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Full text of "The Baptist ladies' cook book : choice and tested recipies contributed by the ladies of Monmouth, Ill"

BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



'THEc^- 



Tp^eeples' jSatienal Jgank 

of Monmouth, Illinois. 



Capital $Y §,000.00, Surf his $20,000,00. 



A General Banking Business Transacted. 



LO R R I C E R S: 



WM. S. WEIR, President. GEO. E. ARMSBY, 2dVice-Pres. 
WM. B. SMITH, Vice-Pres. H. B. SMITH, Cashier. 

E. D. BRADY, Teller. 

« 

We Don't Look for Much 



From you — Mothers, Wives and Sweet- 
hearts — but please use your influence 
2 with the "bovs" to 

^ ^^jaT.heir Clothes Made , I \ 

r^ 03 !C r? ^ 

jj- --I ^ r^ JJXot glued together. ''Scud' cm to lis.'' 

I \^/^CBHT Sc C3RAHAM, 
-3 -J ARTISTIC TAILORS. 



I 



amE 



BAPTIST LAOieS' 



eOOK BOOK 



Choice and Tested "Recipes 



CGNTRIBUrED BY 




The L-adies of Monmouth, III. 



(SyS^^^-^S^ 




January ist, i8qs. 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 






«, 



WAIN ST 



HOG 
LARD 





PEORIA 



mMAWI 



"^ IL 



Breakfaski 



Bacon 






Ask yoxu" Gi-oeer for "Fidelity Brand." 1 



irst-class grocers. 



*C- 



For All Things Necessary 

To good housekeeping in Dry Goods, 
Notions, Etc., 

Call at Montgomery's, 



Always on hand, the very best assorted 
lines of Dress Goods, Hosiery and Un- 
derwear, Linens and Fancy Articles. 



Every Department ifc \ 

Kept full and complete. 

N. W. Montgomery & Co. 

QUINBY BLOCK. 



" // behooves the mothers, wives and sisters of our land to coun- 
teract the cravings for alchoholics, by supplying plenty of notirishing ^ 
enjoyable^ well-cooked food.''^ 



PREFACE. 



'"Things for the cook, sir ; 
But I know not what," — J^omeo and Juliet. 



In presenting this Book of Recipes to our friends 
we desire to say that it has not been the design of 
the committee to give a complete cook book, full 
in all departments. 

But we trust it will prove an assistance to 
the housekeepers who are engaged in the stupend- 
ous task of cooking for the nation. 

Our sincere thanks are extended to the ladies of 
Monmouth for the recipes. The signatures are a 
sufficient guarantee for their excellence. 

We especially ask our friends to read the adver- 
tisements that they may know who have given us 
substantial aid. We ask for them an increased 
patronage, which their generosity to all our public 
enterprises justly merits. 

COMPILERS. 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



National Bank ol Monmoutl 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID DP, $100,000.00. 
SnEPLDS, $165,000.00. 

HENRY TUBES, President. W. B. YOUNG, Cashier; 

JNO. SPROUT, Vice-Pres. JAS. FRENCH. Ass. Cash. 



Dl RECXORS— 1 

Henry Tubbs. Wm K. Stewart, Jas. Firoved, 

Wm. C. Norcross, Ivory Quinby. John Sprout, 

O. S. French, Geo. E. Miller. W.Harrison Frantz, 

Wm. Firoved, Hiram Sheldon. 



Transacts a General Banking Business in all its 

Departments: also, 

Money to Loan on any time desired, at Lowest 
Rate and on Easiest Terms. 

WEIR PLOW CO., 



riANUFACTURERS OF 

Plows, Cultivators, Harrows, 

Corn Planters, 

Cotton Planters, Listers, 

Rakes, and 
Other Farm flachinery. 



MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS. 



 'J^^r.'^u'i. 



i 



3ai 



U Hit 

1 'F 






1. ;"^-: «_?■ 
1 : £-1: ■-; ^- 



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BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



THE 

Warren Co. Library 

CONTAINS THE 

Best Books and Periodicals 

In all departments of Literature and Science, 
also on Housekeeping, Cookery, Sewing, 
Fancy Work, Home Decoration, Current 
Fashions, Health, Home Building, Gardening 
and all practical matters. 



The best books for the young are carefully selected. 
16,000 volumes are now on the shelves and 600 
more new books are bought each year. New, 
fresh magazines are loaned out as soon as pub= 
lished, such as Harper's, The Century, The At= 
lantic. Cosmopolitan, The Bazar, Demorest, De= 
lineator. North American Review, Review of 
Reviews, Ladies' Home Journal, Art Interchange, 
Art Amateur, and many others. 



Three Dollars per year gives the use at home of these 
Books and Periodicals. 



) All persons are invited to read them at any time 
r without charge in the Free Reading Room. 

\» — ^ ■*■ — ».^. — - -*• i_.^ — - -.- _- — ^ — »_^ — v_A — ^.^fc — y 



SOUPS 



SOUPS. 

''Expect spoon meat.'' — Comedy of Errors. 



'The pot must smile but never laugh.''' 



In making soups, put all uncooked meats and 
bones in cold water. If cooked in hot water, adding" 
a little at a time. Use a flat-bottomed pot and 
keep on top of stove. It is better if made the day 
before wanted. When cold remove fat, re-heat and 
strain, adding vegetables as desired. Brown stock 
is made of beef shins and a piece of coarse beef. 
White stock, of veal shins and an old fowl, if you 
choose. One shin of veal will make three quarts 
of good veal stock, one hind shin of beef will make 
five quarts — a piece of each makes the best soup. 
All kinds of bones can be used, and all liquor in 
which beef, mutton or poultry is boiled. Wash 
shins — put on in cold water, skim just before it 
boils, simmer slowly four or fiv^ hours or longer. 
Boil vegetables separately, and add to soup stock 
a short time before serving. Barley, rice, tapioca, 
vermicelli, maccaroni and all vegetables may be 
used separately or together. Also, add the water 
in which they are boiled. Serve very hot. 

To make rice, vermicelli, maccaroni or barley 
soup, boil thoroughly in separate vessel and add 
about quarter of an hour before serving. Cabbage, 
tomatoes or the soup boquet, or other vegetables 
may be also added, separately or together. 

Hodgens' Ice Cream. 



lo SOUPS. 

BOUILLON. 

Four pounds juicy beef, one tablespoon salt, two 
pounds bone, one tablespoon mixed herbs, four 
peppercorns, four clov^es, two quarts water. Cut 
meat and bones in small pieces, boil down to three 
pints, season to taste. Add one onion, one-half 
carrot and turnip if you like ; strain and re-heat. 

ASPAR-VGUS SOUP. 
S. 

One bunch of asparagus boiled in a quart 
of salted water for twenty minutes. Press the 
asparagus through a colander. Put a quart of 
milk into a double boiler, adding a little parsley 
and a piece of onion. For thickening use two 
ounces of butter and three level tablespoonsfuls of 
flour rubbed together and thinned by stirring in a 
little of the milk. Then stir into the boiling milk 
and stir continually until it thickens. Have the 
asparagus and water in which it was cooked, hot 
and mix all together. Season and serve at once. 

S. 
CELERY SOUP. 
S. C. K. 

Take four or six stalks of celery, wash and cut 
into small pieces, using the leaves as well, cover 
with a pint or more of boiling water, and let boil 
half an hour. Press through a colander, do not 
drain, but allow the Avater to go through with the 
celery. Have in a double boiler one quart of 
boiling milk and a slice of onion, to this add the 
celery and water. Rub together one tablespoon 
of butter and two tablespoons of flour. Stir into 
boiling soup. Season with pepper and salt, and 
serve. 

C. SJiultz for any tiling in the Drng Hue. 



SOUPS. II 

CELERY SOUP. — NO. 2. 

Take the. white part of two Ia*rge heads of celery. 
Either grate or chop fine, set to boil with a cup of 
rice, in water enough to cover. Allow^ the rice 
and celery to slowly stew until they can be rubbed 
through a coarse seive. Have hot one pint of 
milk and an equal quantity of strong chicken or 
A'eal broth. Pepper and salt to taste, 

NOODLE SOUP. 
Amanda Reichard. 

One egg, two tablespoonsful of water, a little 
•salt, add to this flour to make it just as stiff as pos- 
sible, mixing all w^ell together. Roll very thin, 
and with a cloth under allow it to remain on the 
board about two hours to dry, then fold in a roll 
and with a sharp knife cut very fine, drop it slowly, 
stirring lightly, into two quarts of boiling stock of 
chicken or beef, the former oftener used. Boil 
briskly ten minutes, keeping the pot tightly cov- 
•ered. 

CHICKEN SOUP, 

To one chicken put five pints of cold water and 
a slice of fat bacon, and boil it down to a quart. 
Just before taking from fire, add a cup of cream 
and a little thyme or parsley to season. Thicken 
as usual — one tablespoonful of flour, rubbed into 
one tablespoonful of butter. 

Barley and rice are both nice for chicken soup. 
They should be boiled slowly, in a separate vessel 
and added to the soup about half an hour before 
removing from the fire. 

/o/i/i C. DiDihar, Druggist, Moninojith, III. 



12 SOUPS. 

NOODLES FOR SOUP. 

Beat one egg very light, add a pinch of salt and 
flour enough to make a thick dough. Roll out in- 
to a thin sheet, dredge with flour to keep from 
sticking, then roll up lightly. Begin at one end 
and shav^e fine, as for slaw. Nice used in chicken 
soup. 

CONSOMME. 

Cne and one-half pounds of lean beef, same of 
lean veal, cut veal and one-half the beef in half inch 
cubes, remove all fat and put two quarts of cold 
water. Let the water simmer slowly, and take the 
remaining three-fourths pound of beef and cut into 
cubes, and brown in a tablespoonful of butter. 
Add browned meat to the other mixture to give 
the stock color, and let it simmer four or five hours. 
Take one-fourth cup each of carrot, onion and cel- 
ery, when the soup has cooked four hours, put 
them in a pan with one tablespoonful of butter, 
and cook five minutes. Add to soup. Add also, 
one tablespoonful of salt, six peppercorns, three 
cloves, three allspice berries, one-half bay leaf, a 
sprig each of summer savory, marjoram, parsley 
and thyme, and cook one hour longer. Strain and 
cool, use to clear the white of one egg and shell, 
to each quart of stock. 

OYSTER SOUP. 
Mrs. John Gettemy. 

One quart oysters, three pints milk brought to 
boil, in which stir one-half cup of finely powdered 
crackers, butter size of Qgg, pepper and salt to 
taste. Last add ovsters and brin^r to boil. Serve 
hot. 

JVew a7id lovely Japanese Napkins at McQaistons. 



SOUPS. 13 

FRENCH GUMBO SOUP. 
E. P. Phelps, Atlantic, Iowa. 

Three slices of bacon, three onions, one young, 
tender chicken, one quart tender okra pods, three 
green peppers. Fry the bacon to a light brown, 
cut up the onions and put in the bacon fat and let 
them fry. Cut the chicken in small pieces and fry 
with the bacon fat and onions to a light brown. 
Add the peppers cut fine, and the okra cut in small 
pieces. Pour over the whole two quarts of boiling 
-water. Cook till tender and season to taste. 

GREEN CORN SOUP. 
Amanda Reichard. 

Half a dozen ears of sweet corn; cut it off of the 
cob very fine, and put it in three pints or two quarts 
of boiling water, with one teaspoon of salt, two 
tablespoons of butter, and one-half teacup of sweet 
cream or new milk. Beat one egg with two table- 
spoons of sifted flour, mixed with sweet milk or 
water sufficiently thin to drop through a perforated 
ladle. Stir it lightly into the soup after it has 
boiled ten or fifteen minutes, then boil all together 
about three minutes, having the pot tightly cov- 
ered all the time. 

CREAM OF OYSTER SOUP. 

Amy R. Rogers. 

Boil one quart milk with one tablespoon of 
flour wet with milk five minutes, stirring all the 
time to prevent burning. Add one-half teaspoon- 
salt and one-half saltspoon white pepper and the 
liquor from one can oysters. Cook five minutes 
longer, add a tablespoonful of butter and strain be- 
fore serving. 



Will I IMIJ UIM CLEAPIELO 

NO WASHING OR CLEANING REQUIRED. 



Rfll I INP PIN" CLEANEO CURRANTS APE READY TOR INSTANT USE. 



14 SOUPS. 

CORN SOUP. 

Grate, or slit the grains and scrape six ears of 
sweet corn. Boil cobs in one pint or more of 
water twenty minutes. Remove cobs and put in 
corn and boil fifteen minutes ; then add one quart 
of rich milk. Season with salt, pepper and butter. 
Boil the whole ten minutes and turn into a tureen, 
in which the yolks of three eggs have been well 
beaten. If a thick soup is desired, use one table- 
spoonful of flour rubbed into the butter. 

DUCHESS SOUP. 

Two slices each of carrot and onion cooked in- 
one tablespoon of butter five minutes. Add 
one quart of white stock, either veal or chicken, 
one small blade of mace. Cook fifteen minutes. 
Melt two tablespoon butter, stir in two table- 
spoons of flour until free from lumps. Add grad- 
ually seasoned stock, also one tablespoon of salt, 
one saucespoon of pepper, mixed together, and 
one pint of milk or thin cream; stir in four rounding 
tablespoons of grated cheese ; cook two minutes, 
serve. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Mrs, Geo. G. Wallace, Omaha. 

A cheap, savory and warming soup. Take four 
good-sized potatoes, pare and slice thin. Also, 
an onion sliced thin and boiled with potatoes in 
enough water to keep from drying, until potatoes 
are ready to fall to pieces. Stir in a pint of milk, 
a tablespoonful of flour, a generous lump of butter,. 
salt and pepper. Serve steaming hot. 

W/ij^ don t y oil buy your Candies at the Bell Candy 

Ki telle n. where they are all home made and fresh. 

D. JVilson, proprietor, Monmouth, III. 



SOUPS. 15 

POTATO SOUP. 

One quart of milk, six potatoes, one stalk of 
celery, slice of onion, and sprig of parsley. Boil 
milk, celery, onion and parsle}^ together. Boil 
potatoes till tender, then mash. Add the boiling 
milk gradually to the potatoes, and press through 
a strainer. Season with salt, pepper and table- 
spoonful butter. Do not boil after the potatoes 
and milk are mixed. To keep warm, place over 
boiling water. 

MEATLESS TOMATO SOUP. 
Emma Gregg, Margaret Dunbar. Mrs. Geo. Babcock. 

^ One quart tomatoes, one quart water. Stew till 
soft. Add one teaspoonful soda and allow to ef- 
fervesce. Heat one quart new milk, add pepper, 
salt, butter and rolled crackers, strain tomatoes 
and add to milk. 

MUSHROOM SOUP. 
Mrs. Louie Babcock Tabor. Denver. 

Milk three pints, one can mushrooms, one tea- 
spoon salt, one saltspoon pepper, one tablespoon 
butter, yolks of three eggs. Put the milk on in 
double boiler and let boil, then add mushrooms, 
chopped fine ; also, the liquor which is over them. 
Then put in the seasoning, and last, the eggs,, 
well beaten. 

TOMATO SOUP. 
Mrs. Wildeniuth. 

One can of tomatoes, one pint w ater, add four 
cloves, one onion, and one teaspoonful corn starch, 
browned in butter. Put together and strain 
through colander. Cook one-half hour. Salt and 
pepper to taste. 



Hodgcns, Fine Candy. 



i6 SOUPS. 

PEA SOUP. 
Mrs. W. B. Jenks, Chicago. 

Half peck young green peas. Shell and boil 
peas and pods separately. Mash peas and strain 
through colander. Strain water off pods and mix 
with peas. Just before serving add one quart of 
rich milk, or part cream, butter size of egg and 
salt. 

PURIE OF CLAMS. 

Mrs. Overton, Boston. 

Two cans or one quart of fresh clams, add one 
quart of white stock. Simmer one hour if raw, 
and fifteen minutes if canned clams are used. Rub 
clams through a sieve until only the hard parts re- 
main. Add one-half onion fried in two table- 
spoon of butter and flour. Pour on clam liquor 
and add one teaspoon of salt, one saucespoon of 
pepper, a sprig of parsley and a bit of mace. Cook 
ten minutes and dilute with one quart of milk. 
Beat the yolks of four eggs, and add to soup slowly 
so as to avoid coagulation, serve. 

CRISPED CRACKERS. 

To serve with soup, split butter or use wafer 
crackers. Spread lightly with butter, brown 
quickly in hot oven. 



TJic finest Cream Tartar and Baking' Soda, at 
Dunbar s Drug Store. 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 17 



The 



Vienna Bread 

Has no equal. Everybody says so. Try it and you won't care 

to bother with these recipes. 

Rye and Graham Bread, Rolls, Fine Cakes, Doughnuts. 

Cookies, etc., etc. always on hand. 

IVe use the Best Materials. 

GIBSON & MILLER. 

MAIN SX. 



G. S. BARNES, 

THF DRUGGIST, 

■Carries a full and complete line of Drugs, Medicines and Drug- 
gists' Sundries, Books, Stationery and Fancy Goods, Spices and 
Extracts. Cold Soda Water in summer and hot in winter. 
All the Novelties in their season. 

G. S. BARNES. 

Postofiice Block. 



PILLSBURY & SAWYER, 



-DK.\LERS IN- 



Hardware. Cultery, Stoves. Tinware, Farm Implements. Wagons, 

Buggies, Harness, Rubber and Leather Belting. 

Wind Mills, Pumps etc. 

North Side Square, - - - Monmouth, III. 



G. W. eUTLE-R,^-^ 

GROCEIR. 

Has always selected Fruits and Vegetables in season. Also 
Fresh countr\ Butter and Eggs 



BAPTIST LADIES" COOK BOOK. 



WM. H. RANKIN, 

FURNITURE. 



SOUTH MAIN S-TREE-r. 



W. W. McCULLOUGH cfe CO., 
LjU]V[IBE1^,— 



Hard and Soft Coal and Wood, 



MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS. 



• Are you thinking of buying a new Stove or Range — one that m 

* will burn the least fuel, cause the least trouble, give * 
the greatest degree of heat, last the longest and ^v\>^^ ^ 

look the best ? Then Jewel Stoves^,^'-"'^!^^ S 
and Ranges will interest you.^.<f; ...iJiliOTS 





fJEWEL 



URGEST STOVE PLANT IN THE WORLD^ 

For efficiency, economy, dura- 
bility, and beauty, they represent the 
zenith of the stovemaker's skill. Ask to see 
them at the dealers. Look for the above trade mark. 




^9—€"^99m 



PINKERTON & EVANS, Southeast Cor. Square 



FISH 19 



FISH. 

"This fish was well fished for." — IVijiter's Tale. 



FISH A LA CREME. 

Mrs. Draper Babcook. 

One pound of salmon, cod or haddock, one and 
one-half cups of milk, one cup of crackers, rolled ; 
one tablespoonful of butter, one tablespoonful of 
flour, one saltspoonful of salt and pepper. Spread 
the boiled fish on a platter, put the butter in a pan 
on the stove with the salt and pepper. . When it 
boils up add the flour, have the milk hot and put 
in slowly, stirring all the time, turn this over the 
boiled fish. Moisten the crackers in butter and 
put over the top, put in the oven over a tin dish of 
water, brown, then take one cup of hot mashed po- 
tatoes and put through the sieve around the edge. 
Serve hot. 

ESCALLOPED FISH. 

Mrs. J. D. Diffenbaugh. 

Boil three pounds of fish until tender, take out 
the bone. Dressing — one quart milk, salt, pepper, 
one tablespoonful butter and three tablespoonfuls 
of corn starch. Boil to a thick dressing; line the 
platter with a layer of dressing, then of fish, etc., 
etc., the last being the dressing ; sprinkle over top 
bread or cracker crumbs. Bake one-half hour and 
serve on the same platter. 



C. Shiiltz Drug and Fine Perfumery 



20 FISH. 

CREAMED SALMON. 

- Mrs. E. J. Pillsbury. 

Drain all the liquid from a can of salmon and 
chop the salmon fine ; grease the bottom of a small 
baking dish and put in a layer of bread crumbs, 
then a layer of fish and so on until you have used 
a pint of crumbs and the fish. Dressing — Boil a 
pint of milk, add two tablespoonfuls of butter, and 
salt and pepper to taste ; pour this over the salmon 
and bread crumbs, and bake until brown. Have 
the top layer bread crumbs. 

BAKED WHITEFISH. 

Cleanse carefully. Wipe- dry, rub with salt and 
dredge with flour, fill with dressing, and tie up or 
sew. Place in hot pan with a few slices of salt 
pork across it, or use butter. Pour in enough hot 
water to prevent burning. A four or five pound 
fish will require from one to one and a half hours. 
If a cloth is put in the pan first, jthe fish can be lifted 
up without breaking. Dressing: — Use bits of 
stale bread soaked in cold water, press dry, add 
one onion chopped fine, salt, pepper and butter. 
Add two or three eggs if desired. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

S. B. 

Pick three-fourths of a pound of codfish ver\- 
fine. Wash in several waters or soak fifteen min- 
utes. Boil with a dozen medium sized potatoes — 
putting the codfish on top. When tender drain 
and make very fine, add two beaten eggs, butter 
the size of an egg, pepper to taste. Make into 
cakes, dip in beaten eggs. Roll in cracker crumbs 
and fry in boiling lard. 

T/ic correct thing in Invitation and Mcnn Cards, 
alzvays at McQuiston s. 



% FISH. 21 

CREAM FISH. 
Mrs. Eliza B. Smith. 

Two pounds of white fish or red snapper. Boil 
it after the fish has been skinned and boned, pick 
it into fine pieces ; one-half cup butter and two- 
thirds pint or more of cream. Put the cream on 
the stove in a double boiler. Put two tablespoon- 
of flour into the butter, add pepper and salt [to 
taste, and put into the boiling cream. Beat until 
done. Pour this over the fish. Mix thoroughly 
with the grated rind and about half of the juice of 
a lemon. Put into the baking dish and cover with 
cracker crumbs. Dampen by' pouring one table- 
spoonful of melted butter. Then bake and serve 
hot. Will serve ten persons. 

CODFISH STEW. 

K. C. 

Shred the fish and let it soak in cold water to 
freshen. When ready to cook pour on boiling 
water and let it stand a few minutes, then drain 
and pour on fresh boiling milk. Allow one quart 
of milk to one cup of fish. Season with salt, pep- 
per and butter, and thicken with a little flour. If 
desired add one or two eggs, well beaten or broken 
in whole and lightly stirred in, or the eggs may 
be previously boiled. K. C. 

BAKED CODFISH. 

Pick up one teacup of codfish, Let it cook in 
lukewarm water while you mix two cups of cold 
mashed potatoes with one pint of sweet milk, two 
^&gs, a good sized lump of butter, pepper and salt 
if necessary. Add codfish. Mix all together. 
Pour in pudding dish ^nd bake twenty-five or 
thirty minutes. 

Hodgens' Confectionery. 



22 . FISH. , 

BOILED SALMON OR HALIBUT. 
Mrs. A. B. Seaman, 

Three or four pounds of f^.sh. Dip in boiling" 
water and scrape clean. Rub with salt and pep- 
per. Put in pan and pour milk over it till half an 
inch deep. Bake about an hour, basting with the 
milk. The milk keeps the fish moist and it browns 
well ; let it cook away toward the last. Serve 
with any sauce preferred. Is nice with Holland- 
aise sauce made as follows : One-half cup butter, 
yolks of two eggs, juice of one-half lemon, one 
saltspoon salt, few grains cayenne pepper, one- 
half cup boiling water. Rub butter to ar cream, 
add yolks, one at a time, and beat well ; then add 
lemon juice, salt and pepper. Just before serving- 
add boiling w^ater, stir rapidly till it thickens like 
custard. Pour sauce around the fish on platter. 

BROILED SALT MACKAREL. 
S. M. B. 

Let the mackarel stand over night in fin earthen 
dish in cold water. When ready to broil, drain. 
Pour on boiling water and let stand a few minutes, 
drain and dry with a cloth. Butter the bars of a 
gridiron. Lay fish on broiler, inside down. Turn 
for a short time. Serve on a hot platter with 
plenty of butter. 

SAUCE FOR BROILED FISH. 

Use in the proportion of one large spoonful of 
butter to one gill of cream. Turn over fish hot, 
just before serving. 

IV/ij' doiit you buy yaiir Candies at the Bell Caudy 

Kite hen zvhere they are all home made and fresJi. 

D. Wilson, proprietor, Monmouth, III. 



FISH. 



:i3 



TURBOT. 
Mrs. Melville Brewer. 

Cook white fish until tender. Remove bones, 
mince fine and add a little chopped celery, sprinkle 
with salt and pepper. For the dressing, heat one 
pint of milk and thicken with flour. When cool 
add two well beaten eggs and one-quarter pound 
butter. Put in the baking dish a layer of fish then 
a layer of sauce until the dish is full. Cover the 
(top with cracker crumbs and bake one half hour. 







TJic jiihcst and best Spices at Dunbar s Drug Store 



24 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



How to avoid Corns and Bunions. 
How to make the Foot Appear Neat. 



Where to get Stylish, 
Elegantly Made and Durable 



Go to 



J- D. Hickman & Brc. 

Sign — Big Shoe. Monmouth, 111 



109 
South Main Street. 



^he pl^enmouth ^etterf^ 





I-."!. 




Butter Jars o^ ^^^ sizes are made, and a full line of Cooking Ware such. 

as Pudding Pans, Stew Pans, Meat Roasters, Bean Pots, Pie Pans, 

Coffee and Tea Pots, Etc., Etc. 



CROQUETTS. 



CROQUETTS. 



"Pretty little tiny kickshaws '' — A'/;/;' Henry IV. 



CHICKEN CROQUETTE. 

Jessie Weir. 

One pint chopped chicken, fine, one-half cup of 
cream, one-half cup stock, one tablespoonful flour, 
three tablespoonfuls butter, four eggs, yellow only. 
Cream the butter and flour, and add to the cream 
and stock when boiling, then the eggs, well beat- 
en and lemon juice. Work five minutes. Pour 
over the chicken. Salt and pepper to taste, mix 
thoroughly. When cold shape into small balls, 
dip into ^%%, roll in cracker crumbs and fry in hot 
lard. 

THICK CREAM SAUCE. 
Mrs. A. B. Seaman. Denver. 

For croquettes and patties. One pint hot cream, 
two even tablespoon butter, four heaping table- 
spoon flour, or two heaping tablespoon corn starch, 
one-half teaspoon salt, one-half saltspoon white 
pepper, one-half teaspoon celery salt. A few 
grains of cayenne pepper if desired. Scald 
the cream, melt the butter in granite sauce 
pan. When bubbling, add the dry flour, or corn 
starch, stir till well mixed. Add one-third cream 
and stir as it boils and thickens. Add more cream 
and boil again, etc. The sauce should be very 
thick and smooth. Add the seasoning and mix it 
while hot with the meat or fish. 

C. Shultz for anything in the Drug line. 



26 CROQUETTS. 



FILLING FOR PATTIES. 
Mrs. Ella Hoyt. 

Make a sauce, using one cup of oyster liquor, 
one tablespoon of butter, one tablespoon of 
flour, one-half teaspoon anchory essence or paste. 
Use one pint oysters, one-fourth cup cold water. 
Wash oysters and remove muscles. Parboil and 
strain and add to sauce. Season to taste with salt 
and pepper. Ella Hoyt. 

PATTY SHELLS. 
K. 

One cup butter, one tablespoon white sugar, 

white of one egg, three tablespoon water, flour 

enough to roll out. This will make eighteen shells; 

bake in gem tins. 

CREAM SAUCE. 
Mrs. Eugene A. Lord. 

One pint milk, one tablespoon flour, two ta- 
blespoon butter. Salt and pepper. Put butter 
in a sauce pan, and when hot, but not brown, add 
the flour. Stir until smooth, then gradually add 
the milk. Let it boil up once. Season to taste. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 
Mrs. E. A. Lord. 

One pound chopped salmon, one cup cream, two 
tablespoonfuls butter, one tablespoonful flour, 
three eggs, one pint crumbs, pepper and salt to 
taste. Mix flour and butter together. Let cream 
come to the boil, and stir in the flour, butter, sal- 
mon and seasoning. Boil for one minute. Stir 
into it one well-beaten egg and remove from the 
fire. When cold, shape and proceed as for other 
croquettes. 

A II the new designs in A rtistic. Dining Room and 
other Wall Papers at McQuistons. 



CROQUETTS. 27 



CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. E. A. Lord. 

One solid pint of finely chopped chicken, one 
tablespoon salt, one-half teaspoon of pepper, one 
cup of cream or chicken stock, one tablespoon 
flour, four eggs, one teaspoon onion juice, one 
tablespoon lemon juice, one pint crumbs, three 
tablespoon butter. Put the cream or stock on 
to boil in a double boiler. Mix flour and butter 
together, and stir into the boiling cream, then add 
the chicken and seasoning. 'Boil for two minutes 
and add two of the eggs, well beaten. Take from 
the fire immediately and set away to cool. When 
cold, shape, brush with egg, roll in crumbs and fry. 

Veal, mutton, beef and turkey can be prepared 
in the same manner as chicken. The remains of 
.a veal roast, if tender, is especially good. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. G. A. Brokaw. 

Mix one pint of cold boiled rice with one egg, 
■well beaten ; one tablespoon of melted butter, 
one-half teaspoon salt. Add flour enough to 
make quite stiff ; make in small rolls ; then roll 
them in cracker crumbs, made fine, and fry in hot 
lard the same as doughnuts. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 
Mrs. F. C. Tapping. 

One can of salmon, one cup of cracker crumbs, 
one-third of a lemon, juice and rind. Dressing — 
Juice of the salmon, one-half cup milk, salt, pepper 
and small piece of butter, one tablespoon flour. 
Boil till thick, then mix with the salmon. Roll 
into small, oblong rolls. Roll in a beaten egg, 
then in cracker crumbs and fry in lard. 

Hod gens Brick Cream. 



28 CROQUETTS 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. John J. Glenn. 

Two pounds veal, one cup milk, lump of butter 
size of walnut, one egg, one tablespoonful flour, 
one cup rolled crackers. Boil the veal till tender; 
when cold chop fine, season with pepper and salt. 
Rub the butter and flour together, place on the fire 
to melt, add the milk, stir till it thickens, then 
pour over the meat and mix. When cold make 
into balls, dip in eggs, roll in the crackers, drop in 
hot lard, cook till brown. Serve hot. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 
Mrs. A. B. Seaman, Denver, Col. 

Half a pound of chicken chopped fine, and sea- 
soned with salt, pepper, teaspoon of lemon juice 
and one-half teaspoon chopped parsley. Make 
one pint of thick cream sauce. When thick add 
one beaten egg, and mix sauce with the chicken. 
Make it as soft as can be handled. W^hen cool 
shape into rolls. Roll in fine bread crumbs, dip 
in beaten egg, then in crumbs again and fry one 
minute in smoking hot fat. Mushrooms, boiled 
rice, sweetbreads, or veal, may be mixed with 
chicken. Cold roast chicken, chopped fine, may 
be mixed with the stuffing, moistened with the 
gravy, and shaped into croquettes. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 
Anna Owens. 

Two-thirds of a pint of cream, boiling hot, one 
can salmon. Boil twenty minutes. Pour off the 
oil and pick to pieces. Add one cup rolled crack- 
ers, salt and pepper to taste. Pour the boiling 
cream and salmon juice over. Prepare as other 
croquettes. 



T/ie fi7iest inatertah for Cake a?id Pastry at Dan- 
bar s Drug Store. 



BAPTIST L\DIE3 COOK BOOK. 



JOHN JACOB, 



Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 



Fresh and Salt fleats, %fc^' 



A-02. RIRTH AVENU 



OAKrOl^D & rAHNE5T0CK, 

(INCORPORATED.) 

Wholesale Grocers, 
Tea Importers and Coffee Roasters. 

302 and 304 S. Washington and 117. 119. 121 and 123 Liberty Sts, 
PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



ASK YOUR GROCER FOR 

Anderson's Jams and nince=neat. 

Welsh's Maple Syrup. 

♦'Blue Ribbon" Canned Goods and Olives. 

Genesee Table Salt. 

Penn Yan '^ist Prize" Buckwheat Flour. 

Epicure N. Y. Cheese. 



olarke: Sc Irvine:, 

The Exclusive Grocery Merchants, 

Library Block. West Side of the Square. 

"Study carefully and thoug-htf uUy the wants of the people 
of Monmouth and vicinity, and will be pleased to serve all 
Ihat will favor them with their presence. All g-oods most 
thoroughly g^uaranteed. 



30 OYSTERS. 



OYSTERS. 

■'This treasure of an oyster. ' — Antony and Cleopati-a. 



DEVILED OYSTERS. 
Mrs. A. B. Seaman. 

Twenty-five nice, fat oysters, one half-pint 
cream, one tablespoon butter, two tablespoon- 
flour, one tablespoon chopped parsley, yolks of 
two eggs. Salt and pepper to taste. Drain the 
oysters, chop them middling fine, and drain again. 
Put the milk on to boil. Rub the butter and flour- 
together and stir into milk when boiling. As soon. 
as it thickens, take it from the fire and add the 
other ingredients. Beat yolks before adding them. 
Have the deep shells of the oysters washed clean, 
fill them with this mixture, sprinkle bread crumbs 
on top. Put shells in dripping pan and brown in' 
quick oven for five minutes. Serve in shells or 
bake dishes. Avoid long cooking, it makes them- 
dry. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Mrs. Ella Porter, Hanna. 

One pint cream, one heaping tablespoon but- 
ter, two heaping teaspoon flour, one-half tea- 
spoon salt, one-half saltspoon pepper, cayenne 
and celery salt. Melt the butter, add flour, then 
the boiling milk, or cream, and seasoning. To- 
this add one quart oysters, parboiled, Turn into* 
a baking dish, cover with cracker crumbs and bake 
in a quick oven — or serve on toast. 

C. SJuiltz Drug and Fine Perfumery 



OYSTERS. 31 

OYSTER PATTIES. 
Mrs Dr. Kimmel. 

Make puff paste in this way : To every pound 
of flour add three-fourths of a pound of butter, the 
yolk of one egg ; use ice cold water ; chop half the 
butter into the flour, then stir in the egg ; work all 
into a dough ; roll out thin ; spread on some of the 
butter, fold closely (butter side in) and roll again ; 
do this until the butter is all used up. Keep the 
paste in a cool place while you prepare the oys- 
ters. Set the oysters on the stove with liquid 
enough to cover them. As soon as they come to 
a boil skim them, stir in a little butter and pepper, 
also, if desired, a little cream. Line your small 
tins with the paste ; put three or four oysters in 
each, add a little of the liquor, then cover with 
paste. Bake in a quick oven twenty minutes. 
While hot v.ash over the top with a beaten egg. 

OYSTER IN VINEGAR. 
K. 

Heat the oysters in their own liquor for a few 
minutes, then drop into hot vinegar, wiih butter, 
pepper and salt to taste. 

LITTLE PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Mrs. Joseph Stevenson. Omaha. 

Wash large oysters and dry thoroughly. Have 
slices of bacon cut very thin. Salt and pepper 
oysters. Pin on each, with wooden toothpick a 
slice of bacon, and broil or bake until the bacon is 
crisp. Serve hot, without removing the toothpick. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 
Mrs. Babcock, Danver. 

To one quart of oysters take two-thirds of a cup 
of butter and the same of flour, rub the flour and 

Hodgcns Lemon Ice. 



32 OYSTERS. 

butter to cream, and stir into one pint of boiling 
milk. Stir the oysters ifi the sauce while boiling 
hot. Season with salt and pepper, Cover with 
rolled crackers, place in oven and bake. 

OYSTER PIE. 

M. 

Two cans of oysters, or three pints of solid oys- 
ters, one quart of cream, one dozen rolled crack- 
ers. Pepper and salt. Stir all together, and pour 
into a dish lined with thick puff paste. Cover 
with another paste and bake three-quarters of an 
hour. This is a delicious mode of cooking oysters. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 

Mrs. W. D. Bell. 

Strain the oysters and remove all bits of shell. 
Cut the oysters slightly. For a pint of oysters use 
a pint of flour, sifted and mixed with a level tea- 
spoon of salt. Put the flour in a mixing bowl 
with the yolk of one egg, a teaspoon of salad oil 
(butter if you prefer) and a pinch of pepper. Use 
enough of the oyster liquor to make a batter thick 
enough to drop from the spoon. Beat the white 
of the egg t£> a stiff froth. Mix the oysters and 
the white of egg lightly with the batter and as 
soon as mixed drop by the large spoonful into a 
kettle of hot lard and fry a nice brown. Lay a 
brown paper on a dripping pan and take fritters out 
on this to drain. Set in the oven to keep hot while 
frying the rest. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Georgie Dennis. 

Roll and sift crackers, and beat egg very light. 
Dip oysters in egg then in sifted cracker, again in 
the egg and last in the cracker. Fry in hot lard 
till brown. Pepper and salt to taste. 

Hodgcns' Ice Cream. 



OYSTERS. 33 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Mrs. Edgar MacDill. 

Drain and remove all bits of shell. Sprinkle 
-with salt and pepper. Set in a cool place for ten 
minutes. Then pour oysters into a pan of crack- 
ers, rolled fine. Add liquor. Mix well and let 
stand five minutes. Add a little salt and pepper. 
Meld into small cakes with two or three oysters in 
each cake. Roll in dry cracker and fry in butter. 
Serve hot. Use just enough cracker to hold the 
oysters together. If there is not sufficient liquor 
to moisten cracker, use milk. 

FILLING FOR PATTIES. 
C. B. 
Breasts of two chickens, one can mushrooms, 
two cups cream, two teaspoon butter, three tea- 
spoon flour, one of chopped parsley, and a little 
mustard. Boil chicken and mushrooms separately, 
•chop in small- pieces. Rub butter and flour to- 
gether, stir into cream and boil until it thickens, 
then pour this over chicken and mushrooms and 
fill shells. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 
Mrs. John Babcock. 

One pint of small oysters, one-half pint of 
cream, a large teaspoon of flour, salt and pep- 
per. Let the cream come to a boil. Mix the 
flour with a little cold milk, and stir into the boil- 
ing cream. Season with salt and pepper while 
the cream is cooking. Let the oysters come to a 
boil in their own liquor. Skim carefully and drain 
off all the liquor. Add oysters to cream and boil 
up once. Pill the patty shells and serve. The 
quantities given are enough for eighteen shells. 

Nail, Hand, TcctJi and Hair BrusJiss at Dunbar s 

Drug Store. 



34 OYSTERS. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 
Mrs. J. B. McMichael. 

Roll crackers, not too fine. Drain liquor from. 
one quart of oysters. Butter a deep dish or pan. 
Cover the bottom with crackers, put in a la}'er ol 
oysters, pepper and salt and bits of butter. An- 
other layer of crackers, then oysters, until the dish 
is filled, having crackers cover top. Pour over the 
liquor from oysters and a pint of milk. Bake- 
three-quarters of an hour in Monmouth Potter>^^ 
Pudding Pan. 




C. Shu If::' for anything in the Drug line. 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 35 

N. A. SCOTT", 

PIONEER GROCERY, 

Wholesale and Retail Grocer, 

Southeast Corner Square and Market Place, 
MONMOUTH. ILLINOIS. 

J. C. Hanna. Prest. J. E. Jackson. V.-Prest. P. L. Sherrick. Sec'y and 
Treas. W. P. Cleaver, Gen'l Manager. 

SHERRICK-CLEAVER CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Shirts, Pants, Overalls, Etc., Etc. 

SPECIALTIES==Cassimere Pants 

and Duck Coats. MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS. 

'*A Contented Hind is a Continual Feast." 

The surest way to secure composure and serenity is by being^ 
well dressed ; hence consult 

WARREN BUNKERR, 

THE DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN 

niLLINER AND DRESSMAKER, 

Who has just returned from Paris, and furnishes all the 
correct fashions and latest novelties. 



OSOAR ZIMMEIRMAN 



GENERAL BARBER SUPPLIES 

SOePropvietor ., ReJ_resh,„g , p|5J||^LED HAZEL BAY, 
Pinaud Toilet Waters, Perfumes, Etc., Etc. 

Finest Grinding- and Decorating Establishment west of 
Chicag-o. Get your carving-, cake and bread knives, razors 
and shears sharpened. 



36 MEATS. 



MEATS. 

''Dainty bits make — to the ribs.'' 



HOW TO ROAST MEAT. 

Mrs. Emma P. Ewing, of the school of domestic 
economy at the Iowa Agricultural College, says : 

In roasting meats of all kinds the method adopted 
should be the one that in the most perfect manner 
preserves the juices inside the meat. To roast 
beef in the best possible manner, place the clean 
cut side of the meat upon a smoking hot pan, 
which must be over a quick fire. Press it close to 
the pan until seared and slightly browned. Re- 
verse and let the opposite side become similarly 
seared and browned. Then put it at once in the 
oven, the heat of which should be firm and steady, 
but not too intense, and leave it undisturbed until 
cooked. The time that should be allowed for 
cooking beef in this manner is twenty minutes to 
the pound, if it is to be rare, less half an hour de- 
ducted from the aggregate time on account of 
searing. In other words, a five-pound roast of 
beef will require an hour and a quarter, a six- 
pound roast an hour and a half, and so on. 

If the oven is not too hot the beef requires no 
basting, and is better without it. When the oven 
is at the proper temperature, and the cooking is 
going on all right, the meat will keep up a gentle 
sputtering in the pan. If, upon opening the oven 
door, this sputtering is not perceptible, more heat 



Hodgcns Pine Apple lee. 



MEATS. 37 

is required. But, if in addition to the sputtering, 
anv smoke isdiscernable in the oven, the heat is too 
intense, and should be lessened. Unless the heat 
of the oven is too great, the drippings in the pan 
will burn and smoke, and when the meat is cooked 
there will be a thin coating of brown jelly in the 
pan where the meat rested, which, by the addition 
of stock or water, will make a delicious gravy. 

A roast of beef should never be washed, and if 
it has been accidentally wet or moistened, it 
should be carefully wiped dry before it is seared or 
put to cook. Searing almost instantly coats the 
cut side of apiece of meat, and prevents the escape 
of juices in the after-process of roasting, while a 
firm, steady heat gently but thoroughly cooks it, 
and thus both juices and flavor are preserved. 
Basting is a troublesome, as well as a damaging, 
process. And as salt and water have a tendency 
to toughen and extract the juices of meat, they 
should not be used on it while roasting, if it is de- 
sired to have the meat sweet, juicy and tenden 

ROAST BEEF. 
M. 

The best pieces for roasting are the sirloin and 
rib pieces. When roasting in an oven dash a cup 
of hot water over the meat; this checks the escape 
of the juices. Baste frequently with salt, and 
water and the drippings. If your fire is hot, allow 
twelve minutes to the pound, if you like the beef 
rare ; more if you prefer it well done. Thicken 
the gravy with browned flour. 



THE MOST DELICATE •^•^^vors are obtained from 



CHICAGO FLAVORING EXTRACTS. 



38 MEATS. 

TO ROAST BEEF. 
M. 

Put into pan without water, unless in gasoline 

stove oven, when put in sufficient water to keep 

from burning. Do not season. Allow twelve 

minutes to a pound for a rare roast, longer if it is 

desired better done. Make gravy in usual way. 

The best way ever roasted. 

GRAVY FOR TURKEY. 
B. M. 

An excellent way to roast turkey. Wash thor- 
oughly and wipe dry. Do not salt. Fill with 
dressing Put without water in double roaster. 
Do not baste. Keep fire enough to hear a gentle 
sizzle. Bake twenty minutes for each pound. One 
and one-half hours before it is done pour over a 
gravy made of three large cups boiling water, three 
tablespoons flour, first mixed with small quantity 
of water and one-half cup of butter and salt to 
taste. This gives sufficient moisture to the turkey 
and makes delicious gravy, rich and brown, 

A good dressing may be made of bread crumbs, 
butter, pepper and salt, nutmeg, sage, and onions 
if desired, well buttered slices of bread. Make 
about right proportion. 

Chicken is excellent baked in this way. Allow- 
ing at least twenty minutes to each pound. 

POT ROAST OF BEEF. 
B. 
Take four pounds ribbed beef, ribs taken out and 
rolled. Put some beef drippings in porcelain-lined 
kettle, rub beef with salt and put it into the hot drip- 
pings. Let it cook one hour, turning it frequenth', 
then add water and cook one hour longer. Re- 

TJie finest Soaps and Perfumes at John C. Dunbar s 

Drug Store. 



MEATS. 39 

move to platter and thicken the gravy with flour 
.and butter made into a paste. 

GOOD STEAK. 
Mrs. Dr. W. P. Smith. 

In the first place buy good steak — porterhouse — 
have it cut tzvo inches thick ; remove all the bone 
.and most of the fat, put the steak upon a heavy 
hard wood block and with an iron beater — 2 inch 
face and 36 sharp teeth, (mine weighs 2 ft)s.) — 
bring the meat to one- half an inch in thickness. 
JFor a gridiron use a large double bread toaster ; 
■open this and place the steak upon one side, ad- 
justed to the thickness you desire it when broiled; 
close down the other half of toaster, pushing the 
slide clear up, to fasten the meat at the proposed 
thickness, place this over a bed of very hot coals 
for about ten seconds — this seals the surface and 
prevents thejuicees running — turn it and cook the 
• other side done, slightly browning it ; then turn 
the first side and cook that the same — steak should 
be broiled quick, and is best if not overdone, but 
so that when cut 'tis very juicy and a little red in 
centre — unclose the handles of your broiler and 
-with forks remove your steak to a hot platter, 
season nicely with salt and pepper, and place 
about the surface small pieces of butter, put it in 
the oven long enough to melt .this, then to the 
table, and it is ready for the carver. 

SPICED BEEF. 

Mrs. B. 

Take a piece of beef from the fore quarter, 
weighing ten pounds — those who like fat should 
select a fatty piece, those who prefer lean may 
take the shoulder clod or the upper part of the 

C. SJinltz for anytJiing in the Drng line. 



40 MEATS. 

fore leg — take one pint of salt, one teacup of mo- 
lasses or brown sugar, and tablespoon of ground 
cloves, allspice and pepper, and two tablespoons of 
pulverized saltpetre; place the beef in a deep pan, 
rub with this mixture, turn and rub each side 
twice a day for a week, then wash off the spices, 
put in a pot of boiling water, and, as often as it 
boils hard, turn in a teacupful of cold water; it 
must must simmer for five hours on the back part 
of the stove; press under a heavy weight till it is 
cold and you will never desire to try corned beef 
of the butcher again, your pickle will do for another 
ten pounds of beef, first rubbing into it a handful 
of salt, it can be renewed and a piece kept in 
preparation every day. 

^ TO BROIL A STEAK CHICKENS, GAME OR FISH 
IN THE OVEN. 

K. C. S. 

Place the meats in a double wire broiler, put the 
broiler over the baking pan containing an inch of 
cold water, place the pan on the top shelf of the 
oven, which should be very hot — for sirloin steak, 
from eight to ten minutes, other articles according 
to size and heat of the oven. 

SPICED ROAST. 
Mrs. J. A. Hanna. 

For this either beef or mutton can be used. 
Prepare for roasting by seasoning with salt and 
pepper, then add one half-dozen whole cloves, one 
dozen whole allspice, 3 tablespoons sugar, one- 
third pint vinegar and two-thirds water; roast 
very slowly until about a half hour before serving, 

Hodgens' Tuty Fruty Cream, 



MEATS. 41 

when let it brown in a very hot oven. Baste 
often and add water as needed. 

SPRING CHICKEN. 
Take a nice spring chicken, or a young one. 
Clean and wash thoroughly and put in a kettle with 
a pint and a half of cold water. Let it boil twenty 
minutes, or until tender, but not until it falls to 
pieces. Take out of the water. Sav^e the water 
for the gravy. Split open the chicken on the back. 
Put in a dripping pan, add salt and pepper and 
little pieces of butter. Then dredge it with flour, 
allowing some of the flour to fall into pan. Put 
into a hot oven and brown. Watch it, and after 
it has been in ten minutes— -for if the chicken is 
young it takes only a few minutes — thirty at the 
most. Take out of pan and put on a platter» 
Take the stock, thicken and put it into the drip- 
ping pan where the chicken has just been taken 
out, and cook it until smooth, stirring constantly. 
It ought to be brown if some of the flour and but- 
ter that the chicken was baked in was left. Lastly^ 
pour over the chicken and serve hot. If one has 
an old fowl it must be boiled or hour or two be- 
fore it will be tender enough to split opn. 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

Mary Patterson. 

Boil a fowl until it will slip easily from the 
bones, let the water be reduced to about one pint 
in boiling. Pick the meat from the bones in good 
sized pieces, taking out all gristle, fat and bones. 
Place in a wet mold, skim the fat from the liquor. 
A little butter, pepper and salt to the taste, and 
one-half ounce of gelatine. When this dissolves 
pour it hot over the chicken. The liquor must be 
seasoned pretty high, for the chicken absorbs. 

Hodgens' Salted Almonds. 



42 MEATS. 

TO COOK VEAL LIVER. 

Mrs. S. 

Pour boiling water over it, put a tablespoon of 
lard and butter in frying pan, lay the liver in, chop 
fine two small onions, cover the liver with them, 
sprinkle with flour, salt and pepper, cover closely, 
and let it fry for a few minutes, then turn and salt 
and pepper the on other side. With ease it can be 
sent to the table with the dressing on each slice, 
which adds very much to the relish. 

FOR CORNING BEEF OR TONGUES. 
Mrs. Frank Hubbard. 

To one gallon of water take one and one-half 
pounds of salt, one half-pound of sugar, one-half 
ounce of saltpetre. Boil these together and skim 
when cold, pour it over your meat or tongues and 
let it stand two weeks before boiling. A large 
tongue will take five hours to cook tender. 

NO. 2.— CORNED BEEF OR HAM. 

Seven pounds salt, three pounds brown sugar, 
four ounces saltpetre, two ounces soda and two 
gallons of water. Boil and skim well and turn on 
meat when cold. Let them remain three or four 
weeks before using. 

CREAM SWEET BREAD. 
M. 

Always get calves' sweet breads. They should 
be soaked from one to three hours in salt water, and 
boil twenty minutes, then throw in cold water for 
five minutes. Then remove all skin and rough 
parts, cut in small pieces, make cream sauce, put 
the sweetbreads in the sauce and let them get ver\' 
hot then put in small dishes and cover with crumbs 
and little bits of butter. Put in oven and brown. 



CHICAGO YEAST POWDER 



IS GUARANTEED HICHFST QUALITY, 
AND COSTS LESS THAN ANY OTHER. 



MEATS. 43 

SWEETBREADS ON TOAST, 
s. 

Cook as above, dress with cream sauce and pour 

very hot over buttered toast. 

SWEETBREADS FRIED. 
After laying in salted water put them in cold 
water a few minutes, then dry in a cloth, fry them 
with little strips of salt pork, or dip in beaten egg 
and roll in bread crumbs and fry in hot lard. Pour 
over half a cup of rich cream, stir in one teaspoon 
flour, let it boil up a few minutes and serve hot. 

VEAL CUTLETS OR STEAK. 
Cut in pieces ready to serve, roll in bread or 
cracker crumbs seasoned with salt, pepper — and 
summer savory if desired — after dipping in beaten 
<igg; have plenty of butter and lard in equal part> ; 
fry quickly on one side then turn and cook thor- 
oughly. A gravy ma\- be made of flour and cream 
if desired, and either poured over meat or serveJ 
in boat. 

BAKED HAM. 
Take ham, ten or twelve pounds, wash and trim 
off uneven fat. Make a paste of rye flour that will 
spread nicely, spread over all the flesh of ham ex- 
posed. Put in a roaster on rack or plate, bake from 
three to lour hours even heat. When done peel 
off the paste and rind and stick cloves in to flavor. 

VEAL LOAF. 
Mabel Pillsbury. 

Boil two pounds lean veal. When cold chop 
fine with one-fourth pound salt pork. Add four 
butter crackers rolled fine, two eggs, well beaten, 
three hard-boiled eggs sliced thin, two teaspoons 

C. Sliultz\ Drugs and Fine Perfumery. 



44 MEATS. 

salt, one saltspoon pepper, one-half teaspoon nut- 
meg. Put in baking mold. Pour over it the meat 
liquor until it stands on the top. Cover with 
cracker crumbs and bake one hour. 

VEAL A LA POULETTE. 
Mrs. A. G. VanHoorebeke. 

Take of the breast of veal, cut it up in pieces 
about two inches square, put it on to stew with a 
little water, salt, pepper and just a little grated 
nutmeg, stew slowly for two hours, add a piece of 
butter and the juice of a small lemon, then thicken 
the gravy with the yolk of eggs, taking care not 
to let it curdle. 

VEAL LOAF. 
Mrs. J. R. Ebersole. 

Three pounds of raw veal chopped very fine, 
butter the size of an Ggg^ three eggs, three table-" 
spoons cream or milk, if milk use a small piece of 
butter, mix the eggs and cream together, mix with 
the veal four pounded crackers, one teaspoon black 
pepper, one large tablespoon salt, one large table- 
spoon sage. Mix well together and form into a 
loaf. Bake two and a half hours, basting with 
butter and water while baking. Serve cut in 
thin slices. 

VEAL LOAF. 
M. B. Sexton. 

Three pounds of veal chopped fine, one-quarter 
pound of salt pork or equal quantity of butter, one 
cup pounded crackers, two well beaten eggs, one- 
half teaspoon black pepper, one-half teaspoon salt, 
one tablespoon sage, one-fourth of a nutmeg, juice 
of one lemon. Mix and press into a bread pan. 
Bake two hours and eat cold. 

Hodgens for anything in the Party line. 



MEATS. 45 

JELLIED VEAL. 
Mrs. H. Smith. 

Chop vtial fine and salt to taste. Add to one 
pint of any soup stock a quarter box of gelatine, 
•salt, pepper and nutmeg to taste. Take two hard 
boiled eggs and one lemon, slice thin, line mould 
with lemon and eggs, fill with the chopped meat and 
bits of lemon and egg, pour over all the soup stock 
and set away to cool. Chicken or turkey may be 
used the same way. 

ROAST SPICED MUTTON. 
Mrs. B. 

Take a leg of mutton. Pound it well to make 
tender, rub well with salt, make gashes all over it 
into w^hich put small pieces of salt pork, onion, 
Avhole pepper and cloves. Brown in hot oven with- 
out water, when brown add water and baste often, 
cook two and one-half hours, thicken gravy with 
flour before serving. Chop two pickles fine and 
add to the gravy. 

VEAL LOAF. 
Linnie Brewer 

Three pounds of veal, one pound of pork. Have 
all chopped fine at the butchers. Roll three square 
-crackers, Iveep out a little for the outside, a half 
cup butter (don't use quite all), two eggs beaten, 
•one-half cup of water, one tablespoon of salt, one 
teaspoon of pepper. Mix all well together, form 
in a nice loaf, make it firm, put in a long, narrow 
pan. Put the remaining cracker and butter over 
the top. a little water and bake two and one-half 
hours, basting once in a while with hot water and 
butter. 

C. S]niltz\ Dvjigs and Fine Perfumery. 



46 MEATS. 

SCRAPLE. 

Mrs. Flora Hyde. 

Take a hog's head, heart, tongue and part of the 
liver. Cleanse thoroughly and soak in salt water 
twenty-four hours. Put on to boil in cold water. 
Cook until all the bones can be easily removed. 
Then take out in a chopping bowl and chop fine. 
Season highly with sage, salt and pepper. Re- 
turn it to the liquor on the stove, which you must 
strain. Then thicken with corn meal and a tea- 
cup of buckwheat flour till the consistency of 
mush. Then dip out in deep dishes, and when 
cool slice and fry a rich brown, as you would mush. 
It is very nice for a cold morning breakfast. If yoa 
make more than you can use at once, run hot lard 
over the rest and you can keep it all through the 
winter. 

MEAT BALLS. 
Mrs. A. T. Waid. 

Take pieces of cooked meat, fat and lean, that 
have been left over and put them through the meat 
chopper, or chop them very fine in a wooden bowl. 
To about a pint of this meat add two beaten eggs, 
a handful or two of rolled crackers. Pepper and 
salt to taste. Stir all together and add water to- 
make it moist enough to form into -flat balls. 
Grease the frying pan and cook lightly. 

TO SEASON SAUSAGE 
Mrs. Sarah Ruse. 

For ten pounds of pork, one-third fat, two- 
thirds lean, when ground, use ten teaspoons salt, 
five teaspoons pepper, three teaspoons of pulverized 
sage. 

Hodgens' Candy. 



MEATS. 47 

FOR CURING MEAT. 

Mrs. Wylie. 

Ten quarts salt, three pounds brown sugar, one 
pound pepper, three-fourths pound saltpetre. This 
amount is for lOO pounds meat. Mix all together 
in a tub and then rub the meat thoroughly with it 
and lay it on plank and leave for three weeks un- 
less the weather is very cold, and then it can be 
left longer. 

VEAL LOAF. 
Mrs. Jno, Brewer. 

For three pounds use two eggs, beaten light, 
four crackers rolled fine, leave out enough to roll 
it in. One teaspoon pepper and one teaspoon of 
salt. Butter size of an Qgg. melted. Mix all to- 
gether. Bake two or two and a half hours, ac- 
cording to heat of oven. Baste often with the 
water. Take out of the oven a half hour before 
dinner. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 
Mrs. Eliza B Smitli. 

Cut the chicken in pieces. Wipe dry. Salt to 
taste. Roll each piece in flour. Use bacon frying 
and lard equal parts. ..If butter is used with lard, 
use only enough to make brown nicely. Have 
your grease hot, and cook slowly, turning until 
nicely browned from the grease, and add a little 
water and cover. Let steam. Make gravy. 



IN'EVERY RECIPE *'*.^" %'£\''A''n°nv^^^-^''"^^^^ 



USE CHICAGO YEAST POWDER 



48 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



Liverpool. 



Ottunnva. 



Chicago. 



John Morrell <Sc Co., 



I^imitecl. 



Pork Packers, Provision Dealers. 

The "Iowa's Pride" brand of Hams and Bacon are not ex- 
celled by any in flavor or appearance. Call for "Iowa's Pride" 
Ham, Iowa's Pride Breakfast Bacon, Iowa's Pride Special Break- 
fast Bacon. Be sure to see that our name is burned on the skin. 



Morrell's Pure Lard 

Warranted free from all adulteration, is the lard for you to use. Call 
for it and have no other. Also try "Wapello" brand of Breakfast 
Bacon, "Dove" brand Breakfast Bacon, "California" Hams, 
Shoulders, and Pickled goods Call for these brands and get hon- 
est, reliable goods for your money. Handled by all first-class 
grocers and Butchers. 




J. W. SIPHEK. 

Prcs 



J. n. DIFFENBAUGH, 

Sec'y and Treas. 



1869-1894 



Siptier Lumbef and Coal Co 



Lumber, Coal and Ice, Sash, Doors 
and Blinds. 



617 S Second Street — Telephone No. 6. 
Monniotitli, III. 



The Very Best Receipt of all 



Will be one for 



The Republican 



For one Year. $1.50. It would give enjoyment for 365 days. 



VEGETABLES. ^ 



VEGETABLES. 



"Unquiet meals make ill digestion." — Comedy of Errors. 



FRIED APPLES. 

s. 

Slice unpared apples about one-half of an inch 
thick. Fry slowly in butter or good drippings. 
AVhen done sprinkle with sugar and serve very hot. 
l^ice at breakfast, or served with pork. 

ASPARAGUS ON TOAST. 

Cut asparagus in small pieces. Boil in salted 
water. When done dress with cream, or milk and 
butter, and pour over well buttered hot toast. 

ASPARAGUS IN OMELETTE. 
K. C. 

Well cooked asparagus chopped and mixed with 

•omelette before frying is very palatable. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Mrs. Wildemutli. 

One quart of beans soaked over night. Cook 
one-half hour. One desertspoon New Orleans mo- 
lasses, one teaspoon ground mustard. Salt and 
pepper to taste. Small piece of salt pork. Bake 
six hours in Monmouth Pottery Bean Pots. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 
Mrs. Carrie Dearborn, Boston. 

One pound of small white beans. Wash well 
and soak over night. Parboil until tender, but not 

Hodgcns Orange Ice. 



50 VEGETABLES. 



soft. Strain and wash with cold water. Put in 
baking pot and add tablespoon of salt, small piece 
onion, teaspoon of mustard, one-fourth cup of mo- 
lasses, or two tablespoons of sugar. Cover one- 
half pound of salt pork with beans, pour in boiling' 
water sufficient to nearly cover the beans. Cover 
closely and bake slowly eight hours. Remove 
cover half an hour before serving to let beans- 
brown. 

ESCALLOPED CABBAGE. 

Put a head of cabbage washed and chopped into- 
boiling water, and boil twenty minutes. Drain in 
a colander, place in two baking dishes and pour 
over it a sauce made as follows : Melt four table- 
spoons of butter and add four level teaspoons of 
flour, stirring together until blended, then add one 
quart of milk and stir constantly until it boils, 
then add six hard boiled eggs which have been 
chopped fine, two teaspoons of salt, and a dash of 
pepper. Pour this over the cabbage, sprinkle with 
bread crumbs, moistened with melted butter, and 
bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. The pro- 
portions are sufficient for two dishes and will serve 
ten or twelve persons. 

CREAM CABBAGE. 
Mrs. F. E. Campbell. 

Slice cabbage fine. Put in hot salted water to 
boil. There should be more than enough water to 
cover cabbage. Just before it is soft drain, and 
add for one small cabbage, about two teaspoons of 
flour, butter size of an egg, one teacup milk or 
cream. With cream use less butter. Pepper and 
salt to taste. Let cook for a few minutes. 

Hodgcns Brick Creatn and Flavors. 



VEGETABLES. 



ESCALLOPED CAULIFLOWER. 
Mrs. E. A. Lord. 

Cook the cauliflower one hour in salt and water. 
Drain and break apart. Put a layer of the cauli- 
flower in an escalop dish, moisten it with cream 
sauce and sprinkle in a little grated cheese. Put 
in another layer of cauliflower, and continue, as 
directed before, until all the vegetable is used. 
There should be two tablespoons of grated cheese 
and one pint of sauce to each head of cauliflower. 
Cover with bread crumbs and cheese and dot with 
bits of butter. Bake half an hour in moderate 
oven. 

CELERY. 
B. 

Wash. Cut in pieces about one inch long. 

Boil one and a half to two hours. Drain. Add 

cream or milk. Milk, butter, pepper and salt, as 

for peas. 

ESCALLOPED CABBAGE. 
Mrs. I. M. Eastam. 

Cut one-half head of cabbage fine and stew un- 
til tender.- Dress with milk, butter, pepper and 
salt. Put a layer of cabbage and one of rolled 
crackers in a pan until the pan is full. Add milk, 
butter, pepper and salt, as you would for oysters. 
Put in oven and bake twenty minutes. 

BAKED CORN. 

Put layer of cracker crumbs in baking dish, then 
layer of corn — the canned will do just as well. 
Butter, salt and pepper, then another layer of 
crumbs and corn. Pour over cream or milk. Bake 
one-half to three-fourths of an hour. Add milk 
to keep moist. 



Hodgcjis Restaurant. 



52 VEGETABLES. 

CORN OYSTERS 

Margaret Dunbar. 

To one quart grated corn, add three eggs and 
three or four grated crackers, beat well and season 
with pepper and salt. Have ready in skillet but- 
ter and lard, or beef drippings in equal propor- 
tions, hot but not scorching. Drop in little cakes 
about the size of an oyster (using a teaspoon for 
the purpose). When brown turn and fry on other 
side, being very careful that they do not burn. 
Serve hot. The v/hite of the eggs should be 
beaten to a stiff froth and added just before frying. 
When green corn is out of season, canned corn or 
^'kornlet" may be used. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES. 
Mrs. J. A. Brundage. 

Boil potatoes until tender in their jackets, then 
peel and slice them in a basin; put a layer of pota- 
toes, sprinkled with pepper, salt and a little flour, 
a small piece of butter, then another layer of pota- 
toes, then seasoning until your basin is filled; then 
fill your basin half full of milk and bake half an 
hour. 

EGG PLANT.— No. 2. 
.\nna Brady. 

Peel the egg plant, boil until Hone, then pour off 
the water, mash fine; pepper, butter and salt to 
taste; put in a shallow pudding pan, and over the 
top place a thick layer of cracker crumbs. Bake 
half an hour in a moderate oven. 

CORN FRITTERS OR MOCK OYSTERS. 

Palmer House, Chicago. 

Grate six ears of corn, and mix with one table- 
spoon flour, two eggs. Salt and pepper to taste. 
Drop spoonfuls in hot lard and fry like oysters. 

TMP Mfl^T RFIIPATP flavors are obtained from 

inc muoi ucLiUHic Chicago flavoring extracts. 



VEGETABLES. 53 

CORN FRITTERS. 

Mrs. Amanda White. 

One pint of canned corn. Half a teacup of 
milk, two eggs beaten well, one tablespoon of melted 
butter, one teaspoon of salt, two heaping tea- 
spoons of baking powder, a half cup of sifted flour 
and a little pepper. Mix all together, stirring 
only enough to get the ingredients well mixed. 
P>y in hot lard, but do not have the pan too hot, 
or the fritters will brown too quickly on the outside 
and not puff up nicely. Drop them into the fry- 
ing pan from the point of a spoon and fry a light 
brown on both sides. 

LYONAISE POTATOES. 
C. K. 

Fry one medium sized onion chopped very fihe» 
in a tablespoon of butter ; chop fine cold boiled 
potatoes and put in skillet with onions. Fry a 
light brown, stirring constantly. Add two table- 
spoons parsley to potatoes. 

EGG PLANT.— No. i. 

Anna Brady. 

Feel and cut in slices the purple kind, sprinkle 
with salt and let drain for one hour; make a light 
batter with one Ggg, flour and a little water, dip 
the slices into it and fry in butter. 

SACKED POTATOES. 

Mrs. Jos. Stevenson. 

Selecft for baking, potatoes as near of a size as 
possible. When baked, cut off one end, scrape 
out the inside with a spoon, being careful not to 
break the skins. Add to the potatoes, butter, salt 
and sufficient hot milk to make quite soft. Fill 
the skins with this and place on end in a buttered 
pan and bake until brown on top. The potatoes 
will puff up considerably if sufficiently beaten. 
Nice for breakfast or tea. 



54 VEGETABLES. 



BAKED TURNIPS. 

S. I. 

If large, split, and bake as you would potatoes, 
only longer — two or three hours if large. When 
done, mash fine, season with butter, salt and 
pepper. Serve hot. 

MUSHROOM OMELET 
To one can mushrooms take twelve or sixteen 
eggs. Cook mushrooms in their own liquor till 
tender. When cold chop rather fine. Season 
with salt and pepper. To the eggs, well beaten, 
add mushrooms, and when ready to serve, scram- 
ble in the old-fashioned way, only very soft, ad- 
ding a little butter. 

POTATOES STEWED IN BUTTER. 
Peel the potatoes and slice them into rather 
small, even slices; put them over the fire in enough 
salted boiling water to cover them, and boil until 
they begin to grow tender, but not until they be- 
gin to break ; drain, and to a pint of potatoes, used 
about two heaping tablespoons of butter and a 
scant half cup of milk. When thebutter is melted 
and put with the milk, put in the potatoes and 
shake gently to keep from sticking to the pan, 
being careful not to break them until they have 
absorbed the butter and milk; season to ta^te with 
salt and white pepper. 

MACARONI. 
Mrs. R. M. Stevenson, Tarkio, Mo. 

Put macaroni on stove with water to cover for 
one half hour. Heat one pint of milk, stir in two 
or three well beaten eggs, salt macaroni, put all 
together, grate a little cheese on top with j)ieces 
of butter all around. Bake from twenty to thirty 
minutes. 

Do not take medicine when yon are well. 



VEGETABLES. 55 



ESCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Grease well with butter a pudding dish and 
place the lirst layer of crushed crackers, butter, 
23epper and salt and a little water, and the 
next layer of ripe tomatoes with a little butter, 
jjepper and salt until the dish is full, the last layer 
being of crackers and seasoning. Canned toma- 
toes may be used. 

ESCALLOPED ONIONS. 
H. K. 

For three persons, peel and boil three good 
.sized onions: w^hen tender chop and place in bak- 
ing dish with alternate layers of bread crumbs; 
season with butter, pepper and salt, and moisten 
thoroughly with milk; bake. 

MACARONI AND TOMATOES. 

Break a cupful of macaroni into pieces an inch 
long anxl boil twenty minutes, after soaking an 
hour in plenty of cold water and w-ashing well. 
Make a puree of one quart of tomatoes and one 
small onion. Add a lump of butter the size of an 
egg. salt and pepper and sugar, if you like; drain 
the macaroni and add: serve hot. 

STEWED MACARONI. 

Boil two ounces of macaroni in water, drain 
w^ell. put into a saucepan one ounce of butter, mix 
with one tablespoon of flour, moisten with four 
tablespoons of veal or beef stock, one gill of 
cream: salt and pej^per to taste; put in macaroni, 
let it boil up and serve w^hile hot. 

PARSNIPS. 
B. 

Boil with thin slices of bacon. Allow the water 
to boil off and fry down to rich brow^n. The bacon 
gives fine flavor. 

Sunshine is one of nature s most potent remedies. 



56 VEGETABLES. 

GREEN TOMATOES FRIED. 

Take four large, smooth, green tomatoes: slice: 
let stand in cold salt water for a half hour: drain 
and dredge well with flour, salt and pepper and 
fry in butter, a nice brown; serve hot. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 
Mrs. M. J. B. 

Cut a thin slice from the blossom side of the 
tomatoes and with a teaspoon remove the pulp 
without breaking the shell: chop one onion and 
add. with bread crumbs rubbed fine, to the pulp 
and season with pepper and salt (and sugar, if you 
like). When thoroughly mixed fill the tomatoes 
and put the slice back in its place. Put in baking 
dish, stem side down with just a little water and a 
lump of butter on each to keep from burning. 

VEGETABLE OYSTER PLANT. 
Mrs. C. C. Pollard. 

Scrape plant, cut into crosswise slices, and put 
into boiling water and boil until tender, then 
thicken with cracker or bread crumbs, mash fine, 
season with butter, pepper and salt. Have ready 
a skillet with two tablespoons of hot lard, drop in 
cakes and fry until brown. 

POTATO PUFFS. 
Mrs. C. C. McCoy. 

One cup mashed potato, one cup milk, one egg. 
two teaspoons baking powder, flour to mix soft; 
roll and cut in strips about size of finger and roll 
lightly with the hand and fry as you would dough- 
nuts; eat warm with butter or syrup. 

POTATO BALLS, 
p. 
Mix mashed potatoes with the yolk of one egg, 
roll them into balls, flour them or roll in egg and 
bread crumbs, and fry a light brown in good drip- 
pings. 



VEGETABLES. 57 



FRIED PARSNIPS. 
M. P. 

Peel and boil: when done, drain, season with 
pepper and salt, dip first in melted butter, then in 
flour, and dust with sugar. Put two tablespoons 
of drippings or lard into a frying pan; when hot 
l^ut in enough parsnips to cover bottom of pan, 
fry brown 0:1 one side, then turn and brown on 
the other. Serve with roast pork. 

POTATO PEARS. 

Mrs. Patterson. 

Mash and season one half dozen potatoes. Mold 
them while warm into the shape of small j)ears, 
dip them in the beaten yolk of egg. stick in the 
small end of each pear a clove (the large end of 
the clove in the potato), to represent the stem. 
Bake in a quick oven fifteen or twenty minutes till 
a rich brown. Success depends on thorough 
mashing and seasoning, and baking long enough 
to heat them through. 

POTATO PUFFS. 
Mrs. B. 

Two cups mashed potatoes, two tablespoons 
melted butter beaten until creamy, then add two 
well beaten eggs and one cup of cream, a little 
salt, beat well, pour into a baking dish, spread 
butter over the top and bake quickly a delicate 
brown. 

FRIED SWEET POTATOES. 
Mrs. Mary A. Frantz. 

Boil or steam the potatoes until almost done. 
When ready to fry pare them, cut in slices one- 
fourth of an inch thick. Take butter the size of 
an egg, four tablespoons sugar, put into frying pan; 
when all is melted lay in potatoes: have a moder- 
ate fire; when brown, turn; fry without cover. 

C. Shultz' for a7iy thing in the Drug line. 



58 VEGETABLES. 



ONION PIE. 
Mrs. Pen D. Good. 

Take one doze:i onions, cut up and put in a skil- 
let with butter and lard and fry till soft: then add 
half cup of sweet cream, half cup of milk, two 
eggs, and thicken it with a little paste made of 
milk and ilour: then season with pej^per and salt; 
bake the pie crust first and have ready: when you 
get the onions all done, put in the baked crust and 
set in oven long enough to brown on top. 

ONIONS. 

This healthful vegetable should be eaten oftener 
and would be if it were not for the disagreeable 
odor. The following way of preparing modifies 
this and prevents the burning sensation often felt 
in the stomach. Slice very thin, pour over boil- 
ing water, let them stand five minutes or longer, 
serve with a very little vinegar and salt: excellent 
with salad dressing. 

HOW TO BOIL. RICE. 

Pick your rice clean and wash it in two cold 
waters, not draining off the last water until you 
are ready to put the rice on the fire. Prepare a 
saucepan with water and a little salt. When it 
boils sprinkle in the rice gradually so as not to 
stop the boiling. Boil hard for twenty minutes, 
keeping the pot covered. Then take it from the 
fire and pour off the water, after which set the pot 
on the back of the stove with the lid off to allow 
the rice to dry and the grains to separate. 

Remember — Boil rapidly from the time you cov- 
er the pot until you take it off: this allows each 
grain to swell to three times its normal size and 
the motion prevents the grains from sticking to- 
gether. Don't stir it as this will cause it to fall to 
the bottom and burn. When properly boiled, rice 
should be snowy white, perfectly dry and soft, 
and every grain separate and alone. 

A skyour grocer for A ndersons Jmns a7id Mincemeats 



VEGETABLES. 59 



MACARONI AND CHEESE. 
E. 

Break in pieces, boil about an hour in plenty of 
water, adding more as it soaks into macaroni; put 
in baking dish with alternate layers of grated 
cheese; salt; nearly cover mith milk. Bake half 
Jiour; a beaten egg may be added. 

ESCALLOPED MUSHROOMS. 

Put the mushrooms in a buttered baking dish 
with alternate layers of crumbs, seasoning each 
layer plentifully with butter; add salt, pepper and 
a gill of cream or gravy. Bake twenty minutes, 
keeping covered while in the oven. 

TOMATOES AND RICE. 
Mrs.'E. Jatnieson . 

In cooking tomatoes for one half dozen persons, 
put in two tablespoons of raw rice when first put 
on to stew. It will be found a very palatable dish 
cooked until the rice is well done, and seasoned 
with butter, pepper and salt. 

TOMATO FRITTERS. 
Mrs. E. 

One" pint stewed tomatoes, one egg. half tea- 
spoon soda, flour enough to make the batter the 
consistency of pancakes. 

CANNED PEAS. 

French Cook. 

Treat any good canned peas in following man- 
ner and they will be found nearly equal to fresh 
ones: Turn from can into colander and drain off 
liquor. Then put in plenty of salted hot water 
and boil two or three minutes. Return to colander 
and drain. Put in saucepan ' with milk or cream 
and butter and cook till tender. Generally no 
more cooking is required. 

C. Shultz\ Drugs and Fine Perfumery. 



6o VEGETABLES. 



ESCALLOPED SALSIFY, OR VEGETABLE OYSTER, 

Scrape the roots and throw them in water to 
prevent discoloring; cut in pieces one-fourth of an 
inch thick, boil till tender, remove from the water, 
then fill the i^udding dish with a layer of the oys- 
ter plant, and a layer of crackers, rolled not too 
fine: salt and pepper to taste, and a plentiful sup- 
ply of butter and milk enough to thoroughly 
moisten the quantity. Bake one hour. 




A sk your grocer for Welsh's Maple Syrup. 



BAPTIST LADIES COOK BOOK. 6i 

how TO HAKE SALADS, 

Buu suitabfe materiafs. We keep evepu- 
thino in Groceries, and make a speciaftu 
of Pure Goods. 

Monmouth, Illmois. Ov-UI I DlxVjOi 01 ^\J> 



A WORD TO THE LADIES. 



See to it that your flEN FOLKS always buy their Hats 
and Furnishing Goods of us. 

Style— always the latest ! Quality — the best ! Price — 
just right I Yours Truly, 

J. A. HANNA & CO., 

• Hatters and Hen's Furnishers. 

The Woman's Exchange 

Is the housekeepers' best friend. E^ver3'thing- 
is prepared by Monmouth's best cooks, and 
therefore is just as it should be. Delicious home- 
made Br:ad, Cakes, Pies, Meats, Salads, etc. 
Fancy Work on hand and orders taken. 

5"„Smh,''?fiK,. I Ida Thompson, Prop'r. 



FOR FINE LAUNDRY WORK, QO TO 

4 

T*"^ rion mouth Steam 
Laundry Co., 

108 West First Avenue, Monmouth, III. 



62 SALADS. 



SALADS. 



"The imaginary relish is so sweet that it enchants my sense." 

— Troihis and Cressida, 



ALMOND SALAD. 

M. B. 

Two-thirds celery to one-third chopped blanch- 
ed almonds and mayonnaise. 

APPLE'SALAD. 
Cut the celery as for chicken salad. Peel the 
apples, cut them as fine as the celery, and cover 
with lemon juice to keep them from turning dark. 
For a small family use two apples and mix with 
them half as much celery a5 you have chopped ap- 
ples. Cover with a French dressing and serve on 
lettuce leaves if you cah get them. For a com- 
pany luncheon put the salad in lemon skins, lay 
them on lettuce, and garnish with a little mayon- 
naise. 

COLD SLAW. 

Mrs. J. H. Wallace. 

Two-thirds of a cup of vinegar, one Ggg, two 
tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon salt, half teaspoon 
of mixed mustard, and butter size of an egg. Stir 
until it boils. When cold pour over the shaved 
cabbage. This dressing is good for any kind of 
salad. 

HAM SALAD. 
Boil ham tender and chop fine, then add tomato 
catsup, a little mustard and vinegar. Mix thor- 
oughly and place in a mold. 

l/se Maple City Soap. 



SALADS. 63 

CREAM DRESSING FOR COLD SLAW. 

Mary Patterson. 

Two tablespoons whipped sweet cream, two of 
sugar and four of vinegar. Beat well and pour 
over cabbage, previously cut very fine and sea- 
soned with salt. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 
Mrs. J. W. Sipher. 

Boil with chicken one pound of loin of veal un- 
til tender. Let stand till cool, then cut with a 
knife in small pieces. Be careful not to use the 
skin of the chisken or any of the gristle. Take 
equal parts of meat and celery, add juice of one 
lemon, one-half pound English walnuts chopped. 
Season with salt, pepper and mix with mayonnaise 
dressing. Just before serving add one-half cup of 
whipped cream. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Mrs. Maggie Rugg. 

Put one pint of vinegar and one cup of butter on 
stove to heat, but not to boil. Yolks of eight 
eggs, well beaten, with two tablespoons of mus- 
tard and one of salt. Stir these slowly into the 
hot vinegar and butter, and continue stirring un- 
til well cooked. Set is a cool place. It should 
be pretty thick, and will keep, if on ice, a long 
time. Cut the meat as fine as you like (not chop) 
from two chickens. Sprinkle with a little salt and 
set away in a cool place. Add about as much cut 
celery as meat and when ready to serve, pour on 
the dressing, stirring it well through, and one quart 
of good whipped creami. Whip part of the cream 
if preferred. 

Ask your grocer for ' 'Bine Ribboii' canned goods\ 
and Olives. 



64 SAL\DS. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Harriet Gettemy Morgan. 

Box of gelatine, soak in one pint of water, three 
lemons, one pint of boiling water, one quart of su- 
gar, six oranges, one can of grated pineapple or 
sliced pineapple chopped, twelve bananas, cut in 
slices, or California grapes cut and the seeds taken 
out. 

FRUIT SALAD. 
B. 
To one package of gelatine use one quart of 
boiling water. Add the juice of three or four lem- 
ons and sweeten to taste. Let the jelly become 
cold, then stir into it small pieces of oranges, pine- 
apple and bananas, then set the jelly on the ice to 
cool and harden. This salad is improved by ad- 
ding cocoanut or nut meats. Use any kind of 
fruit. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Mrs. Jno. Clark. 

Boil about twenty oysters in their own liquor 
five minutes. Drain. Wash in cold water then 
dry and place on ice. Mix with a half cup of may- 
onnaise, and serve on crisp lettuce leaves. 

OYSTER SALAD. 
Mrs. J. M. McClung. 

One large can or two small cans of cove oysters. 
Six hard-boiled eggs, four cucumber pickles, 
not too large, and a little celery. Chop the 
whites of the eggs, pickles and celery quite fine. 
Chop or cut up the oysters, not too fine. Take 
the yolks of the eggs and mix with butter about 
the size, of an egg and beat to a cream. Season 
with salt and pepper. Mix all together and thin 
it with vinegar to taste. 

C. SJuiltz Drugs and Fi?ie Perfumery. 



SALADS. 65 

NUT SALAD. 
Emma A. Tucker. 

Take two cups of lightly chopped meats of black 
walnuts, English walnuts, or hickory nuts. Add 
two cups chopped celery, and amalgamate with 
sufificient quantity of very good salad dressing. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Mrs. Eliza Smith. 

Yolks of eight eggs, eight tablespoons of melted 
butter, two teaspoons of salt, two of sugar, two of 
made mustard, two-thirds of a pint of vinegar. 
Put vinegar on stove to boil. Add the above in- 
gredients and stir until thickens. Add more vine- 
gar if too thick. Set off to cool. Boil chicken un- 
til tender. Take out all the bone and cut up in 
small pieces. Use half as much celery or cabbage 
-as chicken. If cabbage is used add celery seed 
and pour dressing over, and stir lightly. Before 
serving add one pint of whipped cream. This will 
serve twenty persons. 

POTATO SALAD 
^ Mrs. John E. Brewer. 

Yolks of eight eggs, eight tablespoons of vine- 
■gar, eight tablespoons of melted butter, one tea- 
spoon French mustard, two teaspoons sugar, three 
teaspooos salt, one-fourth cayenne pepper. Boil 
yolks of eggs. Heat the vinegar and pour hot 
•over the beaten yolks, stirring all the time. Put 
back on stove and cook slowly. When done put 
in melted butter and mix thoroughly and add last, 
eight boiled potatoes, and about half as much cel- 
-ery, one-quarter of a pound of English walnuts, 
broken up. Thin down with whipped cream when 
ready to use. 

Maple City Soaps arc the best. 



66 SALADS. 

NASTURTIUM SALAD. 
Ella Hoyt. 

Line a salad bow] with nasturtium leaves. Take 
fully ripe tomatoes scald and slice. Cold boiled 
potatoes cut in dice. Onions sliced very thin. 
Put in salad bowl in alternate layers, pouring over 
all mayonnaise dressing. Chop some nasturtium 
seed and leaves and mix through salad. 

VEAL SALAD. 

Gussie Cumming. 

Four pounds of veal. Three stalks of celery, 
two eggs, one cup of vinegar, one cup* of sour 
cream, two spoons of sugar, one tablespoon of cel- 
ery seed, one tablespoon of prepared mustard, one 
tablespoon of butter, one teaspoon of salt. Boil 
to a thick cream, and when cold, or just before 
serving, pour over veal and celery, chopped fine. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Make as salmon salad, using lobsters instead of 
salmon. 

SWEETBREAD SALAD. 

Use recipe for chicken or veal salad. Substi- 
tuting sweetbreads, prepared by soaking in salted 
water two hours. Skim. Put in hot water and 
boil thirty minutes. Put in cold water and remove 
the rest of the skim. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

In making shrimp salad, by adding a little cold 
stewed celery root (chopped) and some chopped 
sweet parsley and chives, the salad is remarked 
by every one as being so much better than the 
usual shrimp salad.. 



C. Shultz for anything in the Drug line 



SALADS. 67 

SALAD DRESSING. 
Mrs. C. A. Willits. 

Yolks of four eggs, one-half teaspoon mustard, 
one-half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon sugar, Beat 
thoroughly. Heat two tablespoons vinegar and 
two of water, add to above. Cook over hot water 
till it thickens. While hot beat in half as much 
olive oil or butter, and reduce with cream. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Mrs. Jos. Stevenson. 

Four eggs, one cup of vinegar, one-half pint of 
melted butter, two tablespoons mustard, a pinch of 
red pepper. Salt to taste. Beat the eggs. Mix 
other ingredients with melted butter, then add 
eggs. Boil until thick. Stir in a cup of whipped 
cream. Stir constantly until done. 

SALAD DRESSING. 
Emma Gregg. 

Yolks of six eggs, well beaten, three tablespoons 
of oil, one teaspoon of mustard, one cup vinegar. 
Heat the vinegar and add to the eggs, oil and 
mustard. Then boil until it thickens. This makes 
enough dressing for two medium or large chickens. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

Add the well beaten yolks of five eggs to five 
tablespoons vinegar. Cook in double kettle until 
stiff, being careful to stir clean from the sides of 
the bowl while cooking. Remove from the fire. 
Add two tablespoons butter, and stir until cool and 
perfectly smooth. When cool, season to taste 
with salt, pepper, mustard, and thin with sour 
cream to the required consistency. With cabbage 
salad use sugar instead of mustard. 

Ask yoiw gj'occr for xAndcrsoii s Jams and Mincemeat 



68 SALADS. 

MAYONNAISE. 

Rub well together one teaspoon of made mustard 
and one half teaspoon of salt, add the yolk of one 
raw egg. Pour on, very slowly, oil or melted but- 
ter, beating hard all the time until as much is made 
as wanted, then add a tablespoon of vinegar. 
The mixture should look perfectly smooth. 

A nice way to eat lettuce is with lemon juice 
and powdered sugar, serving the lemons as for 
raw oysters. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Mrs. Wildermuth. 

Six large potatoes, one large onion, whites of 
three hard boiled eggs, chop all together. Dress- 
ing: Yolks of three hard boiled eggs, yolk of one 
raw egg, half cup of vinegar, half teaspoonful 
of ground mustard, half teaspoonful of celery 
seed. Salt and pepper to taste. 

PECAN SALAD. 
Mrs. W. A. Hoyt. 

Cut celery as for salad and mix with pecan 
meats, pouring over all some mayonaise dressing. 
Nice to serve with meats. 

CHEAP POTATO SALAD. 
Mrs. Peter Burns. 

Chop two good sized onions veiy fine, chop or 
dice six medium sized potatoes; season with salt. 
add pepper and celery seed if desired. For dress- 
ing, beat two eggs and half cup of sugar together, 
then add one cup vinegar, put into a skillet in 
which butter the size of a walnut has been melted, 
let it come to a boil; pour over the potato and on- 
ion mixture. 

Ask your grocer for ''Blue Ribbon' Canned Goods 

and Olives. 



SALADS. 69 

POTATO SALAD. 
Mrs. Jos. Stevenson. 

Boil six or eight medium sized potatoes; when 
cold cut in small bits, with one stalk of celery cut 
fine; six hard boiled eggs mashed fine; a small 
slice of onion cut fine; pepper, salt and one table- 
spoon of sugar. 

Dressing — Five eggs beat light; add one cup of 
sour cream, half cup vinegar, butter the size of a 
walnut; one teaspoon of mustard, a little pepper 
and salt, one teaspoon of sugar. Beat all well to- 
gether; put on the stove and stir constantly until 
it comes to a boil; beat until cold and then pour 
over the salad. 

Put in a cool place or on ice. Before serving 
stir in one cup of whijDped cream, and serve on 
lettuce or cabbage leaves. 

SALMON-SALAD EGGS. 
Mrs. A. H. Dean. 

Boil the number of eggs you desire until hard. 
Mix the powdered yolks with canned salmon, sea- 
son with vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper. 
Place the mixture within the whites of the eggs, 
and throw over them drawn butter. Serve hot. 

SALMON SALAD. 

Mrs. C. D. Tourtellotte. 

To one can of salmon take one-fourth of a 
head of cabbage and two bunches of celery. Chop 
cabbage and celery very fine, mix it with the sal- 
mon, then add one teaspoon mustard, two-thirds 
cup vinegar, with one teaspoon Worcestershire 
sauce. Pepper and salt to taste. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

M. B. S. 

Eggs tw^o, sugar four teaspoons, cream three 
quarters cup, vinegar three quarters cup, mustard 

Ask yoitr grocer for Welsh's Maple Syrup. 



70 SALADS. 

one teaspoon, salt and pepper, (a little). Boil the 
eggs hard; rub the yolks fine; add mustard, then 
the sugar, then the salt and pepper, then the vin- 
egar slowly, and last the cream. Put into the 
dish in which it is to be served a layer of shrimp 
broken moderately fine, then a layer of celery cut 
fine; pour over this three or four spoons of the 
dressing; so continue till all is used. 

TOMATO SALAD WITH SHRIMPS. 

Take six large, smooth tomatoes, skin them, put 
upon the ice to chill, remove the inside of the to- 
matoes, cut it up with a silver knife into small 
pieces, and drain off juice, then add shrimps to 
this mixture, allowing four or five for each toma- 
to, a little pepper and salt, and any good mayon- 
naise dressing, stir all lightly and fill the tomato 
shells, place again upon ice, when ready to serve 
put each tomato upon a lettuce leaf and add one 
teaspoon of mayonnaise upon the top of the mix- 
ture, w^hich ought to be piled rather high. The 
success of this salad depends upon the coldness. 

TONGUE SALAD. 

Chill meat, half cup of ham. one cup tongue, 
one cup celery or cucumber, fourth cup chipped 
olives, one teaspoon salt, a little white pepper, a 
little lemon juice, and a little stock. Line bowl 
with lettuce or parsley; use mayonnaise dressing. 

VEAL SALAD. 

Mi'S. N. S. Woodward. 

Four and a half pounds veal, one bunch of cel- 
ery, three boiled eggs. 

Dressing: Three eggs or yolks of four or five, 
two tablespoons sugar, four tablespoons vinegar, 
one teaspoon mustard. Boil until thick as cream 
and let get cold. 

Use Maple City Soaps. 



SALADS. 71 

MAYONAISE DRESSING. 
Mary C. McNitt. 

Yolks of two ego-s well beaten (or one whole 
■egg), one level teaspoon salt, one level teaspoon 
pepper, two level teaspoons sugar, two level tea- 
spoons prepared mustard, one tablespoon of but- 
ter. Stir into this four tablespoons vinegar. Put 
the dressing in a bowl set in boiling water, stir- 
ring constantly until thick. This dressing is nice 
■on sliced tomatoes. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 
Mrs. W. G. Miller. 

Two heads of crisp lettuce, two cucumbers, sev- 
eral fresh tomatoes, one small onion, a little cel- 
ery. Shred the lettuce, chop the onion and celery 
fine, and slice the cucumbers and tomatoes. Ar- 
range in layers on dish and pour over it any good 
salad dressinfif. 




Maple City Soaps arc the best. 



ya BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK 

The R. A. Wilson Company 



Books and Stationery. 
Carpets, Wall Paper and Furniture. 

MONnOUTH, ILLINOIS. 

A GOOD RECEIPT : 

Subscribe for the IJemOC VSLV *"^ ''^^** '^ ^" ^^^ year. 

<> 

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY AT $1.50 A YEAR. 

Job Printing Neatly Executed. Quinby Block. 



rnVw--" ALUMINUM WARE AT SCHUSSLER'S? 

L/Ooks like silver, is light, will not tarnish, 
and CHEAP. 

Tableware, Cooking Utensils, Spoons, etc. 

Also solid Silver and Plated Ware at Greatly Re- 
duced Prices Bread Knives, Cake Knives, Meat 
Knives, Scissors, etc., etc. 



John W. Byers. John G. Moore. J. E. (Dick) Brers. 

U. S. Yards, Chicago. U. S. Yards, Chicago. St'kYds,So.Omaha,Neb. 

BYERS, MOORE & BYERS, 

Live -Stock CotTvmi.s.siof\ MercKaKt^, 



Byers Brothers & Co., 

Stock Y'ards. 
South Omaha, Neb. 



Room 109 Exchange Building. 
Union Stock Yards 



Address all conrmunlcations Exchange Building, Union Stock Yards. 



CHEESE. 



73 



CHEESE. 

'The queen of curds and cream.'' — JVintefs Tale. 



CHEESE OMELET. 

Mrs. A. H. Dean. 

Three-fourths of a cup of grated cheese, one cup 
of rolled cracker, one cup of sweet milk, two eggs, 
beaten separately, salt. 

WELSH RAREBITS. 
Mrs. T. H. Hanna 

Melt slowly in a crock or porcelain kettle, rich 
cream cheese. Add a little cayenne. Toast bread. 
Butterslightly. Arrange on a plate. Pour cheese 
over and serv^e very hot. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

Three tablespoons of flour, three tablespoons of 
Parmesan cheese, one tablespoon of" butter, one 
tablespoon of milk, one-half saltspoon of salt, one- 
fourth saltspoon of pepper, one Gggy yolk only. 
Mix the dry ingredients, and add the milk, the 
yolk of the Qggy and the butter, softened. Mix all 
well with a spoon, and when smooth divide the 
dough in two parts. Roll these very thin, cut in 
narrow strips three inches long. Bake in a slow 
oven fifteen minutes. They maybe served hot or 
cold. Pile on a plate in log cabin style. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE. 
Mrs. I. P. Pillsbury. 

Two tablespoons butter, one heaping tablespoon 
flour. Mix together. Add yolks of three eggs. 

Get a new Stove frofu Pinkertott & Evans. 



74 CHEESE. 

one-half cup sweet milk, one cup grated cheese, 
one-half teaspoon salt, a few grains cayenne pep- 
per. Put on stove and cook. Whip whites of 
eggs stiff. Mix thoroughly and turn into a but- 
tered dish. Bake until done, about fifteen or 
twenty minutes, and serve immediately. 

CHEESE STICKS. 

Mrs. R. H. Scott. 

One quart flour, one teaspoon salt, shortening 
as for rich paste, one and a half pints grated cheese. 
Mix flour and shortening, then add the cheese. 
Mix with milk to a stiff dough. Roll to the thick- 
ness of nearly half an inch. Sprinkle over it a 
little salt. Cut in narrow strips and bake to a 
light brown. Let them be thoroughly done before 
taking out. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

One-half pound cheese, two eggs, one table- 
spoon mustard, one-half teaspoon salt, one-half 
cup cream, pinch of cayenne pepper. Break cheese 
into small bits, put the ingredients in a pan over 
hot water. Stir until cheese melts. Spead over 
toast and serve. 

CHEESE FONDA. 

Soak one cup dry bread crumbs in two scant 
cups rich milk. Beat into this three eggs whipped 
very light. Add one small teaspoon melted but- 
ter, one small teaspoon pepper, one small teaspoon 
salt, one-half pound of old cheese grated. Pour 
into a buttered baking dish, strew the top with 
dry bread crumbs, and bake a delicate brown in 
quick oven. Serve immediately in the baking 
dish, as it soon falls. This is a delicious relish. 

Fresh Butter and Eggs at W. J. Patterson s. 



CHEESE. 75 

SOMETHING FOR LUNCH. 

Break a quarter of a pound of cheese into bits 
and pound with it to a smooth paste two spoon- 
fuls of butter, the yolks of two eggs, one teaspoon 
of mustard, a very little cayenne, and a half-tea- 
spoon of salt. Toast six slices of bread, and after 
spreading them with the mixture, lay them in a 
pan in a hot oven for five minutes. Serve at once. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

Grate three tablespoons any kind of cheese. 
Add three tablespoons flour, a little red pepper 
and salt. Add to the dry ingredients one table- 
spoon melted butter, one tablespoon water and 
yolk of one egg. Roll thin, as for cookies. Cut 
in strips. Bake fifteen minutes, or to a light 
brown. Delicious with salads. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 
Helen Dean. 

One cup grated cheese, two cups flour, two ta- 
blespoons butter, (heaping). Enough cold water 
to thin. Pinch of cayenne. Mix butter and 
cheese together, add water, then flour. Roll thin. 
Cut in strips and bake in rather hot oven. 

CHEESE CRACKERS. 

M. B. S. 

Place a quantity of buttered Saratoga flakes or 
soda crackers in a baking pan. Heaping teaspoon 
of rich grated cheese. Dust a little cayenne pep- 
per over, and bake about five minutes in hot oven. 
Bake a light brown. Excellent with salads. 



Waseca White Rose Flour at W. J. Pattersons 



76 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



UNt.laiUMi-tL(> iPi UUALITY AND PRICE, 



GHiGACO YEAST POWDER 

Can Aliuaus be Depended Upon for 

PERFECT RESULTS 
*"^~ ONLY HIGHEST GRADE 

BAKING FODDER is required. 

IT MflKES THE~UGHTEST BREflD/ 

THOSE WHO TRY IT, ALWAYS IJSE IT. 



SOLD EVERYWHERE BY FIRST-CLASS GROCERS 
AT THE UNIFORM PRICE OF 25Cts 
PER POUND. 



MANUFACTURED AND GUARANTEED BY 

CHAPMAN & SMITH COMPANY. 
CHICAGO. 



GRUB0STUMI' 




MAKES A 

CLEAN 
_ _ ,^ fyWF F P 

of two Acres at a sitting. A nian,aboy andaboriecanoperate 
it. No heavy Chains or rods to handle. The crop on a few 
acres the first year will ray for the Machine. It will only cost 
you a postal card to send for an Illustrated Catalofrne, pivinp 
price, tprms and testimonials. Address the Manufacturer« 

JAMES M'LNE & SON, 

Breeders of Pure Stietlatii Ponies 

A stock of these Beautrful and Intelligent Little 
Pets for children kept constantly on hand 
and for sale. Correspondence solicited. 

Write for our pony ca^logue to 

MILNE BROS., 

Monmouth, 111. 



45v^r^^y^icle 

-iSKetlaKcl 

PoKy Fartrv 

Mo>\«T\outK,, Illmoia.. 



Milne Bros., 

Proprietors. 




BREAD 



77, 



BREAD. 

"Nature has meal and bran.'" — Cvmbeline. 



A cook can not acquire a more valuable accom- 
plishment than that of making good bread. Noth- 
ing but experience will secure the name merited 
by so few — ^'an excellent bread maker." The 
first requisite is good flour; the second, good yeast; 
the third, watchful care. There is force in the old 
lament, '*My bread took cold last night," too 
much heat carries forward the process too rapidly 
and the dough will become sour. Correct this by 
dissolving a little soda in warm water and working 
it in well. The oven should not be too hot. If you 
•can not hold your bare arm in it while you count 
thirty, it is too quick. Keep the heat steady after 
the bread goes in. The time for baking is not less 
than three-quarters of an hour, and bread baked 
an hour is more wholesome, 

YEAST. 

Mrs. Seth Pratt. 

Three pints of water, six large potatoes. When 
potatoes are done take the potato water and pour 
over one pint of flour, then add one tablespoon of 
salt. Mash the potatoes thoroughly and mix with 
the flour, and thin with cold water until cold 
enough to put in the yeast. Use two and one-half 
cakes of Magic yeast. 

BREAD. 

Mrs. Geo. Babcock. 

At noon, boil one large potato in enough water 
to scald one cup of flour, when cool enough add 

Ask your grocer for Epicure^ N. V. CJieese. 



78 BREAD. 

one-half cake of dry yeast dissolved. At night 
add I quart of warm water and make a sponge, 
beating well ; in the morning add one-half cup of 
sugar, one-half cup of melted lard and salt, and 
mix till smooth. Let rise, knead down, let rise 
again, then make into loaves, let rise and bake. 
To save out three or four tablespoons of the scalded 
yeast, before making sponge, is better for the next 
baking than using fresh yeast. 

BREAD. 

Mrs. Seth Pratt. 

One pint of yeast, two pints of warm water, one 
tablespoon of lard, two tablespoons of sugar, mix 
into dough, let it rise, mould, let rise again and 
then mould to put into the tins. 

BREAD, 

Mrs. W. S. Walker. 

Two quarts of flour, one cup of granulated sugar, 
one cup of butter, half cup of lard, one tablespoon 
of salt, one yeast cake dissolved in half cup of warm 
water, one pint of warm water; rub thoroughly to- 
gether flour, sugar, butter, lard and salt, then add 
yeast and warm water, mould into one large loaf,. 
let rise over night then mould into loaves, let rise 
until light, then bake. This will make three good 
sized loaves. 

BREAD. 

Mrs. R. A. Wilson. 

(For inexperienced housekeepers. ) 

Save the water in which your potatoes for the 
noon meal were cooked. In the evening take three- 
pints lukewarm potato water, one tablespoon sugar, 
one tablespoon lard, one teaspoon salt, put this into 
a crock and stir in nine cups of flour and two-thirds 
cup of home-made yeast, or its equivalent in dry 

Milne Bros. — Stump Pullei\ 



BREAD. 79 

yeast. (Ordinarily this amount of flour is right, al- 
though some flour will do better with d. little less.) 
Set this crock of sponge in flour in your bread pan, 
cover and set in a warm place until morning. 
Then use the warm flour and mix into a stiff dough, 
make it stiff enough so you will not need to add 
more flour to knead well afterward ; set in a warm 
place until light, then knead thoroughly once and 
set to rise again, when light divide into four equal 
parts and make four loaves, or three loaves and 
one pan of rolls; set in a warm place to rise, when 
light, bake in a moderate oven three-quarters of 
an hour. Divide the recipe for small baking. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 
Mrs. J. C. Dnnbar. 

Sift one quart of flour with two and a half tea- 
spoons of Chapman & Smith's Chicago Yeast 
Powder, one teaspoon salt, and two teaspoons of 
white sugar, mix all thoroughly with the flour, 
sifting several times together, rub in one level 
tablespoon of butter, wet with half a pint of sweet 
milk, handle lightly and cut out with biscuit cutter, 
about an inch thick, and bake in quick oven 15 
minutes. Water may be used instead of milk if 
more butter is added. Handle as little and make 
as rapidly as possible. 

CREAM BISCUIT. 
B. s. 
Sift together two or three times one quart of 
flour and two heaping teaspoons of Chapman & 
Smith's Chicago Yeast Powder, work in one table- 
spoon of butter or lard, and half a tablespoon of 
salt, add one teacup of cream, and beat to a soft 
dough, roll to the thickness of three-fourths of an 
inch, cut out and bake immediately. 

Sinclair Meat Co. , Peoria, Breakfast Bacon. 



8o BREAD. 

DIXIE BISCUIT, 
s. 

Three pints of flour, two eggs, two tablespoons 

of lard, one cake compressed yeast, one cup milk, 

mix at 1 1 o'clock roll out at 4 o'clock, and cut with 

two sizes of cutters, putting the small ones on top, 

let rise until supper, bake twenty minutes. 

MUFFINS. 
Dissolve one cake of compressed yeast in a cup 
of warm milk, add one-half teaspoon salt, one 
quart of lukewarm milk, one cup sugar, one table- 
spoon butter, two eggs, and flour to make batter 
stiff enough to drop, mix at night, bake in muffin 
rings. Makes three dozen. 

BUNS. 
One pint of milk, one-half cake compressed yeast, 
one quart of flour — stir this well, let it rise for 
three hours, then add half cup of butter, rubbed 
to a cream with one cup of powdered sugar and 
one well beaten Ggg, add flour to make a soft dough; 
knead briskly; let rise until very light, then make 
dough into buns, quite small ; set them close to- 
gether on tins and let them rise; when all of a 
sponge, brush the tops with a little milk and sugar 
mixed; bake in a quick oven fifteen or twenty 
minutes. 

SALLY LUNN. 
One pint potato sponge, one-half cup milk, one 
teaspoon salt, one large cooking spoon butter, 
yolks of two eggs ; mix butter and sugar together, 
add yolks, salt and milk, mix well, and add sponge 
with flour enough to make a stiff dough. If wanted 
for tea, set at 11 a. m., let rise until i o'clock, 
knead again, adding flour until it does not stick to 

Sinclair Meat Co. , Peoria, Pure Lard. 



BREAD. 8i 

the board, let rise until 4 o'clock, roll out in two 
sheets, butter one and lay the other on top, cut out 
with biscuit cutter, let rise, and bake in a quick 
■oven. 

SPLIT ROLLS. 
Gne-half pint boiling milk, one pint potato 
sponge, one tablespoon lard aud one of sugar, one 
teaspoon of salt. Put one quart of flour in a bowl 
and add to it sugar, salt and lard, mix thoroughly 
and let cool, then add potato sponge and beat well. 
Set in a warm place to rise. When light, work in 
flour until it does not stick. Let rise again, roll 
out, butter, and cut out with biscuit cutter, double 
•over and pinch together. Do not let them touch 
in the pan. Let rise again and bake in a quick 
oven. 



CHICAGO YEAST POWDER 



IS GUARANTtED HIGHFST CUALITY, 
J\^0 COSTS LESS THAN ANY OTHER. 



REAL SCOTCH SHORT BREAD. 
Two pounds of flour, one pound of butter, one- 
half pound of sugar ; mix to a smooth paste, half 
an inch thick when rolled, pinch edges, prick the 
top with a fork, cut in small squares, invert drip- 
ping pan, cover with paper, put cakes on and bake 
in a slow oven. 

NEW ENGLAND BROWN BREAD. 
Ml"s. N. C Burlingim. 

Two cups corn meal, one cup flour, two-thirds cup 
Orleans molasses, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon 
salt, tablespoon lard or butter, one pint warm water 
(not scalding.) Put the meal in a dish with 
the molasses and salt, add the warm water, 
mixing thoroughly. Set in a warm place over 
night. In the morning add the soda dissolved in 
one-eighth cup of hot water, one teaspoon of 
baking powder in the flour. Steam six hours. 



82 BREAD. 

STEAMED GRAHAM BREAD. 
Mrs. I. L. Moses. 

One quart of sour milk, one of molasses, one of 
Graham flour, one of white flour, one of corn meal, 
one teaspoon of salt and one of soda. This makes 
six loaves, using quart moulds. Fill moulds half 
full, cover and steam three hours, remove to the 
ov^en and brown lightly. 

CORN BREAD. 
M. A. Kinkead. 

One pint of sour milk, one of meal, one of flour^ 
two eggs, one teaspoon soda in a little milk, one 
tablespoon lard, one of butter, two tablespoons of 
sugar, one teaspoon of salt. Stir thoroughly. 
Bake in a hot oven. 

CORN BREAD. 

Mabel Pillsbury. 

One cup corn meal, one-half cup of flour, one 
egg, one cup sour milk, two tablespoons of sweet 
cream or piece of butter, two tablespoons sugar^ 
and one-half teaspoon soda. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 
J. M. Holt. 

One cup corn meal, two cups Graham flour, one 
cup molasses, half teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon of 
soda, sour milk to make batter like cake. Stea m 
two or three hours, and brown in the oven fifteen 
minutes. 

SOFT CORN BREAD. 
Mrs. Wm. H. Rankin. 

Half pint corn meal, half pint sour milk, half 
pint sweet milk, tablespoon melted butter, pinch 
of salt, two well beaten eggs. Bake in a deep dish. 

Ask yoar grocer foi' Penn Van ''ist prize' Buck- 
zuheat Flour. 



BREAD. 83 

FEDERAL BREAD. 
Belle F. Rankin. 

Two eggs, two tablespoons of butter, two table- 
spoons of sugar, one teaspoon salt, one teacup of 
sweet cream, one teacup yeast, and flour enough 
for a soft dough. When risen light, roll out in 
layers about a quarter of an inch thick, placing two 
in each pie pan (this quantity wi^l make three pans 
full); let them rise again and bake. When done, 
butter between the layers, cut in pie shaped pieces,, 
and serve hot. 

CORN BREAD. 
Mrs_ A. H. Dean. 

One cup of sugar, two eggs, one cup of sweet 
milk, three teaspoons baking powder, three-fourths 
cup corn meal, one pint flour. 

SALT RISING BREAD. 
Mrs. San DeLong. 

Scald one heaping tablespoon corn meal with 
two tablespoons of new milk. Let rise over night. 
In the morning take two-thirds of cup new milk, 
one cup hot water, one-half teaspoon soda, flour 
enough to make sponge. Add corn meal, stir well, 
put in warm place to rise. When very light add 
one cup milk, one quart hot water, one teaspoon 
salt. Put all together, knead thoroughly, but not 
as stiff as for yeast bread. Place in pans. When 
light bake in moderate oven one-half hour. Care 
should be taken not to use too hot water. Bread 
must be kept warm until ready for oven. 

AN EASY WAY TO MAKE BREAD. 
Mrs. E. C. Johnson. 

Dissolve one cake of compressed yeast in three 
pints of warm water, add a little salt, then stir 
flour in gradually until it is too stiff to work with 

Ask your grocer for Genes sec Table Salt. 



84 BREAD. 

a spoon, then use hands, kneading it and adding 
flour until it is a stiff dough; use spoon to stir the 
flour in as long as possible; knead thoroughly for 
half an hour. Let rise over night in a warm place, 
then in the morning make into loaves, let rise one 
hour, bake one hour. This will make about five 
loaves. Bread made this way is out of the oven 
by 9 o'clock in the summer time. 

COLD WATER BISCUIT. 

Belle F. Rankin. 

One quart of flour, two tablespoons lard, One 
teaspoon salt, mix up with enough cold water to 
make a stiff dough, beat it with a hatchet until it 
blisters, then roll into little balls, (as for rolls,) 
flatten with a rolling pin, stick with a fork, and 
bake in a hot Oven until a light brown (about fif- 
teen or twenty minutes.) This quantity makes 
about thirty-two biscuits. 

EASY AND SURE WAY TO MAKE GOOD BREAD. 
Mrs. Mira L. ]\Iiller. 

First make the following yeast, which will make 
from twenty-four to thirty loaves of bread, and 
will keep two or three weeks in a cool cellar in the 
summer: Pare and boil six large potatoes, when 
done add enough water to make three pints with 
which scald one pint of flour, stir in mashed pota- 
toes, add tablespoon of salt and water to make as 
thin as batter cakes — have warm as you can hold 
your hand in— add two cakes of Yeast Foam which 
have been soaked in lukewarm water several hours; 
keep in warm place until fermentation ceases — 
about ten or twelve hours. 

To make bread. — In the morning put one quart 
of water, as hot as you can bear your hand in, 
into flour, add one tablespoon of lard, two scant 

See M or roll & Cos ad. on page 4.8. 



BREAD. 85 

tablespoons sugar, and One-half teaspoon salt, and 
one pint of the yeast; knead well and put in warm 
place, when light knead again, when light, again, 
make in four loaves and put in pans. Your bread 
should be baked before noon in winter, earlier in 
summer. A two gallon jar heated and greased is 
the best to put bread in to raise. 

OCEAN GROVE CORN BREAD. 
Mrs. Duke. 

One cup of butter, four eggs, three tablespoons 
sugar, half teaspoon of salt, four teaspoons of 
baking powder, One pint sweet milk, one pint of 
corn meal and one quart flour. 

GERMAN WAFFLES. 
Mrs. H. Warner. 

One-half pound butter beat to a cream, then add 
the yolks of twelve eggs, sugar enough to sweeten 
to your taste. Stir this like pound cake, then add 
one cup of milk, some blanched ground almonds, 
and a teaspoon of almond flavoring, one teaspoon 
baking powder, and enough flour to make it stiff 
as pancake batter; last of all add the whites of 
the eggs well beaten. Bake in waffle irons, and 
sprinkle with sugar before sending to table. 



Montgomery — Dry Goods. 



86 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 



'Allow not nature more than nature ueeds.'' — J^ing Lea?- 



PUFF PASTE. 

Take equal quantities of flour and butter, befoi'e 
mixing wash the butter thoroughly, then lay in ice 
water, take the flour, adding a teaspoonful of salt 
for each pound of flour, mix into a stiff, smooth 
paste, using ice water for mixing, allow the dough 
to lie five minutes, after which roll large enough 
to work in butter, fold twice so it will be four 
thicknesses, repeat five times, leaving the paste 
about ten minutes each time, then work paste in 
desired form, a cool place is desirable for making 
paste. 

• ' PIE CRUST. 

Three cups of flour to one of lard makes three 
pies. Rub lard lightly in flour: salt. Pour in 
enough ice water to roll out: mix lightly with a 
knife. For lemon, chocolate and all pies of that 
character, bake the crust first, prick lightly with 
a fork to prevent blistering, then add the custard, 
already prepared by coo king in double boiler. Thi s 
is much better than where the custard is baked in 
the pie. 

GOOD PIE CRUST. 

A quart of flour will make four pies. Sift the 
flour with a teaspoon of baking powder; rub in a 
quarter of a pound of lard or butter, then moisten 
with ice water, using as little as will make the 
flour stick together. Do not work it with warm 
hands. 

Wi'ight & Grahafu Artistic Tailors. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 87 

APPLE PIE. 

Peel and slice three apples, put in the crust; pour 
on a half teacup of water, a teacup of sugar mixed 
with a tablespoon of flour; a small piece of butter 
and nutmeg grated. 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE. 

One pint of sour apples cooked smooth and 
sifted, two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, six 
eggs beaten separately; the whites for frosting 
the top; season with mace and cinnamon. This 
makes five pies. 

BLACKBERRY PIE. 

One pint of berries, one teacup of sugar mixed 
with a tablespoon of flour to prevent the juice 
from boiling out; water if necessary. 

CHESS PIE. 
Julia Clark. 

Three eggs, two-thirds cup sugar, half cup but- 
ter, half cup mlik. Beat butter to a cream, add 
yolks and sugar beaten to a froth, with one tea- 
spoon vanilla. Stir together rapidly and bake in 
a nice crust. When done spread with the beaten 
whites of the eggs and three tablespoons of sugar. 
Keturn to oven and brown slightly. 

CREAM PIE. 
Miss Minnie Babcock. 

One pint cream, one tablespoon corn starch 
mixed smooth in a little of the cream, sugar to 
taste, vanilla; whites of two eggs well beaten 
added to mixture when just ready for oven. Bake 
slowly and serve very cold. 

CREAM PIE. 

Ruth Ray. 

Lay in a pie plate a crust as for custard pie. 
Stir to a cream half a cup of sugar and one table- 

Genuine N. O. Molasses at IV. J. Pattcrsoiis. 



88 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

spoon butter. Add the yellow of two eggs, two 
tablespoons flour and two cups of milk. Mix all 
together and flavor with lemon. When done beat 
the whites of two eggs with two tablespoons of su- 
gar. Spread over pie. Return to oven to brown. 

CRE\M PIE. 

Mrs. Henry Ewing. 

One cup of sugar, three tablespoons of flour, 
three eggs, butter size of an egg, one and a half 
teacup new milk, one and a half teacup new cream, 
flour, with lemon or vanilla extract. This receipt 
makes two pies. 

CREAM PIE. 
Mrs. Ida Weir. 

One egg, half cup cream, half cup milk, half 

cup sugar, nutmeg to taste, one tablespoon corn 

starch: let the milk and cream come to the boil, 

then add the egg, sugar and corn starch: then, 
place in baked crust and frost. 

CREAM PIE. 
Sadie Neville. 

One and one -half cups powdered sugar, one ta- 
blespoon flour, a little grated nutmeg, one pint 
cream. Stir together. Beat the whites of three 
eggs to a stiff froth. Add this to the cream, beat- 
ing well. Bake in a slow oven. This makes 
enough filling for two pies. 

CREAM PIE. 

Mrs. T. H. Hanna. 

Take four eggs (leaving out the whites of two). 
one cup sugar, half cup flour, a little salt: mix 
these smooth with a little cold milk and stir into 
one quart of boiling milk: simmer slowly until 
thick, stirring all the time: flavor with vanilla or 
lemon; pour this into newly baked crust and bake 

' ' T/iej call for dates and quinces in the pastry. " 

— Romeo and Juliet, 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. • 89 

five minutes. Beat the two whites of eggs to a 
stiff froth, add half cup of sugar: spread over top 
and brown lightly. 

COCOANUT PIE. 
Mrs. W. B. Wolf. 

•of four eggs, one cup cocoanut (pre- 
paig/l), one cup sugar, ore quart new milk, pinch 
of salt, four tablespoons flour. Put milk on stove, 
let come to a boil: add cocoanut and sugar; mix 
flour thoroughly with cold milk, then add to boil- 
ing milk: lastly the eggs well beaten. Stir gently. 
Bake the crust before putting the mixture in. 
Beat the whites of four eggs, add eight teaspoons 
pulverized sugar, vanilla flavoring: spread over 
the top and sprinkle with cocoanut: place in oven 
and brown delicately. This makes two pies. 




^'ROLLING-PiN" 



CLEANCO CURRANTS ARE READY FOR INSTANT USE. 

NO WASHING OR C LEANING REQUIRED. 

COCOANUT PIE. 
Mrs. Ida Weir. 

One pint milk, half cup sugar, half cup cocoa- 
nut, one tablespoon butter, two tables^Doons flour; 
cook until thick, then add whites of two eggs and 
pour into the crust, which has been previously 
baked. Frost with whites of two eggs and place 
in oven to brown. 

COCOANUT PIE. 
Mrs. Eliza B. Smith. 

One cup of sweet milk, half cuj) of cocoanut, 
whites of two eggs, half cup of sugar, one table- 
spoon of butter, flour enough to thicken. Put the 
milk, cocoanut and butter in a dish placed in an- 
other one filled with water to boil. Rub flour and 
sugar togettier with a little milk and add to boil- 
ing milk. When thick add the whites of eggs 
beaten. Set aside to cool. Make a rich puff paste; 
when this is cool, jDOur in the filling. Spread over 
the pie the whites of two eggs, well beaten. 



90 PIES AND PUDDINGS, 



Sprinkle half cup cocoanut and two tablesjioons of 
sugar over the top. Place in oven to browii. 

COCOANUT CREAM PIE. 
Mrs. H. F. Eaton. 

One i3int milk, one cup sugar, one tablespoon 
butter, four tables23oons flour, whites four eggs, 
one cup prepared C(x:oanut. pinch of salt. vScald 
the piat of milk over steam; add sugar, cocoanut 
and butter, then the flour and salt which have 
been mixed with cold milk, and lastly the beaten 
whites of eggs: stir gently. Bake crust after 
prickiiig with a fork. When both are cold spread 
the mixture over crust. Then beat whites of four 
eggs, add eight teaspoons pulverized sugar: 
spread this over top and lastly sprinkle one-fourth 
cup cocoanut over top. and brown lightly. This 
makes two pies. If fresh cocoanut is used half of 
one is e.iough. It will then be necessary to use a 
little sugar with that S2)riukled over top. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 
Mrs. W. J McQuiston. 

Yolks of three eggs, two large tablespoons 
grated chocolate, one teaspoon of flour, two-thirds 
cup of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, a very little 
butter: set on the stove till it thickens; flavor with 
vanilla; bake with an under crust; beat the w^hites, 
add two teaspoons of sugar: spread on the pie and 
brown slightly. Serve cold. 

LEMON PIE. 
Mrs. R. A. Wilson. 

One lemon, one cup sugar, one coffee cup water, 
yolks of two eggs, two very heaping tablespoons 
of flour. Mix the flour and sugar together and 
add the beaten yolks of the eggs and the juice of 
the lemon with a very little of the grated rind, 
then add the cup of cold water. Put this into a 

* ' Wishers were ever fools. " — A nthony and Cleopatra. 



.PIES AND PUDDINGS. 91 

i:ice boiler and cook until it looks clear and thick; 
put into the crust which has been baked. Make a 
meringue with the whites of the eggs, one or two 
tablespoons of sugar and a little vanilla, and put 
on the top of the pie and brown slightly in the 
oven. 

LEMON PIE. 
Mrs. Henry H. Pattee and Mrs. J. Shultz. 

One cup sugar, one cup water, one lemon, one 
tablespoon corn starch, two eggs (leaving white 
of one for the meringue). Boil sugar and water 
until dissolved, add juice and grated rind of lemon, 
beaten eggs and corn starch mixed smooth with 
little cold water; cook until it thickens; do not 
.scorch; pour into a pan lined with rich paste and 
previously baked; return to the oven and bake un- 
til firm ; beat wiiite of egg stiff, add tablespoon 
sugar, spread over top and set in the ovea for a 
few minutes. 

^ LEMON PIE. 
i. Ida Parrot. 

Three lemons, three spoons butter, four eggs, one 
cup sugar. Grate rinds and use juice. Melt but- 
ter. Stir all together and bake with under crust. 
P>ost with whites of four eggs, sweetening with 
four tablespoons sugar. Brown delicately. Suffi- 
xcient for two pies. 

LEMON PIE. 

Mrs. Eliza B. Smith. 

One teacup of water, the grated rind and juice 
-of one lemon, one cup sugar, yellow of two eggs, 
two tablespoons of flour, butter size of walnut. 
Put water in double boiler, and place on stove. 
Add one-half sugar to water. Beat the eggs with 
the other half cup sugar. Add butter and lemon, 
then thicken with the flour. Let boil fifteen min- 



'/// d/ozus the ivind tJiat profits nobody. " — Henry IV. 



92 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

utes, stirring all the time. Have crust baked. 
Pour in fillingr when cool. Beat whites of two- 
eggs and spread over top, and sprinkle with two- 
tablespoons of sugar. Place in oven to brown. 

TWO CRUST LEMON PIE. 
Mrs. M. L. Dougherty. 

Three lemons for two pies. Two cups of boil- 
ing water, two tablespoons of corn starch, one cui> 
of sugar, three eggs. 

LEMON CUSTARD PIE. 
Mi-s. D. TurnbuU. 

Two lemons grated, two coffee cups boiling- 
water, two and one-half tablespoons corn starch, 
two coffee cups sugar, yolks of three eggs. Put 
the corn starch, sugar and water on the fire and 
let it remain until it becomes thick, stirring con- 
stantly, then iiour it on the eggs and lemons. Will 
make three small pies or two large ones. 

MINCE MEAT. 
Ida Armsby. 

Four pounds meat, one and one-half pounds of 
suet. As much apple as both suet and meat, 
three pounds raisins, one pound citron, one and 
one-half pounds figs, two nutmegs, ten cts. of cin- 
namon, five cts. cloves, one teaspoon of pepper, 
four pints of New Orleans molasses, four pints C 
sugar, juice of two lemons, one cup of vinegar, 
two and one-half quarts boiled cider, two table- 
spoons salt. Boil one hour. 

MINCE MEAT. 
Mrs. H. M. Graham. 

Three bowls chopped meat, five of chopped ap- 
ples, five of brown sugar, one of shredded suet, two 
of seeded raisins, one of Orleans molasses, one of 

•''To whom God zvill, there be the victory .'' 

—Hejiry VI. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 93 

vinegar, one of fruit syrup or jelly, one of cider, 
one of chopped citron, three tablespoons cinnamon, 
two tablespoons cloves, one tablespoon salt, one 
tablespoon pepper, five nutmegs, grated. Mix all 
together. Put in granite kettle. Set on the stove, 
heat through thoroughly, then set away for use. 
For measurement use pint bowl. 

TOMATO MINCE FOR PIES. 
Mrs. Sarah Ruse. 

One peck of green tomatoes. Five pounds of 
sugar, two pounds of raisins, one tablespoon of 
cloves, one tablespoon cinnamon, one tablespoon 
allspice, one tablespoon nutmeg. Chop the toma- 
toes fine and cook one hour and a half, then add 
the sugar and spice, with one lemon and half a cup 
of vinegar, and the raisins chopped fine. Use a 
teaspoon of salt and half a one of pepper, and cook 
half an hour. This will keep in an open jar all 
winter. Delicious. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 
Mrs. San DeLong. 

Six soda crackers rolled fine, one cup molasses, 
one cup hot water, half cup sugar, half cup vine- 
gar, half cup melted butter, one cup chopped 
raisins, one teaspoon each of cloves, cinnamon, 
allspice and nutmeg. Measure in coffee cup. The 
above will make four pies. 
« 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

For two large pies. Four crackers, one cup 
molasses, one cup sugar, two-thirds cup butter or 
-chopped salt pork, two eggs, one teaspoon each of 
cloves and cinnamon, one cup chopped raisins. 

Exercise, sun and air zvill give good appetite 
and sonnd sleep. 



94 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

ORANGE PIE. 
M-JS. Jennie Hawley. 

One orange, one small cup sugar, one small cup 
sweet milk, two eggs, one tablespoon flour, one 
teaspoon butter. Grate the orange and mix with 
sugar, butter, yolks of eggs and flour; beat thor- 
oughly, add milk, and bake with one crust. Beat 
the white of the eggs to a stiff froth, add sugar to 
make quite sweet, and when the pie is done, spread 
the frosting smoothly on top, return to oven and 
let remain until a light brown. Try this once and 
you will try it again. 

TUF Mfl^T nPIIPATP FLAVORS ARE OBTAINED FROM 

inc muoi ucLiUHii. Chicago flavoring extracts. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 
M-B. S. 
Select deep yellow pumpkin, fine grained. Pare 
and cook slowly. When soft, and the water all 
boiled off, mash and set back on the stove where 
it can simmer until the pumpkin becomes brown 
and waxy. Put through a colander, and to scant 
three pints of the pumpkin add eight well-beaterk 
eggs, one teaspoon mace, one teaspoon cinnamon^ 
one teaspoon ginger, half a nutmeg, a little salt,, 
two cups light brown sugar, and two quarts of good 
sweet milk. Bake slowly until a nice golder^ 
brown. Prepare the pumpkin the day before. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 
Mrs. W A. Robison. 

In preparing the pumpkin, cook from six to eight 
hours. To one pint of pumpkin take two eggs,, 
one cup granulated sugar, one-half saltspoon salt^ 
the same of pepper, one tablespoon butter, one- 
half nutmeg, one teaspoon ginger, one pint good 
sweet milk. Delicious. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 95 

PINEAPPLE PIE. 
M. B. S. 

Use either fresh or canned pineapples, grated. 
Sweeten to taste. Small piece of butter. Bake 
with one crust, with strips over top. 

PINEAPPLE PIE. 
Mrs. Chas. Collins. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup 
sweet cream, five eggs, one pineapple grated. 
Beat the butter and sugar to a cream. Add the 
beaten yolks of eggs, the pineapple and cream, and 
lastly the beaten whites, whipped in lightly. Bake 
with under crust. 

RHUBARB PIE. 
Ruth Ray. 

Pour boiling water over two teacups of chopped 
rhubarb. Drain off the water after four or five 
minutes, and mix with the rhubarb one teacup 
of sugar, the yolk of an egg, a piece of butter the 
size of walnut, a tablespoon of flour. Moistening 
the whole with three tablespoons of water. Bake 
with a lower crust only. When done beat th5 
whites of two eggs and two tablespoons of sugar. 
Spread over top and return to oven. 

SQUASH PIE 
Mrs. H. Burlingini. 

Squash one large pint, sugar two cups, milk one' 
quart, butter two tablespoons, cracker three table- 
spoons, eggs four, ginger one teaspoon, extract of 
lemon one teaspoon, salt one teaspoon. Peel the 
squash, steam it soft, and strain it. To a large 
pint, add sugar, spice, salt and cracker crumbs, 
the latter rolled fine. Boil the milk, and melt the 
butter in it. Pour this gradually over the squash, 

' 'I/i a false quarrel there is no true valour. " 

— Mueh Ado About Nothing. 



96 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

stirring all the time. When thoroughly- mixed add 
the eggs well beaten. Bake in deep plates, with 
a nice under crust. Excellent. 

WASHINGTON PIE. 
Mrs. F. P. Gilbert. 

One cup sugar, one Ggg, half cup sweet milk, 
one heaping tablespoon butter, one and a half cups 
flour, one heaping teaspoon Chapman & Smith's 
Chicago Yeast Powder, nutmeg to taste. Bake in 
two layers in quick oven. Filling — Into one pint 
of boiling milk stir the following: One tablespoon 
corn starch dissolved in a little milk, yolks of two 
eggs, half cup sugar. After this is cooked thorough- 
ly, beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and stir 
into the cream while cream is still hot. Flavor 
with lemon. Spread between layers of cake and 
serve fresh. This makes a very nice dinner dessert. 



PUDDINGS. 



APPLE PUDDING. 

Mrs. J. Shultz. 

Fill a buttered baking dish with sliced apples, 
and pour over the top a batter made of one table- 
#*f{>^on of butter, half cup of sugar, one Ggg, half 
cup sweet milKTand one cup of flour in which has 
been sifted one teaspoon baking powder. Bake in 
a moderate oven. Serv^e with sugar and cream. 
Use peaches the same way. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS. 
Mrs J. B. Herbert. 

Pare, core and quarter good cooking apples; 
have ready well buttered cups; take one pint flour, 

' 'He tJiat is proud, cats up Jiinisclf. " 

— Troilus and C res si da. 



PIEb AND PUDDINGS. 97 

two teaspoons of baking powder, a little salt, and 
sufficient milk to make a thick batter; put in each 
cup a spoonful of batter, add prepared apples, 
cover with batter, and steam until fruit is thorough- 
ly cooked. Serve with sugar and cream. 

APPLE TAPIOCA. 
Mrs. Geo.Babcock. 

Soak one cup tapioca in one quart water over night 
pare and slice a dish of apples, adding a little 
water and sugar. Bake. When nearly done, pour 
tapioca over apples and return to oven. Cook 
until it jellies. Eat with cream and sugar. 

A DELICATE DESSERT. 

Mrs. Mary Pillsbury. 

Bake a sponge cake. Have it two inches deep 
when done. Over this pour boiled custard. Just 
before serving slice some peaches and put over the 
cake. Beat the whites of the eggs to a froth and 
put over the top. For custard use the yolks of 
the eggs and whites for the top. Oranges maybe 
used instead of peaches. 

BOILED APPLE PUDDING. 

Mrs, Sarah K. Miller. 

Pare and core six apples, put them in a stew 
pan with water enough to half cover them, add 
one teacup of sugar and butter the size of an egg, 
a pinch of salt; boil until the underside of the apple 
is tender, then turn them over, thicken with a 
tablespoon of flour mixed in cold water; essence to 
suit. 

BREAD PUDDING 
Mrs. J R Hickman. 

One pint bread crumbs, one cup molasses, one of 
raisins (seeded), one of water, one of flour, one egg, 
one teaspoon of soda; steam two hours. 



[/sc Maple City Toilet Soaps. 



98 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

BANANAS IN SYRUP 
Mrs. Jas. French, 

Heat in a porcelain kettle a pint of currant and 
red raspberry juice, equal parts, sweetened to taste. 
When boiIing,drop into it a dozen peeled bananas ^ 
simmer them very gently for twenty minutes; re- 
move the bananas, boil the juice until thickened to 
the consistency of syrup, pour over the fruit. 
Serve cold. 

BANANA SNOW. 
Mrs. Eliza Smith. 

Soak two-thirds box of gelatine in one-half cup 
of cold water for half an hour, then pour over this 
one pint of boiling water, add a heaping cup of 
sugar, juice of two lemons, stir well, when cold 
and begining to thicken add whites of three well 
beaten eggs; beat all together until stiff and white 
(about one hour.) Peel, cut in thin slices eight large 
bananas and stir into the snow. Dip molds into 
cold water, fill with the snow, set on ice to harden. 
Serve with whipped cream or custard made of the 
yolks of eggs, one pint milk and half cup sugar. 

BAKED APPLES. 
Mrs. Mary A. Frantz. 

Cut apples in halves, take out cores, set in bak- 
ing pan with the cored side up. For seven or 
eight tart apples use 3 cups sugar, i^ cups water, 
set on top of stove, cover closely and let boil half 
an hour, remove cover and place in oven, an bake 
until brown as desired. 

CURRANT PUDDING. 

Mrs. Fred Patterson 

One Q^^, two tablespoons sugar, one tablespoon 
butter, three-fourths cup sweet milk, one cup of 

" Goodivords arc better than bad strokes.'' 

— J ti litis Ccesar^ 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. gg 

currants, two tablespoons bakinj^ powder, a little 
salt. Put in enough flour to make it a stiff batter. 
Steam half an hour. Serve hot. Sauce for pud- 
ding- — Beat one egg until light, then add three- 
fourths cup of sugar, one cup of sweet milk, one 
tablespoon butter. Place this on the stove, let it 
stand until hot, then remove from stove and flavor 
with vanilla extract. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 
Mrs. Draper Babcock. 

One cup sugar, one of sweet milk, one egg, two 
tablespoons butter, two teaspoons Chapman & 
Smith's Chicago yeast powder,two cups flour, steam 
two and one-half hours. 

Sauce for same. — One pint water in a basin, 
three tablespoons sugar and a little salt, one table- 
spoon butter, and let it boil ten minutes, then add 
thickening— flour and water mixed very smooth. 
Strain the same if there are any lumps of flour, it 
should be about as thick as crearh. F'lavor with 
lemon or vanilla. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 
One quart milk in which scald nine tablespoons 
grated bread crumbs and five tablespoons choco- 
late. Then take from the fire and add the beaten 
yolks of four eggs, sweeten to the taste, and sea- 
son with vanilla. Bake one-half hour. Then put 
the whites, well beaten, over the top, w^ith two 
tablespoons of sugar, and l^t stand in the oven 
until a light brown. 

COCOVNUT AND CORN ST\RCH BLANC MANGE 
Mrs Jas French. 

Simmer two tablespoons of prepared cocoanut in 
a pint of milk for twenty minutes and strain 



Chapman & SinitJis Extracts arc delicious in Pics, 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 



through a fine sieve. If necessary, add more cold milk 
to make a full pint. Add a tablespoon of sugar, 
heat to boiling, and stir in gradually two table- 
spoons of corn starch, rub smooth in a very little 
cold milk; cook five minutes, turn into cups and 
serve cold with fruit sauce or cream. 

DIPLOMATIC PUDDING. 
Hannah Tilson. 

Dissolve one box of gelatine in one cup of cold 
water, (it will take about one hour.) For lemon 
syrup use one cup of water, half cup lemon juice, 
two cups sugar — warm until sugar is melted. For 
orange sponge, use one cup of orange juice, two cups 
of sugar, whites of three eggs beaten, and one-fourth 
teaspoon cream tartar. Divide the gelatine about 
equal parts. Pour the syrup into one-half gelatine 
and the sponge in the other half. Mould the syrup 
placing in a large mould, stand a smaller mould in 
the middle of it, fill the small mould with cold 
water until the syrup is solid, then remove the 
small mould and fill the cavity with sponge and 
let cool. 



ly^pypOY RFriPF ^^^^^ baking powder is required 



USE CHICAGO YEAST POWDER. 



DANDY PUDDING. 
Ml-'. H. P. Smith. 

One quart milk, four eggs, two tablespoons corn 
starch, half cup sugar, one teaspoon vanilla ; put 
the milk on to boil ; moisten the corn starch with 
a 'ittle cold milk, and add to the boiling milk; stir 
and boil five minutes; beat the yolks of the eggs 
and sugar together until light, and add to the boil- 
ing milk; take from the fire, add the flavoring, and 
pour into a baking dish; beat the whites of the 
eggs to d very stiff froth, add to them two table- 
spoons powdered sugar, and heap on the top of the 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 



pudding; put it in the oven tor a few minutes until 
a light brown. Serve ice cold. 

DAINTY PUDDING. 

E. Tucker, Chicago. 111. 

Take two ounces of citron, and one orange. 
Grate two large cups of stale bread, and soften it 
with a cupful of water. Grate the rind and squeeze 
the juice of the orange, cut the citron in small bits 
and mix them -with the bread, together with the 
\olks of two or three eggs, and sugar enough to 
sweeten the mixture. Butter six small cups. 
Just before putting the pudding in the oven, beat 
the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, quickly mix 
them with the bread and fruit, distribute them in 
the buttered cups and bake the little puddings 
slowly for about twenty minutes, or until they are 
brown. They are to be served hot and with cream 
sauce. 

DELMONICO. 

Mrs. Lizzie Shultz. 

Yolks of six eggs beaten very light ; then add 
one coffee cup of granulated sugar, one-third of a 
vanilla bean steeped in half pint cream. (Do not 
boil.) One-half box Cox's gelatine in half teacup 
warm water, stir until thoroughly dissolved ; then 
add the warm cream to the gelatine and stir the 
eggs and sugar into this; whip one quart of ]rich 
cream, and stir into the other ingredients. Freezer 
should be all prepared first, as gelatine is apt to 
congeal if not frozen quickly. This quantity will 
make one gallon. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

Mrs. J. Shultz. 

One pound each of finely chopped suet, sugar, 
currants, stoned r aisins, two pounds soaked bread, 

Never borrozv if you can possibly avoid it. 



I02 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

six well beaten eggs, one teaspoon of salt, two 
teaspoons of baking powder, one grated nutmeg; 
mix all together thoroughly; take a square piece 
of cotton cloth, dip it in scalding hot water, flour 
it w^fill and lay it over a pan. place the pudding in 
the cloth and tie it closely: put it in a pot of boil- 
ing water for five hours. Have boiling hot w^ater 
ready to fill the pot as it boils away, so as not to 
let it get below^ boiling heat. 

Sauce: — One cup of sugar, half, cuj) of butter 
beat to a cream, a teacup of boiling water, two 
teaspoons of flour scalded together: flavor to suit 
taste. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 
Mrs. E. I. Camm. 

One pound suet (shredded and chopped fine), 
one pound bread crumbs, one pound sugar, one 
pound raisins (seeded), one pound currants, one- 
fourth pound citron, one-fourth jjound candied 
lemon peel, one pint milk, eight eggs, three table- 
spoons cinnamon, two tablespoons cloves, one ta- 
blespoon mace, one nutmeg, one teaspoon soda. 
Put in a well buttered mould and steam eight 
hours. Serve with hard sauce. 

Hard sauce: — Two cups sugar, one- half cup but- 
ter beaten to a cream, yolks of tw^o eggs; flavor 
with lemon, 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Mrs. Eliza Smith. 

One box gelatine, pour over it one pint of cold 
water, soak one hour, add three cups of sugar, 
juice and grated rind of four lemons. Stir in three 
pints of boiling water — if cool weather four pints 
- — then strain and add fruit, while jelly is warm, 
six oranges, six bananas, one can of sliced or 
grated pine apple. Set' aside to cool. This will 
serve forty people. 

Sdiishine is one of nature s most potent remedies. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 103 



FRENCH PUDDING 

Mrs. Henry Ewiiig. 

Beat four eggs very light. Make a batter of 
two teacups of flour, three teacups of milk, and 
one of cream, pour in the eggs and beat all well 
together, Add a tablespoon of melted butter and 
bake from twenty to thirty minutes. Serve with 
white sauce. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 
Mrs. T. H. Davidson. 

One cup milk, one egg, piece of butter size of 
an egg, one teaspoon soda, two small teaspoons 
cream of tartar, flour to make a stiff batter, one 
cup of tart fruit. Steam one hour. Serve with 
any rich sauce preferred. 

FIG PUDDING. 
Mary R. Irwin. 

Six ounces of figs, chopped fine, six ounce of 
suet, three ounces of bread crumbs, three ounces 
of sugar, three eggs, and a little nutmeg. Steam 
three hours. Sauce — Beat up one teacup of but- 
ter to a cream as for cake, add two cups of sugar, 
and flavor with a teaspoon of vanilla. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Mrs. Geo. Wiley, Chicago. 

One cup sweetening (one-half sugar and one-half 
N. O. molasses,) half cup butter (scant,) one cup 
sweet milk, tw^o eggs, three and one-half cups flour, 
two heaping teaspoons baking powder, one pound 
figs chopped very fine. 

Sauce for Fig Pudding.— Two tablespoons of 
boiling water poured over two tablespoons butter. 
Beat in with Dover egg beater, tw^o cups powdered 
sugar; flavor with juice of a lemon. 

TJic happiness of youi^ life depefids imich upon the 
character of your thoughts. 



I04 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Mrs. O. D. Hawkins. 

One cup molasses, one of sweet milk, one of 
raisins, two of Graham flour, two teaspoons soda, 
and a little salt. Stir the molasses and milk, di- 
vide the flour and stir in raisins, then soda in part 
of flour, stir all together. Put in round cake tin with 
a pipe in, and steam two and one-half hours. Have 
ready cup of powdered sugar, scant half cup butter 
beaten to a cream, moulded into a brick, set out 
to cool on a plate. Then cut your pudding like 
cake and cut a slice of the cream, and serve on 
plate with the pudding. 

GROUND ALMOND PUDDING BOILED. 
Mrs. H. Warner. 

One-half pound ground almonds, one-half pound 
white sifted sugar, eight eggs, beaten separately, 
one-half pound of bread crumbs. The rind of a 
grated lemon. Beat for half an hour and steam 
the same as for other steamed puddings. Must be 
dished up quickly and eaten with sauce. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 
To one quart of milk, when hot, add four table- 
spoons of corn meal thick enough to make porridge. 
When cool add half cup chopped suet, two eggs, 
with sugar to taste, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. 
Bake two hours. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

Mx'S. H. Burlingim. 

Boil two quarts of milk; salt. While boiling 
stir in one and one-half cups corn meal. While 
hot add one cup of suet, one cup of molasses, one 
tablespoon of cinnamon, one teaspoon of ginger. 
Let cool; add three well beaten eggs, piece of but- 
ter half the size of an egg, one cup of raisins, one of 

T/ic cheapest foods are oatmeal, beans and potatoes. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 105 



Chapman & Smith's cleaned currants, and sugar 
enough to serve without sauce if you wish. Sauce 
the same as for English plum pudding, which makes 
it delicious. Bake three hours slowly. 

MOONSHINE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Edna Brcwn. 

Whites of six eggs, beaten stiff. Add grad- 
ually six tablespoons of powdered sugar, beating 
for not less than fifteen minutes. Then put in one 
tablespoon preserved peaches in small bits. In 
each saucer put in some rich cream, whipped, 
sweetened and flavored with vanilla, and on the 
cream place a liberal portion of the moonshine. 
This makes enough for eight persons. 

NESSELRODE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Eliza Smith. 

One pint almonds blanched, and one pint chest- 
nuts blanched, and pounded into a paste, one pint 
cream, one pint pineapple, ten yolks of eggs, one- 
half pound candied fruit, one tablespoon of vanilla, 
one pint water, one pint sugar. Boil sugar, water 
and pineapple juice twenty minutes. Beat yolks 
and stir into this. Put the pan in which this mixture 
is into boiling water, beat until it thickens. Place 
in a pan of cold water, beat ten minutes, mix with 
cream, rub through a seive. Add fruit and pine- 
apple, cut fine. Mix all together. Add one-half 
teaspoon salt, vanilla. Freeze like ice cream. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 
Mrs. C C. Merrideth. 

Five oranges cut up and laid nicely in a dish 
with one coffee cup of sugar j^oured over them. 
Let one pint of rich milk get boiling hot; stir in 
the yolks of three eggs and one tablespoon of corn 

''Man is a giddy thing, and this is my conchision.'' 

— Much Ado About Nothing. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 



starch; when thick pour over the oranges. Beat 
the whites with one tablespoon of suorar; spread 
over the pudding and brown in the oven. Serve 
cold. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

Ella Rogrers. 

To one quart 2:>runes add one quart water and 
sugar to taste. Cook slowly until quite soft. It 
will require several hours. Pour oif syrup, seed 
the prunes and put them in a baking dish with the 
syrup and the beaten whites of six eggs mixed in. 
Bake fifteen or twenty minutes in a moderate oven. 
Serve with whij^ped cream. 

PEACH CREAM. 
Pare and stone some nice yellow peaches and 
mash throngh a colander with a potato masher. 
Allow as much cream as peach pulp, sweeten to 
taste and beat until the cream is light. Serve in 
glasses with currant buns. Banana cream may be 
made in same way. 

PUDDING. 

Mrs. Wilber S. Walker. 

One-half cup of butter, one and a half cup of 
sugar, two-thirds cup of milk, the whites of four 
eggs, three cups of sifted flour, three teaspoons of 
baking powder, one teaspoon each of v^anilla and 
lemon extract. Sauce for pudding — Beat one egg 
until light, add juice of two lemons, half cup of 
sugar. Boil all together until thick. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 
Margaret Owens. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, yolks two 
eggs. Beat all together very light, then add the 
whites well beaten. Flavor to taste. Steam over 
boiling water. 

Press not a falling man too far. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 107 



RICE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Sarah Miller. ^ 

One cup of rice soaked over night in a cup of 
cold water. When time to cook add one cup of 
raisins, one cup of sugar, one piece of butter, one 
nutmeg, nine cups of milk. Bake one hour. 

SCOTCH PIE. 

Slice four or five tart apples in a granite pie pan. 
Add two tablespoons water. Cover with a mix- 
ture made like biscuits, using either sour milk and 
soda, or sweet milk and baking powder, only a little 
more shortening. Stir with a spoon stiff enough 
to spread over apples. Serve with apples up, and 
cover plentifully with a sauce made of one table- 
spoon flour, butter size of an egg, three-fourths 
cup of sugar, nutmeg. Stir with a little cold water. 
Four over one pint of boiling water. Boil five 
minutes or till clear. A simple and good dessert. 
Good cold or warmed over. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

Mrs. I. H. Wolfe. 

One cup sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one cup 
-^weet milk, one cup raisins, three cups flour, one 
teaspoon soda, one teaspoon all kinds spices. 
Steam two hours. Serve hot with a dressing of 
ten tablespoons of powdered sugar, two table- 
spoons of butter, whip to a cream. Add the 
whites of two eggs beaten stiff. Season with 
vanilla. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 
Mrs. L. M. Daugherty. 

One and one-half cups of sugar, one cup sweet 
milk, three cups flour, one-half cup butter, one egg, 



* 'My salad days — when I zvas green in judginetit. " 

— Antony and Cleopatra. 



lo8 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

one good teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon of cinna- 
mon, one teaspoon of cloves, one-half cup of 
chopped citron, one cup of raisins or currants. 
Sauce for pudding — One-half cup of butter, one- 
half cup flour, one cup of sugar. Mix thoroughly. 
Add one pint of boiling water. Stir briskly and 
cook fifteen minutes. 

SUET PUDDING. 
Mrs. Alice Carey. 

Two-thirds cup of suet, chopped fine. One cup 
of sugar, one egg, one teaspoon cinnamon, two tea- 
spoons of baking powder, one-half cup of water, 
one cup of raisins, two cups of flour. Steam two 
hours. Sauce for the above — Two cups sugar, 
one tablespoon cornstarch, one pint boiling water, 
one teaspoon butter. Boil five minutes. Flavor 
with lemon. 



THP Win^T HFIIPATP flavors are obtained from 
inC mUOl ULLIUHIL CHICAGO FLAVORING EXTRACTS. 

SUET PUDDING. 
Alice Winbigler. 

Two cups bread crumbs, one cup raisins, one- 
half cup suet, one cup sweet milk, one teaspoon 
soda, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon 
cloves, one tablespoon sugar, pinch of salt. 
Steam two hours. Pudding sauce — Six table- 
spoons sugar, two tablespoons butter, one of flour, 
teaspoon nutmeg. Mix well together and add ten 
tablespoons boiling water. Cook until done. 

SUET PUDDING. 
Mrs. Edgar MacDill. 

One cup chopped suet, one cup molasses, on. 
pint fruit, one cup sweet milk, one teaspoon soda, 
mixed in molasses, four cups flour. Spice to taste. 
Steam three hours. Any kind of sauce. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 109 



SAUCE FOR BREAD PUDDING. 
Jlrs. £. C. Johnson. 

One tablespoon of flour, one tablespoon of but- 
ter, two tablespoons of sugar, one tablespoon vine- 
gar, one cup of sweet milk, two cups of boiling hot 
water, stirred in grradually. Boil briskly for about 
three minutes. 

SUET PUDDING. 
Mrs. Duke. 

One cup of suet, one cup of molasses, one cup 
sour milk, one cup of chopped raisins, two cups of 
flour, one teaspoon soda. Flavor with nutmeg- 
and cloves. Steam three hours. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

One and one-half cups flour, three tablespoons 
l3utter, three teaspoons baking powder; make soft 
-dough like biscuit: moisten with milk or water; 
bake in two layers. One quart or more strawberries, 
sweeten to taste and partly mash; butter layers 
and put berries between. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 
Mrs. Henry H. Pattee. 

One and one-half cups fine bread crumbs, one- 
lialf cup flour, one teaspoon cream tartar mixed with 
it; three-fourths cup chopped suet, three-fourths 
cup stoned raisins, one -half cup molasses, one-half 
cup milk, one- half teaspoon soda dissolved with 
the molasses, one-half teaspoon salt, one-half tea- 
spoon cloves, one-half teaspoon cinnamon, nutmeg 
to taste. Steam three hours. Serve hot. 

Sauce: — One teacu]D sugar, one half cup water, 
one cup milk, one teaspoon butter, one teaspoon 
corn starch dissolved in a little milk. Boil till 
well done: Pour this over the white of one egg 
beaten stiff. 



''Striving to do better, oft lue mar what's well.'' 

— King Lear. 



no PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

SNOW CUSTARD. 
Sara Bond-Hanley. 

Half package gelatine, three eggs, one-half cups 
of sugar, juice of one lemon. Soak gelatine one hour 
in cup of cold water, then add sugar, lemon juice, 
and one pint boiling water ; stir until dissolved, 
and set away till quite cold; then beat the whites 
of eggs very stiff and whip the gelatine in them 
spoonful at a time, whipping slowly and evenly 
for half an hour or till quite stiff. Serve in sherbet 
cups with whipped cream piled on top. Or can be 
moulded in small cups and served with plain cus- 
tard made of the yolks of the eggs. 

SAGO PUDDING. 
Mrs. Janie S. Pebbles. 

To three pints boiling water add one cup of 
sago. Boil until the sago is transparent, then 
add one cup sugar; let cook a few minutes then 
add four tablespoons sour jelly (currant is best), 
stir until dissolved: take from the fire and add one 
teaspoon vanilla. Pour into a dish you wish, to 
serve it from and when cold eat with sw^eetened 
cream flavored with vanilla. 

STEAM PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS. 
Mrs. W. E. Burns. 

One quart flour, one pound chopped raisins, one 
and one-half cup choj)ped suet, one teacup molas- 
ses, one teacup brown sugar, one teaspoon soda, 
two cups sweet milk, little salt. Steam four hours. 

TRANSPARENT PUDDING. 
Mrs. Henry J. Ewing. 

Yolks of eight eggs, three-fourths pound butter^ 
one pound sugar, one nutmeg, one pint cream; 
mix well, put into a pan and set over a vessel of 
boiling w-ater for a few minutes. To be baked in 
rich puff paste. 

Life is a sJiiittle. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. iir 

TRIPLES. 

One quart flour, one cup sugar, two tablespoons 
melted butter, a little salt, two teasjDOons baking- 
powder, one egg, sweet milk sufficient to make 
rather stiff. Roll out in thin sheets, cut in pieces 
about two by four inches; make as many cuts 
across the short way as possible, inserting the 
knife near one edge and ending the cutting just 
before reaching the other. Pass two knitting 
needles under every other strip, spread the need- 
les as far apart as possible, and with them hold 
the trifles in the fat until a light brown. Only 
one can be fried at a time. 

TAPIOCA WITH PINEAPPLE. 
Mrs. J. P. Stevenson, Tarkio, Mo. 

One-half cup tapioca. Soak over night in enough 
water to cover. In the morning add two pints of 
water and cook slowly until transparent. One and 
one-half cups of sugar and a little salt. Bake one 
hour. Remove and add one-half can of erated 
pineapple. Serve with whipped cream. 

TAYLOR PUDDING. 

Mrs. Lucy Clark. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of suet, one cup 
of sweet milk, one teaspoon soda, flour to thicken, 
raisins or currants. Steam two hours. Sauce — 
I One egg, tablespoon flour, one-half cup of sugar, 
one spoon of butter. Mix and thicken with boil- 
ing water. 

THE QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 
Mrs. E. B. Doolittle. 

Take one pint of nice bread crumbs, add a 
quart of milk and one cup of sugar, the yolks of 
four eggs well beaten, and the rind of a fresh 



Moore hated onions. He said that a man zuho zuould 
eat onions zuou/d steal. 



112 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

lemon grated, a piece of butter the size of an egg, 
one spoon of flour and bake well. Beat the whites 
of the eggs to a. stiff froth and add one cup of pul- 
verized sugar and the juice of the lemon. Spread 
over the pudding a layer of jelly and then the 
whites of the eggs and bake a light brown. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
Mrs. I. i^. Matthews. 

Cover three tablespoons ot tapioea with water 
and soak over night. In the morning drain and 
add one quart milk and one small cup of sugar 
and boil half an hour. Then add the yolks of 
four eggs and boil five minutes. Beat the whites 
and .spread on top and brown in the oven. 

WOODFORD PUDDING. 
Mrs. Eli Dixson, Roseville; Mrs. C. M. Johnson. 

Three eggs; one cap sugar, one-half cup butter, 
three-fourths cup flour, one teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in one -third cup sour milk, one teacup jam 
(raspberry). Bake slowly. 

Sauce for above: Three eggs (the yolks), one 
cup sugar, butter the size of an egg; cream, but- 
ter and sugar together. Make thin as desired with 
boiling water. Put in a bowl and set in a vessel 
of hot water. Use whites of the eggs for top of 
pudding. 

LEMON .SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 
Mrs. A. B. Seaman. 

Two Cups hot water, one cup sugar, three tea- 
spoons corn starch, grated rind and juice of one 
lemon, one tablespoon butter. Boil the water and 
sugar five minutes and add the corn starch w^et in 
a little cold w^ater. Cook about ten minutes, then 
add the lemon and butter. Stir until the butter is 

Balfc said tJierc was 7iothing better tJian fisJi and 

potato salad. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 113 

melted and serve at once. If the water boil away 
and the sauce become too thick add more hot 
water till of the right consistency. 

CORN MEAL PUDDING. 
Mrs J. C. Gettemy. 

Five eggs beaten separately, three tablespoons 
sugar, three tablespoons corn meal. Beat sugar, 
yolks and meal together, stir in whites lightly. 
Serve with hot sauce. 

JELLIED PEACHES. 
Mrs. Geo. Babcock. 

Drain juice from a can of peaches, add one cup 
sugar and boil ten minutes. Add one-half box 
gelatine soaked in cup cold water. Take from 
stove as you put in gelatine. When thoroughly 
dissolved, strain over peaches. Eat cold with 
€ream and sugar. 

DUTCH APPLE CAKE. 
Mrs, A. B, Seaman, 

One pint flour, one-half teaspoonful salt, one- 
half teaspoonful soda sifted into the ilour, one tea- 
spoonful cream of tartar, one-fourth cup butter, 
one egg, one scant cup milk, four sour ajDples, 
two tablespoons sugar. Mix the dry ingredients 
in the order given; rub in the butter; beat the egg 
and mix it with the milk, then stir into the dry 
mixture. The dough should be soft enough to 
spread half an inch thick on a shallow baking pan. 
Coie, pare and cut four or five apples into 
eighths; lay them in parallel rows on top of the 
dough, the sharp edge down and pressed slightly 
into it. SjDrinkle the sugar on the apple, with a 
little cinnamon if desired. Bake in hot oven 
twenty or thirty minutes. Serve with lemon sauce 
as a pudding. 

- — - _, 

'''TJic sands arc nmnbcrcd tJiat make up my life" 

—Henrv VI. 



114 ICES, CREAMS, ETC. 



ICES. 

"A dream, a breath, a froth of fleeting joy." — Poems, Shakespeare^ 



APRICOT SHERBET. 
Mrs. E. A. Lord. 

One pint of canned apricots, rubbed through a 

sieve, one pint sugar, one pint milk, one pint water. 

Mix and freeze. 

LEMON SHERBET. 
Lucy Duer. 

One quart new milk, one pound sugar, five 
lemons, three eggs. Boil the milk with the lemon 
rinds, add the suffar, and when cold put in freezer 
and partly freeze. Then add the juice of five 
lemons,.slightly sweetened, and the whites of three 
eggs, beaten stiff. Freeze hard. 

MILK SHERBET. 
Juice of four lemons, one and a half cups sugar, 
one quart milk, whites of three eggs beaten to a 
stiff froth. Freeze and pack hard. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 
Mrs. Edna B. Brown. 

Juice of ten oranges, one pint of sugar, two pints 
of water, two eggs (whites Only). Freeze. 

SUN SHERBET. 
Georgia A. Smith, Galesburg, 111. 

Juice of four lemons, two cups of sugar, whites 
of four eggs. Stir sugar and lemon juice together, 
add the well beaten whites, -beating all the 
time. Add the milk, still beating hard, just be- 
fore pouring into the freezer. 

A light heart lives long. 



ICES, CREAMS, ETC. . 115 

MRS. DEARBORN'S SHERBET. 

Boil one pound of sugar and one quart of water 
ten minutes, Pour this over two ounces of raisins 
stoned and cut in. small pieces ; cool. Soak two 
teaspoons of Knox's granulated gelatine in one- 
fourth cup of cold water five minutes, strain. Dis- 
solve with one-half cup of hot water. Add this 
to cold syrup, strain. Add one cup of fruit syrup 
to the strained mixture, add also the juice of three 
oranges and one lemon, strained. Put all in freezer, 
freeze to a mush. The syrup is that used in soda 
fountains and any desired flavor may be used. 

LEMON ICE. 

Mrs. E. A. Lord. 

Boil one quart of water with three-fourths pound 
of sugar, add the juice of three lemons, strain and 
freeze. When partly frozen add the beaten white 
of one egg. 

PINEAPPLE ICE. 

(One gallon.) 
Margaret Owens. 

One can of pine apples, four lemons, whites of 

four eggs, one pint of sugar. Make a thick syrup of 

the sugar and pour over the beaten eggs as for icing, 

add the pineapple well chopped, then the juice of 

the lemons and one pint and a half of water. Add 

sugar to taste 

PINEAPPLE ICE. 
Mrs. E. A. Lord. 

Three lemons, one can sliced pineapple, one 
and one-half pints sugar, two quarts water, one 
large tablespoon gelatine, Avhites of two eggs. 
Soak gelatine in a little water two hours. Boil 
water and sugar five minutes and set aside to cool. 

Ladies, do your cooking with Galva Soft Coal, and 
ask for our Icc\ cheapest and best — SipJier. 



ii6 iCES, CREAMS, ETC. 

Chop the pineapple fine. Use it this way or strain 
out the juice as you like best. Mix lemon juice, 
syrup and gelatine, strain. Add pineapple and 
freeze. When nearly frozen add the beaten whites 
of two eggs. 

ORANGE ICE. 
Mrs. Eugene A. Lord. 

Twelve large oranges, one pint of sugar, one 
quart water, on.e tablespoon gelatine, white of one 
Ggg. Prepare the same as for pineapple ice. 

PINEAPPLE ICE. 
Mrs. Edgar MacDill. 

One quart water, two-thirds pint of sugar, the 
juice of one and one-half lemons, strain. The 
juice from one can of grated pineapple. When 
partly frozen add the beaten white of an egg- Too 
make more, double all the receipt except pine- 
apple. 

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 
Mrs. Edgar MacDill. 

One quart berries, strain, one pint sugar, mashed 
together, one pint milk, one quart cream. Freeze. 

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 
Mrs. O S Fre.ncli. 

One pint of rich milk, one pint or cream, one 
quart of fresh strawberries mashed with one and 
one-half pints of sugar, one teaspoon of vanilla. 
Mix all together and freeze. 

AMERICAN CREAM. 
Mrs. C, W. Dougherty. 

One quart milk, five eggs, one-half box Cox's 
gelatine. Soak the gelatine one-half hour in a lit- 
tle more cold water than will cover it well, then 
add the cold milk. Put over fire and stir until 

Schubert loved coj'ned beef and cabbage better thati 
any otiier disJi. 



ICES, CREAMS, ETC. 117 

the gelatine is dissolved. Add the yolks of the 
eggs beaten with ten tablespoons sugar and let 
boil about two minutes. Beat the whites of the 
eggs with six tablespoons sugar. Pour the cus- 
tard over the whites and beat until well mixed. 
Flavor with one teaspoon vanilla. Pour into a 
mold and set in a cold place. Should be made at 
least five hours before using. 

BANANA CREAM. 

Mrs. Delos P, Phelps. 

Remove skins from five large bananas and rub 
them smooth with five tablespoons of white sugar, 
beat one-half pint of cream to a stiff froth, add the 
pounded fruit and a little lemon juice; mix w^ell 
and add one-half ounce Cox's gelatine previously 
dissolved in enough rich milk to cover it; whisk 
all together gently and mold. Cream and sugar 
may be served with this. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
Linnie Brewer. 

One pint thick cream w^ell whipped, the whites 
of three eggs beaten stiff; have all ready one- 
fourth box of gelatine dissolved in half cup warm 
water. Let it cool before putting in the cream. 
Beat thoroughly after the gelatine is added, 
sweeten and flavor with Chapman & Smith's van- 
illa to suit the taste. This will serve ten persons. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

Julia Clarke. 

One pint milk, two eggs, two cups sugar, one 
quart cream, two tablespoons flour, one tablespoon 
flavoring (vanilla), one saltspoon salt. Scald the 
milk in double boiler. Beat the eggs, flour and 
one cup of sugar together till light, then turn into 
the milk. Stir constantly till thickened and then 
occasionally. Cook in all twenty minutes. When 

Liszt was as simple in his eating as he was abstruse 

ill his imisic. 



/ 



ii8 . ICES, CREAMS, ETC. 

cold add the second cup of sugar, the cream and 
flavoring, then strain into the freezer and freeze. 
Put one scant cup of sugar into a frying pan and 
stir over the fire until the sugar turns liquid and 
brown, add this to the hot custard, in place of one 
cup of sugar. 

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 
Mrs. Geo. Babeock. 

One pint rich cream, one pint new milk, one 
egg, one tablespoon corn starch, one cup sugar, 
one and one-half tablespoons chocolate. Heat 
milk, adding sugar, corn starch and chocolate dis- 
solved in a little of the milk. Beat egg and add 
to milk, etc., stirring constantly till thick. Set 
off fire and add cream. When cold add vanilla 
and freeze. 

COFFEE CREAM, 
/^ Adelaide M. Glenn. 

Make one-half pint of custard with two eggs 
and one -half pint of milk. Dissolve one ounce 
of gelatine and three tablespoons of sugar, one- 
half cup of strong coffee, add the custard and 
strain. Whip one-half pint of cream quite firm, 
stir lightly into the custard. When it is cool pour 
into a mold and set on ice. Coffee must be fil- 
tered, not boiled, freshly made and very strong; 
three tablespoons of coffee to the half pint. 

Coffee Ice Cream may be made by not using the 
gelatine and freezing it in a freezer. 

FROZEN PUDDING. 
Mrs. L. Marks. 

Two cups granulated sugar, two eggs, two 
tablespoons gelatine, one-half cup flour, one quart 
cream, one pint milk, three-fourths pounds can- 
died fruit, one spoon vanilla. Dissolve flour in a 
little milk, add sugar and eggs and add the milk 

^'Omittance is no quittance .'' — As Yoii Like It, 



ICES. CREAMS, ETC. v. 119 

boiling hot. Cook in double boiler twenty min 
utes, then add gelatine which has soaked two 
hours, and set away to cool. Freeze tea minutes, 
then add fruit, and finish freezing. 

GELATINE JELLY. 
Mrs, J. F. Gainer. 

A half box gelatine dissolved in one jjint warm 
water, add one quart boiling water, two and a half 
cups sugar, one tablespoon citric acid dissolved in 
a little cold water: boil twenty minutes; flavor 
with banana essence. It can also be used for a 
salad by i^ouring over ripe fruit, bananas sliced, 
green grapes, oranges, etc. Let stand twenty- 
four hours on ice before using. 

ORANGE CUSTARD. 

Make a rich custard with the yolks of eggs, 
using Chapman & Smith's delicious orange extract 
for flavoring. Beat whites to stiff froth, and stir 
through custard while hot. Or, put in grated 
chocolate and flavor with vanilla, and you will 
have an excellent chocolate custard. 

SWEET POTATO CUSTARD. 
Mrs. Eliza B. Smith. 

Rub cup of sweet potatoes through a colander; 
beat two eggs into the potato and add half teacup 
of sugar. Flavor with nutmeg or any spice. 
Add piece of butter the size of a hickory nut. One 
cup of milk. Salt to taste. 

ORANGE CUSTARD. 

Mrs. Ida Weir. 

One quart milk, one tablespoon corn starch, five 
tablespoons sugar, a very small pinch of salt, six 
drops of vanilla, one whole egg and yolks of three 
(save whites of three for frosting.) Pare three 
oranges, cut into very small pieces, and sprinkle 

Hodgens Tntti Frutti Cream. 



I20 ICES, CREAMS, ETC. * . . 

six or seven tablespoonsful of sugar over them,, 
and set aside for two or three hours. Put milk 
into a tin pail in a kettle of hot water with the salt,, 
keep out about one-half cup of milk to dissolve 
cornstarch; add the well beaten eggs and cook 
until thick. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 
Mrs. L. M. Reed. 

Three tablespoons tapioca soaked over night iir 
water to cover. Add three pints of milk, boil five 
minutes (using double boiler), stir in yolks of four 
eggs, one cup of sugar. Let §cald. Add whites, 
of four eggs beaten to a froth. Flavor with Chap- 
man & Smith's extract of vanilla. 

VELVET BLANC MANGE. 

Emma A. Tucker, 

Two cup sweet cream, half ounce Cooper's 
gelatine, soaked in very little cold water one hour, 
one-half cup powdered w^hite sugar, one teaspoon 
ChajDman & Smith's extract bitter almonds. Heat 
the cream to boiling, stir in the gelatine and 
sugar, and as soon as they are dissolved take from 
the fire, beat ten minutes; flavor and pour into 
mould wet with cold water. Stick over the top — 
when turned out and ready to serve — blanched 
almonds. 



A Rubber Stamp 

For Marking Your Linen, Sheets, etc. 

Made to order in any style at the 



/here you can also have your menus printed in attractive shape. 



CAKES. 121 



CAKES. 



''He that would have a cake out of the wheat, must tarn^ the 
grinding Hereafter the kneading, the making of the cakes, 
the heating of the oven, and the baking : nay, you must^stay 
the cooling, too, or >ou may chance to burn your lips" 

— Troilus and Crcssida. 



Cake makers often condemn the recipe when the 
fault lies in themselves. Here are a few general 
rules: Always use the best materials. When 
commencing- have all the ingredients ready, weighed 
or measured, the tins lined with paper and greased 
(or grease the pans, have them cold and dust well 
with flour.) For cakes which require [long baking 
use several layers of paper. Use granulated sugar 
dried and sifted. Always dry the flour and sift it 
four times with the baking powder into a dry dish. 
In making anything of the cake kind begin with 
the shortening and sugar, creaming them with the 
hand in a deep earthen bowl to a light and deli- 
cate consistency, adding the yolks of eggs, which 
should be beaten separately from the whites, stir- 
ring them in thoroughly with a wooden spoon ; 
then add milk or water gradually, beating all the 
time. This adding of the liquid slowly prevents 
curdling. Or alternate with flour a little at a 
time. Add flavor, then flour, and finally fold in 
the whites of the eggs, beaten to a coarse froth, 
Stiff enough to cut with a knife, but never to the 
hard, dry froth which some patent Qg^ beaters 
give. Use a fork or wire spoon for beating. In 
the folding process the motion with the spoon is 
from right to left. 



hr^ 



122 BAPTIST LADIES* COOK BOOK. 



44 



ROLLING-PIN" - GLEANED - CDRRINTS. 

EST 



THE PLUMP 
CLEAN 
MEATI 
AND F\N.MmM^^ J^ FLAVORED. 



They are ready for instant use, and for convenience are 
put up in 1 and 2 lb. cartons. 

DELICrDuS! THAT'S JUST WHAT THEY ARE. 

so ARE CHICAGO FLAVORING EXTRACTS. 

THEY ARE PURE. 
THEY ARE FULL STRENGTH. 
tHEY HAVE THE MOST NATURAL AND DELICATE FLAVOR. 

THEY ARE ABSOLUTELY UNEQUALED. 

EVERY BOTTLE FULL MEASURE, 

AND BEARS THIS 

CHAPMAN & SMITH COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS, 

CHICAGO. ILL. 



THE FAHOUS. 



Leaders in Styles and Prices of Clothing, 
and Gents Furnishing Goods. 

LIONEL WOLFERMAN, 

PROPRIETOR. 



"The New Departure.' ^ ,^ BUY THE BEST! 

The New Departure 




The Original and 
Only Genuine 

Fongueless 

Cultivator. 

None genuine unless bearing our trade mark; PATTEE PLOW CO-, 

"The New Departure" on arch. Monmouth, ill. 

Patentees and Sole Manufacturers. 



CAKES. 123 

ANGELFOOD CAKE. 
Mrs. Eliza B. Smith. 

Whites of ten eggs, one tumbler of fine gran- 
ulated sugar, one tumbler of winter wheat flour, 
one teaspoon cream of tartar, and a little salt. Sift 
the sugar before measuring. Sift the flour, add 
cream of tartar and salt. Sift three times. Beat 
the whites of the eggs until light. Beat the sugar 
in thoroughly and add the flour. Flavor to taste. 
Bake one hour. 

BERWICK SPONGE CAKE. 

Mrs. L. A. Green. 

Six eggs beat together three minutes. 
Three cups sugar, beat this five minutes, 
Two cups of flour, 
Two teaspoons cream tartar beat two minutes. 
One cup water with one small spoon soda dissolved 
in it ; beat one minute, a little salt and lemon ex- 
tract. Bake in slow oven. 

BRIDGET'S CUP CAKE. 
Mrs. M. E. Babcock 

Two heaping cups bread dough. 

One small cup butter. Two small cups sugar, 

Half teaspoon soda dissolved. Three eggs. 

One cup seeded raisins, 

Cloves, cinnamon and vanilla. 

Let this rise until very light before baking. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

One cup coffee cold and strong, One cup butter, 

One cup sugar. One cup molasses, 

Four and one-half cups flour and two eggs. 

One teaspoon of soda dissolved in water. 

One teaspoon cinnamon and cloves. 

One cup Chapman & Smith's currants. 



C. Shiiltz, Pure Spices. 



124 CAKES 

BROWN STONE FRONT CAKE. 
Mrs. H. Burlingim. 

Half cup chocolate shaved, Half cup sweet milk, 
One cup sugar, Yolk of one egg- 

Boil till thickens and cool. 
Three-fourths cup sugar, Two-thirds cup butter. 
Two eggs. One cup milk. 

Two and one-half cups flour, 
Two teaspoons Chapman & Smith's Chicago Yeast 

Powder. 
Add the chocolate. Bake in shallow, oblong tin. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Mrs. Cirrie L. Wallace. 

One cup butter, One cup sugar, 

One cup molasses. One cup coffee (liquid). 

Four cups flour. Three eggs. 

One teaspoon soda, Two teaspoons cloves, 

Two teaspoons cinnamon. One tb. chopped raisins. 

Two teaspoons mace or one of nutmeg. 

CREAM SPONGE. 
Mrs. L. A. Green. 

Two eggs broken in a cup and flll with sweet cream. 
One cup fine sugar, One heaping cup of flour„ 

Two teaspoons baking powder. Flavor to suit. 

MARBLE CAKE, 
; Mrs. F, A. Gilmore. 

Whites of five eggs, One-half cup of butter, 

Two cups of sugar, One cup of sweet milk, 

Three cups of flour, 
Two teaspoons of baking powder. 
For the dark part — One cup of dough, add one 
cake of grated chocolate, dissolved in a little milk. 
Use one-half of the white dough first, then all of 
the dark part, the remainder of the white last. 

W. J. Patters 071^ Groceries and School Supplies."^ 



CAKES. 125 

CRACKER CAKE WITHOUT FLOUR. 

Ten eggs, Two cups sugar, 

Two teaspoons cinnamon, Juice and rind of a lemon, 
Two bars chocolate grated, Half ft), dates cut fine, 
Dredge with a little flour, 
Eleven soda crackers rolled fine. 
]Bake in a moderate oven. 

PRINCESS ALEXANDRIA CAKE. 

Mrs. Lafayette Marks. 

One cup sugar. Whites of four eggs whipped stiff, 
One-third cup sweet milk, One-third cup butter, 
Two teaspoons baking powder in ji cups of flour. 
Bake in an oven just hot enough to hiss lightly 
when touched with water. Flavor to taste. 

PORK CAKE. 

Mary Patterson. 

One pound salt pork chopped fine, 
One pound raisins. One pound currants, 

One pint brown sugar, Half pound citron, 

One pint boiling water, Half pint molasses. 

One heaping quart flour, One teaspoon mace, 
Two teaspoons each of cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg 
Rind of one lemon grated. 
One tablespoon soda dissolved in hot water. 
Pour the boiling water on pork, stir until melted, 
then pass through the colander, add sugar, molasses, 
spices and half the flour — flour first — then add soda 
and rest of flour. Bake in well buttered cake pan 
in a hot and steady oven, 

RAIL ROAD CAKE. 

Mrs. Edna Brown. 

Two tablespoons butter. Two cups sugar, 

One cup sweet milk. Four eggs. Three cups flour. 

Two teaspoons baking powder. 



Gemdne New Orleans Molasses at W.J. Pattersons 



126 CAKES. 

SPICE CAKE. 
Mrs. Chas. M. Johnson. 

One cup butter, Two cups brown sugar,. 

Three cups flour, Four eggs, 

One cup cold coffee. One bowl of citron, 

One bowl chopped raisins. One teaspoon cinnamon 
One teaspoon nutmeg. Half teaspoon cloves. 

One teaspoon lemon extract. 
Two and one-half teaspoons baking powder. 
Bake in slow oven. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
Miss Emma Gregg. 

Five eggs, Two cups sugar, 

Half cup warm water. Two cups flour. 

Flavor with lemon. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Mrs. L. M. Dougherty. 

One cup sugar. One cup flour, 

Two tablespoons water, Three eggs, 
One teaspoon of baking powder. 
One teaspoon of lemon. 
Beat the yolks of the eggs, sugar, flour and 
water together, add the whites well beaten. Bake 
twenty minutes. 

SPICE C\KE. 

Mrs. Mira L. Miller. 

Two cups sugar, One cup butter, 

One cup strong coffee. Four cups of flour, 

Three eggs. 

Three scant teaspoons baking powder. 

One teaspoon each of cinnamon and allspice, 

One-half teaspoon cloves, 

One nutmeg. One pound raisins seeded,. 

One-half cup citron, One-half cup figs. 

' 'OJi ivJiat a goodly outside falsehood hath.'' 

— Merchant of Venice. 



CAKES. 



127 



SUNSHINE CAKE. 
Miss Anna B. Owens. 

Whites of seven eggs, Yolks of five eggs, 

One cup sugar, Four-fifths cup flour. 

One-third teaspoon cream of tartar. 
Flavor to taste. Mix as in angel food. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
Mrs. y. Shultz. 

One pound brown sugar, One pound flour, browned 
Three pounds seeded raisins, 

Two pounds Chapman & Smith's cleaned currants, 
One pound figs, Three-fourths lb butter, 

One cup molasses, 
Two teaspoons mace, cinnamon and cloves. 
One teaspoon pepper, One teaspoon nutmeg, 
One teaspoon soda, One dozen eggs. 

One-half cup currant jelly melted in one-half cup 
of hot water. 

This cake will keep for years. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. Seth Pratt, Roseville. 

One pound flour. One pound butter, 

One and one-half pounds sugar (very brown) 

Four pounds raisins chopped fine. 

Three pounds Chapman & Smith's currants, 

One-half pound citron, chopped. 

Ten eggs. One-half ounce nutmeg. 

One-half ounce cloves. One-half ouncecinnamon. 

One-half pint coffee. 

EASILY MADE FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. J. F. Alexander. 

Two cups sugar. Three-fourth cups butter. 

Three cups flour, One cup sour milk. 

One teaspoon soda. 



''We are born to do benefits.'^ — Timon of Athens. 



128 CAKES. 

Five eggs, yolks beaten with butter and sugar, whites 

added last with flour. 
One pint seeded raisins, 

One pint Chapman & Smith's cleaned currants. 
One-fourth pound citron, roll fruit in a little flour, 
small tablespoon cinnamon, allspice, cloves and 
nutmeg. Bake two hours in slow oven, cover top 
with paper while baking. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
Mrs. James Duke. 

Four lbs seeded raisins chopped. 

Two lbs Chapman & Smith's cleaned currants, 

One lb each of citron and figs cut very fine. 

One lb brown sugar, One lb flour, 

One lb butter. One dozen eggs. 

One tablespoon allspice, Two tablespoons cloves. 

Two tablespoons cinnamon. 
One nutmeg. One cup molasses. 

One teaspoon of soda dissolved in a gill of hot 
water. 
Cream butter and sugar, mix flour and spices. 
Then beat all togretheraddinsrfruitlast well floured. 
This will make two loaves. Bake in moderate 
oven three hours, frosting when cold. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Mrs. John ]. Glenn. 

Two cups sugar. One cup butter. 

One cup sweet milk. Three cups flour, 

I I Three small teaspoons baking powder. 
Whites of seven eggs. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 
S. B. M. 

One heaping cup sugar. One-half cup butter. 

One cup sweet milk, Two cups flour, 

* ' TJicre s not otie wise man among twenty that zvill 
praise /limself.'' — Much Ado About Nothing. 



CAKES. 129 

One cup chopped raisins, 
One-half cup citron rolled in flour, 
Whites of four eggs, 
Two teaspoons baking powder. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

Carrie Smith. 

One cup butter Two cups sugar. 

Three cups flour, Whites of eight eggs, 

One-half cup water, One-fourth lb citron. 

Two teaspoons baking powder. 
One-half lb almonds chopped very fine. 
One teacup cocoanut. 
Cream butter and sugar, add the eggs, then the 
flour, lastly fruit; bake in two loaves forty min- 
utes in a moderate oven. 

VELVET SPONGE CAKE. 
Mrs. Irene E. Smith. 

Two cups sugar. 
Six eggs, leaving out whites of three, 
One cup boiling water, 
Two and one-half cups flour, 
One tablespoon baking powder, 
Beat yolks a little, add" sugar and beat fifteen 
-minutes, add the three beaten whites and cup of 
boiling water just before the flour. One teaspoon 
lemon flavorinsf. Bake in three tins. 



o' 



MY WEDDING CAKE 42 YEARS AGO. 
Mrs. M- E. Babcock. 

One pound sugar. Yolks of eight eggs. 

Three whole eggs, One pound butter, 

One and one-fourth It), flour. Four pounds currants, 
Three pounds raisins. Half pound citron. 

One cup molasses. 
Two tablespoons cinnamon, 

Careless measurement spoils many good dishes. 



I30 CAKES. 

Teaspoon each of mace, cloves, vanilla and lemon. 

One teaspoon of soda dissolved in hot water. 
Work butter and sugar together until very light, 
also yolks of eggs; put whites in last and soda. 
Bake three hours with slow fire. 

RAISED CAKE. 

Mrs. H. Burlingim. 

Two cups light bread sponge, 
Two-thirds cup butter. Two cups of sugar, 

One teaspoon soda, Three eggs. 

Mix these ingredients well, add the sponge with 
flour to make as stiff as cup cake. Cinnamon, 
cloves and nutmeg, and Chapman & Smith's ex- 
tract of spice. One cup raisins, one cup Chapman 
& Smith's cleaned currants, citron and figs improve 
it. Let raise about two hours. 

HARD TIMES FRUIT CAKE. 
Mrs. |. W. Matthews. 

Soak one cup of dried apples over night — chop. 
Add one cup molasses, Half cup of vinegar. 

Let it simmer two or three hours. 
Beat to a cream one egg and yolks of two more. 
One cup brown sugar. One-half cup butter,. 

Add two and one-half cups flour. 
One-half cup sweet milk. 

One and one-half teaspoons soda. 
Cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and prepared apples^ 
Bake slowly. Use the two whites for frosting. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

Mrs. Henry Ewing. 

Two cups of butter. Three cups of sugar. 

Five cups of flour. One cup of milk. 

Four teaspons baking powder, Eight eggs. 
Use coffee cups. Flavor to taste. 

C. SJuiltz, Pure Spices. 



CAKES. 131 

DELICATE CAKE. 
Mrs. Henry Ewing. 

One pound of flour, One pound of sugar, 

Half pound of butter, Whitesof sixteen eggs. 

LAYER CAKES. 

ALMOND CREAM CAKE. 

Whites of ten eggs. 
One and a half goblets pulverized sugar. 
One and a half goblets flour. 
One heaping teaspoon cream tartar. 
For C renin. 
Half pint sweet cream. Yolks three eggs. 
One tablespoon pulverized sugar. 
One teaspoon corn starch dissolved in milk. 
Beat eggs and sugar together; boil cream, add 
eggs, sugar and corn starch. Blanch and chop one 
and a half pounds almonds and stir in the cream. 
Put together like jelly cake. 

PRINCE ALBERT CAKE. 
J. M. Holt. 

One and half cups sugar. Two eggs. 
One half cup butter. Three-quarters cup milk. 

Two heaping cups flour. 
One and a half teaspoons baking powder. 
Bake half in shallow tins, to the remainder add 
one tablespoon of molasses, one cup of raisins 
mixed with a spoonful of flour, one-half spoonful 
of cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Put together 
with icing flavored to taste. 

FRENCH CREAM CAKE. 
Doi-a Dougrherty. 

Whites of five eggs. Two cups of sugar. 

One cup butter. One cup of sweet milk. 

Three and a half cups of flour. 
Two teaspoons of baking powder. 

' ' What's past help should be past f^rief, " 

— Winters Tale. 



132 CAKES. 

Pilling — One tablespoons of corn starch dis- 
solved in milk, yolk of two eggs, one half cup of 
sugar, a small piece of butter. Have one jDint of 
sweet milk boiling, stir in the ingredients and 
boil until the thickness of cream, when cool spread 
between the layers of the cake. Flavor with Chap- 
man & Smith' s pineapple. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
Edna Dean. 

Two cups sugar. Half cup butter. 

Half cake of chocolate, melted. 
Four eggs. One cup sweet milk. 

Two teaspoons baking powder. 
Two cups flour. 
Mix butter and sugar to cream, add chocolate 
and milk and yolks of eggs. Sift baking powder 
with flour, and add alternately with whites of eggs. 
Bake in two layers. 

Icing — Two cups granulated sugar, one-half 
cup of boiling water, flavoring extract. Boil until 
it hairs, and pour over the whites of two eggs, 
beaten stiff. Beat until thick. 

SPICED FIG CAKE. 

Miss Linnie Brewer. 

One cup of butter. Two cups of sugar. 

One cup of milk. Four cups flour. 

Two teaspoons baking powder. 
Five yolks and two whites of eggs or seven yolks, 
if prefered, using three whites for frosting. 
Flavor with fresh lemon. Work the butter soft 
and light, mix the sugar in slow and keep the 
butter light, put in part of the milk and flour, then 
the eggs well beaten, whites and yellows together. 
Bake in three pans, two of yellow, and in a third of 
the dough put two teaspoons cinnamon, one-half 

' ' Woj'ds ivitJiout thoughts never to heaven go. " 

— Hamlet. 



CAKES. 13 

teaspoon of cloves, a little nutmeg and vanilla. 
Put one pound of figs, chopped in a pan on the 
stove with a little water and let simmer until ten- 
der, remove on a plate and dry off. When the 
cake is done take two-thirds of a cup of sugar to 
the whites of each egg, put w^ater over the sugar, 
enough to dissolve and boil until thick enough to 
thread as it drops from a spoon. Have the whites 
beaten very light and drop the sugar slowly, 
a spoonful at a time, beat very light and put a 
thin layer on the cake first, then the figs and an- 
other layer of frosting; put the spiced layer be- 
tween the yellow ones, leaving frosting enough to 
cover when all put together. This makes a large 
loaf. 

LEMON CAKE. 
Sara Peacock. 

Two cups sugar. Three -fourths cup butter. 

Three cups flour. One cup milk. 

Whites of five egg. Two teaspoons of baking 

powder. Bake in jelly tins and betw^een the layers 
spread the following: 

One egg. One cup of sugar. 

One lemon, juice and rind. 
One teas]30on of bnitter. 
Boil till thick as jelly. 

LEMON CAKE. 
Mrs. L. Marks. 

One cup butter. Two cups sugar. 

Three cups flour. One cup sweet milk. 

Four eggs whipped separately. 

Two teaspoons baking powder. 

Filling — Dissolve two tablespoons corn starch or 

flour in a little water, add juice and rinds of two 

lemons, yolks of three eggs, one cup sugar, half 

cup butter and one cup boiling water. Cook in 



Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers. 



134 CAKES. 

double boiler, and just as removed from stove add 
the whites, whipped stiff. 

PORK CAKE. 

No eggs or butter required. 
One-half pound pickled pork, chopped very fine. 
One cup molasses. One cup sugar. 

One teaspoon soda dissolved in a cup of boiling 
w^ater. Six cups of flour. One cup each of raisins 
and Chapman & Smith's cleaned currants, and 
spice to suit the taste. Have the batter about as 
thick as ginger bread. 

PRINCE OF WALES CAKE. 
Mrs. Lafayette Marks. 

One cup brown sugar. A little soda. 

Two large spoons baking powder. 
Two cups flour. Half pound raisins. 

Half cup sour milk. A little citron. 

Half cup butter. Spice to taste. 

Yolks of three eggs. 
Bake in layers and put together with frosting. 

WHITE LAYER CAKE. 
Mrs. Eliza B. Smith. 

Whites of seven eggs. Two-thirds cup of butter. 
Two cups granulated sugar. Beat to a cream. 
One cup sweet milk. Three cups flour. 

Two teaspoons baking powder. Flavor to taste. 
Use this filling, or any other: 

Filling — One small cup of w^ater, one cup granu- 
lated sugar, yolks of three eggs, juice and grated 
rind of one lemon, tw^o heaping tablespoons of 
flour. Place these ingredients on the stove in a 
double boiler, the egg being first well beaten. Boil 
till thick, letting it cook one-half hour. When 
cool spread on cake. 

— ^ — i^ 

''An honest tale speeds best being plainly told.'' 

— RicJiard IV. 



CAKES. 135 

STRAWBERRY JAM CAKE. 

Mrs. L. S. Linn. 

One-fourth cup butter. One cup sugar. 

Three eggs. 
Three tablespoons of sour milk. 
One and two-thirds cups of flour. 
One teaspoon cinnamon. One teaspoon soda. 

One cup jam. 
Bake in layers and put together with boiled icing. 

MARSH MALLOW CAKE. 

Mrs. F. B. 

Make any nice w^hite cake and bake in two long 
tins, boil two cups granulated sugar and one -half 
cup water five minutes, or until it strings from the 
spoon, have the w^hites of two eggs beaten stiff, 
and pour the hot syrup into them, stirring fast; 
"while very hot stir in one box of marsh mallows; 
put half between the cakes and half on top. 

CONSERVE. 

One and one-half cups maple or white sugar, one 
cup sweet cream, one tablespoon butter, one tea- 
spoon vanilla; mix and simmer gently forty min- 
utes. 

FILLING FOR LAYER CAKE. 
Mrs. J. O. M. 

One cup of nice cream, two tablespoons sugar, 
ten cents' worth English walnuts and rolled fine; 
any flavor you wish. This filling can be made 
with sour cream by using more sugar; beat the 
cream up, then add the sugar, nuts, etc., and put 
betw^een layers and on top cake. 

ALMOND FILLING. 

One cup sweet cream set in a basin of hot water, 
heat for tw^o or three minutes, add the yolks of 
three eggs, and one teaspoonful of corn starch dis- 
solved in a little milk ; sweeten to t aste, cook till it 

Striving to better, oft we mar zvJiafs ivell. 



136 CAKES. 

thickens, remove from the fire, add one-hall cu]> 
of almonds, blanched and chopped (not too fine), 
when cool flavor with vanilla, cover the top of the 
cake with a thick frosting and sprinkle some 
almonds on top. 

ICE CREAM FILLING. 
Harriet Gettemy Mororan. 

Three cups sugar. One cup water. 

Boil to thick, clear syrup, or until it begins to be 
brittle. Pour this boiling hot over the well beaten 
whites of three eggs; stir the mixture very brisk- 
ly: pour the sugar in slowly; beat until it thickens 
Flavor with Chapman & Smith's lemon or vanilla. 

FIG DRESSING FOR CAKE. 
Mrs. R. A. Wilson. 

Three-fourths lb. figs. One-half lb. raisins. 
Fifteen almonds. 
Cut the figs in a pan and put two or three table- 
spoons of boiling water over them, cover closely, 
and let them heat through. Have the raisins 
seeded, almonds blanched, add the figs and chop 
all fine. 

ICING. 
Mrs. R. A. Wilson. 

One cup pulverized sugar with enough water to 
set to boiling. Boil to a thick syrup and add slow- 
ly the white of one egg, well beaten. Pour half 
the icing over the fruit to make it stick together. 
The other half of the icing will give the cake the 
first coat of icing. Cover the entire cake with 
icing if desired. 

To be used with any white cake recipe. 

CARAMEL FROSTING. 
Mrs. Gilmore. 

One and a half cups of brown sugar, one cup of 
sweet cream. Boil until very thick, having one 
white of an egg beat stiff, gradually beat the warm 
mixture in it. Chapman & Smith* s vanilla flavor- 
ing. Use any white cake recipe. 



CAKES. 137 

TUTTI-FRUTTI ICING. 

One pound sugar. One gill of water. 

Whites of two eggs. 
Half lb. almonds, blanched and chopped. 
One-fourth lb. raisins swollen in hot water. 
One-fourth lb. citron, finely chopped. 
Boil sugar and water until thick and waxy; jiour 
into the whites, beat until cool' then mix the fruit 
and stir it in. 

CARAMEL FILLING FOR WHITE CAKE. 

Two cups dark brown sugar, one-half cup butter, 
one-half cup sweet cream, stir butter and sugar 
together, then add cream, boil all together until 
when you try it in water you can take it upon your 
finger like molasses; as you take it from the stove 
put in one teaspoon of vanilla, set in a basin of 
cold water and stir until you are ready to put it on 
the cake. This is sufficient for three layers. 

BOILED ICING. 

One cup granulated sugar boiled in one-half cup 
water until it will hair, have the white of one egg 
beaten to a stiff froth, keep beating with the egg 
beater while the syrup is slowly poured in; can be 
used at once. 

PANSY CAKE. 

This is an exceedingly pretty cake of four colors 
— brown, white, red and yellow. It requires two 
mixings: 

Two -thirds cup of butter beaten to a cream, with 
one cup of sugar, one -half cup of milk, yolks of 
five eggs w^ell beaten, one teaspoon baking powder 
sifted with two cups of flour. Divide and flavor 
one-half with half a teaspoon of orange water, for 
yellow cake. To the other half add half a tea- 
spoon of vanilla and enough chocolate to color a 
good brown. Bake each in jelly cake pans. 

T/ie poetry of earth is never dead. 



13S CAKES 

Half cup of butter, one and a half cups sugar, 
one-half cup sweet milk, whites of five eggs, one 
teaspoon baking powder sifted with two cups of 
flour. Divide and flavor one-half with half a tea- 
spoon rose water for white layer, and the other 
half with a half teaspoon of lemon and re ^ ^ruit 
coloring which comes in bottles and is sold by 
Scott Bros. When the four layers are baked, 
place the brown first, then the white, then red, 
then yellow— putting either jelly or frosting be- 
tween each layer, also on the top. 

This is very nice for children's parties. 

NUT DRESSING. 
Mrs. Wilbur S. Walker. 

One cup sour cream and milk, one cup granula- 
ted sugar, one heaping cup chopped hickory nuts. 
Boil all together until jell-like, then remove from 
the stove and w^hip until cool. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 
Mrs. O, J. Blackburn. 

Two cups pulverized sugar. One cup sweet milk. 
Three-fourths cup butter. One cup corn starch. 
Two cups flour. Whites seven eggs. 

Tw^o teaspoons baking powder. 
Put together with boiled icing, using two cups 
sugar and two eggs, adding one-half teaspoon tar- 
taric acid. 

POL.YNAISE CAKE. 

Mrs. Eliza Smith. 

Make a white cake, bake in four layers. 

Filling No. 1 — Make an ordinary custard, divide 
into three parts, into the first part put half cup of 
currants chopped very fine; flavor with lemon. 

No. 2— Stir half cup or more raisins chopped 
very fine, three tablespoons grated chocolate; 
flavor custard with vanilla. 



Wise men never sit and zvail their loss. 



CAKES. 13^ 

No. 3 — Fill with chopped almonds, flavor with 
lemon and vanilla; sugar to taste. 

SMALL CAKES. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Into half a pint of cold water stir until smoota 
one and a half cups of flour, turn the same into h 
spider with a small cup of butter, cook and stir all 
the time until done; when cooled, add four beaten 
egge, beat well and drop the dough in small round 
balls on a tin, so that they will not touch one 
another, and bake them; they will then probably 
be hollow balls; cool them on a paper soon as pos- 
sible, so they will not sweat. 

For filling — Take half a pint of milk, two beaten 
eggs, half a cup of corn starch, rub them smooth, 
and add a cup of sugar. Cook it in a tin pail set 
in a kettle of hot water, stir well; when cool, flavor 
with lemon. Open the puffs with a sharp knife 
and insert the custard. 

HICKORY NUT MACAROONS. 
Nellie Reichard. 

One pound of sugar, One pound hickorynuts. 

Three eggs. Three tablespoons flour. 

Beat all well together, and drop with a spoon on 
a well greased pan. Bake in a slow oven. 

HICKORY NUT DROP CAKES. 

Anna Owens. 

Two coffee cups sugar. One coffee cup butter, 

Three eggs. One cup sour cream. 

Two teaspoons soda stirred into the cream. 

One teaspoon baking powder stirred into the flour. 

Three and one-half cups of flour. 

.One cup of nutsv Flavor to taste- 

14^1 1 IS a dangerous weapon. 



140 CAKES. 

HICKORY NUT KISSES. 
Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Three eggs (whites,) Two cups of nuts^ 

Cup and one-half pulverized sugar. ^ 
Grease paper with butter and bake in a moderate 
oven. 

CRULLERS. 
One pint milk, Two cups sugar, 

One cup butter, Three eggs. 

Two teaspoons cream tartar. One teaspoon soda, 
A little salt. Nutmeg or cinnamon, or both, for 
flavoring. Fry in hot lard. 

EXCELLENT GINGER SNAPS' 
Boil together one pint molasses, 
One cup of butter, One tablespoon ginger. 

Let them only boil up once then set aside to cool^ 
when cold, roll two teaspoons of soda perfectly 
smooth and beat into the molasses; while foam- 
ing, pour into just as little flour as will make it 
possible to roll out very thin. Bake quickly. 

PLAIN COOKIES. 
Mrs. Geo. Babcock. 

Two cups sugar. One cup butter, 

One cup rich sour cream, Two eggs. 
One teaspoon soda. Mix soft. 

FRUIT COOKIES. 
Mrs. Geo. Babcock. 

Two cups brown sugar, One cup of butter, 

Qne and one-half cups seeded raisins, 
Three tablespoons sour milk, One teaspoon soda,. 
One tablespoon cinnamon. One nutmeg, 

Two eggs, three and one-half cups of flour, or 
enough to make quite stiff. Drop on pan to bake. 

He is well paid that is well satisfied. 



CAKES. 141 

GINGER COOKIES. 
Mrs. Geo. Babcock. 

One cup butter, One cup light brown sugar. 

One cup N. O. molasses, One cup sour cream. 

One tablespoon ginger. Two teaspoons soda. 

Mix soft. 

GINGKR SNAPS WITHOUT EGGS. 
Mrs. Mira L. Miller. 

Two cups molases, One cup sugar. 

One cup sour milk, One cup butter, 

One heaping teaspoon soda, 
One teaspoon ginger. 
One teaspoon ground cinnamon, 
Flour to roll. Don't knead much. Bake in 
-quick oven. 

FRUIT COOKIES. 

Mrs E, P. Clarke. 

One and one-half cups sugar. 
One-third cup lard, or butter and lard mixed, 
One-half cup sweet milk, Two eggs. 

Two teaspoons baking powder. 
One cup stoned raisins. 
One teaspoon each of all kinds spices, 
Add flour until stiff enough to roll. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

Mrs. Duke. 

One cup molasses, One cup sugar. 

One cup sweet milk. Nine tablespoons lard, 

One teaspoon each of salt, cinnamon, alum and 
soda. Mix as soft as possible to roll out. 

GINGER PUFFS. 

Mrs. Henry Ewing. 

One cup N. O. molasses. One cup sugar. 
One cup water, One-half cup butter, 

Four and one-half cups flour, 
One tablespoon ginger. One tablespoon soda. 



Question your desires. 



142 CAKES. 

GINGERBREAD. 
Alta M. Claycomb. 

One cup molasses, One cup sugar, 

One-half cup butter, One cup milk. 
Three eggs, Two teaspoons soda, 

Two teaspoons ginger, Two teaspoons spices, 
Four cups flour. 

GINGERBREAD. 
Alice Duer. 

One cup sugar, One cup N. O. molasses,. 

One cup sour cream, One cup butter, 

Four cups flour, Three eggs, well beaten,. 

One tablespoon ginger. One tablespoon soda, 
One lemon, grated rind and juice. 

GOSSAMER GINGERBREAD. 
Mrs. Harry B. Smith. 

One cup butter, Two cups sugar, 

(well beaten) 
One cup milk. One tablespoon ginger. 

Three and two-thirds cups flour. 

Drop one tablespoon on tin and spread with 
knife as thin as possible. Bake in well but not 
over heated oven. 

P. S. Use pans upside down, cut and remove 
before it cools. Cut about four inches long by 
one and one-half wide. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 
Mrs. Mary Patterson. 

One cup molasses. One cup sugar, 

One cup butter, One cup sweet milk, 

F'our cups flour. Four eggs, 

One tablespoon ginger, 
One small teaspoon soda dissolved in the milk,- 
Beat the molasses, butter, sugar and spices to a 
cream, whip in the beaten yolks with the milk and 

Every man is odd. 



CAKES, 143 

lastly the whites, alternating with the flour, bake 
in two loaves. 

LOAF GINGERBREAD. 
One cup butter, Two cups molasses, 

One tablespoon ginger, Two eggs well beaten, 
One heaping teaspoon soda. 
One cup sour cream. 
Flour to make as thick as pound cake. 

GINGER CAKE. 
Theo Sexton. 

One cup molasses, One teaspoon ginger, 

One-half cup water. One teaspoon soda. 

One-half cup butter. One i^g^, 

Two and one-half cups flour. 

One cup raisins, 

Salt, and flavor with Chapman & Smith's delicious 

spice extracts. .-J 

Beat soda in molasses, then butter, the beaten 

egg, one cup flour, water, then second cup flour. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 
Mrs. L. Marks. 

Two cups bread sponge. Butter size of^egg, LZZl 
Three-fourths cups sugar, One egg. 

Mix soft as can be handled. Let raise once 
then cut and when very light fryjin'^hot lard. 2) 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Mrs. Mary Pillsbury._ 1 3 

Two cups sugar, Two eggs, q3 

One tablespoon butter, . Two cups sour milk, 
One teaspoon soda, Flour to mix well. 

Use nutmeg to flavor. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

Mrs. D. D. Dlftenbaii ; 1. 

Take light dough the size of a small loaf bread, 
work into this one cup batter and lard mixed. 

^m I _____ ^^.^^ i — 

Jl7io speaks not truly, lies. 



144 CAKES. 

Two eggs beaten in one pint sugar. Mix tlior- 
oughly in the dough and knead but not as stiff as 
bread. Let rise then work down, lay on the board 
and cut out and let the dough get very light and 
fry in hot lard adding cinnamon to flavor. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Mrs. A. P. Graham. 

One cup sour cream, One cup sugar. 

One teaspoon soda, 
Three eggs beaten separately and flour enough 
to roll nicely. Use just as you want them. Dough 
will keep for weeks. Last is better than first. 

COOKIES. 

Mrs. Ida Weir. 

Three eggs, Three cups sugar. 

Half cup sour milk with soda, 
One cup butter, Half cup lard, 

Make thin dough and bake in hot oven. 

BREAKFAST GINGER COOKIES. 
Mrs. W. T. Wiley. 

Two cups N. O. molasses, One cup of sugar. 

One cup sour milk, One cup of lard, 

Four teaspoons soda — one put in the milk the rest 
in the flour — One tablespoon ginger, two eggs, 
pinch of salt. Roll out thick. 

JELLY BISCUIT. 
Take Boston crackers (they are the best) and 
drop them for a second in boiling hot water — it is 
better to put them in and take them instantly out 
— then dip them at once into beaten egg and fry 
in boiling lard. They should only be a delicate 
brown. When finished they will be the shape of 
egg biscuit, the outside edge curling up and form- 
ing a little saucer. Into this saucer drop a tea- 

Unstained thoughts do seldom dream of evil. 



CAKES. 145 

spoon of jelly or preserve. Preserved figs are very 
nice for the purpose. This makes a very dainty, 
delicate and quickly prepared dish for lunch or 
dessert. Squares of bread, lightly browned in the 
same way, are delicious. If using bread, substi- 
tute cold milk for hot water. 

TEA CAKES. 
One small cup sugar, One large tablespoon butter, 
Half cup sweet milk, One Ggg beaten separately' 

Flour enough to make batter — about one cup, 
One teaspoon Chapman & Smith's Chicago Yeast 
powder, flavor with lemon. Bake in gem pans. 

RAISIN PUFFS. 
Mrs. L. M. Dougherty. 

Five tablespoons sugar. Half cup of butter, 

One cup sweet milk, Two eggs. 

Two teaspoons baking powder. 

One cup raisins seeded, 

Flour to make as stiff as cake dough; put in cups 

and steam one-half hour. Serve with lemon sauce. 

FRIED CAKES. 

Mrs. Addie Morton. 

One quart flour. Three eggs, 

One cup sugar, One cup milk. 

Six teaspoons baking powder. 
Six teaspoons hot lard, 
A little flour and salt. 
When all mixed, set in oven and heat through 
before adding hot lard. Mix soft. 



Ignorance is tlic curse of God. 



146 BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 

Henry Patterson 

Ill and 113 East First Avenue. 

Jobbers of Butter, Eggs, Poultry, Green Fruits and Vegetables- 
i^ Try a few bottles of the 

Celebrated Colfax Mineral Water, 

For $5 we will be glad to give anj- one a Receipt for one year's subscription to- 
The Daily Review: or for half that amount a Receipt for a six months' sub- 
scription. Or, if preferred. Receipts will be given for any shorter time on ^^- 
f^//>/ of Ten Cents for each week for which the paper is wanted. If you are 
not situated so you can gat Tne Diily Review promptly for fiso wa will give 
you a Receipt for one year's subscription to The Semi-Weekly Review. 
\/0 I ID D tr/^ C* I DT^O If yo" ^^'^^ ^'i^'^n^^Se of any of our 
IV-^Un nCv/Cll I O Receipts you will be in Receipt of all 
the news of importance occuring in Monmouth and Warren C^ounty, or in the 
world for that matter, though the home news is given the preference. 

Try It and See. REVIEW PRINTING CO. 




The Photographer 

The Largest Gallery in the City. 

Ground Flour. 213 South Main St. 

THE MODEL 

A glance at our stock wiirtelljyoa 
at once where to trade. ^ ^^^ 3 

Fine Clothing ja specialty, ^ 

^And headquarters forQsnt's FumishJng ^Goods. 



PEN D. GOOD, MAN'G'R. MODEL CLOTHING GO. 



BEVERAGES. 147 



BEVERAGES. 



" Anon, we'll drink a measure 
The table round.'" — Macbeth. 



GOOD COFFEE. 

There are four essentials to good coffee — the 
best coffee, an egg, cream and a clean coffee pot. 
The coffee pot should be emptied, washed and 
scalded and dried every time it is used 

Take one tablespoon of best coffee for each per- 
son and half a pint of water, let it boil five minutes, 
then remove from the fire at once. 

To make coffee for twenty persons use one and 
one-half pints of ground coffee. Mix with ^^g and 
cold water and put in cheesecloth bag. Pour 
over one gallon boiling water. Let stand where 
it keeps hot. Serve with whipped cream. 

TEA. 
Scald tea pot and put tea in while hot, using one 
teaspoon of tea for each person (if strong tea is 
desired,) to one-half pint boiling water Let stand 
a few moments before serving. 

ICED TEA. 
Make strong tea. After standing a few moments 
to extract strength, pour off and let cool. Add 
water to desired stren-^-th. Pour over cracked 
ice and serve with sliced lemon. 

C. Shultz. Extract of Beef. All kinds of foods for 

invalids. 



148 BEVERAGES. 

RUSSIAN TEA. 

Pare and slice good juicy lemons and lay a piece 
in the bottom of each cup; sprinkle with white 
sugar, and pour hot, strong tea upon it. Do not 
use cream. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Dissolve three tablespoons of scraped chocolate, 
or equal parts of chocolate and cocoa, in a pint of 
boiling water and boil for fifteen minutes; add one 
pint of rich milk; let scald and serve hot. 

CHOCOLATE— VIENNA STYLE. 

Four ounces of chocolate, one quart milk, three 
tablespoons of hot water, and one tablespoon of 
sugar. 

Cut the chocolate in fine bits. Put the milk on 
the stove in the double boiler, and when heated to 
the boiling point, put the chocolate, sugar and 
water in a small iron or granite-ware pan, and stir 
over a hot fire until smooth and glossy. Stir this 
mixture into the hot milk, and beat well with a 
whisk. Serve at once, putting a tablespoon of 
whipped cream in each cup and then filling up with 
the chocolate. 

The plain chocolate may be used instead of the 
vanilla, but in that case use a teaspoon of vanilla 
extract and three generous tablespoons of sugar 
instead of one. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

Secure ripe berries and crush them ; to each gal- 
lon of juice add one quart of boiling water ; let it 
stand twenty-four hours, stirring it a few times ; 
strain and add two pounds of sugar to each gallon 
of liquid ; put in jugs and cork tightly. It may 
be used in two months, is excellent for summer 
complaint, and can be taken by delicate invalids. 

A light lie art lilies long. 



BEVERAGES. 149 



STRAWBERRY SHERBET 

Crush a pound of strawberries into a basin 
and add a quart of water, with a sliced lemon, 
let it stand for two or three hours. Put one and a 
quarter pounds of sugar into another basin ; cover 
the basin with a cloth and through this cloth strain 
the strawberry juice ; when the sugar is fully dis- 
solved, strain again, and set the vessel into which 
it is strained on ice until ready to serve. 

TOAST WATER. 
Brown nicely but do not burn the slices of bread, 
and pour upon them sufficient boiling water to 
cover Let them steep until cold, keeping the 
bowl or dish containing the toast closely covered. 
Strain off the water and sweeten to taste. Cool 
with ice 

FLAXSEED LEMONADE. 
Pour on four tablespoons of whole flaxseed, one 
quart of boiling water and add the juice of two 
lemons. Let it steep for three hours, keeping it 
closely covered. Sweeten to taste. Excellent for 
colds. 

SLIPPERY-ELM BARK TEA. 
Pour boiling water over the bark, first breaking 
it into bits ; cover the pitcher containing it and 
let it stand until cold ; add lemon juice if desired 
and sweeten to taste. 

MULLED BUTTERMILK. 
The well-beaten yolk of an egg added to boiling 
buttermilk and allowed to boil up ; or add to the 
boiling buttermilk a little thickening of flour and 
cold buttermilk. 

There s a small choice in rotten apples. 



I30 BEVERAGES. 



BEEF TEA. 

Mince one pound of good lean beef and put into 
a jar with one teacup of cold water ; cork closely 
and set in a boiler or steamer to cook. It will re- 
quire three or four hours. Strain and season. 

BOUILLON. 

To one pound of round steak add one and one- 
half tumblers of cold water, cut the beef in small 
pieces, cover and let simmer until the substance is 
all out the meat, then strain and return to the 
stove to keep hot. Beat two eggs in a bowl, turn 
the broth on gradually, stirring all the time. Salt 
to taste. This is good for dyspeptics. 
CORN MEAL GRUEL. 

Two tablespoons corn meal wet in cold water, 
add to three pints boiling water, a little salt and 
boil twenty-five minutes, 

CELERY TEA. 
Use celery freely. A tea made of the leaves 
and roots and used freely is said to cure rheuma- 
tism. 

BEATEN EGG FOR THE SICK. 
Take one fresh egg, one tablespoon of ice cold 
water, one teaspoon sugar: beat very light. then add 
two tablespoons of cream. 

OAT MEAL GRUEL. 

Add to one cup well cooked oat meal while 

hot, one cup of milk and one cup of hot water ; 

beat all thoroughly together and strain through a 

w^ire strainer; if desired a little salt can be added. 

Boiled milk with a little salt added to make it 
palatable, is one of the most healthful drinks. It 
sooths an irritated stomach, nourishes the flesh tis- 
sues and tends to make the complexion clear. 

Kee/f thy pen from lender s books. 



BEVERAGES. 151 



REFRESHING DRINK FOR THE SICK. 
One-third of a glass of raspberry juice, mix 
-with two-thirds of a glass of ice water. Sweeten 
to suit the taste of the person. 

Blackberry, currant or strawberry juice may be 
used the same way. All are delicious. 

FOR DRYNESS OF MOUTH OR THROAT. 
Take a tablespoon of pulverized slippery-elm 
and pour half a pint of boiling water on it, sweeten 
and ice it. Take a teaspoonfull as often as twenty 
ininutes. 



H. Burlingim 

Keeps Chapman & Smith's Extracts, Yeast Pow- 
der and Cleaned Currants. 

We are borti to do benefits. 



152 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



TN COLL ECE 



nONHOUTH, ILLINOIS. 



A3 






LttKH 



w 



opens First Wednesday 
in September. 



FIVc covir^e^ of ,s<>jc|y, lKcl\Jc|lKg Mu,slc. 
iKtructioK Ik all c|c)DaKtTr\cK<>s by <f\^^ougl\ly 
corTv^DC'tcK't tcacKer^. 

-ScKcl for cataklogvjc aKc| o-tKer iKfo^hxa-tioK 



to 



J. B. McMICHAEL, 

PRESIDENT. 



BREAKFAST DISHES. 153 



Breakfast Dishes. 



■'And then to breakfast with what appetite you have." 

—Henry I'll I. 



MOCK SAUSAGE. 
Soak dry bread in water. Chop equal amount 
of any kind of cold meat fine. Season with salt, 
pepper and sage. Make in little cakes and fry. 

MUFFINS. 

Miss Fannie Adams, Burlington, la. 

One quart of flour, four teaspoons baking pow- 
der, four eggs beaten separately very light, milk 
to make a batter thicker than griddle cake; salt, 
one tablespoon of melted butter put into the milk. 

RAISED WAFFLES. 
Mrs. B. 

One pint of new milk with flour to make a thin 
batter, add one cup of yeast, two well beaten eggs 
and half a cup of butter or the size of an ^^^^ beat 
this very light and add flour to make a stiff batter, 
and let raise over night. 

BUNS. 
One-half cup melted butter, one cup sugar, one 
cup sugar, one cup yeast, one cup warm water or 
new milk, half cup ''Rolling Pin" cleaned currants. 
Beat light and add flour to make as stiff as biscuit 
dough and let this rise all night. Mould and put 
in pans to rise for twenty minutes and bake for 
breakfast. Add a little salt when mixing. 

Lcve all, trust a few. 



154 BREAKFAST DISHES. 

CROQUETTES OF COLD STEAK 
Mrs. F. P. Gilbert. 

Take bits of cold steak and mince very fine. 
Add three oi- four chopped cold potatoes. Season 
with pepper add salt. Mix this thoroughly and 
then add a beaten egg. Press into cakes, roll in 
cracker crum"bs and fry in hot lard. 

PARSNIP FRITTERS. 
Boil five or six medium size parsnips till tender, 
mash very fine, add one-half cup of milk, a table- 
spoon of butter, two eggs, a tablespoon of flour, a 
little salt ; fry a delicate brown in hot drippings; 
serve on a hot dish. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 
To the recipe for fritters add one cup chopped 
apples. 

Oyster Fritters — add oysters. 

MUFFINS. 

Sadie Neville. 

Two tablespoons of butter, tw'o tablespoons 
sugar. Cream the butter and sugar until very 
smooth, two cups flour, adding one and one-half 
teaspoon baking powder, siff thoroughly, two eggs, 
one cup sweet milk, salt; after creaming the but- 
ter and sugar in the bowl, mix very quick and bake 
from fifteen to twenty minutes in gem pans in a 
pretty hot oven. 

PUFF OVERS. 

Mrs. Wildemuth. 

Yolks of two eggs well beaten, three-fourths 
cup sw^eet milk, one teaspoon melted butter, one- 
half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon sugar, one and 
one-half cups flour, two teaspoons Chicago yeast 
powder, whites of two eggs. Bake in gem tins. 



Speak less than thoiL kiiowest, 



BREAKFAST DISHES. 155 

A SIMPLE AND DELICIOUS MUFFIN. 
Mrs. J. W Matthews. 

Take a piece of butter the size of an egg, mix 
with it one tablespoon white sugar, add one Ggg, 
three-fourths teacup sweet milk, one large pint flour 
with which has been sifted one teaspoon Chicago 
yeast powder. Put into a well buttered pie pan; 
bake one-half hour in a moderate oven. Eaten 
hot with butter it is very nice for breakfast or 
lunch. It may be made of graham flour wholly 
or in part. Buttered muffin rings can be used if pre- 
ferred. 

SNOW FLAKE TOAST. 

Mrs. Jas. French. 

Heat to boiling one quart milk to which one-half 
cup of cream and a little salt have been added. 
Thicken with a tablespoon of flour rubbed smooth 
in a little cold milk. Have ready the whites of 
two eggs beaten to a stiff froth and when the sauce 
is cooked turn a cup of it on the beaten eggs stir- 
ring constantly so it will form a light, frothy mix- 
ture, to which add the rest of the sauce; keep hot 
but do not allow to boil. Serve on slices of zwie- 
back or toast previously moistened with milk or 
hot water. 

RICE CRUMPET. 
One coffee cup boiled rice, two coffee cups flour, 
one cup milk, two eggs, two tablespoons sugar, 
scant, one tablespoon melted butter, pinch of salt, 
one teaspoon Chicago yeast powder. Let rise over 
night, in the morning lift carefully into gem pans, 
let stand fifteen minutes and bake quickly. 

A TASTY BREAKFAST DISH. 

Take a few slices of Morrell's "Iowa's Pride " 
breakfast bacon (be sure and cut them very thin.) 

''Have more than tJiciii shoivest.'^ — Kino Lear. 



156 BREAKFAST DISHES. 

Cut off the skin before putting it in the frying 
pan. Have frying pan quite hot before the bacon 
is put in. Keep the bacon turned to prevent curl- 
ing up, until both sides show a light brown. Take 
out at once and serve hot. 

RICE BATTER CAKES. 
Mrs. Mary A. Frantz. 

Three tea cups butter, four eggs. salt, one turn- 
bier cooked rice. Beat eggs thoroughly, make all 
into a batter the usual thickness for batter cakes; 
add ore teaspoon soda dissolved in warm water. 

HASH CAKE. 

Chop fine such bits of cold meat as you may 
have, add a double quantity of potato chopped fine 
also; mix well, season with pepper and salt to 
taste: eight minutes before you wish to sei^ve the 
dish, melt a tablespoonful of butter in a si:)ider and 
when hissing hot, put in the hash and press it 
dowTi well and evenly all around. At the end of 
the time specified, have a heated plate ready, turn 
it over the spider, tip the latter upside down with 
the plate beneath, send your steaming hash cake 
to the table. 

WAFFLES. 

Margaret Owens. 

Mix well three cups flour with one-half cup but- 
ter, one teaspoon salt, two teaspoons Chicago yeast 
powder, one quart milk, yolks three eggs. Stir 
well; add last the whites of the eggs well beaten. 

WAFFLES. 
Mrs. H. M. Graham. 

One pint sweet milk, three eggs well beaten, one 
teaspoon' baking powder, one tablespoon melted 
butter, salt; stir in flour enough to make batter; 
add the melted butter the last thing. Bake on hot. 
well greased waffle irons. Serve with hot maple 
syrup. 

Lend Jess than thou oivest. " — King Lear. 



BREAKFAST DISHES. 157 

CORN MEAL MUFFINS. 

Sadie Neville. 

Two tablespoons butter, two tablespoons sugar, 
one cu) pastry Hour, one cup good corn meal (fine 
ground), two teaspoons Chicago yeast pow^der, one 
generous cup milk, two eggs. Cream the butter and 
sugar, add the other ingredients and stir rapidly; 
the eggs must be well beaten. Add salt to the 
eggs before beating. 

CORN BREAD. 
Emma Greg-g, Chicago. 

Two cups corn meal, sifted; one cup flour, two 
eggs, tw^o cups sweet milk, four teaspoons melted 
butter, one tablespoon sugar, two teaspoon yeast 
powder; add a little salt. 

BREAKFAST DISH. 

Heat a can of salmon, season with pepper and 
salt, and place on thin slices of buttered toast, heat 
a large coffee cup of milk or cream, salt and thick- 
en a little with flour; if milk is used add a piece of 
butter and pour over fish and toast. 

THANKSGIVING HASH. 

Take a dish suitable for the table, place a layer 
of bread crumbs in the bottom, then a layer of 
chopped turkey, next a layer of oysters, so on 
until the dish is filled, pour over one pint of cream 
sauce, bake quickly for twenty minutes. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

Boil potatoes and mash, pick up codfish very 
fine and pour over it boiling water, let stand until 
soft, then add potatoes, having one-half as much 
fish as potato, one egg w^ell beaten, two table- 
spoons cream, a little pepper, salt and butter; fry 
before the mixture gets cold. 

*'Szveets grozvn common lose their dear delights.'" 

— io2d Sonnet. 



158 EGGS. 

CREAM TOAST. 

Brown bread nicely on both sides, let one pint 
sweet cream come to a boil, add one tablespoon of 
butter, a little salt, pour over toast and serve at 
once. 

BREAKF.AST DISH. 

Slice three or four ripe bananas in a dish and 
squeeze over them the juice of a good -sized lemon, 
then put over this a gill of ice water and a half 
cup of granulated sugar, stand where it will get 
good and cold, and after half an hour it will be 
ready to serve. The lemons take away the natur- 
ally insipid taste, and are healthy. 



-5fe^ 



EGGS. 



"Things well done 
And with a care, exempt themselves from fear" 

— Henry VIII. 



EGGS. 

Three minutes will boil them soft. 

Five minutes will cook whites hard, but not 
yolks. 

Eight minutes will cook both. 

To boil an q^^ to perfection use Camm's egg 
cups. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Boil three or four dozen hard, remove shells. 
To one quart of vinegar jDut allspice, ginger and 
two cloves of garlic: boil, when spiced to taste 
pour over eggs. Nice for picnics. 

Welcome ever smiles, and far cwell goes out sighing. 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



159 



Premier 

Bgg Cups 




The Efrg 
is in it. 

Made of Cliina. 
Durable. TiTtty. 
1 and 2 Eggbizes. 

No Shells. 
No Uncertainty. 

Pat. June 13, '93. 



E. I. CAMM. 



mm 



Ever) well regulated 
family should secure some 
of these little 

Egg Cups 

if they wish to relish a 
good wholesome break- 
fast. Considered by 
all epicures as the 
only way to cook 
egps. Sold by 
BREAK TITE EGG into the cup, screw E. I. CAmM, 

on the cover and boil tlie epi^ in this China cuj) Who always keeps a full line 
instead of the shell, and serve the egg in the of everything found in a flrst- 
saiue China cup, class Jewelry establishment. 

MOTHERS! 

When the boys need anything in the way of 

CLOTHING 

You will do well to see our stock, as we always 
carry a large line in Suits ?nd Overcoats: also, 
the MOTHERS' FRIEND WAIST ^n all 
grades. Ask to see the 

Boys' Iron-Clad Black Cotton Hose. 

In HATS and CAPS we always have the newest 
and the nobbiest styles in the market. 

.^••ALWAYS THE BEST AT =^8 




One Pfice to All. 



PHILIP NUSBAUM'S, 



i6o EGGS. 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Eight eggs, four teaspoons potted ham, one-half 
teaspoon lemon juice, one teaspoon creamed but- 
ter, add a little cayenne pepper, salt to taste; rub 
yolks of eggs through a sieve. 

BAKED EGGS. 

Butter your gem pans, dredge with cracker 
crumbs, break an egg in each cup, put a small 
piece of butter on top of each egg, dust over with 
cracker crumbs, and bake in oven; turn them out 
on hot platter. 

DEVILED EGGS. 

Boil eggs hard, cut in two and slip out the yolks. 
Mash yolks fine, season to taste with pepper, salt, 
butter, vinegar and mustard and press back into 
the white. Nice for picnics. 

EGG SANDWICHES. 

Cut thin slices of bread, and butter evenly. Boil 
six eggs hard and remove the yolks; mash until 
soft and add one teaspoon melted butter, a little 
vinegar, and pinch of salt; chop whites fine and 
mix and spread on bread. Cut in fancy shapes; 
serve on platter with parsley. 

BAKED EGGS. 
Mrs. W. Q. Bell. 

Delicious — Twelve eggs, boil hard, cut in two, 
take the yolks and mash fine, add a large spoonful 
butter, one ci.p powdered crackers, one and one- 
half cups milk, season with pepper and salt; put 
the whites in a baking dish, pour this mixture over 
and bake fifteen minutes. 

POACHED EGGS. 
Mrs. W. Q. Bell. 

Serve poached eggs in slices of fried bread that 
are previously covered with the finest mince of hot 

Whafs more miserable than discoiitoit.'' — Henry TY. 



PICKLES AND CATSUPS. i6r 

(warmed over) meat. This is a substantial yet 
dainty dish for luncheon. Make the meat a mince 
of chicken or turkey, and add a few chopped truff- 
les around the well-formed eggs, and you have a 
dainty French dish. 

EGGS SUR LE PLAT. 

Beat two eggs separately, spread upon the plat- 
ter, then drop as many eggs upon this as are re- 
quired at the meal, season with salt and pepper, 
sprinkle over with cracker crumbs, and place in a 
hot oven for a few moments when it is ready for 
the table. 

OMELET FOR BREAKFAST. 

Beat four eggs separately, into the yolks put 
one cup of milk, one tablespoon ol flour, salt and 
pepper lastly, add the whites of eggs, bake in a 
deep dish about ten minutes in a hot oven. 



PICKLES AND CATSUPS. 



•I warrant there's vinegar and pepper in it "' 

— 7\i\-lftJi Xighf. 



PICKLED APPLES. 

Mrs. J. Shiiltz. 

Take ripe, hard, sweet apples, peel evenly, cut 
in halves and core. To a peck of api)les take 
about two quarts of vinegar and four pounds of 
sugar, half an ounce of mace, half an ounce of 
cloves and the same of allspice, all unground, a 
few grains of pepper and a little salt. Heat the 
vinegar and sugar together till it boils, skim well, 
put the spices in a thin muslin bag and add to the 
vinegar, then x^ut in the apples. Place over the 

C. SJiiiltz, Pure Spices. 



162 BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 

A word we wish with every cook 

Who looks within this precious book ; 

Each Recipe will please, we're sure, 

If every dish is clean and pure. 

Before you mix we truly hope 

You'll freely use "SELF- WASHING SoAP;" 

The largest bar of soap in town 

We think is "MAPLE CiTV BROWN;" 

"Superior German" must eclipse, 

The same. is true of "Laundry Chips;" 

The "Alpha" comes a little late 

But takes its place by big "Down WEIGHT. 

We make these soaps much work to save. 

And "Barbers' Bar" for men who shave. 

Now if you would be neat and clean 

And always ready to be seen, 

"Monmouth Oat Meal" we recommend, 

"Maple Boq^uet" will prove a friend. 

With "Cochin Cocoa" or "Pine Tar," 

Or with "Rose Bud" a lovely bar, 

Or with our "AMBER Glycerine," 

The clearest we have ever seen; 

Or with our "Maple CitvTar," 

Or with our nice big "FlYE CENT Bar," 

You'll get results that always please. 

And meet your guests with perfect ease, 

Why use a soap of doubtful worth, 

When we've the best that's made on earthy 

For Maple City Soaps are pure 

And they will please you we are sure. 



PICKLES AND CATSUPS, 165 

fire and stew slowly till the apples are soft. Then, 
take out the apples, let the vinegar boil down and 
pour it over the fruit; cover and put away. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 
Mrs. H. W. Sisson. 

First — Take small, fresh cucumbers, put into 
strong brine and let stand twenty-four hours. 
After draining well, fill quart jars (pack closely.) 

Second— With good cider vinegar add sugar and 
cinnamon bark to taste, and one small red pepper 
for each quart, heat, bringing almost to a boil, not 
boiling, and pour over pickles each day for three 
days, sealing closely each time. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Mrs. Nettie Hess. 

Two hundred cucumbers, cover with w^ater, add 
a pint of salt. In the morning drain off the water, 
take as much vinegar as you had of water, one 
ounce each of whole cloves and allspice, and a. 
piece of alum the size of a walnut. Heat all to- 
gether, and pour boiling hot over the cucumbers. 
Adding sugar to the vinegar makes nice sweet 
pickles. 

CHERRY BUTTER. 
Mrs. Mary Pillsbury. 

Wash the cherries acd stem them. Boil until 
soft, then rub through a colander. To each ]3int 
of pulp add a pint of sugar, boil until thick like 
other fruit butters. Can them or keep in closely 
covered jars. 

RASPBERRY JAM. 

Raspberry jam is much better if one-third or 
one-half cherries are used. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Pare, quarter and core twelve large tart apples, 
(greenings, or any juicy apples preferred), put in 

FricudsJiips full of dregs. 



i64 PICKLES AND CATSUPS. 

a porcelain kettle with two quarts cranberries, 
stew till soft, then strain through jelly bag. heat 
juice, add two pounds of sugar, and boil until it 
jellies. Has much better flavor than when made 
simply of cranberries. 

COLD CATSUP. 

One peck of ripe tomatoes, sliced fine, sprinkle 
with salt and let stand two hours. When drained 
add two grated horseradishes, one small teaspoon 
of salt, one teacup of granulated sugar, two table- 
spoons black pepper, two tablespoons cinnamon, 
one teacup chopped onions, six bunches celery cut 
fine, two red peppers without seeds, four pints 
vinegar. Make cold and can. 

CHOPPED PICKLES. 
Margaret Holt. 

One peck of green tomatoes, half peck of onions, 
one head of cabbage, one pound of white mustard 
seed, one ounce each of tumeric, celery seed and 
cinnamon, half ounce of cloves, one pound of 
sugar, one pint of grated horseradish, six large 
green peppers. Slice the tomatoes, let stand over 
night, sprinkle a handful of salt over them, press 
all the water out, chop all fine. Mix all ingredi- 
ents and cook in vinegar enough to cover them, un- 
til the tomatoes look clear. 

PEACH PICKLES. 

Mabel Pillsbiiry. 

One quart best cider vinegar, three pints sugar 
boil slowly five minutes and skim. Pare fruit 
(free- stones), put in the syrup together with spices 
in the proportio i of two teaspoons whole cloves, 
four tablespoons cinnamon, and a small jiiece of 
ginger root to each gallon of fruit. Simmer u itil 
the peaches can be pierced through with silver 
f )rk. Fill fruit jars with the fruit and set in warm 

'^Angels arc b?^ight still, though the brightest fell.'' 



PICKLES AND CATSUPS. 165 

place. Boil the syrup until like thin molasses; 
skim out spices, and fill the jars with the boiling^ 
syrup. Seal immediately. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 
Mrs. Edgai- MacDill. 

One-half bushel of nice, ripe tomatoes, cut in 
small pieces, jjut in a large kettle, add two large 
onions, let boil until tender; rub through sieve. 
]3lace back in the kettle, adding one quart of 
good cider vinegar, one-half pint of salt; sweet- 
en to taste: five cents* worth of whole cloves, cin- 
namon, allspice, mustard seed, black pei3per; put 
spices in a thin bag, tie up. boil them with toma- 
toes, boil two hours, or until a little thick, stirring 
constantly; seal tight in bottles. 

OIL PICKLES. 
Mrs. Eunice Marks. 

Cut cucumbers in thin slices without paring, one- 
fourth peck onions to two gallons cucumbers. 
After all are sliced let lie in salt water over night, 
then drain in separate colanders. Three table- 
spoons ground black pepper, quarter lb. ground 
mustard, one red pepper cut in bits, half pint good 
salad oil. Mix oil, mustard and j^epper, and pour 
into as much cider vinegar as will cover pickles. 
Cover closely to exclude air and keep in cool place. 
(Good thanksgiving.) One dozen cucumbers make 
a gallon after they are sliced. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

Adeline P. Holt. 

Half bushel of ripe tomatoes, peel and slice to- 
matoes and stew in their own liquor until soft, 
then rub through a seive fine enough to retain the 
seeds, put over the fire and when it is boiling add 
four ounces salt, three ounces ground black pepper, 
one ounce of cinnamon, one half ounce ground 
cloves, and drachm cayenne pepper, one teacuj) 

Kee/f on hand ' 'Rolling Pin' Cleaned Currants. 



:i66 PICKLES AND CATSUPS. 

sugar, one quart good cider vinegar, boil down 
until thick, stirring all the time to prevent burn- 
ing. Bottle while hot. 

MEAT SAUCE. 
Mary Mason, 

Half bushel green tomatoes, half peck onions, 
one dozen green peppers, two gallons vinegar, two 
lbs. brown sugar, spice to suit taste. Cook on 
slow fire two hours. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 
Mrs. Wm. Mitchell. 

Three dozen cucumbers, one and a half dozen 
onions chopped fine, three fourths cup salt sprink- 
led over them and put in colander with a weight 
on top and drain over night, add one tea cup white 
mustard seed, one-half tea cup ground black pepper; 
mix well and put in bottles two-thirds full and fill 
to the top with good cold cider vinegar; seal like 
any other catsup. 

SPICED GRAPES. 
Five pounds of grapes, three pounds granulated 
sugar, one-half pint vinegar, two teaspoons each of 
cinnamon and allspice, half teaspoon cloves; pulp 
the grapes, boil the skins until tender, cook the 
pulp soft, and strain through a sieve, add it to the 
skins, put in the spices, sugar, and vinegar, boil 
thoroughly and then seal. 

MUSTARD PICKLE. 

Mrs. James French. 

One quart each of small whole cucumbers, large 
cucumbers sliced, green tomatoes sliced and small 
button onions; one large cauliflower divided into 
flowrets, and four green peppers cut fine. Make 
a brine of four quarts of water and one pint of salt. 
Pour it over the mixture of vegetables. Let 

Use Maple City Soaps. 



PIC KLES AND CATSUPS. 167 



them stand for twenty-four hours. Heat just 
enough to scald it, and turn into a colander to 
drain. Mix one cup flour; six tablespoons ground 
mustard and one tablespoon of tunaeric with 
enough cold vinegar to make a smooth paste; then 
add a cup of sugar, and sufficient vinegar to make 
two quarts in all. Boil this mixture until it thick- 
ens and is smooth, stirring all the time. Add the 
vegetables, and cook until well heated through. 
Put into jars or bottles and seal. 

SPICED CHERRIES. 
Five quarts seeded cherries without the juice, 
mix five pounds sugar over night, pour off the juice 
for three mornings, boil and skim, each time pour- 
ing on the cherries boiling hot, the fourth time add 
u^hole spices to taste, one pint cider vinegar, boil 
down with enough juice to cover cherries, add 
<:herries, and let come to a boil. 

SPICED GOOSEBERRIES. 
Five pounds of the fruit, three pounds of sugar, 
two teaspoons cinnamon, half teaspoon allspice, 
half teaspoon cloves, vinegar to suit the taste; 
boil thoroughly and stir often to keep it from 
scorching. 

WATER MELON SWEET PICKELS. 
Linnie Brewer. 

Pare the rinds, cut in pieces diamond or square 
shaped, take one large teaspoon of pulverized alum 
to as many as you can cover with water in a gallon 
crock — the water should taste well of the alum — let 
stand from twenty-four to thirty-six hours, as may 
be convenient, pour off the alum water, let stand 
in cold water thirty minutes. Should any of the 
pieces be soft trim it off, as they should be firm. 
Cover with water— may be warm but not boiling — 
put one cup sugar and several pieces of ginger 



i68 PICKLES AND CATSUl'S. 



root, let simmer but not boil hard until the pieces 
are clear. Try with a straw, as they became clear 
and tender, take out in a colander, let drain, 
do not wait until all are done, and don't put all in 
the colander at once for if crowded they will mash, 
thak in a large pan. When all are done weigh and 
soke as much sugar as fruit, make a syrup and pour 
over the fruit, do the same for four days, cooking 
the syrup each day until quite thick; on the fourth 
day add one quart of vinegar, two tablespoons of 
stick cinnamon broken in small pieces, heap the 
spoon and put in the syrup, one tablespoon cloves 
pounded and tied in a cloth, drop in and cook until 
it tastes well — if you like more spice you can put it 
in — put in the fruit and let heat through. Put up 
in glass jars. 

WATER MELON RINDS. 
Pare and cut in any shape, pour over them weak 
alum water, hot; let stand twenty-four hours, then 
pour off, rinse well, and boil in clear water until 
tender, make a syrup of equal measures of vinegar 
and sugar, some stick cinnamon and race ginger, 
boil the rinds in this till clear, put in jar, cover 
and put away. 

SPANISH PICKLES. 
Mrs. A. B. Seaman. 

One dozen green cucumbers peeled and sliced 
fine, one peck green tomatoes, four heads cabbage 
small and solid, one dozen onions, three pints cider 
vinegar, three ounces white mustard seed, one 
ounce celery, one ounce tumeric, one-fourth pound 
box Coleman's mustard, one and one-half pounds of 
sugar. Slice all the vegetables with a cabbage 
slicer. Put each separately in a weak brine for 
an hour or two, drain in a cheese cloth, put in lay- 
ers in a kettle. Mix mustard with cold vinegar 



CONFECTIONERY. 169 

adding tumeric, then gradually add boiling vinegar 
and sugar. Put one-third vegetables in kettle, 
pour on vinegar, then add another third, etc, If 
too moist do not use all the vinegar. Boil slowly 
until tender, and put in glass jars hot. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

'Sweets with sweets war not." — SJiakespeare's Poems 



FONDANT FOR FRENCH CANDY. 

Theo Sexton. 

One-half cup of water to two of granulated su- 
gar; add a pinch of cream of tartar. Boil without 
stirrmg for ten minutes, then try by dropping a 
little in cold water. When it can be rolled by the 
fingers into a soft (not a sticky) ball, put in a cool 
place. When a little scum has formed over the 
top, beat with a wooden spoon until it becomes a 
soft, creamy mass. Then flavor and mould. This- 
may be used as a foundation for any French candy. 
Nuts, dates and figs may be used with the fondant, 
making a variety. For chocolate creams, roll the 
fondant into small balls; let them get perfectly 
hard, dip them into melted chocolate to which has 
been added some of the hot melted fondant. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

Theo Sexton. 

One cup N. O. molasses, one cup sugar, (brown 
or granulated) half cup butter, added when nearly 
done. Boil until it snaps when put in cold water. 
Pour into buttere.d tins and when cool enough mark 
into squares. 

A good nose is requisite^ to smell out work for the 
other senses. 



I70 CONFECTIONERY. 



BUTTER SCOTCH No. 2. 
To the above recipe add one tablespoon vinegar 
and pinch of soda. 

CREAM CANDY 

Eva Clark. 

Two cups of white sugar, one-half cup of water, 
four tablespoons of vinegar, teaspoon of butter. 
Boil twenty minutes ; when removed from the 
stove add one-fourth of a teaspoon of vanilla; do 
not stir it. Pull. 

FUDGES. 

Margaret Dunbar. 

To four cups granulated sugar add one-half cake 
Bakers' chocolate, one cup rich milk and one- 
fourth pound butter. Place over hot fire, stirring 
constantly until it becomes thick, (but Hot hard 
when put in water.) Remove from fire and stir 
until mass begins to set. Pour in pan making 
about half inch thick, and while still warm cut in 
squares. (Vanilla may be added.) 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 
Mrs. H. B. Smith. 

Four cups granulated sugar, one cup cold water, 
three tablespoons glucose. Boil until brittle, then 
add half cake chocolate (melted), one cup cream. 
Boil again until brittle. Flavor. Mark when 
partly cool. 

NUT TAFFY. 

One cup sugar, one cup vinegar with one tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in it, one cup molasses, and 
a piece of butter the size of an egg. Boil till very 
brittle, drop in water when done; add one cup nut 
meats. 

Best and Purest Candies at the Ca?idy Kitchen, 
Southwest cor7ter of the Square. 



CONFECTIONERY. 171 

MARSH MALLOWS. 
Dissolve one-half pound of .gum arabic in one 
pint of water, strain and add one-half pound fine 
sugar and place over the fire, stirring constantly 
until the syrup is dissolved and of the consistency 
of honey; add gradually the whites of four eggs, 
well beaten, stir the mixture until it becomes some- 
what thin and does not adhere to the finger; flavor 
to taste, and pour into a tin slightly dusted with 
powdered starch. When cool divide into small 
-Squares. 

SALTED ALMONDS." 

Margaret Dunbar. 

Blanch the almonds by throwing in hot water, 
then in cold, and stir through them enough butter 

to make them seem oily; warm them while stirring 
in the butter, then spread them over a baking pan 
and bake fifteen minutes, or till crisp, stirring often; 

'•when done sprinkle with salt while hot. 

SALTED ALMONDS No. 2. 
White of an egg, salt, stir in blanched almonds 
and brown in oven. 

SALTED PEANUTS. 
[J Peanuts may take the place of almonds; procure 
the raw peanuts, shell and set them on the stove 
in cold water and let them come to a boil and stand 
ten minutes, drain off and put on cold water, 
blanch and treat same as almonds. 



'To persist in doing ivrong, extenuates not zvrong.'' 

— Troilus and Cressida. 



172 ADDENDA. 



ADDENDA. 



'Jove and my stars be praised. Here is yet a postscript." 

— Tivelfth Xig/it. 



CREAM SOUP. 
Mrs. Eliza B. Smith. 

Boil chicken until tender; if too fat, skim; salt 

and pepper to taste, make thickening as for gravy; 

whites of two eggs, one pint of sweet cream; whip 

each seperately, then stir into soup. Serves eight 

persons. 

OMELET FOR SIX. 
Mrs. Eliza B. Smith. 

Four eggs (whites and yellows beaten separately) 
salt to taste, mix all together, have griddle warm 
and greased, pour on your omelet, place in oven 
five or ten minutes to brown. 

PARKER HOUSE3ROLLS. 
Mrs. Ella P. Hanna. 

Boil one pint milk and ccol it; take two quarts 
flour, two tablespoons lard, half cup white sugar, 
one cup yeast, a little salt. Beat well and let 
rise, then punch it; do the same again. Set about 
9 a.m.; about 4 o'clock roll out about one-half 
inch thick and cut with biscuit cutter. Put three 
pieces of butter in each and fold together, pinch- 
ing the edges. 

POTATO SOUP. 
Mrs. H. Warner. 

Boil for three-fourths of an hour in just sufifi- 
cient water to cover, four peeled potatoes, piece 
of celery, small piece of onion and whole mace. 

Truth has a quiet breast. 



ADDENDA. 173 



At the same time boil three pints of milk, when 
potatoes are cooked mash, add butter, salt and a 
little pepper. Take milk from stove, strain pota- 
toes through colander into milk, place on stove 
and boil up two or three times, then pour into 
tureen in which you have a little grated parsley 
and three tablespoons whipped cream. 

DEVILED FISH. 

Mrs. John E. Brewer. 

One quart hot cream, two tablespoons butter, 
two heaping tablespoons corn starch, half tea- 
spoon salt, half saltspoon white pepper, half tea- 
spoon celery salt, a very little red pepper. Scald 
the cream, melt the butter in a quart sauce pan; 
when bubbling add the dry corn starch, stir until 
well mixed, add one-third of the cream, and stir 
as it boils and thickens, add more cream and boil 
again; when perfectly smooth add the rest of the 
cream; the sauce should be very thick; add the 
seasoning and mix while hot with fish. Bake in 
shells. 

JELLY PIE. 
Vie Harding. 

Four eggs beaten seperately; one and half cups 
sugar, half cup butter, one cup milk, (half cream) 
one cup jelly, two tablespoons vanilla, one tea- 
spoon flour or corn starch. Stir yolks of eggs, 
sugar and butter together, then add cream and 
jelly, (beaten fine) vanilla, and lastly the whites 
of eggs beaten to a froth. If a large cup is used 
this will make three pies. 

BAKED HAM. 

Soak for an hour in water, scrape and wipe; 
spread over a thin batter. Put in deep dish on 
sticks to keep out of gravy. Bake six or eight 
Jiours; remove skin and batter, sprinkle with two 

Hodgens' for Fine Candies. 



174 ADDENDA. 



tablespoons sugar, black pepper and powdered 
crackers. Return to oven to brown. Stick irfc 
cloves and dust withcinnamon. 

JELLIED VEAL. 
Boil veal tender, pick up fine, put in mould with 
liquor it was boiled in; season well with pepper 
and salt. Press in a few hard boiled eggs. 

VEAL SCOLLOP. 

Mrs. W. S. HoUiday. 

Mince cold veal very fine; put a layer in the 
bottom of a buttered bake dish, season with pep- 
per, salt and a little nutmeg. Put a layer of fine 
crumbs, next veal again and so on until full. Wet 
with good broth and put on top a layer of crumbs 
wet with milk and mixed with a beaten esrsf. If 
the oven is hot, cover with a pan and bake half an 
hour, then brown ten minutes. 

DRESSING FOR COLD SLAW. 

Mrs. W. S. Holliday. 

Two eggs well beaten, two-thirds cup of vine- 
gar, one teaspoon sugar, one heaping teaspoon of 
flour, small piece of butter, and a little mustard if 
desired; when these are beaten well together, boil 
and pour over slaw. 

ORANGE SHORT CAKE. 
Jennie Mitchell. 

Three teaspoons baking powder to one quart of 
flour, add two tablespoons butter and thoroughly 
mix and add either milk or water to make a soft 
dough. Bake in two cakes, and when done split 
and spread with butter. P'or the filling remove 
the pulp from a half dozen oranges, sugar to taste. 
Drain off the juice and spread pulp between cakes. 
-Serve with sauce. Sauce: One pint water, one 
tablespoon corn starch, two tablespoons butter,. 
one cup sugar, and if preferred one well beaten 
egg; adding last the juice of oranges. 



ADDENDA. 175 



MINCE MEAT. 
Mrs. Hugh Marshall. 

Four pints chopped meat. 

Four pints chopped suit. 

Eight pints chopped apples. 

One pint molasses, One quart of vinegar. 

Three pounds of sugar. 

Three tablespoons cinnamon. 

One tablespoon of cloves. 

Two tablespoons of mace. Two nutmegs. 

Four lbs. raisins — two large and two seedless. 
Salt and a little pepper. Citron and fruit juice 
is an improvement. 

WHITE LAYER CAKE. 
Mrs. Hiigh Marshall. 

Two cups sugar. Three cups flour. 

Three-fourths cup butter. Three-fourths cup milk. 
"Whites eight eggs. Three teaspoons baking 

powder. Use any flavoring and filling desired. 

FRENCH SALAD DRESSING. 

Mrs. Melville Brewer. 

Three tablespoons olive oil, one tablespoon vin- 
egar, three saltspoons salt, one saltspoon black 
pepper. Serve on lettuce, mixed at table just be- 
fore serving. 

WASHING MADE EASY. 
Mrs. Melville Brewer. 

Eight ounces sal soda, six ounces borax, two 
and a half pounds Maple City Self- Washing soap, 
ten quarts rain water. Shave soap, add to water, 
with sal soda and borax. Heat until thoroughly 
dissolved — about an tour. Use half cup to each 
pail of water to soak clothes over night, add one 
cup to boil in. The mixture may be used only to 
boil the clothes, washing in usual way. It is ex- 
cellent to whiten them and for washing flannels. 

' 'Modest doubt is called the beaeon of the zuisc. " 

— Tro ilu s a n d Cres s ida . 



176 FRAGMENTS. 



FRAGMENTS. 

''A good Wit will make use of anything," Henry IV. 



A GOOD SUBSTITUTE FOR BUTTER, AND BEEF 
DRIPPINGS. * 

Get best kidney suet; put to boil in milk, allow- 
ing one-half teacup to each pound of suet; lift from 
bottom occasionally to prevent burning. When 
the milk has boiled out you can dip off grease, 
which will be of a delicate flavor. The suet is 
improved by soaking a few hours in cold water. 
Excellent to put with lard in frying doughnuts. 

Pinch of salt helps the whites of eggs to beat 
more quickly. 

Dough for breakfast rolls may be kept for sev- 
eral days on ice. 

A spoonful of vinegar in a kettle of hot lard will 
prevent doughnuts from absorbing fat. 

A few pieces of zinc put in a stove, where you 
use soft coal, will clean the pipe from soot. 

Turpentine mixed with stove polish prevents 
rust and gives a higher gloss than water. 

Mica in stoves can be made clean by washing 
with vinegar and water. 

CLEANSING FLUID (Fine.) 
Mrs. Geo. Wiley, Chicago. 

Six drachms alcohol, two drachms ammonia, one 
drachm oil of sassafras, one drachm chloroform, | 
drachm pulverized borax. Mix and shake well, 
then add one quart deodorized gasoline. 

Fezv love to hear the sins they love to act. 



FRAGMENTS. i77 



Fresh lard will remove tar and grass stains. 

Ink stains can be removed from the fingers by 
rubbing them with a match. The sulpher will 
soon erase all stains. 

For washing clothes easily and securing best 
results in every way, the use of Maple City Self- 
Washing Soap is heartily recommended. 

The best cement for mending china or glass is 
white lead. Put away three or four months before 
using. 

Always keep mixed linseed oil and lime water 
in the house for burns Get the druggist to pre- 
pare 5 cents worth for you. 

Apply hot water to a bruise. It will -prevent 
swelling and discoloration. 

Put two or three handsful of corn meal and one 
of graham flour in your buckwheat cakes. 

5 cents worth of Chinese blue, dissolved in one 
-quart of soft water and kept in corked bottles, makes 
an excellent bluing, and will last a family a year. 

Eat oranges and cranberries for breakfast. They 
are good for the liver. 

Give your children plenty of broyvn bread and 
milk, and well made corn meal bread, and fruit at 
meal times. 

Try a teaspoon of kerosene in the water in 
which you wash windows and woodwork. 

Use the white of an egg in making mustard 
plasters. If the mustard is strong, use part flour. 
This will prevent blistering. 

Dissolve copperas in your drain pipes often to 
clean out the slime and grease and thoroughly dis- 
infect them. 



Better three hours too soon than a minute too late 



178 FRAGMENTS. 



For starching muslins dissolve one tablespoon of 
white gum arabic in a cup of water. Clean and 
dry your muslins before wetting in this solution.. 
Iron right side down. 

TO WASH BLANKETS. 

One ounce pulverized borax, one-half pint soft 
soap. Put in cold soft water; soak over night. 
Rinse in two waters in morning, squeze but not 
wring and hang up without wringing. For one- 
blanket. Makes them soft and is easily done. 

Pour sauce arouud puddings and fish, not over 
them. 

Everything to be browned, should be hand- 
somely browned, not burned. 

Pineapple juice or grated pineapple added to 
lemonade is delicious. 

Serve rich, creamy buttermilk with cracked ice. 
Healthful and nutritious. 

One teaspoon sweet cream in frosting prevents 
crumbling when cut. 

Pour hot water on raisins. They are more 
easily seeded. 

To test eggs put them in water. If the large 
end turns up they are not fresh. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



^l 


Teaspoonfuls 


- make One Tablespoonful 


4 


Tablespoonfuls 


" One Wine-glassful 


2 


Wine-glassfuls 


- '♦ One Gill 


2 


Gills 


'* One Teacupful 


2 


Teacupfuls 


" One Pint 


4 


Teacupfuls Salt 


- - '' One Ounce 


ij 


Tablespoonfuls Gi 


-anulated 


^ 


Sugar 


- make One Ounce 



Learning is but an adjunct to oneself. 



FRAGMENTS. 179 



2 Tablespoonfuls Flour " One Ounce 
2 Cups or I Pint Granulated 

Sugar will weigh about One Pound 

1 Scant Quart Wheat Flour 

- - - about One Pound 

10 Ordinary Sized Eggs *' One Pound 
A piece of butter the size of 

an Ggg will weigh about ij Ounces 

2 Cups of Butter - *' One Pound 

1 Quart Indian Meal " One Pound 4 oz 
40 Drops - - " One Teaspoonful 

A common sized Tumbler One-half Pint 
A common sized Wine-glass One-half Gill 

2 Tablespoons Liquid make One Ounce 

I Gill Liquid - *' Four Ounces 

TO SERVE ONE HUNDRED PERSONS. 
Mrs. Eliza Smith. 

Ham, 16 pounds; Chickens 6; Turkeys 2;. Oys- 
ters, 10 cans; Coffee, 2 pounds; Bread, 8 loaves; 
Saratoga Potatoes, 8 quarts; Layer Cakes 5; Angel 
Food 5; Ice Cream, 4 gallons; Fruit Salad, fill 
recipe 3 times. 




* 'Praise us as wc arc. tasted, alloiv 21s as zve prove.' 

— Troilus and Cressida. 



i8o 



BAPTIST LADIES' COOK BOOK. 



ESTABLISHED A QUARTER OF A CENTURY 



M. BREWER, 



IDI^UO^IST 



and dealers in 

Wall Paper, Paints, Mouldings, Stationery, Glass, 

Etc. Picture Frames and Mats made on short notice and 
at very reasonable prices. Call and see for yourself. 



Better is a Dinner of Herbs 



On clean, fine linen than all the dainties 
of a palace served on an untidy table 
cloth 



We Sell Fine Linens 



From Irela-^d, Scotland and Prussia. 



Cloths by the yard or pattern of any 
longth. Napkins of every size and 
quality » • 

Very Respectfully 

13. \nl, ti^FLI^E g ©O. 



Square and Broadway, 
MONMOUTH, ILL. 



TRADE WITH 





57 S. SIDE SQUARE. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



Soup, - - - - - 

Fish, - - - - - - 

Croquettes, . - - 
Oysters, - - - - - 

Meats, ----- 

Vegetables, - - -  
Salads, - - - - - 

Cheese, - - - - - 

Breads and Biscuits, 
Pies, ------ 

Puddings and Sauces, 
Ices, ------ 

Cakes, ----- 

Loaf Cake, 

Layer Cakes, 

Small Cakes, 
Beverages, - - - • 
Breakfast Dishes. 
Eggs, ----- 
Pickles and Catsups, 
Confectionery, 
Addenda, - - - - - 
Fragments, _ _ - 
Weights and Measures, 
Directory, - - - - 



PAGES- 


9- 


16 


19- 


23 


25- 


28 


30- 


34 


36- 


47 


49- 


60 


62- 


71 


/3- 


75 


77- 


8; 


86- 


96 


96-1 


ti3 


114-] 


20 


121-] 


145 


121-] 


[31 


131-1 


39 


139- 


f45 


147- 


'51 


153- 


[58 


158- 


[61 


161- 


[69 


169- 


[71 


172- 


175 


176- 


179 




178 


182- 


183. 



# 



i82 DIRECTORY. 



DIRECTORY. 



"I had thought to have let in some of all professions.'' 

— Macbeth. 



Bates & Son, China Emporium, dealers in Gro- 
ceries and Queensware. 

Bosch & Co., Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters, 
220 South First street. 

W. W. Brooks, dealer in Staple and Fancy Gro- 
ceries, near C., B. & Q. freight depot. 

H. Burliiigiiii, General Store, Fifth avenue and 

Third street. 
Anna Cassel, Fine Millinery, South Main st. 

O. M. Dayniucle, Dentist, Second National Bank 
building. 

D. D. Diffenbangli, Staple and Fancy Grocer- 
ies, Fine Confections, Fruits, etc. 

D. H. Evey, D. D. S., Office in People's National 
Bank Building. 

O. F. FoAA'ler, Meat Market, 205 E. Broadway. 

O. N. Hawley, Dealer in Pianos and Organs, 
111 North Main st., Monmouth, Ills. 

W. S. Holliday, 31. D., Physician and Surgeon, 

208 South First st. 

Hoy Brothers Contractors and Builders, 513 
South Third st. 

Mrs. E. C. Johnson, Dealer in Stamping Pat- 
terns and Fancy Work Materials. 

H. A. Johnson, Jewelry and Optical Goods. 
Eyes tested free. 105 East Broadway. 

B. MeNaniura, Dealer in Staple and Fancy Gro- 
ceries. 95 North Side Square. 

3Ionnionth Gas Co. Gas Stoves at cost. Tel- 
ephone 37. 



DIRECTORY. 183 

Pollock Bros., Caterers and Confectioners, 107 
East Broadway. 

Keel Star Cash Dry Goods Store, Dry Goods 
and Notions. 

Peyton Roberts, Fire and Life Insurance, Main 
street and Square. 

Republican Printing: Co. 

H. W. Sisson, Mdinufacturer of Harness Special- 
ties and Horse Clothing, 107 North Main st. 

W. R. Skinner, I. C. Meat Market. 

W. P. Smith, Dentist, Over Second National 
Bank, Monmouth, Ills. 

Tred. H. Smith, Watchmaker and Engraver. 
Rooms over Second National Bank. 

J. W. Springs & Co., Boots and Shoes, 106 
South Main street. 

Springs & Son, Druggists. 

J. D. Sngg^s, Dealer in Staple and Fancy Grocer- 
ies, opposite Iowa Central Depot. 

J. Sullivan & Co., Hardware, Farm Machinery 
and Plumbing. 

W. T. Steffen, Cash Meat Market, 708 South 
First street. 

Drs. Taylor & Ebersole. Homeopathists, Mon- 
mouth National Bank Building. 

John N. Thomson, "The Fair." 

Dr. A. J. Waid, Dentist. Teeth extracted with- 
out pain and ulcerated teeth saved. 

R. E. White, Undertaker, S. E. Corner Square. 

Woods & Son, Boots and Shoes, North Side 
Square. 

/ 



184 



BAPTIST LAIDES' COOK BOOK. 



Blackburn & Turnbull 




Leading Liverymen, 'Bus and Carriage 

Lir.e. 



Office open day and niight. Calls answered at all hours. 



Special attention to Carriage work for Parties, Weddings, et. 
316 to 322 South Main Street. 



DON'T FORGET 



THE 



MONMOUTH 



Lumber Co. 



FOR — 



Ladd Coal, 



When You Are A Cooking. 



YOU CANT 

do good cooking 

without 

GOOD FUEL 



THE LAOO COAL 



beats everything. 



Try It! 



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Anthraci ^ Bitum. 

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F. W. .iARJ >Jt H. B. 'Ej_ 

I'ashier. \ss'v bie» . 




Telle 



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H. H. PATTEE, D. S. x^aivoi.n, J. R. WEBSTER, 

J. H. STEWART, I. P. PILLSBURY, C. P. AVENEW-, W 
FRED E. HARDING.