itorial is eloquently expounded, 

Thur. 23 — Brother Buss receives the 
physiography stiulents in 451 1. 

Fri. 2-1 — First Student Body meeting of 
the present year is held. 

Mun. 27— The 14s II. S. hold a class 
election. 

Tues. 28 — The 7 :45 bell this morning 
was ten minutes ahead of the 
old faculty standby. Ingersol. 

Wed. 29— 15s H. S. wallop the Sophs, 
in tennis. 

Thur. 30 — Prof. Swenson kept his eyes 
open during devotional this 
morning. How do we know? 

Year's Halloween Ball. 



Sat. 1 — Ray Freck went out for a 
"Lark." 

Mon. 3 — Personal invitations to visit 
Presidency. 

Tues. 4 — A few more visit the "canning 
factory." 

Wed. (i — Not even peaches are pre- 
served. 

Thur. 7 — President Brimhall's hair still 
uncombed. 

Fri. 8 — Weeping, wailing, and gnash- 
ing of teeth on all sides. 

Sat. l » — Sackcloth and ashes in evi- 
dence. 

Mon. 10 — Uncanning machinery in- 
stalled in the office. 

Tues. 11 — School is in normal condition 
a grain, 



& 



$ 






ca 



Wed. 12 — "All good things come to him 
who waits." The decision of 
the State Track Meet held last 
spring is "juggled" a bit. First 
place given to B. A. L*. : L. 
A. C. second ; I', of I', third. 

Thur. 13 — In another battle of rackets, 
the Seniors wallop the Third 
Years. 

Fri. 14 — Another dance. 

Mon. 17 — "Y" pins for sale in the Book 
Store. 

Tues. 18 — A useful upbraiding un- 
shrinkingly uttered by honor 
men in the White and Blue, on 
the why of the "Y" and who 
■-hall wear it. 

Wed. 1 () — Bowman makes a basket in 
practice. 

Thur. 20 — Dave Wilson turns the fruit 
basket over and gets a peach 
for a date. 

Fri. 21 — Barry tries to get a "stiddy" — 
Monday, Wednesday, ami Fri- 
day evenings and Sunday din- 
ner. 

Mon. 24 — Jes' Monday. 

Tues. 25 — Fourth Years debate on the 
"Gun" question. 

Wed. 2<< — Wayne Hales wins cross- 
country run for the second 
time. Associated Collegians 
hold Thanksgiving party at 
the home of their genial pres- 
ident, Aldous DixBn. 



Thur. 27 — Thanksgiving recess. 

Mon. 1 — Mid-winter semester opens. 
Indigestion makes it difficult 
for a few of the industrious! ? I 
students to get to work. 

Tues. 2 — Miss Reynolds smiled. 

Wed. 3 — Briant Stringham startles the 
natives by appearing on the 
scene in a zebra mackinaw. 

Thur. -I — Our basket ball barometer 
takes a lightening chute to the 
basement of hope, "Les," the 
champion guard of the West, 
is barred by the conference 
from competing in intercol- 
legiate basket ball games. 

Fri. 5 — Students enjoy a trip around 
the world. However, some of 
them "tramp" it part of the 
way. 

Mon. 8 — Following Sunday night.noth- 
ing of importance happens. 

Tues. 9 — President Brimhall passes the 
Mxtv-first milestone in his il- 
lustrious life. 

Wed. 10 — Freshmen win from the 16s 
H. S. in basket ball. 

Thur. 11 — Earl Van still growing. Two 
more inches and he will be as 
tall as Uncle Sam. 

Fri. 12 — Oratorical contest won by 
Clarence Baird. 




Mon. 15 — Rondo Anderson puts his gum 
behind his ear for future use. 

Tues. 16 — Miss Camp's recital a huge 
success. 

Wed. 17 — Christmas issue of White and 
Blue published. 

Thur. 18 — Prof. Saner gives his annual 
Christmas concert. 



Fri. 



1') — "Christmas is a'cumin'. an' all 
de week is ouahs." 



CHRHS^TM&S IHTDUDAYS 



Jiuinjiiry,, '1 ^14 



Mon. 

Tues. 

Wed. 

Thur. 
Fri. 

Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 

Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Mon. 

Tues. 



5 — Back from vacation, everyone 
— but they hated to come. 

6 — Full knee-deep lies the winter 
snow. 

7 — Music recital "happened" at 
noon. 

8 — Monthly exams in full swing. 

9 — Mouse causes panic in Domes- 
tic Science Laboratory. Stu- 
dent Body program. Yell and 
song practice. 

12 — Second basket-ball calamity. 
Jones and Bowman visit the 
"canning factory." 

13 — The bow on Prof. Johnson's 
duffy causes comment among 
the girls. 

1-1 — Prof. Glade celebrated by tak- 
ing luncheon today. — Whose ? 

15 — A Jonah to most of us. 

16 — Mrs. Beulah Storrs Lewis 
reads "The Nigger" to a large 
and appreciative audience. 

17 — L. D. S. U. team beats our 
high school bovs in basket 
ball. 

19 — Debating teams chosen. Da- 
vid Wilson, president of the 
Debating Society. 

20 — President Woodrow Wilson 
delivers his annual message 
before both houses of Con- 
gress. 




Wed. 21 — Superintendent Cummings ad- 
dresses the Associated Colle- 
gians. Fourth Years enter- 
tain. 

Thur. 22 — Doubting men and doting 
maids are dotting the calen- 
dar with dates. 

Fri. 23— Cupid turns a trick and Miss 
Evert becomes Mrs. Terry. 
Banyan Ball one grand party. 

Sun. 25 — Apostle Grant lectures on "Be 
in Tune," in College Hall. 

Mon. 26 — "The Death of Minnehaha" 
given by the choir and orches- 
tra in the Tabernacle. 

Tues. 27 — Regular meeting of the Asso- 
ciated Collegians. 

Wed. 28 — Freshmen entertain the fair 
damsels of the class. 

Thur. 29 — "1914 Annex" is born. Ten 
acres on Temple Hill added to 
the "Y" campus. 

Fri. 30 — 15s H. S. give party In the 
Gym. 

Sat. 31— First Inter-collegiate basket Thur. 19 _ 

ball game of the season. B. 
Y. C. vs. B. Y. U. "Y" win- 
ners. Score, 43-22. Thos. 
Romney. one of the Seniors, 
leaves to teach in Idaho. 

F®Iba*>aaarj 

Mon. 2 — Our prophet of spring, the 
ground-hog, saw his shadow 
earlv this morning. 



Tues. 3 — Semester exams, start. 

Wed. -1 — The sun still shines, even 
though there are more exams. 

Thur. 5 — Special meeting for "Annex." 
"Y" team defeats Montana 
team with score of 67-14. 

Fri. 6— Prof. M. W. Davis of Har- 
vard lectures on "Coral Isl- 
ands and Reefs," and "A Les- 
son on the Grand Canyon ot 
the Colorado." 

Sun. 8— The Editor of the Banyan has 
a birthday. 

Mon. 9_Tweed Jones helps Prof. Lund 
climb a" ladder to get into his 
room. 

T ues . 10 — J. Edward tackles the Fac- 
ulty for their orders for the 
Banyan. 

Wed. 11 — Another sucker born. 

Thur. 12— Lincoln's Birthday. Special 
program and half holiday. 

Fri. 13— Lucky day( ?)— perhapst. 

Mon. 16 — Pres. Brimhall, Superintend- 
ent Cummings and their wives 
leave for Richmond, Va., to 
attend the Superintendent's 
Section of the N. E. A. 






Tues. 17- 



Wed. 



-Third basket ball calamity. 
Wilford Egbert leaves two 
fingers in the buzz saw. 

18 — Vera Greenwood, jealous of 
"Wilf"— has his hand ripped 
open in the chemistry labor- 
atory. 

-Milton Chipman starts prac- 
ticing in Egbert's place on 
the team. 

Fri. 20 — "On with dance." 

Sat 21— "Y" five make Aggies sorry 
thev came to Provo. Even 
Peterson, the Logan star, loses 
his "nip." Field basket score 
"13 to 1." Yern's remarkable 
grit helps make this famous 
slogan. 



Mon. 23— Washington's Birthday cele- 
brated. J. Edward Johnson 
wins the Barton & Blake ora- 
torical medal. 



Tues 



-Vern Knudsen changes his 
tune from "Where is Sylvia?" 
to "Oh. Marguerite." 

Wed. 2? — "Closed for Repairs"nailed on 
Tink's front door. Co-eds may 
be dainty, all right, hut they 
have no scruples at eating a 
man out of business. 

Thur. 26— The Misses Worsley and 
Jones, by artful angling, step 
"outside" to exhibit their terp- 
sichorean arts. 

p r i 27 — Student Body learns "Remem- 
ber the Aggies — 13 to 1 — Do 
Utah or Die." 



Sit. 28- 



Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 



-"V" basket ball boys win from 
the "U" with score of 32-24. 
Largest crowd ever packed in- 
to the gymnasium. "Chip" 
makes 20 out of the 34 points. 



3V3aafe2a 

2 — Helen Keller, the wonderful 
girl who interprets through 
the hand, the heart, and the 
mind, and her inspirational 
teacher, Mrs. Macy, lecture in 
the Tabernacle. 

3 — Theology classes discuss Hel- 
en Keller. 



-For lo. the 
monarch v is n 



North Wind's 
eh! 



Sat. 



5— The State High School basket 
ball tournament brings crowd 
of athletes and rooters to 
Provo. 

6— Scalp of the "U. A. C." taken 
again in basket ball by the "Y" 
boys. Special Student Body 
exercises held in honor of the 
visiting teams. 

7 — Debate between University of 
Southern California and the 
Brigham Young University on 
the tolls question won by our 



boys, Wilson and Schwencke. 
Banquet given at Hotel Rob- 
erts to the debaters and judges. 
Basket ball game with the B. 
Y. C, at Logan, won by the 
"Y" team, thereby giving the 
B. Y. U. the State and Inter- 
collegiate basket ball cham- 
pionship. State High School 
basket ball championship won 
by the Spanish Fork team. 

Mon. — President Brimhall sends tele- 
gram from Richmond. Ya., 
congratulating the school on 
winning the debate with Cal- 
ifornia and the State cham- 
pionship in basket ball. 

Tues. 10 — A little lesson in millinery 
economy is indulged in by the 
Misses McNeill and Miller. 

Wed. 11 — Sign in arch requests the dra- 
matic club to sleep until 1 1 :50 
a. m. 

Thur. 12 — Lael is wearing a new Cornell 
pin. Lucky Dean ! 

Fri. 13 — "Y" basket ball "champs" re- 
turn from a tour through Ida- 
ho with more scalps in their 
belts. Commercial issue of 
White and Blue published. 

S at l-| — Work on the new tennis courts 
begins on the "Y" campus. 

Mon. 16 — Coach Roberts inoculated the 
school with the virus of "base- 
ballitis," and it took. Sixty 
huskies meet on campus to try 
"clouting for the circuit." 




Tues. 17 — Instructions regarding "Y" 
Day given. 

Wed. 18 — The big" honor emblem on the 
east mountain is given a coat 
of white-wash. 

Thur. 19 — Story-telling contest. Lisle 
Lindsay is winner of the first 
prize. Second place given to 
Alta Jensen. 

Fri. 20 — "Clean-up" day in Provo. The 
ladies blister their paddies in 
an attempt to improve the 
"city beautiful." 

Mon. 23 — Schwencke lectures in College 
Hall on the traditions and be- 
liefs of the Samoan Islanders. 

Tues. 2-1 — President Brimhall returns 
from an extended trip through 
the East. 

Wed. 2? — Dr. Woods Hutchinson lec- 
tures on "Foods and Foolish- 
ness" in the Tabernacle. Prof. 
Swenson and Coach Roberts 
take his advice ; go to Han- 
sen's and are ill all night. 

Thur. 26 — President Brimhall talks to 
the students about his trip. 
Rondo Anderson ate nine 
opera bars before noon. 

p r j. 27— S. H. Clark reads "The Melt- 
ing Pot." 

Sat. 28— H. Aldous Dixon and LeRoy 
Hafen win the debate with the 
U. A. C. on the tolls question. 
Roland Tietjen and Clarence 
Baird debate the same question 
with the "U" in Salt Lake and 
get the decision of but one of 
the judges. 

Mon. 30 — Bert Sumpsion starts adver- 
tising campaign for "Ro- 
mance and Philosophy." The 
Current Events Club met and 
discussed the Mexican trou- 
ble. 

Tues. 31 — "Romance and Philosophy" 
plaved in Opera House — huge 
success. 




Wed. 1 — "April days ain't for work — 
Instead, to loaf around and 
shirk." 

Thur. 2 — Exams, all day. 

Fri. 3 — If we must part for conference 
let us go "to-gither." 

Spring Vacation. 

Fri. 10 — Schwencke and Wilson win 
debate on the Panama tolls 
question with the University 
of Nevada, at Reno, getting 
decision of all three judges. 



Tues. L 



-Everyone warbles "The Star- 
Spangled Banner." 



Wed. 15 — Professor Lund considerably 
puzzled as to whose bare feet 
made such tracks around the 
campus. . Prof. Eastmond 
Thinks they are vulgar. 

Thur. 16 — Dave and Charley take a dip 
in the Pacific. 

Fri. 17 — Flag Day. Colonel Tatlock of 
the Grand Army of the Re- 
public presents the University 
with a beautiful new flag. Flag 
Day ball. 

Mon. 20 — "Can trouble live with April 
days ?" 

Tues. 21.— 14s H. S. hold a peach blos- 
som party. 



Wed. 22 — Robert is flattered to think 
that the misplaced eyebrow 
below his nose is noticeable. 

Thur. 23 — Charley and Dave return from 
the land of sunshine and flow- 
ers and sing their "swan 
soul;-." 

Fri. 24 — Seniors let us know who they 
are. Program in College Hall 
in the morning ; banquet and 
reception in afternoon; grand 
ball in the evening. 

Sat. 25 — Annual spring athletic carni- 
val. Sophomore Class take the 
honors. 

Sun. 26 — Everybody went to Church. 

Mon. 27 — "Y" base ball team defeats U. 
of U. in Salt Lake City. Mrs. 
Bonnin gives charming talk 
about Indians — her own peo- 
ple. 

Tues. 28 — 15s H. S. hurl defiant chal- 
lenge at 14s for flag rush. 

Wed. 29 — It rained, and we studied. 

Thur. 30— The last of April. 



Fri. 1 — Girls' day. Everything, of 
course, lovely, especially the 
evening ball. 

Sat. 2 — Dual meet, U. of U. and B. Y. 
U. on Y field. We scored 36 
points, but have forgotten the 
other fellow's score — nothing 
much, I guess. 

Sun. 3 — 11. Y. U. students won first 
and second places in Stake 
Mutual oratorical contest. 
Also won in music. 

Mon. 4 — Something happened. What 
was it? Normal Day. 

Tues. 5 — Professional tennis game for 
Roberts' racket. 

Wed. 6 — Oratorical contest for Jex 
medal. Miss Day, winner. 

Thur. 7 — Candidates for Student Body 
officers nominated by Board of 
Control. Baseball team goes 
to Logan. 

Track team leaves for Logan. 
Fine arts ball fine. Marion 
Harris (See next Year Book.) 





wni^JiiE own AiLwmm Awm j»id 



T 



& SIXERS 



Harvey Fletcher, Professor of Physics, B.Y.U, 
E. H. Eastmond, Professor of Fine and Corre- 
lated Arts, B. Y. U. 
Frank L. Harris, Professor Agronomy, U. A. C. 
Alice L. Reynolds, Professor English Litera- 
ture, B. Y. U. 
Ida S. Dusenberry, Professor in Kindergarten 

Department, B. Y. U. 
Calvin Fletcher, Professor Art. U. A. C. 
C. H. Carroll, Professor Biology, B. Y. U. 
Geo. R. Hill, Professor Botany, U. A. C. 
Wm. J. Snow, Professor in Department of 

History and Government, B. Y. U. 
May Ward, Professor Domestic Science, B.Y.U. 
Andrew S. Gibbons, Professor Mathematics, 

B. Y. U. 
R. H. Sainsbury, Principal Uintah Stake Acad- 
emy, Vernal. Utah. 
W. E. Morgan, Principal Fielding Academv, 

Paris. Idaho. 
Moroni O. Poulson, Principal St. Johns Acad- 
emy. St. Johns. Arizona. 
Archie Thurman, Principal Provo High School. 
Chas. Whitaker, Principal American Fork High 

School. 
Hugh M. Woodward, Principal St. George 

Academy. 
Mary J. Ollerton, Director B. Y. U. Training 

School. 
Thos. L. Martin, Principal Big Horn Academy, 

Cowley, Wyoming. 
Hans J. Peterson, Principal McCammon Public 

Schools, Idaho. 
A. L. Kelly, Principal Bunkerville High School, 

Bunkerville, Xev. 
Ray Oberhansley, Principal Juarez Academy. 

Juarez, Mexico. 
Raymond Partridge, Principal Lincoln High 

School, Utah County, Utah. 
Fannie McLean, B, Y. U. Training School. 
Geo. H. Christensen, Snow Academy, Ephraim, 

Utah. 
Sherwin Maeser, M unlock Academy, Beaver, 

Utah. 
James Johnson, Wasatch High School, Heber 

City, Utah. 
Samuel W. Williams, Teacher of Music, Provo. 
George G. Haws, Utah Agricultural College. 
Laura Hickman, Spanish Fork High School. 
Hugh Holdaway, Wasatch High Schooh 
Hyrum Manwaring, English Dept.. B. Y. U. 
Marie Clark, Supervisor of Art, Tooele, Utah. 
David R. Mitchell, Richfield High School. 
Arthur Overlade, Pleasant Grove High School. 
J. Morrell George, Piovo City High School. 
Arthur K. Hafen, St. George Academy, St. 

George. Utah. 
B. F. Larsen, Supervisor Manual Training. B. 

Y. L T . Training School. 
Ray Mcnscn, Payson High School. 



Sarah W. Talmage, Secretary Society for the 

Aid of the Sightless. 
H. Eyring Thompson, Brigham City High 

School. 
Samuel Rigby, Fairview Public Sell' ols. 
Junius F. Banks Lehi High School. 
W. H. Boyle, Principal Academic Department. 

B. Y. U. 
Carl F. Eyring, Department of Physics, B.Y.U. 
Fred Buss, Department of Geology and Phys- 

ography, B. Y. U. 
J. M. Jensen, Department of English. B. Y. U. 
E. H. Smart, Department of Agriculture (Hor- 
ticulture). Brigham Young University. 
James Clove, Jr., Provo City High School. 
Ora S. Cunningham, Lincoln High School, 

Utah County. Utah. 
C. Wilson Glazier, Xephi High School. 
P. Harrison Hurst, Lewisville High School, 

Lewisville, Idaho. 
Anna Ollerton, Provo City High School. 
Roy A. Welker, Fielding Academy, Paris. Ida. 
Erastus S. Romney, Bunkerville High School. 

Bunkerville, Nevada. 

Clarence Jarvis, Chief Engineer for Provo Res- 
ervoir Co., Utah Lake Irrigation Co., and 
Sevier Land & Water Co. 

Clarence Jacobs, Hydrographic Engineer in 
United States Service. 

Irving Jacobs, Assistant Engineer Utah Lake 
Irrigation Co. 

Kenneth Borg, Practicing Engineer. 

D O C'f DTi£J, H*ft'WYERg 

E. G. Hughes, Provo. 

Alfred A. Robinson, City Physician, Ogden. 

Heber E. Robinson, Practicing Physician. 

American Fork, Utah. 
J. Wm. Robinson, Practicing Attorney, Provo, 

Utah. 

JPHmSWIM Z33KE3 <OT IHEGSEIR 

A. T. Rasmussen, Cornell University. 
Martin M. Larsen, Kansas City. 
Elmer Miller, Berkeley, California. 
Henry Rose, Chicago University. 
Paul Miner, Berkeley. California. 
Samuel Baird, University of Utah. 
George L. Luke, Chicago University. 
George G. Meldrum, University of Utah. 
James B. Tucker, Cornell University. 
George W. Worthen, Berkeley. California. 
D. R. Brimhall, Columbia University, X. Y. 

Arthur Beeley of the class of 1912 has re- 
cently been appointed as Emigration Agent for 
the European Mission. 



^VMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



With fuzzy cheek and muddy feet, 

TheFreshies saunter down the street. 

Their colored sucks speak loudly; 

But not so loudly as themselves. 

For they have much to say. 

In wi >rds ; 

They know nut what it is to flunk, 

As yet. 

Hut in the gray dawn of the year 

'Twill different be. 

You see. 

The grinds do then begin. 

Willi silent fife and muffled drum 
Along the street the "Sophies" come. 
Despair is written on the face, 
All mirth has vanished. In its place- 
Stands gloom without a ray of light. 
Thev see a bunch of stiff exams. 
Ami two more years of solid crams. 
And shudder. 

No more a smile flits oe"r the face. 
For it the "profs"' have banished, 
And in its place 
A sour scowl is plastered. 
Tis wisdom's look, but far too sore 
To deck the struggling sophomore. 



With lady fair, in gown so sweet. 

Comes the Junior down the street. 

He worries not. 

For in the months that just have fled, 

His heart has sped. 

And, too, his worry. 

Cramming long has ceased to be 

His main concern. 

The Junior "prom" and fetes e'lite. 

Make now his happiness complete. 

In sombre gown and mortar board 

Glides along the Senior hoard, 

Omnisciently. 

In stride and gesture quite severe, 

As monks of Rome. 

And to the folk at home 

A bluff they run, that's going some. 

But, after all is said and done, 

For fun. 

One sees that up and up, 

Thev've surely come ; 

A ml now prepare 

To do the bister things. 



%/iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiii win" iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu# 



#\, W)©©Mj ©aa t 



"Y," says Hinnesy, "I wuz a radin' in 
th' Whoite and Blue th' other day and 
wuz a commentin' on th' sinsible articles 
it contained, frum the fact that it is idited 
by a Sthudent Body organization uv an 
iddicational institution, whin all uv a sud- 
dent Oi came acrost the argifications 
about the imblim awarded to honor-min. 

Oi am iver moinclful uv the fact that 
the howly jumpers and the pole revolters 
an' sich loike should receave some recom- 
pense, but why they should forinst direct 
their special attinshuns toward th' nixt 
to th' lasht litter uv th' alphabit Oi'm at 
a loss to ascertain unless it is typical us 
an inverted athlete doin' th' hoigh hur- 
dles. 

There's Joseph W.(ith) Freckleson, 
Henry Tweedle de broad Jumpsky Jones, 
Athel, who has baseball Fitz-gerald, 
Hal-oween ze Tromboneovitch, J.B. Con- 
Sumsion, Yern Greentimber, James Pot- 
atopit ( Sellers ) , and members of the 
Demothsenes Club, who spake for thim- 
selves and all their friends, who appre- 
ciate the fact that they have "Y" sweat- 
ers to kape frum freezin' to death in the 
winter and who'd naturally fail warrum 
toward the token." 

"Did vez notice that mon who just 
wint by." sez Hinnesy. 

"Oi did thot." sez Oi. 

"Well," sez he. "sure an' he gets over 
the sod. He usually roides a blue whale, 
but whin in a hurry he walks to town, at- 
tinds to his business, waits fur th' boike 
to catch up to him and then roides back. 
He presoides uver a departhment uv th' 
school which taches a mon to moind some- 
body else's business and at th' same toime 
be mindin' his own. He wuz decaived 
into investin' sum of his money in the im- 
blim, and thin they wur quarantined as 
bein' too significant fur the ondistin- 
guished to flaunt on their coat lapels. 




Xixt comes a statemint fr'm the viking 
uv the Sthudent Body, Anders Einarson, 
who thinks we should not be ultra par- 
tikler. "What's the difference," sez he, 
"whether just a part uv us wear thim or 
whether all uv us duz. The imblim has 
become commonplace with us, anyway. 
The Departmint uv Corrylated Arts has 
embroidered this particular monevgram 
on the faculty pillars on the rustrum, and 
this patriotic Sthudent Body, over which 
Oi have the honor to presoide, even ta- 
tooed it upon the bosom uv mother na- 
ture, and whin they discovered the error 
uv their way, tried to cuver it up wid 
whitewash. 

"Who is this mon Wilson," sez Hin- 
nesy, "it can't be Prisident Winrow Wil- 
son ?" 

"No," sez Oi, "sure an he's the ix-pris- 
ident uv the Sthudent Body, who used his 
official powers uv office to develop his in- 
dividual powers of spache, and thus with- 
out any cost whatever to hisself, devel- 
oped the indumitable gift uv oratory 
which baffled the ingredients uv the Uni- 
versity uv California, and won the de- 
cision uver the lawyers uv the divorce 
courts uv Nevada. Through his gradua- 
tin' this year, he will lose his monopoly 
on this line uv activities, which will no 
doubt be a good thing, as some one else 
will have a chanct, becuz he already has 
enough "Y" pins in his possession to lave 
one to ach uv his decindants down to the 
third gineration." 

"There's no good raisin why honors 
should not be bestowed upon organiza- 
tions as well as individuals. This would 
make for a greater communitive inthrest. 
Then, if this be the case, why should not 
the 1914s H. S. recave a "Y" pinnant for 
its victory last Founder's Day, when they 
won that big race?" sez Oi. 

"What race," sez Hinnesy. 

"Why, the Mill Race," sez Oi. 








TC'y 

OH E.ASY ^ EXAMPLE ۥ 




BOARD OF CONTROL 

146 




STUDENT BODY OFFICERS 
147 




BANYAN STAFF 

148 




OUR DEEATORS. D. J. WILSON AND CHAS. SCHWENCKE, AND THEIR 
NEVADA OPPONENTS 




OUR DEBATORS AGAIXST THE U. of U., ROLAND TIETJEN AND 

CLARENCE BAIRD 
OUR DEBATORS AGAINST A. C. U„ ALDOUS DIXON AND LE ROY HAFEN 



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B. V. U. DRAMATIC CLUB 

152 






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•MISTER - ' GIRLS 
153 





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OFFICERS OF THE "ASSOCIATED COLLEGIANS" 



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This is an organization comprising all College Students. In the past school year 
it has been recognized as an official part of the Brigham Young University Student 
Body and has been given representation on the Board of Control. 

The College Faculty and Students have been entertained twice each month, 
throughout most of the year, in the Maeser Assembly Hall, by the Collegians. The 
discussions of the Presidents' Message to Congress, the Currency Bill and the Mexican 
Situation, before the men of the Institution as well as many towns-people, have brought 
fortli much favorable comment. The need of the College Students for permanent 
headquarters has been supplied — the club room is one of the most handsome in the uni- 
versity. The Collegians encouraged the building of the splendid tripple tennis court on 
the hill, pledged themselves to donate the labor upon it and gave it financial assistance. 

The Associated Collegians' Organization is the nucleus of a College Student Body. 
Its home is the Maeser Memorial. 










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MASTER BUILDERS 

155 





J. EDWARD JOHXSON 
Winner of Washington Birthday Oration 








rj arftsjtk RA1RD 
Winner of Thanksgiving Oratorical Con- 
test 




ALGAE EGGERTSEN 
Winner of Peace Essay Prize at N. E. A. 



AFTON ALLRED 
'"Queen of the May" 



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THE DESIGNING- i 

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INTER-COLLEGIATE BASKET BALL CHAMPIONS, 1914 

Jones, W. Parkinson, Roberts (Director), Egbert, L. Greenwood 
Chipman, Halvorsen, V. Greenwood (Captain), Taylor, Bowman 






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INTER-COLLEGIATE 
BASE BALL 
CHAMPIONS, 1914 






THREE 

RETIRING 

"CHAMPS" 

Baird 

Greenwood 

Halvorson 




1XTKR-COLLEGIATE CHAMPION WRESTLING TEAM, 1914 
B. Harris, Webb (Coach), Mnrdock, M. Harris, Lambert, Turner 




ENTER-CLASS BASKET BALL CHAMPIONS, 1914 
Hales, V. Greenwood, Davis, W. Parkinson, K. Parkinson, Nicholes, Clark 




INTER-CLASS TRACK CHAMPIONS, 1914 
Hales, Stout, Anderson, Wanless, Taylor, Page, Nicholes, Davis, Baird, Jacobsen. 
Gubler, Gardner 




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Einar Anderson President 

Merline Roylance First Vice President 

Lester Taylor Second Vice President 

Fernanda Eyring Secretary and Historian 

E. H. Holt Treasurer 

David J. Wilson Debating Manager 

W. X. Parkinson Basket Ball Manager 

B. Y. Baird Track Manager 

Athel Fitzgerald Baseball Manager 

Barry Harris Wrestling Manager 

Marion Harris Tennis Manager 

Robert Hinckley Cheer Master 

C. E. McClellan Editor 

J. Edward Johnson Manager 

Bent F. Larsen Staff Artist 

Merline Roylance Associate Editor 

David J. Wilson Associate Editor 

Wesley Taylor Associate Editor 

Delbert Webb Special 

Marion Harris Soecial 

Elsie Talmage Soecial 

E. H. Holt Faculty Representative 

E. H. Eastmond Faculty Representative 

Alice Reynolds Faculty Representative 



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Charles Schwencke Editor 

James A. Bullock Business Manager 

Leona Billings Vssociate Editor 

K. X. Parkinson \ssociate Editor 

Hattie Walker Special 

W, J. Snow Faculty 

Lois Smith Society 

E. L. Roberts Athletics 

1 ). J. Wilson Debating 

Leona Worsley Locals 

Merle Snyder Staff Artist 

1 >aisen Ross Staff Artist 

Geo. H. Brimhall President of School 

Jos. B. Keeler First Counselor 

Edwin S. Hinckley Second Counselor 

E. L. Roberts Physical Director 

Einar Anderson President Student Body 

Merline Roylance .. 1st Vice Pres. Student Body 
Lester Taylor.. ..2nd Vice Pres. Student Body 
Fernando Eyring.. Sec. & Hist. Student Body 
H. A. Dixon. .. President Associated Collegians 

David J. Wilson President Senior Class 

Wayne Hales President Sophomore Class 

H. R. Atkin President Freshman Class 

Weston Oaks President 14s H. S. 

Karl G. Udall Presdient 15s H. S. 

Leland Redd President 16s H. S. 

Lyal Stringham President 17s H. S. 





mt PEOPLE DONT pelieve- 

IN EDUCATION 



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Provo Drug Co. 



We carry a complete line of STATIONERY, 
CANDIES and DRUG SUNDRIES. 

Mail orders and prescriptions receive our 
careful attention. 



Provo Drug Co. 



Long JVear and Short Price 

These are points which most men consider 

when they purchase clothes. Probably that's 

the reason our business keeps growing. 

FLETCHER & THOMAS 

Up-to-date Clothiers and Haberdashers 



ALBA DENTISTS 

'"Better Work; Less Money" 

Full Set of Teeth $8.00 Gold Crowns $5.00 

We GUARANTEE to extract all 
Teeth WITHOUT ANY PAIN 

PHONE 637 




AQuicfc 

Electric 
Breakfas1>a 



SUMMER TIME IS 
ELECTRIC TIME 

You'll find much to interest 
you in the large stock of 
Electric Apparatus we carry 



Utah Power & Light Co. 




Manufacturing Plant of Utah Valley Gas & Power Company 

THE GAS COMPANY 

HILE a comparatively recent addition to the list of Provo enterprises, the 
Gas Company has already established itself in the business foreground 
/%/ a- a live, progressive and thoroughly dependable institution, which, by 
wJi^B^ki ' ts vigorous business method has injected into the public utility field of 
Provo a new force resulting in increased activity productive of general 
good to the community. 

The Company's manufacturing plant is conveniently located in the southeast part 
of the city, with splendid trackage facilities. All of the apparatus, including gas benches, 
exhausters, tar extractors, scrubbers, condensers, compressors, station meter, gover- 
nors, boilers, gas holder, and high pressure storage tanks, is of the very best and most 
modern type throughout. The operation is to a great extent automatic. The capacity 
of the plant is sufficient to supply all of the needs of Provo and vicinity for many 
years to come. 

The management of the Company at present lies in the capable hands of Mr. Fred 
W. Freese, Gas Engineer of Fort Wayne, Indiana, whose long experience in the build- 
ing and operating of gas works justifies the belief that the management of this Com- 
pany is second to none. The local plant is the fifteenth complete gas works which Mr. 
Freese has constructed, among the others being Edwardsville, Illinois, La Porte and 
Connersville. Indiana. Escanaba and Cheboygan, Michigan. 

Ably seconding Mr. Freese's efforts in the operating and developing of the Com- 
pany's business is Mr. A. F. Beringer of Salt Lake City, the Secretary of the Com- 
pany, and Mr. Freese's first assistant. 

These men, despite their comparatively short residence in the City, have already 
established an enviable reputation among the business men with whom they have come 
into contact. Their straightforward methods, and the polite and courteous manner in 
which they are conducting their business has made friends of each one of the Com- 
pany's hundreds of patrons. 

The rapidity with which the people of the City are availing themselves of the many 
conveniences afforded by the use of gas, is ample evidence and assurance of the growth 
and prosperity of this splendid institution. 



KNIGHT TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $303,000.00 
PROVO, UTAH 

Conducts all branches of modern banking. 

Pays 4% interest on Savings Deposits, compounded semi-annually. 

Safe Deposit Boxes for rent at $1.00 per year. 

United States Depositary for Postal Savings Funds. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 
Jesse Knight, President R. E. Allen, Vice President and Cashier 

F. G. Warnick, Assistant Cashier 



J. Wm. Knight 
O. C. Beebe 



R. R. Irvine, Jr. 
W. Lester Mangum 
W. O. Creer 



W. W. Armstrong 
F. W. Taylor 




Bopben House 

J. W. DANGERFIELD, Prop. 

Steam Heated Rooms 50c and 75c 

OPPOSITE OPERA HOUSE 

47-65 N. First West Street 

PROVO, UTAH 




Every good time is a 
good time to 

KODAK 



Add to the pleasure of your vacation by taking pictures of the places and 
people that interest you. 

Everything for photography at our store. Let us show you how simple 
it is to take pictures the Kodak way. 

You press the button, we do the rest. 

OLSON & HAFEN 

Photographers, Kodaks and Supplies, Expert Kodak Finishing 
PROVO, - UTAH 




The Students Supply 
Association 










Is endeavoring to furnish Y 
Students with the supplies they 
require, at a considerable dis- 
count. Expressions of patrons 
to the management have given 
us encouragement 



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WE SHALL TRY TO DO EVEN 
"BETTER NEXT YEAR 



1907 



FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK 

PROVO, - UTAH 



1914 J 



"Safety and Service" 



The steady growth of our business is evidence of the high stand- 
ard of our service. 

"Deposits March 9, 1907, $ 41,186.84 
Deposits March 9, 1914, 412,613.40 

Sound and progressive business methods in the bank's manage- 
ment; the active participation and co-operation of well-known busi- 
ness men in the conduct of its affairs; prompt and courteous attention 
to the wants of our customers and a desire to satisfy them. These 
things account for its steady growth. 

We wish to extend our service to all. It will be to your advan- 
tage and to our own. 



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OFFICERS 

T. N. Taylor, President 

John F. Bennett, Vice President 

J. D. Dixon, Cashier 

Arnold Dixon, Asst. Cashier 



DIRECTORS 

T. X. Taylor, John F. Bennett, 



James A. Loveless, 

J .D. Dixon, 

S. P. Eggertsen, 

Joseph S. 



Robert Bee, 
J. J. Craner, 
Andrew Knudsen, 

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THE 

PRINCESS 
THEATRE 

JOHN ■B. ASH TON 

Manager 

Provo 9 s 
Picture 
Palace 



High Class Photo Plays and 
Music. 




7499 \ 



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vines 

The big Dry 
Goods Store 

Carries 

everything in 

Dry Goods, 
Shoes, and 
Ladies' and 
Children's 
Ready-to- 

Wear 
Clothes. 

Send us your 

Mail Orders. 

IVe prepay the 

delivery charges. 



R. R. IRVINE & SON 



45-51 Academy Ave. 



Provo, Utah 




Mfg. of 
Architectural 
Sheet Metal, 
Sky-light, Roof- 
ing, Guttering. 

The H. G. 

BlumenthalCo. 

PHONE 109 



PLUMBING 

Modern Steam and Hot Water Heating 





W. H. Freshwater 

HARDWARE AND 
SPORTING GOODS 

136 W. Center St., - Provo, Utah 



JESSIE M. HARMON J. W. DUNN 

President Sec'y and Manager 

Utah Timber 
and Coal 
Company 

( Incorporated ) 

All the best kinds of 

COAL, 

LUMBER, MINING TIMBERS, 

CORDWOOD AND KINDLING 

Malthoid Roofing, Portland Cement 

"The Square Deal" guaranteed to 
every person. 

Down-town Office: State Bank of 
Provo. 

160 W. Fifth North St., Provo, Utah 
Telephone 232 



Don't hesitate to come 
here and just look around! 

Don't think that we buy from every 
drummer who comes along. We look 
at everything but we seldom buy. 
Drop in at noon or any time and just 
browse around our store. Your time will 
be well spent and, incidentally, you will 
have a high opinion of 



Styleplus<*|7 
Clothes Ml 

"**The same price the world over." 

We make a smaller profit but we sell more clothes. 
You pay less money and get more value. Because 
we believe in this plan we have become the 
Styleplus store. 

Fashioned up to the minute. All-wool fabrics 
finely finished. Come in and look them over. 

Special styles for young and a big 
selection for all men. 



S&HWAB 



BEEBE LUMBER CO. 







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WHOLESALE and RETAIL 
DEALERS IN 

'Doors, Windows, 

Lumber, 

Shingles, Lath, 

Cement, Roofing, 

Plaster and 

'Builder's 

Hardware 

mill work our 
specialty 

Phones 104 and 105 



THE WM. M. ROYLANCE CO. 

Are Always in the Market to Buy or Sell 

FRUITS AND PRODUCE 

And It Will Be to Your Advantage to See Them Before Doing your Trading 

WE ARE UTAH'S LARGEST INDEPENDENT HANDLERS, AND 
OUR PRICES ARE ALWAYS RIGHT 

PROVO, UTAH 



Ice Cream, Sherbets, 
Candies and 
Baking Goods 



Best Place for 
Refreshments in City 





JESSE KNIGHT 



JOHN H. McEWAN 



Independent Coal 
and Produce Co. 

SPRING CANYON, 
ABERDEEN AND 
OTHER POPULAR 

COALS 

Lump, Nut, Domestic Lump and Slack, Kindling Wood 

OPPOSITE WOOLEN MILLS 

PHONE 459 



Our work includes all kinds of Printing — 
Newspaper, Book and Job, also Binding — up- 
to-date and with dispatch 



We Make a Specialty of School Work 




The Columbia Theatre 

JOHN B. ASHTON, Manager 

Completed in 1914 Specializing in High Class Productions 

Vaudeville and Feature Pictures 



Everything the Newest, Most Stylish and Dependable in 

LADIES' SUITS, COATS AND DRESSES. 
LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S SHOES, in all the leading styles- 
Colonials, Tangos, Mary Janes, Sandals and Pumps. 

DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS positively the best for least money in 
the intermountain region. 

THE BIG, BUSY, POPULAR STORE 

FARRER'S 



"Without a love for Books, the richest man is poor." 

GOOD BOOKS ARE GOOD FRIENDS 

A hook that every young man should read is "We Young Men." by 
Wegener. Price 70c postpaid. 

"Why Worry?" is the book for the girls. $1.00; by mail, $1.10. 
The Books we sell are worth while. 

DESERET SUNDAY SGHOOL UNION BOOK STORE 

44 East South Temple, Salt Lake City. 




J^BjqV Halftones, Designs, Cartoons, 
Etc., Etc. 

All our Plates are etched by the famous 
"Acid Blast" double depth etching. Pro- 
cess controlled in this territory exclusively 
by us. 

SCHOOL ENGRAVING IS OUR 

SPECIALTY-SEE US NOW About 

NEXT YEAR'S CONTRACT 



THE 

GILES 



BOYD PARK 
BUILDING 




Your Best Interests Are Ours 



(BM^gGgHQ HAT is why we spend a g T eat deal of time thinking about 

lU-^lR^S^ your wants. Our volume of business enables us to offer prices 

^d©BQS§? below the average and our stock is great enough to give you 

0)i^=^SJ a wide range of choice 

We have nine complete departments, namely: Furniture, Music, Car- 
pet, Drapery, Dry Goods, Men's and Boys' Furnishings, Jewelry, Crock- 
ery, Hardware. 

Taylor Bros. Company 

THE BIG DEPARTMENT STORE 
Where every penny invested pays big dividends in satisfaction. 





PROVO FOUNDRY and 
MACHINE CO., Inc. 

Thos. F. Pierpont, Manager 

General Foundry and Machine Work 

Mining Cars, Iron and Brass Castings, 

Heavy Sheet Iron Work, 

Engine and Boiler Repairs, 

Modern Plumbing and Heating 

Automobile Sale, Repair and Supply Garage 
PHONE 77 PROVO, UTAH 



OUR TELEPHONE IS No. 2 

You need no longer to take time and energy 
to do all your shopping in person. Telephone 
us your order. We deliver anything, any time 

The Provo Hardware Co. 

120 CENTER STREET 



PROVO COMMERCIAL 
& SAVINGS BANK 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00 



OFFICERS 
Reed Smoot, President 

C. E. Loose, Vice-President 
J. T. Farrer, Cashier 

J. A. Buttle, Asst. Cashier 

DIRECTORS. 

Reed Smoot C. E. Loose 

Geo. Taylor, Sr. L. Holbrook 

VV. L. Biersach R. R. Irvine 



4% INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS 



U. S. Depositary for Postal Savings 




HOTEL ROBERTS WD ?°S TS,r 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

Special Students' Breakfast and Lunch, 35 Cents 

200 S. ACADEMY AVENUE, PROVO 



Artificial 
Fruit 

Is a true description of 

They being marie from identically the same substances that nature uses in building real fruits 
in tiie SUN-LIT. SAXITARY FACTORY at Provo, Utah. "The Candy City." 

Send us a 2c stamp and dealer's name, for mailing you a beautiful calendar. 

SAY STARTUP'S ALWAYS 




Candies 




The Wall Paper and Paint 
Store that carry the very best 
of everything in their line, 
have moved to No. 33 East 
Center St. Picture framing a 
specialty. We solicit your 
trade. 



JOHNSON PAINT & GLASS CO. 

PROVO, - UTAH 



TAKE SOLID COMFORT 

in one of our Porch Rockers, 
, or better still, try one of 




our Porch Swings 



ROBINSON BROS. & 
BARTON CO. 

YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD 



Provo Steam 
Laundry 

AL WA rs 
RELIABLE 

375 W. Center Phone 164 

J. N. GULICK, Prop. 



Everything for the Lawn 

INE lawn grass seed, 
lawn fertilizer, lawn 
mowers, lawn rakes, 
dandelion pullers, lawn 
hose and sprinklers. In fact, there is 
no reason why you should not have a 
beautiful lawn. Just call and see us. 

Carpenter Seed Co. 

Provo, Utah 





GRADUATES 

Remember we are dealers in Balances, 
Microscopes, Crushers, Thermometers, 
Glassware and Chemicals, Laboratory 
Supplies as well as Heavy Hardware 
and Machinery 

Your patronage is cordially solicited 

The Mine & Smelter Supply Co. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



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The Difference 



All Camera pictures are photo- 
graphs, but not all Camera 
pictures are good photographs. 
There's where ours are different. 
They are all good. 



Larson & Nygren Studio 

32 WEST CENTER 



DESERET NEWS 

BOOK STORE 

THE LEADING BOOK CONCERN 

Text Book Depository 
School Furniture School Stationery 

Write us for Literature and Prices 

6 MAIN STREET - ' - SALT LAKE CITY 








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