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Full text of "The banyan"

LIBRARY 
BHgham Yoiuig University 




378.05 

B22 

1921 



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19!10 - 19!21 

Being 
A VEAR- 
DOOK OFTtllz 
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OF DRIGMAM 
YOUIsfG UKIV- 
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Our President 

A thousand lives swayed by his will: 
A thousand more to bless him still: 

A thousand who have felt the thrill 
Inspiring purpose to fulfill. 

A moving power of thought and action; 

A dynamo of heart and brain 
From which live wires here remain. 
Tracing glowingly the name 

A priest and teacher's worthy fame. 
Our President. 



To our President 

George H. Brinihall 

^vc dedicate this 
1921 Banyan 



From President George H. Brimhall 

SUCCESS FAILURES 

1. Failures in good causes are but suspended successes. 

2. Morning defeats in reform are afternoon victories. 

3. Every strangled call of Freedom is a bugle blast of Liberty. 

4. Whenever a hero goes down heroism rises. 

5. Out of the ruins of peace plans will grow the Millennium. 

FAILURE SUCCESSES 

1. An unfair victory is a defeat for the winner. It eliminates 
him from the honor class. 

2. Unmerited credits are handicaps. They prevent one from 
ever reaching the safety zone. 

3. The gamblers winnings are always losses. They are bad- 
habit seed. 

4. Unearned wages are unfortunate acceptances. They stop 
work and spoil the worker. 

5. The achievements of trickery are gains with the minus 
sign before them. Their cost is self -respect. 

6. Pleasures purchased outside the law must always be paid 
for — many times with pain. 

7. To rise on the ruins of another is to sink into the pit of 
unfitness. 

8. The exaltation of unrighteous dominion is self-degreda- 
tion. Slave making is the most abject slavery. 

9. Investment in iniquity may bear small dividends of grati- 
fication, but they always carry with them the ruinous assessments 
of sorrow. 

10. Success in self-deception is failure in self-examination. 




PRESIDENT HEBER J. GRANT 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




UNCLE JESSE KNIGHT 




TRIBUTE TO JESSE KNIGHT 



Uncle Jesse 



Dear Fathcr-jrivnd: 

Today our Alma Muter mourns — 

Submissii'e is our prtryer: 
\f e stand in urate ul n veranrc hi 
Beside thy vacant chair. 
To Him ahoie 
H hose houtulless love. 
Fitted tliy great clmnipion lieart. 

If e otve our fullest meed 
The wide, leide vision oj thy soul 
If Us given for our need. 



The bcunly oj thy generous hand. 

Is but the smalttr part, 
Oj thy unstinted heritage. 

Of thy d'voltd heart; 

Through carllilicuiul strife 
If It: re sin is rife. 
Through all our onward, upward climlt 

Thy gnat uiisit : rriiig soul. 
Thy great humility of faith. 

Will help us to our goal. 



Thrr.ughout the coming. (hr.i:g;,ul, yiurs 

Thy memory will stay - 
Thy tcords of hope prophetic power — 

Through bright and dcrk'ning dcy. 
If ill ever live 
Neie hoi>es to give. 
If e build to thee no lofty spire. 

To herald far thy fame. 
Hut in the shrine of grateful hearts. 

Is tliy beloved name. 



-Aretta Yoitng. 




SUPT. ADAM S. BENNION 




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BANYAN c 




ALDOUS DIXON, Alumni President. 



B. Y. U. Alumni Association 




)S THERE as close and intimate a relationship between the Univer- 
sity and its graduates as is desirable? There are graduates who 
do not know that the school still is theirs and these same people 
feel that the school has forgotten that they even exist. How to 
keep interested in them and how to keep them interested in us 
is our problem. Already a start has been made in overcoming this undesirable 
condition by an attempt to get every alumnus into the habit of returning at 
least once each year. 

To director E. L. Roberts and the Alumni officers of 1919-1920 is due the 
credit for instituting the great home-coming of last spring which met with 
such a marvelous response from the members of the aliunni association. More 
than one thousand came back to the old school, and partook once more of its 
influence. At the appointed hour they seemed to spring up from everywhere. 
Nothing in years has done so much to uTiite the old "grads" and to inspire them 
to do something really worth while for our Alma Mater. 

The Association should see its way clear to publish an Alumni Quarterly 
that would contain a summary of the happenings at the University and also 
give current news concerning the alumni members. Such a publication would 
be a step further in continuing the splendid work that the home-coming began. 
The success of the University is directly proportionate to the distinction that 
its graduates achieve and to the extent to which these graduates actively sup- 
port the school. All personal affairs should be forgotten when Alumni Day 
oomes and all minds and hearts should be centered on the welfare of the institu- 
tion we love. 






^ BANYAN 1 




PRESIDENT GEORGE H. BRIMHALL 



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BANYAN i 



President Brimhall 



Alice Louise Reynolds 



President George H. Brimhall has been released and beromes President Emeritus. The 
highest honor that can be conferred upon a retiring president has been conferred upon him, 
and he joins the class, so far as the Brigham Young University is concerneil, of Charles W. 
Eliot of Harvard University. 

He has gone the whole round from janitor to President Emeritus. His life has spanned 
the life of the institution. 

He has brought to his work an amount of love and loyalty seldom seen. President Brim- 
hall left the superintendency of the Provo City Schools to teach in the Brigham Young Uni- 
versity for $20.00 per month. During the year 1909-10 he contributed one half of his salary 
for the erection of the Maeser Memorial. Yet his material sacrifices have been as nothing 
compared with his sacrifice of time and energy. Three years prior to becoming president the 
responsibility of the office fell to him, owing to President Cluffs absence in South America. 
Heavily loaded with class work, and in constant demand on the platfonii. his strong jihysique 
gave way. The doctors who examined and cared for him during bis illness gave no hope of 
recovery but the prayers of his friends prevailed. Wlien he returned to the institution as presi- 
dent he was so frail that he had to be assisted up the stairs to the rostrum. _ When we think 
of the vigor he has put into his work, and the spirit with which he lays it down we can but ex- 
claim, "See what God hath wrought." 

Material advancement has marked President Brimhall's administration as shown in the 
erection of five buildings, the increase in the library and in equipment in the laboratories, 
but above all else, in the acquisition of a campus of thirty-seven acres on Temple Hill. Yet 
material growth is of small significance when compared to that larger gift, the gift of self, which 
he has given so freely. The souls of a host of students from Canada to Mexico have been set 
on fire, and they have been led to seek for the higher life in all things because of their con- 
tact with President Brimhall. 

Dr. Karl G. Maeser passed from leadership of the Brigham Young University in his 64th 
year, Presi<Ient Brimhall will be nearly 69 when he retires from office. Or. Maeser presided 
over the institution for 15 years. President Cluff for 11. Subtract from President Cluffs 
term of office one year in the East and two in South America and ad<l them to President Brim- 
hall's term and you will discover that his term of office has covered the time of that of both 
of his predecessors. 

No one could be paiil a greater compliment than George H. Brimhall was paid when he 
came to the office of President. The .students who clamored for him on all occasion^, llie 
teachers who wrote pleading for his leadership had worked under him ami knew what his 
leadership meant. 

Never has President Brimhall failed to win the applause of the students by his morning 
talks. He has made the devotional exercises of the Brigham Young University an institution 
of great power. The announcement of his retirement floods the air with quotations from his 
morning addresses. 

He retires from the active duties of president beloved by the stutlents. revered by his 
faculty, respected of his fellow citizens, and with the benediction of the Board of Trustees and 
all Israel upon him. 




■BANYAN^ 



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Amos N. Merrill 




Professor Amos N. Merrill was appointed Dean of the Church Teachers College of the 
B. Y. U. in 1915 which position he held until 1920 when the college was divided into two 
schools; that of the School of Education, and the School of Arts and Sciences, Professor 
Merrill was made Dean of the School of Education. 

Professor Merrill received his early college training at the Utah Agricultural College from 
which institution he was graduated in 1896. The following year was spent in advanced study 
under Dr. Brewer and others at the same institution. 

The next thirty months were spent in missionary work in Europe. 

In the year 1902 he was employed as head of the Department of Manual Training at the 
Brigham Young College at Logan, in which position he served for four years. He was then 
made professor of Agriculture in the same school. 

Professor Merrill next studied at the University of Illinois from which he received a 
Master of Science degree in 1908. The following summer he continued with graduate work. 

Upon returning from the East he remained one year at the B. Y. College at Logan. In the 
fall of 1909 he was chosen head of the Department of Agriculture at the Brigham Young 
University. During a part of his time here. Professor Merrill has been Principal of the High 
School and a member of the Presidency. 



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BANYAN^ 




Dr. M. P. Henderson 



During the summer of 1920 the Brigham Young University was reorganized providing two 
Fchools: (a) a School of Education, and (b) a School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. M. P. Hender- 
son was made Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences. 

After taking his A. B. degree from the University of Utah in 1911, he went to the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin to study. During his residence there he was assistant in the department of 
Botany, and for a short time instructor in Cytology and Morphology. He was graduated from 
the University of Wisconsin with the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1914. 

The following year Dr. Henderson became Plant Pathologist for the Farmers and Fruit 
Growers League of the Rogue River Valley, Oregon, and Plant Pathologist to the southern 
Oregon Experiment station (a branch of the Oregon A. C.I. 

Previous to this time he spent three years in the German Mission, and while there be did 
gome work in the Berlitz School of Languages. 

Dr. Henderson has the distinction of having been elected a member of the Sigma Chi 
(National Research Fraternity of 1913). At present he is also a member of the following 
national scientific societies: American Association for the Advancement of Science, Botani- 
cal Society of .America, and the Phytopathological Society of .America. 

He came to the B. Y. U. in 1915 as head of the Department of Biology, which position 
he still holds. 

Dr. Henderson's experience and knowledge are sought in the business world. During the 
summer of 1920 he was appointed Plant Pathologist to the Verde Valley Protective Association 
of Arizona. 




BANYAN 3 



C. JENSEN 
Hislorv and Government 



T. E. PARDOE 

Dramatic Art and Public 

Speaking 



C. E. MAW 
Chemistry 



T. C. JONES 
Business and Commerce 



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■BANYAN 5 




PROFESSOR CANNON 
Agriculture 



ALICE L. REYONLDS 
English 



FLORENCE JEPPERSON 
Moeic 



■BANYAN^ 




BANYAN = 




LMREL MINCI^ 

P*lR»CW(, UTHM SAN 0»TC C<5. 

Physical tOucATiow 

MUSIC 

MtMOEB. ooAa.o or comtrou •i&-'i^.;--8 
DUfcJ, COUi-CjOt WOllCrt 'fo -'71 



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BANYAN^ 








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SOClAl 5CICNC6 
DRAMATIC MANAOCK 
DRAMATICS TO - lO 




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W<C PRSS CLASS 'I'J-'IO 

SIUOCNTQOCY outs. CANOlOATD "S'W 



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PUOIIC SPEAKING 
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OCiPEN , OTAM. 

Public spdaking 

vice pRur. ciAji 'i<)"lo 

DRAMATICS 19 "Jo 

fRCKiOAM COMMintt I'OB. SCOl/ICC I3uftc-4U '?o-2 (" 

UlCiPRDS. PROUO ORAM* ItAOUC 'l"i-'?o 

DANXAN STABe 'ZO-'ll 




TB,^^IK 6 NEWMAN 

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CEOact S B«LLIF 

HEXBURG , IDAHO 

HiyTORV .-d GOVEaNMCNT 

SOCIOLOGY ^nd ECONOMICS 

UJfUOiMTl 1019-10 

net PRDS. 5IUDCNT0ODY 1919-70 

PREriDtNT STUDENT OODY 1930 21 

A.cu-ocBaTE igzo-zi 

PRINCETON OtSaTE l<)20 11 




GRACE NIXON 
P50V0. UTAH 
DRAMATIC AtiT 

MUSIC *" 

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-INTC-RCOLLfOlATE OEBATC l^->0 70*:tl 
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CLASS Pi?ariDIiNT '18-'ig '|0-'l0 
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Seniors 

I UR college days are done and we stand ready to take up the prob- 
lems of that greatest of all universities. Life. Here we have played 
our parts to the best of our ability and have contributed with joy 
our bit in various ways for the growth of our school. Now the 
time has come for parting and we experience a strange confUct 
of emotions in our anticipation of the changes so soon to take place. Yearning 
for the associations that are to be no more and that now become a thousand times 
more dear, we struggle with eagerness to take up our work in the world of practi- 
cal things. With unbounded admiration and love, we bid adieu to our teachers 
whose untiring zeal and words of wisdom have inspired us to greater achieve- 
ments. To our 'classmates we bid God-speed, but not without some sadness. 
To those who come to fill our places we say, "You are our hope for a greater 
B. Y. U., observe her traditions, increase her victories, promote her growth in 
every legitimate way and above all perpetuate her spirit and become imbued 
with it." Our part here is finished and we go into Life with the Courage born 
of Knowledge and Skill gained in our routine of lesson-getting; the Enthusiasm 
of Youth perpetuated by the Zest and Determination with which we have gone 
into our competitions ; and our motto "Service to Our Fellowmen" a heritage of 
the spirit of Unity and Humility which characterizes the Faculty and student 
body of our Alma Mater. 




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JUNIOR PROM DECORATIONS 



The Junior Prom 




I HE ambition of every junior class is to give a prom that no one will 
forget. The ambition of every student is to be at the prom. Both 
of these aims were realized in the grand ball of the season Feb- 
ruary 18. 

On one of the very first evenings of spring came the Junior 
Prom with its flocks of bluebirds on the wing, and its bouquets of flowers, blue- 
birds for happiness and flowers for spring. A verdant arbor surrounded a 
pond where goldfish played in the water. Little caged canaries sang quaint 
melodies, all about the juniors and the ball. 

White leather programs announced the dances. Each number was appro- 
priately named after a member of the class. Our president, Roscoe Davis led 
the promenade in true junior fashion. The evening ended with the entracing 
strains of the Bluebird Waltz. 




HAROLD LUNDELL 



JESSE PIERCE 



DELAMAR DICKSON 



A. C. WEST 



ORA MARK.HAM 



ROSCOE DAVIS 




EDITH CHRISTENSEN 



MINNIE FINLEY 



FRANKLYN HARRIS 



GLADYS LOYND 



LYLE JONES 



PAUL ROBERTS 




RUTH PARTRIDGE 



WARD MOODY 



VESTA PIERCE 



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Soph Writeup 




V^ELL at the beginning of the year we had a head start 
on the rest of the school because of having such 
material to work with; a good-looking bunch of dis- 
greenified Freshmen. Then besides we had a ma- 
jority in the Board of Control. So we just went 
from good to best — Bunk took first in the cross country — "Stop 
Thief" took about a dozen of our members south — basketball 
took a gang of 'em north — lots of 'em chased around in the Pub- 
lic Service Bureau cars — they wrote for the White and Blue — 
some debated — a crew of 'em sang — then some more of 'em took 
to track and field — and also some entered politics, an' the cream 
of the jobs came to us. The rest of 'em just wiggled around into 
everything — got represented everywhere — disciplined the Fresh- 
ies, and just naturally made a great school have a greater school 
year. 



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First in Cross Country run and Oration and Story. 

Right there in athletics both Track and Field. 
Energetic in helping to bring the Y glory. 

Successful in having upper class rule turned to good. 
Happy in making school life more worth living. 

Marvelously apt in both voice and in pen. 
Enthusiastically boosting and always their giving 

I\ew ideas, thoughts. Youth's spirit again. 




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CLASS OFFICERS 



Third Years 



"By their good works shall ye know them.' 



HAT is why the Third Year Class is so well known through- 
out the school. 

The work they have accomplished is surely to be com- 
mended and you will agree that the social part of their 
training has by no means been neglected. 

Watch out for them next year! They ^vnill all be back at the begin- 
ning, with a determination to make good the Fourth Year work. 





THE CLASS 




CLASS OFFICERS 



Second Years 




' NE glance: Reaction — A fine looking group. It is the 
Second Years, of course. A promising bunch, too. And 
not only promising but performing. Do you remember the 
points we won in the interclass contests. They are so 
numerous it is impossible to count them. 

We don't believe in telling everything. This is just a hint. Our 
social activities have been such as to make the other classes "green with 
envy." Yes, and we're doing things in our classes too. You'll hear 
more from us next year, and the next, for our slogan is "On Through the 
High School. On Through the~ College!" 




THK CLASS 




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CLASS OFFICERS 



The First Years 




jURING the year 1920-1921 we, the First Years, have been an 
active class. Under the able leadership of our class officers 
we have had several successful class parties, noted for their 
originality in refreshments and games. 

Our class did its part on "Y" day. Every boy ans- 
wered the call to the "Y" and the girls helped loyally in the kitchen. 

Our greatest achievement this winter has been the publishing of 
the Tobacco Newspaper, "The University-les-Smoke." All of the work 
in it was done by First Year students and it was indeed a creditable 
undertaking. This paper worked up sentiment for the Anti-cigarette 
bill and portrayed the sentiments and ideals of the school. 

Fellow students we have felt the pulse of the school, have re- 
sponded to its influence. Watch us grow! 




THE CLASS 




DOUGLAS SWAN 
Business 



WILLIAM HARRISON 
Biology 




Never mind freshies you'll be at the wheel in four years. 



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Normals 




I MERICA is beginning to realize more and more the neces- 
sity of efficient schools where the youth of today may be 
prepared for the leaders of tomorrow. The great essential 
in making our schools more efficient is to have capable 
teachers. Teachers who understand the psychological 
make-up of the child ; who can present facts in a clear and logical man- 
ner; and who inspire the child to live a life of service. 

This year eighty of the State's most choice young people are tak- 
ing Normal Training at the B. Y. U. preparing themselves to become 
professional teachers. Such men as Dr. Brimhall, Superintendent Ben- 
nion, and Dr. Thomas have delivered a number of inspiring lectures, 
imbedding within the Normals the spirit of true teaching. 

This class will go forth imbued with the ideals of the "Y," doing 
their best to mold the citizens of tomorrow. 





B. Y. U. Women's Organization 

I HE B. Y. U. Women's organization has made itself a potent 
factor in the institution. Each year since its origin it has 
grown broader in its scope and influence. 

The officers for this year are: IVIrs. W. J. Snow, presi- 
dent: Mrs. J. M. Jensen and Mrs. Carl Eyring, vice presi- 
dents; Miss Belle Smith, secretary and treasurer; Mrs. C. H. Carroll, 
Mrs. George H. Brimhall and Mrs. B. F. Larsen, program committee. 
The following programs outlined in their year book suggest the work 
done at the regular meetings: "Redemption" by Tolstoi read by Mrs. 
Henderson; lecture by Dr. Carroll; Christmas program by the Training 
School; "Jerusalem and the Jews," lecture by Professor Wilford Booth; 
musical program directed by Miss Jepperson; "Reminescences of Dr. 
Maesar," by Mrs. Zina Y. Card; reading. "The Great Divide," by- 
Mrs. George Ballif ; lecture by Miss Reynolds. 

Some unique socials have been given. The wedding idea has mo- 
tivated several parties as six members of the association have entered 
matrimony during the year. Other interesting affairs were the appre- 
ciation partv in honor of President and Mrs. Keeler: the Hallowe'en 
social, the children's costume party, anil the literarv" character social. 
The organization has presented a series of high class dramatic 
entertainments to the public and has conducted a physical education 
class and a class in infant welfare for its members and friends. 






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Pleasant Grove 

If ,^2^^ ROB ABLY no school outside of Provo sends more of its 
graduate students to the B. Y. U. than does the Pleasant 
Grove High School. 

Pleasant Grove, with a population of only ahout three 
thousand inhabitants supplied forty students to the B. Y. 
U. during the past year. This was almost ten per cent of the college en- 
rollment. 

Six memhers of the faculty, J. L. Brown, John C. Swenson, Wilford 
Poulson, J. E. Hayes, Mrs. Gillispie, and Hermese Peterson are natives 
of Pleasant Grove. 

Three men on the basketball squad, H. Richards, R. Swenson, R. 
/Olpin, hailed from Pleasant Grove. Two members of the debating 
teams R. Olpin, and F. Newman were ex-students of the Pleasant Grove 
High School. 

A former Pleasant Grove student, Archie West, was president of 
the Missionary Society and the Art Club. 

The Pleasant Grove students are whole-heartedly behind all school 
activities. We hope another year will find all of the old students and 
many new ones back. 




Ogdenites 




jHIS year witnessed the or- 
ganization of the Ofjden 
Chib. Although not a hirge 
organization the members 
"have pledged themselves 
to work for its growth in succeeding 
years. Most of the members are Seniors, 
nevertheless, their enthusiasm for the 
"Y" should attract other Ogdenites in 
1921-22. To boost the "Y" throughout 
Northern Utah is and (will remain) 
their constant aim and program. 




ART SERVICE 



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^„„„„„>, iiiiimiiiii mill 1 1 "" II"""" "Ill""" "II "1"!^ 

I To those students who for various \ 

\ reasons could not get their picture | 
I into our year book ive dedicate this | 

I P«ge- I 



IIIMMUItHtHIHIIItttttlMIUi 



■iLJM. . L. m , M. .,. I1.I.L. M,.....L I..I..L*U— ^L.1. 





GRACE NIXON 

1st Vice President 



GEORGE S. BALLIF 
President 



VESTA PIERCE 
Secretary and Historian 




CARLYLE MAW 
Assistant Yell Master 



KARL V. KING 
Yell Master 




Board of Control 




HE board of control has been remarkably successful in 
solving some of the biggest problems in the history of 
the student body. At the beginning of the year there was 
a large debt, and in order to remedy the financial situation 
plans were made for the big barbecue which netted the 
student body over a thousand dollars. 

Other important questions requiring wise solution have been the 
relations between the high schocd and college, and the submerging of 
diverse elements in one united student body. The various departments 
and activities have been ably directed and their success has reflected ap- 
preciation of the efforts of the various officers. 

The aim of the board of control has been to foster a great univer- 
sity by initiating various movements to create greater enthusiasm and 
achievement. It is our wish that the vision of a greater B. Y. U. will 
be the guide of future student bodies. 





KARL V. KING 



Public Service Bureau 

IINCE "Service" is the recognized proof of education, the B. Y. U. 
early in the beginning of the school year conceived a plan of ef- 
fective public service. The Board of Control appointed Mr. Karl 
V. King and Miss Mary Woolley as supervisors and all students 
automatically became members of the new organization, known 
as The Public Service Bureau of the Brigham Young University. 

The purpose of the organization is to bring before the public, programs 
both instructive and entertaining. Entire programs or special numbers were 
sent wherever desired. 

The work of the Public Service Department this year has been effective 
and far-reaching. Its representatives have traversed nearly every part of 
the state, from Logan in the north to Richfield and Hinkley in the south. The 
programs have been received with enthusiastic appreciation everywhere. 

The Public Service Bureau has plans and expectations for a greater scope of 
activity in the future. 




WHITE AND BLUE STAFF 




The White and Blue Staff 



ERNEST L. WILKINSON, Editor 
VESTRA PIERCE, Associate Editor 
WILLIAM HARRISON, Exchanne Editor 

iVeits Editors 

A. RAY OLPIN 

EDITH CHRISTENSON 

WILLIAM J. SNOW, JR. 

VERA HINCKLEY 

Reporters 

KATIE SMITH 

MAUDE DIXON 

WAYNE MAYHEW, Business Manager 
BRIANT L. DECKER, Circulation Manager 




The White and Blue 

?S,°15^"^NDER the direction of Editor Ernest L. Wilkinson the White and 
Blue has undergone a complete metamorphosis. Emerging from 
the hybrid form of a news magazine it is now a real newspaper. 
Under the leadership of the staff the first literary-comic journal 
has also been produced. This magazine is to be a permanent pub- 
lication with a separate staff in the future. 

The paper has maintained a sane progressive policy. Its creed has been 
the platitude of Paul, "Faith without works is dead." Special attention has 
been devoted to the editorial page. The words of the late Richard W. Young- 
greater recognition "of the school that has developed the leaders who have 
made the Church what it is" has been one of its guiding beliefs. It has con- 
tinually boosted for needed improvements including a stage and a gymnasium. 
It has given its columns to urge more widespread and consistent advertising 
campaign for the school. Its first Article of Faith is "The B. Y. U. can be 
made a school of greater import to the Church and state. I pledge to help 
make it so." 

The paper has been edited acording to journalistic standards. Recognition 
has been accorded by most of the larger American Institutions. The exchange 
list includes about one hundred College Newspapers and it is one of the charter 
members of the Western Intercollegiate Press Association, organized during 
the year. 

The work has been accomplished by a capable staff. Organization has 
been the key to its success. The offices have been patterned after those of a 
real newspaper and weekly meetings have secured the results. 

The paper has contained the news. The standard for the giving of space 
to the different departments has been the activity displayed by those depart- 
ments. It has considered news to be nev^s. And finally it has followed the ad- 
monition of Horace Greeley and published enough of what the public wanted 
in order to get the rest across. 

May the editor and staffs of the future continue the good work. 




I 




I 



Banyan Staff 



FRED L. MARKHAM 
LA RELLE BUSHMAN MARY WOOLLEY 

HARRY BUTLER 
LEROY WHITEHEAD IRVIN J. SLACK 




We wish to thank the student body generally for their assistance in 
publishing the Banyan, and the following students specifically: 



Muriel Smart 
Virginia Christensen 
Karl King 
Floyd Walker 
LaVerne Page 

To Professor E. H. Eastmond of the Art Department is due a debt 
of gratitude for both personal and classroom aid in our book's publi- 
cation. The Staff. 



Wanda Boyack 
La Vern Bromley 
Melba Porter 
Homer Wakefield 
Vearl Manwell 




Walter Cottam 




i E WISH to here express our thuiiks to 
Walter Cottam. During the buihliiig of this 
book lie has proven a friend in need. \^ ith- 
out a staff position — working for nothing, 
expecting no compensation other than the 

thanks of the year book staff, he has appeared in all 

kinds of weather getting pictures for this volume. 

Through his faithful work he has won the respect and 

love of the 1921 Banyan Staff. 




^^mmii 




E. L. WILKINSON 



H. G. BARTER G. S. BALLIF 




The three man team appearing in Provo consisted of: McCormack, bottom center; 
Currey, upper extreme right; Denby, bottom extreme right. 




Princeton vs. B. Y. U. 

HE Priiicetoii-B. Y. U. debate was certainly a grand climax for a 
most successful year. On December 22, 1920, in the "Battle of 
Wits" between the East and the West, the B. Y. U. debating team 
was successful in defeating the Princeton University debating team. 
Harter, Wilkinson, and Ballif represented the "Y" against Denby, 
Currey and McCormack for Princeton. 

This debate was looked upon as the beginning of a new epoch in forensic 
activities for the B. Y. U. We found and proved our level. As President 
Brimhall so significantly stated. "We won two victories, first, in debating a 
school which is our level, and second, in defeating its representatives." 

As was requested by the New Jersey men the question debated was, "Re- 
solved, that the United States should pass a law prohibiting strikes in essential 
industries, constitutionality waived." The visitors defended the Affirmative and 
the local boys the N-egative. 

The debate was a real one and a thriller from beginning to end. It was 
only within the last few minutes that the local boys began to draw away from 
their opponents. And that last rebuttal from Ballif which clinched the argu- 
ment and brought shouts of joy from the audience. A few side lights on the 
debate reveal its intenseness. 

"It was the best debate I have ever heard." — Judge A. B. Morgan. 

"I have heard dozens of debates, I captained the Cornell debaters while 
attending that school. But I have never listened to a better debate." — Judge 
Harold Stephens. 

"I have never heard a more closely contested debate." — Chwf Justice E. E. 
Corfman. 

"We consider we lost to a superior team. We tried our best, but the Nega- 
tive answered us." — Alfred S. McCormack, Captain Princeton Team. 

"The Princeton-B. Y. U. debate was the most interesting debate it has been 
my pleasure to attend. It represented the supreme type of intellectual enjoy- 
ment." — Justice S. R. Thurman. 

"You have done Utah and the Church Schools a great honor."— Superin- 
tendent Adam S. Bennion. 




E. L. WILKINSON 



GRACE NIXON 



A. RAY OLPIiN 



B. Y. U. vs. U. of U. 




QUESTION: "Resolved that Utah should establish a Court 
of Industrial Relations similar to the Kansas plan." B. 
Y. U. Affirmative. Three fundamental propositions were 
sustained by our debators: (1) The complex and intricate 
relationship of modem indusrial life and the absolute inter- 
dependence of all sections and classes, make the strike, which is becom- 
ing more frequent and formidable, a menace so serious and threaten- 
ing that a change of policy is urgently demanded. ( 2 I The anglo Ameri- 
can and Democratic way of handling private warfare either between 
persons or gigantic corporations and labor unions is legislation. Law 
should guard the public in its relation to vital industries as against the 
dictatorial minority of labor, or cormorant corporations. ( 3 I The Kansas 
court has proved successful, arid is winning the approval of capital, 
labor, and the public. These propositions were admirably sustained 
by A. Ray Olpin, Grace Nixon, and Ernest L. Wilkinson, who main- 
tained the usual high standard of our school in debating — this in spite 
of the fact that the "U" won a Pyrrhic victory. Wilkinson proved 
himself one of the cleverest debators, both in main argument and re- 
buttal, that the B. Y. U. has ever produced; and his colleagues sup- 
ported him very effectively. All were clear, concise and effective. 
The negative teams won throughout the state. 




H. G. BARTER 



GLADYS LOYNU 



G. S. BALLIF 



B. Y. U. vs. U. A. C. 




I HE B. Y. U. met the U. A. C. in the triangle debating 
contest March 11, at Logan. The debate was held in 
the CkjUege chapel. 

The question debated was, "Resolved that Utah 
should establish an Industrial Relations court patterned 
after that of Kansas." The B. Y. U. upheld the negative and were 
represented by Gladys Loynds, E. H. Harter, and George S. Ballif. 
The affirmative contestants were LeRoy Funk, Euier>- Ranker, and 
Sidney Cornwall. 

The teams were well prepared showing evidence of careful re- 
search and organization. The clearness, consistent analysis, and ex- 
cellent deliven.- of the B. Y. U. debators won for them the decision 
of the judges. 

The judges were H. L. Mulliner, Attorney W. R. Skeen and C. 
H. Anderson. 

Our local team showed better organization, choice of argument 
and keener analysis of the problem. Their presentation and delivery 
nvarked them as debators of ability and practice. 

Miss Loynd introduced the negative side of the question in a 
clear concise, and sincere manner. Mr. Harter, the second nega- 
tive speaker, with added ferv'or, excellent delivery and absolute self 
control continued to convince the judges that the negative proposi- 
tion was the most practical. The last speaker, Mr. Ballif, in his usual 
clear, forceful, enthusiastic way helped complete the victor>' over 
the U. A. C. 




F. NEWMAN 



E. W. PARKINSON 




Nevada vs. B. Y. U. 

RANK NEWMAN and West Parkinson went to Reno this 
year to represent the B. Y. U. in the annual Nevada-B. Y. U. 
debate. 

The boys arrived at Reno, Thursday, and were met by 
the debating manager of the university. Friday they visited 
school and the most interestijig places in the famous city. So interest- 
ing, is the Riverside Hotel for divorces the boys lodged there. 

In the debate the boys did commendable work, but the Nevada 

team was given a unanimous decision. However this was the first de- 
bate out of ten that Nevada has won from the B. Y. 

Saturday they left for California, here they visited Los Angeles, 
San Francisco and Long Beach, before returning home. 




VESTA PIERCE 

President Grant Essay, College 



MELBA BOYLE 
President Grant Essay. H. S. 




LEGRANDE NOBLE HYRUM HARTER CARLYLE E. MAW 

Special Student Body Oration Extemporaneous Speaking Thanksgiving Oratory Contest 

Contest 




FRANCIS KIRKHAM 



Oration Contests 




■ ONTESTS in oration and declamation have been many and splendid. 
The Thanksgiving oration medal given by the student body 
-M was won by Carlyle Maw. 

The Puritan Tercentenary essay, December 21, medals by the 
faculty won by Leland Wentz and Paul Roberts. 

Washington Birthday oration, the medal given by Beckstead, won by Reed 
Morrill. 

Extemporaneous speaking contest won by E. H. Harter took the beautiful 
loving cup so generously given each year by Rulon Dixon alias Abe. 

The Heber Jex medal (at date of publication not complete) was won by 
Leland Wentz. 

Especial thanks is due Francis Kirkham for his generosity in the giving of 
debating medals. Each of the debaters participating in the Triangle debates 
receives a beautiful gold medal from his hand. 

The honors of the sort mentioned here, given by the big mien of the state 
are the ones to be appreciated by our school, they encourage competition and 
on the whole tend to make this department the favorite of the institution. 




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Dramatics and the B. Y. U. 

Probably one of the most energetic forces in centering interest in the B. Y. U. this year 
has come from the Dramatic Art Department with Professor T. E. Pardoe at the head. 

The Little Theater Movement which for a time has been spreading all over the country 
has exhibited itself here in the organization of a Drama Circle which is associated with the 
Drama League of America whose purpose is to develop an appreciation for what is highest and 
best in drama. The local circle has brought into its midst the best talent in the state to illustrate 
its work. 

The purpose of the Dramatic organization has been three-fold: (ll To make money to 
finance the movements the department is taking; | 2 I To advertise the spirit of the school by 
making many and new friends; (3.) To give the students the practical experience of appearing 
before strange audiences. 

The biggest aim of the Dramatic An Department has been to present to the public that 
which is best, be it in the form of reading, orations or drama. This idea has been carried out 
in the two first-class plays that have been successfully presented. 

"DISRAELI" 

"Disraeli." played by the faculty and alumni of the school was one of the biggest and most 
intellectual plays ever presented by the university. It was remarkably staged with beauti- 
ful lighting and costuming effects and was rendered before a large and appreciative audi- 
ence. The play is only typical of what the university expects to do to a larger extent next 
year. 

"STOP THIEF" 

"Stop Thief." presented by the college was a tremendous success. The play is a clean, 
wholesome three-act comedy of modern life. Its purpose was to furnish fun and amusement 
to its audience which it certainly lived up to. 

The cast made a tour of five southern countries; presenting the play in the leading 
towns, besides playing in the important cities in Utah county and making a trip as far north 
as Jordan. 

ONE OF THE EIGHT 

"One of the Eight." a rollicking comedy in three acts, was given by the fourth year 
class of the high school for the purpose of raising money to be contributed to the school. 
The play was cleverly staged and proved an immense success. 

ONE ACT PL.\YS 

I nder the directions of the Drama Circle a series of six one-act plays were presented. 
The plays were coached and staged by members of the circle, to large and responsive audi- 
ences. Besides furnishing excellent training to those producing them, these plays gave to 
the audiences a form of eilucational entertainment much in contrast to the cheap picture shows 
now in vogue. Such work is hoped to be engaged into a greater extent next year. 




Music 

HIS year the Music Department has regained its former standards. 
Under the able leadership of Florence Jepperson it has forged 
ahead into the limelight of success. Again the students of the "Y" 
have daily enjoyed the rendition of some of the Master's greatest 
works. 

This has been made possible by the organizing and perfecting of the school 
chorus, the ladies and male glee clubs, the orchestra and band; as well as solos, 
duets, etc., rendered by the members of the organization. 

Through the cooperation of these musical organizations a grand pilgrim 
concert was given in the tabernacle. The production was artistic, polished, af- 
fording the people of Provo an evening's entretainment of most commendable 
merit. 

The Ladies' Glee Club this year has won state wide recognition. Through 
its appearance at the teachers convention in Salt Lake during the Christmas 
holidays. The male glee has given several -concerts during the year which have 
proved to be big successes. 

The first opera ever staged by a woman in the history of the school was pro- 
duced May 5th. Never before have the people of Provo listened to a chorus of so- 
pranos that equalled the Pilgrim Maide in Priscilla. The opera was well cast, 
each member taking his part in a way that added to the success of the produc- 
tion. 

Special mention should be given to Professor Sauer and the concerts given 
by the school band as well as Professor Madson and the orchestra. Professor 
Nelson of the piano has also given some splendid recitals. It is because of the 
cooperation of the music teachers that the department has attained its present 
reputation. 





TOP: MALE GLEE 



BOTTOM: B. Y. U. BAND 




MANDOLIN-EUKELELE CLUB 




ORCHESTRA 



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Art 




I HE Art Department has done some things otlier than regular class 
work during the past school year. Among other things accom- 
plished the Art Service Club has done its part to radiate the art 
spirit and has been the source of ideas for various social functions, 
both in the school and the community. The Annual Art Carnival 
was a marked artistic success. The predomination of original creations in the 
way of beautiful costumes was an unusual feature of success. 

The organization of the Provo and Utah County Art Association was ac- 
complished through the initiative of this department and a very successful 
exhibition of paintings was held in the Art Gallery. 

The scenery painting, costume designing and stage settings of the Pilgrim 
Tercentenary opera "Priscilla" presented by the Music Department, was done 
in the Department. 

The educative influence of the Art Department has been felt throughout 
the whole Church in the form of art pageantry. Ideas and outlines have been 
sent out and reports of successful productions have been received in return. 
The pageants written have been generally of a religious nature and have there- 
fore reflected the spirit and mission of the school. 

Much enthusiasm has been shown by the regular students who have de- 
veloped well up to the standard of the courses. Creative expression which is 
the aim of art has been the watch word. 






I HE year 1920 will be long remembered as the year in which foot- 
ball came to the B. Y. to stay. With the spirit and fight of the 
fellows and tlie wonderful support of the student body the team 
was able to bring home the Southern division championship and 
be in the running for the state honors. 

On October 1st, football received a formal introduction in the school. Mayor 
Dixon kicked off the first ball and the band played the College Song. Then 
King Football stepped on the field and the battle was on. This game was 
between the High School and the College. Both teams showed power and 
fought nick and tuck. Too much credit can not be given the boys who took 
part in that game. It was the game which helped more than anything to estab- 
lish the grand old sport in the school. The college won 13 to 7, but the victory 
was won in the hearts of the people of Provo. 

The following week the squad was chosen and practice began in earnest. At 
the end of two weeks of hard practice the B. Y. High School took the Spring- 
ville team into camp with a score of 47 to 0. The visitors were out-classed in 
every respect. 

October 29th spelt defeat for Tooele, old time rivals of the B. Y. The 
gridders of the "Y" humbled them 46 to 6. The lone score being made through 
a misunderstanding of the rules. ,. . j 

The "U" Frosh defeated the "Y" boys in a gruelling contest 33 to 13. In 
figures the game was lost, but in fight, spirit and experience the game was a 
great victory for the school. 

The Tintic fellows came down a week later with fire in their eyes to hand 
the B. Y. a defeat in the same manner as they had the year before. But the stal- 
wart B. Y. youngsters with nashing teeth met and defeated Tintic by a lanilslide 
8Core (76 to Ol, thus completly restoring the honor lost the year before. 

Then the boys took a long jant into the north to contest for the right to 
meet East High for the State Championship. They returned with honors for 
the B. Y. in the form of good, clean fighting although the score showed 28 to 
7 in Logan's favor. 

Mt. Pleasant also met defeat on the 9th, 27 to 0. 




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TINTIC GAME 




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(TSg ^ ROSPECTS at the beginning of the season for a winning basket 
^^ . ball team this year were never brighter. With five old "Y" men 
back in the field for a nucleus for the new squad, basket ball set- 
^^j) tied down in real earnest shortly after the football season ended. 

<& The first game of the season listed with the Utah Athletic 

Association caused much interest. In the U. A. A.'s lineup were many stars of 
the first calibre, some of whom played on the World's Championship team of 
1916. Two new faces were in the B. Y. U. lineup. Bill Snow and Russell Swenson, 
both Freshmen. "Bunk" Brown, Ken Weith and Harry Richards completed the 
quintet. After being left in the rear during the first half of the game the "Y" 
staged a real come back in the second and won out 33 to 29. 

This same team was pitted against the High School and succeeded in piling 
up a 56 to 23 score. Several pre-season games were played with the local Ameri- 
can Legion team, and each game was won by the B. Y. 

The first league game was played in the B. Y. U. gym with the University 
of Utah, before the largest crowd that ever flooded the local gymnasium for 
many years. It was a game of heart throbs and the excitement was intense. The 
first half found the "Y" on the short end of a 9 to 6 score. The second half was 
faster and toward the end the "Y" broke through the U's heretofore impene- 
trable defense and staged one of the most spectacular rallies ever recorded. The 
final score read "Y" 22, "U" 16. 

The second league game played at Logan was won by the Aggies by a two- 
point margin, after the "Y" had apparently tucked the game away by a large 
score. An extra five mintes was reijuired to play resulting in a 45 to 43 score. 

The second game with the Aggies was practically the same as the first as to 
score, but the "Y" finally won out 30 to 28. 

This left the B. Y. U. tied with the U. of V. for the State Title, and on the 
5th of March accompanied by a special train of rooters the "Y" team journeyed 
to Salt Lake and the tie was played off in the "Li" Gym on the Hill. Although 
fighting hard at all times the "Y" was unable to hold the Crimson Quintet, so the 
"U" walked off with the game and the State Championship. 




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FIRST TEAM 




Name 




Position 


Years Experience 


SNOW 




Center 


1st 


SWENSON 




Forward 


1st 


WEIGHT 




Guard 


2nd 


BROWN 




Forward 


2nd 


RICHARDS 




Guard 


3rd 




SECOND 


TEAM 




OLPIN 




Forward 


Ut 


BROWN 




(ruaril 


Ist 


McINTOSH 




Guaril 


2nd 


BENTLEY 




Forward 


1st 


GARDNER 




Forward 


1st 



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Percentage 



Y Record 



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Won Lost Percentage 

U. of U. 3 1 .7550 

B. Y. U. 2 2 ^00 

A. C. U. 13 .250 



PRACTICE GAMES 

"Y" 33 - A. C. U. 29 

"Y" 56 Y. H. S. 23 

"Y" 30 Alumni 26 

"Y" 36 American Legion 30 

LEAGUE GAMES 

"Y" 22 U. of U. 16 

"Y" 43 A. C. U. 45 

"Y" 30 A. C. U. 28 

"Y" 18 U. of U. 28 




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Champions of the Alpine Division 

The Basket Ball team of this year is perhaps the fastest ever produced by 
the B. Y. U. High School. These men under the Coaching of Physical Director, 
E. L. Roberts, met and defeated each of the other three teams of this division by 
overwhelming scores. They won the Alpine division championship and entered 
the State Tournament, where they defeated Dixie Normal College; but due to 
illness lost to the Davis County High. 

Their record speaks for them, and is as follows. 

DIVISION SCHEDULE 

Y. H. S. 40 American Fork 23 

Y. H. S. 27 ...Lehi 16 

Y. H. S. 27 Pleasant Grove 21 

Y. H. S. 42 - Pleasant Grove 17 

Y. H. S. 32 Lehi 23 

Y. H. S. 29 - American Fork 26 

STATE TOURNAMENT 

Y. H. S 53 Dixie Normal 23 

Y. H. S. 20 .- - -Davis High 27 

The team was composed of: 

Truman (Hindoo I Partridge, Captain and Center. 

EUwood (Rip I Jackson, Left Guard. 

Mark (Doc) Pyne, Left Forward. 

Fred ( Buck ) Dixon, Right Forward. 

Dan (Skeetl Keeler, Right Guard. 

Ivan Young, Right Guard. 

Most of these men are going ta attend College at the "Y" next year so we 
have well founded hopes of the College Championship of the State in 1921-22. 

The First Team was very ably backed by a strong and second string com- 
posed of. 

Kimball Mcintosh Victor Hatch 

Rulon Nuttal Hunter Manson 

Ivan Youn"' Bernardo Bowman 

This team played all through the season with the other second teams of this 
division and come out victorious in every game, giving another Division champ- 
ionship to the "Y." 





HERE are eighteen star men on the B. Y. U. Track Team 
this year, an increase of 100 per cent over last year. Every- 
man lias been out for practice for several weeks. Manv are 
showing up well and are expected to take places in the meet 
with the U. of U. and the State Meet. 

Kenneth Weight, the athletic manager is one of our best men. He 
is expected to take several first places, which will help put the "Y" 
across successful this year. Bunk Brown, our star miler and half niiler, 
is out this year to take first in both events. In the dual meet with the 
Aggies, he surprised every oue by taking both the mils and half from 
Chas. Hart, the A. C. distance man, and one of much repute in the 
state. On the sprints we have the Whitehead brothers from Dixie, 
who have been sliowing considerable amount of speed. They have done 
justice, and will do more to the 100, 200 and 440 yard dashes. Other 
men on the sprints are Bushman, F. Markhani, Clove, Moody, Davis, 
and Brimhall. For the hurdles H. Brown and A. Markhani have been 
showing exceptional form. On the weights Mcintosh, Reeves and Mur- 
dock are stellar performers. Beside Weight, on the jumps we have 
Fergeson, Robertson and Seth Davis, 
to school next year. Their experience coupled with ability promises 

Most of these men are Sophomores and Freshmen, and will be back 
not only a strong finish for this year, but prospects for a wonderful 
year in 21-22. 

The team made a good showing in the State Meet at Logan, con- 
sidering the strength of the other two camps. The final score stood "\ " 
15, L. Brown, height. H. Brown and Vi akcfield scoring. 




WILKINSON 

BUSHMAN 

DAVIS 

WEIGHT 

MURDOCK 

REEVES 

TWITCHELL 

BROWN, H 

WAKEFIELD 



McINTOSH 
MARKHAM, F. 
MARKHAM, A. 
WHITEHEAD, R. 
MANWELL 
BROWN, L. 
ROBERTSON 
WHITEHEAD, L. 
FERGESON 




WEIGHT 


YOUNG 


McINTOSH 


PARTRIDGE 


WHITEHEAD 


DIXON 


CHAMBERLAIN 


HUGHES 


WILKINSON 






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I HAT tennis is to become one of our strongest athletic activ- 
ities is evidenced bv the fact, that a sudden active interest 
has developed along that line. 

Our tennis team composed of Snow, Holt and Gardner 
has made a very creditable showing this year and is to be 
complimented. The progress as a team has been somewhat handicapped 
because of the fact that at the critical time in their training they were 
left without a tennis coach. But oiu- prospects for the remainder of the 
season and for next year are exceedingly bright, as this formidable 
combination will undoubtedly work together again and with the united 
experience gained so far this year will place the "Y" on top where she 
was of yore. 

Reports from the Girls' Tennis Club indicate that it won't be long 
before they will be ready for competition with other schools. So in 
the future we look to see our school represented by a girls' team as well 
as a boys. 

Continual improvements have been made until now we can boast 
of a set of tennis courts that are hard to excel anywhere. So with 
these advantages there is no reason why our Tennis department can- 
not become the strongest in the West. 




5i 



I- 1- "fc fc 




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INVITATION TRACK MEET 



Calendar 



SEPTEMBER 

"Still stands the scltoolhouse on the hill, 

A ragged beggar sunning. 
Around it still the uild grapes twine. 

And blackberry I'ines are running." 

MONDAY 13. 

Registration. 
File your name. 
Shake folks' hands. 

TUESDAY 14. 
The same. 

WEDNESDAY 15. 
The same. 

THURSDAY 16. 

School begins! ! ! 

FRIDAY 17. 

Papa and Mama Grace and George, 
Welcome us all, small and large. 
Evening comes we dance with vim. 
In the dear old Ladies' Gym. 

SATURDAY 18. 
Our Landladies are all so dear, 
We do our "first washings" without fear. 

SUNDAY 19. 

We go to Priesthood at the Manavo, 

Sunday School at Pioneer, 

Evening at the Bonneville, 

(The other wards we'll see — next year!) 

MONDAY 20. 

Book Store crowded all day long. 
No longer books "sell for a song." 

TUESDAY 21. 
Social hour today. 
Everybody gay. 

WEDNESDAY 22. 
Teachers faces new. 
Seen in the White and Blue. 
Drama Circle organized 
"Algie's" president much prized. 

THURSDAY 23. 
Pea Greens talk 
And Sea Greens mock. 

FRIDAY 24. 

Class elections held today. 
Freshies Suffrage licked, I'll say. 

SATURDAY 25. 
To the movies we will go — 



SUNDAY 26. 

Sleep till noon — (a good motto). 

MONDAY 27. 

What's your weight? "You need more rations.' 
Physical examinations. 

TUESDAY 28. 

More examinations, their such bores. 

We learn we're not all perfect thirty-fours. 

WEDNESDAY 29. 
"Buy your class card now!" 
If you don't well — "wow!" 

THURSDAY 30. 

■"(■cial 1 1 ur, lots of fun — 
Wilting for next month to come. 

OCTOBER 

The shadow of the balister. 

The shadow of the lamp. 
The shadow of the child that goes to bed. 

All the wicked shadows, going tramp, tramp, 
tramp. 

And the black night overhead. 

FRIDAY 1. 

That mulish, foolish game football begins. 
The College from the High School victory 
wins. 

SATURDAY 2. 
Third Y'ears think they're mighty smart, 
Have a party on the start. 

SUNDAY 3. 

Jes' plain Sunday! 

MONDAY 4. 

We welcome, Dan and West and Jerry dear, 
And shout "Hail, hail! the gang's all here." 

TUE.SDAY 5. 

College girls hold a reception row. 
Brother Boyle tells us to "Do it now." 

WEDNESDAY 6. 

"Little Tom Tinker, got burned with a clinker." 

THURSDAY 7 

Somebody sang in devotional. 
Forgot who it was Tra-la-la. 

FRIDAY 8. 

Handsome foot ball heroes sitting on the stand, 
Girls tell their family secrets, and they blush — • 
my land ! 

SATURDAY 9. 

B. Y. High School fellows, visit down in San 

Pete. 
Bring us back a victoiy from those "carrots we 

eat." 



^ 




FOOTBALL TEAM GOES TO LOGAN 



SUNDAY 10. 

Students all return from fair. 
Balloons and Kewpie dolls they bear. 

MONDAY 11. 

Freshmen set, 
Acquainted get. 

TUESDAY 12. 

"Columbus" day we celebrate, 

At least we know somebody great. 

WEDNESDAY 13. 

Aspirant Brickers are quite bad, 
Wear goggles, ties and collars sad. 
Winding alarm clocks becomes a fad. 

THURSDAY 14. 
Ditto. 



TUESDAY 19. 

"Announced by all the trumpets of the skies, 
arrives the snow." 
WEDNESDAY 20. 
Tin watches of fair damsels outshine the brick- 
er's show. 

THURSDAY 21. 

"Nothing but the truth" is played, 
.\nd a splendid hit it made. 

FRIDAY 22. 

jVfany important events take place. 

1. Honors given to last year's men. 

2. Seniors and Juniors a party gave. 

3. N. L. U. entertain. Amen. 

SATURDAY 23. 
"The selected fifty" forget cares and then 
They frolic in the Ladies' Gym. 




FRIDAY 15. 
Founder's day, _ 

The College song we sing. 
Addresses delivered by W. H. King. 

SATURDAY 16. 
First number of the Lyceum, 
Montague musicians, not so "bum." 

SUNDAY 17. 
"The morning after the night before." 
Each bricker heavily doth snore. 



MONDAY 18. 

"Oh would my twins were old and could 

attend the B. Y. U." 
Is Elsie Talmage Brandley's wish, and we 

do wish so too. 



SUNDAY 24. 



MONDAY 25. 
Chemical and Spanish clubs convene. 
Colonel Whittlesby "Vents his Spleen." 

TUESDAY 26. 
Nothing doing. 

WEDNESDAY 27. 
Ditto. 

THURSDAY 28. 

Every girl and woman wearing yellow tags. 
Reception for Miss Reynolds, suffrage never 



FRIDAY 29. 



BANYAN J 




FOUNDER-S DAY PARADE 



BANYAN^ 



SATURDAY 30. 

Come Freshmen, Come Sophomores, 
Everybody come, a grinning. 
Crooking ghostly squad, 
Will meet you on the run 

SUNDAY 31. 

Numerous folks in fords noisy. 

Seen scouting round as early as 3 a. m. 

NOVEMBER. 
"Oh it sets my heart a clicking 

Like the ticking of a clock. 
When the frost is on the Pumpkin, 

And the fodder's in the shock. 

MONDAY 1. 

Everybody wants everybody to vote for 

everybody on his ticket. 
The air is blue with politics. 

Parades and meetings we all see. 
Captain Mabey speaks at Columbia, 

M. T. Thomas at armory. 



SATURDAY 6. 

Third and Fourth Years play. 
Dress as kids today. 

SUNDAY 7. 
Rain and mud a winner. 
It gives a dinner. 

MONDAY 8. 

Resolved: Swearing is a bad habit. 

It is bad psychologically, socialogically 
theologically. 
TUESDAY 9. 



and 



WEDNESDAY 10. 



THURSDAY 11. 
Our brave and bold ex-service men, 
Revive armistice day again. 




TUESDAY 2. 

Big time at theology hour. 
Big time at various hen coops at night. 
Big time at school, 

Big time at cider mill and center street. 
But biggest time of all in town when land 
slides Republican. » 

WEDNESDAY 3. 

To and fro the boys are running. 

We guess the "cross country" run is coining. 

THURSDAY 4. 

Debating work begins. (Don't shirk.) 
But just get in and work, work, work. 

FRIDAY 5. 

Hit 'em high, hit 'em low. Come on B. Y. 

let's go. 

Our High School team has beat the "U" 

(Frosh) 
That's more than other teams can do. 



FRIDAY 12. 

Wall flowers are most exterminated. 
Everybody dances — much elated. 

SATURDAY 13. 

Lela Eccles Brirahall's smiling rays. 
Greets us in two splendid one act plays. 

SUNDAY 14. 

Dead 
MONDAY 15. 

As 

TUESDAY 16. 
Lead. 

WEDNESDAY 17. 

Resolved: That women (suffrage again) 
Have done as much for the world as men. 
A divided decision 
Was given. 



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= BANYAN- 




FOUNDERS DAY TUGOF-WAR 



^ BANYAN ! 



THURSDAY 18. 



FRIDAY 19. 

Big day. I'll say. 

1. Adam Bennion talks to us. 

2. Our Logan bound boys create a fuss. 

3. We march and pray for Victory. 

4. The faculty plays "Disraeli." 

SATURDAY 20. 
Our H. S. team ne'er made a blunder. 
But the Logan fellow "got their number.' 



SUNDAY 2L 

MONDAY 22. 

TUESDAY 23. 

Big crowd enhance 
Nature's dance. 



SUNDAY 28. 
Feeling fine. 

MONDAY 29. 
School again. 

TUESDAY 30. 
Miss Cutler lectures to chemical society. 

DECEMBER. 

"Jingle, jingle, hear the bells 

Snow is on the ground. 
The horses prance the sleigh bells ring. 

Hark! the merry sound." 

WEDNESDAY 1. 
Christmas in the air, 
Sleighbells everywhere. 

THURSDAY 2. 

Mountain Ash Glee Club entertain. 




WEDNESDAY 24. 

1. Oratorical contest and 

2. Cross Country Run. 

3. Bunk Brown wins first place. 

4. But Freshies have the fun. 

5. Eating that big turkey wings and Jjones 
and all. 

6. And the big day ends with a Thanksgiving 
Ball. 

THURSDAY 25. 

Turkey pies and fruit cake, 

Everything that's fine 

Makes a fine Thanksgiving 

Looks like forty-nine! 

FRIDAY 26. 

"Doctor! Doctor! Don't be late 
Willies' got the stomach ache!" 

SATURDAY 27. 
Convalescent. 



FRIDAY 3. 

Freshies and Sophs have hard time party. 
Oh, what tattered mortals they. 

More work for the Relief Society, 
It's so nice — 'twas only play. 

SATURDAY 4. 

We believe there's something in stars 
For we hear "A message from Mars." 

SUNDAY 5. 

Sunday, Sunday all day long 
Nothing to avoid, but wrong. 

MONDAY 6. 

National education week, 
Normals organize. 

TUESDAY 7. 

Not wealth but a martyrs fame, 
Is the teacher's prize. 




TUESDAY 14. 

If practicing dancing were not such a men- 
ace, 

The girls of the dancing class would shame 
"Ruth St. Denis." 

WEDNESDAY 15. 

Fellows training every night. 
To give Tooele a hard fight. 

THURSDAY 16. 

Sweet voices warble from the stand. 
Music department gives concert grand. 

FRIDAY 17. 
"Stop Thief!" hold your jewelry tight, 
The Dramatic Club is here, tonight. 

SATURDAY 18. 

Our college team is on the wing. 
And beats the American Legion. 
A Christmas Pageant is given. 



BANYAN 5 




WIRELESS POLE RAISED 



: BANYAN ! 



FRIDAY 14. 

Mrs. Bertha Eccles Wright's 
Bible reading. We're all right. 

SATURDAY 15. 

As early as the dawn. 

SUNDAY 16. 

Some students take a hike. 
They go to Maple Flat, 
And do just what they like. 

MONDAY 17. 

"Stop Thief," leaves for south today. 
To bring us lots of '"Kale," they say. 

TUESDAY 18. 

Rain, rain, go away. 

B. Y. students want to play. 

SATURDAY 8. 

Wedding reception for Algie and George. WEDNESDAY 19. 

Priscilla and Alden running at large Our highly honored school is blest. 

We sleep on daintiest wedding cake. By a visit from Hon. E. A. Guest. 

And dream of the "match," we're going to make, 



MONDAY 3. 

School begins again so nice. 
We see, "Bird of Paradise." 

TUESDAY 4. 

Lessons, lessons, by the score. 
Teachers think there's nothing more. 

WEDNESDAY 5. 

Wonderful, beautiful, sunshine gay. 
Sky's as clear as a day in May. 

THURSDAY 6. 

Winter again, a bore 

Seems we're fooled some more. 

FRIDAY 7. 

Ray Olpin can surely folks please 
He tells us of the Japanese. 




SUNDAY 9. 

MONDAY 10. 

Our worthy President says to us, 

"Dear students do not drift. 
But each day your own record beat. 
And you will need no lift." 

TUESDAY 11. 

WEDNESDAY 12. 

J. R. Young, a pioneer. 

Brings to us good words of cheer. 

THURSDAY 13. 

The bells they ring the people meet. 
A mock wedding for the Moody's sweet. 



THURSDAY 20. 
Preparations gay 
For coming holiday. 

FRIDAY 21. 
Dip! 
Barbecue! 

SATURDAY 22. 

"Who's the U's hodo. 

Who's the U's hodo, 

B. Y. U." 

In the U game 

We won much fame. 

SUNDAY 23. 

"The Smoker with each breath. 
Inhales imbecility and exhales manhood." 
— G. H. Brimhall. 



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! BANYAN^ 



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MONDAY 24. 

Not another place to go so 

We see "Earth Bound," at picture show. 

TUESDAY 25. 
Life. 
Going. 

WEDNESDAY 26. 
Going. 

THURSDAY 27. 

Gone! for three days. 

FRIDAY 28. 
Pageant free 
We see. 



TUESDAY 1. 

We start this month with a big frown 
The cigarette we're going to down. 

WEDNESDAY 2. 

The "little white slave" is failing fast 
We hope we've seen him crow his last. 

THURSDAY 3. 

Do you dare forget. 

To hear Dr. Willet— tonight. 

FRIDAY 4. 

Student body's full o'pep. 

And 'fore we even meet 'em. 
We beat the Aggies all to heck; 

I hope real loss will greet 'em. 







SATURDAY 29. 

(Another auction sale if we're not carefjjl.) 

SUNDAY 30. 

"How the snow doth fall" 
That's better than nothing at all. 

MONDAY 31. 

Hush! The curtain rises, would 
I were like bold Robin Hood. 

FEBRUARY 

"Swoop your spitejullest up the flue. 

Wild winds — do! 
If hat in the world do I care for you. 
O detightfullest weather of all 

Howl and squall, 
And shake the trees till the last leaves fall." 



SATURDAY 5. 
"Pride Cometh right before a fall," 

We lost the game because — 
Bill lost his gum the second half. 
And that you see's the cause. 

SUNDAY 6. 
To church tonight we'd like to go, 

But all the boys are training; 
You see we're going to take the State, 
And then, besides, it's raining. 

MONDAY 7. 

A pretty opera, with much wit. 
The "Mikado" made quite a hit. 

TUESDAY 8. 

Peanut bust in English class. 
President says, 'twill be our last. 



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BANYAN i 




MORE WINTER HIKING 



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BANYAN 3 



WEDNESDAY 9. 
Just "cause they're from the "Utah," 

They think we ought to nod. 
But the "Master Builder" failure 
Was certainly a fraud. 

THURSDAY 10. 
Class debates today. 
Are surely under way. 

FRIDAY 11. 

Our High School team the Victory drove, 
.\nd took it back from Pleasant Grove. 

SATURDAY 12. 

Lincoln. The student, the lawyer, the leader. 
The statesman, and the greatest American. 



THURSDAY 17. 
Our High School athletes rest from their toils, 
As Job, old dears, they're suffering from some 
boils. 

FRIDAY 18. 

The hall is bright with flowers. 

And bluebirds waft their flight, 
'Mong pretty maids and bowers. 

At the Junior Prom tonight. 

SATURDAY 19. 

Nothing doing but the weather, 

SUNDAY 20. 
Mighty hard on — 




SUNDAY 13. 

MONDAY 14. 

Wind and kites flying high. 
Coats and hair-nets too. 

TUESDAY 15. 

Hope some one with lots of push. 
Launches the B. Y. U. 

WEDNESDAY 16. 

'"Consider marriage seriously," 
Was Elder Clawson's thought, 
'"Stop Thief." goes to Jordan. 
They travel a lot. 




MONDAY 21. 
Our shoe leather. 



TUESDAY 22. 

George Washington we celebrate 

With songs and praises loud. 
If we were all as great as he, 

Heav'n would soon get a crowd. 



WEDNESDAY 23. 

Spring weather prevails, 
"Mr. A fails." 



■BANYAN^ 



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THURSDAY 24. 

Two social hours we used to have, 

And they were heaps of fun. 
But now today we hear them say. 

They've changed them into one. 

FRIDAY 25. 

Our Basket Ball guys have got the pep. 

And they have got the "brain," 
And so they show the students all. 
Just how to entertain. 

MONDAY 26. 

The Aggies may be wonderful. 

The Aggies may be true, 
But the game was 30 to 28, 

For our dear B. Y. U. 

SUNDAY 27. 
If all the Sundays 

Were so still, 
There'd be no need. 

For a "blue law" bill. 



t;ie.sday 1. 

"Oh, where are you going my pretty maid," 
"I'm going to class, kind sir," she said, 

"What are you taking my pretty maid?" 
"Examinations! sir," she said. 

WEDNESDAY 2. 

(Refer back to March 1st). 

THURSDAY 3. 

Some wide awake "Y" fellows, 

Without a single shy word. 
Have made the "U" "s old campus. 

Look like a Chinese signboard. 

FRIDAY 4. 

"Lost" by the B. Y. U., 
The big game with the "U." 

SATURDAY 5. 

"Be it ever so humble there's no place like 

home." 
(With apologies to the author.) 




MONDAY 28. 
The Provo Band, 
Gives a vodie grand. 

TUESDAY 29. 

There's nothing doing. 

Though there should have been, 
As only each fourth year 

Brings this 29th in. 



MARCH. 

"The March wind doth blow, 

And we shall have snow. 

Ana where will the robin go (poor thing). 

He'll fly to the barn 

To keep himself warm. 
And hide his head under his wing {poor thing) 



SUNDAY 6. 

We return to school. 

To keep the "Golden Rule." 

MONDAY 7. 

We register 16 per 
For the 3rd quarter. 

TUESDAY 8. 

High School Tourney on the match. 
Our team goes without a scratch. 

WEDNESDAY 9. 
Spanish play 
Was alright. 

THURSDAY 10. 
And tonight's 
A perfect night. 




BALLIF WBDDING RECEPTION— FLAG RAISING DAY 



BANYAN 



FRIDAY 11. 

Too bad that we must stay out late, 
But we can't miss the "U" debate. 

SATURDAY 12. 
"Mum's" the word. 

SUNDAY 13. 

Girls are sweet but they are bold 

To all occasions they will rise, 
The fellows cannot win we're told. 

So an atheletic club they organize. 

MONDAY 14. 

A heart so true was never found, 

A soul so full of right. 
And now he leaves us for awhile. 

Dear Uncle Jesse Knight. 





SUNDAY 20. 
Happened. 

MONDAY 21. 

"What noise and life I pray? 
"Why Freshies rule today!" 

TUESDAY 22. 
"Dear upper classmen. 

Our head we lack. 
Won't you please bring 
Our President back?" 



WEDNESDAY 23. 

Our pretty girls prepare the eats. 

The boys cement the "Y," 
We finish a Freshman ball. 
Our "Y" was real spry. 



TUESDAY 15. (?) 

WEDNESDAY 16. 
With measured tread, 
And prayers above 
We lay away 
This man we love. 

THURSDAY 17. 
Very 

FRIDAY 18. 

Sorry 
SATURDAY 19. 

Nothing 



THURSDAY 24. 

If science you much want to know. 
Attend tonight's scientific show. 



FRIDAY 25. 
The upper classman rule the school. 

With voice long and loud. 
The men a Jamboree do hold, 

And get a "monstrous" crowd. 



SATURDAY 26. 
"Practice." 
"Practice." 



BANYAN 



>|^ 




^ BANYAN^ 



SUNDAY 27. 
If out of school you get no kick. 
Come, be an Easter Sunday Chick. 

MONDAY 28. 
Ina heaves a deep sigh. 
As she bids West Goodby. 

TUESDAY 29. 

The English class creates a fuss. 

WEDNESDAY 30. 
Apostle Ballard speaks to us. 

THURSDAY 31. 

If something real you want to see. 
Come listen to our own Male Glee. 



MONDAY 4. 
One 

TUESDAY 5. 
Whole 

WEDNESDAY 6. 
Long 

THURSDAY 7. 
Drowsy 

FRIDAY 8. 
Dreary, 

SATURDAY 9. 

Dreadfully, 




APRIL SUNDAY 10. 

Dead 

"Sweet April! — many a thought. 

Is wedded unto thee, as hearts are wed; MONDAY 11. 

Nor shall they fall, till, to its autumn brought. Week. 

Life's golden fruit is shed." (Can't even make it rhyme.) 



FRIDAY 1. 

The grand Art Carnival, came to town, 

Upon this April fool. 
Clowns and coons arid dam families, 

Came from this sedate school. 

SATURDAY 2. 

We run, we jump, we race, and then 
We win, for we're our own track men. 

SUNDAY 3. 
The Seniors after many a weary dual. 
Decide they'll leave a curtain to the school. 



TUESDAY 12. 
A crowd so blithe and gay. 

In "Desdemona" ride. 
And now the people say, 
' They have lost all their pride. 

WEDNESDAY 13. 

Unlucky. (As usual.) 

THURSDAY 14. 

Orchestra, Glee Clubs, Chorus and Band, 
Present for us a pilgrim's concert grand. 



iiiiiiiiirTiiiirimmiimrT 



BANYANS 



FRIDAY 15. 

Oh it's noble to be noble. 
And it's noble to be best. 

And win with Le Grand Noble, 
The oratorical contest. 

SATURDAY 16. 

Rain stopped Sophomore party, sad, 
And quite too bad? 

SUNDAY 17. 
Practice! 
Practice! 

WEDNESDAY 20. 

Forward march the first man winds. 
Election action now begins. 



MONDAY 25. 

Spring is here at last. 

And everything is new. 
We have a brand new president, 

For the B. Y. U. 

TUESDAY 26. 

Men may come and men may go. 
But lessons go on forever. 

WEDNESDAY 27. 
Help us. 

THURSDAY 28. 

Then here's to Dr. Harris, 

Our welcome President new. 
He'll touch the spark of youth, friends 

To this old B. Y. U. 




THURSDAY 21. 

More elections news, 
Program by the blues. 

FRIDAY 22. 

Stop ! Look ! Listen ! 

This you cannot beat. 
Only two blue candidates, 
Met with a defeat. 

SATURDAY 23. 

Bad weather and bad luck sir, 
I guess they go together, 

The Aggies won the track meet. 
The "Mormons" hit the heather. 



FRIDAY 29. 

And here's to Dr. Brimhall, 

Our loyal President grand. 
He's served us and He's made this 
The best school in the land. 



SUNDAY 24 



(?) 




SATURDAY 30. 

Invitation track meet. 

Help up at the "Y," 
Invitation track meet. 

Won by the East Side High. 



"While from the purpling east departs 
The star that led the dawn. 

Blithe Flora from the couch upstarts. 
For May is on the lawn." 



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■BANYAN^ 



SUNDAY 1. 

May is bright. 

May is gay, 
May is here. 

And it's a May day. 

MONDAY 2. 

Whiz Bangs — Whiz Bangs, everywhere. 
Naughty jokes now rend the air. 

TUESDAY 3. 

Drama Circle presents three one act plays. 
And rising amateurs we gaze. 

WEDNESDAY 4. 

Dresses, laces, pretty frocks. 

At our door dame fashion knocks. 



MOTHER'S DAY 

SUNDAY 8. 
"God gave us friends — and that means much. 

But far above all others. 
The greatest of his gifts to earth. 

Was when he thought of Mothers." 

MONDAY 9. 

A real good student of Dramatic Art, 
You'll find 'tn miss Jane Hibbert who reads 
"Peg O' My Heart." 

TUESDAY 10. 

Music singing, 'twas beautiful fun, 
Condie our "John"' of the Opera, won. 




THURSDAY 5. 

The best, the greatest thing we've done. 
In school this whole year long, ~ 

"Priscilla," spells success for all. 
And crowned our queen of song. 

GIRL'S DAY 

FRIDAY 6. 

Oh the girls, girls, girls. 

With their ribbons and laces and curls, 
With their bright smiling faces and dainty 
sweet graces. 
We all love the girls! 

SATURDAY 7. 
Rain, canyon trips and rain. 
But, you bet, we'll go again. 



WEDNESDAY 11. 

Here's to the Bee Yee, 

It's spicy, it's fine. 
We want some more Bee Yee's 

Their just in our line. 

THURSDAY 12. 
There's something in the atmosphere 

That whispers all about. 
In just two weeks, my students, dear 

Your school will be out. 

FRIDAY 13. 

Here comes the mighty Seniors, 

With measured beat and tread, 
In cap and gown their marching. 

Success is at their head. 



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BANYAN 3 



SATURDAY 14. 

The track and tennis teams did, 

To Logan go. 

The tennis was beaten, and 

The track gang got by with 15 points. 

THURSDAY 19. 
Fred and Alma take in Ferris-wheel, 
And Merry-go-round. 

FRIDAY 20. 

The Honors to the men are given. 

The old turns to the new. 

Then the whole dance the Grand Finale. 

SATURDAY 21. 

The Banquet Honorious convenes. 
A. C. U. Tennis team plays to a tie. 

SUNDAY 22. 
We fear the Baccalauriate sermon. 
A. C. U. teams wins tie-off. 



MONDAY 23. 
That great suspense before exams. 
The Normals express themselves. 

TUESDAY 24. 

They start — we're up to our necks. 

In them — Examinations. 

The Fourth Years hold the stage. 

WEDNESDAY 25. 

U. of U. Tennis meets defeat. 
The Senior play explodes. 

THURSDAY 26. 
They're over. 
President Brimhall immortalized. 

FRIDAY 27. 

The end. The finish. The last. 

Commencement. 

Alumni banquet and ball. 

We leave for home. 

Goodby till next year. 







BANYAN 5 




1 



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Y-DAY— AFTERNOON 



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BANYANs 




DISTINCTIVE 

PRINTING 



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BANYAN^ 



WALK OVER SHOES 

for Men and Women 

FURNISHINGS and CLOTHING 
for Men and Boys 



The Hub Clothing Stores Co. 



Clean 
COAL 



Specify Knight Spring Canyon Coal 

It is the sort of Fuel we take pride in selling to our customers. 
No dirt, no slate, no clinkers, it makes a clean, hot and lasting fire. 
For every fuel purpose our coal fills the bill completly — you 
get full weight and prompt service here. 

Knight Coal Company 

Provo's Exclusive Agent 



STRANGE! 

Jane Hibbert was asked why it is 
That to schools farther south she 
won't go, 

"Well, this climate," said she, 

"Is attractive to me. 
£ just can't get along without snow." 



A handsome class president named 

Roy, 
Was most playful and cute for a boy, 

The girls all went wild. 

Whenever he smiled. 
To them he was surely a joy. 



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IMPRESSIONISTIC PKTURtrs 

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BOUZEK ENCRiV/INC COMPANY 



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Howdy! Walk right into one of 
these Sport Suits — You'll walk out 
satisfied that you are dressed Right. 
At-a-boy ! 

Headquarters for Sport Suits we 
feature Classmate High School 
Clothes in Provo. 

eHRISTEJVSEJV GO. 

Fashion Park Clothiers. 



THIS FROM COTTAM. 

A microbe sat on a test-tube hot, 
Perspiring like gee rusalam, 

And in he slipped and like as not, 
He burnt his alamagoozelum. 



A chemistry student named Greeling, 

Was most careless in all of his dealing 

He was fooling one day. 

In his haphazard way. 

And now he's a blot on the ceiling. 



Utah Power & Light Co. 

Service 

The game current that operates the electric range at home — that runs the 
vacuum cleaner and the sewing machine and lights the house, is also a vital 
force in business and industry. It runsihe dictaphone and the adding machine; 
the machinery of shop and factory. It lights the showcase and the window and 
the billboard — saves time and money and health all along the way. 

To furnish this practically unlimited supply of electricity, it 
takes thirty great generating plants connected by an Immense 
transmission system — the system which the Utah Power & 
Light maintains in this region for the benefit of homes and in- 
dustry. 

Utah Power & Light Co. 

"Efficient Public Service." 



I BANYAN s 



Your Store 




Students' 

Supply 

Association 



REED HOLT 

MARCUS BEAN 

WILLIAM J. SNOW, JR. 



Were the faithful and efficient men who served you during 1920-1921 



SUPERVISION HERALD R. CLARK 



A bird in the hand 
is worth- 



?? 



One of our skilfully made por- 
traits is worth a dozen carelessly 
made photographs. 

Quality tells everything 

Hwcion $c EoUo 

"Quality Photographs" 
Columbia Bldg. Provo, Utah 



M. H. Graham 
Printing Co. 

Provo's up-to-date establishment 
We Print Almost Everything 



Social Printing Our Specialty 



Phone 285 



20 So. 1st West 



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-ail investment m 
Good Afypearance* 



Beckstead Exclusive Jewelry Co, 



Expert Watch Makers and Engravers 



DIAMONDS, WATCHES, CUT-GLASS, SILVERWARE, ETC. 




The Schwab Clothing Co. 

"Dressers of Men and Boys" 

Buy your next suit here and 
save from $5 to $10 — consider- 
ing quality. 

The Schwab Clothing Co., Inc. 

The Kuppenheimer House in 
Provo 



You can always depend on seeing a Good Show at the 



Strand Theatre 



First Run Pictures Only 



Provo, Utah 



HE'S LEARNED NOT TO. 

To debate Bailiff surely knew how 
He was good from the start till the bow 

But he married one day. 

And the neighbors all say 
He debates very few questions now. 







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Prefers 




If you have not tried them, send 10c in stamps or coin for mailing 
a free sample box, together with your dealer's name and address. Write 
Plainly. 




GOLDEN 
CHOCOLATES 



I HIS Store endeavors to merit your 
daily patronage. We measure the 
worth of our merchandise by the 
standard of Quality, and desire to 
maintain your patronage because of the recog- 
nized superiority of our good service. 

Everything for Mother and Sister. Suits, 
Coats, Capes, Dresses, Shoes Notions and Dry 
Goods. 



W. p. Whitehead Company 

BUTCHERS AND GROCERS 



PROVO, UTAH 




Farrer Bros. Company 



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If Bought at 

Barton Furniture Co. 



The Furniture Center 



Maiben 
Glass & Paint 
Co. 

Expert Picture Framing 



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272 West Center Street 



PROVO, UTAH 



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Carpenter 
Seed Co. 



76 N. University Ave. 
PROVO, UTAH 

Our Seeds Grow 




Carpenters 

Best by 

Test 

Garden, Flower and Field Seeds 



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A Big 
Piece of 

News for 

Band and 

Orchestra 

Players 

A new basic principle has been applied in the manufacture of brass inbtruments. It's not 
a mere frill or attachment, but a thoroughgoing system, grounded in the scientific fact that A 
SOUND WAVE EXPANDS AS IT TRAVELS. 

The principle of manufacture is known as "Continuous conical bore." The inventor, E. A. 
Couturier, is one of the world's greatest cometisls. a former director of Gilmore's band. The 
continuous taper in Couturier instruments produces, unexampled ease of playing, uniform 
color and beautiful tone absolutely perfect pitch in all keys and intervals. Come in and hear 
these superior instrument. 

"Click," says the kodak, and the story is told 
in pictures. We carry a full line of kodaks and 
supplies. Our finishing department is up to 
date, and we are pleased to announce to our 
students friends that we are again making por- 
traits, and will be pleased to do your work. 



i 



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Provo Photo Supply 
& Music Co. 

77 to 83 Universitv Ave. 
PHONE 444 ' PROVO. UTAH 



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aSK FOR 




Hoover 

Candy Co, 



Tim^anq^y W tiOCOl 8itC8 Marshtnallows 



THE HIOHTH OF PFffFECr/Ojy ' 



Buying More we Sell for Less 

We Outfit The Entire Family 

J. C. Penny Co. 



312 Department Stores 



PROVO, UTAH 



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Telluride Motor Co. 

Phone 279 Provo, Utah 

Dealers in 
BUICK AUTOMOBILES AND GMC TRUCKS 

Expert shop work and supplies 

Anything and Everything for the Automobile 



The Wm. M. Roylance Co. 

Established 1885 

Utah's Largest Handlers FRUITS and PRODUCE 

PROVO, UTAH 



The Provo Tailoring Co. 

Old Clothes Changed to New 

Bring in your old clothes. We will repair them like new, at reasonable 

prices. We call and deliver. Phone 475 

ALFRED MADSEN, Proprietor 



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Utah Timber & Coal Co. 

160 W. Fifth North Provo 

Building Material and Coal 
A Square Deal to Every Patron 

JESSE H. HARMON, Manager 



Provo Foundry & Machine Co. 

FOUNDRY AND MACHINE WORK 

Provo, Utah 

Mine Cars, Steel Tanks, Structural Steel Work, Heavy Sheet Steel 

Work of All Kinds, Gray Iron and Brass Castings, 

Stock Beams, Angles, Channels, Etc. 

THOS. F. PIERPONT, Manager 





Do the Stairs Need Painting 

We mean the stairs of "Get There. ' 

We do Picture Framing, Painting 
and Paper Hanging. 

Work Well Done is our Motto 

Provo Paint & Glass Co. 

110 W. Center St. Provo, Utah 



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Knight Trust & Savings Bank 

PROVO, UTAH 

J. WILLIAM KNIGHT, President 

Capital, $300,000 Surplus, $33,000 

Directors 

J. WILLIAM KNIGHT W. LESTER MANGUM 

R. E. ALLEN W. O. CREER 

FRED W. TAYLOR F. G. WARNICK 

W. W. ARMSTRONG JOHN C. DEAL 

O. RAYMOND KNIGHT 



Superior ilotor Companp 

COLE, NASH, WILLYS-KNIGHT, OVERLAND 
AUTOMOBILES 

NASH TRUCKS 
Including the Famous ISash Quad 

REPAIRS, SUPPLIES, ACCESSORIES 

C. S. PIERPONT, Manager 
PHONE 74 PROVO, UTAH 



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Be sure that your Gas Range is equipped with 

LORAIN 

The automatic oven heat regulator 



See it at 



The Gas Office 



SUTTON MARKET 

A Good Place to Trade 



Students: 



You are laying the foundation for what the future may have 
in store for you. 

Close application to your studies during your College life will bring you 
untold dividends from whatever calling you decide to pursue. 

We invite you to make our store your store. We will take pleasure in serv- 
ing you to the best of our ability. 

We sell quality Merchandise only. 

FOR YOUNG MEN.— Hart, Srhaffner & Marx and Clothcraft Clothes, Mal- 
lory Hats, Vogue and Bryne College Shirts, Beau Brummel Dress Shirts, Valorn 
Underwear, Themis Hosiery. 

FOR YOUNG WOMEN.— Printzess Coats, Suits and Dresses, Mina Taylor 
Gingham Dresses and Aprons, Kayser Silk Underwear, Valorn Knit Underwear, 
Betsy Ross Silk Hose, Gossard Corsets. 

Students desiring to learn something about textiles are welcome to visit our 
Store any Friday afternoon — singly or in groups. 



iiiiimiiriiiunm 




WOOD-CLIFTON MERCANTILE CO. 



Distributors of Quality Merchandise. 
Everybody's Store. 



Appreciation 

The members of this year's Banyan staff 
wish to thank all those who have in any 
way contributed to the success of the 1920- 
21 Banyan. 

May many leisure moments be filled with 
pleasure as joyous events are recalled while 
glancing through the pages of this book.