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Full text of "The banyan"

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LIBRARY 

Brigham Young University 




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Gift of 

LeRoy R, & ■^•nn W. I-Iafen 



378.'o5 
Call B22 
No. 1915 



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TO the man who thinks of the needs 
of his institution; 
To the man whose acts inspire 
patrons, teachers, and students to do 
their best for the good of the school ; 

To the man who appreciates rcspon- 
sibiUty and the confidence that others 
place in him; 

To President George H. Brimhall, 
whose greatness comes, partly, from the 
lift which he has given our B. Y. U., we 
cheerfully dedicate the 1915 Banyan. 
B. Y. U. STUDENT BODY. 



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College Life 




THERE are two attitudes toward col- 
lege life. First, there is the attitude 
that it is a period of preparation for 
the life to come. Second, there is the atti- 
tude that it is life itself. 

To me, college life is life. Nothing will 
come later that will be sweeter or more beau- 
tiful. Nothing will come later that will re- 
quire a more liberal share of my vitality and 
my interest. Nothing will come later that 
will demand so much of the man in me, as 
these problems of the class room. The joy of 
accomplishment will never be keener, and if 
I have been reared aright, the gall of failure 
never more bitter. 

College life widens horizons, — it illu- 
mines pathways. It stimulates ambition; it 
embarrasses desires for the mediocre. It 
makes one yearn to get under things, that 
the lifting may be more effective. 

If this isn't living, what is? 

EARL JAY GLADE. 









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Stray Gathering 



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SOME of us came to school the very first week. There was Talmage, 
Bradley, Mitchell, Haynie, Evans, Randall, Booth, Lyman, Herbert, 
Thornton, and Blake, a real jolly bunch. 

One day we went for a walk with Hanchett as our leader. It was in the 
Autumn when the Ivie and Sweet Williams were prettiest An-der-son shone 
brightest. 

Our path led past the Maesar and came to-Ward the foothills where the 
Haws and Woodbury grow. One of the boys had his Gunn, but could find 
nothing to shoot except some Brown Beans ■which soon became tiresome. 

Soon we had to Cross-by a ravine in which ran a little Brook, but the 
water was Luke warm, besides there were eggs in it which were old enough 
to Hatch, so it did not o-Kerr to us to drink it. The boys caught some fish 
and nothing would do until we had a Frei with our Hugh-Chamberlain in 
charge. Before it was done a Call came from the rocks above that a party 
had found a Young Knight who had fallen because of Slack communications 
between him and his guide. His clothes needed a Taylor so he was at once 
turned over to the Marshall who procured a Steed with a Cord-on and con- 
ducted him to town. 

When we came to the Snow line we heard Lind-say "Campbells are 
coming !" We all looked and saw any number of sons : Jen-son, Han-son, 
Nel-son, Knud-son, Berge-son, and Swen-son, but only one Campbell. 

Then someone said, "Who is going to the top of the peak?" and the 
answer echoed, "Lew-is, Curt-is, Harr-is, Franc-is, Dav-is." Quickly the 
retort came "What an a-Sumsion to make. It must be only Hir-schi, and 
you will have to Sho-walter." 

All undaunted by these remarks, the stalwarts, Stalman, Jackman, and 
the Clarks, Gillespie and BarkduU said they would Russel a means of get- 
ting to the top even if it took Riches. 

At this point one of the girls became Moody and though we did 
Warn-er against the Harm-on a mountain alone, she struck off up the 
ravine. She had not gone far when a Daw in the bushes frightened her 
and she came running Down with face white as a Miller. 

Smith and Hafen said they would investigate and to our surprise a 
large Stagg bounded past us. Before we could think he was gone, so we 
said, "We do not want to kill him Dew-ey?" Then everything went wrong; 
the water would not Boyle, the Potter would not work, neither would the 
dog Bark-er Gardner dig a hole, for he said he was a Free-man. 

So Snell and Boyden took Magleby, Dalby, Brockbank and Stevens, 
And-rus(h)-ed down the hill until they were ready to drop with ex- Austin. 

On our arrival home we no longer felt bewilderment or backwardness 
of the ordinary Freshmen, but were determined to make the class known in 
the history of the school. 




13 





THE great chemist. Life, scratched her head. In her laboratory, the 
B. Y. U., she had a difficult problem to solve. One hundred and 
thirty-nine green substances for analysis, each with a different com- 
position. They must be tested for energy, ambition, and stick- 
to-it-iveness. 

After treating each with a few c. c. of Music, Art, History, or Educa- 
tion and Philosophy, as the case demanded, all were placed in the great 
beaker, "The Freshman Class of 1913-1914" and general treatment was 
begun. 

The soluble, or the inefficient and faint-hearted, were to be separated 
from the insoluble. This must be done by throwing them into solution and 
filtering them out. To the entire mass was added a few c. c. of Homesick- 
ness, a little Discouragement, a few c. c. of dilute Lack of Funds, a few 
drops of Undesire and numerous other compounds. This process was con- 
tinued until the Spring of 1914. The dhemist now stirred the mass vigor- 
ously with the glass rod. Commencement Examination, and poured it into 
the filtering funnel, then stepped back by Father Time to await results. 

By Fall the soluble and insoluble had separated. The residue of the 
Freshmen filtration was the Sophomore Class of 1914-15. 

The great chemist looked upon this residue with pride and satisfaction. 
Over forty had proved insoluble. These she carefully placed in the various 
beakers as before and again began individual treatment. She must make 
sure that none of the soluble had remained and must test them aJl for 
genuine worth. Into some beakers she added concentrated Lack of Funds, 
into others she poured Offers of Positions, and into others that most sol- 
vent of all her chemicals. Matrimonial Tendencies. 

During this treatment the different members were at times brought to- 
gether in groups and treated collectively. When bathed in a solution of 
School and Social activities they were found to be vigorous and enthu- 
siastic. Shaking them vigorously in a Sleigh Ride, or Street Car Ride only 
helped to weld them together. Each time that they were brought together 
their resistant power was increased by heating them over the bunsen flame, 
Class Spirit. 

AU of these treatments only served to unite them more strongly. 

The great chemist's work for this year is nearly finished. She has 
placed the forty-six members into a great vessel and is now stirring them 
with the rod, Ambition and Hope. Expert scientists of the laboratory say 
that when next October comes 'round for the chemist's report, every Sopho- 
more will be here to a man, ready to stand any further test that the great 
chemist has in store for him. 




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30 




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A Toast to the Future 

FOR the first time in the history of our institution 
the Juniors, as a class, have become important in 
school activities. Although they have been 
quiet and unassuming they have contributed some- 
thing toward the life, vigor, and enthusiasm which 
has prevailed in the Student Body organization. 

Under the leadership of Frank Beckstead the class 
reached a high stage of civilization, but he allied him- 
self at the end of the first semester with the Seniors 
and the guiding reins of the class were picked up by 
Clarence Baird. With the aid of Merline Roylance 
and Mabel Reynolds, Clarence has steered the class 
again into the path of Success and Progression. 

The Junior class has held some rousing good class 
meetings and social functions and has furnished its 
quota of contestants in intercollegiate meets, and 
officials in Student Body organizations. 

Each member of the class is going forward with 
a firm determination to occupy a dignified position in 
the senior class of 1915-16, and each is laying a broad 
foundation with the hope of overcoming all obstacles 
which might be a hindrance to his success. 

Each member of the class has this to say : "Here's 
to you, year of 1915-16! May the Brigham Young 
University graduate a larger, better, and more loyal 
Senior class than ever before in its history. 



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MERLINE ROYLANCE 
Provo. 

Major — Home Economics. 
Second vice-president. 

A young lady with the 
proper combination of good 
cooking abilities and musical 
talent. 

"Ah! Love is wiser than 
ambition." 



MABEL REYNOLDS 
Springville 

Major — Household Arts. 
First vice-president. 

A quiet, unassuming girl of 
high ideals and big purpose. 
Would be a second Jane 
Adams. 



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BARRY HARRIS 
Cardston, Canada 

Major — Agriculture. 

Was wrestling manager 1913- 

14. 

Born in Mexico, reared in 
Canada and educated in 
Provo. 

Is determined to wear a 
Cap and Gown. 



JOSEPH NICHOLES 
American Fork 

Major — Physics. 
Teacher and student. 

Helps students solve alge- 
bra. "His wife's going to the 
country." He wants to be 
right. 




NEWTON JACKSON 
Provo 

Major — Biology. 

A keen rival of Frank Beck- 
stead for first prize in the 
year's beauty contest. 

His aim is to get his M. D. 
and a Ford. 



WAYNE HALES 
Eureka, Utah 

Major — Physics. 

Three times winner of the 

cross-country run. 

"Y" man in basketball and 
track. 

Ambition — To be mayor of 
Midway. 





47 








FRANK WINN 
Nephi, Utah 

Major — English. 

Motto : "Be true to thyself 
and it follows as the night the 
day, thou canst not be false to 
any man." 



PARLEY WOOLSEY 

Escalante 

"Y" man in debating. 

Delights in polemic and 
forensic efforts. 

Ambition — To surpass 
Bryan in statesmanship and 
equal Woodrow. 







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G. OSCAR RUSSELL 
Provo 

Major — Modern Languages. 

Undoubtedly the biggest 
man in school ; speaks seven 
languages and handles the 
class funds (?). His only 
ambition — to master Chinese. 



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HIAL HALES 
Spanish Fork 

Major — Agriculture. 

An ex-Deutscher. Thinks 
Spanish Fork is the center of 
the universe, and hopes to 
see it the metropolis of 
America. 









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FRANK GOULD 
Monroe, Utah 

Major — Physics. 

A small man with a mighty 
brain. An ardent follower of 
Doctor Fletcher. Ambition 
— To count the molecules in 
a rainbow hue. 



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ROBERT HENRY HINCKLEY 
Prove, Utah 

Major — Foreign Languages. 
The Kaiser's plenipoten- 
tiary. Spends his time de- 
fending Germany and visit- 
ing Sanpete. Will be mar- 
ried in June. 






A Parting Word 




WE are leaving college with a spirit of happiness because 
it is an epoch in our lives, but we sorrow at bidding our 
Alma Mater adieu. The adventures of lifes journey 
will but bring to our minds memories of the White and Blue. 

As we arrive at the mile post, "Graduation," we see the goal 
toward which we are striving, receding into the distance as does 
the imagined lake to the thirsty traveler of the desert. The 
world needs men and women who have broad minds, men and 
women who can see and supply the needs of their weaker 
brothers, and men and women who are honest with themselves 
— for as the poet says, "If a man is true to himself he cannot be 
false to any man." 

Efficiency is our motto, and we know that if we act well our 
part we must put ourselves in sympathy with our fellow-man 
and learn to appreciate the good in him. We must have the cour- 
age to face ingratitude, to live the right in spite of the scoffs of 
those about us, and cultivate a love for all. 

We have tried during our college life to make ourselves effi- 
cient, and it is the desire of each class member to become pro- 
ficient in whatever practical vocation he may choose. There are 
those of our members who will be heard of in legislating and 
enacting laws for the people; there are some who will spend their 
time in delving deep into the sciences to learn more of the work- 
ings of nature there are others of us who will be useful as 
teachers, shaping the lives of thousands and helping them 
through difficulties. A number of our class members will be- 
come professional in Art, and Music, or in surgical and medical 
work, and no doubt some will become sons of the soil to toil with 
the class of people who form the backbone of civilization. 

We as the class of 1915 are going to be found among those 
who are pushing to the front, and in acknowledgement of the 
lift which we have received from the dear old B. Y. U. we are 
going to carry with us its high ideals and make them a part of 
the world outside. 




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O. F. CALL 

(Maori) 
Rigby, Idaho 

Major — Biology. 
President Senior Class. 

Three years in New Zea- 
land mission. A scrapper. 
The biggest little man in 
school. 

Will annex Miss Stowell 
and become a physician. 



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CHLOE PALMER 
Provo, Utah 

Major — English. 

Ex-member of Emery Stake 
Academy. A woman who 
really thinks. Will teach in 
St. George next year. 



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GLEN JOHNSON 
Provo, Utah 

Major — Art. 

Vice-president Senior Class. 

Always wears a smile. She 

can mix well and at the same 

time mind her own business. 



HYRUM HARRIS 
(Der Grasse) 
Provo, Utah 

Major — Sociology and Econ- 
omics. 

President of Associated Col- 
legians. 

Vice-president Senior Class. 
German missionary for 

three years. Rival of Eugene 

V. Debs. 



55 











VERNIE O. KNUDSEN 

(Scandahoovian) 

Provo, Utah 

Major — Physics and Mathe- 
matics. 
Class officer. 

Vice-president of Associated 
Collegians. 
Modern Archimedes. 
Vernie is one of the pompa- 
dour tribe. 




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ORRIN BAIRD 
(Shorty) 

Major — Biology. 

A 42 C. M. gun, loaded with 
facts. Some plodder. Not 
only pushing, but getting to 
the front. 




H. R. TIETJEN 
Santaquin, Utah 

Major — Agriculture. 

Second vice-president of Stu- 
dent Body. 
Three-year intercollegiate 

debater. President Debating 

Society. 

Will probably be husband 

to Genevieve. 





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J. EDWARD JOHNSON 

(Johns) 

Benjamin, Utah 

Major — History and govern- 
ment. 

Was president of a deacon's 
quorum. 

Now Student Body president. 
Was "Banyan" manager 

1913-14. 
Will be a famous story 

teller. 




EDNA PERKLE 
Provo, Utah 

Major — English. 
Class correspondent. 

A solid, truthful, and de- 
termined student. 





ANNA DUKE 

(Winona) 

Heber, Utah 

Major — Music. 

Sung the leading roll in the 
Sun Dance opera. 

Vice-president of Asso- 
ciated Collegians in 1913-14. 

Unassuming, yet congenial 
and possesses a charming 
modesty. 





FRANK CLOVE 

(Benjamin Franklin) 

Provo, Utah 

Major — Physics and mathe- 
matics. 
"Sportin' editor of the 

White and Blue." 

The way he has of getting 

in wrong and getting out 

right, has won him many 

friends. 






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I. E. BROCKBANK 

(Judge) 
Spanish Fork, Utcih 

Major — Sociology and Econ- 
omics. 

Manager of 1915 Banyan. 
Chief judge of the Student 

Body court. "Y" sprinter "in 

those good old days." Almost 

mayor once. 




B. Y. BAIRD 

(Dad) 
Provo, Utah 

Major — Agriculture. 

Missionary to Southern 
States. Track manager. 

Honor man ; unassuming 
and on the job. Teacher of 
agriculture. 



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KARL G. MAESAR 
(Der Zweite) 
Beaver, Utah 

Major — Education. 

Three years in German mis- 
sion. Member of Dramatic 
Club. Critic grade teacher 
B. Y. U. 



VASCO TANNER 

(Scarlet) 

Fairview, Utah 

Major — Biology. 
Vice-president of Debating 

Society. 

A man with the goods, and 
a good man. President of the 
U. S. Geological Survey in 
embryo. 



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VERN GREENWOOD 

(Green) 

Central, Utah 

Major — Agriculture. 

Member of three state 
championship basketball 
teams. 

Also championship baseball 
team. 

Will teach agriculture and 
get married. 

Ambition — To equal Coach 
Roberts as coach. 



GEORGE PAGE 
Payson, Utah 

Major — Agriculture. 

Instructor of veterinary 
science. 

Possesses a big body which 
incloses a big heart. Would 
like to unravel nature. Has a 
real leaning toward books and 
malted milk. 



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WARN ALLRED 
(Fiddler) 

Fountain Green, Utah 

Major — Music. 

Wants Winona. 

Coupling a jovial and witty 
disposition with an ability to 
work makes him a "Good 
Fellow." 







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DAVID GOURLEY 

(Dave) 

Provo, Utah 

Major — Agriculture. 

Teaches in the Dixie High 
School. 

One of the old star basket- 
ball tossers of the B. Y. U. 

He is numbered among the 
priceless legacies bequeathed 
to us by the H. S. ll's. 






JACOB N. LYBBERT 
Vernal, Utah 

Major — Agriculture. 

Teaches in the Uintah Aca- 
demy. An excellent fellow 
and a good student. 

His disposition is marked 
by fairness and willingness. 




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HUGH BAXTER 

(Curly) 

Pleasant Grove, Utah 

Major — History and govern- 
ment. 

Taught one year in Cow- 
ley, Wyo. "Y" man in base- 
ball. 

Looking for a wife (Coed.) 




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HENRY OBERHANSLY 
(Hen) 

Payson, Utah 

Major — Agriculture. 

Was Principal of Payson 
Schools. Will demonstrate 
scientific farming to Joe Tay- 
lor on the Model Ranch at 
Thistle. 





STANLEY WANLESS 

(Stan) 

Lehi, Utah 

Major — Philosophy and psy- 
chology. 
Efficient and reserved. 

Every inch a philosopher. 

Always sure of his point. 





KENNETH PARKINSON 

(Parky) 

Blackfoot, Idaho 

Major — History and govern- 
ment. 

Basketball manager. 
Debated the University of 
California. A genuine politi- 
cian. 




FRANK BECKSTEAD 

(Becky) 

Provo, Utah 

Major — Biology. 

Associate justice of Stu- 
dent Body court. Was presi- 
dent of the Juniors. Is after 
the great things of life, i. e. 
"the girls." 



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Edwin S. Hinckley 



Professor Edwin S. Hinckley, who left us at the end of the 
first semester, has been for five years Dean of our College, 
for twice that length of time a counselor to President Brimhall, 
and for twenty years a member of our faculty. 

He is a reformer by nature and he now has the opportunity 
to try his principles of reformation on the unfortunates who 
have become inmates of the State Industrial School at Ogden. 

The "Banyan" wishes him success. 




69 



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THE Associated Collegians number three hundred and 
twenty-seven, an increase of twenty-seven per cent 
over last year. Our aim has been while at school to 
make our lives richer by developing our abilities for actual 
service. We believe that "knowledge is power," but also 
that it may be power for destruction as well as construction. 
To it must be added a proper alignment of life. The sweet 
wholesomeness of our associations this year in both 
intellectual and social ways demonstrates our belief in the 
fact that character, as a vital factor in life, must be added. 
The Master came in order that we might have a more abun- 
dant existence. Our hope is that every member of the asso- 
ciation will leave the world better for having lived in it; that 
we might be dynamic of spiritual regeneration in the social 
sphere to which we are called to contribute our part. Our 
hopes and efforts will ever tend toward the growth of the 
"Church Teacher's College." 



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4 




The Faculty Bunch 



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Well, of all the Banyan bunches 
That I ever tried to get, 
You're the toughest lot of fellows 
I have ever tackled yet. 
Even Keeler tried to dodge me 
And he hid his handsome face 
From the presence of the Banyan 
That provided him a place. 

Brimhall came to me quite easy, 
'Cause he knew that he was boss, 
And he had to show the others 
That his back was free from moss. 
Hinckley simply wouldn't stand it. 
So he hiked himself away 
To that reformation city 
Where he ought to stop and stay. 
Merrill then came up a-smiling. 
With his teeth all clean and white. 
For he saw a place by Brimhall 
That was velvety and bright. 

Swenson's sense of true proportion. 
And his "clear perspective view," 
"In a way," just kept me guessing 
As to what that he would do. 
Mining stocks were shot to pieces. 
And his hair was getting gray, 
And he didn't want a picture. 
If he really had to pay. 

Registrars are always busy 
Fussing round a lot of books 
And our Hayseed made me dizzy 
Trying to record his looks. 
Here he is in all his glory. 
Just as happy as can be. 
He should worry, but he doesn't, 
'Bout the grief he brought to me. 

Holt has twenty years of minutes 
Written down in second books, 



Which has made him so conceited 
That he don't care how he looks. 
I have got him in my Banyan, 
But I wish I'd left him out. 
For he "never smiled at nothin'." 
But the girlies and the trout. 

Glade — well, cut him all to pieces 
And he'll make another race. 
That would cause this one of Adam's 
To look silly in the face. 
He's the "It" of all creation, 
He's a whirlwind set on fire. 
And the one redeeming feature 
Of the bunch that I admire. 

Dr. Fletcher has discovered 
That the whirligig of life 
Is a lot of lectrocutions 
■Dancing in a deadly strife. 
In the city of Chicago, 
Where he won immortal fame. 
All the highest marks of honor 
Punctured passes through his name. 
I have got him in my Banyan, 
Well, I got him — look and see 
He's no "waser" nor an "iser". 
But a "one" that's going to be. 

I could tell you of some others 

That are in this Banyan Book, 

But I'll simply point my finger, 

And invite you all to look. 

Some are fresh and young and handsome, 

Other ones are old and gray, 

Thus I found them and present them 

As they look and act today. 

They have caused me lots of trouble. 

But I ran them in at last. 

If they'll "face" me in the future, 

I'll forgive them for the past. 



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IN MEMORIAM 



Twice has the grim reaper, Death, exacted toll from the 
Student Body during the present year. 

Heyward Marshall, one of six brothers, passed to the 
Great Beyond January 11, 1915. Of sturdy stock, used to out- 
door life in the little village of Minersville, above all else he 
seemed to give promise of life. His death came as a shock to 
all. Perhaps no family from Beaver county is better known 
and more highly respected by faculty and Student Body alike 
than that of Heyward Marshall. Three of his sisters and two 
of his brothers have been of our number at various times. 

The death of Miss Laurel McCarty, occurring January 22, 
1915, could hardly be called a shock. None who came in close 
contact with her could fail to know that she was not long for 
this earth. Sweet and tender in her suffering, she seemed like 
some delicate flower, or like the fragile lines she traced in her 
art designs. The news of her death perhaps brought its own 
resignation, for many felt that heaven had but claimed its own. 

Several members of the faculty were class-mates of her 
father, Homer McCarty. 



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WILLIAM M. BOYLE, A. B. 

Head of the Academic Department 



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The Brigham Young University High School 




THE High school, in the various locaUties, has become 
the center of educational activity of the people. The 
great industrial masses, the bone and sinew of every 
nation ; the v^^arf and woof of society, is greatly in need of the 
uplift of an education. The toiling masses of common peo- 
ple of every nation, need an education that will enable them 
to find music and poetry in their daily toil. The appearance 
of the high school in our country is therefore one of the 
many signs that the people are coming into their own; that 
they are appreciative of their needs and are struggling up- 
ward toward light that leads to joy and happiness through 
channels heretofore traveled, but by the few. 

The ideal high school, the Academy of Brigham 
Young's day, is described in his Deed of Trust, which he 
issued when the Brigham Young Academy was founded, is 
considered to be one that should teach some branch of 
mechanism in addition to other branches of human knowl- 
edge. He therefore made it binding upon the school 
founded by him and started through his liberal gift, (the 
school which finally developed into the Brigham Young 
University) that it should teach to all its students some 
branch of useful mechanism and Theology as well as other 
branches of education. His Deed of Trust comprehended 
the developing of a school of higher education and he con- 
ceived the Academy as an institution which would qualify 
for this higher work. 

The characteristic thing of this school, is its spiritual 
atmosphere; that influence and spirit which accompanies 
all of its activities. This grows naturally out of the theologi- 
cal studies and the religious activities in which all engage. 
This in connection with all things else, received from this 
high school, qualifies the graduate to function efficiently 
among his fellows in all the activities of a complex society. 



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Officers of 15's H. S. Class 



Looking Forward 



"Duty is the keynote of success." This is our 
motto and for four years we have tried, both indi- 
vidually and collectively, to gain its rew^ard, and v^^e 
feel that we have done so. 

At the present time, we stand at the close of our 
four years' high school work. May our commence- 
ment be a true one, may it mark the beginning of an 
effort to reach a higher goal, where a greater com- 
mencement will mark the finish of a successful col- 
lege career. 



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15's H. S. Basket Ball Team 

The 15's H. S. team, after a hard fight has finally come 
out victorious. 

It is from the inter-class teams that our High School and 
College tossers are selected. From the showing that the class 
teams have made this year we can predict that we will next 
year be in the race for Intercollegiate and High School pen- 
nants. 





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96 




"Things Worth While" 

Uknow, Mandy, I've bin up thar tew the B. Y. 
U., as it's called, 'n' there's a klass up thar 
what they calls the Sev'nteens High Skule. 
Sum ov th' hans'mest boys 'n' purtiest gals ever I see, 
an' smartest, too. The skule haz hearn ov 'em, an' 
b'lieve me, Mandy, th' wurld 'ull hear ov 'em when 
th' time comes." 

This is what "Uncle Josh" Billings had to say of 
our class. As Seventeens, we applaud his judgment; 
we know that he is one of the best of judges, of things 
worth while. Shrewd, hard-headed old farmers have 
more than horse sense, and "Uncle Josh" is no excep- 
tion to the rule. 

Time will prove that he exercised the best of 
judgment when he selected the Seventeens' High 
School as his favorite. The school has heard, and 
shall hear more, and the world shall hear from the 
Class '17 High School. 






18's H. S. 

A formidable bunch indeed, these First Year 
High School Classmen — enough of them to fill all the 
nooks and corners in all the buildings and the walks 
of the campus are so covered with them that they are 
stumbled over by all the other classmen. But we can 
not get along without them, their numbers count. 
We cannot hold a school function of any kind unless 
we first consider the 18's H. S. Class. The Student 
Body could not thrive without the fees of these 
students and but one edition of the White and Blue 
would appear each month, because of lack of material 
for its jokology department. The Class has made its 
influence felt and we must have it back next year. All 
such Timber needs is seasoning to make it good quar- 
ter-sawed oak in its senior year. 



<i^ i>t 




101 



.'I- A' I 




J. L. BROWN, B. S. 
Principal of The Normal and Training School 






^. A^;^ V^^/ 



The Professional Preparation 
of Teachers 



-r>«OCIETY has no more important duty to perform 
"^"^^ than that of the professional preparation of the 
*^ teachers for our public school system. The real 
import of their duty is not fully sensed by the average 
citizen as he does not meet the problems at first hand. 
He has a much clearer conception of the necessity for 
professional training for the physician— yet a com- 
munity can more consistently tolerate an incompetent 
physician than an incompetent teacher. If the physi- 
cian makes a wrong diagnosis of a case and admin- 
isters a wrong or ineffective medicine, the chances 
are that the vital physical forces of the system will in 
time completely eradicate the effects of the error. But 
when an untrained person is given charge of a year or 
more of the school life of forty or fifty boys and girls 
and fails to appreciate his problem of the underlying 
principles of the educative process and the proper 
method of applying them, who can estimate the loss 
and what forces will compensate the damages? 

The moral training courses in our teachers col- 
lege aim at the following : 

To give the student-teacher a knowledge of the 
underlying principles of mind development. 

A view of the history of education and an ex- 
planation of our present school system and an appre- 
ciation of the failures and successes of the past. 

An opportunity of meeting the problem of apply- 
ing these principles in actual teaching under the 
supervision of experienced critic teachers. 

An appreciation of his social responsibility and 
his duty as an educator to the community. 

A teacher thus professionally prepared is fore- 
armed and fore-warned of his important work and 
should render much efficient service to society. 

J. L. BROWN. 







107 



J. Edward Coaches The Boys 



Let's be big and bold, fellows, 
Let's be big and bold. 
Why should we, the young and free. 
Let our feet get cold? 
Little men, with little minds, 
Fake and fuss and scold — 
Let's be big and bold, fellows. 
Let's be big and bold. 



Let's get out and yell, fellows. 

Let's get out and yell. 

Darn this way of being time. 

Darn it all to— Well ! 

Harry strikes the proper key. 

Double forty swells. 

Let's get out and yell, fellows, 

Let's get out and yell. 



Let's get in and grind, fellows, 

Let's get in and grind. 

Why should boys of Brigham Young 

Stay along behind? 

God can make us handsome yet. 

When it comes to mind. 

Let's get in and grind, fellows, 

Let's get in and grind. 




Let's begin it now, fellows. 

Let's begin it now. 

What's the use of hanging back 

Like a muley cow? 

Hitch me on the White and Blue 

Belle! You hold the plow. 

By the gods of Greece and Rome 

We will do it now. 



David came and went, fellows, 
David came and went. 
Johnson's son can't always stay 
Paying board and rent. 
He has got to pack his grip. 
Brace up — never mind — 
Let's get in and grind, fellows, 
Let's get in and grind. 

— Alfred Osmond. 







Mrs. R. T. Bonnin and Wm. F. Hanson, composers of the Sun,Dance.Opera. 




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T17"E, the Student Body of the Brig- 
ham Young University, certainly 
feel that we owe a debt of gratitude to 
our Music Department for the many ex- 
cellent musical programs which have 
been given so liberally for our benefit. 

Under the leaderships of such able 
men as Professors A. C. Lund, Robert 
Sauer, Moses Gudmundson, and C. R. 
Johnson, the musical organizations in 
our school have reached a standing 
which is envied by many of the best 
schools of music. 

The Sun Dance opera, composed by 
Mrs. R. T. Bonnin and Wm. F. Hanson 
and directed by Professor Lund, is one 
of the greatest musical treats ever pre- 
sented to the people of this state. It is 
merely a sample of the kind of work that 
can be and is done in the B. Y. U. School 
of Music. 




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118 




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Professor Gudmundson's String Quartette 




A Group of Students Who Play Their Way Through School 



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Emma Larson 



Annie L. Gillespie 



Let US remember, among our other school friends, 
the two dear old ladies whose duty it is to look after 
the books of our library. 

Is there a student among us whose sentiment to- 
ward these dear old friends would not be "God Bless 
Them?" If there is, he lacks, somewhat, a spirit of ap- 
preciation. Our librarians have patiently looked after 
the needs of all and have been partial to none, and our 
book would not be complete without a word of appre- 
ciation. 




Deutscher Verein 




"Schaffen und Streben ist Gottes Gebot, 
Arbeit ist Laben, nichts tun ist Tot." 

"Wer gluecklich ist, kann gluecklich machan, 
Wer's tut vermehrt sein eignes Glueck." 

To foster a German spirit and an appreciation for that great peo- 
ple and their rich language, early in the school year the German stu- 
dents met at Instructor Hinckley's. Here a typical German luncheon 
was served. Acting under the stimulus of this Schmeckende Speise 
an association was organized with Hyrum Harris as president, I. F. 
Brockbank and Olga Wunderly, vice presidents ; Elva Chipman, 
secretary and treasurer, and Walter Cottam, correspondent. There- 
after semi-monthly socials were held at which only German was to be 
spoken or sung. The seventy-five happy faces on the picture is evi- 
dence of the enthusiasm attained. Those on the front row have filled 
missions in Germany and constitute the famous G. M. U. H. Verein. 
Their fluency with the Mutterspracke gives the beginners an incen- 
tive and a stimulus to achieve. 

"Blumen sind an jedem Weg zu finden, 
Doch nicht jeder weiss den Kranz zu winden." 

G. H. 




S 



123 




How many really recognize and appreciate the unusual sociological ad- 
vancement of the present day? In practically all the phases of life, society is 
growing and expanding as never before. The teaching profession is no ex- 
ception. The efforts of the modern teacher are rapidly substituting, if not 
entirely eclipsing, those of his antiquated predecessor. 

The students of Elementary Education of the University recognized 
these facts and early in the year effected an organization formally known as 
"El Maestro" Club — the Teacher's Club. The officers were: W. H. Daw, 
Pres. ; Rhoda Greenwood, Vice Pres. ; Howard N. Blassard, Second Vice 
Pres. ; Georgia Maesar, Sec'y.-Treas., and Heloise Day, White and Blue cor- 
respondent. The Club membership exceeded seventy in number. This organ- 
ization was founded on the basis of unity of purpose and sympathetic relation- 
ship. It was our hope to supplement our regular classes in Education with 
the consideration of vital social problems and to develop a group of prospec- 
tive teachers whose interests would extend beyond the four walls of the 
school-room. 

We feel that in a large measure we have been successful; that our ideas 
and ideals have been broadened, and our appreciation of the Teaching 
Profession has received a dynamic stimulus. El Maestro Club has func- 
tioned — yes, as a potent factor in our preparation for what we have come to 
consider the most noble of all professions. 








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Leroy Hafen Parley Woolsey 

Debated the University of Utah 



We are indeed proud of our debaters. They have 
upheld our institution and have shown that we are not 
deficient in presenting our side of the argument. 

We have won three debates out of four. Utah and 
Nevada have been beaten by our teams and our boys, 
though defeated by the University of California, put 
up a good fight and the debate was no one-sided 
affair. 

We surely "have the team now." 



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Roland Tietjen- George Cordon 

Debated the Agriculture College of Utah. Also the University of Nevada. 



0.= 



The debaters from the 
sage brush flats of Nevada 
have vi^on a place in our 
Year Book, because of the 
many friends they have 
made here. They put up a 
good debate, but took de- 
feat like genuine sports- 
men that they are. We 
hope to see them again. 



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Lyster Withers John W. Heard 



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College Basket Ball Tecun 





In spite of all the figuring which was done by our 
Salt Lake friends during the early part of the basket- 
ball season, our College team has once more brought 
the championship pennant to our school. Of course 
our friends from the North still figure that they could 
have beaten us, but the facts show that they didn't. 

Although our High School team was less success- 
ful, they put up a good fight and made it interesting 
for their opponents. We expect them to do better 
next year. 






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Our Glorious Banner 

Our glorious banner waves on high, 

Folds of white and blue are streaming 
And our star of fortune in the sky, 

Like the noon-day is beaming. 
And our hearts beat true to our college, 
To its name may its sons be ever true. 
Long live its glorious name! 
Long live its glorious name! 
We'll rise, we'll rise and shout. 
And shout for dear B. Y. U. 
On, on to victory! 

II ,1 1 ■ ' il.:s;i 

Hark! the signal trumpet calls us forth 

To the field of fame and glory, 
Where the haughty foeman from the North 

Will be taught this truthful story: 
That our flag which so proudly is waving 
The folds of the dear White and Blue, 
Shall never kiss the dust! 
Shall never kiss the dust ! 
While life, while life, and strength, 
And strength, and being shall last. 
We'll fight for victory! 

JoS■Morto^ 



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133 






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The Wrestling Team 



"When it rains, it usually pours." 
Victory is coming to us from every 
direction. Our wrestling team has not 
been asleep. In fact, they succeeded in 
getting the goats of their opponents 
while they were at Logan. 



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Pljttf ana Ihtt 

MADE IN U. S. A. AT PROVO, UTAH 



No. 17 



Tuesday. February 23, 1915 



Vol. XVII 



Y MEN WIN I BATTLES 

Victory Snatched From the B. Y. U. Wins 

Jaws of Hell by Roberts' Men ^tate Championship 



InDebating 



High School Trims 

Spanish Fork Team 

APOLLO TEAM 
IS TRIMMED BY 
YJUINTETTE 

state Basketball Pennant Will Again 
Decorate B. Y. U. Halls. 

The largest crowd of thf season la-st 
Friday night saw the Invincible Apollo 
team of American Fork go down to an 
IgnomlnlouB defeat before the super- 
ior playing of our varsity team. . 

The victory was a stgniftcant one. 
for our boys, as It places a very opti- 
mistic hue upon our cbanceB tor the 
state charapii>nshJp. 



LOGAN TEAM DE- 
FEATED BY Y QUINT 

Provo Boys Show Marked Imorove- 
ment Since U. Game 



FARMERS DOWNED 

BY FAST Y FIVE 



Victory Won by 

Roberts' Men 

(Continued from Front Page) 
teams : 

B. Y. U. UTAH 

Chipraan .l.f 0**^ 

McDonald, Steed, .r.f. Clarke. VanPelt 

Egertsen, Luke.c Brlggs 

Taylor l.g Knowlton 

Hafes r.g Beal 

Coals from field: Udy 7. Clarke. 2, 
Brigga 1. Beal 1. Chlpman 3. Steed 1. 
Puke 2. Hales 1. Goals from foul: 
Beal, 7 out of 11; Chipman 14 out of 
19. Referee Watson; Umpire, Thur- 
man. 
Spanish Fork B. V. U. H. S. 

Tutble r.f A. Johnson 

Wilklns l.f Sewell 

Hales c Crabajii 

Andrus f-B Johnson 

Rowe '".g Beckslead enjoyment they created In 

— -■ - = n." bod 



Y FIVE WINS FROM 

WEBER BY BIG SCORE 



The Varsity basket ball five came 
back from the northern trip last Sun- 
day with the scalps of bo^h the Ag- 
gies and B. Y. C. teams tucked away 
under their belts. The first game 
with the farmers was won by a score 
of 31 to 23. The second witn 
the B. Y. C. read 24 to 18. All leporu* 
from the scenes of battle say that 
the games were exceedingly fast. Our' 
men. however, got away to an early 
lead and by superior playing held it 
to the end. 

Student 

meetine Friday morning. We 

them again. 

IB" eeting a week ago 

business the fol- 

■re given: A vocal 

son; piano solo. 



The gym last Saturday night was 
again the scene of another impressive 
victory for the B. Y. U. basketball 
team. The much touted A. C. fivo 
was soundly trounced before the larg- 
est crowd of the season. 

The Interest during the entire g!>me 
was intense. From the moment the 
referee's whistle called the play until 
the c-ack of the Uiner's gun ended th- 
second half, the Issue was In doubt. 
It look the characteristic rally of o-ir 
men to put the eight point margin on 
the score. The final fieurea 2ft to £1 

H. S. Team Wallops 

Springville Five 

(Conliniiril from front page 



B. Y. U. Five Take Their 

First Scalp From the B. Y. C. 



MURDOCK WINS FIRST IN 
WRESTLING TOURNAMENT 

We placed another man In tne 
dinner's column of the state amateur 
tournament when Claud Murdock 
pulltd down the championship in the 
featherweight wrestling division. This 
'ls the second year's win for Murdock 
and the school. Last year we got 
birce firsts out of eight and put three 
men In the finals this year, Mr. Mur- 
receives a gold medal and title of 



NEVADA MEN 
LOSE IN DEBATE 
; ONTAXQUESTION 

V • 

li Y Debatora Banquet Sagebrush Team 

r 

e 

, Again the ■Y** boys have dcmonstVi:!- 

j ed their seperiorlty in the fit.-lid of ai- 
gumentation. We are Indeed ^iroud 
of our debating hoys. They have up- 



B. Y. U. Wrestling Team Again Wins 
State Collegiate Mat Championship 



f»'>s?'"' 





141 




142 



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In The Springtime 



It is easy to be cheerful, 

In the Springtime, 

For all nature seems so hopeful. 

In the Springtime. 

Ev'n the sunshine appears brighter 

And the greenness of grass lighter. 

In the Springtime, lovely Springtime. 

Then the raindrops fall so fastly, 

In the Springtime. 

And they swell the rivers vastly. 

In the Springtime. 

Then so quickly flowers spring up 

That we call them Johnny-jump-ups, 

In the Springtime, glorious Springtime. 

Flowers their gayest dresses, wearing. 

In the Springtime. 

Birds their brightest plumage, bearing, 

In the Springtime. 

Tiny blades of grass are peeping. 

Every little insect creeping, 

In the Springtime, happy Springtime. 

Bees are humming, birds are singing. 

In the Springtime. 

Sweet the message to us bringing. 

In the Springtime. 

Put aside dull care and sorrow. 

And be happy on the morrow. 

Of the Springtime, wondrous Springtime. 

Eunice E. Nelson. 



^ 



147 




More or Less Philosophic Rambles 





RUMOR hath it that J. Edward has named the new con- 
stellation of freckles, which recently appeared on the 
South by East corner of his map, in honor of Lisle 'Lind- 
say. He says that he hopes she will remember the compliment 
when Nature presents her with any additional complexion. 

We hate to say this about a friend, but a mean son-of-a-gun 
told us that the reason the White and Blue was delayed one 
week during the early part of the school year, was not because 
the press broke down, as was stated, but because the editor's 
trousers didn't function in a vital place. We know this is honest 
because we visited the editor while he was in bed, at the time 
repairs were being made on his trousseau. 

Ken Parkinson says he is not vindictive by nature, but he's 
out gunning for the guy that invented the Ostend and the B. Y. 
U. Special. He says his bill for suspenders has increased three 
hundred per cent since they started the new dances. We can 
understand Mr. Parkinson's predicament, because we also dis- 
tinctly remember several good gallasses that were sacrificed to 
those confounded dips. 

It's a funny thing that every musician that we have ever 
seen can pronounce "Chopin Shopang" whether the rest of King 
George's English is mangled or not. Perhaps we are unneces- 
sarily severe on the exponents of the divine art, but we con- 
cluded, the other day, that a good many of them missed their 
calling when they didn't study blacksmithing. 

We don't care to mention any names, but some of the gentle- 
men whom we address by the title of brother receive this little 
token of respect because they always feel that we are twitting 
them on their personal appearance when we call them plain 
Dean, or Vernie O. 

Duke Mathews complains that since the faculty went on 
record against chewing gum in class, he hasn't been able to get 
anywhere near enough exercise. 



I 




148 



(i^j 







We don't know whether any of the other boys around here 
are in the same box or not, but when we kidd a dame with the 
remark that we've never kissed anybody but our "Ma" they 
always tell us that they refuse to be an agricultural experiment 
station. 

To show that it depends upon the point of view, witness the 
following asides: 

Jim: "At last I've won her." 
Norma: "At last I've hooked the poor prune." 
Any way, we were sort of interested in the diamond ring 
and lavalliere that "Jim" gave her last Christmas. We didn't ask 
our girl what she wanted because we couldn't be that ex- 
travagant. ^ .,.. J,.^ 

Someone was mean enough to say that the Freshmen kept 
their little caps on by vacuum pressure, and another vile in- 
sinuator said that Elsie Talmage got her start ar a writer of fic- 
tion by composing excuses to her dear teachers. 

Rumor hath it that "Dad" Roberts is suing the company that 

made his peg leg for non-support. Even at that, we insist that 
'Dad" has it on most of us. He can use thumb-tacks to hold his 
socks up. 

We've an idea that a good many of our stenographical 
students will stop taking dictation shortly after they get mar- 
ried. 

A great many of us cannot listen to the plain truth, because 
it is so darned uncomplimentary. 

Frank Goold said that the reason we hadn't seen him around 
school lately was because he hadn't been. 

Hugh Baxter is sure that the most memorable date in his- 
tory is the one "Hy" Harris had with Merline Roylance. 

We were always interested in finding out why a fat man was 
so good natured, so to support our thesis, and in the interests of 
science we inquired of friend Russell the reason for the Cherubic 
smile that always illumines his countenance. "Gosh," he said, "I 
got to be good natured; I can't fight and I can't run." 



^mi 



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140 










Calendar for 1914 -15 



JUNE 5-6-7. — And it came to pass that in the year of our Lord 1914, and 
during the rule of George, the learned of the learned, who were of the 
hosts of Mormon, met in the city of Provo at the B. Y. U., for the dis- 
cussion of truths and to be taught the things to be imparted to the youth 
of Zion. 

JUNE 8-9. — And it came to pass that in the same city of Provo a 
Church Teacher's College had been established for the purpose of en- 
lightening the minds of the teachers of the hosts who were not of the 
hosts of Zion. Yea, the mighty and many in numbers were they who 
came to partake of the fountain of knowledge. And they did commence 
the labor of their choice. 

JUNE 10. — Yea, and in these days two of the mightiest of these 
brethren did join the aesthetic dancing class, yea, even brothers Nelson 
and Romney, and they became very gifted in the moving of their limbs 
to the strains of the tom-tom and cymbal. 



JUNE 13. — It came to pass that a great feast was held and the people 
did partake of the fruit of the land, yea, even the Strawberry, and also 
in that day did they go unto the meeting of the U. C. T. 

JUNE 15. — Yea, and upon this day the hosts of the B. Y. U. were 
greatly sorrowed over news of the death of one of their learned musi- 
cians. Brother Aseal Nelson. 

JUNE 22. — And it came to pass that a great and mighty man, schooled 
in the things of life, came out of the East into our midst and did deliver 
unto the congregated hosts the fruits of his learning. 

JUNE 23. — It came to pass that in this season of the year, that tliose 
thus assembled did become weary of their confinement and wrought to 
find amusement, yea, even with rackets and balls. 

JUNE 26. — Yea, and they did assemble in the place erected for dancing, 
and they did dance until they were weak-in-the-knees. 

JULY 3. — And the great man of the East did finish his teachings and 
returned out of the midst of the hosts. 

JULY 4. — Yea, and it came to pass that the hosts did celebrate the great 
national holiday. The fairer and more nimble of limb, did go up into 
the mountain upon this occasion. 

JULY 10. — And upon this day those among us who were taking physi- 
cal culture, did go to the waters of the Lake Utah and there did ride upon 
the waters of the Lake, yea, until they were exceedingly sick and could 
not partake of the bounteous feast prepared for them. 

JULY 14. — Yea, and it came to pass that one of our host, light-of-hair, 
and quick of speech, did gain great honors at the N. E. A 

JULY 15. — Now the hosts in Provo were visited by Alma, the world- 
renowmed athlete. 

JULY 17. — And among great festivities, such as the cracking of nuts, 
in the room in which Dr. Dains taught bacteriology, the first half of the 
labors of this great gathering were completed. 

JULY 20. — The toils of many were again taken up. 




157 




158 






m 



JULY 24. — And, yea, for the first time cars came into our midst with 
apparently no locomotive power propelling them, but they did run, and 
great was the wondering, for lo ! few had expected such to happen before 
1932. 

JULY 28. — And behold! The students did choose from their numbers a 
leader, yea, even one David, by name, and he did call his flock together 
many times that they might be entertained. 

AUGUST 7. — And it came to pass that one hundred sixty of the hosts of 
Zion did go up into Mt. Timpanogos and bad were the effects, yea, it 
caused many to walk in the ways of Hyrum Ephraim Gerum Franklin 
Clove. 

AUGUST 19. — Paul Nelson returned after having been absent from our 
midst, but he was not the same Paul, no ! he was married. 

AUGUST 28. — And it came to pass that those who had come up into the 
land of Provo, to this great School did return, each one again to his own 
people. 

OCTOBER 9. — After an elapse of eighty-five days, there was a great 
gathering in the city of Provo. From the four comers of the earth many 
gathered to this School of promise, yea, great was the number thereof. 
Now this was during the reign of the Chief Judges : George, Edwin, and 
Joseph, who were judges over these people who were gathered together. 
And one having been chosen from among them, yea, one Edward came 
forth in all his splendor. 

Now it came to pass that the followers of Edward were also followers of 
the three great Judges and were called Brighamites. Now the number 
of them was so great thereof, that these Brighamites did divide into eight 
tribes : Callites, Becksteadites, Walkerites, Hanchettites, Stringhamites, 
Finlaysonites, Obeggites, and Hatchites. 

OCTOBER 16. — And behold it being the thirty and ninth year since the 
founding of this institution of learning, the many tribes of the Brigham- 
ites did assemble to celebrate. Yea, they all did march forth through 
the streets with their leaders ; banners, and trumpets. Yea, every youth 
and maiden did come forth in their colors of White and Blue. On the 
same day the hosts gathered at the waters of the millrace and there the 
physically strong of the S. F. O. H. did meet the strong of the C. B. W. 



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and H. in a tug-of-war. Yea, and great was the contention, until the 
former encouraged by an officer of George, even one Earl, did renew 
strength and did drag their brethem through the waters of the millrace. 

OCTOBER 23.— Yea, and it came to pass that Edward did call the 
Brighamites together and did instruct them in the ways that they were 
to follow, and did pledge his guiding power unto them. 

And it came to pass that many among them did delight in great 
speech making, yea, these did meet together and did organize a society 
called Debating. 

OCTOBER 26.— And the hosts of Call, Beckstead, Walker and Hanchett 
did meet and choose a leader that they might be distinguished from their 
brethren. Yea, they did choose a leader, one Hyrum, and these followers 
of Hyrum were called Hyrumites. 

OCTOBER 28.— Yea, the things which the Brighamites did were so 
great in number that it was found necessary to appoint two, even Loren 
and Isaac, to record in a great book the record of the people. 
NOVEMBER 5.— And it came to pass that the Chief Judge George did 
speak great things concerning eternal life. 

NOVEMBER 6.— Behold, upon this day the Brighamites did hold a 
meeting and the war of the nations on the Eastern continent was dis- 
cussed by Brothers Hinckley and Eggertsen. Yea, and in the eve of that 
day the Finlaysonites did give a festival of dancing and fun making, and 
they did invite the hosts of Brigham. 

NOVEMBER 7.— And it came to pass that this being a bountiful year 
all the grain and fruits were brought together and exhibited by Amos. 
And upon the evening of this day one, a great man skilled in picture 
making did meet vnth the hosts of Brigham and did entertain them with 
much of his work. 

NOVEMBER 13.— Yea, the time did come for the Brighamites to honor 
the birthday of their great prophet, Joseph F. Smith, and they did meet 
in their Hall and praised him with song and speech. 

Now it came to pass that the Callites raised a mighty sign on the build- 
ing, one which told of a great festival, Yea, even one of music and 
dancing. Now the Becksteadites declared that the Callites had too much 
sign room, even so that none was left for them. A great emd mighty con- 




161 






flict ensued, Yea, the two tribes did scale walls and tear banners. After 
much disturbance peace was restored by the unwaring brothers. Yea, all 
did forget their hatred and did meet and dance in the Callite's camp. 

NOVEMBER 15. — A great and mighty apostle, one James E. Talmage, 
did lecture to the Brighamites, and great and wonderful were his doc- 
trines. 

NOVEMBER 16. — Now it came to pass that the paper which did tell the 
Brighamites of all the school happenings did not come forth at this 
appointed time and there was much unrest until the press was mended 
and the paper appeared. 

NOVEMBER 18. — Now the Becksteadites grew exceedingly bold and 
did reserve a large space on the outer walls for advertising. Yea, inso- 
much that the Hanchettites did stir up strife and make signs and banners. 
Yea, this was was like unto the battle of the Callites and Becksteadites. 

NOVEMBER 20.— The Becksteadites did invite the Brighamites to their 
camp for dancing. 

NOVEMBER 24. — Now the Brighamites did greatly enjoy good music, 
and a man of world renown, one Ganz, performed on a grand piano to the 
pleasure of the hosts. 

NOVEMBER 25. — And it came to pass that there was great excitement 
among the hosts of Brigham. Yea, it was the day of their great 
Cross-Country Run Festival. And it happened that a man by the name 
of Hales who had for two previous years won this event, finished first. 
Great was the excitement when it was rumored that the Finlaysonites 
had won the roasted turkey. But it came to pass that after the Finlay- 
sonites had feasted upon the great bird, it was learned that it rightly be- 
longed to the Stringhamites. Great battles ensued in which the String- 
hamites were victorious. Yea, they were so puffed up in the pride of 
their hearts, but not their stomachs, that they demanded a turkey to be 
bought for them. 

NOVEMBER 26. — And it came to pass that a great day of feasting and 
Thanksgiving was called over the length and breadth of the land. And 
the Brighamites did go to their many homes for a vacation. 
DECEMBER 3. — And it came to pass that a great school in the North 
did send down some of its members who did meet in Provo and did enter- 
tain he hosts of Brigham with a wonderful play, yea, "Pillars of Society." 




DECEMBER 7. — The Chief Judge of the Brighamites did journey 
South, even to the land of Dixie and did preach unto that people. 

DECEMBER 9. — When he returned there was great joy in his heart, 
for the hosts of Brigham had remembered his birthday anniversary -with 
flowers, yea, he was 62 years of age. 



DECEMBER 12. — There were two teams selected from the hosts of 
Brigham to represent this people. They were to combat with other teams 
of the land in a game known as basketball. The Weberites of the North 
sent into the midst of the Brighamites a team> which was much beaten 
by a team representing the later. But the other team of the Brighamites 
was defeated by the Groveites. 

DECEMBER 14. — Yea, and it came to pass that the Hanchettites grew 
exceeding bold, insomuch that they did appear in green top pieces, and 
one Earl J. likened them unto mildew on bad fruit. 



DECEMBER 15. — One of the Brighamites, fair Helen, was robbed by 
one of the Gadianton band. 

DECEMBER 17. — Now the Walkerites gave a great celebration in the 
form of a dance and costly was the apparel of those who came to enjoy 
this pondrous affair. 

DECEMBER 18. — And it came to pass that Anthony did gather together 
the singers and dancers of the Brighamites and they did give a wonder- 
ful entertainment. Yea, an opera composed by a Mrs. Bonnin and a Mri 
Hansen. Great was the interest taken in this Lamanitish production, and 
many came from far lands to see it. 

There was one Ida Thorn, of the hosts of Brigham, but once of a far- 
away land, even Samoa, did talk eloquently before the people assembled. 
Yea, she was given a medal for her eloquent work. 

DECEMBER 19.— Yea, one David, who had left his people, the Brig- 
hamites, and had gone north did return to his own country for a visit. 






DECEMBER 20. — And it came to pass that great preparations were 
made for the celebrating of Christmas. Yea, so great was the joy that 
many left school before their work finished. Yea, great was the joy of 
the homes in Utah, because the children of Zion returned to them. 



^^n- 



163 




164 





CLAUD MURDOCK 

Claud Murdock, the B. Y. U. champion in the 108-pound 
wrestling division, was winner at San Francisco at the Western 
A. A. U. meet on April 16th. He was sent with other winners 
in the State to the meet in California. He was one of two Utah 
men to take a first place, and we certainly congratulate him 
on his splendid work. 




^m^ 



165 




166 







A Few of the College Yells 



Look at the white, Rah ! Rah ! 

Look at the blue, Rah! Rah! 

Look at the team, the team, the team ! 

Look at the white, the, white, the, white ! 

Look at the blue, the blue, the blue ! 

Look at the B ! 

Look at the Y I 

Look at the U! Rah! Rah! 

ACH DU LIEBER 

Ach du lieber B ! Y ! U ! 

B! Y! U! B! Y! U! 

Ach du lieber. Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Alles ist schoen 

Du kaempfest und siegest 

Die ehre du "kriegest" O ! 

Ach du lieber. Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Alles ist schoen! 

Alles ist schoen! 



Y Ya 


Ya 


Ya 


Y Ya 


Ya 


Ya 


Y Ya 


Ya 


Ya 


Break 


it 


up! 


Break 


it 


up! 


Y Ya 


Ya 


Ya 


Y Ya 


Ya 


Ya 


Y Ya 


Ya 


Ya 


Break 


it 


up! 



WHEN A BODY 




When a body 

Meets our "squaddy" 
On the old gym floor. 

And our "squaddy" 

Beats a body. 
There ain't nobody more. 

When our "squaddy" 

Beats a body. 
Makes a body sore. 

There ain't no shoddy 

In our "squaddy," 
They're B. Y. to the core. 

We can, we can, we know we can, 
We can, we can, we must. 
We can, we can, we know we can, 
We'll -win this game or bust ! 

Who has the team now? 
Who has the team now? 
Who has the Grand old 

Rah! Rah! Rah! 
We have the team now, 
We have the team now. 
We have the grand old team. 



Brigham Young University Song 



All hail the College that we love ! 

At the throne, the throne of wisdom's sway, 

Oh let us lift our songs above 

The thronging multitude today. 

No pride of riches here may sue; 

The head, the heart, the hand, 

United must be true — 

Be true to thee, our White and Blue, 

When they join our happy band. 

CHORUS: 

Then cheer anew for the B. Y. U. ! 
We've come to work, to live, to do; 
We'll raise the standard — bear it through; 
Our hearts are true to the B. Y. U. 

There is no emblem half so sweet 
As our colors, colors pure and true ; 
There is no banner that we greet, 
Like thee, our dear old White and Blue. 
No youth its beauty ere denies ; 
Such thought no maid allows. 
For blue is in her eyes — 
For blue is in her bonnie eyes. 
And of white her thoughtful brow. 

— Annie Pike Greenwood. 




A Word for Our Advertisers 



Just bear in mind, when you are out to buy 
the articles which you use, that our adver- 
tisers paid One Dollar toward every "Ban- 
yan" which we have published. That means 
that you owe them a dollar. 



y 



169 



THE CHURCH TEACHERS' 
COLLEGE 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL OF THE CHURCH 

It Trains for Teaching in the GRADE Schools of 
the State through its ELEMENTARY TRAINING 
SCHOOL, and for HIGH SCHOOLS of the Church 
and State through its 

SECONDARY TRAINING SCHOOL 

The High Schools of the Church and of the State 
call for Trained Teachers of Science, Mathematics, 
Agriculture, English, Domestic Science, Domestic Art, 
Fine and Mechanic Arts, and Music. 

QUALITY FOR SERVICE 

AT THE 

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 



170 




The Commercial and Educational Center 

(By Jacob Coleman, City Attorney.) 

I am asked to write in 500 words something about Provo City. Why, Mr. Editor, it 
would require the genius of a Lord Bacon to compress into such brief space the th'ou- 
sand-and-one interesting features of our beautiful city. 

No one can write of Provo without mentioning as the chief contributing factor in 
Its up-building; your excellent University. I have had the privilege of attending one of 
the most richly endowed universities in the world, and I feel qualified in a measure to 
appreciate the splendid achievements of your institution and its great value to this city. 
While the thousands of dollars that are annually spent here by students and professors 
contribute in no small way to the growth of Provo, your highest asset to this com- 
munity is the educational leaven you give to it. By your athletic and debating con- 
tests, your lecture courses, your refined social amusements, your dramatics, your high- 
class musicales, you furnish the very life of this city,— a life that is intellectual, elevat- 
ing, and inspirational. 

In return for all this, the officers of Provo City are not unappreciative or ungrate- 
ful. It is their ambition to make this city, the seat of your learning, one of the most 
ideal university towns in the whole West. They purpose to surround your institution 
v.-ith a clean, moral environment, so that every parent will say: "That is the place 
where I want my son and daughter to attend college." The chief of police and his 
lynx-eyed officers never sleep, and are the terror of bootleggers and other violators of 
the law; consequently there are no dens of iniquity to lure the student into forbidden 
paths; and Provo City is regarded the State over, as one of the freest from vice and 
crime. 

Provo City recognizes that the Brigham Young University is not a rich man's col- 
lege, but a place where any young man or woman, no matter how poor, who has ambi- 
tion, may enter and become fully equipped for life's duties; and for this reason, the city 
commission has never required a license fee from any boarding place housing 'students. 

Every year scores of families move to Provo primarily to take advantage of its 
educational opportunties; and, who, becoming enamored of its many other attractive 
features, decide to reside here permanently. And well may Provo be considered a de- 
sirable place to live. With its beautiful canyons and picturesque mountains on the 
east, and its large fresh water lake teeming with fish on the west, with canals full of 
water and gushing artesian wells everywhere, wth a soil and climate that produce 
almost any product that the appetite of man can crave, with an inexhaustible supply of 
pure, ice-cold water for culinary purposes, with a magnificient sewer system, with a 
highly efficient commission form of government that does things, with electrical and 
water power amply sufficient to propel the machinery of 'hundreds of factories, with 
the Strawberry project bringing under cultivation thousands of acres of land, with'sugar 
factories springng up everywhere, with its largest woolen mills in the West, and with 
electrical and steam roads centering here, surely the commercial metropolis of Utah 
County and the educational center of the State, should commend itself to the pros- 
pective graduate when he casts about for a competence and a home. 



171 



The Utah Agriculture College 

offers to the graduates of the Normal School and the High School and to College men and 
women exceptional opportunities for advanced training in Agriculture, Home Economics, Agri- 
cultural Engineering, Commerce, Mechanic Arts, and General Science. Broad and liberal in- 
struction is given in the natural and physical sciences and in mathematics, English, economics, 
literature, and languages. The Degree of Bachelor of Science is given upon completion of the 
College courses. Short practical courses are given in all departments of the institution, for 
those who do not wish, on account of age and other conditions, to take the regular College and 
High school work. 

The College especially appreciates affiliation with the clean and virile minded young men 
and women who are to become the leaders of tomorrow. 



FASHION'S FAVORED FANCIES 



-IN- 



LADIES' SUITS, COATS AND DRESSES 

Authorative Styles, right down to the minute in design, fabric, and color, and 
remarkably low prices. 

Our Ladies' Lace Military Boot, and our 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, and 9-strap Sandals are 
the dressiest things in this region, at our low prices. 



THE BIG BUSY 
POPULAR STORE 



FARRERS 



Oivned bp local peoole and the 
earnings spent locall]). 




172 




JANUARY 4.— And it came to pass that the Brighamites did again re- 
turn to their school and great was their happiness. Yea, costly raiment 
was exhibited and great was the amount of jewelry worn by one of the 
daughter of the Brighamites. Yea, even one Norma did appear with the 
choicest gems, the diamond, and she did wear the ring on the finger that 
signifies engagement and great was the wonder of many, not knowing 
whether it be a gift from Santa or from Bullock. 

JANUARY 7-8-9.— Now it came to pass that Anthony did come again 
with his Lamanites in song and dance and did entertain the Brighamites. 

JANUARY 9. — The Brighamites were greatly grieved because of the 
death of their noble son, Hayward Marshall. 

JANUARY 12.— Now the hosts of Brigham, led by George, did study 
diligently concerning the learning of great men, even one Shakespeare 
who wrote plays, and they did invite a company from the East to play for 
them one of his plays, "As You Like It." Those who performed were 
called Ben Greet Players. 



173 



1 



JANUARY 13. — Now it came to pass that one Elsie, who had gone with 
one of the sons of the Brighamites, but had neglected him for the space 
of many moons, did again return to him, this Sterling. 

JANUARY 15.— And yea, one day it came to pass that Maud May Bab- 
cock, a woman from the great University of the North, yea, the Univer- 
sity of Utah, did read a great play to the hosts of Brigham. The name 
of the play was Caesar and Cleopatra. 

Yea, the same night did the College Basketball team meet the Appollo- 
ites from American Fork and many quick movements were made and 
great was the skill that was displayed in this game, even that the team of 
the Brighamites did return home without any laurels. 

JANUARY 16. — Now the Appolloites did come to the gymnasium of 
the Brighamites for a game, and behold the large team of the College 
men did take the laurels away from the Appolloites and great was the 
rejoicing of the Brighamites. 

JANUARY 22. — The school was again brought to sorrow because of the 
death of one of the beloved daughters of the Brighamites, Miss Laurel 
McCarty. 

JANUARY 29.— And it came to pass that one of the Chief Judges, yea, 
even one Edvirin was chosen to go into the north country and care for a 
group, some of the youth of Zion who had been very seriously neglected 
by their parents. And it came to pass that the hosts of Brigham did meet 
and give great blessings and praises to this man. Yea, he was given 
feasts and banquets; watches and suit cases. The Harrisites did all 
meet and dance and sing before the departure of this brother and great 
was the sorrow when he left. 

JANUARY 30.— And it came to pass that the Brigham Young College 
from the North did send their boys to meet the Brighamite boys in 
basketball, and the latter did win from the B. Y. C. 

FEBRUARY 7. — And the first semester of the school year did end and 
the students did draw a long breath of relief when they learned that all 
semester examinations were at an end. And they did renew their 
strength and determination and did continue on in their studies. 



175 



UTAH TIMBER AND COAL CO. 



CASTLE GATE, CLEAR 
CREEK. KING. BLACK 
HAWK. CAMERON. 
SPRING CANYON, 
ABERDEEN 



COAL 



ALSO LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIAL 
"A Square Deal to Every Patron" 



160 W. Fifth North 

J. M. HARMON, Pres. 



J. W. DUNN. Sec'y and Manager 



Phone 232 















J 


^^m«L 














n 




I 


7 -. ■ 

if 


>-* 


h 


J--. . .- . 








■d 


ir 


I 








^Mp^ 


i^^ 


f 







•\^ 




mm 




w 







The Provo Foundry and Machine Co., Inc. 

Thos. F. Pierpent, Manager 

General Foundry and Machine Work, Mining 

Cars, Iron and Brass Castings, Engine and 

Boiler Repairs, Modern Plumbing 

and Heating 

Automobile Sale, Repair and Supply Garage 

PROVO, UTAH 




PHONE 77 



176 



OPPORTUNITIES 

The West is full of work to be done. There are opportunities on every hand. 
The onlv demand is that your head and hands be trained. 



BUSINESS? 

Lay the foundation broad. Over two hundred courses to choose from in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Preparation to make a life as well as a 
living. 

ENGINEERING? 

Thorough training in Mining, Electrical, Civil, Mechanical , Chemical, and 
General Engineering. An opportunity to study engineering in the very center 
of all kinds of engineering activity. 

EDUCATION? 

Preparation for teaching in all departments of work in common schools, 
hig-h schools and colleges. 

LAW? 

An opportunity to get your law degree without leaving the state. A new 
school of standards and thorough methods. 

MEDICINE? 

You may get two years of medicine, and receive a certificate that will 
admit you to the Junior year in the best medcal colleges in the country. 

Large libraries, well equipped laboratories, shops, and mills, and the best in- 
structors that can be obtained are at your service. 

P'uller information may be obtained by application to the 

UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, Salt Lake CUy, Utah 



WHAT 

FIELD 

DO 

YOU 

WISH 

TO 

ENTER? 



The cleanliness, frequency and 
convenience of electric service makes 

THE SALT LAKE AND UTAH RAILWAY 
THE OREM LINES 




the preferred highwag between Provo and Salt Lake City 

Low rates are available for parties often or more 

Large parties mag secure special rates and 
service on application 

SPECIAL STUDENT RATES 



177 



^ 



A Record of Events of the Second Semester 



Body Court. I. E. Brockbank elected as Chief Judge. 
Professor A. N. Merrill appointed to the Presidency to fill Dean Hinck- 
ley's place. 

FEBRUARY 12.— Lincoln Day program. "Freshies" Grand Ball. Col- 
legians have their pictures taken on the Maeser steps. 

FEBRUARY 17.— President Brimhall goes East to attend the Superin- 
tendent's Convention. 

FEBRUARY 19.— "Y" wins three victories. Defeat the U. of U. in 
Basketball and Debating, also defeat the A. C. U. in Debating. 

FEBRUARY 22.— Washington's Birthday. Lee Huff wins in the Ora- 
tion Contest. The Student Body takes a day off for celebration of their 
many victories. 

FEBRUARY 26.— "Y" wins over A. C. U. in Basketball. 

FEBRUARY 27.— "Y" scoops the B. Y. C. in a game of Basketball which 
was played at Logan. 

MARCH 1. — Parkinson and Baird leave for a trip to California for the 
purpose of meeting the University of that State in debate. 

MARCH 4-5-6.— State High School Basketball Tournament is held in 
Provo. Pleasant Grove wins the meet. 

MARCH 6.— B. Y. C. defeats the U. of U. at Logan, giving the State 
Intercollegiate Basketball Championship to our "Y" team. 

MARCH 6. — Our Debating Team meets defeat in California. 

MARCH 8. — Brother Hinckley pays us a visit; brings his suit case along 
with him. 

MARCH 11. — President Brimhall returns from the East and again faces 
the Student Body. 

MARCH 12. — University of Utah takes revenge on our Basketball teaun. 
Defeating them by a large score. But their awakening is a little late to 
bring them genuine satisfaction. 

MARCH 19. — Prof. Robert Saver and his Band gives a concert. 

MARCH 20. — Sophomore and Junior banquets. 



The Utah Valley 
Gas and Coke Company 

in a single season has connected close to 

400 Customers who Cook with Gas 




No Stooping! Ovens at a convenient height. No Coal or Ashes 
to handle. No long-hour cooking — no waiting for ovens to heat. 

Glass Doors. See baking without opening oven — ^this saves heat. 
No matches. Just press a button and a hot fire is instantly ready. 

Many people have expressed surprise at the remarkable 
showing made by the Gas Company in its first season. 

Yet it was not remarkable. It was the only logical thing 
to be expected. Why should any woman cook by any other 
method — old or new — when she can cook more quickly, at 
less cost, and have better and more wholesome food by using 
a modern Gas Range. 

A Gas Range costs half as much as any other kind and 
does the work in half the time at half the expense. Ask our 
cixstomers. 

The advice of the Gas Company's representative is yours 
for the asking. 

PHONE 295 



179 




JESSE KNIGHT, President 



HEBER S. RUPPER, Manager 



Independent Goal Company 



?- 



SPRING CANYON, ABERDEEN 
AND OTHER POPULAR 

COALS 



^ 



&^ 



-h 



Lump, Nut, Domestic Lump and Slack, Kindling Wood 

OPPOSITE WOOLEN MILLS 
PHONE 459 



180 



PROVO COMMERCIAL & SAVINGS BANK 



CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $150,000.00 

OFFICERS 

REED SMOOT, President 

C. E. LOOSE, Vice President 
J. T. FARRER, Cashier 

J. A. BUTTLE, Assistant Cashier 

F. G. RICHMOND, Assistant Cashier 





DIRECTORS 

Reed Smoot C. 
George Taylor, Sr. L. 
W. L. Biersach R. 
J. T. Farrer 


E. Loose 
Holbrook 
R. Irvine 




4% INTEREST PAID ON 
SA VINGS 


BANK 
CORNER 


U. S. DEPOSITARY FOR 
POSTAL SAVINGS 


_ 









MARCH 27. — A few of the boys do some blasting at the "Y" Spring so 
as to make sufficient H-2 O available for white washing purposes. 

MARCH 27. — "Freshies" give a Bonfire party. 

MARCH 29. — Doctor Jones lectures on "Peace." 

MARCH 31. — At seven o'clock the "Boys" don their working clothes 
and start for the "Y." By two p. m. the Old Letter had received its 
annual wash and all hurried from the hill to partake of the luncheon 
which the girls had prepared. Cook and Hinckley lose their golden locks. 
"There's a reason." 

APRIL 1. — Milt Chipman calls up police headquarters and asks to have 
himself arrested. 

APRIL 2-13. — Spring Vacation. 



181 



/^ 



Digestible Nutrients. 



Professor Maw, examining his chemistry class, asked the question: 
"Suppose you were called to attend a patient who had swallowed a heavy 
dose of oxalic acid; what would you administer?" 

There was silence in the room for some seconds, for none of the 
pupils knew the answer. 

Finally Ole Call murmured, as a sort of suggestion, rather than a 
solution : "The Sacrament." — Ex. 

Martin Mortensen to Prof. Chamberlain in Psychology, after Brother 
Chamberlain had finished explaining a particular phase of the discus- 
sion: 

"Brother Chamberlain, I see that you agree with my explanation of 
the subject." 

"Yes, that is so," replied the Professor. 

"I am glad to know that," responded Mortensen. "For the first time 
during the year we have agreed upon a question." 

"Yes, that is true," replied Brother Chamberlain, very seriously, "and 
it almost makes me think that I am wrong." — Ex. 

A student entered the Students' Supply Office one day and said to 

Rondo Anderson, who was standing at the counter: 

"Let me have, please, the letters of Charles Lamb." 

"The postoffice is right down the street, five blocks, Mr. Lamb," said 

Rondo with a brisk smile. 

We have a student in the B. Y. U. who was bom and brought up on 
a farm, and he had the habit of always going round with his mouth open, 
especially if there was anything of importance going on. One day an 
uncle whom the boy had not seen for years paid the place a visit. 

"Hullo, Uncle!" said the boy, looking up at him with his mouth 
opened like a bam door. 

The uncle looked at him for a moment without answering, and then 
said: 

'Close your mouth, sonny, so I can see who you are." 

Prof. Osmond, in English Class. — Daw, do you know Poe's "Raven"? 

Daw. — Why, no; what's the matter with him? 

Prof. Osmond (looking very angrily). — Well? 

Daw (trembling). — Quite well, thank you, sir. 

Student. — I want my hair cut. 

Barber. — Any special way? 

Student.— Yes, off. — Ex. 



182 



OUR PROFESSION 

IS BUYING AND SELLING 

FRUITS ^^^ PRODUCE 

IN CAR LOAD LOTS OR LESS 

FOR CASH 



Get in touch with us, when vou want to trade 
You will be money ahead 



JKe Wm. M. RO Y LANCE CO. 

PROVO, UTAH 




BY ELECTRICITY 



Away with work and worry; Away with the hot 
cook stove; Use an Electric Range. 

Many Styles to Show You 

UTAH PO WER & LIGHT CO. 

"EFFICIENT PUBLIC SERVICE" 



Ice Cream, Sherbets, 
Candies and 
Baking Goods 

Best Place for 
Refreshments in Citi; 




O UY "XroUNG T T 

r^ THE Y MEN'S / / 

X-/ EST J. SUITS K^ 



UNIQUE AND 
N RIVALED 
STYLES. 



But please remember this store Before You Undertake to solve 
the problem of your new Graduation Suit; Step into Wood- 
Clifton's — Have a look at your "Ideal" Model Suit there — at the 
store that caters to your wants with good service — yet it costs no 
more. See the special collection of Graduation Sutis now on dis- 
play at $9.90, $12.75, $14.75 and up. 

WOOD-CLIFTON CO. 



183 



r"^. 



' ^^^RHnF^n^ Saf' 




i TQWTflm j 







184 



^ 



Don't appear foolish bp trying to 

DAUB IT ON 

in a thousand dollar car 

Be a real sport and step up to something 

REALLY CLASSY 

or else use good judgment and 

BUY A FORD 

FROM THE 

SCHOFIELD AUTO CO. 

PROVO. UTAH 



HOTEL ROBERTS 

W. D. ROBERTS, Prop. 

The Home of the Traveler 
Special Students Breakfast or Luncheon 35 cents 

PROVO, UTAH 



THE SUTTON MARKET 

The Place to Bui; Q)hat You Eat 



Phones 194 and 195 



Provo City. Utah 



185 



"THE BUSY CORNER" 

We aim to satisfy with prices and material. 

Lumber, Doors, Windows, Cement, Paint. Glass and Hardware 

Novelties in Brass and Antique Copper Trimmings for nifty Furniture. 

BEEBE LUMBER CO. 

PROVO, UTAH 




THE H. G. BLUMENTHAL CO. 

ARCHITECTURAL SHEET METAL WORKS 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING 

SANITARY PLUMBING 



474 West Center St. 



Phone 109 



Provo, Utah 



186 



'if 




.-N 




Quality 
First 

jp IRST-CLASS workmanship at 
J- reasonable prices rule here. 
But even at that, the price is a SEC- 
ONDARY consideration with us. 

Qualitip first, A LL 
THE TIME. 

Larson & Ny green Studio, Inc., 

Columbia Theatre Building 
PROVO, UTAH 








y 



187 





*iE 



188 



WHY NOT MAKE 

YOUR OLD HOME LOOK NE W? 

-- . ,-" . ..' . Just a few suggestions to show how easily 
it may be remodeled and modernized. 
A new Front Porch. 
One of those modern Front Doors. 
A Beam Ceiling, Hardwood Floors, and 
many built-in features, such as Sideboards, 
Closets, Kitchen Cupboard, etc. 

The Leading Feature of Any 
Home Is Comfort. 

That is why we are specializing on the construction of modern, moderate 
priced, step-saving homes. Let us help you get what you want in the 
building line. 




E. J. WARD & SONS CO. 



PROVO, UTAH 



PHONE 222 



SANITARY MEAT COMPANY 



PHONES 81 and 84 



82 WEST CENTER ST. 



THE SMOOT LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturers of Doors, Windows and Fixtures of all kinds 
We Furnish Estimates from Plans and Specifications 



598 Acad. Ave. 



Phone 20 and 40 



189 




190 



s^iv 



Beesley Marble and Granite Works 



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MAKERS OF 

HIGH 
GRADE 

MONUMENTAL 
WORK 

IN 

MARBLE 

AND 

GRANITE 

Provo, Utah 



Material and Finish the best; new and artistic designs; prices right. Send 
for our booklet, "The Buying of a Monument" also for designs and prices. 



EVERYTHING FOR 
THE LAWN 



Fine lawn grass seed, lawn fertilizer, 
lawn mowers, lawn rakes, dandelion 
pullers, lawn hose and sprinklers. In 
fact, there is no reason why you should 
not have a beautiful lawn. Just call and 
see us. 



CARPENTER SEED CO. 



Provo, Utah. 



The Seasons Newest 
Materials and Stiples 

Made According to Fashion's Latest 

Decree, Always Foremost at 

The Boston Store. 



Our departments of Dry Goods, Ladies," 
Men's and Boys' Ready-to-Wear, Shoes 
and Furnishings is the most complete in 
Provo or Utah County. Perfect in work- 
manship ; up-to-the-minute in style 

FOR LESS MONEY 
Save Money by Trading at 



THE BOSTON STORE 

Provo, Utah. 
We Buy for Cash— We Sell for Less. 



191 




192 



MAIBEN GLASS & PAINT CO. 

General Decorators 

Dealers in Paints, Glass, Wall Paper, Pictures and 
Picture Framing 



WE PAINT ANYTHING 



272 West Center Street 



Provo City, Utah 



Farmers and Merchants Bank 

1907 Provo. - - Utah 1915 




CAPITAL $50,000.00 SURPLUS $12,500.00 

Eight years of proficient service to the public, a cor- 
rect knowledge of present conditions, up-to-date banking 
equipment enable us to handle your business in an effi- 
cient manner. We appreciate your business. 

A% Paid on Savings Deposits. 
Interest Compounded Semi-annually. 




OFFICERS. 

T. N. Taylor, President. 
John F. Bennett, Vlce-Pres. 
J. D. Dixon, Casliier. 
Arnold Dixon, Ass't. Caslier. 


DIRECTORS. 

T. N. Taylor John F. Bennet 
Jas. A. Loveless Robert Bee 
S. P. Eggertaen J. J. Craner 
J. D. Dixon Andrew Knudsen 



I 



193 



THAT GOOD COAL 




Yard Phone 17 



The Real Coal is what you want. A good 
Coal, and what is there more needful or of 
more importance to have good than Coal? 
It can't he too good, as the more heat pro- 
ducing qualities it has the more economical 
it will prove to be. Try a ton of "THAT 
GOOD COAL" next time, from SMOOT & 
SPAFFORD, and you'll get the real think. 

Uptown Office — Commercial Bank 



SMOOT & SPAFFORD 

AGENTS 




Every good time is a 
good time to 

KODAK 



Add to the pleasure of your vacation by 
taking pictures of the places and peo pie that 
interest you. 

Everything for photography at our store. Let us show you how simple it is to 
take pictures the Kodak way. 

You press the button, we do the rest. 

OLSON & HAFEN 

Photographers, Kodaks and Supplies, Expert Kodak Finishing 
PROVO, - UTAH 



194 



^HE BIG 
DEPARTMENT STORE 



Stands for Quality and Your Money's Worth. These two 
features have always proved to be winners for us during our forty- 
nine years in business. They have made permanent customers, 
whose confidence and patronage continue year in and 3-ear out. 

All of our departments are complete and ever ready to supply 
all your wants. 



TAYLOR BROS. CO. 



PROVO, UTAH. 



^Mi^TTrnrnr- 



JTTnrrr^ ^^n 



KV/LErc5 

\\0 LAT£. H Oi^ «. S 
K\0 PU3L IC P/SiN C£ S 
NO USE of //nT^x/cAisT'; 
t^e S M^K/N 6 
NO d /H £ V^l / N Ti 
NO FLJR.T1N6 

HO u/AST£ OF Time. 
PgN'T KiPTh£ PRofS 




195 



The Columbia Theatre 

JOHN B. ASHTON, Manager 

Completed in 1914 Specializing in High Glass Productions 



Vaudeville and Feature Pictures 



Seating capacity 1250 



Cost $75,000.00 



PROVO ELECTRIC SUPPLY COMPANY 

Largest dealers in 

Electric and Auto goods south of Salt Lake City 



Everything Electric 



Everything for the Auto 



57 N. ACADEMY AVENUE 



ROY BOREN, Manager 



Suits Cleaned, 
Pressed and Dped 



NEW AND SECOND HAND SUITS 
BOUGHT AND SOLD 

EXCHANGE NEW SUITS 
FOR OLD. $5.00 BOOT. 



ORIENTAL CLEANING 
AND DYEING CO. 



THE 

PRINCESS 

EHEA TRE 



A L STALLINGS 
Manager 



Provo's Picture 
Palace 



75 N. Academy Ave. 



Provo. Utah 



High Class Photo Plays and Music 



197 




Snowdrift Chocolates 

Timpanogos Brand 
As satisfying as a view from the Heights of 

TIMPANOGOS 

Ask for them at your local dealers. 



$1.00 PER BOX 




$1.00 PER BOX 



STARTUP'S at PROVO, UTAH 



Sherwin Williams Paints 



33 East Center Street 



JOHNSON PAINT AND GLASS CO. 

PROVO, UTAH 



Wall Paper, Art Materials 

and 

Painters Supplies 

LET IT 

BE THE STYLE TO 

GO TO 33 EAST CENTER 

STREET 




Picture and 

Picture Framing 

a Specialty 

JOHNSON PAINT & GLASS 

COMPANY 

FOR EVERYTHING YOU 

WANT IN THEIR LINE. 



Provo Steam 
Laundry 

ALWAYS 
RELIABLE 

375 W. Center Phone 164 

J. N. GULICK, Prop. 



Art in 

TAILORING ^^^ CLEANING 

of Ladies' and Gentlemen's 

clothing is always the 

studp at 

MITCHELL'S 

101 N. Academy Ave. Phone 281 



198 




1'>J 



IF IT'S U-P-TO DA TE AND IN THE JEWELERY LINE. 
WE HA VE IT 

CHIPMAN JEWELRY CO. 

36 W. Center Street 
OUR MOTTO 



NOT CHEAP GOODS, BUT GOOD GOODS CHEAP 



M. H. GRAHAM PRINTING CO. 

PROVO'S LEADING PRINTERS 

Best equipped printing establishment south of Salt Lake City. Have just in- 
stalled one of the highest grade book and job cylinder presses in the State. 

PUBLISHERS OF 

PROVO POINTER 



Phone 285. 



30 South First West. 



Rochdale Mercantile Company 



It's not what you pay, it's what you get for what you pay that counts. 
We sell you what you want for what you ought and want to pay. 

ASK ABOUT IT. 

The Best Kind of Meats and Groceries 



Fifth North and Academy Avenue. 

PROVO, UTAH. 



Phone No. 274. 



200 




201 



Take a Hike 



Are you feeling fresh and trim? 

Take a "hike." 
Test your courage with a vim, 

Take a "hike." 
Roving, wild ambition don, 
Shady hats and bloomers on, 
Cross the country and be gone. 

On a "hike." 

With Coach Roberts in the lead, 

Forward strike! 
Trust to him with joyous speed, 

Take a "hike." 
Climb the fences, tramp the mead, 
Tread the stinging thistle weed, 
Up and on! the order heed. 

Of the "hike." 

Through the peaceful country lane. 

Take a "hike." 
Watch the people smiling plain. 

No dislike. 
There's a something in their stare. 
There's a feeling in the air. 
And a jolly word to share. 

Take a "hike." 



Cross the bridges, walk the rail. 

Round the pike, 
O'er the woodland and the dale. 

Lucky strike. 
With the "Doctor's" ready wit. 
And "King George's" timely hit. 
How the little moments flit. 

On the "hike." 

Do you want to wade the stream? 

Take a "'hike." 
Through the river's flowing gleam, 

If you like. 
In the water boldly dash. 
With a merry-sounding splash. 
Gain the shore-line in a flash. 

On the "hike." 

Pose for photo on the green. 

Take a "hike." 
Dougall, Walker, Scott, and Bean, 

Cheer our likes. 
O, that feasting, it is fine, 
"Sturdy Oak" and "CHnging Vine," 
Wait upon us as we dine. 

Such a "hike." 



See the sunset on the lake, 

Take a "hike." 
Have a care for Pleasure's sake. 

Forward strike! 
True believe you'll never drown, 
Neither man or boat go down, 
Hale and hearty back in town. 

From the "hike." 

— Minnie Iverson. 



202 



The Students Supply 
Association 



Is endeavoring to furnish Y 
Students with the suppHes they 
require, at a considerable dis- 
count. Expressions of patrons 
to the management have given 
us encouragement 

WE SHALL TRY TO DO EVEN 
BETTER NEXT YEAR 



GEO. M. NUTTALL 

Plumbing and Heating 

24 North First West 




PHONE 490 PROVO, UTAH 



DIXON 

REAL ESTATE CO. 

Agents for 

Home Fire Insurance Co. 

of Utah. 

Doinp Business in Real Estate, Loans, 
Fire Insurance and Bonds. 



Situated in Rooms 1 and 2 Farmers & 
Merchants Bank Building. 



Provo, 



Utah. 



203 




Irvine's 

The big Dry 
Goods Store 

Carries 
everything in 

Dry Goods, 

Shoes, and 

Ladies' and 

Children's 

Ready-to- 

Wear 
Clothes. 

Send us gour Mail 
Orders. We prepay 
the deliverp charges. 



R. R. IRVINE & SON 

45-51 Academy Ave. Provo, Utah 




W. H. Freshwater 

HARDWARE AND SPORTING GOODS 

Phone 123 

136 W. Center St., :-: Provo, Utah 



GRADUATES 



RExMEMBER WE ARE DEALERS IX BALANCES, MICRO- 
SCOPES, CRUSHERS, THERMOxMETERS, GLASSWARE 
AND CHEMICALS, LABORATORY SUPPLIES AS WELL 
AS HEAVY HARDWARE AND MACHINERY. 
Your patronage is cordially solicited. 

The Mine and Smelter Supply Go. 

Salt Lake Citv, Utah. 



PEOPLE ARE BEING EDUCATED to the fact that good, artistic furniture 
in the home, has a pleasing and satisfying influence upon our home life. 




Robinson Bros. & Barton Co. 

"The Furniture Center" 



204 




c '-iii 



One of the many pretty scenes along Provo River 



205 



READERS OF 
THE BANYAN 




S PRINTERS AND BINDERS of this book, we ask you 
j\ to pause just a moment, as you turn these pages, and give 
a thought to the process by which it has been produced. 
Contemplate the labor performed in the preparation of 
copy for the reading matter and illustrations, and don't 
forget to say a word of appreciation to those of your 
acquaintances who performed a labor of love in its 
preparation. Imagine, if you can, the careful technical handling a 
work of this standard must receive from the printer-architect, 
the engraver, the compositor, the proof reader, the pressman 
and the book binder. Picture to yourself an establishment with 
knowledge and facilities sufficient to produce a book so pleasing in 
materials, typography and color harmony. Then compare your 
mental picture with the real thing by calling on us and taking a 
trip through our departments. You will be amply repaid if you are 
not entirely familiar with modern printing and binding machinery. 

New Century Printing Co. 



30-32 West First North Street 



PROVO, UTAH 



Our equipment is so thoroughly complete that we 
promptly and efficiently handle the largest contracts 
for our product. Employees all anxious to please you. 



206 




rxxr 



GILES 
Photo-Engraving Co. 

508 Boyd Park Building 
Salt Lake City, Utah 






? 



trxx: 



% 



Qualiti) and Service 
in Photo Engraving 



~^x'x: -^^^"^ a<r^<r- 



1 
1 



207 



THE BANYAN 

1915 

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 

PROVO, UTAH, May 1, 1915 



PATRONS, TEACHERS, and STUDENTS, 
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY. 

Dear Friends :- 

We have endeavored to make the 1915 BANYAN a book 
which will be pleasing to you and one that will reflect 
credit upon our Institution. We hope that this Book 
contains nothing which will have a stinging effect upon 
any person; otherwise we feel that we owe no apologies; 
we have done the best possible under our limitations and 
we trust that you will receive our efforts as such. 

Yours respectfully, 

THE BANYAN STAFF. 

Loren A. Anderson, Editor 

Fayette Stevens, Asst. Editor 

Algae Eggertsen, Asst. Editor 

L. E. Brockbank, Bus. Manager 

Clarence Harmon, Asst. Bus. Manager 

Daisen Ross, Staff Artist 

Lea Jones, Staff Artist 

Philip Barkdull, Artist 

E. H. Eastmond, Artist 

Stanley Clark, Special 

J. E. Christensen, Photographer 

Walter Cottam, Photographer 

Le Grand Hardy, Photographer 

E» H. Holt, Advisory 

Eunice E. Nelson, Special 

0. F, Call, Special 



208 



NEW CENTURY PRINTING CO.. PROVO , UTAH 



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