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Full text of "The banyan"

LIBRARY 

Brigham Young University 




GIFT OF 

B.Y.U. 
378.05 
B22 

1917 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/banyan1917brig 



THE BANYAN 

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Being a Record of the 
Brigham Young University 
for the school year 1916- 
1917. Published by the Stu- 
dent Body, at Provo, Utah 



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ONE OF PRESIDENT BRIMHALLS FAVORITE WINTER RECREATIONS 



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Greeting 

years to come 



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W^li^Mlm y«« P^^'^d^r over the pages 
§^»lll^v Ifrflj o/ '^'■^' ^^'^^ -'^^.^ Banyan. 
' iWk^fmEw may you see again in mem- 
ory the events that charac- 
terize the banner year of 
m . - ' 4M h ^he B. Y. U.—the year that 
^'^ • *™i! A I saw the A Ima Mater placed 
1^-, "o/j the map" as she has 
\§y^ never been placed before. 
And may the spirit that 
dominates the institution 
thrill you as it ever thrills t 
a loyal Y man. 




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^Y CREED 

I would be true, for there are those 
iiho trust J7ie; 
I would he pure, for there are 
those who care; 
I would be strong, for there is much 
to suffer; 
I would be brave, for there is 
much to dare. 



I would be friend of all — the foe, 
the friendless; 
I tvould be giving and forget the 

gift; 

I would be humble, for I know my 
weakness ; 
I would look up. and laugh, and 
love, and lift. 




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PAUL KUBIN 



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Yesterday thy head was brown as are the flowing locks 
of love. 

In the bright blue sky I watched thee, towering giant- 
like above. 

Now thy summits white and hoary glitter all with sil- 
ver snow. 

Which the stormy night hath shaken from its robes 

upon thy brow; 
And I know that Youth and Age are bound with such 

mysterious meaning. 
As the days are linked together, one short dream but 

intervening. 



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MARION HARRIS, Student Body President 



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ilo our ratters and n?oti?tT5^ scatteredfarand 
luide ti^ru Lt?is broad luestlafvi, iKtee sacriliceand 
earnes'ttoll l?3V6 n?ad£ ^ossUe our attendance 
at ti?e 9rfet?3iT? Youn^ Univer^itT^ -Totte parental 
pair \^\iose teac[?lri<^s' t?ave Inspired u^ii^itt? tt?e 
\i\^\i ideals of' life ^\i\c\i seeiz ew\Q^^atia\[\ie?£,.^ 
Totho^e trusting soul? uKbo looi^ to U9 for lt?e 
perpetuatioaof ll?dr ct?€ri?t2ed topes, tf?eir Ideals; 
and tt?eir faith; reioicin^ ever as m carry l?i^b tbc 
banner of trutliand pro^resSoToour parents 
uiitb <?rateful r€n?e(i?brance and affectionate 
appreciatiofi u/£ dedicate 








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Board of Trustees 



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JOSEPH F. SMITH, President 

JESSE KNIGHT, Vice-President 

EDWARD H. HOLT, Secretary and Treasurer 

WILSON H. DUSENBERRY 

SUSA YOUNG GATES 

WILLARD YOUNG 

REED SMOOT 

LAFAYETTE HOLBROOK 

STEPHEN L. CHIPMAN 

RICHARD W. YOUNG 

JOSEPH R. MURDOCK 

JONATHAN S. PAGE, JR. 

JOSEPH F. SMITH, JR. 



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Old students return to school and greet one another joyfully, registration O^ 
takes places, and the next few weeks pass uneventfullv until — O^ 

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Founder's Day (lawns in all its glory. The grand parade down town surpasses in 
splendor any in the history of the school. 



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^^«J The tar-pull on the campus in the afternoon sees the Second-Years go 

^^ down to defeat. Training for the cross country run commences and — 



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Thanksgiving sees the results. The Second Years carry the cup around, while nCj 
the Third Years eat the turkey. Quiet is again restored until — Ufl 



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just behind him come trooping the first semester exams. The strain upon the '"^^.^ 
students is so great that they have scarcely recovered when — f^V 




the legisators visit the institution to ascertain its strength. Our State represen- 
tatives are not disappointed in us. 



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Thevj Saw. 




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With February comes the basket ball season, bringing to the old Y gym. 
the U. of U. They see — they conquer not. 




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The "Y" men return the visit of their "U" friends, with disastrous results 
to the northeners. As a consequence — 




our boys are off for Chicago a few weeks later. 



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In the meantime, and before, we have heen Hstening to a leeture course, 
the best the school has ever known. 




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The boys return from the East with second place in the world in basket 
ball, and after their welcome home — 




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they, with the rest of the student body, visit the Dramatic Club in "The House 
Next Door." 




18 




War is declared in the Nation, and the Preparedness Move is inaugurated 
the school. Our slogan: "To the front or to the farm." 







With the ranks thinned, but with patriotism "thickened" the men of the 
school climb the mountain to renovate the "Y". The students work while— 




the faculty — ah, well! 



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The afternoon track meet obliterates from our memories all things tend- 
ing to disturb our peace of mind. 




The crowning feature of the year is Girls* Day, which extends from spring 
vacation to the end of the year. What can we have but girls' days when the boys 
all go to war? 



Luck is always against the man who depends on it. 

A little push is often more lasting than a strong pull. 

We can't all be stars, but that is no reason why we should be clouds. 

It isn't until a man lives to learn that he really learns to live. 




20 




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Message From The Presidency 

F in this big world there were the same proportion of good 
will, the same prevalence of the spirit of helpfulness, the 
same ratio of personal purity and health, the same loyalty 
to labor, the same elevative quality of recreation, the same 
love for learning and triumphs of truth and righteousness, the same bal- 
ance of provisions for the physical, intellectual, moral and spiritual 
growth, the same abundance of faith, hope, and charity as characterizes 
our school, the dawn of the millennium would be here. 

If from our educational banyan tree each takes to his own field of 
life, not a flower to fade but a seed to grow; if from the fires of institu- 
tional inspiration each shall carry away a torch to illuminate his path of 
life, and kindle fires at which others may light their torches; if the silken 
threads of knowledge from our school spinning wheel be woven into 
character in the loom of life; if among our victories there is the conquest 
of self, we shall find a heaven partly of our own making; and if we are 
true to our God by whose grace comes the rest, then we shall be progress- 
ively perfect and perfectly happy. 

GEORGE H. BRIMHALL, 
JOSEPH B. KEELER, 
AMOS N. MERRILL. 



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O' Seniors 



Year after year unnoticed hastens by. 

And schooldife seems laborious at times. 

With all its routine, and the daily grind J~~1 



That differs but a little as days pass. 

But one day comes the nearing of the end. 

The end of school days, and companionship 

Of many suddenly groivn dear. 

And thots of leaving bring a loneliness, 

I\o more our voices in the hall will sound — ■ 

Our laughter silent be forever, here 

W here once tve were the life and soul of all. 

Strangers will come to fill the little space 

Made by our absence, and the work and play 

Of school — a thing so ordinary once, but noiv so big. 

The loss of it appals and brings fear. 

Fear for the longings of our life to come. 

Our parting is a victory, we have been 

A part of all, and notv our work is done; 

Are leaving for the greater school of life 

And therein is achievement and great joy. 

But underneath the gladness is a pain — 

An ache of sorrow that we go away 

And never shall return again, our love 

Is tvith our Alma Mater, she ivhose care 

Has filled our school days with dear memories. 

That thruout all our lives will keep us true. 

Farewell, we say with gladness and regret. 

Our gratitude and hopes we leave with you 

Our school, who gave to us so much 

Good-bye, dear school, our hearts we leave with you. 



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MILTON H. KNVDSEN 

"A/y pursp, my iierson, my e.xlreniisl 
nieiins /ic all unlocked to your occasion." 




"!'rt'cisel\ the ri^lit combination o/ 
holnr, gentleman and wit — " 



MYRTLE AUSTIN 

"She is not so very boolcish, but witli 

repartee and punning: 
She can set the savants laughing and make 

even sages smile." 



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FRANK GOOLD 

"Don't set your force 'gainst the river's 

course 
And expect to alter its motion." 



ELSIE TALMAGE 

"Teach me halt the gladness that thy 
hrain must know." 




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n ALLACE BROCKBANK 
"Of all the best things upon the earth. 



i 4 L ^ ''"'<' ''"" " ffi'J'f''^ friend is the best." 



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/,' /> MOMI I.. kM(,Hr 

A iniiit ii/ii) is s/roM.i; In lopr II illi iiriinii. 
I iiinn tlllii h iirollil In uorl:." 




illi joyous steps up p« our irny.s, 
/.ore Iriuls II hnio lo our diys." 



It M. (.. SMITH 

"Thouiih the slriujis nj his hriirl nun bo 

wreiichi'd nnd riirii 
Ky n maiden coquetlish itlin liiis led him 

iilonp:." 



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MABEL E. MORLEY 

"She IS mostly gay and happy, never sad 
or care beladen, 

Tho she sometimes siglis a little if a gen- 
tleman is near'^ 




JOSEPH BRI^KERHOFF 

"I liill leave some sign that I came by 
— My initials carved upon tho tree of 
life-'- 







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REUBEN L. KNIGHT 

"Those dear foolish days nhen the earth 

seemed all beatity 
Before you had knonledgc enough to be 

sad." 



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EZRA ]. POILSEN 

'And the hair of the husband said plain 

as could be 
Two fat chubby hands have been tugging 

at me.' " 




Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more 

Men were deceivers ever 
One foot in the sea and one on the shore. 

To one thing constant never. 



CLAL nnS HIRSCHI 

"I am not bound to win, but I am 
bound to be true." — = 











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LUCY ANN PHILLIPS 
"Believe me, thou canst never be for- 



got. 




"As ive pass along we meet strong 
hearts that are ivorth the knowing." 



MAZIE CAMPBELL 

"Let me liave a friend's part in th* 
uarmth of your welcome of hand and of 
heart." 






37 




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*'S/ir /i/iJ.s tonu.uvs in trrvs, hooks in 
ninniufi hro(tks, si'rnions in st(tni's atul 
f^ooil in evvrylhinfi." 



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ARUNh: MET^' DEN HALL 

"]\ illi \i)ii for a jri<'ii(l I iioiild count 
mrspll rirli." 



MARK L. LEins 

**He of III! men thtil t'vpr luy jotfUsh pye.s 

looked iif>on, 
fr as the best deserting of a fair lady — " 






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LOUIS BRANDLEY 

"Tall cloud iiiotinlains and vast sea 

spaces. 
If ind find tempest and fire. 
If hat are obstacles such as these?" 




MARY EZMA LEWIS 


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"A moment and then it icas over, 
A diamond blazed up on my eyes" 


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MABEL REYNOLDS 

*^And the whole world is lit ivith new 

glory 
As the sweet vows are uttered again.' 



1717 




NEWTON R. JACKSON 1 




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"W ith all good cheer he spake and i 
Imighed." 


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JESSIE SP AFFORD 
"Is she as kind as she is fair?" 



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A. LADRl JENSEN 

*') (Ji/ imn' hf'nrtl me i\u*itp from i'hitu 

A llinnsand timi's tin dotiht : 
U ell, / luire disetn ered he did not hnint 

U hat he tens tulkiif^ tdtout" 



MAHGl ERITK HIISII 

*'S/ie IS like a fish in icater 

And Cfin handle rein find rnrquot.'' 




STAN CLARK 

'"l fear he nHI prove fhe iveepinp. 
philosopher uhen he is old, heir.fi so full 
o* unmannerly sadness in his youth." 



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"I siiid to my heart, let us take our fit! 
Of mirth imd music and lore and 
laughter." 



HOII AKl) \. BLAZZARD 

"He dares do all that may become a mall 
II ho dares do more is none" 





iriLFORI) RAY NEIVTOIS 

J >- / ,' "He is not a man to be played uith 




43 



MARIE COLLETT 

"f riini lir<i(l lo toe and finger tip. 
Site's thoroufihly alive" 




MYRON L. CRANDALL 

Deep in the breast, beyond the shallotc 

sight. 
Is burned the mighty tvords, "Do right!" 



EUGENE DALTON 
A devotee oj school — if coeducational. 






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Grace is in all her steps, heaven in her 
fves, and in every gesture dignity and 
love. 



ELIZABETH LINDSAY 

Her voice was ever soft, gentle and low. 
An excellent thing in woman. 



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SENIOR GIRLS CLUB 




DANCERS 




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JUNIOR PROM COMMITTEE 



The Junior Prom. 




IN February 22, Washington's birthday, the premier event of 
the social calendar was staged in the Ladies' Gymnasium. 
The Junior Prom, this year eclipsed all previous efforts in 
the history of the institution. The national colors were used 
in the decorative scheme, these being very appropriate for the date and 
the occasion. On the walls were large mirrors draped artistically with 
red, white, and blue bunting. The ceiling of the old Gym. was com- 
pletely hidden with huge American flags, hanging in beautifully arranged 
groups. 

A picture of Washington, surrounded by a breastwork of Old Glory, 
hung in the front of the hall. Across the orchestra booth extended a 
great illuminated "MUNIORS " worked out in sididued lights with a back- 
ground of blue. The alcove on the left was furnished as a cozy corner 
for the patrons and patronesses, and that on the right was exquisitely 
arranged for the refreshments. Many potted plants and cut flowers 
added a delicate fragrance to the room, and unique leather programs 
with the augmented orchestra, delighted the dancers. 

The affair was in every respect a grand success. To the Juniors fell 
the work: to them is accorded the honor. 



49 



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If You Knock the Fresh out of Freshie 






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They would still be Freshmen to me; 



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men, Sure they'll Knock lh« "L" out of thee. 



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High School 

HE High School of the Brigham Young University, like every 
other department of the institution, has seen a year of un- 
precedented success during 1916-1917. Its courses have 
heen more complete; its workshops better equipped; and its 

teachers more thorough than ever before. Its motto, like that of the 

college, has been, ^"Move On." 

Competition, both inter-class and inter-school, has been very keen, 
and the High School men have proved their prowess in many well-fought 
battles, both physical and mental. 

As a social unit, the High School has made its influence felt. It 
has been well represented in all of the Student Body activities, and has 
done its share in providing entertainment for the school. 

Judging by the qaulity of the High School students, many of whom 
will doubtless continue on through college, the Brigham Young Univer- 
sity need have no fears for its future. Success and A Greater B. Y. U. 
are already prognosticated. 



Besides gathering no moss, a rolling stone gravitates down hill. 
Mind unemployed is mind unenjoyed. 

Doing good to serve one's ends 
Is serving God for dividends. 

All men may be born equal but they get over it before they die. 



Every normal person is born with a message for humanity, with a 
great sacred obligation to give his best to the world. 



81 



'4 \ 




\ 



82 



The Class of Seventeen 



ikf*^ 



fj9 



How fast hath Time sped by on silent wings. 
And in his flight hath made us Graduates: 
Hath left us. trembling, at the Gate of Gates; 

The Gate of Life and W ork. of Greater Things. 

Four years we've toiled the toil Ambition brings 
And striven hard to mark our upward climb 
By icork well done. And now hath come the time 

W hen all is past, save round what Memory clings. 

Yet. proud are we this Gate to pass today: 
Rest here awhile, and gaze along the road 
At nhat we've passed, dream of what lies before — 

The ever-broadening path to Truth's abode. 

Then, smiling, hence we take again our way — 
To Try, to Trust, to Triumph, evermore. 









Avoid the pleasures that leaves a burnt-sienna taste in your mouth. 

Man is the only animal that blushes, or needs to. — Mark Twain. 

God will only want in heaven those who know how to live. 

Every war is a national calamity whether victorious or not. 

Be sure you do not hitch your wagon to a falling star. 

In the long run a man becomes what he purposes, and he gains for 
himself what he really desires. 



I 



83 



D 




LERU\ I'YPER 



LESTER KAY 



ESTER HENRIE 



ZOE FLETCHER 



HATTIE ROBERTS 



ALBERT R. TAYLOR 



ELINIER TAYLOR 



ELDEN CLARK 




MERRILL BANKS 



CHARLES HATCH 

DONALD STUBLES 



VIRL JONES 




II 



IJ 

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i 



84 



FRANKLIN HARRIS 



LORA CREER 



STERLING PYNE 

KENNETH BISCHOFF 






ANNE SNOW 

FURNESSIA KNUDSEN 






MARION RAY 

ORZEL HUNTER 



LEE KAY 



ALTA NEILSON 



PAUL ROBERTS 

WILLIS BROADHURST 



85 



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i 




LA PREAL REESE 

ROY E. LYTLK 



FRANK ROMNEY 

VELMA HOWE 



ALICE YANCY 

TERRENCE HEATON 



DUTTON MILLER 

MILLIE SELCKE 



rxOSE JOHNSON 

LYMAN KARTCHNER 



JOSEPH RUSSON 

BERTHA MORRELL 




r^n/T nnyyn 



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r-7/7 




86 




LYNN TAYLOR 



ANNA LEWIS 



\ ELMA NUTTALL 



HOWARD D. ROBERTS 

NORINE RAY 



WILMA STALWORTHY 

GENEIVE HORTON 



FARNHAM Mac ARTHUR 



JUNE OGDEN 







AMELL\ HARRIS 



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87 



EARL 
HARMER 





VEOMA 
JONES 





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MARY E. 
HAEL 






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ALENE 
PHILIPS 




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Cottam& Dream of Fair LUonier|. 



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TEMPLE 

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VICTORY 



FILLED 



PROMPTLY 







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Nineteen High School 

V^ ^1^^^ URING this our banner year, which is gone but never to be 
^J uLSfr^B forgotten, our class activities have been characterized by 
I J aB^^^ ^I honesty and efficiency. Honors have come to us, and many 
^* W^^^^P^ victories we have nobly won, yet our path has not been ever 
strewn with roses. Failure has not been a stranger to us, but our mis- 
takes have only made us more cautious. jjU 

Our basket ball team won the interclass championship for the sec- 
ond semester; two of the members of the high school debating team 
belong to our class; and the winner of the cross country run was one of 
our number. 

The upper classmen, from the haughty Seniors down to the ever- 
green Freshmen, have met their Waterloo at the hands of our indom- 
itable athletes. 

In a social way we have been equally successful. The lively and !1J^ 
enjoyable parties given by the class shall not be the least of our pleasant 
memories in years to come. 

^ nil 

Life is service. The one who progresses is the one who gives his fel- 
■- i .- low-beings a little more — a little better service. 



^ I On the choice of friends our good or evil name depends. *^^ 

od 

I Ij j W hat is good is difficult. L'f ! 

Slow accuracy is better than rapid error. 
We all yearn and aspire but few of us determine. 
He is best educated who is most useful. 



95 




SECOND YEAR OFFICERS 



96 



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L bis i5 a rirstlear. 
Ste i:he First Year. 
See the ^Jrett^ First Year\. 







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98 



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First Years 




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anvthing. 



HE First Year Class of 1917 has been one of the most wide 
awake, energetic organizations of the High School. Our 
motto, "Do it now'' has characterized all of our actions, and 
we have never been found wanting when called upon for 
For our first semester officers we chose: J. Carl Christensen, 
President; Grace Rohbins, Vice-President; Mamie Thomas, Secretary 
and Treasurer; and Ardis Young, W hite and Blue Reporter. The second 
semester saw Carl re-elected as President, with Ardis Young First Vice- 
President; Ralph Murdock, Second Vice-President; Gertrude Olson, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer; and Helen Candland, W hite and Blue Reporter. 
To these people we owe much of the success of the class. 

Among our successful entertainments have been a Hallowe'en party, 
a basket party, a sleigh ride, and a dancing party. The girls held a de- 
lightfid "home coming" one time when there was a disagreement between 
them and the boys. 

As proof of our "life" let us remind you of the Easter ball given 
by us in the Ladies' Gymnasium. It was pronounced a success by every- 
one. It has been thought that a First Year Class is naturally slow, but 
our Gold and Green is still waving, and we "Do it now!" 



Life is the largest department store in the world: from it we buy 
continuously — and pay. 



Hoiv does yesterday s work appear today? 



Every thought is a blow that forges part of our lives. 






1 ou may scheme and dream — connive and contrive until your hair 
whitens, but you will never find a substitute for hard work. 




■iy^vv-;.^gw 



99 



CARL CHRISTENSEN 






GERTRUDE OLSON 



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HELEN CANDLAND 






A ORIS YOUNG 




100 





101 




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102 




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103 




Benedicts 

^SS ERE'S to the Benedicts and tlieir wives, those who have come 
r^/K^m^^'-' from the firing-line on the hattlefiehl of life to seek gems at 
|Q the altar of \^ isdonis temple. May their search he rewarded, 
'^ and may they carry away those ideals for service to God and 
man that can best he obtained within the walls of our University. 




Conducl is three-fourths of life. 

The man who sits down too much isn't likely to have a every good 
standing in the community. 



Nothing is politically right that is morally wrong. 



cr_,. 



The man who is looking backward never sees anything until it has 
passed by. 



104 



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JUNIOR BENEDICTS 



105 



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■DIXIE" I'ROIJUCTS 

"In Dixie Land we'll lake our stand. 
To live and die in Dixie." 








!^ 






MAPLE LEAF CLUB 

"We are the men oj the fair, far north." who each winter migrate to your sunny clime 
for educational and other purposes, and our hearts are warmed by the welcome we receive. 



106 



il 




III 



1(1 



SPANISH FORK CLUB 

The Spanish Fork-B. Y. V. students ivill ever be remembered for their alertness, their 
u'illinf:ness, and their lofty ambitions. They are always up and doing. Jf'atch them grow. 




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SANPETERS 

Since at the B. Y. we've "arriven," 

To stop eating carrots ue've striven. 

But it has been hard for the few who did try it. 

And we'll all be glad for old Sanpete's home diet. 



M 



107 







THE GEM ST\TK lidOSTERS CLl'B 
*^A lovely niininltiiit home is ours! 
hialto. (> Idiiho!" 



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! 




CACTUS CLl H 

To all the lands both north and south. 
Our Arizona proudly quoth, 
"Of all the jamilii's east or west. 
My Cactus family is 'he best!" 



yi 



108 










V 




ROYAL ROOTERS 




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GERMAN CLUB 



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109 



Student Body 



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The faces on yonder page The Studriil Hotly Officers 

Their names CoUcclcd from Anderson to Talma^e 

Their respective positions One of Each kind 

Their appearance General, nidely vtiryinfi 

Their work H hatever comes n/i for them to do 

Their workshop Wherever their work is 

Their aim To do all that they do do, well 

Tlieir slogan The school's — "Move On!" 

p^ II Their fa\()rite quotation ^^Worry and ^roiv fat" 

Tlieir eulogy.. ..T/ie best leaders of the best Student Body of the best 
University in the best country in this best of worlds 

The student Body — yes, it is the hest in the whole world. Not so 
very large, perhaps: hut those who ha\e felt that glorious, indomitable 
Y spirit, uuist recognize its power and strength. It is the Student Body — 
the sixth man — that does things; the Student Body that comes, sees, and 
always conquers. We care not what the world sees or thinks, what the 
world sees not or thinks not — for us it is the Y. 

Student Body — first, last, and all the time. 



Heaven is a habit, and so is hell. 

The world exists for the education of each man. 

To err is human, to forgive divine — Be divine. 

W ith all your getting get busy! 

Just you please listen to my advice; take nobody's. 



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STUDENT BODY OFFICERS 



111 




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STUDENT-TEACHERS 



112 



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WHITE AND BLUE STAFF 



113 




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BANYAN STAFF 



114 



Banyan Staff 



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EUGENE HILTON, Editor 
FRED BUSHMAN, Dramatics 
RAYMOND L. KNIGHT, Business Mgr. 
IVIE GARDNER, Associate Editor 
LESTER HENRIE, Assistant Business Mgr. 
WALTER COTTAM, Photographer 
E. M. JENSEN, Art Editor 
RUTH PARTRIDGE, Calendar 
MARY HALE, Calendar 
WM. C. SMITH, Athletics 



In this ivorld a man must be either an anvil or a hammer. 

No one can disgrace us but ourselves. 

Take off your hat to the man who minds his own business. 

He who envies admits his inferiority. 

Country is dear, but liberty dearer. 

]\ Nothing is more significant of men's character than what they find 

j! laughable. 



Men are born with ttvo eyes and one tongue in order that they may 



*■ " see twice as much as they say. 



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STUDENT BODY COLRT 




SOCIAL SERVICE 



116 










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117 



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DEBATING COACHES 



State Championship in College Dehatin 
Goes to B. Y. U. 




^g^ HEYTE (lone it aiiain. Our debators won both sides of the 
question of eonipulsory military training; and I tail and the 
A. C. U. submitted meekly because there was no other alter- 
native. Our boys also defeated Nevada onee more, giving 
us four straight victories over the western school. 

The Sophomore team was not so successful, but we need to lose 
occasionally to keep us at our best. 

Our Freshman team, however, spoke forth in good old B. Y. style, 
running away with all three judges, from the Westminster College at 
Salt Lake. 

The school year 1916-17 has been very successful. We have won 
four out of five college debates, and lost altogether the decisions of only 
four out of fifteen judges. In all the contests, team-work and the high 
standards for which the "Y" is famous were upheld by our champions 
of the forensic art. 




ljirui/1/2? 



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118 







U. OF U. VS. B. Y. U.— WON 0-3 



Hi 







U. A. C. VS B. Y. U.— WON 1-2 



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119 




NEVADA VS. B. Y. U. WON 0-3 




DIXIE \S. SOPHOMORE COLLEGE WESTMINSTER COLLEGE VS. B. Y. l. FRESHMAN 
LO.ST 3-0 WON 0-3 



120 




SPANISH FORK HIGH SCHOUL \ S. 1$. \. U. HIGH SCHOOL— WON 1-2 



HEBER HIGH SCHOOL VS. B. Y. U.— WON 1-2 



PLEASANT GROVE VS. B. Y. U.— LOST 3-0 



PLEASANT GROVE HIGH SCHOOL VS. B. Y. U.— LOST 1-2 



Read the best books first or you may not have a chance to read them 



at all. 



If it be right, do it boldly. — Gilpin. 



121 



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ARDIS YOUNG 

VTinner of Medal in High School Story 

Teliinj; <!oiile.-I on (:iirls' Day 



DICIE BRIMHALL 

Winner of Medal in College Story 

Tellini: Contest on Girls" Dav 



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EARL HARMER ELSIE JOHNSON HOWARD BLAZZARD 

Winner of the Jex Medal in Winner of the Hiendselnian Winner of the Medal in the 
Oratory Medal in Oratory Student Body Oratorical 

[^ Contest 




M 



122 




B. Y. U. Athletics 

NE of the features contributing to the real, live spirit of the 
B. Y. U. is its athletics. The student enters school with the 
enthusiasm of Foiuuler's Day track meet tlrowniu';; the cries 
of his work-accustomed nmscles against the reartion of 
lethargy. Every boy in school who has not previously received honors 
may compete for his class. No sooner is this event past than two big 
turkeys call to the class having the largest number of long-distance men, 
to win them for a Thanksgiving feast. 

The class series in basket ball requires the enlistment of novices, 
and thus develops their prowess. The inter-school boxing and wrestling 
tournament also offers an opportunity for gratifying the demands of the 
muscles during the winter months. Spring brings her meets and general 
activities. 

From material developed in these different events, contestants are 
selected to compete against other schools. The B. Y. V. may well be 
proud of her record this year. In her name, the Collegiate record for 
the high jump has been raised to 6 ft. 5-^s in., and the high hurdles was 
made in 15 seconds flat, which is the College record. Her basket ball 
team is a wonder, and in this its second year it has, under the direction of 
Coach Roberts, developed into an impregnable organization. It won, by 
a safe margin, every game within the State, and then had the privilege 
of being first team to represent the school in the East, where it was at 
once the admiration and awe of the other contestants. Of the sixteen 
teams in the tournament only one was able to defeat the Utah quint. 
That was the Illinois Athletic Club's six-footers. All honor to the boys 
who carried our Glorious Banner to victory — the best College team in 
the world. 



Resolve and thou art free. — Longfellow. 

There never was a right endeavor but it succeeded. — Emerson. 

W^hen a man is no longer anxious to do better than well, he is done. 



if. 



124 



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125 



TAH INTER OOLLEGIATE 
ASKET BALL 
lONSHIP 1917 

WON BY 

BRI6HAM YOUNG 

'INIVERSITY 

PROVO UTAH 



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£3 

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STATE PENNANT WON BY B. Y. U. 



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MEDALS WON BY B. Y. U. BASKETBALL TEAM 



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126 



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1917 BULLETIN 



Byc«Y 8o 37 
4C V. Y 43 22 

U ^ Y 54 3a 
oyS^^ 50 19 

MC^« Y 47 71 

5gv9Y77 /6 
IAC>«Y 14 77 



Record 
Made by 
B. Y. U. 
Basket Ball 
Team, 
1916-1917 



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Training School 



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Educational Ideals of the Brigham Young 

University 

By Prof. J. L. Broun 

HK present national movement towards preparedness to meft the 
crisis that confronts us, and especially the emphasis that is placed 
on the value and necessity of industrial preparation is a full justifi- 
cation of the ideals that were implanted in this institution hy its 
Prophet and Pioneer founder, Brii;hani ^ oun^. Its whole life's 
historv, like that of its founder, who inspired the underlyinj; economic princi- 
ples of our Commonwealth, stands for the value of industrial preparedness. 

Vie point with pride to the fact that our institution was one of the first, if 
not the first to modifv the old traditional academic course of study and to in- 
troduce subject matter and practice that prepared students for productive 
labor. \ ocational Guidance is a new term in education, but its s])irit was im- 
j)lanted in the Hri^ham \ oung L niversitv at its founding;. Its sons and daugh- 
ters are found in every field of industry, and the source of their success they 
trace back to the inspiration thev received here to do sometbinj; worth while 
for humanity. 

The educational value of effort, the doctrine of interest, the modern con- 
ception of the nature of knowledge itself are based upon participation in social 
iictivitv. Dewev savs. "All information an<l svstematized scientific subject mat- 
ter have been worked out under the cotiditions of social life, and have been 
transmitted by social means. There is truth in the statement that education 
nuist first be human and onlv aft-r that ])rofessional. The material of educa- 
tion is humanized in the degree in which it connects with the common interests 
of men as men." 

If we look for an explaiuition of the wonderful social spirit of our school 
■we shall find it a natural outgrowth of its fundamental educational ideals. Our 
students who lune gone out into other institutions are unanimous in the dec- 
laration that, go where you will, you cannot duplicate the spirit of the Brigham 
^ oung I niversitv in anv other institution. It is that which sets our school off 
in a class by itself. It is to be hoped that our spirit of progress will help us to 
retain this distinction and that we will ever increase our efforts to prepare our 
students for productive social .service. 




11 




130 




MEW ANA DRAMATIZED BY THIRD GRADE 
Presented in School-made Costumes 




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THE CANOE SONG OF THIRD GRADE PUPILS 




131 



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CLASS IN HOUSEKEEPING FOR SEVENTH AND EIGHTH (;R\I)E GIRLS 
Trying out various kinds of cleansing media for kilchen utensils. Art Supervision II. 




PART OF THE CRAFTWORK CLASS, JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



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132 



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THE SIXTH GRADE MAKING A STUDY OF POSTAL SERVICE 




CHARACTERS IN WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY EXERCISES 



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TRAINING SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 




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CROCHET AND CROSS-STITCH ^S URk BY FOURTH GRADE PUPILS 



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Myster Girls 



LUIS BENNION, President 

CORA GARDNER, Vice-President 

ESTELLA MANWARING, Secretary and Treasurer 

CLEO PEARCE 
RUTH HAYES 
MEDA MELDRUM 



LAVERN HILLIER 
LAUREL MINER 
MYRTLE THAYNE 
ELENA HASSELL 
LAVERN HOLMAN 
OLGA WONDERLY 
MONA PATTERSON 
EDITH PRICE 
CLARA ROGERS 



EVELYN McBRIDE 
BEE ORRICK 
LELA PETERSON 
LOIS SUMSION 
LILLIAN THOMPSON 
HELEN GOTTFREDSON 
LEONA LONG 
RUBY PARK 
LUCILLE FORREST 
TACY IRONS 
THELMA SMART 
RUTH GOODRICH 
EMMA SMITH 



THELMA EGGERTSEN 
BERNICE DAVIS 
AFTON HYDE 
BEATRICE THATCHER 
ANNA STARK 
RHODA GROSBECK 
FLORENCE RAY 
CATHERINE WHITING 
GENEVA SHAFFER 
SIGNA LAW 
BEE ANGUS 
ADELLE PETERS 



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136 





m 



The House Next Door 



AROMQREL DIXON, Director FRED BUSHMAN, Business Manager 

LOCK HALES, EUGENE DALTON, BYRON BECK, RULON CLARK 

ORTON DURHAM, B. GLEN SMITH, D. REES JENSEN, ALVIN KIRKHAM 

MABLE MORLEY, FERN BROADBENT, DELLA ADAMS, ELSIE JOHNSON 



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TOWNS VISITED BY DRAMATIC CLUB 



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PLEASANT GROVE 


RICHFIELD 


SPRINGVILLE 


SPANISH FORK 


MT. PLEASANT 


HEBER 


MANTI 


SALINA 


PROVO 



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There is a better man behind an honorable failure than the one be- 
hind a dishonorable success. 



lo 



139 



2l 





"Music, niort* lliau an\ tiling else, has power to stir the deeper soniethiiif; in ni> nature." 

nil (I hitman. 

HE work of the music (lepartiucnt duriiiij the vear 1916-1917 has 
been of a quality worthy of the highest eoinineudation. We may 
truthfully say that our musical orj;anization is one of the most 
efTicicnt in the West, and as for its position in our hearts — it is sec- 
ond to none in tlie world. Under the leadership of Professor Reid 

the department has received fresh im])etus, and is rapidly going forward to the 

achievement of "bigger and better things" in music. 

Mi.ss Jepperson, Miss Edmunds, and Mr. Nelson have added greatly to the 
success of our music by their vocal and piano work, and the Ladies Chorus, 
under the dir<'ctioii of Miss Jepperson, lias done great things. 

We have an astonisliing number of talented piano students who, under Pro- 
fessor Reid, are accomplisliing some very excellent work. 

The Symphony Orchestra, under the leadership of Professor Gudnunidsen, 
has attained unusual perfection for a school orchestra and have given a number 
of concerts. The violin work, also, deserves special mention. Professor Sauer 
and his band liave been tlie means of keeping up our B. Y. U. enthusiasm as well 
as our national patriotism. 

With "service" as their motto, the minor organizations, the Ladies String 
Quartet, the Ladies Trio, the Mixed Trio, Wood Wind Quartet, and the Men's 
String Quartet have all been active, and have greatly helped to raise our music 
department to the high position it now occupies. 



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The fare of an old friend is like a ray of sunshine thru dark and 
gloomy clouds. 



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140 




LADIES STRING QUARTETTE 




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WIND WOOL) INSTRUMENT QUARTETTE 



142 









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B. Y. U. BAND 




QUARTETTE AND TRIOS 






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143 



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111. VI. 11. ^umphnuu dVrhcstra 



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/ "Fifth Symphonu 
u-'-.'Ulegrn con htui 
h •-Andanlv con nwto 

: ( I ..a,; S..I,.) ■■ 7„ The U •«/ K -inJ" 

Mix'- /'Ain-nic \1clJriini 

? a—Prclutlc 

h---Ariu (hmm ihc r sharp Sonalu) 

4. iWuol S.uln) "A nream" 

Mr Murnj Roberts 

5 Oicrturi: ".\fcir\ H iics nf II'/n(A<tr" 



Beethoven 



Sailer 



Jamefell 
Sihuniiin 

Burllell 



.\ icolai 



CLiilla\i^ Hall 

l^l>^lu-5^;uJ, jHan-h I 1 :-: TiSLl ^.1. M. 



(I''n-lirstr;i yrrsmu-l 



M S. tlinliiminlson. 


Violas 




1st Violins 




Oboes ' 


.Mill' I'liilllp^ 




Kn-lt roU'iuali 


:^li. nlf H.iiiy ' 


l\>-iiiifili i;u.vlaiit 


.■ 


lt>'V .lollIISllll 


:'arN'\ .l<*p person 


V:intii>-lt Clark 
l.elloy Uolirits 




1 W An.liTson 


Bassoon 

l'(Mi, l!(il..jl Sam-- 

Horns 


Kvji !.»'« is 
DmmliiM M. Ski 
i.i.iiis Hiiyo 


lie 


Cellos 

l..-t:i i:<» l;itl.'.- 


H«w:iril rflirlici'l 






Ahiii Hula- 


.Miirviii Strong 

:M;irc;il*iM Tliorm 


nil 


Basses 

\\V-.s|r> lioluM.SlUI 


Virl Jiilii-s 

Cornets 

tl.-rlifil I'yn*' ' 






..i-liitiil Walkor 


IV 1, llrnwii 1 


2nd Violins 




(■:rit I.inplidal 


1 


l.iro\ I'MHT 






Trombones 


!Ier<l llardiifi- 




Flutes 


•i.iiii .Ii*p|'fr>-<ni 1 


i:il«hi Nilssi.ii 
Mob.T M. M«|i 
M at'I M.'ltlrum 




Kliiifi- N>'tson 
iM.'lin V.ili \V:ip<ii.n 


Miltnii Marshall 

i;,.. \ii)iilsl..Ir 1 


Xornirt Mni'eiin 
Munnii* riiirk 
Xoniiiin Stt-.'U- 




Clarinets 


Tuba 

\' .ilU'i ,i.'M|i. r-i'll 


luscphhi'- Cniiifl 


111 


K. 11. Wotfiii.l.n 


Drums and Tym. 


rfiila Ivf- 




I'M^inr Williams 


!,a*^rfiKi' Ki'|»i-i'si,.i 


I'rol CiaiMhili 




.I..i!.f< \VIIliaii:s 


!';.mk l(,im-<> 



B. Y. U. SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA PROVES 
GREAT SUCCESS 



fCoiuiituiiK-ation.) 

Willi.- ihH B. Y. r. tottPii is 111 Chi- 
ciigo com. sling for %vorltl honors m 
jl'SskGi l.all. iin evt'tit quu'tfr. but piT- 
haps iiior.- signiticaiu in ih.- long 
I rim. wa* taking placp in Provo Wed- 
IncsUay Ui^'lii. Thir was the :<ym- 
' phony conc-Tt by Proi. ' CntlniLnu- 
son's orflit^str::. The presi-nutiun 
j reprtfi.-nts tlio thlrti season v.hf'n th'* 
jorgHuizatioii has altalpi^d tn thn. 
high muslcnl acUlevement. 

Thf program consisted of Bee- 
! ihov^-irs KiCih Symphony, followed 
[by .^flections from Jamefcldt anil 
. Schiiroan and closing with an o\e:- 
Ituro, "Thf Merry Wivps of Windsor" 
I by Nlcolfti, There are .M n\euib«'rs in 
'this student orohf-s(ra ^\ith :i coniple- 
jmi-iit of U diffcroni kinds of insin:- 
1 monte— tbp full InstrumenlHtion ro- 
quired for ihe inierprotailon of ih»* 
>;ymphoriy. 

With a niodi''si\ rharactt.Tl&tlc or 
Prof, tliidmuudson, no unusual at- 
tompt was made lo ndvpriise ihc 
,ovent; yet College hall. «Mri fll'cd 
with Oil' quiet lovers of nitisir from_ 
the schfjol and from (h«* ciiy; und 
Judging hy the rapt att'-ntlen thoy 
were nut disappointed. 

To aprec-jiie :■. f^ympliony by Bt-c 
iliover reqjlr^s .ne r.anie yyinp*--, 
thetic alertness of the spirit that ; 
finds pay in ihe varied and chang- 
ing aspects of nature; In iho flash , 
of fiunbeama. the glint of walera, , 
the movement of clouds, the hlos- ' 
BomJng of orchards, the play of sun- 
set colors and the mysii*- charm of 
moon light- 
As an educational triumph the sig- 
nificant feature of the performance 
was the manifest enthusiasm on the 
faces of the young musicians them- 
selves. 

The months of study ni'cessary to 
this recital served only to heighten 
their aprecuitlon of the master- 
pieces presented, which fart is ai- 
wavB a characteri--*tic of classic art. 
be it literature, painting, muelc or 
what-not: whereas a similar period 
devoted to rag time music would 
satiate and dIsgiiPt. 

T.ong after our basket ball heroc-s 
shall be forgotten, these youne peo- 
plo v.ill-he ni-gnnizlng oirhet;traF and 
:<liinitlu':ng the hc.uiti'u' in musi^ 
Ihrouphntit the h.iirh'ts U>nnii and 
jcl'it-i of th- f-nllre Ir.Vrnipnr.t:^", 
\ region. 



144 



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LADIES- CHORUS 
The picture does not in any way adequately represent the ladies of the chorus, but it was 
impossiLle to get another taken. 




EUKELALIE CLUB 



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MASTER BUILDERS 



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SKETCHING 




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Vcittetwb VWorVed \vom Orvokinal Uesvoq 



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Viddfu and rnaiori receivethe. alientiotj 




o1 ^Vie nurses, pt^oiesb»oncii/voiV\eruAise^, 



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CLINTON LARSEN 




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MEDALS WON BY MR. LARSEN 



Gems From The Rostrum 




C 



What we see in life is in our souls. 

What we see in these majestic mountains is also in our souls. 

■ — Dr. Fisher. 



Wliate'er you re of, and it of you. 
You are then it and it is you; 
You are no longer simply you. 
You now are more, you're B. Y. U. 

— Roberts. 



W hat is not worth our loyalty 
That is not worth our time. 

Be it labor, be it pleasure. 
Or sentiment sublime. 



— Blazzard. 



Not alone the work we do. 
But length of time we do it; 

Brings out the worth of me and you 
Where other folks can vieiv it. 






-Jackson. 



No matter how good any of us are, we are not 
quite so good as Mormonism. 

—G. H. B. 



The tvisdom of God consists of applying knowl- 
edge at the right time. 

— J. E. Talmage. 



The patience to wait and the strength to endure 
are the elements of success. 

— E. S. Hinckley. 




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156 







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157 



( 



Senior Girls' Statistics 

ISame -^8^ Nickname Faiorile Sport Size oj Shoes 

Aline Menderihlll <Jiiestionable Splinter Trainiiiu l-ook and see \—> 

o 

Lisle Lindsay O dear! "Minute" Star gazing Double | li ( 

Jessie Spafford Sweet Sixteen Cutey Tripping the light Big enough for a 

fantastir hal)\ doll -^j — -, 

Elsie Tahnage Too young to be "Els" Writing love notes Not conspicuous, 

sophisticated anyway 

Vera Snow Same as Santa Slim Talking to Dell Speak for thera- 

Claus Webb selves 



I - 



K^ Marguerite Huish Younger than she Marg Tennis A secret 



larg 
looks 



yy 



Vera Eggertsen old enough to be sister Eggersten Housecleaning Ask Luther r--J 

Mrs. U^ 

r 

Lucy Philips Debatable Lucifer Teaching boys to Two feet 

like Shakespeare 



n 



Mable Morley Shell never see Mother Acting well, just Constant 

20 again acting 

(__ J Mazie Campbell The family's eldest Never been ex- Helping others As small as the 

posed girl 

Louise Ogden Promised not to Dear Knight-Hawking The same as the 

tell in Biologv lab. foot 

tin 

Myrtle Austin Something to raise Myrt Studying A good under- Bf"! 

your eyebrows at standing rT— .i 

Mary Ezma Lewis Age of innocence "Faery Queene" Lou Brandley Mere suggestions 

Lael Irvine Decreasing yearly Too dignified for Bluffing Size of Sighs 

such frivolities 

Mable Reynolds I wonder Pet Playing solitaire Old Conifort.size 14 

Mane Collet old enough to Collie Making a noise Hush 
know better 



158 



Senior Girls' Statistics — Continued 



a 



Weight Eyes Favorite Saying Accomplishment Ambition Illness 

gentle reader Seldom noticed I should worry Smiling To grow Sweetness 



Can't tip the 

scales 



Less than half 
a ton 



Decreasing 



Googoo I'll be darned Speechifying To remain Dance craze 

young 

Twinklers Never heard Being pleasant To travel vo- Too sweet to i > 

die-ly last fT-J 



Anything but Oh— Hal! 
dreamv 



Wears a spark- To learn farm- Hal-itis 
ler ing 



'Fraid to tell 



^y^ Never better 



c 



A long one 



Never shut Rule of three Physical To remain a Mathematics 

snowbank It/; 

Mischievous Good-night Winning love To go to court Seven o'clock 

games class „ j. 

Never wet O for single bless- Cooking To be a staunch If any, its a, — -j 

edness Lutherian secret l<^ 



Piercing Be careful or I'U Jack of all To be on time Yawning 

get my jacket off trades pj j j 

Sighing To change her Indifference 

name 



^ fj Constant 

QQ Tips the scales Oh, my! No, really 

(_ I Not worth 



Soulful 



mentioning 



balanced Heavenlv 




Have I done any 
good in the 
world today? 

We won't go home 
till morning 



Being herself To have a Just tired 
home 



Controlling To he Knight- Knight-mares 

light Rays ed in June 



cS 



Changes with 
the seasons 



Pools ( Save the O Cats 
men, I can 
swim) 

They reflect the You dirty little 
blue of heaven piece of cheese 



Somewhat Pensive shades Where is my wan- 

ncfty dering beau to- 

night? 

Feather weight Swamps I can't stand rain 

but I don't mind 
Hale 
Requested that Like stars on Mercy sakes 
it be not pub- a frosty night 
lished 



Giggling To out-Shake- Being clever l^ll 

speare Osmond '' 

'/:■ " i 

Sewing, dailv Adding a plain Baby talk f^i 

sewing. Why? band to the . 

sparkler L» 

Being in style To get thru Heart trouble 



To be a Hale, Red hair ^ ( 

hearty lady - 



Sighing 



Evervthing To capture a Yawning ufj 

soldier p_^ 



Q 



ys9 




cr.' 









160 



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D 

CD 

cn 







161 



fi^i^ac:] 



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M 




Here's to your tiarmesl and cleanesl friends in school 
ir hose li/is at birth knew not the silver spoon. 
Hut uho. by honest toil, make this their greatest boon 
I) ith eyes on floor, their minds to heights oj uisdom soar. 




( 



t 



'i 



162 



A Boyle-istic Class. 

(Compositely) 

Brother Boyle (calling roll I : "De Lila? — Does anyone know anything 
about De Lila?" 

Vehna H: "I think her mother is ill, and — " 

Brother B.: "Yes — she told me." (Finishes roll, takes up a book of 
Chaucer. I "Turn to the 'Knight's Tale.' Mr. Hawkins, will you read for us?" 
Willard: "I can't read Chaucer." 

Brother B.: "Yes, you can. The main thing in reading Chaucer is to get 
your feet in, you know. — Have you kids got something funny down there? Aline, 
(. i'' June, Mary, will you be good if I get you some paper dolls?" 

f ^ Aline: "Well, I'd rather have a rubber one that squeaks. Paper ones can't 

I J make any noise." 

T " ( Class proceeds. Discussion of 'The Faerie Queene." I 

Brother Boyle: "Albert, tell us what the 'Faerie Queene' is about. Give 
us the time, the place, the girl." 

Albert : "I can give you the time and the place, but not the girl." ( Laugh- 
ter. Albert blushes. ) 
t Brother B.: "Well, who was the Fairy Queen — queen of the Cannibal 

* Islands? The reason Spenser represented Elizabeth as the Fairy Queen was 

that he wanted to feed her taffy." 

( Class proceeds. Brother Boyle reads a doubtful line in Othello. ) 
Brother B.: "Scott, did you get that?" 
Scott: "No, but I'm going to. It'll be nice, won't it?" 
Lyman K.: "What will be nice?" 

Scott: "My hobby horse for Christmas." (Laughter. Scott awakens.) 
Brother B.: "Why is it that the Jews have always been hounded, perse- 
; cuted, dogged, ridiculed, hated — " 

iyi De Lila: "And elected governors?" 

[,'"j (Bell rings. General stir in the class ranks. ) 

j'lf f Brother B.: "I must assign the lesson. Read history for the next seventy- 

;' five years — I mean, the fourteenth century — Brother Py per!" 

(No answer. Giggles. Elden Clark pinches LeRoy on one side; Frank 
Gould whispers, "Wake up!") ■■ 

yPyper: "Huh? Oh— what's the matter?" ' 

Brother B.: "I am assigning the lesson. We'll have some of Tennyson's A 

. poems, also, Lyman, you bring "The Princess," Willard bring "The Gardener's J I 
Daushter," Elden bring "Dora," and Walter bring "Maud"— J I 

Walter: "I'd rather bring Eva — but she's gone home." m I 

^ Brother B.: "Well, all your fellows bring the girls I told you to, and we'll m I 

have good company tomorrow. Gooy-bye." '^ 



II 



163 



^ 




''^ol^^'c 



ur Henderson EnTerldins a.\ ex 







0-^^^tS^' 



Olqa cKeri^hes her 
(jer-man Poll. 




^ 

i 1 I B^-o- ^emWs first 
i I - Lesson >n S\oc\c3udainj 





"TTliss tiif'ing puts 
''Her UttTe Rnqers 



iti Ihe Ct-eam' 




o<i:^-: 



f ?. fi?*! 31 






'■^^^lfl^''< 



a 3en(iev^oot. 





^'^V^ 







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I 



164 



Once in a Hundred Years 



I 



A curious thing appears 
Professor Osmond forgets to come, 
Nels Anderson for once gets dumb. 
Sterling Harris forgets his gum. 
Once in a hundred years. 

II. 

Once in a hundred years 
Leona and Emil forget to meet; 
Professor Morgan neglects to cross his feet; 
Y teams MIGHT court a little defeat — 
Once in a hundred years. 

III. " 

But not in a hundred years 
W ould W illis quarrel with dear Elaine, 
Or Charley Mitchell go stepping a Jane, 
Or "Sfeeefer" take a wife again — 
Not once in a hundred years. 



Ei 








.-^, 



^-^ 



165 



Wonders from the Classes: ^^ 

Prof. Boyle's adjectives. 

Prof. "Webb's control of slang. 

Prof. Peterson's knoivledge of books. 

Prof. Snow's calmness. 

Prof. Roht^rU metaphors. ,, 

Prof. Smart's personifications. {(iK, 



n 



Prof. Holt's fund of information. 

Prof. Henderson's power of observation. 

Prof. \^'hittaker's Cicero-lian ability. 

Prof. Hayes' earnestness. 

Prof. Osmond's gayety. 

Prof. Eyring's algebraic phenomena. '~Z^ 

Prof. Maeser's "physical" strength. Cn 

Prof. Dusenberrys seriousness. t-*! 

Prof. Reed's mustache. 

Prof. Partridge's solemncholy-ness. 

Prof. Reynolds' girlishness. 

Prof. Eastmond's "O/f/ Dutch Cleanser" (he chases dirt). 

Prof. Morgan's outlook on life. 

Prof. Jensen's eye-twinkles. 

Prof. Jones' silent laughter. 

Prof. Nelson's compositions. 
' ^ Prof. Keeler's gullibritity. 

Prof. Clark's tailormade appearance. 

Prof. Swanson's sense of humor. 

Prof. Bauer's big bassoon. 

Prof. Merrill's teeth. 

Prof. Dixon's eternal freshness. 
|n*l Prof. Dunn's matrimonial success. 

Prof. Saul's love for his students. 



166 






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168 



V 



Banyan Calendar 
1916-1917 



APRIL, 1915 

Friday, 21st — Where last year's calendar ended. 

Saturday. 22nd — Fayette swipes two pies. 

Sunday. 23rd — This is Shakespeare's birthday, but will celebrate to- ^ 
morrow. 

Monday, 24th — Shakespeare program during the theology hour. 

Tuesday, 25th — "Orus the Great" complains that "there ain't nothin' 
doin' nohow." 

W ednesday, 26th — Campus day. Students wage a clean-up war, all 
around the campus. 

Thursday, 27th — Things are humming, so far as the Seniors are con- 
cerned. 

Friday, 28th — Look what the Seniors can do! 

They don their caps and goivns. and jeweled pins, 
And bid us all to look upon them well; 
Hand out the White and Blue, and entertain — 
Small wonder that their heads begin to swell! 

Saturday. 29th — Everybody goes to the Columbia to see Miss Dixon 
play in "Kindling." 

Sunday, 30th — Some people are good; others aren't; we are! |^t^ 



MAY 



i 



Monday, 1st — Here starts the month of blossoms, lambs, and love-sick- _ 

ness. We know something soft is going to happen. <^ 

'/^ Tuesday, 2nd — We're right, but we won't tell. 

Wednesday. 3rd — Separate meetings. Plans. The earth is still turning, 
and Ireta puts a flower in Frank's buttonhole. 

Thursday, 4th — Frank congratulates Ireta on having put the flower in 
his buttonhole. 

(Continued) 



169 



Friday. 5th — It's Girls" Day. 'Nuff sed. ( Reference, Milton's "Paradise 

Regained." ) ; 4 

Saturday. 6th — We recuperate — partly. I ^ 

-• 1 Sunday, 7th — Election in sight. 1 1 j 

1 Monday. 8th — We girls "stump" for an all-girl corps of officers. (And 

we could have Vni if we wanted 'em! ) 

I j Tuesday. 9th — E phirihns unum. We certainly do. 

' ' W ednesday. 10th — T\ e privately elect 'em. 

-t ,, Thursday. 11th — The Board of Control does the elimination stunt. 

(]i ■ . . II' 

^ 4 Friday. 12th — Political parties — "Whites" and "Blues" — organize. ' ^ 

I 1 1 Saturday. 13th — Statesmen in embryo meet to make plans. The cam- 

paign begins. 

I U Monday. ISth — Jex Oratorical Contest won by LeRoy Hafen. 

W ednesday. 17th — Marion Harris wins in the presidential campaign. 
We always did like Marion. 

Thursday. 18th — We congratulate you. President Harris. 

{y Friday. 19th — Honor Day. Charming young ladies present trinkets to 

the workers. 



Saturday. 20th — "Seventeens" take to the hills — "far from the madding 
crowd. " 



l| V (Continued) 



111 



iM 



' Sunday. 21st — Apostle O. F. Whitney delivers the Baccalaureate sermon. 

Monday. 22nd — Jack and Helen worry about examination. 

Tuesday. 23rd — A slight argument takes place between J. G. Olsen and 
Fern Broadbent. 

I I ff ednesday. 24th — Albert and Elaine make a last call at the Columbia. 

I Thursday. 25th — Elden to Stan: "Wliy is an examination?" ( 

'; Friday. 26th — Our dreams are conglomerate masses of exam, papers and 

" Y balls. 

Saturday, 27th — The morning after the night before (we wish we had 
not imbibed so much pink crepe paper punch! ) 

Sunday, 28th — Eleventh hour repentance is better than none, and we 
can't afford to flunk again. 



I 



9 

I 



Monday, 29th — Misery loves company, so Larry Wood comes over. She , ,, 

had some punch, too. I / 1 



170 



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ni 








'^""■'^^n^:^ 











n 

III 








171 



Just Supposing— 



Ray had graduated before Louise came back to school. 

Ezma had neglected to wear her diamond once in a tchile. 

Marion and his "wife" should port. 

Snell couldn't ever look serious. 

Ross should fail to go home with Knell after choir. 

Edgar Jensen should live elsewhere than at the Cafeteria. 

The Sophomores should cease to "Be Square." 

The Freshies should outgrotv their greenness. 

Milton Marshall should cease to ivalk the pavement-width from 
.Julia when he takes her home. 

"Puss" Thomas should discontinue his courses in h(dl-ology. 

Rogers should ever forget the "Manual of Arms." 

"Tobe" Raile should stray from the right path while going to 
Hansen's. 

"Burb" Eggertsen should give up returning to Chicago. 

Fred Tatten should never sing again. "Just a Little Bit of Heaven." 

Fern or Delia should forget how to act. 

Kulon Dixon shouldn't have an accident for a few months. 

Bee Orrock should never dress up. 

Lysle Lindsay should grow. 

Sam Brooks' pompadour should stop waving. 

Freeh's hair should uncurl. 

"Blackie" Huish should he more — red. 

Randall should cut off his illuminated head decoration. 

Cottam should outgrotv flirting. 

The Banyan Staff should begin to run out of ideas. 

Just supposing all these things — xvouldn't life he queer? 



172 



^1 




c 



Tuesday, 30th — Exams go on to the music of a dirge. 

W ednesday. 31st — The limit of May and other things has been reached 

JUNE 

In this month the little god Love reigns supreme. 
And this is the month of which lovers dream ; 
For "married in the month of roses — June — 
Life shall be one long honeymoon." 

Thursday. 1st — Wish we knew an Alumnus! 

Friday. 2nd — Fortieth Annual commencement : and parties. 

Saturday. 3rd — To the memory of Mary Crosby, who on this date becomes 
a Savage, 'longside of N. Henry. 

Sunday. 4th — Still Savage. 

Monday. 5th — Summer school commences. Pedagogues and goguesses 

are students now. 
Tuesday. 6th — Met Mary Hale today ; she wanted to go to summer-school 

but her purse said no. 
Wednesday. 7th — "Elsie" Talmage says she ought to be thankful to have 

a purse at all. 
Thursday. 8th — Sees the nuptial knot tied around Glenn Johnson and 

Arthur Beeley. 

Friday. 9th — Lael greets us with a patronizing "Hullo, guhls!" 

Monday. 12th — Flowers everywhere. 

Tuesday. 13th — Chautauqua comes to town. 

Wednesday. 14th — Nina Pickford Fuller becomes Mrs. Haus. 

Thursday, 15th — Again yet. This time it's Luther and Vera. 

Friday, 16th — Billie Coleman's mad at "Princess Pat" Partridge because 
she (Billie) likes Pat's Chautauqua beau. 

Saturday. 1 7th — Sleep is the order of the day. 

Monday. 19th — War talk all around. 

Wednesday. 21st — Rumor hath it that Mexico has declared war upon the 
United States of America. 

Thursday. 22nd — The U. S. Bureau of Matrimony still does business and 
J. Edward Johnson ( "Old Hickory" ) takes unto himself Mamie 
Huish, "for keeps." 

(Continued) 




1 

(J. 





r«^ ^ 





aim 





174 



Friday. 23rd — Dr. McKeever lectures to the students. 

' i; Saturday. 24th — The warm-weather scholars seek a cooler altitude and 
Qj3 atmosphere on Maple Flat. 

•^J Sunday. 25th — Notice how stiff today are yesterday's nimhle climhers. 

I J Monday. 26th — Aha! Even pedagogues don't always have their lessons. 

W ednesday. 28th — The "Vodie" hath ever admirers. 

Thursday. 29th — "Goodbye my soldier lad! Three cheers for the Provo 
heroes!" 

Friday, 30th — Decided in devotional to call a vacation until after the 
Fourth. And we all eat, bathe, and boat ride at the lake. 



T^ 



m 



I- 



ifl 



'-'-■J 



JULY 

Saturday. 1st — Our soldier boys leave for Fort Douglas. f\pi 

Monday, 3rd — Midnight. We hear the Fourth approaching in shape of 
cannon balls. 

^^ Tuesday, 4th — Bang! Its here. Kim Thompson eats one dish too many 

C<r of ice-cream. ^_ 

!| i Wednesday. 5th — Recess is over. Brother Thompson gets to school at r-— j 
^' 4 p.m. J^ 

','■ Thursday. 6th — Prof. Partridge pays a visit to his one-horse farm. 

^__^ Friday. 7th — The pedagogue kids indulge in a picnic on the campus. 

OtJ Tuesday, 11th — Prof. Larson eats breakfast. 

L»i>J Thursday, 13th — Hugh Peterson absorbs some H:jO from the school 
(^^___j fountain. 

Friday. 14th — End of first term. Ye mountain climbers pay a visit to 
Friend Timp. 

Saturday. 15th — Coach sends 'em home with stiff limbs and visages of a 
popular maroon. 

Monday. 17th — David Starr Jordan lectures in College Hall. 

Thursday. 20th — "Aunt Alice" locks her house on the inside and throws 
the key out of the window. 

Monday. 24th — Luther and Vera come down to see the old folks at home. 

Tuesday. 25th — Naomi wishes Pres were here in the good old summer 
time. 

Sunday. 30th — Prof. J. C. Swenson preaches in Silver City. 

(Continued) 



17.'; 



t — '' 

rr t ' "I 



od 



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Dell IWebbisms 7T^ 

\q\^ VUenT.'ctc-c\e'\f 



Jiiilflin^ from the jja^it, few of iis; will jrct out <>( tliis woilil alive. 

\\ e come from nioiikevs and go to the dof;!*. 

My poetie ahility is limited to original spelling, sinee Prof. Osmond is 
using all the rest in his story of the "West by H — ." 

My wife and 1 are one, hut she's the one. 

The librarian has put a hueket of lard in the White<-otton library to 
shorten the conversation there. 

iNothing feels so good as the hole where there's been an aehing tooth. 

I'm afraid that some <lay 1*11 die of brainless fever. 

Better enlist on a duek farm; there's a ehanee for a quack. 

Many speakers tell you they haven't anything to sav and then spend an 
hour proving their original statement. 

The reason there's water in waternu^lons is because they're planted in 
the spring. 

When the sheep and the goats are separated, I'll he with the sheep 
because I'm always blatting. 

Let me be a prop)het; invariablv prophets die before their prophecies 
fall due. 







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AUGUST 

We'll plan and we'll play and we'll have a fine time 
For August is best of the whole summer-time. 

Thursday, 3rd — Prof. Boyle conies home from school at the U. of Cali- 
fornia. 

Friday, 4th — "Aunt Gillespie" has hurt her finger, and laid it away in 
lavendar and old lace. 

Tuesday, 8th — Prof. Brown has an L of a time in Education class (a Love 
of a time). 

Wednesday, 9th — Marion says its Jake with him. 

Friday. 11th — We take another excursion to Utah Lake. 

Monday, 14th — Profs. Smart, Buss and Gudmundson, and the Misses 
Morley and Eggertsen leave on a Chautauqua all their own. 

Tuesday, 15th — Isaac Brockbank visits Provo — and Elsie. 

Thursday, 1 7th — Cramming begins. 

Sunday. 20th — It continues. 

Wednesday, 23rd — Fern Broadbent steals a "poppy" on the campus. 

Friday, 25th — Even the brightest pedagogues are glad when vacation 
comes. 

Monday, 28th — ad infinitum — lots of noise. We feel the usual attack of 
blues coming on. 

SEPTEMBER 



Smooth and serene your life will go." 



Thursday 21st — Wayne Hales Belle Wilson as his bride; and Clarence 
Boyle's Elfie Beans' bridegroom. 

(Continued) 



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'Married when leaves in September glow, t^ 






Ireta always did like that verse. Therefore — j|-J 

Thursday, September 7th — Frank Winn(s) her at last. About the same C^ 

time, Elsie Booth turns Brockbank. ^-i 

September 7th-21st — Nothing doing. ^--^ 

Oh! hold! yes, there is. Lou Brandley puts out an advance ^^' 



edition of the "White and Blue." T CJ 



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177 



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Monday. 25th — Registration begins. 

Tuesday. 26th — Old students greet each other affectionately. 

W ednesday. 27th — First classes. Are we really in school? 

Thursday. 28th — I fear we are. Assignments have begun. About here, 
Ruth says unto Hilton. "Entreat me not to leave thee, or I'll cease 
from following after thee." Un" he didn't, un' she didn't, so we 
guess they got married. 

Friday, 29th — ^ orld-famous, never to-be-forgotten handshake. 

OCTOBER 

Sunday, 1st — Wliy does October weep? 

Monday. 2nd — Brother Wm. A. Morton talks to us in devotional. 

Tuesday. 3rd — Randall is back, and up to his old tricks. He spends an 
hour talking to the girls in the library. 

W ednesday, 4th — Classes organize. Some politics, believe us. 

Thursday. 5th — General Thursday atmosphere. 

Friday, 6th — First meeting of the Board of Representatives. 

Saturday. 7th — Mr. Brandley goes a courting. 

Sunday. 8th — "Pres Mac " visits 160 E. Center. 

Monday. 9th — Three Knights and two Bushman (s) return amiably to 
school. 

Tuesday. 10th — Pres. Brimhall talks in devotional on "The Intellectual 
Margin." 

Wednesday. 11th — Seniors gravely shake hands in the Art Gallery. 

Thursday. 12th — We decide to have class meetings on Friday. Jimmy 
and Lael are still good friends. 

Friday. 13th — ^ e do have class meetings, and Herb Pyne says the un- 
lucky date liasnt affected the growth of a mustache, 
^liitefield Ray lectures about South America. 

Saturday. 14th — Grant Taggert shows indications of stepping Fern 
Broadbent. 

Sunday. 15th — ^ ith the warm weather comes Brimhall's Ford. 

Monday. 16th — Founders' Day, Parade, Track meet, and some dance. 

Tuesday. 1 7th — The morning after the night before. 

( Continued) 



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11 



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U ednesday. 18th — Theology unexpectedly. Yes. it was a disappoint- 
ment. 

Thursday. 19th — Earl and Velma go walking. f 

Friday, 20th — The Seventeens have a bonfire party — Eighteens a gym 
party — Freshies a banquet grand, and ball. 

Saturday. 21st — We're beginning to realize the cost of high living. 

Sunday. 22nd — E. S. Hinkley talks in evening meeting. 

Monday. 23rd — Just school. Coach Roberts bids us good-morning. 

Tuesday. 24th — First social dancing class is held. This is the life! 

W ednesday. 25th — Didn't we always just love Hallowe'en Balls? 

Friday. 27th — Some Student-Body meeting, and the aforementioned Ball. 

Saturday. 28th — All we want is to be let sleep. 

Sunday, 29th — Edward and Dorothy are out to meeting; so are dear Stan 
and Mary. 

Monday. 30th — Miss Dixen plays tennis with Mr. Brandley. 

Tuesday. 31st — W. H. King talks in devotional, and a black cat crosses 
the path of the Student Body president — this last predicts the end 
of the month. 



NOVEMBER 

JPednesday. 1st — To make us think that the year is growing old grace- 
fully. Some day. 

Thursday, 2nd — We're "As idle as a painted ship 

Upon a painted ocean." 

1 1 Friday. 3rd — Everybody's bored to death except people lucky enough to 

be invited to radiator-parties. 

Saturday. 4th — Mr. Knight holds a consultation with Mary Ezma. in the 
biology lab. 

Tuesday. 7th — Election day. The sun smiles a little. 

Wednesday, 8th — Wilson enthusiasts after nerve-racking suspense collect 
the bets. 

Saturday, 11th — More snow. 

Tuesday. 14th — Miss Cannon has a radiator party for three nights 
(Knights). 

( (.'Dntimied ) 



(T« 




180 





I\ 



Friday, 17th — The Sophs entertain themselves; the Freshies follow their 
example. 

Monday, 20th — Mrs. Hilton puts out a washing. 

Tuesday, 21st — Leamon keeps the bold bad men away from Zoe, on the 
way home from dancing class. 

Wednesday, 22nd — W. Lester Mangum talks in devotional,, and our 
ladies' chorus sings. 

Thursday, 23rd — Edwin S. Hinckley again smiles a "How do you do?" 
from the rostrum. 

Friday, 24th — Student-Body meeting. Particular enthusiasm noticed in 
the "Amen corner." 



Saturday. 25th — The first tragedy of the year, 
in Utah Lake. 



Stuart Reid is drowned 



Monday, 27th — All gayety stopped until after the funeral. 

Tuesday, 28th — The school turns out en masse to Stuart's funeral. 

Wednesday, 29th — Howard Blazzard wins the Student Body Oratorical 
Medal; Lyman Brown the cross-country run; and the Third Years 
the turkeys. Then they parade. 

Thursday, 30th — Thanksgiving — we mean it, with all our hearts. 



II 



^ ■ 



DECEMBER 

Monday, 4th — Maurine says "Greetings!" 

President Brimhall talks in devotional — "throwing gold into the 
junk-heap." 

Wednesday, 6th — Hewitt Strong studies the moon. 

Thursday, 7th — The three-hundredth installment of the Glenn Bonnett- 
Jean Cox serial is shown at the south radiator. 

Friday. 8th — Fourth Years give a dance. Lots of fun at the Student 
Body debate about how much coin outside ladies and gents must 
pay, to dance at our dances. 

Sunday, 10th — Willis and Elaine try the University evening meeting. 

Tuesday. 12th — The "Wliite and Blue" Christmas contest closes. Pseudo- 
celebrities await the returns of their toil. 

( Contiimed ) 



CTQLISH PEPARTMEMT B.Y4U. 

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Preehnan's view of nature 



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Wednesday. 13th — The editor goes around asking girls for their pictures 
(we mean the winning girls). 

Friday, 15th — A Southern lady and a Hoosier lassie entertain us. ( "The 
Two of Us" surely won a place in the Lyceum side of our nature. ) 

Saturday, 16th — A jolly bunch goes sleighing, and many worthy Seniors 
visit the picture-show. 

Monday, 18th — With President Brimhall's permission, we vote to close 
school tomorrow. The Seniors say, "Eevrybody dance!" 

Tuesday, 19th — "Auf wiedersehen" and "A Merry Christmas!" 

Sunday. 24th — The Benedicts hunt up Santa Glaus costumes. 

Monday, 25th — "All the world is glad, and gay; 
Every heart is filled with joy. 
Pleasure now has no alloy — 
Know you not 'tis Christmas day?" 
P. S. — Peace on earth, goodwill to everybody. 

Tuesday, 26th — Nothing doing. 

Wednesday, 27th — Ditto. 

Thursday, 28th — The same. 

Friday, 29th — Per usual. 

Saturday, 30th — Et cetera. 

Sunday, 31st — 1916 dies hard. We go to a party and stay a year. 

JANUARY, 1917 
Monday, 1st — Provo's famous interurban is working. 
Tuesday, 2nd — Back to school with a warm glow in our hearts. 

Friday, 5th — Aline Phillips and Brother Boyle run races down from the 
Maeser. 

Saturday, 6th — College men can play basket-ball. They scoop the High 
School, 50 to 23. 

Sunday, 7th — Apostle Talmage speaks in evening meeting. Elsie and 
Hal are there. 

Monday, 8th — Miss Dixon reads "The House Next Door." 

( Continuerl ) 



1^1 



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183 



Tuesday. 9th — Junius Gurr's sad end casts gloom over the school. 

Wednesday. 10th — Mr. Hansen of class rings and pins holds a meeting 
with the Fourth Years. Prof. Henderson dines at the Hotel 
Roberts. 

Thursday. 11th — Orzel Hunter. "Larry" Wood. D. Rees Jensen and 
Maurine Cannon have a radiator party. 

Friday. 12th — Another Student Body meeting and dance. Ehna Taylor 
and her ( Reuben ) knight are as thick as — Lancelot and Elaine. 

Saturday. 13th — Veoma makes doughnuts, and Oscar gets two. 

Our college team scoops the West Side High; ^JT! 

Springville wins from our High School team. 

Sunday. 14th — Heber J. Grant speaks in evening meeting. 

Monday. 13th — The same gentleman talks to us in devotional. 

Emil Woolsey forgets that Leona Mildenhall is ill, and wonders 
why she fails to meet him in the hall at 10 a. m. 

Tuesday. 16th — A visit from one we like to hear — Cory Hanks. 

W ednesday, 17th — Class meetings at last. 

Thursday. 18th — Marg. Huish is heard from in Board of Representative 
meeting. 

Friday. 19th — The "Conversational Recess" is established as part of the ^^ 

library regime. Ella Ogden and Charles Westover have it all to , ^ 
themselves, back of the librarian's desk. 
The Myster Girls entertain. 

Saturday, 20th — B. Y. U. wallops Springville in basket-ball, 60 to 25. 

Sunday. 21st — Miss Geneva Shaffer entertains at a walk to meeting. The 

guest list includes Clinton Larson. , 

W ednesday, 24th — Dr. Hatch lectures during the theology hour. ' 

Thursday. 25th — Nothing but Board meeting to create any stir. 

Friday. 26th — Student Body program and dance. A program-pencil- 
threading partv is held in the "White and Blue" office. 

Saturday, 27th — Two basket-ball victories : "Y" High School ( 75 ) versus 
Nephi (6); University 38, L. D. S. U. 19. Give *em the sky- 
rocket! 



(Continued) 



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Sunday. 28th — Same as ten years ago today. If you don't believe us, 
hunt up the files and see. 

Monday. 29th — B. Y. U. 51 ; Chicago Crescents 9. Some basket-ball. 

Tuesday. 30th — President Briniliall talks on "Team ^ ork." Royal 
Rooters organize. 

Wednesday. 31st — The training-school students have a matinee dance in 
the Ladies' g>'ni. 

FEBRUARY 

Thursday. 1st — Supt. H. H. Cunnnings is present. "Y" girls organize. 

Friday. 2nd — LeGrande Hardy and Fayette Stevens show up at school. 
"Bad pennies return" — so do good ones, sometimes. Our high 
school team wins from Pay son hoopsters, 43 to 13. 

Saturday, 3rd — B. Y. C. is defeated by our college basketeers, 84 to 37. 

Sunday, 4th — Roy Pyper makes Ruth Goodrich walk a whole mile to 
meeting. 

Monday, 5th — J. Adam Bede lectures in College Hall. 

Tuesday, 6th — Just school, except for the Dramatic people. 

Wednesday. 7th — Testimony meetings. 

Thursday. 8th — Prof. Morgan takes his history classes to Salt Lake City, 
to see the Legislature and other queer sights. 

Friday. 9th — Sightseeing continues (strict morals maintained). The 
Sophs at home entertain — a Japanese Valentine Ball. 

Saturday, 10th — Glory be unto our basket-ball team! U. of V. goes down 
unto defeat, 38 to 33. 

Sunday. 11th — Celebrations cease just in time for us to go to meeting. 
Levi Edgar Young is the speaker. 

Monday. 12th — A visit and a song by dear old Brother C. R. Johnson. 
Dr. Fisher lectures on "Utah — the Crown of the Continent." 

Tuesday, 13th — John R. Young, pioneer, tells stories to the Fourth Years 
during the theology hour. 

(Continued) 



\\\ 







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186 



i 



W ednesday. 14th — Yesterday continued. Jim sends Lael a peachy Val- 
entine (we don't know, but we can safely guess! ) 

Thursday, 15th — Great expectations. 

Friday. 16th — B. Y. U. wins two debates. Resolved, that the U. of U. 
can't argue as well as the Y, and that the Y can put it over the 
A. C. at Logan (no judges required now — the proof is past tense). 

Saturday, 17th — Our victims in basket-ball — the Aggies; the score, 43 
to 24. 

Sunday, 18th — Prof. W. E. Morgan talks in evening meeting. 

Monday, 19th — Celebration. 

Tuesday, 20th — Anticipation. 

W ednesday, 21st — Preparation. 

Thursday, 22nd — '"Birthington's Washday." A visit from the Legisla- 
ture. A half-holiday. A wonderful Prom. 

Friday. 23rd — We all go to Salt Lake City to court, woo, and win Victory. 
The U fell — and great was the fall thereof — 54 to 33. 

Saturday. 24th — Basket-ball proves a "bad dream" for Payson High. 
Score: Payson, 23; B. Y. High 43. 

Sunday, 25th — "LTncle Tom" Taylor talks to all that are good children 
and go to meeting. 

Monday, 26th — Same as a week ago today, yarns about "the Lake." 

Tuesday, 27th — The ladies sing about "The End of a Perfect Day," and 
Sterl's "Life" is closed by the hand of Bee Orrick. 

W ednesday. 28th — Our high school team again trounce Payson, 58 to 26. 

MARCH 

Thursday, 1st — No lamb today! Prof. Geddes of Oneida Stake Acad- 
emy, Idaho, speaks to us in devotional. Also, the planets of the 
foot-light universe make their first appearance, over in P. G. 

Friday, 2nd — Elsie Johnson wins the Washington's Birthday Oratorical 
medal. Earl Snell and Nels Anderson win a debate for us, from 
the U. of Nevada. 

Saturday, 3rd — Our darling footlight pets play in Spanish Fork. And 
our college quintette eclipse some ancient B. Y. LL stars — 50 to 19. 

(Continued) 




III 



The Best Wav To Show Patriotism Is To Live It 



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^1 ELLOW STUDENTS: The pn.dmtion of ..ur B. Y. U. Ban- 
yan is brought about through the co-operative efforts of 
many workers. Strong backing by the student body, un- 
ceasing work of the staff, and liberal support of the busi- 
ness men contribute to its merits. Do not think of the "ads." given 
to us by the business men as something to take money from us by bar- 
gains but as a gift from the most generous and liberal hearted men of 
our city. Let us as student body and school stand by these men and show 
them we do appreciate what they do for us. and return our thanks by 
patronizing them. 



Following are the men who helped us : 



B. Y. University 

Provo City 

Taylor Bros. Co. 

Salt Lake Engraving Co. 

Provo Paint & Glass Co. 

Deseret News 

Student Supply Association 

\^ ood Clifton Mercantile Co. 

ITtah Valley Gas & Coke Co. 

Agricultural College 

Provo Commercial & Savings Bank 

Knight Trust & Savings Bank 

Olsen & Hafen 

Larsen & Nygreen Studio 

Beebe Lumber Co. 

Menlove's Studio 

Hansen's Catering Co. 

Provo Meat & Packing Co. 

Christensen & Co. 

G. J. Carpenter 

Meredith Cycle Shop 

Provo Steam Laundry 



Deseret News Book Store 

Wm. M. Roylance Co. 

Utah Timber & Coal Co. 

Columbia Theatre 

Utah Power & Light Co. 

Barton Furniture Co. 

R. R. Irvine & Son 

J. C. Penney 

Maiben Glass & Paint Co. 

Farrar Bros. 

Farmers & Merchants Bank 

Provo Implement & Motor Co. 

W. H. Freshwater 

Smoot Lumber Co. 

Hotel Roberts 

Provo Green House 

New Century Printing Co. 

G. H. Heindselman 

D. D. Sutton 

LTtah Business College 

Hoover's Palace of Sweets 

Startup Candy Co. 



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^Walk, and as you walk, make your plans 
to GET and OWN a CHANDLER 
or a SAXON soon 

$robo SitiplEtttent anb Jllotor Co. 



PHONE 142 



PROVO. UTAH 



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Graduates 
Do 
You 
Know? 



That we can save you a goodly sum on the purchase of your new 
graduation outfit, our men"s clothing, shoe and furnishing depart- 
ments are filled to overflowing with all the new. up-to-date suits, 
hats, shoes and furnishings of every description at prices not excelled by any 
other concern in Provo. Before you buy your new graduation apparel we ask you 
at least to inspect our large stock. We know we can save vou nionev on each and 
every article you may see fit to purchase. WE GIVE THE VALUES. 



iJTS MUSyr STORES 



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J^ein Centurp 
Co. 

PRINTERS and 
BINDERS 

Blank Book Makers 

Loose Leaf Devices 

Loose Leaf Records 

Office Stationery 

Legal W ork 

Catalogs 

Fine Color Work 



Dress Better 

and Pay Less 

WE SAVE YOU MONEY 




PROVO, UTAH 



Shoes for the Whole Family 

Clothing. Hats and Furnish- 
ings for Men and Boys 



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1866 The Big Department Store 1917 
AN EVOLUTION 



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'THE world was not made in a day," nor usually do big firms grow over 
night. It is usually a story of consistent growth from small to great. 

Such is the story of Taylor Brothers Company. 

TY7HEN the West was a land "wild and wooley," almost uncultivated 
and barren, a sign was placed in front of a little adobe building one 

day in 1866, informing the few inhabitants of Provo that inside they 

could have their picture taken or buy furniture. This was the humble 

1 1 beginning of the Big Department Store that now occupies the same site | ^ 

i I where once stood the homely adobe. 1 1 

1 1 'THE growth from a homely adobe to a half block of plate glass show i| 

1 1 windows, acres of floor space, auto delivery trucks, electric elevator, | J 

1 1 and ten big departments beautifully equipped and containing everything 1 1 

1 1 essential to make the home comfortable and beautiful, has been a matter | -0 

fc^ I of cooperation. | » 

i 1 TJONESTY, the spirit of service, a clear vision of the needs of the peo- | - 

§ i pie, and careful planning to give them the best there was at the most | - 

1 1 sensible prices has been the firm's policy. The people have recognized 1 1 

1 1 this and in return have given the firm a trade undreamed of when it 1 1 

1 1 occupied the little adobe. The store has been their pride and they have j | 

1 1 not neglected kindly constructive criticism and suggestions which have 1 1 

o 1 always been welcomed. I 5 

> i 'THIS firm has made very "livable" the homes of your grandparents and | g 

1 1 parents, and is well prepared to serve you. It hopes to do it so well | c 

1 1 that it will continue to grow and make pleasant the homes of future gen- 1 1 

1 1 erations. 1 1 

If WE SHIP TO ALL PARTS OF THE STATE 1 1 



1 1 STATE AGENTS FOR THE EMERSON PIANO 1 1 ; 



S8 



III Taylor Brothers Company 

1 1 1 PROVO EUREKA SPANISH FORK j | j 

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Sunday. 4th — Ray and Louise go May ( ? ) walking. B. H. Roberts is 
the evening speaker. 

Monday, 5th — The most unkindest day of all. If you were out in the 
Storm, you needn't be told. 

Tuesday, 6th — "Four bits, please, and our team shall go to Chicago." 
Ladru reads our diary. 

Wednesday, 7th — Camera-crank-itis breaks out; so does spring fever. 

Thursday, 8th — "Give the soldiers a welcome home!" and we get a half- 
holiday. Ida M. Tarbell lectures in College Hall. Our ball- 
tossers "spruce up" the Aggies 34 to 27, and make a dash for the 
Windy City. 

Friday. 9th — Student Body. The Seniors present to the school a new 
silken banner. Prof. Morgan takes his ci\ics studies to the 
Mental Hospital — just a visit. More winter. 

Saturday, 10th — "Uncle Reuben" takes the Myster girls to Springville to 
go swimming. 

Sunday, 11th — "Aunt Alice" is our preacher. 

Monday. 12th — "By their ties ye know them" the Freshies enmasse. 

Tuesday, 13th — More Frosh stuff. 

Wednesday, 14th — The Symphony Concert — Comes a wire, Y boys 
scooped the "Browning Kings" of St. Louis — 52 to 19. 

Thursday, 15th — Our High School debators win from Heber. Another 
victory in Chicago. Alva (Oklahoma) team falls, score 35 to 24. 

Friday. 16th — Freshie program, dance and more victory. Seward Park 
Blues lose to our hoopsters, 27 to 16. 

Saturday. 17th — St. Patrick has the day. Fate is cruel and our boys are 
defeated by the Illinois Athletic Club, 27 to 14 

Sunday. 18th — Recuperation. 

Monday. IQthSupl. J. P. Creer of Nebo district "spiels" to us. 

Tuesday. 20th — Brother Boyle has Shakespeare on the brain Poor 
Shaky! 

W ednesday. 21st — The boys come out in new spring hats. 

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We pride ourselves 
On qettiuQ the vep^ 
b e s f re s utt s in photo 
retouching, lettering 
designing and^^mc 
or copper photo 
e n g ra vi n^__J:;;3^, 

Efic SALT LAlvE 
ENGRAVING CO. 

1^4-5 Main Street 
Sah Lake City. Utah 
Phone IVIain Five-Nme-O 



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Work for a Greater Provo and B. Y. U. 

By Jacob Coleman, City Attorney. 

The Banyan Staff: 

Let nxe assure you that Provo City appreciates the space you have accortied 
it in your excellent year book, the BANYAN. Provo City is proud of the B. Y. 
U. and the achievements of its students and instructors. The interests of the City 
and the Univeristy are mutually interdependent and related. This City without 
the enlivening spirit, the financial aid to business, of your big school, would 
indeed, be dull and less progressive; and the School, without the fostering in- 
terest of Provo City, and the munificent gifts of its leading citizens, would per- 
haps never have cast off its swaddling Academy clothes and have become the 
strong institution that it is today. So then, the City and the University should 
continue to be loyal to each other and to work together for each other's ad- 
vancement. 

What a boost every student of the B. Y. U. could give to Provo and to his uni- 
versity, if, when returning to his home town, he would tell his friends and pros- 
pective college students that Provo is the most desirable place to attend college 
of any city in the state. Why? Nowhere in the West is there a more beautifully 
located city. With its canyons and mountains on the east that rival in grandeur 
the famous Alps of Switzerland, with America's Lake Geneva on the west, with 
the purest and most abundant water supply known, with its gardens and orchards 
that produce everything the palate of man could crave, it, indeed, merits the 
name "City Beautiful." But there are other than aesthetic reasons to induce 
the student and home-seeker to come here. Board and rooms are cheap, and rent 
is very low. Fish, fruit, vegetables and everything to make the boarding house 
table inviting may be had in abundance at extremely moderate prices. 
However, what makes this City the ideal place for young people to attend col- 
lege is that it is the freest from vice and crime of any city of its size in the West. 
And as to the University, no higher encomium could be pronounced upon it 
than that its graduates who attend eastern colleges are in the very forefront when 
it comes to receiving scholastic honors. A splendid tribute is paid to the strong 
faculty of the LIniversity from the fact that every year other colleges and uni- 
versities endeavor to "get away" with some of our able instructors and professors. 
The citizens of Provo, then, should rouse themselves to a greater appreciation 
of what the University means to this city. Tliey should never miss an oppor- 
tunity to urge their young friends throughout the state who are planning on a 
college course to attend the Brigham Young University, where they will re- 
ceive the best all-round education — morally, physically, and intellectually. 
Then all together for a Greater Provo and B. Y. U. 



= fiiiiiiniuuuMinniniiiittniiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiMMiiniiiiiniiHiiniiniiiniiniitniMiiininuitMininiiiiiMiniiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiinMiiirMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniriMiiiiiiiiiiiitii 



195 



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Thursday. 22nd — A grand climax for the producers of "The House Next 
Door." They show us at home how smart they are. 

Friday, 23rd — The basket-ball heroes come home. By golly. I guess 
we're glad to see 'em — sure — you bet me, ain't it? 

Saturday. 24th — The Seniors can't win basket-ball from the Juniors, so 
the latter get the banquet. 

Sunday, 25th — Apostle James E. Talmage the evening speaker. 

Monday. 26th — 2 a. m. Oscar's train pulls in. He's been to Denver, 
don'tcherno? Dr. Edward Amburst Ott lectures on "The Haunted 
House." 

Tuesday. 27th — J. Golden Kimball talks in devotional. 

Wednesday. 28th — Separate meetings. We (who had to stay home all 
day) know what misery is, without company. 

Thursday. 29th — Bro. Buss takes his college physiography students a — 
walking — right into the mountain, like the Pied Piper; but we 
were safely brought out — we just went into the Bonneville tunnel. 

Friday. 30th — Fred Bushman gets his, for pulling our hair. The Jepper- 
son testimonial. 

Saturday. 31st — The lion must go. 



APRIL 

Sunday. 1st — Sister Eggertsen serves her hubby with bean pie. An 
Easter concert by the choir in College Hall. 

Monday. 2nd — April showers — of snow. 

The Domestic Science girls dish up a cafeteria luncheon. Oscar 
Anderson has a birthday. Our H. S. Debators lose to P. G. 

Tuesday. 3rd — Miss Jepperson sings "The Flag Without a Stain." Devo- 
tional becomes a patriotic rally. Evening, Rudolph Ganz and 
Albert Spaulding entertain us. 

Wednesday. 4th — We are seized by serious attacks of vacation-itis. 
Brother Smart personifies ferns. 

'(.'I'Utimied) 



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196 



iiiiiirtiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiniiitiiiiiii 



lliiliiiriiiiiiiiiinritiiiiiiiiiiiiititiiiiiKiii 



iiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiriiiiiiiiiiii 



CUSTOMERS SHOULD MEASURE PRINTERS by 
the Work They Turn Out— by the Goods They Sell. 

We are willing to be measured by tliis standard. We are constantly adding to our pres- 
ent equipment the best that the market affords in the way of printing presses, automatic 
feeders, folding, ruling and book stitching machines. With our new battery of job presses 
we are prepared to handle all sizes and kinds of society and commercial printing. 



Ini'itations 

Announcements 

At Home Cards 

Calling Cards 

Birth Cards 

Programs 

Tickets 

Dance Programs 

Menus 

Dodgers 

Show Cards 

Bills 




OUR NEVT AUTO PRESS — One of Ihe lalesl mod. I aui.Miiii.. |.ib presses, 
which is capable of five thousand impressions per hour. 



Business Cards 
Letterheads 
Billheads 
Statements 
In voices 
Checks 
J ouchers 
Book Headings 
Filing Cards 
Price Lists 
Catalogues 
Booklets 



THE DESERET NEWS, Department of Job Printing | 

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I ^tubentg, l^isiit iHenlobes; iSetn ^tubio | 

j At 283 West Center Street | 

I We are prepared to give you the best in PHOTOGRAPHY. | 

I Sittings made night or day. | 

Eobafe Jf inisiljins anb enlarging 

Ell IIMIIIIIIIIIMM (MIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIttd Ill Ill IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIXIIIIIIIIIIIIIII It HllllillllHIl Mllliri'l Illl Ilrtllilll lllltlllllT 

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You will be very happy — 
very satisfied — if you send 
your mail orders to .... 



We send all parcel post 
Packages prepaid 





TrijHOUSE OF QUAir 



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iiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



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197 



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UM-M-M- 



That's classv! You shouUl see this loose-helted motlel \\ith 
patch pockets, and soft roll lapels. 

It is made in a rich mixture of grays, blues, and reds. 

A MIGHTY FINE BUY at $20.00. Other styles from 
SLS.OO to S30.00. 

Always a complete showing of SHIRTS, NECKWEAR, 
HATS, AND SHOES. In fact everything for the well dressed 
students. 

Wood-Clifton Merc. Co. 

(W here price and quality meet) 
c,oTME« THE CLOTHCRAFT STORE OF THIS TOWN 



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I ALL THE SEASONS ARE ALIVE WITH INVITATION TO | 



K 

D 
A 
K 




K 

D 
A 
K 



I And picture-making is so easy with a Kodak — there's no trick to the click of its \ 

I shutter — anyone, even the youngsters, can make good pictures the Kodak way. | 

I OLSON & HAFEN | 

i Photographers. Kodaks and Supplies, Expert Kodak Finishing Provo, Utah | 



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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiitniMiniiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



198 



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199 



iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii.'; 



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iiiniiiKiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiMnriiiiiiiiiitiiiitiiiitHiiiMiiiriiiriiililli 




BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 
STUDENT SUPPLY ASSOCIATION 



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iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiii 



iiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiu 



THE UTAH VALLEY 
GAS & COKE CO. 

Now boasts of a GAS RANGE in over one-half of the HOMES IN 
PROVO. 

W HY? Because every lady demands the best for the least expense and 
energy. 

Because it saves time and labor and produces more wholesome food. 

A WORD TO THE WISE— PROTECT YOUR EYES 
USE GAS LIGHT 

It has proven the most hygienic artificial illuminant. 

1000 ITSERS for gas— Best by test. Let the GAS COMPANY solve 
your problem. 

Phone 295 



-iMiiiiMiiiiiiiitinhiiiuniniirMintiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiuiiiiHiiiiniMiniiiniitinniiiiniiiniiutiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiiiiiHiiiniiiniiiiHiiiuiniiniiniriin^ 

200 






Different Photography 

Something you cannot get elsewhere 
. Thaf s our kind 



ICarann $c Nggrffu i'tu&tn 

(Inco'poratrd) 

Columbia Theatre Building, Provo, Utah 



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^"" "" "" "" '"< '" "t iirii iitii in mil iiit ii i nm ri iir iiiiiiiiiiii iiti iitt tr itt ni mt: 

W\9t ®[taJ) Agricultural College 

I Logan, Utah | 

I The School of Agriculture f 

I Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Agricultural Botany, Soil, Chemistry, Soil Bacteriology, i 

I Dry-farming, Irrigation Practice, Horticulture, Veterinary Science, Plant Pathology, Entomology, etc. I 

I The School of Home Economics | 

I Foods, Dietetics, Principles of Nutrution, Household Furnishing and Design, Domestic Art, Care and | 

I Feeding of Children, Home Construction, Sanitation, Home Laundering, etc. I 

I The School of Agricultural Engineering and Mechanic Arts | 

I Agricultural Surveying, Agricultural Technology, Farm Mechanics, Irrigation and Drainage, Roads, | 

I Rural Architecture. Rural Sanitation, Ironwork, Woodwork, Machine and Automobile Work, etc. i 

I The School of Commerce i 

I Accounting and Business Practice, Economics, Political Science, History, Sociology, Stenography, I 

I Typewriting, etc. | 

I The School of General Science | 

I Art, Bacteriology, Botany, Chemistry, English, Entomology, Foreign Languages, Geology, Matemalics, | 

I Music, Physiology, Zoology, etc. | 

I For information offered in either of these Schools address an inquiry to | 

I THE PRESIDENT: UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE f 

I LOGAN, UTAH | 

^'""" " '"" '"""' "" iininiiimni iii iiii m mi it n mm mm mii iimi iiimi tii luiiiiiiiiiiiiiitt iiiiiiiiiioiiin^ 

201 



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Thursday. 5th — Student Body meeting — absoquitely "jake." Ditto for 
the First Years" Easter Ball. 

Friday. 6lh — Ralph Buckley informs the class in English that a hen "sets" 
if you put her there, hut she ""sits" if she does it herself. Wallace 
("Skeeter"! Holman laketh unto himself a hride — \ ivian Peter- 
son. 

Saturday, 7th — The calendar writer wears a new coat, and few people 
recognize her. 

Sunday, 8th — Easter Day. Now doth the valiant gent. Harold Claudius, 
present Elsie his lady-love with a bright ring that shall sparkle for 
evermore. Amen! (Honest, people! they're begaged, for sure!) 

Monday. 9th — Vivian, dear, is very, very busy; "Skeeter'' is content with 
being happy. 

Tuesday. 10th — Today it's Friend Willis and his darling Elaine who are 
so full of joy. Great guns and little fishes! does that little devil 
Love, think it's June? Dr. Powers' first lecture. 

Wednesday, 11th — Sees Elaine, very much Thoniasified, take out her M. 
R. S. degree. Dr. Powers' second lecture. 

Thursday. 12th — Henceforth shall sweet Geneva be known as Mrs. Dunn, 
tiie wife of Harold. Dr. Powers' third lecture. 

Friday. 13th — Whew! ("Can you whistle as well as we can?") This is 
a day of catastrophes. But we don't know what they are. Dr. 
Powers' fourth lecture. 

Saturday, 14th — Dr. Powers' fifth lecture. 

Sunday, 15th — We're all (?) coming back. 

Monday, 16th — Ovations for the new members of the Benedicts' Club. 
Will makes the cutest speech ever. A "bomb" consisting of a lead 
ball tied to a fuse of white rope is discovered in the High School 
building. Somebody has a sense of humor! 

Tuesday, 1 7th — Three-quarters of an hour in notices. Record broken all 
to smash. Marion and his "Vife" go to see the "Eyes of the 
World." 

Wednesday. 18th — Notices continued. College ginks and fourth years 
say farewell to regular theology. Colorado Glee Club entertains. 

(Continiieil ) 



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202 



illlliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKiiinpiiiiiiiiiiMPiiiiiiiiiiiiPiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiii 

Hardware 

FISHING TACKLE 
GUNS AND AMMUNITION 



iiiiiiiiiiiirMiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnii 



iiiiiiiiiiiititiiiliiit):: 




Agents for National Sunbeam Mazda 



Lamps 



W. H. Freshwater 

136 West Center, Provo, Utah 

272 West Center Street 
Phone 123 



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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirilllilliiiiiir 



^iliMiiMiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiii<<iiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiirtniiiiiiiiiriiiiiiimMiiiiiilM(lilli^ 

I A Boquet of Flowers | 

^ Sent to Mother | 



^^€Wj&'.-iX^M or some 

Friend comes 
f like a Ray 
i' of Sunshine 



Special 

Boxes 

$1.00 




Provo Green House 



PHONE EIGHT-0 



I Maiben Glass | 
and Paint 
Co. I 

I Dealers in | 

I PAINTS, GLASS, WALL PAPER, | 
I PICTURES AND PICTURE | 

I FRAMING I 

I For Better Business Buy for Cash i 
I Provo City, Utah | 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiirtiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiritiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiir. 
'JiilliillliiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiliiiHiiiiiiiiiirHiiiiiiiiiuiriiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiii'^ 

I Deseret News | 

I Book Store | 

I THE LEADING BOOK CONCERN | 

I ALL THE LATEST BOOKS | 

I Arriving as fast as issued from the press | 

I Headquarters for | 

I SCHOOL and OFFICE I 
I SUPPLIES I 

I Wholesale and Retail | 

I We Make a Specialty of Mail | 

I Order Business | 

I Drop us a card for Catalogues and Prices | 



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203 



II iiiiimiiii iiitiiii iiii'ihiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiMii miiiti iiiMi mi ill» i '. Jlilliiimiiitiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiin (iiiit idiiri iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii iiiiimiiiiiii iiiiiiHl 



I Hudson. tIfliiLE 

I Kacvcle. 

I Mraini WM^^ 

I all make 

I Bicycles 

i Terms SS. 
i Down 

I Jl. PerW.-.k 

i Expert 

I RciKtirin;; 

= \('e Make Keys 





Meredith Cycle Co. 

159 N. Academy Ave. 



I YOUNG MEN 

I and young women are needed in 

i The Business World — 
I Especially those 

I who have been trained for their work 
I by 

I Utah Business College 

I Boston Bldg., Salt Lake City 

I Full particulars for the asking 

I E. C. DAVIS, Prinoipal Mention the Banyan 



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iiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiii II iiiiiiiiic Ti "HI iiiiiiiii' iiiiii """II 



iiijiiiiuiiliiiili" iiniiiiuiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiliililllr. 



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^oober'si palace 
of ^toeetsi 

Try Hoover's Mount Tinipanogos 
Chocolates and Fresh Made Candies. 

Fancy Ice Cream. 

Sherbets and Fruit Punches for your 
Parties. 




ODAY, ECONOMY and 
SERVICE mean everything. 
BOTH ARE REALIZED 
BY GETTING YOUR 
MEATS AND GROCERIES 
at 

J^Provo Meat & 
Packing Co. 

Phones 30 and 19 
North Academy Ave. 



FiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiitiiiiiiiiitiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiii IIIIIMIIIIIII I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I nil tiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiuiiiMiiiF ~iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiii)iiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 



'llltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIItll 




iiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiuiiiJMiniiiiiiiiiniiniiiniiiHiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiMiiniiitiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiniiiiMiiiiiiiMiiHiiiiiiiiniiitiiiiijiiiiniiniiiniiiniiiiHi^ 



Fine For Your 
Linoleum 

Makes it wear longer, dries hard over night. We 
are headquarters for ARTISTIC WALL PAPER 
and PICTURE FRAMING. 



Provo Paint & Glass Co. 



no W. Center Street, Provo, Utah 



iiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiiiiiiitiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiMinMii^ 

204 



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Thursday, 19th — Heber Slack has a jimminy-fit at his typewriter because 
the keys are always in his way. 

Friday, 20 — We're losing the farmer boys, army boys, and navy boys. 
War is — what Sherman said it was. 

Monday, 23rd — Preparation, anticipation, gesticulation, wonderation. 

Tuesday, 24th — Y Day at last. Fine weather, hard workers, delicious 
eats, terrible appetites, afternoon fun, evening dancing. 

Wednesday, 25th — Rain halts the Sun-Rise Hikers' hike and morning 
games. 

Thursday, 26th — Tennis is it — big It. 

Friday, 27th — U. of U. Male Glee Club entertains morning and evening. 

Saturday, 28th — Nels Anderson and Earl Snell play villain; Fred Bush- 
proves a hero. 

Sunday, 29th — Conference. In the evening, Jas. E. Talmage speaks on 
'Is the Fig Tree Budding?" 

Monday, 30th — Campaigning is the rage. Are you Right White or True 
Blue? 

MAY. 

Tuesday, 1st — Election day. Snell's got the presidency for next year. 
Rah fer the Blue! Now we've brought you this far, we'll leave. 
You've got an idea of what's been going on. If you're here, grin 
and bear it; if you're not here, please forgive us for not putting 
you in the calendar. May it, dear readers, remind you, sometimes 
of happy days passed in 1916-1917, is the wish of The Calendar 
Writers. 



are. 



If you intend to work there is no better place than right where you 
Keep your temper, no one else wants it. 



(Continued) 



■■""""""" """" I ' "< ""< •" "I" "I" iirir jiiM r iiiir r jiiiii iiiiiiiiiir iii, i,,,, iiiiiiilllllll 

205 



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Candy | 

is simply | 

Artificial Fruit" | 

I It is an ideal form of carljoliydrate | 

I food, of great energy ^allle, l)eing | 

I made from a combination of nutri- l 

I ents recognized everywhere as of the i 

I highest caloric value for a given | 

I weight. I 

i Sa) STARTUPS uhen buying | 

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•iiitinMiiiiiiiiiiiii)iiiiiitiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiitiiii(iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiii)iiiii)iiiHimiimiimtiimiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiu 

I Provo Steam Laundry | 

I Always Reliable | 

I "Packages by Parcel Post receive | 
I prompt attention." | 



r4^ 



J. N. GULICH. Prop. 



Sutton Market 



I Phone 164 



3.S7 W. Center 1 



The Place to Buy W hat You Eat 
We guarantee everything ive sell 

Phones 194 and 191^ 

PRO\0 CITY, UTAH 



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iiriliimi mimiiiitlim \ turn niiHiiimimiiimiiiiiiiiiniiiiMimimimi i iiim| 

I See I 

I G. H. Heindselman | 

I Eyesight Specialist for those Head- | 

I aches. Eyestrains, etc. | 

I All glasses positively guaranteed t' | 

I work as claimed for them. | 

i with I 

I Heindselman Optical [ 
I & Jewelry Co. | 



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I Regal Shoes 



Christensen 

Company 

154 West Center St. 



Seeds Seeds 

Seeds 

\^ e are Headquarters for Farm, Gar- 
den and Flower Seeds. 

Send for Our Catalog 

Carpenter Seed Co. 

Provo, Utah 



I SEEDS 



SEEDS 



SEEDS I 



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206 



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Utah Timber and Coal Co. 

I All the best COALS on the market. Also Lumber and Building Material 

I 'A SQUARE DEAL TO EVERY PATRON" 

I 160 West Fifth North. Phone 232 

I J. M. Harmon, President J. W. Dunn, Secretary and Manager 

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How he could get along without a typewriter, telephone and other modern con- 
j^ veniences in his office, and then ask him how he expects mother to get along 

-^- without modern improTements in the kitchen an 



Asl 

Your 

Dealer 



Electric Range i 

o . I 

An electric range makes cooking a pleasure, especially during the hot summer | 

months, and is economical and easy to operate. Sold on easy monthly payments | 

Tell mother to call at our store and inspect the Electric Ranges. i 

Utah Power & Light Co. I 

Efficient Puhlic Service | 

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I We are willing to leave it to the jury, both for quality and price. I 

Barton Furnitry Co. 

I "THE FURNITURE CENTER" [ 

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The Smoot Lumber Co. 

I Manufacturers of ' | 

I Doors, Windows, and Fixtures of all kinds. General Building Material and Mill I 
I Work. We furnish estimates from plans and specifications. I 

I OUR MOTTO: GET THE BUSINESS | 

I 598 Academy Avenue Phone 20 and 40 | 

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207 



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208 



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BEEBE LUMBER CO. 



PROVO, 
UTAH 




Dealers in 

LUMBER 

DOORS 

WINDOWS 

PAINT 

CEMENT 

GLASS 

HARDWARE 

and 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Phone 104 and 105 



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•J, mm mmi.immmiii mm mii mimimmii iiii mi mm mm mi ii mil i mi mi mm iimiiim i mm '£ 



UTAH COMMERCIAL AND 
SAVINGS BANK 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00 

REED SMOOT, President 
C. E. LOOSE, Vice-President 
J. T. FARRAR, Cashier 
J. A. BUTTLE, Asst. Cashier 
F. G. RICHMOND, Asst. Cashier 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON SAVINGS 



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209 



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REMEMBER 

We are UTAH'S LARGEST 
HANDLERS ami SHIPPERS of 
FRLITS AND PRODUCE, AL- 
FALFA SEED. HAY, GRAIN, 
HONEY, POTATOES, etc., etc. 
Always in the market to buy or 
sell. 

The 

Will. M. Roylance 

Company 



ColumtJia Cfjeatre 

John B. Ashton, Manager 

Belter Pictures for yourself and family 

Vaudeville and Road Attraction and 

Feature Photoplays 

Cost $7S,000.00 
Seating 1260 

PROVO, UTAH 



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I The Steady 
I Growth 

1 Of this institution is due to our 

I conservative and painstaking 

I method of handliii"; business. 

I Your account will receive our 

I careful consideration. 

e 
S 

jFarniersi anb 

iWercfjante 

panfe 

I T. N. Taylor. President 

I J. D. Dixon, Cashier 

I John F. Bennett, f ice-President 

I Arnold Dixon, Assislant Cashier 



Appreciation 

TO OUR FRIENDS: I 

The pupils of the B. Y. U., we offer I 

our hearty thanks for their generous = 

patronage and good will during this \ 

past year. Let this not be the last, j 

Please order by mail whatever you \ 

need. Write for samples and informa- \ 

tion on authoritative STYLE. It will I 
be a pleasure to us to serve you. 

Wishing you success in life, 

FARRAR BROS. 
& COMPAQ Y 



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210 



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ASSORTED BITS OF HUMOR 

(Very Much Assorted) 

When do the leaves begin to turn? The night before exams. 

Did you knoiv? 

PoHcemen dine on beats, 
Jewelers on carrots, 
Mechanics on nuts. 
Sweethearts on dates. 
Editors on roasts? 

RECIPE FOR SUCCESS IN EXAMS. 

Teacher's point of view: 

4 cups good lessons sifted throughout the year. 
1 cup review. 

1/) cup exercise in open air. 
8 tsp. good nights's sleep. 

3 tsp. clear brain. 

Flavor to taste with steady nerve. Mix and sift lessons, exercise, sleep, and 
food. Add good review and grind thoroughly. Flavor and put in baking pans. 
Bake from ll/o to 2 hrs. in steady, thoughtful, careful work. 

Student's point of view: 

l/> cup learning throuhout the year. 

5 tsp. review. 

4 cups cramming. 

1 afternoon before exams, at the Columbia. 

1 visit to Hansen's. 

1 cup tears. 

Flavor with 2 tsp. fear. 

Mix and sift learning, review, Columbia and Hansen's. Slowly add tears, 
quickly mix the cramming, grind by fits, pour into empty brain pans and 
BEAT IT 

Things we are paid to mention: 

Rulon Clark's own dress suit. 
Ralph Nilsson's wig. 
Hal's new spring suit. 

These are honorable excuses: 

I didn't quite understand your question. Professor. 
Let's see, I looked that up but I just can't recall it now. 
My alarm didn't go off. 
Her lips were so near. 



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211 



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I Knight Trust & I 

I o I 

Savings Bank 

PROVO, ITAH I 

JE.S.SE KNKiHT, rrosi.lfiil | 



Capital. S.iOO.OOO 
Surplus, $10,000 

JBircttorS 

JESSE KNIGHT J. WM. KNKJHT 

R. K. ALLEN O. C. liEEBE 

W. W. ARMSTRONc; 

FRED W. TAYLOR 

R. R. IRVINE, JR. 

W. LESTER MANGUM 

W. O. CREER 



Resources 

Loans and Discounts .$1,071,826.91 

Slock and Ronds 36.271.57 

Haiikiiif; House and Real 

E.state 51,«75.()U 

Fnrnitnrc and Fixtures 48,()0().()() 

Otlicr l{-al Estate 3.894.27 


Due from National Banks 
Due from State Banks . 
Cash 


208,.592.38 
56.095.33 
26,250.17 






$1,.502,805.63 
Liabilities 

Canital Stock $ 3()0.0()().()() 


Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits 


10,000.00 
13,871.66 


Dividends Unpaid 

Due to State Banks 

Individual Deposits 

Savinjis Deposits 

Other Deposits 


43.50 

25,329.25 

933,417.89 

154,067.45 

66,075.88 


$1,502,805.63 
Total Resources 

Marrh 8, 1'>1 ! /....$ 6i:i,r,():i.or, 

March 8 \<)\:> 72:i.7i;i.:i2 


March 8 1916 


9S8,42fl.94 


March 8, 1917 


.. 1,.S02.805.63 



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I HANSEN I 
I CATERING 

I CO. ! 

I Ice Cream, | 

I Sherbets | 

I and I 

I Candies I 



Best Place for Kefreshnients | 

in ProM) I 

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Hotel 
Roberts 

W . D. Roberts. Pmitrivtoi 

THE HOME OF THE TRAVELER 

Special Students' Breakfast or 
Luncheon, 35c 



PROVO, UTAH 



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212 



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IIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIll 



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Ye Fates be Kind, the 1917 Banyan is out! 

''Uh-a-a' (sigh of relief from the Staff) 




I^^^^LTHOUGH perhaps this book cannot be inchided 
in the category "famous history to be engraved 
vipon the everlasting monuments of time," it is 
nevertheless a true record of Brigham Young 
University student life during the year 1916-17. 
No records of hours spent in the lab. or class room 
are necessary — the professors have them, such as 
they are. It is more especially with other things 
that we are concerned. A readable record of the 
present for the future has been our aim. We 
hope the faculty, alumni, and patrons, will find 
interest in these pages — but above all we hope 
the present students, in years to come, will find 
here a reminder of happy days and dear friends 
known at the B. Y. U. 
f^ "C^l ^^ credit is due, give it to the contributors 

\:f^^~i& The faults you find attribute to us — that is what 
'^ we are for. 

— The Editors. 





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Pipiiiiirrippppiiii 



213 



ipppiiiiirpppppipiimiililllliu' 



PRESS OF THE DESERET NEWS, SALT LVKE CITY. I'TAH 



4 



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