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Full text of "The banyan"

LIBRARY 

Brigham Young University 

FROM r.r.;-; 

Call 378.0 Acc> 

No ?22 No- 57816 

1930 





^s^jg, tJ2£F~ 




^BANYAN 

^NINETEEN THIRTY 



The rythmical procession of days gliding by 
takes the Present into the Past where it is oft 
forgotten. But some great events refuse to become 
lost in obscurity, and they reach down the Ages 
into the ever-living Present. 

A century ago — a mighty sweep to the mind 
of man — a small gathering effected the organiza- 
tion of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day 
Saints. From this infinitesimal conclave of six 
men has grown one of the most far-reaching 
influences of modern times. 





pfl 




PYRIGHT 



L. Lowell Johnson, Editor 
J. Grant Thurgood, Business Manager 



M 



i with the fiercest opposition, the 
adherents of this new faith found great 
difficulty in establishing permanent communi- 
ties. Many times they were forced by 
ungoverned mobs to leave their burning cities. 
Each time the Saints sought a new place to 
build, undismayed and with faith unshaken. 




' vitfJd 



Engraved By 

3URGER-BAIRD ENGRAVING COMPANY 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Printed By 

PARAGON PRINTING COMPANY 

SALT Lake City. Utah 

Photographs By 

LARSON STUDIO 
Provo. Utah 




^NINETEEN THIRTY 



c/ 



Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 



'estward, ho with the rumble, the shouting, 
and the clamor of a large company on the 
march, covered wagons in hundreds pulled into 
the long, wavering lines that lengthened across the 
prairies. Toward the sunset, into the great Amer- 
ican wilderness, trekked the thousands of Mormons, 
expatriated, seeking only a place where they could 
enjoy freedom of worship and peace. But some of 
those from foreign lands, unable to obtain wagons 
and ox teams, loaded handcarts and made the 
journey afoot. 

Above the storied romance of "Crossing the 
Plains" stands, unforgettable, the courage and 
sincerity of those who builded our heritage. 





i 





istily veiled in shadow though it may have some- 
times been, an Epoch of the Past comes into its 
own today. For us, the life of those century-old events 
centers in the figure of one great man, and the weight 
of his memory is upon us. To our minds his name 
comes irresistibly in this dedication, and the importance 
of the role he played that occurred a hundred years ago 
cannot be denied. 

His followers loved him. He gave an 
inspiration of courage to his people that 
carried them through many a dark hour 
of despair and trial. His mortal existence 
closed before the Mormon empire was 
built in the Rockies, but he knew the 
destiny of the Saints and foretold their 
great exodus to this place. He lived, and 
gave, and died for the faith and knowledge 
he had, and we remember today the wealth 
of his bequest to us. 

To the Prophet Joseph Smith we 
reverently inscribe this dedication. 





In these opening pages we have sought 
to give a fleeting glance at the march 
of events in the history of the great 
Church now celebrating its hundredth 
anniversary. Humble as our effort is, we 
believe that it is justified by the fact thai 
we are students in the University founded 
by one of our leaders. 

This school of ours, with its ideals of 
educational and cultural achievement, its 
deeply embedded traditions of moral and 
spiritual attainment and conduct, owes its 
very existence to the organization com- 
posed of sturdy and unflinching men and 
women — Pioneers in a country menaced 
by the resentful Redskin and scourged by 
crop-devouring locust. The Indian has 
finally become reconciled to his white- 
skinned brother, and the hated, once- 
feared insect has been subdued by the 
beloved Seagull. 





\1\ 




By its content do we measure the length 
of time. And of a certainty the 
Century just passed is filled to a fulness 
no other like has ever known. Science, 
education, industry, have enjoyed a period 
of advancement never before dreamed of. 
By its growth and influence in the lives 
of thousands, Mormonism has proved its 
right to exist. It, too, has progressed. 

At the celebration of the Centenary 
the whole world listens in — and marvels 
at the results of Mormondom's first 
hundred years. 

ADMINISTRATION 

CLASSES 

AT OLD B. Y. U. 

ATHLETICS 

ORGANIZATIONS 

FEATURES 




. 



Jit Mtmaxwm 

Proctor Hinkley 

Frank Prince 

Alton Wheeler 

Philbrick Jackson 



♦ 



Our Cougar Mascot 
Tarbo 




Buildings frequently partake of the personality of the men 
associated with them. It is not difficult to see in this picture the 
figure of that beloved head of B. ) . U. entering his office to take 
up the daily task of directing school affairs, or leaving after an 
arduous day spent with the problems of students here. Again tradition 
has mellowed even the very walls, and their kindly firmness seems 
to come from the admirable men whose work is accomplished 
•within them. 




^*9*&&r*g2?Tn^ 








Faculty 




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g|_gfr ba n yAiTjL^a^ 



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L \ 



A heavy responsibility is that devolving upon the head of the 
*■*■ Church school system, hut that responsibility is amply cared for 
by the present Superintendent Joseph E. Merrill. 

Of course, one of the most important tasks of this man is with 
regard to the University. During his administration, Superintendent 
Merrill has proved his friendship and interest for B. Y. U., and the 
students have a great deal to thank him for. 



Pase Eighteen 



..?€( 



Wban yan 



**" 




HThere is something about Brigham Young University that causes 
its spirit to be imprinted on the hearts and in the lives of all who 
have received instruction within its sacred walls. 

This Banyan will help to keep alive the memories of college days; 
it should stimulate all who look through its pages to carry on the 
spirit of the "Y". I am sure that all who have a copy will prize it to 
the end of their days. 

— Franklin S. Harris. 



Tf€< 



Page Nineteen 





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l\ g^B ANYAN 1% , ^// 



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[ am in every way, and especially from an educational point of view, 
* grateful to be remembered in a book dedicated to Joseph Smith. The 
prophet who proclaimed that learning and liberty would extend on 
parallel levels into the eternities; the Seer who saw that the Glory of 
God is in intelligence; the Revelator who announced in the name of 
Deity, the opening of all the avenues to truth — "Both in heaven and on 
the earth, and under the earth, things which have been; things which 
are; things which must shortly come to pass; things which are at home, 
things which are abroad." 

I am made happy with the consciousness of working in an institution 
that puts no fences around any of the fields of truth. 

— George H. Brimhall. 

**E mmmmmm ^So . 

Page Twenty 



"»V 




^^^ 



■BANYAN j k 



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School of 

Arts and 

Science 

Dean Christen 
Jensen has filled 
the responsibility 

of the deanships of 
two colleges, one of 
them being t h e 
largest in the Uni- 
versity. Acting as 
Dean of the College 
of Arts and Science 
in the absence of 
Dr. Eyring. he has 
directed the activi- 
ties with the pur- 
pose of providing a 
broad education for 
students and equip- 
ping them for or- 
ganized study and 
investigation. 

Because of his 
higher study and 
extensive travel. 
Dr. Jensen \v a s 

readily seen to be admirably adapted and qualified for the position of dean of the newly organ- 
ized Graduate School. His is the distinction of b^ina the first Dean of this school. 



rammer 





DEAN CHRISTEN JENSEN 



LIBRARY 




School 



Summer school is 
the time when work 
and recreation hit a 
pleasing and profit- 
able balance. Each 
year a larger num- 
ber of regular stu- 
dents avail them- 
selves of the oppor- 
tunity to get this 
full quarter's work. 
When the student 
figures what each 
day in college is 
worth in money, he 
finds it is far more 
profitable to spend 
his summer at 
school than to at- 
tempt to recruit his 
finances in other 
jobs. 

By going to sum- 
mer school the stu- 
dent cuts his four-year course to three, thereby saving one year of precious time. Summer school 
at Brigham Young University, with its augmented faculty, fine lecture courses, and the won- 
derful term at Alpine, makes studv a pleasure. The social life takes on a changed atmosphere. 

.o/Sq J 

Fjgc Tvanty-one 



DIAN HlC. II M. WOODWARD 




ALPINE SUMMER SCHOOL 




Z g^BAN VAN 



***** 



The College of 
Education is at- 
tempting to meet 
the needs of the 
schools of the state 
as much as possible 
by supplying effi- 
c i e n t elementary 
and second a r y 
teachers. 

To satisfy the de- 
mand for excellence 
in the teaching pro- 
fession. Dean Nut- 
tal and his capable 
associates have at- 
tempted to give to 
the pro spec tiv e 
teachers opportuni- 
ties for gaining a 
practical philoso- 
phy and theorv of 
education as well as 
ged knowledge of subject matter. In th 
teachers are given opportunity for rich 




I RAINING I'.lll DING 

elementary and secondary training schools the 
actual experience under expert critical super- 



College of Contintierce and 
Business Administration 



After our gradu- 
ates have partici- 
pated in the schol- 
arly and cultural 
values for which 
Brigham Y o u n g 
University is well 
known, one is en- 
titled to expect that 
their records will be 
a reflection of their 
university training. 
The College of 
Commerce has been 
organized long 
enough to have 
only a sprinkling of 
graduates out in 
the practical world. 
On the basis of the 
short record at 
hand it is quite ob- 
servable that the 
future will find 




DEAN U. V. IIOI.T 



business school graduates in the ranks of the captains of industry, 



Page Twenty-, 



.-rS< 



"*Xv 




,///' 



served the 

[raining ha 



Since its origin in 
1925, the School o 
F-'ine Arts has con- 
stantly grown in 
popularity and en- 
rollment. The stu- 
dents who enter this 
school do so, usual- 
ly, with cultural 
rather than pecu- 
niary motives for 
College offers to 
talented students a 
professional train- 
ing in the fields of 
art and music 
which is invaluable. 
Dean de Jong, 
whose pleasant per- 
sonality and keen 
sense of humor 
have made h i m 
popular with every- 
one, has capably 
College as dean since its establishment. His native ability, 
ve been important factors in the rapid growth of the school. 



COLLEGE BLILDING 



Dean of 




I f you do not 
know Dean Smart, 
go into her office 
and get acquainted. 
She believes that 
"life is an adven- 
ture of understand- 
ing" and that a 
Dean of Women 
must p r a v. like 
Solomon, for an un- 
derstanding heart. 

.Mrs. Smart says, 
"What we all need 
is happiness; but 
this does not just 
come. It has to be 
made, bit by bit. 
We must believe 
that 'all the world's 
a stage,' and that 
happiness comes 
from beautifying, 
idealizing, and de- 
veloping to their utmost the difficult, plain or uninteresting conditions that 
— making the homeliest life perfect in its every tins' detail." 



DEAN NETTIE \EFF SMART 





Page Twenty-three 



y 







BAN VAN J ^ 




«f 



College of Applied Science 




DEAN LOWRY NELSON 




as farmers, business and professiona 

Extension E 

ORGANIZED in 1920. the Extension Division 
has grown steadily in the number of contacts 
which it makes with the people of the West. Upwards 
of 500 men and women are at present receiving 
academic instruction off the campus. Added to this 
number are several literary clubs which are follow- 
ing courses of study outlined by members of the 
University faculty, and published by this division 
The miscellaneous lectures delivered by the mem- 
bers of the faculty throughout the year before ward 
assemblies, dinner clubs, scientific societies, leader- 
ship institutes, both here and in other localities, 
reach tens of thousands annually. 

Not only By the spoken word is the message 
of B. Y. U. carried beyond the confines of the 
campus. The exceptional music and dramatic talent 
produced each year at the "Y" is given an oppor- 
tunity to visit communities of Utah and neighboring 
states. The Division works in close cooperation with 
the Public Service Bureau of the Student Body in 
supplying programs for community organizations. 

We are in the midst of a world-wide movement 
for adult education. The Extension Division 
represents the organized contribution of Brigham 
oung University to that movement. 



THROUGH the departments of agronomy, animal 
husbandry, drafting, home economics, horticulture, 
mechanic arts, and rural social economics, the College of 
Applied Science appeals to three main groups of students: 
first, those students who wish to prepare for vocations of 
agriculture, home econimcs, or the various fields of 
mechanic arts; secondly, the students who wish to prepare 
for teaching, and related work upon graduation; and 
thirdlv, those students who plan to do specialized work 
in some chosen field after graduation here. For this latter 
group, preparatory work in architecture, mechanical, 
structural, electrical, and civil engineering, landscape 
architecture, advanced graduate work in all fields of 
agriculture and home economics may be had. 

Graduates in agriculture are now doing advanced 
work on fellowships at Iowa State College, Rutgers Uni- 
versity, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Oregon State 
College. Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Michigan Agricultural College. Cornell University, and 
Montana State College. 

Other graduates are employed as teachers, county 
agents, Smith-Hughes workers, crop pest inspectors, and 
men, and home makers in the Intermountain West. 



ivasioii 




EDUCATION BULDINC 



Page Twenty-lour 



.-?€< 



-*v 




^5- 



ASAEL C. LAMBERT 

Assistant Professor of 

Secondary Teaching 

B. S.. Brigham Young University 



YILATE ELLIOTT 

Professor of 

Home Economics 

B PJ.. Brigham Young University; 

Graduate Work. Pratt Institute: State 

Normal. Santa Barbara; University ot 

Chicago. Europe. 



A. REX JOHNSON 
I n$t met or in Office Practice and 
Manager Stenographic 
Bureau 
B. S.. Brigham Young University 
Student at Washington School of Ac- 
counting: Graduate Work University 
of Washington. 



ALICE L. REYNOLDS 

Professor of 

English Literature 

A B-. Brigham Young University 

Graduate Work. Umversit) of London: 

Huropean I ni\er<itie>: University of 

California. 



JOHN E. HAYES 
Registrar 

P.. S. Brigham Young University. 



X 



0*' 



<£S8 



WM. J. SNOW 

Professor of History 
A. B., Brigh3m Young Universit) 
Graduate Work. University ot Chi- 
cago. Ph. D . University of California. 



ELSIE E. MAUGHAN 

Professor of 

Home Economics 

S.. llah State Agricultural Col- 
lege; M. S.. Cornell. 



NORMA CHRISTENSEN 

Instructor in 

Office Practice 

\. B. Brigham Young University. 



PRANKLIN MADSEN 
Assistant Professor of Music 
A. B.. Brigham Young University: 
M. M . Chicago Musical College: 
Graduate ot New England Conserv- 
atory c.i Music Student of European 
Teachers. 



KIEFER B. SAl LS 

Secretary to the President and 

Purchasing Agent 

B S I. tah State Agricultural College 



._?€q. 



Page Twenty-five 




r <zrfc BANYAN I ^j// 

pi- — ■ > «M£3J#P r 



<**" 



.MVRON N. JORGENSEN 

Assistant Instructor 

in Chemistry 

A I 1 . . Brigham Young University. 



ELSIE C. CARROLL 

Instructor in English 

B. S. and M. S., Brifiham Young 

University; Student at Cornell; Un.- 

versity of Chicago, and Stanford 



ED. M. ROWE 

Assistant Professor 
in English 
A. B., Brigham Young University; 
Graduate Work, Brij;ham Young Uni- 
versity; Utah State Agricultural Col- 
lege; University of Chicago. 



MAUDE TUCKFIELD 

Instructor in 

I Ionic Economics 

B. S., Ltah State Agricultural Col- 
lege; Student at Brigham Young Uni- 
versity; Univerity of Ltah. Univer- 
sity of Washington. 




.OR.EN C. BRYNER 
Assistant in Chemistry 

Brigham Young University, 




/'. ge / wenty-six 



&** 



RAMONA F. COTTAM 

Instructor in 
Training School 



GEORGE II. HANSEN 

Professor of 
Geology and Geography 
B. S.. Ltah State Agricultural Col- 
lege; M. S., George Washington; Ph. 
D. George Washington; Field work 
with U. S. Geological Survey; Com- 
mercial work with Texas Oil Com- 
panies. 



WM. II. SNELL 
Assistant Professor of 
Mechanic Arts 
A I!. Brigham Young University; 
Graduate Work. Brigham Young Uni- 
versity; Bradley Polytechnic Institute. 



ALONZO J. M OR LEY 

Instructor in Speech 
A. B.. Brigham Young University. 



PERCIVAL P. BIGELOW 

Instructor in Auto Mechanics 

Student at Brigham Young University; 

University of Michigan. 




J. MARINUS JENSEN 

Associate Professor 

of English 

A. B .. Brigham Young Universit) 

\1 \ , University of Chicago, 



EFFIE WARNICK 

Assistant Professor of 

Home Economics 

B S. Utah State Agricultural College; 

Graduate Work. Columbia; University 

of California; Univeristy of Chicago. 



ELBERT II. EASTMOND 

Professor of Art 
Diploma in Art. Pratt Institute; 15. 
Pd., Brigham Young University; Stu- 
dent at University of California; 
University of Washington. Rionido 
School of Art, 



OA JACOBS LLOYD 
Instructor in Typewriting 



GLADYS D. BLACK 

Instructor in English 
Ph |>, , University "I I h cago, 



^EA N VAN.1 >/ 



f 




ANNA EGBERT 

Instructor in English 

B. S.. Utah State Agricultural I ollege 



ROBERT SAUER 
Associate Professor of Music 

Graduate of Music School of Dresden 

Student at Siegel Meyer Music Con 

servatory. 



BARBARA MAUGHAN 

Instructor in 
Training School 




CHARLES E. MAW 

Professor of Chemistry 

A 15 Stanford. M. S.. University 

,,i i hicago; Ph. D., Stanford. 



DELBERT GREENWOOD 

Instructor in Chemistry 
B. S.. Brigham Young 1 niversity 



.-^< 





WBAN YAN 






y 



'•?'- >> ; ?!m? 



ELIZABETH CANNON 

Associate Professor of 
Home Economics 
B. S., Utah State Agricultural College; 
Graduate Work, Columbia; Graduate 
Dietician, Walter Reid General Hos- 
pital. 



FLORENCE J. MADSEN 
Professor of Music 
Student at Brkham Young Un'ver- 
New England Conservatory of 
B. M., and M. M,, Chicago 



stty 

Mm 



Musical College. 



HERALD R. CLARK 

Professor of 

Finance andlBanking 
A. B., Brigham Young University. 
M. B. A., University of Washington; 
Graduate Work. Ohio State Universm 



GEORGIA MAESAR 

Instructor in 
Training School 




BRIGHAM T. HIGGS 

Superintendent of 
Buildings and Campus 





JOSEPH SUDVVEEKS 

Associate Professor of 

Educational Administration 
B. S., University of Idaho; M. A., 
Un'versity of Chicago; Ph. D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 



MAYBETH BOWMAN 

Instructor in 
Training School 



GLADYS KOTTER 

Instructor in 
Training School 



BESSIE IVERSON MEILING 

Instructor in 
Physical Education for Women 
A. B.. Brigham Young University. 



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Student Government 




TfGo. 




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^^ 



' *' I "ONY" has proved to be one of the most 
popular student body leaders ever to fill 
the office of president. Coming from Old 
Mexico, he very early gained recognition from 
his schoolmates, and his circle of friends has 
continually widened. 




**~ 



A friendly smile, a bit of encouragement 
to all, a sense of service, and superb sports- 
manship have all combined to make "Tony" 
an outstanding personality on the campus. As 
a representative of the school he is admirably 
adapted in any capacity, and besides his job 
as executive, he has brought many honors to 
B. Y. U. in the field of athletics. 

For his many accomplishments, his friend- 
ship, loyalty, and devotion to duty, the students 
are all proud of their student body president. 



ANTHONY I. BENTI.F.Y 



' I *0 aid and encourage "Tony" in the many 
*■ duties of his office, the student body' made 
an excellent choice in the election of Evelyn 
to the office of vice-president. Culture, refine- 
ment, and poise have blended in her to mould 
a most charming personality, and her smile 
and cheery greeting for everybody has won the 
esteem and admiration. 

Evelyn has brought a great deal of credit 
to the University through her musical ability. 
Being an accomplished performer on the 
1 lawaiian guitar, she has entertained in num- 
berless programs throughout the state. .Many 
of the splendid student body programs this 
year have been a direct result of her effort. 

Because of her charm, her friendliness, and 
continual service, Evelyn has endeared herself 
to the hearts of her inumerable friends, and 
all cherish her friendship. 




EVEI YN 0ST1.UND 



,£*■ 



Page Thirty 



TfSo. 




4f 



GROBERC 



THOMAS 



GUNN 



Student Body Officers 



Anthony I. Bentley 
Evelyn Ostlund 
Delbert Groberg 
Blanche Thomas . 
Jean Paulson . 
R. Thornton Snow 
L. Lowell Johnson 
Fred M. Moore 
Gertrude Partridge . 



President 

. First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 

Secretary and Historian 

. Editor "Y" News 

Business Mgr. "Y" News 

Editor Banyan 

Yell Master 

. President A. W.S. 



Golden Tueller . 
Claude Snow 
Stanley Gunn 
Stewart Anderson 
James Cullimore 
Howard Cottam . 
Earl 1 lone . 
Kyle Clark 



Student Body Council 



Debate Manager 

Dramatics Manager 

Manager Public Service 

President Senior Class 

President Junior Class 

President Sophomore Class 

President Freshman Class 

President High School 



Front Row. Left to Right— PARTRIDGE, CLARK. BENTLEY, ANDERSON, THOMAS, OSTLUND, PAULSON 
Back Row, Left to R, s ht— COTTAM, JOHNSON, SNOW, WEIGHT, HONE, TUELLER, MOORE. 



■^ 




c d 



<^kBAN YAN 




ANDERSON 



BIRD 



minors 



James Cullimore 



Zola Martin 



Eleanore Kellv 



President 



Vice-President 



Sec.-Treas. 



rl Hone 




SANDGREN 



COTTAM 



Freshmen 



n Smoot 



ra Jackson 



President 



Vice-President 



Sec.-Treas. 



ROMNEY 



MARTIN 




DAVIS 



eniors 

Stewart Anderson . President 
Helen Romney . Vice-President 
Eunice Bird . Secretary-Treasurer 




JACKSON 



Page Thirty-two 



.J?$0. 



CULLIMORE 



KELLY 



Sophomores 



loward Cottam 



Donna Davis 



Clyde Sandgren 



President 



Vice-President 



Sec.-Treas. 




HONE 



SMOOT 




r/f 



I ARNSWORTII 



PARTRIDGE 



Associate! 



onmem Students 



L 



IV1NG up to their aim of greater socialization of the indivdual, the Associated Women 
Students of the University have had a full program of activities during the year. In the 
Fall Quarter, three get-acquainted parties were held: the Winter Quarter saw "A Night Among 
the Stars." the girls' jamboree, taking place. The main project, however, was the annual Girls' 
Day, celebrated on May 2. The play, "Dear Brutus," a special assembly program, the tradi- 
tional banquet in honor of the Mothers, the Girls' Day dance, the short story contest, were all 
features of a most successful celebration. 

Gertrude Partridge, president, and Ella Farnsworth, vice-president, have served commendably 

as officers. 



Public Service Bireau 

THE Public Service Bureau, always an important activity at B. Y. U., has reached more people 
this year than ever before. Under the "capable leadership of Delbert Groberg. the Bureau has 
endeavored, first, to furnish better programs which would contribute to the enrichment of the 
lives of those people in whose communities they were given; secondly, to provide opportunity 
for talented students to gain valuable experiences in appearing before the public: thirdly, to 
give the school first-class publicity. 

Splendid cooperation on the part of student entertainers has contributed in no little way 
to the success of programs given over a wide-spread area. 




DELBERT GROBERG GENEVIEVE MORGAN DaCOSTA CLARK 



INA WEBB 



STANLEY GUNN 



._?€o. 



Page Thirty-tbree 




% ^ BANYAN j| ,_ ^fl 



'/"' 




HUISH JONES COOK BACON REYNOLDS Al 

Junior Prom Committee 



'I \YI OR 



'T'HE chief social function of the year, the Junior Prom, was a spectacular event. The hard- 
working and willing committee deserves unstinted commendation for their good work in 
making it successful. 

Clarence Taylor, Josinette Cook, and Hannah Reynolds supervised the decorations; Leonard 
Bacon and Paul Huish directed the construction and lighting: Joe Allen was in charge of invita- 
tions and refreshments; the advertising was done under the direction of Dix Jones. 

The committee was ably assisted by, and owes much of its success to James Cullimore, 
together with other officers and members of the Junior Class. 

Sophomore Loam Fundi Committee 

■""THE Sophomore Loan Fund Committee made no effort to disguise the fact that they were 
engaged in a pecuniary activity this year. In their advertising and decorations the sign of 
the dollar was a prominent motif. That it was also a very worthy activity was likewise stressed, 
and the committee had the satisfaction of seeing the funds of this commendable project of the 
Sophomores considerably augmented by their efforts. 




ALBERTA MEKDENHALL 



WENDELL TAYLOR 
Chairman 



MIRIAM WARNICK 



*.&£ 



Page Tbirty-jour 



.-?€o. 



STEPHEN FLETCHER 




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Seniors 



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//"' 






Candidates For Master's Degree 



VICTOR C. ANDERSON, m.s. 



Thesis: A study of certain factors which influence the religious 
activities of high school students in rural Mormon communities. 

LOREN C. BRYNER, m.s. 

Thesis: Iron and Cobalt Salts as Catalysts in the Oxidation of 
Sodium Sulfite by Free Oxygen. 

MERRILL D. CLAYSON, m.s. 

Thesis: Child Accounting in Connection With the 
Provo City Survey. 

IIEBER ALVA FITZGERALD, m.s. 

Thesis: The Progressive Opinion Regarding the Origin of the 
American Indian From 1540 to the Present. 

DELBERT A. GREENWOOD, m.s. 

Thesis: The Nature of the Sulphur Compounds in a Crude 
Oil from Winkler Counts', Texas. 




JAMES A. NUTTALL, m.s. 

Thesis: Teaching Loads in Small High Schools in the 
State of Utah. 

WILLIAM COOKE SMITH, m.a. 

Thesis: The Mormons as a Factor in the Development of the 
Public School System of Arizona. 



yftil 




^BANYAN j i 

w 



//^ 



Hazel Aacard 

Provo. Utah 

Physical Education 

Debating (41; W. A. A.: Block "Y" 

Cluh: Deca Sema Fe. 



T. Delece Andelin 

Provo, Ul \h 
[ccounting and Bit 

Administration 

"Y" News (2. 3); Glee Cluh (2) 

M.mager Advertising Bureu ( 4 ) ; 

Priars: Sans Souci. 



Almera Anderson 

Manti, Utah 
Educational Administration 
Snow Junior College; President Home 
Economics Club (4) : Home Econ- 
omics Club : Minae Clarae. 



Floyd T. Anderson 

Id\ho Falls. Idaho 
Educational Administration 

Kicks College; Tennis ( 1) ; Cla 
President lit Forum ( I ►. 



Verna BuRNHAM 
Redmesa. Colorado 
Home Econovda 
Debating (?,. 31 i News (4) \ ice- 
President Block "Y" (3. 4): Block 
Y Club; Gamma Phi Omicron; 
Del Mama. 



Karl Bunnell 

Provo, Utah 
Physical Education 
Football (1, 2. 3. 4): Track (1. 2. 
3, 4); Chairman [.imboree (3); Vice- 
President Social Unit (4); Block "V" 
Club; Pi Zeta Phi; Nuggets. 




Elbert H. Anderson 

Oak City, Utah 

Art 

President Social Unit (4) : Winner 

Studio Medal (4); Studio Guild; Art 

Club; Art Service; Psychology Club; 

Ag Club; Social Unit No. 11. 



Phyllis Adams 

Provo, Utah 
Dramatic Art 
New England Conservatory of 
Treasurer Social Unit (3, 4); 
Trovata. 



Arch Anderson 

Fmrview, Utah 

Accounting and Business 

Administration 

Sanpete Club. Friars; Nuggets 




Music 
O. S 



Ladit 



Edith Bartholomew 

Goshes, Utah 
Music 

i' Glee (2, 3); Mask Club: 
French Club. 



Ric'is 

ketbal 

(3) 



Reid L. Berrett 

Menan, Idaho 
I nimal Husbandry 
College; Football (3, 4): Bas- 
. (2, 3); President Idaho Club 
Idaho Club: Cougars Errant. 



Verna B. Bunker 

Provo. Utah 

Clothing and Foods 

\\ A A ; Home Economics Club: 

< hemistr} Club; Mask Club; Alpine 

Club. 



J& 



yy 



Page Thirty-nine 




S^BAN YAN 



^ 




//r/'* 



Allie Dixon 

Provo, Utah 

Foods and Nutrition 

U. S. A. C ; Home Economics Club; 

Gamma Phi Omicron; O. S. Trovata. 



"Y" 
"Y" 
istry 



Newell \V. Bow n 

Provo, Utah 
\t counting and Business 

Administration 
News (2) ; Business Manager 
News (3); Tennis Club; Chem- 
Society; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Sans Souci. 



Gay Dimick 

Nampa. Idaho 

iccounttng and Business 

Administration 

Secretary Idaho Club < 4 ) . ( Ihrist- 

mas Short Storv Prize (2). Flsie 

i arroll Gold Medal <4>. French Club; 

Idaho Club; Del Mama. 



Preston Creer 

Spanish I : ork, Utah 
iccounttng and Business 



Administration 



Wrestling (I 



3, 4) ; Orchestra; 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 



Margaret Finnell 

Burley, Idaho 

History 



nisiorr 

Mask ( lub; Ma ho Club. French Clu 
I at n Club; Deca Sema Fe. 

1 




Clark Frei 

Santa Claka. U i mi 

Political Science 

Dixie < allege; President Dixie Club; 

Highlanders. 



Page Forty 




Anthony I. Bentley 

Colonia Juarez, Chihuahua, Mex. 
Physical Education 
Thanksgiving Cross Country (I, 2, 
1. 4) ; Winner Spring Cross Country 
(2); Track (2, 3, 4); "Y" News (2); 
Block "Y" Club; Spanish Club; 
Mates. 



Peari Dahle 

Provo. L tah 

Dramatic Art 
French Club; A. W. S. Secretary (3); 
loan Fund Ball (2); Girls' Day Plav. 
(4) , Banyan Staff (3>; "Y" News 
Ml Chairman Cirls' Jamboree; Val 
Norn. 



Roald F. Campbell 

Aberdeen, Idaho 

Educational Administration 

I n versity of Idaho; President Idaho 

Club; President Social Unit; Debating: 

Idaho Club; Block "Y" (.lub. Friars; 

Highlanders. 



Phyllis Fletcher 

New York City, N. Y. 

English 

Hunter College; Val Norr 



N'eweli R Budge 

Paris, Id\hu 

Physics 

Social Unit No. 101. 



Nora Ford 
Centerville, L I \n 

English 

French Club; Fidelas. 



-»v 




****!! 



Thelma Gardiner 

Panguitch, Utah 

English 

Glee Club; Piano Club; Mask Club; 

Beaux Arts. 



W. Harold I Iandley 

Butler, Uiah 

Economics 

Frosh Football; Basketball (I); Track 

(1, 1) ; Stage Manager (3); Chairman 

Ice and Snow Carnival (4) ; Senior 

Project Committee (4) ; Sophomore 

Loan Fund Committee (2) ; Junior 

Proip Committee ( 3 ) ; Social Unit 

President. 



Laura W. Henderson 

Provo, Utah 
Educational Administration 



Hertrand F. Harrison 

Springville, Utah 
Botany 

"Y" News Staff (2); Banyan Photo- 
grapher (4); David Starr Jordan Club; 
Commerce Club; Pi Zeta Phi, Vice- 
President (4) ; Zoologescher 
Gesellschaft. 



Zelda Henderson 

Provo, Utah 

English 

Utah State Agricultural College ; 
Mask Club. 



_^ferPANVAN g 




^ 



Elmo H. Hansen 

Lehi, Utah 
English 

Band (2, 3. 4); Social Unit No. 




Norman Geertson 

Ogden, Utah 
Physics 

Weber College; Inductance and Re 

sistance Club; Persident Social Unit 

Zeit Geist. 



Ora Glediiii i 

Richfield, Utah 
English 

I lub: Mask Club; Deca 
Sema Pe. 



Anton J. Gleason 

Pleasant Grove, Utah 

Agronomy 

Opera (2. 3); Glee Club (I, 2. 3, 4) 
Hand tl. 3); Ag Club; Hilgardia 




Mary A. Hansen 

Provo, Utah 
Educational Administration 
Ladies' Glee Club (4); Ladies" Mis- 
sionary Club. 



W. Grant Hastings 

Mesa, Arizona 

Horticulture 

Loan Fund Ball (2); Swimming (2); 

Banyan (3, 4); President Social Unit 

(4); Ag Club; Arizona Club; 

Olympus. 



Nellie Hicken 

Heber. Utah 

Textiles 

Home Economics Club; 

Deca Sema Fe. 




r^ 



OVJ, 




Page Foriy-ont 




Sbanyan 



L i 




Gladys K. Isaacson 

Provo, Utah 

Foods 

Social Unit President (3) ; Home 

Economics Club; Fidelas. 



James Orr Ivie 

Sauna, Utah 

Physics 

Prosh Football (I); Senior Play (4); 

Ziet Giest. 



Thelma Jacobson 

Manti. Utah 

Foods and Nutrition 

Snow Junior College, Social Unit 

President (4); Gamma Phi Omicron; 

Hume Economics Club: Minae Clarae. 



L. Lowell Johnson 

Provo. Utah 

Political Science and History 

Debating (2, 3. 4): "Y" News (2); 

Alumni Play (4); Editor Banyan (4): 

Block "Y" Club; Friars: Nuggets. 




Fletcher A. Jones 

Provo, Utah 
Accounting and Business 

Administration 
Friars. 



Myrle Kelly 

Midway, Utah 
English 
sk Club; French Club. 



.&? 



Page Twenty-two 




Lavar Isaacson 

Ephraim, Utah 
Music 

Snow College; Student Bodv Officer 

(3); Band; Glee Club; Male Quartet; 

Chorus : German Club. 



Evelyn Jones 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Physical Education 

U. S. A. C. ; Home Economics Club. 



All B 
Ml 



Or in H. Jackson 

Provo. Utah 
Accounting and Business 
Administration 
Show (3); Competitive 



Band ( I. 
Kappa 



4) ; Tausig ; Alpha 
; Friars. 



Smith Jacobs 

Ogden, Utah 
English 

Weber College : Frosh Football , All 
Bovs' Show (2, 4): Competitive Play 
11); Senior Play (4); Boxing ( 3, 4); 
Wrestling (4); Cheer Leader (4); 
Nuggets 



Alma W. King 

Gari wu L i mi 

History 

Frosh Football; Track (2) 
Play (4); Mates. 



Lawrell C. Jensen 

Foi n iain Grf-bn. Utah 

Physical Education 

Snow College; Basketball (3): Cougar 

Errants. 




Donald Merrill 

Preston, Idaho 

Chemistry 

Idaho Club; Ag Club: "Y" Chemistry 

Society; Secretary, Val Hyrics (3 1 ; 

President (4). 



7.INA MuRDOCK 

Provo, L't\h 

Music u»d Home Economics 

Vice-President Class (3); Nautilus. 



Milo Moody 

IIinckiey. Utah 

Chemistry 

Wrestling (2, 3, 4): "Y" Chemistry 

Society: German Club; Olympus. 



Walter Miles 

St. George, Utah 

Economics 

Dixie College: Dixie Club. 



Fred M. Moore 

Provo. Utah 
Business Administration 
Cheerleader (2, 3, 4); Assistant Cheer- 
leader (I); Class President (1); Glee 
Club; Nuggets. 



Ethel Ann Nielson 

Ephraim, Utah 

Dramatics 

Snow College; University of Utah; 

Speech; Mask Club; Glee Club; 

Deca Sema Fe. 



^BANYAN 




^ 




Irene Metcalf 

Springvii i e, Utah 

Elementary Teaching. English 

Deca Sema Fe. 



Maurice J. Mn es 

St. George. L i \ii 

Chemistry 

Dixie Colleee; Debating (4); Dixie 

Club; "Y" Chemistry Society. 



Aline Manson 

Provo. Utah 
Physical Education 







Wn i iam McGuire 






Etna, Cm ifi 


1KN! 


1 


c 


erman 
Club 


Zoology 

Club; David 

Football (II, 


St. 

v.- 


rr lordan 
1 1 lyric. 



Irfta Mortimer 
Provo, U i \n 
Cloth ng and Textiles 
Gamma Phi Oinicron ; Home Eco- 
nomics Club: Deci Sema Fe, 



Russell Macleby 

Monroe, Utah 

Physical Education 

Snow College; U. S. A. C. ; Football 

(2, j. 4). Basketball (2. 1. 4); 

Block "Y" < lub. 



.^30. 



Page Forty-three 




■*X\ 





Jean R. Paulson 

Pleasant Grove, Utah 

Dramatic Art 

Debating (I); Competitive Plav (2, 

3): Band (2); Dramatics (I, 2, 3. 

I): "Y" News Editor (4); President. 

Theta Alpha Phi (3). 



Evelyn Ostlund 

Provo, Utah 
Foods and Nutrition 
Secretary Home Economics Club (2); 
Secretary Junior Class (3); Banyan 
(4): Student Body Vice-President 
(4), Winner Popularity Contest (3); 
Vice-President Psychology Club (4): 
Nautilus. 



tf 



Fay Patterson 

St. Johns, Arizona 

Clothing and Textile* 

Northern Arizona Teachers' College ; 

Home Fconomics Club. 



Mark Reeve 

Hinckley. I i.\n 

Physical Education 

Football (1. 2. 3. 4): Basketball I, 

2. 3, 4); Track (I. 2. 3, 4). 



R. Thornton Snow 

Provo, U i ah 

Accounting and Business 

Administration 
Frosh Football; Basketball (1): Ten- 
nis (I, 2, 4); Assistant Cheeer Leader 
(4) ; Alumni Secretary, Alpha Kappa 
Psi (4); Business Manager "Y" News 
(4); Ranvan (4); Nuggets 




Ruth L Partridge Richan 

Provo, Utah 
Music 
Training in Los Angeles Countv Gen- 
eral Hospital; Banyan (1); A. W. S. 
Officer (2); Competitive Opera (3). 



Max Stewart 

Payson, Utah 

Zoology 

/oologisher Geselleschaft ; German 

Club; Pi Zeta Phi. 




.££* 



Page Forty-four 



.-?€o 



Charles J. Parker 

Payson. Utah 

English and Music 

Track ( I ) ; Band (1. 2. *. 4) ; Or- 
chestra (I. 2): Payson Club: Kappelle 
Orphean 



Gertrlde E Partridge 

Provo, Utah 
Speech 
A W. S.. Vice-President (21; Pres- 
ident (3): Debating (2, 3): "Y" 
News (2): Senior Play (4) ; Block 
"Y" Club: W. A. A.: Mask Club 
Cesta Tie. 



Helen Romney 

C nia Juarez, Chihuahua. Mexico 

Dramatic Art 

Debating (3, 4); Talmadge Essay 

(3); "Y" News (4): Vice-President 

Class (4): Rlock "Y" Club: Tau 

Kappa Alpha: Cesta Ties. 



Eliza Smith 

Pocatellu, Idaho 

Education 

U. S. A. C; University of California: 

Idaho Club: "Y" Missionary Women. 

Mask Club. 



Sarah A. Smith 

Holbrook. Idaho 

Art 

U. S. A. C: University of Utah. 



"*xv 




//"' 



<£& 



LORAN SKOUSEN 

Chandler, Arizona 

Physical Education 

Frosh Football; Basketball <l, 2); 

Student Athletic Manager (3); Alpha 

Kappa Psi; Cougars Errant. 



Ida Tanner 

Provo, Utah 
Foods and Nutrition 
ij S. A. C. ; Home Economics Club 
V" Chemical Society 
micron 



Gamma Phi 
eaux Arts. 



Roland Stucki 

Santa Clara, Utah 

At counting and Busines I 

Administration 

Dixie College; Dixie Club 



Rhea Taylor 

Ogden. Utah 

Mathematics 

Weber Normal; Social Unit Basketball 

(3. 4); Beaux Arts. 



Fermen J. Westergard 

Ogden, Utah 
English 

Weber College; Banyan (4) ; Studio 
Guild ; French Club ; Mates. 



Bert Wheeler 

Springville, Utah 

Physics 

Ziet Giest. 




Hazel Taylor 

Ogden. Utah 

Home Economics 

Weber College; Girls' Basketball; 

Home Economics Club; Gamma Phi 

Omicron; Beaux Arts. 



Ralph Sylvester 

Eureka. Utah 

Finance and Hanking 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



etai 



Blanche Thomas 

5p vnish Fork. Utah 

Political Science 

of Class (H: Debating i '. 



4), Student Body Secretary and 
Historian (4); Block "Y"; Tau Kap- 
pa Alpha. 0. S, Trovata 



Hrnest E. Stucki 

San i a CLARA, Utah 
iiii.it I lusbandrv . Dixie < ollc^e . 



Club; German Club. 
Unit No. 51. 



Sue al 



Ina T. Webb 
Provo, U rAii 

Music 
ies' Glee Club (I. '. 4). Ora- 
i f I ) ; President Social Unit (2. 
Public Service Bureau (4) , Len- 
galyre. 



\ddie Wright 

Pri i\ u It \h 

Dra matte Art 
Girls' Day Plav (3): Senior Plav' 
(3); Vice-President, Mask Club (4);" 
riuM.i Alpha Phi. Mask Club; Cesta 



•^ tfl 



Page Forty-five 




3AN VAN j^ 



^ 



Ray Whiting 

Si-ringville. Utah 
Psychology 
Starr Jordan Cluh German 
Club; Psychology Club. 



l A 



Archie Williams 

Spanish Fork. Utah 
Dramatic Art 
Dramatics (I, 2, 3. 4): Competitive 
Plav (4); Theta Alpha Phi President 
(4) ; Winner Evans Award I 4 ) , Ger- 
man Club , Mates 



Vernon Whiting 

Pay son, Utah 

Mathematics 

University of Utah; An Geist 



Bessie Young 

B RICH AM ( I IV, I l Ml 

Speech 

University of Idaho; Mask Club; 

French < Hub. 




Mark B. Gardmr 

Spanish Fork, I i wi 

Fhysu s and Mathematics 

Zeit deist 



Nita Wakefield 
Provo, Utah 

Dramatic Art 

Vice-President Class (1); Social Unit 
Council (2); Vice President, Theta 
Alpha Phi (4) ; Competitive Plav 
(I); "V News (2, 4); Banyan (3); 
Winner Carroll Medal (Z) ; Woolley 
Medal (3); Alumni Play (3); Dra- 
matics (1, 2, 3, 4). 



.££• 



Page Forty-six 




<x 



**~ 



Martha Thomas 

Preston, Idaho 

' ducational Administration and Music 

U. S, A. C; University of Idaho ; 

Oratorio (3); Idaho Cluh. 



Ruth Watts 

Provo. Utah 

Dramatic Art 
Department Plav (4): Sen or Play 
(4); Secretary, Mask Club (4); 
Theta Alpha Phi. Mask Club; Cesta 



I Ielev Whitesides 

I.ayton. Utah 
Foods and Nutrition 
Weber College : University of Utah 
"Y" News ( 3 ) ; Vice-President Social 
Unit '4) ; Gamma Phi Omicron ; 
I lome Economics Club ; Cesta Ties. 



John Yack 

Neoi.a, Utah 
[ccounting and Business 

Administration 

Glee Cluh (3>; Orchestra (I. 3); 

Lint ah Club; Commerce Club. 



Ted C. Hansen 

Richhei n, I TAH 

Accounting and Business 

Administration 

Track (I); Class President (2), "Y" 
(2. 1 ) ; Social Unit Council 
All Boys' Show (2. 4); Junior 

Prom (3); Alpha Kappa Psi; Theta 
Alpha Phi ; Sans Souci. 



John Snell 

Sp\nish Fork, Utah 
Accounting and Business 

Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 




— -^^n^. 

B AN VAN p ^ 



//^ 



<£& 



Elmer D. Loveless 

Provo, Utah 

Physical Education 

Football (1. 2, 3, 4); Basketball (H: 

Cougars Errant. 



Golden R. Tueller 

Paris, Idaho 

Physical Education 

Ricks College: Debat : ng (3. 4); De 

bate Manager (4); Idaho Club 

Kappa Alpha: Block "Y" 

Mates. 



; Tau 
Club; 



Lenore Rasmussen 

Provo, Utah 

Foods and Nutrition 

Secretarv and Treasurer ( 1) ; 

News Staff (3); President, 

Pldelas (2) ; Home Economics Club ; 

Mask Club; Fidelas. 



Class 
"Y" 



Thorval Rigby 
Fair view, Utah 

Educational Administration 

Track (I. 2); Sanpete Club; Ag. Club; 

Soc : al Unit No. 39. 



Elida Snow 

St. George, Utah 

English 

Dixie College; Vice-President, Dixie 

Club (4); Minae Clarae. 



Dean Terry 

Provo, Utah 

History 

Class Debating (1. 2, 3); Glee Club; 

Hylanders. 




Ruth Smith 

Springville, Utah 

Clothing and Textiles 

University of Utah. 



J. Grant Thurgood 

Provo, Utah 
Accounting and Business 
Administration 
Wrestling (2, 3, 4): Assistant Busi- 
ness Manager, Banyan (3) ; Business 
Manager. Banyan (4) ; Secretarv, 
Alpha Kappa ' Psi f4); All Boys' 
Show (3): Social Unit President (A): 
II lock "Y" Club; Alpha Kappa Psi: 
Tausies. 



W. B. Dougall 

Springville, Utah 
[griculture and Geology 



[.thall 12. 3): Ag Club: ""Pi 
Phi; Hilgardia. 



Zeta 



Norman B. Creer 

Provo, Utah 

Accounting and Business 

Administration 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Friars; Tausigs 



Victor Pratt 

Hinckley. Utah 
Accounting 
A. C; Millard Club: Cougars 
Errant. 




Elmer Peterson 

Provo, Utah 
English 
University of Idaho: Competitive 
Play (2, 3); Senior Play (4); Win- 
ner Rotary Club Oratorical Contest 
I *> ; Debating (4); Departmental 
Play (3, 4); Public Service Bureau; 
Friars; Mates. 



.-^o. 



Page Forty-seven 





^^•^ 



,x 






Lyndon Cropper 

Elsinore, Utah 

Physical Education 

Snow College: "Y" News Staff (2): 

Wrestling (3, 4); Cross Country (I); 

Sevier Club; Olympus. 



Eldona Cox 

Ferron, Utah 

Clothing and Textiles 

Home Economics Vice-Pres dent ; Unit 

President (2): Chemistry Society; 

Girls' Pep Club: Mask Ciub: W. A. 

A. : Minae Clarae. 



Wendell M. Poulson 

Redmond, Utah 

Physical Education 

Basketball (2. 1. 4) Football ill 

Block "Y" Club; Cougnrs Errant. 



Eunice Bird 
Provo, Utah 

Dramatic Art 
Winner M.irv Woolley Medal (4), 
Dramatic Hand Award (2), Theta 
Alnha Phi Plav (3.4); Alumni Plav 
(3,4). Competitive Plav (2): "V 
News (4): Dramatics (I. 2, 3. 4); 
Secretary Class (4): Theta Alpha 
Phi. Mask Club: French Club; \al 
Norns, 



Jay LaMar Haddock 

Bloomington, Idaho 

Agronomy 

Albion State; Ricks College: U. S. 

A. C: Class Debates (3. 4): Bear 

lake Club; Ag Club; llilgardia. 



D. Margaret Peterson 

Ephraim, Utah 
Foods and Nutrition 
amma Phi Omicron; Home Econom- 
ics Club; Val Norn. 



Page 



Forty-eight 



*f 



Edna Bm i 

Springfield, 1 1 1 inuis 

English 

Vice President, Latin Cluh i l) . Pre>- 

'.lint Sncial Unit (3); Vice-President, 

I rench Club M), Editor. "The 

Scratch" (4); Nautilus. 



in\\ AKD CmRISTENSLN 

I: phraim, Utah 
Physics 

I ..Ilea-. Band I 1) ; Cougars 

Errant. 



A\GELY\ W'ARMCK 
I'i 1 \-\m Grove, Utah 
Home Economics 
I lass Debating f 3. 4t . "Y" News 
(2. H: B.invan (4). President. Gam- 
m.i Phi Omicron (4i Del Marna 
( .a in n -i Plu Omicron : I In me Econom- 
ics Club. 



\[. Wesley Porter 

Provo, V iah 
Finance <ind Hoiking 
O. 4): Orchestra (I, 2. *. 
4) ; Sans Souci. 



Ve Bohaus 

Monroe. I i \h 

l-iu>J< and Nutrition 

O S. Trovata. 



I [AROLO Boyack 

Spanish I-hkk Utah 

\ ceo anting tin J Husines 

\Jih>i stration 

Alpha Kappa Psi, 




Cl.AUDK A. tlGGERTSEN 
SPRINGVII I E, U I AH 

History and Political Science 

Football ( I. 1. i, 4) , Dramatics (I. 2, 

3 4); Irvine Oratorical Award (4). 

Debates (41 . Block "Y" Club; Theta 

Alpha Phi; Sans Souci. 



BlIYRLE HlBBERT 

I \Gr\nde, Oregon 

Physical Education 

University of Utah. Girl's Day Play 

(t); Senior Play, Competitive Play 

(3, 4); W. A. A.: Mask Club; Beaux 

Arts. 



Floyd E. Fletcher 

Vernai-, Utah 

Music 

Band (I. 2. 3); Orchestra (I, 



2. 3) 



Stanley R. Gunn 
Beaver, Utah 
History 
Track ( I. 2. 3); Public Service Bureau 
(4) : Second Vice-President (4) : Senior 
Play ; Chairman Senior Project Com- 
mittee; President Friars: Block "Y" 
Club; Mates. 



Burgis Larsen 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Physics and Mathematics 
University of Utah; Escalante. 



rBAN YAN 



I Iaroi d J. Whiting 

Springvii i e, Utah 
Finance and Banking 





0** 



Norman C, Pierce 

Springville, Utah 

German and Spanish 

President German Club; Spanish Club; 

Olympus. 



Bash. Skousen 

Chandler, Arizona 

Accounting and Business 

Administration 

Football ( I. 2, C 4) . Basketball (>. 

n . Social Unit President (4); Block 

"Y" Club; Cougar Errant 



Melvin Miner 

Provo, Utah 

counting and Business 
Administration 



LaYere Wadlev 

Pi easant Grove, Utah 

Accounting and Business 
Administration 

Band I I, 1, J); Friars. 



Dicia Emeri 

Roosevelt, Utah 

iinglisb 

La Volga. 



Lorene K. Fox 

Sai r Lake < nv, Utah 

Educational Administration 

I D. S. < ollege; U. S. A. C: Uni- | 
versity of Utah; Pep club. Psychology 
i lub; W. A. A.. Class Debates (3, U. 



.^Si 



Ui 



I'ane Forty-nine 




jgl ^BANYAN Li 



English 

Ricks College; McCune School of 

Music. Glee Club; Mask Club; Idaho 

Club; Fidelas. 



c <i 



Leonard Bacon 

Georgetown, Idaho 

English 
lunior Prom Committee; Theta Alpha 
Phi Play (4); Theta Alpha Phi; Mates 




George Staples 

Elsinore, Utah 

Physical Education 

Snow Junior College; Football (4); 

Basketball (4); Track (3, 4); Block 

"Y" Club; Cougar Errant. 



Anna Hughes 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Art 
Sophomore Loan Fund; Junior Prom 
Committee; Vice-President Studio 
Guild (4): Social Unit President (4); 
Vice-President Senior Class; Spanish 
Club ; O. S. Trovata. 



Nan Osmond 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

English 

Scratch (3,4); "Y"' News (4); French 

Club; Tennis Club; Psychology Club; 

Cesta Tie. 




George L. Corbett 

Provo, Utah 

Physical Education 
Football (1, 2, 3, 4); Track (1, 2, 
3, 4); Band (I, 2): Social Unit Pres- 
ident (4); Block "Y" Club; Nuveko. 



Naomi Startup 

Provo, Utah 

Foods and Nutrition 
Home Economics Club; Fidelas. 



&? 




« 


p 



DOVLE LlDDLE 

Pavson, Utah 

Zoology and Entomology 
University of Utah; Vice-President 
/oologescher Gesellschaft: State and 
Chapter Officer Pi Zeta Phi (4); "V 
News (4); Pi Zeta Phi; Zoologescher 
Gesellschaft; Val Hyrics. 



Alice Brinton 

Los Angeles, California 

Physical Education 
IDS. College; President \V. A. A. 
(3, 4); President Pep Club (4); 
Freshman Play; Senior Play; Junior 
Prom Committee; Junior Vodie Com- 
mittee: Track (I, 2, 3, 4); Basket- 
hall (1.2. *. 4); President W. A. A.; 
Theta Alpha Phi; Mask Club; 
Nautilus. 



I'age Fifty 



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Juniors 



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Euray Anderson 



Bern ice Braithwaite 



Shirley Baker 



Elden Brinley 
Wilma Boyle 






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Lee Anderson 



May Baird 
Walter Basinger 



Bert Bullock 



George M. Cooper 



Jennie Evans 



Pearson II. Corbett 



Veda Gessel 



Fred Hansen 
Myrtle Iverson 



5*1 BL rJ 



Evelyn Bryner 
Jefferson Cazier 



Ella Farnsworth 



Rulon Hansen 
Reta Gines 



Bliss Hoover 



.££• 



I'age Fifty-two 



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LaRu- Jensen 



Lawrence D. Jackson 



Alma Kartchner 



Alice Jones 
Norma Peterson 



Edna Nelson 



C. Dresden Miller 



Li i ii ik Peterson 



Eva Peterson 



Raymond Peterson 

IIei en Riiwi 



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Lee Lund 



Jennie Johnson 
V. Frank Jorcensen 



\ 1 RNON S. M WRE 



Pred R. Miner 

RoZENA Nil ><'N 



Clarence Wilson 



Maurice N< itali 
LoRh ;e Randai.i 



Vernon Richardson 




Page Fifty-tbree 



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James Cullimore 
Iris Robinson 



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giEANYAN t k _^J!r 



////' 



Lynn O. Taylor 



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Evva Tervort 



Norman Bingham 
Elaine Paxman 



1 1. Vernon Wentz 

I 1 1 IDA WlDDISON 



Glen Vincent 



Floyd Walser 



Vard H. Johnson 

Anna Spotten 



Agnes Killpack 

Br 




Walden Meni.ove 
Genevieve Morgan 



Lewis Nielson 
Claude Snow 



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Vernon Larson 



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Wendell Nielson 



t'age Fifty-four 



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Jennie Brimhali. 
Lynn Broadbent 



Evelyn Crosby 
Waiter Daniei s 





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l-ittsdjy 






Bern ice Barton 
Barr Washburn 



Georgia Dimick 



Josinette Cook 
Eugene Johnson 



Zola Martin 



Maureen Wei ki k 
James Anderson 




Lucile Mfrrii .1. 



Lawrence Oipin 
Kenneth Miller 



i'age Fifty-six 



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K —\ ~^T 



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Eleanor Kelly 



Elvis B. Terry 



Margaret Broadbent 



Edith Rich 



Joe Allen 



Julina Smith 




Helen Mangelson 



Gerald Anderson 



Hannah Reynolds 



Veda Kartchner 




^•BANYAN & ^/' 



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Sophomores 



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Kate Allred 
Bryce Andersun 

Lueli a Baker 
Rind\ Bentley 

rances Benedict 
Pauline Bennett 



NE/ BAIRD 



\Pre\i Bryner 




Howard Cottam 
Ora Clark 



\1iinn\ CAMPBELL 

Ruth Ei.dredge 
\m y Finch 

I lENRY II. F\LKNER 



Merlin Ge\ry 



I'age Fifty-eigbt 



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Wii ma Hansen 
Grant Greer 




Alberta Mendenhai i 



Page Fifty-nine 



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James Scorup 



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Wendell Ohlwiler 
Marie Phillips 

Rayda Riding 
Agnes Partridge 

Ervine F. Smith 
Beulah Strickler 

Josephine Schoi hi d 
Edward Slade 

A. J. Terry 
Helen Tuttle 

Mei.ba Young 
Vivian Wiidi 

Harold Van Wagenen 
Della Wilson 



Rnnn 



SHE! 



BHRC 
HUBS 



Fay Parker 



Thora Pickett 



Madeline Riley 



Graydon Robinson 



Wendell Taylor 



La Rue Snow 



Llicile Thorne 



Glenn Webb 



Joseph Winder 



Laura Walker 



Zelma Winterton 



Ioseph E Whitehead 



Robert Yorgason 



Miriam Warnick 



Fern Page 



"*>' 



^•^ 



KlETH RoSS 

Loya Neilson 

Beth Swensen 
LaRilla Smith 

Imri Hurt iiim.s 
Beatrice Wheeler 

Leah Peterson 
J. M. Ward 

Monta Wentz 
Bernard Walker 

Reed Anderson 
Helen Smith 

Kenneth Miller 

E.XILDA NlELSON 



Harmon Jensen 




///^ 



Stephen Fletcher 
Dorothy Holmes 

Esther Pulley 
Pari ey Jameson 

Howard Kelly 
I zola Stewart 

^lta Mae Braithwaite 
James Call 



Emma Mm is 
Beth Hoffman 

si her Towers 
Morris Clinger 

Rui.on Paxm vn 

ZlNA BEHRMANN 



Mabel Sii cki 




Page Sixty-one 






/*»* 



Eva Hanson 
Fay Allred 

G. A. HlGGINSON 

Arvilla Jacobsen 

ESTHER DoUGAN 

Yllda Carson 

Grove M. Haddock 
L.UCILE Anderson 




LaPreal Harrison 
Mary Ashby 

Nile N. Tayi or 

LAURA Cl.EGG 

Lester Whetten 
Joseph L. Brown 



Allan Fjeld 



^B ANYAN j |,_ ^// 




freshmen 



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HAROLD FITZGERALD 

CHRYSTAL GREY 

ELLIS GRAHAM 



FLORENCE FOWLER 
KAY HAMMOND 



MINOR W. HALL 
MATILDA HUBER 



FRED C. IIORLACHER 




N^ 



HUB 



ZOLA HOLMAN 
WM. HOAGLAND 



ROBERT HARRISON 

IDA HOLT 
CLYDE HOAGLAND 



ALICE ISAAKSEN 
ROLAND JACOBS 



D. LORREI. JOHNSON 
MABEL E. JOHNSON 
BERNARD JOHNSON 



111 ANCHE L JONES 
LORA JOHNSON 



pupei 



GENEVA GARRETT 
KENDALL GEORGE 



BETTY HOLLIDAY 

MILDRED HOLLIDAY 

THERON B. HUTCHINGS 



LOUISE HOYT 
EARL \V. HONE 



VERA HYMAS 

IRVING HANDLEY 

MALRINF HORTON 



FLO III INDS1 I MAN 
JOHN R. HALLIDAY 



FAWN IVINS 
MORONI JENSEN 
LORNA JENSEN 



WELLS E. LUDLOW 

IRMA LANT 

ROSS LEONARD 






LRMA JERGENSEN 
L. R. JENSEN 



MILTON KIRK 
MARGARET 
LIVINGSTON 

I 111 I M \ I \KMIN 



(I \R \ MOORI 
\\ M. MORTI NSON 



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fe-BAN YAN 




Hazel McPhie 
-arrei.i. o. madsen 
Phyllis Miller 



Ben Markham 
Mabel Matthews 



LoRNA NlELSON 

Mark Nielson 
Sigrid Neville 



James A. Ott 

Calvin Peterson 



Ada Rassmussen 

Lowell Richins 

Iosephine Reynolds 



M. F. Smith 
Yirgie Sorenson 



\\ and* Snow 
Ruth Stevens 
Wayne Simper 



Eva Mae Sorenson 
Esther Stevens 



Gertrude Sauer 

Elmo Tanner 

Ltahna Shields 



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WEti 



tim 



tlMM 



James Miller 
La Von Marquardson 



Dorothy Mensel 

Faun McConkii 

Weldon Mathews 



Anna Ogden 
Jamie Oi.sen 



jsephine Patterson 

Irvin B. Pearson 

Lee Peterson 



Walter Roberts 
Roma Robertson 



Hastings Smith 

Elizabeth Sorenson 

Lloyd Shields 



Nancy Smith 
Iva Dell Sabin 



Farris Swapp 

Fern Smoot 

Wanda Seegmiller 



Dallas Tueller 
Virginia Taylor 



•*** 



P, %t Sixty-Ike 





NYANJ 



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Don Tippett 

LaVarda West 

Mary Lou Thurber 



Josephine White 
Alexander Wadley 



Fred Wf.bb 

Daraline Williams 

Darroll Young 



Lenella DePriest 
Mable Whiting 



Warnick K. Swenson 

Carma Bringhurst 

Harold Lowe 



Lucie LeRoy 
Gerald Nielson 



Ray Dickson 
Gladys Hooks 
Daniel LeRoy 



Theras Q. Allred 
Harold Baily 



Marion Poulson 
Neldon Stevens 
Olive Gardner 




Walter L. Wiltbank 
Bernice Winzenried 



Blossom Wilkes 
Karl M. Workman 
Clara Woodhouse 



Helen Webster 
Reanon Wilson 



Mable Cummard 
Grant Wilson 
Joe Whittaker 



Lrma Stone 
Josephine Roghaar 



i (live Gardmr 

Dale Peterson 

Marie Huber 



Mignon Garret i 

Louis I Iarmer 



Hattie Harris 

Lynn Hurst 

Lowell Boberg 



Frank Daly 
Ralph Hicken 



..<*?< 



^BANYAN 



Lawrence Jones 

Blanche Fowkes 

Glen Olson 



Agnes Hales 
S. Clyde Larson 



Ina Markham 

Ethel Alder 

Merrill Miner 



Bern ice Redd 
Grace Gardner 



Elsie Cherrington 

Mable Wheeler 

Joyce Pierce 



Grace Dangerfield 
Belva Wilson 



Loren Whetten 

Mary Smith 
Blanche Andrews 



Bernard Johnson 
Maureen I loRTON 



Glen Sellers 

Edna Coleman 

Earnest Murdoch 




*** 



Nell Hibbert 
Mervin Redden 



Edna Harris 
Emily Madsen 
Alice Taylor 



Olive Bishop 
Kay I lADDOCK 



Eva Jacobson 

Wayne McIntyre 

Edna Ludlow 



Myrle Jones 
Helen Dei ker 



Mable Wilson 

Blanche M. Jones 

Arvilla Thomas 



man Hales 
I'heli a Hess 



I) I iiRKEi i Johnson 

Mary Gurr 

Wm A. Mi.krii l 



Marie Singi eton 

Ellis Wittwer 



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Page Sixty -j« tn 



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Alta Bates 

Helen Boyer 

Gilbert Anderson 



Emerson Adams 
Donald Barraclough 



Dee Broadbent 
Allie Bowen 
Hazel Bethers 



On eta Crouther 
Cloe Coleman 



LuZell Chipman 

lONE CHRISTENSEN 

Ward Clark 



Thelma Crandall 
Reed Coulam 



James Decker 
Pearl Dudley 
Howard Draper 



Jennings Evans 
Henry Ewell 



Hazel Fletcher 

Bertha Farnsworth 

Melvin Griffith 



EB^Ef: 




RE1S0 




Eva Balliff 
Grant Bowers 



Thelma Boyack 

Iola Brockbank 
Eldon Bodiiy 



Esther Towers 
Elaine Cropper 



Gerald Caldwell 
Blrnell Colby 
Hope Chapman 



Velma Cox 
Bricham Crane 



Adelaide Clayson 
Paul Chipman 
Glrina DeL\sg 



Sarah Dixon 
( Irmus Dltson 



Cloe I arrfr 

Takeo Fujiwana 

Reed Fautin 



Fred Goold 

< >1 IVE GOE 



Page Sixty-eigbt 



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High School 



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KYLE CLARK 
President 



MYRTLE SOWARDS 
Vice-President 



CECIL CLARK 
Secretary 



REED THORNTON 
Debate Manager 



B r i g h a 01 Young High School 

A LTHOUGH few in number, the student body of B. Y. High has demonstrated 
that quality is not dependent upon quantity. An excellent corps of student 
body officers has led the way, and under the executive action of this group a fine 
program of activities has been carried out. 

The same high standard of ideals which characterizes the student body of 
the University, find fertile ground for growth here. Many of the prominent 
students of the higher institutions are products of the prep school. 




"^y^ 



**" 




Basketlba 



A FAIRLY good season was experienced by the H. S. courtiers under the coaching of Buck 
** Dixon. This was Buck's first year as men'or for the preps, and although the team didn't 
rate very high in the percentage column, most games were lost by a scant margin which, with the 
right breaks might have seen the opponents on the smaller end. 



Play 

HPHE annual competitive play was "Boomerang" this year. A splendid cast, well-coached by 
■■■ Phyllis Adams presented a finished effort to an appreciative audience. Helen and Beth 
Romney assisted in the direction. 




REED THORNTON, DIXIE MANCUM, WILMA SWAPP, PAUL JACOBSON, HELEN NEWELL, 
LYMAN PARTRIDGE, VIVIAN MERRILL, 



..^O. 



Page Seventy-one 








OPERA 

Miss Maybeth Bowman, instructor in the training school, was in charge of the presentation of the first 
High School opera. "The Belle of Bagdad'' was the choice for the initial effort along this line, and was 
very well received. 




DEBATING 

The "V" High School debating team, coached by Miss Gladys Black, attained a new pinnacle of success, 
winning a place in the state finals this year. Here the two teams won third place for the school. 





PEPETTES 
Organized for the purpose of promoting school spirit and pep. the Pepettes have succeeded admirably in the 
accomplishment of their aim. They have managed to sponsor social events as well, and the outstanding 
function of this nature was the dinner dance atTlotel Roberts. 



Page Seventy-two 



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Special Activities 



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Yellmasters 



T I is true that the members of the teams 
*■ are the ones who lay down their lives for 
the cause, but the yellmasters are the dyn- 
amos which furnish the spark to touch off 
the enthusiasm which inspires such sacrifice. 
\\ ith a cheering, whole-hearted student body 
behind them. Young's athletes have won 
many a victory, and defeat has not been 
nearly so bitter if the loss was taken with 
a cheer. 

For four years Fred Moore has led "Y" 
rooters and it is not without regret that his 
graduation is noted this year. "Ferdy" has 
certainly played his part in past victories 
of the Cougars. 




Page Sincty-jour 



; xv *^ 



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<£St. 



ALICE BR1NT0N 
Chairman' s Partner 



CLAUDE SNOW 
Chairman 



The Junior Prom 

ALL the glory of ancient Aztec civilization was incarnate in the Ladies' Gym on the night ol 
the Junior Prom. Amid crumbling ruins, exotic foliage, and hieroglyphic-carved stone, one 
was transported to the time when the culture of this people was at its height. 

Refreshments that might have stimulated some ancient Redskin were enjoyed by the dancers. 
Joy was brought to the feminine hearts by the presentation of sterling silver bracelets, wrought 
in Indian fashion, as favors. 

Long will the memory of that evening of Aztec gaiety be remembered by all who were present 
that night. 




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L. LOWIiLL JOHNSON 



II k\Y ANDERSON 



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HPHE Banyan of 1930 is presented to you by the staff with the hope that it will meet with your 
■*■ approval. Only those who have worked through weary days and dreamed through long nights 
can appreciate the constant effort and application it has required. 

A limited budget has necessitated the minimizing of expense, and in order to achieve this we 
have had to compress our ideals within a circumscribed boundary. In doing so we have been forced 
to foresake many things which have been features of other Banyans. But as a matter of fact. 
we have tried to make this annual a book entirely different than any volume of preceding years. 
We have not felt like expending a large sum in an over-emphasized Bunvon. believing that you 
would appreciate the more artistic appeal. 

The theme of the book is one which naturally presented itself. The motifs of most college 
annuals could be used with equal success by any number of different books, but there is only one 
University in the entire world which could utilize with propriety the Centennial of Mormonism 
as a theme. The founding of this Church, while very remote, made possible the existence today 
of our beloved school in this choicest of locations. In the developing of our theme we have made 
an innovation in the art work of an opening section. For this work we are indebted to the staff 
artist. Euray Anderson, who worked with an interest unimpeachable to create it. 

We have tried to give you a better calendar section, and in doing so have made another 
innovation which you will readily perceive. We honestly feel that in most respects we have 
made a decided improvement in the athletic section. 

We have made mistakes, to be sure, but our efforts have been in the interests of a represen- 
tative year book which will vividly return to your minds memories of these happy days at B.Y.U. 





\\ ESTERGARD 



OSTLUND 



SANDCREN 




^-BANYAN jv ^sf' 





NORMAN BINGHAM 



I GRANT Till Kc I) 



The Staff 



L. Lowell Johnson 
Clyde Sandgren 
Yilda Jessen 
Euray Anderson 
Angelyn Warnick 
Grant Hastings 
Fermen Westergard 
Evelyn Ostlund 
Dixie Mangum 
Alice Brinton . 
Lynn Broadbent . 
Bert Harrison 
R. Thornton Snow 



J. Grant Thurgood 
Norman Bingham 
Ethel Alder . 
Rex Christensen . 



-usieess Staff 



. Editor 
Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 

. I it Editor 

Calendar 

Snaps 

Associate Editor 

. Organisations 

High School 

. W. A. A. 

Pictures 

Photographer 

. Sports 



. Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Secretary 

Stenographer 





BROADBI N I 



MANGUM 




,/30, 




^re-y 




JEAN PAULSON 



WAYNE KERR 



The "Y" News 




TT is, indeed, an arduous task to efficiently care for the publication of two issues of a college 
newspaper weekly, but the job has been done with neatness and dispatch by the staff of the "Y" 
News for this year. The News has verily been a paper for the students, and its appearance on the 
campus every Tuesday and Friday is a much-looked-for event. 

Paulson is to be commended on the mechanical make-up of his paper. This has been done in 
the approved journalistic fashion, and has meant much in the attractive appearance of the News. 
The editorial policy has been one of conservatism for the most part, which has made a wide appeal 
to thinking students. 

Introducing columnists of a new order this year, Jean has treated the student body to an 
enjoyable type of humor, lie has kept in touch with the activities of other universities, and these 
have been duly reported on this campus. 

Paying particular attention to sports, an excellent department has been conducted by Hettig. 
This field has been covered with thoroughness and ability, every phase being touched. 

All in all, and speaking from the student's viewpoint, the "Y" News has been a pleasing all- 
around newspaper of which the staff may well be proud. 




PAXMAN HANSEN JACOBS HILLMAN JOHNSON ASHBY CARSON 



Pa .'«' Ninety-eight 



Tf&O. 



-»v 



^ss 



//^ 




R. THORNTON SNOW 


PAUI HUISH 


The 


Staff 


Jean Paulson ..... Editor 


R. Thornton Snow . Business Manager 


Wayne Kerr .... Associate Editor 


Paul Huish . . Asst. Business Manager 


Allen Stephenson . . . Associate Editor 


Roland Jacobs .... Circulation 


T. Hettig Sports Editor 


Dean Bullock .... Circulation 


Elaine Paxman Society 


Alberta Johnson . . Proofreader 


Mary Ashby Columnist 


Drayton Nuttall . . H. S. Representative 


Gean Clark Columnist 


Wilma Hansen Editor Secretary 


Guy Hillman 


Sports 




Page Ninety-nine 




EDNA BALL 

Editor 



HOWARD Kl I I Y 
Business Manager 



The Scratch 



1 I 'HE "Scratch" first appeared on the campus of the "Y" in May, 1929. It was published to 
■*■ meet the desire for a literary magazine which had long been felt by the students. This year, 
three editions were printed, one for each quarter, and it is believed that the success of this quarterly 
magazine has assured its future. 

The first number to be printed this year came in December and carried out a Christmas 
theme. The next issue came out in March, and hid an Indian motif, while the final number 
appeared in May and depicted Pioneer life. 

The aim of the staff was to make the magazine entirely representative both as to the type of 
work published and the authors from which it came. As a result, a number of manuscripts were 
received from students and faculty members in almost every department of the school. Essays, 
short stories, poetry, satires, and formal articles were among the features. 

The work of the editor, Edna Ball, has been of a very high order this year and because of 
her effort the "Scratch" has furnished an excellent medium of expression for those who are of 
a literary mind. It has encouraged appreciation in the field of literature and art. 



;y 




Page One Hundred 



•*v 



V3 ^». 




,/"' 



GOLDEN TUELLER 
Debate Manager 



JOHN C. SWENSON 
Chairman Debate Council 



Forensics 



THE importance and value of intercollegiate forensics have long been appreciated at Brig- 
ham Young University, and the reputation of the school has been built up over a long period 
of activity in this field. B. V. U. debaters are known throughout the West for their ability to 
think clearly and reason logically on the platform. 

This year a new record was made here both in the number of debates held and the number 
of men and women participating. Twenty debaters received awards for representing the school 
in eighteen debates. Forensic relations were opened with a number of schools which promises 
to extend the friendly activities of the "Y" into new and wider fields. 

The inter-class debates were of an exceedingly high order, and were won by Lynn Broadbent 
and Bert Lewis of the Junior class, and Boyd Nelson and Frank Harris representing the Sophomores. 
The question used was the same one discussed in the triangle debates. 

The triangles held this year were of the no-decision type, the first time in history that these 
contests have been conducted in this manner. They proved very successful, however, and no little 
interest was attached to them because of the question discussed. It was, "Resolved: That the plan 
as outlined by the United States Tax Association be used as a basis for tax revision in Utah." 
The problem involved is, of course, eternally interesting to all who pay taxes, and to the farmei 
in particular. Because of this, the teams travelled throughout central Utah discussing the ques- 
tion before large and enthusiastic gatherings of agriculturists. Brigham Young was represented 
by Vernon Wentz and Delbert Groberg, arguing negatively, and Roald Campbell and Dix Jones 
upholding the affirmative. 

U. S. A. C. had no women debaters in the triangles this year, so these became a dual meet 




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DIMICK 



THOMAS 



PARTRIDGE 



ROMXEY 



between the "V" and the "U." The disarmament question was the bone of contention, and L'tah 
annexed the victory in both cases. The "Y" debaters were: Gertrude Partridge, Georgia Dimick, 
and Helen Romney, affirmative; and Hazel Aagard, Yilda Jessen, and Blanche Thomas, negative. 

On March 19, Golden Tueller and Lowell Johnson met the forensic artists of Southern Cali- 
fornia, and took the short end of the judges' decision on the disarmament question. Debating the 
negative, the locals appeared to have a better grasp of the question, but their orators' was less 
convincing to the arbiters than was that of the Californians. 

The same team again met representatives from warmer climes when they argued the same 
questions with men from California Tech. Once more the land of orange blossoms and publicitv 
triumphed, for the decision went to Tech. 

The question of the European indictment of American culture came in for consideration next, 
and in this contest John Dalton and Maurice Miles emerged victorious over the team from Whit- 
man College. Dalton and Miles were debating for the first time in college circles. 

In a no-decision debate on advertising that proved very interesting and one of the best of the 
season, Ray Peterson and Claude Eggertson met the University of Colorado here on March 25. 
Both teams displayed keen wit and clever analysis. 

Disarmament once more appeared prominently when Lynn Broadbent and Wright Welker 
discussed it with Washington State. The "Y" team, participating in their first inter-collegiate 
debate, did very well, but lost the decision. This was the only men's team to argue the affirm- 
ative of disarmament. They lost to Redlands and won from Montana State in the conflict that 
closed the season on April 28. 

The most successful part of the entire season, judged from the standpoint of victories won, 
was the trip into the Northwest made by Roald Campbell and Vernon Wentz, accompanied by 
A. C. Lambert of the Debate Council. These men made a clean sweep of their four debates with 
Montana State, Washington State, Whitman, and Willamette. 




Page One Hundred Two 



■*v 




g-BAN VAN 



usic 



' I 'HE .Music Department of Brigham Young University has 
for a number of years enjoyed an enviable reputation in the 
Intermountain West. No small part of this has been due to the 
members of its teaching staff. That the head of this department 
is one of the leading musicians of the West is attested by the 
fact that she was selected by the promoters of the San Gabrie 
.Mission Play in California to direct the musical work in that 
production. This task has taken Professor Madsen awav from the 
University a considerable part of the time during the past two 
years, but in her absence the work here has been admirably 
carried on by other members of the department. 



The Band 

/"\NE of the organizations at B. Y. U. which occasions a feeling of pride is the exceptionally fine 
^^^ band. At every athletic contest these musicians have contributed toward the measure of 
victory. The members have risen in the early hours of the morning to give the basketball or foot- 
ball teams a hearty send-off when those warriors have been leaving for conflicts on foreign soil. 
They have accompanied the athletes to every field within the state, and they are known through- 
out Utah by their programs given on concert tours in the past. 

A big project was undertaken in an attempt to purchase new suits. It was impossible to 
procure them for this year's activities, but ther_' is an assurance that a gaily, bedecked B. Y. I', 
band will make its appearance at the beginning of next year. 

No where can there be found a more ardent supporter of student body activities than Professor 
Robert Sauer, band leader. Possessing ability and leadership far above the average, he has been 
ready and willing to fill any need which might arise. Under his tutelage the band has developed 
until it is second to none in the entire West. 





Page One Hundred Three 



;"*■*» 



| [ ^BANYAN J k _^t/f 



«*~ 







i x e d Chorus 



NO one organization has appeared as often in devotional programs as has the mixed chorus. 
It is comprised for the most part of the combined membership of the Male Glee Club and 
the Ladies' Glee Club with the addition of a few other singers. In the absence of Prof. Florence 
J. Madsen, Professor Sauer has taken charge of the chorus this year, and his work with it has 
proved most successful. 

The year's program has included two concerts in College Hall which were excellently given 
and well received by an appreciative audience. The most noted appearance of the chorus, however, 
was in the Salt Lake Tabernacle during the April Conference. The greatest distinction received 
by the group come as a result of two National Broadcasts from KSL. These concerts were heard 
all over the United States, and many favorable reports were received from various parts of 
the countrv from those who listened in. 




/Vi'.v One Hundred Four 




^V3 



^BAN VAN % ^. fmmm ^f/^ 



<£&. 




Orchestral 

CONTRIBUTING not a little to the value and enjoyment of excellent Devotional programs, 
and yet not being listed thereon, is the distinction of the orchestra. Every Devotional period 
is brought to an end with march music which "plays out" the students. This music is alternately 
furnished by the orchestra and the band. 

Dean De Jong has directed the orchestra most of this year, taking it over when Professor 
Robertson left for the coast. lie arranged, as part of the year's program, an evening of 
Tschaikowsky, a concert in which nothing was played but music from the great Russian composer. 
This proved to be a very popular effort and was enjoyed by a large audience. 

The orchestra has become prominent not only as a unit in itself, but as a means of accom- 
paniment for other noted musicians. Upon several occasions such accompaniment has been 
furnished for soloists and choral groups. 








.^o. 




Page One Hundred / ■ < 







Ladies' Glee Clelb 

lV/flSS MARGARET SUMMERHAYS has been in charge of the Ladies' Glee Club this year, 
*»■!■ and under her direction an enviable record has been made by the group. A concert tour 
into southern Utah, a specially prepared concert given during leadership week, and the presenta- 
tion of the cantata, "Gallea," were the features of an interesting year's activity. 



tie Glee Cluto 

VVyiTH the return of Professor Franklin Madsen after a year's study in Chicago, where he 
* » obtained his Doctor's degree. Dr. Madsen is admirably equipped for the task of directing 
as large a group as this, and he has handled the largest male glee clubs ever to be seen in this 
school. Local concerts and two concert tours into Idaho and southern Utah were the prominent 
features of the program. 



Page One Hundred Six 





nvan % ^**/ 




A 

Mi ^^H 

Al ONZO MORI EY I I UDI SNOW 

Instructor Manager 

Dramatics 

AIMING to present a varied program of plays during the year, the Dramatics 
department, under the direction of Alon/.o Morlev, has produced a total ol 
twelve three-act plays and thirty one-act plays. Besides providing pleasing enter- 
tainment, the work has manifested an intelligent understanding of the art ol drama. 

"The Tflnurstoiis" 

ANNUAL ALUMNI PLAY 

College Hall, October 8 and l >, l°2 l ) 

Directed by A. Rex Johnson 

CAST 

Mrs Thurston Eunice Bird 

Mr. Thurston Lowell Johnson 

Collette . Ferrill Pierpont 

Bernard ...-••• Boyd Rasmussen 

Uncle Dan' .'.'.'.'.. • Jean Paulson 

Buddv ... .... Glenn uuyman 

The judge' .'.'.'.'.'. • ■ . A. Rex Johnson 





jjl gj^EAN VAN 1 





6 Tlhe Fortune Hunter 



>• 



College Hall, November 7 and 8, 1929 
Directed by Alon^o Morley 




CAST 



Nathaniel Duncan, "Nat" ........ Kent Johnson 

Henry Kellog Toney Bent ley 

George Burnham Morris dinger 

James Long, "Jim" Boyd Nelson 

Lawrence Miller, "Larry" Lutell Chipman 

Willie Bartlet Joseph Whitehead 



Robbins 

Tom 

Sam Graham 

Mr. Lockwood 

Tracey Tanner 

Pete 

Mr. Sperry . 

"Watty" . 

"Hi" . 

Herman 

Roland Barnett 

Betty Graham . 

Josephine Lockwood 

Angie 



.£fc- 



I ■ -, i \nt Hundred Right 




9^30. 



Joseph Winder 

. Silvion Edgel 

. ■ Frank Whiting 

Elmer Peterson 

Claude Snow 

Lynn Broadbent 

. Fred Miner 

Raymond Peterson 

Walt Daniels 

. Silvion Edgel 

. Archie Williams 

Wihini Hansen 

Ruth Watts 

Zoie Garfield 



BAN VAN \ > <fT <£tit 




'Seven Keys to Bald pate 5 



College Hall, December 6, 1929 
Directed by Alon^o Morley and Frank Whiting 

CAST 

Mr. Quimby, the caretaker • James Ivie 

Mrs. Quimby, his wife Buryle Hibbert 

Wm. Hagee, the author • Claude Eggertsen 

Bland, the right hand man Melvin Miner 

Man' Norton, the news reporter . Mice Brinton 

Mrs. Rhodes, the widow . . Gertrude Partridge 

Peters, the hermit . . ... Elmer Petersen 

Myra Thornhill, the adventuress .... . Addie WrigM 

Don Max, the dope fiend Frank Whiting 

Cargan, the Mayor Humid Handler 

Thomas Hayden, the railroad president . . Alma King 

Jiggs Kennedy, the chief of police ... . ■ Stanley Gunn 

Owner of Baldpate Ted Hansen 

Jim Bosco, the cop • ' • • Golden Tueller 



TfGo. 



Page One Hundred Nine 






***' 




f *Tlie Weaker Sex" 



College Hall. January 15, 16, 1930 

Presented by the Beta Delta Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Directed by A. Rex Johnson 



CAST 




Jack Bow den 
Alice ( his wife) 
Milton Norris 
I lilda (his wife) 
Phil Baxter 
Flossie (his wife) 
Chief Mason 
Mazie (his wife) 
.Ann 

Cera Id Kenyon 
Mam Poster 
The Singing Butler 
The Musical Maid 



John HalUday 

. Smith Jacobs 

. James Citllimore 

Roland Jacobs 

Paid War nick 

. Elmo Tanner 

Ted Hansen 

Rusell Mortenson 

. Clarence Vacher 

Lynn Broadbent 

. Clarence Taylor 

Elvis Terry 

Russell Carr 



The Dancing Weaknesses: Max Olsen, Wells Ludlow, Marl Steele, Ross 
Graham, Howard Schuler, Schyler Strang, Veloy Vest, Boh Hansen. Irving 
llandlew Sterling Evans, Russell Anderson, Charles Henderson. Howard Cottam. 



Page tint' Hundred Ten 




9^30, 








"Friend Hannah" 

College I kill. March IS, 1930 

Directed by Alonzo Morley and Archie Williams 

CAST 

Jean Paulson Prince of Wales 

Claude Snow Duke of York 

Morris Clinger Sir Thomas Lightfoot 

I -red Miner Lord Bute 

Leonard Bacon Isaac Oxford 

Joseph Whitehead .... Robert Clegg 

Grace Folland Paulsen . . . Margaret Lightfoot, mother of Hannah 

Eunice Bird Hannah Lightfoot 

Nita Wakefield Betty 

Elaine Paxman Augusta, Queen of England 

............-—— .^O— — — — — ....... 

Pus* One Hundred Elton 






<3Jh- BAN VAN 



'S'" 




Pygmalion and Galatea 

College Hall. February 7 and 8. 1930 
Directed by Professor Alon-o Morley 

CAST 
Lynn Broadbent Pygmalion 



Ann Whiting . 
Archie Williams . 
Reta Gines 
Monta Wentz 
I an ell Collett . 
Hannah Reynolds 
Dee Chamberlain 
Gerald Caldwell . 



Galatea 
Cbupas 
Daphne 

Myrine 
Sweippe 
Cynisca 

Munas 
mas 



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Football 







,9^30. 




^ 







Captain Paul Thorn© 



4 * f~* 1 YE it to Simba !" and "Let Simba 
^— * carry it over!" were two oft re- 
peated and significant cries heard from 
the football fans this year. Paul's remark- 
able strength, unfaltering courage, and 
dogged stamina could always be relied 
upon when a few yards were needed for 
first down or a touchdown. 

Playing brilliant ball at halfback 
throughout the entire season. Thorne very 
worthily earned as soubriquet the name 
of the African lion whose qualities he dis- 
played as captain of this year's team. 
"Simba" will be affectionately remem- 
bered for his fine work by those who 
leave school this year, and expectantly 
watched bv everyone next vear. 




Captaim^Eleet 
Elmer Dastrap 

' I 'HE team's choice of "Andy" Dastrup 
*■ for next year's captain is most com- 
mendable, for "Dass", playing guard, did 
not have the opportunity to make the 
spectacular plays which thrill the crowds 
and capture the fickle acclaim of the 
grandstands. The choice, therefore, is a 
sincere and well-merited tribute to his 
ability. 

Andy has, this year, displayed a true 
love of the game, energetic determination, 
and unlimited grit, even refusing to stay 
out of a crucial contest, although he was 
suffering from a painful leg injury at the 
time. Beloved and admired by his team 
mates, a great deal is expected of him 
next when he leads the 1930 Cougars to 
victory. 




■BBBBP 



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I'a \t One Hundred 5 w, , n 



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Coaching Staff 



W/ITI I the coming of Ott Romney to the "Y," Cougar hopes took a sudden spurt skyward. Since 

that time Brigham Young athletic teams have reached a high standard. Many laurels have 
been brought to the school by them, and "the end is not yet." This year, the grid game reached 
its peak thus far when the big blue team finished third in the Conference race with losses only to 
Montana State and the champions. Utah. With only four members of the 1929 squad lost through 
graduation, and an array of freshmen talent from the greenling team second to none in the state, 
the Cougars are to be a much-feared team next year. 

Romney has worked not only with the teams but with the student body as well in an attempt 
to build up a fighting morale that carries through. His success has been very gratifying and the 
future should bear golden fruits as a result of his efforts. 

An excellent staff has been on the job from the start to assist in the building of champion 
Cougar teams. "Chick" Hart, former Aggie star, as assistant coach and director of intra-mural 
sports; Buck Dixon, who scintillated for the "V" not long ago. as Frosh coach; Bob Howard, 
also a Cougar mainstay of other days, as assistant line coach; "Tobe" Raile, trainer par excellence, 
ertswhile wrestler and ball player of B. Y, U. — these have all done yoeman service and must come 
in for their share of glory. 

We here pause to honor one who spared neither time nor effort in his work as head line 
coach, and whose knowledge and skill helped to build the magnificent Cougar squad of this 
year. Long will the memory of "Phil" Jackson linger with the athletes and students of Brigham 
Young. The gridsters have lost a fine friend and instructor and the athletic department will 
miss the services of an excellent coach. 




HART 



RAII LE 



HOWARD 



I \( KSON 



ROMNEY 



,/30, 



Page One Hundred Seventeen 



\A 



fZ3& 




****** 



g [_ g^EAN VAN j ^ _^0/r 



***** 



TIIE Cougars played tour practice 
games, winning from Greenriver U. P. 
and Nevada, tying the Alumni squad, and 
losing to California Aggies under a blis- 
tering southern sun. 

The squad played the first conference 
game with Montana State in the "Y" 
stadium. Faulty generalship and breaks 
at critical moments gave Montana a one- 
point victors', the score being 13-12. It 
was a heartbreaker for the "Y" to lose 
after having outplayed the Bobcats 
throughout the game. The Northerners 
made both touchdowns in the first half, 
one resulting from a 66-yard run by 
DeFrate, and the last one being garnered 
by means of a couple of long passes. The 
Cougars came back fighting mad and 
soon scored two touchdowns of their own, 
but Lilyfoot's heretofore trusted toe failed 
him and he missed both tries for goal. 
With that misfortune the "V's" chance 
lor victory was gone. 




W\ 4- EANVAN | |^ ^<T 



The week following this upset, the 
Cougars made football history when, for 
the first time they defeated another Utah 
team. After being outplayed by the 
Farmers for three quarters, and trailing 
them 6-0 at the beginning of the fourth 
period, the Young squad seemed doomed 
to meet its second Conference defeat. But 
the never-say-die spirit manifested itself 
and the blue warriors came back with a 
rush that completely bewildered the 
Aggies. Taking the ball on their own 30- 
yard line, the big blue team started a 
march up the field that led 70 yards to a 
touchdown. So vicious and certain was 
that glorious fourth-period attack that 
several Aggie players who gave their best 
had to be carried from the field. Line 
bucks, beautifully executed passes from 
Hoover's hands that landed safely in the 
waiting arms of Reeves, and eleven fight- 
ing Cougars, each doing his share, aide 
in the memorable trek to Aggie's goal. 
It was truly a great day in the making of 
football history for the "Y." 







K 



<k Kfi 






MOOSE BUNNELL 


RED CI ARK 




OOP i OOP1 R 


RED MERRILI 


Center 


Guard 




Guard 


l-nd 

— — 




/'iigf One Hundred Nineteen 



r xv ^ 



^ 




One Hundred Twenty 



^BAN YAN 




Page One Hundred Twenty-one 



^■3- 



gl gfrBANYAsl y 



*#*" 




/'''v ( "ur' Hundred Twenty-two 




B. Y. U 



B. Y. U. 

B. Y. U. 

B. Y. U. 

B. Y. U. 

B. V. U. 

B. Y. U. 

B. Y. U. 

B. Y. U. 

B. Y. U. 

B. Y. U. 



37 

7 

10 



12 

7 

33 

13 

25 

40 



Greenriver U. P. 

Alumni . 

U. of Nevada . 

Calif Aggies . 

M. S. C. . 

U. S. A. C. . 

Western State . 

Utah 

Colorado Teachers 

Wyoming 





7 

7 

10 

13 

6 

12 

45 

13 





130 Conference 
54 Practice 



89 
33 



184 Total 





? Sfe-BA 






Frosh Football 



y 



""pHE freshmen football team set up a record for coming freshmen teams to shoot at. They went 
through the season undefeated, and played one tie game, besides winning the state champion- 
ship, which is no small achievement against Utah and Aggie Frosh elevens. 

During the season the frosh met and defeated Snow Junior College, the strong Weber Junior 
Oil lege eleven, and ran away from Grand Junction, Colorado, defeating them by a large score. 
In state competition with our sister institutions, they beat Utah, 7-0, and tied U. S. A. C, 0-0. As 
the Utahns beat Utah Aggies, the victory over the Ute frosh gave the Cougar Kittens undisputed 
claim on the State championship. 

Many brilliant indivdual performers were uncovered during the season, and those youthful 
stars should add considerable strength to the varsity next year. Following are their scores for 
the season: 



FROSH 



.i-MESfly 



Frosh 
Frosh 
Frosh 
Frosh 
Frosh 





OPPONENTS 




52 


Snow Junior College . 


. 


13 


Weber Junior College . 


6 





1 . S. A. C. Frosh . 


. 


7 


U. U. Frosh . 





43 


Grand Junction . 


. 



Total 



115 



Total 






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Hack Rob— DIXON, COACH. MIRDOCK. EGGERTSEX. AACARD. TAYLOR. WANGSGAARD. MINER. WORKMAN. 
Middlt Rov W \l si K, SHEFFIELD, GRAY, HORLACKER, kNIGIIT, ROMNEY, H0AG1.AND, SNELL, B1DDU1.PH. 
Front Row— H. WILSON. P. WILSON, SHOBER. NISONGER. MATHEWS, GRIFFITH, SIMPER. SHIELDS, 

FREEMAN, CHRISTIANSEN. 



.££• 



I'age One Hundred Twenty-four 



.jyGi 



* xv ^. 




V 




Basketball 



._<^o. 




:>** 






^ 



tain 

"/^•OOP" as "Y" basketball fans know 
him, is one of the steadiest and 
greatest guards in the conference. His 
leadership this year has been a valuable 
asset to the team, and has won for him 
the respect and admiration of all his team- 
mates, as well as the fans who were for- 
tunate enough to watch him play. Cooper 
will be back next year, and we look for 
him to bring even greater glory to him- 
self and the "Y." 




Captaiai*Ele©t 
Russell Magelby 

' I 'I IE election of "Maggie" by his team- 
mates was a natural thing, following 
a most brilliant season. His record of ten 
points per game plus his all-around play, 
stamped him as one of the outstanding 
players in the conference, and won for 
him the coveted position of all-conference 
guard. Russ hails from .Monroe, where 
he played lour years of high school ball. 
le then played two years for Snow Col- 
ege, before entering the "Y." He will 
be playing his fourth and last year for 
B. Y. U. in the 1930 season, and promises 
finish his basketball career by leading 
he team to a conference championship, 
hich is not at all improbable. 




l-l ssl I I MAGHl BY 



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Ont Hundred 1 wenty-six 



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I5RINEEY 



REEVE 



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IIALLIFF 



T. 



HE Cougar quint started the season spectacularly bv winning eight out of nine games played 
on a holiday trip through southern Utah and California. Their only loss was to the powerful 
U. C. L. A. quint. They scored victories over the the Los Angeles Athletic Club, the Hollywood 
Athletic Club. Pacific Coast Athletic Club, and the University of California at Los Angeles, some 
of the strongest teams on the coast. In two other pre-season contests, the blue quint decisively 
won from Nevada. 

The conference season for the "Y" opened Friday, January 17 at Provo, with Utah Aggie, 
who, the week before, had surprised by beating Utah twice. The Cougars, playing off form, lost the 
first game by two points, but came back the second night with vengeance to win by fifteen points. 
In this game the "Y" offensive was at its best, functioning in a beautiful manner. 

The next week Montana State College came here for two never-to-be-forgotten contests. "Y" 
lost the first night, but won the second. The last game was undoubtedly the fastest, most spectac- 
ular basketball that has been seen here in many a year, and when the battle had ended, the score 
read "Y", 45, Montana, 42. Although every player starred, it was Magelby who was the out- 
standing performer on the floor. Russ scored 11 points and held his forward to a minimum of 
shots at the basket. 

The unexpected happened in the series with the U. of U. played in the Deseret Gym. The 
Cougars, now a highly-touted aggregation, played the poorest ball of the season and practically 
handed both games to the Redskins with their compliments. These losses proved to be the ones 
that ruined the "Y's" chances to cop the conference bunting. 




■.•^wWWtt; 




ROBINSON 



w \l Kl R 



R.OMNEY 



.^So. 



Pane One Hundred Twenty-seven 





^^-, 



^ 



^f ^BAN VAN |k ^/r 



THE B. Y. U. partially redeemed itself the following week-end at Bozeman, Montana, when 
they surprised conference dopesters and took the first game, 47-40. The Bobcats, playing 
their last home game, and displaying the brand of championship ball which had previously won 
three conference championships, easily took the second game. 

At Logan, B. Y. U. again split the series, taking the first game and losing the second. Inac- 
curacy in shooting, was the cause of the second night's loss, numerous set-ups being missed, 
especially in the last half, when a basket or two might have changed defeat into victory. 

Playing their last conference games of the season in their own lair. Young played sensational 
ball to lake two games from Utah, pushing the Utes into the cellar position and giving the "Y" 
third place in the conference standing, only one game behind the Aggies and Montana who were 
tied for first. 

YOUNG'S SCORES FOR I HE SEASON ARE AS FOLLOWS: 



At Provo 
At Provo 

At Provo 
At Provo 
At Salt Lake 
At Salt Lake 
At Bozeman 
At Bozeman 
At Logan 
At Logan 
At Provo 
At Provo 



B. 


Y. 


U. 


37 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


53 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


43 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


45 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


49 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


30 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


47 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


39 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


49 


B. 


Y. 


u. 


41 


B. 


V. 


u. 


59 


B. 


Y. 


1. 


59 



U. S. A. C. 


39 


U. S. A. C. 


37 


Montana 


59 


Monta na 


42 


Utah 


53 


Utah 


38 


Montana 


40 


Montana 


70 


U. S. A. C. 


36 


U. S. A. C. 


53 


Utah 


31 


Utah 


42 




STAPLES, BRINEFY, REFYH. COACH ROMNEY. COOPER, MAGLEBY, BALLIFF. 

HONE, IENSEN, TEULER, CRAWFORD, JOHNSON, WALKER. 

COA ARE. ROBINSON ROMNEY, SHOBER, OVESON, CHRISTIANSEN, COACH DICKSON. 



Hundred I wenty-eighi 



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Track 

' I 'HE loss of B. Y. U.'s famous Owen Rowe 
was keenly felt in this year's track meets. 
Although the Cougars were strong and were 
given chances of taking both meets, they lost 
to the U. S. A. C. and to the Utes. The Aggie 
victory on April 18-19, although close, the 
score being 70^2 to l\ l /2. was a distinct sur- 
prise, the last race of the day deciding the 
tussle. During the meet, Rasmussen, Bentlev, 
Nelson, Reeves and Griffiths, took first place 
and the "Y" won the 880-yard relay, but lost 
the mile race which decided the meet. 

On May 10, "Lillyfoot" Reeves added 
interest to the track contest with Utah, bv 

CAPTAIN BRAD JENSEN 

shattering his own state record of 144.6 feet in the hammer throw when he heaved the ball and 
chain out 146. 7 feet, and by smashing the state and R. M. C. record of 143 feet 3j4 inches 
in the discus throw. His new mark is 145. 5 feet. B. Y. U. made a clean sweep in the hammer 
throw, the discus throw and the javelin, but Utah's powerful track team won easily in the 
majority of cinder events. They took a total of eleven first places to B. Y. U.'s six. The Red- 
skins made a clean sweep in the high hurdles and allowed but a half point in the high jump. The 
score of the meet was 86y 2 to 56^4 in favor of the Redskins. 





v< ^$^*9^4$'£& 




.Si- 

Page One Hundred Thirty 



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\ ^ba^AN K :*/"" <^XC^ 



■ 7 




P<i£6 One Hundred Tbirly-one 



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Page One Hundred Thirty-two 



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N VAN EL ^jf/ 



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Minor Sports 



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^feHBAN VAN 



restling 



ALTHOUGH the B. Y. U. had but four veterans. Goe. Cropper. Moody and Thurgood, to form 
a nucleus for this year's wrestling squad, she had an abundance of green but strong and 
willing material with which, in course of the season, Coaches Cote and Raille built up a remark- 
ably fast and clever team. Thurgood, because of a recent severe illness was unable to participate 
extensively during the meets. 

Actual wrestling activities began January 14, 15, and 17. with the intramurals during which 
considerable promising speed and many newly learned intricate holds were exhibited. 

Their lack of sufficient training and polish were contributing factors to the defeat of our men 
at Logan, January 25, when they met last year's Rocky Mountain Conference Champions from the 
Utah State Agricultural College. The "Y" fellows won only three of the eight matches to lose by 
a score of 21 to 11. The three victorious men were Moody, Rutherford and Hales. 

The improvement in the Young wrestlers, which took place in the interval between the U. S. 
A. C. meets and the U. of U. matches, was phenomenal and indicated splendid coaching and 
training. The 21 to 13 win over the veteran Utah wrestlers was a conference surprise and the big- 
gest surprise of the meet was Moody's decision over last year's conference champion in the 145 
pound class, R. Detton. Haddock, Creer, Moody and Hales counted the five wins out of the 
eight matches with the "I." Smart and Yorgesen of the "Y" won snappy exhibition matches from 
Lewis and Roylance on the same night, February 8th. 

By taking seven out of eight matches with the U. I. S. B. the B. Y. U. mat men decisively 
demonstrated their superiority in the bone crushing art. 

The victories of Neff Smart, Milo Moody and Iman Hales in the divisional tourney at Salt 
Lake made them conference champions in the 115, 145 and 165-pound classes, respectively, and 
gave the B. Y. U. second place. Creer. Cropper and Goe were finalists. An injury suffered by 
Creer in the Idaho meet was undoubtedly the cause of his loss and thereby the loss of first place 
for the "Y" in the meet. The scores were: Utah, 28J4 : B. Y. U., 21; Montana, 19^, and 
U. S. A. C, 19. 



:"•■ , 





Hack Ron— FILLMORE. LEAVITT, HICKEN, HALES, BALLE 

Middle Rou— MOODY, GOE, VERGESON, JACOBS, KEELER. 

Front Koa— HADDOCK, THURGOOD, COACH COTE. CROPPER, SMART. 



.^So. 



Page One Hundred Thirty-lour 



-*Xv 




40** 



Tennis 

STARTING out this year minus three of last year's regular 
players on the state championship tennis team confronted 
Coach Buck Dixon with a real problem. However, the annual 
spring tennis tournament uncovered some splendid freshmen 
material, who, with the veterans from last year, formed a for- 
midable squad. Paul Holt was the ace of the team, aided by 
Eldon Brinley and Wesley Porter, both letter men. The new 
men to make the squad were Kent Johnson and Rosy Snow, 
and two sensational freshmen who bid fair to make a name 
for themselves before their college days are over, Clayton 
Jenkins, Jr., and Walter Roberts. 

Although they did not retain their state championship 
honors, Young was anything but a set-up, and every meet was 
close and hard fought, with the breaks deciding the issue in 
favor of their opponents. Holt, Brinley, Porter. Johnson, and 
Jenkins were the mainstays of the team in the college meets, 
although they were closely pressed throughout the season for 
their positions on the team by the other members of the squad, 
Snow and Roberts. 



Page One Hundred Thirty-five 



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-ara 










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Other Minor Sports 

/~\NE of the activities participated in here at school is boxing. It made its first 
appearance on the campus only a few years ago, but has steadily increased 
in favor until more and more of the he-men of the institution are entering its 
ranks. The ones who take part are the most ardent supporters of it, and by this 
manifest interest is the manly art of self-defense recommended to all. Some of the 
most outstanding fighters in the A. A. U. tournament conducted each vear in Salt 
Lake City, have been products of B, V. U. A great future for this activity seems 
scheduled for the Youngsters. 

Swimming has always attracted a number of enthusiasts, but the unfortunate 
closing ol Provo High School's swimming pool this year eliminated this activity 
from the program of sports at the "Y." The presence here of Professor C. S. Leaf 
was more than fortuitous, for under his coaching the "Y" has won many champion- 
ships in the aquatic sport. One of the most notable achievements was the producing 
of a two-time national championship in the person of Bud Shields who is the present 
record-holder in the inter-collegiate hundred-yard and two twenty-yard free-style 
events. With no place left in Provo in which to continue training, Bud and his 
coach were forced to leave, and at present are at the U. S. A. C. in Logan. 

it is to be hoped that the near future will see the re-opening of the pool and 
with it the return to this campus of erstwhile laurels. 



2fe- 

Huge One Hundred Thirty-six 



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Hylamdleirs 



THE activity of the Hylanders was distinguished by a wide 
variety which called into play the interests and talents of 
every member. 

Social diversions ranging from dancing parties and pro- 
grams to hikes and sleigh-rides were ably conducted by the 
Entertainment Committee, Alva Johanson, Laurel Leavitt and 
Clarence \\ ilson, assisted by the officers. 

They participated successfully in the forensic, musical, 
literary, and athletic efforts of the university. Roald Campbell 
was one of the debating duo that won an unbroken string of 
four triumphs on a tour of the Northwest. In scholarship the 
unit ranked high, three members achieving the honor roll. One 
of the outstanding athletes was lman Hales, who, though a 
freshman, captured a conference wrestling title and was made 
wrestling captain for 1930-31. 



Roald Campbell 
Ralph Crafts 
Carlton Culmsee 
Clark Frei 
Newell Frei 
lman Hales 
Alva Johanson 
Vernon Larson 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Laurel Leavitt 
Lee Lund 

Vice-President 
Morris Nuttall 
Thomas Perry 
Dean Terry 
Clarence Wilson 
Harold Woolston 
I. T. Woolston 






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l*tlg£ One HunJreJ l-'oi 1 1 



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T^OR three years the iMates have been one of the outstand- 
ing groups on the campus. With the aim of obtaining 
members qualified in all activities, these men have become 
an exceptional all-around unit. Each member is expected 
to be a true mate to his brother members, and everyone 
supports the highest standard of student activity and interest. 
It is felt that here is being accomplished the purpose 
for which the social unit system was first established. As 
the school year closes the curtain falls on another too short, 
but happy and successful voyage of the Mates. 




Bricy Anderson 
Leonard Bacon 
Walter Basinger 
Anthony I. Bentley 
Dee Broadbent 
Lynn Broadbent 
Gaius Call 
Smith Decker 
Rav Dickson 



Delbert Groberg 
Stanley Gunn 
Irving llandley 
Harold Handlev 
James Kerr 
Alma King 
5ert Lewis 
Wells Ludlow 
La.Mar .McDonald 



HAROI I) HANDI II 

Gene Paulson 
Elmer Peterson 
Reed Phillips 
Elvis Terry 
Golden Tueller 
Fermen Westereard 




Page One Hundt<J Forty-ont 



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Nuggets 

THE Nuggets unit was formerly known as the Gold- 
brickers Club, and was organized in 1917. In 1923 all 
clubs were banished from the campus, but the club continued 
to function apart from the school until the installation of 
the social unit system. L'pon the inauguration of the present 
system, the Goldbrickers were among the first to affiliate, 
and became known on the campus as social unit number one. 
The new plan demanded, however, a change in the name, 
so the traditional "Goldbrickers" was abandoned, and 
"Nuggets" was the choice for the successor. The old tradi- 
tions of the group remain, so that this stands out as one of 
the most active on the campus. Many student body officers, 



FRED M. MOORE 


athletes, debaters, and mt 


■n known tor otner accompusn- 




ments are numbered in it; 


membership. 


Joe Allen 


Dean Fisher 


Howard Kelly 


John Allen 


James Gunn 


Paul Keeler 


Stewart Anderson 


Ellis Graham 


Abe Larsen 


Arch Anderson 


Harl Hone 


Fred M. .Moore 


Harold Armstrong 


Arthur Hasler 


Lorenzo McGregor 


Karl Bunnell, Vice-President 


Frank Harris 


Max Olson 


Mark Bailiff 


Dix M. Jones 


James Poulton 


Clyde Buehler 


Kent Johnson 


R. Thornton Snow, Secretary 


Eldon Brinley 


L. Lowell Johnson 


Claude Snow 


Da Costa Clark 


Ben Johnson 


Clarence Taylor 


Walt Daniels 


Smith Jacobs 
Richard Knight 


Harold Van Wagenen 




7 B\ ^T|^| 1 ■ 


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Page One Hundred Forty-two 



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T a 11 s i g s 



A CLOSE blending of scholarship has been the goal of the 
Tausigs social unit. This group offers each year a 
silver loving cup to the most scholarly social unit in the 
university, with resulting wide-spread interest in the more 
serious phases of school life. Socially, the unit holds an- 
nually a formal dinner dance, a Salt Lake theatre party, a 
social held in conjunction with the Nuggets, and an invita- 
tion dance. in..addition to its regular bi-monthly dinners, etc. 
The Tausigs have made an excellent showing in athletics 
this year, ranking high in intra-mural competition. One of 
the distinctions belonging to this unit is the fact that both 
the captains of the \919 football squad, and the captain of 
the 1930 eleven are Tausigs. 



Robert Bushman, Treasurer 

Grant Buttle 

Luzell Chipman 

Paul Chipman 

Lee Christiansen 

Norman B. Creer 

Elmer Dastrup 

Ross Graham, Secretary 

Clair Gudmundson 

Ray Hart 

Melvin Havmond 

Orin Jackson 



Roland Jacobs 
Ray .Merrill 
Russell Mortensen 
Wendell Morgan 
Stephen Murdock 
Stanley Nelson 
Wayne Neilson 
Boyd Rasmussen 
Elwood Romney 
Bert Snyder 
Schuyler Strang 
A. Rex Johnson. Faculty 




Grant Thorne 
Paul Thorne 
J. Grant Thurgood 
Clifford Toone 
Theodore Toone 
Clarence Vacher 
Bud Walker 
Paul YVarnick 
James Westwood 
John Westwood 
Arthur Zabriskie 




Page One Hundred Forly-tbree 



■*v 




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N YAN Hk ^// 



jf* 



WENDELL TAYLOR 



Y i Kings 

' I 'HE outstanding aim of the Vikings this year has been 
to really encourage and further the democratic spirit 
which first gave rise to the social unit system. A spirit of 
good fellowship has bound the members together so that 
unity and success has followed every undertaking. 

In the line of social gatherings the unit has been 
particularly active. The first annual formal dinner dance 
was held the eve of Thanksgiving, and a number of parties 
followed each holiday. The Viking unit numbers among 
its members many who are prominent in student government, 
athletics, and several other student activities. 



Ray Alleman 
Reese Anderson 
Don Candland 
Howard Cottam 
James Cullimore 
Mark Eggertsen 
Jennings Evans 
Sterling Evans 
John Fechser 



Stephen Fletcher 
John Halliday 
Horace Hardy 
Corwin Hatch 
Waldo Hodsen 
Clayton Jenkins 
Lolavee Jensen 
James Miller 
Fred Miner 



Merrill Miner 
Mark Nielson 
Rulon Paxman 
Lee Peterson 
Clyde Sandgren 
Keith Sumner 
Warnick Swenson 
Delbert Tregeagle 
Barr Washburn 





*« * t ft t 



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age One Hundred Forty-four 



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Zeit Geist 



IT has been the aim of the Zeit Geist social unit this year to 
not only meet in a social capacity, but to enlarge the 
acquaintance of each member with happenings in the fields 
of science. As the name Zeit Geist implies, these men have 
tried to keep up with the "Spirit of the Times." The regular 
bi-monthly meetings have for the most part been spent in 
discussion of topics of interest to the group. Lectures were 
given by those members directly interested in the subjects 
considered. Television, light, the fourth dimension, and 
aviation are subjects which have been investigated recently 
by the group. Some of the members have actually made 
experimentation in the field of radio television, and this has 
added interest to the undertakings of the unit. 



MEMBERS 



Robert Clark 
John Dean 
Junior Dixon 
Henry H. Faulkner 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Norman Geertson 
Mark Gardner 
Richard Green 
Ben Goe 



Anson Higginson 



Kenneth C. Yancy 




James lvie 
Vice-President 

Laurence Jackson 
LaFayette Jones 
Howard Johnson 
Vernon Moore 
Lawrence Olpin 
Bert Wheeler 
Vernon Whitin 




Page One Hundred Forty-five 



r^sa 




Val Hyrics 



HAROLD BARTON 


RAY GARRETT 




BUS HOLTSCLAW 


DOYLE LIDDLE 


HAROLD BAILEY 


LYNN HURST 




PARLEY JAMISON 


DON MERRILL 


HAROLD COLVIN 


President 




LAWRENCE JONES 


Vice-President 


FARRELL COLLETT 


CURTIS HARDING 




ALMA KARTCHNER 


KENNETH MILLER 


BERT GLEDHILL 


REED PETERS 




FRED STAHMAN 


WILLIAM WINCIM 


RALPH NELSON 


DEAN STEAD 




WARREN WHITTAKER 


FLOYD YOUNG 


ELMO PETERS 


DR 


HANSEN 








A dvisor 







riW 8 





GILBERT ANDERSON 
JAMES AAGARD 
BURNELL AAGARD 
HAROLD BOYACK 
FREED BUSCH 
I I MO TANNER 



Nuveko 

GEORGE CORBETT 

President 
GRANT GREER 
GUY HILLMAN 
FRANK JORGENSEN 
GRANT PEN ROD 



HARRY McCOARD 

CLARK PRINCE 
RAY PHILLIPS 
CLIFFORD NELSON 
MORRIS SNELL 
DARROLD YOUNG 



Page (.hie Hundred Forty-six 



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gpf ^EAN VAN j ,_ ^// 




Hal^ardia 



JOSEPH BROWN 
GROVE HADDOCK 
JAY L. HADDOCK 

President 
ONEAL OGDEN 



DR. T. L. MARTIN 

Sponsor 
HARVEY MILLER 
WILLIAM MERRILL 
LtROY OAKS 



JAMES PETERSON 
EDWARD SLADE 
NILE TAYLOR 
LORIN WHETTEN 



LESTER WHETTEN 
BRYCE W'ADLEY 

HAROLD BARTON- 
WALTER WILTBANK 




C la a r in a n t a 




RETTA JACOBS 
GERTRUDE KING 
LTAHNA NIELSON 
BLANCH WILSON 
President 



PAULINE CLL'FF 
HATTIE HARRIS 
OLIVE GARDNER 
MABLE WILSON 



JOSEPHINE ROGAHAR 
LOUISE WHITE 
ZELDA MORLEY 
BELVA WILSON 



yfSi 



Page On* Hundred Forty-seven 




•*v 



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L A 




RO/ENA NELSON 



eaux Arts 



YY/E are the Beaux Arts true, we have our social views, 
W But still we're trying to keep the standards, 
Of this our B. Y. U. The school we're loyal to. 
Our aim is culture, friendship, refinement 
On to goals, on honor rolls, 
We find our names printed there. 
Then we'll progress, leading the rest 
All will be fair, we are Beaux Arts true, 
We'll keep our social views, 
Our aim is culture, friendship, refinement. 

This song embodies the true spirit of the Beaux Arts. 
Successful parties, the girls' basketball championship, third 
place in the Pep Vodie, accomplished this year, mark the 
group as one of the most versatile on the campus. 



Virginia Booth 
Vera Bush 
Evelyn Bryner 
Lapreal Bryner 
Elsie Cherrington 
Florence Fowler 
Gertrude Gourley 
Maurine Gourley 
Thelma Gardiner 



MEMBERS 

Lilly Skousen 
Buryle Hibbert 
Dorothy Floover 
Myrle Jones 
Eva Jacobsen 
De On Morrison 
Mercy Nelson 
Rozena Nelson 
Ann Price 



Florence Speckart 

Hazel Taylor 

Reah Taylor 

Ida Tanner 

Lucile Thome 

Thelma Walker 

Emily Wright 

Zenda Wentz 

Mrs. Bessie Meiling 
Sponsor 




Puge One Hundred Forty-eight 










Cesta Tie 

A FRIENDLY group interest has been a feature of 
the spirit of this social unit. A splendid corps 
of officers has aided immeasurably in the carrying 
out of an intensely interesting program for the year. 
Outstanding social events were a Story-Book Ball, Four 
Season Formal, held in conjunction with the Mates, 
and the Spring Festival. The success of this year 
intensifies the hopefulness felt for next year's activities. 




Etha Bleak 
Wilma Boyle 
Alta May Braithwaite 
Lola Braithwaite 
Mariam Colton 
Bertha Farnsworth 
Ella Farnsworth 
Eva Hamilton 
Audry Harris 



Mary Holbrook 
Faun Ivins 
Cally Nelson 
Marcia Osmond 
Nan Osmond 
Gertrude Partridge 
Edith Rich 
Beth Romney 
Celia Romney 



I M1LY SMITH 

I lelen Romney 
Caroline Scorup 
Emily Smith 
Julina Smith 
Beulah Strickler 
Ruth Watts 
I lelen Whitesides 
Addie Wright 
Elva Wright 






Page One Hundred Forly-nine 



^-9 




S^BAN VAN 




,//" 



C i 




DecaSema Fe 

/CONGENIALITY has been a distinctive characteristic 
^--' of the Deca Sema Fe unit throughout 1930. Many 
happy parties, the pleasant memories of which will be cher- 
ished by its members, were enjoyed periodically during the 
school year. Paramount in social activities was the formal 
St. Patrick's Dinner Dance held in .March at the Hotel 
Roberts. Members of the unit have been active in practically 
all phases of student life, there being representatives in 
debating, music, drama and home economics. An original 
and charming act in the Pep Vodie, which received con- 
siderable favorable comment, was one of the features of the 
year's work. 



Ml I BA I.ARSEN 



Hazel Aagard 
Marie Allen 
Eliza Bjencugard 
Mercella Bonneru 
Evelyn Brough 
Mauna Campbell 
Eileen Chipman 
Evelyn Crosby 
Jennie Evans 



Margaret Finel 
Veda Gessel 
Ora Gledhill 
Eileen Hatton 
Nellie Hickens 
Alice Jones 
Agnes Kilpack 
Melba Larsen 
Elaine Mavor 



Ina Markham 

Irene Metcalf 
Ireta Mortimer 
Ethel Nielson 
Mar}* Peterson 
Norma Peterson 
Lorene Randall 
Bernice Sheffield 
Beatrice Wheeler 




.' !i One Hundred Fifty 




I N VAN JL 

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»el Marna 

' I 'I IE Del .Marna is one of the newer and smaller 
units on the campus. It was organized to enrich 
the College experiences of its members through the 
sincere friendship of a group of girls from a variety 
of widely scattered places, but with congenial interests. 
A number of unique and highly successful parties have 
been held during the year and the girls are all looking 
forward to the resumption of friendships at the begin- 
ning of next year. 



Kate Allred 
Marval Atwood 
Frances Benedict 
Verna Burnham 
Louise Candland 
Gay Dimick 



llmnlrrJ Fifty-one 




T^B-,. 



Nautilus 

AUT1LUS symbolizes the development of friendship; 
each year as the spiral grows, it expands and becomes 
more beautiful. 

OVE of friends shines more brightly when it is linked 
with a lofty purpose. Our motto is "Ever Upward." 

NDER the Blue and Gold the Nautilus is each year 
receiving new friends into its iris dwelling, and they 
hear a voice which sings: 



"Build thee more stately mansions, 0, my soul, 
As the swift seasons roll! 
Leave thy low-vaulted past! 
Let each new temple, nobler than the last, 
Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast, 

Till thou at length art free, 
Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea!' 



Lorna B. Allen 
Edna Ball 
Joie Batchelor 
Alice Brinton 
Lenore Crookston 
Donna Davis 
Edna llolbrook 



rma Jergenson 
Eleanor Kelly 
Zola Martin 
Lucille Merrill 
Wilma Mickleson 
Erma Merrill 
Zina Murdock 



Evelyn Ostlund 
Edith Paxman 
Iris Robinson 
Lettie Romney 
Naomi Seamount 
Eva Mae Sorenson 
Louise Swenson 




Page One Hundred Fifty-two 



r^B* 



^S"^fe-PA N VAN "11 ^ 

it jresif 



inae Clarae 



//'" 



' I 'I IE past year in the lives of the Minae Clarae has been one of 
great profit and enjoyment. Social activties, scholastic accom- 
plishments, and achievements in the fields of art, music, drama, etc., 
have taken up most of the time. One of the aims of the unit has been 
to make each party unique, and with this in mind the entertainments 
have all been planned for the interest and benefit of those 
participating. 



I Men Allman 
Almera Anderson 
Thora Andrus 
Margaret Broadbent 
Beatrice Brown 
Eldona Cox 
Yelma Cox 



Grace Dangerfield 
Belle Harris 
I helma Jacobsen 
LaRue Jensen 
Genevieve Morgan 
Eliza Nelson 



Gvven Nelson 
Dorothy Oakley 
Lucile Peterson 
Sally Smith 
Fern Smoot 
Elida Snow 
Janet Webster 




P/3V* 



Page One Hundred Fifty-three 




Sanyan 




**^ 



ANSA HUGHES 



O, S. Trovata 

A SPIRIT of cooperation and the stimulation of originality 
have characterized this group of girls in their activities 
of the year. Believing that a social unit should be a social 
organization, the Trovatas have been very active on the 
campus in this capacity. Some of the most attractive and out- 
standing social functions of the year have been sponsored 
by the unit, among them being the annual spring dinner 
dance held in the I lotel Roberts. A very clever Indian theme 
was worked out upon this occasion, and the party was 
entirely successful. 



Phyllis Adams 
Secretary 

Ethel Alder 
Ruth Allen 
Beth Ashworth 
Sina Brimhall 

Ve Bohman 
Mabel Cummard 



Allie Dixon 
Sarah Dixon 
Elizabeth Gessford 
Ora Haws 

Nell Hibbert 
Betty Hollidav 

Mildred Hollidav 

Anna Hughes 
Vera Jackson 



Beth Mangum 
Phyllis Miller 
Nelda Parks 
Leah Peterson 
Allie Taylor 
Blanche Thomas 

Beth Wright 
Monta Wentz 







.9^30. 



I '■:,■ Hundred Fifty-four 



^^^ 



*** 




IN what was rated by critics as the best Pep Vodie ever to be staged on the 
campus, and in competition with almost every other social unit in school, the 
(). S. Trovata won first place. Their act was a clever and entertaining one. showing 
that it was well-planned and rehearsed. 




Page One Hundred Fifty-fit <■ 




y 



' Ml 



I I AIM: I'AXMAN 



^BANYAN 




f 



**" 



Valnorn 

"\ 7ALN0RN" became the official name of a group of 

"kindred spirited" girls in 1928. Since that time these 
girls have affianced many others of friendly attitude until today 
their social unit is one of renown on the "Y" campus and the 
name "Valnorn" is associated with girls of talent and accom- 
plishments. Of the many interesting activities sponsored by 
this social unit the most symbolic social event was their annual 
dinner dance which was held at Hotel Roberts in January. The 
theme for this lovely "Festival" was "A Flight to Valhalla." 
In the toasts, music and decorations the old Norse mythology 
was uniquely depicted. The theme of the name "Valnorn" is 
taken from Norse mythology — the ancient beliefs of the 
"Valnorn's" ancestors. 



Fay Allred 
Eva Bailiff 
Ada Birch 
Eunice Bird 
Margaret Bird 
Al lie Bowen 
Gean Clark 
Josinette Cook 



Pearl Dahle 
Virginia Eggertsen 
Phyllis Fletcher 
Grace Gardner 
Callie Hanson 
Wilima Hanson 
Ada Hasler 
Rose Lietchy 
Edna Ludlow 



Loya Neilson 
Lota Paxman 
Margaret Peterson 
Betsy Reynolds 
Donna Salisbury 
Beth Swenson 
Virginia Taylor 
Nita Wakefield 




Page One Hundred Fifty-six 



"»%l 




g-BAN YAN 



//"' 



Ficllelas 

' I 'HE aim of Fidelas is the cultivation of enduring 
school day friendships. Along with this go the 
sponsoring and enjoyment of happy social activities, 
and the endeavor to do the utmost in support of B. Y. U. 
ideals. Among the outstanding parties of the year are 
those given by Fidelas. One of the most enjoyable and 
beautiful of all was the traditional formal dancing 
party given at the Motel Roberts in April. 



Clara Anderson 
Mary Ashby 
Bernice Barton 
Alta Bates 
Marie Bills 
Helen Boyer 
Jennie Brimhall 
lone Christensen 
Norma Christenson 
Edna Dixon 
Nora Ford 



Grace Gammon 

Agnes Hales 

Audrey Jackson 

Eva Johnson 

Jenny Johnson 

Ruth Johnson 

Delia Jones 

Belva Lee 

Alberta Mendenhall 

Anna Ogden 

Lucile Olsen 

Mrs. George H. Hansen 
A Jvisor 




Violet Peterson 
Lenore Rasmusen 
Hannah Reynolds 
I lelen Rowe 
Lillie Severson 
Naomi Startup 
Norell Startup 
Erma Stone 
Ruth Stevens 
Izola Stewart 
Helen Webster 




._?€o. 



Page One Hundred Fifty-seven 





3 A N VAN j ^ 



/Jf 




Zel Memlia 



SYL\ IA ALLEN 

IOLA BOSTON 
ISERN1CE BOWER 
ARLA DEAN CHRISTENSEN 
Secretary 



VERONA FIE1 DING 
MAYSIE HALL 
GRACE HALL 
ROSE HAMMOND 
Vice-President 



W1NNIFRED HEATON 

JENNIE JENSEN 
FREDORA JENSEN 
NORMA KNIGHT 
President 



ANNIE KNIGHT 
WINA LISTON 
JENETTA McDONALD 
HILDA OAKS 
EVA PETERSON 





Vol Soomg 



RINDA BENTLEY 

President 
INEZ BAIRD 
ADELIA BOYLE 
EVA CROWTHER 
THELMA CRANDALL 
ZELLA COX 
LILLIAN CARTER 



BLANCHE FOWKES 
GLADYS HOOKS 
DOROTHY HOLMES 
CLARA HAMBLIN 
VOLA JOHNSON 
MABLE JOHNSON 
\ II HA J ESSEN 
LORNA JENSEN 



MYRLE KELLY 
VEDA KARTCHNER 
LUCIE LeROY 
CLARA MOORE 
EMMA MILLS 
DONNA MONK 
LENORE McCLELLAN 
MAE PACE 



EMMA PETERSON 

LOIS PENROD 
MARGARET PETERSON 
BERNICE REDD 
ELVA STEPHENS 

ALVERA SMITH 
WANDA SNOW 
MARGIE TAYLOR 



HILDA WIDDISON 



! EONA WEST 



CI ARA WELLS 



££■ 



,/30. 



t^oge One Hundred Fifty-eight 



safe- BAN VAN ] ^ 




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Clubs 



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TED HANSEN 



Alpha Kappa. Psi 

A S one of the professional organizations on the campus, Beta 
•* *■ Delta chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, national commerce 
fraternity, has played a prominent part in the activities of the 
school. One of the requirements for entrance into the fraternity 
is scholarship, so the members rank high in that achievement. 
The "All Boys Show," is sponsored by this group and has 
always been enthusiastically received. The proceeds from this 
show go to the Alpha Kappa Psi Loan Fund which is made 
available to students in commerce. This in itself is a most 
worthy effort. The members of this group are all active in 
school life and are among the outstanding students in school. 



John Allen 
Edgar Barton 
Harold Barton 
Norman Bingham 
Newell Bown 
Harold Boyack 
Jefferson Cazier 
Frank Cragun 
Preston Creer 
Norman Creer 
James Cullimore 
Elmer Dastrup 



Sterling Evans 

Jim Finch 

Ted Hansen, Pres. 

Orin Jackson 

Dix Jones, Treas. 

A. Rex Johnson 

Melvin McDonald 

Boyd Rasmussen 

Loran Skousen 

John Snell 

R. Thornton Snow 



Anthony Sowards 

Keith Sumner 

Ralph Sylvester 

Clarence Taylor, Vice-Pres. 

J. Grant Thurgood, Sec. 

Bud Walker 

Paul Warnick 

Barr Washburn 

Owen West 

Arthur Zabriskie 




Page One Hundred Sixty 




"**»***-* 



«BA 



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Theta Alpha Phi 

HPHE Utah Beta chapter ot Theta Alpha Phi, national 
honorary dramatic fraternity, is one of the distinctive 
organizations on the campus at B. Y. U. Composed solely of 
men and women who have proved their ability in histrionic 
achievements, this body of Thespians represents the highest to 
be attained in dramatic circles. One of the cultural efforts 
undertaken by the group during the year just past was the 
review of seven Greek dramas by Aeschylus, Euripides, Soph- 
ocles, and Aristphanes. Every two weeks a luncheon was held 
at which interesting reports of plays and activities in the world 
of dramatic art were given. Kester's play, "Friend Hannah" 
was presented in April as the annual Theta Alpha Phi play, 
and its reception indicated an excellently performed vehicle. 




ARCHIE \\ II I I VMS 



Leonard Bacon 
Eunice Bird 
Alice Brinton 
Josinette Cook 
Claude Eggertsen 

Rtta Gines 
Ted Hansen 
Kent Johnson 
A. Rex Johnson 



Fred Miner 
Eloise Morley 
Alonzo Morley 
Jean Paulsen 
Grace Paulson 
Gertrude Partridge 
Elaine Paxman 
Glen Potter 
Boyd Rassmussen 



Elizabeth Romnev 
Helen Romnev 
Claude Snow- 
Ruth Watts 
Nita Wakefield 
Archie Williams 
Frank Whiting 
Joseph Whitehead 
Addie Wright 




•&*< 



.fa 



Past One Hundred S >..■ > -on< 



r xv ^ 




v//S<~ 



ANCELYN WARNICK 



amma Jrlii Umicron 

pAMMA PHI OMICRON Sorority is a professional organi- 
^-* zation, established at the B. Y. L). in 1926. Its member- 
ip is selected from the upper third of the Junior and Senior 
girls majoring in Home Economics, on the basis of scholarship 
and practical application of subject matter. The club also 
functions socially. Among its most delightful affairs this year, 
were the reception given in November, the Formal Dinner 
Dance at the Hotel Roberts in February, the Anniversary 
Banquet, in May and the Alumni Breakfast in June. Beside 
these, a clever novelty party and business meeting and a 
professional meeting, were held each month. The club has con- 
tributed four volumes of Research papers to the Home Eco- 
nomics Library of the school and has established a loan fund 
which is rapidly growing. 



Evelyn Bryner 
Verna Burnham 
Elizabeth Cannon 
Esther Coombs 
Allie Dixon 
Vilate Elliot 
Belle Harris 
Thelma Jacobson 
Virginia Knell 



Mary Lyon 
Elsie Maughan 
Ireta Mortimer 
Murcy Nelson 
Rozena Nelson 
Evelyn Ostlund 
Margaret Peterson 
Norrel Startup 



Gwendolyn Stewart 
Margaret Swenson 
Ida Tanner 
Hazel Taylor 
Maud Tuckfield 
Angelyn Warnick 
Effie Warnick 
Helen Whitesides 
Emily Wright 




Page i >ne Hundred Sixty-two 




i AN VAN j ^ 



Friars 




00** 



'T'HIS is a club ocmposed of men who have filled missions for the Latter-day 
*■ Saints Church. The club is not confined to this campus but is directly con- 
nected with the chapter at the Universiy of Utah also the one at the State College. 
Over all is an executive president under whose direction the local presidents 
function. The purpose is to foster fellowship and to stimulate social, recreational 
and religious activity. 

The word "Friar" (meaning brother) is used to designate this organization 
because, historically, it has an intellectual as well as a religious significance, the 
Friars being practically the only men to carry any intellectual light over the 
chasm of the dark ages. Therefore, the name seems appropriate for such an 
organization on a college campus. 



Archie Anderson 

Rodney Ashby 
Gaius Call 
Roald Campbell 
Dee Chamberlain 
Da Costa Clark 
Anthon Clayson 
Pearson Corbett 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Earnest Clayton 



Norman Creer 
Ronald Dykes 
Stanley R. Gunn 
Delbert V. Brobert 
Grove Haddock 
Arthur llasler 
Orrin Jackson 
Fletcher Jones 
Howard Kelley 
James Kerr 



Vernon Larson 
Lee Lund 

A. Melvin McDonald 
Phares Nielson 
Elmer Peterson 
James Peterson 
Ervine Smith 
J. Foss Smith 
Joseph Whitehead 




Page One Hundred Sixty-three 



•*X\ 




**** 



4 




PRANK WHITING 



ask Clulb 

' I 11 E Mask Club is a local organization existing for the pur- 
pose of stimulating interest in and appreciation for the 
drama. In order to accomplish this end, the club has sponsored 
this year, a program widely appealing in variety and quality. 
Special features were the appearance here of Reed K. Andrews 
of the Church and Drama League, and the program given in 
College Hall by Roscoe Grover and the KSL entertainers. The 
year's activities were particularly filled with excellent play 
readings by the members of the class in play reading. 



Carma Ballif 
Eva Ballif 
Bernice Barton 
Frances Benedict 
Maybeth Bowman 
Evelyn Bryner 
LaPreal Bryner 
Alice Brinton 
Verna Bunker 
Gerald Caldwell 
Norma Christensen 
Maxine Clayton 
Velma Cox 
Mary Crafts 
Sarah Dixon 
Chloe Farrer 
Phyllis Fletcher 
Thelma Gardner 
Ora Gledhill 



Maurine Gourley 
Wilma Hansen 
Thella Hess 
Buryl llihbert 
Faun Ivins 
Gertrude King 
Belva Lee 
Lucy LeRoy 
Emily Madsen 
Dorothy Mensel 
Emma Mills 
Clara Moore 
Genevieve Morgan 
Boyd Nelson 
Ethel Nielson 
Nelda Parks 
Gertrude Partridge 
Elaine Paxman 
Edith Rich 



Josephine Roghaar 
Elizabeth Romney 
1 lelen Romney 
Iva Dell Sabin 
Eliza Smith 
Mary Smith 
Claude Snow 
Elida Snow 
Wanda Snow 
LaRue Snow 
Erma Stone 
Nita Wakefield 
Ruth Watts 
Frank Whiting 
Blanche Wilson 
Belva Wilson 
Joseph Winder 
Addie Wright 



^t&li* 




ip-V",* ' •-/ 



i'age One Hundred Sixty-four 



&** 



S5 




J^S 



°m 



BAN YAN 




^ 



Idaho Club 

THE animating spirit of the Idaho Club may be embodied 
as a person and christened "Friendliness." This friendliness 
to be explained by the fact that the members have analogous 
interests in: a particular vegetable — the spud; a certain area 
consisting of lava rock. sand, sage brush, and coyotes — Idaho: 
and a peculiar school, that is of sufficient attraction to make 
distance unimportant and homesickness a mere trifle — the 
Brigham Young University. The Idaho Club functions as a 
cooperation lor the furthering of social good times, one tradi- 
tional feature of which is the annual moonlight hike during 
the spring quarter. 




ROALD F. CAMPBELL 



Leonard Bacon 
Reed Barrett 
Marcella Bonneru 
Alta Mae Braithwaite 
Lola Braithwaite 
Leva Campbell 
Roald F. Campbell 

President 
Monna Campbell 
Farrell Collett 
Dan Dimick 
Gay Dimick 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Georgia Dimick 
Esther Dougan 
Blaine Fillmore 
Florence Fowler 
Delbert Groberg 
Grove Haddock 
Jay Haddock 



Eva Hamilton 
Eva Hansen 
Edna Harris 
flattie Harris 
Thella Hess 
Anson Higginson 
Mrs. Anson Higginson 
Mary Hubbard 
Aha Johanson 
Eva Johnson 
Delia Jones 
Howard Kelly 
Gertrude King 
Belva Lee 

Margaret Livingston 
Lucille Maughn 
Donald Merrill 
Ezra Murdock 
Cally Nelson 

Vice-President 



Jamie ( llsen 
Lewis Perkins 
Glen Potter 
Clement Prince 
Fenton Prince 
Edith Rich 
Josephine Roghaar 
Iva Dell Sabin 
Eliza Smith 
Mary Smith 
Sally Smith 
Ruth Stevens 
Erma Stone 
Mabel Stucki 
Nile Taylor 
Paul Taylor 
Dallas Tueller 
Golden Tueller 
Maurine Welker 
Hilda Widdison 



> 






• ; '* v "• <% * i 


»-J ,11'. ■■-. II. .- #r IL W 


U -*W- JI \L JP Ti^ 






Pag, i >>,<■ Hundred Si\ty live 




ZT5S 




■*""" 



MARVAI. ATW00D 



issiooaries 

"YY/''^ l ' le '" r ' ars Club appeared on the campus to replace 
» » the old Y. D. D. Club, the women who had returned from 
missions found themselves outside the gate of the new organiza- 
tion. Not to be outdone, the members of the weaker sex 
organized the young Ladies' Missionary Club. This is the second 
year for the organization. One of the most outstanding social 
functions of the group is the annual formal breakfast held 
during commencement week and to which all women mission- 
aries are invited. An extended effort has been made this year 
to make the organization known on the campus, especially 
those eligible for membership. The end of the school year 
closes a successful and happy season. 



La Preal Aagard 
Inez Allen 
Marval Atwood 
Erma Bennett 
Edna Bentwith 
Jennie Campbell 
Hope Chapman 
Agnes Clayson 
Man- Crafts 
Catherine Decker 



Vilate Elliot 
Flora Fisher 
Crace Hall 
Secretary 
Mary Hansen 
Jennie Jensen 
Delia Jones 
Jennie Knight 
Barbara Maughn 



Georgia Maeser 

First Vice-President 
Mable Mathews 
Eva Peterson 
Alice L. Reynolds 
Eliza Smith 
1 lilma Shell 
Pearl Snow- 
Lucy Sudweeks 
1 lilda Widdison 





BANYAN "\ ^m =s ^f^ 



Block Y Club 

IT is not difficult to identify and justify the existence of the 
Block "Y" Club on this campus. There is a camaraderie 
existing among all those who have won the right to wear the 
official block "V" insigna awarded for representing the school 
in one or more of the many intercollegiate contests. This 
spirit of kinship is given concrete expression in the orginazation 
which takes in all wearers of the "Y." 

Being a purely honorary institution, the club makes no 
attempt to function socially, although a spring dinner dance 
is one of the traditions. No one club on the campus is so rich 
in tradition as is this group, and none is better qualified to 
uphold the standards of Brigham Young. 



Hazel Aagard 
Joe Allen 
.Mark Ballif 
Anthony Bentley 
Karl Bunnell 
Yerna Burnham 
George Cooper 
George Corbet t 
Claude Eggertsen 
John Fechser 
Delbert Groberg 
Ray Haddock 
Waldo 1 lodson 
Paul Holt 



Vilda Jessen 
A. Rex Johnson 
Lowell Johnson 
Dix Jones 
Paul Keeler 
A. C. Lambert 
Ferron Losee 
Russell Magelby 
Jud Manson 
Flmo .Martin 
Lorenzo McGregor 
Gertrude Partridge 
Clemont Prince 
•enton Prince 




Wendell Poulsen 
Theodore Raille 
Boyd Rasmussen 
Helen Romney 
Basil Skousen 
Marvin Skousen 
Neff Smart 
Blanche Thomas 
Paul Thome 
Grant Thurgood 
Golden Tueller 
Clarence Vacher 
I larold Van Wagenen 




1 One Hundred Sixty -mi t-« 



r^w. 




/S'" 



^ 




Speech Class 



PROFESSOR III M ROWE 



•"PHIRTY-EIGHT men and twenty-nine women make up the 
sections of Speech 2 and Speech 63. In the group are win- 
ners of various awards in oratory and debate. As a group and 
as individuals these students have manifested a wholesome 
influence in their work and have attained no slight degree of 
excellence in the art of speech. One is safe in predicting a social 
and intellectual uplift in the communities where they reside. 
Many of them will teach in high-chools and seminaries. Others 
will study in various universities. 



Burnell Aagard 
Phyllis Adams 
Mary Ashby 
Lucreiia Ashby 
Harold Bailey 
Walter Basinger 
Adelia Bayles 
Anna Beardall 
Eileen Chipman 
Maurine Christensen 
Melba Christensen 
Morris dinger 
Edna Coleman 
Josinette Cook 
Mary Crafts 
Ralph Crafts 
Myrtle Deuel 
Si vian Edgel 
Alice Facer 
Takeo Fujiwara 
Zoe Garfield 
Ora Gledhill 
Ben F. Goe 



Walter Hammond 
Curtis Harding 
Horace Hardy 
Flo Heindselman 
Tubou Heitig 
Waldo I lodson 
Fred Horlacher 
Audrey Jackson 
Orrin Jackson 
Udell Jackson 
Dorothea Jensen 
Mabel Johnson 
Reed Jones 
Wendell Jones 
Veda Kartchner 
James J. Kerr 
Harold Lowe 
Charles McKell 
Lucille McMillan 
Orion Memmott 
Lzra Murdock 
Ralph B. Nelson 
Exilda Nielson 



Phares Nielson 
Gertrude Partridge 
Elaine Paxman 
Elmer Peterson 
Thora Pickett 
Ann Price 
Esther Pulley 
Freda Rasmussen 
Paul Ripp'e 
Vernon Scott 
Glenn Se'ers 
Joseph Swasey 
Blaine Swenson 
Golden Tueller 
Margaret Utley 
Ardeen Van Leuven 
Rowe Vincent 
Moroni Ward 
Monta Wentz 
Frank Whiting 
Archie Williams 
Ora n Williams 







/'.::/ ')>/, Hundred Sixty-eight 




DaivM Starr Jordan Biology Climb 



REED ANDERSON 
Rl I sE ANDERSON 
D. ELDON BE( K 
HOWARD (.ON AM 
DR. WAI TER COTTAM 
OWEN DAVIS 



BARNEY DOUCAI I. 
JOHN EECHSER 
President 

Bl R I RAND HARRISON 
I I GENE I01INSON 
RAY loNTs 



DOYLI I 11)1)1 E 
BEN MARKHAM 
LUCILE MAUGHN 
ROLAND RIGBY 
EDNA SNOW 



BEN STAHMAN 
MAX STEWART 
MARGARI I SWENSEN 
\\ II I 1AM STANTON 
DK VASCO TANNER 
RAY WHITING 





Y Chemical Society 



IAY HECK 
HERMAN ISENIAMS 
I OKI -N C. URYNER 
HAROLD COLVIN 
DELBERT GREENWOOD 



VAUGHN IIL N I I R 
ALVA IOIIANSON 
MYRON IORGENSEN 
VERNON LARSEN 
DR. CHAS E. MAW 



MAURICE |. Mil I s 
HARVEY MILLER 
KENNETH Mil I lli 
JAMES MILLER 
RULON PAXMAN 



II \\ PETERSON 
ORVAI POLLY 
soREN ROSS 

President 
FRED STAHMAN 



IDA TANNER 







Page One Hundred Sixty-nine 




'"^ 




Spanish Club 



Margaret Bird, Vera Rush. Anthony I. Bentley, Lowell Boberg, Joseph Brown, Farrell Collett, Cleon Coolie, VVillard Call, Caius Call, 
President; Myrtle Deuel, Harold Fitzgerald, Ella Farnsworth. Anna Hughes. Charles Heinze, Hilda Hodgekinson. Ezra Murdock. 
Loya Nielson, Leah Peterson, Norman C. Pierce, George Swallow. Keith Wangsgaard, Floyd W'alser. Loren Whetten. Lester Whetten. 
Wright Welker, Lloyd Young.. 





Germtian Cliwlb 



rna Allen, Ree\.\ Anderson, Bernice Barton, Herman Beniams. Vera Busch. Walter Buss. Yelda Carson. Howard Cottam, 
B. F. Cummings, John Fechser, Floyd Fletcher, Grove M. Hadd >ck, John HalLday, Frank Harris. Fred Horlacher, Waldo Hodson, 
Imri llutchings, Paul lluish, Lavar Isaacson, Alva Johanson, Gerrit De Jong, Jr., Alee Jones, Blanche Jones, Dix Jones. Roy Jones. 
\ irgil Kartchner. /elda Larsen, Rose Leichty, Fred Loveless, Kenneth Miller, Milo Moody. Ralph Morgan. Clara Prusse, Walter 
Roberts, Ferron S.iger. Gertrude Sauer, Foss Smith, Irvine Smit h, Max Stewart, Elizabeth Sorenson, Ormand Weight, Josephine White. 
I nis White, Quinn Whiting. Archie Williams. Willam Wixom, Clara Woodhouse. 



.«£? 



l'<iRe One Hundred Seventy 



._<*£( 



"»X> 



gi 




^BANYAN 





Popularity 



&So. 





SINA BRIMHALL 
(Beauty 





EVA MAE SORENSON 
^Beauty 










ZOLA MARTIN 
^Beauty 





SARAH DIXON 
^Popularity 





JOE ALLEN 
Hajidsome Man 





CLUG VACHER 
(Popular cyVfan 




&far BAN YAN 




Tlie Editor's Finale 



■ i 



OITTING at the typewriter in a frenzied last minute rush, the Editor is wondering as to the 
reception his book will be given. His nerves are worn down by the pressure of the little time 
remaining, so he feels like saying to critics, "You can go to the appropriate place of adequate heat 
intensity provided and reserved for intolerants. bigots, and people of superlative ability who would 
have made the book so much better." But, of course, this would not be delicate so the Editor must 
express himself in terms of better refinement and culture. 

Therefore, in the most approved humble and apologetic manner supposed to be assumed by 
all culprits, we beseech you to consider with leniency the results of our most unworthy efforts. 
Eor a \ear we have slept with the Banyan, it has haunted our dreams and dogged our daily foot- 
steps for a year we have worked and planned, altered and built: for a twelve-month we have 
argued and pled, perspired and despaired; for weeks and weeks we have mounted photos, written 
articles, cursed staff members, printers, and engravers Fervidly and sincerely: and now the thing 
is done. 

But, stay — the Editor still must expiate some how the crime of the misspelled name, the 
wrongly placed photo, and the horrid appearance of the blonde girl whose features were distorted 
by an unkind photographer. We realize that no punishment, however severe, is enough, but serious 
reflection on the matter has suggested that he be sentenced to pay and pay by being forced to daily 
review his atrocities as they have been perpetrated and perpetuated in the 1930 Banyon. 

But at any rate, here it is. Eorsaking facetiousness. the Editor must express appreciation to 
his staff who have done so much for the book. Without detailing it all to you who cannot realize 
the effort it has taken, let us mention particularly the work of the art staff, Eurav Anderson and 
I-ermen Westergard; the loyalty of Angelyn Warnick who prepared the life section: the diligence 
ot Grant Hastings who performed most of the menial tasks required in commendable fashion; and 
the painstaking work of Yilda Jessen whose efforts in organization and planning meant so much. 
In addition let us not forget Ethel Alder, whose nimble fingers typed so much correspondence 
and copy sheets; Clyde Sandgren, who labored as one of the associate editors; Rex Christensen, 
who earned his award in two days' work; Alice Brinton. who prepared the W. A. A. section; Lynn 
Broadbent, who gathered photos; Dixie Mangum, who handled high school pages: Bert Harrison, 
who skill with the camera acquired all the views, athletic pictures, and many of the social unit 
and club photos; Evelyn Ostlund, who supervised the work on the organization section; Rosy 
Snow, who did an excellent job of the sports write-ups; to say nothing of the highly efficient busi- 
ness staff whose work made the job a financial success. J. Grant Thurgood and Norman Bingham. 



>.££* 



Page One Hundred Seventy-eight 



TfS* 




Feature 



■<^° 




BAN VAN p , jf/ 





._^< 



s= 




BAN^Niy <SQJ 



The Pageant Of The Ages 

/^vNE of the most spectacular presentations of the year was given in the Salt Lake Tabernacle 
from April 6 to May 3. It was "The Pageant of the Ages." produced by the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as a part of the great celebration arranged in commemoration 
of the founding of the church a hundred years ago. During the period of its showing it was seen 
by thousands of people who came from nearly all parts of the world to see it. It was, of course, of 
interest primarily to Mormons, but so colorful was it that great numbers of people not of this faith 
were numbered among those who saw its performance. 

That an adequate description of the Pageant could be condensed in the limited space provided 
here is an impossibility. Those who saw it will not need the lew words inscribed here to bring it 
vividly to mind again, and those who were unable to see it could never realize the force of its 
appeal from a mere printed summary. In music, in poetry, and in dramatic color it beautifully 
presented Mormon doctrine, philosophy, and faith. 

The success of the undertaking is due directly to the efforts of the committee in charge — men 
and women of ability, foresight, and vision. Of that committee some of the most important 
members are present and past members of Brigham Young University's faculty and student body. 
No one who attended the presentation of the Pageant could fail to be impressed with the artistry 
of its arrangement and color — its marvelous scenic effects beggar description. I his most import- 
ant phase of the work was in charge of one of B. V. U.'s own faculty members, Professor Elbert 
II. Iiastmond, of the Art Department. 

Possessing an unusual amount of innate ability in addition to skill acquired through constant 
study and application, Professor Eastmond was the logical man to supervise the art work of the 
Pageant, lie has had a great deal of experience in pageantry, and is a recognized authority on the 
art. His indefatigueable efforts are well-known to all with whom he has worked in the past, and 
a deep appreciation for his interest and effort is felt by all who have been associated with him. 
Because of the high standards of his workmanship, his loyalty and devotion to a task once under- 
taken, and the willingness with which he assists projects requiring his aid. he has gained the 
admiration and respect of all. 

Another member of the faculty of this school who performed no slight service in the interests 
ol the Pageant is Professor LeRoy Robertson of the Music Department who .composed most of the 
special music for the occasion. Valuable assistance was also rendered by the I lome Economics girls 
who helped with the costuming. Many other B. Y. U. students participated in the performance 
and in other ways assisted. Thus the Pageant became a feature in the lives of a great many 
connected with this school. 






Page One Hundred Eighty-one 



J"***!* 



<v 




^gT ^fe- BANYAN 



^ 




"»V 




Sife-BAN YAN 




*** 



OOli 



L & 



w 



/^\NE of the features of student life is the annual Pep Vodie held prior to the 
basketball games played here with Utah. The Utes and Cougars have always 
been rivals to a mean degree, and the intensity of feeling has resulted in many 
spectacular battles. It has not been at all unusual for the Redskins to take the 
contests played in Salt Lake, while the Cougars have managed to take most of 
the conflicts staged in the home lair. In order to insure the latter result, the Pep 
Vodie is staged at the psychological moment to arouse student interest and 
enthusiasm to a pitch of fervid loyalty. A contest is staged between social units, 
the winner to be given a lull page in the Banyan. Elsewhere in this book is 
pictured the victorious act. 

Some most unusual talent is nearly always uncovered in the performance, 
and it is said that this year's Vodie surpassed all others in professional workman- 
ship. Hilariously funny, dizzily conglomerate, weirdly kaleidoscopic, fantastic 
in the extreme, the Vodie as a whole was a tremendously impressive and enjoyable 
vehicle this year. 







11 



I'age One Hundred Eighty-four 



._<*fo. 



" xv ^^ 



f 




Page One Hundred Eigbly-jive 




y 



*BAN YAN 




•"" 



Summer School 

QUMMER school at Brigham Young University lias become as important as 
the other three quarters of the school year. Regular students of the school 
attend it. and many from all parts of the country are attracted to it because 
of its special Alpine session. The first few weeks of the school are spent on the 
campus, but the middle of the summer sees the students all packing up and going 
to the coolness of the Alpine camp. Here, near the summit of famous old Tim- 
panogos, the last weeks are spent, and it is not difficult to imagine the enjoyment 
of those who participate in the acivities in this place. 

With the regular faculty of the school greatly augmented by professors of 
note from other schools throughout the I nited States, valuable instruction awaits 
all who are fortunate enough to be listed as students. Nowhere can be found a 
more desirable spot lor a summer school session. 




Page 0)u- Hundred I-ighty-six 




rBAN YAN 









tV Yv 

V 

^ y 

V Women 



&£< 




3BB - ^^^ 

^BANYAN 




The Wo nti ems' Athletic Association 




THE Women's Athletic Association of Brigham Young University, though still 
in its infancy, is progressing each year and has achieved many of its aims. 
The motto of the association is "A girl for every sport and a sport for every girl." 
The girls are becoming more interested in getting out of doors and having a jolly 
good time as well as in playing inside games together. 

The year 1929-30 began with the annual get-acquainted party at which every 
social unit was represented. Points, according to the percentage of the unit present, 
were given towards the cup which is to be presented to the social unit having the 
largest number of points at the end of the year. This cup is being donated by the 
Frank J. Mullet Jewelry Co. To keep the cup it must be won two years in 
succession. 

Basketball was the next activity in line and a tournament that created great 
interest took place in March and ran for one week. At the close of the tournament 
the Beaux Art. winning team, challenged an all-star team of the school and defeated 
them. This team has yet to meet its equal. 

April 24 saw the girls of the "Y" participating in the annual track meet. 
Those teams who met in basketball again met for surpremacy of track and added 
more points toward the cup. 

W. A. A. members and officers officiated entirely at the girls Annual invita- 
tional track meet on April 25 and 26th. They also assisted in entertaining over 
200 girls who participated in the posture parade. 

Representatives were sent to the convention of the three Utah schools held at 
Utah this year. It was held at the "Y" last year. 

Each year four girls receive honor sweaters for their activities in various 
sports. These are given to the four outstanding girls having 1500 or more points. 
This year those to receive sweaters are Lilly Skousen, foremost girl basketball 
star, and sophomore; Buryl Hibbert, senior: LaPreal Bryner, junior; and Lucille 
Thorne, junior. 

Bessie Meiling has been a most capable sponsor and because of her past 
experience and work in the W. A. A. she has given many valuable suggestions 
and good advice and has added to the strength and popularity of the organization. 



icers 



Alice Brinton 
Evelyn Bryner . 
LaPreal Bryner 
Beryl Hibbert . 
Edna I lolbrook 



.£&■ 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Reporter 



Page One Hundred Eighty-eight 



._^o. 



^v 




Page One Hundred Eighty-nine 



r*^ 





3 A N VAN j k _ur/' 



m 



WT" 





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K? 



Bunyon 



.^So. 




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*BAN YAN 




*^ 



Never Be 
Late 



The V News 



Always Be 
There 



Vol. forty-ate 



Date — Anywhere From Saturday to Frida\ 



Page won 



SUNDAY SCHOOL WILL BE 
HELD AT REGULAR TIME 



By T. FIettig 

When I was in the South Sea 
Islands I laughed the day I was 
born, and people knew right there 
that someday I'd be a big Editor 
like — Editor of the "Y" Knews! 
(Con-tin-ewed) 



ADVERTISEMENT 

Sour Pickles can now be bought 

in full quart bottles. 

CALL AT THE "-Y" NEWS 

OFFICE— nuf sed. 



ROUND ABOUT 

It is reported in Colorado Ag- 
ricultural Bulletin — that after 
Monday will come Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day. 




These are strange days — so 
many people are dying that never 
tlied before. 



The U. of U. admitted a great 
ber of students this year. 



Pat- 


ad- 


ron- 


ver 


ize 


Us- 


our 


ers. 



PHYSICIANS BAFFLED AT UNUSUAL 

y 4 BRAIN OF "Y" STUDENTS AT B. Y. U., ETC: 




NUMERAL "Y" RECEIVES 
WHITEWASH 



They was a great turmoil and 
confusion, heaving of skuddles of 
kalsomite liquid, as the Strang 
NUMERAL on the hill was draw 
ed on. 

According to custom. 

Sunlights came heaving in the 
radiant gulps, the "oith" trmbled 
with tramping feet and the 



STAFFMEETING AT FOUR 
THIRTY O CLOCK 
notice 



Tuesday staff will meet today 
to rehearse the selection of next 
sear's banyan editor. 

S-C-R-A-T-C-H members in- 
vited 



students were fanguished at 
last someone bellowed "Dinner" 
in groggy laughter. However *** 
and all galloped gleefully their 
coat tails flying gaily in the wind 
as they dashed like buckroes to 
the incline base. 



ne Hundred Ninety-two 



yf60. 



Many take ILL AS FUNNY 
bone is rubbed on reading Tail- 
yard Topics? 



To one, however, whose name 
is withheld for personal reasons, 
the illness proved fatale? Flis last 
words to his mother 

- - - - kciretsa kciretsa kciretsa 
erew 

Taylors brain has revealed the 
startling fact that he has a double 
madula in connection with his 
double chin. This is the only 
case of its kind since the Grand 
Canyon was built. This undoubt- 
edly accounts for his huge ambi- 
tion to be essentric — one of these 
roller men that wears white kid 
gloves. At the age of three his 
mother bought him a squirt gun. 
(To be continued on page 4) 



TA1LYARD TOPICS 

by sam taylor 

ASTERICK! ASTERICK! 
ASTERICK! ASTERICK! 

ASTERICK! ASTERICK! 
ASTERICK! ASTERICK! 

Now aint that sumpin. 
AasterICK! ASTERICK! 
I have a boil on my nose. 
ASTERICK! ASTERICK! 
cracky I'm a hard boiled guy. I 
don't like amos and Andy. 
ASTERICK! 

ASTERICK! 

ASTERICK! 
(Continued on page to) 




«BAN VAN 




V 



Hats Cleaned and Blocked 



Rugs Shampooed 



ProTO Cleaning A Dyeing Co. 

CLEANING, PRESSING and REPAIRING 

The Quality of Our Work is Much Higher Than Our Prices 
77 North First West FREE DELIVERY Telephone 46 



edieatioo 



A REVERED and beloved tradition of past editors, which we here propose to 
do our share in perpetuating, is the dedication of the Bunyon. In order that 
we avoid making enemies it is imperative that the one on whom this honor is 
bestowed be carefully chosen. After reviewing recent issues of the Bunyon, which 
we find to be dedicated to such as skunks, mountains and donkeys, and after 
many hours of serious reflection and sober deliberation and many nights of tossing 
sleeplessly in bed debating the question, we have made a choice and believe that 
it is in harmony with the past custom of dedicating the Bunyon to something 
insignificant which has not the intelligence to know that it is being attacked or, 
having that amount of "grey-matter," has not the power of retaliating. We have 
chosen tor this honor an organization which, if, by a very improbable chance, it 
has sufficient consciousness to sense the derision in this act, will have very little 
opportunity for avenging its injured honor. Not only is this dedication appropriate 
for these reasons but also because the recipient of this distinction is already an 
ancient enemy of Banyans and BUNYONS. Since ours is an annual publication 
which does not have the opportunity of replying publicly to attacks upon it, as 
they are frequently made throughout the year in the publication of the organization 
to which this is to be dedicated, we very appropriately and with an intense and 
time honored hatred, augmented by a year's accumulation of insults, dedicate 
this 1930 BUNYON TO THE "Y" NEWS AND ITS STAFF. 



■&#' 



!>/3<S. 



Page One Hundred Ninety-three 




c i 






■sffofii •' 




0\ ^BANYAN li 
*^ — "" ^i 




*^ 



B. Y. U. 

The firms listed below are our loyal supporters. When you are buying they 
should be given first consideration. The following does not include our supporters 
on the Business and Professional Page. 



Banyan Lunch 

Beckers Products Co. 

Bennett Culmers Co. 

Bonneville Lumber Co. 

Brimhall Bros. 

Browns Ice Cream 

B. Y. U. Cafeteria 

Callahan Hardware Co. 

Christensen Clothing Co. 

Columbia Coke 

Consolidated Wagon & Machine Co. 

Crane Co. 

Chrysler Motor 

Curtis Zarr 

Dixon Real Estate Co. 

Eccles Hotels 

Elias Morris & Sons Co. 

Farrer Bros. Co. 

Farmers' and Merchants Bank 

Furniture Exchange 

Glade Candy Co. 

Hansen Cash Grocery 

Hotel Roberts 

Inter-Mountain Woolen Mills 

John T. Taylor Grocery 

J. Edwin Stein 

J. C. Penney Co. 

Knight Trust & Savings Bank 

Ladies' Floral Co. 

Larsen, P. L. 

Leven's Chain Stores, Inc. 

Lewis Ladies' Store 

Madsen Cleaning Co. 

Maiben Glass & Paint 

National French Cleaning Co. 

O. P. Skaggs 



Paramount Theatre (Provo) 
Provo Book Bindery 
Provo Foundry & Machine Co. 
Provo Cleaning & Dyeing Co. 
Provo Greenhouse 
R-K-0 

Robinson Inc. 

Salt Lake & Utah Railroad 
Sh river's 

Smoot Lumber Co. 
Sowards Grocery 
Standard Market 
Strand Theatre 
Students Supply Association 
Superior Motor 
Superior Rotisserie 
Sutton Cafe 
Sutton Market 
Taylor Bros. Co. 
Taylor Paper Co. 
Telluride Motor Co. 
Timpanogos Butter 
The Leader 
The Little Hungry 
Union Knitting Mills 
University Market 
Utah-Idaho School Supply Co 
Utah Motor Tours Co. 
Utah Piggly-Wiggly Co 
Utah Photo Supply- 
Utah Power and Light Co. 
Utah Sugar 

Utah Valley Gas & Coke Co. 
Utah-Idaho Cement Co. 
Van Photo Supply 
"Y" Drug 
Z. C. M. 1. 



Page One Hundred Ninety-lour 



^So. 



■sir BAN YAN 



f 



*£fl£J 




LET NOTHING MAR THE I 1 1 ±%'i I I 

OE YOUR TRIP 



With Pep '88' in your gas tank, and Vico motor oil in your 
crankcase, your fuel and lubrication worries are simply non- 
existent! For these famous products are always of the highest 
quality that science knows how to produce. Pep '88' is sweet 
and clean - - - packed with power. Vico motor oil stands up 
under hard usage and intense heat. Power and protection 
for your motor. Look for Pep and Vico signs. 



Distributed by 

I < him II -< iiIiim i Company 

PROVO, UTAH 



PEP 68 

NEW 




ICO 



[PARAFFIN] 



.^So. 



Page One Hundred Ninety-five 




j\ g^-EAN V AN ^ ^j/r 



</"- 



Interior of Farmers and Merchants Bank 




"A Friendly Bank to All." 



A PERFECT SETTING 

The day was warm, and the birds were war- 
bling. Our hero is tall and dark. The heroine 
is beautiful and dumb. He said, "Is there any- 
thing I can do for you, Mary?" 

She simply smiled and gave him the works! 

You see he was a jeweler and her watch was on 
the blink. 



Ted: "1 have added up this invoice ten times. 



sir. 



H. R.: "Well?" 

Ted: "And here are the ten answers." 



Prof: "What steps would you make if you 
detected poisonous gas escaping in a room?" 

Student: "Running ones." 




E LITTLE HUNGRY 

HOT TOASTED SANDWICHES 

HAMBURGERS AND HOT DOGS, HAM, EGGS, CHEESE and TUNA FISH 

CHILLI, COFFEE, PIES, SOFT DRINKS, ICE CREAM, 

CONFECTIONS, CIGARS, TOBACCO, CIGARETTES 



Best of Counter Service 



Opposite Steel Plant 



A. W. Edwards, Prop. 



Pa-^e One Hundred Ninety-six 



,„^0 



•*X\ 




//"' 



CHRYSLER 




PLYMOUTH 



42 East First North 



FOR BEAUTY, STYLE, COMFORT 

DURABILITY and ECONOMY 
Harvey Motor Company 

PROVO, UTAH Telephone 1057 



"Mother wanted to know what we were doing Mrs. Boyle: "1 didn't accept Clarence the first 

on the sofa until three o'clock this morning." time he proposed." 

"What did you tell her?" Clarence: "I know you didn't — you weren't 

"That we were studying our lessons in there." 

Anatomy." 

Talk about tough luck! 1 got &. check for ten 

dollars the other day and the only man in college 

"May I hold vour hand?" that could identify me at the bank was a bird 

"No, thanks. It isn't heavy!" I owed eight bucks to! 




These spreading branches represent our many friends. The roots symbolize our growth. The 
fruit typifies the satisfaction created from the rich soil of service, quality, price, home-like atmos- 
phere, spirit of good will and helpfulness. 

THE BANYAN LUNCH 

Just Across the Street 



i 



r^< 



jf" 



Page One Hundred Ninety-<.even 




-A. 




WBAN VAN 




*** 



When You're up on Your Toes— 

You're not Down in the Mouth 

The world is rich in rewards for the energetic. There never was a time in the 
history of the world for making money like that which invites the "DOER" today. 
It's the "DOERS" who wear a beaten path to the bank door. 

A Savings Account With the 

KNIGHT TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK 

Is an Asset to Energy 




Main Lobby 



Knight Trust and Savings Bank 

proyo, utah 
Capital $300,000.00 

J. WM. KNIGHT, President 
R. E. Allen, Vice-President W. E. Allen, Cashier and Trust Officer 

F. G. VVarnick. Vice-President W. VV. Allen. Assistant Cashier 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL TRUST 

"There Is No Substitute for Safety" 



'. . One Hundred Ninety-eight 



._^< 



j [ g^EAN VAN j L ,-^T C ^2% 



SUTTON CAFE 

"A Good Place to Eat" 

PROVO. UTAH 



CASH TELLS THE STORY AT 
JOHN T TAYLOR'S GROCERY CO. 



PHONES 11 and 28 



ENFORCING SACRED BYU. TRADITIONS 




Many students work their way through college by selling our line 
during the summer months. 

We have been operating successfully for over twenty-seven years. 

Our line is thoroughly complete and very high grade, 
interested write us at Logan, Utah, and we will arrange an appointment 

UNION KNITTING MILLS CO 

Geo. W. Skidmore, Manager 
LOGAN, UTAH 



#$0 ^ 



Page One Hundred Ninety-nine 



"*V 




V ^v, 



girEAN VAN j ^ _^r 



**"• 



1929-'30 STAFF 



STUDENTS SUPPLY 
ASSOCIATION 

Often Called the Stadium Co-op 

The Students 9 Store 



rBAN VAN j ^, ,-^tir 



TIMPANOCOS BUTTER 

When You Phone Say— TIMPANOGOS 
For Sale At All Grocers 

nogos Creamery 

TELEPHONE 213 OS. Olsen, Manager PROVO, UTAH 




SPRING- STYLES 



Orph 



&um 



Where You Hear and 
See the Best 

The Pick of 

Warner Brothers — First National 

Paramount — Fox — Pathe 

Metro Goldwyn Mayer 

United Artist 

Talking - Singing 
Pictures 



AT THE THEATRE 

"Why do you keep on applauding such a 
very poor play?" 

"To keep myself awake." 



A sure sign of Spring is when you read a lot 
of jokes beginning "A sure sign of Spring — ." 



Friend: "When you proposed, did you tell 
her you were unworthy of her?" 

Second Ditto: "Yes, and she agreed." 



Bonneville 


Lumber 


Co. 


"That Good 


Place To 


Trade" 


HERMAN HINZE 


Manager 


298 S. University Ave. Phone 104 



rao. n ..... H .. M ..._...J^- 



Page Two Hundred One 



"*V 




^^^ 





gJBAN YAN | _^J>/' 



*** 



Columbia Coke 



€ h« FhoI Without a Juuli 



Experts figure that the average American breathes five times 
his weight in soot and dirt every twelve months and that the 
national damage caused by smoke in the air exceeds 
$500,000,000 annually. When burning Columbia Coke there is 
no SOOT or DIRT. Protect your health and save on vour 
heating bills by burning this exceptionally fine fuel. 



CALL YOUR DEALER OR TELEPHONE 204 

Direct for Information or Service 



Columbia Coke 



The Dependable Fuel for the Home 



Buy It 



Burn It 



You'll Like It 



£-— .-^o 



/ wo Hundred Two 



■*v 




^BANYAN 




**^ 



STRAND THEATRE 



QUALITY ENTERTAINMENT 



R. E. Sutton, Mgr. 



Phone 749 




HIS WAY OUT 
A boy punctuated his compo- 
sitions very poorly. Frequent 
corrections were of no avail, and 
the boy was dismayed, the teacher 
disgusted. Finally, the boy hand- 
ed in his essay with a great 
string of dots and dashes at the 
end of the effusion. 

"What are these marks for?" 
the teacher asked. 

"Oh, those are the punctuation 
marks." replied the boy. "Put 
them in to suit vourself." 



Girl Friend: "Was Euray dif- 
ficult to entertain last night?" 

Vilda: "Well, I'll admit I 
found myself pressed several 
times." 



ECCLES HOTELS 

Commercial Headquarters 



Good Eating Accommodations 
Comfortable Rooms 

Reasonable Rates 



Blackfoot, Idaho 



Logan, Utah 





9<3 0. 



Page Two Hundred Three 



J& 




^ 



***» 



<m BANYAN ! ^jf' 



<*" 



EAT 






BROWN'S 


ICE 


CREAM 




FOR 


HEALTH 




Made in the Cleanest Factor 


' in the West 




TELEPHONE 315 




OGDEN, 


UTAH 






Sfr 








ILLUSTRATING THe PURPOSE OF THE HUDDLE = TO FIND SlMBA'S TEETH 



The Leader Ine. 

READY-TO-WEAR AND MILLINERY 

PROVOS POPULAR STORE 
High Grade Merchandise Very Reasonably Priced 

You Will Always Find the Seasons' "Newest" and 
"Smartest" Styles Here 



I'agt T-wo Hundred Four 




. --9^30 







BANYAN & ^j// 



,/"^ 



•Wl" 



SHRIVER'S 



IT/ry Young Men Like This Store 

You like it for its style, leadership, for its good taste, 

its fitting service, for its values, and you have faith 

in its standards of quality. 






HART SCHAFFNER AND MARX CLOTHES 



STETSON AND DOBBS HATS 



WILSON BROTHERS FURNISHINGS 



FLORSHEIM SHOES 



> v <■ 



Exclusive Representative in Provo 



SHRIVER'S 

Sixteen West Center Street 
PROVO, UTAH EUREKA, UTAH 



Page Two Hundred Five 





iN VAN Jk 

W 



f 



Enlargements, Photo Supplies, Photo Finishing, Color Prints of Scenic Utah. Photo Finishing is 
an art, an art of which we are masters. We finish films, make enlargements and color prints, 
and supply even- photographic requirement. We maintain the most complete collection of scenic 
Utah views in the West. 

UTAH PHOTO MATERIALS CO. 

11 West South Temple SALT LAKE CITY', UTAH Opposite Temple Square 



Nelda P.: "I wish 1 could get into the movies!" .Medico: "Your teeth look bad. Do vou brush 

Fred M.: "I've only got seventy cents, but them often.-" 



go, if vou don't mind the balconv." 



Anna: "But I'm too young to marry." 
Brownie: "Well, I'm only proposing.' 



"That man cheated me of a million dollars!' 
"Mow?" 

le wouldn't allow me to marrv his daughter!' 



Vou are no gentleman." 
You aren't either. Miss!" 




Stude: "I brush them religiously, sir — every 
Sunday morning!" 



Beth A.: "I don't like Jack. Last night 1 
wanted him to see how well I could whistle, and 
when I puckered up my lips — " 

Nell H.: "Well, what then?" 

Beth A.: "He let me whistle." 



A bachelor is a man with no children to speak 



of. 



erate Cost 

In A Modern Electrified Home You Will Find 

AN ELECTRIC RANGE 

A GENERAL ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR 

AN ELECTRIC WATER HEATER 

And All on an Economical One-Meter Volt 

UTAH POWER A LIGHT CO, 

"Efficient Public Service" 



__^o 




^BAN YANl 

■ - "Csju 




Business and Professional Page 



PROFESSIONAL 

GEORGE S. BALLIF, ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 
City and County Building 

M. B. POPE, ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 
Knight Block 

MORGAN AND MORGAN, LAWYERS 

(A. B. MORGAN, J. RULON MORGAN) 

Provo Commercial Bank Building 



BUSINESS 



CASS1TY MOTOR CAR COMPANY (NASH) PROVO 



M. Fl. GRAHAM PRINTING COMPANY 



"Y" BARBER SHOP, BRIG STEVENS, MANAGER 



POST PUBLISHING COMPANY 



CARPENTER SEED COMPANY 



PROVO REALTY COMPANY, 124 WEST CENTER 



S. B. ROBINSON MUSIC CO., 104 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.— PHONE 137 



HEINDSELMAN OPTICAL & JEWELRY COMPANY— 120 WEST CENTER 




... .-9^0 




Page Two Hundred Seven 



r**** 




4*~ 



1 1 IMIIVII BROTHERS 




"TIRE MERCHANTS" 






QUALITY TIRE REPAIRING 






223 West Center PROVO, UTAH 


Telephone 


260 



M£noi?iuiv| 

TAT? 130 



J3,.^3»tf 










INTER-MOUNTAIN 




KNITTING MILLS, 


Inc. 




Manufacturers an Distributors of 






CUSTOM MADE CLOTHING 


We 


Welcome 

To Student Salesmen 


We Cater 




Arrange for an interview by phone or 


mail 




J. Edwin Nelson, Manager 




1879 Washi 


ngton Ave. 

OGDEN, UTAH 


Telephone 953 



Page Two Hundred Eight 



yf6*. 




5^-BAN VAN 




//^ 



DIXON 


REAL ESTATE 


CO. 






Six 


Per Cent Money To Loan 






Insurance - 


Ho 


mes - Bonds - Loans 


- Rentals 


TELEPHONE 75 




236 West Center 


provo, 


UTAH 



"Everything for Office and School" 
UTAH-IDAHO SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 



155 South State Street 



Salt Lake City, Utah 



TRY AND GET IT 

Mail Order Co. 
Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sirs: 

Enclosed find 11 cents in stamps. Please send 
me the hair-brush on page 3671. 

Yours truly, 

Ott Romney. 

Dear Mr. Kramer: 



Mail Order Co. 

Dear Sirs: 

Please send me hair-brush on page 367. No. 



2769G. Please rush. 



Yours truly, 

Frank Kramer. 



Dear Mr. Kramer: 

We thank you for vour order of recent date 



We thank you for your order of recent date. You have neglected to state the color of brush 

You will note there are two hair-brushes on page No. 2769G. Please reorder and give full informa- 

367. Kindly reorder and give full information. .• 

Yours truly, Very truly, 

M. O. C. M. O. C. 



He Who Chooses GLADE'S Chooses Wisely 



GLADE CANDY C 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



.^6o. 



Page Two Hundred Nine 





_ gjfe-PAN VAN 




We Want 




MORE STUDENTS' CLEANING AND PRESSING 


Madseo Cleaning 


j Co* 


Call 475 


Free Delivery 



Mail Order Co. 
Dear Sirs: 

Send me brush Number 2769G, color black. 
Yours truly, 

Frank Kramer. 



Dear Mr. Kramer: 



Dear Mr. Kramer: 

We find that you have neglected to enclose We have carefully searched all our files and 

the amount of black hairbrush Number 2769. fail to find a record of any order from you 

which is 72 cents. Please write us again and give full information. 
Very truly, Very truly, 

Mail Order Co. Mail Order Co. 




Mail Order Co. 
Dear Sirs: 

1 wrote you on October 1st and sent you 
72 cents in stamps. 

Yours truly, 

Frank Kramer. 



University Market 



Meats and Groceries 




J. J. Booth, Prop. 



Phones 273-274 



498 North University Ave. 



—.^3 O ................ 



Page Two Hundred Ten 




N VAN j y _^jf' 



/Jf 



Utah Motor Tours Company 

Regular Stage, Salt Lake to Bingham Canyon 
Wasatch 1069 Salt Lake City, Utah 




Special Sightseeing Cars for Rent At Any Time 

7 Passenger to 30 Passenger Cars — We Go Anywhere in 

the Scenic West 



T?$< 




Past Two Hundred I U 1 1 n 




^ 



lUf 02fe- BANYAN & ' ^^ 

8S -Jfe^!^ 



P* L* Larsen 

PLUMBING 

HEATING 

SHEET METAL 

WORKS 



♦>♦:♦ 
♦ 



343 West Center Street 
PHONE 574 



What You Can Do for Your 
COMMUNITY 

Eliminate the SMOKE NUISANCE by 
Using GAS for Heating 

While heating with gas, your cost, 
including cooking, hot water heating, 
and Gas refrigeration, runs between 
30 cents and 35 cents per thousand 

cubic feet. 

You probably haven't thought of 
This Great Saving 

Utah Valley Gas 
& Coke Co. 

H. D. Keillor, Mgr. 



He (just accepted) : "Why did you say 'No' She: "Darling, how could you live without 

at first?" me?" 

She: "1 wanted to see what you would do." He: "Cheaper." 

He: "But suppose, darling, I had run 

,?" 



iway : 



She: "You couldn't. I had locked the door. 



Diner: "What's special today, waiter?" 
"What we couldn't get rid of yesterday, sir." 



Columbia: "What would I have to give you 
for just one little kiss?" 

Barnard: "Chloroform." 

$ 

Dr.: "What you need is a little sun, 
madame." 

Modern Miss: "Is this a proposal?" 




He (at the Junior Prom): "Well, we won't 
be bothered by old Professor Zell any more; he's 
going to Washington, I hear." 

She: "I know. I'm Gladys Zell." 

He: "Me too, sister, me too." 



'31: "I don't like these modern dances: 
they're nothing but necking parties set to music." 
'32: "Yeah, we don't need the music." 



Robinson: "Many a heart was broken when 
I got married." 



Jackson: "Heavens! How many women did ever met 



Professor, mad: "You're the biggest sap I \e 



marry- 



Stude. quietly: "You forget yourself, sir!" 



Page Two Hundred Twelve 



-_^< 



?$t&sf(r 



The Best 

IN ENTERTAINMENT ALWAYS 

Paramount Pictures 

Balanced Programs! Properly Presented! 

Provo, Utah 



(paramount 



A Publix Theatre 
Home of Paramount Pictures 




Modern and Homelike 




Page Two Hundred Thirteen 




^ 



^BANYAN 




//"' 



UTAH MINES Paid in Dividends Last Year $37,613,477.80 

Total Paid to December, 1929— $339,809,673.00 

DID VOL' GET YOUR SHARE? 

WELLS L. BRIMHALL, Broker 



19 North University Ave. 



Provo. Utah 



[ i 



Dotty: "Dad has promised to pay half of Tom H.: "Between you and me. what do you 

our expenses when we are married." think of Jack's girl?" 

John: "Cheers! Now we must try to find Chuck: "Between you and me. not so much; 

someone who will pay the other half." hut alone — oh, boy!" 



Young Lady: "Yesterday I saw vour brother Pop: "Did I see you kiss my daughter?" 

kiss my sister." Tom: "No, sir. 1 wanted to see the color of 

Young Man: "It would have been better if her e - ves and ' ' m near si 8 hted " 
his brother had kissed her sister." 

Young Man: "Can 1 see that book 1 had 

last week?" 

Librarian: "I guess so. Was it fascinating?" 

Young Man: "No, but it's got my girl 
friend's telephone number in it." 



The Journalism Student, asked to describe the 
new baby at his aunt's replied: "Typical man- 
about-town: clean-shaven: red-faced, and a hard 
drinker." 



y*&jPi''. 



UTAH 



BEET 



SUGAR 



Utah's Foremost Agricultural Asset 

Deserves the Support of Every Loyal Utahn. 

INSIST ON IT FROM VOUR GROCER- 
THERE IS NONE BETTER 

"Flavor with Sugar and you flavor with health." 



I'dfie Two Hundred Fourteen 



._?>£< 




g^EAN VAN J jL 




,/"' 



The aNewKouse Hotel 

SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 

400 Rooms - 400 Baths - %1 to $4 Single 

B. Y. U. PARTIES 

Formals - Dances 
Dinners 



Careful Attention to Details Make 
Our Social Affairs Successful 




4 HOTEL > 

NEWnOUSE 



Eat in Salt Lakes Only 
Sunshine Cafeteria 

J. II. Rayburn, Gen. Mgr. 




OLD TIMES 

The two students met between classes. 

"How do vou get along with old Professor 
Brown?" asked one. 

"Great," replied the other. "We do nothing 
but talk about old times." 

The first looked rather hard at his friend. 
"That's curious." he remarked. "What subject 
have you got him for?" 

"Roman history." was the reply. 



ABSENT-MINDED 
'Well, well, a professors' meeting?" 
'Yes, a little forget-together." 



The freshman across the hall says he likes 
his new topcoat very much, only he can't get used 
to the wood across the shoulders and the hook 
keeps pushing his hat off. 



"No girl ever made a fool out of me." 
"Who was it then." 



He: I won't graduate from college this year. 
She: Why not? 
Me: I didn't go. 



MEATS AND GROCERIES 




SOWARD'S GROCERY 




A "Y" Booster 




Z58 E. FIFTH NORTH 


proyo, m AH 



LADIES FLORAL COMPANY 

Priscilla Schill. Manager 

"If You Want It Done Right, Let the Ladies Do It" 
TELEPHONE 466 PROYO, UTAH 



9<3 0. 



Page Two Hundred Fifteen 



J& 




«fc 



®"BAN YAN 




40** 



SUTTON MARKET 

Store No. 1 Store No. 2 

Phones 193-194-195 Phones 56-66 



A S the school year nears its close, it very often 
happens that seniors, who are attending 
school for their last year, become sentimental 
and, while under the over-powering influence of 
tender emotions — or the full moon — or liquor — 
pen lines of poetry or flowery essays to their 
dear Alma Mater. Although I am a senior and 
probably shall not again attend school, for some 
time, at least, I have as yet failed to experience 
feelings which would cause me to become poetical 
or philosophical and, although I am not a writer 
of "V" news opinion columns, I propose to attack, 
in a narrow-minded and small manner, the sin- 
cerety of these writers and to make a few state- 
ments which will clearly prove that their senti- 
ments are unwarranted, silly and probably the 
result of some other motive or some other emotion 
which thev have mistaken for a love of school. 



In the first place, why should one profess 
an uncontrollable affection for an institution to 
which one — as well as ninety-nine out of everv 
one hundred other students — is forced, by circum- 
stances or parents rather than by desire and 
choice, to attend? Very likely had one attended 
some other university, where ones peculiar talents 
and abilities would be quickly recognized and his 
subtle but charming personality would be readilv 
appreciated and admired, one would have been 
much more successful scholastically and more 
active in extra-curricular activities, would have 
realized greater accomplishments, and would have 
enjoyed wider popularity. 

Why should one be overwhelmed by a feeling 
of gratitude toward a pecuniar)' organization, 
which for four years or more has unmercifully 
drained his own financial resources as well as 







SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
STATIONERY 



FOUNTAIN PENS 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 



TAYLOR PAPER COMPANY 



Stationers 



TELEPHONE 15 



PROYO. UTAH 



Fage Two Hundred Sixteen 



..rfo. 




? ^BANYAN 1, ^// 



0** 



J.CPENNEYC© 



"QUALITY— Always At A Saving" 



VALUES THAT ALWAYS REMAIN THE SAME 



those of his least unsuspecting relatives and 
friends? What a pigeon-livered conscience one 
must have to feel that he owes anything — even 
gratitude — to his school where he pass far too 
liberally for everything he gets! The cash pay- 
ments which students are obliged to make have 
been quite fully discussed elsewhere during this 
and other years: I need only mention such items 
as tuition, student body fees — which entitles one 
to attend games for which one also pays exorbitant 
figures merely for standing room — graduation 
fees, year book prices, the senior project, etc., etc. 
Again 1 ask you, how can one still feel indebted? 
I suspect there are even a few nit-wits who 
would thank their dear Alma Mater for what 
ever honor and distinction they have gained in 
school. But I firmly maintain that, that, too, 



is very well earned. If one gains recognition in 
extra curricular activities it is through untiring 
personal efforts, sleepless nights and patient 
scheming. If one's distinction is a position on the 
honor-roll it is the result of ceaseless grinding and 
careful attention to the whims and caprices of 
professors for it is generally understood that 
professors are universally the unsympathetic 
enemies of students, that they are constantly at- 
tempting to find weaknesses in the student's de- 
fences and alibis and that with the very slightest 
opportunity or suspicion, they will withhold a 
high grade. Rather than being helpful and in- 
terested in the advancement of their students they 
are trying to keep them down to limit the number 
who get through — does not the freshman class of 
one year become a much smaller sophomore class 





R*K*0 ORPHEUM 




© 


Salt Lake's Finest Screen and 


I?)(rvl 


Stage Entertainment 



._?€< 




Page Tun Hundred Seventeen 




•*v 



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QJ> SKAGGS 



FOOD 



efficient Service 

System 



STORES 



THE LATEST IN FOOD STORES 



the next year, and does not this decrease continue 
throughout the entire four years of the course? 
Professors are many students' barriers to wealth 
honor, respectability, glory and success. 

I have heard students laud the inestimatabli 
valuable friendships formed in college and I have 
wondered how they can conscientiously be so 
hypocritical when in our so-called democratic 
school. I he only acquaintances one makes are i.. 
social units. For, fear of lowering their diemt} 



units are forgotten when they receive the sheep- 
skin. Why, haughtiness, alloofness, and snoboisii- 
ness are getting so rampant that a girl can not 
even get a husband in college! If one does tne 
poor unlucky boy usually awakes to find, that 



he has been a sucker! 






Finally, what have you gained professionally 

or vocationally when college is finished? You 
have received an impractical, theoretical training 
and a diploma. There is no demand tor you in 



seems to prevent mere clossroorn associates the big cold world. You must beg for a job, and 

from becoming friendly. Between social units, in many cases if you haven't a strong puii you 

there is a coldness and an enemity which ap- have to go back to the farm, the mine, the pick 

proaches medevial class distinction in nature, and the shovel— in debt: if to your school, it is 

Within social units, there is a semblance of friend- not a debt of gratitude, but a financial burden 

ship, but it is not genuine. Alumni members of like the rest of your obligations. 

By NEMREF DRAGRETSEW. 



i * 



ROBINSON'S Inc. 
WOMEN'S WEAR 

STYLE ft QUALITY 

PROVO PRICE HELPER 



Page Two Hundred Eighteen 



yfi$0. 




Eanyan 





"Why are you walking so slowly?" 
"Oh, so that if I fall asleep 1 won't 
fall so hard." 



One Frosh: Ever read Carlyle's Es- 
say on Burns? 

Another: I'm not in the medical 
school. 



lie: Shall I take you to the zoo? 
She: No. If they want me they'll 
come alter me. 



Nurse: Well, Bobby, you have a 
new baby brother for a Christmas 
present. 

Bobby: Oh, zowie! May I be the 
first to tell Mother? 



"Have you ever met the only girl 
you could be happy with?" 
"Yeah, lots of them." 



He's the kind of a guy that asks the 

newsboy who won the football game. 



UTAH TIMBER A COAL CO, 



COAL 



BUILDING MATERIALS 



164 West 5th North 



Phone 232 



WE APPRECIATE THE UNIVERSITY 



AND THE STUDENTS 







._?€o. 




Page Two Hundred Nineteen 




^ 



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Page I wo Hundred Twenty 



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Where Service Counts 

CONOCO GASOLINE AND MOTOR OILS 

SUPERIOR SERVICE STATION 

Chevrolet 
parts -:- sales -:- service 

PROVO, UTAH Fifth West and Center PHONE 74 



Mr. G. M. Alexander, 
Mail Order Co. 

Dear Sir: 

1 am writing to you regarding a hair-brush 
Number 2769G black, which I ordered October 
1st. / HAVE NOT received this. I sent 11 cents 
in stamps. 

Yours truly, 

Frank Kramer. 




Dear Mr. Kramer: 

Your letter addressed to Mr. Alexander. 
Assistant to the President and Manager of Opera- 
tions, Promotions and Service has been handed 
to me for answer. 

There is no reason why you should not have 
received this order by this time. We are tracing 
shipments and thank you for calling vour com- 
plaint to our attention. 



Very truly, 



J. D. Bailey, 



'W/E appreciate the patron- 
age you have given us in 
the past and sincerely trust 
that the service and low trans- 
portation cost we have pro- 
vided for you will merit your 
continued good will in the 
future. 

Salt Lake & Utah 



Ride the Big Red Cars! 



•&*< 




Page two hundred twenty-one 




g^EAN VAN j j^ 




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LY1 EMORIES n n 
Notes and Clippings of B. Y. U. Days 



f'age I'vto Hundred Twenty-two 



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CHRISTENSEN'S 



THE MEN'S STORE 



Provo, Utah 



Mail Order Co. 
Dear Sirs: 

1 have never received such service as on my 
recent order hair-hrush Number 2769G black. 
Yours truly, 

Frank Kramer. 

Dear Mr. Kramer: 

Your letter dated October Kith has been 
handed to me for answer. It is our business and 
a daily occurance for us to render 100% service. 
We are glad to know that you are so satisfied 
with our performance. We daily receive hundreds 
of letters from satisfied customers and are indeed 
glad to have your letter among them. 

Very truly. 

G. M. Alexander. 
Ass't Pres. Mail Order Co. 



Ass'i to the Ass't. Mgr. of Operations. 

Promotions and Service. 

Mail Order Co. 

Dear Sirs: 

On October 1st 1 ordered a hair-brush Num- 
ber 2769G black. You have asked me for full 
information. What more do you want? 1 am 
11 years old, black curly hair, part it in the 
center. Also wear glasses. Am 5 feet 1 1 inches 
tall and weigh 189 pounds. 1 sent the 72 cents 
with my first order. Would like to get the brush 
by return mail or my money. 

Yours truly, 

Frank Kramer 



Dear Mr. Kramer: 

Replying to yours of the 2^rd instant we can 
find no record of having received the 72 cents 
in your letter of October 1st. Was this an Express. 
Money Order or check? On receipt of this infor- 
mation we will make immediate shipment ol the 
hair-hrush. 

Very truly, 

Mail Order Co. 



VAN 


PHOTO 


SERVICE 


CAREFUL 


KODAK 


FINISHING 


New Location- 


—Paramount 


Theatre Building 




Mai 


! Us Your 


Films 



.-9^0. 




Page Two Hundred Twenty-three 




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Hundred Twenty-four 



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^EAN VAN % —^tfr 



YOU ARE THE JUDGE 

At 

I ICCLY WICCLY 

MEATS - GROCERIES 

PROVO PRICE 



HELPER 



The teacher was talking aboul the dolphin Clean-Shaven Man (to celebrity with a long 

beard): "Some years ago I had a beard like 
yours, but when 1 saw how ugly I looked I shaved 

"And children," she said, impressively, "just 't °"- 
think! A single dolphin will have two thousand Great Man: "Some years ago, 1 had a face 

■ , .,,•,.. like yours, but as I could not remove that, 1 pre- 

baby dolphins! ; ' , .„ 

ferred to let the beard grow! 

"Goodness!" exclaimed the little girl at the "q you make a charge if I ask a question, 

foot of the class; "and how many do the married doctor?" 

ones have?" "No. Only if I answer." 



and its habits. 




Consolidated Wagon 
A Machine Company 

Distributors of 

FARM MACHINERY - HARDWARE 
SPORTING GOODS 



l IAII 



WYOMING 



IDAHO 



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t'age I "wo Hundred I "wenty-ftve 





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I'agi two Hundred 'Iwenty-six 



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^BAN YAN 1 |^ Wf 



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THANKS TO ALL STUDENTS AND CLUBS 
PATRONIZING THE - - 




B. 


Y. U. 

"Where Y 


CAFETERIA 

ou Enjoy Eating" 




12:20 DAILY 




ARTS 


BUILDING 




Events Leading Up To the Murder 
of a Radio Announcer 

"The Sudsy Soap Syncopators have just play- 
ed "Aren't We All?" and. folks, aren't we all 
grateful to them for their splendid music? We 
surely are!" 

"You have just heard the Sudsy Soap Synco- 
pators plays "At Dawning." Whether it's after- 
noon, night or at dawning, you'll always find a 
wash with Sudsy Soap most refreshing." 

"Glen Glycerine and his Sudsy Soap Synco- 
pators have just finished a fox-trot version of "By 
the Waters of Minnetonka." Sudsy Soap makes 
heaping, foaming lather in any kind of water, 
hard water, soft water, tap water or the waters 
of Minnetonka." 

"That old favorite, "Dirty Hands. Dirty 
Face." was just played for you by the Sudsy 
Soap Syncopators under the direction of Glen 
Glycerine. There's nothing better for dirty hands 
or a dirty face than a thorough washing with 
Sudsy Soap." 

"The final selection played by the Sudsy Soap 
Syncopators was "Mighty Lak a Rose." If you 
ivill use Sudsy Soap morning, noon and night, 
you too, will be mighty lake a " 



CALLAHAN 


HARDWARE CO, 


The Hardware Specialists 


SPORTING GOODS 


- FISHING TACKLE - GUNS 


Give Us a Chance To Help Fit You Out 


02 WEST CENTER 


TELEPHONE 626 



/30, 



&• 



Page Two Hundred Twenty- seven 




e 



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Notes and Clippings of IS. Y. U. Days 



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Page 7"wo Hundred Twenty-eight 



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■f.J.Wtstergird ^-"Uji 

OLD BALDY 



We Support 


Our School and 

FARRER 


Heartily Endorse its 

BROS. CO. 


Achievements 




WEARIlv , \ir \u\ 


SHOES AND DRV 


GOODS 






FOR LADIES 


AND CHILDREN 






TELEPHONE 44 


29-31 North University Ave. 


PROVO, 


UTAH 



Meats Ice Cream 


Frigidaire Equipment 


HANSEN CASH 


GROCERY 


297 NORTH FIRST WEST 


PROVO, UTAH 



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Page Two Hundred Twenty-nine 



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cNational French Cleaning Co. 

Established 1910 

DRY AND STEAM CLEANING 

Repairing and Pressing Ladies' and Gents' Garments 

Hemstitching and Picoting Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

PHONE 125 95 N. University Ave. PROVO, UTAH 



A conjurer was producing 
eggs from a top-hat. 

"Your mother can't get 
eggs without hens, can 
she?" 

"Oh, yes," said the boy. 

"How's that?" asked the 
conjurer. 

"She keeps ducks." 



Dona D. : "Earl stayed 
with me two hours yester- 
day. He is so interesting! 
I was not bored at all." 

Mother: "What did he 
talk about?" 




(U w 



Done 



'About me!" 



THINKING OFSOMtTHING- FUNNY 
FOR THE BUfVYON 



The cool, satisfying, sparkling, drink! 



JCtVC Becker's 

BECKERS PRODUCTS CO. 
Ogden, Utah 

"NOURISHING <w BEfcR* 




Get 
B E C C O 

Wherever good drinks are sold 



■ ■■■ 



.-9^< 



PROVO FOUNDRY 


A 


MACHINE 


CO. 


T. F. Pierpont, Pres and Mgr. 




J. U. Bucm, Secretary 


Provo, 


Uta 


H 




Structural and Heavy Steel Work - 


Iron and Brass 


Castings 


Mine Cars - Steel Tanks 


- General Contract Shop 




Page Two Hundred Thirty-one 




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* ° M E M R I E S n □ 

Notes and Clippings of IB. Y. U. Davs 




Page Two Hundred Tbirty-two 



t?So. 



r^Vs 



g^EAN VAN j ^ ^j// 

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ELIAS MORRIS & SONS CO 

We are installing File Drain Boards, Mantels and Colored Bath Rooms 

in all parts of Utah, Idaho, Nevada and Wyoming 

l\ West South Temple Street Salt Lake City, Utah 



Regular Army Instructor: "Have you had 
my horse shod as I ordered?" 

Cadet Lieutenant: "My God! I thought 
you said shot]" 



Cashier: "No, sir! No checks! I wouldn't 
cash a check for my own brother." 

Client: "Well, of course, you know your 
family better than I do." 



One thing about a kleptomaniac is that he 
takes things so easily. 



Dick: "Why did you stop working for 
I lenderson?" 

Bob: "He did something I didn't like very 
much." 

"What was it?" 

"Fired me." 



Gypsy: "I'll tell your fortune, sir. 
"How much?" 
"Twenty-five cents." 
"Correct." 



She: "You took your hat off to that lady. 
Do you know her?" 

He: "No, but I'm wearing my brother's 
hat, and he knows her!" 



Jim: "Did you carry a stove on your 
camping trip?" 

Tim: "Where do you think we cooked, on 
(he mountain ranges?" 



Officer: "What's your name?" 

Stude: "I won't tell you." 

Officer (looking in skull cap): 
obliterated." 

Stude: "You're a liar, it's Proctor!' 



'It's 



ASBESTOS SHINGLES 
ASBESTOS ROOFING 

Fireproof - Beautiful 
Everlasting 

ESTIMATES FREE 

CURTIS ZAER 

Approved Contractors for 

JOHNS-MANVILLE CO. 

401 Dooly Bldg. Salt Lake City 



Commercial Form Ruling 

Loose Leaf Devices 

Bookbinding 

SAVE your valuable books, magazines 

and journals. We bind them in refined or 

plain styles. 

^rovo ^ook 
bindery 

South of University 



PHONE 612 



PROVO, UTAH 



.-^fo. 



Page Two Hundred Thirty-three 




c i 



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Tage Two Hundred Thirty-four 



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"Hey, pal, give me a break on the turkey 
and cranberry, will you?" 
"1 beg your pardon?" 
"Oh, pardon, Dad, 1 thought I was at school." 



Nurse: "Well, Oswald, do you want to see 
the new brother the stork brought?" 

Oswald: "Naw! I wanna see the stork." 



"What's the charge lor this battery?" 
"Three amperes." 

"Well, how much is that in American 
money?" 




-■v-/** 



Most Artistic Bouquets for Commencement 

For June Brides at 

PROVO GREENHOUSE 

Phone Eight-0 "Where the Flowers Grow" Provo, Utah 



K 



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Page Two Hundred Thirty-five 




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Notes and Clippings of IB. Y. U. Days 



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Compliments, of 

LEVENS CHAIN STORES Inc. 

SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY -:- MEN AND BOYS' OUTFITS 

PROVO, UTAH 



COMMON LABOR 
"You're a college man, you say?" 

"Yes, I'm a college man. 1 expect to get 
through this year." 

"You come from New York? Mmmmm, how 
old are you?" 

"I'm twenty-two." 

"Are you married." 

"No. I'm not married." 

"Do you own a car?" 

"Yes, but I haven't got it here." 

"Well, now, did you bring any letters of 
introduction?" 

"Yes, here they are." 

"Ummm, well, perhaps you will do, young 
man. We'll give you a trial. Here's your pick 
and shovel." 



"Is your son's education at college of any real 
value?" 

"Yes, indeed. It has entirely cured his 
mother of bragging about him." 



Every nerve was taut. His every sense was 
strained to the highest pitch. Slowly, very slowly, 
he turned the knobs, anxiously noting the effect 
of every deviation. He mustn't turn it too fast, 
or surely he would lose it. A fine adjustment 
now would just get it and then — success! 

He twisted the knob to the right very slowly. 
Eureka ... he had it! The hot and cold water 
lor his bath was adjusted exactly right. 



"Have you a date tomorrow night?" 
"It depends on the weather." 
"Why the weather?" 
"Yeh, whether she'll go or not." 



"Why don't you put on your slicker?" 
"I can't. I got a book in one hand and il 
won't go through the sleeve." 



"Could you pass the bread?" 

"I think I can. I moved pianos all summer. 



"Why is a lazy dog like a hill?' 
"I surrender." 
"A slow pup!" 



yuh!" 



'Hey, Rastus! Lemme present man wife 



to 



"Naw, suh! Boy! l's got one of mah own!' 



"My girl has lots of personality." 
"Mine isn't good looking either.' 



He shuffles into class almost nine minutes 
late even- (.lav. and creates an unnecessary noise 
by slamming the door after him. He distiirbes a 
large part of the class by calling them by name, 
and sometimes he has even been known to talk 
aloud in the very midst of class — 

Is he on probation? Why, of course not 1 
He's our professor. 



"The Home of Those Superior Sandwiches" 
SUPERIOR ROTISSERIE 

W. A. Oliver. Proprietor 
: irst North and Fifth West PROVO, UTAH Open 7 A.M to 2 A.M. 



Compliments of the Makers of Most of the High Crude Pins and Medals Used a\ 

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 

Sold and Guaranteed by the STADIUM CO-OP 
Frequently referred to as Student's Supply Association 



•^ 



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Page Two Hundred Thirty-seven 



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PREPAREDNESS 

Even his most Sanguine friends for years regard- 
ed Abraham Lincoln as more or less a failure, hut all 
the time he was preparing for the great opportunity. 

Few big business concerns made good in meteoric 
fashion. They grew slowly on a solid foundation of 
preparedness. Their success was earned. 

We congratulate the Nineteen-thirty Senior Class 
for the preparedness thus far accomplished in college 
and training life. Opportunity comes to those who 
are prepared. 

Ours too is a training school in life. For fifty-eight 
years we have been striving to build a bigger and 
better institution, and have succeeded in helping 
thousands of people to own their homes. This same 
dependable service is available to you and yours. We 
are a state wide institution. 



SMOOT LUMBER COMPANY 



r^ 








Page Two Hundred Tbtrty-niiu 



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n n MEMORIES n □ 
Notes and Clippings of IB. Y. U. Days 



■ 

■ 







Page Two Hundred Forty 



#Go. 



"*%\ 




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TRY OUR -- 

SERVICE STATIONS 

Our Gasoline and Oils are Highest in 
Quality and Cheapest in Price 

Everything for the Automobile 

Open 24 Hours a Day 

Lathes' and Gentlemen's Rest Rooms 

TELLURIDE MOTOR 

COMPANY 

Phone 270 and 824 
TWO STATIONS 

Corner First West and Center 
57 West Center 

In the Automobile Business in Provo 
for 1 5 Years 



Diamonds - Watches 

Rings and Medals 

Class Pins 

■8 

Let Us Submit Prices 
and Designs 

J. EDWIN STEIN 

JEWELER 
SILVERWARE — JEWELRY 



H W. Center St. 



Provo, Utah 



FROSH RULES - 

A5 THE FRESHMEN 
VIEWED THEM 




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Page Two Hundred Forty-one 



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Owned and Operatec 


1 By An Old "Y" Student 


for"\ 


's" Students 


DR 


IfuG 


"Where 


Friends Meet" 



Prof.: "That play was barred from Paris Mrs.: "Did you know I had a little money 

because of its lines." when you married me?" 

Student: "Yes, but it was later produced in 
pantomime." 



Mr.: "No; 1 thought you had a lot." 



Prof.: "Where's that?" 

"Every time I kiss you, it makes me a better 
man." 

"Well, you don't have to try to get to heaven Female: "Good heavens! You aren'u going 

in one ni<>ht." lo commit suicide?" 



Female: "What have you there?" 
Male: "Some insect powder." 



For Exclusive 

OMEN'S 

PPAEEL 



■^ 



Shop at 

LEWIS 

Ladies' Store 

I EO N. LEWIS, Manager 



\A 



Page Two Hundred Forty-three 




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BAN YAN 




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GOODWILL 

Lifeblood of any enterprise — touchstone of success! Intangible . . . 
yet the most valuable possession of any institution, because all the 
money in all the world cannot buy it! Precious . . . yet it cannot be 
retained without being given also. 

Throughout the sixty-two years of Z. C. M. l.'s past history, during 
our present success and in anticipation of our future progress, the 
good will of our customer stands in paramount importance. 

Your Good Will is Our Greatest Earned Reward 

B. V. U. Students We Wish You Success 



Z. C. M. I. 



13-33 South Main Street 



Salt Lake City, Utah 



For Constant Uniformity — 

Your Home - Your Building - Your Street Specify 

BEEHIVE BRAND CEMENT 

The 100 Per Cent Utah Building Product 

Thousands of Sacks of 
BEEHIVE 



Handled by 

BONNEVILLE LUMBER 

COMPANY YARDS 



Anywhere 

All Contractors Like to 

Use It 




Now in 

Your Smooth Riding 

Permanent Streets 



UTAH IDAHO CEMENT CO 



Factory: 
BRIGHAM CITY, UTAH 



General Office 

Eccles Building 

OGDEN, UTAH 



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Page Two Hundred Forty-five 





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185 5 



SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY 



9 3 



Awaiting the Class of '30 



Seen through the time-veiling perspective of col- 
lege life it seems impossible that four years have 
passed since the class of '30 matriculated. But in 
the turbulent world outside enough progress has 
developed to fill a century. 

Notable have been the changes in home build- 
ing. From stark utility, plumbing and heating 
fixtures have been transformed into objects of 
beauty with new designs, new refinements, and 
iridescent colors. 

When the time comes for them to plan their 
homes, members of the class of '30 are cordially 
invited to the Crane Exhibit Rooms where these 
new fixtures and fittings for bathrooms, kitchens, 
and laundries are displayed. 



Val-vtt 



*CRAN E' 



Fitting 



PLUMBING AND HEATING MATERIALS 
CRANE CO., 307 WEST SECOND. SOUTH, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 

Brancha and Sales Offices in One Hundred and Ninety Cities 



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Page Two Hundred Forty-seven 




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