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Full text of "The banyan"




LIBRARY j 




Bri 


gham Young U 


niversi+y 


FROM 






Cflll 


B.Y.U^ 


Ace. 




No. 


-47-8*00.- 
B22 
1922 


No. .. 


190U^. 



HISTORIAH'S OFFIQI 

Church of Jesus Christ of LattSY'^y Jgintj 
47 E. South TemUt St. 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/banyan1922brig 



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JBt, Jf ranfelin ^teloart ?|arri5 

Mf)0£(e hvoah conception of tt)E pos!£!i= 
ijiUtieS of our Scfjool inspires! us! 
toitJ) renetoeb ambition to pusf) on; tot)os!e 
sipmpatfjetic encouragement of all our 
toorttp enterpris!es fires us toiti) ^eal to 
toorfe for eben greater Success; tofjose hvil 
liant leaberst)ip atuafeens toitf)in us an 
imbmmbet) faitfj in our triumpfjal marc!) 
totoarb ultimate recognition, fjotlj national 
anl) international, tfjis bolume of tfje 
panpan is most sincerelp anb graciouslp 
bebicateb. 



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CONTCNTS 

UNIVEDSITY 
CLASSES 

ACTIVITIES 
ORGANIZATIONS 

FEATURES 




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THE TRAINING BUILDING 




THE ARTS BUILDING 




THE AZTEC FOUNTAIN 



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MAESER MEMORIAL BUILDING 



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SUNSET ON UTAH LAKE 






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UTAH LAKE IN WINTER 



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AD.UI S. BENNION 



Adam S. Bennion. Superintendent of the Church Schools, stands for all that is 
best in education. An announcement that he is to speak causes a stampede for 
College Hall. Every student feels that Superintendent Bennion has a deep interest in 
his welfare. 

He has charge of ihe eighteen church schools, the greatest of which is un- 
doubtedly he Young University. Under his kadership this college has attained 
wide recogr.i ion and inoniiiience. 



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THE BOARD OF TP.USTEES 

Thomas N. Taylnr Heber J. Grant Reeil Sniiiot 

Siisa Young Gates Zina Y. Card 

Willarcl Young J. Wm. Kiiinlit 

Joseiili Fielding Smith Joseph R. Murclocl; 

LaFayette Holhiniik Stephen L. Chipman Joseph A. Reece 



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PRESIDENT GEORGE H. BRIMHALL 

President Emeritus George H. Brimhall holds a most enviable position in the 
hearts of the students of the University. From the inspiration of his life and work 
we gain some of our highest ideals and worthiest ambitions. 

He is head of the Department of Theology which has, during the past year, 
greatly increased in size. He also holds the important position of director of the 
church school seminaries, a phase of the church school system that is progressing 
rapidly. 



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JOHN C. SWENSON. M. A.. 

Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Acting Dean of the College of Education 



College of Education 

THE rapid growth of education in tlie Inter-mountain states, and the movement 
toward higher teaching standards, have created a pressing demand for greater 
facilities for advanced professional training in this region. 

\^hile the Brigham \ oung I niversity has always enjoyed an enviable reputa- 
tion for turning out well prepared public spirited teachers, because of the importance 
of the teaching profession among tlie Latter-day Saints, there has been a feeling 
that the Church should establish a College of Education where all phases of pro- 
fessional work from elementary school training, to the training for finished super- 
intendents of graduate rank could be given. 

Incident to the recent reorganization of the University such a policy was adopted. 
The College of Education is now organized with seven departments: Educational 
Sociology, Elementary Teaching. Philosophy of Education. Psychology, Secondary 
Training, School of Administration and Supervision, and Vocational Education. 

The close cooperation existing between the College of Education and the other 
colleges of the University makes it possible for one desiring to enter High School 
teaching to register in the College of Education and take his teaching major in any 
department of the other colleges and at the same time receive the verv best pro- 
fessional training. Those desiring to prepare for principals, supervisors, or su- 
perintendents will be able to major in the various departments of tlie other colleges. 
The training schools, both elementary and secondary, are being organized with expert 
teachers and supervisors. The large building formerly known as the High School 
Building has recently been designated as the Education Building. This action of 
the Board of Trustees creates a real home for the College of Education. 



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MARTIN P. HENDERSON. Ph. D.. 

Dean oj the College of Arts and Sciences 

Professor oj Biology 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



T 



HE very large enrollment, including many graduate students, 
abundantly justified the establishment of the College of Arts 
and Sciences at the Brigham Young University. 

It includes the departments of Art, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, 
English, Geology and Geography, History, Mathematics, Modern 
Languages, and La.in; Music, Physical Education, Physics, Poli:ical 
Science, Psychology, Public Speaking, Social and Recreational Lead- 
ership, and Sociology. 

The primary purpose of this college is to meet the needs of stu- 
dents who desire a broad and liberal education that will enable them 
to find and take their places in the complex civilization of today. 
Abundant opportunity is provided for those who have ambition for 
specialized study in engineering, medicine, law, or who desire to 
train for religious, political or social leadership. Preparation for 
original investigation in the fields of science is emphasized. Graduate 
students who have ambtion for a higher degree will find the college 
rich in opportunity. Educational standards equal to those of other 
instilutions are maintained so that transfer does not involve difficulty 
or loss of credit. 



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HARRISON V. HUYT. E.E., M.B.A., 

Dean oj the College o/ Cpmmerce and Business Administralion 

Professor of Business Administration 



The College of Commerce and business 
CAdministradon 



THE College of Commerce and Business Administration has had a very profit- 
able initial year from the standpoint of growth both from within out and 
from without in. One thing which is fast gaining favor is the solution of 
administrative problems on the basis of accumulated knowledge, rather than on the 
rule-of-thumb methods of the past. Leaders in the business and industrial world have 
been fast recognizing the growing opportunity and need of the Industrial and Busi- 
ness Engineer, such as the College of Commerce is working to develop. 

The Commercial Department of the past has always been able completely to 
justify itself by its large number of graduates who have unquestionably made good. 
The major ideal of the new College of Commerce is to perpetuate this reputation to 
which it has fallen heir. A principal contributory ideal is to develop judgment 
and vision, which above everything else, will enable the graduate to compete with 
graduates of the University of "hard knocks." The practical work of the College 
is specially designed to shorten the period that College trained men ordinarily have 
to spend at routine, and rank and file work, before becoming responsible executives. 



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LO'^T.Y NELSON, B. S., 
Director nj Extension Division 



The Extension 'Division 

THE purpose of the Extension Division is to carry the information and 
message of the University out to the people of the Church everywhere, and 
to make education available to those who do not have the opportunity to do 
residence work. 

The Extension Division is divid; d into three bureaus : Social Service, Cor- 
respondence Instruction, Lectures and Entertainments. Through these departments 
it is expected '.o reach out into the connnunities of the State and assist them by de- 
veloping local leadership ar.d by bringing ihem in touch with sources of inspiration 
and information. 

During the first vear of the existence of the Extension Division, the University 
has reached over three hundred students by organized instruction in extension 
classes and correspondence courses. The number of people who have been reached 
by lecture, denionstra.ion, and entertainment exceeds fifty thousand, not including 
the three thousand five hundred who were in attendance at classes during Leader- 
ship Week. 

Extension work of the L^niversity is a growing factor in religious and general 
education in the inter-mountain country; and promises great things for the future. 
It will endeavor to collect and centralize the vast amount of information that is 
here and make it available to the people at large. This work will act as a great 
leavfr.er out in the communities, and will also be a supporting abutment for the 
Institution. 

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SCENES OF LEADERSHIP WEEK 



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HUGH M. WOODWARD. Pli. 
Professor oj Education 
Dean oj Summer Sclwol 



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The Summer School 



HE summer school of the Brigham Young University has become a regular 
Quarter of the school year. Its scope has been greatly enlarged to meet the 
needs of various classes. 



Students preparing to teach or those desiring to raise their professional standard 
will find a strong faculty and a wide range of educational courses. 

In nearly all of the departments of the University a liberal curriculum of gradu- 
ate work for those desiring to take master degrees has been provided. Regular stu- 
dents working for various diplomas and degrees, besides being able to fill their 
group requirements, will find an extensive elective curriculum. 

The summer quarter affords a splendid opportunity for contact with leading 
men and women. During the coming quarter two or three outside men of national 
reputation and more than fifteen of the leading men of Utah will lecture on special 
subjects of interest to summer school students. 

The recreational features of the Brigham Young University's Summer School 
have become famous — boating excursions on Utah Lake, moonlight hikes to Maple 
Flat, sunrise hikes, lawn parties, canyon trips, and the annual hike to the top of 
Timpanogos. 

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PLAYGROUND OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



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Page Twenty-two 



HUGH M. WOODWARD, Ph. D., 
Professor of Education 



\ I LATE ELLIOTT, B. Pd., 
Professor of Domestic Art 



JOHN E. HAYES, 
Registrar 



ELMER NELSON, 
Instructor in Piano 



ETHEL CUTLER, B. S.. 

Professor of Home Economics 



W ALTER COTTAM. M. A., 

Assistant Professor of Biology 



M. WILFORD POULSON, M. A. 

Associate Professor of Education 



FRANKLIN MADSEN, 
Instructor in Music 



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BENT F. LARSON, A. B.. 

Associate Professor of Education in Art 

anil Manual Training 



ROBERT SAUER. 

Associate Professor of Music 

(Wind Instruments) 



BENJAMIN F. CUMMINGS. A. B., 
Professor of Modem Languages 



THOMAS L. MARTIN, Ph. D.. 
Professor of Agronomy 



GLEN VAN WAGENEN, A. B., 
Instructor in Music 



HERMESE PETERSON. 

Assistant Professur of Education 



FRED BUSS, A. B.. 
Professor rf Geology 



CHRISTEN JEN.SEN. Ph. D., 
Professor of History and Political Science 







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Page Twenty-foui 



AMOS N. MERRILL, J\L S., 
Dean uf the College of Education 



OLGA WUNDERLY, A. B., 

iirjlructor in Modern Languages and 

Typewriting 



HAROLD R. CLARK, A. B., 

Assistant Professor of Finance and 

Banking 



WILLIAM H. BOYLE, A. B., 

Principal Secondary Training and 
Vocational Courses 



PERCIVAL C. BIGLOW 

Instructor in Auto Mechanics 



ALGIE EGGERTSEN BALLIF, A. B. 

Inslructor in Physical Education and 

Oral Expression 



KIEFER B. SAULS. B. S., 

Secretary to the President and 

Purchasing Agent 



BRIGHAM T. HIGGS, 

Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds ^^ 



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BERTHA ROBERTS. 
Instruc Icir in Sliiirtliaiul and Typewriting 



J. MARINUS JENSEN, A. M. 
Associate Professnr nf Enplisli 



PERCIVAL C. niCLOW 
Tnstriiclor in Auto Meclianics 



ALFRED OSMOND, M. A., 
Professor of English 



HATTIE WRIGHT, A. B., 

Instructor in Domestic Science 



WILLIAM H. SNELL. A. B., 
Instructor in Woodwork and Mechanics 



HARRISON R. MERRILL, B. S., 

Instructor in English 



CLAWSON Y. CANNON, B. S., 
Assistant Fiofessor of Animal Husbandly 




Page Twenty-five 



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Page Twenty-six 



ERNEST D. PARTRIDGE, B. S., C. E., 
Professor of Agricultural Engineering 



ANNIE L. GILLESPIE, 
Librarian 



CARL F. EYRING, M. A., 

Professor of Physics and Mathematic* 

Director of Mechanics 



T. EARL PARDOE, 
Associate Professor of Public Speaking 



CHARLES E. MAW. M. S.. 
Professor of Chemistry 



MAZIE CAMPBELL. A. B.. 
Instructor in Domestic Art 



ALICE L. REYNOLDS, A. B.. 

Professor of English Literature 



EUGENE L. ROBERTS. A. B.. 
Professor of Physical Education 



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Harold R. Clark, President 
Elsie Chamberlain Carroll, First Vice-President 

K. B. Sauls, Secretary 
Fern Lewis Brockbank, Second lice-President 

Walter P. Cottam, Treasurer 



^ri^ham Youn^ University^ CAlumni 
CAssociation 

THE history of our Alma Mater shows its Alumni Association to he one of 
its biggest assets. A large portion of the tangible assets of the institution 
stand today as monuments to the achievements of this organization. The 
names of over 3,500 people appear on the records of the institution as havini? con- 
tributed to its financial welfare. Most of these are members of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, among whom are some of the most influential business, political, professional, 
and social leaders of ihe intermountain country. 



Nole: Mr. Cottam's picture was omitted through error. 



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Senioi^ Class History 



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E are now at the end of the beginning. We look back lovingly to the things 
which have gone before, and look ahead with a desire to go on and com- 
plete that which we have set out to do. 



The past vear to us has been a pleasure. Our "Senior Follies" with wliich we 
began the year was just a personification of the class. It had depth too. and was 
light and airy. It was serious, yet it was clever. It was short although it was long. 
And it had "varie'.v, which is the spice of life." 

Our project? Trees! 

'\4nd this our life, exempt from piibl'c haunt. 
Finds tongues in trees, hooks in running brooks. 
Sermons in stones, and good in everything.'' 

The purpose of the trees is to form an arboretum on the northwest ^ide of the 
Alaeser Campus. It is said, 

"He that plantelh a tree is the servant of God, 
He provideth a k.'ndness jor many generations. 
And iaces that he hath not seen shall bless him." 

What else than pleasure could we have wi:h our memories so full ot joys and 
our future so full of hope. 

Our class history has seemed short. Iiul ^ve have no regrets to offer. W illi pride 
we recite of our respect, support and loyalty to the school, which has given us our 
ideals, aspirations and ambi ions. 

Page Thirt" 



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J. Wm. Hanison B. S. 

Provo, Utah 

Major — Biology. Minor — Chem- 
istry. White and Blue Staff 
'21. Swimming Team 'J2. 



Kenneth E. Weiglit B. S. 
Springville, Utah 

Major — .Vgronomy. Minor — Bi- 
ology. Won letters in Basket 
Ball and Track '19-'20. Let- 
ters in Basket Ball and 
Track '20-'21. Captain of 
Track Team '20-'21. Letters in 
Basket Ball and Track '2I-'22. 
Captain of the Basket Ball 
Team '2I-'22. 



John E. Oscarson B. S. 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 

Major — History and Govern- 
ment. Minors — Sociology and 
Econojnics. 



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Carl Davis Swenson A. B. 
Provo, Utah 

Major — Mathematics. Minor — 
Physics. Spent first three 
years of college at the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis. 



LaVieve Huish 
Provo, Utah 

Major — English. Minor — Edu- 
cation. Graduate of the B. Y. 
High School. Received Normal 
Certificate here. Member of 
Junior Prom Committee '20. 
Assistant Editor of the Ban- 
yan 'JO. Winner of Beckstead 
Oratorical Contest '20. Editor 
of White and Blue '21-'22. 
Played part of Mrs Sims in 
Relief Society Play '22. 



Franklin H. Harris B. S. 
ProvOy Utah 

Major — Accounting and Busi- 
ness .\dminist ration. Minor — Fi- 
nance and Banking. Member 
of Y Commerce Club 1922. 




Page Thirty-two 



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Edwin Baiid U. S. 
Provo, Viah 

Major — Education 

Minor — Social Science 

Debated Dixie in '19 

Debated A. C. U. '.'l 

Debated U. of S. t. '22 



Elva Cliipman Olpin A. B. 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 

Major — Musib. Minor — Lan- 

guage. \'icepresident of class 
'18-'19. \'ice-president of Friars 
(U. of U.) ■21-'22. Lambda 
Phi Lamlxla Sorority U. of U. 
Missionary and student of mu- 
sic in New York and Boston 
•16-' 18. Ladies' Glee Club (U. 
of r.) and (B. Y. U.) Dra- 
matics 'rJ-'20-'21-'22. Opera. 



Delmar Dickson 
Morgan, Utah 

Major — Music. Minor — Biology 
and Education. Cla.ss Presi- 
dent 1919-20. Baseball (B. Y. 
C.) 1919-20. Winner of Or- 
ation for .\nderberg Medal '21. 
Winner of \"iolin Contest for 
.\dams Medal •21. 



(© 




Page Thirty-" luee 



■ 

□ BC 



3B arz 



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Jane Hibbert, A. B. 
Mesa, Arizona 

Major — Public Speaking and 
Dramatic Art. Minor — Phys- 
ical Education and Dancing. 
Played in "Stop Thief!" Played 
the lead in "Peg O' My Heart" 
'21. Assistant Public Service 
Director '21-"22. 



Joseph J. Jarvis 
St. Johns, Arizona 

Manager White & Illue '1S-'I9. 
Played in "The Big Idea" '19. 
Student Body President '20. 
Played in "It Pays to Adver- 
tise" '20. Played in "Brown 
of Harvard" "20. Played in 
"Believe Me Xantippe" '20. 
University of Arizona '20-'21. 
Played in "The College Widow" 
'20. President of S. B. S. '21. 
Business Manager of the Ban- 
yan '21-'22. Strong advocate 
of initiative, referendum, recall. 



Minnie Finley 
Springville, Utah 

Major — Histt)ry and Political 
Science. Minor — English. U. 
A. C. '20. Book Lover's Club, 
U. A. C. '20. Y News Staff 
'22. Class Debater '22. 



(© 




Page Thirty-four 



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Arthur Bond B. S. 
Heber, Utah 

Major — Chemistry. Minor — Bi- 
ology. Prom Committee 1921. 
Member S. B. S. Women's Com- 
mittee 1921-'22. Assistant in 
Chemistry Department 1921 -'22. 



Helen Roylance B. S. 
Springville, Utah 

Major — Home Economics. Sec. 
and Treas. Home Economics 
Club '22. 



Roscoe E. Davis B. S. 
Benjamin, Utah 

Major — Chemistry. Minor — Bi- 
ology. Dramatics '19-'20. Jun- 
ior class President '20-'21. Pneu- 
matic Artist of S. E. S. '22. 



(25 




Page Thirty-five 



ID BC 



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Eugene Hillmaii A. 


B. 


Tlielma Fggertson \. B. 


J. Flemini WakefieW B. 


s 


Plcasont Grove, Utah 


Provo, Utah 


Prove, i'tah 




Major — Chemistry. 




Major — Physical Education. 


Major — Biology. 




Minor — Biology. 




Minor — Biology and Englisli. 


Minor — Education. 




Basketball— 1918. 




Won Washington Birthday Or- 


Prominent Bee Man. 




Baseball— 1920. 




atorical Contest 1917. Vice 
President of Sophomore Class 
1917-18. Vice President of Stu- 
dent Body 191819. Senior 
work done through Extension 
Department. 







H) 




i 



Page Tliirty six 



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Hazel Nora Noble B. S. 
Alpine, Arizona 

^[a}o^ — Home Economics. Mi- 
nor — Education. Flagstaff Nor- 
ma! School '17-"18. U. of C. 
Summer *19. U. of U. Summer 
'2\. Vice President Home 
Economics Club 1 92 1-22. Sec- 
retary and Treasurer Senior 
Class 1921-22. 



Everett Mecham A. B. 
Paris, Idaho 

Major — History. 

Minor — SocioIog>', Economics. 

Entered school here in 1919. 

Is a prominent benedict. 



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Ora Markham B. S. 
Proio, Vlah 

Major — Home Economics. 
Minor — Education. 

U. of L'. 'ir.'is-'ig-'jo. 



La \'erne Hansen B. S. 
Mapleton. Utah 

Major — Home Economics. 
Minor — Education. 



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Gladys Loynd A. B. 
Springville, Utah 

Major — Hislorj' and Govern- 
ment. Minor — Social Science. 
Debated Dixie Normal '20. De- 
bated A. C. of U. '21. Y Xews 
Staff *22. Vice President of 
Class '22. Selected honor stu- 
dent and valedictorian. 



Archie West B. S. 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 

Major — Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration. Minor^ 
Political Science. Dramatic 
Manager 1919-20. President of 
Art Guild 1920-21. Frcsident 
of the Missionary Chib 1920-21. 
\'ice President of t'le S. C. S. 
Senior Class President. 



Lorenda John B. S. 
Provo, Utah 

Major — Home Economics. Mi- 
nor — Education. B. Y. U. stu- 
dent for five years. Taught 
one year in Provo 1919-'20. Sec- 
retar\' of the Student Body, 
Provo High School. President 
of the Home Economics Club. 



jg) 




Page Thirty-nine 






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NORTH FORK CANYON IN WINTER 



Page Forty 



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II 




uniors 



IeJi; 



Page Forty-one 



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3B □! 




JunioT- Class History 

IN the scholastic life of the student the Junior period, socially speak- 
ing, is that time when the rough edges of the backwoods home 

town, so abundantly apparent in our Freshie brothers, together 
with the foolish veneer that one year of intellectual guidance gives the 
Sophomore, have been worn from the individual, and he sees himself as 
a member of an organized social unit, t In a sense he finds himself a 
cultural social animal, and in finding the new, its import is impressed 
strongly upon his consciousness. The realization of this is character- 
ized principally by the Juniors in their Prom. 

The Prom of this year marked a step in advance co-equal with 
the advance of the University. The general atmosphere of the dance 
was one of friendly formality. The music, the decorations, and the 
dancers united in producing an entertainment of highest collegiate 
standing. 

Thru the co-operation of the Dramatic Art department, the class 
presented the play, "Eliza Comes To Stay,'' wtih a great deal of suc- 
cess, and received the praise of an enthusiastic audience. 

What was missed from the organized workings of the class was 
given abundantly by its individual members, for they included the 
])resident. the first and second vice presidents of the Student Body, 
the editor of the Banyan, the managers of the Y News, Dramatics, 
Oratory and Debating, also the various members of athletic teams, 
dramatic casts, debators and orators. 



Page Forty-two 



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FRED L. MARKHAM 
Provo. Utali 



VIOLET JOHNSON 



Provo. I lali 



HENRIETTA TAYLOR 
Provo, Utah 



RUDGER H. UALKER 

Rexburg. Idaho 



MARYLENE MAW 
Provo, Utah 



STEWART WILLIAMS 
Provo, Ltali 




31 nf=: 



Page Forty-three 



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Page Forty-four 



RULON BRIMHALL 

Snywflake, Arizona 



WENDELL PERKINS 
Gunnison, Utah 



BERDIE BATE 
American Fork. L tah 



DELAAL\R B. HAIR 
Provo, Utah 



LAVON BILLINGS 
Duchesne, L'lah 



VANESE HARRIS ROWLEY 
Provo, Utah 



■ 

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ROWE GROESBECK 

Springville. I tali 



RLTH PARTRIDGE 
Provo, Utah 



REED HARRIS 
Driggs. Idaho 



RICHARD CON'DIE 
Springville. Utah 



MYRTLE HENDERSON 
Clifton, Idaho 



LYMAN MERRILL 
Prove, Utah 




Pagre Forty-five 



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Page Forty-six 



A. RAY OLPIN 

Pleasant Grnve, Utah 



ALICE TAYLOR 
Provo, Utah 



WAYNE E. AL-VYHEW 
Duchesne, Utah 



W. GLENN HARMON 
Price, Utah 



VEDA SCORUP 
Provo, Utah 



ALBERT S. HUTCHINGS 
Springville, Utah 



y 



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ERVAL CHRISTENSEN 
Provo. Ulah 



INA CREER 
Spanish Fork, Utah 



KARL STOTT 

Meadow, Utah 



E. W. PARKINSON 
Rexburg, Idaho 



WANDA BOYACK 
Delta, Utah 



RAYMOND ROSS 
Provo, Utah 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ] f]^ 

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Page Forty-seven 



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WASATCH RANGE 



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Page Forty eight 



TIMPANOGOS 



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Page Forty-nine 



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10 ac 




Briant L. Decker 

President 



Officers 

Anne Marie Eggertsen 

Vice President 



Harold Bentley 
Secretary and Treasurer 



SophoTTLore Class History 

"Quality plus Quantity" 



w 



HEN it tomes to quality there is no mistaking that you refer to the Sophs. 
As a class we have materially added to the spirit and activities of the 
Y's forty seventh school year. 



We argued our way into the interclass debating championship; wrote our way 
into staff positions on the Y News and White and Blue; played our way ijito Y 
dramatic roles; sang our way into College glees; ran, jumped and wrestled into 
athletics; and did whatever the occasion required for the Service Bureau. We per- 
suaded ourselves that the Sophs should institute a class tradition. The cause was 
general Soph enthusiasm, the result. The Student Loan Ball, the proceeds of which 
are to be used for a Student Loan Fund. The event is to be annually supervised 
by the Sophomore class. 

At the close of a most happy and successful school year, let it be said of them: 
Though slightly capricious, and sometimes suspicious, they're sufficiently studious 
Sophs. 



Page Fifty 



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-rs 




Kmulsen 


Ciiristensen 


Olson 


Miner 


Anderson 


Mortimer 


Farnsworth 


Hayes 


Wanlass 


Huish 


Parker 


McElrath 


Powers 


Davis 


Newell 


Dickson 



Page Fifty-one 



ID ■! 



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iiiii-ii 

Ol-en 
Holhr, ok 
Fairer 



Ferm'iSon 
Mauclsley 
Meredith 
Cliipnian 



Chri-len-' ii 
llcConkie 
M. Gardner 
R. Gardner 



Pelerson 
M'lrtimer 
Maw 
Clark 



Page Fifty-two 



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III 




Anderson 


Poulson 


L. Daslriip 


.•iat.^^ 


Lambert 


Jensen 




Bushman 


West 




Thomas 


Keeler 




Woolley 


Collrin 




R. Gardner 


I. Dastrup 




Markliani 


Hales 




Hansen 

Page Fifty-three 






iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



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31 a 




Wing Whileheail Candlanc! V. Bentley Olsen 

Boley Ivy Phillips Wakefield 



^Uhe Soph 



The Soph is the flapper, the flirt, and the dude: 
They're vain, so the critics declare: 

They save on their toors and skimp on their food 
To buv badsier oil for their hair. 

But Sophs are not fickle, they love to look well; 

Thev study and bone o'er their books: 
Of course in the daylight it's easy to tell 

That thev studv as much on their looks. 



— "Rube" Harrison. 



Page Fifty-four 






•^.'B Dl 



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ashmen 




Page Tifiy-five 



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31 □ 



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Royden Dangerfiekl 
President 



Ojlirers 

Celestial Johnson 
Vice-President 



Truman Partridge 
Athletic Manager 



Leiand Wentz 
Debating Manager 



Leiand Warnick 
Secretary and Treasurer 



Freshman Class History 



T 



HE Freshmen are on the map! No argument is needed to prove it for every- 
one admits it. They are not egotistical, but they are sensible in recognizing 
their possibilities to rightly fill their places. 



To begin with, it happened that the Freshman Class of this year was larger 
than that of any other year in the history of the institution, and as a natural result 
it has proved itself worthy of the distinclion of being the best. Possibly tlie Fresh- 
men have been considered a little green at times, but this is only the fault of youth 
and freshness. It cannot be expected that two hundred live people can get a worn, 
dignified. Senior look, a worldly-wise Junior smile, or even acquire the eloquence 
of a Sophomore all in one year — hut just watch them. 

The Bible, or some other good book says, "By their works ye shall know them." 
If such be the case, then the Freshmen have taken their first steps toward recog- 
nition and fame, for the class contains in embryo, future educational leaders, gov- 
ernors, senators, presidents, and other persons of accomplishment, besides those who 
will make admirable helpmates for them. 

As a class of Freshmen representing our Alma Mater and its high ideals, we 
are determined to devote our lives to true service and so find our paths enriched by 
the guidance of wisdom and happiness. That none of us ever forget the ideals of 
our dear school and that they may be exemplified in our lives and in the lives of 
others is the hope and desire of the Freshman Class of 1922. 



Page Fifty-Six 



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I 



31 Dcra 

■ 




Gillnian 
Atkins 
Hillman 
Mc Key 
Caldwell 



M..rley 

Noalker 

Staley 

Packard 

Fagen 



Anderson 

Starr 

Perry 

Allred 

Calder 



Wixon 
Hod son 
McAuley 
Wixom 
Jensen 



Killpack 
Carling 
Straw 
Miner 
W. Rigby 

Page Fifty-seven 



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Bromley 


Anderson 


Harris 


Marley 


Smart 


Chapman 


Bond 


Hales 


Erickson 


Bennett 


Hurst 


Guyman 


Porter 


Bentley 


Anderson 


Cravens 


Stevenson 


Clark 


Whiting 


Rigby 


Pridie 


Boss 


Bunnell 


Ashley 


Swindle 



Page Fifty-eiglit 



ID ■! 



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=3Bai 




Page Fifty-nine 



10 ac 







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in I iMiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiHiiimmiiiHiil 



BANYAN 



liiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniiimiiiiiiiiii 



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3B □ 




Mortensen 

Anderson 

Miller 

Reid 

Reichert 



Page Sixty 






Boyer 

Bushman 

Wright 

Cheever 

McCoard 



Biddulph 

Browning 

Johnson 

Christensen 

Dougall 



Bayles 

Young 

Reynolds 

Lindsey 

Manson 



Christensen 
Packard 
Bun- 
Vance 
Seamount 



31 □!=] 



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' ■ dc=3 




Page Sixty-one 



ID ac 



3B ai 



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NieUiin 


Femr 


Kirkliam 


Wheeler 




W. Frandsen 


Petersfin 


Clark 


Ludlow 


Probst 




Carson 


Anderson 


\^i!]r.ont 


Herm|)<. 


Johnson 




Thorn 


Hackett 


Cowley 


Nelson 


Parker 




Coy. 


Livingston 


Stoker 


Stuart 


G. Frands 


en 


Thorne 


Page Sixty-two 













\n ■! 



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Page Sixty-three 



3B a 



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3B Dl 




G. Harris McCoard 

Hillman 



Jacobson Harris Talmage 

Rigbv Crandall Wilkinson 



^Z5he Frosh 



A "Frosh" is but a Senior in the making; 

He has but three short, pleasant years to go: 
He, like the grass of spring, at last is waking. 

But, like the oak, his growth is strong — and slow. 

His verdant ways announce that youthful tissue 

Mad to absorb, is flouting all that's past: 
He lacks, 'tis true, in finding out life's issue. 

But give him time and he'll arrive at last. 

— "/?u6e" Harrison. 



Page Sixty-four 



ID BC 



31 Dl 



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Page Sixty-five 



31 ni=n 



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Page Sixty-six 



Fourth Year Class (RoZZ 

MARCUS BEAN, President 
CAMILLE CRANDALL, Vice-President 
EVELYN MAESAR, Y. News Reporter 
LILA ELLERTSON, Secretary and Treasurer ■ 



Russell Hughes 
Melba Peterson 
Clarence Dunant 
Lyda Parcell 
Inez Warnick 
Zella Thomas 
LaVon Harrington 
Delece Andelin 
Fern Ludlow 
Afton Harding 
Lewis Wilde 
Faun Davis 
Aleitha Stagg 
L'Trenne Andelin 
Norma Bandley 
Vera Bown 
Beulah Hatton ' 
LaV erne Page 
Ida Slack 
Orpha Jones 
Kate Slevens 



Eva Poulson 
Holbert Stewart 
M>Tle Penrod 
Stanford Powelson 
Lynn Wakefield 
Erma Murdock 
Mark H. Pyne 
Fred Meldrum 
Melba Stubbs 
Inez Daybell 
Ella Brown 
Zoe Hansen 
Wendell Chiistensen 
Devere Hansen 
Sheldon Christensen 
Clark L. Bayles 
Nina Huish 
J. Leon While 
Oral Knudsen 
Loran Scott 



■ 

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3B □! 



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Butts 


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Ellertsen 


Harris 


Petersen 


Peterson 


Booth 


Penrod 


Davies 


Maeser 


Stevens 


Bown 

Page Sixty-seven 



31 ai 



ID Hc: 



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BABY CRAWL AND HORSE SHOE PITCHING TOURNAMENT 



Page Sixty-eight 



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■ 




STUDENT BODY 
GOVERNMENT 




Page Sixty-nine 



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liiiiiinimmimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiii ] P^l^ 



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Student Body Officers 



A. Ray Olpin 
President 



Wayne Mayhew 
Second Vice President 



Alice Ludlow 
First Vice President 



LaVieve Huish Vera Hinckley 

Editor of White and Blue Secretary and Historian 



J. Stewart Williams 
Editor of Banyan 



A. Glen Hubbard 
Editor of Y Neivs 



W. Glen Harmon 
Editor of Y's Guy 



LaVon Billings 
Dramatic Manager 



Vernon Tolboe 
Athletic Mianager 



E. H. Harter 
Debating Manager 



Meith Maeser 
Yell Master 



Carl Christensen 
Business Manager of Y News 



Page Seventy 



3r. □! 



31 ac=> 



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Page Seventy-one 



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Student Body Council 



Wayne Mayhew 
Second Vite President 



Ray Olpin 
President 



Alice Ludlow 
First Vice President 



Vera Hinckley 
Secretary and Historian 



Meith Maeser 
Yell Master 



Glenn Hubbard 
Editor of the Y News 



Vernon Talboe 
Athletic Manager 



Stewart Williams 
Editor of the Banyan 



La Vieve Huish Glenn Hannon 

Editor of the White and Blue Editor of the Y's Guy 



La Von Billings 
Dramatic M<inager 



Carl Christensen 
Business Manager of the Y News 



Hyrura Harter 
Debating Manager 



Archibald West 
Senior Class President 



Fred Markham 
Junior Class President 



Briant Decker 
Sophomore Class President 



Royden Dangerfield 
Freshman Class President 



Ezra Nixon 

First and Second Year 
Representative 



Marcus Bean 

Third and Fourth Year 
Representative 



Page Seventy-two 



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Page Seventy-three 



ID BC 



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Wayne Mayhew 
Director 



West Parkinson 
Assistant Director 



Carlyle Maw 
Assistant Director 



Celestial Johnson 
Assistant Director 



Elaine Christensen 
Assistant Director 



Jane Hibbert 
Assistant Director 



T 



will, 
will 
dent 



The Public Service Bureau 



HE Public Service Bureau was organized about three years ago. At that time it was 

a mere idea, existing only in the minds of a few progressive students and faculty 

members. Now it is one of the most important of our student activities. Although 

a great stride has been made toward our ideal, the activity is still in its infancy. It 

in years to come, be the most important one activity in the student body because more people 

participate in it and more people will feel its influence than in any other phase of stu- 

life. 



Like all other universities throughout the country, the Young University is endeavoring, 
through its extension department, to offer educational advantages to the many who are unable 
to attend college. Thus it becomes a much greater factor for good in the world, because it 
serves more people. This ideal of greater service to a greater number is the fundamental pur- 
pose of the Public Service Bureau. Almost equal in importance, however, is another pur- 
pose, viz: the opportunity which it affords for students to serve. We believe we are the only 
university student body in the world which fosters activities of this kind. A department within 
the student body which offers to serve the community; which helps to extend the influence of 
the university, and which at the same time offers students an opportunity to serve and to give 
expression to their talents, is surely an ideal worthy of being added to our traditions. 

The Public Service Bureau this year has sent out programs that have upheld the standard of 
the school in every respect. They have been programs that have helped to create and stimulate 
the desire for the higher type of entertainmnts. 

In addition to the regular Public Service programs, a new activity has been advanced — 
that of the B. Y. U. Lyceum Course. Though this year is but the beginning of this step, the 
numbers sent out have been welcomed with appreciation and enthusiasm. Ten lyceum programs 
Aave been sent out this year — five to Pleasant Grove and five to American Fork. Next year anci 
the years following, it is hoped that this form of activity will penetrate into every county of 
the state, and perhaps reach beyond. As only the energetic and most talented students will he 
allowed to represent the school in this line, it is believed that it will prove an incentive for bigger 
accomplishments. 

During the year 1921-22, fifty-two programs have been sent out; four hundred sixty people 
have taken part, and twenty-three thousand people were present at these programs, including 
the lyceum numbers. 

The service offered by the students has not been given alone for personal gain, but in 
order that the enterprise with which they are interested will go on and succeed. 

Page Seventy-four 



3B Ql 



31 ni — I 



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Page Seventy-five 



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— "" • — Tim I 



y News Staff 



A. (rlen Hubbard 
Editor 



Carl Christensen 

Business Mamiger 





Briant Decker 






Associate Editor 




na Creer 




Alberta Huish 


Clubs 




Special Articles 



Minnie Finley 

Special Articles 

Harold Bentley Robert Anderson 

Sport Editor Circulation Manager 

Nancy Bird Gladys Loynd 

News Service Reporter Assembly Lectures 



Margaret Hackelt 

Personals 

Anna Marie Eggertsen Lillie D. Mecliam 

Dramatics Music 

Wayne C. Booth Carlyle Maw 

Special Articles Exchange 



Page Seventy-six 



ID ac 



■ r^ 



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Page Peventy-seven 



31 Dl 



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3B ni 



Banyan Staff 







Stewart 


Williams 








Editor 






Helen 


Candland 




Gertrude Olson 


Associate 


Editor 




Associate 


Editor 


Lynn Wakefield 




Ruth Buckley 




Joseph Jarvis 


Vivian Bentley 


Photographer 




Typist 




Business Manager 


Photographer 


West Parkinson 










Wanda Boyack 


Bunyon Editor 




Roland Browning 
Artist 




LaRelle Bushman 
Artist 


Calendar 



Page Seventy-eight 



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30 ac 




ASrEX GROVE IN THE CLUTCH OF KING WINTER 




STEWARTS FORK WHEN SNOWCOVERED 



Page high:y-t\vo 



10 ac 



IB Dl 



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=1* 



Y Educational Association 



Griselda Olson Mable Giles 



Verda Miner 



Rachel Hollbrook Myrtle Anderson Julia Johnson 



Evan Madsen 



Aha Gillman 



Edna Sumsion Winona Franson 



Devello Whatcott Clara Boss 



Myrtle Childs Rossalie Clayson 



Lois Buell 



Ruby Wright 



Lecta Miller 



Vida Fugal Radcliffe AUred 



Page Eighty-four 



laac 



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Page Eighty- five 



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Y Educational Association 



Nellie Chapman 



(Continued) 



Lela Willett Chas. Johnson 



Rebbecca Cottrin Lois Myrup 



Mary Harris Bess Reynolds 



Florence Gross Lyle Glazier Florence Pridie 



Rhoda Poulson Ellen Cowlev Susa Whitaker 



Nancy Bird 



Amasa Caldwell Fern Ludlow John McConkie 



Delia Carson Mildred Makin 



Page Eighty-Six 



Id BC 



31 Ql 



31 Dl 



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Page Eiglity-seven 



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Home Economics Cluh 



Hazel Noble Helen Roylance Leona Booth 

Vice President 



Jennie Elder 



Lorenda John Amy Poulson Helen Talmage 

President 



Gertrude Olsen Mazie Campbell Pearl Soutlnvick Helen Carroll Ethel Cutler 



Tirzie Cheever Etta Morley Vilate Elliot Velyn Bayles 



Lela Maudsley Leah Habs Nellie Ohlwiller Leah Chipman Edith Booth 



Verna Walker Gladys Seamount Katherine Bennet Annie Randall 



Delia Carson Gertrude Frandson Marian Gardner Phoebe Sauls Phebe Linford 



Olive Randall Ethel Parker 



Page Eighty-eight 



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Page Eighty-nine 



31 ai 



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■ 



CA^ Cluh 



Harold Lundell 
Vice President 



Arthur McCoard 



Erval Christensen Delmar B. Hair Byron Monson Ralpli Philljpj Vivian Bentley 



Clark Bayles Ivan W. Young \ ern \^ right 



Ken Weight 
President 



Myron Boley 



Harold Knndsen R. C. Lichfield Cyril Vance Ernest Clayton 



Albert Hutchings ^'ayne C. Booth Leland E. Killpack 

Secretary and Reporter 



Page Ninety 



ID BC 



SBQI 






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Page Ninety-one 



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31 Dl 



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Gem State Cluh 



Donald Hacking 
Stanley Dean Eva Hansen 

Bryant R. Clark E. W. Parkinson 



L. Elmer Peterson 
Rhoda Clark Myrtle Henderson 

Reed Harris Twayne Austin 



Harrison R. Merrill 
Myrtie Jensen Kathryn Bennett 

Rudger Walker Albert Golden 



Mr. and Mrs. Mableby 
Lovel A. Killpack L. Ray Robinson 

Ethel Cutler Gladys Killpack 



Agnes Farnsvvorth 



Myrtice Burr 



Leland E. Killpack 



Page Ninety-two 



la ac 



3B ai 



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Page Ninety-three 



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laac 



3B □ 



CAvizona Club 



Harold White 



LeGrand Noble 
President 



Hazel Noble Qus. Harris 



Curtis Bushman Jane Hibbert 

I ice President 



Afana McElrath Joe Jarris 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Frank McElrath Marv Cheney Clinton Harris 



Leon White Rolon BiimhaD 



Page Xinety-foar 



in BC 



■ a\ 



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Page Xinety-five 



ID BC 



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French Circle 



B. F. Cummings 
Marylene Maw Olga Wunderly 



Ed. Baird 
Ruby Baird Ila Dastrup j 

Wm. Harrison L'Trenne Andelin , 



C. Paxton Whitaker 
Louise Dastrup Nellie Clark 

Veda Scorup Gertrude Olson 



Myrtie Jensen Venice Rowley 

Reed Harris Rulon Brimhall 



Alice Taylor Helen Talmage 



Page Ninety-six 



ID BC 



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Page Ninety-seven 



ID BC 



31 ai 



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Archie W. West 



Myrtle Henderson 
Secretary 



R. C. Lambert 



Page Ninety-eight 



CyVlissionary Club 



Ray Olpin 



Meitli Maeser 
President 



Wendell Thome 



John McConkie Charles L. Johnson 



Llva Chipman 
f ice President 



Vernon Tolboe 



R. L. Clark 



.Merrill Bunnell 



Stanley Cox Wayne C. Boeth 

Ralph Keeler Paul B. Harding 



ID ac 



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31 ar — I 



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Page Ninety-nine 



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^adio Cluh 



Slewait Williams C. F. Eyiing 



Albeit Hutcliings Royden Dangerfield Reed McAuley Hunter Manson 



Rulon Biddulph 



Alice Taylor 



El win Clark 



Wayne Smart 



Stanley Cox 



Lynn Wakefield Homer \^ akefielJ 



Harold Cliristensen 



jPage One IhnnJte.I 



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(B. Y. U. Radio Station 

6APL 

THE I niversity now has a complete radio slati<in which has heen in operation for several 
montlis. The station which was only partly e<iuipped at the beginning of the school year 
is now fully equipped. While not as efficient as some of the other amateur stations, it 
it has made a very good records, and will rank with some of the best stations next year. 

The equipment consists of both transmitting and receiving apparatus. The transmitter is a 
1 K. W. spark set and was completed in February. With this set communication has been 
established with the stations in Pomona, Woodland, Riverside, Sacramento, San Jose, and Ukiah, 
California, Bozeman, Montana, Ephraim, Utah, also several stations whose location is unknown. 
In addition the set has been heard in Los Angeles and Walnut Lane. Califbrnia; Hoquiam, 
Washington, Eugene, Oregon; New Mexico, and Salt Lake City, Utah. 

The station has a government license, the call being 6APL. It is operated by three of the 
members of the club who have government amateur licenses. 

The receiving set, also incomplete at the opening of school, is now complete; consisting of 
a short wave-regenerative tuner, a long wave honey-comb coil tuner, and a detector and two 
stages of amplification. With this receiver, amateur stations have been heard from all the 
intermountain and pacific coast states, also a number of stations in the eastern and northern 
states, some of which are: New Mexico, Arizona, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, Wisconsin, Minnesota, 
Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Ohio, and Illinois. Music is reguarly heard from several 
California stations, Denver, Seattle, and New Mexico. Several telephone stations are also re- 
ceived, of which the Avalon Phone cotr^ea in especially loud. Government stations and ships 
at sea are also heard. 

With the long wave set, commercial and navy stations are heard from both coasts. Hono- 
lula, Panama Canal, Mexico and Alaska. 

In addition to the radio set, the club also had a code instruction table, where the members 
practice on the code. 



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Royal Rooters Club 



Meith Maser 
President 



Clyde Pulsipher 
Stanley Cox 



Wendell Thome 
Vice-President 



Radcliff Allred 

Inin Slack 
Arlie U. Miner 



Parley Lundell 



Merrill Bunnel 



Earnest Greer 
Ray Kirkham 
Eugene Hillman 

Francis Wilcox 
Amasa Caldwell 
Royden Dangerfield 



Harlen Adams 
Secretary and Treasurer 



John McConkie 

Leon Ivy 

Clarence Jensen 



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Thos. J. Smart 

R. 

Bert Fisher 

J. F. Wakefield 

W. A. Paxton 

Mrs. J. S. Rasband 



Alice Melbourne Mrs. Tlios. J. Smart 

C. Litchfield Mrs. R. D. Litchfield 

Mrs. W. A. Paxton C. L. Johnson 

Mr. J. S. Rasband W. F. Atkins 

Mrs. W. F. Atkins Everett Mecham 

Mrs. Everett Mecham 



<T37ze Benedi(^s Cluh 

Officers 

W. T. Atkin President 

T. L. Snian Secretary 

THE members of the Benedicts Club testify to all people, married, engaged, or 
neutral, that school life for the married is ideal; that the ranks of matrimony 
.should by no means bar persons from enjoying the mental and social develop- 
ment of college life. Their testimony is affirmed bv the couples who have joined the 
ranks of the married during the school year. The student body president, A. Ray 
Olpin and his new bride seal the testimony. 



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OFFICERS 

President Wanda Boyack 

Vice President Mrs. Zina Hickman 

Secretary and Treasurer ...... Helen Candland 

Membership Committee Ina Creer, Chainnan; Lucile Tuttle, Mrs. Lee Baker 
Faculty Advisor T. Earl Pardee 



CAround the Drama Center 



THE Drama Center is steadily approaching the realization of its great aim, "to be a center 
for the revolving of dramatic activity." To accomplish this, the organization, while it 
can profitably be kept within the confines of the University, would be more effective 
if extended to reach the drama lovers of the community. The organization, affiliated 
as it is with the Drama League of America, aims to stimulate a desire for the best in drama, 
and then satisfy that desire through co-operation with league performances that can be brought 
to local centers. 

The Drama Center program for this year has been enjoyed from the standpoints of both en- 
tertainment and educational values. The numbers have included a series of lectures on Italian 
artists, representing all fields of art. and ranging in time from Virgil to Caruso; alternated with 
reviews of plays representative of the trend of current drama, — the best as it is being presented 
on the stages of the world's capitals. This program has been very consistent and also sufficiently 
varied to eliminate any suggestion of monotony. 

Besides the weekly programs, the Drama Center was instrumental in supporting the appear- 
ance of Tony Sarg's Marionettes at the University for the first time. An increased membership 
will enable the Center to undertake more entertainments of this nature. 

The Center of "22 extends wishes for great accomplishments for the organization in its 
advancement. 



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"Y" Commerce Cluh 

Wayne Mayhew President 

Royden Dangerfield Vice President 

Stanley Dean , Secretary and Treasurer 

Bob Anderson Chairman Finance 

Vic Taylor Chairman Lecture and Entertainment 

>^ ■ 'V TRING the winter of 1921-22 a new organization has been effected in the B. Y. U. — 

^1 1 the Y Commerce Club. Tlie purpose of the club is to put into practical use, by 

JL^ comin}; in contact with big business men, their ideals and methods, the theory taught 

by the College of Commerce and Business Administration, and to foster good fellowship. 

Under the excellent leadership of Wayne Mayhew and the other members of the executive 
committee, the club has grown until it has a membership of thirty-seven students of the Busi- 
ness School. 

The members have enjoyed semi-monthly luncheons during the year at which interesting 
musical numbers and talks have been given. Prominent business men from the town have 
delivered educational speeches on current problems of the business world. 

Like all other successful organizations it aims high. One of the aims of the club is to build 
in the future a club house for out of town students. 

It is the purpose of the present members to make the Y Commerce Club an important part 
of the Business College and to increase its size and importance until it becomes a vital part of 
this institution. 



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COACH ALVIN TWITCHEL 

Coach Twitchel has an enviable record to recommend 
him to the B. Y. U. He is one of tlie best football 
players ever turned out at the U. A. C. He was All 
Rocky Mountain Conference Tackle in 1917, and cap- 
tain of the team that tied for the All Rocky Mountain 
Conference honors. He has also been active in basket 
ball and track, and may be regarded as a four letter 
man. 

At the Y he has started our first College Football 
team on its road to success, and he has also been in- 
strumental in bringing in Basket Ball and Track Vic- 
tories. 





MANAGER VERNON TALBOE 

^ ernon Talboe has always been on the job. He has 
given real service in his managership. He is well liked 
by all tlie fellows because of his affabilitv and because 
of his cheerfulness in times of disaster. The football men 
have felt, this year for the first time, that they have 
had really good equipment. Due to Mr. Talboe"s ef- 
forts new suits were purchased for nearly all of tlie men 
on the squad. In connection with Coach Roberts he is 
fostering the biggest athletic carnival in the historv of 
the school. 



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GLENN (SUNS) SIMMONS (Fullback) 

The captain of the team. The most brilliant of the 
players, he easily merited the title of "The Mercury of 
the Gridiron." He is fast on end runs and knows how- 
to hit the line. He is slippery as an eel because he runs 
low. He has had some football experience in the ma- 
rines and a little at the Payson High School. He is an 
old B. Y. U. man who has won honors for himself and 
the school every year he has been here. 



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MARK (DOC) PYNE (Halfback) 

A good open field man: an amazing amount of 
speed. He was responsible for some of the most spec- 
tacular plays of the entire season. He is the son of a 
sporting dad who stands proudly on the side lines. He 
is in love. 



PAUL (PACK) PACKARD (Halfback) 

Captain of next year's team. A hard hitter on 
the line. He works on the theory that the larger the 
man, the harder he falls and so he tackles the firecest 
among the enemy ranks. His middle name is grit and 
he knows no fear. He's a Freshman fresh from the 
Spring\'ille High School and he's majoring in busi- 
ness. We throw out a hint to the co-eds. He's only 
twenty so do be careful. 





LAVONIA (BONY) FULLER (Quarterback) 

The tactician of the crew. He is a good clear thinker 
and knows how to direct the plays. He is a good open 
field runner. He is a brilliant player and when once 
he gets started down the field, he is never caught. He 
had some experience at the Tintic High School. He is 
the son of a stake president but he inherits none of the 
attributes of such an office. He has an irresistable smile, 
twinkling eyes and a sense of humor that is unquench- 
able. 



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KENNETH (DOC) NELSON (End) 

A wonder at drop kicking. He is especially compe- 
tent in intercepting or taking forward passes because 
of his geographical location near the sky line. He is a 
Junior, with no previous football experience. He is try- 
ing out the B. Y. U. for the first time in his young life. 
We like him immensely. Tall girls walk near him just 
to get the thrill that comes to the cuddled. He has an 
adorable way of chuckling after the joke is cold storaged. 



LYNN (MABLE) MILLER (End) 

A steady and consistent player. He is fast but not 
spectacular. He stands like Horatio at the bridge. Mable 
is the essence of good sportsmanship. No matter how 
boistrous the game becomes, he is always a gentleman. 
Beneath his ruddy thatch is a keen mind that has car- 
ried him triumphantly thru his entire school year. His 
Dad is a stake president and so Mable is going on a 
mission this spring. He's the kind we want back at 
the Y. 





ELWOOD (RIP) JACKSON (Center) 

A good man for center. He is steady, sure and calm. 
He goes thru a game systematically and gets results. 
He is built for athletics. He was less cautious than 
Hindu and so his matrimonial status became known 
to the Benedict Club and he was sued for dues. His 
studying capacities are not highly developed and so 
he is still scratching his red hair about a major. No 
one has even dimly suspected what it is. 



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IVAN (IKEj YOUNG (Tackle) 

One of our best. He looks like a real college foot- 
ball player. He never saw a football before this year 
yet he developed into a whirlwind tackle. He is fas', 
and sure and he uses his hands well. He is a good man 
to open holes on offense and equally good on defense. 
His high school experience at the Y made him high 
point man at the division track meet. Besides this he 
is ideal in scholarship and admired by everyone. 



VICTOR (VIC) HATCH (Tackle) 

A battering ram. Good at breaking up plays, steady 
sure. Vic is never known to speak when it is not nec- 
essary. He simply goes his way, like Kipling's cat, all 
by his wild lone. He is a Freshman this year with a 
major still in the untried future. 





EMMET (FAT) HAYS (Guard) 

Is good at breaking up plays. He is heavy and 
tenacious. He holds cave man honors next to Hindu 
and all team championship in water consumption. He 
is always dry. He licks up on the contents of tlie 
whole bucket, sponge and all. He comes to us from 
the Pleasant Grove High School after a year at the U. A. 
C. He has had experience in basket ball, baseball and 
football. Regard him we beg of you. Does he look 
like he is majoring in english? He is!!!! 



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TRUMAN (HINDUl PARTRIDGE (Guard) 

Hasn't he the magnificent carcass though? Only 
( ighteen years old and a Colossus of Rhodes. He's a 
shark at forward passing and holds all honors in punt- 
ing. As a line man he shows up well. He is suspected 
not only of heing spoken for but of being taken for 
life. He grows eyelashes for advertising purposes, 
]irize specimans — measuring two inches. Finally, he 
claims to be majoring in biology. No alarming indi- 
:'lions have been recorded, however. 



FRANK. (BUDDY) MORGAN 

Is a good quarter or halfback. He played in several 
of the league games. He has the possibilities of develop- 
ing into a splendid football man because of his swift- 
ness and speed. He is a Freshman from Spanish Fork 
with two years of high school football experience. He 
has also taken honors in the 100 yds. and 220. He is 
very brilliant in chemistry. 





EARL (MONTY) GROSEBECK 

A prospective end for next year. He has possibilities 
that were undeveloped because of a bad ankle. Spring- 
villa gave him his splendid high school training and 
sent him to us as a most promising Freshman. He is a 
very shy young thing which is most commendable in 
these days of bold, bad men. 



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RULON (ABE) DIXON 

Was sadly hoodooed this year. First he burned 
his fingers, then he broke his ribs and presently he 
sprained his ankles. Altogether his red headed luck 
kept him generally busted up. In spile of this he kept 
oil the field till the end of the season. Abe is a chicken 
fancier, a sheep fancier and a prize winner by habit. 
Also he is a Senior with this wondrous philosophy: 
"There ain't no Hell." 



-MARCUS iFRIJOLE) BEAN 

Was culled from the ranks of the Secondary Training 
School. He is an adorable youngster with a smile that 
keeps the Students Supply from bankruptcy. He takes 
an active part in all school activities. This year he is 
president of the unmatriculated students. Frijole is very, 
very young but he has a marvelous determination. He 
promises to make a splendid quarterback when he grows 
up. He has a good head and he's a clear thinker. He 
carries the ball well. 





WTLFORD (FETE) MENDENHALL 

Came in late but he did splendid work while he was 
here. He made good at quarterback and halfback. He 
was a special student, taking only agronomy and politi- 
cal science. He has good chances for a position to 
ihe leam next year. 



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LESLIE (DUTCH) CORNABY 

As a center or guard ought to make a good bid for 
a position next year. He comes from Spanish Fork and 
is majoring in political science. He has only made his 
voice heard on the football team as yet. We expect to 
hear more from him next year. 



VICTOR (VIC) TAYLOR 

Is noted for his tenacity. He's a sticker — out every 
night to help the other fellows get into shape. He 
keeps on diggin' in spite of handicaps and claims he'll 
be all Rocky Mountain End next year. Vic has acres 
of friends. He is the son of a stake president though 
you wouldn't suspect it. He's a wonderful? scholar, but 
he has high hopes in spite of his hair and disposition of 
eventally, if not soon, taking out a degree in business 
administration. 





ROSS (SWEN) NIELSON 

Is a Scandinavian snowslide in athletics. He is a 
product of the American Fork High School where he 
participated in every sport featured there. He had 
never played football until, as a Freshman, he came to 
the B. Y. U. He got acquainted with the game, slowly 
but by the end of the season he was enthusiastic. He is 
reputed as holding the long distance drinking cham- 
pionship of the valley, his capacity being several gallons 
of certain beverages. 



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MEITH (KAISER) MAESER 

Is a good prospective center for next year. He is 
a hard worker and a wizard at forward passing. He 
could throw the ball farther than anyone on the field. 
He comes from the Murdock Academy where he played 
basket ball and engaged in track work. Though he has 
been on a mission he is still bolsheyiki. He has lovely 
parents and now needs only a violent attack of love to 
make him perfect. 



BERNARDO ( ALL CONFERENCE I BOWMAN 

Is a huge blonde giant who comes from the Kanab 
High School, where he received honors for basketball. 
He has played football for the "Y'" on the high school 
team of last year and college ball this season. He is 
a quiet chap with especial aptitude for auto-mechanics. 
He is roted for being a hard, consistent worker. 






FENTON (SENATOR) REEVES 

Has the inspiring physique of a good athlete. He had 
two years of experience in basket ball and a wealth of 
training in track work at the Millard Academy. At the 
B. Y. U. he has played college basket ball for two 
years. This was his first year at football. It foretold 
marked success if he slicks to it. for this mighty junior — 
a true son of the soil. 



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(B. y. U. vs. O^den A. A. 



OUR two football names with the O^den A. A. clearly represented our first 
year's improvement in the major sport. 

In the first game, at Ogden, October 22, we were defeated by a narrow 
margin. 17-12. Although our men had no alibi to offer, it is conceded that we lost 
by an accident, a most costly fumble. 

Determined to show that they were above such careless plaving and that they 
had learned by experience, the Y players defeated the Ogdenites in their Thanks- 
gi\Tng return game by a score of 48-7. The game will long be remembered as a 
thriller, being characterized bv long runs. Five of these strolls were taken by 
our men. netting five touchdowns. The two longest were made by Fuller and 
Simmons and were eighty and sixty yards, respectively. As the last game of the 
season it was a most fitting close, as it really showed what our team was capable of 
doing. 



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(B. y. 17. vs. U. A. c. 

THE above picture gives a glimpse of an exciting moment during a game 
that will be remembered as an example of clean, consistent football playing. 
It was during this contest that the sport approached the old time aspect 
which won for it the name of gridiron. 

A week previous the Y boys had yielded to the Northerners. Today they were 
determined to retrieve. 

The first period was fast, exciting and hard-fought; but neither side was able 
to carry the ball over the opponents line. 

Fake plavs by the visitors featured in the next quarter but these were suc- 
cessfully me' by the Y boys. Gradually the pigskin crawled toward a touchdown 
for the White and Blue. The Loganites fought hard, but the ball was finally 
wriggled across the line. The first half ended with the score 7-0. 

With the exception of a few fumbles at first, the game reached its maximum 
for clean, consis'.ent playing during the third i)eriod. A second touchdown was 
made in yardage before the shot sounded. This was put over in the last period 
and the game ended with the score at 21-0 in favor of the \. 



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(B. Y. U. vs. U. of U. 



T 



HE U. of U. freshmen succeeded in defeating the B. Y. U. football squad in 
the two ofanies of the season. 



Founder's Day will be remembered as the time of the first defeat. Until 
the end of the last half the score stood and 0, but at this point the U succeeded 
in rolling the egg over the line twice in rapid succession. The final score was 14-0. 

The return game at Salt Lake was characterized by carelessness on bo'h sides. 
However, the Y team showed improvement as did the greenlings. The score was 
greatly improved over that of the previous game and finally stood 16-14 for the U. 



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Schedule of Games 



V. of U. Frosh vs. B. Y. U. at Provo. October 17th. Won by U. of U. 140. 

Ogden A. A. vs. B. Y. U. at Ogden. October 22nd. Won by Ogden A. A. 17-12. 

B. Y. C. vs. B. Y. U. at Provo. October 29th. Won by B. Y. U. 14-13. 

A. C. Frosh vs. B. Y. U. at Logan November 5th. Won by A. C. 37-0. 

A. C. Frosh vs. B. Y. U. at Provo. November 11th. Won by B. Y. I. 210. 

U. of V. Frosh vs. B. Y. U. at Salt Lake November 10th. Won by U. of U. 16-14. 

Ogden A. A. vs. B. Y. U. at Provo November 24th. Won by B. Y. U. 48-7 



Summary of the Season 

COLLEGE football was initiated into the B. Y. U. this year for the first time 
in twenty years. Football, which was practically unknown to the students of 
the B. Y., came into its own again as our college major sport. The team, 
which was entered in the intercollegiate freshmen class, made wonderful strides for 
novices in the game. They were successful in practically breaking even with their 
victories and defeats, showing considerable improvement toward the latter part of 
the season. For the first year in football competition they may well be proud of 
their record. 

The team opened the season against the Pavson lads, who showed the best foot- 
ball machine south of Salt Lake. The game resulted in the first victory for the 
newly organized team. In the second game against the U. of U. at Sail Lake, the 
first intercollegiate game, stage fright seemed to seize the boys and a large score 
was counted against them before they really got down to business, thus the "U" milk- 
lings were given the victory. In Ogden the game was lost in the last two minutes 
of play because of a fumble, but in spite of the 14-12 score fans considered them 
the superior team. 

The B. Y. C. met defeat at the hands of our team, on our own field, in the next 
game. The game was close throughout and hard contested. The Young team lost 
to the A. C. in the game at Logan, but when the Aggie younsters visited Provo they 
found a different team, and were defeated 28-0. 

The University has been admitted as a full fledged member of the Rocky Moun- 
tain Conference, and next year the B. Y. U. will again step into the field of Varsity 
Football. 



Vi 



Page One Hundred Twenty 

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CAPTAIN KENNETH (BUCKLEY) WEIGHT (Guard) 

Is the best guard on offensive we have ever had; fast, 
clever, agile, athletic. He is very elusive and difficult 
for his opponents to handle. Though light, he makes 
up for his lack of weight in speed. This year is his 
third year of college ball. Each year he has gained 
added success and prominence. He has innumerable 
friends and he is admired and respected by every mem- 
ber of his team. As the captain of the famous quintet 
de led his mates through a most successful season. 



One Hundred Twenty-two 



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RUSSEL (RUSS) SWENSON (Forward) 

Is a new man and new here but he has gained con- 
siderable prominence as a forward. His whole game is 
characterized by wonderful sportsmanship. Whatever 
happens he is always polite. Because of his intense shy- 
ness he has never learned to dance and his motto has be- 
come "no wedding bells for me." He comes from the 
Pleasant Grove High School where he was student body 
president in 1920. He goes to Germany this spring 
on a mission. His friends wish him unbounded success. 



GLENN (SIMMS) SIMMONS (Forward! 

Is an old man on the Y team, playing now his third 
year of college ball. He was a member of the famous 
team of 1919 that won second place in the world. Sims 
has the reputation of playing in perfect form. He knows 
just when to get in and out of action. Before his return 
to school he acted as coach at the Price High School. 
We are hoping that he will be with us again next year. 





RALPH (BUDDY) KEELER (Ceneri 

Is a real B. Y. U. athlete. He played high school 
ball here with such success that he made all state high 
school center. After his first year of college games 
he filled a mission of two years to the eastern stales. 
This is his second year of college experience and it has 
been equally as successful as the first. He has come 
up to our highest standards. While not a brilliaait 
player. Buddy is unusually steady and dependable. 



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PAUL (APOSTLE) PACKARD (Guard) 

Is a new white hope. He is a hard fighter and has 
gained the reputation of being "the cleanest demon in 
basket ball.' He is rather small but he makes up for 
it in consistent battle and determination. Pack is just a 
freshman playing his first year of college ball. His 
reputation is widespread, however. So widespread, in 
fact, that he was elected the most popular man at the 
University. 



TRUMAN (HINDU) PARTRIDGE 

Is a shark at guard, center, or forward. He is re- 
markably sure on baskets. If he increases in speed 
next season as much as he has this, he will be one of the 
best players in the state. For three years he has played 
high school ball for the Y and each year he has brought 
added fame to the University. 





ELWOOD (RIP) JACKSON (Guard) 

Is a very promising guard. He has had several years 
of experience on the B. Y. H. S. team and was a mem- 
ber of the quintet that went to the tournament last year. 
A stone wall defense he was until he got his hair mar- 
celled. That sad episode and his wife capturing episode 
were almost too much for one so young. His interest 
was necessarily divided. Next year he will be more 
accustomed to these thrills and will be able to concen- 
trate more completely on the thrills of the hoop. 



One Hundre'l Twenty-four 



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EARL (MONTY) GROSEBECK 

Is a new man playing his first year of college ball. 
He comes from Springville where he played on the di- 
vision championship team. He is a clean player, con- 
sistent, but not spectacular. He is a good team man. 
Rather shy but charming withal. He has more than 
average possibilities. 



LEO (FLOAT I MEREDITH 

Is yet an ui known quantity who will doubtless make 
good in the future. He resembles some great athlete 
Coach Twitchell has seen somewhere. Float has a pas- 
sion for swimming and skating. He appears very shv 
but it is an impression easily eradicated when one knows 
him. This is the testament given by one Ella Brown. 
He is an enchanting dancer, with the blue black hair 
of a raven's wing. 





ROSS (SWEN) NEILSON 

Comes from American Fork. He is a good center, 
forward and guard. He is a very fine team man and 
sacrificies to his team mates more than any other player 
on the floor. Steady and dependable, he will be one of 
the big men verv soon. 



One Hundred Twenty-five 



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FENTON (FENT) REEVES 

Is a big, splendidly built fellow, with a weal h of 
natural talent. He has had two years of high school 
experience at the Millard Academy and two years of 
trainins at the B. Y. Fent has a good chance to make 
the team next year. 



DIRECTOR E. L. ROBERTS 

Is "the hest coach in the west." He has been at the 
University for twelve years. During that time we have 
won six out of ten state championships in basket ball. 
Director Roberts has initiated the annual Timpanogas 
Hike, the Moonlight Hike, the Invitation Track Meet, 
the Athletic Carnival, the Thanksgiving Cross Country 
Run, the Sunrise Hikes, the Social Hours, and the non- 
commercialization of dances. 

He has developed a world's college basket ball team 
and two world's champions in track events. When he 
came to the B. Y. U. it was possible to get four hours 
of credit in Physical Education. Now it is a major 
department, offering thirty-six hours of credit. 

Director Roberts has charge of the wonderful work 
that is being done to further dancing and recreational 
ideals. He aims to make Provo the social, recreational, 
and athletic center of Utah. 



One Hundred Twenty-six 




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1922 Schedule 



Januan" 7 — Young \ arsity, 31, vs Y Frosh, 21. 

January 14 — Y, 45 vs. Lehi High School, 23. 

Januao 21— Y, 30 vs. W. A. A. of Salt Lake, 31. 
January 28 — Y, 35 vs. Provo Legion, 24. 

February 3— Y, 29 vs. U. at Salt Lake. 16. 
February 11 — Y, 39 vs. Aggies at Provo, 22. 
February 25— Y, 32 vs. U. of U. at Provo, 27. 
March 3 — Y, 35 vs. Aggies, 36. 

THE past history of the B. Y. U. is dotted with intercollegiate basketball chanv 
pionships. Out of fourteen years of competition the wearers of the "Y" have 
brought home nine state championships. This year they repeated the event, 
outplaying all intercollegiate rivals and establishing themselves as the undisputed 
Utah State Champions. 

The basketball season opened with the Y men facing the U. of U. in the latter's 
gym. Hoopsters were much questioning the result of the event, but after the game 
the B. Y. U. were looked on as the best quintette the state had witnessed for many 
years. They decisively outplayed and defeated the State University to the tune of 
28-16. 

In the next game the "Timp Imps" met and defeated the U. A. C. team on our 
own floor. Prenous to the game, the Aggies were praised as possible champs be- 
cause of their Montana victories, but all doubts in the minds of fans were dispelled, 
and but few questioned the winners of the State Title. 

The "U" came to Provo intent on winning a game at any cost. They exhibited 
remarkable fighting spirit, but were unable to stay the onrush of the White and 
Blue. This left another victory by the score of 27-32. 

The final game of the season lacked interest, because of the already established 
State Chanipions. As a result the Logan aggregation finally nosed the champs out 
of the victory. The game required two extra periods, leaving the Aggies with a two 
point margin. 



One Hundred Twenty-seven 



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Hayes 
Larsen 



Storrs 
Erdman 



Huber 
Miller 



Taylor 
Stewart 



Freshman Basket Ball History 

THE Freshman class of this year had an immense amount of 
basket ball material. The Class easily furnished the varsity 
team with five men . Even after these most prominent hoop- 
sters had left their ranks the greenlings walked off with the class 
series, carrying a set of scores that were all in favor of the Frosh. 
Aside from the men playing college ball, a strong team was formed. 
This team traveled considerably and played the following teams: 

Provo Legion 
Jordan High School 
Lehi High School 
American Fork Legion 
B. Y. Varsity 



One Hundred Twenty-eight 



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RALPH (BUDDY) KEELER 

Is an all around athlete and a most efficient track 
captain. He runs the high hurdles with a speed that 
makes the other schools feel weak and insignificant. 
His charming personality makes him at once the leader 
and the favorite among the cinder men. Victory and 
progress are his watchwords, as is verified by the rec- 
ords of the teams. 



One Hundred Thirty 



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•^^Tie n^eam 



Ralph Keeler 
Kenneth Weight 
Glen Simmons 
Kfillow Whitehead 
Homer Wakefield 
Frank Morgan 
Earl Swenson 
Karl Grosebeck 
Lynn Miller 
Alilus Markliam 



Fred Markliam 
Issac Taylor 
Ross Neilson 
Merrill Bunnell 
.1. H. Knudsen 
F. Paul Murdock 
Tninian Partridge 
Rufus Robertson 
Royal Chamberlain 
Cnrlis Biisliman 



Ivan Young 



One Hmnlreil Thirty-one 



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The Team 



T 



HE B. \. U. track team of 1922 is composed of several varieties 
of the human race. Take for instance '"Bud" Morgan. To look 
at him vou would think that Darwin had the right idea after all. 



We have on this august crew, men from all walks of life. Meith 
Maeser and Merrill Bunnell are the Moral Uplifters of the gang, by 
virtue of their having spent two years bringing honest souls to the 
faith in the North West. Ken Weight is having a very hard time to 
get along with the rest of the gang, this year, owing to the fact that 
he has promised a certain young lady that he would sign up with her 
for time and eternity. 

'"Buddy' Keeler is the Captain of the crew and he says that he 
is the master of the ship, having captured three women's hearts: and 
according to the law of ratio and proportion he should be able to 
captain at least thirty men. "Mabel" Miller, "Ike" Taylor and Earl 
Swensen are the Bright Lights of the team. They all come from 
rough places which is the cause, to a large extent, for their speed. Gl?n 
Simmons is the only member of the team who has gone in strong for 
Matrimony and of course he is good because he has to stay home at 
night and walk the floor with the baby, an occupation which would 
keep any man fit. Aldous Markham is worse than a married man. 
Married men will slip out with the boys once in a while, but not 
Aldous. Homer Wakefield is a slow worker, he won't consider any- 
thing short of a mile. Roland Whitehead is the "rough neck" of 
the school. The place he came from is about as hot as the place he 
is going to organize a '"coal-shoveler's union." 



One Hundred Thirty-two 



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Youn^ n^rack and Field 'Records 



Name 



Event Date 



Time or Distance 



Morgan Adams Pole vault 



1905 11 ft. 9 inches (State Record) 



Clinton Larsen Hish jump 1917 6 ft. ?■%■ inches (World Exhibit) 



Alma Richards Broad jump 1913 22 ft. 10 inches (State Record) 



Hans Peterson Hammer throw 1909 138 ft. 2 inches 



Alma Richards Shot put 



1913 41 ft. 9 inches (State Record) 



Alma Richards Discus throw 1913 121 ft. 11 inches l^tate Record) 



Chester Riddle 100 yard dash 1908 10 seconds 



Graham McAllister 220 yd. dash. 1905 23 seconds 



Against Stanford in dual meet. 
Homer Christensen 120 vd. Hurdles 



1910 15 4./5 seconds 



Lee Simmons 220 yd. Hurdles 1909 26 seconds (Stale Record) 



Ellis Chamberlain 410 vd. dash 1909 52 seconds 



Ellis Chamberlain Half mile run 1910 2:02 seconds 



Lyman Brown One mile run 1918 1 min. 37' j seconds 



One Honrired Thirty-three 



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TENNIS is rapidly becoming the most popular of minor sports at 
the "Y." This vear more interest has been taken in the game 
than ever before. The school now owns three fine clay courts 
which are kept in the best of condition throughout the season. The 
prospects for cement courts for the coming year are bright. 

The tennis association is larger and stronger this year than it has 
been in the past. It purchased new equipment for all courts and has 
given all its members full value for their money. 

Under the new Rocky Mountain rules, the team was changed from 
three to five men : one team of doubles being added. This gives more 
students a chance to win letters. 

This vear the '"Y" lost "Bill'" Snow, who was counted on to add 
much strength to the team. He is now in California, but we hope to 
have him back with us next year. 

The future prospects for tennis at the "Y" are nothing but the 
briahtest and we hope to have even better success in the future. 



1922 Schedule 

B. Y. U. vs. U. of U. Provo. April 28. 
B. Y. U. vs. U. of U. Salt Lake. May 11. 
B. Y. U. vs. A. C. U. Provo, May 15. 
B. Y. U. vs. V. A. C. Logan. May 22. 



L 



One Hundred Tliirty-fowr 



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^ouhles n'eam 

ELLWOOD JACKSON 
REED HOLT 



Singles ^eam 

HUNTER MANSON 





doubles Team 

REED GARDNER 
EARI, GROSEBECK 



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Tlie Start 




Cross Country Run 

Won by Homer Wakefield. Time: 21 minutes and 17 seconds. 

Theron Hall came in next, followed by W. A. Jones (Frosh), Hal 
Bentley (Soph). Harold Knudsen (Soph), and Nephi Christensen 
(Froshl. 

Thirty-five men entered and all but two finished within the thirty 
minute time limit. 

Three-fourths of the entrants were Freshmen and, true to tradi- 
tion, they won the turkey by a large margin of points. The Sopho- 
mores, their nearest rivals, came in with about half the Freshman 
score. 



One IluildrcJ Thirty-seven 



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Team 
Briaiit Decker Hamilton Calder T. Wm. Harrison Aldus Markham Harold Bentley 

Results of Meet 

U. of U 49 

A. C. U 11 

B. Y. U 3 



One Hiinrlreil Thirty -eight 



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CyVlusic Department 



Vj 



THE music department has functioned this year as only a wide awake, efficient 
department could have done: each section of the whole havins; perfected and 
made itself strong for cultural, communi;y service. 
TIic first offering to the public was the fall musical, which was followed by 
the Christmas Oratorio, "The Holv Citv." both presenting chorus, orchestra, and 
soloists in excellent renditions. 

The department, as a whole, aided much in making leadership week successful, 
furnishing parts and whole programs and musical festivals. 

At Easter time an Easter musical including the cantata, '"The Restoration.' 
was given, and the main part of '.he season was closed bv a musical treat in the 
form of a .Mav Musical Festival. 

The separate organizations of the music school have been especially active. The 
band, opening the season with a high class concert at Prove, has continually ap- 
peared in the surrounding cities of the county. The symphony and philharmonic 
orchestras have functioned of;en with appreciated success in concerts and devo- 
ti'inal exercises. The chorus has been exceptionally good, and the comic opera 
"The Tale of a Hat." which gave solo parts to some of its best talent was received 
with pleasure. The Ladies and Male Glee Clubs have been presented in several 
successful lyceum and concert programs at school and in neighboring school towns. 
The three contests for piano, violin, and voice, for which gold medals were given, 
were all represented by several talented contestants. 

Special attention has been given to duet, trio, and quartet work, and as a re- 
sult, brass, string, and vocal combinations have done much toward brightening 
the musical life of the school and the community. 

But the department, though wide awake and efficient, is small in compari- 
son with what the professors at its head are planning to make it. Next year's pro- 
gram will offer much new work and several new courses. The department will be 
divided into a junior and senior college, and work will assume a complete two years' 
work in both sections, making four years work, in all lines possible. Special new 
courses which are to be given and which will doubtless be very attractive to advanced 
musical students, are courses in kevboard harmony, fugue, cannon, counterpoint, 
music history, normal music, symphony orchestra work, orchestration, band arrange- 
ment, opera, and oratorio. 

Summer school work is also to be made most interesting. It is planned to pro- 
duce operas each summer, in connection with the annual Timp hikes, using the 
stages of the natural theatres at Aspen Grove. 

As the music department grows, offering its art as a gift in public service work, 
the school is bound to grow, not alone in culture, but in membership and popularity 
as well. 



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LADIES" CLEF. CLl B 




MALE GLEE CLUB 



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THE ORCHESTRA 



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MANDOLIN QUARTETTE 




PIANO QUARTETTE 



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BRIDAL VEIL FALLS 



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L\le Nels(iii 
Publicity 



Valentine Benlley 
President 



La\ erne Paj^e 
Vice-President 



.Margaret Walker 
Secretary and Treasure) 

Prof. E. H.'Eastmond 



The Art Service Cluh 



EXTENDING art into service is the aim of the Art Service Club. During the 
school year the following has been accomplished: decorations planned and 
made for various social functions: College Hall decorations for the Christ- 
mas, Easter and other Student Body programs; decoration of the Ladies' Gym- 
nasium for the "Y"' Final Ball, and other occasions: downtown window exhibits; 
painting of scenery and stage settings: costumes designed for plays and pageants 
including the "Poor Little Rich Girl," "Leadership Song Pageant"' and the "Vision 
of the Past" (Salt Lake Tabernacle). The Art Service functioned in the decorative 
work of Leadership week. 



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LA VON BILLINGS 
Manager of Dramatics 



AVON Billings has proved an able and competent manager of Dramatic 
Art. His devotion to his task and his business efficiency have been outstand- 
ing features in the growth of the department. 

The B. Y. U. Dramatic Art Department produces more plays yearly than any 
other educational institution, excepting those specializing in play production. 

Three college plays have been produced this year thus giving thirty-three students 
an opportunity for development and training. 

The faculty play was comprised of a cast of fifty, including and discovering 
some excellent talent among the professors. 

A series of twelve complete playreadings has been given by students from the 
department. Four evenings of entertainment, consisting of one-act plays, produced 
by the members of the play-production class proved exceptionally educational. 
Twenty-five readers, presenting the Public-Service Bureau have entertained thruout 
the state. 

The greatest improvement of the year was the sloping of the stage in College 
Hall. 

The new lighting system installed, excepting the one in the Salt Lake Theatre, 
is doubtless the best in the state. 

As additional stage equipment, three sets of curtains, four-dozen property ac- 
cessories, thirty-six costumes, and one complete set of scenery have been added. 



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Peg O' My Heart 

The Cast 

Mrs. Chichester Miss Lela Maudsley 

FiM.iman Mr. Myron West 

Ethel, Mrs. Chichester's daughter Miss Regina Hughes 

Alaric, Mrs. Chichester's son Paul Murdock 

Christian Brent Mr. Vernon Talboe 

Peg Miss Jane Hibbert 

Montsoniery Hawkes Mr. La Von BilIin!■^i 

Maid Miss Gertrude OUon 

Jerry Mr. Devere Hansen 

The most successful dramatic season in the history of the B. Y. U. was effectively 
started off wiih Manners, "Pew 'O Mv Heart." The cast was happily chosen and 
the parts well sustained. A beautiful new set of scenery, made in our own school, 
gave an added touch of beauty and added to the interest. 

The cast enjoyed a tour of southern Utah where in addition to the play several 
programs of unusual merit were given. 



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Clarence 



\ The Cast 

Mrs. Marlyn Irene Dunn 

Mr. \^'heeler Ray Olpin 

Mrs. \^ heeler Elva Chipman 

Bobljy Wheeler Carlyle Maw 

Cora \^"heeler Nellie Clark 

Violet Pinney Alice Ludlow 

Clarence Fred Markham 

Delia Vera Hinckley 

Dinwiddie Leonard Sproul 

Hubert Stem Wayne Mayhew 

"Clarence." Booth Tarkington s successful plav which has been produced by 
many schools and colleges all over the country this season, was played to perhaps 
the largest audience in the dramatic history of the school, owing to the fact of its 
being produced during Leadership \^ eek. This play, depicting the modern American 
home of the rich, is a scream from start to finish. The amusing situations and irresti- 
ble humor drew smiles from the most critical. Professor Pardee displayed the same 
aptitude of finding the right people for his cast as characterizes all his productions. 
The play was repeated the following evening for those who were unable to see the 
first performance, and later in Payson. 



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'Tjhe Country 'Soy 




The Cast 

Hiram Belknap Merrill Bunnell 

Hezekiali Jenks Harold Benlley 

Sarah Wanda Boyack 

Mrs. Wilson Myrtle Henderson 

Jane Belknap Alberta Hiiish 

Tom Wilson Robert Anderson 

Fred Merkle Carl Christensen 

Lucy Beth Bovack 

Miss Dunstan Helen Candland 

Mr. Phelps West Parkinson 

Mrs. Phelps Anna Eggertson 

Mrs. Bannan Elaine Christensen 

Jimmy .Michaelson Hal Bentley 

Herman Leitz .\lonzo Morley 

.\my LeRoy Ina Creer 

Joe Weinstein Leon Williams 

The Country Boy. the last play of the season, made a pleasing variety in this 
year's offerings. The play carried a good moral, contained nianv strong parts and 
dramatic situations, with enough good comedy to make a splendid production. 

The story of the boy who goes to the city to find his big chance, there to meet 
with failure and disappointment, and who returns to his own town to find what 
he has been searching for. has a universal appeal. The play was unusually well cast 
and made an appropriate final for the season. 



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<^37ie House of Simmon 

The Cast 

Benhadad, King of Damascus Harrison R. Merrill 

Rezon, High Priest of the House of Rimmon C. Y. Cannon 

Saballin, a Noble of Damascus F. R. Madsen 

Hazael William H. Boyle 

Izdubiar Reinhart Maeser 

Rahkaz J. M. Jensen 

Shumakim, the King's Fool B. F. Cummings 

Elisha, Prophet of Israel Alfred Osmond 

Naaman, Captain of the Arniits of Damascus Lowrey Nelson 

Ruahmah. a Captive Maid of Israel Algie E. Ballif 

Tsarpi. Wife of Naaman Mrs. T. Earl Pardoc 

Khamma Florence Jensen 

Nubta Bertha Robers 

Soldiers, Servants, Citizens, etc. 



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'^37ie House of Simmon {Cojitinued) 

The most pretentious undertaking of the Dramatic Art Department was V an 
Dyke's "House of Rimmon." The Music, Dancing and Art departments all united with 
the Dramatic Art department to make it a phenomenal success. Special scenery, light- 
ing, costuming, and musical effects helped to make it a brilliant epoch in our dra- 
matic history. The unusual work of Mrs. Algie Ballif, Mrs. T. Earl Pardoe and 
Lowrey Nelson was of such finished nature as to place it beyond the pale of the 
amateur performance. 

The play, which was the regular annual Faculty play drew large and apprecia- 
tive audiences each night. 



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DEBATING 



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HYRUM HARTER 

Manager of Forensics 



THE 1921-22 season has been an eminent one in our history of forensic ac- 
tivity. For the first time since 1917 we won the State Debating Champion- 
ship. In addition, two debates were held with colleges outside of Utah, the 
University of Southern California and the University of Redlands. 

College Hall has been filled for every debate held here and the enthusiastic sup- 
port of the students has been most commendable. 

The interclass debates were excellent in every detail, the Sophomore and Fresh- 
men teams being especially fine. 

The school now has a func;ioning debating club, "The Ciceronia, ' which has 
carried out a successful program. 

Under Mr. Harter's leadership intellectual contesis have received the support and 
recognition they so much deserve. 



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^Uhe Triangular Debates 



\. C. OF V. vs. 15. Y. u. 

Personnel oj Teams 

Kenneth Robinson Driver E. Smith Leland Weniz 'tte^t Tarliinson 

Emery Ranker Edwin Bainl 

Judges 

Attorney Barnard J. Sliiart. Judge Joseph Straup, and Alloniey \A ils^n \Ic! Earthy 

Chairman 
Mayor D. K. Hansen 

Tlie question was "Resolved that the United Sta'.es GoveinmeiU Should Cancel 
All War Loans Extended to those Powers Associated with Her in the War Against 
Germany. Provided Great Britain Does Likewise.'' In this contes' our men debated 
on the ;iffirma;ive side. The contest look place in College Hall at Provo, January 
21. 1922. 

Dec'sion 
A. C. of U. 1 B. Y. U. 2 




1^ 



I'. OF U. vs. B. Y. U. 

Personnel of Teams 
DeWiUe Paul Edith Jldnl^on (Menn 1!. Harmon Rioliard (jmilie 

Russell Kraus K. H. Harler 

.lit(ii;rs 
Chief Justice (."orfniaii. Judge Uraniniel, and Judi:e Agee 
Chairman 
Ma\or Clarence Netlen 

The question was '"Resolved that the United States Government Should Cancel 
AH ^'ar Loans Extended to those Powers Associated with Her in the U ar Against 
Germany. Pro\ided Great Britain Does Likewise." It look place in Barratt Hall 
at Salt Lake City. Our tvani upiirld the negative side of the argument. 

Decision 
I", of U. 1 B. Y. U. 2 

Pnge One Hini<Ire»I Fifty-nine 



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University of Southern California vs. B. Y. U. 

Personnel of Teams 
Roland W. Maxwell Edwin Baird 

Merril McGinnis E. H. Harter 

Judges 

Chief Justice E. E. Corfman, Associate Justice Valentine Gideon. 
D. H. Christensen of U. of U. Board of Regents 

Chairman 

Judge A. B. Morgan 

Question, "Resolved that the several states should adopt courts 
of industrial relations for the settlement of labor disputes." The de- 
bate was held in College Hall before a large crowd. 

Decision 

U. of S. C. 3 B. Y. U. 



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University of Redlands vs. B. Y. U. 

Personnel of Teams 

Harold Shell Glenn Harmon 

Fred Wight Richard Condie 

Judges 

Attorney John Hadaller, Judge E. C. Gudley, and Principal 
R. N. Westover of the San Bernardino High School 

Chairman 

W. L. Fowler of Redlands 

The question was, "Resolved that the several states should adopt 
courts of industrial relations for the settlement of labor disputes."' 
Our men had the affirmative side. The debate was held in the First 
Baptist Church at Redlands, California. 

Decision 

U. of Redlands 1 B. Y. U. 2 



Page One Ilundied Sixty 



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Interclass Dehatin^ Winners 



Sophomore Team 
i\egariie 


Freshman Team 
Ajjirmatiie 


Henr>- Stark 
Carlyle Maw 
Stanley Dean 


Meith Maeser 
Royden Dangerfielil 
Myrtice Burr 


Judges 




President Harris. J. M. Jensen, 


Harrison R. Merrill 



"Resolved that a soldiers boi.us as pro])osed in Congress should be adopted." 

The Seniors won from the Juniors and the Sophomores from the Freshmen. The 
Seniors refused to mee: the Sophomores however, and forfeited the debate. The 
Sophomore team was declared the winner in the interclass debates. 



Page One Hundred .Six»y-one 






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lANClNG 



THE dancing division of the Physical Education department has 
been able this year to aid the Student Body Public Service 
Bureau in furnishing lyceums and special program numbers for 
various high schools and clubs. Dancing as one of the fine arts is 
fast coming into its own and is becoming appreciated as a kindred 
art of music and painting. 

The dancing department is not attempting to develop professional 
dancers, but to educate our conmiunity in this expressive art. By 
means of carefully selected dances, and an aim to present the best 
only, we hope to bring the art of dancing into its proper place among 
the arts. 

Our courses comprise a study of rhythm, music, interpretation, 
national and character dances, pantomime and nature and interpre- 
tive dances. 

The students are given an opportunity to appear in numbers 
suitable for school plays, pageants, and festivals. Yearly the de- 
partment gives a revue of the work. This is called a festival, dance, 
drama, or pageant. 

As music and dancing are the languages of the soul and body, 
we try to correlate the two and produce an artistic symphony. 



Page One Hundred Sbitytw* 



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COMING OF SPRING. THE CALLING OF THE FLOWERS 




ONE OF THE POSES IN THE NATURE DANCE "THE COMING OF THE DAWN" 

Page One Hundred Sixty three 



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ANOTHER POSE IN. "THE CO>nNG OF THE DAWN"' 




A DANCE REVEL ON THE COLLEGE CAMPUS 

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1^1 E DAL 
WINNERS^ 





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Won by 

ELAYNE CHRISTENSEN 

from the College 

Miss Christensen's subject was, 
''The Song of the Soul, Eternal 
Life." 



GRANT ORATION 

For a 

BOOK AUTOGRAPHED BY PRESIDENT GRANT 

The general contest topic was "What I Like Best in my Religion and Why." 



Won by 

DONNA DURRANT 

From the Secondary Training 

School 

Miss Durrant's theme was "Sal- 
vation for the Dead." 




Page One Hundred Sixty-six 



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SPECIAL STUDENT BODY 
ORATORICAL CONTEST 

For the 

SPECIAL STUDENT BODY 
MEDAL 

Won By 
HAROLD W. BENTLEY 

Mr. Bentley's subject was, "The 
Recognition of Mexico by the 
United States." 



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EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAK- 
ING CONTEST 

For the 

RULON DIXON SILVER CUP 

Won By 
W. GLEN HARMON 

The general subject was "Dis- 
armament." Mr. Harmon's spe- 
cial topic was "The 5-5-3 Plan." 




Page One Hundred Sixty-seven 



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PIANO CONTEST 

For 

THE TAYLOR GOLD MEDAL 

\^on By 
RULON BRLMHALL 

The selections were all written 
by McDowell. Those chosen 
were: "To a Wild Rose," "To a 
Water Lily," and "In Autumn." 



ORATORICAL CONTEST 

For 

THE JEX MEDAL 

Won By 
JANE HIBBERT 

Miss Hibbert used as her sub- 
ject, "On With the Dance." 




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THANKSGIVING ORATORICAL 

CONTEST 

For 

THE STUDENT BODY MEDAL 

Won By 
LEGRANDE NOBLE 

The oration was to have a pa- 
triotic theme. Mr. Noble those 
as his subject, '"Militarism, the 
Evil of the Age." 



ORIGINAL STORY CONTEST 

For 

THE ELSIE CHAMBERLAIN 
CARROL MEDAL 

Won By 
BIRDIE BATES 

The story was to have a west- 
ern theme and the winning story 
was called, "The Western Wo- 
man.'' 




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1 




WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY ORATORICAL CONTEST 
FOR THE ANDERBERG GOLD MEDAL 

Won by 
DELMAR DICKSON 

The oration was to be on some patriotic subject. Mr. Dickson 
chose as his theme, "The Survival of Liberty." 



Jg? 



STRINGED INSTRUMENT CONTEST 
FOR THE ADAMS GOLD MEDAL 

Won by 
DELMAR DICKSON 

All of the contestants played "Souvenir" by Franz Drala and 
some other selection. Mr. Dickson's choice was "The Second Mazurka" 
Op. 19. By Weineawski. 



Page One Hundred Seventy 



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The Junior T^rom 



Committee 

Rutlgar Walker, Chairman 
Violet Johnson 
Henrietta Taylor 
Reed Harris 
Fred Markliain 

Matrons 

Supl. and -Mrs. Adam S. Bennion 
Pres. and Mrs. F. S. Harris 
Pres. and Mrs. George H. Brimhall 
Pres. and Mrs. T. N. Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Hedquist 
Judge and Mrs. James B. Tucker 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Pierpont 



Page One Hundred Seventy-two 



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Loan Fund Ball 

THE Students Loan Fund Ball was initiated tliis year as a tradition of the Sopho- 
more class. The proceeds from the ball go to a fund from which needy 
students may borrow money and finish their school years. 

The classes competed in selling tickets. The First and Second vears were the 
winners and were allowed to select the Queen of the Ball. Miss Ali(e Paxton was 
selected. 

The business men cooperated with us most heartily and furnished everything 
for the dance, including refreshments, programs, etc. The departments furnished 
the decorations and music. 



HEAD LO-M-MITTEE 

Haiiild Beiitley, Chairman (lailyle Ma« 

Helen Candland Anna Fggertsen 

lirianl Decker 



Page One iruniiie.l Seventy-three 



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OKe 1922 BANYAN 

announces as its 
celebrities — 

MISS LOIS MYRUP 

MISS CELESTIA JOHNSON 

MR. ^AUL ^PACKARD 



Lois C^yLyrup 



LOIS is laking work in the School of Education and 
she is diligently striving to become a star teacher. 
She comes to us from Gunnison with a record 
few Freshman girls can boast. She was student body 
president for two years, one year at Green River and 
one at Gunnison, and she has starred for many years 
in dramatics. 

Miss Myrup has dark brown eyes, brown hair and 
n "skin you love to touch." She is tall and dignijied. 
yet she possesses a sneetness. sincerity, and a magnetism 
of personality that mark her immediately as a genuine 
sirl. 



Celesda Johnson 



CESS is the vice-president of the Freshman class of 
this year and the secretary and historian of next 
year's student body, which shows her popularity 
as an executive. She is a charming song bird and is in 
demand as a reader, which shows her popularity as an 
entertainer. She is pretty, vivacious, amiable, and alto- 
gether adorable, which shows why she is regarded as 
perfect, and the most popular girl. 



(PauZ Packard 



THE student's chose an athlete from Springvillc wi 
this year's most popular man. He was one of the 
shining lights on the joolball team and was 
elected captain of next year's squad. He also played 
L,uurd on the slate championship basket ball team. Paul 
is pcrjectly at case on the ball room floor and knows all 
ihe arts and rccjuiremenis that go with the position oi 
the King of Hearts. 



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^unyun Stiff (Staff) 

Kind Contributors 
Chief Pest Warkinson 

Go to Helen Candle Land 

Wanda Beth Bless her heart 

Gertie She conducted the Celebrity Contest 

Ted Responsible for Bathing Scenes 

Ina Queer Drama ticks 

Apologies to the Deseret 

Browning Timekeeper 

Fred and Lizz Hatched the dirty plot of sandpaper 



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Bebication 

Ttry tftc group of "Polsitjebics" 

tueefe, tirclesfglp anb unccasiinglp 
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pijere of our ©nibersiitp, toe 
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cause, bjfjen tfjep bjere in action. 



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Education Building 



Our Campus 



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Sandpaper 

[A Rough Play) 

THE stage is set when the curtain rises. The room is a log cabin 
luxuriously furnished with a table, two benches and a pic- 
ture frame. A wan little girl of questionable age is standing 
quietly seated on a chair down center left. A large burly man, dark 
complexion, weighing possibly ninety-eight pounds, is pacing forward 
and backward in evident fury. Suddenly he stops before the quiver- 
ing maid. i i , -t I 

Man (pointing to tin cup, delicately engraved, on talslel: lake 
the contents or spend the night in yon cellar!'" 

Maid (looking awav) : "Nay, father, nay, say not so to me. 

Man (getting more madder): "Partake or I shall give thy halt- 
socks to Susie." _^ 

Maid: '"Oh, father, treat me not so cruel! 

Man: "Do as I sayest." 

Maid: "Father, I cannot.'" 

Man (at height of wrath): "Thou shall do as I sayest oryou 
cannot longer smoke thv father's pipe nor thy cousin's cigaroltes. 

Maid: "Father I succumb. Pass me the bread and milk and 1 

shall go to bed." , , , .u 

She dejectedly takes the beautiful cup in her hands, consumes the 

contents and sinks to the floor. 

Man: (as curtain falls): "Oh! Raspberry." 



Page One Hundred F.iglitythree 



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The Landlords' Tales 




Listen, my chiklren. and ye shall be told 

Boarding house mysteries manifold. 

On a day in September, two and ten, 

A family moved out to make room for some men. 

"By S. B. S. shall we be known." 

And they stored the wild oats they had sown. 

Just so, they predicted a rare rendezvous 

.\nd many's the night they've slept in their shoes. 

But soon it leaked out, their name I mean 

The "Secret Bootleg Society" was none too clean. 

On a dark wintry night a girl they espied. 

And blanketed they carried her. tho she pleaded and 

cried. 
To their awful den. by a designing guide. 
Then. oh. "How I need you"' rang in her ears. 
And "I'll take you away" (|uiled not her great fears. 
The result, a great tragedy, they never can mend — 
T'leir fair haired colleague forever lost a good friend. 



HOME OF S. B. S. 



Speakmans house was once a scene 

Of wrath and mirth unholy, 
Elayne and Creer to bed retired — 

A pile of feathers lowly; 
They heard a slight but trivial sound 

Come patter on their pillow. 
But true to nature, both of them 

Passed out soon on sleeps "billow." 
The patter to a pitter grew, 

Then faster, faster, faster — 
I ntil the volley up above 
Became a crashing threshing thud 

Ot water and of plaster. 
Up jumped Elayne, her Romance Shroud 

Quite filled with lime and lumber; 
"The bath-tub's broke!" She moaned the sound. 
Then climbed she down and turned around 

And settled down in slumber. 




SPEAKMANS 



Page One Hiimlred Eighty-five 



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N. L. U. ENTERTAINMENT 
HALL 



THE \. L. U. (Naughty Ladies' Union or No Body Loves Us I or- 
ganization is one of the most active organizations (socially) on 
the campus. Weekly they hold their sewing circles after which 
each member tries to see if she can't out-do the others in preparing 
elaborate spreads of refreshments. 

One thing that makes these weekly evening gatherings so enter- 
taining is a certain game which the girls readily participate in, called 
Truth. This s;anie uncovers shattered romances, coming betrothals 
and new matches just effected. Really, it must be very entertaining 
to say nothing of its instructive value. 

Some members of this union have even cut their hair. The reason 
for such conduct is not yet apparent. But watch for further develop- 
ments and perhaps the mystery can be solved. 



Page One Hundred Eighty-six 



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THE SKY'S THE LIMIT 



CIRCULATION 

GOING NIGHT 

AND DAY 



U;I)P 



EVERY STUDENT AT LEAST ONE 



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GET AWAY 

WITH IT— 

DON'T GET 

CAUGHT 



PUBLISHED EVEKY TIME WE GET THIS WAY 



B. T. HIGGS TO RESIGN 



SHERIFF BOYD APPRE- 
HENDS THREE B. Y. U. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Dr. Thomas Martin, Prof. E. H. 
Eastmond, aiul Prof. M. Wilfonl 
Poulson caught in Mayor Han- 
sen's Chicken Coop. 

Disclosure results in the solv- 
ing of several other mysterious 
proceedings. 

The case ot Hansen versus The 
Faculty of the P.righain Young 
University came up in the Twelfth 
District Court for trial on charge 
of Grand Larceny, following pre- 
liminary hearing in Judge Hansen's 
court Saturday morning. They, 
the faculty, are being held in the 
."-^tate Pen. waiting bail. Seveval 
thousand dollars have been put up 
but of such questionable repute are 
the prisoners that the court deemed 
it not advisable to let the prison- 
ers go at large. 

FACTS OF THE CASE 

For sometime past tli:- Hansen 
family have been s<miewliat dis- 
turbed in mind as to where tlieir 
chickens were disappearing. Every 
means to put an entl to this rascal- 
ity has been practiced hut of no 
avail. Due to the evidence of 
feathers distributed promiscuously 
about the chicken rim after a ra'd 
it was thot the intruders were pos- 
sibly eitlier rats nr hawks and 
mammoth traps were '^et. Last Fri- 
day nite, the Mayor's young son, 
Devere. was induced tn hang his 
hammock in the brooding pen next 
to the roost — unlucky Friday al 
ways being the fated nite. ^'oun^ 
Hansen returned from Maw's 
where he had taken his lady friend 
fdue to request lady's name with- 
held ) home from a dance in the 
Ladies' ("lym, about 2 a. m.. ami 
Ijrejiared for his night's repose. He 
hnd scarcely got ten si'uated when 
he was aroused by a quiet "'croak- 
ing" in the pen next to his. A spray 
()f arsenic of lead, previously pre- 
pared for the scattering of the ten 
trihcs of uiitcs hung on the screen 
between the pens. Hansen silently 
■^lijiped into hi*; jeans and the next 
ninment the chicken theives were 
smarting under a heavy burden or 
arsenic of lead. There was a 
scrambling of men and chicken'^ ; 
a cracking of lumber, an oath, and 
the heads of the three profess >rs, 
Martin. Eastmond. and Pon's'^n 
were guillotined between the r-^os's. 
Eastmond was struggling from t'"* 
collar down to unloose himself 
from the tetter*; of the rat trap, 
Martin was endeavoring to dis- 
engage himself from the painful 
clinch of the chicken roost, at the 
same time attempting to cover up 
the blnofly evidence of the massace 
of Hansen's prize chicken (which 
took Kt. J nil and .^rd prizes at 




VERX TO J^E DEPORTED 

Owing '.o the number of Tol- 
hoe's wives it has been deemed ex- 
pedient to deport him to Turkey 
where such practices are in vogu.'. 
\'ern 1 hi night that he was puttin,^ 
something over on the rest of us 
w ho were content to be tied down 
to one only, but in view of the 
recent judgment of the federal 
authorities in Tolbos's case, the 
conservative married students ^cjI 
to be well paid for their sacrifice. 

Judging from the appearand- o'" 
N'ern's family he is able to caie 
for them all. The wives look iier- 
fectly contented and satisfied. 
Wonder why the authorities deem 
i- Tiecessary to disturb the tran- 
quility of his home? 

Voin- name. \'ern, will be immor- 
talized, after deportation and our 
memory of yon will be full uf re- 
spect and envy, because yon s'uc'' 
to them, your wives, in spite of 
jibes and connnenis 

the last C'alamazoo Poultry Show 
in 190S); Poulson was righteously 
upbraiding his F, rot hers in 'he 
Faith. evidently trying to prove 
an alibi and — 

Coutinuefl on i»aBe 1.^34, Section 
.HO— Column 5 



HIGGS TESTIMONIAL AT 

NEW CITY AND COUNTY 

BUILDING 

Prominent Men From State ta 

be in Attendance 

Parade to Start at 6:30 p. m. 

An official testimonial — the para- 
mount event of Higgs day will be 
held in honor of 11. T. Higgs, in 
the new Cily and C"ounty Duilding, 
at 8 p. m. this evening. 

At six o'clock this afternoon all 
the alumni will meet in the La- 
dies' Gymnasium for an informal 
reception and handshake. Imme- 
diately thereafter the parade will 
form to march to the testimonial. 
This will take the form of a grand 
floral pageant ]>arade in honor of 
the retiring janitor. 

.\t the testimonial this evening 
prominent orators, famous musi- 
cians, and other persons of social 
distinction will furnish the differ- 
ent numbers. Musical selections, 
toasts and tribntci will be given 
to express our pupreciat'on and e-- 
t-cm for Mr. Hi'gs and th- fifty 
years of unpre-'ede^ted service he 
iias rendered the school. Pres. J. 
R. Tlurdock will )neside and the 
following program will b- carried 
out: 

•-'election f^. ll'isc Orchestra 

Pres. J. R. Burdock welcomes the 

alumni. 
Song, "Thou Dcuidy Foul," from 
the i>i)era. Opal of .\rgentine. 
bv David Poem (Brilliant Bird) 
(Pearl of Brazil) (Ballad) sung 
Iiv Pansy onJ Pur^e Jnckdottcr 
( \'iolet an<l Celestia Johnson) 

Remarks. .Pr^.s. Olhnccdle (Olpin) 

"My Lung and Thy Sour Voice," 
from the opera Daniel and Vir- 
ginia (My Heart at Thy Dear 
Voice) ( Samson and Delilah) 
sung by the Hearthensen Sisters 
( Christenscn Sisters) 

Expressions of Appreciation South 
Sijiiarinsou (West Parkinson) 
Solo. "With All Your Soles" 
(Heart) by Gardenia Pimple 
(^[elba Boyle) 

Sentiment Sturdy Safety YardiRoy- 
den Dangerfield) 

Tribute Lc Rio Mercio (Le Grande 
Xoble) 

\'iolin Solo. "Oh Sav What is 
False?" (Oh Sav What is Truth) 
by U'illo'w Plumber (Reed Gard- 
ner) 

Tribute Prof. Goings (Cummings) 

Presentation of Token Line Spruce 
(Mark Pine) 

l\emarks Coram Paw (Carlyle Maw) 

Cello Solo ii'cstmiuister Young 
Child (Harvard Olson) 

Selection B. Wise Band 



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Bohhy Sour and His Jazz Hounds 



T 



HERE was much dissension as to whether they should be called 
hounds, since a symphony of wild feline creatures on the back 
fence more nearly expresses our ideas. 



On the other hand, a hound is one that pursues, and in truth the 
above mentioned do "run after." They trail melody, they hunt synco- 
pation, they try to run down rhythm and they scent harmony. 

In the wild chase after jazz the trombones bark, the saxaphones 
howl, the drums growl, and Bobby Sour urges his pups to tree the 
beast. 



Page One Hundred Ninety 



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'Z^e Country Boy 

IT was most convenient! Tlie director was surely taken bad to the days "when 
you and I were young, Kathryn." There were Leon and Ehiyne, Carl and Berta, 
and West and Iva, and Hilin had her voice. How she sang! 

All that glitters isn't gold, young man, all that flashes isn't pure. The Country 
Boy got the moral of this story just in time to take "The love and unity, dark 
corners and opportunity," offered him in the country. 

Jane was chosen by the director because she fit in with Tom, especially as 
far as hair is concerned but in spite of this she proved that women know more than 
men, and father's don't always know best. 

Mrs. Banana and her boarding house family is a study of life for any biologist. 
Their manners reminded us of, "If you're thru, knock out your teeth and give some- 
one else a chance." 

Merkle, such a bitter sweet on ol' Joe Weinstein, lucky thirteen, befriended 
Tom because it's just as pleasant in the country as it is in the summertime. 

Miss LeRoy proved well enough the results of the foot-lights. 

Moral: Never aspire beyond the natural glare. 



(^ 



(Peg O' My Heart 

It's peculiar that the director should choose for Peg, a chump from Ireland, 
where wet is prevalent and rain is constant, a Cactus-Juice-Jane from high and dry 
Arizona. Her "Cotton-top" (?) was easily dyed the necessary red as a result of 
the peg thrust in the heart of Jerry. 

The once-was dentist was easily transformed to a mayor by the moral popu- 
larity of his son. 

Mr. Talboe of garage fame, showed what a mission will do for a man with 
his striking impersonation of a villain. Wasn't his coat of 600 complete? So thick 
it almost ran off. 

And Regina?????? 

Rumor. The internal revenue office ceased collecting for one night while one 
fair-haired young man witnessed her questionable relations with the villain. 

Lela's crowning glory and negligee were guarantees of a second performance. 

Page One Hundred Ninety-one 



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House of V/omen 



In studying dramatic technique Henry Van Dyke apparently missed his course 
in titles. 

Does absence make the heart grow fonder? Oh, George, did you see Algie play 
with our Lowry? Where were thou George? — and actions cry where letters only 
whisper. 

Profs. Merrill and Cummings missed their calling. They should never have 
draped themselves in the robes of pedagogy. The students who frequently haunt 
the attendance and scholarship committee compliment the director on his choice of 
a fool. Merrill is king! — King of what? King of the "Rubes." 

"Oh! Reuben, Reuben, I been a thinkin' 

How much nicer it would be 
If you'd been a "king" of a kingdom, 

'Stead of a "rube" in our city." 

The soldiers, as soldiers, were first-class advertisements for Freezone and 
Gets-It. 

The dress committee of the Municipal League disapproved of the presence of 
"calves" among the ballet dancers. However, their lunges were commendable. 



(© 



Clarence, "The Mule (£) Kite" 

We wonder. We have cause to! Now about Ray and Elva. One would think 
that after the insight they had into family life that they would at least have "put 
it off 'til spring." Will he make as grouchy a husband and she as jealous a wife 
as they did a father and mother? — Oh, well, prove it then. 

Clarence drove mules in the army without swearing. If he did, I'll bet he 
didn't get 'em out again. We know too much about mules to be so deceived. 

Bobby and his father's new gray spats. For a nature such as his, his spats were 
far too few. It was hard to keep the Goldbrickers and their paddles down. 

A woman's tears usually get a man. But when they're accompanied by too much 
cry they get him wrong. But Cora was so young and inexperienced. (She is yet, 
for a' that.) 

All that went wrong, Miss Pinhead put right. She brought all the good out — 
even to the "bugs" of the plot. 



Page One Hundred Ninety-two 



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TTCilE 

ONSEPAK ABIES 



HAM & EGOS 



I'.iite One Uuiulreil Ninety-three 



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'The Hope Chest 



S 



OME certain young lady defined it a? a mania or disease that is very pre- 
valent among the ladies. When contracted it produces various results. With 
some it is worse than fatal. 



It is said that the said chest generally contains monogramed dish towels, other 
kinds of towels, pillow cases and all other things that prove so useful around the 
kitchen. Apparently they are in the bottom of the above chest. Browning certainly 
has a balanced education. They actually tell me that he has been on a mission to 
Honolulu where such things aren't ever used. 

Of the four subjects shown there are two types. The first have substituted the 
name I. W. W. for Hope Chest. This type includes two older girls, their advanced 
station in life making account for the I-Wonder-When sentiment. With them the 
Hope Chest was an uncertain thing before coming to the B. Y. U., but now there is 
no question as to whether the delicate articles could ever be used. But we are glad 
to announce that all preliminaries are over: it is merely a matter of time. 

The other two have given as a substitute name The Despair Chest. To them 
marriage is a certainty but it is a question as to whether it will be a success or not. 
Can they tie themselves down to one man? Yes, but it will put them into the depths 
of despair indeed. 

I Page One Hundred Ninety-four 

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Page One llitntlred Ninety-five 



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SCENES OF THE 1922 BATHING SEASON IN UTAH LAKE 



.I'a:^e () le liiin.l;-tfil Ninety ^ix 



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Our 'Diary 



WRITTEN for the soul purpose of forever disillusioning our successors re- 
garding our deeds, both wild and sentimental, during the school year of 
]92l and 22. To the Pages of this Diary we have confided the secrets 
of many a dark night and sun-kissed dav. the sentiments and emotions of hearts and 
minds so overburdened with rules and theories that we would fain bequeath our story 
to the Pages of our precious Diary. 

September 12. 

All back at the old stomping grounds once more. We've shaken hands and 
kissed so many old and new studes that we're all tired out. 

September 13. 

Repetition of yesterday in addition to being signed up for 17 hours. 

September 14. 

First Devotional. Facultv quartette made a wonderful hit with "Tell Me That 
You Love Me!" President Harris won us all over with his warm welcome. 

September 15. 

Today we attended classes and handed out our coin for texts and pencils. 
Everythirg looks great, we think we'll stay. 

September 16. 

Well, today we all got together for a first student body meeting. President 
Olpin gave us a speech and we had some good music. In the afternoon all the stu- 
dents went to Professor Brown's funeral at the tabernacle. 

September 19. 

We had class meetings this morning and elected class officers. Also organized 
the trail blazing hike to Timpanogas. The girls had a meeting and selected officers 
for their club. 

September 22. 

The girls sandwitched all day. More pickles and cheese and all's ready for the 
hike. 

September 23. 

We didn't have school today. All the bovs were on the pick and shovel gang of 
Timp trail, even the Profs. Twentv-five girls learned that wholesale camp cookery 
was no dream of an idle day. Big camp fire at night. 

^•EPTEMBER 24. 

The Path-finders returned from the mountain late this afternoon. Everybody 
went to the student body dance. 

Page One Hundred Niiiet\-cight 






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TIMPANOGOS TRAIL-BUILDING HIKE 



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Septeaiber 25. 

Today has been a big recuperation day. Dealers in liniment and freckle cream 
have done great business. 

September 26. 

All the classes had a class meeting today except the Sophs, they didn't need one. 
Coach Roberts started a play hour in the Gym for all students who have time to 
play. He didn't get a crowd though. 

September 27. 

Board of Control began to discuss constitution. Wayne Mayhew was selected to 
be 2nd Vice-president of the student body. 

.'September 28. 

We all welcomed Professor Adam Bennion in the first of a series of lectures on 
"Comparative Religions." 

September 30. 

Today we had a student body meeti'ig and amended the constitution. We won 
a football game from Payson 10-0. 

October 3. 

The High School perfected their organization with Marc Bean as head. Wil- 
liams resigned from Junior class and Fred was declared president. 

October 4. 

Simmons elected on Timpanogas field to head gridiron warriors. 

October 11. 

This morning the public speaking class paid a visit to "Startups" and all re- 
turned exercising on "Buy-Roz." 

October 12. 

Today we celebrated Columbus Day and heard Brother Bennion's lecture. 

October 1.5. 

This morning we had a football rally, a peppy one with a stunt and all. In the 
evening we went to the famous Gadowsky concert. 

October 16. 

Everybody's been busy today making preparations for the Inauguration of Presi- 
dent Harris. Even the halls are all decorated with works of art. 

October 17. 

Today's just Sunday, and presents the usual problems. 

October 18. 

This was inaugeration day for the President. We had a big parade and enjoyed 
the inauguration ceremony. And there was the banquet and in the afternoon the 
Sophs sold hot dogs and we lost a foot ball game to the East Side High. The grand 
ball was a crowning success to the day's celebretics. 

Page Two Ilimdred 



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INAUGIIRATION OF PRF.SIDKNT HARRIS 



Pape Two Hundred One 



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October 19. 

This was '"Blue Tues" cause we had to come back to school after celebrating 
yesterday. 

October 21. 

Hurrah, we're having a holiday because its teacher's convention. If they'd only 
happen '"more oftener." 

October 22. 

We played a good gridder game with the Ogden A. A. and lost by a touchdown. 

October 24. 

The Gold Brickers began their imitations with a fresh milk sale on Center Street. 
Rotary was playing "In Walked Jimmy" and we discovered some university girls as 
factory hands. 

October 25. 

We enjoyed a delightful concert tonight by the Paul Gruppe Concert Company. 

October 27. 

Dr. Gottlieb. Professor of Literature of Vienna University read, "Faust"' in the 
little theatre. Meanwhile, the Freshies made merry at a Hallowe'en party. 

October 29. 

Today we played a good football game with the B. Y. C. It was good because 
we won, 14-13. The Sophs had a Spook party at night. 

November 3. 

This afternoon the debating stars tried out for Intercollegiate teams. And at 
night. Oh Boy, we saw Jane and Trink supported by a strong cast. Let us revel in 
love's young dream, which is still the '"Peg '0 our Hearts." 

November 4. 

We lost another foot ball game today, this time to the A. C. Frosh, 31-0. \^'e're 
learning though. 

November 7. 

We were entertained at Assembly by a talk by Kellard. But we were more en- 
tertained tonight when we saw him in "The Merchant of Venice." 

November 10. 

We decorated the streets with a torch -light parade. 

Page Two Hundred Two 



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November 11. 

We had another parade and an Armistice Day Program at the Tabernacle. Also 
another game with the A. C. Fresh. This time we win! 21-0. 

November 15. 

We heard the announcement of the arrival of Thomas Earl Pardoe Junior. 
"What's in a name?" 

November 17. " 

David Starr Jordan gave us a splendid lecture in College Hall. 

November 18. 

"Eliza Comes to Stay" with the Juniors. 

November 21. 

We lost a game to Utah Frosh, 14-16. 
November 22. 

We heard the finals for the Grant Oratorical Contest in assembly. Elaine 
Christensen and Donna Durrant won. Professor Clark is rejoicing over the arrival 
of a baby boy. 

November 23. 

A lot of things happened today. \\e had a Thanksgiving program and then the 
Cross Country Run. The Sophs won first place but the Frosh ate the turkey because 
of so many seconds. The literary magazine was put into circulation, we had a dance 
and our short vacation began. 

November 24. 

We're thankful for a lot of things, among them, that we beat the Ogden A. A. 
this afternoon, 48-7. All of us have had one thanksgiving dinner but some of us had 
three or four. 

November 28. 

Things never do go right after a vacation. 

November 30. 

Brother Bennion has returned from Mexico. He lectured to us this morning. 
Basket Ball class series began with a victory for the Sophs. 

December 1. 

Nothing happened today. We've been having exams since daylight. 
December 2. 

We're still bavin" 'em. but the Seniors celebrate their discontinuance with a 
Harvest Party in the Art Gallery. 

December 3. 

The foot ball fellows were banqueted at the Sutton Cafe and chose Packard for 
next year's captain. We had more fun at night when we saw Tony Sarg's Marionettes 
play "Rip Van Winkle." 

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JUST SNAPS 



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December 5. 

Well, we've got signed up for another quarter. A number of new students have 
come to spend the winter. Dr. Martin's all smiles because "it's a girl." 

December 6. 

Some studes are still looking rather dazed. The semester's collection of D's 
and E's have been distributed and recorded and we each got our share. 

December 7. 

The Andelins visit us and give us a concert. The Frosh five win from the Juniors. 
The "Peg 0' My Heart" goes to P. G. 

December 9. 

President Brimhall was presented with his annual bouquet of birthday roses. 
Chamber of Commerce, Kiwanis and Rotary visit us at Assembly and we had a stu- 
dent body dance at night. 

December 18. 

Miss Jepperson, the choir, and the orchestra present the oratorio, "The Holy 
City." 

December 21. 

We had a special student body program in assembly. The training school opera 
was presented in college hall and the co-eds gave their annual ball. Everybody 
wished everybody else a Merry Christmas and we departed hither and yon for 
vacation. 

January 4. 

We all came back today with new year resolutions made or remodelled to suit 
the occasion. At any rate we began in earnest. 

January 6. 

A student body dance and what goes with it. 

January 7. 

Varsity quintette vs. Frosh in first real game, 32-22 for the Varsity. Frosh 
initiated their new suits. 

January 9. 

Everybody is busy working on plans for Leadership week. 

January 14, 

President and Mrs. Harris entertained the faculty folk at their home. 

January 16. 

0. E. Bradfute of Ohio Farm Bureau Federation spoke in College Hall. 

Page Two Hundred Six 



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Janlary 17. 

Royal Rooters initiation ball at Hansens. 

January 18. 

Katherine Ridgeway of Boston appeared on Lyceum in a Dramatic Recital. 

January 19. 

Utah Stake Mutuals presented "The Poor Little Rich Girl," in College Hall. 

January 20. 

Intercollegiate debating match staged. We have pulled some bone headed ones 
in foot ball but we're not dense at debating. We won from the Aggies here and 
from Utah in Salt Lake and celebrated with a student body dance. 

January 21. 

We played a good game with the Western A. A. They beat us. 

January 23. 

Leadership Week began today and we're being kept busy with so many good 
things to go to. All our visitors spent the evening at a "get acquainted"' party in 
the Ladies' gym. 

January 24. 

Still moving. Public Service Bureau gave excellent program to represent the 
work it is doing. 

January 25. 

More lectures. Our friends saw "Clarence" and were delighted with "it." 

January 26. 

The music department contributed their splendid concert to Leadership Week. 

January 27. 

The week closes, after an attendance of 3,000 people, with the big Pageant. 

January 28. 

The Varsity Basket Ball squad had a session in the coaches office tonight and 
chose Ken Weight to captain this season's squad. 

February 3. 

Intercollegiate Basket Ball Tournament began today. Our Hoop Five white- 
washed the "U" with a 16-29 score. Student Body Oratorical contest held in As- 
sembly, Harold Bentley was presented with the honors. 

February 11. 

We just read the headlines of the evening paper, "B. Y. U. Basket Bailers Tri- 
umph over Utah Aggies." 

Page Two Hundred Seven 



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February 13. 

Next to the Basket Ball team the Jui'iors are the most important people in school 
this week. 

February 17. 

The date of the unforgettable Junior Prom. 

February 18. 

"Y" Winter Walkers, with Dr. Joseph T. Hazzard and other guests spend a week 
end on the toes of Timpanogas. 

February 2-3. 

The Y. Male Glee Club entertained us with a concert. 

February 24. i 

We had a wild student body assembly. The 1922 Banyan was introduced to us 
and the Banvan Popularity contest kicked off. Then we had a rally with yells, peppy 
songs. Dell Webb and everything. 

February 25. 

Our throats are sore but we're happy. We just tore from Utah's clutches the 
gams that sives us the State ihanipionship. 

February 27. 

We all wanted to go down and paint the town red but had to stay at assembly 
to hear the oratorical contest. Delmar Dickson won the medal. We had a half 
holiday in the afternoon and helped the Roval Rooters celebrate our victories. 

I 
March 1. 

Every Frosh has been made to believe that its his solemn duty to purchase a 
Banyan. 

March 3. 

Popularity contest closed at 5:30. Frosh dutifulness showed results. Winners 
of the contests were announced in the big Banyan Band Dance at the T.adies Gym. 

March .S. 

The faculty plavers lead us back to Damascus with them as they presented Dr. 
Henry Van Dykes famous, "The House of Rimmon," under the direction of Professor 
Pardoe. 

March 6. 

Players repeated "The House of Rimmon." 

March 10. 

Dr. Zublin gives Lyceum Lecture in College Hall. 

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YOUNG U. INTERCOLLEGIATE CHAMPS BASKETBALL 



Page Twi> Hundred Nine 



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March 13. 

Freshie week began this morning. Weve ?ee.i nothing but overalls, green shirts, 
green dresses, green handkerchiefs and even green roses. 

March 14. 

Freshie week contiuies. Some attempt^ at kidnapping fail and some don't. 

March 15. 

Ridan Brimhall won Lester Tavlor medal in piano contest. 

March 17. 

Freshies had their program while the upper classmen entertai led themselves at 
a matinee. Freshies cave a £;rand ball in the evening. 

March 21. 

"Clarence' went to Payson. 

March 22. 

Dr. Miener gave the last lyceiim number, a lecture on conditions in Europe. 

March 24. 

Stringed instruments contest. Delmar Dickson won Adams Medal. Fresh were 
defeated by upper classmen in athletic events. 

March 31. 

Glenn Harmon won the silver loving cup in the Extemporaneous speaking con- 
test. 

April 1. 

Alice Reynolds day. The ladies of the school and others gave a program and 
reception. Many books were presented for the Reynolds library. 

Aprh, 4. 

The "Y" got its annual white washing and the boys got their annual "Y" day 
luncheon. We lost a debate to the University of Southern California and then we all 
got the annual "Y'" day ball. 

April 6. 

Nothing but a conference holiday for the Profs. 

April 12. 

A. Ray Olpin. student body president, and Miss Elva Chipman made a trip to 
Salt Lake as two and came back as ore. 

April 13. 

Some students attended the reception at the Chipman home, and we learned that 
there are reasons and other reasons for attending weddings. 

Page Two Ilunilvfd Ten 



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•Y' WHITEWASHING DAY 



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April 14. 

We had an Easter program in the morning. Most of the evening hours were 
spent at the reception which the student body gave in honor of the President and his 
bride. 

April 15. 

Still spring ain't here, just snow, so nobody hunted shady dells for Easter hikes, 
except the winter walkers and they crave snow. 

April 18. 

A band concert in College Hall. 

April 22. 

"The Country Boy," came into college and delighted his audience. Nominations 
were made in assembly for student body officers next vear. 

April 23. 

Big Invitation High School Track Meet at Y. Park. Sixty-five big events. 

April 25. 

The pot of college politics began to boil this morning, with nominations for 
student body elections. 

April 28. 

We enjoyed a special social hour and "send off" for the debators. 

April 29. 

Primary elections held sway all day. Big initial charity ball for Student Loan 
Fund. 

April 30. 

The Faculty Folks had a Spring Party while Harmon and Condie took the 
debate at University of Redlands by a two to one decision. 

April 29. 

Fresh outbreak of Spring Fever epidemic this afternoon. Profs considering 
vaccination. 

May 1. 

Spring came to College Hall in the form of a music and dance festival. 

May 4. 

Elections at high pitch, nearing climax. 

May 5. 

This was "Girl's Day" with its usual Program, reception and grand ball. 

Page Two ITundreil Twelve 



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THE INVITATION TRACK AND FIELD MEET 



Page Two Ilumlrccl Thirteen 



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May 8. 

The one-act play series began. 

May 12. 

We saw the second Episode of Little Theatre specials. 

May 13. 

We exercised freely at the big state track meet and student-body dance. 



/ 



May 15. 

This was the beginning of Senior week. \^ e all had to do honor to the dig- 
nitaries. 

May 17. 

Final installment of one-act plays. 

May 19. 

The Seniors closed a week's adventures with their farewell ball. 

May 24. 

The "Y" men were awarded their official honors with unusual ceremony. 

May 29. 

The Normals gave their commencement Program. 

May 31. 

We reviewed what we had remembered of the Semester's work in the form of 
exams. 

June 1. 

Everybody took a sentimental walk and talk at some favorite rendezvous. 

June 2. 

Annual Commencement Exercises with all that the scene implies to college peo- 
ple. 

New hopes, new fears, new vows. Good-bye." 

Continuation postponed until something exciting happens. 

Le Finis. 



Page Two Htindred Fiturtt-eu 



31 Dl 



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I'age T«o Hundred Fifteen 



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This Ad is No Good 

unless you bear in mind — we offer the 
best there is in 

Life Insurance. 

For the youn^ man there is no better 
investment than a g,ood Life Insurance 
Policy. YOU should take advantage 
of the opportunities derived in taking 
out insurance in your youn3,er years. 
Good physical condition insures you 
of lower rates and better policy condi- 
tions. <^e sure your life insurance 
is "BENEFICIAL" issued by 

The (Bi^ Home Company 

cAll our investments made to help 
build up the West. 

Beneficial Life 
Insurance Co. 

Home Offiice: 

Vermont Building - Salt Lake City 

Heber J. Grant, President Lorenzo N. Stohl, Manager 



Page Two Hundred Sixteen 



ID ac 



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3B DIZ^I 



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The University of Utah 

Invites serious minded students who desire to join the profession of 
law, medicine, business, engineering, etching, music, or those who wish 
only to follow general cultural courses, to join the ranks of its great 
Student Body. 



LARGE FACULTY— EXTENSIVE CURRICULUM 
-AMPLE LABORATORY AND LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 

Arrange now to enter during the summer or jail term 

SCHOOLS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

School of Arts and Sciences 

School of Education 

State Schools of Mines and Engineering 

School of Metlicine 

School of Law 

School of Commerce and Finance 

Extension Division 



9^ 



University of Utah 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE AjNNOUNCEMENTS 



Page Two Hundred Seventeen 



ID BC 



31 Dcrs 



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IBQI 



Our Aim — 




Partnership 


with the Public 






A Public Utility like the Gas Company 


will be of 




greatest service when its patrons are 


its owners 




SAVE AND INVEST IN OUR 8% SHARES 




Utah Valley 


Gas & Coke Co. 



The Measure of Economy 

f I ^HE only yardstick by which economy 
can be measured is QUALITY 

And for Quality you must depend largely upon the word of the store where you buy. 
In this store your ultimate satisfaction is the only condition that is acceptable 



PROVO 



IRVINE'S 

The House of Quality 



UTAH 



PROVO, UTAH 

J. WILLIAM KNIGHT, President 
Capital, $300,000 Surplus $34,000 

Directors 
J. William Knight W. Lester Mangum 

R. E. Allen W. O. Creer 

Fred W. Taylor F. G. Warnick 

W. W. Armstrong O. Raymond Knight 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



Page Two IhimlreLl Kigliteen 



ID BC 



3B □! 



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30 BC 



3Ba 

■ 



Listen Folks- 



Buy music from musicians — musical instruments from men who use them. 
Kodaks and supplies from men who are ready and willing to give you 
expert advice on picture taking and instrument playing. In other words 
trade with us and receive a full Sl.OO worth for every dollar you spend. 

Provo Photo Supply & Music Co. 

77-78 N. University Ave. Phone +44 



BATES STORES COMPANY 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 

FAIR PRICES HIGH QUALITY 

IN EVERYTHING TO FURNISH YOUR HOME 



TRY US 



33 East Center Street, Provo 



Opposite Courthouse 



We welcome the dawn of a New Era — a period of growth and development, the 
building of a greater University, The B. Y. U. 

Always Something New at 

Farrer Bros, Co, 

SUITS, COATS, DRESSES AND DRY GOODS 
Quality Store 



Phone 44 



29-33 No. Universitv Ave. 





P, L, Larsen 




Pipe 
Fittings 
Valves 


Bath Tubs 

Closets 

Sinks 

Lavatories 


Furnaces 
Gutter 
Roofing 




Heating and \ entilation a special 


tv 


We are a 


gents for the famous Ideal Warm 


Air Furnace 


34'} West Center Street 




PROVO, UTAH 



Page Two llutiilrci-l XJneteen 



ID ac 



31 □■ 



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Stay Forever Young 



Let Electric Servants do the hard work of housekeeping and you 
will enjoy freedom from drudgery, and leisure for happiness. 

Utah Power & Light Co. 

"Efficient Public Service" 




Vesigninq 
Sngravinq 
Color Work 
Booklets 
Catalogues 
Calendars 




/oolleqe 
^nmak 

1022 

'Printed by 

^^^eseretJfewsPress 

UTONIAN 

University of Ut^ 

S.EOOK 

L .D. S. Universi^ 
BANYAN 

B.Y. Universi^ 
BEET DIGGEH 

Jordan. H^ Scliool 



THE LARGEST AND cMOST COMPLETE 
PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT in the WEST 



Page Two Hundred Twenty 



B 

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The 

Tower 



npHE love the loyal 
Aggie has for hi-. 
school finds expression 
in his veneration for the 
Tower which typifies to 
him the whole magnifi- 
cent plant of the Institu- 
tion, with its thirty odd 
buildings and its acres 
of spreading lawns and 
farm lands. 

To him. The Tower is a 
symbol of democracy — 
of efficiency in educa- 
tion — of clean living and 
right thinking — of all 
these finer things with 
which he associates his 
college — the U. A. C. 



THE T(l» KH 



TOUR EDUCATION 

Your education should do two tilings for you — it slmidd prepare you to earn a good 
living in an important profession ;»nd it sliould give you an appreciation of literature, 
language, history, art, music and otlier suhjects tliat add to your ability to enjoy lift. 

Vou can get this tuo-fold education at the Utah .\gricultural College. It is this 
broad training which makes community leaders of men and women who are products of 
the L'. .\. C. For thani positions of honor and trust are open. 

Bring to tlic U. A. C. two things— ability to work and determination to learn— and 
you will secure a preparation for life that will insure success. 

The Ut;di .\gricultural Col'ege comprises tlie following schools: 



Agriculture 
Engineering 



Commerce and 
Business .\dministratiou 



1 1 ome Kconomics General Science 
.Mechanic .Arts Summer School 



Extensive undergraduate and graduate courses are offered in Education, in both the 
winter and summer sessions. 

The Summer Quarter opens Monday, June S. 
The Fall Quarter opens Monday, September 25. 

The UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

LOGAN, I'TAH 



I'aiif 'I'wi' Iluiidrct.i Twenty-one 



ID BC 



31 □■ 



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Chipman Mercantile Company 

AMERICAN FORK, UTAH 

Young Men's Suits and Furnishings 

Young Ladies' Dresses and Materials 

Shoes, Slippers, Pumps 

Best Quality — Moderate Prices 




liTT\banQ&r 



CHOCOLATES AND CANDIES 
The Height of Perfection 



,500.00 to be Given Away in Prizes! 

Contest now open — Drawing July 5th 

PRIZES 

$1050.00 Emerson Player Piano 

$ 450.00 10 piece Walnut Dining Suite 

Rules of Contest 

1. One ticket on piano with every $1.00 purchase anywhere in the store. 

2. One ticket on piano and one ticket on dining suite with every $1.00 purchase 

of Home Furnishings. 

3. One ticket with every .$1.00 paid on note or account, two tickets if paid on 

Home Furnishings, note or account. 

4. Same rules govern purchases, etc., at our three stores. 

Taylor Brothers Company 

PROVO EUREKA SPANISH FORK 



1922 



56th ANNIVERSARY 
56 Years of Square Dealing 



1866 



Page Twu Hundretl Twenty-iwn 



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Schwab's 
Faultless 
Clothes 

Tailored by the House 
of Kuppenheimer 




The Schwab Clothing Co. 

'Dressers of Men 
•Trovo, Utah 



^hoto Engravers 

Illustrators 

CArtists 

Ridges 

Eng,ravin^ 

Company 

Ground Floor 

122 "TRe^ent Street 

Wasatch 3723 



CAdvertisin^ Tiesi^ns 

'^rintin^ l^late 
Manufacturers 

Engravers for the 
'Hanyan 



Columbia 
Theatre 



The only Properly Ventilated Theater 
In Prove 

The House of First Class Attractions 
and First Run Pictures 



Princess 
Theatre 

Provo's Picture Palace 
ALWAYS THE SAME PRICE 10c 15c 



I'agc Two Ilnn.lrLvl Twenty-three 



t=3D BC 



31 ni 



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Compliments of the 



Hub Clothing Company 

PROVO, UTAH 

Shoes for the entire family Men and Boys Outfitters 



Jf armerg anb iHcrcfjantg ^mk 

PROVO, UTAH 
Capital $100,000.01) Surplus S16,000.00 

OFFICERS 

T. N. TAYLOR President 

JOHN F. BENNETT Vice-President 

J. D. DIXON Caihier 

ARNOLD DIXON Asst. Cashier 

Members of Federal Reserve System 
"A Friendly Bank to All" 



Diamonds, Watches, Cut Glass, Jeivelry 
and Ivory 

Expert Watch Makers and Engravers 

Anderberg, Inc. 



PROVOS EXCLUSIVE JEWELRY HOUSE 
36 W. CENTER STREET 



PHONE 52 



Taye Two Huiulrtl Twenty-four 



ID BC 



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Golden Chocolates 








THE RICH, CREAMY MILK KIND 






Packed 


in the Beautiful Golden "Message 


Box" 




A Muiiature So 


Are the appropriate Gift for All Occasions 

uvenir Box of Golden's Mailed Anywhere for 10c in Stamps 




"Sweetly Thine" 






"The Candy City" 


Startup Candy Company 


PROVO. 


UTAH 



31 Oi 



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31 Dl 



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PROVO, UTAH 



MODERN AND HOME-LIKE 




Fine Monuments 



Direct from manufacturer to customer at a 
great saving to the purchaser. The best of 
material, the finest of workmanship — hun- 
dreds of pleased customers. 

Send for Designs and Prices 

Beesley Marble & Granite Works 

PROVO. UTAH 



Big Buick 

More Facts — 

You Should Know! 



For the calendar year, January 1, 1921, to January 1, 1922. Buick built and 
actually sold over G0,000 automobiles. 

These sales for the calendar year 1921 exceeded bv over 12,000 cars the sales of 
any automobile maniifarlurcr having a six-cylinder automobile in its line. 

These sales for this period likewise represent a volume of business greater by 
over $9,000,000 than the sales of any other automobile manufacturer excluding 
Ford. 

These figures are taken from official re])orts and are absolutely reliable. 

TELLURIDE MOTOR COMPANY 

ffhen better Automobiles are built, Buick tvill build them 



3B Ql 



Page Two lluntlrcil Twenty-five 



ID BC 



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^"X/TEN with energy and 
^^^ intelligence are the 

builders of the world. 

Education is the develop- 
ment of these attnhutes to 
their hig,hest efficiency. 

We are proud of our Uni- 
versity — the B. Y. U. as one 
of the greatest instruments 
of education in the land. 



Chamber of Commerce 

^rovo, Utah 



I'age T«o Hundred Twenty-six 






IQ BC 



3a Dcrs 



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3B Dl 



Phone 104 



PROVO LUMBER COMPANY 

"QUALITY AND SERVICE" 
PROVO, UTAH 



Box 251 




IFASIHindDN 

IPATM^ 

(CIL(D)iriiIIIIIB]38S 




Christensen 

Company 

^rovo, Utah 




OMER, 



is a complete hot-air healing system in whicli 
ail the clumsy heat transmitting pipes are 
eliminated. It Heals. It Ventilates. It Sat- 
isfies. 

SoKl by 

BARTON'S 

Thr Furniture Center 



Dont Forget Us 




When you want Fraternily Jewelry, 
Class Pins, etc. 




E. J. LEIFF 

Manufacturing Jeweler 
Salt Lake City, Utah 


113 SOUTH MAIN 

(Upstairs) 



I'.ige Two TUnulrctl Twcniy-scvcn 



31 Dtrs 



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YoUT- 

Store 

Students' 
Supply^ 
Associa- 
tion 

Reed Holt 
Marcus Bean 
Frank Harris 






Supei^vision 
Herald R. Clark 


We're the faithful and efficient men who 
served you during 1921-1922 





Established 1885 

THE WM. M. ROYLANCE CO. 

WHOLESALE 

FRUITS, PRODUCE, ALFALFA SEED, 
HONEY, HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

PROVO, UTAH 





"A Bird 


in the hand is 


worth- 


9? 


One 


of our skilfully ma 


ie portraits is worth a dozen carelessly made 


photographs 






Quality tells everything 










Hav^on'si ^tubio 










"Quality Photographs" 






Col 


umbia Bld^. 






Provo, Utah 



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BANYAN 



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An old man sat by the fireside. 

A book was on his knee; 
The book, though worn, was sliil his 
pride, 

As one could plainly see. 

What is the picture his eyes behold, 
As they follow liack thru the years? 
'Tis a picture of youth in football 
tfanip, 
While the onlookers wave their 
cheers. 

Yes, here is the faculty picture, 
The faces so dear to him; 

The times, oh so many, he'd looked at 
it, 
'Twas now growina; rather dim. 



So on thru the Ranyan he wandered. 

From scene unto scene to look. 
And he smiled as he stopped ami 
pondered 

On the value of that old book. 



Ah! here was his graduation, 
Where the road divided lav. 
■Which path shall I take?" he won- 
dered then. 
Hut he knew ulilcli one today. 



Yes, those were the days of magic, 
The days which he loved so true. 

For thev were the hajipy, carefree days 
Which he spent at the B. Y. U. 



J© 



TO the many students and teachers who have given ol their time and I. dent to 
make this Banyan a success, the staff vvi>lies to cxpi'4'ss its appreciation. We 
hope that these people may gain some measure of joy in the realization that 
they have been of much service to the group of students who were diligently striv- 
ing to perpetuate the "Y" ideals in this vear book. 

The Staff. 



Page Two Iluiulie<l Twenty nine 



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NOTES 



Page Two ITiin.lreil Thirty 



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En 

NOTES 



Page Two IlnnHred Thiity-one 



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