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Full text of "The banyan"



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H. Josh Hales 

Lieut. A. W. Morrison 

John Stagg 

J. Leo Morenson 

Lieut. Ray J. Cunningham 

Ereal Day 

Lieut. Marcus Johnson 

W. H. Needham 

Lee S. Bean 

Carl Frisby 

Lawrence Morris 

Leland W. Redd 

John R. Adams 

Lloyd Adams 

Wesley J. Galloway 

Delos Stewart 

Corwin Johnson 

Sterling Lewis 

Robert E. Knowlden 

LeRoy Cox 

Theone ClufF 

John A. Young 

Ira W. Hinckley 

Harold Dalton 

Glen Bonnett 

S. Gideon Hendrix 

Lawrence F. Ewell 

Waher Daw 

W. T. Field 

Dean Clark 

Lieut. C. S. Gardner 

Harold J. Cassity 

W. J. Snow 

Ray Robertson 

Francis H. Beckstead 

Leland Tuft 

Ralph Booth 

Lieut. A. W. Richards 

Albert Westo/er 

Paul Vincent 

Lieut. L. K. Swenson 



Sgt. Stanley L. Dixon 

Clarence Harmon 

Jay Whittaker 

Stanley Wanlass 

Corp. Elwood Anderson 

Lieut. Forest Glazier 

Sam Brooks 

George Knight 

Joseph Benson 

Alvin Kirkham 

Corp. R. P. Done 

Frank Taylor 

Elmer B. Taylor 

Ross L. Bean 

Leslie F. Booth 

Allen Browne 

Clinton Larsen 

Ferd. Erickson 

Joseph Carroll 

Edward Bentley 

Victor G. Bird 

Milton H. OUerton 

J. Rufus Crandall 

Claude Hinckley 

Paul J. Davis 

Sheriff M. Henrie 

Carlyle Hinckley 

Wilford Swenson 

H. Fred Bushman 

Silas Decker 

Mark L. Roberts 

Clyde Haynes 

Corp. Raymond Freckelton 

W. A. Butler 

David O. Butler 

Sgt. Clifford Pierpont 

Ernest L. Teasdale 

Kenneth Henrie 

George C. Knight 

Leslie T. Booth 

Theodore Railie 





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Honor Roll 



Kenneth Bailey 
Orton Durham 
Kenneth Decker 
Moroni W. Smith 
Edward Fernsten 
Wilford Bentley 
George Harris 
W. Waldo Parry 
Donald Bean 
Howard Jensen 
Lyman Larsen 
Hewitt Strong 
G. R. Clark 
Louis Brandley 
Malcolm Jolley 
Clifford Hindmarsh 
A. H. Hickman 
J as. H. Martin 
Roy Collins 
Harold Thurgood 
Kenneth Nelson 
Elmo Simmons 
Sgt. Karl Boshard 
David John 
David E. Daley 
Bruce Simmons 
A. D. Anderson 
David Rogers 
Ether J. Stucki 
Frank Goold 
Clyde Mackay 
Clarence P. Greer 
F. Elbert Huish 
A. Ladru Jensen 
Lynn Openshaw 
Oscar Anderson 
Lieut. Wra. Crawford 
George Marshall 
Frank Taylor 
Ernest Monell 



Glen Fields 
Lyle Flemming 
Frank Johnson 
Sterling Taylor 
Gilhert Fjeldsted 
Ervin Jensen 
Finer Anderson 
Clarence Brown 
Mark Partridge 
Fenton Partridge 
Ralph Eggertsen 
Vem Oberhansley 
Frank Gardner 
Monroe Clark 
Emmett Clark 
Vernie Thorn 
Paul Kuhni 
David Nelson 
Dow Shumway 
Edwin Crawford 
Irving Jennings 
Lawrence Morris 
David Egar 
Silas Cheeney 
James Stratton 
David Julian 
Earl Snell 
Guy Hurst 
Glenn Crandall 
Leamon Randall 
Vernon Nuttall 
Charles Hone 
Edwin Baird 
Marion Harris 
James Gregerson 
Than Curtis 
Roscoe Harmon 
Silas A. Bushman 
Ludean Monell 
Glen Simmons 





Old Glory 

Dr. Geo. H. Brimhall 

Old Glory, wave on, o'er the land of the free. 

The home of the fair and the brave. 
The land where oppression from mountain to sea 

Finds only a place for a grave; 
The hands of a nation grasp firmly thy staff, 

In triumph they bear thee along. 
We join in the chorus like millions before us 

Still pledging our banner in song. 

We'll come at the call of thy colors. Old Flag, 

We're ready for duty today; 
We'll serve where you want us to serve. Old Flag, 

We'll pay what you want us to pay. 

Old Glory, float on, o'er the shop and the farm. 

And wave at the mouth of the mine; 
And flutter in front of our chariots of fire 

And over our birds of the brine. 
The coo of the babe and the beat of the drum. 

The voice of the nurse and the gun. 
Shall swell the refrain — while we sing again— 

The song that our fathers have sung. 

Wave, Glory, wave on, when the world shall be free 

And the peace-dove has builded her nest. 
When the war-clouds no more shall darken the shore 

And the billows of strife are at rest. 
When the Goddess of Right and the Champion Might 

Shall meet at the altar of love. 
And under thy stars and thy symbolic bars 

We'll sing with the heavens above. 




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To Our Soldier Boys 

/vie M. Gardiner 

To our boys tvho have joined the colors. 

Who answered Old Glory's call. 
Who when asked to defend their country. 

Willingly gave their all; 
To them who defend our honor 

And the sacred cause of Right, 
We pledge ourselves with heart and soul. 

And do it icith all our might. 



Whutei^er the task before them. 

Half finished or just begun. 
In stemming the mad advances 

Of the barbarous and vandal Hun, 
We know they'll never falter. 

But with loyal hearts and brave 
Will face the issue boldly. 

The freedom of man to save. 



And when it all is over 

And our boys come home again 
To lay aside their rifles 

For the peaceful walks of men. 
Democracy shall touvr 

Unstained above the world. 
While from steeple and from tower 

Her flag shall be unfurled. 






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But while we are atcaiting 

Our peace dream to come true 
No moment must be idle. 

We're in the army too. 
As at our tasks we labor 

Our prayer shall always be, 
"God bless the brave and valiant lads 

Who fight for Liberty." 



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The Gift of Power to Give 

George H. Brimhall 

Now, while we stand on Freedoms soil. 

Inhaling Freedom's air. 
Be this the burden of our song. 

Our morn and evening prayer: 

O gracious Giver of our land. 

May we who in it live 
Be grateful now for this best gift. 

The Gift of Power to Give. 

Great time, great place, great circumstance. 

To open wide the heart. 
To grow like Him who gave his all. 

By giving now our part. 

To fast betimes, with bread at hand. 

And feed the hungry throng. 
Of fragments make a plentitude. 

In sacrifice be strong. 




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The Brigham Young University Student Body 

Provo. Utah 






DOLLARS 



TO KNIGHT Trust a Savings Bank 

PROVO - UTAH 



'J^.T>T^ *-^^?^r?*('«:^\^5*r^ES, 



The Brigham^oun^^niversity Student Body ^_^ No. s "53 





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DOLLARS 



TO Knight trust & savings bank 

PROVO • UTAH 



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A Triune 



O France, thy valor and thy sacrifice 

Where Wars mad, seething monsters stand. 

Have proved thy purple lily's regal right 
To royal robes through all the land; 

And England's rose of crimson hue. 

But symbolizes that great part. 
In mighty deeds of life and love. 

That springs sublimely from her heart. 

E'en so the goldenrod in glory blooms. 
Where every test of crucial power 

Hath found enthroned a freedom, pure, divine 
That shares unstinted her rich dower. 

Blest triune — lily, rose, and goldenrod — 
Within this prayerful, heartwrung hour 

We do beseech. May God from his great throne 
Make sure thy faith and righteous power. 
Aretta Young. 



WritEen for The Banyan, in explanation of the following 
page, in which the flowers of the Allies were used in working 
out the motif. 




"7 uill put enmity bettieen thee and the woman, between 
thy seed and her seed, it shijil bruise thy head, and thou shalt 
bruise his heel." 

Here's enmity, not kinship, directly established between brutality ' 
and humanity. The serpent still strikes upward to poison and kill, the 
man must strike downward to repel and crush the viper. 
Has brute force survived? 

Which is now on the road to survival, the dove or the hawk? The 
lamb or the lion? And in all of this survival, to what is it most indebted 
— to the nature and power of the creatures or to the interference of 
higher intelligence than they? 

Goliath has once again appeared on the hill, and in the name of 
brute force is defying "the armies of the living God." We have accepted 
his challenge, a hundred million strong, and in the name of Him who 
planned our agency in that premortal state, where we forced the foe and 
fought for freedom — we advance, shouting, "Let the hero born of woman 
crush the serpent with his heel." 

G. H. BRIMHALL 
JOS. B. KEELER 
AMOS N. MERRILL 






"If hen we look at ourselves in the light of thought, we 
discover our lives are embosomed in beauty" 

S the time approaches when the work and play, the joys and 
sorrows of school days will slip forever behind us, they 
wind themselves more closely about our heart-strings. After 
four long, happy years — before us lies a vast untried future, 
holding in store we know not what. Eagerly we strain our eyes into the 
darkness, yet at the same time we reach back with longing to the valued 
experiences of the past. Memory bids us pause e'er we go forth to test 
our powers in life's great battle. 

The associations we have had and the friends we have made while 
here will never be forgotten, their influence upon our lives has been too 
great. As a class we feel that we may have done just a little toward 
inspiring our associates and keeping their ideals lofty. 

While we go on with eager preparations for our final flight from 
the home nest, we do not in any way overlook our sister classes. Their 
care-free jollity and their eagerness for the rugged climb before them 
awaken within us a feeling almost of envy, but our way lies before us. 
Duty calls, and we must answer her. 

Our paths henceforth may diverge widely, and we shall never again 
exist as a class at the dear old school, yet our hearts will ever beat in 
unison with her and we shall watch with pride her future developments. 
No students of the institution will ever be more true to the dear old 
White and Blue than the Seniors of 1918. 







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Juniors 



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I HIS class represents, to the fullest degree, the theory of the 
"Survival of the Fittest." Three years ago one hundred 
and twenty green-looking Freshies began their college career 
at the B. Y. U. The "pep" of the class was felt throughout 
the year and the years that followed. One year later a Sophomore class 
of sixty-four members set forth upon its "higher education." Many 
were the parties and great was the class spirit. At the beginning of the 
present school year ten lonely but brave Juniors entered school. The 
first event which brought them into prominence was the winning of the 
prize on Founder's Day for having the largest percentage of members 
present on the hike. But they lived not on their reputation; they were 
looking for more worlds to conquer. They had numerous parties and 
were extremely liveljr for such a small class. On the 22nd of February 
they gave the most successful Prom ever given in the institution. Proms 
may come and Proms may go, but the memories of the Junior Prom of 
1918 will go on forever. With part of the proceeds from the Prom a 
Liberty Bond was purchased, and each member of the class owns an 
individual Bond. 

"Quality, not Quantity," has been the motto of this class, and it has 
indeed been true to the motto, altho there has been a quantity as well 
as a quality in what it has done. 





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StUl^^tancls bfjlne ancicnb sacrlj'lce. 
On humble and a contrAfee h<iarC. 
Lord God oj^ Hosts, Id* with us yet. 
Lest we kordet -^:^st we koroet! 



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Springville, Utah S 

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RAY TUTTLE \ 




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SARAH WRIGHT 




Charleston, Utah 


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LOUISE BIRD 




Springrs-ille, Utah 




FLORENCE HOLT 




Provo, Utah 


GEORGE S. TANNER 




St. Joseph, Utah 


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CLARA RODGERS 
Snowflake, Arizona 



ROY MILLET 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 



HELEN NELSON 
Mt. Pleasant, Utah 



LOCKWOOD HALES 
Spanish Fork, Utah 



EDITH WILSON 
Midway, Utah 







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EVA LEWIS 
Spanish Fork, Utah 



FRANTZ WESTOVER 
St. Joseph, Arizona 



GENEVIEVE PARRY 
Richfield, Utah 




MARYLENE MAW 
Prove, Utah 



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MAGGIE FRANSEN 
Mt. Pleasant, Utah 



WILLDEE G. DIXON 
Payson, Utah 



ELEANOR STAHMANN 
Spanish Fork, Utah 



ELLA OGDEN 
Provo, Utah 



J. BERT SUMSION 
Springville, Utah 



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^^Keep thou thy soul-worn steadfast oath. 

And to thy heart he true, thy heart; 
What thy soul teaches learn to know. 

And play out thine appointed part. 
And thou shalt reap as thou shalt sow, 

A'or helped nor hindered in thy growth. 
To thy full stature thou shalt grow. 

Fix on the future's goal thy face. 

And let thy feet be lured to stray 
Nowhither, but be swift to run. 

And nowhere tarry by the way. 
Until at Uist the end is won 

And thou may'st look back from thy place 
And see thy long days journey done." 

From the splendid work done in every department of the High 
School, the school may well assume that the efficiency and high standard 
of the college will continue to be evident. 



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ORA MANWARING 



KARL COLLETT 




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RALPH KEELER 



EDNA LEWIS 



JEAN COX 



FRANK WILLIS 



HAROLD BROWN 



LORENDA JOHN 



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CARLYLE HOYLE 



PAULINE BUCKLEY 



MAURINE OLSEN 



HEBER DONE 



PHYLLIS CRAVENS 



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HAROLD LUNDELL 



ARDELLA BATEMAN 



EFFIE JOLLEY 



MELBA OLDRICH 



HAZEL REED 



GRANT CLARK 



EFFIE BEESLEY 








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THIRD YEAR CLASS OFFICERS 



Class Officers 

CARL CHRISTENSEN President 

DELLA MARSHALL First Vice President 

LA VON BILLINGS Second Vice President 

RHEA DIXON Secretary and Treasurer 

ARDIS YOUNG White and Blue Reporter 

LYMAN BROWN Athletic Manager 

WARD McCARTY Cheer Master 

STANLEY CLOVE Standard Bearer 



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SECOND YEAR CLASS OFFICERS 

Class Officers 

ADRIAN F. LUNDQUIST President 

PAULINE BRUNER First Vice President 

WILLIAM COLEMAN Second Vice President 

GERTRUDE OLSON Secretary and Treasurer 

HELEN CANDLAND White and Blue Reporter 

WILLIAM J. SNOW, JR Athletic Manager 

REED S. GARDINER Social Service Man 

ALBERT NUTTALL Standard Bearer 

HARVARD OSMOND Yell Master 



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FIRST YEAR CLASS OFFICERS 

Class Officers 

ROBERT ANDERSON President 

MARGARET PIERPONT Vice President 

LYDIA OLSEN White and Blue Reporter 

LA VERNE PAGE Secretary 

ALGERNON REDFORD Treasurer 

DAN KEELER Athletic Manager 

CHARLES REYNAUD Assistant Athletic Manager 



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Our Music Department 

i^^LTHOUGH the general populous in some respects is being 
hardened by the world's struggle, we at the B. Y. U. are 
having our finer emotions appealed to and our souls light- 
ened by the music of our school. At the beginning of the 
year a good choir, under the direction of Prof. Reid, was organized. 
Later the hymnology class, which is doing splendid work, took its place. 
We are always pleased and wish for more when the Ladies' Chorus, 
under Miss Jepperson's able direction, appears. 

Prof. Reid, Miss Edmunds, and Mr. Nelson are our piano teach- 
ers. Under their excellent instruction the piano work has had its stand- 
ard raised and a number of good pianists will be graduated this year. 

The Music Department has rendered splendid service in our school 
this year. Professor Sauer's Military Band has brought credit to the 
B. Y. U. as has also our Symphony Orchestra. Both organizations have 
added their bit to the war work. The orchestra gave a successful con- 
cert for the benefit of the Y. M. C. A., and the band has played at many 
patriotic meetings. 

The war has been a stimulus to progress in the violin, vocal and 
piano departments, and much excellent work has been done. 

We were highly favored this year by visiting artists. The Cher- 
miavsky trio and the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra gave us rare 
musical treats, which shall long be remembered. 

A novel feature was the organization of the Ladies' Military Band. 
The girls are enthusiastic, and under Professor Sauer's leadership the 
organization proved very successful. It is expected to be a prominent 
feature of the Musical Department next year. 



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F the many activities that 
make school life pleasur- 
able and supplies the re- 
quired amoiuit of "pep 
and vim," perhaps ath- 
^\w ^i^» letics plays the largest role in college 

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^Bl^^^^ttta—^A<^^^^ 1 ^^^ ^^"^^ iroM\ the farm, the bus- 

^^^K^^cA^. "^ ^^<r^ / iness world, and the mine no sooner 

^^^B[^\^^^~~-^j^_^^^^(t«jS[^V^^ get their entrance requirements attend- 

^^^ — P^H™ / ^^ '^'*' t^*^" they hear the call of activ- 

TI I m SIvvW If ^ ''^y coming from the gymnasium which 

"mC*^* / W"^ \ ''1 invites them to take part in an expres- 

» 1 1 / */ ■ \j '' sion of their agility and desire for clean 

athletics. 

After a few weeks of orderly work 
in arrangement and rearrangement of 
courses in Education, Agriculture and 
Science, an announcement is made from 
the rostrum by Coach E. L. Roberts 
that Founder's Day is fast approaching 
and that all boys with red blood in their 
veins should begin preparation for good 
stiff competition in "the 'Y' field 
and track meet." This event is characterized by class competition and pa- 
triotism which binds by one solid bond the members of each class. Only men 
who have not won previous honors are permitted to compete. This rule was 
made to encourage all beginners and to give an opportunity for selection of 
men for the annual track meet in the spring. 

The Founder's Day celebration having passed, other athletics follow in 
rapid succession. Each night a large group of boys are seen racing around town 
for the purpose of conditioning themselves for Basket Ball and the cross- 
country run. The Cross-country Run is managed on the same plan as the 
Founder's Day field meet. Classes are the represented competitors. The class 
winning the largest number of points receives the fatted turkeys and other 
appropriate awards. 

Thanksgiving day has scarcely passed before the snow begins to fall, but 
athletics go on uninterrupted. Basket Ball class games are played and from 
these games the best men are encouraged to try for the College and High School 
Basket Ball teams. After weeks of hard drill under the direction of Coach 
Roberts and Dell Webb, these teams meet their opponents in division and state 
competition. If success favors us, our college competition is not terminated by 
victories over state teams, but a trip to Denver is assured. Here teams of other 
states in the Inter-Mountain Conference compete and the successful ones go 
East to compete for world championship. 

The last big athletic feature of the year is Base Ball. All are given a 
chance to try out for the college team. Many lively games are played with 
teams of neighboring schools and cities, which furnish a fitting finale to the 
season's sports. 

No praises are too great for our able Coach, whose diligent efforts and 
stick-to-it-iveness have never allowed our dear old White and Blue to "kiss 




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Lineup 

FRANK WILLIS Forward 

LYMAN BROWN Forward 

HAROLD BROWN Guard 

DAN KEELER Guard 

RALPH KEELER Center 

STAR SWENSON Guard 

ALBERT PAGE Guard 

VERNON TALBOE Guard 




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Where the Thespians Starred 



Spanish Fork 


Manti 


Silver City 


Ephraim 


Eureka 


Provo 


Mt. Pleasant 


Mammoth 


Ogden 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




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EARL B. SNELL 
President 



"I'll serve tvhere you want me to serve, old flag.' 



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The Student Body 



I HE Student Body of the Brigham Young University, known 
V ^^ far and wide for its democratic spirit and loyal support of 
i-y^^ J^i^* school activities, has this year been tested to its utmost. 
1^^^==^^ War has ravaged its ranks and taken therefrom many of its 
strong college men and active Student Body officers. Time and again 
it has been necessary for the Board of Representatives to meet and fill 
new vacancies. The greatest blow to the organization came in early 
December when our Student Body President answered the call of Uncle 
Sam, and left us without a leader. He was retained as president on leave 
of absence, and the task of representing the Student Body fell upon the 
two vice presidents. The Student-Body to a man stood loyally behind 
them and gave the support that made it possible to carry on all regular 
school activities. 

While we have lost out in regular school activities more this year 
than we have done before for years, it has only served to strengthen 
our spirit of unity and to make us sing more fervently than ever. 

Then cheer anew for the B. Y. U. 
We've come to work, to live, to do; 
We'll raise our standard, bear it through. 
Our hearts are true to the B, Y. U. 



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Board of Representatives 




E. B. SNELL 
President 



IVIE GARDNER 
First Vice President 



E. H. HOLT 
Treasurer 



E. M. HICKEN 

Second Vice President 



BILLYE COLEMAN 
Secretary 



PRES. G. H. BRIMHALL 
Faculty Representative 



J. B. KEELER 
Faculty Representative 

GLEN B. SMITH 
Senior Representative 



A. N. MERRH^L 
Faculty Representative 

AARON TRACY 
Junior Representative 



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RAY TUTTLE 

Sophomore Representative 



FRANK NEWMAN 
Freshman Representative 



RALPH KEELER 
Fourth Year Representative 



CARL CHRISTENSEN ADRMN LUNDQUIST 

Third Year Representative Second Year Representative 

ROBERT ANDERSEN 
First Year Representative 




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Student Body Officers 

E. B. SNELL - President 

IVIE GARDINER First Vice President 

E. M. HICKEN Second Vice President 

E. H. HOLT Treasurer 

BILLYE COLEMAN Secretary 

LOCK HALES White and Blue Business Manager 

RALPH NILSSON Debating Manager 

REED GAMMELL Basket Ball Manager 

ERNEST MORRELL Chief of Social Service 

ERNEST SHUMWAY Athletic Manager 

SILAS BUSHMAN Wrestling Manager 

GENEVIEVE PARRY Tennis Manager 

REED HOLT Tennis Manager 

THEODORE RAILE Base Ball Manager 

LA CELLE SUMSION Yell Master 

ALGIE EGGERTSEN Banyan Editor 

LESTER E. HENRIE Banyan Manager 






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White and Blue Staff 



STERLING ERCANBRACK ...Editor 

FERN BROADBENT, '21 Editor 

LOCK HALES, '20 .Business .Manager 

IVIE GARDINER, '18 issociat^ Editor 

WARD McCARTY Sporting Editor 

GENEVIEVE PARRY, '20 Calendar 

ANNA LEWIS, '21 Staff .Artist 

LEAH COLLINS, '20 Special Writer 

LUCILE TALMAGE, '21.. Special Writer 

LAWRENCE J. SORENSON, '21 ..Reporter 

EDITH AUSTIN, '21 Reporter 

EDITH JONES, '18 H. S Circulation and Ex. 



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Banyan Staff 



ALGiE EGGERTSEN Editor 

LESTER E. HENRIE Business Manager 

HANNAH MENDENHALL Assistant Editor 

IDA JENSEN Assistant Editor 

GRANT CRANDALL Assistant Business Manager 

ANNA LEWIS Artist 

EARL GRONEMAN Artist 

ALBERTA HUISH Calendar 

FANN^ McLEAN Special 

FRED MARKHAM Cartoonist 




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SPRINGVILLE CLUB 




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B. Y. U. Women's Organization 



^^'OR the past three years the wives of the facuhy of the Uni- 
versity have had a nominal organization, and as such have 
_.^^^ conducted socials of various kinds in the school. During this 
===>^^^ period they have come to believe that in a school of this size 
and influence, there should be a permanent women's organization. 

Accordingly, on December 18, 1917, they met and elected the fol- 
lowing officers: Mrs. Christen Jensen, President; Mrs. M. P. Hender- 
son, First Vice President; Mrs. C. W. Reid, Second Vice President; and 
Mrs. N. L. Nelson, Secretary and Treasurer. 

The objects of the organiation are social and intellectual enjoy- 
ment, and the furthering of the ideal of the school. 

The first problem was that of finances. It was decided to raise 
money for the purpose of fitting up the Art Room with rugs. A com- 
mittee of five members was appointed, viz.: Mrs. C. E. Maw, chairman; 
Mrs. C. F. Eyring, Mrs. L. H. Peterson, Miss Edyth Barlow, and Mrs. 
N. L. Nelson. This committee secured Miss Babcock for two dramatic 
readings, which netted the association above expenses $105.55. The 
blue-tinted plush rug, which may be viewed in the Art Room at any 
session of the association, is one result of this venture. 

The officers also decided that at our socials at least one hour should 
be devoted to intellectual enjoyment. Accordingly, the following pro- 












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gram committee was chosen: Mrs. Herald Clark, chairman; Miss Alice 
Reynolds, and Mrs. J. F. Brown. The central topic of the programs has 
been "Themes Suggested by the War," which have been discussed. 
Along with these the members listened to and appreciated selections 
from such artists as Prof. Gudmunson, Miss Lida Edmunds, and Miss 
Edyth Barlow. 

In addition to bi-monthly meetings the association has held three 
special sessions. The first was for the entertainment of Mrs. H. H. 
Powers, a woman as charming, refined, and womanly as her husband 
is intellectual. Mrs. Powers, in a unique little talk, gave the members 
a Red Cross message from the women of the East. 

At the second special meeting, the organization secured Miss Raven- 
hill of the Agriculture College of Logan to speak on "Modern Problems 
in Child Culture." At both of these special sessions an invitation was 
extended to the leading women of Provo, and the Art Room was well 
filled. Miss Ravenhill's wide experience along the line of her subject, 
and her charming personality, gave added appreciation to her talk. 

On April 1, all the members entertained in honor of their hus- 
bands at a camouflage party. Some wives were more than astonished 
to see these dignified Professors taking part in the dramatization of 
"The Three Bears" and "Little Red Riding Hood." As Miss Reynolds' 
birthday came on this date, she was made guest of honor for the evening, 
and was presented with a basket of violets. 

Prof. Roscoe Harmon of the Training School was the first member 
of the faculty to be called to the colors: and in honor of this occasion 
the women acted as hostesses. Brother Harmon was presented with a 
beautiful wrist watch, and the Honor pin by the faculty. 

Since organizing, the officers have been looking ahead for an op- 
portunity to aid materially the Red Cross. Nearly every member had 
been doing this kind of work on the side, but all were anxious to make 
a contribution in the name of the organization. 

With this fact in view, the presiding members planned a luncheon 
to be served at noon on the University lawns, on the Cafeteria plan. 
Through the splendid advertising of President Brimhall and the local 
paper, the eatables were all sold and many people had to be turned 
away. The enterprise netted $144.05, which was contributed to the 
Belgian Relief Fund. 

Since January 9, the B. Y. U. Women's Organization has raised 
$322.17. Of this amount $64.75 have been spent in buying rugs for 
the Art Room, and $125.00 has been given to the Red Cross. 

A vigorous policy have been pursued this year and the organization 
is on a permanent basis. Meetings will be continued until the close of 
school, when there will be a re-election of officers for next year. 



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High School Debaters 

AFFIRMATIVE TEAM 
VIOLET JOHNSON VIVIAN BILLINGS 

NEGATIVE TEAM 
SADIE OLLERTON LA VON BILLINGS 



Question: "Resolved, That Utah adopt a graduated income tax.' 






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REED GAMMELL 
Winner of Student Body Oration 



GEORGE GLADE 
Winner of Washington's Birthday Oration 




EUGENE GLADE 
Winner of Jex Oratorical Medal 





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SEPTEMBER 

Monday, Tuesday, 17, 18. Class registration. 

Wednesday, 19. "Down to business." 

Thursday, 20. J. E. Collet talks on the "Birth of Patriotism." 

Tuesday, 25. Famous "old Clint" Larsen leaves for California to compete in 
Far Western Track and Field Meet. 

Friday, 28. First Student Body program. Annual get-acquainted handshake. 

Sunday, 30. Lucile Talmage takes a beauty nap. 

OCTOBER 

"O sun and skies and clouds of June, 

Count all your boasts together; 
You cannot rival for one hour 

October's bright, blue weather." 

Wednesday, 3. Colorado Cavalry visits B. Y. U. 

Thursday, 4. Au revoir, Utah County draft boys. 
"Over the top with the best o' luck." 

Friday, 5. Reed and Maggie go in search of autumn leaves. 

Saturday, 6. Number of Fourth Years celebrate at Saratoga. Ask Reed Holt. 

Sunday, 7. Mac. sees Ardis for the first time. Who ever would have dreamed — 

Monday, 8. Janitors collect gum "wads." 

Tuesday, 9. Lock accompanies Miss Bird to devotional. 

Wednesday, 10. I just love Wednesday. 

Thursday, 11. "As peaceful and calm as a ship at sea." 
Sterl. and Fern go out for a "lark." 

Friday, 12. Eva Keller's unlucky day. 

Sunday, 14. Just Sunday. 

Monday, 15. Jex stays home to prepare for the big "hike." 

Tuesday, 16. Founder's Day!!! Maple Flat. Happy hearts — tired feet — 
empty kodaks! Big "hop" in gym. 

W^ednesday, 17. Day after the day before. Calder hits the feathers at 9 p. m. 

Friday, 19. Prof. Bovle has a birthdav. Wonder how old? Sh!! 




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Monday, 22. Dizzv dav for Algie. President Brimhall returns from Southern 
Utah. 

Tuesday, 23. Mrs. Redmond of Denver gives talk on Red Cross work. B. Y. 
Symphony Concert. 

Wednesday, 24. Yam — more yarn — needles and more yarn. "Knit your bit" 
motto of the fair sex. 

Thursday, 25. Charles Mitchell seen talking to a girl. Will wonders ever 
cease ? 

Saturday, 27. "High Cost of Living" at Columbia. Jens and Velma are there. 

Monday, 29. Miss Barlow reads and interprets "America." Starr and Marva 
are still coruscating. 

Wednesday, 31. LeRoy Cox joins the Sammies at American Lake. 



NOVEMBER 

''''Even gray November hath its charms." 

Thursday, 1. Delia says this verse refers to her. 

Friday, 2. Silas Bushman attends the Senior party at the Eggertsen home. 

Saturday, 3. Arizonians decide to "blow in" and patronize the movies. 

Sunday, 4. Price has the "blues." Wonder what's the matter. 

Monday, 5. General homesickness — nothing serious. 

Tuesday, 6. Theology hour given over to Patriarch Hale. 

Thursday, 8. First matinee "hop" in Ladies' gym. This is the life. 

Friday, 9. Dr. Geo. E. Fellows explains Y. M. C. A. work. 

Our motto, "Can the kaiser, with our cash." Chemiavsky Bros. ( Con- 
sult M. W. Poulson's Dictionary for pronunciation. I 

Saturday, 10. Big sale at Bott's! One-half off — Hence Newman's new necktie. 

Monday, 12. Even "Aunt Alice" catches the knitting fever. 

Tuesday, 13. We sign Y. M. C. A. pledge cards. J. B. Siunsion and Miss 
Bowker visit devotional. 

Thursday, 15. Music Department turns twentv "bones" over to student body 
for Y. M. C. A. 

01 Friday, 16. Ralph Keeler seen on the street after 8:30 p. m. 




Saturday, 17. Jim Gregerson, "Faithful Jimmy," hangs around school and 
Academy Avenue. 

Sunday, 18. Apostle Reed Smoot speaker in evening services. 

Monday, 19. Tuttle eats corn flakes for breakfast. 

Tuesday, 20. Delia Marshall says she's game for anything once. 

Wednesday, 21. Gerald Beck says its "Jake" with him. Consequently the 
vodie gets an extra quarter. 

Thursday, 22. Male chorus sings "Aloha Ooe." 

Friday, 23. Thanksgiving program. We give President Snell a real wrist 

watch, accompanied with "best wishes and much luff!" 

Saturday, 24. Snell says Provo's too tame for him. He joins Sammies. 

Tuesday, 27. Snow — for a change Willard Hawkins buys new rubbers. 

Wednesday, 28. Reed Gammel runs off with Oratorical Medal. Freshies vic- 
torious in Cross Country Run, and eat the turkey. Third years didn't 
want it. 

Thursday, 29. Thanksgiving dinner! Too much — Ask McCarty and Ardis. 



DECEMBER 

Tuesday, 4. Superintendent Cummings speaks during deovtional. Leamon 
Randall tells Zoe "Goodbye" and leaves for the colors. 

Wednesday, 5. Little boxes tied with blue. 
Greetings from the B. Y. U., 
Merry Xmas, Sammie boys. 

Thursday, 6. Reed and LaCelle take breakfast. 

Friday, 7. Regular student body "hop." 

Saturday, 8. Ladies' gym — Gold Dust twins. "Adrian the Adorable," etc. 

Sunday, 9. President Brimhall's birthday. "Slumbering" band 'awakened 
for the serenade. 

Monday, 10. Hlustrated lecture by Dr. Raines. 

Tuesday, 11. Pat is working on her trousseau! 

Wednesday, 12. Everything comes to him who waits. CoUett waits for Edith 
at the foot of the stairs. 

Thursday, 13. Nothing doing. 

Friday, 14. Ditto. 



Tuesday, 18. Something going to happen sure. We smell orange blossoms. 
Thursday, 20. Wedding bells ! ! Princess Pat turns Clayton. 
Friday, 21. Pat seen reading "Their Yesterdays." 

Sunday, 23. We all knit socks for soldiers. Golda dreams yearningly of 
Kearny. Ladru comes from Camp Lewis. "Algie, where art thou?" 

Monday, 24. "Hurrah! Xmas am a cumin'." An' all de week am ouahs." 
Tuesday, 25. Xmas! Nuff sed! 
Monday, 31. We all repent. 

JANUARY 

Tuesday, 1. Where are those Resolutions? 

Monday, 7. Sees all us "kids" back to school. Fern says the vacation would 

have been complete with just one more night at Hansen's. Our president 

wishes us a victorious New Year. 
Tuesday, 8. Prof. Osmond sweeps the snow from the back porch. 
Wednesday: 9. Geo. T. Odell explains thrift stamps campaign. Terry Decker 

promises to never again buy Spearmint for Mamie Thomas. 
Thursday, 10. "Weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth." 
Friday, 11. "Efficiency after the war" — Earl J. Glade. 
Saturday, 12. First Basket Ball game of the season. College put it over the 

High^O-28. 
Monday, 14. Just for old time's sake, Lorenda and Badley hold hands in the 

Faculty room. 
Tuesday, 15. "Monday's child is fair of face, Tuesday's child is full of grace." 

Anna says she was bom on Tuesday. 
Wednesday, 16. "Hallology" classes unusually interesting. 
Thursday, 1 7. Strongheart comes down from Ogden to cheer us up. 
Friday, 18. Survivors of the dramatic tryouts attend matinee dance. 
Saturday, 19. More victories! We scoop Lehi and Spanish Fork. 
Sunday, 20. Genevieve Parry reads dime novels all day. 
Monday, 21. Theology — for a change. 
Tuesday, 22. Prof. Whitaker sings, "La Marseillaise" for us. Not all canaries 

are caged. 






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Wednesday, 23. Semester exams ! ! "Oh, for the wings of a dove," or a little 

inspiration. 
Thursday, 24. Viv. Billings visits the Hickman home. 
Friday, Saturday, 25, 26. End of semester. Cacti Club gives a sleighing party 

on Temple Hill. Nobody "slain." 

Sunday, 27. Billye Coleman, that dimpled-faced, curly-haired blonde, ac- 
companies Blain Kelsey to the Orem. 

Monday, 28. Exam, papers returned. — One time when ignorance is not bliss. 

JVednesday, 30. Freshmen — Art Gallery — party. 

Thursday, 31. "The Pretenders," is read by Maude May Babcock. 

FEBRUARY 

Month of kisses, dreams and tarts, Valentines and Cupid's arts. 

Friday, 1. Perseverance conquers all! Apostle Grant learns to sing. At night 

we hear "A Blot on the 'Scutcheon." 
Saturday, 2. We play Springville, victorious of course. Score — 29-12. Dr. 

Steiner on the Lyceum course. 
Monday, 4. Radiator party. Guests: Laura Mac, Ervin Jensen, Carlyle Hoyle. 

Chaperon, Cliloe Van. 
Tuesday, 5. Onions — Main dish on the Domestic Science menu. 
Wednesday, 6. Separate meetings. "Woman's Part in the War," Mrs. E. H. 

Eastmond. 
Thursday, 7. Chieftain Caupolican. 

Friday, 8. Edity Austin. "Wasn't his smile simply adorable?" 
Saturday, 9. General irritation of the bronchial tubes. Y team makes time 

fly, but fate hands the laurels to the U. Score, 27 to 21. 

Sunday, 10. "Those who have tears prepare to shed them now." 

Monday, 11. Not worth mentioning. 

Tuesday, 12. Meatless day — Oh, for a ham sandwich. 

Wednesday, 13. Edna smiles sweetly in the upper hall. 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 14, 15, 16. Farmers and Housekeepers' Conven- 
tion. We all go to see the sights and return, feeling like "war bread." 

Sunday, 17. Violets blooming in Springville! 

Monday, 18. Prof. Hendricks of A. C. visitor at school. President Brimhall 
leaves for East. 




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Wednesday, 20. Ladies' Chorus sings about "My Desire." Pete says its Violets 
and vodies for him. 

Thursday, 21. Too bad. Castlegate! 

Friday, 22. Washington's birthday. Wonderful prom. 

Saturday, 23. Morning after the night before. Hey, Utah! Hey! Utah! 
Coo! Coo! Score 38 to 28. 

Sunday, 24. Heap big time in the city. Lost — Afton's powder puff, some- 
where between Shay's cafe and Tenth South. 

Monday, 25. Celebration. Down town with our heroes. 

Tuesday, 26. One holiday calls for another, but the "Profs." don't think so. 

Wednesday, 27. General excitement. Nobody arrested yet. Dr. Powers on 
Lyceum. 

Thursday, 28. Heard Prof. Boyle singing, "I don't want to get well." 

Friday, 29. "Some people are fence runners." Others merely hang on the 
gate. 

MARCH 

Monday, 4. H. S. Basket Ball team boys sit on the stand and chew gum while 
Billy trims them. 

Tuesday, 5. Billy repentant — Starr furious. Others bleached. Alas! 

Wednesday, 6. Prof. Brown has high hopes for H. S. championship. Tourna- 
ment news encouraging. 

Thursday, 7. Children's diseases prevalent. Hicken cant' eat pickles. 

Friday, 8. Sunshine and clouds! Hope, wonder, despair all guests at school. 
Farmers at Cedar the cause. 

Monday, 11. Hannah absent-minded? H. S. resolve to hope for next year's 
champ. 

Tuesday, 12. Pat hasn't changed — neither has the front row. 

Wednesday, 13. Unadulterated study — study — grind. 

Thursday, 14. Brother Keeler's edict — broken hearts — empty halls. 

Friday, 15. Dr. Evans cheers us. Prexy returns — Miss Dixon also forms part 
of the rostrum decoration. 

Monday, 18. Things turning green — note ths dramatic club's lower extremities. 
Green Stockings at the Columbia. 

Tuesday, 19. Earl Groneman takes spasms — melody and flirtation. 




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Wednesday, 20. Alene Phillips places a ban on profanity. Jess Hammond 
takes an oath and secures the sparkler. 

Thursday, 21. Reed and Maggie don't come to chapel together, that's the 
matter? Oh, yes, chapel at 9. "Y" day. Hurn,! 

Friday, 22. LeCelle induces Mar\'lene to take notes from the audience. 

APRIL 

Monday, 1. Alarms — Big Bens — changed time. Prof. Swenson has to sprint 
up the hill. 

Tuesday, 2. Hilman black eye — Stan Clove — Draper — faint-hearted girls. 

Wednesday, 3. Frank Newman advertises the Freshies by being kidnaped and 
abduced and fed. 

Thursday, 4. Found — Necktie and Newman. 

Friday, 5. Freshmen and future Freshmen give a splendid program. Lnclc 
Josh can't help it — he's rarin' to laugh. 

Monday, 8. Ivie acting suspicious. Wonder if Edgar didn't walk home with 
her. 

Tuesday, 9. Clean-up. Swenson and J. M. Jensen read the paper — never been 
done before. Eh? Prof. Nelson. 

Wednesday, 10. All who think the "pinhead bunch" ought to get ducked 

say Aye. 
Thursday, 11. Lester stavs in bed while his suit goes to Madsen's. 
Friday, 12. Marriage of Miss Dixon and Dr. Dowers of Philadelphia. 
Saturday, 13. All the blondes buy new hats. So doss Edwards 
Sunday, 14. Pete spends the afternoon on Glazier's porch. So does Violet. 
Monday, 15. Arbor day — snow — Mozart. 
Tuesday, 16. Miss Barlow carries a "stickette" for self -protection. 

Wednesday, 1 7. Why that radiant glow 

Upon thy tinted cheek? 
Aha! I see, it is the ring 

Fair Edgar bought last week. 

Thursday, 18. A Perfect Day. 

Friday, 19. Liberty Bond rally. Faculty and training school 100 per cent 
bond owners. 

Saturday, 20. Athletic carnival. Payson girls and Shumway are leading char- 
acters. 



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Sunday, 21. Day after the Soph's Carnival Dance. 

Monday, 22. Fern also carries the rod — camouflage for dignity. 

Tuesday, 23. Jens and Algie leave on the 7:05 car. Algie comes back. 

Wednesday, 24. Silas Bushman goes to the colors to represent us. 

Thursday, 25. Riley and Simmons swell the ranks of Uncle Sam. 

Friday, 26. Liberty Day. Everybody buys a bond. U. of U. Glee Club. 

Saturday, 27. Our debating champions return from Nevada. 

Sunday, 28. Conference — 

Monday, 29. School has appearance of seminary. 

Tuesday, 30. Everybody enjoys the "Liberty" theology. 

MAY 

Wednesday, 1. Field Marshal Rogers drills "Battalion of Death" at 4 p. m. 

Thursday, 2. Board of Control hold a meeting(?). 

Friday, 3. Eugene Glade wins the J ex medal. 

Saturday, 4. Ladru nearly shatters Banyan plans. 

Monday, 6. Prof. Whitaker teaches us to say "Dick's mood" instead of "Dick's 
mud." 

Tuesday, 7. Wm. J. Snow (Jr.), how to fly — and how to get the title of "Gen- 
eral Demerit." 



The wind and rain interfere with the Gardiner-Jensen stroll. 

Algie sleeps in Domestic 



Wednesday, 8. 

Thursday, 9. English 2 students take a beauty nap 

Science. 
Friday, 10. Girls' Day. War brides on the stand: the Misses Ivie, Edith, Algie, 

Aunt Alice, Aliene, Fern and Anna. 
Monday, 13. Blackie Huish, Josh Hales home on furlough. Special classes in 

military hallology. 
Tuesday, 14. Sunrise hikers disturb peace. Lawrence falls over his shoelace. 

First aid called. 
Thursday, 16. Coming events cast their shadows before. We see black shadows. 

but Seniors. 
Thursday, 16. Coming events cast their shadows before. We see black shadows. 
Friday, 17. Seniors flaunt their black wings. Ready to fly. 



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B. Y. U. Girls 



I ESTED and tried to the very core were the women ol the University 
of 1917 and 1918 — literally weighed in the balance, and not found 
wanting. The beginning of the school year found President Earl 
Snell managing the complexities of Student Body life; soon 

the reins of government were relinquished for the military camp, 

and Miss Ivie Gardner fell heir to all his woes. 

Strange and devious the path of The Banyan; its very life threatened at 
times. But if it must needs be that one person shall be editor, and that one per- 
son a woman, its life shall not be lost. To Miss Algie Eggertsen the Student 
Body of the present year finds itseK deeply indebted. 

"The White and Blue changed hands not because of a call to the colors; 
its editor heard the gospel trump calling from afar. But what matter; there 
she stood, the proverbial college woman ready to take up the work where 
her brother left it off. 

Those of us who did not do it all, helped to do things. One of us helped 
to win a debate, one of us helped make a municipal flag, and a few of us 
helped soldier boys to get married. Yet another made a cover design for "Old 
Glory" and helped all the star issues of the White and Blue. 

Every girl has done her bit ; an all-star cast in that respect. One girl knit 
seven sweaters and got seven A's. Together we knit 172 sweaters, 50 pairs of 
socks, 25 shawls for Belgian refugees 18 scarfs and 3 helmets. 

In addition to that we have made 25 dresses for Belgian children, 19 
dresses for Belgian babies and 19 jackets for Belgian babies. At Christmas 
time we were Santa Glaus to 120 Sammies. We are keeping the home fires burn- 
ing till the boys come back. 



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U)ty sf^all sit on d kitchen obair; 
^nd £at from a coverUss tablt, 
V/it^) a true, scientific air, 
Th«y sh=^l^ W'^ ma.terials to warK witt, 
Corn-m£i\ andL water that 'b d.11, 
They shall work for a. day ori ont nii«l"fin, 
Doin^ their bit so biT>ail. 
Bnd only HOOVER sbiU prai»t tht-m; 
F)nd orily Ptterson blamej 
^d all bh all coo/i for their country, 

y/iat odds if the cooking is tarne . 
F)r)<i each foi' the joy of worainfj, 
Bnd each in her separate way, 
Shall cook vn€at and 'spuds 

as she wants them, 
f^nd not as the ceok-booKb say. 



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Turn Your Faces Toward the Sun 



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Be u'ings, not weights. — 
President Brimhall. 

Rapt attention shows good 
breeding. — President Brim- 
hall. 

Be bigger than your mis- 
takes. — President Brimhall. 

Help keep things tidy and 
beautiful because that is a 
part of life. — President Brim- 
hall. 

Theology of the finest kind 
is to be interested in making 
heaven as well as in looking 
for it. — President Brimhall. 

What does a mule do? 
Just what you make him do 
•and nothing more, except 
kick. — President Brimhall. 

These hills by us> they 
tower up, say to us,Be lofty! 
They stand immovable and 
say to us. Be firm! — Pres- 
ident Brimhall. 

How like life is road- 
making. Make yours deep 
and wide — have a surplus. 
Narrowness mars the pleas- 
ure of the tourist. 

When you find roads 
smooth, broad and carved 
deep into the mountain side 
you are at perfect ease. 
There is a sense of security 
as you go along. Why? — 
Because there is room to 
pass. — President Brimhall. 




HERE is a cloud of smoke and a pall of sot- 
row hanging over the earth. That is why 
every seat in this hall is not filled. Propor- 
tionately, I presume, our enrollment is un- 
expectedly large. There are many faces 
that would have been here that are looking 
towards the cannon's mouth. To many the flash of the 
bayonet and the roar of battle is the expectant sound, who 
but for the wo^ld-^^^ide calamity would have been here (and 
heard "The Holy City" this morning I. 

I have had some difficulty in keeping my heart throb- 
bing with even cheerfulness. I had my lesson this morning 
from the campus en the hill. I drove up on the campus to 
inspect the building and surroundings, and stood over- 
looking one of the most beautiful landscapes on the earth. 
At my feet were the trees swinging with ripening fruit and 
the fields simply laden with the richness of the harvest. 
Then I turned my gaze towards the building, and there was 
the sunflower. I wrote in my tablet: "Weeds need remov- 
ing from these grounds." I went on up the porch, went in 
the building and looked about, and then came out and 
viewed that patch of weeds from a higher point of vision — 
and they became radiant. Their golden petals spread out 
circular-like, and they almost all seemed to face one way. 
I looked closely and only here and there I saw a smaller 
flower with its back toward the sun. Those radiant flowers 
with seed and golden leaf began to tell me the story of their 
ancestors which for ages and ages had smiled in the midst 
of the desert as they turned their faces towards the sun, and 
ripened to feed the birds during the long, cold winter. 

I said to myself. What would be left if we tore these 
sunflowers, bound them in sheaves, and burned them? Just 
the rocks and the gray yard that might talk of sturdiness 
of character. But these flowers said to me "Sunshine." 

They said to me, "Turn your face toward the sun." 
They said lo me, "There is sunshine in the world for every 
soul that will turn its face towards it; there is sunshine 
in every soul if the soul will turn itself on the sunshine 
in its own heart; there is sunshine in our toil if we face it." 
Let your hearts take on the sunflower attitude; let it 
then turn in on the happiness of life and rejoice — rejoice for 
what your ancestors have done. This is the hour of the sun- 
flower attitude: sunflower attitude towards our rtate condi- 
tion; sunflower attitude towards our school; sunflower atti- 
tude .owards our classwork; sunflower attitude towards 
home life. Let us be facing the sunshine of life, the sunshine 
wi'hin, the sunshine around, and the sunshine above. 




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"Some of Our Faculty in Verse" 




President Brimhall 
The fire and spirit of right combined 
At all times govern our president's mind. 
A man of undaunted faith is he, 
A loyal son of Liberty. 

Whenever money's hard to find 
President Keeler comes to mind. 
He starts to think and work and plan. 
He surely is the finance man. 

Whenever strife and trouble rise 

And clouds of doubt bedim our skies, 

'Tis then we to Dean Merrill go. 

His smile brings peace, dispels our woe. 

Aretta is Young 

As all of us see. 
An artistic help 

To the faculty. 

Professor Eastmond soars afar. 
His ambition's fastened to a star. 
Us common folks he leaves below 
In "unesthetic" depths to grow. 

Prof. Henderson knows bugs and pests. 
He learns wher microbes l9uild their nests. 
He scares young lovers from kisses sweet. 
He robs them of happiness quite complete. 

Professor Buss knows an "awful" lot 
As to what the world is and what it is not. 
He talks of the ice age and glacial action. 
Of drumlings and faults of heat and contrac- 
tion. 

Professor Peterson knows he knows 

How thoughts and a big idea grows. 

He can talk "Normal Curve" for a week and 

yet 
Be as full of knowledge as a person can get. 

Miss Elliott clips and mends and sews. 
She makes the very nicest clothes. 
She carries "shears" and a harmless measure 
For "cutting out" is her greatest pleasure. 



g^TWIJ 




Coach Roberts walks about so proud. 
He calls, "Attention," firm and loud. 
He makes you run and march some more 
And tumble till your bones are sore. 

Miss Harris is a maid so sweet 
She makes ice cream and bakes the meat; 
She makes fruit salad and chicken stew. 
Can you think of a thing she cannot do? 

Miss Reynolds 

A woman who's a Lover 
Who Smiles and likes to Reade. 
She does Wright and Carys Hope; 
She can Cooke but Burns indeed. 

Our Mazie Campbell knits and dams. 
Makes Belgian shawls of coarsest yams. 
She's like a fairy sure enough. 
Making useful things out of homely stuff. 

Professor Maw 
Now there's the man who is our mother 
He tries with fumes his class to smother. 
He talks of acids, salts and metal; 
His brain will all equations settle. 

Without Prof. Sauer what would we do? 
We'd have no band to listen to. 
The trumpet, flute nor deep bassoon 
Would yield for us no lively tune. 
He makes announcements ever clear. 
His music fills the dance with cheer. 
Without his aid what would we do? 
Who'd play the comet? Would you? 

Now that man Larson takes a pace 
That makes us think he's in a race 
He launches into fields quite new; 
That he's late to meals is surely true. 

Gudmundsen. 

1 know a man so natural 

Who admires scales and swells, 
He speaks with rhythmic accent 

And in a flat he dwells. 
He slurs and beats and measures. 

In all lines he's the bass. 
He strews the bar with half notes. 

Takes a quarter rest with Grace. 



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Uncle Josh Saw "The Freshman Kidnap" 

i ALL, sir, by the jiimpin' up cats, while I was down at the B. Y. U. 
the college fellers un' the high school fellers hada excitin' un' 
blood-stirrin' rumpus one day durin' Freshman week. It all hap- 
pened cuz a feller called Newman wus kidnaped un' threatened 
ta terrible sufferin' and torture. 

Newman wus about uz broad-minded uz he wus thick-headed un' uz wide 
uz he wus lengthwise un' thought cus his name wus Newman that he knew 
more U2i' 'em what knew he didn't know any more un he knew what they knew 
he knew. Anyhow he wus a member uv the Dramatic Society, The Woman's 
Secret, Improvement League, The Hall Un' Radiatin', Social Benefit Club, The 
Base Ball Club un' a dozen other clubs far the downfall uv man's headified soul. 

Wall, the gals kinda got stuck on 'im, so they had asufferin-yet meetin' 
un' choosed him fer ta head th' Freshmen bunch ! Wall, then them boys gived 
the compliment back ta the gals un' made Anna Lewis his First Aid un' 
Relief. 

Wall, we pinned our faith on Newman's coat-tail un' peace an' posterity 
reigned in abundance, un' ever-budy promised ta pay thar donations. — But 
jus' then somethin' happened — some high school fellers wanted ta take New- 
man's picture out by the fountin one day, but when they got 'im out thar 
they took him instead. By the time us college fellars got thar, they had him 
in a big bus goin' lickety-cut down Academy Avenue. 

Before night cum ever'budy wus excited; the college boys wus runnin' up 
un' down the stairs spitting in thar hands un' cryin' vengance on the High 
School. Then they all got together, un' run into the street. The gals wrung 
thar hands un' pulled long faces like uz if thar tender hearts would break. 
Some uv 'em wus readin' black-hand letters what said that Newman wus 
painted green un' locked in a dark cellar ta smother. 

I run down the street when all uv a sudden I saw the whole school fightin' 
un' yellin'. Wall, I started back, when a mob uv High School yaps sprung 
from behind a fence — a fellar by the name uv Christy hit me over the head 
with a shotgun un' I knowed no more. 

When I cum to — my suspenders wus wrapped around my neck, un' my 
face and shirt wus covered with wagon dope; it wus dark un' I kinda got scared. 
Wall, I got up somehow un' run down through Main Street with a big dog 
bringin' up the rear uv my seatless trousers and another the tail uv my tailless 
shirt. Wall, I got home somehow that night, un' the next day I knowed it wus 
the mornin' after; an I wuz readin' the paper. And thar on the front page it 
said, "Special to the Telegram — Newman Safe at Hotel Roberts." And, by 
gar. that poor critter had been staked out on the "Y" ta graze awhile, and 
then dumped on a island in Utah Lake cuz he yelled fer water. 

Wall, them college guys finally tracked him ta the Hotel whar the high 
school kids wus treatin' him rayal, cuz they got scared out. And so the next 
mornin' thar wus Boby with a new necktie. 



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TRY THIS ON YOUR PIANO 



P's Psalm of Life 



i 



TeH me not, ye idle students. 

Life is but a round of joy. 

Life is '^Problems, Problems, Problems," 

And "they're here for us to solve." 

"Pseudo sympathy" and "veneer" 

Make for "camouflage" insincere. 

It's "positively" ridiculous 

And "absolutely" vile 

That you "utterly" forget yourselves. 

Come, "study" for a while. 




Wii. 



1. Silas 4. Reed 

2. Ida 5. Elinor 

3. Algie 6. La Celle 





Word Drill 



7. Glen 

8. Ivie 

9. Bessie 



10. Willie 

11. Milton 

12. Lola 



13. Dave 

14. Ernest 



See the pretty babies. 

They are Senior babies. 

Do you love the babies.^ 

The Faculty loves the Senior babies. 

Some are boy babies. 

Some are girl babies. 

Silas has lost his rattle. 

Don't cry Silas. 

Thelma will find your rattle. 

This is Ernest's first pair of pants. 

Would you like a pair of pants, Glen? 

Ivie has some pretty hair ribbons. 

What color are they, Edgar.? 

Lacelle can read. 

He can read "Maw"-"Maw"-"Gee"-"Gee." 

See Bessie's pretty eyes. 

Dave is tw^o years old. 

He can talk. 

Lola likes to play house. 

She can make mud pies for Ernest. 

Ida's Hair is curly. 

She is not a "nigger." 

See Algie's fat little hands. 

They were made to hold. 

Reed does not w^ear petticoats. 

Eleanor is six years old. 

She can tend little Milton. 

Willie comes late to school. 

He does not like to walk. 





GRINS 



Sprig Sog 



Glad ab I that sprig has cub; 
How the hddle bees do hub, 
Ad the birdies id the tree 
Sweetly sigig sogs to be; 
Bud this sog of sprig bust close 
So the poet cad blow his dose. 

Mrs. Reynolds has made applica- 
tion for a patent automatic hand- 
wringer that will not need attention 
while she is talking or meditating. 

Lila, from San Juan, thinks she is 
not to be called a goat because she 
Butts all the time. 

Arnold does not have the habit of 
"kicking" but if things do not go 
right he is pretty sure to be Schlap- 

py- 

Professor Osmond is trying to get a 
law passed to protect the angle- 
worms, as he fears there may be a 
shortage before he gets all the fish 
caught, and Brother Partridge says 
anyone who would do that certainly 
is a bird. 



There was a young youngster named 

Price, 
Mixed some chemicals up with some 

rice. 
Held it over the flame, exploded the 

same. 
They're finding him now slice by 

slice. 
Lock Hales was seen recently at a 
seed store, inquiring the best prices 
on chicken feed in hundred pound 
lots, remarking that the high cost of 
living made it necessary to cut down 
on the board bill as much as possi- 
ble. 

Forced War Sales 
Two soft, brilliant, fascinating 
brown eyes exchanged for a lady's 
devoted attention. — Adrian. 

A lot of dictaphone records have 
recently been found tucked away in 
Engineer Higg's sleeping apartments, 
suggesting that some of the philos- 
ophies of the present are being pre- 
served for future generations. There 
is one of special concern entitled, 
"Why firemen who have taken train- 
ing under me should take special 
certificates when going over there." 



CfA 




Industrial Education 



This is a work shop — AS A RULE, 

Where we construct things while in school. 

It doesnt matter much to us 

Whether a hens nest or jitney bus — AS A RULE. 

No one must whistle — AS A RULE, 

Only the laundry near the school. 

It's a cinch that whistling will not do: 

Lines wont intersect or joints fit true — AS A RULE. 

The stove smokes its pipe — AS A RULE, 

Shavings and 22 shorts make its fuel 

While its stewing up the glue 

We use the plane and hammer too — AS A RULE. 

A kindergarten is the greatest scheme ever devised 
for the education of parents. 




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15S 



DECIDEDLY DISTINCTIVE COATS AND SUITS 

Every woman likes to feel that 
the lines of her suit bespeak in- 
dividuality — that it is suggestive 
of style and refinement in every 
sense. She wants material, mod- 
eling and tailoring to be of the 
best. 

You will find that the new 
Printzess suits in our Garment 
Department are thoroughly dis- 
tinctive — that the tailoring and 
^vorkmanship are perfect. We 
will be pleased to have you call 
and inspect these very reason- 
ably-priced, ready-to-wear gar- 
ments. 

WOOD -CLIFTON 
MERC. CO. 



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Students 



It is a pleasure to have you visit 
our store, and we are appreciative of 
your patronage. 

Visit our store at your every con- 
venience, and make us your head- 
quarters for dress and fashion goods. 

Your mail orders when you return 
home will be attended to with every 
consideration. 

Summer Specials 

SPORT SUITS, SILK DRESSES, 
SHOES, WAISTS, LACES 

FARRER BROS. 
COMPANY 



HANSEN 

CATERING 

CO. 

Ice Cream, 
Sherbets 
and 
Candies 



Best Place for Refreshments 
in Prove 




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TIMPANOGAS HAUNTS AND HIKERS 



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The University of Utah 

Offers splendid opportunities to prepare for the professions. 

Engineering, law, business, medicine, music, dentistry, industrial chemistry, 
assaying, and teaching. 

The University of Utah has now adopted the Four-Quarter Plan. Students may now continue their 
regular work throughout the Summer without interruption. The first Term of the Summer Quar- 
ter begins June 10 and closes July 19; the Second Term begins July 22 and closes August 30. 

Now is the time to make arrangements to take your advanced work at the 

University of Utah 

SALT LAKE CITY 



JOHN A. WIDTSOE, President. 



ELBERT D. THOMAS, Secretary-Registrar. 



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Schwab's Faultless Clothes 



Kupenheimer, Sophomore and Micheal Stern 

Just Right Shoes Schoble Hats 

Emery Shirts 




"The 

Furniture 

Center^' 

^ BARTON 

FURNITURE 
CO. 





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Provo and the B. Y. U. 



iUT Paul said, "I am a man which am a Jew of Tarsus, a 
city in Cihcia, a citizen of no mean city ; and I beseech thee, 
suffer me to speak unto the people." There is something 
splendid in the patriotism and confidence of Paul's speech. 
He is proud to be a citizen of Tarsus — "no mean city." 

In like manner has every citizen of this Provo of ours cause for 
pride; truly, it is no mean city. To the east is lofty Provo peak, greet- 
ing our gaze with each recurring season of the year with a new and en- 
trancing picture of nature's beauty; to the north, hoary-headed Timpa- 
nogos, with its gathered glacial snows of a thousand winters, heliograph- 
ing to the valley below the advent of every morning's sun. 

From the canyons come the sparkling streams merging with the tum- 
bling waters of Provo River, and after escaping from the canyon con- 
fines, gliding on to peaceful, picturesque Utah Lake in the west. 

The efforts of man, too, are worthy. The hives of industrial activity 
and commercial enterprise increase in number from year to year. The 
railroad shops and the pickle factory are the present year's contribu- 
tions. 

But turn we now to Paul again : "I am verily a man * * * * 
brought up in this city at the feet of Gamaliel, and taught according to 
the perfect manner of the law of the fathers, and was zealous toward 
God, as ye all are this day." 

Even as Paul went to Gamaliel, so go we to Brigham Young, to be 
"taught according to the perfect manner of the law of the fathers" and 
to be "zealous toward God." We are proud of our temple of learning; 
we are proud of the hosts of admirable young people who come from 
far and near to partake of its spirit and share in its beneficent influences. 
Long may it live; ever may its rays of resplendent, joy-giving light con- 
tinue to reflect in the hearts of youth and age. 

A Citizen of No Mean City. 



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16» 



There Are Big Things Ahead For You 

IF YOU ARE TRAINED 
But You Must Be trained for SERVICEABLE CITIZENSHIP 
Prepare at 

THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

where hundreds are being trained each year for successful careers as 
Scientific Farmers Housewives 

Agricultural Experts Household Management Experts 

Agricultural Engineers" Cafeteria and Lunchroom Managers 

Rural Sanitation Experts Superintendents for Sanitariums, Indus- 

Contractors trial Schools and similar institutions. 

Mechanics Dressmakers 

Machinists Milliners 

Business Experts Department Store Managers 

Industrial Chemists 
TEACHERS. — Special courses are offered that meet all of the Smith-Hughes require- 
ments for teachers. 

During the Summer of 1918 a full quarter's work will be offered in Summer School. 
The quarter will be divided into two terms, June 10 to July 19, and July 22 to 
August 30. Either or both terms may be taken. 

For further information and for catalog and illustrated Art Booklet address Desk B4, President's 
Offioe, Utah Agricultural College, Logan, Utah. Indicate in what work you are particularly inter- 
ested. 



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Hardware 1 1 Hotel 



FISHING TACKLE 
GUNS AND AMMUNITION 



Roberts 




^ 



W. D. Roberts, Proprietor 
THE HOUSE OF THE TRAVELER 



Prove Agents for National Sunbeam 
Mazda Lamps 

W. H. Freshwater 

136 WEST CENTER 
Phone 123 PROVO, UTAH 



Special Students' Breakfast or 
Luncheon 



PROVO, UTAH 



104 








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PROVO COMMERCIAL AND 
SAVINGS BANK 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00 

REED SMOOT, President 

C. E. LOOSE, Vice-President 

J. T. FARRER, Cashier 

J. A. BUTTLE, Assistant Cashier 

F. G. RICHMOND, Assistant Cashier 

FOUR PER CENT PAID ON SAVINGS 



The pictures in this Banyan are 
samples of our work 

COLUMBIA THEATRE BUILDING 
PROVO, UTAH 



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one or a number 



H does not 
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cu4s you wani refllquicK 

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of pnoio-eii^ravin^ is 
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known^ only usedliiv 

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D?Bouzek 




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V>'tJ# Wasatch 3Q63 



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It Pays to trade at this store 

IRVINE'S 



45 N. Academy 
Ave., PROVO 



THE HOUSE OF QUALITY 
EVERYTHING IN DRY GOODS 



J. C. PENNY CO., Provo 

(One of our 197 Busy Stores) 

Wherever you may go, you will no doubt be near one of our Stores 
Visit us for your graduation needs. We will save you money. 



Snap- 
shots 
from 
Home 




Give cheer to the boys in camp and on ship board by sending them pictures 
from home. There are likely to be some tedious, homesick days and a little cheer 
up in the way of photographs of the home folks and the home doings will do them 
a lot of good. 

And some day when you want to give something a little more substantial 
send along a Vest Pocket KODAK and ask your Soldier or Sailor Boy to send pic- 
tures to you. 

Kodaks and Supplies. Expert Kodak Finishing, Exclusive Photo Supply House. 



OLSON & HAFEN, 



Provo, Utah 



mil II 



Where Do We Go From Here? 

That depends upon who we are 

What Have We to Take With Us? 

That depends upon how we have apphed 
ourselves 

Certain things will be taken with us and remain thru life. 
Impressions of fine musical events, socials and outings along with 
the joy that comes from study and learning. 

Do not permit yourself to be deprived of these fine things 
when you leave school. It is not necessary. 

Surround yourself with things worth while. It some cases it 
may require a little sacrifice, like most good things in life. 

Let your homes radiate culture and refinement that comes 
from nice household effects. 

Wherever we go from here let us take music with us. Be able 
to sit down to an Emerson, Lindeman or some other good piano and 
play the old school songs. If you cannot play get a player. They 
are wonderful, these new player pianos. The rolls of music now 
produced not only give the songs with the music ; description of the 
classics appear on the rolls so the very mood and meaning of the 
musician is produced. 

Taylor Bros. Co. have furnished homes and made happy their 
occupants for fifty-two years. In late years wearing apparel for all 
the family has been added to our store to make it of even greater 
service. 

Along with other good things we take with us let it be the mem- 
ory of what this large institution can do for us. Not forgetting all 
Furniture, Pianos, and household goods may be bought on terms. 

Taylor Bros. Co. 

The Big Department Store 



llllllllllltllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIII 

171 




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N recalling the pleasant memories of that mem- 
orable year 1917-18 at the old "Y" be it re- 
membered that Guy H. Hurst (now with the 
colors), Reed Holt, Preston McDonald, and 
Frantz Westover always found it a pleasure to 
serve you faithfully and well. — Herald R. 
Clark, Manager. 



Students' Supply Association 

YOUR BOOK STORE 



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KNIGHT TRUST & 
SAVINGS BANK 



PROVO, UTAH 

JESSE KNIGHT, President 



Capital, $300,000 



Surplus, $15,000.00 



Mitectoti 
JESSE KNIGHT W. W. ARMSTRONG 

R. E. ALLEN FRED W. TAYLOR 

J. WM. KNIGHT R. R. IRVINE, JR. 

O. C. BEEBE W. LESTER MANGUM 

W. O. CREER 



The Home of Good Printina 



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"By their works shall ye know 
them." 

The Deseret 

News 

Department of 

Job Printing 

Is willing to be judged by its works. 

We suggest that you glance through 

the pages of The Banyan, and then 

decide whether you want us to be 

your printers. 

We cater to out-of-town orders — 

yours in particular. 

We will do your printing sooner or 

later, why not now? 

Address 

DESERET NEWS 

Job Printing Department 

Salt Lake 



Lost — My favorite indoor sport some- 
where on the University Campus ( Lucile I . 

An abundance of second hand neckties. 
Worn only once. Edith. Inquire Frank 
Newman. 

The girl who really ought to change her 
name because of the great burden she 
bears in carrying it is May Weight. 

Delia is probably the oldest girl in 
school as she is a daughter of Adam and 
Eve-n then has a birthday once a year. 

Maggie — "I consider, Reed, that sheep 
are the stupidest creatures living." 

Reed ( absent-mindedly I — "Yes, my 
lamb." 

We understand that after graduating 
from college, Ivie is going to give away 
her Garden-er something like it, so it will 
not be a hingrance to her advancement. 

Clarence Edwards — "I have arrived at 
that period of life when women no longer 
have the power to interest me; but they 
ctill can irritate me more or less." 

Mac — "Will you be my partner?" 

Ardus — "Oh, Mac, this is so sudden. 
Give me a little time." 

Mac ( continuing I — "For the next 
dance?" 

Ardus (continuing) — "To catch my 
breath. I haven't yet recovered from the 
last dance " 



Seeds - Seeds - Seeds 

We are Headquarters for Farm, 

Garden and Flower 

Seeds 

Send for Our Catalrg 

Carpenter Seed Co. 



SEEDS 



Provo. Utah 



SEEDS 



SEEDS 



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HE best way to show Patriotism is to live it. The pro- 
duction of our B. Y. U. Banyan is brought about 
through the co-operative efforts of many workers. 
Strong backing by the student body, unceasing work of 
the staff, and liberal support of the business men contribute to its 
merits. Do not think of the "ads." given to us by the business men 
as something to take money from us by bargains but as a gift from 
the most generous and liberal hearted men of our city. Let us as 
student body and school stand by these men and show them we do 
appreciate what they do for us, and return our thanks by patronizing 
them. 



Following are the men who helped us : 



B. Y. University 
University of Utah 
Provo City 
Taylor Bros. Co. 
Olsen & Hafen 
Deseret News 
Farrar Bros. 
W. H. Freshwater 
Hotel Roberts 
Sam Schwab 
J. C. Penney 



Student Supply Association 

Wood-Clifton Mercantile Co. 

Agricultural College 

Provo Commercial & Savings Bank 

Knight Trust & Savings Bank 

Larsen & Nygreen Studio 

Hansen's Catering Co. 

G. J. Carpenter 

Barton Furniture Co. 

R. R. Irvine & Son 

De Bouzek Engraving Co.