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Full text of "The banyan"

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Brigham Young University 



E.Y.U. 
37t.O^ 
B22 
1931 



Ace. 

No .68.87.3 




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EX LIBRIS 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/banyan1931brig 




pACRELLp. COLLETT'-NOQMAN B. BiNGWAM 
ECrtTOG BUSINESS MA^4AGER 



Printed by 

STEVENS & WALLIS 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



Engraved by 

BURGER-BAIRD ENGRAVING CO. 

Kansas City, Missouri 



Cover by 

DAVID J. MOLLOY CO. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Photographs by 

LARSON STUDIO 

Provo, Utah 



Binding by 

LEITH TRADE BINDERY 

Salt Lake City, Utah 




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HROUGHOUT the ages the river has been a 
great contributing factor to the progress of civiliza- 
tion. It has figured in the physical development of 
the nations through offering highways for commerce 
and travel; water for thirsty desert lands; boun- 
daries for countries and states; power for the 
wheels of industry; and recreation for pleasure 
seekers. 

In much the same way does the river of college 
students contribute to the ever increasing ocean of 
knowledge. The campus is the river bed; research 
and experiment are the world's springs of learning; 
and the extra-curricular activities are the tribu- 
taries. The new discoveries are the hidden valleys, 
and the experience and acquired facts of our facul- 
ties are the water sheds. 

We dedicate this, the nineteen thirty-one Ban- 
yan, in the spirit of learning and progress, to 
Earth's never ending river of scholars. 




BOOK ONE 


. . UNIVERSITY 


BOOK TWO . 


ATHLETICS 


BOOK THREE . 


. ORGANIZATIONS 


BOOK FOUR 


EDDIES 


BOOK FIVE 


CLASSES 


BOOK SIX . . 


BUNYON 



UNIVERSITY 



J. HE innermost recesses of Africa and South 
American still contain man in his primitive state. 
His highways are the rivers, and his bypaths are 
the tributaries. To a great extent the river is his 
school; his larder; his recreation park; his home. 



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IN MEMORIAM 

JOHN FECHSER 

MARY BROCKBANK 

MERRILL BANKS 

ZINA Y. CARD 



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Campus 




PROVO RIVER 




UNIVERSITY GATES 



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MAESER MEMORIAL 




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LIBRARY AND MAESER 



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EDUCATION BUILDING 




MAESER PORTALS 




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Adminiitration 




Reputation brings a challenge to every member of Brigham Young. 

Will he sufcessfully meet it and resolve that, God helping him, he 
will always comluct himself in a way to keep unniarreil the reputa- 
tion of his Alma Mater? 

A student who succeeds in doing this will find the way of the 
"abundant Life" and the benediction of the University will follow 
him wherever he goes. Joseph K. Mrkkm.i.. 

Superintendent of Church Schools. 




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The Banyan, thrnuf^li picture and sentiment, helps us to keep in 
touch with the soul of the University. An educational institution is 
more than a collection of huihiinjis. laboratories, and iiooks; it in- 
cludes friendships and memories. 'Ihei-r are preserved in this student 
year hook which will ^rovv more valuahle with the passing years. 

-FRANKLIN S. HARRIS. 



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BANYAN '31 




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Adniinistnitiro Officers 



[ 13] 



Secretary to the President (left) 
Registrar (left middle group) 
Secretary to Treasurer (center) 
Treasurer (right middle group) 



Kiefer Sauls 

John E. Hayes 

Carma Ballif 

. E. H. Holt 



Superintendent of Buildings and Grounils B. T. Higgs 

A group of administrative officers such as Brigham Young University 
has leaves hardly a thing to be desired. In their hands the administration 
of the business of the institution wants for nothing better. 

Treasurer E. H. Holt has been with the University since 1893, filling, 
besides his regular duty, sometimes that of acting prexy while President 
Harris was away. The kindly nature and ])leasing personality of Professor 
Holt makes him one of the most loved figures on the Brigham Young 
University campus. 

In John E. Hayes, Registrar, students come in contact with a man whose 
sunny and pleasant disposition and rare sense of humor make association 
desirable. Registrar Hayes knows every student in the institution by his first 
name, and that means that he has a joke or a wisecrack for each. 

Besides his duties as secretary to the President, Kiefer Sauls acts as 
purchasing agent for the institution and the student body. Kiefer Sauls has 
travelled with the President on most of the latter's more extended trips, and 
he knows both the head of the institution and the institution, thus being in 
a position oftimes to act as mediator. 

Carma Ballif has been assistant in the Treasurer's office since her gradu- 
ation from the University in 1927. Her's is a most wiiming smile that 
radiates a positively attractive personality. 

B. T. Higgs as superintendent of buildings and campus holds a rarely 
important place in a phase of training of students who work part time for 
the institution. Higgs demands, above all things, tenacity and jicrscverance 
in duty, a quality of manifold value in all lines of Life's highways. 






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Summer School 

The aim of the Summer Session of the 
Brigham Young University is essentially the 
same as that of the school year since the ses- 
sion has grown into a regular university quar- 
ter. The summer session presents a liberal of- 
fering of courses in many lines. In fact, prac- 
tically every department in the university of- 



fers courses during this session. 



The regular 



DR. H. M. WOODWARD 

Dean of Siininier School 



staff is always supplemented by visiting edu- 
cators and lecturers of national reputation. 
The session offers an opportunity for regular 
students to continue their work for degrees 
and also makes it possible for teachers to fill 
in all the state requirements. 

The session is divided into two terms, the 
first of which is held at the university plant 
in Provo. 

This term covers a period of six weeks and offers to the students an 
unusual opportunity to combine study, recreation and profitable social con- 
tact. 

Brigham Young University is very fortunate in being located in Provo 
— the heart of Utah County. Provo, from every angle, is a splendid summer 
school town. Because of its unusually fine climate and its great variety of 
fruits, flowers and trees it has long been called the "Garden City." It is 
located in the heart of outdoor attractions. From the university campus, 
roads radiate in all directions along which outdoor pleasures may be found. 
Its nearness to several points of natural interest — Utah Lake, Tim- 

panogos Mountain, 
Mt. Nebo, and the 
various canyons in- 
viting outers — 
make it one of the 
finest centers for 
summer study that 
can be found any- 
where in the world. 
Moonlight hikes, 
excursions to vari- 
ous points of inter- 
est, lake regattas, 
sports attractions, 
and its many varied 
advantages isolate 
Provo and Brigham 
Young University 
as an ideal place 
for summer study. 




[14] 




BANYAN '31 



Dean of Women 

The work of the Dean of Woiiicii is willi 
the whole life of the student. 

It is the special duty of the dean to har- 
monize and fuse the professional ideals with 
the personal; she must not only look to see 
whether the essential influences of the school 
are reaching the individual and getting heal- 
thy reactions from her, hut she must interpret 
them to her, fill gaps, apply additional empha- 
sis where there is need. 

The dean's conferences are but one means 
of setting up this consciousness. They should 
integrate the work of the class room, the social 
units, the free activities, the home life of the 
girl in all of which the dean plays an impor- 
tant, if somewhat inconspicuous, role. 

Consideration of health, of dress and manners, of social relations, of 
community responsibilities and benefits from the standpoint of the individ- 
ual life should be blended with the consideration of problems as they affect 
the members of the home, the group, and the family; the recognition of the 
supreme profession of woman as citizen, home maker, mother. 




NETTIE NEFF SMART 
Dean uj Women 



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[15] 



To know Dean 
Smart is to know 
the more conserva- 
tive spirit of Brig- 
ham Young Uni- 
versity, as the Dean 
of Women is ever 
the guardian of the 
fine and high stand- 
ards of the institu- 
tion. Contact with 
her ever brings the 
student back to a 
clear realization 
that after all there 
is treasure in the 
more sterling char- 
acter o f strictly 
high standard. 




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BANYAN '31 





lAMES A. CULLIMORE 

President 





Student Government 

Fortunate indeed 
were the Associated 
Students of Brigham 
Young University to 
have as their head for 
the year 1930-31 an in- 
dividual who has real- 
ly felt the responsihil- 
ity of his position, and 
who has studied the 
needs of the students 
as a group in order 
more completely to dis- 
charge his duties. He 
has never shirked his 
responsibility, and, on 
the other hand, has 
taken a lethargic stu- 
dent body and has animated it until big things have been accomplished in 
almost every field of student activity. James Cullimore, A. S. B. Y. U. 
President, deserves a hand for the splendid results of his administration. 

The various student programs during the year have been of an unusu- 
ally high standard. In contrast to the Monday and Wednesday assemblies, 
which were sparsely attended, the Friday gatherings have always found an 
overflow of College Hall. The big reason for this demands untold praise 
for the consistent work of Bernice Barton, vice president, who never failed 
n her duty of preparing attractive programs on Fridays. 

A new feature which was inaugurated this year was the exchange of 
programs with the sister institutions of higher learning in Utah. It is ex- 
pected that the practice will grow with the years. The feature has a most 
commendable end in that it encourages more harmonious and friendlv rela- 
tionship with the student bodies of the other institutions of tlie state. 



BERNICE BARTON 

Vice President 



LOYA 
NIELSON 
Secretary 

nnil 
Histarid 




KIGBY 

JACOBS 

Second 

Vice 

I'rtsitlent 



[ 16] 



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BANYAN '31 




FARRELL COLLETT 
Banyan Editor 

CARLTON CULMSEE 
)' News Editor 



Student CAmncil 



ELAINE PAXMAN 
A. W. S. Pres. 

WALT DANIELS 

l/gr. Music 



GLENN WEBB 

Mgr. Dramatics. 

JOHN DALTON 

Yell Master 



One of the first actions of tlie 1930-31 Student Council was to cut the 
number of officers of the Council for the sake of more efficient handling of 
problems. As Council personnel was before, its unwieldliness rendered 
it incapable of speedily and efficiently coping with urgent and iniporlant 
problems, the task of assembling a quorum being of too herculean propor- 
tions for the best benefits of the students. 

As the Council assembles now only the president of the Associated 
Students, the first and second vice presidents, editor of tlie Y News, editor 
of the Banyan, aiul a Faculty Representative, are regular official members. 
Student heails ol utiier departments were invited to attend Council only when 
problems pertaining to their respective departments were discussed, and these 
officers were also granted the right to appear before the Council at ain lime 
without in\itation whenever there was need for Council action. 



[ 17 ) 



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BANYAN '31 





ELAINE PAXMAN 
President 



ADA HASLER 
Vice President 



VIRGINIA TAYLOR 

Secretary 



DOROTHY HOOVER 
Recreational Leader 




Associated Women Students 

The Associated Women Student organization of the Brigham Young 
University initiated the Senior sponsor system this year. Twenty Senior 
girls were chosen in the spring to act as hostesses to the new girls who entered 
the university in the following autumn. The jieriod of sponsorship lasted for 
six weeks during which time each group was entertained at Dean Nettie 
Smart's home and by their sponsors. At the end of the six weeks a banquet 
was given them by the sponsors. 

"Poverty" provided the theme for the annual girl's jamboree. Prizes 
were given for the best costumed groups and for the best stunt and the entire 
evening was one of enjoyable gaiety. 

The year's program was organized around a "happiness" theme and 
each activity, including the separate meetings, carried out some phase of 
this theme. 

"Cinderella" was the theme that was carried throughout the girls' day 
activities. The theme was initiated by the annual play, "A Kiss for Cin- 
derella," and part of the fascinating magic of the story was inserted into the 
assembly program, banquet, and dance. Each social unit appointed a 
committee to arrange and carry out some special part of Girls' Day and the 
cooperation that resulted was very gratifying. 

One of the special projects for Girls' Day was to make possible the 
return of all former A. W. S. presidents. Those that were unable to be 
present on the campus sent in greetings that were printed in the "Y" News. 

With a quorum of officers to initiate high standards of activites through- 
out the year and a responsive organization, the year 1930—31 was indeed a 
banner year for the A. W. S. Too much credit and praise cannot be given 
to Miss Elaine Paxman, president, for her inspirational and efficient leader- 
ship. To her successor, Miss Maxine Clayton, devolves an herculean task 
to carry on the work as done by Miss Paxman. 



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BANYAN '31 



Classes 

Seniors 

PAUL THORNE 

President 

HELEN MANGLESON 
I ice President 

NORRELL STARTUP 

Secretary and Treasurer 




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Juniors 

ARTHUR HASLER 

President 

ORA HAWS 
Vice President 

HOWARD KELLY 
Prom Chairman 




V. 





[19] 



Sophomores 

CLYDE SUMMERHAYS 

President 

SARAH DLXON 

f ice President 

ELLIS GRAHAM 

Secretary and Treasurer 



V 



Freshvian 

EARL COTTAM 
President 

DOROTHY JACOHSON 

/ ((■(' President 

KENNETH DUKE 

Secretary and Treasurer 



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BANYAN '31 





HOWAKD KELLY 
Prom Chairman 



MIKL\M LILLYWHITE 
Chairmun'.s Partner 



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Junior Prom Coiiimhtee 



MONTA WENTZ 


CLYDE SANDGREN 


SINA BRIMHALL 


HOWARD COTTAM 


FARRELL COLLETT 


RAY HART 


ORA HAWS 


FRANK HARRIS 





BANYAN '31 



Sophomore Loan Fund 




DEAN FISHER 

Chairman 



Beginning in 1922 with a total amount of Fif- 
teen Dollars beijueatlied to them by the Stiulcnl 
Loan Association the sophomore class of the uni- 
versity undertook tlie responsibility of developing 
the fuiul and has succeeded so well that now the 
fund exceeds five thousand dollars. 

The project is the theme of the annual Sopho- 
more Loan Fund Ball, held early in the winter, ttj 
which the majority of students and citizens of 
Prove alike lend their support whole-heartedly. 

The cause, worthv in itself, is not compelled 
to go begging, as yearly each class sponsors the 
big ball. Itself one of the most attractive social 
events of the season the Sophomore Loan Fund 
Ball, under the jealous direction of the class, gives 

value received and at once becomes one of the most unique altruistic organi- 
zations existing. Year upon year the Loan Fund Ball Committees strive to 
outdo their predecessor in making the affair the most attractive of the year, 
and, strangely enough, and peculiarly characteristic, the expense of staging 
the affair is so minimized by the ingenius sophomores that, instead of in- 
creasing, decreases, and every year a larger amount is added to the total oi 
the Loan Fund. 

As in other years the various departments of the institution have lent 
their aid to the Loan Fund Ball Committee in furthering the success of the 
project. Most outstanding has been the work of the art department in gen- 
eral, and Professor E. H. Eastmond in particular, supplying on their own 
expense the decorations for the hall. 

All the effort put forth in this worthy cause results gratify ingly when 
the prime purpose of it is viewed. Aiding needy students with small loans 
in times of need and necessity the Loan Fund has been the savior for hun- 
dreds of students, 238 being helped since 1929. 



CLYDE BEUHLER 



[21 






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BANYAN '31 






Public Service Bureau 

After having directed the work of get- 
ting out programs to the various communi- 
ties in the state for one quarter, Paul Keeler 
left school to move to Mexico. In his stead 
Rigby Jacobs has been directing the work 
for the winter and spring quarters. 

In addition to the usual amount of 

programs which the students have furnished 

to communities and schools in the State of 

Utah, a special event was projected this 

year. During the spring quarter two groups 

went on tour, visiting thirty-three high 

schools and communities in Utah, Idaho, 

and Wyoming. 

Students in the university giving of their entertaining talents freely to 

the public has been the primary factor in the work of the Bureau. The field 

of contact has been larger this year than any previous year of the existence 

of this organization of students. 

The Public Service Bureau is a valuable advertising medium for the 
university. Through it students all over the state and in parts of Idaho and 
Wyoming are made acquainted with the B. Y. U., and parents of students 
gain an insight into some of the types of work that are given attention in the 
university curriculum. 

Students taking part in these programs are taken from outstanding 
groups of various departments. The art department, dramatic art depart- 
ment, and music departments furnish material for the bulk of the programs. 
The public service work offers development for the participants. 



RIGBY JACOBS 

Director 



¥.. CENICVIEVE MORGAN 



ORMON WEIGHT 



PAULINE BENNETT 




[22] 



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[23] 




LOWRY NELSON 
Diredor 



Extension Division 

The Extension Division represents the organized 
contribution of Brigham Yoiinj;; University to a world- 
wide movement for adult education. The division 
was organized in 1920 and has grown steadily in the 
number of contacts which it makes with [)eo|)Ie of the 
West. At present about 700 men and women are re- 
ceiving academic instruction off the campus. Added 
to this number are several literary clubs which are 
following courses of study outlined by members of 
the University faculty, and published by this division. 
This year the Play Lending Service has cooperated 
with the Dramatic Art department in making avail- 
able approximately 400 plays for the use of teachers 

and various organizations in the Rocky Mountain section. The miscellaneous 
lectures delivered by the members of the faculty throughout the year before 
ward assemblies, dinner clubs, scientific societies, leadership institutes, both 
here and in other localities, reach tens of thousands annually. 

The spirit of the "Y" is carried to different communities in Utah and 
neighboring states by members of music and dramatic departments who 
appear in both concerts and dramatic productions. Aside from this is the 
close cooperation given to the Public Service Bureau of the Student Body in 
supplying programs for community organizations. 

This year the 

division is active in UNITED STATES POST OFEICE AT PROVO. UTAH 

supplying interest- 
ing bits of informa- 
tion to the country 
newspapers concern- 
ing students from 
their local commu- 
nities who are at- 
tending the Brighani 
Young University. 

Lowry Nelson > 
has capably taken 
care of this depart- 
ment ever since its 
beginning in 1921. 
It owes its jjrogress 
largely to his efforts 
and foresight. 



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Alpine Summer School 




The second term of the Bri^ham Young University Summer School is 
held at the very base of Timpanogos Mountain and is known as the Alpine 
session. 

It was during the summer of 1922 that Brigham Young University estab- 
lished this school at the base of Mount Timpanogos, the highest of the 
Wasatch peaks. The school is located well up in the Alpine region in a beau- 
tiful aspen grove at an elevation of 6800 feet, below a perpetual glacier and 
a wonderful system of waterfalls and cataracts, where the student has the 
best opportunity possilde to study botany, zoology, geology and other sciences. 

The curriculum, however, is not confined to these lines, but includes 
work in English, social science, education, and languages. Study under the 
aspens with the cool breezes sweeping down Timpanogos' face is productive 
of the best results in whatever line chosen. 

Chief among the features of school under the aspens is the splendid 
courses given in art, by the best instructors procurable in the country. Bud- 
ding artists paint anil mould their interpretation of nature to the whispering 
of pine trees, with but the blue canopy of heaven as roof. 

There is, perhaps, no place in the Rockies where opportunity for re- 
search and artistic creations is so combined with the wonderful beauties of 
nature. 



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[24] 



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College of 

Arts and Sciences 



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BANYAN '31 










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GEORGE H. HANSEN, Ph. D. 

Acting Dean 



College of Arts and Sciences 

For the student who needs and desires a 
broad, liberal education in fields of in- 
struction that will enable him to efficiently 
lake his place in the complex civilization of 
today the Collejie of Arts and Sciences was 
created in 1923, having, until this time, been 
known as the School of Arts and Sciences. 

Abundant opjiortunity is provided for 
ihose who have ambition for specialized study 
in engineering, medicine, law, or who desire 
lo train for religious, political, or social lead- 
ership. Preparation for original investigation 
in the fields of this college is emphasized, and 
students wishing to build a foundation for ad- 
vanced degrees are finding it rich in such op- 
portunities. 

Owing to the ideal location of the Univer- 
sity with res})ect to the natural, civic and industrial interests of the state, 
many of the departments in the College actually carry on much of their lab- 
oratory and experimental work in the active field. 

The grand old Wasatch Mountains and Utah Lake at the very door step 
of the University offer excellent open laboratories for work in botany, zool- 
ogy, entomology, geology, and geography. Again, being located in the center 
of Utah's mining and industrial plants presents unusual advantages in phys- 
ics, chemistry, and mineralogy, and opportunity and nearness to the civil 
and cultural centers of the state make for completeness in every phase of 
college contact. Students wishing to build for advanced degrees are capi- 
talizing on these al- 
most unparalleled 
advantages. 

The College of 
Arts and Sciences 
was officially desig- 
nated as such in 
1921, since which it 
has enjoyed a very 
suljstantial growth as 
indicated by the fact 
that since 1926 the 
senior enrollment in 
the University has 
increased sixtv-five 
percent wliile the 
senior enrollment in 
the College has made 
a seventy-five per- 
cent increase. 




[26] 




BANYAN '31 



The graduating class of this year, from 
all iiulications, will be more than a huiidreil 
per cent larger than any previous year. 

Acting Dean Hansen, under whose guid- 
ance the College has progressed over two 
years, by his pleasant and friendly personality 
and attitude, has always given the students 
coming to him for advice in registration and 
scholastic problems sympathetic and patient 
attention. 

The periodic meetings of the Colleges as 
inaugurated Ijy the administration tliis year 
has afforded wonderful opportunity for the 
College of Arts and Sciences especially for 
discussion of jiroblems peculiar to its own 
field. 




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EDUCATION BUILDING 

From the Smilhuesl Drive 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES FACULTY 
Heading from left In right: Buck row: Dr. WaUer Cottam, Professor E. H. Holt, Dr. Vasco M. Tanner. 
Second row: Dr. Parley A. Christensen. Professor Percival Bigelow, Dr. William J. Snow. Dr. Lowry 
Nelson. Dr. ^'avne B. Hales. Professor Karl E.Young. Third row: Dr. George H. Hansen. Dr. Tliomas 
L. Martin, IMiss \^'ilma Jeppson. Dr. Milton Marshall. Professor Ed M. Rovve. Dr. (Christen Jen.sen. Mr. 
Myron M. Yorgensen. Professor Harrison R. Merrill. Fmn! row: Professor Hugh Peterson, Professor 
Alice L. Reynolds. Dr. Franklin S. Harris. Professcjr John C. Swenson. Mrs. Bessie Meiling. Mrs. 

Elsie i'.. (iarroU. 



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FARRELL COLLETT 

Editor 

EURAY ANDERSON 

Artisl 



BANYAN '31 




.^' 




The Ban y an 



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At this, the culmination of another year 
of college life, the Banyan staff presents to 
the students as a record of the activities, ro- 
mances, heart throbs and heart sobs, and the 
spirit of the Brigham Young the Nineteen 
Thirty-One Banyan. 

So far as possible the staff has tried to 
make this a picture book that in future years 
will recall college days to the owner and keep 
fresh in sweet reminiscence the contacts that 
were made in college days. 

Due to a depression year the staff has had 
to curtail expenses, thus sacrificing some 
things that have been part of former year- 
books, However, the staff has tried to replace 
this by providing intimate glances into the 
various departments, more so than other years, 
and diffusing the spirit of the class room ac- 
quaintances and activities throughout the 
pages of this book. 

In respect of the rivers of college students 
that yearly pour into the sea of life the staff 
this year conceived of the theme of the River 
around which the message of the book is 
woven. From the gurgling brook to the some- 
times swirling and then again placid stream; from the lazy eddying stream 
to the rushing torrent of a mad flood has the life of the college student been 
compared. The romance of moonlit nights, and the crazy cramming for 
exams are typified by the silvery reflection of moonlight from the dreamy 
waters of a quiet river and the frantic onrush of a flood in a stormy season. 
The editor, feverishly working hours and hours and days and days, well 
appreciated the eager and willing support that has been given by the small, 
though splendidly efficient staff of this publication. Smallest of staffs in many 
years, nevertheless the members came through on schedule in almost every 
department. The most generous support of engravers, printers, photographers. 



CHAUNCEY HARRIS 
Photofiraphs 



GENEVIEVE MORGAN 

Social Units 



HANNAH REYNOLDS 
An 



BEULAH STRICKIER 

Typist 



mi 



'muM 



M 




[28] 




ini I mii'lniTliii^ '^'^^^ 
- 'aiiHUimi' 




BANYAN '31 



and contributors, has made it a real pleasure 
to publish this annual. 

Hearty acknowledgement is due Pro- 
fessor E. H. Eastmond of the art department 
for his friendly and constructive criticisms 
and assistance with the art work. Illustrations 
from Glenn Potter, former editor of the Ban- 
yan, set a high standard for that type of work 
in the book. The diligent and exhaustive 
pursuits of snapshots and other pictures by the 
staff photographer, Chauncey Harris, leaves 
nothing but praise for his perseverance. 

Gwen Nelson spent hours and hours in 
faithful labor in the office assembling and 
mounting pictures and to her could easily go 
the title of most constant member of the staff. 
T. Hetlig, originally designated on the staff 
as sports editor, subsequently turned his wil- 
ling efforts to the writing and editing of all 
copy for all departments. To all these people 
whose names have been mentioned must be 
written that the Banyan owes its present exis- 
tence as the eighteenth volume. 

Norman Bingham and Clyde Beuhler, 
business manager and assistant, respectively, 
have struggled capably and heroically, it may be said, in a year where most 
business departments of concerns floundered almost helplessly. As a busi- 
ness man with tenacious business traits Norman Bingham has been "it" one 
hundred percent. 

The staff hopes that it has not failed in its aim to make this a repre- 
sentative college annual. The privilege of working for the student body in 
this capacity has been appreciated fully, and this has been a pleasurable 
task. With a something akin to a sorrow at parting the 1930-31 staff 
officially bows itself out of office and presents to the students of Brigham 
Young the Nineteen Thirty-One Banyan. 




NORMAN BINGHAM 

Business Manager 

CLYDE BEUHLER 

Assistant Business Manager 



V 

V 



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V 



GWEN NELSON 
Calendar 




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BANYAN '31 




ARLTON CULMSEE 
Editor 

WANDA SNOW 

Asfociule Editor 




The "Y" News 

Tliis year the "Y"' News lias had a career of 
storms and upheavals. In the first place the number 
of awards to be given to the staff was cut in half and 
naturally the smaller staff had to struggle along under 
a double burden. 

Then came disagreements between the editorial 
staff and the Attendance, Scholarship, and Discipline 
Committee regarding the personnel of the staff. The 
eventual upshot was that, rather than submit to the 
demands of the Committee that Sam Taylor, Associate 
Editor, be removed, T. Hettig, Editor, resigned. This 
occuri'ed in mid-December. 

Shortly after the holidays, Carlton Culmsee was 
appointed to the editorship. Leadership Week, with 
its daily edition of the News, constituted his baptism 
of fire, and made the remainder of the year seem easy 
in comparison. 

Next, the financial condition of the paper de- 
manded attention. Heavy losses had been incurred 
ever since the News had become a semi-weekly in 
1927. The long-continued business slump, coming to 
a climax this year, made retrenchment in some form 
necessary. The students voted to have a weekly in 
view of the precarious financial standing of the News. 
The weekly introduced a new problem: How 
could the same amount of news be crammed into half the former space? It 
was necessary to eliminate certain features and to write the news in a con- 
densed form. The staff made the adjustment efficiently. Later an increase in 
size to seven columns, which added space equivalent to a full page of the 
former size, made the problem less difficult. The appointed editor had the 
temerity to run for the same position next year, and the good fortune to be 
elected. 




GLEN 
WILKINSON 



MAUREEN 
WEI.KER 



BASIL 
HANSEN 



LEONARD 
PEASE 




[ M ] 



T*- *aC 




"s«^ 



BANYAN '31 



Glen Wilkinson, sports editor, turned in more and 
"cleaner" copy than anybody else. Moreover, hi* 
stuff was readable. Glen is a self-effacing chap but 
a keen critic of athletes and games. He is the vigilant 
"Muscle-bound" of Conference Rumblings fame. He 
was assisted by Leonard Pease and Harold Wilson. 
H. Grant Vest, as business manager, managed to 
maintain a jovial countenance all through the very try- 
ing year. His aides were Merlin Vance, Ralph Kelly, 
and Ronald Wiscombe. 

Allen Stephenson served as associate editor dur- 
ing much of the Winter Quarter. He is another fal- 
low with an unassuming maimer but a clear thinker 
and a writer of ability. 

When Stephenson left, Wanda Snow became asso- 
ciate. She likes to read copy so well that she insists 
upon employing all the sumbols and such on every 
story, including her own. Wanda can put novelty into 
a "lead," and other desirable qualities. 

Ruth I. Johnson made a good society editor be- 
cause they can't help liking her. Under her, the de- 
partment became known as "Candlelight and Crystal." 
Maureen Welker handled the busy and important 
music department ably. Basil Hansen, interview spe- 
cialist, disclosed a lot of interesting personalities in 
his columns, "Intimate Views" and "People You 
Should Know." Mary Ashby covered drama in cap- 
able style. Tlieron Luke covered anything under the sun competently and 
reliably. Virginia Eggertsen was another natural interviewer, probably be- 
cause of a winning personality. Frank Harris, with his telegram style, which 
is as crisp as his manner, and Virgie Fraughton, born feature-writer, who 
never yet has bowed to the yoke of news-writing, rounded out the staff. 




H. GRANT VEST 
Bus. Mgr. 

MERLIN VANCE 
Asst. Bus. Mgr. 



VIRGINIA 
EGGERTSEN 



V 



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BANYAN '31 





The Scratch 

In its junior year the Scratch, quarterly literary 
magazine of the undergraduate students of Brigham 
Young University, went through vital changes but 
held steadfast to the original aim — a magazine repre- 
sentative of the university both in material and au- 
thorship. 

Starting out with the first issue, under the editor- 
ship of Mr. Carlton Culmsee, the magazine made its 
initial appearance of the 1930-31 school year. Liter- 
ary creations of an exceedingly high standard pro- 
duced by students and faculty members set the goal 
for the subsequent issues to shoot at. Mr. Culmsee's 
admirable knack of digging out stories from the most 
unusual and interesting sources and his ability to edit 
keenly and appreciatively made the December issue 
^ 1^ ^ one of the most popular and widely read of any here- 

^R^jr ^^^^K. tofore. 

The appointment of Mr. Culmsee to the editorship 

i \"^^ of the Y News vacated by T. Hettig left a vacancy in 

I m ^h|H the magazine's editorial staff. Miss Lorna Jensen, 

' associate editor, was appointed by the council to edit 

the publication the remainder of the year. 

Under Miss Jensen the spring issue of the Scratch 
appeared in March, following the same high standard 
set by her predecessor and featuring additional art 
work by students of the university. 

The last issue of the school year, the Commencement Issue, appeared 
in May, dedicated to the departing class of "31. 

Following the policy of the publication as it was conceived at its first 
appearance the staff has succeeded well. Short stories, essays, sketches, 
poems, have been contributed by students, with several formal articles writ- 
ten by members of the faculty. 




LORNA JENSEN 
Editor 

CLYDE BEUHLER 
Bux. Manager 



CLARA MOORE 



FLORENCE MAW 



VILDA JESSEN 



EURAY ANDERSON 




[32] 



lUUra«»= 





BANYAN '31 



Speech Class 



An energetic and efficient group of students made 
profitable the courses in the fundamentals of speed). 
The presence of so many men in the group indicate.- 
the importance they attach to speaking in public. 
Both men and women pictured here have taken a 
prominent part in speech activities at the "Y," and 
have spoken in many places throughout the State of 
Utah, and in other states. 



Merle Anderson 
Joseph Andrews 
Leo .Andrew 
Anna .Ashton 
Mark Ballif 
Edgar Barton 
X^'eston Bavles 
Ray Bushman 
Enierv Buehler 
Bert Bullock 
Gus Carlson 
Tom Clarke 
Grant Cobbley 
David Condon 
Eldon Crowther 
Mildred Davis 
Bernice Dorrity 
Elmer Fillmore 
Allan Fjeld 
LaRue George 
Elizabeth Gessford 



Bob Hanses 
\\ ilma Hanson 
Joseph Hape 
Ada Hasler 
Frazer Hill 
Josephine Johnson 
Veda Kimball 
Vernon Kotter 
Clvde Larson 
Seth Larsen 
Arthur Lee 
Bernell Lewis 
Emily Madsen 
Weldon Matthews 
Elsie McCurdy 
Beulah Millett 
LaRetta IMoon 
Edith Nash 
Clifford Nelson 
Mark Nielson 
Alma Nielson 




V 

V 



El). M. ROUE 
Professor 



Orval Okel berry 
Paul Peterson 
Marion Paulson 
Donald Sheffield 
Ernest Shober 
Wavne Simper 
Jay Smith 
Fern Smoot 
Glen \^'ebb 
Echo \^'illes 
Ina Webb 
Morris (!linger 
Alonzo Morley 
Ed. M. Rows 



V. 



V 



SPEECH CLASS GROUP 

i-,..\ X •- aj \ t r» I V ^a.' !. ^ ■■ ■ ■ ' ■■ Iff.'. 



[33] 




/ 



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BANYAN '31 






JOHN C. SWENSON 
Chairman 



Foreusics 

A trip into southern California for a four-debate engagement, all of 
which were decided in favor of the cliurch university representatives, was 
perhaps the highlight of the 1930-31 debating season. 

The tendency in today's collegiate debates is to follow the open forum, 
no decision system, and it was thus that most of the debates followed. Tliose 
engfigements on which judges or audience decisions were given showed the 
Brigham Young University debaters to hold the balance. 

The entire western country and pacific coast supplied opposition to the 
Brigham Young debaters at times, giving the varsity teams plenty of action 
and opportunities to indulge their favorite arguments on official subjects. 

With Professor John C. Swenson as chairman of the university debating 
council, and Professor Asael C. Lambert as coach of the debaters, Brigham 
Young teams were afforded the best preparation of any team in the state. 
Native ability, as in all other lines, played large roles in the success of the 
teams. 

Two of the debaters, Darrell Crockett and Ray Peterson, represented 
Brigham Young University at the annual Rocky Mountain Forensics League 
convention at Boulder, Colorado. 



Georgia 
Dimick 



Rose 
Eyring 



Boyd 

Nelson 



George 
Willardson 




[34] 




-y 



BANYAN '31 




ASAKL C. LAMBKKT 
Coach 

Schedule and Results 

January 29 — B. Y. U. vs. U. S. A. C. at Logan. No decision. (Junior 

College question.) 
February 14 — B. Y. U. vs. Utah U at Salt Lake. No decision. (Junior 

College question.) 
February LI— B. Y. U. vs. Utah U at Salt Lake ( Ladies ) . Decision B. Y. U. 

(Free Trade question.) 
February 20— B. Y. U. vs. Utah U at Salt Lake (Ladies). Decision B. Y. U. 

(Free Trade question.) 
February 27— B. Y. U. vs. U. S. A. C. at Logan (Ladies). Decision U. S. 

A. C. (Free Trade question.) 
March 2— B. Y. U. vs. Utah U at Salt Lake. No decision. (Free Trade 

question.) 
March 24— B. Y. U. vs. Nevada U at Reno. Decision B. Y. U. 
March 27 — B. Y. U. vs. California Institute of Technology at Pasadena, Cal- 
ifornia. Decision B. Y. U. 
March 28 — B. Y. U. vs. University Southern California at Los Angeles. No 

decision. 
March 30— B. Y. U. vs. Redlands University at Redlands. Decision B. Y. U. 
April 2 — B. Y. U. vs. Wyoming U at Provo. Decision Wyoming U. (Free 

Trade question.) 
April 9 — B. Y. U. vs. Mt. St. Charles at Provo. Decision Mt. St. Charles. 

(Free Trade question.) 
April 22-2.3 — Crockett and Peterson to R. M. Forensics League convention 

at Boulder, Colorado. 



Ray 


Mary 


ISIanclip 


Vilda 


Dorothy 


Dix 


Peterson 


Lyons 


l>ol>liins 


Jesson 


Mensel 


Jone 




[35] 



V 

V 



V. 



-^ 




|| H|fl jm| rynTj HnmntLLP:^^W 



/ ' 



1 



y 







BANYAN '31 





Beta Beta Beta 







Phi Chapter 






Edna 


Bertrand 


Dr. Walter 


Ross 


Howard 


Snow 


Harrison 


P. Cottam 


Hatton 


Cottam 


Lucile 


Arthur 




LaMar 


John 


^laughan 


Hasler 




Whiting 


Westwood 



OTHER MEMBERS 

Elden Beck, Anson Call, Jr., Louis Christenson, Lavaunn Curtis, Owen 
Davis, Lee Juppson, Marion Harris, Lynn Hayward, Doyle Liddle, William 
Stanton, Albert Sutherland, Truman Swallow, Homer Wakefield, Dr. Vasco 
M. Tanner. 

The Tri Beta is a national honorary biological fraternity, organized for 
the threefold purpose of Sound Scholarship, Diseniinatioii of Scientific 
Knowledge, and Promptness in Biological Research. The Phi chapter was 
installed at the Brigham Young University on January 31, 1931, with a total 
charter membership of 23 students and alumni of the B. Y. U. 

Dr. Cottam and Dr. Tanner are the faculty advisors of the Phi chapter, 
and Dr. Tanner is also a member of the National Committee on Awards. 

The officers of the Phi chapter are: Truman Swallow, President; Edna 
Snow, Vice-President: Lucile Maughan, Sec'y and Treas.; and Ross Hatton, 
Historian. 




[36] 






in^B™! 



iinP 




BANYAN '31 




\ 



Vv^ 



Physics (Aub 

Front roic : Ray L. Haddock, Wayne Cowley, William Martin. Alton Hughes. Frank S. Harris. 
Adrain Gibby, Rich Green, William Career, George Tanner, Dr. Marshall. Henry Watson, president. 

Second roiv : Paul Huish, vice-president; Preston Taylor. Lawrence Jackson. Lafavette Jones. Iman 
Hales. Waldo Hodson. (!utler Miller. Vard Johnson. Alton Wangsgard, George Tanner. Vernon Scott. 
Ervin Smith, Maxwell B. Co>c, secretary. 



V. 



Chemistry Club 



Front row: Jay Beck. Frank Harris, A. C. Hughes. Myron Jorgensen. Kenneth Miller. Ray Jones. 
Adrain Gibby. Vernon Larson, Alva Johabson, Dr. Maw. Harvey Miller. 

Second row: Wid (ioffin, Quinn Whiting. Vard Johnson. Theron Hutchings, Iniri Hutchings. 
Herman Beniams. Prof. Peterson. W real Lott. ('lell Jackson. Orval Polly. 

Third row: Alan Carter. Harold (iolvin. Frank Dahle. Joe Norton. 




[37 



V 









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BANYAN '31 








Spanish Chih 



First roir: Clifford Allen. Warren Whitaker, W. K. Firmage. Tom Eastmond, Maxine Clayton, Ellen 
Barker. Maxine Phelps, Delia West. Edna Nelson. Vera Merrill. Alton Wangsgard. Second row: 
Marion Powlesen. Vernon Scolt. Harold Fitzgerald. Cutler Miller. Willard Call. Lucille Farley, 
Phylis Douglas, Byrl Gardner, Elsie Cherington. Naomi Tietjen. Mrs. H. G. Merrill. Third roiv: 
Richard Rust. ClifTord Clyde. Graydon Robinson. Irvin Christenson, Kate Whetten. Hollis Grange, 
Mrytle Sowards, Vivian Merrill. Fourth roiv: L. B. Whetten, Gerrit Dejong, Farrell Collett. 




French Club 

First row: Maxine Clayton. Takeo Fujiwara, Dorothy Mensel. Helen Decker. Zelma Winterton, Marie 
Huber, Melba Curtis, Nell Hihliert. Monta Wentz. Second rote: Wilma Blyle. Kada Parkinson. Fred 
Horlacher, Alta Mae Braithwaite. Zoie Garfield, Gean Clark, Vera Jackson, Ruby Dixon. Third roiv: 
Basil Hansen. Frank Harris. Angus Hales. Bessie Decker. Sarah Dixon. Virgie Fraughton. Anne 
Madsen, Pauline Bennett. Eva Bailiff. Maxine Anderson. Dallas Tueller. Fourth row: Jefferson 
Cazier, Horace Jones. Prof. Young, Mrs. Roberts. Wayne Cowley. Glade Wall. Fijlli row: Joseph 
Tlieriot. A. B. Larson. Lawrence Whitman. Morris Clinger. 



[38 J 




BANYAN '31 




V 

V 



German CAub 

First row: LeRoy J. Robertson, Rulon Paxmaii, Grace Gardner, Zelda Larson, Velda Carson, Bernice 
Barton, Lois Smith, Alice Jones. Gertrude Sauer. Gerrit Dejong. Seconil row: Kenneth Searle. 
Alexander Wadley, Stanley Reese, Jean Nielsen, Kenneth Miller. Herman Beiniiams. Takeo Fujiwara. 
Third row: Carleton Culmsee, Harold Woolston, Nile Taylor, Chaiincey Harris. John Halliday. Imri 

Hutchings, Kent Johnson, Ralph Kelly. 

Idaho Club 

First row: Jamie Olson, Edith Marchant. PZdna Harris, Delia West. Eileen Gridley, Beth Rich. Doroth) 
Jacobson, Helen Cook. Second roiv: Lucille Maughan. Helen Whiteley, Alva Johanson Fred Horlacher, 
Uarda Ball. Merle Vance. Grove Haddock, Farrell Collett. Third roic: Grace Sorenson. Edith Rich. 
Wid Coffin. Russell Humphreys, Jex Rowland. Vard Johnson. Irvin Christensen, H. R. Merrill. Ralph 
Kelly, Ray Haddock, Jean Niel.sen. Ezra Murdock. Nile Taylor. Mable Peterson. Beth Beal, Acel 

Lambert, Jesse Richins. LeGraiide Stephens. 





^ — 




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[39] 




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BANYAN ',?1 





Foreign Students 

Back row: Tom Clark, New Zealand; Floyd Walser, Mexico. 

Middle row: Joe Hapi, New Zealand; T. Hettig, Tonga; Edith Nash, 
Australia; G. Call, Mexico; Loren Whetten, Mexico; WiPere Amaru, New 
Zealand; Kouji Nakamura, Japan. 

First row: Gertrude Sauer, Canada; Takio Fujiwara, Japan; Clara An- 
dergon. Canada. 





Psychology Club 



Back row (left to right): Orval Watts, Ben Johnson, James Cullimore, 
Grace Gardner, Faun McConkie, Maurine Johnson, Maxine Clayton, Jim 
Finch, Ray Utley, Professor Wilford M. Poulson. 

Front row: John Clark, Charles McKell, Howard Cottam, Gene Nielson, 
Mark Brockhank, Robert Clark, Henry Clark. 





[40] 



#^Si::>...^ ■^'-' 




BANYAN '31 




V 

V 



Kassmusseii. I" . Prince. Hippie, Skousen. Hull. Kieliardsoii, (^uiiper. Murdnck. Daslriip. IJix. Smart, 
Haddock, Robbins. Mensel. Dimick, Jesson, Lyons, Brinley . 



II I 



BUyck Y Chib 

One of llu' few really honorary clubs on the Brigham Young University 
campus is the Bloek Y Chil), an organization of students who have won the 
right to wear the block Y through excellence in intercollegiate competitive 
activities. Wearers of the Y represent students who have won honors in in- 
tercollegiate competitive activities in football, basketball, track and field, 
wrestling, swimming, tennis, and deiiating. 

The club makes no attempt to function socially, though its one big 
social event annually, the Block Y Club banquet and dance, is one of ihe 
sparkling features of ttie B. Y. U. calendar. 

Rather, the Block Y Club is an organization to foster the natural kin- 
ship existing among students who have won the right 
to wear the official university end)lem. It strives to 
foster and encourage the highest and most sincere 
type of courtesy and hospitality to visiting college 
and high sciiool li-anis, devoting its energy unreserv- 
edly in playing the part of host to them as well as 
other visitors to the Brigham YOung campus. 

Other than its status as host to encourage and es- 
tablish the most courteous relationship with other cam- 
pus bodies anfl the outside the Block Y t>iub is 
charged with the preservation and protection of the 
trailitions that years have buill up so fiiiciy in the 
fabric of the Brigluim Young background. 

To will the block \ and to be in\ilc(l to join ihf 
Block Y CAul) is the most distinctive of honors on thi> 
campus. 



HI "i\ 




HOM) RASSMUSSEN 
President 



^ 




^o^^P^AV- 




BANYAN '31 





Mt. Ogden Club 




Back row: Mark Ballif, Margaret Helliwell, Ellen Barker, Beulah 
Strirkler, Lorene Randall, Jefferson Cazier. 

Front row: Lee Jeppeson, Rich Green. LeRoy Randall, Adrain Gibby, 
Clyde Beuhler, Rigby Jacobs, Jim Hunter. 

Other members: Glen Wilkinson, Dr. Wayne B. Hales. Alton Wangs- 
gard, Keith Wangsgard, Allan Stratford, Gwendolyn Stewart, Bertha Agren, 
Ina Hunt, Annie Wheelwright, Earl Hone, Harold Armsti-ong, William H. 
Johnson. 




[42] 



-^rriiiiiiilllKii'^^'P* 



SKKrfxr^ 



"SP^ .xtT 




College of Education 



/ 




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If .^ 



BANYAN '31 



o^' 




4 







> 




'*^ 



AMOS N. MERRILL. Ph. D. 
Dean 



College of Education 

Through the years of its existence, whether 
as an academy or a university, the reputation 
of the Brigham Young University has been 
largely determined by the quality of teachers 
that it has prepared. Throughout almost the 
entire intermountain west a role of leadership 
in the teaching profession has been played by 
the graduates of the College of Education of 
this institution. 

The requirements for the teaching profes- 
sion have been steadily increasing. Just how 
adequately this College has been able to meet 
these new increasing standards is shown by 
the demand that is constantly being made for 
its graduates. From every section of the in- 
lermountain country boards of education have 
employed the graduates of this College as 
teachers, supervisors, principals, and superintendents. 

At times the demand for the students of the College has been so great 
that the undergraduates could hardly be induced to prolong the period of 
preparation to a point where they were trained for their highest possible 
service. During this period, there was a scarcity of teachers. At this time this 
df^niand for numbers has i)een satisfied. 

Since the introduction of the scientific method in attacking the educa- 
tional problems science has been enriched through research as no other social 
science has l)een. Vast sums of money are now being spent to further educa- 
tional research. These great accumulations of knowledge become the heritage 
of students of Education. In this College the students are directed in their 

quest into the realms 
of exact data for 
materials with which 
they answer many 
difficult and complex 
questions that con- 
front the men and 
women in the field 
of education. 

Colleges of edu- 
cation maintain their 
prestige among the 
other colleges of 
tlie universities of 
our countrv because 
the graduates from 
these colleges can 
capitalize almost im- 




[44] 




BANYAN '31 




ISCg^^ggilv; 



mediately upon llieir training. More experts ui 
this field are needed tliaii in any ulhcr |)rofes- 
sion. Every community, ol a tliousand people 
or more, must liave adecjuate numbers of pro- 
fessionally trained men and women lor teach- 
ing service. 

On reflection upon the constantly widen- 
ing field for educational service, the demand 
for teachers of not oidy childhood and youth 
but adults as well, it appears clearly that there 
is to he no decrease in the demand, hut rather 
an increase. 

Those who have their faces turned to- 
ward a professional career, if they are looking 
to the field of education and aspire to become 
students of the College of Education, are fac- 
ing a promising future. 

The College of Education includes in its 
faculty a large group of most versatile, well 

trained, and highly ca|)able men and women. The faculty of the College, in- 
cludes, as in the picture, from left to right: 

Back row — Miss Emma Brown, Miss Hcrmese Peterson, Miss lone Lud- 
low, Professor Edgar M. Jensen, Mr. William F. Hansen, Dr. Joseph Sud- 
weeks. Second row — Mrs. Mary C. Hammond, Dr. George H. Brimhall, 
Hugh W. Peterson, Professor Guy C. Wilson, Dr. Hugh M. Woodward. 

Third row — Professor William S. Boyle, Dr. A. N. Merrill, Professor 
Asael C. Lambert, Professor Wilford M. Poulson, Ben Johnson, Miss Gladys 
Kotter. Front /•0M^— Mrs. Stella P. Rich. Miss Gladys Black. Miss Jary J. 
Ollerton, Miss Margaret Swenson, Miss Edna Snow, Mrs. Bessie Meiling, 
Miss Barbara Maughn. 



V 



MECHAMC AKTS Bl ILDING 



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V 





FACULTY SNAPS 



[46] 




College of Commerce 



/ 



BANYAN '31 







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H. V. HOYT, M. B. A. 
Dean 



College of Commerce 

It is not a difficult matter to be an optimist 
on the future of the college graduate. There 
is no reason for being otherwise for he renders 
a service of incalculaljle value. He has been 
an essential agent in the revolution which has 
come to pass in statecraft, discovery, science, 
art, and social science including commerce and 
economics. 

During the past ten or fifteen years ad- 
ditions to knowledge have come so fast that 
there has been necessarily an increasing sub- 
division in the fields of knowledge. Associat- 
ed with this progress and modernization of tlie 
practical world has come an aspect of up-to-date- 
ness in the college curriculum. College courses 
have become more practical and more special- 
ized than formerly and graduates are now- 
able to fill into the work-a-day world without 
the abrupt transition which was so apparent in 
the past. 
Along with the modernization of the colleges and the practical world 
a rapid increase has taken place in the number of students which have en- 
rolled in specialized courses. 

Business schools are no exception. For instance, the College of Com- 
merce of the Brigham Young University has grown from its two gradutes 
in 1921 to forty graduates in 1931. The practical world has absorbed this 
increasing number of graduates, until today finds them contributing their 

mite in many states 
of the union and in 
several foreign coun- 
tries. 

Graduates of the 
College of C o m- 
merce of th's Uni- 
versity are to b e 
found in nianv other 
institutions working 
for advanced d e- 
srees, and in such 
fields of endeavor as 
banking, accounting, 
research, statistics, 
politics, real estate, 
insurance, merchan- 
dising, teaching, and 
also in communitv 
and church service. 




[48] 




BANYAN '31 



It is hopeful to note that whih- commerce 
graduates have to deal largely with cold, pre- 
cipe, figures and facts and materialistic situa- 
tions, vet along with these the graduates are do- 
ing justice and honor to those inborn traditions 
and the splendid spirit of the Brigham Young 
University, which are traceable to the noble as- 
pirations of its founders and patrons. 

To the faculty members it is always a 
source of great pleasure to observe this charac- 
teristic in the graduates. 

Dean H. V. Hoyt has been with the Lni\er- 
sity since 1921 when the College of Commerce 
was formed, known then as the College of Com- 
merce and Business Administration. The name 
was changed in 1928 to College of Commerce. 

A graduate of Purdue University with a B. 
S. degree in 1913, Dean Hoyt subsequently re- 
ceived his M. B. A. degree in 1917 from Har- 
vard University. From then until he came to Brigham Young University in 
1921 he worked as an industrial engineer in New York. 

A faculty of highly trained specialists assist Dean Hoyt in the College. 
Professor Swenson in sociology. Professors Clark and Boyle in accounting, 
Professor Holt in office practice, and Professor Hoyt in business administra- 
tion make a well balanced all-round college for traniing undergraduate busi- 
ness world solons. 




MAESER BUILDING 
Smith Wf.-I I'i>!£' 



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THE COLLEGE OF 

COMMERCE 
FACULTY GROUP 

Back run. (left tii 
right 1 : Professor John 
C. Swenson. Professor 
Herald Clark. Profes- 
sor E. H. Holt. Miss 
Bertha Roberts. Mr. 
Jim Finch. Front rou': 
Professor Elmer Miller. 
Mrs. Oa Lloyd. .Miss 
Blanche Thomas. Pro- 
fessor Harrison \. 
Hoyt. Professor Clar 
ence Boyle. 




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BANYAN '31 





Alphu Kappa Psi 



William 

Jex 

Jefferson 

Cazier 

Harold R. 

Barton 



Glen 

Wilkinson 

Boyd 

Rasmussen 

livinf; K. 

Rasliand 



Paul 
\S arnick 
Richard B. 
Knight 
Sterling 
Evans 



DixM. 
Jones 



James A. 

CuUimore 

Ban- 

Washhurn 

Anthony W. 

Sowards 



LeRoy 
Randall 

Walden 
Menlove 
Edgar B. 
Barton 



Norman B. 

Bingham 

Frank R. 

Speckart 

Frank 

Cragun 




JIM FINCH 
President 



Other members are: Melvin McDonald, Elmer Dastrup, Norman Creer, 
Val Hardy, D. Spencer Grow, Ward Clark, Don Brown, Oswald Coombs, 
William Haslam, Dean Anderson. 

The Beta Delta chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, national commerce fra- 
ternity, has achieved distinction, as a professional organization on the cam- 
pus, in animating as espirit de corp among members who have entered its 
ranks through the prerequisite of scholarship. 

In fulfilling its ideal of fostering research in 
the fields of commerce, it promotes creative leader- 
ship and sterling character. 

The "All Boys Show" sponsored by this group 
was once again enthusiastically received. Proceeds 
from this show go to the Alpha Kappa Psi Loan Fund 
which is available to students in commerce. This in 
itself is a most wordiy effort. 

Chosen from this active group, its president elect, 
J. Elmer Dastrup, will attend the national Alpha 
Kappa Psi convention at Asheville, North Carolina, 
during the summer in the interest of furthering the 
high ideals of the fraternity. 




[501 



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College of Fine Arts 



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CK.RHIT ,1.' JONG. ,1 



M.A. 




The College of Fine Arts 

The policy of the Brigham Young Univer- 
sity has always provided for a very liberal 
patronage of the fine arts. Even in the "early 
days" an enviable reputation was enjoyed by 
the departments dealing with nuisic, art. and 
speech. No wonder that the constantly grow- 
th i jx ing desire to offer greater opportunities to 
K iJ»^, > \ those whose inclinations and talents led them 
*mB[^^^ - ^^ into the several fields of fine arts finally re- 
sulted in the organization of a separate college. 
Organization of the College of Fine Arts 
was effected in the spring of 1925, when the 
services of Professor Gerrit de Jong, Jr., were 
secured to start and direct the new college on 
its career. Since then the new college has 
steadily grown until its number of graduates 
with bacJielor degrees is as large as that of 
any other college in the Brigham Young University, with the exception of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

At present the College of Fine Arts has the following departments fully 
organized: Art. Speech, and Music. Any course offered leading to a degree 
is the cultural equivalent to any other college courses offered in the Brigham 
Young Universitv, differing from them maiidy in respect to the emphasis 
placed on the study of the fine arts. 

The splendid organizations maintained by the three departments are a 
constant source of artistic community service, not only in the immediate vi- 
cinity of the university, but at different times iluring the year in places far 

distant from the cam- 
pus. The Glee Clubs, 
Symphony Orchestra, 
Concert Band, the 
Dramatic Art groups, 
the Mask Club, the 
Art Service Club, and 
the many exhiljitions 
of works of art held 
constantly furnish the 
students of the College 
of Fine Arts the ex- 
perience necessary in 
well-rounded training 
as artists, and delight 
and entertainment to 
the students of other 
colleges and institu- 
tions throughout the 




nitermountain 
try. 



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[ 53] 




An exceptionally well prepared faculty 
is maintained, who have received the benefits 
of extended study and travel in recognized art 
centers, and adequate physical equipment in 
every department enables the College of Fine 
Arts to do work of high acailemic and profes- 
sional standing. The average enrollment of 
ihe College of Fine Arts is approximately two 
hundred and fifty students. In the s])ring of 
1931 about thirty of these students expect to 
be graduated with a Baccalaureate Degree. 

Dean de Jong has a keen understanding, 
deep insight, and great appreciation of the 
problems that are peculiar to students of the 
fine arts. Undergraduates registered in this 
College are always assured of a kindly sym- 
pathy and willing help when they seek Dean 
de Jong for aid meeting and solving difficul- 
ties arising at any time. 

The heads of the various departments of 
the College of Fine Arts have succeeded in 

building up a College organization of students that breathes the verv neces- 
sary atmosphere of remarkably high cultural training. Undergraduate, as 
well as graduated students of the college take their places with the foremost 
in their classes of artists in the state. 

The faculty of the College of Fine Arts, reading from left: Professor 
Ed M. Rowe. speech; Professor E. H. Eastmond, art; Dr. Franklin S. Harris, 
president university; Professor Alonzo Merely, speech; Miss Margaret Suni- 
merhays, music; Professor B. F. Larsen, art; Professor Gerril de Jong, Jr.. 
languages; Mrs. Hannah C. Packard, nuisic; Professor LeRoy Robertson, 
music; Professor Robert Sauer, music; Professor Elmer Nelson, music; Mr. 
Custave Buggart, music; Mr. George W. Fitzroy, music; Mr. William F. 
Hansen, music; Dr. Franklin Madsen, music. 



EDliCATIOlN lU ILDIM; 

Presiilenl's Entrance 



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^• 




Director 
Accompanists 



The Mixed Chorus 

Dr. Franklin Madsen 
Miss Wilma Boyle, Miss Clara Woodhouse 



Composed of one hundred and seventy-five voices, including the entire 
personnel of the Male Glee Club and Ladies' Glee Club, the Mixed Chorus 
is the largest musical organization on the campus of Brigham Young Univer- 
sity. The work of the organization in concerts has been marked by an 
exceptionally high standard of music rendition and remarkably fine quality 
of interpretation. 

The Mixed Chorus regularly supplies the music at the weekly Monday 
and Wednesday assemblies, a constant feature ever popular and attractive. 
During the winter quarter the Chorus made its one and only public appear- 
ance outside of the campus, giving and exceedingly high grade program at 
the Provo Fifth Ward. 

Daily throughout Leadership Week the Chorus was featured widi the 
main speaker of the day in the leadership program in assemblies. 

The finest phases of each of the glee clubs, plus the aid of a group of 
vocalists outside of these clubs, combined in the Mixed Chorus, resulting in 
a musical organization of mammoth appeal and majestic level. It was an 
inspiration to hear the near two hundred young voices blend in interpreting 
the classics. 



[54] 



J>^ <XXf 




BANYAN '31 




V 

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Symphony Orchestra 



[55] 



Director 



Professor LeRov J. Robertson 



Under the able directorship of Professor LeRoy J. Robertson the Brig- 
ham Young University symphony orchestra achieved remarkable brilliancy 
this year, giving its own successful concerts as a result of hard work and 
loyal support on the part of the members. 

Too, it has been so busy this year in other than its own concerts that it 
wondered "if its time were its own." Notable were its achievements in ac- 
companying Isador Belarsky, internationally famous Russian basso, willi 
whom a joint concert was presented to a packed hall in tlic Utah Stake Tab- 
ernacle during Leadership Week. 

It rendered most valuable assistance to the Ladies' Glee Club at the 
latter club's concerts, and its few appearances in assemblies heralded musi- 
cal treats of irresistible appeal. 

Numerous ensemble groups formed within the orchestra have given 
of their time freely in assisting on innumerable programs both witliin the 
institution and out. 

Full instrumentation, a leader whose sound musicianship is an inspira- 
tion to its able players, as well as the splendid tracition of artistic success 
which has been steadily growing up around this organization have all con- 
tributed to its well deserved success this vear. 



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BANYAN '31 





Wi %\ 







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Male Glee Club 



Director 

President 

Vice President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Librarian 

Recreation 



Dr. Franklin Madsen 

John Halliday 

Grove Haddock 

Ray Hansen 

Fred Webb 

Howard Kelly 




"A real asset to the institution." That is the epithet given to the Male 
Glee Club of the Brijjham Young University. The club, under the direction 
of Dr. Franklin Madsen and a corps of energetic and efficient officers, had 
the largest membership this year that it has ever had, seventy-five men being 
included. 

At student body functions as well as officially an organization represent- 
ing the university, the Glee Club did credit by its high class and enthusiastic 
participation. 

During the football season the club sat in a body with the band as a 
special rooting section, lending lusty voices in vigorous applause and encour- 
agement to the team. 

As an advertising medium for the institution the work of the Male Glee 
Club of 19.30-31 is unsurpassed by that of any former year. On February 
2 and 3 it gave two concerts at the Paramount Theatre in Provo. A short 
concert before the Leadership Week visitors at one of the social hours held 
in the Ladies' Gym, a concert of varied classics before Dr. F. S. Harris' 
lecture on the second nigiit of Leadership Week, and, together with ihe 
mixed chorus, furnishing the music at the daily assemblies of the Week, 
comprised the program of the club during Leadership. On March 15 the 
club gave one of the finest ward programs of the year in Provo in the Fifth 
Ward chapel. 



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[56] 



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[57] 



Ladies^ Glee Club 

The work of the Ladies' Glee Club this year has undoubt- 
edly excelled in every respect the glee clubs of previous years. 
The club has a definite aim, which is the interpretation and 
appreciation of better music. 

Under the direction of Miss Margaret Summerhays, the 
Ladies' Glee Club work attained a perfection of artistic qual- 
ity entirely in accordance with her exceptional ability and 
training. Miss Clara Woodhouse acted as accompanist. 

Two major concerts have been given in which the girls 
appeared well trained and beautifully arrayed jjefore large 
audiences. A specially prepared concert was given during 
leadership week as well as the cantata, "Death of Joan of 
Arc," which was presented a short time later, with X'i'ilma 
Sorenson and Gertrude Gourley as soloists. 

The officers, Gertrude Sauer, president, and Pearl Ivins, 
secretary, have helped greatly in making this year a most suc- 
cessful one for tlie Glee Clui). 



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The Bdud 




Director 
Manager 



Professor Robert Sauer 
Orman Weight 




Undoubtedly, one of the most vital elements in the spirited support 
given athletic teams of the Brigham Young University is the band. In every 
football game and in every basketball game; in every sort of a rally, the 
band was there as the feature pep generator. One of the spectacular features 
of Brigham Young football games have been the forming of the block "Y" 
by the band in between halves, as well as the forming of the official emblem 
of the institution played. 

And vel the band is far from being merely a pep organization; thai is 
but one of its many lines of enthusiastic activities. The band can boast of 
a really high type body of artist musicians, breathing the personality of its 
master director, that vibrant personality, Professor Robert Sauer. 

In concerts and other public appearances this versatile organization has 
featured both classical and popular music, as well as providing several solo- 
ists, and producing some clever dialogue skits and accompaniment. 

Annually the band makes a tour of some section of the state. This year 
the organization toured southern Utah during the week of March 17-21. 
Concerts, dances, and programs were given at Nephi, Fountain Green, 
Ephraim, Mount Pleasant, Fairview, Gunnison, Monroe, Salina, Marysvale, 
Circleville, Panguitch, Orderville, Kanab, and St. George. 



[58] 



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BANYAN '31 



Ahna Pater 

Much of the spirited response and tremendous popularity of the pep 
rallies during the year may he attributed to the stirring words and music of 
the Pep Song, prize winner in tiie 1930 Pep Vodie. Words were written by 
Glenn Potter, '30, and nuisic by Walt Daniels, '31. 

The song is one of the peppiest and most distinctly collegiate properties 
of modern times. It has a decidedly Birgham Young slant, appropriate 
indeed for the university of that name. The sentiment that it breathes has a 
soul-stirring ability that all who haye eyer attended the institution can hardly 
help feeling. 

At contests, home and away, where Alma Pater was sung the highest 
type of commend on its quality haye been elicited. On several radio rallies 
when the song was sung comment from far and near have been received. 

A great deal of the popularity of the song can be credited to the Cougar 
Quartette, composed of Andy Anderson, Clyde Summerhays, William .John- 
son, and Morris Christensen, whose rendition of the song has been unsur- 
passed. 

ALMA PATER 

We praise our Alma Mater, 
Our Alma Mammy too. 
We cheer for Yale and Harvard, 
With a boo-la boo-la boo; 
You've heard the "Sons of Utah," 
The A. C. anthems sung; 
So here's a song we offer 
At the shrine of Brigham Young. 
Chorus: 

Our Alma Pater 

For you we're fighting 

To hear our Cougars 

Scream victory. 

His fangs are dripping 

\^'ith blood of battle, 

Come on 

We'll FIGHT. FIGHT, FIGHT, for thee. 

It's in your honor 

W^e cheer our warriors; 

Our songs are ringing. 

Our banners flung. 

We're sons of Brigham, 

United ever. 

To fight for Brigham Young. 

Now, nations fight for glory. 
And others war for fame. 
Still some may strive for fortune. 
And others strive for gain. 
But we're just loyal Cougars, 
Alive with pep and fun. 
We'll ever don our fighting togs 
To honor Brigham Young. 



159] 



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BANYAN '31 




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'T}\Q Butter and Egg Man 



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Kaufman's brilliant comedy, "Tlie Butter and Egg Man," opened the 
Brigham Young University dramatic art department's 1930-31 program of 
dramatic presentations. 

It was given in College Hall on the evening of Friday, October 24, and 
was the opening of the new College Hall, recently renovated and refurnished 
with the best in acoustic properties and seating accommodations. 

'Twas a fitting inauguration, this rollicking Broadway hit, of a season 
of superior dramatics at Brigham Young. 



The cast of characters: 
Peter Jones 
Jane Weston 
Joe Lehman 
Fanny Lehman 
Jack McClure 
Mary Martin 
Waiter 
Cecil Benham 
Mernie Sampson 
Peggy Marlow 
Kitty Humphreys 
Oscar Fritchie 
A. J. Patterson 



Glen Webb 

Monta Wentz 

Ward Clark 

Wilma Hansen 

Allan F field 

Mary Ashby 

Boyd Nelson 

Morris Christensen 

. Fred Webb 

. Bertha Agren 

Ada Hosier 

Raymond Peterson 

Walt Daniels 



[ 



"The Butter and Egg Man" was presented twice thereafter, at Coalville 
on December 12, and before leadership visitors on the 30th of January, in 
College Hall. 



[60] 






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''Gypsy Fires" 

Annually the senior class of Brigham Young University presents a three- 
act dramatic production as a project. This winter the class choose Alan 
Davis' gripping and colorful drama, "Gypsy Fires." The players were se- 
lected from a large entry in the try-out, and worked seriously and effectively 
under the direction of Miss Bernice Barton, supervised by Professor Alonzo 
Morley. 

"Gypsy Fires" was given in College Hall on Friday evening, November 
21. In a cast of exceptionally able players two, Miss Bertha Agren and 
Miss Mildred Davis, as the old gypsy queen, Tryphena Stanley, and the 
.flighty little gypsy maid, Synfie Boswell, stood out as brilliant stars in the 
performance. 

The players and their respective roles in "Gypsy Fires:" 

Rodney O'Neil Wright Welker 

Tryphena Stanley Bertha Agren 

Morella O'Neil Zola Martin 

Synfie Boswell .... Mildred Davis 

Zinka Dacos Floyd Walser 

Mihail Dacos Walden Menlove 

Carroll Lankford .... James Cullimore 

Mrs. Lankford Alice Jones 

Mr. Lankford T. Hetlig 

The tradition of putting on an all-senior thespian play every year has 
grown from a small beginning until now it is one of the looked-for dramatic 
treats of each school year. This year's play was commended upon as one of 
the best class productions in the history of the university. 

Besides challenging the best dramatic talent in the class for expression 
the annual senior play is a source of welcome revenue to the class coff"ers 
and aids the treasurer and the class in naming its annual project as it 
graduates. 






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"T/je Ivory Door' 

1931 Varsity Competitive Play 

A powerful drama depicting the killing superstition of a medieval 
society, used as a means of satirizing any form of superstition, was the 
vehicle upon which the Brigham Young University Varsity Players made 
their appearance in 1931. None other a play than "The Ivory Door," by the 
celebrated A. A. Milne, was chosen. 

Twenty-eight characters, representing the pick of the university dra- 
matic talent, made up the complete ensemble, supplemented by seven beau- 
tiful girls portraying through the art of interpretative dancing the "Devil 
Dance." 

It was one of the most stupendous stage productions ever attempted by 
the B. Y. U. dramatic art department, and it is a tribute to the head of that 
department, and a just evaluation, that "The Ivory Door" was rated by able 
critics as a production unsurpassed in the annals of Brigham Young stage 
history. 

Professor Alonzo Morley, head of the dramatic art department, sub- 
stantiated his characterization as a master play producer by deftly selecting, 
with the happiest choice, the various players in their respective roles, and then 
developing and training them to think and breathe the very spirit and life 
of the play. He was assisted in directing the play by Miss Josinette Cook, 
a major in the department. The dancing was under the able direction of that 
gifted young dancer, Miss Aline Coleman. 

Mr. Glen Webb, as King Perivale, was awarded the Edmund Evans 
prize for his masterful work throughout the production, winning over strong 
competition as the best sustained character in the play. 

The cast of characters of the "Tlie Ivory Door:" 
Prologue — 

King Hilary Orlando McBride 

Raymond Adams 



Prince Perivale 
Brand 



Merlin Vance 



[62] 



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BANYAN '31 




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The play — 
King Perivale 
Brand 
Anna 
Thora 

The Chancellor 
Jessica 

Princess Lilia 
Anton 
Old Beppo 
Simeon . 
Count Rollo 
The Mummer 
Titus 
Carlo 
Bruno 



Glen Webb 

Joseph The riot 

Helen Decker 

Bernice Barton 

Boyd Nelson 

Josinette Cook 

Sarah Dixon 

Alan Fjield 

Horace Jones 

Fred Miner 

David W (ilker 

Kent Johnson 

Grove Haddock 

Earl ISielson 

Morris dinger 



Court People 

Ezra Murdock, DeLores McDonald, Phyllis Miller, 

Ruth Stevens, Clifford Jones, Elizaheth Gessford, Fern 

Smoot, Kerinit Anderson 

Epilogue — 

The King T. Hettig 

The Prince ...... Rav Buchanan 

Dancing Girls 
Aline Coleman, Vera Merrill, Vivian Merrill, Louise 
Swenson, Ada Hasler, Willa Sowards, Beulah Sowards 

A great deal of the reniarkahle success in effect of "Tlie Ivorv Door" 
must he attrii)Uled to the help and whole-hearted cooperation of tlie art de- 
partment and the dress making class under Miss Tuckfield. The scenery 
was the work of Professor E. H. Eastmond of the art department and his 
students, and the costumes, other than a few from a costuming house, were 
made hy the dress-making class. 

The play was produced in College Hall on February 13, and was staged 
in Kingsbury Hall, University of Utah campus, on March 14. 



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BANYAN '31 





Lromg borne 

Annual All-Boys Show 

Sponsored by Alpha Kappa Psi 

As its annual dramatic production Alpha Kappa Psi presented this 
year the hilarious "wild west" comedy '"Going Some" by Armstrong and 
Beach. 




Tile cast of characters: 

J. Wallingford Speed 
"Larry" Glass 
Culver Covington 
Berkley Fresno 
Jack Chapin, Jr. 
"Still Bill" Stover 
Aurelio Maria 
Mister Cloudy 
Willie 

"Gabby" Gallagher 
Skinner 
Jeane Chapin 
Helen Blake 
Roberta Keap 
Mariedetta 
Chink 



Hollis Grange 

Elvin Downs 

Paul W arjiick 

John Diilton 

Reed Ririe 

Jesse Chandler 

W ard Clark 

Walden Menlove 

Merlin Vance 

Howard Cot tarn 

Howard Kelly 

Lynn Hurst 

Max Olsen 

Graydon Robinson 

Glenn Thomas 

Laurence Jones 



"Going Some" was directed by Walt Daniels, under the supervision of 
Professor Alonzo Morley. The dancing numbers were directed by Morris 
Christensen. Dancing "girls" were: Jess Richens, Glen Vincent, Bob Erick- 
son, Lee Spencer, LeGrande Stephens, Ray Hansen, Leo Andrews, Frank 
VanWagenen, Wesley Bales, William Creer. 



[64] 



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BANYAN '31 

"Ko/zjeo and Juliet'^ 

Annual Theta Alplii Plii Dranialic Production 

Theta Alphi Plii this year returiu'd Shakespeare to the cain|jus of Brig- 
ham Young University in its presentation oi the immortal playwright's ro- 
mantie love story of Romeo and Juliet. 

It was a classic audience indeed that greeted the actors on the night of 
the play, Friday, April 17. Since 1924 when the dramatic art department 
produced "The Taming of the Shrew," Provo had not seen one; but art 
patrons quickly responded in a most satisfying measure to the beauties of thL" 
master writer's romantic tragedy. 

That week and the following was Shakespeare week on the campus and 
the department contracted a company of the Shakespeare Guild of America 
for three performances in College Hall. Led by the brilliant young Ameri- 
can actor William Thornton the company gave performances in Provo of 
"Hamlet," April 21; "Taming of the Shrew," April 22; and "The Merchant 
of Venice," April 22. 

The players in "Romeo and Juliet" were: Juliet, Elaine Paxinan; 
Romeo, Morris dinger; Friar Laurence, Orlando McBride; the nurse, Gen- 
evieve Morgan; Peter, Fred Webb; Tybalt, Earl Nielson; Friar John, Earl 
Nielson; Benvolio, Joe Theriot; Mecutio, Alan Fjeld; Balthazer, Ray Adams; 
Montague, Jess Chandler; Capulet, Glenn Webb; Paris, Ward Clark; the 
prince, Boyd Nelson; Lady Capulet, Reta Gines; Montague, Alice Jones. 
Prologue, Monta Wentz. 



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[65] 



"Kiss for Cinderella " 

Annual Girls' Day Play 

Co-eds of Brigham Young University on their annual "Day" contiiuu-d 
the practice of producing a Barry play. This year it was the play "A Kiss 
for Cinderella." 

The leading character, Cinderella, was carried by Miss Josinetle Cook, 
whose dainty natural characteristic put life in every line of Barry's Cinder- 
ella. It was one of the finest pieces of acting of a vear of exceptionally 
high class stage portrayals. 

The cast of characters follow: Cinderella, Josinette Cook; the police- 
man, Raymond Peterson; Mr. Bodie, Farrell Madsen; Dr. Bodie, Exilda 
Nielson; orphan children, Nell Hibbert. Donna Salisbury, and Marie Huber; 
woman of the world, Veda Kartchner; Mrs. Malloney, Eliza Bjjerregaard; 
the nurse, Audrey Jackson; a soldier, Martin Ririe; Donny, Edith Nash; the 
king, Elvin Downs; the queen, Mary Ashby; the penguin, T. Hettig; Lord 
Mayor, David Walker; Lord Times, Kermit Anderson; fairy godmother, 
Dorothy Mensel. 

Miss Bertha Agren directed the production of the play, supervised by 
Professor Alonzo Morley. 





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T/iet« -4[p/j(/ F/j 



BacA: roi<': Joseph Theriot. Morris dinger, Alan Fjeld, Professor Alonzo Morley. 

Ward Clark. Glen Webb, Reta Gines. Second row: E. Genevieve Morgan, Wilma 

Hansen, Zola Martin. Josinette Cook. Firat roir: Editli Rich. Elaine Paxnian. Bernice 

Barton. Alice Jones. Bertha Agren. Monta W entz. Ada Hasler. 



I 




MORRIS CLINGER 

President 



The Beta chapter of Theta Alpa Phi was represented this year at the 
national convention held in Chicago in December by President Morris 
dinger. While there he gained many ideas that have made our activity 
more efficient and extensive. 

Home meetings were held each monUi at which time reviews were given 
by the members of the most recent and popular drama. Among the plays 
reviewed were: "The Ivory Door," "Journey's End,'" "'Criminal Code," "The 
First Mrs. Frazier," ""Berkley Square," and '"Death Takes a Holiday." 

During the year business was discussed at noon 
luncheons held every two weeks in the "Y" Cafeteria. 

The annual dramatic production was "Romeo 
and Juliet." This was the first Shakespearean produc- 
tion since 1924. It was pronounced a very finished 
production. 

Special parties have been given by Theta Alpha 
Phi in honor of dramatic visitors on the campus. The 
cast of "The Ship" with Moroni Olsen and the cast of 
the U. of U. play, as well as Mrs. Kathyrn Pardoe 
were all given entertainments after the performances. 

Twenty new members were initiated and a good 
representation attended the annual state banquet held 
in Salt Lake. All members experienced a very enjoy- 
able and interesting time during the many activities 
of the year. 



i N i .nii l llii''' ''Tg=' " 

Aiimuuii' ■•I'n,. 




[66] 




BANYAN '31 



Mdsh C.hih 

It is the great ideal and aim of the Mask Ckil) 
to foster and develop the Drama. In this it lias func- 
tioned admirahly. The cluh's interest, however, has 
not been limited to dramatic art but embraces all fine 
arts — painting, music, the dance, sculpture, architec- 
ture, and literature. The major portion of this year's 
program has been the reading of full length |)lays 
by advanced dramatic students, supplemented by lec- 
tures on various phases of fine arts and one-act plays 
by members. 




DOKOTHY MENSEL 
President 



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Bertha Agren 
Lorna Jensen 
Maurean Johnson 
Pearl Ivins 
Fred \^'ebb 
Pearl A. Decker 
Mary Ashby 
Zelia Hansen 
Louise Candlanil 
Alice Jones 
Marie \^'aldron 
Wanda Snow 
Bernice Barton 
Veda Kartchner 
Ada Hasler 



Allan Fjield 
Gwen Stewart 
Lois Vance 
Eileen Chipman 
Ruth Lewis 
Sarah Dixon 
Hannah Reynolds 
Maxine Clayton 
JMaxine Pace 
Farrell Collett 
Florence Miller 
Ellen Barker 
He'en Ellis 
Josinette Cook 
.Sec. anil Treas. 



Esther Coombs 
Reva Roberts 
Ra\ mond Peterson 
Ruth Stevens 
Faun McConkie 
Charles !\IcKell 
Carma Bringhurst 
Marine Dixon 
Level! Ireland 
Louise Spafford 
Joseph Theriot 
Bessie Collins 
Vivian Merrill 
Ruth Watts 
Helen Decker 



Edith Rich 
Gwen Brugger 
Lorraine Price 
Helen Candland 
Libbie C. Hayward 
-Margurite Romney 
Audrey Jackson 
Mrs. Henrv Jackson 
Mrs. H. B. Mensel 
Mrs. Walter Hasler 
DeLores McDonald 
Lillian Knudsen 
Naoma Rich 
Mabel Peterson 
Mi'dred Davis 



^ 



V 



[67] 





i 



( 




College of 
Applied Science 



/ 



BANYAN '31 





/■ 




I.OWRY NELSON, Ph.D. 
Dctin 



College of Applied Science 

It is the aim of llie College of Applied 

Science to provide training in the vocational 

4| g-.- iSRnl^^H fields of engineering and related fields of ag- 

y tit}l^m ricultiire, including agronomy, horticulture, 

animal husbandry, and in home economics, in- 
cluding clothing and textiles, foods, and 
household administration. 

The College was created by act of the 
Board of Trustees in 1922. A large number 
of the graduates can be found now teaching 
in the high schools of the intermountain re- 
gion. Many others are engaged in practical 
farming and home making, while others have 
found employment as experts in various enter- 
prises. 

A fairly accurate estimate would place the 
number who will receive their degrees from 
the University in the College of Applied Science at twenty-five for 19.31. 
Dr. Lowry Nelson, Dean of the College, came to the University in 1921 
from a short but brilliant career in a varied field. Graduated from the Utah 
State A. C. in 1916, Dr. Nelson took his M. S. degree and then his Ph. D. 
degree from Wisconsin University. Experience in the broad fields of his 
vocation and understanding of the problems that confront undergraduates. 
Dr. Nelson admirably fits the position as guide for students registered in the 
College of Applied Science, and endears him to all his undergraduates as 
well as other associates. 

Through the wide 
contacts of Dean 
Nelson graduates 
from this college 
have found gold- 
en opportunities for 
advanced studies in 
many of the leading 
universities of the 
United States, where, 
proudly the College 
points to them; they 
have been the fore- 
most scholars in 
their classes, reflect- 
ing credit to the in- 
stitution and testify- 
ing to the high type 
of work done in the 
College of Applied 
Arts. 




[70] 



t 




BANYAN '31 



The Gnidudto School 

The growth of graduate work in the uni- 
versity has kept pace with the growth of the 
institution as a whole. Although college grad- 
uates during earlier |jcriods had returned to 
their alma mater to pursue advanced work yet 
it was not until 1919 that the first higher de- 
grees were conferred. At the commencement 
of that year the Master's degree was conferred 
upon Walter P. Cottam and Edgar M. Jensen, 
both of whom are now meml)ers of the univer- 
sity faculty. 

At that time, however, there was no or- 
ganized department which had supervision of 
graduate instruction. It was not until the year 
1921 that a Division of Graduate Work was 
established under the direction of a faculty 
committee consisting of Dr. Christen Jensen, 
Dr. M. C. Merrill, and Dr. H. M. Woodward. 

This arrangement continued until 1928-29 when the Board of Trustees of 
the university established a Graduate School and Dr. Christen Jensen was 
selected as the first dean of the school. 

Each year has seen a larger number of graduate students enrolled in 
this school and an increase in the number who have been granted advanced 
degrees. This year a total of seventeen students were admitted to candidacy 
for the Master's degree. This will be the largest number that has been gradu- 
ated at any commencement. 




CHRISTEN JENSEN, Pli. D. 
Uean 



V 

V 



^ 



COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCE FACULTY 

Bdcli row: Percival IJigelow. Maude Tuckfield. Jean C. Folsom, Professor H. G. Ivins. Clarence Ashton. 
Effie Warnick. Fruiit mw: Dr. Thomas F-. Martin. Dr. F. S. Harris. Dr. Lowry Nelson. Professor \V. H. 

Snell. Etta Sfonip. Margaret Swenson. 




/ • 



I., 
I 



r 







BANYAN '31 





Gamma Phi Omicron 



Beiilah 
Strickler 

Evelyn 
Brvner 



Emilv 
Wright 

Esther 
Coombs 



Virginia 
Knell 

Gwendolyn 
Stewart 



Mary 
Lyons 

Miircy 
Nelson 



Ora 
Haws 

LaPreal 
Rrvner 

Maxine 
(ilavton 



President 




Virginia Delsa Norrell Ina 

Booth Tolhurst Startup Hunt 

OTHER MEMBERS 
Helen AUemaii. Elizabeth Cannon, Gertrude Gourley, Mildred Knud- 
sen. IMaurine Powell, Etta Scorup, Margaret Swenson, Laura Tucker, Maud 
Tuckfield, Effie Wamick, Anna Wheelright. 

Gamma Phi Omicron Sorority is one of the most distinctive organiza- 
tions on the campus. It is a professional organization established at the 
B. Y. U. in 1926, composed of girls majoring in Home Economics who have 
ROZENA NELSON OAKS distinguished Uiemselves scholastically and profes- 

sionally. Many of its members have not only excelled 
in the field of Home Economics, but also in other 
fields in the University. 

The organization also functions socially. Among 
its most delightful affairs this year were the formal 
dinner dance at the Hotel Roberts in March, and invi- 
tation party in November, the Anniversary dinner in 
May, and the Alumni breakfast in June. Business 
meetings were held each month. 

The sorority has contributed five volumes of re- 
search papers to the University library, and it has es- 
tablished a Loan Fund which is rapidly growing. 



[72] 



*«t 



ATHLETICS 



rVOMANCE and rivers go hand in hand. The 
glamor of the world's rivers and streams have 
been painted by artists of all lands. Their 
mysteries and romance have been woven into 
the themes of countless stories and legends. 
The Nile of Egypt suggests Antony and Cleo- 
patra; the Rhine, with its medieval castles on 
overhanging cliffs, brings memories the chiv- 
alry of knighthood. We think of the Mis- 
sissippi in terms of LaSalle, DeSoto, Lincoln, 
flatboats, paddle steamers, and pickaninnies. 
The Hudson recalls the Half Moon. The St. 
Lawrence connotes Quebec and its historic pal- 
lisades. And the Delaware brings a picture of 
Washington and his forces in its ice-choked 
current. 



I 




•-J'<v"Vi««'~' 



The Coaching Staff 

The ri.-ing tide of Brigham ^ oim^ 




{ 



1 




lit 



OTT ROMNEY 
DirerliiT <>j .^thlclics 



University athletics brought to the 
cliurcli institiilion in 1928 as Director 
of Athletics that genius of a man. 
George Ottinger Romney, who. in the 
course of time, lias gathered around 
him a coaching staff tliat is making 
B. Y. U. a threat to the supremacy 
of tlie mightiest of tliis conference in 
all types of athletics, intercollegiate 
and intra mural. 

Coach Romnev — or. just Ott — is 
head coach of football, basketball, and 
track. L'ndcr his direction Brighain 
Young athletic teams have, by their 
prowess and the color lent by his dy- 
namic personality, taken their jdaces 
with the best. Ott's system of basket- 
ball, developed to perfection with the wonder Montana Slate team of 1926- 
30. and his B. Y. U. team of the last three years, has revolutionizeil basket- 
ball playing in this side of the Rocky Mountain Conference. It is not a wild 
prediction to say that it will do this also to basketball as played throughout 
America, if teams coached b\ him contimie lo barnstorm throughout the 
United States. 

Ott's assistants, like himself, have pla\ed the game and know whereof 
they talk when training men for athletic events. Handling the business 
managerial end of die department, and assisting as track coach, is Charles 
J. "Chick" Hart, one time football and track star of Utah State Aggies. As 
freshmen coach and assistant football coach Fred "Buck" Dixon has as 
background the seasoned experience of four years as coach and four years 
in college as one of the greatest athletes in the Rocky Mountain Conference. 
In the spring of 1930 Ott Romney secured as head varsitx line coach one 
Weldoii Monson, one time all-eastern tackle from Georgetown University. 
Monson in his first season worked wonders with a green line, carefully laying 
the foundation of the powerful and effective low charging, fast driving 
oftensi\e anil defensive system proved the most successful as used by Lou 
Little, under whom he played. Monson coaches the B. Y. high school basket- 
ball team dnrins the winter. 



BUCK DIXON 



oil' KOMNKV 



•WKI.DON MONSON 



CHICK HART 




73] 




/■V:^^. 



YELL KINGS AND RALLY COMMITTEE 



MOLLIS GRANGE 

Assistant 



JOHN DALTON 
Cheer Leader 



NEFF SMART 

Assistant 



WALT DANIELS 
Committee 



T. HETTIG 

Committee 



Things have really be done at the "Y" this year in the way of rallies, 
parades, dances and pep parties. Wliile the yell kings kept the walls of the 
gym, the sides of the mountains, and the roof of the sky vibrating with the 
vigor of concentrated college yelling, the rally committee was thinking of 
more and better ways of inducing students to quit their beds and participate 
in farewell parties or welcome home receptions. All hours of the night, and 
some of the day were resorted to for something different. 

The rally pair, T. and Walt, arranged for midnight matinees, all night 
football games, before breakfast dances, and theatre parties. They, with 
the yell kings, have kept the "Y" spirit up to an unusual degree of pep dur- 
ing the entire year. 



[74] 




PKP \OniK PARTICIPANTS— I'idelps. Val Hvric, CHarni anla, Val Norn. O. S. Tnivala. \ ikinps. Nuppetts, Nauliliis 
[75] 




The "Y" Stadium 

The "Y" stadium, built on the slope of a hill which forms a natural 
amphitheatre, is ideally located for athletic events. It is situated so that it 
is easily accessible to both autoists and pedestrians. Tlie seating capacity of 
the stadium is numbered at five thousand, and should future attendance de- 
mand, can be greatly enlarged. One can see any part of the field from any 
part of the stadium. 

Tlie athletic field consists of a regulation gridiron, a quarter-mile track, 
and a two hundred and twenty yard straightaway cinder track. The stadium is 
the home of the annual Invitational Track and Relay Carnival at which 
junior high schools, senior high schools, and junior colleges from the inter- 
moimtain territory compete. 

The view from the stadium is as rich in aesthetic quality as any canyon 
road or mountain park. Across the stadium to the West, over fields and 
orchards, one can see Utah Lake, girdled by purple mountains. On both 
sides and in the rear the Wasatch range bends in a great semicircle from the 
giant Mt. Nebo on the South, to the reclining Mt. Timpanogos, the highest of 
Wasatch peaks, on the North. 



[76] 




SU«*»Y nNOERSON 



Football 



Football 

Football at Brigliam Young University now 
is spoken of in terms of championships instead, 
as in years previous, of how close the team holds 
the mightier aggregation of the Rocky Mountain 
Conference. And the enviable record that B.Y.U. 
gridiron teams have attained under the tutelage 
of Coach Ott Romney speaks fluently of the fact 
that the "Mormons" are coming to the front rank 
in this spectacular American college s])ort. 

Travelling almost 25,000 miles during the 
season and playing 20 football games, the three 
teams of Brigham Young, the Varsity, Junior 
Varsity and Freshmen, won 11 games, lost 5, 
and tied 4. The individual record of these teams 
are: Varsity: played 12 games, won 6, lost 2, 
tied 4. Junior Varsity: played 3 games, won 3. 
Freshmen: played 5 games, won 2, lost 3. 

Most important, of course, and most re- 
markable, was the feat of the varsity team in 
playing 12 games in 13 weeks, only three of 
which were on home soil, one being played away 
from the mainland after a 3000-mile trip across 
the Pacific. 

The season of 1930 for B. Y. U. perhaps equals, at least, if not sur- 
passing, the most strenuous ever undertaken by any college football team, 
and the fact that Ott Romney's charges lost but two games during the time 
speaks highly of the calibre, stamina, and fighting heart of the men and die 
coaches. The rigors of travelling 22,000 miles in one season, playing game 
after game with, as a rule, no more than seven days in between games and 
sometimes only four, accounts for the numerous tie games that resulted with 
teams that should have been beaten. 




CAPT. ELMER DASTRUP 
Guard 



THE VARSITY 




[78 1 



Brigham Young lost hut one game in the 
conference race, that to the championship Uni- 
versity of Utah team, hut Colorado University, 
by virtue of having played one more game than 
B. Y. U., and like the latter, losing hut to Utah, 
took second place standing while Brigham Young 
dropped to third. 

The gridiron season at Young opened on 
September 10 with the first practice, sixty 
picked men reporting that week. Ten days later 
the first game was played, a practice skirmish 
with an all-star alumni team. Fifty men saw 
action as the varsity won 28—19. A week fol- 
lowing the team began its season's trekking by 
hieing over to Laramie for a game with Wy- 
oming University, which was won 19—12. 

Following that game the next Saturday 
B. Y. U. made one of its two remaining home 
appearances by playing the powerful University 
of Nevada team in the "Y" stadium. The result 
was one of the record ties of the Mormon team — 
6-6. After the hard game with Nevada, B. Y. U. 
boarded the train the following week and played 
a game with Colorado Teachers at Greeley. It 
was homecoming for the pedagogues and tliey 
played their best game of the season to tie Brigham Young 7—7. 

Following that Saturday the varsity entered its traditional game witli 
Utah University at Salt Lake City. The R. M. C. champions finally won 
34^7, but it was only after a hectic first half diat ended 7-7 with the Mor- 
mojist clearly superior. The tide of battle turned at the opening of tlie 
second half when a "Y" back fumbled the kickoflf deep in his owii territory 
and Utah recovered. They scored from there. With the advantage now of 
a lead the Utes played like the champions they were and converted the "Y" 
chance attempts to score to tallies of their own. 




CAI'IM- 



W AM.M. AKD 



THE FRESHMEN SQUAD 




[79] 




Next Saturday B. Y. U. ran into another homecoming, this time at 
Gunnison, Colorado, where Western State College was playing before the 
old grads. The Mormons won 25—0. Following that, Brigham Young made 
it two in a row over Utah State A. C. in Ogden by upsetting the farmer 
hayrack for a 39—14 pruning. The Mormon team showed superb form that 
day, flashing as smart a game as any team in the conference during the 
season. 

At Butte, Montana, the following week the blue and white team ran 
into a keyed, madly fighting Mt. St. Charles eleven that tied the Mormons 
13—13. From the point of view of the score, it was a disappointment, but 
taking the conditions into consideration, it was, perhaps, the most heroic and 
superb exhibition of fight displayed by the team. Meeting a team that was 
playing before a rabid home crowd, a team keyed to the highest pitch, when 
they themselves were experiencing a natural let-down aftei playing a hard 
key game the week before, the boys from the Mormon institution were strug- 
gling in an uphill battle to avert defeat. A St. Charles back ran the kickoff 




[82] 




for a touchdown that helped skyrocket the home team's spirit. Tired and 
worn by seven hard games in a row, nevertheless the courage of the hoys in 
blue carried them to a tie in a most remarkable demonstration of heroism 
and fight against tremendous physical and mental odds. No game should 
be lauded greater than ihat. 

Homecoming at B. Y. U. brought Montana State to Provo, and Ott 
Romney's boys trounced the Bobcats 19-6. Another Saturday and another 
game, this time at Denver with the surprisingly powerful Regis College 
eleven. B. Y. U. whipped the Regis team 18-6. Ott Romney and the squad 
stopped only long enough in the home town for one practice before legging 
it on to Boise for a Thanksgiving day date with College of Idaho. The strain 
of the gruelling season told and B. Y. U. but tied with the Idahoans 13-13. 

That was the last game on U. S. mainland soil, but not the last of the 
season. Brighani Young had a date with University of Hawaii at Honolulu 
for December 10, and left Provo on the morning of the first for the islands. 
The Hawaiians gave the Mormons their worst beating of the season. 49—13. 




[83] 




i 



Hawaii made over half their scores on blocked punts, which, strangely 
enougli, happened to be the only B. Y. U. punts blocked during the season. 
There was no alibi for the defeat but the fact should be stated, in fairness to 
the losing team, that the score was away out of proportion to the relative 
strength of the teams. Hawaiian newspapers acclaimed the game the most 
brilliant ever witnessed on the islands, and the same newspapers lauded the 
sportsmanship, conduct, and high character of the Brigham Young boys. 

B. Y. LJ. placed one man, Paul Tlronie, halfback, on the official all- 
Rocky Mountain Conference first honor eleven. Critics acclaimed Thome 
one of the most powerful and greatest all-around backs of the conference. 
Other B. Y. U. players rated mention, two: Captain Elmer Dastrup, guard, 
and Bliss Hoover, halfback, placing on the second and third teams respec- 
tively. Brigham Young lost nine men from the 1930 squad. With some 
promising material from the frosh, and with a varsity line almost intact, the 
1931 teanr should be as strong, if not stronger, than last season. 



I 




[84] 




Baskelball 




Varsity BaskethaU 



Brigham Young University, with the greatest 
array of basketball material in many years, 
played through a season of disappointing ups 
and downs which ended with the Blue and White 
team in second place in the Western Division, 
Rocky Mountain Conference standing, with seven 
wins and five losses. B. Y. U., the "hard luck" 
team of the conference, actually lost the cham- 
j -^^^^^B^^ pionship of the division by a total of three points. 

^ .l^^^^^t' With a very impressive pre-season record, 

meeting some of the greatest teams in America 
on a 6,000 mile tour as far east as Cleveland, 
Ohio, was generally favored as the league sea- 
son opened. As in football, the B. Y. U.'s var- 
sity basketball team played one of the stiffest 
practice schedules of any team in the country, 
engaging in 19 contests besides its regular 12 
Jf'i game league schedule. Of the 19 practice games 

-Sl&r^^— J^' iti the Blue and White played it was victorious in 

12, defeating such outstanding rivals as Illinois 
Wesleyan, Western Reserve, Chicago U, Nebras- 
ka U, and Wyoming U, Eastern Division R. M. C. 
champions. The Mormon team lost to such powerful teams as Henry's Cloth- 
iers, national A. A. U. champions, Butler U, Marquette, and Wittenberg U. 
The conference schedule opened for Brigham Young on January 9 and 
the Mormons went into action at Provo against Montana State in a two 
game series, winning both contests. Two weeks later happened the disas- 
trous series that really lost the championship for B. Y. U. Utah U came 
to Provo with a veteran team of remarkably accurate long range shooters, 
taking both games by a total margin of 3 points. The first game went into 



RUSS MAGLEBY 

Captain 




[86 1 







an extra period, Utah emerging victorious by 
one point, and the second game resuhed in an- 
other Utah victory, this time by two points. 

The next series was with the Utah State A. 
C. at Logan. Again the jinx of a small margin 
defeat slapped the Mormon five in the face, the 
Farmers this time triumphing by two points, but 
the next night B. Y. U. came back into the run- 
ning by soundly trouncing the Ags. Followed a 
series with Montana State at Bozeman and the 
Bobcats turned in the most decisive defeat of 
the B. Y. U. team in the season, and incidental- 
ly, one of the few decisive victories in this re- 
markable league. B. Y. U., however, stepped 
back the next night to turn the tables. 

With the necessity of winning the remainder 
of its games in order to win the title Brigham 
Young received Utah State at Provo and admin- 
istered two defeats to the Farmers. This, as 
Utah U had continued its winning ways, resolved 
the championship struggle to the final series be- 
tween B. Y. U. and Utah at Salt Lake, with the 
Redskins one game to the good. B. Y. U. was 
faced with the task of winning both games for no better than a tie. and Utah 
had to win but one to cinch the title. 

The nervous strain on the men of both teams was evident on the first 
night's game, the contest being rather ragged, but LTtah had far i)etter suc- 
cess at the basket than did Brigham Young and won the game and the title. 
The B. Y. U. players' efforts at goal shooting was pitiful, as they outplayed 
Utah on die floor, but the iron hoop seemed actuallv closed to Ott Romney's 
men. The second night the Blue and White came back with a decisive vic- 
tory to insure second place for itself in the division. 



H 




Captain-Elect 



=ffl 




[87] 




I 




Utah University subsequently beat Wyoming University two games out 
of three for the championship of the Rocky Mountain Conference. 

Six of the members of the squad will be missing when the roll is 
called next season, the list including three men who have played four years 
as regulars on the varsity. They are Eldon Brinley, George Cooper, Russ 
Magleby, and Mark Ballif, Paul Thome, and George Staples. To take their 
places will be a group of young sophomores and juniors on whom is placed 
the responsibility of upholding the fine reputation of the chuch institution 
on the waxed court. 

Brigham Young placed its sensational sophomore forward, Elwood 
Romney, R. M. C. high scoring champion, on every R. M. C. honor team 
named. Other players received mention and places on various selections, the 
list including George Cooper, Russ Magleby, guards, and Eldon Brinley, 
forward. 

The honor that comes but to champions found subject in Elwood Rom- 
ney, captain-elect of the 1932 varsity quintet, when he was placed on Col- 
lege Humor's third all-American honor selection. The selection is one of the 
really official ones in the country and to place on it speaks myriads for the 
ability of a player. Romney, discussed with the fourteen other best per- 
formers in the United States, was found to have by far the highest average 
in point scoring of any of the others. The lithe B. Y. U. forward averaged 
1.5 points per game, compared to 10 per game that his nearest honor com- 
petitor had. 



[90] 




Track 




-dm 



Track Squad 



^-- 








RALPH NELSON 

Captain 



track events. It turned 
letes allowed B. Y. U. 



Brigham Young; University's track and field 
S(|uad had travelled far from the powerful agre- 
gation that in 1929 won the Rocky Mountain Con- 
ference championship, and some of the brilliant 
|)erformers of that year had travelled farther. Thus 
its was that the white and blue track and field out- 
look at the first of this season looked anything but 
a contender for any championship, nor even for 
victory in any meet, dual or state. 

The Owen Rowes, George Corbetts, Brad Jen- 
sens, Mark Reeves, Tony Bentleys, Les Wrights, 
were only names on the records of the church in- 
stitution's track chronicle. These had brought to 
Provo the championship. There was no substitute 
on the field of the "Y" stadium this year who could 
replace these phenomenal performers, and add to 
this the fact that the other institutions of the league 
!iad the most brilliant arrays of athletes that had 
graced one campus in years, and there was not 
nuich of a chance to crow about. 

Utah University, 1930 R. M. C. champions, 
laid for the Romney and Hart team at Salt Lake 
on Saturday, April 18. A pulled muscle took out 
of competition B. Y. U.'s only hope in the sprint 
events, Boyd Rassmussen, and the white and i)lue 
hoped for but a scanty point here and there in the 
out so. Utah's powerful track assemblage of ath- 
but three points in the two mile, two in the low 

THE SQUAD 



Ruck row. (left to right): Coach Chick Hart, Reese, Chadwick, Peterson. Lewis. Romney, Bunnell, 
I>aker. Baird. Jolley. Jones. Middle row: Nelson, Staples, Ripple, Scott, Skousen. Peterson, Griffith, 
F. Prince, Wright, Rassmussen, Toone. Front row: Forrester, Brown, Amaru, Biddulph, Crane, Hansen, 

Rowe. Brasher. 



^^f- 








V 



^^. ■'■i ■\-ffii^.:-- .^ 



[92] 




hurdles, and one in the high hurdles. The final score was lOT^A fbr Utah 
and 371/;. for B. Y. U. 

Two Saturdays later Brigham Young met Utah State A. C. in another 
dual meet at Provo. Little ehance was given the Provo collegians to win 
the meet and the closest figuring could concede B. Y. U. victory oidy by a 
scanty point or two. Few expected a Brigham Young win init the boys 
turned in steady performances, breaking in here and there for unexpected 
points, and winning just about ever)- place that had been figured possible 
to win. The result was the closest of any meet in many and many a year. 
Brigham Young University won the meet by a score of 73 to 72. Even 
though Aggies made clean sweeps in the last tliree events of the meet B. Y. 
U. had things cinched in the hall mile race bv winning first ami second 
places. 



[93] 




Tlie highlight of that B. Y. U. -Aggie meet was the duel between George 
Staples, "Y" pole vaulter, and Carl Belliston, Aggie state record holder in 
that event. The two aces left the rest of the vaulters early and continued 
on past the state record height, both clearing tlie bar at 12 feet 7% inches 
(the record was 12 feet 6% inches.) At 12 feet IQlA inches Staples cleared 
the bar neatly but touched it with his hand coming down, dislodging it and 
failing but by that bare bit to record the new height. 

Two freshmen came through in this meet with stellar performances to 
win firsts and win letters in this meet. Reese beat the veteran Belliston in 
the high jump, and Lewis out-scampered the Aggie hurdle ace in the low 
sticks. Nelson, B. Y. U. captain, was supreme in the distance races, though 
allowing Romney to breast the tape before him in the mile race. This act 
of sportsmanship gave the sophomore basketball phenom the right to a letter 
in the sport. 



[94] 




In comparison with other teams of the Conference, and especially with 
that of Utah University, B. Y. U. appeared as a relative weak team. ])ut in 
realitv the church institution tracksters represented a good average college 
squad. Here could be said that, in truth, the Brigham Young team was not 
weak, but that it was in league with teams of exceedingly great strength. 

Point winners for B. Y. U. who will be absent when sunshine of the 
1932 season calls out the track and field athletes include George Staples, 
pole vaulter; Leo Probert, middle distance; Paul Thome, weights; Boyd 
Rassmussen, sprints. These men will be missed sorely, but a crop of verv 
promising freshmen and sophomore performers are fast developing to carry 
the colors of the institution through the next season, and an exceptionally 
powerful group of junior athletes this year will form the bulwark of the 
1932 squad. 

This book goes to print before the State and Conference meet and thus 
the absence of anything on those meets. It would be silly to altemi)t any jne- 
diction that B. Y. U. could win these meets, although a slight chance exists 
in the State meet. 



[95] 




The last page of the track section of this hook is devoted to intra-mural 
track and field contests, not for the reason of filling space hut hecause of a 
realization that these intra-mural contests hold an important place in the 
college program of athletics. 

Big days in B. Y. U. track and field intra-murals are the annual inter- 
class meet and the annual inter-social unit meet. The inter-class meet has 
been a yearly affair since 1926, and the inter-social unit meet has been a 
featured spring sport event since 1929. 

This year's intra-mural track and field meets were won by the Junior 
class in the inter-class contests, and by the Cougar Errants unit in the inter- 
social unit contests. 

The department of athletics of the University is planning and looking 
forward to a day soon when practically every male member of the student 
body will be out for the spring sport and compete as a member of one of the 
teams working under coaches who understand the training and handling of 
men in athletic contests. 



[Q6] 




Minor Sports 



Varsity Wrestling 

Brigham Young University wrestling is gradually regaining the high 
place in that sport that it once had and the year 1931 saw the Mormon 
team, under the tutelage of Coach Aubert Cote, former Olympic champion 
wrestler, sweep through to win the Western Division, Rocky Mountain Con- 
ference, champion over the most powerful array of collegiate wrestlers as- 
sembled in competition in many years. 

B. Y. U., in winning the divisional championship from Utah State, 
defending title holder, was forced to produce four champions and place 
every man it entered in the meet. The final score was: B. Y. U. — 32; Utah 
U. — 22; Utah State — 22; Montana State — 14. 

In dual meets preceding the divisional tournament Brigham Young 
faired indifferently well. Against the De'seret Gymnasium grapplers the 
White and Blue showed to advantage, winning quite easily. Then followed 
a dual meet with Utah State, which resulted in a 16-16 tie. The Blue and 
White then met Utah U in another dual meet which resulted in another tie, 
18-18. Utah state subsequently beat Utah U and automatically was recog- 
nized state champions. 

The work of several of the B. Y. U. wrestlers bordered on the phenom- 
enal, while collectively it was one of the best balanced teams representing 
the church institution in years. Especially outstanding was the performance 
of Captain Iman Hales, 16.5 pounder. Hales found little competition in hia 
weight either in state or divisional meet, and easily retained his title in that 
weight. Hales has yet to be defeated by a collegiate wrestler in a college 
meet. 

Another B. Y. U. defending champion, Neff Smart, 115 pounder, was 
the second to retain his title in that weight. The other two champions for 
B. Y. U. in the divisional meet were Vard Johnson, 135 pounds, and Bob 
Yorgason, 155 pounds. 

Hales and Smart participated in the intermountain A. A. U. meet held 
at Logan, each wrestling in two weights. Hales entered the 175 pound class 
and the heavyweight division, winning the former easily but losing in the 
final bout of the heavyweight division after two extra periods. Smart wres- 
tled in the 115 pound and the 125 pound class. Heavy entry in the 125 
pound class necessitated to many preliminary bouts and Smart was forced 
to withdraw after winning his first bout in that weight. He proved supreme, 
however, in the lighter class and was crowned champion. 

Bob Yorgason, 155 pound divisional champion, was elected to the cap- 
taincy of the 1932 wrestlers. He will lead a team of grapplers composed 
of every one of this year's squad with the exception of but one. Several 
freshman and sophomore candidates are certain to develop into strong con- 
lenders next year and will be a surprise if Brigham Young does not repeat 
its championship performance in 1932. 



f 98] 




[99] 



THE VARSITY '^ RESTLING SQUAD 




Varsity Tennis 

Producing some of the highest calibre of col- 
lege tennis players in the intermountain region, the 
undergraduate players in the State of Utah put on 
some of the classiest exhibitions of the court game 
in many years. In comparison, and in such com- 
pany, Brigham Young University's varsity tennis 
1 ^ ^^^H players, though playing great games, did not walk 

f ^^^1 tlu'ough to titles as it was wont to do in years past 

when the other colleges of the state furnished but 
feeble competition. 

Every one of the college teams of the state 
boasted of some of the outstanding players that 
could star in the intermountain meets and the tide 
of fortune turned with the winds of the day, so to 
speak, a champion being sure of his title only on 
the day that he won it. In other words, so even 
^^ W*L were the calibres of the players that one day's loser 

^§^^ ^'vfljp quite often was another day's winner. 

Five lettermen formed the varsity first team of 
1931. These experienced court men were Captain 
Paul Holt, Eldon Brinley, Kent Johnson, Clayton 
Jenkins, and Max Mangum. All but Max Mangum played for Brigham 
Young the previous year, winning their honor emblems then. Mangum re- 
turned fruni a three-year mission to rejoin the white and blue ranks in which 
he had previously won honors in intercollegiate tennis play. 

Tennis is a vastly popular sport on the campus, the intra mural meets 
bringing out a large number of players in excellently played matches. 



IKKl) ■I'.ll.k' \n\u\ 
Coach 



Howard Taylor, Melvin Jenkins. Max Mangum. Eldon Rrinley, Kent Johnson. Clayton Jenkins 

Paul Holt. Coach Dixon 



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[ 100] 




THE \ AKSITY TEAM IN I'KACTICE 

Captain Paul Holt. Eldon Brinley. Kent Johnson Max Mangum. and (.layton 
Jenkins, the main varsity team, may he seen in characteristic jioses. These men were 
aided in varsity plavs hv a group of able performers just a shade short of varsitv first 
team calihre. Thev are included in the snaps: Howard Taylor. Aldwyn Smith, and 
Melvin Jenkins. 



[ 101] 




I 



.i:^<l«UW«MMMI 



Intra Murals 

Intra mural athletics at Brigham Young University have been growing 
steadily in its aim to provide sports for the entire student body of the insti- 
tution and a decided impetus toward that end was given this year when 
T. Hettig, erstwhile "Y" News editor and sports writer, was appointed as 
student manager of intra murals, assisting Chick Hart, director. Team and 
individual contests were staged, the winners given appropriate awards and 
an accumulative point system for the sport championship for all year was 
adopted. 

Winners in the various contests were: Upper left: Champion of the 
class basketball tournament, the Seniors. Upper right: Champion of the 
winter inter-social unit basketball tournament. Cougar Errants. Lower: 
Champion of the inter-social unit fall basketball tournament. Vikings. 
Tausigs unit won the inter-unit free throw tournament. Neff Smart, Viking, 
won the spring tennis crown in singles play and Melroy Luke and Tony 
Sowards won the doubles championship. 



? 



[ 102] 




^ 



Cleo 

After the misfortune of losing her mate, Cleo was transferred to Liberty 
Park in Salt Lake City. There, away from the Alnia Mater, whose emblem 
she is, she dreams of Tarbo and sunny afternoons in the cage on the slope 
of Maeser Hill. 



I 103] 




Tarbo 

Although the name of Tarbo is hardly mure than a tradi- 
tion since his demise a little more than a year ago, his spirit 
permeates every contest on the athletic field, and in the gym- 
nasium. 

A little more than a year ago Tarbo and his cage mate, 
Cleo, sallied forth from their home and for a short while 
tasted of the freedom that they had been deprived of for the 
most part of their lives. The shock of having to go back to 
the cage must have been too much for the noble Tarbo, for a 
few days afterward he was found dead in the cage. We have 
only the empty cage and a few photographs to keep alive the 
memory of the two great cats that sunned themselves on the 
slope of Maeser Hill. 



[ 104] 



ORGANIZATIONS 



±N the infancy of any new country the rivers 
furnished the most practical highways into 
the interior. Where treks by horse or on foot 
over land would entail hazard and difficulty, 
the river allowed faster and safer transit. 
Trappers and explorers used the streams with 
their long reaching tributaries to explore fully 
the surrounding territory. Settlements sprang 
up along the banks of rivers because the water 
offered the most rapid means of intercourse 
between towns. 



^'^^- 





The Current 




BERNICE BARTON 
Most liepresentative Go-ed 



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IIP 





VERA MERRILL 

Most 'Popular Go-ed 




4 



I 




Social Units 



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:/ 



/ 



BANYAN '31 





Yr 



lars 




. Gleason 
Kerr 


Fred 
Horlacher 


Howard 
Kelly 


Rigby 

Jacobs 


Eldon 
Crowther 


Spencer 
Growe 


Reed 
Clark 


Ervine 
Smith 


Lee 
Lund 


Jean 
Nielsen 


Ezra 

Miirdork 


Wesley 
Bayles 




Frank 
Cragun 


Russell 
Humphries 



Tlie Friars, or Delta Phi (as they will be known in the future), is an 
organization composed entirely of retunied missionaries. Their purpose is to 
promote a bond of fellowship among a group of men who have had experi- 
ences in common and who are drawn together because of these experiences. 
This organization is composed of five units, three college chapters and 
two alumni chapters. The college chapters are located at Brigham Young 
University, University of Utah, and the Utah State 
Agricultural College. The University of Utah has an 
Alumni Chapter in Salt Lake and the University of 
Southern California has an Alumni Chapter in Los 
Angeles. 

The installing of the Alumni Chapter in Califor- 
nia during the Christmas holidays marked the estab- 
lishment of the first Chapter outside of Utah. Since 
then inquiries have been received from the University 
of Idaho, Harvard University, George Washington 
University, New York University, and Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

The official organ of the Fraternity. "The Friar 
News" ("Delta Phi" now) is published from the "Y" 
campus, and is edited by Howard Kelly. The B. Y. U. 
was honored in the selection of Mr. Kelly at tlie inter- 



[ 114] 



S^^^^^r^^m^^tvr 




BANYAN '31 




Friar 



Grove M. 

Haddock 


Reed 
Wood 


Harrison 

Conover 


James A. 
CuUimore 


Grant 
Vest 


Juel 
Andreason 


Pearson 
Corbett 


Ross 
Hatton 


Clarence 
Dahl 


Clyde 
Summerhays 


Irving K. 
Kasband 


George 
Willardson 




Gains 
Call 


Henry 
Watson 



V 

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^ 



[ 115 J 



HOWARD KELLY 
PresiilenlElect 



chapter convention on April 4th as the Executive President for 1931-32. 
The name "The Friars" was officially changed to Delta Phi durini;; the 
April convention in Salt Lake. The purpose of tlie change was to permit ex- 
pansion and to make the name more acceptable upon the various college 
campii. 

A very fine social program has been carried out during the year; a 
watermelon bust, a hard-time party, a formal dancing 
party, a dancing party with tlie Prom decorations, cli- 
maxed by the Inter-chapter Formal Dinner Dance 
held in the Main Ballroom of the Hotel Utah on April 
3rd. 

The "Y" Chapter's basketball team exchanged 
games with the "U," winning the home game and 
losing the Salt Lake game. 

Paul Keeler very ably led the club during the Fall 
quarter and half of the Winter quarter, but due to hi; 
leaving school, Secretary-Treasurer Melvin McDonah 
was chosen to take his place and has retained the same 
enthusiasm that was manifest by Pres. Keeler. John 
L. Clark has acted as Vice-President and Irving Kas- 
band was chosen to succeed President McDonald as 
Secretary-Treasurer. 



-rf' 




/ ■ 



BANYAN '31 




I 
i 



r y 




Reed Thornton Bob Erickson Walt Daniels Ellis Graham 

A. B. Larson Dick Knight Frank Harris Clyde Siimmerhays 

Clyde Buehler Max Olson Paul Keeler Harrison Conover 

Dean Fisher Kent Johnson Ben Johnson Dix Jones 

Frank Van Wagnen Art Hasler Ralj)h Kelly Barr Miller 

Chauncy Harris Howard Kelly Edgar Barton 



The Nuggett's were organized in 1917 as the Goldbricker's Club. When 
the social unit system was started the Goldbrickers were the first to affiliate, 
becoming unit number 1. 

The Nuggetts stand for the highest development of the individual, 
socially, scholastically, and culturally. Socially they 
have a number of traditional functions, including an 
annual Thanksgiving formal, a New Year's party, a 
Nuggett-Tausig party, a Spring Formal, and a Spring 
Festival. 

The Nuggett members are prominent in debating, 
dramatics, music, athletics, and student government. 
The officers of the unit are: Ben B. Johnson, presi- 
dent; Max Olson, vice-president; Dix Jones, secretary 
and treasurer. 



[ 116] 




BANYAN '31 




Tausigs 



Clarence 
Vacher 


Paul 
W arnick 


Boyd 
Rasniusst-n 


James 
Westwood 


Lazell 
Chipman 


Schuyler 
Strang 


Paul 
Chipman 


Glen 
Wilkinson 


Mollis 
Grange 


Dean 
Nielson 


John 
Dalton 


Kenneth 
Firmage 


Koss 
Hatlon 


John 
Westwood 


Rav 
Hart 


Oswald 
Coombs 


Norman 
Bingham 




Theodore 
Toone 


Clifford 
Toone 


Lee 
Peterson 



BOB BISHMAN 
President 



The Tausigs were organized many years ago under the naiue ui the 
"Tliree I's" and when social units were inaugurated on the campus changed 
their name to Tausigs. During the three years previous to litis, the Tausigs 
have offered a loving cup to be given to the highest ranking scholastic unit, 
but due to the fact that it was won three years in succession this cup passed 
out of existence. Tlie "Sigs" are now preparing to replace this cup with 
another one to show their appreciation of scholarship as attained by a group 
as a whole. Tlie Tausigs promote several parties as well as regular bi- 
monthly luncheons, one "hobo" party being held in the 
fall in conjunction with the Nuggetts as well as one 
unit informal while the annual winter formal occurs 
near the beginning of the winter quarter. A Salt Lake 
theatre party and spring informal occur during the 
spring season with a "'haywire"' party finishing up tlie 
social activities. 

Athletically, the Sigs also rank extremely high, 
finishing near the top in social unit competition eacli 
year, the past season bringing even better results than 
have odiers. Tlie captain of the 1930 football team, 
and the captain-elect of the 1932 basketball team are 
members of the unit while many other prominent stu 
dents, including the president of the senior class aiu 
the business manager of the yearbook, claim active 
membership in this active unit. 



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[ 117] 




/ 



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/ 



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f 



\ 




BANYAN '31 





Fi /tings 



Rulon 


Kelsey 


Ward 


Earl 


Ray 


Sterling 


Morris 


Howard 


Paxnian 


Hill 


Clark 


C.ottam 


Alleman 


Evans 


dinger 


Cottam 


Llovd 


John 


Clyde 


Barr 


William 


Horace 


Wendell 


Neff 


HacUey 


Halliflay 


Sandgren 


Wasldiurn 


Martin 


Hardy 


Taylor 


Smart 


Vernon 


James 


Jim 


^lelvin 


Reed 


Reese 


James 


Dallas 


Scott 


Miller 


Finch 


McDonald 


Wood 


Anderson 


Cullimore 


Tueljer 



WALDO HODSON 

President 




Other members are: Harr>- Blackwell, Mark Brockbank, Don Candland, 
Dean Fausett, Walden Hughes, Rigby Jacol)s, Fred Miner, Mark Nielson, 
Dean Steed, LaGrand Stephens, Gilbert Tanner, Howard Taylor, Delbert 
Tregeagle, and Vernon Wentz. 

In the short time of three years of organization, the Vikings have become 

one of the most versatile groups in the university, and stand at the top in 

scholarship. Their membership includes some of the 

best talent in basketball, track, wrestling, swimming, 

debating, oratory, music, art, and dramatics. 

They placed second in the annual competitive Pep 
Vodie. 
^a, mm' T Some of the most outstanding social events of the 

^H - «>> ^ yg^j. i^ayg ijggn sponsored by this unit, including the 

^^^^ / _^ j annual formal dinner dance, a Spring formal, and the 

^^^B ' -^?^^^^H annual "Comic Strip" masquerade. 

^^V uMr''^^^^| It* spirit of democracy, true friendship, and its 

^^^^ ^ ^^^^1 high ideals give it an enviable position in all phases 

^^I^^L flB^IB^I of school activity. 




[ 118] 









, ••Mill 



;,":t< 



li*- i»f_ 




BANYAN '31 




\ 



^ 







Val Hy 


TICS 






Edward 


Curtis 


Farrell 


Harold 


Jesse 


Harold 


Aycock 


Hardinj; 


Colleti 


(iolvin 


Richins 


Bailey 


Kenneth 


Har(dd 


Leo 


Fred 


Lawrenre 


Frank 


Miller 


Barton 


Andrews 


Hanson 


Jones 


Roberts 


Weston 


Elmo 


Merlin 


Preston 


Lowell 


Wesley 


Bayles 


Peters 


Vance 


Taylor 


Bennett 


Bayles 



iiiyj 



(Jtlu'i members not present are: Fred Evans, Ralph Nelson, Kent 
Featlierstone, Boyce Van Patten, Fay Chadwick, Fay Evans. Glade Wright. 
Ferd Evans, Ervin Stratton. 

A group of eight fellows, most of them from Idaho, Oregon, and Wy- 
oming, met in an upstairs room of a boarding house during the winter of 
1928, and formed what was to become the Val Hyric social unit. After 
three and one-half years the personnel has almost completely changed. The 
group is now very cosmopolitan, embracing members from the entire inter- 
mountain west and Canada. The same ideals, the 
same purpose, and the same binding friendship upon 
which tlie unit was founded still exist. 

Tlie units activities are many and varied. Fiehls 
into wiiich the members extend their efforts are: writ- 
ing, art, dramatics, music, the sciences, and education. 
Their athletic prowess is second only to that of the 
Cougar Errants, which is essentially a unit of ath- 
letes. Every year has seen a Val Hyric entry in the 
annual P<'p Vodie. Their social activities are mam. 
including a "Pirate"' formal, a Christmas party, a 
Tielcss party for breaking the tie jinx of the "Y" 
football team, a Uout supper, a swimming part)', 
and niaiiv others. 



^ 




/ 






a 



7 



i - 






■v^ 



BANYAN '31 





Highlanders 




Harold 
Woolston 


(larleton 
(lulnisee 


Fred 
Hnrlaelier 


Alva 
Johanson 


Inian 
Hales 


Laurel 
I.eavitt 


J.T. 
Woolston 




(Harenre 
Wilson 


Rowe 
Vincent 


Halph 
Oafts 


(irove M. 
Hafldock 




Ezra T. 
Miirdrifk 


Lee 
Lund 



Other members are: Vernon Christensen, Grant Cobbley, Leland Mur- 
dock, and Tom Parry. 

In this the second year of their activities the Hylanders have aimed to 
maintain an attitude of congeniality in all their social relationships. Free- 
dom from egotism and class distinction has been a means of establishing 
friendships that will be long remembered and will last after all forms of or- 
ganization has vanished. Provision has been made for individual participa- 
tion in the leadership of all activities witli the hope 
that such social activity will be conducive to indi- 
vidual progress as well as to the enjoyment of whole- 
some entertainment. 

Varieties of sports, parties and entertainments 
held each month in addition to the regular meetings 
have provided the recreation that the social unit sys- 
tem as aimed to provide. 

The Hylanders have ranked near tlie top of the 
men's social units in scholarship throughout the year. 
Members have participated freely in forensic, musi- 
cal, literarv and athletic fields. 



[ 120] 



ti^ .-r*: 




N«^ 



BANYAN '31 




Lady Missionaries 



V 

V 



Flrsl row: Hilnien Snell. Editha Booth. Margaret Biglow. Delia West. LaPreal Aagard. president, 
Lucy B. Siidweeks. Myrtle Brown, first vice-president. Ertna Bennett. Lila Hatch. Ann Holt. 

Second row. Georgie Maeser. Emma S. Jensen. Barhara Mauglin. Pearl Snow. Jeiniie B. Knight, 
Florence Jorgensen. Hannah Frusse. Edme Dotson. Grace Hall, secretary. Ethel Strauser. Grace 
Cheever, Mary Giles, second vice-president. Florence Miller. 



Tain Man 

Members not in picture: Anna Crandall. \\ anda Garfield. Leona Garfield, Wanda Oldroyd, Bessie 
Lowe, Thora Hales, Eva Haslem, Hope Fae Hilton. Melda Christensen, Florence Wilson. 

Members pictured — top: Flora Kennev. Grace Shumwav. Nina Anderson. Levell Ireland. Valera 
Dixon. Center: Winona Dewsnup. Anna Moore. Eileen Gridley. Dorothy Jones. Virginia Finlinson, 
Goldie Jones. Marv Lvman. president. Margurite Romnev. Irene Rasniussen. Nella Rohinson. 



V. 



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[ 121] 



/ 



/ 



i 



BANYAN '31 .^ 









Beau 


X 


An 






Reva 
Cordner 


Helen 
Whiteley 


Belle 
Filmore 




Genevieve 
Fiigal 


Dorothy 
Hoover 


LaPreal 
Bryner 


Florence 
Fowler 


Evelyn 
Bryner 


Virginia 
Booth 




Lucile 
Farley 


Gwen 
Brugger 


Rozena 
Nelson Oak 


Edith 
Marchant 


Welda 
Grover 


Emily 
Wright 




Gwen 
Stewart 


Murcy 
Nelson 


Blanche 
Rohhins 




To attain culture, friendship, and refinement is the aim of the Beaux 
Art social unit. This aim created a spirit that has prevailed throughout the 
year of 1931. The ideals of the University in developing character in men 
and women have heen strictly adhered to. 

Tlie activities of the unit have heen many and varied. Many social 
activites have been sponsored. Among them were: 
A formal dinner party given at the Hotel Roberts, a 
Valentine dancing party at Keeleys, and an informal 
dancing party held in the ladies' gym, in conjunction 
with the Cougar Errants. 

The members have been active in debating, music, 
drama, home economics, and were rated high in ath- 
etic competition, having won the trophy in 1930. 

A very clever pep vodie stunt was entered in the 
annual competition. 

The officers of the unit, Lucille Thorne as presi- 
dent; Florence Fowler, vice president; LaPreal Bry- 
ner, secretary and treasurer, have directed the unit 
through one of its most successful vears. 



[122] 



-"^.nr'' 



«iir 




BANYAN '31 










Cesta Ti 


es 








Beulah 
Strickler 


Maurine 
Welker 


Edith 
Rich 


Waiiila 
Petty 




LaVeve 

Petty 


E.lilh 
Slack 


Kulh 
Holhrook 


Dorothy 
Jacobsen 


Anne 
Madsen 


Zelma 
Winterton 






Helen 
Decker 


Maxine 
Clayton 


Gertrude 
Sauer 


Rose 
Eyring 


Ethel 
(!ornaby 


Helen 
(look 






Aha Mae 
Braithwaile 


I.orna 
Jensen 


Dorothy 
Mensel 






^ 



^ 



[ 123] 



XHILMA BOVLE 
President 



Organized as it was four years ago, the Cesta Ties social unit has 
grown into a fullv developed club with all the standards of the university 
for its aim. Twice has the club won the club scholarship of the school. The 
unit has played an outstanding part in the A. W. S. organization and the 
girls' athletic department. Led by Miss Alice Reyn- 
olds,, Miss Wilma Jeppson, and Miss Melva Boyle as 
sponsors; and Wilina Boyle, Alta Braithwaite. and 
Maxine Clayton as officers the club has been success- 
ful in accomplishing its aim for the year. 

The outstanding events of the year liave been: 
a formal dinner given ijy tlie new members to the old. 
an informal Christmas tea. a formal dancing party. 
and a progressive dinner at Salt Lake. 

The members, coming from several differenl 
states and localities, make this one of tlie most cos- 
mopolitan groups on the campus. All are active in 
almost every field of campus activity. 




/ 



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> 



BANYAN '31 





I 



Deca Sema Fe 



Ellen 
Barker 


Anna 
Beardall 


Maxine 
Erickson 


Twila 
Kinghorn 


Alice 
Jones 


Eliza 
Bierregard 


Fay 
Averett 


Mable 
Peterson 


Leah 
Probst 


Vilate 
Bunker 


Veda 
Kartchner 


Merlyn 
Hall 




Other members are: Jennie Evans, Ina Markam, Marie Allen, Hazel 
Fletcher, Elsie McCurdy, Mabel Wheeler, Rita Gines, Zoie Garfield, Lois 
Vance, Naomi Smith, Fern Smoot, Mae Baird. 



It has been the best year, and this 



Dear Diary: 

It's all over now but the shouting, 
was due in no small part to my social unit. 

The dear old unit! We had the best times at our parties. The formal 
banquet was fun — and different, too. This was one where all of Uie fellows 
discarded their ties — and we didn't tie Montana the 
next day, either. 

We always supported the team. And weren't 
those games thrilling? Remember the fun we had at 
the Utah game? 

The unit girls were always busy in some activity. 
Why, there wasn't a play presented that didn't have 
some Deca girl helping with it. And the girls were 
busy in other ways, too — especially in athletics. We 
entered the social unit track meet, and acted as of- 
ficials in the invitational meet. 

Gee, I must quit. I hate to go, but I'll never 
forget the good times I had nor the ideals I found 
with the Deca Sema Fe — Dependability, Ernestness, 
Capability, Activity, Scholarship. Enterprise, Modera- 
tion, Athletics, Fair Play, and Efficiency. 



4 



[ 124] 



£^m^f^'li^^m>„^,^ 



jD>^ 




BANYAN '31 




0. S. Trovata 



Amy 
Jones 


Monta 
Wentz 


Nora 
Pickeens 


Sina 
Brimhall 


Sue 
Openshavv 


Dixie 

Manguni 


Beth 
Mangum 


Mabel 
Wilson 


Clarice 
Brunt 


Mabel 
Cummard 




Ora 
Haws 


Nell 
Hibbert 


Phyllis 
Miller 


Myrtle 

Sowards 


Vera 
Jackson 


Beth 
Wright 




Mildred 
Davis 


Sarah 
Dixon 


Josephine 
Johnson 



ELIZABETH GESSFORD 
President 



[125] 



High scholarship and campus activity have been foremost in the accom- 
plishments of the 0. S. Trovata this year. It has always been the aim of this 
group to foster tlie projects of the student body and to support all types of 
clean sport. 

The club has representatives in every department 
in school and has been one of the leaders on the honor 
roll each quarter. It fostered the first student body 
dance and was in charge of the decorations for tlie 
annual girls day dance. 

Its social activities include a formal dinner 
dance, an invitational dance, a canyon party, a pro- 
gressive dinner and Old Mill dance, as well as bi- 
weekly meetings, winter sports, tennis, swimming, 
golf, and riding. 

0. S. Trovata stands for true friendship and 
greater achievement. 



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/ 



I 



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'^^li^ 



BANYAN '31 













Nautilus 








Vivian 

Merrill 




Verla 
Jergensen 


Vera 
Merrill 


Loree 
Van Wagnen 


Helen 
Heiselt 


Aline 
Coleman 


Eleanor 
Kelly 


Lucile 
Merrill 




Joie 
Hateiielor 


Sarah 
I5r<)\vn 


Edith 
Young- 


Priscilla 
Taylor 


Florence 
Maw 


Iris 
Robinson 




Zola Naomi Louise He 
Martin Seamount Swenson Car 


len 

son 


Edith Mary 
Paxnian Thui 


Lue 
her 



ERMA JERGENSEN 
President 




A very successful year for the Nautilus Unit was ushered in by a reunion 
of all alumnae and active members at a house party at Wildwood early in the 
fall. This culminated in a Birthday Banquet, at which time the alumnae chap- 
ter of the unit was formed. The Nautilus was the first unit on the campus 
to orj;;anize its alumnae into an active, functioning group. 

Parties, of course, play their part. Hallowe'en brought ghosts and crys- 
tal gazers to Springdell. The traditional Christmas formal of the Nautilus 
was an outstanding social event of the year. Distinctiveness marked each 
party. 

The annual Pep Vodie offered an opportunity for 
the Nautilus to match its originality with that of other 
units. For ten minutes the stage was transformed into 
the front of the gymnasium where newsies and co-eds 
coinbined their efTorts into an act that won first hon- 
ors. A glimpse at the opposite page partially tells 
the story. 

The Nautilus, recognizing the need for furthering 
scholastic standing, was the first unit to add to its 
constitution a provision for definite scholastic attain- 
ment from each of its members. 

Closely woven into each of these activities of the 
Nautilus, is a friendship that is treasured above all 
else. 



[ 126] 



:fe^^^ 




N.-' 



BANYAN '31 



T3Ei- 




[127] 



/ 



BANYAN '31 





r 



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A~ 



\ 










Val Norns 








Beth 

Swenson 


E\a 
Balif 


Madelyn 
Harrison 


Allie 
Bowen 


Evelyn 
Jones 


Hannah 
Prusse 


Gean 
Clark 


Donna 

Salisbury 


Bessie 
Taylor 


Norma 
Peterson 


Helen 
Ellis 


Margaret 
Reese 


Lota 
Paxman 




Wilma 
Hansen 


Betsy 
Reynolds 


Mae 
Seaton 


Telma 
Boyack 


Loya 
Nielson 


Doris 
Firmage 


Elaine 
Paxman 


Grace 
Gardner 




Ik 
Brockbank 


Margaret 
Bird 


Virginia 
Taylor 


Virginia 
Eggertson 




With the lightness of gaiety mixed with zest and seriousness, the Val 
Noms have left tlieir touch upon almost every activity and department of the 
"Y" for this year of 1930-31. Proud of the Brigham Young University's 
bright standards and of their own high goal they have worked for school and 
unit, endeavoring through the efforts of their successes and by fair friend- 
liness to rank among the ideal of "Y" women. 

Conscious, too, of the subtleties of hospitality, the 
Val Norns have acted as hostesses at a number of the 
most delightful and unusual parties on the campus. 
Prominent among these social functions have been 
their "Annual Indian Summer Tea," their "Night in 
a Tropical Garden," their "Spring Invitational Party" 
at Glengarry, and their most outstanding success, the 
voyage of the S. S. Val Norn on the sea of romance, 
with its formal Captain's dinner and dance. 

The members of the Val Norns have been prom- 
inent in campus activities. This year Elaine Paxman 
was president of the A. W. S. Various other mem- 
bers have brought recognition to the unit through dif- 
ferent fields. 



[ 128] 



taf- 




BANYAN '31 




7i 


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Fidelas 



Jennie 
Johnson 


Lillian 
Hurst 


Norell 
Startup 


Alta 
Bates 


Mary 
Ashby 


Bernice 
Barton 


Agnes 
Hales 


Emily 
Madsen 


Ruth 
Johnson 


Florence 
Miller 


Louise 
Spafford 


lone 
Christensen 


Faun 
Cowan 


Mary 
Brown 


Mary 
Hubbard 


Virgie 
Fraughton 


Delsa 
1 olhurst 


Helen 
Jacobson 


Thclnia 
McKinnen 


Anna 
Ogden 


Helen 
Beyer 


Mildred 
Curtis 


Louise 
Hoyt 


Ruth 

Stevens 



V. 



^ 



[129] 



HELEN ANN ROWE 
President 



The Fidelas have endeavored throughout the year to sponsor such activi- 
ties as would build a bond of lasting friendship among the members, and to 
maintain the ideals of the B. Y. U. 

Their great ideal is to be ever loyal and true 
to Fidelas, and to the B. Y. U. of which they are a 
part. 

The activities of the unit have been varied. So- 
cial activities have been many, including a formal 
Valentine dance, and an invitational carnival dance 
at Christmas time. Their rating in scholarship is high 
and many of the members are active in student body 
affairs. 

Helen Rowe as president has directed the unit 
through a successful year. She has been ably assisted 
by Ruth Stevens as vice-president, and lone Chris- 
tensen as secretary and treasurer. 




' f |ll| JJMUlimn«nm auug<c 



/ 






/ 



BANYAN '31 









Cha 


rinanta 






Grace 
Shumway 


Mary 
LeRoy 


Cloe 
Farrer 


Violet 
Preston 


Rayda 
Ridding 


Belva 

Wilson 


Flora 
Kenney 


Delia 
West 


Goldie 
Jones 


Dorothy 
Jones 


Valera 
Dixon 


Mabel 
Wilson 


Edna 
Harris 


Lucie 
LeRoy 


Thelma 
Nelson 


Levell 
Ireland 


Mona 

Nielsen 


Margurite 
Romney 




Other members: Edna Drapper, Myrtle Biglow, Lucile Cowin, Inez 
Croft, Ruby Dixon, Alice Myrup, Loma Moffit, Fern Robinson, Maude Roily, 
Leona Osterloh. 

The child Charmanta is but three years of age, born of charming co-eds 
at the entegration of the Social Unit system. She is a fair creature with a 
joyous disposition and a perseverance and friendliness that has given her 
strength to grow. Her eyes gleam with happiness and grow serious and 
resolute when there is a task to be completed. 

When the day of christening arrived, the duti- 
ful co-ed parents became very much concerned over a 
name for their child. It was their desire that she be 
a symbol of the idealistic qualities of the young 
women, who fostered it. Friendliness, poise and 
honor were bestowed as her birthright possessions. 
Out of this triad was incarnated the Gift of charm 
which was spelled "Charmanta." 

For the year of 1930-31 Gertrude King has 
acted as president. Her assistants in office are cap- 
able workers, and under the direction of the heads, 
the unit has had a prosperous year. Their activities 
are many and varied. 



[ 130] 



«S3?^fer^S*>-«?T^ 



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->^ 



BANYAN '31 




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i:^i 



Junior Prom 

A garden of beauty and glamour, basically Persian in motif, but mod- 
ernistic in both illumination and design transformed the Ladies' Gym into a 
fascinating "Dream Garden" for the annual Promenade, held February sixth, 
nineteen hundred and thirty-one. With a background of black and silver, 
subdued lights and shadows, romance throbbed through strange fantastic 
trees and among the gliding dancers. 

In the center a huge fountain of light spread forth vari-colored illumi- 
nation. Hidden about the sides were more mellow gleams, stealing upward 
through weird old trees and casting wondrous shadows and tints upon the 
ceiling. Not merely a garden in the full bloom of spring, rather a futuristic 
elfland with all the glamour of unreality, mystery, dreams, and happiness. 

Music by Verdi Breinholt's Columbians completed the charming im- 
pression. Favors were milady's compact upon which was mounted the cou- 
gar's head over a block '"Y" seal. 

Professor Eastmond assisted by Monta Wentz proved the source of 
inspiration from the Art department. Howard Cottam and Frank Harris led 
the construction work. Frappe in orange and green was served from "Na- 
ture's Ice Box," through the ingenuity of Ora Haws. Invitations and patrons 
were under the care of Sina Brimhall. Electricity was the work of Clyde 
Sandgren and Ray Hart, who were much assisted by the Utah Power and 
Light Company. Farrell CoUett had charge of the clever art posters. While 
chairman Howard Kelly reported it a successful financial endeavor for the 
class. 



V. 



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BANYAN '31 






Utah Lake 

Our Utah Lake is very infantile at dawn. Her little fingers of water 
stretch eargerly up the sand and fall back as eagerly, leaving jagged finger- 
prints. She grins up in a beautific confidence with the sky, and covets its 
blue. She reaches little sparkles after the moon. 

Our lake is in her 'teens when afternoon comes, and she stretches and 
yawns in the sunshine, serene and undisturbed, or moves causelessly, rest- 
less with a queer untiring energy. She sparkles and shadows in turn because 
of little clouds. She is subject to sudden little squalls that blow away before 
a mere sunbeam. 

Our lake is middle-aged, and is very quiet at evening, indulgently let- 
ting children bathers clamber all over her, washing their faces and curling 
caressing fingers about their toes. She is strangely majestic, but strangely 
tender. The rising light of the moon grows upon her and she is crowned. 

Our lake is very old, just a little echo and a little remembrance of 
Bonneville, who died many years ago, leaving pretty valleys and a water- 
line traced across our hills. She remembers Escalante and his halting mes- 
sages to the people of the tribe of Timpanogos, who darted about in little 
canoes, and called themselves "The Fish Eaters." She has looked up at the 
mountain named after them for hundreds of years without getting tired, but 
not without becoming very wise. 

We do not know how old our lake really is. But whatever her age, 
she is always very fresh and always very blue. 

—V.E. 






t 132] 




BANYAN '31 




V 




[ 133] 



Provo River 

More than one hundred miles of liquid sunshine an animated shadow, 
Provo River dances down from the high Uintahs to the peaceful embrace of 
Utah Lake. Lined on both sides by lodge pole pines, alders, birches, elder- 
berries, and willows interspersed with cottonwoods, hardy, verdant residents 
of all Utah canyons, it has, since the days of the earliest Red Man, been 
dearly beloved by all those who know and esteem the out-of-doors. 

Many a picturesque Indian camp has nestled in the shadows of the peeks 
beside some placid pool from which the Red Man has drawn his sumptuous 
meal of speckled native trout; many an Indian lover has leaned above some 
birch-made hammock to whisper sweet nothings to dusky maids eager to hear 
the old, old story — the same in any tongue. 

For more than three-quarters of a century the Pale Faces have wandered 
along its shores, fished along its riffles, laved themselves in sparkling eddies. 
Provo River has been a source from which the Red Man, the Pioneer, and 
his descendants have drawn both pleasure and profit — pleasure from the 
coolness of the shade, the gameness of its fish, and the fragrance and romance 
of its flora: profit from its woods, its waters, its power, and from its ever 
present charm that lures thousands to its fastnesses. 

Following in the footsteps of their Red predecessors, the Pale Faced 
lovers have sat beside the misty waterfalls, have wandered pensively and 
tenderly among the lights and shades of friendly willows and trees, have 
canoed over its lower and more peaceful stretches out into the welcoming 
shimmering lake. Could Provo River speak, it could tell tales of romance, 
of often repeated promises, of pledges made in all seriousness of love — yes, 
of life itself. 

River of the silent Indian; River of the Trapper and the Pioneer; River 
of the First Settler and his Sons and Daughters; River of the Hundred miles 
of mystery and magic; River of Dreams fulfilled — Provo River, nourisher 
and provider, promoter of sociability among all classes from the first Red 
Man to the latest Ed and Co-ed, all Hail! —A'. R. M. 



V. 



V 





/ 







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J 



\ 




BANYAN '31 





Kock Canyon 




Rock Canyon! A thousand ghosts of a thousand fires will lin- 
ger there forever. Around them ten thousand skins of as many 
weiners will bleach in the sun and crackle under the snow for four 
times as many seasons — and the shrill laughter of Brigham Young 
University night revelers and mid-day mountain climbers will sound 
and resound from Squaw Peak to the "Y" mountain as long as time 
lasts. 

The age old challenge of Rock Canyon, which was probably felt 
by the first Indian to attempt to find his way up the fierce, yet friend- 
ly, floor of that rugged ravine, has been told of in legend and chanted 
in song since before the canyon was old enough to demand the dignity 
of a name. Indian maidens who followed their braves from rock to 
rock through this canyon probably handed down their secrets of the 
enjoyableness of the place to the "Young" men and women, who have, 
since before the annals of this institution were still in the pen, chosen 
some spot in that rocky pass as a rendezvous — a picnic ground — an 
astronomy room — a hiking trail — or a tent floor. 

Scarcely a student will leave the "Y" without taking with him 
some memory of Rock Canyon: a hot dog roast, a bug hunt, a lecturt3 
listened to from the very rock upon which the Indian mother threw 
her papoose, a midnight hike, an unbroken vow memories! A 

"Y" playground Rock Canyon! 

W. S. 



[ 134] 




BANYAN '31 




Y 

V 



The Social Unit System 

A social unit system was established at Brigham Young University in 
order to aid the students in getting the most out of college life. For more 
than half a century the institution has been a champion of democracy and 
at the same time it has fostered wholesome social contacts. It has endeavored 
to bring sociability even to the most timid student. 

During the early years of the University, when the student body was 
small, its social life could be carried on as one big unit of activity; but with 
the enlarged student body of recent years it has been necessary to make 
some method of division that would be small enough for closer personal 
contacts than could be had in gatherings of the entire student body. To meet 
this need a system of social units was introduced. In this system every 
student belongs to some social group. 

Until such time as students can lje affiliated with their more permanent 
groups they are members of reserve units which give them social opportun- 
ities of a temporary nature. A constant effort, however, is being made by 
the social units committee to get each student affiliated with his permanent 
group as soon as possible. 

The aims and ideals of the social units may be summarized as follows: 

1. To discourage class distinction and stimulate the spirit of democracy. 

2. To socialize rather than oslrasize. 

3. To equalize social opportunities without discriminations. 

4. To discourage excessive and expensive social activities. 

.5. To keep social functions on the campus and afford faculty super- 
vision. 

6. To foster close and lasting friendship. 

7. To provide means for the actpiirement of poise, tact, conversational 
ability, and all the social graces. 

8. To encourage scholarship. 

9. To provide a basis for intra-niural activities. 

10. To have each Unit find its good in the good of the Student Body. 



^ 



[ 135] 






[136] 



EDDIES 



13 EFORE railroads pierced the mountain 
passes and spanned the wide plains, the arter- 
ies of commerce were the rivers. A greater 
amount of freight was transported from the 
coast around to the Gulf and up the Missis- 
sippi than could be taken over tortuous wagon 
roads, sometimes impassable after heavy rains. 
The journey was made much more quickly and 
cheaply over water than over land. The situa- 
tion of most of the large towns on the banks of 
the rivers made the stream the most practical 
of commercial highways. 




Parade. The band in full l)lare: 
Tlu> Training Srliool. The soplis make 
a hill for tho prize. The juniors prove 
successful in competition. Frosh dem- 
onstrate. The seniors lose a close de- 
cision for the honors. 






Potter at the pots. No men here 
either. Chicken for dinner. At old 
Baldy. The Bridal Veil. Tlie Provo 
goes rampant. The executive cabin. 
Ship ahoy! 




One niglit (.luring which the girls are 
ree from the men (almost). Social 
unit stunts. Features in which the "Y" 
girls participate. Crirls, girls every- 
where and not a gink in sight. 




Our Social Side 

Dances: Midnight matinees, noon 
frolics, before breakfast appetizers, 
loan funds, proms. Tlie junior-senior 
party during a quiet moment. 







..- ""--./r 



Band Features 

Tlie parade up State Street to tlie 
nioiuinieiit in Salt Lake City. The "Y" 
as the baiul makes it. Mmitaiia's em- 
blem on a snowy field. '"Utah" spelled 
by the "Y"s"' versatile band. The Utes 
in formation. 




The "Y" cougars back home after a 
successful invasion of eastern terri- 
tory. The boys leave the Orem. Wel- 
come home as played by the ever-ready 
band. No blue notes in this reception. 




■ ' 


. . #jviy^>y- 1 , 


1 


^-.-: 

^ 


1 


% 




t 


#« 


V^3^ 







The House of Davids 

Our laniily album of Samsons. 
\\ itli a microscope one can see evi- 
(li'iicc of some growtli. Ye editor 
straius his eyesight to see llie lone 
growth on the chin of \^ hitaker. Wliis- 
kers iiy the yard. Barber's paradise. 




Side Glances 

The Frosh wear ties — yeah! The 
Friars tame some new goats. The "Y' 
at night from the stadium. Block "Y" 
goats join the company of employed. 
Takeo lends a bit or Oriental atmos- 
phere. The editor convinces some late 
ones to have their pictures taken. 
Hurst freezes on Utah Lake. The fire 
in September. Our Maori entertainers. 




Side Glances 

A little campaign apple sauce. The 
■"Y" spirit. Pres. Hrimliall climatical- 
ly embalmed. Beulali ami (Iwcii plan- 
ning new conquests. Barney thinks of 
other business fields to conquer. Takeo 
crnploxsa little Japanese magic. (Hug 
and Bliss are staving off sea legs. Dick 
and Ott come to grips. Feeding the 
gulls. Pause for refreshment. 




y / 




College of Education 

The College of Education is pri- 
marily a training school for future 
school teachers. Here they get practi- 
cal and valuable experience before go- 
ing out into the education field. Illus- 
trated above are various groups of the 
training school pupils at play and in 
class work. 







1 



c 



CoUofic of EdiKdtion 

Schunl lilV i^ made up ol lioiirs ul 
work ami hours of play. Top left is a 
sarul table at wliiili some little tots are 
•iijoviu}); tliemselves. Top right we 
lavc tile training teaehers joiniii}; with 
the ""kids"* in an exeiting game. Center 
shows the moulding of a future "Y" 
football sijuad. Belou we have the 
lots delving into the treasures of 
knowledge. 




College of Arts and Science 

This college is well equipped with 
laboratories and equipment to amply 
take care of the needs of the college. 
The heads of the department rank 
among the most well-informed indi- 
viduals in the intermountain country 
in their respective fields. 




CoUo'fio of Arts and Science 

1 lu' tolk-j^o ol Alls ami Si'iriiri' of- 
ft-rs great opportiinily for all inter- 
estcil in llic invsteries of nature. Tin' 
iani|)iis is not limited to the university, 
l)iit till' work lakes llie sUkIcmIs far 
afield in the great outdoors. 



.-it-v-yi V 




College of Commerce 

Top left: Barney struts his stuff on 
some prospective buyers. Right top: 
Typing class. Center: Dean Jensen 
with an arm full. Left: Miss Tliomas 
and Pearl Ivins pause to be shot. 
Right: Frog Rasmussen poses in an 
assumed business-like manner. Below: 
The place of give and take. 



I Onft/ contestant" 

ALLOWED ON STAGE 



wntn amati. 
mil tmnncui onni 
IS31 




Collofie of Commerce 

State comnuMvial contest for hi<;li 
selionls. Ban" looks over the "Y " news 
mailiiij; list. Tlie steno l)ureaii does a 
itllf team work on tlie phone. Beiihih 
takes (liclalion. Prof. Miller, Prof. 
(Mark and Prof. Swenson pause for 
the stall piiotographer. 




College of Applied Science 

Upper four pictures: The Home Ec. 
girls finding the way to a man's heart; 
take your pick; Ruth awaits Miss Rey- 
nold's desire; maybe a choice bit of 
news over the cover. Below: Sawing, 
but not asleep in the woodwork depart- 
ment. "Giddyap Napoleon." 




College of Applied Science 

Stmlciits at work in the Heber J. 
'irant Library. A glaiue into tlie 
wodilwork (K'partiiu'iit. Dr. Martin al- 
lows the staff photograplier into tlie 
laboratory. Rrlou: The Moclianic Arts 
Blilg. At right is tiie University green 
house. 




[156] 



W. A. A. 

Varied indeed have been the activities of the 
Women's Athletic Association this year. Under the 
leadership of that dynamic little executor. Miss 
Dorothy Hoover, the organization started out early 
on its ambitious program. 

The first function was that of putting on a 
program for the Associated Women Students in 
college early in the fall that was the peer of all 
such subsequent attempts. Winter came and basket- 
ball tournament interest was high, resulting, after 
spirited contest, in the Atheneae's unit winning the 
crown. 

The greatest of all girl's meet, part of the 
invitational relays, sponsored this year by the 
W. A. A. was pronounced the most successful ever. 

The acme of ambition in girls' unit competi- 
tion is the winning of the beautiful Mullett Jewelry 
Trophy, and it is the motivating force behind all 
competition. 

Crowning the year's activities was the girls' spring sport hesta, held on 
the upper side of the stadium. Miss Hoover represented the local chapter 
at the National Amateur Athletic Federation meetings held in Detroit early 
in the spring. 

Four girls, for outstanding merit and participation in girls' sports, re- 
ceived student body awards. They are: Dorothy Hoover. Florence Fowler, 
Florence Speckart, and Lorene Randall. 



vv j^^^^l^^^H 



iH)i;( j| in iiiii i\ n, 

President 




[ 157] 




W. A. A. ACTIVITY SNAPS 

President Dorothy Hoover (upper center) was easily the ideal leader for the W. A. A. this year when the organiza- 
tion's program was so full of activities that called for an executive of ahility and inspiration. More snaps of the girls' 
in sportive mood. Hockey was no douht the most po|iular. Creative dancing claimed a large majority of the girls' inter- 
est, and basketball was the reigning winter sport. 



[ 158] 




W. A. A. ACTIVITY SNAPS 

Sponsoring a most varied |ini);rarii of activities for the girls of the institution W. A. A. till* an lin|Mirlanl place in the 
univcrsily ralendar. Soinc of (lit- phases of sports are shown: Fencing, pjTamid building, hockey, creative dancing, and 
playground ball. 



[159 J 




W. A. A. ACTIVITY SNAPS 

Glimpses of some of the classes in group activities, inchirliiif! a rapidly approaching poinilar interest — pyramid build- 
ing. Not only the gymnasium is used by the organization for its sports, but whenever weather permits, the campus lawns 
are utilized. 

Loiter right snap: The champion Athenaes basketball squad. Lower left: The yearbook editor .seems to have been 
eml)raced by the W. A. A. 



[ 160] 



CLASSES 



i HE life of our country depends on our 
rivers. Farm production from millions of acres 
of land depends on the water impounded by 
gigantic dams in streams. The power for run- 
ning machinery in factories is directly trace- 
able to the river power. In earlier days mills 
and factories were run by water wheels. Today, 
the power, generated by turbines in power 
plants at waterfalls and dams, runs the wheels 
of industry. Our civilization of today is 
founded on the river. 




Seniors 



/ 



BANYAN '31 



Candidates for Master's Degree 




r 



■/ j^ 






v_ 



LORNA B. ALLEN 
M.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, History 

ILA DASTRUP 
M.A. 

Richfield. Utah 

Major, History 

ELDEN DENNIS 
M.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Geology 

MYRON N. JORGENSEN 

M.A. 

Sail Lake City. Utah 
Major, Chemistry 



BERTRAND F. HARRISON 
M.S. 

Springville, Utah 

Major, Botany 



LYNN C. HAYWARD 
M.S. 

Paris, Idaho 

Major, Zoology 

MILTON C. HUNTER 
M.S. 

Holden, Utah 

Major, Mystery Religions and 
Christian Beliefs 

LORENZO H. REID 
M.S. 

St. George, Utah 

Major, History 




FRANKLIN MADSEN 
M.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Philosophy of Education 

ALONZO MORLEY 
M.A. 

Prove. Utah 

Major, Educational Administration 



WILFORD W. RICHARDS 
M.S. 

Garland, Utah 

Major, Educational Administration 

WESLEY J. ROBERTSON 

M.S. 

Huntington, Utah 
Major, Educational Administration 



SOREN ROSS 
M.A. 






GLEN A. ROWE 

M.S. 


Ephraim. Utah 






Castle Dale, Utah 


Major, Chemistry 






Major, Educational Administration 


WILLIAM D. STANTON 
M.A. 






EDNA SNOW 

M.S. 


Eureka, Utah 






St. George. Utah 


Major, Botany 






Major, Botany 




INA WEBB 
M.A. 






Provo 


.Utah 






Major, 


Music 








[ 162 1 



^^fer^^r^fe^firn 



"-B»- aaH 




--^ 



BANYAN '31 



ZOLA MARTIN 


WALT DANIELS 


Ptovo, Utah 


Payson, Utah 


Major, Speech 
Thela Alpha Phi 
VicePres. Junior Class 
Banyan Beauty Contest 
Senior Play 
May Queen 2 
Nautilus 


Major, Music 

Entered from Univ. of ( !al. at 

L. A. 
Chairman Kallv Committee 2, 4 ; 
Pres. Male(;ieeClul)3,4: 
Drum Major 2, 3, 4: Prize Pep 
Song 3, 4: Director All Boys 
Show 4; Nuggets 


FENTON L. WILLIAMS 
Perron, Utah 

Major, Educational Adminis- 
tration 


NAOMI SEAMOUNT 

Provn. Utah 
Major, Dramatic Art 
Mask Club 




Nautilus 



ANTHONY W. SOWARDS 

Pruvo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad"m. 

Alpha Kappa Psi 



CLARENCE VACHER 
Ptovo, Utah 

Major, Physical Education 
Football 1,2,3,4; Track 1,2, 
Class Athletic Manager 1,2; 
President French Club 2; 
Block "Y" Club ; Tausigs 



3; 



GEORGIA DIMICK 

Nam pa, Idaho 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Debating 3, 4; Block "Y" Club; 

Psychology Club; Assistant 

Bus. Mgr. "Y" News 4; Idaho 

Club; French Club 4 



FRED HANSEN 

Ptovo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Track 4 



t 163] 



HELEN ANNE ROWE 
Prove, Utah 
Major, English 
Freshman Vice-Pres. 
Pres. Fidelas 4 
French Club 1, 2 
Fidelas 



BLANCHE BOBBINS 
Moreland. Idaho 
Major, English 
Block "Y" Club 
Mask Club 
Idaho Club 
Ladies' Club 
Debating 4 
Beaux Arts 



J. WALTER PROTHEROS 

Ptovo, Vtali 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 



MARY HUBBARD 

CniiC. Idalio 
Maior. Art 
blabi.Ciid) 
Fidelas 




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BANYAN '31 





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LAWRENCE JACKSON 

Fillmore. Vlah 
Major. Mathematics 
Football 1, 2, 3 
Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4 
Physics Club 
Ziest Giest 



ANNE MADSEN 
Logan, Utah 
Major, English 
Glee Club 
C'esta Tie 



EARNEST SMITH 
Pleasant Grove. Vlah 
Major, History 



BERNICE BARTON 

Manti. Utah 

Major, Speech 

"Y" News 1,2, 3 

Debating 1 

Coniiietitive Play 4 

Theta Alpha Phi 

Vice-Pres. Asso. Student Body 4 

Mask Club 

Ladies' Quartette 3 

Representative Girl 4 

Fidelas 

CLAYTON M. SORENSON 

Mt. Pleasant, Utah 

Major, Music 

Sanpete Club 1 

Band 

Orchestra 

Glee Club 

Band Mgr. 3 

Band Scholarship 

Rami Gold Medal 

Kajjella Orpheon 

LORENE RANDALL 
Oftden. Utah 

Major, Physical Education 
W. A. A. Sport Mgr. 
Vice-Pres. W. A. A. 
Mt. Ogden Club 
Deca Sema Fe Pres. 
Deca Sema Fe 



ALTA MAE BRAITHWAITE 

Arco, Idaho 

Major, English 

Banyan Staff 1 

'•Y" News Staff 2 

Idaho Club 

.Sec. and Treas. of Cesta Ties 

Cesta Ties 



HARVEY C. MILLER 

Pleasant Grove, Utah 

Major, Chemistry 

Ag. Club Sec. 4 

Ag. Club 1,2, 3, 4 

"Y" Chem. Society 1, 2, 3, 4 

German Club 

Hilgardia 



WILMA BOYLE 

Provu, Utah 

Major, English 

Banyan Staff 1 

"Y" News 1 

Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4 

Vice-Pres. Unit 2 

Pres. of Unit 4 

Lester Taylor Piano Contest 

Winner 1 
Ladies' Glee Club 
French Club 3, 4 
P. S. B. 1, 2, 3, 4 
Cesta Tie 

ALTON BALLE 
Glenwood, Utah 
Major, History 
Football 1, 2 
Wrestling 1, 2 
"Y" News 2 



NINA ANDERSON 
Oak City, Utah 
Major, Home Economics 
Millard County Club 
Home Ec. Club 
Tam-Man 



EVELYN BRYNER 

Helper, Utah 

Major, Home Economics 

Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

W. A. A. Sport Manager 

W. A. A. Vice-Pres. 

"Y" Chem. Society 

Castle Dale Valley Club Sec. 

Gamma Phi Omicron 

Beaux Arts 



[164] 



-~iMiimiiii||||||i,''T3»- - 




BANYAN '31 



JENNIE JOHNSON 
Vernal. Utah 
Major, Business 
Minor, Enf;lish 
Fidelas 



R. ELDON CROWTHER 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad"m. 

Idaho Club 

San Souci Social Unit 

Friars 



MARY LYONS 

Overton. Nevada 

Major, Home Economics 

Dixie Collepe 1 

Home Economics Club 2, 3, 4 

Gamma Phi Omicron 3, 4 

Debating 4 



JEFFERSON B. CAZIER 

Ogden, Utah 

Major, Finance and Banking 

Alumni Secy A. K. Psi 

Clee Club 1,2 

Orchestra 1,2,3,4 

French Club 3,4 

Mt.OsdenClub 

Alpha Kappa Psi 



VEDA KARTCHNER 

Provo, Utah 
Major, Dramatic Art 
Minor, Art 
French Chib 3, 4 
Mask Club 4 
Studio Cuild t 
Deca Sema Fc 



LEROY RANDALL 

Ogden, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Acl'ni. 

A. K. Psi 

Male Glee Club 



REED L. WEIGHT 

Eureka. Utah 

Major, Business Administration 

Minor, Mathematics 

Track 

\^ restling 



ELEANOR KELLY 

.S/. Anthony. Idaho 
Major, English 
Minor, Office Practice 
"\" News 1 : Banyan 4; Sopho- 
more Reporter 
Junior Sec. and Treas. : 
French Club 3; Idaho Club 1 : 
Mask Club 1 
Nautilus 



H. PAUL HUISH 

Prove, Utah 

Major, Physics and Mathematics 

Track 1 

Assistant Bus. Man. "Y" News 3 



ELAINE PAXMAN 

provo. Utah 

Major, Speech ; Minor, Physiciil 

Ed.; Pres. Asso. Women Stu- 
dents 4: Pub. Ser\ice 2: "Y" 
News Staff 3 : Sophomore Lean 
Fund 2: Sophomore Social 
Committee; VicePres. Mask 
Club 2: Mask Club 1,2, 3, 4; 
Competitive Play 3; Sec. ami 
Treas.T. A. P.2,3,4;T. A.P. 
Play 3, 4: President Val Norns 3 

BOYD RASMUSSEN 
Rich field. Utah 
Ahinmi Play 1,2 
AllB(.vsShow2 
T. A. P. 2, 3, 4 
A. K. Psi 2, 3. 4 
Block "Y" Club 2, 3, 4 
Track 1,2, .3, 4 
Tausigs 1,2,3,4 



MILDRED DAVIS 

Provo, Utah 

Major, .Speech 

Mincu-, English, Phys. Ed. 

O. S. Trovala 

•See. and Treas. Fresh nuin ( lass 

.Si iiiiir ( Jass Play 

Mask Club 



[165] 




RT'tn^v 






/ 



BANYAN '31 




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AL'DREY JACKSON 

Provo, Vlah 

^'ajor, Speech ; Minor, English 

Sec. "Y" Typist Club 1 

Mask Club 1,2, 3, 4 

French Club 1, 2 

Girls' Day Play 

Fidelas 



J. FLOYD WALSER 

Colonia Juarez, Chili, Mexico 

Major. Agronomy 

Gila Collepe 1, 2 

Frosh Football 3: Band 3; 

Senior Play 

Class Ath. Mgr. 4; Arizona Club 

3,4 
Spanish Club 3, 4 :Ag. Club 3, 4 
Pres Cougar Errants 4; Cougar 

Errants 



l.EE W. LUND 




VIRGINIA KNELL 


Munii, Utah 




Aeic Castle, Utah 


Maior, History 




Major, Home Economics 


Glee Club 3. 4 




Gamma Phi Omicron 


German Club 




Home Economics Club 


Friars 






Hylanders 






FMILY WRIGHT 




KENNETH R. MILLER 


Pleasant Gniie. Utah 




American Fork, Utah 


Maior, Foods and Nutrition 


Major, Chemistry 


Minor. Household Ad' 


m. 


Minor, Physics 


Gamma Phi Omicron 3, 4 


German Club 3, 4 


Beaux Arts: Unit Pres 


■:2 


Chemistry Club 3, 4 


Home Ec. Club 3. 4 




Val Hvric 3, 4 


Vice-Pres. Home Ec. Club 4 


Awarded Bradford's Sanders 






Fellowship Washington D. C. 


LAMAR WHITING 




E. GENEVIEVE MORGAN 


Provo. Utah 




PuYson, Utah 


Botany and Geology 




Major, Speech : Minor, English 


Tri Beta 




T. A. P. :T. A. P. Play 4; 
Banyan Staff 4 
Public Senice Bureau 3, 4 
Ladies' Glee Club 2, 3, 4 ; French 

Club 2. 3 
Mask Club 2, 3 ; "Y" News Staff 

1,2,3 


KDNA NELSON 




VERNON MOORE 


Pleasant Grove, Utah 




Payson, Utah 


Major, Engli.sh 




Major, Botany 


Minor. History 






Sec. Class 1 






Spanish Club 






CHARLES R. MCKELL 


MURCY NELSON 


Si.unish Fork. Utah 




Montpelier. Idaho 


Major. Psychology 




Major, Foods and Nutrition 


Minor, Acct. and Bus. 


Ad'ni. 


Minor, Household Ad'm. and 


Pres. Psychology Clul 


)4 


English 


Mask Club 




Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 3, 4 


Mining Essay Contest 


Scholar- 


Idaho Club 1, 2, 3, 4 


shij) 3 




Gamma Phi Omicron 3, 4 






Gamma Phi Omicron Sec. 4 



[ 166] 



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BANYAN '31 



MARGARET BROADBENT 
Heher, Utah 
Major, Accounting 



MAX OLSEN 

Provo, Ulah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Minor, Finance and Banking; 

A. K. Psi 

Nugget 



GWEN STEWART 

Ogtien. Utah 

Major, Home Economics 

Welier College 1,2 

Home Ec. Clul) 

Mask Cluh 

Vice-Pres. Gamma Phi Omicron 

Beaux Arts 



ALBERT SUTHERLAND 

Provo. Utah 

Major, Zoology 

Beta Beta Beta Biological 
Fraternity 

David Starr Jordan Zoology Club 

Pres. David Starr Jordan Zool- 
ogy Clul) 



ESTHER COOMBS, B.S. 

Fairview, Utah 

Major, Home Economics 

Snow Junior ( iojlege 

Ganinui I'lii Omicron 

Mask Clul) 

Home Economics Club 



EILEEN CIHPMAN, B.S. 
Amrriian Fork. Vltih 
Major, .Speech 
Minor, Physical Ed. 
Transfer from Univ. of Utah 
French Clul) 
Mask Cluh 

Women's .\thletic Ass'n 
Glee Club 



DEAN E. NIELSEN 
Tooele. Utah 

Major, Educational Adminis 

tration 
Freshman Ath. Manager 
Tausigs 



G. RAY JONES 
.S'/)an!'.s7i Fork: Ulah 
Major, Chemistry, Zoology 
German Club 
Chemi.stry Club 
Wrestling 2 
Zoologischer Gesellschaft 



GLEN VINCENT, B.S. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Economics 
Glee Club 
Val Hvric 

Pres. Val Hyrics 2, 3 
Ice and Snow Carnival 
Committee 2, ,3 



ELIZA BJERREGARD 

Provo, Utah 
Major. Engli.sh 
Mask Club 1,4 
French Club 1, 2, 3 
Girl's Play 4 
Dcca Sema Fe 



GUY HILLMAN 
Pleasant Grove, Ulah 
Major, English 
Minor, Physical Ed. 



GLEN W. COFFMAN 

^•lirinpvilli: Utah 

Major. Music 

Y. I). 1). Cbih.t 

Male Glee Club 1.2, .■?, 4 

Oratorio .3 

B;,nd3, 4 



[ 167] 




/ 



BANYAN '31 





LORRAINE PRICE 

Beaver, I'tuh 

Major. Clnthiiif: and Textiles 

Minor. English 

Masli(:lul)2,3.4 

Home Ec. Club 3, 4 



EDWARD HUTCHINGS 

Springvilte. Utah 
Major. Aprononiy 
Hilsardian 
Chemistry 



MAUREEN WELKER 

Piiris. Ii/nhn 
Major. Phys. Ed. 
Minor, English 
Idaho Club 
German Club 
Tennis Club 
W. A. A. 
Cesta Ties 
"Y" News 4 



FRANK CRAGUN 
Pnivo. Utah 
Major^ Accounting 



RUTH MITCHELL 

Frmo. Vtah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 



ORVILl.E WATTS 
Provo, Vlah 
Major. Psychology 
Pres. Y. E. A. 2 
Pies. Psy. Club 3 
Psychology Club 



CLIFFORD RUTHERFORD 

Salt Lake City, Vlah 

Studio Guild 

Pres. Studio Guild 3 

Wrestling 

Boxing 

Track 



MARGARET BIRD 

Springville, Utah 
Major, English 



REED JONES, B.A. 

Spanish Fork. Utah 
Major, Political Science 
Minor, Economics 
Track 1,2, 3, 4 
Band 



RITA GINES 

Roosevelt, Utah 

Major. Music 

Minor, Speech 

Vice-Pres. Uinta Basin Club 

("ompetitive Play 2. 3 

Mask Club 1.2. 3 

Theta Alpha Phi Play 4 

Vice-Pres. Theta Alpha Phi 4 

Decs Sema Fe 



WARREN WHITTAKER 
Frovo, Utah 
Major, Accounting 
Minor, Office Practice 



LILLIAN KNUDSEN 

Lehi. Utah 

Major. Music 

Minor, Speech 

Opera 1 

Vocal Contest 1, 2 

Public Service 1, 2, 3, 4 



[ 168] 



,^>l|UHLlii' •'Hill. 




BANYAN '31 



KEITH WANGSGARD 
Ogilen, Utah 
Major, Physical Ed. 
Weber ColleRe 1, 2 
Football 3, 4 
Coucar Errants 



RODNEY A. ASHBY 
Leamington, Utah 
Major, Economics 



CLARENCE WILSON 

Nephi, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Minor, Office Practice 

Juab Club 

Hylanders 

Commerce Club 



EDGAR B. BARTON 

Prnvo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Minor, Economics 

Alpha Kai)pa Psi 

Nuggets 



R.\Y W. HANSEN 
Mt. Pleasant, Utah 
Glee Club 1,2, 3 
Frosh Football 
Varsity Football 2 
Males 



MARK S. HAI.I.IF, 
A'()r//i Opilcn, Utah 

Major, Physical Ed. 
Block "VChib 
Frcsbnuiri Football 1 
Varsilv Football 2, 3, 
Basketball 1,2,3, 1 
Track 1 
Nuggets 



B.S. 



[ 169 1 



G. IVAN BROUGH 

Morgan, Utah 

Major. Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Minor. Finance and Banking 

Glee Club 1,2,3 

Lima Ssi 

Quartette 2 



INA P. HUNT 
Ogden, Utah 
Major. Home Economics 
Gamma Phi Omicron 
Home Economics Club 



ALICE JONES, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, .Speech 
Minor, Physical Ed. 
Theta Alpiia Phi 
German Club 3, 4 
Deca Sema Fe 
Theta Alpha Phi Play 
VicePres. Deca Sema Fe 4 
Senior Class Play 



WANDA PETTY 
Nephi, Utah 
Cesta Ties 
Sec. French Club 2 
Orchestra 1.2, 3, 4 
Little Symphony 2, 3. 4 
B. Y. U. String Quartette 2, .3, 4 
Conductor of Theatre Orchestra 
4 



LaRUE GOULD 
Monroe. Utah 
Band 1, 2, .■?, 4 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 
French Club 



\ ERNON S. MOORE 
Payson, Utah 
Major, Botauy 




BANYAN '31 





HELEN MAGNLESON 
Nephi, Utah 
Major, Enplish 
Minor, Physical Ed. 
Vice-Pres. Senior Class 
Home Ec. Club 
W. A. A. 
Chemistry Club 
French Club 
Ladies Glee Club 



ALTON WANGSGARD 
Ogclen, Utah 
Major Physics and Math 
Pres. Spanish Club 4 



FERN BATE 

Springville, Utah 

Major, Economics and English 



JIM FINCH 
Spanish Fork, Utah 
Major, Accounting 
Minor, Finance 
Pres. A. K. Psi 4 
Vikinp; Treas. 3, 4 
Viking Unit 



BERT LEWIS 
Provo, Utah 
Debating 1, 3, 4 
Band 1,2 
Orchestra 4 



LEE LUND 

Manti. Utah 
Major, History 
Glee Club 3, 4 
Hylanders 
Friars 
German Club 



FRED EVANS 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Val Hyric 



BELLE HARRIS 

Payson, Utah 

Major, Home Economics 

Minor, English 

Gamma Phi Omricon 4 

Home Ec. Club 3, 4 

Mina Clare 

Ladies' Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Payson Club 2, 3, 4 



WM. H. JOHNSON 
Morgan, Utah 
Major, Music 
Weber College 1, 2 
Band 3, 4 

Male Glee Club 3, 4 
Football 3 
Orchestra 3, 4 
Banyan Quartette 3, 4 



VILDA JESSON 

Richfield, Utah 

Major, English 

Minor, Speech and History 

Snow College 1, 2 

Asso. Banyan Editor 3 

Debating 4 

Block "Y" Club 3, 4 

Vol Soong 3, 4 

Tau Kappa Alpha 



PAUL THORN 
Springville, Utah 
Major, Physical Ed. 
Minor, Sociology 
Basketball 2, 3, 4 
Frosh Football 1 
Varsity Football 2, 3, 4 
Capt. Football 3 
Pres. Block "Y" Club 3 
F'riar 
Tausig 



NAOMI RICH 
Paris, Idaho 

Major, Education 
Mask Club 
Idaho Club 
Cesta Tie 
Bear Lake Club 



[ 170] 



;il|,.VJ^^n_|^^;;.Mn 



SJSS^^S'"^^^^.^ 




BANYAN '31 



D. MORONI SHELLY 

American Fork, Utah 
Major, Chemistry 
Minor, Physics 
Chemical Society 2, 3, 4 
German Club 4 



T. H. PARRY 

Manii, Utah 
Major, Physics 
Minor, Math 
Snow College 



BEN JOHNSON 
Mesa. Arizona 
Major, Psychology 
Nuggets 
Pres. Nuggets 
Psychology Club 



ARTHUR LEE 

Monroe, Utah 
Major, Geology 
Minor, English 
Val Hyric 



PAUL WARNICK 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'ni. 

Minor, Finance and Banking 

"Y" Commerce Club 1, 2, 

All Boys Show 3, 4 

Treas. A. K. Psi 4 

Treas. Tausigs 4 

Alpha Kappa Psi 

Tausig 



ME IAIN McDonald 

Ofiden, Vidh 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Minor, Finance and Banking 

Friar 

Alpha Kappa Psi 

Vikings 

Sec. A. K. Psi 4 

Pres. Friars 4 

Sec. Friars 3 



[ 171] 



HAROLD COLVIN 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Chemistry 

ValHyric 

"Y" Chemical Society 



JAMES T. WOOLSTON 
Lehi. Utah 
Major, History 
Hylander 



VERNON LARSEN 
Mt. Pleasant. Utah 
Major, Chemistry 
Pres. Hvlanders 4 
"Y"News Staff 
Sanpete Club 
Friars 

Chemistry Club 
Hylanders 



DIX M. JONES 

Springville. Utah 

Major, Finance and Banking 

Minor, Acct. and Bus. Ad"m. 

Debating 3, 4 

.^Ipha Kappa Psi 

Block "Y" Club 

Nuggets 

German Club 

A. K. Psi Scholarship Ring 1929 



W. STERLING EVANS 
Spanish Fork: Utah 
Major, Acct. and Bus. .Ad'm. 
Minor, Econ. and Finance and 

Banking 
Alpha Kappa Psi 
Debating 4 
All Boys Show 3, 4 



MARK WM. JOIIN.SON 
Maplrtan. Utah 
Major. Agr()nomy 
Pres. Corvates 1 




V 

V 



V. 



V 




in "II 




/ 



BANYAN '31 




MAY BAIRD 

Heber City, Utah 
Major, Clothing and Textiles 
Home Economics Club 
Wasatch Club 



ADRAIN R. GIBBY 

Ogilen, Utah 

Major, Chemistry 
Mt. Ogden Club 4 



LOREE BAN WAGENEN 

Provo, Utah 
Major, English 
Sec. Class 1 
Spanish Club 



AUSTIN TYLER 
Thatcher, Arizona 
Major Physical Education 
Cougar Errant 
Entered from Gila College 1 



DELSA TOLHURST 
Payson, Utah 

Major, Home Economics 
Home Ec. Club 
Gamma Phi Omicron 
Sec. Home Club 
Fidelas 



PEARSON H. CORBETT 
Provo, Utah 

Vice-Pres. Executive Council 

Friars 4 




LEE JEPPSON 

Brigham City, Utah 

Major, Zoology 

Tri Beta Biological Fraternity 

David Starr Jordan Zoology Club 



IRIS ROBINSON 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Art 
Minor, English 
Studio Guild 3, 4 
Pres. Nautilus 3 
Nautilus 



LAUREL E. LEAVITT 

Bunkerville, Nevada 
Major, Botany 
Hylander 



DONA SALISBURY 

Springville, Utah 
Major, Speech 
Minor, English 
Val Norn 



A. B. KARTCHNER 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Accounting 
Minor, Economics 



BERTHA C. AGREN 

Ogden, Utah 
Weber College 
Theta Alpha Phi 4 
P'rench Club 3 
Cesta Tie 
Mt. Ogden Club 
Senior Play 



[172] 




BANYAN '31 



Leroy oaks 

Vernal, Utah 
Major, Agronomy 
Uintah Club 1,3 
Ak. Club 1, 3 
Hilgardia 



LUCILE MAUGHAN 

Lava Hot Springs, Idaho 

Major, Biology 

Tri Beta 

Vol Soong 

Idaho Club 

David Starr Jordan Biology 

Club 2, 3, 4 
Sec. Mask Club 
Sec. Tri Beta 4 



VAUGHN HUNTER 
Holden, Utah 
Major, Zoology 



LAURA TUCKER 

Provn^ Utah 

Major, Home Economics 

Home Economics Club 

Gamma Phi Omicron Sorority 

Vol Soong 

Social Unit 



LYNN 0. TAYLOR 

Pima, Arizona 

Major, Physical Education 

Entered from Gila College 

Freshman Football 3 

Track 3 

Cougar Errant 4 

Arizona Club 4 



ADEMA BAYLES 
Blunilin/;, Utah 
Major, Music 
Ladies" Gl.-e Chill 
Mask Club 



ROEZENA NELSON OAKS 

Montpelier, Idaho 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 

Idaho Club 

Home Economics Club 3, 4 

Pres. Beaux Arts 3 

Pres. Gamma Phi Omicron 4 

Gamma Phi 3, 4 

Beaux Arts 2, 3, 4 



EDWARD PAYNE 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Physics 
Physics Club 
Olympus 



JULINA SMITH 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Major, History 
Entered from U. of U. 2 
Sec. Scratch 2 



JAMES A. CULLIMORE 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 
Major, Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi 
Junior Class President 
Vice-Pres. Alpha Kappa Psi 
Friars Club 
Vikings 
Student Body President 4 



VIRGINIA BOOTH 

Orem, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 
Ladies' Glee Club 1, 2 
Sec. Social Unit 3 
Pres. Home Club 4 
Home Economics 
Beaux .^rts 
Gamma Phi Omicron 



EURAY ANDERSON 

Ephraim, Utah 

Major, Art 

Art Editor Banyan 3 

Art Editor. "scratch 4 

Staff Artist Banyan 4 

Studio Guild 

Entered from Snow College .3 




V 

V 



^ 



[173] 




/ 



BANYAN '31 





WALDEN MENLOVE 

Prmo, Utah 

Major, Business Administration 

Alpha Kap[m Psi 

Si'iiior Play 

All Buys Show 4 

Studio Guild 

Art Scr^ ice 1, 2, 3, 4 



MARY LeROY 

'\ Springville, Utah 
Major, Speech 



REED A. PHILLIPS 

Prove, Ihah 

Major, Finance and Banking 

Mates 

Glee Club 1,2, 3 

Pres. Glee Club 2 

Ptera 2 

French Club 2, 3 



ORMAN R. WEIGHT 

Sprinfuille, Vlah 
Major, Music 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4 
Orchestra 1.2.3.4 
Male Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 
Music Mgr. 3 
Public Service Bureau 4 
Mates 



GEORGE TANNER 

Proio, Utah 
Major, Mathematics 



ALVA J. JOHANSON 

Rex fill rg. Idaho 

Major. Chemistry 

Class Debates 4 

Hylander 

German Club 

Idaho Club 

"Y" Chemistry Society 

Pres "Y" Chemistry Society 



NORRELL STARTUP 

Provo. Utah 

Major, Home Economics 

Gamma Phi Omicron 3, 4 

Home Ec. Club 2, 3, 4 

Pres. Fidelas 3 

Sec. Senior Class 

Sec. W. A. A. 

Fidelas 



EDWARD RICH GREEN 
Ogden, Utah 

Major, Physics 
Zeit Geist 
Mount Ogden Club 
Physics Club 



JOSINETTE COOK 

Prove, Utah 
Major, Speech 
"Y" News Staff 1 
Sec. and Treas. Class 2 
Sec. and Treas. Mask Club 4 
Junior Prom Committee 
Sophomore Loan Fund 

Committee 
Girls' Day Play 2 
Competitive Play 4 
Theta Alpha Phi 
Val Norn 

ELDON D. BRINLEY 

Pleasant Grove, Utah 

Major, Physical Education 
Band 1,2 

Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 1,2,3,4 
Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4 • 
Block "Y" Club 
Nuggets 



FLORENCE FRANDSEN 

Springville, Utah 

Major, Art 

"Y" News 

French Club 

Studio Guild 

Sec. Studio Guild 3 

Pres. of Studio Guild 4 



LELAND S. HICKS 
Safford, A rizona 
Major, Commerce 
Olympus 



[174] 




BANYAN '31 



JOHN I. CLARKE 

American Furk, Utah 
Major, Political Science 
Debating 2, 3, 4 
Block -Y" Clul) 2, 3, 4 
Friars Vice-Pres. 4 
Class Debating Manager 3 
Alpine Club 1,2,3 
Spanish Club 1, 2, 3 
Interclass Debates 2, 3 

EDITH RICH 
Paris, Idaho 
Major, Speech 
Theta Alpha Phi 
Mask Club 
Idaho Club Sec. 4 
Girls Day Play 3 
Cesta Tie 



PAUL HOLT 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Block -'Y" Club 

Cougar Errants 

Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4 



OREN C. WILLIAMS 

Thatcher, Arizona 
Entered from Gila College 
Major, Educational Adminis- 
tration 
Class Debates 4 



VIRGIL KARTCHNER 

Provo, Utah 
Major, Agronomy 
Orchestra 1, 2 
Band 1,2 
Opera 2 

Male Glee Glub 
Mixed Chorus 



NORMAN B, BINGHAM 

Ogden, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'ni. 

Entered from Weber College 3 

Assistant Bus. Mgr. Banyan 3 

Bus. Manager Banyan 4 

Male Glee Club 4 

Psychology Club 4 

Alpha Kappa Psi 

Mt. Ogden Club 

Tausigs 



BERT BULLOCK 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 

Frosh Football 1 

Frosh Basketball 1 

Interclass Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 

Tausigs 



ROWE VINCENT 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Acct. and Bus. Ad'm. 



OSCAR BUSCH 

Man cos. Color uilo 

Major, Music 

Male Glee Club 1,2,3 

Orchestra 1,2,3,4 

Manager Orchestra 3, 4 

Sec. Male Glee Club 2, 3 

Band 4 

Talmadge Essay Winner 2, 3 

Prize Christmas Story 3 




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[176] 




luniors 



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^ISiH^ 




Waldo Hodson William Jex Rigby Jacobs Howard G. Kelly 

Gwen Nelson Mildred K. Hagan LaPreal Bryiier 

Beulah Strickler Loya Nielsen Ruth Baker Elsie McCurdy 

Ray I. Hart Glenn Webb Paul F. Keeler 

Carleton Culmsee Vernon Scott H. Vernon Wentz Howard R. Cottam 

Helen Barker Leonard Pease Eliza Mae Hicks 



Grove M. Haddock A. B. Larson Clyde Sandgren Frank Harris, Jr. 

Marie Waldrum Mary Asliby Irene Jones 

Gertrude King Marie Jensen Maxine Clayton Maude Anderson 

Farrell R. Collett Clifford Toone 

Smith Decker Lrvine F. Smith Theodore Toone Allan Fjield 

Lucile Thorne Irene Rasmussen Lucille Merrill 




[178] 



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BANYAN '31 




Rose Eyring Louise Spafford Helen Carksibm Edna Dotson 

Basil Hansen Reed A. Wood Wendell Taylor 

T. Glade Wall Elmo Peters Vard H. Johnson Henry R. Viatson 

Monta Wentz Myrtle Deuel 1 Zelma W interton 

Betha Storrs Florence Miller Maxine Phelps Pauline Bennett 

Imri Hutchings Gaius Call Jean C. Nielson 



Kent Johnson W. Rulon Paxman Elmo C. Larson Burnell Aagard 

Elizabeth Gesford Ezra A. Murdock Rayda Riding 

David D. Condon Beth Swenson Wilma Eldredge \X eston Bayles 

Robert Clarke Don Brown Lester B. \^ hetton 

Raymond Peterson Paul Taylor John Westwood Morris ^L dinger 

Maxine Erickson Nile Taylor 



Curtis Harding 



[179] 



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BANYAN '31 






Harold Barton Fred Miner George Willardson Frank Speckart 

Georgia G. Richards Dorothy Hoover Sina Brimhall 

Floyd Hadley Ruth I. Johnson Rinda Bentley Horace Hardy 

Wendel Ohlwiler Riton Hughes Charles Merkley 

Wayne Cowley Irving Rasband Reese Anderson T. Hettig 

Rada Parkinson Anna Beardall Priscilla Taylor 

Robert Bushman James Westwood Herman Benniams Barr Washburn 

Ross Graham Florence Maw Farrell Madsen 




[ 180] 



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Sophomores 



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BANYAN '31 





Edward Aycock Kelsey Hill J. B. Decker Jr. Elliott Anderson 

Ruth A. Johnson Ruth Peay Ruth Holbrook Mable Anderson 

Eva Ballif Bessie Decker Violet Peterson Gean Clark 

Clyde Buehler Howard Thatcher Martin C. Ririe Harold Bailey 

Reed Q. Clark J. Gleason Kerr Lawrence Jones S. P. Strang 

Maurean Johnson Zola Showcroft LaVeve Petty Virginia Eggertson 

Katherine Dickson Melroy Luke Til lie Gardner Hazel Jensen 

Leona West Dorothy Jacobson Reese Showcroft Jane Evans 





[182] 









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BANYAN '31 




Fred Horlacher Richard Knight Earl Smith Lee Peterson 

Blanche B. Jones Fern Smoot Marie Huber Laura Rust 

Melva Shurtleff Muriel Christensen Nella Robison Belva Wilson 

Harold Woolston Harold Fitzgerald H. Grant Vest Lynn Hurst 

Glenn Wanlass Oswald Coombs Ray S. Alleman Witson McConkie 

Lillian Carter Janie Kilpack Nell Hibert Alene Coleman 

Pearl Dudley Helen Moffitt Melva Hone Lucille McMullen 

Wm. VeLoy Vest James Miller W. K. Firmage Dallas Tueller 



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BANYAN '31 




Elliott Tuttle Sylvia Probst Matilda Hoover Edith Paxman 

Bernice Redd Vola Johnson Ruth Stephens Louis Harmer 

Wanda Snow Bertell Bunker Reese Taylor Margaret Peterson 

Grace Gammon Betsy Reynolds I.oren Whetton Lucille Hasler 

Florence Fowler Avera Smith Twila Kinghorn Lora Johnson 

Virgie Sorenson Vera Merrill Mabel Wilson Hortense Snow 

Takeo Fujiwara Lois Smith Faun McConkie Lorna Jensen 

Virginia Weight Elda Snow Ethel Alder Mark Brockbank 




[ 184] 



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BANYAN '31 




William Cox Ward S. Clark Preston Taylor Neflf Smart 

Beth Wright Erma Jergensen Jamie Olson Gertrude Sauer 

Thelma Nelson Maurine Hortin Helen Decker Virginia Taylor 

Clifford Nelson Willard Call Robert Harrison Lowell Bennett 

Ralph Crafts Weldon Mathews Don Shurtliff Wayne Simper 

Joie Batchelor Grace Hall Alice Isakson Dorotha Jones 

John Halliday Coreene Roberson Margaret Frost Melba \'iertel 

Vilma Cox Dee Broadbent Clara Woodhouse Iman Hales 



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BANYAN '31 





I). Kislier A. Boweii G. Wilkinson Danperfield 

A. Opflen C. Menzies M. Cummard W. Hasleni 

T. Mulchings V. Jackson H. Smith D. West 

L. Paxman D. S. Grow E. Cornaby D. Nielson 



I'. Lliipniari 
('. Gray 
E. Clayson 
E. Peterson 



B. Gardner B. Stahman H. Bethers 

L. (^liipman V . Swapp H. Conover 

M. Anderson C. Bagley B. Man<;uni 

Barraclough M. Hall L. Spencer 



C. Fisher 
A. Bates 
G. Hooks 
C. Crook 



C. Moore I. Brockbank 

C. Farrer M. Pace 

L. Probst. J. Dalton 

C. Larson D. Williams 



I. Christensen M. Johnson 

G. Sorensen V. Dixon 

-M. Thurber M. Schow 

M. Gurr B. Robinson 



M. Redmond 
I. Crandall 
B. Crane 
H. Boyer 



N. Edwards P. Miller 

E. Madsen D. Mensel 

A. Hales L. Hoyt 

D. Nielson K. Towers 




[ 186] 




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Freshmen 



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Floy Hansen 
Vivian Merrill 
Louise Brady 
DeLores McDonald 
Fay Averrett 
Amy Jones 
Flora Kenney 



Winona Dewsnip 
Sarah Brown 
Hannah Prusse 
Doris Firniage 
Miriam Smith 
Fay White 
Iris Gardner 



Anna Moore 
Thelma McKinna 
Helen Whitely 
Bell Felmore 
Ramona Davis 
Mary Lyman 
Verla Jergensen 



M. Harrison 
Wid Coffin 
Gwen Brugger 
Evelyn Jones 
Edith Slack 
Ralph Kelly 
Vilate Bunker 



La Veil Ireland 
Melva Curtis 
Genevieve Fugal 
Louise Nielsen 
Edith Young 
Mary Brown 
Lucile Monson 



Harry Mitchell 
Ronald Wiscomb 
Edna Jensen 
Mona Nelson 
Verda Spencer 
Alton Boberg 
Leo Andrews 



[ 188] 



Hnniiil|lll|i'^'^S=* 



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M. Sowards 


R. Jenkins 


A. Kdliiiisdii 


W. Martin 


K. llrulley 


V. Kohert> 


0. Ok.lberry 


N. Peterson 


R. Thornton 


R. Pace 


II. B. Blaek«rll 


M.Curtis 


(".. Shiimway 


K. Larsim 


H. Kills 


'R'. Oi'spain 


M.Seaton 


II. Clark 


A. Hales 


C UruMl 


B. C.oe 


C. lliilsh 


K. Duke 


\'. Kinlinson 


F.. Maiclianl 


T. Luke 


1.. Karley 


K. Iliiiiiiihrii-s 


M. Kornniy 


H. Miller 


G. Bairrf 


M. Reese 


L. Stephens 


S. Ojienshaw 


A. McConkie 


\1. Bayles 


L. Hurst 


S. Reese 


G. Jones 


C. Dahl 


\'. Fraughton 


J. Richins 





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E. Harris 


A. Hughes 




M. Frost 


R. Crane 


F. Cowan 


L. Crandall 


C. Harris 


T. Devan 




L. Rockwood 


G. Johnson 


B. Livingstone 


W. Bills 


M. Peterson 


R. D. Ander. 


on 


W. Grover 


B. Mangum 


P. Ivins 


G. Ashby 


W. Bayles 


H. Conk 




K. Van Wagenen 


R. Johnson 


W. Rockwood 


A. Ipson 


M. Wilson 


H. Grange 




L. LeRoy 


M. Vance 


J. Johnson 


A. G. Nelson 


R. Erirkjon 


D. Taylor 




H. George 


D. Sorensen 


R. Balle 


F. Bluth 


B. Miller 


G. Thomas 




R. M. Henry 


E. Jacobsen 


A. Conover 


D. Anderson 












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High School 



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Bii^ham Yoiins: High School 



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WEBSTER DECKER 

Dehaling Manager 

MAXINE HENROID 

Secretary und Treasurer 



LYMAN PARTRIDGE 
Student Body President 

REX INGERSOLL 

Senior Class President 



TOM EASTMOND 

Athletic Manager 

MARIE MORGAN 

Vice President 



The Brigham Young High School is maintained by the Church in 
connection with the University. It has its own heads, and is a unit separate 
in itself. It is housed mainly in the Arts Building, but the students take 
their classes in all departments of the school. The enrollment is small as 
high schools go, but the achievements of it as a school are second to none. 

Tire ideals of all of the Church schools are implanted in this body, 
and bear fruit when the students reacli the higher institution. Many of the 
leaders of the upper student body come from the Y High. 

Tlie Y High is a work shop for students majoring in education. The 
actual working with students is credited largely with the success of gradu- 
ates entering the teaching field. The students also benefit from the schools 
use as a training school because any new method and progress in education 
finds expression there. 





BANYAN '31 




Basketball Squad 



Front row: James Martin, forward; Tom Eastmond. forward: Joe Swenson. cap- 
tain and guard; Jack Eastmond, forward; Albert Swenson. guard. 

Second row: Albert Payne, guard; Webster Decker, forward: Vicldoii "donson. 
coach; Konabi Jones, guard. 

Back row. Myron liown, center; Norman Jacob, center. 

The Y High finished second in its division this year, and came within 
a point or two of downing the fast P. G. quint, which took the division and 
nearly the state title. The fast little squad loses only one regular for next 
year, and things look bright for a great year. 



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Peppettes 



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The Peppettes is an organization of the girls of the Y High for the 
purpose of creating spirit in school activities. They form a cheering section 
at athletic events, and in short put the school hehind the team. 

From row: Reva Aagard. May Bennett. FAma Hansen. Olive \\ inlerton. Susan 
Whittaker, Marjorie Smith. Elma Robinson. !\e\a Hanson. Faun Greer. 

Back row: Rea (iollard. Louise Ollerton. Ga) Sowards. Katherine Davis. Alice 
Rartlett. Evelyn Anderson. Darlene Owens. Ruth Robinson. Marie Morgan. Maxine 
Henroid, Ellen Jackson. 




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BANYAN '31 





"The Youngest" 

The annual High School play was presented in College Hall on 
Decemher 12, 1930. The story of the play is of a youngest brother who is 
made to play the "baby" by his other brothers and sisters. With the advent 
of a pretty girl into the plot the boy comes into his own. The play was suc- 
cessfully directed by Misses Edith Rich, Zola Martin, and Elain Paxman. 

THE CAST 

Oliver Winslow .... Lyman Partridge 
Augusta Martin .... Laveve Jasperson 

Allen Martin Fred Kartchner 

Katie Elma Robinson 

Mark Winslow Billy Goodman 

Martha Winslow .... Jesse Kay Mangum 

Mrs. Winslow Marjorie Smith 

Nancy Blake Ceicle Clark 

Richard Winslow Webster Decker 

Debating 

Miss Black, coach (not in picture), William Martin, coach, Smoot Brimhall, Olive 
Winterton, Darlene Owens, Erma Warnick, Fred Kartchner, James Martin. 




[ 194] 



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BANYAN '31 




O. P. SKAGOS 

FOOD STORES 

"Efficient Service System" 
THE LATEST IN FOOD STORES 




Dedication 

After a period of due deliberation in which even the 
"Y" News Staff was considered for the dedication of the 
Bunyon, we, the Bunyon Stuff of 1931, in the spirit of 
Politics and Mud Slinging, dedicate this section to 
"River Mud," commonly known as School Politics. 

Both parties set ? Let 'er go ! 



Hats Cleaned and Blocked 



• Rugs Shampooed 

PROVO CLEANING & DYEING CO. 

CLEANING - PRESSING - REPAIRING 
The Quality of Our Work is Much Higher Than Our Prices 

77 North First West FREE DELIVERY Telephone 46 



[ 196] 






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BANYAN '31 



The Song of the Campaign 
Artist 

Winter's gone and spring is come. 

With summer close behind. 
Exams are night and fever's high. 

Vacation is in line. 
The school elections are in sight. 

The pails of paint are brim- 
ming; 
The artists will be up at night 

Painting ballyhoo that's win- 
ning. 

The candidates with sweat do 
wring — 
Stump speeches are beginning. 
Their mugs e'en now with care 
do bring 
The Fates with mouths full 
grinning. 
Oh! woe to him who paints the 
sign, 
For drudgery is his lot, 
When students plot, exhort and 
whine 
For signs and placards bought. 




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The midnight oil and juice is burned; 

Campaign in secrets started. 
To JONES or BROWN the tide is turned 

When factions choice is bartered. 
The artist his exams will flunk. 

For time is elsewhere spent; 
All else but signs now seems the bunk. 

'Cause pocket book is bent. 

When all the ballots have been cast, 

'N' excitement's at an ebb; 
The sign man shuts his eyes at last, 

Though now he's in the web 
Of haughty seers of subjects 

Taught in classes on the hill. 
And grades will drop from "A" to naughf- 

The sign man's life is . 





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These spreading branches represent our many friends. The roots sym- 
bolize our growth. The fniit typifies tlie satisfaction created from the 
rich soil of service, quality, price, home-like atmosphere, spirit of 

good will and helpfulness. 

The Banyan Lunch 

Just Across the Street 





How I Won the Election in 1930 
By John "Tonsils" Dalton 

It happened in the spring of 1930. Neff Smart 
and I were aspiring to the positions of Yell King. 
The race was going neck and neck, and there were but 
five more votes to be cast. In a fever of feet, I mean, 
a fever of heat, I dashed down to the county jail to 
consult my campaign manager. He was busy dig- 
ging his way through the cement partition into the 
women's ward. He was irritated at my intrusion, but 
I found it necessary to stop him. He pecked away 
nonchalantly at the cement as I told him my story. 

"Have you Ben Turpin?" he asked. 

"Have I been what?" 
"Do you have access to Ben Turpin, the movie 
actor?" he asked, lifting his bleary eyes and looking 
at me. His arms got tired of holding his eyes, and 
he laid them down on the bunk and proceeded to 
tap at his drill. 



[ 198] 



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BANYAN '31 



AFEWAY STOKE 



Dis-rraii3iJ-riOi>i -wi-tti-iou 



"What do you want me to do, start a vaudeville?" 1 asked, bewildered 

"I am really serious," he answered, as the drill slipped and tore ihe 
toe nail off my left big toe. "If you can get him here within four hours, 
we can still win the election." 

I took a phone from under the pillow of his bunk and telephoned a 
telegram. Ben received it in Reno where he had gone to sue for a l^reach 
of promise. He stated that the officers wouldn't let him out of the state 
unless he dropped his suit. One suit was all that he had, so I asked liim 
to drop his shirt and come. He disguised himself as the carburetor on an 
Austin and arrived, by means of a stork, in Provo seven niiiuites before the 
polls closed. 

In the meantime I had told the five voters a gag that held them until 
Ben arrived. When he came, I had Mr. Turpin mount the old safe in the 
archway and give a long campaign speech for Neff. Of the five voters who 
were left, three of them looked Mr. Turpin in the eyes and decided that he 
was all crossed up. In this way I won by an eye. Neff protested the elec- 
tion on the grounds that it was a cock-eyed gyp, but I proved that it was 
a cross-eyed gyp instead and the final results were valid. 



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MARTHA WASHINGTON CANDIES are a Superior Utah Product 

made by Utah People. 



"Let's play croquet, Mary." 

"Oh, I will not, Percy, it's a wicket game. 



Call 475 



We W^ant 
MORE STUDENT'S CLEANING AND PRESSING 

MADSEN CLEANING CO. 

• Free Delivery 




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I^VE 





IPPLt/' 





DEDICATED TO THE 
HOMELESS HECTOR CLUB"- 
FLOYO GABN, JIM HUNTER 
EAaLWONE., GEORGE COOPER 






NORMAN BINGHAM'S 
IDEA OF HEAVEN 




WITH TUt INNOVATION^ 
or MIDMIGHT lAATINECS; 
BEFORE BREAKFAST 
DANCES;ETC. NNE FOUND J 
IT DIFFICULT TO DECIDE 
WWEN TO WEAR EVENING 
CLOTHES OR INFOUf^L 
DRESS 





OUR "FACIAL 
^-;3L.EXPRCSSI0N 
^^.^ SHOWS THE 
~' PLEIASURE 
WE EX- 
PERIENCE 
UPON 

HEARING THE 
MUSIC THAT 
SOAKS TURU 
THE \NALLS 
^O^OF THE 
' 'BAMVAN 
OprPlCE 

FROM the: 

SURROUNDING 

consebvator»e:s 



T^*«.5<eLi_ <:oi-uE'"r-r 



MARTHA WASHINGTON CHOCOLATES are more Delicious than ever 



[200] 



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BANYAN '31 



[201 ] 



WHEN YOU'RE UP ON YOUR TOES . . . 

YOU'RE NOT DOWN IN THE MOUTH 

The world is rich in rewards for the energetic. There never 
was a time in the history of the world for making money like 
that which invites the "DOER" today. 
It's the "DOERS" who wear a beaten path to the bank door. 

A Savings Account With the 

KNIGHT TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK 

Is an Asset to Energy 




Main Lobby 

KNIGHT TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK 

Provo, Utah 

Capital and Surplus $382,500.00 

• 

^'There Is ISo Substitute for Safely" 

J. Wm. Knight, Prosidi-nt 
R. E. Allen, Vici'-Prcsidcnl W. E. Allen, Cashier and Trust Officer 

F. G. Warnick. J'ire-Prisidiul W. W. Allen, Assistant Cashier 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL TRUST 

Utah County's Largest Bank 



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BANYAN '31 




^7/ You 
Mineral 


Can Afford to Do So, Use Your Head Tivice a Day, 

Your Broker at Least Tivice a Year" 
mines of Utah. 1930, rank FIRST in United States in 
paid bv mines— $18,630,000.00 

Wells L. Brimhall Broker 


and See 
dividends 


19 


No. 


University Ave. 




Provo, Utah 



F. 


w. 


WOOLWORTH 


CO. 






FIVE AND TEN CENT GOODS, SPECIALTIES, 


ETC. 




52 West Center St. 








Provo, 


Utah 



DON'T FORGET TO VOTE 

for 

ALOYIUS SCHOHOFLUSCIOUS 

for 

Forty-Second Vice-President of The Society for the Prevention of 
Throwing Cigarette Ashes on the Floor of Room "D" 




ASBESTOS SHINGLES 

Fireproof, Beautiful 

Everlasting 

ASBESTOS ROOFING 

ASPHALT SHINGLES 

ROCH WOOL 

Home Insulation 

ASPHALT TILE FLOORING 

Estimates Free 

Curtis Zarr 

Approved Contractors for 

JOHNS-MANVILLE CO. 

401 Dooly Bldg. Salt Lake City 



BONNEVILLE 

LUMBER 

CO. 

'That Good Place to Trade" 

Herman Hinze, Manager 

298 So. University Ave. 

Phone 104 



[202] 



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BANYAN '31 



PROVO BAKERY 

SPECIALTIES 
For School Parties or Dances 
For Home Socials or Picnics 



57 No. First East 



Phone 334 



Look Before You Lip 

By Pen S. Blotter 

Ladies and Gentlemen and Any Students 
Within Hearing: 

As campaign manager for this great and 
illustrated party allow me to say (you can't 
help yourself), pardon me while I plank 
down our platform, these nohle and inspiring 
broadminded citizen s — denisons — of tliis 
g-e-reat institution of spuming are against that 
latest classic of the immoral (did I say im- 
mortal? (P. S. Didn't mean to.) Groucho 
Marcks "Beds." (Woodcuts by permission.) 



"The Real Silk Inc. 

offers the public not only the best 
made products, but a line of products 
and service containing exclusive fea- 
tures not obtainable elsewhere at 
any price." 

Our "Shop at Home Service" is ob- 
tainable only tiirough ])onded stu- 
dent representatives working per- 
manently on your campus. 

Local Office 

526(;iift Building 

SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 



1203] 




PEN S. HI.OTTER 



ORPHEUM 

If here You Hear and See the Best 

The Pick of 

Warner Brothers 

First National 

Paramount 

Fox 

Pathe 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

United Artist 

TALKING - SIN(;iN(; 

PIGTl RKS 



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UNIVERSITY MARKET 



MEATS AND GROCERIES 

A RED AND WHITE STORE 



Phone 273 - 274 



J. J. Booth, Proprietor 

498 No. University Ave. 




MARTHA WASHINGTON CANDIES Are a Perfect Bon-Voyage 

Gift Package 

Also against all of his bedfellows and — well — (what's wrong with this sen- 
tence?). Therefore, the first number on our program will be X188765432 
lately of Sing Sing and ring master of ceremonies, Rigby Hiccups. (Hie.) 
Pardon me, I mean Rugby Yawckups. (Take that back.) I mean Rigby 
Rugby Oxford Jacobs, one-time president of the university — I mean second 
vice (double time for second offense), now president of Vice in the Island 
known as Chicago. (Applause.) I could tell more of Mr. Hiccups, but 



I'm paid to keep still. (Do I hear any more offers?) 
Sold to the highest bidder on a no trump. 



Coin 



g, going, gone 



"EVERYTHING FOR OFFICE AND SCHOOL' 

Utali-Idaho Scliool Sii])ply Co. 



155 South State Street 



Salt Lake City, Utah 



Van Photo Service 

CAREFUL KODAK FINISHING 

New Location — Paramount Theatre Building 
MAIL US YOUR FILMS 

[204 ] 



^i^tsuk" ■• -^ I II' ,'"• 



"3B- alSi 




BANYAN '31 



MODERN AND HOMELIKE 




V 



HOTEL ROBERTS 



In the next cage we have one of the rarest ani- 
mals in captivity. A really authentic and genuine 
Banyan Editor who pleased everyone. Picture is in 
the square to the left. Pardon me, isn't it there? 
Just as I tliought — he has faded out of the picture. 
What's that? Oh. Jimmy, well don't get excited, I'm 
coming to him. But I tell you I couldn't have had 
him the first. He was out in the back with the gar- 
dener — well, a gardener, then — perhaps he's inter- 
ested. I wish I had a lady 
gardene. Step right out, 
Jimmy. You gulled 'em 
once, now gull 'em more. 
Vote for Samuel Gom- 
pers. Here he is, ladies 
and gents. The one and 
original James Kanaka 
Kullimore, native of Pro- 
vo, P. G., and odier na- 




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Compliments of 




FORSGREN BOOTERIE 




PROVO'S ONE SHOE STORE 




168 West Center Street 


Prove, Utah 




[205] 




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Ash for It . . . 

BARKERS LONG LOAF AND WHOLE WHEAT BREAD 
Cakes and Pastries Made for All Occasions 

BARKER BAKERY 

132 West Center St. Phone 746 Provo, Utah 




tions. A man of P. G. parties and passions. The 
course of true love is his most popular subject in 
college. Let us say Grace. 

Now for the Art Department, boys and girls. 
Art Hustler, Rustler, Rassler — Art regardless. 
Here we have Art himself. Hannah don't mean 
any other girl. Art sings in his sleep. She's only 
a baker's daughter but he loved her for her dough. 
In a nice little cottage who would mind a little- 
oven? Art for Art's sake. Art for Pat's sake or 
what will you have? 

Oye! Oye! Oye! and a couple of Fjords. 
Here we have in person, Loyal Val Morgan Niel- 
son. Don't crowd, boys. Wot a Swede little girl 



For Constant Uniformity Use 
BEEHIVE BRAND CEMENT 




Utah Idaho Cement Co. 

Factory 
Brigham City, Utah 

General Office 

Eccles Building 

Ogden, Utah 




For . . . 

YOUR SAKE 
OUR SAKE 
HEALTH'S SAKE 
use 

UTAH SUGAR 



[206] 



j*^.;?!^ 



"3^ tar 




BANYAN '31 



STRAND THEATRE 

QualityEntcrtaininent 

R. E. Sutton, Manager 



Phone 749 



MARTHA WASHINGTON CANDIES Are "Utah's Best Candies' 



\ 



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but she won't marry me Norway. She springs from Springvillage and all 
during high school she thought the hyphen in bird-cage was for the bird to 
sit on. She suppresses suppressed desires and one time sent for a boolv 
telling what a young girl should know before marriage. She still has the 
cook book. She is now on an independent platform for matrimony. But, 

"Loya, m y dear," 
as the professor said 
when he kissed her, 
you 11 pass. 
Oh, grandma ! 
What big teeth you 
have! Farrell Clan- 
cy Ruben Collett — 
or Callim what you 
choose. He'll come. 
Here's one of the 
most sought after 
men in the univer- 
sity — after his book 
is published — you 
can't forget him, 
folks, He doesn't use 
pepsodent and de- 
spises Amos 'n' An- 





^ 



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EAT 

BROWN'S ICE CREAM 

FOR HEALTH 

Made in the Cleanest Factory in the West 
Telephone 315 Ogdon. I tab 



[207] 



At- 








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BANYAN '31 






ELIAS MORRIS 


& SONS CO. 




We 


are Installing Tile Drain Boards, 
in All Parts of Utah, Idahc 


Mantels 
>, Nevada 


and Colored Bath Rooms 
and Wyoming 


21 West South Temple Street 




Salt Lake City, 


Utah 





dy. Never heard of pink tooth brush and no one 
ever laughed when he sat down to play — the har- 
monica. Now applying for a vacant room in the 
East High. The photographer asked him if he wanted 
a large or a small picture and he replies, "A small 
one." So the photographer says, '"Close your mouth, 
please." And so help me, and believe it or not, he 
tried his best. Is fond of women. Is an artist, with 
personal preference such as: Legs by Steinway, Body 
by Fisher, and Neck by the Hour. Take one good 
look, kiddies, and remember that only the brave de- 
sert the fair. Fond of eating. Ambition, to own a 
cook. No? Scatter brained shots, go a la helen. 
Here he is, mamma. Look at his ears and them 
nose. He's the perfect prototype for a Banyan edi- 
tor. If he can bray and make assembly announce- 
ments and set the last date now, he will be a huge 




THE NEWHOUSE HOTEL 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
400 Rooms -:- 400 Baths -:- $2 to $4 Single 

B. Y. U. Parties 

Formals :-: Dances 

Dinners 

Careful Attention to Details Make 
Our Social Affairs Successful 

Eat in Salt Lake's Only 
Snnsliine Cafeteria 

Hotel Newhouse 

W. E. Sutton, General Manager 






[208] 



i^^Jjiff 



"Tt*- <arf: 




BANYAN '31 



National French Cleaning Co. 

Established 1910 

DRY AND STEAM CLEANING 

Repairing and Pressing Ladies' and Gents' Garments 

Hemstitching and Picoting Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Phone 125 95 No. University Ave. Provo, Utah 



success. Mister Dyde Gangrene. Optomist. enthu- 
siast, and potential editor. You'll hear from him, 
of him, and will have nothing to do with him. Re- 
member, William, you play only with nice boys. 
Clyde can't run for anything but pictures now — and 
from everything but the office. The name? Oh, yes. 
Slide hamstrung, versa vice, Sandgreen. Oh, Clyde 
Dangren. Ladies please keep their distance, and 
don't get your shirt off, he's clerked in a ladies store 
before. 

"Show me the pup," said the butcher as he 
searched for the missing link. 

In this place of higher yearning a man learns 
that wearing letters is much safer than writing them. 




TIMPANOGOS BUTTER 



When You Phone Say 



TIMPANOGOS 



For Sale At All Grocers 



Timpanogos Creamery 



O. S. Olsen, Manager 



Phone 213 



Provo, Utah 



COMMERCIAL FORM RULING 

LOOSE LEAF DEVICES 

BOOKBINDING 

Save your valuable books, magazines 
and journals. We bind them in re- 
fined or plain styles 



Provo Book 
Bindery 

South of University 
Phone 612 Provo, Utah 



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[209] 




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BANYAN '31 





MARTHA WASHINGTON CANDIES Are the Candies Your Sweetheart 

Likes Best 



[210] 




BANYAN '31 




iniJDiliriErr 




North Pacific College of Oregon 

Scliools of Dentistry and 

Pharmacy 



I 211 



Portland, Oregon 



Dentistry: A four year course of instruction is given to students who 
bring not less than one year (30 semester hours, 45 term hours) of 
college credits in selected subjects. 

Pharmacy: The course in Pharmacy is four years, leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science (B. S.) in Pharmacy. 

Dental Assistants: The training for Dental and Medical Assistants 
and Hygienists covers one and two year courses. 

The Annual Session Begins September 28, 1931 

For Catalog and Full Information Address 

THE REGISTRAR 



East Sixth and Oregon Streets 



Portland, Oregon 



THE BEST 

In Entertainment Always 

PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

Balanced Programs! Properly Presented! 

PROVO, UTAH 



ipgramouHt 



A Pitblix Theatre 
Home of Paramount Pictures 



A^ -' 



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BANYAN '31 




The best servant in the home is 
ELECTRICITY.,, 

Let it (li) the Cooking, Refrigeration, Water Heating, and 
nnmeroiis other household tasks, freeing you from drud- 
gery and giving you ample time in which to pursue the 
better things of life. 

We cordially invite you to drop into our store at any time 
and learn more about the many advantages of electric 
servants in the home. 

UTAH POWER & LIGHT CO. 

Efficient Public Service 





THE LYIN' TAMERS 



THE LEADER INC. 

READY-TO-WEAR AND MILLINERY 

Pravo's Popular Store 

Highest Grade Merchandise * Very Reasonably Priced 



[212] 



nMiiimiii|||ii"TT3x> 

iiiiii 



' ii>nm" 




BANYAN '31 



UTAH MOTOR TOURS 
COMPANY 

(Regular Stage 

Salt Lake to Bingham Canyon 

Wasatch 1069 Salt Lake City, Utah 



Y 
V 




^ Special Sightseeing Cars b 
I for Rent At Any Time J 



7 Passenger to 30 Passenger Cars — We Go Any- 
where in the Scenic West 



V. 




[213] 



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BANYAN '31 




DIAMONDS 


WATCHES CLASS PINS RINGS AND METALS 




Let Us 


Submit Prices and Designs 








J. 


EDWIN STEIN 

Jeweler 








SILVERWARE ^ JEWELRY 






34 West Center St. 




Provo, 


Utah 



V^:^^:^ 



O 





HOW BARNEY GOES AFTER AN AD 



Compliments of 

PROVO GREEN HOUSE 

LADIES FLORAL 

When Words Fail, Flowers Prevail 

Phone Eiaht-O, Where the Flowers Grow 



Ask for 

McDonalds 

New 5c SUSAN BAR 

THE LARGEST NUT ROLL BAR ON THE MARKET 
Save the Wrappers for Valuable Premiums 






[214] 



J«>^ aasf 




BANYAN '31 




"IVrATURE'S choicest gifts await you in the 
mountains, along swift-running streams, 
on the highways that lead to distant horizons! 
Make the most of your opportunities to enjoy 
life in the open this summer and every sum- 
mer. 

We believe you will get more pleasure per 
mile, more enjoyment per hour, when you use 
Pep 88 gasoline and Vico motor oil in your 
car. Those pojuilar products are 
specially made to meet the clim- 
atic and atmospheric conditions 
of these highland altitudes. 

Pep 88 gasoline is made \vitli 
an rxirn process, called refrac- 
tioiiation, whicii results in a het- 
ter balanced motor fuel. Vou get 
quicker-starting, more respons- 
ive pick-up, higlier speed, and 
greater power. You'll find that 

[215] 




Pep 88 delivers more miles per gallon. 

Its companion product, ViCO motor oil, 
brings lubrication advantages obtainable in no 
other oil on the market. Vico stands up better 
under heat . . . stays fresh and clean longer . . . 
flows more freely when cold . . . and is 99.94 
I)er cent carbon-free. It exceeds the rigid 
specifications of the Society of Automotive 
Engineers. That's why Vu.o is sold with a defi- 
nite money-back guarantee. 

Pep 88 and Vico, sold through- 
out tiie interniountain region, 
are made by tlie 1 tab Oil Ke- 
lining Company, and distrilniteil 
in I'tah County by Bennelt- 
(hibner (A)mpany. Look for Pep 
88 and \ u:o signs . . . and fill up 
i)i-fore you start on any motor 
trip. HENNETT-CULMEK CO.. 
I'rovo, I tall. 









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BANYAN '31 




UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY 

Everything for the Office, Bank or School 



43 EAST CENTER 



Telephone 15 



'rovo. 



Utah 



Always Ajipreciating OUR B. Y. U. 
Be Sine It's Pasteurized and Ask Why 

CHERRY HILL DAIRY 



Phone 713 



24 So. 4th W. 



Provo, Utah 



When in Salt Lake take home a box of MARTHA WASHINGTON 

CANDIES 




How I Won the "Y" Neivs Election in 1930 
By Pean H. Jaulson 

How she ])icked me out of that crowd of college sheiks, I don't konw. 
Perhaps it was because of my long sensuous looking nails; perhaps it was 
the exotic effect of the aquiline pipe that I wore in th thumb-hand side of 
my mouth; or maybe because I wore horn rimmed spectacles. Anyway she 
chose. 

There were four of us fellows seated around a table in Room "D" 
quietly nibbling at some broiled bolts ( I was nuts about bolts at the time), 
and were just topping off with a dessert of sliced bandanas and lumber soup 
when she stepped in. And stepin is the word. Without a word she glided 
up to the table next to where I sat, eating her curds and why, and looked 
me fool in the face. It was plain that she was laboring under some great 
excitement. Her mouth was set in a grim little line that she sucked after 



Dia<:'S CAFE 

Sjiecial Attention to Banquets and Parties 
OGDEN, UTAH 




[216] 



Tmrilliiii.''^B^ 

imm^i •>Mrii. 



icTS' 



TJ»- <irf 




To make a yearbook that is superlatively fine, an unusually 
close and friendly co-operation is necessary among its creators. 
We believe that this book is decidedly above the ordinary. 
Naturally we are proud that our facilities, personnel and 
equipment were aids to the Editor and Business Manager. 



STEVENS & WALLIS, INC. 

ADVERTISING AND PRINTING 
"That Hits the Mark" 




/AAK€R.S OF PeK.FeCT Pf^lNTlNQ PLATeS 
DeSiqN€KS OF DISriNQUISheDT6AR. BOOKS 




BANYAN '31 



1930-31 Staff 



STUDENTS' SUPPLY 



ASSOCIATION 



Often Called the Stadium Co-op 



The Students' Store 



V 



V. 




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BANYAN '31 





eSTABUISHED 1866 



^^gt^ttTot //^ 



PROVa EUREKA SPANISH FORK 



C^ 





hours and her breast rose and fell in the moonlight. Methodically I stooped 
to recover it each time as it fell with a dull thud to the floor. The men were 
all staring at her with frank admiration and I was beginning to have a prickly 
feeling down my back where the seam of my twelve dollar underwear went, 
when her lips parted and she broke the ten's silence. (The group had by 
this time increased to ten.) 

"Meestaire Hoover," — she always did get the two of us mixed, possibly 
on account of the depression in our chin — "What beautiful black eyes you 
have" 

With an inscrutable smile, I unscrewed one and passed it over to her. 
"Be careful with it," I shot at her with a smirk — and, then, thanks to my 



Enlargements, Photo Supplies, Photo Finishing, Color Prints of Scenic 
Utah. Photo Finishing is an art, an art of which we are masters. We 
finish films, make enlargements and color prints, and supply every 
photographic requirement. We maitain the most complete collection 
of scenic Utah views in the West. 

UTAH PHOTO MATERIALS CO. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 
27 West South Temple Opposite Temple Square 



1218] 



..^^ •'11'" ■ 



«5sg^^j^"T»fev«^ 



~3J3fr^ 




BANYAN '31 



If 


you 


go to 


the end of tlie rainbow 


you'll find 


1 

no 






more 


genuine hospitality, no 

coiuteons seryice 

than at 

KKKIKYS INC. 


more 





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deadly marksmanship, I landed a jjig soft-boiled smirk all over the side of 
her face. '"Be careful with it; there's a pupil inside gettinj^ his less lesson." 

"Big boy!" she breathed, while I fought for fresh air, "I want you io 
run for editor of the "Y" News!" 

"And — and lose all my friends?" I muttered weakly. "Not — nut that. 
Anything else, but not that!" 

"\ou haven't any friends. " she reassured me. 

"But — but, they get into trouble with committees, don't they?" I clam- 
bered on. 

"Enough!" she billowed, with a wave of anger. "You are going to run 
for the position." 

I glanced at her curves, at her spilball, at the adorable little spot 
where her neck met her bosom and no quarter asked; at her gleaming topaz 
hair, her well knit body — every inch hand-knit — and I knew — Knew — that 
I would run for anything — even President of the United States, for this 
exotic creature. 

"Whiit are you doing now to make your way through school, besides 
grafting on the Junior Prom money?" she shot at me with a toy cap pistol. 



JK^ 



ECCLES HOTELS 

Head(juarters for 
Travelers 

Vrrv Rrasonnhli' lin'cs 




LOGAN, UTAH 

First Class Accommodations for 
School Bancjuets and Dances 






BLACKFOOT. IDAHO 



AvJ ^'- 



'JUT 



IB 



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T\Utt» -::fUHmV^IW» 



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BANYAN '31 




Iiiter-Moiuitaiii Knitting Mills, Inc. 

Manufacturers and Distributors of 

CUSTOM MADE KNIT GOODS 



We Welcome Good Salesmen 

And Assure You Success by Giving You Personal Training 

Arrange for an Interview by Phone or Mail 

J. Edwin Nelson, Manager 



1879 Washington Ave. ODGEN, UTAH 



Phone 953 



When in Salt Lake Take Home a Box of MARTHA WASHINGTON 

CANDIES 



"I'm a phimber," 1 shot back at her with an awful bore automatic. "I 
retch pipes." 

"I see; gas pipes." 

I cudgeled my brains with a stout cudgel which happened to be lying 
there in an effort to think up a snappy retort, but although 1 racked my 
brain for an hour, the gray matter still lay loose about the pool table. 



THANKS TO ALL STUDENTS AND CLUBS 
PATRONIZING THE 

B. Y. U. CAFETERIA 

"Where You Enjoy Eating" 
12:20 Daily 



Arts Building 




[ 220 ] 



3- Tin I mrrmTTrnrr^'T'^* 
UHli . III"".'''' 



JlllllVULUIl 




BANYAN '31 



PICGLY WIGGLY 

Low Prices, Good Food-, Self Service, Health Rules, 
Clean Stores, Personal 



MEATS 



GROCERIES 



Provo 



Price 



Helper 



\, 



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Nine months passed, and everyone breathed easier because the elec- 
tion was near at hand. Eveiything was in readiness for the brilliant finish 
that had been planned by my manager and the lady edged in black. At 
that time fifty per cent of the students were illiterate and most of them 
could hardly sign their own names to a check and have it recognized. Most 
of them were direct descendants of tlie Jukes and all the rest were Flukes. 
So up in the right hand comer of the ballot right next to my opponent's name 
we printed my picture. Then, when the time came to \ote, each voter took 
a look at the picture by my opponents name and promptly marked a cross 
opposite my name. In this way I won fifty per cent of the votes and with 
the votes of my two campaign managers, Pen Blotter and Tax Mailer and my 
own, I won the election. 



350 
Rooms 



350 
Baths 








Hotel Bigelow 

Firpproof 

Coftcf Shop 

1 1 Dining Hoonis 

Modern (Parage 

OGDEN, UTAH 



( 221 1 



TRY OUR SERVICE STATIONS 

Our Gasoline and Oils are Highest 
in Quality and Cheapest in Price 

Everything for the Automobile 

OPEN 24 HOITRS A DAY 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Rest Rooms 

Tell n ride Motor 
Company 

Phone One Thousand 

T^ O STATIONS 

Corner First West and (lenter 

57 West Center 

In the Autiuncdtilc Business in Pro\(> 
for 16 ^ ears 



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BANYAN '31 




(jdt at--- 
JOE VINCENT CAFE 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



A Packard was roaring along the highway at a terrific speed when the 
motor suddenly sputtered and stopped. The driver, fortunately, was near 
a drug store, and the soda squirt, who also dispensed gas and acted as a 
mechanic, raised tlie hood and in his search for the cause of the trouble 
discovered an Austin in the carburetor. While going at such a terrific speed, 
the Austin had been inhaled through the air intake. 



V.- 



Barney, the sage of the Banyan office, declares that pleasure is fifty 
per cent anticipation and fifty per cent memory. 




L 222 ] 




BANYAN '31 



UTAH TIMBER & COAL CO. 



COAL 
BUILDING MATERIALS 



V 

V 



* * * < * 



164 West 5th North 



Phone 232 



WE APPRECIATE THE UNIVERSITY 
AND THE STUDENTS 



When in SaU Lake Take Home a Box of MARTHA WASHINGTON 

CANDIES 



^ 



The amateur angler had hooked a small trout and had wound it in till 
it was rammed against the end of the rod. "What do I do now?" he asked 
his companion. 

"Better climb up the rod and club it," was the answer. 

One hen said to the other as the farmer walked by: "There's the guy 
I'm laying for." 



THE COOL, SATISFYING, SPARKLING DRINK! 



Made and BouM In f^^^ Bcck er's ^^^ 

BECKERS PRODUCTS 30f!^^^9^^^^ BECCO 

COMPANY 

Ogden, Utah 

"kCUWSHINGirBEEJl' 



eECCo 



Vi lierever (»ot)d Drinks 
Arc Sold 



[223 ] 



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BANYAN '31 







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CONSOLIDATED WAGON 
& MACHINE COMPANY 

Distributors of 

FARM MACHINERY - HARDWARE 
SPORTING GOODS 



UTAH 



WYOMING 



IDAHO 




SHRIVER'S 

The College Man's Headquarters 

Its standards of Qviality, Style, Leadership, Good Taste, 
Good Fitting Service and its Values Cannot be Excelled 



HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES 

FLORSHEIM & FREEMAN SHOES 

WILSON BROTHERS FURNISHINGS 

STETSON AND DOBBS HATS 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 

SHRIVER'S 



16 West Center 



Provo, Utah 




[224 1 



~~s^ ao: 




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BANYAN '31 



SUTTON CAFE 




"^ Good Place to Eat" 




PROVO, UTAH 





RiGBY Jacobs: "Who was that lady I saw you with last nijjht?"' 
Barney: "Say, are you going to pull that old gag for this year's 

vanV Why, I heard that one in the fall of " 

Rigby: "The fall of 1918?" 

Barney: "No, about the time of the fall of Adam." 

Captain of the Ark: 



Ban- 



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"Do you think that you 
could learn to love me, 
my little Dove?" 

Dove: "Well, Noah 

don't." 

• 

Alan Fjeld: "W h y 
was it that t h e whole 
home economics depart- 
ment went to the Theta 
Alpha Phi play last 
night?" 

Glenn Webb: "They 
wanted to see what Ro- 
meo and Juliet." 



"My boy friend said 
that he was going to bring 
me a big gift, and I jusi 
threw my arms around 
him and kissed iiim." 

"Well, Ihal ought to 

liiild hini lor ihe present." 

— College Life. 



Bhisl t h e s e returned 
missionaries who h a \ c 
been on lorcign missions. 
Nothing is so irrilalitig as 
lo have your room mate 
awaken you in ihc nn'ddle 
of the nighl by talking 
out loud, and then talk 
in German so that mhi 
catri understand him. 

[225 1 



BUY YOUR NEXT SUIT AT 
AMERICA'S bIGGEJJ AZAIiJJ 




/ 









BANYAN '31 




MEATS ICE CREAM FRIGIDAIRE EQUIPMENT 

HAXSEIV CA!!$H GROCERY 

297 North First West Provo, Utah 



KNIGHT COAL & ICE COMPANY 

Exclusive Agents 

KNIGHT'S SPRING CANYON COAL 
Provo, Utah 



Phone 1256 




Banyan Editor Wins General 
Announcer Title 

Farrell Collett, Callit, Screamit, Yellit, or 
Hewlett (which ever you want to say), quick 
change artist (changes from had to worse), a 
Bryanist campaigner (he "also ran"). Don 
Juan lover (sometimes pronounced Doan 
Wanna, or Don Twanta), S.O.S., P.D.Q., B.O., 
Fee H.D., and M.O.F., after a period of al- 
most seven months contesting, won a neck and 
tale victory over Leonard Pease, for giving the 
most, dryest, and longest speeches in devotion- 
al before prayer. 

The official title is known as the General 
Announcer, and is conferred by the Federa- 
tion for Longer and Lauder Announcements. 
Points were given by the Federation on the 
basis of dryness, frequency, repitition, empty- 
ness, and duration. Demerits were allowed 
when announcements went under five minutes, or were discontinued before 




being finished. 



There is on record only one demerit. 



J. C. PENNEY CO. 



'QUALITY— ALWAYS AT A SAVING" 



Values That Always Remain the Same 



^«L_ 



(miiiiilliri"''^^*'* 
■ tdimuiu ■•'III 



[ 226 ] 



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->> 



BANYAN '31 



He Who Chooses Glade's Chooses Wisely 

GLADE CANDY CO. 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 



Y 



Mr. Callit made a total of 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 an- 
nouncements compared to 999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999 and % made 
by Leonard Pease. Mr. Pease might have won the contest, but during a pro- 
longed speech, the air in his throat became so dry that he split a tonsil and 
was unable to continue. In this, he was required to forfeit one-fourth of a 
point, and his total dropped far enough that he was disqualified for the 
medal. 

The medal given by the Federation is a beautiful thing about five inches 
in diameter. Although it is synthetic, it is made in such a clever way that 
it appears to be made of genuine wrapping paper. Due to the practice of 
bull-rushing in the announcement speeches the award is made out of the 
stems of "cat tails." 

The purpose of the Federation for Lauder Announcements is to keep 
the time sewed up tight for such a period as will discourage tlie speaker of 
the day from making his speech. It is estimated that Mr. Screamit alone, 
kept three hundred and seventy-five speakers on their seals although several 
of them sat on their ears. 

Mr. Howlet is shown in a general way in the photo on the opposite 
page. The snapshot was taken by Cahuncy Harrass, the staff photograjjher 
and undertaker. (He undertook some impossible shots.) The eilitur wears 
his beard to hide liis embrassassmeiit when he is asked wh) he cant keep 
a girl. It is well known around some circles that, contrary to all tradition 
and Listerine announcements, his best friend TOLD him. 



Where Service Counts 
CONOCO GASOLINE AND MOTOR OILS 

SUPERIOR SERVICE STATION 

CHEVROLET 

PARTS -:- SALES -:- SERVICE 

PROVO, UTAH Fiflli West and Center PHONE 74 



I 227 1 



nom*! 



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BANYAN '31 




./ ^ 

Bennett's 
Pure Paint 
{ and 
Dependable 
I Supplies 




CLASS d( PAINT 
- COMPANY 



PHONE 160 



Save 

the 

Surface 

and 
You Save 



All 









Skarvin Mousine 



Rooster: "What are you doing in lliat Mr, Skarvin Mousine, the captain-elect 

basement?" for the football squad, declares that he 

Disgruntled Hen: "If it's any of your didn't use his influence with the W. W. A. 

business, I'm laying in a supply of coal." to get his office. 



Compliments of 

LEVENS CHAIN STORES, INC. 

Shoes for the Entire Family -:- Men and Boys' Outfits 

PROVO, UTAH 



DIXON REAL ESTATE CO. 




Six Per Cent Money to Loan 




INSURANCE - HOMES - BONDS - LOANS 


- RENTALS 


Telephone 75 236 West Center 


Provo, LUah 



[ 228 ] 



— im"iuii||||||i,''^TS=» 

■ll'iiiuiLui' ■'",!!! 



~~Sf^ <jtf 




BANYAN '31 



PROVO FOUNDRY & MACHINE COMPANY 



T. F\ Pieipont. Pres. and Mgr. 

PROVO, UTAH 



J. U. Buchi. Secretary 



Structural and Heavy Steel Work — Iron and Brass Castings 
Mine Cars — Steel Tanks — General Contract Shop 



OUR NEW HOME AT 159 WEST CENTER STREET 

i* perhaps the finest shop for doing high grade printing to be 
fonnd anywhere. 

You Are Cordially Invited to Visit Us 

imiElW CEf%lTUI€Y PRnWTHMO CO. 

PROVO, UTAH 



SiNA: "Win, W ilkv, you haven't shaved your face tuiiifiht." 



WlLKY: "No, I shaved this morning, and it makes my 
shave twice a day." 

SiN'V: "And it makes my face sore when yuu don't." 

A Washington hureau which em- 
ploys several thousand women finds 
the unmarried ones are the best work- 
ers. Perliaps this is why so many 
men marrv unmarried women. 

—Life. 



face sore to 



JACKSON STUDIO 




Distinct ire Port rait lire 
260 No. Univer^ily A\e, 

Provo, Utah 



Meats and Groceries 


Soward^s Grocery 


A "Y" Supporter 


2.58 East Fifth Norili 


Pkovo. Utah 



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BANYAN '31 




Compliments of the Makers of Most of the High Grade Pins and Medals 

Used at 

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 

Sold and Guaranteed by the STADIUM CO-OP 
Frequently referred to as Students' Supply Association 



Iff m"' VffAT ; 
^ A mHb mm " , 










p. L. Larsen 

Plunibiiig 

Heating 

Sheet Metal 

Works 

343 West Center Street 
PHONE 574 









The Banyan editor was found by a cleverly con- 
cealed camera to have a Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde per- 
sonalitv. The discovery came after staff members be- 
came sus])iri(ius that he had a dual personality. 



THE STUDENTS AND FACULTY 

OF THE B. Y. U. 
should support the Salt Lake & LItah 
Railroad ( Oreni Line ) in arranging 
for excursions. When the athletic 
teams of the "Y" buy transporta- 
tion it can best be secured from the 
Salt Lake & Utah Railroad. Satis- 
factory rates and service guaranteed. 

Support the Road That Supports the 

School and That Helps to Pay 

the Taxes 

SALT LAKE & UTAH 
RAILROAD 

Ship Your Freight via S.L.& U.R.R. 



[230] 



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BANYAN '31 



Business and Professional Page 

Professional 

GEORGE S. BALLIF 

Attorney -at -Lmv 

Suite No. 12, Knight Block 

I. E. Brockbank M. B. Pope 

Law Offices 

BROCKBANK AND POPE 



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Suite No. 10 



Knight Block 



MORGAN AND MORGAN 

Lawyers 

(A. B. Morgan, J. Rulon Morgan) 

Provo Commercial Bank Building 



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[231] 



Business 

CASSITY CRANE MOTOR COMPANY (NASH), PROVO 

M. H. GRAHAM PRINTING COMPANY 

"Y" BARBER SHOP 
Hal Cowley, Manager 

POST PUBLISHING COMPANY 

STARTUP CANDY COMPANY 

HEINDSELMAN OPTICAL & JEWELRY COMPANY 

1 20 West Center 






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BANYAN '31 




CASH TELLS THE STORY AT 

JOHN T. TAYLOR'S GROCERY CO. 

Phones 27 and 28 



THE LITTLE HUNGRY 

Hot Toasted Sandwiches 

Hanibnrgers and Hot Dogs, Ham, Eggs, Cheese and Tnna Fish, Chili 

Coffee, Pies, Soft Drinks, Ice Cream, Confections, Cigars 

Tohacco, Cigarettes 

Besf o/ Counter Service 
Opposite Steel Plant A .W. Edwards Prop. 





Rob Borgason, a prominent "\" rassler was 
found seriously wounded in his room last Satur- 
day when he. after three years of rassling. and 

~lill unable to throw a fit. slint himself wilii a 
swi" from a whiskev flask. 



Carleton Clumbsey. '"\ "" News editor, has 
been discovered by the staff photographer to get 
his articles for editorials from the Children's 
Friend. Carleton at first denied the charge, but 
on seeing his picture with one of the magazines 
in his hand he confessed. 



For Exclusive 

WOMEN'S 
APPAREL 



Shop at 

LEWIS 

LADIES' STORE 
Leo. N. Lewis, Manager 



[ 232 ] 






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BANYAN '31 




GAS 



GAS 

the Aiitoinatic Fuel 

ivith the 
College Ediuation 

Gas is certainly a well-educated fellow — he car- 
ries a Master's Decree. No other fuel can com- 
pare with his intelligence. And has he polisli? 
Tliere's no smoke, soot, dirt, ashes or grime 
ahout him. 

Without a douht, Gas is the most hrij- 
liant of all his class mates. He is a 
clean fuel s t r i p p e <1 of all incum- 
brances — a remarkable fellow. 

Gas is Smoki'li'ss and Stokelcss 

WASATCH GAS COMPANY 



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Haws-Goodman Co. 

HARDWARE AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

PAINT AND WALL PAPER 

Phone 303 ^ Provo, Utah ^ 28 No. University Ave. 



V 



BRIMIIALL BROTHERS 

"Tire Merchants" 

QUALITY TIRE REPAIRING 

223 West Center Provo, Utah Teh-plione 260 



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BANYAN '31 




V. 



Mutual Coal and Lumber Co. 

Provo, Utah 

Building Materials - Coal - Coke 

Agents r. S. Rubber Company's Asphaltir Tile and Riil)ber Tile Floor Coverings 






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