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Full text of "The banyan"

BANYAN 1960 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/banyan1960brig 



BANYAN I960 




CONTENTS 



ACADEMIC 14 



CULTURAL 176 



SPIRITUAL 224 



EXTRA CURRICULAR 248 




EDITOR Lynn Thacker 

BUSINESS MANAGER Joel Justesen 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Julie Pingree 

Published by Associated Students ol Brigham Young University. Pro.o. Utah 




TO A LATTER-DAY SAINT, education 
means knowing and understanding 
not only the things of the immediate 
world, but the eternal principles of 
the Gospel. With these goals in mind, 
the prophet Brigham Young directed 
Karl G. Maeser to establish a Church 
school in Provo. Thus Brigham Young 
Academy was founded upon the prin- 
ciples of the worth of the individual 
and the teaching of high ideals to 
guide students toward immortality 
and eternal life. 







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The Lewis Building at Third 
West and Center streets 
housed the Academy's first 
classes until it was destroyed 
by fire. While waiting for 
the Education Building to be 
constructed, activities were 
centered in the ZCMI Ware- 
house at the south end of 
University Avenue. 



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Delays in construction prompted 

Dr. Maeser's daughter to say, "But 

father, it will never be finished, the 

foundation is crumbling away . . ." 

With his patient faith and vision, 

Karl G. Maeser replied, "No, no, my 

child, this will be finished, 

and many more " 




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and on that hill, 
for I have seen it.^' 








The present university fulfills in part 

the dream of Dr. Maeser. As BYTJ's 

combination of revealed and secular 

learning attracted students from 

around the globe the ''many more" 

became a reality and spread to the hill. 




As the school grew to be the largest 

church-affiliated university in the 

United States, a less tangible element 

called the "Spirit of the Y" developed 

also. Traditions in keeping with Dr. 

Maeser's founding philosophy, 

scholarship, honor, and spirituality 

all became parts of this spirit. 




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THE JOSEPH SMITH MEMORIAL 
Buidinq Is the center of campus 
religion classes. 



A full college life encompassing 

academic, cultural, and social activities 

with a spiritual foundation was from 

the beginning a part of the university. 




THE STATELY MAESE R MEMORIAL 
Building houses the campus adminis- 
trative offices. 




FRIENDLY BETWEEN-CLASS 
greetings ere not hampered by 





THE MCKAY BUILDING It the home o( 
the colleges of Education and Humanities 
and the Graduate School. 




Real teaching, the inspiration 
to meaningful study which is 
independent of physical sur- 
roundings is supplied by 
serious teachers of insight 
and great knowledge. Excel- 
lent facilities and extensive 
research in all fields serve 
to further stimulate 
intellectual endeavors. 



THE HEBER J. GRANT LIBRARY 
of the busiest centers of ocsdemi 
tivify on campus. 



THE SMITH FAMILY LIVING CENTER, 
occupied by the colleges of Family Liv- 
ing and Nursing, is viewed across the 
Quad through the McKay Building stair- 





HELAMAN HALLS PATIO i 
spot for study or relaxation 



the open 




HERITAGE HALLS provide modern, up- 
to-date living units for women students. 




ARCHITECT'S RENDERING of the 
Administration Building. 



THE RAPIDLY RISING foundatit 
the new million-volume Library. 




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^ITECT'S RENDERING of th 






The concrete foundations of buildings 
under construction symbolize the 

advances planned by men of foresight 

who are shaping Brigham Young 

University's future. 




DURING AN HISTORIC MOMENT of 
summer 1959 the North Building was re- 
moved from campus to make way for 
the new Library. 



ACADEMIC 



Administration 18 
Colleges 26 
Students 78 




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ADMINISTRATION 

Great men provided a solid, 
lasting foundation for 
Brigham Young University 
with leadership firm and 
unwavering in the ever- 
changing university life. 




PRESIDENT DAVID O. McKAY 




PRESIDENT J. REUBEN CLARK. JR. PRESIDENT HENRY D. MOYLE 

Guiding the university and its students on the road to 
further progress and improvement are President 
David O. McKay, his counselors, and the Council of 
the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter-day Saints, who compose the Board of 
Trustees of Brigham Young University. These men's 
exemplary lives of service, humility, and dedication 
to the betterment of man through education and 
spiritual living serve to instruct and inspire the stu- 
dents of the university to strive toward higher goals 
of perfection for better lives. With education as the 
basic precept behind this desired spiritual, emotional, 
and intellectual growth, the Board of Trustees con- 
tinually endeavors to promote expansion and im- 
provement of the university. 






JOSEPH FIELDING SMITH 



i: 



HAROLD B. LEE 





SPENCER W. KIMBALL 



EZRA TAFT BENSON 





MARK E. PETERSEN 



DELBERT L, STAPLEY 



MARION G. ROMNEY 



LEGRAND RICHARDS 



FIRST PRESIDENCY 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



RICHARD L, EVANS 



GEORGE 0. MORRIS 



HUGH B. BROWN 



HOWARD W. HUNTER 







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UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTS heme add! 
scene. 



WILLIAM E. BERRETT, Vice President 



EARL C. CROCKETT. Vice President 



HARVEY L. TAYLOR, Vice Presiden 






UNIVERSITY 
PRESIDENT 



The outstanding leadership of President Ernest L. 
Wilkinson and his administrative council provide the 
force necessary to put into action the many plans and 
programs for improvement and expansion which are 
under way on Brigham Young llniversity campus. 
The dynamic personalities represented in the ad- 
ministrative council have done much to further 
the missionary work of the church and the univer- 
sity as they have made contacts around the world 
in their endeavors to develop a more effective 
educational system for the students of the university. 
The inspiring personal lives of these men and their 
congenial relationships with the studentbody serve 
to instill within the students the goals and ideals 
which they should adopt to become worthwhile mem- 
bers of their church and society. 




ERNEST L. WILKINSON, Pn 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 



JOSEPH T. BENTLEY. Compt 




CLYDE D. SANDGREN, Gen 






RAY BECKHAM 

Secretary to Alumni Associatii 


SAM BREWSTER 
on Physical Plant 


TRACY 
Director 


HALL 
of Resea. 


WESLEY P. LLOYD 
Dean of Students 


DEAN PETERSON 
Director of Summer School 


KIEFER 
Treasure 


B. SAULS 


HAROLD G. CLARK 
Director of Extension Division 








BEN LEWIS 
Auxiliary Services 








LYMAN TYLER 









LESTER B. WHEHEN 
Public Relations 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



An important role in the smooth functioning of ser- 
vices for a studentbody of ten thousand is carried 
out by the men and women who are associated with 
and concerned with every phase of student and cam- 
pus life. The many long hours which they devote to 
improving facilities and services for students, deal- 
ing with the citizens of Provo, and working as inter- 
mediaries between studentbody and university presi- 
dency and administrative council are but one indica- 
tion that their lives are dedicated to serving Brigham 
Young University and its studentbody to the best of 
their abilities and capabilities. They also provide 
living examples to the students by which they are 
aided in establishing their personl values and ideals 
in order to live better lives. 



24 



ARIEL BALLIF 

Foreign Students 



EDWIN BUHERWORTH 



LEONARD CHRISTENSEN 

Security 

HERALD R. CLARK 
Lyceums. Forums 



GLENN DAVIS 
Student Publications 



KEITH DUFFIN 



FRANK HAYMORE 



ROBERT GWILLIAM 
Indian Students 



ORRIN JACKSON 
Admissions Officer 



CLEO McCRACKEN 
Women's H 




BLAINE PARKINSON 



DON PUGMIRE 
Photo Studio 

HOWARD T. REID 
islstant Dean of Students 

LUCILLE SPENCER 
and Registration Officer 



FRED SCHWENDIMAN 
Student H 



WETZEL WHITAKER 
Motion Picture Production 



FLOYD TAYLOR 
Tlclet Sales 



COLLEGES 

Spanning most of the 
wisdom man has accumu- 
lated within all history, 
eleven colleges made up the 
academic structure of 
Brigham Young University, 
providing many personalized 
levels of guidance and in- 
struction to the studentbody. 




In keeping with the ever-increasing demand for 
medical and agricultural specialists in today's world, 
the College of Biological and Agricultural Sciences 
is preparing its students to have a thorough knowl- 
edge in the field of life sciences. Included in the 
curricula are programs for pre-medical and pre-den- 
tal students, and it is hoped that in the future pro- 
fessional medical and dental schools will be available 
in conjunction with the college. Presently an out- 
standing program is offered for the training of 
medical technologists including a laboratory hospital 
internship for one year. Future teachers of the biolo- 
gical sciences are being well prepared to teach 
through such courses as will enable them to create 
an enthusiasm in their students for the life sciences. 
The constant desire of the department is to improve 
the facilities that are available, and current expan- 
sion is evident in the construction of new greenhouse 
facilities and new zoological laboratories. 



MERRILL J. HALLAM. D. 



COLLEGE OF BIOLOGICAL 



AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES 




DAVID DONALDSON 
Bacteriology 



C. LYNN HAYWARD 
Zoology and Entomology 






LAWRENCE MORRIS 
Animal Husbandry 



IVAN R. CORBRIDGE 
Agricultural Economics 



ERNEST REIMSCHIISSEL 



KENT R. McKNIGHT 



R. CHASE ALLRED 

Agronomy 






VASCO TANNER. Stephen Wo 
and a student prepare an enf- 
mology display. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
Clanon Cunnon. Sr. 
Grant S. Richards 
R. Ph:i Shumway 



BOTANY 

Glen Moore 
Earl M. Chrlstei 
John Van Cott 



Oorald M. Allred 
Vasco M, Tanner 
Wllmer Tanner 
Stephen L. Wood 




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Howard Stuti 
HORTICULTURE 

Clarence D. Ashton 

ZOOLOGY AND ENTOMOLOGY 
Letter Allen 
Elbert R. Simmons 




















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THIS "BEVY OF BEAUTIES" represents the fine dairy herd on the BYU dairy fa 



DR. STEPHEN WOOD and student Donald Bright observe wood beetles to dete 
their habits and life patterns. 



THESE STUDENTS enjoy learning the art of 
arranging. 





DR. WILMER TANNER and Stanley Robinsi 
^rcm the Mexican deserts. 



classify lizards 



IN BACTERIOLOGY LAB students learn about the microscopic world. 




AGRONOMY CLUB 

Undergraduate students interested in agronomy comprised 
the membership of Agronomy Club, which is affiliated 
with the American Society of Agronomy. At the group's 
bi-monthly meetings prominent men engaged in work in 
agronomy or closely related fields addressed the students 



with the purpose of furthering recognition and advance- 
ment in their field. One of the activities of the club was 
setting up displays in the Brimhall Building which em- 
phasized different phases of agriculture. A highlight of 
the year's activities was the club's spring quarter "Dig 
Feed." Serving as officers were Derval C. Warner, Presi- 
dent; Boyd Gurney, Vice-President; and Elmo Muir, Secre- 
tary. Dr. R. Chase Allred sponsored the group. 



Row Or.»: Bryce FmMnson. LeRoy Lim. Clyde Hicken, Lee Andersen, Neil Littledeld. Gordon Wood. Rodney Showalter Gordon Clark Udell Winkler Raw Two- 
Dr. R. Chase Allred, Glade J. Barney. Mai V. Hodson. David W. Newman. Boyd Gurney. Ronald Tew, Jotin D. Waler Wesley Vorw'oler Gordon VVeinhelmer' 
Row Three: Ashton H. Taylor. Elmo R. Buir, Leon Mason, Dennis Wagner Wr.ght Noel Melvin Muir Derral Warner ' 





WELDON J, TALYOR. Dean 



The College of Business strives to prepare students 
for the increasing opportunities and responsibilities 
of the dynamically changing world of the business- 
man. The abilities to exercise creative imagination 
and vigor for patterning a world of abundance to 
satisfy man's needs and desires, and to act jointly 
with other leaders in society are developed through 
participation and training in a wide field. Stimulat- 
ing programs are carried out to prepare students not 
only to hold executive positions and further the 
development of the business world, but also to sup- 
ply the world of education with intelligent, capable 
leaders who can aid in preparing others for entrance 
into the world of business and economics. The staff, 
with their insight into how the goals of the college 
may be achieved, add further to the training for a 
full and abundant life of leadership which is offered 
to students of the college. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 




LARS CRANDALL 
Business Education and Offic 
Management 



GLEN T. NELSON 




GEOMETRIC DESIGNS are evident in the interior of the new business building. 




CLINTON OAKS 
Business Management 





ACCOUNTING 

Ernesf D. Hubbdrd 
Eldred A. Johnson 



J. Morgan Whit 



BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

R. DerMonI Bell 

Evan M. Crort 

Karl Herde 

Stanford OeM?lla 



Seulah Swenson 
J Perry Poison 
E)hel»n Taylor 
Russell N. Sisnsfleld 




James W. Geddes 

ECONOMICS 

Wlllard B. Doiey 
Howard NIelsoo 



THIS NEW STRUCTURE will further the destiny of the College of Bu 



19 



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THE COMPARATIVELY SIMPLE method of operating the IBM Calculator which is used by the College of 
demonstrated by Pat Nou. 





ANOTHER PART of the Computer Ce 
ter is demonstrated by Jim Andrus. 



DR. ROBERT SMITH helps students obtain the 
best possible understanding of their work in ac- 
counting class. 



Black. Thelma 

k>hman. Janeal 

Busaih. Beth 



Chrittensen, Kenna P 

Cook, Shirlf, 

Crawford. Thelma 

Gibbs, Sonyd 



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Havct. Maril, 

Jackson. Mary Be) 

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Louder. Sher 

Millar, Carol A 
Mulr. Margar 




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PHI CHI THETA 

Girls majoring in business who maintained good 
scholastic standing and were active in school activi- 
ties were members of the Psi Chapter of Phi Chi 
Theta, national business organization. Special guest 
speakers during the year included President David 
O. McKay's secretary and Arnold Friberg, painter 
of the Ten Commandment series. Highlights of the 
year's activities were the annual dinner dance at 



Maple Valley Inn, a spring canyon party and the 
Senior Farewell. A delegate was sent to national 
convention and the chapter received two of the or- 
ganization's national scholarships. The officers were 
Marilyn Peterson, president; Sonja Leonard, 'Vice- 
President; Shirley Cook, Secretary; Alda Mae Powell, 
Treasurer; and Mrs. Ethelynn Taylor, sponsor. 






ASAHEL D. WOODRUFF, De«n 



Since approximately one-third of the entire BYU 
studentbody is preparing for teacher certification, 
the role of the College of Education is becoming 
more important. Within classes in this college there 
is an emphasis on continued observation and parti- 
cipation in actual classrooms where prospective 
teachers prepare for their future jobs. They make an 
extensive study of the way students learn and adjust. 
They learn to adapt themselves to the school as a 
social institution, and examine the values for which 
American schools are strong. Fundamental method- 
ologies and principles necessary to well-rounded 
teaching are also added. Student teaching is also a 
major part of the program for attaining a profes- 
sional teaching certificate. Many special facilities are 
provided for students through the college. Among 
these is the instructional materials workroom where 
facilities are provided for all types of mounting, en- 
larging, coloring, lettering, and the operation of 
audio-visual equimpent. The Curriculum Library and 
Graduate Laboratory also furnish aids to teaching. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 






ANTONE K. ROMNEY 
Assistant Dean 



KEITH R. OAKE5 
Educational Administratit 




DEAN C. CHRISTEN5EN 
Instruction 



ROBERT L. EGBERT 
Educational Research and Se 



STEPHEN L. ALLEY 
Educational Philosophy and 
Programs 





EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
Percy E. Burnip 
John A. Clartt 
JeHenon Eastmond 



Edith Bsusr 
Mary Krider 
INSTRUCTION 

Lorna C. Alder 
Hyrum Babcock 
Slerlmg B. Callahan 



Bertha Davidson 
J. Richard Brown 
Jennie Campbell 
Lillian Christensen 
Thelma DeJong 



Flora Fiiher 
Reuben D. Law 
Walter McPhie 
May C. Hammond 
Mima Ratband 



THE CURRICULUM LAB helps students develop belter leachlno 
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BASIC RUDIMENTS of learning are taught to inquiring young minds in BYU Lab School. 



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LEROY PORTER counsels a Lab School student en her curriculunr 



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KNOW the answer" is signified by an uplifted h.nd. 



STUDENT TEACHER Carrie Jacobs learns teaching methods by actual 
participation in classroom situations. 



CLOSE TEACHER-STUDENT relations promote classroom harmony and 
cooperation in the Lab School. 






JACK B. TRUNNELL. De 



With the beUef that the happiness and richness of 
our lives depend upon the quality of our family 
life, the College of Family Living provides the 
broader training and greater knowledge which are 
required in many areas of family living in this age 
of rapid scientific, social, and cultural changes. In 
order to provide better training in human relations, 
the college is conducting studies of the development 
of good spiritual and mental health in the family. 
Under this program, students are brought to an 
understanding of the methods involved in setting 
up a good home life and forming the characters 
of the members of the family. In both the teaching 
and the research programs, the guiding principle is 
that the restored gospel is the only sure matrix in 
which true human fitness may be achieved, and that 
it is in the church's smallest ecclesiastical unit — the 
family — that the greatest influences on this achieve- 
ment are found. 



COLLEGE OF FAMILY LIVING 





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STEPHEN STANFORD 
Housing and Design 



BLAINE PORTER 
HDFR 



MARIAN BENNION 
Food and Nutrition 



VIRGINIA POULSON 
Family Living and Horn, 






ELEANOR JORGENSEN 
Clothing and Textiles 

VESTA BARNETT 
Economics and Management 
of the Home 





CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 
Margaret P. Childs 
Mignon Domgaard 
Betty Log Gardner 
Bliss Finlsvson 



FOOD AND NUTRITION 
Maurlne Bryner 
Aleen «iggj 

ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT 
OF THE HOME 
Stella Lewis 



Kenneth Cannon 



HOMEMAKING EDUCATION 
Evelyn Day 




CLOTHING AND TEXTILE maiors are given (irst hand e.peri 
in this eitensive weaving room. 



THE EAMILY LIVING playground provides observation area for Child Development 
students. 





OFFICERS OF the newly organized HDFR Club 
rell Thomas, Sandra Covey, and Nell Birch. 



DEAN TRUNELL'5 




HOME EC CLUB 

Belonging to the Home Economics Club included such 
interesting activities as a field trip to Makoffs in Salt 
Lake, a fashion show at Bridal Arts in Salt Lake, and a 
state convention and fall workshop. The club fostered 
the promotion of leadership and professionalism in its 



members with activities centered around two main pur- 
poses: to gain a better understanding of the role of home 
economists and the opportunities open to them, and to 
broaden the members' scope in learning and understand- 
ing. Officers for the year were Leta Clements, President; 
Margaret Lewis, Vice-President; Ann Putman, Secretary; 
Sherrie Lee Morris, Treasurer; and Alice Crook, Histor- 
ian. Mrs. Evalyn Day was sponsor of the club. 



Row One: Furlann Smith, Anna Joy Woffinden, Louise Andrus, Ali 
Carma Balcer, Claudia Bundy. Row Two: RaChel Anderson. Maxir 
ley. Patricia Burlholder, Cheryl Cuff. Kaye Cunninghame, Linda 
Marth, Larsen, Margo Ray. Mardean Christiansen, Carolyn Beed 
Pennington, Joyce Roberts. Shirley Ann Hadley. LaRue Whiting " 
Carol Skillman, Valine Saunders, Edna Smith. Ardis Killpack. Sha 



Crook, Leta Clements, Margaret Lewis, Sherry Lee Morris. Anne Putnam. Virginia Clark, 
ne Lewis, LaRee Jackson. Marilyn Tolman, Iniece Carnes. Claudette Larsen. BeHy Lou Mob- 
Crandall Kathleen Clark, Judy Lee HIggins, Sylvia Vincent. Row TSree: Nancy McCormack, 
[e Elaine' Thomas Lavelle Elzlnga. Judy Loveless. Barbara Lenhart, Caroyn Peacock, Louise 
Jow Four: Marcla' Bradshaw. Alene Calder. Louise Merrill. Vlra Ann Murphy. Marlene Walker, 
n Weight, Renee Gertsch, Helen Bartlett, Judy Litster. 






Margaret Hall. President 




INITIATION REFRESHMENTS we 

GAMMA PHI OMICRON 



Junior and senior students majoring in any depart- 
ment within the College of Family Living and with 
high academic standing were eligible for member- 
ship in Gamma Phi Omicron honorary organization, 
the oldest honorar)' for women on BYl' campus. 
The organization's activities were centered around 
the achievement of the goals of promoting high 



■e enjoyed by Carmo Baler and Pat Kelly while Judy Lihter served. 

ideals in home and family living, developing a good 
professional attitude, and encouraging a continuing 
desire to achieve high standards of scholarship. Clos- 
ing event of the year was the annual Alumni Birth- 
day Dinner. The officers were Margaret Hall, Presi- 
dent; Maxine Lewis, Vice-President; Mary Jo Peter- 
son and Evelyn Peacock, Secretaries; Linda Pace, 
Treasurer; Maxine Reichert, Publicity Chairman; and 
Joan Goodsell, Historian. Hleanor Jorgeson was 
sponsor for the organization. 




Ande-ion, R. 




The College of Fine Arts exists in order to provide 
better coordinated academic and professional 
growth for students whose interests and superior tal- 
ents lead them into the fields of music, art, and 
drama. Faculty members known for their artistic 
and academic work strive to accomplish the three 
objectives of the college — to provide opportunities 
for all students to gain general cultural values 
through acquaintance with one or more of the fine 
arts; for majors or minors in this field to acquire 
thorough understanding of the arts and to develop 
special skills; and for the prospective teachers of the 
arts to acquire techniques of teaching the fine arts 
on all instructional levels. Another aim of the col- 
lege is to develop in the general studentbody a 
greater appreciation of the fine arts, with the hope 
that such cultural consciousness and appreciation will 
then be carried to the population as a whole when 
BYU graduates move about in society. 



CONAN E. MATHEWS. D 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 





ROMAN ANDRUS 



HAROLD I. HANSEN 
Speech and Drama 




FRANZ JOHANSEN dsmonstrafes some of the 
advanced work of the Art Department. 




MUSIC 

Jacob Bos 
Brandt Curtis 
Robert Cundlck 
Don Earl 




Jed RicKardson 
Kathryn Pardoe 
Owen Rich 
Uel J. Woodbur, 
Ross M. Weaver 



46 



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AT THE AIR FORCE ACADEMY National Invitational Debate Tournament, first- 
place winners Craig Christensen and Tom Read smiled at the trophies they re, 
ceived from Colonel Warren Thompson and Cadet Tom Owens. 



The BYU Forensics Association took first place in 
the largest tournament in the nation, The Harvard 
University National Invitational Debate Tournament 
this year, and also at the Air Force Academy Na- 
tional Debate Tournament. These spectacular vic- 
tories made BYU the only school in the nation to 
win two of the big five national debate tournaments. 
Debaters Craig Christensen and Tom Read were 
responsible for these honors along with several other 
victories which the squad gained. The organization 
was composed of students interested in inter-col- 
legiate competition in debate, oratory, interpretative 
reading, radio speaking, and extemporaneous and 
impromptu speaking. Included in the honors gained 
by the members of the squad were first places in de- 
bate at the Columbia Valley Forensic Tournament 
and also at the Western Speech Association Tourna- 
ment. Both first and second places at the .Southwest- 
ern Invitational Debate Tournament, and first place 
in public speaking and second in debate at the Tau 
Kappa Alpha National Tournament were also added 
to BYU winnings. Officers were Tom Read, Ron 
Inouye, LaNae Hill and Jan Lauritz. 



BYU FORENSICS ASSOCIATION 



Row One: Suzanne Calder, Sally Kirltman. Don Blanch. Jen Jacobs, Co 
er. Jerry Hatch, Ralph Tate, Jim Wilde, Tom Read. 



en Johnson. Row Two: Craig Christensen, John Whetten. Don Pearson. Ronald Walt- 





DON BLACH. Cri 



and Ron Walker, debators responsible for the first place wir 
I student assembly as their coach Jed Richardson told of the 



the Harvard University National Invitational Debate 
compllshments. 



EVERYONE WANTED to get in on th 
Richardson, coach Elder LeSrand L. 



of congratulating the debators who brought national honor to BYU, including Dean Wesley P. Lloyd, Jed 
srds. and President Harvey L. Taylor. 





General College enables BYU to more adequately 
meet the changing educational demands of the uni- 
versity and to more perfectly achieve its objectives 
by helping students develop responsible citizenship 
in the church and state and to acquaint them with 
their cultural heritage and thus lay the foundation 
for useful and productive lives in a democratic so- 
ciety. With these goals in mind. General College 
takes care of the educational needs of several classi- 
fications of students. Those who are undecided about 
their major field register in the Division of Provi- 
sional Registration and take a general course for 
one or two years while they decide on their chosen 
field. Other students who wish to acquire technical 
training and skill in special fields of engineering, 
business, and agriculture enroll in the Technical and 
Semi-Professional Institute for a two-year period af- 
ter which they are prepared to take their place in 
the professional field of their choice. Students in- 
terested in Industrial Arts register in the Department 
of Industrial Education to follow a course which 
terminates in a Bachelor of Science degree. 



WAYNE B. HALES, Dean 



GENERAL COLLEGE 




GUY PIERCE, Industrial Edu. 



THIS SHOP typifies the modern surround- 
ings for all industrial education classes. 






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Lavell C. Gamme 
Rosi J. McArthur 




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iilBliii 

liliiiiiiiiiiiiiir ^ 



4 




THE MOST MODERN oqu.pmerl and (oc 



Iding. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CLUB 



The Industrial Education Club, a campus professional or- 
ganization, extended membership to industrial education 
majors. Special event meetings during the year presented 
programs on such subjects as informtaion on gun stocks 
available in Provo, glider activity reports, and a talk by 
Ray Hatch on Russia and her people. Of special help to 



lAdvliofl. Ray Anderson. M.lo Bowen, Don C. 
Richard Stotts. Gerald Chinq. F. A. Butler. C( 

Howard Ed.ard Lafsen Wll'crd Tclm, 



the graduating members of the club were first hand re- 
ports from graduate teachers an teaching opportunities 
in the field. Officers of the group were Don C. Carter, 
President; Gary Singleton, Vice-President; and Milo 
Bowen, Secretary. Dr. McArthur sponsored the club. 



Gary Singleton, Don Carpenter. LaVell Gammett, Ma. McKinnon Row Two- 
'ill, Lewis Fredriclson, Robert Dowdle. Donald L. Grimand Don Lounsbury 
Hebdon, Lynn Wright, Dale Froelicl, Michall Wasden Earl Ferguson Lyman 




•'^. 





The College of Humanities and Social Sciences pro- 
vides for students the opportunity to gain a broad, 
general education that is fundamental to abundant 
living. In the area of humanities, the purpose is to 
develop within the student an understanding and 
appreciation of man's great heritage, his intellectual 
creations and accomplishments. The social sciences 
are concerned with the nature of man, his environ- 
ment, his motives, his reactions to social problems, 
and the institutions he has created. Unlimited op- 
portunities are available for graduates of this col- 
lege in such fields as social work, teaching, foreign 
service, business and governmental work. Classes 
emphasize the need for breadth of understanding 
and harmonious development of personality by pre- 
paring students to live in an intelligent, satisfying 
manner through which they can get along with 
people, think clearly and communicate effectively. 



REED H. BRADEORD, Do 



COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 







HAROLD V/. LEE 
Lanquaqes 



M. WELLS JAKEMAN 
Archaeology 



RALPH A. BRIT5CH 
EnqNsh 



MARK K. ALLEN 
Psycholoqy 



ALBERT A. FISHER 
Geography 



OLIVER R. SMITH 
Journalism 



STEWART GROW 
Political Science 



RICHARD POLL 

History 







ENGLISH 

Zane Alder 
Dale S. Bailey 
Elouiie Bell 
Marlon B. Brady 
Thomas E. Cheney 



P. A. Chrlslensen 
Bruce S. Clarl 
Marden J. Clark 
Marshall R. Craig 
Da..d L. Evans 
Dustin H. Heuston 



Brian) S. Jacobs 
Darcos Hyde 
Frank Ho'lon 
Clinton F. Larson 
Harold S. Madsen 
Olive K. Mitchell 



John E. McKendricl 
R. Neal Richards 
Irene O. Spears 
Celistia J. Taylor 
Orea B. Tanner 
Douglas H. Thayer 



Jean Anne Waterstradt 
Dale H. West 
Karl E. Young 
Robert K. Thomas 

GEOGRAPHY 

L. Elliot Tuttle 
Robert L Layton 



JOURNALISM 

Marilyn Arnold 
Noel H. Duerden 

LANGUAGES 

Vernon L. Andersoi 
Jack Brown 
Gerrit deJong, Jr. 
M. Carl Gibson 



J. Winston Otters 
R. Mai Rogers 
H. Darrel Taylor 
Lee B. Valentine 
Ernest J. Wllkins 
Arthur R. Watkin! 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Gaylon Caldwell 
Melvin P. Mabey 
J. Keith Melville 
Robert E. Riggs 
Jesse W. Reader 




fLiai 










SOCIOLO&Y 

Joseph N. Svmon! 
John L. Sorenson 
John W. Payne 
Wllford E. Smith 

STORY 
Eugene Campbell 
R. Kent Fielding 



Jay B, Hunt 
LeRoy R. Hafen 
Russell 6. Swensen 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Kenneth R. Hardy 
Robert Howell 
Charles Taylor 



WORLD LANGUAGES are brought to students' 
tapes and ear-phones in the language laboratory. 




KNOWLEDGE OF GEOGRAPHY and world history contri 
butes to a liberal education. 





STUDENTS REPRESENTING (oreiqn coutitrios make the study of world culture more meaninqtul. Pictured are Wars, to Indonesia- Dr Stewart L Grow Mototo 
Sasao. Japan: Shashi Kant ShaK. India: and Sainq Silalahi. Indonesia. 



DR. FRANK WILKINSON, with lie detector and assistants, works on a psychology department proiect. 





ii 


f 


f 1 


K^ 


i 7 ■ 


^1 


1 '^ 


^1 


Iv — 




A GREAT RESPONSIBILITY of trained social workers is to help rehabili- 
tate deviants o( social behavior. 



COUNSELING YOUNG PEOPLE in many problems 
o( the humanities and social sciences responsibilities. 





PRESS CLUB 



The membership of Press Club was composed of BYU 
journalism students. Functions of the club included help- 
ing send a BYU delegate to the National SDX convention, 
assisting with the High School Journalism Convention on 
campus, presenting awards at the Publications Banquet 
for outstanding campus journalistic accomplishment, in- 
viting guest speakers to monthly meetings, and having 



special events parties. The club was instrumental in the 
establishment on campus of Sigma Delta Chi. national 
professional journalism fraternity, and started plans to 
petition for a similar chapter for women. Serving as offi- 
cers for the year were Frank Haynes, President; Dave 
Thomas, Vice-President; Rita Wheeler, Secretary; and 
Alice AUred, Social Chairman. 



Allred. Jeddy LaVa 





SIGMA DELTA CHI 



The Brigham Young University chapter of Sigma Delta 
Chi, national professional journalism fraternity, was es- 
tablished on campus in January, 1960. Thirteen journal- 
ism majors were initiated as charter members and installa- 
tion ceremonies were conducted by Victor Bluedorn, na- 
tional executive director, with Utah chapter members and 
the former national president in attendance. Officers of 
the new organization were Larry Day, President; Frank 
Haynes, Vice-President; Jeddy Levar. Secretary; and Dus- 
ton Harvey, Treasurer. Dr. Oliver Smith was advisor. 



Interest in political activities tied members of the Young 
Democrats Club together. During the year members met 
and heard such prominent speakers as Congressman David 
S. King, State Senator Alonzo F. Hopkins, Salt Lake City 
attorney Richard Moffat, and Western States President 
of the Young DemcKrats, Alan Howe, as they discussed 
matters of political interest. On the lighter side, the group 
held several socials such as a watermelon party at the 
MIA home m Provo Canyon. Serving as officers were 
Ron Brannen, President; Arlyn Bodily, Vice-President; 
and Janice Johnson, Secretary. Miss Jean Anne Water- 
stradt was sponsor of the organization. 

YOUNG DEMOCRATS 



Row On»: Morlene Egbert. Betty Jane Forsyth, Claudine Brannen. Ron Brannen. Arlyn R. Bodily. Joseph G. Wise, Don R McDowell Row Two- Phil Eobe 
Ralph Showaltor. Kenneth Morrison Terry Cavert Allan P Hall Carl L Surr,ino( Blaine Call. 





BERNICE CHAPMAN, Dean 



The College of Nursing prepares young women to 
meet the ever-increasing demand for professional 
nurses in the medical circles of society, with the 
added advantage of possessing a Bachelor of Science 
degree as well as being registered nurses. Students 
in the college are provided with a wide variety of 
general courses and an extensive curriculum in 
nurses' training on BYU campus, at Utah Valley 
Hospital in Provo, and at the L.D.S. Hospital in 
Salt Lake City over a period of four and a half 
years. The student nurses are easily recognized on 
campus and in the hospitals where they obtain their 
experience as they go about in their attractive blue 
uniforms learning techniques, developing their skills, 
and aiding the hospital personnel as they care for the 
sick. The advantages of modern equipment, well- 
qualified instructors, and a variety of hospitals in 
which to gain practical experience in all phases of 
nursing result in competent, well-trained nurses 
which BYU proudly sends out into the professional 
field to aid their fellow men. 



COLLEGE OF NURSING 



^ 






i. A 



STUDENT NURSES learn to care for a patient with confident 
efficiency. 



Jignon Alward 
/Ida R. Babcocl 



Martha R. Jenn. 
•^ Marion Kohler 



Dorothy M. Smilev 





feTI«,llK 



' f* H \ fr kir. 



Row On.: Beverly Robe'ti, Saye Scoresby, Sharon AHhouse. Kay Henderson. Kathy Stephenson. Genelie Hebd - Row Two: Donna Larson, Janice Nelson, Be 
Snow. Kathleen Bearnson. Johanna Baker. Norma Hansen. Row Thro*: Ellen Thomas. Edele Smith. Pat Stiles. Diane Newman. Jean Silver. Emma Lou Bagle) 
N^ary Jo Hendricbon. Row Four: Gwen Tufts. Adele Gilchrest. Phyllis Allphin. Elaine Cool. Linda Oertle. Karen Nice!. Dawn Martin. 

STUDENT NURSES ASSOCIATION 



The purpose of the Student Nurses' Association is to bet- 
ter prepare future nurses for their professional roles in 
society. Although much of the nurses' education took place 
in Salt Lake City at the L.D.S. Hospital, the association 
still found time for various activities. Meetings included 
professional lectures as well as cultural and social activi- 
ties. Other activities included fund-raising projects, their 




annual spaghetti dinner, a winter quarter invitational, and 
participation in Song Fest. As a special feature of tlic 
year, the unit sent a delegate to the National Stiuk-Jit 
Nurses' Association in Miami, Florida. Officers wtie 
Donna Lorron, President; Carolyn Lake, 'Vice-President; 
Kathryn Budge, Secretary; Linda Oertle, Social Chairman 



SURGERY DEPENDS upon th 





--*>J 



h. 



ARMIN J. HILL, Dean 



The rapidly advancing and changing world of physi- 
cal and engineering sciences is affording an ever- 
broadening field of endeavor to the graduates of the 
college. In accord with this growing demand for 
more physicists, chemists, engineers, and others with 
higher degrees of specialized training, the College 
of Physical and Engineering Sciences offers an ever- 
improving curriculum presented by an outstanding 
faculty using modern facilities and equipment. In ad- 
dition to the regular program which is carried out to 
prepare students for doing work which will further 
growth, development, and improvement in their 
fields, numerous research projects and general im- 
provements are constantly in process within the col- 
lege. Highly important research programs being con- 
ducted at present include Dr. Harvey Fletcher's work 
on music acoustics. Dr. Tracy Hall's research into the 
effects of high pressure and high temperature, and 
experimentation in bacteriological mining. Improve- 
ments which will be valuable to the college include 
the addition of a twelve thousand dollar blowdown 
tank, and complete revamping of the chemistry lab- 
oratories in the Eyring Science Center. 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL AND 
ENGINEERING SCIENCES 






HARVEY J. FLETCHER 
Mathematics 



KENNETH C. BULLOCK 
Geological Englneerinq 



KEITH P. ANDERSON 

Chemistry 

DEAN K. FUHRIItflAN 
Civil Engineering 



JOHN SIMONSEN 
Mechanical Engineering 

JENS J. JOHNSON 
Electrical Engineering 



JOHN EASTMOND 



JAMES J. CHRISTENSEN 
Chemical Engineering 






H. Smith Broadbent 
J. Rei Goates 
Reed M. liaH 



Hugh W. Peterson 
Richard L. Meibos 
K. Lerol Nelson 
Joseph K. Nicholes 
John H. Wing 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Cliff Barton 
Glen H. Calder 



GEOLOGY 

Harold J. Bissall 
Willis H. Brimhall 
David L. Clark 



W. Revell Phillips 
Lehl p. Htnfie 
Joseph Owens 
Mont M. Warner 



Oarrel J. Monsc 

MATHEMATICS 
Floyd E. Houpl 
Shlrl J. Hone 
J. Edgar Karst 
J. Lloyd Olpin 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Norman Gardner 



Milton Marshall 
Ma< Hill 
Martin L. Miller 
Delbert H. McNa 



EHHliE 




ISO 2 



59 




DR. LOREN BRYNER and graduate student Revere Pali 
which totals one hundred and twenty-five thousand dol 



tinue work in leaching of sulfide minerals 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING students demonstrate the intricacies of specialized 
laboratory equipment. 




REGARDLESS OF WEATHER CONDITIONS, the Summe 
hays Planetarium recreates the heavens for both stude 
groups and visitors of all ages. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING equipment is checked by 





THE LARGEST TELESCOPE in the Intermountaln area, a twenty-fou 
inch reflector type, is part of the BYU astronomy equipment. 



DR. DAVID CLARK of the geology department checks the measurements 
part of the eitensive fossil collection. 






Gordon Lasley, Charl. 



Tuckett, Colon Stubberf, Lynn Walbr, Dennis Park. Sang Woo Urn, Merlyn Kitchen. Row Two: Re 
as Paris, Gary Crandall, Sheldon Murphy, Weldon Daines, Gory Hatfield, Gary Goodson, Bob St, 



CHI EPSILON SIGMA 

Chi Epsilon Sigma, the Chemical Engineering Society, was 
opened to all junior, senior, and fifth year chemical en- 
gineering students. The group was sponsored by Dr. J. J. 
Christensen, and officers were Gary Hatfield, President; 
Robert Strang, Vice-President; Colin Stubbert, Secretary; 
and William Tuckett, Social Chairman, Activities of the 
year included semi-monthly meetings, field trips, partici- 
pation in National Engineering Week, and social events 
with the Chemical Engineering Wives' Club. This year, 
the chapter was accepted as a member of the National In- 
stitute of Chemical Engineers. 



Juniors, seniors, and fifth year students in Civil Engineer- 
ing were eligible for membership in the Society of Civil 
Engineers. Allen Firmage sponsored the group and of- 
ficers for the year were James Buckwalter, President; M. 
Glenn Weaver, Vice-President; and Jim Dike, Secretary, 
The year's activities included sponsoring speeches and 
movies pertinent to civil engineering, participating in Na- 
tional Engineering Week, taking a field trip to Glen Can- 
yon Dam, and attending their annual banquet. 

SOCIETY OF 
CIVIL ENGINEERS 



Row One- George Wirricl Vard D Jensen, Leo H, Karner, Doyle W, Winterton, M, Glenn Weaver, James W, Roberts, Brady Snnlthson, James Dike, Row 
Two- Wayne Cheney, Clyde R. Naylor, David Prothero, Arnold Wilson, James Buckwalter, Henry Shu-Shing Tung, Heikki Hcvland. Row Thr.6; Joseph 'L. 
Blacl Tpd L Sm.lh, Dell Tyler, Bob Wilson, David M. Neeley, James Peterson, Calvin G, Lasson, 





Row On.: Prof. Dorrel Monson, Prof. Jen; Jor<ssor>, Paul Watts. Ralph Merrill. Row Two: Boyd D. Har>s 
vey L. Bragq, Richard Stralton, John C. Clarl. Row Thr.»: Reld S. Dillon, Brent Montgomery. Noise 
Linford. A. Kent Johnson. Glen Hunsalrer. Stephen J. Clarl. Row Four: Earl W. Bean. Eugene Holladj 
insey, Alma Ray Ivie, Kent B. Bevs. Henry M. Call. Row Fly.: Warren F. Crapse. K. Stanley Cool. G 
La. Rasmussen, David Croclelt. Row Si<: Larry James. James Irvine. Ronald Haymore 
J. mas Wright. 



Tod J Crowlher, Joel R 
Dornoy. James Anderso 
Don McKrola. Ken Phllli 
R. Howard. Peter Polqa 
•d St. Claire, Frank R Judd. Warn 



Varney, Lloyd Thayne, Har- 
, Dwayn. Awerliamp, John 
s, Levon Gale, Durtlee Kar- 
Myles Judd, Charles Corr, 
I H. Fraser, Don M. Jones, 



YEE 

Electrical Engineers was founded to further professional- 
ism and aid students, is connected with the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers and the Institute of Radio 
Engineers. Activities for the year included no-cost help 
sessions, bi-weekly meetings, lectures by experts on dif- 
ferent aspects of engineering, and Engineering Week. So- 
cial events included the fall dinner-dance, spring picnic, 
pizza party, and awards banquet. Officers were Paul J. 
Watts, Chairman; Ralph Merrill, First Vice-President; Ted 
J. Crowther, Second Vice-president; Lloyd Thayne, Treas- 
urer; Richard Stratton and Joel Varney, Secretaries. Spon- 
sor is Darrel J. Monson. 

Row On.: Dovid Dawson, Ken Marshall, Dr. John Simonson. Ed Miller, Gale Hamelwright, Wynn Christensen. Ken Harvey, Henry Todd. Row Two: Forrin West, 
Dennis Bushman, EIroy Christiansen. Forrest Hatch. John Smith, Willis Harrison, Terry McFadden, Kay Diclerson, Richard Bartholomew, Row Thr..: Charles 
Cartmill, Gary Clawson, Steve Ritchie. Keith Johansen, Darrell Whitworth, Garth Thompson, David Tree, Wayne Graham, Gary Sfott. Row Four: Kelland Willis, 
L<.^n Brady, Don Butcher, Dale Huff, Douglas Reneer. Robert Smellie, Kent Rieska, Paul Johnson, Loren Blocher, Jerry Linsey, Byron Peterson Richard Duke 
Mark Perclvai, Clair Shields. 



The American Society of Mechanical Engineers extended 
membership to any junior, senior, or fifth year mechanical 
engineering students. The unit, which was affiliated with 
the Mechanical Engineering Department, was sponsored 
by John Simonsen. Officers of the unit were Ed Miller, 
Chairman; Ken Marshall, Vice-Chairman; Henry Todd, 
Secretary; and Gale Hamelwright, Second Vice-Chairman. 
Activities of the year included technical meetings pre- 
sented by various industries, field trips to industrial and 
military installations, participation in Engineering Week, 
and a social event each quarter. 

BYU-ASME 








LT. COL. WILLIAM J. GIBSON 



The Department of Air Science offers a four-year 
AFROTC program designed to fit into the regular 
academic schedule of BYU. At the end of this 
curriculum, cadets have earned thirty credit hours 
of academic work which count toward graduation, 
have participated in one hour of leadership labora- 
tory a week, and have attended a four-week summer 
training course between their junior and senior years 
at an Air Force base. Successful completion of the 
program and graduation with a baccalaureate de- 
gree qualify the cadets for a commission as second 
lieutenant in the United States Air Force Reserve. 



DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 




S/SGT. GEORGE M. HALL 
S/SGT. MORCK O HANCOCK 



CAPT, STERLING S. HUISH 
S/SGT, WILLIAM K. WILDEN 



A FRENCH AIR prevailed at the traditional Military Ball. 



CAPT. RAY W. ALVORD 
CAPT. GERALD J. DYE 



*• CAPT, DAVID E. STENQUIST 



,^ 




Benwn, Kent 
Barlow, Glenn B. 
Brian. Arthur W. 
Day. Ted S. 
Cannon. Wellei 
Hansen, Gordon 
Burke. Larry 




Moil, Dennli D. 



Olien, Jamet G. 

Peck, Myron H 

Palton, Joseph B. 

chfimihire, Elma «. 





o c^ ::7 



Pellit. Edwin 

Sm.lh. Ted 

Sipherd. David 

T, dwell. Ray W. 

Sorenjon. Kenneth 



^^ 



^ 





SENIORS RECEIVING COMMISSIONS 



MILITARY BALL ROYALTY > 
Charlotte Allen. 


were Morqene Symons. Queen Linda SImms. and 


Wf ' ^ ^^^^^^m 




*^^; 


/ '^^^^^^^^^^^H 




^A W 


. k< 


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THE EIFFEL TOWER was a focal point at the Milila 




^50^^::il« 



^^ %JI' 



jii^^^l 



ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY MEMBERS and their date 



ijoyed the autumn quarter dinne 



ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY 



The Jesse E. Stay Squadron of the Arnold Air So- 
ciety boasted a membership of the outstanding cadets 
of the ROTC Corps. The Society was social in that 
it was active in exchanges with units on campus, 
particularly the Sponsor Corps. The Society was 
honorary in that it admitted only top cadets in 
scholarship and leadership. The members of the 
group made up a large part of the cadet officers of 
the Cadet Wing of the ROTC Corps. Activities in- 
cluded Air Force guest speakers at the weekly meet- 
ings, a December formal, and sponsorship of a cadet 
rifle drill team. In the spring, the Commander and 
two other delegates were flown to the National 
Conclave in Miami, Flo- 
rida, where policies of the 
national organization were 
determined for the coming 
year. The Squadron also 
participated in a service 
project assigned from na- 
tional headquarters. Lead- 
ing the Society were Char- 
les R. King, Commander; 
Ray W. Tidwell, Execu- 
tive Officer; James Gary 
Olsen, Operations Officer; 
Jack L. Christensen, Ad- 
jutant Recorder; and John 
F. Snideman, Comptroller. 



THE MILITARY BALL provided 



g of fun for AAS and dates. 






Charles R. King. Con- 




Zhristenien. Jack L 
Dafrough, George 
Davit. Darrell H 



Farniworth, Fred 




P, 73 p Q. 





THE AAS DINNER DANCE (eatured dinmq and dancing to the 



ol Grady Edenfield's combo 





*AS 



X 




MILTON F, HARTVIGSEN. Dean 



"A sane mind in a sound body," is the aim of the 
College of Physical Education, formerly the College 
of Recreation, Physical and Health Education, and 
Athletics until this year. With this goal of a balanced 
education, both aspects, mind and body, are dealt 
with in a variety of courses, ranging from more aca- 
demic pursuits such as various health and youth lead- 
ership courses, to the more physical matters of in- 
struction such as volleyball and basketball. Their 
wide range of activities include overseeing the inter- 
collegiate athletic events and intramural sports and 
within the same college, driver safety classes and 
modern dance. Through these courses, all interested 
students are able to engage in the physical or ath- 
letic activity so necessary to a healthy body and bal- 
anced education. Facilities through which this can 
be accomplished are being continually added. The 
addition at the west end of the Smith Fieldhouse, 
constructed this year, is the most recent example. 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 






RAY WAITERS 
Health Educatior 



ISRAEL HEATON 



THANE PACKER 

Youth Leadership 






ATHLETICS 

Owen Dlion 
Chrit Apostol 
Robert Bunker 
Stan Watts 
Tally Stevens 



HEALTH 

Henr, J. NIcKols 
Clarence Roblson 

P.E. FOR MEN 
Dave Cro«rton 
Fred Diion 
Wayne Soffe 



P.E. FOR WOMEN 
Cynthia Hirst 
Phyllis C. Jacobson 
Shirlene Oswald 



Diane R. Chatwin 
JoAnn Calderwood 
Lulu Wallace 

RECREATION 
Alms Healon 
Jay J. Naylor 



)UTDOOR SPORTS ■ 
teal and brick. 







f^ 



If 




>.C: 




HOURS OF PRACTICE enable gymnasts to perform in perfect balance and timing. 



being enjoyed under this new eipanse of 





TRAINER ROD KIMBALL uses latest equipment to determine the physical 
condition of athletes. 



SKILL IN BALANCING is demonsrated by Sharon L 




Y SQUARES 



The "Y Squares, " affiliated with both the national and 
state organizations of square dancers, were very fortunate 
to have Earl A. Beck, Vice-President of the Utah organiza- 
tion, as their caller. As they practiced both round dances 
and square dances, they developed the ability to dance 
with confidence to any caller in the nation, and some 



members had the opportunity to dance to the best callers 
in the country at the National Jamboree. This year for 
the first time the group participated in shows with the 
Program Bureau. Officers for the year were Jack Nelson, 
President; Dolores Beutler, Vice-President; and Myrtle 
Bonip, Secretary. Israel Heaton was the sponsor. 



Row One: Louise Cox, Darlene Blanlis, Helen Heaps, Ann Edwards. Kay Croclrett. LuDene Brown 
Becl< Earl A Beck. Jan Bybee. Edith Rains, Mary Sheffer. Row Three: Claudia Miller, Martha 
Darryl Huskey Daryl Teeple, Ernest Keller, Marty Thome, Dean LeWett. Ronden Cannon. Gent 
Five: Jack Nelson, Dolores Beutler, Allen Budge, Larry E. Harmon, Max G. Berthelson, Gale Lam 
Pope, Dennis Lunt, Gerald Lunceford, 



iw Two: Pamela Tippets, Shila Bodley, llene 
ers. Row Four: Myrtle Borup, Pat McNeill, 
ha Steele, Frieda Kunlap. Ellen Alger. Row 
wiett, Monte Mentry. Gordon Spotten, Wiley 




FOLK DANCERS 



Students with an ability to dance well and in interest 
in folk dance and folk lore were members of the 
BYU International Folk Dancers. With L. DeWayne 
Young as director and Mary B. Jensen as sponsor, 
the group traveled to the San Francisco area, Mon- 
tana, Idaho, Wyoming, and throughout the central 
Utah area captivating audiences wherever they went. 
They were enthusiastically received for their knowl- 
edge, spirit, and skill in presenting programs for 
churches, school assemblies, special club and civic 
events, and halftimes of the BYU basketball games. 
The group dances included those from all European 
countries, the Americas, the near East, and some of 
the islands of the sea. The BYU International Folk 
Dancers were members of the Folk Dance Federation 
of California, and winners of the Program Bureau 
Jane Thompson trophy for two years. 




L. OgWatne Young, D< 



VIVACIOUS FOLK DANCERS presented e special studenf assembly. 





Oorny, De Anne 
Dotson, Larry 
Ouffin. Luann 



Ingham. Vernon 

Hanien. Noreen 

Elmer. Roy 




Canister, Linda 

Carpenter, DaHene 

Croft, e«ei,n 



Greenwood. St.,r 




ORCHESIS 



Sponsored by Deane Chatwin and Shirleen Oswald, 
the BYU Orchesis was affiliated with the Physical 
Education department. This dance group of talented 
students was led by officers Lynne Palmer, Presi- 
dent; Mary Jo Ellis, Vice-President; and Jerry Brown, 
Secretary. Qualifications for membership included 
participation in at least two junior Orchesis class 
meetings, along with extensive tryouts. Activities of 
the group consisted of putting on a student assem- 
bly, "The Hunter," entering a first-place Homecom- 
ing float in the beauty division, presenting a winter 
quarter dance concert, participating in Fieldhouse 
Frolics, assisting in the presentation of the drama 
presentation of "Romeo and Juliet," and appearing 
in the BYIJ Christmas television show. Members of 
the group climaxed the year by sparking the spring 
performance of "Sand in Their Shoes." 





ORCHESIS PRESENTED Its annual conceit In Febru, 



Johnson. Shoro" Fs 





MaM 








BOB OLIPHANT 



loist in the presentation of "The Hunter. 



ORCHESIS MEMBERS danced to the old-(ashi< 
in the pari. 






f 



DAVID H. YARN, De 



Based on the belief that no life is full and complete 
unless it is established upon a sound religious and 
ethical basis, BYU has offered courses in religion 
since the establishment of the university. One of the 
primary objectives of the College of Religious In- 
struction is to help students develop spiritually as 
well as intellectually and professionally, and thereby 
to enable them to live more rounded and complete 
lives with religious knowledge properly integrated 
with secular learning. The doctrines, organization, 
and history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints comprise the largest portion of study. In 
addition, courses in comparative religions, philoso- 
phy, and Biblical languages are also included. In 
these varied programs, students are able to gain the 
knowledge required for study of the Gospel. 



COLLEGE OF RELIGION 






TRUMAN G. MADSEN 
History and Philosophy 
of Religion 

SIDNEY B. SPERRY 
Biblical Languages 



B. WEST BELNAP 
Religious Educatioi 



G. BYRON DONE 
Theolqy. Church Organlzatit 
and Administration 



DANIEL H. LUDLOVi^ 

Bible and Modern Scripfur( 









i 



VISUAL AIDS help students to 
further understand their destiny. 



1 



BIBLE AND MODERN SCBIPTURE 
Leland Anderson 
H. H. Barron 
Anthony Bentley 
J. II. Clark 



Hyrunn Andrus 
Roy Dovey 
H. A. FItiqerald 
Eldin Okks 



LDS THEOLOGY, CHURCH 
ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Reed Bankhead 

Glenn Peanon 



J. Orval Elliworlh 

HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY 
OF RELIGION 

Burt Hofiley 

Ivan Berrett 

Guitave Larten 



Ruisall Rich 
Chauncey Riddle 
Lewis Max Rogert 




DOCUMENTARY RESEARCH and st.dy give itudenh a greater InMoht Into their 
betnq. ^ 





STEWART GROW, De 



As an aid to further improvement and another step 
toward fulfilling the destiny of men and their world, 
the Graduate School offers the opportunity for scho- 
larly development at the highest and finest levels. 
The maturing of scholarship and the opportunity to 
participate in the expansion of the boundaries of 
knowledge are thrilling challenges to alert minds. 
The Graduate School aims to develop the power 
within individuals to do independent work and to 
encourage the spirit of research and discovery. Re- 
search and library facilities and teaching faculty are 
constantly being expanded and improved to provide 
better opportunities to the graduate student. There 
is a steady expansion in the number of areas offer- 
ing work leading to the master's and doctor's de- 
gree, and with an ever-increasing number of graduate 
students, the future should see even greater growth. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



DR. REED BRADFORD AND DR. JACK TRUNNELL are worUng !n research in the affects of alcoholis 





OR. DAVID DONALDSON'S obiectlve In his research project is to work toward conquering 



DR. D ELDEN BECK and 

interesting research prcjec 



observing the effects of lids in a most 



IN THE GRADUATE LAB, many aclvltii 
uale students further develop their sliills. 



I coordinated to help grad- 





fi- V> 



STUDENTS 

These were the people who 

made the university a living 

thing. Students from many 

lands with a variety of 

interests, all of whom gave 

a little of themselves to the 

university as they shaped 

their future through 

learning and living. 



79 



PHI KAPPA PHI 



Elected Mey 1959 

Martha Carolyn Adam 
Barbara Sloan Allen 
Carol Anderson 
Ver Don W. Ballantyne 
Glenna Cooper Boyce 
Clilta Bricjht 
Patricia K. Brighton 
Thomas Roghaar Burto 
Helen C. Chandler 
Jack E Clarlson 
Kenneth Stanley Cook 
Duane S. Crowther 
Suianne N. Crowther 
Teddy Joe Crowther 
Norma Dale Draughn 
Sheldon T. Dahl 



Re« Edwin I 
Ma>ine Lev. 
R.chard G. 
Clifford K. 
William Ed. 
Marilyn F. I 
Eldon Arnol 



■aid B. Robinson 
irles Buckley Ros< 
ne Sabin 
sph Grant Stever 
yard E. Sandbar, 
an Olsen Slmmoi 
lard B. Stratton 



Lloyd Pendleton Tay; 
Max LeRov Waters 
Paul J. Watt. 



: All 



Duffin 

I Fullr 

d Ga 

M. Geis 

Goodsel 



Sanna Lee Reading 
Christie Redford 
Janet Joyce Rigby 



illord Bruce Hilton 
lia Patricia Halgren 
innie Jilene Hogan 



Donald James Ken 
Lyn Griffith Klmba 
Robert Arland Lari 



Elected May 1960 

Alan R. Anderson 
Lynn Reese Anderson 



William Jorgen' 
e S. Kanahele 
Bergen Kanahe 



Sarba 
Dayld 
Walte 



Webb 
Allen Howard Weyer 
Joyce Wlltbank 
Peggy Annette Wolford 
Carol Lynn Wright 
Colin Wright 




Chris Allred, Lou Von D. 



Judith L. Mllle 
Wilde. Suianne 



berg, Do 



Allred, Janet Willli 



yileen Sundberg. Marsali McAllister, Kathy Fagg, Kathryn Tate, Arlene Wir 
Allen, Carole Eitel. LaNae Hirschi, Judy Johnson, Charlotte T. Easter, Linda Pope. A 
,er, Kay Crockett, Renee Norton. Row Three: Barbara Savage. Carol Criddle. Bonnie L 
s. Joy K. Wilmoth. Rita M. Benson. Sharon Ockey. 5yd Dyal, Marlene Monson. Patrit 



ler. Shirley Greene, Patricia 
/ Lee Valentine. Barbara Brown, 
Rodgers, Loree Baker. Kathlee 
Pierson. Mary Ellen Edmunds. 



ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 



The Brigham Young University chapter of Alpha Lambda 
Delta, national women's honorary, was composed of soph- 
omore girls who achieved a 3.5 accumulative grade point 
average for two or more quarters of their freshman yeac 
Through their tutoring program and meetings featuring 



outstanding speakers, the group encouraged high scholas- 
tic achievement among the women of BYU. Officers of 
the group were Kathy Fagg, President; Kathy Tate, Vice- 
President; Arlene Wimmer, Secretary; and Qiris Allred, 
Social Chairman. Miss Cleo McCracken served as sponsor. 




David N. WfigM, Pr( 




MEMBERS AND GUESTS had an after 
Nicholos. 



special speaker Honr. 



PHI ETA SIGMA 

"Knowledge is Power" was the motto of Phi Eta 
Sigma, national honorary fraternity for sophomore 
men. Membership was contingent upon the main 
tenance of a }.^ or better grade-point average durmg 
the students' first two or three quarters at BYU. 
The members of the fraternity strived to promote 
spiritual development as well as high scholastic at- 



tainment among the freshmen men at the univer- 
sity. During the year the members enjoyed many in- 
spiring guest speakers at their meetings. A special 
feature of the group was their tutoring program 
designed to help students who desired help in order 
to raise their scolastic standing. Serving as officers of 
the fraternity were David N. Wright, President; 
Maury Cowley, Vice-President; Chad C. Wright, 
Secretary; and Doug Morrison, Treasurer, Dr. J. 
LaVar Bateman was sponsor of the group. 



Aaron, Gerald T. 

Allen. Charles 

Barber. Dave 

Barber, liussell B 

Chambers. Johr\ 



LaVar J, (Advisorl 

:hristensen, Anthony 

Cowley. Maury 




Q tr i:^. Q 









Whitaker. Sheldon 

wnilams David G, 

Wright. Chad C. 








ANDERSON ALAN 
Personnel and Gu.dan 


R. 


ANDERSON. LOREN 
Phys 


R, 


\NDERSON. 
Orqa 


RICHARD 

nlc Chemis 


C. 


ANDERSON. 


WARREN 


B. 



BERGE. ILDA 

Personnel and Guidance 

BERGE. JOHN S. 

BERGE. C. WILLIAM 

Geology 

6ETHS0LD. ELEANOR 

Chemistry 

.CKHAM, E. pONNELL 

BODILY, DAVID 



BORG. ROBERT L. 

BRAMWELL. E. CRAIG 

Semitic Languages 

GRIGHT. DONALD E. 

Entomology 

BRUNDAGE. JOE 

ice. Chemistry Education 

BURTON THOMAS R. 

English 

CARD. ROBERT 0. 

Personnel and Guidance 

CHIEN. PHILIP 

Mechanical Engineering 

CHIU, RICHARD H. 

Civil Engineering 

CLARK. GAYLAN C. 

Recreation 

CLINGER, THELYS K. 

Education 

DJAHA NBANI, REZA 

Business Management 

DAHL. SHELDON T. 



Adrr 



istratic 



DOXEY. SAMUEL G. 

DUTT, REVA 

EDWARDS. CLYDE C. 

Botany 

ERDMAN, KIMBALL 

Botany 

ERICKSON. MAYNARO 

FAWCETT, IRENE 
Secondary Education 

FISHER. M. SCOTT 

Personnel and Guidance 

FORSYTH. WARD R. 

Geography 

GILES. MARLENE 

Education 

GOOD. DANNY 

German 

HALL. CHARLES 

French 

HAMELWRISHT. GALE C 



echan 






HANSEN. LOUISE B. 

Art 

HANSEN WAYNE ROBERT 

Business Management 

HANSEN. UWE J. 

Physics 

\RRISON. BEHY D. 



Educ 



HART. DARRELL H. 

HDFR 

HARVEY. KENNETH 



F^ 





GRADUATE SCHOOL 




HATCH. ROBERT 0. 

SDcech 

HENRETTTf, THOMAS A. 

Educslional Admlnislritioi 

HENRY. JOHAN N. 

HIslor-Y 

HEUOIER, JEAN PIERRE 

HIATT. CALVIN C. 
Physical Education 
ILLIER. DAVIO 6. 



Spei 



Ph^ 



ODGKINSON, KENNETH ALLREO 
eoloqy 
LTON, 8RUCE W. 

OSSEIN^ NOORI 



Political icien. 
HOWELL GLAOE F, 

JENKINS, MARVIN L 



Uuii 



Educ 



JOHNSON. DON F. 
Psychology 
JOHNSON, ROBERT L. 

JONES, LEE 
American Literature 
KARAMICHALIS. NICK 

KANAHELE, GEORGE S. 
Political Science 

HBER, RICHARD D. 



Phyi 



Edu 



KLEIN. SIGRID 

KOTHARI. VIPIN 
Chemistry 
LAUB. DALE J. 
Political Science 
LINDER. BILL 

LE BARON. BRYCE 
Music Education 

MARKLAND. THOMAS R, 

Geology 

MATHEWS. ROBERT J. 

Zoology 

MATSUKI, DORIS YOSHIKO 

Psychology 

NIELSEN, HARRY STEWART 

Botany 

NOAKES, SANDRA D, 

Physical Education 

NOORI. HOSSEIN 

Political Science 

NUTTALL. CAROL V. 

OISHI, TOSHIO 
Political Science 
OWENS, LYNN J, 
Psychology 
PARK, DENNIS 
Chemical Engineering 
PASKEn, RAY E. 
Psychology 
PACK, ELBERT C. 



PECK. H, THOMAS JR. 

French 

PINCKNEY. GEORGE 

Physical Education 

PASKEn, RAY E. 

Psychology 

PARIS. CHARLES 

Chemical Engineering 



REVIER. PALMER E. 

Chemistry 

REEVES. KAY 

HDFR 

SCOTT, DAVID R. 

Sociology 

SHARP. SAY 

Ed< 

SHAH, SHASHI KANT 



SIIALAHI. SAING 
Political Science 
SMITH, DAR L. 



STONES. FRANCES A, 

Speech Therapy 

STONES, ROBERT C. 



STOTT. GARY R 



TAYLOR, JAMES D. 

Chemical Engineering 

TAYLOR, JAMES S 

Spanish 

TAYLOR, LEROY C. 

Pre. Medicine 

THAKKAR. C M 

Business Administration 

TOLMAN. DAVID 

Mathematics 

THOMAS, GORDON 

English 

TRENT. DENNIS W. 

Entomology. Bacteriology 

TURNER, GEORGE 

Political Science 

TYLER, DELL R. 

il and Engineering Science 

WARING, C. JOSEPH 

WEST, ROBERT D. 

Educational Administration 

WARSITO 

Political Science 

WILLIAMS, HAROLD O 

Journalism 

ZOLLINGER, ELMA 

t.onal Research and Service 

ADAMS, KENNETH 

German 

AUGASON, GORDON C 

Physics 

BLACK, BARBARA M. 

Elementary Education 

BROWN, ELBERT E. 



BUSATH, GERALDINE ROMNEY 

HDFR 

BUTTERFIELD OUE V 

History 

CHOW, PEARL 

Educational Administration 

CHRISTENSEN, HERBERT E 

Physics 

CLARKE, CARENE 

Speech and Drama 

CHRISTIAN, KARL 

Educational Administration 

CONWAY. THOMAS L. 

Political Science 

COOK. IVAN B. 

HDFR 

COWLEY. KEN 

French 

DAVIS, EMMA LOU 

Elementary Education 

FINCH JAMES 




Physir 



P <-> % (^ p p 




mk^ 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 




SROSCOST, C. KENNETH 

Ptvchologv 
HAM, WAYNE 
French 
HAMSON, ROBERT 

Ptiviics 

HARRIS. HOWARD M. 
Educational Administration 
HARRIS LLOVDA 

HOWARD, BLAINE N. 
Physics 

HSIA, HOWER 

Journalism 

HSU, TSIN SHENG 

Business Managamtnl 

HU, SHU HSIEN 

Food and Nufrllion 

JENSEN V. LA MARR 

Elementary Education 

KIRKHAM, DAN R. 

Pre-medlclne 

KING, ELTON A. 



KOH, YOUNG OAK 
Animal Husbandry 
KOOK, YUNG GILL 



MERRILL, RONALD B. 

MERRILL, WAYNE 
Accounting 
MOLLAZAL, YAZDAN 

MOSS, RULON 

Psychology 

NARAIN, MAHESH 

General 

MURRI, WILLIAM J. 

Physics 

NILSSON. BRUCE 

Education 

OGDEN, DE VON 

Educational Administration 

PETERSON, KENNETH 0, 

English 

POPE, ALBERT W. 

Mathematics 

REBER, CLARK L. 

Educational Administration 

STEPHENSON, DON RAY 



STEVENSON, J, GRANT 

Hlilory and Philosophy 
SWENSON LE ROY 

STONE. DODDIE J. 

Personnel and Guidance 
TAGHAVI MANIJEH 
Zoology 
THOMPSON. JOANNE 



TOBING, DARWIN HALIM 

Health Education 

VAN DYKE, DERRAH WAYNE 

History 

V/ELLS, JOANNE 

WIDDISON. HAROLD A. 

Business 

WILSON, WILLIAM R. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



85 



BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES 



ANDRUS, KENNETH 

Animal Husbandry 

ALLRED. MERLYN W. 

Zoology 

ANDERSEN, LEE G. 



STEEL, JAMES M 
LLEN, JOSEPH HIUTO 



BARLOW, LYNN B 



BEUS, DANIEL S 
Agricultural Economic; 
BOWMAN, JOHN C 



BURKE, WILLIAM H 

Pre-Medicini 

BURT, MERRILL C 







DEW, DONALD C. 

Zoology 

EDWARDS, CHARLES 



ELLSWORTH, BARBARA 



ERIKSEN. ERIK 

Zoology 

FARNSWORTH. KARL 

Animal Husbandry 
FINDLAY, LYNN F. 

FRENCH, RUSSELL 

Animal Husbandry 

FROST, RONALD N. 

Zoology 

FULLMER, MARK ALLEN 

Pre-Medicine 

FUNK. SHERYL P. 

Agricultural Economics 

GARRETT, MARK 

Botany 

GIST. CLAYTON S. 

Zoology 

GOATBS. MORRIS A. 

Zoology 

HALE. BOYD J. 

Zoology 

HALL, GLADE A. 

Zoology 

HALLOCK, GEORGE 

Animal Husbandry 

HANNA. MARIAN 

Botany 

HANSEN, W. 8RYCE 

Zoology 

HATCH, IRA WALLACE 

Animal Husbandry 

HEWEn. DAVID ERNEST 

Botany 

HAYES REX 8. 

Animil Husbandry 

HUSE MARY ELAINE 

JENSEN, NEIL EVART 

Botany 

JOHNSON HYRUM B. 

Botany 

JONES, LA VAUGHN 

Agronomy 

JORGENSEN, MYRON NELS, JR. 

SHUMWAY LEWIS KAY 
Botany 




^l£.^ 2 






K'R^ 




86 



SENIORS 



LAKSON, DONAIO S. 

Zoology 

LEHR, WAllY (. 



R5HALL, MEIVIN K. 
^ui'urdl Economics 
iON. LEON 




ONI W 
Animal Huibandf, 
THOHNION, HA80LD RICHARD 
Zoology 

STEWART, DAVE 
Bacteriology 

STEVENSON, WILIFREO R, 
Biological Science 
VINCENT, ALAN 

WARNER, DERREL C. 



ATKINSON. LAURA STRICKLEN 

Accouolinq 

ATWOqO, JAY 

R. DE 



SENIORS 



87 



BARRUS, NOLA 

BeOM 

BARLOW, GLENN B 

BEACH. JERRY A 
Marketing 
BECK, MARIAN 



6L-ANCO, MARLO A. 

Marketing 

BOBnoCHER DOROTHY 



BOND, HAL D, 

BOSWORTH, RICHARD 

BRACKNER, SAYLE LINTON 



g!?^ 




CARR, PAUL B, 

Industrial Management 

CHATHAM, BEHY JEAN 



CHRISTENSEN, DONALD H. 
CHRISTENSEN. W GORDON 



CHRISTENSEN, MERRITT 
CLEMENT. CARROLL GENE 



CONDIE, REED GLENN 
Economics 
COOK, SHIRLEY 



COX, 



EdU' 
BRUCE 

CRANDALL, ROBERT W. 

Accounting 

CROCKETT. WILLIAM C. 

Industrial Management 

DAVIS, JACK L. 

Business Education 



DAWSON, RAY H. 

Industrial Management 

DEMAREE, RONALD K 

Accountlna 

DEPUTY, RUSSELL 1.1 

Industrial Managemen. 

DONALDSON, ROBERT M 

Industrial Management 

DUNFORD, HAROLD G. 

Industrial Management 

DOTSON. GLORIA 

Business Educ< 




A^dM, 




SENIORS 



ELLIS, DAVIO 




SENIORS 



89 



JOHNSON, NOLAN L. 

JARVIS. DAVID L. 

Business Man,igement 

JOHNSON, RALEIGH 

Accounting 

JOLLEr. CARL H. 

JOLLEY, JANEEN 

E.ecutive Secretary 

KELLEn, KAY 

Business Education 

KELSEY, DWISHT L, 

Business Management 

KIM, Jl YOON 

Business 

KNIGHT. RICHARD E, 

KOENIG, GERALD C, 

LADLE, MARY ELLEN 
Business Education 



LEONARD, SONJA 

Business Education 

LLOYD, GARY M 

Business Management 

LOVE. DIANE 

Business Education 

LYON, KENNETH 

Business Management 

LYON, PATRICIA 

Business Education 

MARTINDALE, LARRY 

MANN, RONALD M. 

MACKEY. E. JEAN 

Accounting 

McCRACKEN. LAWRENCE p. 

MAnHEWS, DIXIE 



Edu( 



Indu: 



MAUGHAN. 6ERKLEE A, 

Accounting 

MAHHEWS. ELMO G. 

Finance and Banling 

MAY. JAMES 

Business Management 

MATIS. FRED 

Business Management 

McDANIEL. LLOYD S. 

Marketing 

McDonald, jerry 

Accounting 

MILLINER. JOHN T. 

Business Management 

cPHEE. MARTIN WORTHLEY 

MENDENHALL. KAY 

Business Education 

MICHIE. REX 

MICKELSEN. MARGENE 

Business Education 

MOHLER. ELDON A. 

Accounting 

MORRELL. DAVID N, 

MORGAN. SCOTT K. 

Industrial Management 

MORSE. WILLIAM M. 

Business 

NIELSON. FERREL DAN 

Accounting 

NIELSON. MYRNA 




jIPP H 




f^nW^y c^i 



Offic 



anage 




SENIORS 





^x^ 





OVESON. MARY 

Businets Education 
OLSON, LAWRENCE 
Sui.ness Mjnjocment 
PACK, LORNA C. 
Buscneii EJucatlon 
PARKER, DONALO B. 
Marketing 
PECK, HAYDEN 



PETTIT. EDWIN E. 
Accounting 
PEniNGILL, TED H. 
Business l^anogemenl 
PETERSON, KENNEH 0. 
Economics 
PINEGAR, DALE 

POTTS, LAURENCE R. 

Accounting 

POWELL, ALDA MAE 



PRAn, GLENN A. 

PRAn, WAYNE 

REDD. CHERRY 
Office Management 
REED, H, NOLAN 
Business Education 
REED, JACK 
Economics 
REHM, ROBERT 
Industrial Management 

ROBINS, LARRY M. 
Business Management 
RICHARDS, M. LOVELL 
Business Administration 
ROBISON, M. LAVOY 

RUDD, MERRILL W. 
Accounting 
SALAZAR. LILLIE 
Business 

SABIN, ELAINE 
Business Education 

SHAWCROFT, EMMA RAE 
Business Education 
SCHNEYOER. LESLIE M. 
Accounting 

SCHOFIELD. ALLEN C. 
Business Management 
SHIELDS, WILLIAM G. 
Accounting 
SHUMWAY, MILES 

SHURTLIFF. JOAN 
Business Education 

SNOW, SHELDON 

Business Administration 

SINGER, HAROLD E. 

Accounting 

SNYDER, DARRYL 

Accounting 

SOLUM, DARRELL R. 

Marketing 

SOPER, WILLIAM R. 

Business Management 

SPENCER, JANET 

Business Education 

ST CLAIR, STEPHEN 
Accounting 
SPENCER, RICHARD 
Industrial Management 
SPILKER, RAYMOND 
Business Education 
STEWART. JAMES D. 



Indu' 



anage. 



STONE, DAVIO JOHN 
Marketing 

STONELY J DANIEL 
Industrial Management 



SENIORS 



TOLMAN SH 

Ofllce Mona. 

JAMS. SA 




ADAMS 

Eltmentar, 


SHARON 
Education 


AFFLECK 

Elementary 


SUELLEN 

Education 


AINA, M 


ILORED L, 
Education 


ALLISO^ 
Elementary 


, DON S. 

Education 


ANDERSON, B 


LAINE W 

Education 


ANDERSON 

Elementary 


BRITA R 
Education 


ANDERSON 
Elementary 


CAROLE 
Education 


ANDERSON, CAROLE M 

Elementary Education 


ANDERSON. CH 
Elementary 


KRLOTI E 

Education 


ANDERSON 
Elementary 


CONNIE 

Education 


ANDRUS, ROSE MARY 
Elementary Education 


KTKINSON. Afro 

Elementary 


N OAVIES 
Education 


ATKINSO 
Elementary 


M SALLIE 
Education 


6AIRD 


GARETH 



SENIORS 



92 














1^ ft f^ '^ 



.tJ 




REV, BALDWIN 
Secondjr, Education 
BELUSTON, SPENCER 
Ekmcf-Ur, Educolion 
BENNETT, MARY JO 
Ekmenlar, Educalion 
SENNEn, SYLVIA 
Elementary Education 
8ERGESON, DEAN P. 
Secondary Education 
BERG. SYLVIA M 
Education 

BEUTLER. DELORES E 

Elementary Education 
BLASER. ROLAND P. 
Secondary Instruction 
60ICE, CHARLES 
Elementary Education 
BRADSHAW BRENDA 
Elementary Education 
BRADSHAW, SANDRA 
Elementary Education 
BRAMWELL, BARBARA 
Elementary Education 

BRIGGS. CAROL M, 
Elementary Education 
BRIM, LA VERN 
Secondary Education 
BROWN, VADA MAURINE 
Elementary Education 
BUCHANAN, ALICE JOYCE 
Elementary Education 
BUCHANAN, JULYNNE 
Elementary Education 
BUSHMAN. CAROLYN MAE 
Elementary Education 

BUTLER. BEHY 
Elementary Education 
aUTHCHER, CATHERINE 
Elementary Education 
BUTLER, DOROTHY 
Elementary Education 
BYRD, JESSE F. 
Education 

CARLETON. MARIAN 
Elementary Education 
CALL, DIANA 



Ele 



Edu. 



CASTELLO. JANICE G. 
Elementary Education 
CARTER, DON 
Elementary Education 
CHARLTON, LARRY H, 
Elementary Education 
CHRISTENSEN. THOMAS L. 
Elementary Education 
CHRISTISON, BARBARA 
Elementary Education 
CHRISTIANSON, MARGIT 



Ele 



Educi 



CARPENTER, CORENE 
Elementary Education 
CLARK, NANCY KAREN 
Elementary Education 
COHLER. MARGARET 
Elementary Education 
CONNELL, WESELY 
Elementary Education 
COWLEY. ELAINE 
Elementary Education 
COX, BOYD R. 



Elei 



Educi 



COX BRYANT L 
Elementary Education 
CRANE, GERRI A. 

Elementor, Education 
CHANDALL, LENORE 



Elerr 



Edu. 



CRANMER FRED F, 
Secondary Education 
CRAWFORD, SHIRLEY 
Elementary Education 
CROOK, MARGARET 



SENIORS 



93 



CROWTHER. MARIANA 

Elementarv Education 

CUNDICK, MARGARET 

Elementary Education 
DALLIN. DARLA 
Elemenlar, Education 
DARLEV, LUCILLE 
Elementary Education 
DECKER, KATHLEEN 



DEVENPORT, EUGENE C. 

Education 

DILKS, CAROLYN 

Elementary Education 

DOWNING. GEORGE JAY 

Secondary Education 

DUNKLEY. MELVIN E., JR. 

Instruction 

EDWARDS. LUWANA 

Elementary Education 

ELDER. FERN ARLENE 

Elemental 

ENGLAND. ROSALIE SLADE 

Elementary Education 

ERICKSON KAREN 

Elementary Education 

EVANS. CAROLYN KELLY 

Elementary Education 

EVANS. DONNA 

Elementary Education 

EVENSON MERRILYN 

Elementary Education 

EVANS. SONDRA 



Ele 



enta 



FARNSWORTH. BARBARA M 

Elementary Educatlor 

FARNSWORTH 

Seconda 

FARNSWORTH. SUE L. 

Elementary Education 

FINDLAY. GAIL F. 

Elementary Education 

FOUNTAIN. BARBARA 

Elementary Education 

FORTUNG. EUGENE 

Marketing 

FOX. LAURA 

Elementary Education 

FREDERICK. LA DONNA 

Elementary Education 

FRITZ SCHE, MARY 

Elementary Education 

FUCHIGAI 



Ele 



GAB8ITAS. ROBERT S 

Secondary Education 

GAPPMAYER RICHARD 

Secondary Education 



GARLICK. GAYLEEN 

Elementary Education 

GARDNER. MATTIE JEAN 

Elementary Education 

GENTRY RAYMOND 

Elementary Education 

GIBBS SONYA 

Business Education 

GODFREY. DEO 

Elementary Educatio 

GILES. IV 
Secondary Education 

GOWARS. LAVONA 
Elementary Education 
GRAY. SHIRLEY ANN 



Ele 



GREENE CHLOE ANN 
Elementary Education 
GROVER. JUDITH K. 
Elementary Education 
GURNEY VIRGINIA 
Elementary Education 
HALL. FRANKIE 
Elementary Edu. 




Ed I 



Edu. 



SENIORS 








^>^^ 



(^ r> ^j 




HARDING. GLEN J. 
Seconddrv Education 
HARGER. SHERRY 
Elementarv Education 
HARMER. IrfARVIN BUSS 
Secondary Education 
HARRISON. EVAN DALE 
Elemanlarv Education 
HENDERSON, CECIL 



HENRIE, LYMAN 



HERRICK. BETTY JO 
ilementary Education 
HERRON. BARBARA 



Ele 



Edu< 



HICKMAN. SHERI K. 
Elementary Education 
HILBERT. ANNEHE 
Elementary Education 
HINT2E. ROBERTA 
Elementary Education 

HOLLINGER, LORNA 
Elementary Education 
HOLMES, MARIAN K. 
Elementary Education 
HOLT, RONALD W. 
Secondary Education 
HUNT. DOROTHY PIERCE 
Elementary Education 
HUMPHRIES^ BARBARA L. 
Elementary Education 
HOWLEn, MARY 
Elementary Education 

HUNT. SHIRLEY 
Elementary Education 
INGERSOL. CAROL LEE 
Elementary Education 
JAMES, CAROL 
Elementary Education 
JENSEN, AnON 
Elementary Education 
JENSEN. BARBARA 
Education 
JENSEN. GWEN 



JOHNSON. DON L, 
Elementary Education 
JENSON. JOANNA 
Elementary Education 
JOHNSON. JENEEN 
Elementary Education 
JOHNSON YVONNE B. 
Elementary Education 
JONES, MARY GAIL 
Elementary Education 
JONES, MARY ANN 



JORGENSENj LEONA WRIGHT 

Elementary Education 
JUDD GALE 
Elementary Education 
JUDD, MARIBA 
Elementary Education 
KEKAULA, MARY K. 
Elementary Education 
KELLY, NANCY 



KOJIMA. GEORGE 
Elementary Educatior 
KONOO. MIRIAM E. 



KUHN DIANE 
Elemenlarv Education 
LARSON. DOREEN 
Elementary Education 
LARSON, RAYMOND KEITH 
Secondary Education 
LAWRENCE, TRENA 
Elementary Education 



SENIORS 



95 



LEBARON. NORMAN G. 

Elementary Education 

LEE, ZEHA 

Elementary Education 

LEWIS, GLENNA GAY 

Elementary Education 

LOESCH. JANICE 

Elementary Education 

LOESCH, JOSEPH F, 

Secondary Education 

LOO, CLARA L. 



LUND, MARION 

Elementary Education 

LYI.tAN, JOYCE 

Elementary Education 

MACMILLAN, JOYCE 

Elementary Education 

MARCHANT. FRED 

Secondary Education 

MARCYES. DONALD D. 

Elementary Education 

MARTIN, DIANA M. 

Elementary Education 



McBRIDE, CAROL ANN 

Elementary Education 

MARWEDE, PAT 

Elementary Education 

MclNTOSH. FLORENCE F 

Secondary Education 

MEANS, JO ANN 

Elementary Education 

MERRELL. CHYRL JANICE 

Elementary Education 

MERRILL. MARLENE 



Ele 



intary Edu( 



MERRILL, PRESTON M. 

Secondary Education 

MILNE, BRENT L. 

Elementary Education 

MONTIERTH, MYRNA 

Elementary Education 

MOSER. CALVIN JOY 

Secondary Education 

MORRIS. EPHRAIM 



MULHERN, ARLEENE 

Elementary Education 

MOSS, DENNIS D. 

Secondary Education 

MYLER, CHARLES F.. JR. 

Secondary Education 

NAHULU, ELI KAUI 

Elementary Education 

NAHULU, VERNA MAE 

Elementary Education 

NEAL. ALICE 

Elementary Education 

NELSON. GLEN B. 

Education 

NEWMAN. PEGGY 

Elementary Education 

NIELSON. MARCHENE 

Elementary Education 

NIELSON. OTTO ELDON 

Elementary Education 

NIMS. JAN 

Elementary Education 

NORDGREN. SHIRLEY 



Ele 



Edu 



NUNES. PEARL ANN 

Elementary Education 

OKELBERRY. JACK 

Elementary Education 

OLSON, JANET MARIE 

Elementary Education 

ORMISTON LOREHA JEAN 

Elementary Education 

OYLER, GEORGE E. 

Secondary Education 

PALMER. JEAN 




Ele 



Educ, 







SENIORS 




El"^ ^ i 



u. ^\ 





:>r' 9 



B^liM 






i >-:^ r 





NORTHROP. SHERINA 

Elementary Education 
WETCALF. MAVIS 

Elemenlarv Education 
'ARKIN, COLLEEN 
Elementarv Education 
"ERKINS. MARGO 
Eiemenlarv Education 
»EARSON, ADELE 
Elementary Educat.on 
PARSONS, SHARON 



PERKINS. RAYt.(ON0 C 



PETERSON, ALMA KENT 



PETERSON. MYRNA 



PRICE. DIXINA 



PHILLIPS, GEORGE S. 
Secondary Education 
PETERSON, STANLEY A. 



PORTER, JANET H, 



PORTER, PATRICIA E. 



POTTER. RIKI JO 



REID, CAROLYN 
Education 
REEVE, NAOMI 



PULLMAN, CHARLES DEB 



REID, THELMA ANN 
Elementary Education 
RENCHER. LUREEN 



RIGBY, JANET 
Elementary Educatit 
RIGBY, STERLING 



ROSS, WILLMIA HELEN 

Elementary Education 
ROBINSON. ELAINE 



ROCKWOOD. ELEANOR 
Elementary Education 
ROE. W. EARL 



ROWAN. LINDA 
Elementary Educat 
ROWLEY. KENT 



RUTLEOGE. CHERYL 



RUTHERFORD PEGGY 
Elementary Education 
RYDALCH. DELLA JEAN 



SANDERSON. HELEN 



SAWYER. JOHN 

Elementary Education 
SCHOONOVER. ELDA 
Elementary Education 
scon. DEAN 



SIMMONS ANITA 
Eiementar, Education 
SIMMONS. BEVERLY 



SENIORS 



SMITH. CHARLENE 

ondary Education 

SMITH. CAROL A. 



STARLIN. JOAN ELIZABETl 




SENIORS 



FAMILY LIVING 




TEL'^ 




.«'"* 



r 



^ WMSB 



}^^9M%^ 





itfUi 



ADAMS. GAYLA 

HOFR 

*\l";<sON RACHEL 

, J Te.l,l«> 
;A, , ADRIENNE 

BAKER, CARMA JANE 

Homemakini) Education 

8AUMSARTNER. COLLEEN 

HOFR 

BARKER, BARBARA RUTH 

HDFR 

BELL, DIANA M. 

HOFli 

SELL, OONNA R. 

Family Living General 

BINGHAM, JOANN 

Homemakinq Education 

BIRCH J, NEIL 

HQFR 

BJORK. KAY 

HDFR 

BOEL, ANNE 



CALOER, ALLENE 
Homemaklnq Education 
BOWEN, EVELYN 
Homomaling Education 
CALDER, COLLEEN 
Homemakinq Education 
CALDER, SUZANNE 
Homamakmq Education 
CARTER, LILA JEAN 
HDFR 

CLARIDGE, W, FRED 
Housing & Design 

CLARK, COLEHE 
Family Living General 
CROWTHER, SUZANNE N, 
Foods & Nutrition 
FULLER, M, LOUEEN 
Homemakinq Education 
GARDNER, PEGGY JANE 
Foods & Nutrition 
GEISLER, PATRICIA 
HDFR 
CLARKE, NANCY ANN 



CLEMENTS, LEIA 

Homemok.nq Education 

EVANS, MARVA 

HDFR 

FERNANDEZ. CELIA R. 

HDFR 

FRANOSEN. M. LEE 

HDFR 

FROYD. MARGARET 

HDFR 

GOODSELL, JOAN 

Homemakinq Education 

GROSCOST, CATHERINE S, 

HDFR 

HALL, MARGARET 

Homemaking Education 

HADLEY. SHIRLEY ANN 

Homemakinq Education 

HEPWORTH NELLO 

Homemakinq Education 

HERRIN, NAOMI 

HDFR 

HEUDIER, SHIRLEY ANN 

Foods & Nutrition 




HILL. FERN JOY 



OFR 
JACKSON. LAREE 
Homemaking Educatlc 
JOHNSON, JOYCE 

KEARL, MARIE 

KILLPACK. AROIS G. 
Homemaking Educatlo 



SENIORS 



KIMBAI 
Foods 8 


-L, JOAN 
Nulritlon 


LENHART, 

LEWIS, 
Clothing 


BARBARA 

Education 
MAXINE 
S, Tctilss 


LUSTER. J 
Clolhmg 


UDITH C, 
S Teitlles 


LOVELES! 
CORMACK 


i, JUDITH 
Education 

;. NANCY 
Education 


MAYER, 

imcmaling 


RENEE R. 
Education 



MENZIES, RUTH T. 

rRRILL, LOUISE 

MESERVY, BARBARA 

MOESSER, DORENE 

MORGA 



MUHLESTEI 

Homemakin 

MURPHY, 



OBER, SEORG 




PETERSEN, MARY 


ELEANOR 
HDFR 


PETERSON 
Homemaking 


Edu 


!Y JO 


PRATT, MART 
Homamaking 


HA 

Edn 


RUTH 


PRICE, 


ALVIN H. 
HOFR 


PUTNAM, Al 


■JNE 


ZINK 



SENIORS 



100 



FINE ARTS 




ALSOP. HUGH H. 
ANDERSON. CHARLENE 



ANORUS. MONA A. 

ARRINGTON, ROSS L. 

BAOHAM, LEON 0. 
Music Educaf.on 

DE ANN 



BATES CORNELIA 1 
Music Educafior 
BEASLEr^ CAREEN 



CAMPBELL, ALICE 



CHRISTENSEN J, GORDON 
Speech Education 
CHRISTENSEN, GORDON V. 



COOK, RON 
CROOK, KATHLEEN 



DAVIS, KENT S. 

Soeech 

CRUM, PAUL E., JR. 

DICKEY, ROX ANNA 
Speech Educsllor. 
DREDGE, CHE8YE 
Art Education 
DRISKELL, CAROLYN 



GOSS, DONNA DE ANNE 
Speech Therapy 
HALL. CAROLYN 



HALLADAY, ANN 

HANNEMAN, LEA 

Art Education 

HARRISON, SHIRLEY DOVE 



JOHNS, CHARLEEN 
Art Education 
JOHNSON. CLAUDIA 

JOHNSON. JANICE 

JOHNSTON KATHY H 
Speech 

JONES. LOIS 
Speech Education 
EELER PHIL 



SENIORS 



101 




OAKS, HAROLD R. 

Dfama 

PACE, DEAN 

Music Education 

PATTEN, SEN 

PITTMAN, REBA SUE 

Speech Therapy 

POCOCK, NORMA 

Music Education 

POLLEI, JULIA C, 

PETERSEN. KAREN 
QUERY, RENEE 



RICH 



RICKS, NANCY 

Speech Education 

RUMMLER. ROY 

Music Education 

SCHOFIELD. JANET 6. 

SENNHAUSER, LORE LUISE 



Com 



SHU 



Edui 



ARRY 



SORENSON, CAROL 
Speech 

STONE, ono P 



Speei 



Thei 



STRINGHAM, ARNOLD 

TETREAULT, EDWARD L. 

THOMAS KAREN 

Speech Therapy 

WATKINS, PRINCE L 

WELTY. ROY E. 

Art 

YOUNG, MARILYN STARR 

WICKES, NATALIE 

Speech Education 

WOOD, JANICE 

Speech 

WORSLEY, DONALD S, 



SMOOT, ROBERT 



^tT^ 




W^ "^ 




GENERAL 



SENIORS 



102 



^rzi^ 




SANKS. (ENNIE lEE 
BOWEN MHO D 



POWDLE KOBEPIT 
Indosfijl Educalion 
CHING GERALD 



F80ELICH, DALE J. 

Induilr,jl EduCOtior, 
GRIMAUD, DONALD L. 



LAWSON, JON 
Indo.lrlal Educotion 
MANGUM. ALAN I 
Induifrial Education 

RIG8V, HAL B. 

Gencal 

SMELLIE, DON C. 



HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 




iOAMS, CONROY H. 

DAMSON. DAVID P 

KEN, RAYMOND 

LEN, LORENZO C. 

MDERSON CAROL 

condor, tdocalion 

«ED. ALICE 

SON, JOHN S. 



ANDERSON, LYNN R 
Ptychology 
ANDERSON, B. RAY 



•NDERSON STEVEN 
'■- il Science 
>^NOLD, ALVIN W. 
^-.,cKQlogy 
ASHWORTH PETE 



BADGETT, YVONNE 



BARGER DELOS R, 

BARNES LEAH P 

English 

BARRIOS, N, ARTURO . 

>.LTER E. 

BEERS BARBARA 



SENIORS 



103 



BELL. CAROL ANN 

BELNAP, JEAN BARCLAY 

BENNETT, VELDON J. 

German 

BENSON, KENT 

Psychology 

BENSON, SONJA 

BIRD. EARLE P. 
English 

BONZO, DOUGLAS G 

Political Science 

BOOTH. GORDON D. 

Spanish 

BOUCHER. HAROLD DAVID 

History Education 

BOYCE, GLENNA COOPER 

BRIGHT, CLIFTA 

BRANNEN, JAMES R. 
Political Science 



BRIMHALL, NORMAN A. 

Psychology 

BROWN, JAMES FRANK 

Political Science 

BUDGE. RAYO B. 

French 

BURNEn. PAUL M. 

CALDWELL. RAY E, 

Humanities 

BUTTERFIELO. GLENN ALMA 

Journalism 

CARDON. BARTELL W.. JR. 

Spanish 

CALLAWAY, LOWELL E. 

CARTER, CAROLYN 

CHAPMAN. JAMES EDWIN 

CHEESEMAN, WILLIAM E. 



CLARK, ENSYNE S. 



CLARK. VARRO 



CLINTON, THOMAS G. 
COFFMAN, ESTHER 



COOK. ELIZABETH ANN 



CROCKETT. DOROTHY 



Sod 



ogy 



CROUSE. MARISHA 

Spanish Education 

COUSINS, JOHN 

History 

DAVIS. JACK L 

French 

DECKER, ANITA 

Sociology 

DENNETT, KAREN 



DENSLEr, VERNON L. 

Sociology. Psychology 

DORNY, DEANNE 

English 

DOTY GEORGE E. 

Political Science 

DRAUGHN. NORMA DALE 

English 

EOGLEY. RICHARD C. 

Political Science 

DRYOEN. DAVID B. 

Political Science 





-1 f g C) 





SENIORS 




Pfep) 




EGBERT. MARGIE 
ELCIS, ROBERT W. 



ENDERS. GORDON 
Political Science 
EVANS DOUGLAS G. 



FACER. MARILYN 



FANENE, TAUVEVE 
History, Political Scler 
FARRELL. ROBERT M. 



FIRMAGE. GLORIA P. 
FJELDSTED, CAROLYN 



GAMMON. RAY E. 

Political Science 

GARDNER. STERLING E 

Political Science 

GEARY, EDWARD 

English 

GENTILE. MARGARET 

GIBB, BRUCE L 
Political Science 
GIFFORD, GARY C. 
Sociology 

GOATES. KENNETH 

German 

GOSAR, GREG 

Psychology 

GROVER, MILTON DEE 

HALGREN. PAT 
English 
HADFIELD. GARY 



HALL. BLAINE H. 
English 
HALSTEAD. LESTER 



HANSEN. DEAN 
Political Sc.ence 
HARDY. KAREL 

HARRIS. NOLA KAY 

HARRISON, JIM 



HARVEY, DUSTON 

Journalism 

HASKELL, LEO DV/ANE 

Social Studies 

HATCH, JEREMIAH 

HAWS, BEN F. 

Sociology 

HAZEN, ROBERT D. 



HIATT. JOYCE 

HILDEN, H. GORDON 

English 

HILL. HOWARD JR. 

Public Relations 

HOLLAND, BARBARA JANE 

HOI WAN, MARGARET JEAN 

Er.g, ..., 

HU^4rE8, JOHN J. 



SENIORS 



105 



IMAI, TOMIKC 

IPSEN, GEORGE 

JACKMAN. J. HARVEY 

JACKSON, MALAN R 

Political Science 

JACKSON, WILLIAM R. 



JARVIS. GEORGE K. 

JENSEN, DENNIS V. 

Sociology 

JOHNSON, MERLYN W. 

Geography 

JONES, LILLIE JULANDER 

KEY, BRYAN E. 

Sociology 

KIM, KICHUEN 



KINS, CHARLES 

Political Science 

KING, JOHN B. 

German 

KNUDSON, JAMES 

German 

LARSON, SANDER 

Political Science 

LE BARON. THERON C, 

Political Science 

LEVAR. CALLIS JEODY 



LEWIS, KAY M. 

LUCAS, tHUGH 

MACKAY, RUTH MARY 

French 

MAREn, TONIA 

MARSH, GAIL 

Psychology 

MARSHALL, CHARLES 

MASTERSON, DANIEL E, 

Psychology 

MAUZY, ROBERT L 

Political Science 

MAY. MERRILL J. 

Psychology 

MAYER, WILLARD L. 

Political Science 

MCCUE, L. DEAN 

MCDOWELL, DOUGLAS 



MCGUIRE, E, PATRICK 

Psychology 

MCKELLAR. JOHN GLEN 

English 

MCLAWS MONTE B. 

History 

MCMEEN. MARILYN 

English 

MERRELL. V. DALLAS 



MERRELL. LAWRENCE 
Sociology Education 
MERRILL. H. KENT 

MICHELSEN. STAN 

Journalism 

MILLAR. J. REED, JR. 

Political Science 

MILLINER. JUDITH 




SENIORS 




m ^ 



£ C> M 9. 




MITCHELL THEOOORE 

Psvc^ologv 

MOHRAGI. REZVANIVEH 

PiViholoqv 

MOON, TOM 

History 

MORRISON KENNETH J. 

MUROOCK, S. REED 
EnqKsh 
MUIRHEAO. ALICE 

NAKIPAJA, LEENA 
G»rmjn 
NIELSEN, DIANE 

NYBO. JUNE 

Sociology 

O BRIAN, EARL V. 

OLSON, JAMES KENT 

OKAWA, RUTH 
Education 



OLSEN. HALVOR MILLER 
G<,oqr,ph, 

LOSEN. LARRY W. 

Political Science 

OUSBYE. DON 

Piychologv 

OWLE, JOHNSON L. 

Sociology 

PARKER, JAMES 

Political Science 

PACKARD, RALPH E., JR. 

Sociology 

PETERS, JOHN 

Spanish 

PETERSON, ROBERT W, 

PONDER. KENT 

Spanish 

POTTER, RHETT F. 

PROCTOR, GARY 



I ^ci 
PUSEY. CLIVE 



RASMUSSEN, KEN 

Portuguese 

RAYMOND, BARBARA 

English 

REES, ROBERT A. 

English 

REESE, SANDRA 



ROBISON, KAREN W. 

English 

ROUNDS, CLIFF 

ROUNDS. DIANNA 

French 

ROWE, LARRY O. 

Sociology 

SELLERS, CHARLES L, 

Geography 

SCHULTZ, SANDRA 



SHUMWAY, BRUCE L 

Sociology 

SILVA, BEnA 

French 

SKYLES, GEORGE 

SMITH, KEITH 
Political Science 
SMITH. MARIAN 
English 
SORENSON. ELL B. 



SENIORS 



107 



FELSTEO. HAROLD W. 

Psvchologv 

LAAKSO. MARJALMSA 

German 

SORENSEN, JANICE 

English 

SORENSON, KENNETH 

Political Science 

SPENCER, BERKLEY A. 

Sociology-Pre-med 

STUEHSER, M, DARIENE 



TAKAHASHl. SALLY S. 

English 

SUKASIAN, GEORGE 

Hislor, 

STEWART, KATHRYN LYNNELL 

German 

TANGREN, BOYD 

Journalism 

TAYLOR, JEAN 

English 

THACKER, LYNN 

THOMAS. BART 




WRIGHT, MEREDITH 

English Literature 

YATES, JUNE 

Geograph, 

YOUNG. LEGRANDE 

Political Science 

ZANDER, RUDY 



SENIORS 








PHYSICAL AND 
ENGINEERING SCIENCES 




. VkhR, JOHANNA 
. -E. KAIHRYN 
OK., MART ELAINE 
. ^NSEN. NORMA 
ite.iON, GENELLE BURROCK 
HtNRlCKSEN, MARY JO 
HENDERSON. KAY 



HUBER, MARGARET 
HUBER, GENEVIEVE I. 
.ARSON, DONNA R. 
JARTIN. GLORIA DAWN 
■4ELS0N, JANICE LYN 
-JEWMAN, DIANNE E. 
MICOL. KAREN A. 



ROBERTS, BEVERLY 
OERILE, LINDA 0. 
SCORESBY, JESSIE GAYE 
SILVER. JEAN R. 
SMITH, EDELE 
SNOW, 6EVRA M. 
STILES, PATRICIA M- 



AITKEN. GRANT , 



ANDERSEN, MARIO R. 
Mechanical Engineering 
8ACKMAN, ROBERT 

ATKERSON, CHRISTINE 

BARTHOLOMEW, R. 0. 
Mechanical Engineering 
BEAROALL, JOHN S. 

BENNETT, JAY LYNN 
Molhemolical Educslion 
BERGE, DALE L. 

BEUS, KENT B. 

BOND, JAMES L. 

BLACKHAM. SAMUEL M. 



Ift^iik] 



Edu. 

BONE, GEORGE B. 
BOYER, KENT 
BRADY, LON G. 

BRIM, LARRY H. 
Engineering 

BRINGHURST, WAYNE H. 
Ph».ic«l Science 
BURNSIDE, JESSE C. 



SENIORS 



109 



CARLSON CLIFF 

Chemlsfry 

CANDLAND. WENDELL REX 

CLARKSON JACK 

Chemistry 

CHRISTENSEN, DEAN E. 

Physics 

CORNABY, KAY S. 

Chemistry 

CREIGHTON, DAVID M 

Chemistry 

CROCKETT, EARL DAVID 

Electrical Ertgineerlng 

CROFT, KENT 

Engineering 

DALLEY, N. KENT 

Chemistry 

DICKERSON, KAY J. 



Me 



Ena 



ring 



DORNY, NELSON 

Electrical Engineering 

DOTY, LOIS 

Medical Technology 

DRENNAN, G. BRYAN 

Mechanical Engineering 

EASTON, JAMES L 

Civil Engineering 

FIFE, RICHARD 

Chemistry 

FORSGREN, KLANE 

Chemical Engineering 

FOWLER, RICHARD M 

Mathematical Education 

GARNER, KENT R. 

Mathematical Education 

GODFREY, LYNN 

Chemical Engineering 

GOODSON, WALLACE GARY 

Chemical Engineering 

GOWANS, FRED 

Physical Science 

HAGHIGHI. AHMAD 

Geology 

HAGMAN, MARK J. 

Physics 

HANSEN, JOY H. 

Chemistry 



HANSEN, RALPH 

Mathematical Education 

HATCH, DIANE 

Mathematics 

HATCH FORREST 



Me 



iginei 



HAWLEY. MERRILL S. 

Geology 

HAYMOND. JAMES BRENT 



HOLMAN, MAX D. 

Geology 

HUNSAKER, GLEN L. 

Electrical Engineering 

INGHAM, VERNON BROWN 

Geological Engineering 

IVIE, ALMA RAY 

Engineering 

JENSEN, REED 



JENSEN. RICHARD G. 

JEPPSEN, ERNEST ALAN 

JOHANSEN, ROBERT L. 

Physics 

JOHNSON, ROYLE 

Chemical Engineering 

JONES, THOMAS LLEWELLYN JR. 

Chemistry 

JONES, JOHN ARLEN 




SENIORS 



no 




JORGENSEN, DAVID W. 

Physics 

KAARLELA, ROBERT MATHEW 

LAMOREAUX. JACK 
Mathematics 
LANT, LEHY L, 

LARSEN. BRUCE G. 

Electronics 

LASSON, CALVIN G. 



LAURITZ, JOHN 

Electrical Enqinee- 
LAURSEN, KAY 



Itherr 



Edu' 



LEAVITT, CRAYTON OE LANGE 

Geology 

UN. PAUL Y. 

LINDSEY, LOYD RAY 



LOVINS J. MAYNARD 
Radio and Television 
LUKE, PHILIP 

IvtASON, DENNIS 
Industrial Psychology 
MATTHEWS. GEORGE 
Physics 

MCALLISTER. CHERYL 
thematical Education 
DANIEL. WILLIAM A 



E£f WJI 




MECHAM. LYNN N. 
Chemistry 
MONTIERTH. MAX 

Chemical Engineering 
ENZIES. JAMES 

MURPHY. SHELDON 
Chemical Engineering 
NEWELL. ALLEN C. 
Physics 
NEWELL, DIX A. 



OLSEN, GARY 

Physics 

PAPENFUSS, JOSEPH 

Mathematics 

PATTEN, EMERY P. 

Mechan.cal Engineering 

PEOERSON. FLOYD E. 

Chemistry 

PIERSON. LAURENCE 



Math 



PRINCE. DONALD 

PRUEITT. MELVIN L. 

Physics 

READ. JUAN 

Physics 

ROSE, CHARLES B. 

Chemistry 

SAMUELSON. WAYNE 

Electronics 

SAND6ERG. HOWARD ITEDI 

Physics 

SCHWAB. MARVIN G. 

SKIBA. JULIUS J. 

SHIELDS. EARL D. 

Physics 

SMITH. JOHN T. 

Mechanical Engineering 

SMITH, KELVIN 

Science Education 

SMITH, RICHARD C. 



SENIORS 



STANOER, CARVEL R, 

Physics 

STEED. MICHAEL E- 

Geologv 

STEVENSON, RONALD DEE 



STEWART, LOIS 



STU68ERT, COLIN 

Chemical Engineering 

TEEPLES DARYL H, 

Mathematics 

THOMPSON, EVAN M. 



THURGOOD. GLEI 
Civil Engine; 
TIDWEL 



PtrU'wrFr.^ 




"^'S 




MARSHALL KENNETH N 
Mechanical Engineering 
McFADDEN, TERRY T, 
Mechanical Engin 

MERRILL, RALPH T, 



MILLER, EOOY L, 

Mechanical Engineering 

NAYLOR, CLYDE R. 



PAnON, JOSEPH B. 
cal Engineering 
PERCIVAL, C. MARK 



PETERSON, JAMES G 
Civil EngmeerIng 
POLGAR, PETER 



RITCHIE, STEPHEN 

Mechanical Engineering 

SMITH, TED L. 

Civil Engineering 

TAYLOR, SEYMOUR S,, JR. 

Chemical Engineering 






112 




IMAVNE, ILOYO 



WATTS PAUL J. 



ITWORTH, OASREL C. 
.Ncn,tcl E.g. »«..», 
MTESTON, OOVLE W. 



IRRICK. GEORGE WALKER 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 




ARNES, JANICE 
h.-cjl Education 
lliIH, LARRY 
...ccl Education 
KAItHWAlIE, KEIIH 0. 
Hvjical Education 
RAMWELL. RICHARD 
hv^cal Education 
URR, JOHN 
Inallh Education 
ABLE, WAYNE LE ROY 
hyiical Education 
AMPBELL, I-IAURICE L. 
hvxcal Education 



•'■' f' ••■? ^4 9 



CHING. BETTY LOU 
Physical Education 
COOMBS, SUZANNE 

l-Mll Di mj.jLAS L. 

fHWAKti', PATRICIA 



GIBB, ROBERT 
Physical Education 

HANSEN, GORDON L, 
Physical Education 
HIAn, RUTH ANN 
Physical Education 
JONES, LA VYRLE 
Physical Education 
I^ARKS, CECIL D.. JR, 
Physical Education 
lulATISON, VERNON 
Physical Education 
l.<ICHAELIS, ELAINE 
Physical Education 
MONSON, EVA CAROL 
Recreation 

NAKAGAWA, ROBERT K. 
F'h,.icol Education 
NIELSON, MARC 




I 




ROHBOCK, TEDDY 
Physical Education 
ROLAND, PEGGY LEE 
Physical Education 
POSE, DOREEN CYRUS 
Blr:mentafy Education 
SCHMIDT NATHALIE C. 
Physical Education 
SHUEY. VALERIE 



Phy; 



Edu' 



SORENSON, SHAUNA L 

Physical Education 
SPENCER, JAMES A. 



Phy 



Edu 



TAYLOR, SHIRLEY 
Physical Education 
TOLBERT, JANEC6 
Physical Education 
UI6EL, HOWARD 
Physical Education 
WEIGHT JAY REED 
Physical Education 
WHITEHEAD, CRAIG B. 
Youth Leadership 
WILKES, VINCENT 
Physical Education 
WOOD, M. BLAINE 
Physical Education 

113 




^'^:f™ 



L^l 








JUNIORS 



52^'SIP?T 



Ashlon, Lee 

Austin, Lindai;< 




r 









win, Roland A. 

Jennie 
ird. Sh»ron 



irkett, Edward L.. Jr. 




Bean, James H. 
Beck, Phil W. 
Beclslead, Barba 



Bednar, Richard L. 
Belcher. Rona 
Bell. Luana 
Bell, Robert 
Belnac, Dean H. 
Beiton, Linda J. 
Bench, Earl Markhar 
Bennett. Pearl A. 



even, Roland 
ilderback. Judith 
illman. Reed W. 






BInb. Ouane R 



Bischoff. Steve 
Bird. Kathryn Lyni 
Bishop. Janith 




"I'M NOT sleeping. I r 



esttng my testimony.' 



M^^lM 



Blumberq, Richard 



Bohn. Ted S. 
Boies. Bernice U. 



Bone, Steven D. 







Brogdon. Noffnan E 

Broberg, Caroiv 

Btoolsby. Ren 



Brown, Sandrj 



Brown, Wyn D. 



Burgess. DD Rae 



r 



9. 

mm 







Bvwater. Harold D. 

Calder. M;Io 0. 

Call. Albert Gav 

Call, Henry M. 

Calliiler. Linda 



Campbell, David F. 

Campbell, Kay M. 

Campbell, Robert 

Canning, C, R. 



Cartmill, Charl 
Carruth. Ger 
Casad. Aaror 








r> ^ 



▲^ 




V 







1 



^^ilTMl 



JUNIORS 






W^ f% 9 p 9 ^ 




CMC, La Rave 

Clark, Claudia 

Clark. Gordon T. 

Clark. Kathleen 



Clark, Leon R. 




L ^-^ ^ ? ^^^ 



wW'l 




^ 




Collinwood, Gerry 
Connell. Zoe J. 

Coombs. Curtis J. 
CcrbeH, Robert L. 
CD-brldqe Arnold N. 
Co.e». Richard Woyni 
Kaye B. 



DckeH. David F. 
D'ts Dorothy 1. 
Dsland. Ivan A. 




Crouch. Arlen 
Crowther. Joan 
Cunning hia me, Kayc 



Cro«ford, Gary 
Curtli, Evan H. 
Curtis. Robet 



^:^ 




Dalton. Jan W. 

Dance. Celia 

Darrington. John R, 

Davenport. Bvi'on F. 

Davenpoft, Geraldlne 

Davidton, Betty 

Davii, Beth 

Davii. Betty 

Davit. Floyd C. 


P. 


^1 ^M 




4Hh 


Davit. Linda Gale 

Davit, Richard C. 

Davit, Richard L. 

Dawion, Glen O, 

Day. Lavelle 

Dayton, Everetl 

Deaver, Cameron 

cker, Catharine Rente 

Debv, Winnifrcd 






V 


Delaney. Rotemary 

Deputy, Sutan 

Dermatet, Chsriet 

Detpairi, Carolyn Kay 

Despain, Philip 

Donaldion, Kenyon 

Doty, Ann Marie 

Doty, Harold Ray 

Dou^lat, Bob 


<« 




1 


Drake. Beverly A. 

Douglfli, Jean 

Dray. Henry Dennis 

Drechsel, Larue 

Dredge, John D. 

D'lggt, Frank S. 

Dnggt. Gloria 

Diiffln Luann 

Duke, Richard K. 

Dunlap. Frelda L 

Dunyon, Joleen 

Durfee. Kaye 

Durrant. Martin H. 

Dyer. Grady Tom 

Dyer, Ronald E. 

Edgley, Evelyn 

Egan. Kathleen 

Ecfwardi, Gayle 

Egbert, Dolores Ann 

Egbert. Lawrence K. 

Eldrldge. Lana 

Elztnga, Joyce Lavelle 

Eliinga, Yvonne 

Emery. Francis Allen 

Erickton. Kathleen 

Evant, Cherry 

Evans. Jackie 

Eyring. Shirley 

Farmer. Richard 

Farnsworth. Lynn 

arntworth, Mary Ellen 

Farr. David B. 

Felt, John 

Fieelkl Phil 

Field. Robert D. 

Fielding. Don Ray 


7? 

> > 


mdr Kk 




1 

v 




JUNIORS 



O fv n f^ q ^BP 




Giles. Gary N. 
Gillette, Richard D. 
Gillingwster, A. G. Jr. 



Goold, Jay 
Goold, Judy 
Gortler Gordon D. 
Gough. Roy Williar 



Arnold 
Bonnie 
Sheldo 



Greenhalgh, Jlr 
Greenwood, Ka 
Gflgg, Janet 



\l ) 










I 




Hdnien, John B. 
Haajen. LaRee 
Hansen, Lamonte 


^^BKi 


^ 


j^^H^ 


Hansen. La'ry 0. 
Hanson, Sennalr 
Hansen Nor«n £ 




1 


15 








r- 


'• V 




Hanson. Carleen 
Harding. Liane 
Harqofves. Tom 




)IC 







1 

^ 


i 



"OH. NO! Not this face AGAIN!' 



Holmes. Walt 



Hatley. Fred 
Marker. Melvvn R. 
Harper. Vernon 



eld, Don R. 
lam, JoAnn 
1, W. Bruce 



Hatlield. Ma^ Unne 



Hiclo., Cai 
Higqinbottti 

Hill. Lai 

Hill, Sally 

Hill, Waiter E. 

Hinton. Gail J. 

Hlrschi. Janet 



Holland, Vard 6, 

Holley, Karl 

Holmes Marian 



n .'i* (^ ,c i^R« 





-:3 



Honda. Vernon H 

Hood, Robert W. 

Hoopes, F. Vaughn 

Hopkins. Nadine 



Householder, Dawna Jean 
Hovland. Heikki 
Hovup. Moni L. 



r n 




1 </ 



WUk. 








Hunt. Allan Reed 

Hunt. Delmar 

Hunt. Edward B. 

Hunt, Luclle 

Huntsman. Ver Lee 

Husltey, Darryl 

Hutchison, Jackie L. 

Hyde, NanEtte 



ft i 



1, - - 



Grant R. 




! e 



Jackson. Lindel 



Jacobs, Can 

Jacobs, David 

Jacobs, Kay 



Jacobsen. Sharon 

Jacobson. Ron 

James. Judith D. 



Jensen, E. Russell 

Jensen. Gerald A. 

Jensen, Gwendolyn 

Jensen, Joan 

Jensen, R'Lene 

Jeppson, Anna Lee 




f 



^j r; (^ O v-^ 





JUNIORS 












Kenneth G. 
Klmber 
Linda J. 
Nadene M. 



I 



h^M 






N: 






^^ §^ ^ 




Lamb. 
Lambert. Aurelia 
Lamberty, Ruth Helen 
Landers. Martin P. 



L-.^ 



^hkkmk 



r'> 




Lar&en. Douglas E. 
Larsen, Edward S. 
Larsen. Margaret 



.1 'O C' 




SMILING SANTA regales guileless coeds with 
ting kiclred up chimney by irate atitl-NlcIc do 



deer jokes preparatory to get- 
thor. 

2FS 





McCune. Karen 

cDaniel, Earl W. 

McDaniel Lucy 

cOonold. Jerry J. 



"'^'McKay,''jo'ye v 
Mclver. Walter A. |\. j/ 






McLaughlan Leslie N 







\ IJP^'^'g 




JUNIORS 



ilTWIS^S 




Melija, Raymond W. 



edllh, Ralph J. 



?MMil '^ 







/- 



Ok 




Miller, Lorry J. 



Miller. Linda Lou 



^ 




II. Nancy Ann 




MorrisseHf, Dona 
Morse, Bart J. 
Mortensen, Ardath 
Moss, Connie 
Mosleller, Robert E. 



Petersen, Judilh 

Pelerson, Douglas 

Peterson. Gordon A. 




l^^^^i 



Gerald W. 
usee Judith 
,mire, Linda 




^ O ^"' fi 



JUNIORS 




"^^ ' I A-'/^( 



ffSF"^ 







Raya. Evargelina 
Rea, A. Ne.ille 
Reading, Sanna Lee 
Recht, Charles H. 
Redd. Verna 




Roundy. Verl P. 



Royle. Jearvette 
Ruge. Jam«s D. 

(tusson, Jon KimbdII 




T^ 




WELL. I love you. too, Maud. 



Schofield. Rosa 

Schlufz. Pauli 

Scott. George J 



.1 £ii mith Fw . 




Shgkespe 



Shunn, Donald W. 

Silver. John Russell 
Simper. Colleen 
Skeen. Nancy 
Sfcldmore. Carol 
Skousen. Denna 
Skousen, Karen 
Slater. Gail 

Sly. Russell Melvin 



n p c f'^ lb ff^. ^s 




t Cf ^ r^ p p f\ 







125 



Sla 



ird, Carole 



Standing, &. Robert 

Stead. Diane 

Steed. Sherry Ann 

Steele. Dorothy 

Steele, Robert f. 



M 



stone. Jacqueline 
Stolts. Richard 
Stout, Ed 
Stout Wynn 










i 


Wf\ ^^ wf^ f^ 





JUNIORS 









Turner. Robert 
Twitchell. Rulo 
Twogood, Ther 




ff^ 




4T^Aik 



c ,^ 


«^ 




!/■ 


L 


^ ^^ ^B^^Kl^ Ward. Jarrm L. 






k^^BK^'"^ ^^T^^h Ward. Wllliaii W. 
kl^Hir ^Al^^H Ward. Sharron 
WU^M'T ^HI^^B Warnar. Lane 


^^^H^^^^^^ 


1 


fc ^s 


/^ 


mtF' ' ^ 


1 


1 I 


Waihburn, Laurel 

'^ Waten. Melvln C. 

Wafson. Lorraine 


■OKAY, OKAY, I'll ploy your 


■ 


IHBBK: 




silly p 


P^ 


A 






Sk 


^■a .^k Wan. Robert A. 
^■l ^^1 Wan. 
^■1 4^H Warn. Donald A. 










r .-> 



Weeie, Sandy 




Wood, P. Wa»i 



Wollord, Peggy A. 

Workman. wTlllain 

Williamson. Jean 

Wllhelmsen, Sail B. 



Wright, Janlne 

Wright, Willie Lee 

Wyss, Eileen 

Yamda, Connie Ikuko 



Young. L. DeWayne 

Young. Loyd Grey 

Young, Phyllis 

Zirke'r^ S^'undra 
Zohner. Kelvin 0. 



ml 

7^- 










Adams. Settle Loui 

Adams, Carol, n 

Aodms. Don 

Adams, Jerry Ann 

Ahrendes, Lurae 

Aldean, Janice 

Alrth, Edward 



Allen, Paul E 



Ammons, Ida Grace 

Allred. Richard G. 

Andersen, Cordell M. 

Anderson, Ada Annette 

Anderson, Barbara Jean 

Anderson, Oellis M. 

Anderson. J. Frank 







^ 



.IllXl' / ?. 




^ 




r 



^nde 



Anderson, Judv 



Anderson, Neal D 

Anderson, Karel Ann 

Anderson, Sheldon L. 

Aranda, Constantino 

Andrews, Ida 

Angel, Roberta 

ApolonTo. Franli J 

Aragon, Humberto 

Anderson, Valeen 



mfM 










SOPHOMORES 






i;^ r ,• **s r\ f-v r^ 



Armstrong, Richard W. 

Arnold. Richard J. 

Arnold. Robert 

Arrlngton. Cammon 

Asav. Sandra 

Ash, Nola 

Ash, Anthonv W. 




r 
1.1 






Barnhill. Anr 
Bartow. Allan O 
Borrul Judith J 




Be = liledd. Arvsl Li 

Beckstead. Br 

Beckslead C 

Bedwsll. Da 



nion, Bonnie Amussen 

Benson. Rita M. 

Bentlev, M. Carolyn 



BIgelow. Wilbur 
Billi. Gary L 
BInch. Malanle 








"OH. IGNATZ. you dance divinely." "I Itnow. I tno«.' 




Blotter. E. Maurice 

Blue. Prlicllla 

Bodily. Richard 

Bluth, Oscar 



Bonney. Fred 

Bonner. Ewa Kaye 

Boulter. Don F. 




( 



Aii A 




I 



5»nlon. Arthur Lee 

Bradbury, Di«le 

Bramall, Betty 

ramwell, Gary W. 

Bregllo, VInce J. 

rierholt. Karen M. 

rlnghurst, Rae Ann 

Britsch. Charlotte 

Brock. Charlene 

Brockway. Paul E 

Brogdon, Frances 






Browning, Gary Lee 






'^'^oM^ Mn^k\\ 



•jt 



SOPHOMORES 



P 








r> 



ilk 







Brush. Ardls F. 



Burningham. Robert 



in, David 
r, Vernean 
Dennis Boyci 



Butt. David 
Butters, Barbara 
Bybee, Barth N. 
Bybee, Jan 
Byers, Dennis Wende 




r-1 



<i> 



"f 






Carter, Charles G. 



CdStle. Dean L. 
Caieau. Alan 

Chamberla -' °"-1'. 
Chombe-i .:-• 




M.. Kk£a 



» 






» 







A^ MMiiLi^dM 



■ALL RIGHT, all right. So I believe.' 





131 



Cunningham. Delo'>:- 

Curtis, W. Newe: 

Cutlet, Herbert S 

Dahlberq, Ralph R., J. 

Dalley, Ronald John 

Dalton. Jear 

Dalton, Judith Jear 

Dana. Carol 



<, 




Darling, Ro 
Davenport 
Davidson, 



avis, Philip 
!r, Carolyn 
Wayne R. 



De Priest. Ro 



mi^. I 




M 


i 








SOPHOMORES 















f" im^ 



'^l >. 



Easter, CharloHe T. 
Dyer, Zeta 
Eastwood, Judith 



Edmonds, Margie 
Edwards, Ann 
Edwards, Jo An 
Edwards, Les W. 
Edwards, Mildred 



Evans, Robert Kirkhan- 



Falrboufft, Lee Rav 

Faddil. Virginia Lynn 

Farmer, Robert L. 

Farnei Kalhryn 

Feeler. Brian R 



A^ iiki^ ^^ ^"lIHkitf 




Gadd, Galen N. 

Funk, Ida 

Furr. James 8ruc; 

Gadd, Wendell 

Gallacher. Bonn;e R. 

Gardner. Oa'>id Ron 
Gardner, Judith K. 
Gam. Michael D 







Genqler, Gerald 




Giles, Curtis L. 

eiedhill. Sue 

Glines, Gai-/ 

Goligbtly, Efdon C. 



Goeber, Franr 

Gofob. Gordi 

Good, B«vei 

Goodson, Chsrlei 










f i 




133 



Goodwin, Rav 
Gordon. Dixie 
Gordon. Pamela 
Gourdin. Paul 
Gourley, Doug 
er, Howard Dean 





r 

^lS!lk -.1. 





SOPHOMORES 







Harding. Dcanns 
Hardy. John W. 
Hardy. W. Ralph 








Harrison. Sue 
Hart. Robert J, 
Hart. Victor 



Heath Pearl E. 
Heber. Vernon E. 
Hedberg. Kathleen 
Hedden. Patricia M. 
Heilesen. Henr^ Eldon 
Heiner. Roselyn Lael 
Hellewell. Porrert L: 



Helgiiiit. LaMs 

Henderthott Marj 

Henderion J( 

Hendrlckion Cl 

Hepworlh Kb 



He,woo. 

Hicki. Bichar, 

Higgle 



Hodgson, Carolyn 

Hoegh. Shlrle, A. 

ofnnelsler, Elmer F., Jr. 

Hokanson. Ronald M. 

Holbrook. Ron 

Holdaway. Dennis L. 



Holdawav. Jeanne 

Holland, Joyce 

Moiling. M. Dale 

Hollingsheaif. Carol A. 

Holt. Saye 

Hollry. Deanna 



Hoover. Joyce A. 



Howlelt. Rot 

Hiu. Choi 

Hubband. er< 

Hubbell, Richard 




E•^f1/} 








'I Ci '^ ^ ri "W r iBI 



ar.^^ 




U^ 




Hunt, Merr 
Huftfiinger, Richard 
Hunt, Eleanor .. 
Hutchingt. Brend 



"MY TUBA? Yes. yes. I have il here somewhe 





Hyde. Willia M. 

Hyde. William Palmer 

Hyder, Jere E. 

Hyllested. Flamming Daht 



Jack. Rayb 
Jacobs. Ka 

Jacobsen B< 
Jack. Al 



135 



Jackson. Linda Lou 
Jaclnnan. Arthur 
Jaclman, Karolyn 



.n, Kent C 
Jarvis. Ste 
Jcfferies. Ch 



tJLf "^JLS^i 




ML 



Jeppsen, Linda Gayle 

Jensen. William Oelton 

Jeppson, Marilyn 



John. Apploni 








'.^' 



SOPHOMORES 




c 











I 



Kutd. Joseph £. 

Kyle. April 

Lachmdn. Linda 

Lake. Janet 

Lake. Katherine 

Lame. Edna Rae 

Lambert. Judv 

imp. Carolyn Joyce 

Lambright. Lenton 



4>r 



Lee. Donald G. 

LeFeivre. Sharon 

Leonard Louiie Mar.e 



Llilby. M.kc 

Limb, She> 

Lindholm. Severl 

Lindifly. Douqia 



Lindiey. Joseph W. 

Lindsey, Ronald J. 

Llndiey. William T. 

Link. Richard G, 

Utile. Larry 

Livingilon. R. Ladd 

Loflut. Naomi 

Lloyd. Kiev 

Lloyd, Earle K. 







1 



MEN'S HALL 
Dorm mother I 




f c, r c ^'r» 



Lomas. Thomai R. 



Longwell. Rutien S. 



Lott. Ale. 0. 
Luckau. Linda Ruth 



Ludlow. Neils Foslei 



Ludwig. Evan Herbert 



Lunceford. John H. 
LunI, Judith Ann 
Lybbert. Glade 



Lyman. Alfred G. 
Lyon, Calvert B. 




miz 



137 



MacDonald. Susan 

Lv!y. Helene 

clean, Douglas O 






ant, Linda J. 
n. Jack T. H. 
argetts. Jean 



Markhsm. Diana 

Marks, Sharon 

Marley, Brenda 

larguardson, Kay= 

,h. Stephen James 




f ^ r 

^ 




Dennis R. 



Mask, Rudy Andres 

Masters, James R. 

Matsen, Jeffrey 

atlhis. Richard' Wells 

Maughan. David 

Maughan, Mark W. 



i^ 




CTl 



. \ 







r 

A' 








^ "WPR 



SOPHOMORES 






r 



k^^M 



''■^ 







McAllister, Norman B. 
McAllister, Dean 
McAllister Kenneth 



McCuan, Robert E. 
McClark, D, Gordo 
McCarty, Judith 



cFarlane Glenda 
cGlone. Vayland 







'kiG 



Pc^ in p r 



■ ^^ 



^idmk. 






, Kenneth K. 
, Linda Joyce 
Sally Lynn 



» 



Moon, Jerrv R. 
Montgoni«ry, Linda J. 

Moore, Barbara 

Woo'e Dennii 

Moo'e. Richard 

Moore. RulK Ann 

Morgan. Janice Ann 






Morte 



Douglas W 

tJiorf\i Jan — 

Moss. Gordon E. 

Mots. Marlene 

Mois Nancy 

Moles. Nellie 

Moullon. David Stanley 



'fi^iriHtiTf^ 






U^^v 



r^3*<»*4 







Nay. DeVon R. 
Naylor. Carolin 
Needham. Beth 



Nelson. Larry Don 

Nelson. Paul 

Nelson. Sharon C. 




i\ 



^, 



Nicholson. Meredith 

Niederhauier. Ethel 

Nielsen. Carol Jean 

Nielion. Julia Ann 

Nielsen. Hope 

Nielsen. David L. 






Nl( 






NIel.. 

Nlelion. Frederick P. 

NIelson. Kenneth A. 

NIelson. Pauline 

Nlih. Gar, L 

Nooner, Jo, 

Noakes. Jaycene 






"I KNEW that bleach 



Noyes. Garth F 

Nufler. Patricia May 

Nunn. Sandy 



ZT^ 





Olsen. Pat 

Olsen. Saundra Sue 

OUen. Tamara 

Olson, Janet Joyce 



f!^"^ '^^ 






139 





^'^11 -It 



Peer/, Rrrtard Tayl. 



iM^^^i^dkMik 



SOPHOMORES 










d^:'-' Ark 



ce Ronald 
son, Connie 
son Connie 



Pond. Carolvn 

Plotts. Terrel 
Pope, Linda 
Portie. Virginia 
PothsracV. Anne 
Potter, Linda 




7?. I y 



n, Theo J. 
David H. 
Lew D. 



Ralph 



i 



isch Joseph A. 
3sk;. Connie 
ham Judith Ann 
ev, Claudette 
slpher. Linda Ruth 
e,. Carol Lynn 



; 



Pvkslinen. Ritva M. 



Roimuisen. Lane Oo.o -. 



-» 




Rencher. LaVeJa 








^f^^F'' 



9 >> « n f3j 

1^ <w»«#liiJIAfci >niU 




Rytting. C. Brenf 



"I'M SORRY. Rufus, but I 




SariiburY. Oav>d G. 



Sanford. Howard Ra 



^aunaers. vahr 

Savage. Barba' 

Savage, Henry C, J 

Sduage, Shar-'- ' 







141 



anfied M. 
. Jo Anne 
■ ree, Patty 








Shelton, Joseph E. 

Shell, Judy 

Shields. Allan L. 



iw,y, felenna r! 
.ay, Re< Wayne 
Shumviay, Ron 






1 . ; 




SOPHOMORES 





~ f.^^ p p n • 



Smith, Annette 
Smart, James I. 
Smith. Connie 
Smith, David G. 
Smith, Karen Lee 
Smith, Kenneth C. 
Smith, LeGrande G. 
Smith. Linda Ann 



Snelling. Carolyn 
Snideman. John 
Snow. Orlo L. 
Snow, Ruth Ann 
Soderberg, Ulrika 




Staples, lane K 
Spllter. Don H 
Stallingi. Johf 



Steele. Jim L. 

Steele, Uovd 

Stephens. Augustus D. 




Stout Sond. 
Stratford. Karei 
SItatton. David Ctii . 
Street. Judyth Am 



g)kth, I 




MiM ^^f/k 




Taskini. Ataollah 

Taylor. Aihton 

Taylor, Deanna H. 






MISSING FOUCAULT pendulum left campus wondefing if maybe 
theives shouldn't come back for bowl. 




Taylor. Nehon R. 

Taylor. Mary Elizabeth 

Taylor. Ralph G. 

Terry. Lynda 



Thomander. Joar 

Thomas. Alan R 

Thomas. David H, 

Thomas. Daria 




Thomas, Gri 



ThonTpson, jT Wa^d '>^ • 

Thompson. Jon K. ' '- 



^''-''^'^''>ilL 



Thurman, Gordon 

hygerson, Alton L 

Tilbv, Francis 

Tippetts, Heber 

obiasson, Loran J, 

Todd, Ann 

Tomsll, Robert E. 

Toner, Paul G. 



Tolman. Gerald C. 

Torgersen. Mava Lynn 

Tflmnal. Roger 

Truiallo, Jesse A. 

Tucker, Da»id 

Tucker, Mary 

Turner. Deanna 

Turner, Jay Donald 

Turner. June 



Tupou, Pauline 

Udv. Anne 

Uibel, Lynn 

Ullcny, Sandy 

Ursenbach, Jeanne 

Valentine. Amy Lee 

Van Dam. Lou 

Van Wogenen, Richard 



f- ..") Cjf 

















SOPHOMORES 







Von Cannon, Jeraldin 
Wagner, Dennis K. 
Wagner, H. Arnold 



Waldvogel. Millie 




^ ^ 



^,nr.r.^rs£^ 



Ward, Pat 
Ward, Natrone 
Ward, Carolyn 
Ward, Welton E. 
Warner. Dennis 
Warren, Loretta 

burn, Willian 
Watson. Clea 



Watts. Brenda Lee 
Waymire. Frances 
Weaver. Margaret Ja 






David e. 
Mike 
. Richard J. 



White Carol Joyce 
Whipple, Connie I. 
Wheadon, P. Kay 



Whltlnq. Sydna 
Whiting K'istinc 
Whittle Gknr. R. 
WIddlwn. Ga,le 
WIddlson Jeannle 
Wilde. Bonlls 
Wilkes >ae Ann 



David G. 
Da>ld Warren 
/llllami. Donna 
Mllllams. Janet 



Williams. Thomas D. 
Williams. Shirley Ann 
Williamson Jeanette 



Wilson. Donald 







' N 



Wilson. Jon U. 



Wilworth Ca 

Wilson, I 

WImmer A 

Windsor Wllllai 







Inters John B. 
nterton. Joyce 
ird. Bonald D 



ocmbe. J. William 
Wirthlin. Re> Lee 



Wood, Can 

Wood. Dav 

Wood. Gary Law 



Wood, Tommy Rui 



Wortham. Dean i. 

Worlrmon. Gloria 

Wright. Chad 

WrIqhI. David N. 

Wright. Donald L, 

Wright. Edith 

Wright. Cro.g 

Wright John M. 

Wright. Judy 







Wright. Marilyn Irene 
Wright. Owen 0. 



^ssi; 



WORRIED FAN watches BYU grid fortunes plurt 




Youksletter, David 



Young. Carol Am 




Young. Russell Ja 



^iikM^mkA 




145 





* f 






Adams, Cal.ln 
Adams, Daniel 
Adams Frank 



Adamsor. Donald C. 



Alcorn, Gwendolyn 

Aider, Mary 
Alldredge. Carol 
Alleman, Mary Jo 
Allen. Deanna 
Allen. Ellen Ann 
Allen. Linda Ruth 




Anderson, Joan Ellt 
Anderson, Julia J. 
Anderson, Linda 
Anderson. Lane K. 




Anderson, Sandrc 



Andreas. Leslie G. 



Kathy 

Natalie 

Richard 



Anthony, Edwin 
Angel, Ardis 
Apgood, Robert D. 



HOME TOWN newspapi 



Atqyie. Gary 
Arnell. Karen 
Arnett. Kent 
Arnold. Joan Shirley 






a 


Kf gp i^ 


r 


^ 


CI 


.Tf 


'a 


%. 




KMla 


PI 




Ffl 




11 

i 


iL 



Aihbv. Tamara 
Aihbv William ( 
Aihman, Sheryl 



David Soolh 



6abcock. Ken 
Bibcock, Warren 
Sackman. Bronf G, 



Saggett. Garv L 
Saghoomian, Ov 
Baglev. J. Kent 



FRESHMEN 



Baker. Linda Lee 

Baker Lycn 

Bakef, Milton Charlei 



Ball, Robert E. 



ird. Robert H. 




r; Sar-BVo^Oa;. ^fT (^ JTH^"') ^ C' f^l ^^ 

^ Bascotn. Denise v — -I k ', 5k ^ i'*~ ~i y* ' J 



Bateman. Marqar. 

Sales. Jeanr 

Bates. Maxine < 

Bales. Nila Davi 

Batson, Kenneth i 



fSE^'^ir^ 



F^2Ff^^ 










— j 

Si 




Benniod, Bruce C. 
Benson, Barbara 
Benson, Clarl 






i-^^^ -' J^ '^ ^ Jc %^ 







Bingham, Saundri 
BIschofI, AnoeHe 
Bishop. Barbara 



/>..^ Bishop. Tim R. 

Biornn. Bonnie 
Black, Carol L. 




SS^»f 





dM^M 



Blackburn. Wllbert H. 
Blank, Darlene 
Blake. Linda 
Bland. Diane 



Blauer, Lorin Robert 



Bodily, Merlin 
Bohn. Robert 



Boice, Bill 
Boies. Sharon M. 
Soley, HarrY 
Bolman. Rowland W. 



"OH. SO Ajax has a date with you tonight. So glad you told 



148 







Boi'on. Roid Loui 



Bowen. 8arton 



Brddbury. Michdol W. 



FRESHMEN 



Brockbank. David 



Bro»n. Arncl S 








('< 




> 



Buchanan. Betty 
iucklev. Howard D. 



Sudd. Frank W. 



Bunnell. Gary L. 
Burbank. Mai 



irdeMe, Paul Richard 



(% r?n ^-1 ^ t-^ ^ -ri 



Burgess, Marsn. 
Burkholder. Patr 

lornard. Maureen f . k^ 



/ 







P ^'> % -t ■" C> f ^ 

... ^^*^^^4<ik ' ^ ^ m^ Ca»idv, David R. 

"^■liH \ I . » -r ■ . Donna 



Butler. Gall 
Butlef. Sandra H. 
Bultars, Clinton D. 
Lvnette 



l»bee, Shirley Kay 



Canister, Gloria Je 
Campbell. Aaron 
Campbell, Darlene 



Campbell, James Ellis, Jr. 



Candland, Linda 
Cannon, Christie 
Cannon. Rondln Lew 



Carlston. Kathleen 
Carlston. Paula 
Carpenter, Gary 



Carpenter, Paul 
Carr, Wallace J. 

Carter.' Kenneth George 
Carter, Lyie Gordon 
Carter Robert William 
Carter, Thomas C. 



"AND TO think he vyas out with 





ast night!" 



ISO 








FRESHMEN 







Cotfam. SteoSen 







r\ 




ai 






Co« Reg ma Ann 
Co,. Virgil 
Cragun, June Elai 
Cfam, David S. 
Crandall, Linda 
Crandaii, Elwin M 
Crane Kathleen 




1 



f ^FaF^s^i'^ 




Darrough, Geo'^ge 



9i 



152 





, Gladys 

Dofll, Judy 
Doerr, Frodc 



FRESHMEN 



Donnelly. Sha. 



Downey. Karen 

Doiey. Carolyn 

rington. Ann Louise 



Afrinoton. 
Ash. freder; 
Bolster. C 

Bonny] Paul 

Booth. ( 

Dov>e. Dennis C 



Draper, Arthur 
Dredge. * 
Driggs. Deann. 
Drollinger. Kare 




Duriiee. Donald 



'> 
















P5 



,v 



Edmunds. Jane! 
Edwards. Daniel 
Edwards, Eugene 0, Jr 








Enders, Donald LeRoy 
Engeo, Carol Anne 
Englestead, Florence Ki 



Ercanbrack. Den, 




Ikjiil*ki4ii 




Farnsworth. Janet L. 
Featherstone. Mary An 



Faulkner. David P. 
Fechser. James R.. Jr. 
Fellars. Norma Jean 
Ferguson. Ronald D. 



Flcklin. Enessv W. 



Fielding. Ronald K. 



File. Jon M. 
Finch. Theodore S. 
Fish, Marilyn 



"I DON'T Icnow about you, but I'm getting out of ti 



154 




f^rf^np 


q r^ 


f^^, ■ fiihe'. Don Lo«ll 
Jc> / ■ FUher. Jomas R. 
V '1 F.sher. Llnd» Joyce 


■■/w 


\ ~ 1 F;i,qerald, Hal B, 


^A^. h^ ii 


i^ii. 


.K J , Fleming, Ma'Y 
^ ^•^ ' f lelche' Robert A 
^ a^^ Flood. Gary C. 

^K I^^B Flygare David C. 


"T^^T^r) 


Hf 


Z' 1 Foley. Julie 
f , • Flyoare, Wayne 
FolUan. Kriitine 
Fong. Chi Kuona 


• M^*««*^'r ■■" 


^*^ 


.^ Fontano. Judv clle 
^■^^^^ Fo-d Evelyn 
^ l^^B Fcestcr. da'y 


'^si[im 


p^ 


mn^ i Forsyth. Betty Jane 
W ^^-1 Fortie. Jay Eldon 
■ - - W Fortie. Mark Wayn 
^ F Fosi. Mane 


^dk 


Foster, 'David R. 

Foster, Diane E. 

Foulger. Jack L. 

J Foster. Kathleen 


T^.W^ 


K. 

r^r 


Jf^^^ Foster. G. 
W .« Fountain. Loretta 

l.» - W Fouli Dean R. 

^ - . fo»les. Joy Lee 


^ ii^ 


- »v F^'ancis. janii 
■ - F.jncsco, Eldon 
•^ " ^ F;jncom, Sterling 
1 Ffjndsen. Rayola 




FRESHMEN 



Frankrin. Cathei 



/i 




Gibson. Aid 

Gibson. Syl 
Gibson. Jan: 



^1 











1^ 



r 





^-•j 




^ ' 



?^ 



GInn. Edmund C. 
Gllson, James N. 



6od<rev Rolene 
Godwm, Steven L. 
Go«. Ralph 



Goniale;, He 



Goodwin, Dw 



Grange, Margaret 
Grappendorl, Dick 



m r, q -> t\ f 




fflths. Tom A. 




HDFR STUDtNTS rush t. 



Groberg, Delbert 
Gronlors, Dons 
Grothmann, W.Ihe 



Grover. Gary 
Gubler, Kay Norma 
Gulllot, David G. 
Gundersen, Asl'Id 



Gurr, Janet 
Guslafson. Dia 
Haas Madelei 



156 








FRESHMEN 



Hardee. Patrick C. 

Hanien. Venela 

-lanien. Susan La Kelta 

Hardin, Paula Lee 

Hardy. Claudia 

Hardy. Connie Elaine 

Hardy. Glenda Jean 

Hardy. Paula 








Hatch, Sara Jans 
Halcti, Wendell C, 
Hattiaway, DeLos E. 



HawH 

Hawti 

Hawkins Waldi 



Haycock Kaaren 

Hayes. Bill C. 

Hayes. Marilyn 

Hayes. Julianna 




f*^, 









T% 








lilchccck. Brcnda 



Hogdahi. Jeanette 



Holbrook, Marv Lou 






I2l^^^ 



"HE TOOK mv klnq on his first move, but I still have all my pawns. 





1^^ 



Holt, Buddy 
Holt, Lawrence 
Hopper. Jotin 



Hopson. Anthony 
Horlacher, Linda Lee 
Homing. Robert 



Horrocks. Msrva Ma, 
Horsley. Martha Cla 
Houston, Ttieda 
Howell, Carol Joy 



158 




■m«}xrjr"yi 




FRESHMEN 



aacsoB. Sharon Lorraine 

Irokonen. Ra'mo J 

Ivie. Devon R. 

Jacklin. Shdron 

Jackjon, Jo Ann 

Jackson. Marvin N. 

Jackion. Patricia 

Jacob, H. Wendell. Jr. 

Jacob. Priicilla 

Jacobs. Gordon W. 

Jacobs, Janot 

Jacobs. Jeniveve 

Jacobs. Jerry 

Jacobs. Judy 

Jacobsen, Donna 

Jacobsen, Larry 


'^1 




k^.SSSf 


Jacobsen. Paul 

Jacobsmeyer. John 

James. Cecite 

James, Marcia 

James, V Joanne 

Jarman. Myrna 

Jarrsrd, Kathryn Dian 

Jarvls. Donald E. 


n» 




^y f M 


Jarvls. Vila Ruth 
Jeffers, Terry 
Jeffery. Arthur 
Jeffs Vee Ann 
Jenkins. Elaine 
Jenkins. Janice Kay 
Jennings, Rem 
Jenkins, Levenia 

Jensen, Barbara 

Jensen, Beverly 

Jensen. Bruce 

Jensen Carma 

Jensen, Franklin Cla.r 

Jensen, Dave E. 

Jensen Dennis R. 

Jensen, Harvey 

Jensen, Kay 

Jensen, James A. 

Jensen. Kenneth V. 

Jensen. Linda Marie 

Jensen. Maiine 

Jensen. Maiine EMen 

Jensen. Michael K. 

Jensen. Vearl 




2 


f^^ r» C[ <'■ 



:^. ff^ 




C) 



o 






C. Lynn 
Charlene C 
David W. 



"^ ^iiti«ir. 



*5 






Johnson. Sandra O. 



Clea Can 



Eliiabeth (Peggy) 

Helen 

Jerilyn 

Jill 

Judy 




No 



Pal' 



Lee 

'tjn 



Ray N. 

Stephen 
Sieve 0. 




Kaneko. K. David 
Kearns. Susi 










"A RAHLESNAKE? H 



At this tir 



of year! 




Klllln, Carroll (Sue) 
King, Kothy 
King. Richard 
Kimball, David Kay 



King, Mary Sub 
King, Sharon 
Klngslord, Afton 
Kingsolver, Don 






160 





Klrkham. Cralq t. 
Kirkland. Shirley Ann 
Klrkland^ Heb«r D. 







r 



vfc 



■3'^S^??2 



•^?*^ 






FRESHMEN 



U.h«ad. A'de 



U»rton, Gertrude F. 



Lea. Una Kai 



UwU. John Tyron 

Lewis. Karen 

LewiSj Margaret 

Lewis, Spencer 

Lewis. T. Gordon 

Uddle. Sharon 

Lill. Nancy Joan 

Lewis. Ted Kay 







IM^ ^' ilk 






#*"; r. :y[ Oi a 




Wlnjton I 
n. L A. 



Loader, Geneil 

Long. Dorothy Ellen 
Long, Lynnette 

Loosll, "Richard Dwlghf 



Louder. Sherry 
Loveless. Janis L. 
Loveless, Linda 
Loveridge, Elwood 
Loverldge, Ron 



w<. 





abey, Polly Jc 



MacFsrIane, Elsi 





■shall, Warren F. 






Mason. Jerald 



162 







Mata. Oarlen* 

Matterion, Linda 
Mstthewi, Naitev Ann 



^auqhan, Janet Ann 



Mav^ield. Jarne 
Mavr, Robert 
McAtertv. Pat 
McAlliiter, 2ini 




dden. Delbert H. 



FRESHMEN 




Meeks. KAthleen 

Melende:. John J. 

MelCer. Russell Dale 

Memorv. Carol 

Menssen. Ede 



Merock. Flo'ence Bi 

Meyers. CharloHe Ka 

Messimer. Linda U 



Miller. Barbara D 
Miller. Brenda Lee 
Miller. Seven, L 



E 







~ v 






f^ ^K (^ ''^ ^ 

i|BBH||H| 



Monty J. 
Or. an 

Thomas Lym 



S/itchell, Janet 



offett, F.ank S 



t-lontgomery. U Ant. 



Moody. Susan™ 



an, Cartna Faye 



Morris, Fred L. 



on, Ron 

«, Claudene 

lien. Arvid L. 



Mosahauer. lylike W. 
Moss, James A,. Jr. 
Moss. J. Lowell 




"UH-WELL-um.gayyrsh. Hello, Bishop.' 



164 





kMM 



Mr 



IP r, ^,| 



T 




FRESHMEN 



Niibet. Bs'b. 
Nisonqer, 
Nil. /anic' 








Olson. Charles' L j 




m:^ji f 



O'Neil. Judy Ann 
Olson, Jackie 
O'Neill Kathleen 



0> 


M 









Parkinson. Linda Ann 
Parry, Patricia 
Parry. Judith 



Parry Richard T. 
Parsons, Sharon 



Payne, George Keni 



"NOW PLEASE, sis, try to keep your head on straight after th 



Penfold, Doyle 
Pendleton, Barbara J. 
Pennington, Gail 
Pennington, D. Loul 




•u « 










Pclerion 
Ptfferion 
Pflenon 




FRESHMEN 




Pulsioher. Js 
Quinn, Pal- 
Oumnt, i 






^Mi.^^^ 




ie^W2«i 






Rasband. Gay 
Rands. Larry G. 
Rasmuiien. Brenda 








ill k..Nrk^ t Mik 



Sobinion. Sandl 

Robinion. Shiuna 

Robinson. Finn 

ftobinton, Paqgy 



Rodenck, Chad 
Rodqers. Els.ng 
Rogers, Carol 
Rogers. Deneen 
Rogers. Dorothv Rae 
Rogers. Judy 
Rogers. Linda 



Rose, Robert 
tSoienlof. Elva 
Ro.kellev, Ronald 



m'''PPik:' 



Rubow, W. Sieve 



Sandberg. Sandra Lyi 



Saiell. Marv Anr 
Schaefer, Joseph D 



Schenk. N. 
Scherqulst. Lew;- 
Schlffman. Doyle L 



Schlappi. Larry Rei 



Schow. Marllyi 

scoM, judv o;. 

Scott, Jl _ 
Scott. Marsha A, 



Sch. 



Scott. Shai 



FRESHMEN 







Sant. Dennis S 











X^T^W 








Schwarti, Phyllis Jo 




FRESHMEN 



St«gg. Richard K. 



Stayner. Step he i 



Steffensen. Party 



jl (Nicky) 
cWlstlne 



Stewart. Stanli 



& 



T '0^ ^ £■ *■' ^< ^ 












hael 0. 
Marllo Kent 
Kenneth Kelly 



Syndergaard, Clair LaVard 
StucH, Paula 
Taggart. Judy 



Tate, Ralph R. 



league, John O. 



THE HOMECOMING OUEEN 



petition is always a big 



Terry. Sheila 
Tuescher, Lynn H. 
Terce'o. Gloria M. 











TKompion Oorlani 



Thornlev. Joe 
Ihurbor. Steve 
ThurqOOd, Carol 



T^ooetti, Beverly 
Tippets. Jotin M. 
Tippeti. Pamela 




Tuckett. Ci; 
Tuclelt. SI 
Tuclett, M 




Umholtj, Bonnie Ca 



Varner, Lynn 

Vassel. Mary 
Vaugtin. Ed 



Voslla Micliael E. 

Wachter. Larry 

Waddell. Lea 

Wadley. Jerald B. 

Wadley Kathryn 

Wadham. Be> Alvon 











■^ 



,//( 




I 







I 








nA^aMitMm 



Wagstad, Brsnl D. 



Elltn Oe. 
Jeanette 
John D. 



Wanlass, Grant S. 
Walkins, Harriet 
Ward, KHarcia Joa 
Ward, Ricliard L. 
Wardia, Allen 
Warmer, Lynn 
Warner. J. Mark 




^ 




{' ^ ^. 





mM Ak %:^Mlk 



Welghtman. Judith 
Weloiinger, A. Judith 
Welch, Ronald J. 
Weight. Sharon Dean 



ELI, 



2 

O W 



West, Lowell S. 
Westerberg. Dennis S. 
Weston. Carolyn 
Weston, Donna K. 



Wright. Rae Ann 
Yeates, Daryl R. 
Zeeman. Kenneth L. 



Youngberg, Lynn Zabrlskie, Katie Zii 



Yates, Ma i 

Young, 8e' 

Dean R. Zundel, J< 



Wheeler. Jo Ell 
Wheelock, Lee 




^^^ik 



p m^ 



f^^?^ 




Wildar. Harry M. 




FRESHMEN 




Workmar 

Workinan 

Wratkall C 

Wrathall Gwen 
Wright, B!ll G. 
Wright, ^arlene 
Wright. Lynn A. 
Wright. Jeai ' 





176 



CULTURAL 

Music 180 

Drama 200 

Lyceums and Forums 212 

Program Bureau 218 





j 




^ 



\ \ 



p. I 



V 




i 



■wp. 









1 ^<l 







MUSIC 

Long hours of painstaking 
practice and study resulted 
in moving performances 
by student musicians as they 
presented stimulating cul- 
tural and spiritual programs 
for the enjoyment of 
the studentbody. 



m: 





I » 



r'/;'! 



di 



1:4 ^m'^'-^' I}' 



UNIVERSITY 



Aaron, Gerald Tingey; Abbott. Kathy Lynn, Alleman. Mary Jo: An. 
dersen, Naomi Diane: Babcock, Kenneth Lynn; Bake, Rebecca 
Lynne- Baker, Lynn; Baker, Milton diaries: Barnes. Linda Jane; 
Barney, Linda: Barton, Barbara: Bateman, Lynn Lament; Bateman. 
Margaret Lou; Bates Ma.ine Carolee: Beecher. Vermoyne: Bell. 
Dlanne Kay; Bell, Julia Valeen; Berg, Peggy Irene; Berber, Jerry 
Robert- Bolster, Carol Elaine: Boren, Dee Lamar; Brimhall, Marcla 
Anne; Brimley, Alyce Carol: Brockhoff, Claire R,: Brooks, Nadlne 
Blanche- Brown, Joyce Maybelle; Bryant, Joann: Burgess. Bonna: 
Burkholder Patricia E.; Burnham, Wendell S.: Busath, Beth; Bush- 
man Barbara Ann; Busson, Sara Lee: Buys, Valerie Lynne; Carr, 
Kathleen: Chelson, Gary James: Christensen, Claire; Christensen, 
Margaret; Christensen. Paul P.: Church, Lewis Robins: Claridge, 
Samuel E Jr ■ Clark, Lillie Mae: Clove Shirley Del: Cluff Cheryl 
Lea- Connolly Beverly J.: Cooper, Daryl Evan; Cornwall, Evelyn 
C : Cottrell. Charee A,: Coutta. Edward William; Curtis, Carol Za 
Cutler Laura- Daniels, Arthur G.: Danzig. Peter Andrew; Davies 
Thomas Joseph: Dendurent Harold O.: Derrick. Carole Anne: Des 
champs, Diane K.; Devenish, Constance C; Drake, Carolyn Lee 
Earl John Milton; Edgel. Ingrid Jeanne: Edwards, Jelaire: Ellis 
Elairie. Ellsworth, Sharlene: Engen, Carol Anne: Fontano, Judy Ellen 
Ford Evelyn Flora; Forsyth, Betty Jane: Foster. Kathleen: Fowler 
Joyce Pearl; Francom, Sterling A.; Freeman, Bruce Leon; Fullmer 
Richard R.; Gallacher, Bonnie Rae: Gano, Barbara Jean: Gardner 
Herberta- Gerrard. Constance Mae: Gertsch, Renee Carlene: Gib 
son Aldine Marie: GUford Karen L: Golsby, Nereda Smith 
Greene Shirley Mae; Griffls, Carolyn Marie; Hamilton, Sheila 
Hansen Garth M.; Hansen. Inez Veneta: Hansen, Joy: Hanser 
Pattl Rae: Hatch, Reva: Hayes, Julianna: Heward, Lorame: H,nd 
marsh Douglas P.: Hogdahl Jeannette B.: Holland, John Lee 
Houghton Henderson D,: Huber. Cherryl Joyce: Huff, Nancy 
Hugentobier, Sandra; Hullinger. Faye: Hunt, Erma Jean: Hursh 
Sally Lou: Hutchinson, Nancy E.: Irvln, Cathenne L; Jacobsen 
Donna K.: James. Carolyn Ruth; Jensen. Carma: Jenson, Larry Max: 



Jergensen. Lynne: Johansen, Clara Ann: Johnson, Geneal Rose: 
Johnson, Janet Ann; Johnson. Rita Jeanne: Jones, Geraldme: Jones, 
Karen Lee: ones. Norma Lun; Joy, Juanita Louise: Kaiser, Jacqueline 
Ann- Koelllng, Donna Lee: Lamb Edna Rachel: Lambson, Lonnie 
Eldon; Larsen, Cathy Ruth; Layton, Lynette Call; Lillywhite, Cheryl 
D.; Lillywhite, Sharon Kay: Lundgren. Lorna De Ann: Lunt, Stanley 
Gene: Marett, Tonia: Maughan, Janet Ann; Ma>well, Elizabeth D.: 
McDonald Maurine: McGee, Merlene M,: McClelland, Margaret 
R.; McNally, Judith arie: McOmber, Arthur F„ Jr.: Merrill, Marilyn 
Kav: Mettner, Laurel Jean; Meyers. Charlotte " ' 



Mo 



Mo 



Ann 



Marily 



Moy 


le Sus< 


nne 


Mu 


rdo 


ck. 


Rut 


r Mo 


phy 


onnl 


e Kay: 


New 


ville 


Tr 


ay 


Jam 


es: N 


else 


nne 


Gayle 


Ol 


ver 


Fr 


ede 


rick 


Leo: 


Ois 


Joyc 


e: Pac 


ker 


Pam 


ela 


P 


atte 


son 


Lind 



ette, Do 



Ka 



Nel- 



Tan 



Ann: Oi< 
Ols( 



i: Patterson. 
Nancy Lou: Peck Anita Louise: Pend'eton. Barbara J.: Peterson. 
Del'a Diane: Peterson, Karen; Porter. Ruth Alice: Presley, Carlotta 
E- Preston Paula Jean; Ray. Paul Roger: Reese. Kay: Reid, Ruth: 
Riddle, Marcia Jean; Risenmay, Dee Lufkin; Robinson, Donna Kay: 
Russell Carol R.- Schaefer, Joseph D.:Scott, Marsha A'ice: Searle. 
Evelyn:' Sechrest, Verona Gail; Self, Juanita A.: .Shaw Frances 
Karen- Shipp Charles Edwin; Shumway. Del K.: Smith Colleen: 
Smith David 'Kent; Snider Sandra Jane: Smith, Judith Thelma: 
Smith Linda Lee: Smith, Patricia Rae: Somerville, Drue V.: Stand- 
age, Keith Floyd: Stephens Harriet L: Swan, James Albert: Swen- 
sen Winslow Dean: Tanner, Joyce Lynnae: Taylor, Bonita Ann: Tay- 
lor, 'judy Marie: Thompson, Carol Joanne: Thompson. Dorothea R.: 
Thompson, Edgar Joseph; Thornburgh, Karen: Thueson, Neil Cooper: 
Thurman Ronald Varion: Tippets, Pamela Anne; Todd. Jennie Lea: 
Tucker Thomas Conrad: Van Cannon, Lora J.; Ward Welton Evansr 
Weight Sharon D.- Welghtman. Judith Kay: West, Lowell Shell; 
Westover Jacquita K.: Wilcox, Kar'a Jeanne; Wilcox, Dlanne: 
Wiseman,' Shirley Ann: Workman. Gloria: Workman. Linda Louise: 
Workman, Shauna: Wrigha Lynn Austin; Yager Barbara P. 





mjmnu^M 



,1 




CHORALE 



KURT WEINZINGER. Director 




^^ 



^tr* 



I 




More than three hundred students with enthusiasm 
and a desire to sing were members of University 
Chorale, the largest musical organizations on cam- 
pus. Although its large size made touring imprac- 
tical, the group made many appearances under the 
direction of Kurt Weinzinger at devotional assem- 
blies, BYU Stake conferences, and with the com- 
bined choirs at general conference. Besides present- 
ing their annual Christmas and spring concerts, the 
Chorale participated in the spring production of 
"Sand in Their Shoes." Throughout the year mem- 
bers held numerous activities such as parties, fire- 
sides, and Christmas caroling in Provo. The year's 
officers included Kay Bassett, President; Bruce 
Freeman, Vice-President; Bill Coutta and Carolee 
Bates, Social Chairmen; Shirley Green, Secretary; 
and Elaine Ellis and Lorin Blauer, Librarians. The 
group was accompanied by Joan Thomander, and 
Carol Alldredge was the student assistant. 



Row On 

Thelma 

ottoy. y 

Kara Ro 
Kohle 



Nin 



H, 



Beverly Thoma 
cl, Annette H 
■garet Shumwa, 

nnah Oldroyd, Ron HadI 



lor, Hans Baet+ch 

Yvonne Blayock, Virgin 

Skeen. Jean Palmer, Mi. 

bins. Roger Miller. Mat 

Boer. John Thor 

er. Carolyn M 

Giles. Jim Scoresby. Lynn Poult. 



er. Evelyn Neff. Judy Strong 
Paulson. Carol Pulley. JoAnn 
Davis. Pat Tenney. Judy John 
England. Karen Rutter. Marg 
,an Gibbs. Ch 



Rawls. L'De 



,ld Ottley. Ron Lee. Carolyn Broberg 
Luti. Jean Tidwell. Row Three: Nancy 
/lichaelens Packer. Karen Keller. Richard Rob 
aK Hales. Vern Young. Ribert Merrill. Richarc 
Colene Ware. Judith Weinzinger, Jane Weav 
Row Four; Pat Clyde. Katherine Re«. Alyci 
T. Gordon Carter. Eliiah Cardon 



Weddingto 



Mar; 
: Marsha Hoyt 



Bright. 



nd Madse 
ickett. Ri. 



Douglas Gibbs. Robert 
Anne Keeler. Sylvia Berg, Nancy Folsom, Row 
Rosemarr Burtenshaw. Julia Ann Nielson. George 
Steve Jarvis, David Perry. Blaine Quarnstrom. 
Bruce Gibb, Curtis Forsgren, Marv Jenkins. David 
rd Linford, Evelyn Parry, Marcia Ward, Clifta 




A CAPPELL^ 



A CAPPELLA MEMBERS re 
bers at the party atterwar 
Marcia Hoyt. Marv Jenkini 
ments for the evening. 



xed by playing take-offs on the Spring Concert num- 
1. Dee Trac/. Bob Merrill. Director Newell Weight, 
!nd Ron Lee turned their musical abilities to instru- 



NEWELL B. WEIGHT. Director 






)HOIR 



A CAPPELLA OFFICERS. Marv Jenkins, Jim Rowls. Marcio Hoyt Bob Me 
rill. Dee Tracy. Don Lee. Keren Keller. John Thompson. Margaret Kohle 
and Richard Robbins supervised the organization's activity. 



Organized in 1959 under its present director, Newell 
B. Weight, this year's A Capella Choir consisted of 
eighty members chosen through extensive auditionmg 
and qualification in musicianship, scholarship, and 
personality, representing fourteen states and Canada. 
During the eleven years of its existence, the choir 
has toured extensively throughout the western states 
and Utah. This years activities included high school 
tours throughout the state in the fall, the annual 
campus spring concert, and appearances with the 
Utah Symphony Orchestra in Salt Lake City, Ogden, 
and Provo performing Crawford Gates' Second Sym- 
phony, which included the Hill Cumorah Pageant 
music. Besides having a party each year, the choir 
went caroling at Christmas to President 'W^ilkinsons 
home, to the State Mental Hospital, and the down- 
town area of Provo. The highlight of their spring 
activities was their annual choir banquet. 




One 



Mo 



Na 



na Andrus, Jo 
Gardner. Va 



Ande 
Yorq 



Loul! 



Benson. RXene Jensen, Norma Pocock, Charlene Goodso 
Two: Charlene Anderson Susan Yanic, McKay Rawlins. 
Jacobs, Alden Sorensen. Mike Suzuki, Gary Robert Fossun 
ney Zabriskie, Inel Collingwood, Maughan McMurdie. 
Cooper. Ross Brown, Colleen Redford, Sharon King. 




MADRIGAL 



A NIGHT of musical entertainment was provided by the Madrigal Singe 




Throughout the year, the Madrigal Singers, com- 
posed of twenty-six talented students, and directed 
by Dr. John R. Halliday, presented their special selec- 
tions of madrigal music as they sat around a candle- 
lit table. The group began the year with a high 
school contact tour, and throughout the year made 
many appearances in assemblies, church and club 
programs, and at stake and general conferences. 
They also presented their special Christmas and 
spring programs where special musical talents of the 
members, such as playing the clavichord and harpsi- 
chord, provided an additional note of pleasure. Be- 
tween practices and performances, the Madrigals and 
their director enjoyed many pleasant hours together 
at their get-acquainted party, a winter tobaggan 
party and a spring "clean the cabin party" at Dr. 
Halliday's cabin in American Fork Canyon, and their 
annual banquet held spring quarter. 




SINGERS 



MADRIGAL OFFICERS Vonio Yorgason. Charlene Anderson. McKay Ra 
and Inel Colllngwood. 



JOHN HALLIOAY. Director 





1 !\ iLiUllilttttBU 




E 





RALPH WOODWARD, Director 




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fx 



14. 



CANTORUM 



Schola Cantorum was a newly organized group this 
year, composed of two hundred and eighty-eight 
members from the combined Male and Women's 
choruses under the direction of Ralph Woodward 
and his graduate assistant, Robert Bowden. Require- 
ments for membership, which included a 2.5 grade 
point average, musicianship, personality, and proper 
attitude, were rigid, but the resulting ensemble was 
a well-chosen, versatile group. Tours included a 
three-day southern Utah tour in December and a 
ten-day tour in March which extended northward to 
Calgary and Edmonton, Canada. The group per- 
formed at Wasatch Academy in Salt Lake City, in 
the annual Christmas Concert, presented a sacred 
concert in January which included Bach's "Mag- 
nificat", and participated in the spring performance 
of "Sand in "Their Shoes." Other activities included 
quarterly parties, sponsoring a Homecoming float, 
and setting up a booth which took first place during 
Organization Week, sponsored by IOC. 



1 



'"^ >''3^. 



SCHOLA CANTORUM Of-FICERS «ere DeMoyne Belke 
and Gerra Stahle. Robert JenHos and Julalne Johnson «, 
picture was taken. 



Villiam Aihmore 
absent when the 



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CONCERT 



RALPH G. LAYCOCK, conductor. 



Row One: Clifford Sorenson, Fred 



Grigg, Naomi Boyer, C 
Eorlene Wright. Mary Thi 
Grigg. Row Two: f 
Chuck Borough, J( 

puty. Nan , 
Robison, Howard EastI 



Bonney, Brent Faulkner, Billie 
Moss. Paula Stucki. Meriiyn Dalley, 
Linda Callister. Mary K. Davis. Janet 
Knudsen Annette Smith, Marilynn Barney, 
Bates, Rickard Humberstone. Willa Lunt, 
- " ■ ' ■ vich, Lynn 
.11 Robert 




Mortensen, W,ld 
iorie Light, James Bragu 
Lurae Ahrendes, Dean 



Lurae Ahrendes, Dean Pace, Re 
Jensen, Richard Terry, Blaine Hal 



'non Scorr, Dick Bybee. varc 
Roy Rummler. Not present 
■l.l«< Carson Shart 



,^, May, Ma. 

Vard Holland. 

meth 



190 





I 



BAND 



After holding auditions during registration time, 
director Ralph G. Laycoclc and the Concert Band 
began another active year. Besides presenting a spe- 
cial concert each quarter, participating in the annual 
Christmas program, and playing at numerous as- 
semblies, the band performed at several high schools 
in central Utah and toured through Idaho, Wash- 
ington, and Oregon during spring quarter. Group 
activities included parties autumn and winter quar- 
ters and the annual Spring Banquet. During the 
year, thirty of the members played in Intercollegiate 
Band in Berkeley, California, and in Salt Lake City, 
in recognition of the regard which Concert Band 
has earned as one of the outstanding collegiate 
groups in thhe United States. 



CONCERT BAND OFFICERS 
Historian: Janet Grigg, Secre 



dent; Naomi Boyar, 







Row One: Robert B. Welton, Commander Frank H. Gillespie, 
Lynn R. Wariner, Victor L. Brown. David C. Wadsworth, David 
B. Stannard, Howard R. Child Josepli D. Schaefer, Howard D. 
Gober, James B. Heath, Larry D. Nelson. Row Two: Ronald C. 
Beagles, Roger L Sorensen, Ernest S. Ahlborn, Earnest L. Rams- 
worth. Jonathan M. Smith, Thomas W, Biggs. Douglas B. Pulley, 
James F. Cartwright, Varol E. Shaw, Gilbert E. Taylor. Patrick 
L. Simishey. Not pictured: Roger B. Dunn, Lawrence A. Mikesell, 
Brandt C. Curtis, Director. 



ROTC 



ROTC CHORUS OFFICERS Gilbert Taylor, Robert Welton, and David Stannard. 




Directed by Brandt B. Curtis, the ROTC Chorus had 
as its goal and purpose the advertising of the ROTC 
program at BYU. The group ranged from twenty 
to thirty voices, and any person who was a member 
of the AFROTC was eligible to sing with the group 
upon consent of the instructor. The chorus took its 
yearly tour to outlying communities in southern 
Idaho and Utah, and was invited to sing at Disney- 
land in Southern California. Other activities includ- 
ed singing at assemblies, conferences, sacrament 
meetings, ROTC graduation exercises, and partici- 
pating in the production of "Sand in Their Shoes" 
in the spring. Group officers included Robert Wel- 
ton, Commanding Officer; Patrick Simiskey, As- 
sistant Commanding Officer; David Stannard, Flight 
Sergeant; Bert Taylor, Information Service Officer; 
Roger Dunn, Ron Child, and Ronald Beagles, Ele- 
ment Leaders. Others were Douglas Pulley, Guid- 
ance; Lynn Wariner and Victor Brown, Librarians; 
and Larry Nelson, Assistant Information Officer. 




CHORUS 



THE CHORUS PARTICIPATED In the ROTCSponsor assembly 



BRANDT CURTIS, Director 




I 





MARCHING BAND 



MARCHirJG BATJD g 



e prograrns at football gome 



Roqe 
Bingha 



ndolyn Ale 



ck Anderson Natalie Andrus, Robert Apgood, 
Jean Barlow, John Beck, Dean Bennett, Connie 
,ard Charles Borough, James Brague, Gayle 
_jent Roscoe Burnett Duane Call, Gary Car- 
pe°n;e"rrJuhan;a"chr;stensen. Ron Cond.e, Geraldine Davenport, 
Gloria De Gaston, Brent Faulkner, Ray Goodwin, Nancy Graham, 
Blame Hales. Ellis Hamblln, Patti Rae Hansen, Lawrence Harmon, 
Robert Harris, Maryona Hatch, Francis Hoopes. Kent Hughes. 
Verlee Huntsman, Tony Johnson, Diana Kersey, 
Gary Lambert. David Larson. Marjorie Light, Sharr 
Bateman Cornelia Bates Madsen, Vermoyne Bee- 
son Sandra Bischoll. Evelyn Croft. Esther Dillman, P^il^P .feeler, 
Michael Kirkham. James May, Marian McCarty, Lo-se MerrN, R.ch^ 
ard Neadham, DelRay Piatt. Paul Roger Ray, Robert R.ska. CUford 
Sorensen Paula Stucki David Tucker. Beverly White. David W,l- 
iams Lei Young. Ken Fadley, Henry Minor. Andrea Moody, Ray 
Moon Bill Nelson, Joel Norton, Brent Packard, Craig Pa. man, 
Margo Ray. Mary Rav Leon Ricks, John Riehle, Lynn Robmson, 
Gaylin Ro"i".s. ^V^''"' -^'LT ",;..~j"w;ii:;:„ u.r^i ^h,w Beth 



cBrlde, Ron 
Clark Ben. 



Sanders Gladys Saxton, Carsoi 
Marco Ward, Eugene Webb. Fred Williams. VarolSh. 
Shawcroft Merlin Witt. Bob Witt, Lynn Youngberg, Curl 
croft. AnneHe Smith. Sharee Van Wagenen, Natrone War 



Sha 




194 




CONCENTRATION AND practice result in precision marching. 



The members of Marching and Varsity Band led a 
dual lifecoiisisting of performing for half-time shows 
and playing serious works in preparation for their 
winter quarter concert. Special features of the half- 
time shows were their presentations of "Around the 
World in Eight)' Days" and "The Circus." Drum 
major Ronald Bateman and majorette Beverly White, 
with the aid of the snappy Commandants marching 
group, added eye appeal and an extra spark to the 
half-time shows. Marching Band made a weekend 
tour with the football team to Phoenix and Tempe, 
Arizona, for special performances. Winter quarter, 
under the name of Varsit)' Band, the group practiced 
music of a more demanding type under the direction 
of Cliff Madsen. The culmination of their labors 
was their annual concert presented in early March. 




195 




OPERA 



With the rise of the "Opera Workshop" program in 
American colleges and universities and the desire 
of students on campus to perform in operatic j)ro- 
ductions, the Opera Workshop had its beginning 
in 1945. From that time to the present, many stu- 
dents have been given training in music and the 
technical requirements inherent in operatic produc- 
tions. This year the group presented a variety of 
operas during fall and winter quarters and held so- 
cials for the casts after each opera. Some of the 
other activities which the members participated in 
were assemblies, radio and television performances, 
and touring appearances at the high schools in the 
local area and in part of Canada. The group enjoyed 
such extracurricular get-togethers as a swimming 
party, fireside and testimony meetings, and a spring 
awards banquet. Brent Shaw was President and his 
officers included Pat Kelsey, Shirley Harrison, Joan 
Justis, and Jeanette Royle. Dr. Don L. Earl was con- 
ductor of the Workshop. 



DON EARL, Director 





Row Ona: Gae Snow, Jeanatte Royle. Eileen Wyss, Shauna Sooly, 
Veann Webb Judith Ericlson. Judith Owens. Beverly Watlins, 
Karen Jacobs, Claire Leavitt. Row Two: Denis Sorenson Suianne 
Sanborn, Pat Kelsey, Gaile Woodruff, Barbara Raymond, Alice 
Hllden, Andrea Moody. Natrone Ward, Jane Reese, Donna Gar- 
rett, Barbara Key. Nannette Lamb Lynda Mart;. Row Thre.: Paul 
E, Crum, Jr., Beverly Drake, Coralie Stoddard, Sandi Price, 
Judith Ann (vlauqhan, Carroll "Sue" Killin, Priscilla Jacob, Joan 
Justis, Vivien Beecroft, Evelyn Oals, Faye Wittwer, Dawna Tay- 
lor, Beth Schrumpf. Robert Tumor, Row Four: Wayne Wood, 
James C. Peterson, Brent S. Shaw, Keith D. Alger Daniel H. 
Hoqgan, Douglas O. tvtacLeon, Winslen M Jensen Stanley 
Parkinson. Jim Calkin, Boyd Hancock, David White, Gary R. 
Stringham. Lynn N. Ivtecham, David Judd, Bob Ivlerrill, 



WORKSHOP 



THEATRE ORCHESTRA 


OBOES- 


FIRST VIOLINS— 


Naomi Boyer 

David Glen William: 


Wayne Wood, Concorlmasler CLARINETS— 


Clyde E. Weeks. Jr. 
Helen S. Robinson 


Steven S. Joplln 


Beverly D, Dunford 
Robert S. Davenport 


Marvin Jenkins 
Marian F. McCarty 


SECOND VIOLINS— 


BASSOONS— 


Ida Grace Ammons 
Wilma Homer 


Lewis R. Sutherland 
Gayle Bramwell 


Arlene Teaque 


FRENCH HORNS— 


Larry Shumway 


Robert D. Frankovich 


Sharon Thomas 


Susan Deputy 


VIOLAS— 


Lynn N. Robinson 


Marilyn Hales 


Anita Louise Peck 


Kathleen Crook 


TRUMPETS— 


CELLOS— 


Cornelia M. Bates 


Karen Ogden 


Blaine F. Hales 


Rebecca Hawkes 


TROMBONES— 


BASSES— 


Lurae Ahrendes 


Sharron Lynne Wjird 


Vard Burton Holland 


Carrie Jacobs 


TUBA— 


PICCOLO— 


Clarence Bushman 


C'lft'ord G. Sorenson 


TYMPANI— 


FLUTES- 


Craiq William Pa.ma 


Clifford G. Sorenson 


PIANIST— 


Patricia J. Parry 


Carole Crandall 



JACK SCOTT and Jacqueline Robert 





THE IMPRESARIO 

The Impresario, W. A. Mozart's one-act comedy 
with music, was presented by the Opera Workshop 

in November. This light-hearted satire on opera and 
its people concerns an elderly stage-struck Viennese 
banker, Mr. Angel, who tries to influence the local 
opera to hire an old worn-out soprano, Madame 
Goldentrill, who wishes to give her career a grand 
finale. When Madame Goldentrill fails, he produces 
an aspiring young opera star, Miss Silverpeal. Dr. 
Don Earl directed and conducted the production. 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 

Mr. Scruples Brent Shaw and Ray Sumner 

Mr. Bluff Jack Sederholm and Philip Empoy 

Mrs. Angel Dorrell Hadley and Denis Sorenson 

Madame Goldentrill _ Juio Ann Nielsen 

Miss Silverpeal Shirley Harrison 



JULIA NIELSEN and D, 
Opera Workshop product 



DER FREISCHUTZ 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 

Kilian Ken Wilks 

Max Brandt Curtis 

Cuno - B. Rodney Zabriskie 

Caspar Roy Samuelson 

Zamiel Thomas Jones 

Annie Lurline LeVar 

Agnes Nancy Empey 

Prince Ottokar Darrell Hadley 

The Hermit Wayne Keith 



Carl Maria Von Weber's Der Freischutz, a romantic 
opera in three acts, was presented by Opera Work- 
shop in February. This opera portrays the efforts of 
a forester. Max, to prove his superior marksmanship 
so that he may become the new head forester for 
the Prince of Bohemia and marry the girl he loves. 
Max is tempted by Zamiel, the Black Huntsman, to 
assure his success by using magic bullets in return 
for his soul. Max's deceit is discovered and he is put 
on probation and the shooting contest is abolished. 
Dr. Don Earl conducted and directed the opera. 



OPERA WORKSHOP i 



ented Von Wobe 



chutz, during winter quarter. 




NAOMI SESSIONS. Carolyn Woodruff, Jeonelte Royle. Ken Adams, and Jacqueline Roberts appeared In the opera The L .. j j . j 



THE LOWLAND SEA 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 

Dcrie Davis Jacqueline Roberts and Marjorie England 

Johnny Dee _ _.._ Jack ScoH and Boyd Hancocl 

Captain Jesse - Thomas Jones. Jr. 

Nathaniel Hsuid _ _ Kenneth Adams 

Amos _ Robert Oliphant 

The Ship's Doctor. — . Klair Bybee 

Hannah „ Marlene Peterson 

Belinda _ _ Bonnie Stout 

Delight Naomi Sessions 

Patience Jeannette Royle 

Submit „ Carolyn Woodruff 



The American folk opera by Alec Wilder, The Low- 
land Sea, was presented in conjunction with The 
Impresario in November. In this opera, Wilder tells 
the Story of a sailor, Johnny Dee, whose true love, 
Dorie Davis, promises to wait forever for him. When 
he is reported lost at sea, Dorie immediately marries 
a widower with three children. Johnny returns two 
years later, having been in Singapore when his ship 
sank. Brandt Curtis conducted the production. 



THE LOWLAND SFA ■ 



200 





DRAMA 

The excitement of the 

backstage world and the 

glare of the footlights were 

the final results of hours of 

rehearsal, planning and 

development of skill. 



201 




MARTHA ADAMS was surprised by Lynne Palmer's spirit. 



BLITHE SPIRIT 



HAROLD OAKS. Phil Keeler and Lynne Palmer prepared to le 
al Tour, presenting "Blitlie Spirit" in tlie Far East. 




MARGE POTTER, Harold Dales. Martha Adams, and Phil Keeler 
held a conversation during a "Blithe Spirit" scene. 

MEMBERS OF THE CAST 

Charles Condomine Harold Oaks 

Ruth . Martha Adams 

Madame Arcati Carol Lynn Wright 

Elvira Lynne Palmer 

Doctor Bradman Phil Keeler 

Edith Eleanor Brouqh 

Mrs. Bradman Marge Potter 

Sponsored by the Government Overseas Entertain- 
ment Service, a cast of BYU speech students present- 
ed Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit" to overseas troups 
for seven weeks. Under the direction of Dr. Harold 
I. Hansen, and accompanied by Mrs. Mayree Rey- 
nolds from Provo, the group toured Korea, Japan, 
the Philippines, Guam, Wake, Okinawa, and Hawaii, 
presenting their performances over forty times for 
the natives as well as the enlisted men and officers. 
The group was warmly received throughout the dura- 
tion of the tour, and as a special reward for their 
services, the USO allowed them to present a special 
performance at the Church College of Hawaii. 

ELEANOR BROUGH looked horritied as spirit Lynne Palmer fright- 
ened her while Harold Oaks looked on. 






TOM SAWYER 
mortal story. 



TOM'S INGENUITY provided tiim with helpers In his whilowoshinq job. 



Youtheatre, a program of the Department of Speech 
and Dramatic Arts, strived to "involve children in 
creative and cultural experience before they become 
the forgotten children who love Lucy better than 
Toscanini. " Youtheatre, under the supervision of 
Dr. Albert O. Mitchell in association with Max C. 
Golightly, and in cooperation with Provo and Alpine 
schools, was a member of the American Educational 
Theatre. This organization provided experience in 
the living theatre to the youth and children of 
Utah Valley and helped set a pattern for the entire 
Church. Included in the season's productions were 
the classic "Rumpelstiltskin," Mark Twain's "Tom 
Sawyer," and an original pioneer-Indian play called 
"Ann's Papoose Hideout, " which was a creative 
project developed through the efforts of college stu- 
dents with children. This play project exemplified 
the aims of Youtheatre to preserve and develop our 
heritage while providing creative experience and de- 
velopment for young people. 

YOUTHEATRE 




CHILDREN AND college studen- r,, 

presentation of "Ann's Papoose Hideou 



INDIAN VISITS to Ann's cabin prov,d 


ed monnents of tension for 


her and the children. 










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NIELSON, Lee Scanlon, 
Thing perfi 



during Mrs. Mc 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 



Sybil 

Eva 

Maude 

Nelson . 
Howay 
Mimi .... 



The Chef . 
Virgil 
Dirty Joe 
Stinker 
Poison Edd 
Mrs. Shelle 



Leah Holley 
Marilyn Ord 
Lynne Palmer 

Carene Clarle 
Mary Jo Ellis 

Jane Seimssen 
. Lee Scanlon 
. Phil Thomas 
Kathy Tuclett 

. Lorin Blauer 



. Kent Nelson 

Kent Davis 

Arnold Stringham 

Quinn Gardner 

Gwen Wrathall 

Jack Sederholm. Lee Wright 

li^irwitch .'.' Jerry Jo 

Beautiful Witch '^"'" ""' 




Bowen 



POISON EDDIb, yuinn Gardner, got the 
with Mrs. Shellenback. Gwen Wrathall. 



MRS. MC THING 



The Brigham Young University Theater opened its 
1959-60 season with the hilarious "Mrs. McThing" 
by Mary Chase. Hailed by Broadway critics as the 
"Freshest play of the year," the production was di- 
rected by Dr. Lael J. Woodbury and played to capa- 
city houses as well as performing for the Annual 
Rocky Mountain Theater conference being held on 
campus. The plot is concerned with Mrs. Howard 
V. Larue III who becomes involved in witchcraft 
after restricting her son from playing with Mrs. 
McThing's little girl from the "other side." The 
angered Mrs. McThing resorts to witchcraft to ac- 
quire revenge, and the results compose the glamor- 
ous, sometimes frightening, but hilarious climax. 



HOWAY, Phil Thoi 





Iked to Lord and Lady Capulet, Gary 



Thg Prologue 
Samson 

Abraham 

Balthosar 

Benvollo 

Tybalt 

Lofd Capulet 

Lady Capulet 

Lord Montague 

Lady Montague 

Prince of Varona 

Romeo 

Parii 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 



Lynn McKlnlay 
Robert Nelson 



Norr 



Mori 



Kent Nel: 

Jack Sederhc 

Johnny M 

Phil Kee 

Gary Stew 

Judith Olau: 

Lee Scan 

Janice Ander; 

Tom Macau 



Harold Oaks 
aid McCulloch 
Lee GIfford 
Carene Clark 
Lynne Palme. 
Roger Jordan 
Don Worsley 



The immortal double tragedy of William Shake- 
speare's "Romeo and Juliet " was presented during 
the first week in November. Featuring wider and 
higher sets with two gigantic turntables, the play 
presented a unique staging utilizing the entire width 
of the Joseph Smith Auditorium stage. This pre- 
sentation of Shakespeare's classic, directed by Dr. 
Harold I. Hansen, was given in tribute to Dr. Ger- 
rit dejong, Jr., dean emeritus of the College of Fine 
Arts, who is now teaching languages. 




LORD AND LADY Capulet. Gary Stewart and Judith Olauson, reiolvod the 
family feud with Lord and Lady Montague, Lee Scanlon and Janice Anderson, 
after the death of the lovers. 




JULIET. Lynne Palmer, tries to pry informatic 
nurse, Carene Clark. 



-rninq Romeo from he 



ROMEO AND JULIET 



THE FAMILIES cl 



ird Oaks, and Julli 





THE RIVALS 



Starting the new year, the BYU Theater's January 
presentation was "The Rivals," an Eighteenth Cen- 
tury love comedy by Richard B. Sheridan. With long, 
flowing gowns and powdered wigs, together with 
the stylized set pieces placed in front of a black 
cyclorama curtain, the production under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Preston Gledhill lent itself to the Roman- 
tic Period of the Eighteenth Century. "The Rivals" 
is a comedy of the manners of the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury. After the artificial sentimentality of a long 
period of literature, the play's sharp dialogue, witti- 
cisms, and bright repartee have brought it fame as 
one of the classics of the "English" language. 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 

Sir Anthony Absolute Roger Jordan 

Captain Absolute . Sheril Hill 

Faulkland Kent Davis 

Acres Kent Nelson 

Sir Lucius OTrigger Lee O'Scanlon 

Fag Robert Nelson 

David James Fife 

Tho-Tias - Lee V^right 

Servants Barry Lauritien. Theron Twogood 

Mrs. Malaprop Carene Clarb 

Lydia Languish Mickey Halladay 

Julia _ Diana Marlham 

Lucy Marilyn Ord 

Maid Nancy Bowen 

Boy Michael Gledhill 



„ , , . t , „^ „„ rA.t members Carene Claris Kent Davis, Roger Jordan. Diana MarVham, Mictey Halliday. and Sheril Hil 
GALA COSTUMES of former days were featured on cast members i„arene ^.lar e, b y 






mm 



DAWNA TAYLOR tried on g hat boloro Fred Di.on, Shauna Sw 
son. Naoma Davis, and Lee Gifford. 



ALL MY SONS 





MEMBERS OF THE CAST 




Joe 




Gary Stewart 


Kate 




Dawna Taylor 


Chris 




Fred DI>on 


Ann 




Shauna Swenson 


George 




Lee GiOord 


Jim 




Blaine Quarnstrom 


Sue 




Marisha Crouse 


F-ranl 




Richard Sturqis 


Lydia 




Naoma Davis 


Bert 




Steven Peterson 




GARY STEWART and Fred Dl 
son realized his father's guilt. 



BLAINE QUARNSTROM and Richard Iturgis. neighbors, visited with Gary Stewart in < 



Directed by Dr. Lael J. Woodbury, Arthur Miller's 
"All My Sons" was presented in ' February. This 
drama received the Drama Critics' Award for the 
best new American play of the season on Broadway. 
Concerned with the fortunes of the Keller and 
Deever families, this drama involved Joe Keller and 
Herbert Deever, who own a shop for manufactur 
ing airplane parts during the war. Deever is sent to 
prison because the firm causes the death of many 
flyers by turning out defective parts. The love of 
Chris Keller and Ann Deever, and the bitterness of 
George Deever returning from war to find his 
father in prison and his partner free further compli- 
cate events. The reaction of a son to his guilty 
father climaxes this electrifying play. 

from All My Sons. ■ 




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MAJOR HARRY 'CARGILL, Ron Olauson pleaded with his fellow pri 



TIME LIMIT 

BYU Theater's March presentation was the modern 
war play, "Time Limit, " by Henry Denker and Ralph 
Berkey. This story of enemy torture and the limits 
of human endurance involves the court-martial of 
an Army major who turns color in prison camp in 
order to save his men from more punishment after 
the major's son is killed by the prisoners for inform- 
ing on a buddy. Ingeniously staged flashbacks reveal 
the true events in the camp, providing a new and 
terrifying picture of what happens when an Ameri- 
can youth falls into Communist hands. 

JANICE NIELSON, Lee Scanlon. Stan Porter, Roger Jordon. Gary Wood, and Ron Ola 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 

T/Sgt. Charles Baker Lee Scanlon 

WAC Corporal Jean Evans Janice Nielson 

Second Lt. George Miller Gary Wood 

Lt. Col. William F. Edwards Roger Jordan 

First Lt. Mike Livingston Lee Wright 

Capt. Gus Jablonski Ivan Crosland 

First Lt. Steve Warden Glen M. Smith 

First Lt. Peter "Zip" Wardell . Robert C. Stephens 

Second Lt. "Boxer" Bueller Froin Pearson 

Second Lt. Phil Garland Thomas Tyler 

Colonel Kim Johnny S. Ho 

Major Harry Corglll Ron Olauson 

Major General Joseph Conners Stan Porter 

Mrs. Mary Cargill Judith Olauson 

Captain Joseph Connors, Jr Kent E. Nelson 

Second Lt. Mark Allen Loren fliauer 

Captain Paul Dixon . David Loughney 
Chinese Announcer William Lee 

Sentry Wong Cheng 

on were involved in intense action during "Time Limit" production. 





THE PROSECUTION 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 

Violet Caroleo Ferguson 

Watchmen Richard Ma.tiold 

Counselor _ Ron Olauson 

Judge _ ..„ „ „ Monroe J. Pa.man 

Assistant Dale Stirling 

Prosecutor Lee Scanlon 

Assistant Grace Ann Scanlon 



Clerl 



Nels. 



Reporter Marcia Smith 

Esther Reubens Nancy Bowen 

Private Se«tus Lucius Wayne Pond 

Mrs. Nathaniel Pinches Di..le Randall 

Joseph of Arimathea Richard Henstrom 

Lady Procula Claudia Charlotte Sheffield Maxfield 

Pontius Pilate Merrill B. Tew 

Saul of Tarsus Sheril Hill 

Beulah Adams Diana Markham 

Sadoc _ Rei Lee 

Susanna of Canaan Mickey Halladay 

Mary Magdalene Judith Olauson 

Simon Peter Ray Jones 

Gardener Robert Nelson 



A MOMENT OF TENSION 



ated whe 



Ma 



Magda 



THE VIGIL 

"The Vigil, " a modern presentation of the resurrec- 
tion of Christ, was the final dramatic presentation 
of the season under the direction of Dr. Albert O. 
Mitchell. The play takes place in a courtroom shortly 
after the tomb of Christ has been discovered empty. 
The gardener of the tomb area is on trial for the 
theft of the body of Christ. The complete modern 
setting includes all of the characters who were im- 
portant in the resurrection including Mary Magda- 
lene, Saul of Tarsus, Peter, and Pontius Pilate. A 
verdict is not reached, and the play's end is heralded 
by ringing church bells signifying Christ's resurrec- 
tion and the dawning of Easter morn. 

on ..truck out in anger at the gardener, portrayed by Robert Nelson, 







\ 



./ 'rf 





JOSHUA. Walter Richardson, 
comic reliefs in "Sand In Their 



and Drusilla. Lorna Ericls< 



SAND IN THEIR SHOES 



For the second consecutive year, "Sand in Their Shoes, " 
the story of the Mormon Battalion, was presented in the 
Brigham Young University stadium May 27, 28, 30, 31, 
and June 1. The original production presented last year 
was in preparation for two years, and was presented dur- 
ing the last week of spring quarter, drawing crowds from 
throughout Utah and the western states. The original 
script was written by Don Oscarson and the stirring mu- 



sical score was composed by Dr. Crawford Gates of the 
BYU music faculty. Dr. Harvey Fletcher, the "Father of 
Stereophonic Sound," designed the intricate four-track 
sound system. The gigantic musical was directed by Dr. 
Harold I. Hansen, for years the director of the famed 
Hill Cumorah Pageant. This year the sets were even larg- 
er than during the original production, encompassing al- 
most the entire length of the BYU football field. 



and dancers performed as the Mormon Battalit 



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SAND IN THEIR SHOES" Cr 



:luded the entir 



MEMBERS OF THE CAST 



Ned 

Lorraine 
Carter .. 
Orusllle . 
Joshua .. 
Timmy 
Doctor . 
First Pio 
Second 
Third Pic 



... Ewan Harbrecht 
Lael J. Woodbury 

Howard Ruff 

.. Ina Lou Cheney 

Ray Wood 

Lorna Ericlcson 

. Walter Richardson 

, Steven Peterson 

Duane Ryan 

Varney Gailey 

. Thomas Jones, Jr. 
. Blaine Quarnstrorr 



Fourth Pioneer 

Fifth Pioneer 

First Battalioneer . 
Second Battloneer 
Third Battalioneer 
First Woman 
Captain Allen 
Sergeant (U. S. 
Lieutenant Wells 

Private 

Sergeant (Baltalic 
Soloist Dancers . 



Army) 



Cliff Birell 

Glen Humphreys 

C. Kent Jensen 

Joel Justesen 

Klair Bybee 

Nancy Briqgs 

Ron Dixon 

John Beach 

Don Milner 

Lee Gifford 

Robert Smoot 

wald, Diane Russon. 

Penrod, Bruce Hay 



ACT II began with the batfalii 



JOEL. Dr. Lael J. Woodbury, 
Mormon Battalion. 



ed orders for formation of the 



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Lyceums and Forums 

Skilled artists performing 
the world's great music, and 
speakers with varied back- 
grounds provided moving 
experiences and a vital part 
of each student's education 
in lyceums and forum 
assemblies. 



au 



213 




LYCEUMS 

The 1959-60 lyceum season provided a wealth of 
opportunities for the students of BYLI to partake 
of the expert and sensitive performances of world- 
renowned concert artists in all fields of music. The 
highlight of the year was the November performance 
of the Vienna Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, 
under the direction of Herbert Von Karajan. This 
program attracted visitors from throughout the west- 
ern states. Other featured artists of the season in- 
cluded Eileen Farrell, dramatic, lyric, and coloratura 
soprano; Flor Peeters, Belgian organist of the Me- 
chelen Cathedral and director of the Organ Depart- 
ment at the Royal Flemish Conservatory in Antwerp; 
and Leon Fliesher, young American pianist who 
was one of the first artists chosen to represent the 
United States during American Week at the Brus- 
sels World's Fair. Also appearing were cellist 
Mstislav Rostropovich, German pianist Hans Richter- 
Haaser, famed violin and piano duo, Benno and 
Sylvia Rabinof, and vocal duo Alarie and Simoneau. 
The Utah Symphony Orchestra, under the direction 
of maestro Maurice Abravanal, provided two even- 
ings of entertainment during winter quarter. High- 
light of the spring season was Marian Anderson, 
famed operatic star, who gave a stirring performance 
to a packed fieldhouse audience. Winding up the 
year's program was Carmen Cavallero's orchestra, 
which appeared in May. 



THE RABINOFS provided delightfu 



LEON FLEISHER's sensitive interpreta- PIANIST HANS RICHTER HAASER provided rich THE VOICE of talerited Eileen Parrel thrilled he 

special feature of enjoymert. interpretations of the music of the masters. BYU audience. 




';.^-' 



THE WORLD FAMOUS Vienna Philharmonic provided a sliHed and artistic performance tor the BYU audlenc 



LYCEUM COMMIHEE MEMBERS « 
IAN ANDERSON'S appearance brought ca- CELLIST MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH provided Chris Vickari, Kathy Rokes. Karen Ke 



t crowds to the Fieldhou 



chinq evening of musical 



nd Yvonne Blaylocl. 




215 



m 




A WARNING obou 
States today wj 
spy for the F.B.I 



FORUMS 

"Lectures In Contemporary Civilization," the class 
schedule called it. Forum assemblies every Monday 
morning, for which registering students received 
one-third hour of credit, were the biggest "classes" 
ever held on campus. Speakers with varied back- 
grounds and wide experiences discussed every aspect 
of life. Included among the top Forum speakers for 
the 1959-60 school year were the following: Govern- 
or of Utah, George Dewey Clyde; world affairs 
analyst, Howard Pierce Davis; General Carlos P. 
Romulo, Philippine ambassador to the United States; 
Vincent Sheean, world famous author and corres- 
pondent; Gerhart H. Segar, authority on German 
politics; Eddy Gilmore, Associated Press writer who 
lived in Russia for twelve years; John Mason Brown, 
editor of the Sa4:urday Review; Edward Weeks, edi- 
tor of the Atlantic Monthly; Herbert Herring, auth- 
ority on Latin America; Gerald Moore, renowned 
accompanist; William Buckley Jr., editor of Na- 
tional Review; Edward Tomlinson, authority on 
South America; Dr. Richard LaPiere, social science 
scholar; Right Honorable Anthony Nutting, journal 
ist and former minister of state for foreign affairs 
in Great Britain; Dr. E. Merrill Root, conservative 
English professor at Earlham College; and Dr. Lloyd 
D. Andrews, public instruction official. 




THE TERRIFYING EFFECTS of Communist braln-w.shmqt. 
by Or. Willi.m E. Mayer. First Marine D.v.s.on psychiatrist. 




HAILED as "Clown Prlnc 
Mackenzie regaled the Foi 




ACTOR VINCENT PRICE attempted to stimulate «n increased enthusiasm (or modern art among B.Y.U. students and (acuity. 




WE CAN RETAIN fKe leadership o( the tree woria- 
but. we have to be a«ske at home." eiclaimed jou 
nalist Helen Kirkpatrick. 



COMFORT, tne rst.O' prcoem ara 're lacreoress ci tre md.vidual 
were discussed by author, editor, and publisher. IHarry L. Golden. 



217 




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218 




PROGRAM BUREAU 

The Program Bureau sang, 

danced and laughed its way 

into the hearts of thousands 

as a good-will ambassador for 

Brigham Young University. 









^5- 



THE "Y KNIGHTS". Del Faddis, student director of the Pre 
e;ll Nelson, Carson Sharp, Ben Knudson, Marv Jenkins, Denn 



Spendio 



■ett (drums). 



I McKinney, Allan Young, Bill Soper. Cordell Chipman 
and Dave Tucker provided music on many Progran 



PROGRAM BUREAU 



JIM RAWLS, pianist-comedlan, spoofed seeing perforr 




Ward building funds strengthened, high school stu- 
dents converted to BYUism, and prospects for civic 
projects brightened, the Program Bureau moved on 
entertaining thousands both near and far from cam- 
pus. Under the direction of chairman James Law- 
rence, all groups leaving campus, including several 
choruses and instrumental groups, were provided 
with transportation, meals, and lodging. Janie 
Thompson, talent director, worked at building talent 
many varied types. Students with ability or in- 
terest in many different areas were guided on their 
ways to becoming successful entertainers and even 
professionals. The Program Bureau sent tours to 
California several times during the year. Washing- 
ton, Canada, and the entire Intermountain West were 
also visited by Program Bureau shows. 




EMCEE DIRECTORS, Row One: Del Faddis Stodenf Chairman: Anna Joy Wofflndon. Assistant Chairman: Pete Henderson, Kia Ora: 
Genevive Chfislensen, Eddie Sties. Row Two: Dewayne Younq. Folk Dancers: James Rawls. Lynn Poulter. Wavne Allen. Row Three: 
Gary Hopkinson Ouane Crowther. Delta Ph.; Pavale Saqapulo. AKia Mai; Klair Bybee. Mlssinq when picture was taker: Jenlveve 
Jacobs. Kay Reese, Edith Kahoilua, Hawailans: Gay Hicks. Fred Blackburn. Jack Nelson, Y Squares; Jody Milliard. Tflbe of Many 
Feathers. 



COMEDIAN. SAM FRANCIS was a popular Program Bureau per- 
former with his number "Will You Still Be Mine?" as James Caqny 





ETTA BARNER captured audiences with dramatic 
scripture readings. 



THE ROCKEHS were frequent entertainers with variety danc 
numbers. 



"Wff" 



y X 







THE "BRIGHAM YOUNGSTERS", Lee Wheelocl, Charlene John- 
son, Clay Crowley, Jimmie Moss, Julie Bogley. Bob Rose, and Jen 
Jacobs danced before many audiences. 



THE "CLASSICS", Tom White, Bruce Gibb, Juana 
White, and Charlene Johns were a popular quartet. 



CHARLENE JOHNSON and Ray Sumner and the 
animated interpretation of the Charleston becam 
well Icnown. 





THE CHRISTMAS T.V. SHOW featured Jerri Olsor.. Deanna Allen, Carol Preston. Tulja Hell-trom. Sharon Hardy Sandra BarHey Bill Seqo Joan Marie 
Miller, Bonnie Heywood, Marilyn, Judy Combs, Sandra Sandberg, Sandra Richards, and Carol Whoelocl. ' 




CARENE CUVRK sang with many 
Program Bureau shows. 



223 



SPIRITUAL 



Devotionals 228 
BYU Stake 230 




225 



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DEVOTIONALS 

Steps, ramps and sidewalks leading to the Smith 
Field House were filled at 10 a.m. on Wednesday 
mornings with students on their way to Devotional 
Assemblies. There, leaders of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints talked to them about 
matters which were vital in their lives. The spiritual 
influences which these sessions generated could be 
detected in every phase of campus life. Included in 
the long line of speakers was President Henry D. 
Moyle who dedicated the two new Helaman Halls. 
Other featured speakers included members of the 
Council of the Twelve, Elder Hugh B. Brown, Elder 
Marion G. Romney, Elder LeGrande Richards, Elder 
Mark E. Petersen, and Elder Harold B. Lee. Elder 
ElRay Christiansen, Elder Sterling W. Sill and Elder 
John Longden, Assistants to the Twelve, addressed 
assemblies, along with Elder Marion D. Hanks and 
Elder S. Dilworth Young of the First Council of 
Seventy. Bishop Carl W. Buehner and Bishop Joseph 
L. Wirthlin of the Presiding Bishopric; Preston J. 
Nibley, assistant church historian; and Lowell L. 
Bennion of the University of Utah Institute of Re- 
ligion were also assembly speakers. Dr. Harvey Flet- 
cher, scientist and acoustical authority; Rabbi Edgar 
F. Magnin and Reed E. Callister, bishop of the West 
Ward in Glendale, California, were included among 
the other devotional speakers. 



A CHORAL CONCERT presented by the Symphony Orchestr, 
Choir highlighted the Thanksgiving Devotional. 





ELDER ELRAY CHRISTIANSEN, assistant to the 
admonished students to "Seel through repentanc 
buoyancy of the Spirit which is promised." 



ELDER HUGH B. BROWN of the Council of the Twelve urged students 
to build a testimony by emulating the Master's teachings. 



I K 



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PRESIDENT HENRY D. MOYLE S dedication o( the newly constructed Budge and Ivterrlll Hells was one of the highlights of Homecoming Week. 





ELDER MARION D. HANKS of the First Counc 
of the Seventy conferred with a distinguished cam 
pus visitor after devotional assembly. 



ELDER LEGRAND RICHARDS of the C. 
Twelve, author of "A Marvelous Worl and 
addressed a Wednesday devotional audlenc. 



■mm 



BYU STAKE 

Twenty-six wards, twenty- 
six centers of friendship, 
worship, and accomplishment 
made Brigham Young 
University Stake a vital 
part of college life. 



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ANTONE K. ROMNEY, Stake President 



STAKE PRESIDENCY 



The largest Brigham Young University Stake in his- 
tory expanded to even larger proportions when two 
wards were created just before the 1959-60 school 
year began, to make a total of twenty-six wards. 
These wards provided the religious training and 
fellowship necessary to Latter-day Saint students 
while they were away from their home wards. Much 
of the campus social life revolved around these or- 
ganizations. Activity on the stake level was also an 
important part of campus life. The church-wide 
firesides, particularly the mass meetings of all stake 
members in the Smith Fieldhouse to hear a direct 
broadcast from President David O. McKay, were 
some of the highlights of the year. 




WAYNE 8. 
Counselor 



HALES, Second 



ERED A. SCHWENDIMAN. Clerk 



Firjt Word Bishopric: Howarc 
L. Bowers, Clerk: Lyoid Thoyne 
First Counselor: Russell D. Lewis 
Bishop; Gordon V. Christensen 
Second Counselor. 




FIRST WARD 

First Ward, composed of married students in Wy- 
mount Village, met in Wymount Chapel and the 
Social Hall. The ward included one hundred and 
seventy-five families and a total of two hundred 
nineteen children. Unique in this ward was the 
baby clinic conducted to give free shots and check- 
ups to children under five years. Ward activities, 
the only social life available for many of the mem- 
bers, included the annual Ward Dinner Dance, the 
Gold and Green Ball, Christmas Party with Santa 
Claus for the little ones, a Christmas Relief Society 
Bazaar, and the compilation of the Wymount Family 
Yearbook with photographs and contributions of 
every family in the ward. Heading the ward organi- 
zations were Joan Carr, YWMIA; Sander Larsen, 
YMMIA; and Joyce McBride, Relief Society. Ken- 
neth Ashton and David Dawson headed the Elders. 



Boasting the largest ward area of any ward in BYIJ 
Stake, Second Ward was composed of about fifteen 
per cent married students and a large number of re- 
turned missionaries. The ward members shared a 
spirit of friendliness and enthusiasm in their year's 
activities. The members participated in several work 
projects throughout the year and gave outstanding 
support to the ward fireside program which included 
several talks from converts to the church. Another 
special project of the ward was to take pictures of 
all the members for the ward's historical record. 
Leaders of the ward auxiliaries included Bliss Fin- 
layson, YWMIA; Marshall Chatwin, YMMIA; and 
Sonia Aycock, Relief Society. President of the El- 
ders' Quorum was Wallace Lehr. 

SECOND WARD 



Second Ward Bishopric: Ted 
Winn. Clert: OeMoyne Belker. 
First Counselor: Charles Taylor. 
Bishop: Thomas Christensen. Sec- 
ond Counselor. 




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Third Ward Bishop 
Busath, Second Cour 


i 

ric: Boyd H. 
selor; A. Les- 


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ter Allen. Bishop: 
field, First Counselo 
Miclcelsen, Clerk. 


Grady Eden- 
r: Stanley C. 


ft 


jyP 







THIRD WARD 



Third Ward, composed of Hinkley, Fox, and Felt 
Halls, also had five married couples since the First 
Counselor finally got married after years of prompt- 
ing from the Bishop. The membership was composed 
of seventy per cent freshman students. One of the 
main ward projects of the year was attempting to 
start all meetings on time. A traditional feature of 
the ward is that there is always a returned Samoan 
missionary in the bishopric. The year's activities in- 
cluded canyon parties, ice-skating parties, Gold and 
Green Ball, and Ward Banquet. Heading the ward 
organizations were Norma Pocock, YWMIA; J. 
Wayne Sabey, YMMIA; and Ann B. Michelsen, Re- 
lief Society, M. Lyman Henrie, Elders' Quorum. 



One of the few wards composed entirely of on-cam- 
pus single students, Fourth Ward conducted services 
in the Wymount Chapel. Hinckley, Home, and Har- 
ris Halls made up the ward population, the only 
married couples being in the bishopric and the head 
residents of the halls. The annual Ward Banquet 
held in connection with the Gold and Green Ball 
was the big social event of the year for Fourth 
Warders. In addition, a big Spring Outing was held. 
Under the direction of the ward Relief Society, new 
drapes were made for the chapel and were com- 
pleted in time for Ward Conference. Heading the 
ward organizations were Marilyn Webb, YWMIA; 
Blaine Lund, WMMIA; Gwen Saunders, Relief 
Society; and Dwain Peterson, Elders' Quorum. 

FOURTH WARD 



Fourth Ward Bishopric; Mark 
Nelson, Clerk; Berkley Spencer, 
Second Counselor; Max J. Berry- 
Bishop; Joiin J. Hunter, First 
Counselor; Ronald Hughes, Clerk. 





Mfth Ward Bishopric: Spencer G. 
Sheets. Clerii: Dave Boucher. First 
Counselor: W. Frent Killpacl. 
Bishop: Rey Lynn Hatch. Second 
Counselor; Alma Ray Ivle. Cfertc. 



FIFTH WARD 

The membership of Fifth Ward come from Chip- 
man, Maeser, and Penrose Halls, and the southwest 
quarter of Provo off-campus housing. Two members 
of the years campus royalty, Homecoming Queen 
and Snow Princess, were members of the ward, as 
well as the only unmarried high councilman in the 
stake. Annual functions included the Gold and Green 
Ball, Ward Banquet, and ^X'ard Birthday Party. An 
unusual feature of the ward was its one real mem- 
ber, who was converted, baptized, ordained an Elder, 
and sent on a mission to Uruguay by the ward. 
Ward organization heads were Dorothy jMarie Niel- 
sen, YWMIA; Kent Benson, YMMIA; and Sherry 
Hale, Relief Society. Elders' Quorum Persident was 
Rex Bruce Hayes. 



Sixth Ward members came from all over the cam 
pus. Girls on the first and second tloors ot Amanda 
Knight, the fourth floor of Knight Mangum, fel- 
lows in D-7, and some off-campus students in addi- 
tion all joined together in ward activities throughout 
the year. Some of the more prominent members of 
the ward included President Ernest L. Wilkinson, 
the BYU Stake Presidency, and many stake workers. 
Chiefly single students, ward members had much 
in common. Leaders o( the ward auxiliary organiza- 
tions were Donna Hill, YWMIA; Jerry Frisbcy, 
YMMIA; and Karen Merrill, Relief Society, lilders' 
Quorum President was Garth Noyes. 



SIXTH WARD 




Si.th Ward Bishopric: Max Hill. 
Clerk: M. Glenn Weaver. First 
Counselor: A. John Clarle. Bis- 
hop: V. Dallas Merrill. Second 
Counselor. 





Seventh Ward Blstiopricr Sheldon 
T. Dahl. Second Counselor: Har- 
vey S. Glade, Bishop: John S. 
Serge. First Counselor: J. Alan 
Blodgett, Cleric. 



SEVENTH WARD 



Eighth Ward was an all off-campus ward with about 
two hundred married students and the same number 
of single students. Because of the large number of 
married students, the ward was able to function in 
all auxiliary organizations including Junior Sunday 
School and Primary. The ward activities included the 
Gold and Green Ball, the Ward Banquet, and the 
annual Christmas party and music program. Heading 
the ward organizations were Diane Pyper, YWMIA; 
Steven Brown, YMMIA; and Betty Jo Dunnell, Re- 
lief Society. James Steel and Kenneth Smith were 
Elders' Quorum Presidents. 



The Seventh Ward, composed of off-campus stu- 
dents and Allen Hall, is primarily a single student 
ward, but fourteen married couples are included also. 
Although it was one of the largest wards in the 
stake. Seventh Ward members were noted for their 
friendliness and enthusiastic participation in ward 
functions. Some of the highlights of the year in- 
cluded the Gold and Green Ball and the annual 
Ward Banquet during spring quarter. The ward 
won stake and district championships in volley- 
ball and third place in the All Church Volleyball 
Tournament. Heading the ward organizations were 
La Preal Allison, YWMIA; Roger F. Jordan, YM- 
MIA; and Margie Pace, Relief Society. Deon R. 
Gubber was Elders' Quorum President. 

EIGHTH WARD 




Eighth Ward Bishopric: Keith C. 
Terry. Second Counselor: Melvin 
R. Brooks. Bishop: Wilford J. Tol- 
man, First Counselor: James 
Pyper. Cleric. 



Ninth Ward Bishopric: James D. 
Stewart, Clerk: Btrtell W. Car- 
don. First Counsellor: Raymond 
E. Beclham. Bishop Donald T. 
Nelson. Second Counselor. 




NINTH WARD 

Forty married couples, girls from Shipp and Robin- 
son Halls, and a large section of off-campus housing 
made up the population of the Ninth Ward. Known 
as the "Neighborly Ninth," the ward tried as a 
whole to live up to its reputation. Many marriages 
among ward members and the birth of several 
babies were among the memorable events of the 
year. Over three hundred twenty active ward mem- 
bers participated in traditional ward activities from 
the Gold and Green Ball to weekly sacrament meet- 
ings. Heading ward organizations were Mary 
Fritzche, YWMIA; Bill R. Anderson YMMIA; 
and Marge Potter, Relief Society. Elders' Quorum 
Presidents were Max E. Llewellyn, Robert Johnson. 



Both off-campus students and girls from Fugal and 
Carroll Halls were included in Tenth Ward member- 
ship. About fifteen married couples were also ward 
members. Special "budget" activities were the high- 
light of each quarter, such as the party and dance in 
the fall, the Gold and Green Ball during winter 
quarter, and the spring Ward Banquet. Athletic in- 
terests ran high among ward members as they com- 
peted with championship teams in intramural vol- 
leyball and basketball. Meetings were held in the 
Smith Family Living Center. Ward organizations 
were headed by Barbara Coates, YWMIA; David 
W. Cobia, YMMIA; Sylvia Bryson, Relief Society, 
Dick Hirtzel and Brent Eager headed the Elders. 

TENTH WARD 




Tenth Ward Bishopric: Robert S. 
Gabbitas. Clerit: W. Bruce Hilton, 
First Counselor: Clyde D. Sand- 
gren. Bishop William G. Leach. 
Second Counselor: James E. 
Stewart, Cleric. 




Eleventh Ward Bishopric: Terry 
L. Crapo. Second Counselor: B. 
West Belnap. Bishop: K. Lamont 
Hadfield. First Counselor Jay M. 
Smith. Jr., Cleric. 



ELEVENTH WARD 



The second floor of Knight Mangum Hall, along 
with thirty married couples and off-campus single 
students, made up the membership of Eleventh 
Ward. One of the original wards in BYU Stake, it 
holds several traditional activities such as the an- 
nual ward party in Prove Canyon. On this day, ward 
members spent the entire day away from campus 
worries, eating and, in general, enjoying themselves. 
Leaders of ward organizations were YWMIA, Mari- 
lyn Ord; YMMIA, Robert Weddington; Relief So- 
ciety, Diane Stirland; Sunday School, Vern Payne. 
Don Stephenson was Elders' Quorum president. 



Twelfth Ward population came from off-campus 
students in addition to Snow and Smith Halls and 
Wiscombe, Hardy, Larsen, and McKay Houses. All 
males were of the "off-campus " variety with a heavy 
sprinkling of graduate students and returned mis- 
sionaries. The annual closing social was the high- 
light of the year. It was held in the MIA girls' home 
in Provo Canyon. Among the ward's accomplish- 
ments for the year were thirty-four marriages, in- 
cluding the second counselor in the bishopric and 
two clerks. Ward members met in Room 167 McKay 
Building. Auxiliary officers were George Jarvis, 
Sunday School; Joan Taylor, YWMIA; Norman D. 
Calhoun, YMMIA; and Marilyn McMeen, Relief 
Society. Larry Williams headed the Elders Quorum. 



TWELFTH WARD 




Twelfth Ward Bishopric: Ervin L. 
Larsen, Clerk: M«k G. Pitcher. 
Second Counselor; J. N. Symons, 
Bishop ■Stephen R. Covey, First 
Counselor; Charles E. Jenkins. 
Clerk. 



Thirteo 


ith Ward E 


shopric 


Wayne 


Merrill 


Clerk: J. 


Gordo 


Chris. 


lensen. 


First Coun 


selor: Bleine L. 


Houtj. 


Bishop: Robert E. 


Francis. 


Second Counselor. 








THIRTEENTH WARD 



The members of Thirteenth Ward were from Rich- 
ards and Tingey Halls and the right wing of Taylor 
Hall, and met in the south chapel of the Smith 
Family Living Center. Since all members lived on 
campus, there was a prevailing spirit of closeness 
and loyalty to the ward. The year's activities included 
the ward Gold and Green Ball, the VC'ard Banquet, 
and the annual party at the MIA home )ust west of 
Timp Haven. An unusual feature of the ward was 
its outstanding choir, which added a special note to 
many sacrament meetings and other ward functions. 
Heads of the ward organizations were LaDawn 
Whittle, YWMIA; Bart Thomas, YMMIA; and 
Patricia Kelly, Relief Society. Elders' Quorum Presi- 
dent was Alvin C. Rencher 



Varied talents in many fields were characteristic of 
Fourteenth Ward members, as exemplified by the 
thirty-one experienced organists and forty experien- 
ed choristers in the ward. Meeting in the south cha- 
pel of the Smith Family Living Center, ward mem- 
bers enjoyed usual ward activities in addition to 
traditional special events. The fall exchange dinner- 
dance between Relief Society and Priesthood, snow 
party, and canyon party were high spots in the year's 
activity. Calling themselves the Friendly Four- 
teenth, ward members were single students living 
in Wells, Smith and John Halls. Leading ward or- 
ganizations were Mary Thomas, YWMIA; Robert 
Seeley, YMMIA; Janet Nims, Relief Society; El- 
ders' Quorum president was Rodney Fye. 



FOURTEENTH WARD 



Fourteenth Ward Bishopric: Kar 
Herde. Jr.. Clerk: Scott Fisher 
First Cour 

Counselor 



Dean A. Peterson 
Lasson. Second 





fifteenth Word Bishopric: 
R. Calllster. Second Cour 
Loftis J. Sheffield, Bishop: 
ord H. Henstrom, First 
selor; Gary H. Carver. Cle 



FIFTEENTH WARD 



The Fifteenth Ward was composed of students 
from Rogers and Richards Halls and the left wing 
of Stover Hall, and met in the Joseph Smith Banquet 
Hall. The members were proud of the warm, friend- 
ly spirit of participation which prevailed in the ward. 
Their traditional ward activities, the annual Priests' 
breakfast, and the annual Christmas charity pro- 
ject, were the highlights of the year's activities. The 
ward had an unusual record of one hundred per 
cent ward teaching since May, 1959. The ward or- 
ganizations were directed by Linda Barney, YW- 
MIA; Ronald Eggertsen, YMMIA; and Nola Har- 
ris Relief Society; David Dryden, Elders' Quorum. 



Made up of single students from Gates and Kimball 
Halls and the right wing of John Hall, the members 
of Sixteenth Ward call themselves the "Close 
Ward." A "Kownty Fair" party was held at the be- 
ginning of the year at the Bishop's home. At an- 
other party, members had a work day and did yard 
work for some townspeople. During winter quarter 
an ice skating party was enjoyed, and a Ward Ban- 
quet was served during spring quarter. Another of 
the ward highlights was a spring canyon party. Lead- 
ers of ward organizations were Nancy Clark, 'YW- 
MIA; Gary Wright, YMMIA; Karen Teleford, Re- 
lief Society; and Clinton Baxter, Elders' Quorum. 

SIXTEENTH WARD 




Si.teenth Ward 


Blshooric: 


Ralph Telford, Sec 


end Counsel 


Ernest J. Willclns, 


Bishop; Da 


R. Clarl.. First Co 


unselor: Deve 


Perry, Clerk. 





r^'mamn 




Wj 



Seventeenth 
Eugene Pettlt. 
Taylor. Bishop; 
Second Counseic 
F. Jensen, First 



ebsenl. Ooneld 




SEVENTEENTH WARD 



Seventeenth Ward, including Budge and Taylor 
Halls and off-campus students, had as its aim m 
all activities and classes to make the ward the most 
friendly on campus. The ward emphasized e.xcellent 
teaching in MIA and Sunday School, and kindled 
enthusiastic participation in all ward activities. Spe- 
cial traditions which the ward is noted for include 
a sunrise service on Easter Sunday, spring quarter 
steak fry in the Canyon, and the publication of the 
weekly "Ward Argus." Ward organizations were 
led by Ruth Moss. YWMIA; Wayne Crismon, YM- 
MIA; and Eleanor Bethsold, Relief Society. Elders' 
Quorum President was Merlin Whittle. 



The married students in Wyview Village comprised 
the membership of Eighteenth Ward, and had as 
many members under eight years of age as over. 
Such family membership enabled the ward to carry 
out a complete church program. As might be imagin- 
ed, this ward is probably one of the most productive 
wards in the church in respect to baby production. 
The leaders of the ward organizations included Bev- 
erly Blasongame, YWMIA; Kenneth Adams, WM- 
MIA; Elna Petersen, Relief Society; and Judy Price, 
Primary. Monty Smith and Alan Anderson headed 
the Elders' Quorums. 



EIGHTEENTH VV^ARD 



Eighteenth Ward Bishopric: 0. 
Ray Reese. Clerk: Horry L Tarr. 
Jr.. First Counselor; Melvin P. 
Mabey. Bishop: R. Blair Murray. 
Second Counselor. 





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NINETEENTH WARD 

The "Friendly Nineteenth" Ward, composed of off- 
campus students north of Center Street and west of 
University Avenue, plus the third floor of Amanda 
Knight Hall, held their meetings in the Women's 
Gym. About twenty per cent of the ward members 
were married, and returned missionaries comprised 
another large portion of the ward membership. A 
Christmas party with Santa Claus, a ward dinner and 
Family Night, and a spring quarter party, were 
some of the activities enjoyed by the members. En- 
tertainment at ward functions throughout the year 
was provided by the very talented members of the 
ward. Heading the ward organizations were Letty 
Lou Lant, YWMIA; Dean Hansen, YMMIA; and 
Dorothy Walker, Relief Society. Bruce W. Hum- 
phreys was Elders' Quorum President. 



Students from Chipman Hall and Young Hall made 
up the majority of the Twentieth Ward member- 
ship. This ward also stressed friendliness in all the 
year's activities. Membership participation was en- 
couraged through sacrament meeting talks, musical 
presentations, service on committees, and firesides. 
Activity highlights of the year were the Gold and 
Green Ball and the Ward Banquet. Heading the 
ward organizations were Betty Louise Moyle, YW- 
MIA; Don R. Fielding, YMMIA; and Margaret 
Hall, Relief Society. Herman E. Funk was Elders' 
Quorum President. 



TWENTIETH WARD 



Twentieth Ward Bishopric: Craig 
K. Mayfield. Clerk; Harold D. 
Bywater, Second Counselor: Les- 
ter N. Downing, Bishop: Melvin 
T. Farnsworth, First Counselor: 
Weston H. Morrill, Clerk. 




Twenty-First Ward Bishopric: Har- 
old Singer. Clerli: W. Keith Gar- 
rett, First Counselor: C .Verl 
Clark, Bishop: Ward R. Forsyth. 
Second Counselor. 




I 

TWENTY-FIRST WARD 



An information board with pictures, names, ad- 
dresses, and phone numbers of all ward members 
was one of the most successful projects of Twenty- 
First Ward. This was done in an effort to get the 
four hundred ward members who lived both off- 
campus and on the bottom floor of Knight Man- 
gum, better acquainted. Meetings were held in the 
Social Hall. Among ward functions was the annual 
banquet, attended by more than two hundred fifty, 
and completely self supporting. Leaders of ward or- 
ganizations were David S. Moody, YMMIA; Arlene 
Larson, YWMIA; and Joan Ellingson. Relief So- 
ciety. David White was Elders' Quorum President. 



The north halves of Stover and Budge Halls com- 
posed the membership of Twenty-Second Ward, and 
thus every member was of single status. A unique 
feature of the ward was that it met in the Fieldhouse 
where classes were held in such rooms as handball 
courts and body building rooms. The ward was noted 
for its excellent spirit, its Priest work days, the large 
number of young men who went on missions, and its 
outstanding fireside program Leading the ward 
organizations were Ann Marie Doty, YWMIA; Brian 
Drennan, YMMIA; and Ann Sheffield, Relief So- 
ciety. Cont Jones was Elders' Quorum President. 

TWENTY- SECOND 
WARD 



Twenty-Second Ward Bishopric: 
Carl Johansen. Clerk; Martin F. 
Durrant. First Counselor: Stewart 
L. Grow, Bishop; Klane Forsgren. 
Second Counselor. 





Twenty-Third Word Bishopric: 
Charles Sellers, Second Counselor; 
Harvey J. Fletcher, Bishop: Kirk 
Tolman First Counseic, ; Wayne 
Beebe, Clerk. 



TWENTY- THIRD WARD 



Composed of five off-campus blocks and Whitney 
Hall, Twenty-Third Ward had an unusual fifty per 
cent male population. The well-supported ward ac- 
tivities included weekly firesides. Elders' Quorum 
and Relief Society parties every quarter, unusual 
MIA programs which utilized the outstanding talent 
possessed by various members of the ward, an active 
genealogy program, and publication of a newsy 
ward paper every week. Ward organizations were 
led by Marian Carleton, YWMIA; Don Wursley, 
YMMIA; and Tonia Marett, Relief Society. Darwin 
Martell was Elders' Quorum President. 



One of the newst members of BYU Stake, Twenty- 
Fourth Ward, was composed entirely of off-campus 
students, except for the third floor of Knight 
Mangum. The ward membership included twenty- 
five married couples, a large number of returned 
missionaries, and mostly upperclass women. Ward 
activities included the annual Gold and Green Ball 
and the Ward Banquet. Leaders of the ward or- 
ganizations were Joanna Jensen, 'YWMIA; Ronals 
Spence, YMMIA; and Elenore Rolapp, Relief So- 
ciety. James Parker was Elders' Quorum President. 

TWENTY- FOURTH 
WARD 




Twanty.Fourth Ward Bishopric: 
Ronald T. Leavitt, Clerk: fed E. 
Ridenhour, Second Counselor: M. 
Carl Gibson, Bishop; Ray H. Gar- 
rison. Second Counselor; Bill Ro- 
lapp, Clerk. 




TWENTY- FIFTH WARD 



Just created fall quarter, Twenty-Fifth Ward was 
already the best in the stake according to its mem- 
bers, who participated in an outstanding year of 
ward activities. Before Christmas, there were three 
single girls to each single boy, and then a new area 
was added to bring the ratio down to three girls to 
each two boys. Included in the ward boundaries were 
the left wing of Merrill Hall, four blocks off campus 
downtown, and the area of Canyon Road. Meetings 
were held in the Women's Gym and a taxi service 
was in operation to move the girls to and from 
meetings. Heading the ward organizations were 
Irene C. Papenfuss, Y^X'MIA; Engene E. Green, 
YMMIA; and Eleanor Brough, Relief Society. Jo- 
seph K. Papenfuss was Elders' Quorum President. 



Off-campus students, the Graduate House, and Mer- 
rill Hall contributed to the membership of Twenty- 
Sixth Ward, which was one of the newest wards in 
the stake. The ideal balance of freshman through 
graduate students, with a number of married stu- 
dents and a majority of returned missionaries, 
created a closeness in the ward which is unusual 
for BYII Stake. The ward quickly asserted itself in 
the athletic department, being the only ward to 
reach the semi-finals in touch football. The ward 
organizations were headed by Catherine Barton, 
■yWMIA; Martin Gurney, YMMIA; and Margaret 
Hansen, Relief Society. Elders' Quorum President 
was George Downing. 



TWENTY- SIXTH WARD 




nty-Siith Ward Bishopric: 
Phillip 0. Harris. Clark; Duane M. 
Laws. Rrsf Counselor: Vern H. 
Jensen. Bishop: Richard K. Hanks, 
Second Counselor. 






BYU TWENTY-SECOND Ward took first place In the College Division of the All Church M-Men Basletb.ll Tourn 
Tom Means, Tom Maxfield. Gary Pedersen, Dave Sorenson, Elijah Cardoi 



enf, Del Shumway, Jim Nelson. Tom Mil 



WARD AND STAKE ACTIVITIES 




THE BYU SEVENTH WARD Gold and Greer 
JoAnne Bingham and Don Bullard attended, 
social festivities which were held by all campus 



■Snowflale Lane." whici 
eprentative of the man> 



DRAMATIC TALENTS sprang up all 
with local talent. 



npus as wards presented pla 




STAKE MISIONARIES 

Counselor: Hyfum L. Andru 
Pusoy, Henry Lee Carlson. B 
Vord B. Holland, W. Re< C« 



led with non-members ot th 



. Nana V. Plate. Clare Johansen, Daniel H. Ludlow, High Council Advlso 
J. Kent Nielsen, First Counselor; Janet Burton Secretary: Linda Lou Jackson Row Two- I 
II, Warren Stevenson. J. Harvey Joctman. Heikki Hovland. Carolyn Avery, Young B. Loe 
lie Matttiews. Kenneth Andrus. Phil Brown. Ted Smith. Jim Dahl and Eugene Holladay worked th 



Sheldon C 
iry Ann Crud, 



Snow. Second 



ugh the year. 




atter-MIA activities. DIANE STIRLAND. Eleventh Ward Relief Society President 

speaker at BYU Stake Conference. 



247 




248 



I 



EXTRA CURRICULAR 

Student Government 252 

Student Publications 276 

Activities 286 

Student Life 314 

Sports 326 

Service Units 360 

Common Interest 376 

Social Units 392 




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STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Endless hours of telephon- 
ing, organizing, checking, 
clearing and worrying went 
into the simplest of student- 
body functions. Thus, leader- 
ship and responsibility 
grew in student leaders. 



Yk 



REX LEE, ASBYU President, is e senior from St. 
Johns, Arizona, nnajoring in Accounting. He was a 
rrember of the General YMMIA Board for two 
years and has served on a mission in Mexico. 
This year he served as a member of the High 
Council of BYU Stake. He plans to attend law 
school and set up a practice in Arizona. He be- 
came a married man shortly before the 1959-60 
school year began. 




Top: DEE HADLEY and TERRY CRAPO, Execu- 
tive Assistants to Rex Lee. Bottom: FARRELL 
LINES, Assistant to Max Pinegar; JERRY BAG- 
LEY, Assistant to Heber Thompson. 




MAX PINEGAR, Vice-President of Finance, is a junior 
from Spanish Fork, Utah. He has filled a mission to 
the Netherlands and has served as Associated Men 
Students secretary. After graduating with a degree in 
Finance and Banking, he plans to enter law school. 




STUDENTBODY PRESIDENT 



The executive branch of student government, con- 
sisting of the Executive Council, contributed to 
Brigham Young University's destiny through super- 
vision of student affairs and activities. Under the 
studentbody officers' direction, students learned les- 
sons in political science out of the classroom as they 
worked in a student government patterned after that 
of the United States. Activities from dances and as- 
semblies to half-time programs at games came under 
their jurisdiction. They also acted as official repre- 
sentatives of the studentbody to the faculty, admin- 
istration, and other universities. The Executive Coun- 
cil was also responsible for executing Senate legis- 
lation. During the year much of their effort was de- 
voted to the Academic Emphasis program for rais- 
ing scholastic standards, and emphasis was placed 
on the Honor System. Rex Lee, Studentbody Presi- 
dent, presided over all general studentbody func- 
tions and had the power to veto any law enacted by 
the Senate. His quarterly State of the Studentbody ad- 
dress kept the campus informed on student affairs. 




HEBER THOMPSON. Vic 



Bsldent of Social Ac- 
Rlchlond. Washington, 
lor year. Both graduate 
is plans for the future. 




GORDON WELLS. Vice-President of Student 
Relations, is a senior from Logandale. Nevada. 
He Is majoring in Political Science and plans 
to attend law school after graduation. He has 
filled a Western States mission where he was 
in the mission presidency. 



AND EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



MAX PINEGAR, Vice-President of Finance, was 
responsible for all studentbody monetary matters. 
Most workers in student government became ac 
quainted with him as they obtained campus purchase 
orders. Preparing a budget and sticking to it were 
his chief concerns. 

HEBER THOMPSON, Vice President of Social Ac- 
tivities, was in charge of all social functions. His 
main duties revolved around the planning and pre- 
paration for dances held almost every week of the 
school year. This year special emphasis was placed 
on the exchange dance program. 
GORDON WELLS, Vice President of Student Re- 
lations, had the three areas of pep activities, campus 
publicity, and public relations under his jurisdiction. 
The new "light-bulb" committee for increasing 
school spirit was organized under his direction. 
DOL'G EVANS. Vice-President of Cultural Activi- 
ties, supervised studentbody assemblies and lyceums, 
and also had the Program Bureau under his juris- 
diction. He encouraged initiative and creative activi- 
ties, which resulted in a fift\' per cent increase in as- 
sembly attendance. 



DOUG EVANS, Vice-President of Culture, ii a 
Public Relations maior and will enter Into a 
partnership in a newly formed public relations 
agency in his hometown of Calgary, Alberta, 
Canada. He is a senior with interests all the 
way from siciing to music. 





SENATE 



The legislative branch of BYU student government 
is represented by the Senate, which operates com- 
pletely independently from the executive branch, but 
in cooperation with it. The Senate is composed of 
four senators from each class, three graduate sena- 
tors, the four class presidents, an executive repre- 
sentative, and the Senate president. The Senate is the 
body of communication between the students and 
student government, administration, and faculty. 
It identifies the problems and needs of the student 
body and legislates to fill those needs. This year, six 
standing committees composed of senators and non- 
senators worked on complete codification of all 
ASBYU laws. Issues acted upon this year included 
full integration of foreign students on campus, 
methods of dealing with the National Defense Edu- 
cation Act in regard to student loans, establishing 
a grade-point requirement for appointed officers, as 
well as elected officers, and passing a resolution on 
registration procedure. 




FRESHMAN SENATORS Ralph Tate. Lynn Young- 
berg. Merldene Christensen. and Boyd Johnson. 



256 



TERRY WARNER, Asioclate Justlt 



ED FIRMAGE, As. 




SUPREME COURT 




The judicial branch of the Associated Students of 
Brigham Young University government is headed 
by the Supreme Court. One of this body's important 
functions is its existence as a court of high appeal 
from any of the lower courts on campus. In the tra- 
dition of the democratic form of government, no 
student need be satisfied with a lower court decision. 
Unlike the United .States Supreme Court, but like the 
highest tribunals in other countries, the student Su- 
preme Court will give advisory decisions as to the 
constitutionality of actions before the action has 
taken place. While this judgment is not permanent 
or binding, it does give the campus organizations 
a guide as to what they can expect as far as legality 
is concerned. Court proceedings are held approxi- 
mately twice a month in the legal atmosphere of 
the Law Library in the Joseph Smith Building. 



DIANE HATCH. Senate Pr( 



257 






:■ 


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IrJB 1 1 



Phil Kunz, R|ay Lloyd, David Jacobs, Glaydo Hill, M 
Dunford, Fred Matis, Clifta Bright, and Gayle Gibbs, 



J. Gcrdor Christensen. Woody Clayton, Harold G. 



ASSOCIATED MEN 
STUDENTS 



The goals of the Associated Men Students are to 
promote a spirit of fellowship and brotherhood 
among the men students by providing activities for 
them and opportunities for them to serve the stu- 
dentbody. The year's activities included a shuttle 
service for incoming students at train and bus sta- 



tions, Autumn Leaf dance, banquet for the highest 
grade-point average wing in Helaman Halls, Fite 
Nite, Winter Carnival, and activities with AWS. 
Highlight of the year was Men's Night at which the 
AMS Exemplary Manhood Award was presented to 
Elder Marion D. Hanks, member of the First Coun- 
cil of the Seventy and member of President Eisen- 
hower's Committee on Youth Fitness. 



CONT JONES, AMS Secretary. 



LARRY BRIM, President. 



KENT BENSON, AMS Vit 





Row On*: Re> Lee. John B.nqhem. Gl 
and Scott Fisher. 



Sandra Reese. Row Two: Terry Crapo. Bill Jaclson. Ron Robison. Doug Rhoton. Dl.ie Randall. Larry 



The Jr. Associated Men Students Council consists 
of twelve freshmen men whose main purpose is to 
help' the AMS presidency create activities for fresh- 
man men. Since its formation two years ago, the 
council has become increasingly active in school lead- 
ership. This year the Jr. AMS edited a bi-monthly 
activity calendar which was available for ail stu- 
dents. Jr. AMS directed the Keep Off the Grass and 
Keep the Campus Clean campaigns, in addition to 
Operation Need-a-Ride-Home to enable students to 
find a ride or riders to various areas. The Jr. AMS 
also sponsored a campaign to organize off-campus 
males into geographical areas with planned activities. 

JUNIOR A.M.S. 



Phil Kuni, Tom A. Griffiths, Bob Fletche 
Scheffield. 



Cordell Burnha 



Fredrick S. Do 



CABINET 

The Cabinet of the Associated Students of Brigham 
Young University is primarily an advisory body to 
the Studentbody President. It is also useful in dis- 
seminating information to the studentbody from the 
executive council. It consists of the presidents of 
both the Associated Women Students and Associateil 
Men Students, all of the class presidents, NSA co 
ordinators. Student Participation Chairman, Supreme 
Court Chief Justice, IOC President, Senate President, 
Honor Council (Chairman, and Hlections Committee 
Chairman, in addition to the Studentbody President, 
the Vice-President of Culture, Vice-President of Stu- 
dent Relations, Vice-President of Finance, and Vice- 
President of Social Activities. 

on, Martin Rasmussen. Jerry Jacobs. Roger Aodenino. and Beck 




s f f f 





AWS Council, Ro 

Moss, Carol Monc 



ASSOCIATED WOMEN 
STUDENTS 



The primary purpose of Associated Women Stu- 
dents is to make every BYU coed feel a part of the 
university. The four AWS officers and their twelve 
council members sponsor numerous campus activities 
to include all campus coeds in order to accomplish 
this goal. Of most importance to the Freshman wo- 
men is the AWS Big Sister Program, which keeps 
hundreds of BYU coeds busy throughout the year 
helping their Freshman "little sisters" get acquainted 
with campus rules and traditions. Other AWS-spon- 
sored activities include Preference Ball and Women's 



BONNIE BENSON. Vice Pr( 



GLENNA BOYCE, 



MARGE POTTER. Secretary 



PAT HALGREN Tr! 





n9 Board 



Week, Songfest, Twirp Week, and transfer and in- 
ternational student parties The AWS also sponsors 
many activities jointly with the AMS. These activi- 
ties include Y Day, Cougar of the Week, and the 
annual Christmas Drive. This year an AWS hous- 
ing board was created to co-ordinate on and off- 
campus housing and to work on such areas as aca- 
demic achievements, dress standards, and housing 
regulations. In conjunction with this board, a presi- 
dent of off-campus women students was chosen to 
help unify and co-ordinate their functions. 



The Jr. Associated Women Students council is com- 
posed of fifteen Freshman girls whose main concern 
is serving all the Freshman women on campus and 
helping them to feel welcome as a very special part 
of BYU. Under the leadership of president Julie 
Bagley, the council sponsored the Birthday Program 
to send every Freshman girl a birthday card, the 
Freshman Reception, and the Get-Acquainted Pro- 
gram through which every Freshman girl was visited 
by a member of the council. Other activities of this 
council included visits to the Health Center patients 
and the Mental Hospital, a Transfer Birthday Party, 
and raising money for a scholarship. 



AWS Junior Council. Row One: Pat Jackson. Judy Fullmer. Joan Dalley. Judy Morris 
Jean Dalley. Jean Fletcher, Sandy Thomas. Jen Jacobs. Julie Bagley. Not pictured: No 



irton. Christie Robii 



Judy Stebbins. Marie Foss 





John Hunter. Dan R. Klrkham, Robert Rees, Elmo G. 
K. Jacobs. Susan Boyack, Edna Rae Lamb, Louise Johns. 



Nancy Bo 
L. Locey. 



ind B. Ray Ande 



onto. Janet J. Rigby. 



etary; Carole Cly 



HONOR COUNCIL 



The Honor Council celebrated its tenth year of 
existence on Brigham Young LIniversity campus this 
year, having established itself as a traditional and 
effective body in student life. The honor system as 
established ten years ago is designed to assist stu- 
dents in maintaining a high standard of honor, both 
in academic work and in personal integrity, with the 
hope that the system will influence the students 
throughout their entire lives. The Honor Council, 



composed of a student chairman, a vice-chairman of 
education, a vice-chairman of cases, and twelve stu- 
dent counselors, functions in a manner somewhat 
different from honor councils of most universities. 
Student counselors consult with violators of the 
honor code in order to help them improve their at- 
titudes, rather than immediately expelling the stu- 
dents from the university. Another important func- 
tion of the Honor Council has become the distri- 
bution of information on the Brigham Young Uni- 
versity honor system to other colleges and univer- 
sities throughout the country who are interested in 
establishing an honor system of their own. 



B. RAY ANDERSON 




ACADEMIC EMPHASIS 



The newest member of the student government 
cabinet was instigated this year under the name of 
Academic Emphasis Committee. With their motto 
of academic excellence, the committee worked under 
the direction of Studentbody President Rex Lee. The 
six members were headed by Byron Fisher. 



PUBLICITY 



Any form of publicity posted on campus was first 
cleared by Central Publicity Committee. The com- 
mittee did well in its efforts to clear the campus of 
unsightly posters strewn on campus premises. To 
help eliminate problems, a new bulletin board was 
constructed under the auspices of the Publicity Com- 
mittee. All activity announcements associated with 
the bulletin board were supervised by the committee, 
which approved posters and took care of posting 
events of the week on the bulletin board. 




Shirley 
Lynn Je 



David CrocUtf, Go 



and Byron Fishe 



Roger Lew 



Julie Pingr. 



jrge Ipson. Janet Stew 




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Row One: Z. Reed Mil 



; Sue Robinson, and Grant Ipson. Row Two: Kay Cornaby. Bill 



Kirk Stramberg. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 



The six members of Student Public Relations Com- 
mittee worked under the direction of Reed Millar, 
who was responsible to the Vice-President of Stu- 
dent Relations. As a body, the committee worked 
to promote good public relations between students 
and other groups concerned with the university. An- 
other function of the committee was to gather in- 
formation concerning curriculum and life on the 
BYU campus through student polls. 



Under the direction of Doug Evans, the Culture 
Committee was responsible for student assemblies 
and the lyceum program. Jobs such as central as- 
sembly chairman, taping assistants for assemblies, 
and judging the best of the year's assemblies were 
performed by the members of the culture committee. 
The big drive of the committee this year was to im- 
prove attendance at assemblies and lyceums. 



CULTURE 



Chris Vikari, Pat Ford. Larry Bluth, Louise M. Udall, Joel Justesen, John Prichett, Jean Nesbitt. Doug Evans, and Jane Swift. 




ilifii^ 




Roger Lev* 



I, Loreno Matson, Errest Jewell. Sandra Dosai, Judy 
, Blaine Quarnstrom, Lee Wirthlin, David Payne. Rage 






CENTRAL DANCE 



The Central Dance Committee, supervised by Blaine 
Quarnstrom, acted as an advisory unit for all dances 
which pertained to the entire studentbody. Various 
members acted as chairmen in charge of Mat dances, 
intermission, publicity, bands and scheduling, decora- 
tions, patrons, and refreshments, to name a few. The 
committee sponsored several dances for the student- 
body throughout the year in addition to some other 
major social functions. 



The ten members of the Elections Committee, under 
the direction of Sandra Reese, conducted every elec- 
tion on campus this year. They began their work by 
supervismg the selection of the temporary Freshman 
Council, and continued with Homecoming Queen 
balloting, AWS and A MS elections, and votmg for 
studentbody officers. 



ELECTIONS 



Row One: Sandra Reese. Chairman. Chri 
Terry JeHers. Allan Earl. Kirk Stromberq. 



Redford. Mary Beth La 



Judy Chapin. Row Two: Bill Tho 






r 

1 




JEAN NESBIT, Se 



SCOTT FISHER. Pr< 



DAN ELIASON, Vic 



INTER-ORGANIZATION COUNCIL 



The Inter-Orpanization Council is composed of the 
presidents of all the campus organizations. Its pur- 
pose is to counsel and advise all units and to help 
in solving all student organizational problems. The 
council printed handbooks for distribution to all 
units to acquaint them with school policy and pro- 
cedures. Faculty advisors for all units were found 
by the council, and the council helped with financial 
problems with the aid of the Financial Vice-Presi- 



dent. The council also aided in the establishment of 
new units and clubs on campus. IOC sponsored In- 
ternational Week to give the foreign students an op- 
portunity to present their cultures to the school. An- 
other activity of the council was to sponsor IOC 
Week, during which booths were placed on campus 
to afford all campus units an opportunity to present 
their purposes and activities to the studentbody. 




CKucl Whitting 



Joan Starlln 
nd Cal Stratford. 



266 




IOC INTER. COUNCIL PRESIDENTS: Row One: Linda 
Oleic Hubbell. Geographiculs: and Gary Wright. Religi 



NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



National Student Association is a national student 
union with organizations on four hundred campuses. 
Members cooperate with eight)'-five units throughout 
the world to foster understanding and exchange of 
ideas of students of all racial, cultural, and religious 
backgrounds. NSA participates not only in inter- 
national programs, but in regional and national con- 
ferences sponsored by national foundations. The 
benefits of these meetings are then carried to each 
campus in order to keep student leaders well-inform- 
ed about student ideas and problems the world over. 
On Brigham Young University campus, NSA mem- 
bers strived to put improved methods of student 
government into practice. They were greatly aided 
in their endeavors by Diane Hatch, one of the three 
national execaitive vice-president of NSA for the 
year 1958-59, who contributed a wealth of prac- 
ticable ideas gathered during her busy year. The lo- 
cal NSA group also fostered a program to promote 
better relations with other schools in our Conference 
by inviting them to various studentbody events and 
participating in sectional conventions. 



Young, Bill Jacksc 



and Judy She 




267 



GEORGE JARVIS. President, 





SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



"A torch was giien to me thai I might light the 
lamps of others as I seek to see the road ahead." ... 
Elder Hugh B. Brown 
With its torch of education, the class of I960, after 
completing four years of active and successful 
schooling, left BYU behind and went out " to light 
the lamps of others." But those who left and those 
who remained will long retain memories of the ac- 
tivities they participated in: "FiancaiUes en Baroque" 
— the Junior Prom, the Senior Ball, class parties and 
exchanges, Homecoming floats, units and athletics. 
Senior Week, and most important of all — Gradua- 
tion. Through these came the love and appreciation 
which will always be the tie between the Senior Class 
of I960 and BYU. The class designated the money 
raised through their class fund drives to be used to 
erect a greatly needed baseball scoreboard. 



COLLEEN CALDER, Vice-President. 
268 




Kathleen Crool. Rachel Ande 



Two: Earl Cardon, Dicl. Robblns, Howard Hill, Reed 



VND CABINET 



JUDITH LITSTER, Se 



GEORGE JARVIS, Senior Class President, is a so- 
ciology major from Salt Lake City, L'tah. During his 
last year at BYU, he expressed his goal "to give to 
as many individuals as possible the opportunity to 
contribute to their class and their university." 
COLLEEN CALDER, Senior Class Vice-President 
and home economics education major from Provo, 
stated her purpose as an officer: "I have endeavored 
to help other students gain as much from BYU as 
I have, and through this gain class unity and to 
encourage the Seniors to recognize and associate 
themselves with the graduating class of I960 " 
JUDY LITSTER, Senior Class Secretary and fashion 
merchandising major from Huntington, Utah, said, 
"To share with every senior my love for BYL' and 
to provide an opportunity for personal growth and 
development have been my goals. 



iv > - ' ^i^^^H 



RON ROBISON, President. 





JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



"It is the purpose and function of the class to develop 
a loyalty to the university." With this as a goal, the 
Junior Class moved to play an even more important 
and active part in student government. But along 
with this came their intra-class functions which built 
more unity and loyalty within the class. Over two 
hundred students participated in one form or another 
to present the traditional Junior Prom, and class 
parties, exchanges, and participation in university 
functions encouraged all the class members to gain 
the utmost from their junior year. 



PEGGY PARKER, S 



■^ 









Parker Fuhr.men, Cra.g Chrlrtensen. Doyle Schiffman. Sharon Faye Johnson. JocVeen Morgan, Toni Zelqler Claudia Clark Claris' 
Eemes, Carolyn Nelson. 



A.ND CABINET 



MARK BENCH. Vice-Presidonf. 



RON ROBINSON, Junior Class President, is an 
electrical engineering major from Bakersfield, Cali- 
fornia. As he fulfilled the duties of his office, he 
said, "It has been my goal to carry out the purposes 
of a class organization by presenting activities for 
the benefit of each class member which would pro- 
mote unity and loyalty to the university. " 
MARK BENCH, Junior Class Vice-President and 
English-pre-law major from Burbank, California, ex- 
pressed his goal "To afford as many as desire to 
participate in student government the opportunity to 
do so, and to stimulate that desire." 
PEGGY PARKER, Junior Class Secretary and ele- 
mentary education major from Draper, Utah, stated. 
"It has been my goal to bring, through personal en- 
deavor, achievement and recognition to the Junior 
Class." 




JOHN BINGHAM, President, 





SOPHOMORE 
CLASS OFFICERS 



The Sophomore Jamboree was just the beginning of 
what the officers termed "the year to make class 
cards worthwhile." The advice to "remember that 
no matter where you are from, you are still sopho- 
mores," stuck to the class members as they forged 
ahead to establish new traditions and to promote top 
activities. "Search for Love," the humorous class 
assembly written by Thiel Collette, the Sophomore 
Cottillion, the Junior-Sophomore exchange, "Yodel- 
ing Yule," the class Snow Party, and participation in 
Homecoming sparked enthusiastic class participation 
for the year. The class announced that their project 
would be to donate a collection of books to the new 
campus library. They hoped to have one book to 
represent each member of the class, containing the 
name and home town of its donor. 



DENNIS TAYLOR. Vic 



272 








Ray Good. 



ot, Ro 



Wright. Jody TiUon. Sandy Ulicny. David Payne 



Laurel Fisher. JoAnn Murphy, Row Two: Dr. Walter E. McPhii 



GAIL SPILSBURY, Se 



AND CABINET 



JOHN BINGHAM, Sophomore Class President, is a 
political science major from Emmett, Idaho. As exe- 
cutive leader of his class, he said, "It has been my 
effort, as an officer, to raise the status and prestige 
of class government. I felt this was necessary be- 
cause the class will be the tie in the years to come." 
DENNIS TAYLOR, Sophomore Class Vice-Presi 
dent and political science major from Malibu, Cali- 
fornia, stated, "It has been my desire to promote 
unity in the class — unity which comes from participa- 
tion and spiritual growth." 

GAIL SPILSBl'RY, Sophomore Class Secretary and 
history major from Chicago, Illinois, said, "It has 
been my goal to stimulate class unity and to create 
a personal devotion to the class." 




273 



DOUG RHOTON, President 





FRESHMAN CLASS 



DOUG STEWART. Vice Pre!-de 

274 



The largest class yet to enter BYU made an out- 
standing impression upon its newly adopted alma 
mater and was well on the way toward establishing 
itself on campus. For the first time, the Freshman 
Class Homecoming float took top honors in its divi- 
sion. The class sold a record number of class cards, 
and held controversial elections which will long be 
remembered. The new officers developed class en- 
thusiasm to such an extent that they were able to 
hold several class parties, to present an outstanding 
assembly, and to successfully sponsor a spring Kam- 
pus Karnival as a fund-raising project. A class news- 
paper was established to bring the class, officers, 
and cabinet closer together. 




Row On*: Gem Mitton. Ann Page. Jen J 
ley. Gary Stewart. Lynn Poulter. Lyie Hall. 



)FFICERS AND CABINET 



DOUG RHOTON, Freshman Class President, is 
from Navasota, Texas. After his election autumn 
quarter, he stated, "As an officer, I wish to serve 
the class in such a way as to insure that the unity 
and enthusiasm which has been displayed thus far 
will continue throughout the years to come." 
DOUG STEWART, Freshman Class Vice-President 
and art major from Las Vegas, Nevada, stated his 
goal as an officer: "To help the class achieve the 
recognition and honors which it is capable of at- 
taining." 

SUE EMMETT, Freshman Class Sercretary and psy- 
chology major from Portland, Oregon, said, "I want- 
ed to be a class officer because I enjoy student gov- 
ernment work and I want to do my part to make 
the class of 1963 the most impressive to enter BYU." 




275 




STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Copy paper, proofreading 
marks, and the mysteries of 
press terminology became 
common things in the lives 
of student editors, writers, 
artists and business person- 
nel, as they worked to- 
ward unending deadlines. 



277 



DAILY UNIVERSE 

The fifth largest daily newspaper in Utah, the Daily 
Universe was published every schoolday throughout 
the year. The staff, made up entirely of students, set 
records such as publishing two eight-page issues a 
week in addition to the regular four-page publica- 
tions. More special editions with twelve and sixteen 
pages were published than in previous years, also. 
The advertising staff took advantage of the extra 
pages and sold more space than ever before in Uni- 
verse history. Special traffic safety campaigns were 
conducted through the paper at Thanksgiving and 
Christmas when students would be traveling home. 
Staff members also worked with the Academic Em- 
phasis Committee in publishing several scholarship 
editions. The most spectacular Universe scoops in- 
cluded the story about the BYU freshman who spent 
the night injured on Squaw Peak. This Universe 
story appeared all over the country, via United Press 
International's wires, and staff pictures were sold 
to many local newspapers. In addition, the news of 
the missing foucault pendulum was first reported in 
the Universe. With the new ban on posters on cam- 
pus, the newspaper became even more important in 
publicizing dances, assemblies and other activities. 
The Unicorns, official Universe basketball, football, 
and Softball teams, competed in intramurals. These 
journalistic athletes played the University of Utah 
Chronical basketball team in their annual game. 




DUSTIN HARVEY, 
^ Managing Editor. 



JEDDY LAVAR, 

Campus Editor Fall quarts 



RITA WHEELER, ^ 

Campus Editor Winter and Spring 
quarters. 



JIM BRACKNER, 

Advertising Manager, 




ALICE ALLRED, Society Editor 



JEANETTE BARNEY, News Editor 



278 




LARRY DAY. Universe Editor, Is a graduate student 
from Idaho Falls. Idaho. He received his Bachelor 
of Arts degree In journalism In 1959 and did (ur- 
♦her work In his field this year. He has been on a 
million to Uruguay and plans to return to South 
America on a scholarship or with a news service. 




STAN MICHELSEN. Universe Business kfanaqer. Is 
a senior journalism major from Palo Alto. Cali- 
fornia. After filling a mission to Uruguay, he turned 
down a Stanford scholarship In order to return to 
BYU. He plans to do graduate work In advertising 
at Denver or California. He became a married man 
before the beginning of the 1959-60 school year. 




DON ROBERTS. 

Sports Editor. 



JIM HOG&AN. 

National Advertising Manage 



LYNN TOLMAN. 
Classified Advertising Mana 



ADVERTISING STAFF: Howard HIM. 
Glenn Butterfleld. Mary Child. Marv 
Loflin. Paul Tripp. Dick Houlihan, and 
Larry Sommers. 






BARBARA COWAN, 
Office Manager 




ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR, Irene Brietiga 
Associate Campus Editor. Pat Middleton. 



and SOCIETY WRITERS Saye Hicks and Doris Allred 



DAILY UNIVERSE 




CIRCULATION STAFF David Finlinson. Kaye Co 
Merrttt Christensen, and Kent Sullivan. 



iPORTERS: Ro» On*: Beck; Fillmore. Marilyn 
ce. Carole Clyfilck. Row Two: Linda Hunter, 
Corless. Judith Woolstentiulme. Ursula 
Ipopp. 



Wayne Pascal. Ron Haller. Jerry Mason. Toi 
Washburn. 





GARY HOPKINSON, 
Banyan Photo Coordinalo 



DRUE SOMERVILLE, DAVE NEWMAN. 

Universe Photo Coordinator. Darkroom Supon 



PUBLICATIONS PHOTOGRAPHY 



DOUG DILL. 
Head Photographo 



A new department created this year as a step toward 
promoting better photography on campus was the 
Publications Photography Department. Functioning 
as a separate organization from the Banyan and Uni- 
verse, the department did photographic work for 
both publications with a centralized staff of photo- 
graphers and darkroom technicians to turn out good 
quality photography in large quantities. 




Row One: Larry Peck and Tony Ragozzlne. Row 
Two: Susie Blakemore. Darkroom; Margaret 
Lead, Filing: and Nadlne Brooks. Secretary. 







BANYAN 

Wee hours of the morning and all day long on Sat- 
urday seemed to be the favorite working times for 
Banyan staffers. With layouts, picture appointments, 
proofs, broken trimming machines and a Banyan 
Ball to worry about, there was little time left for 
anything but studies. Long hours were spent in the 
basement of the Clark Student Service Center where 
rays of daylight never penetrated. Becoming daily 
better acquainted with principles of typography, de- 
sign and composition, staff members spent free 
moments in their school life learning things which 
could be of use in many occupations. Serious work 
was mixed with lighter moments of joke telling, 
potato chip devouring, and even political arguing 
as the yearbook was produced. Loyal staff members 
who devoted time and effort to the cause were 
more than just a little relieved when the final pages 
were sent to the press and another years history of 
Brigham Young University was completed. The job 
done, staff members traveled to Alpine for a party 
canyon style. They also socialized at a sneek-peek 
party, the night before yearbooks were issued to the 
studentbody, celebrating the completion at long last 
of the I960 Banyan. 




LES YOUNG. Artist 




^ 



LYNN THACKER Banyan Editor, was a senior his- 
tory major from Hebe.-. Utah. His (our yeai^ of 
work on the Banyan were interrupted by a mission to 
the Hawaiian Islands and two years with the U.S. 
Army In Korea. He was a member of Val Hyric 
social unit and Intercollegiate Knights. His future 
plans include a Ph.D. degree and teaching on the 
college level in Hawaii. 



JOEL JUSTESEN. Banyan Business Manager, was a 
junior majoring in Speech. He was also chairman of 
assemblies for units and organizations, and a member 
of both Culture and Central Assembly committees. 
He served as Space Sales Manager on the Banyan 
In 1959 end will again be Business Manager on the 
1961 Banyan. He was also a member of Alpha Epsllon 
Rho. national honorary radio and television fraternity, 
and served as an assistant director of the BYU pro- 
duction of "Sand In Their Shoes." 




PENNE fREEBAIRN. Activities Editor 



JUDY LEE HIGGINS. Photo File Co 

ordlnator 



MARGARET ANDERSON. Space Sale 




AURiE CHRISTENSFN, Pub 
:ity Manager 



WAYNE SABEY. Sports Edlto 



BARBARA CARR. Art Assistant 



NORMA DRAUGHN, Student Go 




283 



BANYAN 





SHERI CHRISTOFFERSON, BARBARA KEY, Classes Edito 

Fine Arts Editor 



1., 


vW^^I^'" ' /^^^^^l 



KAREN LYON, Senior Class Editor SHERRY LOUDER. Junior Class Editor 



KENDRA WINCOTT, 
Freshrron Class Editor 



PAUL SMITH. Sophoi 



ELSIE MCFARLAND, Assistant Organi. 
zations Editor 




STAFF MEMBERS, Barbara Blake, Ruth Reid, Ruth Butler, Dorine Smith, STAFF MEMBERS. Sharlene Elsworth Diane Haight, and Betta Silv 

Bill Roach Janis Francis worked on various sections ot the yearbook. 




WYE MAGAZINE 

The Wye is a literar)' magazine prepared by an all- 
student staff and published and distributed twice 
during the school year to students and faculty mem- 
bers. This year the magazine contained contributions 
in the form of essays, short stories, poetry^ and plays. 
Representative of the magazine's artistic expression 
were paintings, sketches, photographs, ceramics, and 
interior design. The Wye was distributed winter and 
spring quarters of the year to students eagerly await- 
ing the appearance of the "new " Wye. Students with 
artistic or writing talent were afforded an excellent 
opportunity to express their abilities through this 
medium. Featured in the two issues of this year's 
Wye were articles on modern music, ceramics, and 
printmaking, representing a policy of wider scope in 
interest and accomplishment in the magazine. 



MARILYN MEHR, Wye Mogaiino Editor. Is < 
senior English mejor (rom Hollydsle. Californie 
After groduotion, she plans to pursue furthe 
study in her major field. 




WARREN LUCH, Art Ed 



WARREN LUCH. Art Editor 
ROBERT ELDER. Short Storv Editor 



RICHARD MIRATTI. Non.fiction Edi- 







t! 



\^' 



STAFF MEMBERS Harriet Carlson. June Christensen, Richard MiraffI, Robert Elder, and 
Larry McBride spent many hours planning and preparing the magazine. 



EDWARD 
Editor 


GEARY. Poetry 




q : 




f J 




.#J 







''r^^a 



>^iW^ 



1^,0??' 



w«i'-_or^y 



10>1.?- 






-riX 



.'? 'f 



.ri --to--' 






286 



ACTIVITIES 

Students relaxed from study 
worries, met each other, and 
learned responsibility and 
organization in planning 
weekly dances, special week- 
long activities, and in numerable 
other campus events. 



287 



More than 250 student leaders loaded into buses 
September 16, bound for Sun Valley, Idaho, and a 
three-day Leadership Conference amid ski chalets 
and crisp mountain breezes. The keynote address by 
Elder Ezra Taft Benson of the Council of the Twelve, 
and Secretary of Agriculture, who had held con- 
ferences with Premier Nikita Khrushchev just 24 
hours before, was the highlight of the week. The 
conference consisted mainly of informational ses- 
sions where such things as campus purchase orders, 
scheduling, responsibilities of leadership, and the 
structure of student government were explained. 
Delegates also took time out to try their skill at 
bicycling, horseshoes, swimming, and other less ath- 
letic pastimes such as conversation and singing. 




ELDER EZRA TAFT BENSON highlighted leadership 




THE YEAR WAS PRIMED 
FOR PROGRESS 



"WHO'S steering?" 



NOW ABOUT this plan to abolish social un 





"BUT 2'/2 yeo" fof a »" 
for the army, ard 3 yeai 
isn't so long to wait for 



: for pr, 



BYU Frosh were put in the spotlight in the first week 
of Autumn Quarter as they were introduced to the 
traditional freshmen activities of the university. They 
sported becoming blue-and-white beanies, attended 
numerous get-acquainted parties, and made their first 
trek up Y Mountain to weed and clean around the 
block "Y". By the end of the week there was no 
doubt that they had become an integral part of the 
university. The following week saw Y Town become 
Hi Town during Hello Week. Under the guidance of 
Ron Lewis and Marcia Bradshaw, the studentbody 
participated in the traditional Hello Week assembly, 
was treated to the three-act musical comedy, "Swing- 
ing on a Star," and attended the annual Hello Week 
dance with a new feature — a friendship-forming ex- 
change dance program. 



'NO. CALIFORNIANS. not ye 





"HOW MUCH for block-morlst la 
passes?" 




■■CAREFUL— that's sharp!' 




HOMECOMING BROUGHT 




A CONTENDER for originality hono 



Vikings' Egyptian float entry. "BATTLE HYMNS". Tausig entry, floated fo the sweepstake 





THE STORY of the magic bell 
enacted in assembly. 



A!?»Tl .SOtKC 

HOUSING DECORATIONS sparked a fervor ot 
talent and energy. 



290 



^IVING MEMORIES 




^ - .s-ytLy 



SHERRY HALE, Homecoming Queen 



"Living Memories" of people, talent, events, and 
traditions highlighted 19')9 Homecoming Week. 
The crowning of Sherry Hale as queen, with Gwen 
Newton and Lynn Fechser as attendants, set the 
mood for a week of festivities. Students felt the 
spirit of Homecoming as they decorated their resi- 
dence halls, attended mat dances, constructed floats, 
and participated in the other annual activities. Two 
Helaman Halls were dedicated at the devotional as- 
sembly by President Henry D. Moyle, second coun- 
selor in the First Presidenq'. The story of the Old 
"Y" Bell was dramatized during Homecoming as- 
sembly, after which the new tower in which the Bell 
now hangs was dedicated, thus culminating a long, 
sustained drive by the Intercollegiate Knights to 
secure a permanent shrine for the traditional Cougar 












THE LONG HOURS b 



irned "ochs and ahs" dofirtg t)-,e pomade. 



AS ROYALTY WAS CHOSEN 




LYNN FECHSER. 
Homecoming Artendont 




BRISK ENERGY slowly yielded to tired trudging OS units strutted down 




&WEN NEWTON. 
Homecoming Attondont 



symbol. Fieldhouse Frolics, under the direction of 
Janie Thompson, revealed BYU talent of today and 
yesterday, climaxed by the presentation of former 
athletes, studentbody presidents, preferred men, and 
beauty queens — a look at the past for a prediction of 
the future. University Avenue was the scene of bustl- 
ing activity as thirty floats, ten cars filled with 
various dignitaries, twenty bands, and several march- 
ing units combined to present a parade of memories. 
The sweepstakes award was captured by the im- 
pressive float, "Battle Hymns," entered by Tau Sig- 
ma social unit. Highlight of the events was the an- 
nual Homecoming dance, held Friday and Saturday 
nights at three halls. Entertainment for the evenings 
was provided by the Four Preps male quartet, who 
sang some of their current hits. 




CLOWNS TEASED Cosmo Cougar while intent young watchers pondered tde 



293 




AND ORIGINALITY ANE 





c-d to the Cfc.ds, 



■'TWENTY SIX MILES across the s, ,, 
l;no , . ." waited while the Four Prf|; 
at the dence. 



k 







ORCHESIS DANCERS struck a graceful silhouette to earn "Most Beautiful Flo 
award. 







THE MAZE of signs for (all registration was de- 
picted by this float. 



TALENT WERE DISPLAYED 




Women reigned supreme on campus as each day of 
their week featured a special activity planned just 
for them by Janet Morns, chairman of Women's 
Week. "My Fair Lady, " "Ladies in Print," "Ladies 
in Lace," "Gabrielle, " "Leather and Lace," were 
themes which rang out in the halls and on the quad. 
Latest fashions were presented to them in a rags to 
riches story, which was followed by a study day of 
academic emphasis. Women's social units displayed 
trousseau treasures to the delight of the marriage- 
minded femmes on campus. Special devotional speak- 
er with Sister Bertha S. Reeder, President of Young 
Women's Mutual Improvement Association, who 
urged the women of B'YU to face the responsibility 
of this age. The long-awaited Preference Ball as- 
sembly, at which the thirteen most preferred men on 
campus were presented, told the story of Gabrielle, 
a French war orphan, who found her ideal man in 
the mail-order catalogue. Climaxing highlight to 
Women's Week was the Preference Ball which had 
been prepared for a number of weeks in advance 
by those eager coeds who stood in long lines to pre- 
fer their favorite men as dates for the all-important 
night of women's traditional dance of the year. 



BYU WOMEN HAD THEIR 



COUPLES WHIRLED to romantic strains at the Preferenc 



A^M 




WEEK 



y^ 





BRUCE DOCKSTADER 



,\ 



*^^lmi 



■ 



AND CHOSE THE 



BYU coeds chose the thirteen most preferred men 
on campus in conjunction with their Women's Week 
Preference Ball. The preferring and the Ball went 
off smoothly as a result of the capable managing of 
Lannie Berrett and her committee, and the coopera- 
tion of BYU's female population. 
The thirteen Preferred Men represented every phase 
of student and campus life and activity. These in- 
cluded members of bishoprics, leaders in student 
government and organizations, athletic performers, 
cheerleaders, and members of campus dance bands. 



SHELDON OAHL 



RON JACOBSON GORDON HANSEN 





BLAINE (PUARNSTROM 



r 



DAVE FERREL 




PREFERRED MEN OF BYU 



DESIGNATED by Ys coeds as fhe most outsfanding mole personal, 
ity. in tribute to his character, good looks, and achievements, was 
MUe Kirkham, who stood with the top thirteen men of Brighom 
Young University for the third consecutive year. 




\w 



SNOW ANTICS added to the fun of the sculp- 
ture contest. 




ICE SKATERS participated in the figure-slcating 
contest. 





VAL HYRIC'S cuckoo clock won first place in the snow sculpture contest. 



Winter Carnival provided a week of Bavarian Holi- 
day entertainment and events for the studentbody, 
with Snow Princess Ida Funk and her attendants, 
Sharon Low and Tuija Hellstrom, reigning over the 
holiday atmosphere. Winter sports exhibitions high- 
lighted the competition for Snow Princess, and later 
in the week more of the snow sports provided com- 
petition between units for the traditional Broken 
Ski. The humorous search of two BYU professors 
for the abominable snowman in the Winter Carnival 
assembly continued to carry out the week's Alpine 
theme. A special treat brought in for the Bavarian 



-^'^ 



WINTER WEATHER SET THE MOOD 



BYU FOLK DANCERS portrayod Alpine villag- 
«rs In the assembly. 



SKIFRS COMPETED In the downhll 




WINTER CARNIVAL ASSEMBLY (, 



Holiday was the Kirby Stone Four, well-known sati- 
rical and swinging quartet, who entertained at a 
pre-dance concert Friday evening for the studentbody 
and the residents of Provo. The Winter Carniva 
Dance was held two nights with dancing to the 
music of Si Zentners orchestra in a ski resort atmos- 
phere created at the Fieldhouse. Due to the lack of 
snow during the week, snow sculpture was not held 
until several weeks later, when in a few hours' time 
clever, beautiful, and colorful snow figures sprang 
up around the Quad. 



THE SKATING RACE wes e feature of the week. 





^^^^^Bc - d 


^^^^1 


TUIJA HELLSTROM 
Snow Princess Attendant 








r \.\ 
















HF ^ 


SHARON LOW 
Snow Princess Attendon 





FOR A BAVARIAN HOLIDAY 



THE KIRBY STONE FOUR provided riotous entertainment at Friday's concert. 




THE DOWNHILL RACE required skill and steel 





IDA FUNK 
Snow Princess 



THE WARMTH of the pot-bellied stove lured observers insldi 





FINALIST COLLEEN REDFORD song for talent 



The annual search for the exemplification of ideal 
womanhood on BYU campus was conducted in 
February by the Y Calcares and Intercollegiate 
Knights. Under the direction of Susan Lillywhite 
and Ernest Jewell, daily contests were held through- 
out the week to judge the contestants in the fields 
of cake baking, beauty and personality, dancing 
ability, talent, and popularity. Winner of the cake 
baking contest was Barbara Herron with a cake in 
the form of a pink and silver bell. Beverly White 
and Carolyn Johnson tied for second place in the 
private interviews for beauty and personality, with 
Colleen Redford and Judy Tilton in second and third 
places. At the dance contest, where contestants 
waltzed, cha-chaed and jitterbugged, Sherri Magnus- 
son received first place with Lynne Barlow and Han- 
nah Oldroyd as runners-up. In the talent contest, 
Sherri Magnusson again took first place with a dra- 
matic reading. Marlene Brown and Colleen Redford 
were named second and third in the contest. Follow- 
ing a popularity vote by the studentbody the winner 
was announced at the Belle of the Y Dance, as the 
I.K.'s trekked up the mountain to light the Y for 
the occasion and in addition spell out the winner's 
initials in lights. A royal atmosphere was created at 
the crowning as the Belle and her attendants walked 
down a red carpet and Sherri Magnusson was crown- 
ed Belle of the Y by President Harvey L. Taylor. 



A WEEK OF COMPETITION LED 





THREE OTHER FINALISTS. Beverly White. Barba 
son. displayed their prize-winning coles. 



MARLENE BROWN, another finalis 



danced in the talent 




rO THE SELECTION 



BEVERLY WHITE, Belle of the Y Attendant. 



LYNNE BARLOW, Belle of the Y Attendant. 





OF BELLE 




BELLE OF THE Y ROYALTY. Lynne, Sherri, and Beverly 
troduced at the dance. 



FINAL PREPARATIONS for lighting the 

Y were made by IK's Wayne Sabey, j^ 

Lynn Thacker. and David Hansen. 




306 



OF THE Y 




SHERRI MAGNUSSEN. Belle of the Y 




»LONG WITH the lighted Y, S. M. 
«as spelled out on the mountainside. 



307 






KAPPA DEBONAIRE captured second place in the 
women's division of Song Fest with "Simple Simon Fan- 
tasy," written and directed by Marilyn Neeley. 



TAU SIGMA took second place in the men's units 
petition, with their production of "Legend of Lotus 
som." written and directed by Don Marshall. 



KAREN KELLER of ToKalon was given the award for the best song. She 
wrote and directed "The Most Precious Gift." 




"Fables and Fancies," Song Fest I960, represented 
weeks of rehearsals and polishing of original songs, 
as twelve organizations who qualified for final com- 
petition sang before an overflowing crowd in the 
Smith Field House. Elaborate productions, complete 
with costumes and scenery, added to the effect. Ser- 
vice and social unit organizational spirit ran rampant 
among competing groups as winners were an- 
nounced, and Athenians won sweepstakes honors. 




308 



Trovata with "Poor Meteusco, 
Judy Dana. 

VAL HYRICS took third place 
their song, "Whistling Breeze," 
aren and directed by Carl Stone 



en's division was O. S. 
'itten and directed by 



Tiposed by Dee Sand- 





ATHENIANS with their story in sonq about Ichobod Crone won both sweepslaUs award and award for best group in the men's division. "The Legend o( khabod 
Crane" was written and directed by Ray Goodwin. The audience saw only lips and hands which were painted with fluorescent paint. 



SONGFEST 

UNITS SANG ABOUT FABLES AND FANCIES 




VAL NORN was named first place in the women s division with their production of "The 
Prize." which told of the love of Sir Francis for Princess Valerie, and was written by Gloria 
Dotson and directed by Nancy Barnes. 







Wk 




wtBS^^k 





PLAYFUL ANTICS helped 
whitewash lighter as they v 
to the Y. 



nalce the buckets 
ant up the mount 



The high point of the Y Week was Y Day, April 
27, set apart as a time for the studentbody to partici- 
pate in the general clean-up and beautification of the 
city of Provo, the campus and the block Y on the 
mountain. The hard work was over by noon, and 
then the fun began as all participatorh assembled at 
the football stadium for free lunch and an afternoon 
of races and relays which were unhampered by 
cloudy skies and rain. The day was culminated by a 
studentbody dance in the evening and the lighting of 
the Y by Intercollegiate Knights. 



Y DAY STUDENTS HAD A HOLIDAY 




THE MIXING CREW spent a busy 
special whilewash formula. 



310 



THE LIGHTED Y and the torchlight parade of IK s and their dates was the finishing touch to a day of work, fun, and traditional activity. 



OF WORK AND PLAY 




MANY CAMPUS UNITS participated in z 



rnt AFTERNOONS GAMES featured a tugof-war bet.een the 
old and new executive councils with the losers being pulled through 



a stream of water. 



311 



COUPLES WENT FORMAL 

TO "GREEN MANSIONS' 



GIRLS IN muu muu's set the island mood for Green Man 




The lush, exotic decor of "Green Mansions" ushered 
couples into the I960 Junior Prom, the only formal 
dance of the year, held April 29 and 30. Jerry Gray's 
popular orchestra, remmiscent of the great Glenn 
Miller group, provided music for dancing. The Lime- 
lighters quartet was featured as special intermission 



312 




JERRY GRAY and his orchestra provided 
both dreamy end swinging music for 
dancing. 



DANCING HALTED as couples paused to wafcti the orchestra's floorsho 



THE LIMELIGHTERS rendered a variety of 
ballads and folk songs fronn around the 
world for Intermission entertainment. 



entertainment for couples as they partook of refresh- 
ments during the evening. Special decorational cen- 
terpieces in the refreshment area v^ere large goblets 
containing unusual candles and live goldfish. Chair- 
man of the this successful event, the greatest under- 
taking of the junior class, was Gary Stewart. 




li !■■! !■■! nai 



314 




111! 




STUDENT LIFE 

Ten thousand strong, they 

came to Brigham Young 

University. Education was 

first in their minds, but there 

were other times, too. The 

students lived, loved, and 

laughed as BYU became 

part of them. 



3IS 




1/ 



STUDENTS THRONGED BACK lo school, their arms laden with suitcases, bo.es. paper 
bags, and stuffed animals. 




IN SPITE of summer construction, the campus was still tecogniiable 



RESUPPLIED WITH FUNDS frorr 


home. . . . 




^P 


1 CHARGE 1 


^^K^ 


PECKS ■ 




Hi tf^ t«« 


■ 


jfi 


It": 


w 


■■Hv^i^^^jl ^ 


\*'A 


k 


i^fe- ^ 


^4 


ET^^^ 


-rMiJr 


*^ 


^T 


^^ J 


■ip 


\m 


■ 



they felt rich 





THEY BEGAN the year with firm resolutions to study 



but spring fever set in almost 



LETS SEE, if I park in the lot at 1:15 . 



nd Security doesn't checl the lot 'til 1 :45 



>» -< - -» 





HOW ABOUT research paper on "One Hundred end One Items to Meke from Used Brass" ? 



(ST SEE if I ever 90 to s dence with Herman again. ITS BEEN DIFFICULT adjusting after two years 5t MAYBE IF I KICK him hard enough he 

Utah State. have to notice me. 








.hich ranged from basketball ga 



TO HOMECOOKED meals that were never quite like mother used to cook. 





FAMILY PRAYER broughf 



ng close to each day's octivitie 



THEY RELIED on the Universe for news of delly AND THEY heeded the bookstore's edv 
happenings OS well as ■■Peanuts." books." 



OH. YES. they went to classes, too. 







,., dMiMjmM 






TELEPHONE CONVERSATIONS often led to date 
with interesting new acquaintances, . . . 





AND MORE evenings together followed as friendships developed. 



SOMEHOW DORM HOURS always came a little bit too early. 





OF COURSE, married studecik made good grades— look at all the help they had. 



APPROXIMATELY ONE-FOURTH of the studentbody combined the unity of family hfe with their educatic 




326 



V 



'X."-*>. 



SPORTS 

'^^ Stalwart men and true, 
wear the white and blue.'^ 
In track shoes, with golf 
club in hand, or under the 
brightness of basketball 
lights, BYU athletes in- 
creased strength and coor- 
dination with greater goals 
than mere physical prowess. 



327 







Eddie Kimball. Afhietic Director 



Tally Stevens, Head Football Coach Stan Watts, Basketball Coach 



Clarence Robison. Track Co 







Pete Witbeck, Freshman Coach Dave Crowton 



Chris Apostol, Football Assistant 



COACHES 



The athletic program at BYU, under the able di- 
rectorship of Eddie Kimball, has given the Y an 
active and comprehensive program which is build- 
ing along with the school to provide a maximum 
amount of activity for all while still striving for ex- 
cellence in every field. The Mountain States Athletic 
Conference, of which BYU is a member, is growing 
steadily in prestige and renown, and is striving to 
take its place among the top conferences in the 
country. Competition is extremely keen, and is con- 
stantly developing in excellence. Cougar teams took 
somewhat of a back seat this year, but the look is 



toward the future, as the department attempts to 
build up its teams to new levels. Several new coaches 
headed teams this year, with Floyd C. "Tally" Ste- 
vens as new head football coach, and Glenn Tuckett 
as new head baseball coach. Several other coaching 
changes were made, as the football and basketball 
staffs were reorganized. In areas other than inter- 
collegiate athletics, the Y had an outstanding pro- 
gram geared to maximum participation and intra- 
murals for both men and women in addition to the 
regular program of physical education. 






Bob Bunlier, Basketball Assistant 



COSK/tO HELPED prepare card stunts to odd color to BYU athletic events. 



Rod Kimball. Tr, 



COSMO WAS catapulted out over the audience in a spectacular stunt which was just one of many 
provided by the Pep Committee. 






50NGLEADERS Carol Ronnow, Sherry Hale. Judy Dana, Jonelle Johnson. Dixfno Price and Marlene Molan 
provided color and added pep during Cougar games. 




FLAGTWIRLING was a novel part of Cougar pep activities, and was displayed to perfection by Judi Ov 
ersby. Karen Davis. Shari Hoffman. Ann Hastings. Carol Dana and Sue Felts. 



PRESIDENT ERNEST L. WILKINSON ga 
address after a completely surprised crow 
him unveiled as a temporary Cosmo. 



JUNIOR CHEERLEADER Cherie Sue McAllister, two and FROSH CHEERLEADERS Kaye Milne, Jack Los- 

one-half year old daughter of Lawrence McAllister, added mann, Jerri Davis and Ned Solomon provided 

a special note to pep activities. pep at Frosh football and basketball games. 




330 




CHEERLEADERS Kent Stephens. Wendell While (top|. 
Chuck Whiting provided leadership and organization (or 
tlvltlos through the Cougar sports year. 



and pep 




PRESIDENT WILKINSON 



Danny Gallogo 



PEP ACTIVITIES 

Under the direction of the Pep Committee and 
ASBYU Vice-President of Student Relations. Gordon 
Wells, pep activities were many and varied during 
1959-60. They ranged from card stunts at football 
and basketball games to suspending Cosmo from a 
rope and catapulting him out over the fieldhouse 
audience, to pep rallies and send-offs of all types 
for Cougar teams. Cosmo, in person of Danny Gal- 
lego, provided traditional color and entertaining 
laughter for Y fans. The biggest excitement of the 
year came when President Wilkinson was unveiled 
as Cosmo, only to reveal the real Cosmo after some 
satirical remarks on his personal recommendations 
for changes in basketball rules. Cheerleaders under 
the direction of Kent Stephens, song leaders under 
Judy Dana, and flagtwirlers under Shari Hoffman 
provided the leadership for cheers, song, and team 
support throughout the season. 



PEP COMIvtITTEE members Udell Winkler. Ray ZInn. Annette ! 
Hoffman Annette Humphreys. Barbara Brown. Marshall Chatwin, 
Two: Brent Backman, Bary Wood. Carroll Jacobs, and Ben Shipper 
of promoting school spirit. 



charge 




331 



1959 COUGAR FOOTBALL 




GeORGE SUnLES HAROLD HAWKINS ROY TIDWELL 




HEAD COACH, Tally Stevens gives directions to LeSrande Young 
during a tense moment In a Cougar game. 



The 1959 edition of Cougar football produced a 
season in which the Cats struggled through a some- 
what frustrating and disappointing season to a 
three-won seven-lost record, and a season which 
taught the Cougars that balance, depth, and experi- 
ence are needed together and in abundance to pro- 
duce winning teams. 
Disappointing.' Yes, to most followers. 
Frustrating.' Certainly. 

BYU football potential for 1959 had been rated 
from good to excellent by everyone before the start 
of the season, and optimism reached its high point 
when a local papers announced "Cougars rate nod 
as number one team in Skyline for '59' 
Elsewhere, the Y was generally tabbed for second, 
third, or possibly fourth in the conference. Material, 
it was said, was excellent. The fact that the coaching 
staff was almost entirely new and the Cougars would 
thus have to adjust to a new system was overlooked 
as something which would be overcome by hard 
work and "spirit." Certainly it was disappointing to 
many onlookers that the Cats barely managed to sal- 
vage a third part of fifth place. That the season was 
a frustrating one, especially to the coaching staff and 
those directly concerned, is even more certain. In 
view of the fact that Cougar football had been on 
the upswing due to a new emphasis on the program 
after several disappointing seasons, and that "ac- 
cording to schedule, " this was the year for them to 
"arrive," the campaign was even more of a let- 
down. But, to the close observer, the "storm clouds 
were on the horizon." When the team opened with 
a squeaker win against a rebuilding Arizona club, 
then lost to Fresno State and their passing wizard 
Bob Van Galder, there was evidence of things to 
come, even though optimism still reigned. 
Then the roof fell in!! 

The team moved into Cougar stadium for the first 
time in front of the home fans against a "weak" 
Montana team which hadn't won a game in its last 
14 starts. The keynote for the Silvertips seemed to 
come when coach Ray Jenkins said: '"We're sure to 
be improved this year. Last year we lost ten games: 
this year we only scheduled nine." Cougar faithfuls 
marched into the stadium freely predicting "at least" 
a 21 -point win for their beloved Cats, in view of a 
crushing 49-0 defeat administered to the 'Tips at 
the hands of Wyoming earlier. Montana then pro- 
ceeded to exploit the extremely weak BYU flanks 
and pass porous secondary while the Cougar offense 
sputtered and misfired due to numerous mistakes. 
The final score was 14-0. and the bubble was broken. 
A loss to arch-rival Utah followed the next week, 
and only a win over Utah State when the alert Cou- 
gars capitalized on five fumbles, and a heroic tri- 
umph over a strong Colorado State team 14-1.5 to 
end the season interrupted the loss skein. The story 
of the season seemed to be a struggle by the coach- 




¥^^ 



NYLE McFARLANE 



coily by fcuf Colorado S', 



he flMempts to gain precious yardage during the Cougars' final garno of the 



ing staff to overcome weaknesses which were clearly 
evident; a struggle which was culminated with some 
success in the Colorado State win. The Cats were 
very strong in the line, where John Kapele, Lonnie 
Dennis, Paul Eckel, and Dave Barrus led out. Strong, 
that is, until they had to dip deep into the reserves. 
Good backfield talent marked the team, where Nyle 
MacFarlane, Keith Hubbs, Gary Dunn, Bud Belnap, 
and Jack Jordan, led the way. Good, that is, until 
an injury hit or a bad pass from center or a fumble 
caused it to sputter on offense. Good, that is, until 
it had to face an outstanding passer while on de- 
fense. The Cougar ends were good, but they were 
also slow, and this caused much hair-tearing when 
time after time an opponent would go to the out- 
side with a quick pitchout to reel off a long gain. 
The staff experimented with many combinations and 
changes to correct the defensive weaknesses, and 
their multiple offense slowly evolved from using a 



majority of single-wing plays to a system in which 
T-plays were predominant. It is a tribute to their 
efforts that both defense and offense seemed to jell 
against Colorado State. State was a team which was 
big, strong, exceptionally fast and confident. They 
certainly weren't in a position to let down either, 
since they still had an outside chance for the con- 
ference championship. If Wyoming could lose to 
Denver, and Colorado State could beat the Cats, they 
had a tie for the top. But BYU had come out on 
that cold, windy day to salvage their pride, their 
prestige, and the confidence of their fans, and sal- 
vage them they did by topping the Rams even more 
convincingly than the score shows. Thus the stage is 
set for the 1960 edition of Cougar football, and 
having learned an innumerable number of lessons, 
the Y can head into the future with optimism. 




JOHN C08ABE JOHN KAPELE VERL SHELL 




N/LE McfASLANE 




KEITH HUBBS tries to turn the 



ilnst three Montanons as Jock Jordan attempts a block. 




BYU 18 -ARIZONA 14 

The Cats opened their season at Tucson, Arizona, 
against an untried Arizona University team. This 
was a rebuilding year for the Wildcats, and the Cou- 
gars were generally conceded the favorite's role for 
the game. Some weaknesses began to show in the 
BYU defenses early in the game, and two draw plays 
to the weak side of the line just about spelled the 
Cats' downfall as the scoreboard showed 14-0 for 
Arizona at the half. In the third quarter the Cats 

BYU 16 - FRESNO STATE 27 



DICK MAGOFFIN 
HOWARD HOMAN 
GAYLE ANDERSON 



Started to click as they brought the score to 14-6 
with Jack Gifford's 10-yard draw play. The Cougars 
then took to the air for their next tally, as Gary 
Dunn hit Harold Hawkins on a 42-yard pass play to 
bring the score to 14-12. The aerial game provided 
the margin of victory as Ron Startin connected with 
Howard Ringwood who carried to the 1. Startin then 
sneaked over and the Cougars had an 18-14 win. 



Fresh from their win over Arizona, the Cats headed 
for Fresno, California, and were quickly installed in 
the favorite's role over the Fresno State Bulldogs. 
But there were those who felt they could sense an 
upset, and their intuition didn't prove to be far 
wrong as Bob 'Van Galder and his cohorts found 
some holes in the Cougar's defensive secondary and 
passed their way to a win. Fresno scored quickly on 
a "Van Galder pass after receiving the opening kick- 



off. Keith Hubbs then took charge for the Cats and 
personally accounted for 8 points with a 51-yard 
punt return. The Bulldogs quickly erased the lead, 
running the score to 21-8 before the Cats could score 
again. Although Fresno gained 407 yards in offense 
against the Y's 261, the passing department was the 
real difference as the Bulldogs completed 180 yards 
on 14 completions. 




HAL LEWIS HOWARD RINGWOOD LONNIE DENNIS 




NORRIS FISH 



LAN CHRISTLEY LYNN STEWART 





A LOOSE BALL 
tana fumble. 



aded for by Nylo McFarl 



and Wes Vorwalle 



ed Couqa 



STEVE DANGERflELO 

PAUL ECKEL 

ROY BENNION 



BYU O- MONTANA 12 




Grizzly Club dominates Skyline Duel at Provo 
Upset. 

This was probably the classic understatement of the 
year as far as most BYU followers were concerned. 
And this because of events leading up to the game. 
The Grizzlies hadn't won a game in their last four- 
teen starts; they hadn't beaten BYU since 19^6; and 
they were still recovering from the 49-0 fiasco in 
which Wyoming's Cowboys nearly ran them into the 
ground. The 'Tips were at low ebb, or so the Cou- 
gars thought, but a sophomore named Bob Billo- 
vich found out the same thing that Bob Van Galder 
found out the week before — that the Brighams' pass 
defenses weren't quite what they should be. Half- 
way through the first period, he found Jim Grasky 
with an aerial covering 32 yards for the score, 
and that, essentially, was the ball game. Most of the 
fans in the stands settled back after the TD for the 
inevitable victory that the Cats were to grind out in 
the remainder of the game. True, they settled back, 
but it was to stunned silence, and the thing that 
couldn't happen did. The Cougars mounted drive 
after drive, and then saw their drives stopped by 
their own ineptness and an inspired Grizzly forward 
wall. The last Grizzly TD was only icing on the cake 
as the clock ticked off the seconds on the Cats' route 
to an embarrassing defeat. 



ijRT BULLOCK attempts to restrain a Montan 
■- -.mble, as Dick Magoffin rushes up to lielp. 



player after for* 



BYU 8 - UTAH 20 



Fourth Period Ute Drive Ends Doubts on Game's 
Outcome. 

The Brighams went into their game with arch-rival 
University of Utah with only one way to go — Up. 
But the Utes saw to it that they didn't go very far as 
they squelched the Cougars with a last period drive. 
The Redskins had been battered the week before by 
the Washington Huskies, and Y fans had hopes that 
they would still be recovering and that the Cougars 
would finally jell to catch them for a win. But 
they didn't know the strength of the Washington 
club, which was grinding its way to a win in the 
Rose Bowl on New Year's Day. 
And the Cougars didn't jell! 

Miscues and mistakes were the order of the day for 
BYU and eventually proved to be their undoing as 
the defense couldn't hold up against the Ute on- 
slaught. Utah didn't pass much, but when they did, 
they found the mark at crucial moments to keep 
the Brighams on the defensive. Utah did run, though. 
They rolled up 341 yards rushing as speedy backs 
found the flanks vulnerable. And when their final 
drive came, Tony Campman and Bob Mastelloto 
found that the Cougars were weakening from tackle 
to tackle due to lack of depth, and moved through 
the forward wall toward their clinching TD. The 
Redskins rolled up a 14-0 lead over the Cats 
by halftime, but the Cougars mustered their forces 
and Lonnie Dennis blocked a Utah punt and recover- 
ed it himself on the Utah 4. After three plays Gary 
Dunn crossed into the end zone and then carried for 
the 2-pointer, and the Y was back in business. An- 
other Utah bobble gave the ball to BYU on the Red- 
skin 25 and they moved it to the 11, while excite- 
ment built to a feverish pitch. But the backfield 
mixed its signals and lost 10 yeards, and from there 
the last Ute drive seemed almost inevitable. 





RON NIELSEN 



RON JACOBSEN 



RON STARTIN 





GA«Y OUNN 
TOM COLE 
DON PEreHSON 



COUGARS Lo 



Ute Bob Mastelloto du 



BYU 6 - WYOMING 21 



'Poke Attack Explodes in Second Half. 
After the Utah game, BYU traveled to Laramie, 
Wyoming, for the game which had promised to be 
the big one of the year in pre-season figuring, but 
now the Cats were down and almost out, and the 
game didn't hold much promise for anyone who 
wasn't extremely optimistic. The Cowboys had three 
wins and no losses in conference play, and the only 
blot on their record was a loss to a powerful Air 
Force aggregation. The 'Pokes were big, powerful, 
and fast, and they led the conference in almost every 
statistical department. In the face of this, the Cou- 
gars were slated to fall before the onslaught, and 
fall they did; but in falling, they played what was 
probably their best ball game up to that time. The 
line began to hold, and the defense, in general, got 
a good start on the road to recovery, with the end 
situation much improved. Joe Dempsey provided 
the initial advantage for the Pokes in the second 
quarter with field goals of 25 and 32 yards to give 
Wyoming a 6-0 lead at the half. In the fourth quar- 
ter, the Cowboy offense began to roll, and two 
touchdowns upped their lead to 21-0. The Cats then 
mounted a 73-yard sustained drive which was to come 
into pay dirt with just 23 seconds left in the game. 
Jack Jordan led the drive from the quarterback slot, 
and Lynn Stewart finally went over for the Cougars' 
only touchdown. 




<<\ 




EDDIE YOUNG 
STEVE SULLIVAN 



DAVE BARRUS thro- 



BYU drive goalw 



RUSS 

JACKIE JOR 

KENT HC 



BYU 7 -DENVER 14 



BYU 18 - UTAH STATE ( 



Returning to the friendly atmosphere of Provo, the 
Cougars brought an improving ball club into their 
Homecoming tussle with Denver hoping to get start- 
ed on a new winning streak. Capitalizing on a DU 
gamble early in the first period, the Cats took over on 
the Pioneers' 31 and began to grind goalward. With 
barely 'i minutes gone in the game, Gary Dunn skirt- 
ed end for the score and the Cats appeared to be on 
the way with a 7-0 lead. But after one exchange of 
the bail, the Pioneers finally started a drive which 
covered 9'' yards in 10 plays. Quarterback Bob Lands 
led the drive as he hit Dick Gorden for 28 yards 
through the air and then gave to his fullback Doug 
Curliss who carried for 10 years and the touchdown. 
The try for f)oint went awry, and the Cats still held 
to their lead at 7-6. This score held up in a seesaw 
battle which saw the Cougar offense stall once on the 
DU 20 until the middle of the final quarter. At this 
f)oint, the Hilltoppers recovered a hobbled punt re- 
turn on the BYU 44, and this seemed to be the break 
they needed as they crunched to the Cougar 20 in 
10 plays from where Sands baffled the Brighams' 
secondary with an aerial which hit Steve Meuris in 
the end zone. A two-point conversion gave the Pion- 
eers their victory 14-7. The statistics column showed 
Denver to be even more superior than the score 
would indicate as they rolled up 311 yards on total 
offense to the Cats' 195. 



338 



The traditional battle for the Wagon Wheel with 
the Farmers of Utah State saw the Cougars as a 
definite underdog previous to the game, since the 
Cats were still hurting from four consecutive losses, 
and the Ags were primed to capitalize on the Brig- 
hams' defensive weaknesses with a big and confident 
ball club. But all of the capitalizing in this game 
was done by the Cougars, who alertly recovered 5 
USU fumbles and used them to advantage in an 18-0 
win. The Cougar offense seemed to click much more 
easily as they used a new attack composed almost 
entirely of T and wing-T plays, and the defense, 
as the score will attest, held up admirably in blanking 
the normally potent State offense. After winning the 




AN UNIDENTIFIED COUGAR 
rushes up during Cat's Homecoming li 





DENVER HALFBACK Jack Wort 
tackle during Homeccminq game 



BYU 6 - NEW MEXICO 21 



toss of the coin for the first time during the season. 
Jack Jordan took over and led the Cats 79 yards in 
7 plays for the score immediately following the 
opening kickoff. The big plays of the drive were 
Jordan's pass to Paul Allen for 25 and a draw play 
with LeGrande Young carrying which was good for 
33. The score came on a Jordan pass to Tom Cole 
and stood at 6-0. Then, in the third quarter, the Cats 
mounted a drive after recovering one of the Aggie 
fumbles on their own 45. Ron Startin led the attack 
and Jack Gifford carried for most of the distance and 
the TD. State fumbled again two plays after receiv- 
ing the kickoff, and the Brighams took over again, 
this time on the Farmer 33. Nme plays later, the 
Cats were in with their final score as Howard Ring- 
wood carried, and the final tally was 18-0. This was 
the third consecutive the Cougars had won the 
battle for the Wagon Wheel, and was the first shut- 
out recorded over USU since 1957. 



Fresh from their Utah State win, a steadily improving 
(A)ugar ball club traveled to Albuquergue, New 
Mexico, fora showdown with an extremely fast group 
of New Mexico Lobos. NMU was on a 5-game win- 
ning skein, and had three of the conference's top 
ground-gaining backs, who were all speedy scatbacks 
as well as powerful runners, and who were supposed 
to be the undoing of the Cougars due to the fact 
that the Cats were admittedly slow, especially in the 
end department, fkit the tough HYU line rose to 
the occasion to partially squelch the backfield speed, 
and it was left to quarterback Chuck Roberts to lead 
the Lobos to victory. In the second quarter, he passed 
for one TD and ran for another to open up the New 
Mexico lead. Then, a third quarter drive netted 77 
yards for the Cougars, and Jack Gifford accounted 
for the only points of the day for the Y with a 39- 
yard run off tackle. It wasn't until the final quarter 
that talented backs, Perkins and Crandall, finally 
got going on a drive which culminated in a Perkins 
score just as the game ended. 




LEROT OVEKSTSEET WES VORWALLER PAUL ALLEN DAVE BARRUi MILl JOHNSON fREO LEAVin 




NYLE McFARLANE thn 



-■-- -^ ^ « Li,_ • -'.II ■ ■'J'^ ■■■>.. ■■■■ 

block for LeGrande Young during Cougar drive toward 14-13 win over Colorado State. 



BYU 8 - ARIZONA STATE 27 



The Cougars then journeyed to Tempe, Arizona, for 
a contest with the highly touted Sun Devils of Ari- 
zona State. The Devils were favored to overrun the 
Cats, but it was a potent aerial offense that did the 
trick as they proved out victorious with a 27-8 win. 
Quarterback Joe Zuger led the ASU attack which 
completed 14 out of 20 passes for an even 200 yards. 
Zuger and Nolan Jones led the first Sun Devil drive 
which was capped with an 18-yard aerial to Jones. 
Zuger did not let up, however, as he passed his way 
to the Cats' 21 the next time ASU got the ball, from 
where Jones carried for the tally to make it 13-0. 
The Cats managed to move the score up to 13-8 with 
Jack Gifford carrying for the TD and Nyle McFar- 
lane carrying for the extra two points. But the Devils 
were not to be denied as they came roaring back for 
two more scores to ice the win at 27-8 to give them 
a 7-1 season won-lost record to that date. 




FLAGTWIRLER Ann Hastings and stray kitten are caught 
during lull In action at Colorado State game. 







^ i'A )^ ^ i: 

LARRY HARRISON JACK GIffORD MERLIN SMITH LESRANDE YOUNG DION FRAZIER DALE GRANT 





GARY DUNN otempts to shale loose fi 
Schneider. 



BYU 14 - 

COLORADO STATE 13 



INTERCOLLEGIATE KNIGHTS Wayne Sabey and Chucl Watson give the Old 
Y Bell a long-needod workout to sound the Cougar victory over CSU. 




LeGrande Young mo 



Then the Cats came to their finale against Colorado 
State's Rams, another extremely fast and rugged 
team. State had been beaten in the conference only 
by league- leading Wyoming, and the prospect 
seemed to be that the season would end in frustration 
for Tally Stevens' football forces despite their great 
improvement. Spirit and enthusiasm seemed at a 
season low on that cold, blustery day. The stands 
were only half-filled with Cougar faithful, and half 
of those present seemed to be sitting on their hands 
waiting for the inevitable, in contrast to the crowd 
which sat in on the Montana game just seven weeks 
earlier. What was inevitable then and now were 
almost diametrically opposed. Quite a contrast, also, 
was the football team which played that day, for 
lack of spirit and enthusiasm existed only in the 
stands. The offense which had sputtered and mis- 
fired all year was not evidenced as Gary Dunn, How- 
ard Ringwood, and LeGrande Young used up most 
of the first period in a 19-play drive which was not 
to be stopped until BYTJ led 6-0. The defense which 
had not held up all season held up magnificently, 
having only two momentary lapses all afternoon in 
which a little scatback named Brady Keys asserted 
himself. In the second quarter. Keys took the ball on 
a sweep around left end and scampered down the 
sideline for the score. Ward Gates converted for the 
point, and CSU led 7-6. In the third period, Lonnie 
Dennis and John Kapele led the Y line on a charge 
which resulted in a Ram fumble on the 15 and a 
Y recovery. Nyle Macfarlane then scored both the 
touchdown and the two-point conversion. Then it was 
Keys' turn as he uncorked a 52-yard touchdown pass 
to Al Fortune. But the Cat line held as the Rams 
went for two points. That 52-yards was all the Rams 
got through the airlanes. The score may have been 
close, but the game was BYU all the way as the Cats 
rolled up 337 yards and 19 first downs to 8 for the 
Rams from Ft. Collins. 





BRUCE SAPLES 
Frantz look on. 



opped by two Montan. 



FROSH RON MICKLE and 
Rambler drive, as Mike Conr 



unidentified Gato temporarily halt 
rushes to help. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 



USU RAMBLERS vainly attempt to block a Sato point after touchdown at. 
tempt by Kitch Elton. 







BYU Frosh football forces posted a record of three 
wins and one loss for their season, splitting two 
games with the Utah Papooses and defeating the 
USU Ramblers and the Montana State Frosh. The 
Gatos opened their season in Prove with a 14-0 win 
over the Ramblers of USU, scoring once in each half. 
The first TD came after a pass interception by Val 
Weenig on the USU 34, as quarterback Ron Mickle 
carried for the score. The second half was marked 
by an all-the-way punt return by Bill Wright as well 
as two other Gato drives which fell short. A passing 
combination of Bill Cravens to Marv Fleming proved 
to be the Kittens' undoing when they traveled to 
Utah, as the potent Papoose offense ran over them 
to post a 22-0 win. After the Utah loss, the Gatos 
came back to Provo to host the Montana State Frosh. 
The first frosh TD came on a 90 yard punt runback 
by Bill Wright, but MSU retaliated by going 52 
yards in 8 plays for a score to bring it to 7-6 at the 
half for BYU. The Gatos added 2 more TDs in the 
last quarter as they ran the score to 19-6. The Frosh 
hosted Utah in their last game, and avenged their 
previous defeat by topping them by a score of 27-1 *>. 
Bill Wright and Steve Clark combined to provide the 
Kittens' offensive punch, and Jerry Overton sparked 
the Papooses with a 93 yard kickoff runback. 







i^ 






1 




Row On«: Kent Chamberlain. Coach Reed Weight, Joe De*ey. Row Two: Lowell Wllkms. Robert Powers, Ron LecHe. Phil Kresge 



WRESTLING 

Plagued by injuries throughout the season, the Cougar 
mat squad had a difficult time putting a full squad to- 
gether, and this and other factors combined to drop the 
Cats to sixth place in the conference. The Cougar grap- 
plers never did get all eight first string wrestlers together 
as a team, as the injury bug even hit undefeated Chamber- 
lain, who was sidelined with a knee injury. The team cap- 
tain was Ron Leckie, and Reed Weight coached the 
grapplers during the I960 wrestling season. 



After winning their initial three matches by wide mar- 
gins, BYU's netters faced the future optimistically with 
a squad of only one senior, one junior, and the rest fresh- 
men or sophomores. The Cougars opened the season with 
a 9-0 win over the Air Force Academy at Provo, and then 
gained revenge at the expense of archrival USU 7-0 in 
their first conference test. They followed this with a 6-1 
win over Montana, and had high hopes for success in the 
Western Division and conference meets on the strcngtii 
of their showing in these lopsided wins. 

TENNIS 



Richard Di>on. O'Neil Miner. Gary C 
Dennis Doyle. Charlie Sensiba, John St, 



Mel Bennett. Milie Webe 
lig Smith. Jerry An 



Prank Driggs. Paul Shuey. Row Two: Go 
Terry Warner, LeRoy Peterson. Coach Dii 




343 




GARY EARNEST DRIVES in for two points 



BASKETBALL 



Cougar basketball forces struggled through a some- 
what disastrous season to a 7 won 19 lost record — 
a season which saw the Cats play some of the top 
ranked teams in the nation, and a season which saw 
them finish in the Skyline Conference second divi- 
sion for the first time under the coaching reins of 
Stan Watts. Watts' basketball forces played what was 
possibly the most difficult preseason schedule ever 
played by a BYU team, as they met such teams as 
UCLA, use, Kansas, Kansas State, Michigan State, 
and Ohio State. These six teams were met in suc- 
cessive games, and were all ranked in the top twenty 
teams in the nation at the time the Cats played them. 
The conference campaign didn't give the Cats any 
chance to let up either, as Utah and Utah State 
battled it out for the championship, and both were 
rated among the top ten teams in the nation for the 
duration of the season. Colorado State and Denver 
also finished ahead of the Cats, in one of the tough- 
est races ever held in the Skyline Conference. 
The Cats opened their season at home with a two- 
game series against the Washington Huskies and 
split the series by losing the second game by a 60-52 
margin after winning their opener 54-52. A 6'8" 
sophomore, Bill Hanson, proved to be the spoiler 
for Washington in the second game and almost prov- 
ed to be the Cougars' undoing Friday before he 



fouled out early in the second half. He bit for 16 
counters Friday and counted 14 Saturday, along with 
spearheading a rebounding .effort which saw the 
Huskies pick off 53 rebounds to 23 for the Cats. 
The Y led most of the way Friday, but it was left to 
Jan Robinson to hit a fielder in the closing minutes 
and break a 52-52 tie for the Cougar victory. 
The first road trip of the season took Coach Stan 
Watts' crew to southern California for games against 
UCLA and USC. Both teams were highly touted, 
and they lived up to those press notices as the Cats 
lost both games by wide margins, 64-42 and 79-61. 
Things didn't get any better during the hoopsters' 
next two games, as they traveled to the Midwest and 
lost two games to Kansas State and Kansas by scores 
of 86-65 and 96-64 respectively. 
A return home to the friendly confines of Smith 
Fieldhouse seemed to pick the Cougars up, as they 
beat a Michigan State team, which was ranked 11th 
nationally, by a score of 79-75. The game was one 
of the high points of the season for the roundballers, 
as Gary Earnest hit for 4 points in the final 34 
seconds to cap the victory. The next night, the Y 
came up against the second ranked team in the na- 
tion, Ohio State, and their heralded sophomore, Jer- 
ry Lucas. This same team eventually came out as 
top team in the nation as they topped California's 




fRANK BARRfcT 
JAMES MCINTYRE 
BON ABEeSLEN 




DAVE EASTIS WHEELS for 
over Michigan State. 



of his patented hook shots in the Couga 




Bears in the NCAA finals. And they certainly didn't 
disappoint anyone, as they rolled to a 91-97 victory 
on the heels of a phenomenal effort by Lucas. Ho 
hit for 36 points, and hit an unbelievable 16 out of 
19 field goal attempts. Dave Eastis again was top 
point producer for the Cats with 23 counters. 
A swing to the East during the holidays was high- 
lighted by the Cougars' participation in the Hurri- 
cane Invitational at Miami, Florida. The first game 
against Miami U was all offense, as the Hurricanes' 
little 5'6" guard, Dick Hickok, led an offensive on- 
slaught which ran up a season high 110 points 
against the Brighams. Mark Miller came off the 
bench to can 27 points in this game and win a start- 



UTAH 

UTAH STATE 
COLORADO STATE 
DENVER 

BRIGHAM YOUNG 
NEW MEXICO 
MONTANA 
WYOMING 



PCT. 
.929 
.857 
.714 
.571 
.357 
.214 
.214 



345 




COUGAR PLAYERS boost Stan Watts to the 
Stan's 200tli baskotbjil win. 



ing berth for the rest of the season, but his effort 
wasn't enough to offset Hickok's 34 counters. Dave 
Eastis and Gary Earnest led the team in a comeback 
against Florida the next night, as Dave hit 21 and 
Gary hit 20 points to lead a 74-65 win which gave 
the Cats third place in the preseason finale with 29 
points as Loyola University succeeded in topping 
the Brighams 82-76 in an overtime jjeriod. 
The Y opened regular season play with a road trip 
to Missoula, Montana, and returned home with a 
63-58 win under their belts at the expense of Mon- 
tana's Grizzlies. Returning home, the Cougars next 
encountered Wyoming, and CSU and came away 
from this severe test with a split, as they topped the 




BRENT PETERSON 



LARRY CROWLEY 



VALOY EATON 



DAVE EASTIS 




MARK MILLER REACHES for the 


ball 


Colorado Stater comes up with it 


. D< 


up to assist. 





Eastis struggle to retain post 




Cowboys 73-52, but lost a thriller to the CSU Rams 
53-51. The Y held only a slim 29-27 lead at half- 
time against Wyoming, but a second half which saw 
them hit a hot 56 per cent from the field gave thein 
the win by a wide margin. On Saturday, the com- 
bination of Chuck Newcomb and Larry Hoffner was 
too much for the Brighams to handle, as Newcomb 
hit for 23 points and provided the Rams' margin of 
victory. Eastis led the Cougar scoring over the week- 
end as he rammed 47 points total. Maintaining his 
high scoring, he hit for 24 Friday and 23 Saturday. 
Utah's Redskins, who were ranked 7th nationally 
at the time, provided the Cats' next challenge, and 
their touted bench strength finally wore down the 
Cougars for a 76-69 win. Eastis hit for 17 pomts in 
a closely contested first half which saw the Utcs 
leading by a 40-39 margin at intermission, but the 
Cats went cold with only 6 points in the first 10 min- 
utes of the second half, and that was the ball game. 
League-leading Utah State was the next opponent 
for the Y as the team traveled to Logan without 
Dave Eastis' services to face the Farmers. Max Perry, 
Cornell Green, and company never gave the Cougars 
a chance as they rolled up an early 16-8 lead and 
coasted in for an 84-53 win. 

Returning to Provo, the Brighams reached another 
high point of the season, as Stan Watts won his 200th 



347 



GARY EARNEST'S FACE 
check him, as Dave Eastis 



against De 



Bob Moe. Clare Slov, and Jim Peay attempt to 



MARK MILLER SEEMS to say "come to papa," as an unidentified Montan 
seemingly lands a right cross to the jaw of Larry Crowley. 




coaching victory as his crew rolled to a 95-97 win 
over New Mexico. A stellar performance by Dave 
Eastis brought him 44 points for the evening and 
a new fieldhouse scoring record. His 21 field goals 
also broke another fieldhouse record as he obliterated 
Jerry Lucas' mark of 16 set earlier in the season. Jim 
Peay and Jerry Cole led the Denver Pioneers to an 
86-66 win over an inept bunch of Cats the next 
night, as Peay hit for 32 points and Cole master- 
minded the Pioneers' floor game. Mark Miller man- 
aged 21 points for the Y, but after being behind 39- 
33 at halftime, they couldn't get any closer as the 
Hilltoppers pulled away. Utah State then journeyed 
to Provo to meet the Cougars for the second time 
and came away with their second victory, but not un- 
til after the Cats threw a scare into them by pulling 
up to within 3 points late in the game. Max Perry 
proved to be the final difference, as he bagged 25 
points and hit 13 for 13 from the foul line, most of 
which came late in the game. Taking an ever dan- 
gerous swing to the eastern end of the Conference, 
the Cats managed to split with Wyoming and Colo- 
rado State, as they beat Wyoming 75-70, and lost 
to the Colorado Rams 65-53- 



348 




DAVE EASTIS IS surrounded by RedsHns as he attempts to get the ball away 
time to save a iump. 



608 INGIIS 

DON BELL 

DAVE SARBER 



MARK MILLER JUMPS :n to tie up the ball with Ralph Cullimore of Utah Stale 












^§r 


•^41^^ > 



349 




RON ABESGLEN GOES in for 
linst the eventual NCAA 



A LOOSE BALL re$ulh 
Eaton grapples for the 



nble in the Ohio State ga 



i4 


(r 


tf^ 


kP& 




'If" 



Utah's runnin' Redskins came to Provo for their sec- 
ond game with Coach Watts' crew, and almost ran 
the Cougars off the floor as they jumped out to a 
lead of 47-23 after 10 minutes of play, and were 
never headed thereafter in gaining an 87-75 win. 
Allen Holmes led scoring for the Utes, and Eastis 
hit for 21 for the Y. For their last home game, the 
Brighams got caught off guard as Montana's Griz- 
zlies swamped them by an 87-67 margin. MSU's cen- 
ter, Duane Ruegsegger, led all scorers with 31 points 
and Gary Earnest's 16 was the best the lack-lustre 
Cougars could muster. It was MSU all the way as 
they out-shot, out-hustled, and out-rebounded the 
hapless Cats during the entire game. 
When the Cougars traveled to Denver, the Pioneers 
were without the services of all-conference guard 
Jerry Cole, but he apparently wasn't needed as the 
HiUtoppers ran over the Y for an 88-68 win. The 
Cats rolled late in the second half to salvage a win 
in their final game against New Mexico by a score 
of 75-69. NMU led 42-40 at intermission, but the 
Cats, led by Dave Eastis' 25 points, came through 
for their win with a stall for the final 3 minutes 
which increased their lead and iced the game. 





BOB BOWN BAHLES fo 
Webarites and Jim Kelson 



UNIDENTIFIED FROSH BAHLE foi 




FRESHMEN BASKETBALL 



The frosh basketball forces compiled a record of 9 
wins and 3 losses during a successful season which 
saw them win the mythical state frosh championship 
over Utah and Utah State. Before starting their sea- 
son, the frosh gave the varsity a scare early in their 
traditional game before succumbing 81-68. After a 
group of intrasquad games, the Gatos entered the 
College of Southern Utah Invitational tourney and 
came in third with a 79-64 win over Compton Junior 
College after losing their opener to Glendale J. C. 
75-62. They buried Dugway under an offensive bar- 
rage 112-60 before losing a 71-67 game to a highly 
touted Weber Junior College team. A Weber press 
in the last few minutes caught the Kittens off guard, 
as Weber overcame a large Kitten lead to win. Dur- 
ing the next weekend, the Gatos hit the road, and 
won two games, beating arch-rival Utah 82-78 in a 
hotly contested game, and Mesa J. C. of Grand Junc- 
tion, Colorado, 76-72. Their third straight road 
game proved to be too much, however, as the USU 
Ramblers broke a 66-66 tie late in the game with 
6 straight points to ice a 72-70 win. Then the Gatos 
really turned on the offense, as they buried Tucker 
Air Force Base of Oklahoma City 105-69, and Hill 
AFB of Ogden, Utah 117-60. The Gatos then closed 
out their season with 3 straight wins, avenging their 
previous loss to USU and trimming Utah 97-67. 




SPRINTERS. 
100-yard da. 



McDonald, Dick Heywood, Alton Thyqe 



=ff and running fr< 



TRACK 



RON PINKSTON, Fred N 
they practice for futu 




Cougar cindermen, under coach Clarence Robinson, 
opened their track season this year in quest of their 
sixth straight Skyline Conference championship. In 
addition to having five straight conference firsts, the 
Cats have won the conference Western Division 
championship six years in a row, and haven't lost a 
conference dual meet in seven years. The Cats 
showed their power in their first conference meet 
this year, as they annihilated arch-rival Utah by a 
109-22 score in a show of possible things to come. 
This score was the widest margin by which a BYU 
team has ever won a dual meet. The present Cougar 
team has three conference record holders and three 
defending conference champs on the squad. Confer- 
ence record holders are Gary Griffith in the two- 
mile, Marcus Nielsen in the pole vault, and Ed 
Costa in the high jump. Conference champs are Grif- 
fith in the 2-mile and mile, Alton Thygerson in the 
100-yard dash, and Glade Nixon in the broad jump. 
Costa was among the top high-jumpers in the nation 
at press time, with a jump of 6 feet lll/^ inches in 
the BYU Invitational meet. 



352 




Row On*: John ParLer. Manager: Roger Dunn. Richard Heywood Alton Thygarson. Ted Potter. Glade Wiiom. Oava Youkstetler. Richard Palmer. Guy 
DoHart. Row Two: Marcus Nielsen. Richard Bloomburq. Ron Pinbton. Carl Williams. Gary Brinlman. Mickey Day, Larry McDonald, Kirk Wright, Leon 
Smuin, Dee Reese. Larry Schlappi. Row Three: Ron Michael. Bill Walton. Ed Costa, Fred Nelson, Bob Cowart, John Quinette. Jerry Jensen, Carl Quinn, 
Norm Eburne, Ale> Cowan. Coach Clarence Robison. 



CARL QUINN shows his shol-puHing form as he prepares for confer, 
competition in his event. 



ED COSTA skims over the bar in practice as he perfects his form for 
his repeated assaults on the record books. Costa had posted a jump of 
6 feet iM/s inches at press time. 





t ^^ ,^'.'^^1^'^^ 





ALTON THYGERSON tests his blocls as he worls on h.s get- 
away in defense of his conference channpionship m the 100 
yard dash. 



JI^MCadBBSSHS 



MARCUS NIELSEN speeds down the runway in pole vaulting practice in 
preparation for upcoming conference meets. 



DISTANCE MEN Kirl. Wright and Terry Jeffers 
they prepare for comoetition 



irk on endurance and stan 




354 








MARCUS NIELSEN goes over the ber with 



.crk; toward breaking his own confei 




355 




RALPH ASHBY and Carl Clayton demonstrate their double-play form as ttiey ready themselves for conference pla 



BOB MOSTELLER, Jim Plerson, Bob Birch, Erwln Haws, David Nuttall and 
Brent Haymond work on signals, as the pitching staff prepares for upcoming 







After a disastrous road trip to California to open the 
season in which they lost 9 out of 9 games, BYU 
baseballers, under new head coach Glen Tuckett, 
won 8 out of their next 10 games and were in the 
thick of the conference championship fight at press 
time. The Cats got on the victory path in their first 
four home games with twin wins over both Snow 
and Carbon Junior Colleges, but then lost their first 
two conference games to Utah 9-8 in Salt Lake, and 
11-5 in Provo. Continuing in conference play, the 
Cougars clobbered Utah State with a barrage of hits 
to win a doubleheader 25-11 and 14-0, and then top- 
ped Montana 11-10 and 8-3 in another double- 
header in Provo. This left the Brighams with four 
wins and two losses in conference play and put them 
one-half game behind division leader Utah with half 
the season left to play. 



356 




Row On.: Steve Jorgensen, Roland Bevel, Er..n Haws, Ralph Ashby. Pele Man, Carl Clayton. Jim O'Brien, Bob Birch, Dick Thornton, Bob Niml, Bonn 
Sanchei, Row Two: Don Mergler. Dean Bergersen, Dave Nuftall, Ron Ostler, Don Heath, Erik Erikson, Mike Hatfield. Nels Ludlow. Mel Coudill, For 
rest Darling. Row Three: Rich Rolapp, Roger Burt. Hugh McMillan, Danny Moore. Brent Haymond, Jerry Martin, Bob Mostellar Jim Pearson Don Davis 
Brent Peterson. Bill Russon Coach Tuckett. 



BASEBALL 



BOB BIRCH bears down as he warms up preparatory to pitching a Couga 



BASEBALL TEAM MEMBERS. Hugh McMillan. Dean Bergensen. Jir 
O'Brien and Roger Burt paused during practice. 





357 





ACTION DURING the Carbon Junior College gome sho 
Carbon runner bursting into third as the Y baseman wa 
throw from the outfield. 



MORE ACTION at third during the Carbon ga 
held up by the third base coach. 



shows a Cat runner being 



DANNY MOORE puts the tag on Erwln Haws as the Cougars work out preparatory to 
their quest of a Western Division championship. 




358 




GOLF 



Coach Dave Crowton's golf squad found itself on the short 
end of two of its first three matches in conference play, 
but was building under its new coach and showed some 
promise for the future by winning its last match before 
press time from Montana by a score of III/2 to 6I/2. The 
first two matches played found the Cats losing to Utah 
16-2 and Utah State III/2 to 6I/2. 



In their second year of intercollegiate competition, the 
BYU gymnasts participated in a program which included 
five dual meets and two invitationals. In these meets, 
there were only three in which the Cats had a full squad, 
as they beat Denver L'niversity and lost to Colorado State 
twice. Steve Pratt and LeMoyne DuPaix both took firsts 
in the Los Angeles State Invitational, which was a five- 
team meet. All five letter winners this year were sopho- 
mores, which shows promise of great things to come. 



GYMNASTICS 




AA\, 



P 




¥« 



V 



UTAI 
: & 



360 




SERVICE UNITS 

Serving their fellow students 

and BYU, the service units 

placed more importance 

upon others than themselves. 

Ushering, selling, guiding, 

helping, they were the spirit 

of Brigham Young University. 



361 



WHITE KEY 

White Key honorary service sorority for seriior wo- 
men consisted of twenty-four girls who had main- 
tained high academic standing, and who had shown 
outstanding leadership ability and a willingness to 
serve the school. As the oldest service unit on BYU 
campus, the White Keys traditionally led the Home- 
coming parade. As an aid to the entire studentbody, 
the unit published the White Key student directory 
at the beginning of the year. Other activities of the 
group included sponsoring the Cougarettes freshman 
women's drill team, performing special service pro- 
jects for the university such as acting as hostesses 
for the spring track meet, participating in half-time 
shows at basketball games, and handing out foot- 
ball tickets. The girls also spent many hours in the 
Alumni Office helping Dr. T. Earl Pardoe with the 
same work for which the organization was first es- 
tablished by him. Officers of the unit were Maxine 
Lewis, President; Ra Chel Anderson, Vice-President; 
Christine Atkerson, Secretary; Cathi Groscost, Treas- 
urer; and Welda Lendt, Historian. Sponsor for the 
organization was Dr. Marion Bennion. 





Beers. Barbara 
Atlerson. Christine 
Anderson, Rachel 




Pace. Linda J< 



ff* 9 5 




. MARION 


BENNION. Judith Litster. and 


>ine Lewis 


carved turkey for their Thanks- 


Ing buffet. 






I 



Tetreaulf. Ed 

Wells. Gordon 

Wilklnton, Odvid 

Woodward, ftois 



BLUE KEY 

The members of Blue Key National Fraternity were 
selected on the basis of ^rade average and service 
to the university. With the motto, "Serving We 
Live," activity was the byword of the unit as the 
members kept a continual stream of projects in pro- 
gress at all times. In addition to carrying on the tra- 
ditional rivalry, with the L'tah State chapter Blue 



Key for the old wagon wheel, the unit establisheil a 
new tradition with the University of UtaK between 
the two schools for a Union Pacific bell according 
to the highest accumulation of points from athletic 
events each year. Serving as officers were Dallas 
Merrell, President; Ted Sandberg, Vice-President; 
Barte! W. Cardon, Corresponding Secretary; Ted 
Packard, Alumni Secretary; and Wally Lehr, Treas- 
urer. Clyde D. Sandgren sponsored the group. 




BLUE KEY OFFICERS Wally Lehr, Howard Sandberq Dallas Me 
Paclard. 



rratRiiiEi?! 




I 








OUTSTANDING YC and IK. Kaye Pas' 
were announced a! the ioint invitational. 



Y CALCARES 

The members of Y Calcares, junior women's honor- 
ary service unit, were noted for the enthusiasm with 
which they carried out service projects such as usher- 
ing at assemblies and lyceums, making stuffed toys 
for the Primary Children's Hospital, reading to blind 
students, and helping with registration. Y.C. mem- 
bers, chosen on the basic of academic achievement 
and participation in student affairs, willingly res- 
ponded to the call of service to the university and the 
community. During the year the Y.C.'s took Thanks- 
giving and Easter baskets to needy Provo families 
and participated in the campus Christmas Drive. 
Joint I.K. and Y.C. ac- 
tivities such as Hello 
Week, Belle of the Y 

_ Week, and the traditional 

invitational. Escapade in 
Ice, were some of the 
year's highlights. In con- 
junction with the invita- 
tional, the Y.C. of the 
Year, Kaye Passey, was 
announced. Serving as the 
year's officers were Kay 
Senzee, President; P a t 
Hixson, V i c e-President; 
Pat Kelly, Secretary; Joan 
Justis, Treasurer, and Gail 
Wilhelmson, Histo r i a n. 
Sponsor for the unit was 
Mrs. Conan Mathews. 





YCS WORKED with IK's to enter a II 
•,. Tr.-. ■> .<j. 







^sm^ 



Leigh. Mary Louise 
Lill,.hile. Susan C. 
Manning Marilyn K. 



Nelson. Linda Lei 




Smith. Pai 
Thurston. Loui 
Wilhelmsen. G 















YC OFFICERS Kay Senioe. Pot Hiison, Gall Wilhelmsen. Joan Juslls. Verlene Spaclman, YC'S DISPLAYED traditional banner in Homecominq parade 

and Pal Kelly. 



-calcares 






I. K. DUCHESS, Colleen Redford and attendants Ka 
Nordes and Suzanne Calder. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE KNIGHTS 




Members of Gold Y Chapter of Intercollegiate 
Knights national honorary service fraternity were 
chosen on the basis of activity and scholarship. With 
the purpose of service, the chapter awarded scholar- 
ships to worthy students, ushered at lyceums, devo- 
tionals, and ball games, and guided visitors around 
campus. Besides their traditional sponsorship of 
Hello Week and Belle of the Y Week with Y Cal- 
cares, the IK's took care of lighting the Y for special 
occasions and ringing the Old Y Bell. The chapter 
also carried out special projects under the su- 
pervision of the university administration. Special 
recognition was brought to 
the chapter at regional 
convention as their Duch- 
ess won the regional con- 
test and Clark Neuroh was 
chosen a regional officer. 
The year's officers were 
Sterling R i g b y, Duke; 
Clark Neuroh, Vice-Duke; 
Dave Dredge, Scribe; Don 
Harvey, Chancellor; Boyd 
Hale, Recorder; Wayne 
Sabey, Executioner. Ray 
Beckham was sponsor. 

sterling Rigby. Duke 



I.K. OFFICERS Wayne Sabey. Dave Dredge, Sterling RIgby, Claric Neuroh, Do 
Harvey, and Boyd Hole. 






NOT PICTURED 



Thackef. Lynn 



^W 




^^^" 






l,K. PAGES John Drodge, Merv.n White. Paul Stephenson, Garth McCann, John Stone, 
Vaughn Nordoi, Jerald Mason, Norman Midgley, James Jewell. Gary Eyring, Guy Clark. 
Craig Kirkham, Bill Bachler, Lamar Helquist, Roy Wolty. Not pictured: Harold Dendur- 
ant, Ted Lewis, Val Dean Rust, John Wright. 



DUCHESS FINALISTS with their I.K. escorts awail 
ent of the winner at the annual Invitational, 



\ I 



-i- 




367 



Bourne, Marcia Les 



SPURS 




MARCHING ^OR HOMECOMING was a result of fun and hard work af early hour; 




1 



••. :?? 



Johnson 
Malmitrom, De 
Miller. Jul • 



Valentine, Arr 
Van Dan 
Weaver. 











SPUR OFFICERS Carolyn Decker, Renea Norton. Shirley Greene, Ma 
Chris Allred, and Sandra Dcsal. 



Members of the BYU Spurs chapter of the national 
honorary service unit for sophomore women were 
chosen on the basis of academic achievement and a 
willingness to serve, honor, and uphold BYU stan- 
dards. Sponsored by Bliss Finlayson and guided by 
officers Carolyn Decker, President; Shirley Greene, 
Vice-President; Renea Norton, Secretary; Marcia 
Bourne, Treasurer; Sandra Dosal, Historian; and 
Christine Allred. Editor, the unit participated in 
many worthwhile service projects. Included in their 
activities were ushering at assemblies, marching in 
the Homecoming parade, selling tickets, working at 
election tables, making 
stuffed animals for or- 
phanages, and working in 
the Alumni Office. Unit 
traditions which the mem- 
bers participated in were 
tapping new Spurs in the 
spring, their annual invi- 
tational, the special initia- 
tion ceremony, and parti- 
cipation in Song Fest. 
They also had engaged 
girls parties, secret pals, 
and a traditional 6 a.m. 
breakfast for the Y.Cs 






Higgins, Judy 

Holbrook, Mary Lou 

Hunter. Linda 

Hutchings, Joan 



FRIENDSHIPS GREW among Thea Alexis members as qirls socialized after work 
projects. Carolyn Allred, Mary Jones and Linda Loughton held a representative 



THEA ALEXIS 



orbj.-,] Ar^;.3n. P-csiden 





370 




LcBa-on Sail, Su« 

Loughton Lindd 

McLaughlin VicH 

McGee. Merlcnt 







Phllllpi. Vlck! 
Ou'mi), Patty 

Richard. Judy 







Sunderland. P. 

Varn.r Lyr 

Tippeti. Pame 





THEA ALEXIS OFFICERS. Barbara Ardlan, Karen Cox. Row Two: Sho 
Robison. Linda Larson and Annette BIscoK. 



At the beginning of its fifth year, Thea Alexis form- 
ed its membership from freshman girls of good 
academic standing who were interested in serving 
the university. The officers elected to lead the unit 
were Barbara Ardian, President; Joan Evans, Secre- 
tary; Karen Cox, Treasurer; Annette Bishoff, His- 
torian; Linda Larson, Social Chairman; Shawna Robi- 
son, Work Director; and Suzanne Smith, Project Di- 
rector. Some of the activities participated in during 
the year included ushering at student assemblies 
every other Friday, Winter Carnival events, ex- 
changes, slumber parties, and selling tickets for 
various campus organizations, along with ushering 
for some of the lyceums. Projects which the girls 
took part in included weekly visits to the Stale Men- 
tal Hospital, office work in the Alumni Office, the 
annual campus Christmas Drive, and Y Day ac- 
tivities. Mrs. Alma Heaton acted as sponsor. 




371 







Calderon. Paula l» 

Burfup, D;«i 

Cooper, Car< 

Crookston, Oonn 

Delaney, Rosemar 





Eastman, Donn, 



Gardner, Mau 
Gardner, VII, 
Gerlach, Reg 



Jensen. LInd 



-J ^ 6^ ^ © ^ 






SPONSOR CORPS 



Allene Calder. Commandant 




"Happiness through service" was the basic theme 
of the AFROTC Sponsor Corps as they strived to 
maintain esprit de corps. Each Monday the members 
donned their uniforms of Air Force Blue and par- 
ticipated in Leadership Lab Drill with the ROTC 
cadets. Sponsors supported the cadets and upheld 
the dignity of the U.S. Air Force through achieve- 
ment and service to others. They presented the 
ROTC-Sponsor Corps assembly, participated in par- 
ades and ceremonies, sponsored blood drives, held 
an Easter Egg hunt for the Wymount children, usher- 
ed at assemblies, and had social exchanges. The 
events which added somethmg special to the year 
were the drill competitions with drill teams of other 
universities, a trip to Hill Air Force Base, the Mili- 
tary Ball, and the spring dinner-dance. Heading the 
corps were AUene Calder, Commandant; Ann Marie 
Doty, executive officer; Margene Symons, adminis- 
trative officer; and Charlotte Allen, social chairman. 



372 



Johnion. Co-- - 
Johnson, Liinor 
Johnson, Louise 
Keller, Berbere Y. 
Lerson Connie 



Llllywhite. Sharon 

McPherron Diane 

Mevers Kaye 

Miles. Helen 

Montgome^y, Linda 

Peeler. Pamela 



Nellson, Hope 

Mumford. Janice 

Page Ann 

Perry. Dee Anne 

Peterson. Donna 

Petersen Pat 

Potter. Marlene 



Robinson, Mario'r 







f^ B & ^ ^ ^^ _, 







Woodside. Sa 
Williams. Vila Je. 








MARCHING FOR HOMECOMING -as 




COUSAREHES' PRECISION DRILLS highlighted halftime programs 

COUGARETTES 

Freshman and sophomore girls selected on their 
marching ability, poise and personality were members 
of Cougarettes marching and service unit. These 
girls were seen performing in many half-time shows 
on campus during the year, and traveled with the 
basketball team to perform in Los Angeles during 




Annette Humphreys. Commandant 



autumn quarter. In addition to their many hours of 
practice on intricate drills, the Cougarettes presented 
a student assembly, "That's Life, " in conjunction 
with the Athenian social unit. Commandant of the 
group was Annette Humphreys, other officers were 
Beverly Lindholm, President; Gayla Whitmore, Se- 
cretary; and Tamara Ashby, Social Chairman. Mrs. 
Lanis Dastrup was the sponsor of the group. 



£1£ 





Row On.: E.rl O'Brien. Richard R. Nielsen. Row Two: Jack Dey. John Whetten, Darwin Cheney. Did Bolton. Craiq Whitehead Karl Seethalor Mart.n Thorn.. 
Russell Ord Bill Price Row Thr..: Thane Packer. William Adams. Allen Fors. Richard B. Snow. Delbert P. Pearson. Kenneth Kelly Summers. Clifford I. Franks. 
Jerry Hatch, Frank A. Browne. Michael K. Jensen. Robert Galen Nelson. Bob Smith, Mart.ll Johnson. Jerry Capps. 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 



Previous members of Boy Scouts had the opjXJrtunity to 
serve the university in Alpha Phi Omega, national scout- 
ing fraternity. The main project of the year was the es- 
tablishment of a First Aid Station in Smith Fieldhouse. 
Other activities engaged in by the group included usher- 



ing at assemblies, helping at the Invitational track meet 
and the Big and Little Sister picnic, and being in charge 
of first aid on Y Day. Officers were Craig Whitehead, 
President; Dick Bolton, First Vice-President; Karl Seet- 
haler. Second Vice-President; and Jon Ord, Secretary. 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA OFFICERS Dick Bolton. Craig White- 
head, and Karl Seethaler made a special presentation to Presi- 
dent Taylor during Boy Scout Week. 



SERVICE UNIT MEMBERS William Adams and Jill Carlston lent a helping 
hand to students as they worked in the Inter-sorvice booth. 





376 





COMMON INTEREST 

Liking the same things or 
claiming the same home- 
town brought students to- 
gether for parties and serious 
moments. Common interest 
was a strong binding 
influence among friends. 



377 




tlKe:' ., ,..,„. 



Row One: David Austin, Vic Oldroyd. Marty Harris, Billy G 
Pierce Sterling Brimley, Douglas H. Thayer. 



SPORTSMEN 



Aiming at achieving a balance between leadership, out- 
door sports, and social and cultural activities, the Sports- 
men were organized during Winter Quarter of 1959. With 
an emphasis on "doing," the group participated in several 
forms of outdoor life during the year. Doug Thayer acted 
as sponsor to the group with officers Martin Harris, Direc- 
tor; Bill George, Business Manager; and Gordon Whit- 
more, Historian. Special activities included the Sports- 
men Cup Ski Race for both students and townspeople, a 
river run, rabbit hunt, and a Sports Week with competi- 
tion in sports and a water show. 



Sportswomen, the sister unit to Sportsmen, was organized 
in 1959. Members shared an interest in outdoor activities 
and a desire to participate in the group activities. Spon- 
sored by Phyllis Jacobsen and Barbara Uibel, the members 
of the unit strived for a balance between spiritual, aca- 
demic, cultural, and social aspects of life through indivi- 
dual effort. The officers included Joan Peterson, Presi- 
dent; Helen Bartlett, Treasurer; Carolyn Beck, Secretary; 
and Claudia Clark, Activity Chairman. Activities included 
a Sportsfeast pheasant hunt and dinner dance, ski trips, 
water ski show, and other sports activities. 



SPORTSWOMEN 



I 



, One: Julia Shaw, Lena Eldredge. Claudia Clark, Carolyn Bed. Joan Peterson, Helen Bartlett Shirley Coppel, Linda Moody. Row Two: Beverly B Go 
ol Lynn Smith, Toni Zeigler, Sharon Faye Johnson, Dotti Douglas. Judy Combs, Annette Smith, Jan Lundgren, Hannah Oldroyd, Charlene Johns. Ja 
kson, Jonelle Johnson, Sharon Allred. 



P! 



«!.>• 



Row Ont: Jesnnio Clorlt. Bob Peterson. Mary Joan Wonloss. Boyd Tangren. Carla 
Pat. Tom Segar. Lore Sennhauser. Dick Stats. Row Three Bill Boyne. Doug McClain. 
Watson. Row Four: Unidentified. Unidentified. Unidentified. Unidentified. Bonnie 
Ray Lindsay. Unidentified. Unidentified, Unidentified. Eleanor Welded. Dorothy 
Lynnette Long. Unidentified. Unidentified. Sherm Butters. Unidentified. Lynn Curri 
Christenson. Unidentified, Ralph Brown. Unidentified. Harvey Davenport, Unident 
man. Unidentified, Unidentifed. Row Eight: Pat Patterson. Ed Clarl. Unidentified. 
Paul. Dale Richens, Unidentified. 



ALPINE CLUB 



The common interest of the members of the Alpine Club 
was an interest in all phases of sports and a desire to find 
out what the Utah area had to offer them in these fields. 
The most professional climbers of the group were mem- 
bers of the Sheriffs Rescue Team which was on call in 
any emergency. Winter skiing and touring, hiking to the 
club's cabin in Aspen Grove, water skiing, and tubing were 
the main activities of the group. Officers were Boyd Tan- 
gren, President; Darel Davenport, Vice-President; Joan 
Wanlass, Secretary; and Chris Vickari, Social Chairman. 



Sevey. Dariell Davenport. Chris Vickeri. Row Two: Tom. Bonnie Brown. Shirley, 
John Passo. Judy Blood. Dick Wall. Unidentified. James Haroldson. Lester 
Halfacre. Ed Halfacre. Lance Chace, Judy Shell. Wendy Mangum. Row Five: 
Rogers. Susie Morris. Sharon Smith. Ethel. Row Sii: Vale Kessler. Unidentified. 
■ n. LaRae Cittee. Lynn Uibel. Marlene Moss. Unidentified. Row Seven: Julie 
Ifled. Unidentified. Unidentified. Steve Hinton. Unidentified, Sherry Hick- 
Unidentified. Barbara Gregson. Unidentified. Unidentified, Unidentified, Bill 

Afio Mai Club, noted as one of the finest show-making 
groups on campus, was compjosed of students from many 
different cultures who shared an interest in the songs and 
dances of the Samoans and Tongans. Resides taking a 
high school tour throughout southern Utah and partici- 
pating in their yearly Polynesian assembly, the Afio Mai 
performed in shows for the Program Bureau. Special feat- 
ures of the group were the Afio Mai Serenaders and the 
Samoan Knife-fire Dance. Officers of the group were 
Paovale M. Sagapolu, President; Amy Fuchigami, Vice- 
President; Betty Turpin, Secretary; and Sharon Ballard, 
Social Chairman; with Dr. Richard Snow as sponsor. 

AFIO MAI 



Row One: Joyce Wiltbank, Sue PIHman. Betty Torpin. Sharon Sal 
Holt. Sally Takahashi, Rone Belcher. Richard L. Snow, Maaola Lam 
McSrIde, Arden Lawhead. James Smith. Lenore Crandall, Glorii 
Coranne Galley. Amy Fuchigami. Tultalau Tonga. Row Four: Sai< 
Diiie Curtis, Henry Curtis. Duane Moulton. Lou Mueller. 



ird, Nancy Sandiff. Leanne Ponder. Row Two: Faase Lulu Tenney, Don 
Sam, Janet Farnsworth. Carolyn Richardson, Pago Afualo, Enosa Wil 
Tercero, VaM Ponder, Marie C. Favene, Deena Fackrell, DeAnn Chamberlain, <an 
Lanulo, Paovale Sagapolu, Senifa Scott, Lauveve L. Farreve, Marley Jarnagin, All< 



Lee Koelllng. Gaye 



Schuck. 
Tidwoll. 




rv 



.r^ 








Row One: IMa. 
Taylor. Row Two 
Kunz. 



BEAR LAKE CLUB 



The Bear Lake Club was organized to promote unity and 
friendship among students from the Bear Lake area of 
northeastern Utah and southeastern Idaho. Some of the 
year's club activities included the Christmas and summer 
parties, held at home, to which students from other uni- 
versities were invited. Other social and spiritual activities 
of the year were highlighted by a fireside where the his- 
tory of Bear Lake County was related. Officers were Phil 
Kunz, President; Karen Sleight, Vice-President; and Verda 
Rex, Secretary. LeVar Bateman was sponsor. 



California Club was reorganized fall quarter by Jerry 
Mason, Ray Lowry, Carol Garns, Aldine Gibson, and 
Jelaire Edwards. The aims of the reorganized club were 
three s's — social, spiritual, and scholastic. Social activities 
of the year included sponsoring a successful studentbody 
dance, a Welcome Back party, a special roller-skating par- 
ty, and a spring quarter picnic. The year's officers were 
Maxine Ellen Jensen, President; Jerry Mason, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Aldine Gibson, Secretary; and Carol Garns, Social 
Chairman. Chris Poulos sponsored the club. 



CALIFORNIA CLUB 



Row One- Gary Croft Aldme Glbion, Jerry Maion, Carol Garns, Jelaire Edwards, Ray Lowry, Row Two: Alice Kay Hllden, Deanna Van Vllet, Arlene 
Teague. Diane Hess, Cherry Evan., B,5rb(,r,s Hcr,.,nd, M,,,>., J.n m Row Three: JacHe Pfvlll, J. Wayne PerHns, Ronald Chowen, Jerry Basinger, Sharon 
UFaivre. Farrel Duncan. 





Stanley Syphi 



DIXIE CLUB 



Alumni of Dixie Junior College and residents of 
Southern Utah's "Dixie " composed the membership of 
Dixie Club. The year's activities included exchanges with 
other clubs, and cultural evenings. Serving as officers 
were Edward Thompson, President; Stanley Shakespear, 
First Vice-President; Lucile Hunt, Second Vice-President; 
Marilyn Foremaster, Secretary; and Carolyn Foremaster 
and George Mc"Conkie, Publicity Chairmen. Ross Mc- 
Arthur was sponsor of the group. 



Students with an interest in Finland were invited to join 
the Finnish Club to learn more of Finnish customs and 
to associate with people from Finland. During its third 
year on campus, the group was sponsored by Mrs. Darcus 
Hyde and was led by officers Keyte Hanson, President; 
Irmeli Antsola, Vice-President; Fern McKnight, Secre- 
tary; and Laila Blomquist and Jerry Bench, Social Chair- 
men. Activities included a special Christmas party featur- 
ing the Finnish Santa Claus, Joulu Pukki, presentation of 
the play, "Seven Brothers," in Finnish, and a spring 
dinner for all Finns, Finnish missionaries and friends. 

FINNISH CLUB 



Row On.: MarHu Itlonen. Delbert Blair, Margaret Blair. Jarmo IHonen. Row Two: PhHeon B. Robinson, Jr., Laila Blomquist. Fern McKniqht ErUi K Kerttulo 
Keyte L. Hanson. Irmeli Antsola. VuoUo Vaananen. Robert W. Blair. Row Three: Ralia Ma. field SoUe Natri Janice Green Tuiia Hell'trom LaRue Gee' 
Donna Hill. Belly Merrill, Hilda Ift.^neo, Diane Edwards. Rltva Lawton. Pirtlro Heinonen. Armi Sarlrlra. Row Four: Darryl Huikey Uwe J Hansen Ma, w' 



Hill. Gerald 
Legrand M 

rn iiiii 



Ma, field, H. Lynn Williams, Thomas Bean, Joe Allen. Preston MerrJI E Brrnl rl/rv Po 



p r. 






on 





Row On«: Lawrence Reese, Albert Allred. Evelyn McGrath, Franl. Moffett. Unidentified. Tony Johnson, Donna Rinquest. Row Two: UnldentKled. Denna SItousen, 
Deneen Rogers Darlene Anderson, Margaret Pace. Phyllis Reneer. Kathy Davis, Kay Hardy. Row Three: Unidentified, Gail Aider. Sharon Ashcroft. Linda Crosby. 
Janice Finch Karen Davis, Barbara Bushman. Linda Pope, Raleigh Johnson. Row Four: Margaret Stones, Chief Hall, Ron Shumway. Eugene Webb. Gene Car- 
ruth. Craig Wright. LoVerne Tyler, Dave Jarvis. Deiter Wurth. Howard Peterson. Row Five: Karolyn Jackman. Tyrrel Whipple, Nelda Crockett. Carlene Hancock, 
Royiene Taylor. Mary Ellen Farnsworth. Boyd Bushman, Evelyn Jane Reese. Unidentified. Unidentified. Dewey Funk, Archie Schmidt. Row Si«: Clarence Bige- 
low Charles Starr Mak Tanner. Janet Slaughter. Joy Maqilbee. Kathy Bridges. Betty Barney. Mimi Dewett. Barbara. Emma Jean Rasmussen. Sherrill Benz- 
ley' Verona Sechre'st. Jeri Smith. Row Seven: Unidentified, Coranne Galley. Terry Morris, Harold Rogers. Ken Batson. Tony Terry. Unidentified. Les Andreas, 
Jinimy Lillywhite Irene Webb, Blaine Jarves. David Bushman, Patty Bushman, Bill McVough. 



ARIZONA CLUB 

Arizona Club members had a busy and successful year as 
they started out by winning first place for the most hu- 
morous float in the Homecoming parade. Besides hold- 
ing two successful studentbody western dances, the club 
had several real western swings complete with western 



ARIZONA CLUB OFFICERS CI 



dress and western music provided by Lanie Lambson. 
Other activities included exchanges with geographicals, 
a Spanish supper and steak fry, and participation in 
Western Week. Officers for the year were Clarence Bige- 
low, President; Tony Turley, Vice-President; Kathy 
Davies, Secretary; Joyce McBride, Treasurer; and Mar- 
garet Pace and Duane Johnson, Social Chairmen. Ivan J. 
Barrett was the club's sponsor. 




A PRIZE-WINNING FLOAT 
Club. 



ling parade by Arizi 




,i t * 1 * » 



Row One: Peg Robinson. 
Pennington. Row Two: Ja 
Reden. 



impbell, Joyce Hyde 
npbell. Kent Hughes 



Mothis. Oonno Jecobson, Judy Rogers. Betsy Johnson. Jean Cordell, Shor 
Harmon, Mile Corbett. Jerry Wrrght. Ken Wills, Ron Ferguson, Richard 



CONFEDERATE CLUB 



Southern students at BYl! had the opportunity to join in 
fellowship with each other in the Confederate Club, which 
was organized on campus in autumn of 195'>. Much of 
the club's efficient organization and successful social pro- 
gram was due to the leadership of officers Richard Mat- 
his. President; Ronnie Kirkland, Vice-President; and Le- 



CONFEDERATE CLUB MEMBERS held an openhouse for interested : 



X ) 




tS 



vinia Jenkins, Secretary. The many activities of the year 
included tobagganing and ice-skating parties in the win- 
ter, canyon picnics, swimming and tubing parties in the 
spring, special club firesides, and participation in Song 
Fest during spring quarter. Dean David Yarn was sponsor. 



CONFEDERATE OFFICERS Betsy Johnson, Jane Mathis, Donna Jacob- 
son. Joyce Hyder. Roy Spradley. Richard Malhis, and Kan Willa. 





Row One: Clara Loo, Mary Kekaula, Lupua Kanoilua. Reva Meatoga, June. Betty Lou Ching. Row Two: Odetta Kualaau, Edith Kahoilua. Ann Raid, Janeen 
Brown, Noe Kaimi, Marlene Anderson, Abble Waiwaiole, Henry Ah Sam. Salina De Guzman, Bunny McDougalL Row Three: Alwin Battad, Clarence China, 
Glen Moore, Ernest Tsuji. 



HAWAIIAN CLUB 



The Hawaiian Club was composed of students born or 
raised in Hawaii, with honorary membership extended to 
others who showed definite interest in the island country 
and desired to be part of the club. Members performed 
for the Program Bureau, presented student assemblies and 
special shows throughout Utah, and competed in the cam- 



pus intramural program. In the spring the club presented 
a special program to acquaint the general public with the 
social cultures of Hawaii. Officers of the club were Edith 
Kahoilua, President; Richard Detton, Vice-President; and 
Clara L. Loo, Secretary. Dr. Glen Moore was sponsor. 



THEIR HOMECOMING FLOAT depicted Hawaii's new statehood. 



A CLUB GET TOGETHER and da 
atmosphere. 



almost a return to the island 






Deloy Vernon 
:<>rol Nielsen. 
Elelne Doughty. Ro' 



Whitehead, Je 



Cortwright. 



Giles Parler 
<oren Kennedy 
¥ Four: Maria 
lithson. Merid 
I Higley. Kare 



Ale.onder Forbas George Bates Jim Taylor. Lynn Bjorliman, John Segga 
. Hula Christy, Karen Olson. Joan Kimball. Darris Bright, Pete Hendersoi 
ine Graham. Deri Davenport. Helens Vislck. Di.le Bradbury. BobbI Mui 
sne Chrlstensen Loretta Fountain. Beclcy BIrlt. Rublna Rivers. Cecile Ja 
1 McCune. Kirk Evan. Fred A. Calder. Ken Sayer. Ralph Taylor. Don C. 



, Jon Fife. Row Two: Beverly Watllns, Nore< 
Welda Lendt. Sue Deputy, Kothy Chambe 
ay. Deonna Taylor. Warren Thornock. Elaii 
iss. Barbara Fountain. Row Fiv«: Loree Chr 
Kimball, LeAnna Cagle. Charlotte Alen. Ji 



KIA ORA CLUB 



t.tAORI WAR DANCE performed by Pete Hendersan, Darris Bright. 
and Frank Hoftnn w.ji a pecial feature of club programs. 




The membership of Kia Ora Club, which presented in 
song and dance the culture of the Maori people of New 
Zealand, consisted of Polynesians, returned missionaries 
from New Zealand and others who had a desire to learn 
more of the culture. During the year, the club presented 
programs at the request of wards and organizations in 
the area and also toured nearby states. The club stressed 
the spiritual, intellectual, and social development of its 
members through firesides and parties held throughout 
the year. Officers of the group were Pete Henderson, 
President; Darris Bright and Welda Lendt, Vice-Presi- 
dents; Joan Kimball, Secretary; Sue Deputy, Treasurer, 
Huia Christy, Dance Director. Frank K. Horton was spon- 
sor of the group. 



KIA ORA OFFICERS Pete Hcnd^ 
and Frank Horton. 





Row One: Connn 

Pursley, Keith Standagi 



LOS URUGUAYOS 



Students and returned missionaries from Uruguay who de- 
sired to retain or gain memories of Uruguay and Southi 
America were members of Los Uruguayos. The group's 
sponsor was Wilton G. Wille and officers of the year 
were Stan Michelsen, President; Don Johnson, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Sharron Parry, Secretary; and Dale Jarman, Social 
Chairman. During their second year as an organization on 
campus, they had a representative in IOC and participated 
in numerous cultural exchanges with other clubs. 




The Tribe of Many Feathers represented students of 
several different Indian tribes present on campus. The 
group presented many programs with the BYU Program 
Bureau, planned and built a float for the Homecoming 
Parade, and in the spring sponsored the second annual 
Pow Wow for young Indians from throughout the South- 
west. Officers were Gary Owens, President; Jody Mill- 
ward, First Counselor; Woody Snead, Second Counselor; 
Phyllis Beck, Secretary; Roger Trimnay, Treasurer; Nina 
Vecenti, Program Chairman; and Gerald Antone, Social 
Chairman. Bob Gwilliam was sponsor of the group. 

TRIBE OF MANY 

FEATHERS! 



Row 


One: 


Jolene. 


Ned 


SaraJ 


Lope 


. Row 


Two: 


Phiii; 


Becit, 


Jody 


Millwi 


rd. G 


ary 


Owens. 


Dan 


Edward 


. Chr 


ston 


Owens. 


Row 


Thrae: 


Seri D 


avenport, El- 


don 


■ranclsct 


J, Gene 


Bow 


er. Dick 


Brow 


n, Me\ 


Farns 


worth 


Dean 


Benn 


bH, Me 


Thorn 


Margie Ed- 


mono 


s. 













' n n 



L 

Row Ont: Vickie Merrell. Mary Merrell. John Yearout, Sandra Butler. Sue Amundsen. Row Two: Down Brasher. Ken Higbee, Don Ha 
Sweeney, Merilee Olsen, Mary Pratt. 




WASHINGTON CLUB 



Any students who were present or recent residents of the 
state of Washington were eligible to join the Washington 
Club. Activities of the club included chartering buses for 
the Christmas trip home to Washington, holding exchange 
socials, participating in various service projects, and at- 
tending their annual dinner dance. Officers of the group 
were John H. Yearout, President; Steve Bone, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Mary Merrell, Secretary; and Sue Yank, Social 
Chairman. Richard Pratt acted as sponsor of the group. 



A roller skating exchange with Cache Valley Club and 
the traditional tobaggan party with Confederate Club 
highlighted the year for members of Yankee Club. The 
easterners also had a variety of parties and meetings on 
their own where they ate and danced or played games. 
One long remembered meeting featured a panel discussion 
on the question "Which Is The Stronger Sex.^" In the 
spring, the Yankees along with Confederate Club spon- 
sored a Civil War Week complete with Mason-Dixon 
Line. Competition was held in everything from Softball 
to pie baking and eating. Officers were Lance Chase, 
President; Ken McAllister, Vice-President; Bob Jenkins, 
Secretary; Bob Curran and Ginger Wyss, Social Chairmen; 
and Ann Laker, Historian. 

YANKEE CLUB 



On.: Kennefli McAIKsfor. Ann LoUr. 
nis Lunt. Fred <wlatVowskl, Sherry Horgo 
Cvnthia Bishop. VIcVi McLoughun. 



Lunf. LaRalne Lunt. i 
Pearson. Cherryl Hube 



L.z Milford J. 



tow Two: 

«n Fletche 



■oug Cur, 
Judy Sir 




L*l 




>w One: Michael 
iith Wilhoit, Melv 



Nadme Bro 
isen. Ed Ga 



ett, Kathleen Ericlson, Jacqueline Wilson. Row Two: Linda Eardley. Anita Peck, Joy Vernon, Sha 
Barnes, Naty Ray, t^ary Ray, Sharyn Smith. 



OREGON CLUB 



Winning the geographical trophy during IOC Week was 
one of the highlights of the year for Oregon Club mem- 
bers. Other activities included a Christmas party with the 
Washington Club and the chartering of a bus with the 
Washington Club to go home during the Christmas holi- 
days. Reactivated this year, the Oregon Club made a 
name for itself under the guidance of officers Bill Bur- 
nett, President; Kathy Erickson, Vice-President of Pub- 
licity; Donna Leder, Vice-President of Social Activities; 
Nadine Brooks, Secretary; Jaquie Wilson, Historian; and 
Michael Vosika, Sergeant-at-Arms. 



Returned missionaries from Mexico belonging to Ex- 
Mexican Missionaries got together often to reminisce 
about the old days in the land south of the border. They 
viewed each other's elides and had Mexican dinners. The 
group's favorite menu consisted of mole with pavo, tacos, 
enchiladas, Spanish rice, and Mexican punch. One of the 
highlights of the year was breaking the pinata at the an- 
nual Christmas party. Bevan O. Haycock was sponsor of 
the group. Officers were Wayne Lesue, President; Nena 
Flake, Vice-President; and Tita Alfaro, Secretary. 

EX-MEXICAN 



MISSIONARIES 



Row One- Gordon Booth Evan Dale Harrison, Tracy Wright, Martin H. Durrant. Glen W. Probst. Row Two: Lois Sprague, Nena Flake, Maria F. Alfaro. Row Thr< 
Glenn L.'Srown, Samuel' M. Blackham, Val I. Lefler, Edward G. Thompson, Byron Fisher, J. Wayne Lesue, Leon R. Sylvester, Robert W. Eellis, Re» M. Michie. 






SHOMRAH KIYEL 

The membership of Shomrah Kiyel, a unit unique 
on BYl' campus, was composed of girls waiting 
for their missionary sweethearts to return from the 
mission field. They joined together for social ac- 
tivities under the Hebrew name signifying "keeper 
of the faith," with the forget-me-not as their symbol. 
The members enjoyed testimony meetings, lesson 



nights, book reviews, seasonal parties, and com- 
panionship with one another while waiting out the 
time until their missionaries would be home. Wel- 
come home parties were held for each returning 
missionary and his girl. Officers were Sylvia Vin- 
cent, President; Pat Taylor, Vice-President; Marilyn 
Manning, Secretary; Laura Fox, Treasurer; Joan Mor- 
rison, Historian; and Joyce: Roberts, Social Chair- 
man. Mrs. Wayne B. Hales was sponsor of the unit 



Dule. Mary J 
Dunlord. An 
Egbert. Mel 



Niiffer. Pat 
Potter. June 
Packer. Rut- 
Parry. Cat- 
Petersen. Kare 





DELTA PHI OFFICERS Andy Walton, Don Ga 
Glayde Hill, and Jack Cousins. 



DELTA PHI 



Allred. Merlin D< 



Cook. C. Ronald 




Finlinson, David S 



Delta Phi, a national honorary fraternity for men 
who had served six months or more as missionaries, 
provided service, as well as spiritual, scholastic, and 
social outlets for its members. The group sponsored 
the Delta Phi Dream Girl contest in which Carolyn 
Decker was chosen Dream Girl on the basis of her 
beauty, talent, personality, and spirituality. Other 
campus activities sponsored by the unit were the 
Christmas Season Mistletoe Frolic and a studentbody 
extemporaneous speech contest. The most outstand- 
ing feature of the group was the Delta Phi Chorus, 
which toured the United States at the close of spring 
quarter and presented 
many programs on cam- 
pus. Elder Milton R. Hun- 
ter is the present National 
President of Delta Phi, 
and President David O. 
McKay and other author- 
ities of the LDS church are 
prominent alumni. Offic- 
ers were Glayde Hill, 
President; Don Garner, 
Cultural V i c e-President; 
Andrew Walton, Social 
Vice-President; and David 
Finlinson, Secretary. 



DELTA PHI DREAM GIRL, Carolyn Decker, center, and attendants. R'Lei 
Jensen and Norma Pocock. 




Glayde Hill, President 




390 



I 




i- ii' ^ 



391 



392 





:^ 



1 




ALCYONE 



Alcyone social unit was organized on RYl' campus 
in 1951. With a reputation for beini; a friendly unit, 
Alcyone had exchanges with other units, held their 
annual invitational and their spring dinner dance, 
and put on the traditional Luau in the spring with 
Athenians. Other featured activities of the year in- 
cluded the Alcyone fashion show, presentation of a 
student assembly, a unit birthday party, and partici- 
pation in Homecoming, Winter Carnival, Songfest, 
and Y Day activities. The unit's most outstanding 
culture night of the year featured Captain DeVere 
Baker of the raft Lehi, who related .some of his ex- 
citing experiences while on his raft journey. Mrs. 
Wilford Smith sponsored the unit. 




UNIT TROPHIES and awardi were displayed during IOC Week. 



Whithead. Margii 






^m^ 




^ ^^ f i 4 




Martin, Karen 
Msrkham. Sherry 
McFarland, Roberta J. 







a ^^ 'S^ ^ 



Perry, Connie 
Peterson. Joan 
Oyler, Julie 



Sant. Sharyn 
Pia, Nona 
Powelson, Colle 
Randall, Dixie 



396 




CAMI LOS 



Cami Los was organized in 19'^2 when a group of 
girls set up the standards and goals of social devel- 
opment, scholastic achievement, and recognition 
through service which they wished their organization 
to exemplify. This year's activities included partici- 
pating in Homecoming and Winter Carnival, staging 
their fall invitational and spring dinner dance, pre- 
senting a student assembly, and holding exchanges 
with other units. President Sherry Hale brought 
Cami Los the distinction of having Homecoming 
Queen this year. The members of the unit worked to- 
gether to develop themselves through their sister- 
hood and strengthened their unity through i.]uarterly 
testimonial meetings. Mrs. B. Jensen and Mrs. Mc- 
Ginnes sponsored the unit. 




Scholes, Cdrol 
Smllh, latit 
Taylor. Janet 





Eliia Jo Paine. Preside 



DILECTUS CHI SORORES 

During autumn quarter of 1959. thirty charter mem- 
bers were chosen and these girls set up the policies, 
constitutions, and other prerequisites for Dilectus 
Chi Sorores, a new BYL' women's social unit. As 
"Beloved Sisters" the new members of Di Chi rapid- 
ly became organized and began participating in regu- 
lar social unit functions. Besides exchanges, firesides, 
and intramural competition, the unit held its first 
annual dinner dance, "Elysian Fields." A new and 
different culture night program was initiated with 
culture nights being held once a week after short 
business meetings. These culture periods were pre- 
pared by the girls in the unit, and included such 
topics as sports cars, fashions, music appreciation, 
current news, and book and show reviews. Another 
special activity of the unit was participating in Song- 
fest. Mrs. Diane Chatwin and Miss Elaine Brasher 
were sponsors. 




DI CHI OFFICERS Lindo Young Diane Hess Jan 
Laurih. Carla Presly. and "Jo" Paine. 



AN ORIENTAL MOOD was set by Dl Chi at ^ 
Songfest. 







Carlston. JudI 
Chambers, Dora Lee 

n, K^argaret 



f*2^^^^ 



Hunter. Loli Anne 
Hunter, Llnde 





X^ f% f\ 







Nlelson, Anna Mo 
Nelson, Cari 
Nielsen Marcheni 
Nlelson, Pauline 
Petersen. Judv 
Reese, Kay 
Rlndlielsch, Sue 




Alton Jensen, Pr, 



KAPPA DEBONAIRE 

Kappa, the tenth letter of the Greek alphabet, and 
Debonaire. meanint; affable, ijenial, and courteous, 
were combined for the name of the tenth women's 
social unit to be founded at BYl'. The unit was be- 
gun in 19^4 with forty-two members and since then 
has grown to full capacity of sixty members who 
take an active part in unit and campus activities. The 
goal of the group was to be the friendliest unit on 
campus. The main social events of the year were the 
invitational, birthday party, dinner dance held at 
Alta and the spring Homestead party. Also on the 
Kappa Deb agenda for the year were a breakfast- 
testimonial and several culture nights and exchanges, 
along with participation in Homecoming and Song- 
fest. Mrs. Armin J. Hill and Mrs. Stephen Covey 
were Kappa Deb sponsors. 




NEW PLEDSC Judy Pete 



ed her KD flower (rem member Barbafa Ingetscll. KD'S INVITATIONAL was anticipated by Broob Larjon, Lynn 

low. Doris Allred. and Heber Tippets. 



JOYCE LYMAN and Janet Mcllhenny helped at the 
IOC Weol booth. 



^j t f 




Senne. Joellen Ka, 






^^^ 



rj^ ^^ -^ 



^. 



Parry, Barbara Ann 




-££. 








Parry. Patricia 
Peterson. Ruthie 
Portie. Virginia 
Pecord. Save 
Reese. Sandra 
• ^S^^ Saxton. Gladys 





Carole Hoope, P 



NAUTILUS OF NLU 



To further love and friendship amoni^ its members 
and to foster spiritual and cultural growth through 
unit activities are the ideals and purposes of Nautilus 
of N.L.U., which was organized in 1920 by eight 
girls who chose as their symbol the chambered nau- 
tilus and as their motto, "Excelsior Ever Higher." 
During the year Nautilus members enjoyed a full 
schedule of activities including culture nights, ex- 
changes, intramurals, buddy parties, service projects, 
and participation in studentbody activities such as 
Homecoming and Songfest. Nautilus and Delta Phi 
sponsored the annual Christmas assembly. Other tra- 
ditional activities which the unit participated in were 
the fall invitational and the spring dinner dance. 
Sponsors for the year were Mrs. Clyde D. Sangdren 
and Mrs. Dalian R. Clark. 




NAUTILUS PRESENTED their annual Christmas assembly with Delta Phi. 



CAROLE HOPPE. Ron Tomlinson. Joy Nooner, and Bon 
pared for an exchange in the gay twenties style. 



Banls pr( 





Jarman, OI>lna 





Becky Csmpbell. Preside 



O S TROVATA 

"To know only the pure in heart so that 1 mii^ht 
know only the pure in life." This expression is only 
a small part of the O.S. Trovata creed. O.S., the 
oldest women's unit on campus, has lon^ strived to 
live up to the academic, social, and spiritual stand- 
ards of BYU. O.S. began their year of accomplish- 
ments with members Lynn Fechser and Gwen New- 
ton reigning as attendants to the Homecoming 
Queen. Members and their guests spent an ethereal 
evening at the fall quarter invitational, 'Septiemc 
Ciel." During winter quarter rush season, O.S. in- 
augurated a unique openhouse. Their annual assem- 
bly produced with the Bricker social unit, "Culture- 
mania," was acclaimed by all. Other activities of the 
year included culture nights, exchanges, participation 
in Songfest, the annual dinner dance, and a spring 
canyon party. Sponsors of the unit were Mrs. De- 
Costa Clark and Miss Jeannette Morrell. 





I ., t^^Mi 



OST MEMBERS, led by President Becky Campbell danced In the OST-Bricker assembly. KATHY PHEGLEY, Ann Haynie. Shauna Swensen. and Lynn Fechs. 

worked on decorations for their invitational, "Septleme Ceil." 



THE UNITS IOC booth featured OST trophies and 
emblem. 




Teichert, Pat 

Taylor. Kalhy 

Thomas, Daria 

Van Wagenan. Sharee 





££l^* 





TOKALON 

"To seek beauty in all things" is the ideal which 
members of ToKalon social unit strive to maintain. 
Outstanding events of the 19^9-60 year included 
the ToKalon-Tau Sigma assembly. "The Black Rain- 
bow." the annual invitational, "Gold Wind." the 
Christmas Traditional, and participation in Song- 
fest. A special accomplishment of the unit was win- 
ning the scholarship trophy. Other unit activities in- 
cluded participation in Homecoming, visits to the 
State Mental Hosptal, participation in the intramural 
program, and donations to the campus Blood Drive 
and Campus Chest drive. Firesides and testimonials 
added spiritual influence to the years activities. The 
spring social season concluded with the annual din- 
ner dance held at the Salt Lake Country Club. Mrs. 
Ina Lou Cheney sponsored the unit. 




STUDENTS VIEVVED ToKalon 



-mg IOC Week, 






O''?f^0'^'-^ 




Allen. Elizabeth 
Allen. Mary 
Andrus. Aniene 
Avery. Carolyn 
Bagley, Julie 
Bardin, Befty Ann 



Back, Linda 
Breinholt, Karen 
Brilsch. Charlotte 
Bryner. Judy 
Calder, Janet 



Eldredge. Lena 
Fielding. Leica 
Firmage, Judy 
Firmage. Karen 
Haighl. Diane 
Harrison. Sue 
Hart, Sharon 



Higginbotham. Sharley 
Hughes. Alice Ann 



Murphy, Jo Am 
Nielsen. Dot 
Oals. Evelyn 



Oldroyd, Hannah 



Potter. Carolyn G. 



Smith, Marcia Loui 




Jo Ann McGinnis. Preside. 



VAL NORN 



Val Norn, one of the oldest women's units on cam- 
pus, was organized in 1928. The purpose of the or- 
ganization was to further bonds of friendship be- 
tween members and to support all school activities 
through combining scholastic abilities with service 
and social activities. Both the service and scholar- 
ship trophies have been retired. Besides various 
service projects, Val Norn produced their annual 
assembly with the Vikings, sponsored sport teams, 
and participated in campus activities such as Home- 
coming, Songfest, and Winter Carnival. Other out- 
standing activities included their invitational, "Feast 
of the Gods ", carnival rush party, Banquet of the 
Yellow Roses. Alumni Tea, buddy party, spring can- 
yon party, annual dinner dance, and exchanges. Mrs. 
Lavern Green and Mrs. Ralph Britsch were sponsors. 




THE VAL NORNBrlclcer HawoMsn e.chonge 
Madsen, Joyce Hiatt. and Dave Nelson. 



njoyed by Aniene Andrus. Dal' 



Woodruff. Sailt 




#'%^ 




Yvonne Sadgelf, Presldi 



FIDELAS MEMBERS participated in the Nautilus-Delta Phi Christmas assembly. 



Barton, Carol 
Dallin. Daria 
Driskell. Carolyn 




FIDELAS 

Over a quarter of a century ago, a -group of LDS 
girls organized Amici Fidelas Ami, "Friends Faith- 
ful Forever." These young women desired a social 
organization which would fill their desire for ser- 
vice, activity and entertainment, and sisterhood, in 
conjunction with spirituality. Since that time Fidelas 
has fulfilled these needs for a great many girls as 
the unit's traditional activities were established and 
carried out with the goal of perfecting the twelve 
virtues symbolized on the unit's pin. The year's ac- 
tivities included presentation of a student assembly, 
special culture nights, exchanges, and the annual 
dinner dance and invitational. Fidelas also sponsored 
the traditional sign-up for Thanksgiving dinners for 
students remaining on campus over the holiday. 
Brother and Sister John Gurney sponsored the unit. 




f f • f % f.ft I 



TjPIpjmJ^ 



Joyce Gay Sherr, I Benzley Sand, Seer JeanneHe Williamson. Karen Jones, Judy Fischer. Tan 
■h. Dorothy Schroedter. Pat Kimball. Alicia Collins. LaVon Stephens Nadiene Schent, Chris Allred 
ow Three: DeAnn Lundqron, Judy Jones. (Marilyn Ellsworth. Sharlene Ellsworth Jo Anne Brouqh Je 



AZYAN TZATA 



The newest women's social unit on campus, Azyan 
Tzata, was instigated by Shirley Nissen and Joyce 
Gay during winter quarter of I960. In a meeting of 
sixty interested girls, they voted on each other and 
the top thirty became the charter members of the 
new unit. Quickly forming "Eternal Friendships," 
and with the purpose of making history setting tra- 
ditions, the members organized a ball team, began 



Tiy Mad.en. L,nda Wilson, Shirley E. Nisser 
Connie Moss. Judy Umbers. Nancy Ske 
nnine Bechtold. 



evrrl"; 



planning an invitational, and elected officers. New- 
ly elected officers were Joyce Gay, President; Chris- 
tine Allred, Vice-President; LaVon Stevens, Secre- 
tary; Sharlene Ellsworth, Corresponding Secretary; 
and Jennine Bechtold, Treasurer. One of the unit's 
first special activities was working on Songfest deco- 
rations. 



ORGANIZATION OF th. 







nii-fj ^»r% Wot 






Brown, Kent 
Burns. Keith 
Chapman, Gregory 
Chrlslensen. Herbert 
Coleman. Neil 
Cottrell, William 





f* q (.^ ^ o p {^ 




Holmes, Walter Wm.. Jr. 
Houston, Tosco 
Hunsaker. Glenn L 
Johnson, Jim 
Knudsen, Ben 
Larson, L. Keith 
Lawson. Jon 



Linford, Dick 
Marble, Haws 
Maughan. Berlrle( 
Meltier, Russell 
Nelson, Zane 
Ostler, Ron 



Romney. Keith 
Santiago, Frank 
Schilling. Jim 
Scholes. Harold 



Smith. Phillio 
Shehan, Bill 
Smack, OIck 
Smith. Jack Gary 
Schwendlman. Rict 
Stephens, Jon 
Stephens. Kent 



Thurfaer, Steve 
Stevens, Jay 
Tucker. Oavid 
Waite. Wendell 
Waller. Paul 
White, Wendell 
Wilson, John 




Oockilsder. Presld< 



ATHENIAN 

One of the youncest units on campus, the Athenian 
social unit was organized in \9'>\ with the motto. 
"Faciamus Quam Dicamus" — Let us act rather than 
let us talk. Especially noted for their brotherhood, 
Athenians actively participated in campus activities 
as the unit won the supremacy trophy for the fifth 
consecutive year. A special feature of basketball half- 
time entertainment was furnished by Athenians as 
they sponsored the Delxinettc marchint; uroup from 
Overton, Nevada. The year's activities mcluded a 
series of exchanges and parties and participation in 
Songfest, Homecoming, and Winter Carnival. Con- 
cluding the year was their annual Dixie Ball, which 
received national recognition and was considered to 
be one of the outstanding social events at BYU. The 
unit's sponsors were Lynn McKinlay and Ben Lewis. 







HARD WORK resulted in this entry in ttie snow sculpture contest. 



MEN OF ATHENS rode their famoi 
parade, encouraging her on with a bit of •. 



WIrthllf 

Woffinde 

Wootton Willi 





BRIGADIERS' HOMECOMING float posed the question, "What was your dream?" 




414 



i 




BRIGADIER 

Brigadier Social unit, organized in 1931, has carved 
its niche in the social life of the university with the 
definite objective of creating better fellowship 
through common social interests. During fall quar- 
ter the Brigs held exchanges with Nautilus and par- 
ticipated in Homecoming as they sponsored a float 
and held an openhouse. Winter quarter the Brigs 
sponsored their annual invitational, had a successful 
stag breakfast during rush, and held their annual 
Bower)- Brawl in an atmosphere resembling the Gay 
Twenties. During spring quarter, the Brigs held 
their dinner dance in Salt Lake City and staged 
their annual steak fry and canyon party at Kelly's 
Grove. On Y Day, the members did their traditional 
job of mixing the whitewash for the Y, as well as 
competing in the afternoon's contests. Jack Berge 
was sponsor of the unit. 




A GIANT SNOWMAN was Brigs' entry in fho snow sculpture contest. 



BRIGADIER Et^BLEMS were displayed b/ Wayne Muhlostein at Brigs' 
booth during IOC Week. 



ALICE IN WONDERLAND furnished the theme for 
Brigadier-Kappa Debonaire exchange. 








Hibbard, Elden 
Hoen, James 
Jarman, Dale 




o 



ff. p :^ f ^"Ti> 



Richardson. Wende 
Ricis. Marl 




Robison. Russell 



Weber, Gerald F. 



4 






David Jarman. Preildent 



DELTA RHO 



During the spring quarter of 1960 a new social unit 
was formed by a small number of enthusiastic BYlf 
men students. Adopting the name Delta Rho, the 
members of the unit dedicated themselves to scholar- 
ship, brotherhood, spirituality, and fellowship, as 
they looked forward to a prosperous future. They 
set as their goals to bring progress to the university 
and to offer a rewarding and healthy atmosphere 
to every student who will be a member of Delta 
Rho. The unit's full schedule of activities included 
exchanges, participation in intramurals, and their 
first annual spring dinner dance. Sponsor of the unit 
was Lynn Ravsten. 



Ul 




LOOKING FORV^/ARD to party f 



b Lewis, Nancy Robins, and Neal Anderson. 






ML-f 



Jenninqi, Rem D. 






M^^ 




418 




Merino. Joe 
Merrill. Keith 
Nelson, Paul 
NIelson, Norm L. 
Smith, Craig 
Steele. Dorryl 



Sorenson, Steve 

Steinke, Ron 

Stone, Dave 

Sturgis, Richard 

Sutherland, Russell 

Taylor, Dennis 

Van Wegener. Richard 



Young, LeSrande 




GOLDBRICKER 



Founded in 191" by a uroup of World War I vet- 
erans, the Goldbricker social unit is the oldest social 
unit on campus. Brickers are characterized hv their 
belief in balanced social activity and fellowship, and 
the perpetuation of college friendships throuijh an 
active alumni association. This year's social program 
included such traditional activities as the annual 
alumni reunion banquet, the spring quarter invita- 
tional, a formal dinner and dance, the Rricker-O.S. 
Trovata student assembly presentation, the "Misfit" 
party, a buddy party, and Spring Festival. The unit 
also participated in Homecoming, and Winter Carni- 
val. Dr. Clinton L. Oaks was the unit's sponsor. 





Allen. William Roy 
Eriksen, Erik 
S.irdrner Rod 
G:((ofd, Jack 



Hayes, Robert 
Hendrlckson, Cliff 
Heninger. John C. 



•shall, Melvin (Pete) 



Tomlinson, Ron 



Solmon. Rick 



SAXON HOMECOMING float depicted a famous historical vessel from out of the pa 





Aflo Sorenien, Preildent 



SAXON 

Saxon social unit, re-activated in 19S9 after three 
years of inactivit)-, was conceived in brotherhood atid 
unit}'. With the Greek letters Alpha Ome^a on 
their pin reflecting unit brotherhood, and the motto. 
From Beginning to the End, the Saxons were one ot 
the most vigorous and active units on campus, hi- 
cluded in a well-rounded schedule of activities were 
exchanges with women's units, a dinner dance, an 
invitational, and participation in intramural ath- 
letics. Saxons entered a float in the Homecoming 
parade and competed in the sports contests and snow 
sculpture competition during Winter Carnival Week. 
The unit also participated in Songfest and the pres- 
entation of a student assembly with Alcyone. Bob 
Thomas and Ivan Barrett were sponsors of the unit. 




THE SAXON EK^BLEM wos displayed at the unit meetings. 



ERNEST MIDDLETON tended the unit booth during IOC Wool.. 



A BIG STEIN for a litfle man was the Sa<ons' 
tribution to snow sculpture. 






l3 '^p. "p ^. o 






Ala.ander. Sob 
Ashworth, Don W. 
Baler. William J. 
Bargerter. Darrell 
Barber, David 
Barnes. Milton 



Barnett. Robert 
Brim, Larry 
Borguist. Tom 
glio. Vince 




Byers. Dennis W. 



Campbell. Mauri 
Crockett. David 
Davis. Will 




^^^JL^^l 





Hacking. Richard 
Harlson. Kent L 
Hawkins. R. D. 
Hall. Chief 



Hayes. Bill 
Hubbs. Keith 
Jacobsen. Bart 
Johnson. Nolan L. 



Cormick. Don 




Davis, Glenn— Sponso' 



Dave Adamv. P 








TAU SIGMA 

Since its inception in 191 *>, Tau Sigma stxial unit 
has built a tradition of loyalty and fraternity with 
its goal of providing an outlet for members' desire 
for social betterment and providing opportunities for 
growth in highly important social consciousness not 
available in the strictly academic curriculum of the 
university. During the year the Tau Sigs" athletic 
abilities were evidenced by their intamural victories 
and their capture of the Broken Ski during Winter 
Carnival Week. Tau Sigma merited special recog- 
nition for their Homecoming float entry, Battle 
Hymns, which won the sweepstakes award. Two 
other important Tau Sig activities were their tra- 
ditional Deer Bust and participation in Songfest. 
Other social events of the year included Christmas 
and New Year's parties, exchanges, and the invita- 
tional. Glenn Davis and LeRoy Porter were sponsors. 




CASTLE OF LOVE was a pnjo-.lnninq snow sculpture for Tau Sigs, 



KENYON OLSON, Denri; 
played latest styles shown 



Doyle, and handsome masked man dts- 
of fashion show sponsored by Hoover's. 



Overstreet. Lerov 




Sanctiei. Benn 



Sheppard, Wavland 



Ttiorstenson. Clark T, 



f>. r^ p r\ 




f 






Arringlon. Cam 

Ashby, Kenneth 

irth, Dean Frampto 



urnham, Cordell 



Christensen, Craig 
Clayton, Woody 
Cloward, Sherman 




... .y^^Q 

Mi? 9 




Dave Ward, Pi 



VAL HYRIC 

Taking its name from Norse mythology, Val Hyric 
social unit was founded on the immortal rock of 
friendship and organized in 1928. The tradition 
and brotherhood of Val Hyric are built upon a record 
of academic, athletic, and social activities. This year 
was filled with social highlights from start to finish. 
Some of the year's special features included the stag 
deer hunt, Val Halla invitational, Val Luau, and 
Asgard two-day dinner dance. In athletic competi- 
tion throughout the year, the unit was seldom out- 
pointed. The unit participated in Homecoming and 
Winter Carnival, taking first place in the Winter 
Carnival snow-sculpturing competition. Sponsors 
were Dr. Wilford Smith and Dr. Gaylon Caldwell, 





%^ 






f"^^ ^7 "V^ T/ 'a^ ^' 

f^ ca J? ppT 
"(:. "f^ 'c O (^ ^ ^ 




Burton. OIck 
Carter Charlei 
Charles. Dick 
Collins. Roger 



Erikson. Glen 
Edwards. Roy 
Forsgren. Klane 
Fisher. Byron 
Fuhrlman. Parker 
Green. Jim 
Harris, Marty 



Hardy. Ralph 
Hartslield, Don 
Jellers. Terry 



Kemp. Jack 
Knioht. Edwin 
Laub. Dale J. 



lienouist. John 
yeson. Steye 
cCue. L'Dean 




h^^\t^i 



Sheffield, Beck 



Stratford, Dick 




Jerry Eagleston. Preiideni 



VIKING 



Besides being one of the largest social units on cam- 
pus, the Vikings were one of the most active. They 
were in the upper bracket of the intramurals, win- 
ning the supremac)' trophy for the second straight 
year. Songfest, Homecoming, Snow Carnival, and \" 
Day found them participating with enthusiasm. Their 
Homecoming float entry was a special eye-catcher 
as they pulled and rolled it dosvn the street on lugs. 
This year the new navy blue blazer and crest made 
their appearance on campus, going along with the 
unit's characteristics of fraternalism and unity. Spe- 
cial activities of the year included the traditional in- 
vitational and dinner dance and presentation of a 
student assembly with Val Norn. Steve Covey and 
Dr. Howard Nielson sponsored the unit. 





VIKING OFFICERS Slon Cameron, Dale Loub, Jon Marple, Dici, Charles. Olai.; VIKINGS WENT incognito in assembly with Val No 

Durrant, Jerry Eagleston. Tony Seymour, and Klane Forsgren. 




Whitmore. Jav Gordon 



A CLOSING WORD - - OR LA CAVE SOUS 
LA TERRE 



The school year 19'>9-60 is now only a memory. In 
putting together this book, we have endeavored to 
provide you with something which in years to come 
will bring back to you the joys and accomplishments 
which you have experienced during the year. The 
production of a book such as the Banyan requires 
the concerted effort of many people, and for those 
of us who have put a part of ourselves into it, the 
book provides different memories — memories of 
hours of work and decisions, and sacrificing other 
things so that deadlines could be met. We spent 
many cool, moonlit autumn evenings in our window- 
less office in the basement of the Student Service 
Center, deprived ourselves of numerous dates, or 
brought our reluctant dates to the office to help 
finish up the classes section. On cold winter nights 
and many Satuurdays we were completely cut off 
from the outisde world except for the incessant 
jangle of the telephone and a scattering of lost or 
curious people who found their way to room 143 
SSC for photo appointments, lost Banyan stubs, and 
a million other little details we thought would never 
end. Occasionally as we made our way to the press 
in the evening or started home, we heard the tan- 
talizing strains of dance music floating over from 
the Family Living Center and we had to content 
ourselves with the thought that next week we could 
see that dance when the proofs came up from the 
darkroom. We remember the ecstasy of the fresh air 
in our faces when we came up from the depths into 
the daylight world or the cool night, the element of 
surprise when we discovered a fresh blanket of 
snow on the ground after our Banyan sojourn all 
day Saturday, the thousand-and-one trips to the 
press to deliver completed pages and pick up proofs, 
and last of all, drawing lines on the index pages 
until our heads swam. We remember, too, the staff 
parties we didn't have because work had to come be- 



fore play, and the exultation and the fun we had 
when we finally succeeded in throwing our grand- 
slam soiree after the last pages had gone to press. 
Then we had only to read more proof sheets, check 
the never-ending flow of blueprints, and wait for 
our sneak preview party and the day when the Ban- 
yans would be distributed. 

We hope you will understandingly accept the errors 
which you may find, and we extend our apologies 
to those seniors whose pictures appear outside the 
senior section. We wish at this time to express ap- 
preciation to many who have made the production of 
this book possible: To Delvar Pope of the Y Press 
who throughout the year patiently assisted us with 
many problems; to Jerry Rogers of the BYU Photo 
Studio who spent long hours painstakingly checking 
facial and background tones of thousands of indivi- 
dual portraits; to last year's editor, Lynn G. Hale, 
who came back to provide us with the cover design 
and photograph; to Julie Pingree and Judy Bilder- 
back for accepting responsibilities and enduring to 
the end; to former editor, Wally Barrus, who with 
infinite understanding and patience provided us with 
photographs of drama and other materials which 
otherwise we could not have obtained; to the Im- 
provement Era for the painting of President McKay; 
to the Spurs and Y Calcares for selling Banyans and 
making picture appointments; to Nautilus, White 
Key, Y Calcares, Intercollegiate Knights, Spurs, and 
Sponsor Corps for compiling the index; to Les 
Young who provided us with art work when he was 
already carrying a heavy load; to professors Roman 
Andrus and Richard Gunn of the Art Department 
for helpful suggestions; and to the understanding 
midnight custodial staff of the Clark Student Ser- 
vice Center. 

THE EDITOR 



LYNN THACKER 
JOEL JUSTESEN 
JULIE PINGREE 
JUDY BILDERBACK 
ALAN FRAZIER 

PENNE FREEBAIRN 
SONJA BENSON 
WAYNE SABEY 
SHERRI CHRISTOFFERSON 
MARGARET ANDERSON 
NORMA DRAUGHN 
GARY HOPKINSON 
BARBARA KEY 

DORINE SMITH 
BARBARA BLAKE 



Editor 

Business Manager 

Associate Editor 

Copy Editor 

Layout Editor 

Activities Editor 

Organizations Editor 

Sports Editor 

Fine Arts Editor 

Space Sales Manager 

Student Government Editor 

Photo Coordinator 

Classes Editor 

BETTA SILVA 
SHARLENE ELLSWORTH 



KAREN LYON 
SHERRY LOUDER 
PAUL SMITH 
KENDRA WINCOTT 
RUTH REID 
DAVE PRATT 
LES YOUNG 
BARBARA CARR 
LAURIE CHRISTENSEN 
JERRY MASON 
RON HALLER 
JUDY LEEHIGGINS 
ELSIE MCFARLANE 
LUGENE BUTLER 

DIANE HAIGHT 
BILL ROACH 



Senior Class 

Junior Class 

Sophomore Class 

Freshman Class 

Exchange Editor 

Sports Assistant 

Artist 

Art Assistant 

Publicity 

Photographer 

Photographer 

Photo File 

Organizations Assistant 
Index 

RUTH BUTLER 
JANIS FRANCIS 






I 



iste 



FACULTY INDEX 



A — A— A 

Addv. Geofga M. 



Oiwald. Sh-Hsne 



Sud.eoki, 

S.en. Euc 



L — L — L 

Lanen. A. Oasn 
L«nan, Don H. 
I, Cllntor^. S 



Dov.d, Glonn C . 



<»rdy"'Go'ld«n 



M — M — M 



h(i»i. Cor^an E.. 
:onl;o, Oo" 



Tylor. S. Lyman. 24 

llndali; Hilda"*' 

u — u — u 

V — V — V 



/an Col 



. Slann 



Dya. Garal 

E — E- 



Sandgren, Clyde 0.. 



r. EldrwJ A 
Carl 

M" Eleanor 



Olion, Erneit U 2 



W — W — w 



Bryan.' Una^^ ^ ^^ ^^ 
B^iggJft.^GJ^Jav^ 


Empoy. LaMor 
Evonv Dav.d 51 


Bunker' Robert £..69, JJ' 
flurch. Hilton 


F — F — F 


Burton, Alma P. 
Butler. Eliot S9 
Butt, Newbarr. 

Buttle, F«ya 


Faarmlay. La"wre 
Faarnley. Unor, 
Fehlberg, jMn 
Fell, Paul E., 2S 
Ferguion, Hal 
Fielding R. Ker^ 


c— c— c 





V Ho-ard C. 

R. A. M.O. 

ran, Q^en.on ( 



Ikinior., Erneit I 
lie. Millon's. 



430 



STUDENT INDEX 

'■il»iiii Doiii> 111, "ii li I if Crff, >i] 1^! Vb^to Ihrf^ HM^tk 40B %»*9* **-• Dim. ■«' •_-»_. l_ ■ ... 

^^"^ ^ ^ '^V' '* *«*•<*»■, Gw** tljmm. Wv«cM I >• ta^bv. Jmmt tm. 5 ii ■»»!*. *•*- l« !••*» *<-••»•. V«~«l 

Abb*M M««*. P.O-* in A-dwvM J«Mt Fi««* f™«), in laqlVr- »i«ta» M*"^ Smm*. C»U- !•' ••— Ja-«* Eva«<* 

Achno. S l,-^.. S*. O.^CjW, 114 A*<tooo*" J«i»<«, Ctn« H»^H. C-KMOS ••91^. Iohm M.*^ ld.ho NIK W*- tM k.t^ Lor.. &•■•. Kl 

Am-*. J«- M.«n« N.p4 Crf4. 114 A«J,oc-. JoM BUm. l^m^Oom. N. J. 146. Itt, I.^^. J,A. toM ©«>-»'. Wyo, I4T. 737 I6I >«>. J*-r, Artt.«. L 

T^" i;^* tr* . , "^ ^'JiiQ - . J«*» M..IO-. SaHonl. A«t 4H U<r^ CU^ iM S*H UW C^ty 147 Imij-m. Ro*^ C*H ( 

Ad*.. WMa 0>4>»^. 146 A«tano». Jo»t« &•»• Aho* W,0- 15. It4, IH. fek* Do* Ftmca. •«>*«< N 0, 101. )U >i«q'»T Jo^- Ufy T 

Ail^^UMTuTU^KA. Ci*4 tM '" "^^ ^'""^ ^ '^^ '*' "^ *^''**" '^'^* ^' 

!lir te! !2;i,!!rL^ .4* A«Woo. JJ.4J.VW Id... 14* ••I^T.^hA.., 0— ,C«»a. 141 ftMl lo-^ l<k^ W^, .„ .-. ...., ^. 

A44«M C«l« W3<t>rrf. J^ 14* A*<fano«, K»^ A— Se*Mk Fwt. I» taJWr S«M Lt»4 fc'taW*. C*!!', I4T IhU M.r.lv. R.. T,m©» A^. Il« »..gh,~. Jo4«, G'44' M. 

Ad4M.C4ni«l« k^WHl* N.... m AmIom* Ka.M SpoUM W«^ 114 406 t^ J*0^f to.^t» i»» frv^^9. C**-*. *t l>4 kM* S<«xU&*l. CUnavIx. 14^ au.4f.«* JcA. Ua.,.,(«. («• 

**«"^ S*"?' **-"••"■ JP Aadvne* K**** II4 114 U.. Ma,> L»— Nti»4 &•. I4» Im> 0<*6«it l»4«4 MsdWd O^. Ii4 I»l 

'V"* - £**T .T;;-^***" ^^^ A*id«rtor« K«u«» W. Ai«w<w. Fw*. H4 h„^ Adwl. l*>i1o*. W4, I4J »M" £•" W A»w<i* Fwl 6J t-t'^m La.f**. h.r*nH». W 

l*' '• g*^ ^JiTR****^ Ssl 416 * *^*'* °" '^•* *•"' '*^ *«<to— ' *6 t*-^ S4»»»* M*«9fc^ Pi'fj.-o « tM" &«^»d t. Ml tx^Ksm Wo^dra. E<^U. C. 



t^*,^ 


» J^.» 


A- k 




Ctt 




«•*• «• 


„.j. 


«a 
















Md W.I 


M> Mto>« 






r-w*. 






•Jh. J4* 


.Th«id4 




44 


n 141 


















»• 


i4i 


fc^S.- 


lr>rt*t\> 






Id* 




Da Aw 


■4«.d4J< 




lOt 


I.-M,*.- 


Do..ql«. 


. lll*>N 




V «• 



., G*,*4 N_ OaU^, W*. *♦ AwJ.™,- U.>9a'«l A«.. Oqdan I 






btv eiVHl* t.rWt Id* ■» ftM'dail Joka im.t*. Spt^^t; I 

Balw. Jo«<. W^rfMr C«i><. i*} Bm'«4'> T»u>4 [X.M, I4R 



Adam W^^-". "I*. 'K >'i A-d*>w. S*«d« ior** »&.• Ida. I46 lU taU. JaMt I^Wt Ida, 14T BmS* Ja->*i C. J. h«^ II- 

Ad*-M-. 0«>id F Salt Ula C. Tt. 10 1 A»d.oo- &K.'o» E«M. VmHooI Ida., 1 14 laU* Jelaa* F >4T •KktfOd J.«....n. H . lom.1., I 

Ad4*w*. S**™ ^- '*~'^*7'^'** A«da**c* Sfcaldei L Sa»t UU C.t», III lala> l-d* La* C.^ll-4. Cat*. I4T »a<t CatcN* Kaa Cl*Tbo»'-a, 

TT*"^ ?r*"'u. a t*^' cJi^i) A«J»no- S*ae*»- Jati Otv»|M Wait. 146 »ata< Ua I4» Ivck. (a*! A.. » 

Ad*r^ fr-WiTo k^'ldlko 114 A*da-«>., S«.v.- 1 S Ui-»a4po'.. M— . 101 BaU- Lr"> "•*> '•'* CalU,. 147 IW Bxt. Ilaoa JO 

Ad*«M*. Ju4a C«f*|f, «•■■!** AitdafM* Vatea Ka, B-t. M<l., 146 lata' W3t^ Oa->a. Spart.. Na». 147 »,cl Ja, Tyla* Part*. W4>H.. I 

AdaatM. Na-afl H»uy. llMttm. 114 Aad^no* tacM 4J |at*> ►»»»<* A-i.e Mavi.90d Catt 14? tacl Jo*« Walta< St La«.fc U, 

Ad4«*o- Ra. Uotd^ijfc^tda IT A»dar«<." V».,t. I V. S*><* ta'ba'a C**.! 146 Rata. la— . Da. h»la*ad* C*!.!, IM I« Uti. JfM*- Mta^Mw*. 161 






A-d<«» Mo-« A)-ta Ucc*. Ida 101 >t* la" JoK" »«ja- Sp'.-qr,»ld III 147 

Aod'Kt. R-cka'd t*T J*>c«<a Ida 14* |aU loqa* EiTail Oow C«l<< l«' 

'aCiH 146 tallaiV* Na-<. Laa W.>»a->M(a Na^d* tl( ba<'4<t V.«aA. hcc. lU. 197 

LaU 6^ l» •aia'd. J«n>ca A.4».w Po/tw>.lla Calt l» B*4d* Carolvx Ada Alataodna. Va . <1, I 









f, dohar* A^ Jr. $*!• I**^ C4I, 114 4ll ^^^^ j^^l^ ^^j^, ^^^j, ,^j ,^ 1^^,^ 






Qlw. Ai.4. Pro«,, 146 


Af-oW; Robert •.. Sail L44a C.ty. in 


•«.U' Dm H . 61 


Ftant Aartw-,, L« AfloaUC C4l.f . l» 
G*#T Rott. Vaa N.^ C4J>< . HI 


AfrUgto.. C«>*»*>o» l*». Sail UU C-t, 1 » 


b>ia> J«la*a F E«».to«, W,< 
•aftatt Edsofd L J< tot Am 


John Laxatc*. W<i>(ia». Ar>i. 14* 
Jo.j»pl.H3lo*.O.b.^C.ia.l6 4ll 


Ar.i.»., Jo Aan 0.1l» Monl . lU 


«*rU.f Saodr. Ml 




A>*T. SaMl>a Lo.. hvn. t». 406 
















Uf.-«. C, Rypart. Ida, IM 




BaAH e«T<a Da-**'' Col« 1 


Harv* ly*m. Amar<aa fo**. 1 14 
Mart l««. frovo. M. IM. 114 


A!ha.d°lm"s2t UUoJ» '?I7 




u^im'i^iw "* 




Sa'lo. Ma. &a<ald ^ow. HI 



•a.<o. L,*.* Bunil>afl< lo. A-^aUi C*l.( W 104 Ba.i.<att Syl... I , Macon &,.. 91 

Ai.bi!iein"<.at* R'aJpk »«i«... A/u, "" — - "- " — 

7,7"' i"; ?Ti ilT Z^ i'li " **''^ '•'** 6dwa^. ^w« 114 JS' 1^,^ («, 6J|, n^i D,a«o«d WiK tn, n? la-tioA «6T B-ll.oq* lah; nS tli^lh Urrv 111 4»6 

!^ flli; W ~~ " *»>** S'-d™ D4ta, H,»libo«>^h Cai.l 1 14 f,„^ j„^ »rj|.a« lafUlvr CaM_ 111 BaiK^ Ba'b*'* Ann A/(.n,i^ Va I4| 1|7 |i„t»> lott.V<. E J* fafn..nqto« N 

>Gl!!I" ijSu'VmJ RUatoot Id. 14* ^^ Jir;*'* i"'*r'J,'^ '*' 'V , ,., »a"».Ha.<»( Lo», fcoth C4M . 1 14 114 lof,«v. CU.l )4) 14il64 

Allwi. Ronia AfT6i. ■Mtk'oaT loa- '•• A,hb» WJIion Cafd. W.tifcaiqtoa 0*1 I4T Baiwt Jan<a Salt Lata C.fy I II laoton Mafd. 6a. I to.ta Ida Ml 741 404 Roam Ma'oaiat Aon Muxan I IG 

AJW, W«yM '■]J[^^''* "' "' AiKtrolt Sl^io* A. £*«*' A™. 171 )« lamat Marl- AIim LoKi 171 lanwi! Ma'ifc* P'a.to" Ida 116. 177 Bodily Sandy Coitipion Calif 179 

Aiii»^. Don stwiCv. Ui. « ;i;^;^«a*.irrL' biu'iT' ** ' '* '" "* u,zi wMi^i 'i^NJu"ca'w ■ t» t'^ '[r^ ''iVi"^ '''' " "** '" '" tj'i' si!^'"/ ""!i!i cVT^ It* 

Al!X A!u4^'*ltliJ^W6* in Alston Lo. M.«fc M.d«W, 114 la«a., MJ.O. 0. Itt B*.«v> R.ta M.ld.od, M«ifo.d O- » 174 tod.ly. R.<>,.,d M P....^-, Id. 179 

Aiipt.1.: Ffc^n'A-n. o.-., 5J. s».^« J:i:!;c.'*i^.j'eoo.rB.u-,fi.^ cm , 174 s:::rH ^ eiiif^il;;?- in'"" "* '™ S::;^ »^«'a Ar.,^^* w..iisr<,,o. d c .79 l^;!; Ts.* iZrLit'J*w,^ 

^.^ ^r^A.rw^I.'trtar DC M. S4 101 *''«^'' t*^* P-**!*'*- *« lar-atf R«b*rt L>^. S-n V.ll.». CW . 17, 4n 760, 190 40* lodL, Sh.,1. !.,«. San U,. Obi.po 

M^ ct^^.^'LIituU^.t^'V W « ^!;^*c?'i!!ti.!'^.^"lC» 167 '•'*'' " •''^'« ••^■S*'* '"*• " '*' "• S^*^ ?.:«« j'' p'To" -Vi 197 fc;"'=Ta', o'o"Ur A'cu'r!;; n'j.,' 

Ai.,^,D^w.wa.K..,,o-,oc 10 .71 no, jj^J^^jj^jt^j];'^ ^ £:::: ei^St wiU^li&i " S:::S MV^(^™^'^'o>,ln^S^^^^ i» ^Li^t!:lTiStZJji 

. OMiabwi.noo &aat_ 101 la'da 

-JS c.r M4 a-. 



J"6!k-« ^«.^P™.»«:idri44 A.'^ T>««a, C , J' tJaM-Cji-l 1» ».«> Ma— t.a-. h D^-flla., 147 R,.^ Ja", ■.)*>art U.lfwd l79 Rond H.l , Salt Lak. City M 

1. T^ Y-ir^ ifiT A-9v.t« D.-..tUa. R^fcr^d, in 1^^ ^.^ M4 »..<,.«-. D«n R f.«r, *1 JS7 k«j J.ma. La.v.lt Ram.Ei N Mat 101 

M— I. H. oo.r, .01 A,.*- Da.id Oa-aaG™-. Cal.(. 171 - .... .... _ 

M Slta-o* La. *»"''9~* " *' ~^. Artl- L.ndal* M*4a P«« 114 

, N**o L*- .. N.t.o*.l C-ty, ^l-K 146 ^^^^ U.™dim Mht.!*. Ajto.. C**- I4T 



. &»• EIW* 1.1 V.44I. N«> . 



rtt« V.^^.*.. Ila™.ia U. 147 »a"W»t Moi*. Mof« t^a. PwM**Ka HJ_ 47 l.'r.H D«.«l H,.-« Pa«at. 

«i,. W.>l,«»TKo-». M»5.aM. Alt. C*-, in jjf 406 ».".»• Frank Do. Oqdaa, 1 

,l.«at> Jo An. h«v>« C*«- 147 |,,^^ Ba*a« Cnil O.II.. T.,, 4.0 R-™*. 1.— D~— , T^l 

,l»y Robot Lm Jr Wdn«qtai>. NC 114 Wn' Ra^ba-a Car** Ida 147 






• la*r» Man-iF M.fbi.™ Ft WortK T.. , 179 tonnav F'adafxk J . S«n Caftoi. Ca'il IJt ItO 

Anda an. 14* ..—..-—■ ~ JT" ' " „ ,, .., ,^ .anw i_arM'«a Mn um ^.fy 40* Bartkalwn Mai Sa/at. Coniad, M«il . 70, 179 tonny P.^l W f(«^, ISl 

A^dTw* Ma-lo i.r^o^ '*•• *"*'**"l?;,^'''* 'Tt^JT* ***' ^ " ' ' " •»"<=* •''on EJa"* <*»»■•'«>• '!• •«♦ "."^ LWI Spnn^^lU 114 k«th Gordon Owoa Pto.o. '04, IM 

A..*«« A.»n RcwT^Maarat* Att^ C«n, •> B ■ B '•''" '"'•^' ^^'•^ Ta.-..en Ida 147 Balkan Patr^a Ann Pro-o '4| Bcw> Do. L*-4', Amanu^ Foj4 14* 

Jr™— ^ ^"^ 1*6 " * " BwM- DwM V<*ar.JI., Ctl, 147 )79 BoitMoid B^.-o' © fcunt.fj. 17 7S6 «o.^ •ob.t Un>.> 0*Imm Mt C*(.( 17 

^"^ - - - ----- — •__„-_ .._.. ^_ n.^, ,14 j,^ Q^^ Spwio Mwwn Id. 16 Bc'qq.it D.1. TKohm Lw Ahqat«i Cal IIS *r 

p^caa Fort 147 417 •.«> lU«t B, Oh.'la W.ih 61. 109 tor^ M,^. CiJ.'.a Piovo 70 

> {>* (79 ta.>l*> Ddwm E F'.><l*nd, Id. fO 91 Betten. Rou Cou-m Mwnpk't Ton. I4f 

F.1K M. 147 TJi »r^ N*<i4 Jo.., Pfo-o, l» Bewotk R,tK.n( C Oflda. Bl 

riWy Ida, 147 B«<.. Wayna t 7i Bo*t uait Dm* Oqdan MS 

• II* 474 >.*•■. «e*.nd tti^ BatanAla Miit. II4 |46 117 Bottc«>r,.'d Reoar L PIm*..! &ov« I4« 

kC^ H^. 101 Wkaw. Do'^iCa'ol. W>utti.f. Caii' , 141 kv-.h*' Harold O..^ Toronto Om C4n I0< 

Spfi^*Ud. >t9 B^td.'o''. S>>."' Lot S«rtaa«/b«'.. CV.I. <4t nS 

•fCfy H*. 147 1*0 B.qalo- La. *J.on %9t*<t^»m. >•• BewJ-o* Hanf, S— Cotagtc, C«fc' II* 



1 <•- Babo tod-ood C*y, C««i< 147 Baiaat 'tfim- T 



431 



432 



STUDENT INDEX 









7, Bo'bars K. Eiit Ely, h 



C*>itn Anq*l.f>a Hovilo'i T«ui ISO Clsrl. Noncv Keran. Sun Vallaf Cal-f. n. 389 Co-<*> Uaur* 111 

Cai»B.. Ala" Ray Wt>^tt«r'Cel:f 111 Cla'l. Pam«i« Da.n Loi Axgvln C«li(, ISI C«i. Sryan) LaVtm, fn.n^w. 43 

C*»*' Unda 160 CU-i. PaJ Wafd. La(ay«tt«. Calif. Ilr Coi. Boyrf Bay. Xayiv>lla « 

C««f Cte««MArtl.gf Rupart ld« ISO CUrt. R L.OB. Oqc*.". 116 Co. Ct-a^a^aOa^y C-y. C«i;(, I 

CfcaH. AaWU Vi.;««. AJkambia. C*lif . ISO CUrt. Ranaa. 1)6 Co.. Ow-r. Edq*' Ma-ic Paf*. C. 



STUDENT INDEX 






DaX>k« KoMtd wa^ S*a..^*Di>. Umu i33 D=«, C^ N«hg-. 0«-f C 



Om^*!. l«toH W Spr-^r^ M 0«.«v t-i» M».»... Ai*K. H Um, 151 Ob. tin. &«»■ J., 

t_ Bmtv e*~<« S^ Uk« 0*t 
* !*• Oc^ .. _ _ _. ,. 



Dewy, Ca^Qif LmK 0«M— d, C*£<. I 

lo9«r Wa«u«. Sd« Ufa Or. 4 
U«|W. DwB^ E^. CcHa Cat4_ US 



C'»-4oH Sfc.^^ 



[V^ K^rvD— 


n r 


.,!,:. uv . 


























D-^afl. Jeh. 0«<K*- 




CVmI^. Sk.j^ k 






























fC- 














Dr^a. KaAi>« f . 


Srfi Uk. C*, tJJ 



Eti*9a. isrc* U'Wla SaN i. 






, W.'!.^ U{Co» iMwrfv h 



C»IM**«,AI.<.. M,-lofwt;Crf.*~ III" ^"'*- "•"'.-D W'UttCh' IP Dw^tr n«Mt^jM>l 6o— .y CM.ISl (^.^it^ (C.'^mU. Lm Ah.U. CM 

Cr«oL lUlltUM. P™»o, '01 IM 0»ck»< Ajirj Ja*« &*>d*> G's^ C«l.(, rM Du<i(o^ HtnM Gms Pw.^ M Ht Enkt** ffH P«.l Sxo Valtay C«lif ■« 1(1 

C>ool, Mafsarat Kit Fallo*. N«> _ tl Owla- Ca»>>a'.-a • Sw»fl»l» A.*. (() Db^lWi Am. Oa4w< I?! tO* ErM Iwl AiMa*rfa> Danm Colo lU 

Cra»ltlM OOKM PmH SaKLaUC^, »l, JH D«ia., C«'oV •>«•• M.^ A^,, III.IW 110 D^tl^ U»1,.*Tj'- Sait Lak. C^^, M t».>. Jot.- W.yna' Lcq »aa<». Cal.L l» 

C/'tST'u^da! G'^. /J?, tn! IM ■ D^k-'^ l--^ OaUa-d, Su(, ISI Du"!."c^'M^:dI^ (Va, IM ' " h^'o^!^*l4' ^ ^lU^TiT^*''' '"' 

C»«Ka-, >.«a' PaJ, SmIHj. W.^k., IJJ lU 0^U> M.U. S^apkaM Prwo. ISI p..« Rorf I.,..,, J«ai* ISI €.„H, AU«t Almwd, V.r«l IS4 

C/(»la"d, (mmaHatoiW, W»f»^, Ora. 1)1 O^U' Wayna taw™ ftwo, IJl Dv"- O. Do- t-ql.-«d Ceto. IM Ka-t Cha", ia" Frai>tiKo talir 11711 

Oi>-(l>. A,la« |M^Ja««., I^'" -. 10* Mi ^TT T-C'*VoiyrVw^ i^.^V 'mi_j._ V ^'" "'^- *^" Wt.«i.^,a. Coto. I«. H4, C^., p»-Jli>*.a, Arimo, Ida. 1*4 



Hood Garr CK«f<ai. \ 






. Bo,.. O— M., 



••'••• "•-• °¥'*' '" 1»^ Ov-.-f «-«- 'H 









c:;:? 


<»4l.«»a. Kaya. feda«a. C*n( 41 M' 


" ^j?^3rLttjrNM,. .„ 


E — E — E 

Ea^laiio- e«fald J_ SaUnT^ld. Caf.L 4<«. 41 


era.. Ja.»*. Mil.p Co.-.. C«'<( IS4 
E.»ll. [lm« ll«d La. VaqM Nm IS4 
(•all Ka.MM TilUa, GWa IS4 


Foti— ., Robao M,. LaWi'a*. Ora.. ISS 


C«". 


. (>»,4la. M , SA** ScK-g* Md . ISI U 


J OafhN R^i*i M.-*' f 'anllonl M . Ba 


Um^ t^r 414 


t^Hi D-a'iaE'PariiAlhii. Calif ISS 


C-tii 


» I,". Ma»« Ofda- ISI JW 
. Ho-a.d Rov Uxait*' Call'. iSI 


Srro^''r!i'lvtlc.v... 


U~«. Oar-ua 6 . W> UU Ot*. ISl 
U'dWy L'-da E Ui-O*. ISJ. in 
fM'htr,, Ei-*a « «_ P.0-0, ?JI 


Eya Ba<-a U> Vaoat Na-. 1)1 
Fr*'. Uff >•■• Wi UU Cty I)) 
hi.« Pw>» U«a' Eva-ito- W,« I)) 


Cta< jCph'D^'dHa^?! Calif «7 
fo^la- Kafhlaao, ISS 


C»rtl 


f*a- Haipa' T,e»o" Am. MT 
Ha«Y m 
JawaJ P,y,^ ill 


0«cka«.(>. Mafv Ktt* ■.•Im-L CMH IH 


fr ^-;'"-'^'^'*p^^;;^^^^^ 


Ev"? Obaa Joh- Oarr >«*»r« Ma>sK»i N Y 
t,,U^ Hal*. !.,»*>«. tarWay Cai/. 11) 
E*™., tt.H^ Wa.,t., Ckaadfar A™.. M7 


IS4 Fo»i^' Arf,i>. Kay Gla-do'a Cal'f . Ill 
r<h.l^< Ga'ol R . Sa(M,lvada. Calif 11* 


C-#«i 


UanV !•• S.*^ Spf-«» Md, ISJ 1^ 


D«M-* D«»dM ISI 










tdZrfTW.a..O'«->. llV 


D*i»a' Can^lv- Ka. L»*«n. Wye. 1 1 r 


^: ■. i*V .11 


F-F-F 


foi^Main; larb... J... v.- Nvy. Calil.. 

E«,r, 0.,-Roy Mi-o* N Oat. ISS 










Fata* M*.J,- B U^h.CM l)S 




?^'..^"r=*T'-. "Vc" CaH, ISI 1 


T 0*^ai! l*da la* u^a, isi 








c'"" 


. .'■ ' '• i... C*l. IIT. 


CW.»-po« {.-vi-a C , U<6- Ida. « 

m D*..,^ c*4A. p c.9i<. ut. Co-9* 111 


[^iZ.'iML^'Ta^C.'fJ^'catl- MO 


Fact'*' Dovqin C V'-orMa IS4 

Fa44. KaH W f'a*><:at FvWxa Or* . W. 4U 


fo-'at. Joy Ua So.M Ida ISS 
fo.<«, ia*>«»ta OaUay Ida 40» 


c:;: 




Oa Vf^ Uwxa Sa> «a» C*il. IM 
Oa. [>o«a>dC.Pn>^ •• 


Ea'o- VakFf Pt?*o. )4« 


f«M^. V,r,».a ly— 111 



OaU. ShaUoA T. Sy*MM*. (U. 154 MD OkUi >o> Ahm. 101 Ed9a' Ksdav toy. Po-ca Cty Olla_ tn Farx-orM (a'te'a M Uaqaa *4 41 



Oaaat. Waldoa Ua l.s^t.an Cry 61 C>>>*«M Da«»a Ka.* RoHbo**. Om. 



M*I.106 £*■;■ *> , M ».»a Aaa. Co—. OUa. 111. M6 F.rn,oH« I 

C**«*y> E-O, F-Jbrta*. Cab'. 1 

RoHb-^r 



DaZ'sor- 



• SMa*'*U Sv-yvda «4 



OaK* OaH* Sor-^Tnla «4 410 (Xio- Uafda- Gn PajMa IS) Ed-a-di Fv* Au A-tarkaa ForL 1)1 

Da)*?- -•'•- ."•.- ^^« i;;-^^ "SI &>M l<kwdCi.pwa- P>o«j. )6S Edsa'di. Gai<a M4*ord m» F«»a4 Rsbw^ U CWa Vt'a Ca-* K 



Dadw. Gladyt M«y U«w«a. Cote, IS) E9a- Ca»k^a.. Ar— «.. Id*- 117 Faa«fc.fit«i^" 



ed>a^ La>M 




N» 1 






Sd-a/d.. M«»i 




• Cty 




















694- H<,,£a 












^h^.U^^ 












f,ba^ -at- 




ft. Ida. 






















K tawS Ana Saa (h<.9o. CWrf. 

'" -.---— ^ Me-aH Jofc- IdaKoFae.. h 



433 



STUDENT INDEX 






G-<ll'*m. G^i>. N.r 



\.":rA ' 



434 



STUDENT INDEX 



_ _ ^^^^ ^ _ *B^.C*dH. &«^ W 



Mmi t.ck«4 0— »« |«*^ 








H^.*. Joh« JKeb A«*«4 


C^4. lO 


K-..,. U» A«, W< Uto o «00 












H-fc. i»» L* CW.-* ■. 




































M«t<i-,i Jo« l«*.oo(l O^, CW.*, 



» A.4rt* ScfM«C>K. *•- IS* io-M. Oien I 





















I «06 J»a, S*.H^ V*l.«, H*.1«T, I. 



•• St A-tfco*, 14*. I«I Ih Jo«J«» llo«r F«,. I<(«h<. Ftik li 



1. AIk* iMldo* 0^6^ t 



J«ru ArUo* Cwt'* Vtlbv. <UI> 

I" D.. S*l 






M Jack AK^i. WHU». f.fm.9(o. N M« OS JoIx.m- C«.* «.y, Uihb.^. AJti, C*-, Ml J, 

j"li f™" G^L ■''*"" ** ""■■ '** JoH**-* Cl»r, Aflfl LaMbnJq* Al»«„ C«»-. 170. Jo.^b»b Van L Mo»« Ul*. W.iK.. lit R-i.l.p' Fr*Jd« 7o' 

MopHA, AMhonv ■«' Spf-gi, W»o ISI Jackman Arthw. lloU»d •oMfltMrf. C.I.I. 11« JohMM* lt»-Mi M, Kan.lvorfh, U '" '" JmT t4*raJ!^t» ^nUiat tVlVi "" "* l("(>*"B*l'lhVd ^ Ifdrff ^c'lil 'ui"*' "* 

Honing. toUrt Earl. «wio. Nr., IS! )II jot.» Appkiaa, lU i,.-M ttli t .iil!?*t,„*i™i *r' ril '^ I!'''*1i "T"; "? ... 

Mo-™t.. M,«. Ua*. A^arfU lU Jachon. Ja*. )»t iofc-. Car,. Jill. Wh..tV CaU,, IM) }^3 S!„b. P^T Vi «4 ' '^ ' ' 

HoHMtt, R D-a.n. Ouranqo, Caio- lU Ja<boa. JoAnn. Kunb*rt(, M». .S« 171 Jofcn*, Lofvlla Ann Enc.i>« Calif 116 *07 jJlA M.laTAIl^M. Anii.^n fo,k ft) III 

Hwtlair G'lnt UR«|r. Prvwo. lit Ja<baa UKh 47 Johnton Ann Imxia AthaHen C^IJf ll* i jj D i\! tlj' * \^n L -^ L ^ L 

HWa». M...ka Clai* Hqtiant .» Jactwn, Undall W FrMj«*« A™, IM Jol.n»n AHan lU-l N.«pa Ida u' j^dd' ■ Iw V C Ml « 101 la.l.o M.„. I .. Tamo... F f.Und 101 

Ho.*on, CarrI Ullian Walla-jd^ On. Ca- lU Uthon. tnda Ic- h«<.. 747 J<*.«,-, ta.ba.a A-n Ioo,W 1)6 J„,t„„ Alan Mo.m ' Oada; 170 IW 711 l.<>>«.n, L,nd. U^.a f.c P da,' C.hl 11* 

Ho-ton. Mary L*"na PakW. Wa.l... W JtclMn M.^ A.n B Pa» T,«^ IJO iofcavon. Bal.f. O'^ando Ma )•] J-,ta-n Jail Laa Lan«..« C.^t 170 li* l.dl. M.r, [Man ll..b..'a Ida « 

Moith, Mami L. MkhaMadt, GaimanT I " Jaa«-. Mala* Rob... frw-on. 10*. Ifc7 *>fcn«n, B^arly V . Malba. Ida, 116 j„,i, J^^Roiaty,. ()«»•' C^'o 197 lis l«>"» N.n', Ma^alana Columbu. Oh.o 170 401 






Mwlind, Ha.lL Joh.n K.A.nM.. Nttwaf >*' Jatlww. LaRaa. « Johnwu. Chartan* Gaf*. Sal 

Ho.,l Douglai La<» Maoio Pi.l. Calif I JS Jattiw W.l.ia* R . I**«rif M.Ui, Calif. 106. 7Sr JolinMn. ChaflM Lynn. Gfam 

HMard. Gary 'Md. '(xa'alla. Ida . 6) J*<ob H Wandall J- San Oiaoa Cab* IW Johnwn CoHMn Santa Rom 

Mo-ail, C«.«l Jo*. f*™«>- Cad*. ISI jI,^-* ^*.'.i.'^N''..fc.^qa*Su. isi 191 407 J^n^ Dc^^ C Ca"b« 

HomII. GUda Mu. MaUd Ida , 17 J.^obi C«".a {n.m.» Ida. 16S Johnw. D»>«ld lor Na«M 

Hwltl e*ti;'sir't.''S;i^*70 l» *" J«ob. JZ Ca.«JI v.. N,^ Calif .70 ». J^E Wr,''i3'pf^^^' * '" !ulir1>,!^I(.I;'R«n'i«''il1'V ^M " U^W^i;;, U;'.;«T!'"f^i'^'.«,'N m",. , rl7 

Hua.Ho.*. JohnKM. Hong K(H>q Ch-a, H JacoU Jw>..«n. P™-o 4«, 771 716 261. 77) 406 Jo^Mo". Ga.l EvgMa Van Nu,^ CaT.J, 176 KaarOaln.«''su^an.'f%-o*IW uZ^ui ^U 'oillSw^Ar.i'^Jo"" '" 

M» Ct*l F>., Ho« Kona Ch.na. Hi Jatobi JmIv h<^ 'S« JoJ.«o-. e»9 E<J9M. Va^. W»^ IM iaaia.. Ph«.p F , P«wo, 101 707 Umc™I«t J«i Wava. Lahl J I 

M«>nSh«.,^Ia.p..,eh,na IS J^cbt R^ Pa-fcn Paw toW.^ C^if . . 70 J<*««.. 6W. l»«- 0—-.. Colo.- 160 bota. L«n. ■.«!-«». l-a iaa<fc C.I.MI6 fl^T!!; Vri^ /*^T:?1' 'r. ... ... 



i*'^' "(Si^w'* J^otwa* "^ 5*- 0-v., Catl . ilS, 417 Johaw Hyn«> >o«i*« HoUU. 16 SaoM^ Sk..*w Oo.«. Hynt.^q^H. Part. CaFIt . 106 lalldwlrfc 



)d«n. M«rfln PaiuKa, l«dondo 
Una, WMa'd CarifM. Ufchfiald. i 

M'bklid il''bZrt'Bi*.i'V)drr'*n'''ldI' OS •p'T'T- ,•""■ '' ■■ ., u. ,« Je*.ion. ja«.» U noopa^gi K«l«wtB. Mary K.. Ma-aii. ^S »] U"«y. MM.rot Ana. Sfl.^ Spun 

Mubbi KailK t»i).ft. C^i';- C«.< 477 Jatobtmuyr Joa W. Su-Land Coljt. IV> Jnli w en, laiaaa. 170 UU*' K«<an Ova C.(r« Ha^hii Cal.f 1)6 406 Un^ifon Wrl[I^ M MmIIb io 

M.ba- Ul. M.rq.-,. lap...... I0« Ja«*«>n Ronald J— l>**<«n A.it IJO. }«t Jofcaaoa Jmm*. Badondo laadi. Cal.f. « KalUr. Ja«« Lao Caldwall Ida. 106 La«a. Hal Ad'.an Ha«ard C*l 

M-ba- &.-»..a« I L«i>.---t (04 Jamav Caciia Prtxo. lS« IIS Joiunoa. ioaaa Rodoodo ftaaeh. Calif 1)6 Ka"^ Kay Moron, « La-T l.-t U " 7 17 1 

M„b«r Bar*'l| A-» Ca.ff-' V«Uo, Ca" IS* JamaL Carol. Ro(t Spr^nqi. WfO. «S JolwMii. Joarfa 1 Uvycnlla (Uh* 110 17| H6 SaAt Ja<'<'« A*n 41 170 )6S 1,, ■ ' .', in "' 

H.bo', Chwy* Joi<a Tt-t.-. NV. lit M7 J*a.ai. DofcaU W-a-d. Pw-o. Rt JoJ-io- JJaiao to-a". Wyo_ 170. tH KaUr Pa«t 170, )tl ,,,. '■ -. >. il 

HMUkitom. Ratpk. 470 Ja**t J^M DaH Too*ia. 110. 401 JoUua J^, ITQ Kaho, J«J lola- Lot Angalai CaUf 170 . . ' // l 

Hodta*. Ja<i»6«a. WnKalo OS J«*.t^ M,. l,« ».m SM"-t*> Fwl 7S6 Jofc-Ma. >.dM HonortJIa M. 116 406 '•*»« Pah<.a Aj.« Sal. UU C.N 116 l«7 400 , . , , ' . , Im 

Hyff, Oat* Ulot. Spon.^ Fori, 6) Ml Jo«,t. Larry Ooan Soda Spr.<<VL Id*. 6l. 170 Jo6a»oa, J«tA Oaqoy OaUwid CaM 10 1)6 Kal»« Jai-at Marry P.wo. 4W I .. ... 

"""■ '• rTr'- ^!T'^'* '** J^i-i. Marta Sart UUCly .St Jok«o- Jwh It" l« A"9«to.. C«l.(- to, 116 KalMy 0-^*1 Um*'. Sal* Lata C>V tO »l u- ■ « . , , i . », . i! fo 

H,H. Honey &Ma^ Fori ISt J,n.« V«a. Joonaa I|>Oa*a. iSt JokMoa liiaaa Joy, Sah LaU Cl»y. 160 Kamp utd^ Pa-J'«* Ajhambra Cal.f 160 \X'Z"'- c'.da o'l^V. T<'Z('.*td"'T6 

M-ffalar. p4la C»*o-. Sal. t»t" C-^i OS Jamoto- Karon Lo,.;<o t»yk l» Jokaioa. i.<fclfc Am. U mt^pl m . Uii». HO Kannatfy CU'. R^ Sm.riwilla, Mw ll 

H.Hmaa. U>«r^ J-*a PoH Cofbor-a 0<.I4'« ia<>»an Dala A.r*^ Va< [>|U. Cato. 116 1S6. Jofc«o-. Kara-. &ro-t(.i«a. lU Kaonody Kam Ua Stan. Coan MS 

£4"- >St 416 Jelmon Ka*oa. SMtaRM6.CoM, I M Kannar Brvco Ball Jo>«^. Ida 114 

H.tlina. Cenitonea Ha-tfcor-o No, OS Jar^ao D»..d L Gardan Gn^a Col^f I06,4|7 Jofctwoo. Ko*M* S, Tabof. AMa,. Can 170 Kaa>«t Alan AdarM BoMntifJ lU 

Huqaaloblot, Saadr*. Boiia. Ut ISS Janhan. Don Bwrton Barl Calif, 170 [nhaim. Cnbor 6. R«-tiM Wyo, ttO Kauar UoHo. 'I'TtT* *"^ 



1. Sta»fc«> f Sat laW C-*t 0« 167. 416 Jefi ai oa. Uondl Ro^. Moia. Ari. .16 K»« Batt, Pot'.c: 

I Via R.t» fren iSt Jehatoa. UJIa> Kailfc Compion CaC»_ 1)6 K*^ Barbara M«la. 






>.Sa»yJao>.C 



PlaataM &foi,«. i lO Kimball Da.si 

>r«>.400 K^boU Do*< 

HLaiaOty 116 Itl. 401 X.«ball ia«. 



no 


Ckarl*. Curt;. By N«t . 16. 












Oann.. Howard Pro™ 117 




Daa E«»r.. T..n Fait. Ida, 161 




Oowqlai E»an Anarxan Fofi II 




(•rio S J. iM Anoalat, Calif 




Ed.«>d S SpaA..h Fcrk 4t 








FranI Rulon Emnwtt tda* 111 




Karel Baota. Lot Angola. Cal.f 




lUrfa Ma*. Sal. UU Cn 161 «. 




Urry Palmar Spannl. Fort, 1)7 












Nan<v CUira Salt Uta Oty I6t 








Pa-l .71 




Robart D*..d B^ldorCt, N« 




R«b*rtAr(and IdaKo FaN. Ill 




S«».an ><o Oram 161 


lan 


Thc-at C , Ar{,d;o. 07 400 



tan Wayno AmMon Wa^ifco,, K 



u tS. 40. ictm^m. SUa* K 



435 



STUDENT INDEX 



l:::;';''"x".;£°;;i;rT."('w."'.!i i»«<i« m— m— m 



Limb. Sk... L.™ Sly, N... IJI 



u.d..y. Sk..i e.<> 



S^Mo-w Sao J«u Cat-f.. 



436 



STUDENT INDEX 



• U*. t>M^ C*to, 11 



> !.•-•■ <X,d» I 



I &»er^ Uw* Sv UUC*T I 



I F'^t Ajb*H S«cto>* WmIi, 



mC^ 






1. Epl»«« bAM' S«li UU Ctv 1 






'. Z«*« ^a^r R^bi Id* 4 



n ».K<k $••. 0^ ( 



D Oq'** 6*n^ KaT Oks^o I 



O^dvi 9.^ CVd* N*pk. ifrS 
Oi* Tc^lifi Toftc J«»»« U 

0«- U«r.lT*«.&«^ S».'mW W«ll 



Nlana- f*f<UK ll*-dM»« I 
N>*ni!* Gv4m AII««. C<y< 






^ Sfc-rry U. Gard..-' 



nGa'Y. Nampa. M«-' 



I' '•Mt M-1* 
» D*^ S°aala 



N..«.. r«„, J^i, «ft 



fK;;! 



WtlXciV l» 4 



p:ru':i';.i'3^s 



L«»«.. Nw l«bt*t. Cah 















OdM.f« S»Aaii 






\. R»bwi Jehit S(K.*< 



0-*nb> J^'lr**. 



OnuM Staph*- l*iq f 






■ G»^ W^ala. Port Orchard ^ 



Mri*', Cka*^! F. Jf . Lm Aoq*!** Ca«f. ft NoUa V»n^ 

N — N — N S^S^ 



'- "■"*■ '"., M<«**t V».-»i- Ed-*nl 

A. H«>a-' I H Nafdya" Sft-rWi Jcr S 



N*>n Sail Awwt. KoUoU Fi»l*Bd. I 



Oy*' Om» Ou*v** ■^•••-i Ctf 166 



I M*4>*. Spna^nH* 166. 281 
I W«u<B Kar Boua'^J 166 



Nmotv^k STaciK** Ffa'k U*«*dal*. > 



M9»o« Uodnta Ca<^* lU U.l'W t 






'•TV Oaaa Ed-*/d. GMtton*. d** 



r Ir- &''b*rt Sp*"^ F- 






r Gl«» AJma. An^axM* F«'k. 1 



ffwi*«<fe. i^ fr«ra I 



437 



STUDENT INDEX 






R — R — R 






438 



STUDENT INDEX 



■. C«t-<. in Sfpfc— t io D 



S" » M «| WXm Ia9w Mow. UW >l 






Tka>.*.H^ (».^ CMil<4*i I 



SrMt.ijH'd Ow' L S^ Lata CN < 
.. (UH. NJ STph« St*.*^ E<l-«^ St GMt^ U 

*'^.'L T — T— T 












$»•>.)••>. 0*«d J«M« S(«*;ifc Fort. t«0 7H $*•.»• j*A«« l.< 



&•*■•>* S'*<^ M'VO Ca>A>o* AJI« 



l^d A""it^W,"c^( *♦• 









w— w— w 



ii«r-(M>4. C*i>l 41, 100 












Hm>iu4*(m r«>i C«u. 






n V«»H Hm- lU y^ f 






n rh.(« AMConk- UmI. : 



rnt. Hu-ft«|»w>f*'t C*< , I 



.J 0>v4 Amm(. C^. 



riulJ!'trw^cif*in'" **' ^'^ M^.U«ci^'u<i u^' i 



£••»■>•» S««- J*-« S>if UU C>. Ml. 4CB S-«* &»«U Km S<Mk>w. C«U_ I 



439 



STUDENT INDEX 



GENERAL INDEX 






\codem,c Emphasis, 
\«dem,ci Dwislon, I 
\ Cappeila. 184-66 



Alcyone, 194 9S 
All My Sonv 207 
Alpha ■ ■ - ■ 



Art^old Air Society, 66-67 
Athenians, 4I2.4I3 
AWS. 260 

Banyan. 282 84 
Baseball. 3S6 SB 
Baskelball, 34450 
Bear Lale, 380 
Belle of the Y. 30207 
Biological and Agricultural 
Blithe Spirit. 202 



Central PuWic-'y. 263 
Cloi.nq Word. 428 
Coaches. 328-29 



Daily Universe, 278-80 
Delta Ph., 390-91 
Delta Rho. 416-17 
Devotionali. 228-29 
D; Chi. 398-99 
Diiie Club. 381 
Drama Section. 20001 

Education, 36-39 
Elections Committee, 265 
Engineefinq Organliations. 
E.ecutive Council. 2S4-55 



.,ng, 4043 

ilO 

, 45-47 



lan Basketball, 3SI 

.an Class Officers, 274-75 

lan Football. 342 



General College. 48-4 
eoldbncler,. 418-19 
GoU, 3 59 



lello Week, 789 
lomecomioq, 290-95 
lomeEc Club, 42 
lonof Counc.l. 262 
lumanities, 50-55 

iduitnal Ed. Club. 49 



, AMS, 259 
, AWS. 261 

inior Class Officers, 270-71 
in.or Prom, 312-13 



Kappa Debs. 400-01 



Pep Activities. 330-31 
Phi Chi Theta, 35 
Phi eta Sigma. 61 



ROTC Chorus, 192-93 

Sand.nTheif Shoes, 210 

Sa.ons, 420-21 

Schola Cantorum. 188-6 



■s Section, 360-75 



Sigma Delta Chi. 55 
Social Unifi Section, 392-427 
Sor>q Pest 308-09 
Sophomore Class Officers, 27j 
Sophomores. 128-45 
Spiritual Division, 224-47 
Sponsors Corps. 372-73 
Sportsmen, 378 
Sports Section, 326-59 



Student Government Section. 25 
Student Ue Section. 314-25 
Student Nurses Association. 57 
Students 78-175 



ToKalons, 406-07 

Tract. 352-55 

Tribe of Many Feathen. 386 



Hync. 424-25 
Norn, 403-09 
mq 4Z6-27 



White Key, 362 
Wirfer Carnival 30(W)3 
Womer^s Weeli, 296-97 
Wrestling. 343 



Youtheatre 203 



440