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Full text of "The banyan"

LIBRARY 

Brigham Young University 



FROM 



Call B.Y.U. Ace. 

No. 378.0$ No. 10ii27li. 

B22 

1929 




my: 




GONE IS THE PAST. 

1 l.s IHROBBING HOURS 

HAVE DRIFTED OFF 

INTO ETERN1T^ 

BUT EVERY MOMt;M 

HAVING BEEN A BIT OF LIFE 

MUST BE ETERNAL,— 

FOR LIFE'S A LASTING THING. 

AM) THERE W ILL SURELY COME 



Digitizedl!,by'',ti!ie Internet Archive 

in SM'vvJtIiillwficiiriaJfom 

Bri^h^^fflTd'O'h'g University 



Church of Jesus Onist of Unsr-da . 
47 E. South TempU St. 
''SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



http://www.archive.org/details/banyan1929brig 




Dmsnffi ttnd PrtnUri 
1111 PARACON PRINTISC. COMPANY 

l*holo:raf>hi flv 
I ARSON STUDIO 

f-ngraved Ify 
LO.MMI KI.IAI. ART i ENGRAVING (.OMI'ANY 

S\N l=«tNCISCJIi - BeITKIET - l.OS ANCELCi 

Cov-rr Created fly 
DAVID J MOLIOY COMPANY 

Round fly 
LLITII TRADH BINDl-RY 






iiivw- IS A SPARK ^Jv'i•l|{;:l•^ hiolds 
\m. imimw OP iHi- I'AST 

A riN'v TOKr.ut. <)1' 1IJ\MI- 
I)i'\'I SMOULDllRS UNTIL S'IIRKEI> 
,AND FANNRl) KY TURTMmC LILAJ' 
OR TOUCH OR MAGIC WORD 



ERL IS A BOOK 









HISTORIAH'S OFPn:^^ 

Church of Jesus Christ of Larter^y Samn 
47 E. South Temple St 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 








K 



d Fun. 
Work and Romanic 



TwentyNine 



UNIVERSITY 



HISTORIAN'S OVnC^ 

Church of Jesus Christ of Lattsr'day Saints 
4.7 E. South Temple St. 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



THE YEAR HAS BEEN A PLEASANT 

CHAPTER OF ROMANCE,— 
^A YS FULL OF HOURS FOR LESSONS 

FRIENDSHIPS AND FUN- 
HOURS AND LESSONS TO REMEMBER, 

FPIENSHIPS TO HOLD 
TO HELP BRIGHTEN FUTURE DA YS 



May eiery Diiuii spcdk oj I bat icbich holds your greatest Siiurise. 

Let the auakeiiiiig of neu Jays be the heiiiinuiig of the fulfilment 
of your Dreams. 

Promises are in the shafts of Morning lehicb flaunt opportunity as 
liDiitless as the t'l'i'r recurring Da"^en. 

College Days are as the SuJinse. bright leilb youth and marking a 
glorious entrance into a fuller day of Life. 




E- 



^Asi dents r ,ntrartc^ 




\^ ampiisy!!!!^ppr each 



pper \.ampiis 



%./^t 



?"«• 



h 



he i L ^ ibr ary N^alk 




''-^jsf^imo 



>I>'^r1 



(^Personnel |j 




A large pari of wbal one gets jrom college coinei jroin the aisocicition in and 
out of the class room. The "Y" n noted for its spirit of friendship and "get 
togetherness." I'robably in no other college in the world could ice duplicate 
this democratic attitude on the part of everyone. From the president on 
down that spirit oj frienilship prevails, the faculty is one with the student 
body. Hveryone tries hard to make the personnel of the ")" outstanding 

in this respect. 



aHtaaajaarxfxteiaasx 





CAdm in istra t ion 




Faculty Administration 

Students come and students go but it is the facultj- that remains at the school 
and views each new-coming crop of Freshmen with more or less optimism. Brib- 
ham Young Universit)' is fortunate in having an unusually fine group represented 
among its Faculty members. They have inspired us to study, som;;times, and 
they have driven us to it at other times. Though we ma\- not have learned all the 
lessons in the books, we have learned a lesson from contact with them. Our highets 
praise is "With all their faults, we lo\e them, still." We leave them as the greatest 
legacy possible to the in-coming students of future years. 





The Banyan is a reflection of the stream of our colleite life, aboumlinn with opportunity anj actniu. 
carrying within it the freedom of obedience to the Perfect law of Liberty." a liberty in which there i> no 
light to do wrong, a freedom filled with the "pursuit of happiness" a happiness in which Hope and Memory can 
be friends forever. 

To the extent that a book represents life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, it i« American in spirit and 
in so far as it echoes the call. "Seek the truth ' it is Christian in character. Be the Banyan both. 

GEORGE H BRIMHALL. Pmidtot Emertu, 




To ail of us who have sat under the Banyan tree of college life together, this book will be a reminder of 
many pleasant Jays. As we look through its pages in after >ears we shall see thei pictures of those we 
learned to love while in college. Many friends will go out of our li\es at the close of spring, but the memory 
of pleasant associations with them will be kept in our minds by turning through the pages of this treasure 
house of so much that is dear. 

To those who are permanentlv leaving the institution 1 send this word of greeting. I hope that you will 
carrv with vou wherever vou mav go the spirit, of the Brigham Young University. May the nx-mory of the 
University and the friends you have made here be an inspiration to guide you into a richer life, patterned 
on the ideals of \our Alma .Mater. 

PRESIDRNT P. S. HARRIS. 




.^1^ Jii. Ik 



General Church Board of Education 



JOSKPH I-. MlKRILL . 

Arthur Winters . 

Hebhr J. Grant 
Anthony W. Ivins 
Charies W. Nibley 

Wll.I.ARD ^'oUNG 
RtDGER ClaWSON 

Orson F. Whitney 



Superintendent of Church Schools 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Joseph I-. Smith 
David (). McKay 
Stephen 1 . Kichards 
Richard K. Lyman 
John A. W'idstoe 
Adam S. Bennion 



^Board of Trustees 



IIebek J. CjKANT 
Thomas N. Taylor 
E. II. Holt . 

SusA Young Gates 
Reed Smoot 
Lafayette Holbrook 
Joseph F. Smith 
J. Wm Knight 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and treasurer 

i^TEPHEN L. ClIIPMAN 

Joseph T?. Murdock 
Joseph Reece 
ZiNA Y. Card 
W'li I ARD Young 



Executive Committee 
I iio.MAs \. Taylor |. W M. Knight Stepiii.n I.. Chii'man 



The men who have entire charge of the Church School System 
and of the Brigham 'Soung University in particular represent the 
highest type of Latter Day Saints. Theirs is a grave responsibility 
to have to shoulder, that of the educating of the 'S'outh of Zion. .And 
they are doing the work in a manner fitting to the task. Without a 
competent and sympathetic Board, the work of the facult\- and stu- 
dents is set at nought. We do honor to them, therefore, whd are 
responsible for our existence as an institution. 



n^ 



A 



j'werity i lift 




'You are all members of the great concourse of people who love 
rhe Brigham Young University. May your love be of the type that 
bears fruit — service, maintenance of ideals, and other manifestations 
of worthy character, if \ou forget not your Alma Mater you will 
have increasing cause to be proud of her. 

JOSEPH F. MERRILL, 

Superintendent of Church Schooh. 



*vJ^ 




J 



rts and 
Science 

Each il a \ books, 
laboratories, ami clas>- 
rooms have brouj;ht to 
v'ou ever wiJeninK con- 
tact with the accomp- 
lishments anJ ideals of 
the race. No genera- 
tion of stuiients has 
inherited so complete 
a storehouse of know- 
ledge. N'ou have learn- 
eii the art of unlock- 
ing the dtx)r of this 
treasure-house. 

Each da\'. mingling 
with friends and teach- 
ers you ha\e felt the 
spirit of the "V" You 
have discovered this 
spirit taking rcxit in 
your life. You have 
given a new birth — 
>ou and >()ur friends 
are the makers of the 
spirit of the "Y". 




01 AN ( AKI I I VKIM. 




DEAN I . JOHN NLTTAl.L. JR. 



be kind Idad 
The Ba 



to .service 
nyon cont 



College of 
Education 

This book is a s\m- 
hol carr\ing meanings 
of friendship. .Mav 
f a c h reader recall 
teachers who were con- 
>trusti\e in their think- 
ing and liel|iful: fel- 
low stuilents who were 
sincere: friemls who 
^tu.;ied hard, pla\ed 
clean, and were con- 
.iderate and courteous. 

Work is necessarv 
in li\ing a construc- 
tise life. Sportsman- 
ship and recreation 
are essential. Appre- 
ciation of beaut\- and 
worth is one of life's 
most \aiuabie ele- 
ments. A sense of 
hLimor prevents many 
u n h a p p \' moments. 
Consideration for 
others and a ilesirc to 



ind unselfishne.u. .All of these are products of college life, 
ains the suggestions for pleasant hours of recall, evaluation and nlannins. 



JL 



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\jy i) 





College of 
Commerce 



It is well, now that 
the year is about over, 
and the accomplish- 
ments of the Colleae 
of Commerce are about 
to go into the record, 
that I should express 
an appreciation to all 
who have contributed 
toward this fine year. 
Also that greetings 
should be expressed to 
those worth\' students 
and faculty members 
who are to carr)' on 
the good work in the 
future. The College 
of Commerce is gain- 
ing normallv and its 
abilit\- to serve is at- 
tested by the high de- 
gree of success attain- 
ed by its graduates, 
locally and in the larg- 
er business centers. 

With this tie-up from the oulsidi, together \Nit,h the fine knalty and untiring efforts of the faculty 
of Commerce and the studious efforts on the part of around two hundred and fift\' commerce students, 
I can truthfull\' sa\' it is withal a \'er\' fine pl.Tce in which to work, serx'e. and studv. 




ACTING Dl.AN 1:1 Ml K Mil I I 



College of 
Applied Arts 



College da\s are 
closing — for some just 
a brief span until they 
will be resumed — for 
others the end is near. 
^'our college life must 
undoubtedlv undergo 
scrutinv. it will he 
challenged. Has it 
been worth while? 

If you can conscien- 
tiousi\- say that it has 
enabled you to form 
worthwhile friend- 
ships, to face the fu- 
ture with an assurance 
of better prepardness. 
to meet your fellows 
with a broader s\m- 
nath\'. to understand 
the problems of hu- 
manit\' with a keener 
insight, to sense your 
responsibilitiy to the 
Infinite with a deeper 
trust, and to approach old age with a me 
it has been worth while. 




DEAN CHRISTHN JENSEN 

and appreciati\e spirit — if college 



has done this for \0'j. 



i 





' r 



=dni 






College of 
Fine Arts 



li is highly proba- 
ble that we. as faculty 
and students of line 
Arts, hardis realize 
how happ> we are be- 
cause of our connec- 
tion with that part of 
the Lni\ersil\ which 
pla\s such a «.'■<■'•" P-""' 
in making; our lives 
and those of other 
members of our insti- 
tution hroailer, more 
cultural, more pleas- 
ant. 

It behooves all of us 
to organize our efforts 
while in school and 
after we leave in such 
a was' as to allow our 
respective communi- 
ties to enjo\- anil bene- 
fit to the fullest by 
our talents ami train- 
ins. 

We are. imleeil, the recipients of the bies 
the academic, the aesthetic, the professional a 
pass on the opportunities for living more fullv 




DI AN I.IRRIT DK JONC. JR. 

Mngs of a most fortunate combination whc 
nd tradition are happilv blended. We 
to those among whom we would be r^'co 



re the eil 
will not 
■ni/.ed as 



ucation. 
fail to 
leikiers. 




DFA.V C. Y. CANNON 



Summer 
School 

Delightful spring 
comes upon us. 1 he 
sap slow l\ courses 
through the tree trunks 
forcing the promise of 
vigorous leaf ami fruit, 
rhe buds swell and 
Nuddenlv change inio 
laughing, dancing, use- 
ful leases, lilossoms 
burst into bein.g. giv- 
ing promise of ripe 
luscious fruit. 

As spring and its 
beauties are forerun- 
ners of the harvest of 
summer, so are I he ile- 
lights of each (juirler 
of school f)nl\' a p-om- 
isc of tile ripened us.-- 
ful satisfactions of the 
results obtained in the 
school sessions and 
they amply fulfill all 
claims of being trulv 
worthwhile. 



f% 



^~^^ 








ai:ting ljiri:(.tor ii, li. mi-.rrii l 

luindreds of patrons and friends to which it goes, the Extension Div 
at least an ex-officio member. It is gratifying, therefore, to those 
find place among the finest year booi'Cs in the nation. 

'Dean of 
Women 

As 1 see you pass 
through the halls of 
learning, I love you. 1 
en\'\' \'oLi, and I sym- 
pathize w i t h \ou. 
I^irst, you are an in- 
spiration that helps to 
make m\' life happy. 
Second, >■ o u have 
\oLith which is fearless 
and progressive. 
I'hird, you must ob- 
tain wisdom; this wis- 
dom comes only with 
experience, and is oft 
times a hard path, be- 
cause the things vvhicli 
alku'e and give much 
promise turn bitter. 
The things which are 
worthwhile seem hard 
but prove to be the 
elixir of life. Hold 
aloft the torch of 
faith, let it be a light 
to your pathway 
through life. 



Extension 
'Division 

Though Director 
Lowry Nelson has 
been away studying 
during the year at the 
Universit>' of Wiscon- 
sin, the Extension Di- 
vision over which he 
presides has been car- 
rying on the program 
which he established. 
Through it contact 
has been made with 
hundreds of enrolled 
extension and corres- 
pondence students off 
the campus, and, by 
means of public lec- 
tures and programs of 
various kinds, with 
several thousands un- 
enrolled friends. 

Since the Banyan 

serves as an important 

visitor and instructor 

in the homes of the 

ision alwa\s looks upon it as being 

in charge of Extension activities to 





DEAN NETTIE NhlH S.MAKT 




AMOS N MERRILL 

Proftsfor of Secondary Ttacbmg 

R.S.. Uuh .-VKrKultural ^J>\^cKe, IH9>< 



M.S.. I'nivcr^.lv ot 
Ph O . Siinfor.1 L 



■'IV. 



llji. 



Al FRED OSMOND 

Prolettor of FngUth 

A.B.. lljrvjiJ Lni\crMlv, IWt. .Nl.A . 

liolumhu Lnivrrsilv. IViO. liraduju- 

•oik Univtrjilv of Chicmo and C.il- 

umhii Univtniiy. 



JOII.S E. HAVES 

Retitlrat 

B S H. 1. I . \'>l\ 



KIEEER B. SAULS 

PKTchaiint Afttil. Stcrtlary 

lo Ibt Pttiiitnl 

BS U A <: . 1920: Gra.luiic work. 

I'»2n-2I. 



\ II 



Wll I l,\.M I, SNOW 

I'rtifuwr of Hiilory 

II V. I.. 1919: I'h.n. 

\er>ilv III California. |92L 



Ihli- 



WII.I.IA.M II. SNELL 

iiiiitant Profenor of Mechanic .-Ir/t 

^.B.. B. Y. L.. |9|8: Graduair work 

Bradlev Polyiechnit: In^tituic. summer 

1919. 



VII ATE El I lOTT 
l*rofeiwr of Clothin; and Textiles 
B I'h . B V. li . IH95: Oradualc work. 
Prall InNtiluIe. 1907-08. Slalc Normal 
School. 1919-20: (.nivi'r>ii\ of Chi- 
:aKo. |92J: Siiuh in luropr, 1924-:; 



ELSIE C. CARROLL 

Imtruclor in rngtitb 

B.S., B. V I .. 1926: .M.S., B. Y. I'. 

1928: Cornell I nivcriilv. |9|4: I'ni- 

.crsiiv of Chicago. 19|S: Sianfor.l 

Iniiirvilv. 1924 



BERTHA ROBERTS 
Inilruclor in Office Practice 
\K.. B. Y. U., 1926: L'nivrr«iv 
L'fah. summer |92h. 



PERCI\AI 
Instructor in 



P. BICEIOW 
Auto Mechan i 




VJ* 



JL 



^ir^ o 



E. 



v_/ 




CHARLES E. MAW 

I'rofeiior of Chemistry 

KB.. Stanford University, I90.i; M.S 

I ni\ersity of Chicago, 1916; Ph.D 

Stanford I'niversity, 1924. 




ZEELA MOODY 
htslructor in Ihtuhsh 



MAUD TUCKFIEl.D 

Instructor in Clothing and Textiles 

B.S, U. A. C, 1928: Student, Uni- 

^ersitv of Utah, summer 1920; Uni- 

^ersit\' of Washington, summer 1924. 



STELLA P. RICH 
Instructor in Fngtisb 
B.S,, H, V, U., 1926, 



C. S. LEAP 
Iif.tniclor ill Swinnnina 



GEORGE H, HANSEN 

Assistant Professor in Geology 

and Geograpk v 

B.S., U, A, C, 1918; M.S.. George 

l\'ash:ngton University, 1925; Ph.D. 

George Washingon Unlversitv, 1027 



WALTER P, COTTAM 

Professor of liotany 

K R , B. y. v., 1916; M.S.. B. Y. U., 

l')l'>. Ph 1). University of Chicago, 

1926. 



\.n. 



THOMAS L. MARTLN 
Professor in .'igronomy 
B. Y. U., 1912; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1919, 



HERALD B. CLARK 

Professor of Finance and flantiins 

\.R.. B, Y, U,, 1918, MSA., Uni- 

*-e]sity of Washnglon, 1924, Gradu- 

ite work work Ohio State University, 

1927-28, 



BENJAMIN E. CUMMINGS 
Professor of Modern and Classical 
Languages 
\B.. University of Utah. 191!; 
graduate work, Univcrsitv- of Utah, 
1920-22; Universit\' of Shicago, sum- 
mer of 1922; St.tnf.ir.l Uni\ersif,, 
1923-24, 



lilt 




lOKI N (; BKYNHR 
Aitiitant in Cbtmittry 
B S.. B V I. . 1928. 



Wll MA JI.PPSUN 

luiliiiclo, in l'h\>ral l-diiealiot> 

Inr M'omfn 

B S . B. V. I . 1927. 



ANNA P.C.BIKr 

ImltMelor m linnlob 

R S.. U. A. C. 1921: CiraJujic wnk, 

B, Y. v., siiinm-r* 1922-21 flolunihij 

Ln:vrf:i:y. l92>-2<i. 



EI.SIF. K. MAl'f.llAN 

Aanlant Proltaor in t-ood^ iiiij 

\'itlntian 

I.S.. U A. C. 1921: .MS., (jirncll 

.'niversilv. |92o; ('irjtlinlc work. i'.nt- 

nri\ l^nivrrsilv, |92,v27. 



I RI.D W. DIXON 

In^liuilor tn Phyi-rai r.dufalinn 

and Mbiet:<t 

B S . II Y i; , 1926. 



^CJ 



DRLBERT GREF.NWOOD 
Imlruclor in Chrmittry 



J M JENSEN 

Atsotiale Prof/nor of Bngtitb 

\.n. B. Y I . 1912, .MA., tnivinil.v 

i( ChkMgo, 1919, Ciridualc work, Uni- 

,'cr^itv of (lalifiirnta. Mimnirr 1920: 

Sl.in(n:,l llnivrrsilv. 1924-2i. 



IILIWI \V I'l TI.RSON 

tmlruilor in ('hemi\try and Phytht 

\R B. Y. r . I9l(i: M.A.. B. Y. U . 

|92H, (;riiifujli> woik. I'nivcrsily of 

I lih. |9|(,.|7. 



I WESTON OAKS 

Mtdical Diffctor 

\\n.. J.fTiTMin Me.licil Colicm-, IPI* 



I.. JOHN NUTTAI.l., JR. 

ProleaOT of l-dnfational 

Adminiilrat.tyn 

B.S.. Columhia Univcrsily. 1911: 

M.A.. Ciolumhia University. 1912: 

liraduate work, Columbia University. 

102 1. |927-2«, 




A 



VJ»' XD ^ 



eray 





ELBERT H. EASTMOND 

Professor of Art 

S'ormal Diploma, Pratt Institute, 1902; 

BPd.. B. Y. U.. lonii; Student. Calif- 

^irn-a School of Fine Arts. Rionido 

School of Art. University of 

Washington, 



LAVAl, S. MORRIS 

:\s^isliiril Professor of f{oriifuIinre 

R.S.. II, A, C. 1923: M.S., Michisan 

State Collese. 192(i. 



A REX JOHNSON! 
In^trurfor in Office Practice 
B,S., R. Y. II.. 1924: Student. Wash- 
ington School of Accounting, 191R-20; 
Grndiiate work. Universilv of Wash- 
ington. Slimmer 192(1. 



ED. M. ROWE 

Assistant Professor in Fn^Ush 

1,,- VB,, B. Y. v.. 1923: Graduate work. 

I'niversitv of Chicago, summers of 

I925-2fi-27. 



,|OHN C. SWENSON 
i^rofessor of Fconomic^ and SocioJoay 
A B.. Stanford University, 1898: M.A.. 
rolumhia Universitv. 1921: Graduate 
work, rolumhia Universitv. summer. 
1924. 



WILLIAM 11. BOYLE 

Assistant Professor of fli'tiu'iitary 

Teacliing 

A.B., B. Y, U.. 1915: M.A.. B. Y. U.. 

1923; Graduate work. University of 

California. 19|7. 1923. 



lONE PAI.FREYMAN 

fnstructor in Home Fconomics 

R S., R, Y, U. 192fi. 



GLADYS D. BLACK 

fnstructor in Fnglisli 

Ph.B., University of Chicago. 1924; 

Graduate work, Columbia University. 

l92f>-27. summer 1928. 



IDA SMOOT DUSENBERRY 

Assistant Professor of Psyclyology 

B.Pd., B. Y. U., 1905: Graduate, 

Chaurecv Hall College, 1908; Gradu- 

work, Pestalozzi Forebel House, 



Be 



lin, Gernian\', 19I2-M; C'olumbia 
Universitv. IIN-IS. 1920-21. 



ROBLRT SAUER 

Associate Professor of Music 

Graduate of Music School of Dresden. 

Germany; Student. Siegel Meyer 

("onservatory of Chicago, 1905, 



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SENIORS 




The Seniors take a last regiftlul Icok behind them as the\' get ready to shove 
out from the home port. They have seen many changes and improvements during 
their four years at the schcx)!. They have seen the new Library Building on the 
hill, with the passing of the glory of Room D. They have seen the achievement 
of that long-cherished dream, the stadium. They have seen the growth of a small 
college to a great University. They have seen the passing of the small uniteil 
student body and the coming of a new experiment in student life, the social unit. 
All these things and many others have they seen in their passage through the 
finishing mill. They have contributed their share and they have partaken of 
the numerous things offered. But the task is done now, and must stand for better 
or for worse. Many things remembered, fewer things regretted, these are what 
they will take with them into the future. 




JENNIE HOLBROOK 
Vice-President 



— — J. -AS S Li-^ZsJlflfl^-J III I I II HM ^ggSjBi— ^— ^ 

VU K'KII I CMKISTOPIirRSON JIIWEL LINEBAUGII 

Prciident Secretary 




rf<$:^sr 



A. 



V 



Candidates for Masters Decree for 1929 



Burns Finlinson 



LbAMINGToN, I TAIl 



B. S. 1927 B ^ L. 



Thesis: "A Coviparative Study of the lidiicational Systems, 

of the Orient." 

Sadik Preston Worsley Provo. I i \ii 

A B 1908 B. ^^ L . 
Thesis: "Ancient Man m America." 

biLLiE Iris I loi i ingshead .... Kckjsharh.m. I'iaii 

B. A. 1922 College of Industrial .\rts. State College for WCnu-n. Texas 

Thesis: "Curricuhtm Adjustment and the Half-Day Session in 
the f-'irst and Second (hades of l^rovo (hty Schools." 



^ 



j. (j.iiroN .Mm 1 II r 



Provo. I iaii 



B. S. 192(1 B Y. L 



Thesis: "A Psyclyological Study of the Out-of-School Cfnldren 
betii'eeu the .\i>,es of Six and f-ighteen )'ears in Provo. Utah." 

.Mi-.KRii I. 1). Clayson \\\iKi(:\N Fork. I iaii 

1^ S. I<)2^ W. \. U. 
liuisis: "A Child Accounting Study." 



Samuel 1) .MooKr. Jr. Pleasant (Ikovl. Itaii 

.A. B. 1914 B ^ . L. 

Thesis: "An Extra-Curricular and Keligious Activity Survey of the 
Graduates of Pleasant Grove High School." 



f% 



A 



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wenty i im 



QyVly Sunset 

Tbi' ntchly icalcni mouth has swallowed up the sun 
And marks the hour my college day is done; 

From that loi^'est Maeser step I ga^e across the lake, 
Across that pool to which the sun has go)ie, his thirst to 
slake; 

I see the clouds the sun lejl burnuig, reflected in the glass, 

But as my college day is done too soon, too soon the flames 
will pass; 

The gaping gorge across the lake, that swallowed up the sun 
Is drinking up the light of day — my college day is done. 





^ 



Page Thirty-seven 




IIAKUIU « RIGHT. B.S. 

PitMtKf GlinE LlKH 

Pbytut: Mathtmatui 
Alpine ("luh (I. 2. J). 



ASAIN B (LRTIS. B.S. 

I OWELL. AmZUNA 

Fmloimoloir: Geology 

•A I t. 4). Djvid Surr Jor- 
l-lub (4). Aiizunj <,luh 
i.lcni. /nologi^hcr Ocscll- 
wh;ifl (4). 



ELDON DENNIS. A B. 

P«ovo. Ctah 

Otology: Zoolotf 



RAYMOND O. BAKER. B.S. 

BeavEB. t'TAH 

Fdmcotion: Hiitory and Sociology 
OI> mpus. 



J 



U.ARLNLL D. ASHTON. B.S. 

Pnovo. Utah 

Horticultmre: Botany 

Ak ( lub (I. I, \. -t). (:U» Debating 

(4). M Igardu. 



ELTO\ J. SUMNtR, B.S. 
Pirovo, Ltah 
Finance and Ranking; Accounting 
and Bmiimtt Adminiitration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Public Seoice Bur- 
eau (4), Sans Souci. 



PALL S. DIXON, B.S 

PtO%0. t'TAH 

hconomict , Political Scientt 
Public Ser\ice Bureau <2). Clhairnun. 
Ice anJ Snow (larnival iZ). ( la^^ 
.Athletic Manaiter (I». PrrMileni, Ten- 
nis ( lub (2). Prevdrnt. Nu^ets <i) 



I REDA STAIVSBIRV. B S 

St. Juhns, Abiiona 

Clothing and TfxtiUs; English 

W ilMtn \(irmal Sch»i»»l (1», Northern 

Arizona Teachers' (lolleKe {1. )). Home 

hconnmics (Hub M). Alba Nhu 



\I:DA i PORTER. B.S 

Pbovo. Ltah 

Clothing and Textiles. Foodi 

and S'uitrition 

Gammi Phi Omicron <4). Public Se - 

\ice Bureau (4>. "Y" News (?) 

Opera ()). Home rcnnomics (MuH 

(J, 4». L'te-Eskies C:iub Secretary M». 

Secretary. Beaux .^rt (4). 



ORA THO.MAS. B.S. 
llEBeit. I'tah 

Clothing and TexliUi. F.nglith 

V\a>alch Club (I. 2. M. Typists' Club 

fZ). Home Economics (Jub (I. 2. J). 

Aialanta. 



JENNIE HOLBROOK. A.B. 

PROVO. L'lAH 

Dramatic Art, \fntic 
Thela Alpha Phi: Secrelar\ Thtia 
Alpha Phi (41. Vice-President, .Mask 
< lub (i). 'Y" News (2). President. 
T\pisls Club n>. Vice-President 
Senior Class (4». Secrelar>. Social 
Lnit Council: Dramatics (i. A}. Sen- 
ior Play (4). Osia'ties. 



I ESI IE BENNETT. B.S. 

Desemet. I tah 

F.ducattonal Adminiitration ; Pbyiical 

Education 

Cx»ugar Errants. 




rh 



4 ^^TTT^ (D 



\Jweniiy i im 




WliSLIiY I'lERCl!. A. 11. 

St. CiEoKdE, Utah 

Ataiic; Gennn 

(")ictiesli-;t (?. 4). String Oiiarlt-t (4). 

Dixie Cluh, CuTm.in riuh, /cit lK-i>t. 




ANMh CI AKK. U.S. 

Kt\BURG. Idaho 

School AJinniyfrctlioii : llfitttnltiry 

l air bin '^ 
IJjho Cliih; Mask Cluh: I a \ nl^.i. 



IRl-.NC OSMOND. B.A. 
Provc). Utah 
h' reach ; Iznuliib and Latin 
Tfiiiiis Club (I. 2. 3). Tvpists" Cluh 
(I. 1). Spanish Club (1). \ice-Prosi- 
lit-ni (if Prt-nch Club (2). \ico-Prcsi- 
ileiit of C.i'iman CUib (?). Ccsta'ties. 



r\I-I YN IIROWN. U.S. 
.Manti, Utah 
{■i>oii\ tidn \'iitritioii ; l-n}:li\h 
Ganiniii Phi (^niicrim : Si'cretary (if 
Inier-Sociitl I 'nit ('ouncil (4), J lomc 
Hconomics Club (2. 3. 4), Presiilent 
of Minae Clarac (4), Minae Clarae. 



M \K1I KINDKI'D. B,S. 

Si'Ki\<,\ II t (:, Utah 

h'ooJ\ iiiul \Hlrilio»: Clot hi Uf; 

and Textilea 

(ianima Phi OniicrDn: I bmie rcononiics 

Cluh ( I. 2. J. 4>. Deca Sema I-c. 



I lv\^ io\ I , i I A\ HI", b.s. 

Santa C",i ara. L'i ah 
f-conornta:: h'diiciitiomtl Administralton 

'Yr.\ns\v\-\\\\ from Dixie ( olli'm- 



JASI'I K SMI III. U.S. 

Ill- WLK. L lAH 

Motbt'matici : Pbysia 
/eil C;ti>l. 



J. I AMOM IIOI I 1.1 I/. B.S. 

\ URNAI.. Ui'aH 

l^hysics; Malbemat.cs 
Track (2. J). A' Nnvs (4). 



W II 1 (ikD Ol Sl-N. A.B. 

Hrigham CiTV. Utah 

Zoology: liotany 

"V" News (1. 4). Daviil Slarr Jorilan 

> (;iub; /ooldjiischer Gesellschaff. 



\1 HI K I DAKlC.i:. U.S. 

I'KUS... L lAH 

Accounting and Uuiiness A dminiit ra- 
tion; I-conomici 

Commerce Club (2). German Club (I) 
Mask Club (3). 



II Ml K IIMUIIIV, U.S. 

\ I KN \l , I I Ml 

Agronomy : liotany 
OiH'i.t ( U. Oratorio (2). I inl.ih ( luh 
I'usubnt (if .\ti. <"Iuh (4). Ilil«aniia 



W I NDI-.I.I II. CANDI AND. U.S. 

Provo. Utah 

Chemtitry: Mathenuitics 

"\" News (1). AoranK". 




'/Z0l3 3^QnO/ 



~ 



^ 



A. OWON SMOOT. U.S. 

Paovu. Utah 

.\,eomnlint and llmtiitu AJminiilr^i- 

twn: l-conomKt 

Stotk JutlKinii Team (H. Ar. (.lub (1), 

Ommcrcijl (Tub (2). 



1)1 AN A ANDERSON. B.S. 

PtiAs^NT CiiKivE. Utah 

AKfonomy : Itolany 

I'rrMtlcnl of HilKaul<.i (I). 



VKRNON N MRHRIl 1.. B.S. 

PildVn. I'lAH 

/'/'iiiru/ Iducalion: (itology 

I.KilhjII (I. Z. 1. U. WreMling (I. 2). 

BI<Kk "Y" Club. PrcMilcnl, O.uisar 

l-rrants (4). 



HORACE R. CRANDALL. B.S. 

Pnovii. Utah 

Xffountinz and Hunnea .Admintitra- 

lion: OIJici I'racliee 



JOHN L. ALLEN. B.S. 

Ray,M(»nd. Ai ta., Canada 
AeeountinR and ltui:ne\t AdmtnulTit- 

Iton, t-.conomui 
.A>sislaiit Ycllmastcr (I). Yl■llma^ll■r 
(2). Vice-PresiilcnI. Alpha Kappa Psi 
(i) All Rov>' Show (1. 2. 3. 4). 
Tennis Club rl. 2). Y.D.D. CTub 
(I. 2). Commerce Club II. 2). I-ool- 
hall (2). Prom (ommiltcc (1). Public 
Srcvict Bureau ^^^. PresidenI Inlcr- 
Social Lnil Council (4), NuRgcls. 

ROBERT K. (BOB) ALLEN, B.A. 

Provo. Utah 

t-.nzliib: iMngiiagti 

A>»itanl Yellmaster (t, 3), Banyon 

(2). "V News (2. 3). Debalinn 

Manancr ()). Commerce Club (I). 

Rally Committee (4), Nuggets. 



LIONEL IfARRIS, B.S 

PitASANT Gros'E. Utah 

Agronomy; Geology 

Wriillini; ( L 4). A«. Club (3. 41. 

Ililgardia. 



Bl ANC II .M I WIB. 11 A. 

TogL'i ii\ iLi E. Utah 

Mhhc: t-'ngtith 

Dixie ( ollege (I. 2). Dixie Club: 

I enxalyre. 



/EEI.A MOODY. B.S. 

Hinckley. Utah 

Itducation; Izngliib 

Val Norn. 



Till I .VIA 1 11)1 0\V. B.S. 

Benjamin. Utah 

I dutationat AdtHinitlralton: littgltth 

I J \'<ilga. 



DONNA HANSEN, 
Pnovo, Utah 



B.S. 



Foodi and S»trttton; Clothtng 
and TextiUi 
Gamma Phi Omicron: Home Econom- 
ics (I. 2. 3), Dcca Scma Fe. 



ACE WAl.LENITNE. 

Paris, Idaho 

Hiitary; Sociology 

Olympus. 



B.S. 




Page I 



<nk 



xr 



ji 



wenty i itn 




RUI.ON T. SHEPHERD, B.S. 

Paris, Idaho 

t' ducat tonal Administration; History 

Ricks Collefie (I, 2), Senior Plav (4). 




I I CILE STRAW. B.S. 

SpRiNGviLLE. Utah 
Poodi and Nutrition: Fngtsh 
(lan-.-nia Phi Omi.Ton: Home Econom- 
ics ("liih (I, 2, ^ 4). Ofca Sema Fe. 



NORMA CHRISTENSEN. B.A. 
Richfield, Utah 
llngUsb : Office Practice and Prench 
Secretarv. Commerce Cluh (2), Ban- 
van (2)^ French Chib (1. 1. 4), Fidelas 



DOROTHY STEWART. B.S, 

Provo, Utah 

Clothing and Textile^; Poodi 

and Nutrition 

Home Economics Cluh (2. 3, 4). " 

News f4). Njiitilus. 



EDITH SELIN. B.S. 

Benjamin. Utah 

Ciothin'i and Textiles; Foods 

and Nutrition 

Gamma Phi Omicmn ; la Volga. 



MAX B. FERGUSON, B.S. 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Chemistry: Mathematics 

Nu\'ekn 



DEAN PRIOR. B.S. 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

History ; Political Science 

Freshman Fnothall (I). Y.D.D. 

l:scalante. 



(3). 



J. LESLIE WRIGHT. B.S. 

I liNCKLEY, Utah 

Physical Pducation; Aytimal Husbandry 

looiball (I). Basketball (I. 2. 3. 4), 

Track fl. 2, 3. 4), Cougar Frrants. 



REED G. STARLEY. B.S, 

Fillmore, Utah 
At counting and liusiness Adiinni^lrii- 

tion; P.conoynics 
Alpha Kappa Psi: Secretarv, Alpha 
Kappa Psi (4), Banvan (3), 'Y" News 

(4), Sans Souci. 



L, WALTER PETERSON. B.S. 

Castle Dale, Utah 

Music; Geology 

Band (I. 2. 3. 4). Orchestra (J, 4). 

Kappelle Orphean. 



DONALD TOBLER. B.S. 

BuNKERVIi-LE, NhvADA 

Agronomy: Botany 

Dixie College (I, 2), Ag. Club (3, 4). 

Dixie Club {3. 4). President, Hilgardia 

(4). 



MI-RRILL STUCKI. B.S. 
Santa Clara, Utah 
Accounting and Business Administra- 
tion. Finance and Banking 
Los f"antentos. 



^ 



l^age Forty-one 



/ 




PARI Htr< MI\GS. IIS. 

SriiNOvii IF. I'tah 

Aitromimy. ftolany 

Icr«hnian roolhjil An C.liih (I. 2. 1). 

MJlii;irilia. 



\IU\A I VVOKrillSOTON. lis. 

I'mivo. liMi 
Icri'ialtfiill! <l"J Itutinrii ,4 Jntiini/rJ- 

Imn: Phriiciil I Jufjiion 

P.KilhjII (I. 2. »). Alpha Kappa l'>i: 

niiick V < liih \iiK«cl». 



I A AN M 1 Kill I . It s. 

DF.SFItrT. I' I All 

Cimmfrcf: l-fonom r* 

Pri'Milcnl. MillarJ Club (2). Wrcsl- 

linx (1. 4). Banvan i ». 4). Lire Cliih 

(1. 4), .Maio. 



IRA J MAKkllA.M, liS. 

Spanish Fukk. L'mii 

Finance anil llankinK. Ironomui 

SwimmnR (I. 2 .1, 4t. Dramalics 

(I), Oprra ()). Glee tliih (1), Priars; 

I »l\ mpiis. 



ST.ANSEI.I. H. CRHKR. B.S. 

St. Jiihns. Arizona 

Animal Hu^bandtv. Social Science 

^ri/^na (liih (I. 2, J. 4). Ar. f.liih 

(I. 2, i. I). 



T DHAN tDni-L. B.S. 

I Fill. L'lMI 

AfumnliHK and Itunnen Adminntra- 

liiin: f-'inan e and Itanhing 

Class DehalinK M). 



^n 



MARY J BASINOtR. B S. 

Meaoe. Kansas 

l*hyitca\ tiducaliou: Fnghtb 

Srcrclary. W.A A. (4). Rraiix Aft. 



\l RONA I IIU DING. B S. 
Mrovu. Utah 

t'liHtJi and S'utr.tion; ('lo:hint: 'fi/ 

(ijrnmj Phi Omicmn Home I:c«m4tm- 
i.^ < UiU I I > in. /rl Mcnhj 



Jl ssil: IIIT(.HI\GS. B.S. 

SmiNovii I E. L'tah 

i'liihm; and Tfxtilff : FonJ* anJ 

Sulrition 



Kl SMI I l\l RSON. B.S. 

I'Bovo. Utah 

Pbyital hdufuti n; l-ngliib 

PrcMJenl. W.A. A. ( M, Recorder. 

W.A.A. (2), Vice-Prrsulent. Beaux 

Art (4). 



I.I Sin JORGr\SI:N. B.S. 

I tM.ANDALF. Nevada 

Voodi and Sutrition; Clothing 

itnd t'fxliln 



ANNA SMOOT. B.A. 

F'bovo. Utah 

I-.nghib; Hulory 

Secrciofv. A. U.S. (?), Ktlitor. 

issue of Y" Newi (1). ' Y" 

St.ifT (i>. Min.ie (:l;ir.ie. 



d'^) 



Trnsh 
New> 





Koss I,. ji-nsi;n, b.s. 

Oakley. Utah 

iiciilo^v; MeclMtiii: Art^ 

\V:isalch Club (1, 2. 3), Tr.icU (-!>. 

Olympus. 



'rCL 







^£% 



MRCIE MULLINER, B.S. 

Idaho Tails. Idaho 

Oramatu Art; Iznihtb 

Kickt (i>llnir: liah Aiiriculiuril Col- 

Imc: Senior PJjv (4). CitW Diy Pjiv 

(l>. Vicr-l'rcsiJnii, Maho Club (t), 

("c^la'lifs 



TRANCIS J. CURNrV. B.S. 

l.tHI, ItaH 

Chfmiilrjr: Pbjrtiff 



U.S. 



linNRY D. TAVl.OR. 
P»ovo. Utah 
Arounting and Bunmtn AdmimittrJ- 

tiOH; l-.nglnb 
Second \ ii-r-Ctfvulcnt. Mudcnl Body 
(}). Prciidenl. * ommcrce (Juh (?). 
Alpha Kappa P»l All Hoys' Show 
(I. 4). Y I) D. l2. t). I liars (4). 
Prcsidrnl. NuKxets (4). 



PRANK WILSON. B.S. 

NfPHt. I TAH 

Aetoutilin^ and llminrn Adtuinnlra- 
Itom; Offue Ptactitt 



I OL RPNA (.1 AVSON. B S. 

.Amfricsn PitRK, Utah 

l*hv*ical h-dueation: .Uuiir 

Tennis Club: W.A.A.: Winner. AW S. 

iinu (nnlesi (4). Presiileni, Drca 

Sema Te (4). 



HARI. CARRnrr, B.S. 

Pbovo. Utah 
Affnunting: l-conomia 



lir.l-EN SWENSON. B A. 

Pifassnt GtovE. Utah 

t-HRtith: Pramalic Art 

Universilv o( Utah (M, Rccrealion 

leader. A W S (2). President. A.W.S. 

( M. \ ice-Presidenl. Studcn! Bods: 

\ ice-Presidenl. PsycholoR>- Club (3, 4). 

Val Norn. 



J. MAX TAYLOR, B.S. 

Pnovo. Utah 

Political Scirnte and Hiilory: F.fnhih 

Thela Alpha Phi. Class President (I). 

Business .Manager, "Y" Nests (1). 

■Y" News Staff (4). 



I.UI A McCLELI.AN. B S 

<!oiONIA JlAKF.Z. MfXICO 

Clatbing and Tc\tiU\: Foodt 

and Sutntion 

Gamma Phi Omicron : Home Economics 

Club. I. a VoUa. 



c 



JOHN A. ROWE. B.S. 

Spancsh I"o«k. Utah 

/oolagv- Hiitarv and Political Scitncf 

Spanish Toil; Club (I. 2. 3). David 

Starr Jordan BioloKV Club (5. 4). 

German i:lub (1). /iHilonischer 

Gesellschad. 



n\ANS J. PHILLIPS. B S. 

Roosevelt. Utah 

rdncalional Adminnlration: llntory 

and Political Science 



KAR.MA PARTRIDGE, B.S. 

Piinvo. Utah 

rn-itifb; Foodi and Nutrition 

la \'olKa. 




tv-fl-'lil 



n^ 



\j> 



A 



wenty i itn 




CAROLINE rVRINC. RA 

Pima. Arizona 

£iig/f>/>/ Dmvtalic Art 

Gila Collese (I. 2). Tau Kappa Alpha: 

Block "I" Club: Debating (!, 4). 

Class Debating (i). Grant Oratorical 

Contest (5). ■V News Staff (4). 

Presiilent, \ W S. (4). Cesta'lies. 



n ORPNCE RORINSON. B A. 

Pnovo. Utah 

Clotbinn and Textiles: Art 

Nautilus. 




Al BHRTA JOHNSON, B.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Art; French 

Suulio Guilil: 'Y" News StalT (I. 4). 

lianvan Staff (2), Chipman .Medal (i). 



LUCILE WORTniiN, B.S. 

St. George. Utah 

DrtJnmlic Art; litigliih 

Dixie College (I. 2). \'ice-Presidenl, 

l)Aie Cluh (?. 4), President, Beaux 

Art (4). 



MAUD NILSSON, B A. 

Heber, Lt\h 

IinsUih; F Tenth and Span sh 

L niversit.N- of Utah (2). Grant Qra- 

torical Contest (I), ' Y" .News (i.'4). 



ELEANOR .STARK, B.A. 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Dramatic Art: F.ngh^h 

Weber College (2). Senior Plav (4). 

.^talanta. 



LERO^' GIBBONS, B.A. 
St. Johns, ,Arizona 
Muiic: Spaniih 
President, Theta .Alpha Phi (21. Presi- 
Jent, .Arizona Club f2). Chairman. 
I o.in Piind Ball (2). -Y" News Staff 
1 2). President. Student Bod.v: Drama- 
tics (I. 2. J). Kappelle Orphean. 



OWEN ROWE. B.S. 

Spanish Fork. Ut\h 

Phviical l-ducation: Economics 

Block -y Club (I. 2. 3. 4), Track 

(I .2. 3, 4), Basketball (I, 2. 3. 4). 

Football (I. 2. 3, 4). Captain. Track 

Team (2. 4). Anderberg .Medal (2l. 

Tausigs. 



G. RAY DURNELL. 
Provo. Utah 
Historv; Economics and 
Wasatch Club (2), Glee 
Curiata. 



B.S. 



Sociolog V 
Club (2). 



DON Z. DECKER, B.S. 

Snowfiake, -Arizona 

Physics: Mathematics 

Gila ("ollege (I. 2), Class Debating 

(i). -Y" News (4). Mates. 



DONAI D DIXON, B S. 

Pro\o, L't\h 

Phvsical Fducalton : Hislorv 

Foothali (I. 2. i, 4), Basketball (I,- 

4), Tennis (I, 2, 3. 4), .Ander- 



3. 
berg .Medal 



(3). Block 
.Nuggets. 



Y- Club; 



OSWALD 1 . PEARSON. B.S. 

Oakley. Utah 

Sociology: Mathematics and Physics 

Winner Rotary Oratorical Contest (3). 

Rock.v Mountain Oratorical (!onfesl 

(3), Ol.vmpus. 



Page Forty-five 





k 



HA/1:L Wl.M. ll>. 

Idaho Falls. Utah 

Viiufalional AdminitlT,ilwtt: \l»\ic 



PAYTON Al fXANOER, B.S. 

Sr«NISH l-o«K. UtSH 

I'hyntal Idiudlion: Chrmiilry 

Poolball (I. 2. 1. *). Block ■Y" Club 

(2 J 41 I'crMdrnl. Block Y" (.lub 

(4). 



(JVROI. KIRKMAM. U.S. 

S»n 1 AKE (;iTT, L'tAH 

l-iiueational Admtniilralwn: 

l-.Umtntary Tfitt-bina 

llomir liconomtcs (Hub (4). Klaho 

i:luh (4>, Alba Nhu. 



I.IY Kit III Y, B.S. 

Sr. Johns. A«iiona 

4i.«iiii(mj and /Imiilrii ,1 Jimn/i/r.i- 

IIOR, .UlKK^ 

Bmii (1. 4). Minajifr, Band (4). 
Aiizon.1 I liih I ' II. 



\l;l l)A IIANSIIN. B.S. 

Pavson, Utah 

I'hyiual IdKcalioii: Ingliili 

lomir l■conomc^ Club (t). I'rcsiJcnI. 

Itiinc hcononiio I luh (4). I.lass Bjs- 

kilh.ill (1. 4). Braux Art. 



II WIS .MINK. n.A. 

CJEORGETOWN. IDAHO 

lintilnh: Spanish 
Nrws (O. Iljnvan (4). Trnn » 
(1). 



II ,MA S A.\(.L, U.S. 

I'hovo. Utah 

I nglilb; I'byncai l.ducalion 

dice Club (I, 2. )). Beaux Art. 



.MAX THOMAS. It A. 

Spanish Toiik. Uiah 

Polilical Scittici: Music 

Band (I. 2, », 4). Orchestra (I. 2.- 

). 4», Spanish Pork ("luh (2. i). 

Tausin. 



BIRMCi; WADDOUPS. B.S. 

lloNoLt'iu. Hawaii 

Orttmtiiu Art; l-nghib 

l'niver>.ll> "I L'tah: University 

Hawaii. Alba Nhu. 



An 



CI KAI D D. BURR. B.S. 

0»t.M. lllH 

Horlitullurt: llolany 
(lub (2. 31. Idaho Club (3). 
Ililfiardia. 



AI.ICI: TAYI-OR. A.B. 

Pnovo. Utah 

Art; n»iliib 

Studio Guild. Class Treasurer (3), 

Secrelarv of Student Body (4). OS. 

I'rovata. 



( IIARirS MPRION BIHRCn. B.S. 

Pnovo. Utah 

,1ffO»il/iiiB and Bmiiies! .4JmiifM/r.i- 

/lon; r.conomici 
Secretary (>l. Ptcsidenl (4). Alpha 
Kappa Psi: .McDonald Scholarship 
(3). Senior Play (4), Chairman. Class 
Social Commiltee (4(. Dramatics (3.- 
4). Alumni CorrespondinR Secretary 
(4). Secretary, Tausins (3). 




JL 



V_il' ^ ^ '<._^'JiL 11 




. IL Z_ ILL ilL IL'- 




HILDA PKTERSON. U.S. 

Fairview, Utah 

Clnthitig and Textiles : Fnfi/is/i 




ALDREV OSTI.UND. B.A. 

Provo. Utah 

Drumaiic Art: Physical Educalion 

Thela Alpha Phi: Vice-President, Class 

(f). '\' News M). Secre:arv, Y.D.D. 

(H). Public Service Bureau If), \ice- 

Presi.lent. A W .S. (41. \auliliis. 



HELEN MENDENHALL. B.S. 

SpRiNGviTLE, Utah 

Physical Education: English 

W.A.A. 11, 2. H, 4>. Priim Cnmmittee 

(II. Athletic .Manaser. A.W.S. (S, 4). 

hiniur-Senior Parl\ ( i. 41. \al Num. 



\ESTA E. SNELL. B A. 

Provo, L tah 

English: History and Sociology 

Snow (.'ollege: Minae Clarae. 

K\TIII-RlNn TAVI OR. B.A. 



KATUERINE TAYLOR 
Salt Lake City, IItah 
Dramatic Art: English 
Competilive Play (i). Senior Pla>' 
(4). Ban>an (4), Vice-President. 
Inler-Sociai L'nit Council (4). Drama- 
tics (4), n.S. Ttovala. 



OLI\E HARRIS. B A. 

Slk-.ar City. Idaho 

Mttsic: French 

Rick^ ( ..lleKe (I, 2), Orchestra (1. 4). 

O.S. Trovata, 



CHARLES A, WALL, B,S. 

.Mt. Pleasant, Utah 

liusines^ Administration: Economics 

Snow College C, 2), Band (3, 4), 

Alpha Kappa Psi: All Boy's Show 

(4). Kappelle Orphean. 



LOUIS \V. CHRISTENSON. B.S. 

Bi-oomington. Idaho 

Zoology: Mathematics 

Da\id Starr Jordan Biology Club 

(?. 41. Idaho Club (1, 41. Band (3.- 

41. Orchestra (3, 4). 7oolosischer 

Gesellschaft. 



.MARLIN E. NEWBOLD, 11. S. 

South Jordan. Utah 

Music: Education 

Band (I, 2, 3, 4), Orchestra (I, 2, 3,- 

41. String Ensemble (2). Firmage 

Scholarship (3). Kappelle Orphean. 



LELAND A. BOSWELL. B.S, 
Nephi. Utah 
/Accounting and Business Administra- 
tion: Einance and Ranking 
Alpha Kappa Psi: |uab Club (I. 2). 
CW-c Club (2). Commerce Club (2), 
All Roys' Show (3). 



01 EN PETERSON. B.S. 

Flagstaff, Arizonx 

Physics : Mathematics 

Gila College (1, 2). "Y" News (4V 

Kapelle Oprean. 



ROY FUCAL. B.A. 

Pleasant Grove, Uiah 

Dramatic Art: Music 

Dramatics (I, 2. 3, 4), Band (I, 2,- 

!. 41, President. .Mpine (^lub (3), 

Junior Prom ('ommittee (3). Football 

(I. 3). Kappelle Orphean. 



s 



rage Forty-'S£ten 





c 



< AKHM.H I.. El LERTSOV. B S. 

Mo»i«. L't»h 

immdl Hmtttmjrr. .4;r0k(iair 

Slock Jiid«m( Tnm (I I. 



•*■. rJARPNCE JOHN. B.S. 
P»m(i. l't«H 

'•(. h mjm<-f tnd Bamkmg 

Y" Sr»> li). Bjnvjn (J). Businrss 

Minmrr. Binvjn (41. Alphi Kippj 



< lARENCE SKOL'SEN, B.S. 

GiiaetT. .^KijidN^ 

Phriietl FdmtM:on: Chtmitirr 

I'nncriitv of .\ri2una (1). Fooitull 

IZ. 1. *) Risl^rlKill i». 1. 4). Track 

(21 BkK-k •> ■ ( luh. fuins Soiici 



nVTRETT E D\VTO\. B.S. 

f'oKEVlUE, W'VO 

Patrtifsl Stifuct and Hulory: 
SoTHttogr mmd l-tomamut 



MPRRII L <:HRISTOPHERSO\. B.A. 

P«ovo. It»h 
Chemiitry : Matbewutui and Pbritcs 
Swimming (I. 2. ». 4). -V" Ni»s'(4). 
BkKk ■ V Uuh; CAtt Club (2). 
Prr<i.l»nl. .^ulumn I rif Hikr (4). 
Prr»i.l»nl. Ol.vmpus (I. 4). 



OTIIELL C\RLSTON. B.S 

P«ovo. Ltah 

Zoology: Cbrmntry 







ZT 



^^ 



ELROV NELSON. B .\. 

PiE*s»><T Grove. L't\m 

Efonomisf: Finan<e and ttanktnf: 

Tiu Kippi .Mphi: Thcia Alptii Phi 

\lphj Kappj P>i Bkivk V Club 

:ijs5 DrKilmit ( 1 21, Orbaling (2. 4> 

Dramjlio (2. 1. 41. Imnc Onlorical 

rjMiim (21, Track ( «. 41. i:Us> 

PrcMJcni (1). Second Vic^-Pw$idcnI 

Stulml Bwlv (4). loan Fund Ball 

<2). Prriidrni. V D D. (2>. Sins 

Souct 



.MARV I EE. B A. 
Bmr.HtH <'iTT. Ui*H 
/>'4.-«M/i.- Art: Pbyiiial Fdncalion 
and Fnfliib 
Thrla Alpha Phi Dramatics (1. 2. J). 
\icf-PrrMdeni. Class <2\. l-rrnch Club 
<2l. loan Fund Ball (21. Banyan ()V 
Associate Editor. Bant an (4) Com- 
petitive Pbv (41. Then Alpha Pht 
Plav (4». Vice-President Archer\ 
Club (I. 2). \il Norn 



1 ICII E .MARKHAM. B A 

PtOVO. ItSH 

Pramattc Art: Fnfliib 
• Y" Ne«s n, 4). French Club ( 
Spanish i:iub (1). (jimpetifive 
(4). Val \on,. 



. 2). 
Pbv 



ORA N. .VNDERSON. B S. 

F»I«VIEW. 1.TVH 

FiHtdi and Knirition: Clottin; 

and TfxtiUi 

O.S. Trovata. 



Jl :\M:L A 1 IVEBALGII. B A 

PlEVSAST OkoVE. UtvH 

Dramutic Art; Phytifal Fducation 

DrhatinK (I). Competitive Plav (2.- 

1. 4). Junior Prom Committee (1l. 

BkKk • V tJub: Secretar>-. Class (4). 

O.S. Trovata. 



.\NTHON V. HAVNIE 

.MvN\SS«. COLOttMM 

Actomntnit iMd Ihtiintis Admimjilra- 

lion, Finanee and Banhinf 

.Alpba Kappa Psi. 




Page Forty-eight 



J y/BnlY 1 lift 





r.AKV Wirili, li S, 

I'tfovo, L'rAH 

/'fitilinil Siientr: Arcfiunfinti and 

ituunfti AJmtniitratu/n 

Alpha Kii|M>:r I'.i, l(l«ck "V" Mub; 

WfirifliriK n, 2, 1, 4), AMiOant '',hir«f» 

m;i>trr 14), (.hairman, Jiini'jr Vodic 

f);, Ma«« tJrbalinK H;, "V" New* 

(I), I'ruidcrU, Taii«i«« M>. 



AKI.lAi; KAKKIS, B.A. 
('novo, i;r»il 
/^««J< iinj Stttrittnn; /'ntilnh 
'.'i4mm-j Phi Omicron; "V" New* nj, 
lianyan li), \:ilil(ir, (iirli' l«»iie "V" 
*stw\ <)), Alumni Kcprewnfalivr ^4), 
l-r«nch riiib; Spanith ',luh; Home 
I.CMnnmict (Jub (I. 2, J), Val Norn, 



Id III M.AHK, DA. 

I'unvii, UlAH 

Dramulk Arl; I'tiyxiral l.duralmn 

Ihtta Alpha I'hi; I'ublic Srrvict Bur- 

:ac) M), fy.mpflilivc I'lay O^ 4), 

V'ict-l'rKiilitii, Thfta Alpha f'hi M). 

r»irl»' iJay I'lav M), Viw-Mrnidrnl, 

French <;liib (2), I'rctiilcnf, Val 

Norn (4 J. 



WIMIKhl) «.I<UIKSIIANK. U.S. 

MoHfF'fMfhR, IflAHO 

Hillary: l.mllth 
L'lah Axricullural <AllrKr <U, Albion 
Slalc Normal '2), "V" Ni-w» r4i, 
I ally Mi»»ionary <,liih; Bear Kivrr 

(lub; Val Norn. 



(,l I NN Ol IVtR DICKSfW, B.S, 

Moti/tN. t<'r«M 

I'aliliral Sctnre and lliilmy: hngltih 

Tan Kappa Alpha, BUkIi "V '.lub; 

l>cbalinK <Z. 3. 4). l^dilur. "V" 

Newt (4). 



j' 

J 



V 



|i)l II. BUYS, M.S. 

|-.IJ»M<», UmH 

I'hyuiai Iducalian: Malhtituitici 

|-.«l(;all n, 2, 3, 4), Bfwk -'V" Club; 

Band H, 2), Orcbc«lra (I, 2), 0«i((»r 

Erranit, 



JOHN W IIIA.I.KAI U, B.S, 

Cd/rtO, tl»M 

^,cl•unlinl| and llutinen Adminiilra- 

ttttn: hcfinnmui 

Track II, i. 4), Orch<-«lra It, 2), 

Sail lain; <>.«nlfy Club (l>. 



WII.I.IA.M B. .McUMKD. B A. 

P«</vij, Ut«(i 

Dtamalic Arl: Muuc 

Ihria Alpha Phi; '.ompflilivir Play 

'I, 2, >», loan PumI Ball H), Tbtia 

Alpha Play 11. 4). Prr«iilenl, .Ma»li 

.lub U), Srnior Play M». Oramalkt 

(I, 2, ), 4), f;haitman. Prom '»rr/- 

fflillrr O). San» Sojici. 



I;l MI;K A, GI<AI-(-, t 
S*»rrA (.(»«», Uf«(( 



'.S, 



Aiiramimy: llialiity 
A«. Club M, 4), iJiiit Club <J, 4), 

It;*,.... Am-. 



i) II iJisN BkCK. B A 

Unmn Ctir. i.mniutu* 

/.aalffgy. Hwla-iy 

Wrrallinii (J), PfcMiJrnI, David Slarr 

Jordan Biriloiiy (.lub 14), /AinUiv*cltct 

IxteHwluU. 



W. CKISM<;N I.I;WIS, B.S, 
S*ti I.AKi: <jrr, tT»M 
lUifntftnui and Political Sctenie 
Alpha Kappa P>i, Banyan ()), Ban- 
yan l-.dilor 14), I.. D. S, C, (l>, 
L. o( U, (2), 



/^flj^g I'orty-^tne 




JUNIORS 



■:31 




The Juniois are the social lifi;hl^ of ihe school. Their Junior Prom annualK' sets 
ihe pace for all other social acti\ities, and the Junior X'odie furnisiies most of the new 
humor heard around the campus. The Promenade this year shcjwed that in spite of 
their reputation for unaboundinj; recreation, they could do some real work and produce 
results, it was very successful. In addition to these major events. the\- cooperateil 
with the Seniors in puttino over an Emigration party, and enjoved the annual moon- 
light cruise on Utah Lake. 

.After much dodging of the "flu", Ton\- Bentle\- finally wtjn the Thanksgi\inj^ Tur- 
key for his class. The Juniors were equally well-represented in other lines of student 
acti\'ity nnl did their share and more \\hene\er called upon. 




/.INA MURDOCK 
Vice-i^Teiident 



.M.BI:KT A. S.MITII 
Preside}:t 



E\Cl.Y\ OSTI.UND 
Secretary 




v^ 




I 



i£^ ^ 

X)aryeirk^ 



~ 



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OOLUtN R TUl-Xl tK 
NOKA POKI) 

F1UT( II. R JONES 



Mi IKIMMAN 

no <;. IIANMN 

MARV IILBBARD 



C.bORGh (OKBI TT 

GERTRllJi: 1'ARTRllH.r: 

\Vi;Mil.l 1 M. POUl.SON 



1 1 nVl) JONHS 

II Sll: JONI S 

TMOKIIV GAMMON 



I \\ \K ISAAI.SON 

11 IDA SNOW 

ARi Mil; Wll I lAMS 



SMIIII JA<,OBS 

PHYI.l IS I1T( III R 

I RLD A. LLW IS 




raae Ftftv-two 



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JIL ILLIL 



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lliiWAKI) ( IIKIsTENSUN 
PEARL DAHIE 

OWEN WEST 



r.l A\( HE THOMAS 

GL"l' HII I MAX 

GLADYS KING 



NORMAN C. PIERCE 

IRENE METCALF 

JAMES I VIE 



LI BIRT 11. AND'.KSON 

HELEN \\iiitlsiul:s 

W II LIS nil I 



IHO.NL^S ROBERISON 

BEATRICE BRiiWN 

FLOYD II LICIII If 



^ 



L. HADDOCK 

MARGARET II\NL:LL 

DLAN ILRRY 



Fifty-three 




cV/ 



\M IMIM I BIMl IV 
I ItRliTIA ASIinV 

STAM IV R. I'.LISN 



ORA GLliDHIl I 



T. DELICi; ASDI I IN 

ANCi;i YN WAKSIl.ll 



( IIARI IS Ml:RKI 1 Y 

Mil ORII) I'dlTIR 

A J ANI)I:KM)V 



DONALD I'. MI:RR1I I 

VIRCIi: Bl.lil AR 

MWhl 1 R. HDDGl: 



I.I AKK I Id I 

I.I AIM llli)MI'M)N 

BLIU'.IS I. ARSON 



J. ROLAND CI ARK 

ALINK MANSON 

NHWCI 1 \V. BOWN 



Jt 




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weniy i im 



(D 





VhRNON DUStNBLRRY 

WINAFRbD HEATON 

MORRIZLL CLARK 



AIMLRA ANDLRSON 

THAI WAX IIAbLHR 

PHYLLIS ADAMS 



WliSLEY PORTER 

LOIS JORDAN 

DAI L IL PETERSON' 



W . II JOHNSON 

ETHEL ROISINSON 

O. L. POLLY 



PHAKIS I , NILLSON 

MAKGAR[:T PL! LRSON 

ROWE \ INCENT 



^ 



MARK JOHNSON 

VERA SOWARDS 

VERNON WHiriNG 



J 'age l^i/ty-fio'e 



mm 




^ 



Ml I MS MINI K 

AUDI II I IDIDW 

l,K\ST HASTINGS 



\\\A mi. MIS 

IKWK wiiiriv. 

1 l)\A HAI I 



WAVM M II S(i\ 

MOPE ItlNGIIAM 

J. ROSCOE CREEK 



KAI I'M SY1\ ESTER 

Till I MA JACOIISON 

KOI \M) STli Kl 



Ml) AKMSIKOM, 

Jll lA IIKIKNION 



EAKI. Mill IK 



^\TMl)^ V. MAVNIE 

<;ar^)line scorup 



IIOVD BKYNEK 




'■'ifiy-sis 



Ol^ ^f 



./"^P^r 





W'AI TER CORBETT 

EUNICE BIRD 

DON B. CLUFI- 



NAOMI SEAMOUNT 

R. TMORXTONJ SNOW 

Al-ICR BRINTON 



VHRL DIXON 

I.OREE VAN WACENEN 

MAURICE J. MILES 



HAROLD BOYACK 

ETHA BLAKE 

Wll I lAM WIXON 



DEI SA TOI HURST 

IDA TAWER 

SARA lONES 



MACK GARDNER 

MARY BROCKBANK 

FRED MOORE 



t' Fifty-seven 





Tfo^wToT 



~ 



GRANT Till KGOOD 

JASr. (LASNON 

I own I lOIINSON 



MTA WAKrPlPI D 

CI AUDH A. rCGHRTSON 

Al l.ir DI\(1N 



I 0Ri-\70 McGregor 

MM)ir WRIGHT 

IIXURV Mc< OARII 



BCRT WHERI.nR 

wii I lAM s. I nwis 

I.VAN CIIRISTrNSHN 



1 PROV KANDAI I- 

JLII lA RARTI P.TT 

LORAN SKOUSPN 



Hll'ill MOORP 

PIAA WII KINSON 
TIIORIT C. IIPRnnRTSON 



£% 




/'/2P,' P\h\ 



rik 



XT 



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A. 



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JuT2 ior 
Pi^o menade 

The Junior F^romenade is 



the premier social acti\it\- 
of the >ear, and this >'ear it 
set a \erv high standard lor 
the other social functions. 
An idea which had never 
been used at "this schoc'l be- 
fore was carried out with a 
perfection of details tiiat 
raised the already high stan- 
dard a notch higher. 

The Ladies' G\m v,as 
transformed into an under- 
water garden. Da\\' Jones' 
lock-;r was in the center of 
the floor and old sea chests, 
hulks of ships, anchors, and 
other nautical paraphenalia 
.\ere scattered around. Nep- 
tune himself was present on his throne and presented the favors to the ladies. 

.\ new precedent was established this \-ear with the presenting of favors to the ladies. 




STEWART .\NDERS0\ 
Prom Chilirttuill 



.^NNA HLGHES 

Chairman's Partner 



\ear they were a leather pocketbook with the seal of the uni\'ersit\' on the tront. 
ver}- popular and it is likely that the custom will be continued. 



liis 



This 

prosed 




D 



CROWD AT THE JLNIOR PROMENADE 







SOPHOMORES 




V 



k^ 




Sophomores 

The Sophomore class is always remembeied as the Policemen and Collectors 
of the school, performing the first ofTice for the henfit of the Freshmen, and the 
second for the benefit of their Loan Fund. This may be counted as a successful 
year for them, for the Freshmen emerged as well-behaved a bunch as youngsters 
as could be found anywhere, and a goodly sum was added to the previous contribu- 
tions. In addition to the Loan Fund Ball, several entertaining parties were held 
which helped to break the tedium of studying. All in all, they began to act like 
a bunch of college students should. It should not take many more years of polish- 
ing to make real men and women out of them. 




MARCARHT CI.RGG 
Vii'i'-Pre^idful 



HARL E. JONES 
President 



JOSINRTTF COOK 
Secretary 






i 



liU L 




.^e'P of 



^ 



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(2^ 

V 



F 



r 



CBRALD ANDERSON 
MEIAA JRNSEN 
CREED KINDRED 
WII.MA BOVLE 
REED A Pllll I IPS 



1 OKIMi KAVDAI I 
Kl BY HKASIM K 

MliRMN PETERSON 
GRAf E BISHOP 
WANDA ni SIISI I I 

(OSINETTE COOK 
I I I A EARNSWORTII 
All EEN STEADMAN 
AUDREY JACKSON 
EMM Y SMITII 

CURTIS All Rl I) 
MAYMIE 1 AIRD 

w 11 1 IS <:andi and 

ELORINcn HICKMAN 
DIX JONES 

ni 1 A BROCKBANK 
ANN FITZCERAI D 
MARY I.YON 

nVEl.YN BRYNI R 
I.OIMSE BENSON 



EERN WlllTTWTR 
MARC.RITTA PARKI R 
\ri<\ON WENT/ 
I I <:il E VAWDREY 
1111 IN MANCni SON 



lAMES ANDERSON 
Al 1 in MAE JENSEN 
ORMl I A LARSON 
MERCY NELSON 
SHIRLEY SOWBY 




wmSR 




A 



-Jweniy i iiri' 



® 





r.l^TN VINCENT 

ANNA LOU CLEGG 

FRED MINER 

I.ILLIE SEVERSON 

CLAUDE SNOW 



l.l*A<,l CAKDNLR 
I INDA RANDALL 
FLOYD RASMUSSEN 
MAXINE DA\'IS 
ISABFLLE HODGE 

IIM I I- HARRIS 
MAY I'RIOK 

ELIZA liJI-RRItGAARD 
EDNA NELSON 
OLIVE GUYMON 

RULON B. HANSON 
RUTH SMART 

I A \ LI 1. VARSONS 
KATIIERINE WELLS 
FI,MFR DASTRUP 

I IIFDLA MALLORY 
JULINA SMITH 
liERTHA VOGLL 
ALICE JONES 

IRMA PETERSON 



I \ \ERNE LOSEE 
\IRGINIA liOOTII 

WAYNE R. McCONKIE 
LOIS WADE 
ERMA \AI I NTINE 

J I I PERSON c:azier 

F.MII V W RIGHT 
VERNAL F. TIPPETTS 
ANNA PETERSON 
RAI I'll I Rir.KSON 



% 



/'(/-(■ Sixty-three 





T 



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r I IN J1:\SEN 
EVA STICE 

EI.LWOOD (J^RK 
MARV DIX 
<: DRESDIN Mil I ER 



lORRAINt PRICE 
CI ARA ANDERSON 
Al TON Will I I I R 
l\A (ilMIIIR 
MEI BA I I'GAI 

IXJNNA Nl WEI I 
VIRGINIA SCHEID TIPPETS 
ROZENA NELSON 
JOV AAGARU 

DOROTIIV DICMORE 

ROBERT BRAITIIWAITE 
AKMI I A JACKSON 
n BOL IIETl IG 
I LCII.E MAK.IIAS 
SMIRIEV HAKI K 



M Gil: \RUNSON 
EREDA HOUSTON 
lAVINIA WELLS 
EDNA DIXON 
11 I EN LUNDQUIST 

EDITII RICH 
Al I ENE WHEELER 
HARR WASHBURN 
ATHA HAl M 

I NMIIU I ARSON 



< IIARLES McKELL 
niPHAMIA IIINTER 
I Rl 1) STAIIMAN 
IDA STOKER 
IIORA<P REin 




I 'age :>M 



A 



xiweinay 1 iino 





WI.NDULL NIEiLSEN 
/OLA MARTIN 
JIM FINCH 

MARJORIE SPARKS 
El DON BRINKEY 

\R.\ CALL 

111:1 i:n brown 

A (J. HULL 

LARUL GOOLD 
JOSEPH K, ALLEN 



HELEN ELLSWORTH 

MARGARET BROADIJEM 
MINA RASBAND 
RUTH OLSEN 
\ERA BUSCH 

SALTER DANIELS 
EVELYN BAIRD 
PAUL THORNE 
HELEN ROWE 
DELBERT V. GROBbRG 



IRIS ROBINSON 
WILMA BEARNSON 
HANNAH REYNOLDS 
EVELYN CROSBY 
JENNIE JOHNSON 



\V K. TAWFR 
LJ.AINE PAXMAN 
BR LICE COX 
GWEN HURST 
REESE NORMAN 

I AMES AAGARD 
ALTA MAY HRAITNWAITn 
LELAND NIELSON 
AUDREY HARRIS 
LYNN BROADBENT 



dy-five 




^ 




tr 



KAKL BALLin 
GENEVIEVU MORGAV 
CLARENCE WiLSON 
MIRIAM COLTON 

DAN S. CHRISTENSEN 



lOUISE BENSON 
Al I EN STEVI V.fIN 

KUTII ANN WDODKl 1 E 

VAUGHN II III NTER 

ELEANOR KEI I Y 

( I ARENCE I). lA^LOR 
JENNIE BRIMIIALL 
VERNA lllRNIIAM 
KALEI JACOltSON 
GOLDI N III A( K 

\NNA spoiti;n 

IIAHKV MM I IK 
.\LM((.ARI I ItlKl) 
W Al 1)1 S \U \l i>\ I 
II I IN W III I I I R 

\AKI) II. JOHN ON 
( IIRISTINE JOHNSON 
ROSANNAH CANNON 
111 RIIIA MORIS 
I RNI SI I sri< Kl 



III I IN HAVES 
I AIRENCE JACKSON 
H I \ W 1 1 SON 
RAY JONI S 

ANNA Ol DHAM 



I RED LO\ELESS 
1 ELLA STEWART 
ROY OAKS 

NORRELI. STAR 1 1 1> 
IIAILSEY BIRD 




/ 'dU.C 



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ill 'iLu- y 



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Fountain in \Vi Titer 



A 




FRESHMEN 




i 



Frosh 



The l-reshmeii thi> scar were a t\pical crop of new comers, with more pep 
than sense and not too much of either one. With the aid of the Sophomores they 
soon began to realize their place in college and settle down to their rightlul duties. 
.Although there were a few sporadic outbreaks, thev brought nothing but trouble, 
and the lesson was soon learned. 

Their football team was notably successful and there was a good group of 
participators in other sports. Sociallw they did not make any new history, but 
the\' learned a few things about how to act. The Freshman Da\- program was 
abo\'e average, and, apart ifrom another outburst of High School stuff, they made 
a good impression on the school. The greatest compliment that can be paid to 
them is the fact that they have 'become enough like the rest of the scliool ihat it 
is impossible to distinguish them. 




.\I.\R\EL .ATWOOD 
Vice-President 



M.\RK i;g(.,i;rtshn 

PresiderM 



\n\ BLRCH 

Serretilrv 




<^\ 



/an 



~ 



KIOYI) CORSABV 
Mfcl BA YOtNG 
El \A SUULEY 
CI ARA IIAMBl IN 
I L'CY Ml SS 

BU:«NEI L AAC.ARO 



NELLIE ELLIOTT 
P II HINCKLEY 
BLTII CIIRISTtNSEN 
lOIS MORGAN 
\VI STON I-. BOYl I S 
Bl A MAI LORY 



RUSSELL GARDNER 
INEi BAIRD 
LENORE STERLING 
I.EONA 1 ARSON 
JANI.Y EINCII 

HOWARD R. COrrAM 



FLORICE SMITH 
C. M BOOTH 
LOIS CREER 

MARY HOLBKOOK 
OWl N TIIDRNOCK 
L I AIINA NELSON 



I'Al I IIADIXX K 
MAYSIl HAI I 

1 l.ANOKI Mc( 1 11 1 AN 
ANNA B1:AR1)A1 1 
l/Ol A STl.ttAKT 
IIAROI 1) SAN WAGLNl :N 



ETHEL JARRELl. 
EENTON HRIN( I 
ZELMA WINTER ION 

/El I A i:o\ 

EDWARD A. STADE 
El AINE MAJOR 



DL'ANE ACORD 
SADIE MORGAN 
NELLIE DLNFORD 
ESTHER PEARSON 
MARCIA OSMOND 
CI YDE SLMMERHAYS 




^ 



JiL 





GRANT CALDER 
MARY ASHBV 
HELEN JARRETT 
LALRA CLEGG 

BEATRICE tt HEELER 
GRANT GREEN 



MARV ROBINSON 
ROBERT YORGASON 
IRENE HAYNIE 
NORMA JACKSON 
WAYNE COWLEY 
FA>' TAYLOR 



FRANK GOODRICH 
MARTH PIPKINS 

FRANCIS BENEDICT 
MARCELLA BONNERU 
MARIE ALLEN 
BOYD BALLE 



RLTH JOHNSON 
MERLIN GEARY 
NILA KAY 

LAPREAL BRYNER 
REESE SHAWCROFT 
MONTA WENTZ 



LEVI HANSEN 
CHLOE DLNSDEN 
MADELIENE RILEY 
lOLISE MENDLNHALL 
MILDRED YOLNG 
JACK H AHERN 



MARY CRAFTS 
HAROLD BARTON 
RETTA JACOBS 
NAOMI MADSLN 

HOWARD BLACKHAM 
ANGELA HINCKLEY 



HORACE JONES 
MILDRED JORDAN 
NAOMI FLCATE 
DOROTHY HOMES 
IRIS NISONGER 
ELW YN B. STANFIEI 




I A \ ALN MtRRII I 
NAOMI ROBINSON 

Mil DRID lllNDRIt.KS 
JANIT WIltSTtR 
Wll MA BARTl I;TT 
RAV IIAHT 



MVRTLt DLUtLL 
FRED (HRISTENSLN 
EVA TERVORT 
CAPTOl.A ClILRRINtllON 
WhNDEl.l. Olll Wll tR 
ZINA BEIIItM\S\ 



CHARLES BOYNTON 

LILLIAN SJOBERG 

JOHN f. GREEN 

HERMAN BENNIANS 
LLTHA ANDERSON 
KARL HATTON 



LULA BLAKE 
WILPORD OR EDGE 
MARIE JENSEN 
BLANCHE WILSON 
LOWELL BOBERG 
RAYDA RIDING 



JOSEPH L. BROWN 
EELMA BAILEY 
EURAY All RED 
ELMO LORD 

RINDA BLNTLEY 
RALPH KirCHLN 



/| I UA kAY 
NILE TAYLOR 

ZOI A SIIAW(.R01T 
Rtril JOHNSON 

OSWALD COOMBS 
LOVETTA ANDERSON 



v\ALDO IIODSON 

BERTHA REED 

ANN LOVELL 

HARRIET HLBBARD 
Al BERTA MENDENHALL 
REESE ANDERSON 






\MI2S SCOKUI' 

NCLDA fakk:-:s 

BCTM SVVHNSON 

MAX INT- ANDF.RSOX 
ANGIil.A lllNCKI.nY 

lii-RNAKn w'Ai ki:r 



Ml-I \'A JKNSEN 

R. WAYNH TAYLOR 

MII.DRnD SIIAWCROPT 
IIAZm, DAVl:Ni'ORT 
GRANT P. H1-;NR0D 
PAUIJNH BHNNF.TT 



ROWl FY SMART 

iii;Li:n dfckfr 

rONWAY OVESON 
GAINS CALL 
OR A RARKS 

IMIL IIUTCIIINGS 



■RMA MILLS 
I DWIN JONRS 
III I LN LORSYTII 
ANNL RRICn 

DON CANDLANn 

ll:a riitrson 



MARVIN S. (.OOMBS 
IRETA EAGER 
CLIEPORD L OI.SEN 
OR\ Al 11(11 MAN 

IRIS Mi( iial:i son 
i-;ugenl: s rowlll 



DOROIIIY COONS 
GLN WILKINSON 

I I All s\vl:nson 

DIANi; STANDI LORD 
NOLAN G. WRIGHT 
MARCARI T W'AYMIRI 



I RANK HARRIS 
LOYA Nli-I.SON 

MYDA D ROBINSON 
Al LA MliTCALL 
MIRIAM WARNICIl 
RA'iMONn STLW \L 




r^ ,' 



3ALE ASHMAN 
IDA EGBERT 

MORINDE GRANGE 
DONA RITCHIE 
LtCILE THORN 
1 ESI IE XV STANFIEI D 



VIRGINIA OKEI.BERRY 
JAMES SIDDOWAY 
Mil 11 A I ARSON 
MAI DP Nil I SON 
KIETIl Wll SON 
I ETNA ANDERSON 



ROBERT BISMMAN 
MII.DREN HANSEN 
EARl SMITH 
JOSEPH ANDREWS 
I A Rll I A SMITH 
Kll ON PENMAN 



EI.I/ABETH GESSFORD 
WENDEI I TAVI OK 
I UFIT A BAKER 
El I.I N BAKER 
M. I AVERI IIAI I 
Ml I R\ STFI Dl 



HOWARD BI.ACK 
I I'CII.E ANDERSON 
CHARI ES SANFT 
C. \ERNON scot: 
I OUI^E SWENSON 
JOSEPH WINDER 



I A PRI Al HARRISON 
WENDI 1 I \ Al DRIV 
\IOLA ASHE 
EDA DOTV 

STEPHEN El ETCHER 
PAli INE PRINCE 



JINNICE WRIGHT 

RITII WINTERS 

I ten E MERRIl I 

ADA IIASLER 

ORA HAWS 

\\\ NDI I I \ \NCE 




^ 



>^ii >^iir^. <T) 



x: 



O" ^^ 



7 



/ iiL zaiii L^ 





GKORGE MIIXER 
WII^MA MICKELSON 
EZERIL THURBER 
FRANK JORGENSON 
PEARl, PRICE 
WA'lXE KERR 



HELEN BECK 

CEYDE SANDCREN 
BELEAH STRECKEER 
MAMNE ERICKSON 
RAEPII NELSON 
HELEN DeGRAFF 



WALDO B. BUSHNELL 
BEN F. GOE 

CARL VVARNICK 

DELMORE NELSON 
DOROTHY HOOVER 
A. B. LARSON 



SPECL\L STUDENTS 
BERT WHEELER 
KATHERINE GROW 
METTA RICHIE 
E\EI ^N BRVNER 
BERNICE RAPPLEY 
OSCAR BUSCH 



RANK ANDERSON 
DON SWALLOW 
TAKEO FUJIWARA 
DON CANDLAND 




iU. 



Ct^' 



f\ 





DLDICAILD l() Till- SPIKII Ol CO-!:l)l CM ION 




THE EDUCATION BLILDING FROM HIE NORIll WALK 




- ' A? 



-sfr 



HIGH SCHOOL 




Thu nursery in which the college students learn how to take care of their future 
students is the part pla\ed b\- the B. Y. High School. But in addition to providing 
a training ground for prospectise teachers, all the activities of a regular" school are 
carried on. L'nder the direction of their own student body officers, the students 
engage in basketball, tennis, debating, oratory, and conduct a multitude of social 
affairs. It ma\- not be large in size, but there is a lot of qualit\' represented in 
its ranks. The officers this vear have been especially efficient in leading their 
classmates through a successful \1ar. 




klTII IIOI. BROOK 

Secn'liiry 



XEFP SMART 

Presidenl 



W l\r (,()M-..MA\ 
\'nt--l'resjdeiit 



^ 




WILLIAM COWLKY 
hAAN RUSSLI.L 
SAXON rOKSYTII 
RAV HADDOCK 
FTIiri I FWIS 



SIVIAN MERRILL 
VERA MERRILL 
JOSEPHINE WELLS 
KEZIA HEATON 
RtTII ROBINSON- 



SARAH DIXON 
DEI ENNA TAYLOR 
GERTRUDE SALER 
WII.LA L. SOWARDS 



MABEL DELL INGHAM 
LOUISE f;ANDLAND 
HELEN DECKER 
LUCY LEROY 



RUSSELL ELLSWORTH LOUISE FORSYTH 



CLAYTON PETERSON 
HOWARD DRAPER 
El.MA KOBINSON 
CLARENCE BL( Kl I \ 
I ORNA JENSEN 



-jwenty i an 



High School Pla/^ 




Nfc 




\ 




ARCENt \ANLI-, Whllslli; DIJ.kLK Kill) TIU)R\ri)\, DKA'irilX \l I I Al I . HOWARD DRAPHK 

WILLIAM COWLEY. SARAH DIXON. GERTRUDE SAUER. AN.\A BEARDAI.L. LOUISE C.WDLAND, 

\'I\1AN MERRIL. RLTLI ROBINSON 

l-or their annual dramatic production this year, the high school chose the dramatization 
of Louise M. Alcott's popular novel. "Little U'omen." Three of the college seniors in Dramatic 
Art, Ruth Clark, Lucile Markham, and Mary Lee, directed the production under the supervision 
ot Mr. Morlew It was reported to be one of the best plays given in recent vears. 

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM 

.■\n inno\ation this \ear was the taking over of a program in Devotional by the high school, 
the\- taking complete charge of it. The program represented High School Spirit, and if any of 
the college students hadn't been aware of the existence of the Prep school before, the\- were made 
acutel\- aware of it by this program. It was received very enthusiasticalh' and the High School 
in\ited to present another one next year. 




^hty-one 




H. S. ^Basketball 




SKOISI-.N. Cooch. SWINSDN. PI II-.R'-ON. IllSWOKIII DKAPIR. W II SON. HI VS. Coach 
SMART. JA( KSOS BOOTH S.MITII MTl Al I I AST.MOM1 

The \\ ilJcat squad finished the most succesful season in its short career at the top of the 
second division in its region. Although it did not have much success with the stronger teams, 
it prc)\ide<.l strong competition at ail times. 

H. S. ^Bcbatin^, 

The High Schcx)! debating learn enjoyed the most successful _\ear in its history during the 
past season, .\fter defeating Lincoln and Provo High Schfwls in the district, they also met and 
defeated .Manti anil lintic high schools to take the regional title. It was not until the\' went 
to Salt Lake in the semi-finals thai ihev lost a dthate. 




.MKRRII I IIA.M.MOND. Ill-.l EN DI-CKER. DRAYTON NITTAII II.VRRV .MERRIll, IIIALNCV 
HARRIS, Wll I lA.M .MARTIN. .MISS BLACK. LOUISE CANDLAND 



n^ 



X3 



H. S. Tennis 




\= 



-w?r^ 




SWLXbON A\I)M IN \\l|sii\ SMIIll BlK)lll SMAK 



Tennis is one sport in vvlTicii the ^' lligli School's laci< of numbers is no handicap ami ihev 
lia\e airead\' tlemonstrated this man\' times. This vear. the doubles team composed of Wilson 
Booth and Aldy Smith, captured the championship at the Invitation Meet and loiks to have 
excellent prospects in the Slate. Provo High was also defeated. 



'^Pepettes 



W hile the boys of the llifih School were fighting for the honor of the school, the girls organ- 
ized to cheer them on. This group, known as the Pepettes, attended all the contests in a bod\' 
an dadded much to the spirit of the school. They also sponosored a number of social allairs. 











./ 






>' men sciioor I'l-.i'i-.TTi-.s 




f 



QJ 



CACTIVITIES 




L II hill I It'll tire iludcnt dttivilics at the ">". .4 campus ideally situated 
■with mountains an. tljree sides and a lake on the other. Class work never 
becomes a bore interspersed as it is ■with pleasure and recreation and work 
outside the class room. Publicatians, dramatics, debating, music, art are 
but a pari of the student life. There is no tnue to uaste. activities demand 
too much attention. 




V 



4 



Student Activities 




Student Activities 

Student Activities provide the vast laboratory where the students are enableil 
to put into practice all the theories that have been accumulating. Brigham Voung 
L^niversity is fortunate in possessing a varied and rxh program that gives many 
opportunities for student participation. There is debating for those with serious 
minds, dramatics lor those who want to live another life on the Stage: music for 
those seeking culture, student publications for the budding \oung literar\- artists, 
sports for the athletically inclined, parties for the social, hikes for the lovers ol 
outdoor life, Public Service work for those wanting to serve, and so the list could 
be continued on, almost indefinitely. With all these activities available, therj 
is no excuse for any student not participating wherever their interest may lie. This 
statement is justified by the fact that there has been a greater number of students- 
engaged in activities this year than ever before. And they have made ihem 
reallv worthwhile. 




f£- 



I^. 



'^ 



m^m 



VJii-ili iL y \JiLMi. t 




'vl/ 



Student Government 







;:;ri^«^»^ 



/^f 





III I r-.N SWKNSON 
\'u'f'l'rttident 



I I KOY i;iBBONS 
Prendent 



The bust line-up of student activ ities in liie world is not capable of making a gooi.! student boily organi- 
zation unless there are efficient officers to administer ji. 1 Ju- students who have guided the destinies of 
the "\"' during the past vear diserve a clap on the shoulder and a "\\ ell tlone. thou good anil faithful ser- 
vant." lor that has been the ke> note of their polic\ throughout the \ear. acting as the ser\antN of the 
students but iloing it so ijuielly and elTicientlv that thj machiner_\' for (lerlorming this was never obtrusise. 

At the head of ever\ thing, Kos Gibbons has made an enviable record. No one was afraid to come up 
to him and tell him what he thought about the way affairs should be run. Roy not onlv invited suggestion, 
but he actuall\- acted on them to the best of his ability and tried to make the actions of the Student Body 
representative of the opinions of all the stuilents. lie even carrieil this to the naniing of his ciiiid. choosing 
the name picked bv the majority. In atldilion to carr\ing on the old tratl'lioiis in an .minentlv successful 
manner, several new features were introduced. .-Xmong these were the pilgrimage to Salt Lake to advertise 
th Dedication (.jame, the mammoth (lolle^^e ("ircus in the new Stadium, and others equallv successful. 

Aiding and abetting Ro>' whenever help was neeiled was Helen Swenson as X'ice-President and .Mice 
Tavlor as Secrelarv of the Student Bodv. I hev provided the feminine element of the Student Bodv Gov- 
ernment and proved the old saying that 'Women are born to rule." Thev believed in showing their wortii 
bv tloing rather than talking. The efTicient manner in which the "\" Day anil invitational Track Meet 
lunches were served was onlv one manifestation of what thev could and did do. 

The Student Body Council, that august body that in the end reallv runs things, managed to gel a 
quorum together often enough to settle all matters of really important business that came up and a number 
of affairs that were not important. But considering the reallv important men who composed it, it was 
remarkable that thev got together as often and as promptlv as they did. 




FRRD MOORH 
Cheer Leader 


AIJCE TAYLOR 
Secretary and Histontin 


CAROLINE EVRING 
Preident A. W. S. 


El. ROY NELSON 
Second Vice-President 


GLENN niCKSON 
Editor "Y" News 


CRISMON LEWIS 
Editor lianyan 


NEWELL BOWN 
lliiiinesi Manager "Y" News. 


W. CLARENCE JOHN 
linsincii Manager lianyan 


MIKRI! 1 CHRISTOPHERSON 
St-itior President 


ALBERT A. SMITH 
funior President 


EARL JONES 
Sophomore President 


MARK EGGERTSEN 
Froih President 


XEFF SMART 
President H.sh School 


1 AVAR ISAACSON 
.l/iu/c Manager 


FRANK \VH1TING 
Dramatic Manager 


DON B. CLUFF 
Debating Manager 



Eighty 



X 





■^ 



C^/ L^i^ 



/ 



'Zj^.^mxof 



^Public Service Bureau 



~. 



=n 




ELTON J, SUMNHR 



\ IDA IIANSRN 



ELAINE PAX MAN 



ELROY NELSON 



An acti\il>' trul\' representative of the spirit of Young L ni\ersit_\' is carried on under the 
name of the Public Service Bureau. Under the leadership of the Second Vice-President of the 
Student Body, it provides the public with high-class programs and it gives an opportunity for 
the talent of the sch(x>l to be heard, and to gain valuable experience. This year FJRoy Nelson 
was head of the Bureau and had as his assistants, Elaine Paxman, \eda Porter, and l:lton 
Sumner. A great deal of valuable publicit\ for the school has been secured oxer a wide terri- 
tory. Of course, the operation of this service would iia\e been impossible witiiout the cooperation 
of the students, and in this, as in other felds, the final credit must go to them. 

CAssociated Women Students 




Hl.LI N .MLNDI.NIIALL 



I'lARl OAIII.R 



CAROLINI- LVRING 



ALDRLY OSTI.LNU 
Prttident 



.^s women only compose about half the student body, they feel that ihc'\ do not get an 
opportunity to talk as much as they would like to in Regular Student Body meeting. So they 
established a separate organization several \ears ago for women onl\'. The big project each year 
is the putting over of the annual Girls Day, which came on .May 3. This \ear, a Girls' Play, 
"Quality Street," was given on .May 2, and then on Girls' Day itself, the program was given in 
Devotional, a banquet was given at noon, the Ma\- Queen was crowned in the afternoon, and the 
Big Girls' Day ball in the evening. 



I'a^e ;- 



VsJ" 



d 



(D 



wemiy i im 



Social Unit Committee 





JOHN E. MAYES ELSIE C, CARROE EEMER MILLER NETTIE NEFF SMART MERRILL ClIR IS! c)l'lll:RSON 

Chairman 
ALBERT A. SMITH /ISA MLIRDOCK HELEN MENDENHAL MARCARIT CI EGG EARL JONES 

KO^ GIBBONS CAROLINE EWRING ADA lilRCH MARK EGGERTSEN 



CHARLES BERGE 
President 



Inter-Social Unit Coujicil 




KATHRINE TAYLOR 



EVELYN BROWN 



JOHN ALLEN 
President Pint Half 



Page Ntnety-one 




'^^>Hi^. 




■ / LI 



\JL.J1L IL. y \JilA 



1 liLJ 




"T 



^n 




Yell Masters 

I 111' i|ualit\ ot school spirii 
i> to a large extent lietermined by 
the quality of the ycllmaster. 
The Cougar supporters were \ery 
tortunate this year in having 
leaders of more than usual pep 
and originalitv. With Ired Moore 
as leader, and Ciarn Webb and 
lid. Sibbett as assistants, the>' 
worked better together than any 
other learn seen on the campus. 
rhe\ were present at every con- 
test and did all they could to 
make it an enthusiastic j^ather- 
in^. 1 1 was also under llieir 
direction that the higlil\- success- 
ful Pep \ odie was held. 




GARN WEBB 

Atsiitant YellmatUr 



liD. SIBBETT 
Aiiistant Yeltmaiter 



I 'U^i .\ lliCl 



f% 



XT 



wenty i itiii 





TliXI \1A\ IIA-^^I LR I MiRLNLll IRANDsLN AIIU; BRIN TUN LOW LLL JOI INiON 



I'll-iLls ADAMb WIIJ.IAM S. LEWIS 



Junior ^rom Committee 



The biggest social e\ent of the year is the J unior Promenade, held this year on February 22. 
Under the leadership of Stewart .\nderson as Chairman, the Prom Committee was composed of 
Verl Dixon. Phsllis .\dams. Thalman llasler, .Alice Brinton. Harold Handlew William Lev\is, 
Anna Hughes. Lowell Johnson, and Florence Frandsen. L'sing the submarine motif for their 
decorations, the Ladies' G\m was transformed into an underwater garden. An inno\'ation this \-oar 
was the giving of fa\ors to the ladies. A leather pocketbook with the seal of the university on 
the front was chosen. 

Sophomore Loan Fund Ball 

NOVEMBER 12 

The Sophomore class started its plans for the annual student loan fund dri\e early in the 
school year. The committee composed of Delbert \'. Groberg. chairman. L\nn Broadbent. Joseph 
•Allen, Elaine Paxman and Josinette Cook worked out the plans. The Thanksgi\ing season sug- 
gested the general setting. Miss Paxman assisted by Professor Eastmond arranged a harvest 
pageant. Miss .Aline Coleman danced a ver}' striking festival dance. A good representation of the 
student bod\- attended the Dance Ball and all hid a very good time. 

The ticket selling was made attractive by the offering of valuable prizes for winners. Miss 
Miriam Colton won first prize, Barr Washburn second and .Al Smith third. 

The committee and the class worked hard on the worthy project and it was a success. 




RLAINE PAXMAN JOSINETTE COOK DELBERT GROBERC. 

Chairman 



^ 



I \ \N RROAHRENT Joi; ALLEN 



l\ige Sniely-lbree 



/ 








"T 



=s^ 



"Y" cXews 



Starting willi ;i policx 
which promistd to print 
nniliiiii; whicli wouUl intcr- 
tcic with inlfrnational re- 
latione, thf paper has been 
printed issue alter issue. 
sa\ing what was thought 
anil keeping; the rest hitlJen 
with the light under the 
bushel. The "V News," dur- 
ing this year, has broujilit 
to light many interest mu 
phases of college life, whicli 
pio\ed to be at least enter- 
taining to the Stuiienl 
15od>.' 

I'he problem of filling a 
semi-weekl\ paper with 
timei\' news and profitable 
advertising has been well 
M lived by the editorial and 
business staffs. .-\s a result 
this has been a smooth- 
running and well-liked col- 
lege paper. 

Several features have been added this year, providing a medium of expression to the more 
subtle wit of the institution. The "Hall of Blame," "(Haws and Scratches." along with "Who 
Killed Rock Kobin," were among the "most read' for l^)28-2i). 

Ihe circulation of the "\ News" is wide. .Ml former "\" students now is the mission filed 
receive copies anti the luesdav issue is sent to the alunini 




NUVVhLL BOVVN 



c 




TLBOU HETTIG 
Aisociate Editor 



DON B. CLUFF 

Aiioctate Id 'tor 



X. nni.i;*;r: andi.lin 

Aisociate BusitifH Manager 



I'liiii' 



A 



weniv 1 iifii 



(D 








DON Z. DECKER, Circulation 

WILFORD OLSEN, Asso. Editor 

MAN TAYLOR. Sporti Editor 

REED STARLEY, Ofjice 

MERRILL CHRISTOPHERSON 

Circulation 



L,LRALD ANDERSON, Reporter 
MAUD NILSSON, Proof-reader 
JAMES ANDERSON, Reporter 
LOUISE SWENSON. Reporter 
GLEN PETERSON, Sport, 



ALLEN STEVENSON, Sports Editor 
i-LORENCE ERANDSEN, Reporter 
ALBERTA JOHNSON, Reporter 

HELEN ELLSWORTH, H'omeus' Sp. 
ALTON ISALLE. Sporti 



DALE ASHMAN, Reporter 
KOSANNA CANNON. Reporter 

VIVIAN MERRILL, H. S. Reporter 

LUCILLE MARKHAM, Reporter 

CLAUDE SNOW, Reporter 



CRIS.MON LEWIS, Eciture Writer 
WINIERED CRUIKSHANK, Reporter 
CAROLINE EYRINC, Reporter 
ANGLYN WARNICK. Reporter 
LAMONT HOEELT/. Reporter 



GENEVIENE MORGAN, Reporter 
WAYNE KERR. Reporter 

LENORE STERLING, Reporter 
ALTA liRAlTllWAlTE, Reporter 



Page Ninety-five 







ZiO. 




ilanven c 



nr 



n 



^^Banyan 



^ _ ^^ 


r^ 




•%. k..sJiA>^VS 


\k 


1^ 




Q^«W 


'•sfflE 




p." 


i^^^ 

#**■ . 


it 


t<- 


^^^SHpL^ 


r 

\ 


V 


oi 


\ 




■%^ 


1 A 


.!» 


I^^^^^^H, 




t^.-' 


-.■■^.- 


■■l^iBii 




_^.!'2^^^^bI 



W. CKISMON LLWIS 
I'dilor 



\V. CI.ARCNCI- JOHN 



This year we have attempIeJ to gi\e to you a real B. ^'. I . ^'earbook. \\ c will Ul the reailer 
jiidf^e our success. We iliti not pick out a theme to tie i.io\\n our work to but concenlrateil our 
effort on puttinj; out a bixjk that partakes of student interest in its various forms. .As it is impos- 
sible for a small staff to entirely exhaust the diversified interests of a student body even the size of 
this or to effectivelv combine the efforts of a large staff into a book of this t\pe. the book is not 
entirely representative, it is representative only to the extent that our limited time and abilities 
coukl make it. We have tried to show to \ou the intriguing side of college life. .\\a\ the romance 
of the thing appeal to xou as it has to us. 




GRANT TML'RGOOD 
AfiotidU tiu^infii Monafifr 



MARY LEE 
AMOfiale l'd:tor 



ALBERT A. SMITH 
■ Aiyonate id-tor 



€% 



XT 



weriy i iiii< 



(D 



Banyan Staff 





l:\VIS MUNK 

\Ki h:\n HARRIS 

■ K'ANT HASTINGS 



\l IDA PARKHS 
HORACn REID 
\l ICR liRINTON 



KATHRINR TAYLOR 
E\'A\ CROFT 
I'l ARI DAHMH 



MTA WAKHPini r> 

CI INN nii:KsoN 

I (Hlisr CANDIAND 



^ 



Page Ninety-seven 





-ar^ -^AOj 



M 



<^Post Mortem 



As the book nears a finish there are a few things that I would like to sa\ that 
I fear woulJ never be said unless I stop now an J sa\ them 

I hope \(>u like the b<K)k. No one knows as well as I the impertections of the 
thing or the wa>s in which it could be impro\etl. This could have been done to that 
section and that could have been done to this section. It coukl have l>ecii improved 
hither and thither in more wavs than most of vou coukl guess. We have tried hard 
though to make it a giK)d book and. with parts of it I am. 1 think, justly 
proud. Be critical of the book though, and don't be afraid to tell me your criticisms, 
they cant hurt mv feelings and 1 might bj able to make use of them some dav. If 
\ou are to be critical though, there is one request that I now make and that is to 
make \our criticism contsructive. please don't bawl me out about a misspelled word 
the proof reader missed, or a mistake I maile in the construction of this, that or the 
other sentence, it can't be helped when the book is out. Tell us about the things 
that will help out next year, tell us what you would like to see included or excludeil 
from another btn^k. 1 am strong for the Banvan and will ;d\va\s want to see it gooil 

The work on the Banvan this vear has been pleasant, with excellent friends for 
companv and some reallv efficient workers to work with. 1 have met with excellent 
C(M>peration on ever\- turn, and everyone seems to want to lend a hand to help the book 
along. 

I wish to express my thanks to several who have done much to help out 
in the making of the book. Arlene Harris and Mary Lee of the staff have aided greatly 
in making up the book. They have always had time to assist with the work that needed 
doing. Glenn Potter with his Bunyon and his suggestions has helped more than can 
here be expressed in this limited space. 

Keifer Sauls has been an excellent man to work with ami both (;iarence and 1 
appreciate his cooperation and his interest in the book. 

Walter Cottam and his generositv with photographs has given to the book several 
of its more artistic pages. Kenneth .Watheson of Salt lake, has also contributed 
several delightful photographic studies. 

In planning, in art work, photographv. anil even in the I'unvon. Cieorkee, as usual. 
has k-nt a helping hand. 

Kav Kusson lias contributed generously with his art talent, the opening section 
showing the school is his. Thanks Kay. 

But I talk on and say little and the book is nearlv done, you may take it or leave 
it. It represents my best effort for nearlv a year of work, so I will sign off wishing 
the Banyans of the future all the luck in the the world, may they be belter and better. 

I've said it, so Adois, 

CKIAISON LHWIS 



(H^ 



"^3 



^Jy 



A 



weniy 

Debating 





JOHN (;. swtNsoN don b. ci.upp 

Chttiniuiii. Hehiiting Council Dehcitins Manager 

The tiebating season this year was very successful loi' the lumiber of debaters who triei.1 out 
and had an opportunity to participate in forensic activities. Although not all the debates were 
won a fine effort was made in every case, and all of the decisions were close. A feature of the 
year was the growing number of non-decision or one critic judge debates. I he open-lorLun methcid 
seems to be growing in favor among the schools of this region. 

Owing to the necessary curtailment of finances this \ear. onl\- one long trip was made, that 
taken to Southern California. ,\lthough a number of the experienced men are graduating this 
\'ear, a wealth of good material was uncovered in the class debates which promises to keep the 
same high standarti next year. 

TRIANGLE DEBATES 

The State Triangle Debates were held on January 24, with the question being, "Resohed 
that Utah Should Adopt a Classified Property Tax." The negative team, composed of Elroy 
Nelson and Don B. Cluff defeated the U. A. C. team at Logan and the affirmative team com- 
posed of Glenn Dickson and Vernon Wentz lost to the University of Utah team at Provo. The 
University of Utah won over the U. A. C. at Salt Lake City so that they captured the state title, 
Young Universilv coming second. 




s 



DON IS. Cl.UII- 



CLKO"!' NLl.SON 



\liRNON WENT/, 



CI.ENN DICKSON 



Puf^e Ninety-nme 




MB^"^^ 







T 



^^H) 




CiOl DI:N TUI I.LRR 



I own I JOHNSON 



nil BPRT \ C.ROBI:KC, 



On Janii;ir\' 20. Occidental Collt'sc at Los Ani^t-les. st-nt a team ht're to debate the question, 
"Resol\ed thai a Substitute for Irial b\- Jury b: Adopted." Golden Tuelier and i^asmond 
Peterson representetl the B. V . I . There was no decision given. 

On March 22, the University of Wyominji debated the question. "Kesloved that the Plea of 
Temporar)' Insanitv as a Defense for Crime Should be .Abolisheil." The B. Y. V. took tile nej^a- 
li\e sitle .\nd the team was composed of Delbert \'. Groberj; aiul Ra\ mond Peterson. I he critic 
juilge };a\e the tlecision to B. \. U. 

The University of Southern California debateil the same question of .\pril 2. witli Golden 
Tuelier and Lowell Johnson. The decision was two to one for Southern California. 



c 




R\>MONn PnTHRSOS' 



OSWAI n PHARSON 



IIAROI O CANDI AND 



I'uge Unc liundied 



^ ■'III \ kL' 

weniy 1 lift 




LINDA RANDAI L 



lit AXCIIE TIKIMAS 



CliRTRLDi; PARTRIDGE 



Ihe only long trip made was taken by EIroy Nelson and Don Clull to Southern California. 
They debated the question, "Resolved that a Substitute for Trial by Jurv be Adopted," with the 
following results: Occidental College, non-decision; University of Redlands, critic judge in favor 
of B. Y. U.; University of Southern California, critic judge in favor of Southern California: South- 
western University, two to one decision for Southwestern. 

The women held a dual debate with the University of L'tah on Januar\- ^1, on the que^tion, 
"Resol\ed that a Substitute for Trial b\- Jury be Adopted." The negative team compo.sed of 
Caroline E\Ting, Ruth Ellsworth, and Verna Burnham lost in Salt Lake and the affirmative team, 
composed of Blanche Thomas, Getrude Partridge, and Linda Randall lost in Provo. 




CAROLINE EYRINC 



VERNA BURNHA.M 



RUTH ELLSWORTH 



I'ifj^e One Hundred One 




/ir^ 







\JiL 



"Dramatics 



AOJ' 



~ 



dH) 




Al ON/O MOKI LY 
/) ttclor ol Dratmttici 




I l< \\k M. Will I IM. 
t)Tam:tu Mdntt^rr 



i lu' Dramatic An Deparinicnl started this >ear under a new liead. Allhounh Mr 
had a lar^e joii before him to tr\ to fill the place left h\- Professor i^ardoe. he has done h 
efficientiv and well. A large number of students ha\e taken part in pla\s anti \et some 
most finished proiluctions seen in (College Hall ha\e been given. Trank Whiting as .Man; 
Dramatics has had a large share in the success the Department has attained. 

A new leature this year was the presentation bs' the girls of a plav the evening 
Cjirls' Day. "Quality Street." by J. .M. Barrie was the proiluction chosen this war and j 
by th." favorable comment it brought forth, this will be an annual event. 

In addition to the regular productions, a full program was enjo\ed in Mask Club 
Little 1 heatre was crowtled e\er\ Wednesday evening and some ver\ good work wa 
b\ the students participating. 



.Worley 

is work 

of the 

iger of 

before 
udging 

The 
s done 




PLAY R[-AI)ING CLASS 

rOH K«li— HAXMA.\, STARK. liYRINC, SWINSON. WORTIILN. \\AKLriLI». BIRD 

BOTTOM «Olf— MORLEY. SbAMOLNT. LLIJI OW. PALI SON. WADDOLPS. TAYLOR, I-UGAL. 



I'di!,e One lliinJred 



<rh 







rtCAL. CI ARK. PI LM.VItK. XANCI:. JACOBS. NLTTAI I . ^NOW 
PALI-SOX. IIIBIiEKT. WHITING. PAX.MAN. .McCOARO. I INFBALGII. .MARKIIAM. CI A/II.R. PlITbRSON 

The annual competiti\e play this year was "The Swan," b\- Franz Molnar. Although it is 
a story dealing with European aristocracy with a subtle satire pervading it. it was well done and 
well received. New scenery added much to its effectiveness. Those winning parts were. Jewel 
Linebaugh. Lucile Markham, Jean Paulson. Elaine Paxman. Joseph Winder. J(jseph Theriot. F^riink 
Whiting. Will McCoard. Ruth Clark. Claude Snow. Elmer Peterson. Helen Glazier. Bur\l llib- 
bert, Mary Lee, and Roy Fugal. It was directed b\ .Alonzo .\lorle\-. with .Mar\- Lee, assistant 
director. 




MARKIIA.M, LI\LBALGII. CI ARK, .MtCOARH \\I.\IJI:R WlirnNG. rillRloi. 
PA.X.MAS. PAL ISDN. LEE. FLGAL 



Page One Hundred Three 




'^ar\ 



L//20X)aTiyanQ 



T 




POTTr;R, SKAMOLNT. \VMITIN(;. I l:TliKSON. 1 INEBALGll. PAXMAN. I'Al ISON. SMART. 
BUOADBrNT. McCOARn, TAYI OR. IIGAI.. Wll I lAMS 

"Is Za t So " 

I he first ilramatic pntiluction of the \car was the comuilv Is /at So?" li\ jamt's Cileason 
ami KicharJ lab.-r. Direclcil h\- Alon/.o Morley. assislL-d hy jinnii' I lolhnmU. it was f;ivcn in 
(lolli-f-c Hall, XovL-mher I. 

"So ^his Is London" 

This comuily by Arthur Gooilrich. was prfsfiitcJ h\ ihu Si-nior class iiiulcr ilu' liiicclioii of 
Kathi'rinc Taxlor on December 14. 




OSTLtNO, POTTIR. SIllPHrRI) Ml I I INI R, STARK. .McCOARf). FIOI BROOK. I UGAL, BIRGl:, I 1 WIS. Ml SON 



/'(i,t;f (Jne Hundred hour 




BIRD. CANDLAND, N'ANC.F, MOdHl-, WAKI- M IHI-D. TII1:RI()T. ilAKK \I1mi\ K\^\\lsM\, |;IN(,11A\1 

"Sweet Lavender," a coined)- drama b\' A. W. Pinero \v•a^ the production chosen by the 
Alumni Association for its annual tour. After being tai<en to a number of towns in S.iutiiern 
and Central Utaii, it was presented in College Hall. Nov. 14 and \^. Members of the cast were: 
Ruth Clark, Wendell Vance, Harold Candland, Joseph Theriot, bred Moore, Nita Wakefield. 
Bo\-d Rasmussen. Hope Bingham. Hunice Bird. W. .M. Wendell and l:lro\- Nelson. Rex Johnson 
tlirected the production. 

"Outward Bound" 

"Outward Bound." b\ Sutton \ane. was the pla\- given b\ the L tali Beta chapter of Theta 
Alpha Phi. national dramatic fraternitw on .March 18. Under the direction of Alonzo Morlev . 
the following members to;ik part in the production: Roy Gibbons, Mary Lee, Frank Whiting, 
.Alonzo Morle\-. Helen Glazier. Lunce Bird. Harold Candlaml, L\nn Brondhent. and Bill .McCoard. 




lUKi), ,\ioKii\, ni(oA0ni\T. cnuioNs, r,iA/ii:i!, wiiinsr,. 1 1 r, candi and. .\u(-oard 




V 



All Boys Show 



i,iiou> (H ndis i\ no\r ri 1 1 aintii' 



A three act comuily by Ge;)rge Ade presenteJ in College I iall. January 16-17, hy the Beta Delta 
Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi. Sponsored by the Trovata Social Unit and directed by A. Rex 
Johnson. 

The annual All Boys show al\\a\s affords some of the richest comedv of the year. 

The following composed the cast: John L. Allen, J. Grant Thurgtx)d, Orin II. Jackson. Earl 
Jones, Kent Johnson, LeRo\- Gibbons, llenr\ I). Taylor, Joe Theriot, Garn Webb, Wendell X'ance. 
"Short\" Berge. Bill Oldroxd. Bob Curtis, Reed G. Starley, Rees .Anderson, Bruce Cox, Wen.'.ell 
Ta\lor. Charles I KiidirMin. Hix Jones, ("iharles Wall, Clarence John, I, oren Skousen, "I-'roo" Ras- 
mus sen. 

1 he purpose of this bo\ s show is to establish a loan fund for senior students in the college of 
commerce, i'his \ear the project was more than successful, the receipts being the largest in the 
histor\- of dr.imatics at the "\". 



i 




GROUP Oh GIRl (.II.\R.\(:TCRS 




The girls of the school started a new feature this year with the presentation of a pla\ the 
evening before Girls' Da\-. Barrie's delightful comedy, "Quality Street " was chosen and it pro\ed 
to be a real success. The leading parts were taken by Ruth Clark and Harold Candland. Others 
in the cast were \irgie .Mulliner, Eleanor Stark, Caroline Eyring, Audrey Ostlund, Claude Snow. 
Ber\l Hibbert. Delbert Grobert. Josinette Cook, Bernice \Vaddoups, Claude Eggertson, Rowland 
Cannon, and .Addie WVight. 

"^Uhe Bull Gan^" 

".\\\ work and no pla\' makes Jack a dull boy" is the motto of the Bull Gang, otherw ise known 
as the Lion-Tamers Club. They can set scenes such as were never seen before, pull properties out 
of the air, and perform other similar miracles. The\' can also keep an audience waiting half the 
niaht while thev build a house, but with it all the\' aren't a bad bunch. 







WHITINC. BROADBENT, H.\NDLEV, P.^RTRIDC.E. \.\NCE. TMIRIOT 



Jiuiu 





h| 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




VSRI^^^I 




W '-"'^^^H 


^^Vr 


^f^^H 




1 i^H 




L ^^^H 








Bk. VHi 



I A \ AR ISAACSON 
Miinager of Musu 



The Music Year 

Steaii>' and sure progress in all deparlmenls ralher 
than a spectacular advance in one thing has been thi- 
ke\ role of the Music Department ih s year. In the 
three branches, theory, vocal, and instrumental, ex- 
ceptional work has been done anil much beni'fit has 
been received by the music stduents in particular and 
the whole student bod> in f.eneral. 

.A bij'ger and better balanced orchestra than ever. 
a male and a ladies' glee club far above average, a 
band which exceeded its u^uall\' high standard, we e 
some ol the noteworthy features. A Sacred (Cantata 
was presented in the Tabernacle at Haster 1 ime, with 
the combined ,t;lee clubs and ch rus siriging the musi; 
and the orchestra pla\ing the accompaniment. 

.Although .Mrs. 1 lorence Jepperson .Madsen left 
for Ciialifornia at C>hristmas time to dirict the music of 
the .Nlission Plav. her work was carried on in a splendid 
manner b\ Prof. lilmer Nelson an.l Miss .Margaret 
Summerhavs. 



Male Glee Club 

I he .Male Glee (ilub ^tarlc■d its \ear by effecting a complete organi/.atioi. consslin;; of \\ m. 
F. Hansen. Director: [ilia l-arnsw'orth. Accompanist : Reed Phillips. President; Walter Daniels. 
Nice-President: and Oscar Bui^^ch. Secretary-Librarian. Besides singing several tim s in Devc- 
tional and in surrountling towns, an extensive trip was taken to the northern part of the state, 
where the>' werj \er\ favorably received. 




.MALE Gl Et; a LB 



"^ 




Band 




The band under the lead.-rship of Prof. Robert sauer. with (his- Richie'maniiger, and a mem- 
bership of fift\' musicians has had a very successful \ear. 

Besides phi\ing for Football. Basketball games, as well as for Track m.^ets and for otlur 
Student Body activities, the organization gave a number of well appreciated concerts. 



Symphony Orchestra 




The "Y" S\niph()n\ Orche-Ntra has given two regular concerts during the season. It has 
played sexeral s\'inphnnc selections for the student bod\' at the assembly periods. 

The "Little S\mphony" mac!e a tour of central Ltah and ga\'e a series of educational conceris. 
The director. Mr. Robertson, spoke briefly upon the instruments in the orchestra which were then 
demonstrated. 





"UlLJll Hi. y -^ok-ii. 



.^ 



\nr ^ 



d^ 




Ladies Glee Club 




the 
r 



Ihc I.ailifs' Glee (llub lias IkuI a mo>t >uccesNliil year (.lurinj; ihe past seasun. L luici im 
direction of .Miss Margaret Summerhavs, with Ina W'ehb as accompanist, they ha\e sung a numbe 
of times in Devotional, over KSL, at the Paramount Theatre. 

Mixed Chorus 

The mixcti chorus as a complete organi/aiinn in itself has been especiall\- active this year. 
It has appeared nearl\' every wee in devotional. >inning some anthem. 

The cutstandins production of the \ear by the chorus of se\ent\-fi\e voices was tht reiuli- 
tion of the sacred cantata, "The Holy City," by A. R. Gaul, on the evening of I:aster Sunday at 
the Stake Tabernacle. The chorus was accompanied by the B. Y. V. S.hphony Orchestra and the 
work was augmented by several fine soloists. 




«i 



.s.\(.iu.u i.AM.vTA. 1111; llolVln^• 



r^ 



XT 



A. 



^TTTN O 



QyVfale Quartet 





■■: ->4Vj.."' 



The 'VoLing Ouarlul' had a very successful year. I'hey took part in manv 
student-bod\' and class programs. They also gave programs and lyceum numbers 
for the Hxtension Division of the B. Y. U. 

I he personel of the quartet is: (Jyde Summerha\s. first tenor: .Morris Chris- 
tensen. second tenor: William Johnson, baritone: and l.aX'ar Isaacson, basso. F.lla 
l-arnsworlh, accompanist. 



Q~he String Quartet 




.\n unusual aiul i.ltcLii\e Lomhinalior. ol instruments made up the String 
Quartet this year. Composed of Audrey and Evelyn Ostlund, and Zola Martin, 
steel guitars, and Lucile Merrill, violin, it was one of the most popular organiza- 
tions on the campus. Few meetings were complete vsithout some music from them. 
In addition to this they went on Public Ser\ice lUireaLi Programs to all parts and 
plaved over the radio several tinics. 



:> 



I'ti^e One Hundred Eleven 




W hen the chiss get^ dull and the professor cannot keep the hack three rows 
awake, when the first signs of spring makes its insistent call of the wild, when 
activit\' is the only cure for that desire to sleep, the campus activities make of 
college days dream da\s. Da\s that are long to be remembered for the associa- 
tions and the pleasures that they pro\ide. 

It is the campus life that brings back the student \ear after year to complete 
that course of higher learning when the problems of life seem to bear down to 
the extent of making college difficult. 

Campus fun, foolishness and work, may we ne\er forget it. 




The yerr i> ilnnt aiul .^^ we pause to 
consider all that happened during the 
short nine nmnlhs of the school session 
our hearts heal a little faster and our 
spirit rises a little higher for the goiKl 
old \. To those of us who leave the 
schiK)l this year, particularly, comes a 
feeling of pride and satisfaction for that 
which has been done while we were a 
part of the school. To those of us that 
still have time to spend here the year 
means now more of a promise of better 
things to come. But to all of us the V 
means much, we appreciate what it has 
iUine for us ami the luii tluil it has 
provided 



^^^iXk 



Ihe siimnuT proved to be an active one and a {5CK>dly portion ui our mcmbcship lailid to 
return to school in the fall in the interests of niatriiTion\-, but for those who got back there was 
plenty to do, the entire >ear has been crammed full ol activity. 

I he _vear started out with a huge bonfire rally, and then came the big ice-breaking ball that 
made possible an introduction to everyone in school. If vou didn't meet everyone \(iu were sup- 
poset-l to have tlone and consei|uently the hello habit was lirml) and irrevocably est.ij">lished. 

By the first of October, school was going with ail the vim and vigor of a healthy youngster 
and even that early rumors of freshmen rebellion were afloat, maybe they didn't like the senior 
judge and his associates. About that time the "Y" News got going strong and everything worth 
mentioning got clawed and scratched. Things happened 1(h) fast and t(K) man\- at a time to go 
into a lengthv discertation about them at this time but in the interests of hislorv and for tile benefit 
of those who are interesteil we will mention a lew of tiie oiilslantling events of tlie school year to 
start off this campus life section. 

The F-rosh got busy and cleaned the "Y" on the hill the same day that the College of Idaho met 
defeat at the hands of the Cougars. About that time the freshman ffxnball team showed a little 
class to beat Provo High. The Social L'nil svstem came in for a little pubiicitv and we heard 
all abf)Ut it for a week or so. The Senior C^ourt spent some hectic mornings with results thai onl\ 
the frosh can graphically describe. ,\sk them about it. 

We won our next football game by the comfortable maigin of one point from the California 
Aggies. It was a great game. The next one with the Colorado .-Xggies we liroppeil hv the lune 
of I S to 6, the I-rosh football squad were turning in some good scores though. 

W'e beat \V. S. C. A()4) and then when we had to dedicate the slaiiium the score just wouldn't 
come to our side of the hoan.1. We had already won the game though accoriiing to the pep rails 
the night before when we nearly set the town on fire with our superfluitv of torches. .Montana 
rather put one over on us to the tune of 10-7 but then we avenged all defeats whin wc held the 
powerful Utah team scoreless on that mud field during a terrific blizzard. 

Then came a scholastic attainment when the "\" was accepted by the .American .Association 
of L'niversities on November 17. The football season ended with the B. Y. L'. in a better position 
than she had e\er beff)re occupied in her athletic historv. 

There is not r(K)m to tell it all though, it w.)uki take me a nioiilh to tlo it in an>wa\. hut, 
Bu.i showed his speed in national competition, the Junior Prom was great even if Al did get 
the mumps, basketball tickets proved more than hard to get, we took the state tennis title and 
the the conference track title, the circus was stupendous and the Invitational Track .Meet was 
bigger, and even a chapter of the Friars were established on our campus. 





One ol the jtrsi events of the year was a huge botifne ntlly held at the south end ol (he new itudium. Sptnt 
ran rampant and everybody seemed to enjoy everything that happened, and .even the 'absence of the evenings's 
program u'as not a seriom huider^nce. The football team told all they knew and f-reddie ^ave us some nood 
yells. Someone parsed around a coupU or tl}ree areen u-atermelom to finish off tl<e eveninf;. The bottom picture 
depUcts a touchdown in the Dedication Game. 



4 




0/ the lealurei ol the Annual Ttmp Hike. 




The 
one 
out 

SeT^ 
p:cl 
iind 



J and there yjas nearly 
res ihoti: various form 
the other the entrance 



battle 



Hres shoK various form oj Prosh activity, but there ■mere two thin ; 
once ol the Frosh president at the l-roih dan 



I 



Frosh this rear were more than active, they really d,d Ih n::s. I he Frosh-Sofh lifl^t on December , ..as 

o he brj iTts oi the school vear. The photosrarher got can.ht in tl,e m.-.v-,./. and -..as lucky to gel 

alveto ay noihm about netting' pictures. That same day some dtrty rascal or rascals sw.ped the ) 

al.ve to say noimiif. i k ,( p,^.ervone lived happily ever alter so the day vias a success. I he 

thin:s vee missed, one the Kipple rebellion 




I 



Timf^vnoitai it at the height of her ftlory in the fait and the Annmil Autumn t.taf Hike tiJ* one long to he 
remembered Thit year conditiom were ideal w everyone utnt home iL-tIb jubilant hearts and blistered heels 
and Horn out lolet. The pictures on this page grapht tully depwl the numerous intereilinj incidents along 
the way. We don't know what they were hut exery picture tells a story, thank goodness. 




At the top -a.1- caught Turbo in a niibcr pcn^^iie moment in -u.hch he wotddn't even take a piece of beef for 

his thoughts. The two pictures at the top on each side arc of Cleo. Three of the Cougar Quartette look as 

though they were ready to burst into song, the fourth refused to be around at the time of the picture. Alary 

Lee riezi-s the Canyon on one side and fcedi the k lien milk on the other. Tarho and Cleo pose. 



w. 



zj^^St^a 





Through the t^ourte\y of the national guard, many of the nudenti are ahl^- to enioy horse-back rtding dunna 
Ihf fail and if>ring monthi. Many fine mountt are ava.lahle and almoit any faiorable afternoon seei various 
KTouf*i tn.oy.nfi the heautiet of nature and the pleauires of a }:ood ride. 




Polo and jumping are to some e.\!i'nt participated in and a polo team composed primarily of fellows from 

school has excellent posiibiltties of 7}uikins a real tea^tt. The photographs on these t-^o places largely speak 

for themselves, they are but typical of the activities on and off (he hones. 




Dancing r> ont of Ibc imeresting and Jeligbt/ul pha'ts of the women's physical education department. 

During the fall and the spring the girls get out of doors to get atmosphere and e/fect. Utah lake providei 

an excellent background at leait from the photographer's point of view. 



Aline Cohneti deserves special mention for her work with the dancing this year, she has git-en careful 

aitent.on to the developing of dancing here at the Y and some excellent work has been done under her direction. 

Plam for even more extensive dancing programs have beeit nuide by the Physical Education Department. 





The fumor-Sfmor party xaenl entr with a hang but un'ike its predecesson it was compuuoui for itt lack of 
ihoottng afjrayi — in fact, ut don't beUeve that anyont was even half shot. The parly was an emtgralion 
affair and everyone ieemed to come across in great style. The man without a country at the top seems to 
know what he wanted though. Henry and AUce look almoit like a retenion to type. Anyway the group at 
the bottom seems to be having a good time. 




The Anniidl Pep \'odie was a snappy affair this year, in fact, it was the kind that popular i^c's the bald 
headed row with the college boys. We show here a few of the acts presented during the evening At top 
left, the Tausig act; right, the Mate's act; center le t. the Fidelas and right the O. S. Trovata whoi woti 
second place; bottom, the Val Norn act which ca^ptiir-^d third honors. The Nautilus, the winners, are shown 

elsewhere. 






^^^^ 




A iiucttilul pitfTimate to Salt Luke wat tlaged the iiy before the Dedication Game. About ball the ichool 
vent north to gite vent to their enthuttatm. and some real ipirit was stirred up. There vas really too 
mueh to tuit the admtniilralion at the "U" and we nearly lost our good graeei. The top pctturei show 
parts ol the pilgrimage, the bottom, two views of the dedication services. 




f'rendenl Heber }. Grant iieu-> the Grand Canyon. President Grant n president of the Board of Truitees. 
of the R. >'. v. The other three upper picturei shou- s.poti on and near our campus. The lower picture 
IS of the crowd that gathered in front of the jhon R. Park Building at the U. of U. the afternoon of the 

big pilgrimage. 




Iht u.nltr Kdi a long and cold ont uiilb p/fn/v of inou- to lalisly "'» '*' "«"' confirnud snow nun. 

Iimt and again Iht Y camfui ua, Iranilormed inla virilablt fairyland. In the mountains tbe snow was 

drtl> and well packed lor all of the winter sports. Tbe bottom picture shows the big snowslide that kept 

Ui awa\ from some of the fun this winter. It completely stopped trallic through Proio Canyon 




Ihe top piclurf li ii view of the skii grounds at Viv-dii Park. livery -ueek end. while the snow was good, 
there were groups of Y students demonstrating the r ability and lack of it with the polished hickories, 
or tryitifi to get a thrill out of a good fast toboggan slide. Winter sports have promise of becoming im- 
portant here before long and there is some talk of organised hockey for next year as Utah Lake affords iotne 

of the be it ne to be found anywhere. 







i'pptr /«•//— <,t*iJt </ Koiufi^ piM-*tnh the all-around ath'ete au:arJ at the Invitattonul Tronk Meet. Ctnlet — 
Ct-'ach Romney surveyi the new uortdt that are to be conquered. L'pper mht — A croud hidi the hatketball 
team good-bye. The middle picture is of the Girlt' Athletic links, the pri;e for the best group that night 
uat won by the \auttlus. lower left. Lower right — fust a small corner of the Froth-Sophomore fight where 

the activity wat scarce. 





The Invitational Track Meet is one of the biggest athletic events of the Inter mountain country. This year 
there were over 1500 participants. The big posture parade is the feature of this meet. At the top, left — 
E. L. Roberts, the founder of it all tells the crowd about the history of the meet. Top Center — H. R. 
Aterrill announces that the Utah Woolen Mills makes possible this broadcast. Upper Right — President 
Harris looks on. Center The crowd watches the posture parade and Bottom — Two views of the parade. 



r7£S^ 



! \ 







,\imr(>J, and more Banyans. 




■tverything and Eierybody" lidj our motto for this i.vr. bul -.^c forgot Ibi Zoolonnhir OettUscbalt 
lormal. Now don't moan—^e promist ibal if your p-.clurt doetn't occur any place else in the book, you 
u-ere at the B. >'. L'.-Aggie game, seventh rov;, seat So. 15. 




// II a JitlicHll thing lo lake clan work striouily u>h.-n tbe freal ouldoori beckoni at nery Inrn and Jurmg 
nery itaion. Spring, fall and winter all bold charms thai are irreiistible and often our ichool work sullen 
al the expense ol our lesions, /or il is easy lo "lini sermons in stones, books in running brooks and good 

in ei-erytbing." 




A. RU.S JOHNSON, '24 

Bxectiltve Secretary 

INEZ KNIGHT ALLEN, '01 

Director 



ASSOCIATED ALUMNI OF BRIGHAM YOUNG UNI\CRSITY 

DR. RICHARD R. LYMAN, '91 

President 

LEDA THOMPSON, '27 

Director 

CHARLES M. BERGE, '29 

Recording Secretary 



BAYARD W. Ml-.NDENIIAI I , 
Vice-Preirdeitt 
ESTELLE S, HARRIS, 1)7 
Director 




l-fudenb-.p M.tek m one of the hig veeki of the tchoo' year. Tbousandi of people from all oxer i'tah. Idaho 

•ind even Arizona and Sevada. aalher for a coune in adult education. The itudents co'operate in making the 

\*:eek a iueeea. A huge Spanub f-'iefta uat the culmination of the actnttie\. The "Panuelo" booth arranged 

by the Vikng and the La Volga Social Unitt was declared winner of the pn;e offered for the bat booth. 




/ be Senior whiiker growiufi contest t*,-j( the height of something or another when the boyi who grew 
fn-f^di went around to thfi barbers of town and ioliated prizes to be given to the ones who deprived the said 
barber ■i of the greatest amount of busittess during th^ two weeks. From the looks of most of the growths 
though the barbers mined nothing but the prices they gave away. The following were winners^ Potter, litrhey. 
Stucki and l-it;gerald. The rest of the people on the page had little or nothing to do with it. 






■U i JjU'Ly'Seven 



/ 



/ 




i 



the uorld is our campm and the mountaim and Uke. „iir f>/,.i.s-o .nj lie u/iw/wn i> :dcjl lor all of Ihe 
outdoor sporl, m Ibe uarld and uv certainly art indulgent to thai extent. In the spring lime and the fall 
the moonlight and all that goes ui/fr it plays havoc u'i(A any incl:n,.1on that might have existed to study. 
The winter months prov.de glorius fun lor large groups uZ-o get a thrill out of the last skii trail or a 

long mush on snowthoes. 




On^ tradition at tbt "\" that has nntr he^n broken n ')" Dtty. otu of tbt big JuVj of the year v;b<n 
the Utter on the biil grfj its coat of icbitncasb and the campus in genfral ggts a cUa% up of one kind 
or another. The pictures aho\e show a fcuf phases of the day's trorfc nfhicb n-as moftly play. The letter 
looked better though and besides that the tm^itational Track Meet xcai rrtside foswo.V the next day by the 
gallant work of the redder blooded of the imtitution. 




Siluatti in a glariui mouHlatn sttling Ibt B. >'. U. Summer tehool ollm one of the motl delightlul coun/i 

ol the entire icbool year. The iituation it ideal lor the ttudy o/ art and ol alt cour lei in nature ttudy. An 

excellent /acuity uilh ieveral nationallr knouri teachers ii provided lor this six weeks session. 




These two po^ei' picture some of the ticintties aud a little of the scenery surroiiitdttis Ihe su/umer school. 

I be faculty, group of the students, a group on a hike to one of the lakes, the school itself, one of the 

CLibim used as Ihiiig quarters are some of the things shoicn on these pages. 





,J 



CATHLETICS 





'itriffmjM^lJTti 




CAthletics 



scorelea. In- on a mud lielj in o dnvinv. imnv itorm icithlthc oJJs twenty 
to one afianist us. The Diklictition Came ll.nilled from the first ■whistle to 
the last nun. —The "lUillel" flashes post the tape with a hurst of speed that 
da^^les. "Lilly foot' idles down the mud bed to snag a fifty yard pass, "Sa'tky" 
drops in II loiiii shot to tie the score, two mitional swimminti records go in one 
evening In viclorv or in defeat, athletics add ;est to colleiie life. 







cJyfajor Sports 





CyVfaJor Sports 



l-oolball, basketball, and track are B. V. I'.'s major sports. These receive 
added stress from the coaching statT. probabl\- due lo the iact that more importance 
is accorded them in state and conference competition than is given to tennis, 
wrestling and swimming. 

A factor which has minimized popular interest in football at B. Y. U. 
has been the lack of football tradition. Ihe Cougars are now in the process of 
building up a mass of legendary material of this sort. Another year as colorful 
and successful as the past one will go far to accomplish this. 

B. Y. U. is famous or its basketball and track. Conference and state flags 
ha\e found their wav to Provo with surprising cons!Stenc\'. Although the hoop 
sport has suffered a series of lean \ears in the past decade, track has produced 
cinder luminaries recognized bv sports authorities and public alike from coast 
to coast. Notable among these has been Owen Rowe, premier hurdler of the nation 
and widely known sprinter and all-around athlete. 



-3WBKgwiwawBii»tew»»^i'i>BI8iii .■ 




.'•i'W?w.:"ri"-t'-if)c-. 




IIMd I s J IIVKI 



(. Ill I l\(.l l; KIlSIM N 



I 1(1 II III \il\ 



/ 



V 






PHIL JACKbUN 



(.APT. HtNRY SIMAIONS 



On,' II 



niiJ 1 1 



•Ik 



imN 



vr-- 



mm 




J^K 





Football Resume 

L^iulcT tliL' polisliiii.j; und liiglil\' ^limulatint; inlluc-iice ol' Coach Otl KomneN', B. Y. V. football 
attaiiu'd a new lu>li level ilurin>; the past season. The Couf-ars hrilliaiitl\' climaxed a consislentl\- 
successful season when the\- unexpectedly held University of Latah's unbeaten conference champions 
to a significant tie game in the season's final appearance. This feat, alone, stamped the season as 
a success regardless of the outcomes of the oth.'r games. 

Romney's "words aiul music" idea was respjnsible for an effective rhythm and internal har- 
mon\- which characleri/ed the team throughout the season. It was this quality which endowed it 
with an amazing power and speed manifested, both when forced under the shadow of its own goal 
posts in defense, and when viciously attacking its conference foes in the open field. 

With a team predominantly sophomore, B. Y. U. losses may be accredited largely to inex- 
perience. 

Brigham Young dropped contests to L'tah Aggies, Colorado Aggies, and Montana State to 
lose sight of the conference banner early in the season. Pre-season contests however, witnessed 
the crushing of two strong intersectional rivals when the Cougars took at a stride both games with 
the College of Idaho of Caldwell and the California Aggies of Davis. Later in the season, with 
Cougar backs cruising the length an.l b;eadlh of the field. Western Stale Teachers were over- 
v\helmed in a sensational encounter. 




1929 Football Squad 




lor «ou— HOGliRTSHN. IIANSliN, DOUGAL, COOPtR, SKOUShN. DYCIUiS. Second Ko-u.—\\hST. REEVE, IIOONER, BUN- 
NEIJ., MERRILL, BALLE, SKOUSEN, JACKSON. Third Row— PUTHRSON, DASTRUP, BRINLHY, VACHER, ROWE, LOVE- 
LESS, INGERSOLL. Front Row— THORN, CAPTAIN SIMMONS, BALLIF, MAGI.EBY, DIXON, BUYS, LOVELESS 




sANKY" DIXON 


■- 1 , ■ 1 1 ^1 \ 




KOWI-. 


All Confer enre i-.nd 


l.nd 




Hallhack 


Spartan blood — dies for the cau^e 


A Ktcat athlete with a misleading 




When he runs he just appears in 


every evening and Saturday matinees. 


marcel. 




spots: last as lightning; versatile as 


BUNNELL 


VACHER 






Guard 


Quarterback 




HOOVER 


dives his all every time — all the 


.\ mouse with a lion's heart. 




Halfback 


tiine. 






A talented toe and a wicked whi[) — 
a gre.if (i"l-' H-ill (il;iver. 




Pa^iv. 


n 


nc Hn 



JL 



_y iu. li-iii- 



"U 



-Lil_ ^ I 





BKINl.LY M!:RRiLL 

Tackle Center 

... i:.iriu-:i[ .iiul loval in love as well as 

l-roin celloist to varsity tacUIi.' in j,^ football 

ihiTe weeks — beats Elinor Glyn. 

DASTRUi^ 
Tackle 
Reminds one of a southern gentle- 
man — and fights like one. 

JACKSON 

'iundred Forty-nine sir.uig and wiiiing. 






B. SKOUSEN 

Giiiird 

■'Bulltin.g"— Thai says it! 



TilORS 

Hal/back 

"Simha" — in ever>' sense of the 

word. 

BALLIF 

QuoTierhack 

\K\^A Tace"' — Ciood for the morale 



/ I^ 




lu ^ s 

Quarterback 

The hoy with the athletic bean; 

(eeJs on statistics. 

INGERSOLL 

End 

Rose to great heights. 



I'l ILRM.N 

Fullback 

I n«il<s like 2 nice "feller" but oh, 

how he hits! 

MAGLEBY 

Hal/back 

"Cagey" — A great athletic instinct. 



I<1I:\L. I„J 

Takes his football with all the ex- 
citement and perturbation of a mod- 
ern Diana accepting a gift. 

DYCIIES. Ctnlfr 

Traded a "Watermelon" for intestinal 

stamina, or what Shakespeare calls 

"Stomach." 

Oil,- HiDuht'.l !'il! ■ 




LiGGRRTSEN 

Tiwhle 

\\ ill be a big help to the line when 

he gets his full size. 

LOVELKSS 

Tackle 

Pathcr of two anJ a varsity tackle — 

that's the height of something or 

other. 



HANSON 
Line 

Jtist liUe a clock — on tinx- ami 
steady. 

COOPER 

Line 

! ithe and active as a Cougar — • 

promising maierial. 



DOUGALL 

As excitable as a contented bu\ ine 

BAI.IE 

All conference when it cunies to 

-fiKht.-" 



iijty-onc 




h 



'«'■(, 




SOME roOTBAI L PICTl RliS SNAPPED AT SE\URA1 Ol Till GAMES 1)1 RING THE 1928 EOOTBALL SEASON 




^■■H 


1 


PPH 


IPHfUpi 


i 






i 



M 




^i^^J^'~/■%T:^r:T,.., 



THE l-OOTBALL SEASON THIS YEAR PROVIDED SOME REAL THRILLS. TI-IE nLniCA'ITOS GAMi:. THE UTAH GAME 

AM) THi: \\f:stir\ states game weri; exceptional 



■'"^^J 




r 



B. Y. U. Coaching, Staff 

Brigham ^ uung L ni\frsii\ s athletic coaching ^lail was increased this >ear 
when Ott Romney was signed up from Montana State College as athletic director 
;uid head coach and Buck Dixon, a form.^r all-round star of the school was brought 
in from a coaching position at Weber High school. 

RomnL'\' is one of the eminent coaches of the countrx'. Besides having a won- 
derful background of coaching knowleilge gained b\' actual participation in the 
various sports, his teams have alwaNs shown a high polish and craft which has 
placeil them into the winning column almost exclusively. Already under his 
regime at B. \ . U. Cougar athletes have captured state championships in swim- 
ming, basketball and a conference track title. 

The growing affairs of the department ha\e necessitated a special athletic 
manager. Coach (Charles j. Hart .seems to be the proper man for the position, hav- 
ing handled that work during the past \eai \er\- efficient l\. In addition to this 
t\ pe of work "(^hick' has demonstrated his abilitv as a track mentor, ha\ing 
brought B. V. L'. her pennant in this sport last \ear. 

Coach Buck Dixon, former four \'ear four letterman and a member of numer- 
ous state and conference champion teams proved a strong addition to the staff, 
helping I-reshman gridders to a tie for the state pennant during this, his first year, 
besides bringing a tennis championship to the Cougars. 

In swimming, Coach Leaf, himself a strong swimmer, has elevated B. Y. U. 
to a position of national prominence in this sport. Bud Shields is a product of his 
personal tutelage. In the Kock\- .Mountain Conference, l.eaf-coached teams 
have been pre-eminent for the past six years. 

Without the services of "Tobe" Raille, B. \ . L . athletes would be unable to 
keep in the perfect physical condition for which the\' are noted. Besides acting 
as trainer "robe" is wrestling coach. 

Phil Jackson coaches B. \. L'.'s line pla\ in football. His experience in this 
department was gained at Chicago wher.i he occupied a berth on the Maroon team. 

Football Games of 1928 



College of Idaho 


6 






U. 


9 


(^lalifornia .Aggies 


6 






u. 


6 


Colorado .Aggies 


15 






u. 


6 


Utah .Agricultural College 


10 






u. 





Western States 









u. 


47 


Montana State 


19 






u. 


6 


University of Utah 


f) 


B. 




u. 








lAKI) IIITTiNG 
MTILNS DL 



MAItMN SKOUSIjN 

i-ii.LBACK. WHO {•.ai->taini-:d Tin; 

RING TIIH r.l(l-:ATi-:R PART (11- 
Till: SIASON, 



Frosh Football 

The Kittens established what is probably a record 
in Frosh football in winninj; ten of their fourteen starts 
against the very toughest kind of competition. Al- 
though apparently being pushed out of the state race 
by an early defeat at the hands of the Utah Aggie 
yearlings, they reversed ilope later in the season with 
a clean-cut win over the undefeated LIniversity of Utah 
first-year team. This threw the state freshman race 
into a three-cornered tie since Utah won an easy victory 
from Utah Aggie freshmen. 

The Frosh squad provided valuable training for 
se\eral plavers who will look \erv nuich at home in 
\arsity suits next fall. Romney kept close watch over 
their activities throughout the season. 

A hard-hitting backfield attack behind a sturdy 
line won notable victories over Grant! JLinction College, 
University of Utah freshmen and L. D. S. C. En- 
gagements were lost to U. A. C. freshmen, Ogden U. P., 
and Weber Junior College. 



1929 Fi^osh Football Squad 







Bach Row—COMM TOBG RAILLE, MARTIN. RIPPLE. F. PRINCE, HARDY, lACOBS. CANDLAND, 

HALVORSEN, COACH BUCK DI.XON. Middle Rot.—L. JOHNSON, KITCHEN, WALKER. M. SKOUSEN, 

McGregor, coombs, WILKINSON, hall, AAGARD, staples, IIANSEN. Fwnl Koii— YORCASON, 

C. prince, WILSON, NELSON, MAGLEBY, POLLARD, MANSON, PROBERT, LIVINGSTON. 



r'i:<ie One Hundred HtfLy-five 




'Basketball 

B. \. U. ;iK;iin a-MimcJ her acciislomcd place as a ainftTcnco ami slate liaskell->all enlilv this 
vcar after several lean >,ars in ihe h'lop sport. AlthdUf^h "Kans" hifjerMill was the t)nl\ man on 
the team to attain six teet in height, an overdose of speed and court sanacity jjave the "\" one 
;)f the most effective angrej-alions ever to win a state title. Ordinarilv , with such a team, a con- 
ference championship w;)uld have been a matter of course. .Montana's wonder team, howcxer. 
ruineil these title aspirations. 

The Clouj-ars were distinlcls superior to the other state institutions cornering; three ol the four 
name series with both I . A. C and I tah rniver>ii\ to win the state championshiji and sectmd 
place in the conference without trouble. 

In spite of this si);nificant showing, B. \. U.'s source of greatest price lies, probably, in the ex- 
neplional slrim; of vict(irie> turned in during a h.'av\- scheilul^' of pre-season. inter-sectional con- 
tevts. North Dakota llickerlails. stale and conference champions. Colorado Teachers, and Phil- 
lips L'niversitv of Hnid. Okli.. erstwhile conquerors of the national .\. A. L . champion Cook 
Painter Boys, were some of the stronger challengers who were unable to solve B. Y. L'.'s new 
attack on the home floor. 

During the holidaxs a long excursion to the F^icific Coast was m ide b\ the team. There they 
met fise of the strongest ath'eic club teams in the countrv defeating them in as mans games. 

The season's play was marked by a sharp departure from (loach Roberts orthodox lightning 
short pass to Romnex's combinaf'on long an.l shirt pass which stressed freak shoot ng and handlin •, 
of the ball. A marv.-lous de!."p corner stall wa> aKo instituted b\ Romnev with results at times 
humorous to home fans. 

With his system firmly instal'ed and with plent\ of material to fill up graduation losses, 
Coach Romney looks forward to the annexation of the l*?3() conference title with confidence. 



1929 'Basketball SquaJ 




Hack Hm^^l.rll la Rinht—WMMVR. IIRINI I V. COOPtR, Rtt^NE, INGI:RS01.1.. IIALVORSUN. JOHNSON. 

From «<mw.Jl:SsrN. .MAGLIBY. SKOLSHN, WRIGHT. B.M.I. II-. niXON. THORN. 

ROW T. anil \V[:ST nui in picture. 



werty i iir\< 




"EEL" IJRINLEY MAGLEBY 

Forward Guard 

SeciMul hJKh scorer in western IIjs an uncanny passing jnd 
division. R. M. C. shooting ability. 

"SANKY" DiXON 

Forward 

Exceptional for his hall rustling. 

j'age Une Hundred J'il> 



COOPER 

Guard 

t)tK' nl the greatest ^"^1 guards 

ever developed al B. Y. U. 



INGERSOLL 

Center 

"Rai^s" generalship and scoring 

were indispensable. 



ROWE 

Forward and Center 

Was shifted this year from guard to 

forward where he made a very 

enviable record. 



f 



.^an^ 




=A 



C. SKOUSEN 
Foraard 



. JINSPN 

ForlAiirJ 



THORN' 

IiIIiItJ 



HALVORSEN 



BAr I. IP 

(iitard 



I hese men represent part of the powerful reserve slren^lh which kept the Cougars at their 
lull power throughout the season. I lalvorsen. Jensen and Thorn were new additions this year 
and with Ballif should provide the "Y" with c msiderable offensive and defensive strength next 
year. 



/•, 



!>::, rfri„,r,,J 



rh 



± L 



A 



wenty i iiii' 



® 





/ 




WAI.KIiR 

Forward 

OiK- of the flashiest ball rustlers to 

enter school for some \ears. 



JOHNSON 

Center 

A promising pi\ot man. 



WRIGHT 

Forward 

lias proxed himself a mainstay on the 

scoring line for three years. 



\\1 ST 

Glldrd 

Can take the place of any rejiular 

on the team anJ look good. 



REEVE 

Center 

Is adept at tapping the rebound 

back through the hoop. 



^^'-"- Hundred 




'**if^ 



<jt. 



'jr 




Snapped as the (Jougar) IricJ unsuccrssfullv Ui ri*|>el the inva\i<in (if the C4>nrtri'ncf champion 
Moni.ina Sialc Bnhcnis in Prnxo 




The first game of iht B V. I — U; A. C. basketball series staged in Provo. 




B. Y. LJ.'s Rabid Fans After j Bas'.etball Game 



Record of the basketball games played bv B. V. U. during the current season. 



Opponents 


Opponents 
Score 


B V. U. 
Score 


Where Played 


Colorado Teachers . 


. 30 


48 . 


Pro\o 


Phillips .... 


30 


40 


Pro\o 


Phillips . 


. 51 


38 . 


Proso 


U. of N. Dakota . 


53 


50 


. Ogden ^overtime) 


U. of N. Dakota 


. 28 


42 . 


Provo 


U. of N. Dakota . 


30 


31 


Provo 


Hollywood A. C. 


. 44 


49 . 


llollxvvood 


Los Angeles A. C. . 


23 


32 


. Los Angeles 


.'\lhambra A. C. 


. 26 


33 . 


Los .\ngeles 


Pacific Coast A. C. 


28 


41 


. Los .\ngeles 


Las \'egas .\ C. . 


. 26 


42 . 


Las \'egas Nev. 


iMontana Mines 


25 


20 


. Butte. .Mont. 


Montana State Normal 


. 25 


II. 


Dillon. Mont. 


L'ni\-ersit\- of Utah 


38 


41 


Pro\o 


University of Utah . 


. 45 • 


40 . 


Provo 


University of Utah 


56 


41 


Salt Lake Citv 


Universit\- of Utah . 


. 37 


53 . 


. Salt Lake City 


Utah .\ggies . 


34 


46 


Logan 


Utah Aggies 


. 45 


53 . 


Logan 


Utah .'Xggies . 


46 


49 


Pro\o 


Utah .Aggies 


. 52 


50 . 


Pro\o (oxertime) 


Montana State 


72 


36 


Bozeman 


Montana State . 


. 67 


37 . 


. Bozeman 


Montana State 


79 


42 


Pro\() 


.Montana State 


. 67 


57 


Prc)\() 



l\ll 



The B squad won ten out of fourteen games numbering among its \ictims the 
strong Weber, L. D. S.. and Snow Junior Colleges. 

red Six 




BRIOIIAM VOINC. IMVr.RSlTV TRA( K SQl.M) <il I'lJ" 



T 



rac t 



^<£> 



Judging from the lad that B. ^^ U. overwhelmed hcith I ni\erNil\ ot llali and L lah Aggies 
by scores of S\-(y\ and 93 1-3 to 51 2-3. respectively, in dual meets, it would appear that 1020 
was a B. Y. U. \ear as far as track was concerned. 

Coach Komney had one of the most evenly balanced combinations of high class perfor- 
mers seen in Utah for years, this season, in contrast to last season's team which was notable for 
weakness in pole vault, high jump and javelin. 

.An unusual influx of strong freshman material to aid a g(K)dl\- group of \eterans s;)l\ed all 
former difficulties. Against U. A. C. the "Y" captured thirteen out of a possible seventeen first 
places .Against Utah twelve firsts, were brought to the "Y", showing remarkable all-round 
strength. (Captain Owen Rovve was again the bulwark of the team. His sensational performance 
againvt I't-ih will go down in L'tah state track hisiorv Single-hanileil he won 21 1-4 points with 
victories in the UK). 220. lli^ low hurdles, and broad jump ix■^ide^ being a member of the winning 
half mile relav team. Not t>nl\ did he win first place in these events but in two of them he set 
new state marks. His leap of 23 feet 4 3-4 inches was a new record while he negotiated the 220 
low hurdles, his specialt>. in the new time of 24 l-S seconds. 

Mark Reeve broke a 25-year record in the han>mer with a heave measuring 130 feet 6 
inches, in the same meet. 

With McGregor and Halverson jumping over six feet in the high jump; Staples bettering 
twelve feet in the pok' vault; Kitchen heavin;; the javelin for place in each meet; Bentley cutting 
near the 4;3() mark Un the mile with Wright yetting under two minutes for the half together with 
clean sweeps in the weight events besides performers capable of annexing |ilentilul >econtK ami 
thirds, state and conference prospects kxjk exceedingly' bright. 



rk 



XT 



A 



weriy i im 



(D 




\^^ 




W'rishl. "Clug" \ acher, Owen Ri»we, Rasnvussen, Princ 
Bra J Jt-nsen. Bunnell. C^irhi-it. Reexc. 



^ 



I 'age Une Hundred Sixty three 




>tilLii¥^fl Q 



J 



=Li) 




lop: McOrcBor over wilh (ict li> spart; Bunnell heaving the shol 

Midille Measurins for distance; over the bar again. 

[totlom; Freshman relay learn (Proberl. Sknujen, Ripple. Halvorsen). Corhett throws a long one. 



f- Hundred 




■■HANK" SIMMONS. HIGH 

HURDIINo 

INVHRTHD BICYCLE RIDING 

F. PRINCE, STARTINI", 

RESTING BETWEEN WORKOUTS 



STEPHENS, .1,\VEMN 
■Y" DAY 



McGregor in the ah; ■stew" andersen anoids G^■\l 

ROWE EINISHING HIS STRIDE BUD WALKER. EKOSIl HLiRDIIK 
to insure a high broad lU.MP 'RIP" IN THE II LSII 



l^a^e One Hundred Sixty- fivi 




Tup (kll lo riKhli; OwiTi Kiiwc nt'KiilialinK Ihr lew hurJIes in characlrrislcc Inrm. Maples, ircshman pok- vault phcnom clear- 
ing the har Thorn, pulling the »hul Center: HraJ Jensen, stellar middle distance man. Toone. freshman sprinter: Ton.v Bentley, 
ac'.' i>( I tah milers. Bottom: Group of freshmen who have htilstered the team streniilh rcmatSiahlv over last year. 




Scdlt. \v..-:j>htM rilzKerald. distances; Barlow. distanceN. Il;.\vkins. niiJJk- Jislaiict: Hayes. 

T. Tdoiil', sprints; Kitchen, javelin , Rfc\e, weights; 

Johnson, javelin; M. Skousen, middle distances. Ilalvcrsen. jumps; Corhelt. discus. 



Page One Hundred Sixty~$even 




Cyyiinor- Sports 

jMuch la\'orable recognition has come to B. ^'. L'. through her minor sports 
consisting of tennis, swimming, and wrestling. Duo largely to the fine coaching 
of C. S. Leaf, swimming coach, the "Y" natators have run up a startling record 
of confeernce and state victories as well as a long list of dual meet wins during 
the past few \ears. The fine work of the team as a whole and its individual stars 
has gained as much favorable comment for the school as her major sports. 

The Cougar tennis team went through the entire season last year without a 
defeat and have won their first three starts alread\' this year. Cougar teams are 
always eminent in this sport. 

As additional minor sports, fencing and boxing attract a goodly number ol 
tlex'otees also, while baseball comes in for some interesting inlra-mural cuinpeti- 
tion late in tht season. 




k 




kJ 



n 



—Tl T 



=A 



/"' 



f^^ 

%■ 




Ml KKIl I (IIKISIOI'HI KSOS 
Captain 



I l:AF 

Ctiiiih 



lUD Mill I us 
(Captain itect 



s 



wimmi 



n/i 'J^i 



csumc 



Winning ihrcj out (it tnur niLrl>. llu' \ai>il\ water dogs proved unlu-atahlc 
in till' slate lank competition. I tali and Utah Aggies both lost (.iual meets to 
the "\" while the state meet also came to the C^iiigars hy a satisfactory margin. 
L tah won ihj conference meet. 

Led bv the brilliant Bud Shields, the B. V. I . Paddlers were able to pile up 
winning majorities of points in spite of intense competition from such men as 
Shaip. Spencer and Walling of I tah. 

B. Y. L'. combined its swimming team with that of the L niversity c-f I tah 
against an invading team from Northwestern L ni\ersit\' but the combination was 
beaten b\- a galaw of stars from the eastern school who remained unbeaten on 
their western tour. Shields, however, won his individual races. 

National fame came to B. \. L'. swimmers when Bud Shields focused the 
eves of the sporting world on the Cougar team with a double v iclorv and a brace 
of new records at the national collegiate swims at St. Louis. 



Page One Hundred S 




Top row (from left to ri!!ht): Gerald and |im Andersen ; Bud Shields, nat onal titlehoKler in collesiate 440 and 220 yard Iree 

stvle events Merrill Christnpherson, captain of th's year's team; Martin and MarHiam. Center riw: Pc'ersen, sprint ace; Allen. 

Kic'.stroke; l.ossee. 220 yd. phenom; \ an WaKonen, breast stroke. Bottom; Coach C. S. Leaf, Markham, Miner, Fechser, Chris- 
topherson. l.ossee. Shields, Petersen, Andersen, \;in Wasonen. J. Andersen, .Martin. 



I di't' One Hand red 




d% 



^ 






■o 



^Tennis 

\\ nil tour \clciaii> with w lucli lo dctciul licr 
state net championship, l^. V. I . began the sea- 
son as a ruling favorite to win the state title 
again this \ear in spite of the presence of good 
teams in the other state universities. 

In ttieir first meet of the season, against 
L'tah. the (Cougars showed characteristic form to 
win !■>>■ Ihre.- matches to two. This ex'eniled 
their winning streak to five straight tiual meets 
without a single loss. Ihe Ute team of Ireed 
and I-orsberg opened the scoring for the lies, 
winning U-4: 0-^: ')-7. 15. N'. L'. countered with 
.Munk defeating Harold Smith in the lone singles 
h\' a score of 6-2; 8-6; ^-6; 6-i I reed measured 
llolt to the tune of 6-0; 7-t but the score was 
evened when "Sank\" Dixon and Brinlev for the 
"\" won over Irvine and Stegner. 6-4; 6-8; 6-3; 
()-!. With the tk-ciding match o fthe meet rest- 
ing on the l)i\on-lr\ ine frav. Dixon snowed his 
opponent under a ileep avalanche of lirives to 
w ine 6-2; 6-3. 

.\ week later the ('ougars were hosts to the L'tes in i'rovo where ihev repeated 
their performance bv the same count. Dixon and Brinlev won from Smith and 
I-orsherg, 6-1 ; 6-4; 6-3; llolt and Gilchrist, also of the "V", beat Irvine and Steg- 





L^^ i ^ — 



(.11 CHRIST. POKTrR. BRIM I-V. COM. II DIXnN, S.ANKV Dl\0\. .MUNK, HOI T 



<nk 



JL 



^HT^ (D 



y dlL k. 



t7 




BRUCE GILCHRIST LEWIS MLNK 



ner. 1-6; 7-^; 6-4; 6-3; Freed. L tah. won from Munk. 6-4; T-t; 6-3; 
defeated Holt, 6-4; 4-6; 6-4; Dixon, ' ^■", defeated Smith, Utah. 

With a clear slate and a state champion- 
ship again within grasp, the Cougar's entered 
the home courts the following .Monda\' against 
U. A. C. Holt and Gilchrist surprised when 
the\' humbled Cannon and Saxer 6-2: 6-4; 6-4 
in the opening match. The other doubles en- 
counter between Dixon and Brinle\"and Cowie\' 
and Linebaugh was bitterl\' contested. .After 
leading their opponents two sets to one, the 
B. ^'. V. team was forced to pla\" 32 games on 
the fourth set before winning the match. The 
score for the match was 4-6; 7-5: 6-3; 17-1 r 

Munk evened matters with Chris^^ensen 
who had beaten him the previous \'ear in win- 
ning the lone sin.ole 6-4; 4-6; Q-7; 6-2 Holt 
defeated Cannon in the singles to gi\e B. '^'. L'. 
a fourth match. Tired from their strenuous 
doubles nnd deadlocked at one set each in their 
singles. Dixon and Cowley discontinued their 
match with the score standing 11-f); 10-8 

With the powerful material on hand 
steadil\' improving the Cougars should sur- 
vive sta^e and conference competition handilw 




Irvine, Utah 




J) 



WESLEY PORTER 



P.ML HOLT 




-::k. 



diwen 



^ 



WRESTLING 



The mat season centered the interest of a large number of adepts in the sport 
of the cauliflower, this season. 

Long before (loaches Kailie and Merrill had begun selecting team material a 
large number of men were in ardous training in the Men's g\m tocontlition them- 
selves for coming competition. 

The season was opened auspiciousl\' with an inter-social unit l<airnament. 
Three da\s wrestling with a full card each day provided fans with aN intiresting 
an exhibition of grappling as can be seen an>where. The contestants were in the 
best of shape and the competition for the medals was nothing if not fierce through- 
out. Olympus social-unit won thi' team competition. 

With plent\' of material from which to select a team the coaches put a strong 
arra\ into the field as the inter-collegiate season opened. Ilowexer. little luck 
attended the Cougars in the face of the stiff competition proxideil b\ the other 
colleges and the>' dropped their team engagements one h\' (me. Several individ- 
ual luminaries stooil out. however. The ^ "s first loss was to the I ni\ersit\' of 
Idaho. Soutlu-rn Branch team of Pocatel'o. Idaho who won six of eieht matches. 
M(K)dy and Thurgood were the onl\' R. ^'. V. nH'n to gain falls from Coach Bud 
F^li>;s's men. 

A (.lual meet with I tah also ended d'sastroush' for the V with Itah nilin<r ur» 
a larce majorif)' of points Neither stat" nor conference comiu'ti'ion \ielded the 
>' an\- \ictories from a team standpoint. 'ar"el\' due to the fac that several of the 
men were absolu»^el\' nt-w to the mat game in which experience is of param(;un^ 
importance. 

The coaches will be able to preserve a strong nucleus for dut\ next season, 
however. 



r.ditor's Sole — Due to some mi^unllerstanlllng on the cnKravinR the cut of ihe wrestlers 
was delayed on the coast to late for printing, and ihe copy here was lost We regret this 
lorced omission. 



/•',/ 



Hund 



re. 




iop — Leit to «i;;>/— JuLLb"!. joSlh, HbTTIG, KUTHbRI-OKU. BALI.h, MADUOC.k, lAVLOK. H. ilAUUUCK 
/n!c«— SMITH JACOBS. I.m.er—H\-.1J\C. JOSIE. BALI M AND RLTMERPORD IN FIGHTING POSE. 



e Hum: 




CROSS COLNTRY 

Lpr" UII-iMOWD OF STLOtNTS AWAITING Tlin OLTCOMF OF Till; FAl I K;^.',^,,^,?^" «;ff:'-<-!lARI>;S MFRk- 

LLF.Y, WINNFR OF THK SPRING RUN. Ult C«(fr-MFRKI I FY AND NFI SON I IGIITING '1 , "^^v r-'\ «d ^xuu^ruv 

FINISH OF TllH SPRING RACE. K.gK C«(.rr— CLEARING I .^NES FOR Till HNISIF '"'"'-^^AIT NO FOR THE GUN. 

lloltom LtH—TOSY BENTLEV, THREE YEAR WINNER OF FALL EVENT. Rollom Kig*(— TIIEV RE OFF. 



^ ^ v^Ji IL 




To/)— FENCING GROUPS WARMING UP. /nj.T(— MIL.DRED POTTER, I^ENCING .NEWACER. MiiiJU-— 

POTTER AND NELSON SPAR FOR AN OPENING: MILDRED POTTER AND VIRGIE MULI.INER WORK 

OUT. Bo/Zora— WAKEFIELD. AND FITZGERAI D: POTTER AND POTTER. 



r.r-e ( 



^ . ^^ 




=d% 



dedication Game 

The U. A. C.-B. V. L . fnothall name on Ocl :)bfr 27. 192S markt-il ihc lormal oj>ening of the 
new B. Y. V. stadium. The tleJ.ication ceremony was impressive. 

Twelve verv fair co-eds first ran mit conference uni\ersit\' colors embodied in a do/en flash- 
ing banners t<) open the afternoon's activities, [-"resident Harris followed with an address wherein 
he recognized the various donations and gifts ma.k- to the s"a.iium anil offering the appreciation of 
the school to contributors. President lleber J Cirani offered the speech of accep ance. 

With six bands plaving to approximatelv livx- thousand spectators, sjateJ comfort;;b'v on the 
hillside arena, the blue shirttd warriors frjm both schools took the field amid thunderous cheering. 

Following the kick-off. B. Y. L. rushed the Aggies oflf their feet to move s eadilv do.vn the 
field with a spectacular exhibition of open field and aeriel plavs. .At the three vard line, however, 
ihev were halted for downs and the Aggies pla e.l the ball out of danger. 

B. ^ . I . appeare.l to have worlds of power as thev again made a devas ing m.ir.h down the 
gridiron in (he first half. \ iclorv seemed certain hut a rejuvenated .\ggie line again robbed them 
of a score. 

Shortiv after the second period had opened. C^all tied up tin- game for ilie A.ggies when he 
eluded frantic tackling on the part of the "Y" to cross the goal line. Smart added a placement in 
the final perioil which left the final score 10-0 f >r the .Aggies. 



c 




TIKI NPW B. V. I STAHIl VI 



€\ 



"X3" 



A 



iweniy 



B. Y. U. Stadium 




Approximately three \ears after ground was first broi\en on the B. V. L'.s natural hillside site, 
a Cougar stadium became a realit\'. 

With the lofty Wasatch range for a background and an inspiring cvclorama, including a 
broad sweep of the Garden Cit\' ending with a magnificent view of Utah Lake in the foreground, 
the stadium in its naturally adapted setting presents a spectacle as picturesque as nature herself. 

Fort\- thousand dollars exclusive of student bodv labor were expended in adapting the hill and 
field for the first seating unit of 5500 seats. Two more un'ts of the same sizs may be added as 
needed. Due to the steep slope of the hill and its ideal curvature. ever\' seat is as good as the 
best on the ringside. 

Features of the huge arena are a 220-\ard straightaway track leading onto a quarter mile 
cinder runway and a gridiron inside the track unusuall}' well drained by an extensive network of 
underground tile lines which insure a dry field under any conditions. 

The stadium was not dedicated until October 27. even though football games with College 
of Idaho and California Aggies were pla\ed in it earlier in the season before all seating arrange- 
ments had been completed. 

.\fter the football season the next athletic event to be staged in it was the huge Invitational 
Track .Meet and Rela\- Carni\al on April 26 and 27. With ele\en schools represented in the girl's 
posture parade and t)\er eight hundred athletes participating in the track and field competition, the 
even was a colorful affair. 

In addition to its indispensabilit\- as a setting for athletic encounters the stadium housed a 
mammoth B. Y. U. circus this year which, because of its success, bids fair to become an annual 
spring e\ent. The stadium also found good use as a site for commencement exercises, relieving the 
congestion of College Hall. 




IwriATIONAI. TR.^CK MEET 



hie liundred 





'h 







'Y" WOMEN 




Wumens athletics uiulcr capable leadership made a wide range ot athletic, 
activities available lor an unusually large number of participants this year. 

Beginning with the "Athletic Jinx." a novel get-acquainted party, staged at 
the beginning of the school year, a continuous program involving lencing, archery, 
hockew basketball, horseback riding, swimming, baseball, dancing, and tennis was 
carried forward throughout the \'ear. Significant features of the season were the 
inter-social unit and class basketball tournaments won by the Beaux Arts unit 
and the Freshman class, respectiveh'. 

B. ^^ U. women accepted a large share of responsibility in the staging ot the 
huge Invitational Track meet and Relay Carnival this year. Officials for the high 
school and junior high track meet were selected from members of the W. .A. A. 
while visiting girls were entertained by this organization also. 

As faculty director. Miss Wilmajeppesen deser\es special commendation for 
the manner in which she has elevated physical education for women to such a high 
plane at B. Y. U. Alice Brinton, W. A. A. president, under whose direct super- 
vision the activities have been sent fonvard should also share this praise. 




UEl F.N FI I SWORTll LIIYSKOUSEN AMCF BRINTON 



FDA DOTY 



MARY nASINGER 



-i 





Tlin ArrAIN.MtNT OP BEALTV IS Tlin PL RPOSE OI- WOMRN S ATlll.fTU;. 




DANCING IS AN IMPORTANT PEATL RE 01- TUP CIRI S' .\(T1\': T 



idred I 




1 




^u> 




BEAUX ART 

WINNFRS OF INTER-SOCIAL UNIT 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT— 

AN OVERHAND SHOT 

BASKETBALL ASPIRANTS 



■JEPPY" 
Tlir TIP-OFF 



GOOD GUARDING 

LOOK OUT. SKOUSENl 

NOW FOR A BOUNCE PASS 




BESSIE IVERSON 
RLTH ELLSWORTH 

\I\L\N MERRILL 



MARY BASINGER 
EVA GUNTHER 

Manager 



ETHA BLEAK 
HELEN MENDENHALL 
ARCHERY GROUP 








£% 



Womcji's Athletics 

The girls of the 15. ^ . L'. completed their track season with an inter-class and inter-squad track 
meet. The winning class, the Juniors, have not as _\et been defeated, and are pultin}; forth a 
challenge to all classes to beat them and thereby take the title from them. The \ear to come will 
howeser be worked out on the intra-mural program using the social units in place of the class. 
The girls who won points toward a sweater are: Susie Lee, Etha Blake, lithel Kobinson. Alice 
Brinton. Rhea Taylor, Jo Stanford, Hvelyn Crosby, .Monta Want/. I'Isie Jones, I.ilv Skousen, 
lAel\n Br\ner, Ruth Johnson, .\ngela llincklex'. 

The loss of .Miss Jeppson for next \ear will indeed be felt in this field as in ail the others, no 
one seems to be able to put things over as does Miss Jeppson and none can make the girls rjspon I 
as she. 

Ethel Robison was the successful manager of track this season. 

The basketball tournament was enlarged this year, taking in ten teams, including both class 
and social units. Next vear we expect to have more groups enter the tcurnament 1 he successful 
team this \ear was the Beaux .Art and in this group are found many of tl-.e bjst .ind m :sl capable 
girl athletes of the B. \ . V . 

The class series was captured b\ the Prjshmen in a hotl> contested game with the Seniors. 

The bovs were allowetl to watch the games for the first time and they showeil their sports- 
manship b\ not booing the girls but watching the ability of the team members. 

During the year 1020-^0 it is intended that bo\s shall not be barred from an\ girl's comp.'- 
lition. 



Bessie l\er>on wa> the basketball manager ani. 
in this sport. 



lo iier is due ihe prais 



a succes>ful vear 




GIRLS' TRACK GROLP 




«?;(?<* s : 



/ \ 






fW ^r^'r^'^mm% 



IjIKI s Ai I 1\ s lll-.kL AND TIIERK BUT MOSTI.Y (IN Till: TRACK SPKINCTI MI-: SUES IIIL 

ATHLEri(,AI I 1 INCLINED GIRL OUT AFTER A GOOD COAT 01- IAN AM) A MI II I 1)1 A l;l.OPME\T 
OE THE LEG MUSCLES TO KEEP IN TRIM EOR THE, Nl-Nl SI-ASONS DANCES. 



clred I: 



t- 




ILNCINO IS ONL OP Till: POPL I AR SPORTS WITH Till. V WO.Vll.N (H TDOOK SPORTS COMi; 
IN lOR Till IK SHAKt Ol- AITLNTION. TOO. 



wenty i iiiii 




ARDhLL l.UDI OW I i )L KliNA CJ.AYSON ITIIA KuKAK M ILDKUD PO I THR EDNA DIXON 

Dane ng Tennis Si^immng. Fencing Hockey 

riVA GUNTHER EVELYN BR'tNER ITIIII KOHINSON 11 Sli-: JONES 

Archerv Baseball Track Hockey 



Wearers of the W. A. A. "7" 



'I'he following girls ha\e been outstanding in women's athletics during their 
vears at B. \'. U. and ha\e been awarded for their work the W. A. A. "Y." 




IMII A lil l..\l\ 



liliSSIE l\l:RSON 



.\1AK1' LSASINGER 



lli;i LN MENDENHALL 



t lliimi 



'iy-nine 



A 




Or^an iza t ions 

To i^el eflcctivc and pliable luorkiui^ ,t;r(>/(/)5, organisation is necessary. To 
provide for the many pleasurable and u;rrlbu'hile tbingyoj life the school is 
provided iiHth many organisations of various kinds. Social, intellectual and 
•nUitral activities are all a part of the varied program of th:se iirgannatii ns 
Dm Social Unit still in its infancy promises great things for the future, f be 
development of wore honorary and professional organisations is incvitakle. 




4* ..-i- 'ii^ 



- i^^dii. 



Social Units 




Social Units 

This \car marks the lirsl lull \ear of the operation of the Social Lnit s>slem. 
Started as an experiment in Democrac)- last year .it is working so well that most ot 
its critics have been silenced. .Although there have been man\- problems arise 
in the inauguration of such a radical departure from the policies ot the past, most 
of them ha\e been met and successfull}- solved. It is not a settled proposition 
yet, by an)' means, and much still remains to be wor! ed out. 

The most notable contribution of the Social Units this year has been the co- 
operation with the Student Bod\- otTicers in the putting over of various projects. 
1 he value of the existence of man>' groups already well organized was pro\'ed 
numerous times. .Among these were, The Spanish 1-iesta, staged during Leadership 
Week; the Pep \odie; The big pilgrimjage to Salt Lake before the Dedication tjame; 
and on various other occasions. 

The social life of the school has been increased both in quantity and quality 
due to their activities. The\' have given opportunities for development that wre 
impossible under the old system. 





c^Ci^Aj^jf^fs 



CI \Ki\c:i: HoM.i- 

hiiiulty Aihiuir 
\ IKVAI WOK llll\r.|()\ 
NOHIIM K \l I I \ 
|()ll\ I Al I I \ 
IIAKOI D A CANDI.Wi) 
IJOSAI U M DIXON 
I'M I S DIXON 
III Nl<> I) I AMOK 
SlIUAKI \\l)l K'SOX 
XKCIIII J ANDI KM)N 
KAKI. lU NNHI.I. 
\V niAl MAN NASI IK 
I low I I I JOHNSON 
I OKI \/o NKCKI COK 
lUN jo 



I KID M M(K)Kr 
K I IIOKNION SNOW 
M \KK S UAI I II 
W \f;K W CIIII'MXN 
UKICI M COX 
W Al I I K DANII-I S 
I KANKI IN S IIAKKIS JK 
WAKION W. IIAI I \\)\\ 
1)1 X \l JONI-S 
I AKI I JONI S 
SMII II JACOBS 
\ H I AKSON 
CI SDI: SI MMI KlIA^S 
CI AKINCI^ D I AMOK 
KIN I JOHNSON 
NSON 




IIINRV D TAYKIR 




»1\()N. Al I i;\ WORTH INCTON, AI.LEN. SNOW, CAN Dl AND. llASLtR 

DIXON. .MOORI . AN13CRS0N. JOHNSON. All EN. Bl'NNF.1.1 . ANOIRSON 

JONIS. DANIIIS. .McGRncOR. |ONES. HAIIIDAY. I OX 

BAllll- TAVl OR. SL.M.MERHAYS. HARRIS, I ARSON, JAi DBS 



Os 



A 



-Jwenty i iiino 




O. S. Trovata 



PH\LLIS ADAMS 
ORA AiNDERSON 
ALIA HANSEN 
()L1\E HARRIS 
JEWEL LINEBALGII 
ALICE TAYLOR 
KATHERINE TANLOR 
HOPE BINGHAM 
ANNA HUGHES 
BLANCHE THOMAS 




ALLIE DIXON 
.\L\R.IORIE SPARKS 
MAXINE DAVIS 
MARGARET CLEGG 
ELIZABETH GESSFORD 
BETH CHRISTENSEN 
LEAH PETERSON 
ORA HAWS 
NELDA PARKES 
MAXINE ANDERSON 



ORA AND13RS0N 
President 




HARRIS 


THOMAS 


TAYLOR 


BINGHAM 


TAVI.OR 


1 IM HALICH 


<;i i:gg 


ANDERSON 


GESSFORD 


SPARKS 


HLGHES 


ADAMS 


PARKES 


CHRISTENSEN 


PETERSON 


niXON 


DAVIS 


1 lAWS 




N Kl\ JOHNSON 
CI AKI-NCI-: JOHN 
MAX THOMAS 
OK IN JACKSON 
KOBIK I I CI KilS 
I KID A I.I WIS 
CHARLtS M BI.KCI 
ALTON J. HAVES 
0\VI:N ROWn 
WANNI- NFII.SON 
GKANI" IHIKGOOI) 
BOM) KASMISSI-N 
PAL I. niOKNI- 
CLAKI:NCI-: \ ACIIhK 
S. CALL NI:LSON 
GRANT Bl Til I-; 



Tausi^ 



R. G 



DANS CHRISII-NShN 
ROBERT Bl SIIMXN 
RAY IIARI 
OSWALD C()0.\U5I 
CLII lORD T(M)NI-: 
rilEODORI- TOONI-: 
BERNARD WALK! R 
ELMER DASTRl P 
l-DWARD SIBBI TI 
IDGI I. Bl ACKIIAM 
WliNDI-il, MORGAN 
SPl NCIR PASSED 
CLIETON PASSE Y 
NOEL PETERSON 
ARTIIl R ZABRISKIE 
SIIIRMVN ROBINSON 
CLARK 




GAKN WI.BB 




lOHNSON 


lOHN 


THOMAS 


lACKSON 


CURTIS 


1 l:\VIS 


UERGE 


THURGOOD 


RAS.MLSSEN 


THORN 


VACHER 


BASTRLP 


BUTTLE 


CHRISTENSEN 


PtSIIMAS' 


MART 


COOMBE 


C. TOONE 


WALKER 


T. TOONE 


NELSON 



vj wf ^oi ^iLy ji II. 



1 ^ 




^eca Sema Fe 



.ORENA CL A'iSON 
\IKGI.\1A l\\CKAKD 
IRHNE METCALF' 
MARIE KINDRED 
DONNA HANSEN 
LL'CILE STRAW 
MAMIE LAIRD 
ORA GIJ-DilILL 




miij)red hansen 
mi:lba larsen 
ll'cretia ashby 
TERN wiinrwER 

LOUISE BENSON 
ALICE JONES 
IRETA MORTIMER 
JENNIE EVANS 



LORENA CLAYSON 
President 




tf 



I'ACKARn 


MRTCAl.F 


KINDRED 


HANSEN 


STRAW 


1 AIRD 


r,l HDHII.I. 


HANSEN 


1 ARSFN 


ASHRY 




WIIITTWTR 


BTNSON 


iiiMS 





rafic I 



idred A 







:^''> 



;iL * 



cM^autilus 



GLADNS BLACK 
0\ JAC:()BS I.I.OM) 
LOI<\A B ALl.l:\ 
FLORIiNCI-; ROBINSON 
ELI:AN()K KHLLY 
ZINA Ml KDOCK 
GRACh lOI I AND 
HDNA BALL 
DOROTIh Sri W AIM 
ALICI BRINTON 

NAOMI si-;a.n\olnt 

AlI)Ki:> OSTLLND 
LOR II- \AN WAGLNLN 
LRNORf: CROOKSTON 



\ i ri3a baciirlor 
i.orraini-; ciiipman 
c.i;nlalandlrson 
angela hinckley 
iris robinson 
/ola martin 
ll rai: bickwalter 
e\i-.lvn osill nd 
betty sibbett 
margakii w \\\ 

l.LCILI.I MhKRIl.l. 
WANDA KICII.NIOND 
I OL ISI-; S\\ I NSON 
WILMA MICKLESON 




I ORNA B. AI.1.FN 




KFI I.V 


FOLI.AND 


BALL 


MLRDOCK 


E. ROBINSON 


STEWART 


BRINTON 


Rl \< k 


MiAMOUNT 


A. OSTI I \n 


\ AN WAGENEN 


1 ROBINSON 


MARTIN 


BLTKWAI TrR 


r OSTLLND 


SIBBETT 


CROOKSTON 


MAW 




MrRRII.L 


RICHMOND 


SWENSON 


MICKI ESON 





^HHNCD 



Tim 




NALTUIS SOCIAL LMT 
Till-: WINNMNG STUNT OV Till: ANNLAI. PFtP VODIl- 



I 'age Oih 




2l 



t//z0 X)a^ ' '"^M 



T" 



^'^ 



/ 



Sans Souci 



G. ELROY NELSON 
RLTON J Sr.MM K 
WILLIAM \ OLDKDM) 
WILLIAM McCOAKO 
Kl-I-D G SI AKI l> 
CLAKLNCI-: SKOL SI N 
ALBERT A. SMITII 
CLAL DE A EGGER ISLN 
NIAVELL W. BOWN 
WILLIAM S LEWIS 
I ED HANSEN 



T. DELICE ANDELIN 

W ESI I ^ PdRTl R 

I'llARIS M ILSON 

W ALTER CORBItTT 

RISSI:LI MAGEI.BV 

OWI-N wi:si" 

l-I.DOS BRIM I \ 

lA.MES A. CULLIMORE 

.WARN IN SKOl SEN 

GERRI I dc JONG. Jr. 
Ftifulty Aihisor 




Al. s.Wlill 

PrftiJrnI 



C 




Nfil.SON 


SU.MNER 




Jc JONG 


EGGERTSEN 


01 DROYD 


nowN 


.McCOARD 




STARI.EY 


LEWIS 


HANSEN 


ANDIfl.lN 


PORTER 


WEST 


BRINLEY 


NEILSON 


CUI-LIMORE 



XT 



u 



4 



^ ^ ^L^ 



^niv 









Val Norn 






RLTIl CLARK 
HELEN iMENDENHALL 
ARLENE HARRIS 
LUCILLE MARKllAM 
ZEELA MOODY 
HELEN SWENSON 
y\.\K\' LEE 
MARVA HODSON 
NITA WAKEFIELD 
EUNICE BIRD 
PEARL DAHLE 
ELAINE PAX MAN 
ROZANNE CANNON 
ARDELL LUDLOW 

DONA SAL 



WINIFRED CRUIKSIIANK 
JANE CANNON 
MARGARET PETERS()N_ 
PHYLLIS FLETCHER 
JOSINETTE COOKE 
ADA BIRCH 
ADA HASLER 
DOROTHY COONS 
ELIZABETH SWENSON 
LOYA NIELSON '" 

FAYE ALLRED 
MARGARET BIRD 
ROSE LEICHTY 
HELEN EGGERTSEN 
ISBURY 





MnNDEMlAI 1 


I1M<KIS 


MARKHA.W 


M(>()U^■ 


s\\e:nson 


WAKEFIELD 


UIKI) 


PANMAN 


CANNON 


lADLOW 


CANNON 


I'l TERSON 


l-'LETCHER 


COOK 


HURCH 






COONS 


SWENSON 


NIELSON 



LEE 

iRL IKSIIANK 

HASI ER 



/',:/! 



/ 




:A 



^ 



Nuveko 



\V[-.LBV BROWN 
C.i:ORGF. CORBHTT 
NHRNON DLS^:NBI:RR^• 
CU V IIILLMAN 
IIARRN OI SRN 
RAN I'llll.l.lPS 
WILLIS R III! I. 
HLWIN SIANI Ihl.D 
HAROLD BONACK 
PRRSTON CRLER 



MAX B. pk;>gi'son 

JOHN SNELL 
KIITII ROWS 
\RLO S. FURLONG 
PR no N. CHRISTHNSFN 
MIRVIN PFIFRSON 
I RANK JORGENSFN 
PI RRV McARTHlR 
IJARKN McCOAKO 
JAMES C. AAGARD 




AKI () I rui n\c; 




McARTIILlR 


DtSr.NBRRRY 


CORBFTT 


McCOARD 


PMII.I IPS 


CMRISTENSEN 


BOVA( K 


MUX 


PETERSON 


STANPIELD 


STAMIEI D 


PEN ROD 




FERGUSON 


HILLMAN 


AAGARD 


JORGENSEN 





/'. 



ilundt 



vr 



JL 



Wt-i i^ 1 line 



Minae Clarae 



THERA LOU OLSEN 
ANNA SMOOT 
VESTA SNELL 
BEATRICE BROWN 
EVELYN BROWN 
MARGARET BROADBENT 
TIIELMA JACOBSON 
GWEN NELSON 
ETHEL ROBLNSON 
EL El DA SNOW 

ALMERA AN 



GENEVIEVE MORGAN 
DOR()'nL\ TANLOR 
JANET WEBSTER 
ELDONA COX 
IRMA PETERSON 
EILEEN STEADMAN 
RUTH WINTERS 
BELLE HARRIS 
MINA RASBAND 
MAUDE rOOTE 
DERSON 





RPATRlCr RROWN 

ANNA SMOOT 
l;\F,l,VN BROWN, rmidenl 
MINA RASIIAND 



MARGARET BROADBENT 

IRMA PETERSON 

ELEIDA SNOW 

GENE\IEVE MORGAN 



VESTA SNELL 

ri DONA rox 

TIIELMA JACOBSON 

EILEEN STEADMAN 



/V 



/ 




V^..' 



.^r^' 



w 



ariyenoT 



■y 



G. 



f 



Vol Hyfic 



GLHN VINChM 


KM I'll MDKGAN' 


Mil-: TAVIOK 


NOLAN 0. WLIGIIT 


IKKD STAIIMW 


MOKKISCIIKISILNSLN 


A. C. HULL 


WRIGHT WELKF-R 


CLAL'DE SNOW 


RALPH Nl-LSON 


W. K. TANNLR 


WALDO HANSKN 


WMJJAM W INO.M 


ORVILLE L POLLY 


KARL BALI II" 


SIDNLV THOMPSON 


II.WOODCI \KK 


.Ml TON RLST 


R\\ STFWMM 


HENRY STEWART 




DONALD Mr.RRII I. 




TANMR 



I AVI OR 
WIXOM 
M<)H(,AV 



STAIIMAN 
II Al I l|: 

m:iso\ 



MLI.l. 
CI ARK 

wriciiT 



SNOW 
STF.WART 



\Jwen^ 1 lino 



® 




Cesta Ties 




gi-:rtrldi: i'aktkiix",e 

CAROLINH lARING 
JKNNIE IIOLBROOK 
IRENE OSMOND 
HELEN GLAZIER 

MALIDE NILLSON 

wiLMA li()^^L: 

.\L-\RN' IIOLBROOK 
ALLIE MA^• JENSEN 
NAN OSMOND 



EDITH RICH 
RUTH WATTS 
MAURINE WELKER 
HELEN WHITESIDE 
ADDIE WRIGHT 
REA WILSON 
EVA ST ICE 
HELEN CLARK 
HELEN BROWN 
l-LLA FARNSWORTII 



MIRIAM COLTON 



CERTKLDh: PARTRIDGE 
freiident 




BOYLE 
lENSEN 
BROWN 



OSMOND 
RICH 

VVHITESIDES 



SAll III mil BROOK 

BRAiriiwAiTi. I III roN 

STICE 



SCORUP 
W lESON 
IIOI HKOOK 



lA'RING 

lARNSWOKIII 

SMITH 



I'd'^e Two Hundred Five 






§ 



& « *l 




fiiK^ 




Kappclk 


' Orphean 


KOY FUGAL 


CHARLES A. WALL 


WALTER PHTERSON 


ILOVL) JOHNS 


ROV GIBBONS 


RALPH A l-RICKSI-N 


MARI.IN M WBOLD 


1 RID l.<)\ 1 LESS 


Gil \ Pi- 1 IKSON 


O. BLRGl-NI R 


IRANK WliniNG 


ciiARi 1 s parki-:r 


RLLON B. HANSEN 


RALPH SI.\\.N\ONS 


FLOYD I-LETCIIER 


JEAN PALLSON 


EVAN CIIRISTENSEN 


E/REL Tin RBER 



sA 




KM I'M I KICKSON 
PrtiiJtnl 




WAIL LOVELESS I LLT(JIER 

WHITING IIANSRN THLRBLR 

CIIRISTENSEN PETERSON JOHNS 



riGAi. (;iiinoNS 

PETERSON PAUl SON 

NtWBOLD 



weray 





GLADYS KING 

DELSA TOLIIURST 
ILA MINER 
ANNA LOU CLEGG 
HARRIET IIUBBARO 
EDNA DIXON 
jLI.IA BARTLEJT 
WILAIA BARTLEIT 
LL'CY HESS 
AL^DREN' JACKSON 
HANNAH REYNOLDS 

LENORE 



ENNIE JOHNSON 
LEAH HALES 
JENNIE BRIM HALL 
NAOMI ROBINSON 
NORELL STARTLIP 
NORMA CHRISTENSEN 
CLARA ANDERSON 
LILLIE SEVERSON 
NORA FORD 
ELSIE JONES 
HELEN ROWE 
RASMUSSEN 



GLADYS KING 
Preiident 




liARTL-LTT 


AM)I:KS0N CIIRISTLNSLN 


Sl:\ ERSON 


MIXER 


EORD 


CLEGG 


IIRIMHALL KOlilNSON 


SI ARTLIE 


rowe: 


lONES 


TOLIIURST 


HALES JACKSON 

REYNOLDS DLXON 


JOHNSON 


IIERBARD 
liARTI LIT 


HESS 




f{. 



^'^: 



w. 



J 



D C)J 



^^ 



c^^j^iy 



V ikin^jS 



lU ION I'WM W 
CI .^Dh SAMK.KI N 
STEPHEN I LHTCIII K 
CKIHI) KINDKID 
MAKK l:GGI:KISl)N 

\ i-KNoN savn 

W \l DO ll()l)S()\ 
JIM I INCH 
WINDI-l.l. r AM.OK 



\\i \Di-,i.i. \ \\c:i- 

KoWl I !■ S.MAKI 
IIOWAKD con AM 
(il 1 \ W II KI\SON 
\\\\<\< \\ \SIIIU l<\ 
I'illl I IP CIIRISri:NS()N 
I ll<l<o\ lOSII 
IIOWAKD PAXMW 
W Sll KMNC. I \ A\S 



IIAKOI I) \ \\ \\AC.IM;N CIIAKI IS 111 \l)l KSON 
KLI.SI-; ANlJbKSON 




la I (l\ I A\MA\ 




SAMJCKLl N 


11 1; KM IK 




KINUKUD 


1 1.1,1; KTShN SCOTT 


IIODSON 


HINCII 




TAYLOR 


\AN WAGNEN VANCE 


SMART 




(OITAM 




rtllKINSON rtASllBL'RN 



rik 



XT 



d 



wemy 




LLCILLH \V()IMIIi:\ 
MARY BASINGHK 
VELDA HANSEN 
BESSIE IVERSON 
MURCY NELSON 
ROZENA NELSON 
METTA RrrCMIE 
IDA TANNER 
VIRGINIA OKLEBI■RK^ 
GRACE BISHOP 
ALGIE BRUNSEN 
RAGOLA RIDING 
MYDA ROBINSON 




^eaux CArts 



MARY ROBINSON 
EVELYN BRYNE R 
LAPREAL BRYNER 
VERA SEEGMILLER 
MARIE SEEGMILLER 
1 ILMA BAILEY 
HELEN MANGELSON 
VERA BUSCH 
GERTRUDE GOURLE^■ 
VEDA PORTER 
SUSAN LEES 
ZENDA WENTZ 
THELMA GARDNER 



LUCILE WORTMKN 
President 




DASTRUP 
BOOTH 
ATWOOD 



IVERSON 
E. BRYNER 
ROBINSON 



PORTER 
L. BRYNER 

HRLNSON NELSON 



NELSON 
BUSCH 



ROBINSON 



BASINCER 
RITCHIE 

HANSEN 



Hunch ■ 




ZjCI. 



■JOaTyairiQ; 



CAtalanta 



.MALRINH ALLKN 
hLLHN BARKI-R 
\\\\<\ BROCKBANK 
DliLLA BURCIl 
SARAH LISTER 
LINDA RANDALL 
LORENE RANDALL 
ELEANOR STARK 
ORA THOMAS 



LRi\L\ X'ALENITNE 
EDNA DIXON 
MELBA STEED 
LEERA HATTON 
ELAINE HATTON 
DOROTin' HOOVER 
ADA ANDERSON 
WANDA BUSHNELL 
ELAINE MAJOR 



ZT 



£% 




ADA ANDERSON 
President 



^ ' 




RANDALL 


RANDALL 


.\LA.IOR 




SIARK 


THOMAS 


BARKER 


BROCKBANK 


BUSHNELL 


VALENTINE 

Hundred Ten 



<rh 



A 



werity i iiii< 



o 




Olympus 




VERL DI.\OK. l; O P.AKl K. .\U)1;.\1A\ i.. I'lT.Ki.L. Kuss L, I I \M N, lAKI F. HYRING. MERRILL CHRISTOPI lERSON 
I LO>D HRYNtR. GERALD ANDERSON. JAMES ANDERSON. \\ \LLACE WALLENTINE. GRANT LL^STINCS, LOWELL BOBLRG 
WENDEI L \A\VDRY SHIRIEY BAKER, DALE H. PETERSON. 0?\VALD L. PEARSON, VAUGHN HUNTER. IRA MARKHA.M, 

I nWARD PAYNE 



Charmanta 




BLANCHE WILSON. /.El DA .MORLEY. MAXINE ERICKSON. DONNA NEWELL, MRS, CHRISTENSEN. 

Sponsor, LILLIAN TERRI'. MELBA YOUNG. EDA DOTY, GENE PHILLIPS, ZELDA KAY, RETTA JACOBS 

LUCILE ANDERSON, GATHERINE GROW 



I'age I 'u;o tlundrcd LLcven 





zi::!. 







L//Z0 xiaiyeB 0'/ 

Hil^ardia 



£% 







CLARENCE ASTON. KARL MILLER. HARVEY MILLER. DONALD TOIUER. I're.denl. 

WILFORD DREDGE. ELMER TIMOTHY. LIONEL HARRIS 

ORA CALI . ROY OAKS. LL.KOY liANTER. DE.\N ANDERSON. EARL HUTCMINGS. LLMI.R GRAIL 



^/ Thalia 




HI LA BROCKHANK ELAIN THOMPSON BERTHA \OGEL lARUEGOOLD 

liEUI.AH STRICKLER OLi\E GUY.MAN EUPIIA.\LA IILNTIiR 

ALICE CARTER 'President (Not in Hicture) 




ORliX FULLER, LYNN BROADBENT. DON DECKER. RAY HANSEN, ALMA KING, JOE THERIOT. 

AUSTIN HAYWOOD, VAL BENTLEY 

EVAN CROFT, TONY BENTLEY, DELBERT GROBERG, Prcudenl. HAROLD HANDLEY, LEROY GRORERG 



La Vol^a 




ANNIE CI ARK I'l.AKL SNoW LULA McCLELi AN .WAMUTII HOW , NUN, ,■>.-, 

SARA JONES ,\1IIDRI:D JORDAN EDITH SluM 




lUiRI WIIEE 
MARK GARDNER. 



AiR. JASPLR. SMIIM JAMIs IMI , CHARLES MERKLEV, EARL BASINGHR. luMrni 
HORACE JONES. CHARLES HENDERSON. NEWELL R BL DGE. CARW IN HATCH. BEN GOE 



Los Contentos 




L .WAR ISAACSON. GOLDEN TUELLER. MERRILL STUCKI. ROBERT YORGASON. GERALD BURR 
ROBERT BRAITHWAITE, CLARK PREI. NED ARMSTRONG. RULON T. SHEPHERD. MORRELL CLARK, Prei. 



r\ 



XT 



Jl 



wenty i im 



Cougar- Errants 





REtD 1 . BERRETT I EW'IS MtXK 1. LESLIE WRIGHT lA.MES WRIGHT W INDIiLI. POLL=ON VERNON MERRILL, /'n 

HENRY SIMMONS FENTON PRINCE DUANE ACORD LEW IS PERKINS RALPH MITCHEN LESLIE BENNETT 



Our New Social System 

Social units are at once the pride and jo\- and the target for ridicule at Brig- 
ham ^'oung Uni\ersit\ . The optimists among the faculty and students view their 
handiwork with beaming approval, proclaiming it a panacea for ever\' social evil. 
The pessimists, intolerant and impatient, proclaim it a masterpiece for making 
bad conditions worse. The majorit\' of the students regard it with toleration and 
sympathy, realizing that it is like a young baby that is not yet entirely sure of its 
steps. The\' hope that it will soon grow up into a husky system, well able to take 
care of itself, it is with hopeful eyes that the future is faced with the expectation 
that this will prove an improvement over the past. 



/'L/i,(- / u.'o Hundred I 





Clubs and Fraternities 



fc 





Clubs and Fraternities 

The variety and larf.,e number of clubs on the Brigham Voun;; Ln.versity 
campus has alwa\s been traditional in the past. Although the beginning ol 
Social Units has caused a decrease in the number, the qualiiy has not suffered an\- 
slump. Clubs offer an opportunity for contact with people \\ho cannot be met 
in any other way and the\' will never die out. 

Although social fraternities and sororities are barred from this institution, 
there are three national professional fraternities and one local honorary s3rorit> 
represented in school. Thev have all been \'er\- active this vear and ha\e done 
much to fLirther the spirit of fellowship and rai^e the standards of their r."spjcti\e 
(.lepartments. They ha\e added a great deal to the cosmopolitan spirit of the 
campus and have incerased its reputation among other schools. 





z£:x 



"JOaiiveffi Q 







~y 



^% 



CAlpha Kappa ^si 



ANTIION \. IIA'iNll- 
CLARENCE JOHN 
Rl ED STARLEY 
A. REX JOHNSON 
^ENR^■ D. lANLOR 
VERNAL WOR IHING'rON 
GRANT THURGOOD 
lOHN L. ALLEN 
CHARLES A. WALL 
ROBERT E. CL:RTIS 
OR IN JACKSON 
G \\AiO\ NELSON 
l-ARL GARRETT 
GARN WEBB 
LELAND BOSWELL 
PAUL DLXON 



W. CRISMON LEWIS 
TED HANSEN 
JOHN SNELL 
ELTON J. SUMNER 
DL\ JONES 
LORAN SKOUSEN 
WILLIAM V. OLDRO^D 
BRUCE COX 
L5R0^■ RANDALL 
GARR GARDNER 
R. THORNTON SNOW 
ALION J. HA^ !S 
RALPH SNLXESTER 
CLARENCE TA^ LOR 
I AMES EINCH 
\L\RION HALLIDA^■ 




CHARLES M. BERCE 
President 



*.S,<«*^i.i^«;i^i*.^jf*V . , *!:^iJ<: 



c 




IJIXON 


HAVNin 


|0H\ 


STARLEV JOHNSON 


H. TAYLOR 


WORTH IXGTON 


THLRGOOD 


ALLEN 


WALL CURTIS 


JACKSON 


NELSON 


GARRETT 


WEBB 


LEWIS HANSEN 


BOSWELL 


SNELL 


SUMNER 


lONES 


SKOUSEN OLDROVD COX 


RANDALL 



Page Two Htnulred FAs.hteen 



€% 



A 



'-^ 



^eniv 1 iifi' 



® 







^heta CAlpha ^hi 



JEAN I OU. SON 
Prei:dent 



ALONZO MORLE^' 
Faculty Advisor 
J HAN PAULSON 

President 
RUTH CLARK 

Vice-President 
JLNNIE HOLBROOK 

Secretary- Treasn rer 
ROV GIBBONS 
ELROY NELSON 
ERANK WHITING 
lUtLEN GLAZIER 
MAX TAYLOR 
HAROLD CANDLAND 
WILLIAM McCOARD 




LYNN BROADBENT 
EUNICE BIRD 
MARY LEE 
ELAINE PAXMAN 
ALDRE^■ OSILLND 
NITA WAKEEIELD 
CLAL'DE EGGERTSON 
I.UCILE .\L\KKII\M 
ELEANOR STARK 
CLAUDE SNOW 
ARCHIE WILLIAMS 
VIRGIE MULLINER 
GLENN POTTER 




MORLEY CLARK McCOARD IIOIBROOK GIBBONS 

WIIITINC, I>A\.\1A\ IRE BIRD CAM1I AND 

NELSON OSTLL'ND GLA/ILR BROADBENT 



Page I 



d Nineteen 







z£Y 



l3aT5/"eno/ 



TT" 



^^ 




Gamma Phi Omicron 

Gamma Phi Omicron is an honorary Home 
Economics Sorority. It takes its members from the 
upper class girls who are majoring in some phase 
of Home Ecnomics. They are chosen on a basis of 
scholarship, professional attitude, qualities of woman- 
hood and work done in the department. 



VIL.ME ELLIOTT 
ELIZABETH CANNON 
MALD TUCKFIELD 
lONE PALFREYMAN 
ELSIE MALGHAN 

ARLENE HARRIS 
President 

.MARIE KINDRED 

Vice-President 

DONNA HANSEN 

Recording Secretary 

l.LiCILH STRAW 
Curresponding Sec. 
EVELYN BROWN 



VEDA PORTER 
LULA McCLELLAN 
EDITH SELIN 
VERONA FIELDING 
ANGELNN WARNICK 
ALL IE DIXON 
IDA TANNER 
ELVA WILKINSON 
THELMA JACOBSEN 
IRETA MORTIMER 
BELLE HARRIS 
MAR"!' LNON 
ROZENA NELSON 
MURCY NELSON 




ARI-RNH n.i^RRIS 




PORTER 


ELLIOTT 


TUCKFIELD 


STRAW- 


ll.'VNSEN 


FIELDING 


TANNER 


BROWN 


KINDRED 


McCLELLAN 


W IIKIXSON 


SELIN 


WARNICK 


DIXON 


JACOBSEN 



inched 7 



n^ 



JL 



-Jwer, 



u 





Ho me Economics Club 



VELDA HANSEN 
Presidtnl 



K)NH PALI RHNMAN 

Sponsor 
HVliLVN BROWN 
I^DITH SELIN 
DOROTHY STHWAR r 
VHLDA HANSEN 
MAR^' BROCKBANK 
DAISY RAPPLHN 
MARIE KINDRED 
LUCILLE STRAW 
\IRGINIA PACKARD 
GLADYS KING 
DELSA roLIIURST 

Rill 



CAKOI INL SCORl P 
\ 1 DA PORTER 
IREDA SAINSBUR'*' 
ANGELYN WARNICK 
BEULAII SIRICKLER 
\IRONA MI-LDING 
OKA niOMAS 
<;\R()I KIKKIIAM 
DONNA HANSEN 
■LLIE DIXON 
IDA TANNER 
I LLA McCLELLAN 
TIIELMA JACOBSEN 
A WILSON 




I IIU DING 

5AINSBURY 

VIIOMAS 



I'ORTbK 
KIKKIIAM 
TANNER 



SIEWART 
5C0RLP 

U ROC KUAN K 



•<INC 
DIXON 



WARNICK 



W II KINSON 



McCI El I AN 
lACOBSEN 
W II SON 




/r^ 



JOanvefi Oi 



zr 



^^% 






r 



ojvlask Club 



jMa>k (Juh i.s one of th<j most popular club.s in Ihe 
school. Sposored by the Dramatic Art Department, every- 
one interested in the Drama is eligible lor membership. Its 
membership limit of one hundred and t\vent\-five is always 
filleil soon after the opening of school. 

Meetings are held every Wednesday evening in the Little 
Theatre. Capacity houses have been the rule rather than the 
exception. During the first quarter a number of lectures 
were given by facult\- members and recitals bv advanced 
students. During the last two quarters, readings of full- 
length plays were presented by members of the Play-reading 
class. 

The officers this \ear have done their work in a verv 
efficient manner. The\- were Bill McCord. president ; Elaine 
Paxman. vice-president: and Eunice Bird secretary and treasurer. Alonzo Morle>' represented the 
Dramatic Art Department. 

The climax of the year came with the Mask Club Banquet held at the Hotel Roberts the 
latter part of Mav. Officers were elected at that time for the coming \ear and plans were laid to 
continue the work through another successful season. 




WILLIAM McCOARD 
President 




WEDNESDAY, 7 P. M. 



Ihniih't'd T'.'t^iify-f' 






jL 



we. .^ 1 nil' 





^Uhe Idaho Club 



This club has been one of the largest and most 
active clubs on the B. V. V. campus bat with the 
achent of social imits it has been hard to remember 
whether one is from Bannock or Shoshone Countv 
I he club still functions though, as the Gem State is 
a hard one to forget and even a social unit system can- 
not break up a group once organized from Idaho. 



RbED BERRhTT 
Preitdent 




rai 



PRINC.I; 


CRUIKSHANK 


CI. ARK 


1 AIRO MllllNER 


DREDGE 


MF.RRIM, 


RICH 


UARTI.ETT 


HONNERLi HUBBARD 


SHEPHERD 


taxni-;r 


JONES 


WEST 


IIENSON PRICE 


MERRILL 




NEILSON 


R. RRAITIIWAITl-: 


A. liRAlTHWAITE 






Hundred 7 










AKOLD A. CANDLAND 
Preudent 

l.BKRT V. GROBERG 
Second Vice-Presidcnl 

NORMAN B. CREEK 

Corresffonding Secretary 

STANLEY CUNN 
First Vice-President 

PliARSON II. CORBET! 

Secretary-Treasurer 

VV. EARL HUTCIIINGS 
W TIIALMAN IIASLER 
HENRY DLXON 1 A^ LOR 
WM. SPERRY LEWIS 
LAVERE J. WADLEY 
IRA J. MARKHAM 
JAMES A. CULLIMORE 
PAUL S. DLXON 
L. LOWELL JOHNSON 
T. DELICE ANDELIN 
KENNETH O. MAUGHAN 
EARL E. JONES 
GOLDEN H. BLACK 



Fl 



riars 



Club 




PHARIS L. NIELSON 
[•LTON SUMNER 
ARCHIBALD ]. ANDERSON 
ELETCHER A. JONES 
RLLON T. SHEPHERD 
LORENZO B. DECKER 



JAMES E. PETERSON 
JA^■ L. HADDOCK 
MARVIN GEO. MILLER 
WELLS MUNK 
JAMES O, HAWKINS 
VALENTINE I. BENTLY 



WILLIA.M \'. OLDRUVD 
LhRO>' B. GROBERG 
GAIUS I. CALL 
NIEL OGDEN 
PERRY McARTHUR 



^:c:^rxr::-ffi .,.,., 



C'tmSmmSmrmtt^m 



-Tf.%dm- jL-i-. *»"" 



r* 



t 







Standing— ROM.N'EY. GRKER, THORXE. lONES, DYCHES. ANDERSON. PETERSON, PETERSON, MILLER, 

JONES, HASLER. .MOODY, (.LLLLMORE, CREER, RIGBY, WADLEY, LEWIS 
Silting— GROBERG, MUNK, CALL, DECKER, HADDOCK. BENTLEY, HUTCHINGS, McARTHUR, NELSON, 
STEWART, HAWKINS, TAYLOR, SUMMERHAYS, CHRISTENSEN, CANDLAND, ANDELIN, PIERCE, KING 



<nk 



JSL 



JL 




MRS. INI;/ KNIGHT ALLEN 
I'TtiidciU 



' 1 im 







\ 



Lady^ Missionary Club 




ixi:/, KXKiirr alli-n 

PreiiJcnt 

JHNNIi; t5. KMGirr 
Pint Vicc-I'reiidoit 

W INII-RED CKLIIKSIIANK 
Second Vice-Prciutent 

lU 111 nLI.SVVORlll 
Saretary 

\ l:K A SOWAKDS 
I rctmircr 



crokgia maesi-.r 
pi:arl snow 

ANNA l.OU CLbGG 
MAKVCRAPTS 
CAIIII-KINH DliCKER 
BARBARA MAL'GHAN 
MINNIE I IIODAPP 
VILATE EILIOIT 
MRS. (). W HYDE 

MRS J. y\ ,ii-;nsen 

MRS. G. 11. HANSEN 




MARSER 


SOVVARDS 


KNIGHT 


CRIIKSIIANK 


II 1 SWORTIi 


CLEQG 


DECKER 


HODDAPl' 


HVDI-: 


.MALCIIAN 


CRAFTS 


.SNOW 


ELLIOT 


JENSEN 


HANSEN 




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David Starr Jordan Club and the Zoolo^isher 
Gesellschaft Social Unit 



C 



TOP GROUP. DAVID STARR JORDAN CLUB. TOP ROW—0. WIIFORD OLSEN, Reporter: LA\AL\ B. CURTIS. JOHN 
FESCHER, FRED ROWLAND, DR. VASCO M. TANNER. PROFESSOR CLARENCE COTTA.M. D. ELDEN BECK. Pra. 
FRONT «011— DOYLE FIDDLE. JOHN ALLEN ROVVE. BERTRAND HARRISON, Vke-Prei. NOT IN PICTURE— DR. FR.WK- 
LIN S. HARRIS. DR. W. P. COTTAM, DR. L. WESTON OAKS. SA.Vl .MITCHELL. CLAUDEOUS I. D. BROWN, EDWARD BENT- 
LEY, LOUIS W. CHRISTENSON, C. LYNN HAYWARD. LYE.AN JOHNSON, D. H. WAID, MAX STEWART. KENNETH 
MAUCHN. BOTTO.M GROUP. ZOOLOGISHER GPSI-LLSCHAFT. TOP ROIf— JOHN ALLEN ROWE. ELDON DENNIS. DOYLE 
LIDDLE. Secretary: HAROLD NELSON. I.AVAUN B. CURTIS. President: BERTR.AND HARRISON. WILLIAM D STANTON 
RAY JONES, ROSCOE CREER, D ELDON BECK. .MA.X STEWART. 

"To him who. in the love of Nature, holds communion 
with her vesible forms, she speaks a various language." 
— William Cullen Br\ant. 



P. 



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\I:RNAL WdKTIIlXGTON \ERNON MERRIM. PAYTOX Al EXANDIiR 

I'.R.WT TMURGOOD |I:\\EL LIUNBAUGIl IRA MARKilAM 

CARI. IRiWELI. GAR\ WllUi JOE Al.LEX W l:\DEE HAUl.SHN 

EEDliN BRINEEY ( I All) E:DGERIS0N STAM EV liUNN 



Studio Guild 




.S/.^^7)/^(;--AEBI•:R•|■A JOHNSON, Vice-Presidml: C\.\f\'ORn RLTIIKRI-ORD GERAEDINE I AKSEN. I I OM) ( ORNAin', 
THEKA lOE OESliN, GI:RRIT 1)1: JONG, JR., E. H. EASTMOND. B. l-\ EARSEIN, NITA WAKE.EIEEU. .V// / /.Vo- -RUTI I 
POEEY. EAVAN B. CLRTIS. liuuneis Manager: ELYA WIEKINSON. EE:R.\1EN WESTERGARl). \ lOEA l-ARNSWORTl I. 
CEALDE: snow, EEORENCE: ERANDSEN, Secretary and Treasurer- I:IBE:RT ANDERSON, ANNA HUGHES. /,V FROM — 
\ERE DENON, I'reiiJeiil; \ Al ENTINE Bl N i'l EY. iVOT (l\ I'lCTLHI- Al ICE: TAM OR, l-V lil ■! N CROSBY. 




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CHARLES WALL, KENNETH STRINGHAM BRUCE GILCHRIST, NELO WESTOVER, FLOYD JOHN, 
WRIGHT WELKER, SHERMAN DUNN, GENE NELSEN, PAUL SALISBURY, CHARLES PARKER. 
This Orchestra, composed of school fellows, has furnished the school with a lot of excellent music this year. 



Clubs and Fraternities 



C 



The most invaluable source of growth in college is the development that comes 
through contact with the other students of the school. There are two types of con- 
tact that can be made, that which is purely social and the other kind which com- 
bines the professional with the social. In the Brigham 'S'oung University, the sys- 
tem of social units takes care of the needs of the student for a purely social organi- 
zation. But in addition he wants some :ontact through his school work with other 
students who are interested in the same problems that he is, who are working for the 
same ends that he is, and who will furnish him with a wider outlook on life. This 
function is fulfilled by the clubs and honorary fraternities and sororities of the 
school. Before the advent of the social unit they took over much of the social life 
of the institution but now they are retiring to their proper position of the bringing 
together of homogenous groups. Each year they are becoming more firmly estab- 
lished and making the life of the student richer. 



/',, 



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A BIT OF BEAUTY 

as the Sun Sets on the Rim of Grand Gan\-on 



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A FOKhST TRAIL 



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NORTH FORK 

Near Alpine Summer School 



/'(/(,;(' Tzvo Hundred Thirty-one 




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FEA TURES 





College lije is made up of l-ealures. livery day sees something 
iu"u lo demand the alteiitiou oj Youth. Yesterday it ■uas a hike 
III ,1 iieti.- and jascniatiiin mountain peak — tomorrow.- a formal 
diinicr dance Kith the «/>/ of today's dream. A football rally 
makes one nboop it-ilf.> anticipation — a nii>bt on the lake makes 
one pensive and romantic. C.oUe'^e life is ever a Change and 
always a f-eature. 




i:r^ 




fiiatgauoi'saxsssssax-i 





X students, representative of the student 
body of the Brigham Young University. Six 
students who have done things for the school, 
who have made history during their college 
days here. The student body honors these six 
students and wish them luck in life, may they be as suc- 
cessful alwa>-s as they ha\e been here, may they make a 
record as enviable in days to come as they have in days 
past. 

The Representative Student Contest, conducted this 
year by the Banyan, was something entirely different for 
the "Y" and its success was more than gratifying. The 
students chosen were certainly deserving of the honor they 
received as they have been students outstanding in all 
student enterprises during the last four years. They have 
been well liked and the school should be proud of having 
such a group affiliated with it. Their work has been con- 
structive, making it better for the student of next year and 
the years to come. 

Here is to the representative of 1929, we wish them 
the best of life, of luck, of lo\e, and of lucre, for ever and 
always. 




N addition to the Representatix'e Stuilent Con- 
test, the Banyan presents several additional 
features on the following few pages which 
are all phases of our school work and \et diffi- 
cult to classify under the regular divisions of 
the book. A hall of fame, arm\- and airplane pictures 
complete this section. 

We present three people in th':: Hall of Fame whom 
we feel have done enough to deserve a mention of some 
kind in this volume. To Bud Shields, Owen Rowe and 
Walter Cottam we express a particular appreciation for 
what they have accomplished. 

Included in this section are two pages of arm\' pic- 
tures. The 145th Field Artillerw Battery C, although 
not a part of the school, draws its membership largely from 
B. Y. U. felUiws who participate in the activities provided 
by the National Guard. In addition to rehearsal in the 
gentle art of warfare these fellows are provided with un- 
usual facilities of recreation which makes it an interesting 
sidelight of school life. 

The two pages of airplane pictures of the campus and 
the town were taken by the editor during the State track 
meet last spring. The\- are the first air pictures taken 
of he B. Y. U. Campus. 



/ 




ZEX 



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^^ <Dr. Wa/fer Cottam 

There are probably but few of you who 
have not seen the picture on this page en- 
titled, "The Call of Spring." Most of you 
have seen and enjojed dozens of others of 
Dr. Cottam's photographs, he has presented 
hundreds of beautiful studies which ha\e 
been displayed over practically all of the 
United States. During the last few months 
he has been a consistent contributor to the 
Rotogravure Section of the Denver Post. 

Our reason for our mention of Dr. Cottam 
at this time is for his much appreciated work 
for the Banyan. For years now, no Banyan 
has been printed without some very worth- 
while contributions from him. He is par- 
ticularly generous with all of his work and 
for this generosity to the Banyan this \ear 
we express our thanks for what he has done 
to make this book a success. 






/ ; II nil 1 1 



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BLU SHIRIDS 

Owe?! '^owe 

Probably ihe outstanding collegiatt ath- 
lete in the intermountain country todav is 
Owen Rowe. or as is a little more expressive, 
the "Bullet" or the Iron Man." l-'or four 
years he has been the mainstay on the "Y" 
track team and this year he has been in the 
habit of scoring 21'/4 points in track meets. 
lie turned in the best time recorded in the 
nation on the 220 low hurdles in 1927. He 
jumped out to break the slate record in the 
broad jump this year. There is nothing in 
track Rowe can't do but his specialties are 
the 100 anti 220 \ard dashes, the broad jump 
and the 220 low hurdles, and a runner on the 
half mile relay. 

lie plass equall\' v\ell as a guard, center 
or forward in basketball and in football he is 
a real triple threat man, running, passing 
and kicking, with rare abilitv in all three, 
lie is about the fastest thing in cleats. 




^ud Shields 

Bud has put the "V ' on the ai|uatic map. 
1-or two years he has held the lnter-C(jl- 
legiate 220 and 44()-yard free style records, 
lie broke into limelight last >ear b\' break- 
ing the two records in one night at the 
national meet. This \'ear he repeated the 
performance b\' breaking both of his old 
records one by the comfortable margin of 
eleven seconds. 

Bud swims anything and e\er\thing and 
holds all the conference and state records 
worth mentioning. It is said that he hires 
a special vault to take care of the medals he 
has won. 

Mis ambitions have not \et been satisfied 
as he is determined to hold two world's 
records before he is through, and if we know- 
Bud like we think we do he has not stopped 
breaking records nor will he stop for a \-ear 
or two yet. 




OWI N KOWE 



I' a. 



Hundred I 




I'i'K^' Two Hundred For 



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I-ISth ribLD 
ARTILLERY 
NON- 
COMMISSIONED 
OFFICERS 
REHEARSING 
THE J IMPS 
THE MEDICAL 
CORPS 
GROLP OF 
OFFICERS AND 

MEN OF 
BATTERY "C" 



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AIRPLANE 
PICTLRES 
OF PRO\0 
AND THt: 

B. Y. t. 

CAMPUS 



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lAMA 
Ul RING 

THE 
STATE 
TRAC:I< 
.MEET 

I \sr 

SPRING 






X)aiiyen Oi 




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Georkee Opines as How 
SPIKING IS HARD UPON US 

I sit on a rock b\- a river that's romping 

Its way to the distant and lapping blue stas. 

There is spring in the air and there's spring all aniunil nic. 

But there's no spring beneath in this rock, if \ou please! 

I sit. now in sunshine, and now I'na in shadow 

For dappled clouds dance with and dart with the breeze. 

.A cold 1 am chancing since spring's so entrancing 

But there's no spring beneath in this rock, if \ou please! 

Fhe spiders are crawling from rocks and a sprawling 
Companion is drawling some spring pleasantries: 
1 le croons a new sonnet of his girls bright spring bonnet. 
But there's no spring beneath in this rock, if you please! 

Cutting their wa\' with sharp blades are the grasses; 
The sap is beginning to rise in the trees. 
it would be no surprise should another sap rise. 
For there's no spring beneath in this rock. 

IF YOU PLEASE!!! 



(fh 



weriy i lifii 




G^ND THE 



^UNYON 



Two Hurut 



Proof 



-Jweriy i lino 




edication 




In order to take advantage of an old cus- 
tom and thus keep abreast with the times and 
traditions it will be necessary to indict some- 
one as the cause and inspiration of all that will 
follow in this section. The realization that 
there are many things in pictures, verse, and 
story which should be kept quite as the results 
of the Banvan and "Y" News basketball game 
does not prevent the continuation of this dedi- 
catory preliminarv. It is a precarious under- 
taking beyond a doubt but when we remember 
that he who drinks near beer has no kick com- 
ing, we continue to receive the blow. .Ma\'be 
our beer is too near because this is a ticklish 
proposition. There is always a chance of 
touching the wrong key; playing a wrong note 
and therebv creating a false impression. 
When this book is finished we want no one to 
be in doubt as to what was meant, intended, or 
indicated. In re\iewin<2; the dedications of the 
past at this Synagogue of learning it seems 
that no Bun\'on has ever been justh' and prop- 
erly dedicated. But after the contents of this 
one have been scrutinized, read, thought of 
and condemned there will be no doubt but 
\\i-i;it th's dedication is at last the right one. 

Accordinsl\', with malice aforethought. I 
take the old boy by the horns and toss him for 
a touchdown and dedicate this section to the 
Gentleman whose picture appears on the op- 
posite oaoe and to all other Ban\ an and Bun- 
ion editors. So help me! 



Hundred hi/ty-out- 




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L//Z0 Xlaiwen Oi 



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'CLEO" 



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•77?^ ^unyon Staff 





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In iiiiIlt 1(> ulesaic tlu- IUin\(in to the same piaiit- with an\- dIIk-i' part (iT tlic Ban\an we have 
decided to run a picture of the Bunson StatT. 

The picture in the uppL-r left hand corner is (^-ismon Lewis who aspires to the title of Bun\on 
I'holo,2,rapher. lie takes all the p'cturjs worth taking and man\- that ain't. 

The melonchoJN' looking individual in the Center is Glenn S. Potter, editor in chief (by name 
only). He was so busy collec'.ing material for this section that he didn't ha\e time to shave to 
have his picture taken. I le's shore looking sad about it because he realizes how much a go -d pic- 
ture would mean to the young ladies of the institution. 

In the upper right hand corner, in all the glor\- of a budding litcrar\- genius, we have depictcil 
Senor Don B, (lluiT. societ\- eilitor and poet. 

The bottom row, reading from left to ri;ht, is Donald Bertram CJuff, spiritual adxisor and 
janitor. 'I'he ambitious and decidedls' wild appearing per.-on in center answers to the name of 
Potter and covets the cognomen of C]owboy Artist ami judging by the male bovine type of bunk in 
this section he has already won his spurs. Then on the extreme right ("looking backward) ("and hack- 
ward looking) is William Crimson Lewis who assumed the ofTice of drawback and censor. 

The members on the bottom row reading from top to bottom are: Farrell Collctt. Genn lOick- 
son. Horace Reid. and lewis .Munk. The_\' had an attack of stage fright at the last minute and 
backed gracelessly out of the picture. 

.) llioidiea 



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Often a Bridegroom but Never a Bride 



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I reallv wouldn't say any more about my famous 
visit to the courthouse were it not that some innocent 
people have been implicated. 1 feel that it is my dut\- 
to clear them of suspicion so 1 am going to throw the 
whole affair into the light of day. It is not right that 
others should suffer for m\- foll\- and so 1 am gomg to 
lav bare m\- aching heart. First, however. I will clear 
all the names that have been sullied b\' the scandal 
and then so that no more rumors will arise 1 will tull 
the truth. 

Perhaps the first person to be implicated in the 
affair was the Dean of Women, so let me say now and 
say it emphatically, that all she was accused of was 
false. Ne\er did she suggest that it was m\- duty to 
set the younger girls of the school a good example by 




marr}'ing the first man that asked me. Neither did 
she suggest that if I was to raise a large family as 1 
should, 1 ought to be getting at it. In fact she had 
nothing to do with the affair. 

The next person at v\hom the finger of rumor wa> 
pointed was my aunt. She was suspected because she 
took so much interest in the affair after it was all o\er. 
1 assure you, though, that this interest was simply a 
desire to make sure that I got all of the publicity that 
was coming to me. You see. Lncle Carl has lost all 
reason whenever the name of Glenn Dxkson is men- 
tioned ever since he, that is Uncle Carl, was implicated 
in the murder of Rock Kobin. Consequently m\- aunt 
was afraid that he would try and hush the affair up as 
unbecoming to the Eyring name and she was determined 
that this glorious opportunity to let the neighbors know 




that the family is human after all should not be wasted. 
I want it strictly understood, however, that she had 
nothing to do with the inception of the incident. 

I believe that 1 have cleared everyone who was 
innocent so now let me gi\'e you the stor\' of what 
really happened. In the first place I will admit that 
the facts as carried in the Tribune on .April 14 a-e 
substantiall\- correct. But before you condemn me let 
mie tell of what led me to do such a vile thing. With 
me. the whole affair was one of family pr'de You see 
(Continued on page 300) 




Page Two Hundred Fiffv-fm 



XT 



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tk'iicc. 




Man}' a knave who goes after a queen gets the 



A gold-digger is only a woman alter all. 



"Can you give mc the names of some of Brigham's 
wives?" 

"Nope! I never stepped any." 



Ii'g." 



"They can't hang a man in England with a wooden 



"Did you hear about Ta\'lor coming down with the 
Infatile Paralysis?" 

"He will hang arounil those high school girls." 



"Why not?" 

"They have to use a rope." 



rot /:f 



We know a lad\' who had triplets and in six months 
she had a pair of twins. — One of the triplets died. 



It must have been called "Scotch" because after a 
few drinks you get tight. 



A lot of girls are bottle fed babies 
even after they are grown. 



There's a flat note in most of these 
Daddy-I -Love- You songs. 



ON JVIAHSHR HILL 

Up we go to study law 
When the wintry wind is raw 
Then there comes a sudden thaw 

— On Maeser hill. 
Then old Sol he turns the trick 
Makes the trail so nice and slick 
We sit down too gol d— n quick 

— On iMaeser hill. 
As for speed there's nothing lax 
On we go right on our backs 
And the spots are blue and blacks 

— Not Maeser hill. 
But sweet Mary, little elf 
Sat down hard and hurt herself 
Now takes her breakfast from the shell 

— On Maeser hill. 




'Third Down and Two to Go" 




II 



Bud Shows the Fish a Few Points 



I'dj^e I -uco Hundred ti/ly-fivc 




^"^^'N ice boys 
by Hockie 



Gi 'me 
pulls one 



"OUT OUR WAY" 



I'ai 



Hundred Fifty-six 




"HYSTERICAL HISTORIES" 

Page Two Hundred Fi/ty-rseven 



/ 



X 




/1f^ 



OaryenQ 




~::r 



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"I nearly killed mystif last night. 1 got out on the 
wrong side of the bed." 

"Bunk! I'm not superstitious." 

"Neither am 1 ; but this was a lower berth." 



"See that goofy looking bird over there? He's 
a professor of — er — What are those people that look 
for bugs?" 

"Chambermaids." 



Father: Young man, would you take my daughter 
from me forever? 

Suitor: Sure, did you think I was negotiating a 
loan?" 



lie's just an alcoholic athlete — 
A rum runner. 



A girl is only as strong as her weakest moment. 



diei 



Polly Says: Let the people know 
the truth and your life is unsafe. 



"Have you seen Albert lately?" 

"No. He died in the fall." 

"You don't say. And how did he die?" 

"He died in the spring." 

"But you just said he died in the fall." 

"■Well, it was the fall that killed him, but he 
in the spring." 

"Oh!" (unbelief) 

"It wouldn't have been so hard on his parents il 
he had died in the spring." 

"But you just said that he died in the spring." . 

"Yes, he did. The fall must have been terrible." 

"The fall?" (Thinks he sees the light.) 

"It was such a long fall. And to have the spring 
at the end of the fall might have saved his life if it 
had been deep enough. But he was dead before he 
ever reached the spring." 

(Feeling now that nothing can help his poor suf- 
fering friend except sympathy) 

"Won't you explain yourself? You say he died 
in the fall and then in the spring. You then said that 
il wouldn't have been so bad if he had died in the 
spring, but that the fall was so long that it killed him." 

"Well, you see — he fell in the spring in the fall 
and ilied." 




"The Stadium is Dedicated." 



Pa^e Two Hundred Fifty-eiRht 



€\ 



XT 



A 



wenty i lino 









at 



Cougar: If I'd had a new Gym I could 'a licked you! 

"Do you mean to say that my cliL-nt look you b\- 
surprise and kissed >ou against your will?" 

"That's what I said," smiled the sweet young thing. 

"it's strange that he should ha\e managed to kiss 
\ou so unwillingly when .\ou are at least a foot taller 

than he is." 

"Well." she snapped, "1 can stoop, can't 1?" 



^"^ 



" — and if you don't like it you can get out.' 



Men look down on women with shapely legs. 




Stern Parent: What are you doing. 
Junior? 
^■(lung Son: Playing marbles, papa. 

Stern Parent: Well, don't ever let 
me catch you u^ing father's glass e.\e 
for a shooter again. 



Dr: ^'our husbanti must be absi>- 
lutely quiet. Here it a sleeping 
draught. 

Wife: When do I give it to him? 

Dr: ^■ou don't \(>u take it your- 
self. 



Hayne: "I'm a turnip, 
you can't bleed me.' 



One of our teachers wa^ bawling 
:iul a student for not answering him. 

Student : But I shook my head. 
Teacher: Well, you don't expect 
im- to hear the rattle way up here. 
.In vou? 




Strictly Formal 



l\i 



Hundred / 



■JOanven Oi 




"SPRING" 



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Yes folksj I won it, so help me Oscar and 
a little dirty politics,— and don^t believe 
anything Glenn Dickson or Don Cluff 
will tell you to the contrary. 



Yours for worse and worse reprobates 

— Cris. 




I\r 



/' 



RKMEWT-D NEXT 
WEEK 

-The linwbis of the 

Pniiiii\cJ Suit'' 
•'I'll Sec ) oil in the Suite'' 

'By Ann Bye. 
■■'I' he Miinl in WcuUng" 




'JOaiwen Oi 



j^ 



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Of all the zoo's 

Most dangerous 

And wild and fearsome beasts 

The cougar claims 

First place, complains 

The bird who was the feast. 



Oh there was n little coug;ir 

That they fed on milk and 
sugar. 

And he grew up calm and do- 
cile as could be. 

^'ou could fondle and caress 
htm 

And the little fellow. — Bless 
him, — 

Wouldn't bite or scratch, not 
even at a flea. 



■<S 



But one day they fed him 

porterhouse 
And old instincts were then 

aroused, 
He up and bit the leg olT one 

poor guy; 
And his left paw hit another 
SxmS be'ore he could recover, 
lie was leg, and arm, and 

health and ("ougar shy! 



THESE PAGES BEING SLIGHT BITS OF 
LITERARY CRITICISM WITH 
VARIATIONS AND OBLIGATTO 




OUR MOTTO;- "COLUMN GOOD 
OR COLUMN NOT AT ALL" 



Came the Sunset to consumate the hopes of a hectic 
day. For only by the flicker of a fitful kerosene flame 
can one enjoy the full atmosphere of the western litera- 
ture captured by the facile pens of our contemporaries. 
And so, in our Weekly Wail, let us praise our profuse 
talent. If these few eulogxzing epitaphs encourage you 
to rush to the nearest volume vender, you may be 
assured a night of thrills as \ou follow -Alkali Ike over 
:he mirage soaked stretches, or trail a bit of philosophy 
lo an inaccessable peak. 



VERNACULAR VOICES 

"I'he people all for miles awa\- 
Will purchase papers ever day 
Ter read the lines 1 pen the wa\' 
Thet people talk, or as they sa\- 
The\- talked before the\' went away 
Her hia;her eddication. 
My voices in vernacular 
Ma\' look a bit peculiar 
But over KSL you're 
Bound t' hear it as she are 
Spoke in towns both far and near. 
Towns of all creation. 



JUST OLT — MARRED SWEDE ARTS 

Breaking all speed, sensation, sizzling, and slander- 
ing records. Ultra modern ne plus ultra rapid: ad 
infinitum intense. The fourth dimension in the plastic 
arts. Get your asbestos cast reproduction today. 




'^^ w^^-n 




BLNVONS PRI/n FLTLRISTIC DR.AWING 



I nu I L u : 1 1.\ 



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LULilL rO^ 



THE BARK OF KANINE 
COUNTY— 

^ OR =^ 



"OUR COUNTRY 

WRITE'R WRONG" 



Interminable iiours and miles unfolded to the drone of 
the high powered motor whose insatiable appetite for high- 
wa\' knew no limits. Have >ou observed a son of ltal\' 
demonstrating the faculty of suction on en endless string of 
spaghetti? Thus did the enchanted chariot engulf the rib- 
bon road that ran to haunted hori/tins and led to The Brink 
as awful and awesome as that of Hternitx-. And. — speaking 
of Italians. ma\- we not be reminded that there was one 
furriner that had to be "Counted" out. and who in turn re- 
minds us that for strict western atmosphere. Bull Durham 
has it over dukes mixture in at least nine directions, includ- 
ing translation into hierogl\ph. 

But lest we forget the moon, we shall shift our point of 
\ iew to the lookout of the Ionel\- coyote, that dusky denizen 
of the desert domains where such drammer (if we would 
believe the compilers and chroniclers of western romance) 
is enacted. .\nd herein lies the secret of the weird wails, 
tormented cries, and the dispairing doggerel loosed on the 
welkin on appointed nights. But the stead\- drone of the 
t\pe\\riter, insatiable, in its appetite for punishment, con- 
tinues on as the ine\itable brink impends and the hero 
clasps the heroine in his hurculean arms and the pairod\- 
draws to a close (Close like in contact). 



WISDOM \'S. I ARSIGHTEDNESS 

An owl may be wise, 
But they say he can't see 
With wide open eyes 
The trunk of the tree 
Which anchors the limb 
On which sits the owl, 
L'nless the light's dm. — 
Oh! what a queer fowl. 



DESKRT DOGGEREL .AND COLG.\R Qf.\TR.\lNS 
B\ REQUEST — Reprit Permission by .Arrangement 

I'age Two Hundred Sixty-thrt't- 




And then there was a 
Kooger who caused a 
forest fire by hot footin' 
It over the mountain. 




IV !-» •/■■-i*"r 



Out where the land is 
free, 

.\nd there's no land- 
lord there; 

It's queer, \ou must 
agree, 

rile co\()tes rent the 
air. 





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The lion lurks in den so black, 

Within his ca\ern lair, 
.•\nd those who enter don't come back. 

L'nless he wasn't there. 




z^X 



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T7" 



dH) 



Confessions of a Married Man 

"Be calm, be tranquil," said Mr. Gibbons when 
questioned regarding his domestic relations. "It's a 
proposition of gi\e and take. Vou gi\e up \our mone\- 
and time and your wife takes the credit. Marriage isn't 
so bad, though, unless >ou couple it with running a 
student body office and then it resolves itself into both 
ends of Sherman's famous definition: "War is Hell." 




"Now, for example, it is nothing uncommon Inr 
me to walk the floor half the night with m\' second 
daughter, arise early to get m\' wife her breakfast, an.l 
then come over to school and get bawled out by the 
Dean of Women or no: giving the girls a air show. 
I like to help my wife and 1 do all that I honestly can 
and we would get along first rate if it wasn't" for those 
infernal triangles. Since 1 also have to act in the 
capacity of laundryman I'm sure that young daughter 
lives upon the square. And besides I'm tired of hang- 
ing out the laundry at night for fear Lynn Wakefield 
will be waiting around the corner with his camera. 

"Of course. 1 want it firmK- understood that I am 
master of my own home and I kept my barrel of cider 
at the neighbors just to keep m>' little girl from med- 
dling with the spigot. 



"I could give you boys a lot of advice but you 
wouldn't take it. 1 know how it is when the birds of 
spring sit out in the trees stuttering in whistling notes 
and the dandelions tell you she loves butter and you 
take advantage of your opportunity while her chin's 
tilted. It's onl\- natural boys so don't think you can 
escape. 1 can't continue an\' farther because Beverly 
is howling in disgust and pnjtest against the name the 
students chose for her so again I'll have to settle matters 
like I would a controversv between Banyan and "Y" 
News present a bottle. 

"I don't suppose Professor Christensen will appro\e 
of the frankness of this article but I'd like to let the 
student bod\' know just how things are. And this 
is the truth and nothing else but — so help me. 



A Scotch minister was walking through a street 
in a \illage one misty evening when he fell into a 
deep ditch. He could not get out so began yelling 
for help. A passing laborer came over to the ditch 
and looking into it, asked who it was. 

'Tis Reverend MacTavish." came the reply. 

"Weel, weel." said the man. "Ve needna kick up 
sich a noise. You'll not be needed afore Sunday an' 
this is only Wednesday." 













IS d^iNQ ROsH^C^ 



I 'age Two Hund 



,>uy 





Our Colors ^ Black and Blue 
OurSon^ ^ 

\fust before 

the battle. 

Mother" 



Conducted Sy Monl liurJi 




A SON OF BRIGHAM 



m 


1 


w. 


^ ! 




z:i::x 



•anven O/ 



£% 






HH^:^ 




'HERE'S WHO" 



JL 



.yii ILtli- ■-, 




B. \. V. BOOSTERS 

7 he firms lislcd below are our loyal sLipporters. \\ hen >'ou are bu\ing the>' 
shoiiUI he si^eii first consideration. The following tloes not incUule our supporters 
on the Business aiiil Professional Paue. 



Alpine Ice Oeam 

Anderberg's Inc. 

Banyan Lunch 

Bonneville 1, umber Co. 

Brimhall Bros. 

B. Y. U. Cafeteria 

(Callahan I lardv\are (]o. 

Columbia (]oke 

Consolidated Wasjon & Machine Co. 

(Curtis Zarr 

Dixon Real I stale (^o. 

Occles Motels 

HIias Morris & Sons Co. 

Excelsior Roller Mills 

Parrer Bros. Co. 

P'armers and Merchants Bank 

Prank M. .Mien Co. 

Cem Theatre 

Glade (]and\ Co. 

Hansen (lash (jrocerN 

I lansen Catering Co. 

I ledquist Drug Co. 

Hotel Roberts 

j'lhn r. Tavior CroccrN' 

j. (;. Penne\' ("o. 

Kendall's "Y" \^n\'i 

Knifiht Trust & Sa\in;;s Rank 

Padies Ploral Co. 

Larsen, P. P. 

I.even's Chain Stores. Inc. 

Pew is Ladies' Store 

Madsen Cleaning Co. 

McArthur's 

National P'rench Cleaning Co. 

O. P. 



Paramount 1 heatre 
Pantages 

Portland Cement Co. ol I tab 
Provo Bakery 
Provo Book Binder\- 
Provo Foundary k Machine O). 
Provo Cleaning k D_\eing Co. 
Provo Greenhouse 
Roberts S. A. 

Salt Lake Ac Llah Railroad 
Shriver's 

Smoot Lumber Co. 
Sowards Groccr\' 
State Bank of Pro\o 
Standard ALarket 
Strantl Theatre 
Students Supply Association 
Superior Rotisseric 
Sutton Cafe 
Sutton Market 
Ta\lor Bros. Co. 
Taylor Paper Co. 
Telluride Motor Co. 
Timpanogos Butter 
Tolboe C. A.. Construction Co. 
University Market 
Utah-Idaho Scho-il Suppl\ Co. 
Utah Motor Tours Co. 
Utah Piggly-Wigglv Co. 
Utah Power anil l.i,i.;lil Co. 
Utah Sugar 

L'tah Valley CJas iS; Cloke Co. 
"Y" Service Station 
\'an Photo Suppl\- 
Skaggs 




~ 



£% 



UtaK Motor Tours Company 

Regular Stage Salt Lake to Bingham Canyon Every Two Hours 



PROVO 

Phone 730 



SALT LAKE CITY 
Wasatch 1069 




Special Sightseeing Cars for Rent At Any Time 



7 passenger to 30 passenger Cars — We Go Anywhere in the Scenic West 



VAN ^HOTO SUPPLY 

Experts in Kodakrv 
KODAKS - FILMS - SUPPLIES 






The inveterate necker according to the evolutionist. 



He can make a lot of noise for a little fellow. 



Complete Electrification of tKe Home 

Is to realize that comfort and satisfaction, 
which is no longer a luxury. The electrical 
way, like education is a pleasant economy. 



X 



UTAH POWER & LIGHT CO. 



"Efficient Public Service" 




GLTiyefi Oi 



~7' 



£% 



The "Y" News Editor Gets a Month's 
Telephone Bill 



It's a wisL' call llial kmnsi its own I'odtler. 



Then there's the one about the Scotchman who 
died and left a million dollars to the mother of the 
unknown soldier. 



"Q^hree Weeks" 

Scene — "Y News" ofTice, 

Time — An)' time a very important special meeting 
of staff members is called. 

Characters — .Ml staff members and the editor. 

E. fin whining voice): Now this meeting was 
called — to impress it upon \<)ur highlv esteemed minds 
— that we've got to have better articles — What is it. 
Ilettig? 

T. Ilettig (who has raised a finger); Well. 1 
don't think it's the quality of the articles that matters, 
but 1 think we'\'e got to ha\e a larger \ariety. 

Rd (still in a discontented voice): Yes. there's 
thai too, but if each one would take a little more time 
we ^'es, Hettig? 

T. I lettig: And if each one would be on the look- 
out for a eature article, and write it up and hand it in. 

I:d. (still in a complaining \i)ice) : "^'es, and 
there's another thing. \\'e\'e' got to ha\e these articles 
in on time if we expect to have a paper. I can't — ^'es. 
Ilettig? 

T. Ilettig: Now my idea is this. .Assign each one 
a certain article and two features, ani.1 set a definite 
time for each one. .And then if — ■ 

Ed. fin the same tone) : '^es. 
here an\' suggestions to make? 

T. Ilettig: Well, there's one 
are going to be given soon and — 

Ed. fin his characteristic tone) 
all this time. Now get to work and don't forget what 
r\e said here. Get your articles in! 

(Ever\-one leaves — but the\- will come back in 
another three weeks when a \er\ important notice is 
gi\en in the "\ News" for a special staff meeting. 



\\ ell, has anyone 

thing. If awards 

Well, that'll b.- 



57 NO. 1st CAST 



qPROVO q3AKERY 

Quality Bread and Cakes 
PHONE 334 



82 W. CENTI-R 







MEATS - ICECREAM - FRIGIDAIRE EQUIPMENT 










HANSEN 


CASH 


GROCERY 






297 


NO. 


1st WEST 




Pr^ONO, 


Ul 


■.Ml 



//;/ 



■t-)it y 



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^nr^g) 



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Z_ 111. JJ. IL 




^^ST 



business and Professional ^ag,e 



PROFESSIONAL 
George S. Ballif, Attorney-at-Law 

Cit\- and Count\- Building 

M. B. I\)pe, Attonwy-at-Law 

Kn'Liht Rloci< 

Morgan and ( Coleman, Lawyers 

A. B. Morgan — Jacob Colt-man) 

Abe W. Turner, j. Albert Page, Lawyers 

Kniglit Block 



Pro\(> ComnuTcial Rank Buikiinu 



BUSINESS 

Jackson Motor Car Company (Nash) Provo 

M. H. Graham Printing Company 

"Y" Barber Shop, Brig Stevens, Manager 

Post Publishing Company 

Carpenter Seed Company 

Provo Realty Compan\' 

124 West Center 

Globe Music Company' 

K)4 N. L'niversity Ave. 

Heindselman Optical lV Je\velr\- Company 

120 West Center 
Russell Barbershop, Will Russell . Prop. 

I<)() West CeiUer 

Harlan S. Thomas 
Economy Shoe Shop 

300 West Center Street 
"We mend the Rips and Patch the Holes 
Build L'p the Heels and Save ) our Souls." 



/ ."ievei! 



WmmC 



\^ 




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mtw 



K±:-=^ 



3 MEN IN 100 LEAVE WEALTH AND COMFORT 
FOR THEIR FAMILIES 

The way is open to each one of you to be either one of the 3 or one of the 
other 97. One of the services of this bank is to help people plan their estates. We 
are ready to suggest two or three, plansi which have been successful in creating an 
estate to provide for the future needs of a family. 

Surely you want your children to have the benefits of an education. Now 
is not too soon to begin thinking lof a way that when \oui" bo\- or girl wants to go 
to college he or she will be amply provided for. 

We welcome an opportunit}' to assist students in forming their plans for 
the future. 




.Main f^ohbv 



Knig,Kt Trust & Saving,s Bank 



PROVO, UTAH 
Capital 1300,000.00 

J. WM. KNIGHT 
PresiJenl 



R. E. ALLEN 
Vice President 

r. G. W.^RNICK 

Vice President 



W. E. ALLEN 
Casl-Ver and Trust Officer 

W. W. ALLEN 
Assistant Casl)ier 



Savings 



Commercial 



Trust 



i> I Inmlrcir St'i 



't';/ 



liL liL LU- ■ ■ 



±L HL'.. 




223 WEST CENTER 



q^RIMHALL qBROS. 

"Tire Merchants" 
QUALITY TIRE REPAIRING 

"^ PROVO 



"t^^ 



PHONE 260 




The colortd men had just emerged from the funeral 
Hne. "Sam sho' did lcx)k natcherel. I come nish axin' 
liim wha' in liell he was S""'''-'' 



To the Ozark backwoods there penetrated, one day, 
a traveling salesman who possessed many treasures the 
old Hill Bill\- had never seen. Among them was a 
mirror. 

"Where did you get that?" asked the farmer ex- 
citedly, as he gazed at himself in the glass, "That looks 
just like my father!" 

One da\- his wife found the mirror. 

"Oh," she muttered, as she gazed at herself in it. 
"So that's the old huss\' he's been chasing around with, 
is it?" 



if all the gold diggers were 
wouki still reach for money. 



laid end to end they 



Yeah, Jake had three sons, two are lixing and one 
was a saxophone player. 



It is easy enough to look pleasant 

When you're looking and feeling flip. 

But the man worth while is the man who can smile 
When his girl has a sore on her lip. — Dirge. 



SUGAR vs. CIGARETTES 

Which is more important— The support of our industries which refine U l.M I SL'G.AR 
and those which use UTAH SUGAR in their finished product, or, the appeal to SMOKE 
a certain brand of cigarettes? Does cigarette smoking actually produce the effect implied? 
Does it improve the health and appearance of the race? SUGAR builds vitality necessary 
for the wellbeing and appearance of mankind. Don't be misled. LSB UTAH SLXiAR for 
health's sake. Don't undermine your resistance— build up yourself and UTAH. 



USE UTAH SUGAR 

THE EQUAL OF ANY SUGAR IN THE WORLD 
1007o PURE AND WHITE 
100% FINE AND WHOLESOME 
100% FOR UTAH 

"A Bit of Sweet Makes the Meal Complete" 



Cis 




zEi. 



■JOaryaino/ 



~y 



THE HOME OF COLLEGE STUDENTS 
AND KEELEV'S ICE CREAM 

A PLACE TO TRADE 

The Best Goods for the Best People 

KENDALL'S -Y- DRUG 

A Booster oj the B. Y. U. 

Ti\- a Collfge Mall W'itli Keuley's Ice Cream 
'Best By Test" 



C 



TKe cNEWHOUSE HOTEL 



400 Rooms 

400 Baths 

|2 TO |4 Single 







<HOTEL> 

^EWHOUSt 



SALT LAKE CLr\ 

^. Y. U. Parties 
Fornials — Dances — Dinners 

Curejitl Attention to Details Make Our 
I Social Affairs Successful 

Mks. W. B. I alghber. Hostess 
EAT IN SALT LAKE'S ONLY 

SUNSHINE CAFETERIA 

J. II. RwBURN, General Manager 



Imuhi 



(Hv- 



A. 



'■^^ -^ y 



-tJ 



±L. Z_l 



iiL't^' N^.^ 



q3. Y. U. STADIUM 



FENCE .m/ STEEL WORK 



Furnished by 



FRANK M. ALLEN CO. 



Structural Steel Engineers 



1526 South West Tf.imple 



Salt Lake Chy 






NEW B. Y. U. STADIUM DURING CONSTRUCTION 



/ 



\ 




r 



:i 



^^jhprrfmij 



\..^Ml. -Ul- 



or 



'T'ortland Cement Co. of UtaK 



Salt Lake City, Utah 



Build With Concrete 
for Permanence 



A 100 Per Cent Utah 
Company and Product 



"UTAH BRAND" 




USE "UTAH- 


Sold by your local 
Lumber Yards. 


"UTAH" P""'"^"'' 
Cement 


PORTLAND 
CEMENT 
TO BUILD 


UTAH TIMBER & 


Is uniformly popular 


J© 


COAL CO. 


with Contractors who 


Stadiums 


and 


use It. 


Tunnel-Linings 


MUTUAL 


jg) 


Swimming Pools 


LUMBER CO. 
Provo, Utah 


GIVES 

Unequaled results be- 


Septic Tanks 
Power Plants 


W 


cause of its Unfailing 


Pipe Lines 


KNOWLEDGE 

is the basis of 


Uniformity and Fine 
Grinding 


Feeding Floors 
Warehouses 


CONFIDENCE 


J® 


Sidewalks 


Engineers and Build- 


SATISFACTION 


Dipping Vats 


ers are invited to visit 
our Plant and Quar- 
ries and invest'gate 


Comes to you and your 
customers in every sack. 


Cisterns 
Paving 


fully the processes of 
cement manufacture 




Silos 



PORTLAND CEMENT USED IN B. Y. U. STADIUM 



i-.^_;r;-' 



^t7 





( I 



Y" SERVICE STATION 

Students Drive in for Real Service 

CORNER 5th NO. and UNIVERSITY AVE. 



VICO 
Motor Oils 

Auto 
Accessories 



"<^ook of Revelations" 

CHAPTER I 

31. Blessed is he that readeth, and they th;'t hear 
the words of this prophesy, and keep those thin.!>s that 
are written herein; for the time is at hand. 

CHAPTER II 

1. 1 was in the spirit on a certain day; and I hei'rd 
a voice behind me saying: 

2. I am he of whom it is written. I am the be- 
ginning and the end I am A and Z. Behold I am alive 
forevermore. 

3. And I turned to see the voice that spoke to me. 
And being turned 1 beheld a glorious figure. 

4. And the figure was clothed in white but his 
head was of gold and his feet were of clay. 



5. .Viid he continued speaking. sa\ins "W hat tiiou 
seest write in a large book and proclaim it to the seven 
social units which are in Provo, 

6. Unto the social unit which is Nugget, sav I 
know thy works and thy labors, .^nd how thou woukUt 
run the school but heed me mv warning. 

7. Many have come to \ou and you have wel- 
comed them wherefore \ou have let in many who do 
not labor and are not politicians wherefore take heed 
for the da}- is at hand. 

8. And to the social unit that is Tausig say, 1 
know thy fears that some may say, Lo! we are better 
than the Tausig. wherefore 1 am with you. but take 
heed lest sou acquire some whose capacities are limited. 

9. For Lo many thirst but few drinketh. Let 
him that hath ears hear and him that hath eyes see 
but all men should walk. 

((^ontiiuied on page 280) 



UTAH-PORTLAND CEMENT IN THE "V" STADIUM 



FURNISHED THROUGH 



UtaK Timber & Coal Co. 



Coal 



AND 



Lumber 



164 W. 5th No. 



Phone 232 




zd. 



L//z0X)airyeii^ 



~y 



£% 



Asbestos SKin^les 



ASBESTOS ROOFING 

FIREPROOF — BEAUni-UL 

everlasting 
Estimates Free 

CURTIS ZARR 

Approved Contractors for 
Johns-.Man\iIle Co. 

408 DO()L^• BLDG. SAL. I LAKE CirV 



P. L. LARSEN 

PLUMBING 

HEATING 

SHEET METAL 

WORKS 

J® 



343 \V. CENTER ST. 



PHONE S74 




•■•—l^' 



.ver 



Standard Markets 

ALL OVER THE STATE 




ALL OVER THE WORLD 



T^i^^ly Wi^^ly 



riiu ciwiHT of a small store whose prciiiises IkuI 
bci-'ii burned met a frieiul. 

"A terrible affair! I am ruineil. 1 am ruineil; I 
just stood there helpless, watchinj; it burn. .M\- lace 
got white, while — white as \'oiir shirt." 

Then, looking at his riieiul's shirl. he ackk-d. 
■•Whiter." 



"Last night 1 diank sc\en cocktails. I woiK^er il 
I did wrong?" 

"CJood hea\ens, girl: can't \-ou remcinber?" 



Grandpa was attending a parts'. During iheesen- 
ing his flapper granddaughter came up to him anil askv.\l 
how he was enjoying himself. 

"line, fine!" replied the old man. 

"I'll hel s'ou ne\'er saw dancing like this when \iiu 
were a young man," prattled the girl, artlessly. 

"just once." replied grandjia. reflectively "but the 
place was raitled." — Iixcbauge. 



The crowd milled ami surged about the morgue. 
.\ new bod\' hail been brought in — a murdered man, 

Sutklenly a tia/.ed genlleman pLished antl elbowed 
his way through the throng, anti into the builuing. lie 
spoke qu'etl\' to the caretaker, and was admitted iiTo 
the inner recesses. Shortiv' he reappeareil. 

"Was he sour brother'^'" aske dthe caretaki'r. 

"^'es." came the sorrowfiil answer. 

"lUil how did sou iilenlifs' himi'" 

The man ssiped aw. is a teai" as he chokingly re- 
li d, "I le was deaf." 



Cissie: .Xuntie. sou knoss I hat old man at the 
corner that was ill — " 

Aunt ((Christian Scientist); >'ou mean he thoughl 
he was ill. 

Cissie: Well, now he thinks he's dead. 



"Waiter, whs' is it that there is a Irouser button 
in m\' soLip?" 

"I do not know. sii'. We emplos none but female 
help." 



FIRE PROOF BUILDING PRODUCTS 




S. A. ROBERTS AND CO. 




Ill DOOLV BUILDING SALI 


AKI: CI 1 1 



The Beautiful Colored Tile Bath Rooms 

anti other tile ssork in the President's home 
l-'urnished bs' 

ELIAS MORRIS & SONS CO. 

21 WnST so. TT-MPLE ST. SALT L.\Ki; CI I ^' 

We arc installing 1 ilc Drain Boards. Mantels and Oilorcil Bath KcKinis in all Parts ul 

L tail. Idaho. Nesada and Wyoming. 




-' ^ 



JlI-llL 



w 



GENERAL CONTRACTING WORK ON 
THE B. Y. U. STADIUM 

Done by 

C. A. Tolboe Construction Co. 



ARMERS and MERCHANTS 

BANK BLILDING 



PRO\0 



(Continued from page 277) 



^^5^1 



10. And to the social unit that is Cougar Errant 
si\y 1 know of th\- \ictories and 1 have been with \ou in 
them but take care for many there are who walk in 
ignorance and you have not helped them. 

11. And again to the social unit that is Cou^^ar 
Errant say You must labor well and diligently lest 1 
leave \ou for some arriiong \ou have strayed from the 
path. Wherefore drink a little wine for thy hell\'s 
sake. 

12. And to the social unit that is Nautilus say, 
Lo you have been slack in your duty wherefore you 
must be first with the high school girls if you would 
ha\'e them with \ou. 

1 3. And wherefore do you ask them to \our parties 
when others have been before \ou? Can you find no 
one for yourselves? 

14. And to the social unit that is O.S. say. Where- 



fore do \ou keep the name that was with >ou before I 
came? Know \ou not that 1 am the beginning and the 
end? And all that was before me was sin? 

1 5. Wherefore >-ou must cast out the \'estige of all 
that was before me or 1 will cause you to be dri\en from 
the face of the earth. 

16. And to the social unit that is \'al Norn say. 
Lo 1 ha\e seen your labors and they are good. It is 
pleasing to be that the young should be clothed. 

17. Wherefore continue your good work that all 
may see. It is not pleasing that \ou hide \our light 
under a bushel. 

18. And to the Social Unit that is Beaux Arts say 
it is necessar\' that you do more than piav basketball. 
Wherefore the purpose of social units is to socialize. 

19. It is not fitting that you should play and not 
dance so take heed. 



f 


1 


LADIES FLORAL COMPANY 

Priscilla Schill, Mgr. 

"// vou want it done right. let the Ladies do it" 

PHONE 466 ' PRO\'0 



rik 



Jl 



^ IPno 



vJ 



we. 



•Z_ LLL ili. UL 




COLUMBIA COKE 

The Fuel Without a Fault 



Experts figure that the average American breathes fi\e times 
his weight in soot and dirt e\'er\- tweh-e months and that the national 
damage caused b\- smoke in the air exceeds $^00,000,000 annualiw 

When burning Columbia Coke there is no SOOT or DIRT. 
Protect your health and save on _\our heating bills by burning tliis 
exceptionally fine fuel. 



Call \our dealer or telephone 204 
direct for information or ser\'ice 



^ 



COLUMBIA COKE 



IHH DEPEND.ABLE FUEL lOR THE IIO.ME 
BLVIT — BIRN' IT — VOUTL LI Ki: IT 




/r^ 



'JOaryen o. 




j^ 



^ 



^ 



CALLAHAN HARDWARE CO. 

The Hardware Specialists 
SPORTING GOODS - FISHING TACKLE - GUNS 



Give Us a Chance To llelp Fit \'ou Out 



^HONE 626 



62 WEST CENTER 




IT'S A KNEESY THING TO LOOK AT 



He 


Who Chooses 


Glade's Ch( 


30ses 


Wisely 




GLADE 


CANDY 


CO. 








SALT LAKE CITY 










^ 



We support our school and heartily endorse its achievements 

FARRER BROS. CO. 

WEARING APPAREL, SHOES AND DRY GOODS 
FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 



21)- ^1 NO. LiNIVERSrrV AVE. 



HONE 44 



^ 



Feel sorr>' for the poor student who listened to his \ou've probabl)- heard the story of the steUar 

professor tell dirty stories every day in class and then half-back, son of an absent-minded professor, who car- 
got bawled out by the same prof, for close dancing, ried the left end around the ball. 



.\ girl is onl\' as strong as her weakest moment. 



Ill llic okleii times "Rum was not made in a da\-." 



\'es. tlarlin", a roof "arden is where the\' sow wild 



oats. 



"Why don't \ou kiss me on the neck the wa)' \ou 
u>ed to?" 

"\Vh\- don'l \()U wash it the wa\' n'ou used to?" 



"What makes the world go round. Pop? "I have just purchased a ThesauruN." 

"Oscar, how many times must I tell you to keep "^'ou can't fool me. Those animals ha\e been ex- 

;iut of the cellar?" tinct for a million vears." 




These spreading branches represent our many friends. The roots symbolize our growth. 
The fruit typifies tJ)e satislaclion created from the rich soil of service, quality, price, home- 
like alniosphere. spin! of good ■will and helpfulness. 

Ttlli BA}^yAN LUNCH Just Across the Street 



Kf i i II t< ^ 





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WE CLEAN YOUR CLOTHES CLEANER 



^ROVO CLEANING & q^YEING CO. 



77 N. 1st West 



Phone 46 



Provo, Utah 




CHICKEN-A-LA-B. Y. U. 



c 



SUCCESSFUL 



IN SERVING THE PUBLIC OF PROVO AND UTAH COUNTY 
OVER A PERIOD OF 45 YEARS 

THE REASON — Fair Dealings in Quality Merchandise 

TAYLOR PAPER COMPANY 



66 No. Univ. Ave. 



"Stationers" 



Phone 15 



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QUALITY by 
KUPPENHEIMER 




EMERY SHIRTS 

"Equal To Custom 
Made" 

Kevstone Trousers 



Nettleton and 

Bostonian 

Shoes and Oxfords 



DOBBS 

"Quality Hats" 

Wheary Trunks 



cMcG/lrtKurs 



House of Kuppenbeimer "Good Clothes" 

\1 N. UNIVERSITY AVE. 



PROVO, UTAH 



This space is lovingly dedicated to 




Al Smith and the publicity he would have 




liked. 




(Paid Adv.) 





Cop: Aren't you afraid to leave your raccKin Judge: Have you an\thing to say before I pass 

:oat there in the rumble seat? , sentence? 

Stude: It's all rij^ht. officer, a friend of mine is Prisoner: Nothing, your honor, except that it lakes 

inside minding it.— JuuGh, ver>' little to please me. 



J. HLMER JACOBSEN, Mgr DHNZIL BROWN. Secy. 

q)IXON REAL ESTATE CO. 

INSURANCE - HOMES - BONDS - LOANS - RENTALS 



PHONE 75 



236 WESI' CEN lEK 



PROVO 






Txvo Huii> 





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A THANKS TO ALL STUDENTS AND CLUBS 
PATRONIZING THE 

T3. Y. U. CAFETERIA 

"Where You Hnjoy Eating" 



2:20 DAILY 



ARTS BUILDING 



C 




When I asked him for a date he said he was as busy 
as a cat with nine wives. 



^ 



Yes, darling, a roof garden is where they sow wild 



oats. 



^ 



Then there is the one about the Scotchman who 
died and left a million dollars to the mother of the un- 
known soldier. 



The Ice and Snow Carnival was a Huge Success 



MODERN AND HOMELHkE 




HOTEL ROBERTS 




From kft 10 right; Mark Bullif, lMn> BlmiUcn , Helen Bonion, 
Harold Barton, Nora Ford, Warren W hitaker. Martha Pipkm, led 
Hansen, Linda Randall. 



Page Tiz-c 



VALUE IS A BIG THING 




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At least it is to us and tiiat is tiie reason we alwajs "gi\e something" 
extra to our customers — a little more in service, a little more in quality, 
a little more in value — a little more of all three whenever it is possible. 
It's this polic\' that we will always adhere to. 

LEWIS LADIES' STORE 

Leo N. Lewis, Manager 

Formerly Mose Lewis' Co. 



"I found you intoxicated in a sink of iniquity." 
"I beg your pardon; it was porcelain." 



The boarding house mistress glanced grimly down 
the table as she announced: "We have a delicious 
rabbit pie for dinner." 

The boarders nodded resignedl}- — all, that is, but 
one. 

He glanced ner\'ousl\- downward, shifted his feet. 

One foot struck something soft, something that said, 

A recent traveler in Algeria returns to report hav- ".Meoow." 
ing found the banks of the famous "River of Ink" lined Up came his head. A relieved smile crossed his 

with Highlanders filling their fountain pens. face as he gasped, "Thank goodness." 



He: Young ladv, do \ou know what that stuff 
will do to you? 

She: Sure, make me cock-eved. 




The Tuesday's editorial writer gets an editorial. 



cMost G/lrtistic 
bouquets G^ 

For Commencement 
For June Brides 




AT 



q^ROVO 

GREENHOUSE 



EIGHT-O — "Where the Flowers Grow' 



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SUTTON CAFE 



"A Good Place to Eat" 



PROVO 



We saved this space for Cobb Webb but he got a date 
that night so we had to save his part of the Bun\on till 
afterwards. 



Cash Tells the Story at 

JOHN T. TAYLOR'S GROCERY STORE 

Phones 27 and 28 



"If it wasn't for one thing this old bus couki I he most liistiessing part about having >our car 

travel a mile per minute." overhauled is having a motorcvcle cop do it. 

"What's that?" 

"The distance is too long for the shortness of the "W hat did the\ offer vou on \our old car?" 

time." "The\ took one look and offered a praver." 



Compliments of the makers of most of the high grade 
pins and medals used at 

BRIGHAM DOLING UNIN'ERSITY 
Sold and Guaranteed by the STADIUM CO-OP. 

Frequently referred to as Student's Suppiv Association 




zJCl 



"JOGLTyeno; 



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O.P. SKAGGS 



FOOD 



&fficient Service 

System ^ 



STORES 



THE LATEST IN FOOD STORES 




Potter Forgets and Appears on the Range with Spats 



J.C.PENNEYC0 



"Quality — Always at a Saving" 



VALUES THAT ALWAYS REMAIN THE SAME 



Page Two Hun, 



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"The Home of Those Superior Sanditnches" 

SUPERIOR ROTISSERIE 

W A ()IJ\f-:R. Prornetor 
1st NO., 5th WEST, PRO\0, UTAH OPEN 7 A. M. to 2 A. M. 




Bob Allen looking for his seat in the 
basketball game 



COOK - HEAT 
REFRIGERATE 

With GAS 
"71?e Better Fuel" 

CHEAPEST BY 1-AR 
J© 

UtaK Valley Gas and 
Coke Co. 

Springville — Pro\o — Spanish Pork 








The Frosh are Greeted 



BOOK BINDING 

Commercial Form Ruling 

Loose Leaf Devices 

Save your valuable books, maga- 
zines and journals. We hind them 
in refined or plain st\les 

^rovo ^ook 
^indery^ 

South of L'niversity 
PHONE 612 PRON'O 



Hundred S 



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cNational FrencK Cleaning, Compan}/^ 



Established 1910 

DRV AND STEAM CLEANING 

Repairiiii^ and Pressing Ladies' and Gents' Garments 
llemslitching and Picoting Hats Cleaned and Blocked 



PHONE 125 



95 N. UNIVERSITY AVE. 



PROVO, UTAH 




Her only visible means 
of support 




The "Y" News is Stolen 



STATE ^ANK OF T^ROVO 



W. H. Brereton. Pres. 
John Roundy, Vice-Pres. 



Ojj 



icers 



Alva Nelson, Cashier 

Julian F. Greer, Asst. Cashier 



T. F. PIERPONT, Pres. and M 



gr. 



J. U. BUCHl, Secretary 



^rovo Foundry & cMacKine Co. 



PROVO, U lAH 



Structural and Heav ^ Steel Work - iron and Brass Castings 
Mine Cars, Steel Tanks, General Contract Shop 



Pag 




c/lnnouncin^ tKe Inaug,uration of Our 

NEW LOW NET PRICES TO ALL 



We have in the past endeavored to show our 
sincere appreciation of the Un'ally of our man\- 
customers by serving tiiem with merchandise 
of dependahle quality at the lowest possible 
prices. This policy has brought us increased 
\olume, which has reduced our percentage of 
o\erhead. in consequence we lia\e decided to 



inaLiguiale m all of our departments and stores 
a new era of l.OW Nlil" PRICFiS TO ALL. 
.\bsolutely one price and that lo t'\er\body we 
serve, together with I he price and qualit\- 
guarantee explained below. Come and take 
ad\antai;e of tlK'Se prices. 



We Guarantee That T/.icrc Are No Loicer Prices T1?an Here 



Our Price 
GUARANTEE 

If you make a pur- 
chase here and 
find a lower regu- 
lar price elsewhere 
we will refund the 
difference. 




imm BRO 



// 

COMB 



THE DEPARTMENT STORE OF PRQVO 



Our Quality 
l.l AR.WTEE 

We will make fair 
and immediate ad- 
justment of any 
article purchased 
here that is not 
satisfactor\' and as 
represented. 




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MEATS AND GROCERIES 

SOWARD'S GROCERY 



258 E. 5th NORTH 



A "Y" Booster 



PROVO 



HEDQUIST DRUG COMPANY 



PRO\0 



Four Stores — One Photo Shop 

— PLEASANT GROVE — SPRINGVILLE 



How I Saved the O. S. TKirty-five Dollars 



Editor's Note — This wasn't solicited but was handed 
in with the request that it be run. Personally, we don't 
think much of it, but the author did. 

I know that one shouldn't brag about one's achieve- 
rrJent and really you know 1 am not writing this in a 
spirit of boasting but rather I am gi\ing a little infor- 
mation to the rest of the social units. We all know how- 
hard it is for the organizations to raise money and when 
we'do get it we shouldn't squander it. So 1 hope that 
everyone takes this in the spirit in which it is written. 

When the O.S. first decided to celebrate its tenth 
birthda\- there was quite a little discussion as to what 
kind of a party we should gi\e. One of the new mem- 
bers said that she thought that it was our first birthdaw 
Well, we told her how the O.S. was much older than the 
social unit system. In fact, 1 can say this without fear 
of contradiction, we were one of the principal reasons 
that the social units were brought onto the campus. 
Well, we got it all explained hf)w this was our t n h 
birihda\- and so we should really give quite a big party. 



At first we were going to give the biggest formal the 
campus had ever seen. All the plans were laid when 
someone happened to remind us that we were broke 
from trying to buy scant}' costumes to beat the N.L.U.'s 
in the pep \odie. \^'ell anyway all we had was a little 
under a hundred dollars. Our formal would have 
come to at least |150; well we cut down all we could 
and still have a party and yet the total was |125. Well, 
the club just didn't know what to do. 1 suggested that 
we itemize the expenses and see if there weren't some 
that could be cut out. Roughlv sp.^ak'n'!; the accojnt 
went like this: Orchestra, |40: dinner, $70: incidentals, 
|15: and mind you that didn't even include flowers and 
still the club couldn't meet it. 1 looked at the biggest 
item and asked them how come the dinner would be so 
much. They told me the price was a dollar a plate and 
what with our partners and the high school girls and 
their partners there would be at least seventy of us. It 
was then that I had m\- great idea that made the affair 
possible. I cried out, "Well, let's not have our partners 



SALT LAKE'S 

GREATEST ENTERTAINMENT 



q^ANTAGES 






JL 



W6^ .^Y 1 III 






\L\^ 




TIMPANOGOS GUTTER 



When ^011 Phone Sa\— TIMPANOGOS 

For Sale At All Grocers 



PHONE 2 1 3 



TIMPANOGOS CREAMHR\' 

O. S. OLSEN, Mgr. 



'IIOVO 



to the dinner. N\ e can ha\e a dance lor them alter ha\ e to ^o in tiebt lor it. Now if anvolhjr social unils 

we eat." Some of the girls didn't like the idea at lirst. can profit bv our experience, do so. .\nd remember 

but I told them the boys would think it all right if we now. 1 am not bragging about it. 

explained that inasmuch as it was the birthday of the P.S. No, I didn't get my id;a from the pre\alenl 

club we had some ceremonies to go through that no one practice employed by sororities at their dinner parties, 

outside the group could witness. Well the girls all it was siricth' original. 

fell for that and so we had our partv and didn't e\en — F. C. P. 



"Where did you get the new lace dress?" 

"That isn't lace. I wore it in (Chicago last week." 

"Lot's wife had nolning on me, " said the cow, as 
she turned to salt. 



"A penny for your thoughts. " 

"Whadda \a think 1 am? A slot machine?' 



"lie must have been on the Norlhein side because 
he wore his L'nionsuit." 



HOME MADE CANDIES AND 
REFRESHMENTS - DANCING 




Let Us Serve Your Parties 



TR\' OUR SERVICE 
STATIONS 

Our Gasoline anti Oils are highest in 
Qualit\' and (Cheapest in Price 

E\'er\lhing for the .Xutoniobile 

OPliN 24 IIOL'RS A DAY 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Rest Rooms 

Telluride cMotor 
Conipau}/^ 

\nvme 11'-) aiul S24 

TWO ST.MIONS 

Corner I-irst West and Center 

57 West Center 

In ihc .\utcini(ibile Business in Pro\o for 14 'I'ears 




airman Oi 



~7' 



^ 



Strand TKeatre 



Quality Entertainment 



R. E. SUTTON. Mgr. 



PHONE 749 




"The horn on this car is broken." 
"No, it's not it's just indifferent." 
"What do you mean?" 
"It doesn't give a hoot." 



Doctor: lla\e \ou ever had any serious disease 
in the family? 

l-rosh: is that absolutely necessars to enter the 

uni\'ersit\'. 



if we believe the movies, any college is a floating 
university. 



History — "Y" Holds Utes Scoreless 



CONSOLIDATED WAGON & 
MACHINE COMPANY 



Wholesale and Retail Distributors of 



Farm Machinery - Shelf and Heavy Hardware 



UTAH - IDAHO and WYOMING 



JL 



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ALPINE ICE CREAM 

is more than a delicious dessert 
— it is refreshing, nourishing 
food as well. 



"^ 



Diamonds--WatcKes 

CLASS PINS 

RINGS AND MEDALS 

LET US SUBMIT 

PRICES AND 

DESIGNS 

cv4nderber^ Inc. 

Jewelers 

SILN'ERWARE — JEWELRY' 

J. Edwin Stein, President 

34 W. c:ENTER ST. PROM) 



Wf-. 




Ill 



The Editor in Conference 




L/he^Um^otn or 



sA 



GEM THEATRE 

Home of Provo's Best Organ 
Our Stars 

Douglas r-aiibanks Charle>- Chaplin 



Mary Pickford 
Vilma Bank\ 
George Sidne\- 



Ronald Colman 
Laura La Plante 
Hoot Gibson 



and others 



Admiral: "Woman's greatest attraction lies in 
her hair — her crowning glory." 

Captain: "Naw — 1 sa^- her eyes are more attrac- 
ti\e— the magnets of her soul." 

Mate: "Me thinks her swan-like throat is the 
acme of perfection." 



"Poor old Cris. " 
"How come?" 

"Burned to death last night." 
"House burn down again?" 
"Nope — he just went to light a cigarette and his 
breath caught on fire." 



"Two men held me up New Year's eve." 
"That's nothing. Four men carried me out. 



"If you don't raise my salar\-, you can all go to 
hell!" cried the Preacher. 




"What is the president all up in the air 
about?" 

"Someone said social units." 



q^ONNEVILLE 

Lumber Co. 

"That Good 
. Place to 
Trade" 

Herman Hinze. Mgr. 



298 S. UNIX'. A\'E. 



PHONE 104 



Ride tKe Big,, Red Cars 

On the 

Salt Lake and Utah Railroad 
The "OREM" Line 

Cleanliness, Comfort, Courtesy 
and Safety 

Patronize a Home Institution 

Salt Lake, Prove, Payson, 
and Intermediate Points 

SPECIAL RATES FOR ALL 
SPECIAL OCCASIONS 

Remember 

TKe "OREM" Line 

Aldon J. .\nderson, Traffic .Manager 



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INTERIOR of FARMERS and MERCHANTS BANK 




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^ Friendly 



^Bank 



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A feller motorist r;ipiK'i.l ;it St. Peter's pearly por- 
tals last week and gaining entrance, St. Peter pointed 
out the thousands of miles of golden pa\ing which 
stretched out from the gate across the heavens. 

"Fine — beautiful highwavs. St. Peler, hut where 
are the automobiles?" 

"i"m sorr\' to sa\'." returned Peter, "but ndu'II 
find all the automobiles down below." 

"Tough luck." grumbled the motorist, "but I'll 
sta\- with mj' car." 

Soon he arrived at the charred gates of Satan's 
abode and saw within a score of high-powered auto- 
mobiles. 



" 1 his is more like it." he remarkeil enlluisiaslical- 
1\. "Which one is mine. \ou old Devil? " 

" lake \our choice." smiled Satan, not displeased 
at such familiarity. 

.\ selection was i|Ln'cklv made ami the motorist 
climbed behind I he wheel of an attraclixe roadsler. 

"This one will do: now which wa\' ilo I go to 
finil a road? " 

Satan shrugged his shoulders. "There aren't an)'," 
he remarked, "That's the 'ell of it!" 



(^luff dropped Irench because lhe\ starletl print- 
ing "l.ci \ ic Pariiicniic" in r-nglish. 



You Get the Best Flour At 




EXCELSIOR POLLER 


.:MILLS 


Our Specialty 




Lll 1 ^ \\ lini: — COl'G.\R BRAND 




\\ hole W heat and Turke> Ked llour 




212 \\\ 5th NORTH 


PI ION n 124 




_£_ll 



J_i. 



1' ^M TiftiiyeB o'l 



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SEE AND HEAR THEM 

TALK, SING AND DANCE AT 

PROVO 




Direction L. Marcus Enterprises 

SOUTHERN UTAH'S FINEST THEATRE 
Home of Perfected 

VITAPHONE and MOVIETONE 



Oh'TEK A BRIDEGROOM BUT NEVER A BRIDE 

(Continued from Page 2S4) 

two years ago Glenn was going with m\ older sister, matter of minor consideration. I should do what m\' 

It looked like an engagement was imm-nent when for sister should ha\e done, become Mrs. Dickson. All 

some unknown reason she let him get away from her. went well until the clerk asked if we were serious. Glenn 

She never explained things to me and in my ignorance replied. "Of course we are." and then to me. "aren't we 

1 thought that the honor of the famih had been dam- dearest?" As he spoke he leaned close to me with that 

aged. I decided that it was up to me to do something, adoring look that all you girls know in his eyes. It 

so 1 took the first opportunity that came to hand. I was then that the reason for my sister's strange behavior 

got Glenn in one of his numerous weak moments and was made clear to me. He had but even his best 

rushed him down to the courthouse. 1 walked firmlv friend won't tell him. Needless to say. 1 walked hur- 

into the counts- clerk's office determined that that da\- nedl\- from the office. What followed \ou already- 

the name of E\Ting should be cleared, and that, as a know. 





WE WANT MORE STUDENTS' CLEANING AND PRESSING 




cMADSEN CLEANING CO. 


Call 475 


Free Delivery 



A. 



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Conpliments oj the 

LEVENS CHAIN STORES, INC. 



SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY' 



PRO\ O. L TAH 



MEN AND BOYS' OUTFITS 





"Honey, I'm knee deep in love with you." 
"All right, I'll put you on my wading list." 



W'hali dumber than a Senior? 
Two hrighl 1-rosh. 



Be nonchalant like the man who wab caught, b>- 
his son, kissing the maid. "Bring me m\- glasses, son," 
he said, "I thought it was \our mother." 



riie night before the quarter ends 
W hen midnight oib burn. 

Be it autumn, spring, or fall. 
The leaves begin to turn. 



There was a terrible accident in Glasgow. Two 
taxicabs collided anil thirt\' Scotchmen were seriously 
injured. 



For Making Whoopee 



"Do \ou know that every time a clever thought 
enters \our head it leaves a crease on \our brain?" 
"Oh. 1 see. You mean wise cracks." 



University cMarket 



MEATS AND GROCERIES 



■^ 



J. J. ^OOTH 



PHONES 273-274 



498 NO. UNIN'ERSIT^" A\'E 



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"Everything for Office and School" 

UTAH -IDAHO SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 



155 SOUTH S'lATH SI 



SALT LAKE CITV, UI'AI 1 



SUTTON cMARKET 



STORE NO. 1— PHONES 1Q3-194-195 



STORE NO. 2— PHONES 56-66 



We meant to run here 
Potter's list of preferred 
telephone numbers but 
yesterday he changed 
his preference. 



Some men persist in tirixing the old dihipidated 
cars because it gives them a much better e.xcuse for 
not netting home earlw 



Professor: "Now he pcrfeclly frank willi me — 
have you a suppressed desire?" 

Conscientious student: "Ve^. sir. I ha\e." 

Professor: "What i> it?" 

C. Student: "To tell \()U what a low heeled, pig- 
headed, mangv skimk I think _\()U are for flunking me 
on that exam." 



The girl was so dumb ihat when she saw them 
voting for the popular men she thoLight I hey were 
putting love and kisses by I heir names. 



Some girls walk home so ihey can hurry and lell 
their friends about it. 




Without sense enougti to phone 




ECCLES HOTELS 

COMMERCIAL HEADQUARTERS 

Good Eating Accommodations 

Comfortable Rooms 

Reasonable Rates 



LOGAN, 
UTAH 



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CONFIDENCE AND SATISFACTION 

GO HAND IN HAND 




Per>c)nall\-. if we think a merchant is tr\ing to put sonu-lhini; ovur on us we sa\- 
nothing, but bu\' elsewhere, if we find him alwa>s worlvinf; tn our interest we 
learn to ha\'e confidence in him. You have a right to feel tiie same wa\' and we 
belies'e \'ou ilo. Our satisfaction comes in knowing thai wi- ha\e gi\'en \'ou the 
same kind of a deal we would expect you to give us. W hen thai is dune we ha\e 
a real basis for satisfaction all arountl. That is the real attitutle of the 

SMOOT LUMBER CO. 

PHONE 20 




Jug not lest ye be not jugged 




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SHRIVRR'S 

Provo's Newest and Smartest Men's Store 
Hart Schaff-ner & Marx Clothes 








Wilson Brothers Furnishings 








Stetson Hats 








Caps 










Everything Direct to ^'oii Erom St\ie Centers. [;ver\thing that is 










Authentic in the Best Uni\ersities is here. Extraordinar\' X'alues and 








E'inest Quality at Moderate i^rices. 








Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Back 




!'' 




SHRIVER'S 

16 WEST CENTER 
PROVO EUREKA 













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■|| hi; a rover JList once more 
:() know a^ain the jo\' of free 



1 cannot fret me lonner here. 
Besieged bv memories of yesterdays 
Inviting skies tiiat bend toward For the horizon, a siren star 

rile things that I must see. Promises — and pa\s. 

So just once more I'll tramp the trails 
That lead me where the muses pla\'. 
Although I know it never fails 
To make another Yesterday. 



lundred Six 



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