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Full text of "The banyan"

LIBRARY 

Brigham Young University 



76.05 . 

^2 No'' ^9679 
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PICTORIAL REVIEW 
OF THE YEAR^ ^ 

1922-1923 

BRIGtL\M YOUNG 
UNIVERSITY »* ^ 



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zMouni- Timpanogos 

The dattmiiig day iilumes thy 

rugged peaks. 
Descending si\fUy to the VKrId biioti'. 
Each golden ray of rosy mornir.g seeks 
To set his jewels in thy crowns qfsnmv. 
IVu" dazzling gems of sapphire gieum 

and glow f 
Till all ihy crags fiii'f< lun!-- "J 

ghry bhze. 
Nor pomp af prid.« 'With all its 

gorgKius r/ioWj 
limblazoned li-ith the charms, of 

arlful ways. 
Can so (nfrance the soul and glmfy 

its goiiie. 



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zJW^unt Timpanogos 

The dawning day illumes thy 

rugged peaks. 
Descending softly to the world below. 
Each golden ray of rosy morning seeks 
To set his jewels in thy crowns of snow. 
The dazzling gems of sapphire gleam 

and glow. 
Till all thy crags with bursts of 

glory blaze. 
Nor pomp of pride with all its 

gorgeous show. 
Emblazoned with the charms of 

artful ways. 
Can so entrance the soul and glorify 

its gaze. 

Alfred Osmond 



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"T>edication 



To PRESIDENT HEBER J. GRANT 

ONE WHOSE LOVE of BOOKS 

HAS ESTABLISHED IN HIS LIFE THE ADMIRABLE 

PRACTICE of MAKING THEM 

A CONNECTING LINK IN HIS CHAIN oj 

ACQUAINTANCES. 

HOW GOOD TO OFT CEMENT A THOUGHT, 

' A BUDDING FRIENDSHIP, 

WITH A BOOK! 



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University 
Classes ^ - 
Or^antati(m 

Acfiviiies^--- 
Features 





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T. N. Tavlor Susie Y. Gates Heber J. Grant Zina Y. Card Reed Smoot 

WiLLARD Young Joseph Fielding Smith J. William Knight Stephen L. Chipman 

Lafayette Holbrook Joseph R. Murdock Joseph Reese 



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President Harris lives in the present for the future. His 
interests are the here and now, but always with a thought of 
what is to come. Often when he looks at us we feel that in his 
mind he says, "Here is life, vibrant and valuable, with which 
to work." He is our president, our guardian, our friend. 



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George H. Bri.mhai.l 
D.Sc.D.,Ll.D. 

P)-esideHt-Emerilus 

Head of 
Departmefit of Theologv 

He plans and works and 
teaches, always that we niav 
know and understand the truth 
in all its purity and light. His 
speeches thrill us with ambi- 
tion; his deeds impel us to ac- 
tion; his hte is our inspiration. 



M. P. Henderson 
Ph.D. 

l^ean of The College of 
Arts and Sciences 

Dean Henderson has stated 
that his college is the clear- 
ing house of the university, and 
indeed he makes it such. Stu- 
dents, stormed with doubt and 
indecision, carry their troubles 
to his office, where he looks 
them over and smiles — and 
presently the clouds disperse 
and things clear up. In his 
class work he is thorough and 
patient, and his students re- 
member him tor his svmpathe- 
tic understanding. 



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Hugh Woodward 
Ph.D. 

Dean of Summer School 

To Df.an Woodward we tell 
not only our troubles but our 
secrets as well, for we find that 
he is not above enjoying a bit 
of nonsense or a practical joke. 
Under his supervision, summer 
sessions at the "Y" are gaining 
an enviable reputation; and 
rightly so, for they are rapidly 
acquiring many distinctive fea- 
tures, showing throughout the 
effect of his forethought and 
guidance. 



John C. Swenson 

M.A, 

Acting Dean 0/ the College of 
Education 

Dean Swenson is noted for 
his keenness of analysis, both 
of his students and their prob- 
lems. Once the analysisismade, 
there is a clear path ot pursuit. 
He amuses us and instructs us 
at once, and although there are 
people who, not knowing him 
well, would doubt it, he has a 
saving sense of humor along 
with his well prepared store of 
knowledge and information. 



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Mrs. Amy I.. Merrill 
B.S. 

Z^raw of IVunwn 

Mrs. Merrill ciime to us hist 
tall as the new Dean of Women. 
We like her already with a lik- 
ing that is destined to become 
better with closer acquain- 
tance. The girls who have 
needed her most, because ot 
sickness or difficulties, like her 
best because ot" their better ac- 
quaintance with her sympathe- 
tic friendship; but we all love 
her because she knows "the 
heart of the girl." 



M. C. Merrill 
Ph.D. 

Dcau of the College of 
Applied Science 

De.^n Merrill is the first dean 
of a newly created college, and 
under his able direction this 
college is, in spite of its youth- 
fulness, already firmly estab- 
lished in importance. The stu- 
dents have needed it, and meet- 
ing Dean Merrill's helpful and 
enthusiastic welcome, they 
have "come into their own." 
We like him because he has that 
genuine "get acquainted" atti- 
tude. 



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I.owRV Nelson 
B.S. 

Director oj Extensiij>i Division 

Director Nrlson prolialily 
comes in contact with more 
students than anv other one 
man, with the exception ot the 
registrar. His department is 
growing rapidly, but he is safe- 
guarding extension scholarship 
with a master hand. Not only 
is he known and admired by his 
students, but by both the farm- 
ers and the artists of the state, 
tor he has an understanding, 
sympathetic nature, and a well 
balanced education that car- 
ries him safely into many lines. 



H. V. HOYT 

M.B.A. 

DciDi of ihi' College nf 
Commeree 

.Although Df.an Hoyi' is a 
man ot business affairs, he is 
tar from being an extremist. 
He meets his students upon a 
triendly, business-like basis, 
and they are made to feel that 
his advice is not only author- 
itatiye from a professional 
standpoint, but yaluable be- 
cause of his keen personal in- 
terest. He is ever alert to 
discover our problems, ami to 
aiil in then' solutions. 



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Thomas L. Martin, Ph.D. 
Professor of Agronomy 



Christen] ENSEN, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of History and 
Political Science 



Florence Jepperson Madsen 
Professor of Music 



Murray O. Haves, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Geology 



T. Earl Par doe 
Professor of Public Speaking 



Benjamin F. Cummings, A.B 
Professor of Modern Languages 



Ethel Cutler Butt, B.S. 
Professor of Home Economics 



Alfred Osmond, M.A. 

Professor of English 



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Eugene L. Roberts, A.B. 

Professor of P/i \sical Education 



Clawson Y. Cannon, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Animal 

Husbandrx 



Charles E. Maw, M.S. 

Professor of Chemistry 



William H. Bovle, A.B. 

. Assistant Professor-Ed neat io)i 

Principal Secondary Training 

School 



Fred Bu.s.s, A.B. 

Professor of Geologv 



.Amos N. Merrill, M.S. 
Professor I 'ocational Education 



William H. Snell, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Mecluuiic 

Arts 



Edward H. Holt, B.Pd. 

Professor of Office Practice 
Secretary of the Faculty 



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Ernest D.Partridc;e, B.S. 
C.E. 

Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering 

Annie L. Gillespie 

Librarian 

Robert Sauer 

Associate Professor of Music 

{Wind Instruments) 

Harold R. Clark, A.B. 

Assistayit Professor of Firunice 

ayid Banking 

Algie Eggertsen Ballif 
A.B. 

I nstriictorinPhvsical Education 

Blanche Mendenhall, B.S. 

Instructor in Textiles 

and Clothing 

Alvin TwnCHELL, B.S. 

Instructor in Ph \sical Education 



Walter P. Cottam, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Biologv 



19 



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J. Marinus Jensen, A.M. 
.-Issociate Professor of English 



Harrison R. Merrill, B.S. 

Instructor in English 



Ella Larson Brown 

. iss ista nt Li br aria n 



Franklin Madsen 
Instructor in Music 



Effie Warnick, B.S. 

Instructor /« Foods and 
Nutrition 



Ida S. Dusenberry, B.Pd. 

Assistayit Professor of 
Elementary Education 



Newbern I. Butt, B.S. 
Instructor in Extension 

Division 



Bent F. Larson, M.A. 
. Issociate Professor of . Irt 



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Franklin Y. Gates, B.S. 

histructor in Chemistrx 



KiEFER B. Sauls, B.S. 

Secretary to the President 

Purchasing Agent 



Brioham T. Higgs 

Superintendent of Buildings 

and Grounds 



JoHN'E. Hayes 
Registrar 



Emma Sharp 
Instructor in Trai>ii>ig School 



Percival p. Bigelow 

histructor in Auto Mechanics 



Elmer Nelson 
Instructor in Piano 



Pearl Snow 

histructor in Training School 



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Ramona Farrer 

histriictor in Tra'ni'nig School 



Hermese Peterson 

.is si slant Professor of 
Elementarv Teaching; 



Hazel Brockbank 

Instructor in Trainino; School 



A. Rav Olpix 
.-Assistant i>i Mathematics 



Charles H. Carroll, A.B. 
M.D. 

Medical Director 



Fannie McLean, B.Pd. 

histritctor i)i Trai>iing School 



Ina Johnson 

Instructor in Trai}iing School 



Florence Newell 
Jssista)it i)i Tvpewriting 



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ViLATE Elliott, B.Pd. 

P}-ofessor of Textiles a>id 

Clothing 

Alice L. Reynolds, A.B. 

Professor of English IJterature 



Elbert H. Eastmond, B.Pd. 

Professor of . irt 

L. John Nuttall, Jr., M.A. 
Professor of Elementary 
and Secondary Teaching 

Director of Training Schools 

Cordelia Anderson 

Instructor in Training School 

A. Rex Johnson 

Jssistaiit in Office Practice 

Olca Wunderlv, A.B. 

Instructor in Modern 

Lanznazes 

Marguerite Jepperson 

Instructor iyi Training School 
Music 



23 



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Horace G. Merrill, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
.issociate Medical Director 



Thos. C. Romnf-v, M.A. 

Instructor in History 



Tiwp's 'Doive?' 

From the ocean's heaving bosom, 
From the swelling crest of seas — 
Borne upon the wind's far stretches 
And the trosr embittered breeze — 
With the brightness ot the sun-beam, 
With the beauty ot the dew-gleam, 
Come your snows in eager whirl 
As the cloud-waves switt unturl. 

Barren cletts and dark crevasses. 
Coffers filled with star-white gems — 
Fold on told the drifts enshroud you, 
Opal fringe your mantle hems — 
While the rhythmic mists embower 
Noontide sitts a jewel shower. 

Through the long years how you guard them. 

Your vast treasure-laden snows. 

For the solace and the healing 

Of the desert's hectic woes — 

Within your throes of elemental strife. 

Is touched the mamspring of a lite, 

And from your crucible of power. 

Is sent to earth a priceless dower. 

— Arena Toung 



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K. G. Warnick 
Executive Comtnittce 



T. K \Ri. Pardof, 
Treasurer 



Harold K. Clark 
Executive Committee 



E. S. Hinckley 
First Fice-President 



H. G. Merrill 
President 



KiEFER B. Sauls 
Secretary 

Mrs. R. E. Allen 
Second Fice-Presidcnt 



The B. T. U. \Alumni ^dissociation 

During ihe past year the officers of the 
Alumni Association have compiled a list con- 
taining the names of every person who has 
ever attended the institution, together with 
the years in which enrolled. The total ot this 
list is over 20,000 names. From this master 
list a new official Alumni mailing list is now 
being made up. It will contain several thou- 
sand names. 

F.arly in March the first issue ot the new 
official organ of the Association — THE 
.ALUMNI ANNOUNCER— was issued. It 
will contain general campus news items, 
stories from the "old grads," etc. The officers 
hope to soon have a much larger active mem- 
bership which will become a more vital force 
in "putting over" various projects for the 
University. 



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A.RayOi.pin, A. B. I. 
Provo, Utah. 
Ma!het7iaticsi Phvsics. 
Debating, '21; Basketball, 
21; Y News Staff, 21; Stu- 
dent Body President, '22; 
Dramatics, *22, '2^; Char- 
ter Member and Secretary 
Tau Kappa Alpha, '22, '23; 
President Block V Club, 



Alpine, Arizona 
Politica! Sciencf and 
ffis/orv; 
Sociology and Erannmics. 
Winner Student Body Ora- 
torical Medal, '21; Winner 
Special Student Body Ora- 
torical Medal, '22; Debat- 
ing, *2j; Class President, 
'23- 



\km X Pit Kt.K, A. H. W 
(.iuNNisoN, Utah. 
English^ Dramatic Art. 
Winner Girls' Story Con- 
test, '19; Winner Grant 
Oratorical Contest, '21 ; 
White & Blue Staff, '20, 
'21, '23; Secretary Student 
Body, '21; Class Officer, 
'20, '23; Y News, '23; Dra- 
matics, '21. 



1 1f\ k^ Wardell, B. S. 
Rexburc, Idaho. 
Education; Social Science 
At Ricks Normal College: 
Student Body Vice-Presi- 
dent, '17. President Cicer- 
onia,'23; Athletic Manager 
Senior Class, '23. 



Scfiiors 

Our view of college life must of necessity be 
a backward glance. We see our junior classmen frol- 
icking on the playground of our happy past, toiling 
in the field our intellectual spades have helped to 
dig, and turning their faces upward toward our 
present position. As we told about us our official 
gowns, we feel the warm, firm fingers of our 
Alma Mater entwine themselves about our heart- 
strings, and we know that we shall never really be 
very far away from her protecting spirit. 

As a class, we have held our place in the col- 
lege activities. Our class play, "The Rejuvenation 
ot Aunt Mary," was received with rollicking en- 
thusiasm; our class project, the initiation of the 
Stadium fund, is a worthy and endurable founda- 
tion; our Senior Bail was a pleasing success; and 
our class parties have been far from failures. 

We have worked, we have achieved — and we 
are moving vet. Au Revoir. 



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J. Stewart Williams, B.S. 

Provo, Utah. 

Physics; Mathemalics. 

Class Vice-President, '20; Banyan 
Editor, '22; Dramatics, '2J, 



Ruby Smith, B.S. 

Salt Lakt Citv, Utah. 

Textiles; Foods and Housei^old 

.-Idministration. 

Secretary and Treasurer Home 
Economics Club, ' 1 \, 



Wanda E. Boyack, .A.B. 

Delta, Utah. 

Dn'.miilic Art; Physical Education 

and Emjish. 

Dramatics, '21, '22, '23; White and 
Blue Staff, '20, '21; Banvan, '22, 
'23; Secretary A. W. S., '23; Presi- 
dent Drama Center, '22. 



Lynn D. Taylor, A.B. 

Provo, Utah. 
Fiyie Arts; Languages. 

Y News, '23; Banyan, '23; Y's 
Guy, '23; Live Y-er, '23; Dramatic 
'2^; Tennis, '18, '19, '20, '23; Man- 
ager Minor Sports, '20. 



E. West Parkinson 

Rexblirc, Idaho. 
History; Social Sciences. 

Dramatics, '20, '21, '22, '23; De- 
bating, '20, '21 ; Debating Manager 
'21; State Champion Debating 
Team, '22. 



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Richard P. Condie 

Springville, Utah. 
Bio/ogy; Music. 

State Champion Debating Team, 

'22; Winner Vocal Content, '21 ; 

Debating ,'2;^; Debating Manager, 

-.1; Opera, '21. 



William I). Holt, B.S. 

Spanish Fork, Utah. 
Music; Edticalion. 



LuciLE Chrjstensen 

Sait Lake Citv, Utah. 

English; Dramatic Art and Phvsi- 
cal Education. 

At University of Utah: Chronicle 
Staff, '21. Dramatic?, '23. 



Minerva Kdwards, A.B. 

Provo, Utah. 
Home Economics; EducMion. 



Andrew M. Axderson 
B.S. 

Rf.xrurc. Idaho. 
Education; Psychology. 

Secretary Y Commerce Club, '23; 
President Gem Stare Club, '23. 



30 



»^lS&.^SSSk.^lC&k.^^ i^tnettrn S:toenrp-ttree ,ii^SS&^.eS^SSi^4iSBS£)^4i^SD^^ 



I 



§=' 



r 




Carl J. Christensen 
B.S. 

Provo, Utah. 
Chemistry; Malhenmlics. 

Dramatics, '2c, *2i, *a2, '2-^; Ath- 
letic Manager, '21; Manager, Y 
News, '22; Winner of Vocal Con- 
test, '22; Opera, '21, '22. 



Henrietta Taylor, B.S. 
Provo, Utah. 
Education; Engliifi. 
Class Secretary, '22; Prom Com- 
mittee, '22. 



M\ RILE K. Henderson 
B.S. 

Clifton-, Idaho. 
Dramatic Jrl; Biology and English. 

Dramatics, '21, '22; Pulilic Service 
Bureau, '2j. 



Albert S. Hutchings 
.A.B. 

SpRis(iviLi,F, Utah. 
Mntheniatics; P/ivsiis. 



Frank. E. Wanlass, B.S. 
Eureka, Utah. 
Music; Education. 
Vice-President Piano Club, 'ij. 



31 



I 



■I, Mmlttn SUKnlf-Hret ,i!Sgi'i.jStSa~&WlkJ&S&k. 



% 



I 



i 



% 






'5 



i 



I 



s 



•'^M,.:i^>-^i:4i.ii«-^---os4,S'>%2JiS'>-' ^i}t Jlanpan '■^■'Ai4^--^-^-f'3i^'-52. 






■r^^ 
f? 



^ 

rw 



:5^ 




Clarence Edwards 

Prov'o, Utah. 

C/iemistrv; Biology. 

Basketball, '18, '19, '20; Athletic 
Manager, '19, 



Ervai. Christense-v, B.S. 
pRovo, Utah. 

Jnitnal HHS^iandr\\ Agronom\ and 
Horticulture. 



Rhoda Clark, B.S. 

GKORtiETowx, Idaho. 
Home Economics; BtfJogy. 



Joseph Jenkins, B.S. 

Provo, Utah, 

EduciUion Adminislraiion. 

English and Physical Education, 

Athletics, '12, '13; Athletic Mana 
tier, *i I. 



J. RiLoN Morgan, A.B. 

l*Kovo, Utah. 

History; Political Science. 

Baseball, '20. 






32 



>>-«,>-- 'X.-i^'^-.y^d^^.'-K^-i^- 



■iia^riiSBSst, Nineteen EtDentp-tijrtr ricS^fiia- 



^^ (Efje lianpan ■^t^-"^M^'- 




A. Glenn Hubbard, A.B. 

WiLi.ARD, Utah. 

History; English. 

Editor Y News, '22; Y News Staff, 

'23- 



Wavne E. Mavhew, B.S. 

DucHRSNE, Utah. 

JccouNling and Business Jdmini- 

slrntion; Finnnct:. 

Manager Y News, '21; .Second 
Vice-President Student Body and 
Chairman of Public Service Bu 
reau, '22; Manager Y's Guv, '22; 
Dramatics, '22; Purchasing .Agent 
S. B. S., ■22. 



^'I<)LET Johnson, B.S. 

Provo, Utah. 

Music; Fine .-frts. 

White and Bkie Staff, '20; Class 

Vice-President, '21, '22; Officer A 

W. S., '23. 



!•:. 11. Harier,B.S. 

Salt Lake Citv, Utah. 

Political Science; Sociology. 

Winner Extempo Contest, '21; De- 
bating, "21, '22, '2;j; Debating 
Manager, '22; President Tau Kap- 
pa .'Mpha, ■2J; Student Body Presi- 



Henrv M. Stark, B.S. 

Spanish Fork, Utah. 
Chemistry; Mathematics. 

Inter-class Debating, '22; Debat- 
ing, '23. 



4 



4 






■^1 



33 



■^^ 



i-, Nineteen SEtDentp-tljrtt ^fSShA: 



^^■^^!sp'^z(S!^'^gisp'"«m^ WfDt Jianpan '^ms^'^z^''^s&so''^b'^ 



■K^- 



8? 



- i 



&m 




34 



WiLKORO A. Paxton, B.S. 
Kanosh, Utah. 

Biology; Chemistry. 
President of Alpine Summer School 

Student Body, '22. 



Leo Wai.ker 

Pleasant Grove, Utah. 
P/ivsicctI Educaliofi; Mathtmalics. 



J. RowE Groesbeck, B.S. 

Springvilli:, Utah. 
Political Science; Geology. 



Mary R. Camenish, A.B. 

Sm.t Lake Citv, Utah. 

Lauguages; English ath'l Psychology 



A, V. RiGGS, B.S. 

pRovo, Utah. 
.-/grononiy; Biology. 
Tr;iL-k, ' \<). 



^i2&.^IfiShd(©®&h,d(^'Sfia»dCS®fi!)h /^iiiEtttn fftopntptfirrr .-i->?5'?(?i-.-i'?:T5f'i. -i*?; 



iKfjE Panpan •^t^^t^sp^^^ms.^"^'; 




h' 



RuDGER H. Walker, B.S. 

Rexburg, Idaho. 
.^^ronotuy; Bio/o^v. 

At Ricks Normal Coiiegt; Dram- 
atic Manager, '20; Class President 
'20, '21; Debating, '21 ; Dramatics, 
'2.1. 



PaI I. H. MURDOCK, BS. 

Hkrrr, Utah. 

Social Science; Emjish. 

Dramatics, '20, '21 , '22, '2j; Track 

'20, '21, *22; Class Debating Man 

ager, '20, '21, '2"^; Debutint;, '21; 

Y News Staff. '21. 



Alice Ta\'lor, A.B 

Pr()\<), L'tah. 

Physical Education; Bin/ogv. 

and Languages. 

Dramatics, '21, '22. 



Fenton Reeves 

Hinckley, Utah. 

Socia/ Science; History and 

Political Science. 

Basketball, '20, '21, '22, '2j; Tra 
'21. 



Harold \V. Ben i lev, A.B. 

CoLONiA Juarez, Mexico. 
Languages: Education. 

Basketball, '21, '2^; Second Vice- 
President Student Body and Chair- 
man Public Service Bureau, '2;;; 
Spanish Club President. '22, '23; 
Dramatics, '22; Swimming Team, 



F 



35 



4 

* r 

4 



i 












1 

'4 






4 
% 



M 



M 



'/ju ^mttnn JEtoentp-ttiret ^s^'Sih^iM'SD^ci^'Slir.^t^^ 



m 



(^ms^ Ki)t ^anpan ^z(^"«s>ztso'^w^'^t'^-' 



.5? 

I 



i 



i 




Arch S. Reynolds, A.B. 
pRovo, Utah. 

English; History and Languages. 



Fred L. Markham, A.B. 

Provo, Utah. 
Mdlhewulics; Cheniislrw 

Dramatics, '19, '20, '21, '22; Ban- 
yan Staff, '19, '20; Editor Banyan, 
'21; White and Blue Staff, '20; 
Track, '2c, '21, '22; Holder State 
Reco-d Half Mile Run. '21; Y's 
Guy Staff. '22; Class President, 



W.NESE ROWLEV, .A.B. 

Provo, Utah. 
Lafigua^rs; English. 

Officer, Spanish Club, *2i, '22: Y 
News Staff. '23. 



Ii.A Dasirlp, A.B. 

Provo, Utah. 

History; English. 
Secretary French Club, *22, '23; 



F.N'os Simmons 

Provo, Utah. 

Ethicafion; Social Sciftice, 



36 



ilinftfcn CtDtntr-tfirtr ^WS&,,i(!SS^<Ssi^,iiSBS£)»^lSSi)r-.^(i^ 



■■^i^ ^i)t iPanpan ^t5»^^iis»'^]K{^^a5^''t^ 




Gi.F.N N. Crandall, A.B. 

Provo, Utah. 
Chemistry; Fine Jrts. 

Inter-class basketball, '15; Man- 
ager Banyan, '21; President Art 
Service Club, '23. 



Birdie Bates, A.B. 

American Fork, Utah. 
Social Science; Office Practice. 

Winner RIsie Chamberlain Carrol 
Story Contest Medal, '11. 



Ralph Bullock 

Provo, Utah. 
.-Igriculture; Eiinctition. 



RiM.oN \V. Brimhall, A.B. 

Mesa, Arizona 
Music; Languages . 

President Piano Club, '2j; Presi- 
dent Spanish Club, '22; Winner 
Taylor Medal for Piano, '22. 



Harold Lundell 

Benjamin, Utah, 
Agronomv; Biologv. 

State Champion Wrestling Team, 
'23; Spiritual Advisor, S. B. S., '22, 



I 



37 



.-cSIfia, ^inttttn SCbjfntp-tljrft 4iSWS.^.4iS^!S!i.4!5t<l%,^t'S%., 



d 






The Tost graduates 

William H. Boyle, Principal Secondary Training School; Major, 
Philosophy of Education. 

Henry Ray Hatch, M.D., Superintendent L. D. S. Hospital, Idaho 
Falls, Idaho; Major, Biology. 

Delilah Higgs, Instructor in High School; Major, Physical Educa- 
tion. 

Maud Beeley Jacob, Head of English Department Provo High 
School; Major, Philosophy ot Education. 

Hyrum Manwaring, Head of Training School, Ricks Normal Col- 
lege, Rexburg, Idaho; Major, Philosophy of Education. 

E. A. Jacobson, Principal Uintah Academy, J^ernal, Utah; Major, 
Philosophy ot Education. 

Wendell S. Stout, Head of Seminary, Preston, Idaho; Major, Philo- 
osophy of Education. 

B. Glen Smith, Ex-siiperintoident of Schools, Driggs, Idaho; Major, 
Philosophy of Education. 

Willis A. Smith, Ex-SNperi>itendent of Schools, Rexh/irg, Idaho; 
Major, Philosophy ot Education. 

The graduation of a class of this size is significant in that it indi- 
cates the progress being made by the B. Y. U. The fact that men 
and women of the prominence of the members of the class should 
select this institution tor doing post-graduate work suggests a con- 
fidence in its standards which is encouraging. 

.Another closely related development ot the past vear is the initia- 
tion of the Graduate Club. It has tor its purpose, as stated in its 
constitution, "to foster tellowship among its members; to stimulate 
a desire for higher learning; to assist in tinding and developing leader- 
ship in the communities; and to use every effort to encourage men 
and women of the inter-mountain region to attend the Brigham 
Young University." 

The officers of the Graduate Club are: 

Willis A. Smith, President. 
B. Glen Smith, Fice-President. 
LowRY Nelson, Sec'y-Treas. 






-f 



3» 



n.4:^Z'S£k^Wh.i^<SsUcSSS!^S&, ^inetfrn (Ttotntp-tbret ,aSBSD^^Z<SsuJiSi8lSShfaS^& 



i 



^f)E Jiaiipan ^^-M^-^Mm-'^^i 




uniors 




39 



Nineteen (EtDctitp-ttree ^t<SSh^t^^t<S!k^t&Si.,^^ 



^•%^Mso^"fims!y"'^mi^"f!mso' ^i)t Panpan 'wssssw'ntsasssf^tjj}!: 



^-* •* .' '-^ y-A ■- 




Ralph B. Keeler 
President 



Anna Marie Eggertsen 



Alberta Huish 
/ 'ice-Presifient 



\\. Glen Harmon 



Briant L. Decrer 



Helen Candland 



40 



i>4iSM!Ssu,iiSS^,iiS!!SlSa»i^<Sl)^ Nineteen ^tDrntp-tijrte A&So^^t'S&^iSBSSh^ZlSsh^'^ 



^isi^ ^i)c Pauvan -^i^-j-^i^'^]E<ji^'t.55ns3>"«s5^ 




-r-~< y'l 







Edith Hedq.uist 



Laura Gardner 



Stanley R. Dean 



Edmond Evans 



WiLDEE Dixon 



IzoLA Jensen 



.1 



"■4 



f^ 



«} 



m. 






41 



'<i. 



'4 



I 

i 



^ 



fe 



M 



«5 



i% Nineteen Ctoentp-tfiree .-cai&h=*&I{&,.aS?HgSb.-jL' 



■^-''^iGo^'tsgssisiP'tiBajs^ Panpan '^Ms^f^m^f^'^m^^'^ii. 



i~^^''Tr"!j 






2^05@^Si2^ 




John McConkie 



Dorothy Chip.man 



Edna Snow 



Aldus Markham 



HvRUM Hilton 



Lois Mendenhall 



A ^inetftn ?EtofntPtfircf ,i?5?!'!Sa,-i>S 



K\)t Jianpan 






?:■.■ 



<3^s?igs2&2y^ 




43 



MvRTiE Jensen 



Homer Wakefield 



Arthur Crawford 



La Vonne Bromley 



Katheryn Calder 



George Mortimer 



..-i^Bak ^inttfen artotntp.tfjrte ci^t<SSk>^t'S!k<^ :i!X-.M 



is 






'^M 







Sadie Ollerton 



Leah Hales 



Leo Holt 



Martha Cowan 



Reed Gardxer 



LvLE Nelson 



'i^Sk.^^SS^lSSk^&SS),s<i&S2k,fSiS^^SSk fiiMXttv. ITtoentp.tftrfe ^12Qh^l5&h4!iE£i 



>y,i>^ .-V^H -> ^ft^Jr. #1 



VL\}t iianpan 




Ethel Peterson 



Ernest Greer 



WiLFORD \V. Richards 



Mary Winder 



Helen Hinckley 



R. C. Litchfield 



i 



& 



■i 



i. 






i 



'■I: 






45 



J)h:«S5B52fc^Bi2flh,4iai2a-.-f'S!?S!i, iJinttftn Ctotntp-tljrtt ^Sfia,^Ba3h^ 



afc^ 



^^z^^ti^'^ti^'^m^ ^i)t Panpan '^z(sp"''^m'S!!f"^m 



j!Krx--i 



m 




Alma McElrath 



Clyde Keats 



Ir\'in Slack 



Nell Clark 



A. Rex Johnson 



Elavne Christensen 



U 



46 



.^Hah.-c^iTi^'i, .p?^^3(,Mjaifiii)k /Jinftffii (Ciutiin- tiirff ,iiSSSa>>^eSBSsk^WSsMsSiZ[ 



■^iss-'^tsBf' ^i)c Panpan •^z^sj^'^z^'^Mv^'^^s^''^^ 




47 



Wayne Stout 



Heber Holt 



Lizzie Phillips 



Myron Boley 



Vivian W. Bentley 



Leon Ivie 



.?5 

i 



i 
i 

i 



i 






^1 

i 



iJinttten attotntp-ttiret cQSiB&h<i^'^<Sar>^Z^^t<SarJ^\ 












p 



^y -^^...v^w. -055155^ Clje Panpan ^'^^^-^'^s^^smis^"'^?^-' 




r^m 



Charles McCoard 



Margaret Reese 



Ward Moody 



Mavbeth Bowman 



Paul Harding 



Annie Andrus 






■^s:%- 



i% iiinetftn JCtofntptftrct .^SfS*!-. -cI; 



■■rj^g^Sfy^TiM^'^TiMSy'^^ZiSi^' Wi)t PaitpaU '^^t^'^MS^^fmi^'^m' 




<ifl, Nineteen ^toentp-tbrrt ,^ 



wm"'^M^'^w^"^&<Sff"^ti^ Wi)t Jlanpan '^Msj^'^t^'^z^'^s''-^-'"^- 



W 







Soph 


mores 






M 


EITH MaESER 

President 


Celestia Johnson 


Ethelvn Hodson Raymond 


HoLBROOK 


Mabel 


Straw Merrill Bunnell 


Leland W 


ENTZ 


Olive Crane 


J 


osEPH Benson 


Ivan Young Rovden Dangerfield Harlen M 


. Adams 


Al.ONZO 


MORLEV 


Marie Wheeler 


Ellen Bowen 


Leland Warnick 






Clara Creer 






Margurue Hair 


Lovell Killpack 


RuLON Van Wagenen 


Etta 


Ma RLE V 


•Rita 


Kav 


Maurine Clark 


1 

Carrie Millet 


Melba Condie 






Leslie 


Cornabv 
5° 







>.^EJ!riS3hriC'SS'2Ch ^inetetn actnentp tfirrr ..i'5!'!S'i,-rS'*So.-r'*t 



^ti^"^ti^'^M^''^^zi^ ^\}t IPanpan '■fm!sp'"(mis*y'^ssp'% 




8lfett,.jja'i^S&,.<ai;&,.-caS?&.cj(^Bfia, ^(nrtten Sitoentp-tftrtt ^ffia,^I0a..di>SI?^<iv 



-4 



m^'^m^"(smi^''^zts^"«m!^ W^t Panpan '^z^'^t^'^'^s^^"'^^'^: 



te 





Sophomores 


VVavne Booth 


Krmon Ross F.va Hansen Clarence Jensen 


Amy Jackson Ray 


Van Luvev Hamilton Calder Katie Forbes 


F.UGENF. MoRRF.I.l. 


Gkiselda Olsen Alice Brunner Nei'hi Christensen 


Martin D. Bushman 


Melba Clark Zina Clayson Lewis Wilde 




Klva Crosby- 


Pearl Bowman 


Harlow Jones Myron West Blanche Johnson 


Valentine Bentlev 


Hugh Doucall Joe Harris Frank Morgan 




Royal Chamberlain 




S» 



g32%-i«iJSfiSh.J2SlJfi&.^cS!lfiSh.-caf2a, Nineteen Crtotntp-tl)"* .)Cfiiaih.-cSS2a,<i!S; 






'^zis^'^zisjf"(!ms!!f tKfje IBanpau '«s}a5»''«3a^'^s5a^"^aiS5^" 




SS^^IfiSh^lSaah^iaDhriC&Ifiah giinttttn ^toentp-tljree A:£)1^Sli^^WSSk^t^^t<Sl]k^i 









Sophomores 



Elroy Jones Annie Randall Kate Lemmon Cornell Mendenhall 



TiRZAH Cheever Leland Killi'ack 



Earl Manwaring Effie Young 



Artie U. Miner LaVerd Scorup Margaret Hackett Leland Wrighi 



Edna Taylor L. Ra'*- Robinson George Harris 

Arthur McCoard 



I\ V NiELSON 



Wilford Mendenhall Muriel Smart Bella Seelv St. Clair Nixon 



LiDA Hariell Melva Porter Annie L. Gardner Marie Smith 

Clinion Harris 



54 



,.4;SIfi%.-caiS%A>SEai^.-x>SSSa, ilinttttn ^\x)tntvt\ntt ,aSBSa>,<^t!Ssh4i^'So^rt3SM'Siu^ 



4 




55 









■^1 









i 



4 
^ 



•.^•tfSIfiQs^dCaSgQh^iaOhJjSIfiSb Nineteen actoentp.tfjrec rit^Igft,rCSIgft.,.^Si2L%.i': 



"<i^!sp"vsssp''''^^!^nssisssp' tE^fjE ^atipatt 'fim!^*^fsis!sp'"(is&sp''^t^ 



'^r.wrr«:« 



hn 




John- Lewis Melba Bovle Velv.n Bavles Perry Sewell 



Cecil McGa\i\ \'rtor Frandsek 



Spencer Larsen Rvk\ Baird 



Drew Jorgensen Radcliff Allred Wendell F.. Thorne Jesse Stalev 



56 



^inttttn attotntp-ttjree 4S!SlSik.iS!$&i^(iS^'^''''^'^-^:-^J 



^i}t |Ba!ipan -(^z^'^z'so'-^&si^-'^^- 



Sopho mores 



The Sophomores, distinguished business expo- 
nents of the institution, living most admirably up 
to an established tradition, "put over'* in a com- 
mendable fashion the annual Loan Kund Ball. Later 
in the season, to further swell this fund, they staged 
a circus — a real one, with clowns and acrobats and 
everything. 

They snatched the interclass basketball cham- 
pionship from the fangs of the other fighting hoop- 
sters, and did the same thing in a slightly different 
way with the interclass debating championship. 

The rest of their time was spent trying to enforce 
Krosh campus rules. Generally speaking, they were 
a busv bunch. 






i 



i 






I 

i 



,1 



& 






4 
4 






,-jtt9l&, Nineteen Ctoentp.ttjree ri(MfiShcCSSfiSh.-JtSI^<^^^'J^ 



T(,o 








'OUT WHERE THE 

WEST BEGINS' 







"THOSE HAIR! 

THEM eve" 



Adam's RIB 




(^ 



! 

^^P THE ETERNAL TRIANGLf 

rue FOWL HUNTER FOWL LANGUAGE 




) 



I 'Pi 

"SIX BITS FROM LUCIA" 





k^ 




TH0R0U6HLV DUMCiTlfATEO 



J8 



rtufnip tfii'f I 



ij y^ije iBdm 





resnmen 




59 



iitp-tOrrt 



ps?^'^i(^*t©g^'«55i{3a-''t©£i^ tKfje ^anpan '^wsj!f"^z's?f"^z^"^s^ 



^ 





Freshmen 






ViDA BrOADBENT 


Alvera Creer 






/ ice-President 


Secy. -Treasurer 






F.LRov Nelson 


Owen Romnev, Pres 


ident 


Chesiina Bairu 


I.VMAN Cornish 




Alma Brandlev 


Roberi- Wilkinson 






Louise Engar 


RlTH KjAR 




Cecil 


Tebbs 


Francis Smith 




Leona Brvnrr 


Theora Snow 






Vivian McDonald 


Vesia Anderson 




Camii 


i.E Crandai.i. 


loNE 


Carter 




Delice Andei.in 


Maurine Sieadmax 






\'lOLEr Al'lM.ENAI" 


Helen Clark 





Vivian McDonald 


Vesia Anderson 


Camii.i.e Crandai.i. 


loNE Carter 


Delice Andei.in 


KLaurine Steadman 


\'lOLEr Al'lM.ENAI" 


Helen Clark 


Lawrence Clavson 


Reese Sanderson 


Lorraine Snvder 


Helen Ro^i.ance 


Lvman Anderson 


Joseph Christensen 


Hlh;h Anderson 


George Lewis 


K. J. Cow LEV 


Arline J. Anderson 


Helena Stewart 


Ida Slack 




60 



,-<fiIfi8h.4fi®aa,dQSIfiah.i!SSrfia, ^inetten CtoentF-ttjrtt ^^^SiS}„^f^SSS:i„<i^SS^Sskr^^SSk^ 



^■u32[53j^'i!ij}t{sa-Ti;^;ij--^,2iSj-- ^jjf iBaiipaii '^^is^'^'^t 




i 









i 









S 



^ 
H 



8^.-cS^2i^.-i®lg8h.-jc£j®a}h,*iS5l2tt, ^inftrtn Ctoentp.tljrfe riQ&iai,^Ifii,^I{&, 



'^'^'''^----■■■'m!Sif''^t^ Sl)e Paitpan 



i. 









Freshmen 










Cari. 


H 


jicHiNcs Gam, Pi.ummer 










Mabel Terry 


Virginia 


W 


•\i,ker 




Mai 


riE 1)av].s 








Doroihv 


Dunn 



f 



Hazei. Williams 
Verna Decker 
Nellie Hansen 

Luella Poui.son 



Nellie Plant 

Ph^ Ll.IS Paxi'on 

RiiiH Dedrickson 
Klma Denslev 





Florence VVestenscow 


Jesco Whiiehead 


p 


loNE Harris 


Gertrude W'estern 


p 


Marv Hales 


Donna Daniels 




Jennie Parker 


Marva Vance 


f 


Amber Hanford 


loNE PaI.KREVMAN 




RuiH Harper 


Thei.ma Vest 




Hazel Welch 


Lois King 




Kdna Hales 


Louise Whiting 




Blanche Martell 


Margarei' Walker 




Francis Probsi 


Waller Dew 



^ 

M 



61 



% 



IS^.'i&Sa^^'S'SSh^WSihci&Sa, Nineteen aCtotntp^tftree ^]i>w>,-i:^-:.<^,^,..^-,.iii5SaikJ 



QTije J^anpan '^t'sp-^mew 










63 



iSh iJinttecn Ctoentprtirf r 



_:ij"^z's?^'^z(S!^'^t^ 'QLi)t J^anpan '^zis^'^tfs^'^Wf''^^'s?f"^ 



4 



m 



4 






Fn 


esJimen 


Luis Brockbank 


Phyllis Bu iterkield 


Carma Bai.lif 


Elva Bunnell 


Chi. OK Wru.hi 


I''.LUA BiNt.HAM 


Evelyn Baii.v 


Susie Bennion 


Amy Bri TERFiEi.i) 


Emii.'^' Brown 


E\'KRr. 1 r Bi i.i,iN(is 


I'reston Porter 


Don Bishop 


hiNs Bentley 


Nh-RPi.E Blackburn 


Forresi Booke 


Una Broom head 


Ri iH Brahhwahe 


I.ii.\' Brown 


Irene Bain 


(jEORGE Bovalk 


CaRI.YLE BrAII HWAI IE 


Allen Brockbank 


Max Perry 


Annie Birb 


Lii.LiE Barton 


IsABELi.E Park 


Mamie Bliss 


Sophie Tofte 


Mae Wilcox 


Annie Procter 


Edda Wheeler 


Marian Pvi'er 


\'era Webb 


1 

1 


64 



'olQih.4SS}2Jfift,riC©f'?'^ -^^^CiihrfCSIfia, Nineteen ffitoentp-ttiree ,fiSIiaBbdCfiSSahdC©IR&.4fiIS2Dh4t^ 



^^ 

~ I 4 




65 



-,dC®l5&,dBa2IfiSh<«ai2Sh Nineteen tEtocntp-tljree dCaifiBhriGSIfiShrCSl&hH 



F I 



Fre 


shmen 


• 




Lewis Joseph 


Morris Jones 


Erma Coleman 


Marva Crawford 


VVlI.FORD Storrs 


Harold Ashman 


Bervi. Jackson 


Stella Johnson 


F.RMA SORENSON 


Ethel Smiih 


Elm A Jones 


DoRoiHV Jacobs 


Udell Jensen 


Reed Johnson 


Alice Cluff 


Ida Jex 


Halbert Siewart 


Cannon Jones 


Helen Ash 


Jen Ci.avson 


Merle Sargent 


Maurie Jones 


Li Bin Cook. 


^'ERA Johnson 


Leora Cook 


loNA Seei.v 


Alice Jenkins 


Helga Jones 


Erwii.l Smiih 


Weslev Johnson 


Osmond Crow ther 


Heber Rasband 


loNA Robertson 


Rita Schofield 




66 



Wsh^s^^Sic^'i(^^£k>'^S^^SSk»i!&^SSk> Nineteen Etoentp^Hjrte riCfiBi2a»caai2!i«<fil!a)h. 



A-^'<-:-Ki>:'..-»4kX L>4 



^■^ 'QL\)t Panpan -^^fSf^-^tis^'^m^'''^'^'^ 




i.rCSSSst, Nineteen Ktocntp-tljrtt ^t'SSh.^i^'SikA^Mac^'^'SSk'i 



'-T^'^isgDP'iaEJss^j-^AJis^t.ii^itiJ-' ^\)t JIanpan "(ms^^^^M^'^^i^'^zf^f^^ 



Freshmen 



Dora FnzcERAi.i) 
Viola Ludlow 
Belva FoRlI 

Lucille Ferguson 
Mabel Hansen 
Irene Dudley 

Kph Homer 



Delvla Movi.e 

Bernice Hughes 

Gladys Watson 
Aleda Nelson 

Nina Huish 

ZoE Hansen 

Milton Hunter 



^M 



Thelma Esplin 


Bessie Higcinson 


Clement Hilton 


Huber Visick 


Marie Young 


Helen Hansen 


D ELBERT HeISELT 


LOVELL HiBBERT 


Nina Halliday 


Mary Hansen 


Nora Gilman 


Marian Graham 


Hattie p. McGavin 


Jean Hendricks 


Haroi.deen Martin 


Myrtle Dudley 


Fay McDaniel 


Lavetta Houston 


Leona Field 


Leah Hansen 




68 



'?^Si>,^SBl2k>:iSiSS!^SSk.<!^SM^lSj^<iS&SSk Nineteen tETtocntp-tbree ^^Sl^SSD>>,^S^SSh^(^SMi£h.,^^Sss^ 



'^^ ^i)t iPanpan "^t^si^'^M^'^zi^'^T^m^- 



TSSgg 







('I 

i 

i 



'% 



t 



h 



igi 



i 

^ 



69 



M 



i 



lu^t'&h^^^SSk^t'SSr, Nineteen WmtntH^vtt ^iai,.<£fS!afcJiaBgah.*£?l!2ift,ri 



w ■ ■ 







Fresh//ie/i 








Dee Young 


Morris Buckwai 


ter 






Alice D. Reynolds 


Lucv Rovlance 




Caroline Rigtrup 




Nellie 


Rol'ER 




Knola Towers La Rue Turner 








Melvin Robbins 


Golden Romnev 




GWEN 


Robertson 

Melba Cook 


Grace Roland 


Sarah 


Reese 



Wavne Nielson 
Frank Woffinden • 
Ross Billings 



Richard Francis 

Warren Rasmussen 
G. M. Wright 



Etja Scorup 



Inez Snow 



Madge Tuft 



EsTELLA Richardson 



Marvin Strong 



Blair Thomas 



Minnie Crawford Lola Clyde 



Lois Rich 



Ella Robinson 



Verda Reese 



Florence Cropper 



Ordell Blackham Marcus Bean 



70 



.^®2ft»<^lS;aah<^lC5ft,d(^fiSk ^inrtftn lEtDtntp-tljm ^Sai.jt!Siaft..ilS8fiDkAlS 



Y^:m?^"fmi^'^z^'^is^''Q!^f)t ^aiipan '«SE55^:^3gs«^'^£S3^%3icpy'*^ 




^t^^tlSa. ^mfteen Itoentp^tfireE ^t^^mSa^^t^^tigskMm 



'"fms^'^ms?f"''!Sisiis!f"''msy W^t Panpan ''«miso"f!m^'^z'sp- 



Fr'eshmen 



Mamie Gardner Don McConkie David Pierl-e Marian Gardner 

Erma Hill Grace Folland 



Jesse Hullinger Jennie Servis Donna Durrani Otis Carlinc: 

Agnes Markham Ida Hone 



OvANDO (iuBl.ER 


Grani- Morrell Simon Harrison Ci.aribel Hursl 


Ma- 


' Walker Ai.ihora Mlrdock 


Fav F 


nzGERALD LaPriel F<"indlav 


^'IRGINIA Da\1S 


F'rANLIS J. GURNEV IrA MaRKHAM KeNKEIH MvERS 


Clara 


Gilness Ella Hansen 


Fern Gardner 


Si anlev Gunn Willis Fawns F2velvn Maeser 


John \V. 


Henderson Mildred Duncan 


Mahel Hansen 


Reed Morrell Nettie Murdock Erma Murdock 




71 



i:',w-3 



^^jj.^^dS^lSSk^^fiSSSiSh^f^BSSh^f^'SSk, Nineteen Ckucmp'tljrre A^<SS)^js^<S&<,iiSSBSsj^^i&SD»Ji^ 



"^-'^zis^'^z^'^z^ Wi)t Panpau ^^^Ms^-f^^&^-vi^ 



'tyJiJci.*^' 




73 



:i)h jfiineteen tZCtocntp-tlirer 






Frosh 



We are the Krosh, mentally awake, 
physically straight, scholastically de- 
pendable, and traditionally green. In 
the words of the poet, "we are the 
limit." 

Our I'rosii program and annual hall 
were simpl\- wonderkil. We've worn 
our green caps and cleaned the "Y", 
and in general, behaved quite respect- 
ful like — but, wc possess a spn-it ot 
revenge. 

We like the H. "!'. I'., and think we 
have a good chance to make ourselves 
the best class in the university. And 
as a class thinks, so is it. 



74 



K^Wk<4iSB^ci^t<SlJ..4^BSSk, ^inetttn tCtoentp-ttrtt A!SBSsir,4iSB<S!i4^BS!h.i^SSSSShM!^ 



^^m^^w^'^ti^'^M^ W\)t iBanpan '^M^'^t^s^'^t's^'"^^^"^^ 




Roma Bvland 
Ezra Nixon 
Joseph Oldroyd 

Orin Jackson 
Maurine Carroll 
Carol Dunn 

Li LA Burr 
Kenneth Spurrier 
Carl Miller 

Mae Jeffries 
Reva Ahlstrom 
Margaret Swenson 
Inez Warnick 

Phares Nielson 



Rhea Blumenthal 

Harold Candland 

Reese Hubbard 
Reed Magelbv 

Lois Magelbv 

Mattie Havwood 
Virginia Bingham 

Alma Johnson 

Sheldon Christensen 
Elton Sumner 

Lyman Parcell 

Edgar Vance 
Hazel Foote 
Earl Crowther 



75 



M 



m 






is^ 



g 



n 



n 



ts 






m. 



;4.^StSa,.4?2>S^dCS^^^I?&h Nineteen CtDentp-tfjree riC^Iga,d(^S{&kcCSJH&u£?S^« 



'■■Xj^^ 



•A.. 



(Ei)c Jiaupau '^ms'j^^^sji.S'^^-ii-i^'^^^-i^-A' 



80b-izv, 




■■■. IF" 




Secondary Training School 

We loiter on the campus and roam around the balls — 

Have radiator parties and scribble on the walls. 

We keep outrageous hours, but stay within the line, 

We have to squeeze to do it, but otherwise we're Jine! 

It's good that we are limited to ftftv in a class. 

For what this school would do with more, we do )iot loiow, alas; 

lie hate the college atmosphere which holds us so i)i check. 

And seems to interfere to make our best of plaiis a wreck. 

But we're getting college-fever, and soon will grow to be 

As proper eds and co-eds as one could wish to seel 



76 



^iCZM-'K^^^'iC^M. -KjJi'^Y^^M. 



..-iM^ ^inttten Woatntv-t^xtt ,eSSBS^.aSBSSir„eSS!SlSa>.i^i 



'^M 




"iiii^ 



II 



bridal Veil Falls 



1 



\ 



t 





SecondLirx 7 rmnDig School 



jUII ill.! (I'lit .'til' 



fhool ivotild do with n- 



getting iolu'v 



f I 



■•^i;,is^Tssa»£?^'Tisis3^'na2:aF vL^ij*: ;tt^iinpdn ■'>tmA--^^issv 



■<i32[5»"' 



^ 



h/-n 




%,^iS!lS^4s3SStimA&S&!^fitS!^&k fiixutttn Z^mmp-tiittt rOSSlSii^rtSBSr 



^iSSSOkd 



■>' ^\}t Panpan '^^i^'^t^'^t^"^^'^'^. 




'»4sSm^^t<Sa.'eSB!S£h4!SmD^ fimttttn 8i;tBentp.tljrte ^t^^t<SSi,4m^^'^^' 



^'^z^^'^B.i^'^Ms^'^z^ etc Jianpan ''^m!Si^'^m^''^^sm^"(^!^%^^^ 



tm 



ti.^i 



Student ^Body Officers 



E. H. Harier 

President 



Celestia Johnson 
Secvetayx 



Anna Marie P^ggertsen 
First rice-President 





Vivian W. Bentlev 




Harold \V. Bentlev 




Athletic Mam 


ger 




SecoJid I 'ice-Presidoit 


Richard P. Condie 






Ernest Greer 


Ma 


la^er of Fnrensics 






Business Manager, ?" Nei 




B 


riant 


L. 


Decker 






Editoi 


, ? 


' Neivs 




Alberta Hiish 






Helen Candland 




Editor II kite a)id Bin 






Editor Banyan 




W 


. Glenn 


Harmon 






Edito? 


r 


's Guv 




Rovden Dangerfield 






Clarence Jensen 




Manager of Dramatics 




78 


Cheer Master 
1 



».4!SI{&.-fiSI;&.ri£^S2ah^$fia, iJintteen aTtotntp-tJjree 4jS$i2skdaSS2&.^v!:ga,dQi- 






W 







i 



U 



79 



is3 






Ji5 



''Si- 






.1 



M 



S^ 



:;2ai,.«&Igft,^Ifia,^iaa,riC^Igtt, ^intteen €:toentp=tl)ree ^Z<Sa.ci^l^^-B^^M%,^M 









p^ 




Harold W. Bentlev Myrtle Henderson Elavne Christensen Rulon Van Wagenen 
Genera! Director Dtamatics Music Music aud Transportation 



f 



J. 



f 



T^iiblic Service bureau 

The Public Service Bureau has kept its ear to the ground detecting all rumblings 
of talents within the confines of the institution. The discovery was immense and due 
to the copious supply of spendid material, numerous programs ot very high calibre 
were sent out in most every direction. 

The idea ot making monev tor the bureau was abandoned earlv in the season. We 
onlv aimed to make the undertaking selt sustainmg, the great objective being to re- 
present the accomplishments of the school in the lines ot endeavor we were privileged 
to pursue within our scope of activitv. We have furnished some 75 programs and 
parts of programs to wards, clubs and High Schools, from Lehi on the north to 
Goshen on the south. Much appreciation has been shown by those who sent in the 
requests. 

Our recording system is exceedingly accurate and adds considerably to the effici- 
ency of the organization. A record is kept of each number that is sent from the school. 

Weekly programs have been sent to the State Hospital. Our frequent appearance 
there is an indication of the appreciation of the services of the participants. 

The students have supported the bureau wondertullv. Kven at short notice the 
response has been very worthy of honorable mention. 

We feel the public service activity is lending much to swell the enrollment each 
year of our school and is one of the ways to express: 

B\ their fruits, \e shall know them — 



go 



t-, ^inftttn QTtDtntp-tljrtt ^cSSfiDhr 



tEfje panpa?^ 



■-rrr'<t'<r>--^rr:>^-:7>«7>---? 



« 



<lli:i<lllllllllillilllllllllllMlillll!lljllillllllllllllll{lllllll[llll{llllil>lilllllllii ill; I 





i 

I 



8l 



igineteen Clnentp-tfjrtc ^ 



m"^mf"^M!s^'^z^'^Ms?f' W\)t Panpan '^^s^f^^^mi^'^^s^'-'^''''^-'^'' 



The r:A(ezvs 



=1 






Krnest Greer 
Biisirit'ss Manager 



Briaxi L. Decker A. Glenn Hibbard 
Ei/ltor-in-C/iief .Associate Editor 



Mabel Straw Vesta Pierce Marian Gardner 

Dramatics Editorials Special IVriter 



Osmond C. Crowiher 
Circulatirjii 



Hari.en M. Adams 
Special IVriter 



Cannon Jones J. Hamilton Calder R. Clair Anderson 

Circulation .Advertising Former Business Af^r. 

Kdna Snow Mvrtie Jensen 

• Asscmhlies Specia ' If'ritcr 



Clara Creer 
Scic'elY 



\'aneese RowLEV Wendell Ri(;n\- Annie Andrus 
Special tVriler Calendar Faciiltv 



Sadie Ollerton 
Special U'riler 



Nell Clark Lynn Tavlor Marc^aret Hackett 
Humor Sports Special IVriter 



8i 



;&, iJinttttn aTtor ntp tfirer .i>>:*!2«i,.^2!rfiaE«j(^. 



•••\v 






•^3 



>^ ^f)c J^anpan ^^^i^-^^ms^^'^iSP'"^: 




,jUciiSmkcisQM^^^t<S£i.^Wu iJinctecn (Etoentp-tfjrtt ^Ifl&^lS5ga>-cai5fiJi..aai25i^JlS« 



•rV-' 



"^ziso"^z^'-^t^ Wi}t J^anpan '^zi^'^ms^^ws^'^'b^''^ 



The "Banyan 



La Relle Bushman 
Staff .in ! St 



Harlen M. Adams 
Athletics 



\V. Gi.ENN Harmon 
.■Associate Editor 



Helen Candi.and 
Matiaging Editor 



Stanley R. Dean 
Business Manager 



Wanda Bovack 
Literary F.ditor 



NeI.I. Cl.ARK. 

Cale)iiiar 



Lvnn Tan- lor 
Bun\o>i Editor 



F.LWIN A. PoiTER 

Photographer 



Walier p. CoilAM 
Photographer 



8+ 



.-JOSiai... 



_-,,«ia. fl^mtUtw dnfntP.flirff ,^(©!S52ft.<JlS5H5^pCSE-r^. 



■v,fc-^ -V KAi^'^f W ifc H JAKJ 



■^rJkife^^ 



tC^ijc 5^anpan '^ws^f^m^f^^s^'^zs^'m 




M 



I 



i 



M 

^ 



•^ 



i 



M 

^ 



^ 






'"?Sf«5C^e. 



-A--' 



^()c S^anpan '^w^'^zt^'^fm^'^^- 



^K^t. '-=r'"-« 




Alberta Huish 
Matiagitig Editor 



Vesta Pierce 
Assoiiate Editor 



J. Hamilton Calder 
Business Manager 



La Vern Page 
/irtisi 



White cind "Blue 



"Literature is the thought of thinking souls." 
The purpose of the White and Blue is to encourage undergraduate 
writings of literary value and to promote an appreciation for gooci 
literature. Essay, short story, verse and one-act plav have been 
featured in the issues of this year. 

Previous to 1 921 -22, both news items and literary articles ap- 
peared in the White and Blue; there was no distinctlv literary pub- 
lication. The separation of material and the creation of the Y News 
made possible the better cultivation ot purelv literar\' writing by as- 
signing to the White and Blue a definite field. It is the earnest desire 
of all who are concerned that a high standard of artistic composition 
be maintained. 

For twenty-six years the White and Blue has voiced the interests 
and achievements of the B. Y. U.stucients, and as the purveyor of "Y" 
traditions and ideals, it is dear to all connected with the institution. 




86 



,dCfiIfiakdQaSiSft,<j2£®fiift, ^metetn tEtoentp-ttiret ^Ba&,aS8Gi&Aig5®2a.^I0ft.,j 



^24:-s3--^Sii!S3-'^i5J- ^\)t JPaiipan "^ws^'^^msp"^' 




Carl J. Christensen 
Biaiufss Manazer 



W. Glenn Harmon 
Managing Etiffo*- 



Lynn Taylor 

Associate Editor 



La Relle Bushman 
Jr/ist 



87 



•jh iJineteen Ctorntp-tfiree dC55IfiSh<*SH&,.^S(SCh=i\ 






AN ELECTRIC 

STORM IN 

STORE FOR 

THE 

FARMERS 



BASKET BALL M 





POPULA?X«?f CONT 



[TJJO MISCHIEF 

■TCHAMPION^^" 







Arouse 



«^*S 



' bfTd uncartli' 




I of tha ichoc^ 



I 



.tr^^\\%'<^^ ' HIPPED W 



«»^J^ 



^ell Tbou(ht Out 









Nkr 



:\T«v;<>"-«""^ vetii' 






:i;v 



jirMV 



Glenn Harmon 

C/iief Scandal Motner 



Lynn Tavlor 
In Charge nj the Morgue 



A. RAvOirrs 
.id Hound 



The J(^ve T-er 

"Conductor of a Positu'e Current" 

With the birth of the Block Y Club, a new publication was in- 
troduced to the students. Brewed to blow the '1 out of flight, the 
sheet was temporarily given the name of "T. N. T." by its sponsor 
the Block '\' Club. This name was later changed to the "Live Y-er,"- 
and it will be henceforth so known. 

The organ announced editorially in its first issue that although it 
belonged to the wind instrument class, only one tune could be pla\ed 
upon it, "The Truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth," 
and that it was without fear or favor, and would print "all the news 
that's fit to print — and some that ain't." 

Its fearless policy soon won the hearty support ot the entire stu- 
dent body, which for the first time was able to get the "inside dope" 
upon the ones higher up. Only one "higher up" got sore, but since 
the management stated that it would be responsible neither for libel 
nor slander, time soothed his wounds and it is believed he will recover. 

The "Live ^ -er" has become a permanent fixture upon the campus 
and will continue on its way next year, "without fear or favor." 



88 



•,,^i^M<S2},^r(^SSS^!Si)^,i£i^SSiu^^Wsi. ^inrtttn ^WnxvWntt ^Bgft„cE; ,^ 



^<i— 0? 



^!)e Panpan '^MS!y'^t^"«m!sjf-^^- 




CLUBS 







H 



'm. 



4t 
4 



I 



I 



89 












s 



^ ^inttetn 3CtDcntp-tl)ree ^ 



^'v^Msa-'iiiiis^-vsii^rvasi- tKJje Panpan ■vsas>"tsig^vsasi'"«ssi^" 



"Block r Quh 



k. Rav Oi.I'IN 
President 
Rui.oN Morgan 
Frank Morgan 



W. Glenn Harmon 
Editor Live ] '-er 

Merrill J. Bunnell 

LeGrande Noble 



Ralph Keeler 
LvNN Miller Lvnn Tavi.or 

Rkep (iardner Ro^AL Chamberlain 



F. HvRUM Harper Aii.ene Phillips 



Algie F. Ballik Meiih Maeser 
Sec'y-Treasiirer 



Richard P. Condie Aldus Markham West Parkinson Leland Wentz 
Executive Committee 



Ross Nielsen Isaac Tavi.or Fi.wood Gledhh i. Henrv M. Stark 



\'icroR Hatch 

I\an Young 

Truman Partridge 
Executive Committee 



Hi Nn er Manson 
Homer Wakefield 
Paul Packard 

Executive Committee 



90. 



iSa8h.-i^S{&kri(fi®2ShriC©S0Bhoi^l;&, Nineteen ICtoentp-tfjrfe ci^WSst>4&S£i«^WS!k^. 



■^^^"f^Msp'-^mif' ^fje Jianpan '^w^^mi^'^w^'^-: 







^.^i2a,.^lJga,.-jjS?fi2ShcJjaBi;&, iJineteen (Etotntp-tJjrtt ,jiiSJffi3k<jcS}IfiSh^2J;&.^I^^ 



fvil kTr^ti ■ .^-T-n ■.'. . WW,- r.'w-ry^ - 



"-^'ims^'^zi^ W\)t Panpan '^is-' '>;y^^«>"'t©a5>'"^"^^'' 











- 




Tau 


I 


'(a^ppa ^ 


flpha 


Ernest L. 


Wilkinson 


E 


West Parkinson 
Charter Member 


George Bali.if 


Frank B. Newman Udell 


Jensen 


A. Rav Olfin 






E. HvRUM Harier 


Charter Me 


mber 






Charter Member 


Secretary 








President 


T 


Karl Pardoe 


Henry 


M. Stark 


Thomas L. 


Mariin 


Chrisien Jensen 


Hugh M. Woodward 


Charter Member 






Charter Member 








9» 





..^I(Sa«^S{SSkdC^lS%^<4Q£S2Sk ^ituttfit 3rtDrnt}>-tl)rrr ,i(SSSSS£k,<^^!SSi,xif&^^siS^SSk.^ 



'.>> 



tE!)f Jlianpan '^M^'^zisp^^z^^'^t^" 



t 



P 




,^liSfl,^®2ah.4!aiS&..*aifiiDh Nineteen tCtoentp-tljret ■j£iSSfift,<jaS}I?2tt,c;(^I^^J52a„j 



p 



The Qommerce Qliih 



Leon T. Williams 



A. Rex Johnson 
President 
Merrill J. Bunnell J. Rulon Morgan Ra>mond Hoi. brook. 

Pru irii ni s Co »i m iltee 



S IAN lev R. Dean 



Lei. AND KiLLPACK Rulon Van Wagenen 

Glenn Cameron Raymond Taylor 



Reed S. Gardner 
Finance Committee 
George Bovack 



Carma Bali.if Clyde Kevte J. .Aldus Markham Birdie Bate 



Paul Harding 
Irvin J. Slack. 



RoiiER r Wilkinson 



Chestina Baird 
Secretarv 
Ethelvn Hodson Wilford W. Richards 



La Relle Bushman Rovden Dangerfield Florence Newell 

La Vonne Bromley Edmund Evans Ernest Greer 



Clinton Harris Royal Chamberlain 

Wendell Thorne Ivins Bentlev Owen Romnev 



94 



n4iS^<S£ir„iiSMlh<4^Ss)^ci^BSSh ^inettm tEiutmi-ujirt AiSSSlSsu4^t!Ss>».^SSSSSSi->.iiSS^^ 



fj.:^... 



^z^'^t'sp'"^sisi^ ^fje IPaiipan '^^smsp^^zi^'^M^'^gsc^' 




95 



..-t^t^^i^.-eSiM%^SB^ Nineteen aCtoentp-rtjrte ^I<gft,dG&f0!X,daSf0ShdGai?^« 



•^i5»^'r©s2sp)^'T©]2ffip^ ^l)c Panpan *c352{sii^*tjg2K«^- 



Home 


Economics 


Club 




ViDA BrOADBENI 


KuiTH Hedquisp 


Leah Hales 






President 


Secretary 




Mrs. Kjhel Cutler Butts 




Blanche Mendenhall 


LvDA Hartell 


Kffie Warnick \' 


IRGIE SiEWART 




Anna Randall 




I.izzie 


Phillips 


Hazel Williams Ermon Ross 


Nellie Ohlwiler Gladys Watson 


Fi.DA Bingham IV 


ARCAREl SwENSON 


F.I.NA BUNNEI. 


L 


Leona Cook. 


- 


Marv 


Hales 


Veneese Rowlev 


F.RMA MURDOCK 


RriA StOHFlEI.D 





Phoebe Linford Velvn Bavles Inez Warnick 
Etta Morlev Tirzah Cheever 



96 



^1 



\,^^^Si»4iSISSD>,^(lSBSsi»4^S^!Ssk, ftmxttw. dtoentp-ttret 4!SSBlifc,)aSH&>^Ifi!ih^: 



.1 




Nineteen aTtoentp-tftree ^'B<Sa.^t<Ssk.-cSB&%.4m<Sii.^ 



',j^'''(imsp"-'^^^'^"^tiMsp' ^i)E Panpan ^^msp^^^^ssm.' 



ir'-T, 



h 



The T ^Countaineers 



Fl.ORF.NCE WeSI EN.SCOW AmV LvMAN MeRRILL MaRIAN (iARDNER 

Sponsor Presiiie>it 

Alile Jenkins Jran Henorr-k.s 

Sciyclar\-Tri-dSun'r 



NriA Wakefield 
Marian Pvfer 



Isabel Pack 



\.\\.\ Browne 

Margarei Hackett 



Net MuRDotK Margaret Swenson 



Fav McDaniel Gladys Watson 



\'irginia Walker May Willox Theora Snow 
M\RrLE Dudley F.\ elyn Bailey 






Susie Bennion Lola Clyde Rita Slhofield 

Mei.ba Cook L^)Is King 



Belva Forti Helen Ash F'ern Gardner 
Leona F'lELD Leona Bryner 



iiu)^lh'X£i8^.«S8Dg0b<J^^ Nineteen Ctntntp-ttirce wC!iSSr^.aSSC^ 



(Et)E Panpan •^m^'^z^" 




99 



-riC^S2!i,oiE 



.^Dh-jcSteh Nineteen Etorntp-tljrtt ojaSjSgBhJjSJMfc.JiaS'gSt-dQSISSjh^ 



s®^'*>4ici'^-''^j'i;aci'j-'-^iJici>-^-T>i;4iii'r ^j[j0 JBanpaii ■'^3is«j-"^2JES'j*"^2is»^"^* 



The Qeni State Qlub 



CjOl.DF.N ROMKF.V RhoDA Ci.ARK I.F.l.AND KlI.I.I'ALK 

I.. Ra'i' Robinson Maurinf. Ci.akk K. West Parkinson F.vei.vn F.dmond 



l.o\F.I.I. KlI.I.I'AtK \'aI.ENIINK BKKri.F.\- RkID MoI.FN F.\A HaNSFN 

I.ii!hjeCook Acnes Farnsworth Owen Romnev W. W. Richards 



F.I.DRED KnICHT 

Nei.i.ie Plant 



Cii.EN Cameron 

Ai.IA DlNKI.EV 



Dee ^'oiNC 
Jean Hendricks 



V'u'IAn McDonald K\iif Imirhfs Mrs. F. C. lirris I'.lmfr Pkierson 
Herschfi. l.oosi.i RiDt.ER Walker Sianlev Dean Cari.vle BRAriHWAii e 



Rr IH Harper Mildred Vocnc Lorraine Snvder 



Jose 


■H 


Benson 


BR\ANr 


c 


,ARK 


IviNS B 


ENI LEV 


Brian I L. 


Decker 






Pi 


RRN- Sf\\ 


ELL Anna 


D 


liNKI,E\- 


A. II, Hil 


TON Andrew Anderson 




1.. 


IIS 


Rich 


Carma B 


ai 


I V K 


Fare Crow i her 


RoxiE Imndlav 








Ivan ^'oltnc 




Henrv W 


\RDELI. 


T. C 


RoMNE'i- 




I.UEI 


LA 


w 


ARD 


Roma Parkinson 


Rem 


Smith 


(Jl.AD^S 


Waison 








Fl.WIN 

Pr 


A. Po] lER 

•iideiil 




Rllon 


DoMAN 


I- 


D M. ROWE 










Deli i. \ 


Hk;os 




I.OUISE I''.NCAR 


V 


1 "lA ^L'\RLE^■ 




H 


ARRISON R. M 


ERR ILL 




Leah 


Hansen 




MvRii.E Henderson 














lOO 












.^Ifift»riC^&ihci!aifitt,rfaS!55aik Nineteen tStotntp.rtjree 4iS58aDh.jcS!Raiu.jQiS3«2ia.Jia 



^\)t panpan '^s5»^'^ass^"^E«^"^- 




J 
^ 



m. 



m. 



m 



M 



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s 

^ 



m. 



m. 






ta 






si 



M 



i 



M 



M 



.»juri8S}lGfei-.-i''^^S'i..-i:'BE£ft,.-cSSSa. ^inetfen JKtoentp-tfjrtt ^•^5ahoi^Sfi8hdeS}l52a.caaSfia,« 



^\)t JBanpan 



'^ji4>SP' '■ 



r 

h 







Kathf.rine Caldf.r Wanda Bovack Annk Marif Rccertsen Nfli. Clark Izoi.a Jensf.n' 

Chairman^ Project Senetarv Preside>il rice-Presidefit Chairman 

Cummitiee Enterlaiumetit Commiltee 



Associated Women Students 

The college women ot the Young University were 
this year fully organized and became affiliated with 
the national inter-collegiate organization of Associ- 
ated Women Students. The aim is to get more girls 
interested and participating in college activities. 
It has been, in its first year here, altogether success- 
ful. Five representatives attended the annual con- 
vention of the A. \V. S. held in Salt Lake City 
during November. 

A thorough establishment of the Big Sister 
scheme has helped the girls, through bi-weekly 
luncheons and numerous parties, to become better 
acquainted with the school and with each other. 
The sister groups have functioned in giving pro- 
grams at meetings of the A. \V. S., and also success- 
fully conducted day 'nursery during Leadership 
Week. 

As the crowning feature of the year plans were 
laid for securing a chapter of the Mortar Board for 
Young L^niversity. This chapter will in all proba- 
bility become a reality during the coming year. 



icMr.mM .-Ji.:kJ<'.^y-i>i.-ij»-*<iv<..y?. .-j 



■ii3lKaa«cS5®2ia, .Nineteen ICtotntp-tljrfe riCai!ifift.daSSfia,4!af^diiS5Safcrikii^ 



I 



-^-^ji.^ Ei)t panpan ^^i^'''ms?^''fw.^"'^"^-'^^ 




La Reli.e Blshman Rith Kiar B. F. Laksen 

Leo Holt Ri i h Braithwaite Genevieve Hlish Lvnn Tavlor 

Veneese Rowley Carlvle Braithwaite Glenn Crandall La Von Bromley 
Edda Wheeler Fay Fitzgerald Belva Forti Dorothy Jacobs Nellie Roper 
Ruby Baird Lizzie Phillips Lvle Nelson Li Verd Scorup 



■^1 

i 



4 












4 



103 



Nineteen aUnentp-tJjrr 







77;r Frc/ic/i Club 



Oi.cA \Vundi:ri.v B. F. Clmmings Alice Taylor 
Cakoi. Ov nn Alonzi) MoRi.EV Lk(} Hoi.T Bf.th Hamblin 

Presidetit 
Amv Jackson Ivv Niki.son Nita Wakefiei.o Helkn Clarke 

Rae Rust Soi-hie Tofte Mars Hosi.ance Alice Brunner 

Lois Mendenhall Harlen M.Adams Marian (jardner 
yice-Presidet2t 



104 . 






,^1^S!i.ci^Wlkci^'^S&,ci^W)r- flimtttxi artotntp-mree ^t<SSh4£S!BSSi.4£it^,4!^.^ 



■^z^'^m^ Cf)c Jianpan 



'<E 



# 







span is// Club 



TO 



Cannon Jonf.s B. F. Cummin(;s Harold Benti.k.v 

Owen Romnkv Aii-F-ne Phillips Vkni-.i-sk Uowlkv Clarenck Jf.nsen 

Arthi R Crawford F.thelvn Hodson Etta Marley Leon Ivie 

Alma McElrath Sadie Ollerton Elles Bowen Donna Daniels 

Minnie Crawford Homer Wakefield Isf.zWarnick 



105 






;ilh Nineteen tEtoentp-tlirf c daS 



■g^-'UMts^'^^is^'^tfso''''^^^ Wi)z Panpan '^t(so"rms^'''^is?f"^." 



:V«-T.'j«r^- 






h 
5^ 



W 



'^. 





The 


Viano (^ 


lub 










Frank Wan LESS 


F.L.MFR Nelson 


RVLON' 


Rrimhall 






/ 'iic-PrcsidenI 




Pi 


esidc'til 






Marol ERiiK Hair 








LiL \ Im.lf 


RISEN 




Mildred YouNC, Jos 


;i'H Chrisi rnsen 


M 


wwv.y 11 


Bowman 




Mfi.ii. 


. Clark 








Helen C 


ARKE 


Amber Han ford Carma Bai.i.ik 


Phoebe 1 


JNFORI) 


Jennie H 


\NSEN 




Ll'Ella Ward 


Osborne Henrv 




Lida 


Hartell 




Florf.xce Si'ECKART 








Loi> 


King 




Rae Rlsi Grant Morrell 




Alke 


Jenkins 




Reva 


AhLS I ROM 








Gene\ l\ E 


HrisH 




Ione Huish 


IiiNF Harrlk 


Mel 


ha Bovi.E 






Secetary 


io6- 











^!^SSh^^BSSh<i^S&«f(&Sst, Nineteen {Ttotntp-ttree 4i^SSSkiiS^S!S!S&>iiSBSSir^-i^1^S&^ 



.iAS«j-%2ss«^%25£s<>''-«3ic^ Wi)t iianpan '^M^"^w^'^z>s?f''^ws?^' 



%3g 



I 




■..•i^'BSar, Nineteen tEtoentp-tfirte ^t<S&,^Z<Sar.cCSi^^Z^^ 






^f)c Panpan '^$s^'^MSif"^zis!f"v:^ 




* 



J , C, cLy7. 



Anderson, Jamks 
Ashman, Harold 
Baxter, E. N. 
Bennett, Lesi.ik 
Blackburn, Mvrtlk 
BoHN, Theodore 
Bramwell Clyde 
Bromley, La Vonnf. 
Carling, J. Otis 
Chipman, Dorothy 
Creer, Clara 
Dixon, Wildee 
Dudley, Verna 
Dudley, Myrtle 
Eggertsen, M. Anna 
Hackett, Margaret 
Heslington, Melbourne 
Hilton, Ivan 
Hinckley, E. George 
Garmon, Erma 
Jones, Etta 
Litchfield, C. R. 
Lewis, Edna 
Loveless, E. Ray 
LuNDELL, Harold 
Metcalf, S. Maurice 
MoiRER, J. Harold 
Murdock, Althora 
Newell, Rulon 



NiEi.soN, P. Otto 
Porter, Melva 
Rees, Clifton 
Rigbv, Wendell 
RiGBY, L. Roland 
Smart, Muriel 
Smith, Oralie 
Stanton, D. W. 
Wilcox, May 
Allred. Radcliff 

BoWVER, MeLBA 

Braithwaite, Carlvle 
Brockbank, Lois 
Carter, Jessie 
Davies, Fawn 
F-DWARDs, Maude 
GuNN, Stanley 
Hughes, Bernice 
Harris, Vivian 
Hunter, Milton 
Halts, Mary 
Kay, Rheta 
Olsen, Grisilda 
Smith, Josie 
Sumsion, Edna 
Seel^', Della 
Smith, Ethel 
Thurman, Blanche 
Willett, Lela 



1 08 



V7 









13^h.-i£Bi::jr,A:^^i::jn.-x::^^',c:jr..-u£M!sii,- ^intitni (ttoentp-tljret ^'^Si,^^3&,^l^SSkciiSitlSi3^.i 



^i)e panpan "^©ss^J^^t*s^<J ^iii^ ^ 




r.e.^. 



y0u\c, f.ffif. 
Allison, Nki.l 

HuTTERFir.LD, PhVLLIS 

Bennett, Arvella 
Hart, Mf.lba 
Clyde, Lola 
Densi.rv, Edna 
Davis, Mattie 
Ferguson, Lucilla 
HiLLis, Winnie 

HlGGlNSON, KsSiE 

Hone, Ida 
Hansen. Mabel 
Jones, Clarissa 
Jex, Ida 

Johnson, Blanche 
Man villi:, F.llen 
MuRDocK, Nettie 
Parker, Jennie 

POULSEN, LuELLA 

Procter, Annie 
Robertsen, LaPriel 
RiGTRUP, Caroline 
Robinson, Phoebe 
Ross, Ermon 
Rolands, Mrs. R. C. 
Randell, Annie 
Robertson, Genieve 



Steedeman, Maurine 

ScOFlRLD, RkTA 

Sturnway, Leona 
SvMUELSON, Beatrice 
Trrvitich, Grace 
Tuft, Madge 
Thorn E, Fern 
Turner, LuRuf. 
Walch, Hazel 
Brown, Emily 
Clawson, Gene 
Cove, Melba 
Crawford, Minnie 
Davis, Virc;inia 
DuNKiN, Millie 
DuNKLEv, Alta 
Di'NKLEV, Ann 
Hair, Marguerite 
Hansen, Nellie 
hol'ston, l0veth\ 
Johnson, Stella 
Markham, Agnes 
McGavin, H\ttie 
McDaniel, Fay 
Robinson, Ella 
Towers, Ella 
Towers, Enola 
Vance, Marva 



109 



W^^.i&S^^W£k.^^i^^Sl^^i^^S^ ^inetrf n JEtuentp-tljcff 4^WS£)n.iSX£i^<^i^^S^^iSM£h.^ 



^i^'^(!s^j^'^zi^'v^t'S!f''^Msp' ^fje J^anpan *«Kt5»''«3a<5'''*''S0gsff='^ 




The z^gg/'es 



Wavn'e Booth 

President 



M. C. Mkrrill 



Thomas L. Martin 



Hknrv Jonks, Jr. C. V. Cannon Wilford Mendenhali. Dee Yolng 

Arthur McCoard Rav Robinson Leland Wright Morriss Buckwai.tf.r 

Kucene Morrei.i. Haroi-d LuNDEi.i. Frank Lamp.ert Ervai. Christensen 

Ri'iKiiR H. Walker Cari. Zang Pearson Corbett R. C. Litchfield Meith Maeser 



»^S0a«iJS)ffiSk,jQ©^{2a.^:S52cu iiinetecn (Ctoentp-ttirte j!£5S52tt,daSEfift.> 



T 




T/?e .Mush 



Presenting now a tragic, now ;i thoiighttiil, ami now a hiunorous 
bit ot lite, the Mask strives to reach the hearts of students interested 
in plays and phiy production, and impress therein a love anci appre- 
ciation for the possibilities and future of the drama. Advanced stu- 
dents appear in entire play readings and direct the appearance of 
other members ot the club in one-act plays. 

At the annual Mask bancpiet, (reorge D. Pypergave his illustrated 
lecture on "Theatricals in Utah." 

The Mask Ball was one ot the most unique affairs ever held at the 
school, members ot the club greeting the guests and giving their faces 
a coat ot "make-up" to match the costiune worn. 

The Mask has grown very rapidly. Although this year is the first 
in its history, it boasts a very substantial membership. 

The officers are: \'irginia C. Keeler, president; and \'ivian Mc- 
Donald, secretary. 



-.«« 



il, Nineteen BTtoentptbrte <^lj[fift,dC5SH!&,d(^IgShri 



^r7rf^r:*.-^>':Tf' 



'^Ms?^'^t>s?^'''ms!^ VLi}t Panpan ■^e<5j^'«e®55-'«s25!^^ 




Bkth Bovack Wendell Rk.b\' Lfj.i.and Wright Dkif. Law 

Kenton Reeves Kdna Hales Alice Paxton Liatha Wricjht Clement Hilton 

MiL'iuN Hunter Phyllis Paxton Hazel Walsh Wvrd Moodv 

Nellie Koper Samuel Hales Nellie Hansen Calvin Croft La \'on Robins 

Vonda Blaci; \Vii liam Paxton Gertrude Western Wayne Shum.kv Kdith Christensen 

Ivan Hilton Ila Dutson Harold Ashman Florence Cropper Glen Cameron 



iJtnftetn jrtDtntptftrer .^S'!W'i..-r^j:S'i-.4>S^'i.-r^ 






i 




The Dixie Club 




Marva Crawford Frma Hoi.t Hi:bkr Cdi iam Kmii.v Pavn'f. 


Pfari. Bowman 


Ki.Rov Junks Mabfi. Tkrkv Tennyson Atkin Laura Gardnkr 


Walter Cottam 


Vice-Presidetit President 




Jfssico Whitf-Hhau Ovando Gubler Kdna Snow 


Inez Snow 


Seirelttrv 





Edith Cottam Minnie Crawford H. M. Woodward Minnie Gardner Annie Gardner 

Arilla Bringhuist Hkber Holt Kmii.\' Woodward Arthur Crawford FIffie Cottam 



;i)h Nineteen 3rtoentj»=tl)ree ;^I{&,d(© 



'A>A 



^£ 



'"(m^'^t>sjf^ws^'^wsj!f VL\)z Panpan ^z'^'^z^^zis<f"^i^'^ 



9 
I 









t. 



5? 




!Sa?ipete County Club 



Ci.ARFNi'i-- I.. L'dei.1. Jknsf.n Lor.,\CLVDt IzoLA Jf.nskn Ariie MiNciK I'liARi;;, N11-.1.SON 
Jknsf,n President 



Kadii.iffk Ali.rkij Doroihv Jacobs 

Alonzo Mori.i.^- AM^■ Jaiknon 
Sei retar\ 



Diu.i.A Sffi.v HinvAun V'ancf: 

Ruth Braithwaui I(>^r fh Oi.orovo 
Vle-Presidenl 

Rf.fse Sanuf.rson Hi (.h Andf-kson 



ArDEI.I. Bl.AtKHAM OrRIN JaCKSON 

Rl"" l^J" ViR.MMA KeeI.FR 

Helf.n Han.sf:n Amber Hanforu Lilv Barton Ivv Niei.son 



114 



5lia)h^B!g8^.iSfc,<*SBa}t, ^inetttn Etotntp-tfjret riC£®!&,HaSS2ftriC5l!&,^-' 



"^ 




Sunset On Utah J^ke 



lilimpMiinuilinTrtimiritrnTiiriiTit-ii — 




S-'"''*!!!! 



I 



I 



'.'vD 



'S% 






ii::: K!ISSiniil^'llliiiliiil>illMiill;i. 

San pa,' 





iiiiirnmuiiiiiiiin 



f''essss^'^;smSfr'assgf"^9l0f ^i)i iBatipatl •vstlS?f''ismSr''^m^''«mS!y'^ 




n.tSSSSSk.i£SISSi>JS3K!0m fiinttttn StDtntif-tiirte 4:Sl^^.tS!SlS^J!S9&h4i£SSeSSk* 



■'^z'S!!f"^ti^ Clje Jlanpan '«3i5»^'^: 




n<,cm!&i-.A^Ma.ci^BS&.ci£BSsu Nineteen tCtnt ntp-tfjree dC^Iga,dQSIfiBh^IS<i]hd(iaifiBhj^ 



^fje lianpan 




Coach Alvin Twitchell 

TwricHELL CAME TO THE B. V. U. with a Splendid recommendation 
and an enviable record. This year he was the real directing helm 
of our athletics, and several of his teams have surprised the athletic 
world. With a big job in actual college participation, his training 
spreads over a large field and his developing stars made a good record 
tor the year. Although tew pennants were won, almost all new mate- 
rial had to be worked in, and now tor some years to come these ex- 
perienced men will still he under our successtul trainer. 

E. L. Roberts 

.Although replete with nicknames tor his various nature proteges, 
athletic work and interest, the most common when this old depend- 
able is reterred to is, "The Coach." No matter what weather, what 
trouble, what condition, always "The Coach" is ready to give smiling 
aid in any difficulty. His tame continues and grows as new fields are 
entered. Relieved now trom actual direction, he takes time tor clever 
mental supervising in which he is unique. This year in a new field he 
coached a championship P'rosh team in football which brought new 
honors. He is always a friend of, for and by the school. 



ii6 



m 



rfi?3 



?a-' 



tKi)e iBanpan '^- 





Paul Packard 
Halfback and Captain, ig22 
Fame may come and fame may 
go, but our Captain's name goes 
on forever. Due to his person- 
ality and his record ot last year, 
Paul was the unanimous choice 
of the team for our first Rocky 
Mountain Conference season. 
He worked at a disadvantage 
this year. He was hiid up halt 
of the season with physical dis- 
abilities and most ot his work 
was on the side lines. It must 
be said he kept up the pep from 
the bench. But vou can't keep 
a good man down and Paul got 
in enough to win his honors 
with applause. 



Ivan Young 
Tackle ig22. Captain ig2j 
Ike is a good natured and 
agreeable chap who is very 
popular with his teammates. 
Whether on the grid or in any 
other sport he is characteristi- 
cally fighting, on his toes every 
minute and refusing to stay 
put. Playing the role of tackle 
this year's squad, he was easily 
the outstanding man of the 
Rocky Mountain Conference 
infant eleven, and probably the 
phenomenon of the entire con- 
ference. He was ignorant of the 
game until last year, when he 
received rudimental training on 
the Frosh squad. His aggres- 
sive playing earned him a berth 
on the mythical conference 
eleven by two critics and named 
for the second bv still another. 




117 



.j!SS2sh-ci, 



.^ iiinftftn JCtDtntp-tfjrtt ^^ 



^'^zts^'^tisp'"(mt^'^sj!^ tKfje ^anpan ^is^'^ij^'^sjijssp'^s.s^'^:- 



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M 



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RovAi. Chamberlain 
One of the school's unassum- 
ing stars of wide interest. A 
stelhir athlete, a musician, a 
favorite, and blessed with a face 
and form good to look upon. 
He puts all his energy to the in- 
terest at hand and well earns 
all his experience and honors in 
anv activity. 



Hunter Manson 
Hunt will never lack for 
fame as he can always fall back 
on this one honor man. As the 
first honor man to score against 
our opponents, he won instant 
favor. His initial and our only 
touch-down won our first R. M. 
C. game. 




Lavonia Fuller 
Bony's list of numbers would 
stump a statistician. He had 
always the right signal at the 
right time. His clever tackling 
when a man had chanced to get 
through brought down many 
an opponent's hopes. 

Truman Partridge 
All through our first year 
history of football appears 
"Partridge punted out of dan- 
ger." etc. The hefty kick of this 
heavy man as well as his con- 
sistent work at guard was a de- 
ciding factor in all our games. 



ii8 




« 



i 



-oifiH{2ft,.-cai2a,riCS^fiBh^Ifia» Amttttn 3rtoentj'-tf)ree .cSMa,^tSii,A£)S^^ciiS^ 






p 



^zis^^zis!^"(!s>ti^ ^\)t Panpan 



■^zis!^"«m!sp'"^ws^'^m^'f^ 




i 

4 



Lynn Miller 
Our "Red Flash," his nick- 
name" Mable", had a great in- 
fluence in our initial game. On 
his plays the rooters gave three 
cheers for "Mable." The game 
was almost protested because 
the coaches of the worthy op- 
ponents thought this to be a 
signal from the side lines. 



Elwood Gledhill 
Being lhe introduction of an 
old star under a new name since 
the venture into matrimonial 
circles. Whether his Maggie 
treated him rough or not, he 
did not last through all the 
games, but with the fighting 
"Rip" spirit he played a con- 
sistent season and won his let- 
ter. 





Meith Maeser 

"The bigger they are the 
harder they fall," — and espec- 
ially hard did our lengthy cen- 
ter fall on any opponent. Also, 
the above might be revised for 
his benefit. "The longer they 
are the farther they fall," — for 
he was a sure ground gainer it 
he got the ball and fell for- 
ward with it. 



Merrill Bunnell 
Merrill won his recognition 
as one of the special mention 
stars of our first victory game. 
His clever end work stopped 
Wyoming from circling around 
and his interception of passes 
broke up many a play. 




i 



i,riaSS5^<jC©'teh.-4^I0Sh.^5S:^ Nineteen Ortoentp-tJjret ^WSst^^Wa^^Wih^^B^.iS^ 



lL\)t iBanpan 



¥ 

h 




Victor Hatch 
Vic continued through his sec- 
ond year of football, first in 
the R. M. C, as the battering 
ram with the slogan "mum's 
the word" when after an oppo- 
nent. It is not known whether 
"Comfort" means his "speedy" 
size or method of landing on an 
opposing team. 



Bernardo Bowman 
Bv BREAKING into Wirsitv 
Football and Dramatic Art the 
same vear, came a coordination 
of "Slipperv's" activities. From 
his gridiron experience came a 
wealth of scenes for pantomirne 
and from class pantomimecame 
the hypnotizing power over his 
opponent. 





Frank Morgan 
Frank is jhe "greased pig" of 
the R. M. C. In wet grounds 
he absolutely can't be handled. 
Speed and size, of the shorter 
kind, are his assets. When he 
iirabs a punt or fumbled ball 
and starts sliding through the 
legs of the opponent, it's a sure 
ertjund ijaincr. 



RiLoN Dixon 
"Abe" being a sheep man is 
naturally interested in goats. 
The redeeming feature of a goat 
is his powerful punch. '.Abe" 
successfully proved the value 
of his association by putting a 
real punch into his playing, and 
"riding" his opponent with his 
unique hand mdvements. 




ii, Nineteen Ctof ntp-ttjret ^8^ 



^ije IBanpan 'vm.^'^Mssf^f 





\'l\lAN BeN'TLEV 

Jihletic Mnimger IQ22-2J 

Viv WAS AiToiNTED assistant athletic manager tor the 
year 1 922-2"! by Coach E. L. Roberts. He served as 
such until about November, 1 922, when he was appointed 
to succeed Aldus Markham, manager, who resigned. 

He took up his new duties late in the year before any 
work in his department had been accomplished, and, 
without an assistant, he faced a big task. However, he 
was a willing worker and a popular student; he got 
along splendidly with his teammates, and has made a 
successful manager. 










n 

■-f 









;&, .Nineteen Ctoentpttiree ^ 







Schedule 



Y 


.^ 


U. A. C. 41 


October 7 


Y 


o 


Utah 48 


October 14 


Y 


o 


Colorado Mines 47 


October 24 


Y 


7 


Wyoming 


November 14 


^' 


o 


Colorado Aggies jj 


November 2<; 


^' 


o 


Wyoming i^; 


November 30 






Total pubits y /o; 


Opponoils i/i) 




A^J 



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Frosh Football Team 

The Frosh football team furnished a real surprise 
for the school. They made a name for themselves by 
taking the State Championship. In two encounters 
with the varsity squad thev held the latter to a tie score; 
with the B. \ . C. they were easy victors. The U. of U. 
having defeated the A. C was runner up and in the de- 
ciding game the Y men were successful in beating the 
many high school stars playing on the sister squad. The 
Y Frosh, with a beautifully balanced team, was superior 
to any freshman team in the state, and played a brand 
of ball which would have done credit to the varsity. 
Schedule 

Y 13 B. Y. C. 6 

Y 20 U. of U. 6 

Total poi)its; T jj, Opponents 12. The Frosh had a /j to o win 
over the varsity to their credit. 



123 



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Summary 

October 7 

The Y scored in 
it's initial appear- 
ance as a R. M. C. 
team, and against 
the champions of the 
previous season. 
Thus was KingFoot- 
ball hilariously in- 
troduced in Provo. 

October 14 

The Y put up an exceptional and consistent fight against this year's 
R. M. C. champions, holding them in the first half to but 19 points; the 
game disproving the statement that we could not stopa score of less than 60. 

November 14 

The Y celebrated a holiday by not only making a touchdown, but by 
winning our first R.M.C. game as greenlings against an experienced team. 

October 24 

The Y CELEBRATED Founder's Dav, and incidentally, lost the game 
against the Colorado Miners. But we held down one of the R. M. C's. 
speediest teams to a consistent score. 

November 25 

The Y Footballers on their first trip held the Colorado Aggies to 
the lowest score in a losing game. Our team fought hard and won praise. 



November 30 

The Y in the re- 
turn game with 
Wyoming m e t de- 
feat, but with no 
disgrace. The fea- 
tures of the game 
were a blizzard, and 
linemen wearing 
gloves heated in 
buckets of hot 
bricks. 




"1 



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Twi'RHKi.i., Coach JOSF.I'H 



ill FDHIM, ROMNFV RfKVKS BeNTI.EY, MgT. 

Howard Young Nielson Sanderson Roberts, Coach 



Partridge 



Packard 



Stewart 



Kkfi.fr, Capiat}! Dixont 



BlRD 



"Basketball Schedule 

The B. Y. U. Hoop Squad was unsuccessful this year 
in the attempt to capture the much coveted state inter- 
collegiate basketball pennant. When work was first 
started on building up a team prospects looked dim, for 
altho there was a wealth of new material there was a 
severe loss of most of the letter men from last year's 
championship lineup. The splendid start at the first of 
the season, winning both games with the U. of U., ended, 
and we were lost the rest ot the season until the .Aggies 
came to visit us. The first game with them on our floor 
was lost by one point, but in the second, we came into 
our own, giving them a glorious drubbing which showed 
what our boys could really do. Our prospects are very 
bright for next year, for all of the squad except Captain 
Keeler will be back. 

Schedule 

Jan. 26-27, B. Y. U. vs. U. of U. at Provo, B. Y. U. j6, 24; U. of U. 29, 19. 
Feb. 2-j, B. Y. U. vs. U. A. C. at Logan, B. Y. U. 19, 10; U. A. C. 52, 36. 
Feb. 16-17, B- Y. U. vs. U. of U. at Salt Lake, B. Y. U. 3j, 18; U. of U. 35, 24. 
Feb. 23-24, B. Y. U. vs. U. A. C. at Provo, B. Y. U. 22, 37'; U. A. C. 23, 26. 



ia6 



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II 



Captain and Cknter 

Buddy captained a developing team tliroiigh the 
season that gained a wealth of experience though un- 
successful in championship aspirations. He gloriously 
finished his basketball career in the B. Y. U., as the 
star of the scjuad. Due to other plans he will not be 
back, hence his athletic work here is done. Playing a 
steady center, he was always the hope of the 
coach, his mates and the crowd. 

Due to physical disabilities he played at a disad- 
vantage, but was always ready and could be depend- 
ed upon when needed. With such a personality and 
qualitiesot persistence, histriends see a brilliant future 
and wish him success. 



"7 



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4 





Fred Dixon 
Buck initiated himself 
bv winning individual 
recognition; he was 
one of the high point 
men and stellar play- 
ers of the state. In the 
first game he caged 
four field goals from 
back of the halfway 
line. He continued his 
expert work through- 
out the season. 



P.MM, Packard 
Whenever defensive 
play is started the 
voice of this guard is 
heard:"Get a man." 
His grin has often 
brought wrath to an 
opponent and has, as 
often, saved Paul a 
referee's "foul." Paul 
was choice for all- 
state guard h\ all the 
critics. 

Reed Stewart 
Reed was introduced 
into B. Y. U. basket- 
ball this year. His 
determined efforts in 
the U. games at Salt 
Lake after two grind- 
ing trips surely de- 
served applause. 



Nick Bird 
Nick is from Sprina- 
ville and this is his 
first year in collegiate 
ball. From the first 
of the season he proved 
a good individual and 
team worker, always 
valuable in anv play. 





f=i' 



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Elwood Gledhill 
Married life seems 
to settle heavily on 
Rip. Due to physical 
disabilities, he was 
unable to undergo the 
necessary continuous 
training grind, and so 
was prevented troni 
getting into many 
games and continuing 
his splendid defense 
of last year; but what 
he did he did splen- 
didly. 

Ivan Younc; 
This stellar athlete 
won his letter in what 
to him was a new line 
ot activity. .As next 
year's football cap- 
tain, a basketball! 
honor man and a good 
man on the track, he 
proves a true "all 
round athlete." 

Ross Neii.son 
A good center, tor- 
ward or guard. He is 
a real team man, sac- 
rificing to his team- 
mates more tlian any 
other players on the 
floor. Steady and de- 
pendable, he has 
bright prospects tor 
tuture teams. 

Truman P.^rtridce 

A HANDY MAN tO be 

trusted in any ot the 
five positions. His 
real distinction comes 
in his dependability 
and sure basket shoot- 
ing. He did not quite 
meet all hopes, made 
trom his fast work, be- 
cause of early physi- 
cal disabilities. 



129 



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Golden Romnev 

ATOWERlNGColonade, 
he was made for the 
center position. He 
came to us from Idaho, 
where he attained his 
physical advantage. 
He brings some good 
experience, and in 
another year will fill 
Keeler's position in 
great style. 



Fenton Reeves 

Fent is the biggest 
man and the endur- 
ance worker of the 
team. He has been 
out for basketball all 
four years of his ca- 
reer and, this year, re- 
ceived an honor for 
his consistent efforts 
and support. 




RoBERi Howard 
Another introduc- 
tion of a Freshman 
into intercollegiate 
sports. He comes from 
Jordan and brings 
rare experience and 
wonderful possibili- 
ties. He is another 
developed dependable 
that the Coach will 
have to work with 
next year. 



'3° 



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Stewart 



Groesbeck. 



Chipman 



Young 



Maeser 



Sophomore Ticiskethall 

Basketball was initially staged by the usual inter- 
esting class series in which the Sophomores took 
the title. Being an outgrowth of last year's Frosh 
Class Champs, the squad members of the class of 
'25 made a second success which points to a record 
for class activity. All squads played good ball, and 
aided the coaches in picking varsity players. No 
team was able to go through the season without a 
defeat. The title was decided only after three teams 
the Frosh first and second teams and the Sophs, 
played off the tie. 



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Track cjud Field Team 

The B. Y. U. this year entered one of its best balanced teams 
in the final athletic calendar event, in spite of the fact that there 
were but six men in the school who haci represented the institu- 
tion before in this form of college sport. The enthusiasm was 
due to the host of Freshman athletes who crowded the "Y" field 
every afternoon, a squad of about forty reporting daily. Work 
in the various departments was given to the following men: 

Hurdles: Decker, Gunn, Morrell and Keeler. 

Distance Runs and Sprints; Wakefield, Hall, Stewart, Mc- 
intosh, Bentley, Chamberlain, Miller, Sanderson, Sandberg, 
Pierce, Van \Vas;enen and Romney. 

High Jumpers: Young, Maeser and Morrell. 

Pole Vault: Young, Dixon and Miller. 

Weights: Partridge, Maeser, Morrell and Howard. 

In the first contest, for the Schwab medal, Meith Maeser was 
declared the best all-round man on the field, with a score of 55. 

Tr.-^ck Schedule 
April 28, Dual meet, B. Y. U. vs. U. of U. at Salt Lake City. 
May 5, Dual Meet, B. Y. U. vs. U. A. C. at Provo. 
May 19, State intercollegiate meet at Salt Lake City. 



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Homer Jf'akejield, Qaptain 

Homer was the unanimous choice of his fellow mates to captam 
the track and field team for the 192J season. He is well known 
in "Y" athletics and is feared by his competitors far and near. 
His honors in the past have come mostly because of his excep- 
tional ability as a distance runner. He looms up this year as a 
first rate quarter miler and half miler. For two years he was 
winner in the Thanksgiving cross-country run. Last year he 
took first place in the mile run at the Rocky Mountain Confer- 
ence meet in Colorado. 



I 

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Qross-Qountry "^Ruti 



The cross-country run was unique this year in that the smallest 
entry in the history of the Merrill cup lined up for the start. How- 
ever, the field, while small, was rather select and all ten men finished 
well. All dope on the event was upset when Theron Hall took first 
place over Homer Wakefield, last year's winner. Hall's time was 24 
minutes, 51 3-4 seconds, somewhat slower than last year and two 
minutes below the record for the race made by Wayne Hales. 

As usual the turkey winners of the day were the Frosh, they easily 
garnered a majority of the points. 







.1 



.1 



The men finished as follows: 

I. Theron Hall 

1. Homer Wakefield; 

3. Ivan Bentley 

4. Owen Romney 

5. George Corbett 

6. Carl Pryor 

7. Val Bentley 

8. Wendell Christensen 

9. Elton Billings 
10. Newell Baum. 









\ 



BW. 



137 



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Szvimming 



In the Second Annual Intercollegiate Swimming meet, the Y team 
was responsible for a tremendous shock. It easily won second place 
after pushing the Utah champions to the limit. The meet was un- 
doubtedly the most successful ever held, with competition so keen 
that the men had to break four state records to win the various 
events. One of these was set by Fred Richen, "Y" Student, on the 
40 yard free style, his time being 30 2-5 seconds. 

The team was composed of Fred Richen, Ira Markham, Harlow 
Jones, Walter Stevens and Willard Sandberg. .All five "Y" men 
placed, winning their letters. 

iScore 

U. ofU. 31 

B. Y. U. 21 

A. C. U. 1 1 



138 



feojC©S(&,^f;2ft,dQ&B5&.»«af2ft. Nineteen CTfcDfnip-tljrft ^ 



-'C02s»'^ss»^'«3a5J^'«3ts»' tE.\)t panpan '^z^'^wssf-^w^f^M^"' 




JVrestlifig 



The first state championship won in the year 1922-23 by the B. 
Y U was the state intercollegiate wrestling tournament. Repeating 
the surprise of the swimmers, the proteges of Coach Del Webb over- 
came all difficulties and showed considerably more class than their 
much-touted opponents. 

Remarkable work was shown by all the inexperienced Y men, and 
by taking three first places, B. Y. U. went on top of the score. 

Those participating in the event were: Raymond Holbrook-125 
lbs.; Ordell Blackham-135 lbs.; Harold Lundell-145 Ibs-; Earl Crow- 
ther-1^8 lbs.; Wendell Christensen-175 lbs.; Paul Wilk.ns-heavy 
weight'. Those taking first place were: Blackham, Lundell and Wil- 
kins, who won their Tetters. First place men were sent to Denver tor 
the R. M. C. meet. 

S!core 



Young 

Aggies 
Utah 



14 

10 

8 



139 



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m'"msx'-'--'^tij^^t>s^^z^ Cf)e Panpaii 



•^•'TJ55f{S3)E''rr- 



♦ f 






>'^ -' 





Gledhill Markham 



Taylor 



Dixon 







Manson 



Gardner 



Tennis 



The B. Y. U. Tennis team which entered the state 
intercollegiate court contest this year, was the best 
the school has produced for some time. All men 
were experienced prize winners. 

Schedule 
April 26 B. Y. U. vs. U. of U. at Provo 
May s B. Y. U. vs. U. A. C. at Provo 
May 17 B. Y. U. vs. U. of U. at Salt Lake 
May 26 B. Y. U. vs. U. A. C. at Logan 



140 



tSi. 



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-..^^- -^t^g^' ^fje Panpan •^zi^^m^-'^wsp-'^M: 



Debating 



:>cr-.L '^y-^jn 




141 



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.:i^'i^iS£s 



f%3isj^ Wi)t Jianpan "«m!s?^'^t's?f"^ms^'^ 







Richard P. CoNDiE 



W. G. Harmon 



Udell Jensen 



Bri^hiim Toung Universitv I'S. Utiiversity of Utah, at Provo^ January 26, /g2J, 
The Question: "Resolved, that the best interests of the State of Utah would be served 

BV GROUPING THE CENTRAL PACIFIC RaILROAD WITH THE UnION PaCIFIC, RATHER THAN WITH THE 

Southern Pacific." 

The University of Utah was represented by E. Conway Stratford, captain; Miss Edith Johnson and 
Donald Creer. 

The Brigham Young University upheld the affirmative side, and won, two to one. 




LeGrande Noble 



Leland Wentz 



Henry M. Stark 



Brigham Toung Universilv vs. Utah Agricultural College, at Logan, January 26, /92J. 

The Question: "Resolved, that the best interests of the State of Utah would be served 
BV grouping the Central Pacific Railroad with the Union Pacific, rather than with the 
Southern Pacific." 

The Utah Agricultural College was represented by Emery Ranker, captain; E. R. Wilcox and Milton 
B. Jensen. 

The Brigham Young University upheld the negative, but lost to the .Aggies, two to one. 



14a 



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F-J". WWr^-'.-B-T^. 







E. H. Harikr 



Leland Wentz 



The Question: "Rksoi.ved, that the UiNited States should adopt a cabinet-parliamentary 

FORM OF government." 

The Young team which rravelletl, upheld the negative side in each debate, winning from the Univer- 
sity of Nevada oi. April 1 1, by a unanimous decision; losing to the University of Southern California at 
Los Angeles on April i6, two to one; and winning from Red lands University at Redlands. April 17, two to 
one. 




\V. G. Harmon 



LeGrande Noble 



The Question: "Resolved, thatihe United States should adopt a cabinet-parliamentarv 

FORM of government." 

The Young team which remained at hon-.e, upheld the negative side of the question against Occiden- 
tal College of Los Angeles, April 14. It lost, two to one. 



143 



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Wendell Rigbv 



ROYDEN DaNGERFIELD 



Raymond Holbrook. 



Inte?'-Class Champiofis 



The Question: "Resolved, that the United States should enter the League of Nations." 
The Sophomore team upheld the negative side, and won from the Freshmen and the Juniors. 

Summary of the Season 

The year 1922-23 saw a further increase in the deliating activities of the school. 
The teams which represented us in the state triangles were very well balanced and 
put up splendid arguments. We were able to defeat our old enemies, the Universitv 
of Utah; but the Aggies, whom we met at Logan, worked up a surprise argument 
and proved invincible upon their own floor. 

Although handicapped financially, our interstate relationships were advanced 
another step. Last year we had two interstate debates, one at Provo with the travel- 
ing team of the L'niversitv ot Southern California, and one at Redlands, California. 
This year, we engaged the traveling team ot Occidental College at Provo, and our 
traveling team was enabled to meet Nevada, Southern California and Redlands. But 
for a mishap in arrangements, we would also have met the College of the Pacific at 
San Francisco. 

It is becoming more and more apparent that our forensic interests lie chiefly with 
the states to the west of us, rather than with eastern schools whose trips west are so 
uncertain. It is hoped, therefore, that following the work of this year, we will in the 
future be enabled to bring more western teams here, and to establish relations with 
Oregon, Washington, and Northern California. It would be a verv easv matter to 
cooperate with the schools upon the coast in choosing the question, and use it in our 
state triangles as well as for the interstate debates. In this wav we could verv easily 
hold our own with all comers. 



144 



till 



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Dramatics 




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ROYDEN DaNCERFIELD 

Manag,;r 



T. Earl Pardof. Harlen M. Adams 

Director Assistant Manager 



T) ram a tics 

The Dramatic Department at the "Y" plays a leading role in en- 
tertainment lines. Under the enthusiastic direction of Professor T. 
Earl Pardoe, it is never idle. Six major productions were successfully 
presented this year, with the addition of twelve Little Theater spe- 
cials of the one-act variety, which were directed by students of the 
Play Production Class. The department not only trains in dramatic 
technique, but gives majoring students opportunities for practice in 
leadership and social service as well. 

The field of dramatics offers a wonderful opportunity for a com- 
mon meeting ground and the socialization ot a student body, as well 
as a cultural and instructive form of amusement. The "Y" makes 
use of it in all its phases. 



^•a 




•j£^UfiSbdl^H&.riCSH{&h ^inetern Etofntp.tljrte ^. 



Briant R. Clark 


Alonzo Morlev 


Thomas Washburn 


Clarence L. Jensen 


Electrician 


Stage Manager 


Stage Carpenter 

146 


Properties 



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By IsRiLL Zangwell 

A department production, directed b\ Professor T. Earl Pardoe, 

and presented October ij, ig22. 

The Cast 

Lancelot {a composer) Harlen M. Adams 

Peter {in business) Wendell Thorne 

Herr Brahmson {a music publisher) Jesse Hunter 

Rev. Samuel Smedge {a country vicar) Harold Bentley 

O'GoRMAN {a journalist) Briant Decker 

Jim Blaydes {a medical student) Royden Dangerfield 

Lord Valentine {of the Automobile Club) George Hinckley 

Howard (a butler) Wayne Shipley 

Mrs. Leadbatter {a lodging house keeper) Helen Candland 

RosiE {her daughter) Florence Baird 

The Sisters Trippet {Kitty and Polly, music hall da?icers) .... 

Alvera Creer, Clara Creer 

Lady Chelmer {a poor peeress) Beth Boyack 

Caroline, Countess of P'oxwell {her friend) Leah Chipman 

The Hon. Mrs. Fitzgeorge {in society) Veda Scorup 

Lady Glynn {oJ the smart set) Ivy Nielson 

Lady Gladys Valentine {the countess's daughter) . . . .Amy Jackson 
Rowena Fitzgeorge {Mrs. Fitzgeorge's daughter). . . .Eva Hansen 

Mary Ann {merely) Virginia Christensen 

Dick, {a canary) 

147 



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The Qreat "Divide 

Bv William Vaughn Moody 

A department production, directed b\ Professor T. Earl Pardoe, 
and presented November 2^1., ig22. 

The Cast 

Phillip Jordan Clark Wright 

Jolly Jordan {his wife) Gladys Seamount 

Mrs. Jordan {his mother) Lucille Christensen 

Ruth Jordan {his sister) Elaine Christensen 

Dr. Winthrop Newbury Glenn Cameron 

Dr. Newbury {U'inthrop's father) Gail Plummer 

Stephen Ghent Alonzo Morley 

Burt Williams Tom Washburn 

Dutch E^dmund Evans 

"Shorty" {a Mexican) , Leon Williams 

A Contractor Osmond Crowther 

An Architect Paul Murdock 

A Boy Clarence Jensen 



148 



^ 
% 



^ 



»,f^<SSk.<:i&S£h'eSMsj,»i&SSh. .Nineteen (Ttoentp-ttrtr ciiSSBS!kciiS!!^S),>cii^<S£h4sSBSii>>^ 



-'Aiiio- -oiJicic»--oi;i,5j-' ^jjje IPanpan '^s5S5<'f-'^Ei^'"^£<33-'"^'. 




The Rejuvenation oj\Aunt ^Cary 

B\ Ann Warner 

Presenled b\ the Senior Class, under the direction of Miss JJ'anda Boyack, 
December yj, /(J22, and January 22, ig2j. 

The C a si- 
Aunt Mary Watkins {a wealthy spinster) 

Wanda Boyack 

Jack Denham (her nephew, always in trouble) 

West Parkinson 

Betty Burnett (^Jack's chief trouble) Izola Jensen 

Bob Burnett {a charming host) Stewart Williams 

Mitchell {who invented the measles) Ray Olpin 

Clover {a most beautiful box) Lynn Taylor 

Girl from Kalamazoo (/;/ afi uftprofitable 

line of business) Maud Dixon 

Mr. Stebbins {Aunt Mary's legal advisor) 

Carl Christensen 

LuciNDA {engaged for thirty years) Vesta Pierce 

Joshua {the other part of Lucinda's engagement) 

Andrew Anderson 

James (the Burnett butler) Rudger Walker 



149 



ia, ^inetttn tEtotntp-tfjrtf dC5SJli;&,^iai,<«ai';&^l55ft,,i 






dje Jianpan •^m^'-'^^'s^-^m?^-'^' 




Twelfth Night 

By William Shakespeare 

The competitive student body play, directed by Professor T. Earl Pardoe, 

and presented March i and 2, ig2j. 

The Cast 

Orsino {Duke oj Illyria) E. Glen Cameron 

Sebastian {brother to Viola) Glen Guymon 

Antonio {a sea captain, friend to Sebastian) . Robert Wilkinson 

A Sea Captain {friend to Viola) Bryant R. Clark 

Valentine {gentleman attendi)ig o>i the Duke) . . Spencer Larsen 

Curio {gentleman attending on the Duke) Ward Moody 

Sir Toby Belch {uncle to Olivia) Eldred Knight 

Sir Andrew Aguecheek Stanley Dean 

Malvolio {steward to Olivia) L. Elmer Petersen 

Fabian {servant to Olivia) Leon Ivie 

Feste {a clown, servant to Olivia) Harlen M. Adams 

Officer Royden Dangerfield 

Lord Raymond Taylor 

Musician Prof. E. D. Partridge 

Musician Roland Olsen 

Olivia Nell Clark 

Viola Izola Jensen 

Maria {Olivia's woman) Clara Creer 



150 



^' 






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iat, iJineteen tEUjentp-tfjrec ^csH; 






m 



''is^mf''^^mss?rvs^is^'iwss3y Wi)t J^aupau ^^iS3^-^-':i;iitJ--^.^ 






Qyrano T)e "Bef 


'gerac 


The 


annual faculty play, directed by Pro 


fessor T. Earl Pardee, 




and presented Jpril 2j and 


24^ 1 923 




Main Characters 






Christian de Neuvillette 


l.owry Nelson 




Count de Guiche 


T, C. Romncy 




Ragueneau ..... 


Leon Williams 




Le Bret 


M. C. Merrill 




Captain Carbon or HAucyHTV Hai.i. 


Stewart Williams 




LrCNIERE 


Kieter Sauls 




Montfi.f.urv ...... 


C. Y. Cannon 




CuiGV ....... 


Walter Cottam 




CVRANO DF. BeRCERAC .... 


T. Ear! Pardoe 




ROXANE ...... 


Kathryn B. Pardee 




The Duenna ..... 


Amy L. Merrill 




151 





I 






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i 



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■ X^^ 



■•^isa-^ESi^t^i^ Zf)t Jianpan '^M^'^m-^z^- 




•^c^'-j^z^i\;^^'B'Ss^rCSB!^.4^t<Sa^ i^mfteen artoentp-tftree ^WS!i.<4!S&^^~ 



jra'-i!St(S»''riBI5»'"«E>SS»''«BSia»' tEfjt Paitpail -SMStfOEJasa-oSlSa"- 




^//^V IVild Oat 

By Clare Kummer 

A department production^ directed by Professor T. Earl Pardoe, 
and presented in May. 

The Cast 
RoLLO Webster (with aspirations) ... A. Rex Johnson 

Hewston [Rollo's man) Royden Dangerfield 

Mr. Stein {theatrical manager) Edmund Kvans 

George Lucas [an actor) La Relle Bushman 

Horatio Webster (Rollo's grandfather)Mem\\ Bunnell 
Whortley Pamperdown (an actor). . .Merrill Bunnell 

Thomas Skitterling Clarence Jensen 

GoLDiE MacDuff (an actress). .Anna Marie Eggertsen 

Lydia Celestia Johnson 

Mrs. Park. Gales Melba Condie 

Aunt Lane (Rollo's great annt) Alma McE^lrath 

Bella (house maid at Webster s) Melba Condie 



"54 



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@ 



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"C£ 




ROYDEN J. DaNGERFIELD 

/f inner oj the EXTEMPORANEOUS 
SPEAKING CONTEST for the 
RULON DIXON SILVER CUP 

The general subject was, "Palestine 

and the Holy Land." Mr. Dangerfield 

spoke on the "Turkish Interests in 

Palestine." 

Myron West 

Wiinier of the ll'inti Inslrumeut 
Contest for the 

P.ARDOE MEDAL 

The selections played by Mr. West, 

who used the trombone, were "Bercu- 

ese," by Goddard. and "The Message," 

bv Brooks. 



Minnie Crawford 

Winner of the GRANT ORATORICAL 
CONTEST, Junior College Section 



Virginia C. Keeler 

II inner of the GRANT ORATORICAL 
CONTEST, Senior College Section 
for a 

BCXJK autographed BY 
PRESIDENT grant 

The general subject was, "Obedience 
to Law," 



William J. Harrison 

// inner for the year I()2t-22 of the 
Efficiency Medal given by the 

PROVO 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



156 



8a)k.-j(^S{ahraaH{2ft,daiS}S5aa,<.aE5SfiEh ^inetttn (Etoentp-tljret ^Sfii,ria2I2Sh.cSJi2a,:4!S;i'2%.,S 



^Y^gi,^ .v.:^j^'«0sss^-'«is»^ ^f)t Manvan "^m^'% 




Ivan Young 

If inner oj the Oralnrkal ConlesI Jurlhc 

K.RVINE MEDAL 

The general subject was limited to any 

social theme. Mr. Young spoke on 

" The Conquest of Success." 



Andrew M. Anderson 

// uiner of the Oratorical Contest fur the 

LEVEN MEDAL 
The general subject was, "The Great- 
est Man in the Bible, Christ excepted." 
Mr. Anderson spoke on "Paul, The 
Apostle." 



Ka'ite Forbes 

U nmer (,f the Original Story Contest 
fur the 

KLSIE CHAMBERLAIN CARROL 
MEDAL 

Miss Eorbes' story was entitled, "A 
Desert Tragedy." 



Inez Warnick 

// inner of the GRANT OR.iTOklC il. 

CONTEST 

Seionilary Training School Section 



Harvard Olsen 

IT inner of the String InstrumrnI 
Contest for the 

ADAMS MEDAL 

The selections played by Mr. Olsen, 

who used the cello, were "Cavalier 

Rusticana," and "Since First I Met 

Thee." 






■$1 



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"57 



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HAR.VEST OF TflUTH 

SALT LAKE TABERNACLt 



•VISION OF OLD" 

(book of MORMO!^ PAOfAMT) 
SALT LAKE TABERNACLE) 



I 



'«;«'**'**« 




158 



. Ji 



..4?^S{iQkriCiSJl2Sh4fil!IgSh^lS!2a, nineteen actnentp-tfjree ,jQaSacurjQ£5Sfiiik^l552ia,^^ 



^suMk 







MUSIC 




'J9 



£% mmtttn ^Etoentp-tfjref ciiSBS&,^msi,ci^t&St.<r. 



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The Egyptian T^rincess 

A Romantic Operetta in Two Acts 

Presented b\ the Music Department, 

April 26, ig2j 

Libretto, Geanie Quinton Arrose. 

Music, Charles Vincent 

Music Director Florence J. Madsen 

Stage Director Virginia C. Keeler 

B. Y. U. Orchestra Director Alene Philips 

Pianist lone Huish 

CHARACTERS 

Queen of Egypt Violet Johnson 

Princess Aida [her daughter) Celestia Johnson 

Princess Tabubu {sister to ^ueen) Elaine Christiansen 

Companions to Aida: Nyssa. .Melba Condie Phila. Clara Creer 

Alva {favorite slave) Virginia C. Keeler 

Queen Grania {captive ^ueen) Norma P. Bullock 

Herub {daughter of wizard) Cynthia Lyman 

Herald Florence Maw 

Chorus of Priestesses, Slaves and Egyptian Girls, Attendants to 

Princess Aida 



j6o 



'h Nineteen Xtotntp'tliret 



(Ei)c Panpan ^Es»*-^3s»^-«st©3^'-«^ 




In A 'Persian Qarden 

The presentation of "In A Persian Garden" was one of the out- 
standing musical successes of the year. A picked chorus of twenty 
voices, under the direction of Mrs. Florence J. Madsen, once more 
demonstrated the unusual ability ot their leader. The ensemble work 
was pleasing while the soloists did very brilliant work. 

The act was a dramatization of the famous "Concert Cycle of 
Songs" by Lizalehamn and, as this was the first time this has been 
attempted, its unmistakable success opens a new field in our music 
world. Professor Pardoe deserves special mention for the masterly 
way in which the staging was directed. 

The special scenic arrangement and gorgeous costumes enhanced 
the magical charm of the performance while the ten dancing girls, 
coached by Mrs. Ballif, gave the last desired touch of atmosphere 
with their graceful oriental number. 

"In A Persian Garden" played to crowded houses before and again 
during Leadership Week. The cast of characters included the best 
talent of school and city. Among those who carried prominent parts 
are: Mrs. T. Earl Pardoe, as soothsayer, and the following soloists: 
Celestia Johnson, Elayne Christensen, Norma P. Bullock, Fay 
Loose Steel, Melba Condie, Carl Christensen, Richard Condie and 
Franklin Madsen. 



i6i 



ainttf en aCtoentp-ttjrfe cJCSI^cJjSS^.^S'fiDhdi 






■■'■'■^iss!y^z(so"^z'so' ^Ije Panpan ^' 




"B.r. U.'Band 

Robert Sauer, Director 




®. V. U. Syf?iphony Orchestra 

Franklin Madsen, Director 



.4 



162 



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cJ%r//'j- ilua7'tette 




ladies' Quartette 



-63 



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■ <y 



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i 






<:J^i/s/c department 

What would we do without our music department? During the 
past year it has demonstrated, time after time, its value to the school. 
From the thrice weekly assemblies in College Hall, at which either 
the band or the orchestra has invariably played and at which the 
choruses and quartets and soloists have all demonstrated their abil- 
ity, to the special concerts given from time to time, the musicians of 
the school have done their full share to make up a real college atmos- 
phere. 

Under the direction of Professor Florence Jepperson Madsen, all 
of the vocal organizations were prominent during Leadership Week, 
the male glee club, ladies' glee club and all the quartets, trios, etc., 
rendering special numbers at the general sessions. The chorus gave 
two presentations ot "In A Persian Garden," and in May staged 
Victor Herbert's opera "The Red Mill." During the spring quarter 
the Ladies' glee club presented the operetta, "The Egyptian Prin- 
cess." The orchestra, under the able direction of Professor Franklin 
Madsen, in addition to its work during Leadership Week, rendered 
two special concerts during the year. 

Professor Sauer's band of forty pieces has become one of the best 
in the state. Two concerts were given during the year, one of them 
being humorous, and during the month of May the band took a short 
tour through the southern part of the state. During the basketball 
season it furnished peppy music at all the games on the local floor, 
and made the trip to Salt Lake City with the team. 




164 



ii, .Nineteen Ctoentp-tljree ^ 



m 




A" 



Up The Timpanogos Trail 




.■:'i;^\mmmm)m::^'i'.:o::^;:s;>i\m^.. 



/mmnmm. 



f;.y)i(uSU ^'^rh.n-!rr. 



■ ,ii:cu, (111' :(' LJio sch'.jol. 

x'I^'mI'i. .. :.. . ...^^.. ^vliik'h eitlicr 

■iiri^Mv plii Ahich the 

.r-A rheir ahil- 

;.init; to unit, tne nuisiciajis yf 

■ .:.;o ':■ :■ .•,<?''■ ' ,■ . : /V I- i..r.^riC(: Jt-.ppcrs'„«) Vladsen, all 

■ii^ r.minent during Leadership Week, 

' ciub and all the quartets, trios, etc., 

viii/ I".- ' leneral sessi<:ins. The chorus gave 

:>^ "li: II' d'arJerij" and in May staged 

1 i )uring the spring quarter 

pet'Sltta, "The Egyptian Prin- 

- of Professor Franklin 



Prnfc - xt" rhe fet 

1 ■.,•,-, I ■ I, .11 

being hunior<Jus, aiiJ iiurlng i,Ue n May ijii.' b^nd look. a short 

tour through the southern part of mm: -liate. During f '" '■ - '• "'•:i' 
•-'.•ason ir fv.rni^^hcd peppv ni'.^sic a*- ii!l thr; c-nmc; nn .' ., , \ 



„=■ 



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Junior T^rom 

: ARE NEITHER making a 

take nor constructing a 

ross exaggeration when we 

hat the Junior Prom of 

"lass of '24 will take its 

with the best ever. 



Greeted by Japanese maids, 
guests were ushered into a Jap- 
anese garden of exquisite color 
and delicacy, flooded with soft, 
liquid lights from behind tinted 
shades. The odor ot cherry 
blossoms, and the fumes of in- 
cense, curling in all directions 
from the hands of the little Jap 
god in the center, gave a touch 
of realism to the oriental pic- 
ture. The orchestra, in true 
Japanese costumes, with faces 
masked by the artful strokes 
ot grease paint, played delight- 
fully dreamy and entrancing 
melodies, while in the garden, 
the serving maids never tired 
of supplying one with rice 
crackers and a deliciously iced 
substitute for the original tea of the native. No less distinguished 
were the ladies and gentlemen who were the hosts and hostesses, 
patrons and guests. The whole affair was a perfect symphony of art 
and joy. 



166 



^:iiSS!^'^^t'S&.,s^<Ssu.4^'S£h ^inttffii Ctoentp-tftrtt ri!iS82Sk^Ifi£u.JttSl{2a.AiSJ2su^ 



'■'^^M^'^gis^'^zts^ ^|)e J^aupan '■fmsi^'^zi^'^z'S!^'^ 




Clarence L. Jensen 



Merrill J. Bunnell Leland Wentz 

Mki'ih Malser Rulon Van Wagenen 

Wayne Booth Ethelyn Hodson Victor Frandsf.n 



T/ie J^au Fiwd "Ball 

The project to institute and support a students' loan fund was 
started by the Sophomore class in 1922. Their efforts began with the 
Loan Fund Rail, the proceeds of which netted about I500.00. So suc- 
cessful was the venture, and so heartily received by the student body, 
that the class seized upon the opportunity of making it a permanent 
affair, and consequently, the perpetuating of the loan fund has be- 
come the paramount official function of the Sophomore class. In 
1923, the proceeds from the ball and from the circus added materially 
to the growing fund. The Sophomores of this year are to be com- 
mended for their successful efforts, and coming classes are charged 
with continuing the good example which has become a class tradition. 



.67 



{%> i^inetten 3!:tDentp=tljrfC ri8SJl0Oh^IgSh.-i^Ifiiih.v 






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5S?2ft.»xffl®2!ihraS!SSJW!S12ft, jfiineteen SCtotmp-tfjrte ^cET 



'■>i^ii^^:sisa- y^ije JUanpan ^zis?^^z(S!^"mi>s^'- 




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Small, dainty, and exqui- 
sitely SWEET, she radiates a 
sunn)' disposition through 
dancing eyes and smiling lips. 

Nor yet is she fickle, tor she 
speaks a philosophy of life 
with an authoritative air quite 
out of proportion to her size. 
She is denied neither the 
charms nor the caprices of 
woman, but uses each with 
an alluring artistry which is 
altogether winning! 

She is a sunkissed blossom 
from Arizona. 



170 



,^I!r<2a.<^lJ^.4^$ga,rfiSIfifflk .Nineteen SEtoentp-tfjrtt dCfiiat.- 



'^ii.i£v^ 



^.i;iQij-^si^j-%25i^-' (Et)e JPanpan ^^li^^^m^f^^wsp"^ 




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4 









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kciiSlt'Sih^t'&h^Z'Sa.^Wsu flimtten aCtoentp-tftree ^^fia,ojc£}ItaChwaaS0a,riaai{&.^ 



^f)e Panpan '^zi^^m^'- 



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Frer/ 'Dixon 

Buck's motto is "silence is 
golden," but in spite of his un- 
assuming air, he is known to 
every student. He is state 
junior champion in tennis; he 
was one of the mainstays of 
the Frosh champion football 
team; he shows up well upon 
the track. But it is in basket- 
ball that he has won his great- 
est tame. .And withal, he goes 
quietly about his business, 
working jiist as hard as he 
plays. 



k 



b 



172 



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4 





'73 



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NOT LOAFINU- 
JUST A PAUSE IN THE WORK 



E THf REWARD FOR THE 
FAITHFUL WAS PREPARED 



•»»♦*- 




EXCEUSIOK:" 



THE SENIORS 
APPLY THE WIIITFWASH 



"HIGHER LEVEL!" 




'HIGH ON THE MOUNTAIN KIK> A DANlMlK 1^ UNt-UKLt)-" 



174 



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*55i<s»-"^ns3-''^ssiS!P'^is3^ Wi^t Paupan '^M^'^zts^"^fiJi's.'^'"^^M^'^ 



^*BUNYON 




175 



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<5®si^tJ55E{s»'iJsgs»' ^f)e lianpan ^cst^s^-^^csc' 



r 



F, 



orezvor. 



d 



I AM THF, BUNYON. 

I am wild and painful, \'et on the 
whole, harmless. 

I come to you as a needed appen- 
dage to an otherwise perfectly nice 
book. 

I am as necessary as the smell to 
limburger cheese. Take me with a 
grain of salt, and if you don't like me, 
use a plaster and forget me. 



.76 



^'SSSlSSkxfsSS^SSkuC^^SSk iJJnetetn BCtDrntp-tljret 4lSJS2a-. 



CtMl 



W^\)t Panpan ^wsp^ 




Dedicated affectionaielv 

/o the 

A. AND S. C. 

I r hi eh has heoi to the stud cut body what 
THIS BUN TON is to the BJNTAN. 



177 



u Nineteen CtoentHftree .^I{&hr*S»teh.jcS12Sk.-)(>i; 



4 



m''^ziso'^m^'^MSc^'^^isso' ^fje Panpan ^z's^^'^sp^'^z^'^z^''' 




i.<^lgShr<®f{&,riC©JStt»4!£53^ Nineteen Ctuemp-tljKf 4jS!!rfia.,riGSJ5Sft^3;&,-- 



Sh-J.' 



, . T 







This fraternitv which was sponsored by Coach Roberts, has a 
membership restricted to those who have given out twelve more or 
less useless notices in assembly. The club roster is as follows: 

President: Shy Starter 
Vice-President: Shv Stari er 
Pitblicitv Agent: Shv Starter 
Secretary-Treasurer: Shv Starter 
Chaplain: Shv Starter 
Chief Guard: Shv Starter 
Speaker of the House: Mrs. Shv Starter 
Tell Master: Tex Wench 



mi^miikm 




Being a fraiernitv devoted to those organizations which give 
weekly luncheons in the art gallery, particularly the Commerce Club, 
the Ag Club, the Home Economics Club and the Big Sisters. In ad- 
dition to the above, the following persons have been elected honorary 
members: Professor Harrison R. NIerrill, A. Glenn Hubbard, A. Rex 
Johnson and Bob Wilkinson. 



179 



i.j(j5Ii2a.rfCfiffian<4jBI^cXfi|!^ Nineteen tCtnentp-tfjrtt 4sSSl^SSh,siSM^Sh^,(SS!l!SS),,oQSi<S£Ui 



^ 



^Ije Paupaii ^^is-j ^mS'^'*5Jis»^^'^^ 



Saints &^ Sinners' Society 

The most exclusive club in school is known as the 
Saints and Sinners' Society. Entrance requirements 
are so rigid and selective that no applicant may become 
a member unless he obtains a signed recommendation 
from the president of the school. 

The club derives its name from the characteristics of 
its members, being composed ot two classes of individ- 
uals, the Saints and Sinners. 

.According to the articles of its constitution, the sin- 
ners shall be those students who have been excused from 
theology because ot different religious affiliations. The 
Saints are those persons who having been on missions 
are also prejudiced against religion. 

The club meets each Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ings from 11:30 to 12:30 in the Library, when round 
table discussions upon such vital topics as birth control, 
baptism by submersion, the conscience as a guide, or 
the evils of Coueism, are carefully considered. 

The distinctive personnel of the club is greatlv en- 
hanced by a unique corps of officers. 

Meith Maeser as Chief Mogul, aided and abetted by 
Purity Bunnell as Right Bower, have been largely re- 
sponsible for the brilliant success of the club. 

Many students are leaving school to spend two years 
as missionaries that they mav become eligible for this 
much coveted order. 



180 






-^iSi^'-^js^^-y'^M^'^-tiJiM'-'- vii/ijc it)aiipaii '■^Jui^'-^^^'Ji^c^ 




SAINTS s SINNERS 
SOCIETV 




1^===>Q 




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T//e S. B. S. 



AFTiiR KEEPING FOR TWO wholc ycars, the official name of the "S. B. S." has at last been discovered. And 
it's so simple that we wonder why it was not discovered before. It wasn't "Somebody's Sweethearts," 
nor "Sage Brush Sapheads," nor "Stew Bum's Society," nor "Social Biscuit Samplers," nor any of the 
other numerous guesses as to its meaning. 

The suspense has become so great that the Bunyon felt that the name should be discovered at any 
price, and so, although last year we refused to make an honorable mention of the society, the staff offered 
to publish the club pictures if the name were now made known. We discovered that the "S. B. S." had 
its price the same as other people, and in return for the privelege of mapping its members' classic physogs 
upon our august pages, we are permitted to announce that it is strictly a gastronomic organization, whose 
motto is, "The inner man — first, last and all the time," and whose official cognomen is, "Soup Bone So- 
ciety." Its present roster includes: A. Glen Hubbard, Chief Bone; Harold Lundell, Spiritual Adviser; 
F.lton Billings, Pneumatic Artist; "Judge" Harmon, Legal Adviser; Leon Williams, Chairman of 
Women's Committee; Wayne Mayhew, Purchasing Agent; West Parkinson, Dish Washing Engineer; 
Keese Hubbard, Tooth Paste and Tonic Supplier; Rudgcr Walker, Chief Crumb Wiper; Elwin Potter, 
(iravy Licker; Joseph Brown and Udell Jensen, Little Bones; Joseph Jarvis, Archibald West, Arthur 
Bond, Roscoe Davis and La Von Billings, Past Grand Bones. 




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Erma Murdock 


Gladys Seamount 




Edna Lewis 


LORNA B\GLEV 


Lucille Christensen 




Violet Johnson 


Edith Hedquist 


Gertp.ude Olson 




Celestia Johnson 


Anna Randall 
Atha Bateman 

184 


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Neli, Clark 
Ina Creer 
Regenia Hughes 



Camille Crandali. 
Mei.ba Condie 
Olive Crane 
Alma McElrath 



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Elavne Christensen 
Muriel Smart 



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The Lion Tamers' Club, otherwise known as The Sextette from Lucia 



We, those people who have been so fortunate as to receive these letters of dis- 
tinction, hereby dedicate this page to our beloved 

thanking our benefactor tor the excellent advice and inspiration contained in the mis- 
siles of love and sympathy. 

Club Members 



Glen Guvmon 
Erma Murdock 
Violet Johnson 



Olive Crane 
Harlen Adams 



Edmond Evans 
LvNN Tavlor 



Dick Condie 
Celestia Johnson 
MvRTLE Henderson 



1 86 



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BunyowBelles 

ME -BEAU AND SHE -BELLE 



CELEBRITIES 




187 



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BUNYON HE-BEAUX AND SHE-BELLES 

From a field in which the competition was extremely keen, the judges were com- 
pelled to limit their choice to the six whom thev thought to be the most celebrated 
in their line. Thus it was necessary to disappoint many entrants, especially since 
space will not even permit the names ot the numerous group who won honorable 
mention, 

YK MODERNE NAPOLEON 

Words fail us as we try to crowd into this small space the mighty events which 
our modern Napoleon has succeeded in crowding into his career. He won his right to 
this position ot notoriety hands down, especially since he doesn't occupy much space, 
and can therefore fill up the chinks. It is whispered that he has aspirations along the 
same line as the Napoleon ot old — but it he isn't caretul, that weakness ot his for 
women and circuses, which is just now outcropping, will prove his Waterloo. 

CLEOPATRA 

If ihf.re is one who has demonstrated her beauty beyond all doubt, that one is 
Cleopatra. Even as of old she used her beauty to capture the great orator, Mark 
Antony, so does she now use her charms to bring the modern judges of the forensic 
art to their knees. Her form is classic and supple, her features are divine, her eyes 
are glorious, and her feet are immense. 

OUR OWN MAGGIE JIGGS 

.As A MEASURE of self protection, her husband beat it to California; but it won't do 
him much good, because she's going to follow him — and she's been practicing daily 
with the rolling pin, and developing her voice in between times. So all told, poor 
hubby will have to face the music. We cannot help admiring her perseverance, which, 

if nothing else, entitles her to this position of honor. 

E. V. DEBBS 

A BOLSHEVIK who glories in the title, fearless and bold, but otherwise all right, he 
won his place in this hall ot fame because he's not afraid of tooting his own horn. 
And believe us, he's some tooter! 

CARUSO 

No ONE MORE DESERVES to be thus honored than does our Caruso, though no one 
tried harder to avoid it. He is ot such modest nature that it took the most astute 
brains on the Bunyon staff to get his photo. He dodged the photographer for weeks, 
and refused to succumb to the wiles of numerous fair damsels who were sent to camp 
upon his trail and lure him into the desired pose. .As a last resort, rather than run a 
page which would be incomplete without him, we were compelled to use a clipping 
from a phonograph book. 

RUDOLPH 

Could anything be more adorable than the exclusive photo of Rudolph which the 
Bunyon herewith presents to its readers? There are many things about him which 
we like, from his graceful dancing to his vaselinoed hair, but the thing we like best 
is that hail-fellow-well-met-air which he so graciously carries everywhere. 



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BUNYON Celebrities 




189 



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The Vice-President Demonstrates Evolution. 




CARBONIFEROUS AOE 



OLACIAL AoE 



STONE AOE 



LIVING AOE 



T'he'i-^nno- Hairpinistic Theory 

The libraries are flooded with books upon evolution, setting forth in great detail 
the various experiments and theories of the great men ot science. The matter has 
progressed to such a stage that there is no longer any doubt about the actuality ot 
the evolutionary process, but there still seems to be great doubt about the method 
involved. Lamarck proposed as an explanation the inheritance of acquired charac- 
ters; Darwin, the survival of the fittest; Weissman, the theory of pan mixia; Osborne 
the tetrakinetic theory; and deVires the mutation theory. Each of these men has 
hacked up his particular theory with experimental evidence. They've experimented 
with beetles and salamanders, with guinea pigs and hooded rats, with butterflies 
and drosophila, with the teeth of dead elephants and the skulls of dead monkeys. 
But somehow, not one of them has had the nerve to actually put his theory to the 
test with human beings — and so, none ot their theories have been actually proved. 

It has remained for the Bunvon, whose main purpose is not scientific at all, but 
which has the courage of its convictions, to actually produce ev\dence from the human 
race, and to evolve a theory based thereon which adequately explains the entire evo- 
lutionary process. This theory it now announces to the world as the .■luno-hairpin- 
istic theory. It goes turther than the ideas ot any ot the above scientists, tor it not 
only shows the change trom generation to generation, but the actual change within the 
generation, from vear to year. The term anno is the Latin word tor year, and is also 
closely related to the first name ot the subject ot the Bunvon experiment. As to the 
rest of the name by which our idea will go betore mankind, it will take but a glance 
at the above photographs to show the significance. 

No less scientist than Briant Decker, B. Pd., famed in local biology circles, 
watched with critical eye the progress of our experiment; and now, with his hearty 
approval, we announce it to the world. We await with interest the verdict ot other 
scientists. 



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MERRY HAY, L. F. 

Picked on acct. of his Mathematical persishun. Packs a sliderule and has all the 
boards in the floor numbered and a table figured out which enables him to calculate 
the exact amount of mussel necessary to cage a ghoul. 



FREEZF.M HICKS-LIFT GARTER 

Picked on acct. of his versatility and vast experiences in using a wrench on his fel- 
low enemy that he always gets the bawl. His knowledge ot oiling stiff joints makes 
him awful poplar with men and women of both sexes. Addicted to shooting craps or 
baskets. 



MARTINI-SUBWAY SCENTER 

Has Gutter Perchie ankels and can almost Inst. sore thru the clouds. His keen msight 
enables him to know wether his fellow enemy is knock need or bowiegged so he can 
steer a clear coarse via the subway and make a nimble jacknite dive betore dropping 
the bawl thru the whoop. 



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MIDGET MAYORELL-STATIONERY GUARDIAN 

Nothing can get by this rock ot the Marne but the time and the opposing shooters 
has to stay back of center to loop the bawl over his prayer arms. Called the rock ot 
the Marne because during the game he stewediosly repeated "They shall not pass," 
a saving that has maid him poplar with his stewdants. 



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IMA COMMING-FORWARD 
Picked as traveling 4-word on acct. of his progressive name and also on acct. of 
his being the most forward member of the elegebility committee in giving the schools 
most promising athelets thumbs down, saying promises are nothing in his young life. 



i 



192 



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MIDGET MANORELL 

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ATHLETICS 





194 



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IN CLASS 





SHOOTING CRAPS 



195 



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No, DEAR READER, thesc are not the Siamese twins, despite the close 
resemblance. We are prone to believe that one of them has the firm's 
money which accounts for the affectionate juxtaposition, as the only 
thing these captains of industry have an affinity for is money. 

These gentlemen represent the firm ot Ketchem and Skinem, the 
great corporation controlling the Muskrat pelt industry on Utah 
Lake. 

A visit to their offices at the eastern extremity of Center Street dis- 
closed some remarkable schemes in the circles of frenzied finance. 
With a capital of ?5joo the firm acquired 50 acres of bull rushes 
stocked with 376 rats. .At the end of the first year the rats had in- 
creased to the extent of 8,140 and the interest on the money invest- 
ed was lioo'^'ci. 

One rat, when skinned, w\\\ fee^ ten others which makes food ex- 
pense nil. The skinning is done automatically by means of an inclined 
runway covered with mud and glue. The rats are started down the 
chute and a little ball of mud forms under each one's tail. Becoming 
frightened the speed accelerates until it is impossible to stop before 
they slip out of their skins and become rat food. 



196 



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We presen]' for vour approval three youthtui prodigies wlio have soared far up 
into the realms of fame. How could one but think, after gazina at the above pre- 
cocious faces, that their possessors were destined for meteoric careers? Note, for ex- 
ample, the determined look on the face of the youth holding the ball. See the "never- 
say-die" spirit leap from those flashing eyes! Note the gently bulging muscles which 
unconsciously bespeak the strength of a Hercules. Observe the way he holds the ball, 
then compare it to the picture on page 17J of this volume. Gentle reader, could any- 
one be so dumb as to tail to recognize the unparalleled athletic genius and character 
in that aesthetic countenance.' 

His companions likewise inspire the close observer with the thought that here in- 
deed are creatures ot remarkable destinies. The one in the center with the classic 
profile and the permanent wave is extremely popular in studious circles at school. 
And as to the other one, it seems ridiculous that anyone should question the auburn 
shade of hair which he so proudly wears. A radiant atmosphere of religious fervor 
seems to emanate from his very being. No one will be surprised to know that he is 
now swaying the multitude with his cry to repentance somewhere in Berlin. 

It is with pride and unstinted admiration that we are permitted to name the above 
prodigies: Mr. F"red Dixon, Mr. Henry Taylor and Mr. Victor Taylor. 



197 



1^ .^inetftn JEtoentp-tftree ^85 






Qomfort Hatch Shatters '^aby Qrawl T^cord 

Noses Out Lav-on William and Creeper 
Hinckley in Ticklish Stomach Marathon 

{Special to the Buti\o)i) 

Before the most gentlemanly and best behaved audience avail- 
able, Comfort Hatch, with his torso at halt mast like some of this 
year's underslung tractors, ambled over the tape a good half hour 
ahead of his nearest competitor in the fifty yard infants' handycap 
dash. 

Some of our most prominent sport writers say he was able to win 
over such a fast field as Lay-on William and Creeper Hinckley only 
on acct. of his close family resemblance to the proverbial tortoise 
wile several other great minds has gone on record as saying it was on 
acct. of his rear legs being longer than his front ones which kept his 
scenter of gravity forwards, propelling him on to greater speed. 

I hope these great minds wont be libel to take a fence at my frank 
remarks but as a sporting writer I would be deeralect in my dooty to 
not give the correct version ot the hole affair. Being a close observer 
of human nature and always on the alert I almost instantly knew 
that the one passing the judges' stand first would win. 

.After considerable jockeying for places they was off with Creeper 
Hinckley easily in the lead till he tried to spraddle a high scenter, 
and got stranded which made him want to yell, "ouch!" only he 
started to stutter and developed a charley-horse in the convulsion 
which followed, forcing him out of the running. 

Lay-on, who was abel to dive onto his front feet and cast his hind 
feet far out between them, repeating, etc., was making better time 
than a cat on a hot tin root when suddinly the I2 noon wistle blowed 
and Lay-on trom torce ot habit suspended all operations and knocked 
off. When Comfort herd the wistle it was the call of the wild to this 
boy and he headed straight down the coarse for home, passing the 
judges at a rate wich would make Man 'O War look like he was run- 
ning backwards. He was awarded the prize which was a grand pair 
of steam heated knuckle pads. 



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September 

Monday, i8. Everybody cheerful at the prospects of a happy and successful year. 
Hello is on every tongue. The "Y" News greets us with the facts that we have 
some brand new offices and faculty members to put in 'em. 

Tuesday, ig. A long, weary day for the Freshies. We wonder why every class we 
want comes at the same hour. We continue to meet old triends and give pros- 
pective new ones the "once over." 

Wednesday, 20. President Harris makes us feel right at home and the Faculty 

Quartette cheers us with its annual song of greeting. The Mammas and Papas 

having left, we endeavor to comfort their scared looking Freshie children. 

Thursday, 21. Certain pairs of last year's "steadies" demonstrate the fact that they 

are still on the job by taking a stroll around the Campus. Maud looks lonesome. 

Friday, 22. Celestia takes us to "The Little Red Schoolhouse," where F.lavne and 
Virginia sing tor us. Our Student Body Officers make their first official appear- 
ance. The entire school joins in the "Pleased to meet va" chorus at the Ladies 
(ivni. 

Saturday, 2^;. \ tew ot the bravest temales pack their frying pans and weenies and 
follow Dean Merrill up Rock Canyon. The thrill ot being lost in the mountains! 

Monday, 25. Dr. Brimhall delivers the first of his inspiring tour-minute talks. Class 
elections are accomplished without any casualties. 

Tuesdax , zh. Paul Harding proves his love for Lucille by accompanying her to The- 
ology. 

Wednesday, 27. Brother Lyman tells us how to build communities. We all decide 
to be engineers. The High School lads and lassies lose some excess energy at a 
dance. 

Thursda\-, 2S. To show that we are really down to business, Pardoe announces the 
cast ot "Merely Mary .Ann." The Frosh tie the \'arsity in the opening football 
skirmish and the Spaniards proclaim ^'al Bentlev their president — until the 
next revolution. 

Friday, 29. The various activities of the school are explained to us by faculty mem- 
bers. Briant Decker and Clair .Anderson are given official permission to try 
their hands at running the "Y" News. 

Saturday, 30. Faculty women organize. Football tans spend the afternoon at Tinip. 
Park. ' 

October 

Monday, 2. We are filled with a tremendous sense of responsibility while amending 
the constitution. Pardoe gives one of his famed "pep talks" and we try to raise 
the roof with the College Song. Owen Romney is chosen as captain of the good 
bark "Frosh," with Vida Broadbent as first mate. 

Tuesday, 3. West Parkinson and Glenn Harmon arrive, toss their grips in the door 
of the S. B. S., and dash off to Spanish Fork and ist West respectively. 

Wednesday, 4. Politics! King vs. Bamberger the topic of every radiator party. 
Organizing clubs becomes a fad. The Lyceum number proves a rare delight to 
all who crave to use their new red activity cards. A tew ^o to enjoy the music. 



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Ccilciidar: Qoiitiiiucii 

Thursday, 5. A yearning for greater fields to conquer takes the Ladies Trio, Fac- 

culty Quartette, and String Trio up to the State Fair. 
Friday, 6. General migration in the direction of Conference, the Fair, and other 

attractions. 
Saturday, 7. We entertain the U. of U. at a touthall game. Unfortunately we have 

forgotten the score. Alma, "Liz," and their Freds go to Strawberry; the rest 

ot us go to the dance. Long skirts and new dance steps much m vogue. 
Monday, c^. Important "farmers" visit us. The Idahoans, believing that "In unity 

there is strength" gather around Andv Anderson and find themselves fifty 

strong. 
Tuesday, 10. Wearers ot the block "Y" organize tor the purpose ot upholding the 

standards of the student body — other reasons not given. "Y" Mountaineers 

spend the afternoon writing a constitution. 
Wednesday, 11. John McConkie is seen with a "special police" badge glimmering 

upon his manly bosom. Clarence Langford and Larry Billings pay us a social 

call. 
Thursday, 1 2. Prof. H. R. Merrill climbs Timp. Bill Buttle, \'\c Taylor and Russell 

Hughes bid us "autwiederschn" before embarking tor the land ot tin hats and 

sauerkraut. 
Friday, l ";. Frosh men give the "Y" a manicure and celeiirate the tact w-ith a mati- 
nee dance in the afternoon. Pardoe introduces his famous "Bum .Song." The 

setting sun ushers in "Merely Mary Ann." 
Saturday, 14. Some rather well known students are arrested for speeding to the 

game at Salt Lake. We've forgotten the score of this game also. 
Monday, 16. Senator King is entertained by the "Block Y" initiations. The drama- 
tically inclined hear Janet Young. 
Tuesday, 17. Faculty Lyceum Course is organized. Reports trom the hospital in- 
form us that Miss Wunderly is recovering niceK trom her operation. 
Wednesday, 18. Our "gypsy blood" asserts itself, and the upperclassmen, attired 

in relics of former prosperity, make merry at Raymond Park. Later, the Sophs 

are invited to leave their bon-fire and join them at their dance at the gym. 
Thursday, 19. We join in three cheers for Educational Conventions. Of course, we 

love to have our dear teachers around, but an occasional holiday is appreciated. 

The Gem State Club is successsful in reaching NLiple Flat. 
Friday, 20. We are honored in having Prof. Nuttall chosen head ot the V . E. \. 

Our music department is lauded because of its unusual work at the convention. 
Saturday, 21. Millardites make merry at the .Art Gallery. Particulars of that party 

are not generally known. 
Monday, 2^. Dell Web and "Jim" Tucker make us feel that w-e could beat the whole 

state of Colorado. The Colorado School ot Mines team is given an auto tour 

through the county by the "Block Y" Club. 
Tuesday, 24. Founders' Day! We parade past the movie camera to the excercises, 

devour the barbecue and the contents of the "scandal sheet," and ruin our voices 

at the game. The surviving few gather at the old stamping ground and dance 

until the end of a "Perfect Day." 
Wednesday, 25. Whispering is the popular mode ot expression. Cough drops are the 

favored confection. Senator Snioot convinces us that to grow up and be great 

men in Washington is the acme of our ambitions. Beth Boyack announces the 

cast for the senior play. 



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KNIGHT TRUST &' SAVINGS BANK 

PROrO, UTAH 
CAPITAL $300,000.00 
SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS ?5o,ooo.oo 



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J. WILLIAM KNIGHT. President 
R. E. ALLEN, Cashier V. G. WARNICK 

W. W. ALLEN, 



AssisliDit Cashiers 



DIRECTORS 



J. WILLIAM KNIGHT 
R. E. ALLEN 
FRED W. TAYLOR 
W. W. ARMSTRONG 



W. LESTER MANGUM 

W. O. CREER 

F. G. WARNICK 

O. RAYMOND KNIGHT 



104 



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Qolumbia T'heatre 


^^^^ T'rinccss Theatre 


The Onh' Properly Ventilated 
Theatre in Provo 


^^^)jjif^ Always the Same Price 


THE HOUSES oj FIRST-CLASS ATTRACTIONS 
«W FIRST RUN PICTURES 



T^rovo J^jnher Qompany 

"OUAI.ITY rtWSP'.RVICE" 

Phone 104 Box is'i 

PROVO, UTAH 



Stay Toiing Forever! 

Let Electric Servants do the work of housekeeping, 

and you will eniov freedom trom drudgery 

and leisure tor happiness 

Utah ^T'O'wer and jTight Qompany 



'EFFICIENT PUBLIC SERVICE ■ 



DON'T FORGET US 

WHEN YOU WANT FRATERNITY JEWELRY 
CLASS PINS, ETC. 

8. y. JCeif, '^J^itanufacturing yeive/cr 

//J South Main {Upstairs), Salt Take Cit\ 



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Ca/endcir : Continued 



Thursday, 2^. The Spanish students (and otherwise) are seen coming to the home 

of their professor for a little party. The bright boys take exams for the Rhodes 

Scholarship. 
Friday, 27. Victory! Frosh vs. B. Y. C. at Logan, .'\nnie Marie Kggertsen makes 

a very charming chairman at the student body program, where Director Arnev 

talks to us. 

Saturday, 28. Spooks gather at every corner. The popular boys are invited to sev- 
eral Halloween parties. 

Monday, 30. We didn't realize that there were so many beautiful hands in school. 
Helen Hinckley finally defeats Royden Dangerfield in the contest and carries 
home a five pound basket of candy. The rest of us suck all dav suckers. 

Tuesday, 31. Algie finds her ball room dancing class for bashful boys overcrowded; 
Glen Guvman and Harlen Adams are turned away. 



J'^oy ember 



\Vednesda\', i. French Club "parlent la francais" in the ."^rt Gallery, while the stu- 
dents from Dixie play over at Woodward's. 

Thursday, 2. The Spanish Literary Club visits old Spain. (."^Il return in time for 
supper.) 

Friday, 3. W. Lester Mangum serves us "Turkey" in devotional. We buy .some 
candy from the facult\ women and wade through the snow to see an O to O 
game played between the Varsity and F'rosh. At the dance we try to make 
merry in spite ot the fact that our president has gone "Way Down East" for 
a week. 

Saturday, 4. The Gold Brickers give one ot their justly famous parties. Helen Cand- 
land gives a no less famous one. 

Monday, 6. The A.C.L'. lends Professor ,'\rnold to the Drama Center for an evening. 
Members ot the Y. Democratic Club nearly get injured. 

Tuesday, 7. After drilling the rules of etiquette into their heads. Dean Merrill de- 
parts for Salt Lake with the delegates to the A. W. S. Convention. 

Wednesday, 8. The Young-Folger Co. takes us to Greenwich ^'illage, Fair\ land and 
several other places in the course of an hour and a half. 

Thursday, 9. Leon Williams is elected chairman of the Womens' Committee of the 
Spooning Bachelors Society. Osmond thrills the F.nglish students with Hamlet. 

Friday, 10. War time days are graphically recalled to us in the .'Armistice Day ]iro- 
gram. 

Saturday, 1 1. Just as we had given him up for lost, Stanley Dean shows his smiling 
face on the campus and calmly informs us that he is here to stav. Galena Day 
writes us from far off India. 

Monday, 13. The enthusiastic delegates return from the convention firmly resolved 
that the autocratic rule by the men of this institution must forever cea.se. Un- 
derclass women are intormed that they are to be given "big sisters." Roberts 
wins an undisputed place in the "hall of fame" and shows his versatility by 
staging a "slow motion" football game. The high school kiddies entertain the 
whole school in a most grown up manner at a grand ball. 



2o8 



ifiSbraSSRSautaiga. fUntutn ruiMUt. tfure ^SfiSfto^sSlCtj 



Ctje J^aupan '^ms^'^m^'^i 



SATISFACTION 

easily obtained by buying and using 

IVilso?! Athletic Qoods 

WESTERN ARMS & SPORTING GOODS CO., SALT LAKE, UTAH 
A Home Institution Sporting Goods for Over Fifty Tears 



^?iy ^ook at^ny Time 

Remember — during school days and alter, our book service b\ mail can 
bring you any book you may wish to possess and read. Likely we'll have 
it in stock when your order arrives — it not, we'll get it for you right 
soon. Order your books sent by mail C.O.D. Free Price Lists on request. 

DESERET BOOK COMPANY 

44 EAST SOUTH rEMPLE, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



Compliments of the 

Hub Clothing Company 

PROVO, UTAH 

Shoes for the entire family Men's and Bovs' Outfitters 



m 



Sutton Market 

"L^PA/rY to 'Buy and Sell 
What You £af' 



209 




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(^alefidar : (Continued 



Tuesday, 14. The Wyoming Cowboys are defeated 7 — o!!!! Manson makes the first 
touchdown in the history of the Y as a member of the R. M. C. Bricker, N. L. 
U., and O. S. "goats" are rather conspicuous on the field. 

Wednesday, 15. That sad, lost look on Beth's face is explained bv the announce- 
ment that Glenn is in Price. Alma and Fred let her go with them to the band 
concert. 

Thursday, 16. The joys of publishing a Banvan are felt all too keenly by the editor 
and ill health forces him to resign. The entire staff is reorganized. 

Friday, 17. The women students hold a meeting behind closed doors. Officers are 
elected and plans laid for some deep-dyed schemes. The men get rough in their 
meeting. We go to the Columbia and see some Y students and faculty members 
in "Kick In," the Kiwanis play. 

Saturday, 18. The "carrot eaters" hold forth until a scandalous hour. Prof. Pardee 
returns from a Lyceum tour, gracefully draped with laurel. 

Monday, 20. Cal Creer is the belle of the party when the band goes to Heber; so 
many beaux in one night would turn most any girl's head. Thurlow Lieurance 
and Co. charm a breathless audience with the magic of flute and voice. 

Tuesday, 21. Bob .Anderson writes that the life of a missionary in foreign lands is 
quite to his liking. Wayne Kartchner catches the fever and leaves immediately 
for a mission. 

Wednesday, 22. Just for the sake of keeping it in the family, Virginia Christensen 
follows her sister's example and wins the Grant Oratorical Contest. "The Bub- 
ble" proves itself to be one of the most refreshing comedies that we have ever 
seen. 

Thursday, 23. .Accompanied by the band and the rest of the student body, the team 
is hauled to the station in the old stage coach. As the train leaves for Colorado, 
a few of the fairer sex secretly dab their eyes with their handkerchiefs. 

Friday, 24. This day dedicated to the Freshmen. The youngsters give a very pleas- 
ing program in the morning, and we feel very proud of them when they capture 
the Frosh State Championship by defeating the infants from Utah. It's really 
a shame that we have to mar their happiness by beating them in the flag rush. 
The Freshie ball after "The Great Divide" was a wonderful success. 

Saturday, 25. We receive the depressing news that our boys got lost in the blizzard 
and let the Colorado boys carry the football over the line. The O. S. girls enter- 
tain at a travelling party; Hawaii, Japan and Alaska are visited. 

Monday, 27. President Harris is given a "rising welcome" on his return. Lyle Nel- 
son turns fish and ties with the state champion swimmer. 

Tuesday, 28. Upperclassmen tell the Frosh the whys and wherefores of the new reg- 
ulations. Will Irwin sends us home to dream of bombs and poison gas. "Abe" 
Dixon's departure for Wyoming is a signal for seven women to go into sack cloth 
and ashes. 

Wednesday, 2q. Andy wins new honors as a vocalist; while we are convinced that 
Muriel, Alice, and Elva have a real career as step dancers ahead of them. In 
fact, several students are discovered to be budding geniuses in the skit "Thanks- 
giving in Utah, fifty years ago." Hall runs away with the turkey, which the 
Freshmen eat. The "Cowboys" carry off the long end of the football score. 
Student body hop in the evening. 

Thursday, 30. Vivian Bentley becomes the new athletic manager. Carl Christensen 
causes some excitement in the Chem. Lab. We pack our suitcases and catch the 
evening train for home. 



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^lualityzy^iCerchandise at a 'Tiea son able ^rice 

INTELLIGENT SERVICE 

nPHESE three things have been the big factors in our growth 
over a period of 57 years of merchandising. Every want is 
cared for in our Ten Big Departments — 

Furniture — T^gs — -JhCen s — Shoes — Indies' 

Hard-ware — (^rockery — 'Jewelry 

T'ianos — i^usic 

GET IT AT 

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EUREKA 



SPANISH FORE 



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Gas is the one Perfect Fuel 
Best for Cooking 

CHEAPEST, QUICKEST, CLEANEST 
7/ is the Best Study Light /or Students 



UTAH VALLEY GAS & COKE COMPANY 
SPANISH FORK PROVO SPRINGVILLE 




It's :j\(ot What You Tay~~Us 
What Toil Qet 

You can see style, pattern, fabric. But 
value — you can't actually see it in a suit 
of clothes. You've got to test the value 
in the wear and tear of actual service. 

KUPPENHEIMER 

GOOD CLOTHES 

give exclusive style, superfine fabrics and 
sterling value. Styles for men and young 
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Qulendar: Qontiiiiied 
'December 

Monday, 4. The joys of a perfect vacation are marred by the prospect of term exams 
looming ahead. "Cess" Johnson and Rex Johnson are the outstanding beauties 
in "The Beauty Shop." Mrs. Ballif explains the higher meaning of dancing to 
the members of the Drama Center. 

Tuesday, 5. "Second nigh ters" and "Sunbeam "go to see "The Beauty Shop" again; 
the rest of us cram. 

Wednesday, 6. President Thomas of the "U" informs us that it is Educational Week, 
a fact that we can readily appreciate. 

Thursday, 7. Myrtie Jensen has the misfortune of being ill through exam days; some 
people have all the luck. The life and works of Riley are recalled in song, poem, 
and story. 

Friday, 8. Brother Brimhall is honored with program, reception, and a book shower. 
Mrs. Madsen sings for us in the exercises. Students, past and present, mingle 
at the Gym. 

Saturday, 9. Evening dedicated to "Little Sister" parties. The hitherto immune 
LeGrande "falls" for a Tower. 

Monday, 11. Would-be Patrick Henrys try out for the Levan Oratorical Contest. 
Anna Marie and Briant go to devotional together. 

Tuesday, 12. The noise issuing from the men's gym reminds us that the Inter-class 
basketball series has started. Dr. Woodward startles his Theology class by 
telling a joke. 

Wednesday, 13. We go through the halls with virtuous expressions on our faces and 
badges on our clothes. It gives us such satisfaction to help the "Loan Fund." 

Thursday, 14. West Parkinson and Izola Jensen have a very dramatic scene in 34 E. 
Mrs. Merrill gives a luncheon for the A. W. S. officers. The Frenchmen get hi- 
larious in the Art Gallery. 

Friday, 15. Many things are made clear to us in "The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary." 
West and Izola repeat their little scene for our benefit. 

Saturday, 16. Walter .'\dams gives us a present of 2,500 valuable books, for which 
we heartily thank him. 

Monday, 18. The music department scores another triumph bv presenting "In \ 
Persian Garden." 

Tuesday, 19. There being nothing else to do we study all day and go home early tor 
our "beauty naps." Secrets and Santa Claus stories prevail. 

Wednesday, 20. The White and Blue makes its first bow for this year. "Hindu" 
Partridge goes in the library for a change, and after reading "Jest 'Fore Christ- 
mas," goes home to make peace with the family. The .'\rt Service Club locks 
itself up in the gym. Andrew ."Anderson adds another medal to his chain. 

Thursday, 21. We put on our very best clothes and go to the Community Music 
Festival, then to the Loan Fund Ball. The gym is transformed bv the marvel- 
ous decorations for the occasion. 

Friday, 22. After an exceptional program we bid each other "Merry Christmas" and 
depart in diverse directions. Many tender parting scenes are observed. 

Tuesday, 26. The "left behinds" comfort themselves with a party at Baird's. 



114 



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The initials of a friend 

You will find these letters on many tools by which 
electricity works. They are on great generators 
used by electric light and power companies ; and 
on lamps that light millions of homes. 

They are on big motors that pull railway trains ; 
and on tiny motors that make hard housework 
easy. 

By such tools electricity dispels the dark and lifts 
heavy burdens from human shoulders. Hence the 
letters G-E are more than a trademark. They are 
an emblem of service— the initials of a friend. 



i 



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GENERAL ELECTRIC 






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NINETY PER CENT 

of the banyan 'Pat?'0/is 

CAME TO US for their PICTURES 

"■'There's a T^cisoir 




LARSON STUDIO 



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WEST ^RfiS 
EXPOSTULATE 



CLEOPATRA FATHER 

SANS MAKE-UP NOAH 




KNIGHTHOOD OONE 
TO SEED 




FULLV CLOTHEP 
FOR ONCE 



THE TOREADOR 



217 



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Qalendar: Qontinued 
'January 

Wednesday, 3. The Brickers mourn over the loss of their late "brother," who has 
fallen into the hands of the fair Virginia for life. 

Monday, 8. One third of the students return to resume the labors of school life. 
Santa apparently was very good to the Frosh, for they all have new green caps 
and bows of ribbon. Dr. Winship wins our united admiration and love. Eg- 
gertsens entertain for their lost sheep who have returned to the fold. 

Tuesday, 9. Virginia is showered with gifts and advice by twenty-five of her friends, 
at the home of the Johnson sisters. "Ike" Young is proclaimed the leader of the 
football heroes at their banquet. 

Wednesday, 10. Former residents of Spanish Fork entertain for Dr. Brimhall. The 
Y News furnishes some "inside dope on Manti students." The Sophs manage 
to carry off the basketball honors. "Dutch" Evans reads "Kick In." 

Thursday, 11. Gales of laughter from College Hall. Prof. Sauer proves himself a 
master comedian and every woman in the house is profoundly jealous of "Mile. 
Pagioliny." 

Friday, 12. Pardee returns from New York. Gertie Olson stays home and writes 
an Ode to Training Rules. 

Saturday, 13. Y Winter Walkers walk up Rock Canyon — and limp back. A bunch 
of "kids" plav house at the Fourth Ward, with 'Gin and Dan Keeler as the 
mamma and papa. 

Monday, 15. Lucy Gates Bowen sends us reluctantly home after holding us spell- 
bound for two hours with her marvelous voice. 

Tuesday, 16. Just a work day. 

Wednesday, 17. Prof. Osmond goes to Salt Lake to make Shakespeare live in the 
minds of the students of the L. D. S. U. The Y Commerce Club forgets its 
account books and gives a real party. 

Thursday, i8. Irene Stolofagy dissolves us into render tears with her appealing 
violin playing. 

Friday, 19. The football men strut around wearing their new sweaters. Oh tor the 
life of a dark-eyed villain, or a doll in a doll shop; the Junior Vodie is better than 
we even dared hope it would be. 

-Saturday, 20. Just to get a little practice we wallop the West High School in a prac- 
tice game. Valentino loses his following after we hear Synd Hossian lecture. 

Monday, 11. We are just simply crowded out by the mobs attending Leadership 
Week. A few of us try to appear busy at information tables, etc. A scandal con- 
cerning .suffocation in a faculty office is whispered about, and we resolve to take 
better care of our debaters. 

Tuesday, 23. Not feeling very welcome anywhere else we go to the movies. Leon 
Williams and Hy Thomas spend the afternoon in the nursery. 

Wednesday, 24. A few of us manage to creep into the Little Theatre to hear Helen 
read "The Little Teacher." 

Thursday, 2<;. Scared looks are seen on the faces of several when the T. N. T. is dis- 
tributed. We just naturally crowd out our visitors at the debate. We nearly 
get the state championship but decide not to be selfish, so give it to the Aggies. 

Friday, 26. "Hit 'em high. Hit 'em low," goodness how the Y did go. The game 
could not even be called peppy, we waded through the Crimson team so fast. 



318 



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"Without vision the people perish." 
Without organization visions vanish. 

Vision is simply ability to look into the 
future, grasp the fullness and meaning ot 
its opportunities and visualize them. 

Organized intelligent, unprejudiced hu- 
man force is the necessary power to make 
visions realities. 

The 'Provo 
Chamber ofComme^'ce 

is such an organization. It is composed of 
active, earnest, energetic men, free from 
political and creed bias, looking to the fu- 
ture welfare of our City, County, State 
and Nation. 

Our Motto is ^'■'^etter Homes, 'Bet- 
ter Opportunities for 'Better zJM^en and 
Women y 

Qan we help you f 



"Provo 

Qhamber 

ofQommerce 



219 



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^B^ll^nnting 



Such it is, indeed, for the keyboard, like a 
large typewriter, perforates your message in 
the spooled paper, which is placed in the caster 
at the left and unspun into type. The caster at 
the right makes large type (like the heading 
above), leads, slugs, rules, borders, ornaments, 
etc. When used butonce, by the way — they 
are dumped into the pot and made over into 
new type. That is why our work always looks 
clean and keen. CI^^^V^?^ in and see these Ipponders. 
This equipment is the onlv one in the State 
kept in connection with the composing room. 
Twelve thousand dollars were laid out to sup- 
ply you this splendid facility. Jf^/iy not use itf 

The zA. jT. Scoville T'ress 

LITHOGRAPHERS "^ PRINTERS ^ ENGRAVERS 
2433 GRANT AVENUE 

OGDEN, UTAH 



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Qalendar: Qontinued 

Saturday, 27. We repeat last evening's performance with a few extra flourishes. 

Monday, 29. We simply can't resist some ot our orators, so we all become enthusi- 
astic over the Stadium Fund project. 

Tuesday, 30. Everybody is just naturally too busy on Tuesday to do anything in- 
teresting. 

Wednesday, 31. An epidemic ot studying seems to have overtaken us. The com- 
mercially inclined hear Boyle speak on "Marketing. 

February 

Thursday, l. Shakespearean actors and actoreens try out for parts in "Twelfth 
Night." The student body gives its Ji,<;oo worth ot bonds to the Stadium Fund . 

Friday, 2. The athletic men and women put on their mittens and go to Vivian Park 
for the week-end. We send our team to Logan where they treat us so royally 
that we just have to give them the long score in the game. The school divides 
against itself and the girls hie themselves to their gym tor a strictly private 
affair. The men get together to console themselves in the other gym. 

Saturday, 3. Reports ot the good times at the park make us wish we were up there 
also. We receive our first radiogram. 

Monday, 5 The freshies do honor to their victors by presenting them with vivid 
green sweaters. "The Great Divide" is staged at the Columbia for the benefit 
of the steel site. 

Tuesday, 6. The English, Dramatic .Art, and several other students take the train 
for Salt Lake to see the Shakespearean plays. We are certainly enthusiastic 
over this author and we don't believe in letting school interfere with our edu- 
cation. 

Wednesday, 7. We unite in sorrow over the passing beyond ot one ot our beloved 
fellow students. Miss .Anna Smart. 

Thursday, 8. The Block Y Club carefully explains just what the wearing of a block 
Y means. Several ladies blushingly return pins, sweaters, etc. 

Friday, 9. Junior Day. We didn't realize that there was so much talent in the Junior 
Class and their program quite overcame us. Would I had the tongue of a poet 
to describe the most wonderful prom ever given! 

Saturday, 10. Alice Reynolds is chosen .Assistant Editor of the Relief Society Maga- 
zine. The U defeats the Aggies at Salt Lake. 

Monday, 12. We pause in our busv life to pay homage to one ot the great men ot 
the past, Lincoln. Brother Brimhall and "Jim" Tucker pay glowing tributes to 
this hero. 

Tuesday, 13. Mrs. Madsen goes to Salt Lake to lecture before the Primary Conven- 
tion. "Bish" Markham and Gladys Seamount go to the matinee. 

Wednesday, 14. "Ike" Young displays a combination of brain and brawn and wins 
the oratorical contest. It is contended by many that his beauty had an effect 
on the judges. Richard Harris stages a one act play, and Lyle Lindsay reads 
"Penrod" in the Little Theatre. 

Thursday, 15. You never can tell what is going on in these quiet peoples' minds! 
The engagement of Elva Bunnell to Paul Murdock is announced. 



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BETTER CUTS he/p to make a 
Better Banyan 

The Qommercial zArt Qompany 

jj Third Street, San Franrjsco 
California 

MADE THE CUTS FOR 
THIS BANYAN" 

The Quality of Its U'ork Speaks for Itself 



PAIGE 



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Superior <J)(Cotor Qompany 

PAIGE ©='|EWETT 
SIX CYLINDER 
MOTOR CARS 



''The 
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in America'^ 



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SALT LAKE CITV 



490 WEST CENTER STREET 
PROVO 



113 



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Qileiidiii- : (Continued 

F'Viday, i6. As many as can, accompany the team to the U where we miss the basket 
just once too often. The rest of us entertain ourselves with parties; the S. O. D. 
Club claims the Art Gallery, The Chem. Club holds a rather mysterious affair, 
and Anna Marie Eggertsen entertains at her home. 

Saturday, 17. It's a shame but we just couldn't keep our lead in that game. The 
Wasatch Club gets the bug and gives a party. 

Monday, 19. President Harris returns from Denver. Delila Higgs is seen wearing 
a Block Y Club pin. 

Tuesday, 20. The Inter-class debates begin. Walter Adams addresses the Com- 
merce Club. 

Wednesday, 21. A woman tries her hand at editing the Y news when the newswrit- 
ing class gives the regular staff a week of vacation. 

Thursday, 22. Rumors of the approaching celebrity contest makes us look every- 
body over with an appraising eye. 

Friday, 23. The I.ive-Y-er makes us sit up and look about us, and its originators 
give a highly original and amusing program m College Hall. 

Saturday, 24. The first hint of approaching spring sends us down town to try on 
hats. Others of us stay home and do our mending. 

Monday, 26. Petitions for our popular people are much in evidence. Kvery beaux 
is boosting for his belle. 

Tuesday, 27. The long looked tor band uniforms arrive, antl the bo\s don them and 
pose for their picture. 

Wednesday, 28. .After hearing several of our boys blow on their horns and pipes, 
the judges proclaim Myron West winner of the Wind Instrument Contest. 

zMtirch 

Thursiday, l. The oft repeated niaxium, "I met my wife at the B. \. U.," is once 
again heard when Miss Cutler and Mr. Butt go to Salt Lake as two and return 
as one. The gorgeous trailing gowns and doublets of velvet worn in "Twelfth 
Night" make us yearn for the return (jf "ye goode olde days." 

Friday, 2. Dr. Swain delivers an intensely interesting address before the student 
body. "Twelfth Night" is repeated. 

Saturday, j. The first warm sunbeams of spring lead us to the canyons. 

Monday, <;. The official "Banyan Week" is ushered in with a unique presentation 
of the proposed contents of the book, and the announcement of the popularity 
candidates. Bunyon competition is very keen. 

Tuesday, h. "Have you bought your Banyan.'" seen and heard on every side. 

Wednesday, 7. We can't find a thing in the Y News that doesn't refer to our annual 
in some way. Everyone from our Bolsheviks to our mild seniors tell "What the 
Banyan means to me." ".'\utumn Fires" is presented and "Within the Law" is 
read for the Mask Club. Helen and \'esta are responsible. 

Thursday, 8. Nick Bird appears with a broad grin and the proud announcement 
that he is a papa. The "Big Sisters" have a luncheon. 

Friday, 9. F>ma Hill and Walter Thatcher believe in following their faculty in all 
things and so take a trip to Salt Lake to be united. We 20 to the "dark room" 
and see the moving pictures of a Timp. trip. 



224 



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STUDENTS' SUPPLY ASSOCIATION 



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^ne cover for 
this annual 
was created by 
THE DAVID J. M O LLC Y CO. 

Z857 N WESTERN AVE, CHICAGO 
Send for Samp/es 










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endless variety ot the 
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latest in Photography 

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(Calendar: (Continued 



Saturday, lo. We mourn over the loss of our little friend Mary Bell. The Home 
Fxonomics girls and the Ag Club boys hold a party. 

Monday, 12. The Gabbe Magga Pi Fraternity is organi/.ed when the star "announc- 
ers" of the faculty hold an endurance test. We wonder why people go to hear 
the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra when they can hear Prof. Madsen's pro- 
teges. 

Tuesday, 13. The musicians entertain tor Brother Madsen prior to his departure 
for Europe. 

Wednesday, 14. The agony of exam week is once more upon us. .\ few of us leave 
our lessons lone enough to go to the Little Theater and hear "Maggie Pepper.' ' 

Thursday, 15. We bid farewell to professors Eastmond and Cummings and just as 
unwillingly greet "Old Man Flu" who is making a call on several of our students . 

Friday, 16. The few who have managed to take their exams without any ill effects 
go to separate meetings. Our swimmers take second place in the meet. Music 
lovers heartily enjoy the concert given by the Mendelsohn Glee Club and assist- 
ing artists. 

Saturday, 17. Circus day! A three ring affair with I. eland Went/, as ringmaster. 
Dan Keeler and Elayne star in the side shows. 

Monday, 19. We make our regular set of good resolutions for the new quarter. The 
absence of the Frosh green is very restful. Ed. M. Rowe is permitted to wear 
a Y after 23 years. 

Tuesday, 20. The Student Body Council passes upon a brand new set of athletic 
rules. The Block Y Club's goats enjoy themselves by looking miserable. 

Wednesday, 21. We do think those Marionettes are the best actors! Mark Pvne and 
Carroll Poulton catch the wedding fever and seek the preacher. 

Thursday, 22. The S. O. D. Club entertains at a novel feasting party. We hear that 
Hazel Noble will be the donor of a medal for Home Economics girls. 

Friday, 23. Richard Condie captures the state singing honors and the right to repre- 
sent Utah at the national contest. We go to the Pyne-Poulton reception and 
find the bride very kissable. 

Saturday, 24. The B. Y. U. walks off with the state championship in wrestling. 

Monday, 26. The celebrated A. C. Glee Club drops in on us and gives us a splendid 
program. Prof. Poulson returns from Chicago to train our minds during the 
spring quarter. 

Tuesday, 27. Somebody's artistic sense is injured so we begin to fix up the Maeser 
Hill. 

Wednesday, 28. Our beloved teacher and poetess is laid to rest. "Told in a Chinese 

Garden" and "Sham" are produced in College Hall. 
Thursday, 29. The Domestic Science girls hem napkins for Mrs. Butt. 
Friday, 30. The Smart family presents us with a portrait of our late professor. His 

life and works are reviewed by former friends. 

Saturday, 31. Coach Roberts announces the arrival of a new Miss Roberts. Work 
is begun on the cement tennis court. 



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piovo "[Jtah 

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COMMERCIAL PRINTERS 
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Specializing i?i School Prijiting 
30 SOUTH FIRST WEST, PROVO 



227 



^^ciiS<^i^.-ir^l^ir.Aii:^}:^s..-i!S^:^h Nineteen ?!i;tpfntp.t()ree oC5H&,<«S}iax,oili; 



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Our reputation is our greatest asset and 
is closely guarded at every turn in our 
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fidence is based upon our reputation 
for St\le, Quality, Service 
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The reputation we have built up for exceptional values in 

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UNIVERSITY .AVE. PHONE 475 



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VHITECOTTON 



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Telluride Motor Company 

Phone 2jg, Provo 

TRY OUR SERVICE STATION 

Our gasoline and oils are highest in quality and cheapest in price. 
Everything for the automobile. Expert mechanics. Standard 
accessories and tires. Storage. Open 24 hours a day. 

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High Qlass "JMIotion T'ictures 

Five shows daily — papular prices — perfect venti- 
lation — gocd projection — $10,000 pipe organ. 

R. E. SinroN, Manager Phone j^g 



B. Y. U. YEAR BOOK 



We sincerely trust that this year has been a profitable, as well as pleasant, year to 
all the students ot B.Y. U. We know that the covers of this book contain many 
happy memories that will be treasured for years to come — and we hope that Life 
will always have in store for you such treasures as these! 

We extenil our best wishes for your 

future increase in mental attainment, dyjr^n^/ * 

and the pleasure it is sure to bring you. ^ tTlTH/ 

PROVO, UTAH 




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PRO\'0, VT.\\\ 



MODERN .AND HOMELIKE 



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Qalendar: Qontinued 

Monday, 2. The funmakers have one glorious time with their April Fool jokes. 

Tuesday, 3. The pianists gather together to entertain each other and their friends. 

Wednesday, 4. Brother Ivins gives a graphic description ot "Indian Traditions." 

Thursday, 5. The more religious of us pack our grips and go to Conference. Others 
go to pay their monthly calls on the home folks. 

Friday, 6. "Cess" Johnson brings fame to us with her musical reading in the ora- 
torio at the Salt Lake Tabernacle. The High School socializers have a dance 
in the Ladies Gym. 

Saturday, 7. Occidental College drags the debating bacon from our hands with a 
2-1 decision. T. K. .\. entertains at a debating banquet at the Roberts. 

Monday, 9. Our Radio sharks are praised for their highly efficient work. The na- 
tives in far off Alaska are entertained thru our apparatus. 

Tuesday, 10. It does give us such a satisfied feeling to have our greatness recognized. 
We receive word that the B. Y. U. has been placed on the accredited list of the 
Northwest .Association of higher schools. 

Wednesday, 11. Two young Lochinvars come out of the west to give us the de- 
cision in the Nevada — B. Y. U. debate. Nell presses Hy's suit for the occasion. 

Thursday, 12. The N. L. U. Club entertains at a formal dancing party. The cast 
for the final play of the year, "Rollo's Wild Oat," is made public. 

Friday, 13. We defy superstition and give the Y the best face washing it has had 
for years. The girls provide a most satisfying spread and an entertainment on 
the lawn. The Y Day Ball is declared the best ever. 

Saturday, 14. The drug stores have a phenomenal rush for "Foot Kase" and like 
remedies. Strangely, not many Y students are seen at the dances. 

Monday, 16. The .Aztec fountain is the scene of vain protestations and thorough 
duckings as the Block Y Club punishes the Y Day slackers. The U. of Southern 
California treats our team so nicely that we give them the benefit of the 2-I 
decision. 

Tuesday, 17. Homer Wakefield is chosen captain of the tracksters. Our debating 
team is successful in defeating Redlands University. 

Wednesday, 18. The glories of Shakespeare are extolled in speeches ami reatlings. 

Thursday, 19. The little sisters of Lizzie Philips and Norma Smith take their part- 
ners and weinies and hold revel on Temple Hill. 

Friday, 20. We forget our worries and our lessons and ijo to the concert given by 
tile L. D. S. U. Band. 

Saturday, 21. Young U. is host at another successful invitation track meet. Teams 
from Kanab to Brigham Cit\- compete for the laurels which are carried off by 
the West High School. 

Monday, 23. The political pot is once more put on to boil and nominations for the 
student body offices issue forth. Harvard Olsen wins the Walter .Adams string 
instrument contest. 

Tuesday, 24. Wendell Rigby just couldn't wait until May, so announces his own en- 
uagement. We wonder if it was a protective measure. 

Wednesday, 25. Royden Dangerfield proves himself a real minute man and wins 
the extemporaneous speaking contest. .All the thrills and charm of the orient 



131 



■»■' 



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W. H. FRKSH WATER 

Household Haviiii-are, Cutlery, Guns and Ammnuit'w)) 

THE JVINCHESrER STORE 

Phone I 23 136 West Center Street 



// V ivelcome the dauin of a Neva Era — a period of groivth and 

developmeiit, the building of a greater U>iiversitv, the B. }'. U. 

Alwavs something neiv at 

FARRKR BROS. CO. 

SUITS, COATS, DRESSES AND DRY GOODS 
PHONE 44 QUALITY STORE 29-39 N. UNIVERSITY .\\V.. 




THE^ITTLE CAFE 



Specialtv on T Bone Steaks and Coon Chicken 
1. \V. HoDsoN, Proprietor 

JC6 W. CENTER STREET 
PROVO, UTAH 



-^skfor 




Sold br 

All 

Leading 

Dealers 



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;?--^^iJ4is^--'-'i2i<S'j-'-^i5iLCi-^'«st^ Wi)t Panpan '^t^-^t^^'^m;?^'^'^ 



Calendar: Continued 



are brought to College Hall by the "Egyptian Princess." 
Thursday, 26. Rollo takes his "Wild Oat" and the rest of the cast and journeys to 

the land southward. The play is enjoyed by all at Nephi — even the cast has a 

good time. 
Friday, 27. The first round is passed as the ballots are counted for the primary 

elections. The lucky ones wipe their brows and prepare for the final bout. Dean 

Jennings and Mr. Brydler address the women and men in separate meetings. 

The farmer lads and lassies pack their lunch pails and have a party. 
Saturday, 28. Y takes the first place in the Y. — A. C. track meet. Vic Hatch is the 

star of the day. Anna Marie leaves for Ohio where she represents the .^. VV. S. 

at the Convention. 
Monday, jo. The long-looked for faculty play more than fulfills our fondest hopes 

for it. The only difficulty is in trying to reconcile ourselves to the fact that those 

enamored thespians are really the people who dole out the tacts to us every day. 

^May 

Tuesday, i. Our cynics agree that there must he something to romance after all, 
after seeing Pardoe make such ardent love to his own wife — in the facultv plav. 
Osmond gives the first of a series of Shakespearean readings. 

Wednesday, 2. F.rma Murdock is voted queen of the Mav with Genieve Huish and 
Roma Byland as the maids of honor. Young loses the track meet to Utah by 
a small margin. Alma McElrath reads, "Come out of the Kitchen." 

Thursday, 3. We pause in our work to mourn over the loss of our beloved friend 
and teacher, E. D. Partridge. 

I'ridav, 4. After a week of ardent and strenuous campaigning we go to the polls 
and elect our leaders for next year. We win in tennis from the U. of U. 

Saturday, <;. And lose in tennis to the \. C. U. Mrs. Ballif presents the dance 
drama, "Aphrodite and Adonis" in .Spanish Fork. The Gold Brickers and their 
partners get spring fever and go to Wildwood. 

Monday, 7. The Fourth ^'ears are seen flashing their new class rmgs. The engage- 
ment of Miss \'era Hinkley, a last year's student, to Mr. Wayne Mayhew is 
announced. 

Tuesday, 8. We are all happy to see Agnes Farnsworth back in the halls again after 
her long illness. 

Wednesday, 9. "He and She" are introduced by Leah Chipman in her play reading 
at the Little Theatre. The wives of married students hold a social. 

Thursday, 10. Just as we are getting so we really think spring is here it has to storm! 
Papers for the James F. Talmage essay contest are handed in. 

F"ridav, 11. The Girls hold sway for an entire day. Katie Forbes reads her prize 
story. Mayor Neslen speaks, and many beautiful musical numbers are enjoyed 
in the morning exercises. Everybody is proudly showing off their Mothers. 
The reception, dance drama, and dance are the best affairs of the year — if you 
believe the girls. 

Saturday, 12. We go to Salt Lake to cheer for our track team at the state meet. 

Monday, 14. The "Red Mill" proves the crowning achievement of the music de- 
partment. 



»34 



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Provo Photo Supply & Music Co. 

DEALERS IN HIGH GRADE 
PHOTOGRAPHIC and MUSICAL m 
MERCHANDISE 
PROVO, UTAH 

A Sound Wave Expands As It Travels 



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'WmWL, 371 DEPARTMENT STORES 

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for Cash only, one price to everybody 

The Shopper s Service Store Superior 



i 



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DU/LD/NG H£ADOUAPT£/?S - 



i^gS South University Avenue 
Phone Two-0 



'4 



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PLUMBING 



HEATING 



P. L. LARSON 



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»3S 



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Nineteen JEtDcntp-tfjrtt ^12a,^llS2Shcififfia»^l!I2flk,j 



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Qaleiidar: Qo)iti)ined 

Wednesday, 16. The final papers in the Talmage contest are read in Devotional. 
Clara Creer reads, "The Prince Chap" and Mvrtle Henderson presents the one- 
act play, "The Four Flushers." 

Thursday, 17. The new High School auditorium is opened bv the Yountj U. players 
in, "Rollo's Wild Oat." 

Friday, 18. The students furnish the program in Devotional. 

Wednesday, 23. The Mask Club gives its first annual banquet at the Hotel Roberts. 

Thursday, 24. Aspiring vocalists and pianists contest. 

Friday, 25. The Seniors prove themselves pretty human after all and furnish a 
splendid program. Their Ball in the evening is a wonderful success. 

Monday, 28. After hearing of its successful presentation in distant places, the stu- 
dents are at last permitted to see, "Rollo's Wild Oat," in College Hall. 

Wednesday, 30. The Mary Wolly humorous reading contest is held. Melba Condie 
reads, "The Lady of the Lyons." 



J' 



line 



Friday, i. We find it harder than ever to cram tor exams! However, we forget our 

represents 



troubles at the last student body dance 
Saturday, 2. Dick Condie leaves for Ashville, North Carolina, where he 

LItah in the vocal contest. 
Sunday, 3. The Baccalaureate address is given in the Tabernacle. 
Monday, 4. The "tardy number" of the "Y's Guy" is distributeii, and is warmly 

received by the students, 
Wednesday, 6. The worthy workers of the student body are honored. 
Thursday, 7. The Alumni tents makes a real "White City" of our lawns. Old 

friends greet each cjther after separations of many years. 
Friday, 8. Commencement! The last farewells are said at the .Alumni Ball. 
.As we lav down our pens we wish voii 

.-^ happy (Did prosperous vacation. 



"OuALiTV and Service" 

Troy I^iundry Qompany 

Rhone 164, Provo, Utah 
375 West Center Street 



136 



k<^I;2sh<^S(S!^<j£?S^^fiSn2a^ Nineteen Ctotntp-ttiret ^ssSBSSc^^i^SSh^i^SS^'SSk^.^i^SMSs^ 



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^Professional T^age 







The following are the names of Prove Professional Men who have 
the interests of the Brigham Young University at heart and have con- 
tributed to the success of this Banyan. The staff wishes to thank them 
for this support. 

FRANK T. REYNOLDS, Dentist 

M. A. CONANT, D.D.S. 

DR. J. W. AIRD 

DR. J. KARL BECK 

BOOTH, BROCKBANK & JOHNSON, Attorneys at Law 

DR. D. D. BOYER 

DR. C. H. CARROLL 

DR. J. C. CLARK 

DR. STANLEY M. CLARK 

DR. F. M. FOSTER, Dentist 

DR. VERN R. GREENWOOD, Dentist 

DR. O. K. HANSEN, Dentist 

DR. E. A. PAXMAN, Dentist 

DR. WALTER T. HASLER 

CHASE HATCH, Attorney 

K. J. HAWKINS, Chiropractor 

J. H. HENDERSON, Chiropractor 

DR. W. G. HUGHES 

DR. H. G. MERRILL 

N. H. NELSON, Dentist 

DR. LEWIS W. OAKS 

DR. L. C. POTTER 

DR. H. S. PYNE 

STEWART & STEWART, Civil Engineers 

R. LESTER SPURRIER, Chiropractor 

DR. W. J. STIEHL 

DR. FRED R. TAYLOR 

DR. FRED W. TAYLOR 

J. B. TUCKER, Judge 

ABE W. TURNER, Attorney 

DR. D. L. WALLICK 

T. F. WENTZ, Civil Engineer 

DR. DAVID W^ESTWOOD 

PARKER & ROBINSON, Attorneys at Law. 

MORGAN, COLEMAN & STRAW, Attorneys at Law 



*37 



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AND NOW-**AU REVOIR!'' 





JLEB" 





WITH THANKS TO ALL WHO HELPED- 

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