(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The banyan"

■3£E3H 




XNI&4 







I 



THE 




w 



HEREIN ARE SHOWN THE WORK AND PLAY 
OF STUDENTS AND FACULTY AT THE 

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 

PROVO - - - UTAH 
THIS BOOK HAVING BEEN COMPILED BY THE 
1934 BANYAN STAFF OF WHICH RALPH W. JENSON 
AND OTTO DONE WERE ASSOCIATED EDITORS. 



■®^*m 


BOOK 1 ADMINISTRATION 


BOOK 5 ORGANIZATIONS 




•• ^M-^h^i •" ! Efci *.T***- *^r""_wC^^^y^ 



TO NO SINGLE PERSONALITY, ACTIVITY, OR 
IDEAL IS THIS BOOK DEDICATED; BUT RATHER. 
IT IS A PORTRAYAL OF THE ACTIVITIES OF 
THE FACULTY AND STUDENTS OF NINETEEN 
THIRTY -FOUR, PRESENTED IN THE HOPE 
THAT THROUGH THE RECORD OF THESE 
PAGES ONE MAY FIND THAT WHICH WILL 
KEEP ALIVE MEMORIES OF THIS SCHOOL YEAR. 







BODK I 



PRESIDENT, COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION, 
REGISTRAR, TREASURER, PURCHASING AGENT, 
DEANS. CUSTODIANS OF BUILDINGS - ALL OF 
THESE REPRESENT THOSE IMPORTANT 
FORCES WHICH SET THE MECHANISM OF 
SCHOOL ACTIVITY INTO MOTION IN THE AU- 
TUMN AND KEEP IT RUNNING SMOOTHLY 
AND QUIETLY UNTIL SUMMER SESSION ENDS. 




■ 



COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION 

PRESIDENT 

PRESIDENT'S AIDES 

DEANS 

DEPARTMENTS 

SNAPSHOTS 



swa: 



% 




Commissioner of Education 



Commissioner's Message 



The exploration of the world's store- 
house of knowledge, to become acquainted 
with the vast intellectual gains of the ages, 
remains the most interesting and exciting 
adventure of youth. To make knowledge 
provide for man's normal needs, to dis- 
cover new ways of promoting man's com- 
fort and power, becomes an adventure even 
more exciting, more definite in its objective, 
more permanent in its appeal, than the 
noble quest of knowledge. 

The increase of human joy is the pur- 
pose of schools. In the Brigham Young 
University that noble objective is the test 
of achievement. The institution, accepting 
the principles of eternal truth known as 
the Gospel of Jesus Christ, seeks to per- 
fect human character and to make men 
more capable of using wisely, in harmony 
with God's eternal plan, the gifts of the 
ages, whether of pure or applied knowl- 
edge. The Banyan, and all that pertain to 
the Brigham Young University, derive 
their living fire from the adherence to the 
Gospel, restored by the Prophet Joseph 
Smith. 

JOHN A. WIDTSOE. 



Unc 



•ota; 



President Franklin S. Harris 




^President's Message 

To the Readers of the Banyan: 

This book is sent out by the Banyan staff 
in the hope that it will bring satisfaction and 
happiness to hundreds of those who have 
been privileged to attend Brigham Young 
University. 

As we look over the book in years to 
come and see the pictures of faculty members 
and students with whom we have not been 
privileged to associate during the intervening 
years. I am sure that our hearts will be 
thrilled by memories which these pictures 
will recall. 

The Banyan is more than just a picture 
book. It conveys something of the democratic 
spirit of this great university. It reminds us 
of work and of nonsense, of class room and 
social function, and out of all of these we 
have the memory of what college life has 
meant to us. 

May this Banyan take its place along 
with its worthy predecessors in carrying over 
to the present student body the spirit of the 
"Y.'-F. S. HARRIS. 



Two 






President's Aides 



4Br 




Kiefer B. Sauls 

Purchasing Agent 
Secretary to the President 



John E. Hayes 

Registrar 



E. H. Holt 

Treasurer 



B. T. Higgs 

Custodian 



PURCHASING AGENT 

Kiefer Sauls fills a position of three-fold responsibility. 
As Secretary to the President he oversees office routine and 
assists with various details of administration; as purchasing 
agent he secures for the institution supplies and equipment; 
and as manager of the stenographic bureau he has charge 
of clerical equipment and service. 

REGISTRAR 

The Registrar's office under the management of J. E. 
Hayes is Alpha and Omega in connection with the career 
of the university student, since it is the place of first con- 
tact on registering in the institution, and the last place of 
concern when securing credits for graduation. Registrar 
Hayes' motto is, "make the students feel at home so they'll 
want no other." 

TREASURER 

This is the thirty-fifth year of service to the Brigham 
Young University for Treasurer E. H. Holt. In this capacity 
he has been responsible for handling the funds of the school 
and for the details of administration connected with his de- 
partment. Besides his regular duties he has been Professor 
in the School of Commerce, and acted as administrator dur- 
ing President Harris' absence. 

CUSTODIAN 

Since 1896, B. T. Higgs .has been Custodian of the in- 
stitution. He has supervision over janitorial services, up- 
keep, improvements, and repairs of the grounds and build- 
ings. Mr. Higgs not only aids students in securing employ- 
ment, but also inspires them wtih his educational plan of 
instruction in character training which runs parallel with their 
work. 



Three 



;*w-\: 




Dean Nettie Neff Smart 



DEAN OF WOMEN 



It was primarily as an advisory factor that the office of 
the Dean of Women was created and has been continued. 
It has been the desire of Mrs. Smart to have the confidence 
of the girls in order to be able to advise them concerning 
problems that inevitably arise in university life — to be a de- 
pendable friend and confident rather than a critic and dis- 
ciplinarian. 

—Dean Nettie Neff Smart. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

"Nature has put a bit of all of herself into the most 
humble creature. " Thus, as you achieve a fullness of life 
you — your sound and agile body, your trained and creative 
mind, your matured and balanced emotions — are indeed a 
glorious expression of nature at her best. It is the aim of the 
Arts and Sciences to stimulate and aid this achievement. 

— Dean Carl F. Eyring. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

The College of Education is preparatory to all phases 
of school work. Positive emphasis is laid upon the problem 
of school administration, the organization of educational fa- 
cilities, and actual classroom work. Practical experience in 
teaching is provided through the Brigham Young Training 
school which is used as a laboratory for instruction in the 
Education Department. 

— Dean A. N. Merrill. 



COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 

The L.D.S. principle of lay leadership places upon the 
College of Applied Science a religious responsibility. To 
exercise their leadership most effectively, community leaders 
in social and religious affairs must be able to establish them- 
selves on a firm economic basis. To do this, they must be 
well trained in the trades and vocations characteristic of 
community life in this region. 

— Dean Lowry Nelson. 



Four 



;my.\; 



Dea 



eans 




Dean Gerrit de Jong, Jr. 



Dean Herald R. Clark Dean H. M. Woodward Dean Christen Jensen 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

The very existence of the College of Fine Arts is indica- 
tive of the encouragement given by the Brigham Young Uni- 
verstiy to all those whose inclinations lead them into several 
fields of fine art. In each department a well prepared fac- 
ulty aids the unusually large number of fine art students in 
their efforts to acquire professional skill with their general 
education. 

— Dean Gerrit de Jong, Jr. 

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

In the College of Commerce men and women of char- 
acter and ability receive training for positions in business 
leadership. Although emphasis of the fundamentals of com- 
merce is paramount, and considerable attention is given spe- 
cialized subjects in this field, the needs for cultural devel- 
opment of the student are recognized and provided for. 

— Dean Herald R. Clark. 



DEAN OF SUMMER SCHOOL 

The summer quarter at the Brigham Young University, 
especially the Alpine term, has achieved fame throughout the 
intermountain states. Post graduate courses are pursued 
under the most favorable conditions. Intensive study in all 
of the colleges is afforded, and faculty and student body 
enjoy a social, intellectual and spiritual feast. 

—Dean H. M. Woodward. 



DEAN OF GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The University confers the degree of Master of Arts 
and Master of Science through its Graduate School which 
was established in 1928. This school is administered with 
the view of encouraging research problems in all branches 
of knowledge, training investigators in the methods and tools 
of research, and stimulating the development of scholastic 
attainment. 

i — Dean Christen Jensen. 



Five 



;!WA: 



departments 



EXTENSION DIVISION 

The Extension Division sends out programs consisting 
of lectures, musicals, and similar instruction and entertainment 
which annually reaches an audience of about a quarter of a 
million people in the inter-mountain region. The most sig- 
nificant factor in the recent growth of this department is the 
development of the new Bureau of Visual Instruction, under 
Secretary F. Wilcken Fox. Professor Ellsworth C. Dent 
was brought from the University of Kansas by Dr. Lowry 
Nelson to serve as special consultant for several months last 
winter. Under the care of Dr. Nelson, Professor Dent, and 
Mr. Fox, the bureau has grown rapidly. The 13th Annual 
Leadership Week reached new heights with seventy stakes 
represented. Home study work has expanded considerably 
since the first of the year. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

The Department records for the year tell the story of 
the safeguard placed on the student body's health by the 
medical department. Six hundred and twenty-five complete 
physical examinations were given, two thousand three hun- 
dred office consultations held, nine hundred minor wounds 
were dressed and simple treatments given, three hundred 
fifty students were vaccinated for smallpox, sixty-nine were 
innoculated for diphtheria, ninety-seven received "cold" 
serum, and seventeen received other specific innoculations. 
At present the personnel of the department is as follows: 
Dr. L. L. Cullimore. Dr. L. W. Oaks. Dr. H. G. Merrill, 
and Mrs. Rhoda J. Young, R.N. Dr. G. P. Wiseman, foot 
specialist, and other members of the medical profession of 
Provo have voluntarily donated their services when called 
upon. 



Six 



.£W-\1 



Callers for President Harris. 

Pay as you enter. 

President and Mrs. Harris at Logan. 

Governor Henry H. Blood. 

Apostle John A. Widtsoe. 

Apostle and Mrs. Melvin J. Ballard and 
President Harris. 

Apostle and Mrs. Callis and family. 

Extension Division office force. 



■^aSHSB*- wm« 




* 


■ • * U B 


J 




r 




W3 J^M 




Seven 








^ 9^^ 1*1 

NB 


1* 

11 11 


r- 


11*1 




i 









DOCTORS. PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SORS, INSTRUCTORS - OUR IMPRESSIONS OF 
THEM ARE USUALLY MEASURED IN TERMS OF 
EASY OR HARD COURSES, CLASS-ROOM PER- 
SONALITY, BLUE-BOOKS AND GRADES. HOW- 
EVER, THERE WILL ALWAYS BE SOME OF 
THEM WHO WILL BE REMEMBERED AS TEACH- 
ERS AND NOT MERELY FACULTY MEMBERS. 




FACUOY 



II 






FACULTY 
SNAPSHOTS 



;s&iraa 



This year has brought several changes in 
the personnel of the Brigham Young Univer- 
sity faculty. 

The sudden death of Mary }. Ollerton, 
supervisor of the training school grades, bereft 
the university of a beloved personality and 
teacher. Miss Etta Scorup left the Home 
Economics department to accept a position 
with the state department. The following have 
been added to the faculty: Joseph K. Nich- 
oles, Russell Swenson, and Irene }. Barlow. 

Faculty members who returned this year 
after absences of a year or more are: LeRoy 
J. Robertson, Laval S. Morris, Alice L. Rey- 
nolds, A. Rex Johnson, and Ed. M. Rowe. 

Members of the faculty on sabbatical 
leave this year include: A. C. Lambert, Ella 
L. Brown, J. M. Jensen, J. Knight Allen, 
Bertha Roberts, and Billie Hollingshead. 



Faculty 



G. Ott Romney, M. A. 

Professor of Physical Education and Director of Athletics 

Nettie Neff Smart, B. A. 
Dean of Women 

Carl F. Eyring, Ph. D. 

Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

Dean of College of Arts and Sciences 



Edna Snow, M. S. 
Instructor in Science 

C. Lynn Hayward, M. S. 
Instructor in Botany 

Florence Jepperson Madsen, Mus. D. 
Professor of Music 



Edgar M. Jenson, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Educational Administration 

Director of Training School 

Thelma Ludlow, B. A. 

Instructor in the Elementary Training School 

L. Weston Oaks, M. D. 
Associate Medical Director 




Nine 



Faculty 



*w\: 




Keifer B. Sauls, B. S. 

Secretary to the President, Purchasing Agent 

Oa Lloyd 

Instructor in Office Practice 

Lester B. Whetten, M. A. 
Assistant in Spanish 



Herald R. Clark, M. B. A. 
Professor of Finance and Banking 
Acting Dean of the College of Commerce 

Effie Warnick, B. S. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics 

William F. Hansen 
Assistant Professor of Music 



Edward H. Holt. B. Pd. 

Professor of Office Practicc.Secrctary of Faculty 

Stella P. Rich, B. S. 
Instructor in English 

Christen Jensen, Ph. D. 

Professor of History and Political Science 

Dean of Graduate School 



Gerrit deJong, Jr., Ph. D. 
Professor of Modern Languages 
Dean of College of Fine Arts 

Margaret Summerhays 
Instructor in Music 

Charles J. Hart, M. A. 

Assistant Professor in Physical Education and 
Athletics 



Hugh M. Woodward. Ph. D. 
Professor of Philosophy of Education 
Dean of Summer Session 

Georgia Maeser, B. S. 

Instructor in Elementary Training School 

Karl E. Young, B. S. 
Assistant Professor of English 



John E. Hayes, B. S. 
Registrar 

Lowry Nelson, Ph. D. 
Professor of Rural Social Economdcs 
Dean College of Applied Science 
Director of Extension Division 

Joseph Sudweeks, Ph. D. 
Associate Professor of Educational Administration 



Fred Dixon. B. S. 

Instructor in Physical Education and Athletics 

John H. Wing, B. S. 
Assistant in Chemistry 

Amos N. Merrill, Ph. D. 
Professor of Secondary Education 
Acting Dean of College of Education 



Ten 



I 




Faculty 



J. Marinus Jensen, M. A. 
Associate Professor of English 

Wilma Jeppson, M. S. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Sidney B. Sperry, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Religious Education 



Bertrand F. Harrison, M. S. 
Instructor in Botany 

Rhoda J. Young, R. N„ A. B. 
School Nurse 

John C. Swenson, M. A. 

Professor of Economics and Sociologu 



Carlton Culmsee, B. S. 

Instructor in Journalism and Secretary Extension Division 

Elsie C. Carroll, M. S. 
Instructor in English 

Percival P. Bigelow 
Instructor in Auto Mechanics 



Alonzo J. Morley, M. A. 
Assistant Professor Speech 

Ella Larsen Brown 
Assistant Librarian 



Joseph K. Nicholes, M. A. 
Assistant Professor of Chemist.-y 



M. Wilford Poulson, M. A. 
Professor of Psychology 

Barbara Maughn, B. S. 

Instructor in Elementary Training School 

Elmer Nelson 
Instructor in Piano 



William H. Boyle, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 

Anna Ollorton, A. B. 
Librarian 

A. Rex Johnson, M. A. 
Assistant Professor of Economics 



William J. Snow, Ph. D. 
Professor of History 

Margaret Swensen, B. S. 
Instructor in Home Economics 

Seth T. Shaw, M. A. 
Instructor in Horticulture 




Eleven 



Faculty 



;EtK01 




C. La voir Jensen 
Instructor in Mathematics 

May Billings 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Clarence S. Boyle , M. S. 

Associate Professor of Accounting and Business 
Administration 



Benjamin F. Cummings, A. B. 

Professor of Modern and Classical Languages 

Mary C. Hammond 

Instructor in Elementary Training School 

Russell Swenson, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Religious Education 



W. Elmo Coffman. M. S. 
Instructor in Science 

Gladys Kotter, B. S. 

Instructor in Elementary Training School 



Thomas L. Martin, Ph. D. 
Professor of Agronomy 



Harold Colvin, A. B. 
Assistant in Chemistry 

Gladys D. Black, M. A. 
Instructor in English 

Alfred Osmond, M. A. 
Professor of English, Emeritus 



Milton Marshall, Ph. D. 
Professor of Physics 

Annie L. Gillespie 
Library Cataloguer 

Bent F. Larsen, M. A. 
Professor of Art 



Robert Sauer 

Associate Professor of Music 

Effie Warnick. B. S. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics 

Wayne B. Hales, Ph. D. 
Associate Professor of Physics and Mathematics 



Hugh W. Peterson. M. A. 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Vilate Elliott, B. Pd. 
Professor of Home Economics 

Alva Johansen, A. B. 
Assistant in Chemistry 



Twelve 



m'AT 



Faculty 



Elmer Miller, A. B. 
Professor of Economics 

Anna Egbert, B. S. 
Instructor of English 



Guy C. Wilson, B. Pd. 
Professor of Religious Education 



Parley A. Christensen. Ph. D. 
Professor of English 

Irene S. Barlow, B. S. 
Instructor in Foods and Nutrition 

Elbert H. Eastmond, B. Pd. 
Professor of Art 



LeRoy J. Robertson, M. A. 
Professor of Music 

Alice L. Reynolds, A. B. 
Professor of English Literature 

Lloyd L. Cullimore, M. D. 
Medical Director 



Vasco M. Tanner, Ph. D. 

Professor of Zoology and Entomology 

Hermese Peterson, B. S. 

Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 

Harrison R. Merrill, M. S. 
Professor of Journalism 



Gustave Buggert 
Instructor in Music 

Beulah Strickler, B. S. 
Instructor in Office Practice 

T. Earl Pardoe, M. A. 
Professor of Speech 



George H. Hansen, Ph. D. 
Professor of Geology and Geography 

Jennie Campbell, B. S. 

Instructor in Elementary Training School 

Franklin Madsen, Ph. D. 
Professor of Music 



Charles E. Maw, Ph. D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Aline C. Smith, B. S. 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

Laval S. Morris, M. S. 

Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture 




Thirteen 



*W\1 




Jan Cherniavsky, concert pian- 
ist. 

Bruno Roselli, lecturer on Inter- 
national Peace. 

Philippine quartette. 

Captain "Gypsy Pat" Smith, 
evangelist. 

Charles B. Hutchings, Natural- 
ist. 

K. M. Manookin, Music Appre- 
ciation Lecturer. 



Fourteen 



i!W^ 



Faculty members at the A. C- 
Y game at Logan. 

The faculty must have their 
fun. 

J. W. Sauls, associate Super- 
intendent of Buildings and 
Campus. 

Ellsworth C. Dent, visiting pro- 
fessor of Visual Education. 

Say ah-h-h — ■. 




Fifteen 







ANY AMBITIOUS Y STUDENT CAN KEEP BUSY. 
IF HE IS NOT TALENTED IN MUSIC OR DRAMA. 
HE CAN WORK; FOR WE HAVE A STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT, EDITORS, MANAGERS, CHAIR- 
MEN, AND NUMEROUS AND VARIED OTHER 
OFFICIALS, ELECTIVE AND OTHERWISE, WHO 
ENTERTAIN US OR GIVE US A JOB THAT WILL 
WITHHOLD US FROM ACADEMIC HONORS. 



msmm 





STUDENT OFFICERS 

A. W. S. 

PUBLIC SERVICE 

BANYAN 

Y NEWS 

DANCES 

DANCING 

DRAMATICS 

MUSIC 

FORENSICS 

ART 

RALLIES 

PEP VODIE 

SNAPSHOTS 



JLWAL 1 



Student Officers 




Meredith Wilson 
President 



Helen Cook 
Vice-President 



Leona Gibbons 
Secretary and Historian 



u 



: ? 




Student Government at B.Y.U. during 1933-34 has fea- 
tured a "new deal" in the organization of student activities 
generally. 

With O. Meredith Wilson as steersman, the council 
views with satisfaction the spirit of unanimity which its mem- 
bers have exhibited in all decisions rendered in the interests 
of A. S. B.Y.U. Met's geniality and understanding of human 
nature have won him a respected place in B.Y.U.'s hall of 
fame; but without the aid given by Helen Cook and Edith 
Young, the service would have been but partially consum- 
mated. 

Leona Gibbons, secretary-historian, has also brought an 
unusual talent to their aid and deserves commendation for 
her efficient work and loyalty. 

Other members of the council are: Otto Done, man- 
aging editor of Banyan; William C. Carr, editor of Y News; 
James McGuire, rally chairman; and class presidents: Wil- 
liam P. Martin, senior; Oakley Evans, junior; Vee Call and 
Tom Eastmond, sophomore; and Webster Decker, freshman. 
Each of these has given a cooperation without which the 
accomplishment of council enterprises undertaken would 
hardly have been possible. 

Notable among the achievements of the 1933-34 coun- 
cil are: the evident interest in and friendliness of the exchange 
programs with sister institutions in the state; the sponsor- 
ing of unique and friendly get-acquainted dances; the organ- 
ization and control of all election machinery; and the pro- 
gram of strict economy which has been followed successfully. 



Seventeen 



£WK 



A. W. S. 




Alison Comish 
President 



Nadine Tavlor 
Vice-President 



Alice Spencer 
Secretary- Treasurer 



Irene Johnston 
Social Chairman 



New innovations characterized the activities of the As- 
sociated Women Students this year. At the beginning of 
the school year, a freshman dance was sponsored to which 
only non-dated frosh men and women were invited. How- 
ever, each freshman fellow had to leave the dance with a 
date, a ruling which was enforced by the sophomore court 
and the White Keys. 

To help girls become acquainted with each other, and 
to prevent homesickness, the senior sponsor system was 
adopted during the fall quarter, culminating in a Christmas 
party for all girls at the end of the term. Several of these 
sponsor groups organized and became affiliated as social 
units. 

Winter quarter ushered in the annual jamboree, admis- 
sion for which was one cent per inch-length of nose. Nearly 
150 girls attended, dressed as families. Prize winners were a 
negro family and a Brigham Young family. 

In April Brigham Young University sent representatives 
to Tucson. Arizona, to attend the convention of the A. W. S. 
organizations of the colleges and universities of the western 
states division. 

Girls' day completed the year's activities with the pre- 
sentation of the play "Holiday'' by Phillip Barry, a tea 
for the girls and their mothers, and the annual Girls' Day 
dance. 

Officers for the year were Alison Comish, president; 
Nadine Taylor, vice-president; Alice Spencer, secretary; and 
Irene Johnston, social director. Mrs. Nettie Neff Smart, dean 
of women, is the adviser. 




Eighteen 



swa: 



Public Service Bureau 




Louise Nielsen 



Claude Snow 



Leland Priday 



Edith Young 
Director 



Eugene Jorgensen 




The Public Service Bureau, as its name implies, is an 
organization which serves school, church and civic organiza- 
tions by providing entertainments to fill their various needs. 

This year, under the direction of Edith Young and her 
staff which includes: Eugene Jorgensen, Claude S. Snow, 
Louise Nielsen, and Leland Priday, the Bureau has sent out 
approximately one hundred programs. Although most of these 
programs have been confined to the church and school or- 
ganizations of Utah County, there have been several enter- 
tainers who have gone as far north as Hyrum and as far 
south as Marysvale. During the winter quarter a group of 
students under the management of Claude Snow spent three 
days touring the towns of southern Utah and gave programs 
in Richfield, Bicknell, and Marysvale. 

The students of the university have responded willingly 
and unselfishly to the requests for programs and have given 
freely of their time and talent. In return they have received 
invaluable experience in their various fields of accomplish- 
ment. The Speech, Music, and Art departments have all 
been contacted for material and have cooperated to the fullest 
extent in making this year a success. 

The Public Service Bureau as an advertising medium is 
invaluable to the Brigham Young University. Through their 
demonstrations of accomplishments, the students make the 
acquaintance of the high school students and pave the way 
for later contacts with the University. It is, therefore, an 
organization of three-fold benefit — to the student, the school, 
and the public. 

Nineteen 



Banyan 



••OTAL 




Dean Van Wagenen Leland Priday 

Edith Young 
Helen Young Phil Hansen 

Ernest Eberhard 
Tom Bullock Tom Eastmond 

Nathan Davis 



Ralph Jenson 
Francis Grimmett 



Erika Seiter 



Once again in the face of financial difficulties, the Ban- 
yan staff under the direction of Ralph Jenson and Otto Done, 
co-editors, have put out a successful yearbook. In addition to 
being larger than last year, the 1934 Banyan is extremely 
colorful and modern. The art work was done by Ralph Jenson 
with his own invented "Art-Mat" process, the use of which 
saved considerable money in the production of the book. 

The untiring efforts of Earl Cottam as sales-manager as- 
sisted by Phil Empey. Helen Young and Erika Seiter assured 
the success of the book early in the year. Advertising has been 
under the capable management of Oakley Evans, aided by 
Dean Van Wagenen. Phil Hansen and Francis Grimmett. 

Photography has been under the direction of Otto Done. 
assisted by Ernest Eberhard, Fred Washburn, Tom Bullock, 
Jack Eastmond, and John Talmage. Edith Young as literary 
editor has had valuable assistance from Margaret Taylor. 
Nathan Davis. Howard Forsyth, and Ruth Biddulph. 

Mounting, typing, and general office work has been taken 
care of by Tom Eastmond. May Louise Mitchell, and Leland 
Priday. 

The staff wishes to express appreciation to Professor 
E. H. Eastmond for his valuable criticism and suggestions in 
the arrangement and art work of the Banyan. 



May Louise Mitchell 

Oakley Evans 

Otto Done 

Margaret Taylor 

Howard Forsyth 

Earl Cottam 

Ralph Jenson and Otto Done 

Associate Editors 

Earl Cottam 

Sales Manager 

Oakley Evans 

Advertising Manager 





Twenty 



;!W-\L 



YNe 



ws 




Milton Nelson Louise Nielsen Bill Carr Alison Comish Nathan Davis 

Jay Nelson Howard Forsyth Ray McGuire Maurice Jones 

Roy Hudson Dean Van Wagenen Cecelia Jensen Dale Jones DarylHuish 

Clara Moore Theron Luke Duane Ballard LaPriel Myers 

Elbert Miller Elfie Hansen Milton Jacobs Sebrina Cropper Ermel J. Morton 



Reese Faucette 



Anthony Woolf 



Ferron Losee 



Gilbert Chatwin 



William C. Carr 
Editor 

Jay Nelson 
Business Manager 




HUM 






This year the Y News has found itself freed of some 
of the problems of yesteryear, but faced still with those which 
have been paramount heretofore, namely, those involving fi- 
nances and staff organization. 

At the end of last spring quarter, editor-elect William 
C. Carr considered eleven applicants for the business man- 
agership. Jay Nelson received the selection and has very 
amply justified the responsibility of handling the business 
affairs of the paper. He has been ably assisted by Elbert 
Miller, Lawrence Brown, and Daryl Huish. 

The staff this year has been a fluctuating one due to the 
stricter competition afforded by the "beat" system in opera- 
tion. The editorial staff composed of William C. Carr, Ray 
McGuire, Maurice A. Jones, F. Howard Forsyth, Louise 
Nielsen, and Nathan Davis, has done much towards making 
the student paper more interesting and readable. 

The present staff has worked consistently well to estab- 
lish a real professional interest in journalistic activity and 
merits the hearty commendation of the editor and associates. 



Twenty-one 




PROM COMMITTEE 



The gushing waterfalls of the Rocky Mountains which 
have thrilled thousands of observers, provided the theme for 
the annual Junior Promenade held March 23. 

Bridal Veil and Upper Falls were realistically produced 
with mechanical devices, and the Shooting Cascade waterfall 
on the trail to Stewart's flat was reproduced with running 
water. 

The setting for the affair was laid in the Wasatch moun- 
tain valley in which was a profusion of brilliant sunflowers, 
vari-hued Indian paint brushes, mariposa lilies, and other 
Rocky Mountain springtime flowers, as well as ferns, rocks 
and mosses. 

The orchestra stand was a moss and fern cave, while 
the stage on the south was transformed into a brilliant cavern 
with flowers protruding through the jagged crevices of the 
rocks. Don V. Tibb's Salt Lake orchestra furnished the music. 

Phil Christensen headed the Prom committee and was 
assisted by Prof. E. H. Eastmond, art advisor; David Mer- 
rill, co-chairman; Don Alder, sales and advertising; Dale 
Jones, purchasing agent; Maurine Romney, refreshments; 
Pearl Taylor, favors; Mary Dahlquist, decorations, and 
Wilma Jeppson, faculty advisor. 



Phil Christensen 
Chairman 




Twenty-two 



■ota: 



Dancing, 




DANCERS 



Aline C. Smith 
Instructor 




Each year the dance department grows in strength and 
power, until now it is one of the most important activities 
of the physical education department. Under the supervision 
of Miss Wilma Jeppson the program for this year was en- 
larged considerably by adding several new classes to the 
curriculum. Aline Coleman Smith is the dancing instructor 
and she has been assisted this year by Floy Hansen. 

The department has furnished dancing numbers for the 
school opera, the Girls' Day activities at the Y and Provo 
High, the Easter sunrise services, and programs and enter- 
tainments throughout the county. 

The outstanding activity of the department is the annual 
Dance Review which was presented May 18, in College 
Hall with over fifty students participating. The theme for 
this year was "Dancing Through the Ages" and the program 
consisted of primitive, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Medieval, 
Renaissance, and Modern dances. 

Each year the activity grows in strength and influence, 
until now it occupies a central position in the school life 
of every woman student of the university. 



Twenty-three 



.ota: 



Dramatics 




"THE TORCHBEARERS"— DEPARTMENT PLAY 



Viewed from the angles of extent and variety of pro- 
gram and student participation, 1933-34 will always be found 
near the top in the annals of successful years in the history 
of dramatics at Brigham Young University. 

Of major importance to the students and to the dramatic 
department was the inclusion of six plays in the student body 
activity program. This action by the administration made 
it possible for students to gain admission to six plays on 
their activity cards, and to purchase reserved seats at a 
reduced price. 

Professor T. Earl Pardoe and Professor Alonzo J. Mor- 
ley head the dramatic personnel. They supervised the gen- 
eral program and directed the plays. Business management 
came under the jurisdiction of dramatic manager Ray Mc- 
Guire and his assistant, Milton Nelson. 

Much of the success of activities on the College Hall 
stage depended on the work of stage manager Ariel Davis, 
with Wilmont Berry supervising the lighting and Reed Bid- 
dulph supervising the painting of all scenery. 

The Y Theatre Orchestra was a big feature of plays 
this year. Twenty musicians, under the direction of Donald 
Olson, played between acts and furnished special music for 
some plays. 

The B.Y.U. Speech Tournament was revived this year 
with contests during the week of April 2 to 7. A dramatic 
reading contest for high school students, and a one-act play 
contest for high schools and junior colleges comprised the 
dramatic activities of this conference. 

Twenty-four 




■?w-\: 



Dramatics 




Ray McGuire 
Manager 

Milton Nelson 
Assistant Manager 



Other activities included two evenings of original one- 
act plays written by Y students, and the Mary Woolley read- 
ing contest which was won by Alta Snell. 

The play program opened November 10 and 11 with 
the "Torch Bearers,'' annual department fall comedy, directed 
by Professor Morley. 

Seniors assumed full charge of the second play, "The 
Ghost Train," by Arnold Ridley. Alta Snell and Jayne Evans 
were the Senior directors. 

"Lady Windermere's Fan,' a brilliant drama by Oscar 
Wilde, was presented January 18. Twenty-five former stu- 
dents participated in this annual alumni play. Mrs. Stella 
H. Oaks assisted Professor Pardoe with the directing. 

Over forty students participated in the production of 
"The Little Clay Cart," an early Hindu drama directed by 
Professor Pardoe assisted by Helen Cook. 

Competition was keener than ever for the Evans award 
for sustained character portrayal which was won by Roy 
Broadbent. 

Professor Morley and Kathryn B. Pardoe, favorites of 
yesteryears, returned to the Y stage at the head of a talented 
Theta Alpha Phi cast in "Mrs. Moonlight," which was staged 
March 8 and 9. 

Sherwood's "Journey's End," one of the greatest of war 
plays, met with rousing success on its presentation April 12 
and 13. This annual all-boys production was coached by 
Professor Morley. 

"Holiday" by Phillip Barry concluded the dramatic 
schedule. This refreshing drama was presented as a part of 
the Girls' Day activities. 



'LITTLE CLAY CART"— COMPETITIVE PLAY 



w 



■* • 



>%* rtTm »$ 




m 



■■■■■■■■■■■ 




Twenty-five 



Dramatics 



.T-WLM 



CASTS 



THE TORCHBEARERS 

By George Kelly 

Directed by Alonzo Morley 

November 10, 11, 1933 

Mrs. J. Duro Pampinelli . . . ]ayne Evans 

Mr. Spindler ..... Elmo Geary 

Mr. Hossfrosse .... Merrill Wood 

Teddy Spearing .... Phil Christensen 

Florence McCrickett . . . Leola Green 

Nelly Fell ..... Grace Simpson 

Stage Manager .... Jesse Chandler 

Paula Ritter Alta Snell 

Frederick Ritter .... Lynn Broadbent 
Jennie, the maid . . . Marguerite Romney 



THE GHOST TRAIN 

By Arnold Ridley 

(Senior Play) 

Directed by Alonzo Morley 

December 8, 1933 



Richard Winthrop 
Elsie Winthrop 
Station Master 
Charles Murdock 
Peggy Murdock 
Miss Bourn 
Teddie Deakin 
Julia Price 
Herbert Price 
John Sterling 
Jackson 



Stewart Groiv 

Genevieve Fugal 

Owen Thornock 

Bud Walker 

Esther Maycock 

Deleen White 

Clarence Rich 

Helen Cook 

Sherman Tanner 

Sheldon Hayes 

Read Thornton 



LADY WINDERMERE'S FAN 

By Oscar Wilde 

(Alumni Play) 

Directed by T. Earl Pardoe 

January 25, 26, 27, 1934 

Lord Windermere . . . Sherman Christensen 

Lord Darlington Jean Paulson 

Mr. Cecil Graham .... Claude Snow 

Mr. Dumby Fred Webb 

Mr. Hooper Madison Merrill 

Parker Will Hanson 

Lord Augustus Lorton . . . A Rex Johnson 
Sir James Royston . . . Sterling Ercanbrack 
Lord Paisley . ' . . . B. Frank Cummings 
Lady Windermere . . . Fern B. Ercanbrack 
Duchess of Berwick .... Laura Shepard 

Lady Agatha Fern Jude 

Mrs. Cowper Cowper .... Minnie Boyle 
Lady Stutfield ..... Phyllis Miller 
Lady Jedbourgh .... Odessa Cullimore 

Miss Graham LaVern Paulson 

Mrs. Arthur Bowden . . . Edith J. Johnson 

Lady Paisley Adelc B. Merrill 

Lady Plymdale Stella H. Oaks 

Mrs. Erlynne Addic Wright 



THE LITTLE CLAY CART 
Hindu Drama of 4th Century 

(Competitive Play) 

Directed by T Earl Pardoe 

February 21, 22, 24, 1934 

Charudatta, Brahman merchant .... 

Lynn Broadbent, Elvon Jackson 
Rohasena, his SON .... Tom Pardoe 

Maitreya, his friend . , Claude Snow, Miles Judd 
Vardhamanaka, a man-servant in his house 

William Hasler 
Sansthanaka, brother-in-law of the king 

. Roy Broadbent. Lyman Partridge 
Sthavaraka, his servant . . William Goodman 
Kubata, another servant . . . Joseph Crane 
A Courtier . . . Harold Bateman, Bill Haws 
Aryaka, a herdsman who becomes king 

Preston Gledhill 
Sharvilaka, a Brahman, in love with Madanika 

Allen Sorenson, Eugene Jorgensen 
A Shampoer, who becomes a Buddhist Monk 

. . Milton Nelson 

Kumbhilaka, a servant of Vasantos ena Evan Nelson 
Viraka. a policeman . . . Norman Freestone 



Chandanaka, a policeman 

goha, a headsman 

Ahint, a headsman 

A Judge .... 

A Gild-warden 

A Clerk 

A Beadle 

Guards 



. Floyd Mullins 

Merrill Woods 

Smith Jacobs 

Dean White 

Robert Parker 

Douglas Merrill 

Sherman Tanner 

Jack Gibb, Alton Peterson 



Bullocks . . Clifton Boyack, Roswell Willard 

Vasantasena, a courtezan . Alice Spencer, Beth Paxman 
Her Mother . . Margaret Bird, Grace Simpson 
Madanika, Maid to Vasantasena 

Virginia Ekins, Esther Maycock 
Nadarika, Maid to Vasantasena 

Lorna Wentz, Gladys Hooks 

Wife of Charudatta . Lorna Poulson. Margaret Boyer 
Radanika, a maid in Charudatta's house 

Grace Simpson, Margaret Bird 
Villagers . May Louise Mitchell, Maxine Stewart 



JOURNEYS END 

By R. C. Sheriff 

Directed by T. Earl Pardoe 

(All Boys Show) 

April 12, 13 

Burnell Lewis, Jack Gibb 

Lyman Partridge 

Roswell Willard. Bruce Wakefield 

Joseph Dean, Preston Gledhill 

Lynn Broadbent 

Nick Udall. Bill Hasler 

. Ivan Willie, Norman Freestone 

Sheldon Hayes, Dean White 

Webster Decker. Allen Sorenson 

Alton Merrill. Merrill Wood 



Captain Hardy 
Lieut. Osborne 
Private Mason 
2nd Lieut. Raleigh 
Captain Stanhope 
2nd Lieut. Hibbert 
Company Serg. Major 
The Colonel 
2nd Lieut. Trotter 
German Soldier 



HOLIDAY 

By Phillip Barry 

Directed by Alonzo Morley 

May 2, 3 

Julia Seton Beth Paxman 

Linda Seton Margaret Bird 

Ned Seton Phil Christensen 

Edward Seton .... Norman Freestone 

Johnny Case Milton Nelson 

Seton Cram Joseph Crane 

Laura Cram Olive Edmunds 

Nick Potter Ray Davies 

Henry ...... Clifton Boyack 

Susan Potter Louise Nielsen 

Delia Margaret Peterson 



MRS. MOONLIGHT 

By Benn Levie 

(Theta Alpha Phi) 

Directed by T Earl Pardoe 

March 8, 9 



Thomas Moonlight 
Minnie 
Edith Jones 
Sarah Moonlight 
Percy Middling 
Jane Moonlight 
Willie Ragg 
Peter 



Alonzo Morley 

Stella H. Oaks 

Vera Jackson 

Kathryn B. Pardoe 

Victor Ashworth 

Monta Wentz 

Eugene Bryson 

Phil Christensen 



Twenty-six 



iOTAl 



Dramatics 



Theta Alpha Phi production, "Mrs. Moon- 
light." 

"An' the Bogie man'll get ya if ya don't be 
good." 

Freshmen Trek play. 

Original one-act plays by lone Duncan and 
Ed Evans. 




Twenty-seven 



J-WK 



M 



US1C 



This year the music department has again done much 
toward maintaining the traditional high regard which the 
Fine Arts enjoy among all those whose lives have been 
linked with the Brigham Young University. This department 
is a place of instruction not only for students majoring in 
music, but also for those who are interested in music for its 
cultural influence. It further serves as a cultural center for 
the community in that it offers many productions of high 
standard. It is the belief of the faculty of this department 
that they should help to acquaint the students and patrons 
of the university with the most desirable music, hence the 
high quality of the many and varied offerings of this de- 
partment. It is gratifying to note that as a result of this, the 
student body and the many friends of the university are be- 
coming more and more discriminating in their appreciation 
of music. 

One of the year's outstanding achievements was the or- 
chestra concert given during Leadership Week in the Utah 
Stake Tabernacle under the direction of Professor LeRoy J. 
Robertson. Among the numbers played were Beethoven's 
"First Symphony,'' exerpts from Wagner's "Meistersinger," 
including the monumental prelude, and a new organ sonata 
by Professor Robertson, played by J. J. Keeler. Another 
orchestra concert of merit was given during the spring quar- 
ter, at which was played Professor Robertson's "Overture 
Symphonic'' which has been dedicated to President Harris. 
At this concert was also played Schubert's beautiful "Unfin- 
ished Symphony." The orchestra has also rendered valuable 




LeRoy J. Robertson 
Orchestra Director 



Leland Priday 
Manager 



SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 




Twenty-eight 



.ota: 



M 



US1C 






CONCERT BAND 




Robert Sauer 
Band Director 

Farrell Madsen 
Manager 



services in accompanying the major vocal productions 
throughout the year. 

The concert band, which each year, under the direction 
of Professor Robert Sauer attains an unusually high degree 
of excellence as a college band, gave several concerts in 
which the best of classical and popular music was featured. 
The annual Leadership concert and another one in the mid- 
dle of the Winter Quarter were especially outstanding. This 
organization has also presented concerts at intervals during 
the year in various schools and wards throughout the county. 

As a service organization the band has been invaluable 
at football, and basketball games and track meets. In stu- 
dent body activities such as pep rallies and programs the or- 
ganization, under the direction of their loyal and willing 
leader, Professor Sauer, has responded willingly and readily 
to the various calls made on them. The ensemble work fos- 
tered by the band, such as that done by this year's trombone, 
clarinet, saxophone, and trumpet quartettes and trios was 
also much appreciated. 

The vocal division of the department under the general 
direction of Dr. Franklin Madsen, shouldered an exception- 
ally heavy task this year. It presented three major produc- 
tions: Handel's oratorio "The Messiah" in the fall quarter. 
Balfe's opera "The Bohemian Girl" in the winter quarter, 
and Mendelssohn's oratorio "Elijah" in the spring quarter. 

The production of the "Messiah," given this year with a 
chorus of two hundred and forty-five voices, has already be- 



Tivcnfy-nine 



*w\: 




Double-mixed Quartette 



String Trio 



come an esteemed annual event. A large number of student 
soloists participated in these events, since in each case a 
double cast was selected. 

A special chorus made a concert tour into the southern 
part of Utah and Nevada: the Ladies Glee Club of over one 
hundred voices, led by Dr. Florence J. Madsen. had success- 
ful appearances in the fall quarter and during Leadership 
Week; the Male Glee Club of over sixty voices gave a pro- 
gram during the spring quarter; a Ladies' Ensemble of eigh- 
teen voices appeared at the Utah Education Association con- 
vention; and the A Capella Chorus on several special oc- 
casions gave interesting programs. 

Much has been done by Miss Margaret Summerhays in 
developing an appreciation for the works of Liza Lehmann. 
Last year she directed the production of Lehmann's "In a 
Persian Carden" and followed it this year with "Leaves of 
Ossian," a finished performance by the double mixed quar- 
tette. 

The students of this department have given freely of 
their time and talent and aided in church and school pro- 
grams throughout the county. Likewise, they have contrib- 
uted much to the devotional spirit of the university assemb- 
lies through their finished production of sacred music. 



Thirty 



Eflfiai 



Music 



The Bohemian Girl 

Music by Michael W. Balfe 
Words by Alfred Bunn 

Directed by 

Dr. Franklin Madsen and Dr. Florence Jepperson Madsen 

MARCH 14-15 COLLEGE HALL 

CAST 

Count Vernon Collier, Owen Bingham 

Thaddeus Walt Foulger, Eldon Richardson 

Florestein ..... Blaine Johnson, Douglas Merrill 

Devilshoof Lyman Partridge, Ladd Cropper 

Arline ...... Edith Harrison. Ann Parkinson 

° UDA •••-... Barbara Perrett. Louise Boyer 

Uueen ■ Myrthe Allen, Fredona Strickler 

Captain Theodore Johnson, Roy Huntington 

Arline, as a child Marion Robertson 



Floy Hansen 
Martha Coleman 
Irene Johnson 



DANCERS 
Anna Lou Peterson 
Leona Gibbons 
Moreho Allred 



Alice Spencer 
Phyllis Robinson 



Beth Paxman 
Nadine Taylor 
Louise Jenkins 
Jean Harrison 
Elva Bingham 
Lue Groesbeck 
Alice Beth Whiteley 
Ethel Kerr 
Margaret Peterson 
Eva Watson 
Alene Peterson 
Velda Murdock 
Wanda Stevens 



GYPSIES 
Alta Stoker 
Emmeline Hastings 
Anna Lou Peterson 
Annice Nisbet 
Maurine Kjar 
Ellen Scorup 
Opal Christensen 
Farris Edgely 
Ray Davies 
Arlington Spilsbury 
Calvin Frandsen 
Arthur Sundwall 
Tracy Call 



Ross Davis 
Jack Selck 
Marion Harding 
Theodore Johnson 
Ailsa Page 
Lorine Lee 
Helen Childs 
Marzelle Jesperson 
Donna Dastrup 
Huitau Allred 
Murray Roberts 
Wilford Lee 
Roy Huntington 



Maurine Yarbrough 
Dora Coombs 
Elizabeth Ramsbotham 
Afton Garner 
Mattie Taylor 
Erva Watson 
Naomi Zumbrunnen 
Sara White 
Evelyn Prusse 
Dale Reese 
Leon Christensen 



PEASANTS 
Lorraine Bowman 
Norma Crane 
Olive Ogden 
Lu Dean Waldram 
Elaine DeGraff 
Bessie Lowe 
Laurel Harper 
Pearl Callis 
Geraldine Eggertson 
Roland Pond 
Mifflin Williams 



Reva Vickers 
Junius Payne 
Byron Geslison 
Jim Simmons 
John Freckleton 
Paul Jensen 
Lee Morgan 
Lynn Searle 
Weldon Bastain 
David Sabin 



TV 



OPERA CAST 



Thirty-one 



*w-\: 



For 




Thirty-two 




i ensics 



The year of 1933-34 has marked one of the most suc- 
cessful seasons the Forensic Department has enjoyed for 
some time. In the spring of 1933 Kenn Peterson was selected 
by the Debate Council as student manager for the coming 
year. At the opening of school last fall, many students ex- 
hibited much interest in debating. This was largely due to 
the added incentive of the approaching trip to Bozeman, 
Montana, for the Rocky Mountain Forensic Conference. 

The first week in December six representatives of the 
Y invaded California for a series of debates with the Uni- 
versity of Southern California, and entered the University 
of Redlands tournament. The Junior Varsity and Women's 
teams made several short trips throughout the state, and 
many colleges visited here for the purpose of meeting Y 
debaters in verbal combat. 

As a fitting climax to an already successful forensic 
season, the University's Annual Speech Tournament for high 
schools and Junior Colleges was revived, and held here in 
connection with the Utah-Idaho Junior College Debate 
League during the first week in April. The tournament was 
under the direction of Kenn Peterson, and was one of the 
largest ever held in the United States from the standpoint 
of the number of teams entered. A total of 53 Junior College 
debate teams entered the tourney, the largest entry on record 
for Junior College Tournaments. The Y can well be proud 
of conducting so successfully a tournament of such magni- 
tude. 



Floyd McIntyre Roy Broadbent Oakley Evans Meredith Wilson 

Lucille Skinner Louise Nielsen Alison Comish Clifton Boyack 

Reed Fautin Laura Mensel Marjorie Wagers Darlene Owens 

Harold Smith Weldon Taylor Kenn Peterson Milton Beck 

William Reeder Harold Christensen Guy Callahan Keith Romney 

Erma Young Clifford Young Nola Comer George Stoddard 



;*W-\1 



Art 




E. H. Eastmond 
Professor of Art 



The service division of the Department of Art has 
shown efficiency and willingness in serving the student body 
in extra-curricular activities, where art supervision and ad- 
vice are necessary. Decorations for student body dances 
have been a large contribution, as has the outstanding work 
on the Junior Prom, Pep Vodie, Loan Fund Ball, Founders' 
Day pageantry, plays, assemblies, concerts, and various so- 
cial functions. 

In connection with Blue Key Fraternity the art depart- 
ment has played an important part in making possible the 
success of the Homecoming Celebration by preparing the 
parade and pre-game pageantry, while the pageant prepared 
as part of the annual Freshman Trek made that event a 
noteworthy one. 

Of importance to students in this department is the "art 
service'' instituted several years ago by Prof. Eastmond for 
the purpose of serving the university with the art ability of 
students. 

Through the services of the Studio Guild many exhi- 
bitions of art have been placed on the walls of the insti- 
tution, and in prominent centers in Provo and Salt Lake City. 

Members of the Art Service are: Wendell Vance, 
Vaughn Livingston, Marjorie Mitchell, Jack Eastmond, Har- 
old Woolston, Dale Jones. Emeline Hastings, and Ariel 
Davis. Earl Cottam and Elizabeth Conover have been mem- 
bers of the Art Advisory Committee. 

ART DEPARTMENT EXHIBIT — PROM DECORATIONS — FINE ART EXHIBITORS 

HHHH 



; 



rmcmttl 
warn 







•S&J3 




- rf«i 



4 



Rallies 



•ota: 



Brigham Young University's pep rallies, always snappy 
and always colorful, were ushered in this year one week after 
the opening of school. The occasion was the first football 
game, played with the Montana Bobcats on September 31. 
Following a one and one-half hour matinee dance, the Fri- 
day previous to the encounter, a theatre rally was held at 
the Paramount Theatre. A snake dance to the theatre and 
the lighting of the giant Y on the mountainside were the 
pre-rally features. 

The Aggie-Cougar football battle provided the situa- 
tion for the next rally, which was a distinct improvement 
over the first one. One of the biggest torch light parades in 
years took the crowd from the two-hour matinee dance to 
the Paramount for the rally. Lyman Partridge acted as mas- 
ter of ceremonies, and an interesting program was presented. 

In addition to these major rallies, special short ones were 
held in College Hall preceding several of the games. A wel- 
come home for the basketball team after the Wyoming series 
was sponsored by Blue Key Fraternity. 

Arrangements for the rallies were supervised by the 
rally committee which included Lyman Partridge, Jack Mc- 
Guire, Gilbert Tanner, Harold Van Wagenen. and Harold 
Merkley. Yellmaster Jim McGuire was chairman of the 
committee. 



II 
1 




* 



Jim McGuire 
Rally Chairman 




Thirty-four 



;?LW£: 



Pep Vodie 



Participants 

Fidelas 

Nautilus 

O. S. Trovata 

Val Hyrics 

Vikings 



This year was the tenth birthday of the Pep Vodie, 
which is presented annually to generate a "beat Utah" spirit 
for the traditional Y-Utah basketball series. Competition 
this year was unusually keen with eleven acts in the prelim- 
inary try-outs. Of these, five were chosen to appear in the 
finals, which were held at the Paramount Theatre, February 

8. 

"Solomon's Court," exotic act of the O. S. Trovata 

social unit, was awarded first place. The Vikings took sec- 
ond prize with their act, which was entitled "Brigham 
Young's Favorite Son." Val Hyric's "Three Little Pigs" 
came third. The Fidelas and Nautilus units were the other 
contestants. Judges were Gail Plummer, Maud May Babcock, 
and Laura Snow of the University of Utah. 

Members of the committee in charge were: Harold 
Merkley, Harold Van Wagenen, Jack McGuire, John Tal- 
mage, Neff Smart, and James McGuire. Meredith Wilson 
was master of ceremonies for the program. 

This year, the conducting of the annual Pep song con- 
test was not attempted. The awarding of cash prizes to the 
winning acts was continued with the winning unit receiving 
twenty-five dollars, second place winner, fifteen, and third 
place, ten. 

In the opinion of the audience the excellence of the acts 
was the highest ever, and the units should be commended 
for their whole-hearted support. 





Met and Helen set the pace for 
Homecoming parade. 

The best band in the State. 

Vehicle of the fourth estate. 

Chick Hart, director of parade. 

Pioneering for the Banyan! 

"And what a game, ladies and 
gentlemen." 

Homecoming float. 

The score tells the tale. 

White Keys at Utah. 

Frosh-Soph scrimmage. 

' Ott and Dick. 



Thirty-six 



;7-W<\: 



Autumn Leaf hike. 

Last call for lunch! 

Tausig tortures. 

Babies will play. 

Hockey in January. 

Who said no snow? 

Ice angles. 

Give 'em a hand boys. 

The first snowfall (and last). 

"Y" icers. 




Thirty-seven 



;OTA1 



Exciting entertainment for a quiet Sunday af 
ternoon. 

Joe Johnson, 1 , 2, 3. 

To the victors belong the spoils. 

Working (for) the school. 

Christmas fan mail for the Banyan. 

Regina Weaver, Shanghai bound. 




Thirty -eight 



;£W-\1 



When Grandma was a girl. 

Delegates to the International Relations Club 
convention. 

Erick and his boys. 

Sowards sisters, Hawaii bound. 

B. Y. U. Islanders. 

Sing you sinners. 

Girls' Jamboree. 




Thirty-nine 



Bim 4 



COUGARS ALL THE PLAYERS TRAIN HARD 

AND LONG IN PREPARATION FOR THE FRAY; 
BUT WHEN THEY FIGHT - ALL THE OTHER 
LOYAL COUGARS JOIN IN TOO, AND HELP TO 
WIN THE GAME WITH THEIR CHEERS. EVEN 
IF THEY DO NOT LIKE THE SCORE, THEY DO 
THEIR BEST TO KEEP JEERS SUPPRESSED AND 
TRY TO WIN AT LEAST IN SPORTSMANSHIP. 

m wwm 






COACHES 

FOOTBALL 

FROSH FOOTBALL 

BASKETBALL 

TRACK 

TENNIS 

WRESTLING 

W. A. A. 

INTRAMURAL 



JLWK 



Coach 



es 




G. Ott Romney 



Charles J. Hart 



Fred Dixon 




That good coaches bring victories in the sports as well 
as in sportsmanship has been aptly demonstrated by the Y 
coaching quartet who have this year handled a big assign- 
ment with competence. Its great coaching staff maintains 
Brigham Young consistently prominent in conference ath- 
letics. 

Once a brilliant college athlete himself. Coach G. Ott 
Romney knows how to build men as well as how to turn out 
athletes and teams. He has supervised track, basketball, and 
football, and he performs this ample work in a creditable 
manner. A coach who can turn out conference material in 
one of these divisions is considered good — Ott does it in 
them all. 

Fred "Buck" Dixon, who turned from an athletic career 
at the Y to coaching, handles the frosh football squad, the 
high school basketball team, the tennis men, and is athletic 
manager and instructor in physical education. 

Charles "Chick" Hart returned last year with educa- 
tional experience to direct campus athletic programs and the 
live intramural program is a monument to his energy and 
versatility. 

Aubert Cote has rendered unselfish service in the wrest- 
ling division and always turns out a finished team. Although 
he worked this year under several handicaps, he made a 
strong bid to retain his perennial conference laurels. 



Forty-one 



Football 



;f^ T Ai 




That Brigham Young is definitely one of the recognized 
powers in Rocky Mountain Conference football was demon- 
strated by Coach G. Ottinger Romney and his gridders dur- 
ing the season of 1933. Although the Cougars' final standing 
was not so high as in the previous year, the Blue and White 
had a good season, winning five out of eight conference 
games played. 

With the best conference schedule that B. Y. U. has 
ever played, the Cougars' intersectional competition was 
limited to one game, that with the United States Marines at 
San Diego. Although losing by three touchdowns, the 
Youngsters gained much praise from the critics by their 
plucky stand against the much heavier Californians. 

The recent development in gridiron standards and 
achievements is evidenced by the fact that the Y was in- 
cluded in the proposed "Big Six" football conference in the 
Rocky Mountain region. The Big Six was to include Brig- 
ham Young, University of Utah, U. S. A. C, Colorado 
A. C, Colorado University, and Denver University. 

An inspiring battle against the big red Indians in the 
annual game with U. of U. was the feature of the season. 
Young held the Utes to a 7-6 score during the first three 
quarters, but was beaten back for two touchdowns in the 
final period by a combination of breaks, greater weight, and 
superior reserve strength. 

Rivaling the Utah game for thrills was the battle with 
Denver on a snow-swept field at Denver. Heart-break- 
ing fumbles were largely responsible for the 6-0 loss to the 
Pioneers. Another prime thrill of the season was the bar- 
rage of passes, laid down by the Cougars in the second half 
of the game with C. C, which netted three touchdowns in 
less than five minutes, crushing Colorado College's chances 
for victory. 




Max Nisonger 
Captain 



Forty-two 




Standing, left to right: Coach Ott Romney, Condie, Griffith. Kotter, Taylor, Hanks, Tucker, Nisonger, Oaks, Dick- 
son, Millet, Richardson, Hart. 
Second row: Vest, Allred, Haws, Wilson, Allen, LaComb, Merrill, Lytle, Brown. 
Bottom, row: Simmons, Snyder, Crane, Boyd, Hibbert, Russell, Gillespie, Merkley, Favero, Warner, Hutchinson. 



Captain Max Nisonger led one of the scrappiest lines 
ever assembled at Brigham Young University. Light com- 
pared with most lines in the conference, the Cougar forward 
wall was outstanding for its unquenchable fighting spirit. 
Although losing four games in all, the Y team restricted its 
opponents to an average of 7.33 points per game. In no 
case did the opponents score more than three touchdowns, 
and in five of the contests the Cougar goal line was not 
crossed. 

At center was Glen Tucker, an excellent passer and an 
alert and fighting defensive player. Captain-elect Max War- 
ner and Dewey Favero flanked Tucker and were two of the 
most consistently brilliant performers in the conference. 
Warner proved to be a veritable iron man; he was out of 
the game for only five minutes during the entire season. 

Two of Young's greatest tackles finished their careers 
as collegiate gridders last fall. "Hap" Nisonger, captain, had 
an almost flawless season. In all the games he was a bul- 
wark of strength on both offense and defense, being honored 
on nearly every all-conference selection. 



Forty-three 



Football 




^fllNllNtilb 



Richardson, although receiving 
an unfortunate injury in the first 
game, which kept him out of a suit 
until the last two games, closed his 
final season in glorious action. 
Vernon Condie and Melvin alter- 
nating at the injured star's tackle, 
could always be counted on for 
steady performances. 

Coach Romney was faced with 
the total absence of experienced 
ends at the beginning of the sea- 
son; but. before actual competition 
was under way, he uncovered a 
pair. George Gillespie and Charles 
Oaks, who held down the flanks 
in creditable style. Both will be 
back next year, their ability forti- 
fied with a year's experience. 

Reserves whose names very sel- 
dom reached the headlines were 
responsible in a large measure for 
the line's success. These deserv- 
ing, but "forgotten," men include: 
Niles Vest and Wayne Hanks, 
centers; John Lytle, Blaine Allen, 
Golden Taylor and Bill Haws, 
guards; Ned Dickson and Roy 
Brown, tackles; Theron Snyder, 
Floyd Kotter, Douglas Merrill and 
Reed Crane, ends. 

Jesse "Phantom Pete" Wilson, 
fleet and elusive halfback, was the 
sensation of the team. His super- 
lative passing, kicking, and field 
running won him nation-wide ac- 
claim. Pete was listed among the 

Vernon Condie 

Floyd Kotter 

Kay Hart 

Niles Vest 

Floyd Millet 

Dean Simmons 

Max Warner 

Dewey Favero 

Jesse Wilson 

Max Nisonger 



Forty-four 



JLW£I 



Football 



Grant Hutchinson 

George Gillespie 

Floyd Merkley 

Melvin Griffith 

Blaine Allen 

Glen Tucker 

Wayne Hanks 

Hunt Sanford 

Frank LaComb 

Charles Oaks 



all-Americans and was unanimous- 
ly all-conference. 

The other backs were worthy 
team mates for Wilson. Frank La- 
Comb, at quarter, maintained his 
high standard of the previous year. 
Besides his steady generalship, 
Frank contributed a great deal to 
the team in the way of passing, 
blocking, and defensive play. 
Floyd Merkley and Dave Hibbert 
were the quarterback reserves. 
Floyd understudied both LaComb 
and Wilson in an efficient manner. 

Floyd Millet and Kay Hart, 
both being outstanding as line- 
plungers, blockers and tacklers, 
were the leading fullbacks. Millet 
was the regular starter, but Kay 
was often needed to bolster the 
end positions. Grant Hutchinson, 
by utilizing his speed and power, 
gained the other half-back posi- 
tion. Besides steady play in the 
secondary defense, "Hutch" was 
a constant threat on the offense, 
both as a blocker and as a ball- 
carrier. Hunt Sanford was cut out 
of almost certain stardom in the 
backfield by a serious leg injury 
suffered early in the season. 

Capable reserve backs rounded 
out the squad. Such men as Reed 
Russell, Dean Simmons, and Griff 
Kimball were but little behind the 
regulars and were ready for ac- 
tion when they were needed. 




Forty-five 



Frosh Football 



*4*4'* , 4* , ^'» 



lVf>- lifl -4' 






*- ■ , - 



- 



- . , tic 1 '- ■ *• * 

' ■* -■'"... r-' ■^ r - " . ■ ' ,: 



. .-.- •■' 



First row. /eft fo right: Croft, Black. Burton, Law, Kavachevich, Merkley, Baldwin. Woodward. Higgins, Mcintosh. 

Assistant Coach. 
Second row: Turpin. Kimball, Nelson. Palfreyman, Brown. Gunnel, Knight, Rigby. Wride. Rowley, Gardner, Durrant. 
Third row: Dixon, Coach, M. Peterson, Burgess, Dickson. M. Johnson. D. Johnson. Pehrson, Wheeler. Bohman. C. 

Peterson. Hart, Shields, Assistant Coach. 
Back row: Giles, Brimhall, Aired, Waldo, Tea, Cook, Asay, McPheeters. 



"A football team is no stronger than the frosh team 
of the two previous years," is an old maxim with any coach: 
therefore there is always a great deal of interest in the 
Cougar Kittens. 

That Young's football stock will soar is a prediction 
justified from our frosh men this year, for they snowed under 
the Papooses, and fought hard against Utah State's strong- 
est frosh team in years. Several excellent varsity prospects 
were uncovered. 

Eighty-five is no mean group to turn out for frosh scrim- 
mage, but Coach Buck Dixon got just that response this year, 
and then spent most of the season scratching his head over 
whom to eliminate, and whom to leave on the bench. 

McKinley High School of Hawaii gave the Kittens their 
initial encounter of the year, winning 27-7. But the Kittens 
defeated Utah's Papooses the next week when they won 
27-6. Then Utah State's touted Farmer Boys came down 
and won 12-7 to take the freshman state title. 

The following won sweaters: Cook and Durrant. co- 
captains; Schofield. manager: Dickson, Waldo, Hart, Mc- 
Pheeters, Rowley, C. Peterson. Wheeler. Turpin, Tea, Gun- 
nel, Law, Wride, Croft. Higgins, M. Johnson, Alfred, Cat- 
mull, Asay, Rigby, Woodward, Pehrson, Bohman, D. John- 
son, Simmons, Black. Giles, Merkley. Baldwin. Gardner. 
Brimhall. Kavachevich. Palfreyman. Brown, Burton, Nelson. 
Kimball. Burgess. Knight, M. Peterson. 



Jamks Durrant 
Wayne Cook 

co-captains 




Forty-six 



.*wa: 



Basketball 



Jay Whitman 
Captain 



Cougars vs. Cowboys! 

That combination has come to be expected every year 
when the Rocky Mountain Conference playoff time arrives. 
This year the brilliant rangemen from Laramie drove through 
the eastern division without one loss, while the Cougars were 
snarling out their victory in the western sector. The white 
and blue men lost a game to each of their three opponents. 

That series on Wyoming's "quarter-section" floor was 
said to be the best Laramie has seen, although the Cougars 
lost all three games, sacrificing their possession of the con- 
ference championship. 

In all three games the Y was a threat. In the second a 
twelve point lead in the last period was overcome by those 
invincible Cowboys who won in overtime playing. A heart- 
breaking foul attempt was missed one minute before the end 
of the second half, and the Y men were forced to a tie, when 
that extra point would have deadlocked the series and given 
the Cougars an even break for the third and deciding game. 

The third game was listless, with the Cougars tired after 
two nights of their furious brand of ball, and the Cowboys 
saving energy for the National A. A. U. at Kansas City. 
That the Cowboys took second place honors in this latter 
meet argues well for Rocky Mountain hoop activity, and 
casts an incidental reflection of excellence on the Cougars. 

Although underrated at the first of the season. Young's 
courtiers came through the season with only three losses, and 
thereby upset a tradition of two years' standing — that of 
tying the University of Utah for first place in the western di- 
vision of the conference. 

Brigham Young started the season with practice games, 
including a jaunt out through Colorado, and came back look- 
ing none too good. Utah Aggies was conceded by sports 
writers to have the best chance at western division laurels. 



Forty-seven 



*Y,kYAl 



Basketball 



MarlowTurpin 
Frank Wright 
Floyd Millet 



Bryon Nelson 
Joe Johnson 
Wilford Fischer 



The season opened with the so-called 
crucial series with the Aggies, at Provo. The 
first night Brigham Young inspired a packed 
gym by an exhibition of perfect basketball 
and showed that last year's conference 
champs had not forgotten the responsibility 
of that position. The second night the Aggies 
threatened, but with Cannon and Joe Johnson 
playing beautifully in substitute roles in the 
last half, it was clearly the Cougar's victory. 
Grimmet, Millet, Nelson, Hunter, and Whit- 
man started in those games, as they did in 
nearly every other game in the entire season. 

That same week the Redskins were easily 
taking the measure of Montana's Bobcats, so 
that it didn't mean anything in particular 
when Ott Romney's men trounced the Bob- 
cats by top-heavy scores in Provo the next 
week, while at the same time, the Aggies 
were staging a comeback by taking two from 
Utah at Logan. In the series Whitman, Nel- 
son, and Millet starred; and wben count was 
taken over the week end it was found that 
these Cougars led the western division in 
scoring honors in all three positions. 

So far things looked pretty for Young's 
Cougars, but Utah came back after their 
Aggie defeat and took one from the Y in the 
Salt Lake series to demonstrate that no team 
can proceed to championship in this sector 
without a challenge. 

When Utah came to Provo two weeks 
after that, it was their last desperate chance 




Forty-eight 



VlWl 



Basketball 




Jim Hunter 
Hugh Cannon 
Dick Grimmett 



Earl Giles 
Marklan Allred 
Howard Adams 



to embarrass the Cougars in their victorious 
drive. But it was just too much to expect 
those fighting, teaming Youngmen to let 
down in their stride, and the series ended 
with the Y taking both games. 

Then Young traveled to Logan and split 
with the Aggies, leaving the division race still 
in doubt, although less conservative dopesters 
conceded western division laurels to Ott 
Romney's Cougars. 

It was left to Montana State's Bobcats, 
that team of sophomores who had been un- 
able to win a conference encounter all season. 
to tip over the Cougars in the last game of 
the season; but Utah State was being driven 
to the wall in Salt Lake City the same week 
end, so that the Cougar defeat held no sig- 
nificance. The western division was already 
safely hidden in the Cougar's lair. 

The 1934 Cougar team, perhaps one of 
the best-balanced teams in Y history, loses 
three regulars by graduation. Millet, Nelson, 
and Hunter played their last game for Alma 
Pater in the Wyoming series. Millet played 
sensationally and steadily to be chosen all- 
conference for the second successive year. 
Nelson played defensive ball in several of 
the crucial games, and held down some 
mighty tough men to single digit scores. 
Hunter, the most underrated man in the con- 
ference deserves more glory than he received. 
Whitman repeated at All-Conference selec- 
tion and was All-American timber. 

Forty-nine 



my-\; 



Track 



One of the strongest track teams in years was developed 
by Coach Romney this year. Few men were lost from last 
season's squad which placed fourth in the conference meet. 

A strong team means strength in every department, a 
characteristic which the Y men showed strikingly. With 
Hutchinson. Coon. Dudley. Wilson. Schofield, Warner. Mil- 
let. Cannon. Verney. Gourley, Taylor. Dean. Kotter. Brady. 
Griffith and others, the Cougar boasts a well-rounded aggre- 
gation. Captain Ed Brady, high jump flash, led his team to 
outstanding performances in every meet in which they par- 
ticipated. 

Newcomers added color and strength to the squad in 
many events. Clifton Coon was a brilliant dash man. John 
Verney made excellent marks in the shotput. Earl Giles 
showed up well in the high jump and discus. Andrews and 
Piatt were outstanding in the longer races. 

In the hundred and two-twenty yard dashes, Coon and 
Greer did much of the point winning. Hutchinson, Bud 
Walker, and Dudley were the mainstays in the four-forty. 
LaMar Taylor and George Ashby were the half milers. Tay- 
lor and Andrews the milers. In the two-mile, Ernest Dean. 
Snyder, and Piatt were iron men. 

Last year's men dominated the hurdles event again, when 
Pete Wilson. Lewis, and Schofield showed themselves to be 
an invincible trio. Coon. Greer. Lewis. Kotter and Harris 
Walker were used in the half mile relay: while Wilson. Bud 
Walker. Ashby. Dudley. Hutchinson, and Kotter participated 
in the mile relay. 

Captain Ed Brady. George Gourley. Reese, Herbert Tay- 
lor, and Earl Giles were the Cougar high jumpers who could 
be depended upon for points. Warner and Millet again 
dominated the broad jump, but Blaine Hart was a newcomer 
of ability. George Gourley. Lee Gourley. and Harris Walker 
upheld Young's pole vaulting strength. 




Ed Brady 
Captain 



Fifty 



*\"UY-\; 



Track 

Griffith, Bohman, and Law in the javelin event, Bun- 
nell and Gene Johnson in the hammer, Verney and Nisonger, 
shotput, and Cannon and Giles, discus, gave the Cougars 
that balance in weight and field events which was the de- 
ciding edge in several of the meets. 

An exceptionally mild winter and an open spring gave 
the Cougars ample time for training and they entered the 
season in top form. The regular season found the Cougars 
meeting the Utes and Aggies in separate clashes, and then 
again in a triple meet at Provo to decide the state title. The 
conference meet was held again this year in Denver, with 
all Rocky Mountain teams participating. 




Fifty-one 



••OTA1 



T 



emus 



Losing the cream of last year's squad of racqueteers 
made it necessary for Coach Buck Dixon to uncover a lot 
new material this year, but after brisk pre-season tryouts an 
aggregation was found which showed more power than last 
year's group. 

Y net men have gone through several indifferent seasons, 
and so the additional strength shown by the 1934 men was 
gratifying to tennis supporters. Placing second to Utah's 
championship team was conceded as a possibility when the 
season opened this year. 

New material which showed up were George Stoddard 
and Tom Eastmond who were chosen on the first five. Joe 
Swenson and Tom Eastmond were picked as number one 
doubles combination, and Wilson Booth and George Stod- 
dard comprised the other doubles. Harold Fitzgerald, last 
year letterman, was named ace singles player. The other two 
players selected to complete the seven man squad were both 
newcomers, Bert Weight and Kirk Stephens. They were se- 
lected through stiff competition among a dozen aspirants. 

Steady Joe Swenson was chosen captain of the squad at 
a meeting the first of the season. Last year no captain was 
named. The regular season, which consisted of home en- 
counters with both the University of Utah and U.S.A.C., was 
launched when Utah invaded the Y courts April 13. 



. 



w 



4tt 




Joe Swenson 
Captain 



Front row: Joe Swenson, Tom Eastmond, Kirk Stephens, Meredith Wilson, Coach Dixon. 

Back row: Harold Fitzgerald, Wilson Booth, Bert Weight, John Talmage, Sherman Wing, George Stoddard. 




Fifty-two 




ack row: Roberts, Lott, Jacobs, Peterson, Palfreyman, Orser, Walton, Parker, Kitchen, Duffin, Bascomb, Wooley, 
Wootton, Shaw, Murray, Smith, Iverson, Stallings. 

Center row: Jeffery, Rowley, Tanner, Hibbert, McGuire, Shepherd, Piatt, Hullinger, Harrison, Bryner, Clegg, Coach 
Aubert Cote. 

Front row: Johnson, Taylor, Yorgason, Baldwin, Young, Despain, Croft, Thornack. 



Delbert Young 
Captain 




A rather discouraging season for a wrestling team which 
last year won every meet they entered, was nevertheless 
climaxed by one of the most brilliant victories any mat team 
could be expected to annex, when the Cougars snared five 
of the eight first places in the A.A.U. tournament. 

Coach Aubert Cote's charges this year constituted a 
well-balanced team, and it was generally thought to be as 
strong as last year's conference champs; however, through- 
out most of the season it was not written that they should 
win. 

The season opened with a loss to the Aggie grapplers, 

23-15; but the University of Utah suffered a similar fate at 
the Cougars' hands by losing 3-8. Then Utah won from 
the Aggies and there was a deadlock. At the western di- 
vision meet, decisions turned on hairs'-breadths, and Utah 
won with 26 points to 24 for the second-place Cougars. Utah 
State placed third and Montana State last. 

Captain Dell Young had another brilliant season, al- 
though injuries kept him from participation in all the matches. 
Captain-elect Merrill Croft turned in one of the best records 
of any man of the squad. 

Owen Thornack. Merrill Croft, Del Young, Bob Yor- 
gason, and Golden Taylor were the men who convinced 
intermountain fans that Coach Cote turns out champions. 
The victory demonstrated that the previous defeats suffered 
by the Y men may have had in them elements of bad luck. 



Fifty -three 



W.A.A. 



'•OTAl 



The Women's Athletic Association at Young has enjoyed 
one of its most active years. An unusual attendance at the 
Y hike in the autumn presaged enthusiastic participations in 
all subsequent activities of the group. The November pro- 
gram included the beginning of the basketball practice and 
a progressive house party. For December, skiing and skating 
parties had been scheduled but were abandoned because of 
fair weather and no snow. January and February were the 
basketball tournament months, March the annual sport fes- 
tival, April and May, track and tennis time. 

W. A. A. sponsors all major and minor sports for women 
in the university. Each year they present four Y sweaters 
to the four outstanding women athletes, those with the high- 
est points in participation scoring. The winners in 1933 were 
Vera Conder, Aline Coleman, Irene Johnston, and Eva Baliff. 

Officers of the organization this year were Vera Conder, 
president; Laura Mensel, vice-president; Darlene Owens, sec- 
retary and treasurer; Laura Banner, recorder; and Ada Tay- 
lor, reporter. These officers have been responsible for the 
unusually active year. 

Miss Wilma Jeppson. head of the Women's Physical 
Education department has the following to say regarding the 
organization: 

"The most constructive use of leisure time has become a 
matter for serious consideration among people who heretofore 
have been too busy to give thought to this subject. Under the 
W. A. A. girls will participate in sports in a wholesome at- 
mosphere.'' 




Vera Conder 
President 



Fifty-four 



;mv-\; 



W.A.A. 



Aiming high. 

Playing Hookey at Hockey. 

Pinch-hitting for Cupid. 

"Jeppie." 

Racket Pals. 

Johnsonsky and Jonesky. 

Beware, yon Ford. 

Touche. 




Fifty-five 



;m T A; 



Intramural 



Bricker Social Unit, Winners of Softball 

Tournament. 
Warner and Hunter, Horse Shoe Champs. 
Intramural Track Participants. 
Stephens and Stoddard. Ping-Pong Kings. 
Javelin Throwing Competition. 
Viking Champion Basketball Team. 




Fifty-six 



B30K 5 



FORMALS, INVITATIONALS. CANYON PARTIES, 
RUSHING, PLEDGING, GOATING, INITIATION - 
ALL THIS CONGLOMERATION OF STUDENT 
ACTIVITY CAN BE EASILY REDUCED TO THE 
SIMPLE TERMS OF "SOCIAL UNIT SYSTEM." 
UNITS, HONOR FRATS, OR CLUBS MAY KEEP 
US FROM MANY SCHOLASTIC HONORS BUT 
WE MUST HAVE OUR PLEASURE REGARDLESS. 




?J. 



M 



SOCIAL UNITS 

HONORARY ORGANIZATIONS 

GEOGRAPHIC AND LANGUAGE CLUBS 




Helen Swenson 
Helena Brown 



Helen Childs 
Regina Weaver 



Lucretia Burgess 
Enola Johnson 



Aileen Lyon 
Emmeline Hastings 



Marie Barlow 

ISABELLE DlLLMAT 



LaBerl Cook 
Helen Morgan 



ISABELLE DlLLMAN 
President 




c Irialians 

The Thalian social unit was organized last fall by ten 
girls for the purpose of fostering closer contacts between a 
group of girls who were interested in dramatic art. The 
name, Thalian, is derived from Thalia, the Greek goddess of 
drama. The purpose of the group is to forward scholarship 
and interest in drama. 

Although a young unit, the Thalians have been unus- 
ually active in their initial year. Besides the regular bi- 
monthly meetings, members have enjoyed theater parties, 
candy-pulls, canyon outings, informal dancing parties, a 
George Washington dancing party in conjunction with the 
Alta Mithras social unit, and a boat party on Utah Lake in 
the spring. 

Members of the unit stand for those high ideals which 
are characteristic of the Brigham Young University. They 
participate willingly in all activities sponsored by the school. 

Officers of the unit are: Isabelle Dillman, president; 
Helen Swenson, vice-president; LaBerl Cook, secretary-treas- 
urer; Lucretia Burgess, reporter; Mrs. Lynn Hayward, fac- 
ulty sponsor. 



Fifty-seven 




Ada Taylor Stella Dixon Huitau Allred Leona Gibbons Moreho Allred 

Alice Spencer Ireta Pierce Maxine Austin Olive Winterton 

Edith Dixon Anneliese Buggert Luana Mercer Dorothy Hunn Helen Cook 

Dorothy Clayton Phyllis Smith Betty Linn Marzelle Jesperson 

Bernice Colton Marion Arnold Beth Richards Amy Young Irene Johnston 

Laura Mensel Jayne Evans Lorna Murray Bertha Robison Elizabeth Holbrook 



Ce£ta Tie 



"All would I .have my friend to me; that must I be to her 
and more" is the motto of the girls of the Cesta Tie Social 
Unit. 

The members promote friendship, not only among the 
sisters of the unit, but also among all B.Y.U. girls. Culture, 
education, tolerance, scholarship, sportsmanship, and social 
activity are all ideals fostered by this club. As members of 
the associated students of the Brigham Young University 
Cesta Tie girls aim to willingly support all student body 
projects. Cooperation and congeniality are evidenced by 
their participation in nearly every school undertaking. They 
have representatives in nearly every phase of school activity. 

Outstanding activities of the past year include the 
Autumn invitational dancing party held at Provo First Ward, 
numerous rush parties, including banquets given by and for 
the new members of the club held at Keeleys and first ward, 
respectively, Annual Christmas Tea held at the Old Colonial 
House, formal dancing party, featuring a Persian Garden, 
given in the City and County Building, Alumni Reception 
held at Hotel Temple Square in Salt Lake, and the annual 
spring invitational dancing party. 

The 1933-34 officers are Dorothy Hunn, president; Beth 
Richards, vice-president; Launa Mercer, secretary; and 
Bertha Robison, treasurer. 



Dorothy Hunn 
President 




Fifty-eight 







Lenore Condie Louise Richards Aline Rawson Fay Johnson Pearl Callis Arlene Harris 

Lo Ree Rawson Helen Harris Florence Todd La Vada Westover Alison Comish 

Dona Dastrup Lucile Skinner Mary Brown Frances Seaton Hazel Anderson Gloria Friel 

Beth Swenson Nadine Taylor Margaret Hansen Ione Rich Theresa Hansen 

Madelyn Harrison May Seaton Beth Paxman Caroline Hansen Carol Bennett Katherine Stokes 

Margarett Reese La June Brown Mary Dahlquist Lillian Stokes Laura Callis Gerry Eggertsen 



May Seaton 
President 




Val Norn 

During the year the Val Norn social unit has upheld 
its ideal of well-rounded activity among its members. This 
has resulted in a closer friendship, not only among the mem- 
bers of the unit, but also with other members of the student 
body. 

The unit is one of the well-established organizations on 
the campus, being one of the first to receive a charter in 
1927. A strong alumni group has been functioning for more 
than two years and has given support and encouragement 
to the projects of the active group. 

Social functions of the year have included the annual 
summer vacation week at Wildwood, numerous rush parties 
and a fashion tea during the get-acquainted period in the 
fall; a formal dinner-dance during the winter quarter, danc- 
ing parties, a Spring Invitational party, and a Mother's Tea 
at commencement time. 

Officers for the year were: May Seaton, president; Beth 
Paxman, vice-president; Arlene Harris, secretary; La June 
Brown, treasurer; Nadine Taylor, reporter; Mrs. Alonzo 
Morley, sponsor. 



Fifty-nine 




Margaret Bird Naomi Halliday Marjorie Seegmiller Maureen Harris Esther Maycock 

Mary Clark Betty Cutler Irene Houston Afton Anderson 

Zula Hansen Fern Christensen Alice Huckins Barbara Reid Ruth Huffaker 

Marjorie Beth Smith Myrl Washburn Ione Robinson Mary Brown 

Evelyn Prusse Flora Kenny Olive Ogden Helen Boyer Velda Hone 

Thelma McKinnon Rhoda Young Tess Packard Neva Hansen 



Fidel 



as 

The Fidelas aim is to be a true social unit and sponsor 
intelligent cooperation and close fellowship among members 
of the school. The name of the unit itself, Amici Fidelas 
Ami, means lasting friendship. 

The purpose of the Fidelas is a reflection of the social 
unit purpose as a whole, that is, to sponsor higher standards 
in social and scholastic activities, and to foster close and 
lasting friendships. 

In order to materialize this fellowship ideal, the Fidelas 
members cooperate with each other in school activities and 
enter such competitions as the Pep Vodie and basketball 
tournaments with enthusiasm and vigor. 

The social phase of the school life of Fidelas members 
is enriched by their formal party held in February, the spring 
invitational party at the Copper Club in Magna, and many 
other informal parties. 

Officers for the year 1933-34 are: Alice Huckins, presi- 
dent; Mary Brown, vice-president; Esther Maycock, secre- 
tary-treasurer; Marjorie Seegmiller, reporter. 



Alice Huckins 
President 




Sixty 




Maza Christensen Floy Hansen Kathryn Davis Jessie Kay Mangum Cecile Clark 

Clarice Brunt Beulah Sowards Norma Pardoe Helen Dixon LaPriel Myers 

Louise Ollerton Aline Holdaway Tony Wilson Zona Brunt Anna Lou Peterson 

Vera Jackson Lorna Wentz Maurine Romney Jenny Romney Belle Fillmore 

Florence Allen Ruth Stevens Helen McCallister Gwen Ashman Mae Christensen 

Afton Hodson Wilma Kotter Martha McCallister Theresa Hagan Josephine Johnson 



Floy Hansen 
President 




O. S. Trovata 

The characteristics of a worthwhile group are: high 
scholastic standings, sociability, pep, enthusiasm, interest in 
all activities of the school, and a determination to put these 
qualities into each undertaking. O. S. is symbolic of all these 
and many more. 

The O. S. Trovata is composed of girls of high ideals 
who foster and maintain activities which will keep the high 
standards, so familiar on our campus, ever prominent. The 
aim is enduring friendship and a sincere attitude toward all. 
Their interest in activities of the school is paramount. 

This year the unit has sponsored many outstanding 
events. These include: clever rushing parties, and informal 
dancing parties, invitational dancing party, formal dinner 
dance, numerous canyon parties, progressive dinner party, 
and many other similar occasions. 

This year the O. S. won the annual Pep Vodie by 
giving a clever portrayal of "King Solomon's Court," thus 
showing their interest in student body activities. 

The officers for the year are: Floy Hansen, president; 
Ruth Stevens, vice-president; Myrtle Sowards, secretary; 
Helen McAllister, treasurer: Josephine Sowards, correspond- 
ing secretary; and Belle Fillmore, reporter. 



Sixty-one 




Ila Schow Ruby Cox Lois Greenwood Ailsa Page 

Phyllis Armistead Barbara Perrett Sara White 

Helen Jorgensen Velma Christensen Winifred Smith Doreyn Latimer 

Roberta Wilde Genevieve Fugal Myrth Allen 

Norma Miner Sybil Clark Faye Page Mary Bayles 

Phyllis Ball Louise Boyer Evelyn Miner 



Les Ceciliennes 



The Les Ceciliennes Social Unit, under the able direc- 
tion of Margaret Summerhays, is the only unit of its kind 
on the B.Y.U. campus. It has as its chief interest the finer 
appreciation and presentation of good music. 

Social activities have included: the annual autumn Tea. 
the theatre party for the rushees, a novel "kids" party, a 
delightful Christmas party in American Fork, an invitational 
informal dancing party at the Ladies Club House and the 
regular bi-monthly socials. 

Musical activities have been many. The unit participated 
in the KSL pep broadcast, the Paramount Theatre pep rally, 
Leadership Week programs, and programs in several schools 
and wards. 

Two annual events climaxed a year of unusual success. 
These were: The formal Spring Concert in College Hall, an 
event culminating months of anticipation and effort, and the 
Invitational Formal dancing party held at the McCune 
School of Music in Salt Lake City. 

Officers for the year were: Genevieve Fugal. president; 
Sara White, vice-president; Louise Boyer, reporter; Phyllis 
Ball, secretary-treasurer; and Ruby Cox, librarian. 



Genevieve Fugal 
President 




Sixty-two 




Reta Woodward Lilia Menzies Louise Smith Una Barton 

Maurine Yarbrough Oleah Rockwood Margaret Llewellyn 

June Farnes Beulah Strickler Thelma Larsen Mildred Peay 

Miriam Larsen Rhea Larsen Celia Larsen 

Arma Lay Ina Lindsay Afton Kay Ednal Shanks 

Leota Roskelly Vivian Crosby Moniece Waters 



June Farnes 
President 




Alta Mifkras 

This is the first year that the Alta Mithras Social Unit 
has been on the campus of the B.Y.U. and it has been a 
very successful one. It was organized to enrich the college 
experience of its members through the sincere friendships of 
congenial and friendly girls from widely scattered places. 

The symbol of the unit is the torch, since Mithras was 
the Persian God of light, and it represents the light of truth 
and wisdom. The aim of the members is to be true to their 
own individual ideals and standards as well as those of the 
University. 

The success of this year intensifies the hopefulness felt 
for next year's activities. A number of very successful parties 
have been held during the year. A George Washington Ball 
was held in conjunction with the Thalian Social Unit and 
proved a delightful affair. A formal dinner-dance held during 
the Spring Quarter culminated the unit's social activities for 
the year of 1933-34. 

Miss Beulah Strickler is the faculty adviser and the 
officers are as follows: June Farnes, president; Una Barton, 
vice-president; Oleah Rockwood, secretary-treasurer; and 
Leota Roskelly, reporter. 



Sixty-three 




Marjorie Cooper Rhea Stalworthy Gladys Sorenson Merlene Gardner 

Mary Leonard Verle Paulson Anna Deen Scott 

Marinda Bennion Helen Farrar Margret Boyer Doris Larson 

Nola Comer Dorothy Stringham Rosiland Taylor 

Melba Brower Jeane Smith Helen Wheeler Naomi Zumbrunnen 

Norrinne Checketts Lucy Rice Wanda Crandall 



La Vadis 



The La Vadis Social Unit, organized in 1932 with eight 
charter members, has as its aim, "the development of ini- 
tiative through activity of every girl in the unit, that she may 
be a leader for good in college, church, and community." 

Through combining scholarship and social activity the 
unit has been one of the most active groups on the campus. 
Its members are represented in all student activities and have 
tried to cooperate with the student body at all times in up- 
holding its aims and ideals. 

Social events of the year included: several interesting 
fall rush parties, Annual Spring Invitational using a "Cherry 
Blossom Theme," a canyon party, Hallowe'en and Christmas 
dances, a New Year's party in Salt Lake, a Novelty Sport 
Dance, the Annual Valentine Tea held February 14, and the 
Spring Garden party held at the home of Mrs. L. L. Culli- 
more. 

The unit has been guided this year by Margret Boyer. 
president; Marinda Bennion. vice-president; Gladys Soren- 
son, secretary; and Edith Cannon, treasurer. Mrs. L. L. 
Cullimore is sponsor of the group. 



Margret Boyer 
President 




Sixty-four 




Lois Peterson Lenore Jane Benedict Mary Broadbent Maud Snell 

Eleanor Nicholes Lavina Whitney Della Snell Retta Coombs 

Clara Moore Glenna MacFarlane Mrs. Wayne B. Hales Mima Broadbent 

Alice Humphrey Grace Thomas Eleanor Brown Althea Marsden 

Sylvia Young Lucile Hundley Erma Young Maydell Pistole Nedra Simpkins 

Rhean McAllister Dorothy Janson Ellen Scorup Helen Huish 



Retta Coombs 
President 




Ta Lenta 

To each girl who has discovered a special talent must 
come an opportunity to develop and use that talent. Two years 
ago, the Ta Lenta Social Unit was organized to develop 
talents, to foster a spirit of sociability, and to help raise the 
scholastic standards of the Brigham Young University. It 
has been an undertaking of youth, for youth is "the time of 
seeking and finding, of trying and testing." It is a time 
"for learning and doing, for beauty and grace, for growth 
and development." 

Although comparatively new, the unit has not been in- 
active socially. In the fall quarter dancing parties were held. 
During the winter quarter the Annual Invitational Birthday 
Tea was given. In the spring quarter the special feature was 
a formal dinner dance at the Hotel Roberts. Numerous other 
get-to-gethers, such as hikes and house parties, have been 
enjoyed. 

Representative of the unit are the officers: Retta Combs, 
president; Mary Broadbent, vice-president; Mima Broadbent, 
secretary-treasurer; Rowena Hutchings Rigtrup, correspond- 
ing secretary and historian; and Mrs. Wayne B. Hales, 
faculty sponsor. 



Sixty-five 




Bernice Bailey 

Marie Miller 
Catherine Bowles 

Melba Jensen 
Minnie Hardman 

VlRGA BARTHOLEMEW 



Margaret Tholen Maude Shawcroft 

Ruth Mendenhall Winnifred McDonald 

Orpha Soffe Mona Wilson 

Marjorie Wagers Fern Fairbanks 

Helen Janssen Anna Hardman Dee Shawcroft 



Estella Mortensen 



Christella Hansen 



Em Anon 

The Em Anon Social Unit made its appearance on the 
campus in the fall of 1933. It grew out of one of the sponsor 
groups, which are organized for the purpose of helping new 
students become acquainted with each other and the cus- 
toms of the University. This group was initiated as the 
"Double Decade" club at Dean Smart's home on October 19. 

The unit encourages cultural development, social ac- 
tivity, and the democratic spirit of the Y. 

A clever hard-times party, rush parties, a semi-formal 
dance at Keeley's, a hike to the Y, canyon outings, an in- 
vitational barn dance, and a dinner dance at Springville 
are among the social activities participated in by the unit. 
At the Annual Girls' Jamboree the Em Anon Unit won first 
prize for the largest family. Brigham Young and fourteen 
of his wives comprised the group. 

The officers of the unit are: Orpha Soffe, president; 
Marie Miller, vice-president; Winnifred McDonald, secre- 
tary; Melba Jensen, historian; and Catherine Bowles, re- 
porter. Mrs. Gerrit de Jong, Jr., is the sponsor of the group. 



Orpha Soffe 
President 




Sixty-six 




Marjorie Stevens Edith Young Josephine Smith Maud Green 

Faye Greer Louise Zabriskie Anita Smoot 

Helen Swenson Ruth Crane Leola Green Norma Crane 

Maurine Jones Afton Bingham Virginia Teerlink 

Emma Farnsworth Evelyn Mickelson Jessie NeVille Ellen Binns 

Wyla Johnson Helen Childs Helen Young Anna Dee Coons 



Phylis Robinson 
President 



«e-~ 'ty'-m/m -» -J^r 




mm 




■Jjgi jjr =? 1 




mi 


wBf L f i 






W\w j 




^1 


^** Tp ..▼ 


&*: ' 






•^WPl 






-^J- A 


t~~ 


1 


"~m\^m 


i 





Nautilus 

Each year the Blue and Gold of Nautilus are receiving 
new friends into its iris dwelling — the coil of the living pearl. 
Nautilus symbolizes the development of friendship, and love 
of friends shines more brightly when it is linked with a 
lofty purpose. The motto of the club is "Excelsior." 

The N.L.U. girls are an active group in the fullest sense 
of the word. They make school life interesting by inter- 
spersing it with dancing parties, dinners, teas, and other 
socials. They love the girls within their unit and make each 
one feel that she is welcome. 

The girls are builders, for they have built ideals and 
standards of the highest type — Guilders just as a Nautilus 
in the sea. They are creative, for they have composed and 
written the songs of their club, and they are happy, because 
they have reaped joy and satisfaction at the end of their 
conquest. 

Officers for the latter part of the year include: Phylis 
Robinson, president; Leola Green, vice-president; Anita 
Smoot, secretary; Louise Zabriskie, treasurer; and Maurine 
Jones, reporter. Mrs. Fred Dixon acts as faculty advisor. 



Sixty-seven 




Nick Udall Harold Van Wagenen Oakley Evans Vee Call 

Tom Eastmond Robert Olson Ferron Losee 

Dean Van Wagenen Floyd Millet Horald Bateman Ralph Alder 

Reed Thornton Marion Olsen Harold Armstrong 

J om Bullock Phil Hansen Kenneth Taylor Elvon Jackson 

Carl Warnick Roy Hudson Meredith Wilson 



Brickers 

The Bricker Social Unit, formerly known as the Nug- 
gets, stands for the highest development of its members, so- 
cially, scholastically, and culturally. The unit was organized 
in 1917 as the Goldbricker's Club with sixteen charter mem- 
bers. When the social unit system was adopted, they were 
among the first clubs to be affiliated and granted a charter. 
They took the name of Nuggets and functioned under that 
name for several years. This year they went back to the 
old name of Brickers. 

The Brickers aim to combine a genuine interest in schol- 
arship and student body activities with a congenial social 
life, hoping to get from this union a real benefit and pleasure 
while getting an education. 

The social activities of the year have been very suc- 
cessful and have included the annual Thanksgiving formal 
dinner-dance at the Hotel Roberts which represented a set- 
ting in ancient Egypt, a New Year's Eve progressive dinner 
and theatre party, a dancing party at the Van Wagenen 
home, a Bowery Ball with the Tausig Social Unit which was 



Carl Warnick 
President 




Sixty-eight 




Woodrow Wilson Wayne Millet Rudger Jones Joe Swenson 

Delbert Young Rex Thomas Barr Miller 

Vern Waldo William Reeder Webster Decker Don Alder 

Dick Clark Joe Johnson Jack Eastmond 

Albert Swenson Angus Bodily Hugh Cannon Joe Dean 

Floyd McIntire William Carr Bennie Schmidt 



Brickers 

held on Provo Bench, a spring misfit brawl, a spring invita- 
tional dance, and the crowning event of the social activities, 
the annual Spring Festival, a three-day outing that is held 
in Provo Canyon at the end of the school year. 

Besides being active socially, the unit prides itself on 
the members who are outstanding in student body and extra- 
curricular activities. 

In athletics the Brickers have members who are out- 
standing in football, basketball, tennis, wrestling, and track. 
In the intramural competitions the unit made an excellent 
showing in several of the activities. 

Of all its activities, the thing which best characterizes 
the unit's spirit is its bi-monthly luncheon which fosters the 
fraternal spirit so necessary among the members of any suc- 
cessful organization. 

Among the alumni who have been taking graduate work 
and have been active socially are: Chauncey Harris, Ellis 
Graham, Claude Snow, Wreal Lott, and Smith Jacobs. 

The unit has been unusually successful in all of its 
activities under the leadership of the following officers: Carl 
Warnick, president; Don Alder, vice-president; Oakley 
Evans, treasurer; and Tom Eastmond, secretary. 

Sixty-nine 




□liCE 




wllklns nuttal mllton nelson douglas merrill robert sneddon howard peterson 

Jim McGuire Jack McGuire Daryl Huish Fred Kartchener 

David Saben Scott Benson Levi Reynolds Ray McGuire Walter Pitcher 

Howard Forsyth Joseph Seethaller Morris Duke Duane Anderson 

Marcel Bird Merrill Croft Averil Nielson Harris Walker 

Ariel Davis Guy Callahan Bill Hasler Jerome Platt 



Brigadier 



Brigadier Social Unit entered its third year last fall with 
an increased membership and a more comprehensive activity 
program. 

Under the leadership of Howard Forsyth, president; 
and Douglas Merrill, secretary; this young unit has had a 
very successful year viewed in the light of expansion and 

activity. 

An invitational dancing party, December 8, in the First 
Ward amusement hall climaxed the activities for the fall 
quarter. This large invitational affair marked the initiation 
of the new Brigadier shield, which is strikingly constructed 
in black and silver and lighted indirectly. 

A military theme, in line with the name of the unit, was 
worked out in the Ladies' Gym when Brigadiers sponsored a 
student body dance during the winter quarter. The varied 
party program was concluded with a party at the Old Mill 
at the end of the spring quarter. 

A successful participation in intramural sports was en- 
joyed by the Brigadiers. Unit teams were entered in almost 
every event. 

Other officers of the club are: Daryl Huish, personnel 
chairman; and Howard Peterson, athletic manager. 



Howard Forsyth 
President 




Seventy 




Floyd Goodrich Don Neilson Kenneth Lewis Rex Larsen 

Charles Menzies Lee Wiscombe Floyd Mortensen Robert Parker 

Jess Buchanan John Lytle Clifton Boyack Tony Shalfoon 

Elmo Nelson Edmund Evans Ermel Morton Nathan Allen 

Reece Faucette Edgar Dunn Merrill Hammond Stan Orser 

Eldon Reese Dale Despain Paul Murphy Fred Musser 



Robert Parker 
President 




Mates 

The Mate Social Unit was organized seven years ago 
by a group of fellows whose interest gave them a common 
bond of friendship which they wished to preserve. Each 
member is expected to be a true mate to his brother members, 
and everyone supports the highest standard of student schol- 
arship and activity. 

The unit is very democratic and represents to a high 
degree a cross section of the school. It draws its members 
from everywhere and the interests and hobbies show a great 

variety. 

Members of the unit participate in school activities such 
as athletics, debating, music, dramatics, and student govern- 
ment. In the intra-mural activities the unit participated, thus 
showing its interest in student body activities. 

Social activities for the year have included several in- 
formal dancing parties and the usual bi-monthly business 

meetings. 

Much credit is due the officers for the successful and 

happy voyage for the past year. They are: Robert Parker, 

president; Paul Murphy, vice-president; Theron Lambert. 

secretary-treasurer; Clifton Boyack, reporter and publicity 

manager; and Tony Shalfoon, athletic manager. 



Seventy-one 




Phillip Knight 
Marian Rowe 



Owen Rowe 

Jim Tucker 



Francis Rowe 
J. E. Allen, Jr. 



Smoot Brimhall 
Niles Vest 



Ray Jenkins 

Gilman Jensen 



Tausigs 

The Tausigs appeared on the campus in 1922 under the 
name of the "Three I's." Glen Guymon, popular varsity 
dramatic star, was instrumental in its organization and was 
its first president. In 1923 the Brigham Young University 
banished from the campus all clubs, but due to the brother- 
hood ties established during the first years of its formation, 
the Tausig Club remained intact until the instigation of 
the present social unit system under President Franklin S. 
Harris, at which time it was approved as one of the social 
units to function on the campus. It was one of the first 
units to be granted a charter and allowed to function as an 
organization. 

Since the inauguration of the present social unit system, 
the Tausigs have endeavored to maintain the cultural, social, 
and scholastic standards set up by the Brigham Young Uni- 
versity. 

Tausigs have for their members, students who are out- 
standingly active in all phases of school life. The unit has 
representatives in athletics, dramatics, publications, student 
government, music, and other extra-curricular activities. 



Orval Okelberry 
President 




Seventy-two 




Earl Wignall 
George Neslen 



Harry Dixon Kenneth Cannon Russell Foutz Taylor Nuttal 

Willard Nelson Dave Hibbert Bernard Walker 



Tausigs 



The primary aims of the Tausigs have been to further 
leadership, socialistic achievement, cultural development, and 
scholastic advancement in college life. It has always main- 
tained unusually fine cooperation and individual advance- 
ment among its members, who have worked always with the 
slogan "OMNIS UNO" ever in mind. 

The Tausig social register for the current year includes 
many outstanding social events. Besides the regular meet- 
ings, outstanding events have included: a revival party, the 
annual Christmas invitational dancing party, the annual 
Tausig-Nugget bury-the-hatchet party which was a bowery 
brawl this year, and the glamorous and colorful annual 
formal dinner-dance. 

Last spring Truxton Purvance was elected president of 
the unit for this year, but he failed to return to school. Orval 
Okelberry succeeded him in this position. 

A new and revised constitution was presented to the 
inter-social unit council by the Tausigs because of a slight 
infraction of the school rules, and it was highly praised and 
commended by this committee. 

Officers for the current year who have worked so hard 
to make 1933-34 an outstanding year are: Orval Okelberry. 
president; Smoot Brimhall, vice-president; Gilman Jensen, 
secretary; Ray Jenkins, treasurer, Harry Dixon, reporter; 
Kenneth Cannon, athletic manager; and A. Rex Johnson, 
faculty advisor. 



Seventy-three 




Golden Taylor 

Glen Black 

Norman Freestone 

Lyndon Dudley 



Joe McEwan 

Kay Hart 

Ray Fahring 

Boyce Clark 



Eldon Ball 

Duane Ballard 
Herbert Taylor 

Archie Romney 



Vern Bullock 

LaVerne Ungricht 
LaMar Taylor 

Mennell Taylor 



Val Hyrics 



Gradually achieving eminence and success the Val Hyric 
Social Unit has done fitting honor to its eight charter mem- 
bers of 1928. Dedicated primarily to chivalry and good fel- 
lowship the unit also fosters high standards in scholarship 
and extra-curricular activities. 

The individual welfare of the members is a large order, 
but Val Hyrics has fostered athletic and social activities, 
in which mass participation has been outstanding. 

The monthly party has become an outstanding social 
event for members of the unit. This year, these have been 
not only dancing parties, but also picnics, steak-frys, and 
stag parties. The annual formal was very successful under 
an able committee headed by Glen Black and Bruce Wake- 
field. The spring invitational was a worthy party, display- 
ing the good-fellowship that exists between the members 
of the Val Hyric and those of other units. This party was 
planned by LaVerne Ungricht and Delbert Bean. 

The Val Hyrics demonstrated their enthusiasm and in- 
terest in student body activities by entering a winning act 
in the annual Pep Vodie. "The Three Little Pigs" was the 
title of the presentation and was awarded third prize by the 
judges. 



Karl Jameson 
President 




Seventy-tour 




Lloyd Young Virgil Wedge Karl Jameson Lloyd Peterson 

Hatch Farnsworth Harry Mitchell Marshal Huffaker Sheldon Hayes 

Delbert Bean Byron Geslison Grant Hutchinson Blaine Allen 

Don Greenwood Marvel Hutchinson LeGrande Dunkley Wesley Bayles 



Val Hyrics 



Besides being active socially the unit has entered into 
other fields such as dramatics, art, music, and athletics. In 
the intra-mural contests Val Hyrics were winners in all ac- 
tivities such as volleyball, basketball, track, and tennis. 

The Val Hyrics have enjoyed one of the most success- 
ful years of its history. The membership has increased from 
fifteen to thirty-eight members and the unit has become one 
of the most active organizations on the campus. 

The most distinctive social activity was held in the 
Springville Second Ward Hall on the seventeenth of Febru- 
ary. A valentine theme was carried out in decorations, re- 
freshments and favors. Favors were gold chain necklaces 
with heart pendants on which were inscribed the initials of 
the guests and unit. Featured numbers were presented by 
the Maori quartet. Dr. and Mrs. George H. Hansen and 
Professor and Mrs. A. Rex Johnson were patrons for the 
evening. 

No little credit for this year's success is due the untir- 
ing efforts of the following officers: Karl Jameson, president; 
Marshall Huffaker, vice-president; Lloyd Peterson, secretary- 
treasurer; Joe McEwan, athletic manager; La Verne Ungricht, 
director of publicity; and Duane Ballard, social unit council 
representative. 



Seventy-five 





222IL 




Jay Schofield Bert Fulmer Ken Brown Clyde Washburn 

Sherman Wing Weldon Alldredge Jay Nelson 

Jack Brown Jennings Evans Waldo LeSueur David Merrill 

Neff Smart Walter Clark Don Alldredge 

Lawrence Brown Vern Scott Ray Alleman Phil Christensen 

Lyman Partridge Lynn Wright Roe Thorn 



Vikings 



The aim of the Viking Social Unit is to encourage and 
further the spirit of democracy, friendship, fellowship, and 
all other high ideals which are characteristic of the Brigham 
Young University. 

This year the Vikings have taken advantage of the firm 
foundation which was built by its members in the six pre- 
ceding years of successful activity, and have added many 
steps with the tools of friendship and unity in the direction 
of their goal. These steps have been built of materials such 
as social parties that have the popular conception of being 
novel, entertaining, and lively. 

The first affair of the year was a rush party held in 
the City and County Building, and another similar one 
soon followed at the Old Colonial House. Then came the 
outstanding event of the year, the annual formal dinner- 
dance. Its theme was "Matrimony" and it was held for the 
third consecutive year in the Second Ward Amusement Hall 
at Springville on Thanksgiving Eve, climaxing the activities 
of the autumn. 

The winter brought with it a dancing party at Spanish 
Fork, another at American Fork, and the annual Jiggs party 
which was held at the Provo Odd Fellow's Hall. Spring 



Jay Nelson 
President 






Km 


jar 


mm 

1 H ~<> — a 


^b2 






■ ' liiask. 



Seventy-six 









mh 




Wendell Vance Virgil Stice 

Boyd Page 
Gordan Braun Jack Shaw 

June Payne 
Max Andrews Ivan Willey 

Ralph Jenson 



Roy Hammond Bill Howe 

Kenn Petersen Dale Jones 

Alton Merrill Earl Cottam 

Weldon Hughs Verl Whiting 

Everett Pullen Preston Hughs 

Wallace Gardner Kay Hammond 



Vikings 



socials included the annual barn party which was held at 
the Utah State Hospital, the annual invitational semi-formal, 
and a Utah Lake boat party. 

The Vikings were honored by annexing second place in 
the annual Pep Vodie for the fourth consecutive year, thus 
cementing another step firmly to the history of the past. Their 
act was a clever portrayal entitled "Brigham Young's Fa- 
vorite Son." 

They have shown themselves unsurpassable in athletics 
by coming through the season undefeated in inter-unit 
basketball for the second successful year. The Vikings are 
well represented in the student government, publications, 
dramatics, public speaking, debating, and music. 

Much credit is due the officers who so skillfully gener- 
aled the Vikings through this year of outstanding achieve- 
ments. They are: Jay Nelson, president; David Merrill, vice- 
president; Roy Hammond, secretary and historian; Wallace 
Gardner, treasurer; and Ivan Willey, athletic manager. 

By holding their enviable position in all phases of school 
activity, and displaying their spirit of democracy, true friend- 
ship, and high ideals the Vikings are sailing onward into 
years of greater success and accomplishments. 



Seventy-seven 




Louise Nielsen Genevieve Fugal Helen Cook Alison Comish 

Edith Young Wilma Jeppson LaPriel Myers 

Floy Hansen Helen McAllister Afton Anderson Irene Johnson 

Norma Pardoe Helen McAllister Hazel Anderson 

Leola Green Helen Harris LaVada Westover Helen Boyer 

Wilma Kotter Leona Gibbons Willa Sowards 



White Keys 



With white costumes, blue and white shakers, a spirit 
of enthusiasm, and a motto of service, the White Keys made 
their appearance on the campus of Brigham Young Univer- 
sity in the autumn quarter of 1933. 

This honorary organization corresponds to Blue Key. 
honorary for men. and membership is confined to women 
students who are outstanding in activities on the Y campus. 

White Keys have sponsored pep assemblies, aided with 
dances, and served as guides at conventions, such as the 
journalistic and the commercial contest for the students of 
high schools of the state. During the football season, the 
White Keys appeared in costumes, and performed with the 
band during the half. At every basketball game they ap- 
peared on the south side of the gymnasium to help with yells 
and to perform stunts. 

Social activities have included bi-monthly meetings, 
pledge breakfast at Keeley's, a steak-fry, and a party with 
the Blue Keys. 

Officers for the year are: LaPriel Myers, president; Wil- 
ma Kotter, vice-president; Helen Harris, secretary; Alison Co- 
mish, corresponding secretary; Hazel Anderson, historian; 
Mrs. E. H. Eastmond, honorary member; and Miss Wilma 
Jeppson, sponsor. 



LaPriel Myers 
President 




Seventy-eight 




Bill Martin Neff Smart Joe Johnson Dale Jones Chauncy Harris 

Lyman Partridge Jack Brown Floyd Millet Earl Cottam 

Harold Christensen George H. Hansen John Talmage E. H. Eastmond Ray McGuire 

Jay Nelson G. Ott Romney Carlton Culmsee Oakley Evans 

Wendall Vance Bill Carr Phil Christensen Meredith Wilson 

Weldon Taylor Del Young Kenn Peterson Ralph Jenson 



Blue Key 



Neff Smart 
President 




Blue Key is an honor society which takes for members 
only outstanding leaders in student body activities. Its pur- 
pose is to study, discuss, and strive to further the best in- 
terest of Brigham Young University, to promote a spirit of 
fraternalism among the students of the institution, and to 
otherwise fulfill the obligations set forth in the pledge of 
Blue Key and Motto: "Serving I Live." 

This is the second year of the Blue Key activity on the 
campus, the chapter being installed June 3, 1932, and it has 
been an unusually active one. It was under the leadership 
of this club that the Freshman Trek was inaugurated for the 
first time on the campus last year, and it was even more 
successful this year. Homecoming Day was planned and 
directed by the Blue Key members, and a Christmas Carnival 
for students was sponsored during the Christmas Holidays. 

The organization does not attempt to function socially. 
The members met monthly at luncheons and a formal dinner- 
dance is given every April. Officers are: Neff Smart, presi- 
dent; Weldon Taylor, vice-president; William P. Martin, 
secretary; Kenn Peterson, treasurer; and George H. Hansen, 
sergeant-at-arms. 



Seventy-nine 




Orval Okelberry Len G. Sterling Harry Blackwell Hyrum J. Smith 

Stewart Grow Gilbert Chatwin A. T. Ludlow Ray Jenkins 

Hatch Farnsworth Bernard S. Walker Marvell Hatch La Verne Ungricht 

Joseph Seethaler Lynne Wright Karl M. Jameson Jack Owen 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



In 1923 some of the active students of the school of 
commerce organized a club for the purpose of fostering social 
contacts for those students whose work was in the commerce 
department. On January 14, 1928, the club was granted a 
national charter and was admitted to the ranks of Alpha 
Kappa Psi, national commercial fraternity, as the Beta Delta 
chapter. There were forty-three charter members. 

This year the local chapter has achieved national dis- 
tinction through attaining first place in the national efficiency 
contest which is based upon professional activity, research 
project, service to the school of commerce, scholarship, fi- 
nancial administration, membership, chapter administration, 
ritual and pledge training, and chapter publicity. This is a 
great achievement in view of the fact that Beta Delta chap- 
ter rated only forty-fifth last year. First place was also 
achieved in the best survey published. It was entitled, "Con- 
sumers' Practices in Purchasing." This year the fraternity 
has hung a scholarship plaque in the hall of the Maeser 
Memorial Building on which is to be inscribed each year 
the name of the outstanding Junior in the college of com- 
merce. A medallion is also presented to that student. This 
year Oakley Evans was awarded the scholarship. 



President 
Earl Wignall 




Eighty 




Earl Wignall 

Elmo Geary 
Jay Schofield 

Jennings Evans 



Joe McEwan 

Weldon J. Taylor 
Kay Hart 

Spencer Grow 



Aaron Brown 

Don Alder 

Rudger Jones 

Harry Mitchell 



A. Rex Johnson 

Oakley Evans 
Virgil Wedge 

Gilman Jenson 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



The bi-monthly luncheons this year have had such 
guests as: Earl J. Glade of KSL; Harold S. Jennings, sec- 
retary of the Utah Manufacturers' Association; Gus P. Back- 
man, N.R.A. administrator for Utah; H. R. Hurren, Federal 
Reserve Bank Guaranty Deposit Commissioner, and the 
deans and professors of our local Commerce College. 

Social events for the year have included the annual win- 
ter formal dinner-dance, a spring birthday party, and a 
mothers' reception. 

Not a little of the unusual success of the chapter this 
year has been due to the untiring work of the District Coun- 
selor, A. Rex Johnson. When school began last fall the 
chapter had only ten members, but through his efforts the 
membership was increased to thirty-eight. 

The officers of the organization include: Earl Wignall. 
president; William Haslam, vice-president; Albert Ludlow, 
secretary; Arthur Zabriskie, treasurer; Bernard Walker, mas- 
ter of rituals; Don Alder, director of publicity; Stewart Grow, 
alumni secretary; Harry Sundwall, chaplain; Clarence Tay- 
lor, historian; and A. Rex Johnson, faculty advisor. 



Eighty-one 




Forace Green 

G. L. Woolf 
Spencer Grow 

Maurice Jones 
Harold Christensen 

Bill Carr 



Marian Olson 

Ted Young 

Ernest Eberhard 

Weldon Taylor 

Glen Randall 

Angus Bodily 



Dave Miller 

Joe Dean 
Eugene Bryson 

David Allred 
Ferron Losee 

Joseph McAllister 



Smith Jacobs 

Meredith Wilson 
Otto Done 

Harold Van Wagenen 
Paul Brunt 

George White 



Delta Phi 

Sixty-five years ago Delta Phi was organized at the State 
University. Its purpose then was to foster public speaking 
and to promote a spirit of brotherhood among college men 
who had particiated in Christian missionary service. At the 
Y the organization was first known as the Y.D.D. club and 
became affiliated with the Friars club at the University of 
Utah. Three chapters in Utah and one in California effected 
a definite organization in 1930 known as Delta Phi honorary 
fraternity. 

Delta Phi now has chapters at Brigham Young Uni- 
versity. Utah State Agricultural College, University of Utah, 
University of Southern California, Weber, University of Ida- 
ho Southern Branch, and an alumni chapter in Salt Lake 

City. 

The organization is open only to male returned mis- 
sionaries. Its primary functions are meetings, public service, 
socials, banquets, and athletics. In these the fraternity aims 
to assist with the readjustment from the work in the mission 
field. 

The B.Y.U. chapter pledges its wholehearted support 
to the Church authorities. Its beliefs and ideals are those of 
the Church. Its members feel the same urge for active 
Church service that they did in the mission field. Its purpose 
is to assist in the advancement of the work of the Lord. 



Weldon Taylor 
President 




Eighty-tivo 




Roy Broadbent 

Reed Maughn 
Berne Kindred 

Francis Grimmett 
Marlow Wootton 

Jennings Evans 



Weldon Bascom 

Howard Bird 

Kay B. Redd 

Wilmer Tanner 

Maron Hiatt 

Harold Smith 



Kenneth Duke 

Virgil Peterson 
Cecil Dimick 

LeRoy Condie 
William Reeder 

Homer H. Royle 



Hugh Parks 

Wesly Bayles 
Stanley Christensen 

Nathan Hale 
Joseph Johnson 

Orran Ashby 



Delta Phi 

The events of the past year have been successfully led 
by Weldon Taylor, president; Eugene Bryson, vice-presi- 
dent; and Joseph McCallister, secretary and treasurer. Forty 
new members, including two former mission presidents, were 
initiated. This brings the chapter's membership to sixty. 
Twenty-two missions are represented by this group. 

Meetings have been held every week at which such 
prominent men as Dr. John A. Widtsoe, Earl J. Glade, and 
President F. S. Harris have been the speakers. Two vic- 
tories over the U. of U. and the U.S.A.C. chapters gave the 
Y its third consecutive basketball championship. Many sac- 
rament meeting programs have been given by the members 
in various wards during the year. 

The first social event was a banquet held in the Third 
Ward hall at which alumni and other chapter members were 
guests. This was followed by several social and informal 
dancing parties and a formal dance in March. The climax 
to the social events was a fraternity formal in April in the 
University of Utah Union Building to which all chapters 
were invited. 

Harold Christensen was elected president for next year 
with Paul Brunt as vice-president and Theodore Young, sec- 
retary and treasurer. 



Eighty-three 




Vern Scott Darlene Owens Alison Comish Chauncy Harris 

Del Young ]oe Swenson Harold Van Wagenen 

RoyBroadbent Oakley Evans Ferron Losee Grant Hutchinson 

Merrill Croft Louise Nielsen Herbert Taylor 

Neff Smart Ernest Dean Weldon Taylor Sylvan Stevens Norma Miner Lamar Taylor 



Block Y 

The Block Y Club, which is an organization having for 
members only those students who have won the official uni- 
versity letter in intercollegiate competition, has for its pur- 
pose the fostering of friendship between members, and the 
maintenance of a high regard and reverence for the block 
letter. It is the duty of the organization to protect the Y 
against abuse and disrespect. 

This year the club undertook a worthy project, that of 
raising funds with which to give the lettermen's banquet. 
They sponsored the student body dance and were able to 
raise enough money to insure the success of the affair. 

Another worthy undertaking was the sponsoring of an 
athletic carnival for the purpose of raising funds for a trophy 
case for the school. 

Regular monthly luncheons have been held during the 
year at which discussions have taken place concerning alumni 
participation. Block Y club duties, and school traditions. 

Weldon Taylor is president of the organization with 
Delbert Young, vice-president: Louise Nielsen, secretary; Al- 
ison Comish, social chairman; Neff Smart, reporter; and 
Ernest Dean, athletic manager. 



Weldon Taylor 
President 




Eighty-four 




Ruth Waldram Beulah Sthickler Bertha B. Robison Lorna Murray 

Clara Moore Effie Warnick Margaret Swensen 

Helen Christensen Irene Haynie Martha Swenson Hortense Snow 

Madge Harris May Billings Mary Brown 

Gwen Brugger Mildred Maughan Elizabeth Conover Olive Winterton 

Myrtle Sowards Mildred H. Dimick Fay Johnson 



Gamma Pki Omicron 



President 
Elizabeth Conover 




The aim of Gamma Phi Omicron is to give its members 
a professional viewpoint of the field of Home Economics, to 
instill in them high ideals of scholarship and womanhood, and 
to cement a lasting friendship among the girls of the sorority. 

Membership for Gamma Phi Omicron is based on the 
following: the girl must be a major in some phase of Home 
Economics; she must have eighty-six hours of approved col- 
lege credit; she must maintain a high scholastic standard, 
and she must be socially accepted by the group. 

The Gamma Phi Omicron sponsors a loan fund for 
students majoring in home economics and presents a project- 
gift each year to the department. 

Activities of the year have included professional and 
business meetings held twice a month, a formal initiation ban- 
quet on November 11, an informal Christmas dancing party 
December 16, the annual formal dinner dance held at the 
Hotel Roberts March 3, the spring birthday party, spring 
initiations, and the New-Officer-breakfast. 

The officers for the year 1933-34 are: Elizabeth Con- 
over, president; Marjorie Ellsworth, vice-president; Mildred 
H. Dimick, recording secretary and historian; Olive Winter- 
ton, corresponding secretary and treasurer; and Myrtle So- 
wards, reporter. 



Eighty-five 




Wilma Jeppson Genevieve Fugal 

Dorothy Richmond Louise Neilsen 

Laura Mensel Aline C. Smith Floy Hansen 



Irene Johnston 

Wilma Kotter 
Lucile Murdoch Elva Dean 



Phi Delta Pi 

Phi Delta Pi is a national professional fraternity for 
women who are majors in Physical Education. The organ- 
ization makes a bond of friendship for its members in the 
chapters throughout the country from New York to Califor- 
nia. It aims to bring the outstanding girls in scholarship, 
personality, and leadership who are majoring in physical 
education into an organization that will promote growth of 
the field and usefulness of this phase of education. 

In November of 1931 the Xi Chapter of Phi Delta Pi 
was installed at the Brigham Young University. The mem- 
bers have been given opportunity for social development and 
leadership and have made friends with the sister organiza- 
tions at the University of Utah and the Utah State Agri- 
cultural College. 

During the past year under the leadership and guidance 
of Dorothy Richmond, president: Floy Hansen, vice-presi- 
dent; and Wilma Jeppson, faculty advisor, they have en- 
joyed many social activities. 

During the month of June Xi Chapter will be hostess 
to the Western Province Convention of Phi Delta Pi, which 
will be an honor for Brigham Young University. 



President 
Dorothy Richmond 




Eighty-six 




Lyman Partridge Eugene Bryson 

Genevieve Fugal Olive Edmunds 

T. Earl Pardoe Vera Jackson 

Aline C. Smith Virginia Ekins 



Alta Snell 

Claude Snow 
Farrell Madsen 

Jayne Evans 



Edith Young 

Alonzo Morley 
Leola Green 

Phil Christensen 



Lyman Partridge 
President 




Theta Alpha Phi 

The Beta Chapter of Theta Alpha Phi, national hon- 
orary dramatic fraternity, was installed on the campus of 
Brigham Young University in May, 1924, with twenty-five 
charter members. 

The fraternity takes for its members students who have 
been outstanding in dramatics on the campus, and each year 
brings a fine group of new members into its organization. 

This year's program has consisted of bi-monthly lunch- 
eons at the cafeteria and monthly meetings held at the homes 
of the members, at which discussions on "The American 
Drama" were participated in. The annual formal dinner- 
dance at which the three chapters of Utah all participate was 
held at the University of Utah with the Alpha chapter as 
host. 

The fraternity play this year was Benn Levie's "Mrs. 
Moonlight," a delightful production which starred Kathryn 
B. Pardoe and Alonzo Morley. 

The officers for the year include, Alonzo Morley, ad- 
visor; Lyman Partridge, president; Aline Coleman Smith, 
vice-president; Edith Young, secretary-treasurer; Jayne 
Evans, historian; and Leola Green, reporter. 



Eighty-seven 




Bertrand F. Harrison 

C. Lynn Hayward 

Phil Hansen 

Lynn Lamar Gee 

Harold Merkley 



Dr. Vasco M. Tanner 
Edna Snow 

Charles Menzies 

Douglas Merrill 

Theron Hutchings 



Dr. Martin 

WlLKINS NUTTAL 

Owen Thornock 

Wesly Bayles 
Louis Breiner 



Wi Pere Amaru 

Preston Hughs 
Merrill Hammond 

Clyde Washburn 
Sheldon Hayes 



Eugene Larson 



Clyde Biddulph 



Teut Becker 



Beta Beta Beta 

Beta Beta Beta is an international biological fraternity 
founded in 1922 at Oklahoma City University. It was or- 
ganized for the purpose of supplying an honorary under- 
graduate fraternity for the students of the biological sciences. 
Membership comes as a reward for active interest in the 
study of biological sciences and as a recognition of attain- 
ment above the average in the courses offered in the college 
curriculum. The purpose of Tri Beta is threefold: develop- 
ment of sound scholarship, dissemination of scientific truth, 
and the promotion of research. 

Phi chapter was initiated at B.Y.U. in the fall of 1930, 
and since that time has been active in both local and national 
affairs, having won recognition in the "Bios," the national 
quarterly magazine through both its students and its faculty 
representative, Dr. Tanner. 

Lectures are given on biological subjects and special ac- 
tivities include an annual boat trip on Utah Lake, various 
field trips, and the sponsoring of public exhibits and lectures 
through the year. 

Officers are: Dr. Vasco M. Tanner, faculty representa- 
tive; Merrill Hammond, president; Duane Anderson, vice- 
president; Wi Pere Amaru, secretary and historian. 



Merrill Hammond 
President 




Eighty-eight 




Daryle Redd 
Glen Hansen 



Harold Madsen 
Illiff Jeffery 



Grant Bishop Miles Harston 

LeGrande Spillsbury James Jensen 



Vaur Waters 
Lowry Nelson 

Delbert Young 
Thomas L. Martin 



Roy Hickens 
Clarence Harston 



Don Nielson Floyd Martensen 

Theron Hutchings Marvin Dahl 



Claud Abbott 
Irving Anderson 

Theodore Young 
Willard Lott 

Kenneth Cannon 
Wayne Gammet 



Laval S. Morris 
Kenneth McNeill 

Mark Scott 
LeGrande Dunkley 

Don Tippetts 
Seth T. Shaw 



Afe Club 



Don Nielson 
President 




The Ag club was organized to bring about a close fel- 
lowship among those students whose interest lies in the vo- 
cational field of agriculture. 

Perhaps the most outstanding event of the year was the 
three-day horticulture show held in the Ladies' Gym in Oc- 
tober. The following organizations cooperated with the club 
in making it a success: Home Ec. Club, Agronomy, Zoology. 
Botany, Animal Husbandry, Horticulture, and Art Depart- 
ments. Fruits of the county were exhibited in the various 
booths. On the evening of Founder's Day the Harvest Ball 
was held and the Harvest Queen crowned. 

Under the leadership of Dean Lowry Nelson and ac- 
companied by the professors of the department, all agricul- 
ture students made a tour of the dry farming sections of 
central Utah, visiting especially the experimental dry farming 
station at Nephi. 

Social affairs have included the annual Home Ec-Ag 
Club boat party, informal socials at homes of members, and 
monthly luncheons. 

Officers have included: Don Nielson, president; Willard 
Lott, vice-president; and Clarence Harston, secretary. 



Eighty-nine 




Beth Swensen Velma Christensen Irene Haynie Barbara Maughn Josephine Johnson Jennie Campbell 

Aileen Agren Alice Reynolds Georgia Maeser Hortense Snow Gloria Fisher Leona Booth 

Ruth Speckart Lila Hatch Olive Edmunds Ellen Lund Rhoda Young Cecelia Jensen 



Yesharah Club 

The Yesharah Club is an organization composed of re- 
turned lady missionaries who have been affiliated with a 
college. The word Yesharah means "messenger of truth, 
straight, ever upright." The purpose of the club is to foster 
service, stimulate social, recreational and religious activity, 
and inspire those with whom it comes in contact to see the 
greater light of truth through Latter-day Saint ideals. 

A number of traditional functions are held. These in- 
clude: a Christmas party and an invitational social and 
temple excursion in conjunction with the University of Utah 
Chapter in Salt Lake City. One of the most outstanding 
events of the year is the annual breakfast held during com- 
mencement week with the members of the Utah State Ag- 
ricultural College and University of Utah chapters as special 
guests. 

Officers of the club are: Hortense Snow, president; 
Leona Booth, first vice-president; Ruth Speckart, second vice- 
president; Janet Scott, secretary; and Velma Christensen, 
corresponding secretary. 



President 

Hortense Snow 




Ninety 




Elbert Miller Horald Bateman 

Sanford Bingham Karl E. Young 

Eugene Larsen Maurice Jones 

Lyman Partridge George Bone 

Lawrence Brown Wm. Martin 



Sylvan Stevens Morris Vance 

Don Markham Chauncy Harris 

Jay Nelson Merrill Croft 

Merrill Hammond Preston Hughs 

Roy Hammond Ralph Jenson 



Philip Knight 



Smoot Brimhall 



Howard Dixon 



Y Eagles 



Lawrence Brown 
President 



r"7T m ^ 




1 

• 


1 



T,he end of the school year 1933-34 concludes the second 
chapter in the history of the Y Eagles Club, which first made 
its appearance two years ago. Its membership includes Eagle 
Scouts and Scouters of the University who have shown out- 
standing interest in the scouting movement. 

The purpose of the organization is two-fold: to act in 
a service capacity for Scout work, and to furnish a means 
for the fellowship of the Eagle Scouts of the school. 

The activities of the club include the sponsoring of the 
annual Autumn Leaf Hike, a spring moonlight hike, the 
Winter Carnival in coooperation with the Y Ski Club, and 
bi-monthly meetings at the Y cafeteria. A fall hike up Mount 
Timpanogos and a three-day "winter sports" outing at Aspen 
Grove during the Christmas Holidays are being made tradi- 
tional features among the club's yearly activities. 

The officers are: A. A. Anderson, honorary president; 
Dr. Wayne B. Hales, faculty advisor; Lawrence Brown, 
president; Morrell Ashby, vice-president; Merrill Hammond, 
secretary and treasurer; and Jay Nelson, reporter. Honorary 
members include Dr. F. S. Harris, Dr. Carl F. Eyring, Dr. 
Lowry Nelson, and Professor Karl E. Young. 



Ninety-one 




Helen Summers Tom Eastmond E. H. Eastmond Marguerite Ennis LaPriel Myers 

Jessie Neville Elizabeth Conover Del Mar Nelson Margaret Taylor 

Herbert Brienholt Harold Woolston B.F.Larson Flora Fisher Helen Boyer 

June Farnes Margaret Tholen Ina Johnson LeRoy Condie 

Thelma Young Deline White Kenneth Taylor Hattie Conover Walter Foulger 

Leona Eitel Amy Young Evan Nelson Leo Powel 



Studio Guild 

The Studio Guild was initiated and organized by art 
students of the Brigham Young University to enhance the 
value of the art and build an appreciation for the works of 
others in this vocation. Those eligible for this organization 
are students majoring or minoring in art. 

The club has been unusually active this year. Meetings 
have been held twice a month, where outstanding lectures 
have been given on mat printing, mask-making, the lives of 
great artists, and many other related subjects in the field 
of art. 

This organization has brought to our school famous art 
exhibits from Salt Lake City and other neighboring towns. 
It has attempted to emphasize the importance of art as ap- 
plied to interior decorating, clothing, and other phases of 
everyday life. Other activities have included the sponsoring 
of a Christmas pageant in assembly, the annual school Val- 
entine dance, and visits to the Springville Art Exhibit. 

Officers for the year of 1933-34 include: Del Mar Nel- 
son, president; Elizabeth Conover, vice-president; and La- 
Priel Myers, secretary. Professors Eastmond and Larson 
have been faculty advisors. 



Del Mar Nelson 
President 




Ninety-two 




V. Christensen L. Fish E. Watson M. Ennis E. Hastings M. Jesperson 

N. Udall G. LeSueur E. Maxwell J. Verney G. Todd 

R. Allen M. Fish D. Dastrup W. Peterson L. Gibbons L. Westover 

A. Hall W. Millet E. Watson P. Nicholes D. Hibbert 

O. LeSueur W. Smith T. Young I. Brooksby F. Millet O. Done 

N. Freestone H. Smith R. Bigler T. Bingham P. Allen G. Decker 



Vernon Richardson 
President 




Arizona 

The Arizona Club was organized with the purpose of 
bringing the students from Arizona into an active group 
which is bound together by geographical ties. The organ- 
ization has been outstanding this year in both social and 
scholastic activities. 

On Homecoming Day the Arizonians were represented 
with a float which won first prize for originality. At the 
inter-club dance they also took a lively part in decorating 
to represent their own locality. 

Social activities have included: an autumn leaf hike to 
Maple Flat, a party on Round-Up Day, several informal 
social and dancing parties, a swimming party at the Hot 
Pots, and a spring dancing party. 

It is the purpose of the members of the club not only 
to have a good time socially, but also to engage in the schol- 
astic activities of the school and do their part in upholding 
the standards of the university. Their aim has constantly 
been to be a group of young men and women of which the 
school may be proud. 

Officers of the club are: Vernon Richardson, president; 
Winifred Smith, vice-president; Velma Christensen, secre- 
tary-treasurer; and Leona Gibbons, recreation leader. 



Ninety-three 




Evelyn Mickelson Lucille Park Edna Reed Maxine Jensen 

Millard Brady Golda Christensen Webster Decker 

Bernice Bailey Maud Shawcroft Ina Dunn Maurine Harrison 

Leo Brady Iris Allred Edgar Dunn 

Edna Jensen Marie Miller Dee Shawcroft Reese Faucette 

Floyd Mortensen Estelle Mortensen Illa Behrmann 



Colorado 

This year for the first time, the students of Colorado 
have appeared on the campus of Brigham Young University 
as an organized unit, representing a land where snow-capped 
mountains as sentinals over the thriving valleys below, pierce 
a sky of eternal blue. 

In spite of the recentness of its organization, the club has 
been extremely active this year. "Pikes Peak or Bust" dis- 
played on a large banner entwined with pine boughs, led 
thirty-two Coloradoans triumphantly through the Home- 
coming parade September 30, 1933, in the initial activity 
of the club. 

A miniature of the picturesque San Luis sand dunes 

was displayed in the southeast corner of the Ladies' Gym 
by the club at the inter-club dance during the Thanksgiving 
holidays. 

The club has participated in many other activities dur- 
ing the year, including the club basketball tournament, at- 
taining a high position as compared with the rating of the 
other clubs. Varied parties have also been participated in 
by members as part of the social activities. 

Officers for the year are: Reese Faucette, president; 
Maurine Harrison, vice-president; Evelyn Mickelson, secre- 
tary-treasurer. 



Reese Faucette 
President 




Ninety-four 




May Gardner Mary Black Sebr.na Cropper 

Wayne Cropper Lloyd Schlappi Ladd Cropper 

IliffTeffery Rawlin Roper Halden Boyack 

jeffery Merr.ll Croft Gretha Petersen Helen Hilton 

Parlell Peterson Leo Day Phyllis Talbot 

Grant Bishop Duane Bishop 



Nelda Petersen 
Verdell Bishop 



Rondo Law 
Clifton Boyack 



Millard Club 



Clifton Boyack 
President 




The Millard Club, one of the oldest clubs on the Y 
Campus, was organized to foster closer friendships between 
the students from Millard County. During the school year 
the club has participated in many social and athletic ac- 
tivities. 

Early in the school year the following officers were 
elected for the year 1933-34: Clifton Boyack, president; 
Sebrina Cropper, vice-president; Mary Black, secretary- 
treasurer; and Dr. Thomas L. Martin, faculty advisor. 

The club members have participated not only in the 
social functions planned and carried out by the group and 
intra-mural activities offered by the institution, but also in 
the many activities offered by the curriculum of their selected 
field of work. 

For the club's annual invitational dancing party which 
was held February tenth at Keeley's, the Valentine theme 
was used. The hall was cleverly decorated with a Millard 
banner and Valentine colors and Valentines were given 
as favors. 

The club has enjoyed a very successful year, and has 
done much to establish many friendships and acquaintances 
between the members and other groups with which they 
have had associations. 



Ninety-Hi'e 




liAJi 



Henry Jensen Theron Hutchings Helen Janssen Glen Borg Lawrence Nielsen 

Afton Boberg Douglas Nielsen Harold Fitzgerald Lillian Stokes Ellis Butterfield 

Rulon Oborn Woodrow Mickelson Marvin Dahl Joseph Despain Horald Bateman 

Vanice Beck Margaret Tholen Eleanor Brown Katherine Stokes 

Orpha Soffe Helen Farrar Florence Todd Sarah Fitzgerald Winifred McDonald 

Forace Green Don Greenwood Duane Ballard Bennie Schmidt 



Jord 



an 

Believing that college life can be made more full and 
that college spirit is improved by keeping high school fellow- 
ships alive, thirty-eight former students of the Jordan High 
School inaugurated the Jordan Club on the Y campus last 
fall. Taking its place among the many other active geo- 
graphical clubs, the "J" organization has filled the need for 
association among former schoolmates and has provided club 
activity for many members not affiliated with other units. 
The membership is representative of the student body and is 
active in campus affairs. 

It has been the purpose of the club to hold meetings 
once each month. These get-togethers varied from bonfire 
parties to dances, with business being combined with the 
social side of the affairs. 

The organization was completed at the first meeting, 
held early in October. Forace Green was elected president, 
and Dr. Thomas L. Martin was chosen faculty sponsor. 
Other officers were: Vanice Beck, vice-president; Duane 
Ballard, secretary and treasurer; Horold Bateman, program 
chairman; and Harold Fitzgerald, membership chairman. 



Forace Green 
President 




Ninety-six 




Virginia Madsen Reva Madsen Margaret Simpson Helen Miner 

Duane Anderson Louie Jean Miner Grant Anderson 

Ruby Cox Maurine Kjar Averil Nielson Farrell Madsen 

Arthur Sundwall Olive Edmunds Grace Simpson Margaret Peterson 



Sanpete 



Wilmer Tanner 
President 




The Sanpete is one of the more recently organized geo- 
graphical clubs on the campus, yet it is an outstandingly 
active one. Its members are prominent in all forms of student 
activity and are always willing to cooperate with the school 
in upholding its ideals, and supporting all worthy projects 
and undertakings. 

The entire club marched in the Homecoming day parade 
and had a carrot as a symbol of the geographical locality 
which it represented. 

Social activities throughout the year have included sev- 
eral informal dancing parties, a party on Utah Lake, a hike 
to the Y and the usual bi-monthly business meetings. 

The Senior members who are graduating this year and 
whose pictures do not appear on this page are: Morris Bun- 
nel, Frank Jorgenson, Leland Frost, Ralph Erickson, Ray 
Aldrich, Kenn Peterson, Harry Sundwall, Frances Jennings. 

Officers for the year have included: Wilmer Tanner, 
president; Averil Nielson, vice-president; Reva Madsen, sec- 
retary and treasurer; and Harry Sundwall, chairman of so- 
cial activities. 



Ninety-seven 




Back row: Harold Christensen, Marian Duffin, Willard Hayward, Alice Spencer, Delbert Young, Vern Moncur, 
Roland Pond, Douglas Merrill. 

Front row: Lu Deen Waldram, Barbara Perrett, Annice Nisbet, Regina Weaver, Katherine Woodland, Marie 
Jensen, Lois Holt, Arval Ericksen, Marlowe Wotton, Ruth Rasmussen, Morris Vance, Edna Stowell, Twila 
Petersen, Ella Lund, Mabel Petersen, Mary Duersch Helen Cook. 



Id alio 

Since the "Idaho Spuds" paraded down University Ave- 
nue last Homecoming Day, they have been increasing in 
popularity and importance on the Brigham Young University 
campus. And as they manifested interest in the Homecoming 
Parade, so has the Idaho Club displayed willingness for co- 
operation in all student body activities. 

Members of the club have representatives in student 
body activities such as: music, dramatics, debating, athletics, 
and student government. 

This club has been improving each year since its recent 
organization. Spirits of the members have been kept high 
this year by indulging in a few enthusiastic parties, one held 
during the autumn quarter and one held in the winter quarter 
after Brigham Young University had succeeded in scoring 
over Utah in the second great basketball game on their home 
floor. 

The Idaho spirit has been prevalent all during the year 
and has been aided wonderfully by the officers of the club: 
Douglas Merrill, president; Harold Christensen, vice-presi- 
dent; and Lu Deen Waldram, secretary. 



Douglas Merrill 
President 




Ninety-eight 




William C. Carr 
President 




International Relations Club 

International relations work at B.Y.U. received con- 
siderable stimulation this year when the Rocky Mountain 
International Relations Club conference met in Provo, No- 
vember 3-4, with the local club as host. 

Seventy delegates and nine faculty members from twelve 
of the twenty-two registered colleges in the region attended 
the conference which had as guests Miss Amy Heminway 
Jones of the Carnegie Foundation for International Peace; 
Mr. C. Douglas Booth, English economist; and U. S. Senator 
Elbert D. Thomas of Utah. 

The success of the conference was due in no small way 
to the effective organization of the local club, and to the 
untiring assistance of Dr. Christen Jensen, faculty sponsor. 

During the year the following speakers have responded: 
Professor Elmer Miller, Dr. W. J. Snow, Dr. Christen Jen- 
sen, Dean Gerrit de Jong, and Dr. Carl F. Eyring. Student 
discussions, book reviews, and reports have augmented these 
programs. 

Officers for 1933-34 include: William C. Carr, presi- 
dent; William P. Martin and Alison Comish, vice-presidents; 
John Domina and Francis Foster, secretary and acting sec- 
retary, respectively. 



Ninety-nine 




Back row: Joseph Crane. Aline Rawson, Meeks Halliday, Alta Snell, T. Earl Pardoe, Genevieve Fugal, Howard 
Forsyth, Olive Edmunds. 

Front row: Esther Maycock, Norman Freestone. Alice Spencer, Louise Nielsen, Virginia Ekins, Margaret Bird, 
Phil Christensen. 



Mask Club 

The Mask Club has had one of the most profitable and 
entertaining years of its existence. The annual novelty party 
provided a rich variety of prizes and easy method of quick 
and easy introduction. The club produced an evening of 
original one-act plays, the first to be so presented in the 
university. Commedia dell' arte was another feature evening. 
The alumni program. Professor LeRoy Robertson's European 
impressions, Olvera Puppeteers, and the Christmas Dance 
were among other outstanding features. 

Lecture recitals have been given by the following: Alice 
Spencer. Margaret Bird, Olive Edmunds, Virginia Ekins, 
Esther Maycock, Norman Freestone, Louise Nielsen, Phil 
Christensen, Joseph Crane, Aline Rawson, Meeks Halliday, 
Grace Nixon Stewart, and Elizabeth Gessford. 

The Mask Club Banquet on May 16th was a fitting 
climax to the year's events. 

Officers for the year were: Genevieve Fugal, president: 
Howard Forsyth, vice-president; Alta Snell, secretary-treas- 
urer, and T. Earl Pardoe. program. 



Genevieve Fugal 
President 




One Hundred 




Bach row: Eldon Reese, Rex Ingersoll, Alonzo Morley, Gordon Braun, Gerald Bodily, Milton Beck, LeRoy 
Condie, Olive Reeve, Professor M. Wilford Poulson. 

Front row: Helen Cook. Josephine Johnson, Nadine Taylor, Ina Lindsay, Eileen Agren, Beth Paxman. 



Psychology Club 



Rex Ingersoll 
President 




With a common interest in psychology and its phenom- 
ena, members of the Psychology Club have met faithfully 
once every two weeks for the purpose of discussing the latest 
psychology, conducting experiments, or listening to excellent 
talks. The club, though few in numbers, has kept up a lively 
interest in all phases of the subject. 

At two of the meetings, Mr. Mark Allen talked on ab- 
normal psychology as it is exhibited at the American Fork 
Training School. At other meetings educational and ab- 
normal psychology was discussed by department majors. Va- 
rious reports on topics of interest were given by members 
of the club at some of the meetings. Some of the best in- 
formed people of the town have talked to the group. The 
meetings have been truly worthwhile and educational. 

Professor M. Wilford Poulson, the faculty advisor, 
called the first meeting, and since then the club has functioned 
under the leadership of Rex Ingersoll, president; Helen Sum- 
mers, vice-president; and Helen McAllister, secretary and 
treasurer. The president didn't return during the spring 
quarter and Eugene Bryson was elected to fill the vacancy. 



One Hundred One 




French Club 



Averaging two meetings a month, the advanced French 
Club has completed a highly successful year as measured by 
consistent, group activity. This club has for its aim the 
combination of social and intellectual activities in order to 
bring about a better knowledge and appreciation of the 
French language and customs. 

Evening entertainments of the year included: a cafe 
party, a French Noel party, a Mardi Gras carnivale, a 
French musicale, and evening programs featuring other as- 
pects of French life. Two weeks preceding the evening en- 
tertainments, meetings were held in the class room to stimu- 
late interest in and present information concerning each par- 
ticular entertainment. 

Approximately seventy-five members comprised the or- 
ganization. The officers were: Ray McGuire, president; 
Esther Maycock, vice-president; Beth Roberts, second vice- 
president; and Read Thornton, secretary. Professor B. F. 
Cummings is the sponsor and originator of the club. 



Ray McGuire 
President 




One Hundred Two 




Allen Sorensen 
President 




German Club 

In order to help its members broaden their knowledge 
of the customs, habits, and life of the German people, learn 
some of the characteristics of the country in which they live, 
and to awaken an interest in German for cultural and per- 
sonal interests, the German Club was organized in the au- 
tumn quarter with the following members as officers: Allen 
Sorensen, president; Marguerite Condie, vice-president; 
Francis Jennings, secretary and treasurer; Joe Dean, reporter; 
and Horace Christensen, Y High representative. The mem- 
bership of the club includes all those students who are study- 
ing or have studied German. 

The Christmas party given the club by the Seiter fam- 
ily, former residents of Germany, instilled in the minds of 
those present a delightful memory of the German Christmas 
and of the true German "Gastfreundlichkeit." Another im- 
portant activity of the club besides its regular meetings was 
the offering, in collaboration with the Modern Language de- 
partment, of a moving picture about Germany and the Ger- 
mans for the enjoyment and education of club members and 
the public. 



One Hundred Three 




Spanish Club 



Developing interest in the achievements, and an intel- 
ligent understanding of the peculiarities, customs, and ideals 
of the people of Spain and Latin America has been the aim 
of the Spanish Club during the past year. Having one of 
the largest memberships in recent years, the club consisted 
of about forty students and faculty members. Monthly meet- 
ings were held featuring games, stunts, songs, and stories 
in Spanish, and illustrated lectures by various authorities on 
phases of the life of Spanish-speaking peoples. Occasionally 
the members received literally a "taste" of Spanish life 
when food de los mejicanos was served. 

Besides being an opportunity for social contacts among 
those interested in Spanish, the club work has been found to 
be a valuable supplement to the more formal routine of the 
classroom. 

At the first meeting of the club Duane Ballard, Draper, 
Utah, was elected president; Ireta Pierce. El Paso, Texas, 
vice-president; and Roswell Willard. Phoenix. Arizona, sec- 
retary and treasurer. Associated with these officers and tak- 
ing an active interest in the affairs of the club, were Profes- 
sor B. F. Cummings, head of the modern languages depart- 
ment, and Lester B. Whetten, assistant instructor in Spanish. 



Duane Ballard 
President 




One Hundred Four 



BOOK 6 



FRESHMEN - LOOKING WITH AWE AT THEIR 
UPPER CLASSMATES. SOPHOMORES - SU- 
PERIORITY MARKING THEIR ATTITUDE TO- 
WARD THE UNDER CLASS-MEN. JUNIORS - 
SETTLING DOWN TO THEIR FILLING OF 
GROUPS AND CHOOSING OF THEIR MAJOR 
AND MINOR. SENIORS - WORKING FOR COM- 
MENCEMENT - OF WHAT, THEY KNOW NOT. 





GRADUATES 

SENIORS 

JUNIORS 

SOPHOMORES 

FRESHMEN 



;ota: 



Graduates 



Lucile Murdoch, M.A. 
Thesis: "A Correlation 
Tests." 



Salt Lake City, Utah 
of Physical Achievement 



Ray S. Alleman, M.A. Springville, Utah 

Thesis: "Measurements of the Coefficients of Visco- 
sity and Slip of Certain Gases by the Oil-drop 
Method." 

Phyllis R. Tregeagle, M.S. Provo, Utah 

Thesis: "Edwin Arlington Robinson's Treatment of 
the Tristan Legend." 



Claude Shipley Snow, M.A. Provo, Utah 

Thesis: "Drama of the Navajo, Zuni and Hopi In- 
dians of Southwestern America." 

Herman N. Beniams, M.A. Provo, Utah 

Thesis: "Positive Jon Formation at Low Pressures." 

Edmund Evans, M.A. Iowa City, Iowa 

Thesis: "Theory and Technique of the One Act Play." 

Antone K. Romney, M.A. Provo, Utah 

Thesis: "A Study of the Use of Instructional Space 
in the University of Utah, the Utah Agricultural 
College, and the Brigham Young University." 

Lester B. Whetten, M.A. 

Colonia Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico 

Thesis: "A Study of the Work Performed by Student 
]anitors Employed Regularly at Brigham Young 
University During the School Year 1933-34." 

Wi Pere Amaru, M.A. Tolaga Bay, New Zealand 
Thesis: "An Anatomical and Histological Study of 

the Alimentary Tract of the Larva, Pupae, and 

Imago of the Phyllophaga." 

Theron Hutchings, M.A. South Jordan, Utah 

Thesis: "Further Study on the Influence of the Carbon- 
Nitrogen Ratios of Organic" Matter on the Rate of 
Decomposition in the Soil. 

David de Lancey Condon, M.S. Provo, Utah 

Thesis: "A Preliminary Study of the Human Geog- 
raphy of the State of Utah, with Special Emphasis 
on the Geographic Factors." 

H. Grant Vest, M.S. American Fork, Utah 

Thesis: "The Problem of Isaiah in the Book of Mor- 



Justin M. Smith, M.A. Snowflake, Arizona 

Thesis: "Methdds of Sampling Desert Browse." 

Bountiful, Utah 
of the Writings of 



Eugene D. Bryson, M.A. 
Thesis:" Psychological Aspects 
Arthur Schnitzler." 



John Hildebrand Wing, M.S. American Fork, Utah 
Thesis: "Studies on the Determination of Small 
Amounts of Lead by Electrolytic Deposition." 



Alva Johanson, M.A. Provo, Utah 

Thesis: "A Correlation Study of Methods of Pre- 
paring Anhydrous Ethyl Alcohol." 

Harold A. Colvin, M.S. Provo, Utah 

Thesis: "A Study of the Correlation of Mottled 
Enamel with Fluorides in Drinking Water from 
Endemic Areas in Utah and Nevada." 

Fenton W. Taylor, M.A. Thatcher, Arizona 

Thesis: "A Comparison of the Humor and Sentiment 
of Sterne to that of Dickens." 




One Hundred Five 



Graduates 



if-WK 




Farrell D. Madsen, M.A. 
Fairview, Utah 

Thesis: "Instrumental Music in the High Schools o[ 
Utah." 

Frank VanCott, M.A. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

Thesis: "A Comparative Analysis of Music in the 
Homes of Provo and Springville." 

Cornell Christensen. M.A. 
Rexburg, Idaho 

Thesis: "The Effect of an Electric Current on 
Young's Modulus." 

Delbert Tregeagle, M.S. 
Provo, Utah 

Thesis: "The Effects on Labor of the National In- 
dustrial Recovery Act." 

Arlene Harris, M.A. 
Provo. Utah 

Thesis: "A Study of the Standards in Criticism of 
Contemporary Fiction." 

O. Norman Geertsen, M.S. 
Ogden, Utah 

Thesis: "A Study of Piezo-electric Effects in Rochelle 
Salt Crystals." 



Margaret Helena Hansen 
Provo. Utah 

Vern Scott 
Provo, Utah 

Vera Jackson 
Provo, Utah 



Takeo Fujiwara, M.A. 
Sapparo, Japan 

Thesis: "The Political and Military Policies of the 
Tokugawa Shogunate." 

Margaret Fish 

Snowflake, Arizona 

Thesis: "A Comparison of Elements of Decadence in 

the Late Elizabethan Dramatists and Eugene 

CNeill." 

Harold Woolston 
Lehi, Utah 



Neff Smart 
Provo, Utah 



Floyd Millet 
Mesa, Arizona 



Harrison J. Merrill 
Provo, Utah 

Chauncy D. Harris 
Provo, Utah 



Charles W. Menzies 
Provo, Utah 

Karl A. Miller 
Provo, Utah 

Smith Jacobs 
Provo, Utah 



Harold Fitzgerald 
Draper, Utah 



One Hundred Six 



icura: 



>emors 




William P. Martin 
President 



Myrtle Sowards 
Vice-President 



Mildred H. Dimick 
Secretary-Treasurer 



The Senior Class of 1934 will be long 
remembered for its outstanding extra-curric- 
ular activities. Under the capable direction 
of the class officers the year was begun with 
the Junior-Senior Party where farmer boys 
and girls held sway. Next came the senior 
class play, "The Ghost Train," which was a 
thriller and a huge success. Following the 
worthy example of Floyd Kotter, the Senior 
boys joined the "House of David" and what 
beards they grew! Under the chairmanship 
of Bud Walker, the Seniors sponsored the 
St. Patrick's Day Dance. 

In activities such as debating and athletics 
members of the Senior Class were also ac- 
tive, winning first place in the intra-mural 
track meet. Following the example of classes 
in previous years the Seniors also supervised 
a worthy Senior project. 

The president, William Martin, showed 
exceptional leadership throughout the year. 
He was assisted by Myrtle Sowards, as vice- 
president, during the first two quarters, then 
a mission called her to the Hawaiian Islands 
and her place was filled by LaPriel Myers. 
Mildred Housley Dimick was secretary of 
the class. 



One Hundred Sevsn 



>eniors 



.^w^ 



H. Duane Anderson, A.B. 
Provo. Utah 
Major, German 
Snow College 
Brigadier 



Genevieve Fugal, B.S. 

Pleasant Grove. Utah 
Major. Physical Education, 
Dramatic Art 

Theta Alpha Phi, Phi Delta Pi. 
White Key. Vice-president Les 
Ceciliennes '33, President '34: 
President Mask Club '34; Com- 
petitive Play '32 



Don C. Lillywhite, B.S. 

Mesa, Arizona 

Major. Education 

Arizona State Teachers College 

Arizona Club; Mary Woolsey 

Dramatic Reading Contest '34 



Madge Harris, B.S. 
Payson, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 
Gamma Phi Omicron 



Gordon Seaman, B.A. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Major, Accounting 



Mary Ralston. B.S. 

Provo, Utah 
Major, Economics 




Alison Comish, B.S. 
Eugene. Oregon 
Major, Economics 
Oregon State College 
White Key. Block Y, Val Norn, 
Tau Kappa Alpha, International 
Relations. President A. W. S. 
'34; Y News '33; Varsity de- 
bate '33, '34; Competitive Play 
'33; Valedictorian 



Kenn J. Peterson, A.B. 
Manti. Utah 

Major, Accounting and Business 
Administration 
Snow College 

Sanpete Club, Mask Club. Blue 
Key. Viking. Manager Foren- 
sics '34; R.M.C. Forensic Team 
'33, '34; Irvine Oratorical Con- 
test; Competitive Play '33 



Winona Dewsnup, B.S. 

Deseret. Utah 

Major. Education 

Ladies Glee '31; Millard Club 



Meeks Halliday, B.A. 
Circleville, Utah 
Major, Speech 



Afton Anderson, B.S. 

Magna. Utah 

Major, Physical Education 

Fidelas, White Key 



Talmage DeLange, B.A. 
Koosharem. Utah 
Major, Accounting 



One Hundred Eight 



m T A: 



>eniors 



G. L. Woolf, B.A. 
Magrath, Alberta, Canada 
Major, Education 
Delta Phi, French Club 



Gladys Hooks, B.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, English 

Competitive Play '34, Mask 

Club, "Y" Journalist Club, "Y" 

Camera Club, Advanced French 

Club 



Rex Larson, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Physics 



Bernice Warner, 
Grace, Idaho 
Major, English 



B.A. 



Orville L. Larsen, B.A. 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 
Major, Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration 
Delta Phi 



Eileen Agren, B.A. 
Ogden, Utah 
Major, Education 




Doris Melton Kimball, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, English 
French Club 



Owen Thornock, B.S. 
Bloomington, Idaho 
Major, Botany 

Beta Beta Beta, Band, Wrest- 
ling, Senior Play '33, '34 



Helen Summers, B.S. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Psychology 

"Y" News, Psychology Club, 

Studio Guild 



Clyde M. Frost, B.A. 
Coalville, Utah 
Major, Chemistry 



Mary Brown, B.S. 
Grantsville, Utah 
Major, Foods and Nutrition 
Vice-President F i d e 1 a s '34 
Gamma Phi Omicron 



Aubra Cartwright, B.S. 
Beaver, Utah 
Major, Education 



One Hundred Nine 



;*wa: 



Seni 



mors 



Carl G. Warnick, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 

Major. Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration 
Delta Phi, President Brickers 
'34 



Dorothy Richmond, B.S. 
Provo. Utah 

Major. Physical Education 
President Phi Delta Pi '34 



B.S. 



Bus 



William Hill Haslam, 
Lewiston, Utah 
Major. Accounting and 
ness Administration 
All Boy's Show '32, Dairy Cor- 
respondent Alpha Kappa Psi 
'33. Senior Play Committee '34, 
Vice-President Beta Delta, 
Alpha Kappa Psi '34. Chairman 
Senior Project Committee '34 



Myrtle Sowards, B.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 

OS. Trovata, Gamma Phi Om- 

icron 



J. Ronald Wiscombe, B.S. 
Roosevelt, Utah 

Major. Educational Administra- 
tion and History 
"Y" News '31, Band '31, '32; 
Glee Club '31. '32; Mates, 
Uintah Basin Club. 



Deleen White, B.S. 

Morgan. Utah 

Major, Art 

Senior Play '34. Glee Club '33, 

'34; Vice President La Deja's. 

Weber Club, Studio Guild 




Edith Young, B.A. 
American Fork, Utah 
Major, English 

Nautilus, Theta Alpha Phi, 
White Key, Vice President A. 
W. S. '33, "Y" News Staff '32. 
33: Banyan Staff '33, '34; Pub- 
lic Service Bureau '33, '34; 
Student Body Officer '34 



Lloyd Shields, B.S. 

Tooele, Utah 

Major, Physical Education 



Rhoda J. Young. R.N., B.A. 
Idaho Falls, Idaho 
Major, Household Administra- 
tion 

Secretary and Historian A. S. 
B. Y. U. '32, Idaho Club. Ye- 
shara Club, Fidelas 



Harmon R. Hatch, B.S. 

Spanish Fork. Utah 

Major, Music 

Orchestra. Assistant Teacher in 

Music '33, '34 



Alta Snell, B.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Dramatics 

Competitive Play '32, '33; Fall 

Comedy '34, Student director 

Senior Play '34, Theta Alpha 

Phi, Secretary Mask Club '34 



Shirley B. Barnett, B.S. 
Payson, Utah 

Major, Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration 
Male Glee '31, '32; Alpha Kap- 
pa Psi. French Club 



One Hundred Ten 



;m7-\: 



>emors 



Emery Merle Vance, B.A. 

Jerome, Idaho 

Major, Education 

French Club, Idaho Club, "V 

News '30 



Esther Maycock, B.A. 

Springville, Utah 

Major. Dramatic Art 

Mask Club, French Club, Fidel- 

as, Theta Alpha Phi, Senior 

Play '34, Competive Play '34 



Merrill Hammond, B.A. 

Provo, Utah 
Major, Zoology 

President Tri Beta '33, '34; Sec- 
retary "Y" Eagles '33, '34 



Katherine Grow, B.A. 
Cardston, Alberta, Canada 
Major, Education 
Ladies Varsity Debate '32, 
Block "Y" Club 



J. Bud Murphy, B.S. 
Salina, Utah 
Major, Social Science 
Brigadier, Psychology Club, In- 
ternational Relations 



Olive Edmunds, B.A. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Major, Dramatic Art 
Mask Club, Theta Alpha Phi, 
Girls Day Play '33, Student Di- 
rector of Fall Comedy '33 




Bertha B. Robison, B.S. 
Baker, Nevada 

Major, Household Administra- 
tion 



J. Harry Mitch 'll, B.A. 

Eureka, Utah 

Major, Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi, International 

Relations, Val-Hyrics, Spanish 

Club 



Helen Cook, B.A. 

Paris, Idaho 

Major, Speech 

Class Officer '32, Junior Prom 

Committee '33, Vice-President 

Student Body '34, Mask Club, 

Idaho Club, Cesta Tie, White 

Key 



Grant Bishop, B.S. 
Delta. Utah 
Major, Agronomy 
Millard Club 



LaPriel Myers, B.A. 
American Fork, Utah 
Major, Art 

Junior Prom Committee '32, Pres- 
ident White Keys '34, Studio 
Guild, "Y" News, Band, Sen- 
ior Class Officer '34, O. S. Tro- 
vata, White Keys, Journalism 
Club, French Club 



Sylvan Graff, B.S. 
Santa Clara. Utah 
Major, History 
Dixie Club 



One Hundred Eleven 



>eniors 



;OT^ 



B. Alva Maxwell, B.S. 
Eagar. Arizona 
Major, Accounting and 
ness Administration 
Delta Phi. Arizona Club 



Busi- 



Retta Coombs, B.S. 
Cardston, Alberta, Canada 
Major. English 

Canadian Club, President of Ta 
Lenta's '34 



Melvin Griffith, B.S. 

Lake Point, Utah 

Major. Physical Education 

Football '32, '33, '34; Track '31, 

■32, '33, '34 



Ailsa Page, B.A. 
Fort Duchesne, Utah 
Major, Music 



Jess Chandler, B.S. 
Thatcher, Wyoming 
Major. Mathematics 



Marguerite Romney, B.A. 
Colonial Juarez Chihuahua, 
Mexico 

Major, Dramatics 
Dramatics '32, '33, '34; Span- 
ish Club, Psychology Club 




May M. Seaton, B.S. 
Price, Utah 
Major, History 

Student Body Program Com- 
mittee '31, '32; President of Val 
Norns '34 



Clarence D. Rich, B.S. 

Morgan, Utah 

Major, Accounting 

Senior Play '33, Male Glee Club 



Faye White, B.S. 

Payson, Utah 

Major, Elementary Education 



Vernon Clegg Condie, B.S. 

Springville, Utah 

Major, Agronomy 

Spanish Club, Agriculture Club, 

Block "Y" Club. Football '30, 

'34; Track '32, '33 



Jayne Evans, B.A. 
Spanish Fork, Utah 
Major, Dramatic Art 
Department Play '33, Competi- 
tive Play '34, Fall Comedy '34, 
Assistant Director '34. Officer 
Theta Alpha Phi '34, Mask 
Club, French Club, Cesta Tie 



C. Harold Armstrong, B.A. 

Ogden, Utah 

Major, English 

Advanced French Club, Bricker 



One Hundred Twelve 



Seniors 



Alene Holdaway, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 

Major, Secondary Education 
Glee Club 31, French Club. O. 
S. Trovata 



David Hammond Allred, B.S. 
Raymond, Alberta, Canada 
Major, Finance and Banking 
Glee Club '30, '31, '32; Cana- 
dian Club. Delta Phi 



Gwen Brugger, B.S. 

Venice, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 



Allan J. Carter, B.S. 
Helper, Utah 
Major, Chemistry 
"Y" Chemical Society 



Thelma McKinnon, B.A. 
Price, Utah 
Major, Music 

Ladies Glee Club '31, '32, '33, 
'34; French Club, Carbon-Em- 
ery Club, Secretary Fidelas '33 



Thomas Paumea Clarke, B.S. 
Tokomaru Bay. EC, New Zea- 
land 

Major, Mathematics 
Cheer Leader '31, '32: Rally 
Committee '31, '32; Theta Alpha 
Phi Play '32, Football '31, '32 




William C. Carr, B.A. 
Auckland, New Zealand 
Major, English and History 
Delta Phi. Brickers. Internation- 
al Relations Club President '34, 
Editor "Y" News '34, Blue Key 



Ann Parkinson, B.A. 
Rexburg. Idaho 
Major, Music 



R. Morrell Ashby, B.A. 

American Fork, Utah 

Major, Physics 

"Y" Eagles Club "33, '34; 

Physics Club, Chemistry Qub 



Maurice A. Jones, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Economics 
"Y" News '31. '32. '33. '34; 
School Play '32, '33; Psychol- 
ogy Club President '32 



Delbert Howe Young, B.S. 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 

Major, Agronomy 

Wrestling '32, '33, '34; Idaho 

Club, Ag Club, Vice-President 

Block "Y" Club '34 



D. Elmer Johnson, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Zoology 



One Hundred Thirteen 



>eruors 



••ota: 



Floyd Kotter, B.S. 

Elsinore, Utah 

Major, Physical Education 

Football '31, '32. '33, '34; Block 

"Y" Club 



Irene Haynie, B.S. 
Salt Lake City. Utah 
Major, Home Economics 
Gamma Phi Omicron. Yeshara 



O. Meredith Wilson. B.A. 

Provo, Utah 
Major, History 
U. of U. 1928, 1929 
Debate Mgr. '32-33; Debating 
'33-'34; R. M. C. Extemporan- 
eous Speech '34, Student Body 
President '33-'34; Junior Class 
President, Delta Phi, Brickers, 
Trying Trio 



Orval W. Okelberry, B.S. 
Goshen, Utah 

Major, Finance and Banking 
Football '31 -'32; President Tau- 
sigs '34 



Blanche Jones, B.S. 
Spanish Fork, Utah 
Major, Physical Education 



Le Roy VanCott, B.A. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Major, Accounting 




Helen Boyer, B.S. 
Springville, Utah 
Major, Physical Education 
White Keys, Fidelas 



Morris Bunnell, B.S. 
Spring City, Utah 
Major, Sociology 



Floy Hansen, B.S. 

Richfield, Utah 

Major, Physical Education 

White Key, W. A. A., Sevier 

Club, Phi Delta Phi Vice-Pres. 

'33, '34; Dance Review '32, '33, 

'34; O.S. Trovata Pres. '34 



Horald M. Bateman, B.A. 
West Jordan, Utah 
Major, Music 

Band '31, '32, '33, '34; Orches- 
tra '31, '32, '33; Male Glee Club 
'31, 32; Secretary Freshman 
Class '32, Junior Class Officer 
'33, Competitive Play '34, 
Brickers, "Y" Eagles, Jordan 
Club, French Club 



R. Wendell Vance, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 

Major, Zoology and Entomology 
Class Debating Team '28, Com- 
petitive Play '29, '32: Alumni 
Play '29, All Boys Show '29, 
Delta Phi, Blue Key, Viking 



Howard A. Bird, B.S. 
Snringville, Utah 
Major, Economics 
Delta Phi 



One Hundred Fourteen 






Seniors 



Harold J. Bissell, B.S. 
Springville, Utah 
Major, Geology 
Sauropodian President '34 



Carol Partridge, B.S. 
Provo. Utah 

Major, Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration 
Les Ceciliennes 



Weldon J. Tayior, B.S. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Economics 

Irvine Oratorical Contest '31, 

Debating, President Delta Phi 

'34, President Block "Y" '34 



Wayne Harris, B.S. 

Portage, Utah 

Major, Education and Geology 



Leah Nelson, B.A. 
Spanish Fork, Utah 
Major, English 
Fidelas 



Carl L. Larson, B.S. 

Preston, Idaho 

Major, Finance and Banking 




Clarice H. Hart, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 

Major. Clothing and Textiles 
Gamma Phi Omicron, B. Y. U. 
Women's Club 



Wesley L. Bayles, B.A. 
Blanding, Utah 
Major, Chemistry 
Delta Phi, Val Hyric, Wrest- 
ling 31, '32 



George Ashby, B.S. 
Leamington, Utah 
Major, Mathematics 
Track '32, '33, '34; Block 
Millard Club 



Y," 



Alberta Williams, B.A. 
Morgan, Utah 
Major, English 



Gordon E. Braun, B.S. 
Ogden, Utah 
Major, Mathematics 
Psychology Club, Weber Club, 
Band, Vikings 



Ralph A. Ericksen, B.A. 

Mt. Pleasant, Utah 

Major, Music 

B. Y. U. Male Quartet, Double 

Mixed Quartet 



One Hundred Fifteen 



>eniors 



;ota; 



Preston Hughes. B.A. 

Spanish Fork, Utah 

Major, Zoology 

"Y" Eagles, Beta Beta 

Viking 



Beta, 



S. Bertell Bunker. B.S. 
Provo. Utah 

Major. Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration 



Emma Jacobs, B.S. 
Ogden. Utah 
Major. Education 
LaLenta, Mask Club, Competi- 
tive Play '33 



Elvin Bunnell, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Sociology 



Wilford Lee, B.A. 

Iona, Idaho 
Major. English 
Glee Club 



Eugene Larsen, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Botany 

Glee Club, French Club. Ger- 
man Club, "Y" Skii Club. Beta 
Beta Beta, "Y" Eagles, Sauro- 
podians 




Rhoda Stowell, B.S. 

Provo. Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 

O.S. Trovata 



H. Dean Parry, B.A. 
Ogden. Utah 
Major, Physics 
Delta Phi 



William P. Martin, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 

Major, Chemistry and Mathe- 
matics 

Senior Class President '34. Ro- 
tary Oratorical Contest '31, De- 
bating '32, '33, '34; President 
Democratic Club '33, Junior 
Prom Committee '33, Secretary 
"Y" Eagles '33. Secretary blue 
Key '34, Viking 



J. Sherman Tanner, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Physics 



Caroline Hansen, B.A. 
Provo. Utah 
Major, English 
Val Norn 



Ray M. Aldrich, B.S. 

Mt. Pleasant, Utah 

Major, Finance and Banking 



One Hundred Sixteen 



;ota: 



Seniors 



Margaret Taylor, B.S. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Major, Art 

Mask Club "31. Glee Club '32, 
Banyan Staff '33, '34, Vice- 
President Salt Lake City Club 
'34, International Relations Club, 
Studio Guild 



Leland Frost, B.S. 
Ephraim, Utah 
Major, Chemistry 



WlLMA KOTTER, B.A. 

Brigham City, Utah 
Major, Physical Education 
O.S. Trovata, White Key, B. 
Y. U. Double Mixed Quartet 



J. Reed Thornton, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Political Science 
Secretary French Club '34, In- 
ternational Relations, Senior 
Project Committee '34, Brickers 



Hortense Snow, B.S. 

St. George, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 

Gamma Phi Omicron, Yeshara 



Clinton Allen, 
Goshen, Utah 
Major, Physics 
Physics Club 



B.A. 




Loman F. Hutchings, B.A. 

Springville. Utah 

Major, French 

Winner of Cross Country '27, 

French Club, Spanish Club. 

German Club, Vikinq '31, '32, 

Track '27 



Mildred Dixon, B.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Accounting and Business 

Administration 



Bernard S. Walker, B.A. 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 
Major, Economics 
Basketball '28, '29; Track '28, 
'29, '30; Band '28, Sophomore 
Loan Fund Committee 29, Sen- 
ior Play '34, Tausig, Alpha 
Kappa Psi, French Club 



Ellen B. Lund, B.A. 
Huntington Park, California 
Major, English 



Morris Johnson, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Music 



Bernell H. Lewis, B.S. 
Spanish Fork, Utah 
Major. Physical Education 
Tausig, Track '31, '32, '33, '34, 
Bootball '30, '31 



One Hundred Seventeen 



Seniors 



;ota; 



John H. McGuire, B.S. 
Provo. Utah 
Major. Botany 



Wm. E. Creer, B.S. 

Spanish Fork. Utah 

Major, Chemistry 

All Boy's Show '31, Brigadier 



Elizabeth Conover, B.S. 

Provo Utah 

Major. Home Economics 
Ladies Glee Club '30, '31; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee '33, Beaux 
Arts Social Unit, President 
Gamma Phi Omicron '34, Vice- 
President Studio Guild, School 
Art Advisory Committee '34 



Preston N. Taylor, B.S. 
Bonida, Idaho 
Major, Physics 



Marjorie Ellsworth, B.S. 
Lewisville, Idaho 
Major, Foods and Nutrition 
Gamma Phi Omicron Vice-Pres- 
ident '34 



LeRoy Condie, B.S. 

St. George, Utah 

Major, Education 

Delta Phi, Prom Committee '32, 

Psychology Club, Studio Guild, 

Graduate Club 




Barr C. Miller, B.S. 

Murray, Utah 

Major. Accounting and Busi- 

iness Administration 

Brickers 



Louise Nielsen, B.A. 

Tooele. Utah 

Major. Physical Education and 

Speech 

Debating '32 '33; Competitive 

Play '32, "Y" News '33, '34; 

Public Service Bureau 34. Phi 

Delta Pi, W.A.A., Mask Club, 

International Relations Club, 

Journalism Club, Block "Y," 

White Key 



Lynn Taggart Bright, B.A. 

Lewiston, Utah 

Major, Music 

Band '32, '33, '34; Orchestra 

'32, '33, '34; Glee Club '32, '34 



Kathryn B. Pardoe. B.A. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Speech 



Earl B. Cottam, B.A. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Architectural Drafting 
Blue Key, Viking, Studio Guild, 
Art Service Bureau, President 
Freshman Class '31, Loan Fund 
Chairman '32, Prom Committee 
'33, Banyan Staff '34 



T. Edward Aycock, B.S. 
Vernal, Utah 
Major, Economics 



One Hundred Eighteen 



j-wa: 



Seniors 



Virgil J. Smith, B.S. 

Lehi, Utah 

Major, Religious Education 

Debating 



Uarda Ball, B.S. 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 

Major, Textiles and Clothing 

Cesta Tie, Ladies Glee '30, '31, 

'33 



Robert Yorgason, B.S. 

Fountain Green, Utah 

Major, Economics 

Sanpete Club, Wrestling '30- 

'31, '34; Nuveko Social Unit 

'29-'31 



Mildred Housley Dimick, B.S. 
St. Anthony, Idaho 
Major, Household Administra- 
tion 

Secretary Senior Class '34; Sec- 
retary Gamma Phi Omicron '34 



Paul E. Anderson, B.S. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Accounting and Business 

Administration 

Track '24, '25, '26, '27; Glee 

Club '24, '27; Opera '24, '25, 

'26; Young Gleeman '26; All 

Boys Play 25, '26, '27; Block 

"Y" Club, "Y" Peppers '27 



Ernest Abbot, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 

Major, Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration 




Elva Wilkinson, B.S. 
Ogden, Utah 
Major, Sociology 
Gamma Phi Omicron, 
Club, Studio Guild, "Y" 
Staff 



Mask 
News 



W. Frank Jorgensen, B.S. 
Fountain Green, Utah 
Major, Economics 



Margarett Reese, 
Price, Utah 
Major. History 
Val Nora 



B.S. 



Dale B. Wilson, B.S. 
Payson, Utah 
Major, Geology 
Tausig 



Vera Conder, B.S. 
Olmsted, Utah 
Major, Physical Education 
Women's Skiing, Basketball, 
Track, Archery, Women's Ten- 
nis Singles Winner '32, '33; 
President W. A. A. '34; Presi- 
dent Athene Social Unit '32; 
Secretary Beaux Arts '34 



David E. Miller, B.A. 
Syracuse, Utah 
Major, German 
Delta Phi, German Club 



One Hundred Nineteen 



>eniors 



;OTa; 



ROWENA RlGTRUP, B.S. 

Springville, Utah 
Major, Physical Education, Sec- 
ondary Education 
Ta Lenta Social Unit 



Clara Moore, B.S. 
Spanish Fork. Utah 
Major, Clothing and Textiles 
"Y" News '29, '30, 33, '34; The 
Scratch '30, '31; Senior Essay 
Contest Winner '32. Gamma 
Phi Omicron, President Ta 
Lenta's, "Y" Journalist 



Ed Brady, B.A. 
Castle Dale, Utah 
Major, Music 



Leila A. Bunderson, B.S. 

Emery, Utah 

Major, English 

Mask Club, Emery - Carbon 

Club, French Club 



Ray L. Jenkins, B.A. 

Springville, Utah 

Major, Accounting 

"Y" News '31, Tausig, Alpha 

Kappa Psi 



Beth Swenson, B.A. 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 
Major, English 
Val Norn, "Y" News '28, '29 




D. Spencer Grow, B.S. 
Calgary, Alberta, Canada 
Major, Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration 
Officer Alpha Kappa Psi '33, 
"Y" News '33. Delegate R. M. 
I. P. A. Laramie '33, Delegate 
Chicago Convention Alpha 
Kappa Psi '33, Canadian Club, 
"Y" Journalism Club, Delta Phi 



Blain Allen, B.S. 

Salem, Utah 

Major, Mechanic Art 

Wrestling '32. '33; Football '33, 

'34: Spartans '33, Val Hyric 

'34. Block "Y" Club '34 



Fay Johnson, B.S. 

Provo, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 

Vice-President Junior Class, Val 

Norn, Gamma Phi Omicron 



Allen T. Wells, B.S. 

Lehi, Utah 

Major, Mathematics and Physics 



Flora Kenney, B.S. 

Holden, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 

Gamma Phi Omicron, Fidelas 



Del Mar Nelson, B.S. 
Pleasant Grove, Utah 
Major. Art 

Studio Guild Gold Medal '32, 
A.W.S. Original Musical Com- 
edy Award '33, Glee Club, Or- 
chestra 



One Hundred Twenty 



;£W-\: 



>emors 



Clarice Brunt, B.S. 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 
Major. Household Administra- 
tion 

O. S. Trovata, Idaho Club, 
French Club 





Earl T. Smith, B.S. 

Beaver, Utah 

Major. Physics and Mathematics 

Vice-pres. Mates '32 





Helen Christensen, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 
Gamma Phi Omicron 





Vernon Lee Masters, B.S. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Music 





Georgia Hougaard, B. S. 

Manti, Utah 

Major, Foods and Nutrition 





William Carrigan, B.S. 
Morgan, Utah 
Major, Physics 
Delta Phi 



J*. *- 




Betty Cutler, B.S. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Major, Clothing and Textiles 

Fidelas 







Harry Sundwall, B.S. 

Fairview, Utah 

Major, Accounting and Business 

Administration 

Alpha Kappa Psi, Sanpete Club 



Virginia Hougaard, B. S. 

Manti, Utah 

Major, Home Economics 



Harold Van Wagenen, B.A. 
Provo, Utah 
Major, Economics 
Block "Y" Club, Bricker, Delta 
Phi, Yellmaster '30, Rally Com- 
mittee '34, Yellmaster '34 



Frances Jennings, B.A. 

Ephraim, Utah 

Major, English 

Sanpete Club Vice-Pres. '33, 

Secretary German Club '34 



Warren E. Shipp, B.S. 
Beaver, Utah 
Major, Horticulture 
Mates, Ag Club 



Elna Harris, B.A. 
Ogden, Utah 
Major, History 
International Relations 



Club 



Alta Stoker, B.S. 

Sugar City, Idaho 

Major, Music 

Glee Club '33, 34; Orchestra 

'33; Concert Chorus '33, '34; 

Opera '34; Idaho Club 



One Hundred Twenty-one 



*W-\1 




Facial foliage. 

Big mogul Kotter. 

Junior-Senior brawl. 

Come on in; the water's fine — ! 

Frosh-Soph party. 

More Frosh-Soph antics. 

Green hands editing the "Y" 
News. 



One Hundred Twenty-two 



XXM& 



Juniors 




Oakley Evans 
President 



Maurine Romney 
Vice-President 



Belle Fillmore 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Led by Oakley Evans, president, and ably 
assisted by Maurine Romney, vice-president, 
and Belle Fillmore, secretary-treasurer, the 
Junior Class has proved itself outstanding in 
scholastic, athletic, and social activities. 

The class lias been superior in many 
events. They won the inter-class debates and 
the silver loving cup in the Founder's Day 
Parade. 

Social activities have included the annual 
Junior-Senior party which this year was a 
hilarious barn-party. However, outstanding 
among all achievements was the annual 
Junior Promenade held March 23. The 
Ladies Gym was transformed into a canyon 
scene of marvelous beauty. "By Our Water- 
falls" was the theme and it was artistically 
portrayed in every detail. Phil Christensen 
was chairman with David Merrill as his co- 
worker. 

At the end of the winter quarter the vice- 
president, Maurine Romney, left school, and 
the vacancy was efficiently filled by Moreho 
Allred. 

The Junior Class, larger than ever, more 
successful than ever, enjoyed its year. The 
members have played hard, worked diligent- 
ly and have profited much. 



One Hundred Twenty-three 



*wa: 



Juniors 





'$ £ I t 




SE^aPE 



ft fr £ 









Ernest Eberhard 
Zelma Brown 
Roy Brown 

Helen Miner 

Waldo LeSueur 



Maurine Jones 
R. Kay Hart 

Zula Hanson 

George Neslen 

Grace Elaine Simpson 



Glenn Hansen 
Mary Clark 

F. Howard Forsyth 
Ilda Hansen 

Eugene Jorgensen 



Lucille Skinner 

Karl R. Weight 

Muriel Walker 
Ferron Losee 

Nelda Petersen 



Lyndon L. Dudley 
Ruth Waldram 
Ivan Willey 

Maude Snell 

Dave Merrill 



Louise Boyer 

Wayne Millet 
Alice Ririe 

Ray Fahring 

Helen Morgan 



Lawrence Brown 
Neola Madsen 

W. Douglas Merrill 
Opal Christensen 

Ray W. Kartchner 



Laura Mensel 

George A. White 
Leona Booth 

George S. Gillespie 

Marguerite Sears Conuie 



Harry A. Dixon 
Alice Houston 

Merrill E. Wood 

Marjorie Mitchell 
Karl M. Jameson 



Vanice Beck 

Rex A. Bigler 

Olive Winterton 

Lloyd L. Peterson 
Neva Hanson 



One Hundred Twenty-lour 



;OTa; 



Marcell W. Bird 
Ada Taylor 
Glen Black 

Lorna Murray- 
Joseph Swenson 



Reva Madsen 

Jay L. Nelson 

Ireta May Pierce 
Ray McGuire 

Moreho Allred 



Harold T. Christensen 
Alice Spencer 

Norman Freestone 

Dorothy Hunn 

Dale Jones 



Helen Louise Bower 
Lynn A. Wright 
Naomi Halliday 

Lamar A. Taylor 

Ruth Huffaker 



Joe McEwan 

Laura Callis 

Grant H. Hutchinson 
Leona Gibbons 

Marshall E. Huffaker 



Faun Greer 

Robert Olson 

Maurine Yarbrough 
William Price 

WlLLA SOWARDS 



Elbert Miller 

Clara Edwards 
A. La Von Earl 
Erika Seiter 

J. Gilman Jensen 



Margaret Bird 

John R. Talmage 
Thelma Larsen 
Averil Nielson 
Ruth Clark 



Earl Crookston 
Dee Shawcroft 

Marvell Hutchinson 
Ruby Kelly 

LeGrand Dunkley 



Bertha Clarke 

Theodore K. Young 
Leota Roskelley 
Bill Haws 

Virginia Ekins 



una 



j 



umors 









f i* $ f 




One Hundred Twenty-five 



JLWK 



Juniors 




ftJiQZ 




Emma Farnsworth 
Albert H. Wright 
Dorothy Clayton 
Karl Jamison 

Marjorie Seegmiller 



J. Vaur Waters 
Ariel Davis 

Lyman M. Partridge 
Weldon Alldredge 
Kenn Brown 



Bruce Wakefield 
Irene Johnston 
Theron Luke 

Olive S. Reeve 

Willard E. Done 



Vaughn Livingstone 
John C. Domina 

Glen L. Randall 

Irving E. Anderson 
Niles Vest 



Alton D. Fordham 
Anna Jensen 

Harry Blackwell 

Kate A. Whetten 
George I. Bone 



Millard F. Brady 

Parlell Peterson 
Alice Smith 
Joe Johnson 

Antone W. Nisson 



Sherman Wing 
Ellen Jackson 

Vernon Holindrake 
Edna Lee Reed 

H. Clyde Washburn 



Phil Hansen 

Paul Anderson 
Maurine Kjar 
Grant Greer 

Don C. Markham 



J. Walden Hughes 
Edna May Jenkins 

J. Keith Gudmundsen 
Josephine Sowards 

Virgil V. Peterson 



Esmond Snell 

Alton H. Peterson 
Mildred Maughn 

Hunt L. Sanford 
Walt Foulger 



One Hundred Twenty-six 



my«\: 



Juniors 



Harold E. Merkley 
Cecile Clark 

Wayne Hanks 

Mary Dahlquist 
Rudger E. Jones 



Mildred Swensen 

Henry J. Nicholes 
Millie Steele 

Clifton D. Boyack 
Ione Robinson 



Allen B. Sorensen 
Cleone Amundsen 
H. Martin Iverson 
Devaun Dix 

Phil Christenson 



Betty Jones 

Bradford Hatch 
Josephine Smith 

Levi E. Reynolds 
Marie Rivers 



Wayne Cropper 
Mamie Jensen 
Lynn L. Gee 

Mary Broadbent 
Lavell Gamett 



Glenn B. Johnson 
Rex Ingersoll 

Don M. Alder 
Elden Schow 

Verness W. Frazier 



Jack Brown 

Lois Greenwood 

Kenneth L. Cannon 
Pearl Taylor 
Daryl Huish 



Huish F. Yates 

Leon N. Christenson 
Orran T. Ashby 

W. Guy Callahan 
Byron C. Nelson 



Lloyd Young 

Aline Rawson 
Jay Strong 

Rinda Rowley 

Duane Bishop 



Joseph L. McGregor 
Walter Pitcher 
Arval Erickson 

Clarence A. Anderson 
Howard Peterson 




One Hundred Tiventy-sevcn 



*w-\? 



Juniors 




* Q>w. 




Joseph Crane 

Louise Ollerton 
Don Nielson 

Martha Swenson 



Cecile Dimick 

Wyla Johnson 
Reed Russell 

Stanley Christensen 



Wilmont Berry 
Ella Lund 

William Hasler 
Paul Chipman 



Tony Shalfoon 

Beatrice Jensen 

LaVern Ungricht 
Marvin Graff 



Robert Parker 
Helen Morris 

Kenneth Lewis 

Sylvan Stephens 



LaGrande Spilsbury 
Fern Boyer 

Bert Ludlow 
Dee Cox 



Calven Frandsen 
Helen Calder 

Harris Walker 

Duane Ballard 



WilkinsNuttall 
Elgia Perry 

Thelma Young 

Marion Harding 
Stewart Grow 



LeGrande Magleby 
Esther Mitchell 
Glen Gordon 
Mary Bayles 

Sheldon Hayes 



Elmo Geary 

Gerald Bodily 

Ralph Backman 
Jim McGuire 
John Webb 



One Hundred Twenty-eight 



SopKomores 




Vee Call 
President 



Elizabeth Holbrook 
Vice-President 



Tom Eastmond 
Secretary-Treasurer 



The Class of '36, in spite of considerable 
trouble in keeping a class president in school, 
has functioned actively throughout the year. 
The class has had among its members many 
students who have been active in athletics, 
forensics, dramatics, student body govern- 
ment, socials and various other school activi- 
ties,. 

The Sophomore Class is always remem- 
bered by the Loan Fund Ball. This year, 
with Tom Eastmond as chairman, they put 
over a very successful and colorful affair. It 
featured an NRA theme and succeeded in 
adding a considerable sum of money to the 
school Loan Fund. 

Other social activities of the year in- 
cluded an Autumn Leaf Ball and a Mis-fit 
Party with the Junior Class. 

At the end of the school year last year 
Kay Berry was elected president of the class, 
Elizabeth Holbrook, vice-president, and Tom 
Eastmond, secretary. Kay Berry did not re- 
turn to school and Vee Call was chosen to 
fill the position. He served in the office for 
two quarters and then left school. Tom 
Eastmond was then elected president for the 
remainder of the school year. The office of 
secretary was thus left vacant and Smoot 
Brimhall was chosen to fill this position. 



One Hundred Twenty-nine 



.ota; 



Sophomores 




Forace Green Charles Oaks Joseph McAllister Bert Fullmer Archie Romney 

Leola Green Lorna Poulson Deborah Scott Lorna Wentz 

Marinda Bennion Althea Marsden Mima Broadbent Mary Black Margaret Simpson 

Earl Wignall Delbert Bean V. David Sabin Clarence Harston 

Vernon Kirk Ladd Cropper Lynn Searle Ronald Jones Herbert Taylor 

Glenna Macfarland Cloris Butler Naomi Zumbrunnen Katherine Davis 

Marjorie Stevens Glenavieve Decker Ina Lindsay Elva Bingham Ruth Evans 

Fred Kartchner Lynne Wood Kenneth Duke Verdell Bishop 

Orren Bone Wally Banks G. Lee Morgan Aaron Brown Goulding Johnson 

Phyllis Armistead Katherine Stokes Lillian Stokes Ruby Ricks 

Winifred Smith Ellen Scorup Fredona Strickler Della Snell Myrl Washburn 

Jack Gibb Eldridge Maxwell Sanford Bingham George Larsen 

Philip Schwieder Cullen Barton Dale Schofield Owen Rowe S. Lloyd Vance 

Rhean McAllister Carma Coffin Rosemary Hodson Norine Checketts 

One Hundred Thirty 



i^ir^: 



Sopkomores 




Phil Knight Ralph Anderson Dean VanWagenen Leland Priday Rondo Law 

Helen Wheeler Phyllis Ball Josephine Johnson Barbara Perrett 

Mildred Tobler Myrth Allen Faye Page Ruth Crane Margret Boyer 

Reed Fautin DeVoe Brim hall Louis Bryner Eldon Reese 

Iliff Jeffries Kenneth Whitwood Anthony Woolf Clyn Young Merrill Croft 

Melva Jones Eleanor Nicholes Sibyl Clark Alicebeth Whitley 

Ruby Christensen Helen McAllister Virginia Kimball Louise Christiansen Elaine Brimhall 

Ernest Dean John Freckleton Keith Romney Gilbert Chatwin 

Floyd McIntire Golden Taylor Otto Done Marion Olsen Verl Whiting 

Ruby Cox Priscilla Allen Norma Pardoe Emmeline Hastings 

Golda Christensen Mary Barton Irene Houston Florence Jones Gloria Friel 

Clyde Biddulph Leo Brady Woodrow Mickelsen Leland Wiscombe 

Frank Postma Billie Goodman Dean White Warwich Palfreyman Kay Hammond 

Beth Roberts Edna Jensen Helen Hetrick Sarah White 

One Hundred Thirty-one 



••fAlkY-M 



Sophomores 








Milton Nelson Reid Petersen Jennings Evans Smoot Brimhall Roy Hammond 

Lucretia Burgess Mary Leonard Antoinette Wilson Beth Paxman 

Ruth Stevens La June Brown Norma Miner Moneice Waters Maurine Harrison 

Farrin Mangasun Berne Kindred Merrill Nielson Roe Thorne 

Milton Grimes Wildon Bascom Reece Faucette Kenneth Taylor Elden Ball 

Louise Richards Elfie Hansen Phyllis Talbot Lue Groesbeck 

Helen Young Marjorie Smith Marguerite Gardner Ellen Binns Maurine Harris 

Dale Reese Lynn Markam Harvey Moore Milton Beck 

Ned Dickson Mervin Peterson Val Johnson Teut Becker James R. Clark 

Helen Farrar Irene Brooksby Maude Redd Afton Kay 

Vera Anderson Zenna Gee Mabel Petersen Sebrina Cropper Evelyn Miner 

Charles Thorne Hart Stallings Dale Despain William Howe 

Ben S. Markam Alvin Cazier Woodrow Wilson Morris Vance Vernon Collier 

Ione Hickman Virginia Madsen Margaret Petersen Gretha Petersen 



One Hundred Thirty-two 



;OTA: 



SopKomores 




Nick Udall Boyce Clark Everett Pullen Paul Brunt Howard Dixon 

Evelyn Prusse Beulah Sowards Maud Green LaVada Westover i 

Nadine Taylor Luana Mercer Jessie Neville Nanieve Owens Doreyn Latimer 

William Ashby Jim Simmons Tracy Call Hyrum Smith 

James Jensen Theodore Johnson Keith Hatch Leon Cahoon Paul Murphy 

Lucy Rice Beth Richards Miriam Thurston Hazel Anderson 

Afton Hodson Vera Deane Parks Edna Ellsworth Frances Shelby Anna Dean Scott 

Burnis Wightman Mark Stahmann Joseph Seethaler Elvin Downs 

Virgil Wedge Kay B. Redd George Todd Ray Davies Bud Evans 

Oma LeSueur LoRee Rawson Lavina Whitney Kay Mangum 

Edna Starr Pearl Naegle Helen Hilton Stella Scott Edna Shanks 

Wilmer Tanner Henry Hurst Arlington Spilsbury Byron Geslison 

Boyd Page George Irwin Reed Nielson Russell Foutz Vance Holman 

Bernice Hacking Lucile Handley Mildred MacFarlane Anna Lou Peterson 



One Hundred Thirty-three 



;!W-\1 



Sophomores 




Albert Payne George Holindrake Francis Rowe Hugh Cannon El von Jackson 

Helena Brown Verle Paulson Thelma Bingham Carmen Benson 

Ruthe Giddings Fav Brown Golden N. Swallow Afton Boberg Laurel Harper 

Ralph W. Monk Ross B. Davis Grant Bunderson Max Steed 

Len Sterling Dave Hibbert John Lytle James Martin Willard C. Lott 

Lenora Benedict Veda Steele Maydelle Pistole Barbara Reid 

Flornce Allen Gene Goetzman Erma Young Darlene Owens Fern Fairbanks 

Wallace H. Gardner Roy A. Strong Leo Powell Max Marquardson 

Robert Elliott Morris E. Duke Elmo A. Nelson Don Woodward Owen Bloomfield | 

Dorothy Janson Lillean Jones Norma Perkins Alice Huckins 

Evan Nelson Ann Bonnett Walter Williams Taylor Nuttall 

Owen Steed Roy Broadbent Ermel Morton 



One Hundred Thirty-lour 



;£W-\: 



Freshmen 




Webster Decker 
President 



Helen Harris 
Vice-President 



Dale DeGraff 
Secretary-Treasurer 



This year's Frosh class, the Class of '37, 
has seen a year of exceptional activity and 
enjoyment under the leadership of Webster 
Decker, class president, who has been ably 
assisted by Helen Harris, vice-president, and 
Dale DeGraff, secretary. Over six hundred 
strong, the class through its support and co- 
operation, has made it possible for the offi- 
cers to arrange and carry out many success- 
ful parties, programs, and contests. 

They now admit that they were green 
at the first of the year, and even yet they 
feel it possible to consider themselves as hav- 
ing a slight greenish tinge, but they also 
feel that they have progressed sufficiently 
this year at Brigham Young University to 
make themselves full-fledged, Frosh-fright- 
ening Sophomores next year. 

Because of the exceptional talent shown 
by the members of the class in music, drama, 
debating, arid athletics, the Freshmen feel 
sure that in the future, the school as a whole 
will recognize the Class of '37 as one of the 
most outstanding classes ever to attend the 
"Y." 



One Hundred Thirty-five 



;m T Al 



FresKmen 




Thales Smith Ralph Berrett Francis Grimmett Wilmer L. Barnett Sam Dase 

Marion Arnold Marzelle Jesperson Nola Comer Amy Young 

Dona Dastrup Huitau Allred Alene Hansen Maxine Jensen Nedra Simpkins 

Bennie Schmiett John Lamb Willard Hayward Moroni Marchant 

Erwin Boyer Lowell Clegg Voss Ward Mennell Taylor Alva Burton 

Mattie Taylor Mary Brown Lorraine Bowman Rhea Larsen 

Afton Garner LuDeen Waldram Anita Smoot Norma Crane Virginia Brand 

Weston Harper Max Andrews Loskiel Jenkins Max Jones 

Karl Murray Eugene Blackham Merrill Duke Marvin Allen Roland Hullinger] 

Jean Smith Carma Wilson Una Barton Jean Summers 

Maurine Carlile June Farnes Pearl Callis Ruthe Hawley Ellen Adams 

Jason Wall Jesse Buchanan E. M. Jorgenson Edmund Evans 

Shirley W. King Joseph Clayson McKay Ogden Arthur Christensen Weldon Shephere 

Edith Dixon Stella Dixon Lucile Tippets 

One Hundred Thirty-six 



Dorothy O. Tolman 






.ota; 



Freshmen 




Benjamin Call Avard Rigby Ansel Hall Stanley Knight Malcolm Johnson 

Doris Bronson Helen Childs Louise Smith Vola Knight 

Helen Welch Marie Miller Ina Dunn Fern Shelley Olive Ogden 

Thomas Bullock Lowell Yancey Harry Newell Chester May 

Gerald Weber Whitney Chapman Jack Kellersberger Jack Eastmond Mulford Aycock 

Clara Riley Mary Duersch Marie Jensen Helen Brinkerhoff 

Lyle Holdaway Grace Thomas Francis Seaton Zella Harding Rosalind Taylor 

Henry Jensen Rawlin Roper Harold Hutchins Cannon Jensen 

Joseph A. Naylar Roy Huntington Clair Pond Wendel Johnson Nathan Allen 

Erma Warnick Marjorie Wagers Lois Baird Helen Hammond 

Catherine Bowles Reta Woodward Sarah Nickerson Anna Hardman Lois Haws 

Neil Day Jay Oldroyd Jess Monson Clair Pickup 

L. Elwin Reid LeRoy Smith Fred Musser Claud Abbott Alton Merril 

Marian Dudley Eva Watson Helen Jorgensen Ruth Rasmussen 

One Hundred Thirty-seven 



*w-\: 



Freshmen 




Alice Miller Estella Mortensen Maxine Bailey Eleanor Jenson Fern Gardner 

H. Neil McKnight Owen Applegate Levar Rassmussen Vern Moncur 

Lewis Anderson Daryle Redd Shirl Swenson Glen Borg Blaine Thorpe 

Elaine Richards Lenore Condie Ruth Smith Gladys Sorensen 

Louie Jean Miner Lila Menzies Afton Buchanan Ida Fechsen Mona Wilson 

Walter Clark Harold Smith Jack Shaw Norval Kitchen 

Albert Swensen Marian C. Peterson LeRoy Waite Roy Hudson Harold Tuft 

Evah Keil Norma Molyneux Katherine Smith Helen Dixon 

Maxine Folster Lucille Park Laura Banner Melba Brower Eleanor Brown| 

Phillip Cave William Reeder Alma Peterson Colvin Tanner 

Harvey Wilson Herman Rowley Lloyd Schlappi Leon Elmer Floyd Mullins 

Vera Schow Fawn Gardner Amy Miller Lacy Williams 

Nelda Hicken Bernice Bailey Maude Shawcroft Ruth Colton Celia Larsen 

Richard Clark Ronald Laksen Weston Johnson Cecil Bullock 



One Hundred Thirty-eight 



;OTa; 



Freshmen 













Frank Harding Roscoe Nelson Fay Walker Erwin Zeyer Junius Payne 

Helen Clark Martha McAllister Sylvia Young Zona Brunt 

Roma Eaton Phyllis Williams Lena Crosby Betty Linn Illa Behrmann 

Floyd Goodrich Marion Rowe Vaughn Abbott Ray Wheeler 

MaxJacobsen Milton Jacobs Paul Nicholes Lincoln Gardner Rex Greenhalgh 

Virginia Burr Lalovi Fish IrisAllred Aileen Lyon 

Phyllis Smith Dona Nelson Melba Jensen Josephine Jackson Maxine Stewart 

Harold Clark Miles Harston Keith Thomas Don Hamilton 

Kenneth Baker Don Greenwood Rulon Oborn Leo Day Miles Romney 

Phyllis LeBaron Arda Hilton May Gardner May Louise Mitchell 

LuluColton Ruth Mendenhall Helen Shurtliff Evelyn Mick elsen Erva Watson 

Gordon LeSueur Calvin Swenson Thomas Cowan Stan Orser 

Jerry Zebell Joseph Despain Ellis Butterfield Jack Owen Hatch Farnsworth 

Aurelia Stevens Carol Bennett Isabelle Dillman Roberta Allen 



One Hundred Thirty-nine 



;*wa: 



Freshmen 









Marlow Wooton Paul Christensen Robert Stell Nathan Davis Joe Dean 

Wanda Peterson Reginald Weaver Cecelia Jensen Ione Rich 

Miriam Larsen Merline Gardner Ellen Walker Maxine Austin Gerry Eggertsen 

Lee Stokes Floyd Mortensen James Phillips Kenneth Nelson 

Hal Taylor Vern Waldo Parley V. Redd Carson Healy Halden Boyack 

Margaret Tholen Edith Scorup Minnie Hardman Ivy Russon 

Afton Cornaby Vivian Crosby Mildred Peay Roberta Wilde Agnes Newton 

Halden Gunnell Vinton Merrill Roland Pond Bert Asay 

Douglas Nielsen Paul Hunt Lewis Jones Gerald Gunnell Jack Selck 

Annice Nisbet Sarah Fitzgerald Dagmar Byland Jennie Romney 

Orpha Soffe Maurine Baird Helen Swenson Anna Allphin Winnifred McDonalI 

Owen Steed Jay Schofield, Jr. Jerome Platt Evan Nelson 

Alexander Woolley Homer Royle Victor Freestone Emer Broadbent Gordon Anderson 

Marjorie Cooper Donna Lee Johnson Twila Peterson Dorothy Harmer 

One Hundred Forty 








Guy Percival Evan Call Wayne Grimmett Clarence Hill Kirk Stephens 

Rella Miller Gwen Merrill Oleah Rockwood Enola Johnson 

Ruth Speckhart Faye Greer Afton Bingham Virginia Teerlink Helen Huish 

Clifton Coon Blaine Hart Luther Edwards Clifford Young 

Marion Rowe Narval Driggs Wilson Street Rex Hansen Leon Wride 

Marjorie Smith Edith Rowley Veda Gardner Tess Packard 

John Murdock Newell Larsen J. E. Allen, Jr. Levi Kitchen Clifton Brimhall 

Avery Kirkham Hugh Sellers George Stoddard Kenneth Roberts 

Roy Hicken Varian Ralphs Allen Smith Don Tippets Champ Allen 

Dorothy Chase Ruth Sylvester Theresa Hagen Amy Nelson 

Anna Olsen Dorothy Stringham Louise Peterson Fern Christensen Faun Jensen 

Lorin Bunker Glen Johnson Elroy Murdock Mifflin Williams 

Warden Duke Winston Fillmore LeGrand Foulke Vern Bullock Eldon Richardson 

Loren Johnson Maron Hiatt Willard Nelson Harold Madsen 



One Hundred Forty-one 



;OTA1 



Freshmen 




Ralph Dixon Marian Duffin George Crawford Wilford Fisher Junius Hacking 

Genevieve Bluth Velma Christensen Florence Todd Lola Mickelsen 

Lois Peterson Virga Bartholomew Gwendolyn Harris Gwendolyn Ashman Helen Janssen 

Clyde Snow Floyd Hayes Donald Alldredge Norval Carter 

Max Rasmussen Rolland Perry Donald Dickson Earl Giles Roy Sutton 

Ila Schow Bessie Redd Eve Marie Jarvis Loa Brown 

Herbert Brienholt Sterling Redd Neldon Calder Leo Hacking Proctor Bohman 

Burns Magleby Joseph Johnson Dick Manwaring Edgar Dunn 

Virgil Stice Marvin Dahl Garrett Pack Paul Batty Preston Gledhill 

Alice Humphrey Fern Randall Mary Knudson Lorna Colton 

Anneliese Buggert Martha Ashby Elsie Standering Margaret Lewellyn Winona Clark 

Nathan Hale Rumel Cragun John Verney Earl Bascom 

Phil Empey Richard Grimmett Neville Thornock Mark Scott Luther Baldwin 

Aurlene Christensen Louise Zabriskie Doris Larson Floral Lemon 



One Hundred Forty-two 



■•ota: 













,M 





2m 











f- $ •: 





Ray Nash Dick Cummings Don Richardson Robert Sneddon Lawrence Nielsen 

Martha Evans La Rue Boyce Theresa Hansen LaVonne Houston 

Leone Burch Rosella Wright Eda Ashby Esther Laney Marie Barlow 

Garth Olson George Smeath Arvid Larson Stanford Steele 

Paul Jensen Bill Pryde Evelyn Anderson David Prior Glen Berge 

Arma Lay Morris Thorpe Berkeley Parkenson Florence Pickering 

Rhea Stolworthy Velma Ford Margarite Ennis LaVerl Lanceford LaBerle Cook 

Marius Call James Tucker Barratt Chadwick Champ Myers 

Scott Benson Virgil Hansen A. D. Cloward Eldon Hawley Gaylord Gillies 

Eva Madsen Ruth Allred Bessie Payne LaDenna Nance 

Hansen Jacobs Helen Johnson Dorothy Griffiths Mae Christensen Maud Coleman 

Harry Loader Richard Curtis Rex Thomas Ralph Alder 

Jack Thomas Karl Parker Robert Adams Elmo Poulson William Hurst 

Wanda Crandall LaRue Rowley Leona Eitel Norma Moulton 

One Hundred Forty-three 



LWK 



Freshmen 




ifk i 



Lynn Oaks Marvin Dahl Lynn Richardson Pauline Bodily 

Norma Whitney Fred Page Arthur Sundwall LeKntght Jordan 

Bernice Colton Mary Hacking Christella Hansen Durwood Butler 

Fred Peterson Maurice B. Hall Anna Dee Coons Velda Hone 

Wayne Winzenried Leslie George Blanch Lublin Norma Hatch 

Ila Jones Maza Christensen Henry C. Ames Willlvm Schofield 

Frank Harding Max Benson Robert Anderson Evan Judd Harold Thurston 

Hugh Park Max Tuft Ken McNeill Melvin Kavachevich 



One Hundred Forty-four 












II 



BOOK 7 



FILL IT WELL WITH YOUR EULOGY, FLAT- 
TERY, AND GENUINE COMPLIMENT. BETWEEN 
THE ADS AND THE HUMOROUS SPOTS THERE 
IS AMPLE ROOM FOR MANY A LONG AND 
VARIED TALE. WHILE SOME ACQUAINTANCES 
WILL WRITE IN A PERFUNCTORY AND AN IN- 
DIFFERENT MANNER, OTHERS WILL WRITE TO 
REMIND YOU OF A TRUE AND HONEST FRIEND. 

EagMsM 



II 



ADS 

SNAPSHOTS 

INDEX 






BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY'S, 




Interpretation in fine art of 
Prom Prattlings. 

Muvver's lamb must eat his 
mush so hims can grow up to 
be student body president. 

Come out from behind that 
mask, Ed. We know you — . 

Is Syd Boyling? 

Nudist Nuttal. 

Did someone say one acquired 
dignity as a Junior and 
Senior? 



One Hundred Forty-five 



THIS 

MODERN 
WORLD 



The world of business becomes more and more com- 
plex; the boy or girl who enters it without training 
is under a handicap. 

The training gained through establishing close rela- 
tions with a good bank early in I fe is recognized 
today as essential to a broad and well balanced 
education. 

You are invited to avail yourself of the friendly, 
reliable, complete banking services this bank provides. 

FIRST SECURITY BANK OF UTAH 

National Association 

BRANCHES LOCATED AT 

PROVO BINGHAM MAGNA OGDEN 

LOGAN RICHMOND 

These banks are members of the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Fund, and their depositors are entitled to the benefits of 
deposit insurance thus created. 

Member First Security Corporation System 



One Hundred Forty-six 



TIMPANOGOS CREAMERY CO. 

Our Specialty 

TIMPANOGOS and GLACIER BUTTER 

PROVO, UTAH PHONE 313 

O. S. Olsen, Mgr. 



Thank You, Students, for Your Patronage 

ORPHEUM 

WHERE YOU SEE AND HEAR THE BEST 



Gy4uto^rapK 



Ask for 

Ostler's 

Prize Winning Candy 

For a Delicious Meal — 

GOLD STANDARD BAR 
SILVER STANDARD BAR 
OPERA BAR 
NUT LOAF 
HICKORY BAR 
SPUD BAR 



United Billiards 

Pastime and Clean Recreation 
We Appreciate Your Patronage 

Bob Bullock, Manager 



The girls call Bill a handsome shiek 
And turn to see his fine physique. 
The secret of his clever dress 
He'll tell you is our Clean and Press. 

PHONE 475 

Madsen Cleaning 
Company 

"Re good to your clothes" 



One Hundred Forty-seven 



Butler's 

Give 
A Little More in Service 
A Little More in Value 

WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR 

PIECE GOODS 

ART GOODS PACKAGE GOODS 

TO EMBROIDER 



The Home of 
VITALITY 

Health Shoes 
For Women 



You Can Buy 

Hart Schaffner and Marx 

Clothes 
STETSON and DOBBS HATS 
WILSON BROTHERS FURNISHINGS 
FREEMAN and FLORSHEIM SHOES 
GRAYCO SHIRTS and NECK- 
WEAR 



at 



Shri 



rivers 



16 WEST CENTER PROVO, UTAH 



e/luto^rapk 



For Quality Ask Your Dealer for 
CHALLENGE DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Manufactured by 

UTAH WASATCH DAIRY, Inc. 

PHONE 1255 Farm-Owned Organization 



GLADE CANDY COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Quality Candy 



One Hundred Forty-eight 



Nothing you buy is cheaper than 




LEWIS LADIES' STORE 


ELECTRIC SERVICE 




Known for 
Exquisite 
• STYLE 


Dealers all over the territory we serve 
are displaying new devices for accom- 


plishing home jobs the Electric way. 




• QUALITY 


Be really up-to-date when you 




• PRICE 


buy for your home 












Make this Store Your Headquarters 

Lewis 


UTAH POWER & LIGHT 


CO. 




Ladies' Store 


"Efficient Public Service" 




PROVO, UTAH Levi Lewis, Mgr. 


oAut 


o^rapK 



LEVENS 

The Stoke of Greater values 



DISTINCTIVE COLLEGE OUTFITTERS 
Everything Direct to You from the Style Centers 

Everything that is authentic in the best university is here. 
Extraordinary values and fine quality merchandise at modern prices. 



One Hundred Forty-nine 



TH 


J 


N EW 
U T E 


FREE PARKING SPACE 
EFFICIENT COURTEOUS SERVICE 


8- 3 




^HOTEL 


Situated Just North of the 
Temple Ground on Main St. 






Salt 


Lake City, Utah 


JL 


Rates $1 


and up 




__JK 



e/luto£raph 



EAT 

BROWNS ICE CREAM 

FOR HEALTH 

Made in the Cleanest Factory in the West 

"Ask For It!" 

TELEPHONE 315 OGDEN, UTAH 



One Hundred Fifty 



FACULTY, STUDENTS, ALUMNI! 

As the Years Roll by 
and You Look Through the Pages 

of This Edition of the BANYAN 

We Trust You Will All Remember 

Our Pleasant Associations Together While Making 

the Photos for This Book; and Whenever 

You Think of Photographs or School Annuals 

You Will Think of 



LARSON STUDIO 

of 

PROVO, UTAH 

Owned and Operated by B. Y. U. Alumni 



One Hundred Fifty-one 





PIGGLY WIGGLY 






Quality and Economy 




PROVO 




PRICE 



c/Luto^rapk 



W. E. MITCHELL 



JEWELER 

DIAMONDS WATCHES JEWELRY 

MEDALS CLASS PINS RINGS 

34 West Center Provo, Utah 



One Huridred Fifty-two 



Creative Artists 



Seasoned Die-Cutters 



Quality Materials 



Expert Super finishers 
and Binders 



And a staff well acquainted through 
frequent contact with the require- 
ments of school annual work and the 
problems of the year-book staff — 



make it possible for our organization to produce high school and 
college annual covers of unsurpassed quality and originality. 



We made the cover of this BANYAN 



THE DESERET NEWS PRESS 



29 RICHARDS STREET 



SALT LAKE CITY 



One Hundred Fifty-three 



Meats and Groceries 

SOWARDS GROCERY 

A "Y" Supporter 
258 East Fifth North Provo, Utah 



G/4uto£,rapri 



SEARS ROEBUCK & COMPANY 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 
189 WEST CENTER STREET PROVO, UTAH 



M. H. GRAHAM PRINTING CO. 

School Printing a Specialty 
30 South First West Phone 285 

PROVO, UTAH 



One Hundred Fifty-four 



HOTEL ROBERTS 




Rooms That Are Comfortable and Homelike 
.... — >«-•*»- — .... 

MEET AND EAT AT THE ROBERTS HOTEL DINING ROOM 

Open All Day Sunday Special Sunday Dinners 

BANQUETS, DINNER PARTIES AND CLUB LUNCHES ARE OUR 

SPECIALTY 

Meals Are Served Daily 

Hours: Breakfast — 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon; Lunch — 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. 
Dinner — 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

We Cater to School Athletic Teams, Providing Their Special Diets 

OUR MOTTO 

'''Quality Food and Service at Popular Prices" 
'We Aim to Please" 

Wm. Monks, Prop. 



One Hundred Fifty-five 



PROVO GREENHOUSE 



PHONE 80 



Flotvers for All Occasions 

Where the Flowers Grow 



ARTISTS AND SIGN WRITER'S SUPPLIES 

FRESCO COLORS FOR SCENERY 

In Appreciation of Your 1933-34 Business 

GESSFORD'S 

47 NORTH UNIVERSITY AVE. 



e/4uto£,r apK 



University 
Pharmacy 

Prescriptions - Drugs - Sundries 
Ask Ahout our Party Room 



Candies 



Fountain Service 



'You Don't Have To Be 
Rich to Be Stylish!' 

The 
Booterie 



168 West Center 



Provo, Utah 



One Hundred Fifty-six 



The Whole Show is Always FINE at the PARAMOUNT 
Every show is a good show .... all the way through .... 
We offer for your entertainment the hest feature pictures 



obtainable 



PLUS .... the greatest array of short 



subjects made today. 



pARAMOUHT 

■ • WHERE THE BIG PICTURES PLAY* 



c/Luto&raph 



Progressive Printing Co. 

97 No. University Ave. 

QUALITY COMMERCIAL 
PRINTING 

Dance and Party Programs 
and Announcements 



When you buy from us we must pro- 
tect our good name. It is your assurance 
of complete satisfaction. 

FRANK J. MULLETT 

JEWELER 
Provo Utah 



One Hundred Fifty-seven 



BOOKBINDING SPECIALISTS 

MAGAZINE BINDING — GOLD STAMPING 

NOTE AND THESIS BINDING — PAPER RULING 

LOOSE LEAF BINDING OF ALL KINDS 

THE PROVO BOOK BINDERY 

PROVO. UTAH 



c/luto^raph 



Good W ill and Best W ishes to the 



Brigham Young University and its Students 



Consolidated Wagon & Machine Co. 



FARM MACHINERY 



HARDWARE 



"Y" Cafeteria 



'Food at Cost' 



Dennis, Jeweler 

Makers of 

SCHOOL PINS. RINGS 

and Awards 



Salt Lake Citv 



Utah 



One Hundred Fifty-eight 



f^ Pasteurized 

/PHONE \ 



Products < f ==: i 

/pHnNFX 




PHONE 

760 

R-3 

713 



c/4uto£raphs 



STARTUP CANDY CO. . . . Provo, Utah . . . Manufacturers of High Grade 

Confections 



REPAIRING 



APPLIANCES 



"Artistic Lighting Fixtures" 

Peck Electric Company 

213 West Center St. Provo, Utah 

CONTRACT WIRING PHONE 418 MOTOR REPAIRING 



GAS 

The Automatic Fuel with the College Education 
Gas is certainly a well-educated fellow — lie carries 
a Master's Degree. No other fuel can compare with 
his intelligence. And has he polish? There is no 
smoke, soot, dirt, ashes or grit about him. 

WASATCH GAS COMPANY 



One Hundred Fifty-nine 



Utah Timber and 
Coal Co. 

164 West Fifth North 

COAL AND BUILDING 

MATERIALS 

PAINT — OIL — GLASS 
Phone 232 




Sixty-Eight Years of Service 

When an institution has lived splendidly 
for sixty-eight years, that fact of itself is 
the finest evidence one could have of the 
trustworthiness and fair-dealing of the in- 
stitution. 

We are proud of the record of service 
made during the sixty-eight years in which 
Taylor Brothers Company has grown from 
a tiny one-room adobe shack to its present 
place among the fine stores in Utah. 

Taylor Brothers Co. 

PROVO, UTAH 



C/4 uto&raph 



Hats Cleaned and Blocked Rugs Shampooed 

PROVO CLEANING and DYEING CO. 



CLEANING 

77 North First West 



PRESSING REPAIRING 

Free Delivery Provo, Utah 



PARRY & PARRY, Inc. 

Manufacturing Jewelers 

CLASS PINS TROPHIES MEDALS RINGS 

ENGRAVING JEWELRY REPAIRING 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



One Hundred Sixty 



Meet Your Friends at the 

BANYAN LUNCH 

AND ENJOY A HOT COLLEGE LUNCH FOR 
TWENTY-FIVE CENTS 

Quality Foods at Low Prices 

Board and Room — Fountain Lunch — Catering 



Everything for Office and School 

UTAH-IDAHO SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 

155 South State Street Salt Lake City, Utah 



C/4uto£,r aph 



University Market 

MEATS AND GROCERIES 

A Red and White Store 
Phone 273-274 J. J. Booth, Prop. 498 North University Ave. 



True Values of Quality are the Finest Lessons in Learning True Economy 
to all Ideals of Life . . . We Invite You to Try It 

QUINN'S QUALITY ICE CREAM 

83 East Center Street 



One Hundred Sixty-one 



Business and Professional Page 

Professional 

DR. H. F. CANNON 
MORGAN & MORGAN, Attys. 



Business 

CLAUDIN FUNERAL HOME POST PUBLISHING CO. 
CARPENTER SEED CO. "Y" BARBER SHOP_ 

JONES BARBER SHOP JACKSON STUDIO 



PAY'N TAKIT SAFEWAY STORES 

UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE 
McKESSON OGDEN WHOLESALE DRUG 



One Hundred Sixty-two 



The last lay of the stage hands. 

Wall nuts. 

Bruder and Sister Schweitzer- 
dor f. 

Playing the game. 

Boys will be girls. 

Showing us how! 

Let's hope he's dead at last. 




One Hundred Sixty-three 



Ind 



ex 



GENERAL 

Advertisements 

Art 

A.W.S. 

Banyan 

Basketball 

Class Officers 107,123 

Coaches 

Commissioner of Education 

Dancing 

Deans 

Departments 

Dramatics 

Faculty 

Football 

Forensics 

Freshmen 

Graduates 

Intramural 

Juniors 

Music 

Organizations 

Pep Vodie 

President 

President's Aides 

Prom 

Public Service Bureau 

Rallies 

Seniors 

Snapshots 7,14,15,36 

145, 163 
Sophomores 
Student Officers 
Tennis 
Track 
WAA. 
Wrestling 
YNews 

FACULTY 

A 

B 

Barlow, Irene 

Black, Gladys 

Bigelow, Percival P. 

Billings, May 

Boyle, Clarence S. 

Boyle, William H. 

Brown, Ella Larsen 

Buggert, Gustave 

C 

Campbell, Jennie 

Carroll, Elsie C. 

Christensen, Parley A. 

Clark, Herald 

Coffman, W. Elmo 

Colvin, Harold 

Cote, Aubert 

Culmsee, Carlton 

Cullimore, Lloyd L. 

Cummings, Benjamin F. 

D 

de Jong. Gerrit 

Dixon, Fred 10, 41 

E 

Eastmond, Elbert H. 13 

92,22 
Egbert, Anna 
Elliot, Vilate 
Eyring, Carl F. 
F 
G 

Gillespie, Annie L. 
H 

Hales, Wayne B. 
Hammond, Mary C. 
Hansen, George H. 
Hansen, William F. 
Hensen, William F. 
Harrison, Betrrand 
Hart, Charles J. 
Hayes, John E. 



Hayward, C. Lynn 9, 88 

Higgs, B. T. 3 

Holt, E. H. 3,10 

Jensen, Christen 5, 10 

Jensen, C. Lavoir 12 

Jenson, Edgar M. 9 

Jeppson, Wilma 11,78,86,22 

Johansen. Alva 12 

Johnson, A. Rex 11,81,26 

K 

Kotter, Gladys 12 

L 

Larsen, B. F. 12,92 

Lloyd, Oa 10 

Ludlow, Thelma 9 

M 

Madsen, Florence Jepperson j 

Madsen, Franklin 13 

Maeser, Georgia 10, 90 

Marshall, Milton 12 

Martin, Thomas L. 12,88,89 

Maw, Charles E. 

Merrill, A. N. 1. 

Merrill, Harrison R. 

Miller, Elmer 

Morley, Alonzo J. 

101 

Morris, Laval S. 

N 

Nelson, Elmer 

Nelson, Lowry 

Nicholes, Joseph K. 

O 

Oakes, L. Weston 

Ollerton, Anna 

Osmond, Alfred 

P 

Pardoe, T. Earl 

Peterson, Hermese 

Peterson, Hugh W. 

Poulson, M. Wilford 

R 

Reynolds, Alice 

Rich, Stella P. 

Robertson. LeRoy I. 

Romney, G. Ott 

S 

Sauls, Kiefer B. 

Sauer, Robert 

Shaw. Seth T. 

Smart. Nettie Neff 

Smith, Aline C. 

Snow, Edna 

Snow, William J. 

Sperry, Sidney B. 

Strickler, Beulah 

Sudweeks, Joseph 

Summerhays, Margaret 

Swenson, Margaret 

Swenson, John C. 

Swenson, Russell 

T 

Tanner, Vasco M. 1 3, 88 

W 

Warnick, Effie 10, 85 

Wing, John 10 

Wilson, Guy C. 13 

Whetten, Lester B. 10 

Woodward, H. M. 8, 10 

Y 

19 Young, Karl E. 10,91 

Young, Rhoda J. II 

11 STUDENTS 

13,79 A 

10,26 Abbot, Claud 137 

10,26 Abbot, Ernest 119 

11,88 Abbot, Vaughn 139 

10,41 Adams, Ellen 136 

3, 10 Adams, Howard 49 



146-162 

33 

18 

20 

47-49 

129,135 

41 

1 

23 

4,5 

6 

24-27 

9-13 

42-45 

32 

136-142 

105, 106 

56 

124-12S 

28-31 

57-101 

35 

2 

3 

22 

19 

34 

108-121 

-39, 122, 

130-134 
17 
52 
50.51 
54,55 
53 
21 



13 
12 
11 
12,85 
12 
11 
11 
13 

13 
11 
13 
5,10 
12 
12 
53 

11,79 
13 

12,26 

5,10 
, 46, 52 

23, 79, 

13 

12 

4,9 



10 
13 
13 

11.24,26,87, 

13 

11 

4, 10,89 

11 

9 
11 
12 

13,24,87,10 

13 

12 

11,101 

13,90 

10 

13,28 

9,43,79 

3,10 

12,29 

11,89 

4,9 

13,23,86,87 

9,88 

11 

11 

13,63,85 

10 

10 

11 

11 

12 



Adams, Robert 
Agren, Eileen 
Alder, Don 
Alder, Ralph 
Aldrich, Ray 
Alldredge, Donald 
Alldredge, Weldon 
Alleman, Ray 
Allen, Blaine 
Allen, Champ 
Allen, Clinton 
Allen. Florence 
Allen, J. E., Jr. 
Allen, Marvin 
Allen, Myrth 
Allen, Nathan 
Allen, Priscilla 
Allen, Roberta 
Allphin, Anna 
Allred, David 
Allred, Huitau 
Allred. Iris 
Allred, Markland 
Allred, Fulmer 
Allred, Moreho 
Allred, Ruth 
Amaru, Wi Pere 
Ames, Harry 
Amundsen, Cleone 
Anderson, Afton 
Anderson, Clarence 
Anderson, Duane 
Anderson Evelyn 
Anderson, Gordon 
Anderson, Grant 
Anderson, Hazel 
Anderson, Irving 
Anderson, Lewis 
Anderson, Paul 
Anderson, Ralph 
Anderson, Robert 
Anderson, Vera 
Andrews, Max 
Applegate, Owen 
Armistead, Phyllis 
Armstrong, Harold 
Arnold, Marion 
Asay, Bert 
Ashby, Eda 
Ashby, George 
Ashby, Arran 
Ashby, Martha 
Ashby, Morrell 
Ashby, William 
Ashman, Gwendolyn 
Ashworth, Victor 
Austin, Maxine 
Aycock, Edward 
Aycock, Mulford 
B 

Bailey, Bernice 
Biley, Maxine 
Baird, Lois 
Baird, Maurine 
Baker, Harold 
Baker, Kenneth 
Baldwin, Luther 
Ball, Elden 
Ball. Phyllis 
Ball, Urada 
Ballard, Duane 21. 
Banks, Wally 
Banner, Laura 
Barlow, Mary 
Bartholomew, Virga 
Barnett, Wilmer Lee 
Barnett, Shirl 
Barton, Cullen 
Barton, Mary 
Barton, Una 
Bascom, Earl 



143 

90. 101, 109 

12,22,68,81 

68. 143 
116 

76, 142 
76, 126 

76,93,105 

43,45,75,120 

141 

117 

61,134 

72. 144 
136 

62, 131 

71,137 

93,131 

139 

140 

82,113 

58, 136 

94, 129 

46,49 

43 

58, 125 

143 

88, 105 
144 
127 

60. 78, 108 
127 

70,97, 107 

143 

140 

97 

59,78,133 

89, 126 
138 

119,126 
131 
144 
132 

77, 136 
138 

62,130 

68,112 

58, 136 

46, 140 

143 

115 

83, 127 

142 

113 

133 

141 

26 

58. 140 

118 

137 

66,94,138 
138 
137 
140 
129 

46, 53, 142 
74, 132 

62, 131 
119 

74,96, 104. 128 
130 
138 
57 
66, 138 
136 
110 
130 
131 

63, 136 
142,53 



61 



Bascom, Weldon 


83, 132 


Bateman, Horald 


26,68, ly, v6. 


114 




Batty, Paul 


142 


Bayles, Mary 


Oi, i^8 


Bayles, Wesley 


75,83,88,115 


Bean, Delbert 


75, 130 


Beck, Milton 


32,101,132 


Beck, Vanice 


96, 124 


Becker, Teut 


88 132 


Behrmann, Ilia 


94, 139 


Benedict, Lenora June 


65, 134 


Beniams, Herman 


105 


Bennett, Carol 


59, 139 


Bennion, Marinda 


64, 130 


Benson, Carmen 


134 


Benson, Max 


144 


Benson, Scott 


70, 143 


Berg, Glen 


143 


Berrett. Ralph 


136 


Berry, Wilmont 


128 


Biddulph, Clyde 


88, 139 


Bigler, Rex 


93, 124 


Bingham, Afton 


67, 141 


Bingham, Elva 


130 


Bingham, Sanford 


91,130 


Bingham, Thelma 


93, 134 


Binns, Ellen 


67, 132 


Bird, Howard 


83,114 


Bird, Marcell 


70, 125 


Bird, Margaret 26, 60, 100, 12 


Bishop, Duane 


95, 127 


Bishop, Grant 


89,95,111 


Bishop, Verdell 


95, 130 


Bissell, Harold 


115 


Black, Glen 


74,125 


Black, Mary 


95, 130 


Black, Orin 


46 


Blackham, Eugene 


136 


Blackham, Ralph 


128 


Bloomfield, Owen 




Blackwell, Harry 


80, 126 


Bluth, Genevieve 


1 42 


Boberg, Afton 


96, 134 


Bodily, Angus 


69,82 


Bodily, Gerald 


101, 128 


Bodily, Pauline 


144 


Bohman, Proctor 


46, 142 


Bone. George 


91,126 


Bone. Orren 


130 


Bonnett, Ann 


134 


Booth, Leona 


90, 124 


Booth, Wilson 


52 


Borg, Glen 


96, 138 


Bower, Helen Louise 


125 


Bowles, Catherine 


66,137 


Bowman, Lorraine 


136 


Boyack, Clifton 26, 


32,71,95,127 


Boyack, Halden 


95, 140 


Boyce, La Rue 


143 


Boyd, Wallace 


43 


Boyer, Erwin 


136 


Boyer, Fern 


128 


Boyer, Helen 


60,78,92,114 


Boyer, Louise 


62, 124 


Boyer. Margaret 


26,64,131 


Brady, Ed 


50, 120 


Brand, Virginia 


136 


Brady, Lee 


131,94 


Bradv, Millard 


94,126 


Braun, Gordon 


77,101, 115 


Breinholt, Herbert 


92, 142 


Bright, Lynn Taggart 118 


Brimhall, Clifton 


141 


Brimhall, De Voe 


131 


Brimhall, Elaine 


131 


Brimhall, Smoot 


132,91,72 


Brinkerhoff, Helen 


137 


Broadbent, Emer 


140 


Broadbent, Roy 26 


,32,83,84, 134 


Broadbent, Mary 


65, 127 



One Hundred Sixty-four 



Index 



Broadbent, Mima 


65, 130 


Christenson, Phil 


22, 26, 76, 87, 


Broadbent, Lynn 


26 


100, 127 




Bronson, Doris 


137 


Christensen, Ruby 


131 


Broodsby, Irene 


93, 132 


Christiansen, Louise 


131 


Brower, Melba 


64, 138 


Christensen, Mae 


61,143 


Brown, Aaron 


81,130 


Christensen, Maza 


144 


Brown, Eleanor 


65,96, 138 


Christensen, Golda 


94, 131 


Brown, Fay 


134 


Christensen, Arthur 


136 


Brown, Helena 


57, 134 


Christensen, Paul 


140 


Brown, Jack 


76,79, 127 


Christensen, Aurlene 


142 


Brown, Ken 


75, 126 


Christensen, Fern 


60, 141 


Brown, La June 


59, 132 


Christensen, Velma 


62,90,93, 142 


Brown, Lawrence 


76,91,124 


Chanceler, Jess 




Brown, Loa 
Brown, Mary 


142 
59, 136 


Chapman, Whitney 
Chase, Dorothy 


141 


Brown. Mary 


60, 85, 109 


Chatwin, Gilbert 


131 


Brown, Roy 


43,124 


Clarke, Bertha 


125 


Brown, Zelma 
Brugger, Gwen 
Brunt, Clarice 
Brunt, Paul 
Brunt, Zona 


124 
85, 113 
61,124 
82, 133 
61, 139 


Clark, Boyce 
Clark, Cecile 
Clark, Harold L. 
Clark, Helen 


74, 133 

61, 127 

139 

139 


Bryner, Louis 

Bryson. Eugene 26 

Buchanan, Afton 


53, 131 

.,82,87,105 

138 


Clark, James R. 
Clark, Mary 
Clark, Richard H. 


132 
60, 124 
69, 138 


Buchanan, Jesse 


136,71 


Clark, Ruth 


125 


Buggert, Anneliese 
Bullock, Cecil 


59, 142 
138 


Clark, Sibyl 
Clarke, Tom 


62, 131 
113 


Bullock, Thomas 


20,68,137 


Clark, Walter 
Clark, Winona 


76, 138 


Bullock, Vern 


74, 141 


142 


Bunderson, Leila 


120 


Clayson, Joseph 


136 


Bunderson, Grant 


134 


Clayton, Dorothy 


58, 126 


Bunker, Bertell 


116 


Clegg, Lowell 


57, 136 


Bunker, Lorin 


141 


Cloward, R. D. 


143 


Bunnell, Elven 


116 


Coffin, Carma 


130 


Bunnell, Morris 


114 


Collier, Vernon 


132 


Burch, Leone 


143 


Coleman, Maud 


143 


Burgess, Lucretia 
Burr, Virginia 
Burton, Alva 


57, 132 
139 
136 


Colton, Lula 
Colton, Ruth 
Colton, Lorna 


139 

138 
142 


Butler, Cloris 


130 


Colton, Bernice 


58, 144 


Butler, Durwood 


144 


Colvin, Harold A. 


105 


Butterfleld, Ellis 


96, 139 


Comish, Alison 


18,21,32,59, 


Byland, Daqmar 


140 


78, 84, 108 




c 




Comer, Nola Mae 


32,64,136 


Cahoon, Leon 


133 


Conder, Vera 


54,119 


Calder, Weldon 


142 


Condie, Lenore 


59, 138 


Callahan, W. Guy 


32,70,127 


Condie, Le Roy 


18,83,92, 101 


Calder, Helen 


128 


Condie, Marguerite Sears 124 


Callis, Laura 


59, 125 


Condie, Vernon 


43,44,112 


Callis, Pearl 


59, 136 


Condon, David de La 


ncey 105 


Call, Evan 


141 


Conover, Elizabeth 


118,85,92 


Call, Benj. E . 


137 


Conover, Hatty 


92 


Call, Tracey G. 


133 


Cooper, Marjorie 


140 


Call, Marius 


143 


Cook, Helen 


111, 17,35,78, 


Call, Vee 


68,129 


98,101,26 




Campbell, Jennie 


90 


Cook, La Berle 


57, 143 


Cannon, Kenneth L. 


73,89,127 


Cook, Wayne 


46 


Cannon. Hugh S. 


49,69,134 


Coombs, Retta 


112,65 


Carlile, Maurine 


136 


Coon, Clifton 


141 


Carlile, Rulon G. 




Coons, Anna Dee 


67, 144 


Carter, Allen J. 


113 


Cornaby, Afton 


140 


Cartwright, Aubra 


109 


Cottam, Earl 


118,77,79,20 


Carter, Norval 


142 


Cowan, Roy Thomas 


139 


Carr, William C. 21,69 


.79,82,113 


Cox, Dee 


128 


Carrigan, William 


121 


Cox, Ruby 


131,97,62 


Cave Phillip 


138 


Cragen, Rumel 


142 


Cazier, Alvin 


132 


Crandall, Wanda 


64, 143 


Chatwin, Gillbert 


21,80 


Crane, Joseph 


128.26 


Chadwick. Barratt 


143 


Crane, Reid 


43 


Chandler, Jess 


26,112 


Crane, Norma 


136,67 


Checketts, Norine 


64, 130 


Crane, Ruth 


131.67 


Chipman. Paul W. 


128 


Crawford, George 


142 


Childs, Helen 


57,67,137 


Croft, Merrill 


131,91,95,70, 


Christensen, Cornell 


106 


84,53,46 




Christensen, Helen 


85,121 


Crosby, Lena 


139 


Christensen, Harold J 


32, 79, 82, 


Crosby, Vivian 


40,63 


98, 125 




Crookston, Earl 


125 


Christensen, Stanley W. 


83,128 


Cropper, Wayne 


127,95 


Christensen, Opal 


124 


Cropper, Sebrina 


132,21,95 


Christensen, Leon N. 


127 


Cropper, Ladd 


130,95 



Cullimore, Odessa 
Cummings, Dick 
Curtis, Richard 
Cutler, Betty 
Dahl, Marvin 
Dahlquist, Mary 
Dase, Sam 
Dastrup, Donna 
Davies, Ray 
Davis, Ariel 
Davis, Katherine 
Davis, Nathan 
Davis, Ross 
Day, Leo 
Day, Neil 
Dean, Elva 
Dean, Ernest 
Dean, Joe 

Decker, Glenavieve 
Decker, Webster 

26 

DeGraff, Dale 
De Lange, Talmage 
Despain, Dale 
Despain, Joseph 
Dewsnip, Winona 
Dickson, Donald 
Dickson, Ned 
Dillman, Isabelle 
Dimick, Cecil 
Dimick, Mildred Housley 

107 
Dimond, Lloyd 
Dix, De Vaun 
Dixon, Edith 
Dixon, Harry 
Dixon, Helen 
Dixon, Howard 
Dixon, Mildred 
Dixon, Ralph 
Dixon, Stella 
Domina, John 
Done, Otto 131 

Done, Willard Edwin 
Downs, Elvin 
Driggs, Norval 
Dudley, Lyndon 
Duke, Marden 
Dudley, Marian 
Duersch, Mary 
Duffin, Marian 
Duke, Kenneth 
Duke, Warren 
Duke, Merrill 
Duke, Morris 
Dunkley, LeGrand 
Dunn, Edgar 
Dunn, Ina 
Durrant, James 
E 

Earl, La Von 
Eastmond, Jack 
Eastmond, Tom 
Eaton, Roma 
Eberhard, Ernest 
Edmunds, Olvie 

87,97 
Edwards, Clara 
Edwards, Luther 
Eggertsen, Gerry 
Eitel, Leona Loue 
Ekins, Virginia 
Elliott, Robert 
Ellsworth, Edna 
Ellsworth, Marjorie 
Elmer, Leon 
Empey, Phil 
Ennis, Marguerite 
Ericksen, Ralph 
Ericksen, Arval 
Evans, Bud 



26 

143 

143 

60, 121 

142,96,89. 144 

127,22,59 

136 

136,93,59 

133,26 

126 

130,61 

140, 20, 21 

134 

139,95 

137 

86 

131,84 

140,69,82,26 

130 

93, 135,69,99, 



135 

108 

132,71 

129,96,53 

108 

142 

132,43 

139,57 

128,83 

119,85, 



127 

136,48 

124,73 

138,61 

133.91 

117 

142 

136,48 

126 

, 93, 20, 82 

126 

133 

141 

124 

137 

137,98 

142,98,53 

130.83 

141 

136 

134,70 

125,75,89 

142,94,71 

137,94 

46 



125 

137,69 

52,20,68, 129 

139 

124,20,82 

111,90,100, 

26, 125 
141 

140,59 

92, 143 
125,87, 100,26 
134 
133 
118 
138 

142,20 

93, 92, 43 

115 

127,98 
133 



Evans, Edmund 
Evans, Edmund 
Evans, Jayne 
Evans, Jennings 
Evans, Martha 
Evans, Okley 20, 

123,23 
Evans, Ruth 
F 

Fahring, Ray 
Fairbanks, Fern 
Fames, June 
Farnsworth, Emma 
Farnsworth, Hatch 
Farrar, Helen 
Faucette, Reese 
Fautin, Reed 
Favero, Dewey 
Fechsen, Ida 
Fillmore, Belle 
Fillmore, Winston 
Fischer, Wilford 
Fish, Lalovi 
Fish. Margaret 
Fisher, Flora 
Fitzgerald, Harold 
Fitzgerald, Sarah 
Folster, Maxine 
Ford, Velma 
Fordham, Alton 
Forsyth, Howard 

100 
Foulger, Walter 
Foulke, LeGrand 
Foutz, Russell 
Frandsen, Calvin 
Frazier, Verness 
Frechleton, John 
Freestone, Norman 

100, 26 
Freestone, Victor 
Friel, Gloria 
Frost, Clyde 
Frost, Leland 
Fugal, Genevieve 

87, 100, 26 
Fujiwara, Takeo 
Fullmer, Bert 
Gamett, La Veil 
Gamett, Wayne 
Garner, Afton 
Gardner, Fawn 
Gardner, Fern 
Gardner, Lincoln 
Gardner, Marguerite 
Gardner, May 
Gardner, Merline 
Gardner, Veda 
Gardner, Wallace 
Geary, Elmo 
Gee, Lynn 
Gee, Zenna 
Geertsen, Norman 
George, Leslie 
Geslison, Byron 
Gibb, Jack 
Gibbons, Leona 

93 
Giddings, Ruthe 
Giles, Earl 
Gillies, Gaylord 
Gillespie, George 
Gledhill, Preston 
Goetzman, Gene 
Goodman, Billie 
Goodrich, Floyd 
Gordon, Glen 
Graff, Marvin 



105 

136,71,83 

112.58,87,26 

132,76,81 

143 

68,79.81,84, 

130 

124,74 

134,66 

1 36, 63 

126,67 

139.75.80 

132,64,96 

132, 21, Vi, 71 

32, 131 

44,43 

138 

61.123 

141 

48, 142 

139,93 

93, 106 

9Z.V0 

52. 96, 106 

140,96 

138 

143 

126 

124,20,21,70, 

126,92 
141 

133,73 

128 

127 

131 

125,74,93, 



131 



40 

59 

109 

117 

108,62,78,86, 

106 

130,76 

127 

89 

136 

138 

138 

139,46 

132 

139,95 

140,64 

141 

134,77 

81,128,26 

127.88 

132 

106 

144 

133.75 

130.26 

25,17,58,78, 

134,64 
142,49.46 

143 
124.43 
142,26 

134 
131,26 
139,71 

128 
11, 128 



45 



One Hundred Sixty-five 



Index 



Graff, Sylvan 

Greenhalgh. Rex 

Green, Forace 

Green, Leola 

Green. Maud 

Greenwood, Don 

Greenwood. Lois 

Greer. Faun 

Greer. Faye 

Greer. Grant 

Greer. Wm. 

Griffith. Dorothy 

Griffith, Melvin 

Grimes. Milton 

Grimmett. Francis 

Grimmett. Richard 

Grimmett. Wayne 

Groesbeck, Lue 

Grow. Katherine 

Grow. Spencer 

Grow, Stewart 

Gudmundson, Keith 

Gunnell. Gerald 

Gunnell. Halden 

H 

Hacking, Bernice 

Hacking. Junis 

Hacking. Leo 

Hacking. Mary Helen 

Hadley. Irene 

Hagen. Theresa 

Hale. Nathan 

Hall. Ansel 

Hall. Maurice 

Halladay, Meeks 

Halliday. Naomi 

Hamilton. Don 

Hammond. Helen 

Hammond. Kay 

Hammond, Merrill 

Hammond, Roy 

Hanks. Wayne 

Hansen, Alene 

Hansen, Elfie 

Hansen. Caroline 

Hansen. Christella 

Hansen. Floy 

Hansen. Glenn 

Hansen. Ida 

Hansen. Margaret Helena 59. 106 

Hansen. Phil 126,20.68,88 



139 

130.82.96 

130.67,78,87.26 

133,67 

129,75,96 

127,62 

125 

136.67 

126 

118 

143 

45.112.43 
132 

136.20.83 

142.49 

141 

132 

111 

120.81.82 

80, 128.26 
126 
140 
140 



133 

142 

142 

144 

90 

141.61 

142.83 

137.93 

144 

108, 100 

125,60 

139 

137 

131,77 

.71.88,91 

132. 77. 91 

127.45.43 

136 

132.21 

116.59 

66. 144 

114.61.78,86 

124.89 

12.40 



11 



Hansen. Rex 
Hansen. Theresa 
Hansen. Virgil 
Hanson. Neva 
Hanson. Zula 
Harding. Frank 
Harding. Marion Bird 
Harding. Zella 
Hardman, Anna 
Hardman. Minnie 
Harmer. Dorothy 
Harper. Laurel 
Harper, Weston 
Harris, Arlene 
Harris, Chauncy 
Harris, Elna 
Harris, Gwendolyn 
Harris, Helen 
Harris. Madge 
Harris. Maureen 
Harris. Wayne 
Harrison. Madlyn 
Harrison. Maurine 
Harston. Clarence 
Harston. Miles 
Hart, Blaine 
Hart. Clarice 
Hart, Kay 



Haslam. William Hil 
Hasler, William 



141 

59. 143 

143 

124,60 

124.60 

139, 144 

128 

137 

137,66 

140.66 

140 

134 

136 

59, 106 

79.84.91,106 

121 

142 

59.78,135 

108.85 

132.60 

115 

59 

132.94 

130,89,53 

139.89 

136,46 

115 

45.124,74,81,43 



110 
70. 128.26 



Hastings. Emeline 

Hatch. Bradford 

Hatch. Harmon 

Hatch. Keith 

Hatch. Lila 

Hatch. Norma 

Hatch. Marvell 

Hawley. Eldon 

Hawley. Ruthe 

Haws. Bill 

Haws. Lois 

Hayes, Floyd 

Hayes, Sheldon 

Haynie. Irene 

Hayward, Willard 

Healy, Carson 

Hetrick, Helen 

Hiatt. Marion 

Hibbert. Dave 

Hicken. Nelda 

Hicken. Roy 

Hickman, lone 

Hill. Clarence 
Hilton. Arda 

Hilton. Helen 

Hodson. Afton 

Hodson. Rosemary 
Holbrook, Elizabeth 
Holdaway. Alene 
Holdaway, Lyle 
Holindrake, George 
Holindrake. Vernon 
Holman, Vance 
Holt. Lois 
Hone. Velda 
Hooks. Gladys 
Hougard. Georgia 
Hougard. Virginia 
Houston. Alice 
Houston. Irene 
Houston, La Vonne 
Howe. William 
Huckins. Alice 
Hudson. Roy 
Huffaker, Marshall 
Huffaker. Ruth 
Hughs. Walden 
Hughs, Preston 
Huish, Daryl 
Huish, Helen 
Hullinger, Roland 
Humphrey. Alice 
Hundley. Lucile 
Hunn. Dorothy 
Hunt, Paul 
Hunter, Jim 
Huntington, Roy 
Hurst, Henry 
Hurst, William 
Hutchings, Harold 
Hutchings. Loman 
Hutchings, Theron 
Hutchinson. Grant 

84,43 
Hutchinson. Marvell 
I 

Ingersoll. Rex 
Irwin. George 
Iverson, Martin 

J 

Jackson. Ellen 
Jackson, Elvon 
Jackson. Josephine 
Jackson. Vera 
Jacob. Milton 
Jacobs, Helen 
Jacobs, Emma 
Jacobs, Smith 
Jacobson. Max 



131.53.93 

127 

110 

133 

90 

144 

80 

143 

136 

125.43.26 

137 

142 

88, 128,26 

114,85 

136, 98 

140 

131 

141.83 

34.73,93.53,43 

138 



75. 



141,89 

132 

141 

139 

133,95 

136,60 

130 

58, 129 

113,61 

137 

134 

126 

133 

98 

60, 144 

109.26 

121 

121 

124 

138,60 

143 

132,77 

134,60 

138.21,68 

125,75 

125,60 

126,77,91 

116.77,88 

127,21.70 

136,65 

136,53 

142,65 

65, 133 

125,58 

140 

49 

137 

133 

143 

131 

117 

105.88.89,96 

125,45,75, 

125.75 

127,101 

133 

127,53 

126 

134,68.26 

139 

61,87,106. 126 

20 

143 

116 

53,26 

139 



Jameson, Karl 
Janssen, Helen 
Janson, Dorothy 
Jarvis. Eve Marie 
Jeffery, Illiff 
Jenkins, Edna May 
Jenkins, Loskiel 
Jenkins, Ray 
Jennings, Frances 
Jensen. Ana 
Jensen. Beatrice 
Jensen, Cannon 
Jensen, Cecelia 
Jensen, Edna 
Jensen, Faun 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, Gilman 
Jensen, James 
Jensen, Mamie 
Jensen, Marie 
Jensen. Maxine 
Jensen, Melba 
Jensen, Paul 
Jenson, Eleonor 
Jesperson, Marzelle 
Johnson, Delbert 
Johnson, Elmer 
Johnson, Enola 
Johnson, Donna Lee 
Johnson, Fay 
Johnson. Glen 
Johnson. Glenn 
Johanson. Alua 
Johnson, Ina 
Johnson, Helen 
Johnson. Goulding 
Johnson. Joe 
Johnson, Joseph R. 
Johnson. Josephine 
Johnson, Loren 
Johnson, Malcolm 

Johnson. Morris 

Johnson, Theodore 

Johnson, Val 

Johnson, Wendell 

Johnson, Weston 

Johnson, Wyla 
Johnston, Irene 1 

Jones, Betty 

Jones. Blanche 

Jones, Dale 

Jones, Florence 

Jones, Ua 

Jones, Lewis 

Jones, Lillian 

Jones, Maurice 

Jones, Maurine 

Jones, Max 

Jones, Melva 

Jones, Ronald 

Jones. Rudger 

Jordan, Lee Knight 

Jorgenson, E. M. 

Jorgensen Eugene 

Jorgensen. Frank 

Jorgensen. Helen 

Judd. Evan Alonzo 

Judd, Miles 

K 

Kartchner, Fred 

Kartchner, Ray 

Kavachevich, Melvin 

Kay, Afton 

Keil. Evan 

Kellersberger, Jack 

Kelly, Ruby 

Kenny, Flora 

Kimball, Doris Melton 

Kimball, Virginia 



124, 126,80,75 

142, 66. 96 

134,65 

142 

131.89,95,53 

126 

136 

120,72,80 

121 

126 

128 

137 

140,21,90 

131,84 

141 

137,96 

125.72,81 

133,89 

127 

137,98 

130.94 

129.66 

143 

138 

136,58.93 

46 

113 

141.57 

140 

120.59,89 



141,127,53 

105 

82 

143 

130 

48, 126,69,79 

142.83 

131,81,90, 101 

141 

137,46 

117 

133 

132 

137 

138 

67, 128 

18, 126.58,78,86 

127 

114 

22,125,21,77,79 

131 

144 

140 

134 

113,21,82 

124,67,91 

136 

131 

130 

127,69,81 

144 

136 

124, 19 

119 

137,82 

144 

26 



130,70 
124 

46, 144 

132.63 
138 
137 
125 

120,60 
109 
131 



Kindred, Berne 


132,83 


King. Shirley Wayne 


136 


Kirk. Vernon 


130 


Kirkham. Avery 


141 


Kitchen. Levi 


141,53 


Kitchen. Norval 


138 


Kjar, Maurine 


126. 97 


Knight, Phil 


131,72,91 


Knight. Stanley 


137.46 


Knight. Vola 


137 


Knudsen. Mary 


142 


Kotter, Floyd 


114,44,43 


Kotter, Wilma 117,61,78.86 


LaComb, Frank 


45.43 


Lamb. John 


136 


Laney Esther 


143 


Lansford, LaVerl 


143 


Larsen, Celia 


138.63 


Larsen. Eugene 


116,88,91 


Larsen. George 


130 


Larsen, Miriam 


140,63 


Larsen, Newell 


141 


Larsen, Orville 


109 


Larsen. Rex 


109, 71 


Larsen. Rhea 


136.63 


Larsen, Ronald 


138 


Larsen, Thelma 


125.63 


Larson. Arvid 


143 


Larson. Carl 


115 


Larson. Doris 


142.84 


Latimer. Doreyn 


133.62 


Law. Rondo 


131.95.46 


Lay, Arma 


63, 143 


Le Baron, Phyllis 


139 


Lee. Wilford 


116 


Lemon, Floral 


142 


Leonard. Mary 


132.64 


LeSueur, Gordon 


139.93 


LeSueur. Oma 


133,93 


LeSueur. Waldo 


124.76.93 


Lewis. Burnell 


117.26 


Lewis. Kenneth 


71,128 


Lillywhite, Don 


108 


Lindsay. Ina 


130.83.101 


Linn. Betty 


139.58 


Livingston. Vaughn 


126 


Llewellyn, Margaret 


142,63 


Lott, Willard 


134.89.53 


Losee. Ferron 124 


,21,82.84,68 


Loader, Harry 


143 


Lublin, Blanch 


144 


Ludlow, A. T. 


80 


Ludlow. Bert 


128 


Luke. Theron 


126,21 


Lunceford. La Verl 




Lund, Ella 


98,128 


Lund, Ellen 


117,90 


Lyon, Aileen 


139.57 


Lytle, John 


134,71.43 


M 




Macfarlane. Glenna 


130,85 


MacFarlane, Mildred 


133 


Madsen. Eva 


143 


Madsen, Farrell 


29,87.97,106 


Madsen, Harold 


141,89 


Madsen. Neola 


124 


Madsen. Reva 


125,97 


Madsen. Virginia 


132,97 


Mangason. Farrin 


132 


Magleby. Bumes 


142 


Magleby. LeGrande 


128 


Mangum. Kay 


133,61 


Manwaring, Dick 


142 


Markham. Don 


126,91 


Markham. Lynn 


132 


Marchant, Moroni 


136 



One Hundred Sixty-six 



Index 



Markham, Ben 
Marguardson, Max 
Martensen, Floyd 
Martin, James 
Martin, William 

107 
Marsden, Althea 
Masters, Vernon Lee 
Maxwell, Alva 
Maxwell, Eldridge 
Maughan, Mildred 
Maughn, Reed 
May, Chester 
Mavcock, Esther 
McAllister, Martha 
McAllister, Joseph 
McAllister, Helen 
McAllister, Rhean 
McDonald, Winnifred 
McEwan, Joe 
McGregor, Joseph 
McGuire, Jim 
McGuire, John 
McGuire, Ray 

79, 102 
Mclntire, Floyd 
McNeill, Ken 
McPheeters, Harry 
McKinnon, Thelma 
McKnight, Niel 
Mendenhall, Ruth 
Menzies, Lila 
Menzies, Charles 
Mensel, Laura 
Mercer, Luana 
Merkley, Floyd 
Merkley, Harold 
Merkley, LaVerle 
Merrill, Alton 
Merrill, Dave 
Merrill, Douglas 

43,26 
Merrill, Gwen 
Merrill, Harrison 
Merrill, Vinton 
Mickelsen, Evelyn 
Mickelsen, Lola 
Mickelsen, Woodrow 
Miller, Alice 
Millet, Wayne 
Miner, Evelyn 
Miner, Helen 
Miner, Louie Jean 
Miner, Norma 
Mitchell, Esther 
Mitchell, Harry 
Mitchell, Marjorie 
Mitchell, May Louise 
Miller, Amy 
Miller, Barr 
Miller, David 
Miller, Charles 
Miller, Elbert 
Miller, Karl 
Miller, Marie 
Miller, Rella 
Millet, Floyd 

93, 106, 43 
Molyneux, Norma 
Moncur, Vern 
Monk, Ralph 
Monson, Jess 
Moore, Clara 
Moore, Harvey 
Morgan, Helen 
Morgan. Lee 
Morris, Helen 
Morris, LeVal 
Mortensen, Estella 
Mortensen, Floyd 
Morton, Ermel 



132 
134 

89 

116,79,91, 

130,85 

121 

112 

130.93 

126,85,90 

83 

127 

11,60, 100.26 

139,61,78 

130,82 

121,61,78 

130,65 

140,66,96 

125,74,81 

127 

54,70,128,53 

118,70 

25,125,21,70, 

131,32,69 

89, 144 

46 

113.60 

138 

139.66 

138,63 

71,88 

124,32,58,86 

133,58 

45,43 

127,88 

46 

127,77.26 

22.124,76 

124, 70, 88, 98, 

141 

106 

140 

139,67,94 

142 

131,96 

138 

124,69,93 

132,62 

124,97 

138, 97 

132,62,84 

128 

111,75,81 

124 

139, 20, 26 

138 

118,69 

119,81 

106 

125,21,91 

106 

137,65,94 

141 

48, 44, 68, 79, 



Moulton, Norma 
Mullins, Floyd 
Murdock, Elroy 
Murdock, John 
Murdoch, Lucile 
Murphy, Bud 
Murphy, Paul 
Murray, Karl 
Murray, Lorna 
Musser, Fred 
Myers, Champ 
Myers, LaPriel 

92 
N 

Naegle Pearl 
Nance, Lu Dema 
Nash, Rav 
Naylor, Toseph 
Nelson, Amy 
Nelson, Byron 
Nelson, Del Mar 
Nelson, Dona 
Nelson, Elmo 
Nelson, Evan 
Nelson, Jay 
Nelson, Kenneth 
Nelson, Leah 
Nelson, Milton 
Nelson, Roscoe 
Nelson, Willard 
Nelson, Wm. 
Neslen, George 
NeVille, Jessie 
Newell, Harry 
Newton, Agnes 
Nicholes, Eleanor 
Nicholes, Henry 
Nicholes, Paul 
Nickerson, Sara 
Nielson, Averil 
Nielson, Don 
Nielsen, Douglas 
Nielsen, Lawrence 
Nielsen, Louise 



143 
138, 26 

141 

141 
105,86 

111 

133,71 

136,53 

142,58,85 

137.71 

143 
111,21,61,78, 



133 
143 
143 
137 
141 

48, 127 

120.92 
139 

134,71 

140,134,92,26 

125,76.79,91 

140.21 

115 

132,25,21,70,26 

139 

141,73 

124, 73 

133, 67, 92 

137 

140 

131,65 

127 

139,93 

137 

125.97,70 

71,89,128 

140.96 

96, 143 

19,118,21,32. 



138 

138,98 

134 

137 

120,21,65,84 

132 

. 124,57 

130 

128 

89 

138,66,94 

140,71,94 

134,21,71 



78, 84, 86, 100, 26 
Nielson, Merrill 
Nielson, Reed 
Nisbet, Annice 
Nisson, Antone 
Nisonger, Max 
Nuttall, Taylor 
Nuttall, Wilkens 
O 

Oaks, Charles 
Oaks, Lvnn Eugene 
Oborn, Rulon 
Ogden, McKay 
Ogden, Olive 
Okelberry, Orval 
Oldroyd, Jay 
Olsen, Anna 
Olsen, Marion 
Olson, Garth 
Olson, Robert 
Ollerton, Louise 
Orser, Stan 
Owen, Jack 
Owens, Darlene 
Owens, Nanieve 
P 

Pack, Garret 
Packard, Tess 
Page, Ailsa 
Page, Boyd 
Page, Faye 
Page, Fred " 
Palfreyman, Warwick 



132 

133 

140,98 

126 

44, 42, 43 

134,73 

86,128,70 

130,45,43 

144 

139,96 

136 

137,60 

114,80.72 

137 

141 

131,68.82 

143 

125,68 

61,128 

139,71,53 

139,80 

134,32,84 

133 

142 
141,60 
112,62 
133,77 
131,62 

144 
131,53,46 



Pardoe, Kathryn 


118,26 


Redd, Kay 


133,83 


Pardoe, Norma 


131,61,78 


Redd, Maude 


132 


Park, Garrett 




Redd, Parley Vincent 


140 


Park, Hugh 


83, 144 


Red, Sterling 


142 


Park, Lucile 


138,94 


Reed, Edna Lee 


126,94 


Parker, Karl 


143 


Reeder, William 


138,32,69, 


Parker, Robert 


71. 128,53,26 


83 




Parkinson, Ann 


113 


Reese, Dale 


132 


Parkinson, Berkley 


143 


Reese, Eldon 


131,71,101 


Parks, Vera Dean 


133 


Reese, Margarett 


119,59 


Parry, Dean 


116 


Reeve. Olive 


126,101 


Parry, Roland 


142 


Reid. Barbara 


134,60 


Partridge, Carol 


115 


Reid, Edwin 


137 


Partridge, Lyman 


126,67,79, 


Reynolds, Levi 


127,70 


87,91,26 




Rice, Lucy 


133,64 


Paulson, Verl 


134 


Rich, Clarence 


112,26 


Paxman, Beth 


132.59,101,26 


Rich, lone 


59 


Payne, Albert 


134 


Richards. Beth 


133, 58 


Payne, Bessie Vee 


143 


Richards. Elaine 


138 


Payne, Junius 


139,77 


Richards. Louise 


132.59 


Peay, Mildred 


140,63 


Richardson, Don 


143 


Pehrson, George 


46 


Richardson, Eldon 


141 


Percival, Guy 


141 


Richardson, Lvnn 


144 


Perkins, Norma 


134 


Richardson. Vernon 


43 


Perrett, Barbara 


131,62.98 


Richmond. Dorothy 


110.86 


Perry, Elgia 


128 


Ricks, Ruby 


130 


Perry, Roland 




Riqby, Avard 


137.46 


Peterson, Alma 


138 


RiqtruD. Rowena 


120 


Peterson, Anna Lou 


133.61 


Riley. Clara 


137 


Peterson, Alton 


126.26 


Ririe, Alice 


124 


Peterson, Fred 


144 


Rivers, Marie 


127 


Peterson, Gretha 


132,95 


Rockwood. Oleah 


141.63 


Peterson, Howard 


127, 70 


Roberts. Reth 


131 


Peterson, Hugh 




Roberts. K»nnpth 


141.53 


Peterson, Kenn 


108, 32, 77, 79 


Robinson. Bertha 


111.5X.85 


Peterson, Lois 


142 


Robmson. lone 


127.60 


Peterson, Louise 
Peterson, Lloyd 
Petersen, Mabel 


141 

124,75 
132,98 


Robinson. Phvlis 
Romney, Anton 


67 
105 


Petersen, Margaret 


132,97,26 


Romnev. Archie 


1 30, 74 


Peterson, Marian 


138 


Romnev. Tennie 


140.61 


Peterson, Mervin 


132 


Romnev. Keith 


131 


Petersen, Nelda 


124,95 


Romnev. Marguerite 


112.26 


Peterson, Parlell 


126.95 


Romnev, Maurine 


22.61.123 


Petersen, Reid 


132 


Romnev. Miles 


139 


Petersen. Twila 


140.98 


RoDer. Rawlin 


137. 95 


Peterson, Virgil 


126 


Roskellv. Leota 


125.63 


Peterson. Wanda 


140, 93 


Rowe, Francis 


134.72 


Phillips, James 


140 


Rowe, Marion 


139.141,72 


Pierce, Ireta 
Pickup, Clair 
Pickerinq, Florence 


125,58 
137 
143 


Rowe, Owen 
Rowley, Edith 


130.72 
141 


Pistole, Maydelle 


134.65 


Rowley, Herman 


46 


Pitcher, Walter 


127,70 


Rowley. Sherman 


138.53 


Piatt, Jerome 


140,70.53 


Rowley, La Rue 


143 


Pond, Clair 


137 


Rowley. Rinda 


127 


Pond, Roland 


140, 98 


Royle, Homer 


40.83 


Postma, Frank 


131 


Russell, Reed 


128 


Poulson, Elmo 


143 


Russell, James 


43 


Poulson, Lorna 


130,26 


Russell, Maurice 




Powell, Leo 


134,92 


Russon, Ivy 


140 


Powelson, Verl 


64 


S 

Saben, David 

Sanford. Hunt 




Price, Wm. 
Priday, Leiand 
Prior, David 


125 

131,28.19,20 

143 


130,70 
126 


Provost, Orval 




Shawcroft, Maude 


138 


Prusse, Evelyn 


133,60 


Schlappi, Lloyd 


138,95 


Pryde, Bill 


143 


Schmiett. Bennie 


136,96,69 


Pullen, Everett 


133,77 


Schow, Elden 


127 


R 




Schow, Ila 


142.62 


Ralphs, Varian Dee 


141 


Schow, Vera 


138 


Ralston, Mary 


108 


Schofield, Dale 


130 


Randall, Fern 


142 


Schofield, Jay, Jr. 


140,76.81 


Randall, Glen 


126,82 


Schofield, William 


144 


Rasmussen. Levar 


138 


Scorup, Edith 


140 


Rasmussen, Max 
Rasmussen, Ruth 
Rawson, Aline 
Rawson, Lo Ree 


142 

137,98 

127,59. 100 

133, 59 


Scorup. Ellen 
Scott, Anna Deen 
Scott, Deborah 


130. 65 

133.64 

130 


Redd, Bessie 


142 


Scott, Mack 


142,89 


Redd, Daryle 


138, 89 


Scott, Stella 


133 



One Hundred Sixty-seven 



Index 



Scott. Vern 
Schwieder. Philip 
Seaman, Gordon 
Searle, Lynn 
Seaton. Frances 
Seaton, May 
Seethaler, Joseph 
Seegmiller, Marjorie 
Seiter, Erika 
Serlinq, Len G. 
Selk, Jack 
Sellers, Hugh 
Shalfoon, Tony 
Shanks. Edna 
Shaw, Harold 
Shaw, Jack 
Shawcroft, Dee 
Shawcroft, Maude 
Shelly, Fern 
Shelly, Frances 
Shepherd, Weldon 
Shields, Lloyd 
Shipp, Warren 
Shurtliff. Helen 
Simmons, Dean 
Simmons, Jim 
Simpson, Grace 
Simpson, Margaret 
Simpkins. Nedra 
Skinner. Lucile 
Smart, Neff 
Smeath. George 
Smith. Allen 
Smith. Alice 
Smith. Earl 
Smith, Harold 
Smith. Hyrum 
Smith. Jean 
Smith, Josephine 
Smith, Justin 
Smith. Katherine 
Smith, Le Roy 
Smith, Louise 
Smith. Marjorie 
Smith, Marjorie Beth 
Smith, Phyllis 
Smith, Ruth 
Smith, Thales 
Smith, Virgil 
Smith. Winifred 
Smoot. Anita 
Snedden, Robert 
Snell. Delia 
Snell. Esmond 
Snell, Maude 
Snell. Alta 1 

Snow, Claude 
Snow, Clyde 
Snow. Hortense 
Snvder. Theron 
Soffe. Orpha 
Sorensen, Allen 
Sorensen. Gladys 
Sowards, Beulah 
Sowards, Josephine 
Sowards, Myrtle 
Sowards, Willa 
Speckart. Ruth 
Spencer, Alice 
98, 100,26 
Spilsbury, Le Grande 
Spilsbury, Arlington 
Stallings, Hart 
Stahmann, Mark 
Starr, Edna 
Stalworthv, Rhea 
Stanford, Hunt 
Standring, Elsie 
Stahmann. Mark 
Steed. Max 
Steed, Owen 



76,84 

130 

108 

130 

137.59 

112,59 

133.80,70 

126.60 

125,20 

80 

140 

141 

128,71 

133,63 

138 

138,77,53 

125.94.66 

94,66 

137 

133 

136,53 

110 

121 

139 

44,43 

133 

124,97,26 

130,97 

136,65 

124,59 

76,79,84,106 

143 

141 

126 

121 

83,93 

133,80 

136,64 

127.67 

105 

138 

137 

137.63 

132 

141,60 

139,58 

138 

136 

119 

130,93,62 

136,67 

70, 143 

130.65 

126 

124,65 

10,87, 100,26 

105,19,87.26 

142 

117.85.90 

43 

140, 96, 66 

127, 103,26 

138,64 

133.61 

126 

110,85,107 

125,78 

141,90 

18,125,58, 

89, 128 
133 

132,53 
133 
133 

64, 143 

142 
133 
134 
140 



Steele, Millie 
Steele, Stanford 
Steele, Veda 
Stell, Robert 
Stephens, Kirk 
Stephens Sylvan 
Sterling, Len 
Stevens, Aurelia 
Stevens, Marjorie 
Stevens, Ruthe 
Stewart, Maxine 
Stice, Virgil 
Stoddard, George 
Stoker, Alta 
Stoker, Katherine 
Stokes, Lillian 
Stokes, Lee 
Stowell, Edna 
Stowell, Rhoda 
Street, Wilson 
Strickler, Fredona 
Stringham, Dorothy 
Strong, Jay 
Strong, Ray 
Summers, Helen 
Summers, Jean 
Sundwall, Arthur 
Sundwall, Harry 
Sutton, Rov 

Swallow, Golden Nevada 
Swensen, Albert 
Swensen, Beth 
Swenson, Calvin 
Swenson, Helen 
Swenson, Joseph 
Swenson, Shirl 
Swenson, Martha 
Swenson, Margaret 
Swensen, Mildred 
Sylvester, Ruth 
T 

Talbot, Phyllis 
Talmage. John 
Tanner, Colvin 
Tanner, Sherman 
Tanner, Wilmer 
Taylor, Ada 
Tavlor, Fenton 
Tavlor, Golden 
Tavlor, Hal 
Tavlor, Herbert 
Taylor, Kenneth 
Tavlor, T^amar 
Taylor, Mennell 
Tavlor, Preston 
Tavlor. Margaret 
Taylor. Mattie 
Taylor, Nadine 1 

Taylor, Pearl 
Taylor, Rosalind 
Taylor. Weldon 

84 
Tea, LeGrand 
Teerlink. Virginia 
Tippets, Don 
Tippets, Lucile 
Thomas. Grace 
Thomas, Tack 
Thomas, Keith 
Thomas, Rex 
Tholen, Margaret 

96 
Thorne, Charles 
Thorne, Roe 
Thornock, NeVilL 
Thornock, Owen 
Thornton. Read 
Thorpe, Blain 
Thorpe, Morris 
Thurston. Harold 
Thurston. Miriam 



127 

143 

134 

140 

141,52 

82,91, 128 

134 

139 

130,67 

132,61 

139,26 

142,77 

52,141 

121 

130,59,96 

130,59.96 

140 

98 

116 

141 

130 

141,64 

127 

134 

109, 92 

136 

97, 144 

121 

142 

134 

38,69 

120,59,90 

139 

140,57,67 

52,125,84,69 

138 

85, 128 



85 
127 

141 

132,45 

125.52.79 

138 

116.53,26 

1 33. 83 

125.58 

105 

131.74, 53 43 

140 

130,74,84 

132,92,68 

74.84 

136.74 

118 

117,20.92 

136 

8,133,59.101 

22.127 

139,64 

115,79,81,82, 

46 

141,67 

141.89 

136 

137.65 

143 

139 

69. 143 

140, 66, 92. 

132 

132.76 
142 
109. 88. 53. 26 
117,68.76 
138 
143 
144 
133 



Todd, Florence 


42, 59, 96 


Todd, George 


133,93 


Tobler, Mildred 


131 


Tolman, Dorothy Orlene 


136 


Tregeagle, Delbert 


106 


Tregeagle, Phyllis 


105 


Tucker, Glen 


45,43 


Tucker, James 


143 


Tuft, Harold 


138 


Tuft, Max 


144 


Turpin, Marlow 


48,46 


U 




Udall, Nick 133. « '<• 


Ungricht, LaVerne 


74.80,128 


V " 




Vance, Lloyd 


130 


Vance, Merle 


111 


Vance. Morris 


132,91,98 


Vance. Wendell 


114,77,79 


Van Cott, Frank 


106 


Van Cott, Le Roy 


114 


Van Wagenen, Dean 


131,20,21, 


68 




Van Waqenen, Harold 


82, 84, 


121,68 




Verney, John 


142,93 


Vest, Grant 


105 


Vest, Niles 


44,126,43 


W 




Wagers. Marjorie 


137,66 


Waite, LeRoy 


138 


Wakefield, Bruce 


126,26 


Waldo, Vern 


140.69.46 


Waldram. Lu Deen 


136.98 


Waldram. Ruth 


124.85 


Walker, Bernard 


117,73,80, 


26 




Walker, Ellen 


140 


Walker. Fay 


139 


Walker. Harris 


128,70 


Walker. Muriel 


124 


Wall. Tavson 


136 


Ward, Voss 


136 


Warner, Bernice 


109 


Warner. Max 


44 


Warnick. Carl 


110.68 


Warnick. Erma 


137 


Washburn, Clvde 


126.76.88 


Washburn. Mvrl 


130.60 


Waters, Moneice 


132.63 


Vaters. Vaur 


126..^. 


Watson, Erva 


139.93 


Watson. Eva 


93.137 


Weaver. Reqina 


140.57.98 


Webb. Tohn 


128 


Weber. Herald 


137 


Wedae. Virgil 


133.75.81 


Weiaht. Rert 


52 


Weinht. Karl 


124 


Welch. Helen 


137 


Wells. Allen 


120 


Wentz. Lorna 


30.61.26 


Wesi-nver, La Vada 


133, 59. 78, 


93 




Wheeler. Helen 


131,64 


Wheeler. Melvin 


46 


Wheeler, Ray 


139 


Whetten, Kate 


126 


Whetten. Lester 


105 


White, Dean 


131,26 


White, Deleen 


26,110,92 


White, George 


124,82 


White, Sara 


131,62 


Whiteley. Alicebeth 


131 


Whiting, Verl 


77, 131 


Whitman, Jay 


47 



Whitney, Lavina 


133,65 


Whitney, Norma 


144 


Whitwood, Kenneth 


121 


Wooton, Marlow 


140,83,98,53 


Woolly, Alexander 


140,53 


Woolston, Harold 


92, 106 


Woodward, Jack 


46 


Woodward, Reta 


137,63 


Wood, Lynn 


130 


Woodland, Katherine 


98 


Wood, Merrill 


26, 124 


Woolf, Anthony 


21 


Woolf, G. L. 


81 


Woodward, Don 


IS4 


Wood, Merrill 


26 


Woolf, Anthony 


21,31 


Woolf, G. L. 


81, 109 


Wride, Leon 


141,46 


Wright, Frank 


48 


Wright, Rosella 


143 


Wright, Lynn 


125,76,80 


Wright, Albert 


52 


White, Faye 


112 


Wignall, Earl 


130,73,80,81 


Wightman, Burnis 


133 


Wiilard, Roswell 


26 


Wilde, Roberta 


140,62 


Wilkinson, Elva 


119 


Willey, Ivan 


124,77,26 


Williams, Alberta 


115 


Williams, Lancy 


138 


Williams, Mifflin 


141 


Williams, Phyllis 


139 


Williams, Walter 


134 


Wilson, Antoinette 


132,61 


Wilson, Carma 




Wilson, Dale 


119 


Wilson, Florence 




Wilson, Harvey 


138 


Wilson, Jesse 


44,43 


Wilson, Mona 


138 


Wilson, Meredith 


114,52,17.79, 


82,68 




Wilson, Woodrow 


132,69 


Wing, John 


105 


Wing, Sherman 


52,126,75 


Winterton, Olive 


24, 58, 85 


Winzenried, Wayne 


144 


Wiscombe, Leland 


131,71 


Wiscombe, Ronald 


110 


Witney, Norma 




Y 




Yancey, Lowell 


137 


Yarbrough, Maurine 


125,63 


Yates, Huish 


127 


Yorgason, Robert 


119,53 


Young, Amy 


136,58,92 


Young, Clifford 


141 


Young, Clyn 


131 


Young, Delbert 


113,79,84,89, 


98, 69, 53 




Young, Edith 


110, 19,20,78, 


87, 67 




Young, Erma 


134,65 


Young, Helen 


132,20,67 


Young, Loyd 


127,75 


Young, Rhoda 


1 10, 90, 60 


Young, Sylvia 


139,65 


Young, Thelma 


92,93, 128 


Young, Theodore 

Z 

Zabell. Jerry 


125, 82, 89 


139 


Zabriskie, Louise 


142,67 


Zeyer, Erwin 


139 


Zumbrunnen, Naomi 


130,64 



One Hundred Sixty-eight