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Full text of "The banyan"

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Brigham Young University 



F R OM-fi^fW 

378.05 
B22 



Call 

Mo._ 



1932 



_No.. 



1175 60 



B.Y.U. 
378.05 
Call No. B22 

1932 
Author B.Y.U. 



Ace. No. 117560 



Title 
Date 



Scaap book 193? 



7, 



\ 



i 






117560 



Brigham Young 
University 

SCRAPBOOK 



1932 




PUBLISHED BY 

Clyde D. Sandgren 
Howard R.Cottam 

PROVO, UTAH 



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Page ( hie 



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( OPYRIGHTED 

1931 

BY 

Clyde I '. Sandgren 
Howard R. Cottam 



printed by 

New Century Printing Co. 

provo, utah 



BOUND BY 

'novo Printing and Binding Co. 

PROVO, UTAH 



Page Tzvo 




Franklin Stewart Harris, Ph.D. 
President of Brigham Young University 



Page Threi 




ffireword 



It is with humility that we pause here to 
acknowledge that great spirit, of Brigham 
Young University which pushes on and on 
to achievement no matter what obstacles 
may block its path. 

The fact that financial conditions make 
it impossible for us to hare a Banyan this 
year has not dampened the desire for some- 
thing to aid us in the future to re-lire in 
memory these many happy days at Brigham 
Young. 

This Scrapbook is the result of such 
spirit on the part of a majority of the 
student body. 

As the rising sun is but the promise of a 
glorious day ahead, so is our University of 
today, rich in attainment, but the assurance 
of a golden future to come. We hare, in 
the pages to follow, pictured a few of the 
activities of this year which probably will 
be interesting to the most students and the 
buildings around which all activity takes 
place: but, just as the gem is ever richer 
than its setting, so these monumental edi- 
fices are but fitting temples for the higher 
and nobler development of character, mind, 
and soul. 

Our efforts zvill have been justified if, 
for the present and the golden years to 
come, tee hare helped you set forth . . . at 
least in spirit . . . the story of the Brigham 
Young University of our time . . . a Univer- 
sity in which greater achievement has but 
kindled the desire for greater progress. 



. 



Page low 




Maeser Memorial 



Page Fit 




MllNTA WeNTZ 

I 'ice President 



^tudent 'Body Officers 




FaKKELL CoLLETT 

President 




How ARD k. COTTAM 

Second Vice President 




Carlton Culmsee 
V News Editor 




Helen Deckek 

Secretary- Historian 

Maxine Clayton 

President of .1. W. S. 




Clyde l>. Sandgren 
Banyan Editor 



Page Six 




Rigbv Jacobs 
Senior Class President 




Mark Brockbank 
Junior Class President 




Chauncy Harris 
Sophomore Class President 



^Activities 




Jay Nelson 
Freshman Class President 




Boyd Nelson 
Dramatic Manager 




I 1- 

- iiir 




Ray Peterson 
Debating Manager 




Robert Sauer 
Director, B. V. U. Band 



Poc/c Seven 




' I V HE years fly by pretty rapidly. The outcome 
of a few athletic contests matters little. It's 
the cumulative and dominant and genuine spirit 
that counts. Brigham Young University's ath- 
letic past is studded with gems; its future is in- 
viting and challenging. And it may l>e faced 
confidently, for the Cougar spirit obviously is 
compounded of vigor, enthusiasm, loyalty and 
courage and is . built on glorious achievement. 



( i. Ottinger Romney 
. Ithletic Coach 





Boyd Rasmussen 

Track Captain 





Keith Wangsgaard 
Football Captain 



Elwood Romney 
Basketball Captain 



Page Eiiiht 



In the Words of the Professors: — 



DEAN OF WOMEN— 

Prospcts never were better for the best social, scholastic 
and spiritual year in our history. The attitude of the students 
has thru a little skimping tended toward a more democratic 
student body. The students are showing a pronounced earnest- 
ness and wholesome seriousness in obtaining everything that 
college life has to offer.— Nettie Neff Smart. 

THE COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCE— 

The College of Applied Science will celebrate its tenth birth- 
day on January 25, 1932. During this period, over 200 men and 
women have undertaken the bachelor's degree, most of whom 
have found places of prominence in their respective fields. This 
year the College can celebrate its ten years of service with the 
satisfaction of continued growth. 

The faculty is strengthened this year by the addition of a 
new member to the staff, Mr. Seth Shaw, to teach horticulture 
during the winter quarter, and the return from leave of ab- 
sence of Miss Vilate Elliott, who went around the world with 
the Floating University. We are looking forward next year to 
the return of Professor Laval S. Morris, head of the department 
of horticulture, who has been at Harvard for the two years 
past.— Dr Lowry Nelson. Dean. 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES— 

In his later years Sir Isaac Newton wrote: "I do not know 
what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have 
been only a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself 
in now and then finding a smoother or prettier shell than ordi- 
nary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered be- 
fore me." 

My wish for the students of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences is that they shall preserve a youthful curiosity in class- 
room, laboratory, library and shop; and that out of the ro- 
mantic search for truth they shall find elements which will 
aid in the successful integration of their personalities. — Dr. 
Carl F. Eyring, Dean. 

THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE— 

Although just entering upon its eleventh year, the College 
of Commerce is second largest in enrollment at Brigham Young 
University. Its growth has been steady and continuous. 

The aim of the College is to instill into the lives of its stu- 
dents high standards of business integrity and to train them 
technically to meet the complex standards of modern commer- 
cial life. A large percentage of its graduates has gone into ad- 
vanced fields of study at Eastern and Western institutions. 
The showing made by its students has been very credible.— 
Herald R. Clark. Acting Dean. 

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION— 

Brigham Young University is known far and near as the 
great training center for teachers in the inter -mountain West. 
The responsibility for this work centers in the College of Edu- 
cation. Its faculty administers all the professional work offered 
to qualify for teaching service. 

The training received in this college qualifies for various 
types of educational work, as teaching on the elementary, Junior 
and Senior high school levels, supervision and administration. 
Since prospective high school teachers must qualify in the 
subject matter in the various lines, it is obvious that students 
may major in any of the departments of the University. But 
no matter what the major line, in the training schools of this 
college they receive their practical teaching and from this col- 
lege they are recommended for and obtain placement in the 
teaching service. The College of Education has become one of 
the leading professional schools of the University. — Dr. Amos N. 
Merrill, Dean. 

THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS— 

The College of Fine Arts is carrvine on as well as it possi- 
bly can, considering the handicap of Dean de Jong's absence. 
He is at Stanford University enjoying a year of graduate study, 
far removed from the manv cares of his office in the College 
Building. 

The morale of the College was never better In the various 
departments of instruction, art, music and dramatic art, the 
number and spirit of the students was never better. The repu- 
tation of the "V" as a center of art is growing from year to 
year. — Dr. Lowrv Nelson, Acting Dean. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL— 

Some 260 graduate courses are offered— manv more than 

last year, with better library and laboratory facilities and a 

more scholarly faculty than ever before. — Dr. Christen Jensen, 
Dean. 



SUMMER SESSION— 

The Summer Session of the Brigham Young University rep- 
resents a full quarter. Because of the type of student body it 
is one continuous social and intellectual feast. The efficient 
home faculty is always supplemented and enriched by visiting 
professors. 

The lecture course on world problems proves always^ to be 
instructive and entertaining. Every department of the Univer- 
sity is represented with a fine offering of courses. Special at- 
tention is given to the preparation of a rich curriculum for 
graduate students. 

The Summer quarter is a time for meeting friends and ac- 
quaintances of other years. Nothing is left undone to make it 
both instructive and pleasant. The second term at Aspen Grove 
behind Mt. Timpanogos has become a symbol of a perfect Al- 
pine vacation. 

The administration welcomes all who desire a pleasant and 
profitable summer to attend. — Dr. Hugh M. Woodward. Dean. 

Religion up to date and enduring consists in helping God to 
build human character. — Dr. George H. Brimhall. 

A crooked road is always longer than a straight one. — W. H. 
Boyle. 

Meeting each day's obligations with courage and fortitude 
leads to happiness.— Emma Brown. 

Chas. W. Eliot said "there is in each of us a spirit dull or 
bright, pure or foul, petty or grand, that looks out of the eyes, 
sounds in the voice, and appears in the manners of each of us: 
it is our personality." — C. S. Boyle. 

"Home is a domestic sanctuary — 
Wrought out of desire— 
Built into memory — 
Where kindred bonds unite the family 
In sharing labors. 
Leisure, 
Joy and Sorrow." 

— FLUENE WILLIAMS 

— Elizabeth Cannon. 

"There is another way to do it that vou haven't vet tried." 
— Benjamin F. Cummings. 

A book becomes a masterpiece in so far as it has the fine 
art qualities of creative expression written in and illuminated 
with a sort of home-made finishing touch of individuality. — E. H. 
Eastmond. 

"Live to learn, and learn to live 
If you want to give men knowledge, 
Y'ou must get it, ere you give." 

—Vilate Elliott. 

There is no cash better than good credifs"; if you will al- 
ways keep one or the other you will never be broke. — John E. 
Hayes. 

Few experiences develop industry, power and self-reliance 
like the successful mastery of a difficult problem.— Wayne B 
Hales. 

"The rock pages of Nature's History Book unfolds many 
beautiful romances of the past." — George H. Hansen. 

"And from here we would start, where she pledged me her 
heart, on the trail, on the trail of the 'Y'."— William F. Hanson. 

Life's iournev would be limited and troublesome if there 
were no service stations on the highways. — E. H. Holt. 

The wisdom of age in vouth gives the energy of youth in 
age. — J. M. Jensen. 

"It's good to have money and the things that money can 
buy, but it's good, too, to check up once in a while and make 
sure you haven't lost the things that money can't buy."— 
Wilma Jeppson. 

The pictures throughout the school buildings and the work 
in the art classes are primarily for the purpose of increasing 
the joy of living, stimulating a love for beauty in nature, and 
creating a desire for the finer and more worthy products of 
man. — Bent F. La r sen. 



Page Nine 



In the Words of the Professors:— 



(Continued ) 



In giving do we get the most ; in mourning do we love the 
most; in working do we rest the most*.— A. C Lambert. 

hi years to come this book of accumulated experiences in 
picture and in story will provide a wonderful opportunity for a 
"check up" on what one's ideas and ambitions once were.— 
Thomas L. Martin. 

A well-balanced and practical education includes a knowl- 
edge and appreciation of the Fine Arts.- Franklin Mad sen. 

It is gratifying to find, as one travels about, our Brigham 
Voung University .--Indents doing such excellent work. -Florence 
Jepperson Madsen. 

If I were to give advice to students, it would be, "under- 
stand the calculus, then start your education."- Milton Mar- 
shall. 

Giving assails the citadel of human selfishness, the energy 
lit spiritual growth.- Chas. E. Maw. 

K ven u it bout the accustomed record may our friendships 
and ioy.ul memories continue to live.— Elmer Miller. 

In tins fascinating play called "'life", whether on the stage 
or off, play your parts with that sincerity, exuberance of spirit 
and flare, with carries courage, iov and the love oi living into 
the hearts of men.- Alonzo Morley. 

Life holds but few satisfactions that equals the iov of suc- 
cessful self-directed work.— Mary J. ("Morton. 

Fact and fancy should unite 
In defense of truth and right. 

— Alfred Osmond. 

Your character is revealed by your voice, your intelligence 
by your vocabulary.- T. Karl Pardoe. 



It is our privilege to work with the children — 
"To wdiom is given 
So much oi earth 
So much of heaven." 

— Hermese Peterson. 

May you have many happy memories of this wonderful yeai 
at Brigham Voung University. — M. W'ilford Poulson. 

To appreciate the best that has been thought and felt has 
always been one of the objectives of literature.- Alice Louise: 
Reynolds. 

The growing attitude at the L'niversity toward better music 
is encouraging. — LeRoy J, Robertson. 

I find that some people waste most of their time when they 
are busiest.— Robert Sauer. 

The Y Scrapbook is another evidence that 1931-32 offers the 
best education for the least money in the memory of man — let's 
increase our capital in education at these bargain prices.— 
Kiefer B. Sauls. 

A trained mind plus a trained hand makes for a fuller life. 
— W. H. Snell. 

History broadens one's sympathies and increases one's ap- 
preciation of one's heritage from the past.— William J. Snow. 

The main aim of the zoological work at B. Y. U. is to lead 
the students into an acquaintance with the fauna of this region 
and establish in them an abiding love for nature.— Vasco M. 
Tanner. 

Homes of the future will be judged not by houses and fur- 
nishings but by the quality of the individuals it sends forth to 
meet the problems of life.— Effie Warnick. 




6 



Page Ten 




^Autumn Quarter 



ATHLETICS : 

Football, (Varsity and Frosh) 
Baseball, (Intramural) 
Tennis, (Intramural) 

DRAMA: 

Departmental Play 
Senior Play 
High School Play 
Mask Club One-Act Plays 

DEBATING— PUBLIC SPEAKIXG: 

Irvine Oratorical Contest 



MUSIC: 



Band 
Orchestra 
Glee Clubs 



SOCIAL 



Handshake 
Hallowe'en Ball 
Homecoming Dance 
Loan Fund Ball 
Frosh Ball 
Christmas Carnival 
Class Parties 



OTHER ACTIVITIES: 



Page Eleven 



Senior Class 




Alleman, Helan 
Allen. Melba Kate 
Anderson, Laurence 
Anderson, Maud 
Anderson, Reese H. 
Ashby, Mary E. 
Baker, Shirley 
Barker, Ellen 
Barton, Harold 
Bayles, Weston Lyman 

Beardall, Anna 
Benion. Herman N. 
Bennett, Pauline 
Boberg, Lowell 
Braithwaite, Ethylene Potter 
Braithwaite, Lola R. 
Brimhall, Sina 
Brown, Don H. 
Bryner, Lapreal V. 
Bullock, Bert K. 



Call, Gaius D. 
Carson, Velda R. 
Christensen, Maurine 
Clarke. Robert A. 
Cottam, Howard K. 
Clayton, Maxine 
Clinger, Morris M. 
Collett, Farrell Ruben 
Collins, Bessie 
Condon, David de Lancey 



Cowley, Angus Wayne 
Cooper, George N. 
Croshie, Elva Dean 
Crobkston, Elden 

Cullimore, Owen S. 
/j.Culmsee, Carlton 
Dastrup, Elmer J. 
Davis, Owen 
Decker, Lorenzo B. 
Decker. J. Smith 

Deuel, Myrtle 
Dickson, Mildred 
Dotson, Edme M. 
I hirrant, L. Dean 
Eldredge, Willma 
Ellsworth, Helen 
Eyring, Rose 
Fjeld, Allan E. 
Garfield, Zoie 
Garrett, J. Ray 

( iourley, Gertrude 



Gurney, Ferrin 
Haddock, Grove M. 
Hadley, Lloyd 
Halliday. Nina 
Hambline, Clara 
Hanson, Wilma 
Skousen, Marvin 
Smuin, Carma Leora 
Smith. Ervine F. 



Snow, Claude S. 
Spafford, Louise 
Speckart, Frank R. 
Storrs, Bertha 
Strauser, Ethel 
Strickler, Beulah 
Sandgren, Clyde 



D. 



Tanner. Orea Bean 
Toone, Clifford 
Toone, T. Philip 

Tregeagle, Delbert Van 
Wadley, Bryce N. 
Waldram, Marie 
Walker, Loronzo S. 
Washburn, Barr V. 
Watson, Herrick 
Webb, Glenn 
Weight, Bert Howard 
Wells. Claire 
Wentz, Monta 

Westwood, James 
Wheelwright, Annie L. 
Whetten, Lester B. 
Whitaker, Warren S. 
Willardsen, George 
King, Miriam 
Winterton, Zelma E. 
Wittwer, Reed 
Wright, Janus E. 
Wright, Vesta 



Page I ivclve 



^Autumn Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machinery— PROVO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

Page Thirteen 



zAutumn Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machinery— PROVO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 



Page Fourteen 



^Autumn Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machinery— PROVO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

Page Fifteen 



^Autumn Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machinery— PROVO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 



Page Sixteen 



^Autumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 

Page Seventeen 



^Autumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 



Page Eighteen 



Autumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 

Page Nineteen 



^Autumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 



Page Twenty 



^Autumfi Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 

Page Twenty-one 



^Autumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 



/ agi ! wenty-two 



zjfutumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 

Page Twenty-three 



^Autumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that arc different at GESSFORD'S 
Page Twenty-four 



^Autumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 

Paijc Twenty-five 



^Autumn Quarter 



Christmas cards that are different at GESSFORD'S 

Page Twenty-six 



Autumn Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run— McARTHUR'S 

Page Twenty-seven 



^Autumn Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run — McARTHUR'S 
Page Twenty-eight 



117560 

^Autumn Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run — McARTHUR'S 

Page Twenty-nine 



^Autumn Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run — McARTHUR'S 

Page Thirty 



^Autumn Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run — McARTHUR'S 

Page Thirty-one 



^Autumn Quarter 



Xmas cards and gifts are distinctive at UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 



Page Thirty-two 



Autumn Quarter 



Xmas cards and gifts are distinctive at UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY. East Center 

Page Thirty-three 



^Autumn Quarter 



Xmas cards and gifts are distinctive at UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 
Page Thirty-four 



^Autumn Quarter 



Xmas cards and gifts are distinctive at UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 

Page Thirty-five 



^Autumn Quarter 



Xmas cards and gifts are distinctive at UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 
Page Thirty-six 




Winter Quarter 



ATHLETICS: 

Basketball, (Varsity, Intramural) 
Wrestling, (Varsity, Intramural) 



DRAMA: 



Competitive Play 

Theta Alphi Phi Play 

Pep Vodie 

Mary Woolley Reading Contest 



DEBATING— PUBLIC SPEAKING: 

Varsity and Class Debates 

Rotary Club Oratorical Contest 

Chamber of Commerce Contest 

Dixon Extemporaneous Speaking Contest 

MUSIC: 

Band 

Orchestra 
Glee Clubs 

SOCIALS: 

Junior Prom 
Leadership Dances 

< )THER ACTIVITIES: 



Page Thirty-seven 



Campus XJiews 




Upper Campus 
Education Building 



Winter Quarter 



We rent. sell, repair, and buy office machinery- PROYO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

Page Thirty-nine 



\ 



Winter Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machinery— PR< >V< » TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 



Page Forty 



Winter Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machinery— PROVO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

Page Forty-one 



Winter Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machinery— PROVO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 



Page Forty-two 



Winter Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machinery— PROVO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

Page Forty-three 



Winter Quarter 



We rent, sell, repair, and buy office machine y- PRO VO TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 
Page Forty-four 



Winter Quarter 



LEVEN'S, INC., is the place where I buy my clothing and furnishings. 

Page Forty-five 



Winter Quarter 



LEVEN'S, INC., is the place where I buy my clothing and furnishings. 
Page Forty-six 



Winter Quarter 



LEVEN'S, INC., is the place where I buy my clothing and furnishings. 

Puye Forty-sczoi 



Winter Quarter 



LEVEN'S, INC., is the place where I buy my clothing and furnishings. 
Page Forty-eight 



Winter Quarter 



LEVEN'S, INC., is the place where I buy my clothing and furnishings. 

Page Forty-nine 



Winter Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(On the way to University Hill) 



Page Fifty 



Winter Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(On the way to University Hill) 



Page Fifty-one 



Winter Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(On the way to University Hill) 



Page Fifty-two 



Winter Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(On the way to University Hill) 



Page Fifty-three 



Winter Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(On the way to University Hill) 



Page Fifty-four 



Winter Quarter 



The best lunch in town for 25c— THE BANYAN 

Page Fifty-five 



Winter Quarter 



The best lunch in town for 25c— THE BANYAN 
Page Fifty-six 



If inter Quarter 



The best lunch in town for 25c— THE BAXYAX 

Page Fifty-seven 



If inter Quarter 



The best hmch in town for 25c— THE BANYAN" 

- 



Winter Quarter 



Hal Cowley's Y Barber Shop 

Page Fij:_ 



Winter Quarter 



Have you seen that new line of Ladies' shoes and hosiery at LK\ EN'S, INC.? 



Sixty 



Winter Quarter 



Have you seen that new line of Ladies' shoes and hosiery at LEYEN'S, INC.? 

Page Sixty-one 



Winter Quarter 



Have vou seen that new line of Ladies' shoes and hosiery at LEVEN'S, INC.? 



Page Sixl} 



Winter Quarter 



Have you seen that new line of Ladies' shoes and hosiery at LEVEN'S, INC. ? 

Page Sixty-three 



Winter Quarter 



Have you seen that new line of Ladies' shoes and hosiery at LEVEN'S, INC.? 
Page Sixty-four 




Spring Quarter 



ATHLETICS: 

Track, (Varsity, Invitational, Intramural) 
Tennis, (Varsity, Intramural) 

DRAMA: 

Girls' Day Play 

Alpha Kappa Psi All Boys Show 

A. W. S. Musical Comedy 

DEBATING— PUBLIC SPEAKING : 

Varsity Debates 

Oscar B. Young Essay Contest 

MUSIC: 

Band 
Orchestra 
Glee Clubs 



SOCIAL: 

Commencement Dance 
Girls' Day Dance 

OTHER ACTIVITIES: 



/></!• Sixty-fivt 



Spring Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(()ii the way in University Hill) 



fane Sixty-six 



Spring Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(On the way to University Hill I 



Paac Sixty-seven 



Spring Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

( On the war to University Hill | 



Page Sir/y-i ighi 



Spring Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(On the way to University Hill) 



Page Sixty-nine 



Spring Quarter 



For fairness in quality and price I trade at STADIUM LUNCH AND GROCERY 

(On the way to University Hill) 



Page Seventy 



Spring Quarter 



Of course, I take my clothes to MADSEN'S to be cleaned. 

Page Seventy-one 



Spring Quarter 



Of course, I take my clothes to MADSEN'S to be cleaned. 

Seventy -tW9 



Spring Quarter 



Of course, I take my clothes to MADSEN'S to be cleaned. 

Page Seventy-three 



Spring Quarter 



Of course, I take my clothes to MADSEN'S to be cleaned. 

Page Seventy-four 



Spring Quarter 



Of course, I take my clothes to MADSEN'S to be cleaned. 

Page Seventy-five 



Spring Quarter 



The best lunch in town for 25c— THE BANYAN 



Page Seventy-six 



Spring Quarter 



The best lunch in town for 25c— THE BANYAN 



Page Seventy-seven 



Spring Quarter 



The best lunch in town for 25c— THE BANYAN 
Page Scrcnly-cight 



Spring Quarter 



Hal Cowley's "V Barber Shop 

Page Seventy-nine 



Spring Quarter 



I'm going to have my Graduation Portraits made at JACKSON STUDIO 



Page Eighty 



Spring Quarter 



I'm going to have my Graduation Portraits made at JACKSON STUDIO 

Page Eighty-one 



Spring Quarter 



I'm going to have my Graduation Portraits made at JACKSON STUDIO 
Page Eighty-two 



Spring Quarter 



Parker and Sheaffer Pens and Pencils— UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 

Page Eighty-three 



Spring Quarter 



Parker and Sheaffer Pens and Pencils— UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 



Page Eighty-four 



Spring Quarter 



Parker and Sheaffer Pens and Pencils— UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 

Page Eighty-five 



Spring Quarter 



Parker and Scheaffer Pens and Pencil*— UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 



Page Eighty-six 



Spring Quarter 



Parker and Scheaffer Pens and Pencils— UTAH OFFICE SUPPLY, East Center 

Page Eighty-seven 



Spring Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long nut— McARTHUR'S 



Page Eight ■ 



Spring Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run — MgARTHUR'S 

Page h\ 



Spring Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run— McARTHUR'S 
Pegs Ninety 



Spring Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run— McARTHUR'S 

Page Ninety-one 



Spring Quarter 



Kuppenheimer Good Clothes are the cheapest in the long run— McARTHUR'S 
Page Sinetx-tuo 




Stadium and Mt. Timpasogos 



"One sou! there is that knows me as I am, 
Reads each pretense, sees through each little sham. 
Goads me with scorning lip, with laughter 
And dogs me night and day — ' My Better I! ' 



Friends O" Mine 



\~ mcty-threc 



^Autographs 



Pacie Ninety-four 



Autographs 



I 'agi \ inety-five 



Autographs 



Page A inetv-sLt 



24