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Full text of "The banyan"

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LIBRARY 

Brigham Young University 

RARE BOOK COLLECTION 

B.Y.O. 

B22 
1920 




TENTH EDITION 

OF 

BANYAN 

Published by the Students of 
the Brigham Young University 




This Edition limited to si.x hundred copies of 



ies of which this is No. <J ^ <^s 




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THE SACRED GROVE IN SUMMER 




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SCIENCE. 



TMIS BANYAN WE DEDICATE TO 

THE GREATER 

BRIGHAh YOUNG UNIVERSITY 



-QEOR&EET ut^ii «.r»J. 




JOSEPH SMITH . THE PROPHET 

/ 1 aeh ye diligently and my grate shall attend you. that you may be in- 
ttructed more perfectly in theory, in doctrine, in the law of the gospel, in all 
things pt rtaining unto the Kingdom of did. that are expedient for you to under- 
stand: of things both in heaven and in the earth, and under the earth: things 
which hare been, things which are. things which must shortly rome to pass: 
things which are at home, things which are abroad: the tears and perplexities of 
nations, and the judgments which arc on the land, and the knowledge also of 
countries and kingdoms, that you may be prepared in all things. — See. 88, 
Doctrine and Covenants. 



The Vision of 1820 




J. Bert Sumsion 

HE mark on the dial struck, the veil was lifted, Jehovah spoke, 
and a Seer — a Prophet — listened. The dispensation foreshadow- 
ing the past, the present, and the future was ushered in, breaking 
the curtains of a long and dreary night, establishing an ensign for 
the nations, and the powers, bidding the creeds of men diminish, 

speaking as "one with authority" to the "crimson courtesan," counseling the 

eons of men to listen to the Principles of Eternal Science. 

This Vision of personal manifestation of Deity to Joseph Smith, Jr., estab- 
lishes the truth that God speaks to man, even today. Since that April day one 
hundred years ago we have been re-assured that both the Eternal Father and 
His Son are in the image after which man has been created. This Vision marks 
the year eighteen hundred and twenty, Anno Domini, as an epoch among the 
greatest events. 

As a result of it, Zion has arisen where Zion once was, building anew a 
structure, a nucleus around which the atoms of thought might be gathered. A 
Zion — a "Lamp of the nations" with powers, glories, Priesthood — keys, has 
arisen upon the desert's parched and dusty face; where homes and farms are her 
crowning virtue. Schools, colleges, churches, magnificent Temples, stately 
buildings bespeak her glory. Teachers, Educators, Philosophers, Statesmen, 
Prophets, and Seers guide her destiny to the end — the crowning event of the 
ages the consummation of the centuries when the Son of God shall reign among 
men. 

"Let the mountains shout for joy, let the valleys cry aloud, ye seas tell 
the wonders of the Eternal King," * * * "And ye rivers, and brooks flow 
down with gladness, * * * and the sons of men shout for joy;" for Vision 
— Eternal Vision — is now the anthem of the age, the melody of the time, the 
voice of the redeemed. 

"Fly, fly these thoughts on the lightning car, 
With speed of light to realms afar! * * * 
Search the darkest spots where mortals dwell; 
With voice of thunder these tidings tell." 



JEHOVAH HAS SPOKEN— WHO CAN HEAR? 




PRESIDENT HEBER J. GRANT 

8 



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The Commissioners and Superintendent gladly join with the other friends 
of the B. Y. U. in this most commendahle Home-coming idea. "Home-coming" 
is the crowning event in any experience. Heaven triumphs over death itself 
in that great final Home-coming. 

As you friends of the institution return to your Alma Mater, may you find 
all the welcome of the old home, together with the added charms which you 
may now have in your hearts as a wish for the school you love so well. 

Only today the Commission has approved two plans that mean a greater 
B. Y. U. The first calling in from each stake of the Church at least two repre- 
sentatives to train for leadership. Such a call opens the door for a wonderful 
future. The second plan granting to college faculty members a Sabbotical leave 
of absence, thereby insuring the maintenance of high scholastic standards, more 
students, high scholarship, and the old spirit that has made the B. Y. U. famous 
— the future is full of promise. DAVID 0. McKAY, 

RICHARD R. LYMAN, 
STEPHEN L. RICHARDS, 
ADAM S. BENNION. 




History of the Brigham Young University 

ttice Louise Reynolds 

UK Brigham Young University, formerly known .1- the Brigham 
Young Academy, was founded by a deed <>f trust executed bv 
President Brigham Young, October l'». 187."). Soon alter this date 
a brief term of the institution was carried on by Hon. Warren X. 
Dusenberry, who subsequently resigned to practice law. It was 
in the spring of the year 1870 that Dr. Karl G. Maeser, under special instruction 
from President Brigham Young, held a preliminary term, which covered six 
weeks. On that first day twenty-nine students were enrolled. Joseph 11. ki I. 1 
being the twenty-ninth. 

The first faculty consisted of three teachers, Karl G. Maeser. Milton 11. 
Hardy, and Anna Kristina Smoot. familiarly known as "Tecnie" Smoot. Three 
persons made up the first graduating class. Teeme" Smoot, Sam Moore, and 
Caddie Daniels Mills. Caddie Daniels Mills was the first normal graduate to 
teach in the school Mi-. Smoot came on to the faculty before her graduation. 

In the hall of the high school building, at the present time, hang- a first 
painting of a square, red brick building enveloped in flames. This was the first 
home of the institution. It occupied the present site of the Farmers and Mer- 
chants Hank. It burned to the ground Sunday. January 21. 1881. 

President Charles (). Card of Cache \ alley, hearing of the disaster, made a 
trip to PrOVO, promising to charter a train and take the students to Logan if they 
would go. That such a thing was wholly unnecessary was proved by the fact 
thai only one day of school was lost. The basement of the old tabernacle, the 
V. 0. Smoot building, and the S. S. Jones building were hurriedly put into con- 
dition and made to furnish temporary quarters for the school. 

The following year the Z. C. M. I. warehouse was partitioned off and 
turned into class rooms. Amidst the puffing of engines and the shriek of 
locomotives classes were held. 

In January. 18°2. the students took the long trail up I niversity \\ -line, led 
by Dr. Karl G. Maeser. and entered the High School building by the front door. 

It is nearly thirty years since the High School building Has erected. \t the 
time it was built it was the pride of the entire state, for it marked the begin- 
ning of a new era in school buildings. Those who thought it- capacity limit- 
less wire surprised to find that six years had scarcely passed when the institution 
began to agitate for another building. 

In less than a month. Senator Smoot obtained money enough to erect the 
building containing our chief school auditorium. College Hall. The Alumni 
Association, under the leadership of Professor Edwin S. Hinckley, contributed 
the money that purchased the heating plant and the furniture. The whit:' mar- 
ble slab in the hall bearing the date. May 21. I8°8. has the name of the donor- 
to the building. 

Since that time -ix buildings have been added, the most important of which 
is the Mae.er Memorial, erected to the sainted memory of Dr. Karl G. Mae- -r. 
I hree of the group of eight buildings, now comprising the University plant. 



10 



would have been impossible but for the generosity of Uncle Jesse Knight and 
family 

The beautiful campus on Temple Hill, of thirty-eight acres, partly donated 
and partly purchased, is one of the most valued acquisitions of the institution. 

In the field of student activities the Brigham Young University has had its 
greatest successes in basket-ball and debating. The pennants in the new trophy 
room ar° eloquent witnesses of the fact that for many years we were the State 
champions in basket-ball. 

It is just ten years since the Brigham Young University began debating with 
teams outside the state. In that period of time we have lost only one debate 
to outside teams. It was also in the year 1910 that we met on the track Stanford 
University, the only time we have had an out-of-state track meet. 

This year the students have built a foot-path up to the Maeser Memorial 
and are at this time collecting money to pay for a moving picture machine. 

In this respect they are but following the students who before them have 
dug trenches, paved walks, purchased and planted trees, founded libraries, fur- 
nished a gymnasium and bought tracts of land for the Temple Hill campus. 

Although the students who have marched under the banner of the White 
and Blue number thousands, and the persons who have served on the faculty 
number hundreds, three presidents have directed its destinies. These men 
are Dr. Karl K. Maeser, Dr. Benjamin Cluff, and Dr. George H. Brimhall. 

The supreme test of any institution is its output. This may be called the 
acid test. When put to this test the Brigham Young University feels just pride 
in its history of forty-five years. It is not possible to include names in an article 
of this length; suffice to sav that in practically every line of worthy endeavor 
and notable achievement the names of its graduates and former students are 
written high on the roll of honor. 




OUR FIRST HOME 



A Greater University 



Dean A. N. Merrill 




EATNESS ill educational institutions can be measured only by the influence 
thev have over the lives of the men and women who attend them. Endow- 
^ ments for maintenance and grandeur in buildings are sometimes urged as ele- 
ments in greatness: but after all these are as mere incidents when compared 
with the power of the institution in shaping the lives of its students. 

The first element of greatness is spirit. By spirit we mean an influence which dominates 
and fashions mens lives, restrains their acts, and inspires them to endeavors in the right 
direction. It is that which lasts. Through its power, the institution is magnified 
when the students are far away. It enters into the heart and soul of things, inspiring the 
feeling that this is the best. It emanates from everything. It endears every nook and 
corner of the institution and enlivens every function and activity. By its power all things 
arc unified. A greater University, then, means greater evidence of that which we call 
spirit: the thing which makes for a greater unity of purpose and a stronger determination 
to bring things to pass. 

The second element of greatness is Purpose. Every school has a purpose; but to be great, 
a school should have a unique purpose, one which is specific and clearly defined, a pur- 
pose which ever beckons onward but is always a little too high when one attempts to reach 
it. The unique purpose of the University is reflected in the conduct of its graduates. More 
greatness means larger numbers of graduates with still more lofty purposes. 

Endowments adequate to facilitate business always contributes to the achievement of 
greatness. In schools, this condition is brought about by supplying Finances adequate to 
insure the present contentment and future assurance of those who labor therein: by supply- 
ing the necessary means to carry on educational activities: and by attracing a virile teach- 
ing staff, one whose words and deeds shall win students. Supply these to the Brighaiu 
Young University and one might as well try to stay the north winel as to prevent the insti- 
tution reaching greater heights of achievement. 

Unsatisfied needs is an S. O. S. call: a stmulus to greater initiative; an urgent in- 
vitation, not only to the school, but also to its patrons. Every increasing need serves as 
stepping stones to ever increasing greatness. 

A background of worthy Traditions throws every virtue of a school into bold relief. Tra- 
ditions are the impregnable bulworks of every University. Traditions from the past serve 
as reminders to the present that the future is depending upon us. They are as a strong man 
stripped for the struggle, standing braced with arms forward. Traditions, however, can 
brace an institution only as they are constantly enlarged by new achievements. As the stu- 
dents of bygone days paint in glowing colors the victories of the yesterdays, the stutlents 
01 totlay are being stimulated to constantly increasing resolutions to excel. They plunge 
into their activities as if the eyes of the centuries were upon them. Thus new glories are 
added, another splendid tradition is affixed, and one more step is taken toward the Goal of 
true Greatness. 





The alumni of the Brigham Young I Diversity will come together for three 
days and nights of celebration, May 2(>. 27 and 28th. This h ill be the first home- 
coming liflil here for over twenty years ami will be attended l>y hundreds ol 
former Btudents and gradnates. 

The program as worked out by the officers and committee in rharjie of the 
Alumni \— 01 iation. is as follows: Wednesday, May 26th at p. in., reunion and 
handshake, College Hall. 7 p. in., grand parade of Alumni and students, rest 
of evening reunion of classes at various balls and residences will be held. Thurs- 
day, May 27th. 10 a. in.. Aluinni program at Columbia Theatre; 1 p. m., Good 
Fellowship Banquel at the Armory: 3 p. m., sports of Athletic Field; 7:30 p. m., 
Parent on I niversity Hill: Friday, May 28th, 10 a. m., Graduating at the 
Tabernacle: ."> p. in.. Alumni Banquet at Brigham Young University Library; 
8:30 p. in.. Alumni Rail at Ladies and Men's Gymnasium. Minor changes may 
be made in the above program, but in general it will be carried as scheduled. 
Reservations mu-t be made in advance for Banquet tickets. 

E. L. ROBERTS, 

E. JAY GLADE, 

J. E. HAYES, 

MRS. LAFAYETTE HOLBROOK. 



14 






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From the Rostrum 



law. 



1. The moal unprofitable of holdings is grudge holding. 

2. Man must obey; disobedience I<> a higher law is obedience Ii> a lower 

i. It i- aoble to return good for evil hut verj ignoble to expect it. 

4. Strewing downward paths with flower- is the work of a foe not of a 

frii ml. 

."). It take- courage to resisl the briber) of self interest. 

6. To expect something for nothing i- to assume unfairness in both parties 

to the transaction. 

7. Even sincerity may he brought to shame by folly or prejudice. 

8. An invitation for you to join in a crime is a confidential announcement 
that you have been prejudged a rascal. 

9. What we <lo when we have nothing to do is an index to what we in- 
trin-icallv are. 



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Junior Prom 



We didn't expect the Juniors to so forget their training and natural pro- 
pensities as to disappoint us at the prom, and they didn't. Our expectations had 
been so high and our hopes and plans of such long and brilliant duration that 
'here are those who say truthfully that the seniors and even the freshmen had 
their dates made far in advance of other advertising. All our social ambitions 
centered round this: prom. We all understood that it was to be the biggest 
social feature of vears and all other events just lesser lights. And yet after 
all our highest hopes we were surprised. The reality surpassed our expecta- 
tions. Cupid had superintended the decorations. They were all his style, hearts 
and flowers everywhere in an exquisite color scheme. Music that set your feet 
a-whirling and music that set your eyes a dancing and helped Cupid and 
the hearts to carry out their plan. We have never enjoyed another dance so 
much and we can't ever forget the night that the Juniors gave us three hours in 
a perfect wonderland. 



38 






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J^^fjtsi page is! affectionately oebi= 
\) catcb to tfjosfe Jfaeultp jWem= 
bers anb IMubentS, Unjo, be= 
cause of tfje press of time, or perhaps 
for otfjer justifiable or unjustifiable 
reasons, faileb to gibe us tljeir pljoto= 
grapbs. : : : : : : : : 




* Recent (iliotograf)^ 
i 4 sctn«j the 



1. The Old Hill Road, between Sharon and Tunbrii 

2 The Old Well with the long sweep. 

3. Apple trees planted when the prophet was a boy. 

4. Interior of the Old Mill, built about one hundred years 

5. Road-side Brook. 

6. View near Prophet's early home. Harmony. Pa. 






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The Normals 



The Normal Department is a most vital part of the B. Y. U. Through 
it the school will ever grow and become known throughout the land. It has 
graduated some of the most successful teachers in the state. We do not in- 
tend to detract from its splendid record, but rather add to it. 




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Prize Winners 



The Banyan paid from nine centt to ' dollar and twenty-three cent- 

each for tli*- following joke- which were mbmitted bj the persons, whose names 
arc attached. 

$1,23. 

\ watch's fate i- bard i 1 1 « 1 «-«-< I 

For when it's not in soak, 
It'- Bel back when it <:ets ahead, 

\nd scorned whene'er it's broke. 



."4. 
\ftir wedding a rich heiress, Price 
Said, "Gambling's a terrible vice 
Hut one thin-: I know 

This matching for dongh, 

I- ,i tliinj; that's exceedingly nic -. 

.09. 



Well West. 



The first ki-- only conic- once in a lifetime. 

The trouble with the fellow who lose- hi- temper i- that he always finds it 

again. 

The man who plays the bass drum should ha\ • no difficulty in beating 
bis w aj . 

An amateur performance for charity demonstrates that charity uncovers 
a multitude of -in-. 

It takes a musical crank to play a hand organ. 

It i?- possible to Bquare yourself without resorting to cube root. 

\\ bile some peopl • mount upward to the pinnacle of fame, others reach 
the height of folly. 

A faint heart may never win a fairlaih. but five ol them have won main 



a jackpot. 



Prof. < Esmond. 



.17. 



Ob the sadness of her sadness 

\\ hen she's sad. 
Ob the gladness of her gladness 
\\ hen she- glad, 
Bui the sadness of her sadness 
< )r the gladness of her gladness 
\rc nothing to her madness 
\\ hen she's mad. 

Je--< Ellsworth. 
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He always kneeled before the maid 
Anil kissed her finger tip-: 

Hut be lost out. Another man 
Came bj and kissed her lip-. 



Ernest \\ ilkin-on. 



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GEOBGe K- LEWIS 




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THIRD YEAR OFFICERS 
"Next year ire i< ill run the High School.' 




74 





THIRD YEAR CLASS 





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The Home-Coming 

Krom out our gate- i»f Learning, opened wide, 
Yon patted ami went your way. I'pon \nur brow 
Tin- light of wi-dom -hnwn. while in your 
Throbbing breast the deep desire for greater 

Things gave radiance lo your mule. 

While »i' who -loud ami waited, watched you go. 
\ricl shed a tear at parting. 

\ f{ we were not alone. The noble deeds 

You wrought live after \ mi ami \ ou bave won 

\ home within our hearts none can replace. 

You worked and fought, altbo tbe afteriuatb 
Gives u- the harvest of your toil. \nu went 
Before, and now we walk the paths 

Made easier by your tread. 

Ju-i a- tbe birdlings from tbe home neal -tra> 
To dip and flutter in tbe golden light 
Of lite- broad pastures, le-l their growing wings 
l!ut when tbe even fall- return lliev In 

Tbe waiting mother nest, come thou to us, 
v itb folded pinion- and with heart of peace 

To mingle in the ne-l you love so well. 

Dear senior partner- in this school of life 

' who have climbed a little way beyond 

Cone back to us. Tbe pates once opened 
That you might be free, to test your powet 
In the world of men. we have kept open 
Thai win might return, and cross or laurel 
Hearing, do we welcome thee. 

Come thou hack home to us, brave leader heart- 
Who with unfaltering -tep man lied till the la-l. 
Come listen to these -acred wall- once more 
King forth the fond traditions of the past. 
And with us weave the plan- for future year-. 
For we with outstretched hand ami heart, the wbib 
Await the sunshine of \our -mile. 

Alberta Huisb. 



M4 





77 




Second Years 



I'n-it\ (»irl- pin- \\ iit\ E}<>\.- pin- Lots of work divided by lot.- of pep. equals 
THF. SECOND YEAH CIASS. 

S is lor students thai cannol 1»<- beat, 

E is lor c//( n ami never defeat. 

(! is lor classy, for class\ wo are. 

<> is for onward, we expect to climb far. 

\ i- for the "Nuts" who joined not our band, 

D i- for dances 60 jazzy anil grand. 

^ is for yelling, we all <li<l our share. 

E is for efficiency and qnalitiej rare. 

A is for always on time for a wake, 

R is for real handsome fellows to lake ami — 

S is for shimmies they've all tried to shak;'. 

C. C. 




78 




SECOND YEAR CLASS 



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81 




FIRST YEAR OFFICERS 
The Last, hut hy no means the Least 




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FIRST YEAR CLASS 




Tin training school has made a very enviable record this year. Prof. 
Larson has worked out some problems in the teaching of the manual arts that 
baa attracted attention throughonl the United States and many hundreds <>f 
inquiriei have been received by bim from educators throughout the country 
who are interested in the teaching of manual art in the grades. 

The upper picture nil page 85 ehoWS -<>mc work submitted by the chil- 
dren for the clean up campaign. 

The lower picture opposite show-!) the committee from the Junior high 
school thai waited on the mayor in the interest of the clean up campaign. 




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Fools' Frolic 

A Smiling Success. Biggest High School 
Event of the Year 








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Ye Staff 



> Staff Arti-t~ 



\els Anderson Manajiin-: Editor 

Glen Crundall Advertising Manager 

Geo. V James 

Geo. K. Lewis 

Le Relle Buslunan 

Muriel Ilorsley 

\\ . P. Cottam Photographer 

Fav Ollerton ) , _.. 

i 17. II • l c Assoeiate hilitor- 

Le \ leve Hmsli ) 

Hil.la Miller Typi-t 




Swan Song of the Banyan Staff 

To Our Friends and Patrons — 

We appreciate the support you have extended to us. We have tried to 
inject into this publication as much material as possible that would be of 
interest to you. We realize that college annuals are but pictures of a year and 
are of most interest to those who have been present. However, we hope that as 
you turn these pages you will find them breathing that good old B. Y. U. 
spirit that you love so well. 

To the Faculty — 

We thank you for your co-operation in the production of this book. As 
a group you have been loyal and, with the exception of a meager few, vou 
have not failed to support us. 

To The Students — 

We hope you find this Banyan above the average. We have tried to make 
it so. If we have failed it is not because of our laziness or indifference as 
much our incapacity. We have sought your support and solicited suggestions 
from you. We have tried to entertain any ideas that you have been generous 
enough to extend. We have tried to give everyone a square deal, if anyone 
has been slighted or if anyone has been overconsidered we hope you will have 
mercy on us for even the staff is human. 



Policy of the White and Blue 

"THE WHITE AM) BLUE DEMANDS THE THINGS FOB WHICH IT 

STANDS!" 

Mainly Student Democracy, Co-operation, in Student Body Affairs, life with 
red blood, a greater I Diversity, and a stronger Faculty. 

The 1919-1920 V bite and Blue lias been a paper of the student body. 
voicing its sentiments and its wishe- and lias not sacrificed the will of the 
-Indents to the preference of the faculty in cases where opinions clashed. \\ e 
have stood for ideals and have tried to aid in maintaining the high standard 
of our university. In trying to keep our publication on a high and dignified 
plane We have stood for ideas ami for reform. It Stands lor .1 rating second 
to none as a college paper. It stands for the spirit and spirituality character- 
istic of the B. Y. I . 

"HYBRIDISM Ml ST GO." 

\\ e have supported strongly and firmly the movement for complete sep- 
aration from the High School and we have aided the seniors in their initative 
in campaigning for "A GREATER LNTYERSITY." In fact we have even 
made a special effort to keep before the public the needs of our institution. 

"Furlough System for GUM CHEW ERS and RADIATOR LOAFERS." 

THE HALLS ARE FOR TRAFFIC NOT GOSSIP." 

We have lectured and pleaded and deplored and impressed, in trying 
to bring home to the students the need of reforming certain personal habit- 
that lower the efficiencv of the institution. 



"IT PAYS TO AD\ ERTISE." 

The White and Blue has conducted a live advertising campaign. Of the 
two thousand copies of the Christmas issue, one thousand were used for ad- 
vertising. The weekly issues have been sent regularly to nearly every High 
School in the state. W c exchanged with thirty universities and from the eastern 
colleges to those of the Pacific coast. 

THE DEPARTMENTS AND CONTESTS. 

Our paper has given publicity to the activities of the various departments 
and has especially paid a great deal of attention to making our athletes and 
athletic activities known both in this community and throughout the state 
and nation. 

We have conducted several interesting literary and artistic contests and 
have received a hearty response from the students. 

IN THE LIMELIGHT." 

Social events have received the attention of our society editor who aims 
to please. 

AND IN CONCLUSION. 

We will say that we .hope that the ideals and policies of the White and 
Blue will have a lasting influence in defending and upholding the institution 
and all that it stands for. 



While and Blue 




TSHITE AND BLUE STAFF 
i Robert Reed"? Picture not received.— Ed. i 






College Student Body Officers 

Reading Left to Right: Upper Row: Nels Anderson, Editor Banyan: 
Thelina Kggertsen, First \ ire President: Joseph Jarvis, President: George S. 
K.i I lil. Seeond Vice President: Guy Hurst, Dramatic Manager; Center: Pern 
Whiting, Secretary and Historian. Bottom Row: Lynn Taylor, Manager Minor 
Sports: Le Roy Cox, Editor. White ami Blue: Carl Christcnsen, Manager Major 
Sports: Joseph ( Hpin, Manager, White and Blue: Edmund Evans, Cheer Master. 



IkJv 




,., „ , '„, '" vv ' — . vv ^ ■""■■'■•'. .^«" :::'."''" ,7. ,'..'.,.77 




Report of the House of Lords 

HE student-body administration has been remarkable, in the first 
place, for an unusual personnel. Every name on the roster stands 
for something fine and original. 

The President, Joseph O. Jarvis, has been distinctive for a 

dynamic personality; intuitive, sympathetic, a good mixer, — in 

short, wholesome. The two Vice-Presidents, Thelma Eggertsen and George S. 

Ballif have supplied keenness of insight, and those finer aspects of spirituality 

which have kept the student-body in time with the best traditions of the school. 

The White and Blue has reached a standard of editorial, typographical, 
and artistic excellence which has won praise from Superintendent Adam S. 
Bennion, which fact is monument enough for Rov Cox, Joseph Olpin, and their 
well-chosen staff of assistants. 

The getting out of a year book, involves recollections, vexations and other- 
wise, to last a life time; but he who does it successfully will also have his 
compensation. From a thousand centre tables will spring picturesque memories 
of this year's Banyan editor, trying day after day for months to find a new and 
sharper way of calling for delinquent pictures and subscriptions. Nels Ander- 
sen has been a live wire. 

As to the other members of the General Administration: Fern Whiting 
Secretary; Lorenzo Jennings, Debating Manager; Carl Christensen and Lynn 
Taylor, Athletic Managers; Archie West, Dramatic Manager; and Edmund 
Evans, Cheer Master; each has filled his niche, not with an animated dummy, 
but with a virile and distinctive personality. 

Space permits onlv of congratulations to these various servants of our 
Student Bodv republic, on having functioned; that is to say, on having been not 
only good, but good for something. — N. L. N. 




80 






High School Student Body Officers 

Top Row: Virginia Christensen, First Vice President; W. J. Snow, Jr., 
President; Marcus Bean, Second Vice President. Bottom Row: Loyal Frand- 
?en, Cheer Master: Reed Swenaen, Manager Athletics: Helen Candland, Sec- 
retary and Historian: Algenon Redford, Assistant Editor White and Blue. 




B-Y-U- WOMEM 



The Faculty Women's organization has in 1919-20 been a most potent force 
in promoting the welfare of the school. In social affairs, especially, has tlii- 
fact been apparent. The president. Mrs. M. I*. Henderson is endowed with an 
abundance of energy and vitality, and possesses the bappj faculty of com- 
municating that spirit to others. 

One of the unique social affairs of the season was the kitchen party, on 
which occasion the men were pressed into service, and donned kitchen aprons. 
The gentlemen, it may he said, appeared to no mean advantage. Among the 
Other social functions were the entertainment of the girls of the school and of 
the wives and mothers of out of town students. The patrons' hall was well 
attended and was a highly enjoyable affair. 

The Women were instrumental in securing the presentation of a faculty 
play, which proved to he a complete success. They also presented Professor 
T. Karl Pardoe in a series of readings, much enjoyed by all who attended. Vl 
the last of the -cries, the old folk of the citv were entertained. 

Among the other activities of the year may be named the following: 

Furnishing of the girls" rest room at the Maeser Memorial with couch and 
curtains, contribution of $25.00 to the Red Cross Society anil $5.00 to the clean 
up campaign. 



hi: 






I — «=.'..'--.'"„: ;.. .. :•».,. ™ _.. = 





UIHTAH 5TUDEMTS 




5PRJhGVILLIA5TA5 







^atWPETE- 5TUDENT5 







SPANISH FORK CLUB W, 




B 



Ml? I; 






. " 








ftj %^ 



@$&m$ qw® 




X ^ 



110 Hr I ^ x 



^ii^^~^fJ^;:!-'-^-^^^ s= 




sl»2^;^-^™^^4<SSjii 



n 



ATHLETICS 



oDq 




107 




Coach K. L. Robert-, head of the Physical Education department aims 
toward the cultivating and preparing of the individual for more abundant 
and wholesome living. Not only does he produce Athletics in track, ball and 
field -port-, hut every student who feels the pulse of the great out-of-doors 
linds new inspiration in such inauguration as his Sun-rise hikes, Timpanogo- 
climh-. moonlight hikes, and invigorating gymnasium recreation. His field is 
not with the few hut with the many. Not only docs he teach (dean sportsman- 
ship to the athlete hut he also trains for a clean fight in the battle of life. 




... : i^ 



jpfiffl . 





H. S. Football Team 

From the fertile Acorn grows the mighty oak. Nature's only requirements 
are a good seed bed and proper care — Father Time will do the rest. 

When the Church School Commission lifted the ban on Football the "Pig- 
skin" spirit created a germinative seed bed. The Student Body planted the 
Acorn. It grew, Coach Roberts and Raile nurtured the plant. B. Y. men 
played Football throughout the season. Memories of bruises and sprains attest 
to the earnest effort put forth. Our men made a good start. 

But a real Oak develops slowly. No intercollegiate games were played. 
Next year the Varsity begins Freshmen Football. The Red-blooded action 
demanded by the game has aroused our athletic ambitions. It has come to 
stay. This year's activity argues well for final success. The superiority of the 
B. Y. eleven as when played in 1900, etc., will soon be duplicated. 

"Labor Omnia Vincit." 




Baseball Team 



The bull teum bus played i" hard tack this year. This is the first season 
thai the B. Y. I". bus not been u top-notcher in base bull. No we're not down 
in the month; there is another year coming. 




t » 



1 r^¥ :: 
i 





College Basketball Team 

RECORD OF BASKETBALL FOR THE LAST TEN YEARS. 

1909-10— Won by B. Y. U. 

1910-11— Won by B. Y. U. 

1911-12— Won by B. Y. U. 

1912-13— Won by U. of U. 

1913-14— Won by B. Y. U. 

1914-15— Won by B. Y. U. 

1915-16— Won by U. of U. 

1916-17— Won by B. Y. U. 

1917-18 — No Cbampionsbip decided I Relations Severed.) 

1918-19— Won by U. of U. 

1919-20— No Championship Decided. 



EMI 



- ! .l, ■ „ ■ ,..:- 





H. S. Basketball Team 

This team has all kinds of fight and speed and they will make a good run 
for the state championship next year. 




TEHHIS 




Tennis is justly called the most popular sport at the B. Y. IL, according 
to the number who particpate in the different games. The courts ar? con- 
stantly crowded by Students of both sexes who wish to profit by the unusual 
advantages it possesses. 

It is a wonderful exercise for the muscles, nerves and mind. Because of the 
unlimited skill one can obtain and the fact that one never becomes quite per- 
fect, makes it unusually fascinating. Of all games one playing Tennis must 
display qualities of genuine sportsmanship or he cannot stay with the game 
long. One is attracted by the clean, wholesome atmosphere of the courts where 
courtecusness and goodfellowship exist along with determination to win fairly. 

At this school, the past year has probably been the most successful of its 
history, because of the construction of two perfect, new courts, thus stimulating 
unusual participation in the game. An extremely brilliant singles tournament 
was held in which more than forty players contested. 

Last year our team won the State doubles Championship and since we 
have a similar team this year, prospects are delightfully encouraging. 




DIXON CI T WON in Jl NIOR« 




(ONTKSTANTS IN ANNUAL THANkSCIX ING CROSS COUNTRY RACE 

Won b> "Bunk" Brown, the man wearing the Y 

114 










0* TE1CE 



Weight 



^ 



Heaton Markham 

Murdock Blackburn 

I Clove did not get on Picture. — Erf. I 




Wearers of the Y 



College 



lt\SKFT BALL -MEN 
Jared Dunn 

Uberl Page 

Clarence Edwards 
Harr> Richard* 
kcnncth Weight 
I. > man Broun 

Thonuu Pyne 

li.'ii.il. I Mcintosh 



BASE BALL MEN 

Donald Mcintosh 
Eugene Millman 
Uberl Page 
Edgai Hiilman 
Harry Richard- 
Lce Kirk 
Stanley Peterson 
I l\-i- Mare 
Blackie llnl-li 
Jared Dunn 
Kulnn Morgan 



TRACK AND FIELD 

Kenneth Weight 
Le Roy Cox 



TENNIS 



Lynn Ta>lor 
Blaine Kelsey 
Eugene Allen 



\l \\ \CF.RS 

Carl Christensen 
Lynn Taylor 

DEBATING 

Debating Manager — 
Lorenzo Jennings 

Frank Newman 
Nil- Anderson 
Le Roy Cox 
George Ballif 
Nora Anderson 
Lionel Jacoh-en 
Earnest Wilkensen 
(.rare Nixon 
Gladys Loynd 
West Parkinson 
Heloise Day 



WHITE AND BLUE 
Le Ro Cox 
Joseph Olpin 
Billye Coleman 
Ernset Wilkinsen 
Ardis Young 
Fred Varkhaiu 
Heloise Da] 
Vesta Pierce 
Mhcrta Huisli 
\ iolel Johnson 
(Grace Nixon 

THE BANYAN STAFF 

Nels Anderson 

La Vievc Huisli 

Fay Ollerton 

(Ifo. James 

Glenn Crandall 

Murie! Horsley 

DRAMATICS 

Alice Ludlow 
Fred Markham 
La \ on Millings 
Alice Taylor 
Carl Christensen 
Grace Nixon 
Joseph Jarvis 
\fton Newell 
Mary Woollcy 
George Ballif 



BVSKET BALL 



Daniel keeler 
1 'ruiiian Partridge 
Elwood Jackson 
W illi. mi J. Snow 
Fred Dixon 
Reed Swenson 
Milo Ray 
Mark Bean 



TEN MS 



William J. Snow 
Hunter Mansen 
Fred Dixon 



TRACK 



Truman Partridge 
Daniel Keeler 
Rohert Ried 



High School 

DEBATING 
Carlyla Maw 

Algeanon Redfurd 
Helen Phillips 
Royden Dangerfield 

DRAMATICS 

Bernice Cluff 
Nile Washburn 
Helen Candland 
Carlyle Maw 

STUDENT BODY OFFICERS 

w illiam J. Snow 
\ irginia Christensen 
Mark Bean 
Helen Candland 
Carlyle Maw 
Reed Swenson 
Loyal Frandsen 
lis 



WHITE AM) III. I E 

\ljienon Redford 
Rohert Ried 
Leona Jacohsen 
George K. Lewi- 

BAM \\ 
George K. Lewie 
Le Relle Bushman 

FOOT BALL 
\\ illiam Wilkensen 
\ ictor Hatch 
Elwood R. Jack-on 
Truman Partridge 
Warren Tonks 
Victor Ashworth 
William J. Snow 
Victor Taylor 
Joseph Robinson 
Dean Bench 
Hugh Colton 
Dani '. Keeler 



.« 





J'C-SWTOEfl 




j-n- Mrnin dttiMM^:ft - 



Debating Coaches 

These men have been untiring in their efforts to put the B. ^ . I . <>n record 
as a debating institution. We divided the honors this year hut heretofore our 

defeats have been in the minority. 

Prof. J. M. Jensen our Ilij:h School Coach was largely instrumental in hav- 
ing the B. \ . I • represented in the State llijjh School Debating finals this year. 



120 




COX-DAV-tlEWMAN 

BYU-A.CU. 

ip^t ™ AfeU. 




\jon fwm u-u 



121 




&Y.U.»DME 

1PST To DIXIE 



IQYND 


- 


MIYON 




m 


^': 1 .3)!£mHk 



WILKin5EiVJACOB50h 
WON FOT NEVADA 




'fEV 



* 



12 



0ELFORD-HORNADAY 
OURL nEVAM FRTOS 



Record of Debating for Last Ten Years 

DEBATES WITH UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 



1910— Debate 
1911— Debate 
1912— Debate 
1913— Debate 
1914— Debate 
1915— Debate 
1916— Debate 
1917— Debate 
1918— Debate 
1919— Debate 
1920— Debate 



won by B. Y. U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
lost to U. of U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
lost to U. of U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
won by B. Y. U. 



DEBATES WITH U. A. C. 



1910— Debate 
1911— 

1912— Debate 
1913— Debate 
1914— Debate 
1915— Debate 
1916— Debate 
1917— Debate 
1918— Debate 
1919— Debate 
1920— Debate 



lost to U. A. C. 

lost to U. A. C. 
won by B. Y. U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
lost to U. A. C. 
lost to U. A. C. 
won by B. Y. U. 
won by B. Y. U. 
lost to U. A. C. 
lost to U. A. C. 



OTHER DEBATES 

1914 — B. Y. U. won debates from University of Southern Californa, and Uni- 
versity of Nevada. 

1915 — B. Y. U. won debate from University of Nevada, lost to University of 
Southern California. 

1916 — B. Y. U. won debate from University of Nevada. 

1917 — B. Y. U. won debate from University of Nevada. 

1918 — B. Y. U. won debate from University of Nevada. 

1920 — B. Y. U. won debate from University of Nevada. 

1917 — B. Y. U. won debate from Westminister College. 

1917— B. Y. U. lost debate to Dixie Normal. 

1920 — Debate forfeited by Westminister College. 

1920— B. Y. U. lost to Dixie Normal. 





DAnOCEFIELD- PHILLIPS 



■MkftMMHI^^M 



Winner! u\er Heber. Spanish Fork and Sevier ami contestants in the finals for the Stale high 

school debating championship. 




SMAtf WE!>Tr\IN15T 
FORFEITED 

V 

JGv/E5Tni.NI5TOi 



^Z&S^&SBte^^&s'i'--'.. '■-■-- 




PP>RM\Wbor\ 




Neli on Evans Cheney 

Contestants for Thanksgiving Student Body Medal. Won by Evan;. 




'foal 



Top: Contestants for Berk-leail Meilal. Won l>\ Miss Iluish in College and Miss Can<l- 
laml in High School. Below : Winners of extemporaneous speal Inp contest. Wilkinson in the 
College anil Redfonl in High .v'nool. 

126 



*»w ".>■— - 




ParK 



msoix 



WnniBQS (V>as6n. _ j ___^ 




Ilex Me<b) 

Won by denninf 



College STudenr 
8oofy »I«M 

Won By 
ftfiss fierce 




127 





1 «| 


I 






; ^% 








■ 


^^^tf fl^ 









Here, near thi- magnificent tree, stood the old Peter Whitmer home, in 
which the Church was organized. April 6. 1830. 




About -i\ mil< - -outh of the VTIiitmer home i- Senrca lake where bapti-m- 
took place just prevunu to the organization of the Church. 



ISA 




l'->9 




The Little Theatre and What it Means to B. Y. U. 

The 15. Y. I . Little Theater i- one <>t the most artistic, compact, and finch 
arranged Theaters in the country. It is thoroughly equipped having twelve 
full set- of Bcenerj and a comfortable Beating capacity of 125. 

'I'lic Little Theater movemenl is spreading ;ill over the country. It means 
tlic encouragement <>f tine Drama. 

T, Kail Pardoe, professor of dramatic art. i- to he congratulated for the 
manner in which this little theatre movemenl has been put over. I nder 1 1 1 — 
capable direction ami inspirng personality plays were presented which not only 
paved for the Little theatre hut also jmm- experience to a large number of 
gtudents. 

1.10 







FA(.UUX: PRbENft "RDLUnc, STONES" 




CJOLLtCt '* "BROWN OF HARVARD 



g ^c-v .** > ■* * 




HIGH 3.HOOL W "JKRET SERVICE ' 




SEMOR PLAY 

"THE AB.R.IVAL'/ KITTY 



ao 



132 



■V 



EM 




Plays We Have Played 

HE aim of the Dramatic Art department has been to create an 
avenue for the development and training of student.- ability to 
express their thoughts and give meaning to th*ir actions in an 
artistic way and elegant manner which gives the mark of cul- 
ture and a literary appreciation for all things classical in lit- 
erature and all things beautiful in nature. 

Following the ideal that one can best serve by doing the department has 
presented verv successfully six first class plays, which furnished wholesome 
entertainment for the students and finance sufficient to equip a Little Theatre 
second to none in any of the western states. 

"ROLLING STONES" 

''Rolling Stones" was a typical western comedy in which the students were 
privileged to see the faculty from the human side of life. It was the first faculty 
plav ever given and drew one of the largest and most appreciative audiences ever 
seated before the footlights. 

-BROWN OF HARVARD" 

The first college play given was "Brown of Harvard" which pictured and 
verified a true college atmosphere and life. The cast was the largest of any in 
the history of our school dramatics and drew an applause from the audience 
second to no other college play given by the school, in every way was a decided 
success. 

"SECRET SERVICE" 

The H. S. play "Secret Service" typified to its audience southern life dur- 
ing the civil war and revealed remarkable adaptability those young in years can 
with training make before the bright lights. 

"IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE" 

"It Pays to Advertise" a partial fact believed and practised bv all. drew 
from us at first a smile that broadened into a laugh and from a laugh into a 
roar. It took the form of a real theatrical stock company and played in every 
theatre from Lehi to Richfield. 

"BELIEYE-ME-XANTIPPE" 

The second faculty play "Believe-me-Xantippe" was the one plav where 
some of the faculty cast, as many students think they should be all the time, 
were in ball and chains. 

"THE ARRIVAL OF KITTY" 

Last but not least, the Senior Play in which the seniors attempted to be- 
come theatrical genisuses, and to act situations so complecated that it would 
have puzzled the best of the theatrical stars. The novel part of the plav was 
the naturalness with which the individuals fitted the characters. 




134 







?ifri<^9? 



Music Department 




UK Music Department lias not proclaimed itself in pyrotechnic dis- 
play but never in the history of tlie school lias there been more 
systematic drilling in fundamental things nor lias there ever been 

a higher average of result. 

There are many brilliant students, hut the work of those who 
might he railed average ami less than average has been consistent ami such 
students have been given very earful consideration. 

The onlooker who has to be shocked into recognition of "things doing" is 
waiting for the "bit noise" but those who have musical intelligence are satisfied 
that the results of the year make a "firm foundation" upon which to build a 
substantia] structure when the policy of the school shall be definitely de- 
termined. 

(The editor regrets to announce to the band members that their cut was 
damaged and time would not permit getting another). 




i.ie 




,1(1 / 



^=^^ GLEE CLUB 



1.17 



-y\ 




1 88 




139 




Art Department 



I he Art Department with Professor Kastiiioml at its head is a wide awake 
section of the I niver-itv. It can take it* place in the fine arts with any I ni- 

versity of the State, while it- practical adjustment of applied art to commercial 

needs is in advance of any other home institution. 

Their new feature of advertising the work of the stndents in the husiness 
booses of the city with a view of creating a commercial demand for their efforts 
i- an original ami beneficial scheme. Because of it being a new feature in Art 
Education, solicition has come from many Educational Magazines for articles. 

But we bave not forgotten -that Fine Art development is really the foun- 
dation of all practical expression, line Vrt Pagentry has heeri developed to 
quite a successful il-jrice. The Art ideas are impi r-oiiated in living form, in 
other word- a picture i- made to live. 

MO 




141 



- ; 



"i 













«1> 



nu^ ic 



142 




i lONgi flPflJ 



;ofTheTO 

FOURTH WRfiD COnnuniTY PRCEflflT 



'-T"k" *« mo-WM 




143 



WHAT THEY STOOD T-OB. : 



WANT n UNOLR^lCKxA 
^T t'f\ SUPPOKTINC7 J 





jr WHITE 

■ AND 

N BLUE 



7a new science e 

I A NEW OYfl AN 
( OF OTHtR THINGS 



BLC* 

u rs 
s 

l woN'i n m «(CL_?y 



THE WHITE o BLUE, 
51OO0 FOR. HIXON 
1 AMD PlER.CE 




THE BAM NAM 
FOB MISS 
HOP.SLEY — 



K jTi 




J VOTE 

(straight; 




IT SEEMED LIKE 
THEY STOOD FOR MUO 
THROWING, TOO 




I'll' VOTE FOR-h 

} HICKORIES >-. 

.ano t iRonsiqes) 

iVl get 

I TO OH 
OCMHtTT 

or. keeics. 

EITHER - 



THEY DIDNT 
THEY STOOD FOR IT BUT p RA CTICE IT 



THE 
HICKORIES 
'STOOP ON 
A LOT OF 
THINGS -BUT 
I1AVBE THAT 
WAS THE 
<^Jl.) TR0U8LE - 



b 



THE AVER AC, 6 
HIGH M.HOOL 
CAN PI DATE 
STOOD ON SHAKY L( 
WHILE "SPEAKING 





THIS CiOY STOOD FOR 
WHOEVER. HE COULO 
OET ODDS Ofl — 



THE IRONSIDES DlDMT I WWU 
STAND - THEY MOVED . UNO/) ' 



60 



o p for e c- ^t< i>v 



™ ' iS/FmnnFlttflimnrro 




Calendar 

(Dales in Italics are Illustrated) 




\IO\l> \Y. Sept. 8. 1919. 

All jirst years ami Irishmen allow the reception 
committee to /lin Y's on them, and Hro. 
Hayes to extract their money. I'rovo com- 
nurcial club entertain us at night 

Tl KSDAY. 

Old college students begin lo appear. B. ^ . 
U. re.-ponii- to commercial club with music. 

song an<l readings. 

\\ KDNF.SD.AY. 

A few studious ones attend classes. "Vodie" 
night still hold-, its charms. 

THURSDAY. 

K.Iks band concert at Federal Park. 

FRIDAY. 

Student laxly program. Lynn and lienz get 

special invitations to the rostrum. Faculty 

reception at night. Murmurs of "they don't 
dance here like they do at home." 

SUNDAY. 

Professor Christian Jensen tells us of the re- 
lationship of the college to the problem- of 
today. 

\IO\l) U . Sept. 1.1. 

Professor Osmond's chtss discusses the intangi- 
bility of love. At H:30 student* relax from 
their first hard labors. Others ilo the same. 
Coach Huberts leaves for "down East." 

Tl ESDAY. 

Biology 12 class members skin leaves and af- 
terwards spend their nickles al the hook 
store. LeRoy Cox appointed editor of the 
W bite and Blue. 

WEDNESDAY. 

First college devotional is held at the Maeser. 
Three more girls are stltng! ! I by hornets. 

THURSDAY. 

> BS, it rained. Student body vacancies filled. 

FRIDAY. 

President Itrintltrill pulls Professor Poyle's coat 
while he delivers his famous "amen" speech. 
fT e learn how to pronounce xylophone. 
Everybody goes over the benches, "a la Pe- 
terson," at the Romninc concert. Student body 
dame ii here several people are discovered by 
the introduction committee. 

\|H\D\Y. Sept. 22. 

We gel ready for Tuesday and incidentally \ i-it 

Taylor Bros, fashion -how. 
II ESDAY. 

Half holiday declared ami all who can afford 
it go to see the President. Left behindert 
enjoy ".The Third Ki--*" at the Colombia. 



WEDNESDAY. 

Everybody buck, ready to vote for the League 
of Nations. The Freshies and Sophs elect 
their officers with Evans and Wilkinson as 
leading men. 
THURSDAY. 

Freshie officers anil would have been officers 
hold a meeting. Lorrain Crawley holds his 
usual street meeting on 4 north. 
FRIDAY. 

Separate student body exercises. We vote to 
keep the rules and regulations. Ex-soldiers 
and sailors and Cottam entertain at night. 
SATURDAY. 

It rains and the Juniors decide not to have a 
bonfire party. Nets Anderson gets a hair-cut 
and steps Berta to see the "Shepherd of the 
Hills." 
SUNDAY. 

Lyle conducted a party to an apple orcliard 
on the bench but they didn't stay long. 
MONDAY Sept. 29. 

Separate devotionals initiated. 
TUESDAY. 

All the classes that have not had parties de- 
cide to have one. 
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1. 

Seniors form a triumvirate with Anderson at 
the head. 
THURSDAY. 

The freshmen officers entertain the defated 
aspirants and the student body officers down 
at Grace's. Jarvis sees the handwriting on the 
wall. 
FRIDAY. 

Professor Poulson tells us that the library 
should be used as a laboratory, and the dic- 
tionary isn't mentioned but once. Billye 
sees her first football game. 
SATURDAY. 

Junoirs and Fourth years have parties with 
regular "eats." 
SUNDAY. 

The sun comes out and we all go to church. 
Editor Cox entertains at his usual "at home." 
MONDAY, Oct. 6. 

Just Monday, that's all. 
TUESDAY. 

The college votes to have a half holiday to 
clean up the Y and campus. 
WEDNESDAY. 

J. B. is surrounded with an air of mystery and 
the seniors seem to be bursting with import- 
ance. 
THURSDAY. 

DeLila makes dates for all the seniors but we 
don't know what for. Committee on excuses 
informs the boys that no excuses will be ac- 
cepted. The Reuben going south at six car- 
ries with its passengers our worthy seniors. 
Curiosity, that's us all over. 





FORBIDDEN- 
FRUIT 



^ 



^ 



^>>>i 







147 



CLEAM 




WHAT 1 
Art EYA.H 

THE 
'MORN- 

)N6 m 
AFTER 



bOER HAKES 

his e*iT 




THE 

Star" 
STONES* 




I RIDAY. 

They niiirn twelve hours lnti r . ileepier hut 
nuirr liiimmi seniors. Freshiet hold on indig- 
nation meeting uith hurl Page as chief in- 

itignator but In i) o'clock mi> them nimbly 

ttepping up to the ) . insi the tame as 1/ f/ie-y 
11 1 re being initiated. 1/ eight ice "'/ assemhla 
nt the "Keep Klrnn Kiek" and have the best 
time up till yet. 

SATURDAY. 

1/rs. Pardoe holds the college enthralled while 
-Ik- r<iul\ Madame Butterfly to them in the 
Little Theatre. Freshiet Jnzz in short skirts 
anil knee trousers. 

MONDAY, On. 13. 

Professor Pardoe tell* Dt llial for a ilollar on 
Tlmr>cla> night, we can »ee l*rofe—or Nel-on 
hold up two nun. ami several other severe 

things. Student hoil\ tend a telegram In llie 
I tali -enators. jlm: them to vole for the 

league of nations. 

II ESDAY. 

Senior- practice for the sehool of prophet!-. 

\\ EDNESD U . 
Let, ramie VoMs geti toohened to r'ie carnival 
by two damsels and l.rnie and Joe (). arc seen 
quiett) leaving the tide exU of the Hula 
dancers' pmillion. High tchool gets a half 
holiday for cleaning purposes. 

THURSDAY. 
Founder's day, Professor Eastmond does him- 
self proud by his peagent. In the afternoon 
e ve r yth ing happens from Principal Boyle 

breaking his glasses to Hill Jariis taking up 
n collection for apples. Faculty />■ rlom in 
"Rolling Stones" m night and u >■ wonder why 
they are teaching when they might make so 

much more on lirouiheny. 

FRIDAY. 

Dr. Ill nili rson praxes that he is the meanest 
mini 011 eurth by giving his nine o'clock elnss 
nn 1 xem. Editor anil manager of the \i hite 
ami nines entertain their -lull to n party. 

SATURDAY. 

Profe--or Jen-en lertures on the League of Na- 
tion-. 

-1 NDAY. 

William Harri-on <\nu know, that Englishman) 
escorts a member of the training -rhool fae- 
ult> home from Stimla) let ;ol. 

MONDAY. Get. 20. 
Nothin" iloin". 

Tl ESDAY. 

Hallowe'en parties and rumor- of Hallowe'en 
parties in the air 



lls 



WEDNESDAY. 

H. S. begins preparations for a big time. 

THURSDAY. 

One of the clean up day "slu//ers" gets his 
and in return ]oe loses hair. All popular 
boys receire invitations to two Hallowe'en 
parties. 

FRIDAY. 

David J. Wilson, a former student body presi- 
dent points out our weak and strong places. 
Joint H. S. and college dance at night. 

< 
SATURDAY. 

Faculty ghost and goblin party, normal party, 
fourth year character ball, gold brickers ini- 
tial party in which Tobe does his famous 
bathing beauty stunt, a party at Grace's and 
numerous other private expeditions. 

SUNDAY. 

More snow and conference. Student body pres- 
ident gets his first invitation out to dinner. 

IIONDAY, Oct. 27. 

Radiator parties in rogue. Professor Peterson 
installs a little football enthusiasm into us in 
spite of the inclemencies of the weather. 

TUESDAY. 

The Varsity Players with Miss Barlow as lead- 
ing lady appear. Mr. Plattenburg lectures 
on "Worms under the Dark." 

WEDNESDAY. 

Coach Roberts returns to Zion. Boys passs a 
resolution that they'll never use totbacco or 
swear again, but you know where good res- 
olutions go. 

THURSDAY. 

College men begin path around Maeser hill and 
girls serve hot dogs as a reward. At night 
the sophomores visit hell, heaven and earth 
and are none the worse for it. 

FRIDAY. 

High School enjoys torch light parade and dance 
while the Seniors and Juniors uith all the 

extra boys they can commandeer hold a pro- 
gressive supper. 

SATURDAY. 

Everybody but the beet diggers rest from their 
dissipations. Miss Reynolds wears out the 
head of a hatpin at the Chernivsky concert. 

SUNDAY. 

Ex-missionaries tell us why they are Mormons. 

MONDAY, Nov. 3. 

Coach Roberts relates his impressions from 
"down Ea.sf." Culture societies are formed. 
Football squad loses tivo hours while they 
search for BilFs missing tooth. 




149 




TUESDAY. 

We hear more of traditions* 

WEDM-.Mm. 

Testimony meetings. Initial social liour. Family receives its first lesson in shimmying. 

THURSDAY. 

School invited to join in Red Cross parade. 

FRIDAY. 

Prof. Douglas lectures on "d> nosios." Rain no parade! Joe has room to dwell at the 
college dance. 

SATURDAY. 

Faculty women discuss great women. 

>( \D\Y. 

*. e editor move- hack into his re n novated quarters. Prof. O. P. Widtsoe speaker at the 
evening services. 

MONDAY. Nov. in. 

Prof. Bnss explain- how we can avoid being annihilated on Dec. 17. Cafe dweller- in 
I'ardoe's basement take advantage of the 1° cent sale on ties. 

TUESDAY. 

Too much to write about but it can never be forgotten. Ex-serviee commemorate armistice 
day by a program taking us al [the way from rookie days to the end of wailing on the 
Rhine. Matinee dance afterward. Bean balls them out. 

WEDNESDAY. 

Dean Merrill gives bis charges a few words of warning and Byron Dastrup. Crandall ltro-„ 
ete.. decide to remain home on Tuesday nights hereafter. 



THURSDAY 13. 

High School girls sell tags to buy football suits 
for the team — College faculty and six students 
attend the Varsity play. 

FRIDAY. 

Professor Eyring gives an illustrated lecture 
on the value of work. 

MONDAY. Nov. 17: 

This would be a good time to quote poetry 
but something will happen tomorrow sure. 

TUESDAY, Nov. 18. 

Dr. Zueblin mistakes the red house on the hill 
for us but finally finds the right place. Ber- 
niee and Carl add to their laurels in "Qual- 
ity Street." 

I 
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19. 

Unpreparedness popular among both classes 
(faculty and students) but we are enjoying 
the lectures anyway. 

THURSDAY. 

Cottam gives an "at home" to his labratory 
classes with corn and apples cut in longi- 
tudinal sections for refreshments. 

FRIDAY. 

H. S. football team loses to Eureka. Score too 
big (on Eureka's side I to tell. Matinee dance 
and a lecture on "Education." 

SATURDAY. 

verybody tired but still "a rariii" for more lec- 
tures. We receive one on "Faith" and af- 
terwards see Guy Bates Post in "The Mas- 
queraders." 

SUNDAY. 

Miss Eggertson and George seen sitting on the 
front row in parent's class. 

MONDAY, Nov. 25. 

We entertain distinguished visitors, Apostle Mc- 
Kay and President LeSuer from Arizona. 
Professor Swenson receives scientific instruc- 
tion in dancing. 

TUESDAY. 

The book-store does a rushing business in sell- 
ing yellow paper. Boarding house ladies get 
together on their woes. 

WEDNESDAY. 

Evans wins student body medal for oration and 
"Bunk" Brown the cross country run. High 
school entertain college at a football dance. 

THURSDAY. 

Everybody thankful that it wasn't any colder. 

FRIDAY. 

Provo's foremost chicken raiser wins first place 
at a poultry show in Kansas. We are told 
that "Jazz" is naughty. 




Jhe PR0FFES5OR 
EXPLAINS HIS 
UNPREPAR- 
EDNESS 




THMIKSGIVIW 







151 




THK ghristmvs p\gf..\nt 



SAT! EtDAY. 

Faculty ami partner! trip tlic light fantastic at the Ladies* Him. 

MIIMHV Dec. 1. 

First da] <>f llii- winter quartet anil Frank Newman returns again to our midst. 

TUESDAY. 

Prom committee holdt it first conference. \n unsolved mystery makes its appearance. 

Where iliil the rurtains in the While ami Itlue office disappear to? 
WHIM H) \V 

M Nothing to ilo till tomorrow." 

THURSDAY. 

Riiloii Dixon promises to ilo some Bolo work fur the benefit of the Alpine -take \i-ilor-. 

i "RIDAY. 

Professor Kimhall -peak- to OS "about one thing anil another" anil incidentall] mentions 
jazz. \lpine brothers ami -i-tir- view the college ilanre. 

SATURDAY. 

[dahoiani ami Ariaonians gather in Art Gallery and wait for rehearsel to lei out. Second 
and third sears dance in the Gym. 
MONDAY. Dec. 8. 

Judge Tncker talk- national guard in Devotional. 61 episode of the affairs de eolur of the 
editor -down at the Banyan movie. President Brimhal] celebrates his 67th birthday. 
Hainan campaign launched. 
WEDNKSD \V 

Collegians learn to "glee -aw" almost as good as the high school. Merrill Clayson buys a 
Banyan from the Soph-, hut like grapenuts, "there's a reason." 

THURSDAY. 

\ deep) junior allows a Freshie to sell him a Banyan. Slake presidents call on the school 
and -ample the cafeteria. 
FRIDW 

Ballif and Bill Jarvi- -tar in "Brown of Harvard." 
-I \D\Y. 

Berlha Roberts and Algenon Redford win President Grant's autographed book. 

MONDAY, De. 15. 

Professor Pardoe breaks the cold spell. bv reading "The Gilded Fool." 

TUESDAY. 

F.. H. Hinckley, former dean of the college visits school. Faculty women give girls a re- 
ception in the afternoon ami at nighl the college team wipes up the West Side High. 

152 



WEDNESDAY. 

Sophs W'in Banyan contest and hold forth with 
a chicken supper at Miriam Taylor's. Cox's 
thoughtful friends save him a chicken. 

THURSDAY. 

Freshie Vodie after which we hand Evans the 
palm. All night work down at the Graham 
residence. 

FRIDAY. 

Xmas edition of the White and Blue voted the 
best ever. H. S. confetti hall at night after 
which everybody who can leaves town. 

Calendar writer takes a rest until Monday, 
Jan. 5. 

MONDAY. Jan. 5. 1920. 

Sleeping sicknes favorite indoor sport of re- 
turning students. Josephine displays an African 
glim on the left hand and regulation finger. 

TUESDAY. 

Leap year ball discussions heard everywhere. 
Evans bets that he won't he invited. 

WEDNESDAY. 

Boys begin looking for chaperones. 

THURSDAY. 

Superintendent Bennion visits school and we 
see a vision of our future through his talk 
to us. 

FRIDAY. 

Mrs. Preston, third woman president of the 
N. E. A. addresses joint student bodies on 
the problems facing the teachers of today. 
Leap year dance at night proves highly suc- 
cessful. 

SATURDAY. 

College defeat the high school basket ball team. 

MONDAY, Jan. 12. 

Book store sells Mormon Battalion phaniphlets 
by the hundreds. 

TUESDAY. 

Maybe something happened and again maybe 
it didn't but anyway 301 persons including 
Fenton Reeves and seventeen professors fell 
on the ice. 

WEDNESDAY. 

No social hour per usual. 

THURSDAY. 

Seniors indulge in a leap year party, engineered 
by DeLilah. 

FRIDAY. 

A regular working day including an address 
on the Mormon Battalion, a junior working 
party with refreshments at the end. recital 
by Mr. Pardoe, and a dance in the gym, 
given by the fourth years in honor of their 
girls. 



BANYAN 
OUBN 





TO /%- 

Outgoing 
TRAINS 




s/AeSLCuntid sickness - 




THE (MRU 

DO Trie 
A-5KIN6 



PALL ! 




153 




SATl RDAY. 

Tlie college team defeaU Springville. 
SUNDAY. 

Wm. F.. Morton speak- in college hall. 

MONDAY, Jan. 19. 

We'll pan tlii ^ day over. 

II ESDAY. 
High school and college teams return from 
American 1'ork each with a icalp. 

w i dm -i> w 

Junior- make ro-e- at Muriel-'. Damsels 

pledgc themselves not to vamp basket hall 

player- ami ilelialor-. 

THURSDAY. 

The library janitor gets vamped 01 iisiml. 

FRIDAY. 

Lydia W hiie Boothsb] gives recital. 
SATURDAY. 

College team defeats Lehi American Legion, 
1 7-1 8. Bunk ami the two ushers gel knocked 
out. 
SI M)AY. 

Most everyone goes to conference. Mood] ami 
Hinckle] make thre- meetings l>er (lay for 
two days. 
MONDAY, Jan. 25. 
Old friend "flu" appears ami many of our num- 

brrs succumb to it. 

TUESDAY. 

More -eat- varan). 

\\ EDNESDAY. 

Boh ami Josephine visit Blarkie in the White- 

cotton library. 
THURSDAY. 
Dr. Henderson sends ever] other person home. 

FRIDAY. 
Bosket bull players receive a royal tend off 

by l)i II II rb. II. S. dramatic club presents 

"Secret Service*" to the surviving few. The 

juniors go jor a jay ride in Blaine's new 
ford. 

SATl KI>W 

\. C. beaU the college team. Game with 
Springville postponed. 
Sl'NDAY. 

Everyone afraiil to go to rhurrh so Bill lake- 
all hi- girls out walking. 
MONDAY, Feb. 2. 

Springville quarantines again-t Provo. 

II ESDAY. 

Stuilent bod] activities have heen -u-pended. 

WEDNESDAY. 

//. S. sends an ultimatum, refusing to accept 
the college constitution. 

THURSDAY. 

Those who dare, go to see the Zinata Graf play, 
crs. 

FRIDAY. 

Returning from the "Romancers" this sign con- 
fronts us. "Hi cess until Feb. 16", but it proves 
to be longer. 



154 




MONDAY, Feb. 23. 

Bark in school again but we are saddened by the death of our beloved teacher, C. W. 
Whittaker and five of our students. u 

TUESDAY. 

Still glad to be in school again. 
WEDNESDAY. 

H. S. beats Springville by one point. Yes, it was some game. 
THURSDAY. 

Juniors hold their regular meeting in the art gallery. 
FRIDAY. 

Dramatic art department stage a debate between the A. C. and the B. Y. Otto Davis 
vs. Swenson creates a sensation we hand it to the A. C. at night for the second time 
this year. We win U debate. 
SUNDAY. 

Prom workers break the Sabbath. 
MONDAY, March 2. 

March comes in like a tame lion. 
TUESDAY. 

Coach Roberts discusses our chances with the U. 
WEDNESDAY. 

Apostle Ballard speaks in College Hall. We are delighted with both his speaking and sing- 
ing voice. H. S. defeats Spanish Fork. School board of censorship passes on stockingless 
dancing. 
THURSDAY. 

We play an exhibition game with the U and give them the game with ten points in their 
favor. 
FRIDAY. 

Juniors the cynosure of school eyes. They entertain with a program in the morning and 
with the best Prom in the history of the school at night. From the first sight of the 
beautifully decorated hall until the last strtains of a perfect day it was a night never to 
be forgotten. Y debators defeat Nevada in the same old way. 
MONDAY, March 8. 

Lost, one perfectly good calendar record for one week. 
MONDAY, March 15. 

Evans week commences. 
TUESDAY. 

The green flag is taken from its lofty place by three upper classmen and not one Freshie 
gives as much as a dissenting vote. 
WEDNESDAY. 

St. Patrick's day but nothing green seen but the Freshies' caps. 

155 







* 




-WT*", 



E DUCATIONAL UPLIFT 



MOTHIHG BUT SNO\*/~ 



CLOSE-yP 

^TUDGNT 
IN UNI: 

FOR ft 

FURLO 




nil RSDAY. 
/ /</"'' doss presidents teen trying i<> hide in 
the Trophy room. Second college ploy, "It 
Pays to Idvertise" delight* id audiences and 
mysteries like why certain people wear loud 
hosiery and influenza sign thins m< ex- 
plained. 

FRIDAY. 

Fre-hic- carrv mi vnMIi llirir program in spite 

of the ittempu of several well meaning 
g< nth-men ami llieir struggle at nighl marks 

ilif end of a perfect ih-ii .1 

SAT1 RDAY. 

Evan- tests from lii- nerve wracking experi- 
ences of the <la\ before. Great pedagogical 
convention. 

MONDAY, March 22. 
(Jrace ami Gladye return from the south, not 
victorious but -iill undefeated. I . \. <-. glee 
club sings io a -mall but appreciative on- 
diences. 

Tl ESDAY. 

March Mill raging, 

\\ EDNESDXY. 
Iloliitas and parade /or educational campaign. 
Some people take their educational uplift at 
the "vodie." 

THURSDAY. 
I)u> spent in recuperating. 

I RID W 
Regular theology, could anything be more un- 
kind. Junior- entertain Beniora at a dancing 
part] in the fonnh ward hall. Joe Olpin 
brings the highest l> ■ < I at the auction. 

SATURDAY. 

Vothing hut tnou . 

>l \I)\Y. 
Same thing. 

MONDAY, March 29. 

I ; ■ i .'!■" of spring weather anil elections. Renz 

discovers that l hour- in political science 

doesn't look like 2 to Professor Jen-en. 

TUESDAY. 

Nothing hut a few petition- ili-turh our deep 
seated calm. 

WEDNESDAY. 
Furlough promised to nil gum chewers. Del- 

brrt puts his in tin 1 waste basket. 

Till RSDAY. 

School goes over the top in French movement 
fund. Jennie finds a cadavar in Billye's 
locker. 

FRIDAY. 
Ernest Wilkinson wins the bantam cup for ex- 
tempereaneous speaking. Orem begins car- 
rying a feu of the over zealous ones north- 
ward. Fools' Frolic proves to hi- the big' 
Hest high school social event of the year. 



l.-.tt 



SATURDAY. 

Art society has a party and there were three boys to every girl. 

SUNDAY. 

General migration to north Zion. Two feet of snow to observe Eastenn. 

MONDAY, April 5. 

Too much going to happen to waste time on a Monday. 

TUESDAY. 

Supporters get busy on primary election candidates. The sun shines for the first time in 
forty days and nights. "It Pays to Advertise" still doing business. 

WEDNESDAY. 

More election troubles. Mary makes her famous promise to Wilkinson. 

THURSDAY. ,,,„-, 

Roscoe Davis gets the hook for his dissertation on the abilitie. of a girl, while Cox lets it 
be known that he is supporting two women. Primary elections and Patrons' ball at night. 

FRIDAY. . 

Primary winners begin to concoct schemes. Mr. Mi-Gill speaks on "Service. College 
dance at night. 

SATURDAY. 

Campaign managers plan their lines of offense and defense. 

MONDAY, April 12. 

Election campaign starts off in full glory. Dan Keeler succumbs to the 59th damsel and 
buys a ticket to the normal movie, which, however, doesn't move. Blue supporters eat 
chickens cleaned by the whites. 

TUESDAY. 

The whites hold their initial rally. All politicians m their natural element. 




Farmers and Merchants Bank. It was on this corner that 
the building stood which is shown on page 11 as Our First 
Home. 



157 




mm 





\\ EDNESDAY. 

Sfudatlfl Mium/ hy <7ie <7ii«/ih-fii e <</ f/ie ii hili' 
leaders. Normal moiie at night. President 

sunn ami i timirkirs inkr reserved benchet 
on the side limit. 

nil RSDAY. 

\\ .■ repi-ler ureal expectations for our camera 
man a- ( 1 1 •- two parlie- parade up the liill. 
Blue- return eloquence for eloquence ami 
Milium lir-ni-. later in the ila> we -bout 
hurrah! for Grace ami 1..-..1.. 

FBIDAY. 

II. S. JoOBton 11 in from lleher. Art </e/«irr- 

manf starts traditionating uiih a grand car- 

nivul ill night. It ISM a success from the 

first milt: till the throwing of the lu-<t con- 
fetti. 

SATURDAY. 

Mr. I'arlriiUe i- crowned queen of the M.i* 
at the spring Festival of the facult] ladies. 

SI \l> w 

Grant lleck-lrand anil (Men \ an take picture- 

in Pioneer park. 
M0VU1". \|.ril I". 

Joe 1 .1 1 1 r ) - a measure through for a leap 

rear dance. Girls bnj beans for Tuesday's! 
luncheon. 
Tl ESDAY. 

V receives its annual dotting up and in the 

afternoon the hoys relax In playing stellar 
rnlis in favorites from fairyland. Everybody 
goet to dance regardless of partners of either 

sex. 

\\ EDNESDAY. 

Sihiuil turned into a stiff jointed generation. 
II. S. politicians wage 11 ar on each other. 

FBIDAY. 
Physical Ed. chases present one of the best 
programs of tin- year. Must everyone, espe- 
cially the boy s ii* ride to po to Salt Lake 
anil take dancing lessons under Professor 

Christenson. Ironsides, with llonnett as 

loader win out in the elections, 
SATURDAY. 

Kith invitation track ami field meet in the 
afternoon ami hanil dance afterward- where 

we £ei thawed out. Several of the -tars of 
a few rears ago perform on the field. 
MONDAY, \pril 26. 

School take> on appearance of a rro.-s be- 
tween a musical corned) ami a labor union 
parade in order to hrinj: down that hint. 

known as the H. (!. L. Base hall ineligible! 
wi-h they'd studied their theology. 

II ESDAY. 

Profe--or Jone- ha- -ea-ickne--. resulting from 

-i\ pair- of striped overalls occupying the 

front row. I . of I . defeat- our baseball 

nine. 

\\ KI)\KSI),U . 



"It Pays 10 \d\erti-e" -lar- 
tour. 



on it- southern 



1S8 



THURSDAY. 

Just the kind of a day for the tennis sharks and bird fiends to enjoy, and for Sister Ander- 
son and Brother Crandall to lake a walk in. 

FRIDAY. 
Spring fever sets in and as a re?.ult, Saratoga gets visited and the Juniors stroll down by the 
river's verdant side to indulge in a weenie roast. 

MONDAY, May 3. 

The "Arrival of Kitty" startles the natives of Mapleton. 

TUESDAY. 

"Kitty" arrives in College Hall with an all star senior class and West Parkinson. 

WEDNESDAY. 

Baseball team loses to the Aggies. Seems like we're getting used to such things now. 
Domestic art exhibit opened in Art Gallery. Blaine Kelsey wins the singles from the 
U. who in turn takes the doubles. 

THURSDAY. 

Rue Jacobsen accidently happens into the Art Gallery and wants to know what's been 
pulled off there. Classes decide on plans for home coming carnival. 

FRIDAY. 

Seniors in their glory. They have everything from a program, free lunch, fre» ride, anil a 

grand ball at night. 
SATURDAY. 

A red letter day for the university and the high schools of the state, but especially for the 

East Side High, when they take first place in the state meet. 

SUNDAY. 

Seniors depart with all their dignity in response to the call of the wild and at the 
present writing they are still answering the call. 

MONDAY, May 10. 

Honor men and women decide that the honor system of the school will be carried out to 
the last letter. 

TUESDAY. 

The calendar goes to press. The Seniors have yet to return final exams loom up. Home 
coming is on us. This has been a full and happy year — good luck all of you. 




WM 



a 




. ■ 



TRIED AND TRUE 



No. 00 



PROVO, UTAH, WEDNESDAY, MAY 32, 1920 Vol. LXXVII 



Leap Year Results Are Now Before the Public 



New Department Opened in University 



"LEAP" YEAR AT THE B. Y. U. 

Yes, 1920 was certainly a "leap" 
year at the B. Y. U. Everybody 
"leaped" at everything that came 
along. Those dreadful bacteria, "the 
marriage fever germs," whose eco- 
nomic va'ue lies only in their power 
to raise the high cost of living, 
"leaped " into our midst. Smother- 
ing Dan Cupid with noxious gases, 
said backteria bribed the little imp 
into letting a number of fatal arrows 
"leap" from his bow and as a result, 
Miss Hone. Miss Harris, Miss Eg- 
gertsen and Miss Gee, also. Gene, 
Grace, Starry, Elva and Josephine all 
shown' strong inclinations to "leap" 
into the sea of matrimony, and doubt- 
Ies-ly most of them will succeed about 
June. 

The boys haven't shown as much 
initiative as might have been expect- 
ed, although some of them have 
"leaped" in certain directions. 

The Seniors "leaped" into a "great- 
er University." The Junior boys 
"leaped" into dress suits, and the 
girls into party dresses, and together 
they "leaped" into a prom. The 
Sophomores "leaped" into forty acres 
of Intellectual Brilliancy and found 
the field too small, and so the Fresh- 
men "leaped" from their state of 
greenness into the eternal brilliancy 
left vacant by the Sophs. And thus 
ends the "leaps" of the "leap" year. 



ART NOTES 

Muriel Horsley is busy making a 
screen, just what she intends to do 
with it has not been discovered. We 
hope it is satisfactory. 

Geo. K. Lewis and his bathing girls 
are getting along nicely, but just 
where the lad gets his ideas beats us. 

Sadie Ollenton felt very badly when 
the Prof, removed a perfectly good 
picture from the board, and was in- 
structed all pictures must appear in 
full dress. 

Nels Anderson is the Banvan Bol- 



shevist, as it appears. Many is the 
bomb that has been placed under the 
Banyan staff, in fact, some of the staff 
never have returned, perhaps through 
fright — who knows! 

Anna Anderson and Taylor Bond 
were seen painting a duet which 
proved to be such a success that 




Maurine Olsen was taken in, and a 
successful trio was their accomplish- 
ment. 

The big clean-up slogan has been 
'"ken rather seriously here today. 
Most of the students have formed a 
habit of looking in the waste basket 
for their belongings. Many have 
abandoned their lockers. 

Jimmy James is spending his spare 
time working on a picture of l'Amoure 
under the direction of Prof. E. H. 
Eastmond. 



HELPFUL HINTS TO THE HOME- 
LY BUT HOPEFUL 

The L^niversity has opened up a 
new department, one in which we feel 
the school and especially the fairer 
portion of it, will be interested in. 
For a long time there has been a 
crying need for just such a depart- 
ment, and today this paper is glad 
to announce that it is now function- 
ing properly. The Rest Room has 
been selected for the receiving and 
lecture room, and it is expected that 
within a few weeks two laboratory 
rooms will be added. 

Two oi our lady teachers will have, 
for the present, entire charge of the 
work. Their morning lecture hours 

let 



will be from 9 to 12 o'clock, and in 
the afternoon, practical work and 
demonstrations will be given. Their 
lectures will include the following 
subjects: "How to be Married Be- 
fore Twenty." "How to get through 
School on Hallology Credit," "How 
to Obtain an Escort to Accompany 
You Home. After ^ on have Gone to 
a Dance Unattended." and similar 
Subjects. Demonstrations will be 
given on the proper way to curl the 




hair, and on the artistic and modern 
way to make up a face. A special 
lecturer will come from Spanish Fork 
to give the girls an idea of the best 
methods to employ in overcoming 
competitors in a school containing 
more girls than boys. 

Girls, here is the chance of a life- 
time! Don't fail to register early! 



TRIED AND TRUE 



TRIED AND TRUE 



Published weakly l>> die knecken of die lirigham Young Dnivereitj 
Interred .1- dead mailer ai the cemetery; in Provo, 



Contributions of tin- faculty, undents, etc.. will be tolerated, bnl not pub- 
lished. 



-I USI RIPTION U \ll S 
-Students K\tra All Other- Nothing 



TKIEI) AND TRUE ST \ I 1 

Editor M. T. Dome 

Bnau Manager .. Lava u . Nur-e 

\--i-lant Editor- Heeza Taker. Adores M. Young. Like- M. Wooly 

Humor Iona Mack 

Athletic* Heepsa Pep 

Specials Desira Chance 

Literary Editor Rima Hilt 

Soeierj and Music [ma \ amp 

Exchange Editor [goa Wot 

Studio Theatre Sheeza Charmer 

krtUl Ila-chcr Ties 



THE GREATER UNIVERSITY 

Never before has there been less 
need for a greater university, yd 
should our facullv and hoard mem- 
ben insist, we ma\ lie forced to grant 
ihem their desire-. However, ihere 
are a few reservations upon which 
we united!] pledge to take our stand: 
l-t. the new building. like the one 
for mechanics, must be more showy 
than substantial. It has been sug- 
gested and favorably accepted that it 
be constructed on the plan of the 
pagoda so prevalent in the thirteenth 
century. 

2nd. The things we need arc: le-- 
sludents and more faculty, a 90 per 
cent increase in re-t rooms lined with 
ea-> revolving chairs, such as appear 
in the private offices at the present 
time. 

3rd. We stand firm for halls with 
darkened corners, a cozy library, cur- 
tained off into private apartments; 
and feel justified in demanding an 
up-to-date smoking room for the fac- 
ulty 



has almo-t hardened her. In lectures, 
theatres ami mo\ ie- -he ha- had in- 
numerable applicants waiting for the 
pleasure of escorting her to these va- 
rious place-. Ml this has been very 
pleasant, but there is such a thing as 
too much being enough, and boys, 
it is time to call a halt in your at- 
tentions towards the opposite sex. 
The] have been parlied, feted, etc., 
until some cf them arc so worn out 
that they are considering discontinu- 
ing school. Think the matter over, 
boys, and decide to let them alone 
for a while. 



THINK THE MATTER OVER. 

The boys of the B. Y. U. have al- 
ways been noted for their considera- 
tion and gallantry towards the girls 
of the school, but this year they have 
fairly outdone themselve- in -urpass- 
ing past records. Dates for important 
occasions have been made weeks and 
sometimes months ahead, anil as for 
the regular Eriday night dances, no 
girl has ever been seen attending them 
alone. In fart, the average girl has 
hail lo refuse so many boys that it 



THE K\NkS OF SIN HAVE IN- 
\ ADED OUR MIDST 

With the opening of spring by the 
calendar, not by the weather man. 
great changes have taken place in the 
Brigham Young University of all the 
world, changes which I will leave to 
you, dear reader, to deride whether 
or not they are for the best. For 
\ears our school has gone on advanc- 
ing the ideal- of the Church, and 
daily turning out purer and more sim- 
ple minds, but now all is changed. 
Where once theology and all its prin- 
ciples reigned supreme, the modern 
evil of dancing in the form of jazz has 
taken it- place, and each day sees 
a great number of our erstwhile re- 
spectable students rush to the gym- 
na-ium and spend the hour in close 
contact and other digressions from the 
correct. This is heartrending in it- 
self, but a still greater evil awaits our 
attention for a number of charming 
and once innocent girls are taking an 
advanced course in the art of siren- 
ating, known as bourgeoise nomen- 



clature a- ramping, under tin- guise 
of a course in homemaking. Could 
anything be more ironical.'' 

Our dear old College Hall, once 

noted f»»r it- elevating atmosphere 
among the earnest wekera for right- 
con- education, i- now a place of 
rendeavons for movie fans anil 
p l eas u re seekers of the lightest va- 
rieties. 

Student-, are you going to -it calm- 
l\ hv and -ee our dear old school 
go down, down ill!" lilt- depth- of 

degradation? No, we feel assured 

tli. ii miii will ri-e with all vour forces 
to meet the present crisis. 



FACl LTY, SOCIETY AND 
SON \l. NOTES 



PER- 



Mr-. Walter Cottom entertained 
Wednesday, evening at a bridge party 
in honor of her first husband's 59th 
birthday. Mr. Cottom has been a 
teacher in the Biology department of 

the lirigham Young Universit) for 

war-, having entered this institution 
in the fall of 1492. Some days ago, 
upon being asked to resign, he staled 

that his health was in excellent 

■ Iii and he entertained no inten- 
tions of resigning before the spring of 
1947. 

Mis- Myrtle Hone entertained at a 
tin shower Thursday evening. Among 
the useful gifts received were two 
switches and a lemon squeezer. 

Mr. M. P. Henderson entertained 
at a "bug" parly last Saturday eve- 
ning. Covers were laid for two. The 
buffet was delicately decorated in 
miscroscopes. prepared slides, and 
rubber cats for experimentation; a 
beautiful jar of green algae forming 
the centerpiece. A superfluous quan- 
tity of I'.ii aiiie-iun punch was unique- 
l\ -rrvetl in colored test lubes. After 
dinner speeches on "The Compara- 
tive Anatomy of Chizozarherozmy- 
ehohles and Amylopigerionbelovor- 
mis'" were rendered, and enjoyed by 
all present. Mr. Henderson was mas- 
ter of ceremonies and showed Mrs. 
Henderson a wonderful time. 

A marriage license has been issued 
lo Mi-- Ma/.ie Campbell. It is hoped 
she will avail herself of this phenom- 
enal opportunity and purchase a 
sparkler, if no other means of obtain- 
ing one is in sight, q. t. (You know il 
pays to advertise. I 

Mi-. Carl Eyring spent her week 
end at home with her husband in 
Provo. 

Beginning with Thursday evening's 
performance, private lessons in aes- 
thetic dancing will be given under the 
special tutorship of Miss Vilate Elliot 
and Alfred Osmond both teachers 



TRIED AND TRUE 



of this institution. Tuition will be 
regulated by progress made. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Ballif are an- 
ticipating spending next winter in 
Provo. 



SOCIETY AND PERSONAL NOTES 

Mildred Boyer reports that she in- 
tends leaving for Arizona in June 
for a stav of indefniite length. 

Blaine Kelsey and Ray Bromley 
forded from Springvilie Friday 
morning in time for Theology. 

The Seniors entertained the Juniors 
at a delightful supper and dancing 
party at the Hotel Roberts. Covers 
were laid for fifty, and the out-of- 
town guests included Kathryn Calder, 
Bernice Davies, Muriel Horsley and 
William Oliver. This is the 16th in a 
series of 26 parties given by the 
Seniors this year. 

Edmund Evans has a heavy cold 
this week, as a result of losing his 
red sweater while, swimming List' 
Saturday. 

Mr. Marion Taylor spent the week 
end in Springvilie as a guest at the 
home of Miss Josephine Crandall. 

Among the out-of-town visitors in 
school this week are Frank Newman, 
Eugene Hillman, Earl Page, Belva 
Wadley, and Laura K. Lewis. 

Mr. Abe Dixon, late of the Third 
ward, entertained the Banyan staff 
and Billye Coleman at a unique 
party. Life Savers and Adam's ale 
formed part of the delicious refresh- 
ments. 

Mr. Arch West has been made as- 
sistant librarian at the Provo Public 
Library. This appointment comes as 
a reward of faithful services ten- 
dered the librarian. 

The Sophomores held another of 
their delightful chicken parties at 
the home of one of its members, 
Miss Miriam Taylor. Singing and 
conversation were indulged in until 
an early hour. 



ABOUT THEM THERE OVERALLS 

It came to pass that overalls came 
upon us, even so that they were "all- 
over.' That there's scripture quoted 
from J. B.'s essay on wild women. 
If you don't believe it close yer lids 
an' think of Abe Dixon. A living 
example of the sin (overalls, I mean, 
not wild women, his are chickens.) 

This here treaties that I'm ex- 
plainin' to you, is one of them re- 
sults of the world war and tight shirts. 
The men says, "give us liberty or 



stripes," an' they went and got both. 

If you wuz ramblin' up to devo- 
tional some day you'd see a purty lit- 
tle girl lalkiV to a red-headed man in 
stripes, an' you'd natchurally think as 
how some convict has 'scaped, an' 
she wuz preachin' reform to im. But 
you look back and see so many stripes 
comin' up the hill that you think 
you've been drinkin' shavin soap, and 
all the barbers' poles had started after 
you. An' then you discover it's just 
Joe and Bob I the two, I mean I. 

You know Coach Roberts wuz try- 
in' to buy some of this here bed- 
lickin' an' they wouldn't trust him fer 
five bucks. Don't know as I blame 
em', either, him havin' twins, etc. 

Some of these allovers aren't 
stripeil though. They run out of 
stripes, so Ken Weight got some 
flappy brown ones. When he walks 
he can tell jes' how the wind's blow- 
in' most as **ood as a girl with loose 
skirts I full, I mean I. 

I quess I've treated this treatus enuf, 
so I'll begin to quit. The only trou- 
ble is that some of these little girls 
in school kind of ferget which boy 
they wuz flirtiif with cause he ain't 
got the gren suit on now. 

The fellers had better send up a 
pair of these eye-blinders to St. Peter 
so he'll be in style, too. Or they mite 
exchange these fer a pair of wings or 
horns — huh? 

I'm endin' now, with scripture from 
J. B. again — listen — "And it came to 
pass that this plague overtook the 
land.' All men. 



Financial Report of the 
1920 Banyan 

In order that the stockholders, 
faculty and other enemies cf the 1920 
Banyan might have a full and de- 
tailed account of its physical condi- 
tion the Banyan staff has prepared the 
following: 

Surplus from 1919 Banyon ....$ 2,000.00 
Sale from 6,000 Banyans at 

$5.00 each 3,000.00 

Utah County endowment 
fund for decrepit and 

feeble year books 7,520.20 

Bonus from Congress .35 

From Laurel Miner for vo- 
cal adv 115.10 

From E. Evans for running 
his picture in the Banyan 

31 times 73.40 

Frcm Lyman Merrill for giv- 
ing special mention to his 

graceful dancing 15.20 

From sale of extra pictures 
of Maude Dixon to Fred 
Markham and Merrill 

Clayson 89.80 

Sale of two chickens to Blue 

Party 30.15 

From sale of Banyan paper 
to White party for making 
night caps 17.05 

103 



Sale of scrap paper to J. E. 

Hayes for faculty minutes 1.10 

From sale of old copper to 

4th years for class rings.... 700.00 

Remnants of Banyan ban- 
quet to gold brickers 2.49 

Frcm George Ballif not to 

mention his engagement... 340.40 

From Delilah Higgs as hush 
money for not mentioning 
her spelling ability 500.00 

From sale of pretty girls to 

Cottam 5.00 

From faculty for patent on 

Banyan notices 2,999.45 

From 1921 staff for stand- 
ing with faculty .005 

Total $23,816,895 

EXPENSES. 

To kindergarten for hecto- 
graph printing 500.50 

To commercial departn.cnt 

for use of adding machine 25.00 

To Hans Anderson for etch- 
ings and engravings 444.40 

To E. H. Eastmond for mop- 
ping up the art rooms 57.00 

For rent of art rooms 900.03 

To B. T. Higgs for special 
work in turning out lights 
and chaperonage .80 

To Cottom for use of office 

after hours 6,600.00 

For Banyan banquet 40.04 

For use of faculty car in 

getting pictures .12 

To Lavieve Huish for giving 

out Banyan notices 51.00 

To Fay Ollorton for promise 

to give out notice 52.85 

To Taylor Bond putting the 

soft pedal on his speech 4.00 

For hospital Lills for wound- 
ed feelings inflicted by the 
editor 3,999.09 

To Biology department for 
rat skins to bind the Ban- 
yan 10.00 

To registrar for giving staff 

passing grades 300.02 

To Dr. Hjnderson from ex- 
cusing staff members from 
recitation and final excnu; 150.00 

To Provo Foundry for Nol's 

hammer 7.35 

To Rotton's Cafe for nour- 
ishment for staff for 18,- 
764,490 hours overtime 
work .93 

To Book Stcre for bars ar.o 

life savers .10 

For improvements in art gal- 
lery in making conditions 
more sanitary 57.49 

For hush money to tliosc 
who discovered the Ban 
yan graft 2,001.00 

Banyan trip to Saratoga 39.00 

Bathing suit for Ted Bush- 
man .50 

To Prof. Nelson for picture 15.25 



FRIED AND TRUE 



Dress -ui:- fur the Junior 

Pi ur, 

I o < m i"r support to the 

editor 1.80 

For mucilage 111.11 

Beet pnlp for making special 

paper 300.00 

Oram eai I looks 115.00 

I eathet medals for the -taff .83 

To Joe Jarvi- fur hi- inlirr-l 

in the staff ■»'• 

Pepper fur the an -taff 39 
I '.. I ,n i Morton !•■ 

graphic "ork. 15,970 boon .l"i 
I .. Muriel Horael] fur Jun- 
ior ipeciala 79.00 



Total M'MKMl.Tt,:, 

>nr|ilu- -i;:l:. Jo. in !„■ used for 
the licinnr system of the Brigham 
> • >ii n ^ 1 Diversity. If an) mono] it 
I. ii ii i- suggested bj the rtaff thai 
thil -uni In' u-fil in bnilding ami 
operating ■ mental hospital f..r worn 
mil year book staffs. 

Total a- -i. 123,816.90 including 

•>.l"i n'lil- in n.ii --s.it ■ ami build- 

m--. 

Expenses Slo.Win.HV. 

Jurplus I.H16.89 

Km 1 bj Jnir K. 11 \1 I 5, 

\..iar\ Public 
Mj i.rm expires Maj 18,1920. 



\\ Willi Ii n and Imaril in pri- 

\air family, before June 1st. The 
laiK who has served me up to ilai<- 
nii-i move, and I must bare a new 

home. I a-k mi favor-. |ia> ni\ own 
way, prove myself agreeable to com- 
pany, ami ran vouch fur the fail that 
1 am ea t in please, eai all whole- 
some food, and have proved an easel 
in m\ house f<>r two and three-fourths 

\rar-. I am always willing tu a--i-t 

the daughters of the house in obtain- 
ing gentlemen callers Sundaj nights, 
ami in help in the mam household 
problems, 

i Signed ' Jos. S. Jarvis. 



WILL VDOPT CHILI) 

\m f.imilv having more children 
than the] consider neceasar] fur their 
own comfort and satisfaction "ill do 
well i" look me up, as I intend to 

adopt ami rai ime one as though 

ili.v were mi verj own; I can make 
a wonderful home fur the ri:ht child. 
Of course I would 1 iki- to choose the 
infant b] careful observation and as- 
sociation. I would prefer a nirl. with 
brown hair, ami brown eyes, small 
and mil older than 13 or younger than 
three <!a\ -. 1 have in> own ideas what 
a child -liniilil I"-, ami would prefer, 
of course, some one dial fii- m\ fancy. 
Phone 841 where the part] stays. 
Blackie Heui-h. 



COLUMBIA THEATRE 

Presents 1 acts ..l I u-i < bus Vaudeville Next Wednesda] Night 

A Freshmen Jaas Orchestra "Win Caps ar. Green." 

B I iving Statues. Posed I * > our groat collection of i\nr\ heads and -tiff 
in ck. 

C Dtlbert II. i. It a.id bis chorus of -'"• celebrated beauties, ii "Win do 
Hi. v I ..II rot Mr When I Can't I all f..r Hem?" 

D World's Greatest I ine Puller. See ' ox iuggli wires fot < irace. 

E Ariel Troupe Ballif ami N.I- \n.l. I-..H. Il.iirrai-ini: feat, re- 

>l ii i r i ii great barmonj and cooperation. 

F One-acl Tragedy, "Out I ittle Graj Ilium' in the -i- Brush," featuring 
Gladys Langlois and Carl Christy. 

G Mima l>a\i- ami Eddie i ..mi- iii ih. Latest Song Hit-, including No- 
bod] Loves a I .ii Mm. .ni.l (Mli. r Favorites. 

PRICES "»"r am! 75c 



I U I.OH BOM) 
D. M. S.I .. \.<>S.K. 

Mj |ni|iil- are noted fur their grace 
ami refinement in everything per- 
taining in entertainment. Ml tin- lat- 
est steps taught, close dancing not 
tolerated. If you wiah in spoon I 
teach Mm bow to do it decently. If] 
ipecialt] i- teaching lm« i" converse 
properly. Appointments made In 
phone. 



\\\<>l NCEMENT 

I wish tn am in.- tin' opening 

of mj matrimonial bureau. I fin. I 
husbands for am lad] at an] time. 

W ith mj experience ami personalitj 
I do mil hesitate in herald ili»' fart 

iliat ii i \ rr-iill- last Tlii- in-litii 

tiiui i- known from coast in coast, ami 
I am irrv mm h pleased tn establish 
a branch in tlii- city. 



Drill. Ml BIGGS 
731 F.a-t 5th North Provo, 



Utah 



BE \N \IMIST 

I teach hall vamping in three lee- 
sons, either In mail or personal eon- 
tact. M\ methods ar.- need In even 
celebrate .1 hall vampire. 

MINIMI. I IKK 



TESTIMONY 

I wish tu give this message in the 
world, a- it will mean happiness tn 
many. For ten years I was an in- 
valid ami during that time tried 
'■'in rented] known hut without re- 
-uli-. Tin- doctors gave me up ami 
m\ friends thought mj tune ha. I 
.inn.', hut mi.' da] I harm-. I of Geo 
Ballifs wonderful discovery, ami se- 
cured treatments ami I ran truthfully 
-n in. heart trouble ha- complete!] 
I. -It in.-. I firl a- young a- I ,11.1 ten 
years ago. I heartil] recommend Mr. 
Ballifs wonderful discovery, a- it 
saved me from a worse fate than 
death, 

Mi. II EGGERTSON 



MOM V TO LOAN 

(tn dii ui- watches, instruments, 

kn.lak- tennis hall- nr candy. I pa] 
more than an] other person in town, 
a- I have arranged tn use the Junior 
funds. W ith these I can handle am 
amount of goml-. 

I \\ II \l III l-ll 



WANTED 

Partner with mone] with -mall 
amount of capital in invest on 
money-making scheme. I am treas- 
urer of the Cactus (luh. ami ran fur- 
ni-li references a- in mj standing. I i- 

iiamial report given if required. I I 

invi -tmi-nt to right part] . 

i .11 at (id Lewis Terrare. 

164 



NIXON'S PLACE 

I treat you ri^hi 
Entertainment I ir-t class 

M» tin — "If ii'- fii I,, eai I serve it" 

Open .In an. I night 

(true Vixon, Prop, 

Mathias Tanner. H.O.IL 

I -lill bave a fi» vacancies left in 
mj studio i. 'am. especial]] mj wrest- 
ling ami boxing teams. These courses 
an- especiall] arranged tn give the 
moat brutal punishments. Under nrj 
persona] training I can assure you of 
the latest things in huih Mm--, such 
■ - ih.- "Iiiimn Hug, Grape Juice 

Pum-li." i'lr. 

Office hours, 2 pjn. in 1:30 pjn, 



ICME 



•^iSs' 






■ . .- ■ : 





"How coup 



College Song 



All hail the College that we love 

At the throne, the throne of wisdom's sway, 

Oh. let us lift our songs above 

The thronging multitude today. 
No pride of riches here may sue; 

The head, the heart, the hand, 
United must be true — 
Be true to thee, our White and Blue, 

When they join our happy band. 

Chorus 

Then cheer anew for the B. Y. U. 
We"ll raise the standard — bear it through; 
We've come to work, to live, to do; 
Our hearts are true to the B. Y. U. 



There is no emblem half so sweet 

As our colors, colors pure and true. 
There is no banner that we greet 

Like thee, our dear old White and Blue. 
No youth its beauty e'er denies. 

Such thoughts no maid allows, 
For Blue is in her eyes. 
For Blue is in her bonnie eyes, 

And of white her thoughtful brow. 



f^S'- 



tliliiiimilliiii IIIIIIHIIIIIMIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUItlllUUmillUWHHIinHIIIIII Mill • IIIIIUIIIIIIIUItlimillUMIIIItUIMIHWI mimiimilHmiimillllliimiimil.nl, l IIIIiiiHIIHIiimiiiiiIiiihiiiiiiii; 



Humor 



SMILE 



MuDI-KN MODEST* 



SMILE everj time \<>u gel the chance; 
it i- ill- chance smile thai w ins, 

SMILE it you an- thin, langfa if you 
are fat, and if you are neither, ju-t firm. 

SMILE at hard luck: ill. fates m.i\ 
iliink % on like ii and quit. 

SMILE and never lei the bud -•■! on 
\<>iir troubles; set <>n them yourself. 

SMILE at tin- past ami you can *i i- ■ 1 1 

at tin- Inline-. 

SMILE while jron are awake an. I jrou 
will laugh in \.iiir sleep. 

SMILE when jron fail ami you will 
die laughing at your success. 

SMILE when you are mail, ami trj 
in frown when Mm an- happy. 

SMILE at a fifteen anil it will look 
like a dollar. 

SMILE if it kill- you ami you will die 
w itli a erin on your I ace. 

SMILE <'\i'r\ time \<>u think of it ami 
you will soon fret the habit. 

CONSOLED 

She la\ in hi- arm- ami snuggled her 
head against hi- neck. A rush of .'mo- 
tion surged through her. Tenderly h ■ 

caressed her, ami -In- closed her ye- in 
delight 

"Poor kitty. Did I -lip on your tail!" 

I 
Ex-S. A. T. C. — Expert to have a jolly 

time at home during the holidays? 

Ex-Buck Private — You tell 'em! Mj 
old lieutenant is clerking in a shoe 
-tore, ami I'm figuring on going in everv 
dav to trv on -hoe-. Sun Dial. 



Matron — I object to these one-piece 
bathing suits. 

Daughter — Oh, mother! I think I 
ought to wear something! 

I see miii ha\e a new girl. \\ ho i- 

she? 

i hat'- not a new one. That's ju-l 

tin- old one repainted. -Tiger. 

First Co-ed. Oh, dear. I have a date 
w ith George. 

See. .n. I Co-ed. — \\ hy all the joy -tuff'/ 
First — I just heard the coach say he 
wa- a fa-t man! — Froth. 

Skirl- may ri-e or -kill- may fall, hut 

men will rubber ever. — King Solomon. 

IN BI0L061 LAB. 

DeLilah — Merrill, you're a boy after 
11 1 > on n heart. 

Merrill C. — No. I'm not after vour 
heart. 

Jcry Dunn, at the librarian's desk — 
I'rol. Swenson gave ns a reference from 

K/ekiel. and I can't find it anywhere in 
the card index. Can you tell me where 

I can find the book? 

"'^ou ilont" -ee much of those old- 
time courtly hows.* 

"No?" 

"Now. my son's idea of saluting a 
lady is to shift his hat from th" hack of 
his head to the front." 



GET A Fl NAFF. 



The professor was engaged on a knot- 
ty problem when his study door wa- 
opeiied h\ a servant who announced: 

'"A little Stranger has arrived, sir." 

"Eh?" 

"Ifs a little bov." 

"Little hoy? Wei, ask him what he 
want-." — U. S. C. Wampus. 



"You Americans an- <piecr people," 
remarked the English visitor. 
"How's that. Lord BlesSUB?" 

"You -peak of a swindler as a confi- 
dence man." 

"Well?" 

"By Jove, sir, von can't put any confi- 
dence in the bally chap at all." 



ti Mllminiiitiimiiitnmiiiiiill Illlllutllliraillllll MHIIIII. Rllllll. tilliliiiilllHIII.IIIIt t uillllill t t I I tliliniiliiit mitliiii IIIIIIMUIIIIIlfi 



-JII111IIIII II111II 



lllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllttlllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllttllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Ittllll [Hi IIIIHIIIIIttl lllltlllilllllltllllllKllllllllllllllllllllllllllini^ 



iEJ 



£&itw$i pwrnrnwiWiim ©m 




9 A Houseful of 
ealthf ill Heat 

T TPSTAIRS, downstairs and in* my 
^ lady's chamber, — in living room, 
bathroom, bedroom or kitchen, — day 
or night — the Homer heated home is 
cheerfully, healthfully warm. 

The Homer is the original patented 
pipeless furnace, sending out a generous 
volume of warm air into the house 
through a single register. 

There are no cold corners in Homer 
heated houses. The warm air fills every 
nook and crevice, and drives cold air 
back to the basement. 

No pipes, no flues, no danger, no dirt, no expense 
to install. Delivered and ready for use in a day. 
Built in sizes to fit all homes. 



It Heats Less Price 

It Ventilates Less Fuel 
It Satisfies More Heat 

ti\ Have you looked over the 

C-\ neiu 1920 Furnace Book? If 

not, you can have a copy 

any time for the asking. 





initiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiitiiiiiiiiitiritiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiii nuiii i iniiimniiififniiii mil iiniiiiiitmiiiiiiui iiinuuiituHiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiitHiii iiiiiiiniiiiii nuui iiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiuitniiiiiiii 

'0 n so ¥ '0 IE IE r J s li x i ^ £! s<; JJ 



^ 



w 



-iimiiuiiimiiiiii 1 mm iiiiiini Iliiiint 



lie Jiilir r iiirr ■. iiiir iiiiirrc J r ■:■■■ 

188 



Mllll" 1 1 I" 1 " " 



minium immimiuimtiimimiim iimiiiHiittlliimiiimillliilillliii: 



iiiiiillllllllMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII i mi mi i mil nn n.i 1 1 m i i.u i mil nil 1 1 in 1 1 >i 1 1 mi 1 1 m 1 1 im ill n i in i mi i im i in in 

Music is a Necessity, not a Luxury 

Every Home should enjoy Good Music 

Own a Good Player: I pright Piano or a Phonograph 



I Player l'ium> u ill 
Hake home attractive 
To ) oung and olil. 

\\7llrTllr.R it's Id 

><ni i litTi i melodji a 
-I i rrini- imirrli li> Sousa, 
.in uplifting selection 

from I .rami I >|irra. nr tllr 

latest foi trot, it nuh •- 
Hull- difference, fur it"- 
eertain in make bome 

re i In ■■•rful. inure en- 
joyable, more ■ place 
miu'II like to be. 

TK >ou want to ril b> tin- 

fire anil reinini-i em r. 

or ilaiir*'. a player will 
■id Mm in spending a 
happj evening. 



"«" 



> , 







The Bond 

(/ row IRO frrneni'nn of 

Irchag Tchobanion) 

Sometimei an urn ol 

in. nM>r i< - i- unsealed 
Ju-i bj a simple tone, 
-ail or gay, 

r.iri ni the pari »iili ev* 
er\ quivering note 
From it- dark deep 
awakeni i" the ■!;•>. 
\nil w 1 live o'er again 
a Iiiiii; |ia-l life. 
Ju-I through a simple 
tune, -ail or gay. 



Cheney 




Phonograhs that are 

Real Musical Instruments 

\ phonograph brings to > i m the beat 
music thai ilie »nrlil hai to offer, You 
needn't journej t" Neti J <irk nr Pari- 

to bear fainou- arti-l-. 

In the comfort of your own home >mi 
can bear Caruso ring from the famoni 
opera "r dance to the merr\ -ir.iin- 
of a Jazi i Irchestra, 

Enjov Good Music while you pay 
for if. 
Yon can liny an Instrument on 
convenient terms. 



I it trola So. 10 

\\ itli lu riilv -I'ln I iiiii- 
I In- i- one of many models. 




Write today for descrip- 
tive literature and prices 



You May Select 

( :ltrne> 

\ irinr Phonograph 

\\ iinl-nr 

KmiTMiii I pright, 
Lindeman Player, or 
Bchr Grand Piano 

Musical instruments of all kiml-. 
\ iilor Phonograph supplies. 
Latest Victor Records ami RQC 
Player Rolls. 

Taylor Bros. Go. 

"The Hit* Department Store" 

Music Department 



II 
J 




'. Four ^ 

illiara and 
Mary 
One of many models. 
\\ iih iwrni> selections 



.IllllllimmilllllllllllimiimilllllllU 



mil Milium mil iiimiiMiiimHIiiimiiliiimilmjii ill 




llllliiillliil II iiiiii iiiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii.iiiiiimiiii nun II mi 



170 




171 



iiinmiiimmituii imiiiii niui.ni iniiinmiiii iiuiiiiiimniiiiiiuniiiiiiHi iihii iiiiiummiiiiim 



iQSi 




Entering the 
World Electrical 




J HE graduate of today enters a world 
electrical. 

Gathered from the distant waterfalls or 
generated by the steam turbine, electric 
power is transmitted to the busiest city 
or the smallest country place. 

Through the co-ordination of inventive 
genius with engineering and manufac- 
turing resources, the General Electric 
Company has fostered and developed to 
a high state of perfection these and 
numerous other applications. 
And so electricity, scarcely older than the Kradu- 
nte of today, appears in a practical, well developed 
service on every hand. 

Recognize ita power, study its applications to your 
life's work, and utilize it to the utmost for the 
benefit of oil mankind. 






SssS^? C@innip 




n © ra!®El ® e 1 c 



YJ^'vty Sales Offices in 
1111 y all large cities 



55-JH6I 



m 1 Illllll 1 u 1 1 11 1 mmiim, mull 1 illinium I run nm 1 mil I Illllllllllllllll r 

173 



ii minimi minimi 1 J J liinillliilliiiliH I iiiimiiiiiiuii 



J mill i limit minimum, mm inn i mi nil'- 




The Schwab Clothing Co. 

Is headquarters for Kuppenheimer Clothes, 
Schoble Hats, Just Right Shoes. 

Come in and see us before you buy. 



Mr. Student: 

Our service and consistent prices 
make it possible to extend your 
school privilege. 

Mr. Professor: 

You will not feel so extremely un- 
derpaid by trading where your 
money buys most. 

Poulton Cash 
Market 

Service First 
Phone No. 2 368 West Center St. 



iiimimiimmiiimiiiiiiimiiHiimiiimim miiimiiimimim 



.iijiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



£jr tit 11 m i mm in 1 1 mm mm mm t mmiiiimm mi 



'■'" "nit i nun in iiiiiiiiiin 

lllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



FALSE ECONOMY 

A man who was too economical to subscribe for his home paper sent his little boy to 
borrow the copy taken by a neighbor. In his haste the boy ran over a S4 stand of bees and 
in ten minutes looked like a warty summer squash. His father ran to his assistance and, 
failing to notice the barb wire fence, ran into that, cutting a hole in his anatomy and ruining 
a S10 pair of trousers. The old cow took advantage of the gap in the fence and got into the 
cornfield and killed herself eating green corn. Hearing the racket, the wife ran out, upset 
a four-gallon churn full of cream into a basket of little chickens, drowning the entire batch. 
In her haste she dropped a $35 set of false teeth. The baby, having been left alone, crawled 
through the spilled milk into the parlor, ruining a brand new $25 carpet. During the excite- 
ment the oldest daughter ran away with the hired man. the dog broke up eleven setting hens 
and the calves got out and chewed the tails of four fine shirts on the clothes line. — Sebree 
I Ky.) Banner. 



niiimniiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiii 



miiiiiiiiiiini urn 



iiMiiiimiuniiiiimiiiii 



i mm mill i i in 



iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii i miiiiiiimiiiiiii 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



iiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinr- 



W. H. Freshwater 

Household Hardware, Cutlery, Tools, Guns and Ammunition. 

Phone 123 



The Winchester Store 



iniiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiii 



iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiii 



inn iiiiiimii ■ 



" niiiinn.iiiiii. iii.iimiiiMiii.Hiiiiiiiiiiimii.imiiiimiimii.iiiiMiiimn lilt! 



£,*%&■ 







COMAL 



Square 

Deal 

to 
Every 
Patron 




Utah Timber & Coal Co. 



Pimm- 232 



3 II 1 1 II 1 1 II 1 1 HI II Ml till llll I III! Illl I ll.l It. 1 1 1... 1 1.11 1 Ml 1 1 llll I..I III 1 1...1 I.I I I.I.I till I.I.I 1.1 I 



MiMiiiMimiimiimimiiiMii. iii. MiiMii.iiiiMii iMiiiMimnmii.iiimii.nl .iiimiMiimiiMiimiiiiniiir 



_ I 1 1 111 I nil llll I IN HI N I || mi || i minimum nil Mil I I mil 1 1 III llll 1 1 III I llll I llii >i_ 



Provo Foundry & Machine Co. 

Foundry and Machine Work 

PROVO, UTAH 

Mine Cars, Steel Tanks, Structural Steel Work, Heavy Sheet Steel 

Work of all kinds. Gray Iron and Brass Castings, 

Stock Beams, Angles, Channels, Etc. 

Thos. F. Pierpont, Manager 



m i ■ i . . j i r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r ■ 1 1 1 m 4 1 1 ■ < 1 1 > i • l M 1 1 1 M ■ 1 1 1 ■ j 1 1 m 1 1 r ■ ■ ■ u ■ ■ 1 1 ■ ■ j 1 1 r < ■ ■ i c ■ ■ i ■ r r 1 1 ■ ■ c ■ ■ ■ r * ■ ■ ■ • j ■ ■ < r ■ ■ ■ ■ < ■ ■ < r h i . < i ' . ■ < i e ■ ■ m ■ ■ ■ 1 1 t m ■ ■ l ■ ■ u t t 

IT4 



h.MJMM It Itlllll.MHIMMl 



illinium: .in mini i MINIUM u urn iiiililni n i , mm I 11 u mm 1 1 1 1 HUM in. mi Ill II i llllllllll 1 1 1 1 1 till III i i II IHIIHtlllllllimiM- 

Expert Watch Makers and Engravers | 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, CUT-GLASS, SILVERWARE, ETC. 



•Tintiiiii 1111111111111111111111111111111 to mini id mini mi mill iiiiitiiiiiiiimtniiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimii mi m minium im mn mil hi mm urn.-; 

s£iminiu 1 1 1 1 hiii j 1 1 1 1 11 1 iiitiii 1 1 1 1 1 1 itimi 11 1 11 imnii iiuui iiui 1 1 iiiiuim i luiiiinui u in mill m iiniiit 1 1 1 1 1 tn tiiiuiui 1 1 nitii 1 1 1 in iiimi 1 1 imiiuti iniuiiiiiiiuutiuiuutniiiiittiiiiiniiii m tuiiiunitiii iiniuii timtti i uiiiiiiiuiiihihiii iih i muss 

MORE TRUTH THAN POETRY 

Sir: As I was dragging my emaciated body from the classroom to the flat, 

which by grace of God and the terms of the lease I call home, I evolved the 

following: If money is the root of all evil, a college professor should possess 

a character of such purity as to make Ivory soap's boasted percentage look like 

I a German mark. I 



-llllllllllllllllirillllllllllMtlllllllllltllllllllltlllllllllllltlllllllllllltlllllllllirilllllllllllltllllllllllKIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIItllllllllllirtl I I I I I I nun II IIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIH>- 

aiuniiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiii iiHiiciiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiNiHiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiMuimiimiiimniMiitiiiiiiMitiiHiuiiiiirHiniiititiiiniitiiiuiiiiHiiimis 



Sometime 

You or some of your friends will want to 
buy or sell FRUITS, PRODUCE, ALFALFA 
SEEDS, HONEY, HAY, or GRAIN. 
Remember that we are always in the mar- 
ket to buy and sell these goods. 

Ask for Our Prices 

The Wm. M. Roylance Company 

Established 1885 
PROVO, UTAH 



Tllllllllllllllllimilllllllimilllllllllltllllllllllimillllllllllllltinillllimit 1 if 11 1 1 1 m tf n n r h«l nt imi mt MitiM)* mi ( 7 

175 



w 








tnco w»wm*« 



1T0 



iii in in minium 11 i i mi in 1 1 milium in illllitJilliimilll mi muni mum i i in mini Illtlllllimillllllll mm 1 1 1 mm i\ 

Do you want to Know? 
Do you want to Do? 
Do you want to Be? 

The Brigham Young University is ready to help you in your aspira- | 

tions and ambitions. The big | 



Y 



stands for progressive scholarship and exalted ideals. 

COURSES ARE OFFERED— 

In Standard College Work 
In Business 
In Education 
In Mechanics 
In Music 

Preparatory for work in Professional Schools. 




•-•iiiittiiliiiiTitiiiiitiiiiiiii i tiiiiii i iiiiiiiii : iiiiiii . tiiiiiii i iiiiii 1 1 tiiiiti i tiinii 1 1 iiiiiiit i iiiiiii iiiiiiii 1 1 1 »iiii 1 1 1 tiiii 1 1 1 1 1 rii 1 1 1 1 1 tiii 1 1 1 1 iiii 1 1 1 1 riij 1 1 1 1 till 1 1 1 ttiiii 1 1 iiiiii 1 1 unlit i trim 1 1 1 milt r iiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



AMOriG THO SE PRESENT- 

(SNAPSHOTS QP THE V PROM") 



THt 
tfCrVTQD 





f^ 



THE GUY 
THAT DON'i 
KNOW WHO?! 
70 PUT 
HIS MITTS 



L 



closc-up or- 

THE TIGHT 
COLLAR — 




41 




THE 
TIGHT 
Pun PS' 



this Biro would 
FeEL *t none. 
AfiY where - 



1 



— 




The boy tm/"1t en jo-o 
LOOKIITG on ' — > 




SOLOELLE 

The Tone-Coloring 
Solo Player-Piano 

Hear it at this store. 



ROBINSON BROS. 
MUSIC CO. 

Born with the Century 

University Ave., 
Provo, Utah 

Also 
134-136 State Street, Salt Lake 







g rx z**— 



llllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllttlllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIiltllllllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllllllltlllllllllllUlttllllllllllllll 

THE SEVEN FAMOUS LIES 

| "Say, but you're a good dancer." 

| "I wish I could have dresses like that." 

"Congratulations, old timer." 
"Oh, no, you'll never be fat." 
"Your fraternity brothers are charm- 

1 mg." 

"Oh, a street car is all right for me." 
"I don't care if they never have flow- 

I ers." 



WHAT'S IN A NAME 



He — May I call you by your first 
ame ? 
She — By your last name, if you wish. 



LAMENT OF YE COLLEGE STUDE 

I done like to work on week-days. 
I don't like to work at night, 
I don't like to work when the sunshines, 
I don't like to work when it's dark, 
I don't like to work. 



TiMiiiiiiiiiiiUiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiii iiiiii i nun j 1 1 1 1 1 1 



i miiiiiniiii mini i minimi mm i m iniiimiiii I inimiiiiii 11111111111' 



I = 

iiiiiltiiiilllliiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiinmiiiimir 

sjiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiunniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiu 



"That Good Coal" 



KING 
PANTHER 
STANDARD 
BLACKHAWK 
CASTLE GATE 
CLEAR CREEK 

m 



Smoot and Spafford 

Phone 17 
502 So. University Ave., Provo, Utah 



B»talp Hank nf 
iforon 

Capital, $25,000.00 
Surplus, $20,000.00 

OFFICERS 

Win, H. Brereton President 

John Roundy Vice-President 

Alva Nelson Cashier 

Julian F. Greer Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Wm. H. Brereton R. W. Brereton 

John Roundy H. E. Hoaglanii 

E. E. Corfman John A. Randall 

N. C. Spalding 



/illliliiimiiiiliiiiiimiiiiiiiiumiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiinn iiiiiiiuiiiimiiiiiiuiiiMiiiiiniimiiiiiiiniimiiii.-. Hiiiiini IlllUtUllIUItl iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

179 



U"'l' HMUWMUM 




Are Your Ciothes Guaranteed? 

The fact thai clothes cost more dian 
ever before makes it all the more ini- 
portant to be sun' <>f \% hat thej are. 

^ <iu II find 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

here, and thai i> onrj one waj of Bay- 
bog thai \oull gel full value for your 
inonc\ when you buy. 

All-wool fabrics. h«--t tailoring, 

Bnuul styles, good lit: can \<>u a-k for 
more in clothes than that? 

We guarantee your satisfaction — or 
money hack. 



I 



tXJeocC/ 




.iiiilllllilHlllimimiiliimiimiimilliliiiiiiiiililll mi ill tiiiiimimmiiHiitiiiimiiimimiimimmiiniimiiiMlluniiiiiiimii iiiimiuiiitiilit minimum > mil it iniiiiliillllMirr 

fjlimiltlllllliillHiliiintiiilHIIIIIIiliiiiliii in i i i i iiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiimimimiitiiii'i ^niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiniiiiiiuiiMiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij 



For Your Service 

ijanant 
Catering (£0, 



Maiben Glass & 
Paint Co. 

Expert Picture Framing 

272 West Center Street 
PROVO, UTAH 



S imiiiiiimiiiini imnmnmiii imimiui |||| tniiu nun mi mm iimmiiiiiiT n i iniimti miimii nntiin immmiimiiiimni iimimniimi iinniiiii 



ymiiiini m.im i HI mill 



„„„,„ in,,, in, i n inn i i in ih'ii in inn ill >i nuns 



All BANYAN Negatives made by us are on 

file at our Studio, and 

Pictures or Enlargements may be bad now or at any time. 

Larson & Nygreen Studio 

Photographers 

Columbia Tbeatre Building, Provo, Utah 



=11 in mn 11 ii mi i» I' ' 'I i n ' i ' ' i " "' "' " "" "" 

„„„„, ,,,, „,,„ ,i mi, i in ii i I m ii in i i i "'I i 







■ 



Roy den House 

J. W. Dangerfield, Prop. 
Steam Heated Rooms, 50c, 75c 

Opposite Provo Armory 

47-65 N. First West, 

PROVO, UTAH 



5„ , mm „„ i n ni n ra mmmmnn I m mm mn mm mil inn; 

a „ , , „ m in .«.., , ,.,,i ii mil mim " " '» ' ' ' ""| 

HIGH FINANCE 1 

Prospective Son-in-law: — Please, sir, may I marry Gwendolyn? 
Father: Well, last month she spent $600 for a coat, $3000 for a diamond 
pin, S400 for— | 

P. S-I-L. — But, sir, I am a union carpenter — | 

Father — Take her, my son, she's yours. 

Co-Ed (home on a vacation) — Oh! Father! Why didn't you tell me you 
had those benches painted. Frank and I sat down on one and Frank got paint 
on his trousers. I 



| I,,, m, „ n mi i I I I II III! II III! I II I I II I Ill m " 

181 



THE BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 





STANDS FOR 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE 
SCHOLARSHIP 

INDUSTRY 
PATRIOTISM 



ujihuuiiiiuiuu i mi i miimimiii immimiiiirmmimmmiiniiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii uui u inn ftMuiiiiittMiiiiiinuMt jiiii ii-^ 



button (Eafe 



"A Good Place to Eat 



5? 



:--i Hint 1 1 1 r n it n 1 1 1 1 1 r i r I k 1 1 1 r I ri i r r r u r i r 1 1 1 r n I r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 c ■ ■ i I ti r • ■ 1 1 i i r ri ■ ■ ■ i j 1 1 1 1 L 1 1 • ■ i ■ 1 1 1 J nil n 1 1 -■ 

uiiinuttiininiiiiitiiiiiiiii iiiiiiniiiintiiiuii iiuuniiitiiniiiiiHUiiiii i luuitniiiiiiiiiiii mi nuiui naiiuiitiiuiiiuiiiiitiiiinii iitiini niiimiiii inuuniitiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiniiiuuuiininuiiiitiiiHiiiii uiniiiii iimiuiniiiiHiiiiinif ■■£ 



Sutton Tea and China Co. 

"Where the Women Trade" 

iittiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirtiiiiiiiiiii' 

50 North University Avenue 



- ii r i r ijj ii ji ij i u 1 1 it mini imii n inn nm mum mini i minimi miiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiimm mm iimimmiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii^ 



Il """ ""»• IIIMIIIIIIIIIIHmirilHtlllllUtMllllllllmiHItllllllllllHIMIItMllmilllllHIIMIIIIIIIHIII IIIIIUIIIHIIIIIIiillllUIIUIUIllHlulilUII UHMIIHIM H HIIIII Illllllllltlllllllll i 




Everything the Newest, Mosl Sty- 
li-li and Dependable in 

Ladies' Suits, Coats 
and Dresses 



Ladies' Shoes 

In all the leading st\les. Pumps. 
Oxfords, one and two-hole tics. <»1 
all the leading colors. Our line of 
DRY GOODS always complete. 

Call and See I s 

Fairer Bros. 

& Company 

29 to 33 University Avenue 




iriiiilillliiliiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiitiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiliilliiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiMiiin intuit iiimiifiiimimiifiiiiiniii IfiiiiiiimiimiiiiimimmiiiMiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiHIIIHimiimiimirHilIlT; 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ■■Hinnimimmii i mnn n • BnmuHnnmHM roammi nnnHnnami hu immiimi mimiiiiiimimimiimiimimiimimiiif 

Provo Meat & Packing Co. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries 

Economy is the paramount duty of every citizen. 
Satisfied customers means success. 



Illlllll II Illlllllllllll It Illlll Illllllllllllllllllllllllll Hill II Illlllllll Illl I ll Illimillllll mil I I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

j iiiiiiiiiiiiin i i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimni i nun t miimmnmiimimim mil i mimiimiimimimi m miimiiinimi 

SOCIAL UPLIFT 

First Worker — Did you sing at the prison today? 

Second Worker — Yes, hut I wasn't appreciated, for some reason. 

First Worker — What did you sing? 

Second Worker — How Can I Leave Thee." — Punch Bowl. 

OLD TIMER 

Can't tell me that young fellow' hasn't heen in a full dress before. 
How so? 

Whv. he even laughs without glancing down to see if his studs have 
popped off. 

milliiiiiiiiimmillmimilmimimiiiiiiimiimiimimiiiiiimiimimiimimiimiiiiiimiii iiimiimiimiiiiiimimiimiimiimimiimimiiimimiimimiiimmiiimi limn iilimimiimiimiimiimiiimimiiimiiimiimF 



n in nil II i u unit i ' iriiinr litem n 'i, i mi i itiiiniiiiiiiMiinniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiMiniiiiL- 



The Deseret INews 

Job Printers and Book Binders 

in 1 1 ii iiiiiiim iiiinin 1 1 iimiiiiiitiiiuui 1 1 iiiiiii mil iniiiiiniuiiii nuiimiiiiuiiiuiitiuiiiii itiiiiiiuitimiitiii innnmuniiniinnni 

SALT LAKE CITY - UTAH 



This issue of the Banyan is a 
sample of our work 



Tiiimiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiii 11 urn it mil i iiitni imiiiinim iimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiitin iiiiiiiiimn liu (S 

185 



i ii 1 1 mil mi 1 1 ill 1 1 ill 1 1 mi !>> inn 




Irvi 



"whim in i miimiii.m 111 iiiimiiiiiimm iiiitiiiifiimiiMiiiiiiiimiiiiiii minimum mmmmmmmmi immimiim 11 

HHH i' iiMitiiiiiiiiiii in u < imiiiiiiniiuiiiimiimimiiiiii MNIU mil iiimii iiimiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii 



Columbia Theatre 

The Finest Theatre in Utah 

Vaudeville, Road Shows and Feature 

Pictures 

The Best Orchestra in the State of I "tali 



vines 

EXCLUSIVELY A WOMAN'S STORK 

Dry Goods, Suits, Coats, Shoes 

Igenta 

Royal Society Art Goods 

I 



iiiiiiKiiiiiiiiimimmmiiiim iiiniiiiir 



III! I I Ill in I mi i m lining 



~ T ' ' ^ n ■ 1 1 ■ » i 4 ■ l ■ ■ 1 1 1 ■ ■ i ri ■ ■ 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ ■ t p ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ i ^ t p i ■ r r ■ ti t ■ i ■ 1 1 ■ j 1 1 m 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ■ n ■ 1 1 1 n t m i j I • i ■ 1 1 1 j i ■ i r 1 > 1 1 ■ i ^ i ■ i ■ t ^ i ■ i > « i ■ ■ 1 1 ■ ■ ■ > > ■ ■ 1 1 b ■ ■ ■ 1 1 . i ■ 1 1 ■ ■■ j r .><.■■ : r > ■ 1 1 . . i ■ 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 r • 1 1 1 1 r f ■ i ■ > 



■iimiHiitniiiiiiiii n im 1 1 mn 1 11111 1 1 1 



1 1 j in iii iim iii mi i i i in lit until mi ii ^ 



The Provo Tailoring Co. 

Old Clothes Changed to New 

Bring in your old clothes. We will repair them like new, at reasonable 
| prices. We call and deliver. Phone 475. | 

Alfred Mad sen. Prop. | 

;, hi iii iii m i mil i> n ii II "I i ' ' I"' '" I» " ""'"' 

y | , n ii i n i inn iii c; ij i ii ii i I"" i i II I" % 




Provo Bakery 

Eat More Bread 

Bread is the Ideal Food 



THE GIRL QUESTION 

I call on Ruth because she has a piano 
with lots of new music which I enjoy 
playing. 

I call on Helen because her father 
tells me such funny stories. 

I call on Henrietta because I am kept 
warm by the glow of her hearth. 

I call on Grace because I like to hear 
her mother and dad argue. 

I call on Mary because she always 
asks me to stay to dinner. 

I call on Anna because I like daven- 
ports. 

But I'm looking for the girl — she 
doesn't need to have a piano, a hearth, 
a davenport, or even a father or mother, 
as long as she plays papa to me and 
comforts me while I am longing for my 
old girl back home. 



7,111,111111, imiimmmmimi, 



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We don't want to hurry yju 

but we advise you to 
put on your hat and 
come 81 



you 
for 



e straight here if wsui^ 

make an) claim- v\» 

thriftiness. V^l 




The time to buy PAINT 1 

is now, and the place is this store. You'll appreciate that fact thoroughly as soon as | 

vou come and investigate. I 

PROVO PAINT & GLASS CO. | 

110 West Center Street, Provo, Utah \ 



Phone 53 



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A IT PAYS 

to ADVERTISE 




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FOR YOU AND YOUR FOLKS | 

In building or remodeling your home, arrange to give 
die electricity in your walls the proper outlets. 

Electricity is anxious to work for you — to cook, 
sew, clean, wash and iron for you. Provided with the 
proper outlets and appliances it will gladly come 
forth and take up its work. It will pay you to make 
provision for the reading lamp alongside your bed — 
for kind lights throughout your home — for washing 
machine, range, toaster, grill and curling iron — for 
all the particular electrical comforts which add to 
the happiness of your home. 

Consult our experts — they will save you money. 

UTAH POWER & LIGHT CO. | 

"Efficient Public Service" I 



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Hotel Roberts 

The Home of the Traveler 
Rooms $1.00 and up 



It's Different 

Starr 

Phonograph 

Make us prove it 



Also 



Gennett Records 



Rasmussen 
Music Co. 



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Superior Motor Co. 

Dealers in 

Hudson, Nash, Essex, Overland 

Automobiles 

Nash Trucks 

Including the famous Nash Quad 
REPAIRS. SUPPLIES. ACCESSORIES 



C. S. Pierpont, Mjrr. Phone 74 Provo, Utah 

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2Cntght ©mat $c i£>atrittna lank 

PROVO, UTAH 
Jesse Knight, President 

Capital, $300,000 Surplus, $30,000 

DIRECTORS 

Je»se Knifilii R. R. Irvine, Junior 

R. E. Allen W. I. ester Mangum 

J. Wm. Knight W. O. Creer 
Fred W. Taylor F. G. Warniek 
John C. Deal 



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from ifjotfl * **wte ®o- 

(SUCCESSORS TO OLSEN & HAFEN) 

Kodaks and Supplies 

Expert Kodak finishing for Amateurs 

Music 

Musical Instruments- All kinds of Music Supplies 




Mail Orders Solicited 




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THE DANCE 

Some dance, 

Some prance, 
While walking twaddle; 

Some slide, 

Some glide, 
Some merely waddle. 

A LEMON 

He tore at the scented letter, 
Blushed and then turned pale. 

"The female of the species 
Is more deadly in the mail." 

THEIR NOSE KNOWS 

Slick — How do you get so many girls? 

Slicker — Oh, I just sprinkle a little 

gasoline on my handkerchief. — Chap- 



.1. 



HIGHER EDUCATION 



A modern child is one who doesn't 
believe that it's so unless he's seen it 
I in the "movies." 

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When you want Flowers 
for any purpose just ask 
telephone operator for 

EIGHT-0 

Our slogan, "P|/ione 
Eight-O, where the Flowers 
Grow," has become the 
best known advertising 
phrase in the State. 

Our Flowers are equal to 
our slogan. 

Provo Green House 

Provo, Utah 



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j\ rx\ sis, 

Engravers, 

Elec€rcr£ypers. 



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■/ENGRANING CO. | 

WASATCH.3963. 50 E. 4™S°. S™. 

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One of the best Equipped 

Engraving Plants 

in the Country 







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Coal bought here is clean and honest all through, full of fire and heat. 
It's UNCLE JESSE KNIGHT'S famous 

Spring* Canyon Coal 

Knight Coal Company 



Provo's Exclusive Agents 



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Graphic Chart indicating healthy growth 

of this Bank 

1907 Totals, $170,000 1919 Totals, $940,000 

FIVE YEARS" GROWTH 

1915— $320,000 

1916 $420,000 

1917 $585,000 

1918 $775,000 

1919- $940,000 

CAPITAL $100,000 SURPLUS $6,000 
Members of the Federal Reserve System 

ifarmprH $c iHmljattta lank 

"A Friendly Bank to All" 
CENTER STREET AND THIRD WEST 



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103 



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M. H. Graham [ [ J. C. Penny Co. 



Printing Co. 

Largest equipped establishment 
south of Salt Lake City 



We Print Almost 
Everything 



Phone 285 South 1st West, Provo 



297 STORES 
A Nation-wide Institution 



Your J. C. Penney Store is one 
belonging to the largest ehain of 
Dry Goods Stores in tbe world. 

We offer five good reasons for 
the marvelous growth of this insti- 
tution : 

1. Reliable merchandise 

2. Fair prices. 

3. Prompt and courteous service. 

4. A large and complete stock 

5. By the treatment of others as 
we would be treated 



J. C. Penny Co. 

A Nation-wide Institution 
PROVO, UTAH 



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flmttfi (Eommrrrial & fairings 

lank 

Capital and Surplus $200,000.00 

REED SMOOT, President 

C. E. LOOSE, Vice-President 

J. T. FARRER, Cashier 

J. A. BUTTLE, Assistant Cashier 

F. G. RICHMOND, Assistant Cashier 



Four per cent paid on Savings 



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195 




100 



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You Can Always Live with Books Though 
Your School Days Have an End 

It is largely through the agency of Books that you have stored your mind with knowledge. 
No reason why your education should end with the end of your school career. Keep in touch 
with the hest authors through the summer vacation and during the years following your 
university training. 

We can cooperate with you to good advantage in an enterprise of this kind. We have 
all the hest Books new and old. Every branch of literature is covered by our extensive hook 
service. Shop in person at our stores or let us serve you by mail. All orders filled promptly. 
Write for book lists. 

Next to meeting the old familiar faces comes the joy of keeping in touch with the old 
familiar authors. 

Deseret Book Company 

44 EAST SOliTH TEMPLE, SALT LAKE 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHI 



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The Designing and Art Decoration of this book are the 
work of the Brigham Young University Art Department. 



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DAUGHTER'S COMEBACK 

Mother — Shame on you, Dorothy ! the 
idea of letting a hoy whom you've 
known only a week kiss you! Why, 
when I was your age a girl was con- 
sidered vulgar who would let a boy 
even hold her hand until he'd known 
her several months. 

Daughter — And, didn't you say once, 
mother, that it used to take two weeks 
to go from New York to Chicago? 

Nora — Why is a kiss like the three 
graces?" 

Ray — It's faith to a girl; hope to a 
young woman, and charity to an old 
maid. 

He who courts and goes away, 
May court again another day; 

But he who weds and courts girls still 
May go to court against his will. — Cox. 

Three women may a secret keep 
If, as it has been said, 
There's one of the lot has heard it not 
And the other two are dead. 



YOU CAN ALWAYS DEPEND 

on spending a pleasant evening at 

The Strand 
Theatre 

R. E. Sutton, Mgr. 

Highest Quality First Run 
Pictures Only 



Phone 79 
PROVO, UTAH 



1 mini 



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Your Store 

Students' Supply Association 

Guy H. Hurst Reed Holt 

Marcus Bean 

Were the faithful and efficient men who served yon during 1919-20. 
Supervision Hvraltl Ii. Clark. 



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