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Full text of "The banyan"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/banyan1928brig 







Reproduced by toiirtcs\ c-y .A. .i-/<,w iind 
The Federal Schools^ Inc. 

WATCHING THE TRAIL 



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Printed and Bound by the 

DESERET NEWS PRESS 

Engraved by the 

COMMERCIAL ART & ENGRAVING CO. 

Portraits by 

LARSON STUDIO 



all 




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IllliilllillillllHIIIII! 



Vol. 15 
Published by 

THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS 

of the 

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 

Prove, Utah 
1928 



DeaicATion 



^o those years: 

Of lasting friendships with teachers and friends, 
Nights of study and days of classes, 
Intercollegiate activities on field and floor. 
Evenings of delightful entertainment, 
Friendly smiles in the halls and about the campus, 
Hours of classes, morning walks to school; 
While the leaves fell in the autumn, 
While the snow laid its mantel in the winter, 
While the trees burst and the birds sang in the spring. 
To these and all phases of student activity, 
To the happiest years in our lives, 
Do we offer this book as a reminder, 
Of those golden days. 



f\ 6 ]Y 




Reproduced by Courtesy of Artist Benson B. Moore 



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nPHE most cherished memories of college days are of 
those events in which we participated as a united 
student body. Long after facts have faded, they re- 
appear — strengthened by the years. Since it is the stu- 
dent activities that make our college and our school 
days distinctive, we have featured them in this annual 
with the hope that they may be happy reminiscences. 

As we struggle on toward a man-made goal, we 
sometimes forget that the western world is full of ro- 
mance, adventure, and untamed friends who live in 
happy oblivion. To bring us into closer relationship 
with nature and the charms of the outdoors, wild life 
has been selected as an art motif. Greater appreciation 
for the lower creatures of creation and worthwhile 
thoughts of school life will to an extent measure our 
success. 



f[s]f 



MTRficfainoM 



nr'O those who have in any way added to the success 
of this 1928 Banyan, do we extend hearty appre- 
ciation, especially to the following who are not in our 
school, but have made the listed contributions: 

Walter J. Wilwerding, artist, an illustration of a 
bull moose, and a color picture of a cougar, "Watching 
The Trail." This picture was obtained through the 
courtesy of the artist and The Federal Schools Inc. 

Benson B. Moore, artist and etcher, a dry-point 
etching of a cougar. 

David Newell, artist and author, an illustration of 
a bear, 

Kay Russen, artist, an illustration of a deer. 

George K. Lewis, artist, a picture of a wild cat. 



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NAfiMOItt 



The Right Wing oi tiii: Educational Building 



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The Ladies' Gymnasiua 






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The Vine Covered Entrance to the 
Educational Building 



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The Maeser Memorial 



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Campus in Back of Library 



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Lover's Lane in Springtime 
Maeser Hill 





<[16]/ 




Lover's Lane in Winter 
Maeser Hill 



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aooiftisn^anod 



r[19]/ 



GENERAL CHURCH BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Arthur Winters, Secrcfary and Trcantrer 
Joseph F. Merrill, Siipcrintcihlcii/ of Church Schools 

Heber J. Grant Joseph F. Smith 

Anthony W. Wins David O. McKay 

Charles W. Nibley Stephen L. Richards 

Willard Young Richard R. Lyman 

RUDGER ClAWSON JoHN A. WiDTSOE 

Orson F. Whitney Adam S. Bennion 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Heber J. Grant, Prcsiilciit 

Thomas N. Taylor, Vicc-Praidciit 

E. H. Holt, Secretary and Treasurer 

SusA Young Gates Stephen L. Chipman 

Reed Smoot Joseph R. Murdock 

Lafayette Holbrook Joseph Reece 

Joseph Fielding Smith Zina Y. Card 

J. Wm. Knight Willard Young 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Thomas N. Taylor J. Wm. Knight Stephen L. Chipman 



•',.81' 



4 20 1/ 




President Franklin Stevcart Harris 
Preside lit of Uiiiicrsi/y 

(_y NE of the great events each year at Brigham Young University is the coming 
out of the Banyan. At this time I wish to extend greetings to all who have supported 
the Banyan this year. In it we have a permanent record of faces and scenes which 
have become dear to all who have been connected with this great school. 

This book is a link to connect the friendships of the present with the uncertain 
future. In after years we may turn over its pages and have recalled to our mmds 
some of the happiest experiences of our lives. 

I hope that all will care for this book as a precious possession and that through 
it the Spirit of the B. Y. U. may continue to "carry on" in their lives no matter where 
their lots may be cast. 



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g. 



Joseph F. Merrill 
Sit[}criiitciidcnt of Church Schools 



REETINGS to the students of the Brigham Young University. We congratulate 
you on the opportunity of receiving a college training in the high moral and refined 
spiritual atmosphere of this institution. 

To you much has been given, of you much will be required. Are you loyal 
to the B. Y. U.? Your conduct gives the answer. The good name of the University 
IS in your keeping. It is not so much what you know as it is what you do that 
will help or hurt your Alma Mater. In this respect your responsibility is incomparably 
greater than that borne by students of state-supported institutions. May you not fail 
in your duty either to yourselves or to the B. Y. U. Your life here has been pleasant 
and profitable, made so, by your industry and the spirit of the School. This spirit 
is that of love and service. May you breathe it deeply and keep it with you always. 



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George H. Brimhall 

Preside lit -Emeritus 



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C ^^ YOUNG MAN said to me, "The B. Y. U. is a good school but it has no 

great state behind it." I replied, "No, but it has something behind it greater than 
any state. It has the interest of a people with homes in many states, a people whose 
destiny is to lead the world." 

Decades have passed since the conversation and my belief in the onwardness of 
the school has had good soil for growth. The speed of our advancement has exceeded 
expectations. 

The output of the Brigham Young University is an asset unmeasurable. "Once 
a student always an advocate" is said of those who have attended its classes. To be 
a member of its student body or of its faculty means to become a Banyan tree trunk, 
a live pillar on a growing structure that gets its expansion from the light of revelation 
and the soil of science. To become a graduate of the Banyan School is to be equipped 
with choice implements of usefulness and filled with a desirable spirit of helpfulness. 



r[23]/ 



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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

People who believe in the importance of 
genealogy and ancestry readily concede that the 
College of Education has reason to be proud since 
its origin goes back to the very beginning of the 
Institution. 

When the University was founded, it began 
its career as the- Church Teacher's College. In 
1920 its title was changed to the School of Edu- 
cation and in 1921 it evolved into the present 
College. 

The aim of this department is preparation 
for leadership — intellectually and socially. Theo- 
retical knowledge is supplemented by practical 
experience in the training school, a part of the 
division. The work, both elementary and second- 
ary, is standard and meets state requirements. 

In seven years (1920-1927) the number 

graduated from this college increased from ten 

to thirty-four. 

John C. Swenson, acting Dean during the absence of Dean L. John Nuttall, has managed the affairs of 

the college successfully. His knowledge of society and its needs has made his assistance especially valuable 

in this field. 




John C. Swenson 
Dean 




From A',)?(i— John C. Swensen, Praiiklin S. Harris, (icdreie II. r.rimli.ill, Amos N. Merrill 

Second Rou< — Ida .Smoot Dusenberry, Georgia Maeser, Asel C. Lamliert, Clarence Cottam, Joseph Siidweeks, Edgar M. Jensen 

Third Ko7i'~StelIa P. Kiche. Wm. H. Boyle. Myrtie Jensen, Maude D. Markiiam 

Fourth Row — Hugh M. Woodward, J. VV. McAllister, M, Wilford Poulsen, Barbara Mauglian 

Fifth Row — Ilcrmese Petersen, Mary J. Ollorton. Gladys Kotler, Mary Hammond, Emma Brown 

Sixth Row — Wilma Jeppson, William F, Hanson, C LaVoir Jensen 



'[24 J, 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

Although Young University has always given 
liberal support to cultural phases of education, it 
was not until 1926 that a separate college of Fine 
Arts was organized. 

It is the aim of this division to meet the 
demands of those whose interests and talents lead 
them into this field. That the department is 
succeeding is seen in the steadily increasing en- 
rollment. In 1926 — the year of its appearance, 
ten students were graduated from the college. 
The number increased in 1927 to sixteen and 
from the maximum enrollment in 1927-28, the 
number receiving degrees is estimated as doubling 
the first year's record. 

The work of the college has been excellently 
directed by Dean Gerrit De Jong, Jr., whose 
varied talents and broad experience extended by 
foreign travel and study, have proved valuable 
assets. 




Gerrit De Jong 

Dean 




•' -^JYIwiSiifi,. 



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Front Row—I. W. McAllister. Anna Huisli Heaton, Bessie E. Couvley, Gerrit dejong, Franklin .S, Iljirris, T. Earl Panlt>e. Ralpli Booth 

Second Ron— Lucille Tuttle. Hanna C. Packard. Florence J. Madsen. Elmer Nelson 

Third Ro-w~E. 11. Eastmond, Geo. W. Fitzory, B. F. Larsen. LeRoy Robertson, Gustav Bueart 

Fourth Rmv — Win. F. Planson, Franklin Madsen, Benjamin F. Cuinmings, Edfiar M. Jensen. Robert Sauer 



y[27]/ 



■ 



■■'"'■ -■■'■■^"m 




COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Although the College of Commerce and 
Business Administration does not rule against 
women, it has had a strikingly low number in its 
graduating classes. In 1927, the sixth year after 
its organization, the department boasted one 
feminine graduate. 

The growth of this college from ninety- 
six students in 1921 to two hundred twenty-seven 
in 1927, illustrates conclusively the fact that 
students are realizing the obvious advantage of 
better training before competing in the specialized 
business world. 

The College aims to equip the individual for 
leadership in finance and industry by giving him 
a thorough knowledge of commercial problems 
as well as practice in business administration. 



Harrison V. Hoyt 
Dean 

Harrison V. Hoyt, in addition to academic training, has had valuable practical experience in the work and 
thoroughly understands the requirements and purpose of the college which he supervises. 




Front Rc7i'—E<i. M. Rowe, Bertha Roberts. ]I. \'. Hoyt 

Second Kuic— Herald R. Clark, E. H. Holt, Oarence Boyle, M. Wilford Poulseii 

Third KoK'— Christen Jensen, H. R. Merrill, Elmer Miller, A. Rex Johnson, Geo. H. Hansen 



.[28 ]< 



EXTENSION DIVISION 

"All tlie world — our campus" is the new 
slogan adopted by Lowry Nelson, head of the 
Brigham Young University Extension Division. 

The present aim was definitely implied by 
the organizers who, in 1921, instituted the Ex- 
tension Division for the purpose of providing 
educational and social opportunities for those who 
are unable to participate in resident instruction. 

Two different groups of individuals are 
served by the department: Those who matriculate 
in the University and those who are benefited 
without formal registration. The latter are 
reached by the lecturers and entertainments 
fostered by the department and by the package 
library which it maintains. 

To the individual desiring University credit, 
a variety of well-chosen correspondence courses 
and extension classes is offered. With the 
territory represented by the 750 matriculated individuals stretching from Hawaii to 
Islands, it is truly no exaggeration when one says: "The sun never sets on our campus." 




Lowry Nelson 
Dean 



the Tongan == 




Front Row — Laval S. Morris, Ivuvvry Nelson, Thomas L. Martin, T. Earl Pardoc,, A. N. Merrill, Geo, II. Briniliall 
Sesond Ro'W — Murray O. Hayes, Tlios. C. Komney, Wm. J. Snow, Elsie C. Carroll, Jolui C. .Swcnson 
Tiur.l Ro'v — Edgar M. Jensen, Cieo, H. Hansen, Vasco M. Tanner, M. Wilford Poulsen, T. Lynn Smith, C'lawson V. t'annon. II. K 

Fourth Row — Wni. H. Boyle, I>onald P. Lloyd 



.Merrill 



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Clawson Y. Cannon 
Dean 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

A combined education and vacation is of- 
fered by Young University Summer School. 

Regular classes, although not as numerous 
as those scheduled other quarters are varied and 
conducted by specialized instructors. The in- 
creasing enrollment still permits closer association 
and individual instruction not possible in larger 
groups. 

The campus is so situated as to afford ex- 
cellent settings for unique social events, valuable 
factors in socialization as well as recreation. 

A second term at Aspen Grove is replete 
with opportunities for research and field work. 

Although his duties as Dean of this depart- 
ment were, relatively speaking, assumed recently, 
Clawson Y. Cannon is well prepared for his 
position. His enthusiasm and interest in his work 
wins the admiration of his associates. 




Front Rozc — Jolin A. Widtsoe, John C. Swenson, Lee Randolph, Nettie N. Smart, Adam S. Bennion, Vasco M. Tanner. A. O. Garrett 
Second Row — Guy C. Wilson, Murray O. Hayes, Parley A. Christensen, Lowry Nelson. Walter P. Cottam 



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David F. Hart 

Student Body President 



Ethel Lowry Handley 

Student Body Vice-President 



Student Administration 

T3 ECIPROCAL activity and mutual ambitions have dominated the operations between 
■*-^ the student body and the executive organization within it, this year. As a corps 
of officers all work conducted during the year has been to the end of a maximum output 
in vitalized student activity. In the execution of that ideal all phases of the work were 
carefully adjudicated and weighed before launching into operation, in attempting to 
appease the interests of all concerned. Fairness and honesty to the trust reposed in leaders 
by the student "Demos" has ever been kept paramount, aiming always at a square deal 
for all. That has been the task of the year — wherein it has succeeded the honor goes to all, 
and where failure has attended the inefficiency of the leaders is, perhaps, accountable. 

Not only have the officers sought to give their best for the student body, but the 
latter has been just as animated and responsive when called on by the leaders in the 
respective projects. Students have been valiant in helping with the programs, public 
service bureau work, and other features that have needed support. Surely, no body of 
people in the land is more loyal to and cooperative with their leaders than at the 
B. Y. U. 

A word from the officers: We extend our thanks and appreciation to all with 
whom we have worked this year for the support experienced. We are happy with you in 
our successes and feel disappointed at the reverses. May we, through this Banyan, 
register with you this expression with the hope that its content will be assimilated by all. 
As we separate, we bid you adieu and wish to all the most pleasant indulgences an 
abundant life affords. 



ii'i i; 
<[ 33 ]. 



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Robert K. AIIlh 
Debating Manager 

Fred Moore 

Cheer Leader 

Ted Hansen 

Sophomore Class Fres. 

Glenn S. Potter 

Banyan Editor 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL 



(innlini (.raiulall 

Hiis. Mgr. of BaHVtin 

LeGrande Anderson 

Music Manager 

Henry D. Taylor 

Second Viee-Prcsident 

Kenneth Handley 

Dramatic Manager 



Ethel Lowry Ilaiulley 



David F. Hart 



William Edwards 



Student Body Vice-Prcs. Student Body President Senior Class President 



Helen Swenson Max Taylor 

President of A. II'. S. Bus. Mgr. of "K News" 

Kathleen Bench E. DeAlton Partridge 

Secretary and Historian Forensics Manager 

Bruce M. Cox Kent Johnson 



C. Erwin (Star) Nelsen 
" y News" Fditor 
ElUoy Nelson 

Junior Class President 
Victor Taylor 



Freshman Class President High School President Student Mgr. of Athletics 



iiiiiniiii' 



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r[34]r 




Anna Smoot 

Secretary 



LUCILE TUTTLE 
Vice-President 



Helen Mendenhall 

Recreation Leader 



Helen Swenson 

President 



A. W. S. 



' I 'HE A. W. S., affiliated with the National Organization of College Women Students, 
-*- sends its president-elect to the annual National convention. In 1927 the B. Y. U. 
delegate was one of five to present a paper. 

It is the aim of this organization to help solve problems of college women and to 
provide activities which will lead to self-realization. A major aim is that of greater 
socialization of the individual which will further unify and democratize the group and 
cultivate a sense of responsibility leading to service. 

To help the girls come nearer to the ideal of the charming, cultured women, a pro- 
gram for the entire year was planned on this theme. Lectures and accompanying demon- 
strations were helpful. 

The Big Sister movement resulted in numerous lasting and helpful friendships and 
was responsible for the outstanding success of the girls' jamboree, dominated by the spirit 
of fun and good fellowship. 

The retiring officers send greetings to you all, fellow students, and leave with the 
sincere desire that this organization will, each year, come nearer to the splendid ideals 
for which it stands. 



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(■> |, 




John Allen 



AUDRV OSTLUND 



Ruth Clark 



Henry D. Taylor 

Director 



Public Service Bureau 

"A PROGRAM A DAY" in 1927-28 established for B. Y. U. Public Service Bureau, 
■^^^ a record attainment. The number of entertainments supplied not infrequently 
reached ten in one week. 

Co-operating with the Extension Division, the Bureau sent performers from Ephraim 
to Murray at the request of schools, churches, clubs, socials, and benefits. 

In order to practice more efficiently the policy of the Division — a higher type of 
performance and as many participants as possible — Henry Taylor, president, selected 
three assistants and assigned each a special division. The vocal department was managed 
by Audrey Ostlund; readings, by Ruth Clark; and instrumental music by John L. Allen. 

The quality of this fearless quartette is evident when one recalls how they subdued 
the Friday the 13th jinx with a "real' extemporaneous program. 



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INTER-SOCIAL UNIT COUNCIL 

Front RoiL> — John L. Hayes, Helen Swenson, Elsie C. Carroll. Mary Bird. Jennie Holbrook. 
Elh r'arnsworlh. 

Back Row — ElRoy Nelson. Bruce M. Cox. Elmer Miller. Nettie N. Smart. William 
Edwards. Ted Hanson, David F. Hart. 



AFFILIATION COMMITTEE 

From RoiU — Ruth K. Hansen. Selena Roberts. Verda Bachelor. Ora Anderson. Anna Grace. 
Linda Randell. Gail John,son. 

Second Roiv — Cristine Hinckley, Lois Wade, Francis Swan, Lorna Call, Lucille Tuttle. 

Third Ruu.' — Jean Poulson. Verlc Dixon. Lezelle Jones. Don Lloyd, Mark Jenkins, Claude 
Snow. Alton Larsen. 

Back Row — Wendell Poulson. Clifford Rutherford. Ted Hansen. Wendell Candland. 
Walter Corbett. Dave Hart. E. DeAlton Partridge. 




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'Bob" Allen 

Assislartt 



Fred Moore 

Cheer Leader 



Spence" Passey 

Assistant 



Cheer Leaders 



THE most manifest sign of wisdom is continued cheerfulness." — Hail to the 
Solomons of the season, whose wide-awake, sincere, enthusiastic leadership backed 
by a united student body awed the opposing warriors before the battle and after the 
victory as well as during the actual skirmish. 

For the success of the trio, there is no greater proof than the outstanding character 
of their complete work since the ability to put over a big job without becoming con- 
spicuous is truly a test of greatness. Under their supervision, new songs and yells were 
introduced and old cheers revised and modernized so that not meaningless noise but pur- 
poseful cheering of a happy, cooperating group was attained. 

Clever stunts at vodies, rallies and games were of a high type — carefully planned 
and skilfully carried out, their effectiveness heightened by a striking uniform. 

For 1927-28, cheering was not limited to athletic fields but support of every school 
activity was a conscious aim. Success in anything, whether debating, literature, 
dramatics, music, or athletics won the same hearty recognition. 

Courtesy to visiting contestants was emphasized — even to the extent of providing 
a body of cheerers for the opponents. A good game, not victory at any cost, was the 
unspoken slogan. 



'[ 381, 




CCASSC& 



r[39]< 




CLASS OFFICERS 



Senior 

William Edwards 

President 

Catherine Eyring 

Vice-President 

Rae Rust 

Secy, and Treas. 



Junior 



ElRoy Nelson 

President 



Audrey Ostlund 

\' tee- President 



Alice Taylor 

Secy, and Treas. 



Sophomore 

Theodore Hansen 

President 

Gertrude Partridge 

\'ice-President 

Blanche Thomas 

Secy, and Treas. 



Freshman 



Bruce M. Cox 

President 



Helen Rowe 

Vice-President 



Edna Nelson 
Secy, and Treas. 



MiJiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiii 



/[40]/ 




Rcf-'roduccd ky Courtesy of .-irtist. 



SCMCOAS 



'[41]/ 




MASTERS 



ANSON B. CALL. JR. 

Colonia Dublan. Chihuahua. 

Mexico. 

Took B. S.. 192 7. at Brigham 

Young University. 

Major Agronomy. 

Thesis: "A Study of Utah 

Miridae." 



HUGH W. PETERSON 

Provo. Utah. 

Took A. B.. 19 16. at Brigham 

Young University. 

Major Secondary Teaching. 

Th;sis: "A Study of Methods 

of Teaching Ho. S. Chemistry 

Bas:d Upon Recent Literature." 



CLAUDEOUS J. D. BROWN 

Oqden. Utah. 
Took B. S.. 192 7. at Brigham 

Young University. 

Major Zoology and Entomology. 

Thesis: "A Morphological and 

Systematical Study of Utah 

Asilidae ( Deptera) ." 



JAMES A. KARTCHNER 

Provo. Utah. 

Took B. S.. 1926. at Brigham 

Young University. 

Major Horticulture. 

Thesis : "A Study of Forest 

Tree Insects of Utah." 



DREW JORGENSEN 

American Fork. 

Took B. S.. 192 7. at Brigham 

Young University. 

Maior Horticulture. 

Thesis : "A Preliminary Study 

of Utah Coccidae (Scale 

Insects) ." 



HELEN HINCKLEY 

Took B. S.. 1924. at Brigham 

Young University. 

Major History 

Thesis: "Religious Impulses in 

Western Colonization." 



SENIORS 



KENNETH G, HANDLEY. 

B. S. 

SandQ. Utah. 

AcountinK and Business 

Administration. 

Football 1 . 

Chairman Loan Fund Ball 2. 

Junior Prom Committee. 

Sec. Theta Alpha Phi 4. 

Alpha Delta 2. 3. 

Nuggets. 



GRANT BROADBENT. 
B. S. 
Heber Citu. Utah 
Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Pres Wasatch Club 3. 

Commerce Club 

Y. D. D. 



HARRY J. PARKER. B, S 

American Fork 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



VESTA ANDERSON. B. S. 

SpnnQville. Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Sec. of A. W. S. 3. 

Vice Prcs. Springville Club 4 

Sec. and Treas. Valnorn 4 

Y. D. D. 4. 



FLORENCE C. PETERSON, 

A. B. 

Preston. Idaho 

Dramatic An. 

Theta Alpha Phi. 

Department Play 4. 

Ladies' Glee Club 4. 



THEODORE J. ARBON. B. S. 

SnoLCville. Utah 

Chemistry. 

Track 1. 

Class Debates 4. 

Pres. Utc Eskie 4. 

Glee Club 2. 3. 4. 



/[42]< 



REED N. COLVIN, A. 

Pai^son. Utah 

Physical Education. 

Football 3, 4. 

Track 5, t. 

Prt'S. Payson Club 3 . 

Prcs. Archery Club 3. ' 



B. 



EDGAR E. BOOTH. B. 
Orem, Utah 

Physics. 

Dramatics 3. 

Jr. Prom Committee. 



JEAN L. COLEMAN. B. S. 

Midwau • Utah. 

Clothing and Textiles. 

Corresponding Sec. of Gamma 

Phi Omnicron, 



MARVA HODSON. A. B. 

Prove. Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Vice Pres. Class 3. 

Vice Pres. Typist Club 2. 

Sec. and Treas. Archery Club 4. 

Valnorn. 



A. B. 



3. 4. 



RHODA JOHNSON. 

Provo, Utah. 

Music. 

Competitive Opera 2 

Oratorio 3. 

Inter Class Debates 1. 

Loan Fund Committee 2 

Nautilus. 



MARY B. OSLUND, A. B. 

Lelhbridqe. Alberta. Canada. 

Dramatic Art. 

Senior Play 4. 

Thcta Alpha Phi 4. 

Nautilus. 



STANLEY HARDY. A. 
Salt Lake Gift/. Utah. 

Zoology. 

Y. News Staff 2. 3. 

Banyan 4. 

Mates. 



BLISS L. FINLAYSON. A. B 

Provo. Utah. 

Zoology. 

Alpha Theta Phi. 

Football 1, 2. 3, 4. 

Competitive Play 1 . 

Competitive Opera 3, 4. 

Pres. Young Gleeman 2. 

Dramatics 1. 2, 3. 4. 



E. DeALTON PARTRIDGE. A. B. 

Provo. Utah. 

Psychology. 

Y. News 1, 2. 3. 

Banyan 2. 

Dramatics 1 . 2. 3. 4. 

Theta Alpha Phi. 

Debating 3. 4. 

Tau Kappa Alpha. 

Block Y. 

R. M. Oratorical 2. 

Jex Oratorical 3. 

Les. Chevaliers. 

C. ERWIN (STAR) NELSON. 

B. S. 

Brigham Cilq. Utah. 

Accounting and Bus. Adm. 

Y. News Editor 4. 

Nuggets. 



DONALD P. LLOYD. B. 1 

St. Anthonu. Idaho. 

Football I. 2, 4. 

Track 1, 2. 3. 4. 

Dramatics I, 2, 3. 4. 

Theta Alpha Phi. 

Pres. of Inter-Social Unit 

Committee. 

Nuggets. 



WILLIAM F. EDWARDS. 

B. S. 

Rigbij. Idaho. 

Accounting. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Nuggets. 
Class Pres. 3. 4. 




'[43 ]. 




IVINS BENTLEY. B. S. 

Colonia Juarez. Mexico. 

Accounling and Business 

Administration. 

Athletics 2. 



BURDETTE C. CRANE. B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Agronomy. 

Banyan 2. 

Vice Pres. Ag. Club. 4. 



LORIN C. MILES. B. S. 

St. George, Utah 

History. 

Transferred from Dixie Normal 

College. 



RUTH K. HANSEN. B. 
Provo. Utah. 
Dramatic Art. 
Pres. Valnorn 4. 



HARRY J. OLSON. A. 
ProL'o. Utah. 
Dramatic Art. 
Track Team 3. 



LYNN T. SMITH, B. S. 

Sanford. Colorado. 
Sociology. 



CATHERINE EYRING. B. 

Pima. Arizona. 

Clothing and Textiles. 

Debating 3. 4. 

Y. News 4. 

Banyan 3. 

Gamma Phi Omicron 3. 

Block Y. 3. 4. 

Tau Kappa Alpha 4. 

Pres. Home Ec. Club 4. 

Vice Pres. Class 4. 

Cesla Ties 



RAE RUST. A. B. 

Kanub. Utah. 

Art. 

Banyan Staff 3. 

Y. News 4. 

Sec. Treas. Class 4. 

Sec. Studio Guild 4. 



4. 



ROSS DICKSON. B. 5 

Morgan. Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Football 3. 4. 

Track 2. 

Male Glee 1. 2. 3. 4. 



MARY BURCH, B. S. 

PrOL'o. Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Commerce Club. 

Home Ec. Club. 



HEBER F. DENISON. B. S. 

Manti. Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Male Glee Club 3. 4. 

Commerce Club 3. 4. 

Band 3. 4. 



FERDINAND K. STUCKI. 

B. S. 

St. George. Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Transferred from Dixie College 



/[44 ]/ 



MILTON R. HUNTER, B. S. 

Holden. Utah. 

History and Political Science. 

Wrestling 1. 

Pres. Y. E. A. 2. 



CLEON C. SANDERS, B. S. 
Nepbi. Utah. 
Horticulture. 



ANNA GRACE, B. S. 

Nephi. Utah. 

Accounting. 

Prcs. LaOnaclca 

Sec. and Trcas. Juab (..lub 3. 4. 



WILLIAM E. MORTIMER. 

B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Mathematics. 

Glee Club 3. 

Curiata. 



GENOVA L. ROBINSON. 

B. S. 

Wttlard. Utah. 

English. 

Transferred from U. A. C. 



RAY C. HOUTZ, B. S. 
Provo. Utah. 

Chemistry. 

Track 1, 2. 

Y. News Staff 2. 

Vice Pres. Young Chemical 

Society 4. 



ISABELLE DUTHIE. B, S, 

Colonia Jaurez. Chih.. Mexico 

Accounting. 

McDonald Scholarship 3. 

Orchestra I, 2, 3. 

Commerce Club. 

Mexico Club. 



HUGH V. KING, B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Commerce Club 1. 2. 3, 4. 



PHYLLIS TREGEAGEL, B. S 

Provo. Utah. 

English. 

Transferred from U. of U. 



ELLIS EVERETT. B. 
St, Gt'orye. Utah. 
Mathematics. 



CHESTER GRAFF, B. 
Santa Clara. Utah. 

Sociology. 

Essays Contest 4. 

Orations 2, 3. 

Basketball 4. 



ORIN C. FULLER, B. S. 

Mesa. Arizona. 

Secondary Education. 

Transferred from State Teachers 

College. Arizona. 

Mates 4. 




,111111 



<l 45 ]y 



iillll 




FRED KELSEY. B. S. 

Sprinqoille. Utah. 

Physics. 



RICHARD H. THORNE. B. 
Sprinqoille, Utah. 
Physical Education. 

Yellmaster 2. 

Football 1. 2, 3. -i. 

Football Captain 3 

Prcs. Tausig. 

Block Y. Club. 

Alpha Delta 2, 3. 



RALPH J. CHRISTENSEN. 

B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Physics. 



DON C. CORBETT. A. 

ProL'o, Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Football I, 2, 3. 4. 

Captain Football 4. 

Wrestling 2, 3. 4. 

Track 3. 4. 

Nuggets. 

Thcta Alpha Phi 4. 

Block Y. Club. 



MARILLA GRAHAM. A. 

PrOL'o. Utah. 

English. 

Y. News Staff J. 

Dcca Sema Fc. 



MARGARET E. JOHNSON, 

A. B. 

Nampa, Idaho, 

English. 
Deca Sema Fe. 



OWEN W. JOHNSON. A. B. 

Provo, Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 



MARGARET HANSEN. A. B. 

Provo. Utah. 

English. 
Valnorn 4. 



WARREN L. BEARDALL. B. 
Sprint/ville. Utah. 
Accounting and Business 
Administration. 



DONALD EAVIS. B. S. 
Spanish Fork. 
Sociology. 
- Spanish Fork Club. 



ETHEL L. HANDLEY. A. B. 

Manli. Utah. 

Dramatic Art. 

D.-bating 1, 2. 3, 4. 

Vice Prcs. Class 3. 

Vice Pres. Student Body 4. 

Drama League 3. 

Theta Alpha Phi. 

Tau Kappa Alpha. 

Beni Trovota. 



BOYD C. DAVIS. B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Horticulture. 

Ag. Club 2. 3. 4. 



^ /[46]/ 



DAVID F. HART, B. S. 


RULON C. JEPPESEN 


Rigbi). Idaho. 


Moore. Idaho. 


Political Science. 


Physics. 


Tnlmadge Essay 2. 




Sophomore Pres. 




Student Body Pres. 4 




Nuggets. 





A, B. 



HELEN CARROLL, A. B 


PHIL 


M. ANDERSON 


Prouo. Utah. 




Elsinore. Utah. 


Dramatic Art. 




Commerce. 


Th.na Alpha PhL 




Oratorio 3. 


Pres. Bcni Trovota 4. 




Glee Club 3. 4. 


Class Sec. and Treas. 3. 




Pres. Sevier Club 


Competitive Play 2, 3. 







B. S. 



NAOlVll BROADBENT. B. 


S 


BERNE P. BROADBENI 


Hehec. Utah. 




B. S. 


Dramatic Art. 




Prouo. Utah. 


Sec. Mask Club 3. 




Horticulture. 


Thcta Alpha Phi. 




Stock Judging Team 2. 


Gamma Phi Omicron. 




Ag. Club Pres. 4. 


Sec. of Class 2. 







MARY GRAHAM. A. B. 


FRED 


J. RICHAN. 


St. GeorQe. Utah. 




Provo, Utah. 


English. 




Botany. 


Debating 3, 4. 




Swimming 3, 4 


Tau Kappa Alpha 3, 4. 






Block Y. Club 3. 4. 







B. S. 



LENORE JOHNSON. A. 


B. 


REED R. PORTER. B. S. 


Provo. Utah. 




Provo. Utah. 


English. 




Finance and Banking. 


Y News Staff 2. 3. 




Alpha Kappa Psi, 


Banyan 4. 




Sana Souci. 

Class Debating 1, 2. 

Track 1-4. 

Tennis 3, 4. 

Basketball 3, 4. 

Y News Staff 2-4. 


W. RADCLIFFE ALLRED. 


VERL VAN WAGENEN. B. S 


B. S. 




ProL'o, Utah. 


ProL'o. Utah. 




Finance and Banking. 


History and Economics. 




Band 1. 2, 3. 4. 




47 ]* 



nil: 




ANTHONY I, EYRING. B. S. JOHN BUCKWALTER, B. S. 



Pima. Arizona. 

Economics. 

Prcs. Arizona Club 3. 



American Fork. Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Aipha Kappa Psi. 

Commerce Club. 

Alpine Club. 



OWEN F. BURGENER. A. 

Mqton, Utah. 

Music. 

Band 1. 2. 3. 4. 

Band Manager 4. 

Glee Club 3. 



NORMA JARMAN. B. S. 

Pleasant Grove. Utah. 

Clothing and Textiles. 

Opera 1 . 

Las Camarades. 



RAY B. CHRISTIANSON. 

B. S. 

Sp.wish Fork, Utah. 

Horticulture. 

Ag. Club 2. 3. 4. 

Art Service 2. 



ZADA MAE BUSHNELL. 

B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Music. 

Opera 1. 



GLEN S. LEE. A. B. 

Panquitch. Utah. 

History. 



DOROTHY HARMON, B. S. 

ProL'o. Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Cesta Ties. 



WILLIS ROBINSON. B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Zoology. 



MARIAN AAGREN. B. S 

Lewisville, Idaho. 

History and Political Science. 

Transferred from Ricks Colleg? 



ALTON R. LARSEN. 

ProL'o, Utah 

Political Science. 

Glee Club 3, 4. 

Mates. 



B. S. 



ROY S. McDANIEL. A. B. 

La Jara, Colorado. 
Educational Administration. 



>fi/iiS!&::iLj^:A mm 



= r[48]. 



HEBER DENNISON. B. S. 

Manti. Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Male Glee Club 3. 4. 

Commerce Club 3. 4. 

Band 3, 4. 



PAUL B. PEARSON. B. S 

Oakleu. Utah. 

Animal Husbandry. 

Tr.insfcrrcd from U. ot U. 



ALBERTA P, SCORUP. A. B. 
Proco. Utah. 
Clothing and Textiles. 
D bating 3. 
Y. News 3. 
Ccsta'ties 4. 
Banyan Staff 4. 



B. S. 



RALPH A. TRACKER 
Daniel. Utah. 
Mechanic Arts and Drafting 



MARVA CRAWFORD, B. S. 

Enterprise. Utah. 

Foods and Nutrition. 

Y. D. D. 

Home Ec. Club. 

Dixie Club. 



LAVON YOUNG. B. S. 

Blandinq. Utah. 

Mathematics. 

Circulation Manager of Y. 

News. 



NINA M. MILLER. B, S. 

Manti, Utah. 

Clothing and Textiles. 

Cesta Tics 



G. LOWRY ANDERSON. 

B. S. 

Springville, Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Pres. Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Tausig. 



EMELINE SIRRINE. B. S- 

Dinqle. Idaho. 

English. 

Transferred from U- of U. 



RAYMOND T. BAILEY. 

B. S. 

Nephi. Utah. 

Secondary Education, 

Bus. Mgr. Studio Guild 4. 

Pres. Juab Club 2. 

Pres. Curiata. 



STANLY WILSON. B. 

Pauson. Utah. 

Physcial Education. 

Pres. Payson Club 3. 

Athletic Trainer 3. 

Student Manager 3. 

Graduate Manager 4. 



LYEAN I. JOHNSON. B, S. 

Pleasant Grace. 

Secondary Ed'jcalion. 

Class D.bating 4. 




f[ 49 ]f 




HOWARD D. ROBERTS, 

B. S. 

Provo, Utah. 

Animal Husbandry. 

Stock Judging 3. 4. 

Ag. Club. 



CLYDE I. FECHSER. A. B. 

Provo, Utah. 

Art. 

Pres. Studio Guild 4. 

Art Club 3, 4. 

French Club 1, 2. 3. 

Curiata. 



EUGENE F. PRATT. A. B. 

Arco. Idaho. 

German 

Jr. Prom Committee 3. 

Transferred from Idaho 

Technical Institute. 



PAMELLA LEWIS. B. S 

Spanish Fork. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Vice. Pros. Commerce Club. 



GORDON CRANDALL. B. 

SpcinqviUe. Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Class Debating 2. 

Commerce Club 2. 3, 4. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 4. 

Bus. Mgr. Banyan 4. 

Sans Souci. 



VERNAL L WORTHINGTON, 

B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Business Administration. 

Nuggets. 

Football 2, 3. 4. 

Block Y. Club. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



LOWELL BIDDULPH. A. 

Provo. Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Football 2. 

Basketball I, 2. 

Pres. Block Y. Club 4. 



MARION L- RUSSELL. 

A. B. 

Eureka. Utah. 

English. 

Y. News Staff 3. 

Xmas Story Contest 4. 



IVA PHILLIPS. B. S. 

Sprinqville. Utah. 

Foods and Home Administration. 

Gamma Phi. Omicron. 

Home Ec. Club. 



MELBA DASTRUP. 
Provo. Utah. 
Music. 



B. S. 



NOBLE A- KIMBALL. B. 

Kanosh. Utah. 

Economics. 

Class Debating I. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 4. 

Sans Souci 4. 



ARTIE U. MINER. A. 

FairViciC. Utah. 

Political Science. 

Class Debating 4. 

Sans Souci 4. 

Y. D. D. 



.[50]. 



A. LYNN MILLER. B. S. 

Murray. Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Adminislration. 

Track 1. 2, 3. 4. 

Football 2. 3, 4. 

Nuggets. 

Block Y. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



ELVA P. GEDDES. B. S. 

Preston. Idaho. 

English. 



LeGRANDE MANGELSON. 

B. S. 

Levan, Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Pres. Juab Club 4. 

Y. D. D. Club. 

Commerce Club. 



ELMER H. SMITH, B. S. 

Beaver, Utah. 

Physics and Mathematics. 

Beaver County Club. 



MYRTLE E. JENSEN. A. B. 

Huntsville. Utah. 

History. 

Valnorn. 



DONALD E. WENTZ. A. B. 
ProL'o, Utah. 

Zoology. 

Y. News 4. 

Jordan Club 4. 



EDYTHE THAYNE. A. B. 

Moore. Idaho. 

English. 



VICTOR R. TAYLOR. A. B. 

Provo. Utah. 

Political Science. 

Students* Manager Athletics 4. 

Nuggets. 



DELLA McBRIDE. B. S. 
Pima. Arizona. 

History. 
Arizona Club. 



PRESTON O. ROBINSON. 

B. S. 

Farming ton. Utah. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Class Debating 4. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Pres. of Sans Souci. 



HARRY W. ROWLANDS. 

A. B. 

Proco. Utah. 

Zoology. 

Tausig. 

French Club, 

Spanish Club. 

Boxing 1. 



NEWELL R. FREL B. 
Santa Clara. Utah. 
Political Science. 
Pres. Dixie Club 4. 




r[51]/ 




AFTON A. WALDON, B. S. 

Morgan. Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Male Glee Club 3, 4. 



STELLA HARRIS. A. B. 

Payson, Utah. 

Dramatic Art. 

Public Service Bureau 3. 

Theta Alpha Phi. 



MELVIN LEAVETT. B. 

Bunkerville. Nevada. 

Agronomy. 

Ag. Club. 

Track 4. 



LOLA M. ELLSWORTH. B. S 

Safford. Arizona. 

Clothing and Textiles. 

Prcs. Gamma Phi Omicron 4 



ROBERT C. BRAITHWAITE. 

B. S. 

Area. Idaho. 

Art. 

Band [. 2. 3. 4. 

Art Club Pres. 3. 4. 

Studio Guild 4. 

Curiata 4. 



ALBERT V. CORLESS. B. S. 

Paul. Idaho. 

Dramatic Art. 

San Souci. 

Football 3. 4. 

Competitive Play 2, 3. 

Mask Club Pres. 4. 

Idaho Club. 



ELLIS A. SANDERS. B. E. 

Nephi, Utah. 

Commerce. 



LUCILLE TUTTLE. A. b 

Manti. Utah. 

Dramatic Art. 

Vice Pres. of A. W. S. 4. 

Vice Pres. Inner Social Council 



JAMES M. HOLLAND. B. S. 

Rigby. Idaho. 

Educational Administration. 



MADGE PETERSON, B, 

Richfield. Utah. 

Physical Education. 

Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Senior Play 4. 

Comp?titivc Opera 2. 3. 

Theta Alpha Phi 3. 4. 

Beni Trovota. 



FERN JUDE. B. S. 

Oaden. Utah. 

Dramatic Art. 

Competitive Play 2. 3. 

Senior Play. 

Miry Wooley Dramatic 

Reading Contest 3 

Th-ta Alpha Phi 

Y. N:ws 4 

Cesta Ties 



MAURINE HINKLEY. I 

Oaden. Utah. 

Dramatic Art, 

Competitive Play 4 

Y. News Staff 4 

Cesta Ties 



'[52]/ 



CLARA FARNSWORTH, 

B. S. 

Cedar Citu. Utah. 

English. 

La Onaclca. 



GAIL JOHNSON. B. S. 

Aurora. Utah. 

Dramatic Art. 

Transferred from U. of U. 



VELAN D. CALL. A. B. 

Colonia Dublan. Chihuahua, 

Mexico. 

Agronomy. 

Track I. 2. 3, 4.. 

Block Y. Club. 

Pres. Mexico Club 4. 

Spanish Club 1 . 2. 



LOREN C. BRYNER. B. S. 

Helper. Utah. 

Chemistry. 

Casle Valley Club Pres. 3. 

Nuggets. 

Senior Play. 

Pres, Young Chemical Society 4. 



THELA BUCHANAN, B. S. 
Blackfoot. Idaho. 

Economics. 

Y. News Staff 4. 

Junior Prom Committee. 

Cesta Ties 

Idaho Club. 

Typists' Club. 



AFTON FINLINSON. B. 

Leaminqton, Utah. 

Foods and Nutrition. 

Gamma Phi Omicron 4. 

Millard Club Vice Pres. 1. 

Sec. and Treas, Deca Sema Fe 

Home Ec. Club 1. 2. 3. 



BLAINE O. LARSON. B. S. 

Provo. Utah. 

Political Science. 

Swimming 2. 

Chorus 2. 



IRWIN D. RASMUSSEN. 

B. S. 

Mt. Pleasant. Utah. 

Zoology. 

Y, D. D. Club. 

Biology Club. 



EDNA C. SHELLEY. B. 

American Fork. 

Foods and Nutrition. 

Gamma Phi Omicron. 

Home Ec. Club. 



JOSEPH T. BENTLEY. B. S. 

Colonia Juarez. Chihuahua. 

Mexico. 

Accounting and Business 

Administration. 

Track 1. 2, 3, 4. 

Band 2. 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Pres. Commerce Club 4. 

Banyan Staff 4. 



MARY L. BIRD. B. S. 

SprinQViUe. Utah. 

Clothing and Textiles. 

Gamma Phi Omicron 3. 4. 

Valnorn. 

Banyan Staff 4. 



VERNAL J. SIMPSON, 

Oqden. Utah. 

English. 

French Club 4. 

Latin Club 3. 



A B 




4 53]. 




THE STADIUM SITE 

Senior Class Project 

PERHAPS the greatest undertaking of the Brigham Young University at present is 
the stadium. The movement for the stadium had its beginning in 1923 and since 
that time the classes of 1923, 24, 26, 27, and 28 have made stadium construction their 
project. The class of '2 8 will probably be the last to make "Stadium" their project. 
This year the class is proud of the fact that they paid in a larger project sum than any 
previous class. 

Nature has been kind to the B. Y. U. in supplying such a wonderful site. The hill 
to the east of the field rises abruptly, making a most ideal natural place for the seats to 
be arranged in convenient tiers. It is safe to say that there is ample room on this hill 
to afford seating accommodations for from eight to ten thousand people. 

The work is progressing rapidly at present. The stadium is not a dream. The work 
has so far progressed that there is very good reason to hope that the field will be suf- 
ficiently completed and the first block of seats installed for use during the coming season, 
the fall of '28. 



4 54]r 




JUniDAS 



'[55]/ 




Rayiiion.l O. T-akcr 
Evan M. Croft 



Lucille W'ortlien 
Lucile Markham 



Clarence Jolin 
Don Z. Decker 



Lucille Olson 
Veda Portor 



Owen Snioot 
Merrill Christ ophcrson 



Vernon Merrill 
(iraytun Leavilt 



Edilh Bee 
Lima V'ance 



Clarence Skousen Caroline Eyring I\eed Starley 

Horace Whittle Ethylene Potter John \X. Fitzgerald 




.[56]< 




Cliar'es M. Berge Tennie Hulliroi^k Carr Gardner Teiia \'. Clegg Clifford Dangerfied 

Eldon Crowtiier Sanoma Young Henry D. Taylor Marie Yonkstetter Glen Peterson 



Evan J, Phillips Alice Snjder 

Wendell Candland Ora Thomas 



Lonis W. Christensen 
Reed L. lierret 



Lenore Rasmnpscn 
Lula McCI^ran 



Robert S. Corless 
Lyndon M. Cropper 




'[57], 




Harold Wright 
Jasper B. Smith 



Olive Harris 
Thola Miner 



Ira J. Markham 
Owen Cullimore 



Bee Parsons 
Nellie Hicken 



Glenn Dickson 
Oswarld L. Pearson 



ifa 



Lavaun Curtis Margaret Duthie Lynn Furlong Katherine Taylor Wallace Wallcntine 

Perle White Anna Smoot Merrill Stucki Erman D. Heindselman Thoral Larson 




lllllliillllllll 



r[58]r 



lllll|l||IH!ll 




Ross L. Jensen 
D. EMon Beck 



X'irginia Smith 
Helen Mendenhall 



Lewis Munk 
Elarl Garrett 



Helen Swenson 
Hilda Peterson 



Rulon Nelson 
Jean Poulson 



Verona Fielding Velda Hansen Helen McArthur Arlene Harris Anna Peay 

Alice Egbert Jewel Linebaugli Harold Candland Ora Anderson \'elma Otteson 




r[59]r 




Leiand Boswell 
Clyde Sumsion 



Mary Basinger 
Clara Williamson 



C^arn ^Vebb 
Glenn S. Potter 



Alberta JohnEon 
Dale Davis 



LeRoy Groberg 
lirown Ingersoll 



Tnnies Ivie 
III M. Uasinger 



Se'.ina Roberts 
Norma Cliristensen 



Ralph Simmons 
William McCoard 



Hazel Aagard 
Ze".d^ Hendersen 



Max Thomas 
Albert Datthge 




juiiiiiiiriniMuuin'iiiiMi 



ifiiMiffi 



r[ 60 ]f 



llllllUiUIUlU 



.ilAIMUIUmilll 



mmi 




Ilriice (^ilclirisl 
I'hares Nieisoii 



N'ertla n;iclielnr 
Virginia I'ackard 



Virginia Smith 
Marie Kindrd 



Kvelyn Brown Tolin AIK'n 

Marie Tervort Lelami G. Larsu 



Charles Wall 
liob Allen 



Laiirina Clayson Ila Miner Edith Aldrith Ciare Christen&en 

Mary Lee riorence Robinson Loree N'anWagcnei W. Crismon Lewii 




4 61]' 




Cliarles Merckley 
Sophomore 
Don Cluff 
Sophomore 
Marion W. Hall 
Freshman 
Alma Neilsoii 

Freshman 
Creed Kindred 

Freshman 

Horace Reid 

Freshman 



Glen Boyer 

Sophomore 

Norma Thurber 

Sophomore 

day Hannah Reyno 

Freshman 

Irene Clayton 

Freshman 

Athelia Moffitt 

Special 

Vearl Plarel 

Freshiran 



James Jacob Dorothy Powels 



Sophomore 

Vlma W, King 

Sophomore 

Ids Carl Lassen 

Freshman 

Boyd Rasmussen 

Freshman 

Paul Holt 

Freshman 

Warren Richardson 

Freshman 



Sophomore 
Nekla Tanner 

Sophomore 
Eldonna Cox 

Sophomore 
Josinette Cook 

Freshman 

Kva Anderson 

Freshman 

May Terry 

Freshman 



Diirgis Larsen 

Sophomore 

Grant Hastings 

Sophomore 

Reed W. Crystal 

Special 

Dale Anderson 

Freshman 
N'erland Nelson 

Freshman 
Alton Balle 
Freshman 



Celia RonnK\ 

Sophomore 

Ruth Olsen 

Freshman 

Mima Rasband 

FresJiman 
Helen Gamette 

Sophomore 
\*renna Bailey 

Special 

Helen Brown 

Freshinan 



Kll.crt Anderson 

Sophomore 

Delece Andelin 

Freshman 

Charles R. McKell 

Freshman 
James C. Aagard 

Freshinan 

Ronald \\'. Purcell 

Special 

Shirley Baker 

Freshman 



,[62], 




Rctroiinccii by Courtesy of Artist Darid Xcwcll 

and Tin- Century Company. 



SOTHOdOAeS 



y[6i]f 





@ficia 



Ru5-"el Magleby 
Rose Ilammund 

Helen Prior 

Hope Bingham 

Florence Jones 

a \'on Christcnsen 



Eva Hortin 

An then V. Haynie 

Bernice Holt 

Ruby Thurbur 

Newell W. Bown 

Thelma Gardner 



May Baird Pearl l_^ahle Lydia Hansen 

Blanche Xelfon Mildred Allred \V. Tha'.man Hasler 

Perry McArthur Jcx Hoyafk Reta Gines 

Anthony I. Bent!ey Donald Fortheringliam Leah Broadbent 

Inez Gibson Nellie Oaks W. G. Jackson 

Florence Miller \'erona Thorn Eunice Bird 



Barney Pou^all 

Zina Murdock 

\'erna Rappleye 

\'irgie Beelar 

Winnafred Heaton 

I-Cfinneth Haslani 



r[64]r 




Max Gilchrist 

Elizabeth Romney 

Sylvia Harris 

Lera Penson 

Oral Beckstead 

Fred Moore 



Louise Spafford 
Mark Johnson 
Aline Manson 

Dorothy Decker 
Rulon Boyson 
Emily Jeffery 



Bessie Iverson 

Allie Dixon 

Rulon Tueller 

Grant Gardner 

Helen Romney 

Melba Allen 



Dezzie Farmer 
Rilda Bingham 
Lewis Sorenson 
Dean E. Terry 
Mary E. Dahl 
Vera Showalter 



Ruth Hanson 
J. Irel Hart 
Helen Weeks 

Geneve Shoell 
Ray Magleby 

Nathella Tolboe 



Lloyd Bryner 
Ora Gledhill 

Era Anderson 
Gladys King 
Ruth Scorup 

Fred A. Lewis 








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M 



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Osborne Ilenrie 

Eva Kmids^n 

Riitli Musey 

Jenta Prince 

Bessie Ilatton 

Claude Eggertseu 



Ethel Robinson 

Ralph VV. Morgan 

Jane Farmer 

\'irginia Whittaker 

Grant Thurgood 

Nita Wakefield 



Etha niake 

Ella Jorgenson 

\''ernon Dusenbery 

II. \'ern Hardy 

Alene George Olive 

Gloria Mangum 



loii-^ Dudley 

Mildred ?orensen 

Dean Durrant 

^''ernon S. Moore 

Lorna Call 

Alice Harton 



Tone Dudley 

(ieorge Cooper 

Ida Tanner 

Hannah Si-oficld 

Karl nunn;-l, 

Norma Wilson 



Merrill Bank=; 

Christine Hinckley 

La Rue Nei'sen 

Hillie Bean 
Mercedes Poulson 
Bert rand Harrison 




;^ 



r[ 66 ]y 




Milo Hendricks 
Tliella Mallary 
Esmnnt Jensen 
Guelda Johnson 
Bessie Collins 
[larokl J. Whiting 



Lonaine Cliipninn 

Grant Christopherson 

Evelyn Ostlund 

Emily Wright 

Donald Men ill 

Lenore Rich 



Genile Allred 
Lenore Kimball 
Lowell Johnson 
Lamar Whiting 
Alice r.rinton 
Erma Brasher 



The'nia Hassell 
Stella Singleton 

Jay Painter 
Frank Whiting 
Anna Hughes 
Katie liayniore 



Mildred Davis 

Lorimer Christ enson 

Blanche Thomas 

Delsa Talhurst 

Huish Moore 

Nora Ford 



George L. Syme 
Naoma Seamount 
Fern Hansen 
Kathleen Bencli 
Arde'.la Ludlow 
Milo Moody 



v: 





I 



Wendell Jacob 

Verilc Dixon 

Clifford Knudsen 

Lawrence Leak 

John Snell 
Wesley Porter 



George Madsen 
Naomi Startup 
Caralyn Scorup 
Thelma Bown 
Lucretia Ashby 
Gerald Lee 



Frances Swan 
Gladys Sorenson 

Wm. S. Lewis 

Alton Kartchner 

Marie Bills 

Mark Gardner 



Una Peterson 
Barnice Barton 
Roy Gibbons 
Tom Nuttall 
Ve Bohman 
Cyrel Whittle 



Dale Pearson 

Edna Ball 

Elene Clegg 

Ruth Coleman 

Hazel Nuttal 

Ralph Sylvester 



Loran E. Skousen 
Mark Jenkins 
E. Blackham 
Merrill Hone 
E. H. Devy 
Basil Skousen 



iiiiliiii 



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CR?*. 




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rACSHcicri 



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LaVel Jackson 


Christi Eldridge 


Iris Roljinson 


Eldon Jensen 


Fred Cliristensen 


Mildred Dickson 


Marjorie Sparks 


LaVell Parsons 


Isaac Dunford 


Anna Petersen 


Eva Stice 


Eldon llrlnley 


Laurence Olpin 

1. ' . 


Eleanor Jones 



Lynn Broadbent Margretta Farrer Clayton Sorenson Wanda Pettie 

Jnne Smith Agnes Skinner Faun Bunnell 

Noel Bown Lydia Hood 

Jennie Brimhall MignonMichealson 

C. H. Mitchell Eugenia \"audrey 

Myrtle Nordfars Myrtle Iverson 

Miles Haslam Elia Brockbank 



Ralph Olpin 
Greydon Robinson Jesse Farley 
Royce Knight Bertha Vogel Louis D. Perkins 

Nita C. Carbine Wayne McConkie Aleen Wheeler 
De\'on Stewart Morell Wakefield La Von Orem 
Synthia Larsen Griffith Kimball Eilene Chipman 
Wm. Evan Josephine Sanford Lorin Millet 



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y[70]< 



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Mervin Petersen Helen D. Clarke 
Wanda Bushnell Gerald Anderson 



Stanley Bailey 
Anna Fitzgerald 

James Jensen 

Lola Strong 

Harry Plummer 



Irnia Johnson 
Ralph Cook 
LaRue Snow 
Rulon Winget 
Viola Ilolladay 



Joseph Allen Ada Jensen P.arr W'asliburn Maurine Allen Glen \incent 

X'eloy Terry Josephine Berry Fern W'ittwer James Anderson Ada Green 

Wallace Boswell Julia Faux Dix M, Jones Sadie Rogers Orville Stanfield 

Mercy Nelson Leah Neiison Daisy Rappleye Claude Snow Marie Childs 

Hailey Bird Ruby Bartholomew Ross Grayham Evelyn Nelson Joseph C. Goff 

Wilma Sorenson Dean Terry Ruth Stephenson Clifford G. Price Virginia Booth 

Morris Rasmussen Naomi Ellison Lyndon Dickson Elaine Thompson Orman Weight 










r[71]. 



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Lawrence Bodily Christine Johnson Camille Olson Orville Larscn AnReline Lovell Maxine Davis Dan Christensen 



i 



Mayme Laird 
A. C. Hull 

Mary Monson 
Darwin Elktt 
Linda Rnndall 



Wilma Bearson 
Blanche Jones 

Evelyn Bryner 
La Rue Goold 
Lena Bishop 



H. Vernon Wentz Ella Farnswortli 



George R. Wilks Anna Ostlund Lloyd Hayes Vivian Leavett Ruby Brasher 

Maurine Clifford Donald Corless Dorothy Dugmore Euphamia Hunter Owen Skousen 

Van Rowley Ada Showalter Bert Lewis Myrtle Peterson Thora Pickett 

Melba Blackburn Ara O. Call Tennie Knudsen Lorene Randall Lazelle Jones 

Francis Chesley Josephine McKee Parker Fillmore Clara Clement Erma Petersen 

Jewel Willardsen Booth Cook Zella Perry Genevieve Morgan R. J. Dycbes 




M^ 



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.[72). 




Walter Jensen Lola Strong Audrey Jackson Clarence Wilson Fern Clayton 

Alta Braithwaite Edith Bartholomew Lawrence Jackson Ilozena Nelson Harvey Ford 

Reed Phillips M. Huntington Maurine Wclkcr Wilson McConkie Katie Ludlow 

Atha Baiim Evelyn Curtis Reed Weight Wilma Boyle Arthur H. Lee 

Clarence Taylor Zella Stewart Maurine Christensen Harold Holdaway Belle Harris 

Cleone Olsen Mary Dix Roy Oaks Delia Robertson Ralph Harmer 

Earle Larson Verna Burnham Ruth Olson Warren Richardson Zendo Wentz 



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f[73]f 



Aleen Aladsen Ralph A. Ericksen 

Bcrnice Jensen Margaret Broadbent 

Mariam Wing Athclla O. Richins 



Ethel Tregeagle 

Aileen Steadman 

Fern Birch 

Flora Robertson 



AUie Jt-nsen 

Jess Farr 

Marjorie Reeves 

Boyd W. Madsen 




IS .:ii:C^<&QS^ '':-'^r-'^iM'<Jet-y .'--'■-:■ 




Owen J. Moon 

Margaret Clegg 

Willis R. Dunkley 

Helen Mangelson 

Harry Douglass 

Norell Startup 

Karl Baliff 



Jetta Wine 'ar 

Donald Colley 

Kdith Rich 

Mark Patterson 

Anna M. Spottcn 

Ilenry Slewart 

Elaine Paxman 



Grant Buttle 
Clara Anderson 
RoUo M. Rich 
Maxine Clayton 
R. E. Gardner 
Dorothy Jones 
Farrell Collett 



Arthur Zahriskie 

Delia Burch 

Grace Hassell 

Agnes Kill|>ack 

Elouise Myrnp 

Eleanor Kelly 

R. G. Clark 



Earl Kobincnn 

Ethel Cropper 

Lee Spencer 

Olive Betteridge 

Alma Kartchner 

Ruth Smart 
Austin Heywood 



Edna Reynolds 
Lioyd Williams 
Erma Harris 
Ray Hansen 
Joy Aagard 
Bradford Jensen 
Helen Hales 



Bryce Wadley 

Almira Burra ton 

La \'ern Greene 

Nola Ford 
Delbert Groberb 
Ethel Buchanan 
Sterling Evans 




'[74]< 




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men scH 



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y[75]y 




Kent Johnson 

President 



Rose Liechty 

Vice-President 



Mary Holbrook 

Secy, and Treas. 



Robert Bushman 
Dramatic Mgr. 



High School 



THE inauguration of new events and activities has been the cause of the growth experienced in the 
High School this year, '27-'28. 

Among the new features of the High School this year was the organization of the new Pep Clubs. 
Sweaters were obtained by all members and these clubs greatly increased the enthusiasm for athletics in 
the High School. Regular student body assemblies were also added and were sponsored mostly by student 
talent. 

Social activities increased greatly during this year and many unique parties resulted. Among them 
were the Annual Junior Promenade, a Rags and Tatters Ball, the Senior Hop, and regular High School 
dances. 

The Prom proved to be the main event of the year socially. College Prom decorations were used and 
as a special feature of the evening, a Spanish Dance Act was given. 

At the Rags and Tatters Party old clothes were in order and cider and doughnuts aided greatly in 
keeping up the spirit of the evening. A "Rippin" good time was had by all. 

The Hop given by the class of '28 was also one of the most unusual events of the year. Easter features 
and decorations were part of the evening's entertainment. 

An annual High School Day was instituted this year. The High School was host to the Institution 
and sponsored all activities of the day. This is to become an annual event. 

One of the features in which the college has co-operated with the High School is the allotment of a 
book within the Banyan and space in the "Y" News for High School activities. 

The Dramatic Art, Forensic and Athletic Departments have all been enlarged upon this year. 

The Annual Competitive Play, "His Best Investment," and several one-act plays have been success- 
fully staged by the Dramatic Art Department. Debating, which was inaugurated last year had a success- 
ful growth this season. 




RAGS AND TATTER PARTY 





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uyL '^/leneseen th 

•Iff' ,. Jl picture oi i 
,iiJlntd like some . 


7omcs back through tears '^ 
fnour are sureeier somehour^ 
rough, ihe t^Lass oi i^ears ~ 
old, like a rainbour of gold, 
youth portraits ~ 
suteel so ay lue are drifted alony^ 
'M of our yesierdai/s.'^ 

ANCIS LAKt • 




WSSKK^^^^P^ 


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f[ 82 ]f 



Cougar Tracks 



Glcndoiicr — / ciin ciill spinfi from tlic itis/y deep. 

Hotspur — Wby so can /, or si> can any man, but will Ihcy conic tchcn you do call 
for thcni ? — Shakespeare. 

IF you would be a Glendower, follow the trail of the massive cougar across the field 
of 1927-2 8. Each print of the powerful paw has stamped indelibly an outstanding 
achievement, an adventure, a lasting friendship. 

Like the trick of memory, the tracks may wander, and should the journey become 
wearisome, find your favorite dream and rest. 




IN THE LIBRARY 



r[83]/ 




FROSH RULE BREAKERS AND COURT SCENE 
f[ 84]/ 




THE AUTUMN LEAF HIKE ON TIMPANOGOS 



TRACKS 

Pacing foot prints indicate a restless cougar, impatient to be off and because they 
occur at the first of the school year, it is safe to conclude that they represent Autumn 
registration. Aimless wandering from building to building, up and down hill, soon set- 
tles into definite, well-trodden paths which echo with steady footsteps and chorused 
greetings. You are reminded perhaps of the excellent field for the inventive genius to 
make such contributions as the one way road, a rapid method of locomotion, a new salu- 
tation to break the monotony of the "hello" that fairly hail upon the weary pedestrian, 
but somehow, they need no change now. 

The echo dies. A sudden stillness steals over the field, ghastly after the merry 
march of the college company. Is the mascot losing pep? Just to ourself we whisper 
the dreadful question and sigh with relief and expand with pride when a weathered paper 
reminds us that the first issue of the semi-weekly appeared at this time. To read the 




RALLYS AND THE GAME BY WIRE 



r[ 86 ]r 



TRACKS 

publication, comment on it, and rejoice over such an accomplishment are sufficient rea- 
sons for a brief delay. 

In it we re-read the Frosh formula for correct conduct and sense again the feeling 
of concern or excitement that the announcement brought. Police forces soon began 
extended sessions and many erring infants were led by the Sophomores before the Senior 
Judge where predicted and unheard of punishments were meted out unselfishly. Truly 
innocence proved painful bliss. 

"Spank, spankety, spank, spank!" From the forlorn Frosh we dance on to the same 
accompaniment, but no longer in a minor key, down a path made merry by melody. The 
haunting spirit reminds us of the return of the Cougar Quartet, the Spanish Senor and 
Senora, and Andy's favorable rating in the state radio contest. 





:Jj^H 



•JSSI 






FOOTBALL AND HEROES 



487]/ 





FOUNDERS' DAY PARADE 
*•[ 88 ]/ 




FOUNDERS' DAY PARADE 
y[ 89 ]r 



TRACKS 

However, we couldn't appreciate all this until after the Get Acquainted Social. 
Line up again here and review "Who's Who and Why." It is a trifle crowded and you 
may not remember all the najjes but you'll catch again the spirit of the "Y" good- 
fellowship — and you'll belong — no longer a stranger on the outside. 

Now the field becomes a net-work of luring lanes and by-paths. 

"The flood of time is setting on 
We stand upon its brink." 

A few guideposts will aid in a wise selection if time is seriously limited. 

Should one follow the paths to the Jamborees, remembering will be flavored with 
"ghosts" of doughnuts and cider, lollypops and apples. The apple still seems to have the 
traditional power when held by a woman for the San Souci left the cider and succumbed 




BANYAN PROGRA.M 



r[ 90 ]r 



TRACKS 

to the apple. Really they shouldn't be blamed for everyone or his or her representative 
was there from Santa Claus to baby Sue in characteristic costumes. 

If you are content, remain until you have reviewed the entire scene, but I must 
point out other paths for those whose interests lead elsewhere. 

Thousands of fascinating memories are aroused when one retraces the steps of the 
Autumn Leaf Hiker. The gorgeous splendor of fall colors, the thrill of attainment as 
one reaches the top, the comradeship that one found on the way blend into thoughts of 
other trips, adventure, romance. 

Wherever your fancy leads you, in time you come back to this tradition-trodden 
path — the anniversary celebration of our Alma Mater. It is a day of history and 
prophecy in which former achievements are reviewed and admired and future pos- 




INITIATIONS AND COMMERCE BARN DANCE 



/[91]. 




FOOTBALL RALLYS 
fl92]Y 



TRACKS 

picture-taking demonstration. Parallel to it is the path which guides to the "Y" News 
program which partly revealed the numerous talents of our editor. 

Step carefully for a smoldering fire kindled by "friendly enemies" is hidden here 
which rash remarks might irritate and cause us all to be buried like Pompeii of old. You 
may speak a little louder because Glen's wild-west hat quite covers his ears and Star's 
saxophone makes him sound proof. I can't tell the age of the disturbance. It hasn't 
ended and therefore probably never began, but we are staying too long in this one spot. 

We'll have to forgive these swaggering prints for they indicate a real victory over 
Western States College, 60 — 7. True, we didn't win all the ball games, but we were 
unexcelled in pep and enthusiasm. 

Remember the rallies? This path takes us to them. They're certainly worth more 
than a passing thought and you'll want to find your favorite and linger there thinking 




OUR GANG AND THH GANG 



'[95], 




THE JUNIOR-SENIOR APACHE PARTY 




The Cross Country Run— Won by ■'Tony" Bentlcy— Time. 22:47; Charles Merkeley. 23:57. Sophomores Eat the Turkey 



TRACKS 

about your mustache singed in the torch light parade. Quite a calamity to befall the 
object of weeks of devotion, but that little blond gave you her vanity case to carry and 
forgot to ask for its return, so after all it was a great occasion. 

You must show a Sophomore card if you have a slice of this turkey that Tony's 
cross country run won for his class. If you cannot qualify for the eating, you can join 
in the praise for the victor. 

Looks as though Sophs are running things about here for following Thanksgiving 
victory is the Loan Fund Ball, remembered for the successful achievement of a worth- 
while ideal, a tradition of the class and an evening of unforgetable pleasure. 

The conviction that the Second Year class was alone in the school is dispelled by a 
visit to this section which rivals Ireland in color. Discarded green caps effectively tell 
of the emancipation of the infants. Frosh Day was all that the name implies. To them 




THE CHRISTMAS ART CARNIVAL BALL 



»-[ 98 ]/ 



TRACKS 

was given the management of the day's issue of the "Y" News, the student-body pro- 
gram and dance, all of which they capably conducted. However, they over stepped the 
limits of their freedom and assumed too much, even the costume of the upper classmen. 
As a result. President Bruce sacrificed his trousers "below cost" at an auction sale. After 
a few similar sales, the trial and error method succeeded admirably and corduroy re- 
mained the undisputed privilege of the Juniors and Seniors. 

In spite of the merriment here is a fossil tear in this quarter's end shale which must 
mean another burst of rapture, perhaps your own over an unearned "A." We hope that 
the keeper of the books will not hold it against you at the Judgment Day. 

Clubs and classes must be temporarily forsaken since Social Units demand attention. 
This guide will direct you to your own and what a reunion you will have — troubles and 
joys of organization, constitutions, programs, parties — something for everyone. 




BANYAN MATINEE DANCE AND CANDY SHOWER 



/[ 99 ]f 




THE FROSH PRESIDENT WEARS CORDS TO COUNCIL MEETING 

/[ 100 ]/ 




WILD LIFE AT THE GIRLS' JAMBOREE 



/[ 101 ]/ 



TRACKS 

But clubs will not be submerged for long and here commerce students entertain at 
a barn dance. That's the hayrack now, bound for the country social. Aprons and over- 
alls are suitable costumes, but don't dance too hard, because the Christmas carnival and 
candy shower is near by. There the Banyan gave the sales prizes, announced the celeb- 
rities and gave everyone candy — just a suggestion of the holiday joys to follow. 

If you are a senior and haven't eaten too many sweets, come to the class party and 
enjoy again the popcorn and candy, program and Christmas tree, even if it does mark 
a victory for the boys who proved themselves champion salesmen and won the party at 
the girls' expense. 

Your own devise for recording your Christmas holiday will have to assist you here 
since the cougar tracks are silent and the field is barren. 




ARTISTS OF WINTER 



y[ 102 ]f 



TRACKS 

When the tracks start again, rice along the way reminds us that Mrs. Ken and Mrs. 
Dick appeared at this point in the cougar's journey. 

Leadership, although not entirely as students had planned (we didn't get a holiday) 
was according to professors and visitors, highly successful. The results of unexpected 
exams administered by substitutes while instructors attended classes, are not such cheer- 
ful memories. Of course we don't remember tests. I just discovered my red-pencded 
blue-book that had in some manner escaped the fiery furnace. 

Look! That's the ghost of the lost carnival that hovers over this forlorn spot. 
Didn't know the event meant so much. His mournful demeanor makes all visitors 
regretful. 

The faint wail of steel guitars drives the sad spectre back to his icy mound and lures 
us to enchanted ground. Its never-failing charm quite transforms you. Your eyes 




U. OF U. STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT VIEWS Y. CAMPUS LIFE 



r[ 103 ]/ 




N^jsass^ii 



THE GLEE CLUB TOURS 
f[ 104 ]/ 




SOUTH WITH THFi Gl EE CLUB 
r[ 105 ]f 



TRACKS 

sparkle as you, in fancy, adjust the perfect tie or inspect the immaculate shirt front; 
arrange the exquisite corsage bouquet or smooth the wrinkleless frock. Marvelous 
arrangement of color, bewitching perfume, gay laughter mingle in memory as the Junior 
Prom. 

Again you are more successful than Hotspur at conjuring up departed spirits for 
in this very cougar track Stan's white-robed, girlish figure beckons one to the Pep Vodie, 
a motley array of clever, well-planned and presented entertainments. So keen was the 
competition that a tie for first place resulted. Memory readily leaps on to the Junior 
Vodie, a traditional event originally worked out. 

"Milestones," the competitive play, was an event valuable alike to participants and 
listeners. Drama fans will probably wish to bask in "Yellow Sands" and enjoy again 
the State Play Contest. 




AFTER THE GAME 



rf 106 ]/ 



TRACKS 

while you rest, Tony dashes past, setting the pace in another cross country run. 
Victories seem to be a habit with him. 

We marvel that the cougar walked so sedately when he welcomed our national 
champ. The recollection of it still causes a thrill of pride. A half-holiday, parade, 
program, matinee dance, banquet, were included in Bud's welcome home celebration 
which rain didn't upset since the day's hero was entirely at home in water. 

And while we are reviewing accomplishments, it is an appropriate time to listen 
again to Tarn-Man Nacup, written by a member of our own teaching staff, William F. 
Hanson, and to recall the national essay contest and loving cup won by Caroline Eyring. 
Surely the memory of association with those who have achieved is priceless. 

It is cruel to scatter contented thoughts by such a commotion, but right in the 
middle of the election campaign, "Some Girl" appeared and about upset the normal 




f[ 107 ]r 




COLLEGIATE? 
/f 108 ]/ 




TRAINING SCHOOL ACTIVIIIHS 
*■[ 109 ]y 



TRACKS 

campus life. The cougar certainly was side-tracked, however the student body recov- 
ered in time to elect the best man and set the mascot back in line. 

About this time, days not only were numbered, but also designated by distmguished 
titles. On Girls' Day, boys had an opportunity to see whether or not their popularity 
was mirrored reflection of their own opinion, for women asked and men acquiesced. 
Program, banquet, dance and an all girls' play are interesting reminiscences. If you 
members of the sterner sex were not duly recognized at this time, perhaps you had your 
chance on Honor Day. 

'Tis not the traditional Honor Day that we find recorded, but a reunion of all 
former as well as present honor students. The participants came, literally, from the 
four corners of the earth, could the proverbial saying brave the test of science. 




ON FOREIGN LANDS AND THE HIGH SEAS 



*■[ 110 ]f 



TRACKS 

And then the day of days for the cap and gown possessor — Senior Day, breakfast, 
program and Senior Ball together with all the pomp and exercises accompanying a gradu- 
ating class — happy memories for you who left and inspiration for you who remain. 

Wander where you will upon the field, you will find something of interest. Art 
courses, musical entertainments, matinee and regular student body dances, special recitals, 
contests, track meets, class programs and parties — all have combined to make the year 
worthwhile. With these few illustrations your imagination and memory will revive 
the entire scene and you may live again the happy college days, for 

'" thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. 



Awake but one, and lo, what myriads arise! 
Each stamps its image as the other flies!" 




TO LIVE AND LEARN— THE WORLDS OUR CAMPUS 
Parker. Sculptor. Visits the "Y" 



.[ Ill ]/ 




ART CLASSES AT THE ALPINE SUMMER SCHOOL 
i[ 112]/ 




ru&acnTiora 



4 113 1/ 





C. Irwin "Star' 

Editor 



Nelson 



Max Taylor 

Business Manager 



««"\.r55 



Y" News 



IN line with the general progressive program which has been carried out by our worthy President Harris, 
the "Y" News began this year with the inauguration of a semi-weekly. 
Further consolidating the organs in and pertaining to the institution, the editor, C. Erwin Nelson, 
and the general alumni secretary, A. Rex Johnson, came to an agreement whereby the entire fourth page 
of each Tuesday issue of the school paper should be devoted entirely to alumni news. Also, it was agreed 
that the Alumni secretary should be permitted as much editorial space in the same issue as he desired. 

Thus, the circulation of the "Y" News was increased by one thousand copies weekly, and the Alumni 
were furnished with a more complete and intimate insight into student activity and progress. 

A conservative editorial policy has been followed throughout the year, although the editor has stood 
firmly for his convictions, for the students, and for any progressive move or moves for improvement. 

The "Y" News has reached a total circulation of 2,431 copies, including the student campus circu- 
lation, the advertising list, the Alumni list, the exchange list, and the independent subscribers. 

This year the activities of this student body have been read of in the official news organ in Australia, 
New Zealand, Mexico, Germany, France, England, Switzerland, Austria, Canada, South Africa, Hawaiian 
Islands, Society Islands, Samoan Islands, Brazil, Argentina, more than half of the states of the Union, all 
of the counties of Utah but six, and into one-fourth of the homes of Provo city. 

The wide circulation is greatly accredited to the missionaries sent out from the school, practically all 
of which received the paper. 

The paper has been published with dispatch, has paid for itself, and has built up a friendly attitude 
toward it in the school. 



Newell Bown 

Circulation 



Wendell Candland 

Circulation 



W, Clarence John 
Advertising Manager 



T. Delice Andelin 
Assistant Manager 



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= f[ 114 ]/ 




"Y" NEWS STAFF 



Hubert Ailen 

T. Anthony Bentley 

Me!ha Iflackburn 

Wilfurd Olson 

E. Genevive Morgan 

Eleanor Kelly 



Xita Wakefield 
Selena Roberts 
\'ernon Wentz 
Leonora Kimball 
Wesley Porter 
Lewis Munk 



Ucrtrand Harrison 

Ted Hansen 

Fern Judge 

James Jacobs 

Josinette Cook 

Rae Rust 



Lawrence Lee 

Agnes Killpack 

Harold Candiand 

Lucille Markham 

Lyndon ^L Cropper 

Garn Webb 



Catherine Eyring 

Roy Gibbons 

Thela Buchanan 

Reed Porter 

Arlene Harris 

Bernice Barton 



Lowell Johnson 
Louise Swensou 

Don Wentz 

Maurine Hinckley 

Anna Smoot 

Glenn Dickson 



llllllllllll 

.[115]/ 



l = lllllll!lllllll> 





Glenn S. Potter 
Editor 



Gordon Crandall 
Business Manager 



The Banyan 



"T IVE and let live" well illustrates the aim of the 1927-28 Banyan staff. Enjoy to 
■■--' the fullest extent the best of life that is within one's reach and then, when has 
taken and given freely, record it in a bound volume, that it too, may live and be a glad 
reminder of the glorious past. 

The year has displayed problems to be solved. Limited finance with which to 
achieve an expensive goal has necessitated careful planning. We regret that our ideal has 
had to be trimmed to fit a painfully narrow budget, as a result many desired elements 
were omitted but more things of greater value remain. 

In featuring student activity, it is with the belief that in this manner', every stu- 
dent's interest will be served. Less of the conventional contents of an annual are offered, 
with an enlarged campus section and a bigger and better Bunyan as special features. The 
artists, with a wild-life motif, have attempted to draw us out of our miniature world 
into closer sympathy with nature and her children. 

Our one aim has been, that through unbounded time, this school j-ear will live as 
recorded in 1927-28 Banyan and give to those who finger its pages, life again in B. Y. U. 
In this thought, as a group of fellow students who have watched with interest growth 
and expansion and preserved the best of the year's activity as we have seen it, we rejoice 
and trust that the result of our effort will meet with your approval. If this is so, we 
regret nothing — the days of work, nights of concern, hurry and bustle to fill the space 
in the alloted time will be happy reminiscences. 



IIIK 



iliilliililiilllllllii 



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THE BANYAN 


STAFF 




Crismon Lewis 


Mary Lee 


SiNA BRIMHALL 


Reed Starley 


Photographer 


Arrangement 


High School 


Pictures 


Mary Bird 


Alice Egbert 


Le Nore Johnson 


Dorothy Decker 


Seniors 


Artist 


Calendar 


Typist 


Farrell Collett 


WiLMA Boyle 


Alberta Scorup 


Stanley Hardy 


Artisl 


Typist 


Clubs 


Circulation Mgr. 


Evan M. Croft 


Alta Braithwaite 


Ralph Simmons 


Joseph Bentley 


sislant Circulation Mgr. 


Typist 


Sports 


Advertising Mgr. 



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y[ 117 ]y 



Thanks 



To further show our gratitude to those who have been of great help to the Banyan this year, we wish 
to introduce to the reader some men, several of whom are not in any way connected with our school, 
who have been willing to aid with this publication. "The world is our campus," will be readily under- 
stood when one sees what we have gathered from all over the United States. 

Mr. Walter J. Wilwerding, a famous animal artist of Minneapolis, Minn., has sent us an illustration of 
a Bull Moose, which is used as the divisional sheet for the Senior section. Through the aid of The Federal 
Schools, Inc., of Minneapolis, and the courtesy of Mr. Wilwerding, we have a wonderful color picture of 
a cougar to use as frontispiece. Mr. Wilwerding knows animals, because of a life-long study of them in 
their native haunts. From fourteen years of age until twenty, he was an apprentice in a taxidermy, where 
he learned animal anatomy, invaluable in his later work as a painter of animls. As he gained knowledge 
of animals and their ways, he decided to paint them instead of hunting them as he had been doing for 
scientific collections. He has illustrated many magazines and has painted many cover designs. He is at 
present on the faculty of the Federal Schools, Inc. 

Seeing some of Benson B. Moore's work advertised we wrote him and by way of a reply we received 
a wonderful dry-point etching of a cougar which is used opposite the dedication page. Mr. Moore is an 
artist and etcher of Washington, D. C, and is famed for his etchings of animals. He is a student of the 
Corcoran School of Art, and is a member of numerous art organizations. He was awarded first prize by 
the Mississippi Art Association at the Mississippi State Fairs of 1925-1926 for his etchings. His work has 
been exhibited in many art exhibits, among them the International Exhibition of Etchings at Florence, 
Italy, in 1927. 

David Newell, of Fruitland Park, Florida, artist and author, is the very type that fits in well with 
our art theme. He sent a pen drawing of a bear which is used as Sophomore divisional sheet. Mr. Newell 
is a real out of door man and writes as well as he draws. His book "Cougars and Cowboys" would be of 
interest to anyone who loves stories of the real out-of-doors. Through the courtesy of The Century Pub- 
lishing Company, the illustration and a copy of the book was sent to the Banyan editor. Mr. Newell is 
well known in the writing field for his stories and illustrations. 

In a response to an appeal for aid, Kay Russen, artist, of Salt Lake City, made two special illustrations 
for the book. One is an illustration of a deer used as divisional sheet for the Junior Class and the other 
is a drawing for the dedication page for the Bunyon. Mr. Russon's suggestions and ideas have been very 
helpful throughout the year. 

The Banyan would be incomplete without the aid of our old friend George K. Lewis, otherwise known 
as Georkee. Having the interests of the book at heart, he has aided in every way possible, even though 
he is not in school this year. His illustration of a wildcat is used as a divisional sheet for the High School. 

A write-up on Professor Eastmond, who contributed a decorative wild life study and many invalu- 
able suggestions, will be found elsewhere in the book. 

Our photographers, Walter P. Cottam, Homer Wakefield, and Crismon Lewis deserve special men- 
tion for their invaluable help. 

In our last minute rush we have, Glenn Dickson, De Alton Partridge, Bob Allen to thank for their 
efforts in completing sections needed. Glenn has burned much midnight oil to help complete the Bunyon, 
while De Alton has helped throughout different parts of the book. Bob completed the debating and "Y" 
News writeups. 

With special thanks to the business manager, Gordon Crandall, Clarence John, the Banyan staff and 
all others, we present this book for your consideration. 



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118 




oe&mt^G 



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A. C. Lambert 

Chairman of Debating Council 



Robert K. Allen 

Debating Manager 



Wm. J. Snow 

Member of Debating Council 



Debating 



SIXTEEN debating awards were made to successful students in their forensic endeavors 
during the season of 1927-28, for participation in nine debates. 

An innovation in debating annals took place near the close of the season in the form 
of a radio debate between the Brigham Young University and the University of Southern 
California. 

William B. Henley and Stanley R. Hopper of the California school met Donald P. 
Lloyd and Don B. Cluff in a regularly scheduled debate on Thursday night, April 5, on 
the question: Resolved: that the results of the recent great World War have tended 
toward world peace, and at the conclusion of the debate it was decided that Brigham 
Young would meet them again the following Saturday on the question: Resolved, that 
the United States should cease to protect by armed force, capital invested in foreign 
countries except after formal declaration of war, on which question the visitors were 
better prepared. 

Through the cooperation of Earl J. Glade of KSL, and H. R. Merrill of the local 
institution, an hour was obtained, and a very successful encounter was staged over the 
ether, for the first time in the history of the Brigham Young university, and the second 
time in the history of the State. 

A compliment should be here extended to Don B. Cluff and Glenn Dickson who 
were the Young University speakers in the radio debate. They prepared their speeches 
after ten o'clock the day of the debate. This was made necessary due to a misunderstand- 
ing as to the side of the question, and the undesirability on the part of the other "Y" 
debaters to change sides. They were complimented from a good many sources on their 
fine performance, despite the haste of preparation. 

The financial condition of the department was seriously impaired by the cut from 
the deficits of last year, but, generally speaking the season was as successful as it has 
usually been. 

Upwards of thirty men and fifteen girls tried out during the course of the year, 
and much new material was uncovered, and according to the debating council, a very 
promising outlook has been developed for next year. 

Two contract debates have been arranged in Southern California for next year, with 
a possibility of two more. This assures one good trip next year, as has been the policy of 
the department. 

The debaters this year traveled into Montana and Idaho, but finances curtailed the 
extensiveness of the campaign. 



Ill 



III 



y[ 120 ]/ 




Caroline Eyring Agnes Skinner Helen Romney Catherine Eyring 

Linda Randall Mary Graham Ethel Lowry Handley 



Girls' Debating 



"DRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY placed second in the state debating this year, 
-'-' by virtue of a victory at Logan, and an adverse decision on the local platform in 
competition with The University of Utah, January 27. 

Considering the fact that there were but three letter debaters in competition this 
year, the showing is to be complimented. 

The debaters who made the trip to Logan were: Ethel Lowry Handley, captain; 
Helen Romney, and Catherine Eyring, and they were accompanied by Elmer Miller, of 
the Debating council, and chauffeured by the manager of the department. Very hos- 
pitable treatment was reported, which will be referred to again in the Banyan. 

The local debaters on the triangle question; Resolved, that the modern system of 
installment buying should be condemned, were: Mary Graham, captain, Caroline Eyring, 
and Agnes Skinner. 

Utah was awarded the decision in this encounter, but the showing was said to be 
creditable. Agnes Skinner, a freshman, and Caroline Eyring, a junior, had not before 
represented the school in competition. 

The only interstate debate during the season was between the University of 
Wyoming and Brigham Young, on the question: Resolved, that too many people go to 
college. Young University upheld the affirmative, and were represented by Caroline 
Eyring and Lynda Randall. 

The debate was a no-decision affair, presided over by Dr. Christen Jensen of the 
political science department of the local institution. 

The visitors reported a very pleasurable impression of the school and of the city and 
surroundings. 

Perhaps the most unusual feature of the debating season was the awarding of a 
twelve-inch silver trophy to Ethel Lowry Handley for four years of participation in 
inter-collegiate debating. Ethel is the only student, male or female, to ever accomplish 
the feat of debating four years, and the council wishes to compliment her. 



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f[ 121]. 




Don B. Cluff 



Glenn Dickson 



Elroy Nelson 



Triangles 



THE men's triangle debates opened the season for 192 8 on February 3, the same night 
as the "Y" Junior prom, which probably accounted for the very poor turnout to the 
debate held on our own campus. 

The Young debaters were unable to place in the competition, and it might be said 
that the triangles was the worst showing made during the entire season. 

Don B. Cluff, captain, and Ellsworth ^X'^eaver, a new man from Weber College, 
traveled to Salt Lake to debate the negative of the question: Resolved, that the United 
States should cease to protect by armed force, American capital invested in foreign 
countries, except after formal declaration of war. 

The White and Blue was represented in Provo by Glenn Dickson, captain, and Elroy 
Nelson. The local debate was presided over by Judge A. B. Morgan, and Theron S. 
Parmelee of the University of Utah acted as critic judge. 

Elroy had been working on the junior prom, inasmuch as he was president of the 
class, and, according to the council, he did unusually well despite his divided interest. 

The Salt Lake debate was attended similarly to the local one, according to the debaters 
who traveled there. 

MONTANA TRIP 

The question: Resolved, that the United States should cease to protect by armed 
force, American capital invested in foreign countries, except after formal declaration 
of war, was chosen to be used on the Montana symposium. 

The team selected to make the trip consisted of Elroy Nelson, captain, and DeAlton 
Partridge, with Dr. William J. Snow of the debating council to accompany them. 

The team was accorded a unanimous decision over the State College of Montana at 
Bozeman, in a well-attended and interesting debate. 

A contract debate was scheduled with the University of Idaho at Moscow, but they 
refused to honor their contract, and so, severed relations with this school. 



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'f 122]' 




Lowell Johnson 



Harold Candland 



Don Lloyd 



E. De Alton Partridge. 



Men's Debating 



' I *HE University of Southern California and the Brigham Young University engaged 
-*■ in a debate on the question: "Resolved, that the results of the great world war have 
tended toward world peace," on Thursday, April 5, 1928. 

Brigham Young University was represented by Don B. Cluff, captain, and Donald 
P. Lloyd, who was engaging in his first intercollegiate debate. 

City Judge, George S. Bailiff, former student body president of the institution acted 
as chairman. 

No decision was rendered, but the arguments were said to have clashed in a com- 
mendable manner. 

The Californian's, William B. Henley and Stanley R. Hopper, expressed appre- 
ciation for the hospitality shown them. Mr. Henley is U. S. C. student body president, 
and Mr. Hopper was once national oratory champion. 

These same men agreed to the arrangement told of in the general write-up, namely, 
the radio debate, which idea they approved of heartily. 

This debate, as stated was on the "Investments" question, and although the only 
decision was rendered by the listeners at large, the splendid caliber of the California men 
was recognized by their victory. 

Concluding the season, the Brigham Young University met Southwestern, a new 
law school of note located in Los Angeles, in a no-decision debate on the question: 
"Resolved, that in the United States we are sending too many people to college." 

The local school was represented by Harold Candland, captain, and Lowell Johnson, 
and the debate was held in College Hall, Monday night, April 23, 1928. 

The debate was the best attended of the entire season, and was an unusually fine 
exhibition of the forensic arts according to critical witnesses. 

Special mention should be made in this space of the faithful work put in on the 
various questions by the alternates on the men's debating squads. 

They were: Bert Lewis and Vernon Wentz, in the triangle debates; Delbcrt Gro- 
berg, with the team which met U. S. C; and Rollo Rich, with the team which met 
Southwestern University. 

These men were not given any opportunity to participate, but their support was felt 
from behind. 

For their creditable investigation of the subjects they were each awarded one hour 
of college credit as were the men who participated. 



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Contests and Medal Winners 

/""XNE of the most interesting phases of student life in the Brigham Young University and one that 
^~^ offers development which can be gained in no other place are the various contests for awards and 
medals offered by different organizations and individuals interested in the development of special phases 
of student activity. 

Other than the three medals awarded each year for oratory, there is the Noble Medal for the most 
efficient Home Economics student. This award is given each year to the girl who best qualifies as a stu- 
dent of home making in the B. Y. U. Each year the Chamber of Commerce awards a medal to the most 
efficient student in the institution. President Heber J. Grant awards a prize each year for the best essay 
on some religious subject. 

The oratorical contests have always been a major activity at the Brigham Young University, much 
Interest has been shown in the contests held during the past year, manv students have participated and 
although it is not arranged so everyone can win, yet there still remains for those who lose more than the 
medal itself, the effort and experience that accompanies writing, memorizing and presenting an oration 
before an audience. 

The first contest staged during the year is that for the Rotary Club medal for the best ten minute 
oration on Peace. This is a worthy subject and one in which much work can and needs to be done. This 
year there were six contestants tried out in the preliminaries which were held before the Public Speaking 
Class of Professor Pardee. Two men were selected to present their orations before the student body. They 
were Lyndon Dickson and Oswald Pearson. The finals were held during the Fine Art Department pro- 
gram and the judges awarded the decision to Mr. Pearson for his oration, "Peace on Earth, Good Will to 
Men." Professor Pardoe represented the Rotary Club and presented the medal at the time. 

The next speaking contest to demand the attention of orators was the R. R. Irvine medal for the best 
economics speech given. Seven participants fixed their eyes on this award and presented their products 
before the public speaking class. The class were at a variance as to the best two to be presented to the 
student body and it was finally decided that three speeches would be given. All three contestants for this 
award showed marked ability in the originality of their orations. Mr. Edward Sibbetts, Mr. Ira Markham 
and Mr. DeAlton Partridge displayed their speaking ability before the student body and judges and the 
latter saw fit to award the medal to Mr. Partridge; his oration was "The Economics of Time." 

The Heber C. Jex medal for the best oration on any theme is one with much tradition in the B. Y. U. 
It is one of the oldest contests and hence is one of the most coveted of all awards. Eight contestants vied 
for honor and Lazelle Jones and Miss Lacetia Ashby were selected to present their compositions in the 
finals. The subjects were "John Milton, Statesman" and "The Fine Art of Loving." 

The Mary Wooley medal for the best dramatic reading was a most interesting contest this year. 
Several major students of Dramatic Art gave their readings and the audience selected Miss Fern Jude as 
the winner. 

Miss Edna Shelley was selected this year as the best student in Home Economics in school. Miss 
Shelley has an enviable record in this department of school activity and was selected by the faculty for the 
Noble medal. 

The Heber J. Grant Essay Contest was conducted by the Theology classes of the school and after 
deliberating extensively and reading all entrants, the committee decided that Miss Caroline Eyring, of 
Pima, Arizona, had prepared the best paper on a religious subject. The subject chosen was "How to get a 
testimony of the truth of the Book of A'lormon." 

Among the most enticing medals given during the year is that of the Pardoe Wind Instrument Con- 
test. This contest furnishes a high type of entertainment and stimulus for music lovers of the school. 
Of the several contestants entering this year, Mr. Francis Haycock was selected as the winner and was 
awarded this medal. 

The special awards hold the interest and anticipation of all the active students. It is this phase of 
college that pays most for its effort, the medal winners of the school are its best possibilities. 



/[ 124 ]/ 




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r[ 125 ]< 





Florence J. Madsen 

Head of Music Departmi'nt 



Le Grande Anderson 

Student Manager of Music 



Music 



THE value of music in the life of an individual is receiving universal recognition, increasing with the 
growing appreciation of its true worth. No longer is the field open only to professionals or those 
whose talents enable them to become skilful performers, but also to individuals who wish to become edu- 
cated listeners. Thus the enlarged field includes everyone. 

Young University attempts to serve the two groups, the performer and the listener, with well- 
equipped music department, excellent classes and efficient instructors. The department is divided into 
three divisions — the theoretical, instrumental and vocal. 

Theory of music, like grammar, is often slighted, although it is fundamental. It underlies all phases 
of music and is necessary to extensive study, but because it does not easily lend itself to public demon- 
stration, this phase is slighted and its relative importance unrecognized. 

Exceptional work is done in the theory classes that merits favorable comment and praise is due to the 
instructors whose progress receives no public notice. 

The vocal department — including individual and group instruction has contributed extensively to the 
entertainment of the student body and patrons. Musical numbers furnished by choruses and soloists have 
added to the worth-while nature of devotional exercises and entertainments of various types. Chorus, 
glee clubs, quartets, trios, all have done praiseworthy work. 

Private instruction offered by the division grows rapidly in popularity. Through the co-operation 
of the various teachers, public recitals have been given, each of high merit — excellent opportunity for the 
development of the individual, as well as entertainment for the audience. The relative frequency of the 
appearances has illustrated the rapid progress of the students and the success of the department. 

The exceptional work of the instrumental department has been evident in the daily performances of 
its students. To this division was given the responsibility of furnishing march music for the devotional 
exercises — a task which both band and orchestra handled admirably. Good material, careful organization 
and skilful leadership insured their success. 

Willing and enthusiastic support was given to all student body activities and especially in rallies and 
ball games was the band a moving force. 

A special feature of the year's work was the organization bass and string quartets, trios, duets, etc., 
that aided in numerous public functions and became strikingly popular as is evident in the great demand 
for their performance. 



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y\ 126 ]y 




Orchestra 



THIS year's Orchcslr.i h.is ihc bcsl siring choir in ils history. This nukes it possible to interpret tlie classic composers in 
their greatest compositions. 'I'he smaller chamber music organizations are largely responsible for this unusual growth. 
There is a keen interest manifest in every part. The best players do not hesitate to play second violin, because they 
realize that this part, when done well is just as necessary and effective as any other. 

The next problem is to add more of the proper wood wind instruments. This is the most difficult stction to perfect in 
any orchestra. However, we are fortunate in having four professional performers in this department. The brass and per- 
cussion sections are equal to those of any school conservatory orchestra. 

Some outstanding program numbers for this year have been; Poet and Peasant Overture by Suppe. Overture Symphonic 
by Mr. Robertson. Ballet Suite by Gluck-Mottl. Surprise Symphony by Haydn. The Evolution of Dixie, by Lake, and the 
Orchestration for Mr. Hanson's Opera, Tam-Man Nacup. Besides these the orchestra and chamber music organizations have 
played numerous shorter numbers. 



The Band 



THIi band, built upon the cornerstones of service, unselfishness and love of art, has been scjuarely behind the iootball and 
Basketball teams and all student-body activities. It has been anxious to help, in every possible way to make this year a 
single success by being ready at the spare of the moment to give to the school whatever it desired. 

The band has attained unusual perfection for a College Band and has met with great success in .several concerts given in 
Provo, American Fork, Spanish Fork, Coalville and broadcasting over the Radio in Salt Lake City, These entertainments 
were of high standards, presenting to the people the best in classical, characteristic and popular music. 

At the annual Spring Tour through the southern part of the state, concerts and dances were given in Payson, Nephi, 
Fountain Green, Ephraim, Gunnison, Richfield, Monroe and Panguitch, 

Several talented members of the organization took part in the Wind Instrument Contest for the Pardoc Gold Medal, in 
which Francis Haycock, the wizard on the cornet, was the winner. 




-'<i»iBn ' muMnAiiii I 



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y[127]y 



r"*.JSM MMflHifl^B^M 















^ ■' 



The Ladies' Glee Club 



THE work of the Ladies' Glee Club this year has undoubtedly excelled in every respect the glee clubs of previous 
years. The club has had a definite aim in view, to break away from the old conventional concert style and 
usher in the operatic costume style with action; which has set a standard for succeeding years. 
Under the very professional direction of Professor Florence J. Madsen the Ladies' Glee Club work attained a 
perfection of artistic quality entirely in accordance with her exceptional ability and training. Two major concerts 
have been given in which the girls appeared before large audiences well trained and beautifully arrayed in costume. 
The pagination of each song was carefully and artistically arranged by Professor E. H. Eastmond. head of the Art 
Department. The officers were: Miss Gladys Sorensen. Manager of the Club and Pianist; Rhoda Johnson, Assistant 
Manager; Leah Broadbent, Secretary; Bee Parsons, Art Director. 



The Male Glee Club 



A 



S we look back over the year's activities, we marvel at a few of the organizations in the institution. Among 
the foremost in individual and collected activity is the B. Y. U. Male chorus. 

This club has accomplished more in the year than any previous group in the school and perhaps in the 



In five weeks' time a complete repertoire was memorized in the first quarter and a tour taken before the quarter 
was more than half over. 

Throughout the year under the able directorship of Professor Franklin Madsen and Managership of Lee Larsen, 
the club has given concerts that have thrilled large audiences, throughout the county and adjoining communities. The 
climax came with the brilliant tour to southern Utah towns and Nevada. This tour was supplemented by several 
concerts and programs in Provo and in student body and stake functions. 

The organization has been assisted and accompanied in all its activities by the "Y Cougar Quartet." 

Mr. Madsen as director is to be congratulated upon the splendid work the boys have done under his leadership. 




IHIIIII 



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f[ 128 ]y 




Lawrence Lee 



Edgel Blackham 



Bliss Finlayson 



LeGrande Anderson 



The Cougar Quartet 



Two years ago four members of the 1927 Banyan staff organized what was called the "Banyan Quartet." and 
entertained throughout the year. 

Beginning the year 1927-28. they began singing for the "Y" again after a successful summer together 
in the parks of Southern Utah. Up to this time the quartet had been composed of Lawrence Lee. first tenor. Julius 
V. Madscn. second tenor. Bliss Finlayson. baritone, and LeGrande Anderson, second bass. Madsen discontinued 
school during Christmas holidays and Edgel Blackham became the second tenor of what, then, became the "Cougar 
Quartet." This group has sung in many places in Utah. Idaho and Nevada, and have broadcasted over KSL on 
variotis occasions. Only one of the boys is graduating this year so we expect to hear more of them in the future. 



''Tarn-Man Nacup" 



Alto- 



INDIAN OPERA 
Cast 

Tam-man. Young Indian Maid. (Soprano) Rhoda Johnson 

Tava-mou-i-scie. (The Sun Comes.) Her Lover (Tenor) J. W. McAllister 

Medicine Man, Her Father. Spiritual Leader of the tribe. (Basso) LeGrande Anderson 

Cutchi, (Spring Blizzards, no good.) A visiting Shoshone. (Baritone) Bliss Finlayson 

Friends of Cutchi — Lone Eagle Elmer Timothy 

Pompey , Lavell Jackson 

Squano Ira Markham 

-Rhoda Burmingham, Geniel Allrcd, Alice Carter, Leah Skouscn. Grace Hassel, Delsa Jacobs. Lucile Worthen, 
Marie Youkstetter. 
Soprano — Meta Richie. Lera Benson. Melba Dastrup. Tillie Jones. Veda Porter. Eugina Vawdrey. Maud Foote, 
Tenors — Perry McArthur, Anton Gleason. Vernon Dusenberry, J. Theodore Arbon, Ira Markham, Elmer Timothy, 

Charles Merkley. 
Bassos — James Ivie, James Peterson, Reed Phillips, Alma Hanson, Lyndon Dixon. Lavell Jackson. 
Pawappicts — Catherine Pardee, Glenna Cottam, Helen Rae Hanson. 

Orchestra 

Violins — LeRoy J. Robertson, Concert Master: Verda Batchellor. Florence Priday, Lenore Crookston, Wanda Petty, 

Marlin Newbold. Russell Wclker. Louis Christensen. 
Violas — Willis Loveless. Wesley Porter. Wesley Pearce. Bassoon — Robert Sauer. 
Ce//os — Joy Batchellor. Vera Busch. //orns — Gerrit de Jong, Preston. Creer. 

Bass — Oman Weight. t~ ,, ^, , r, , 

n, , r:i_ T- M \ \iT -a J 11 trumpets — Max 1 homas. Jay Keeler. 

Hutes — hlmer b. Nelson. Warren Beardall. '^ ^ n i 

Clarinets — Floyd Fletcher. Clayton Sorenson. Trombones — Gerald Anderson and Charles Parker. 

Oboe — Sheriff Henrie. Walter Peterson. Drums and Tympani — Roy Fugal, James Anderson. 

Another chapter was written in the history of the "Y's" brilliant musical achievement in the spring of 1928 
when "Tam-Man Nacup," (Spring Comes) written, both words and music, by Professor William F, Hanson, of the 
music department, was selected and presented as the annual competitive opera for the year. It was produced for the 
first time in the Paramount Theatre, afternoon and evening, of Thursday, May 3, to two of the largest audiences 
ever gathered in Provo to see a B. Y. U, musical production. 

"Tam-Man Nacup" is based entirely upon the Ute ceremonial known as the Bear Dance, a spring festival with 
which, through years of intimate associations with the Indians. Professor Hanson is entirely familiar. The Ute 
songs, civilized a bit, but retaining their weird charm were used throughout the production, as were the Ute dances 
and traditions. Long and careful research among the Utes on the part of the author made the presentation of his- 
torical interest as well as an artistic triumph. 

The songs and choruses of "Tam-Man Nacup" were unusually and weirdly beautiful and effective. All of the 
principals as well as the chorus so lived the ceremonial that the audience was immediately transported to the very 
hearts of the Ute Indians where they beheld their simple faith, heard their simple superstitions, and enjoyed their 
meaningful dances. 



IMIIIIIIII 

*■[ 129 ]/ 



lllllilli 




SCENES FROM TAM-MAN NACUP INDIAN OPERA 
f[ 130 ]/ 




oaiMM 



<[ 131 ]< 





The Dramatic 
Season 

THE dramatic season was one of 
a conventional nature, though 
the All-Boys Show and the Junior 
Vodie offered departures from the 
older standards. The general aim of 
the department was attained in that 
some two hundred collegians partici- 
pated before University audiences. 

The third annual one-act play con- 
test brought to us some of the greatest 
one-act plays ever written and all of 
unusual merit in their presentation. 
Drama and comedy will alternate, 
hereafter, and drama will be the 
theme for the year 1929. Fourteen plays were given and money prizes, a cup and four medals were awarded to the 
winning contestants. Ephraim, Richfield, Eureka and Weber were the successful finalists. 

The Paramount Theatre co-operated with the Dramatic Art Department and initiated a Children's Theatre 
movement, which will be an annual winter effort. This season two matinees were given, with a plan for four shows 
next winter. 

A precedent has been established with this year, in that Girl's Day will be followed by an All-Girl's Show. 
Beauty featured this year's show. 

The department enjoyed the staging of Professor Hanson's Opera "Tarn-Man Nacup." 

Twenty-five one-act plays were presented for the various Wards of the County to aid them in the entertain- 
ment and finance problems. 

The little theatre was crowded each Wednesday with interested auditors for the varied program of enacted 
plays. 

The year of 1927-192 8 has been the outstanding season since Professor Pardoe came to the University nine 
years ago. 



T. Earl Pardoe 

Head of Dramatic Department 



Kenneth Handley 

Student Manager of Dramatics 




MAKING-UP 



'[132]/ 



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''Milestones" 



THE competitive play this year was Milestones, a costume play by Arnold Bennett 
and Edward Knoblauch. It deals with three different generations; 1860, 1885, 
and the last in 1912. It is based on the misunderstanding that exists between old age 
and youth in practically every generation. 

Mrs. Rhead was startled at what seemed to her the extreme daring of her daughter 
Gertrude, and the first act takes up the events in the lives of Gertrude, her lover Sam, 
her brother John and his sweetheart and Sam's sister Rose Sibley. 

The next act takes up John and Rose and their problem with their daughter Emily, 
and her desire to marry the man she loves and not the one her parents think would be the 
best for her. However, in spite of the pleadings of Gertrude, who spoiled her life, Emily 
allows herself to be ruled by her parents and the last act shows her sorrow and yet how 
she tries to bring about the same sorrow for her daughter Muriel. Muriel, however, is of 
a- generation which demands its own way — but rather than destroy what happiness her 
mother has will give up her own. The play ends with the older generation seeing the 
rights of the younger and allowing them to make their own lives. 

The cast of the play was well chosen. 



Mrs. Rhead Rcfa Gives 

John Rhead ]ean Paulson 

Gertrude Rhead Eunice Bird 

Samuel Sibley Harold Nchon 

Ned Pyne Edgel Blackham 

Rose Sibley.-, Jewel Linebaugh 

Webster Orin Fuller 

Arthur Preece Elroy Nelson 



Emily Rhead -„ Ruth Clark 

Nancy Preece Ada Anderson 

Lord Monkhurst Harold Clark 

Muriel Pyne Maurine Hinckley 

Richard Sibley ....Frank Whiting 

Thompson Archie Wiltia ni s 

Terrance Ira Markham 



The three major characters, John Rhead, Gertrude Rhead, and Rose Sibley were very 
adequately sustained throughout and they did some of the best acting seen on College 
Hall stage. 




/[133]r 



mill 



I 




''The Haunted House" 

A THREE-ACT mystery play by Owen Davis, it is a satire on the modern form of mystery plays. 
It deals with the attempts of a psycho-analyst to solve by scientific methods a mysterious murder case. 
The climax is reached when Isabel Westly is arrested for her own murder. 

Victor Ashworth, as Desmond Duncon. a psycho-analytic author, did a good piece of acting, and Helen Carroll 
as his loving wife kept the audience amused during the entire performance. The bride and groom. Emily and Jack 
Drescoll. were played well by Ethel Lowrey Handlcy and Max Taylor. Ed. the milkman. "Star" Nelson, gave some 
excellent humor as did Don Cluff in the part of Morgan the hobo. The rest of the cast were: Mr. Evans. Glen 
Dickson; Isabel Carter. Helen Glazier; Thomas. Frank Whiting; Ezra. Perle White: and Dan Grogan, Roy Fugal. 



"The Patsy" 



THE PATSY, a three-act comedy by Barry Conners, is a revision and modernization of the old play of Cinderella. 
Patricia Harrington, played charmingly by Thelma West, is the Patsy who is blamed whenever anything goes 
wrong, and is forced to remain in the background in order that her sister Grace. Idella Sainsbury. might be 
presented to the best advantage and win the well-to-do Billy Caldwell. William McCoard. Pa Harrington. Jean 
Paulson, is on Patsy's side and finally puts Ma in her proper place. The part of Ma was taken by Ruth Clark and 
was one of the best characters in the play. This new authority of Pa's brings about Patsy's triumph in the winning 
of the young Prince Charming. Tony Anderson, played by Roy Gibbons. The other parts were: Sadie Buchanan, 
Mary Lee; Francis Patrick O'Fbhcrty, Harry Olsen ; and "Trip" Busty. James Jacobs. 



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I 




"John Ferguson" 



JOHN FERGUSON, an extremely effective play by John St. Irvine was presented by the Senior Class. The 
leading role was taken by Harold Clark with Mary Ostlund playing opposite him as Mrs. Ferguson. They 
carried the parts very effectively. "Star" Nelson and Madge Peterson played together, presenting both comedy 
and tragedy in their parts. Fern Jude played the part of Clutie. a half-wit beggar of the streets. Albert Corless 
played very well the part of the villian. Other characters in the play were Lorin Bryner. the postman: and Orin 
Fuller, the part of Andrew Ferguson. 

To just what extent a religious man can accredit all acts of man to Gods beneficent direction, motivates the 
play and gives John Ferguson ample opportunity for effective acting and gripping scenes. 



"'Yellow Sands" 



AFTER a tour of the southern part of the state with the play "Yellow Sands." the Theta Alpha Phi players 
presented it in College Hall. The play by Adelaide and Evan Philpotts is based on the happenings and people 
of the little English seaboard town of Yellow Sands just after the World War. Victor Ashworth. as Richard 
Varwell. an old drunken philosopher, did some excellent characterization. Jenifer Varwell. his well-to-do sister, was 
played by Florence Peterson. Mary Varwell, his sister-in-law, an old woman who was used to having her own way 
in the world was extremely well acted by Lucile Tuttlc. Helen Carroll and Harold Candland. as Emma Major and 
Arthur Varwell the lovers, kept the interest of the audience throughout. Albert Corless. took the part of Joe Varwell, 
a stalwart seaman laborer and anarchist, who finally inherited Aunt Jenifer's fortune which was sought by all the 
Varwell family. Albert did some excellent work in this part. The feminine disturbance in his life was Lydia Blake, 
taken by Jennie Holbrook. The twins, Minnie and Nellie Masters, played by Anna Peay and Madge Peterson were 
screams. Star Nelson did well as Thomas Major. Charles Berge took the part of Mr. Baslow, the lawyer. And lest 
we forget. Akoo-ko-ko taken by himself. 




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r[135]r 



"Some Girl" 



Alpha Kappa Psi All Boy Show 

TINKLING with witticisms, and surging with the pep of youth, the 1928 all boy's 
show "Some Girl" was staged in College Hall on April 25-26. The story hovers 
around the escapades of a female impersonator who ensnares an English fop, in a success- 
ful effort to recover stolen bonds. All the "girls" were of a high calibre, and the climax 
came when the dancing "girls," coached by Kathryn Stahmann decidedly won the hearts 
of the audience. The play was coached and staged by A. Rex Johnson, organizer and 
former president of The Alpha Kappa Psi organization. 

The members of Beta Delta Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, national professional com- 
merce fraternity, feel the need for added loan funds available to seniors, and by means 
of "Some Girl" began the Alpha Kappa Loan Fund, which is to be handled through 
regular institutional channels, and be available to Seniors in the College of Commerce. 

From the compromising situations incident to female impersonations by one man 
in the midst of a bevy of girls, to the artistic singing of the Cougar Quartette, the all- 
boy show for 1928 sets a new high level for "fun stuff." 

Social Unit No. 2 (Trovotas) were enthusiastic sponsors. 



The Cast: 



Mary Ann Clarence (Cli(g) Vacher 

Richard White Chas. M. (Shorty) Berge 

Mrs. White Ted Hansen 

Joseph Grabber ...\rw. F. (Bill) Edwards 
Sir Reginald Lightfood Prcs/o« Robinson 

Winnie White Henry (Heinz) Taylor 

Wally Warner Gordon Crandall 

Tom Letsgo John Allen 



Princess Van Valkenburg Mackeroff _ . 
Gam (Cobb) Webb 

McClosky Leland Boswell 

Cousins of Winnie's 

Pansy Summer .Robert E. (Bob) Curtis 

Rose Winter ....Boyd Rasmnssen 

Violet Frost Irving Rasband 

Lilly White Earl fones 

Daisy White Edgel Blackham 

Lilac Snow Reed Starley 



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r[ 136]/ 




inTniencs 



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OUR MASCOT 



Used by permission 



f[ 138 ]/ 




Coach "Chick" Hart 



Coach "Phil" Jackson 



Football 



' I "HE Brigham Young University football team scoring two decisive victories from 
-*- Western States Teachers and the Colorado Miners, one draw with the mighty 
California Aggies and four defeats from the Utah University, Colorado Aggies, Greeley 
Teachers and the Utah Aggies did some very commendable gridiron battling this season. 
Although they failed to capture the conference championship some very good football 
technique was displayed. 

The "Y" team was very fortunate to have Dick Thorne, the famous linesman, within 
their ranks. Among the other prominent linesmen, Don and George Corbett, Worth- 
ington, Alexander, Albert Corliss, Reeves and Henry Simmons — the captain for the 
'2 8 season — counted as very strong numbers. In the backfield Clarence and Basil 
Skousen, O. Rowe, Collins and Dixon proved to be a unit of strength not found in many 
varsity elevens. With the Skousen brothers' fighting tenacity and Owen Rowe's speed 
the opponents would usually find themselves in deep water. Some of this football stock 
will be in the ranks next year and with more experience added to their collection of 
football tactics the "Y" should make a very good showing. 

Charles Hart, the director of football and track at the "Y," has supervised these 
phases of the athletic system for the past three years with the aid of Roberts and has 
been very efficient. Hart was previously known as a stellar track man at the U. A. C, 
and has been a star in many events at the B. Y. U. He was appointed to his position at 
the "Y" after very efficiently managing athletics at the Teton High School, Driggs, 
Idaho, for two years. He has been retained as assistant to O. Romney, the chosen Mentor 
of "Y" athletics for next year. 

The football lines have also received much valuable assistance from Coach Phil 
Jackson who spent part-time to aid the technique of line activity. He previously was ail- 
American tackle of the Big Ten, three-year letter man, captain, and a favorite of his 
coach at Chicago where he previously attended school. 



f[ 139 ]/ 



ISKOUSEN 



MERRILL 

CENTER 



ROWE 




D.CORBETT (Q^FT) 

L 7 FICKLE 






DICKSON 

HBLF BfiCK 



MS ARTHUR 

FUUHflCK 




Capt. Caldwell 

COLORADO AGGIE GAME AT FORT COLLINS 

B. Y. U., — Colorado, 29 
^ I 'HE B. Y. U. eleven took the first trip of the season to Fort Collins where they battled with the mighty 
-*- Colorado Aggies. Although within striking distance of the goal several times the Youngsters were un- 
able to penetrate the Farmers' line for a score and the game ended unfortunately for the B. Y. U. with a 
score of 29 — 0. 

Twice during the game the Cougars were in the Farmers' barnyard with the goal at close quarters, but 
each time the Farmer boys proved too many for them. The Cougars fought hard through the game and 
once held the Farmer lads for four downs on the two yard line, but when the clamor of battle subsided the 
Aggies were found to be on top. 

CALIFORNIA AGGIE GAME AT DAVIS, CALIFORNIA 

B. Y. U., — Aggies, 

' I 'HE B. Y. U. gridiron eleven traveled to the sunny south to Davis where they encountered the 

•*■ California Aggies and battled to a scoreless finish. In a struggle which reduced itself largely to a 

battle between two evenly matched teams the clamor of gridiron clash waged on for four quarters without 

score. 

Throughout the struggle the Cougars were slightly favored. Many times they broke through the 
Mustang line and scrambled for a touchdown, but were grounded on the five yard line. At the close of 
the fourth quarter the blue boys were pending on the five yard line near the Farmers' goal and the time 
snatched away their victory. 
Capt. Robinson 




y[ 142 ]/ 







ppt- 



Capt. Gilchrist 

B. Y. U. vs. GREELEY TEACHERS AT PROVO 

B. Y. U., 7— Colorado, 21 
OURPRISING offensive and stone wall defense in emergencies placed the Colorado Teachers with a 21 — 7 
^~' victory over the "Y" Cougars in the first home game of the season. 

The B. Y. U. gridders made an auspicious start by scoring a touchdown less than a minute after the 
game had started, but the Teachers began their puzzling triple passing and forward passing which for a 
time completely capsized the Cougars routine of playing and spelled two touchdowns for the opponent 
eleven. The struggle waged on until late in the game when the Greeley field general outpunted the "Y" 
assortment and was mainly responsible for another touchdown. The inability to solve the Teachers' trick 
plays was the fundamental clot that proved fatal to the local eleven. 

UTAH AGGIE GAME AT LOGAN, UTAH 

B. Y. U., 0— Utah Aggies, 22 

THE "Y" gridders gallantly held the Utah Aggies to a 3 — score for the first half and apparently played 
their opponents on equal terms, but in the second half the Aggie backs broke through the Cougar's 
line for several long gains and run the score to 22 — 0. 

Throughout the game the "Y" was puzzled with the mystery of why the A. C. squad displayed such 
crushing offensive, but then the Covigars were quite dangerous at times themselves. Several times the 
Farmer lads were on their prayer bones at the ten yard line struggling to block the blue boys. A desperate 
punting was staged between Colvin of B. Y. and Warburton of the A. C, but the honors were about evenly 
divided. An attempted forward pass by the B. Y. was intercepted by an A. C. milkman and carried 97 
yards to a touchdown, which ended the contest at a score of 22 — 0. 

Capt. Lin ford 






v» 





mm^ 



y[ 143 ]y 




Capt. Howells 



THE UTAH GAME AT PROVO, UTAH 

B. Y. U., 0— Utah, 20 
IJLAYING dependable football and at times showing sparkling flashes of gridiron technique, the B. Y. U. 
■^ Cougars held the dynamic U. of U. Redskins to three touchdowns. Although the encounter was 
fatal to the score card the "Y" gridders counteracted an exceedingly powerful Utah forward which refused 
to be blocked and a speedy backfield which charged with a dynamic force behind a substantial protective 
interference. 

Several times the Redskins were forced to battle for dear life to ward off the advancing blue warriors 
as they broke through the line at close quarters and stampeded for the goal line. Outside of those few 
times, B. Y. U. chances for touchdowns were incessantly contaminated when the Redskins refused to flinch 
to the bullet-like terror of the "Y" Cougars and the game ended with a score 20 to 0. 



WESTERN STATES GAME AT PROVO 

B. Y. U., 60— Western States, 7 

THE "Y" Cougar eleven, with their crushing offense, and their stone wall defense, dethroned the W. S. 
C. gridders with a score of 60 — 7. After a late start, the "Y" eleven found themselves and completely 
upset their opponents. 

The brilliant line crushing, tackling, and guarding consistently, demoralized the U. S. C. football 
tactics and the Cougar eleven charged to victory. The blue boys surpassed their opponents throughout the 
game and were primed in every way to bring disaster to W. S. C. The "Y" passes, line plunging and 
systematized defensive bulwarks were so effective throughout the contest that the W. S. C. line was 
repeatedly shattered and the Cougar boys dashed across the gridiron to a decisive conquest. 



Capt. Whalley 



ra J5 




*■[ 144 ]*■ 




Captain Sofgren 



THE COLORADO MINES GAME AT PROVO, UTAH 

B. Y. U., 28 — Colorado Mines, 19 

AT the B. Y. U. field the Cougars ended the '27 football season with a tremendous outburst of super- 
power which carried them on an equal platform with the other teams of the conference. 
Throughout the game the "Y" Cougars outclassed their opponents; their fine gridiron tactics, the 
crashing "liners" and the speedy backfield utterly bewildered the Miners, broke up their line, hurled them 
to their prayer bones and finished with four touchdowns. The tactful line plunging of the Skousen 
brothers, the speed of Rowe and the fighting tenacity of Corliss was outstanding in this brilliant victory. 

MAJOR ATHLETIC STUDENTS 

Front Row — Wilson. D. Simmons. Larson. Biddulph. Dixon. Coach Roberts. T. Berrett. 
Buys. Thorne. Waldron, Purcell. 

Second Row — H. Simmons. Dickson. Merrill. D. Corbett. Wright. Colvin. Menlove. 
R. Berrett, Rowe. G. Corbett. 




ff 145 ]/ 



Frosh Football 



THE Frosh football season for this year viewed from the standpoint of victories was 
successful, and as a season for developing material for the prospective varsity squad 
it was of superior nature. Their first clash with Weber College ended in a score of — 0. 
However, in the next encounter with Snow College the Frosh played like veterans and 
plainly outclassed their southern opponents; they scaled the score card for two touch- 
downs which settled the conflict at 12 — 0. The following week they lashed the Spring- 
ville gridders and galloped through the mud knee deep for seven touchdowns which ended 
the struggle at 45 — 0. As a final test the Kittens were matched against the Ute Tribe to 
determine the state title, and when the atmosphere cleared and the clamor of battle sub- 
sided, it was found that the "Red" gridders were victors by virtue of one lone touchdown. 
Although the Kittens had equaled the Utah eleven throughout the contest the Papoose 
gridders won with a score of 6 — 0. 

Throughout the entire season the Greenlings flourished that type of gridiron enthu- 
siasm which placed them very near the top on the honor roll, and of which most varsity 
elevens would not have been ashamed. 

The clever field runs of Vacher along with the line plunging, tackling, blocking 
and passing of his skilful colleagues was a surprise to football fans. Hoover as tackle, 
R. Magleby, Ballif and Bullock in backfield, Balle as center, and Purcell, Brown, Barrett 
and Clark on the line proved to be a very systematic combination and responsible for 
much of their effective playing. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM 

Top Row — Coach Raile, Barrett, Pcrcell, Dychse. Kimball, Brinlcy, Passey, Hettig, Stevenson, Taylor, 
Coach Wilson. 

Middle Row — Fillmore, Candland. Lunsford, Balle, Jackson, Farr, Dastrup, Speckhart, Skousen, Jorgenson. 
From Row — R, Magelby. Hoover, Bullock, Vasher, Hull. Gee, Bown, Bailiff, McDowell, 




f\ 146 ]r 






Stan Wilson 

Graduate Athletic Manager 



Basketball 

ALTHOUGH unable to add the 
western division Rocky Mountain 
Conference championship flag to their 
conquests, the Cougar basketeers of this 
season did some of the most commend- 
able playing that the basketball fans in 
this particular section have ever wit- 
nessed upon the wax floor. Out of the 
twelve games played the blue and white 
"Y" boys demonstrated a distinct superi- 
ority in three of them, trouncing the 
Redskins twice and the U. Farmer boys 
once; the games lost were only by a very 
small margin or last minute rallies. 

The first series played against the Bob- 
cats of Montana which took place at 
Provo resulted in two defeats for the "Y" 
quintet. Although the Cougars played 

superior ball, they were forced to submit to the fine basketball technique of the 

Bobcats and chalked a very close score in the two contests which ended 4.^ — 41 

and 43 — 37, the two nights respectively. 

In the second series of games stalked against the Redskins at Salt Lake City, the Cougars showed superiority and 
walloped their Papoose opponents in two successive contests. The game finished the first night with a score of 37 — 50 
and the second was a similar result, 35 — 31. 

The B. Y. Youngsters then encountered the Aggie boys from Logan on the Provo wax floor to determine the 
victors in the third conference meet. In the first night's event the Cougars completely shattered the U. A. C. defense 
and ran the score to 49 — 34. The Young quintet displayed some of the best basketball of the conference in this con- 
test. The next, the rejuvenated farmer basketeers came back and registered an almost incredible improvement and the 
Logan scoring machine hit it off on all six to even the count at a score of 3 9 — 31. 

The Redskins from Utah University motored to Provo and walloped the Cougar ranks in two successive conflicts. 
Featuring a stubborn defense throughout the game by both teams the encounter continued at an even stride until the 
last half, when the Utes found the hoop with the most consistency and ended the game 31 — 25. The next evening 
the teams played an evenly matched game continually, exchanging places for lead in score, but unfortunately the 
game ended when the Utes made a last bound and chalked up five points in lead with a score of 31 — 26. 

The third and fourth encounters with the Farmer boys at Logan were somewhat disastrous, for the Cougars were 
downed in two successive games with a score, 52 — 41, the first night, and 48 — 42, the second night of playing. In 
the first series of games played with the U. Aggies, both teams featured a stone wall defense in contrast to the brilliant 
offensive and lack of guarding in the second series, which resulted in a higher score for both teams. 

The last two games of the season were the most disastrous to the Cougars of any in the conference conflict. The 
contests centered at Boseman, Montana, where both teams displayed some latent ability in basketball techniques, but 
evidently too much of this ability was latent on the part of the Cougars, as the scores of the two evenings respectively 
climaxed at 69 — 44 and 57 — 41. 

Director Eugene L. Roberts, mentor of the Brigham Young University athletic department, has this year been 
of the school; the other leave of absence was in 1924-25, when he went to Ogden to be director at the famous Weber 
of the school; the other leaves of absence was in 1924-25, when he went to Ogden to be director at the famous Weber 
gymnasium. Coach Roberts elevated sports and athletics from a rather mediocre condition to the advanced plain of 
where they are today. Besides being an able coach, he is also well informed on all phases of physical activity and 
development. He has been very successful in organizing the diversified and usually inexperienced material at the 
"Y" and making victorious teams. His mission at the Young University has been very successful. 



<[ 147]/ 




SKOUSEH 

FORyslRRD 



DIXON 

F0RW/1RD 




...^ 



COLLINS 

GUARD 



RUSS HAOLEBY 

I GURRD 



Freshman Basketball 



FROSH Basketball this season, with a team aided by the hand 
of mother good fortune, captured eight out of the twelve 
games played. Besides rushing the score card, the grcenling 
basketeers revealed some very good fodder with which to stuff the 
varsity guns for next year. 

The greenling squad composed of Hatch, Gee, Bullock. 
J, Bown, N, Bown, Rassmussen, Modean, Purcell, Barrett and 
O, Skouscn, worked hard throughout the season to sharpen their 
technique for the season's events. N. Bown was quoted as 
being one of the most consistent in finding the hoop, although 
he had several close competitors. 

Coach Hart and Stan Wilson, assistants to Roberts, proved 
to be able coaches and responsible for not a small portion of the 
greenling success. 



Club Series Basketball 

BASKETBALL was very competitive among the clubs this 
season with Payson barely defeating the Idaho basketeers 
in the final encounter, and proudly carrying off the spoils 
of the club basketball series. 

The final line-up into the quarter finals created some hot 
discussion upon the waxed floor of the gymnasium when the 
Alpine quint chalked a defeat under the superiority of the quint 
from Payson by a score of 16 — 11. The second upset of the 
series was the defeat of the Bear Lake Club by their less expe- 
rienced opponents, the farmer lads of the Ag Club by a score of 
16 — 14, the game ended by a 14 — 14 tie, and five extra sessions 
were necessary before a deciding margin was made by either team. 
The Idaho boys then invaded the ranks of the Provo aggrega- 
tion and chalked the score card to a 17 — 12 win, Garfield 
then advanced into the limelight by defeating the Block "Y" quintet by 6 — 4 score. 

It finally simmered down to a combat between the Payson five and the Idaho quintet. The Idaho boys were then eliminated by a 
very spectacular struggle while their opponents proudly walked off with the spoils of the club series conflict. 




PAYSON QUINTET— CLUB SERIES CHAMPS 




U, OF U.— B. Y. U. GAME 



/[ 150 ]r 



Track 



IN the first intercollegiate track meet of the season the Young Cougars experienced 
another characteristic '26 and '27 heart-rending close point defeat. Although the 
"Y" Kittens astonished the athletic fans of this section who expected them to outscore 
the Ute opponents hands down, they were successful from an individualistic standpoint 
by having within their ranks high-point man. The Utah University stacked up un- 
expectedly yet well deserved a total of 77 2/3 points against 67 1/3 for the blue and 
white. 

The Crimsonites placed first in the meet by monopolizing all nine points in the 
pole vault, taking first and second in the 880 yard dash, scoring 7 2/3 counters in the 
high jump, and walking away with the high hurdles. The clean sweep in these events 
plus an occasional first and second in others, pronounced the Redskin warriors victors 
in this feat and made them enthusiastic, with high hopes for state championship. 

The 220 yard dash, one of the events most conspicuously featured in the contest in 
which Nate Long, Crimson greenling, nosed out the Cougar veteran, Owen Rowe, by 
less than one foot at the tape to win in the exceptional short time of 22 seconds flat. 
The long distance races of the event were also particularly interesting with the long 
winded Tony Bentley of the Cougar ranks and Jess Sevy of the Crimsonites sprinting 
their best to win first place and dividing the honors. In the mile Bentley uncorked a 
sparkling 200 yards' sprint on the last lap to put the Ute ace back at the finish 
while in the two mile event the two aces exchanged places at the tape line and the 
Crimsonite bore the honor of first place. 

The Brigham Young contestants copped first places in nine events, while the Utah 
Redskins claimed only eight. The last event of the meet, the 880 yard relay, was voiced 
by some as being the most thrilling race ever staged on the "Y" field in recent years. 
Owen Rowe running as anchor man for the "Y" snatched the baton when a Ute victory 
seemed inevitable and with bullet-like swiftness, closed the gap of twenty yards to nose 
the Crimson finisher, and the meet ended with victory for the Utah Redskins. 

Coach Hart, track director at the "Y" should not receive any small amount of the 
credit for the good work done by the trackmen. It was because of the coach's per- 
sistence and able directorship that the track boys made the good showing which they did. 



Front Row — Rasmusscn, Thome. 

Second Rolv — W. Corbett, D. Corbctt. Fitzgerald. T. Bentley, Evans. J. Bentley. Rowe. Colvin. E. Nelson. D. Simmons, 
Sumner. Jones. Miller. 

Third Rou.' — Reeves, Bunnel, I. Hart, G. Corbett, V. Call Vacher. Biddulph. Brinley. A. Corless. Jensen. Barlow. Allen. 
Fourth Row — Rutherford, Bailiff. Wright. H. Simmons. Leavitt. CoUett. Modeen. Skousen, Waite. D. Hart, Dixon, S, Nelson. 
Fifth Row — S. Wilson. Coach Hart, Taylor, Huish, Johnson, Stucki. 




f[ 151 ]y 




CORLESS ■ ROWE 

BuNNEL Wright 

Vasher Jensen D. Hart 

'[152]/ 



Collett 



D. Simmons 
I. Hart 
Tony Bentley 




Miller 
I. Hart 



H. Simmons 



J. Bentley 

G. CORBETT 



ROWE 
D. CORBETT 



BiDDULPH 




AT THE INTER-UNIT MEET 
r[ 154]/ 




COACH HART CHECKS OVER THE FIELD 



'[155]/ 




Swimming 



COACH^ 

LEAF 



DUPLICATING the process of 1927, the Young University Paddlers captured the 
Rocky Mountain Conference title in swimming when they outclassed and out- 
swam all contenders in the conference meet and billed the score card for a total of 38 
points as against 28 for Utah University, 16 for the Utah Aggies, 14 for Colorado Uni- 
versity, 5 for the University of Wyoming and 5 for the Colorado Aggies. 

Two events were surrounded with limelight when two conference records were 
smashed before the navigating of the "Y" aquatic artists. Bud Shields and Millet, the 
former who later became one of our famous national champions, both increased previous 
scoring. Bud broke his own standing record in the 100 yard free style event, setting 
the time at 57 2 5 seconds, one-fifth of a second over his previous mark. Millet sub- 
tracted several seconds from the time of the 200 yard breast stroke, swimming the dis- 
tance in 2:48, this broke both state and conference records for this particular event. 

Competition and excitement reeled to a climax in the first event of the conference 
meet when Young and Utah were paddling their fastest to gain an early point lead in the 
160 yard relay. Utah got the lead by a three yards margin and which could not be nar- 
rowed until the last round when Bud Shields put the spectators to riot by his spectacular 
paddling which closed the margin and placed the Cougar natators on a common field 
for high point honors in this event. Millet then chalked up five more points for ""Y" 
when he surprised swimming fans and dashed away from all contenders in the 200 yard 
breast stroke event. B. Y. continued to make additions until the final score increased to 
a difference of ten points to the nearest competitor. 

A large portion of the credit for these victories is due to Coach C. F. Leaf, who is 
the swimming coach of the Provo High School and the B. Y. U. He has been coach of 
the two schools for some five or six years and during that time has brought many vic- 
tories to the B. Y. in swimming, having aided the Cougars to three consecutive conference 
victories. 

Some of those trained by this outstanding swimming coach and responsible for most 
of this year's victories are: Bud Shields, Millet, Merrill Christopherson, Joe Allen, 
Rondo Robinson, Ira Markham and Cliff Dangerfield. Coach Leaf will likely be on the 
coaching staff next year and is expected to tow in another conference victory. 



Roger Fechser Grant Hastings George Madsen Fred Richin Cliff Dangerfield Waldo Strong Harry McCord Earl Robinson 




r[ 156 ]/ 




Shields 




MILLHT 




Chrisiop 


:LKbON 


Dangerfield Miller 


Dixon 


Shields Christopherson 
r[157]r 


RiCHEN 


Markham 






Our cNational CKamp 

Bud Shields 

|_j' ROM a physical weakling, to a national champion in six years is the record set by 
■■" Bud Shields, premier swimmer of the "Y." 

Although but twenty years of age and a sophomore in college, he has set a record 
which places him permanently in the Hall of Fame. He has garnered twenty-eight 
medals; one bronze, two silver and all the rest gold. He now holds seventeen records 
which he has set in interscholastic, junior and senior A. A. U. and intercollegiate 
activities. 

This year Bud was the leading man on his team which won another Rocky Mountain 
Conference championship. Single-handed he tied Stanford University for fourth place 
in the National Inter-Collegiate Meet held at Philadelphia on March 31, winning individ- 
ual honors for the meet and breaking two national collegiate records, and one ail-Ameri- 
can record in the 220 and 440 yard free style events in time of 2:19.1 and 5:08 
respectively. 



/[ 158 ]f 




RIDING 
f[ 159 ]/ 



The Wrestling Year 

WRESTLING this year placed the Brigham Young University one step 
higher when the"Y"clowned the "Redskin" grapplers with a score of 
20 — 13, shortly before the Rocky Mountain Conference meet at Logan, in 
which they tied with the Ute's for second place, out-distanced Montana, but 
were downed by the U. Aggies who won the conference meet. The score 
ended B. Y. U., 24 — U., 24 — Aggies, 28 and Montana, 8. 

Clark Larsen, Don Corbett, Johnson and T. Larsen were probably the 
best bets within the "Y" circle, although others were strong, scienced, and 
showed a great deal of determination, they lacked experience in the grap- 
plers' arena. C. Larsen and Corbett, "Y" letter men and old veterans on the 
mat downed their opponents with decisive superiority in the state meet, both 
winning by falls. In the Rocky Mountain Conference meet, Corbett 
supremely floored his opponents in short time and the first bout Larsen 
successfully put his man's shoulders on the mat, but in the second tumble 
his leg was broken and hence he lost the decision. 

Johnson, a newcomer in the Cougar wrestling ranks, efficiently supplied 
the vacancy in the 175 pound weight left by Knudsen of '26. He romped 
off with victory and showed speed, science and strength, characteristic of an 
old timer in the grappler's den. 

T- Larsen and Thurgood of the lesser weights showed good trim when they lashed their men to the 
carpet and showed fair time in doing it. Both men displayed courage, speed and strength in capturing 
their honors. 

Several others within the Cougar squad of mat huddlers showed good possibilities. Bailey, a freshman 
in the game, has a good start for the next year although his inexperience spelled defeat this year. A few 
others showed fine form, determination and science, although the lack of experience played to their dis- 
advantage this year and they did not place on the final conference line-up. 

The wrestling unit at B. Y. has made much accomplishment by the persistence and able training given 
by Coach Webb. Each year new material comes in for grappler formation and it is up to the direction of 
the coach to mold it into effective product which he has done very efficiently. 





THE WRESTLING MEET, U. OF U. — B. Y. U. 



f[ 160]/ 




Johnson, i 75 

TiPPETTS, 145 
Balle. 165 



Croft, i25 



Moody. 135 
Harris. 165 

r[ 161 ]/ 



Thurgood. 1 1 1 
C. Larson. 125 

T. Larson, 135 




Tennis 



THE tennis teams at the Brigham Young University have at 
the time of this writing, cinched the state tennis title. This 
regains for them the tennis state supremacy which they held for 
two years preceding the two years previous to this season. 

Thus far this season they have won three matches. The 
tennis squad from the state university with a brilliant lineup 
and just as confident, were the first ones to stagger and finally 
fall under the superiority of the Cougar raqueteers in their first 
initial match of the season at the Ute courts. The meet is voiced 
as being close, but the final encounter dropped a "Y" victory. 
The entire match was undecided until the last few minutes, when 
Lew Munk, a "Y" raqueteer, steamed up some fast and accurate 
playing, and downed the invincible Bill Hayden, strong man for 
the Redskins. In this encounter Munk gave Hayden the battle 
of his life time. 

Munk easily took this first set at 6 — 2, but Hayden then 
came back and captured the next two sets. With the two uni- 
versities tied with two matches each, and Hayden, a two to one lead on the "Y" score. The pangs of defeat 
seemed inevitable to B. Y., but then Munk steadied himself and pulled through with a win of 6 — 8 over 
the Redskin. 

The two doubles in which Belvins and Farsberg, "U," defeated Dixon and Porter, "Y," and Holt and 
Gilchrist, "Y," defeated Freed and Crane, "U," showed good style. In the other two singles. Holt downed 
Crane, "U," and Belvins defeated Dixon, "Y." 

The Young tennis team, scored a victory over the Utah Agricultural College raqueteers, with a two 
to three match on the local courts, thus ending the first half of the state collegiate tennis season undefeated. 

However, the encounter was hotly contested, and it was only after much persistence and steadiness 
that Young defeated their opponents in a last minute steam up. In the doubles, D. Dixon and R. Porter, 
"Y," conquered J. Cowley and J. Christensen, "A. C," and L. Johnson and A. Saxer, "A. C," downed P. 
Holt and E. Brindley, "Y." In the singles, Dixon, "Y," conquered Cowley, "A. C," and Holt defeated 
Johnson, "A. C," and Cannon, "A. C," defeated Munk, "Y." 

In the return match with the U., the Cougars were again victorious, winning the same matches as in 
the previous meet. 

T. Earl Pardee, tennis Mentor at the "Y," has been responsible for much of the success of Brigham 
Young University in this sport. 



rf 162 ]y 




R. Gilchrist W, PorUr M. Gilchrist Holt Brinlcy Munk R. Porter 

/[ 163 ]*■ 



Dixon Coach Pardoe 




L ••< 



Boxing 



BOXING is a prospective prominent sport at the Brlgham Young University. Although the mit-sHngers in this 
section have not been sufficiently strong to organize an intercollegiate boxing league, they are gradually growing 
in number and a more brilliant future appears quite secure. As boxing is a developer of speed, keen muscular co-ordin- 
ation, sportsmanship and mental alertness, it has been voiced by some that this form of athletic activity will eventually 
demand a top seat among the other conspicuous college sports. 

With Jess Hullinger and "Chick" Josie, two professional sluggers training within the group and lending assist- 
ance, the boxing aspirants have developed some very good technique during this season. The next season will possibly 
place the boxing sports one step nearer to the position among athletics which has been outlined. 

r[ 164 ]/ 



Taylor 



Partridge Lewis 

FENCING— A NEW AND RISING SPORT 
f[ 165 ]< 



Potter 




SPORT FOR BOTH SEXES 
/[ 166]/ 



Women's Athletics 

' I 'HE Women's Athletic Association has co-operated with the physical education 
-*- department in all of the girls' activities this year and a keen interest has been 
exhibited. 

The activities have made for good sportsmanship and the best qualities of the girls 
have been brought out by competition. 

The W. A. A. has fostered the following activities during the year: field hockey, 
basketball, baseball, volley ball, tennis, dancing, swimming and archery. 

Swimming has become a more popular sport since Ethia Blake won the state diving 
contest. 

All of the upper class students have taken greater part in the activities than ever 
before. The Sophomores won the basketball tournament from the Frosh for the first time 
in three years. 

Our aim has been "A girl in every sport and a sport for every girl." Girls who 
want less vigorous activity have found that archery is right there to fill the need; while 
girls desiring more vigorous activities have found basketball a real sport. 

The third invitational track meet open to women has been an outstanding factor to 
girl performers and also the awarding of sweaters by the student body has been a great 
incentive to the girls who have entered the field of athletics. 



GIRLS' RELAY CARNIVAL COMMITTEE 
Front Roa.' — Cclia Romney. Leah Skouscn. 
Second Row — Una Peterson. Madge Peterson, Ethel Handley, Vesta Anderson, Remina Larson. Dczzie Farmer, Emiline Vance. 
Back Roiv — Marie Tervort, Hulda Young. Josephine McKee. Beth Romney, Matva 
Hodson, Wilma Jcppcson. Coach: Elna Vance, Sanoma Young, Velda Hanson, Mary Basinger. Evelyn Bryner, Zela Moody. 




i 



r[ 167 ]/ 




GIRLS' ATHLETICS 
*■[ 168 ]/ 




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GIRLS' ATHLETICS 
f[ 169 ]Y 



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GIRLS' ATHLETICS 
r[ 170 ]*■ 




DANCING NYMPHS 
'[171]/ 




The Stadium 



As the 1928 Banyan goes to press the Stadium project which has been under way for 
several years is rapidly taking form. Present plans call for the completion of the 
work for the opening of the new school year in September. 

The structure will be of solid concrete, situated in a natural site which affords one 
of the finest views of the most beautiful valley in Utah. The seating capacity of the 
unit now under construction will be double that of any crowd which has ever assembled 
for an athletic event at the Brigham Young University and the hillside on which the 
seats are to be erected has an additional capacity of over ten thousand seats which can 
be erected as the demand arises at a very minimum cost. 

This much needed addition to the plant of the University is being made possible by 
the students, alumni, and many friends of the institution. For several years the gradu- 
ating classes have made the Stadium their project; the profits of the Students Supply have 
been used to purchase the site; the men of the Student Body have donated the major por- 
tion of the hand labor; and many friends have given most liberally of their equipment. 

The Alumni and Institution co-operating will raise by a popular subscription and 
sale of tickets the additional funds needed to complete the work. 

Neither time nor money has been spared to make this new athletic field with its 
adjoining spacious practice fields, playgrounds and parking areas one of the best in the 
country. 



r[172]/ 




ARM 



/[ 173]. 




Army 



A' 



LTHOUGH the Brigham Young University has no official 
connection with the state or national government, Battery 
C, 145th Field Artillery, Utah National Guard, serves the pur- 
pose of a department of military science. Officered by a staff 
who know their business, and equipped with the best that money 
can buy. Battery C, extends unparalleled opportunities to the 
students to become versed in the science of modern warfare. It 
not only benefits members from a cultural and financial stand- 
point, but it opens untold resources for their pleasure and amusement. 

The Battery teaches the basic things in the science of handling men, horses and machinery, first aid, 
health and sanitation. Many things which are not taught in school are given to those who choose to wear 
their country's uniform and protect the flag if necessary. Men receive instruction in how to accomplish 
things in an orderly and economic way, letting them see the real value of co-operation and efficiency. 
They take orders and give them, they are men among men. Their obligations are those of a gentleman 
and a soldier. 

The battery not only aids the school in the instruction of science, but it also helps to give its mem- 
bers pleasures which they otherwise would be denied. To those who are fond of outdoor sport, horses and 
polo equipment are at their disposal. The polo and baseball teams of the battery stand up well with the 
best in the state. To every member is offered the opportunity to participate. 

At the present time, approximately seventy-five per cent of the organization are men from school. 
These men who serve their country every Monday night, and 1 5 days every summer are letter men, student 
body officers, and prominent students in every department. Although there is no official connection, the 
Battery is indeed a part of the school. 



Front Roiv — Lieutenant Corbett, Captain Edwards, Major Clawson. Lieutenant Hebertseiv Lieutenant Fuller. 
Second Raze — Sergeant .Simmons, Sergeant Jensen, Sergeant W'ortliington. Sergeant Vonng. Corporal 

.\lexander. Corporal Corbett, Corporal Crowlber, Corporal Hardy, Corporal Lassen, Corporal 

Patten. 
Third Rozv — Merrill Smith, Hansen, Christensen, Fielding, \\'ortbington, Rowley, Larsen, Edwards. 
Fourth Rote — Brown. Snell, Laws, Palmer, Goff, Young, Morgan, Oaks. 
Fiftli Row — Krauss, Roberts, Corless, Dickson, Clark, Larsen, Corless. 
Sixth Roz>.'- Pntter, Kimball. I^nrr. Barney, Tolin:on. Roberts. 




THE BATTERY 



f[ 174 ]< 




BATTERY ■■C" AND THE MEDICS IN ACTION 




POLO 

An opportunity for every kind of sport is what the B. Y. U. offers to those who desire to take ad- 
vantage of available facilities. Polo, the sport of kings, is open to the students, through the courtesy of 
Battery "C" 145th Field Artillery. A barn uf well-kept saddle horses may be used by merely asking for 
them. The Battery has had a championship polo team for the past four years, this same team bemg made 
up of University students. The "Y" has not adopted polo as a regular sport, but students desiring to enter 
into this field may do so. Polo, the sport of sports, and almost any other form of sport may be found on 
the Young campus. 



/[ 176 ]/ 




renTUftfis 



/[177]/ 




William McCoard 

Prom Chairman 



I 






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^^. s^ 



Ruth Clarke 

Chairman's Partner 



Junior Prom 



"Far, far away in old Madrid 
Where softly sighs of loie the light guitar 
Tu'o sparkling eyes, a lattice hid. 
Two eyes as darkly bright as loir's own star. 

INTO the enchanting atmosphere of romantic old Madrid danced the throng of students and friends 
at the Junior Promenade, given February 3 by the class of '29. A Spanish garden was the setting of 
this outstanding social function and throughout the festivities of the evening the motif was carried out 
effectively and charmingly. 

Gaily bedecked in a profusion of flowers, the Feria presented an imposing sight, such as might have 
greeted the eyes of a light-hearted Spanish grandee in his native country. From the Fonda, a typical inn 
of Old Spain, refreshment was served to appreciative guests. Serenaders, in all the gallantry of this 
chivalrous people, played seductive strains beneath the window of a fair senorita who rewarded them with 
a rose, coquetishly thrown to them. 




JUNIOR PROM COMMITTEE 

John Allen Jewel Linebaugh Vernon Merrill Helen Mendenhall 



Roy Fugal 



iltilllllli'iiiiiil 



il|ili|||||||!llllllllllllil!llilliill!iill!!lil!ill(!HI!l!lllllil(lll!ll)l||il|||liH 



/[ 178 ]y 



rh 



Leadership Week 



'^''\ ^ AN'S quest for joy," the theme of the seventh annual Leadership Week, is truly one of nation-wide 
■*■■*■ appeal since it drew to Brigham Young University, January 23-27, 1505 people, representing 
seventy stakes from Canada to Mexico. 

The importance of better trained leaders was officially recognized b)' the institution seven years ago, 
when one week was set aside for those desiring special instruction. The opportunity was readily appre- 
ciated and the number registering increased each year until the present maximum attendance. 

By providing splendid opportunities for mental, social and spiritual growth, the organizers of the 
program recognized the value of well-rounded development as a factor in securing greater happiness. 

Classes were conducted by capable instructors in history, music, psychology, science, literature, teach- 
ing, theology, health, art, clothing and textiles, scouting and journalism. The last named class, an added 
feature this year, was well-attended by high school newspaper workers. 

To accommodate the exceptionally large crowd, two assemblies were held daily — 11:30 for students, 
and 1:30 for visitors. The exceptional nature of the meetings was appreciated by those who attended. 
Prominent speakers were: President Heber J. Grant, Stephen L. Richards, Melvin J. Ballard, David O. 
McKav, Richard R. Lvman, J. Golden Kimball, Adam S. Bennion, B. H. Roberts, whose subjects were 
chosen in keeping with the general theme. 

Recreational or social leadership classes were ably conducted by Eugene L. Roberts, Wilma Jeppson, 
C. J. Hart, and capable assistants. 

"The Daily Leader" a publication edited by the news writing class under the direction of Professor 
H. R. Merrill, contained helpful information, an aid to the visitors. 

The true accomplishments of the week can not be evaluated accurately since they must be judged 
by the success of the individual seekers after happiness. 




A LEADERSHIP ASSEMBLY 



y[ 181 ]*• 




Co-tDS AND Cougars 



r[ 182 ]r 




*■[ 183 ]f 



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Clhristae© HieH©y 



Msirjoo© Speirks 



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Mpllar 



Albert G©]rl©§§ 

lar Mam 



Three beauty pictures by Wilcox Studio 
Popular lady and man by Larson Studio 



*■[ 184]/ 






X 




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Si^3 .^0^£iB£uL.i^.;a£i!2Hfa^K 



Cougar Haunts 



f[ 190 ]r 




OaMMCZATIOliS 



/[ 191 ]y 



Social Organization 

THE Brigham Young University recognizes proper social development as one of the 
important by-products of college training. For many years this social opportunity 
has been provided through the class and club organizations of the institution, but in 
late years the student body has grown so rapidly that these organizations have become too 
large to provide students the intimate social contacts, and opportunities for leadership, 
which are thought desirable. 

After careful investigation and discussion on the part of the Faculty, a Social Unit 
system of organization was worked out, and upon approval by the Board of Trustees it 
was put into operation at mid-year. 

The basic idea is democratic, as it provides that every student in the University shall 
belong to a group of congenial companions. The size of each unit varies from twenty 
to thirty, and many motives other than social have contributed toward this grouping, 
such as similar scholastic interests, art, athletics, music, language, etc. 

The general supervision is delegated to a Social Unit Committee. This committee 
has general supervision over membership, names of units, and their activities. This com- 
mittee is a representative group from the faculty and the classes, thus all the major social 
interests are adequately represented. 

A subsidiary committee — the Inter-Social Unit Committee — is composed of repre- 
sentatives from each Social Unit. This committee is responsible for the proper regula- 
tion of Inter-social unit affairs such as fees, costs of parties, and social unit practices. 

From the brief experience thus far this year it is confidently hoped that this system 
will meet the needs of the University in a broad social way. The enthusiastic support 
of the students is evidenced by the fact that already over 750 students are affiliated in 
about thirty-five units. These fine groups are enjoying themselves, making lasting 
friendships, conducting proper social functions, and are making for a wholesome social 
spirit about the Campus. 



r[ 192 ]< 




THE VAL NORN 



THIS page was given as a prize for the clubs best represented in numbers and stunts at 
the "Who's Who" Ball. The Mates won two prizes, while the Val Norn won first 
prize for girls. 




THE MATES 
f[ 193 ]y 




MATES 
<[ 194 ]f 




C'i % ^ *V V' (i 



Eoji^tKoyt. 




ll 



Members iit Pictures 

Marie Voukstetter 

Mary Lee 

Audry Ostlund 

J 'ice-President 

Gloria K. Mangum 

President 

Ruth K. Hansen 

Marva Ilodson 

Genile Allrcd 

Hilda Petersen 

Margaretta Farrer 

Edith Ree 

iMherta Scorup 

Arlene Harris 

Caroline Scorup 

Nita Wakefield 

Anna Hughes 

Eva Kniidson 

Alice Snyder 

Loiirina CJayson 

Pearl Dahle 

Dorothy Pouelsoii 

Pamella Lewis 

Jennie r.rimhall 

Audry Jackson 

Jane Farmer 

Sina Brimhall 

Margaret Hansen 

\'esta Anderson 

I lelen Mcndenhall 

Kathriiie Taylor 

Alice Brinton 

Xaomi Seamoinit 

Ora Anderson 



CO-EDS 
/[ 196 ]y 




BLOCK ■■¥•• CLUB 
/[ 197]/ 




Y. D. D. CLUB 
f[ 198 ]/ 




HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 
*■[ 199 ]r 




Viva Skousen 

President ami Mutual Director 

liee Parsons 

Vice-President and Representative 

Melba Dastrup 
Secretary 

Leah Skousen 
Athletic Manager 

Marlys Akin 

Mary Bassinger 

Bessie Iverson 

\'irginia Booth 

Winnie Haywood 

Ruth Olson 

Olive Harris 

\'eda Porter 

Lucile Worthen 

Veda Hansen 

Meta Ritchie 

Wilma Sorenson 

Elma \'ance 

Oral Goodrich 

Mary Monson 



BEAUX ARTS 
/[ 200 ]/ 




C hni-les Meikley, President 

Ueta (iines, I'icc-l'rcs. 

Liila Karren, Sec. and Trcas. 

Reulali Freestone, Reporter 

Ruth Smart 

liea Murrey 

( )ral Goodrich 

Ruth Goodrich 

Elgia liingham 

Zella Perry 

Vera Sliowalter 

Alton Larsen 

Kenneth Stringliam 

Evans Phillips 

Morvls Akin 

Nellie Oaks 

LeRoy Oaks 

.Alton Hatch 

Warren Richardson 

LaRue Nielsen 

Arvin Moon 

Marvin Moon 

Clark Larsen 

Remina Larsen 

Roy Hill 

Howard Stevens 

William Evans 

Aha Evans 

Estella Stevens 

Ezra Stewart 

Carl Bodily 

Victor Christenson 

Ertmoii t'hristeiison 

Floyd Fletcher 

llessie Iverson 

Myrtle Iverson 

Ardella Freston 

Oulsa I IinchnKm 



UINTAH CLUB 
/[ 201 ]y 




FIDELAS 
f[ 202 ]f 




VAL NORN 
fl 203 ]/ 




DECA SEMA FE 

Front Rote — Margaret Johnson, Marian Bean, Marie Kindred. Virginia Packard. 

Second Rotv — Ethylene Potter, Dorothy Decker, President; Francis Swan, Ora Gledhill, Mamie Laird, 

Lydia Hanson, Ada Green. 

Third Row — ^^ary Graliam. Ruby Tliurber, Lera r>ensnii, Ruth Hanson, Vice-President ; Afton Finlinson, 
Secretary and Treasurer ; Josephine Berry. Hazel Aagard, Leah Neilson, 

Members Not in Picture — Bessie Hatton, Louise Spafford, Hazel Nuttall, Helen Brown, EIna Paulson, 
Leia Peterson. Maurine Clifford, Wilma Boyle. Mary Graham, Ireta Mortimer, Manila Graham, 

Lourina Clayson. 



/[ 204 ]/ 




L^hCA SEMA Ffi 
/[ 205 ]y 




AG. CLUB 
»•[ 206 ]< 




Kuy (.ibliuns, l'i\'suU-:it . Caroline Eyring, Vice-President; Catherine Eyring 
Ada Haymore, Katy Haymore. Guy Richie, 11. Greer, Lavon Curtis, Glen 
Peterson, Don Decker, Loren Skousen, Clarence Skonsen, Wayne Webb, Basil 
Skousen. Myrtle Peterson. Homer \\'akefiel(l. Maud Foote, '^^ " ^^-r.... 
Lola Ellsworth, Earl Piatt, Anthony Eyring. 



McBride, 



ARIZONA CLUB 



r[ 207 ]■/ 




Provo Drama Center 

PROVO, UTAH 
MEMBER DRAMA LEAGUE OF AMERICA 




ALBERT CORLESS. Trfjidcn.~ 
JENNIE HOLBROOK, UUt-Tjesidtni- 
EUNICE BIRD, SecTaaTy<STeasuTcr 



T. EARL PARDOE. Stan •Rfprweniatiw 

anti TTOgram^ 
LUCILLE TUTTLE, Tioduchon Cltairman^ 
RUTH WATTS. Junior Trogram^ 



THE Provo Dr.ima Center has been in existence since 1920 and has brought to its 
members such numbers as WilHam Butler Yeats, William W. Ellsworth, Louis 
Untermeyer, Maude Scheerer, Guy Bates Post, San Carlos Opera, Helen Mencken, Robert 
Mantell, Tony Sarg's Marionnettes, and many others which would have passed by but 
for the Center interest. This year John Van Drutcn came as our special guest. We 
also tried for the Theatre Guild, but their itinerary did not permit a visit here. 




f[ 208 ]f 



THE STUDIO GUILD 




Patrons 

Elbert H. Eastmoiid 
Faculty Advisor 
Gerrit De Jong 
Rent F. Larson 
Edgar M. Jensen 
Laval S. Morris 



Members 

Seated — Bent F". Larson, Florence Frandsen, Alberta Johnson, Raymond Bailey. Beatrice Parsons, 
Clyde Fechser, President: Rae Rust, Edith Bee, Elmer Jolinson, 

Standing — La \'on Curtis, Alice Egbert, Walker, Alice Taylor, Clifford Rutherford, Anna Hughes, 
Elbert Anderson, Nita Wakefield. Parrel CoUett. 

Members not on Picture — Verle Dixon, Ira Phillips, AUie Jensen, Carlisle Braithwaite. 




/[ 209 ]/ 




AMICI 

Top Row — Glenn Vincent, Lee Spencer, Earl Piatt, Rarr Wasbburn, Crede Kindred. Anthony Sowards. 

Bottom Roxv — Mark Jenkins, President; Keith Sumner, Vice-President ; Alma Neilson, Evan M. Croft, 

Henry Stewart, George Wilkes, Isaac Dun ford. 



NU-VEKO 

Top Rotv — Clifford Knudsen, William Waldron, Ross Dickson, Vernon Dusenberry, Arthur Birk, Perry 
Mc Arthur, Reed Mc Arthur, Reed Phillips, and Phil Anderson. 

Bottom Roic — Harry McCoard, Max Olsen, Harry Olsen, Walter Corbett. Prcs.; Ray Phillips. J'ice-Pres.; 
Ralph Lichfield, Sec. and Treas.; Welby Brown, Mervin Peterson and Jex Boyack. 

The folluwing members, and not in picture: Guy Llillman, George C"nrbett, Harold Handlcy. 




y[ 210 ]r 




VAL HY RIC'S 

F}oiit Ron — Willis R. Hunkley, Donald Merrill, I'icc-Picsiticnl ; Lawrence Bodily. Alvin Ilnll, Reporter; 

Osmond Dun ford. Rulon Tiieller. 
Biiik Razv — Owen Skousen, Elwood Clark, Karl Bailiff, I-'arrell Collett, Athletic Manager; Max Gilchrist, 

President; Claude Snow, Secretary and Representative; Joseph Goff, Clifford G. Price. 
Members Xot in Picture — R. K. GardnL-r, Wright W'clker, Lewis Perkins, Wi.liani W'ixoni, Kenneth Weight. 



MINA CLARIS 

Front Rati- — liillie Bean, Evelyn Brown, Kva Knudson. Lucille Tattle, President ; Ardell Ludlow, X'esta Snell, 

Marion Russel'. 

Bach- Rotf — BL-rnice Barton, Leah liruadlient, Helen Romney, Florence Peterson, Anna Smoot, Vice-President; 

Margaret Iiroadl)ciit. Eunice Bird. Secretary and Treasurer. 




'[211 ]/ 




HILGARDIA 

Front /?ow— ^Dean A. Anderson, President; Clark Larson, Elmer Timothy, Secretary; Ray B. Christensen, 
Clarence Ashton, Ralph Thacker, Barney Dougall, Carlyle Bunker. 
S'tatK^hig — Dr. Clawson Y. Cannon, Howard Roberts, Donald Tobler, Veland D. Call, Vice-President; 
Berne P. Broadbent, University Rcprcsentatife; Boyd Davis, Byron H. Parker, Elmer Graff, Paul Pearson, 

Dr. T. L. Martin, 
Members Not in Picture — Gerald Burr, Cleon Sanders, C. Burdette Craine, Reporter ; Clair Christensen, 
Edward Aycock, Clarence Palmer, Orsen Hansen, Edward Hutchings, Stancell H. Greer, Riilon Lewis 

Clyde Sumsion, Alvin Monson 



DI THALIANS 

Front Row — Alice Carter, Alta M. Braithwaite, Vice-President ; Mary Dahl, Elaine Thompson, Katie Ludlow, 

Wanda Petty, Ella Brockbank, Bertha Vogel. 

Back Row — Eiipbamia Hunter, Erma Johnson, Gail Johnson, Representative; Rubye M. Bartholomew, 

President; Jewel Willardson, LaRue Goold, Margretta Faar. 

Members Not in Picture — Ada Showaliter, Norma Keece, Maude Olson, Mariam Colton, lone Ludlow. 





"Y" CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

Lorin C. Bryner, President: Ray C. Houtz, I'iee-President; Ida Tanner, Secretary and Tresaurer 
Honorary Members— Br. F. S. Harris, Dr. C. E. Maw, Hugh H. Peterson, Dr. W. P. Cottam, 

Delbcrt Greenwood. 



LA ONACLEA 

Valvi Terry, Anna Grace. President; Lena Bishop, Mary Burch, Secretary and Treasurer; Eunice Badger, 

Reporter; Effie Hilton, Ida Stoker, Minnie Hendricks, May Baird, Ida Clark, May Prior, Anna Spotten, 

Tillie Jones, May Terry, Eleanor Bishop, Inez Durrani. Clara Farnsworth, Marian Agren, Recreation 

Leader; Marie Danielson. Vice-President; Georgia Dimick, Gaye Diniick, Wanda Bushnell. 




4 213 J/ 



I^^^^^Ril^^^^^^^^pS^^^^^^P^^^^I 








lBrl^^^^i/i^< w^^^E 


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iHtew' w^w£jHHv~4mW 


^^^!lJtt^H 







IDAHO CLUB 

Front Ro-iV — Asel Lambert, Irel Hart, Mignon Michaelson, Edith Rich, Delsa Jacobs, Emeline Serine. Max 
Gilchrist, Dorothy Decker, Vice-President ; Don Corless, Mayme I-aird, A. C. Hull. 

Second i^oti-— Louis Perkins, Gay Dimick, Alta Breath waite, Don Merrill, Rollon Rich, Ted Eanett, 

I^ah Nielsen, Alice Snyder, Bruce Gilchrist, President. 

Third Row — Parrell Callett, Wm. K. Tanner, Mary Dunkley, Joe Goff, LeRoy Groberg, Reed Banett, 

Ronald Percell, Mark Patterson, H. R. Merrill, Jay Painter, Wallace Wallentine, Ralph Simmons. 



JUAB CLUB MEMBERS 

Back Row — Wanda Petty. Mrs. IL V. Hoyt. Dean \\. \'. lloyt, LeGrande Mangelson, President Earl Garrett. 
Krank Wilson. Cleon Sanders. Anna Grace, Helen Mangelson. Clarence Garvers, Clarence Wilson. 

Grant Gardner. 

Front /?(3tf— Raymond Bailey, May Andrews, Edith Belliston, Thelma Hassle, Leland Boswell. Trena Bailey, 

Maurine Allen, Pearl Dahle. 




i[ 214 ]y 




Wesley Porter 
Secretary and Treasurer 

LaVell Tackson 
rii-e-PresiJeut 



LIMA PSI 



(). Phiiiie Lavsen 



Weut-lall Caniilaiid 
f'rcsideitt 



Newell I-'rci 
Owen CuUimore 



La\*on Voiing 

Merrill Stucki 



TAU KAPPA ALPHA 

Front Rcnv^C. A. Lambert. Ed. M. Rowe. Mary Graham. Thomar. L. ^ra^tin, E. DeAIton Partridge. 

Clifton Moffitt. 

Back /?..:.— Glenn Dickson. George S. Raliff. Christen Jensen, Don B. Cluff. Hugh M. Woodward, 

T. Earl Pardoe. 




r[215]r 





Front Roio — Dr 
Dr. F. S. Harris, D 
Clarence Cottam. 



Walter P. Cottam. 
Vasco M. Tanner. 



Back Roiv — Claudeous J. D. Brown. 
Pres.: O. Wilford Olsen, Stanley Hardy. 
Reporter: Lyean Johnson. Anson B. Call. 
Homer Wakefield. Vice-Pres.: D. Drew 
Jorgenscn. Bliss Jinlayson. D. Eldon 
Beck. D. Irvin Rasmussen, Don E. 
Wcntz. Sam Mitchell. 

Other Members — Edward W. Bentley. 
Secy, and Librarian: Sheriff Henry. C. 
Ray Van Leusen. Vesta Anderson. Willis 
Robinson. J. Allen Rowe. Wayne N. 
Smart. Louis W. Christenson. James A. 
Kartchner. Marion L. Harris, C. Lynn 
Hayward. 



DAVID STAR JORDAN BIOLOGY CLUB 
f[ 216 ]f 




ALPHA KAPPA PSI 



Anthon V. liaynie 

Vernal Worth ington 

A. Noble Kimball 

Reul F. Jacobson 

Reed Porter 



Charles A. Wall 

Harry Parker 

John E. Buckwalter 

G rant Th u rgooci 

Henry D. Taylor 
Master of Rituals 



Harrison V. Hoyt 
Jean H. Alleman 

Treasurer 
Charles M. Berge 

Secretary 

Joseph T. Bentley 

Diary Correspondent 

Reed G. Starley 



A. Rex Johnson 
Deputy Dist. Counselor 

Ralph Naylor 
Leland Boswell 
Robert Curtis 

Garr Gardner 



Garn Webb 

li'arden 

Preston Robinson 

Chaplain 

Bill Edwards 

John L. Allen 

. I'ice-President 

Gordon Crandall 



W. Clarence John 

G. ElRoy Nelson 

Lowry Anderson 
President 

Earl Garrett 
V. Dale Pearson 



i[2\7]< 



Anne Ostlund 

Secretary 



NAUTILUS 



Gloria K. Mangum 
Vice-President 



Erma Merrill 

Treasurer 



Edna M. Ball 

President 



LorRaine Chipman 
\'erda Batclielor 



Rhoda Johnson 
Representative 
Jane Farmer Mary E. Ostlund 



Gladys Sorensen Evelyn Ostlund Alice Brinton 

Marie Voukstetter Ada Jensen 

Dezzie Farmer Naomi Seamount Loree \'an Wagenen Audrey Ostlund 

Members Not in Picture — Helen McArtlnir, Florence Rolnnson, Geneal Anderson, Maurine Peck. 



Active Alumnae— (.Vof in picture)— GUdys Seamount Markham, Celestia Johnson Taylor, Edith Lewis 
Meredith, Erma Murdock Dixon, Grace Folland. Ethel Lewis. Maud Dixon Markham, Aline Bonnett. 

Edith Jones Johnson 



r[ 218 ]i 








TAU 


SIG 


y^jj^v^^l^M 


I. Gam Webb 
Vice-President 


Rex Johnson 




Richard H. Tlmrne 
President 


11. Weymeih Rolands 


Max T 


umias Grant Tlnirgood 

Secretary and Treasure 


C.iniit 1 


'. Ttittle Clarence \'aclier Uruwn 


Ingcrsoll 


Charles 11. Beige 


Clifford Dangerfieia Paul 
Warden 


Allen 


Royd Rasmussen Fred A. Lewis 


Robert Curtis 



Renel V. Jacobsen Robert Bushman Jay Anderson 



Don Cliristensen Lowry Anderson Clarence John 



/[ 219 ]/ 




Selena Roberts 
President 



Alberta Scorup 
Secretary and Treasurer 



CESTA TIES 

Thela Buchanan 
Parliaiucntanan 



Caroline Eyring 
Vice-President 



Lucile Romney 
Social Chairman 



liessie Collins Wilma Jeppson Fern Jude Maurine Hinckley 

Edith Rich Jennie Holbrook Carolyn Scorup Catherine Eyring 

Edith Bee Maxine Clayton Emma Harris Dorothy Harmon 

Melba Blackburn Erma D. Heindselman Marie Tervort AlHe Jensen Gertrude Partridge 



f[ 220]/ 



IBIii^^^^^^!^^'?w' 



NUGGETS 



Vernal W.irtliington G. Kenneth Handley 
l'icc-/*rcsidciit 



Karl Bunnell 



Paul S. Dixon 
U. Thornjun Snow 



James W. Puullon 
Victor R. Taylor 
Don C. Corbclt 
HonaM M. Dixon 
William Jackson 



Robert K. Allen 

Dix M. Jones 
I'^red M. Moore 
Joseph K. Allen 



Donahl I'. Llovil 

I'liiz: Council 

Kcprcscntalivc 

Marion W. Halliilay 

\'ern D. Greene 

Clarence I). Tavlor 



William P. Edwards U. Lynn Miller 

, , ■ .„ Sccrcltiry and Trcasnrfi 

John L. Allen Bruce M. Cox 



Henry D. Taylor 
President 

C. Erwiii Nelson 

r.eGrande Anderson 

Havid 1". Hart 

Loriii C. Hryner 



Clarence S, Boyle 
J. Irel Hart 

I.eland G. Larsen 



W. Thalnian Ilaslcr Harold A. Candlan.l 



/[221 ]r 




Camille Olseii 
Clayton Sorenson 
VVilma Sorenson 

Charles Wall 
Delia Roheilsun 



Pliares L. Nielsen 

Genile Allred 

James Jacobs 

President 

Hilda Peterson 

Alma Niclson 



SAN PETE CLUB 

Gladys Sorenson 
Vice-President 
Ross Graham 

Cernice Barton 

Morris Rasmussen 

Ruth Olsen 



Hdgel Klackham 

Thelma llowii 

Boyd W. Madsen 

Mary Monson 

ilcber Deiinison 



Ila Miner 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Ralph Erickson 

Evelyn Brown 

Ronald Dykes 

Julia Faux 



r[ 222 ]/ 



Lowell Johnson 
Vice-President 



SANS SOUCI 



O. Preston Robinson 
President 



Gerritt de Jong 

Sponsor 



Reed G. Starley 
Secretary and Treasurer 



Gordon Crandall McRay Magleby J. Theodore Arbon G. KI Koy Nelson 

Albert \'. Corless Keed Porter Eldon Crowthcr Newel \V. Bown Teddie C. Hansen 

Artie U. Miner . T. Delece Andelin Russell Magleby Jay E. Painter 

Rondo Robinson W'm. S. Lewis Claude Eggertson Eldon Brinley Tharol Larson 



4 223 ]< 




GAMMA PHI OMICRON 



Violet Elliot 

Instructor 



Maude Tucl^erfield 
Instructor 



Effie Warnick 
Instructor 



Anna Page 
I nstriictor 



Lola Ellsworth 
President 

\'erona Fieldings 

Dona Hansen 



Alberta Scorup 
Vic?-President 

Marie Kindred 

Evelyn Brown 



Jean Coleman 
Treasurer 



Edna Shelley 
Iva Phillips 



Catherine Eyring 
Lucile Straw 



Arlene Harris 
Secretary 



Lula McClellan 
Afton FiiiHnson 



r[ 224 ]r 



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X 



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226 



BUNYON 



AFTER THE BAWL IS OVER 

After the Prom — 

When you are tired and your feet are sore; 

After school when vacation days have lost their 

glamor; 
After an exam in Psychology; 
After being bounced for your board bill; 
After walking home from a boat ride; 

When the blues grip you; 

When you've had a spat with HIM; 

When your wife goes home to mother; 

When your check doesn't come from home; 

When you find out for sure that she doesn't love 

you; 
Before retiring and after each meal; 
The first thing upon arising; 
For your daily dozen laughs; 
For flat feet; 
For Halitosis; 
For the Ha Ha's; 
For canker and false teeth; 

Use Bunyon Oil 




ROBERT NIGHT 
ALLEN 

Alias 
"Bob Allen" 

Alias 

"Boob Allen" 

Alias 

"Gold Brick Allen" 

Alias 

"The Ape Man" 

Wanted at Provo 
High School for de- 
frauding the males. Im- 
poster and fakir. Last 
isecn at side show at 
Barnum and Bailey's 
circus. Wanted by 
snake charmer, and ani- 
mal trainer. Eloped 
with bearded lady. 
Charged with petty lar- 
ceny. Escaped from 
East S'lde Institute. 
Shoot on sight. No 
reward. 



KATHLEEN 

BENCH 

Alias 

"The Tiger Woman" 

"Under World Queen" 

"Chicago Sal " 

Height; 66 inches. 

Hair: Short. 

Face: Queer. (Sub- 
ject to change without 
notice.) 

Complexion: Has 
changed. 

Age: Guess again. 

Wanted in 1 9 states 
for kidnaping and 
murder. Escaped from 
state industrial school 
in 1927, and was last 
seen with huge corn on 
little toe of left foot. 
Poses as movie actress. 
Attempts to imitate 
Theda Bara. or Clara 
Bow. Wanted in 
Provo. for black mail 
and defraud of males. 
Reward in heaven. 



CONFIDENCE MAN. 

POLYGAMIST, 

SWINDLER 

LEGRAND 
ANDERSON 

Alias 

'Shiek Anderson" 

Alias 

"Andy Gump" 

Description 

Tall and beautiful. 
Eyes sore from fre- 
quenting cheap vaude- 
ville. 

Wanted by twenty- 
five women. Captured 
by one in 1927-28. 

Reward, $3.98, left 
isle, bargain county. 



THE RICH MANS DEATH 

Or 
THE MOURNER'S CHANT 

The rich man's death was wide announced, 
Relatives heard and thought: 

"The will, the will, 
I wonder what's in the will! 

Does it bode us good — 
Or iUi"' 

The telegrams his praise pronounced 
While cousins more news sought, — 

"The will, the will, 
I wonder what's in the will! 

Does it bode us good — 
Or ill.?" 

The rich man's corse was well attended, 
His relatives sat and pondered, 

"The will, the will, 
I wonder what's in the will! 

Does it bode us good — 
Or ill.?" 



The preacher's words with truth were blended 
While relatives wept and wondered — 

"The will, the will. 
I wonder what's in the will! 
Does it bode us good — 
Or ill.?" 

They placed him in his own rich vault 
While his family groaned — and mumbled, 

"The will, the will, 
I wonder what's in the will! 

Does it bode us good — 
Or ill?" 

Away they rushed both well and halt 
And through his papers fumbled, 

"Ah, here's the will, 
Sec what's in the will! 

God! It bodes us good — 
And ill!" 

— E. L. Roberts 



Try 

Presidential 

Brand 

Hosiery 

The famous 

Milk white color for 
Contented Calves 

COOLIDGE HOSIERY CORP. 

They do not choose to run 



BUNYON 



227 



The Student Supply Excavation 

(Sometimes called the Stadium Scoop) 



This space was to have contained a picture 
of the place, but it would only have been a 
hole and you couldn't have seen anything 
anyway — so we accidentally omitted it. 

Never go to town to buy anything when we can charge twice 
as much for it here. — We have "It." 

All prophets from this store go to study 'cm. No individual 
receives one scent — Effes Aris. 



Throw Away Your 
Alarm Clock- 



Try our patent pyjamas and you will 
awaken in time for every class — No need 
to miss breakfast or be late for school. 



Two Weeks (Free) Trial 



BARBED WIRE PYJAMA CO.. INC. 



Shylock Reducing 
Corp. 

{We extract a pound of flesh) 

Are you happy? 
Do you want to be popular? 

Arc you a wall flower? 

Do you sleep well in classes? 

Do your professors give you A's? 

If not then what 
You need to do is 

REDUCE 

Shylock Reducing Compound 

One trial will convince 
We Jew you down 



228 



BUNYON 



^ P iW. i . i HWl<BftW PiW' (W ■ il J llW B WIWpilP 




OUR BUNYON KITTY 



L 



was 



BUNYON 229 



Culture Plus 

EST the school year 192 7-28 remain anonymous and thus be illegitimate in the generations of B. Y. 
U. school periods, let us give it a name. Shall it be called the stadium year? Nay. for the stadium 
conceived years ago. and its incubation period docs not end until next fall. Shall we dub it the men's 
wardrobe, or the Social Unit, or the athletic renaissance year? Probably we are now approachmg an 
appropriate identification tag for 1927-28. 

Why not agree that the eight months just passing, shall be known in history as the Academic Culture 
Year? The year when Brigham Young stepped from overalls into dress suits. There you are. You can't 
beat the term, for it connotes all that has gone on from September until June, and it has a world of mean- 
ing. This Academic Culture Year, initiated as it was by our good President. Franklin Stewart Harris, 
after his sojourn with Kings and Consuls. Monarchs and Missionaries in all parts of the world, shall stand 
out as the epochal period of B. Y. U. history. 

Is there any student or faculty member so ungrateful as not to be glad that culture has at last come 
to Brigham Young University? We are the salt of the earth; the aristocracy of earth's teeming millions; 
the choicest blood of the Lord's selected few. That being the case, why should not all that the world has 
in culture, in refinement, in social and educational excellence, in appearance as well as in reality— why 
should not all this be our inheritance? 

Boasting direct decent from the tented culture of the Israelites, from the traveling nomads of Asia 
Minor, from the tough Teutons of the north countries, from England's merry monarchs, from pioneers of 
New England, from the hunted and driven Mormons of '49, and from recent Rotarians and all who are 
now great, let us no longer have the appearance of false humility, but rather let us strut to our full 
proportions. 

The faculty has good right to clean its finger-nails, and to brush the dust from its shoes, and to shave 
daily. It should also wear its collars no longer than six days, that they might rest on the seventh. And 
there is good reason why its pants should not bag at the knees as well as the seat. But. even my enthusiasm 
for culture stands hesitant at proposing that this learned group of blue blooded educators shall adorn them- 
selves with swallow tails and tuxedos. May the president be merciful in his demands in this respect or let 
him install a tailor on the campus. For suppose that Harrison R, Merrill and Dr. T. L. Martin would be 
forced to exchange pants for economic reasons. 

There is, however, no good reason that the students in general should not step up into the code and 
habits of refined society at one big step. They should adopt the president's wardrobe immediately. Let 
them wear business suits when they buy from the merchants, academic costumes in classes, sport suits 
they hike to and from Maeser Hill and. perhaps, as they walk home from auto rides into the country. 
Then, when the blushmg sun ducks down behind the desert horizon, let the students place about 
their select and smooth forms the dinner jacket for evening study or for infoi<mal visiting after dinner, as 
was the wont and habits of their pioneer ancestors. At formal functions — and may they be frequent 
let them appear in the swallow tail, and the high silk hat. and the spats, and the patent leather shoes. In 
order that the costume may have its proper setting, let the students swing polished canes about their heads 
as they walk to and fro at social functions. Also let their hands never be ungloved except at suitable 
moments. 

In all gatherings, where men and women meet, friendliness should be tempered with formality, lest 
it become familiar. The weeds of culture should be such as will keep people safely apart, and permit them 
to observe each other's externals at great distances, for distance lends liberty to the imagination, and 
romance has no chance to work at close-up points. 

Yes, when the history of Brigham Young University is seen from the perspective of years to come, 
the school year 1927-28 will stand out as the turning point, when the old school started on its career of 
culture and collegiate practices. Let us give thanks. — The Editor. 



as 



ft. %^ Ifr 




GEO. K. LEWIS 



BUNYON 



231 



Qflitrattiin 



To dedicate a publication such as the Bunyon to any one is, according to Bud Fisher, like naming a 
cross-eyed kid after somebody. But Bud had an easier time than I. because he dedicated his book 
to the guy who ran off with his sweetheart. Not having a feminine entanglement, I have been at a loss 
until finally a possible solution has arrived. 

When we check back over the years and trace down all the devilment which has occurred, nine times 
out of ten. the leads end at the same source. The chief instigator of humor, trouble, devilment, practical 
jokes, et cettera. is well known to most of us. being none other than our friend and accomplice. George 
K. Lewis, alias Georkee. To him I dedicate this volume. 

Some reports have it that he was born at the B. Y. U.. but tracing his birthplace and checking with 
his mother. I am happy to say that this statement is false. He did. however, spend many years here and 
it seems he took out his degree in a course of time. He was an intimate friend of Karl G. Maeser and he 
loves to tell of the time when he took Alice Reynolds to her graduation exercises. It was he who tossed 
a monkey wrench into the cogs of the machinery and delayed the laying of the corner stone of the Maeser 
Memorial. He also startled the whole institution by giving out the starting information that not a single 
window on the second story of the Educational Building was licked — not even the ladies' rest room. 

"When did you really first start going to the B. Y. U.?" I asked him. 

"Well sir," he began reminiscently. "It was way back when the tuition was twelve dollars and fifty 
cents and the big dipper was just a collapsible cup and the dog star, but a new-born pup. In fact. I can 
remember most all the incidents of the early days of the University, except when Professor Poulson used 
to cuss the teachers for piling on more work." 

He was well liked around the school, especially by the ladies. His shiekish appearance, caused many 
a young lady's heart to leap and slip, but none could phase him until a young lady who was collecting 
antiques, came along and fell for his rare old mug. He was recognized as Professor Eastmond's pet stu- 
dent and an intimate acquaintance of Prof. T. C. V. Romney, as was shown by the amount of time he 
spent in Romney's private office. Prof. Romney even petitioned for another chair, because Georkee was 
always occupying the only extra one he had. 

The faculty had two special sessions to try and determine how much rent should be paid by Lewis 
for his spot on the President's carpet which he occupied with monotonous regularity. 

"Didn't you ever get tired and wish to leave the school.""" he was asked. 

"Only once. " he returned. "And that was when Prof. Romney, in a fit of anger ordered mc to cither 
go to school or get off the campus. That was the only time I came near leaving home." 

He was often seen carrying large stacks of books to and from the Library, but we didn't find out her 
name until later. 

He enjoyed life here for many years and had he not left in 1927 it would have kept him jumping to 
graduate during leap year. Being a true patriot his only regret as he hung onto the school year after year, 
was that he had only one life to give to his college. 

"There is only one wish 1 would make." he said at parting. "That is that when I die I want my 
body to be cremated and my ashes mixed with the sweeping compound and used on the halls of the 
University, so that my spirit may hover over the old ruins and I will feel at home throughout all eternity." 



232 



BUNYON 




A PAGE FROM THE FAMILY ALBUM 



From safety pins to suspenders might safely be applied to 
the above snapshots. However, will not attempt to really 
give a name to the above, because we are rather rushed for 
time and we can't think of one anyway. But by way of 
explanation, we will state that the above pictures are 
authentic and guaranteed to be genuine, if not pure. If 
you will look them over carefully, you will readily see or 
guess who is the principal character in this great Meller- 
drama. Since this section is dedicated to our friend Georkee. 
we are showing pictures of him from the milk-bucket age 
to the boy scout period. 

In the first picture, it may be necessary to point out 
which one is he. so the reader will not be confused. The 
one between the ladies (as usual) is Geork — not the burro. 
His four-footed friends may have had some influence upon 
his later life. (We're not referring to his ears.) Next we 
find him in the milk-bucket (on the University farm) 
waiting for breakfast. As usual he is first in line where 
eats are concerned. Then we see him celebrating Christmas 
with the ladies, looking rather disgusted as he sees it a tea 
party. He doesn't mind tea. but he's from Arizona, not 
Boston. Being a good mixer, he is always in the swim 
and we see him at his old tricks, imitating Earl Carrol and 
annoying the ladies in the bath tub. Just observe the ex- 



pression of disgust where he stands with the hoe, realizing 
that the time has arrived, when he must dig in and work 
for a living. The next picture shows him first giving vent 
to his criminal tendencies when he was caught (and 
clouted) when in the sugar bowl. The picture almost 
looks like a flash snap and we can see that even at that 
early age he was becoming acquainted with night life. 
Doesn't he look sweet in dresses i" Just notice the center 
picture and observe the graceful form and pigeon toes. He 
claims that he had just slipped that on. because his sister 
had borrowed his trousers while he slept. The corner pic- 
ture proves that even in his early dates, he had a pull with 
the ladies. (Another version states that he began making 
an ass of himself for the ladies at that early date. ) But 
then his mother informs us that she bought him a tool chest 
so he could become an artist — not an artisan. However, 
she is still sadly disappointed. The picture in the scout 
uniform shows why he has always had such an aversion to 
the army. It's a cruel world, and if any one should show 
pictures of me like this, I'd carry them up to the 82d floor 
of the "Woolworth building and — here wait a minute 
Geork — I'd give them a nice ride down on the elevator 
and buy them a chocolate malted milk — so there. When 
do we eat? 



BUN YON 233 

The Old Grad Visits the Campus 

A^" Y, how times have changed 1 When I first came to Prove, the chief institution was seen on the 
^^*- foot of the eastern hills. Now, the young chaps refer to it as the East Side High and the Ware- 
house Academy, has become a full-fledged University, dragging a street along with it. Did roads have 
been covered with cement and great trees have been cut down for telephone lines. Traffic! I remember 
when Bullock's bull scared Holbrook's spanking team of mares and they had a runaway on Center street, 
and made so much noise, that half the town came out of the saloons and watched young Swenson catch 
them on his pinto pony. And later, a one-horse street car brought the boys and girls up to the Academy 
for a nickel a ride. There was nothing yellow about transportation in those daysl It was nothing un- 
common to see East Provo and West Provo driving real race horses at a healthy gait. My, what a change! 

Look at the girls and boys now-a-days. When I was in college, all the school boys used to wear 
derby hats, baggy clothes and square-toed shoes. And their hair looked like a mop-cloth. The old men 
wore beards down to their waists. And the girls! Their hair was five feet long and was filled with rats. 
Dresses trailed the ground and their sleeves had enough cloth in 'em to make a modern girl's dress! When 
I was a boy. if a man hid behind a woman's skirt, he was a coward, if he can do it now-a-days, he's a 
magician. We used to sit on the bench on the bank corner and enjoy windy days. I don't think the young 
fellers appreciate the times they're living in. The other day I saw a girl's track meet. Imagine my Ma 
lettin' her daughter appear in public without twenty yards of cloth draped all over her! And we used to 
put more sole and less cheek into our dancing! The present-day wrestler can learn more holds from an 
audience than was known to a professional wrestler, when I was a boy. And the women used to pad fore 
and aft. They don't take up near so much room as they used to, and I guess that's because we're con- 
serving resources and they want to help all they can. I once got my ears boxed darn hard, because I 
peeked through the keyhole and saw my .=ister put a little powder on her nose. The other evening, twenty 
girls in the first four rows of our church powdered their whole faces, while the choir leader led the con- 
gregation in the Doxology! My, times have changed! And gum cost lots more then, than it does now. 

Men used to do all the talkin' in public; now they're taking to writing, so as to preserve part of their 
vocabulary. It used to be unlady-like to discuss public affairs, now the women are fluent on all Dam 
projects. The men used to govern the States, as well as home, now they are permitted to enjoy one-half 
of their clubs. Women are being hired in the schools as fast as the men are being fired. It won't be long 
now, until you boys will be staying home and tending to one child, until it is old enough to be sent to the 
primary, where the public school system will free you from further obligations. When a woman married 
a man in my days, it usually lasted through a long period of years, until the couple got fairly acquainted 
with each other. But now!! I was readin' in the paper, the other day, that for every three marriages, 
there was one that was followed by a divorce. Seems like that's where you young 'uns aren't living up to 
your privileges and opportunities. It doesn't fit my teachings to have about one-fourth of our children 
without both their parents. 

Yes, times have changed! And I believe I'd rather be a young fellow of your day, than one of mine, 
but this much I'll say, liberty shouldn't be synonomous with abuse. Some of the boys who used to horse 
race arc still the best example of manhood. But our mothers' sacrifice taught much that should never die 
Live today, but honor the past. 



Last Minute Flashes 



As we go to press, the news comes to us that the old Cougar Cat has dragged in another victory. 
The "Y" track men have just completed taking state honors at the big track meet, setting; new records in 
the hurdles, the half-mile and mile relay, and tying the state record in the quarter-mile run. Rowc alone 
was responsible for nineteen and one-half points. 

Our kitty does make a real catch every once in a while. 

i 1 1 i 

HEARD AT THE TRACK MEET 

Jane — Why do they call these races "heats." 

Janie — I guess they run until they are all warmed up and then the one with the highest temperature 

wins. 

Let's go over to the church house and pick up a couple of chorus girls. 

1111 
Cleo — Tarbo, don't you dare take any more of that vile liquor! 
Tarbo — Aw, please, just one little cat-nip. 

1111 
We hereby extend a vote of thanks to Professor McAllister for teaching us to appreciate good music. 

1111 
In the olden days we used to go out and shoot a buck to get a pair of trousers. But times have 
changed. We now shoot twenty bucks and get hardly enough to cover our nether limbs. 

1111 
Think how lucky the early Mormon kids were! They had many more opportunities to remain away 
from school. Just think how many grandmothers they had. 

1111 
Clarke Larsen says that as schools nears the closing date, he is so broke that he couldn't buy a feed of 
oats for a night-mare. 



234 



BUNYON 



JUST FOR REMEMBRANCE 



Your presents is requested at the 

Old Gold ^arty^ 

in the 
Third Ward Hall 

Saturday evening, April 21, 1928 
Ei^ht o'clock p. m. 

a4dmission . . . . $ .10 
(Net Saving $1.40) 

BOARDING HOUSE FABLES 

Student's vision: Landlady ironing his shirts with broad 
smile. 

i i i -t 

Guess what is wrong with this sentence: "If anyone 
wants to take my car," said the landlord, "It's out there in 
front full of gas." 

1 i i -f 

The Ford: "What are you tryin' to pull.' You're 
choking me!" 

/ / / / 

The sun shines through upon him but still he doesn't 
see the light. 

■t i i i 

Enterprising Poet: "I shall write about a mountain 
and get inspiration from your stony stare." 



THE LATEST SONG HITS 

Chop Suey Must Be Putty Cause They Use It To Fill 
Up Chinks. 

1 i i i 

When They Wash The Nigger Baby Do They Have To 
Use Tar Soap? 

i i i i 

Judge, to girl reporter: "The prisoner was exoner- 
ated." 

Girl Reporter: "Oh, you mean thing! There ought 
to be a law against capital punishment!" 
1 i i i 

"Have you read the Condensed History of Borden, writ- 
ten in his Dairy?" 

"No. He must have been a Canny Scot." 
■f i i i 

"Will you have another drink?" 

Heavens no! Give me a glass of fire extinguisher to 
stop the burning in my throat!" 

i i i i 

"Is Tom Mix a bronch rider?" 

"Is he! He can ride anything from Pike's Peak to a 
Charlie horse!" 

i 1 i -t 

"The room was so quiet you could hear a drop gurgle." 
i i i i 

LATEST FACULTY YELL 
Three chairs for Harrison R. Merrill! 
i -t i -t 

She was only a hog-raisers daughter, but she sure made 
a ham out of me. 

i ■{ i i 

"Is it a real formal," I asked, "Or arc they wearing their 
own clothes?" 

"It's not a real formal, it's a B. Y. U. Formal. All 
the boys are ordering milk." 

i i i i 

We wonder who puts the cats out at night? 




THE FIRST WILD LIFE PARTY 



BUNYON 



235 




And then came my last year in College 

(Friends and Prof's all hoped 'twas the last) 

I was tired and worn out with women 

And Cupid's flag hung at half-mast. 

I crammed, studied, copyed, and worked sir! 

As a degree loomed faintly in view. 

So a few short months later I said "Good bye Alma Mater, 

I've learned about women from you!" 

What do Freshmen ladies think? 

No one ever knows. 

What of Soph's and Juniors? 

Just the same I s'pose. 

For when it comes right down to facts 

Whether discussing thoughts or sins. 

The Freshman baby, and the Senior lady, 

Arc sisters clear to their shins. 



THE SADIES 
By Quippling {With Apologies) 

I've taken my fun where I've found "IT" 
I've loved, motored, necked in my time. 
I've found fun in picking up sweethearts 
But few of the lot were prime. 
One was a well painted Senior, 
And one was a Junior from Cal. 
One was a shy little cross-country lass — 
Heaven help the poor studious gal. 

Now I am a good hand with the ladies. 
I can handle good, bad, tame, and wild. 
But I sure draw the line and I will every time 
At another Co-ed child. 

I was a young'un at college. 

I hardly knew how to begin 

To become well in touch with the ladies — 

Till the well painted kid broke me in. 

Faster'n me, but I trailed her. 

Stepped high and wide, I did sir! 

It seemed a good joke, to always be broke, 

But I learned about women from her. 

Then as a Sophomore in College 

I began looking round for a gal. 

And I took with a baby faced Senior, 

A sweet little Sheba from Cal. 

Lively, vivacious, and willful, 

A fiery vixen she were. 

And by all the dams, I flunked all exams! But — 

I learned about women from her. 

Somehow I was rated a Junior, 

Or I might have yet been lower class, 

And I got me a sweet little Sophomore, 

A shy little cross-country lass. 

She taught me the comforts of home life. 

From which pleasures I ne'er wish to stir. 

But she biffed me in haste, as my arm clutched her waist 

And I learned about women from her! 




It was just a game of hearts, of which he was rapidly 
growing weary. He had been interested at first, but there 
were too many. Hearts were his for the asking, some he 
had to reach out for. but always they were his. Some he 
kept awhile, fondling them, only to turn them loose again 
when he wearied. Then the queenly one came to him, 
dark and sinister. Like all the rest she was his from the 
start. From the first he feared her. He must rid himself 
of her at any cost. And even as he thought she came to 
him again, all alone. He held her close to him, running 
his fingers over her satiny face. His chance had come to 
cast her from him forever. A wicked gleam was in his 
eye, and his face lighted with a look of triumph. His 
change had come. He cast her from him saying, "Away 
deceitful witch, away from me forever." 

He sat back and breathed easier, relief showed upon his 
destorted face. "I thought I would get caught with that 
damn queen of spades." he quoth. 

It was just a game of hearts at a half a cent a point. 




SONG HIT— "When It's Springtime In The Rockies" 
(With apologies to Pratt Bethecs) 



236 



BUNYON 







H.R.M. 



"Do you play basket bn//," ambitioned the Beauteous Dame. And there were a (ireat many 
heard him gyrate, "/ hoop to tell you.'''' ISun- linger on that, hut do not stray. They get worse. '^Where 
can I produce a Dark Horse without a yellow stripe?^'' thought aloud the Coach, "/n Gallop, I\. iW.," 
thundered the Old l\ags who strayed about loosely. W hereupon Rothchild inquired, ^'W hat makes the 
ocean moan, and toss, and roll, and groan the iray it is in the habit of doing?^'' (A snicker is heard 
from the gallery. Someone has heard the ansiver.) A loud voice with a puny homo attached volunteers, 
''''If you had as many crabs on your bottom as that ocean, well, imagine what you would do.''"' And the 
long procession of invalids from the History Department prevented the massacre. Adduce! 

i i i i 

WHEN IS A DRUNK? room, the night-club and the home we cling to our well- 
Masterly definition of drunkenness has been made by a f'^d formula: 
committee of the British Medical Association. There is no If you boast that you're drunk, you're not; if you insist 
single test, they say. They put no trust in the rapid you're sober, you're drunk. — Judge. 
pulse, the repetition of phrases, walking a crack on the > / / > 
floor, or failure of the eyes to converge. They would GOAT TO IT Crow's nest and ladies 
observe jointly the state of clothing, smell of breath, . . , . , ..^ . ^ bowers — 
ability to pick up a coin, deftness in turning around quickly ^ ^ ' ' ' ^ All presented their lure 
and a dozen other things. More pure science is found in ^ poem. p^^ sentiment lofty, pure; 
the Cincinnati traffic court system. There the suspected So I cudgled my brain ' But these I disdained 
souse is tricked into giving a sample of his breath by In a fit to obtain As too highly constrained 
blowing up a football. The captured breath is then passed What I thot would please ^o I fluridly wrote: 
through a gas which betrays the percentage of alcohol, and ^, ,• • , , , "Little goat, little goat 
the intoxication graded as follows: , How is your sore throat? 

t »u 1 f/ r~> J J Thru the field I wandered c;„^„ ,,„,, H_,r,t -,ii rrnr n\-n 

Less than .1% Dry and decent bincc you drank, all my gin, 

.\% to .1% Delighted and devilish ^"^^ studied and pondered; Where have you been?" 

.2% to .3% Delinquent and disgusting Grass, trees, flowers. And the teacher said, "Bah!" 

.3% to .4% Dizzy and delirious i i i i 

.4% to .5% Dazed and dejected INNOCENCE 

More than .5% Dead drunk ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^ris Lewis a picture of September 

That procedure may do very well in sending taxi-drivers Morn, he blushed and exclaimed, "Goodness! Who did 

to the workhouse. But for daily social use, in the locker- you get to pose for that?" 



BUNYON 



237 




JUDCJES, 11 



and Washburn fled and was 
counted as a huathcn untu all 
Israel that day. 



N' 



DcALTON PARTRIDGE 

Alias 

"Big Fried Tater and Egg Man" 

Wanted for white slavery. 
( Blonds. I Deserter from the 
Boer War. Criminal conspiracy 
to win oratory medals. Wanted 
for the defraud of borders. 
Descnplion 

Guess vot nationality he iss. 
(Nose sirr. ) Musician and 
author impersonator. Looks like 
Abraham Lincoln, with varia- 
tions. Drunkard and Klepto 
manias. (Has taking ways.) 
Last scene, shoveling smoke out 
of gun powder factory. 
i i i 1 

"What does she look like?" 

"Well, she's the kind that has 
calves that only a cow could 
love." 

1 i 1 i 

She called him Maple Syrup, 
because he was just a refined 
sap, 

i 1 i 1 

Speaking of auto rides, Melba 
says that she has gone so far that 
instead of using roller skates, she 
had to use a compass to get home. 

OUR SUBJECT IS FINALLY BROUHT TO A HEAD 
G. K. L. ti Co. 

I was taken for a trimming yesterday and still I figure 
that I got my money's worth. When I feel a chronic tick- 
ling at the back of my ears, I know that it is time for the 
fort-nightly visit to the tonsorial parlor. No, dear reader, 
that is not where a throat specialist awaits those with a 
down-in-the-mouth feeling, it is where you get your hair 
cut. Not only a hair cut but also something to put on it 
to make it grow fast so you'll have to hurry back and have 
it done all over again. 

These tonsorial artists know their colors as well as their 
patrons because they appeal to the little shavers with a big 
stick dolled up like peppermint candy and starts them in 
early at a habit thai is seldom overcome unless they join 
the House of David or become poets. 

The manipulator of the clipping machine was buried 
in a Saturday Evening Post which he shut up as I entered. 
"Shut up" is rather a poor phrase to describe an act of a 
barber, for as he scrapes up faces with a razor he seeks to 
scrape up acquaintances with such leads as: "Wonderful 
fall weather we're having lately; seen the new cords the 



Cll.M'TKR 11 

( )\\' behold it came to pass 
that all the land was filled 
with tureen caps, "and there wa- 
not any place where they were 
not. 

1 .And from the north unto the 
scnuh there was peace, many spats 
and much rakint; of leaves, and 
Abdash I'.ushwah Cluff was 
counted as a great man and a 
worthy policeman. 

3 r.ut behold as the lif^htning 
flashed out of the East, ''and they 
knew not from whence it came, 
so did there begin to lie niurnuir- 
ings in the land. And the space 
of two court sessions had not 
passed away before there was 
found much nashing of teeth, and 
stiffneckedness. And Washburn 
'rose up and cried out against 
justice, and there was much con 
cern in Israel. 

4 Now it ilid come t(j pass that 
I did perceive that Abdash liush- 
wah Cluff was much to blame. In 
the hour of his weakness, yeah in 
the hour of his transgression, he 
did sin, and was no longer fit to 
be chief unto Israel. Yeah his list 
of telephone numbers did wa.x ex- 
ceedingly, ''and the young maid- 
ens of our land loved him ''dearly, 

.T .\'ow this was because of his 
subtlety in lightening their bur- 
dens, '^for behold Abdash is a 
plain man, and not given to much 
beauty, and the Lord was not 
good to his face for the maiden's 
sake, and before the foundation 



(1 "Banyan," 
19U, 
page 207. 

() "Bark of 
Kane 
County," 
Merviil, 

c "l*>osli 
Class 
Minutes," 
1927-28. 

,/ "The Ex- 
Exiles," 
Osmond. 

e "A Soph's 
Fables." 
page 6. 

/ "Discour- 
ses of 
Brigham 

^'oung." 

K "Wild .\n 
inials I 
Have 
Known," 
Jack 
London. 

;, "My Phil 
osophy Of 
Life." 
Osmond. 

i Provo City 
Police 
Records. 
Vol. 32, 
page 362. 

; "Commer- 
cial .\rith 
nietic," By 
Lyons, 

k "Lydia E, 
Pinkliam" 
Ad. 



/ "Sliylock 
Reducer" 
Ad. 

(M Sears & 
Roehucks 
Catalogue,' 
1889. 

)( ".Sppcclies 
of Great 
Import- 
ance," By 
TTaroId 
Candlaiid. 



of the earth freckles were with 
him. 

6 .\nd 1 did cr_\- unto him to 
turn aside from his ways but be- 
hold he was in the bonds of iniq- 
-lity and two sessions passed away 
then did I cease to cry repent- 
ance. 

7 Now I, ISaaz-ilarcjld II, am 
not a strong man and it did come 
to pass that I Jjegan to listen to 
the words of the crafty Abda.sh. 
Then Alyrtle-Tetra Peterson «and 
those like unto her came before 
me for judgment, and in fear did 
I judge them, and one day I did 
perceive that I had fallen like 
unto the sinful Abda.sh. Then 
four sessions did pass in which I 
judged with great bitterness, 
''then 1 did repent. Yeah my 
collection of telephone numbers I 
gave unto .\bdash, and my date 
l)Ook did I give unto Tubal B. 
Cox, 'and there was not one part 
of mine inheritance that I did not 
give away that day. 

8 But behold i am not a happv 
man. Though I turned aside and 
in my vengeance did I make 
Israel's maidens to weep and fif- 
een s])ats were counted as naught, 
'yeah and though I was hated by 
all young Israel for my *judge- 
ship's sake yet to this day am I of 
all men most miserable. 

9 And behold mine hour has 
come and whether I shall see you 
in the flesh 'or out I know not. 
But woe to me for my judgeship 
is left desolate. ( )ffenses must 
needs come, '"but woe unto Ab- 
dash, woe unto Tubal and unto 
Tetra and all by whom they came. 
■"I'eah verily woe unto all "Israel. 

Selaii 



Freshies are wearing? How's the Professors treating you 
lately? Who're you bettin' on Saturday — ?" ad infinitum. 

"How's business?" I sandwiched in as bibbed and 
seated, I turned myself over to the mercy of the butcher, 
whose tongue attempted as fast a clip :i.f, the machine, which 
had started the fur to flying, 

"Tough as a baling wire beard," returned the barberous 
one, cutting a wide swath well up toward the summit. 
"Can't even get a daily dozen to keep it trim." 

Taking a scissors hold on my ear and starting at the 
back of my neck, he signalled a left turn and abolished 
a sideburn. He repeated the operation on the opposite side 
as he started a new verse of bad business. 

"Shear fright" I offered as an explanation of why they 
stayed away but he pointed to a calendar which proclaimed 
in seven inch letters that the day of the month totaled four 
times that number. The twenty-eighth of any school 
month finds the students counting their pennies and the days 
before the allowance allows another ice cream soda. 

"They all carry long faces at the end of the month." he 
said sorrowfully, "and long faces makes the hair look 
shorter." 



238 



BUNYON 



OWED (ODE) ON A RYE CASE 

— : — Verse the First — : ■ — 

The boy was wailing on the deck 

Because the mermaids wouldn't neck. 

Mysterious glance, around he stole; 

His bag of chink he chunk. 

And many a wicked smile, he smole 

And many a wink he wunk. 

His doubts grew large, he snuk away 

A half a case of rye. 

"I'll have you yet my squirming maid 

Though all the fishes die. " 

And so he cast it o'er board. 

That half a case of rye. 

— : — \'erse the Second — : — 
A splash, a whirl, the rye it sunk 
Down many fathoms deep. 

And rested on a Crynoid trunk 

Where radiolarians sleep. 

Up swum the mermaid and smote amain 

The rye case in its strength. 

And many a bottle she did drain 

And quaffed it down full length. 

Her head, how like a fish it swum! 

Her eyelids heavy grew, 

And straightway to the top she cum 

And found him rye'd up, too. 

— : — The first neckstra — : — 

They met; 

They neck'd: 

The ship was wreck'd; 

The waves were in commotion. 

The fishes blushed; 

The waves were hushed; 

And greener grew the ocean. 

— ; — The second neckstra — No encores — 
An arctic breath old Neptune blew 
And chilled the maid and sailor, too. 
"Ah, " quoth he — "What hast thou done?' 
Then to the briny depths she spun. 
And as he staggered up the shore 
Quoth the mermaid, "Never more!" 
MORAL; 

Never neck 

When you're all lOet. 





OLD SONG HIT — 

"OH, HOW I MIS-USE TO-NIGHT 

/ / / / 

WANTED— HELP (.FEMALE) 

Applicants must possess the following qualifications: 
Ordinate between 4 and 7 feet; Abscissa not to exceed 
two arms length; Density must exceed 24 I. Q. ; Temper- 
ature must be between 82°c. and smoking; Angle of de- 
pression must not be more than two movies and one 
dance per week; Velocity must be between 50 and 250 
revolutions per evening; Endurance must be equal to two 
assemblies per week, and simple harmonic,, bi-labial oscula- 
tion; Age must not be evinced by the loss of wisdom teeth, 
molars, or grinders; Blondes with cars preferred. NO 
APPLESAUCE TOLERATED. 

SIGNED — Oliver's Boarding House. 
Phone 414-W 
y < r / 
A REVISED EDITION (OR ADDITION) 

Lips that touch liquor shall never touch mine — • 

Meaning liquor, of course, and not lips. 

Though girls carry theirs under knee garter bands, 

Boys still carry theirs on their hips. 

I've hidden my liquor in a place that is safe. 

When I take any with, it's inside. 

I'll admit that I'm selfish and the boys they are vexed. 

But good liquor I am loathe to divide. 



Pardoe's definition of College days: 
fool period we get a diploma for. 
y < *• / 



A glorious damn 



"Is he dumbi" ' 

"Dumb? He's so dumb that he soaked his feet in Dri- 
Foot so he wouldn't have to stop to use a towel." 

i 1 i i 

Poet: "I think I shall write a real love letter." 
Bachelor friend; "Better mark it 'Sample' or 'Not 
Valid' to play safe." 

■f 1 i -t 

I lay me down in class to sleep. 
I pray my notes my friends will keep. 
If a question's asked before I wake — - 
Poke my ribs — f'r heaven's sake! 



BUNYON 



239 




"The Man of a Thousand Faces" (we pulled that one). 
Alias "Straight Eye David." Alias "His Majesty." 
Description 
No whiskers. (Expelled from the House of David 
when he was just a litlc shaver). 
Height: Tall enough. 
Finger prints: Sticky. 

Wanted for bigamy by D. Davis. Figured in breach of 
promise suit. Poses as minister, and student body presi- 
dent. Escaped from San Quentin, 1921. Took the gold 
cure. 1927-28. 

Peculiarities: Has scar on left hip. First class nugget 
for some gold digger. 

■f Y Y y 
WHY FEED THE BABY ONIONS.'' 

Our baby then was sweet sixteen 

So sweet and so demure. 
We planned and schemed the long years through 

To keep her sweet and pure. 
Where ere she went her mama went 

We watched her every day. 
And — 

We fed the baby onions just to keep the shleks away! 

She had a form like Venus 

And her smile was just divine. 
The pucker of her rose red lips 

Just thrilled like rare old wine. 
One look into her deep brown eyes 
Just — Well now, need I say.'' 

We fed the baby onions, to keep the shieks away. 

We gave her everything she wished 

And onions, old and new. 
We gave her clothes and cars and cash 

Barred nothing 'cept home-brew. 
But then the worse it came to worse 

The news it made me flop. 
A Dago liked those garlic smells 

And she ran off with a Wop! 

Y -f f Y 

"So the professors have joined the Musketeers?" 

"Yes. they keep saying every morning. "You Musketeer 

earlier." 



The Hi-Power Girl, or Why Asylums Are Full 

By Glynn Deveraux 

It wouldn't be the act of a gentleman to betray the 
name of the girl in this heart-breaking epic, but suffice it 
to say that she had those, this incident taking place before 
Elenore Glynn invented it. For the sake of this tale we 
will call her Semantha. She was very lovely, this fair 
thing, so naturally I was attracted, because her father was 
a real estate agent, and I wanted grounds for my case. 
To add to her charm she was fortunate enough to have a 
car of her own. The attraction seemed to be mutual, I 
having a monopoly upon the local liquor business, and 
carrying a goodly bank balance at the time. This intro- 
duction isn't particularly material, but being a landscape 
gardener I must have my background. 

Seven-thirty, one glorious evening, just as the sun was 
setting behind the purple-tinted mountains in the west, this 
fair damsel chiffnered her benzene buggy up in front of 
the old man's residence. Alighting daintily she tripped up 
the path, missing the mud puddles, to the front door. The 
old man knocked the ashes from his pipe, took a bite of 
Climax, spat at the coal bucket and missed it, then arose to 
open the door upon the most glorious vision that human 
eyes have ever beheld. 

Her mission was simple, or that's how it sounded to the 
old man at least. A lounge lizzard had been bothering her, 
and she had come down to get some snake-bite. She pro- 
posed that I take a ride with her. When I came to. I was 
seated beside this fair thing. I looked around me. Thirty 
miles from the nearest gas station. Primeval was the 
country which greeted my eyes. The moon was up now, 
shimmering through the milk weed plants, casting weird 
and fantastic shadows upon the bug laden grass which 
encircled the stocks of these obnoxious weeds. 

It was an opportunity long sought. The moon over- 
powered me. Slowly my left arm found its way about her 
waist. She yielded. I placed a kiss upon her brow, next 
time lowering my aim, to the satisfaction of both. My 
heart was pounding like the engine of a 1914 Ford. Hours 
went by like minutes. Morning was nearing when at last 
she gasped. "Do you really love me?" 

"Yes, dearest," I faltered. "I would do anything in the 
world for you." 

"Anything?" She cooed. 

"Yes, anything,' I said desperately. 

"Then buy that dry farm that my father has been trying 
to sell you," she said in a business-like way. 

A sickening sense of disgust swept me. "How many 
sales does this make for you this week?" I ventured. 

"Seventeen, embracing five hundred acres, and fifteen 
customers. " she said proudly. 

I heard the key click in the ignition, later I found my 
way up the front steps and thus to bed. Well I've never 
been the same since, and I grow older every day. — Moral: 
Be kind to dumb animals. 




HO'W CAPTAIN NOAH AND HIS CHIEF GUNNER 
QUELLED MUTINY ON THE ARK. 



240 



BUNYON 




GORDON 

CRANDALL 

Alias 

The Banyan Shick or 

The Milk Thief 
WANTED 

For murder, arson. 
and molesting young 
ladies. Indicated by 
Federal Grand Jury for 
stuffing ballot box in 
beauty contest. 

Description 

Tough looking shiek 
of the cave man type. 
Has lily white hands 
and a chip off the 
corner of his left molar. 
Afflicted with klepto- 
mania (has taking 
ways). His right eye 
is off center and he has 
a leak in his left lung. 
Escaped from State 
Mental Hospital and 
poses as a business man. 
Choked five women to 
death in necking con- 
test. Has mania for 
stealing milk bottles as 
he goes home in the 
mornings. Likes milk 
so well he stole two 
cows and one goat, and 
four sego lilies. 

Reward, two 1927 
Banyans. 



ETHEL LOWERY 

HANDLEY 

Alias 

"Second Story Nell" 

WANTED 

Reward 77.000 Rubles 

Manti. St. George and 

Provo. 

Game 

Gold Digger. and 

sob sister. Connected 

with various jewelry 

deals, many of which 

were illicit. 

Description 
Age: Somewhere be- 
tween 1 2 and 52. 

Weight: 
3 ozs. 
Height: 



in lbs., 

6 feet 2 

Never the 



inches. 

Hair: 
same color. 

Eyes: Cattish. 

Mouth: Four false 
teeth on left side of 
lower jaw. Tonsils in 
fair condition. 

Clothing: Flapper 
type. 

Oftimes frequents 
cabarets and public 
dance halls. Married 
to gambler by name of 
Handley. 



BRUCE M. COX 

Alias 

"The Pantless 

Wonder" 

Pan handler, love 
pirate, and swindler. 
Wanted for selling imi- 
tation kilts, and safe 
crackers. ( Maybe we 
mean soda. ) Sentenced 
by freshmen court. 
1927-28 for stealing 
telephone numbers of 
fair sex from Judge 
Clark. 

Description 

Dark, black eyed, 
has fallen arches, and 
a floating kidney. 

Has knock knees and 
bare legs. Two pigeon 
toes and one webb foot. 
Has insolent expres- 
sion in right eye and a 
scar on third rib. Ar- 
rested for embezzlement 
of time from Stadium 
quota and padding the 
hours (not pants) of 
delinquent Freshmen. 
»■ »■ f / 

Cure for blackheads 
— Peroxide. 

1 i 1 i 

She was only a Print- 
er's daughter but I sure 
liked her type. 






■^iX-/ 



y 



What's Wrong With This Picture When Pardoe called out 

in Dramatic Art Class — 
"U-Nice-Fowl — " 

Eunice Bird answered. 
"Here." 

i i i 1 

The humble gentleman 
on the left is Cobb Webb. 
Being of a family of hero 
worshipers he is seen at his 
daily devotional. In the 
race of the year Cobb led 
by a cauliflower ear and 
if he had only gotten a 
picture shaking hands with 
Vic Taylor he would have 
made the team for the 
O. S. We ask you, man 
to man. is the picture 
right? 



"Hearts and love, love and hearts," 
Twas the first poet started it. 

And ever since, in songs of love, 
I he rest have "hearted" it. 

Why should the heart be chosen 
As the place for love to dwell, 
When any other organ 
I think would do as well? 

"My floating rib is broken!" 
"My stomach aches for you!" 
These two nifty phrases 
Are realistic, also new. 

"Come ease my pining left lung 
By saying you'll be mine!" 
Is a touching little couplet, 
Good on any Valentine. 

It really would be thrilling, 
To hear a bright young "medic" say, 
"Sweetspleen. my epiglottis 
Will be yours, forever and a day!" 
—E. C. J. 

■< i -f i 

"She sure has a vegetarian figure." 
"What do you mean?" 
"No meat." 

/ .* > > 

"Gee, but he's an awful smoker." 

"Why, I didn't know he used 
tobacco." 
"He doesn't, he smokes hams." 

i i i i 

Why should I live in the city when 

I love the country so? 
Why should I work in an office when 

A garden I could grow? 
Why should I make a costume when 

A picture I could paint? 
Why should I be such a devil when 

I could be a saint? 





SONG HIT— 
'I'm Gonna Dance with the Guy What Brung Me. 




Illte©®lliE(c^5iyGi(ai 



©mis 




^i5ai?g 










KATTY KITTIES 



THE above cut was taken from a color drawing, but the results makes Tarbo look positively sick. He seems 
very pale and meek for some reason. Leap year probably having something to do with it. Why even Clco 
refused to be in the same picture with him. They are really very nice kitties, though some people cannot 
tell them apart. For the benefit of those who can't tell which is which, we will let you in on a secret. Merely go 
up to their cage and toss a piece of meat in to them. If he picks it up. it's Tarbo, but if she picks it up it's Clco. 
We have named Tarbo so the reader will not be confused. 

Of course we all know that Tarbo is taken from the Indian word, meaning Brigham Young and Cleo is short 
for Cleopatra. Just think! The Shiek of the Plains and the Sorceress of the Nile. What a combination! But 
they are very well behaved cats when Glenn and Georkee isn't around. They arc now approaching three years of 
age and full growth. Both of them are in excellent health, even if Tarbo docs have Indian blood in him. (He bit 
one of his trainers, once.) Being wonderful spccimans of catdom. they should not be overlooked when one strolls 
around the foot of Maeser Hill. Without many worries, they live in happy oblivion even though they do have a 
scrap once in a while. Why one day Cleo biffed Tarbo a smack on the side of the ear that made him yeowl! 

"What did you do that fur?" asked Tarbo. in cat language. 

"Cat fur! " sn-a-a-ed Cleo. wittily. "To make a pair of kitten breeches." 

But being a modern cat and having read all of A Sap's Fables and the True Story Magazine, Tarbo still refuses 
to be a cat's paw. 

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248 



BUNYON 







GLENN S. POTTER 

Alias 

"Pyorrhea Pete" 

Original bad man. Bootleg 
king, Cowboy imposter. Cattle 
rustler and Horse thief. Arrested 
April 4. 1922. charged with 
drunkenness. Arrested March 
28, 1923, charged with intoxi- 
cation. Arrested April 19, 1924, 
charge, inebriated. Arrested 
again May 13, 1925 — for the 
possession of Moonshine. May 
1, 1926, for driving while intoxi- 
cated. July 4. 1926. he was ar- 
rested again for riding bronchs 
while under the influence of 
liquor. Sept. 13. 1927. he was 
again pinched for the possession 
of alcoholic beverages. Indicted 
by Federal Grand Jury April 2, 
1928, as head of alcohol ring. 

Description 

Words fail, ask any woman. 
Reward: Two pints. (Please 
don't crowd, boys.) 



I 

* 



12495K 



WILLIAM CRISMON LEWIS 

Alias "Bad Bill" 

(Ask the landlady) 

Alias "Red Lewis" 

Alias "Crimson Lewis' 

Ladies' man. and parlor shick 
Wanted for the circulation of ob- 
scene photographs. 

Description 

Wisdom tooth missing. Short 
on cash. Frequently is seen in 
cheap joints with either Tatherine 
Kaylor or Vena C. Jlegg. May 
use name of Taylor, seems to 
have liking for that name. May 
pose as politician or newspaper 
man. Has small mouth and ears. 
Wears number twelve shoe. Mole 
on left lung. Heavy drinker. 
Fond of root beer. Double re- 
ward if captured dead. 




This touching little paragraph was posted by 
the mates and we reproduce it as it was writ: don't 
blame us for mistakes. 

WARNING 

"CERTAIN INDIVIDUALS CONNECTED 
WITH THE BANYAN STAFF SHOULD RE- 
MEMBER THAT EVEN THEIR RIGHTS 
AROUND THE INSTITUTION ARE LIM- 
ITED. IT MIGHT BE WELL THAT THEY 
JOIN SOME SEWING CLUB WHEN THEIR 
GOSSIP AND TROUBLE MAKING 
TONGUES WOULD BE IN ORDER. 

"SPEAKING OF THEIR RIGHTS— WHO 
BUT THE EDITING STAFF OF THIS PUB- 
LICATION HAS A RIGHT TO TAKE OUT 
OR CENSOR ARTICLES PUBLISHED ON 
THIS SHEET. IS THIS NOT A DEMO- 
CRATIC SCHOOL— FREE SPEECH AND 
FREE PRESS. WE MIGHT ADVISE THESE 
INDIVIDUALS TO KEEP THEIR FINGERS 
OUT OF THE PIE HENCFORTH. 

"TRUE. BANYAN PICTURES ARE DE- 
SIRABLE BUT THE INDIVIDUALS IN- 
VOLVED SHOULD BE THE ONES WHO 
SHOULD SETTLE DISPUTES AMONG 
THEMSELVES. IS IT NOT POSSIBLE 
THAT THIS COULD BE ACCOMPLISHED 
WITHOUT THE AID OF TROUBLE- 
MAKERS. LET THOSE TO WHOM THIS 
APPLIES TAKE A RECOMMENDATION 
FROM US: OUR ADVISE IS THAT THEY 
START AN OLD MAID'S HOME FOR 
BLIND CATS." 

Sorry, boys, we haven't enough old maids, nor 
blind cats (we deal in blind pigs) to start a home 
— but any time you feel the old age creeping into 
your bones call around and we'll clean out the 
old coal shed and furnish nice new yarn for you 
to knit — bye, bye. 

(Tell it to the Sans Souci ) 

■f y Y Y 

SIGN ON GEOLOGY BLACKBOARD 

Students must not sleep out loud. 

Class asleep. Sh 

( So's your old Prof.) 

Snoring Limit — 50 minutes. 

Fossils in adjoining room. 

i 1 i i 

Take 

Bunyon Oil 



A COLLEGE BOY PULLS A FAST ONE 

1 1 i i 

"Search me." said the monkey, when asked where the fleas 
went in winter. 

1 1 i 1 

"If Tarbo and Cleo don't go to heaven, where will the 

angels get strings for their harps?" 

"I'm sure the hen's immortal because her sun never sets." 




THE SPIRITS OF '76 



*1 . \ J. ', 



lELSON 
FOUND 
GUILTY 



Six Others Implicated in 
Conspiracy Case 



After hours of severe questioning 
■fore the local city court seven 
irfully confessed a conspiracy to 
embers of the "Y" News staff 
Isify pre^s reports of the Banyan 
['" News liasketball game. C. Ir- 
in Xelson. ecHtor of the "Y" News 
so jilead guiky to the charge of 
ving his official sanction to the 
iblication of untrue statements 
mcerning both the Banyan and its 
iitor. 
The investigation came as a result 

a complaint lodged by Glenn S. 
atter against Nelson, .\fter a two 
onths' trial Nelson implicated six 

his staff, .who were also foiuid 
lilty by the court today. Judge 
eorge S. r>aliff annoimced that 
dgnient would be passed June 13. 



ROM PROVES 
KNOCK-OUT 

[any Novel Features At Hop 



"y News Editor Tirrested 
On Bigamy Ghar^e 



One of the charming and unique 
'ents of the year was the Junior 
rom., fostered by the Junior Class. 
he large hall was hastily decorated 
irrying out "A Night in Spain" 
ea. Others were carried out later, 
he decorations were helped great- 
by the placing of piles of red 
•icks at intervals about the floor 
ith great bowls of refreshments 
ion them. 

The receiving line were well 
ained in pocket-picking and they 
ited many good watches, pearl 
?cklaces and silk handkerchiefs, 
he girls were tastily dressed in 
ue polka-dot woolen night gowns 
hile the boys were more modest 
id came in Levi's. 
The feature of the evening was a 
mtest of eating corned beef and 
ibbage. Others spoiled a good 
'ening by trying to sing. 
The frolic reached its height when 
on Lloyd became enraged at Irlclen 
Don her refusal to dance with him 
)r the fifteenth ct)nsecutive dance. 
!e threw one of the empty bowls at 
Helen's head, scoring a neat hit. 
he bowl was badly spoiled as well 
I a large mirror. This affair was 
le signal for the party to liven up 
id instantly there ensued a thrill- 
ig exchange of bricks by all pres- 
it. The city authorities were jeal- 



C. Erwin Nelson, alias Star, alias! 
-Major Canis. was arrested last' 
Thursday afternoon just as he was 
making his getaway from the court 
house after having married }^Iiss 
Sina Brimhall. local beauty and 
campus belle. 

Nelson was arrested and lodged in 
the city jail where he is being held 
without bonds. Lpon searching his 
suitcase officers discovered a quan- 
tity of silverware belonging to the 
bride's parents, which Xelson alleges 
was given to him for a wedding 
present. 

Investigation of the count\- clerk's 
records showed that Miss I'.rimha'.l 
had misre]5resented her age Isy seven 
years, having told the clerk that she 
was twenty-one. The unfortunate 
iiride's parents were called, and upon 
arriving they insisted upon having 
the marriage annuled, saying that 
they had always disapproved of Nel- 
son, suspicioning that he had designs 
ujion the Ijride's estate. They stated 
that the}- also mistrusted h'm on the 
grounds of his past love affairs, and 
because of the snaky look in his left 
eye. It is an interesting fact that 
while this man has been in the vi- 
cinity of Provo he has not been seen 
with a girl older than 18. Eminent 
psychologists, including Mr. Poul- 
son, declare that he is an interesting 
case of neaudosauratis indentin- 
tatus specialrosis. This is another 
name for "gentlemen prefer chil- 
dren." 

It has been learned that Nelson 
has wives both in Brigham City and 




ViciousCriminal 

Escapes From 

San Quentin 



Canada, and eighteen sweethearts on 
the "Y" Campus. Governor (ieorge 
H. Dern today signed the extradition 
papers, and Nelson will be returned 
to Canada, where he will be tried 
upon the joint charge of bigamy and 
contributing to juvenile delinquency. 



Card of Thanks 

Members of the Alpha Kappa Psi, 
national commerce fraternity, are 
unanimous in expressing their ap- 
preciation for the hearty co-opera- 
tion offered 1)y the editor in ap- 
propriating two entire issues of the 
"Y" News to their installation into 
the national order of "Eagle Squeez- 
ers." ( Maybe we should have said 
"Buffalo Squeezers," because there 
isn't many who have more than a 
nickel left.) 




'SPIDER" WEBB MUZZLED 



Due to a recent tirade against the 
]iiiwers that be, the official muzzle 
lias been applied to Cobb Webb, free 
lance writer, political economist 
and radical. This drastic action 
comes as a result of an article which 
recentlv apjjeared in the "S(|uak" a 
paper owned and edited by Webb, 
in which he denounced the first part 
of the social unit system as being 
jiartial, and unfair in their selection 
of new members. 

".'~i])ider" Webb received the sen- 
tence in silence, without any great 
.-how of emotion. .After recover- 
ing his balance enough to speak, he 
turned to his right hand man, Alton 
J. Hayes and said, "Now man to 
man. I ask you, is that right?" 

.Ml authorities agree that this ac- 
tion will be followed b\' a distinct 
fossilization of slang, and general 
staunation of righteous indignation. 



SONG HIT— 
"AMONG MY SOUVENIRS" 



MAN NEARLY ESCAPES 
WITH yOUNG PROVO GIRL 



.\ strange, red headed, young man 
nearly escaped with one of the pop- 




SAN QUENTIN, Calif. ( AP) — 
According to dispatches received 
from here last night C. Irwin, alias 
Star Nelson, is reported to have 
escaped from this institution today 
by digging a hole under the swim- 
ming ])Ool and floating out of the 
sewer into the sea. It was impos- 
sible to pick up any clue from the 
ocean but it is believed by the police 
that the young man headed for San 
l^'rancisco. 

Nelson, who has been doing a 
term of \? years for continued en- 
croachment upon the rights of free 
voung girls, is one of the institu- 
tion's worst criminals, refusing to 
work, stealing the silverware and 
making it miserable for the other 
prisoners by going out into the sticks 
and pulling faces at them. Nelson is 
a \ery accomplished young man and 
may be found in the best of society 
until he gives himself away by fa- 
voring the youngest girls he can 
find. He is five feet '■) inches tall, 
weighs 150 pounds and has bright 
red hair (which may be dyed to any 
color as he is very clever at decep- 
tion ) . When he smiles he portrays 
a good set of second hand teeth back 
of which is a scarred tongue. 

This atrocious x'oung man wa> 
convict ninnber ')")9')') and residents 
of neighboring states are asked to 
keep a sharp lookout for him and to 
watch their young girls. He may 
appear at .-uiy time disguised in any 
manner. 

The police started the search with 
blood hounds but were disappointed 
as the young man is reported not to 
have halatosis and his trail cannot 
lie followed. However, this may be 
just one more of his clever decep- 
tions, it is almost certain that he has 
pyorrhea. 

Any information which would 
lead to the apprehension of this atro- 
cious young man should be forward- 
ed to San Quentin at once. A re- 
ward of 50c, is now set on his head. 



250 



BUNYON 



SOPPED BY THE CAMPUS SOAK 

Once upon a time there was a College boy who didn't 
smoke, drink, cuss, play pool, dance, or care a whoop about 
women. But remember, that was once upon a time. 

I was nervous. There's no use denying it. As nervous 
as a Collegian with a strange Bootlegger. I had been listen- 
ing to his sobbing and crying until I could stand it no 
longer. Approaching him I asked. "What's the trouble, 
old man.'" Fresh wails burst forth and when he finally 
calmed enough to speak he sobbed. "I just found a good 
recipe for home brew and — and — I ain't got no home!" 

"What! have you been drinking.'" I asked sharply. 

"I sometimes wonder," he returned, sadly. 

"Have you ever tried eating candy as a substitute for 
liquori"" I asked. 

"It may be all right." he returned wearily, "but candy 
never makes me want to sing 'Sweet Adeline.' 

He leaned toward me and whispered in my ear. 

"You're j'ight!'' I said, glancing neirvously up the 
street. "A drink in time prevents confiscation." 

"Tee hee," he giggled. "Eat, drink, and be merry — " 

" — And you'll soon be drunk." I added. 

"Lets sing," he suggested. 

"Sing what?" I demanded. 

"Sixteen drinks on a Co-ed's breath, Yo-ho-ho-ho- and 
the Dean of Women." 

"Is the moon up? " he asked, sleepily. 

"No," I said. "The last quart was one dollar cheaper." 

"Good boy." he muttered as he kicked off his shoes and 
climbed a lamp post. "Look before you lap." 

Being shot at sunrise is a great thrill — if you can afford it. 

By way of explanation, dear reader, this is not an Amer- 
ican tragedy. Neither is it a story of two College boys 
gone wrong, but merely extracts from a College Humor 
Magazine. 

1 i i i 




A QUESTIONNAIRE OF SPRING 

Oh tell mc why do lovers sigh 

And seek some dim seclusion. 

Why do they stand, just hand in hand. 

Half drunk with sweet delusion? 

Oh why the bliss, in lover's kiss 
When lips meet, press, and linger. 
Why do hearts sing when sparkling ring 
Shines on a dainty finger? 

Oh tell me please, why lovers squeeze 
When arms round waist entwine. 
And why they gaze in soulful daze 
In eyes that seem divine? 

I do not know why love should glow 
And make the world go reelin'. 
But then I see. and you'll agree 
'Tis a grand and glorious feelin'. 




IF FOR GIRLS 

If you can keep your beau when all about you 

Girls lose theirs and blame it on a vamp. 

If you can scorn a boy when others chase theirs 

And yet keep him from going on a tramp, 

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting. 

Or being talked about, don't deal in such. 

Or being hated, don't give way to hating. 

But sweetly smile and do not gossip much. 

If you can dream and not make dreams your master 

Or love and not make man your aim. 

If you can cope with vamps and blue-eyed babies 

And beat these dangerous creatures just the same 

If you can dare to introduce your sweetie 

To beauties, flirts, an heiress., coeds too, 

And yet keep him to you surrendered 

While watching faces, pretty, young, and new. 

If you can stand to lead him to the movies 

And watch Mae Murray gaily flip along 

Or Aileen Pringle as the vamp eternal 

Yet keep the dear from wandering off far wrong. 

If you can make your red lips and your coy eyes 

Keep him thinking you're the only girl on earth. 

And keep him loving you like all creation 

So he'll never guess the truth of what you're worth. 

If you can dance with other men and make him jealous 

By walking with them, make him raving mad. 

Then with a few words smooth the thing all over 

And with a loving smile then make him glad. 

If you can fill the unforgiving minutes 

With sixty seconds full of dizzy whirl. 

Yours is the world and every man that's in it 

And more, you'll be a super-vamp, my girl. 

i i i i 

"Say! This is a rotten 'Who's Who'. I've looked all 
through it and I can't find a single name but Glenn Pot- 
ter's." 

"Glenn Potter! Let me see that book! * * * '•No 
wonder, you dumb-bell!" This isn't Who's Who,' this 's 
a copy of 'Here's How!' 

i 1 i i 

APPLESAUCE! 

Four hundred people tried to live at the boarding house 
where it was reported that they always had hot water, 
and the landlord didn't make excuses about the heatei 
being out of order. 

i i i i 

"Say! Don't walk so fast. I can't keep up." 
"Why, I'm not walking fast. I'm almost crippled. I 
have a charlie horse." 

"No wonder I'm behind! I can't compete with a quad- 
ruped!" 



BUNYON 



249 



OQE? ©OGxecg 



NUGGETS 

The year of the Nuggets would have been a perfect success 
if they hadn't have had to bid Snowball Worthington three 
times before he realized the benefits of becoming a member of 
the auxiliary to the Y. D. D.'s. But then Snowball is a good 
man. he has heard lots, even if he can't remember. This group 
was most conspicuous for the absence of its famous doUar-and- 
a-half party this year. But speaking of a doUar-and-a-half 
reminds us of that traveling salesman story — but that is entirely 
away from the point — let us continue. There's really no trurh 
to the rumor that the Y. D. D.s and the Nuggets are going to 
amalgamate, there is really no need of this. Need more be said.' 
There needn't be another word, but what we are trying to say 
quickly is this, there are just four ways of becoming a Nugget, 
namely, be a returned missionary: get elected to office; thirdly, 
steal, borrow, buy or rent, a tuxedo and act elite: last, but no: 
least, trace your bold relationship — prove that your ancestors 
dipped their socks in the same coffee — in other words be a litic 
brother. Of course all aspirants are supposed to spring a f st 
one on the Sigs at every opportunity. Having withstood the 
rigors of the above, you are then eligible to sink everything you 
own. including your birthright, for a half acre in the mountains. 
Do all these without bending a borrowed shirt and you are as 
good as elected. 

TAU SIGS 

Struggling Co find an appropriate name for a newly formed 
unit, the group stood in the rear of a nearby confectionery and 
pondered. Smoke curled through the cracks in the door when 
suddenly a Professor came ambling around the corner. In a 
hoarse whisper came the command. "Toss Gigs." The fags 
disappeared and as the color returned with the departing Prof., 
thus spoke one of the gang, namely. Spider Weblj. "I have it. 
we will henceforth be known as the Tau Sigs. The name was 
voted in at once. They didn't dare refuse, because, as a rival 
unit said, "There's only about two of that gang that has a mind 
of their own and Cobb Webb thinks for the rest." Of course, 
we don't believe all we hear. Any way. they elected Dick Thorn 
president, because he was the only four-quart man in the bunch. 
They were forced to give up their Frat house, because the cellar 
wasn't large enough. They're a fine bunch, anyway, in spite 
of the rumor that they would have had Vic Taylor for vice- 
president, if the Nuggets hadn't beaten them to him. They 
daren't go on missions, for fear they will be Nuggets when they 
return. Where do bad little boys go? Join the Tau Sigs. 

SANS SOUCI 

Yea. verily, brethren, we live our religion. If we get cuffed 
on one side of the cheek, we turn the other and allow a swat on 
the nose for good measure! 

This Sunday school bunch is rightly named — let happen wh;t 
will — why worry.' Being a gang of "stout fellas." they're sure 
brave. They'd tackle anything, from a training school teacher. 
to a crippled missionary. Nothing (?) scares them. They arc 
really just in the period of evolution, since the mates made 
monkeys out of them. But in spite of all. they're an agreeable 
bunch. Their ladies have decreed that they cannot have a stag 
party and lamb like they agree. We use the sheepish expression, 
because they can't pull the wool over our eyes. Anyhow, they 
are supposed to be a unit, when convenient, and things indi- 
cate that they might fight just as quick as the mates can say 
"Pres. Robinson." 





CROOKED POLITICIANS 

1 i 1 i 

We have heard that money draws more interest in stockings 
than a bank. 



What the Well-Dressed Coach Will Wear. 



MATES 

Water, water, everywhere, that's all the sailors drink, seems 
to be the war cry. 'This we can readily believe, since we saw 
them take watei* one memorable afternoon in the Banvan offic. 
But then we admire their courage (? ) and diplomacy in evad- 
ing unpleasant acknowledgments. Of course, there arc some who 
do not exactly agree or follow the House of Israel, under the 
big cheese Groberg, so those we exclude and excuse. They have 
honestly tried to stimulate life by stirring things up, but being 
slightly fearful whenever they rub fur the wrong way, they 
hasten to brush it back and apply the soothing oils. Being good 
sailors, they realize the advantage of oil on troubled waters. 
Evidently the water cure has its effect. 

LES CHEVALIERES 

It has been discovered that when a poor lad has not a leg left 
to stand on. he joins the horsemen. Not the Pour Horsemen — 
the Poor Horsemen, a sort of foreign layout, known as the 
Chevalieres. Cherchez la Femmc and Potter's jug. seems to be 
the battle cry. They are a promising group, according to their 
private books, therefore, they are about to dismount for lack 
of funds. They almost had a party once — two of the group 
agreed and the rest had individual ideas. Whenever they call 
a meeting, they merely lock Star Nelson in the bath room and 
De Alton calls the roll. If this group is still horsing around 
next year, we hope they find their horses and get into the race, 

O. S, TROVATA 

So far in our research, we have been unable to trace the root 
of the word Trovata. However. Tony the shoe shiner informs 
us that is probably of Italian origin. This we doubt very much, 
due to the circumstances which surround the organization of this 
illustrious society. It seems to be the prevalent understanding 
that most of these girls come from long island, maybe they are 
all great neckers? The only evidence we have to substantiate 
this theory is that "Cobb " Webb, two letter wrestling man. 
didn't even qualify for the finals in the O. S. Formal. 

To these girls w'c hand the floral wreath, regardless where they 
hail from. It will be remembered that they tied for first place 
in the Pep Vodie. Our sincere compliments go to them, even 
if the judges did have to cheat to place them. 

DECA SEMA FE 

And to think that they organized social units to get away 
from the Greek names for Fraternities and Sororities. The 
Deca Sema Fc unit is one of the largest (in numbers) in school. 



252 



BUNYON 



It is rcpoucd that they have two mascots. Don Juan Cluff. and 
Socrates (Dorothy Decker's dog). These girls have demon- 
strated to the world that stability is a result of evolution, hav- 
ing weathered fifteen fights and three successful parties. Their 
meetings are interesting, all they have to do is suggest something 
to do. and wonder who is going to do it. Don Cluff and 
Socrates just wait outside until it is all over. It is rumored 
that Socrates refuses to sleep unless Don is there to rock him 
in his cradle. In conclusion, we might mention that the 
club seems to have a failing for road houses and other question- 
able places. (Ask Mrs. Smart.) 

NAUTILUS 
In reviewing the feminine tongs, we have arrived (somewhat 
dizzily) at the conclusion that the Nautilus carry more weight 
than any other social unit in this de-ir democra'.ic old institu- 
tion. Along with the follies girls, they have adopted form — 
ality as their chief objective. As a matter of fact these girls 
are so formal th:!t their boy friends have to smoke exclusively 
Tuxedo at their parties. Which reminds the writer that al- 
though the Salt Lake date bureau functioned admirably, their 
Haster formal had to be held two weeks early on account of the 
shortage of Tuxedoes which the threatened trip of the Male Glee 
Cub to California was almost bound to occasion. To the ris- 



V MR.H/HNKS.' I UNOfR-j 
( STAND T.1/\T VOU v^ 
C MAve QUITE A ? 

( LAROE FAnii-y -" 




Social error 
book mark. 

Political error No. 
tuition was raised. 



gg for 



Y Y Y 

Asking the Presicient why the 



ing generation we dedicate this plea. "Let him take your Tux 
kid. there's a possibility that you might break into society if 
you do. He won't spoil it. why the trousers might not even 
come within a proximity of his shoes. " 

CESTA TIES 

Contributions, inventions and discoveries should always be 
lauded by those whose happiness has been increased by the same. 
To the originators of the "community sweetheart " idea goes 
the glad hand of the lonely and deserted, or in other words, the 
Extension Division of the Physical Education Department, has 
achieved a notable success. This powerful organization known 
as the "Celestial Ties " could not be balked by ordinary prob- 
lems like the shortage of men. However, this played an im- 
portant part in fixing the date for the first annual "jewel." no 
treasure hunt. The future of the club will be devoted to an 
attempt to make the f.^mous motto of the Northwes:ern Mounted 
Police a reality. "Get your man." 

Y Y Y Y 

Lack of space and information prevents us giving each Unit 
a nice write-up, but then again, some of them do not like tae 
idea of paying for advertising, but it's really their loss. But 
for the most part we really haven't the power to resurrect the 
dead. — Selah. 

I LOVE WOMEN! 

I love women! 

I dislike them! 

I hate them! 

In fact I am a confirmed 
misogynist. 

I am afraid of women! 

They annoy me! 

They get on my nerves! 

In fact they are my worst 
enemies. 

But — 

The good book says to love 
your enemies. 

Therefore — 

I love women! 

Y Y Y Y 

"1 love to thee a girlth 
thigh. " said lisping Johnnie. 
Now he wonders why she slap- 
ped him. 

Y Y Y Y 

"Bring me the listerine," 
commanded the lady holding a 
cute black and white kitten at 
arm's length. "I think this kitty 
has halitosis." 

Y Y Y Y 

"Gosh. " sighed Star. "There 
are a lot of girls that don't want 
to get married." 

"How do you know?" 
"I've asked them." 

Y Y Y Y 

"She was so hot that every 
time it rained she looked like 
a cloud of steam." 

Y Y Y Y 

Cris says that a negative dis- 
position isn't developed in a 
dark room. 

Y Y Y Y 

"The room was so quiet you 
could hear a drop gurgle." 
/ / / *• 

She's so dumb she thinks a 
Pool Room is a place to swim. 

Y Y Y Y 

We were going to tell the story of the jail but we find it's 
barred. 

Y Y Y Y 

Pitful cases. — The sap who mi.'itook a lighted cigar butt 
for a keyhole in the dark. 



Business and Professional Page 



PROFESSIONAL 

George S. Ballif, Attorney at Law. City and County Bldg. 

Booth and Brockbank, Lawyers. Knight Block 
A. L. Booth, L E. Brockbank 

M. B. Pope, Attorney at Law, Knight Block 

Morgan and Coleman, Lawyers. Commercial Bank Building 
A. B. Morgan, Jacob Coleman 

Christenson and Watkins and Dunford, Lawyers 
A. H. Christenson, A. V. Watkins. Wm. S. Dunford 



BUSINESS 

Jackson Motor Car Company (Nash) , Provo 

Olsen y Lewis Barber Shop, 274 West Center 

Sutton Market Company (Two Stores) 

M. H. Graham Printing Company 

Y. Barber Shop (Brig Stevens, Manager) 

Post Publishing Company 

Carpenter Seed Company 

Provo Consolidated Real Estate Company, 124 West Center 

New Century Printing Company 

Globe Music Company, 104 North Univ. Ave. 

Heindselman Optical K Jewelry Company, 120 West Center 

Haws-Goodman Hardware Company . 

Robinson Music Company 

Russell Barber Shop 

Provo Cleaning ^ Dyeing Company 



r[253 ]r 




'quality — always at a saving** 

Doing Business Under the Same Plan for 26 Years 



Metropolitan 
Newspapers 



There are eighty-one important market 
centers in the United States. 

Salt Lake City is one of them and The Salt 
Lake Tribune the outstanding paper repre- 
sentative of this rapidly developing territory. 

It is a member of "The 100,000 Group of 
American Cities." each paper of which was 
chosen for its large circulation and character 
of its editorial and business policies. 



'alt Safe? ©rthuttp 



'My roommate is awfully dumb." 

'Why so.'" 

'I can't learn him to say 'teach.' " 



"Do you drink water?" 

'What are you trying to do, dilute me.-"' 



GAS 

OILS 

TIRES 



EDITORIALS 

Wholesale and Retail 
See 
A. Rex Johnson 



FOR LOVE SICKNESS 
(Female Trouble) 

Lydia E. Sinkham's Compound 



"That is a twelve piece orchestra." 
"It doesn't look like it." 

"Yeah, those six men can play ten different fox trots and 
iwo waltzes." 



i i i 1 




BUD'S SERVICE 



Phone 85 5 and 39 



We Call and Deliver Corner 3rd So. and 7th Ea 



CAR 

WASHING 

GREASING 



<[ 254 ]y 



WE CLEAN YOUR CLOTHES CLEANER 



PROVO CLEANING & DYEING CO. 



77 N. 1st West 



Phone 46 



Provo, Utah 



DIRECTIONS FOR A FORMAL 



Be sure and wear a tuxedo, and a stiff front, but for 
goodness sake don't wear your sweater underneath your 
coat. If you haven't any studs, be Nonchalant. Hght a 
Murad. Hook bouquet of posies, and dress Hke an errand 
boy to deliver them, this will save you money. Slick your 
hair down. (It isn't polite to use lard) and make sure that 
your tie is a bow tie and fits your collar. Shine shoes, and 
be careful to remove all protruding tacks from the soles so 
they will not cling to the floor. Then if your neck and ears 
are clean, and the dirt removed from under your fingernails, 
you are ready to sally forth upon the great adventure. After 
walking to your lady's house, grab a telephone and while 
holding the receiver hook down cuss the yellow cabs for 
being busy. 

When you are finally seated at the banquet be careful, 
while crossing your legs and don't wipe your shoes on your 
partner's stockings. (The door mats are used for this 



purpose ) . Take good notice of the speakers, this will serve 
as an index to how much and how fast you may eat. Be 
careful and not stir your cocoa with a fork, and for good- 
ness sake do not. under any circumstances, ask for a second 
helping of anything. Observe closely if chocolate is served, 
and do not blow the cream off before drinking. Your napkin 
is to be used to wipe your mouth, not your nose. Do not 
tuck it under your collar, because if you must drink your 
soup, lean over the table, so as not to spill it down the 
borrowed front. Try not to make too much noise when 
the orchestra is playing, it annoys the musicians. They may 
be hungry too. When you finally get down to the olives 
nibble very daintily, and eat slowly, because it takes a long 
time for Pardoe to get through what he is trying to say 
quickly. Follow these directions carefully and take your 
own girl home. You are made. son. You will be more 
than a success, you will be a riot. 



PACIFIC STATES CAST IRON PIPE CO. 

General Offices and Foundries 
PROVO : : UTAH 

Manufacturers of 

McWANE-PACIFIC, PRECALKED JOINT AND OPEN BELL, 

CAST IRON PRESSURE PIPE AND 

PACIFIC SANITARY SOIL PIPE 

Sales Offices 



Salt L.ikc City, Utah 
Pori'Lind. Oregon 



Los Angeles. Calif. 
S.in Francisco, Calif. 



LOVINGER DISINFECTANT CO. 



Utah's Only Exclusive Manufacturers and Jobbers 
OF DISINFECTANTS AND .JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 



liq SO. WEST TEMPLE 



SALT LAKE CITY 



/[ 256 ]/ 




Announcing the Inauguration of Our 
NEW LOW NET PRICES TO ALL 

We have in the past endeavored to show our sincere appreciation of the loyalty of 
our many customers by serving them with merchandise of dependable quality at 
the lowest possible prices. This policy has brought us increased volume, which 
has reduced our percentage of overhead, in consequence we have decided to inaug- 
urate in all of our departments and stores a new era of LOW NET PRICES TO 
ALL. Absolutely one price and that to everybody we serve, together with the 
price and quality guarantee explained below. Come and take advantage of these 
prices. 

WE GUARANTEE THAT THERE ARE NO LOWER 
PRICES THAN HERE 



Our Price 
GUARANTEE 

If you make a purchase 
here and find a lower 
regular price elsewhere 
we will refund the dif- 
ference. 




mm BROS COMB 

THE DEPARTMEMT STORT; O^ PROVO • 



Our Quality 
GUARANTEE 

We will make fair and 
immediate adjustment of 
any article purchased 
here that is not satis- 
factory and as repre- 
sented. 



f[ 256 ]/ 



The EMPORIUM 



WOMEN'S WEAR 
ART GOODS 



An Exclusive Ladies Store 
Featuring The Best In 
DRY GOODS — LADIES' FURNISHINGS 
At Lowest in the City Prices HOSIERY 



REGISTER NOW 

For Class in 

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 

Evening Classes 



She's so dumb she thinks a chaser is a game of tag. 



i i -I i 



Love's Old Sweet Song: When do we eati' 




■■HE BROKE HIS RIB. 



JT 



\ 



The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 

The DAVID J, 

MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois J^ 



(S'ver> Mo Hoy Made 

Covet- hears chis 

tfode mark on the 

back \id. 




<[257]y 





Depend on PIGGLY WIGGT ,Y 

BECAUSE 

PIGGLY WIGGLY GIVES YOU LOWEST PRICES, 
PIGGLY WIGGLY GIVES YOU FULL WEIGHT. 
PIGGLY WIGGLY GIVES YOU BEST QUALITY. 






MEATS 


"It Pays To Pay For Quality" 


GROCERIES 















OLD BOLD CHEESE 
1 5 scents per mile 

HEAD CHEESE SHOP 

Scar Nelson. Prop. 

{He usually has to be propped. He can't stand 

alone) 



Heard at the Armory 
They say the Lieutenant passed away. 
Yep. passed away. 
What was the complaint. 

There wasn't any. Everybody in the battery was per- 
fectly satisfied. 



Farm Machinery — 

Hardware & 

Sporting 

Goods 

Leading Farm Implement Dealers in 
Utah and Idaho since 1885 

Distributors of the celebrated John Deere Farm 
Machinery. Planet Jr. Garden Tools, and 
Nationally known shelf and heavy hardware. 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 

Consolidated Wagon & 

Machine Company 

UTAH IDAHO 



EVOLUTION 

Long years ago when earth was young 

And courtesies were few. 
A cave-man picked a husky club 

And wandered out to woo. 

He'd see a flash of nut brown skin, 
Some tangled hair and YEOW! 

He had his miss — It wasn't a kiss 
But a club that caressed her brow. 

How sadly now the times have changed 

Deny the facts who can. 
The male seeks cover when the maids 

Use motto "Gef your Man." 



Judge Baliff: Isn't this the fifth time you have been 
arrested for drunkenness, this month? 

Glenn: Don' ash me. I thought yoush keeping score. 

1 i i i 

Bryner: Hey. Jep. a guy just hung himself in the Physics 
Lab. 

Jep: Well, did you cut him down? 
Bryner: No. He isn't dead yet. 

1 i i i 

Cluff: Hey, you going to class today? 
Dickson: What's the matter with you? I went yester- 
day. 

■t i i i 
Pershing: I'd rather fight than be president. 

■< i 1 1 

Judge: Are you the defendant. 

Sanky: No. I'm the guy that stole the chickens. 



LAUNDRY 

3 75 W. Center 
Phone 164 



y[ 258 ]/ 



DEPENDABLE MERCHANDISE 

Means SATISFIED CUSTOMERS 
And We Sell Both 



LADIES STORE 




PROVO. UTAH 



He is the kind of a guy that asks the newsboy who won 
the football game. 

1 1 i i 

Visiting lady: Are you an instructor in the college? 
Prof.: No, I merely keep the gang together for an hour. 
1 i ■> i 

Someone's stolen the clapper from the bell. 
They ain't done right by our Knell. 

THE HERPICIDE TRIPLETS 

1 suppose when you get to college, you'll never think of 

Two thousand years ago Aesop said: "Some guys are wearing a hat." 
chips off the old block, but others are just plain slivers." "Not me. I'm going to Stetson University." 

i i i i i 1 -t i 

Boy friend to girl's father: "If you please, sir, can you She is the kind of a cook, that if she was turned loose in 

assure me that your daughter's intentions in regard to me the kitchen by herself, she'd have to have a range finder to 

are strictly honorable.'' locate the stove. 





National French Cleaning Company 

Established 1910 

DRY AND STEAM CLEANING 

Repairing and Pressing Ladies' and Gents' Garments 

Hemstitching and Picoting Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Phone 125 95 N. University Ave. PROVO, UTAH 



HOTEL ROBERTS 

PROVO, UTAH 



Modern and Homelike 



f[259]y 



J. ELMER JACOBSEN, Mgr. 



DENZIL BROWN, Secy. 



PHONE 75 



DIXON REAL ESTATE CO. 

See Us for HOMES, RENTS, LOANS and INSURANCE 236 ^^aJvcf ^^^^ 



VAN PHOTO SUPPLY 

Experts in Kodakry 
KODAKS— FILMS— SUPPLIES 



A traveler was paying a bill at the hotel office, when he 
suddenly looked up at the girl cashier, and asked what it was 
she had around her neck. 

"Why, that's a ribbon, of course," she said, "Why?" 

"Well," replied the traveler, "everything else around this 
hotel is so high, I thought, perhaps, it was your garter." 

i -t -t 1 

An anti-climax is getting caught in a raid and meeting the 
old man in the patrol wagon! 

i ■> -t 1 

"I didn't know that you had a baby." 



BEST IN THE LONG RUN 
LiNDBERG Hosiery 

The famous 

Non-Stop Brand 
"We" Know 

Notice the Girls Who Wear Them! 



I call my sweetie Gibraltar, he's such a big bluff. 

i i ■( 1 
Robertson: "What is the motif of that piece I just 
"That's my husband. He went too far with his gland played.''" 
treatment." "Voice from the Rear: "Sounded like revenge to me." 



THE HOME OF COLLEGE STUDENTS 
AND KEELEY'S ICE CREAM 

A PLACE TO TRADE 

The Best Goods For The 
Best People 

KENDALL'S-Y-DRUG 

A Booster of the B. Y. U. 

Try a College Malt With Keeley's Ice Cream 
"Best By Test" 



f[ 260 ]»■ 



En^vavin^s 

in this Puhlicadon — 



made hy the 

COMMERCIAL ART & 
ENGRAVING CO. 

2163 Center Street •\Berkeley, California 



f[ 261 ]r 



COMPOSITION, PRESSWORK 
AND BINDING 

By 

A Complete Prinfing Plant 

29 Richards Street 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



J 




.[262 ]/ 



Columbia Coke 

"THE FUEL WITHOUT A FAULT" 



Again — let's make the City clean. A 
goodly number of citizens have adopted 
COLUMBIA COKE as their fuel. Place a 
trial order and be convinced — it is 
CHEAPER, CLEANER and ENTIRELY 
SATISFACTORY in every respect. The 
smoke, with that dirty by-product, SOOT, 
is entirely eliminated. 

You can obtain a supply of this clean, 
smokeless fuel by simply phoning your 
Dealer. 



COLUMBIA COKE 

Buy It Burn It 

You'll Like It 



f[ 263 ]y 



PHONE 626 



CALLAHAN HARDWARE CO. 

The Hardware Specialists 

SPORTING GOODS 
FISHING TACKLE— GUNS 

Give Us a Chance To Help Fit You Out 



62 WEST CENTER 



CHRISTENSEN COMPANY 



THE MENS STORE 
Provo 




Dick and Ken. — Who was that lady I saw you with last night. 
Ken, and Dick — That wasn't no lady, that was your wife. 



"The school is sending my brother east. " 
"Oratorical contest, track meet, or swim- 
ming meet." 

"Naw. grand larceny." 

y -f -f -f 

"Say. didja hear about Fred disgracing 
the old school." 

"No." 

"Well the sap committed suicide during 
the summer vacation." 

i i -t -t 

Mother: Goodbye, Percy, and remem- 
ber to dress warmly at college. I don't want 
you to catch that Social Unit grippe. 

r / y y 

"Say, Cobb, what do the three balls in 
front of a pawn shop mean." 

"Two to one you will never get it back." 

/ y y y 

Bert: Ever read Carlyle's Essay on 
Burns? 

Bruce: You know they don't teach 
medicine here. 



PHONE 2 1 3 



TIMPANOGOS BUTTER 

When You Phone Say— TIMPANOGOS 

for Sale At All Grocers 

TIMPANOGOS CREAMERY 

O. S. OLSEN, Mgr. 



PROVO 



y[ 264 ]y 



Knight Trust & Savings Bank 

PROVO, UTAH 

Capital $300,000.00 

Surplus and Profits $85,000.00 




J. Wm. Knight, President 

R. E. Allen, V.-Prest. and Cashier F. G. Warnick, Asst. Cashier 

W. W. Allen, Asst. Cashier 



DIRECTORS 



J. Wm. Knight 
R. E. Allen 
W. O. Creer 
Fred W. Taylor 



O. Raymond Knight 
W. W. Armstrong 
R. J. Murdock 
R. R. Irvine. Jr. 



F. G. Warnick 



/[ 265 ]< 



THE 




PROVO 



Direction L. Marcus Enterprises 



THE HOME OF UNITED ARTISTS, METRO-GOLDWYN 
AND PARAMOUNT PICTURES 



High Class 


Vaudeville 


COMEDY. FEATURE PICTURE AND NEWS 1 


Every 


Wednesday 



OLD MOLD LIQUID 
Not a coffin a carload 
Ask any Y student 







''Cougars 

and 
Cowboys" 

By David Newell 



i 1 1 1 



A LIVE WESTERN BOOK 

FOR 

OUTDOOR PEOPLE 



i 1 i i 



Published by~ 

The Century Company 



*■[ 266 ]f 



SUTTON CAFE 

"A Good Place to Eat" 



PROVO 



Tramp: "Lady. I'm dying of exposure." 
Lady: "Arc you a politician or financier?" 

1 1 1 i 

1st Frosh: Did you ever take chills? 

2nd Ditto: No. What hour docs it come? 

1 1 i i 

Dale: And they arc keeping their engagement a secret. 
aren't they? 

Helen: Well, that's what they arc telling everybody. 

1 1 1 i 

He: Aw. come on. slip me a kiss. 

She: Naw, Lvc got scruples. 

He: Sail right. I've had it twice. 

1 1 i i 

Four out of five don't have IT. 




MADE OF THE BEST 
MATERIALS 



t i i 



PASTEURIZED 
HOMOGENIZED 



> > 



Order Through Your Dealer 




WHY hOnORS GROW GRAY 



Diamonds— Watches 

CLASS PINS 

RINGS AND MEDALS 

LET US SUBMIT 

PRICES AND 

DESIGNS 



Anderberg Inc. 

JEWELERS 
34 W. Center St. Provo 

J. Edwin Stein, President 
Silverware — Jewelry 



/[ 267 ]/ 



*^ ^ 






|k|Aifl^^^^ 


'^^hBI^^^^I 




W 




^-^'-llld^r.. 




■^ 


' ""^"^ 



These spreading branches represent our many friends. The roofs symbolize our growth. The fruit typifies the 
atisfjction created from the rich soil of sert'icf. quality, price, homelike atmosphere, spirit of good will and helpfulness. 

^Uhe BANYAN LUNCH 

Just Across the Street 



UtaK TimLer & Coal Co. 



Appreciates the 



Students and the BANYAN 



Coal 



AND 



Lumber 



164 W. 5th No. 



Phone 232 



*•[ 268 ]f 



We Support Our School and 

Heartily Endorse Its 

Achievements 

Farrei^ 
Bros. Co. 

Wearing Apparel, Shoes and 

Dry Goods for Ladies 

and Children 

29-31 No. Univ. Ave. Phone 44 



OLD AND used EXAMS 

Good as New 

Special Reduced Prices 

Study 'Em Scoop 

H. R. Clarke, Proprietor 



P. L. LARSEN 

Plumbing 
Heating 

SHEET METAL 
WORKS 



343 W. Center St. 



Phone 574 



The girl who wouldn't say damn 




"Come sit on my lap." 

"Go sit on a tack." 

"I don't want you in my lap that bad." 

i 1 1 i 

"When I was in China I saw a woman hanging on a 
tree." 

"Shanghai.'" 

"Oh, about six feet." 

1 i 1 -I 

Teacher: "Who can give me a sentence using the word 
'A vaunt'.'" 

Little Abie: "Avaunt what avaunt when avaunt it." 

1 i 1 ■( 

Early to bed and early to rise while your girl goes out 
with other guys. 



Strand Tlieatre 

FIRST RUN FEATURE PICTURES ONLY 



R. E. Sutton, Mgr. 



Phone 749 



y[ 269 ]/ 



BONITA THEATRE 

THH MOST MODERN SHOW HOUSE IN PROVO 
Special Features 

Spring Cushion Scats and Courteous Service Commodious Rest Rooms for Ladies and Gents 

Latest Model Projection Machine 
Visit the BONITA once and you will go again — all high-class pictures, adapted to young and old. 

J. W. NIXON, Mgr. 



The movies are true to life now, except that the innocent 
little thing never gets a wrong number when she phones 
for help. 

> > > > 

"What say you. 'Nezra. is it too late for long dresses to 
come back?" 

"Faith, yes. "Z'kiah. we all know what thcy'ci hide." 

i i 1 1 

Freshman (entering crowded barber shop): How long 
will I have to wait for a shave.'' 

Barber (eyeing him critically) : Oh, I should judge 
about two years. 

i 1 1 i 

He: What did Ethel have when she lost that strip poker 
game last night? 

She: A Royal Flush. 



We have a goat named Lizzie 

She eats naught but tin cans 
Last night she had some little kids 

And all were Ford sedans, 

i i i i 

"I got Shanghai on my one-tube set last night." 
"Can you beat it! I found five tubes of tooth paste in 
mine and 1 only got Pyorrhea." 

■I i -t 1 

It is said that eating onions will prevent a mustache from 
coming on a woman's lip. 

i i i i 

Thirsty days has September, 

April, June and November: 

All the rest are thirsty, too — 

Except for those who have HOME BREW. 





YESTERDAY 



TODAY 



WE WANT MORE STUDENTS' CLEANING AND PRESSING 



MADSEN CLEANING CO. 



Call 475 



Free Delivery 



Compliments of the 

LEVENS CHAIN STORES, INC. 



Shoes for the Entire Family 



Provo. Utah 



Men and Boys' Outfits 



/[ 270]/ 



Interior of Farmers and Merchants Bank 




"A Friendly Bank to All" 



Arlene Harris, if we get the gist, 

Has a list of girls and what they've missed. 

A list of boys, nice ones elect, 

Those who have and haven't necked. 

"And is mine one.'" I asked, amazed. 
She looked at me like one full dazed. 
"My list," said she, "Is one taboo. 
To those who don't and those who do." 

"But is mine one?" I asked again. 
She looked at me with high disdain 
And in a cutting voice she said, 
"Now class yourself. Alive or Deadi"" 



THE GENERAL SHOP 

False Teeth Rcsharpencd 
Give us a trial 



"Do you know what kind of a ship that one is way off 
there?" 

"No, what kind is it?" 
"It's a Scotch ship." 
"How can you tell?" 
"No sea gulls following." 



Compliments of 

MUTUAL COAL & LUMBER CO. 

COAL AND BUILDING MATERIALS 



Phone 357 



Provo 



Corner 5th So. 2nd West 



r[271]< 



WHEN IN SALT LAKE YOU 

WILL WANT TO SEE 

SALT LAKES GREATEST 

ENTERTAINMENT 

That's 

PANTAGES 



Vaudeville 

AND 

Feature Pictures 



SPARE-NONE STUDIO 

Handshape Artists 

Your Map Repaired And Renovated 



Please don't play "The Halitosis Blues." the air is awful. 



i i 1 i 



The most useless thing in the world is a glass eye at a 
keyhole. 



BONNEVILLE 
Lumber Co. 

''^Uhat Good 

^lace to 

^rade" 

Herman Hinze, Mgr. 
298 So. Univ. Ave. Phone 104 



The night was dark and moonless, 

A whistle at the gate. 
The lovers meet against Papa's will, 

The hour is getting late. 
A heavy step upon the porch; 

A flashlight's brilliant ray; 
A bark, a growl, a shriek, a howl, 
The shadows fade away. 



He came to see her every night 
The album was their chief delight. 
They sat and sighed the evening through 
'Cause mama always stayed there too. 



He Who Chooses Glade's Chooses Wisely 



GLADE CANDY CO. 



SALT LAKE CITY 



/[272]/ 



Cash Tells the Story at 



John T. Taylor's Grocery Store 



Phone 2 7 and 28 



-Everything for Office and School" 

Utah-Idaho School Supply Co. 

155 South State St., Salt Lake City, Utah 



^,, ,^^nc o. n AKin NFW Two Scotchmen bet that they could stay under water 

SCOTCH JOKES-OLD AND NEW ^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ twenty-f>ve cents. 

••Give me two cents worth of poison," sa>d the Scotchman. Both drowned. ^ , , , 

•■We don't sell it in less than five cent lots." said the 

,l„k McCloud madly waved his hands and paced the end of the 

After meditating the man said. •'Well, I guess 1 wont .^r. Off jumped the life guard and rescued his I'ttle son 

After meauaung ^ Full of anxiety he grasped his child and started toward home. 

commit suicide tonight then. ^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ back to the guard 

and demanded, "Wheere is my little boy's hat,'"' 

/ f f ' 

A Scotchman offered twenty-five dollars to the man who 

would f^^ swim the Atlantic. But later he added the stipu- The latest wrinkle is frying bacon ,n lux so that it won t 

lation that it would have to be under water. shrink. 



Electric Cooking and 
Water Heating 

FOR YOUR HOUSE 
There is no substitute for Electric Cooking 

Electrical Equipment Can Be Purchased — 
Very Easy Terms 

UTAH POWER & LIGHT CO. 

"Efficient Public Service" 

y[273 ]r 



Universit3/^ cMarket 

Meats and Groceries 



o^^ 

O 



J. J. ^OOTH 



Phones 274 and 1100 



498 No. Univ. Ave. 







ti( re — « ^ 



i U .2 ^ =J rt 



A Scotchman wanted to charge more interest on his 
money in the summer because the days were longer. 



O i N- u 



■f -f Y Y 



r _3 



There once was a Scotchman who ate dear down to his 
elbow one day before he found that he had finished his steak. 






.2 a ° . 



i 1 i 1 



O u » £ ' 



4> 'O . 



There was a Scotchman who tore his fingernails off trying 
to get pennies out of a slot machine. 



i i i i 



'■aB~ 



y, n n 6 = ■ 



X 2 — •- -= a 






Another man ( Scotch » cussed because after walking fif- 
teen miles to see a baseball game he was too tired to climb 
the fence. 



SUCCESSFUL- 



In Serving the Public of Provo and Utah County over a 
Period of 45 Years 

The Reason — Fair Dealings in Quality Merchandise 

TAYLOR PAPER COMPANY 



66 No. Univ. Ave. 



"Stationers' 
Phone 15 



Provo 



f[ 274 ]r 



YOU GET THE BEST FLOUR AT 



212 \V. 5 th No. 



EXCELSIOR ROLLER MILLS 

Whole Whcjt jnd Turkey Red Tlour Our Specialty 



Phonf 1 24 



BRIMHALL BROS. 

"Tire Merchants" 

QUALITY TIRE REPAIRING 

Provo 




HELEN SWENSON. alias "White Slave Annie", alias 
"Bowery Moll." Prominent figure in dope rings. Ar- 
rested for keeping disorderly house, served two terms 
in state prison. Escaped from woman's ward by getting 
hot and going up in smoke. Description : Left eye 
looks off toward Jones's. Peculiarities; May be found 
hanging around small towns or questionable joints. Small 
reward. 

THEODimE H. HANSEN, alias "Silent Ted," Em- 
bezzler. Wanted for arson (hot papa). Convicted of 
removing candy from boxes, and selling empty pasteboard. 
Claims that love of the stadium prompted his actions. 
Convicted in 1919 of stealing girls* underwear from 
clothes line. Description : \'ery reticent, talks lots but 
says little. Has four toe nails on right foot. Two 
large blackheads in right side of nose. Sty on his bad 
eye. Has dandruff. Reward— $20,000. (To be taken 
from stadium fund.) 



^^ Crane equipment ranges from simple necessities to 
appointments for tiie finest homes^^ 

CRAN E 

307 W. 2nd south, SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 

GENERAL OFFICES: CRANE BUILDING, 836 S. MICHIGAN AVENUE, CHICAGO 

Branchti and SaUi OJfices in One Hundred and Fort\-Jii<e Cities 

National Exhibit Rooms: Chicago, Aeiv York, Atlantic City, &in Francisco and Montreal 

H^orks: Chicago, Bridgeport, Birmingham, Chattanooga, Trenton and Alontreal 

CRANE E.KPORT CORPORj\TION: NEW YORK, SAN FRANCISCO 

CR.\NE-BENNETT. Ltd.. LONDON 

C2 CRANE. PARIS, N WTES. BRUSSELS 




Enameled Iron Kitchen Sink, No. 191S0 



y[275]/ 




QUALITY by 



KUPPENHEIMER 

This Spring we can give you 
better values than we've ever 
offered before. That's because 
of concentration on Kuppen- 
heimer Famous Features. You'll 
see the extra value in the 
woolens, the tailoring, the 
styles. Displays are in our 
windows now. 

The Schwab Clothing Co., Inc. 

House of Kuppenheimer 

"Good Clothes" 

1 2 No. Univ. Ave. Provo. Utah 



DOBBS 

"QUALITY HATS" 

EMERY SHIRTS 
"Equal to Custom Made" 

1 I -f -t 

NETTLETON AND 

BOSTONIAN 

SHOES AND OXFORDS 

1 ■< 1 1 

WHEARY TRUNKS 

i -t i i 

KEYSTONE TROUSERS 



*T3m^Kam Sta^e Line Company 




Provo 

Phone 730 



Salt Lake City 
Wasatch 1069 



Regular Stage Salt Lake City to 
Bingham Canyon Every Two Hours 



i i i i 



Special Sightseeing Cars for Rent 
at Any Time 



7 Passenger to 30 Passenger Cars 
We Go Anywhere in the Scenic West 



i\_ 276 ]i 



To {he Facultj/^ 
and Students'^ 



A S the years go by and you 
\_y 1 look over this copy of 
the Banyan, we trust 
you will always remember our 
pleasant association together while 
making the photograph for this 
book, and in the future when ever 
you think of photographs you will 
also think of 

Paramount Theatre Building 
Provo, Utah 



r[277]r 



Most Artistic 
Bouquets— 



for COMMENCEMENT 
for JUNE BRIDES 



at 

Provo 

Greenhouse 

Eight O — "Where the Flowers 
Grow" 



MONKEYING WITH PRESIDENTS 

Text Book of Geology, Pirsson and Schuchert. Part II. 

Historical Geology, page 699: 

"The Gibbons are of early Pliocene origin and have clung 
to the ancestral form more closely than any of the other 
apes. Between the Gibbons and the monkeys there is a 
wider gulf than any we have so far seen, yet we cannot well 
say the one is higher than the other. In certain features we 
see that the Gibbons are related to the Old World monkeys, 
in others to those of the New World; we believe that there 
must be extinct ancestral Gibbons which, did we know 
them, would show us that these three forms of primates 
have all arisen from a common stock at a long past period of 
the world's history." 



Try Our Service 
Stations 

Our GASOLINE and OILS are 

highest in Quality and Cheapest 

in Price. 

Everything for the Automobile. 

Expert Mechanics. Standard Tires 

and Accessories. Storage. 

Open 24 Hours a Day 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Rest Rooms 

Telluride Motor 
Company 

TWO STATIONS 
Phone 279—824 

Corner 1st West and Center 
57 West Center 



Nix! this school will never be run by women. You 
can't tell me that all those masculine looking creatures are 
females! 



"You look worried, what's the matter?" 
"The Doc. says I have a floating kidney." 
"Well, teach it how to swim." 



An optimist is a guy who wipes his glasses off before 
starting to eat his grape-fruit. 

A pessimist is a fellow who takes Listerine before talking 
to his girl over the telephone. 



WALL PAPER— ART MATERIAL— DECORA SETS 

Make Yourself at Home at 

PROVO PAINT & GLASS CO. 



1 10 WEST CENTER 



PHONE 53 



OUR BINDINGS ARE "BOUND TO LAST" 



Telephone 6 1 2 



PROVO, UTAH 



60 East Fifth North Street 



*■[ 278 ]/ 



1927-28 StafF of fhe 

Students' Supply c/lssociation 

The STADIUM CO-OP. 



, JJWllltll) 1 tUltllM WIIW 




IviNS Bentley Mildred Davis Nora Ford Ted Hansen Pamella Lewis Mark Ballif 



y[ 279 ]*■ 




EATING ACCOMMODATIONS THE BEST 



rifi 



mm 



LOGAN, r 1 All 



ECCLE: 
MOTEL! 



lisrair 



TtSSKJ 



On THE Scenic Highway of America 



TOURIST AND COMMERCIAL 




BLACKFOOT. IDAHO 



UTAH SUGAR 

Is the Equal of any Sugar 

Produced Anywhere in 

the World. 



It is lOOTf Pure 

It is 100% Fine 

And Best of all It is 

100% for Utah. 



Utah-Idaho Sugar Co. 




Y LD LIFE 

"No. this wasn't snapped unawares. It was posed pur- 
posely just to show that the B. Y. boys might have been 
out of Provo. If you don't believe it. that's your priv- 
ilege. It's our story and we're going to stick to it. Other- 
wise we'll plead insanity. (Note the cards up Potter's 
sleeve — we always knew there was something more up 
there than a dirty water mark. J 



r[ 280 ]y 




Do We Win the Big Race Each Year? 
There Must Be a Reason— 

The Big Home Company 

LEADS THE ENTIRE FIELD IN PRODUCTION OF 
ORDINARY LIFE INSURANCE IN UTAH 
AGAIN FOR 1927 



/^ Is If our % 
i LifeMtirmice % 

\BfN^OAL/ 



You Need Our Insurance 



We Want Your Business 



Beneficial Life Insurance Co. 



Home Office 
HEBER J. GRANT. President 



Salt Lake City 

LORENZO N. STOHL. Manager 



SALT LAKE AND UTAH 
RAILROAD COMPANY 

{Henry L Moore and D. P. Abercrombie. Receivers) 



DO YOU KNOW that the Orem Line operates 16 
main line trains daily to adequately serve the people of 
Utah County and students of B. Y. U.? 

DO YOU KNOW that the Orem Line has recently 
extended its week-end excursion rates to include selling 
on Friday afternoons of each week in order to accom- 
modate B. Y. U. students? 

To those students graduating from the B. Y. U 
this year, we wish to extend our best wishes for their 
success in their various fields of endeavor. We have 
appreciated to the fullest extent their patronage and 
cooperation and trust that after their leaving this 
Institution of Learning, we may still be permitted to 
serve them. 

We have also appreciated more than mere words can 
express the spirit of good will and cooperation which, 
in the past, has existed between the faculty and student 
body of the B. Y. U. and our Company and sincerely 
trust this pleasant relationship may continue always. 

Aldon J. Anderson. Traffic Manager 




WANTED 
BILL EDWARDS 
Alias "Willy Boy' 
Reward: He isn't want- 
ed that bad. 

Game 
Posing as minister, col- 
lecting dues for charity. 
misuse of funds thus de- 
rived. Has a mania for 
prospective school teachers. 
Description 
Weight: He h a s n't 
much. 

Height: 4 ft.. 1'/^ inch. 
Hair: Dirty brown. 
Mouth: Large enough. 
Last seen: 3d East. 3d 
North, Prove. Utah, Mar. 
31. 



MAX TAYLOR 

Alias 

"Percy the Lady Killer" 

Alias 

"Marcell Pete" 

Born. yes. Died, we hope 
so. Wanted, yes. Record, 
broken. Crashed gates at 
Bricker FormaL Indicted 
by federal grand jury for 
political conspiracy. 

Description 

Beautiful, but dumb. 

Finger prints: Slick. 

Motto: "I am just a 
grocer's son, but I like my 
chickens fat." 



f[ 281 ]f 




-S-W-E-E-T A-D-E-L-I-N-E! 



*[ 282 ]/ 



INDEX 



Advertising 25 3 

All Boys Play 136 

Ag. Club 206 

Alpha Kappa Psi 217 

Arizona Club -- 207 

Appreciation — - " 

Administration — 1" 

Arts and Science Faculty 25 

Applied Science Faculty — -- 26 

A. W. S. .- -- - 35 

Affiliation Committee 37 

Army - — 173 

Athletics 137 

Archery - -166 

Amici .... 2 1 

Ba nd 1 2 7 

Basketball .— 147 

Basketball Club 149 

Basketball Freshman 149 

Banyan — -- 1 1 6 

Banyan Staff -^ 117 

Beauty and Popularity 183 

Boxing 164 

Block ■■¥•• Club 197 

Bud Shields 158 

Board of Trustees.... — -- 20 

Brimhall, Geo H . -- 23 

Beaux Arts Club 201 

Bunyon 225 

Bunyon Kitty .— - 228 

Corless Albert - 189 

Clark Larson 243 

Cesta Tics — - 220 

Classes 39 

Class Officers — - 40 

Cheer Leaders — 38 

Clegg, Elene -- 187 

College of Commerce 28 

College of Fine Arts 27 

College of Applied Science 26 

College of Arts and Sciences 25 

College of Education 24 

Co-Eds _..... .....196 

Campus Scene .__.190 

Contests and Medal Winners.— 124 

Debating .-..1 1 9 

Drama 131 

Dedication 4 

Deca Sema Fe ...205 

David Star Jordan Club 216 

Di Thalians 212 

Dedication Bunyon 231 

Extension Division — 29 

E. H. Eastmond-... 180 

Freshmen 69 

Features 177 

Fencing 1 ^5 

Football 1 3 9 

Gamma Phi Omicron 224 

Girls' Debating ....121 

High School 75 

J-ligh School Officers 76 

High School Party 76 

High School Panel 77 

High School Play .: _ 78 

High School Prom .., 78 

High School Tennis _. 1') 

High School Basketball 79 



High School Snaps - 80 

Haunted House ....134 

Hilgardia — — 2 1 2 

Hinckley, Christine 185 

Index _. - 2 8 3 

Idaho Club 214 

Inter Social Unit Council 37 

Juniors 55 

John Ferguson ».. .— 135 

Juab Club 214 

Lima Psi 215 

Ladies' Glee Club 128 

Lair, The _ 11 

La Onadea ..._ 213 

Music 125 

Marks -283 

Mina Claris _. 211 

Mask Club 209 

Mates -195 

Milestones 1 3 3 

Male Glee Club -. 128 

Men's Debating 123 

Masters 42 

Nu Vcko 210 

Nautilus — 2 1 8 

Nuggets - 221 

Ostlund, Evelyn _ ...188 

O. S. Trovota 194 

Our Mascot 138 

Orchestra 1 2 7 

Publications 1 1 3 

President F, S. Harris... -- 21 

Patsy, The 134 

Prom Junior .178 

Polo 176 

Sparks, Marjorie _ 186 

Summer School 30 

Student Administration 33 

Student Council _. 34 

Seniors 4 1 

Special Students 62 

Sophomores _ 63 

Senior Project 54 

Swimming 156 

Sans Spuci _. _. 223 

Sanpete 222 

Stadium 172 

Tarbo _ 242 

Tau Sigs 219 

Track 150 

Tarn-Man Nacup 130 

Triangles _ 122 

Thanks 1 1 8 

Tracks 8 1 

Tennis 1 62 

Uintah Club 200 

Val Norns ....202 

Val Hy Ric's 211 

Women's Athletics 167 

Watching the Trail _ 1 

Women Faculty 31 

Wrestling . ..160 

Western Stars and Wild Roses. _-.241 

Y Chemical Society 213 

Y. D. D. 198 

Yellow Sands 135 

Y News ...114 

Y News Staff 115 



*■[ 283 ]/ 




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