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tH£ 






FOR 



»■ -» 



^^ir^ 



1821 



THE PROFITS 



ARiSI^G FROM THE SALS OF THIS WORK^ 



ABS Olfllf 



TO THE WIZX>W8 OF BAPTIST MINISTERS, 



AT ni ftSOOMMBiroATIOir Of TBB 



CONTRIBUTORS. 



VOL. XIII. 



*^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^*^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



SPEAKING THE TRUTH IN LOVE. 

EpH. IV. 13. 



iLonHon: 

PRINTED BY J. BARFIELD, WARDOUR-STRJBET, SOHO^ 



■j • « 



AND SOLD BY 



B. J.^HOLDSWORTH, ST PAUL*S-CEU^CH-XliiCS>. 



V ■ ■ « 



1821. 







•ivv:4iSi::: 



tH£ 






FOR 



1821 



THE PROFITS 



ARISING FROM THE SALS OF THIS WORK^ 



ABS offiir 



TO TH£ WIZX>WS OF BAPTIST MINISTERS, 



AT TMI ftSOOMKBiroATldir Of TBB 



contribvtors. 



*<l»»#»»»>^ > >»#^l»#^^^^^ ^ l»rf>»l#l»»^^» 



VOL. XIII. 



^^^^#^»^^^^^^^S»^^l^»^^^^^^^»^^^ 



SPEAKING THE TRUTH IN LOVE. 

EpH. IV. 13. 



iLonHon: 

PRINTED BY J. BARFIELD, WARDOUR-STRJB^, SOHO; 

AND SOLD BY . 

B. JvHOLDSWORTH, ST PAUL*S-CEU^CBL-XAKS>. 






1831. 




• ••• 
• • •* 



U.I, 



• • « 



• J * 






• • • 






• • • • 



•* ' • • • 

• • • • » 

• * • ■ • 

• •• • • •«• 



PREFACE. 



At the close of another year, we shall present our 
Readers with a brief Compendium of some ot its leading 
events. 

1. The Bible Society. — ^The Bibles issued by Foreign 
Societies aided by the rarent, have risen from 547,320 to 
739,045; and the Testaments from 588,200 to 721,376. 
The Bibles issued by the Society have increased from 
1.152,434 to 1.307,044; and the Testaments from 1.704,857 
to 1.963,118. The Society has distributed, or assisted to 
distribute, since its formation, 5.445,583 copies of the Old 
and New Testaments. Its total expenditure has been 
^908,248 lOfi. 6d. 

m 

S, The Religious Tract Society. — During the year 
4.830,770 Tracts have been issued. 

S. The London Missionary Society/, — This year is distin- 
guished by Mr. Campbell's Second Tom* m Africa, and 
Ketum to England; the erection of an Anglo-Chinese 
College at Malacca ; the Deputation of the Rev. Daniel 
Tyerman and Mr. George Bennet to the South-sea Islands ;* 
the increasing civilization of those islands through the 
benign influence of Christianity; the visit of Prince 
RatafFe of Madagascar to this country ; the Ordination of 
Missionaries to Calcutta; and the labours of Mr. Swann in 
Siberia. 

4. The nortliem part of our Island has not been deficient 
in zeal and activity both at home and abroad. The southern 
metropolis has been lately favoured with a visit from our 
beloved and respected Friend and Brother Dr. Wardlaw, 
whose ministerial labours amongst us, whilst collecting for 
the Congregational Union, have been highly acceptable. 

5 The labours of the different Missionary Societies in the 
United States have been principally directed to Burmah. 
the Sandwich Islands, the Seven Apocalyptic churches, 
and Palestine,— and to itinerating in Vermont, Mew York,' 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, and 
Missouri. 

* In an early number for the ensuing year we intend to give in out Po^VvcitX 
DepartiDont the beaotifu] Address to these genttenien by lAi* '^oux^owk^x^. 



iV tHE PREFACE. 

6. The United Brethren are continuiag their labours in 
Greenland^ Antigua, Africa, aod other places. 

4 

7. The enlightened Roman Catholic Clergy on the Continent. 
— Professor Leander Van £ss meets withjgreat opposition, 
but armed wiih courage from on high, be continues the 
conflict. His sphere of operation is of prodigious extent. 
He has distributed 408,210 copies of the Scriptures among 
the Catholics, some of them Catholic versions, others Pro- 
testant. There are numerous enlightened Catholic Priests 
in Bohemia, Cologne, Calb, 8cc. 

8. The JevDs. — An unusual spirit of inquiry on the subject 
of religiou prevails amongst the Jews in every quarter of 
the world. Many on the Continent have been savingly 
converted to God, and some are now preach^ of the 
faith which once they destroyed. During the past year 
3180 copies of the Hebrew New Testament have been cir- 
culated amongst them. SOOO copie3 of the Epistle to the 
Hebrews have been printed separately. 3780 copies of the 
German New Testament, in the German Hebrew character, 
have also been distributed; and the* London Society for 
promoting Christianity among the Jews is contemplating ah 
Edition of the Old Testament in the same character. 
70,000 Cards, containing parts of the Acts of the Apostles 
in Hebrew and German, have been circulated. Some thou- 
sand copies of the New Testament have been printed in the 
Judaeo-Polish lan^age. 250,000 Tracts for tne Jews have 
been printed in different languages. In Russia, Holland, 
Germany, Bohemia, and Poland, many Jews are inquiring 
into the evidences of Christianity, and a general expectation 
of the manifestation of the Messiah prevails. 

9- We congratulate our Readers on the powerful opposi- 
tion which has been made to the Education Bill proposed 
by Mr. Brougham, and that that gentleman has relinquished 
this very odious, illiberal, and unpopular measure. 

10. For the labours of the Baptist Missionary^ Baptist 
Irish, Baptist Home Missionary, Home Missionary, Church 
Missionary, Wesleyan, Continental, London Hibernian, 
Irish F/cangelical, Port of London, British and Foreign 
School, and many other Societies, we must refer to the 
diffisrent numbers of our Magazine. 

1 1 . We conclude with returning our sincere thanks, and 
those of the Widows of our Ministers, to our Readers, for 
their past favours, and with soliciting their future support. 



rH£ 



Uupti&t 0i^u}im, 



JANUARY, 1821. 



5 



THE NEW YEAR, 



t^HE WAY WHENCE THERE IS NO RETURN. 

I 
Cedes coemptis Mkibns et domo, 
VUIaqiMt flavns qoam Tiberis.lftirit, 
Cedes: et extructbin altani 

DlThfis poiietur beres. 
Oihnes eodero oo^or : omniairi ^ 
Venatiirunw: serins, ocy us 
Sort eutnri. Hok. 



AivoTHBR year is about to be 
added to those that are past for 
ever ; and a new and solemn pe- 
riod of time will soon dawn on 
me. And shall I regard the close 
of the one^ and the commence- 
ment of the other, with in* 
difference? O no. Come, my 
soul, retire into the closet, shut 
out the busy scenes of life, and 
review the way by which Divine 
Providence has led thee through 
the wilderness. And canst thou 
do it mthaui peniienee ? Though 
the year is almost gone, thoughts, 
words, and actions, pass not 
away: they are entered in that 
awful volume which will be open- 
ed ainidst assembled worlds. 
During the past season I have 
thought of my earthly friends, I 
have been grateful to them for 
their kindnesses, I have been 
conscious that I have loved 
them, and have b^en solicitous 

VOL. XIII, 



to please them : but, 6, I have 
too miich forgotten my best 
Friend — the good, the gracious, 
and the blessed God ! How many 
opportunities have I permitted 
to pass by unimproved, by which 
I might have testified my grati-^ 
tude to him for his inimeasurable 
goodness I How questionable, on 
many accounts, has been my love 
to thii kindest bf Beings ! I have 
not, as I ought to have done, 
made it my chief solicitude to 
pleafte my adorable Benefactor; 
to whom I am indebted beyond 
all measure and bounds ; and yet 
he has borne with me — and yet 
I live, and am the hourly object 
of his unmerited loving kindness. 

" Sare, were I not roost vile and base, 
I coiild not thus mj Friend requite \ 
And were not be the Ood of grace, . 
He^d fhrnn^aDd s|xim me from bis sight." 

And shall I then review the 
past wiihmtt holg and tU^atcA 



s 



THB NBW TBAr. 



gratitude? I cannot, I dare not 
ilo it. Bless the Lord, O my 
ftoiil, and all that is within me, 
bifs.s and [iraise his great and 
holy name. Bless the Lord, O 
my &oul, and forget. not all his 
benefits. Thou art " ray God, 
and I will |irai^ tbee; thau 'irt 
my God, and I will exalt thee." 
Shall I not also pray far the Di- 
vine blessinsc through the new 
period on which I am about to 
enter? I cannot help doing so. 
O my God, still ^uide, guard, 
uphold, comfort, deliver, supply, 
and save thine unworthy creature. 
Let me not be a cumberer of the 
ground ; bless me, and make me 
a blessing. And surely every 
one who has the least pretension 
to seriousness, will now be awak- 
ened to solemn reflection. At the 
end of the year, the merchant 
examines his accounts, that he 
may know the exact state of his 
affairs; and it is important that 
be should do so; but of how 
much greater importance is it, 
that we should examine our cha- 
racters in reference to etenuty ! 
It is high time to awaken out of 
sleep ; for our salvation, or our 
coodemnation, is a twelvemonth 
nearer : and if we arc nearer an 
eternity of joy, heaven ought to 
have more attractions, and earth 
fewer; or if we have come thus 
far onward in the *' broad path" 
(o perdition, it ought to be our 
first concern to leave it, lest God 
should swear in his wrath that 
we shall not enter into his rest. 
Our Ql^aracters must necessarily 
be soon, very soon, decided for 
ever; for when ** a few more 
years are come, then shall we 
go the way whence we shall not 
return." Job xvi. 22. 

Reader! there is a way in 
which men go wfun they depart 
cut of the present life. There is 
a part of mao which does not die. 



The body is a house; and no 
wonder, that after a course of 
years, the inclemency of the sea- 
sons, and frequent repairs, it at 
length becomes untenantable. 
The body is a garment ; and who 
is surprised that in the lapse of 
time it should become too small 
for the expanding faculties, and 
be laid aside, or be worn out, and 
be found unfit any longer to en- 
wrap the immortal spirit ? Yes, 
every man has a soul, that must 
live, 

— — • — ** when every fire 
Of every star shall languUhaud expire* 

This sentiment appears so ra- 
tional, that the very heathens 
have professed their belief of it. 
They justly concluded, since a 
man might search through crea- 
tion, and gain all that the world 
could possibly confer on him, and 
yet find something that it could 
not give essential to his happi- 
ness, that he was made for a no- 
bler world than the present, and 
that his nature was immortal. 

No one but a bad man, who by 
his iniquities has made it his in- 
terest that there should be no 
immortality, ever advanced the 
degrading sentiment that the 
grave takes the whole of man. 
Dr. Young admirably remarks, 
that 

" Nature's j(rie wffA is endless happiness; 
Annihilation — is an ajler thought, 
A monstrnus thoaght, — unborn till virtue 
dies." 

If there be no hereafter, if the 
soul be not immortal, religion is 
of no importance ; we need not 
fear to die, any more than the 
leaves falling from the trees In 
autumn, or than the grain fears 
to be cut down by the sickle. 
Then virtue apd vice, godliness 
and ungodlines^, are alike — then, 
the drunkard, the seducer, the 
thief, and the murderer, may 



THE NEW YEAH. 



3 



** untrembting moutli the hea- 
vens:*' but if there be an here- 
after, — 

** And thtt there is« — conscience uuin* 

fliienc'd. 
And suffered to speak out, — tells every 

roan,— 
Then must it be an awful thing to die.'* 

On the very face of things, 
without any profound examina- 
tion of the subject, we may safely 
pronounce that doctrine to be 
false, which would fill every good 
man in the world with the deep- 
est possible affliction, and every 
villain with ecstatic joy. But 
Revelation confirms the conjec- 
tures of reason, and assures us, 
that the power that thinks, and 
wills, and acts, and feels, and 
hears, and sees, is immortal. It 
cannot die. The body will re- 
turn to its original dust ; but the 
deathless spirit will depart to 
God who gave it; and it will 
** profit a man nothing if he gain 
the whole world, and yet lose his 
own soul." 

Death then is a departure for 
another world. Thus the Apostle 
says to Timothy, " The time of 
my departure is at hand." The 
believer in Jesus, when ^* absent 
from the body," is present with 
God his Saviour. We read, that 
when Lazarus died, the angels 
bore his happy spirit into the 
heavenly paradise. And we are as- 
sured, that ** though this earthly 
house of our tabernacle be dis- 
8olved» we have a building of 
God, a house not made with 
hands, eternal in the heavens.'' 
When a gentleman, referring to a 
pions youns^ man, who had often 
given out the hymns in public 
worship, and who had recently 
exchanged earth for heaven, said 
to Mr. Newton, '• Well, Sir, you 
have lost your clerk ;" — " Nay," 
Implied the venerable preacher, 
** you talk very unlike a ifoercath 






tile man ; is a vessel lost, when 
she gets into port V 

Death is a departure also to 
the wicked; not, however, to 
happiness, but to the miserable 
abode, where, for ever, they will 
reap the frait of their doings. 
God, the holy, the faithful God, 
has said, in reference to the un- 
godly, *' Woe unto him, — it shall 
go ill with him/' — and who,— 
who can alter the terrible dieci- 
sionl 

There is not only a way in 
which men go when they depart 
out of the present state, but it is 
also a way, whence it is impossibk 
they should ever return. The 
moment the spirit departs^ the 
character is decided ; there is 
" no work or device in the grave." 
I recollect some, who during the 
past year have gone into eternity, 
who, if they were permitted, i 
fear would be glad to return; 
and I also recollect others, who 
would not wish by any means to 
return again ; no, not even to 
earth's fairest scenes. Puring 
the past year, in the recollection 
of every reader, some^oirng' tntfJi 
has gone this tra^— ^perhaps it 
may l>e said of him, *' He was an 
object of envy to most of bis 
companions — his worldly pros- 
pects were most desinlble — and 
bis whole heart was occupied in 
earthly pursuits — he thought of 
getting before his competitors, 
of settling in life, of rearing a 
family, of gaining the esteem of 
all around him, of rapidly ac-( 
quiring a fortune. Indeed, b(: 
thought of every thing but of 
God, of his soul, of the way of 
salvation, and of eternity. But 
he was suddenly called away 
from the present state — he is 
gone, and, solemn thought ! he is 
" gone the way whence be shall 
not return." 
Perhaps, dunng vVi^ v^^ '^<i'^'«» 



THE NEW YEAR. 



$ome rich man among our ac- 
quaintance has taken a last fare- 
vrell of the things of time. And 
how lamentable bis condition, if, 
like multitudes aroond us, he was 
making provision for this world, 
as though it were never to have 
an end ; and for the other world 
as though it were never to have a 
beginning; if he were saying, 
** Soul! take thine ease, eat, 
drink, and be merry, thou hast 
much goods laid up for many 
years," and has not been per- 
mitted to see the close of one of 
those years on which he so con- 
fidently relied! The place that 
once knew him, knows him no 
more for ever. How gladly 
"would be give the whole of his 
treasures, might he return but for 
one short day, to attend to the 
things which make for his eternal 
peace ! The wealth of the Indies 
cMHild not procure the boon. 
There are impassable barriers 
between him and mortals. He 
is gone the way whence he shall 
not return. 

The tomb has also received 
HMTiiy a busy inhabitant during 
the past season. Such seemed 
to think, if we may judge of their 
thoughts by their actions, that 
God did not require of them any 
love, gratitude, or obedience; 
that they were sent into the 
world merely to seek momentary 
good. They were planning new 
earthly schemes at the very mo- 
ment when death summoned 
them to give an account how 
tbe^ had spent their months and 
their years. Could they come 
back again, O how differently 
would they think, how differently 
would they act! But they are 
gone the way whence they shall 
not return. 

And many a saint, — many a 
faithful pastor, — many a believer 
in the Lord Jesus, is also gone 



this way, during the past year. 
They wish not to return. They 
have bid an eternal farewell to 
their enemies, fears, labours, con- 
flicts, and sorrows; they hunger 
no more, neither do they thirst 
any more. The days of their 
mourning are for ever ended. 
They behold the face of their di- 
vine Redeemer, and they dwell 
perpetually in his life-giving pre- 
sence. They know somewhat 
experimentally of the plenitude 
of glory referred to in that as- 
tonishing passage, — " Our light 
affliction, which is but for a mo- 
ment, worketh for us a fiir more 
exceeding, an incomparably 
great, and an eternal weight of 
glory."* Dear as they once were 
to us, — dear even as our own 
souls, yet, when we calmly exa- 
mine things in the light of divine 
truth, we could not wish them to 
return. No, 

*• What here we call oar 1Mc#— is such. 
So little to be lov'd> and they so mucb* 
That we thoald ill reqvite ihero, to 

constrain 
Their onbomid spirits into bonds again.*' 

The closing and the opening 
year should forcibly remind U8» 
That we must soon all go thq 
way whence we shall not return^ 
Our fathers, where are they I 
And the prophets, do they live 
for ever? O no. They are on 
earth no more; and a moment is 
rapidly approaching, when we 
too must exchange our habita- 
tions for the tomb. The momiBg 
is at hand, when we shall rise 
for the last time ; and the evening 
is near, when we shall lie down 
to rise no more. The soul will 
soon quit its clay tenement, and 
become instantly mighty to sui^r 
or enjov. 

Reader! bring the ^subject 

• So Mr. Hervpy renders tlie espres* 
sive and beautiful original. 



HISTOBICAL MBM01E8 OP THE CATHOLICS. 



home to thy own bosom. It is 6f 
iDfinite moment. You cannot 
die safely or happily unless the 
stiog of death be taken away. 
Death is stingless only to the be- 
lievers in Jesus. " I am the re- 
surrection/' says he, " and the 
life : he that liveth and believeth 
in me shall never die; and though 
he were dead, yet shall he live.'' 
Tliere is no other name but his 
in which you can find salvation. 
O fly to faim without delay. Then, 
if this year, you should be called 
to relinquish all that is dear to 
you on earth, — wife, or husband, 
or children, or friends, or sub> 
stance, it will be a matter of no 
regret, for you will be received 
into " everlasting habitations." 

Sauihampiou. B. H. D. 

BEMARKS 

VTOV THE 

** HISTOBICAL MEMOIBS 

BISPBOTIIIO TBB 

BfigUth, Irish, and Scottish CathoUes, 

Ftom the lUform^Mon to Um |ires«iit Tune. 

Bi Cbftrlcft Butler, Esq. of Lincoln'sinii : 

Two VoU. 8vo." Mnrray, 1819. 



Thb perseverance with which 
the Roman Catholics of the united 
Empire iiave, for several years 
past, applied to government, in 
order wt they may be placed 
opon iPlevel with Protestants 
of the. Church of England as to 
efi^bility to all offices of civil 
trust and authority, is a subject 
so' big with importance, that it 
has employed the tongues and 
^pcai of the most eminent persons 
Iff diaoommunity. Among others 
the author of the volumes 4>efoTe 
us, ^ho is himself a Roman Ca- 
thdiB* has exerted no small mea- 
SDK of talent on behalf of that 



his writings and his influence, 
towards obtaining the repeal of 
many severe and oppressive acts 
during the period of the late 
reign. 

Mr. Butler, as might be ex« 
pected, in relating the history of 
Roman Catholics, has endeavour- 
ed to show, that, from the period 
of the Reformation, they have 
been an oppressed and persecuted 
people; and, though he cannot 
deny them to have been in some 
instances guilty of crimes against 
the state, that they were pro- 
voked to them, and were oAen 
joined in them b^ Protestants; 
also, notwithstandmg they have 
sometimes burnt Protestants for 
their religion, that he can prove 
that Papists have been burned 
by Protestants I Having summed 
up the items, he strikes the ba- 
lance, and finds the account 
nearly equal. 

We are no apologists for per- 
secuting Protestants, nor have 
we, as Baptists, any cause to 
blush for the conduct of our fore* 
fathers, respecUng whom even 
Mr. Butler says, voL i. p. 325, 
** It is obsjcrvable, that this de- 
nomhiation of Christiafls, — now 
truly respectable, but in their 
origin as little intellectual as any, 
-—/frs* propagated the principles 
of religious Itherty!" 

It is not our design to remark 
upon the whole of these volumes^ 
but to collect information from 
them respecting the state of the 
Roman Catholics in the united 
kingdom, and the principles 
which they at present bold on 
those subjects which are essen- 
tially aud necessarily connected 
with the question uf what has 
been designated '* Catholic Eman- 
cipation." This will be done by 
ext{^cting from Mr.l^vWVcf % n^^ 
lumes informa\*\ou us lo V^^ ^|rc^ 



coaiMiBioB^ and has, donbtiess, ^ 

a^mHOMed in a large degree, by I ceedings of \\\e 1£m^\^Vv ^^Aycais^ 



B18TORICAL MEMOIRS OF THE CATHOL1C9* 



Calbolnv since they were formed 
into.nphat is called the English 
Board afftpman Catholics; and 
also asiotlwoppositiou which they 
have experienced from the Pope, 
the Vicart* Apostolic in England, 
and the Irish Roman Catholics^ in 
all their attempts to procure the 
Repeal of those penal statutes, 
which are still in force both against 
Homan Catholics and Protestant 
Dissenters. In these respects both 
these bodies stand so much upon 
a level, that the late eminent 
statesman Mr, Pitt told the Ca- 
tholics in 1788, " that whatever 
was conceded to the Roman Ca- 
tholics, the Protestant Dissenters 
must also enjoy." Vol. ii. p. 100. 
The Roman Catholics had ob- 
tained great relief by a bill passed 
in 1778, at which time the pre- 
judices which existed against them 
were so strong, that in the year 
1780, while other methods for 
removing penal statutes were con- 
templated by Parliament, the 
riots at London, Edinburgh, and 
Glasgow, took place, to the dis* 
grace of a civilized country, es- 
pecially of a Protestant state. 
Another act passed in 1791> which, 
with some subsequent measures, 
has entirely secured the persons 
and property of the Roman Ca- 
tholics from outrage and vio- 
lence, and conferred also upon 
them the most extensive religious 
liberty. The summary account 
given us by Mr. Butler of the 
principal circumstances which 
attended the act of 1791 for the, 
relief of the English Catholics, 
contains some curious facts not 
generally known, but which bring 
to light some of those causes 
vvhich have produced so much 
disunion amongst the Roman Ca- 
tholics, and which have exposed 
the English Catholic Board to so 
much odium and reproach from 
the Irish Catholics* 



1^.. 



It was in 1787 that the English 
Roman Catholics formed them- 
selves into a committee for watch- 
ing over and promoting their 
public interests. This commit- 
tee originally consisted of noble- 
men and gentlemen; but the next 
year one of the apostolic vicars, 
and several priests, were added 
to their number. 

One of their first proceedings 
was in 1788 to memorialize Mr. 
Pitt, stating the severe laws iii 
force against them. In reply to; 
this, Mr. Pitt desired the Catho- 
lics to furnish him with authentic 
evidence of the opinion of the 
cathoHc plergy ana catholic uni- 
versities, with respect to the ex- 
istence and extent of the Pope's 
dispensing power. 

They then proceeded to make 
application again to Parliament 
for repealing all the laws which 
placed the English Catholics in a 
worse situation than the Protes- 
tant Dissenters. It was in con- 
sequence of this that the late 
Lord Stanhope framed a "pro- 
testation," for the purpose of the 
Roman Catholics solemnly and 
publicly, disclaiming some of the 
tenets which were generally im- 
puted to them. This " protesta- 
tion'' was signed by the four 
vicars apostolic, and by all the 
catholic clergy and laity in Eng- 
land of any note, and was printed 
and circulated throughout the 
country. A new oath was pre- 
pared, in accordance with the 
clause in the protestation which 
respected the views of Roman 
Catholics as to the dispensing 
power of the Pope. This was, 
" that no foreign prince, person, 
prelate, state, or potentate, hatli 
or ought to have, any civil juris- 
diction or authority whatsoever 
within this realm ; — or any spiri- 
tual authority, power, or juris- 
diction whatsoever, that can di- 

• 

\ 



HI8TOBICAL MEMOIRS OF THE CATHOLICS* 



reotlj or indirectly affect or in- 
terfere with the independence, 
sovereignty, laws, or constitution 
of this kingdom, or with the eitil 
(H* ecclesiastical government there- 
of, as by law established, or with 
the rights, liberties, persons, or 
properties of the subjects thereof." 

It soon appeared that the four 
vicars apostolic, though they had 
signified their approbation of 
these principles by signing the 
'* protestation,*' were determined 
to oppose the oath ; for they ad- 
dressed what is called an ency- 
clical letter to all the clergy and 
laity, declaring the oath unlawful 
to be taken. Sic, &c. The Com- 
mittee being now in great difii- 
cutties, met February 8, 1790, at 
the Crown and Anchor, and re- 
solved, ''That the Committee 
shall endeavour to prevail on the 
legislature to alter the oath to 
the words of the protestation; 
and that so altered, the oath 
would be unobjectionable." The 
oath was accordingly altered, and 
then stood in the present form : 
*' That no church, nor any pre- 
late, nor any assembly of prelates 
Off priests, nor any ecclesiastical 
power whatsoever, have, hath, or 
ought to have, any jurisdiction 
or authority whatsoever within 
this realm, that can, directly or 
indirectly, interfere With the in- 
dependency, sovereignty, laws, 
constitution, government, or the 
rights, Jibertics, persons, or pro- 
perties of the people of the said 
realm, or any of them." 

Thb alteration satisfied one of 
the apostolic-vicars, but not the 
three others, who wrote to their 
respective flocks, telling them 
that '* the altered oalh remained 
liable to the censure fixed on the 
former/' 

. The Committee, notwithstand- 
ing this^ resolved to persevere to 
(cltbe bilipas^ecfl, [vitbout taking 



any further step to get tim oath 
altered to please their oAoded 
prelates. In an addittss lo the 
general body of the £nglufa Ca- 
tholics, signed April Sl» 1792, 
they speak of the proieeimiien^ '' as 
an explicit and unequivocal de- 
claration of the sentiments of the 
English Catholics as men and ci- 
tiiens," and of the oath "as a 
counterpart of the protestation/' 
— •« To withdraw the oath," say 
they, ** appeared to us recedinf 
from the protestation. To recede 
from the protestation we held in 
horror; we thought it an act of 
unjustifiable perfidy; we were 
persuaded it would cover the 
body, and ourselves in particular, ' 
with ignominy, and make ns for 
ever despicable in the eyes of 
men of honour, principles, con- 
sistency of character, or truth. 
We never, therefore, could be 
induced to solicit the withdraw- 
ment of the oath." 

Our readers will be ready to 
ask. If these were the determina- 
tions of the body of English Cai- 
tholics, who had protested in the ' 
face of the country and of parliii- 
ment, ** that no foreign prince, 
prelMtCf &c. &c, had or ought to 
have any civil jurisdiction, S£c. 
or any spiritual authority within 
the realm, that could^ directly 6r 
indirectly, interfere with the in- ' 
dependence, &c. of the people of 
this realm, &c &c. how was it 
that they were so much inter- 
fered with, that their indepen- 
dence was entirely nullified, if 
not destroyed ? The subseauent 
history informs us, if not in so 
many words, yet by implication, 
that a power existed at Ron^, to 
which these noblemen, gentle- 
men, and priests, -weM so sub- 
ject, and by which they were so 
enthralled, in a matter wlrfoh re- 
lated solelj to lV\e\t cWAxittDft*^ 
the subject ot GwaX wcftK»> 

I 



a 



TOBICAL UBM01R8 OF THS CATHOLICS. 



that, V to prevent aoy miscoiH 
eeption of their conduct by the 
holy see, the Committee deter- 
min€{(^ to depute the Rey. Mr. 
Huss^y, fifterwards Bishop of 
Waterford^ iq his bolioess/' — 'f to 
lay before bis holiness, a fair re- 
presentation of the late proceed- 
ings f»f the Committee, and an 
e^iact state of the present situa- 
tion of the £lnglish Catholics.'' 

In the instructions given tq Mr. 
Hussey as to the object of his 
embassy to Rome we find, that 
hfs was tQ inform his holiness, 
'fthat the protestation," which 
had given so much uneasiness at 
Rome, ** was a pledge of uprigHt- 
oess called for by their Protestant 
fellow-subjects ; that it was not 
attempted to be carried into ex- 
ecution, as a basis of public 
measures, until it had been ap- 
PfDved and signed by the apos- 
tolic-vicars, the far greater part 
of the clergy, and most oT the 
respectable laity in the four dis- 
tricts; that jt had been already 
presented to Parliament, anil 
therefore, if the present form were 
not perfectly correct in the word- 
ing, the Committee were not to 
blame, because no alterations had 
been previously called for by the 
clergy, and the deed having gone 
before Parliament, it could not 
possibly be revoked ; and that it 
ivas not intended to hurt religiop, 
bqt to serve it; not to infringe 
the communion of English Ca- 
tholics with the holy apostolical 
see, but to render that commu- 
nion less odious ; not to prejudice 
the character of the JirU pastor 
of the churchy but to reecue it 
from ijibloquy and abuse." But 
Doctor Hussey being chaplain to 
the Spanish embassy, was not 
suffered to proceed to Rome, and 
we hear no more of the opinion 
of the Pope I 

The inBoence, however, of the 



*/ 1- 



Pope over the three vicars «poa- 
toKCf was more powerful than 
that of the whole body of Eng- 
lish Catholics, 1' who persisted m 
their refusal to take any active part 
in procuring an alteration in the 
oath. The bill passed the House 
of Commons umalteredt and with* 
out a dissenting voice ; but in the 
House of Lords the vicars apos« 
tolic obtained the alteration which 
they solicited ; and the clause to 
which the Pope and they had 
objected was altogether omitted. 
And the bill thus amended passed 
into a law, leaving the oath pre- 
cisely as it was in the bill of 
1778, viz. ''And I do declare, 
that I do not believe that the 
Pope of Rome, or any other fo- 
reign prince, prelate, state, or 
potentate, hath or ought to have 
any temporal or civil jurisdiction^ 
power, superiority, or pre-emi- 
nence, directly or indirectly, 
within this realm." The addi- 
tional clause which they rejected 
was, '' Nor any ecclesiastical 
power whatsoever^ have, hath, or 
ought to have, any jurisdiction 
or authority whatsoever within 
this realm, that can, directly or 
indirecthf, interfere with the in- 
dependency, sovereignty, laws, 
constitution, government, or the 
rights, liberties, persons, or pro- 
perties of the people of the said 
realm, or amy of them* 

From this it appears, that the 
body of English Catholics, both 
clergy and laity, were willing to 
renounce subjection, not only to 
the temporal and civil jurisdic- 
tion of the Pope, but also to 
his ecclesiastical jurisdiction, if 
ever it should interfere directly or 
indirectly with the allegiance 
they owed to the King of Eng- 
land ; but that the vicars aposto- 
lic, influenced by the Pope, would 
not suffer them to give the go-^ 
vemment such a pledge. Is it 



WILLIAM TYNDAL, 






!) 



not clear then, that English Ro- 
nan Catholics are expected by 
their spiritual superiors, to snb^ 
mit implicitly to foreign eccle- 
siastical authority, even when it 
interferes with th^ independency, 
soveiieignty, laws, constitution, 
government, &c. &c. &c. of the 
people of the realm? So true is 
it, " that no man can serve two 
masters;" and also, that when 
the civil authority of the chief 
magistrate interferes with the ec- 
clesiastical authority of the Pope, 
the Roman Cathohcs must obey 
the Pope rather than theKiug! 
Is it not, therefore, impossible 
they can give that pledge of their 
allcfgiance to the King, which 
sliall effectually secure his Pro- 
testant subjects from oppression, 
if they should be entrusted with 
the administration of the laws? 

But to return to this famous 
*f protestation," which had now 
been rendered useless, we find 
that at a general meeting held at 
the Grown and Anchor Tavern in 
the Strand, June 9, 1791, it was 
resolved 9 " That as the oath con- 
tained in the bill for the relief of 
Eoglish Catholics, is not ex- 
pressed in the words of the pro- 
testation, the English Catholics 
take this occasion to repeat their 
adherence to the protestation, as 
an explicit declaration of their 
civil and social principles; and 
direct the Committee to use their 
endeavours to have it deposited 
in the Museum, or some other 
proper place of public institution, 
that it may be preserved there, as 
a lasting memorial of their politi- 
cal and moral integrity." To 
which they might have added, — 
and as a permmunt monument of 
their degraded mid humiliated 
circmmeianeeM, in consequence of 
their religioue adherence to a "fo- 
reign prlSice and prelate, who has 
hy Atf reeeni c^iiici Jusi/y sub- 



jected them to the suspicion of 
their government^ and exposed 
them to the pity and derision of 
all their Protestant fellowsub- 
jects! " In consequence of thi^ 
resolution,"" (wc are gravely in- 
formed, but without any expret<r 
sion of indignation,) " it is, this 
30th day of December, 1791. 
delivered to Doctor Morton, the 
Secretary of the British Museum^ 
by Charles Butler, Secretary to 
the Catholic Committee!" We 
only add, that we hope Dr. Mor- 
ton took p;ood care of it, for the 
purpose of its being known in 
future, what concessions the Eng- 
lish Catholics would have madci 
in 1791, to obtain merely equal 
privileges with Protestant dissen- 
ters ; but which we suppose thej 
would not now be permitted to 
make in order to their being ad- 
mitted to share in all the honours 
and jurisdictions of the state. 

IOTA. 

(To be cimthnued,) 



WILLIAM TYNDAL. 



To the Editort rfthe BapHtt MagaziH§, 



The Portrait and Memoir of 
William Tyndal* could not but 
afford much gratification to all 
who value the blessings which 
have attended the Reformation 
from Popery. If the following 
additional particulars shall be 
deemed sufiiciently interesting tQ 
deserve a place in your Magazine, 
they are at your service. 

A laudable anxiety is often feU 
to know something of the private 
life, as well as of the public his- 
tory, of those individuals whose 
labours have materially benefitted 
their fellow-men ; and our esteem 

* See our Mngaxiue Cot Oc\,«V)»Tt\%V%*. 
We are ioiry Uiall^vW M\\fi\<b>OkiAVM% 
so long dcluyed. 



n 



LETTER FEOM DE. EE8KINB TO ME. ETLAND. 



as the Apostles in the primitive 
age first planted the Church in 
trueth of the Gospell; so, the 
same trueth beyng agayne de- 
ftced and decayed by enemies in 
tfays our latter tyme, there was 
Done that travayled more earnest- 
ly in restoring of the same in this 
realme of England, than dyd 
Willitn Tyndall." 

Query. Is it not desirable that 
some competent person should 
compile and publish a history of 
fhe life and times of this eminent 
Reformer, accompanied by se- 
lect extracts from his works, 
which might give a clear idea of 
hU doctrinal sentiments ? 

J. M. C. 

Kent Boad* 

EXTRACT OF A LETTER 

VROH TBB 

Rew. Di% Er$khu of Edinhurgh, 

TO TBS 

REV. MR. RYLAND, $en. 

OF NORTHAMPTON. 



LaviMtm, Nov. 1, 1779. 

DeaeSie, 

1 was just about to have wrote 
you, when our good friend Mr. 
Thomson acquainted me of the 
beavy trial you have lately sus- 
tainecl. May your shoes be as 
iron and brass, and as your day 
is, so may your strength be ! and 
when vour dearest stream of 
earthly comfort is dried up, may 
you drink more abundantly of tlie 
Ibontain ! - You have recommend- 
ed, in your '^Contemplations," 
Calamy on Inspiration, and Fla- 
^1 on the soul, which, though 
lone in my possession, I have not 
read, but purpose now to read. 
Let me recommend to you Fla- 
▼ers Token for Mourners, which ^ 
I think the best book of the kind 
I evef read, though I have fre- 
aueaih peroied lU On the other 
^ I bare tnaicribtd for you 



part of a letter which has admi« 
nistered comfort to many mourn- 
ers, as I am sure I could write 
nothing that could equal it. 

Copy of Part of a Letter Jrom 
Mr. Henry Davidson, Minister 
at Galashiels, to Mr. Thcwuia 
Davidson, Minister at Brain-- 
tree, occasioned by the Death 
of Mr. Wilson, Minister at 
Roxton, dated Feb. 23, 1750. 

** To the shame of our selfish- 
ness be it spoken, how loath are 
we to make an exchange of a 
friend on earth, for one in hea* 
ven ! A great man is fallen : 
when we mourn, we must not 
murmur. It becomes us rather 
to adore God for making him so 
great, and continuing him so long 
capable of perfbrming so many 
acceptable and honourable ser- 
vices to the church of God. As 
our world loses by the death of 
eminent saints, the other gains 
by it. They fall in our world 
to rise more illustrious there. 
Could we trace them exulting 
before the throne of God and 
the Lamb, triumphing in our 
blessed Redeemer, in immortal 
youth and vigour, freed from all 
disorders of mind and body 
whatever; could we discover 
how bright they shine, how ar- 
dently they love, how humbly 
they adore ; and could we bear 
the melody of their songs; it 
would soon make us wearv of this 
sinning, vain worid, and adopt 
these words in an allowable 
sense, * Let us also go, that we 
may die with them.* 

*' You may easily, dear Sir» 
imagine how this loss affects 
me, and that in a very tender 
part. An able and judicious — 
an affectionate and constant 
friend, for upwards of thirty-five 
years. My two dearest fri^nda 
on eaith|befoiem«\ik ^Nex>} \Vvv\^ 



WOEDS OF THE WISE. 



13 



good and Taluable, ha^e likewise 
got to heaven before me, and left 
to poor me the sinning, sighing 
part, while they are jpined to the 
spirits made perfect in knowledge, 
holiness, ana joy. However well 
pleased our Lord and the saints 
are in one another, upon the 
change that death makes, it is not 
easy to make us pleased too, and 
cordially wish them joy of their 
new dignity and elevation. Their 
sentiments are different. Their 
affections are raised and enno- 
bled ; and as well as they loved 
us, they would not come back to 
us for a thousand worlds. Upon 
their entrance into heaven, we 
may suppose their first wish is. 
Oh that I had been sooner here 1 
and their next wish is, for oiir 
being with them as soon as may 
be. The saints are Christ's 
friends, as well aa ours, and we 
must allow him his blessed will, 
John xvii. 24, to have his friends 
about him in preference to ours, 
who have had them so long ; and 
it may be, before Christ has had 
them so long with him, as some 
of us have had them here below, 
we shall be with them again, and 
Christ, and they, and we shall be 
all together. Oh what a happy 
meeting I They and we freed of 
all natural and sinful infirmities ! 
There the communion of saints is 
in perfection, and this blessed so- 
ciety shall never break up or se- 
parate. No parting salutation 
there! the word farewell is no 
part of the heavenly language. 

** Now, my dear friend, when 
onr Lord takes awav our gracious, 
emihentlv useful fnends and pub> 
lie blessmgs, we must learn to 
transUte our affection and de- 
pendence from earth to heaven, 
from these short-lived and uncer- 
tain supports to the ever-living 
God ; and as our eye is directed 
to and fixed upon him, we shall 



be composed and comforted 
even when Providence has set us 
down among the tombs. We are 
called to mourn, but not as with* 
out hope ; not as if Christ's in- 
terest were to sink and die with 
them. No. His stability de- 
pends not on any mortal, but 
upon him that said, ' I am he 
that liveth and was dead, and be- 
hold I am alive for ever wore.' 
Christians die, and ministers die; 
but the word of the Lord dieth 
not,^ but liveth for ever. It is 
good news, that, though the 
earthen vessel is broken, Uie hea- 
venly treasure is not lost and bor 
ried in the grave. Oh to be 
taught of God, to look up to 
him, who has the seven spirits 
of God, to supply all our wants, 
and to heal the wide breaches 
that are made from time to time ! 
The weaker the poor instruments 
are that are left, the excellency of 
the power will be more of God." 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



Instead of standing still, go<> 
ing back, or turning out of the 
road, always proceed. It is better 
to creep in the right way, than to 
fly in the wrong. 

Art thou arrived to maturity of 
life ? Look back, and thou shalt 
see the frailty of thy vouth, the 
folly of thy childhood, and the 
insensibility of thy infancy. Look 
forward, and thou shalt behold 
the insincerity of the world, and 
the cares of life ; the diseases of 
th^ body, and the troubles of thy 
mmd. 

In this world death is every- 
where, grief every-where, and de- 
solation every-where. The world 
flieth from us, and yet we follow 
it. It falleth ; and we adhere to 
it, fall with it, and attempt to en- 
joy it falling. 



14 



9tt\)enile B^attment* 



n lA« Editor of the BaptUtMagazine. 



Upon reading the following Let- 
ter inserted in the Life of Lord 
William Russell, I was strack with 
its great superiority to the foolish 
advice given to bis son by that con- 
temptible infidel the late Earl of 
. Chesterfield. I have left out a few 
things,' and have made a few altera- 
tions in it Perhaps you will have 
no objection to insert it in your Ju- 
venile Department. 

A.B. 



Copy of a Letter^ (with the above- 
mentioned omissions and altera- 
iions^) written by Wiliiam, 
Earl of Bedford^ to his Sons 
Francis and WiUiam. 

Dear Frank, 

Ignorance and vice are the usual 
' effects of an unlearned and undisci- 
plined education. Of my passionate 
desiro to free yoa and your broUier 
from both these, I suppose I have 
given yoa and the world sufiicient 
testimony : sure I am, I have satis- 
fied myself. Yon may guess how 
Violent my longings are to advance 
yonr piety and understanding, » that 
Is, to render you perfect men, in 
that death is only displeasing when I 
think of dying before I see this my 
desire accomplished, or at least so far 
as that my hopes may be greater than 
my fears. And as death every day 
makes his approaches nearer and 
nearer, (God knows how soon he 
will make a long separation between 
na,) and in this other regard loo, 
that whilst I live I shall always be 
with thee, be this then received, 
either as the legacy of a dying, or 
the advice of a living, father. If it 
be observed or obeyed in ehher ca- 
pacity, I shall think mysHf neither 



dead nor absent. I put it into yotir 
hands with a prayer, that God will 
give it his blessing, and then yoa 
have mine. It was the wisest saying 
of the wisest man, — the fear of God 
is the beginning of wisdom. Holi- 
ness, then, is the' introduction of all 
wisdom. So it shall be the first of 
my advice, — fear God ; and if holi- 
ness give knowledge, knowledge 
will give thee happiness, long life, 
riches, and honour. Length of 
days is in the right hand of wisdom^ 
and in her left haiid are riches and 
honour, said the wise king. How 
exalted a thing then is religionf 
which is the mother of so great 
blessings ! 

As for your Duty to me, I doubt 
not but it will grow up with your 
understanding. And when yoa 
know how nice and curious my 
care hath been over your education, 
even to the least circumstance, — 
my prying into your inclinatiuna, 
observing the bent of your sOul, her 
very first putting forth, heightening 
the good and checking the ill, plac- 
ing guards upon your senses and 
conversation, not only pointing ont 
the way to virtue, but putting your 
feet into it, and teaching you \o 
tread it, (I speak not of fashioning or 
adorning your body, fori would not 
have you to measure my love and 
care by gay clothes, noble diet, and 
recreation, though you enjoyed these 
in some measure :) when you come 
to know and judge of this, t have 
reason to expect, and therefore may 
boldly challenge, that if you were 
to choose a father, you would seek 
me out. Should you now so behave 
yourself, as that if I were to choosd 
a son, to adopt a gentleman into my 
family, td inherit my name and fbr^ 
tunes, you only I should pitch upon \ 
besides the joy of beholding, I should 
have a requital even to my wish. 
Nor were it possible for you to die 
in my debt for your education, if 
yoa observe this, with like care U$ 



JUVENILE BEPAttTMENT. 



15 



liriiif^ np yonr children also, (if it 
iiinill please God to ipve .voa that 
blestin^). A nd beoaiise I have an 
ambition to obii^ posttfrity, I do 
here change this dnly upon yon, tliat 
you also Uy th<* like ohnrg^c upon 
your:(, anil they on their chitdri^n 
tnocessivcly. For in^*nuoas mnn- 
Ders first made iis noble, markod 
oat and advanced oor family first tu 
honour; \iith equal reason, and 
more facility, will surh manners pre- 
serve us noble, wbicli is most cer- 
tainly ofic*ctcd by education ; other- 
wise the estate I leave you will he 
but as rich trappings upon au ass, 
and render you more ridiculous: 
wherefore, whatsoever yon leave 
your heirs, (and now I s|ieak to 
yonr posterity in you,) be sure to 
give them a learned and liberal edu- 
cation ; there being, in my judg- 
ment, no other way to socnrc you 
from falhng from honour, and from I 
the despite of fortune. This which I 
have said concerning your duty to 
ne, it also applicable to the me- 
mory of your excellent mother, for 
a personal observapoo you cannot 
pay her. I most strictly charge you, 
often to call to mind, that you and 
your brother have entered into a 
flolemn engagement unto me, under 
yoor hands, to imitate the honours 
and excellencies of that dear saint, 
the best of wives, the best of mothers 
and friends. Be religions in the 
performance of it, as you expect my 
blessing. Remember, Frank, she 
had more pangs in yonr bringing up, 
than bringing forth, and she has 
been an excellent nurse to your 
mind, regarding more the health 
and strait ness of that, than oT your 
body, though this was cared for 
with tbc greatest tenderness imagin- 
able. The truth is, yon owe her so 
much that you cannot clear yonr 
obligation by any other way; no- 
thing can discharge you, and acqnit 
you to lier also, but by being such 
to yonm, as she was to you ; thus 
her memory will be honoun'd, audi 
Aall profess myself satisfied. 

Affection to Brothers and 
Sisters. 

As for yonr carriage towards your 
hrothecB and sisters, 1 muat iieeda j 



say, that your liatural kiudness to- 
wards them now, gives me great 
hope that yon will he a lovioir bro- 
ther hereatiter. And be so, Frank, 
as you expect Iho blessing of God, 
and my favour. Besides, your in- 
terest will require this from you; 
because a numerous, wealthy^ aad 
ancient family, entire, and agre^ng 
witfiin itself, With all its dependents 
and relatives, cannot easily be 
wronged in such a country as this.. 
1 know very well how liliie it caa 
sutfer, and how much it can do; 
but then it mnst be, as I said, entfre. 
The dying l'ather*s bundle of arrows 
in the fable, has an excellent moral, 
to show, how invincible love and 
union are. And that you majr 
rightly understand me, this love of 
yours to them, must not only bo ia 
affectionate words, kind entcrtato- 
ment, and the like, but in a hearty 
real performance of all good officeff 
that may tend to the advantage of 
their estates and reputation; study 
to do them good, and stay not for 
opportunities offcred,<*-snatch them 
rather, and prcveni their wislies. 
This is a noble way of obliging, and 
by this means you may make them 
your friends, a dearer name by fjir 
than that of brother or sister, and 
which, perhaps, may be repaid to 
yours, though yourself may not i»eed 
the return; for I mnst tell you, kind 
oflSces have been Vcmcmbercd whea 
the bestower has been rotten ; and 
the grandchild hath been thanked, 
sometimes relieved, for the grand- 
father's kindness. Insomuch as tlie 
courtesy to your brother may prove 
a charity to your child, think sert- 
ously of this, and remember it. Hot 
that I may be thoroughly under- 
stood in this advice, your love doth 
not end here, and 1 am not fully 
obeyed if you only love them ia that 
manner which 1 have expressed: 
you must endeavour that they lovo- 
one another also. To this end, b^ 
sure to putouttlie fire of discontent, 
if ainy appear, or bat the smoke 
tliereof, presently, so soon as it doth 
appear; and be careful to put it 
quite out; for smothered discou- 
tents breidc put afterwards with more 
violence. And, herein, after ray 
(Iccease, you are tu ahoy: \\iq ^^Wm^ 
rity of a father,!^ ^c\V 9i%X}ki«2\<»\c^Ql 



16 . JUVENILE DBPARTHBNT* 

a brother, to.|Plfr iMBily ; for wfaieh 
purpose, you ought to enable yonr- 
■elfwith those abilities of nnder- 
standing and judgment, that yon 
may be a person fit to be sought 
unto, and to be relied upon. This 
will give you authority: for both 
sides will be confident that your 
equal affection will not suffer yon to 
deceive them, nor your sound reason 
to be deceived yourself. 



Affection to Kindred. 

This advice I must carry also into 
my next particular that concerns 
your kindred, which, for the former 
reasons, you must also labour to pre- 
serve in amity, at least the major 
and better part of them ; and it will 
require a very good skill ; but once 
happily effected, it must needs bring 
yon great reputation. Let your 
outward deportment be full of re- 
spect to all your kindred, but reserve 
to yourself a secret mark and cha- 
racter of each. And take heed of 
suffering them to come within you ; 
yet thrust them not off. Gentleness, 
bat managed with discretion, will 
be sometimes necessary, yet dis- 
tance and gravity must presently 
step in to secnre it from presump- 
tion, and protect it from abuse. I 
should say more conuerning this, 
but I refer you to my more secret 
-instructions, where you shall have, 
God enabling me, a particular ac- 
count of those frieifds and servants 
to your family, whose counsels you 
may follow, and whose service you 
may trust. — Frank, you are now 
setting your foot into the world, and 
before you place it, look about you, 
«nd consider that you can hardly 
set it but upon a snare, or a thorn, 
which calls upon you both for care 
and courage. With these, taJce my 
experience for your guide ; and, if 

Jfou follow not my directions exact- 
y, which frees yuu from all danger, 
yet tread as near as you can ; you 
shall suffer the less; slip you may, 
fall you cannot. 

Manners. 

I have observed, that the greatest 
mischief to our manners proceeds 
fkom a mistake of the nature of 



things; loam, therefore, first to 
make a right judrment of thlfigv; 
esteem not a feather, and slight a 
jewel ; know that nothing is beauti- 
ful, great, or your own, but only 
piety and virtue. Riches are not 
great revenues, noble bouses,- mo- 
ney, or plate ; but not to want that 
which is necessary to support a mo^ 
derate and ingenuous condition. 
Glory, is to hear well for doing 
good ; honour, a reverence for b^ng 
virtuous; power and command, an 
ability to oblige noble persons ; no- 
bility, heroic actions, or to be like 
noble ancestors ; generosity, a na- 
tural inclination to virtue; health/ 
such a constitution of the body as 
renders the mind vigorous ; beauty, 
a fair soul lodged in no unhandsome 
body ; strength, not to be weary in 
virtuous actions; pleasure, those 
pure, firm, lasting delights^ which 
arise from those things alone which 
belong to the understanding and 
soul. 

After you are able to judge of 
things,] having kept off'^the servile 
yoke which opinion hath laid upon 
most men by impf>sing false names, 
and governing the world by that 
cheat ; after you can plainly see a 
rich man to want those thinj^ which 
he has, and a high content in pover- 
ty; and after you can discern a 
great man, in all his liberty, chained 
like a slave to his lusts and idleness^ 
and another fre«» in his fetters ; — ' 
this done, to fit you for conversation^ 
receive these following directions. 

First, because the eye doth make 
the first report of the man, and a» 
she tells her tale, so, for the most 
part, the presence is liked or dis- 
liked, (though sometimes very un- 
justly,)-— to avoid prejudice, be sure 
to put yourself into good fashion : 
and, without flattery, I may teli 
you, but do not hear it without 
thankfulness to God, you have a 
body every way fit to bear a glee- 
ful presence, answerable to yout 
rank and quality. But take heed of 
affectation and singularity, lest yoa 
act the nobleman, instead of heiwg 
one. And whether you stand, sit, or 
move, let it be with such a becom- 
ing, pleasing gravity, as that your 
very behaviunr may commend yea, 
and prevail for a good opimoa with 



JVVBNILB D£FARTMBNT. 



i)ie beholder. Before you speak, 
let your mind be full of coartcsy : 
the dvility of the bat, a kiud look 
or word, from a person of honour, 
has boQj^t that senice which 
money could not; and he that can 
gain or preserve a friend, and the opi- 
nion of civility, for the moving of the 
hat« or a gentle look, and will not, 
\s sillily severe. Spare not to spend 
those things which cost nothing ; be 
liberal of them, but he not prodigal, 
lest they become cheap. I remember 
Sir Francis Bacon calls behaviour 
the garment of the mind ; — it is well 
resembled, and expresses the beha- 
viour I would have in proportion to 
a garment. It must be fit, plain, 
and rich; useful, and fashionable. 
Frank, I should not have advised 
yoa to such a regard of your outside, 
the most trilling iiart of man, did I 
not know how much the greatest 
part of the world are guided by it, 
and what notable advantages are 
gained thereby, even upon some 
very wise men; the request of an 
acceptable person being seldom, or 
at least unwillingly, denied. Yet 
take heed of minding your behavi- 
our too much, lest it pilfer from your 
consideration,, and binder action. It 
is at best but a letter of commenda- 
tion, or, like a master of ceremonies, 
presents you to have audience. If 
iomething be not well said or done, 
you are but a handsome picture, the 
pageant or show of a man. 

The next thing that fits you for 
conversation, and is indeed chiefly 
to be laboured for, is a oraceful 
MANNER of spearing, in a distinct, 
well-tuned voice, without stammer- 
ing, lisping, stopping, or repetition. 
And let these be your rules and 
caution in discourse. 

1. Be sparing of speech. Some 
do it to be suspected for wise men: 
yet do you speak sometimes thiityou 
may not be thought a fool ; but let 
the little you utter be very much to 
the purpose, and therefore frame it 
within before you set it fortli, still 
observing the point of your dis- 
course, and go to that directly. If 
it be a knot, untie it skilfully. Al- 
ways have respect to a grey-haired 
experience, and famed understand- 
ing, if soch a one be present 



iniPi 



n 



proper, significanf, amPintelligible^ 
fitted to tlie subject, which, as near. 
as you can, should be according to 
the humour of the persons you con- 
verse with : and this being various, 
it is requisite that your abilities be 
various also. As in all things else, 
so in this of speech, be a strict ob- 
server of decorum. Speak not 
scholastically to a lady, nor courtly 
to a plain man. And take heed of 
surfeiting the ears of your hearers, 
seeing that the best discourse is 
like sweetmeats, which quickly cloy 
if they become constant food, and 
like perpetual music, which loses its 
charms. Therefore, still leave your 
company in an appetite to hear 
more, baiting them sometimes with 
short offers, so cunningly as that they 
may invite you, and press yon to 
speak on. Did I fear in yon a po- 
verty of speech, or should yon find 
at any time a slender stock, I should 
entreat you to good husbandry. 
Above all tilings avoid common 
places : they are fulsome and ridi- 
culous. 

3. If your genius leads you, and 
I hope it does, to affect a pleasant- 
ness of wit, this will charm and win 
upon all companies. And let me 
tell you, that a story, and a fit well- 
chosen tale, well told, have effected 
that which a more serious and wise 
debate could never accomplish. The 
Spanish are singular in this kind, 
which renders thicm the best com- 
pany in the world; and yon have 
often heard me say, that it was the 
best music I ever heard in Spain. 
Their gravity in the narration sets off 
a story exceedingly well. Imitate it, 
ifit be possible; and if youcan,get the 
appareling the same tale in a various 
dress, that if you should chance to 
tell the same again, either it will 
not be known in its disguise, or it 
may again please bec^iuse of its va- 
riety : neither were it amiss if yoa 
sometimes seem to forget to show 
your dexterity that way. By no 
means affect scurrility, and whet not 
your wit on a dull adversary. It is 
no way generous to raise mirth, or to 
triumph over a fool, whom to over- 
come can be no victory, when the 
contention itself was dishonourable. 



^, ^ If you meet wllhapT0uA^N«Mi^M^l- 

2. Let jeur Jangaage be Wear, f cooceited man, it ma^j \)«Co\a« '^q^ 



so 



OBITUARY.. 



^ whom arc still living; and at the 
time of his doccuse he was siir- 
roin)t!<!d hy twciity-five prand- 

X childnii. He joined (lie cbuich 
now mcetini^ in Rymm-street when 
he was tliirl v years of afc«. He was 
one offhep'iiieipHi persons eoncero* 
od ill hrin^inj^ to Liverpool the late 
Mr. SHraucI Medley, who was a 
great blessino; to ihat town and 
neignSiourliood: The name of Med- 
ley will Vn\^ be remcnthorod in Li- 
verpool with veneration and respect. 
The m«niv>ry of the jnst is blessed. 
The most intimato friendship snh- 
Bisted between Mr. Barnes and Mr. 
]^1e>i!ey .mlil death parted them. 
Mi. Medley usnaify caHe<l him his 
old friend, and would oftei\. say, 
V How shall 1 be able to preach 
Broth' I Barnes's funeral sermon?" 
But he \N as spared this painful task : 
it devolved un the present pastor, 
who lost, in the removal of the de- 
ceased, a faithful friend, and a wise 
coun!)Cllor. Mr. Barnes was an ho- 
nourable member of the church 
Ibrty-sovon years; and during forty- 
four y earn of that time he fulfilled 
th odice of deac(m with great wis- 
dom, unfeigned piety, and a perse- 
"ve^'ng and disinterested zeal. He 
bad the happiness of seeing the 
chnrch reused from a low state to 
its present condition ; to see the en- 
largement of one place of worship, 
|ind the erection of another : and he 
maintained, during his residence in 
Liverpool, tor more than sixty years, 
an unblemished reputation, and 
died beloved and lamented in the 
seventy-eighth year of his age. He 
€i/LTed upon life with a determina- 
tion, through grace, not to neglect 
hiF soul, his family, his bnsines6,Qor 
the church. As a Christian, he was 
a \an of prayer; the Bible was the 
man of his counsel: his meditation 
wap therein day and night. As a 
busband and father, he was all that 
18 kind and afi'ectionate. He walked 
in bis house with an upright heart, 
and his fapiily devotions were pecu- 
liarly serious and edifying, and will 
Ion;;' be remembered. He disco- 
vered great tenderness of con- 
scieneo. and a coueern to acknow- 
ledge <iod in all his ways. When 
one of his children asked his advice 

tgfspectiug aa iaport&Bt step in life, 



he said. First be concerned to pleas<r- 
God ; then please yourself, and you 
will please me. He was a con- 
srieutious observer of the LiordV 
day, and uniformly exhibited the ut 
most care and anxiety to avoid the 
least appearance of evil. As a man 
of business, he manifested great dis- 
cernment and decision. Possessing 
a strong n^ind, well stored with ge- 
neral and u.sefal knowledge, and 
having an extensive acquaintance 
with men and things, he pursued his 
business with such prudence and 
industry, as under the blessing of 
God issued in extensive and perma- 
nent prosperity. His business wa». 
his pleasure, and he always entered 
upon it with prayer. The Arst thing 
he did in his counting-house every 
morning was, to ofier up an ejacula- 
tory prayer, and to write a verse of 
.scripture. This was his constant 
practice, and was the means of fur- 
nishing his mind with ample stores 
of Bible knowledge. In tran.nacting 
business, be gave as little troul>le as 
possible. Indeed, bis commercial 
engagements were executed with 
such dispatch and correctness, as se- 
ctyed to him the esteem of men of 
all ranks and conditions. His punc- 
tuality in business did not occasion, 
him to neglect the worship of God, 
either in public or private. He wa.% 
regular in his attendance at church- 
meetings, prayer-meetings, and 
weekly lectures, as well as on tho 
Lord's-day, as long as health and 
strength would permit. He united 
to a degree more than is often found, 
seriousness with cheerfuhu'ss, auti 
fidelity with affection ; and he |)os- 
sessed, in no common degree, that 
wisdom, which .so well adjusts the 
aflfairs of business and the duties of 
religion, as not to suffer the one to 
Miterfere with the other. The wel- 
fare of Zion lay near his heart; ami 
he conscientiously gave at least tbc 
tenth part of his income for the sup- 
port of religious and charitable in- 
stitutions. In his last illness he was 
deprived of speech ; but his life had 
spoken volumes, and his patience,, 
calmness, and serenity, spoke in his 
death. One of the family reipiested 
that, if his mind was supported and 
happy, he would lift up lu;» hand. 
He inunediateJy smiled, and did so. 



OIMTl'AKV. 



Jl 



HU end was peace. The corpse was 
interred in the bnrial-gronnd at Low- 
hill, Overton, September 26, 1820, 
when a crowd of mourners testified 
their last tribute of respect to de- 
parted worth. On the following 
liurdVday the pastor of the church 
preached a funeral sermon from the 
text 5i»lucted bj^ the deceased, \iz. 
the 2Ut verse of JuUe, Looking for 
the mereif of our Lord Jesus CUrut 
unto eternal life ;— a text which de- 
scribed the object and {ground of his 
-hope, and the frame and temper of 
mind which that expectation ex- 
cited and cherished. May our last 
«nd he like his ! 



REV. THOMAS FLETCHER. 



Died, AprH 15, 1820, in the forty- 
<eveolh year of his age, the Rev. 
Thomas Fletcher, Pastor of the Par- 
ticular Baptist Church at Burton- 
upon-Trenti 

. He was born at Linton, a hamlet 
in the parish of Grcasely, Oirby- 
shire, March 31, 1774. We arc not 
acqaainted with any circumstances 
in bis childhood and youth which 
appear necessary to be mentioned ; 
but wc are informed tbat, in bis 
twentieth year, his Bible became his 
constant companion. June 15, 1794, 
he was baptized, and became a 
member of the church at Burton, 
which had then been formed about 
four years ; aad Septemlier, 1798, 
he was choscu Deacon. 

It was not Jong after his appoint-^ 
ment to tliis office, that a dark cloud 
overspread the church; and in "the 
year 1800 public worship was for- 
saken, and the house of God neg- 
lected. Mr. Fletcher, when giving 
au account of the steps which led to 
his being engaged in preaching the 
gofpel, refers to this gloomy season, 
and says, ** For some time 1 was in 
ao awful, backsliding state. The 
peiisbable things of time and «euso 
bad dif erted my attention from the 
inportant concerns of my soul, and 
therefore I was very little concerned 
about the »tate of the. church. But 
it pleased God to awaken me from 
(thislukewami sIa/£?; nud, after being 
lor jo/jie tihw t^reatly alannud by the 



remonstrances of conscicuce, I was 
enabled, as a poor guilty siuner, to 
make application to (yod forpardon, 
through the atoning blood of Christ. 
No sooner did hope spring up in my 
mind, than I became anxions for 
the revival of the Redeemer's cause, 
aud immediately consulted with 
otbers about rc-opcnlng the doors of 
our place of worship, and a^ain 
uniting in the service of God. This 
was now happily accomplished; 
and we began with prayer and read- 
ing the scriptures, occasionally in* 
troducing sermons, it was at this 
time that I began to speak a little 
in the name of the Lord ; and as it 
seemed to have a good effect, I 
considered it my duty to go forward. 
This consideration, together with 
the desire of the friends, has led me 
thus far to pcrsevefe: and 1 have 
reason to hope, that my poor at- 
tempts have not been altogether in 
vain. It is now my wish, in com- 
pliance with the desire of the 
church, to proceed in preaefiinj; the 
unsearchable riches of Christ." It 
appears, however, that, although ho 
continued to preach at Biirtuu for 
several years, when other assistance 
could not be procured, there was 
not at that time any intention of 
inviting him to become the pastor. 

In the commencement of 1809, 
the prospects of the church at Bur- 
ton became much more encourag- 
ing. On the 10th of May a pastor 
was ordained over this little society, 
whose labours excited much atten- 
tion, and raise«l expectations of 
great success. But these pleasing 
anticipations were not realized ; for 
such an alteration took place in the 
sentiments of theu" newly chosen 
pastor, as compelled the church to 
dissolve their connexion with Irim 
in J nue, 1 812. Preachers were now 
sought after in Tarions directions^ 
when, after having heard sevcraly 
without any prospect of being suited, 
the members of the church begaa 
to think they had too much oven- 
Joi»ked the disinterested services of 
Mr. Fletcher, They invited him 
to preach to thorn six months, on 
probation for the pastoral office : this 
he did with macU acc^v^''^^^^ '^^ 
was ordained DcccmVlftt Q<» ^^^ 
, Messrs. Jkrmuu o£ .^otl^T^^na"^ 
. Davis of Derby, liiook o^ -YvvVVj^^ 



Et ODITC 

*Dcl Jarvii of rfewartc, were present 
■t Ilia ordiDilinn. 

Ill the exctclie of the pastoral 
office, Mr Flclchei' Dianir»ted Ihe 
fc nil limes'! of a Tatber. fur mnnj' j^can 
walcliiii); oviT the inleresin of this 
church with anxions solicllude. He 
Was veil acqiiaiuled with the cir- 
cntnslaiiica ni* all Ilic menbere; and 
bis ullr^n^)llill|; oxertions to pro- 
kiotc Ihcir temporal and ipirilaal 
hdvaalRij^, pr<idiir«d a strong at~ 
tachoieiil to bis pcisoii and ministry. 
He aludioi Illy aimed to promote frr- 
^ent love among Iho members of 
the church ; aud rcKolarly met the 
■erious jouns people of llie congre- 
gation in the vestry, for the purpose 
of free eonversatioii nn religious lo- 
pies, a« well as lo iolroduco tliem 
to siicli society as be hoped miKht 
be asefiillo tbero. Hy thisconduct 
be obtained tho nBcctions of bis 
bearers; and Uiuagb bis proachinf; 
was simple and unadorneil, he bad 
» v(ry nlicDiive audience, to whom 
bis humble atid faithful bibours were 
bt^hly beneficial. Several additions 
were made to the church, and Chris- 
tian love aboanded. It may indeed 
be -doubted whether tliere ever 
were such encouracinf^ prospects, 
as at tlie very period when the aF- 
fcr.liobato pattor of the little floek at 
Burton was Inid asjdo from hia 
work. This afllictive event took 
place o» Lord's-day, February IS, 
1820; whet), after preaching and 
admiuUtcrinic the Lord's-supper, h« 
was uniibtc lo meet his friend) 
ibe eveniiiit, and never anerwards 
resumed bis work amon^ Ihem. 

For some lime previous his health 
bad appeared in a declinin|; state. 
Jd a letter which he wrote to bi« 
dangbter, be remarks, that she vai 
Iheu without a mothr»; and that he 
aomeiimes feared, from what he 
felt, that idle would soon be nitlioui 
K father too. fie llien admonislieil 
' her to seek to God to be her futber 
■gainst such a day. He did not ap- 
pear, however, to apprehend the 
'aflecting termination of his illocss. 
■atil ihe 61h of April, when, with 
■west cijiDposurc ol mind, be said 
be believed himself to be a dying 
nan. Oo the next day, while la- 
boBiing under niurh pain, be said to 
^tmmof themembeai>( On ebank, 



thai he belitrved bit time was at 
hand, nuoting those linet of Dr, 
Watts : 
■■ Jnuj can mike a dyiiiK bed 
Ffrl suit u duirny pjlloivi arc," 

Then, lifting up his eyes to heaven, 
be said with much cmphaus, " Yea, 
he can." Afterwards be wtid, 
■' Well ; shall not God the Jud^ of 
all the earth do right? He must, 
he will do right. Though 1 die, I 
ihiUl live again." In these affecting 
circum stances, he nrged on all wb« 
visited him, Ihe great necessity of 
repentance towards God, and faith 
towards our I^ord Jesus Christ. On 
the Independent minister, Mr. Claik, 
sajinfc to him, " Brother, God u 
good," be earnestly replied, " Yea, 
he is gracious tou; he is gnicHNM 
loo." At another time, wbeH n- 
pealing those well-known Unu: 

"Tboneh puinful ar present. 
Twill ccBie berure long ',** 

A friend added, 

•■ And llien O liow pleaianl 
The i^oijqueruri »Dg !" 

" Yes, (replied he,) that's it." 

For a few days before bis deatb, 
his recollection failed him ; and Imh 
ing overpowered with disease, ba 
was incapable of saying any thing 
on the state of bis mind. But on the 
I3lh of April he sn far recovered, as 
to ouile in singing the &4th Hyma 
in the 2d Boole, beginning, 
" My Gud, Ihe tprirgof all mj joys." 
On Ihe I4th, he was pinch con- 
vulsed. He once exclaimed, with 
great rameslness, " Impossible, im- 
possible, that the son) should be lost, 
beii^ fiTDi (Ki the rock." After this 
I the fits Rlnrned more IVequenlly. 
When coming unt of one, be said, 
" I am yet alive," Mhirb woa the 
last sentenre he wns heard to articn- 
lato; and at twenty-five minalaa 
past three, A. M. he fell asleep in 

Mr. Fletcher was twice married, 
and enjoyed much domestic happi- 
ness in the connexions he fermcd. 
His first wife died Heecrober 38, 
1H06, leaving thrre children, oDa 
of whom soon faltowcd its mother t9 
the grave. He was married again 
in tbe corlj part of IMS, and tost 



t>BITUAKT. 



ts 



lifs seroad wife in July, ) 81 9, so that 
^y bii death his foar children were 
4eft without cither father or moliier. 
May wc not hope, however, that the 
Lord will take tliem up? 

Tliough in the early part of bis 
ministry be felt the truth of the 
proverb, that a prophet bath no ho- 
noar in his own country ; yet by his 
bumble, prudent, and amiable de- 
portmenty he so far overcame this 
prejudice, that his preaching was 
well attended; and nt his death, 
I Churchmen, Dissenters, and Melho> 
dists united iu paying the most 
marked rusfiect to his memor}', 
evincing that the most disadvan- 
tageous circumstauces shall not 
prevent the fulfilment of the Divine 
declaration, '^ Them that honour me, 
I frill honour.*' Such was Thomas 
Fletcher, the plain, faithful, and af- 
fectionate pastor of the church at 
Burton-upon-Trent: and thougrb he 
tt now laken from the chuiefa on 
earth, it is pleasing to call up to our 
recollection his dying words, ^ 1 am 
yet alive/' Yes, in the seals of his 
ministry be still lives on earth ; and 
flow that he has ceased from his la- 
bours, he lives in heaven, where, 
with ineffable tk^ligbt, he waits to 
behold bis works follow him into 
the bkssAil mansions of eternal day. 



ANN SCROXTON. 



Ann Scroxton, daughter of the 
Rev. John 8cr<)\lou of ISroitisgrove, 
was born Fedriiarv 13, 1H08. Pre- 
viunsly to her affliction, (a palpita- 
tion of the heart, M'liich began in 
January, 1817, and terminated in a 
decline,) she was lovclv in her per- 
son, and mild in her manners. She 
was fearful of a falsclioofi, ulUclied 
to the bouse of God. and ;;iven to 

Kayer ; and these amiablo <]ualities 
igbtened during her illness. It 
was affecting to see her love to 
the bouse of God ; for wlien her 
sireogth failed, so that she could not 
walk, sbe went with the assistance 
of two crutches; and when she 
coaid no longer walk with them, 
dbe oAeo cried to be carried thither, 
nd fooeived that indulgence m Jong 
4tilM could mt wbmt there. 



i 



The last four days were the most 
painful of her affliction. She many 
times in a day begged her father ta 
pray for her, that the Lord would 
give her faith and patience, and 
prayed herself to the same effect 
She would cry out, '* How longl 
how long! When will it be over? 
Lord J esns have mercy ,on me a poor 
sinner ; prepare me for thyself.*' 
After her lather had been praying 
with ber, she would say, '' Tbitis 
what I want." 

In the last few days of her illness, 
she frequently prayed to the I^ord 
Jesus for mercy, faith, patience, and 
preparation for death ; and for her 
parents, brothers, sisters, and friends. 

Observing an aged friend come 
in, she said, *\ Soon shall I see dear 
Mr. P. come to heaven.'* — She 
wanted all to pray for her, and was 
afraid to neglect prayer, lest there- 
by she should offend the Lord. She 
loved good books ; and was much 
pleased with reading the lives of 
good children, and the obituary part 
of the Baptist Magazine. These 
books she has often read till nature 
seemed exhausted, and they drop- 
ped from her hands. Books of 
amusement were sometimes sent 
her; but her reply generally wai^ 
'' These are not what I want" 

It was a great trial to her to leave 
her parents: she longed to tako 
them with her. Her affectionate 
expressions and looks can never be 
forgotten ; but towards the last she 
was enabled to commit tbem, and 
her brothers and sisters, to the 
Lord, begging they would not 
grieve for her, but would pray 
'' that the Lord would take her to 
himself." 

During ber long illness, she often 
read and sung many suitable hymns 
with great interest, and btrifgcd her 
parents to sin*, even in the middle 
of the night, when their hearts were 
overwhelmed vi'ilh grief. A little 
before her departure, she said to her 
mother, ** You often told me my af- 
ilietion would be for my good: I did 
not then think so ; but now 1 see it." 

On the 14th of September, after 
bidding her friends farewell with 
looks of the most ardeut ^Si^^Vic^ti, 
she endured a few c\iav^ «>\xu%<|^«% 
and Buok into Uiq %ivba oi te% 



U RBV 

On th« 241ti, ti fiiDcrBl Mrmon vu 
preiM-bcJ lu K crowded kiidicDce, 
from Rzrkiel xxiv.14, "SodoTdimi, 
behold, I tNke bwr; ibe desire of 
thine ejes with a (trokc." 



KEC£NT DEATH. 

Died, at Arljngbani, near Glou- 
cetter, on Tuesday the 241fa of Oc- 
tober, 1B20. Mrs. Hannith Carter 
Rippon, wife of llic Rev. T. Rippon, 
lateofSwanieai fourth daughter of 
lb« lale Mr. Henry Carter, of the 
abpTe place ; and nearly eix jean a 
truly pious and exemplary member 
of tbe Baptist CliDrcli In Broad 
Head, BristoJ. 

The variety and supenor order of 
ber mental eDdowments, natural and 
■cqaired ; and her unafTecled, lia- 
bilnal, elevated, and attractive pi- 
ety ; procured her the esteem and 
respect of ail wlio knew her, and 
({aalified her mosi cffectuaDy to lill 
and highly to adorn tbe station slie 
occupied, and rendered her tbo pat- 
tern and the ornament of her sex. 
Her rare virtnes, all derived from 
the original source of moral beauty 
and excellence, excited in her 
fVienda Ibe most cheering hopes of 
her permanent and extcnnve ase- 
ftilness' on earllt ; and the heart 
rending disappointment is accom- 
panied by tlio consoling and firm 
persuasion, that her redeemed and 
purified spirit is gone to embellish 
the society, and heighten and parti- 
cipate the joys, of the celestial fa- 



mily, and lo act an ineffably nora' ' 
sublime and ennobling; part Iq tba 
presence of her adorable Redeemer. 

She was long and very heavily 
aSlirted, hor diseaie beiug palmo- 
nary; but she nniformly Bumberrd 
her afflictions with Ibe most bleaaed 
and important of ber Heavenly Fa- 
ther's viiitatioDs; and dnnng the 
whole of her illness, and especially 
as the dissolution of her lovely body 
approached, her convenAtkws and 
ber conduct produced the moat pow- 
erful and pleaung testimony to Ibose 
nho were with her constantly or 
occasionally, of Ihti reality. th« 
efBcacy, and the value, of tbe divitw 
religion of Jesus Christ 

The interesting history of her lift 
and death, necessarily known to bat 
few, presents a subject for a rather 
full memoir, by the compilation of 
which hor bereaved and sorrowios 
husband hopes to beguile his grief, 
and to interest and t>enefit her 
friends; and an epitome of which 
will, it is hoped, be prepared for tb* 
columns of this work. 

She was born December 4, 1792; 
married May 1&, 1619; and became 
Ihc joyful mother of a most lovely 
and healthful dauj(hler March 20, 
1830. On July Clb, after three 
days' illness, this little angel pre- 
ceded her weeping malher to the 
realms of eternal purity and bliss. 

" The Lord reignelb ; let the 
earth rejoice; lot the multitude of the 
isles be glad thereof. Clouds and 
darkness are round about him ; rigV 
leousness and judgment are the ha- 
bitation of his thrgnc." T. R, 



3ael)itto. 



On PnttttUHt Nman^ormilj/. By 
' Jiuiak Cmdtr. 8vo, Bds. 2 Voli. 

617 Pages. 144. 

That it is the duly of every man 
to worship God, is a position few 
will bave the folly or hardihood to 
deny. This is not an obbgalion im- 
posed Dpon UK by tbe sicru mandate 
•f aibilrary aulhorily, but one that 
BMetsvUjMriMeaoui of the Acknow- 



ledgment of hji being, the perlbc- 
tion of liii moral character, and tb« 
relation we sustain to him as the 
oApring of his hand, and peosioti- 
crs upon bin bonnty. If it had not 
been expressly enjoined uppn us bjr 
a revelntion from himself, Thou wUA 
norihip llie hord th\/ God, and Asms 
' ihalt t/um tare, the duty Would 



a 



have been Imperative, to k 



rhip anil hnw (lovit, and knert before 
Ike Lont mir Makrr; for m are ku 
ptfipU tint iha tlutp of ia» ptutio-t. 

Now ir it be cunceded that ever; 
in«H h ander in inilispensablc obli- 
ip>tii)n to worship liia Creator, liis 
risia ftvcly to perform this liiity 
nt^infiliiiK to Ibe diclales of his own 
cousriencc, will DccesRarily follow, 
iinli'M it can be shuun that men 
have no rifcbt to |M>rform m% acknow- 
Icd^i duly, or that a cousciemioug 
(liscl>arj;e of duty is not eiu^i-'iitial to 
its moral cfanraoter. No devotional 
service, it oogbt never to be fbr- 
^tten, cnn be acce)>tal>le to God, 
iioleu it be & volunttiry and apiri- 
Iiial exercise. Bedilg rxerein pro- 
fiuih huU. Godu a tphit. andtkty 
tkmt jcnrMp him, ntiut worthip him 
IK tpiril and in Iniih. Ho requirua 
ifae UDieiervcd liomagc of the heart. 
And whatever forms or fciveuoj 
aor devotiont may assume, if tlicj 
be not the ^naitie cxprcssi-m oP 
internal feeling, in vain do we ad- 
drcM them to an OoinJKieiit Cdng : 
iosti>ad of secnring his benediction, 
(bey will meet with hia re]>roncb. 
Thii peopU drwwrth mjrA unto me 
anlA tktir vunilk, and /umourclh trc 
witk thtir lipt, bid t/itir hii 



{\>\i i 



il>k' ;. 



icy: 



h^n 






mud mraff uith. 
Neither will it suffice lor llic pur- 
poses of faith, that we snbscrihe to 
any rubious formula, biiweverscrij)- 
luial tbe articles contained in it, 
unlMa we obetf from the heart Ihal 
form of dottrine vihich is drlivaetl 
unto Ki. Faitb does not consist 
simple apprehension uf the truth, 
bat in a sense of its vital energy, 
and supreme imjiorlance. II is iiui 
m intrlleotual attainment, but hij 
iipcralive principle. Jt it the gift of 
God. Its ImplaQtatJon in man is tbv 
work of that divine Agent, to whom 
Ibe reeeaie* uf tbe mind are a 
accowblx. I'be enlighten iD|{ 
lanctifyiuK inllDenees of this celes- 
tial ViNtsnt, constitute a promincnl 
featore of that system uf merc> 
which infinite Wisdom has doviseil 
la meet the exi^nciei of oar falleii 
Batnre. Hence it is that in sorip- 
Isie, the eummeocemeDt, progresi, 

IB (kp Mw^ atv aaiformly asciibei 



bm-n. not of bti.od, hoi' tf the icitt of 
thefitth, nor of the Kill of nun, but 
•if God, by Hluim also we are it»Ud 
unto Iht dag of icdrmptiOH. 

We have the more enlarged npoa 
these princi]ileti, bee anno we believe, 
with the anIboT of the nnrk befbra 
OS, that a correct view of the spiri- 
tual naturo and divine origin of 
Chriittianity ia vital to the queatiaip 
uf I'rutcstant Nonconfurmily. 

' "' :i>lianity, on accouut ol ili iinri- 

tibl«, and ibe prufetiion of it. discun- 
ircled with the religion* ptiiiciple. is 
iliogelbet KOttbleii -. it ii nut obidi<Dce 
if any Lind, but an aggravalion of da- 

liiiquiMicy." P. it. 

" Every ibing in leligion ii of ■ looral 
iHtuisj every tiling, Ifaereloie, in order 
o puueu [lie chicacterorreliguiii, must 
>c uiiconi)iellcd. Nothtug iborl ul' an 
ibedience ^uielj voluDtary and spri' 
ual,caii be uEceplable to llie great Ob^ 
ret uf icligiaua lear, Bud Ibe piudnc. 

le>ign (it Clitiiiiaiui)'. If thi) uberiience 
^ould b* ptoduced in any oilier way, 
t HDuld be uf no value. Secular in- 
lucemenli niny biat ilie mind lo lbs 
lide of iTuth, msy diipose a man Id be- 
leie un tbe >ttcn|jlh af a lest degree of 
:vldcnce than would oltierwiie b*T« 
seen lufficieiit to aa'ijfy ilie piirie of his 
lUidcnliindiiig; but if hii belief, or his 
ikei of no bightr cha- 



hal of Bi 



il llir Divi 



lauding, 
' -.Go. 



venimeni uie not fulfilled in ibe cbaiae- 
ur uf iliai ludiviiluai." Page 71. 

No means employed to propagate 
the goapcl arc lawful, or will prove 
cHiclent, hut those which its Autlior 
baa ap|Hiinted. Every attempt to 
imiKiic upon mankind a form of 
worship, or a system of fiiith, by 
the intervention uf secular power, 
betrays a inelaneholy ignorance of 
Ibe design and essential character of 
Cbristiauity. Religion, if it has any 
p<iwcr, operates u|iun the con-, 
■cieuren of men. It planes before 
the mind the invisible realiliifaof an 
eternal world ;— and as human sanc- 
tions can add nutliing to the roagni - 
tude or sulemnityuflhi'so objeeta, — . 
neither can thcj s^i^V^ an^ «A&- 
lioral GvideDce u to \\ww\«Ki\^,«t 
in*JeoraU tiiat pivaavXc oS to*o,V 



<6 



SRVIBW* 



tibicb alone Uiey rnn be «ppre- 
lieiitied. It is liot ill the nature of 
pontiiical decrees, or pnrliameiitarjr 
i'Dactmcnta, ti> fEtippIy lawn to the 
couscience, or light to the under- 
tlandiuj^,' or impulse to the affec- 
tiona^ or motive to Uic will, at least 
Bone but what would destroy the 
rdtffions purity of the action it im- 
^'JelK'd. 'I'be force of truth is the 
only power, tho cords of lo?e the 
(yily fetters, Clirisfianity cmpKiyH; 
and had n(»t the Spirit of Intolerance 
been aa blind as it is cruel, it must 
have perceived the inadequacy of 
any other in such a service. The 
Word vf God is the sword of tht Spi- 
rit ; — Whose low also is shed abroad 
w the Iteart by t/te Holy Ghost which is 
given unto us, 

5in has extin^nished in the soul 
fbat moral sense of tho divine ex- 
cellence which it once enjoyed; 
and enveloped its spiritual percep- 
tions in darkness; and to expect to 
Meet these evils by any political ex- 
^dicot, betrays not less egreg^ious 
lully, thaii to expect to rekntdle the 
•park of vitality in the df;ad, or 
scatter the shades of midnight, by 
physical force. Vain is it in nfnn, — 
wliotbcr he be called Prince or 
Pontiflf, — to seek to extend his em- 
|Mre over the intellectual and moral 
w orltls. Conscience is the exclusive 
domain of that Rciuji^ to wlntm alone 
it belongeth to tfnicktn w/iomsoever 
he will; an<J who» having com ftmmled 
the light to shiite out pf darkness^ can 
skiiu! into tits heartj 'to give tlte tight 
of the hnowkdge tf the glory of God 
in the face iff Jesus Christ, 

KeU^n dots not even require to 
hnn upon tbe arm of secular power^ 
to assist its pro]B:rcss through the 
earth, it is true, it has hostilities 
to encounter, but it has energies of 
its own. Its weapons are not carnal, 
to mighty throagk Gody to the ptilling 
down of strong holds. My kingdom^ 
iaid the Rear emer, is not ^ this 
world, else would my servants Jight* 
Every attempt to blend the church 
and the world is an attempt to effect 
an unnatural alliance. The friend- 
Mp of the world4s enmity with God, 
Between the two there can be no 
coalescence, for there is no aflBnity. 
The genius of Christianity, and the 
ttswMcier of it» Fomdtr, alike for* 



bid the union. The kingdom efCt/d 
cometh not with observation. It is si- 
lent \\\ its progress, and onostenta- 
tious in its character ; and flourishes 
most, remote from the noise and 
tumult of secular interests. 

When Chiistian Emperors, heed- 
less of its native simplicity, have 
sought to render the gospel mere 
imposing, by attaching to it -ti^iel 
empty and artificial distinctions .of 
woildly greatness, they have ou\j 
impeded the cause they professed lo 
acct:lcrate ; for rvligion has alwityili 
declined in purity, Justin proportion.' 
as it has advanced in splendonr. - fi 
has for ages been the most irighttnl 
anomaly of tlie moral world, that li^ 
who was born in a stable, who ex^. 
pired upon a cross, and wIm^ durlns^ 
his residence upon earth, had not 
where to lay his head, should Im) ro^ 
presented by a train of followers^ 
seizing with rapacity upon the very 
things which he despised, and Who, 
instead of being clotlied with his bo- 
milify, are solicitous only to invent 
themselves with the insignia of se- 
cular grandeur. Well was the voice 
of warning at length beard in res 
fercnce to such a church, Com/e oh$ 
of her my people, that ye be not p«a^ 
takers of hn- sins, and that ye reeeiv'o 
not of lur plegnes, 

ll^e Author's object in tl>e worlt 
before os is, *' tu redeem the subject 
of which it treats, from the disad^ 
vantages of fugitive controversy'; 
and to exhibit the principles of Non- 
conformity, as a coherent system of 
religions and political truth ; and In 
this object we think lie has well suo* 
ceeded. He takes an ample view 
of his subject, and, in his method of 
discussing it, discovers the bappy 
union of a mild temper and a vigo* 
rons understanding. 

His conviction of the truth and 
importance of the cause he advo- 
cates, appears to be the result of 
extensive reading, patient rosearcb, 
and matured reflerliou. His rea- 
soning is dispassionate and clear; 
and if prejudice be not subdued by 
the cogency of his arguments, it will 
not be inflamed by the bitterness of 
his spirit. He does not feel it ne« 
cessary in the defence of truth to 
have recourse to invective, but hat 
woU focUfiLed hui poaitiona by tb# 



coBccMioni or snme oftbe must di^ 
tinitdiibed memben of the cslkbluli- 
neat 

or ilic contcDti of tfie«c volnmei, 
4>iir limits will nnt allow an to give 
any furmul siialysis. Tbc na- 
ture of true rcIii;ioii ; llio charac- 
ter and (ipsijni ur il:i institutions ; 
tbe spirituality or the Cbristlaii 
«con«iny: the snffinenny of the 
script II rex for the purposes ut' fnilh 
and practice ; Ihc origin, connlila- 
tion, utiity, Koveroment, laws, and 
olfices of the Christian cliiirch ; the 
niftny corntplinna wbicb adhere to 
»n establish mcnt. and are foilcrcd 
by it; with a variety of other topics ; 
snccessiTely pass under inspeclioo. 
We arc not snrc that tbe moat 
Talaable part of Ibrso materials 
tnif^ht not haTu been arninscd in a 
form in wbicb (be i>riiici|ilcs of Non- 
erintormity vrunid have appeared less 
di^nse, Hiid tbe nrKnincnti more 
coDsentaneoas ; bntupoii tbe whole, 
the work reflects grcnl credit on the 
talents, the industry, ami the piety 
«f ita Author. 

(^To it cencMed inm-r «at.) 
■ -♦*■ ■ 
Aiaiftt/ Dirtctird ; a Smaan prterhei 
AutSHtl 0. 1820, at SaUer>-H<dl. 
brf-rr thp '• Himr MisHannry So- 
fUl„," fl.irf p-ihlithrd gt l/mr rc- 
^Hfil, Jtv Wiliitm Jail, Uamil- 
ton and Wcstley. Is. Oil. 
If Ihc vhImc ol' n strinitn is to he 
estimated by its cviin^chriil senti- 
ments, and its prnctipjil tendency, 
by its nppr<>prlH,t<: dirccliniis and 
faithrnl cxhiirlnliuns, then, this is n 
l^noil sermoir: Tar bolter than must 
that is [iroached. snil the bi'st thai 
Wu have seen pnblishe<l for Ihc pnr- 
pAsc of excitiiifc Cbrisliiii /a:iiI and 
activity for CKiemlinK the gospel to 
tliuie (leslitate towns and villngcs 
in our r)Wn eonirtni. whiHi are as 
jet without its hcnvciily Vv^Ui anil 
cbeerinq innnence : the direct ten' 
dcncy of ilie sermon is lo |ir<imi)(( 
tbe ilisposiiion expn^ssrit hy the 
apostle ufthcOcntiles, Ym, mSni-e 
1 tlrinfd la prtaeA the gotptl, not 
vhere ChriH toa latmtd^ Sett 1 ihntlH 
htild upon another mnn't fonadation. 

From tbo text, I Cor. vii. 33, 33, 
whicb, at Erst si^bt, appean siofj^i- 
}u tor iocb aa occaaioD, tbe author 



dedocus three proposUiou, l.That 
tbero arc things vrhicb peculiarlj' 
belonKuutotheLord. 3. Uowtbef 
are to cognge our attention. 3. Th» 
obligation we arc nndcr to make 
them the objects of our noticitude. 

It is imposaible in the coDfinod 
limits of uui work to make litfp 
extracts; thu futlowiDg remarka ■»• 
der the third bead are selected b^ 
1 pecaliarly strikiug. 



ptiir, Ihc prince, the hero: liar gaia 
with pteaiure on ilia miiiiuDarjr > on ihe 
Sundaj-tchool, that is welling to nvc 
Ihe cbildran of rliB noedy ; oa ibe 
brokca-heaned peiiilcDt, eiyiug ' Gnd 
ba meicilul to me a sinner.' li't ara 
■Ilracted by the wonden of crralioni 
and Ihc prodDCIioDiuf arl: 1^ dctiia 
lo look into ttie tuffcriagi of CliriM, and 
Ihe glnrj Ihat should follaw. We re 
jaicB inaiicloiy: tby ■ rejoiM over ona 
linner Itist rcpeoteih,' We celebrals 
the binh of a Wcltinglon: and thiy Iba 
birth or a WhitcGcId— for they 'Iirak 






i foitlM 



the lhina> iihich are not Ken are eter. 
ml.' Wbal am I laying I God hinucU 
carrs.fpr thno things, in kUjudgmami 
Ihcy are of Ihe tuiheii moneal. " 
hIi.i1 yui\ioie did tie umlie tlii) et 



A laboralDTT foi cheiniiti? Ail ub^cr'r^ 
■tory furattn.oDnieii' No— bet ■<■ be 
a Itif aire, in "liicli to display tederminf 
^race; a leniple, in which la pcocUiia 
ilio tiding) of sclraiiuui a scIhwI, in 
*hich lu train ap Iho bvici of life, foe 
gJory, honour, and. iminurtality. In 
iliue lhiii£t he deliglto. Tbese arc hia 
glorj. Tfi llicio he iDakei every IJiiiig 
the subnrdliiile and lub^erricnt. Ta 
these every thing else moH bend, or bn 
will iriDiple it under foot: ■ The nilioi 
and kinadom that will nst serTe ihee 
ihall pciiih.' Theie >faall see ihe 'sum 
lurnrd into dirkneia, and Ihe raoon iota 
bloud ;' turtiire Ihe wreck of Ihe uni- 
verse ; and Rouitih for ever in llic ' new 
hcavei'i and new earth, itlieieia d<»U> 

Tn Ibe applicalton oftbo suhject, 
the preacher recommenda IIlc lilja«ib 
Missionary Socielj.fiom ct^unAntv- 
tioni enforced t^ jMrtFioliw»,'ihc J*- 
cilittf by vh\cb\\» <Aie«Va wi^VVi* 



^ 



REVIEW. 



jRCcompHshed, and the necessity 
which exists for such labours, not- 
withstanding^ all the means of in- 
struction provided by the establish- 
ment, and established congregations 
of Dissenters and Methodists 
throughout the country ; and by the 
eneouragement the Society had al- 
ready received, though ** but a year 
old, and yet it has sent forth, and is 
supporting no less than ten Mis- 
sionaries.'^ 

In, concluding the discourse, this 
f loquent minister says, 

" Complain not of the number of these 
applications. It foretells, it implies 
good. Would you wish there was no 
qause for such calls ? Would you wish 
fur the same »ort of religieup dulness 
and death, wliich prevailed in this 
country about ninety year! ago, and 
which would indeed eifectually preclude 
you from all these spiritual exertions ? 
Have yoB not for years been praying 
that his kingdom may come, and that his 
word may have free course and be glori- 
iied? And are you displeased with God 
for hearkening to yonr petitions ? Or 
did yoD imagine He would fulfil your 
requests by miracles^ instead of means P 

/ Or did yon indeed wish Him, that he' 
jbould carry on the cause, but that you 
should be excused from the work ? You 

, lay, * The times are trying, and we must 
economize/ We have no objection to 
.economy — we wish many bad introduced 
it long ago — you cannot economise too 
much, if you run not into meanness and 
niggardliness. But we hope you will 
nut begin, at least, with the part of your 
substance, which you have consecrated 
to benevolence. I hope you will tee 
what can be retrenched in servants, and 
table» and furniture, and dress, before 
you think of refusing the apphcations of 
those, who come to you in the behalf of 
perishing souls, and in the name of Him 
who loved us, and gave himself for us." 

We recommend this sermon most 
earnestly to the attention of Chris- 
tians who feel concerned for the 
promotion of the gospel abroad and 
at home ; especially to the Mem- 
bers of the Baptist Itinerant and 
Home Missionary Society. 



Deity und Humanity united: or, the 

Attributes of both Piaiwes ascribed 

to Jesus Christ in the sacred Writ' 

SMffs. A Strmon, premehed aX the 



white Chapel, Leeds, on Lord^s-day, 
Feh'itary 6, 182(); containing some 
Remarkt on a Discourse lately pub^ 
lished, entitled, ** Omniscience the 
Attribute of the Father only:* By 
Thomas Scales. Second Edition, 
1*. 

A VERY respectahli; sermon, 
founded on Col. ii. 9, '' For in him 
dwellpth all the fulness of the God- 
head bodily.'^ Mr. Scales has no- 
ticed, at some length, the objection 
urged against the omniscience of 
Christ, drawn from Maik xiii. 32, 
" Neither the Son'* — and pleads that 
it is sufficient to recognize tlie hu- 
manity of Christ " We may say," 
he observes, ** with truth, that the 
humanity of Christ did not know the 
judgment day — though the deity of 
Christ knew that and aU things,** 
We are of opinion that it is far more 
judicious to insist on the interpreta- 
tion which Mr. Scales has hinted at 
in p. 21, '* It formed no part of the 
discoveries which he was to commu- 
nicate." This view of the matter is 
strongly supported by the idiom of 
the language employed in that pas- 
sage, by the context, and indeed by 
the current doctrine of holy writ 
respecting Christ as Mediator. See 
a paper in which this subject is dis- 
cussed in our Number for October, 
1811. Vol. III. p. 416. We earnest- 
ly hope this valuable discourse will 
be useful. Perhaps, in another edi- 
tion, the worthy Author will mark 
the divisions more distinctly. The 
plan is not chargeable with per- 
plexity or obscurity; biii we like to 
6ee the mile-stones on the road, 
though the journey may not be long, 
nor the country through which it 
passes unknown. 



Means of doing Good, proposed and 
exemplified, in several Letters to a 
Friends Bu John Brown, Mi-^ 
nister of the Gospe% Whitburn, 
Edinburgh; printed for Ogle, 
Alardyce, and Thomson. 

Every Christian, from the priih- 
ciple of grace lie lias received, is 
disposed *' to do good." It is his 
earnest desire, at the same time, to 
be suitably directed in this, which 
is the pTO^Qf Wu«uei& ut* hit Ufe« 



LtTBRAKY IMTSLLIGENCB. 



Mnefa KssUtance in ibis work — 
mach profitable dimstion, will be 
round, at a small price, in this VO- 

In the til leltera, vhicb it con- 
tains. varioDS important queslioiu 
on tbis subject will be found pro- 
perly answered. Whi> should do 
good''. To loAamsbould wedogoodi 
And Wkat mauit ahoald we aae for 
tbts pitqiose! 

Tfatse, and vatiom other tonins, 
are discnsied in a pleavog and sa- 
tii&clory manner in theati letlen; 
the fruit of roach labonr and itady. 

This volume poasesse* one Terj ' 
■inKiilaradvantaso above manf other 
works of this, or of a similar kind: 
that the means of doio^ good which 
are proposed and recommended, arc 
likewise exmtphfifd. They are Ifaux 
demonstrated to be practicable ; and 
the uscfalneu of Ihem is also point- 
ed oat II is not a matter of spe- 
cnUlion, bat of great and practical 
utility, which 4s here tanglit ll 
appears to be a truly noble diitioo' 
tion of tbe Cbriitiao cbaracter — 
fuefminiH — " The doing of good." 

This volume will be found a truly 
happy addition to the work of Dr. 
CVKlon Matktr, entitled " Essays to 
do good." Let It be read wilb Jeep 
atteution, and wilb prayer to " Uu- 
God of all grace," to furnish abun- 
dantly for eTcry good work. May 
He command his rich btessing 00 
it, and cause it to answer its excet- 
luit design ! 



Tli.Pilg 






'. ProgM! 



LITERARY INTELLIGENCE. 

la tit Prtf. 

Tie UcmtHl* tf Oral Languagt ; or n 
Diuenuion on ilie Art a( Speccli. wii.' 



1. by (b« 
ihiWoik 
ilocldaied'rram ilic Life of the 
Aiiiliiir, iDd fVum ibr Hiilorj uf iha 
Tiriiei in which he lived. 

Third Edition of Biawn'i (Whilbum) 
Mciiiriin of Hervcy, wilb Eoaiiderabk 

I' radical DiieoDrie on Baptism. N«« 
Edinjii. Wilh ■ Pteface by the Hev. 
Mr. Mutch of Frome. A Fr«gm*Bi OB 
Clinsiian Commonion ii addud, (never 
bcSute publiriitd,) by tha late Be*. Wil- 
liam Fool. 

Secund Volame of Brown's Religio«» 

Sequel (0 "The Pleaiares of.Rali- 
nii.'> in l.elleri from Chailei FelloD to 
It Sao Goorge. Sa. &d. 

Happiaeu: ■ Tate fat the Grave and 
le Gay. 

Nmlb AanivetWTjSernion of the Rev 
nrirew Reed'i Ordinatiun. 

Kvaiigelieal Caiechiuu, ihawing the 



ifSalva 



> Gd. 



•Ildini 



ai DiacDV 
I Alph, 



with Pr. 

Anicnlale Suoiidi ullercd by the Hutiian 
Voiee, in eaoDciiau »iih ibeit vatioui 
IfodiScBtiaDSi bving the Remit- of an 
AtteiDpt 10 faciliialB the Acqaiiilion of 
fiweign Languagei, and lu futiiitli a 
Hadaofcottectlj eipieiiiBg own own. 
By Jahn Freeman, Author of the Mtthod 
fTtMcUiv JdiilU, advetliaed Ob the co- 
IM of 4is iltfuine- 



Kph JiHi»*t Divine Origin of Re- 
veiaiioa. t>. 6d. 

EduU9tnn*iS*CTeil Lyiici. Vol.11. 

Second Editlouof Foaiet't Eiaayaon 
I entrance. 

A Chtiitiaa Biogcaphical Dictionary. 
By John Wilt). Jun. 

A new and improved Edition of Lee-- 
turet on the Cbriilian Sabbalb ; by tb*' 
ItcW.ThumorPenrHb. 

I'lie Cbriilian Recorder: a new Pe- 
Tiudieal Work, publiabed by Jsckaon 
■lid Orr, Glaigow. 

Siilh Edition of Bnck'i Young Cbiis^ 



JtMl PMithei. 

Dr. J. P. Smilh'i Scripture TMIimooy 
in the Metilab, Vols. II. and UI. Svo. 
2(rt.— Analon Park; a Tale, 6».— • 
Itrotin'i (Whilbum) Meani of doing 
Gund, propoied and eienplilied. — 
Cruy't (Ai)octate Congregaiion, Avon- 
bridge, near FaHilrk,) SenptBie Monitor 
fnc every Day of the Year. — Itfr. Iisac 
Maiin't J.ife of Mr. Joiepli Mann ut' 
Bridlioglon, and Mrs. Ann Msiin hit 
wife. I>. — Dr. Winter'* Funeral Sermon 
f.>t the Rev. J. Wcbb.-J. A. Jsmei'a 
Scrniv'n on bostd ihe Floating Chapel. 
I). 6d.— Sermon by the Bat- J- Hartn, 
Cor the Benefit of the Horibatn Sunday 

The Price of ChambetUw'* \ie«- 
rcmmeni Cliiitcli (,itii,eyt«4 \u. umi \»»\."j 



*■ '< • 



3B 



POBTRYt 



.dety, will feel the re-acHoa of tlie same 
.priaciple, and hail Hie labours and suc- 
.cess of all suob Auxiliaries, until moral 

and spiritual darkness shall be chased 
. from every part of oor land^ by the light 

•f evangelical truth. 



London, 



J.E. 



NOTICE. 



The Annaal Meeting of the Stepney 
Academical Institution will be held at 
the King's Head Tavern in the Poultry, 
on Tuesday evening, January 16, 1811. 
The chair to be taken at six o'clpck pre- 
cisely. 






REMEMBRANCE OF RURAL WALKS, 

After M long ConfinemerU to the Chamber of Affliction, 

Written in Bed, 3Sd ApriMSt^. 



" Acquaint thyself with God, if tliou vouldst taste 

« His works.*' COWFER. 

Therb, where those tiny flowVs of brightest blue. 

That helped to form my simple nosegay, grew ; 

There, where the Crouch's distant banks were seen, 

Array'd in various shades of beauteous green; 
J And Canewdan's high tow> conspicuous rose — 

'Twas there my solitary walk I chose. 

To me, emerg'd from long confinement's gloom, 

How sweet th' uncultur'd wild flow'r seem'd to bloom ; 

How sweet the distant landscape, long unseen, 
. The rural path-way, where I oft had been ; 

There Louictra twines her fragrant bine, 

And there, beset with thorns, sweet Eglantine. 

The Whitc-thom hanging high her snowy flow*rs> • 
t All the wild store which Flora lavish pours. 

Greeting th' enraptured eye ! I seem to see 
, . A new creation rising suddenly. 

Where am I ? Is it fairy-land ? There floats 

On ambient air such clear mellifluous notes, 

That my wrapt spirit almost seems to soar 

'* Where pain and sickness shall be felt no more !" 
Ye fe«ther*d choir ! who, from your leafy homes. 

Welcome the languid wandVer as she roams — 

Untutor'd minstrels 1 let my heart aspire 

To hymn with you Creation's bounteous Sire. ^ 

Where'er I move, whichever way I bend,* 

I trace thy footsteps, my Almighty Friend ! 

When, from my cuaement, I have view*d afar ^ 

The brilliant mom, and many a radiHut star ; — ' 

When at the midnight-hour, in solemn tone. 

The winds have rush'd with loud tempestuous groan; 

And when, in Autumn» the dread thunders roar. 

Or the pent clouds a mighty torrent pour — 

In ev'ry change, terrific or serene, 

Thy hand, great Sov'reign, I've admiring seen ! 
Bttm/uim, £iiex. E. S. G.* 

I * The truly interesting and pioas Author of the preceding Lines, (who ts no# 
totally deprived of the use of her right side^ by a third, and most severe attack of 
.paralysis,) has ji small post octavo volume of Evangelical Poetry preparing for 
■ the press, entitled ** Spiritual Recrfationt in the Chamber of Affliction** written dur- 
Jng thirteen ytars of bodily suflterings, and now publishing for her benefit. Sab- 
•criptions, 5s. common paper — superfine 7s. will be thankfully received by Mr. 
JSTsddon, If, Tabernacle- walk. Fmsbory-square; Mr. GarringtoOt Bitfulian^ 
^x; or MnCoJjrer,FodVBCny, KeuX, 



as 



i- ft 



I ' .-Ai 



Sxisii CI)tontde* 



The CdmmitHn> or the Baptist Irish Society have, during the fgMt 
month, received fresh tokeus of the interest which is felt by Br|(i|l) 
Christians, in the measures v'hich nro pursued for diffusing the light uf llioi 
truth amoiig our fellow-couiifrymen in Ireland. They aclLilow ledge, with/ 
devout gratitude to God, tht^ kindnesa of those who have contributed to, 
tbe funds of the Society. A pious Lady at Bath has, in addition to. 
former liberal donations, sent them Fifty Pounds. The Proprietors of thif> 
** Youth's Mapusine*' have kindly voted 'Acwify-jlfM Pounds from the proflts 
of that pleaaiug and useful work, which has t»een paid by the Treasureri! 
W. B. Gumey, Esi). The Rev. Mr. Barker of Toweester, has sent 
Foar Pounds from a Penny-a-week Society ; and the Rev. Mr. Wiht<*r^ 
botbam of Horsley, Three Pounds fh>m a sinyilar institution. I'het 
HftTe beard also of several anx if iary Societies ha\iiig been lately fbrtifedi 
(h>m which assistance may be depended upon : and o^ other fVien<^s,' wl!6 
ire ** devising liberal things" for'helping rorward *Mhe work of fuifli, tho 
labour of love, and the patience of hope/' in which ihey are eugagei^ 
The Committee hope, therefore, thart notwithstanding they may not ^ 
able to meet the expenses of the present ^rtM>We'\ >et that renewed ex^ 
tortious among Christians throughout the country will provide a supply 
for I lie next kalf yettr; since they feel desirous, as they have hithMto 
been enabled to do, of raising their supplies during tlMn year in whi«h 
tlieir expenses are contracted. Tliey know that ** the shieldti of- tho 
earth belong to the Lord," that '* the silver and the gold are bis kl^f 
and, therefore, while they are employing good men as their agents, ab^ 
are only solicitous to make tho Irish acquainted with *'the scriptures of 
troth,*' thry depend upon him who h^ said, "Him that honooroth met 
will honour.*^ 



jrr0m the B€9, Jtmiah Wilson, Smperiii' 
tmdent tf tht Sclu>olt ia Cmmaught, to 
Mr. Ithney. 

Mt DBia BaoroER, 

With this you will receive tbc juardals 
mi the Irish rcadtrcs; lome of which ^til 
be r«ad, I an coftaini with peculiar iu- 
Mcst by Ike Comoihtee. With W. 11.^ 
jooraal I also inchMC a note, addressed 
to lae, which contains an ioteresiing^eel, 
chat it iboold be mnde known to yuu. 

I have nothing at fhb drae to say re*; 
spcctilig tl»e Schools, as during the last' 
inoDlh they hava haan nearly empty, 
tbe children being employed in getting 
in and storing op potatoes, the *' stuff of 



life** in Ireland. And it ought tft be 
mentioned to the praise of tiim who 
watcheth over tbe seed when it h put itylo 
the ground, that he has nut permitted 
it ^ to abide alone" in this counrf y, f^t 
lias graciously caused it " to hring fortb 
much fruit." For this the hihabitants df 
this part of the kirirdoni ^hould indeetl 
be 'gf'aterut; for the ettecty uf the scaiibMy 
of 1816 are still extensively fdt. ''\ 
But neither the ^ gopdnes&" nor lire 
"* severity*' uf Ood has produced ihit 
^change of mind and' of conduct, whfd), 
^by every pious person mu»; ^e devb^tfy 
'inahed. 

' In this town aad neigbhciurTiood iIHa 
small p6i has be^n reeentfy i^ry pteVft. 
'lieirt and fi^al, li^arly one buu^tt^ VEk4 
fifty children having died ol '\x« \ ^nVii 



ss 



t§tt%n mftoKtCLik 



Id ■nketheniemibteof fhe danfrrr that ) 
aCtenled such an alK>minatilc practicr n ! 



fcnf eliDg to ft fe'low «iiifi#T, wiib an inteii- 
yiDfi of recervine pardon frrjin him fori heir , 



I 
ir 



unip at that prrrog^iirr belongs to God i 
oiiIt 'f tbej rephrd, Ae aH know thai it ^ 
■oi f'lr our g*joA\ but if wr moil f oing re- 
gularly to cinfr»i/>nfl, and pay him no- 
AC J twice a jear, he will aiHiounce a 
•raiimi at oor bnu^ei, the expense of 
whic'i would he rt-ry cmtider able ; and 
if wc d'l not ii«e hini well, he will cry us 
out fruflj the altar, w* that it t% for peace 
aak<'* MoM of ibe people b( this part of 
Ireland Mbey said) paid their priestt 
iBoner. noi tor the lake of religion. I 
beiovght them not to be any longer led 
iMtra> by err'>r, but to lay hold of the 
prDfnff«e» of God, which were calcolared 
to nff'trii tbfin eontolation in this world, 
■Ad re«l happtneis in the world to come. 
1 heic are four description* of people 
in thtftcoontry.that bate the proceedings 
•f the Baptiit Inititutiun, tis. the jrrktit, 
the pitgrim$, the dancing nwtten, and the 
fiptn: the people who profess ihese dif- , 
lercoi Mccupations are well aware that if 
ttie preaching of the gospel* and reading 
ittod eiptamlng tlie script ores, be conti- 
Bued a few years longer, they will 
tiavr to learn some other craf> or scheme 
lor their support ; therefore each of the 
above paciiek has an aversion to the cir- 
culation of the scriptures* particularly 
the priests, who are using all the rocHns 
in tlifir power to extinguish the glorious 
Kfbt of the gospel, lest their legerde- 
main should be made known unto all 
.•len. The pilgrims get their living from 
.ignorant people, on acouiit of invoking 
.taints And augels on Iheir behalf. The 
-dancing-maftert and pipers get their 
■livinc-by breaking the Sabbaib. Nei- 
ther ilieone nor tlie other of these prac- 
licet it aauctioned in the Bible; there- 
•ibretbe Bible is considered at a nuisance 
by tuck characters, liut, thanks be to 
•Almighty God, there is more good done 
•t prticnt than ever can be extirpated. 
I rcinain, Kev. Sir, 

Yourt^ very tiDcerely. 



From R. P. 

UtT. Sim, November tl, 18t0. 

Ok my tour through Liny, I met . with 
t yoongman 11 FreiKbford. 1 hope the 



Lord has opened ha heart fo rrceive hb 
wurd. I spent several hours c-xplaining 
the scriptnres to hiro. At M:i;:hinKh X 
spifit a flight and part of tvro days at a 

Ml. P 's, both ar^uini; ^i!i> and ex» 

pUiiiiog the scriptures to a Uooian Catito* 
tic. At our parting, he told me he never 
got a satisfactory eiulan^tii >fi oi' the >cnp< 
tures heiore— and (iiat he wus Cunrinced 
that I wa& right, and that he bim^t If wat 
wrong. 

The night foilo^tmgl preachtd at KiU 
mattigoe, to a small cx.)iit;ie^niiou : part of 
them were JKoroiAn Caiiiolics Some of 
ihero stopped after preaching, and I had 
a cunversatiou with them on the plan of 
aalvaiion. 

I still continue to preach in Ardwuley, 
and I hope ibe Loid i» blessing his 
word- I was much delighted t^^lte last 
Sabbath) to hear many ol them thaiik 
God that their eyes wire opened to see 
the way of salvation by Jcmis Chri»t, 
and that their Sabbat bs were now spent 
in the service of God, and not in the 
service of the Devil, at thry were in 
time past. 

I ofic-n have a praycr-mecting in La* 
carnaveuugh, seldom tewer than twenty 
or thirty persons attend* 

Some of the neighbouring Homan Ca- 
tholics come to hear me explain the 
scriptures in my own house. 1 often 
have a conversation with a young man, 
(his parents are Roman Chi holies;) he 
was taught to read the Tcatument at a 
free school, tod by this means he was 
convinced of the errors of Foper^b: he 
has not joined any religious consrega* 
tion of people as yet. He often asksuc, 
" Which is the true religion ?*' as he sayt 
he is determined to join those who pro- 
fess it, whatsoever name they may go 
by. I desire him to search ibe scrip- 
tures, and to judge for himself i he it 
still on the inquiry, and 1 hope be will 
find that Jesus Ciirist is " the way, tlie 
truth, and the life.'* 

There are many in this neighbour- 
hood who are convinced of the errors of 
Popery ; but I fear they tee not further 
at pretcnt. I hope that the Stin of rigbte- 
ou»ness will arise upon their minds, and 
will carry on that gloriont work lie hat 
begun, and enable them who now ••tec 
men at treet walkinc* abort iy to tec 
ibingt at they really are. 



' $nheripthtn mtd Donationi received by W. BtrBtt, £tq. Treofurer, 56, Loihbu^ ; 

99 ike Rev. Jotirii Itimit* Scmtory, JO, Harpur-Street, London. Any Pervm 
f-^tkhing m Oopy of ike UaH Annual Bepcrt may be tupplied by Afplicotion to the 

Seeretory. 



a? 



Miesiomtp Hetaltt^ 






it 



It u requetted that all Communications oji Missionary BusinetSp, 
imUndtd for the Rev. John Dyer, may be addressed, not eti 
hir^ifore to 15, W6od Street, but to 9, Wardrobe Flto«, 
Doctors' Commons, where the Meetings of the Conwuttjffi 
will in future be held, and the Business of the Society 
transacied. 



BAPTIST MISSION. 



IDom ptmtttin^^ 



Letter fimm Mr. Saffery to Mr. Dyer, 

Mr DSAft Bbotbb«» 

My late mit to Portsea occatiuned the 
IbBowiiig letter* addressed to our friend 
Mr* Ettjctt* leferring to the hiehlj in- 
tefCitiiig tfate of the 8unday-aco(MNs in 
•dm town. Perhaps joo will not deero 
•o aiiiBatsog a proof of exertion in the 
kerne department, foreign to the interests 
sfdw Misnonary Herald, where an in- 
•ertion of the letter will prohahly serve 
to render the calculations efficient, by 
■BiniiinMmiliiig to general attention so 
tkKflet aod fUaemg, and pYvducttve a 
fowce of revenue. 

I am» IB? dear brother. 

Very oordlaHy yours, 

J* Safpbbt. 

CaKfkiry»Bee.7,1820. 



BekUbuty, Nsv. SO. 18fO. 

Mr OBAB FbI SWD, - 

I was mach interested widli my attend- 
anoi on the meeting of the f/ieods who 

VOL* Xltl, 






support the Mary-le-boqe and Lake-laot 
Sunday-schools, atyour pnhlie tea party 
on Tuesday last. The detail of your Ab- 
nual Reports was particularly pleasiogp 
both on account of the numbers instructed, 
and the assiduity of the teachers, repaid 
by various instances of divine mer^— 
With the motion put into my hand, **That 
the meeting highly approved cf the tnJtirv^ 
turn ofMiuionary Societies in iheee tchook, 
and recommended their adoption wherever 
practicabte," I felt appropriate pleasnrt, 
suited as it was to the work in which I 
was engaged of collecting for our Mission, 
and affording roe an opportunity of advo> 
eating that important cause. 

During the speeches of those who pre» 
cedffd me, I made some 'hasty calculations^ 
to show, that while yon were laudably en* 
gaged in procuring from the pupils ^i$ 
per annum, to support a Native School of 
forty children in India, much more thaa 
(his might be accomplished. I now for* 
ward to you and Mr. Ralfs, Treasurers of 
the schools, a copy of these calculations, 
hopuig that your united influence will 
give them permanent effect. It was ob- 
served that one halfpenny per week from 
the 1323 childre4i would amount to 
J, 143 6i» 6d. per atinum'^a sum which 
would support nine Native Schools, and 
leave a surplus of «f 8 |6s 6d Or, if all these 
children were to fj ive^n ^mv %\\ an«\%^% 
but one fartAimg ^i we^k, flV W.^^ 



UlUlOtrisV HSKALD. 



per BuniM would he pradactal ; • provl 
■ipiinDratliui tqul ta tb> «p«ue c 
Jmr Nuin Scboolh kinng * tarulu <i 
^11 13.. 3d. Taiog rbe Bnl mm. i 
■ppon that Anc t» Snrf^-fdkil 
■»|«bt d«^y (Aim* 3<t HiwiM ail 



tadieri. Xow, ifeacbof lhrw*«t to 
oJIeel (W kBJTfwny per wwk frai» Itti 
penoiu uncDniiecinl oith (hit icliootl. tnr 
Ihe fntni rnrpowi of ihe Mmioo, oliii ], 
mm apathy n^nn m^itmat, il ,- 
•■BoiBU nnid be £l*d 3t «. lUkii, 
«WmI to the tnregoing lum, woutJ nait 
■ iMd of ^S88 9). 1M. etduiM of «. 
>wat la6KTVti<nu nd (aUcidoiu. Tbuj 
fa FbKtra alaoe. heonn £30a uA 
Mil^* je" might be niiol for the 
SooK, pcrhap), may Hunk thii u Ulri- 
p«n. Of ui inpractickUt mruuir. It i, 
oenbet. You b»e it slRiuij in optta- 
Won to • certaju limii ; e»lm4 ih»t opem 
l«on to ill nlnKW honnduj. Comidir 
the infiailndc and bleMrdaeH of Ihe oL- 
J«ct 1 Ulniir lo hare jour own niindj im- 
preuftl wtlh il, uhI conTej, if pouilil , 
the nine ■iiimiling imprcnioD to iLt 
iund< of yoor Hipenntendniti and iB»ch. 
«K bj 9kIi addmsa ud cnmmuiiict- 
ttou u are oilailal«l to keep tlim ih.- 
■Hcmt, aud tlx work nUl be done , 

It il liie opinina of tonw, anj in iliii 
opinion 1 fultj coiocide, that nst )ulf ilji- 
monaj wblcb migbt be niied amoni oi 
hujit brat collected. Not a few of on r 
cbDrchMrfa»liiqgfoi|hrMiuian:iMhei! 
ioUllie; and I fear ihal wbentbe aboT" 
.•dcnlaiioni an: couidcred. mat ant of 
tben all could draerve tbc enconiiuiu 
^TOi of Uarj, -She h»lh done wtiat li' 

The Million i. in gr^ot pecuninry diiE- 
aOutt, and li wiU be a npniBcb to liii 
^enoniination il ii he MilTered lu continue 
«>. Veij ^metall; at kail, the ric*— 
IneyaT— the vnn^—niighl du more— 
— «e* ■ore. Fmm the eienioni of iht 
Wter, a grcol deal il to be hoped for, 
■IM ni cnliit iU their entfeiri, ,upp|, 
wmnali for their glooiog teal, and pnf 
JMUe their enthouuni Id ihe gond tauie 
Ibii, probablj, will arsiue oibni to 
■MrtioQi and the emburaumeot we cum- 
phin of will Taniih. 



Fer wut ioti ^tnAtuUisrifSaeiefy 



WEST OF EN'GtAND. 
Frg* At Am. J«fai SMrtM, Ttttrtm, to 

Thertm, Dec. 8. IBtO. 
UciaSia, 

The importance of Mtanaoary eieTlicin» 
ha* long been acknowledged l^ nHMt of 
the cburchei in Ibii neigbbouitraod ; but, 
throagb loHB BoknowB caae, tben tm 
oat been that co-opFraiion which ii an ea- 



tbeFoitign h 
a Kieeling wai heM M TanMn oa No- 
re mbcr ]S, " tu lake into cmuidenlioa 
ibe Male of Ihe Uinion. a>d (be pro- 
priety of fotming an AuiiBarj Sucietv in 
(id of iu fundi." T)w neoeiaitj ot Ihe 
Abject wai uiianiinr>u9lj acknowledged, 
uid rcHiluliDiu paiird teconuneoding Ihe 
iramediale foimalian of a Sucietj aniili*. 
rj lo tbe MiuJoni h likb wai acomluiglj 
canieti into eaecuiiun. TwcKr or thbtesu 



cliuichn bare 


Ireadf onH 


Srt with u.. 


miiaiigit which 


VVdnuglnn, 


launlon. Tirert 


™"coL!r^p' 


N). &c &c 


TheSadeljhai 


- »i-_j.- ej_- ... 



Yonn, cordiallj. 



In order lo giTepuWicitjto our doign, 
■ well a) 10 engage Ihe alteniluit of out 
churchts we should be bappjp to be fut- 
[jihed bj von wiih the " necemrr p^ 
pert' ipcciSed in your circular, in otdar lo 
ilieii diilrtbution, pmiuui io the GrK 
raeeilng oflhc Socielj, which ii aimint- 
nl (0 be held in Taunton aboul Uar. 

I am, dear Sir, im behalf of the Conk. 
mitlee, leipeclfuDj and aActinMidj 

JoHk SmaLtioN, Sfc. 



Accounts have alto bera r»* 
ceived of the eslablisbment of ta 
Auxiliary Societji, in connexion 
with the Baptiit Church at Daii- 
moatfa, now under tb« paslotti 
cire of tbe Rev. Philip Hdqm. 



REV. WILLIAM WARD. 



We htit^ great |dnaure ia an- 
iiouactn){, lt»( Mr. Ward arrived 



MIUIONAkT MBKAtD. 90 

••My It NewTork on the 2»lh '■™>&o"i6« time they h«w btcnread- 
«fNo«ii.ber. Bftw ■ favourable '",*',' <'^,!?,'^.'£ T "^ T*"^ 

LonI wtll pcoipei ^ mji haml. There It 



Sionisa SiitelUgentt. 

CALCUTTA. 

Wz bivf been repealeillv fa- 
voured by Mr. Lawsoo wiih a 
variety of iniiror articles of intelli^ 
fence, nnder the denomiaalioii of 
" Scraps," many of which have 
been ioMrled iu the Uerdld. Vft 
add, this month, a few of the 
same description. 

f jlrotl if ■ KpU fro 



, . mv haml. 

I one uf (he iDquiran 1 tfaitik pccotivlT 
huidhit heirl i> deeply bK 



I Mr. Pnrct ta 



, ..;' /tineID,]ei9. 

Dsik Batrraaa htmiow, 

Yoa wrabed to be niwta (cqtuinled wllli 



SBanan. If you think the taiJoiin^ 
Ibv bf notice, you may nake UM of i 
IJM iright I went to litit one of thi 
fire iklen, whu it tery 111. and to n 
oar brotliieT Jobni hii thinni iBudi kind 

I »keH the pool iroinin, " Well, how i) 
yaaraniKl^ I aae ycwr bodf if ■eali.'' 
SbcteplitKl, "AlliimlL XbiTeimrear 
of ideelh. Je^ CliriM ha* luiTertd for 
UK. All my tiuH n in liim.* Tliinking 
>Im wai ihiitly, I iiikeil bei If ihc wanted 
oaler. She uSd, '■ I ktie living w«ter 
•rilhiit, wliich my Saviour hn giieDme; 

fiMiiri> YiMi kiiuK yun rend theclup' 
Icr 10 ai tiie uibet day." Altit liiia the 
weul la itccp. 1 have liol lieatd huwilie 
a to^y. Yo«n, ii.c. 

Ff» M-. Sntton, MMnht^tlud. (« lUr- 

Jane 19, iei9. 
_ . Iia*bwn peculii 
4ariaf .the la 



I appeatauces 
ot u»g( iTDUiKl nr. I kninf appeaianucs 
■re oArn letj deceptive, and tlw native 
ebataeter dtmcull to be uiidentoDd ; bui 
J bn« BOW tfaiee, who, I tidiik, are lan. 
cnely wri[ingaR« Con. Tko ef ihem 
bavB been bnioght, through a Tetumeut 
X pnm iny, and HnBH convetaatkia 1 bad 
wU IkMK imaedbttiy tiler ay vriral; 

i 



iUbciOToufOiiii 

Yautt, lie. 

S. Sutiihi. 



RoiiniOH, Batatia, to Mtt 

I T^tUtrndea, June 4, 1 B19. 

I have beea huiying mytdf tbeie iMt 
IK» yean fai trying to compOK a few Ma- 
lay hjmni, and have at lart, after mock 
painlni>tudy,t>rUBght my little vroiktoa 
conduiioD, md prepared a fair ispj. be 
the preu. Tlie |Mrcel 1 tend yoo conlalia 
thev hymni, vbicb I wiih to get prialad 
ai won ai poaiible. hopinfj that when tb«r 
are pal into circulatkn, tbey will, Ihroofb 
a dliina bleinag, *k Ibe bf«b of loan 
good. We have no nilive anverti to 
make hynns for ui here, u you ban in 
Bengal ; and, judging froio apptaranoeti 
we jhall not have any for Dttoy yean tu 
come. To thit day the greater part of 
the people ling the Datch puhns, whcD I 
preach in Malay ; for there lie very few of 
them capable of imdenlandicig the rcrdoa 
in Mtlay, the ityle being too high be 
ibAn. rnxB heooe yoa an jndge Ihata 
few hynni, conveying gonelidMi iu ■ 
fantiliat ityje, are very doirable. We 
•Iways nng theMi hymjii at out Monday 
evening prayer-nkeeiiug, and on tbe Stb- 
bath motiiiiii; ; and thote who powaii ma- 
nnicript copict, uni; them in their huti*e*> 
I hnvc intrntiiced English tune*, and I 
5nd the people like thein a> well ta tbe 
Dutch tones, if not better; and many el 
the children a<e master* of aeveral £0^ 
li>h tanei, an an to be aUe to tin* than 
wilbout any BMiitance. SofstallUwdl; 
Out if you atk bow Dumy noli have been 
laved by my raeaiu, !■ have bat a p^ot 

which produeeionly here and ibrrea bil^ 
fipwn (hnib. Plants or Iniiitiant growth 
trc out 10 be found here. 1 often feci auuh 
iliiticssed, but the Lurd enables me to go 
r. 1 _. !n po„|j preidl 



1 tear that 



c bat 



ery fro at last to be my joy and crown of 
rjoiciug: but pny fur nw, that 1 mayyrt 
c uaeful. I du nut forget you, and my 
uther brethren, and am always happy la 



■W,1 



JIUafOII'AKV ltBBA<,D. 



-TnB Mowlae iwknipb <*rilM Mb red plewore Md pMlttdr reBgiau McU 
l«»iDO.> ia Uom ihe CalcMU Jouiul of «ic nnivcd. The account, in ihe Baplut 
tbl ncnlh. 1 ioKit k here, >i ' 
tMrin>iiig to Eogluh frieodi iii 
■n rriilciii proal ibal *cry amudtnUe 
(eviiluiiiins ■» ukhig pluc in tht nunds 
of Ihe HindiMH. 

Tht lUonotbeiukal doc- 



trine uf irligion h> jtaitHy n 
ta cvcijF nnd CfaiiU ur i 
tbc pocfililj of thr. conirir 






■puartnt 



nfHinduni «l 
' Vediuiic doclriiwj, if 
i|nd progrei 






>• ircll ■> imdtcciauJ 
mit, tautVc tu iIif lerni, mpcct- 
M*. Willi thr ilaoilh tfOcio uf idolmrj, 
■och ■ hint of prEJiHlicei, iuiniical ID ihe 
kniinUinii ■>{ tudti). at mice vinuli, 
thai ibe phi taut hiopiat cannol but partike 
«f ifae plcaiurr. oitU iiliicb ■»' nuie llie 
.pioachuig 



Aiuongil ihtfte, thi o 
'tWMI, peihapi, it tlie fieqiiincj nilh 
«h^rh the proimon ol ibe purer doariue 
■■EM logetbeti *'uh ilimlew ot pmnioling 
bee iiKUMoaa — u the rfaditit iiKaiii uf 
Mica^tbeiiinf; ihimirlvci in ilic maiuti:- 
MDceof rhatihuj bate cnme to corwder 
•■ troth. We ha<c b«aid of aiwiber of 
)br«e nmiingi, held at Kidderpoie, an 
Snnda; Ihe 30th allino, ul llic boote of 
Moia Cbuudcii. a near ivJalioii af ilw 
Kaja of botdnn, and a DiTin in tliE 
Sail dt-patlmeat. Tliil (^culleiniin faatiiig 
dMelf tinriied the Vtdaiitic tjilirn, aiid 
tnvcMtgateil the aigumenli ndTanml 
■giliiH it. ha> wannl; embraced in doc- 

M* opinirioti' incited a uomLiet nt' hii 
JHntdi Id a meeting, limilu' la thuse *e 
tiaie ■Iready Jiiil occaunn lo ucacribft 
Wt fron the rank and chancier ol iJie 
ODUvukvr, more numerously aiteiidrd llian 
Viyat, br Hindoo* of the Grit letpectabi- 
Itj and lomini;. Tlie follxnciiig iransla- 
t»a naj Mrre t> a tprciinen hoib uf the 
fNiMrj conipOKd foi Ihis (Kciuion, and of 
tke 0[dniu(u proleited b; the audience. 
'■Sec llmi^ideilrojing hand efface 
Each form that liiion'a pouercan trace: 
lluiik T<i.r then kuDian light citcndi 
To Biin on •rhi.ni e'en Hmc drpendi? 
Thai 3»u] il no UK can pounraj, 
Wbicli auimaira our moiiui c\ay ; 
Say, huw can liununi eje enibraea 
Tbe Miud ibal £1li all nature^ space I" 

Thi folbwing ii an eiliact from a aol. 
<Her at CuUack, lo one of our brrlhren at 
Bale Gunge, and i< copied here thai our 
jatodt la Sogltad mmj imnr irilli whM 



Hsgazlne, of Temperance Pucoe, wu 
primed in tbe form uf a tract bj o«r Aua- 
iliaij Sodetj, and >cnl lo oar breibrea ki 
■'"■ ■gimeDti. 

Deia BaoTBia, July tt. 1B19. 
With TiatDj thmki we leceired the 
bookt bj itar bearer uf thii. I ueret niet 
wiih any thius more rnliTening lo oat 
fallh than the Coniertion of TimiM. llita 
i> anulher addliion to out belief, that we 
an not in any iitpectJnitiGed bj our own 
Horki of tight KHimcia, hut by dtiiiw 
mercy, which is unrflowing wd hwue*' 
■UTdblr; for vp S»d •here ni hMh 
abounded like a flood, dhrine meter 
abounds like an orealu Tbe grace of 
Gud is immeniely rkb ; it a«coni[diabe* 
allils blessed enda. Who can dedu« Ih« 
naUc acta of our hleved Lord, oeihow 
fbrih half hja praiie? bat u luHg n wa 
are pcroHtted lu lisp hu boljr name, may 
it be llu: delight iif all OBI heaita. It ghrct 
Ul great joy tu bear that you an all well, 
and that the good work uf our Hatter ia 
fiourislilnj; amung you. What tan I iiy i 
Why, may the Lord bleat yoot ei "* 



and grant yon a Hill greater meanir* of 
ibe OBt-punringa of hi> Hol^ %>ifit. Haj 
yoD aee still iDore of the light of Us ^o- 
rioiu gmpcl, and enter into Ibe Dnaearch- 
■bte riches uf Christ, iiid ooatinue to bold 
OB to the end, Irne discipleaof oik K»- 
deemer. and omamcnti snio )ua chuich 
■nd people I , 



Ju^Sl. 1819. 

" For the lail foilnlghi I have been ^n. 
ing strength gradually, but alowly, and 
bate been riialiled lo do a ItlUe at mj 
noik. During Ihe two or three iMt daya 
I hdie brrn in belter apjrits ihan usual; 
and 1 have been belter crery vay bodily. 
I leel grateful, but not lo that decree I 
ought, witainiy, I am anaioua lo finish 
Ihis letter fur fear anotber atlack ahoulj 
cunntence before it it finished. 1 am 
di«:uil>.ged in m, work. Had I any one 
in prospect to take what 1 have accum- 
pliihed, I siKiuld feel eatkr. Howeier. 
on ihii head 1 feel more at lett ibau I 
liaie done." 

" We are almoM b itafu quo here. Tb* 
na<i.e brethnu are .ery wii.e. We l.a*< 
l*o scluiuls. which, acG.^nJin^ lu report, 
coniain 40 buysj and one stiop in a baiar 
wlicte many people bear the word read j 

hope, bowerei. iliat lltings arc 



MlSSlOKAair MfiftAM. 



41 



MOORSHEDABAD. 

VfE faaye lately receiTed from 
Mr. Sutton, our Missionary at 
Ihts important station^ a copy of 
bis JourniU for December and 
January last. We shall select a 
few extracts^ which will sudici- 
ently prove that he is diligently 
employed in the service of his 
Divine Master. 

Dec 5. 1619. At Berbampore. Early 
tliif morning I baptized seven persons. 
Preached in tbe afiernoon from 1 C\)r. xi. 
f4. This do in rementhrancc of me, and 
■dminutered tbe Lord's Supper to 46 p<>r« 
•ooa. In tbe evening preached aguin, 
ifoin Boin. viii. 6. Tu beipiritualltf minded 
u ^e mud peace. To-daj has bi-en one 
iu which X have had much spiritual en* 
largement andjuy ; and 1 think those who 
iMve beard the word have found the Spirit 
of God with tbem, solemnizing and pre- 
))aring their hearts for the reception of hit 
truths. 

Dec. 7. Rode home this morning in 
tbe midst of tbe heat of the sun, and was 
afterwardt fearful of the consequences; 
but the Lord bat protected me hitherto 
. Ifom tbe son by day, as well as from ene- 
■lies by night. No adequate idea can be 
formed in Britain of the exceeding great 
lieat of the son in tropical diniates. On 
my return home Ibund mj native Brother 
Kureem very ill. May the Giver of life 
fe^tore him. In the evening had worship 
Id Bengalee. 

Dec. 8. There has been for some 
months mocb illness near me. Have ad- 
mnistered medfcine seveial times this 
morning, and with it 8|)oke of the neoes* 
sity of seeking for that rordicinc which 
cmn heal tbe diseases of the soul. Gr«ti> 
tade is but little exercised among Chris- 
tians* but among heath* ns it is scarcely 
disoorerable. When medicine is given 
they seldom return the second time lor it, 
if it does not completely succeed at Ant ; 
•nd if it does succeed in healing them, it 
is an extraordinary ihin^ for a native to 
return and acknowledge \m obligaiion. In 
looking at the state' of human nature 
among the heathen, we may lastly say. 
How are tbe mighty fallen! How differ- 
ipnt from man in his primeval state t and 
there is nothing that can in any way re^- 
stnrf him bn^ that gospel which hushrought 
ftgbt and immortality into the world. I 
bdieve s6me of the Hindoo booh have en- 
deavoured to intrulcste a principled of mo- 
r&fiiy ; some of tbeir writers hiite been as 
grvat as any of tbe philosophers of Greece 
ok Borne. But what bas ever philosophy I 
4Q»e £v- the reaafBiioo of the bomnn I 



mindf Itlias-ipot hai a'^etfer effect 
than a drop of pare water would in being' 
thrown into a sea fuU of filth. 

Dec. 9. Spent the morning with mjf 
HindoostanecPundil; and afterwards lead 
tlie history of one of Iht* Hindoo gods. la 
the evening spoke lo several of th** nativet 
coiH)erniiig him who come to be a light tn 
the Gentiles. * 

Dec. 11. To-da^ Sister Marsha^ ga«s 
me a call. I receim^i a visit aittttiom a 
uativij. who had jbtfrore. j|^Md the goapcU 
ami wished to emSrace it. When I sair 
httn about two months since, I did not 
approve of lii^ dbposition; but he omt 
appears more hutkible, spiritual, and holy. 
From a letter also received from Mr. H— > 
wluim I lately baptized, it appears lie i$ 
exerting himself to nudte Icnowu to liit 
servants and neijgbbours that truth whick 
has brought holiness and peace to liis sonU 

Dec. ise. Went early to Berhamponb 
Preached from John v. 39, Semrch iki 
acripturti. In the afternoon visited tlif 
hospital, and preached lo several of tlw 
patients. In tbe afternoon preached again 
to a very attentive andienoe from 1 Kla^ 
sviii. 21; Hoto long halt ye heimem 
two optmamt. After worship conversed 
with tbe brethren concerning the proper 
means to promote the spirituality aaA- 
peace <ff tbe church. 

Dec. 14. Went with the Brethren 
Koreero and Kangalee to Kattra marker 
where many beard with attention ; aftnb 
wards retired to the shade of a large tia^ 
where many assembled and heard. T<^ 
wrards the conclusion several of the poor 
natives came, and requested I would a/^ 
quaint the magistrate with the exceeding 
(learness of provisions. I answered* 
Though I mueh pitied their circumstaucea, 
yet I luid not power to interfere ; 1 could 
only gii'e them the bread of lile, wliicH 
was free to all» and would last for ever. 

Dec. 17. Have been much distresaed 
liitely at not seeing more fnnt from mf 
labours among the natives; but thelobouf 
is mine, and the blessing l:elo^gs to tho 
Lord of tbe harvest. He knows well when 
to cause his sun to shine, and his rain 
to descend ; and no doubt in dae time, if 
I faint not, an abundant liarvest wiil he 
reaped. But tbe hearts of the Hiudooi 
appear greatly steeled against spiritual ob« 
jects. In other conntries a Felis will often 
tremble trader the sound of the gospel* 
though his mind may not be changed , but 
here Satan has so managed his devices* 
that the arrows of God ap*ieur t<# fly off 
whiioot entf^ing. Death, eternity, and 
judgment, are wo(ds of no solemn meaning 
to them. Kangalee leit this morning loc 
Cutwa ; he has been ouv ^aK^>vv|, \»m>^ 
nually since he has been W\\\\\n^, vktk^>\>b 
word of UfaUat hccn viVM) tfkteii!ii«4\uB>^ 



HtSStOltAtT HEBAtO. 



Die 19. Pnachnl ttib momlof; tt | 

BeHmmporc, fiiini lUilacli) iii. 16, Thei/ 
IhatftaTidtlit limltpaktiftiii. Pwacbtd 
■gain tn the etenlud to in BtiemlTE cnn- 
gre£fltkin. I liid IhPM !bbbaLh-d*_v lea. 
•nn* ahbin; brrltiRn and frinicli at Beb- 
tmmpoie prculiulir cndming to n 
«)dI. Aftrr libmilnK during (he *« 
»iili ni; Mwlin in ihe HindiMiMtnce Ui 
|u3i;i'.aiHl inpreacbiDglo (he iiillfc^ 
■ppnn hke * i»j oF rtat la M*nd i 
•moncit m; oioiKrjrnKn, and divide (h» 
birad of lile (o (heir hnngrj ao«1>. 

Dec. to. Was a( a pri;'(T-ineirtin|[ (Ui 
nuroing ■■ Brihamporcwiih wme »idier» 
After breakful liwi-d L«o Nil»e Srlioolt 
MKHlkepoie and Kijra. One wu in ■ 
gaod s'aie. bat ihe oihrr aou Atierwerdi 
cidNisbcd aiiMber in ■ good ailnaliun. 
In (he erenn^, in nij rnj hone, con. 
vetKd irilh leTeial i>ilgrlnn going to Jog. 
Ip^uiut, inrl inromted lh«a thai hnHnui 
«uon)T to be foimd ill I hr heart, and nol 

. Aon (he ptecpt of ground vrhicli (bej 
caUed hotj placet. 

Dec tS. Then; ii nne gr*i( erii anxnig 
the heathen, namely, the idea o( fate- 
Satan eannot dntmj thai principle which 

', it coUod conicienee, liat lie upprnn greatly 
to ham Injured ii, b; iiienkaling (he idea 
Ibat fMe a the author of all Ihingt; and 
Boihinf! ii more conitaua, whra ipeai^ing 
tatfae Hindoesibovt ihe necruitjof iwli- 
«ew of lift! and beafi, than Ihii aniiret, 
- What can we do? thai which will be, 
atHI bet" ■"! Iberelbre Ibey ted aaiuied 
irilhoul rilher ihiaking or acdne. 

Dec 99. Was engaged tmlaj in con- 
wniug wUh two of my inquireiii. Tiie 
IIim:r*of one were >ery pimlng. In 
bh BguratiTe wiy he loM me, Chiiit wai 
■ goodpiliri, and would *le«r in the great 
•u ilomu I that Sutaii'i gardeu wai plea- 
aant lo behold at a diatanee, bul wilhtn 
•rerf evil weed; Ihal a haue ungoatded 
would be entered hy Ilunes; alMl tbe 
■ind without watchfulDcta woold be filled 
wliheni 

Dec. 39. Went again lo-dajr b« the 
rideof Ibe riTer,whrntbe majoR'; Keaid 
wtUinglj, butieiaral, tike IhePharucei of 
oM, were oolj auioua to caTil al thing) 
vt little importance, white the; would be- 
Here tboae of the greatcil alnurdity. I 



partkfllar, namdjiTafe, end told them, by 
•ttributing eierr tbiag to /ate thu made 
Ood tbe aulboT of iin. But thii it aa 
^Tgnment which baa lillle effect wilh hca- 
flwn* i for it i> well known nearly all Iheir 
fodiare guUlynf the wiiMlCTimri. While 
ipeaking, many tuld me ihcj wcm igno- 
fut, and what oouU thej do bnl tread 
tbe nwd tbdr liUhen bodbdbie tbem. 



I DELHI. 

AccouKT of a joumty, hf 
Mr. Thompson, from Dcibi, to 
LnoriiRna, (or Ludbeeans.) a town 
BlxiutaiOmilej Itxlienorili-wnl, 
oil the borders of lite Punjabi 

Demnfrrr B. 1S19. Attwop.m. htt 
hnim, »lih a ihouund bnnti and imcla n 
v-iriAin lanpmKei. [n Inll an hour paucd 
uu< lioni Delhi at the Lulmiec-gate, in • 
H, w. direciion. The cuunlry wai weit 
Kiicked wilh fiuit; tianlt'tii lie very im- 
iDcTinii and eiieiiiin-. The ftnl fieet of 
^alcrwaioneof nogintdcplh.yrlalinrd* 
iiigsInipereH^fiiirufclcaFandiimtwuIrr 
I liruflRliuui iIm- jfiiri (hii ^|MJl b mads 

■ hailing- place. Beyond Badlfr ilero 
arc no moTP luini, but one citen«»r 
plain, with here and ihcrc a mound of 
c^anli, a solilnr; Iree, or an isiilBied Til- 
lage, The fii^Miun all iidci serm lerT 
liuriially culiiTaleil. On reaching Itie Til- 
lage of Nerita, I f.iund. Ibat nn aicoimt of 
a (ll-'puic belwrcn (he Nabob of Ludnuw 
And ibe widow of a Mahiaita chivf re- 
t])p[lin[! tUr ri^ht of poueuion, a >atf 
tracioflaDdremauu unctUlivRred. 

NcaitA} (imly/nir mUafitm DtlU. 
Nerila ia a pi^ulou IhoB^h a tlraggljng 
'Linil of tillage : it iciida ijrent ouaiiiitiea 
01 dried CO- dung for fuel lo Delhi. AlW 
a lillle iniiniij, 1 found a ten Hctl-ditpoacd 
Hindoot. and amiiug ihcm the pundit of 
[lie 'illaRc 1 they eiprvued great plrainie 
"11 lieaiiog ne aildiesa Ihciu rnprcring 

■ tic way of lalTaliun. The poor au 
jcpmed 10 hear wilh si llwrMub, aiid 
)iruniiicd lhem»ln;i much plcawre from 
ihr perual uflhe bookigid'nlbeni. One 
biulimiin, who at Sist laughed at every 
ihingserioua, and declared hiuvdfsaiiifitd 
triih this worhl. alletwarda made nanj 
inquiriei. llie poor muD Mid, that oow 
1 liad made him my diidple, he wauM 
tnuiU llie dayi till niy relutn. 1'hc hih 
dii. whoM houie ii Irequenled by Vidy. 
Hri'liees," readily toi>k a lew Iracti tin di»- 
iiibution 1 othert look loiue for Ihemelics. 

SoOHFUT ; /arty miU$fr9m Dtlki. 
Eiceptine the ruini of two large and 
puciiah built innt, there it noliiiiig bat 
iilciiain plains all (he way to Soonput, ■ 
I. >igL> Tillage, wilh the mim of a foitifica- 
on which account it ii itill calked • 
It boAtti of great aniiqiiily. Hera 
1 Muu a good opportunitT ut dittribulinB 
llie word of God in Peraian and HindeS 
llif se paili hare nerer been *iii(Ed wilh 
Ihi: word of God, and the people are eager 

* " yidyaitTieea," men who profeM h»^ 
Karctt fw kaMlcdge. 



MISStOMAKT HftCALO. 



43 



10 resd It : some propotcd to me to come 
and spend • few davs occasiooally with 
ibesB, that they might obtain more in. 
fltnietion : others offered to become Chris- 
tians if they were rewarded for losing 
cMt ; but the gjeneralky believed that the 
rdtgioo of Jesos woa^d prerail. and said 
it ordy required to be known. Ore&i 
eagerness was manifested for books, and 
ffom mid-day till near midnight, I was 
vaiiottslf engaged with the people; but i 
waa oblifsetl lo send mnltitudes away with 
tracts only. A poor drunken Sikh on 
being reproved, fell at my feet, and tuach- 
iog my thighs, promised for ever to re- 
Bonnoe liquor and liuoxlciiting drugs, and 
^ve kmisrlf wboUv to the reading of the 
acriptnres, which hearing me read in bis 
•wn Imgeaiee, be asked' for. He was a 
lespectaUe man aud well attended; he- 
coald read ; one of his attendants said he 
bad aqoaudered thoosan-Js of rupees Mnce 
bis Ukiug to liquor. Some sipahees were 
among my bearers, and were particularly 
desirous of the only two copies of the 
aciipiare selections I bad; when I told 
cbem bi*uks would encumber tbem ou tticir 
marcb. and tracts were more conv**nient, 
tbejr repeated, that tracu would be 
crompled, but a well'Stitched book would 
be safer in their knapsack. A young 
Hooauiman soldier, who applied fur the 
•criptnres, mentioned the parts be wanted, 
Mjaug, that ainoc bis brother had. some 
jeara ago, given him an account of their 
contents he had been desirous uf perujung 
tbem. This is pleasing, audshuws tliul the 
acriptuivs are talked of among the natives. 
la tbe evening I beard one of ilie na* 
lave soldiers repeat a stauza in praise of 
ecrtain virtues. I caUed the man in, and 
giving him some tracts, reconi mended the 
gospel to bam : after some conversation he 
wffrffed to resign hU siiuatiun, und attend 
me for fuiTber iostruciion* I told him, 
chat bis gooroo Busunt-iVlisr had taken a 
New Testament, and reeommeud«:d to 
bim to peruse it attentively. 

Between two and three this afternoon 
an imnuMise flight of hicusts darkened the 
«ir lor a contideraJjIe time, and awakened 
the fears of the poor hunbiuidmen, wliu 
ran out into their fields, and waved their 
cbitlies and bands to prevent their de- 
•cent Qpoo their fields, which were but 
just sown. 

(T0 be ctmtimud,) 



AMERICA. 



Estraa of a Letter from a Christian 
FrieMd, wh^ iatdy went to the SettUneni 
of Hondufos, 

Honduroi, Beiise, July 18, 1820. 

» 

Bblizs is not a regular built town ; tlia 
houses are from twenty to a hundred feet 
apart, for the benefit of air, as the win* 
dows, or jidoutie^, are on every side. 
Some bouses have glass in paf i : jalou* 
Me» are like Venetian blinds, only much 
larger. Tbe houses are built on large ma- 
liotfuny hlockt, three to six feet lon^ 
The house consists of a cellar for provi- 
sions; over that the store, or what %va 
should call tbe shop; and over that are tba 
apartments in which tliey live. In tba 
evening, we use larite glass shades to 
protect the candles. Mattresses are oae^ 
instead of feather bed>, and a pavilion ta 
keep off the fiies. It is not an uncommoa 
thing to have scorpions in our bed^ruooM: 
i luive killed iliree iu mine. 

As ii respects religion, I am at a loti 
what to say. J fear the principal part of 
the people think nothing of it. Of tlia 
negroes, perhaps iu>t one iji fifty caa 
read. On Sabbath-da^ «» they work for 
themselves, making bowls, paddies, &c. 
and attend to tlieir plantoiions, the pro« 
duce of which they seJl to their mastert* 
About (lie end of June, I had nccaiiua 
to survey some mahogany on the Ria 
Grande. 1, had a cutter prepared tor me* 
to take me to the mouih of the river, 
where I took a doray, (a kind of small 
boat cut out of a tree,) and went forty 
miles up. As I was passing along, about 
five o'clock on a Sabbatb-day, I saw a 
number of little sheds. All the ueproes 
were at work, making large bowls uf 3 feet 
diameter, used for wasldng, doray s, pad* 
dies, &c. I addressed myself to one, 
but 1 soon uad a dozen. 1 pointed ooC 
the evil of working on the Sabbath, but 
they said, ^'* My raassa no give Q)e mo* 
ney, so me work to i^tt money to buy 
lings.'* At hall-past six, 1 suppose thertf 
were near thirty ; hut after I closed, they 
went lo their usual amusements, beating 
ttie drum, singing, dancing, aud firing 
guns, till one In tbe morning. 



Thr Committee of the Baptist Missionary Society beg to ex(>resf 
their cordial thanks to the Ministers, and other Christtaa Fn«\M\%« 
in Scotland, by whom the Secretary and Mr. Mack Nvece ao Vuv^V} 
receiTed, and vheerfuUy assisted, in their )ate Joiiiae). 



44 



ifnatoKAAT iiBBAio. 



The fitUowittgSums thoidd have been imerted in the Lut qf Monkt reeehid im 9mf 

Kumbier, 



.tmtx Aavlwj Socictjr»- by. the Eev. J. Witl^injon 

Saffron W^ldeo, iu addition to f former CoUeo- 

tion this year » j£7 . 5 

Harlow for Trantlatiuns, by the Her. T. Finch It 7 

JUMP, -Joveaile Society, for Native Scbook S 

Fotter-itreet, Collection by the Rev. J. Hain* • • • 4 
Baylfcigh« Collection and Subscription, by the 

Rev. J. Pilkington 4 6 

Old Samford by the Rev. R. Peitit* • > • 1 7 

Habcead-- by the Rrv. J. King • • • • 1 4 

Earls Colne • • « by the Rev. M. G. Pudney 5 

Thorpe by the Rev. W. Bolton- •• t 

l^raintree. Collection at 8 10 






o 



8 
6 
O 

O 



£ $. d. 



18 i 



Tlirapilane* CoU^ctioii and StibMiriptions» by Mr. Stevenson • • • 23 10 O 

Mr. F. DuerdcD, of Berinuda. DoqMion •••• • 3 

.llcmcl IJeAipstcd, Female Missionary Society, Half-year's Sobacriptions 

to Midsummer, .by the Rev. James Clark • •...• 11 1 9 

Cardiugton, Cotton End, Collection and other Subscriptions, by the 

Rtjv. \V. Freeman T «6 li 

N.B. Of the Sum of «£49 lis. Hl^d, received from Abingdim,- as mentioned in t\m 
Herald for Dccembrr. it should have been specified that atl4 Is. ttl. was subscribed 
for the Support of Native Schools. For Evesham, in the same List, read Enthmm% 
The amoimt collected at Newbury should have been entered ^45 13s. instead o(jpS6* 



JuiT Publuhedt—Tnn Annual Report of the Committee of the Bapdst Mbdonary 
■Society, read at the General Meeting, June 32, 1820 ; together with an Appendti^. 
and lilt of Subscriptions, Donations, and Collections for the Year. * 



Xfflidon ; Psinted by J« Baby fsiiP» 91^ Wardour-slreefi Soba. 



v» 



tU£ 



UnpU&t |ll»0a^iif e. 



FEBRUARY, 1821. 

WORLDLY ANXIETY 

FBODUCnVE OF 

RELIGIOUS DISTRACTION; 

Sketch of a Sermon on I Cor. tu. 29 — 31. 



The apostle is here cautioning 
the Corinthians against«^o)rldly 
anaietf • The 35th verse is the 
key which unlocks his design in 
iu;ging the advice with which this 
clnpter abounds. It is as if he 
had said, ** Christians, that is a 
snaie to joo, whatever it may be, 
which so occupies your thoughts 
and your anxieties, that you can- 
not 9erve the Lard without dii' 
treciwn. To engage in his' ser- 
vice, whether in reading bis 
holy word, or in attending to se- 
cret, or (amily, or public worship, 
with a divided and distracted 
miod, is neither comely in itself, 
nor for your profit. You cannot 
justify it, that when you are in 
the house of God, instead of 
thinking upon his loving-kindness 
in the midst of bis temple, you 
should be thinking upon some 
person or favourite object, that 
absorbs all your affections. But 
if our hearts condemn us, God 
is greater than our hearts, and 
^noweth all things.'^ 

To check these contrivances 
^boat worldly connexions and 
imniiits, which relate merely to 
tbe present life, and to events 
pertaining to the earth, the apos' 



VOL. xiti. 



tie proposes one principle, short, 
but weighty ; trite, but convince 
ing; laconic, but grave; — *' Bre* 
thren, the time is short." 

Marriage occasions great anx« 
iety . and employment for the 
mind. The unmarried are anxi- 
ous to enter into that endearing 
relation ; and- there is no impro- 
priety in the msire, — only let it 
be '' in the Lord." The mar- 
ried are anxious to promote each 
other's happiness ; and all mar- 
ried persons should consider 
themselves bouild to do this, 
even at the expense of their own 
individual inclinations: but let 
them not forget that the time is 
short — and let this regulate their 
anxieties and enjoyments. 

The afflictions of life are ano- 
ther source of anxiety. Rachel 
mourned for her infants ; £11 and 
David for their sons ; Jacob for 
his Rachel ; and Mary and Mar- 
tha for their brother Lazarus. 
We do not bkime you for weep- 
ing ; for Jesus wept. But let not 
grief occupy all your thoughts, 
and consume all your hours and 
days. — " The time is short." 

The prosperities ot \\fe mvi 
have a similar effect \u tfviVx^^X- 



46 



WOULDLT ANXIETY FKODUCTIVE OF 



ids; the mind, and in drawing it 
off from God. You " rejoice," 
for \ou have gained the object of 
your affectioDSf and have entered 
theMaified slate. YoahavedoM 
well; terriage b honourable in 
aUi-bot rejoice with trembling. 
There is probably a canl^er- 
worm, though unseen, at the root 
of your comforts, and a blasting 
wind may soon destroy the flower 
of the field. You '* rejoice ;" for 
God has heard your prayers, and 
has delivered you from the pinch- 
ing straits of adversity, and you 
are now placed in easy circum- 
stances. But remember, the wheel 
is still going round. Do not let 
these pleasant feelings engross all 
your thoaghti, and draw them off 
from God, You ** rejoice ;" yimr 
ekifdren are about if on ; your rooi 
is spread ant by the waters^ and 
the diw lies all night upon your 
branch; the blessing of the Al- 
mighty is with you; you wash 
your feit in butter^ and the rock 
pours you out rivers of oil. Job 
xxix. 5, G, 19. It is well you 
should be thankful: but take heed 
lest eyen these things draw off 
yoor heart from God, distract 
you in his worship, and render 
yott unfit for his service. *' The 
time is short." 

Buying and setting are other 
engagements which are necessary 
to the well-being of society, and 
to the providing of things honest 
in the sight of all men. But take 
heed lest these engross all your 
Httealion. It is not necessary 
that the buying of articles of pro- 
vision or of dfess should so oc- 
cupy your thonghts, that you can^ 
not serve God without dislraction. 
It will require thought and care 
to buy a house, or an estate ; and 
to buy articles for your trades, 
on the profits of which your fa- 
milies depend. But surely you 
f)iould not be so anxious ; so so- 



licitous; so delighted when you 
buy cheap, and so vexed when 
you have purchased a bad arti- 
cle; so constantly emplored in 
Calculating bow milnj anOlings 
profit will produce so many hun- 
dred pounds upon the whole, and 
then how much per annum you 
will get for your savings, and 
where you shall place them to the 
best advantage. Alas ! alas ! were 
men only bom to count pounds, 
shilKogs, and pence ; and not 
rather to numher their days^ that 
they might apply their hearts unt^ 
wisdom ? Psalm xc. 12. 

** And they that use this world,, 
as not abu&iug it ; for the fashion 
of this world passeth away." The 
apostle, addressing Chnstians^ 
takes it for granted that they wpuld 
not abuse the things of the world ; 
that they would not through co> 
vetousness board them, nor in 
prosperity extravagantly waste 
them in eating or driniung, in 
dress, in furniture, in unneoessaiy 
journeys, &c. 

But even they who use the 
world as not abusing U had need 
take heed lest their minds be too 
much exercised, and too rauck 
employed about it. There are 
some of you who have not much 
to use; aud what you get, yon 
use well. You are indnstrioos, 
and support yourselves by yonr 
labour. You are honest, and 
therefore contract no debts which 
you have not the prospect of pay- 
ing. Take care lest your honest 
anxiety to render to all tbdr 
dues, become a sinful anxiety, 
which sball lead you to forget 
or distrust the providence of 
God; and thus your hearts be 
overcharged with the carts of this 
life, Luke xxi. 34. There are 
others of you thdt have an abun- 
dance of the world to use, so 
that (like Solomon) you withhold 
not yom* heart from any joy,, 



RELIGIOUS DISTRACTION. 



47 



Ecclcs. ii. 10. Take heed lest 
frffxn this, your spirit de^eocrate 
ioto carnal use. There is a dan- 
ger of yoor forgetting- jonr con- 
stant dependence, and of your 
sayinff, '' Who is the Lordr 
and that thus your hearts should 
he unfitted for the work of God. 
Again : there tre those who are 
po&r, and have scarcely any 
thing of the World to use. You 
hate scarcely meals ; yon arc 
poorly fed, and meanly clad. 
Tout situation requires you to 
eierdse dail^ care, lest you should 
be tempted to use unlawful 
meaM to pirotide for your own 
wants; lest, heing poor, you 
should steal, and take the name 
of God in vain, by telling false- 
hoods in the name of the Lord. 
ProT. xtx. 9. Zech. xiii. 0. You 
are in danger lest a mnrmuring, 
complaming, discontented, and 
eoTidtf^ spirit eat up all your 
(hoa^hrs. and prevent you from 
serving God without distraction. 
But remember, *' the time is 
short.*' All these things will soon 
be ovei^. You were bom for 
highf^ employments ; yon are ca- 
pable of nobfer enjoyments ; yon 
are destined for eternity. Every 
thing worldly, or that can be en- 
joyed in the present world, if 
trusted to for happiness, will 
prove vanity and vexation of spi* 
fit. 8e«k first the kingdom of 
God, and then you may enjoy 
every thing else. Hear the con- 
dirston of the whole matter. 
Fear God^ and keep hU commmid- 
mtnis ; for this is the whole hap- 
piness of man. For God shall 
brhig every work into Judgment, 
With evtry secret thing, whether it 
If gddd, or whether it be evil, 
Ecctes. xii. 13,14. 

But I proceed to illustrate the 
PRINCIPLE by which these sen- 
timents a#e enfiirced. '* Bre- 
thren, the time is short: it re- 



■\ 



I 



maineth that both they thdt have 
wives be as though they had 
none, &c." The time is short 
which is allotted, 1. For >our 
existence in the present Rfe.*'^ 2. 
Which is capable of belXg im- 
proved for spiritual purposes. ' St 
The time which remains is short : 
to many of us at least ; perhaps 
to all. And I purpose to con* 
elude, by mentioning some of the 
most important objects to which 
we are called to consecrate the 
time we may have yet to spend. 

1. There was a period when 
human life was counted by hun- 
dreds of years. See Gen. xi. But 
now it is reckoned bv scores, 
Ps. xc. 10; and is reduced to a 
band breadth, Ps. xxxix. 5. Itis* 
less than a twelfth part of that 
of the antediluvians. How few 
reach the period of SO! 

2. The hours which we are 
under the necessity of consuming 
in sleep occupy a third part of 
our time, during which we are 
stretched in a species of tomb, 
and undergo as it were an antici- 
pated death. Add to these the 
hours spent in dressbg and un- 
dressing, and in other occupa- 
tions equally insipid and unim- 
portant ; and then how short will 
the time appear, when the mind < 
is completely at liberty to think 
of spiritual subjects, or to engage 
in useful employments ! Shall we 
not be constrained to acknow- 
ledge, that the man who has 
lived sixty years, has not lived 
twenty yearsmmplete? Although 
he has in tniih spent sixty years 
in the woKld, forty of them have 
passed away in listlessness and 
inaction. Let us ask seriously the 
qnestioris, " What proportion of 
our time has been given to Godl 
What proportion of it has been 
given to the world 1" Ah, my 
friends, the propottiow vWx \\^% 
been ^veft to God \s ^q %\\otX ^^ 



48 



WORLDLY AKXl&TY, &C. 



Co be almost imperceptible, com- 
pared witb the years which have 
been engrossed by the world. 

5. That which remains. Our 
times are in the hand of God, Ps. 
jLxxi. 15 ; he has appointed our 
.bounds, Job xiv.5; he alone can 
make an accurate estimation. And 
as he alone has 6xed the term of 
,our life, be alone is capable of 
knowing it. It is not absolutely 
impossible, however, to ascertain 
»what shall be the probable re- 
maining years of those who are 
•now hearing me. Let me suppose 
900 persons. I will divide them 
into six classes : 



1. from 10 to 20 



2. 
8. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



20 — 30 
30—40 
40—50 
50 — 60 



- 265 

- 220 

- 173 

- 127 

- 80 



— 60 & upwards 35 

900 



According to the most exact cal- 
culations of those who have 
made such kind of researches 
their study, each of these classes 
must, in the course of the next 
year, present to death a tribute 
of ten persons. In that case, 
sixty will be numbered with the 
dead. Conformably to the same 
rate of computation, of the 900 
present, there will remain in ten 
years, 635 ; in twenty years, only 
415; in thirty, 240; in forty, 
115; and in tifty, no more than 
35. Surely the sacred writers are 
correct in representing human 
life as a shadow that aeclineth, 
Ps. cii. 11 ; as a vanity, which 
has nothing real and solid, Ph. 
xxxix. 5 ; as a flower which fadeth, 
Isai. xl. 7; as grass which is cut 
down and withereth, Ps. xc. 6 ; as 
a vapour, that appeareth for a lit- 
tle time, and then vanisheth away, 
James iv. 14; as a dream which 
£ies away. Job xx. 8; and as 



swifter than a weaver's shuttieV 
Job vii. 6. 

Improvement. Timeis given* 
us as a state of probation for 
eternity. How valuable then i» 
every moment! It is time we 
must redeem, Eph. v. 16 ; it is a 
time of visitation which we mnst 
know, Luke xix. 44 ; a time ac- 
cepted, and a day of salvation we 
must improve, 2 Cor. yi. 2; a 
period of forbearance and long- 
sufferipg which we must embrace, 
Rom. ii. 4 ; and a time beyond 
which there shall be time no 
longer. Rev. x. 5, 6. Time b al< 
lotted us, not merely to acquire a 
trade, or a fortune ; not to fill the 
magistrate's bench, ttie senator^* 
seat, or the monarch's throne; 
not to spend our days in mirtb 
and jollity, or in sorrow and mi- 
sery ; — but to repent and turn to 
God ; to believe, and be convert- 
ed, and to serve and honour God. 
Let each of us then say, What 
shall I render unto the Lord for 
all his benefits toward me? Ps. 
cxvi. 12. It was a useful reflec- 
tion which I once heard an old 
member of the church make 
Having said, ** I am the oldest in 
this company," he added, " I 
feel confounded at the thought, — 
but what have I done to serve my 
generation by the will of God." 
We may all say the same. 

Many ways will present then- 
selves to those who are anxious 
to be useful. It is astonishing 
how facilities will open to those 
whose hearts are alive in the 
work of God. " The way of the 
slothful man is as a hedge of 
thorus ; but the way of the righ- 
teous is made plain," Prov. xv. 
19. Do not say, I have nothing 
to do. Are there not School- 
visiting Societies 1 Are there not 
Missionary Societies to the East 
Indies and to Ireland? Is there 
not Social Prayer? Is there not 



QUESTIONS AND COUNSEL. 



49 



Tillage Preacbiug? Ouehtyounot 
constantly to prep^are for death 1 
It is true that habitual readiness 
f(Hr that solemn event depends 
upon t>ur faith in Christ, through 
whom alone we have a title to 
the heavenly inheritasce; but 
our actual readiness depends upon 
the state of our liearts, and upon 
the holiness of our conduct. Let 
us not then sleepi as do others ; 
but let us watch and be sober. 
Let us gird up the« loios 0% 
our mind. And when the Bride- 
groom shall come, may we be 
ready to go forth to meet him ! 
Watch therefore, for ye know 
neither the day nor the hour 
wherein the Son of Man cometh. 

IOTA. 



QUESTIONS AND COUNSEL, 

Addreued to Young Per4ons who feel 
m Concern for iJmr hest Lutresis. 
By tho Rev. Ashbel Greifn, D.D. 
IJL.D, PresideiU of the College of 
NewJeney^ North America, 



QUESTIONS. 

1. Have you seen yourself to 
he, by nature and by practice, a 
lost and helpless sinner ? Have 
you DOt only seen the sinfulness 
of particular acts of transgression, 
but also that your heart is the 
seat and fouutain qf sin ; that in 
yoH, literally, .4h^e is no good 
thing 1 Has a view of ibis Jed 
you to despair of he\^ from your- 
$elf: to see that you must be al- 
talker indebted to Christ for 
salvation, and to the gracious 
aid of the Holy Spirit for strength 
and ability rightly to perform any 
duty ? 

2. On what has your hope of 
acceptance with God been found- 
ed 1 On your reformation? on 
your sorrow for your sins 7 on 
jour prmfcrs? on your tearsl on 
vour giM works and religious 



observances? or has it been on 
Christ alonCf as your all in eUf 
Has Christ ever appeared' very 
precious to you ? Do you moitm 
that he does notlappear more 'so I 
Have you sometimes felt great 
freedom to commit your soul to 
him ? In doing Ibis {if you have 
done it) has it been not only to 
be delivered from Xhepunishment 
due to vour sins, but abo from 
the power, pollution, dominion^ 
and existence of sin in your soul 1 

3. As far as you know your* 
self, do yoM hate, and desire to 
be delivered from all sin, without 
any exception of a favourite lust? 
Do you prai/ much to be deli- 
vered from sin 1 Do you watch 
against it, and against temptation 
to it ? Do you strive against it, 
and in some good degree get the 
victory over it? Have you so 
repented of it, as to have your 
soul really set against it? 

4. Have you counted the cost 
of following Christ, or of being 
truly religious? that it will cut 
you off from vain amu^memts, 
from the indulgence of your lusts, 
and from a sinful conformity to 
the world ; that it may expose 
you to ridicule and contempt ;-^ 
possibly to more serious persecu- 
tion ? In the view of all these 
things, are you willing to take 
up the cross, and to follow Christ 
whithersoever he shall lead you ? 
Is it your solemn purpose, in re- 
liance on his grace and aid, to 
cleave to him, and to his cause 
and people, to the end of life ? 

6* Do you love holiness? Do 
you love a Holy God, and be- 
cause he is holy ? Do you ear- 
nestly desire to be more and more 
conformed to God, and to his 
holv law? — to bear more and 
more the likeness of your Re- 
deemer? Do you seek, and 
sometimes tind, communion W\VVk 
vour God and Sav\out1 

I 



50 



QUXflTIOKS AKD COUaiSEL. 



6. Are yoa mo/rrtf, in God's 
strength, to endeavour conscien* ■. 
tiously to perforoi your tckok 
doty to God, to \our neighbour, 
mnd to yoftrselfi Do you per- 
form amnum and relatite duiie* 
conscientioiMly, as a part of the 
duty which you owe to Ged 1 

7. Do you make conscience of 
§€crei fttttfcr daily ? Do you not 
ioroetimea feel a backwardness 
to this duty ? Do you at other 
times • feel a great delight in it 1 
Have you a $et time, and piace, 
and order of exercises for per- 
forming this duty? 

8. Do you daify read a portion 
of the Holy Scriptures, iu a de- 
vout manner? Do you /ore to 
read the Bililc? Do you ever 
perceive a sweetness in the truths 
of Holy Scripture? Do you find 
them adapted to your necessities, 
and see at times a wonderful 
beauty, excellence, and glory in 
God's word? Do you make it 
the man of your counsel, and 
endeavour to have both your 
heart and life conformed to its 
doctriues and requisitions? 

t>. Have you ever attempted 
to covenant with God ? To give 
yourself away to him, solemnly 
aud irrevocably, hoping for ac- 
ceptance through Christ alone: 
and taking God, in Christ, as 
the covenant God, and satisfy- 
ing portion of your soull 

10. Does the glorif of God 
ever appear to you as the Jirst, 
gi'eatest, and best of all objects? 
Do >ou desire to promote the 
glory of God, as the cAif^ object 
of life? 

11. Do \ou feel a love to mmm* 
kind — such as you did not feel 
before you became religious? — 
Have you a great desire that the 
90ul8 ojfmen should be saved, by 
being brought to a genuine faith 
and trust in the Redeemer? Do 
you love God's people with a pe- 



admr aUachmeot, bccaue tbey 
bear their Saviour^s image; and 
because thev love and pursue the 
objects, anci delight in the exer« 
cises, which are most pleating 
and delightfol to yourself! Do 
you, from your heart, lurgive all 
your personal enemies; and re- 
fuse to cherish or entertain any 
sentiments of hatred or revesgel 
If you have injured any person, 
have you made repaialion; or 
are vou willing and ready to make 
it? " 

12. Do you feel it to be very 
important to adorn religion, by 
a holy, exemplary, amiable, and 
blameless walk and coaversation? 
Do you fear to bring a reproach 
on the cause of Christ? Does 
this appear to you extremely 
dreadful? Are you a&aid of 
backsliding, and of being left to 
return to a state of <;afeletsness 
and indifierence in religiou ? 

18. Do you desire and endea- 
vour to grow in grace, and in the 
knowledge of Christ your Saviour, 
more and more? Are you willing 
to sit at his feet as a little child, 
and to submit your reason and 
understanding implicitly to his 
teaching ; imploring his Spirit to 
guide you into all necessary truth, 
to save you from all fatal errors, 
to enable you to receive the truth 
in the love of it, and to trans- 
form you, more and more, into 
a likeness of himself? 

COUNSEL. 

1. Remember that these cfues- 
tious are intended to point your 
attention to subjects of inquiry 
the roost impcu'tant. . Do not, 
therefore, coutent yourself with 
a careless or cursory reading of 
them. Read and dehberate, and 
examine yourself clonly on the 
questions under each head ; and 
let your heart be lifted up to God, 
while you arc considering each 



QUESTIONS ANP COUN$EL» 



51 



ptfticoiar questiopj in earnest 
desires that -be may show you 
the very truth. You canoot or- 
dinarily go over all these ques- 
tions at oue time. Divide them, 
therafene, and taM omt pari at 
one time* and another at another. 
But try to go over the whole in 
the course of a week ; and do this 
ev^ry week* for. some months. 
When you find yourself doubtful 
or dcmcient, in any point, let it 
not disGOttiage you; but note 
down that point in writing, and 
bend the attention of vour mind 
to it, and labour and pray till 
you have made the attainment 
which will enable you to answer 
clearly. It b believed that you 
cannot fail to see how each ques- 
tion ought to be answered. 

2. Remember that secret pray- 
er^ reading the ward of God, 
watekfmim$s$, and self-examina- 
turn, are the gr^t means of pre- 
serving comfort in religion, and 
of growing in grace. In propor- 
lion as yon are exact and faithful 
in these, such usually will be 
your inward peace, and the safe- 
ty of your state. Unite them all 
together, and never cease to prac- 
tim them while you live. Think 
often of the character of Enoch, 
and try to walk with God. Read 
Mason's little book on Self-Know- 
ledge — I recommend it as excel- 
lent. 

3. Besides the Bible, have con- 
stantly in reading, at your leisure 
hours, the works of some author 
of known piety and excellence : 
such as Owen's, Baxter's Saints' 
Jlest, Doddridge's Rise and Pro- 
gress, Watts's, Witberspoon's, 
Newton's, Scotf s, Venn's, &c^c. 

4. Do not suppose that any 
evidence which at present you 
jM^ think you possess of a gra- 
cious state, will release you from 
4be necessity of maintaining a 
constant vigilance in time to 



come; nor from repeated exa- 
minations and trials of yourself 
even to the end of life. Many 
marks and evidences of a gracious 
state are set dowu by pious wri- 
ters ; but they must ail come to 
this — to ascertain what is your 
prevalent temper and character; 
whether, on the whole, you are 
increasing in sanctitication, or 
not. If you are, you may be 
comfdrted4 if not, you have 
cause to be alarmed. It is only 
he that eudureth to the end that 
shall be saved. 

5. I think it of very great im- 
portance to warn you not to ima- 
gine that true religion is confined 
to the closet or to the church; 
even though you apprehend that 
you have gr^t comfort and free- 
dom there. Freedom and com- 
fort there, are indeed most de- 
sirable ; but true religion reaches 
to every thing: it alters and 
sweetens the temper : it improves 
the manners ; it goes into every 
duty, relation, station, and si- 
tuation of life. If you have true 
religion, you will have a better 
spirit — you will be better sons, 
better daughters, better friends, 
better members of society, and 
more exemplary in the discharge 
of every duty; as the sure con- 
sequence of this invaluable pos- 
session. .\nd if your religion 
does not produce these effects, 
although you may talk of inward 
comforts, and even of raptures, 
you have great reason to fear 
that the whole is a delusion, and 
that the root of the matter is not 
in you. *' Herein (said the Sa- 
viour) is my Father glorified, that 
ye bear much fruit; so shall ye 
be my disciples." 

6. Be careful to avoid a gloomy, 
and to cherish a cheerful temper. 
Be habitually cheerful ; but avoid 
levity. Mirth and laughter ?.y^ 
not always smful ; \i\i\. \tV ^qvwl 



52 



nlisTORfeAL MEMOlftS OV THE CATHO-LiCf/ 



indulgence in them be deariy in- 
nocenty not very frequent^ and 
nevec of lotig continuance. Be 
▼eiy humMe. Be not talkative. 
Befpre e?[perienced Christians^ 
pe B hearer rather than a talker. 
Try in every way, however, to 
promote religion among your rela- 
tives and fncnds: win them to it 
•by your amiable temper and exem- 
plary deportment. " Flee youthful 
iusts.'^' Shun every excitement 
of them. Guard against dissipa- 
tion — it extinguishes piety. Be 
not disconcerted by ridicule and 

* reproach ; your Saviour bore 
much of these for you. Think of 
this, and be ashamed of nothing 
80 much as of being ashamed of 
Him. Trust in his protection — 
live to his praise-^and you will 

' spend an eternity in his blissful 
presence. 



REMARKS 

UPON THB 

** HISTORICAL MEMOIRS 

RKSPBCTING TUB 

JEftglisftt Irish^ and Scottish CatliolicSf 

Prom the Reformation to the present 'i ime. 
Bj Charles Butler, K»q. of Lincoln** inu. 

(Concludedfrfltn Page 9) 

Since the English Roman Ca- 
tholics were obliged to abandon 
the protestation mentioned in our 
last number, a new project has 
been tried, for the purpose of ob- 
taining eligibility to all the offices 
of trust and authority in this 
Protestant state. This was, by 
proposing to give the king a 
power in the election of the Ro- 
man Catholic bishops in Ireland. 
V This proposal received," says 
Mr. Butler, *' the short, but ex- 
pressive, appellation of the Veto." 
Vol. ii. p. 144— 148. 

We are informed by Mr. Butler, 
)mtiD the transactions relating 



to thi« document, ^ the EogHsli 
Catholics can scarcely be said to 
have taken any part f but we are 
flavoured with a copy of what are 
called the ''^celebrated resolutions 
of the Irish prelates in 1799, in 
favour of the Veto." The first 
and second of these are, " That 
a provision, through government, 
, for the Roman Catholic clerey of 
I this kingdom, competent and se- 
cured, ought thankfully to be ac- 
cepted." — *' That in the appoint- 
ment of the prelates of the Ro« 
man Catholic religion to yacant 
sees, within the kingdom, sach 
interference of government as 
may enable it to be satisfied of 
the loyalty of the person appoint- 
ed, is just, and ought to be^greed 
to." Several other resolutions to 
the same import follow ; and then 
it is added, ''Agreeably fo the 
discipline of the Roman Catholic 
church, these regulations caii 
have no effect without the sane* 
tion of the holy see ; which sane* 
tion the Roman Catholic prelates 
of this kingdom shall, as soon as 
may be, use their endeavours to 
procure." " The prelates are satis- 
fied that the nomination of the 
parish priests, with a certificate 
of their having taken the oath of 
allegiance, be certified to govem- 
fnent." These resolutions were 
the iresult of the most grave deli- 
berations: they are sign^ " by the 
four [titular] metropolitan arch- 
bishops, and the six senior bi- 
shops;" and a Committee was 
appointed to transact all business 
with the government relative to 
the said proposals. P. 154 — 157^ 
In the year 1800, this subject 
was introduced into the House of 
Commons by Mr. Ponsonby, who 
said, " The Catholics have con- 
sidered among themselves, and 
they are determined to give to the 
government every inlbrmatioQ 
upon the subject^ and to mafcci 



I 



HISTOBtCAL ilEMOiaS OF THE C^FTHOLIgf^ 



5S 



their superior clerrjr 8i\}>jeGt to 
the crowD." Mr. P. nirther stated, 
that Dr. Mibier, (one of the Eng- 
lish Vicara-apostolicy who re- 
presented the Catholic prelates of 
Ireland,) had said, " That if the 
prayer of their petition for eman- 
cipation were granted^ they would 
baTe no objection to make the 
King of England virtually the 
head of their church.'^ This 
statement was afterwards con- 
firmed in writing by Dr. Milner, 
in these words : ** The Catholic 
prelates of Ireland are willing to 
give a direct negative power to 
his Majesty's government, with 
respect to the nomination of bi- 
shops." P. 178— 188. 

Thb provision for securing the 
just prerogatives of the crown, 
and for preventing the improper 
influence of the ipiriiual authori- 
ty of the Pope over his Majesty's 
subjects, appears to have been 
considered by the House of Com- 
mons as a sufficient ground for 
granting to the Roman Catholics 
a share in the honours and juris- 
dictions of the state; but we soon 
find that, however satisfied the 
Irish prelates were to be made 
dependent upon the crown, and 
to accept their support from the 
government, there was a power 
greater than the throne, by which 
they were over-ruled, and were 
even constrained to pass a cen- 
sure upon their own conduct. 
This appears in some resolutions 
fiassed in September, 1808, at a 
convention of the Irish bishops 
in Dublin. They then resolved, 
'* It is the decided opinion of the 
Roman Catholic prelates of Ire- 
land, that it is ituxpeditnt to in- 
troduce any alteration in the ca- 
nonical mode hitherto observed 
in the nomination of the Irish 
Roman Catholic bishops; which 
mode long experience has proved 
to be QnesceptfoiiaMe/ wise, and 



salutary.'' Then the Roman Ca- 
tholic prelates pledge themselves 
to adhere to the rules By which 
they have hitherto been uniforo^ly 
guided, namely, to recommend to 
hb Holiness only such persons 
as are of unimpeached loyally, 
and peaceable conduct." Mr. 
Butler says, '* It must be added* 
that, some time after the Irish pre- 
lates had published their resolu- 
tion, that the Veto was ipexpe- 
dient. Doctor Milner, their agent, 
also declared against it." P. 194 
—196. 

The sentiments of Mr. Butler 
on this subject may be collected 
from the following paragraph. 
*' How greatly the acquiescence 
of the Irish prelates in the Veto, 
disposed the public mind in fa- 
vour of Catholic emancipation, 
has been mentioned. As soon as 
this actual rejection of it was 
known, it was evident, that the 
mention of it in Parliament had, 
in consequence of this rejection, 
become the most unfortunate 
circumstance which had befallen 
the Catholics, since they had 
been suitors for their relief. It 
may be said, with the greatest 
truth, that it was a matter of 
triumph to all the enemies, and a 
matter of great concern to all the 
friends, of Catholic emancipation. 
Unhappily there were not wanting 
those, who too successfully exert- 
ed themselves to keep alive the ge^ 
neral irritation which this way- 
ward event had prod uced.'T.196. 

At the beginning of the year 
1810, the English Roman Catho- 
lics, who had petitioned Parlia- 
ment, were informed by Lord 
(irey, then at the head of the 
Administration, that " the Eng- 
lish Catholics should annex to 
their petition some general decla- 
ration of their willingness to give 
any reasonable pUd^e^ \i^x xw. 
consistent >\'\\Vi vW\i t^Vv^o>3^ 



54 



- V. 
1I16TOKICAL UbMOIRK OF THE CATHOLICS. 



principltff for the loyalty of Iho 
persons who^iliould ba appoiated 
their b»kc^»s." It appears that 
the Engiiih^ Rdman Catholics 
*^ were wiiliii^, vrheuevcr an en- 
larged and liberal system shuuld 
be adopted iu their regard, to 
acquiest'e in any arrangement, 
KonsUitni wiih their religious 
prindpleSy and ihg distipUtu of 
flu Roman Cai&oiic church, 
wfiiiii might be deemed expe- 
dient for securing the loyalty oi 
the persons thereafter to be cho* 
sen to the rank or ofiice of bi- 
shop.^ As this declaration, how- 
ever, might appear to express a 
readiness on the part of the Eng- 
lish Catholics to accede to the 
specific measure of the " Vbto," 
which the Irish prelates had de- 
, clared to be inexpedient, and 
fearing that it might give offence 
to the Roimn Cuiholict of Ire- 
land, the following resolution was 
framed instead of it ; viz. <<Tliat 
the English Roman CathoHcs, in 
soliciting the attention of Parlia- 
ment to their petition, are ac- 
tuated, not more by a sense of 
hardships and disabilities, under 
which they labour, than by a de- 
sire to secure, on the most solid 
foundation, the peace and har- 
mony of the British empire ; and 
to obtain for themselves opportu- 
uilies of manifesting, by the most 
active exertions, their zeal and 
interest in the common cause, in 
which their country is engaged, 
for the maintenance of its free- 
dom and independence ; and that 
they are firmly persuaded that 
adequate provision for the main- 
tenance of the civil and religious 
establishment of this kingdom 
may be made, consistently with 
the strictest adherence, on their 
part, to the tenets and discipline 
of the Roman Catholic religion ; 
and that any arrangement, found- 
on this basib of mutual iatis- 



ftctioo and security, and extend- 
ing to them the full enjoyment of 
tb« civil coostitution of their 
country, m iU omet their perfect 
concurrence." This resolution 
was Mnanimously adopted, Feb. 
1, 1810, at a meeting of ibe Eng- 
lish Roman Cathoricf, with the 
exception of the Rev. Dr. Milner, 
the agent of the Irish prelates* 
The above resolution, having 
been cast into the form of a peti- 
tion, was signed by the Vicars- 
apostolic of the London, North- 
ern, and Western Districts^ and 
their coadjutors, and by about 
two hundred of the principal 
Roman Catholic noblemen, gen- 
tlemen, and clergy. These 
measures of the English Ro- 
man Catholics, though adopted 
with so much caution, gave great 
offence to the Irish prelates, and 
led to many disputes. U will, 
however, be perceived, that they 
took good care to leave room suf- 
ficieatly large, by which to re- 
trace their steps, if it were found 
necessary; namely, ^* Whatever 
might primarily, or intermediate- 
ly, or ultimately, be proposed by 
government, if it contained a sin- 
gle iota, inconsistent with the 
strictest adherence to the tenets or 
discipline oj the Roman Catholic 
religiony the gentlemen who 
subscribed the resolution in 
question, might most honourably, 
most conscientiously, and con- 
sistently refuse it." P. 197— *201. 
In the progress of the history, 
Mr. Butler infbims his readers 
what were the sentiments of Rome 
respecting the Veto. That these 
were favourable to the sentiments 
of the English Roman Catholics 
appears from a rescript of Mons. 
Quarantotti, dated 16lh of Feb. 
1814, written during the time of 
the Pope's captivity in France. 
After the lil>eration of Pope 
Pius Vll, " hisHolinesB answered 



LKTTBB FROM lUl. LAW&ON TO fllS BftOTUBB. 



55 



a letter of eoatntalatioii sent 
hiiA by the EnglM RemaD Catho- 
lics, ip which he inlonns them, 
that as it respected the rescri|)t 
first DOW mentioned, ' be should 
most willingly comply with their 
wishes, as/ar m ike dignif^f, tkg 
fmityt Md ihi integrity of the 
Oitkoiicnligim would allow.'*' 
By a subsequent letter from Cai^ 
diaal Litta, dated Genoa, 26th 
of April, 1815, we are furnished 
with some important information, 
how far his Holiness could allow 
his subjects in England to go, in 
order to satisfy the government 
that their subjeotton to the Pope 
would not endanger the safety of 
llie state. *' His Holiness will feel 
no hesitation in allowing those to 
w4iom it appertains, to present to 
the King's ministers a list of can- 
didates, in order «that if any of 
them should be obnoxious or sus- 
pected, the government might 
immedittely point him out, in or- 
der that he might he expunged ; 
care however being taken to leave 
a sufficient number for his Holir 
ness to choose thereirom indivi- 
duals, whom he mtgbt deem best 
qualified in the Lord for govern- 
ing the vacant churches. The 
examination of papal re- 
scripts cannot even be 
madb a subject of nego- 
tiation: such a permis- 
sion cannot be granteb. 
When it is practised, it is 
an abuse, which the holt 
see, to prevent greater 
«vil3, is forced to bear 
and tolerate, but can 
NEVER APPROVE" ! ! ! 

The letters from which the 
above extracts are made, are iu- 
serted at length in ** The Report 
from the Select Committee ap- 
pointed to report the nature and 
eubetauce of the htm and ordi- 
noMcee exiUimg in foreign eiaies, 
reopecHng the reguhtions of the 
Reman Git hoiks in ecclesiastical 



mi9ttero, and their (Ulereouree 
with the $ee of Romi, or any 
other foreign eecleeiatiieai Jurio^ 
dietione; trn'M an Appendir. 
Ordered by the ttouw of Com- 
mums to he printed, t5th June, 
1816." P. aoi— B04. 
' It is rather singular, that ** his 
Holiness" should grant the exa- 
minatioa of his rescripts to the 
small petty Protestant states of 
Qermany, and yet absolutely ^re- 
fuse such a license- to the court 
of Great Britain; But can a state 
be safe, when several millions of 
its subjects are under the imme» 
diate and secret direction of a 
foreign Potentate f 

This account of the proceed- 
ings of the Irish, and English Ro- 
man Catholics, respecting the 
Veto, confirms the correctness of 
the sentiments of the celebrated 
Judge Blackstone, in his Com- 
mentaries, Book iv. chap. 4. 
p. 35, "If once they could be 
brought iorenouneethe supremaey 
of the Pope, they might quietly 
enjoy their seven sacraments, 
their purgatory, and auricular 
confession ; their worship of re- 
liques and images; nay, even 
their transubstantiation. But 
while they acknowledge a foreign 
power, superior to the eovereigniy 
of the kingdom, they cannot com- 
plain if the laws of that kingdom 
will not put them upon the footing 
of good subjects" iota. 

Erratum in our last Number. 

P. 5, col. 2, i. 27— For Preiutttnts reul 

CathoHct. 



A LETTER 

From the Rev. John Lawson, Pastor 
of the Baptist thufvk in Caieutta, 
to his Brother Joseph, a Utile ot^ 

phan Boy, 

" ■ 1 

Mr BBAR BnOTHJtR Jul, 

1 th'mk ^ou av« wq^n <^^ «aA^^ 
to uviderbldud «l VfcVV«.t W^vsi ^^>a2« 



56 't.8TTEK T%6u UK. LAW80N TO HI6 BHOTHES, 



brother; tlierefoie 9 shall hegin 
to wHte one to yoU^ and I will try 
to write it very plain indeed , that 
you nay know tod remember 
«very word of u. 

You, my dear young brother. 
Have been' the subject of many 
afflictions^ and I wUl just speak 
of some of them ; not that I wish 
you to repine on account of them, 
* but that you may see the good- 
liess of the Lord in providing for 
^ou amidst them all. About a 
month before our dear father 
died, I visited our native town ; 
1 then, for the first time, saw you, 
^ a very little boy indeed, asleep in 
your cradle. Little did I then 
think that we were so soon to 
lose a kind parenl. He was par- 
ticularly anxious for your wel- 
ftre. He loved you, he prayed 
to God that he would bless you 
and preserve you; and although 
'he was very ill, and looked ex- 
tremely pale, yet he would sit by 
you rockine your cradle ; and if 
you had beeu old enough to 
observe it, you would have seen 
his eyes swimming with tears, 
which he let fall on your account: 
for he knew that you were but a 
'(very little child, and feared that 
«oon vou would be left without a 
jdear father to care for you, and 
pray ^ vou. But he was a good 
man; and though beloved you so 
much that it made turn cry at the 
thoughts of parth^g from you, 
yet God whom he served, ena- 
bled Jum to leave you, a helpless 
orphan, in his hands ; and when 
he saw you last, his heart was full 
of sorrow, and I am sure, if he 
could have spoken, he would have 
said, *' O Lord, if it be thy will, 
«pare my life, that I may provide 
for my poor little Joseph, for he 
is very dear to me, and I will 
teach him to fear thy name. O 
ly life, that I may provide 
or little Joseph." 



God, who always does right, 
thought it best not to grant this 
last request. Our dear parent 
grew worse and worse, and then 
he became more and more subab- 
sive to the will of God, in sepa- 
rating him from you, and your 
brothers and sisters, who stood 
weeping round his bed. He told 
me that Jebus was precious, and 
his only support. I prayed, 
kneeling by him, and .hb eyes 
and his hands sufficiently declared 
how earnestly he was engaged in 
this solemn exercise. You were 
then unconscious of what passed 
in the chamber of death, and I 
shall not attempt to describe it 

The remains of our dear fiither 
were interred the following Lord's 
day. The grave in which he hes 
is in the comer of the Baptist 
Meeting-house yard. It is pa- 
rallel with some palisadoes which 
inclose the tomb of some rich 
family. There is no grave-stone. 
Perhaps if you were to try to find 
the grave, you could not. 

In less than a year your poor 
mother was laid in the same 
place, and I hope they are both 
now singing the praises of him 
who hath said, ** I am the resur- 
rection and the life." If they can 
be anxious in heaven, it is, that 
poor little Joseph may be a good 
child, that he may love the Re- 
deemer, that he may shun the 
paths of the destroyer, and that he 
may finally join them in the man- 
sions of glory. 

Thus, my dear brother, you 
were left an orphan at a very 
early period indeed. You were 
left in the very depths of pover- 
ty.* Then you had no earthly 

* The circumstances here alluded to, 
are Tcry feelingly expressed and en- 
larged upon in the Author's Poem, enti- 
tled, " Tne Maniac** printed a few years 
ago in England, and reprinted in Amer 
rica, with high commeDdations. — Kd, 



LETTEB FROU MR. LAWSOX TO BM-BROTOMK 57 



friend but the parisb, no place in 
which you might fiod refuge but 
the gloomy apartments of the work- 
house; there were none to caress 
you, and rejoice in your smiles; 
there were none to dry your tears» 
or supply your wants. But God, 
who is a " very present help in 
time of trouble/' tboueht upon 
you in your distress, and in a lit- 
tle time he delivered you. Yes, 
my dear brother, it was God that 
delivered you. He rabed you up 
kind beneRictors. He put it into 
the hearts of hb people to rescue 
you ; and now you are in circum- 
stances of ^mercy which loudly 
call for your gratitude. Think, 
my dear Joseph, what might have 
been your circumstances. I shud- 
der when I reflect on the situation 
of the fatherless; pitied by none 
on earth — the wretched object of 
cold contempt— a prey to penury 
and 4isease — and the unresisting 
victim of the meanest viced : fpr 
having no earthly friend, who 
shall sympathize with him in his 
sorrows! who will resard his 
wants with pity, and administer 
to him in his afflictions 1 who is 
there to encourage in the paths 
of rectitude, or to deter in the 
career of wickedness 1 And you, 
my brother, would have been 
thus destitute but for the abound- 
ing mercy of God, who is *< a Fa- 
ther to the fatherless, in his holy 
habitation.^ Ps. Ixviii. 5. O then 
let the orphan's sacrifice ascend 
to God : devote yourself to grati- 
tude and praise, and when it is 
well with you, O pray for the 
Baptist Missionary Society, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Ivimey. — 1 would 
now entreat you to remember him 
who is called- " a brother born for 
adversity." You have a world of 
affliction to pass through. You 
have already been exercised with 
a great deal of bodily pain, and 
must expect a great deal more; 



but let your mffcrings temind yois 
of the sul^in|s of jesus our Re- 
deemer. What are yours com- 
pared with hi&J[ He was born in 
a manger. H^ #as daily the ob» 
ject of insult, and scorn, and ha- 
tred. His enemies were crueL 
his friends were iMikind. He had 
not where to lay his head. He 
was as an outcast in the earth, 
despised and rejected of men. At 
length when his time was fulfilled, 
he began to be sore amazed ; and 
in the garden of Gethsemane he 
endured sufferings which it is im- 
possible for mortals to compre- 
hend ; and on the cross of Cal- • 
vary the awful scene was ended. 
He bled and died. — But why all 
these sufferings 1 He was not, as 
you are, a sinner. He did not 
need afflictions to make him more 
holy, as you need them. Jesus, 
my dear Joseph, suffered thus, to 
redeem a people unto himself* 
He died, that sinners might live ; 
and he is willing that you should 
come unto him, and obtain eter- 
nal life. He will not refuse you 
because you are a little boy ; but 
he will fold you in his arms, and 
carry you in his bosom. He will 
guide your feet in the paths of 
rishteousness, and he will supply 
all your need from his own trea- 
sury. It is impossible that your 
brother in India could receive 
more pleasure than in hearing that 
you love the blessed Redeemer. 

Let your sufferings also remind 
you of your mortality. The seeds 
of death are sown in your mortal 
body. Prepare for eternity. Eve- 
ry pang is a kind monition, tell- 
ing you that happiness is not to 
be found below, and that it be- 
comes afflicted mortals to think 
of another world,, where there is 
no pain. FareweU, my dear Jo- 
seph. May God still be vour 
friend and protector; I have 
you in hU gr^c\o>is VA^di^, -aj^^ 



58 



A DREAM. 



votft resolve, " My father, tlioii 
«halt be the *;md«r of my yooth !* 
Your t*vcr nflVrfiontttc brother, 
John Lawson. 

Where 0rt your FeUowTravtUtn? 

A DREAM. 



•• Now and then I gel, wbilsC sleeping, 
A hinl or ttfothal*i worth the keeping." 

Nkwtom. 



pflny thnf Ibis «Miy be your de- ^ from tlieir allegiance ; iTiet* 

" " '" ' was not an iodtvidoal who Tield- 

ed the snbmission and obedfienoe 
which were pre-eminenfly ^nt^ 
Rom. iii. 10 — H. Their con- 
duct was utterly inexcusable, and 
of a nature peculiarly aggfairated, 
as their gracious Monarch had 
indeed, in every sense of the 
word, been the ikther of his peo« 
pie. His incomparable cltaractcr 
was distinguished by consummate 
perfection. His name alone was 
excellent through his boundless 
dominions ; his glory is above 
the earth and heaven. Psalm 
cxiviii. 13. He was by no mean^ 
a hard master; he liberally and 
freely bestowed on them all things 
richfy to enjoy, and gave them 
only one easy command as a test 
of their obedience. That they 
might be influenced by all that 
was sacred atid affecting to con- 
tinue their attachment to their 
rightful Sovereign, they were not 
only loaded with his favours, but 
they were solemnly assured, that 
the penalty of rebellion wotitd be 



After a day, occupied more 
than usually in meditation on the 
great and inestimable truths of 
revelation, I lay down to "enjoy 
my customary repose. In my 
slumbers, my busy imagination 
presented me with a number of 
circumstances, a few of which, 
perhaps, may be worth recording. 

1 thought tlrat, in some unac- 
countable wav, I Irad been trans- 
ported into a very dreary region 
— a land of brinrs, and Uioms, 
and savage beasts, wild and de- 
solate beyond any place I had I death. Awful to relate, without 



ever beheld. It appeared to me, 
and the thought gave me great 
nncasiuess, that it was my native 
country, and that my habitation 
had once been in the midst of it. 
I was however informed, I scarce- 
ly know how, that the land was 
formerly as beantiful, as it was 
now sterile and uninviting. It 
had been one extensive, lovely, 
and fruitful garden, where every 
*' tree grew, which was pleasant 
to the sight, and good for food," 
Gen. ii. 9, where there were 



** Flow'm nf ■I] huci, and without thorn 
the rose." 

The vast change that had taken 
place I learned was in conse- 
quence of the rebellion of the 
inhabitants against their rightful 
Sovereign. So universal was their 
•otion, that they all depart- 



any reason, they renounced his 
sovereignty, they afiVunted him 
to his face, they impeached his 
wisdom, though it is divine, and 
they contemned bis unutterable 
goodness. They dared to enter 
on a contest with HIM, whose 
almighty wrath« when " kindled, 
yea but a little," no creature, 
however elevated or powerful, is 
able to withstand, Psalm ii. 12. 
Of their offended Sovereign, in- 
finite in magnificence, it might 
he said, with the utmost proprie- 
ty, " He covereth himself with 
light as a garment — He stretches 
ont the heavens like a curtain — 
He lavs the beams of his cham- 
bers in the waters — He makctb 
the clouds his chariot, he walk- 
ctli on the wings of the wind," 
Psalm civ. 2, 3, 4. What then 

1 



A titlEAM 



«| 



coaM be expected in such a cott- 
flicf, bat enlife dahnt, igfi^nfifiy, 
and ruiB : these iddeed were their 
raiserable portion. Tkeir 9ove« 
reigDy as a display of his infinite 
rectitude, and as a meniorsible 
and striliing exaniple to all beings 
in all irortds, fnfWue^ on (he 
land which had produced nothing 
bnt traitors, and its fair featnresy 
the admiration of etery eye, were 
inniiftdiately in a great measure 
deranged, and deprived of their 
glory;* and the cHminal inha- 
bitants, without Exception, since 
they Ind all shared in this most 
unnattftal rehellion, were involv- 
ed IB a general and merited sen- 
tenee of eondemiration. 

The execution ^howeter of this 
terriblai bnt just sentence, was 
3^t delayod; and I saw in my 
dreaniy that the King's own son, 
invested with tlie most aAple 
powers from his offended Father, 
came, and proclaimed his inten- 
tions, afl oivine and gracious, 
animated merelv by his own lote 
and lciffdness> nilly and freely to 
pardon all wfafo should lay down 
tbcir weapons of rehellion, and 
return to their riglitful Sovereign, 
He also declared, that though 
the deserved carse, which the 
uMiatoral rebellion had brought 
down on the land, sbonkl not be 
remitted, yet in many respects it 
shcMild be turned into a blessing ; 
and that he woold safely con- 
dnet all who would obey his com- 
mands, to a land pre|)ared for 
tliem by his Father, <' flowing 
with milk ami honey" — a land, 
which should be their own, of 
unspeakable and everlasting feli- 
city. ** Fall of grace and trnth," 
John i. 14, he came near the 
place where I lived, and, as I 
had often feared, from the dreari- 

* ** Crentioii bears obTioas marks of 
Wing a MionTY nuix/' 

BulUi^s Analogy. 



rte9s and stealit;^pf the coitlitry, 
that t should one day *' perish 
with hutiger,*' Lilke xv. 17. I 
deteritiitied to go, and if he would 
receive me, to follow, him. I 
wetit and tatngled with the throng 
with which he was surrounded, 
and gazed on his unpafalleled 
glories. I hnd beard of his com- 
passion, loveliness, and grandeur, 
but the one half bad not beeti 
told me. I said, 

" Fly through the world, O sun, and tell 
HflTw dark thy beams, compared with hiil" 

I exclaimed, ** Happy are thy 
men, and happy are these thy 
servients, who stand continually* 
before thee ! O that I might be 
permitted to occupy the meanest 
place in such blessed and ele- 
vated society V* Luke xv. 19. I 
perceived, that there were scars 
in his hands, his feet, and bis 
side, John xx. 20 ; and I learned 
that he had taken the place of the 
wretclied traitors, and by his own 
sufferings and obedience, *^ even 
unto death," had satisfied the 
righteous denrand^ of the violated 
law, tfnd purchased infhiite bliss 
for a multitude of guilty rebels, 
that no man could number. 
Rev. vii. 9. Unlike all other vic- 
tors, he had conquered by dy- 
ing, and he appeared on his 
- throne as one who had been slain, 
Rev. v., 6. I saw him receive and 
pardon many of the most un- 
worthy of my conipanions, and 
I with trembling steps I ventured to 
come into his venerable presence. 
Prostrate before him, I exclaimed, 
** I have sinned against heaven, 
and in thy sight, and am unwor- 
thy of the meanest blessing from 
thy hands ; yet be merciful to nie 
a sinner — Other Lords iiave had 
dominion over me, but hence- 
forth by thy name ( will be call- 
ed. Art not thou the Saviour, 
whom God the Father hath &e^V- 
cd ] Art tViou \io\ Vie cwv^wtv\w^ 



60 



A BUBAri. 



vffBm the promise is made. He 
that believeth on him shall not 
he ctmfaknded%*Tho\i art; and 
I conm to'thee, I belike on thee 
-*4^ cattaiyself on thy mercy — 
God bat laid the help of poor 
ffeMs'vn thee — and on thee I 
huiM 0Pf laope of pardon, of life, 
afliUdvatioti — I am willing, Lord» 
thou shouldst do with me as 
seemeth theif good— only let me 
ben vessel of honour in thy pa- 
lace, . and let it be of wood or 
of stone, of gold or of silver^ as 
thou pleasest — only let me have 
a place in thy fkmily, and num- 
b^ me, if thou wilt, among the 
door-keepers (Psalm Uxxiv.) in 
thy house, or the hewers of wood, 
or drawers of water — Call me, as 
thou wilt, to do or to suffer, to 
be exalted or to be trodden under 
foot, to be full or to be hungry, 
to possess all things or to be des- 
titute, only reject me not — say 
not, I will not pity thee — I will 
not take thee into my service — if 
I perish it shall be suing for thy 
mercy — I cannot — yea. Lord, be 
not angry, pardon the importu- 
nity of thy wretched suppliant, — 
< I will not let thee go, except 
thou bless me !' " 

Trembling, and silent, 1 wait- 
ed his reply — I durst not so much 
as lift up my eyes from the ground 
on which I had fixed them, Luke 
xviii. 13. I feared, that at least 
lie would reproach me for my 
past rebellions; but in infinite 
condescension, and boundless 
grace, he called his servants and 
said, " Bring forth the best robe, 
and put it on him, and put a ring 
on bis hand, and shoes on his 
feet — ^This my son was dead, and 
is alive again ; he was lost, and is 
found/' Luke xv. 11—32. He 
assigned me a place in his royal 
household, 2ind bade me follow 
him whithersoever he should go ; 
be also repeatedly and solemnly 



declared, that they who did ttoi 
serve and follow him, should as- 
suredly die, and perish in their 
rebellions, Luke xiv. 26, 27. Mark 
xvi. 15, 16. 

Many of my neighbours and 
acquaintance came also, and sup* 
plicated his compassion; and they 
met with a similar reception. 
Indeed, I do not recollect, though 
I have had the happiness of serv* 
ing my Masteif for more than 
twenty years, that he has ever 
cast a poor rebel out of his pre- 
sence or service, however un- 
worthy. But during this period 
many have left our society, and 
others have been added to it 

Now I saw in my dream, that 
in the course of our journey, all ' 
who followed my glorious Leader, 
peculiarly consecrated one day in 
seven, by his express command, 
to refreshment and repose. On 
these delightful days, he used fa* 
miliarly to converse with each of 
his servants. It was, I think, so 
far as my memory will serve me, 
at the close, or the commence- 
ment of a year, on one of those 
hallowed periods devoted to re^ 
flection, when I had withdrawn 
a little from my accustomed so- 
ciety, and was meditating on the 
glory of my Master, and the un- 
merited and unspeakable felicity 
he designed to confer on me, 
that, amidst my solitude, some 
one in a plaintive tone of voice, 
made the inquiry. Mortal f where 
are thy Fellow Travellers 7 The 
question awakened me to a re^ 
collection of the way by which I 
had been brought, and to the 
history of my companions. The 
throng that surrounded my 
Master wb^n I first supplicated 
his compassion, were almost all 
known to me; but numbers of 
them had quitted our society, yet 
so imperceptibly, and at such 
differeut perioJs, that I had 



A D K i: A M . 



m 



sxrarcely missed them. I began, 
however, eagerly to inquire after 
them, and though I could not 
recall all my oM companions to 
jny remembrance, yet some of 
their hbtories were fresh in my 
memory. It may not, perhaps, 
be uninteresting or uninstructive 
to mention a few of I hem. I 
thought of one* who at £rst bade 
fair to persevere till he reached 
the land of promise ; he had not 
however proceeded far in his 
journey, before he began to think 
of turning back ; and having loved 
the cebeluous country, of which I 
have made mention, he went 
back to it, going out from us, as 
might readUy have been expect- 
ed, because he was not of us, 
1 John ii. 19. He made light of 
the infinite felicities of the plea- 
sant land, whither we were jour- 
neying. Psalm cvi. 24« 

I xecollected another, who, 
though he professed an attach- 
ment to my Master, never deci- 
dedly and heartily loved him. 
He was also secretly devoted to 
the service of the guilty rebels 
who contemned the government 
of the most gracious of Sovereigns. 
We were not surprised that he 
forsook our society, for it was 
but too manifest by the whole of 
his conduct, that bis heart was 
never with us. He too returned^ 
to perish I fear in his abomina- 
tions. My Master said of him, 
" It would have been better for 
him not te have known the way 
of righteonsness, than afterwards 
to depart from the holy command- 
ment delivered unto him/' 2 VtU 
ii. 21. 

A third who occurred to my 
recollection, was a youth, who 
frequently, in strong terms, ex- 
pressed bis determination never 
to desert the service of his ador- 
able Lord; nor did he, till be 
W9M called to eacounter a few 



hardships fur which he was not 
prepared, mid he could, not en* 
dure them. He had determined 
to accompany va# but he had 
not counted the cost, and he was 
unwilling to make anv sacrifices. 
So he went away, and walked«n# 
more with my Master. 

I could easily enlarge the list, 
but I must mention a few who 
left our company for ** the ple^ 
sant land," of which I have been - 
speaking. Having done and suf«> 
fered the will of their Lord, he 
sent his superior servants to bring 
them to his Father's court; where 
it is his glorious design, that all 
who love and follow him shall 
dwell for ever, partaking his gio- 
ry and his joy. Indeed, before 
they lefl us, they had evident 
foretastes of the felicity they were 
about to participate. One of 
them, I well recollect, whose 
heart was immoveably fixed o« 
the goodly land, a little before 
he left us exclaimed, *^ I go to 
Jesus, the Mediator of the New 
Covenant, to God the Judge of 
all, and to the spirits of the just 
made perfect. — 

' My passions rise and soar aboTe^ 
Fain would 1 reach eternal things; 
I'm wing*d with faith, and £r*d with loTe, 
And learn the notes that Gabriel sings.*" 

Another, who was lately sent 
for to this blissful country, had 
such a delightful prospect of it, 
that the last words we heard her 
utter were, ** Farewell to all sor- 
row r 

A third often said, that he was 
daily listening for the sound of 
the wheels of the chariot, which 
he knew would shortly convey 
him to his home. At length it 
was heard, and exclaiming, *' I 
am ready 1" — in an instant he en- 
tered into bliss. 

* A fourth, ere he <\u\U^d V!i\% 
accustomed soc\e\>j ^o^\tk%to>KDA. 
on it, 88ud, **\ Yio\M HQl d^ 



6e 



IVVBMILB DBFARTMBNT. 



cban^e my life with you alL I 
alreadjf perceive the fragrance of 
the place whither I am going/' 

A fifth, after committing his 
ftmily to the kind care of his 
adoraJ>le Lord and Master, ex- 
elaimM, 

^Above the rest thb DOte shilJ swell, 
My Jesus hat done all thiogs well !'* 

and jnst as he was entering ** the 

{leasant land/' he elevated his 
and, and in gentle whispers pro* 
Qounced the interesting words, 
" Happy !— happy !-— happy J" 

A sixth, on the very threshold 
of eternal joys, said, ** I am go- 
ing to leave you, hut I am not 
afraid to depart — the kingdom of 
heaven is my portion — the Lord 
Jesus has promised to receive me 
•—my mind is happy !" 

Many more are on the eve of 
their departure, and when a few 
more years are elapsed, all who 
are now followiqg my Master, 



will have entered into his joy. O 
I wish I could impart adequate 
ideas of this delightful reffkm ; 
but I know not how to m iU 
No language, however oopioiia^ 
no tongue, however eloqwent, aor 
imagination, however rieh, cas 
pourtray the incomparabte beaa* 
ty of the inheritance, or tfia iai* 
raeasity of the hliss which my 
Master has prepared for thoee 
who love him. Reader! above 
all things be ooncemed to have 
a share of this iodescribable, tliii 
infinite fehcity. 

S^Mttrnplon, B. H. D. 

QUERY. 



Is there any impropriety In ad- 
ministering the Lord's Supper 
privately to Christians in dying 
circumstances? 

IGNOTVS. 



Su^emle Bqpartment 



LETTER 

raoM 

WILLUM,£ARLofB£DFORD 

TO HIS SONS. 



(Continued from Page 18.j| 



Now, Fr%nk, you being thus fitted 

with comely presence, and furnished 

With gbod langua^, and sufficiency 

and dex4erity of discourse, I will 

proceed to your Employment, 

which at present is your study ; and 

I shall be less careful kerein, upon a 

presumption tiiai your tutor's care 

and ftufficiency in the kind have pre- 

^ yented me ; however, I shall tell yon 

Hhvhat I have heard a very learned 

Ml speak concerning books, and 

troeaaeofthomi 






1. You are to come to your study 
as to the table, with a sharp appe* 
tite,- whereby that which you read 
may the better digest He tliat has 
no stomach to his book, will very 
hardly thrive upon it. 

3. And because the rules of study 
do so ei^actly a^pree with those of 
the table, when you are from your 
tutor, take caro that what you read 
be wholesome, and bnt sufficient. 
Not how much, but bow good, is the 
hest diet Sometimes, for variety, 
and to refresh and please the palate 
of your understanding, you may read 
something that is choice and deli- 
cate; but make no meal thereon. 
You may be allowed also the mujiic 
of poetry, so it he clear, chaste, and 
not effeminate. 

3. After you have read a little, 
make % aUfA u^vk\\* aM ^W^ not 



iUVBNILS DEPARTMENT. 



63 



More illy nor that down, till it be 
well diewed and examined. Go not 
to anollier things -nntil the first be 
niideffvtood in aome measare. If any 
thing ttiek with yon, note down 
year doabts in a boolc for the pni^ 
poee, and lett not till you be satis- 
fied ; then write that down too. 

4k In year reading, ase often to 
amily that which yon observe appli- 
cable to some pnrpose : and if tbix 
ebango be a robbery, I know not 
what win become of late writers. 
Swe I am, nothing to my reason ap- 
pears more effectual to raise yonr 
infeBtien, and enrich your nnder- 
standing. 

6. After reading, remember, as 
from the table, so you rise from your 
book, with an appetite ; and being 
np, disturb not the concoction, 
which b Infinitely improved by a 
nunination, or chewing of the cud. 
To this end, recollection with yonr- 
aelf will do well, but a repetition 
with another far better; for thereby 
yon will get a habit of readily ex- 
pressing yourself, which is a singular 
advantage to learning ; and by the 
%'effy discoursing of what you learn, 
yoQ will again teach yourself : bc- 
8ide.% something new, and of your 
own, must of necessity stream in. 

6. For the choice of your books, 
be advised by your tutor ; but, by 
my consent, you should not have 
above one or two at the most in 
every science, but those very choice 
ones. 

7. For the more orderly manag- 
ing of y(»nr study, I would have you 
divide tlie day into several employ- 
ments. Great and wise persons 
have given you the example. If you 
will have me dispose your time for 
you, I f<hall proportion it in(o three 
octaves : eight hours of which for 
sleep, comprehend ing dressing and 
vndressiug ; eiglit hours for devo- 
tion, food, and recreation, in which 
1 comprehend visits and yonr at- 
tendance upon me ; the other oc- 
tave, give it constantly to your stu- 
dies, unless business, or like acci- 
dent, interrupt, which, if it fihall, 
yon must either recompense by the 
Micceeding day's diligence, or bor- 
row from your recreation. But by 
no means iDtreocb vpon your boars 

pfdcfotHm, which I woaU have jou 



proportion into little and jf^nent 
offices, to sweeten the spirits and 
prevent wearisomeness. Possibly 
even these hours of devotion may 
sometimes receive interruption, by 
travel or employment of necessity; 
then yonr offices must be the less. 
You may likewise be deprived'of tlie 
conveniency of place : if so, yet steal 
a retirement — nothing must hinder 
you from withdrawing yonrsielf; and 
a good man makes any place an ora^ 
tory. But be sure no merry-meeting, 
pastime, or humouring of othera, 
make a breach upon your daily ex- 
ercise of piety — nothing but evident . ' 
necessity can dispense. 

8. Be not ashamed to ask if yon 
doubt: but be ashamed lo be re*> 
proved (or the same fault twice. 

9. Be constant in your course of 
study; and although you proceed 
slowly, yet go on in your path : as- 
siduity will make amends at last. 
He that can but creep, if he keeps 
his way, will sooner come to his 
journey's end than he that rides post 
out of it. 

10. Endeavour at the highest per- 
fection, not only at yonr studies, but 
in whatsoever you attempt; strive to 
excel in every thing, and you may 
perform many things worthy of 
praise, nothing meanly. Ho that 
aims further than he can shoot, and 
draws with his utmost strength, will 
hardly shoot short, at least <leserves 
not to be blamed for short shooting. 

11. Avoid night studies, if you 
will preserve your wit and health. 

12. Whether thou dost read or 
hear any thing — indeed whatsoever ' 
you do— intend what thou art about, 
and let not tliy mind wander, but 
coin pel it to be fixed and present. 
If any other thought comes across 
thee in thy study, keep it off, and 
refer it to some other time: this 
wandering of your spirit yon know I 
have often reproved ; therefore, 
whatsoever you do, do it, and no- 
thing else. 

13. Suffer not thy memory to rest; 
she loves exercise, and grows with 
it every day. Commend something 
notable to her custody: the more 
she receives, the better she keeps. 
And when you H«ve \t>\%Vfc^ «a>j 
thing to her care, \e\. \\ teftV V\>J^>ft«« 

a while, then ca\V foi i\ %%«^i^> tiK^pfc- v 



56 ISTTEK Vt^M MK. LAW80N TO HI6 BROTHBR. 



brother; therefore 9 shall begin 
to wHte one to yon^ and I will try 
to write it very plain indeed, that 
you may knov^ iod remember 
«very word of n. 

You, my dear young brother,. 
Ibave been' the subject of many 
afflictions, and I wUl just speak 
of some of them ; not that I wish 
you to repine on account of them, 
^ but Ylut you may see the good- 
ness of the Lord in providing for 
^ou amidst them all. About a 
month before our dear father 

V died, I visited our native town ; 

'1 then, for the first time, saw you, 
*" a very little boy indeed, asleep in 
your cradle. Little did I then 
think that we were so soon to 
lose a kind parent He was par- 
ticularly anxious for your wel* 
ftre. He loved you, he prayed 
to God that he would bless you 

% and preserve you ; and although 
he was very ill, and looked ex- 
tremely pale, yet he would sit by 
you rockine your cradle ; and if 
jou bad heeu old enough to 
observe it, you would have seen 
ihis eyes swimming with tears, 
which he let fall on your account: 
for he knew that you were but a 
'(very little child, and feared that 
«oon you would be left without a 
jdear rather to care for you, and 
pray ^ you. But he was a good 
man; and though beloved you so 
much thiUit made turn cry at the 
thoughts of parting from you, 
yet God whom he served, ena- 
hied him to leave you, a helpless 
orphan, in his iiaads ; and when 
he saw you last, his heart was full 
of sorrow, and I am sure, if he 
could have spoken, he would have 
said, *' O Lord, if it be thy will, 
«pare my life, that I may provide 
for my poor Uttle Joseph, for he 
is very dear to me, and I will 
teach him to fear thy name. O 
spare my life, that I may provide 
for my poor little Joseph.'' 



God, who always does right, 
thought it best not to grant this 
last request. Our dear parent 
grew worse and worse, and then 
he became more and more submis- 
sive to the will of God, in sepa- 
rating him from you, and your 
brothers and sisters, who stood 
weeping round, his bed. He told 
me that Jesus was precious, and 
his only support. I prayed, 
kneeling by him, and his eyes 
and his bands sufficiently declared 
how earnestly he was engaged in 
this solemn exercise. You were 
then unconscious of what passed 
in the chamber of death, and I 
shall not attempt to describe it. 

The remains of our dear fiither 
were interred the following Lord's 
day. The grave in which he lies 
is in the corner of the Baptist 
Meeting-house yard. It is pa- 
rallel with some palisadoes which 
inclose the tomb of some rick 
family. There is no grave-stone. 
Perhaps if you were to try to find 
the grave, you could not. 

In less than a year your poor 
mother was laid in the same 
place, and I hope they are both 
now singing the praises of him 
who hath said, " I am the resur- 
rection and the Hfe." If they can 
be anxious in heaven, it is, that 
poor little Joseph may be a good 
child, that he may love the Re- 
deemer, that he may shun the 
paths of the destroyer, and that he 
may finally join them in the man- 
sions of glory. 

Thus, my dear brother, you 
were left an orphan at a very 
early period indeed. You were 
left in the very depths of pover- 
ty.* Then you had no earthly 

* The circninstances bere alJaded to, 
are Tery feelingly expressed and en- 
larged upon in the Author's Poem, enti- 
tled, " The Maniac** printed a few years 
ago in England, and reprinied in Ame<^ 
rica, with high commendations. — Kd, 



LETTEB FROM MR. LAWSON TO BU BROTOMK - 57 



friend but the parisb, no place io 
which you might fiod refuge but 
the gloomy apartments of the work 
house; there were oone to caress 
you, and rejoice in your smiles; 
there were none to dry your tears, 
or supply your wants. But God, 
who is a *' very present help in 
time of troubre," thought upon 
you in your distress, and in a lit- 
tle time he ddivered you. Yes, 
my dear brother, it was God that 
delivered you. He rabed you up 
kind beneRictors. He put it into 
the hearts of hb people to rescue 
you ; and now you are in circum- 
stances of mercy which loudly 
call for your gratitude. Think, 
my dear Joseph, what might have 
been your circumstances. I shud- 
der when I reflect on the situation 
of the fatherless; pitied by none 
on earth — the wretched object of 
cold contempt— a prey to penury 
and disease — and the unresisting 
victun of the meanest viced : for 
having no earthly friend, who 
shall sympathize with him in his 
sorrows! who will resard his 
wants with pity, and administer 
to him in his afflictions 1 who is 
there to encourage in the paths 
of rectitude, or to deter in the 
career of wickedness 1 And you, 
my brother, would have been 
thus destitute but for the abound- 
ing mercy of God, who is ** a Fa- 
ther to the fatherless, in his holy 
habitation.^ Ps. Ixviii. 5. O then 
let the orphan's sacrifice ascend 
to God : devote yourself to grati- 
tude and praise, and when it is 
well with you, O pray for the 
Baptist Missionary Society, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Ivimey. — 1 would 
now entreat you to remember him 
who is called " a brother born for 
adversity.'' You have a world of 
affliction to pass through. You 
have already been exercised with 
a great deal of bodily pain, and 
must expect a great deal more; 



but let your iiiSerings temind yois 
of the sul^iofs of jesus our Re- 
deemer. What are yours com- 
pared with hia| He was born io 
a manger. He #as daily the ob* 
ject of insult, and scorn, and ha- 
tred. His enemies were crueL 
his friends were unkind. He had 
not where to lay his head. He 
was as an outcast in the earth, 
despised and rejected of men.. At 
length when his time was fulfilled, 
he began to be sore amazed ; and 
in the garden of Gethsemane he 
endured sufferings which it is im* 
possible for mortals to compre- 
hend ; and on the cross of Cal- • 
vary the awful scene was ended. 
He bled and died. — But why all 
these sufferings 1 He was not, as 
you are, a sinner. He did not 
need afflictions to make him more 
holy, as you need them. Jesus, 
my dear Joseph, suffereil thus, to 
redeem a people unto himself. 
He died, that sinners might live ; 
and he is willing that you should 
come unto him, and obtain eter- 
nal life. He will not refuse you 
because you are a little boy ; but 
he will fold you in his arms, and 
carry you in his bosom. He will 
guide your feet in the paths of 
righteousness, and he will supply 
all your need from his own trea- 
sury. It is impossible that your 
brother in India could receive 
more pleasure than in hearing that 
you love the blessed Redeemer. 

Let your sufferings also remind 
you of your mortality. The seeds 
of death are sown in your mortal 
body. Prepare for eternity. Eve- 
ry pang is a kind monition, tell- 
ing you that happiness is not to 
be found below, and that it be- 
comes afflicted mortals to think 
of another world, where there is 
no pain. Farewell, my dear Jo- 
seph. May God still be vour 
friend and protector; I have 
you in h\s ^r^mws Wu^^^, *mA 



58 



A DREAM. 



pmy tH»^ rtiia WiT ^e your de- 

votrt resolve, " My father, thow 

flhfllt be the «mdi* of my yoafh T 

Yoar ctcr «ffeetionttt« brother, 

John Lawson. 

CW/etflftf, 19141. 

Where m'e 1/our FellowTratellerB? 

A DREAM. 



«' NoifT and then I gel, wbiltC sleeping* 
A hint or t«f o thalTft wofth fh« keeping.'* 

Newton. 



After a day, occupied more 
than usually in meditation on the 
great and inestimable truths of 
revelatioot I lay down to «njoy 
my customary repose. In my 
slumbers, my busy imagimitkin 
presented me with a number of 
circumstances, a few of which, 
perhaps, may be worth recording. 

1 thought that, in some unac- 
countable way, I had been trans- 
ported into a very dreary region 
— a land of briars, and U><^ros, 
and savage beasts, wild and de- 
solate beyond any place I had 
ever beheld. It appeared to me, 
and the thought gave me great 
ancasiness, that it was my native 
country, and that my habitation 
had once been in the midst of it. 
I was however informed, I scarce- 
ly know how, that the land was 
formerly as beautiful, as it nas 
now sterile and uninviting. It 
had been one extensive, lovely, 
and fruitful garden, where every 
" tree grew, which was pleasant 
to the sight, and good for food," 
Gen. ii. 9, where there were 

*■ Flow'n Af all huct, and without (horn 
the rose." 

The va^t change that had taken 
place I learned was in conse- 
quence of the rebellion of the 
inhabitants against their rightful 
Sovereign. So universal was their 
disaffection, that they all dcpart- 



M from fheir allegiance; tltef^ 
was not an individual who yield- 
ed the submission and obedTienoe 
which were pre-^minewfly due, 
Rom. iii. 10 — H. Their con* 
duct was utterly inexcusable, and 
of a nature peculiarly aggMvated; 
as their gracioiis Monarch had 
indeed, in every seUse of the 
word, been the father of his peo« 
pie. His incomparable cliaractcr 
was distinguished by consommatc 
perfection. His name alone was 
excellent through his boundless 
dominions ; his glory is above 
the earth and heaven. Psalm 
oxiviii. 13. He was by no rnean^ 
a hard master; he liberally and 
freely bestowed on them all things 
richfy to enjoy, and gave them 
only one easy command as a test 
of their obedience. That they 
might be influenced by all that 
was sacred atid affecting to con- 
tinue their attachment to their 
rightful Sovcrci«:n, they wiere not 
only loaded with his favours, but 
: they were solemnly assured, that 
the penalty of rebellion woiiTd be 
.death. Awful to relate, without 
any reason, they renounced his 
sovereignty, they affronted him 
to his face, they impeached his 
wisdom, though it is divine, and 
they contemned his unutterable 
goodness. They dared to enter 
on a contest with HIM, whose 
almighty wrath, when ^' kindled, 
yea but a Kttle/' no creature, 
however elevated or powerful, is 
able to withstand. Psalm ii. 12. 
Of their offended Sovereign, in- 
finite in magnificence, it might 
he said, with the utmost proprie- 
ty, •' He covereth himself with 
light as a garment — He stretches 
ont the heavens like a curtain — 
He lays the beams of his cham- 
bers in the waters — He maketb 
the clouds his chariot, he walk- 
eth on the wings of the wind," 
Psalm civ, 2, 3, 4. What then 



A DtlEAM 



«| 



could be expected io such a con- 
flict, bdt entifc defeat, igiionfioy, 
and mill : these iildeed were their 
niBersble portion. Their Sove- 
reign, as a display of his infinite 
rectitude, atid as a menioniDle 
and striking example to sdl beirtgs 
in all worlds, frowned on (he 
land which had produced nothing 
bot traitors, and its fair features, 
ihe admiration of etery eye, were 
mediately in a great measure 



deranged, and deprived of their 
glory;* and the criminal inha- 
iMtants. without exeeption, since 
they fend all shared in this most 
unaatiftal tebellion, were iuTOlt- 
ed in a general and merited sen- 
tenee of eoademiiation. 

The execution ,howeter of this 
teniblay bot just sentence, was 
yet delayed; and i saw in my 
dreaaiy that the King's own son, 
iaiested with Hie most ample 
powers from his offiended Father, 
came, and proclaimed his inten- 
riona, an divine and gracions, 
animated merely by his own lote 
and kindness, ^IIy and freely to 
pardon all who should lay down 
their weapons of rebellion, and 
Mfum to their rigiitful Sovereign. 
He also deelarcd, that though 
the deserved corse, which the 
umiatnral rebellion had brought 
down on the kmd, slionld not be 
remitted, yet in many respects it 
should be turned into a blessing ; 
and that he woold safely con- 
duct all who would obey his com- 
mands, to a land pre|>Bred for 
them by his Father, " flowing 
with milk aitd honey"— a land, 
which should be their own, of 
unspeakable and everlasting feli- 
city. " Full of grace and truth," 
John i. 14, he came near the 
place where I lived, and, as I 
bad often feared, from the dreari- 



• «• Creiitioii bcari obTious msrks of 
being » micbty nuis." 

BulU^s Analogy. 



rtcfsrs and steVilitjfpf the coutttry, 
that I should one day ** perish 
with hunger," Luke xv. 17. I 
determined to go, and if he would 
receive me, to foDow. him. I 
wetft and mingled whb the throng 
with which he was surrounded, 
and gazed on his uiipafalleled 
glories. I had heard of his com- 
passion, loveliness, and grandeur, 
but the one half bad not been 
told me. I said, 

** Fly tliTongb tbc world, O sun, and tell 
Hofw dark ihy beams, compared with hii!* 

I exclaimed, " Happy are thy 
men, and happy are these thy^ 
servients, who stand continually* 
before thee ! O that I might be 
permitted to occupy the meanest 
plate in such blessed and ele- 
vated society P Luke xv. 19. I 
perceived, that there were scars 
in his hands, his feet, and bis 
side, Juhn xx. 20 ; and I learned 
that he had taken the plac^ of the 
wretclied traitors, and by his own 
suflerings and obedience, '' even 
unto death," had satisfied the 
righteous demands of the violated 
law, Snd purchased infinite bliss 
for a multitude of guilty rebels, 
fhat no man could number. 
Rev. vii. 9. Unlike all other vic- 
tors, he had conquered by dy- 



ing, and he appeared on his 
throne as one who had been slain, 
Rev. V..6. I saw him receive and 
pardon many of the most un- 
worthy of my contfpanions, and 
with trembling steps I ventured to 
come into his venerable presence. 
Prostrate before him, I exclaimed, 
*' I have sinned against heaven, 
and in thy sight, and am unwor- 
thy of the meanest blessing from 
thy hands ; yet be merciful to nie 
a sinner — Other Lords have had 
dominion over me, but hence- 
forth by thy name [ will be call- 
ed. Art not thou the Saviour, 
whom God the Father hath ^e^V- 
ed 1 Art \V\ou noV Vv^ cwv^«tv\w^i 



60 



A BUBABI. 






wjIBbi the promise is made, He 
that believeth on him shall not 
be ctfrnfafindedft^Thou art; aod 
I confa to^thee, I belike on thee 
^^ caat.fliyself on thy mercy — 
God bat laid the help of poor 
ffebels'm thee — and on thee I 
buHd my lK>pe of pardon, of life, 
aMlnilvatioii — I am willing. Lord, 
thou shouldst do with me as 
seemeth theif good — only let me 
be «. vessel of honour in thy pa- 
lace, and let it be of wood or 
of stone, of gold or of silver, as 
th<m pleasest — only let me have 
a place in thy family, and num- 
b^ me, if thou wilt, among the 
door-keepers (Psalm l\xxiv.) in 
thy house, or the hewers of wood, 
or drawers of water — Call me, as 
thou wilt, to do or to suffer, to 
be exalted or to be trodden under 
foot, to be full or to be hungry, 
to possess all things or to be des- 
titnte, only reject me not — say 
not, I will not pity thee — I will 
not take thee into my service — if 
I perish it shall be suing for thy 
mercy — I cannot — yea. Lord, be 
not angry, pardon the importu- 
nity of thy wretched suppliant, — 
< I will not let thee go, except 
thou bless me !' " 

Trembling, and silent, I wait- 
ed his reply — I durst not so much 
as lift up my eyes from the ground 
on which I had fixed them, Luke 
xviii. 13. I feared, that at least 
lie would reproach me for my 
past rebellions; but in infinite 
condescension, and boundless 
grace, he called his servants and 
said, " Bring forth the best robe, 
and put it on him, and put a ring 
on his hand, and shoes on his 
feet — ^This my son was dead, and 
is alive again ; he was lost, and is 
found/' Luke xv. 11—32. He 
assigned me a place in his royal 
household, a(nd bade me follow 
him whithersoever he should go ; 
be also repeatedly and solemnly 



declared, that they who did aoi 
serve and follow him, should as- 
suredly die, and perish in their 
rebellions, Luke xiv. 20, 27. Mark 
XVI. 15, 16. 

Many of my neighbours and 
acquaintance came also, and sup- 
plicated his compassion; and they 
met with a similar reception. 
Indeed, I do not recollect, though 
I have had the happiness of terv* 
ing my Mastei^ for more than 
twenty years, that he has ever 
cast a poor rebel out of his pre- 
sence or service, however un- 
worthy. But during this period 
many have left our society, and 
others have been added to it. 

Now I saw in my dream, that 
in the course of our journey, all 
who followed my glorious Leader, 
peculiarly consecrated one day in 
seven, by his express command, 
to refreshment and repose. On 
these delightful days, he used fa* 
miliarly to converse with each of 
his servants. It was, I think, so 
far as my memory will serve me, 
at the close, or the commence- 
ment of a year, on one of those 
hallowed periods devoted to re- 
flection, when I had withdrawn 
a little from my accustomed so- 
ciety, and was meditating on the 
glory of my Master, and the un- 
merited and unspeakable felicity 
he designed to confer on me, 
that, amidst my solitude, some 
one in a plaintive tone of voice, 
made the inquiry. Mortal! where 
are thy Fellow Travellers ? The 
question awakeded me to a re- 
collection of the way by which I 
had been brought, and to the 
history of my companions. The 
throng that surrounded my 
Master wh^n I first supplicated 
his compassion, were almost all 
known to me ; but numbers of 
them had quitted our society, yet 
so imperceptibly, and at such 
difFereut periocis, that I had 



K DREAM. 



«i 



scarcely missed them. I began, 
iiowever, eagerly to inquire after 
then, and though I could not 
xecall all my old companions to 
ray remembrance, yet some of 
their hbtories were fresh in my 
memory. It may not, perhaps, 
be Mninteresting or aninstructive 
to mention a few of them. I 
thought of one« who at £rst bade 
hkr to persevere till he reached 
the land of promise ; he had not 
however proceeded far in his 
journey, before he began to think 
of turning back ; and having loved 
the cebelUous country, of which I 
have made mention, he went 
back to it, going out from us, as 
might readily have been expect- 
ed, because he was not of us, 
1 John ii. 19. He made light of 
the infinite felicities of the plea- 
sant land, whither we were jour- 
neying. Psalm cvi. 24. 

I recollected another, who, 
though he professed an attach* 
ment to my Master, never deci- 
dedly and heartily loved him. 
He was also secretly devoted to 
the service of the guilty rebels 
who contemned the government 
of the most gracious of Sovereigns. 
We were not surprised that he 
forsook our society, for it was 
but too manifest by the whole of 
his conduct, that his heart was 
never with us. He too returnedy 
to perish I fear in his abomina- 
tions. My Master said of him, 
'* It would have been better for 
him not to have known the way 
of righteousness, than afterwards 
to depart from the holy command- 
ment delivered unto him/' 2 Pet« 
ii. 21. 

A third who occurred to my 
recollection, was a youth, who 
freqnentlv, in strong terms, ex- 
pressed bis determination never 
to desert the service of his ador- 
able Lord; nor did be, till be 
WUB cMlIed to eacouDter a few 



hardships for w&ifch he-wattaot . 
prepared, mid he could, not en- 
dure them. He had determined 
to accompany ust but he had 
not counted the cost, and he was 
unwilling to make any sacrifices^. 
So he went away, and walkednM 
more with my Master. 

I could easily enlarge the list, 
but I must mention a few who 
left our company for ** the plea- 
sant land," of which I have beea - 
speaking. Having done and su£> 
fered the will of their Lord, he 
sent his superior servants to bring 
them to his Father's court, where 
it is his glorious design, that all 
who love and follow him shaU 
dwell for ever, partaking his glo- 
ry and his joy. Indeed, before 
they left us, they bad evident 
foretastes of the felicity they were 
about to participate. One of 
them, I well recollect, whose 
heart was immoveably fixed oa 
the goodly land, a little before 
he left us exclaimed, '* I go to 
Jesus, the Mediator of the New 
Covenant, to God the Judge of 
all, and to the spirits of the just 
made perfect. — 

' My passions rise and soar above. 
Fain would 1 reach eternal things; 
I'm wing*d with faith, and iir*d with lore. 
And Icarn the notes that Gabriel sings.' ** 

Another, who was lately sent 
for to this blissful country, had 
such a delightful prospect of it, 
that the last words we heard her 
utter were, ** Farewell to all sor« 
row!" 

A third often said, that he was 
daily listening for the sound of 
the wheels of the chariot, which 
he knew would shortly convey 
him to his home. At length it 
was heard, and exclaiming, ** I 
am ready l" — hi an instant he en- 
tered into bliss. 

* A fourth, ere he <m\U^4 Va& 
accustomed socAeV^ ^owvci^x^MxA 
on it, said, " \ vioxMi noX «*» 



ee 



4VTBNILE DEPARTMENT. 



cbanle my life with you alL I 
abeady perceive the fragrance of 
the place wbitber I am going." 

A fifUi» after committing hit 
family to the kind care of his 
fulorable Lord and Master, ex- 
<elaimM» 

f^Above the rest tb|s note shall swell, 
My Jesm bu done all things well !" 

and just as he was entering ''the 

Ceasant land/' be elevated his 
ind, and in gentle whispers pro- 
Qounced the interesting words, 
" Happy ! — happy ! — happy T 

A sixtli, on the very threshold 
of eternal joys, said, ** I am go- 
ing to leave you, but I am not 
afraid to depart — the kingdom of 
heaven is my portion — the Lord 
Jesus has promised to receive me 
—my mind is happy !" 

Many more are on the eve of 
their departi^re, and when a few 
more years are elapsed, all who 
are npw followip^ my Master, 



will have enteitd into hb joy. O 
I wish I could impart adequate 
ideas of this deKgbtful reffUHi ; 
but I know not how to do It* 
No lauguage^ however oopiodt^ 
no tongue, however eloqueot, 
imagination, however rich, 
pourtray the incomparable beaa- 
ty of the inheritance, or the ui* 
measity of the bliss which ny 
Master has prepared for those 
who love him. Reader! above 
all things be concerned to have 
a share of this indescribable^ this 
infinite felicity* 

Sauihampiom B. H. D. 

QUERY. 



Is there any impropriety in ad- 
ministering the Lord^s Supper 
privately to Christians in dying 
circumstances? 

IGNOTVS. 



Su^entle Sepattment 



LETTER 

FaOM 

WILLUM,£ARLofBBDFORD 
TO HIS SONS. 



(Continued from Page Id.) 



Now, Frank, you being thus fitted 
with comely presence, and furnished 
with gbod language, and sufficiency 
and dexterity of dhcourse, I wiU 
proceed to your Employment, 
which at present is ynar stady ; and 
I shall be less careful herein, upon a 
presumption tl^at your tutor's care 
and sufficiency in the kind bare pre- 
vented me ; however, 1 shall tell yon 
what I have beard a very learned 
man speak concerning books, and 
iife tme use of thorn: 



\ 



1. You are to come to your stody 
as to the table, with a sharp appe* 
tite,- whereby that which you read 
may the better digest He that ha^ 
no stomach to his book, will veiy 
hardly thrive upon it. 

3. And because the roles of study 
do so exactly agree with those of 
the table, when yoa are from your 
tutor, take caro that what you read 
be wholesome, and but sufficient 
Not how much, but bow good, Is tho 
best diet Sometimes, for variety, 
and to refresh and please the palate 
of your understanding, you may read 
something that is choice and deli- 
cate; but make no meal thereon. 
You may be allowed also the muj&ic 
of poetry, so it be clear, chaste, and 
not effeminate. 

8. After you have read a little, 
mske % sMiudi ^i^ik W «M \»kA aoti 



JUVBNILI DEPARTMENT. 



63 



Horc iSy nor fM, dowo, till it be 
veil vliewed and eXAmined. Go not 
te noolJier thing -antil the first be 
andentood in wme me«iare. If any 
tlnng tticlc with yon, note down 
ynor doubts in a book ibr the pnr- 
poae, and rest wit till you be satis- 
led; then write that down too. 

4. In yovr reading, ase often to 
apply that which you observe appli- 
oible to some purpose : and if this 
change be a robbery, I Icnow not 
what win become of late writers. 
Soffie I ani, nothing to my reason ap- 
pears mofe effectual to raise your 
invention, and enrich your nnder- 
atanding. 

5. After reading, remember, as 
llrom the table, so you rise from your 
bookf with an appetite ; and being 
np, disturb not the concoction, 
which b inOnitely improved by a 
mniination, or chewing of the cud. 
To tliis end, recollection wUh your* 
aelf will do well, but a repetition 
with another far better; for thereby 
yon will get a habit of readily ex- 
pressing yourself, which is a singular 
advantage to learning ; and by the 
%'ery discoursing of what you learn, 
yoo will again teach yourself : be- 
sides, something new, and of your 
own, must of necessity stream in. 

6. For the choice of your books, 
be advised by your tutor ; but, by 
my consent, you should not have 
above one or two at the most in 
every science, but those very choice 
ones. 

7. For the more orderly manag- 
ing of your study, 1 would have you 
divide tlie day into several employ- 
ments. Great and wise persons 
have given yon the example. If you 
vrill have me dispose your time tor 
yoo, 1 vliall proportion it into three 
octaves : eight hours of which for 
sleep, comprehending dressing and 
undressing ; eight hours for devo- 
tion, food, and recreation, in which 
I comprehend visits and your at- 
tendance upon me ; the other oc- 
tave, give it constantly to vnur stu- 
dies, unless business or like acci- 
dent, interrupt, which, if it shall, 
you must either recompense by the 
Micceeding day's diligence, or bor- 
ruw from your recreation. Rat by 
no means intnenc/i npoii yorir hours 

jofdcfotkm, wbicb I would have yon 



proportion into little and fV^nent 
offices, to sweeten the spirits and 
prevent wearisomeness. Possibly 
even these hours of devotion may 
sometimes receive interruption, by 
travel or employment of necessity ; 
then your offices must be the less. 
You may likewise be deprived'of tlio 
conveniency of place : if so, yet steal 
a retirement — nothing must hinder 
you from withdrawing yourself; and 
a good man makes any place an orm* 
tory. But be sure no merry-meeting, 
pastime, or humouring of others, 
make a breach upon your daily ex- 
ercise of piety — nothing but evident . 
necessity can dispense. 

8. Be not ashamed to ask if yon 
doubt: but be ashamed to be re^ 
proved Ibr the same fault twice. 

9. Be constant in your course of 
study; and although yon proceed 
slowly, yet go un in your path : as- 
siduity will make amends at last. 
He that can but creep, if he keeps 
his way, will sooner come to his 
journey's end than he that rides post 
out of it. 

10. Endeavour at the highest per- 
fection, not only at your studies, but 
in whatsoever you attempt; strive to 
excel in every thing, and you may 
perform many things worthy of 
praise, nothing meanly. He that 
aims further than he can shoot, and 
draws with his utmost strength, will 
hardly shoot short, at least deserves 
not to be blamed for short shooting. 

11. Avoid night studies, if you 
will preserve your wit and health. 

12. Whether thou dost read or 
hear any thing — ^indeed whatsoeveir * 
you do— intend what thou art about, 
and let not thy mind wander, but 
cotaipel it to be fixed and present. 
If any other thought comes across 
thee in thy study, keep it off, and 
refer it to some other time: this 
wandering of your spirit yon know I 
have often reproved; therefore, 
whatsoever you do, do it, and no- 
thing else. 

13. Suffer not thy memory to rest; 
she loves exercise, and grows with 
it every day. Commend something 
notable to her custody: the more 
she receives, the better nhe keeps. 
And when you Vi«vQ \rcnX<ti^ ^cgl"^ 
thing to her care, \e\.\\. wil ^\>>ciV«i 
a while, tbtn ca\V fex \\ ^%w^> ^«^^ 



<|4 



JVVEKlLfi DEPABTMBNT. 



eially if H be a fault corrected. Yoo 
nust not err twice; and bj this fre- 
quent calfing her to acouiint, she 
tirill be, always ready to give you 
aatisfaction ; and the sooner, if what 
she was entrusted with was laid up 
orderly, and put, as it were, in the 
several boxes of a cabinet. 

14. If thou wouldst seem learned, 
Uie best way is to endeavour to be 

•learned; for if tbou dost not strive 
to be that which tbou dcsirest to be, 
tbou dcsirest to no puq)08e ; — which 

Sves me occasion to recommend 
Is following advice to your espe- 
cial regard. 

15. It is an extreme vanity to 
hope to be a scholar, and yet to be 
unwilling to take pains; for what 
excellent thing is there that is easily 
acquired? Its very difficulty doth 
imply, and, as it were, doth invite 
us to, something worthy and rare. 
Consider, it is a rose that thorns do 
compass; and the forbidden object 
sharpens the desire in all other thiugs. 
Thus a difficult mistress makes a 
lover more passionate ; and that same 
man hates an offered and a prosti- 
tute love. I dare say, if learning 
were easy and cheap, thou wouldst 
as much slight her. Something there 
is, doubtless, in it, that none but 
noble and unwearied spirits can at- 
tain her; and these are raised higher, 
and heightened, by its difficulty, and 
would not gain her otherwise. Some- 
thing there is in it, that no money 
or jewels can buy her. No, Frank, 
nothing can purchase learning but 
tjiy own sweat: obtain her, if thou 
canstv any other way. Not all my 
estate can buy thee the faculty of 
making but one quick epigram — the 
trifling part of her ; wherefore I en* 
treat the^, Frank, to raise thy spi- 
rit, and stretch thy resolution. And 
10 often as thou goest to thy book, 
place before thy eyes what crowns, 
sceptres, mitres, and other ensigns 
of honour, learning hath conferred 
up<»n those that have courted her 

^ with labour and diligence ; besides 
^the rare pleasure of satisfaction, 
which, of itself, is an honourable 
reward. And let me tell thee, 
Frank, a learned holy man, (and 
such a one would 1 fain have thee 
to bo,) looks like an angel in flesh 
— M morUI cherub. And because 



letters are great discoverers of tba 
man, therefore, when you write, let 
your style be genteel, clean, rounds 
even, and plain, unless the subject 
or matter require a more manly and 
vigorous expression. I cannot al- 
low 'you a curiosity, unless it bo 
like a lady's dress, negligenUy neaf^ 
Go not to counsel for every word, 
yet neglect not to choose. Be more 
careful to think before yon write 
than before you speak ; because let- 
ters pass not away as words do; 
they remain upon record, are still 
under the examination of the eye^ 
and tortured they are, sometimes^ 
to confess that of which they wert 
never guilty. That is rare, indeed, 
that can endure reading. Under* 
stand the person well to whom yoa 
write. If he be your inferior, or 
equal, you may give your peU tbo 
more liberty, and play with it some- 
times ; but if to your superior, them 
regard is to be had to your interest 
with him, his leisure, and capacity ; 
all which will be so many caveats 
and instructions to the humility, 
neatness, and brevity of your style. 
You shall do well if, like a skilful 
painter, your draw your sense, and 
the proportions of your business, in 
a plain draft first, and then give it 
colour, heightening, and beauty af- 
terwards. And, if it be duly con^ 
sidered, it is no such great com- 
mendation to be praised for penning 
a letter without making a blot, not 
in my judgment howe\cr; therefore,, 
afler you have pondered and pen- 
ned, then examine and correct A 
negligent manner of writing, me- 
thinks, is a kind of an affront and a 
challenge, not a letter, to a person 
of distinction. Avoid all roughness, 
swelling, poverty, aud looseness, in 
your style : let it be rather riotous 
than niggardly. The flowing pen 
may be helped, but the dry never. 
Especially shun obscurity, because 
it must go a begging for an inter- 
preter: and why should you wish 
to entreat him to understand you if 
he can ? Be this your general rule, 
both in your writing and speaking, 
— labour for sense, rather than 
words : and for your book, take this 
also, — study men and things. 

16. Perhaps you will expect, after 
all Ibese mUu^^to, i doSwoAd couu 

\ 



1UVBMII.B OBPABTHGKT. 



69 



unto yoa tome copy or ex- 
^nple to imitate, ^s fur iha iQrrek 
And Latin tongues, I leave it to 

toor talor'ft choice. In ijie EnfcliiUi, 
know no .itl>le I thouiA sooner 
Mfer tojour imitalipn than that of 
Sir Francis Bi^con, liiat excellent 
unhappy man. And to give yon Ji- 
jrectioii /or aJI imitation in general, 
u veil as of JiIb style in particular, 
he eaj-elul ao to imitate, ai that by 
/Irawinff forth the very spiriui of the 
yriter, yon may, ifpouiiile, hecoroe 
liimaejf. Imitate liim, but do not 
mock hin : Tor the face i>f a bull, or 
a horae, is more coQieJy, ibao of an 
;ape or a moiijccy, tboq^h the ape 
jiQpat xp9omt»U!% mfui, the most beaa- 
tir«| of all ciratures; and, in that 
/eyvd, yonr own gcunine and na- 
inraj .atylu may show yi^re qomely 
than an imitation of Sir Francis 
Baaoo, if it be not exactly done. 1 
would havis jj^e imii^r/jc as the 
/K>n of .t|^c 6iti|er,'nut ^be ape of a 
am ; tiat is, io \iiaxpjt the likeness 
pf a rJiitd, not pi' ao ape : for the 
ape only iipi^t^;i the deformities 
and the ridic^loBs inctions of man — 
the son jrcy regents all the (graces of 
ithe fyfx, jpo^sfiue* anil every fij^ure 
of Jus &tkejr; and, iu this rcpre- 
aeotalion, he h3tb something of him- 
aelf too. I shall aild but one caution 
more, and Ihat 13 this; — As be can 
never nin well, who shall rcsolv/L* to 
set bis foot in the footsteps of one 
that went before; so ncilhcr shall 
any man write well, who precisely 
and snperstitiously ties Ip.msclf to 
anotber^s words. And with this li- 
berty 1 winh you still happy. 

17. And such will all your stndics 
be, if you constantly ^pift in practice 
this my last admonition, which I 
reserved purposply for this p4ace. It 



yonr etfate. T<nt if this couno bo 
ptrijctly obseryed each nil^t between 
God and yoiu* soul, tlier^ will ha 
true advantage appear. Fail not, 
thercforr, Frank, what employment 
soever yon have, every night, as in 
the presence of God and his hply ai^ 
gels, to pass an inquisition pn yoi)r 
soul what ill it hath dona, what goo^ 
it hath left undone s what slipsy whf t 
falls, it hath had that day; wh^t 
temptation hath prevailed npon it c 
and by what means, or after what 
manner. Ransack every comer of thjf 
dark heart, find let not the least 
4^ceadillo, pr kiodncv to a sipt 
lark there ; but bring it forth, bewail 
it, protest against it^ detest it, an4 
sGourge it by a severe sorrow. Thus 
eaeh day's breach between God and 
your soul being made up, with mora 

3uict and sweet hope thou mayst 
ispose thyself to rest» Certainly, at 
last, this inquisition (if steadily pur* 
sued) will vanquish all /cuslomaiy 
sins, whatever jthey be* I speak it 
npon this rjcMon, because I presunv9 
tliou wilt not liave the face to a|h 
pear before God fSMfry jaighl confess* 
jng the same oflfencc ; and ihou wilt 
forbear it, lest tliou niayst seem tp 
mock God, or despise him, which is 
dreadful hut to imagine. This finish* 
cd, for a delightful close to the wIioId 
businirits uf the day, cause your ser- 
Tant to read sometliing that is excel- 
Jently written or done, to lay you to 
sleep with it, that, if it may be, even 
your dreams may be proGtable o^ 
Itiurnod. This you will Qnd, by yov 
own experience, trpp, that fjiipgs 
will appear more naked to the eye 
of the soul, when the eye of the body 
is shut ; by w^ilch, together with tha 
quiet of the night, that time is ren- 
dered a most fit season for contemn 



ift, that you be careful every niglit, plation and contrivance. As a great 



before you go in l)ed, or perform 
}oar devotions, to withdraw yourself 
ioto your closet, or some private 
partaf yonrxihamber, and there call 
Bemory, your steward, to recount 
what she has heard or read tliat day 
worthy of ol^servation ; what she 
hath laid up, and what she hath 
spent ( how the stock of knowledge 
iapoHres; where and how slie do- 
csys. A notable advantage will thu 



advantage, not only to your book, 
but health and business also, I can* 
not but advise and enioin you to ac- 
custom yourself to nse early ; for, 
take it from me, no lover of his bed 
did ever yet form great and noble 
things. Now, though 1 allowed eight 
hoars' for your bed, with the prepa- 
ration to it and from it, yet this was 



rather to point out the utmost limit 
beyond which yoti aVkWi\4 iwcA. ^^ 
hriagto yoor sludies at preteat, and f rather than to cmige 'sovl \o oVma\^« 
Jbneiifter (/f/k$S WJ^ empfoyjdd) to i |tu:b a proportion ^«slc\\>* . '^k^mvsit 



''OJ^ XI U, 






^ 



66 



OBITUAliT. 



iherefbrc, of U^se g^olden moming 
flowers, and' bestow tbem on your 
l)ook. A noble person, of all others, 

: has need of learuing, and therefore 
should coBtribnte mo5t time to it; 

'for, besides that it gilds his honour, 
and sets off his birth, it becomes his 

'Employment, which a iftfleman, of 
^ all others mast not want, if he will 
a^cnre his soul, honour, and estate, 
all which are in most certain danfi^r 
from idleness, the rock of nobility, 
considering the plenty of his table, 
and society, with all sorts of tempta- 
tion. If, therefore, he be a hard 
student, he is not at leisure to be 
Titious : the devil knows it is to no 
'*• purpose to tempt a busy man. Be 
always, therefore, employed: and 
because some are triflingly active, 
that you may not with them be idly 
Imsy, your book will itostruct you 
how. O Frank, did you but hear 
the complaints of excellent person- 

.ages, for missing of that opportunity 
^ 'which you are now master of; or 

'could you but suppose yourself old 
and ignorant; how tender would 
\ou be of the loss of one minute ! 
vVbat would you not give to return 
to these years yon now enjoy ! I jet 
tills consideration sink deep and set- 
tle in you. Be more curious of the 
expense of your time than of your 
gold; time being a jewel whose 
worth is Invaluable, whose loss is 
irreplirable: therefore secure the 
present time, that you may not here- 
after lose more by a vain bewailing 
of the past. 
Now, because the best of learning 



is to study yourself, and I hate rd^ 
son to believe I have some skill in 
you, having so curiously obsenred 
your nature and inclinations, I shall 
make some useful disconrse in order 
to this knowledge, by vrhich you 
miy both see your defec^ts and 
amend them. 

'file most profitable and necessary 
thing in the world is to know and 
study thyself. Wherefore, with all 
the jilaiuness, siucerity, and obser- 
vatiim you can make in yoar best 
tcin|>cr of mind and body, lay yonr- 
sclf open to yourself: take an im- 
partial survey of all your abilities 
and weaknesses, and spaire not to 
expose them to your eye by writing, 
which I conceive the best ^one 
by framing your own character, and 
so to draw the picture of your rilind, 
which I recommend to your yearly 
practice during your life. This, 
Frank, if you flatter not yourself, 
will be your best looking-glass, 
and must needs have a singular in- 
fluence upon your religion, and serve 
your soul extremely well to very 
high purposes; for, by this m^h^, 
your growth or decay in piety will 
be discovered, and, consequently, 
ways for the increase of that growth, 
or for the repairing of those decays 
and breaches iu the soul, will more 
readily bo found out, and be more 
easily cured. 

• » • • • To conclude : If the 
fear of God be the Star you sail by, 
doubt not of a good voyage ; at least, 
be sure of a good harbour. 



^itawt^. 



Miss EUZABETH WOODHILL. 

Miss Elizabeth Woodbill had.thc 
.nnspeakable privilege of being born 
of pious parents, who trained her up 
in the nurture and admonitibu of 
the Lord. By restraining grace she 
^Was kept from following the vain 
oma of a sinful world ; yet she 
iMd M total itranger to the 



transforming influence of Divine 
grace, until near three years ago, 
when, hearing a sermon by a stran- 
ger, she became deeply convinced 
of her lost condition, and her utter 
inability to do any thing towards 
oxfiicating herself from her wretcli- 
cdness. In her diary she tbos 
writes: ** Oh may the impre8sion.s 
I Uavo TccoiNed Was day Jiever be 



IIBVXSVi 



49 



i wy oH ei i, knt nsy tbey pfodiico « 
laitiap cibot on my life and coqh 
dflctl Lord, do thou condescend 
to belp tne< n poor sinner I I now 
IM I can do nothing of myself; Oh 
tench nse, and save mo, for tl^ 
.itoeroy's sake 1 Until now, the tri0e« 
d time have en^rrossed me, but to- 
day I hare been led to see the infi- 
nite Taloe of my never-dying soul. 
Oh may I never cease to seek the 
Lord, until I find Him to my soul's 
saltation I" She began to read her 
Bible with prayer, diligently attend- 
ed pablio worship, and retired in I 
secret to mourn over the hardness 
of her heart, and earnestly to pray 
fiar a right spirit to be renewed 
within her. 

ACany weeks she continued the 
■abject of much dejection and dis- 
tress, yet still pressed with diligence 
aAer some sweet assurance of inter- 
est in the forgiving love, pardon, and 
salvation of God. At length the fa- 
voored hour arrived, under a sermon 
preached by Mr. Earl, March 18, 
1818, from John xii. 32 : Andif Ibe 
lifted Mp, &c. Her hardness of heart 
was. diuolved, and all her powers 
were engaged, fixed, and concen- I 
grated, in behol^ng with an eye of 
fkifli a crucified Saviour. She felt 
she could give up her soul, her life, 
)ier all, to him who had done so 
mnch for ber. From that time she 
went forward in the divine life, fre- 
qnently, (as her Diary expresses,) 
enjoying sweet communion with 
God as ker Saviour. 

It is about six months since it 
pleased God to afflict her with that 
disease which terminated her mortal 
career. At its commencement she 



was aiked by a Menirl, wluijl oho 
thought of her si4«ation. and if J4t« 
had any anxieties respecting ro^o^ 
very. She replied, •' No, I havo 
left it with the Lord: if he sees fit U> 
restoro me, it is wfU; if not, it in 
fcelL I am auite suboiissivo to tfaa 
will of God.'^ Sho waa fisvoai!e4 
tliroughout with a sweet compo2iur^ 
of spirit, was always placid, and waa' 
never onoe heard to utter a mur- 
muring word. She said, ^ I dare 
not murmur ; the Lord is «o kind : 
so gently he deals with me, laying 
upon me no more than he enables 
me to bear." 

.Conversing with a friend on tho 
state of her mind, in the season of 
extreme bodily weakness, she laMlf 
^ 1 have no hiumpkt, but I bave no^ 
dtmkt^m^ eUnuL Ifoel I wmmtfei 
I am Mdng to Jenu.^* When eft* 
tering on tM dark vidley of the sha- 
dow of deathman aged and endeared 
relative said, *' How do you feel 
now V* She replied, ** Very happy.^ 
On seeing her sister weep, she saM* 
'* Do not weep for me *, I am going 
to glory. Jesus there stands waiting 
to receive me ;'* — and in a few mi- 
nutes she sweetly fell asleep ill tho 
arms of her Saviour, Anguat 31, 
1830, aged twenty-four years,* 



* ** This account w«a written by her 
l>e loved friend Miss Cope, a iew dajt 
after her decease, and presented to hef 
grandmother, Mn. Woodhill, John-stree^ 
Aston Parish, at whose house the dear 
sufferer expired, after living chiiefly witfa 
her grandfather and grandmother lor 
twenty years and upwards " 

John Woodhill. 



3aetti\D« 



On PrUestant Nanem/ormhf. By 

Josiah Cander, 

(Ccutinued frmn Page 27.) 

Iris vritfa regret that we turn frofl^ 
ibe more agreeable task of commen- 
dation, to advert to what we deem 
motxceptiaa io ib0.m€rit8 of a woik 



in which there is so much to admire. 
But Mr. Conder has left us no altera 
native. 

Alter all that has been written 
upon the mtich-controyerted sttb^QCt 
of Baptism, we atQ mfcnmft^ Vew Visa 
preface, tUat *^ \1 %eexnc^ \tic^vi\Atk\. 
on tho Wrilevy \o exVivXAV ^V^X ^^ 



s to be the prafwr lijcbt JB 
iriikb Iha tci i pt u re i anthorize onr 
H^ptrdiDg the institntion, notwith- 
stwlinK Ibat it )eit turn In tunch 
npan points rmpectinfc which Non- 
eon rormUli tbemM' I Tei differ;" ftiid 
tbat, " un tbu natarcit conitidera- 
tioti no mItemaliTA preieDted ilwlf." 
Pref. Pa^vii. Undtr thi> cooiio- 
tioo, the Aathor has devoted more 
than thirty piif[«* in hii wcond t»- 
lone, to diKUM (lie nature, de- 
Kga, mode, and niltject of Bap- 



Every controverted point i* 
open to diftcussion, aud vre are fhr 
from quealiunini^Mr. Conder'i rigii 
to adopt the laniiaege of Elibu, in 
reference to thii, or any other anb- 
jeot, I aUa will lAowmintopiHiim. But 
tbefuwni(*;)Ieaf&drorestendinKlhe 
dicuRtion in theie paf^i, beyond the 
preacribrd limits of hi* subject, into 
points on which Nouconronnists 
flMDitelTC* dider," we confess we 
have not be«n able to perceive. To 
•baw that Baptism ii not a saving 
Wdinaaoe ; — that it does not regene- 
rate ib subject, whether infant or 
adnlt, and by whatever mode admi- 
Hiilered ^lo oiear it of all the fa- 
fauloas Tirlnes, and fanciful analo- 
pes, with which it has bean corrupt- 
ed in ecclesiaslical eilablishmenis ; 
—was clcariy a doty incumbent on 
the writer, and his work woold have 
been iDccmplete without it But 
beyond thii line the author was not 
Impelled bybii subject A defence 
of the rite tfB^Utm Was not ro- 
<|iriKd in discutiiDf tbe |Hrindplei 
of ProtesUnt Noncooforniily. A 
defenoe of /n/mt B«plitm is still 
lem in character. This is altoge- 
ther a work of supererogation. It is 
the Tery point wliere our author 
aud the Epiicopntlan meet and 
■haJce hands. Mr. Conder could 
bardly be inpposed to feel that 
the Baptism of Inhnis dvrired tv 
nucA HTpporl from the false nuliimi 
with which it is assoeintcd jti eeclc- 
■lactioal estahlisbmenrs, as tlinl (h« 
remeviU of these dliiiDkl render it 
necessary forthwith to raise for it 
'BO abntment ont of olhrr mstcriaN. 
Rather, porlraps. his frratnitoui dc- 
'feooeof tbi* ritual ohierrance, was 
ialeaded as a conipenaatiun tn the 
•btttob tor the dumagrm lie bat done 
win mU bt!t otlier institutions. Bt 



this as II may, on this gnati w» 
tirink she is fikirly entitled lo alt tba 
l>enefit of our author's arfomenti IB 
favnur oflnfant Baptinn ; while we, 
who bitppfn to he NonamfrrmiiU 
with rexpect to that rite, most ba 
PnttitMmu also, SO lon^ as it dia)l 
sppear lo us to want the seal and 
sanction iff a divine anihurity. 

As a term of salvation, or a rite of 
initiaiion into the visible church, 
tbe Bnptrsm of Infants Mr. C. ic^ 
knowledges to he indefensihle : bnt 



brlieve > Aiiurrdlj, if tlie renhiionof- 
jiitt, (III gteat blcMinit of Ihe Goa|Ml, is 
abnululelj luipcndei] on rha inlellt|«M 
uerciHorfaithinClinM." P. 466. 

Thai the remission of rins b not 
4USficndi^ on the intelligent exen- 
rlse of faiib, in any case where sncb 
mi exercise is naturally ittipoaslMe, 
is freely grantird. And tbat itis not 
luspended ou tbe administration of 
any external rile, will aluo be ad- 
milled by those who have not(W^- 
towed tbe Dionstrous dogma of Dr. 
Uant and bis disciples, " that all 
betides are led to the uncovemutcd 
mercies of God." But neilhn- at 
these concesiions will oegalive tbs 
position tbat faith is a prvrcqnisits 
lo Baptism. Baptism may be nt- 
peDtled on tbe cxcrciie of fait^ 
though Iho remission of sini is not; 
and It u Ihtu tutpeiuied, if the testi- 
mony of our author may be addnsef 
u legitimate w'hority. 

[lire liiuhnt 
Christ 

iUhiiPi.LiieehsrMtersi s^vipnr. Is 
oell ■■ t'> iliit of a Teacher,— a belitfia 
Lillicr*oril<.intbe FiUhtr, ibc Son, sad 
iheHalyGlwiMiaiaiciilialK ihcbeimg 
iaptiitd ii. 0.1 MJM pf f *ri.t /"■ (At rf 
nwiina 'I »ni." P. 4J9. 

In whose name (hen arc nncon- 
icious babes Implizcd, whom our 
iuilliorarknowkduestobeincapable 
nf lbal/of(A wliirh was made titm- 
tiid to tliis Chi isliun ordinance ! If 
It powar exist to remit any of thg 
r$tcHtial trrms nf a Ch ittim intHtu- 
(I'oa, that powi'i, .w e a]>pri-hcitd, mint 
Ik) adequate " lo decree rites and 
ccrtnionies." 

It we B&f atV \n Vtie sifmbolual (b- 
I j|igiiotBavV»n>><>^VtaW&^i tlLT.^. 



KEVltW. 



09 



dcsif^n, A specimen of IVIr. C/s logic 
on this point nay claim oar attea- 
tion fur a moment We refer to the 
pas&a}^c last quoted. It appears bj 
the course of the amimcnt of whicn 
this pftMaji^c forms tue c»|)ening, that 
Mr. C. is wishing to establish the 
position, that the baptism of adults 
by immersion is favourable to the 
notion of its possessing a regenerat- 
ing efficacy; — a charge, in which he 
is nut borne out either by fact or 
reason. Not by fact. For inrith 
whom has this siiiierslitious notion 
originated ; and where are the advo- 
cates of il to be found ? Not amongst 
those who administer Baptism by 
immersion on a profession of faith ; 
lint with those who practise a dif- 
ferent mode, and upon subjects en- 
tirely passive. N either is this charge 
supported by the reason of the case. 
Christian faith is held to be one of 
the fruits and evidences of regeoe^ 
ration, and inseparable from it. 
IJence where faitli is made a pre- 
requisite to Raptisra, by whatever 
mode it is ndmniistered, so long as 
this cunstitntfts an essential term of 
the institution, a state of regenera- 
tion is presupposed by the adminh- 
stratiou of the rite. Where one thing 
is made an indispensable prelude to 
another, it cannot be supposed to 
be subsequent to, or siniultaneoos 
with it ; or to pniduce that, of the 
existence of which it is required as 
'* a sign and attestation. This 
would be equivalent to the placing 
of an eflVict antecedently to its oausOi 
an error at which the early converts 
from if ndaism to Christianity woald 
certainly never arrive, as Mr. C. haa 
stated, *' by a process of association 
the most natural.'* They who make 
faith indispensable to Baptism are 
therefore suffi(;iently secured against 
the danger of ascribing tu it a rege- 
nerating oflicacy, by the terms of the 



^»e sliall bo as little warranted to 
cQDclnde that Infants are its proper 
sabjerts. 

* That the litc or aciion of Baptism 
was sjobolical ciiher of repentance ur 
ol the rciDiwion of transgrestioD, by no 
means Mlows from this being the distin- 
guishing docirine of his ^i. e. John's) 
preaching. The Jewish washings had 
ceriamly no luch significance; they 
were t\ pica! of moral cleanliness, bat 
tlie only instance in which the affaaion 
of water was emjiloyed as au expiatur^- 
rite is that in which ilie whole efficacy 
was derived Irom the ashes ot the sacri- 
ficed lititer. The ucca^iuiis oiv which 
the crrr nioiiial purificaitons under the 
Law became rcq jisitc, were not such as 
immediaieiy called for reprntance; they 
frequently- related to inroluniary ettriu- 
sic pc>llimon. The Baptism of Juhu, ou 
Che tiihtrary. Was designed to signify a 
niofml diaiige, a total cleansing, of per- 
laaoent virtuCt aud the true idea ot the 
figure sreais to be, the pursuing in- 
fiMm€9 tf ka docir'me upon thi iniMd.** 
P. 441. 

In accordance with this sentiment 
tiie mutlior observes of Baptism, as 
connected with the Christian sys- 
tem, that 

<* The rite of Baptism was symbolical- 
ly sigaificaiit neither of belief nur of 
repentance, but it continued to represent 
the desieued effect of Divine iiisiruc- 
tion.** i.e. moral purity. •• In the same 
sense* it seems the most natural to un- 
derstand the strongly figurative lan- 
guage of our Lord's conversation with 
MicKdewus, by referring it to the rege- 
ncraiioo of mind which a proselyte un- 
derwent who really embraced the doc- 
trim Mttf fiAieh he was baptited" P. 447. 

Speaking of its moral significance, 
and in reference to its mode, Mr. C. 
tflerwnrda remarlts, 

" As synbolicai of moral purity or 
deaming, any mode of adirinisteiing it 
might seem to be of equat significance ; 

%utlbat of immersion appears to roe to 

be less appropriate to its specific import. | iustitulfon. They arc amongst the 

J to be at the same time more likely i^x on whom such an error is fai 



and 

to countenance the superstitious notion 

•f its f^cacy as washing away sin/* 

F.45t. 

Having adduced these passages in 
felation to the mdject of Baptism, it 
wi^X seen to be departing from this 
object Uk notice the author's reason- 
iag in referenoe to the mode. But 
wnQVllorinf Vfbt of wr priadpai 



1 



- fairly 

chargeable, notwithstanding our 
author's readiness to fix it upon 
them, even at the hazard of contra- 
dicting himself. For, in the passage 
before quoted, Mr. C. argues, that 
any mode of administering the rite 
might seem to lie of eqwl vm^^Al- 
cance as a tipibot o^ moraL cUiDaiiM 



■ ftart df HorAiji. till 
*otthip, md ounbip i 
forbid den, — Ibc an i lug 
me of ibe meuphor,-^ 



(tbtdiCDCB I it hu do rtla'ion id an} pu- 
ntl*e tonnindnient, and nia>l be clau- 
it wilh tlicDc palpHble lyirroptiuni of 
Chtiailanii; b; humiii iotnuiun, whkli 
tiia ipripturei poiiitedlj cDndemiii ' II 
it UDi In ihc power of man,' il ha* brcil 

jack retl^oui or bolj' pluca, betiuie he 
Mn nake miua au.' Here Prjleklwili 
are called upon lo naka a itaiid, tiid lo 
teherala Iba Anaui dcclaraliun or CIiil- 
liagiTarlh in iarmi Miaewliat audiritd ) 
tbe New teilauifnl, tha Niy. teila. 
tent intir il ibe lelijiiun uf Chililiaii*." 
P. 347—350. 

■ Thca* argnmrnta breathe the terv 
tonl of Protealanliim ; and for llii-lr 
HBex operitloii on therilu of IiiHtrit 
£aplisnl wn are not reipoiiHiblti. 
Bui Mr. C.'s defcDM of that rite jii 
« ibe (Bme volume, «« cooreaS, doi'ti 

Kot Appear lo ua likt applet of guU 

■ ■»»^-. 

Tf-tabU CliMti or Religioui AlU- 
teriei told at tfie Tea table m a 
Settdiiaiy for LaiUu. Bg RtUfl 
SamtiiU, A. M. Vul. I. 1V3 
Fans, l^tno. Bds, 3i. 6<1. 
" Tk* Retigioa if Mankaid^ \vj 
the aau« antnor, reviewed pp. 419 
— 43S of oar lut volume, was bet- 
ter Mited to the hobra of iludy ; ttiii 
Uttle woiii, 10 the boon of rclaxa- 
tton. The objool of botli, however, 
ii lo pramute the best inU'realt of 
their readers. 

" The ivbiiance of theie [alet. wiili 
Ifae eiceptiou bf une or (ro, ita> deli- 
vered ai a leipectable neminary for la- 
dlei in the rielgbbourhood nF the metru- 

Cli>. Thcj were taken from a mulll- 
de itniitar lo them, not ■■ beiiiK ihe 
bMta but beCBDie die; prettnird Ibcn- 
leltei tlisl. The lekion of their recital 
wai, Ibal ihe autbor deemed il hit diitj. 
Id maintaining the character of a tutor, 
not ID Idle ilglit tif tbat which tKloogs 
In a Cfaiiiliui niniuer. He iheretbre 
took ad'aniige of ihe few momeiiii that 

were lei apart for refreib "-■ 

tea-table, when buiin™ wa 

to remiad liii Fair pupili, 

which might be MOMwhat picaiing at 

w«U at iiuuaaive. that it wu of int- 



I porlaDce la be amtalilaahd bappy, twf 
I in lime onlj, but also in eiernifj. Fat' 
I I ibe aake of inming varitlji. the tiorj 
. I wat inuallj founded oil one of ibe leitf 
1 I Ihai bad been ptracbrd fruiD Ibe pte^ 
; I ceding (iiibbBlh) and twii ur I Imp n/a*- 

amwan, i«tni»aied ibe affair, fu what 

plied the rctaiDr ia iedvnnt; bai Ibit 
be knewi. ihiil when Ik bbi iu danger 
or deviating (ruia ihe cu-Iuni ihn.agh 
presi or huilneii, Iha yuung ladiii •!• 
rfajn took cate in Intimate, in ■ manner 
■uScienil; iniellicitil'i ihuugb rmpcc^ 
ful, lha< ilrej had not had Ibeir lala." 

We rejoice \a tM mtr vcnerkbts 
Mill etieented frknd tbut iiirttally 
emplojed. It h of gtreit ito]<Ort* 
miec, D(rt mercij tbal *■ what H 
wrillen be nprighl, even worda of 
truth." bat niao tbat " the preacher 
seek to and out aerrptahle wtnb," 
tbu» deiervirii; tbe cummeiHlatiaa 
iriveii ill the lacred itraclea to hiB 
" thai tBimitlh aoitls." We pray 
Uiat his valuable life may be loof 
•pared ns a blCKsini; to tbe (iaiif 
iiem-r«1ion. ami that bit lalwura t« 
ia gmyd ma) be, crowned with Ah* 

Oar opiniDD of the work eaDSM 
be mure correut'j given than io tbo 
fuilowing extract uf a letter whick 
H'e have juM tven, written to ■ 
person who resides above liztf 
milra from Ibe inttrn|ioli*, and wuB 
which »e ahall cunrliide. 

" I have lately real! with verj great 
ptealuie Mr. Burii)idi:'> Tva-lable Chat. 
I'lii) miiiixtr leeni) (0 be in Ibe haUt of 
prencbing liii lermunt twice ovorj— 
un(;e in the pulpit ; and ilie Kcund iimc< 
Horked up inin entertaining and very 
eriifjiiig altegurifi, ai ihe lea-tiblc, b»- 

habit of giving to hit fair pnpila. Not 
knowing what more acceptable pretent 
la make jou, I hi*« pnrchaaed and 
now tend nne, of which I beg joat 
acceptauEe." 

• ♦ ■ — 

LITERARY INTELLIGENCE. 

Jiut PMiiAtd. 

WsxT ia Life, and other Foenu, By 






itiley. 



■ Con. 



Plain Truth). 
Baptiani, ConfirBmiiuni he. 4d. 

MiKellaneuaa Thonghit on Divina 
Subjactij together with Eitracts boa 
t«iM bT the beat telipani Aathoih 



*t 



fa 



?^ 



3ntM^ntt, Sfc. 



bortui ofm LeHirfrom the Rev. Dr. 
SimughUn of PbiUuUlphU, to Mr. 

Mt Af A\R BllOTBRB* 

By ih« ^'*p JartiQe, I have tlie plea- 
tUTo of sending yoa a hiic» dnd with it 
aome of oar recent publicaiiont. Tiiese 
will inforni you of the state of things 
among as tn a roitsionary point of view. 
We have imuiy trials, but the pului tree 
can austain pressure. The cause is the 
Lord's, and his kingdom must come* 

Brother Ward biis arrived in America. 
t bare revived a letter from him, dated 
New York, bat have not yet had the 
pleasure of seeing him. I hope he may 
do lomething iii •these States that shall 
amply repay bis visit 

We have a fine building rising in 
Washington city — foiir stories liigh, 117 
feet by 50, for the accommodatiuii of a 
national. Baptist, theological institution, 
TwentT young meb are now studying in 
Phila<(elphia, some of whom are persons 
of considerable promise. These will, in 
tU probability, be removed to the fe. 
derml eity, at the close of the next styn- 
mer. When it is expected the building 
will ba ready for their reception. Mr. 
Ira Cbaie, a professor in the Institution, 
is a young man, whose habits of study 
hit laborious, and whose talents are of 
a superior order. The education, like 
the mission concern, meets wah consi- 
derable opposition ; but I trust it will 
exceedingly grow and increase. 

What a painfull reverse has occurred 
III Bnrmah^ Yoii will be pleaded with 
the manlj, godlv temper that breathes 
through Mr. Jodfon's journal. Let us 
hope that all these scenes, uupropitioos 
as is their aspect, will yet termiuaie in 
Ihie furtherance of the gospel. 

ne Lord bless yoa. Ever jours, 

W. Stavohtok. 



T%e foikwhig Extract from the 
Jmuntml of the Rev. Mr. Judeon, 
eemtmini the aecouut to which Dr. 
StemghUm ailudee. It it copudfrvm 
mtAmeritmH Qmrterfy PibUe^tion^ 
emMed '' The Latter Day Lu- 
MlMAAT for November, 1820." 

Appiicitioii to the New Emperor of 
Btittak \ff ifae Amrioui Misnouariet, 



for permiwlon to propagate ChfisUahity 
in his Empire. 

/oatiory i7.-*We left the boat, and 
put oors«lv<sr under the conduct of 
Moung Yo. He carried us first to Mya* 
daymen, as a matter of form; and then 
we learnt, that the Einperor had beta 
apprized of our arrival, aud said, l,et 
them be introduced. We therefore pro- 
ceeded 10 the palace. At the outer gate, 
we were detained a long time, umil ih» 
various officers were sati^rd that w« ba4 
a right to enter, after whicti we deposit- 
ed a present f«.r the private minister oC 
state, Moung Zah, and were ashered into 
his apartments iu the palace-yard. He 
received tis verj pleasantly, aud order* 
ed us to sit before several governors and 
petty kings, who were waiting at his lo- 
veer We here, for the first time, dist 
closed our character and olycct--4ol4 
him, that we were missionaries or " pro-' ' 
pagators of relighin ;•• that we wished to 
appear before the emperor, and present 
our sacred books, accompanied with a 
petition. He took the petition into his 
hand, looked over ab<»ut half of it, and 
then familiarly asked several questiooft 
about our God and our religion, to which 
we replied. Just at this chsis, some one 
announced, that the golden foot was 
about to advance; on which the minister 
hastily rose up, and put on his robes of 
state, saying, that he must seise the mo* 
ment to present us to the emperor. We 
now found, that we had unwittingly 
fallen on an nnpropitioos time, it being 
ttie day of the celebration of the laU 
victory over the Cas^ys, and the very 
hour when his Majesty was coming 
forth to witness the displi^ made cm 
the occasion. When the minister was 
dressed, lie just said, •* How can yon 
propagate religion iu this empire? tint 
come along.'* Our hearts sunk at theae 
inauspicious words. He conducted us 
through various splendour and parade* 
until we ascended u flight of stair s.and en- 
tered amostmagnificeui halLHe directed 
us where to sit, and took bis place oe 
one side ; the present was placed on the 
othter, and Moung Vo, aud another oA. 
cer of M>a day-men, sat a little behind* 
The scene to which we were now intro- 
duced, really surpassed our expectation 
The spacious extent of the hall. tbA 
number and magnitude ot ^bA ^^C^ikh 
the height of Oie Aome, \Xia iiVAa 



€6 



OBITOAliT. 



ilierefbrc, of Uiese g^oldeh morning 
flowers, and' beslow them on your 
l)Ook. A noble pcnon, of all otbers, 
has need of learuhig, and therefore 
should coBtribnte most time to it; 

'for, besides that it gilds hitf honoar, 
and sets off his birth, it becomes his 

'IfeiiiplDyment, which aiftfleman, of 
^; all others mast not want, if he will 
B^cnre his soul, honour, and estate, 
all which are in most certain danfi^r 
ih)m idleness, the rock of nobility, 
€on8idering the plenty of his table, 
and society, with all sorts of tempta- 
tion. If, therefore, he be a hard 
student, he is not at leisure to l>e 

' Titious : the devil knows it is to no 
'•» purpose to tempt a busy man. Be 
always, therefore, employed : and 
becauRC some are triflingly active, 
that you may not with them be idly 
Imsy, your book will itastrilct you 
how. O Frank, did you but hear 
the complaints of excellent person- 

. ages, for missing of that opportunity 
^"which you are now master of; or 

'could you but suppose yourself old 
and ignorant; how tender would 
\ou be of the loss of one minute ! 
\Vhat would you not give to retnm 
to these years you now enjoy ! Let 
this consideration sink deep and set- 
tle in you. Be more curious of the 
expense of your time than of your 
gold; time being a jewel whose 
worth is Invaluable, whose loss is 
]rrep4rable: therefore secure the 
present time, that you may not here- 
after lose more by a vain bewailing 
of the past. 
Now, because the best of learning 



is to study yourself, and I hate n>V 
son to believe I have some skill hi , 
you, having so curiously obsenpe^l 
your nature and inclinations, I shall 
make some useful discourse in order 
to this knowledge, by which you 
may both see your defects and 
amend them. 

The most profitable and necessary 
thing in the world is to know and 
study thyself. Wherefore, with all 
the plainness, siuoerity, and obser- 
vation you can make in yonr best 
temper of mind and body, lay your- 
self open to yourself: take an im- 
partial survey of all your abilities 
and weaknesses, and spare not to 
expose them to your eye by writing, 
which I conceive the best ^one 
by framing your own character, and 
so to draw the picture of your mind, 
which I recommend to yonr yearly 
practice during your life. This, 
Frank, if you flatter not yonrself, 
will be your best looking-glass, 
and must needs have a singular in- 
fluence upon your religion,'and serve 
your soul extremely wdl to very 
high purposes; for, by this meah^, 
your growth or decay in piety will 
be discovered, and, consequently, 
ways for the increase of that growth, 
or for the repairing of those decays 
and breaches in the soul, will more 
readily bo found out, and be more 
easily cured. 

• » • • • To conclude : If the 
fear ofGod be the Star yon sail by, 
doubt not of a good voyage ; at least, 
be sure of a good harbour. 



^itawt^. 



Miss EUZABETH WOODHI LL. 



Miss Elizabeth Woodhill bad. the 
unspeakable privilege of being born 
of pious parents, who trained her up 
in the nurture and admonithin of 
the Lord. By restraining grace she 
was kept from following the vain 
customs of ^ sinful world; yet she 
remained « total stranger to the 



] transforming inflaence of Divine 
grace, until near three years ago, 
when, hearing a sermon by a stran- 
ger, she became deeply convinced 
of her lost condition, and her nttor 
inability to do any thing towards 
cxfiicating herself from her wretoli- 
cdness. In her diary she tbos 
writes: '* Ob may the impressioiLs 
I V\a,VQ tc«oiN^ \hii day never be 



\ 



^BVlftV. 



i wfr otl tp, bat in«y tbey piodocQ a 
lattiii^ ciioot OD my life and co^- 
dscll Lord, do thou condesccBd 
to help me, a iioor sinner 1 I now 
feel I can do nothing of myself; Oh 
teach me, and save mc, for thy 
jmeroy'a sake I Until now, the triO^ 
of time hare engnrossed me, bat to- 
day I have been led to see the infi- 
nite Talne of my never-dying soql. 
Oh nay I never cease to seek the 
Lord, until I find Him to my soul's 
salvation 1" She began to read her 
Bible with prayer, diligently attend* 
ed public worship, and retired in 
neeret to mourn over the hardness 
of her heart, and earnestly to pray 
far a right spirit to be renewed 
within her. 

Many weeks she continued the 
flibjcot of much dejection and dis- 
tress, yet still pressed with diligence 
aOcr some sweet assurance of inter- 
est in the forgiving love, pardon, and 
salvation of God. At length the fa- 
voured hoar arrived, under a sermon 
preached by Mr. Earl, March 18, 
1818, from John xli. 32 : Andif The 
i^Ud up, &c. Her hardness of heart 
was. dissolved, and all her powers 
were engaged, fixed, and concen- 
trated, in behol^ng with an eye of 
faith a crucified Saviour. She felt 
she could give up her soul, her life, 
jier all, to him who had done so 
much for her. From that time she 
went forward in the divine life, fre- 
quently, (as her Diary expresses,) 
enjoying sweet communion with 
God as her Saviour. 

It is about six months since it 
pleased God to afflict her with that 
disease which terminated her mortal 
career* At its commencement she 



« 



was atfced by a Mewl, whM liie. 
thought of her s*4«atk>n« and if 4i% 
had any anxieties respecting ro^o- 
very. She replied, *' No, I have 
left it with the Lord: if he sees fit ^ 
restore me, it is wtU: if not, it ia 
welL I am quite suboisaive to the 
will of God." Sho waa fisvouiecl 
throughout with a sweet composur^ 
of spirit, waa always placid, and was* 
never once heard to utter a mur- 
muring word. She said, ^ I dare 
not murmur ; the Lord is so kind: 
so gently lie deals with mo, laying 
1 upon me no more than he enables 
me to bear." 

.Conversing with a friend on Uki . 
state of her mind, in the season ^ 
extreme bodily weakness, shesaWC 
^ 1 have BO triwmpki^ but I have Wf{ 
duuktifi^ clautL Ifnl I ttmrnf^i 
I ttm loMng to J^muJ* When eft* 
tering on tM dark valley of the sha« 
dow of death, an aged and endeareif 
relative said, " How do you foel 
uow V She replied, *' Very happy.'' 
On seeing her sister weep, she saLf, 
" Do not weep for me ; I am goiof 
to glory. Jesus there stands waiting 
to receive me ;** — and in a few mi- 
nutes she sweetly fell asleep ih thf 
arms of her Saviour, August 31, 
1H30, aged twenty-four yearSt* 



* ** This account wsa written by her 
beloved friend Miss Cope, a i«w days 
after lier decease, and presentecl to hef 
grandmother, Mrs. Woodhill, John-street 
Aston Parish, at whose hoose the dear 
sufferer expired, after living chiieOy witii 
her grandfather and grandmother Air 
twenty years and upwanis " 

John Woodhill. 



3iSlebi(Ui* 



On Protestant Noneorfomdty. By 

Jatiah Gander. 

(CmUinutd from Page 27.) 

Iris vritfa regret that we turn frooi 
the more agreeable task of commen- 
dation, to advert to what we deem 
•nvxe^tkm to tl»M>frit3oftL work 



in which there is so much to admirt. 
But Mr. Conder has leftusno^altei^ 
native. 

After all that has been written 
upon the mdch-controyerted subject 
of Baptism, we are iatovia<^d Vei Vub 
INToface, that '^ il «eatnc^^ uvc'^viSu^t^. 
on tbo Whlef , lo exVwvVvV ^V%V >ft» 



!• to be tlui proper lifcht in 
which Ihfl soriptorei aothoTiBe nnr 
iVfpirdiDg the institntion, notwrlh- 
■taading tb*t It led Jiira to tunch 
npMi poioti tcKpecling which Non- 
eonroriniili tbcii)ii«ltei differ;'' and 
tkkt, " on the raatamt considera- 
tion no altematifn prenented itH«ir." 
Pref. PaftB vii. Under Ihii couvic 
tioD, Ibc Anthor htu devoted more 
than thirty P"K«" in hi* lecond to- 
Inme, to discuM llie nainre, de- 
■ign, mode, and aulject of Bap- 
turn. 

Ererj controTcrt«d point it 
open to diiiciisiion, and w« arc ffar 
Ax>m qneitioninKMr. Conder'i Wg^i 
to adopt the language ol' Elibu, in 
reference to thii, or an; other wib- 
jeot, Jaboict/'jAiHDtMiMOfnunM. But 
ibeiueruity pleaded for «ileni\\ag the 
dicuiision in Iheie paf[ei, beyond the 
prMcribed limit* of hi* subject, Into 
* pointi on which Noocoorurfniats 
UnmaelvcB differ," wc conresi we 
h»,n not been able to perceitu. To 
^Mw that fiiiptism h not a uving 
ordinanve ; — that it does nut regene- 
ntn ill mbject. whether infant or 
■dnlt, and b; whatever mode admi- 
niatered , — to clear it of all the Ta- 
bnloiH Tirtuei, and ranciful analo- 
^ei, with which it has t»e«n coirupt- 
ed in ecolesiailical eiltbliibmenls ; 
— wai clearl; a duly incambent on 
the writo', and bit work wonid have 
been inoomplete without it But 
bejond tbii line the anthor waa not 
Impelled by hli lubject A durenc« 
of the rib a/B^Urm was not ro- 
qoired in diacauing the principlec 
of Proteitant Noncaorarmify. A 
defenoe oT Jn/m/ Btmlitm is itill 
len in character. Thii is altofe- 
tfaer a work of tuperero^tiun. It ii 
the very point wliere our author 
and the EpiicopRllan meet and 
■hftke faanda. Mr. Condcr cuald ; 
faardly be Euppos(^d to fral that . 
the Baptism of Infants derived *v 
MueA iirpport from the false nollinii 
with which it is associated in crclc- 
■iaitioal establishmirnlR, as Ihnt the 
icuMval of these iihriutd render it 
neceaMry forlbwith to raise for it 
'BH abntoient out of otbrr mxtcriatii. 
Bather, porhnps, bis frmtiiilDUt dc- 
'fenoe of this hitinl observance, was 

. inleaded »» a cumpensaliou to (he 
vbnreb for the d»mmgf.» be hai dona 

ber in all lirj: other inttilMtions. Be 



this aa it may, on tbit gnmi «» 
think she is fairly entitled to all tb« 
benefit of our author's aiinnenti ia 
favour ol'lnfant Beptiim ; while W«, 
who li.ipprii to he Neiitw^ormitt* 
with respect (o (hat rite, most bo 
Protusuiat also, n> long •* it *faa}i 
appear lo us to want the seal and 
sanction of a divine anthtiiity. 

Aa a term of salvation, or a rite of 
initlalion into the visible churdi, 
the Bnptism. of Infanta Mr. C. ac 
knowledges to be in defensible : bat 

" Who Iheu ate (hepvoper ebjecli of 
Chritiian Bapliini ^ Thoie alone who 
bclicre J Aiiutrdlj. if UiB rrmiHionaf 
I'm, lilt |;rHi bicHing of the Goiptl, is 
abioluielv lutpfniled on the inlclllgrM 
HcrciieoffulhinChriM." P. 466. 

That the remission of sins is not 
suspended on the intelligent exar^ 
rise of faitb, in any case where such 
an exercise is naturally impossible, 
is freely granted. And that it is not 
su upended on the admjnislration of 
any external rile, will also be ad- 
mitted by those who have not swal- 
lowed tha monilroas dogm« sf Dr. 
Mant and his disciples, " that all 
besides are left to the uacovenjuited 
mercies of God." But neither of 
these concessions will negative tha 
position that failfa is a pterequislto 
to Baptism. Baptism may be stn- 
peoded on the exercise of faitl^ 
though the rcjniasion of sios is not: 
and It M lAui mtptiided, if the tesU- 
loony of our author may be addaned 
as legitimate uilhotity. 

« No*, tincc none cstt faTglve tini baX 
Cod only, an icccplaiiee or Jeiu* Christ 



fa Teacher,— a btli^in 
Uc Filbar, ihe Snn, and 
•L'« attuthl It lAftbciiv 
■Bit (f Ckriti fer 1I14 n- 
P. 459. 



abi>D"i 
leli Ml 



In whose name fhcn are nncon- 
scious babes baptized, whom our 
anilior acknon UdRes to Iteincapabk 
of thAl/aiM which was made rfsa*- 
tittl lo thin Chi isliun ordinance ! If 
,1 powar CNisI lo remit any of Ihe 
rtsciilial Ifms n/'n Chtitliiat iiulila- 
liDK.tbat power, .ue apprehend, must 
bo adequate " lu dcvtcc rites and 
certnionies." 

It we «avat^\Attt« s-ftabeKcat dt- 



RBVISW. 



OD 



%e shall be as little warranted to 
conclaae that Infants are its proper 
■objects. 

^ That the rite or action of Baptism 
was sjmbolical either of repentance or 
ol the remission of transgression, by no 
means follows from this being the distin- 
gonhiog docirine of hts ^i. e. John's) 
preaching. Ilie Jewish washings had 
certainly no sueh significance; tliej 
were t\ |Hcal of moral cleanliness, bnt 
tlie only instance in which the affusion 
of water was em{)!oyed as an expiatory 
rite is that in which ilie whole efficacy 
was derived from the ashes of the sacri- 
ficed heiter. The occasions oiv which 
the c^rt^moiiial purificaiions under the 
LaW became requisite, were not such as 
immediately called for repentance; they 
ft«quen:ly related tu involuntary eitriu- 
tie pollution. The Baptism of John, on 
Che tontraty. Was designed to signify a 
moral ctiange, a total cleansing, of per- 
manent virtue, and the true idea of the 
figure teems to be, tht purif'ymg in- 
Jbynct •/ kk$ docirine uym thi mindJ* 
P. 441. 

In accordance with this sentiment 
tfie author obterves of Baptism, as 
oooDected with the Christian sys- 
tm, that 

** The rite of Baptism was symbolical- 
1j tlgaificaiit neither of belief nur of 
repentance, hot it continued to represent 
the desMtned effect of Divine iiisiruc- 
.tion,'* i.e. moral purity. *' In the same 
tense, it seems the must natural to un- 
derstand the strongly figurative Ian- 
goage of onr Lord's conversation with 
iliciHlemus, by rclerring it to the rege- 
neration of mind which a proselyte un- 
derwent who realiy embraced the doc- 
trhta inf vtkich he wts baptiied." P. 447. 

Speaking of its moral significance, 
and in reference to its mode, Mr. C. 
•Ilerwwds remarks, 

" As tymbolical of moral pnrity or 
desniing, any mode of adirinisteiing it 
■light seem to be of e^nal significance; 
%ot that of immersion appears to roe to 
be less appropriate to its specific import, 
asd to be at the same tune more likely 
to coontenance the superstitious notion 
ef its ^eaey at washing away siu.'* 
P. 451. 



HsTijig adduced these passages in 
lelatioD to the ni^ecl of Baptism, it 
■d^bt seem to be departing from this 
object to notice the author's reasoii- 
iif Id refereBoe to the inodlf. But 
wfihootloifav iisbtofoorjNfuiaipaJ 



design, a specimen 6f Mr. C/s logio 
on this point may claim our atten- 
tion for a moment We refer to the 
passage last quoted. It appears bv 
the conrse of the arrnment of which 
this passage forms. tne opening, that 
Mr. C. is wishing to establish the 
position, that the baptism of adults 
by immersion is fa? ourable to the 
notion of its possessing a regenerat- 
ing efficacy; — a charge, in which be 
is not borne out either by faCt or 
reason. Not by fact. For with 
whom has this superstitious notion 
originated ; and where are the advo- 
cates of it to be found ? Not amongst 
those who administer Baptism by 
immersion on a profession of faith ; 
but with those who practise a dif^ 
ferent mode, and upon subjects en- 
tirely passive. N either is this charge 
supported by the reason of the case. 
Christian faith is held to be one of ' 
the fruits and evidences of regene>- 
ration, and inseparable from it. 
Hence where faith is made a pre- 
requisite to Baptism, by whatever 
mode it is administered, so long a£ 
this constitutes an essential term of 
the institution, a state of regenera- 
tion is presupposed bv the admini^ 
stration of the rite. Where one thing 
is made an indispensable prelude to 
another, it cannot be supposed to 
be subsequent to, or simultaneous 
with it ; or to produce that, of the 
existence of which it is required as 
'* a sign and attestation.^' This 
would be equi\iUent to the placing 
of an effect antecedently to its cause, 
an error at whicb the early convertA 
from Judaism to Christianity would 
certainly never arrive, as Mr. C. has 
stated, *' by a ])rocoss of association 
I the most natural." They who make 
faith indispensable to Baptism are 
therefore sufficiently secured against 
the danger of ascribing to it a rege- 
nerating efficacy, by the terms of the 
institution. They are amongst the 
last on whom such an error is fairly 
cliargeablo, notwithstanding oiur 
author's readiness to fix it upon 
them, even at the hazard of contra- 
dicting himself. For, in the passage 
before quoted, Mr. C. argues, that 
any mode of administering the rito 
might seem to be of f^piMi sigidft- 
cance as a si^mboi q( moral 




Ui iprciiic Import uiT at tbc lawc 
Ijint; to be mdi'« blulg to coiiutc- 
Juncc llio iupeialitioui notion of its 
^cacy tu Ktuhing away "!>■ Su' 
why more liketg to couDictmnca tite 
,sapcnlilioa;i nolinn ofili effieHcj- in 
MMutg' Avov till, if u)j mode be 
^tuitijf ly nilonCB f o/" g mora/ uiuAia^? 
The argdmcnt appcKnlonn lorom- 
ulelF a aolcct(.ni, Uiat wo know not 
' ^w tn sccoiint for it wilboiit lup- 
pomf lliat the urller'* prcjadiccs 
lipou lljis Mllijcct liaie belraycil bis 
niKliTiitBndiiig. But paising Ihii ; 
^e wish nioru purlicDlarty fu direct 
our feRden' atleiition t<i liio symbo- 
lical desigu of Ibc rile, in rfleroncp 
.'to llicm^ecl, axBtatcil in Ibc abovt 
quoin I ions. 

irfiaplnmbcsi'Dibolical uriDoial 
purity, or of the cluaniing effiuaoy ol 
iboio christian ductriaet iulo which 
the subject is bapttBcd, u Mr. C. 
has stated, it leem.i iiilural lu aik. 
Wilb what propriety can it bo ad- 
miniiletcd to oue, borv in tin, and 
fiopcn in iniijuily, irbiJe yet incajia- 
We of IweominR the subject of that 
fii'lk ukith pitrifielk the heart' 
Wherein consists tlm significance oi 
■ppropriatencts of tbii mystic sign, 
M applied tr> Ibe rprlain heir i ' 
depraved and polluted nature, 
oeroiognllom no eviilcncc can have 
been furnished that he is, or 
will be, the subject of that grace 
vhich can alone sanctily tind 
Cle«n*e it! The moral dcGlement 
i* certain, because universal ; WAe 
tan bring a cfnM tAing aid i>f «■ tiit- 
ibaa? not one. Bat the languaj^e 
ofPctcr, wo apprehend, would not 
admit of an application eijually ex- 
tended : _ Sftiug ye iaee purifird 
gourHhet in obti/utg lAe IridA tAraugh 
tit Spirit. 

Are all who are horn into the 
world born of^ain, not o^ camiptUiU 
Htd, hul 0^ inaiiTuptHU. iy tht word 
^Cod, ic&ch iivrth ttitdabidtlhfor tver! 
* That such a change ncccseuily, or 
Mnally tikei place ol Bipiiim," Mi. C. 
jntly ubscrvo " is disproved by Ihtin- 
xontrovcrtible irguiDEnt uf fsct.* • • ■ ■ 
Thr proof afiuchachinge being alfnct- 
•M upffl the ordiiianee, leeinf; thai lerip- 
•arc conisini no promise in that iffeet, 
nn netei he obtained." P. 4t€. 

' Tlie aamu " ineoMutmU* mrgu- 
ttaU," ire ajiprehcud, will equal tj 



di]|KOTe tho n. 
saty ch^ge, &t the time the ha»- 
tiinial rite is adminialcrei), and in 
precisely the name nninber of.in- 
Ktances. And that the cleansing ^- 
cacy nf Ihe goiipel on the mind of 
the iinconicioiis subject, will cer- 
tainly be realiiod at any subseafucnt 
period, " seeing that scripture oob- 
taiiis no promise lu lliat effect, can 
never tw ohiatncd." 

That all whom infinite Witdon 
doirigns to remove frnm this Mate of 
trial ere pprsnnal responiilbility 
commence!!, are comprehended In 
the provisions of sDTcrei;;ii Mercy, 
wc iiate no qiirstioji. But tbete 
can only lie knoHn, and Ibe change 
wroD^bt upon tbi'ir incipient power* 
only perceived, by Him, in. whoae 
giHciuus pnrposei they art) inclnded. 
UetwiHjD those who are lints early 
sanctified, by (he immediate ope- 
ration of (he Holy Sfiirit, and re- 
moved beyond Ibe power of temp- 
laliun nilboot feeling ils flails, or 
bearing its scan; and tbose who 
shull be called to encounter ftii the 
perils of probation, we cannot dis- 
criminate at the time the haptitmal 
rito is adminislcrcd. Aud if we 
could, wc s)iould*slitl be at a loss to 
perceive the approprialcocss of the 
symbol as applit-d to eillier. 

For with respect tu tlie former; 
if, as our author itslra. " the Ime 
idea of the figure seem* lo be, tbe 
purifyitif; inllucnce of oHy dbrtritie 
upon tht mt'iu/;" if it was designeil 
lo represent Ihe regeneration of 
mind which a prosclytft underwent 
who Ttalhf taitracedihe daelriwt inio 
wiiich he was baptised, its myslio 
design is loxt, as applied to those 
whose faculties in tlic present Rtahi 
will never be suflicieutly develo[ied 
to aiiprehcnd tbem, God kavinrjrmn 
lit irginniiig rioifii tuth lo saiiwtivii 
throu^ trnietifixatioa of tht ^rit 
without tiie belirf a/' the IruUi. As 
a ifmhal of tlie sancliriiitg fffirty 
of truth vpon the hmrl, the wtll- 
knonn operation tif death as a na- 
tural cnusc, munI reader it &n nn- 
nieaning ceremony us to alarfepro-' 
portion of those lo whom it hi ap- 
plied. And with rcsfiect to the ihI, 
tboav wbu arc called to eno«ODter 
(ha tcmplations of Ihe world, rbc 
Besb, and tbe devil ; ve hare " Ibe 



;iL V i i.w . 



; i 



xiicontestahle ai'f^unieni offnct,'' tliat 
the Cleansing; efficacy of the gospel 
id nut unilormly realiieil in them. 
'Fhere is, Kays ' the wise man, a ge- 
iteraiimt that mre pure in their own 
eifes, ttnd yet ta t not woikedfrom their 
fUikines$, 

Far be it from nx to wish to en- 
ronrage a contracted, or a distrnst- 
fnl view of the pnrifying influence 
of tlie gfospel on the hesirts and lives 
of men i but against the '* incun- 
tcstable ai|^ment of fact" there is 
DO appeal. The sanctifying opera- 
tion of the gospel, on tlie spirits of 
those who shall he spared to hear 
its sounil, being thus awfully pre- 
c^ioua, sHFely the mystic exhihitiuu 
of that efficacy must bo premature. 
in aU cases, therefiire, the bnptism 
of infants, as it appears to us, is 
.symbolical of a moral transforma- 
tion, of which the subject can afl'ord 
no ciidence, and for the prospective 
expression of whiuh scripture has 
given us no authority. And it is 
unnecessary to remind Mr. C. that 
^ tbe sufficiency of the srriptures is 
the foondation-stoiie of protestant- 
isB.'' For after having argued fur 
the baptism of infants on the ground 
that anch are included in the pur- 
poses of sovereign grace; with a 
bnppy disregard to consistency, he 
reraarkSy that " the will of GcmI, 
ujt the divine purpose, must eou- 
alitate oor role." P. 409. 

Mr. C. observes, 

" There i«j we kaow^ a way in which 
iittle children may come to Christ ; and 
a%, while he was niton e.irih, Ihey re- 
ceived his divine benediction* so now, 
t^.iey mo^ be ninde partakers of the 
hlestings of hi« death.** P. 467. 

A case which has often been re- 
ferred to; and which may well 
enough be cited as an examph; to 
pious pan'nt;} to bring their infant 
oflspring in tbe arms of their faitli, 
'tnd present them to the Saviour; 
1 lit ufilhin;; sliort of the most ex- 
it eme necessity, could induce such 
writers as Mr. C. to press into the 
argument fiir this ritual observance, 
a passage in which it is neither ex- 
pressed nor implied ; whore there is 
no more allusion to Baptism than to 
the iiupper, either in the text or tliu 
cdotext; and whirh, by the same 
Utitude of ioferenre, might be urged 



in favour of a!)si)liilion, conHrma- 
ti(ui, or sii^uing with the sign of the 
cross. AVhat would become of Pro- 
testant Nonconformity if such a law 
of interpretation were once admit-- 
ted i and if to acts of pious dedica- 
tion, ritual observances were thus 
easily attached ? 

In adopting such kind of reason- 
ing in favour of Infant Ba|)tism, and 
it is on this account particularly to 
be regretted, our author loses tliat. 
vantage ground, which he hatf m 
nobly occupied in dcmolishiuff tfao 
unscriptural ceremonies of the Ro- 
mish Hierarchy. Take a passage 
i\r two as a specimen. 

The danger of attaching to reli- 
gious actions, adventitious circtim- 
stances, not authorized by scripture, 
is thus pointedly exposed. 

" Thii wooden engine proves to con- 
tain within itself a huftiile army. What 
may not by this artifice be snuggled 
into the christian church? Rituft are 
circumstances, ceremonies arc circuni- 
sianccsi, circumstances fitting and de- 
cent in order to the due celebration of 
divine worship. The cross in baptism 
i.H a circumstance ; so are the spittle* and 
the oil* and the salti circumstances ; 
such is the use of the cruciiix it»elf. 
The consecration of churches is a cir- 
cumstance; !io is the consecration of 
water, of vestments, ond of images. 
The Prayer-book and tbe Mass-book aru 
ahke circumstaRcef, and so are all tbe 
mummeries of Rome. • • * 

• ••*••• 

Tlie proposition, that every thing re- 
lating tu the worship of God» which is 
not commanded, is forbidden, presents 
after alh when rightly understood* the 
only satisfactory conclusion on which 
we can rest./ • • • » 

• • • • • • • 

Whatsoever is added as a moral or reli- 
ligious circumstance, with the view of 
constituting the action either more effi« 
cient, or more acceptable to the Lord of 
worship* is to be condemned as super- 
stition ; it being that »ort of addition to 
the commandments of God, which is 
I eipresslif forbidden. The application of 
this axiom may* like that of every ge- 
neral principle, be a matter of some 
delicacy ; for this very reason* the de- 
cision must uliimately be left with con- 
science ; but thus much there is lio room 
for hesitation in alfirming, that all sym- 
bolical, or ceremonial worship, not ex- 
! preisly instituted by God biraself, bor- 
I dcrs upon ittodaV idoVviU^. 'V^*^^tov 



a ptn bf waiibip. tUrthre (lie; aife 
Aoiihip, «]d ADntiip uncmumBtided ii 
furbiddcn,^ — the iDilugy wurrkuu the 
me of ihe mcuphor.-^il ii iirungtfiTt 
Till rilual canKcratiou o( pinun and 
thingi."'— and mighl mii iht aiillii>r liMve . 
kddcii. of pBrniDi — i. e. iiirdtiiij — " u 
clearly no part of iha citcumtiauiiili of i 
olMilleace ) ii h» no iclaiiun to anj p»- 
Mrt tomathdmtai, ltd lun-l be c\»ii- 
tB with tlioM pitpable i;g[rupliaii> ufl 
ChiiittanUj b; Imman iDimilun, wlilcli 
tlia ipripturei poiiiicdijr eondniitii ' ll 
' e power of min,' it hai bceil 



fell r 



mrkiid 



r.lig)<n. 

Mn mabe mitie to.' Here Pruiettaola 
•recalled Dpon to nuke ■ tlaiid. and lo 
tailcnl* the Ikmaui deciaratiait of Cliil- 
liuworth in terniHincHhal iLiKliGirfl I 
lb. New I'ntamfiit, the Nrw T«U. 
Awcl inly i> Ihe religion ut Clirliliaai." 
P. 347—350. 

- ThvwaTYumpoUbrealhPttMverT 
tonl nfProteiliinlitiii ; and Tor tlii-lV 
reflex operation on tlwriltioriiiniiit 
Bapliinl mp are not reipoii;<ililt9. 
, Bui Mr. C.'« defence of Ihat rite in 
-a Ae lanit) volume, we oonfes*, dovn 
not appear to ui liit tppU$ of gul,l 



pin-tinee lo be amlatla a'Ad ^PPfi >»' 
in lime only, but also in eiernilj. Fat' 
liMj, the Morf 



(jiied the teluior ii ienvrant ; bai thit 
he liiiowi, ihal wlicn h« wa'i in danger 
of dEviitliij[ (ruiB (lie cu'loni Ihn.ogh 
preif Of huiineu, the juttng ladlo al- 
^myi look caPe tnifirioialei in a laannCf 
■ufficicnily iiiitllii!ibl'i ihiMKh mpecU 
(v\, tha< iliv; had ool had Ibcir Mia." 



Sendiiart/ for Laditt, Bj/ Rahtri 
b«mii£i, A. M. Vul. I. tl» 
Pasei. l^ino. fidi. Oa. fid. 
" TItt M^igioH ^ MmJuHd," by 
Hit aame astDor, reviewrd pp. 419 
-^23 of oar lait Tolome, was bet- 
ter Miiled to the hofara af aitiAy ; this 
Ultle work, to the boors of rclasa- 
lioii. I'be object of both, bowever, 
to lo promote the best inttresta of 
Ibeir readers. 

" The subiiance of ihcie talci, *itli 
Ibe eicepiiou of otie or two, liu deli- 
**red at a rwpeitable >eniiuary lot li- 
die* In the iielghbnDrhood nf Ihe nieiru- 
polii. Thcj wece taken fionl a malll- 
lade tlnilBT to ihem, no! a> beiiiji ihe 
beat, but beeaoie they p[»«alec) thcni- 
keltei flni. The leUDii of ibeii recital 
wai, (hat ihe author deemed ii hit dulj, 
In nainlainiog the character of a tutor, 
not 111 lose ligiit nf ibat which beloagi 
to a Cbriiiivi tainitter. He therefore 
took ad'anlage of Ihe few 

in bUiiiv 
to remind hit fair f , 
wbicb might be aoiDewhat pleating aa 
— " - ^- — ^te, Ibat it WB» of im- 



We rejoice to we 
and ealeerocd friend tfana aicttally 
enplojed. It ii of ftatt iii|Mr1* 
niicc, not mrret; that ** what W 
written be aprigbl, even worda of 
irutli." but hImi ibal " the pr ew che r 
aerk lo ftnd out mmflmbte wtnk^ 
tbus de*er*iiiK tlie cummendalioa 
Kiveo iu the lacred oraoka to huB 
" that vimietk sonla." We prsj 
lliBI bla valuable life may be long 
Dpared ni a btCKsiii^ to ihe limaf 
geiil'nHioo. and that hi* laltoars 19 
do ftHxl ma} be ,ciowtiCd with tak- 
neiit Buncew. 

Our (iplnion of tbe work eanDot 
be mure correvl'j given than id lbs 
ruHowing ektraet uf a letter whiiA 
M'e have just ti-en. writleo to • 



" ih 

pleatare Mr. Buriiiidi:'j T 
Thii niiiiiiict ternii lo be in ihe faabll of 
prencUiiig hit iriniunt twice Over^ 
uiiiiti 111 (he pulpit 1 and ihe tecood liawy 
worked up ialo ciileiltiniDg and voj 
ertifymg allegurip), at ihe lea-table, ti- 
■Keen ibe leuoni which be ii in tlw 
hibil of giving to hit fair pD|dli. Not 
knowing whai mote accepiable prevent 
lo naka yoo, I have pnrchaied and 
-- J - ,f ^ijiei, I i^g jogt 



*-•-■ — 

LITERARV INTELLIGENCE. 

Jtut pMbaatd. 

WaaT ii Life, and oibci PoeiDi. B7 
Tbomaa Bailey. 3*. Mi 

Plain Troiht, 01 ConvetaatioM on 
Bapliini, Cuufitmation, jtc. 4d. 

MiKcllanpvttt Tbonghti on Ifiviu 
Sobjectaj togetfaei with Eitracti 6o» 

aoiae of tba beat laligioBa Aattaoii. 



'*;« 



n 



SfntelUgence* ^c 



bebmet oft LeUtrfrwrn the Rev. Dr. 
SitmgiiUm ^ PUituUlpkiM, to Mr. 
JvtMfjft dUtdNmt, 11, 18-iD. 

lUr BiAk Brotbkb» 

Bjr the tbip Jartine, I hate ihe plea- 
core of seoding jou a liiie» And wiih it 
Bone of our recent publicaiiuns. These 
will mform you of the state of things 
umoDg us in a lUMsionary p<iiiil of view. 
We have inaiij trials, but the palm tree 
tan Mutain pressure. The cuum is the 
Lord's, and bis kingdom must come* 

Brolber Ward has arrived in America. 
2 have received a letter from hiro, dated 
New Ymk, bnt have out yet had the 
plcaiore of seeing him. I hope he maj 
do something in 4hvse Slater that shall 
amply repay his visit. 

We have a fine building rising in 
Washington city — foiir stories iiigh, 117 
Icet by 50, for the accommodatiuu of a 
national. Baptist, theological iustitution* 
TwenlY young meta are now studying in 
PbilaJelphia, some of whom are persons 
of considerable promise. Tliese will, in 
all probability, be removed to the fe. 
derml city, ai the close of the next slim- 
mer. When it is expected the building 
will ba ready for their reception. Mr. 
Iia Cbale, a professor in the Institution, 
is a young man, whose habits of study 
bre laborious, and whose talents are of 
a superior ofder. The education, like 
the misfeion concern, meets with consi- 
derable opposition ; but I trust it will 
exceedingly grow and increase. 

What a painful reverse has occurred 
bt Bnrmah * Yon will be pleaded with 
the mauly, godly temper that breathes 
through Mr. Jud«on's journal. Let us 
hope that all these scenes^ uupropitious 
as is their aspect, will yet terminate in 
the fnttberance of the gospel. 

The Lord bl«ss you. Ever yours, 

W. Stauohton. 



Tie fiOowbig Extract from the 
Jcmruai of the Ret, Mr. Judson^ 
tmUmne the mecount to which Dr, 
SimighioH tUtude*. It is cofnedfrom 
amAmerumH QmrterUf PMutLtioHy 
etOUied '* Thb Latter Day Lu- 
MlMAAT for November, 1820." 

AppiicalioD to the New finperorof 
Bwank bj tiie AaeriPHi MiMooiriet, 



for pefmisMon to propagate Chrisliatiitr 
in his Empire. 

/anicary 17.^ We left the boat, and 
put oorselvear under the conduct of 
Moung Yo. He carried us first to Mya« 
day-men, as a matter ol form; and theie 
we learnt, that the Emperor had bccQ 
apprised of our arrival, and said. Let 
them be introduced. We therefore prof 
ceeded to the paiaCe. At the outer gaU« 
wc were detaihed a long time, until the 
various officers were «iiti«fird that w« ha4 
a right to enter, after which we deposit- 
ed a present f«»r the private minister o£ 
state, Moung Zan, and were ushered into 
his apartments in the palace-yard. He 
received us very pleasantly, and order* 
ed us to sit before i>cveral governors and 
petty kings, who were waiting at bis le- 
vee; We here, for the firat time, dia* 

closed our character and oliject tol4 

him, that we were missionaries or ** pro-' 
pAgators of religion ;•• that we wished te 
appear before the emperor* and present 
oar sacred books, accompanied with a 
petition. He Utok the petition into hit 
hand, looked over about half of it, and 
then familiarly asied several question* 
about our God and our religion, to which 
we replied, just at this crisis* some one 
announced, that the golden foot waa 
about to advance; on which the minister 
hastily rose up, and put on his robes of 
state, saying, that he roost seise the mo- 
ment to present us to ttie emperor. We 
now found, that wc bad unwittioglj 
fallen on an unpropitioos time, it being 
the day of the celebraiion of the lau 
victory over the Cas^ys, and the very 
hoar wheii his Majesty was curoiiif 
forth to witness the display made oa 
the occasion. When the minister wae 
dressed, he just said, ** How can yom 
propagate religion in this empire? but 
come along.'* Our hearts sunk at tbeee 
inau«picinus words. He conducted iu 
through various splendour and parade 
until we ascendedu flight of staiis.and en- 
tered a most magnificent hall.He directed 
us where to sit, and took his place oe 
one side ; the present was placed on the 
oth^sr, and Moung Vo, and another ofi* 
cer of Myaday-men, sat a liiile behind. 
The scene to which we were now intro- 
duced, really surpassed our expectation 
The spacious extent of the haJI« the 
number and magnitude oC >^ ^^i 
the height of the Aome» >>» ^Wj^ 



74 



INVBLUGENGEi &C. 






pletdy c&Tered with gold« presented » 
most grand Ad imposing spectacle. 
Very few were present, and those evi- 
dently great officers nf state. Our situa- . 
tion prevented us from seeitig the further 
avenue oi (he hall ; but the end where 
we sat, opened into the parade, which 
tba emperor was about to inspect. We 
' ramaioed about five minutes, when every 
* ••e pat himself into the most respectful 
attitude, and Moung Yo whispered, that 
\ his majesty had entered. We looked 
^ through the hall, as far as the pillars 
h would allow, and presently caught sight 
' of this modern Abasuerus. He came 
forward, unattended » in solitary gran- 
deur — exhibiting the proud gait and ma- 
jesty of an eastern monarch. His dress 
was rich, but not distinctive; and he 
eirried in his hand, the gold-sheathed 
sword, which seems to have taken the 
place of the sceptre of ancient times. 
But it was his high aspect and command- 
hig eye, that chiefly riveted our atten- 
tion. He strided on. Every head, ex- 
aeptlngoun, was now in the dust. We 
remained kneeling, our hands folded, 
our eyes fixed on the monarch. When 
he drew near, we caught his attention. 
He stopped, partly turned towards us — 
••Who are these?" '< The teachers, great 
king," I replied. "What, you speak 
Biirraan— the priests that I heard of last 
night? When did ^ou arrive? Are 
Tou teachers of religion? Are you 
like the Portuguese priest? Are you 
married? Why do you dress so?" 
These, and some other ftimilar questions, 
we answered; when he appeared to be 
jl^leased with us, and sat down on an 
4Aevtited seat — his hand resting on the 
hilt of his sword, and his eyes intently 
fixed on ns. Moung Zah now began to 
tead the petition, and it ran thus :— • 

** TheAmerican teachers prescntthem- 
•elvesto receive the favour of the excel- 
lent king, the sovereign of laud and sea. 
Hearing that, on account of the great- 
ness of the royal power* the royal coun- 
try was in a quiet and prospj^rous state, 
we arrived at the town of Rangoon, with- 
in the royal dominions, and having ob- 
tained leave of the gOTcrnor of that town 
to come np and behold the golden face, 
we have ascended and reached the hot- 
torn of the golden feet. In the great 
eountry of America, we susuin the cha- 
fatter of teachers and explainers of the 
tontents of the sacred scriptures of our 
t«ligion. And since it is contained in 
those scriptures, that, if wc pass to other 
countries and preach and, propagate re- 
}%ion» great good will result, and both 
those who teach and those who receive 
the religion^ will be freed from futore 



ponishment, and enjoy, without decay or 
death, the eternal felicity of heaven, — 
entreating that royal permission be given^ 
that we, taking refuge in the royal power* 
may preach our religion, in these domi- 
nions, and tliat those who are pleased with 
our preaching, and wish to listen to and be 
guided by it, whether foreigners or Bur- 
mans, may be exempt from government 
molestation* they present themselves to 
receive the favour of the excellent king* 
the sovereign of land and sea." 

The emperor heard this petition, and 
stretched out his hand. Moung Zah 
crawled foiward and presented it. His 
majesty began at the top, and delibe- 
rately read it through. In the mean timCf 
I gave MouBg Zah an abridged copy of 
the tract, in which every offensive sen- 
tence was corrected, and the whole put 
into the handsomest style and dress 
possible. After the emperor had pe- 
rused the petition, he handed it back* 
without saying a word* and took the 
tract. Our hearts now rose to God for 
a display of his grace. ' O have mercy 
on Burmah I Have mercy on her king I' 
But, alas, the time was not yet come. 
He held the tract long enough to read 
the two first sentences, which assert* 
that there is one eternal God, who is in- 
dependent of the incidents of mortality* 
and that, beside Him, there is no God; 
and then, with an air of indifference, per- 
haps disdain, he dashed it down to the 
ground ! Moung Zah stooped forward* 
picked it up, and handed it to us. Moung 
Yo made a slight attempt to save us* hj 
unfolding one of the volumes, which 
composed our present, and displaying 
its beauty ; but his majesty took no no- 
tice. Our fate was decided. After a 
few moments, Moung Zah interpreted 
his royal master's will, in the following 
terms : — " Why do you ask for such per- 
mission ? Have not the Portuguese, the 
English, the Mussulmans, and people 
of all other religions, full liberty to 
practise and worship, according to their 
own customs ? In regard to the objects 
of youx petition, his majesty gives no 
order. In regard to your sacred books, 
hit majesty has no use for them, take 
them away." 

Something was now said about brother 
Colman's skill in medicine ; upon which 
the emperor once more opened his 
month, and said, "Let them proceed to 
the residence of my physician, the Por- 
tuguese priest; let him examine whe- 
ther they can be useful to me in that 
line* and report accordingly. He then 
rose from his seat* strided on t&the and of 
the hall, and ther^ after having dashed 
to the ground the fiat uuetiigance he 



INTBLLieBNCB, &e. 



h»d avcT raeettad af tke «(eni*l GoJ, 
Lit Halirr, bii FtcterTcr, fiii Judge, he 
ihrew hiiDKtf down on ft cutbion, mil 
Uy tiMrniug to ihe mule, uid guiDg 
■t (lie parade ipread oat bcfon bin ! 

A> Tot Bi *ud our preaent. we were 
linddlcd np and huiried awaja wilhoat 
■DDch ccTEDUHiy. We paued out of the 
pabce gat«, with iniieh nnis racillCf 
ihan we entered, and w«e cundncted 
firat 10 Ibe houH ol M}rB-daj-ineD. 
Thets hji officer reported oar receplian; 
bat in aa fi*ouiable tarmi at poMihle : 
aa^ a> hii highneaa was not appriied of 
oar pieciie objetl, our repulse appeared, 
pfcfaablj, to him, nol » deciaiTe, a> wg 
knew it lo be. We were ncit conduct- 
ed Iwo milea through the lua and duK 
of the ttrccti of Ati, la the teiideace 
or Ihe Pcniagaete piiett. He very apee- 
dilj Bieerlaiaed, that we were in pD»- 
•euion of no wonderful aeciel, which 
wonld aectire the emperor from all dii- 
taac, and loake taim Ii<e for attti and 
we were accordingly allowed to lake 
laaee of the reverend laquiallor, and 
tClTCai lo oat boat. 



HB. BROUGHAM'! EDUCATION 

BILL. 
It ii DOderstood that Ur. Brougbaa 
la deiermJned to press forward bU ob- 
noiioaa bill lor erecting another eitab- 
liihaienl, in conrwxioB with the episco- 
pal cbarch, under Ihe entire diroe- 
ttOQ of the parochial clergy, and to- 
wanli the expense of wliich the Diwen- 
tara moit contribute, ibould it pus into 
a law, nolwilhitanding the intuit uffc red 
by it (o them and Iheir piinciplei. It it 
the tnoit appretaivB meatore thai bu 
been aliempted tinea the " Occaaionai 



l«.dii_. 

ten ten In London are retolred to 
oppoie Ihia Injuriooa, eiclDtiie, and im- 
polilic meaaaie, by every meani wilbin 

Tie Editors feel great pleatare in 
obliging the Couimillee of the ■■ Fmlei- 
■ant Snciel; ," &c. by inserting the fol- 
lowing Docmnenti upon ihe above snb- 
ieet, (m Psgt 89 i) tliongb from Ihcii 
bting Mnt to late, it has reqaiied an ad- 
dUicnal quantity ot Ictier-pcau. 

NEW CHURCH FORMED. 

■n-iOIVPt, fiTAFFORDSHIRE. 

Oh Friday, Deoetnbci 1, 1810, i 

Ckwcb -wH foratd m the BapEiil 



Chapel, Hanley, StaArdtfake.* Eight 
perioni, rrsiUent in Hanley, who were 
niembfnof tlie Baptist Church at I^vrv 
tem, received Iheir djiraiauaa UiT that 

Rev, J. Newlandi Independent, began 
iih reailing the icrlplDret and prayer. 
Rev. J. Hinmeis detciibed the nature sf 
ChtiHian Church, frooi 1 Cor. ii. 
9—17: and implored the divine bleu- 
pon the union Ihoi publicly reciig- 
. TheRev. W.Farmei, Indcpen- 
denl,eihDried Ihe choicb frotaFhit, i. 37, 
and concluded with prayer. It give* us 
pleatute to annonnce thai Ibit lioase of 
ptajer, which hat lo lougremained in a 
desolate sluie, hat been repaired, and is 
regularly lupplied. Still it n regretled. 
that nolwilhitanding ihe libetaliiy of the 
fricndt who have nened ihenueltei for 

s debt of Ihree hundred aikd forly-foar 
pounds upon the. ohapel, it having cost 
fodr hundred and BUj pounds, and one 
hundred and fifty pounds having been 
ei(j>ended in rep^rs. The harden rena 
pnndjially opon an individual, who faa% 
in thii caie already cietle'd himself tn 
the Dtmost, which rendetl an appeal to 
the liberality of Ibe Chtlstian public in- 
disprnttbte, and from tlie nalnrc of the 
pase it it eacneMlj hoped it will not t>e 



Sermon for tha Rtlirf tf PruUilvU 
JHuntling Miidtttrt' Withttl. 






The Annual Sermoii n 
the benevoleni porpuiea o 
for the relief of nrcetiiloat wiaowi ano 
children of Proletlant Diatenting Mi- 
nitten, is expected to be preached by 
the Rev. W.J. Fo(,ofPailiBnient-coiiil. 
Anil I en- lane, Bisliopsgale, at ibe Old 
Jewry Chapel, lemoved to Jewin-atreel, 
Alderagale, on Wednesday noon, Ihe 4lU 
day of April nenl. 



POET OF LONDON SOCIETY 
PrmMtuig Mttigim among Stamat. 

APnauc HatTiRo will be held at 
Free-masnnt' Tavern, Great Queen- 
•trcel, UncolnVhii^Eeldt, on Tuesday, 
Febroavy 13, 1811 — Tbe Cbait lo be 
laken at twelve o'clock. 

* See an accoant of the le-opeoiag nf 
this place of wurthip in oifc NvnlKt Cm 
Jnne, 1B30, f«yaHt< 



t9 j^detr^^ 



Iro TH* MEMORY OF MRS. HANNAH CHAMBERLAty, 
• ' -The Wife of one of the Missimtaries tU Seramport, 
WaO DIBD AT CviwA,Nov. 14, 1804. 

Owasioned by reading the affecting Narrative nf her Decease, iu Mr. (now Dr.)r 
Marihman't Letter to Mr. SutcUffe ; in the 3d Volume uf the i'eriodical Accoouis 
%i the Baptist Mitaion. 

** Th€ tighte(na ihall he hi everlasting remembrance.** Psalm ciii. 6. 

HeARD ye that sitrh ? It breath'd from Serampore — 
The mf% the mother, sister, is no more ! 
She, to the will of God supreme resigned, 
Cross*d the wide sea, and loft her borne behind; 
Her father, mother, kindred, country, all, — 
Save one iov'd object. To the heavenly call 
Not disobedient See ! see her leave 
Her native land, and tempt the briny wave, — 
IVbere |M>on her firat-bom finds nn early grave ! 
I'he veil we draw o'er tliat affecting scene, 
The feeling roimi knows what sueb partings meaub 
Bont on the sea, her infant's voyage ends. 
The molher childless — distant from her frieDda-^ 
Yet is she still supported, and she sees 
A Fatlior's band, though vcil'd in mysteries ; 
Yields up her babe, nor at ber lot repines,' 
Mtowmtf but not tnumturi, at his wise designs. 
$ee ber safe landed on a heathen shore — 
£iee, and with her, the Christian's God adore I 
His God in Christ, in ludia't fervid clime, . 
Sov'reign of earth, air, sea, eternity, and time I 

How shall a stranger tell the moumfol tale, 
Franght with unusual interest? How paint 

Her blest df'parture from this tearful val^ — 
The sweet experience of the dying saint? 

All, Chamberlain! for thee, for thee I weep! 

A widow'd husband! Motherless tby child! 
Methinks I hear thee, when she fell asleep — 

Hear thee address her clay, in accents wild,^ 

" Speak, my lov'd Hannah! let me bear thy voice} 
'Those tones affectionate, r<*peat once more ! 

Oh have they made this angUMird heart rejoice^-i^ 
Speak, dearest woman !** but-^** the struggle's o'erS^ 

Marshman! Of men most feeling— thon wast there ;-^ 

Sure, never mourner bad a kinder friend ! 
Such prpofs of love--~Ah ! would they were less rare— < 

In which the brother and the Christian blend! 

Oft have these eyes thy tender page bedew'd. 
And oft these lips pour*d blessings on thy name. 

When, in idea, 1 that scene have view'd. 
Which lays to sympathy so strong a clainu 

The mother now has left her babe behind, 

And lies at Cviwa^ solitary — low :— 
Bnt their blest spirits round the throne have join'd^ 

To sing and love, as angels cannot de! 

Wialten in Bed» iStb May, 1812, by the severelv afflicted Aathor of*' Spiriiiu^ 

Reereationt in tlie Chamber ef Affliction." 

f See the inteieiting Nanative, VoL UI. Periadical Accooatt, Page 68—74. 



77 



3xis^ Cjbtontde^ 



from Mr. WiUUim Moore, an Irish 
Reader. 

KUmaetigtj Dec. 18. 1830. 

Hit. Sttit 

Sinoe my last joomal I have travelled 
thnragh tbe twron? of Tyreni, part of Ty- 
jBwly, Corran, an^ the.tMronj of Lieney. 
From oneexnviniityto the other, I have not 
beennore than fntir nights in the s^nie bed, 
and but seldom the &ecotid, dnring which 
time I have tieen In company and 'cos- 
venation with all descriptions of people — 
the thief, the blaspheiper. the scbflTcr, the 
deist; in short, with persons of every 
description aboonding in these perilous 
times. However, the I/wd has found out 
ills own* even aiiiongst these characters; 
instances of which will appear, to his 
gbry« and the comfort of his people, 
iboogh by means hitherto onknown and 
aoeipacted. 

Deism abounds hftre to a great extent. 
The principle is so agreeable to flesh and 
Uooo, that tbe spark of corruption is easily 
JBuined into a flame : and when we see 
llicae two. characters, the deist and the 
jiBpist, conbined against tbe scriptures, 
jinstead of being sur^sed, we should con- 
lider it a cause for concluding that *' the 
Vmedom of heaven is at hand." 

Hie day after f sent jofF ray last journal, 
R« Ifdore told roe he had been in oonvei^ 
Mtiott with a deist, a man of great natural 
abiBty. As he would not adtpit the truth 
<if the scriptures, and Richard had never 
Men any of Thomas Pafne*s writings, he 
irged me to go with hfin to the place 
vtere this man lived, thinking it was not 
aofe than three nSles dlytant. It proved, 
bowever, to be more than seven, and it 
»*i tbe most difficult road I ever travelled. 
Bicbard himself did not know exactly 
wbere the cabin was, but by inqairy we 
aade H oat, and when we had found it, 
.aotbing coald surprise me more than to 
tad s BUI of hii abUities iu a wilderness; 
aipno^ttoH megiory; a great reader 
afhJUoiyi wA vmad io Aliie's doc- 



trines, as wdl as In the ^ Fasloitnf,* 
which Is one of the rogst celebrated worhy 
of the papists. In short, there is no his« 
tory I ever read, or saw any qaotatios 
fruin, of which he was not master. He 
quoted the Alcoran where he thoaghtjc 
suited his parpose. No time was lost« aa 
he inmediately commenced the attack 
against the scriptures. He said, that then 
wete historians as credible as Moses, 
who proved ti^ existence of this world 
to have been rpore than twenty thousand 
years ; and he asked Bie wlietber I ooiiUi 
deny that Thomas Paine was a man of as 
sound judgment, and of as solid reason, aa 
Moses, or aay man that ever appeased 
in tbe world ? 

I replied, that the di6ference bet w een 
Moses and Paine was this ; Moses Wrote 
and spoke by divine inspiration, and 
Paine by tbe inspiration of the devU. 

^ Oh," said he, '* you are acting against 
the principles of your own religion ; you 
are taking on yourself to judge another.** 

" No," replied I, " and when yon and 
I part, I hope you will have the manly 
honest spirit not to bring that charga 
against roe behind my back : I do not* 
nor ever shall I, judge any roan ; I only 
read the tentence of tbe ^iidge, who will 
judge Paine, and you. and ne ; which 
lenteiice is this ; He that believeth net ihaU 
be damned. You and Paine both declare, 
that yoB do not believe in the name of tha 
only-begotlen Son of God. The sentenoa 
therefore is already passed apon yon both, 
and is left written, (or all men to read.'*' 

" Well," said he, <* men may say and 
write what comes into their heads. Yom 
have read the Pantheon^ Orid^g Metamor* 
phartei, and all those poetical ficttonsy 
which you believe as well as we to ha 
fictions, concerning Jupiter, Juno, Mer- 
cury, Mors, HercuUh &c. &c. and w|iy 
should not voor authors of the scriptures 
he disbelieved as well as they? They are 
all priestcraft/* 

I feared that all i«<mV\>ii( ^ ti^^qaia« 
aod that I iho\Ad Ymiv« Vo 



:^8 



IRISH CUfRONICLB 



' fband him ; bat the Lord would Dot so 
permit. A ihonght suddenly struck me. 
*• I beg your attention,'* said I, •• only to 
«necftHpter« and I will trouble jou no 
farther. If I do not convince you from 
that chapter that aU icrtpHir* w given ky 
inspiration of God, I will drop the contro- 
versj,and we will part friends as we met.* 
We had an Irish Bible, and a better Irish 
reader I iir.wet heard. We opened upon 
t the second chapter of Daniel. I said, 
" WUI you read it," " or shall I?'» 

•• 1 will," answered he. 

When the chapter had been read, I 
said, ** If you had not been an excellent 
Klstoriaii« I would not ba?e pointed cot 
that chapter. Yoo canoot deny that the 
. Ji»kyl(mitm was the first great monarchy 
ever established iu this world." 

" Granted." 

** The MedO'Pernan socoeeded : then 
• tb^ Macedfinum; and lasdy, the Raman!' 

•* Freely admitted." 
. <« You also will admit that the Beman 
was the roost powerful that erer ap- 
peaTcd ?** 

" Yes." 

" And that, on the irruplioB of the bar- 
biirons nations, that emfure was divided 
and anbdivided, and never has been one 
body or empire from that period to the 
preient." 

This not being denied, I thus proceeded. 
*' I will endeavoar to prove from the same 
chapter that it never will ; and also that 
a part ot this image is still in being. This 
appears to me as plain, as the whole did 
to Mebochadneasar. This prophetical vi- 
sinn appeared to Nebnchadnezxar S390 
years ago, and the accomplishment is a 
bistory ot the world from bis time to the 
general judgment.*' 

. '* If," answeivd he, " yea can prove to 
ne that any part of that image still exists, 
I will submit, and will acknowledge that 
the scripture! were g^ven by divine inspi- 
ration. 

" Yoa perceive,* said I, •' from 
ilie interpretatioQS, that the [head rf 
gM. was the Babylonian or Cfaal- 
fkmuk noamrdiyt which vanbhed away. 
The Medo-Peisian kreast and armt of 
»U§er succeeded* and they also vanished 
»way. Then came the Hiucedonian belly 
amd thight of frnui. The iron Ug» and 
/net, or Roman monarchy, broke and sub- 
dued the Maoedonian. Tlie ten toet into 
4ir|iich the Roman monarchy was divided 
by the irruption of the barbarians still 
4auat The days, llierefore, in which we 
BOW life were predicted in the sacred vo- 
lume, and the dream is certain, and the 
juterprrtatioo sure." 

A more bumbled man I never saw. 
A//er thh tbere was no opposition, but a 



patient heaiing. He time three miles on 
the road with us, and said he would often 
go to Richard's house. He besought me, 
whenever I should come, to let him know. 
So the Lord has put a stop to thatdeisiical 
spfait, I an persuaded, in that part of the 
oountfy ; and I hope to see this bumbled 
man become an able defender of the truth. 

After leaving him, I called at a place 
where there are two men thai have not 
received the sacrament from the piiest 
these two years past. At that time I ter- 
rified them so greatly, that they told me 
they durst not attempt to receivej it any 
more according to the faith of the pofnsh 
church. One of these men could read, 
the other could not. The illiterate man said, 
that from the time of my first beginning to 
explain the scripture-plan of salvation* he, 
was greatly agitated in bis mind, and was 
convinced of all the errors of Rome, ex- 
cept purgatory ; but that from bis infancy 
that belief had been so strongly impressed 
on his mind, that if he could be convinced 
that any of those whom he called the 
holy fathers entered heaven, until released 
from purgatory, after the death of Jesus, 
he should have all doubts removed from 
his mind. 

He paid the greatest attention, whilst I 
explained to him the parable of the rich 
roan and the beggar. But in ordt r fully 
to convince him, I read and explaiurd to 
him the conference of Moses and Elias 
with Christ before his death. " Surely 
then,** said I, " they could not at that 
time be in purgatory." He acknowledged 
that his doubts were considerably re- 
moved, and that he would meditate on 
the subject, earnestly desiring that I would 
soon return. 1 promised to return twelve 
days after, which promise I am sorry I 
have not been ;et able to perform. 

At my return home, I found, to my 
consolatbn, that mv labours there bad nut 
been in vain. There was a poor old wo- 
man tliat I mentioned in a former journal, 
to whom I read, and who was convinced of 
the truth. She had .died without what is 
called the benefit of the clergy ; that is, 
the ointment. The day after ray return, 
1 visited a young man at the point of death, 
who had constamly been inquiring whe- 
ther I was come home : it was a case which 
I mentioned in a former journal. Two days 
before his death I was with him, and left 
him reconciled ; but when bis unbctieviog 
neighbours gathered about him, and urged 
Iiim to send for a priest, his parents very 
properly said, they wonfd neither urge 
him nor prevent him. (The whole faniiJy» 
I hope, are not fur from the kingdom, of 
heaven.) He said, he did nut think a 
priest could be of any leivice to him; 
** WeU then/* said a sister of bi^ tboogh a 



I 



IBISH CHKON1C1.E. 



79 



"young wommn, " if you do tutt, do not 
«end for liim ." be also died without be> 
be£t of defgy. As it is their last and onlv 
liope at tlt« hour of death, and their sole 
dependence rests for time and eternity on 
tlie ointment and purgatury, there was a 
'great outcry made about his dying without 
the ointment. A woman answered* " Ye 
are all wrong; Billy Moore anointed him. 
And take care, but his ointment would do 
lietter than ye imagiue.* The youngest 
brother in that family, five years ago, re- 
Boonoed popery openly, and by means of 
his reading the scriptures the family are 
greatly enlightened. A few days after, 
another brother of the deceased met the 
uriest. The priest asked^ *' Was his bro- 
ther dead ?" 

-Yes.* 

•• And why did not ye sdnd for me?" 

"I suppose if he had thought it neces- 
tmy, he would.** 

•• And," said the priest, " what will be- 
come of his soul?'* 

The young man replied, ** His soul is at 
the mercy of Jesus, who will judge us all.^ 

The priest then asked, " When were 
you at your duty (that h, confession) ?** 

'* Not these two years," answered the lad; 
* for when one of our brothers changed from 
that piofesmon, a former priest hearing of 
it, cried out from the altar, that not one of 
the fanuly should enter the chapel any 
more: therefore (said he,^ we did not 
troahle it since.** 

The priest stooped his head, and went 
«)fr weeping. 

So in these fire years past, there hare 
been in one town six who hare died with- 
out the benefit of the clergy ; and the 
priests know well that their craft is in 
dai^rr, for on the traffick of the souls of 
men their whole liring depends. 

I hare been much entreated by three 
faithful men in different places, whose wives 
are their greatest cross, through^ uubelief, 
to rtnt their houses. I replied, that sure- 
ly themselres could converse with their 
wires, and it was natural they would sootier ; 
hear and be persuaded by them, than by i 
me ; but Ihey thought othenoUt* The first ! 
I went to heard with becoming patience, 
and at the conclusion I said that it is ' 
written, There wiU be two in one bed : the 
•ae ehail be taken, and the other l^t, 
f Well." answered she, •*! shall be the 
4ne that will be taken." This led me to 
taad the awful judgments pronounced 
agaiuftt the antk:hristian church, and to 
point out ad their abominations and sor- 
ceries, which were written, and which 
rile herself coukl not deny. <* Well," 
ntMnd she, " Mv mind will greatly al- 
icrfiferer I trouble them again." 
Tbtneit woman wms quite tUtrntivc, 



and spake neither for nor against ,bat hcar^ 
both promises and judgments. The result 
I know not yet. 

The third woman was a Protesllnt out- 
wardly, but a rank Papist inwardl^ Her 
answer always was, when her nnsband 
desired her to read or hear the scriptures* 
" Let every one mind his own koul." 
live different tiroes he sought me at 
places I U6fd to be at : at length I went 
with him, ajid I am persuaded it is oua 
of the best visits I ever paid. The Lord 
has so ordered it, that three others and 
herself are brought out of darkness. 
When the Lord grants the blessing, the 
work is easily done; though ' really tlicre 
was no encouragement of success at the 
beginninff. There was. a scoffer present, 
who, in derision said, he would thank me 
if I would let him Imow if his name was 
written in the book of life ? 

I told him, be would not wish it should 
be there. 

••Of said he, •'there is nothing I 
would wish more." 

" I think I can make you acknowledge," 
replied I, " that yon would not, and I 
will ask no pioof only from yourself.*' I 
showed him the whole gospel plan of sal- 
vation, how a sinner could be justified. 
They all paid the greatest attention. 
" Now 1 am pretty confident you would 
not wish to be tared in that way ; yet 
this as the only way that, men ever, were 
sared, or will be tared, and in wloch 
they can have assurance that their naines 
are written in the book of life." 

•• Well,*' said he, " that is the way in 
which I would wish to be sared." 

** Be honest," answered I, ** did yuu 
in all your life before hear or know of that 
vray of salvation ?." 

" I never did**' taid he. ■ 

" I am thankful to you for acknowledg- 
ing the truth," said I. '* Now if ^ you 
were sure before this time to-morrow 3'ou 
would die, would you not wish to be 
Viointed ?" 

'• To be siue I would.** 

*' Then," said I, " you have neither 
lot DOT part in the salration of which I 
wasreadmg. Your wish is to be saved 
by the mark of the beast.*' I then read part 
of the 13th chapter of Rerelation, where 
all worship the beast, except thoee tphore 
namee were written in the book of Ufe, 
I next read part of Rer. xir. conoeroiog 
the torments wkh fire and brimstone, and 
charged their consciences to answer; 
«< Was it not by confession, stations, oint- 
ment, and purgatory, they hoped to le 
saved, and was not the blood of Jesus Icit 
entirely out of the i\\iesV\oikV* 

Thb ihey Go^\d not deiv^. 

For a Utile time VW"^ >Nwe ac.v^\N V*- 



so 




XKIftH CHRONICLK^ 



4efprfr» mitiag whit thej ibould do to be 

I toM tbeoit tbM« was hope, and quoted 
^fn> niit 4/ Come mu rfker, my people i 
IHiyinstbat ifthey were, the people o( uu«i 
ibey would obe«f the call, iliey dec!art-d 
tbey would, and eameirtly requested I 
jpould spend another night with idem be- 
foT€ I left the country. Tliis I did. The 
neit evening there was silence for a con- 
-liderable time, and tbfn ex|iIanatiom 
were required how they sliuuld obtain ac- 
jCCfittnce witli Qod, and niake satisfaction 
for the^ tins, before, God would have 
infrcy on theni» I told thero, the sure 
praparatiun wm> to see themselves lost, 
ruined, guilty ^ncrs, condemned by the 
hdy and just law of God, and unable to 
Biake the least satisfaction. And then, 
when they felt there was no hope, the 
Jjaah of God that talceth away the sins uf 
jihe worl() was presented to the sinner, 
and whosoever believeth in him sbull not 
perish^ but have everlaftipg liOi^. We 
had motf comfortable conversation, until 
fL fiery -young 'woman could refrain no 
hmiger; but it tiime() out for the better. 
iShe faturst out J|n a rage and railed, say- 
tng» " Accordinpr to ^our ^religion, a man 
pkif gio and n\urder, rob, and commit all 
Manner of depredatibnt* Be ha^ nothing 
to do but iNtlfeve in Jesuv No,** continued 
site, •* I roust fast« praj, ^nd mi^e sati^ 
faciton for mj stHs.* she railed at great 
length, and I let her go on. At length t 
replied. ** Ye are all Catholics, J wiii bring * 
the whole inatter to a conclusion. Now,'* 
•pid I tu ber, ", did you, or ^ny of you, 
ever see a belle yer mdrdf r or steiU f J^id 
you eirer see a believer in Jeios die on 
^hegallows?" 

ifcy acinowladged they never did. 

« Ifoi* aaid I, *• they are kept by the 
power of God tbrongh faith onto salva- 
tion ; and ihev are iiot their own, tliey 
are bought with a price, aitd are therefore 
preserved from evn. On the other band, 
are not thoM! that arc eonfessiiig, and per* 
lorming stutionsi banging, transporting. 
Iniprisonin^ and betraying one another?'* 

Thpre was not an indtvidnal in the com- 
pany tb^t did mat a^OtiFled^e |t to be 



the troth, nor could they deny It, nor w^ 
one of all of them more humbled than she 
that brought on the contest. Thtn { 
showed them the cause, and proceeded tp 
( b«exve, tfiat if (he scripture doctrine wft 
impressed on their minds, instead of tbp 
sdul-ruining tables uhich they wore taught, 
they would be a happy people, an<l ij 
would save them great txp- n^es. Thai 
blessing, said I, the sdionls have pro* 
duced, and they will have the desired 
effect. 

The following account I have from my 
son. A man that lives in a distant part 
of tlie country,' travelled with him eight 
miles. Religion was the subject. I*be 
man said, ** ( never knew what the «*ord 
scriptwe signified until my children, that 
I sent to the free school, brought a Testa* 
mnut from school. I read the whole book, 
and I believe it is the best book in the 
world ; and all my neigh boiir hood are 
re;idii)g. or g^ttipg persons wlio can r^a4f 
to read fur them: ami there is nothing 
can prevent the people from reading 
them ; for they will read them unknQwp 
to the priest. But there is another arcSt 
obstacle, greater than the priest, a book 
called Pattorini." 

** I never saw that boolc,** answered mj 
wii ; "but my fatber says^ that that man 
wai the most deceived roan that ever 
handled a pen. and that it is owii^ 
to that boojc that so many have been 
hdnged and transported' tliefd two ycarp 
past in Ireland.*^ 

*' I wish your father,*' said be,«* wonM 
come to our neighbourhood, where thab 
book is a very great obstacle tq tiM apriD- 
tures." 

But the children's minds cannot be oor« 
rupted. So, notwithstanding ail oppo» 
sition, the light is breaking forth. % hmwp 
been tedious, as I urn endeavoimpg ta 
make plain the progress ijnA reception OL 
and op}x>8ition lo, the scriptttres; and f 
hope siiprtly I shall speak' of tbetriompb (^ 
the gospel. And that niy poor oountrynieti 
may be rescued oat of worse than Egjp* 
tian bonda^i is the prater uf jour loving 
frietid^' 

W. BfooBS* 



rm'^'^mmmf 



*«^ TheSfereUry Aai received frtn a kind friend te the Tniaw ^ccbtt, retUbm 
^t Ifargatf, a kandtome prtieui cf the Fuhlicatiam nf the '* Beok Sflfiefy/erpreaMCSiJ 
UeligioM KnowUdge among the Poor." Also a pollection of the ekemp devotUmal mu4 
iupentUiaus pubiie^imiit circuiattd by the Hcman £atht>fi€f, §mm f|i pe^iantfy ff 
Ifr/ai^. 



81 



\ 



Mififiiomvp Heralb. 



BAPTIST MISSION. 



Dome ptoceeHfojpL 



ANNIVERSARY 

or THX 



Bath Auxiliary Socitiy, 



Tk* serrioet cannected with the Anni- 
itfwurj of the BristuI and Bath AuiUUry 
Bftptin MiMtooary Sociaty, oummenctKl 
in On Ibmer cttjr, eu Tueadaj eveoing, 
t4lli of Novcnber, 1890; when the Rev. 
Will. Jay of Bath delivered an excellent 
Ifaeoano Itobi Loke lii. 40» Aud he 
mmered. mud iaid unto tkem, I teU tfou 
\ktft if Ikue thtmld koU their ptace, the 
tmm moM hmmtdiaitkif cry out, at the 
ifccting» b a iiie in CounSersIip. The ler- 
riee was opened by the Rev. S. Lowell 
ivkb reading and prayer; and concluded 
)y the Rev. Mr. Dbeermaii. 

On Wednesday morning, the 15th, at 
Biwdncad, the Hev. Mr. Wood of Dublin 
jrayed ; adter which, the Rev. R. Hall 
picaelied ironi Job ii. 4» Skin for sJbm, yea, 
ditftflt a mau hath wiU he give for his 
IMb In the evening of the same day, at 
Bq^-atreet* the Rev. Mr. Reed prayed, 
ind th^ Rev. Cbriatmas Evani of Angle- 
lea preached from 1 Chrun. xiv. 15, And 
ItdkaU he, wAcn theu shaU hear a sound of 
ftb^imihe tops rf the mulberrjf trees, that 
tkm Ams shaU go out to battle : for God is 
imeforth before thee to stnte the host of 
Ik PhiUstmes. The Rev. Wm. Thorp 
condoded with prayer. 

On Thursday morning, the I6(h, the 

pibDc meedng, which was most numer- 

Mdy and respectably aUended, was held 

tttte Assembly-room in Priuce's-ktreet, 

Biehard Asli, K^q. in the Chair, when the 

wiotts resolutioiis counccti^ with the 

bsdness of the Society, were moved, and 

«ttiBdcd.bv Dr. Okeley and Mr. Everett ; 

ilae Bev. Saniod^ Lowell and the Bev. 

Bkksrd Reroe; C. C. Bumpass, Esq. and 

ibeBev. W. Thorpe ] the Rev. T« S. Ciisp 

Tot. Xlll. 



and Che Rev. Christmas Evans ; the R^. 
Dr. Ryland and the Rev. John HolfoWay ; 
and Mr. WhittodE and Captain Carpenterv 
R. N. The second of these xesolutions 
notiotd, with jost approbation, the onion 
which has been effected, in the coaise of 
the last year, between the two Auxiliary 
Sodeties at Bristol and at Bath, and re- 
commended iu extenaon to the sorround- 
ing Dutricts. 

On Sabbath rooming, the 19th, the Rev. 
Robert Hall again advocated thi taaose of 
the Society, bv delivering a most Impres- 
sive sermon^ from Isaiah liil. 6; All ve 
like sheep hme gone astray; we kawc 
turned every one to his own uwy ; omd the 
Lord hath laid on him the iniffutty rf us 
alL The Rev. C. Evans preached In the 
morning at Cuunterslip. from John xiz. 
30, When Jesus therefore had received the 
vinegar t he said, h h finished ; and he 
bowed his head, and gave up the ghost ; 
in the afternoon (in Welsh) at King-street, 
from Matthew xxviil. 6, He is not hrre ; 
for he is risen, as he mdd. Come, see t/«c 
place where the Lord lay; and in the 
evening, at the Welsh chapel, from Dan. 
ii. 35, Then was the iron, the clay, tlie 
brau, the sdoer, and the gold, broken to 
pieces together, and became like the chaff 
of the summer threshin^floors ; and tJie 
wind carried them awan, that no place was 
found for them : and the stone that stnote 
the image became a great mountain, and 
filled the whole earth* 

On Tuesday, the 21st, the Public 
Meeting was held for the City of Bath at 
the Baptist Meeting-house, Somerset- 
street, Ed ward Phillips, Esq. uf Melksharaf 
ill the Chair. On this occasion, also^ tlie 
usual resolutions were passed. The meet- 
ing was most respectably attended* not 
only by the friends of Miisions in Bath, 
but by various iikdividuals from BristoU 
Frome, and other adjuoeut places. 

On Wednesday, tlie fSd, the Rev. R. 
Hall delivered an excelleiU sermon, iu the 
place of worship where the public meet* 
lofcwas held, from 1 11m. ii. 1, I exhort 
therefore^ that, first of all, supplications, 
prayen^ tHterceseionSt end giving ef tKoovVx 



r > 



8£ 



MISSIONAUY HERALD. 



he mad I for all men ; in the evening oftlie 
aaroe diiy, the Rev. C. Kvaiis preached 
from Luke xxiv. 47, And that repentance 
mtd rrmisi'um of pus 'ihmAd H pvimched in 
kit name among aU nsthm, ktgiMHmg at 
Jermakm, 

Tlie collections made on these several 
occasions amounted to .£'430; which is 
about ^100 more tha>i was received last 
jear. A still greater increase had taken 
place in the amount of receipts for the jcar» 
Dvhichi including-a sum of .^'dSl 7s« 6d, 
aabicribed towards the College at Seram- 
porr» were no less than one thouiand two 
hundred and teventy-aneyoundt. We con* 

Satulate our active and lealous ftiends in 
18 important diitrlct,oo the distinguished 
inooeta which hat attended thvirnertions 
on behalf of Uie Mission, so that it may 
tnil V be said, in reference to th^ir Sodety, 
TKtir laU verkt are more than ffcetr Jin$, 
Wc undetttand that, under tlie Divine 
Uessing, it has been principally owing to 
a jndicioua perseverance in the plan of 
fertonal offpHeation to the friends uf nW- 
gion in general ; and We are persuaded 
Uiat if similar steps were taken in other 
places, the result would be very graiify- 
tng, and much would be done towards re- 
moving the embarrossmenM under wliich 
the Society labours. 

KENT. 



Thx Committee of the Auxiliary Society 
fbr the County of Kent, have held an ex- 
traordinary meeting, to consult how they 
may most e^Kstualiy assist the funds of 
the Society, and have appointed drputo* 
tious fron^ their own body to visit every 
church hi the district, and request coUix- 
tlons for the Missioa. Messrs. Sliiriey of 
SevendaJcs and Giles of Chailiani will go 
through tlio Eastern part of tlie county, 
and Messrs. AtkSnsoft of Margate and 
Exall of Tenterden the Western. They 
hope to carry this plan info eflfact in the 
course of the present month ; and we jisel 
a pleasing confidence that what has been 
so promptly and liberally deviled by our 
brethren of the Committee, wiH l>e met 
with equal cordiality and kindness by the 
fticods to whom these appUcatious arc ad- 
dressed. 



..BROIVLSGHOV£» WoftCMisvsmnx. 



• ThbIwo Baptist churches in l^rons- 
'grove hare kindly reaolved to form an. 
•Ausiltary Society in aid of the IVIission; 
-tnd have iartlicr determined to avail them- 
selves of the aid of a neighbouring minis- 
tor to nuke immedimte co/iections in eaclv 
place ofwonhip. 



KINGSBRIDGK, Dxvt>x. 



Intelligence bas al&o been 
' received tf ihe ^ forvatiou of an 
Auxiliary Society at Kingsbridge^ 
Devon, the birth-place of our late 
valuable Missionary brother, Mr. 
Trowt. We subjoin an extract 
from the letter announcing it, 
addressed to the Secretary of the 
Parent Society. 

*' Encousagej) bv tlia cheering pros- 
pect of Missiomry laoovrf in gcueniL wc 
have fur some timcbern desirous of initiat- 
ing ourselves into the plans recommended 
by the Parent Society, which arc so welJ 
cttlculuted to unire the afTcctiuns of oor 
churclies. and to promote the best interest 
oftlie Mission. For these purposes^ the 
evening of the 14th of December, 1830, 
was set apart, when the following arrangt:- 
ment» were made,* which met with tha 
decided approbation of oor friends. A 
penny-a-weck fand has l>een established 
among us upwards of eight years, and 
which » on the whole, has paid inta tlie 
Mission Treasury a& much as we coald rea- 
wmably eipeoC^; yet, as oor present ar- 
rangements wiU call others of our esteei»- 
ed frieuds t^ co-operate, and be the laeans 
of extending general iiiformatiiMb wt 
hunbly trust that the funds of the Society 
may be beneficed by onr labours, and 
pray that Almighty God may prosper tlie 
work of our hands. We shall he extremely 
glad to receive any additional infonsatioa 
from you. 

" Impkirtiig that the Spirit of God from 
on high may descend and abide on every 
Clirisiian Jnissiotuiiy, until the inipurinm 
tidings of salvation and eternal life, by 
Jesus Christ, shall have sounded thrcrj{:li 
the wide creation, on behalf of our Com- 
mittee, we remain, dear Sir, lespecifully 
and afiVctionately youis, 

Several collections luive al- 
ready been made among our 
churches in London and it« vici- 
nity. An account will be gives 
in the Herald for next mouth of 
all which may have been received 
by the Treasurer up to the 13th 
instant. 



I 



* Referring to a copy of the R'll^es i^n. 
r.exed, which are in sub^avoe (Ifoy^puU- 
Uahed u\ uMT'^MkinVxt Iloy A.u^<ii&t Ja5i« 



;&iaNAi<v UkHALU. 



.»J 



On llir 101 ii of January, a geu- 
Itrnrun entirely unkontMi )o Mr. 
tiurls, tuIImI iDd pTeienled liim 
with a banknote (ototw hvndred 
paundt, »s B donation to the Mis- 
kion. Wlirn he was requested to 
•ptrcify ill wbut name it sliouM 
be entered, be replied, " An Ua- 
Arotilahle Servant ;" nlltiding to 
Luke XTii. 10. 



JFtntign gnttlUflnice. 



CUITTAGONG. 

Extncis from letters addressed 
by Mr. Peacock to the bretliren 
at SeraupoTC. 

ChiUasfag, MtTch 7, tB19. 
I SAVi Juil been lo I'mk iit our llf D- 
nl« leliool, which liBS uow Inxii cil<t>- 
OArA iboDt loDr moiilbi: thricura nboiil 
1iinil;.<!i;;Iit clilldrcu wliu aticiid. Dri 
pn;r, Ut lue ciitinl juii to biid •unui 
Awiiii of K-ndiag bgoki U)lh lur tbc Kut 
Ibh and Kfngali^e KhoiiU. Mr. W. ii 
very icalou* till llie tcliuols, eipfdBll3> fur 
(lie Benealcr. He hai deiicrd lue lu 
eilsUiib ■Dulliri ■( snnir diiuiice inim 
the one ilrurfj' irtiablislicil, »nd hi: will 
beti the cipentei thercoC I hax doiie 
la he ddiied, hired a puRdii and ■ Kbuol- 
huiLic ltd there an: aliuil fuiirtecu diil- 
dirn btiginniDg la atitnH. They Mini 
hctt more afraid thin Ht anv iHhcr tla- 



hswpTrr I hnpe that idea itill ««ar awai 
^nduaJlvj Hi}iJ ihai hy and hy we <ha1k 
lie CDaMcil )o eiiidiliih laige Khuoli ot 
iimItc childiciL Bui I wish yoa snnhl 
•rod UB Bennlee Luscatti.riui readinp 
Mbin, and mu mbiu Benplre ichDol 
toHiki nf ihort Iruoni, for ihiMc cbildmi 
>)>(! brgin loiniike prugreji ia leudiiig. 

JiuM S. — T om much in nanl of ilatPB 
and penciLt, nnd TcMamenU for the tcJiuuL. 
Wc han »iw trieiity-rouradiulart belung- 
log lo Ihft irliuul. I received ibe three Kia 
•<F LancoMrrimi lablei wliich you 
vrrr m gODil as tu ttnd u^ aiwl 1 
ihKnk you lor thciii. We an (roublrd 
vilh vprmin ihM cat ihe paiirr off ihc 



I ing, for the school, id put the booki, &c. 
I in, afler Khoct hoiira. 
] Mr ichool ii my cOTigregaiton «I»o; 
! for I li«c only my scholars lo read the 
word ut God tu on Sabbnlli days, and 
uetimca an old *unwn or t»o, bcddci 
lie one o{ iheii lelaiirea. But I iinirt 
, that it ii ■ coiigirgallon I an veil 
iiSed Hhh, Irom the allmilan Ihe; 
leen tn juy to what is read to Ibem. miA 
M«K of tlien are at Ihe age of ander- 
ilandlne, being ihiTleen, fouiteeo, GEteeu. 
•iiteen, and leveHtmi yean of age, iny 
^Mor wid huniUe bo}-i. Ai »on M you 
wild me loiiie Waita^ Calechiini] and 
Hymns, and a few Testamcnu and Blblrt, 
1 'iaiend to open ■ Sandajr nchool also. 
fur I see no gxd end in pving them a 
liolidny nn the Sahbarij dayii ihey uuly 
•iii'tid it in idly rovine aboul, and Mine in 
..ickcdneii. We cuidi-ntly lee that lli« 
[sni htis abuiulaiiilv h^Mcd Sundav 
v:hooli for Ihe poot la England. IT It 
|i1eaie God iticirfura to eitibiikh me bi 
this pmd work, mj Subbathi will in lu- 
iiire t>r spent lu leaching and preaching lo 
"J young oongiepUou. May iho Lord 
hare mercy aiponus all, and deliver di Irani 
u-TJl, nod came his face to ihlne upun usl 
Juit 19.~Tii« ChlltagoiiE Kliool ii «iUl 
Hiion iheincreaae. I waa M firit almost In- 
clined to repine under an idea thai llie H'm- 
■hiostlianee whicli I had laboured so hard I* 
acquire itbile «t Afiia. would now be en- 
(iirly u9elrs<atC4iillo(lDng; but I fmd h 
to the eoolmrv : 1 should base been quite 
ut a lorn wilhuut it. 1 BiKl my poor scho- 
Inn would hnve foaiid mf great diSinil- 
>r in oi.drrsiaiid each vlhpr, but now 
sik and converse and go on wilh 
the lesions, with as much ease and faml- 
Imiiiy as Ihough we had been brought 
up under ihe sume roof togeiber. Sumo 
of my Bihola™ are of Ihe ago of fiCtcai, 
en, mcBierii, and eigUlern yearai 
you kuuw tbal it is in general raihet 
liDui and ifiHIcull task lo Inre to bw- 
Itln lellett wiib wich gniwn.up lads M 
ihese. Uuwpvir, seeing these poor li:l- 
Inws attend >u coiulaiiily, labour in hard, 
and Sfcm su dewroui ol insirucliun, I find 
moch pkaiure wilh ihem, wearineu snd 
diflieuttio U'ing done Bway. My scho- 
Ian are slsu my Sabbath day'* cnnprcga- 
liun; and I du uuurc you no desiiicuble 
coBgregalionneirhiTi niBiiy of Ihem being 
at BU age eapoble of uiulentanding : ihey 
■fiord ne ihul-Ii enciiuragenienl by the 
allpntion ihey seem to pay ■( vronhip a* 
whoul. S.m 



despise llie idea of lianng only ■ congic- 
pition of boys to preach W: but realty I 
an quite happy and nlcBSrd with men k 
I'oii^n'eaiion. OxAj m the Vtit& >!«»> 
aiid'^lUiJ Me we\cur« Vo Aai^M Vfti^w^. 
I hs.v jut ja*OwV>BAotw»e««™* 



84 



MISSIONARY HERALD. 



which SDitt mc. And we know who thej 
were that suns Hoftiuwas to Christ in the 
temple, — not the learned and the wise, 
hot poor children. Throoghoot the week 
vrt generally aiserohle for school at eight 
oVIcMok, wh«n we commence with worship 
ia Hiodoost^anee. and I am in great 
hopes that the reading of the scriptares, 
fcgalarly and dailr to the scholars, will 
not he m vain. We know who hath sud, 
^ ro^ word shall not retdm onto roe void, 
bttt It shall prosper in the thing whereonto 
I sent it." 



JESSORE. 



Journal of Mr, Thomas, for March and 
April, 1819. 

Oir Toesday, the 2d of March,, hre- 
thren Huri-Diisat Didhera, and I, went 
oat and spoke to eleven brahmuns, shoo- 
dms, and •Mmolroans.. On Wednesday, 
the5d, had a very pleasing conversation 
with a brahmun, who gladly received a 
scripiore tract. On LordVday, the 7th, 
wejit to Choogpcha and perturmcd the 
morning service, and in the evening we 
held a charch-raeeting, Sristee-Dhura, 
Nirmul, and Soonahlee were proposed to 
the church. Aftmr this iweniy-one of us 
sat down at the Lord's-table. On Mon- 
day, the 8th, spoke to a bmhmun, a 
shoodra, and six Musulroans at Ba^danga, 
and afterwards returned to SabeUgnuj. 
(Ai Tuesday, the 9th, two Portuguese 
from Husunabid came to Jessore to ask 
cliarity ; they came to roy house and con- 
tinueo several hours am versing about the 
Christian religion ; a Musulman and two 
Hindoos were present and heard the word 
with great attention. On Saturday, the 
15th, spoke tn three viragees, a woman, 
and two Masulmans in the street of Kbou- 
tolla, and on roy way luime converseit 
with three men. On Lnrd*ls-day, the 14ih, 
niy servants and two Masulmans attended 
public wor»hip. 

• On the 3d of April, preadied to about 
three or four hundred people at tbeSaheb- 
ganj market; and in the evening we held 
a cburch-meetiog, when a Hindoo weaver, 
of tbe name ot' Sri>tee-Dhara, gave an 
account of his conversion, and was re- 
ceived for baptism. Nirmul and Soonah- 
lee, who were proposed last month for 

' baptism, were postponed for the present. 

. On Lord*s^ay, the 4th, we went to the 
river »ide to ba|^ze Sristee-Dhura, where 
a great concourse of llijiduus and Musul- 
mans were aisepbled. I spoke to them 
for some time. In the eveiung seventeen 
of US-partook uf tbe Lord*s-supper. On 

/Ae ntorniag efthe 5th, we held a chnrch- 



meeting, and enqoired into the state of 
the brethren and sisters ; and in the even- 
ing had our usual prayer-meeting- for the 
spread of the gospel. On LofdVday 
rooming, the 11th, my gardener, a chow« 
kedar, and tbe Daivga of Saheh-gonJ 
fhana, anended pubTic worship; aflct 
n^icb I bad some reUdoas amveiBatioB 
with tbe Darogfu He s^d, that the Mo> 
sulmans do not worship Mahomet, nor 
anv other pfophet or peer as a God, bat 
only pay their respects to them as tberr 
master ; for through them they learnt the 
way of salvation. On the 14th, went to 
the Mooralee Bazar and met some men 
who were buying rice. I began a conver- 
sation with them, when several others 
surrounded me; all of whom heard tbe 
word with great pleasure ; on my return 
home talked to a |>rahman and two shoo- 
dras. On the 15th, two respectable Ma- 
sulmans called on me, and I had some 
talk with tbem ; they seemed to be some- 
what acquainted with tbe scriptores, and 
received a copy of the three gospels and a 
pamphlet in Persian. In the afternoon 
two Hindoos called; I road to them part 
of the .5th chapter of Matthew, and ha^ 
some pleasing conversation with them ; I 
gave them also some pamphlets. On thft 
21 St, Shakur-mabumud and one of his 
friends called on me for religious conver- 
sation ; they also attended the morning 
worship. Shakur-mnliumud joined whn 
us in «nging tbe hymn, and . stood up at 
the time of prayer. On Lord's-day moni- 
ing, the 35th, I went to Bakospola to 
the house uf brother Prankrisbna's rela- 
tions and I'oUnd them all i^ell. I h«d 
some very strrious talk with a' nomher of 
the villagers t after this preached to eight 
brethren and listers, -and two of tbe vil- 
lagers who attended the meeting. 



BENARES. 



Journal of Mr. Smith, for Mofrch and 
Ajnril, 1819. 

March 1, 1819. This morning a re- 
spectable Musulman 'invited me to his 
house : I went and found a good number 
of persons sitting together. The Mosul- 
man received me very kindly, and asked 
me the reason of distributing the scrip- 
lures. I told him, that it was the com- 
mand of our Lord Jesus to- preach tha 
Gospel to all nations. " But this conr- 
mand-was given before Mahomet,*' said 
the Mnsulman. I told him, ** Heaven 
and earth shall paM away* but my worria 
shall not pass away, saith the Lord Jesut.t' 
After some more conversation on the Go^ 
pd, the Musulman appeared ranch pleaaaii, 



M1S810NART HBRALO. 



65 



and pTOinised to all tt mj honte to- 
morrow morning. Snd. Thit moniiag ihe 
Mufulman ailed Bgreenhly to Iris pro- 
mise, with all h» attendaiiM, aiid tpent « 
lEood while reading the tciipture, snd 
c«»nvrriing on the Gospel. He afterwards 
expmted a great with fur an Arabic Tes- 
tament, which Ijp^ ^^ ^hh a Scrip- 
tare Selection in ftnaan, which he rhank- 
fblly accepted. 4th« Three persons called 
for the scriptures, to whom 1 save a copy 
of Mark's Gospel in HindoostMianee, and 
two copies of the Scripture Selection in 
Pi'rslan : afterwards went out among the 
Hindoos with Ram-dasa, and spoke to a 
number of persons at Trilochon-ghat. At 
Nursing ghat a brahman was sUtlug and 
moving his lieads, and many persons 
around biro. I spoke to him respecting 
ihf- love of Christ towards sinners^ with 
which he appeared moch affected, and 
said, " O fir, do take me with you, and 
instruct me more in the way of salvation ; 
Cur I have not seen any way of salvation 
in tlie Hindoo religion." I told him. If 
you wish to follow me you may* Imme- 
diately the biahman got up with his things, 
and followed me. The persons who sur- 
rounded him wondered, and said he was 
mad. 5th. Conversed with a brahmun in 
tlie presence of a crowd of people at Tri- 
lochnn. From thence went to Prulad- 

that and spokt* to many brahmuos. 6th. 
evcral hranmuos called, to whom I read 
and expounded tlie scriptures, and gave 
chem a copy of tlie Scripture Selection. 
7tb. Lord'a-day. Preached at the Bengalee 
school. Stii. Addressed the word of life 
to a number of persons at Choukhumma, 
who appeared very attentive, and several 
fierwns promised to call. From the 9th 
to the Itftb, at the Hoolee festival, the 
inlribitants were throwing red stuff on' 
each other, in consequence of which I 
was not <ible to go out. 13th. Collected 
a large congregation at Trilocliun, who 
listened to the Gospel with much atten- 
liun. aOih. Spoke io a few people at Nur- 
stng-ghat. From thence went to Chuuk- 
humraa and spc^e to many. 9ist. LurdV 
day. Preached twice at the Bengalee 
scbool. On m}' return home two brali* 
raons called on me, and spent a good 
wliile conversing on religious subjects. 
92nd. Spoke to many persons at Prulad- 
gbat; from thence went to Nursing-ghat ; 
where a good number of persons assembled 
anO hSeard the Gospel atientively. :^ih. 
A brahmun calledt wbo, after some con- 
ver!>3itinu, promised to call apain. 28th. 
ix>rfl*s-uay. Preached at the Bengalee 
4«*kH>ol. From thence walked about the 
town and addressed the word of life in 
several places to crowds of people, who 
Iifttf ned wirhout the least iatenupthn. 



April 1, 1819. Went to the fair in oom- 
pany with brother Ram-dasa, and Mr. 
Bowley, where we continued all day, con- 
versing and givinc tKioks. Bfany persons 
heard the Gospel with much aUention» 
and received tne scriptures very thank- 
fully, bat some disputed. At eleven o^clock 
in the evening left Chanar and arrived at 
Benares by nvater on Ihe fd instant* and 
spoke to a few people by the river side. 
Srd. Mr. and Mrs. R. (the school-master 
of Jayanarayvna's school,) called and 
spent the day with us, ai>d a l>rahrann, 
with whom we had moch conversation on 
religious subjects. 9th. Conversed with a 
good number of persons at Triloclmn-gliat. 
6(h. Mr. A. favoured me with a horse to 
enable me to go to the fair at Chunar, 
which will take place on the 8(h instant. 
Till. Very early tids morning left BeiuueSf 
and readied Chnnar at eleveo o'dock. 
In the evening went oat whh Mr. B. and 
spoke to many people, who listened with 
much attention. 8th. This morning preach- 
ed at Mr. B.'s. After worship went to 
the fair vrith t>rother Ram-dasa and Messrs. 
A. and B. As soon as we reached tint 
fair, the R«v. Messrs. G. and H. joined 
us; we preeohed altematdy to crowds of 
people, and gave away tliiiteen copies of 
Matthew's Gospel in Uiodce, fourteen or 
fifteen copies of Hindee tracts, five copies 
of David's Pbalms, seven copies of Hin- 
doost'hanee Gospels, twdve copies of 
Persian Gospels, eight copies of Hin- 
doosi'hanee parables, dght copies of Per- 
sian sdections, one copy of the Persian 
Testament, two copies of the Hindoost% 
hanee Testaments, and one copy of the 
Arabic Testament. We were mtich pleas- 
ed to see the people listen to the Gospel 
without the least interruption. 9ih. To- 
day left Chuuar and reached JulaUpoora ; 
here I Mt under the shade of a tree, and 
read and expounded a portion of Mat- 
thew's Gospel to about forty persons, whs 
listened wiih much attention, and ac- 
cepted a copy of Matthew's Gospel in 
Hindee with two Hindee tracts. From 
thfjnce went to Bughauhe and spoke to a 
number of attentive Hindoos, and on leav- 
ing them a tract, proceeded to another 
village named Mon-poora, where a crowd 
soon assembled and lieaid the word of life 
wiih much iitteuiion, and gladly acceptnl 
a copy of Matthew's Gospel ui Hiodee, 
with some tracts. From thence we went 
to Tckurree : in this village I found the 
two brahranns wlw had given up their 
gods to me some months agp ^ they ap* 
pcaied very sorry at having left me, and 
promise<l to call oeain. 11 th. Lord*s.dav. 
Preached at Mr. R.'s ; after worship Mr. 
R. expressed a freal wVsVi Vo yvv^ >\\% 
church by bapiVsm. U\Yi.T>iio\^tiNKGK<uA^ 



MiaSIOMAST KBRAU). 



PjiatTiiTt n«v^ dgktymOajTtm DtlU, 
After paring about Aonrcn nikM of 
jun^c and wute Undi. wUhnut Myine ■ 
^Bgle villigroa thr roar], m etam to Pm- 
Diput, STcrj lirgeiiut inckntdt;, pMl; 
inrainvbutTOj pupuloui: h bM OM, ■■ 
fiu •• I could «, oiw Mtbw or liled hM, 
bat all ibRboildlngt ire of bikk, Bnd the 
MTMli psnd witb the Mme. 

When I had pmenlad ibe tira priad^ 
pal pundlli witb Sunpkritii •cripiurci.and 
^ndee Incti, tM tbe Culvil wilh the 
nme ID FcnimD, Ihej Knt >ucb ■ nuDonr 
■bfOid, Ibit mDllhiKlM of >U ruilu and 
outi flocked to mj lodging, uid fiodiog 
mm dii|>OMd lo girc booki, importnoed loe 
to dutrnwtebjr hiiudrediibut Ibiileoald 
Dot do on ■ecounl of my tonty Nock. 
J bad not tbe nartdlNaal idea of the in- 
teriur of Uw counnj being w full of let- 
Uiad nieni and hi deriiom of tho tcrip- 



I tnrM. To malie up Id tome degree Ibr tbe 
want of book* I picacbod thr^D timea, tai 
obuined ihe moit nalidactocj hrariiifi 
On ny coneliMling, oiauj Hindoui tajd, 
tbej dedred to kucnr qwie of tlie Saviour, 
deriwd to b* tand bj liim, and to poueat 
oar acripturoi. I could luppl; thrm but 
panially; tbej croirded about me. Wbcn 
lb* duconne wu otrt, alllmugh night ad- 
vancBdi ibn liileoln^ mulliiuHiM H.'vnwil 
not in Ihe leaii drgiee liied, bol deiiird 
H> hear laore. I cooduded bj tajuig. 
TMa then i> ibe Savioar, praj lo htu aiid 
lake refaice in bim: joor niue incama- 
tiiini haling failed lo acacimpli>h ^oui tat- 
ntion, jDo look for the tenih ; if ulvi- 
Uon be what jou aeek. if lbs pardon of 
■in, HuctiGoalian of baait. and liopc of 
heaven be jnnir deslrr, mark the Danj 
prooti of Chiiit'i djiinily. 

(Tv te cmliiiufd.) 



TO C0ERE3P0NDENTS. 

It kLid frtendf at Deal, wbo ha>« 
ID Mr. Blakf> of Cb^MBanOade; 
ta tC Nomben of the ETangrlical Hagadne, &c. We brg lo obKTve, thai bo<Ak 
iotanded ibt ■ warm dimale iliould be bmaid, and ta gted CBntHtipn. 

Tba " LincQlnibire Drill Han" it infomed, Ibil bii fanmr arrlTed In die oastK, 
CDTcring ■ DoEMlion of ^1 for the Million. He will Bod ifte lait duly cnleml Id Tba 
prport ; and will.' doobUeu, he gratified to oburre, in thla Numbec, that H) fileadlf 
wiib «n BGGODv')>l>ed, In part, oa tb« leiy day Ihal It met Ibe eje of tbe IndiiMsid 
to wbon bu iMtcT wai addreiaed. 



Im4<ni ■■ Nnled lij J. B*kntL»i 91, Wardnur-iircet, Soh 



8d 



9 



POR 



PROVIDING MEANS OF EDUCATION. 



Tq the ]E4itors of the Baptist Maga;i^ine. 



Thb Com mittbb of '< The Protestant Society for the Protection 
of ReUgioas Liberty*' cherighed a hope that Mr. Brougham would 
not have reintroduced this Bill to Parliameut, or would (nreviously 
have consented to mak^ many alterations, rendering it less objec- 
tionable to all classes of Dissenters from Ihe Established Church. 
Those hopes they now fear will meet with disappointment ; and 
they request that you will insert in your Publication an Abstract of 
the Billy as circulated by Mr. Brpugham, and the Resx>lutionS) ex- 
preaaiveof their sentiments thereon, adopted by the Committee in 
July bst The Committee expect that your numerous readers 
may be thereby enabled to determine whether it is a measure which 
tbw real desire for the Education of the Poor — their attachment to 
liberal principles — and their love to religious freedom, will allow 
Ibem to approve ; — and will be better prepared to concur in such 
efforts as may be suggested, and they shall deem e;i^pedient, to pre* 
▼ent its jBuccess. 

Jmmmy 23, 1921. 



ABSTRACT 



or 



Mr. Brougham's First Educa- 
tion BiU. 



It connsts of three Branches. 

1* The manner of estahliahiug schools. 
. n. The manner of appointtng« risit- 
^tnd removing the masten. 
. ^IL Tlie manner of tdmitting and 
"wn««mg tiie icholtrt. 

▼OL. Xlll. 



I. ESTABLISHMENT AND ENDOW- 
MENT OF SCHOOLS. 



. This Branch eonsiflls of three parti. 

i. The manner of mcf^iog the qaestion 
of eitablithment. 

ii. The manner of trying the qneslioo. 

iii. The execation of the order mada 
on the trial. 



i. M0TIK6 07 TBt QvBsrtoir. 

A. school or schools ma^- be moved for 
in any eccfesiosticoi dUtx\6\^ \. «« %Sk;3 ^v 



84 



MISSIONARY IIGRALD. 



which SDits mc. And we know who thej 
were tb»t sung Hotannas to Christ in the 
tenipler— not ue learned and the wise, 
hot poor children. Throoghoot 'the week 
w« generally aisemhle for school at eight 
oVwck, when we commence with worship 
ia HindoostliaDce, and I am in great 
hopes that the reading of the scriptares, 
fcgalarly and daiW to the scholara,' will 
not he m vain. We know who hath sud, 
^ rov word shall not retdm onto roe void, 
btt^ It shall prosper in the thing whereonto 
I sent iu" 



JESSORE. 



Journal of Mr, Thomatf for March and 
April, 1819. 

Oir Toesdaj, the 2d of March, . hre- 
thien Uuri-Diisat Didhera, and I, went 
oot and spoke to eleven biahmuns, shoo- 
dias, and .Moiolroans* On Wednesday, 
the5d, had a very pleasina conversation 
with a brahmun, who gladly received a 
iciipiare tract. On Lord's-day. the 7th, 
went to Choogpcha and pertumicd the 
morning service, and in the evening we 
held a church-meeting, Sristee*Dhura, 
Nirmul* and Soouahlee were proposed to 
the church. Afler this twenty -one of us 
sat down at the Lord's-table. On Mon- 
day, the 8th, spoke to a bmhmun, a 
•boodra, and six Musulmans at Ba^daoga, 
and afterwards returned to SaheUgnuj. 
<Ai Tuesday, the 9lh, two Portuguese 
from Husunabid camt* to Jessore to ask 
charity ; they came to roy house and con- 
tinueo several hours conversing about the 
Christian religion ; a Musolman and two 
Hindoos were present and heard the word 
with great attention. On Satorday, the 
iSth, spoke tn three viragees, a woman, 

. suid two Mosulmans in the street of Kbou- 
toHa, and on roy way home conversed 
with three men. On Lnrfl*ls-day, the 14lh, 
my servants and two Mosulmans attended 
public wor»hip. 

• On the 3d of Aprils preaclied to about 
three or four hundred people at the Saheb- 
gonj market; and in the evening -we held 
a church-meeting, when a Hindoo weaver, 
of the name ot Srisiee-Dhora, gave an 
account of his conversioUf and was re- 
ceived for baptism. .Nirmul and Suonab- 
lee, who were proposed last month for 

• baptism* were postponed for tlie present. 
On Lord*s-day, the 4th, we went to the 
river »idtt to bapjtise Sristee-Dhurat where 
a great concourse of llindt>us and Musul- 
mans were assembled. I spoke to them 
for some time. In the eveiung seventeen 
of us partook uf the Lord*s-supper. On 

fjftt mornJng afthc 5ihp we held a chorch- 

/. . ■ • 



I meeting, and enquired into the state of 
tlie birthreii and sisters ; and in the evf n* 
ing had our usual prayer-meeting for the 
spread of the gospel. On Ixmrs-day 
rooming, the 11th, my gardener, n chow« 
kedar, and the Daroga of Saheb-gnnJ 
tluLti; attended public worship; aflct 
which I bad some reli^oas conveffsaiiQft 
with the Darogfi. He stid, that the Mu- 
sulmans d(> not worship Mahomet, nor 
any other pfopbet or peer as a Ood, but 
only pay their respects to them as their 
master ; for through them they learnt the 
way of salvation. On the 14th, went to 
the Mooralee Basar and met some men 
who were buying rice. I began a conver- 
sation with them, when several others 
surrounded me; all of whom heard tbe 
word with great pleasure ; on my return 
home talked to a |>rahman and two shoo- 
dras. On the 15th, two respectable Mo- 
sulmans called on me, and I had some 
talk with them ; they seemed to be tume- 
what acquainted with the scriptures, and 
received a copy of the three gpspcis and a 
pamphlet in JPentian. In the afternoon 
two Hindoos called ; I read to them part 
of the .5th chapter of Matthew, ond ha(| 
some pleasing conversation with them ; I 
gave them also some pamphlets. On th6 
21 St, Shakur«roahumud and one of his 
friends called on me for religious convei^ 
sation ; Ihey also attended the morning 
worship. Shakor-mahumud joined witn 
us in singing the hymn, and . stood op at 
the time of prayer. On Lord's-day moni- 
in^;, the 35th, I went to Bakuspola to 
the house of brother Prankrishna's rela- 
tions and found them all i«ell. I hid 
some very s(*rious talk with a nomher of 
the villagers t after this preached to eight 
brethren and sisters, -and two of the vil- 
lagers who attended the meeting. 



BENARES. 



\ 



Joumai of Mr» Smith, for AforcA and 
Ajnril, 1819. 

March 1, 1819. This rooming a re- 
spectable Musulman 'invited roe to his 
hoose : I went and found a good number 
of persons sitting together. The Musol- 
man received me very knidly, and asked 
me the reason of di&triboiing ibe scrip- 
tures. I told him, that it was the cons- 
mand of our Lord Jesus to- preach the 
Gospel to all nations. " But this conr- 
roond was given before Mahomet," said 
the Mnsulman. I told him, ** Heaven 
and earth sliall paM awuVf hut my wordi 
shall not pass away, soith the Lord Jesus.?' 
After some more conversation on the Got^ 
pel, the Musulman appeared moch pleasail, 



MISSIONAKY HKRAM). 






an<l promised to call at my house to- 
nKirr<»w morning. 2»d. Thit morning the 
MnflulnMn aillod agreeably to Ma pro- 
miie» wiih all hi:* attendants, and spent a 
IBDod while reading the tciipture, and 
convming on the GMpel. He afterwards 
f^xprcssed a great wish fur an Arabic Tes- 
tament, which Ijp^ biffl, whh a Scrlp> 
lerr Selection in Arsian, which he thank- 
fUly aoc«pied. 4th. Three penons called 
for the scriptnTCS, to whom I gave a copy 
of Mark's Gosnel in Hindoost'uanee, and 
copies of tlie Scripture Selecuon in 



P^'ruan : afterwards went out among the 
Ifindoos with Ram-dasa, and spoke to a 
number of persons at Trilochon-ghat. At 
Nursing ghat a brahroun was sitting and 
moving his beads, and many persons 
around him. I spoke to liim rtspeciing 
thf- love of Christ towards sinners^ with 
which he appeared much affected* and 
saidy " O ur, do take me with you, and 
io^ruct me more in the way of salt ation ; 
for I tiave not seen any way of salvation 
in the Hindoo religion.*' I told him. If 
you wish to follow me yoo may* Imme- 
diately the hnhnran got up with his things, 
and followed me. The persons who sur- 
rounded him wondered, and said he was 
mad. 5lh. Conversed with a brahroun in 
the pr^senoe of a crowd of people at Tri- 
lochon. From thence went tu Prulad- 
giiat and spokt* to many brahmuns. 6th. 
Several fanbmuns called, to whom I read 
and tfjipoonded the scriptures, and gave 
rliem a copy of tlie Scripture Selection. 
7ffa. Lord's-day. Preached at the Bengalee 
acfaooL Odu Addressed the word of life 
to a mimber uf persons at Chonkhumroa, 
who appeared very attentive, and several 
|ior«M» promiKd to call. From the 9th 
to tlie Itih, at the Houlee festival, the 
inhabitants were throwing red stuff on 
each other, in consequence of which I 
was not able to go out. 13th. Collected 
a large congregation at Trilocliun, who 
listened to the Gospel with much alten- 
tiun. S!Oth. Spoke to a few people at Nur- 
ting-ghat. from thence went to Chuuk- 
humraa and spoke to many. 9ist. LurdV 
day. Preached twice at the Bengalee 
school.' Oh my return hume two brali* 
nrans called on me, and spent a good 
while conversing on religious subjects. 
SSnd. Spoke to many persons at Pruiad- 
ghat ; from thence went to Nursing-ghat ; 
where a good number of persons assembled 
and hfleard the Gospel attentively. 27th. 
A bnhfflnn called, who, after some con- 
vrrfsition, promised to call again. 28th. 
liOrd*s-aay. Preached at the Bengalee 
vhool. From tlience walked aboiit the 
ti'wn and addressed the word of life in 
several places to crowds of people, who 
listened without the least imermpfion. 



/ 



April 1, 1819. Went to the fair in com- 
pany vrith brother Ram-dasa. and Mr. 
Bowley, where %re continued all day, coii> 
versing and dvinc books. Bfany persons 
heard the Oospd with much attemion» 
and received tne serlptnfes very thank- 
fully, bot some disputed. At eleven o^dock 
in the evening left Chunar and arrived at 
Benares by water on the fd instant, and 
spoke to a few people by the river side. 
3rd. Mr. and Mrs. R. (tlie school-master 
of Jayanarmna's sclmol,) called and 
spent the day with us, and a brahmnn, 
with wluMn we had much conversation on 
religious subjects. 5th. Conversed with a 
good number of persons at Trilochun-ghat. 
6th. Mr. A. favoured me with a horse lo 
enable me to go to the fair at Chonar* 
which will take place on the 8th instant. 
7ili. Very early tins morning left Benares^ 
and reached Chonar at eleveo o'clock. 
In the evening went oat whh Mr. B. and 
spoke to many people, wlw listened with 
much attention. 8th. This morning preach- 
ed at Mr. B.'s. After worship went to 
the fair with brother llam*dasaand Messrs. 
A. and B. As soon as we readied the 
fair, the Rev. Messrs. G. and H. joined 
ns ; we preaolied alternately to crowds of 
people, and gave away thirteen copies of 
Matthew's Gospel in Uindce, fourteen or 
fifteen copies of Hindee tracts, 6ve copies 
of David's Pbalms, seven oopies of llin<* 
doost'Iianee Gospels, twdve copies of 
Persian Gospels, eight copies of Hin- 
doosi'banee parables, eight copies of Per- 
sian selections, one copy of the Persian 
Testament, two copies of the Hindoost^ 
hanee Testaments, and one copy of the 
Arabic Testament. We were much pleas- 
ed 10 see the people listen to the Gospel 
without the least interruption. 9lh. 'To- 
day left Chunar and reached Julal-poora ; 
hvre I Mt under the shade of a tree, and 
read and expounded a portion of Mat- 
thew's Gospel to about forty personst whft 
listened with much attention, and ac- 
cepted a copy of Matthew's Gospel in 
Hindee with two Hindee tracts. From 
thence went to Bughaulie and spoke to a 
number of attentive Hindoos, and on leav- 
ing them a tract, proceeded to another 
village named Mon-poora, where a crowd 
soon assembled and lieaid the word of life 
with much attention, and gladly accepted 
a copy of Matthew's Gospel ui Hindee* 
with some tracts. From thence we went 
to Tt kurree : in this village I found the 
two brahmuns who had given up their 
gods to me some months aeo ^ they ap* 
peaied very sorry at having left me, and 
promised to odl aeain. 11th. Lord*s-dav. 
Preached at Mr. R.'s ; after worship Mr. 
R. expressed a great wish lo yQ\^ vVa 
church by bapiiMn. 1%\Y\.Tniq m^Mams 



.86 



.MISSIOMAKY HBRALU. 



callnl latl spmc > good <nbUe hcaiiog'tlio 
SciiptiucJ, at Itiiglh ihejr uccpled ■ cppj 
of Mutbt*'! Goapd in Hludee. 14th. 
Two MuHilouas called, who, iftn bou-- 
Ing the Scripiwcs racxdied > co|i^ of Ibe 
Pcninn Guspcl. 15Lh. Weol out aitb 
brothsr lUn.diM wid ut on Iht banlu ai 
Ue tner >t TrHochuD-ghu : wtiilr ruding 
the Scriptuei, gnduilly ■ cmiiA of pcr- 
taat amniblcd and btiinl iiilh nuclt lO- 
imliau, aad du rrcrired Hinic Hladce 
tTHCtl iritb |)IcMBn. FlOM ibcOCl! W( 
10 GoH^hal ; here, wl icwJiog ■ Hiarice 
taa, a nunbiit uf prrMiu tiirnmn^Dd 
toe. and appeued wrtj *tteiili<e ; (Iter 
f irini; them imm Uindte liacti return 
bone. A. pandit caHcd, wiih wbom 
.had mncb MnMnatiou mpectiiig i 
Uoapel : lafWrw^rdi R>n bioi ■ cupj of 
MMlheWi GoMid in Ulndee. lOlh.Weni 
out uhI Ml on Ibe baiik> of the rirer ; beir 
a rich Munilmen look the Scripium from 
nie, and read ■ )iotliuti, with which b« 
■|i|Rared much plcued, and prouiicd (u 
nil tD-morro* mcKuing. £lit. litis moni- 
' ing Ihi: rkli Mutuliuan coUcd ami itteaC a 
fDod while oomreTsing on the Goipet : he 
altrritardi allied mc foi a cupy ofihe Fur- 
lian TeMoment, which I gtn him j after 



ALLAHABAD. 



i4IlaUiail, AprV 10, 1S19. 



Dijia aaoTDia Ma( 



„^ „ lODim 

yon iMloo^Og to rhe irtil1<.-ry : thej oi- 
lemble in ibe fort now deilj for prayer, 
■nd have ■ room demted to ihe gHipaae. 
I carrj uo the nmtiogi there, and preach 
'igcoulDiMllj in k in Hludu<nl'hBDeB to 
■Dme nitmii who legnlarly allend. I 
lalctj had ■ large audience uf lipobea* in 
)t wiih two of their native oScnn, who 
lieanl attenlltdjr : ibe meeling roaa be- 
ing near ilie prioon goaid, oyr liopng 
drawitheK peopla into ft. Seeta-ram ro- 
lumHl wilti 111! wiTa ajler vlnting bii 
^untTj aod 9top]^n^ a ihort lime at Agra. 
I hair eniploycd him in dittribuilng ihe 
teponi uf liie Naliic Bcliouli, and lie hii 
accompanied me abuut the nelehboarhood 
10 make known the rkbe* of Chritt lo hli 
cnuntf jmea ; lie appean to be well.di*> 
poKd. 1 (Mnk lie b ^towing in giaca, 
and in the knowledge ot the saeing (mlbi 
^ the Gnipel ; he lakrf lilt inm with me 
Id pteocli at the rip:iher line*, and goea 
daily ro Ihe fort In MBeli wtiie women, 
rr/w iifr tleirtus of Iraniing lo read ibe 



Hindee Teaiamtiiti at also to teach bt»i 
tber C. orilie atlillerj compoiit. Iiideed 
I was appreheiudve of eijtirely ioiing bin; 
''"■"''' ■" tiiiB hoick fia 

nave a nalite brolber lo aiii*t aa, eips> 
oidly OD account ut nilettainiiiE inqaiten, 
ibr we coold not accomaadate iheoi in the . 
mdtiner a aallee bruUierean( our tinug 
and nods are ao foreign tu thein, Ihat ■ 
finl they do not feet ibeBoeleci to bapj^ 
with ui ai with a nMiie bnxher- 

Since Seeta^rara it retviwd, I bad fbi ■ 
few dayi ihrcc who itoppcd and attended 
wonliip with u>; ImI oaaurthaia being a 
Uiuid viragee, made hettdf nneuy, and 
drew Ihe oilier Iwu away with betielf. 
Btollier S. lias pertuaded hu mutber lu 
fcillDw liim frum hii coonli^ : ibe eati wiib 
her loo and daughtrr-lii-Uw, bat ibc.ii 
not 09 yet well recnnciled to oar wayt. 
Daring the mualh of March I dliltibuled 
certain tradi at ihe four, and two « ihrer 
gDipcli at home. I'lie nollTe pjlgrita I 
■wniioncd ume lime ago, who u>nd lo 
attend wocihip and bad Ihruwa off bit 
idolaliout badgci, baa pul ibem on again ; 
but he readi a Coipel which 1 haVe given 
him al an iduJolnnti place whrro a uank- 
iiei of Uindoot rtnrt to leiaplei devoted 
to tbe HiuduD gods. On ilie ]8Ih of 
March I wti sent far by unc Pereira, who 
wat Jolt dtpHrtiag thit life, but before J 
could laach bim be died. Doetut S, hod 
notimdaad aSbrdrd him both tbgd and 
medicine, and Iwd removed him lo the 
■ipahee line* near himself^ about tbree 
mllei from bk. I liad vijUed ibe do- 
ceoied atdiffeirnttimttdutuighii illneu: 
be al timet acknowledged lliat liis titu 
were known to God, and benrd of iw: 
lo (iiit luB and read lo him, which I os- 
COrrllngly did. Ai lu any niarkt of true 
conversion I cannot be <ure, Tot aiuwen 



and lairt lliat ihii wti 
eiJightening hi* ratnd. 

Remembei u* kindly with Chritllan love 
Id rhe brethren and liiten, and alio at 
Ibe throne of grace in your applicatioot. 

J. MacaisToan. 



MOORSHEDABAD. 

Nr. Skiltm'i JdikwiI. 

(Cwiflaiiad/rBiBpi^ 4a.J 

Dec. 3(1. To-day went aeruit Ihe rive 

to Ely Cunp. I1nl net a fitagec, ur la 



MMtlONARY lifcftALb.' 



87 



leious mfndkant, sitting down in t thop. 
I inquired olf him bow h« expected to (m 
$alvatum f He replied, his Goorooor teaelier 
knew ; it wu nnC ncoesMfj for Mm hi 
Itnow. While oonTerMng^ mmy collected, 
with whom we hod much convetiatlon 
cuncrming the fme way which lead^ to 
eternal life. Afterwards proceeded Utriher 
in tlie ▼iHa|Ee, wfien a ftlinpman offeretl me 
« leat ; upun wbirh I again sut down, and 
convened about liini who came to be the 
light of the Gentiles. They wnold not 
tun any tracts or copies of tlic scrip- 

Janoary 4. A native family threw 
away cast, and voluntarily came out from 
thctr friends, and made a profession of the 
CDspeL I eipected this some time since, 
but did not press it, lest they sliould 
prore ftunbling blocks to otiiers. 

Jan. 7. Toniay another native came 
and wished to join us, professing to be- 
Ueve in Christ: I du not yet know his 
direct motives. In the evening was in- 
formed of another, who has assured the 
brethren he will come and inquire more 
particolarly to-morrow. Things are at 
present very enooaraging. 

Jan. 8. My thoughts have been much 
on the obstacles which subsist against the 
spffead of Christianity. They appear to 
he chiefly theac: tst. The great apathy 
9>f the people, fd. Their want of Sab- 
jhalht. And, 3d, the diiBcolty of pro- 
curing a subsistence, and t^ deriuon they 
areeipoeed to after breaking their cast. 

Jen. 1 1. The mother uf one who lately 
thtew offcasts came this morning, and wept 
Utiarly, decbrhig that her son had ba- 
nished all her kindred to hell, through 
breaking cast. The son did all that a son 
coold do to comfort her, but would not re- 
jfaiquish his views of Christ. In the after- 
noon w^. near tfll Bang Market, and 
distributed some books. 

Jan. If. Engaged with my Hindoos- 
tanee Pundit, ui the evening worshipped 
as usual in the Bengalee language. 

Jan. 95. Left home early this morning 
for Daudpore. Arrived ui tlic evening, 
and found all the friends well; had a 
pleasant prayer meeting on the occasion 
uf my arrival. 

Jan. 96. Conversed with several ser- 
vaursof BroUicr H. whom I have seen 
before, and who wuh to be baptized. In- 
quired also of Brother H. cuiicerning their 
walk and conversation. He speoks highly 
of them : their knowledge is but small, hut 
Brother H. has p:dd much attfiition to 
tlicir instruction, and will continue to de- 
vote the Sttbbaih to that object. They 
threw oJT their cast eight months since. 

Jan. 87. Baptised this morning the 
peisoos I convened with }cgietday. 



Their names are Lockmen, Lucksman, 
Bollut and a IVIis. Hose. ' I have never 
seen a more humble penilcut than the 
btter. It is with difficulty she can ^peak 
of herself, or of thn goodness of the Sa« 
1 in^, on accowa of her tears. A ftor bap- 
tisiiig, I administered the Lord's "supiier 
to Brother and Sister WympaftS, Brut her 
II. and the rest of our brethren and sialeis. 
It was a refreshing season. 



DELHI. 



iiccouNt $/ a Journty by Ur. Thampton 
from Dtthi to Loodiana. 

(Cmtm»edfr9m Fege 43.) 

SuMHALKA ; about lirty mU$from DoVii. 

A few miles from Soouputwesaw about 
fifty deer crossing the plains ; shortly af. 
terwards we entered a jimgle (ru>t vf.rf 
thick) of Dhak trees, the leaves of which 
serve the Hindoos instead of Queen's- 
ware, chuia, and plate. 

At NerUa we entered the Huriana dis- 
trict. This province is not pecoliar either 
(or its inhabitants, its language, or its pro- 
ductbns, cattle excepted, which perliaps 
owe their superiority to tlie rich and abun- 
dant pasturase. 

The inhamtonts are Hindoos and Mbo- 
sulmans, with Jat xonieendars :* indeed 
most, if not all tlie husbandmen are Jats, 
and some of them Moosolmans; who, 
however, are scarcely recognised by the 
more pharuaita) sort, for solemnizin*^ 
their marriages by brahmnns, and for other 
coronlTances with Hhidoo rites and cere^ 
monies.' 

The Hindoos are the luhouring and tlie 
most nselVil part of the population, and u>o 
the Kythee and Nagree cnanicters ;- their 
language is plain Hiiidee. Tlie Moosul- 
mans possess lands, and excepting the 
poorer sort, are not ingenious and uidus- 
trions like their Hindoo neighbours. Their 
reading is confined to tlie Koran in Arabic, 
and idle and loose romances in Persmn ; 
and their language is the HindoostMiaiire. 
with a great mixture of Persian and Ara- 
bic ; but this may probably be affected 
upon occasions, for they understand the 
most uoalloved Hindee of the villagers. 

The whole of this day has been very 
rainy, and we had to travel during a heavy 
shower. Shortly after the ruin ceased w~c 
reached the Utile village of Sumhalka, 
where the superintendent of police cainr* 
to pay his respects, find receive orders t(ir 
accommodations, nrcTssartes, &.c. 



• m 



Zumecndaci -,* Wv\ \\v»\<\e\ s . 



88 



MUSlOHAftY HBRAUI. 



Pavifpt} nmrly eighty mUeifimn Detti, 

After passing fibotit fiMiiteen miles of 
jungle and waste lands, without serine a 
^Dglc village on the road, we caoKs to Pn- 
niput, a very large and ancient dty» paitlj 
in mins, bat very populous : it liat not* at 
ftr as I could see, one straw or tiled b«if» 
bot all the buildings are of bnck, and the 
streets paved with the same* 

When I had presented the two piind^ 
pal pundiis with Sungskrita scriptures, and 
liindee tracts, ai33 the Cutwal with the 
nme in Persian, they sent such a rumour 
abroad, that maltitiidas of all ranks and 
casts flocked to my lodging, and finding 
ne dis|)osed (o give books, importuned me 
Id distribute by nuudreds ; but thu I could 
not do on account of my scanty stock. 
J bad not the most distant idea of the in- 
ferior of the country being so full of let- 
tered men, and so desirous of the scrip- 



tures. To make up in aome degree for the 
want of books I preached thr'-e times, and 
obtained the most satislactory liearing* 
On my concluding, many Hindoos said, 
they desired to know more of the Saviour, 
denied to b« saviad by him, and tu possess 
oar scriptures. I could supply them but 
partially ; they crowded about loe. When 
the discourse was over, altliough night ad- 
vanced, the listening muliiiudes »i*vmed 
not in the least degree tired, but desired 
Id hear more. I concluded by sayiiig. 
This then is the Saviour, pray to him aiHi 
take refuge in him : your nine incarna- 
tions liaving failed to aooomplish your sal- 
vation, you look for the tenth : if salva- 
tion be what you seek, if the pardon of 
sin, sauctification of iMiart, and hope of 
heaven be your desire, mark the many 
proofs of Christ's divinity. 

(To be con(i»urd.) 



TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Tbb thanks of the Committee are presented to our kind friends at Deal, who have 
forwarded a box of books for the MisMonaries ; and to Mr. Blake, of Chapmanslade; 
for ft Numbers of the Evangelical Magazine, &c We beg to obaerve« that bookt 
intended for a warm cliniale should be bound, and in good condUion, 

The " Lincolnshire Drill Man** is informed, that his favour arrived In die ooutse, 
covering a Donation of «£l for the Mission. He will find tite last duly entered in the 
Report ; and wilL' doubtless, he gratified to observe, in thb Number, that Ids frifliAlly 
wish was aooompBshed, in part, on the very day that it met the eye of the indlfMnal 
to whom his letter was addressed. 

* 

We are oblig^ to our friends at Burton-on-Trent for the remittance of ThretPottodt 
by Mr. W. and regret that it should have been overlooked at the proper time. 



Lnadon : Printed by J. BAinELD* 91, Wardour.&treet, Soha. 



89 



^(^os^e^ i^aAD 



POR 



PROVIDING MEANS OF EDUCATION. 



TV the JE4iiors of the Baptist Magaii^ine. 



Thb Com mittbb of '< The Protestant Society for the Protection 
of Retigious Liberty*' cherithed a hope that Mr. Brougham would 
not have reintroduced this Bill to Parliameut, or would previously 
have consented to mak^ many alterations, rendering it less objec- 
tionable to all classes of Dissenters from Ihe Established Church. 
Those hopes they now fear will meet with disappointment ; and 
they request that you will insert in your Publication an Abstract of 
the Billy as circulated by Mr. Brpugham, and the Resolutions, ex- 
preaiiveof their sentiments thereon, adopted by the Committee in 
Joly bst The Committee expect that your numerous readers 
may be thereby enabled to determine whether it is a measure which 
Xhar real desire for the Education of the Poor — their attachment to 
liberal principles — and their love to religious freedom, will allow 
Ibem to approve ; — and will be better prepared to concur in such 
efforts as may he suggested, and they shall deem e;i^pedient, to pre* 
▼ent its jBuccess. 

Jmmmy 23, 1921. 



ABSTRACT 

or 

Mr. Brougham's First Educa- 
tion BiU. 



It eoDttftt of thre« Branches. 

I* The manoer of establiBhiug schools. 
. n. The manner of appointtng» Tisit- 
^«nd removing the masters. 
, UL The manner of tdmitting and 
^win^iing the scholars. 

▼01. XIII, 



I. ESTABLISHMENT AND ENDOW- 
MENT OF SCHOOLS. 



. This Branch consists of three parts. 

J. The manner of mdVing the qaestion 
of establishment. 

ii. The manner of trying the question. 

iii. The execation of the order made 
on the trial. 



i. M0TIK6 07 TBS QvBsrtoir. 

A school or schools ma^- be moved for 
in any ecc/ettoittcai du\x\6\^ \. «« %Sk.;3 v^ 



90 



INTELLIGEKCB, 8CC. 



rish or chapelrj, in two ways-- >by com- 
plaint or by appiication. 
^ 1. Conipiaint is whel'e a school or 
schools are sought to be proTided, there 
being either none, or no sufficient tclioolt 
in the ecclesiastical district, tt io the 
Deighbouring districts. The complaint 
may be preferred by 

a. The grand jury at quarter sessions, 
eilher complaining themsejves, or adopt* 
ing the complaint preferred to them by 

/ koy honseholder. 

b. The rector, vieart or jptrptHial cu- 
rate, residing and officiating ; or the cu- 
rate or other officiating minister of the 

' parish or cbapelry. 

c. Two justices of the county or 
riding. 

d. Five householders of the parish or 
chapelry. 

2. Application is wliere any master or 
conductors of a subscription or other 
private school desire to have it become a 
parish school, and apply for this pur* 
puse upon terms. This appUcation must 
have the Consent of the officiating minister, 
or two justices, or five householders. 

5. Both complaints and applications 
must be made after notice. It the grand 
jury make complaint at one sessions, it 
cannot be tried until the next. In all 
other cases four weeks' notice must be 
given in the parish church or chapel 
during divine service, and on the 
doors. 

4. An estimate of the probable cost 
must accompany the complaint, and an 
estimate of the cost of any alterations 
required, must accompai\y the applica- 
tion. And notice mutt be served on all 
persons whose property may be affected 
by any order to be made. 

5. Several parishes or chapelries may 
be joined in one complaint; and then 
the officiating minister of each must join, 
or Cliree householders of each, or the 
grand jury of the county, or two jus- 
tices, and with the same notices and es- 
timates as before. 



ii. Trial of tub Question. 

Complaints and applications are to be 
tried by the Justices at Sessions. 

1. Church or chapel wardens are to 
defend their parishes or chapelries, if 
they please, against any complaint or 
Application, at the expense of the pa- 
rishes or chapelries; and they may be 
required so to do by five householders 
with a week's notice. 

2. Justices may order the costs of the 
proceedings to either party, 

3, Justices may Qtdcr ichoels not ex- 



ceeding three, in any parish or chapelry, 
or any aumber of this parishes or cb»- 
pelries joined in any application, or af- 
terwards in any such parish or chapelry 
as has been joined, but so that there ne- 
ver shall be more than three parish 
schools in any one parish or chapelry. 

4. The master's salary is to be fixed 
in the order : not to exceed thirty 
pounds, nor be less than twenty* and 
not to be changed daring the master's 
incumbency. 

5. The order is to specify the cost of 
the buifding and garden, or to allow a 
yearly sum not more than eight nor less 
than four pounds in lieu of garden, 
where none can be provided. 

6. The order of sessions to be finaL 

7. The Education Digest may be 
given in evidence, but not as coucuisive 
evidence. 

8. Repairs, if above ten pounds, ara 
to be obtained on complaint by the mas- 
ter, or, if the master's place be vacant, 
by the same persons as those authorixed 
to make complaints, and with the same 
notices and estimates. 






iii. Execution op tsx OmDim. 

1. Justices are to issue their wanant 
upon any order made by tbero, di- 
rected to the officiating minister and pa- 
rish officers. 

S. The warrant is to be a sufficient 
authority to the receiver-general of the 
county or riding, to advance money for 
providing house and gatdeu, or for pay- 
ing persons making application, or tut 
altering premises conveyed by them; 
and the receipt of the mmister and pa- 
rish officers, or persons making applica- 
tion, to be authority to the treasury to 
repay from the Consolidated Fund such 
sum, to the extent of two hundred pounds ; 
the overplus, if any, to be borne by the 
county rates. 

5. No person's buildings or land to be 
taken without notice a month before trial 
of the complaint; and if any such be 
taken, a jury from a neighbouring 
ecclesiastical district is to assess the 
value. 

4. No parish officer is to be concerned 
in building, alterations, or repairs at all, 
under one hundred' pounds penalty, nor 
in selling buildings or land for the use of 
a school, without an estimate of price 
fixed by the county survey<*r. 

5. Warrant of justices for theniafici's 
salary, or for repairs above (en pounds. 
Of for money in lieu of carden, to be au- 
thority to the pariih officers to levy the 



iNTBLLiesNce, Sic. 



91 



ifUM 4h€rem iireiied ha^^fevthf, in the 
fmme manntr mi poor meet, ky a rnte to be 
emtUd the Schtol rate. 

6. Hooteholders at a meeting, with 
one month*! notice, and cement of the 
miniater or mtftuten, during a 



▼acancj in the place of roaster, may, if 
thre^fourtha concar, increase the sa- 
lary, by a sam not exceeding twenty 
)K>unds a year; absent propnetors of 
one bondied ponnds a year and - up- 
wards, voting by agents authoriied in 
writing; saeh additional salary to be 
levied as the other salary. 

7. The schoolmaster is to have the 
freehold of the house and garden to all 
intents aad purposes^ except voting at 
elections of menibers of poriiament. 
< 8. Repairs, as far as ten pounds in 
two-jearsy oiay be made by the parish 
officers, and paid by levy of school- rate 
on tiie parish as above. 



II. APPOINTMENT, VISITATION. 
AND REMOVAL OFTHE MASTER. 



This Branch consists of three parts. 

L Qualification of the master. 
ii. Election of the master, 
iil Visitation of the school. 



' i. QUALiriCATIOV OF THE MaSTSB. 

• 

1. Certificate of the efficiating mirdster 
and tbree householders of tbis pari&h 
where l>e last lived a year, or of the 
minuler and two householders of each 
parish, if he lived in more than one, 
setting forth his character, and thmt ke it 
a mtmber of the established church. 

a. Age not less than twenty-four, uor 
more than forty.* 

3. Parish clerks eligible as school- 
masters. 

4. Officiating minister not eligible. 

5. Where the master i» continued on 
application, the same certificates ne- 
cesmry. 



ii. Election of the Master. 

1* Meeting of householders rated to 
the school-rate, and agents (authorised 

* It is proposed to alter the age, and 
^^ give a power of chooting persons 
^riuerly schoolmasters, thougio not 
within the stataM Me age. 



in writing) of proprietors of one hundred 
pounds a year and upwards, to be called 
by one month's notice in church or 
chapel, during service, and on the door«, 
and to be faolden in the school-house, for 
the purpose of choosing a masier. 

2. Senior parish officer to preside, and 
have a casting vote in case of equality of 
votes, to read the certificates and other 
testimonials, to determine all disputes 
as to the right of voting, to declare on 
whom the choice has fallen, and to 
report the same to the officiating mi- 
nister. 

d. Officiating niinisterto call the person 
chosen before him, and examine him and 
his certificates, and to notify his approba* 
tion or rejection to the parith officer : if he 
approve, the appointment to he complete ; 
if he refect, a new election to be had as 
before. 

4. Other acting parish officer to pre- 
side, and report in case of the senior's 
illness or necessary absence. 

5. Where, on application, a school is 
put on the footing of a parish school, 
without any consideration for buildings 
and land belonging to it, or with a con- 
sideration below their value, the justices 
may appoint the former master, if duly 
qualified, and with the approbation of the 
resident officiating mtnister. All future 
vacancies to be filled up as hereinbefore 
stated. 



iii. Visitation of the School. 

1. Ordinary from time to time may 
visit ali parith schools within his diocese, 
either 

a. By himself in perton ; or 
6. oy the dean, within his deanery; 
or 

c. By the archdeacon, within the 
diocese, or archdeacottry ; or 

d. By the chancellor, wiihin the 
diocese. 

2. Visitor may remove the master. 

3. Visitor may superannuate the master, 
after fifteai years* service, and order him 
a pension not exceeding two^irds of his 
salary ; such order being a sufficient war^ 
rant to the parish tfficers to levy the same 
lialf-vearly wUh the other school rates, and 
in like manner ; and to proceed to a new 
electunu 

4. Appeal from the ordinary to the me- 
tropolitan : and from the dean, archdeacont 
and chancellor, to the ordinary.* 



* It is proposed to give an appeal to 
the other metropolitan, in th« c««a ^ 
schools wilhiA an «ccYi\«^\i«(>^%V ^<(^ 
cese. 



ae 



IKTELLIGSNCS, &C« 



5. Orihuay ta wdke ynH^ rcfiiraf of 
the names of parbh •choolmaston in his 
diocese, nambers of children atteoding. 
salaries, and emolonients, with remarks, 
as a pari of the returns which he is re- 
qoired to make by 43 Geo. IIL c 84^ 
and 57 Geo. III. c. 99. 

6. Ojfieiatignf mmiiter may at all timet 
enUr the pariih tchooU, and esamim the 
wuAttr and scholart; and is reonired to 
answer qoestions tooching the state 
thereof to the ordioar j. 



IIL ADMISSION AND TUITION OF 
THE SCHOLARS. 



"this Branch consists of two )Murts. 
i* The manner of admitting scholars, 
ii. The manner of treatmg them. 



i. Admissiov. 

1. 'The nffieiatiag mtnitUrp with the ad> 
▼ice of the parish officers, as assessorsr 
thaU fix the rate of quarter pente* as often 
as the master's place is vacant; not 
lower than one pennj per weekt nor 
above four pence, and affix the same in 
the schooUroora. 

2. Pauper children to pay one penny 
in all cases. 

S, Officiating minitter, with parish 
officers as assessors, to recommend any 
poor child whose parents (not receiving 
parish relief) cannot pay at all, to be 
admitted gratis. 

4. No distinction whatever to be made 
by the master In bis treatment of ditfer- 
ent classes of scholars. 

5. Master, if called on to teach any 
children at ektra hours, or extra things, 
may agree for the same with the pa- 
rents. 



il. Tuition. 

« 

1. The ejfficiatmg mMtler, ^n each va- 
cancy of the master's place, it to fit the 
hmirt of teaching — not hiore than eij^l 
nor lest than six hourf a day-— and the 
times of vaeatioii not more than twitfe <k 
year, and a fortnight each time, 6r a 
noDth if In one racation ; to affix the 
same in the school room. 

2. The Holy Scriptores'to be taursjirt : 
the officiating mini$ter, if he pleatet, dU 
reettngtfrom time to time, any passages 
he may think fit to be taught among 
pthers. 

9* No other religioos book whatever 



to be used or laaght in lesaanst na katk 
witkaut officiating mtnktot'e ap p r ok aii a mf 
and no refigioos worship* except the 
Lord's -Prayer* or other paasagea ol 
Scripture. 

4. Church Catechimn to ke tam^ hajf 
of one day in the week; andt if dte effi" 
dating wtinitter thmka proper, at c teihatl 
auetingon S nni a y eoeningt fM< emeeding 
three houre. 

5. No child to be panbbed, rebuked, 
admonished, or otherwise molested, for 
being absent with leave of its parenta* 
guardians, or persons having oare of it» 
at the times wbeo the Chordi Catechism 
is taught. 

6. Scholar B to attend th^ parith ckmreh 
once every Swidoff milh the aicsCert sm* 
leu they attend with their parente eHr oAere 
having care rf them } but no chiid to be 
punii^ed, rebuked, admoaisliedft or 
otherwise molested, for not to attendiBgh 
if the parents or guardians shall signify 
a wish to that effect, and that Ae 
child attends some other place of chris- 
tian worship. 

7. Reading, writing, and artihroe- 
tic, to be the things taught in all parish 
schools. 



At a Special General Meetibc of 
the Committee of " Tba Pro- 
testant Society for the Protee- 
tioD of Religious Liberty," held 
at Batson's Coffee House, Com* 
hill, on Tnesdav* Jnly IB, 
1820, '' To consider a Measure 
announced to l^arliament, * For 

^ the General Education of the 
Poor/ "^ 

David Allan^ Esq. in tbeChair. 

It wof ttnontmatts^ Reuthed, 

1. That this Committee appointed to 
protect the Religioui Libertj of Pro* 
testant Dissenters* believe that wisdom 
and freedom mutnallj promote indivi* 
dual and public happiness ; and desire 
that all men should ei\joy the benefits of 
an appropriate and religions education, 
— ^including histroction in reading, writ- 
ing, and arithmetic. 

f. That this Committee have observed 
with satisfaction ndt onlj the numerous 
educational Institutions, liberally en- 
dowed bv our forefathers ; but the ge- 
neral dimision of elementary knowledge 
1 among their feflow countrymen; atid 
the great modern iacreaie of attention 






IVtBItUCKirCB, fcc. 



d3 



to iba IiiitrvolNm of Um Poor» maiu- 
feated not only by poor p«reiita^bj 
Parochial Scbooli— bjf tho National So- 
cietj«-bj tbe Britbh and Fortign School 
Institiiiion — bat etpeciallj by the estab- 
Ksbnient of Suoaay Schools, which 
oonbuie the great advantages of soffi- 
dtfiK ivition witb the diie oUerritaee of 
ibe Sabbath day« itid with aoril and 
religious improvemeDt. 

3. That gratified b j these observations 
•—considering also the facilities to in- 
stroaion afibrded by the systens of t>r. 
Bell and Mr. Lancaster— anticipating 
that tbe benevolent seal already niRni- 
ff»sted. and yet progretsive^ wonid con- 
rimie to incr«aie-*eoiiclil4irt^ that u 
parents^ themteWes instracted. would 
becone tbe inethictors of their chrldred, 
or desire their instruction, the progress 
•f iostnutlMi weald Aogment with every 
saeeetsive geocratton— end believing 
that flpontaneons beneficence is more 
effective thah eitortcd contribatious, 
and that iodividoal and cordial etfbrtl. 
are more eseftil than prescribed and le- 
gislative Bjrsteml, this Committee have 
cbcflshed a bepe that, witbmit any ek- 
traneona hiterp(Mition or parliamentary 
enactments, every benefit that the love 
of freedom, pattiotism, philanthropy, 
and religion could desire as to General 
^nc«don would be eventually, speedf* 
ly, and happily obtained. 

4b That this Committee— ^presenttttg 
a large portion of the population of Eng- 
land and Wales, from whom many civil 
rights are yet withheld on accoant of 
their religious opinions, and who are tet 
subject to exclusion from offices, and to 
teats which they deem obnoxious and 
disgraceful — mtut deplore any measures 
that may increase the degradation they 
desire to terminate, and augment the 
powers and abases of a system which 
they conscientiously disapprove. 

5. That this Committee have there- 
fore perused, with regret, some Charges 
and Discourses of Dignitaries ef the 
Esublished Chocch, declaring that the 
General Education of tlie Poor would 
be connected with the JEUtablished 
Chnrcb, and that the Parocliial Clergy 
would be invested with additional pow- 
en, te superintend that edacation» and 
to render it subservient to the increase 
ef the members of that folablithraent. 

6. That such regret b atrgmented by 
Ibe propo d tion of i^ Measure f Partia- 
BMiit, jrealittng all the apprelieniions 
excited in their mindi, and proposing to 
establish Parochial Schools at a great 
•aasediate national expense, and at con- 
aiderable atod permanent local chargca: 

■0 cooiecttd wiib tbe EsiMbliibed 



I 



Church, as to t|)e veto in the appoint* 
ment of Schoolmasters^ — as to the qoali- 
fication of those persons, — as to the vi* 
sitorial powers of the Clergy and Supe* 
rior Officers of the Church, — and as to the 
compulsory contributions of Dissenters 
•towards such Establishments, as must 
incftfaae the powers of the Church, at 
the expense of Dissenters of every de- 
nomination, in a manner which not only 
the fViends to Religi^ Freedom, but 
even the advocates of an imperfect To- 
leration, must condemn. 

7. That to this Committee the details 
of the Measure appear equally objec- 
tionable with the principle of the union 
of such Parochial Schools with the Esta- 
blished Church '.—-and they Cannot doabt 
that the Bill, if passed Into a Law, will 
produce parochial litigations, loieal 
feeds, ezperuive contests, and sectarian 
and party disputes, that Would agitate 
every dutrict of the country, and occa- 
sion additional animosities and disunion 
— when the public interesti and private 
prosperity especially require candour, 
coAeiliation, and unanimity among wi^d 
and Kood men. 

8. That this Committee, f^oro the'r 
observationa and inquiries, believe thut 
the inibrmation on which the necessity 
for the Measure has been ibanded, is- 
imperfeet ; that Edvcation Is more ge- 
nerally dififesed than the Proposer of wis 
novel plan is aware ; that tlie Measure 
is as unnecessary as oMectionaMe, — and 
that it is especially ill-timed, at en et» 
when unprecedented private eiertiont 
are made to diminish the existence and 
evils of Ignorance — and when public bur- 
dens and parochial taxation ife already 
greatly oppressive. 

9. That this Committee tberefore ex* 
perience net astonishawnt bet ^as ure 
at the disapprobation which tha project 
has already excited, and perceive with 
satisfaction, that, not only in the Metro- 
polis, but in every part of the Country, 
such disapprobation exists:— and that 
not only the Disventen end Methodistf 
connected with this Society, but the 
Wesleyan Methodists, Qaakers, Jews, 
Catholics, and ReligioniMs of every 
Sect, as well as nxiny pious and liberal 
Members of the Established Church, wbo 
disapprove of many parts of the plan, 
concur in their di«inclination to this well- 
intended but injurious design. 

10. That acting however, on the prin*' 
ciples by which they have invariably 
regulated their conduct, this Committee 
will seek rather to allay than to ioflame- 
that general discontent \ and at til\e 'B^vVV 
is postponed ua\i\ anovViet ^<eaii\oi\, axA 
may never be revived, oc VI t««'\^e^ 



!H 



INTELLIGBNCB, &C. 



niaj be nneh modified uid lc» eicrp* 

tionible, ibey nill, from rttprcl to the 

tioni uf Ihe Propoirr of tho Meuiire, 
■od (ram k dciire to prCTcnt igilttion 
uid (ItiiD, ■bilain from all public op- 
{Kwilion toihe Bill, nntil it ihdl beaeain 
Mbmillcd to Ihe coaiidcnliim of Far- 
liament. 

II. Thiti to Iranquilliie Ibeaoiioui 
»ticllude of thair numennii and ia- 
^oititf Memben. the 5«ctctu!e> (rini- 
mil > short Letter lo *«ch of the Peri- 
odical Pablicaiiont cireulatlDg Bmong 
PruleiUai DiaieBten, ioformine iheii 
fnendi of tbeir itleoiion lo the mhject 
— oppiiilng Ibem of the dela; ihu muit 
■ov occur in in progren. and that will 
wpetiade the neceuil; for genetal lod 
ioiiDediBle eieitioini — and annring 
suid I 






•gain Bltempled. thi 
(imelj noiice of the ancnipi, ana loiiie 
or accept their iniienal co-operalion to 
preirnt )ti ticceia. 

13. That aware that iDch re-intiudnc- 
tion aod lach aaccen, rnnit ptmdpallj 
depend on the sentimanli that idij be 
formed of tbi* Meiaare bj Hii Majei- 
tj'i GoTernrDCDt — and rendered confi- 
dent of their liberal principle!, b; put 
■ttentiost and ftequent eiperienra — and 
eipecially eocoarBged by the parti en Jar 
and reoent pledge of the King, that the 
ToleraDimihouldbe preierted inTiolate, 
thii CommiLiee think i1 [eapectfBl to 
appriae Mii Majeilv'iGoiernaienl »ilh- 
oui delay of their Heioliilioni ; and Ihal 
the Sccretariei be therefore direcied to 
trinimit ibem to the Right tiuDourable 
The £atl of Lieetpooi, end to reqnest 
an inicrrlew itilh him. pierioui lo the 
DCiI SeiHoQ of Parliament, whenever 
be ibatl ban coniidered Ike inbject, 
■nd hii con<renicDce will peripii. 

13. That the SccreliTiei alio trantmit 
copiei of ihew Rciolulioot to Hit R. H. 
The Dake of Suihi— The Rigbt Ho- 
HOarahla Lord Hollaud — 8Jt Jimei 
Uackintoih. and Mr. Aldeiman Wnud, 
tlie late Chairmen to Iheir Annual Meet- 
ings and aI)o lo Ihe Sccretariei to Ihe 
Depaliei fur defending the Ciril Righii 
of Diuenlen, and of The Brilitb and 
Foreign School Society — To the Com- 
niiiee fur protecting ihe piirilegei of 
The Weileysn Mclhodirii — and to Ibe 
Gcnllemen who watch onr the inleieiti 
af ihe Society of Quaken, that ihey may 
uidenlBiiil the lentimeDt* of Ibii Cum- 
■Itlet, and the conduct thcj bare de- 
tarmined lo adopt. 

14. That thit Heeling, ipeciilly con- 
vened by their Hoooraty Secrclaiiei, lo 

riiAllj impgitant (o 



their ConMlnenti, etpreti tbeir Hianb* 
to them fur iheir ■lienlion lo the Sabjecl 
— and for their metiloriooi eierlion*. 



GeHtrat Mating of ProtetUxt 
Diattnting MinMera in Lon- 
don and Wtttmingter. 

A Mbbtimo of Ibe General Body of 
Proteitinl Diwciiling Mluiiien of the 
Tliree Denominationi in London and 
Weitouasler, wai held at the Librai; 
in Hed Cnni Sueet, on WedneHlaj. 
January 14, lo coDiider what itept 
•hould be lalien reipecting the propoacd 
Bill of Mr. Brougham'!, when a ddb- 
nimoui feeling of diiapprobaiwn of its 
enaclmcDti wai decidedly expteued; 
and a retolution formed lo uie all ibe 
meant in tbeir power lo preieut iti 
being adapted. 

The Secretary, the Rer. Dr. Morgan, 
repotted that he bad received a tetter 
from Coggeihall. informing him that Ihe 
Auociated Independent Miniileii ilk 
the county of £»ci, at a meeting held 
at Dunmaw, July 10, 16M, adopt- 
ed lomc itroog and weirexpieMcd 
leaolationi reipecting Mi. Krooghaa^ 
Bill, eipiewre of their opinion of it* 
ohaoiiout clauie), and of tbeir leadi- 
ne» to co-operate with the diffetent 
bodiet of Diueoteri in London, in op- 
poiing that aicBiate. 

We nnderilaad that a wetl-written 
pamphlet, for the purpoieof ibowing ihe 
ujnrioui operation of Mr, Brougham'* 
Bitl, will be publiihed in i few dayi, 
by Arch, ofComhill. 



Irith Natumal Society for JPro- 
moting the Education of the 
Poor. 

At ■ General Meeting of the Roman 
Catholic Ctergv of Dublin, Convened 
by otder of The Moil Re». Doctor 
IVoy, and held in Ihe Chapel-Houie 
of St. Michael and St. John, on Wed- 
neidey, January 10, 1811. 

Tbe Moit Re?. Dr. Tnoi in the Chair, 
Mr. L'Eilraage made hii Report, and 

read the following PlsikoT an Inatllu- 

tion for piomoliog tbe Education of tfaa 

Foot in Ireland ; — 

No. 1. The name nf the InMhotion 

■hall be, '■ The Irith Nalantl Socitlfjtr 

pnauliag At EducaliMi of Itc foer." 



INTELLIGBNCE, &C. 



95 



\ 



No. 2. The object of the Society is to 
diffasc, throaghoQl tUii co\intry» a welU 
ordcred System of Education for the 
Foor» whicti shall coaibiue economy of 
time aud moaey* and bestow due atten- 
tioQ on cleanliness and discipline, and, 
aboTC all things* promote chrbtian cha- 
rity and' benevolence. 

No. 3. The leading principle by which 
this Society shall be guided, is to afford 
the same facilities for Education to all 
classes of professing christians, without 
any atuoiptto interfere with the peculiar 
religious opinions of any* or to counte- 
nance proselytism. 

No. 4. That this leading principle 
shall be adhered to with perfect fidelity ; 
and for the purpose of preventing any 
▼iolation of this principloj, it is a fanda^ 
menul law of this Instituiion, that it 
shall be, at all tiroes, competent for any 
fire Members of the Society, upon re- 
quest in writing, to obtain a Committee 
to inquire and report whether this, our 
leading principle, has been in any re- 
spect violated, and to suggest the best 
means to prevent future violation. 

No. 5. That, with a view to attain 
the objects of tlus Societv, it proposes, 
so soon as adequate funds can be coU 
lected, to use the following means: — It 
will esUblish and maintain a Model 
S^iool, on an extensive scale, in the 
Metropolis, which shall at the same time 
exemplify the System of Education re- 
cumaiended by the Society, and serve 
ms a Seminary for the instruction of per- 
aons to act as teachers; it will also assist 
in procuring properly qualified school- 
masters, and will provide suitable books, 
stationery, and other articles necessary 
for Schoolsb at reduced prices. 

No. 6. As it is conceived that Schools 
best adapted to the wants and circum- 
stances of Ireland are those in which the 
appointment of Governors, Teachers, 
and Sdiolars, shall be uninfluenced bv 
religions distinctions, from which all 
books of religions controversy shall be 
excluded, and in which catechistical 
and reKgioos instruction shall not be 
given to any denomination of christians, 
except by persons of their own persua- 
sion, separately and apart from all 
oiben, and in which the morals of the 



and regular discipline shall be duly^en- 
forced. the funds of the Institution sliall 
be devoted to the support of such schools 
alone; but the Society is willing to com- 
municate information, and afford such 
assiftance as shall not diminish its re- 
sources, to any seminary for the itisiruc- 
tion of the poor. 



Providential Preservation. 



Early on the morning of Tuesday, 
January 2. 1821, some men belonging to 
Sheriff-hill Colliery, Northumberland, 
were waiting the arrival of the ^in-hor»e 
to go down into the pit. Owing to the 
cleaning of the boiler, the regular en- 
gine rope was not in a working state at 
the moment ; but about 90 fathoms of it, 
with the chain, were hanging into the 
shaft. One of the men» John Wilson, 
having, in the dark, gone incautiously ^ 
too near the bridge, fell in. Repeated 
cries from v^ithln the shaft at last roused 
the attention of the other men, who, on 
repairing to the spot with a light, were 
told by him that he had fal|en into the 
pit, and was then hanging by the rope. 
As soon as the alarm would a^low them 
to take measures for his preserration, 
they proceeded to adjust the gin-rope— 
a work that occupied not less than 15 
minutes, from their having to discharge 
it on one pulley and place it on another. 
After having fixed on a corf, one of ' 
them wished to descend into it to his 
assistance ; but this Wilson forbade 
them to do. The corf was now let down 
gently till it came under his feet : be 
then freed himself from the engine rope, 
and being seated in the corf, was drawn 
slowly to bank in a state of indescriba- 
ble trepidation. He was able, however, 
with the assistance of another roan, to 
walk upwards of a mile to his own house, 
on entering which, he threw himself 
upon his knees, and poured out his 
fervent thanks to Ood for his deliver- 
ance; no sooner was this done than, 
overpowered by the dreadful conflict of 
his feelings» he fainted. Some time 
elapsed before he recovered tolerable 
composure; and even still, when the 
I subject is recurred to, his agitation i« 



iBUUJWft i» .Si^wi..^^* to, ...V w|j. .■»«- — •. -•• 
extreme. Being questioned minutely, 
be said he had gone to the brink of the 
fbru made to promote mutual cordiality ^hz(t to ascertain whether his comrade 
and affection, and reciprocal confidence, ^^s calling upon him from below, and 
between all classes and persuasions; 
where habits of decency and cleanlineu 
ihtll be considered indispensable; 
wbeie reading, writing, and arithmetici 
dull be taoght in a cheap and expedi- 
Uoos manner, and in which good order 



was - „ . 

being deceived by a glimmering of liglit 
through the crevice in the lattice par- 
tition, his feet slipped. He was con- 
scious at the loument he dropped w; 
but has no TCco\\ect\ot\ ^\\«l\«^« Nxo>a 
or when he caug)\l YvviV^ <il >\i^ %\n^\u^ 



96 



1NT£LLIGSVCB, 8Cc; 



tope. 7h§ fint thing be wm Msiible of 
wM the lOpe Mm^ oa hi* brtnit, and 
nest its ttnpping his left bandi which 
he held mainly oa, at well m with bit 
iegt end feet. He bed in hit right bend 
a tmall stick, of which he kept firm poe- 
aetsiuu all the tim«t and brought it up with 
him. There wat a cbatm of 4SO feet 
perpendicular depth yavfning beneath. 



UtilitfJgf TeM Viil€ge Preaching. 

later from an ItmeraiU of cke Sinry 
Hisnon SocUiy$ to a Minitttr m Lenctpn. 

Your tent has fully Terllied joar 
opinion of its atility* o» a mode of ac- 
commodating a village congregation 
preriQus to the erection of a place <rf 
worship. Since yon kindly lent it to 
me in the summer of 1819« I have avail- 
ed myself of the oppoKonity of em- 
ploying it in some of the villages of 
Surry, and in several it has proved a 
comfortable tabernacle, filled, I trust, as 
of old, in the vrildernest, with the glory 
of the Lord. like that it is easily 
erected, and easily remuved. The last 
village in which it has been pitched, is 
the centre of a dreary region of British 
heathenism. Here the preaching nf 
the gospel was common in the street ; 
and aoon afterwards this moveable tem- 
I pie was reared. A young roan (former- 
ly very profligate,) to wliom the word 
aeems to have been blessed, with liit fa^ 
ther» took the charge of it, aiid without 
any trouble to myself or others who 
have laboured there, we have found it 
prepared every sabbath, for nearly half 
a year. Here upwards of tierce hundred 
peasoMdof all ages, f«om the children 
with ruddy fbces, to the decrepid lean- 
ing upon their sticks* farroecs, plongh- 
men, Ico. have listened to these tidings 
of mercy, which were to them a new 
teund.t The judgment-day will reveal 
those things of which we oannot amv be 
positive ; but we have reason to believe ! 
that tons and daughters have been bom 
unto God. We have been favooicd to 
behold the sabbath-breaker levere that 
holy day, the drunkard become sober, 
and the adulterer break his sinful con- 
nexions. In that neighbourhood the, 
Lord has been pleased so to bless the la- 
bours connected with those above alhided 
to, that one place of worship has been al- 
ready fiUed up; in a nother village^ one 
^■■"^^^■"^^^^^'^^^''"'"^^^^^^^^ 

• This tent, when fixed, forms a room 
34 feet long* by 17 feet wide.^ With the 
poles, &c it is SSOlb. weight -, and it cost 
utaJjr thiftjr gfuntM, 



is expected to be erected; and m thai 
where the tent was fixed, the peopM 
having raised part, and friends having 
cone forward to astist, a coromodioua 
chapel would be commenced immediate- 
ly, did not the season of the year pre- 
vent. I am sure. Sir, that it vrill aflbrd 
▼oa pleasure to reiect,that you hcve so 
lergely contributed to these things ; an^ 
I doubt not that if the plan were adoptea 
of employbg tents in itinerant labours, 
they being on many accounts ho far pre- 
ferable to rooms, it would be found by 
many, who are glad to preach Christ in 
highways and hedges, a privilege to 
have such a comfortable shelter. I have 
been often reminded, while preaching in 
it during heat and storms, of Hhn who 
it " a ahadow from the heat, and a co- 
vert from the tempest.** 

Yours affectionately, J. B. G. 
CeMem, Dec. 1. 18tO. 



Loss of the Abeona Tr^mtf^rt. 

This vessel destined to convey free 
settlers to the Cape of Good Hope, took 
fire at sea on the 15th of December^* 
18tO, through the first mate taking hit 
candle from his lanthorn to see something 
he was looking for more clearly. The 
distress which prevailed on board wfM 
indescribable. OnU forty-nine pers o nst 
by taking to the small boats, were tavedf 
and these, at if by miracle, out of one 
hundred ayd sixty-one ; the whole num- 
ber betides perished. 

One of the survivors says, ** A few 
minutes after I quitted the wreck, th^ ^ 
main and miaen roasts fell > the flamee 
rapidly advancing forwards, drove num- 
bers of the poor wretches on i he pew- 
sprit, where it was our hard lot toAphold 
thero frantic, without being able Iftjend 
them any assistance, Ycu may ju^lf ^^ 
the boaU were crammedt vhen iwsOsnd| 
who had wivet and children ttiU clingwg 
to the wreck, etclaimed aganut fStre &ing 
received.** — Ttmei of Jan; 17, 1 69 1 . 



CAUTION. 

A person named Bikvbtt, th /ktS 
three inehei high, with very red hair, 
assuming the character of n Baptist mi* 
nister, has been collecting ft)r the Bap- 
tist Meeting-house at Bishop's Stort ford. 
He has been within the last few weeks 
at Colnbrook for that purpose, where he 
was suspected^ This method is taken 
to put our friends upon their guard 
against a very wicked man, and e vile 
impostor. 



J BAHFIEJ.D, Printer, 91, VTrntdouT-Suect, SoVg. 



\: 



THE 



l^upti^t |lla0a|ine, 



«!*5 



MARCH, 1821. 



ON SATANIC INFLUENCE.— Part I. 

lU^ist the Ifevil, and lie will flee from you.-^jAUEs iv« ?• 



X HERB are soma persons who 
preiume not only to doubt, but 
poMlivclj to deny, the existence 
and iaUvcoce of that evil spirit, 
who is denominated in tk|» sacred 
volume, the Devil ; biit I am ut- 
terly at a Iq^s tQ understand bow 
tj^ejr who admit the aqthenttcity 
yf -Ihe Scriptures, can entertain 
#och a •eatimei^t, with any co- 
lour of eonsHtency, Itifp^vious 
tl^t fos all o^r knowledge of t|ie 
apirit^al woild» we must be in- 
clebtej^simpiy to the discoverief 
of regpation. Onr organs of vi* 
J^fllited in |heir range tQ 
objects: spiritual exist- 
^ too refinf d lM)d aj^rial 
lo meat the sensesi They are 
imMrceptible to the eye, and im- 
palpable to the tpucli ; b^t their 
reality is not on tbi^ accoui^t the 
less certaiot mep tb/s testimony 
of divine truth, ap to the impor- 
tant/act, is clear and tjepisiye, 
and dcMBS OQt ifi the |i)Jgbte;it de- 
gree aviitate against the dictate^ 
of soood aojd .eq)ightened reason. 
The material ivorld is crowded 
with Ji vine proofs of creatjyff ener- 

Sr ; why then should we jmagine 
e spiritual world ^ waste tiopeo- 




pled desert ; and fancy the Deity 
to sit enthroned in silent and so* 
litary grandeur) In 'the visible 
creation we behold a regular gra- 
dation in the scale of existenc^^ 
ascending from animals of the 
simpl/est organization, up to the 
compleii and beautiful stnictur? 
of man ; but why should the as- 
cending scale stop at this pr^ 
cise point? Since man combines 
in ku own nature, a material 
body and 90 immortal soul, may 
we not refi9onably suppose that 
he forms the connecting link In 
the great chain of being; that 
unnumbered ranks of intelligeivses 
have been created, sppcijoj: |i& 
dignity and power to m^n; so 
tl^at while he occupies the high<» 
est station in the order of mate- 
rial, ^e fills the Ipw^st in that p^ 
spiritual, existence 1 This supoo- 
sition is sanctioned by the high 
authority of scripture ; and f^a- 
son and revelation perfectly ac<» 
cord there^yitly. Hence we read 
pf aqgels; of cherubim and sera* 
pbim; of thrones, priucipaj^ties, 
and powers, in heavenly places. 

But although the exisJDt^qce of 
good angels be admitta4« VV^a ^HV 



9S 



OV SATANIC INFLUfiNCE. 



sibility of evil spirits may still be 
questioned. We know, however, 
by melancholy experience, that 
sin has appeared in one province 
of the creation, amouo; beings 
who were originallv as innocent 
and holy as the angels themselves; 
and therefore it is not incredible 
that it may have appeared in 
other parts, among neings of a 
higher rank. The origin of evil 
is a problem too intricate and dif- 
ficult for the human intellect to 
solve; but its existence is evi- 
dently not ineompatible either 
with the wisdom, power, or good- 
ness of the Deity. Creatures, 
however exalted their dignity, 
and enlarged their capacity, may 
deceive themselves with the vain 
expectation of improving their 
condition; and hence a guilty 
ambition might find a place among 
them, and prompt to deeds of 
open rebellion against their Crea- 
tor. And doubtless there were co- 
gent reasons, however inscrutable 
to us, which induced the Deity 
to permit so fatal a delusion to 
prevail, notwithstanding the aw- 
ful consequences which it neces- 
sarily entailed. Hence, in the 
epbUe of Jude, mention is made 
of those angels, " who kept not 
, their first estate, but left their 
own habitation ;" who were dis- 
satisfied with the station in which 
the Deity had placed them, and 
aspired after higher honours. 
These are described, as "reserved 
in everlasting chains under dark- 
ness unto the judgment of the 
great day." With this striking 
representation, the language of 
the Apostle Peter exactly corres- 
ponds : — ** God spared not the 
angels that, sinned, but cast them 
down to hell, and delivered them 
into chains of darkness, to be re- 
served onto judgment.'' 

Whenever rebellion breaks 
fortb^ there is generally one of a 



bolder cast and more enterprising 
character than the rest, who takes- 
the lead, and urges forward hi» 
companions in crime by his ex- 
ample and exhortation.^ i^mong 
the angeb who dared t? wage air 
impious war with the ^Eternal, 
there was one more aspiring and 
more guilty t^an his associates, 
who became their leader and 
prince ; who is stigmatized as the 
arch* apostate, the chief of the 
revolted spirits. This is the migh- 
ty and malignant being, who is 
styled,. in scnptural language, the 
Devil. Pride was the occasion of 
his crime and his condemnation ; 
and as his guilt was awfully ag- 
gravated, his punishment was sig- 
nally just. The arm of Omni- 
potence was extended tb'oiTenge 
the insult, and he was huricd, 
with all his criminal iMiciateSr 
from the region of light and pu- 
rity and joy, into the dark and 
fiithomless abyss of woe. 

If then the existence of this- 
evil spirit be admitted as an 
established fact, it can scircdy 
be doubted that he if capable of 
exerting, and actually does exerts 
a most powerful and pemidons 
influence over the minds of men. 
His energies indeed haT^d<>ubl- 
less been in some degreWnpatr- 
ed by his fall ; for tin Awt only 
debases, but weakens |m*fiicui- 
ties; but it is probabUHilat he 
still retains a large portion of that 
capacious intelleet which he ori- 
ginally possessed; together with 
that superadded subtilty which 
arises from power petverted by 
guHt. Sin generates a feeKng of 
deep malignity, and it is^ natural 
for the guilty to find a fearful 
satisfaction in rendering others as 
depraved and wretched as tbefn- 
selves. Hence it is not a poetic 
fiction, but a just and tational 
representation, which describes 
the Devil as moved with envy,. 



ON SATANIC INFLUENCE. 



99 



wben he beheld our first parents 
M they c»me pure from the hand 
of the Creator, and as iDsfanUy 
nsolviog to effect, if possible, 
Iheir ruin. Hatred, malice; cruel- 
ty, revenge; every base and ma- 
ligoaiit passion, would prompt 
him to engage in (his new enter- 
prise. Thus would he give vent 
to the smothered emotions of dis- 
appointed ambition; and his 
jdecp-rooted enmity would display 
jtseff in aiming to deface that first 
and beautiful creation on which 
the Deity had enstamped his 
moral image. In order to com- 
pass his end, he assumed, accord- 
ing to the Mosaic history, the 
form of a serpent, and by an art- 
ful falsehood, allured the mother 
of mankind to taste the forbidden 
Srvut, and thus to violate the po- 
.aitive injunction which the Deity 
.bad given. This action may ap- 
:pcar trivial; but it betrayed a 
disposition in the highest degree 
.criminal; — a disregard to the 
authority, aud a disbelief in the 
.Tciacity of God; together with 
.an unworthy preference of mere 
•eiisitife gratification to the en- 
joyment of the divine favour. 
■0€ace the mournful consequences 
which it has involved. This 
tranigression has entailed on the 
: human race a fallen and polluted 
natnljk; and the Devil, having 
bci^Jtoo fatally successful in the 
aeduction of our first parents, ob- 
tained an easy conquest over their 
posterity, and has ruled them 
with an iron sway. Hence the 
earth, which once promised to 
. bocome the favoured seat of bar- 
.Biooy and happiness, has, ever 
aiace the fall, been the scene of 
maarchy ; the dwelling-place of 
niseiy. How widely extended 
are the ravages which sin has 
flMide! How entirely hasitefiaced 
cvcrjr vestige of the primsBval 
. digpity of man I To wluit but to 



the malignant influence of Satan 
are we to trace tbc total aliena- 
tion of the human heart from ho- 
liness and God 1 To what but to 
infernal agency can we ascribe 
those fierce and unrelenting pas- 
sions, which have so often led to 
crimes of deepest die I These are 
strong confirmations of the scrip- 
tural sentiment, that men are 
** taken captive by the Devil at 
his will ;" — that he has obtained 
an entire and fatal ascendency 
over the human mind. 

Apostate spirits are styled 
'' the rulers of the darkness of 
this world ;" and thb expression 
evidently intimates, that they 
have been active agents in the 
production of that intellectual 
and moral darkness, which has 
enveloped the earth. They have 
reared the altars of idolatry, and 
instituted those cruel and ob- 
scene rites, which are a disgrace 
to humanity. The gloomy aspect 
and darkened features of super- 
stition plainly indicate its origin. 
For four thousand years, Satan 
was permitted to reign as ** the 
God of this world,'' almost with 
an undisputed empire. One little 
spot alone was sacred to the wor- 
ship of Jehovah, and blest with 
the holy light of truth; while 
every other portion of the globe 
was under the dominion of the 
Prince of Darkness. At length, 
'* the Son of God was manifested 
to destroy the works of the De- 
vil.'' But in order to accomplish 
this great object, he had to sus- 
tain a fearful conflict with the 
hosts of hell. No sooner did he 
enter on the field of his high 
enterprise, than he was assailed 
by every artifice and stratagem 
that Satan could devise ; aud for 
the space of forty days and forty 
nights had the holy Jesus to en- 
dure the unremitting attacks 
and temptations of the D«sil*. 



ItX) 



HOW TO RUIN AND HOW TO Bt'ILD UP 



but at len^h this infernal foe 
wai compeUed to retire abashed 
and confounded. He doubtless 
instigated the Pharisees to op- 
pose and to persecute the Re- 
<feeincr. He entered into the 
heart of Judas; and that base 
traitor acted on the sugeestion of 
8atdn when he barters for the 
blood of Jesus, and sold his Lord 
and Master for thirty pieces of 
silver. But at the very moment 
when he appeared to hane gained 
an ascendency over the Saviour, 
and beheld with a ghastly smile 
the agonies of the cross, in that 
very moment was there a death- 
l^low given to his empire ; for Je- 
sus conquered as he fell; — he 
bruised the serpent's head ; — and 
when he rose Arom the dead, he 
rose in triumph, to seci;|re the 
victory he had won ; to reap its 
finits,' and to enjoy its impe- 
rishable honours. He is now 
seated at the right hand of the 
Majesty on high, and sends 
forth his Holy Spirit to take pos- 
session of the hearts of those 
whom he has ransomed by his 
blood. His grace disposes them 
to renounce their allegiance to Sa- 
tan, and their love to sin; he in- 
fuses a sacred energy into their 
souls, which enables them to 
burst their iron bands, and rise 
to the liberty of the sons of God. 
Christian converts are so many 
trophies of that memorable vic- 
tory which was obtained on Cal- 
vary, and are destined to swell 
Ih'e triumph of the Redeemer iu 
the eternal worid. 

But although the Devil is de- 
feated, he is not tiestroyed. H'm 
power is curtailed, but his nature 
remains unchanged. I'hose who 
have been rescued from his hard 
and cruel grasp, he continually 
harasses with temptation. En- 
raged at having lost his victims^ 
he puts forth all his efforts^ to 



regain, if possible, his domipioq 
over their hearts. We are en- 
gaged in a perpetual and painfjil 
struggle with an innumerable host 
of spiritual foes. *' We wrestle 
not with flesh and blood, hat 
with principalities and powers; 
with the rulers of the dfurkoess of 
this world, with spiritual wiclie^h 
ness in high places.'^ In such a 
conflict, we might well despafa^ 
were it not for the animating as* 
surance, that, if we *' resist the 
Devil, he will ^ee from os/' 

H. 



HOW TO RUIN, AND HOW TO 

BUILD UP, 

A CHRISTIAN SOCIETY. 



Havino been hitely in compa- 
ny with a friend, who had come 
from a distance, after much gene- 
ral conversation, I asked after the 
welfare of the church at the place 
where he resided. A few years 
since had been in flourbhing eup» 
cunistances, and the prospe^ft 
was very pleasing. I was pained^ 
however, to learn, that few now 
came to the solemn assembly, and 
that there was but little am<nig 
them which was commendablew 
After much inquiryt 1 ^UB<I thA| 
things came into their pfesesf 
state in the following maniifcr. 

The public ordinances of6pd*8 
house were neglected by some of 
the principal friends, under a 
variety of friv(Jons pretenees. 
Seldom more than a small part of 
the Lord's-day was devoted to 
religious purposes; aod ^is hi 
so formal and IndiflTeMnt a mm- 
ner, that it was evident that very 
linle good could arise froos sueh 
services. 

Once the people were appa- 
rently fnpeh concerned that the 
word of ^fe might *< run and be 
glorified ;*' they seldom eanie isi 



A CHRISTIAN SOklBTY. 



101 



Ibe tenctnary aloiM ; they brought 
their iamilies, and they w«»uld 
cAen invite some of their neigh- 
bours to accompany them. They 
do not do to DOW, but are be- 
come evidently indifferent whe- 
tfaer tbe cause of Christ prospers 
or not. Persons have attended 
the means of grace for moulhs 
and years, unencouraged and un- 
noticed. 

llie Social Prayer Meetings 
were too generally neglected; 
and at the Church Meetings some 
of the members met to find fault 
with each other, and to differ, 
and their conduct effectually dis- 
couraged all around from casting 
hk tbeir lot with so discordant a 
community. The discipline of 
the church was also much neg- 
lected ; — ^it became like a garden 
overran with noxious weeds. 

The members of the Society 
were not careful to cultivate bro- 
^rly affection; some of them 
grew shy towards each other; 
they differed ; mischief-makers 
iatetttioually, and injudicious 
fnends unintentionally, increased 
fhe difference; the breach be- 
came so wide, that it could not 
be made up ; they would not re- 
linquish the ground of their 
quarrel, or. forgive each other: 
at length, they relinquished their 
attendance on the table of the 
Lord, on account of their differ- 
ences with their fellow- worship- 
pers — as if they were justilied m 
teglecting their duty to their di- 
Tihe Redeemer, because a bro- 
ther had insulted or injured them. 
The church became divided into 
parties ; the children and friends 
of each arranged themselves on 
the one side or the other. ''They 
bit and devoured one another" — 
aod^ as might naturally be ex- 
pected, ** they are consumed One 
4sf another." 

Many becafbe Catdess iis thrir 



general deportment; no differ- 
ence was to be perceived between 
them and the men of the world : 
their conversation became un- 
suitable to their profession; it 
was worldly, censorious, trifling, 
and unbecoming their profession, 
as followers of the Redeemer. 
Some were carried away from the 
means of grace by the leaven-^- 
the accursed leaven of Antinomi- 
anism. Others, like Eli, did not 
reprove their children when they 
were manifestly wrong; they 
permitted them to siie^r at the 
ministers of the Gosplel, arid to 
cavil at their instructions — thev 
have their reward — some of their 
household are profane and wick- 
ed, and are sources to their pa- 
rents of perpetual inquietude. 

The Sabbath School also was 
generally neglected, till it was of 
little or no use. The teachers 
sought their own ease, and, one 
after another, abandoned their 
interesting charge ; and numbers 
of the children deserted the 
school. 

Their pastor, a plain, pious, 
affectionate man, who <* shuiined 
not to declare the whole counsel 
of God,'' they slighted and griev- 
ed. Some thought his preaching 
too doctrinal; whilst others 
thought it too practical, and dfd 
not hesitate to affirm, that he did 
not preach the gospel, because he 
addressed poor sinners on the 
things pertaining to their eternal 
peace, and endeavoured to leave 
them without eXiDUs^. There 
were a few ttiiserable, niggardly 
people, who grudged him his 
salary, though it was barely suf- 
ficient to maintain his family in 
The plainest way, and took care, 
as Opportunity offered, to lessen 
it — as if the labourer was not 
Worthy of his hire. 

But whilst the mere professor^ 
or the mistaken, oi V\\t y;^t\^^^ 



I 



102 



HOW TO RUIN AND HOW TO BUILD UP, &C. 



or the malevoleQty or the wick- 
ed, to gratify their own e?il pas- 
sionsy or private views, would not 
hesitate to injure, scatter, and 
ruin, a Christian Society, yet, 
blessed be God ! there are not a 
few who will exclaim, with the 
Psalmist, " Peace be within thy 
walls, and prosperity within thy 
palaces ! If I forget thee, O Je- 
rusalem, let my right hand forget 
her cunning. If I do not remem- 
ber thee, let my tongue cleave to 
the roof of my mouth, if I prefer 
not Jerusalem above my chief 
joy. For my brethren, my com- 
panions' sake, I will now say, 
* Peace be within thee !' " 

Reader! are these the senti- 
ments of thy heart,, in reference 
to the church of God in general, 
and towards that part of Ziou 
especially with which thou art 
more peculiarly connected ? Let 
your conduct, at well as your 
words, prove the sincerity of 
your profession. Diligently attend 
the public ordinances of God's 
house. Let there be a marked 
diflfcrcnce between the Sabbath 
and other days. Let, the whole 
of the Lord's-day be consecrated 
to God. Take your ffimilies to 
the sanctuary, and invite your 
neighbours and friends to accom- 
pany you. Be much in prayer in 
necret, and in your Social Prayer 
Meetings, that God would pros- 
per his cause amongst you. At- 
tend Church Meetings with a 
spirit of devotion and love, and 
with a sincere solicitude for the 
divine glory. Love all who love 
Christ, *' with a pure heart fer- 
vently." Cultivate an affection- 
iite disposition towards all who are 
around you. Do not be readily 
oflfended. When offences come, 
be anxious for recopcSiatioo, re- 
collecting the precepts and glori- 
ous example of our divine Lead- 
er, who " when reviled, reviled 



not again,'' and forgave, with hit 
dying breath, bis invetente ene- 
mies and murderers* Alvraya b« 
found in your place at the table 
of the Lord. Differences witb 
arw of your brethren can never 
afford a just reason why yon 
should neglect this holy ordi-' 
nance. Train up your children' 
" in the nurture and admonitioii 
of the Lord." Be much conecm* 
ed, that there should be an evi- 
dent difference between your fa- 
milies and those of the ungodly* 
Let your conversation, let the 
whole of your deportment, in the 
familv, the church, and th« 
world, be such as becometh Ike 
Gospel of Christ. Unremittingly 
pursue a Aer that holiness'* without, 
which no man shall see the Lord*^' 
Watch for opportunities of use- 
fulness. Wherever you may se^ 
good impressions made on the 
mind of any attendant on the 
means of grace, talk kindly to the 
individual, and encourage him tQ 
** follow on to know the Lord."* 

If you have not a Sabbath 
School, collect one immediately^ 
you will by this means do good, 
not only to the children, but td 
the parents — some of them wil| 
come and bear the Gospel, an4 
it may become the ** power .of 
God" to their everlastmg salva^ 
tion. If you have a school, visif 
it, pray with the children, encou- 
rage them, feel for the genera| 
prosperity of the institution. Be 
willing to deny yourselves some- 
what of your usual ease and 
comfort for the public good» 
There can be but little hope of 
permanent usefulness in a congre- 
gation^ where there is no ardenf 
concern for the spiritual welfare 
of the rising generation. 

Hold up, in every possible 
vray, the hands of your minister* 
He can never be eminently sue* 
cessful without your active an(i| 



\ 



ON WALKING WITH GOD* 



103 



«ed^a# GOfeperatioii. Ever meet 
liiai with the smile of affeclioD. 
Too cannot profit by bis labours, 
unless 3fOtt love Mm; love him 
4hen ; " esteem him highly for 
his works' sake/' Bear him fer- 
irently.on your hearts at a ihroue 
of grace. Aid him, wherever 
you can, in the spread of the Re- 
deeaMr*s4iiigdom. Always speak 
of hioi, and to him, with respect 
and kindness. >lf you, who attend 
Us ministry, do not revere him, 
you will 'destroy his comfort, 
and iqlttre his usefulness. Be as- 
sured, that your happiuess and 
respectability are intimately con- 
nected with his. Be more gene- 
rous than to make him an offen- 
der for a word. Disdain to coun- 
4enance such as would slander or 
calumniate him. In temporal 
matters act towards him not only 
with justice, but, as far as you 
can, with liberality. " Be stedfast 
and immoveable, always abound- 
ing in the work of the Lord: 
your labour cannot be in vain in 
the Lord/' 

Pursuing such a line of mon- 
,doGt, you cannot but be pros- 
■perous. Generally speaking, it is 
,the fiiult of a people themselves, 
when a church falls into decay or 
^in. Of a community, where 
iove, and truth, and holiness, and 
i^encvoience, and devotion, pre> 
side, even an individual of no 
.friety might sometimes be in- 
4 need to exclaim, *' Blessed be 
lie that blesseth thee, and cursed 
:be' he who curseth thee! — Let 
jne die the death of the righte- 
tous, and Jet my last end he like 
Jiisr 

The man who (eels as be 
•ought, will indeed oAen say. 
Let the joys and the sorjrows of 
2ion be mine. — Give roe, O my 
God, to see tbe.prosperity of that 
.fNirt of thy cause especially with 
^hi^I am pemonally connected. 



" Id answer to my fervent cries. 
Give me to see thy church arise ; 
But if that blessiog be too great. 
Give me to mourn its low estate.*' 



SouihrnrnpioH, 



B. H. D. 



ON WALKING WITH GOD. 



Thb Christian Course ( 2Tim. 
iv. 7) is a perpetual walking with 
God. Influenced by religion, 
Enoch was thus devoted to him. 
Gen. V. 22. 

I. Description. Walking 
with God is not a monkish sc« 
elusion from the world; it is not 
an ostentatious display of devo« 
tion. But it is a sincere and uni* 
versa! obedience to the Divine 
Will ; au entire subjection to his 
holy authority ; an uqliniited con- 
fidence in his promises. It com- 
prehends our deportment in the 
world, and our devotional exr 
ercises. We must have no wiU 
of our own, opposed to his. They 
who i»alk with God, retire frc* 
quently from the world to medi-> 
tate upon his glorious character 
and eaalted perfections ; they de- 
light in pouring out their hearts 
to him in humble prayer; the^ 
obey his commands ; they culti- 
vate the dispositions which he 
has enjoined, and which the ex- 
ample of Christ exhibits; they 
live perpettially under the benign 
in^uence of religion; and th^ 
walk in the 4ight of the Divine 
countenance. 

II. Benefits. These are nei- 
ther few nor, small ; uor can we 
be deprived of them by our most 
malicious and powerful eiiemieSk 

1. Knoii)Mgt of, and cleavinff 
io, ike doctrine* qf Uu GotpH. 
We shall beliold their beauty and 
ifuportanoo. We shall experience 
a sincere and growing attachment 
to them. We shall know their 
value, ,and feel iheii: ssjitMjiib^<^%'& 



: f 



104 



ck ti^AticiSG ^irfl oob; 



id oiif condition. Conformity to 
ihe Divine Will, and the jutt 
tronception of Divine Truths afe 
insepahlble. *' If any man," said 
the Saviour, *' will do his will, 
he shall know of the doctriffe, 
whether it be of God, or wlietber 
I speak of myseli'." John vii. 17. 
Every dereliction of religious 
fmth is preceded by disobedience 
to (he Divibe Will iii some ^ay 
or otheh The mind is in some 
Jiegree diverted from God; his 
authority is disre^rded; his 
claims are overlooked ; devoted- 
liess of heart to htm is with-hcld. 
WBen men " choose their own 
ivays/' God *' t;hoose§ their de- 
Instofai/ Ita; kvi. 8, 4. If men 
'* tike pleasure in unrighteous- 
tiessy'' Ood ''will send them strong 
dHusiohs, that they may believe 
a lie/' 2 Thess. ii. 1 1, 12. But 
th^ Lord, in this as well as in 
i*very other respect, preserveth 
his paints. 

2. Solid und pena/knnent Peace. 
The wicked are ** like a troubled 
sea/' But '< the Lord will bless 
his people with peace/' Ps. xxix. 
11, he will "extend peace to 
Ihcm like a river," Isa. hvi. 12, 
\* they shall delight themselves in 
tUfe abundance of peace/' Ps. 
xxxvii. 11. <' Glory, honour, and 
peace shall be to every man that 
Vrprketh good," Rom. ii. 10. Their 

Eith is ** the way of peace,',' 
like i. 70. This peace they have 
'' through our Lord Jesus Christ," 
Rom. Y. 1. John xvi. 33. It 
** passeth all understanding," 
Phd. it. 7i It b an antidote 
against Xh^ feat of death. «' O 
deathy where is thjr sting I O 
ffraV^t, where is th^ Victory ?** It 
flows froin hopie in \h^ promises, 
from the pardon of ftin, At>m the 
light of heaven oti Our path^ and 
from the presence of God. 

^.JnuraneepfSkivaiUm. This 
b patnliar to those who )iv« daily 



under the infklenee of tb^ HM 4f 
the Lord ; whose hearts afe flx^, 
trusting in him, Ps. cxii. 7, ilid 
whose sooli breathe the language 
of the poet, *' O fdr a closer vndk 
with God!" It i^ the fruit of 
every grate of the Holy Spirit. 
This assurance is not ftith. Faith 
is a belief of the diviti^ ieitirao* 
nyt but the divine testimony 
points out no person by name. 
Being, however, otie of the graces 
of the Holy Spirit, by wbitb the 
christian is sealed and designated, 
thfc believer beholding it in him- 
self, together tvith th^ other graces 
of the Spirit, becotnes assured of 
bis own salvation. Blessed is the 
nlan^ who, walking with God, 
has a hope full of immortality. 

4. The Divine Honour pro* 
moted. He who walks with God» 
adorns the religion which he pro- 
fesses, illustrates its purity, ex* 
emplifies its excellence, and Uvea 
down the prejudice and over- 
comes the opposition of its ene- 
inies. 

6. Meetnessforjviwre B/essnf- 
ness. They who have no com- 
monion vrith God in the present 
life, shall not dwell with him for 
ever. Bnt "the pure in heart 
shaJl see God." They who have 
fellowship with the Father, and 
with his Son Jesus Christ; who 
manifest by their actions the su- 
preme control which relieion baa 
oter them; who have the testi- 
mony of their eonsciences in their 
favour ; and who are conformed 
to hi^ image in the present worM ; 
— shall dwell with him for ever* 

6; The Divine Preoence in 
Death. If our hearts are de- 
voted to God ; if we maintain 
habitaal cominunion with him ; if 
we constantly submit to his an* 
thority, and- obey his commands; 
if we cordWly leceive his Son, 
and rely witfa> confidc^nce on hia 
.atonement^' if we. are guided 



TBB dUT-POUniN6 OP THE HOI.V SPIRIT. 



IDS 



b^ tlie teachings of his Spirit, 
Bfld walk with God ; lie will be 
with lu in the valley of the «ha* 
dow of death, and heaven will 
be oar final and everlasting abode. 

A. 



HINTS 

For a Gonera! Union of Christianf 

volt 
PRAYSn 

FOB TUE 

6iii'pimring of the lioly Spirit.^ 

Ik the present day; H day 
which, for obvious reasons, may 
be called a day of trouble, of re* 
buke, and of blasphemy; and 
yet a day which^ irOm the ad- 
vaace of true religion, chines wilh 
many a ray of bright hope and 
earnest expectation; — in such a 
day, in which hope and fear thus 
alternately prevail, one great ques- 
tion ought to occupy the miud — 
How to overcome the evil, and to 
extend the good ; how to con- 
found the works of Satan, and to 
enlarge and establish the kingdom 
of our Lord Jesus Chrbt. 

Many are the attempts now 
making for this purpbse. Socie- 
ties are in active opeiation to sup- 
press vice, to reform our prisons, 
to afford a refuge for the destl- 
fute — to provide an asylum for 
the penitent — to educate the 
young — to circulate the Holy 
Scriptures — - to evangelize the 
heathen — and to promote Cliris- 
tiaoity among the Jews. Each of 
these institutions has its peculiar 
excellence, but they are all li- 
nited in their object and in their 
effort. No one great and exten* 
aive plan has yet been adopted, 
which nay, at the same time. 



^ Knotrifis the rMpectable sonrce 
ftoB which ebb paper proceeds, w^ wilh 
plcataieiiveittothepahlle. £a« 



effect nail V benefit ourselves, our 
families, our country, and the 
world at large. 

The aim of this paj^r is hum* 
biy to suggest such a plan* not it$ 
disparage other benevolent bU 
tempts, bnt to give life, and ii- 
tiour, and energy to them all.^-* 
The plan is this : to unite all 
sincbrb christians in bab- 
nest prayer for thb obnb* 
Aal out-pouhing op tub 
HOLY SPIRIT. This will meet 
the full extent both of our wants 
and of our desires. 

The limits of this paper requirt 
brevity ; but If the Scriptures aro 
examined, the following truthi 
will be clearly seen; vii. That 
no human effort is of itself sufli^ 
cient to change the heart of man,, 
or tQ build the spiritual temple of 
the Lordi God ^toploji mm as 
instruments, but He is himself the 
great agent. Paul may plant and 
Apollos water, but God only 
giveth the increase. Not by 
might, nor by power, bnt by my 
Spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts^ 
. The Holy Spirit, as the Spirit 
of Jehovah, the third Persoa 
of the ever-blessed Trinity^ U 
infinite in pbt^er; with Hiv> no* 
thing is impossible; all hearts 
are open to Him, and all crea» 
tares subject to His will. Ex- 
clusively of his almighty power 
as God, in the economy of our 
salvation, he has undertaken 
offices which are fully sufficient 
to secure the most extensive bless* 
ings. He convinces the world of 
sin, of righteousness, and ofJndg« 
ment — He takes away the stony 
heart, and gives a heart of flesh, 
—He assists ill prsyer, and acts 
as a teacher and remembrancer. 
— He guides into all truth. — He 
glorifies the Lord Jesus, and 
sheds abroad the loie of God iq 
the heart.— He has also a bound- 
leu tieatOTy of eret^ teo^vXvX^ \^ 

i 



100: 



TR£ OOrr-FOURlN«. OF TUB SOLT SPftRtT.r 



aceompUfth hi» purposes: for he 
receives of tlia tiuogstliat are 
Christ's, and shows them to his 
people; and io the Lord Jesils 
we know are hidden aU the U«a- 
sures of wisdom and knowledge. 
•* In'Hiu dwelleth all the fulness 
of the Godhead boddy." The 
HoljF Spirit, therefore, has only 
to exercise his office, to pour out 
gifts and graces from the inex- 
haustible fulness of Christ, and 
what man by aU his efforts can 
never attain, the Eternal Spirit 
can immediately accomplish. The 
slime power which, on the day 
af Pentecost^ effected the con- 
version of three thousand unbe- 
lieving Jews under one discourse, 
canoonvinoe the most prejudiced, 
and change the heurts of the most 
4JMiirate of the present day. 
When He makes bare his arm, 
the rooootains will flow down at 
Uis presence, nations will be bom 
at once, and the kingdoms of 
this world become the kingdoms 
of God and of his Christ- 

>Vhilst the sacred Scriptures 
thus acquaint us with the power 
of the Holy Spirit to effect these 
i;resit objects, they afford us every 
rMson to expect this aid when- 
ever general P^y^ ^* made for 
hs exercise. — The prophecies 
clearly show that days of great 
bicsseidness are before us, and 
thM these days will be preceded 
tr accompanied by a very large 
cflVision of the Holy Spirit. The 
Prophets Isaiah, Jeremiah, and 
Joel, plainly predict this effusioni 
whilst Ezekiel confirms these pre* 
dictions by the most striking em« 
blems. Who can read the rti* 
markable visi6n of the vaHey full 
of dry bones, and the interpre* 
fation given of that virion, with- 
out being convinced tluit the 
Holy Spirit will yet exercise his 
office in a very remarkable man- 
nerl So powerfiillyi that those 



who are now as a multitude of . 
dry bones, shali stand up as a 
great |tf my of true jbelievers. The 
divine oracles at the same time 
assure us thai it js im answer to ^ 

Srayer that this blessing wiH be 
estowed. It w^s not tiJU the 
Prophet had said, <* Come from 
the four winds, O bretth, and 
breathe upon these slain that thej^ 
may live," that the life-giving 
Spirit came. Io another ^iropher 
cy, also, after promises of great 
mercies, it is aoded, " I will jet 
for this be inquired of by the ^ 
house of Israel to do it for them.** 
Such is the connexion between 
the gift and praver for its bestow* * 
ment.^— So mucn b this the ordea 
in which the Lord grants his mer- 
cies, that he has promised not 
only to pour out a spirit of pray- 
er and supplication upon his peo- 
ple, but to lead them to excite 
one another to this exercise ; lor 
thus it is written, '* The inhabi* 
tants of one city shall go to an- 
other, saving. Let us go speedily 
to pray before the Lord, and to 
seek the Lord of Hosts; I will go 
also.'' And when prayer- is offer' 
ed, God declares, ** Before they 
call I will answer, and whOe they 
are yet speaking I will hear.'' 

Without, therefore, entering 
into the question as to the exact 
period of these glorious times, wo 
have every reason'to believe, tlmt 
w henever prayer is generally mad^ 
for the out-pouring of the Holy 
Spirit, this unspeakable Messing 
wiU be afforded. 

Could we find any instance in 
which the Lord has refused 16 
hear the prayers of his people^ 
€w€n when praying solely for their 
own ^leliveranoe, we might be 
discouraged ; but when He has 
from the begmning beard their 
cry and saved them, we may res| 
asiured he will ans^ver our peti- 
tions.. That which is uqw d(|^ 



TH8 OUT-PaUaiNG 07 THE HOLT SFIEIT. 



107 



tired is for His own glo^ ; for tbe 
attaiQoneot of tint object for 
which the Lord Jesus shed his 
precious blood. For, at what 
time will He see the travail of his 
soul and be satisfied 1 Is it not 
when the Holj Spirit, taking his 
great power and exercising his 
mighty energy, shall so bless the 
earth, that multitudes of every 
nation, tribe, and tongue, shall 
bow to the name of Jesus, and 
confeit that he is Lord to the 
^ory of God the Father? 

The earnest supplications, 
therefore, of every sincere Chris- 
tian for the out-pouring of the 
Holy Spirit; and his unwearied 
efforts, by the Divine blessing, to 
excite a similar earnestness in 
others, are particularly desired. 
For the readier attainment of this 
object, the following Hints are 
respectfully offered. 

I. That all Ministers should 
seek a deeper and more abiding 
conviction of their own personal 
need of the divine influences of 
the Holy Spirit, both for their 
own growth in grace, and for suc- 
cess in all parts of their ministe- 
rial labours ; that, under this 
conviction, they may be Ijed to 
more earnest secret prayer for this 
Messing. 

H. That they should, like 
Daniel and his companions, unite 
with their brethren as opportu- 
nities offer, in private social pray- 
er for the general oot-pouring of 
the Holy Spirit. 

HI. That they should preach 
apoo the various offices of the 
Holy Spirit, that their congregia- 
tions may be more practically 
acquainted with His important 
work in our salvation. 

IV. That, in their general dis- 
courses, they should more babi- 
Inally honour the Holy Spirit, by 
^ntreating his divine aid, and 
aBcribing their succea to Him. 



y. That in large towDi a week-: 
ly lecture should beiset apart for- 
the above purposes. 

VI. That in the pnyer-oMet* 
ings which are now neld by dif- 
ferent denominations of Christians, : 
special prayer should be made 
for the out-pouring of the Hdly 
Spirit. 

yil. That all Christians shooU' 
be invited to set apart individually' 
an hour from sevem till tight 
o'clock on the Sabbath mornings 
for private prayer and meditation 
on this subject ; their piUyer may 
include the out-pouring of thai 
Holpr Spirit upon themselves, their 
family, their ministen,* their con- 
gregations^ their country -*alC 
ministen of true religion, all so-* 
cieties formed for doing good^* 
the heathen, and the Jews. 

VIII. That all heads of fami» 
lies on Monday evening shouJ<l 
entreat the same blessing in theii* 
family devotions. 

IX. That all Christians should 
read the Scriptures with a vtew^- 
to a more intimate acquabtance 
with this subject. 

X. That they should mentidii 
it to their religious correspond 
dents at home and abroad { each 
Christian using his utmost ability 
to make this union for prayer as 
extensive as possible. 

XI. That religious periodical 
publications should be requested 
to aid the design ; and that this 
paper, if approved, should be 
reprinted, and other tracts written 
and published. 

XII. That whilst Christians of« 
fer their prayers in simple reli- 
ance on the merits* of our Lord 
Jesus Christ, they bhould accom« 
pany them with deep humiliatioil 
for their own sins, for the sins 
of their country, and for the sins 
of the whole Church ; — and aim^ 
in their conduct, to walk in leve 
with all ChtutiauB, Vo Vie'n^V^ 



108 



-«APT1BT CHDkCB, BKIDCNOBTfl. 



ful •gaiilil grieriag the Holy 
Spirit^ wid ID all ihingt to adorn 
the doctriae of God our Saviour : 
tUmemberiBg tbit il it written, 
** Tlic Holjr Ghoit was not yet 
given becauw that Jbsl's was 

VOT TST GLORIFIED." 

Several Miniitcra, aod manv 
private Cfarialianj, have ulrcady 
iMgitn to act cnnfnrmahly lu 
tkete Hiol* ; ami it i* hoped, as 
netM in ilow using for drawing 
Ifae attenlioa of ChriiiiaDs in all 
parts of tlte world to this subject, 
that, by the Divine blesiiug,' this 
Wiion for prayer wiU ere long be- 



tlEDiplated without feeliugs of ibe 
nost exalted pleasure and bright 
^a|>ectalion. — II it a union in 
which no party spirit is raised, 
ao priDci|ilei sacrificed, no pri 
nte feeling hurt, no doultll'ul 
qticitiDn Hgilaltd, no funds re- 
quired. Il is a union of piety 
add Ipve I . Ea^h Christian may 
MMXiiatc lu |>ri^er with those 
•f his own more initnediate com- 
munion, at the same time that be 
«Bit« in heart with ail who are 
■ceking the same object. Tliv 
poor PlBy assist as well as the 
rich; llic invalid, unfitted for 
active eaerlion, may, in this way, 
■id in building the spiritual tem- 
plet whilst those who are at the 
nost remote dislanre. may m«et 
logclher at the hour of urnyer. 

It was among ibe last peli- 
tkns of our blessed Lord, that 
■U who believe ia bim might 
BB ONK. 

Christian Reader, let it bejyour 
tUiire to be thus united ! Trust 
•inply. Pny rervenlly. Ex- 
pect largely. Watch soberly. 
Wait paliciitly. 

. ^'Sdrkly Icoheqdicslt: 
kVsN so COMB LOBD JbSUI. 



Histmy &f Ike BaptiH Cimfch, 
BKICGNORTH, SHROPSBIBB.- 

Mtt.Ivimey, ia his History of 
ihe Baptists,* a work that de- 
serves a much wider circulatioH 
lliau it has yet obtained, infiima 
us that there ivere Baptists in this 
inwH preTioiislv to the year 17W. 
Thi:jpTol)ubiywaslhefact, though 
it is to be lamented (hat the ori- 
gin of the church here is involved 
in a considerable degree of ob- 
scurity. The fint date that oc- 
curs m the church-book is ITOu, 
where it mentions, as il iloea alsa 
in 170G, the payment of the ca- 
penses of a messenger to the ts* 
socialion.t This proves the ex- 
istence at that lime of a 8ul^ or- 
ganized church. Their firM pas- 
tor appears to have been Hr. 
John Slug, one of their own mem- 
bers, a man eminent for piety, 
and respectable fur talent He 
was settled about the year 17)1, 
The following account of his 
death isextniCted from Ifae church 
records. " Our bonaurtd minii- 
ler, Itlr. John Sing, who was a 
faithfnl miniltet of our Lord Je- 
sus Christ, and preached lite 
gospel freely for upwards of 40 
years, sweetly slept in our Lord 
Jesus Christ, July 12, 1753. N.S. 
lo our very great loss, but hb 
everlasting gam, aged 73. "J 



• Vol. it. psfefilOt 

t Thii I Hippacs adft hmve been lit* 
Midland ASsociSlioB, (rbicfa, if I bm 
not mil la ken, dm fbrined in 1659. 
Wontd nol ■ brief hittoiy of it, by some 
pcrton qailiScd to wiitt il, ba iMcpla- 
bla in tbc ftfaganne? 

t A un of lliii Mr. Sing, wliote name 
ain w» Jobn, wai msji; jean * mem- 
ber and ■ draeonof the church al ftridg- 
notlh. Mr. John Sin^, gnndwn of the 
fwrner. and un ol tM laal-aamcd Joba 
Sing, died m December, 1S1B. He was 
• niim fficnd la Ilia cauu of Clitiiti 
aad though he ncTtr joinad iba cbnich 
il il hoped be wu ■ ttnly good mas' 
H« UBS a ssaa of coaiidetablc propcit^* 



PRACTICAL KHOWLBDaS OF THE TRINITY. 



109 



From die death of Mr. Sing, 
t1|e pburch appears to have been 
destitute, till March 25, 1769, 
when Mr* John Macgowan, well 
Inown as the author of Lectures 
on the Book of Ruth, Dialogues 
of Devib, and other curious and 
usefulpoblications, came hither 
from Warrington. No account is 
given of fus settlement ; bpt he 
probabjy was tjie pastor of the 
church. He left Bridgnorth, and 
icmoTed to Devonshire-square, 
LoDdon, October 13, 1766. 

April 1, 1768, Mr. Henry But- 
terworth came to Bridgnorth, and 
was ordained pastor, June 19, 
1790. Mr. Jaines Butterwortb, 
(nis brother,) of Bromsgroye, be- 
gan the service, asked the ques- 
tions, and received the confession 
of faitjl^. Mr. Medley of Liver- 
pool oJSered the ordination pray- 
er. The charge to the minister 
was given by another of his bro- 
thers, Mr. Lawrence Butterworth, 
who is still liyjug at Evesham in 
lyorcestershijre, and retains the 
pastoral charge in that town, 
thougb now considerably advanc- 
ed in age. Mjr. Medley preached 
to the people, aj^d Mr. Fawkner 
of Broseley coucluded t}\e service 
^ith prayer. Mr. j^utterworth 
died May 13, 1806. In October, 
the same year, lyiir^Thon^as Ed- 
monds came to Bridgnorth from 
Upfon on Severn, and continued 
pastor till June 1813, when he 
left to take the charge of the 
church at Leominster, which he 
still retains. 

In May, 1816, Mr. William 
^aiu^ formerly of Qamlingay in 
Capibodgeshire, reiiiov.ed hither 
from jOswesJtry. At this time Jhe 
^■^•.^^^"'^■^^^'•"^^^■^^^"^"^■^^^"^■"""""^■^"'^"^"■'^"^"^ 

beloved in life, apd Umenied iu dcftth.* 
He left niue ehildrenf most of whom it 
is hoped know the Lord (God of their fa- 
JhcfSi none of tbcm, bowe?er» have jet 
made a public profession of their faith 
^Cbria. 



church was redpced to threa 
mcpibers, one of whom die4 the 
following year. Since that pe- 
riod, however, a few persona 
have been added* The present 
number of members, eacluslye of 
the pastor, is eight. 

It is truly affecting, in tracing 
the history of this chdrcl|, to see, 
that notwithstanding the talentf 
and the piety of its pastors, it has 
at all times been very small. It 
is howeyer pleasing, that amidst 
all its discouragements^ it has 
been kept in beinff. May the set 
time to favour this part of Zlob 
soon come! — It may be proper 
to add, that Bridgnorth has an 
endowment for the support of m 
minister. Perhaps the discussioi| 
of the question, how far endowr 
ments promote qk retard the pro* 
gress of religion, might be ^nte? 
resting and profitable. 

Whitchwrch, Salop. J. R 

Jan. 7, 1821. 



PRACTICAL KNOWLEDOK 

or 

THE TRINITY. 



As some persons have lately 
revived the Sabellian heresy, 
whereby the doctrine of the TH« 
nity is subverted, denying the 
existence of three distinct Persons 
in the Godhead, and maintalki* 
tng, that Jesus Christ and the 
Holy Spirit are names, characters, 
or emanations only from the di- 
vine Essence ; — I send (flr your 
Magazine ttie following paiisage 
from a l/iXe learned and excellent 
Diviiii:. *' Tl|e doctrine of the 
Trinity is oOen represented as a 
speculative point, of no great mo- 
ment whether' it is believed or 
not, too mysterious and curiouy 
to be pried into, and that it had 
better be let alone than meddled 
with ; but» alas, it entetrs into tfie 



^10 

.ivbole of our8tlvation,ancl all the 
.parts of it; into all the doctrines 
.oClbe gospel, and into the expe- 
rience of the saints ; there is no 
doing without it ; as soon as ever 
a man is convinced of his sinful 
'and miserahle estate by nature, he 
.perceives there is a Divine Person 
that he has offended, and that 
*there is need of another Divine 
Person to make: satisfaction for 
his offences, and of a third Divine 
.Person to sanctify him ; to begin 
and carrv on a work of grace in 
Um, and to male him meet for 
rataamal glory and bappiness/'This 
hhuntfing the existence of three 
Persons in the Godhead experi- 
mentally. 

A CONSTAMT RBADEa. 



JEWS. 



JEHVS. 



In a tract lately published at 
Paris, by M. Bail, the following 
. is given as a fair calculation of 
:tiie number of Jews in the differ- 
ent parts of the globe. 

In all parti of Poland, before 

the Partition of ITTS • • • • 1,000,000 
' In Itouia, including Molda> 

via and Wallachia 200,000 

Id all .the states where the 

German langaaee u spoken 500^000 
In ftolland and the Mether- 

luds 80,000 

- la fiw«den and Denmark* • • • BfiOO 

la France 50,000 

In England [of which Lon- 
don contains 19*000] • • • • 50,000 
In the statesin which Italian 

is spoken ••••-• 200,000 

In Spain and Portugal 10,000 

In the UnitedStates 5,000 

In the Mohammedan States 

of Asia, fiorope, and Africa 4k000,000 
• Inr Persia, and the rest of 

Aua, inclnding China and 

India** 500,000 

6398,000 



In the abote statement, we 
lurve a remarkaUe proof of the 



fulfilment of the dirine predic- 
tions in relation to the Jewish 
nation; especially of Amos ix, 9; 
For^ lo, I will command, and I 
will sift the house of Israel among 
all nations, like as com is sifted 
in a sietfe, yet shall not the hoH 
/sprain fall upon the earth* We 
are probably to understand by 
this scripture, that notwithstand- 
ing the Jews would be scatter- 
ed among all the nations, yet 
they should be preserved a dta- 
tinct and undiminished people. 
It is indeed very remarkable, &at 
they " still dwell alone/' and are 
not reckoned among [or of] the 
nations: they are not amalga- 
mated with them; though they 
live among them. They have 
outlived their oppressors in most 
countries where they have been 
persecuted: and are still nearly 
as numerous, (admitting the cor- 
rectness of the above estimate,) 
as at the most prosperous state of 
their nation ; which, it is . aap- 
posed, did not exceed in the time 
of Solomon sbvbn millions. 
Had this French writer seen Dr. 
Carey's letter in our Magaiine for 
Nov. 1B17, P. 483, in which 
he speaks of the Affghans in In- 
dia, as being undoubtedly there- 
mains of the ten tribes ; he would 
probably have rated the numbers 
in India and China still higher. 
Seeing then, that the predictions 
respecting their dispersion have 
been so minutely fulfilled, may 
we not confidently expect, Yhat 
those which foretel their restora- 
tion will be also accomplished 1 
With this expectation, let the 
reader consult the close of the 
same chapter of the book of 
Amos, from the 12th verse ; and 
he will see that glorious things 
are spoken of the city of God. 
May the Lord hasten it in its 
time, that so ali hrael wHfy be 
savedl 

IOTA. 



ANECDOTE. 



Ul 



' TiBB following original anec- 
dote of the late Rev. John Wesley, 
vdated hy Mr. Robert Miller to 
fhe preachers assembled in con- 
ference at Liverpool, August, 
1820, appears as appKcable to 
the Baptists as to the Methodists, 
and for this reason a corner is 
•olicite4 for it in the Baptist Ma* 
gaifne. J. B. 

*< The first time I had the plea- 
sure of being in company with 
the Rev. John Wesley was in the 
jear 178&. I asked him what 
must be done to keep Methodism 
ifive when he was dead; to 
which he immediately answered : 
^ The Methodists roust take heed 
to their doctrine, their expe- 
miBKCE,' their practice, and 
tbeir dtscipline. If they at- 
tend to their doctrines onljf, thev 
will make the people Antinomi- 
€»$; if to the eiperimental part 
of religion oitfy, they will make 
them enihuiiasti ; If to the prac- 
tical part 4mlff9 they will make 
Pharimet; and if they do not 
'attend to their discipKne, they 
'^ill be like persons who bestow 
Mttch pains in cultivating their 
garden, and put no fence round 
k to save it from the wild boar 
•ftheforest*"* 



TH^ BARREN. FIG-raEE, 

MATt. XXi. 19. ' 



Jssud of\ retired from Jemsff* 
lem, afler the labours of the day, 
to tome neighbouring viUage, to 
enjoy the company of a friend. 
Now^' io Bethany, where Lazarus 
lived. He jujt^ expected fmk 
from a tig-tree m tfaS^ way, be- 
cause it had leaves, tmd the timte 
of gathering figs was not yet 
(Mark xi. 13). As num, he tni^ht 
not, till he came to it, know that 
it was barren. He cursed it, not 
in anger to the tree, but emblewMh' 
iicfjfy, to teach his disciples that 
the Jewish nation, from whom the 
Master of the vineyard* expected 
fruit, and reverence to his* Son, 
would in like mann^ wither away. 

How awful- is the ease df n»- 
fruitful and unprofitable Profes- 
sors, abounding in leaves, decent 
in their lives, perhaps leidoos-*^ 
affectionate — constant in their at* 
tendance upon the means of grace,, 
who yet have not the glory ol 
God at heart, and do not study 
to do all the good they can in 
their generation ! They will, if 
they repent not, be eut ddw»: 
Luke xiii. 7. Now the exit luid 
unio the root of the trees: thert* 
fore every tree ttkieh hringeih m§t 
forth good fruit is hewn dmon, omd 
cast into thejire, Matt. iii. 10. D.. 



BfubenCle department 



IMPORTANCE 



OF 



flUBOLITY AND VIGILANCE, 
(iln Anecdote from BoHmm.) 



♦* Innocence is better than 
fepentance. Let us see danger 
at a distance, and guard the pass. 



It h not possible for a goo<f man 
to go instantly into the practice 
of great crimes : but what slow 
degrees may effect, who can tellT 
Permit me to abbreviate the sub- 
ject by a short account of one sad 
ease. In the very early, part of 
my ministry, while I was yet" a 
boy, I had beeu pi^'a^c\Atki^ '^V ^ 



It 



'iV?£KtLB DEPARTMBNr. 



town far distant from this place, 
where 1 #as on a friendly visit. 
Most youths in office are caress- 
^,nior« for the novelty, than for 
their abilities. One morning, a 
fery decent grey-headed man in- 
quired for me; and, when he was 
admitted, without ceremony he 
(lirew himself on a chair, aud sob- 
lied andwept,bi|t pould not speak. 
I retired, to give him an opportu- 
nity to vent his passion ; (or such 
jweils of gneff whatever may be 
the canse, threaten (o burst the 
tort, and destroy the frame. 

«'On my retummff,the man had 
fvcovered his c^mncss, and, 
0miltipg his apologies, the sub- 
stance of %vhat he said >vps this. 
^ Coraptssiou for your youth 
^compels me to tell you my case. 
At your age I was as innocent 
and as happy as you. Like you, 
toOf I was chosen by one of our 
tebarches to teach. I taught; the 
cbnrch caressed me; neighbour- 
ing churches gave me uncquivo- 
cid marks of their esteem ; eaph 
liew day ivas winged with new 
fdelights ; my time passed sweetly; 
every month was May. One day 
an old man said to me, Young 
>na.D, guard against vanity. J felt 
- iKyael? hurt, for I saw no need of 
.Jus otulioiif and I did not conceal 
my djslike. ' Does that oft*end 
youT* added the old man ; * take 
jcare you do not become a profli- 
gate. For know this ; a mun un- 
•pprized of danger, is at the brink 
of a fall ; and as confidence is the 
parent of carelessness, so care- 
lessness is the high road to the 
commission ofactuul &iu; one sin 
leads to another, and by slow de- 
grees a plausible youth may be- 
come a profligate man/ I paid 
very little ri-f^ard to my udmonisli- 
er, and a ,few years after, some- 
how or .other, tirst tastetl, then 
■libmitted to entreaties, then rc- 
|»eated| and at length found my- 



self a lover of strong liquors ; co0<* 
nected with dissipated men like 
myself; fond of my condit'ion, 
deaf to the remonstrances of my 
friends, and, in brief, the churpfi 
was obliged to cut roe off, and I 
became a confirmed drunkard. I 
i/i'as VifSver happy. My appetites 
on fire impelled roe to intoxica- 
tion ; but the stings of roy coo* 
science could never be blunted ; 
and lietwieen the two I vras io m 
state of torment. How insepsi- 
blv do habits of vice form theiy- 
selves ! How difficuh it is to sub* 
due then) wben they are become 
obstinate ! I am not come to yoif 
for advice; I know all a(M>ut it* 
I am not come to o^ake yon the 
depositary of my holy resoliu 
tions: I should try to keep theos 
to myself, if you were not in the 
world. I am come in pure af- 
fection to sav to you; Watcl| 
over yourself; be afraid of tiie 
first emotions of sint find reyef- 
encft the caiftions of aged men ; 
always older, and generally 
wiser, thaii piinisters when they 
arc first elected to offipe P 

To the above affiecting reb|,« 
tion, which is taken from a sejj* 
mon preached at the ordination 
of the Rev. Mr. George Birley, at 
St. Ives, October 18, 1786, 1 beg 
to add my most cordial reconi- 
mendatiou of it to ministers lii 
general; but especially to those 
who are just going to begiji their 
ministjeria) coujrse ; or who have 
but recently begun it. As they 
value the glory of God^ tbe ho- 
nour of Christ, the credit of the 
gospel ministry, and of rcligioii 
in general, the comfort of their 
own minds, and the salvation of 
precious souls, let them weficli 
and be sober; let them flee youth* 
ful lusts ; and let them serve the 
Lord with fear, and rejoice with 
trembling. 

■IP' 



Ii5 



^ituarp^ 



ikRS. MARY RUTLAND. 

At Foot's Craj Mill, io Kent, on 
Katordajr, 23d September, 1920, de- 
fiarted this life, *" with the bifrh 
INTiiaes orGod upon her lips,^ Mary, 
the wife of Mr. Wilfiam RaUand, of 
IliTvr, near Dover, after ari^id de- 
cline of' m few months, and in the 
tbirtjr-ninth jear of her age. Her 
parents. It appears, were respect- 
able people, ** bcncalh the dome, 
above the cot,** — and being ignorant 
of Christ, at least until many years 
after the Urth of all their children, 
it is no wonder that the subject of 
this Memoir was not *' trained op 
in the nurture and admonition of 
the Lord." Her early life, however, 
^exhibited nothing particularly dif- 
ferent from that of other youug peo- 
ple in the awful slate of nature in 
wliicb all mankind arc born, and in 
which she continued until her ri«;h- 
tcenth or nineteenth year ; wIh'ii it 
pleased ** the God of all grace*' to 
give her very inSwerful convictions 
«i£ her condition as a sinner — *' the 
oomauuidaienteame — sin revived — 
ftofl she died," ai to any hope of sal- 
vation under the law; and many 
times has she profusely wept, at the I 
remembrance of thsit travail oT soul ; 
which she endured before she Was 
broaglit to behold, ^y failb, ** the 
Lamb of God, Which takefh away 
the ains of the worid.^ This happy 
iMUisition from the bondage of tne 
law to the "^ liberty wherewith 
Chriat makes us free,^ appears to 
tave been prodnce<1 by the effectual 
.working of the Lord the Spirit, with 
bis own word, under the public mi- 
nistnUions of Mr. JFohn Miffin, then 
of 2km Chapd, Dartford; and the 
Mlowing acriptoresy it is believed, 
were applied to her heart with pecu- 
liar force upon that occasion: 
"** Fear not, thou worm Jacob, and 
ye men of Israel : I will help thee : 
I will never leave thee, nor forsake 
Ifaee.** Thus convinced of mn, and 

VOL. xuu 



thus translated out of the kingdom 
of Satiui into that of the Son of God» 
it is no wonder that her life and con- 
versation ^vere such as '* became the 
Gospel of Christ," which from her 
lioart she loved, and in her genera- 
tion served, through the daily '' re* 
lie wings of the Uoly Ghost." 

Soon after her deliverance from 
the terrors of the law, she was bap- 
tized, upon a profession of her faith 
ill Christ, and aildod to the ParticiH 
lar Baptist Church at Eynaford, to* 
Kent, undi'r the pastoral care of 
Mr. John Rogers; and of wluchsho 
continued an honourable member 
for many years. In 1805 she was 
married to an affectionate husband, 
(a help meet for her in the Lord,) 
who now mourns her loss; and by 
whom she had twelve children— of 
which number five only are now 
alive. Surrounded by so largo a 
family, it is not to be wondered at^ 
that, like Martha of old, she should 
sometimes have felt herself*' careful 
and troubled at many things," yet, 
** amidst all,*' she used to say, *' I 
do rejoice in the promises of God, 
for they are both sure and atead- 
fast." 

The bounds of her habitation hav- 
ing been fixed at some distance from 
tlie house of God, and as she wan 
natnrally of a weak habit of body, 
it was not oti all occasions that she 
could attend **the courts of tho 
|jOrd*s house'* upon his holy day ; 
this, whenever it did happen, waa m 
considerable trial to her, and some- 
times induced her to attend, when 
she appeared quite incapable of tho 
fatigue of getting there ; yet, during 
her walk, she has frequently ob- 
served, thst '* she knew it was tho 
Lord's service in which she was en- 

S aging, and tliat He would afford 
er stiength, according to her day." 
Her gruat personal solicitude for 
her increasing family, necessarily 
occupied much of her time ; — ^^«v, 
even while she wma mo«\ ^\^<e\iX.*vu. 

H 



114 



OUfrVMlYi 



ber domeKtio concerns, it is evident 
she was no stranger to a '* fervency 
Of spirit" tUat ** serves the Lerd*^ in 
ail things — the house of God heing 
always esteemed as her beloved 
earthly home — the children of God, 
her l>cloved companions — the word 
of God, the ra»n of her counsel — 
xrhile the glory of God, and the good 
t)t immortal sonln, lay nearest her 
heart — and her own sonl^s prosperi- 
ty ill that of Zion, what she ardently 
voiight and desired above all other 
)irosperity in the world. But what 
she was as a Christian, we should 
never forget, " she was by the grace 
of God f* and this grace, which was 
the very soul of her song upon earth, 
is now the glory of her song in bea- 
ten: *' Unto Him that loved us, and 
washed ns from our sins in his own 
blood; to Him ho glory and do- 
minion for ever and ever.*' 

About the month of July Isst, she 
complained of excessive weakness 
of body, and from that period amor- 
Hal decay became increasingly visi- 
ble, in defiance of all the human aid 
that could be afforded her. Her me- 
dical advisers having recommended 
a change of air, as the only probable 
ineans of benefit which they could 
prescribe, she determined npon \i- 
sitting, once more, her dear relatives 
«t FoofsCray Mill ; and, amidst the 
pains and infirmities by which she 
*was attended, so as to be rendered 
Incapable of sitting np for many 
boars together, (alter having made 
It a matter of earnest prayer for di- 
Vine direction and support,) she left 
liomo, with the fullest confidence 
tliat she should be supported to the 
end of her journey ; and which she 
eertainly was, beyond the expecta- 
tion of all wb<» knew her situation, 
since she travelled the whole dis- 
tance in one day, thongh It cannot 
*be much less than sixty miles. 

Dnring ber short reudence atFoot's 
Cray, until within two or three davs 
of her departure to glory, nothing in 
particular transpired as to the state 
of her mind, if we except that» on 
.the evening of the first Lord's-day 
after her arrival, she exproflsed her- 
self as having been wonderfully 
eomforted and delighted as she sat 
bjlier window, and heard the hymns 
ihat were sang that evemiig in the 



Salle, or Finishing-roodi at the mill, 
where she had iietore utttMided di- 
vine worship; stating, '* that they 
were ty her soul as the very songs of 
heaven begun upon earth.'' In gene* 
ral, her mind seemed to be comfort- 
ably stayed ttpon the Rock of ages, 
without much sensible experience 
either of joy or trial, while her body 
rapidly declined towards ** the house 
appointed f(»r all living.'* But, upon 
the Thursday morning preceding the 
Satnrday on which she fell asleep in 
Jesus, after having passed the night 
with .very little bleep, and amidst 
vreat difliculty in breathing^ she was 
highly favonicd of the Lord with 
such powerful .support and personal 
assurance of Interest in Christ, that 
all her bodily indisposition and men- 
tal infirmity seemed as if they were 
swallowed np in that out-pouring of 
the Spirit, which was so remarkably 
manifest In her npon that occasion : 
her bodily indisposition, neverthe- 
less, continuing entirely undiminish- 
ed, and her difficulty in breathing 
the same as before; so that, al- 
though her soul was so sensibly alive 
to God^ her corporeal weakness was 
so excessive, as scarcely to allow 
her to speak more than one word at 
a time, without stopping to recover 
her breath. 

In the morning of Thursday she 
stated, that she had pass<rd almost a 
sleepless night, but ** it had been a 
very blessed one indeed to ber son!,** 
since the Lord had powerfully sufi- 
ported her, by applying a number of 
very precious scrijitures to her heart, 
particularly the following i " Fear 
not; be not dismayed, for I am 
thy God: I will strengthen thee; 
yea, I will help thee; yea, 1 will 
uphold thee with tlie right hand of 
Diy right eonsness ;" — and, •* When 
thou passcst through the waters, I 
will be with thee: an|i through the 
rivers, they shall not overflow thee.'' 
Soon after this, she complained of 
one of her arms being particnlarlj 
weak ; biit tliis, she said, was only to 
remind her, ** dust thou art, and unto 
dust thou sfaalt return." " YcsP 
said her dear relative, (who bad 
watched over her nitli a maternal 
affection, enhanced, indeed, by spi- 
xitual ties,) ** but the immoriml pact 
for ever ^v«s; aud \bo Lord has 



I 



OUltUAEV. 



110 



Ipromued that he will never leave 
luir forsake his people." ** O no P 
fdie replied, ** blessed lie bii name: 
I have not trusted iu Iljm.all these 
3'ears, for Hiiu now to leave me, 
when upon the brink of Jordan! 
* 1 know in whom I have l>elieved !' 
There is nothing that I wish lo live 
|br but my dear children ; and al- 
thoiigh 1 cannot give them up yet, J 
know that 1 shall ^ be able to do so 
when my time shall come/' 

She repeatedly stated to her dear 
Relative before mentioned, (who had 
often importuned the Lord that he 
vrould yet grant some very gracious 
fhfing testimony from her mouth, 
vhose walk and conversation had so 
loqg been a living one,) that she was 
fnlly confident that the JLiord would 
not leave her then — for she had long 
known him to bo Aer God, and hoped 
who bad been fnablcd, tiirough 
grace, to abow *' whose she was, by 
whom she served.'* After Ijing down 
« few minutes, she said, ** What a 
mercy it is to bo reatly when the 
time shalt come!" *' Yes," added 
her dear relative, ** the Believer iu 
Jesus is always ready m hen his time 
is come — and io Mm sudden death 
is ludden glory !*' '* Yes !** she ob- 
served ; and at that instant entered 
ihat Christian friend who ministers 
to the neigbliouring villagers *' iu 
the things of God," who, after hear- 
ing her testify to the faithfulness of 
God to his word, ami ist considerable 
difficulty sljo fouml in breathing, 
read the 33d Psalm, made a few ob- 
Mr^ ations upon each verse, and then 
commended her in prayer to Him on 
whom slie had so long believed. 

When this friend left her, she 
still expressed her confidence in 
God*s faithfulness to the promises he 
liad given in his word, and repeated, 
with pecaliar emphasis, 

^ Aud whea ye hear niy heart-itiings 
break* 

How tweet my miuntes roil; 
A mortal paleiievs on my check, 

But glory in my soul." 

After this, she added that verse from 
Vowper's Hymn on the Fountain 
•pened: 

•* Dear dying Lamb ! Tby precious blood 

Shall never lose its pow'r, 
JiU all the raoMw'd Church of God 

fie 'iar^d, to^fkoo more V* 



These lines she spoke with a« 
earnestness that evinced, heyon4 
dispute, the interest she felt ta 
them, and the blessings conveyed 
by them to her heart, by the power of 
the Holy Ghost ; through whose sup- 
port she was enabled to triam|jJi 
over all those strong emotions of 
natural nflection, which she felt in 
so great a <legree, towards her iM> 
loved husband and children. 

On the Friday she kept rapidly 
declining iu bod}*. Her husband's 
arrival iu the evening afl'oided her 
peculiar satisfaction; and to himsJio 
declared that she was *' very happy^ 
— '* exceedingly happy, in the l^rd.'* 
During the night also, she repeated- 
ly spoke to her husband of hcf 
'' great happiness in the Lord.*' 

The next morning, after being 
assisted in comiug down stairs, the 
.drowsiness of death seemed to hang 
about lier, until the middle of the 
day, wlien a sudden alteration took 
place in her countenance, and aftc^ 
being taken up stairs and laid upon 
the bed, her bnsbaud affectionately 
inquired if she ihen felt that scri]>- 
tuie precious to her soul, ** When I 
pass tiirough the valley of the sha- 
dow of death, 1 will fear no evil;*' 
she answered, ** I do.'* At this mo- 
ment it was supposed she had some 
cnnflict with the enemy; and her 
husband beard these wonis from her 
lips, — ** Trusting to vain and foolisii 
things;*'— after which she spoke 
aloud, with a triumphant accent, 
*" He is my righteousness and tlrength:* 
aud lifting up her dyiug hand, her 
husband heard her depurtiug spirit 
gently articulate, *' Hallelujah! 
Iialk'lujah! Imllrlujah !*' and imme- 
diately afterwards, without the 
smallest emotion, sigh or groan, she 
ceased to breathe on earth ; her 
happy spirit having taken its tri- 
umphant flight into the presence of 
God in glory, there to experience 
the full accomplishment of that word 
of his grace, upon which he had 
caused her to bofie while on earth, 
'* Surely shall one say^ In the Lord 
have I righteousness imd strength,*' 

Her remains were deposited in her 
uncle's vault in the church-yard ot* 
Foot's Cray ; and her death was im- 
proved iVm {oWo^\\\% \a\^v^v$ 
week, Craa ^^ «^u^V3ct« x^^^*^^ 



i\fi 



Obituary. 



I>y her dyings lips ; and a crowded 
and attentive audience, it is be- 
lieved, sincerely exclaimed upon 
the occasion, " Let mo die tiic death 
tof the iig;liteous, and let mtf last end 
belike hers.", 

WML COLYER. 



MRS. HEWIT. 



Mrs. Hewit died at North 
Shields, October 29, 1819, a^cd 
lhirt3*two. She was born at rital, 
near Berwick. Her father, Mr. 
l^obert Wood, was a pious man, of 
the Fresbyterian persuasion. Mrs. 
H.was brought to the knowled^^eof 
ihc truth, when about eighteen, nn- 
tier the ministry of the Rev. Julm 
Black, pastor of the Haldane Baptist 
Cbnrch at Ford Forge. She was a 
\ronian of a superior mind, and en- 
tered ^itli ail her sonl into the plan 
of salvation by the sovereign grace 
iDfGod, as revealed in the gospel. 
From the commeneemriit of her sc- 
lions impressions, she spent mucb 
time in nra^er, reading, and medita- 
tion. The sciiplurcs wore her con- 
iitant delight, and fitjni them her 
teind was richly furnished with di- 
vine truth. 

When Mrs. H. came to reside at 
Shields, she became a membtr of 
the Haldane Baptist Church ; then 
in a flourishing state, but now nearly 
^extinet For a few years past, she 
ftvqnentty attended the Particular 
Baptist Chapel, where she professed 
to receive much edification and 
icomfort. 

During her last afnidion, she 
called hel' husband to her bed-side, 
and asked him to request that 1 
would improve her death in a ser- 
mon from 1 Tim. i. 15. From the 
pleasure which I experieneed in 
viiitingMrs. H. 1 have thought that 
the insertion of a fetv of her last say- 
ings might be pleasing to the pious 
part of your readers. 

Her husband, Mr. Robert Hewit, 
a respectable draper in this tf»wn, 
lias communicated to me the fol- 
lowing particulars. 

** When my dear wife said that 
hemcorcrj wag verj doobtAil, the 



thought of parting with her waA 
truly painful. Anxious to know tlitt 
state of her mind, I asked if she en- 
joyed the consolations of the gospel. 
* O yes ; gloi-y be tn God, I hav# 
good hope thi'Oiigh grace, and strong; 
consolation.' At another timashe 
said, ' 1 have no fear now; in the 
morning my mind was much op- 
pressed, and very barren ; but that 
is all removed.' Frequently her lips 
moved ; bht, owing to her weak state 
of body, I couM not distinctly hear 
her without lading my head close to 
hers. By this' means I often heard 
her repeating, with great fervour, tho 
following words, * Thanks be unto 
God, which giveth us the \ictory, 
through our Lord JeSns Chnst. -^ 
Worthy is the Lamb that was slain. 
I am vile, oneof the chief of sinners; 
but I am washed in that blood 
which cleansclh from all sin/ On 
one occasion she earnestly requested 
liiat her ehihlrrn niighl, from their 
childhood, l>e tailght the scriptures, 
uliich mn able, thk'oug^h the teaching 
of the Divine Spirit, to make thi*m 
wi^e to salvation, and gladden their 
henrts, as they did hers, in the hour 
of dissolution. Speaking of three of 
her children that had died, she said, 
she thought at the time they died« 
it was bard to be bereaved of them ; 
but now she saw the Lord*s way was 
the best way; that all was done 
well; and that she was going to 
them. 

''Sept. %, an intimate female 
friend spoke to her respecting her 
ehildren she was likely to leave bo- 
hind, and expressed a wish that she 
might recover, for the benefit of Iter 
family. She replied, ' O no, I shall 
never be better In thh world ; but I 
shall soon be better. I would not 
change my sit nation for ten thou- 
sand worlds. O when shall I join 
the holy angels^ and dwell with them 
in glory V Two friends from New- 
castle calling upon her, on seeing 
them enter the room,. a tear stole 
down her cheeks. They continncd 
i6 weep near her bed for some time, 
upon which she said, 'Weep not; I 
would not change situation with any 
person on earth.' A little time after 
this, on being asked if her mind was 
kept in perfect peace, she replied^ 



OBITUABT. 



" OcL M, to ISn. F. on tabiog 
Ie«T«. wiih grcmt energy ibe wid, 
* Farewell: give mj dying love to 
Mr. BiKuk's family: tell them we 
■hall meet in heaven.' At inotbei 
time I uked. It God iltll with jou I 
With « twlf-reproving look she ro- 
plied, ' Did jou erer read ofGod'i 
tbruking an j who pat tbeif tni*t in 
him ? O no, quite the rerene ; nei- 
ther doet be Ibnake mc. He is still 
widi ne, to npport and oamrort 
me.' Being B*kcd the ttate of her 
mind, ihe aniwered, ' Mj tniit is 
now placed upon a very different 
foaDdaliaa lo laj poor Tnunes and 



not |»u away till all be rolQIted.' 
From tliii time ilie eqjoyed onlu- 
teimpted peace, and the full aiinr- 
ance of b^, always afltnning that 
thii or that pTomi»e was fulfilled in 
her happy experience.'* 

AbiHit an hour before faer death, 
after praying wllb her, that ibe 
migbt nave a safe and caav pauage 
Ihrouffa the Jordan of death, I aiked 
tf the Lord was now blestiDg ber. 
She anawcied, " Wilh tbe fnlneai of 
tbeblcwiog of the Goipel of peace." 
A little ader, I remarked, (hat death 
is c«llcd a dark valley, but that to 
beMeven In Christ it is light; add- 
ing. Is it dark to yon nowT She re- 
plied with great fcrronr, " O no, 
no." A few minutes aflcr, she turned 
ber fsce to her mother, on ber left 
huid, and said, " God bloui" then 
to ber bnsband, oa her right hand, 
and said, "God bless." She was 
loo weak to say " you." These 
were her last words. She was then 
aeixed with convulsioos, which de- 
prtf ed her of her faculties. The vio- 
IcBGO of the straggle gradually snb- 
stdcd, and she caTmly fell asleep in 



RECENT DEATU. 

REV. DR. NICHOL. 

We bavo to notice Die lamented 
death of the Rev. Dr. Nichol, who 
baa been for more than twonty-fifa 
years the respectable minister of the 
Soots' Clinrch in Swallow-atree^ 
London. He died Feb. 9, at bis 
bouse in Hans-place, Sloane-sqaare, 
aged sixty yean. Dr. Nichol wa* 
a pious, evangeUcal, catholic, useful 
minister of Christ His death will 
be regretted not only by his oongre- 
gation, but also br diaae ministers 
especially with wbaK he was oon- 
ueoted io tbe Weatern District Bits- 



of his confersation; 

the devotional spirit which brealbed 
in his petitions, and the evangdieal 



drenes, justly endear 



SUDDEN DEATH. 

RE\'. DR. LINDSEV. 

On tbe 14th of February, a Ge- 
neral Meetiogoflhe three Denomi- 
nations wa* bold at Dr. Williami's 
Library, Red-crosi-slrect, to oouii- 
dcr of a Pclition against theptoject- 
ed Bill of Mr, Brougham on Iho 
cdiicBlioiiof the poor. Dr.Lindaey, 
who, for Ibtrty-live years, had been 
putor of the Presbyterian congr^t- 
tjun in Monkwell-strect, had deli- 
vered his leutimeDts upon that soIh 
jcct, and soon after suildeoly ex- 
pired. The ministers, of whom theie 
were upwards of one buudred i>F^ 
sent, were deeply affected with this 
solemn event: Dr. Wangh offered 



IV8 



3aet»(eto* 



A DtfencB cfih^ Briiuk mnd Foreign 
School SoeiHff agmntt the Rematki 
in the e7tk Ntmber ef the JStfm- 
hnrgh Eeviiw, London, Hatcb- 
anl & Son, Pp. 48. Price Is. 

Observetiofie on Mr, Bt^ttghofk'M 
Bill " For better Providing the 
Metmi of Bdiwtiiie^ for kit ilfa- 

' jeetif^s SuiffeiHe;*' MMetng its Jit- 

• adeqtitky to the JSnd proposed, tmd 
tile Ihnmer whieh wtii arise from 

' Ute the CttunetfReligimie Liberty. 
' London, Arob, Commll. Pp. 32. 6a. 

tnhUlfy into tlie Operation of Mr. 
Bi'iiughmn's Education Biu, as far 
at regdrds the Proteetant Dissen- 
tere, Bu a Jfoneonformitt, 8her- 
wdod. Pp. !24. 

Plain Thoughts on the Abstract of 
Mr, Brougham*s JSducation Bill, 
By a plain Englishman, Riving- 
ton. Pp.28. 

A Letter to a Member of Parliament^ 
showing (in these DoifS ofh^idelUy 
said Sedition) the serious and dan- 

' gerous Defects of the British and 
Fon^gn School^ andtf Mr,Bremgh- 
am*s Bill (now pending) for the 

' general Education of the Poor. Bw 
K. U&yd, A,M. Rector of St. Dun- 
etan^s m the WeH, Rivington. Pp.66. 

' The a^ithor of the first of thwe 
l^amptif ets . Writes in reply to the 
Bffinburi^ Review, with siniilar 
feelingii to those expressed by David, 
^'If it had been an enemy, then 1 
QOuid have borne it!'' &c. These 
peiings will be accounted for, "when 
it is l^own that ^he very kist article 
in the preeeding nomber Is an cn- 
loginin upon tbe Societv and its pro- 
otpdlnt^s r--lhat <' the Bill which js 
to'place the ^holo business of the 
Education of the Poor under the 
control of the hierarchy,*^ is brought 
ibrward in the House of Commons 
** by one of the most distinguished 
contributors to the Edinburgh Rb- 
^iew ;" — and that " tlie promoter of 
the Bill has deemed it expedient to 
aacrifico his old fritnds, and to aban- 
don the broad and liberal principles 
#f eduoaljon which he once so nobly 



defended." We feel impclledl, wEilW 
looking at this picture, as if wer« 
involuntorily to Exclaim, "Cease 
from man, for wberefo is he to be 
accounted of?" 

The conductors of the British an^ 
Foreign School Society are now ac- 
cused, on account of their expressed 
dislike to Mr. Brougharo^s projected 
Bill, '* Of objecting to GoveriimeDt 
taking this business into lis ow» 
hand, lest it should thereby acfuira 
t6o mneh influence." P. 7. 

It is smartly replie4; (the insina* 
ation would have justified an indig* 
nant answer.) 

" But why introditce the Govertfteent 
here, when the question relates solely 
to the Hierarchy, and tomi upon thi» 
point, whether m new set ef disiioiijke^ 
tions shaU be created fty Act i} PorKo- 
mentfor these who are net members of the 
Establishment f The proposed BhI, it 
Qfi fortunately it be carried, will lev^ » 
tax upon a body of Englishmen foraa 
object in which they are alike interested 
With \ht rest of the comnimity, while it 
exclndet them from bairiDg any sbart In 
the msnagemant or control.'* 

As a proof of the inadequaoy of 
the proposed Bill *' better to pv^ 
vide," as its title purports, **the 
means of education Ibr Hir Majes- 
ty's subjectSf^it leaves out of its tdto- 
sideration entirely aR the poor grrle 
in the kiu^om ; and leaves no rodn»' 
for the l^ind superintendence of » 
'Ladles' Committee to exercbe fbeit 
benevolence towards thefeniaie sex, 
which has been found s6 highly be- 
neficial in having fitted giris who> 
appeared doomed to wretchednen 
and vice, for decent serfitnde, and 
other honourable employmontt* Wo 
wish all could witness the surprising 
cflccts of this kind which have been 
prod need by the kind superintend* 
ence of Ladies in the Irish Free 
School in St Gileses. The force of 
the following remarks cannot be le- 
sisted. 

•' When we considertbe infvence of 
the female tea in forming the characier 
of children* we shall soon>peroaivc thai 



(h* •dMMtM *( glih, 

parhap* of man 

arboj». irtha 

tmlilj be cDgnTi 

lb« coaMuii r«aduii ef MlcCtMi 

tbeBoWBci 

to luhil* of _ 

Ac; ar* Inarcd 

pablic wonbip on (he<)*y Klapart bj 

ttat daij — if <b«7 *ra (■ughi rn fii 

«ll of whicb iba UritUfa Syuaia i> fwc 
liulj BdBpted lo effect ( whM ma; ■« 
sot axpect from foch children, whi 
ttej- Mall have baoone women ai 
Modianf Who can calcaUle tba good 
Aat mtj ba produced froa tbcir iutts. 
Mea oa Iha tioder mindi of tbcir off- 
Vdqi'" 

*■ la aor ojuniao, tba pmcnt Dill, m 
lar from haileaiog the period when 
' arary poor cbild thall b* aWc to read 
111 Hiblc.' wonld promct it contidsii. 
«blj. The whole coueern would be 
Made Iba aonrce of patrmaie 
-•Baritiiia ; adght -becDma an iniliDnirat 
Af onrauion; and would nuul certaiolj 
>itUiair ■ipporl fcam awnj of the ei- 
ining Kliaali. It would bare another 
Aanefal cooieqntncc. BcnetoJaDt feel- 
-lap naj be clieckad, but cauDOt be 
«aotad b* Act of PhIiuocoIi but Ihii 
Jlill. if it becoiae one, will poweifoll; 



I. them 



bill 



•ill dUc 



Ui^j pvaa bj Bianj wonby pertoa* to 
the CDticetn* ef the poor, aareljr. if 
Aara k ooa iMng non than another 
vhich oaa wontd with la promote, il ii 
ihai the Bppet and niddle tanki of »- 
rfaly ihaaJd iDi]o!ra inlo ibe atale of the 
awnofaolaiag and laboaring pact, with 
» ■lew lo reoMTO ftom aboal tbeia u 
aiach a* pombic all dmanMaocca wtaieli 
•taad to eneoBtaie *ioe ; itiaBld cooccrt 
■aainrai far wprovini their ■oral) ; and 
-thaatd cenaidae (>f what may ba done to 
belter tbeir conditioD eiery way. Tlie 
Craal fealtire in all ihii ii Edacalion. 
-nareare bnndredi and ctcd ibniiindi 
of boDCVolatil petiona who lobicriba tbeit 
pcoprrty, aod ^n np Ibeir liiue, to the 
taacUng of Ihe poor, whu. if Ihii Bill 
paaaM, would in all probabilily be ob- 
Bged n relloqaiih tbeir aaeful labotiri — 
uefal lalinan iadecd. when wa conti- 
4e>i baaide the good effrci* produced 
ipM Iho children, bow mocb they are 
* * led to imprOTC ibc bearti of the 
r> of Ihe Comiaitteei wbo are thiu 
[ to cDUfei one of Ihe greatetl 
I apon tlia poor— of tboae ttttV 
long Bra, the Saaday School 
K aaay «( wben. wUle Ibay 



mw. 1 19 

aia ledaloady occupied dating ih« weak 
in eatniog the meana of uibuilciice, find 
their iweeleil employment on the day 
of mt, in leaching iboie who would 
otherwiie receire do education at aU, 
and in eacoutaging ibcm in a conrM of 
motaiity and Tirtne. For if ihii BlU 
paai, there i> no doubt but that Ihen 
noble eiertioni will beeouw paralysed, 
if not annihilated. 

DBtcrnuned to ooaiiBCt tlic edn- 
oation of tbe poor wilb tlic Hit^at-- 
chy, Mr. Brougham bai taailc tiio 
iallDeBCD ofllie CIcrKf tlie very «oaI 
of bii ayalevi : withnnt the conaeiA 
of the offlciatiDft Clerg ymao, no pqc- 
•OD in tbe paiiib of llioae who will 
b« iMiDpelled (o lapport tbc aclio^ 
will bo Buffered lo coter it, no, ikk 
even tbe Lord of the Manor ia ivhich 
it may beiitiiatcd; and at forcM»- 
plmiinf, aboald any infiacliona «t 
the /iiera/euaottneiita of thsBill lake 
place, why fliese must be made ta 
the oiBicialiag t^Ieixynan, who hai 
perfanpa appoiDled hii fuiuKeUrk Ip 
be tb« (cbool master : aDdiflie will 
not bear, wbj Ihen it mnst ba told 
to Iho bliihop of the dioceae!! and if 
he will aot hear, — what thoni 

It ia pmposL-d by tbii Rill, 
that every " xcbolar (hall attt^ud 
IbediTiDC srrvtco of tbe Chnrch of 
England," ke. under tlie oare of 
the master, tmittt A? bt mtufird Uial 
they do attend nek wortiip under 
the care of their parenU," In). "Pro- 
vided neierlhelnM that the parcala," 
&c. of any tcbolar, " thmll not^ to 
Ikt laid majler, timt A* or the detirtt 
tuck lehebr not la atltnd tbe worship 
tf tht ChtrcA tf EnglmH: but irill 
take care that the aaid scliolar at- 
tertdi lomc other place of chiistian 
worihip." In ncA cuer, nt)<I iu itltoh 
only, " lucfa echolar ahall in no wiie 
be obliged to attend the public nor- 
ahip of the Chnrch of England, &c. 
nor be pttnisbed, relinked, ad- 
monlBbed, nor in any manner mo- 
leiled for not attending the same." 
~ we aak, "lUppoao Ilio mailer, 
itbatanding the poor Diucnier, 
after having been impelled, rnlhet 
than vioUtte bU conacieoro, to " ao- 
lifif" (we aappoae in writing] that bo 
deairea bit child may not be obligod 
to attend th« Cfaureh of England 
-inppoae tbe aaid maater abonU 
mtl; » Kbake" ifbA qUOi^ to q- 



1!20 



KEV1BW. 



fbriDg (o come with tbe otber boys | 
to learn the cateclrism ; or tenderly 
** admooiiih" him of the ^uilt of he- 
resy and schism ; or should the yOting 
Bonconrorroist be " in any manner 
molested*' by the otht*r scholars for 
continuing obstinately a schismatic 
In return for so many favours; whtTc 
is the poor father to lodge bis com- 
plaint? Why, to the officiating cler- 
g^an, who is bound by oath to 
discoarage Conventicles by every 
means in bis power: or to (forlorn 
bope) the bishop of the dioce^s I If 
this be the only /tfrera/tl^of the mea- 
sore, what will its severity be! 

.The severe operation of the Bill, 
ahonld it pass into a law (which we 
bope that gracious Being who 
alone preserv^ our forefathers from 
the schism- bill in the reijg^n of Queen 
Anne will mercifully prevent) is 
most judiciottsljr exposed in this 
pamphlet. 

From the '' Observations," &c. we 
extract a summary of the objections 
wfaichDissenters have to the measure. 

** 1. Because they are conrioced that 
by diicouraging the ex^ons of the 
public ; by impeding the progress of 
eveij plan for promoting edacation now 
in active operation; by neglectiog to 
call forth the energies of the peor; and 
by omitting the ose of Chose means which 
are absolutely necessary to ensure the 
instruction of tbe most indigent classes ; 
this Dili will not only fail to realise tlie 
hopes it holds Ibrih, but will retard the 
very object for wbich it is enacted. 

** f . because, by imposing a tax for the 
support of the schools to be established, 
it will prove practically oppressive to 
those who desire to promote universal 
instruction, as they roust maintain other 
schools for children whom this Bill will 
not benefit, viz. — a large proportion of 
the most indigent of the population; 
those who can receive education by 
means of Sunday Schools only; and 
others who may be driven from the 
** established" schools by mismanage- 
ment and oppression. 

'* 3. Because, while it commits the 
proposed schools to tbe sole manage- 
' menC of the Clerpy and Dignitaries of 
tbe Estatflished Church, to tlie entire 
caclusion of the public at large, it pro- 
vides no adequate check on the undu'e 
eacrcise of the power thus f;rantcd ; 
which power, experience justifies the 
IMttenter in apprehending will be a dan- 
(eroQS instiumcut, liable Co niucb abuse. 



and calcnlated to raise greater obttaeleS 
to the general end, than the advantages 
wbich it can possibly afford will coQn«> 
terbalance. 

<■ 4. Because it will prove injurioas t6 
the interests of religtoos liberty, by 
adding to the number of those civil dis* 
abilities under which Dissenters froas 
the Church EstabltshmenI at present la- 
bour ; thereby reeognising aad legtsfaitifig 
upon a principle which is the basis of 
all religious persecution, and which 
Christianity and enlightened policy unite 
to condemn." 

Tbe third pamphlet is elegantly 
and admirably written^ for the pos- 
pose of exposing Mr. Brougham's 
plan of exclusive and hierarcbical 
educatiou. The following paragraph 
is a specimen of its style and spirit. 

<* It may be still a question how far it 
is desirable that general edaeatioa 
should be foretd by public authority. 
Tbe interference of govcramfeots ssith 
private concerns has been often mis** 
chievous, and as the world is managed, 
t^eir patronage is always suspicious, 
itll the beneficial moral changes that 
have taken place In society have been 
effected by private activity and benevo* 
lence, and commonly in opposition ta 
political power. Govemmenia follow 
rather than lead thepnblie mkid. They 
cannot go before tbe general Mtelied 
without endangering their own safety. 
It is well perhaps wlien tbev are content 
to move in the path which the people 
have already made common, and to assist 
rather than to institute schemes of public 
benevolence. Scope is thus allowed for 
the exetcisa of private benevolent ge- 
nius, the encouragement of which is of 
more importance to ilie character and 
happiness of a natiou, than the axecuiioa 
of' any works of magnificence, er the 
establishment of any institutions* how* 
ever specious and imposing. 

We were struck with the follow- 
ing just remarks : 

** irct not the Dissenters be Alarmed. 
The Education Bill will in all probabi- 
lity experience the usual fate of schemes 
involving a compromise of principle ;. \\%^ 
author may alienate the Dissenter*, but 
he has not yet gained over th«$ HigU- 
churchmen : and the muss of the natiou, 
standing between the two parties* will 
look with suspicion upon the pnliticaK' 
tendency of a project, the immediate 
and certaiu effect uf which would be the 
promotAou of clerical asceudencj[. ^ 



SBVIBW. 



litl 



^ Are not tlien tlie ptof^ to be edo- 
■Ctted? is the qoettioo of Mr. Broqgtwni 
•mi bis Edinburgh odvocato. Undoubt- 
•dlj« thej nUit DO educated lo fit them 
lor the times in which they live : and in 
tlio presf-nt eagerness of ihe pubhc 
mind it is not probable that oniversal 
education can be long delayed. Bat, 
be it observed, that the alternative is not 
between this Bill and no national educa- 
tion at all. Other plans may be devised 
by which this great blessing may be se- 
curedf without bringing in such enor- 
moDs evils as would render it a doubllul 
good. Of these, the foundations must 
be placed in the opinion* the affections, 
and^tbe power of the people. And when 
nny' schemes of th'is liberal and com- 
preben^ve character are brought for- 
ward, it will^ found that tlie Protestant 
Difltenters -are not more jealous of their 
own rights and privileges, than anxious 
for the diffoaion of all the means of 
Jinowledge and respectability and free- 
dom aoMMigsl all classes of their country- 
anen. 

The « Plain ThoagLt*" will be 
roond very sensible and important 
suffgeitions on the same subject. 
AAer lomo remarks on the probabi- 
lity that *^ sufficient evidence has 
not been produced to authorize the 
I«egiskitQre4o agree to any measure 
of such ji ^enonil and universal na- 
ture as that which is now proposed/' 
Sbe writer adds^ 

'*' There is great harshness, not to say 
IMMtive injustice, in tbe principle, ihai 
every man shall be compel U'd to con* 
tribute towards the education of ano- 
ther man's child, whether he is willing or 
not so to da. Tlte duties of Christian 
charity are not the proper sulyects for 
]ef;al Assessment : and why should I be 
obliged to pay my quota towards the 
building of a Parish School, if I feel 
persnaded that snch a school is more 
likeW to do harm than good in my 
sie>ghbo«rhood ? As for the manner of 
* moving the question by complaints,' 
we know that * complaining' people will 
never be wanting in any parish, and it 
would be strange, indeed, if ' Hve honso- 
holders* covid not be found, in any 
neightMorhood, to make themselves of 
Importance, by mooting soch a question 
at tbe Qnarter-sessions." 

To abov that there ia no nfcewnty 
Cmt tbe pn>posed meaitirey the author 

^ Th0Acii^bowerer, that the Sdo- 



cation of tbe lower orders is now going 
forward quite as faK as any prudent 
man can desire, and quite as rapidly as 
is consistent with tl^ general peace and 
salety of the country. The object is ac« 
compfiithing in that gradual aira progres* 
sire manner which is ihe most like^ to 
produce good and permanent effects. It 
is not desirable to employ any steam- 
engine to work up the whole disposable 
materials at once— -let it go forward as it 
has done for the last five or six yeara-* 
and though some impatient enthusiasts 
may be disappointed, we shall soon ar* 
rive at such a state of society, ihat no 
man, however poor, may not command 
such an education as is fitted to his con* 
dition." 

We feel truly sony that we can- 
not find room for more extracts 
from this energetic writer and power- 
ful reasoner: should, however, thia 
impossibility to (jpratify our reader! 
lead them to resolve to purchase tbe 
pamphlet itself, they will be thank- 
ful that they have had an opportu- 
nity of perusing one of the most 
powerful and luminous exposures of 
Mr. Brougham's anomalous measure 
for laying the last grain of sand upon 
the landholder, by snch an enor- 
mous increase of the poor-rates, and 
for working education by a steam- 
engine. 

The design of all these Pamphletsis . 
to stir up Dissenters throughout the 
kingdom to adopt moderate, but 
firm and energetic means; to pro- 
test against this measure, by peti- 
tioning the legislature to preveirt it 
from passing into a law, not be- 
cause they disapprove of a National 
System of Education for the Poor, 
nor because they object to contri- 
bute towards such an object, but 
because they cannot consent to a 
secUritai tmd exehmve mode ofedwtt' 
tivHf though that mode should bo 
tbe creed wad eaieehism of the sect 
which hanpens to be endowed by 
law. We cannot but consider 
this aa a matter, if not '* devised 
against the auiet of the land,** 
yet as most degrading and vexa- 
tions to Protestant Dissenters ; aa 
tending most baneAilIy to counter- 
act thehr labonri in educating the 
children of thei^oov; and ia \K!siB% 
a snare in tbe ^vi vX \Vma\ frnxi^Ae* 
spring, to draw \tom vwa:^ ^lom^QBA 



Iti 



EEVIKW. 



profession of principles which faa?c 
been proved highly beneficial both 
for '* the life that now is, and that 
which is to come." 

The last of tliese publications is at 
variance with all the rest, written 
by a clergyman, who in his theolo- 
gical creed is said to be twmfelieal, 
bnt who in his political sentiments 
and feelings is truly tt Saekeverel ! 
He, good man, discovers in Mr. 
Brougham's Bill a modern Pando- 
ra's box, — full of evils to the Church 
of England! ** a reprehensible 

8 Ian, proposed at a time when 
le enemy is, with malignant 
craft and industry, compiling far 
apd wide, manuals of the most 
blasphemous and seditious nature, 
lor the use of those very children 
wbo are taught to read and to 
write by the public benevolence/' 
Atid all these evils will certainly 
arise, (admitting the Author to be a 
(me prophet,) because he says, Mr. 
~ltongham*s Bill ** does not essential' 
differ from the Lancasterian or 
Iritish School — an essential and 
characteristic part of the constitu- 
tion of which is to exclude religious 
Creeds and Catechisms, in direct op- 

SDsition to the practice of the primi- 
ve church, and of all enlightened 
nations*/' at least, he ought to have 
added, of all those nations who have 
been so enlightened as to establish 
and endow some sect of Christians, 
and then modestly, but dogmati- 
cally, to assert, respecting that 
endowed sect, ** The church hath 
power to decree rights and cercmo- 
hies, and to decide controversies in 
matters of faith." 

The Author candidly admits that 
''Mr. Brougham aims to give his 
Bill a clerical sort of aspect, an ap- 
parent alliance to the Church of 
Bngland ;" but then bis Bill provides 
that the scholars, under certain cir- 
.^umstances, '' shall not, in any man- 
ner of way, bo obliged to attend, nor 
.t>6 punished, rebuked, nor molested, 
for not attending." It should seem 
that, because its enactments are not 
cmnpulsery in i|ll cases, that its alU- 
aiice with the Church of England is 
apparent only and not reat Who- 
ever may be employed to new-model 
Jfr. JBrougbam'a BUI, (he Dissenters 
Will be aawillingit should be en- 



I trusted to the tender neretos of tbo 
Rector of 8t. Dnastao's. 

Mr. Lloyd endeavoors to prov«i 
that a '* Christian ^Legislaturer 
ought not to countenance the pro- 
posed Bill, and that it ci^not do so 
" consistently with its own avowed 
principles, and a due regard to tho 
welfare or safety of our ecclesiastical 
establishment" He adds, ** 1 coa^ 
fidently aflSrm, (on the imfrobablb 
assumption that a Christian legisla- 
ture should sanction it,) that its de-> 
fective character will soon appear In 
the deformity of the life, — In an infi- 
del creed, and a licentious practice ; 
as no streams can rise above the 
fountain from which they issue; aa 
no fruit can be superior in ouality 
to the tree wliich produces it*^ But, 
it might be asked, will not a know* 
ledge of the scriptures operate at 
powerfully as that of the Ckmrek Ce- 
tecAtm, (especially when assisted by 
it I) in preventing the children from 
adopting infidel creeds, and a licenti- 
ous practice ? Alas I alas ! how stupid 
was Cbillingwortb, who exposed the 
cloven foot of his church, when he 
declared, *' The Biblb, and tka 
Bible alone, is the reHgimtrf PrfH 
testantsT 

Our limits will not suffer us to 
follow this turgid and bombastio 
writer, who speaks of *' sudden il- 
lapses of the spirit, and irreaiitible 
interpositions of providence ;" — ** je^ 
June and pagan plans of education^ 
the basis of whicn is so wide on tho 
one hand, and so narrow on tho 
other, that no Christian, consbtentlj 
with his avowed principles, cMUi 
stand upon it !" who, with all hia H^ 
heraUty^ can only account for the 
support which *^ some individuals, 
both of character and talent, have 
given to the British System, to a 
want of due consideration, or to a 
morbid, illegitimato candonr, antl 
that febrile thirst for popularity 
which it excites !" 

We conclnde by giving one of tho 
most finished specimens of clerical 
biffotry and pride which we have 
lately seen : Mr. Lloyd judged it of 
sufficient importance to plaoo it aa 
the '' Appendix" to his workl Oliver 
Cromwell used to call the batUo at 
Worcester his ^ crowning tietory:^ 
]^efhipa Ml. bVo^ tavj tn^tio&i^ 






^ftm Ae femlU of Hiii %Uionle 
pamphlet n bu milr^ iriim^ / 

' In iha Bfitiih ud 7oielgD School, 
Ike- ehildmi ue not odIj taught reading, 
■ritiaEi and accaanti, bat are rewardad 
with booti of Tuioui diKripliuni, — 
Mich a* relate to Nataral Hiilorj, ti> 
Bio«mphj, to TtbibIi and Vojagci, to 
tha Hbtoij af Kaslandi and evan lo 
Matufajiia; for Walu, ' On ilia Ha- 
■aan Hind,' U jnillj dciignated bj Dr. 
Jahaaoo, ■raBJ/waliM of Locke. Are 
■niitt pablicaiiaoijd for lie IsbmI oidcn 
«f*ociety? Do (boy nal lend to exak 
tbtDt abOTC tbrir hnmblc and Uboriaui 
dutlM. Mod 10 ioflale (hem vilh ill ^ha 
iuoleDceaf lettered ignorance^ Thiaii 
*t«c b ■ Bore qoaliBed kiuc, apon the 
•iMnftlton that the GhrietlBii Hcligion ii 
ike baiii «f thli pablic >diene«f iiuttac- 

tianily, in all ilt characlcriitic feaiare*. 
ii (jNtmatiullj eicluded, we caimot 
too itrooilj deprecale thii attempt lo 
•IcTatetha nn demand ingt ofLheFoor, 
W it can pradoce no oiber effect Ibati to 
CKale ■ twiligbt in ihojr nindi, and xbat 
40 kindle thai >anlly and preininption 
which will aoon quatirf them la rink 
among the tnrbaleDl declaiman of Ibc 
itj, Tbay will be abuudanllj lapplied 
■ wjlh blaapbcTDOui and teditioai nintler 
lor ihi* puipi 
IRlanM by 
priociplc* of their Creed." 



f%» Duv> <f*'^ Dtath of Ckrut 
mtpUimd, aaJ Ut InfbMntt in raa- 
ttrmbmtg ChitHaM to " Htv ta fun 
M*aJuS/orlUm" enforetd. Bf 
WilUmmWard i/Smnytort. Lon- 
d«B. li. Gd. 

Tue itKccM of miuionarj effort* 
among the hmUien, dependi in an 
cninent degree an the evBiij^elical 
aenlimealf, luwl ixiiiMcrBtcd apirit, 
4>ftiMMC who arecroplaycdlDpreacb- 
mg theaiKlvei, or in iDpetiiiteiid- 
tag the labuura of tboM who nay 
Im railed up among the healbeu for 
that parpoae. If tliej' do not low 
** wfaoUj a right aeeii," it cannot 
reaaonalilj be expected Ibat Ihcj 
will " gather frnitantn lifectemBl;" 
, and if they *«)o nnt nshibit a living 
|iortraitof the ipliit ofCbriit, it it 
not liknlj that thoye who arc tb« 
frait of their labgnr* will bear a 
clOKreieiBbUitce lo the Divino ori- 
j^«L A. MiiMooaij, eipecially, 
dumid beetle to adopt tbcexhorla- 
4KHI ofPaa^aadfj to hia oottrerli^ 



IT. ia.j 

Bo jre firilowen of me, even a« I 
alM am of Cfarial." 

It was tfae tear leat onr Miision- 
ioi in India abonld lo«e the apirit 
df disiiitercated and boly ccal, which 
liadinducod them to embark in their 
nrduoai work, tbat led many guod 
men to tremble, when Carey and 
'rhoma* engaged in conducting aa 
indigo narmfactory at^Hudnabatty : 
and aimilar feelingi have been ex- 
oitcd, from the eitabliafament at So- 
rampore fur priNluif tbetrantlatloBa 
of tlie icriptuTua, lest employ me nta 
of that dnxcription ibonid abtorl) 
ibuir Ihonglita, confame their time, 
itnd eshauat llicir encrgie*, deprif~ 
iDg them of IboHi tpiritual fcetinga 
•rhich uru indispeniably reqaiiiile to 
impart to tlio heathen " not the got- 
pel of God only, but alio their own 
wah." Judging, however, from tbia 
iiermon of Mr. Ward, who tiai been 
employed twenty yean in condnot- 
ing the printing establishment at 
(hat itation, there appeari good rea> 
ton to conclude, that the cTangeU- 
rat flame buroa higher and hot- 
ter in his mind than when ho waa 
flnt engaged aa a Mluionary ; and 
that the cammtrtiti feeling bai no 
place in hii heart; but, on the con- 
trary, according to the aublime ti- 
tle ho hai affixed to bii diaconne, 
" The love of Chriat bcuvlh Iiim 
away." The text in 3 Cor. xiv. 16, 
Tha loM ^ Ckritt eanttrminttk m. 
Ice. which having read ; in the tme 
apirit of a Miwioniu'y, wboae heart 
wai yearning over a lost world, he 
Ibna exclaims, 

•• A world in r^iiiit All dead I Whit 
a ield of tliughler i) here 1— Fbe iniage 
of God defaced 1 tlie pretence of Ood 






arid <. 






Icsl ; all d< 

The following quntalion ia a liiir 
ipocimen of a sermuni at uneo nre- 
dilabletolhe talenia of the preacher, 
and highly encouraging to tlie So- 
ciety liy which Mr. Ward and hia 
foUeagnca, Dra. Carey and Marab- 
mao, were originally employed. 

-To live to Hin who died fur sf. 
faribei Impliri, tbit * 
ed with a lenia of gial 
of Dr. Doddridge, wc 



i Dverwhelm- 
. In the Life 
I the tUnj of 



tlTEBASV IHTKLLISBNCC. 



«■> 10 (Irneli wtlb wna eircuniilance) 



]nh» 



■ leti 



bebalf, and a itipilowi) obtained. The 
Ciiminai «■■ lO orttjaytd at lhu« ap- 
pearaneei ui his fiTOur, aad aa grateful 
to hii benefactor, tbat lis tbrei> Limwlf 
•t the lect of [he Doctor, and laid, 
"Sir, CTSrj drop of my blood thank) 

500 ; for yoa bsTC bad mercy on ever; 
rap or tt! and I shall come ctrery year 
bam Ireland lu paj jtoti Ihi homage of 
■ gralefal heart." Theie were the feel- 
ing! of a poor manlowardi a bcnefaclor, 
who made no perunal aacrifice in Ihii 
•Uempt lo WTC hii life, and >hu>e effnTti 
were fiaally oniucceiifol ; for in a (tw 
daji be iD^red the wnlence of the 
IsWi Hon niDch more, then, my bre- 
thren, ODght jDU and I ro be affected 
vilh the loie of him, who. Ihougli ihe 
Lord of Tife and glorj, died for our 
rucue t OD|ht not each of ui lo lake 
up Ihe langaage of the poor Iiiibman, 
and lay, 'LokI, every diopofmj blood 
Ihankithee; for than bait had pity upon 
Mery drop ofit. ^or mj blood, thou 
didM peinil thy oirn lo be ihed. For 
my life, llioaaidit make ihine own ilie 
HCtiScei Abt nereribatitheiemerctci 
. be buried in forgelfulaeu. Here, Lord, 
take Ibr purcfaaie of Ihy death ) I am 



fbrei 



All t 



, and which 



hich thou hatt endc 
thou hail rcicutd froi 
' application, inalt be employed fbr thee; 
' sll my lime, my rnorfliei, m; inflnence, 
-ahallbe deiolrd to Ihee, and be ipenl 
Du the abject which Ihou diedsl to ac- 
COiBpliih. I can netei discharge— cao 
never ultei, oy obligatloni. 1^ eery 
Ihinit that liBlh breath help me to dia- 
chargc the debt of prabe ; Ihii, Ihii ii 
Ibeiweeteii idea connected with eter- 
nity. I shall be filled with ihe aong: 
Unio Him that loTcd a>> and watlied di 
ttma oar aina in bif^ own blood — la 
Him— Id Him—to Him— be glory for 



jPfaui Tttftib.- or, CfanrrMhMu M 
Jjvttt Safptr, —i wOur imworUmt 



DiiLoauEs betvecn Mr. Andrew 
Mkctean, tlw BkililF of * Oma lo 
XnglMd, and Xhoumi V\M', one of 
the laboann,Tii which <ho fenntr, 
'. betidM rectif^ins Iho errora of Ibe 
kktur, who ii to ignoruit Chnrch- 
MKaiCODGerKitiK (he aubjects dicd- 
ikned in the title, K>vei hint T«ry 
UmparUml mMee. TUa Ji a very 
■MitmUe book to bv put into the 



liFtnda of ptmons (nnd tbcy fonD ■ 
namettmi dui of locinty) of the 
deMSriplion ofTbomu Field. Nor 
is it nn ImprimeT Rvtrard Book for 
our Snnday Schools. 



Tie Prtutuml I«fi»ttKt tf Etaigtli- 
tml Ratigim: m StmuH mmckrd 
at tht Baptiit Mettiitg-kaiwM na 
Coltegt'lane, NortltampUn, Jtam 
38,1819. BpJoknRstmi,D.D. 

Rtdemption from lie Cutm if lit 

Law: a Sermon preadmi al GU- 

(n*im, .S^.13, IS30,M lkOp*a- 

ing ^ tia aav Mntin^iom* fo- 

longngto lk« BapliH Uturtkimdtr 

the PtiUoFml Care afthe Rm. Mr. 

Walton. By John By/md, D.D. 

Pubtiabed by Rcqncit. Fotty-ttto 

PrigM Sctred. 

We rccomineud (o oar rekdi-i* 

Iheso Sermooa, u not aoworUiy of 

our highly reapectablo I^eod. We 

tvonld have given aorae excellent 

cxlracti from Ihemj but tbo Author 

is ao well known in the religloiH 

worldu to render itannece&aary. 



LITERARY INTELLIGENCE. 

JmI PMithed. 

Tmporlant Queiliom recunmeDded to 
■hcierioDi Coniidenlion of ProfaiaiBg 
CUrliiiani of all OenoiaiiuuiiMia. Bytba 
Jle*. John Townaend, BeiDondaey* 
Fiice 3d. 

True and Falte Religion Practically 
Conaidered : thuMine the CauKi and 
CnroofSpiTitualDecTeniioni iu Heart 
and 1/fe, and the t>e>t Mean* lo proaxila 
I'lMl GoiUntu. Every Fart proTeiT 
IVdm the Bible, and conBracd by Qno- 
lutionifrom great DiTinei, and Ibe Pying 
Sajingi of eminent Sahili, op to ISW. By 
itA Rev. G. 0. Scraggs A.H. UiuiMcr 
ofCnion Chapel, Poplar. 

Dr. Chalmen's(of Gla«gow) Chtiitian 
niidCiric Economy of large Towns, Noa. 
5 and 6. "On Chunh Palroiwgc," Bto. 
dice it. PMithti QHarlcrl^ 

He. ClialoieTa'* Diuounu on "The 
Applicaliou of Chrittiatiity lo Ihe Com- 
■nerclal and Ordiuary Affaiia of Life." 
&«a. Price Bi. Bd>. 

Mr. Dudley'! Work on ihe StitEm of 
ihn BiaLK Siioiett, which ha< been dr- 
illed by tbe KTCrr and long-conliaoed 
illaeai ufthe Author, i> now in lh( tV(«(, 
and will b« pnbliahed with all piwaible 



les. 



^nteUtgeme, s^c. 



AMERICA. 



Tac Baptist General Convention in 
the United States lui pobliibed a qaar- 
terlj work, entitled, '* The Latter Daj 
Lsninarj/' of wliicb they have lold of 
tlie first YoloDie the amazing number of 
91|000 copies. But this will excite no 
aurprise when it Is known* that there are 
in oonntxion with the Convention 145 
associations; S848 churches, and up- 
wards of 9000 ministers. There had 
been baptised in the year 1819-20^ in 
85 aasoaatiodsj 7S1S; and it was sup- 
poae<} there were not fewer baptized in 
mli the atsociations than Id.OOO. They 
addf " these estimates may be considered 
as falling below the real number r* 

From the report of the C!omipittee to 
the General Convention assembled at 
Philadelphia April 96* 1820, it appears, 
that they are porsuing their labours 
among the Aborigines of the country : 
there are seven or eight Missionaries 
who are devoted to that work : and it is 
recommended by the Committee, '* that 
in order to the reform, civilization, and 
(with divine bleuing) the ultimate con- 
version of the Indians to the faith of the 
gospel, it is of the first importance that 
Missionaries fix their abode in the midst 
of the tribes^ mingling wiih them in 
daily conversation and habits, to conci- 
liate their esteem, and establish their 
confidence." 

It has been thought by many, that 
Mr. JndsoQ and his colleague missed 
their way by taking the course mention- 
ed ID our last number, of soliciting from 
^e Emperor of Bur mail pemdision to 
preach the gospel in his dominions. 

The reasons of their conduct will be 
ctplaiocd by an interesting letter, which 
wa are obuged to postpone till nexf 
mouth. 



JEiCrart of a Letter from a Baptut Minit- 
Ur in ATtfM S^ia^ to a Minitter of the 
ume Denaminmt'um in England, 

CkeOer, Nooa Scotia, March 9, 1820. 
At my first anival in this country, 
about three years ago, I was a good deal 
discouraged, finding the people lode and 
Ignorant, especially in religious matters, 
and soma of them a good deal tinged 
with enlbnaiaanis especially in those 
paitf whera the/ hare Unfe access to 



preaching. Yet I trust fhcre are con* 
siderable numbers who know Christ and 
the power of bis resurrection, and wliosa 
religions sentiments are correct. And 
in some instances the powerful efTusiona 
of the Divine Spirit have appeared verjr 
remarkable. I will mciition a few in- 
stances since our Association, June 2U 
S5, 1819. 

In July I was invited to^St. Martia*« 
in New- Brunswick, to assist in forming 
a church. When we first entered am 
this business, several persons, wha be- 
fore had entertained unfavourable o^ 
nions on this subject, were led to see the 
propriety of church order and discipline, 
so that though at first there were onlj 
eleven persons willing to unite together 
in fellowship, yet at the second meet- 
ing there were thirty-eight incmbera; 
these were all, but one, that had been 
baptized in that neighbourhood. Thcj 
have not yet had constant preaching; 
but while wc staid, many sinners were 
awakened to a sense of their danger. 
We had preaching every dav, during 
the fortnight that I staid. 1 baptized 
nineteen persons on a profession of foith 
before 1 sailed from that place, and lett 
manv more mourning under the bnrdca 
of sin, though there are but thirty Ca^ 
milies in the place. I lately formed a 
church in Windsor, where there baa 
been a remarkable revival i about nxty 
appear to have experienced a work of 
grace within a few months. In Corii- 
wallis, where brother Manning labours, 
about a hundred have lately made a 
profession. I have lately visited Nicloii 
a second time, where is a large church, 
to which eighty have been lately added : 
and nearly as many more in Wilmot. 
Both these placet arc supplied with 
Baptist preachers* There is a revival 
of religion in Horton, where I was threa 
weeks ago, and twenty-one were newl/ 
set at lil^rty. The Lord has displayed 
the power of his grace in and near'the 
town of Halifax, which I lately visited, 
and find a hundred and fifty have been 
baptized within eight months, by bro- 
ther Burton ; a hundred and thirteen 
were added the year before, and a hun> 
dred and twenty the year before that* 
who gave hopeful evidence of a work of 
naee on their hearts. Thb is the Lord*a 
doing, and it is maTve\\na%\fk owt v)«^^ 

Etrly thh mtet, na wj ^la.'^ %n \Ji^ 



126 



IKTSLLI^nrCB, &C. 



▼erpool» I COM to Chester, where there 
is a Ba|>tpt church. A prajer-meetui^ 
was appoioted the neit day; wid in 
conscqoence of a strangei's bein^ to 



Floating Chapel*- the nnmevoiu in- 
stances of oUwr Portly both domestic 
ndd foreign* LaTtng, in inutation of 
London, openly taken up the cause of 



preach, the house was crowded. I en- . religious instinction of Seamen — and the 
lOTed much freedom in delivering an well-grnonded hope entertained that the 



jojed much freedom in delivering 
fihortation« and almost every eye was 
Ibathed in tears. The eldest daughter 
of Mr. Dimmock the minister, and the 
second daughter of David Crundil, Esq. 
were powerfully impressed with a sense 
of their lost condition. I staid here two 
weeks, during which season conviction 
became so general, that business was 
mlmost suspended. Eleven have been 
baptiaed, and we eipect fifteen more 
next Lord's day. Perhaps there are 
^thirty more under deep impressions; 
'nnd every day there are new instances 
of awakening and joy. 

Datid Nvttbe. 



PORT OF LONDON SOCIETV 

tor fTwmoting RtUgim emeag Scamtn, 

Oif Tuesday, the 15th of February, 
was held at .the Freemasons' Hall, Great 
Qoeeq*street, a Public Meeting of No- 
blemen, Ladies, and Gentlemen, inte- 
rested in the religious instruction of 
British Seamen. Tlie meeting was nu- 
merous and highly respectable. The 
•huir was taken by the Right Honourable 
John Charles Villicrs, M. P. who was 
supported on his right bv the Earl of 
Rocksavage, and on bis leA by the ve- 
nerable and respected philanthropist 
Mr. Wilberforce* On the platform were 
Joseph Bulterwoith, Esq. M. P. Mr. 
Stephen, Master in Chancery, The Ho- 
oourable and Rev. Gerard Noel, Admi- 
ral Spranger, and other eminent charac- 
ters. The Treasurer, R. H. Marten, Esq. 
read letters from The Right Honourable 
(he Chancellor of the Exchequer, and 
Lord Gambler, excusing their absence, 
but inclosing donations in aid of the 
important object of the Socictr. The 
speakers were» the Earl of Rocksavage, 
]Jr. Thorpe, Mr. Wilberforce, J. Ste« 
phen, Esq. Admiral Sprauger, Lieut* 
Saunders, The Honourable and Rev, 
Gerard Noel, Rev. Mr. Allen from Te- 
nessee in North America, the Rev.George 
Thorn, District Minister of Caledon in 
Soeth Africa, Rev. Mr. Stratton. W. 
Cooke, Esq. &c. he. &c. The Rer. 
Henry Lacey read an animating address 
' frooi the Committee, stating the iroport- 
, anceof the object — the growing influence 
of religion on the minds of seamen — the 



grounded hope 
efforts in the metropolis qf Great Britaia 
will, by their influence, result in tho 
improvement of the morids of sailors ui 
most parts of the world. The Treesorrr 
read a letter which he had received 
from the Rev. J. Pint, Corresponding 
Secretary to the «* Port of New York 
Society, for the promulgation of tlm 
Gospel among Seamea,* with encoa^ 
raging accounts of its prosperitT, and 
that tho PorU of Bostoiv Philedelphia* 
and Charlestown, had fitted up tempora* 
ry places of worship for seamen. The 
speeches expressed the BMnt coufideiit 
hope, that now there was a commeace- 
ment of direct and kind attention to tba 
religious instruction of seamen, it woald 
be canied on with increasing success-* 
that the gratitade of all ranks of tha 
community was due to seamen, as 
such, and that the exertions of Chris« 
tians ought now to be redoubled to make 
up the long arrears of debt to the soole 
of this long-neelecled class of our fel- 
low-subjects. A hope was expressed* 
that the Church of England, many of 
whose pious and benevolent roemoerf 
had supported the Port of London So- 
ciety, by liberal donations, a|thon|^ 
began and conducted br Dissenten^ 
would, ere long, have a ship fitted in tba 
Thames as a chapel for sailors, memben 
of that communion. There were many 
masters of merchant- ships, and a goodly 
number of seamen, present, which ren- 
dered the meeting aiore interesting. 
Many donations were handed lo tlM 
Treasurer, and a good collection waa 
made, in aid of the f^iDds of tba 
Society. ^ 



THE GREENOCK SEAMAK'f 
FRIEND SOCIETY. 



Wa learn with sincere pleasure that 
thb Society has made excel]ent progress 
toward the noble purpose for which it 
was formed. Such was the seal of the 
good men who felt for the eternal inte- 
rests of our brave seamen, that they pur- 
sued their object by holding roeatiogs 
every week. 

The sloop of war which had served in 
the Clyde for Ae purposes of the Ma- 



^eeriah regular, and exemplary atten- , rine &hooI| was solicited of Govei-n- 
tha of mMmen qn pubVlt worship at ihf mealt» lad VVbaitll^ |]c4uited to the gen^ 

•I 



INTEU.10SKCB| 8CC. 



1«7 



llemen wte were on tke €eftniitt#e* to 
be traosformefi into e chapel for the ose 
of the BUBieroiu eeeaieii frequeating the 
Port of Greenock. 

The whole nMun-deck bet been lifted 
•everal feel : the gun-deck b the floor 
ef the cbepel,. which now occupies the 
entire length of the vesicL and leveral 
hundreds can be commodioiulj seated 
within the reach of the preacher's 
voice. 

Preaching is always once a week on 
board ; and when opportonity will per- 
mit* more often^ Seamen attend wil- 
linf^f listen nitentiTcly* and the sight 
of hardy (acei bedewed wiih the tears 
of contrition is not nnfrequenu The 
veseel is moored near to the new Custoro- 
boose* When the vessels which took 
oot the nnoMrous emigrants to America 
were nboot to depart, these were collect- 
ed* and with the seamen in the port, 
formed lerge assemblies* to whom the 
Rev. Mr. £l wards, and other ministers 
in Greenock and the neighbourhood, 
preached tnth Bsanifest effect. It is in- 
tended to form a Sunday School on 
board the chapeit fur the evening in- 
stractaon of the lads training for a sea 
fife. 

Tbe Committee have in purpose, and 
ere taking the necessary steps, to pre- 
tent, if possible* the enticing'of seamen, 
aewly arrived* to bosses where their pro- 
perty and their morals are equally en- 
danipered ; and to Induce them to use 
in preference other lodging-houses on 
thofe of mr better character* and on the 
gobd condnct of which dependence may 
^placed. 

The Committee* following the example 
of the London Merchant Seamen's Aux- 
iliary Bible Society, add also to their 
other good efforts* an , inspection 
of vessels outward bound* that the 
(Brews take to sea for their instruction, 
isnd for the Improvement of their many 
lcbur« hoars* a suitable supply of tb« 
^oly scriptures* and of the religioift 
tracts. 

May the blessing of God rest on these 
laboers* and the pleasure of the Lord 
abnndaotly prosper in their hands 1 



pOME mSSIONARY SOCIETY. 



support of measotcs fbr'the aacfiorstioA 
of their condition. Thb people hav»> 
been uronderfully preserved, a distinct 
people/ for the space of foor hundred 
years, having been expelled from India 
about that space of time, and scattered 
all over Europe, Aiia, and Africa. Ic 
is ascertained by Oriental scholars, that 
they speak, nut a cant language, but the 
same as that spoken by the Suder caste 
of India, whom they resemble in person* 
manners, and habits. The oircerobtance 
of their speaking tlie same language 
anumest all their tribes in everv country^ 
as well as that of their aborigines in the 
East, may bo roost favourable for the 
circulation of the scriptures* and diffo* 
sion of oral instruction | and being sd 
widely scattered among all nations* 
whose languages are s^>ken by their 
different tribes, they may - also be the 
instruments of much good among others^ 
and well repay the privilege of sojourn- 
ing among them, by scattering amoug 
them that wealth which surpasses the 
riches of Golconda and Peru. Ii is pro* 
poaed to form a Brtnch Society to that 
for Home Missions, which will both 
leave the funds for village preaching un- 
touched, and afford an opportunity Ctf 
those persons to contnbnte, who may b# 
favourable only to the promotion of mo^ 
ralily and education. Any informaiioA 
or subscriptions, forwarded to the Homi 
Missionary Rooms, 18, Aldermanbaryi 
will be gladly received. * 



BAPTIST ITINERANT 

AMD 

BRITISH MISSIONARY SOCIETY^ 



Tb I Committee of the Home Mission- 

Sy Society, feeling deeply for the con- 
liom' of the neglected Gipsy race, of 
whom tigjiiieen Aautmtd are wandering 
tliroegh this eeuntry* earnestly entreat 
the cbftiMa world to coma fonrmrd in 



Extract of a Letter froui the Rev* Thomoi 

TlUytotheSeentmryttUuod 

January 8, 1821. 

** Mt OEAa Sin* / 

"I write to acknowledge the receipt of 
a parcel of Reports* Tracts* &c. whidb 
were very acceptable* and will, I hope* 
prove very Ubefal, as the Tracts irill 'be 
distributed aeM>ng those who never heair 
the fospel, and may gain aecoM where a 
living teacher cannot. I ahi happy t^ 
inform yo«» that we have ai len^h ei»- 
compli»hed an object at which 1 have 
been aiming for years past*/ i. e. tlui 
formation of a Baptist kifneraiitHudety 
for this county* (Hants.) Youwi^ll'he 
pleased to hear that at Ammite^ <^wMfci> 
witch, and- eeveiaV <a\mi ^Vmei >aV\^ 
are Tcgnlarly • «u|t|\Vtt4, ♦^% %vs*kAm^ 



itvcfT good, and woM be mvA br^ 
U Ibc pUcB> woald ctmlun lbn>. it 
i«Jbc-Iae, (tic SoiuUj-icfaooI coatteaat 
Id prMper ; tine penom b«*e iHalj 
WcD bipiiied at ibM pluci uid we ci- 
pect iJmi ■ choTch will ihorlly be focD- 
id, uid ■ miniHCT wltled <»cr (hen— 
Tbu I bop* ' jouT ml bu provoked 
mj msDji' uid tbtt (lie cune h> 
whkh joa («ke m> deep w iat«ei[, 
)tiiJ be yet note aiteuiiel; ptano(ed. 
1 rcmuD, dear Sit. 

Ysn» DMt affect ionatel?, 

TbDM** TlLlT." 



It ii eliMyi witli' poculiiT pIcuDie 
that ne tepoti (he fotBUioD of Diiirict 
Sscialieiin (be eountrj, being fnllj peiv 
aaaded (hat (hoia wlio >eu<le en oi near 
tbe >p<M> have tbe be>( meapa of aicrr- 
taining ihe BOial and spiriloal waiiii of 
tktit oan nciglibourlMHid ; and abo of 
aiding and eoccHmfing Ihote wbo go 
fcttb |o laboar ouder (heir own imme- 
dlale inafxction, with an inuieat and 
feeling nhteb no leilioxiay of o(ben cao 



,_ jr IS (late irtieTB Ihe 
WW* win ke italioBsd. at (be cltioii of 
diArest placei appear equally urgent 
■nd dtwrTingorngcird, while Ihe; baie 
MM yet met a >u>(able minbter who it 
diiengagrd. They wonld (hcieloce iDui( 
•ameillj implora their Chritliaii frtendi 
to "pray the Lojd of Ihe baiieiT, that 
ke wosld aend forth noR labonnn inio 
kiiharveMi" and alto coatinne aad in- 
creiM ibrir liberal eontrihation* for the 
Mpport of thoia who now aie oi mty 
hfrcaflerbe called to (be work. 

The foUowitig donation* arc for (be 
tvppon of an &tra Iiineianl. (Sa ear 
ttiptn ia tkt Hmmhtrfir Vtetmbtr latt.) 



finy Ard, pet Mn. Saiib, t 



DeaklOt Mr. John, of DtnahighaBi, 

perSectetary S 5 

X>avy,Hta'Notwich.perH>.Coae<u5 5 
X>a*y, Hiat. Dklo, parDUio-.S 5 
Mend, A, IHl(*, petVi((o..lO JO 
Ulh), per A* Re*. John Oyer A fi 
Meadh A few, at NottbampioD, 

petB.8hiw,Za<|... 6 5 

WAU*. Ttra, at WUtehweb. 

1]aBla> 10 10 

ff.M,ftr0ufMmj 5 5 



Abe fct the fteacral ohjem 

of tlie Socieiy. 
Ke^.Thwaaa, En^neai York, pee 

J. B. Gumey, Ek].. .95 O 

]. H. and Son. per Secretary 6 6 

Mayo, Mr. Coventry, (millted in 

the lail Accoent) 1 9 

Collected hy Opte Sntb, E«|. of 

**-th 96 It 



preach un Wedneaday Uomiiu. Haicb 
tl. at the Re*. & HMIyafd^ Ueetine- 
hoDW,' Bedford, a Senaon br the bcnelt 
of the Bapliit MiaHonatj Society. An 
Aniiliaiy UiuiuDaiy Mciety ttir (he 
Cuunly of Bedford ii cipected to be 
fornf d, and ■ Sermon (a be preached in 
ihe afleraoon and eiening of the aane 
day. 



portt?. 



ON 8EB1N0 A CROCUS, 

Tit btoieuig if tcUek 



tFrtL 



BiBOLD Ihia lilile droo^ng flowcTt 
The ttaniient bcaaty of ihe bower. 
I( fain would blow, our eye* U choc^ 
But piercing windi ilt power diwrib 

li uot lliit flower an caibten true, 
Uj cbriitfan fnendi, of me and yon i 
Plant! ite are call'd of iighteaouc>a> 
Sei by the band of laTeiciea grace; 
Bui oft our proipect* are o^ercaal 
By Satan*! iioraii, or ibi'i chiH bla)l ( 
Corruptioui too, with migbiy poarer. 
Try hard Ig crush the coining Bower, 
f Batcoucage, fiinda, the (eat lUiiA 

Your life U hid wiifa Chriat in God. 
Til hid. Dot toit. O bleued word. 
Safe kept by our rtdeemiai t-ord I 
And if oar God and Saiioet Stc, 
So ceitaioly ihall wa reriTa : 
The plant! of grace hewilladoro 
On tha great leaoncctieB 



nWindi. 



H— 



ERRATA^Pho ^- >■«< f»i f** 
' wa! oonmon' raad " had comisenccd." 
Lhic Penult. Jer " 380 lb>." reed 



IS9 



3fti0|i tfftonidt. 



Extract •/ a Jikiter from Mr, Stephen 

Daws* 
Cloimd, Januaiy U, 1821. 

My OBAm Sift* 

I mentioiied in a late letter to onr et- 
tcened friend Mr. Wetr, which I expect 
he fonmrded, that the Popish archbishop 
who lesided at Tkarlcs was deceased, and 
the cbim^ cbapel, nunnery, and market- 
house belb were kept rindng night and 
<Uy» Iron Salnrdaj until his futieral on 
Tunday, to our great annoyance ; and all 
the abops in the town were closed, espe- 
cially oo the day of his burial ; and not- 
witbfttaoding the day was' very wet, the 
body wascanied round the town in a slow 
nroceisinD, attended by about forty priests 
in white scarfs, with the Protestant minis- 
ters, one on eadi side of tlie new arch- 
bishop, and a numerous concourse of peo- 
ple; after which he was buried with great 
ceremony under the gallery which the 
nuna occupy in the cliapeK I did not go 
to the funeral, that I might not be consi- 
der^ at countenancing in any manner 
their superstiUons. Bat on the above- 
iMentioncd day, (the I7th,) there was the 
lifst month's mind, (as it is called,) and 
bigb mass was said at the chapel for the 
tool of the dece.ased prelate, by an arch- 
^^p, assisted by four bikhops, and mnre 
than 100 prirsts ; and a vehement oration 
was deTivcred from the pulpit, in English, 
in praise of Dr. Bray : after which tl|» 
bw>ps, who were previously robed at the 
altar before all the congregation, which 
cuosisted of some thousands, were con- 
docted withhi a railing in the body of the 
chupel, where a coffin was placed upon 
trestles, to represent the deceased, when 
fr«»tb pray era were offered by the arch- 
biahopt and channted by the choir; after 
which a procession was m .dc round the 
empty coffin, and the archbishop sprinkled 
bcJy water in profusion* and then made 
•ooiher procession with the holy incense ; 
0lj wkeB ali waf gone thrvug^ the 



hitfhops were again conducted to the altar^ 
and disrobed in great ceremony^ and tba 
assembly was dismissed. The priests n£» 
terwards dined together at the inn. 

But you win bo partienhuly grieved to 
understand that the shops (without aiqf 
exception) were ail closed upon this diqr 
also, and the day was more reli^ouslj 
observed than the Sabbath is at anj 
time. Indeed the Protestants are very 
few, and it would oertainly have offended 
their neighbours, and it might have injured 
tliem in their businesa it the shops tiad 
beenopened: bat iiu most lamentable tlint 
snch a countenance should be afforded to 
the delusion of porgatoryt as though a 
departed soul could be benefited by snch 
(boleries; and I greatly fear the eaanpio 
of the Protestants must have a tendency to 
confirm their Popish neighhoars. in their 
dangerous superstiiiona. Indeed I wm 
sorry to say, that after all the preachii^ 
they have heard, there are scarcely auy 
of them that can hear to hear a woid 
against Popery, in public or private ; and 
if any conversation (however mild) is held 
upon tliose subjects, and a Popish servani 
comes iiMo the room, it is invariably hush* 
ed in a moment, lest tliey shouMi be of- 
fended, though the papista arc by no 
means so cautious and limid. The truth 
is, and it ought to be seriously consideredt 
that in every direction within the compais 
of m^ knowled|ie» and of others Pro* 
testantism is rather on tlie decline than 
otherwise ; for if we have done soroething^ 
the papists have done, and are doing muA 
m9re, and are increasing in respectability 
and favour in the eyes of their Protestant 
neighbours every day: and nnless tiie? 
are met witK somethuig like oorreapondU 
ing exertions on our part, and» abova alU 
unless ** the Spirit is pouted out from on 
hixh," " the man of sin*' must continue to 
reignt and be mere triumphant than ow 
brethren in England aecm to imagint. 
" Attempt great tbuigs, and expect gre«t 
thingC was the motto ef tlM venerabU 
Carey; for uokMi pnyer and exeitioa §« 



i 



ISO 



IBISH CHRONICLE. 



togetlier, no raceest can be expected. I 
am a most weak creature, and 1 feel it in* 
creasingly, and !ionietimes in a most op- 
pressive way ; bot I can trnly say* 1 have 
done what I coald, and I Icme my work; 
and am desirous to spend mod be sficat ior 
Christ ; bot we want more lahouren for 
' ireUmd, and England must bear the chief 
expense, and tlios secure to herself the 
honour, while Ood has all the glory. The 
Schools are certainly doing good, and we 
know also the gospel will not be preached 
in vain, but roust in erery instance be the 
savour of life or death, and sooner or la* 
ter Jesus will take to himself his great 
.pvweiv And idgn over Ireland, and all 
•Ae earth. Dst as, thefdare, hear bis 
•wwB liiRctioii, by his Spirit, in the apoetle, 
^ Be ye steadfabut, immovable, always 
a fam n fi a g m the wark of the Lord," &c. 
iwitended to notice my late 
kut arast leave it to the next letter. 



Letter from a Sabbath Iruik Reader. 
CMmnegt Jan. 2, 1831. 

* The h«ppy «iects flrrodooed hjf the 
lest quartet's Sabbath Reading, impels 
'ine to ley before yon an abstract of the 
-vnede I adepted. I called meetinics at 
rhrhavses af Tlioroiie M'M. and B. L. 
where I classed tbem, holding the Irish 
Bible in my band, and each of theiu look- 
ing into tbetr Itish and English Testa- 
ments, deshrtng tbem in their torn to ask 
.vse -any question concerning their eternal 
welfare ; and referring them to their Tes- 
laments to know whether the answers I 
nve them were correct or not. 

Question by Thomas M'M. «< WiU 
'|Ood men be saved for their obeying the 
.commandments?* Answer. •• By the 
'6eedsof the law' there shall no flesh be 
-tostified In the sisht of God, for by the 
itM is the knowledge of sin." Rom. lii. ?0. 

• Question by B. L. "Why were the 
'>coromandraents given, as they could not 
•»aveus?" Answer. "They were added 

bec aos e of transgreanon, that cvf>ry month 
nay bestopped, and all the world become 
•vtiifty before Ood.* Gal. iii.l9. 

Question by P. Q. '* Why do men think 
that they ore to be saved by their morel 
Tfrtiiea?*' Answer. " Because the heart 

* bdeteitlbl above ell things, and despe- 
tately wicked ; and again* they being ig- 
norant of Ood'a rigbteoosness, and going 

''«lx>iit to eitabllsh tbeir own righteousness, 

' liave not sabmitted themselves to the 

tighteousnesa of Ood^" Question. "How 

van we ever expect to be saved, in that 

'TBsef* Antwef. "There is liope in the 

Gospel, tfhidi Godbasflent to give light 

unto them who sit in darkness, and in 

•be shadow of death; to guide our feet in* I 



to the way of peace.* Jer. xvil. 9. Bott. 
X. 3. Luke i. 79. 

Question by A. M<M. " What is the 
Gospel ?** Answer. ** It is good tidings of 
great joy. This is a faithful saying, and 
worthy o£jbM acceptation, that Chriat Jesot 
came into the worid to save ainners.* 
Luke ii. 10. 1 Tim. i. 15. 

Question by J. R. " How can Christ's 
salvation come to us V* Answer. " By 
futlj : Believe on the Lord JesnsChrist, and 
thou shalt be saved. To liim give all the 
prophets witness, that, through his name, 
whosoever believeth in him bhall receive 
remission of sins. He redeemed us from 
the curse of the law, heivg made a cwae 
for us, and put away ain by tlie sacrifice 
of himself, thereby fulfilling the whole 
law, that his righteo uM wa s 4iiight be ins- 
puted to us, and we in him become per- 
fectly righteous." Acts xvl. St.— s. 48. 
Gal. ill. IS. Rom. iv. 44. 

Question by E. M. " How caa the 
righteousness of CInist come opnn us f" 
Answer. "By faith t Christ is the end 
of the law for righteouaiieas to evaiy one 
that believeth.'* Rom. x. 4. 

Question by J. F. " How «aB one who 
is a great sinner have peaoe of niMi if lie 
does not confess t«^ a •priest^' Answer. 
" By believmg in Christ, who says. Cone 
unto roe all ye that labour and are iieavj 
laden,and I will give yon rest." Matt.xL S8. 

Question by B. U. " WitI Christ w- 
cept of all who come to him for salvation'?'' 
Answer. " The invitation is. Whosoever 
will, let him take the water of life freely. 
Him that coroeth to me, I will in no wise 
cast out." Rev. xxii. 17. Luke vii. ST. 

Jane M'M.*s question. " While we con- 
tinne in wilful sin, will Christ's salvation 
profit us?" Answer. " Except we re- 
pent, we must all perish." Luke xiii. S, 6. 

Question by T. M. " Was that to do 
penance?" Answer. "No; there is In 
true repentance a change of heart, a godly 
sorrow for sin, a forsaking of it^ that we 
may serve the Lord in holiness and rigfi- 
tcousness. Aud again ;^-to have Christ 
formed in us, to put off concerning the 
%}rmer conversation, the old man, whi^h 
is corrupt, according to the deoeitfiil 
lusts, and to he renewed in the spirit of 
our mind, and put on the new roan, which, 
after God is created in righteousness aiKl 
troeholinen.'* Zech. xii. 10. Luke i. 7B» 
Eph. iv. tS, t4. 

Question by A. C. " How mar we learn 
to behave so as to please God alwaya.*' 
Answer. " From the holy scriptures, 
which are profitable foTdoctTine,for reproof* 
for correction, for instraction in righte- 
ousness; fur faitb conieth by hearing, and 
hearini; by the word of God." f Tim. IK. 
16. Rora. X.17. 

Question by P. K. " Bow can mem 



I«ISR CHXORIOI.B. 



ISi 



andenlaDd tbe seriptmet who doD't go to 
tolle^ ?^' Answer, " If any lack witdotn, 
let bim ask of Oad» who giveth to all men 
fibenlly» and aphnddeth not, and it shall 
be given him." James i. 5. 

U vMHild fiM a Toimne la alata aO their 
^^estloiia, ^hicb they stody to meet me 
%1tk, on every Sabbath. These means 
hava been fiaftlcnlarly blesked^ to the 
Mfieation of the above persons, who are 
aH um i l ae c d of the error ef thdr ways, 
fcseept K. and F.), and three of thero 
a anrw ttd to the defer fight of the gospel, 
#hoiiotr plead Mirir own wretdiedness, 
and Ills atomng blood fe^ acceptance; and 
aie neMMsr aMd nor ashamed to declare 
lo ttnir nekhbours, that God b well 
pleased in the way of salvation he has 
ypeintad, wfaerahy his justice is sods* 
■edy Ms law ful^lUed, his mercy reigns, 
Iria Ipoe triomph^ the sinner is saved, 
and Ood in Christ glonfied. Xhoseinthis 



vicinity^ wiio wcia- formerfy brought to a 
knowledge of the truth, adorn the doo- 
trineof their davionr tothe present moasent, 

I visited a pHest, at WiHiam Moor's le* 
quest, who told me^ as long as he should 
be eotttinued In the priesthood, he wooid 
neitber please men, nor decetva the peo> 
pie; but wonM puUiciy aMioanoe that 
Christ was the way, the tnitls and the 
life ; and that none eoHMth to the Fathe? 
but by him : and that there was no salva- 
tion iaanv other: fbr there is no other 
name under heaven given among man, 
whereby we must be saved* He reproved 
me for not comkig to see him oftea, said 
that he should soon be removed, and timt 
he would find himself happy in convening 
with aman who loved the scriptures. 

I remain, with very high esteem, Ren 
Sir, ifn best bonds, your mlthfni end veiy 
humble servaiit» 



A ttep^riefthe State, OmiHimy and Numler of the Schools in tha 
CmuOy of Clare, and Town of Nenagh, in the County of Ttppo- 
rmry^eotabUshed by the BapHet Irish Society, made by iMt 
imqfootar Jmmet Faughan, to the first Day of January, 1821. 



• 
UHftelMje voerin* • • 

John Eyre 

John Blolooy 

Jdhn Sexton 

Thomas RuUedge .. 
John banning • • . . • 

John Killeen 

Jamea Byrtie j, 

JeoesO'Dea 

IPatrickByan 

and 
Jdhn Bfett* «••••••, 



FMMie Sbh§oU. 



iitMBran 
IXnan^.. 



Schools. 



Scariff 

Moynoe . . • . 
Tomgraney . . 
O'Oonriolloe 
Aughnuh... 
Kilfurane . . . 
Broadford . . 
Beaudyke... 
Clare 



Nenagh 



Tttml 



ScarMT.... 
Tomgraoey. 



Gr«M Total 



Bemdera of ike Iriak TeKoaiefir. 

Anthony MQf amara. 
Aadiew Bradley, 
thomas Farretl. 



Total 


Present* 




Oct. 1, 


Dec.ig^ 


Eeadan 


1880. 


1880. 




70 


68 


23 


71 


56 


14 


7« 


er 


38 


96 


63 


18 


70 


36 


12 


68 


36 


20 


140 


118 


38 


er 


36 


14 


112 


73 


31 


296 


154 
697 


30 . 


1062 


238 


26 


21 


8 


»5 


20 


3 


1113 


738 


249 




. 





f 



45 
42 

29 

35 

24 I 

16 

80 

22 

42 

124 



459 



13 
17 



' 



489 



XAMESVAUGHAN. 



■«i«*Mi^M 



^m 



ISC 



IRIBH CHRONICLE. 



Januvy 2, 1821. 



1 Hort to meet with the iiidiilgence of 
the Commiitee of the Baptist Irish Sodetj, 
^bile perusing my Report of the Schools 
established bv them in theoomity of Clare* 
tnd town of Nenagh, in the conatj of 
Xipperary, to the end ot tiie quarter^ 
commencing the lit of October last, and 
concluding the jear 18S0 ; and it affords 
ne great satisfaction to report the sensi- 
ble improvement of tbq scholars in these 
schools daring mjr last inspection of them, 
which concluded on the 19th of last De- 
cember; and I am certain that the num« 
ber would be as great then as in the middle 
of last summer* if the little creatures had 
covering sufficient tu guard them from the 
Mverity of the weather. The portions of 
•cripture committed to memory has been 
taken down by Mr. Tliouias, in my ure- 
flcnoe* «bout the middle of last November, 
which I conclude the Committee have 
loBg since received. Indeed* the daily 
and constant reading of the New Testa, 
nent lias, even now* made such an im- 
presston on the minds of the scholars as 
win nut be effaced during their lives. 
And some of the parents (during the pro- 
gress of ni> last iji-speciiou*) told me* that 
they at ni^ht make seme of their children 
vewCe to them an account of the birth* mi- 
racles* pauion* and resurrection of our Sa* 
viour* which dfiights and affects them 
^ry much. The masters are diligrnt and 
attentive to their duties ; and no exertion 
of mTne has been spared or wanting to 
make tliera so. The Female Schools are 
going on as usual. The Irish Readers of I 
tb^ Holy Scriptures* besides reading them 
Id the houses in dilFcrcnt Townlands, (an 
■oconnt of which ihe^ have given me*) 
employ themselves in teaching young men 
to read the Irish ; all of whom have re- 
quested to get Irish Testaments* for the 
purpose of reading the scriptures in their 
tespective habitations to their families and 
ne^boors* which Mr. Tliomas promised 
lo mmisli them with. I am very unwell 
with a cold* attended with a troublesome 
cough* which I caught during my late in- - 
apeclion. Tliat every Individual of the 
Society f and their friends* may enjoy many 
bappy returns of the new vear* is the sin- 
cere wish of their faithful and obedient 
ipcifant* 

James Vacobav. 



From a Gentkman who tuperiniendt m 

SchooL 

GuryhiU, Dtc. 31 . 1820^ 
Dbar Sik, 

■ I have great pleasacc in informing you, 
that notwithstanding the opposition of 
the Roman Catholic priests, the chUdreo 
still attend as well as we can eapecc mt 
this season ; and that I have no doubt but 
by persevering in the steady method wo 
have hitherto pursued, without intcrlecioff 
with the leligioos opinions of the cbUdreoI 
we shall nwintain the coofidenoe we 
have gamed over the minds of both chU. 
dren and parents. I amiyosrstroly^ 

EMtract of a Letter frmm the Bev. Jotlak 

BoUina, Jtm. t2, IHt. 
Some of the priests, who are so vloleotlr 
opposing the Bible, and Bible Scbooli, (m 
they contemptuously, but very properiy 
call our Scliools.) are endeavoudngb to 
complbuice with the advice of the Ape^ 
to establish some of their own* and tn niae 
the means for supporting them from their 
congregations. But as the poor are not 
exempted* some of whom are reqeeated to 
give from two and sixpence tu ten and 
sixpence per year, they very much cooi-' 
plain of it as of " e bniden grievous to 
oc borne.** 

It ought to be mentioned, to the bo^ 
ooiir of several other prieitt, tbat ao hr 
from givhig opposition to the BtMo ' 
Schools* thejr. most heartilv enomin^ 
them: and I add with pleaiuiei that 
within the last two months I have received 
applications from two priesta to ettebUah 
Schools in their respective perisbea. Yo« 
see from these statements that a diffcienoe 
of opinion exuts among! the Roman Catbo- 
iic clergy on the subject of scr^urei edn* 
cation for the poor children. 

Notwithstanding the very violent eppo* 
sjtion that has been given to the Scboob^ 
i(s influence has been but partudly fek| 
and I feel confident ^evcn this will not h% 
of long coulmuance. I do not, bowevcr» 
expect such a work to go on without <^po* 
sition : thia we have no reason to espect| 
but « go fi>rward" is the word of ooQiwnd z 
and «' be thou faithful unto death" li Ui« 
i^junctioiu That we may obey boib |i 
the prayer of 

" Yours affectioiMildy. 



The CommUtee acknowledge the kindness rf the Committee of the British smd Forelgi^ 
Bible Society, in voting ihem, at their late Meetings, lOQ IriA and 100 EagliA BUfUu 
mid 500 Irish and 500 English Testaments. 



]3d 



Mi»fiiomv]f Heralb. 



BAPTIST MISSION. 



Wb feel much pleasure in being 
able to lay before our readers 
soase extracts from a speech de- 
livered at the late AnniTersary of 
the Bath Church Missionary As* 
lociatioii, by that distiaguished 
fnend of Missions. William Wil- 
berforee, Esq. M.P. We insert 
them, not niereW on account of 
the tribole of afiectionate respect 
paid to our venerable friend Dr. 
Carey, but in the hope that good 
will result from the diffusion of 
those excellent and impressive 
sentiments contained in the con- 
cluding part of the extract. We 
earnestly recommend them to the 
serious attention of our readers. 
We hope they will excuse us for 
adding, that if they should be 
aded mpam by all who peruse our 
pages, the pecuniary difficulties 
of the Mission would instantly 



^ I Cttmot look at India without pecn- 

llar ddight : there we tee the god of this 

world hrnving entrenched biniseiras it were 

whUn ■ line of circunt all^ion, having 

narked the territory as Vis peciiriar do> 

main, hainng drawn aroandhim feooet 

mod banien agaitnt the admission of bea* 

▼cBljUght^ and thus sorroonded and in- 

ti«Ddwd» he seemed to bid defiance almost 

to the God of Lore himself— triumphing 

both om the understandings and the 

hcttits of his wretched TictiniSt gaining a 

viotorj even over the instincts oioiir oora* 

noQ oilare — ^for there. Sir, clifldren were 

aecn, not to mtpp* rt their aged parents, 

tot to deihrmf them : there, even the mo- 

thcrs were spen to sacrifice their darling 

infimts by wiBbgly cxponing ihem Co an 

VOL. X/l/» 



uotimelv grave« thrawing (hem to be d^ 
voured bj sliarkn and alligators. There, 
these things were going on; and coing 
on« too, wUboQt esciting even a sentimeut 
of disapprobation, ur an^ feeling of revolt. 
Bnt what a change do we now begin to 
witness even in tl^t regbn which the god 
of this worJd seemed to have approp.-iateil 
to himself! Tliat chosen regbn has become 
as it were the arena of a grand and deci- 
sive conflict : there we no w find the gleams 
of light banning to penetrate in what 
was a wQdemcss, (nay, a million times 
worte than a wilderness ;) symptoms of 
vegetation now begin to appear; and the 
desert begins to blooro and blossom lilie 
the rose, and exhibits every where fresb^ 
ness, fertility, and beauty. 

'< It happens here, also, that in Chf! 
means tued in effecting this great work, 
wc see the marks of the Divine Hatid. It 
would have been natural lor us to f xpect 
that it would have been achieved in a 
very different way, by the united efforts 
of many religious Sudeties; but. In fict, 
we find these great effects to have l>een 
principally owing, hitherto, to the exer> 
tions of one, and that, in its origin at least, 
not the most rich or powerful ; and one of 
its Imgbtest and most useful ornaments a 
poor ignorant mechanic (I allude to Dr. 
Caery.) We see him, rising from that 
poverty and that ignorance to a degree 
ofkno%v1«Klgr, and then to a degree of 
u<iefuhiess, which was scarcely ever be- 
fore attained amoncst the sons of men. 
When I see this, I seem to see a se- 
cond lime the god of this world totted hf 
the weapons of the Spirit ; I seem to see 
an exemplification of that text, that * the 
weakness of God is stronger than neo, 
and the foolishness of Gon b wiser than 
men.' I see this giant GoUnth vaoquiibed 
by a peasant child with a sling and a stona, 
seeing, as I do. Dr. Carey, from bis know- 
ledge and skill in the Asiatic languages, 
affording the grestest and moat valnalrie 
askance to the cause of Christianity, and 
rendered an instrument of diffusing per* 
haps nltirontelv more happiness than any 
of the sons of men who hate been most 
distinguished as the benefactofi of out 
species. 



154 



M18S10NAET H£EALn. 



'*Th«re U one comidenUioxi on tbis 
sabject which I wonld beg to propose. I 
think mankind, in their waj of viewing it 
are apt to contidtr the support of Misuons 
as if ibejr had axr option ia the case. .Mow 
I ronst frankly state, that, noita tio t9 the 
very tttnMit oj our power, both in mbstance 
and influence, and tn every possible way to 
osttit this eamse, is to be wantitig tn our 
DUTT. And it appears to me* that if we 
could see before our eyes* the cruel prac- 
tices which still prevail in India (if I say 
less about i^ira. it will not be thought 
(hat i think less,) I am persuaded that it 
would orercume the reluctance of any 
person who is unwilling to allow that it is 
our duty to do the best we can for the 
conversion of the Heathen. 1 am per- 
aiuded that this reluctance can only arise 
from these things being removed from our 
percept iun. It is because we do not wit- 
ness these things that we are slow in be- 
lieving ihero. I said itwastbeduiyofecieiy 
One to do his very utmost in this cause; 
and I laid this the rather, because we may 
urge that principle which is sanctioned by 
Divine Wisdom and Goodness, that it is 
not the amount of « hat is gi%'eii, but the 
motive in every thing that Is regarded by 
Almighty Oud. That thirty shillings. Sir 
William, nhich was given by that poor 
blind girl, of whom my friend told us, 
la a donation which I deubt not will oc- 
cupy a principal place in the treasury of 
God. By Him, things are valued ac- 
cording to their true worth. By Him, 
I doubt not, that poor girPk contribution 
will be equally rewarded (might I not say 
more) than the princely donations of the 
richest benefactor. Ob Sir! when we 
look still farther — when we look forward 
to those scenes when all the distinctions 
which prevail here shall be done away ; 
wlien things shall assume their true colour 
and proper size ; then only shall we esti- 
mate them according to tneir real worth. 
Why Sir, to roe it is a delight, that the poor 
are not excluded from contributing to these 
creat and good objects ; that the Almighty 
Jiai ^vcn them the means of benefiting 
their fellow creatures : and 1 confess I 
know nothing that has ever struck my 
Blind as more bate and narrow, than, un- 
der the pretence of sparing them their lit- 
tle subscriptions, to deprive them of this 
piivilege, and thus, under the plea of kind- 
ness, to degrade them below that leveJ 
which the common Parent of us all meant 
that they should occupy — to defraud 
them of the power of doing good. to 
their tellow-crwitores : on the contrary. 
Sir, when tliey ^vc according to their 
means, thry assume the true dignity of 
their oatom. Let all our exertions then 
be wortlty of the cause in which we are 



engaged. And in truth. Sir, both yaa 
and I feel, it is with the more peculiar 
pleasore that we attend on occasions of 
thisViod, because we can engage in them 
with auch onmixed confidence and de- 
Kghl.. It too often happens that even the 
path of duty is painful and dubious, and 
call) forth conflicting feelings ; but, bless- 
ed be God, the path in which we fim* 
tread, is one in which we can go forward 
with freedom ; find in it present peace and 
joy, wkh the assurance that it will con- 
duct to happiness and glory. Thi|f we 
alwa^'S find that Clirtttiaiiiiy scatters 
blessings on every side of her, in her pro- 
gress Iroro this world to another. In pro- 
moting such a cause, shaM we be slothful 
or lukewarm in our efforts? Oh Sir 1 in 
lltat world to which I have just alluded, 
how languid will our warmest seal appear, 
how unworthy our most strenuous exer- 
tions ! Let us then go forward with in- 
creased earnestness, humbly assured that 
that same gracious Being who has hitherto 
so remarkably blessed us, will give still 
greater and better hleaaingis, till at length 
all the poor wretched lieathen aball be 
cheered with tlie knowledge of salvation, 
and we oii, as the children of one commoo 
Parent, shall rejoice together.** 



LIBERiVLITY OF A POOR BUND 
GIRL. 



(From the Misnonary Begitter.) 

A BLIND girl broucht to a derg^fnan 
thirty shillings, for the Missionarifa of the 
Society. The clergyman, snrprised that 
she should offer him so larce a sun, faid 
to her, " You are a poor blind girl, you 
cannot afibrd to give thirty sliilliAigs to the 
Society." *« I am indeed. Sir," said she, 
" as you may see, a blind gM i hot not 
so poor, perhaps, as you may suppoae me 
to be ; and I think I can prove lo vou, 
that I can better alTord to give these 
thirty bbilliogs, than those girls can who 
have eyes.** The clergyman wa^ of 
course, very much struck with tier answer, 
and said, " I shall he g|ad to know how 
you make that out" '* Sir," she answer- 
ed, « I am a basket-maker; and being 
blind, I can make baskets as well in the 
dark as in the light. Now I am sure. Sir, 
in the last dark winter, it roost have coat 
those girls that have eyes more than 
thirty shillings to buy candles to see to 
make baskets; and so I think I hav^ 
proved that I can afford this money, and 
now I hope that you will lake it all for the 
Missionaries." 

Whose heart is not moved by «uch an 
instance of exalted ChrisiJa^ chanty ! 



M1SSI0NABT HBRALD. 



155 



BBDFORDSUIRE. 



Wb are gratified io havina to 
aonouocey that od Wednesaavy 
March 21, a Meeting will be held 
at the Old Meeting House, Bed- 
ford» to form an Auxiliary Baptist 
Missionary Society for the County. 
The Rev. R. Hall, M. A. of Lei- 
cester, and the Rev. S. Hillyard 
of Bedfordyhaveengaged to preach 
on the occasion. 



fyvtifsa 3fntelU0ence. 



SERAMPORE. 



Ecfroct tf a Letter from Vr* Carey to 
Dr, Rylaudf dated 

Calcutta, AprU S5, 1820. 
I THiMX the cause of our Redeemer b 
evideuily on the Increase ; \re are seldom 
a month in Calcutta without additiuns* 
and the neit montli I expect to baptiie 
three pefsons, one of whom was a devotee 
at Kalee*gli8ut» where he acloally kept a 
vuw of silence for lour years* A painpfaJet, 
I think sent out by Mr. Towuley, aflected 
his heart and opened his mouth. When 
he first came to me h« made the most 
singnbr appearance imuguiable, 'being co- 
wered with chwiBS and amulets; he wore 
a ueckkoe made of snakes' hones ; and so 
fu were tlie Hindoos of Calcutta from 
thinking of Us converswnv that when he 
lint walked nioog the street with John 
letter* several of the chief natit es came 
out of their hooses and prostrated them- 
selves at his. feet. One of the others is a 
TeJInjpi BrahnaOf aiyl the other a Dane^ 
the first of that nation we hate yet bap- 
tised. In. a week or ten days more I ez- 
jpect to baptise three soldiers in the ^oti. 
At BeerbhooQ a good number has iieen 
haptiasiH the last year; at Moorshedabad, 
or its ^dgbboorbooda b^tlicr Sutton lias 
baptbed several* and has much eiicou- 
ragement. A greater number has been 
hsptifed At Pinagepore and its vidnitv 
than fai ,any other ploce. Brother Smiib 
has baptUed several at Benares; and a 
letter mm hSm received to dav inlbrms 
me that thie^ others are soon to be added 
to the chaich then. At Dacca there 
have been addltioDS ; and at Chittagong 
the Mog Christians have now kept toge^ 
tber» hav» maintained the worship of God, 
nad edified one another for three years. 
withoyt • pastor tu renda among them. 
. JBnNhcrPcaco^ lately went to theai^ and 



his account of them is highly encouraging; 
so much was he encaura^ed* that he 
seems now determined to visit them fre- 
quendy» and do his utmost to help for- 
ward their spiritual concerns. Brother 
Chamberlain has been very ill* but is 
considerably better. The printing of bis 
lransbtif)n» wliich has been, with several 
others* delayed through waut of paper* is 
now going forward. Our steam engine 
is now in operation* and fully answers its 
purpose* su that we have plenty of paper. 
In short* accounts from every pari of 
India are encouraging. The printing of 
the Mahratta Bible u almost finished ; the 
last proof sheet I read finiiibcd Micah 
wiibin a verse or two* and all is printed 
except the remauider of the minor pro- 
phets. The historical books in Punjabce 
are almost fiubbed ; the last proof sheet 
readied to the seventh chapter of Nelic- 
miah. In Telinga, Pushtoo* and Kunkoha« 
we are nearly through Leviticus. The 
New Testament will* within a few months, 
be finished at press in Goojurattee* Bika« 
neer* Kashmeer* and Komata; and se- 
veral others are advanced as for as Lukt 
or John. 

Through mercy I enjoy tolerably good 
health; wliich is the cise with us all ex- 
cept ray wife* whose weakness is great. 
£ustace's wife is just recovering from a 
dangerous illness; lust Friday her lilW 
was despaired of* but she is now recover- 
ing. The American Missionaries have 
b^n ordered to quit the Borman do- 
minions; and Mr. and Mrs. Coleman have 
arrived in Calcutta. Three persons had 
received the word at Rangoon* and were 
baptised ; this stirred up opposition, and 
tbey resolved upon going to Ava* to re- 
quest leave of the king to propagate llic 
gospel in bis dominions. It could scarcely 
be expected that a heathen king shouui 
give that liberty* and hci of course re- 
fused it* and ordered, them out of the 
country* saying* that though -toe Barman 
laws allow ull tu worship as they chooM* 
yrt they allow pfj^p proselyting. On their 
retuni to Rangoon* some who had occa* 
siunally atieiufed before. '.came forward 
and proposed themselves for baptism. 
This induced Brother Jndson to*RSu|ve 
upon staying as long as be could. 

Brother Uobinson has baptised a Chi- 
nese. I received a letter from .Brother 
Brockner a few days ago ; he dseU dis- 
couraged at want of snccess. Brother 
Chater labours much. A son of Christian 
Davld^ who is now with nie* says* that 
Brother Chater pieaches oUen in Cinga- 
lese* and is well attended ; and Brotticr 
Siers the same in Portugnese. I enclose a 
letter from my son Jabes* which I re- 
ceived to-day. He is lar from t.u<j o^<bV^ 
help him, but \h« lotd YvQtaV«^ \\\id^>g\* 



196 MISSIOMAB* HBBAID; 

(halD ; uui I triut bii Ktltciumt it Ajt- 
mere wilt be m atlhnate bleu' 
ptru. Accept my thiulti ii 



mere wilt be m atlhnate blcuing lo theie 
t my thiulti fur Harrloo'i 
jny gira mif bat thank* to 
drv Mr^ ScDlt, for bu tnntlMioa of tbt 
Hiilmy, be of ibe Sjnod et Dort. I 
mold wrile (a him if I could "" 



hli pmchhiKi *hcj 
inji of the Loid. 

Crtnet ^•Lattr 
toDr.R 

Oh the 19lh, brooiei O 
|fare« Midien In Cikutts, and la 



btract ^a tottrfiom Dr. Manlmim 
ta Dr. BytmdtJmttd 



Gnt impiCMkiDi Iroai nadiiig 
hnMber Cnej^ ' — '-' 



Calcuiu 

__._ ._ the N« 

In tbe Tellngt Ungnage ; the 
uw« -•• 4D aacetie, vbo liTCd Tcati m the 
S«DdntMnd>( iipaQg the irild beaiti, 
wearing a auls, (a oacktaca) made of the 
vart^itB of aerpeBta- Wa hRn four pen 
aoDi befiire [he dinich at SerampoTe^ 
Ihrae of ihem to be baptind on Lord'!- 
i^, BleMerf be God, all the churcbvi 
vnwl trcm to be floariihin|. 

EcCrxf ^a LttltrfTvm Dr. Cang tt JUr. 
Bttrii, dotrd 
Scm^vre, Julg 7, IBM. 
LaiT Tueaday ercnhig, an AaiUIar; 
MMoDary Sodetjr *ai focmed In thf 
Cbirdb neating at th« Lai Bam CbapcJ. 
Ilie ]Foa<^ n*ii ofcicd lhcnuFl<m a^ 
llhtloiwritate tbe popnlalion aranud thdi 
dwdBDn. Tbeae act natoiUiulT. I do 
hepolbe timdi wWisaUe oaUido 
m •dtMDce fiDta Calctnta. 

n* iramben bapilaed bit nar In all 
Ae ebwcbea in India b higClj cncoa- 
i and a goodtj number ara ma 
'"" way to Zion, with thdi 



frtendlym>_._ „ 
litre returned then wilb the greateat 
pleanre ag^n, (ai tin Doldi goramteut 
kindlj gnt tae thmr pe m iw i o n ao lo do,) 
liid Dot AjtmeK becD tbon^t of aa a 
place of toora conKqaeoce, and when 
loore good nl^ be imm lo Ihae Ibtn at 
Ambojoa. Hj atlacbawat^ to AMboto^ 
Idwtnr, I hep* *riU Mm mm. Tbe 
icipect and eatecm of (he inhoHtoiM 
Ibere, I flatlet mnelT, Ihadinaomemcv 
MOtcd, and It gaT« me the gttaieat 



AJIMERE. 

laurfrtm Ur./alnCanv fvfir. 

^imere,AftU7,ia30. 
Ur Bta* Sia. 

I hare the plcaure to acknowledp; ikc 
leeetpl of joor letj kind wl ercoun^lr fi 
letler, dated tbe liloljiilj, 1«1A, whicli 
I reedred a ihoit time ap); aiid can haM- 
I; fiKfire mjirlr thai I did i»( aoMrct it 
faaminlatal* on hi rtceipt. Yuu biTc iid 
doohthraideiclliiilbat I have changtd 
Aahoyna for Ajtnne ; but Ott exclnupr, 
I am torrr ta •aj, li nui ranch in ir.j f,i. 
nmr. mile mt Auihojsm, the Uutih 
gatmnuaeat iebtitd m idc in (be muit 



I parted from than ; bat wba Ihaofht 
then that tbe aoparetbn would haie Mea 
rniolong a aeiM aa it aow afpeanla 
nic it wiD be? Ajimcn it a fine phca, 
and will Kno, I have oodoab^ba b a 
\-aj flaurUhini ilate. Tbeie la a Imik 
Hboat 7 ndleafroaheBca, to which Hiadooa 
come from all parti of Iho woild to waih 
awBj ibcir rin. and tbe pandtla here 
nffirm that U'l water baa iBor* eScaqr 
lac that parpoie than that of tbe GiDgM, 
nod that tt had III eiinaice bcfbra the 
(i anget. The Mnwnlmrn have alio in lUa 
city a nunmment rataed to one of tbett 
^intt, to which the; onme fmm all parta 
ef the world. The; belletc thli idpt ha* 
(Kiwcc to do erery tbbif , and tlwivfcre 
laakc their appiUanoo to hid the mme at 
if he were a Ood. Both Hindoo* and M<)»> 
<u1iDen join in pajtng ibe hijjhert ic*mgi> 
ind neu wonhlp to tbii aaint, and I bolere 
thi* U ibe Gnt object that 1 have eret 
licaiU of or known, when both job. 
Both Hindoo! and MulnitlHn awear by 
iJi Dime, wUdi la Kbwaja Sabehh Tlity 
tiKte dio a number of . aibeManlia hne, 
which belong to other inlerlor ntnti. I 
haTC, ahei moch dUBeotlr, been aUe l» 
sbtaia a hone, wbicbi with tome TefKln, 
will icno be fit lo Ihc In. When ai^ 
good willbe donehete, I cannot tajj maj 
Ond grant that it nay not be ifj long. 
I have ncreedMl at iaat ta tsradag on* 
■cbool, but not hate, Itfa atFoter, tb* 
place wbrte the lank In, where abool 
iMrt; cblldicn attend fat Ibe temple of lo 
Uol. I am going lo make aooHier trfal 
bere. In lee vhat can bedoaa. KIj ftral, 
I an lony lo HJ, failed. I hope tuccek 
will Ditend my endeBTOuft Ihit line. 1 
ftel a good deal of difficulty to get Mi, ai 
I ha*a no anilance flom any one la 
power bere, whlcb yoo well know I had ta 
Amboyna. Mr. &Iaiiin will, I hope, tU 
wayi lie ttiuembetrd h; nw with RTHt- 
tuJe. My drar and errr nlued fklbFT, I 
irallf thiiik UhiLi oUrr than hr li,and 1 da 
Eonw ban' moch longer he i "" 



Id hntJ out. 1 nred yuur prajrra, mi 
dMtilir.ai I atnjoDiiaand im.-iprrifnccd, 
ami whi knnwi uilh wbnl Irtnptailol* 



MllftlONARY HBEALD. 



137 



SUMATRA. 



Wb h«ve At length received 
intelligence of the arriTal of our 
bkDd9,MeBsrs.Burton and Evans, 
at thU new station. They landed 
at Fort Marlborough on the 91h 
of June last; but we regret to 
add» that soon after, Mr. Burton 
was taken so ill that his life was 
dbspairedof; and what rendered 
the affliction more distressing 
was, that this occurred at the 
time of Mrs. Burton's confine- 
ment He had, however, so far 
lecovered, when the last accounts 
came swat, as to be on the eve 
of proceeclingto the northern part 
of the islaud, with a view of fixing 
Umsclf there. These particulars 
are chiefly derived from a letter, 
addressed by Mrs. Burton to a 
ISunale friend ; previous commu- 
■icatioDs from our Missionaries 
themselves not having come to 
hand. We hope they may arrive 
iatime for publication in our next 
Number. 

DELHI. 



Aeeouni tf a Jbuntey by Mr. ThimpicH 
fnm Dethi to Loodinna, 

KVftNAL. 

Another dajli irovcHing ttkroagh ilit 
Dhsk jim^eij with onlir the mheniUe 
Choagh brick village' of Ghurounda ou tbi: 
raaH. Kamal it a cantoovent; il it ib« 
ahude, I think, ufSikht of dittincUon. 

Here I had an oppominily of preaching 
mice to about fiAj EaroiieaM of the ar- 
itllefyt the dmrnnars, bimI lerieanla uf 
the native battalion and their faofilief. 
Three sentleRien reqneited the acripinrf 9 
in PcrJan and Bengalee, for ihcir ler- 
fftntk and other natirea aboul them. A 
few Hindoos loticited the tanie for tlieoi- 
idrct. 

Tebsawabi 9r Tlrrowly. 
A short stage, but rendered disagree* 
•hic b« the road lying through jungles. 
The village it. within the wins of a town ; 
the popuUiion small, and the place dull. 
Very few Sikhs were to be seen, although 
c^ir pessessbni are said to comaierTce 



here. A pandit, a banker, and a Sikh, 
came to me at night for the scripCnret ia 
Hindoo and Punjabce. 

TRANisnwra. 

A large town, solaject to a Sikhstrdn 
named Gulab-siogha. Connected with 
this town is Kooroo-kshetra, a fisrooos 
|)lace, to which pilgrims report at the 
eclipse of the sun. Four hnndred familiea 
of biahnioiu tub^^ist upon llic guuf ; tliese 
men are wcll-Tencd in Songfckrtta, but 
live solely upon tlieir unlawful gains. The 
Sikhs are very opalent and numeroua 
heivv as might have been expected ; and 
well acquahited with the few books tliej 
have, in the deportment of this people* 
there is a degree of forwardness, perliaps 
net unbecominf( their independent cha- 
racter: vet quite free from the iusolcnoe 
and pri<ie that mark tlie Mussahnan. 

On my reaching the town, an upper- 
roomed house was allotted to me, but aa 
it wanted a cookroom, the thanadar con- 
ducted uie to the fort, (an old Mussnlmam 
building,) and gave me mj choice of ita 
a|iari meats ; placing my baggage in onc^ 
I went up to the Hookurlta, now a SUih 
teroplo, where I saw Baba Nanuk'a 
GniHih, an immense folio, which was 
read or dhaunted by a yoiin||Sikbf bat 
little attended lo by the multitude, whe 
thronged about me^ and were intent apoft 
questkniag and conversing with me. I 
Uierefore read out of the *< Goapd Bie^ 
senier*' or (as it is In the Ponjabet) 
« ftlesscnger of the EsceUaH BmUc.** and 
as I pTOMeded, it led lo a great daal of 
conversation illostmtiva oC tlie tract. 

While thus engaged, a lame boy (torn* 
ed Mnssoiman) came in sight, mid an old 
Sikh remarked of him, that '* he had pio» 
bahly broken tlie legs of another during a 
former birth." The simUariiy of this re- 
mark to that Bsade by the Apostle, ** Afaa. 
ter. who did sin» tins motf or hispaient^ 
that be w«a bom blind V* made me tur« 
CO the 9th chapter of Johtt*s Gospel ia 
the Panjabcc TestaaMut, and read the 
accoont of the Mind man's being restored 
to sight. The 3d chapter of AcU I ol9» 
read, containing tlic account of the lame 
man restored by a miracle, «|ith Felei^ 
serrmm on tli^ occasion ; giving all ghay 
to Qod, and shewing wheiefare Christ 
csroe Into the worbj. 

The Siklis wer«) pleased to l|ear me read 
in iheir own hinguage and their favourite 
diameter, the Gooreo^ookhee.* I had 

* " Goomo-Mookhoe,** a naidification 
of the Deva-Naguree alphabet, liighiy 
esteemed among uie SAkhfc frun its being 
that in which tlie writings of Nanuk, tlieir 
founder, are written. In this character 
the, Bie\hi«u tX &«c«A^i9M.\Miit^ .^aa^ «. 



198 



MISSIONARY HERALD. 



a great caH here for tha Puojabee Scrip- 
nireSy and enjojed great satisfiiction in 
reading and distribaling the word of God 
in a new language and amongst a strange 
people. 

I may be too credulous, but I ccrtainlj^ 
think the Sikhs beard and received the 
word, and talked of the thinf^s of God 
with uncommon interest. All this feeling 
niaj die awaj with the occasion j but my 

Ibnnt of types* with which they tiave 
printed the New Testament, the Penta- 
tench, and nearly the whole of the liisto* 
ileal Books» with many tracts in the Sikh 
•r Fimjabee kngoage. 



hope is, that as they have the writtea 
word with them, it will not lie dormant^ 
but prove sufficient to awaken and save 
some* before it be Cfmiigncd to the dost. 
Thb is my hope, and I piay that I maj 
both live and labour to realiaeir. The 
Sikh Muhnnt, an old man, very rcadilT 
accepted the Punjahee Testaonent, and 
promued to teach it to the young Sikha 
who attend his school within the lenplc. 
The brabmoD and pundits of Kooroo-> 
kshetra came in peat numbers even for a 
single traeu I left a votome of tlw Sungt- 
krita Scriptuee liero with two pdncipal^ 
pundits* 

(To U cmtmued.) 



4ce9mr if Bfonifs received by the Tretmtrtr of the Bqrtiii Miuknary Soeiettft from 
November 1, IbtO, to February 1, 1821, not iacladwi^ Individuai Subteriptiom* * 

FOR THE MISSION. £ u 4. 

Cornwall, collected by Rev. F. A. Cos • • • • • • • • 100 6 S 

Hamilton, N. B. bj Rev. James Mather 4 O Q 

Dunstable, Collection and Subscriptions, by Rev. W. Anderson it 5 Q 

Boston, Lmoolnshire, Gollectbn and Subscriptions t 7 7 O 

CNney, Ditto, by Mr. W. Wilson ■* SO O O 

Reading, Collection and Subscriptions, by Rev. J. H. Hinton ••• 99 5 7 

Bristol and Bath Autiliary Society, on account, by Mr. John Daokl • • 2^ O 

Cbu^w Auxiliary Society, b^ Mr. Deakin, Treasurer 98 15 6 

Youths' AuzUiarjr Missionary Society 35 O 

Wallingford AusiUary Society, by Mr. Field, Treasurer S8 10 6 

Hants and Wilts Auxiliary Society, (iududiug ^18 15 7) at Westbury . 

Leich) • 350 8 

Loughton Auxiliary Society, lyy Rev, Mr. Brawn* • • « • 6 IS 11 

Hull, ^dbscriptionsk by Mr. CarHle 04 e 

Kippel»Street Auxiliary Society, Subacriptions up to Michaelmas last, 

f by Mr. Matshall 42 

Kent Auxiliary Miasiooarj Society, vis. — 

• Setffi Oaksy •Second Cdlaclioo this Year SO S 6) 

Subscriptions 13 1 6>7116 

Ladifib* Assodaiion 381% 0) 

WeRlngboroiigh, SbbscriptioM^ br Rev. Mrb Davlea 5 

Tbonibury, CoUection, by Rev. Edward Sttfsne**/* S S i 

OakhABi, Ditto, by Rev. W. MiUar ? - ^.. O 18 O 

Eastern District of the Sooth-East B«piM|AMoclation hi Wales 66 18 .0 

iVowbrldg^ Cutteetioa and Sabscriptioiit, by Rev» Si Saundecsb (|b- 
< ' ^ doding 3 QuInciA extra Subscriplious U\ consequence of tbe {ire- 

*' s^rft demands upon the Societr) •••••..,••. i6 19 S 

ffettdley^ baptist Congregation, by Rev. Mr. Brook •-••••• 3 

Birmingham', CoUeofioo at Cannon-Street Meeihig, by Rev. R. Hall •• 54 15 10| 

Nofthnmptmi, Subaoriptions, by Rev. Thomas BhmdeU •••••• • 9 13 O 

Camiisie, N. B. Bible, Missionary, and School Sodety, by Rev. J. 

I/ickban.*..' - .^.o.« 10 10 o 

Tbrapstone, Cottedlon and Subscriptions, by Mr.. StevcosoD ••• 88 10 

Kt. Riter^t, Rev. T. Cramp and CoiKrcgation 10 

Eirter, Female Auxiliary Sodety and Friends • • • • 8 4 

Half-yelirly Auociation of BapUst and Incifipendent Ministers for the 

V I«Ie of Ely and lu Vicinity • 4 2 8 

TofwceMer, IVfnny Society^ by Rev. Mr. Barker 7 

MItcham, Surrey, Subscriptions from Mrs. Pratt, by Rev. J. Elvcy • • • • 4 3 6 

> * Tb» first/ of «f 85 ««. Sd. was acknowledged in tbe^ HeraW for July last. 



msSlOHARY RBRALD. 13$ 

^ '^ «. A 

Shtrnbiook, Auxiliarr Sockty, by Rev. Joseph Hindes •••••••••••• e S S 

Cniyibid» Auxiliary Feimle Sodeiy , by Mn. Smith, Trcararer* • • 5 5 O 

Hertford. Auxiliary Society, by Rev. W. James 9 O 

Kingibridge, sundry Subscription^ by R«^* John Nicholson 9 5 6 

BidgnxMint, Subscnptioosi Iw Rev. W. Cuttriss • 18 o 

JEVIiiees Bisboioogh« Half of Annual Subscriptions and Donations from 

the Sodtty in Aid of Foreign Hissiuns 7 16 6 

Half of ColleGtion in the Paiiib Church of Bledlow, in 

Aid of the above Society. Rev. W. Stephen, Rector S > 6 

— — — 10 4 

Yoilttbire and Tiancashire Society, by W. Hope. Esq. 25 o O 

Dairy, N. B. Legacy of the late Mr. John A old. by Rev. G. Barclay* • 5 

•Unpnifitable Servant. (Luke xvii. 10.) by Mr. BurU 100 O 

Maiditooe. Henry Shepherd, Esq. Life Subscription • 10 10 O 

Mrs. Hall, Cheltenham Donation 10 O 

Two Swiss Ladies in the Canton of Bern, by Rev. Dr. Steinkopff • • • • • 5 o 



The Committee are indebted to the following Ministers and 
CUmgregations for extra Colteciions, kindly made in consequence of 
the Appeal on behalf of the Mission in the Herald for December 
last. We expect to announce several others next month. 

Battersea Rev. Joseph Hughes, ^and a Cold Ring)» fi 9 4 

Chelsea Owen Qarke 7 10 7 

Fctter-L«ne J. Elvey 15 O 

Borton-Street J. Bebber and J. Edwards 15 17 7 

Walworth. East-Street Richard Dav'is 8 10 6 

GraftonSCreet W. WHlhnns •• 9 5 6 

Hammersniith T. Uppndiue f4 7 7 

Ciapham, Rev. J. Philipps. indoding two Life Spbacrlptlpns, via.-^ 

Mrs. Mary Horsnuin. Ciapham G>nunon 10 10 07 g.^. ^ 

John Blackett. Esq. West Smitbfield 10 10 0$**^ • 

Plymouth Dock. Church at Morice^Sqnare, remitted by Mr Pinsent • • 10 
Baubnry. Friends at, by Rev. W. Gray • 13 f q 



FOR THE TRANSLATIONS. 

Glasgow Auxiliary Society, by Mr. James Deakin. Treasurer • ^ 5f IS ^ 

Edinburgh. Baptist Church, hv Messrs. Braidwood and Peddle, Pastors S5 

HanU and Wilts Auxiliary Society, by Rev. John Saffery 5t S 

MTigpn. Female Society, by Mrs. Brown •••* ••• 8 

Newcastle. Penny a Week* Society, by Miss Angas •••• 14 O 

Saltcoats. Female Bible and Gaelic School Society, by Rev. G. Barclay 9 

Irvine. Bible Society by Ditto 5 o 

Female Bible Society by Ditto 5 

Friend* by Dr. Stuart. Edmburgh Donation* • • • 10 o 

FOR NATIVE SCHOOLS. 

Glasgow Auxiliary Society, by Mr. James Deakin ••#• • S5 H q 

Hants and Wilts Society, by Rev. John Saffery 42 1 

Liverpool Ladies' Society, lor a School for Native Girls at Cutwa, under 

the care of Mrs. W. Carry • • 15 

For Ditto at Digah, under th^ care of Mrs. Rowe 15 o 

For anotlier, to be formefl under the direction of Messrs, 

Carey. Marshman, and Ward ••••••••••«• *•• 13 



940 



IIISIIONARY BB«Al4«b 



Ta OcmBESPOKOENTS. 



Thb tliaiikt of ihe Committee are presented to Mr» John BaU» of New. Camptoi* 
'beeti for a rarcel, contaii^ Mi^auncs« he* for the Bliadonaries. 

It*b tnteodfid, )o futore, to acluowkdge the receipt of monSet on aoeoimt ^ tlw 
Hinion OTenr motitlL Whatever m^ itack the Treanirer or Secr e t a i y la Lmd^m, 
\j the 14th Sfeieb Mouthy will le wntkod hi the neat HcnkL The puNkadoD of 
indhUual 5k^wq^iffM moi^ of €Ouiie». as in aO similar Socieliesy be oonfinod to the 
Airaealllepon. ' A devtatiab from this plan wooldf to saj nothing of odier inoon* 
▼enieocesb innlfe ilw Sodetr in such aodi t ki n al expense as could J>y no means l|a 
jastified. 

The naoMTous Sabserihers to tlie Seiampore CoUe^ are fespectfhilt tnibrmedy tlidt 
a complete List of the Donations reoeiTed for this ehiact will be pubQshed« as foon as 
tessible after Ms* WaidV aniTal from Ameilca» which is eB|wcted in the month <^ 
Jlprll. 

We are requested, by Mr. Blondell of Northampton, to state, that the snm of ^{5 
entered as « Donation from him in the lUpqrt for IBiO, pa^ 67, shoa)4 ^^t J^een 
printed •• A Friend, bj Rer. T. Bhrndetl.** 

Anj ^iendof tba Misrion, who omj be able to spare a Oopj of No. VUL of the 

Periodical Acooanti^ pei^t* will highly oblige (he Secretary by seodkm it m Urn 
Rooms, 9, Wardrobe-pUce, Doctors* Commons. Tim fiill price' f« 



clwcrlullj be paid for il» if ic^red* 



J. BARPISLDi Prioter, 91, Wardbnr^Street, Soh^ 



f 



TH£ 



^tipU^t 0imn^int, 



APRIL, 1821. 



MEMOIRS OF THE REV. DR. JOHN GALE. 



Dr. John Gale was bora in 
London, May 26, 1680. His 
father spared neither pains nor 
cipense in his education, but, 
aAer he had made great proj^ress 
in learning in his own country, 
sent him over to Leyden to 6nisb 
what he bad so happily begun. 
He was so industrious, and so 
soccessful, that in the small space 
of two years he conquered all I he 
difficulties of his favourite study, 
and received, with universal ap- 
plause, when little more than 
nineteen years old, the academi- 
cal degrees of Master of Arts, 
and Doctor in Philosophy. Upon 
this occasion his Professor wrote 
to his father as follows. 

" It has happened to no one 
that I know of, to gain such a 
knowledge of things which are to 
be traced out by natural reason, 
within the space of fifteen months 
3nd no more, which is all the 
time your son has applied him- 
•elf to the study of Philosophy, 
and that before the expiratiou of 
the nineteenth year of his age, as 
to be judged worthy to be adorn- 
ed with the highest honours in a 
solemn ceremony, God grant 
be may go on in the same pace 
Jie has begun, and continue the 



same assiduity and diligence to 
the end, that so he may become 
a most fit instrument to advance 
the glory of the name of the Lord, 
the furthering of his own salva* 
tion, .and the public good of his 
neighbours." 
(Signed) WolferduBSenguerdius. 

Upon this occasion, when he 
published his Thesis, De ente 
ejusQue conceptu, dedicated to 
his father and his two uncles. 
Sir John and Sir Joseph Wolf, — 
the ceUbrated Adrian Reland 
subjoined a testimony of bis 
worth, in a Latin panegyric which 
ends thus, alluding to the Car* 
tesians whom be had always op* 
posed. 

Vince taos liostes, & monis ahe n«us esto* 
Ut reff rat laudes Anglica terra tuas. 

Summd ens perfeclum coeptit magis aa* 
noat isUs, 
Uc BBcli nostri ludda Stella fores. 

At the same time, July 3, 
1699, a most eloquent Latin ora- 
tion was pronounced by the 
learned Voider, Professor of Phi- 
losophy and Mathematics, and 
published after his death by the 
celebrated Professor Boerbaave, 
wherein he says ; — " If that be 
new which has not been done for 
many years, which no on$ of th^ 

? 



14£ 



MEMOIRS OF THE REV. DR. JOHN GALE. 



Professors bath seen in his time, 
then it is new to declare a Doc- 
tor of Philosophy from this place, 
tlioiiuh, if you consider the ce- 
remonies with which this solem- 
nity is performed, it appears an- 
cient. But I wish the nohle and 
very laudable design of this can- 
didate in prosecuting his studies 
were a thing customary, who, 
after he had applied his mind to 
them, thought it his business, not 
according to the new, but very 
bad method, to rest sntished with 
a slight and superficial knowledge 
of the liberal arts, but to look 
into their inmost recesses, and 
to acquaint himself with what lay 
^ost concealed in those of them 
which he conversed with. Where- 
fore, in the first place, with great 
labour he gained the knowledge 
of the tongues, that he might 
afterwards with more ease and 
advantage apply himself to the 
sciences themselves. For this 
purpose, he not only carefully 
studied the Latin tongue, but 
what in this age is very rare and 
unu5ual, the Greek and Hebrew. 
1 say nothing of the Latin, in 
vhich he has often spoke pub- 
licly at London, that famous 
city; for you have heard with 
what elegance, propriety, and 
force of persuasion* he commen- 
ded the study of wisdom. But 
1 can by no means omit to ob- 
serve, that he so applied himself 
to the Greek language, as not 
only to understand it, but to be 
able to declaim in it publicly. To 
these he added likewise the He- 
brew, thinking the knowledge of 
the Greek insufiicieat without 
this, and that he must depend 
upon the credit of others for the 
interpretation of the sacred wri- 
tings. Furnished with these 
helps, he entered upon the study 
of Philo!>ophy» being induced to 
it partly by the pleasure which 



arises from inquiries into things 
obscure, and partly by the advan- 
tage which those studies afford 
both in life and the other sci- 
ences, and partly likewise, as 
thinking it the best method to 
cultivate his xmind, and dispose 
it more readily and clearly to dis- 
tinguish truth from falsehood in 
every subject. And before he 
had pursued these studies full 
two years, see, I beseech you, 
what penetration of mind, joined 
with incredible diligence, is ca- 
pable of performing. He was 
willing to give some public proof 
of his proficiency in them. Nor 
has he failed in the attempt ; for 
both in bis private and public 
examinations, he discovered so a- 
cute a genius, and such knowledge 
of things natural, divine, and 
moral, that, agreeably to his great 
merit, the highest honours io Phi- 
losophy have been decreed to \\t 
conferred on bim in a solemn 
manner, and according to ancient 
custom." 

" Upon his return to his native 
country, (says Dr. Campbell,) he 
perfected his skill in the Oriental 
languages, assiduously studied 
the sacred Scriptures in their ori- 
ginals, with the most celebrated 
commentaries, and the roost emi- 
nent amongst the fathers, by 
which he acquired a thorough ac- 
quaintance with, and a due re» 
gard for them, without imbibing 
an implicit faith in, or a danger^ 
ous reliance on, the authority of 
antiquity. All this time, his worth 
was in a great measure hid ; and 
there were but very few thai 
knew his real merit. It was not^ 
however, many years before an 
occasion offered which called his 
very high qualifications into a 
much more conspicuous point of 
view. The Rev, Mr. Wall, Vicac 
of Shoreham in Kent, wrote % 
celebrated treatise, which be ia 

\ 



MBMOIBS OP THB R&V. BR. iOHN OALB. 



143 



titled. The History of Infant Bap- 
tism; and for (bis be not onlj 
leceived, long after, the honour 
of a Doctor's degree from the 
University of Oxford, but also 
the thanks of the convocation 
tbeo assembled. A friend of Dr. 
Gale's, a member of the Church 
of England, and very zealous for 
the doctrines of the church, con- 
sidering the reputation of this 
book, wrote the Doctor a warm 
letter thereupon, as if it had been 
abadutely impossible to read the 
argvoMOts contained therein, with- 
oat being convinced. It fell out, 
liowever,otherwii^ with Dr. Gale; 
be was not only proof against 
botb book and letter, bat resolv- 
ed to answer them, purely to sa- 
tisfy his correspondent, that rea- 
son might appear in defence of 
that cause which he thought so 
utterly overthrown by this per- 
formance. These letters, though 
written in 1705 and 1706, were 
not published until 1711, and 
then, at the very earnest desire of 
some persons of distinguished 
abilities, who thought it an injury 
to the public that they should re- 
flMUO longer in obscurity. Thus, 
by their own merit, they came 
abroad into the world, and made 
their author generally known and 
vespected, in a very short space, 
even by those who did not em- 
brace his sentiments. Indeed, 
there was so much good sense, 
learning, and moderation, in his 
discourses; that it was impos- 
iible they could meet with any 
olber than a favourable recep- 
tion." Biographia Britannica, VoL 
111. P. 2079. 

The same excellent biographer, 
who is one of the most able wri- 
tcn this country has produced, 
and whose opinion concerning 
Dr. Gale's performance is intitled 
to the greater regard on account 
^ifldabetog a jbmIous member of 



the established church, which 
however, did not prevent him 
from rendering justice to the me- 
rits of eminent men of other de- 
nominations, has given us the fol- 
lowing compendium of this work. 
" The best way of making the 
value of this work known wilhin 
the narrow compass of a note, 
will be, by entering into a suc- 
cinct analysis of his learned per- 
formance, in which he has shown 
himself equally conversant with 
books and men, and with polite 
literature, as well as ecclesiasti- 
cal writers. In the first letter 
he observes, that Mr. Wall's his- 
tory is not so formidable as is 
pretended, though the best de- 
fence of Infant Baptism which he 
had seen, and that for thdse rea* 
sons on which Mr. Wall himself 
recommends it in his preface. He 
then tells us, that Mr. Wall is not 
much to be depended on, and 
that his real aim and design was 
only to establish the baptism of 
infants, and that he takes all oc- 
casions to blacken the Anti Pab- 
dobaptists, disguising his designs 
with pretences to moderation* 
That Mr. Wall endeavours to 
possess his readers with an opi* 
nion of his penetration, by seve- 
ral needless digressions, aud to 
gain reputation by quarrelling 
with several of the greatest men 
for learning, &c. as particularly 
Archbishop Tillotson, Bishop 
Burnet, Rigaltius, Gregory Na- 
zianzen, both father aud son ; St. 
Chrysostom, Monsieur le Clerc, 
and Grotius. That he has not 
acted the part of a faithful histo- 
rian towards the Anti-Psedobap- 
tists, but several times, on no 
ground at all, takes for granted 
some things, merely because they 
favour his design, and changea 
the Anti-Pasdobaptists with what- 
ever he had heard any one among 
them to have believed ot «^^« 



U4 



BiCNO'mS OF THB BBV. DR. JOHN GALB. 



Tu the second tetter. Dr. Gale en- 
deavours to justify liis brethren 
from the charge of schism ; and 
observes, that in order to an 
union it would be requisite, and 
' I thinic (sa\s he) none can ex- 
cept against it, that some fit per- 
sons were chosen on both sides, 
to examine the Scriptures impar- 
tially, and the fathers of the three 
first centuries, who followed their 
great Master through sufferings, 
and whose writiugs are undoubt- 
edly by far the best commentary 
on the sacred books; and, with 
these helps, to collect from the 
Word of God the true doctrine 
and discipline of the primitive 
CathoHc Church. And to wML 
should be thus sincerely dediieil[| 
every one should resolve to con- 
form without reserve. And, I 
doubt not, if an union were en- 
deavoured on this expedient, it 
would be accomplished much 
more easily than is imagined." 
In (he thhd letter our author re- 
marks, that the dispute between 
the English Paedobaptists and 
Anti Paedobaptists, may be cast 
iiuder two head^, one relating to 
the mode of baptism, whether it 
is to be administered only by dip- 
ping, and the other, who are the 
(rue subjects of it, whether adult 
pers9ns alone, or infants also. 
He tells us, (hat so far as the 
Scriptures are clear, the practice 
of the Anti-Psedo baptists is al- 
lowed to be agreeable therewith ; 
and that therefore if they err, 
they are, however, on the safer 
side. He observes, that the Greek 
word for baptize, always signifies 
to dip only into any manner of 
thing, but is more commonly 
used for dipping into liquids, 
which oi^servation he confirms 
from several passages of ancient 
writers. In the fourth letter he 
remarks, that the critics constant- 
iy affirm the proper aud ^euuine 



sense of Baxr/fw to the immergo ; 
that Mr. Wall is conscious, not- 
withstanding his pretence, that 
the opinions of learned men are 
against him; and that whereat 
that writer appeals to the Scrip- 
tures for the bense of the word, 
it is evidently never used there in 
his sense, but the contrary. In 
the Jlfth letter he observes, that 
though it is very unreasonable to 
appeal to the Scriptures only for 
the sense of a word, yet it is clear 
from them the Greek word must 
always signify to dip: that if 
the word were otherwise ever 
so ambiguous, yet, as it relates to 
baptism, it is sufiiciently deter^ 
mined only and necessarily to 
mean to dip by the doctrine and 
practice of St. John amongst the 
apostles, and of the succeeding 
church for many centuries, which 
urged a trine immersion. He af- 
firms likewise, that the ancient 
church of the three first centuries 
did not practise affusion ; that 
all who baptized in the times of 
the apostles, were baptiaed bv 
immersion; that clinical affusi- 
ons do not appear to have been 
introduced till about two hun- 
dred and fidy years after Christ, 
at which time their validity was 
much doubted ; and that all al- 
low immersion to have been in- 
sisted on anciently, as the only 
regular way in all common cases. 
In the sixth letter, he proceeds to 
the other chief article in dispute, 
between the Anti-Paedobaptists 
and their antagonists, relating to 
the persons who are the true sub- 
jects of baptism, whether adult 
persons alone, or infants also. Ht 
observes, that Mr. Wall's attempt, 
though the best in its kind, falls 
very short of answering the design 
of it; and that this writer allows 
it cannot be made to appear from 
scripture, that infants are to bt 
baptized, and therefore recura to 



MEMOIRS OF THE BBV. DR. JOHN GALS. 



14S 



e as the only expedients. 1 . 
the practice of the Jewish 
rch. 2. To the practice of 
iDcient Christians. Dr. Gale 
irfcs upon this, that from Mr. 
's concession that it cannot 
roved from Scripture, it un- 
lably follows, that it is no 
;ation of Christ, and tluit to 
oie it may be included in 
I of the more general expres- 
I, is only to beg the point in 
ite; and that unless Mr. 
can show that Infant Bap- 
it to much as mentioned in 
iture, the Anti-Paedo baptists 
Mt believe it instituted there, 
observes, likewise, that the 
ism of Infants is unlawful, if 
st has not instituted it; that 
Protestants should adhere to 
Scripture, as the only infai- 
guide in all religious contro- 
es; and that the silence of 
Scripture is a good argument 
1st Infant Baptism. In the 
4k letter he shows, from 
L sxviii. 19, that the Scrip. 
4o€s Jiot leave Infant Ba|v 
so undetermined as some 
Id pcetend, and that the corn- 
ion necessarily obliges to 
ball who it iutends should 
laptized; and that therefore 
Its cannot be included in 
commission: and he as- 
that the verb /ladfirsveiv 
instantly used to signify no- 
^ less than to teach/ In the 
fk letter he remarks, that the 
tantive fiadifniQ is only said of 
! as are at least capable of 
% taught, and that the most 
nous have always agreed, 
the word in the commission 
icularly signifies to teach and 
net; and that this appears 
ently to be the true sense of 
place, from the authority of 
Scriptures themselves, from 
practice of the apostles, and 
I parallel places. The sum 



of the Doctor's reasoning on this 
head is this, that the commission 
obliges to teffch all that are to be 
baplited, and therefore that the 
Scriptures are not so silent con- 
cerning the baptizing of infants as 
the Paedobaptists would persuade 
us; so that if Mr. Wall should 
prove that the Jews and Chris- 
tians did baptize their children, 
the Anli-Psedobaptists have still 
reason enough not to admit the 
practice. In the ninth letter he 
observes, that Mr. Wall's asser- 
tions, that the Jews did initiate 
their Proselytes, and their infants 
Inf Baptism, and that the apostles 
and Primitive Church haptized th^ 
JMuits of beiieving parents, are 
matakes, and that the arguments 
biroiight to prove these two 
points are no better. Dr. Gale 
examines first Mr. Wall's pre- 
tences from the Jews in this and 
tl>e following letters, in which he 
endeavours to show, from many 
considerations, that the argu- 
ments of the Paedobaptists do not 
make it appear to have been the 
custom of the Jews, in our Savi- 
our's time, to baptize Proselytes 
and their children, ami urges scr 
veral arguments to evince the 
contrary. He remarks likewise, 
that even supposing the fact 
could be demonstrated, it is no 
rule in the administration of a 
Christian sacrament, as being only 
the tradition of their elders, and 
not grounded on Scripture, or 
derived from Moses. In the eie^ 
tenth letter. Dr. Gale proceeds to 
the other kind of evidence pro- 
duced by Mr. Wall, viz. the au- 
thority of the Prifbitive Fathers, 
which, the Doctor observes, 
ought to be valued more than 
Monsieur Daill^ and some others' 
suppose. * It is an ill return X^ays 
he) for the great lessons and ex- 
amplies of piety they have given 
us, and for tiu^ to'vvtk^ V^^^^ ^^ 



146 



MEMOIRS OF THB REV. DR. JOHN CALB. 



instramental io transmitting to us 
the knowledge of our most holy 
religion. And there is yet a 
greater eyil attends this method ; 
for ail the abuses and affronts put 
upon the Fathers of the first cen- 
turies» do in the end reflect on 
Christianity itself which those 
great men have handed down, 
and which therefore must needs 
%e, in some degree, of but doubt- 
ful authority, if it depends upon 
sufficient testimony. It would 
not be difficult to defend the 
writings of the Fathers from the 
reproaches cast on them by these 
men, and by DaiM, their oracle, 
notwithstanding he has taken such 
pains in the matter, and pushed 
it with all the vigour he could. 
But it is a nice subject, and much 
too copious to be treated here at 
large. I shall therefore only say, 
that in many cases the rejecting 
ihe authority of the Fathers is a 
very wild extreme, which men 
are driven to, only because they 
have nothing better to say for 
themselves, and cannot brook to 
«ee their own opinions contra- 
dicted in their writings. That the 
Fathers of the first Churches 
were honest faithful men, and 
every way capable to acquaint us 
with the true posture of afl^irs in ^ 
their own Churches and times, 
and therefore are to be depended 
on, as far as they relate facta 
within their proper cognizance, 
must be allowed on all hands, and 
I don't see how their greatest 
enemies can have the fac^ to de- 
ny this.' The Doctor then ob- 
serves, that Mr. Wall's argument 
from the Fatfiers, turns upon a 
supposition which cannot easily 
be granted him, vir. That the 
Primitive Church believed and 
practised nothing but what they 
had received from the Apostles 
themselves. But Dr. Gale tells 
us, that without tmy reflection on 



the honioiwr and fidelity of tkt 
Fathers, their testimonies cannot 
support Infant Baptism, though 
they should afford Mr. Wall ever 
so many and full citations, * for if 
the Fathers onlv prove Fact in 
the Church, and not Right, and 
the Church was not whcAly pure 
from innovations, how does this 
prove the Baptism of Infants was 
no innovation, but an institution 
of Christ^ And yet this is the 
thing oiir author should have 
done, though he takes no notice 
of it. It is irksome to remember 
the instances of human frailty 
which even the most ancient 
Church was liable to. They were 
men subject to like passions 
with us, and therefore no wonder 
they were sometimes in the wrong, 
and their zeal for God's honour 
was not always according to 
knowledge, which, though it 
might keep them from losing the 
chief thing our Lord had com- 
manded, might however expose 
them to the inconveniency of su- 
peradding several things he never 
authorized. The apostles un- 
doubtedly kept close to his di- 
rections in all things without de- 
viation, either in ddector excess, 
for they had the immediate as- 
sistance, in a most extraordinary 
manner, of the Spirit of God.' 
But that the Christians of the very 
next age made several additions, 
Tertulllan confesses in his book 
de CoronA. And Ensebius, from 
Hegesippus notes, * that the 
Church continued all the Apos- 
tles' time, a pure virgin and iin- 
defiled; but when those holy 
men were d«ad — Iheo errors 
began to arise, through the 
mistakes of other teachers. 
Dr. Gale then proceeds to dis- 
cuss the grand question, whether 
it can be proved from any of the 
AUTHENTIC PiKCBs of the Pri- 
mitive Fathers, that the Church 



\ 



M KMoi xs or 1 11 1: 1. 1 '^ 



1) 



JOHN cam:. 



Ii7 



used Infant Baptism in those larly 
iimea. He cousidera in this und 
the twelfth and thirteenth letters, 
such passages as are produced by 
Mr. Wall. He remarks in the 
thirteenth, that in St. Cyprian's 
lime. Infant Baptism was prac- J 
tised in Africa ; and infers from 
thence that it probably took its 
rise there» together with Infant 
Couimuniou; that the Africans 
were generally men of weak under- 
standings; that the Greek church 
probably had not yet admitted 
the error; that the practice of 
infant baptism began» as all in- 
Dovalions do, with only some 
little variations in opinion, and 
then passed to as little deviations 
in practice, and so by very short 
steps, at length attained, unob- 
served, the great reputation it 
has DOW indeed for a long time 
eojoyed ; that this was occasion- 
ed io some measure by a zeal 
which was not always according 
to knowledge ; and that the ear- 
liest Pasdobaptists admitted chil- 
dren to the Lord's Supper on the 
same principles as to baptism. 
His own words upon this subject 
fairly deserve the reader's notice, 
* For thus, (says he,) in a case 
most exactly parallel, the same 
pecBons who introduced the bap- 
tizing of infants, were equally^ for 
admitting them, immediately af- 
ter that, to the otlier sacrament 
likewise, and that upon just such 
another mistake of our Saviour's 
words too; for as they inferred 
the necessity of Baptism from 
John iii. 5, so they did also that 
of the Eucharist from John vi. 53. 
Thus St^ Austin, from these very 
texts, at the same time argues for 
baptizing and communicating in- 
fants. And this custom of com- 
municating infants accompanied 
the baptizing them, even from the 
first rise of Paedobapltsm, for se- 
veral himdxed years together^ as 



ill the Greek Ciiurch it does to 
this day, ail which is so true and 
manifest, as to be pretty general- 
ly acknowledged. Dr. Taylor 
somewhat largely proves it, and 
frequently says, the one is alto- 
gether as well grounded as the 
other; und indeed he earnestly 
pleads for the continuance of 
both." Note[C]. 

There is something so attrac- 
tive in a modest and learned 
search after truth, thruS^h the 
obscurest paths of antiquitv, that 
such as take different roads in 
that search, naturally wi^h each 
other well, and speak kindly of 
their common labours. This was 
the case with the learned Dr. 
Wotton, (See Miscellaneous Dis- 
courses, Vol. I. Ch. viii.) though 
he writes expressly against our 
author in relation to the Jewish 
Talmud. Dr. Whitby also says, 
(Dissertat. de S. S. interpret. Praef. 
§ 5.) that Dr. Gale's very learned 
letters prove it to be doubtful 
and uncertain whether that prac- 
tice did constantly obtain. Mr. 
Whiston acknowledges, that the 
iirst light he received, in refer- 
ence to the primitive mode of 
baptizing, was from Dr. Gale's 
observations upon the passage of 
Irenaeus, which laid the founda- 
tion of what he wrote upon that 
subject. *' This most important 
discovery (says he) I soon com- 
municated to the world in this pa- 
per, which both Bishop Hoadley 
and Dr. Ciarke greatly approved, 
but still went on in the ordinary 
practice notwithstanding. I sent 
this paper also by an intimate 
friend, Mr. Haines, to Sir Isaac 
Newton, and desired to know his 
opinion. The answer was this, 
that they both had discovered 
the same before. Nay, I after- 
wards found, that Sir Isaac New* 
ton was so hearty for the Baptists, 
as well as foe lU^ t^i^^Vyv^vk^^ ^x 



i48 MESlOlRS OF THE REV. DB. JOHN OAttf* 



Arians, that he sometimes sus- 
pected these two were the two 
witnesses in the Revelation." Sir 
Peter King, successively Chief 
Justice of the Common Pleas, 
High Chancellor of Great Bri- 
tain, and Lord King of Ockharo, 
had a very high opinion of Dr. 
Gale, who was also honoured 
with the friendship of Dr. Hoad- 
ley, in his time Bishop of Salis- 
bury, and afterwards of Wiuches- 
ter, aud of Dr. Samuel Bradford, 
Bishop of Rochester, who declar- 
ed in writing his esteem of our 
author, on account of his good 
understanding, great learning, 
candour, and largeness of mind. 

In the thirty-fifth ^ear of his 
age, he was chosen one of the 
ministers of the Baptist congrega- 
tion in Paul's Alley, near Barbi- 
can; and there was a prodigious 
resort to hear him, as often as 
he entered the pUlpit. •* This 
pleasing work (says one of his 
biographers.) he pursued with 
unwearied diligence and integri- 
ty ; preaching the word, as the 
Apostle directs, in season and out 
of season, reproving, rebuking, 
and exhorting, with all long-suf- 
fering and doctrine, resolving 
firmly to regard no man in the 
discharge of his duty. He stood 
too much in awe of his great 
Master, to fear or know any 
man, or to be swayed by any 
worldly considerations." 

** In his preaching, (says Dr. 
John Kinch,) though he highly 
deserved the praise and com- 
mendation of his hearers, yet 
what he sought was their profit 
an^ advantage. It was pleasing 
and agreeable to a polite and in- 
genious audience, which usually 
attended him, and at the same 
time plain and easy to persons of 
a meaner capacity ; so that in his 
discourses there was instruction 
for the ignorant, and entertain- 



I ment for the roost learned an 
judicious. His deportment ii^* 
the pulpit was easy, yet attende^K- 
with a seriousness and gravitjr^ 
becoming the solemnity of tfale^ 
work in which he was engaged. 
His method was exact; his style 
elegant, but unaffected ; his rea- 
soning clear and strong ;'aDd his 
arguments just and nervous, 
which, by his happy managing 
them, constantly discovered fresh 
beauty to his hearers.'^ 

** The consideration (says Mr. 
Joseph Borroughs, in his Funeral 
Sermon,) that a person so well 
furnished, was content to struggle 
with so many difficulties as he 
did, when he might have enjoyed 
ease and plenty; that, for the 
sake of what he believed to be 
the truth, and the command of 
Christ, he chose to minister in an 
unfashionable and despised way, 
when he might have had both ap« 
plause and riches in turning his 
thoughts to some other courses ; 
and that he persisted in this 
choice to the last; — obliges me 
to observe, that herein he did, 
like the apostle, fight the good 
fight, and finish his course, and 
keep his fidelity. He imitated 
him likewise in his zeal, as well as 
in his integrity and constancy." 

He was Chairman of a society 
for promoting primitive Chris- 
tianity, from July 3, 1716, to the 
10th of February following. This 
society met weekly at vMr. Whis- 
ton's house in Cross-street, Hat- 
ton-garden, in order seriously 
and amicably to consider and 
examine the most ancient writers 
of the Christian church; to deter- 
mine which of the pieces attri- 
buted to them were, and which 
were not genuine ; that from 
thence the doctrine and disci- 
pline of the church, in the ages 
next to the apostles, might be 
clearly and certainly understood 

\ 



MEMOIRS or Tiir. ncv. T)[\. JOHN i.w.r.. 



140 



^nd embraced. At the persuasion 
^f Mr. Winston, he had, in tiiat 
H^Qtleman's house, a conference 
^hh his former antagonist. Dr. 
Wall, <« which (says Dr. Camp- 
^>ell) ended as such conferences 
generally do, without any signal 
^5r deci'jivc success. Indeed, Mr. 
"VTfaiston is very clear that thead- 
^^rantage was altogether on the 
9ide of Dr. Gale ; but having 
liimself embraced his opinion, 
perhaps his judgment in this case 
may admit of some exception." 
After this, Mr. (then Dr.) Wall 
published a Defence of his His- 
tory of Infant Baptism, which 
Dr. Gale did not live to answer. 
The following passage appears in 
a letter of Dr. Gale to his father, 
upon the subject. " Dr. WaU 
has written a Defence of his His- 
tory of Infant Baptism, in which 
he has treated me very roughly, 
and has endeavoured to enrage 
the clergy, as well as our own 
people, against me, besides which, 
there appears not to be much in 
liis book ; however, I am prepar- 
ing an answer/' 

Dr. Campbell thus concludes 
liis remarks upon this controver- 
ay: "After all, as they were 
men, we do no injustice to these 
learned persons in saying, they 
had both their failings, or, to 
speak with greater propriety, 
both had the same failing, that of 
warmth, and suflfering themselves 
to be too much heated in the 
course of the dispute. But when 
a proper allowance is made for 
this, it may be truly said, and in- 
deed though in their heat they 
sometimes unsay it, yet in several 
places they say it of each other, 
that Dr. Wall's History of Infant 
Baptism is by much the best vin- 
dication of the doctrine and dis- 
cipline of the Church that ever 
appeared ; as, on the other hand, 
Pr. Gale's reflections upon that 



work are the best defence of the 
Baptists that wasi ever published: 
and this, though it is no mora 
than the truth, is saying a ereaf 
deal for both, since the subject 
had been handled by very great 
men before," 

Amongst the labours which 
he had proposed to himself, if 
Providence had lengthened his 
days, were a translation into 
English of the Septuagint, ac- 
cording to the accurate edition 
published by Dr. Grabe, at Ox- 
ford ; and a complete Exposiition 
of the whole New Testament from 
the pulpit: but about the begin* 
ning of December, 1721, he was 
attacked by a slow languid ftver, 
of which he died af^er an illness 
of about three weeks. He bora 
his last sickness with great con* 
stancy and patience, expressed 
the utmost resignation to the Ds- 
vine Will, and, in his last mo« 
ments, testified an entire confi« 
dence in that almighty and all- 
wise Being, m whose hands are 
the issues of life and death, and 
whose mercies are over all his 
works. He may be said to have 
died in the flower of his age, be- 
ing in his forty-second year ; and 
in some measure unexpectedly, as 
being of a strong and healthy con« 
stitution. In his person he wa» 
rather taller than the common 
size, of an open, pleasant coun* 
tenance, and of easy and aflable 
behaviour. Serious without any 
tincture of moroseness, cheer- 
ful without levity, having a most 
perfect command over his pas- 
sions, insomuch that one who 
knew him intimately for many 
years assures us he never once 
saw him discomposed ; extremely 
humble, though in such high re- 
putation for learning ; and parti- 
cularly careful of giving offence 
to such as were in low circum- 
stances, as be\Q^%«tk%\V^\ft \ScaX w^ 



150 



MEMOIBS OF THE AEV. DR. JOHN OALB. 



tbiug makes the mind so sensible 
as poverty, and that nothing 
wounds so deep as the very sus- 
picion of contempt. " He was 
blessed (says Dr. Kinch) with 
extraordinary natural abilities, a 
bale strong constitution, a smooth 
ready wit, a bright and lively 
fancy, a piercing thought, a quick 
invention, a strong memory, and 
a good and solid judgment. These 
excellent qualifications were very 
much heightened and improved 
by the advantages be received 
from an ineenuous and liberal 
education, m which he made so 
great a progress, as rendered him 
truly valuable to all persons of 
real worth and learning, who 
were so happy as to hav« any 
knowledge of, or acquaintance 
with him. He had an even and 
composed temper, which disco- 
vered itself in the constant sere- 
nity of his countenance. The dif- 
ferent turns of his affairs seemed 
to make little or no impression 
upon his mind ; for he, with the 
great apostle Paul, had learned 
in whatever state he was, there- 
with to be content. He knew 
both how to be abased, and how 
lo abound; every where, and in 
all things, was he instructed, 
both to be full and to be hun- 
gry, both to abouqd and to suf- 
^r need. He was truly pious, 
but without any thing of osten- 
tation, CKercisin^ himself herein, 
to have a conscience void of of- 
fence toward God and toward 
man. He adorned the profession 
he made of the Christian doctrine 
by a holy and exemplary life; 
which was a convincing proof 
that be lirmly . believed religion 
to be of the greatest importance, 
and that he was in c^amest when 
be endeavoured to persuade 
others to live soberiy, righteously, 
and godly in this present world. 
He w as a person of great integrity. 



and preferred the peace ofbit own 
mind in the answer of a good con- 
science to all other considerations. 
His thoughts were so fully employ- 
ed about affairs of the highest 
consequence, that he neglected 
several opportunities of advancing 
his temporal interests. He was 
so intent upon his. great Master's 
business, and was so warmly en- 
gaged in the pursuit of the dura- 
ble riches of the eternal world, 
that these fading treasures passed 
his notice. He was a kind fneud, 
and made it his business to in- 
struct and inform, to advise, and, 
on proper occasions, to reprove, 
those with whom he conversed ; 
which most difficult office of 
Christian friendship he so well 
managed, that none could be 
[justly] offended with him. And 
always delighting in doing good, 
he was ever as ready to perform 
any friendly office, even for the 
meanest disciple of Christ Je&us, 
as for those whose circumstances 
being more exalted, are from 
thence generally deemed to have 
a more commanding influence. 
He abounded greatly in those 
fruits of the Spirit mentioned by 
the apostle. Gal. v. 22, 23, love, 
joyf peace, long-suffering, gen- 
tleness, goodness, faith, meekness, 
and temperance. But that virtue 
wherein he peculiarly excelled, 
was his great humility. Notwith- 
standing his valuable and uncom- 
mon abilities, both natural and 
acquired, he always appeared 
humble and modest, mild and 
courteous, and was so far from 
having a vain and proud conceit 
of his endowments, that he knew 
how, without the affected vanity 
of lessening 'his own qualifica- 
tions, to esteem others belter 
than himself. He bore his last 
sickness with great patience, and 
resignation to the will of God. 
1^' When a little before bis dissolu- 



IfftlfOlM OF THB REV. DR. JOH-M CIALB. 



151 



lion, his mournfal consort, with 
weepiogeyet aod wringiDg hands, 
cxpectMi the dreadful separation, 
* Tmst/ said he, ' in Him who is 
■lUsulficient, and who can, if he 
Ibinks tit, raise me up/ He 
aeeroed to depart with the great- 
est composure and serenity of 
mind, making good that observa- 
tioD of the Psalmist, that the end 
of the perfect and upright man is 
peace." 

Although Dr. Gale differed in 
some of his sentiments from the 
Editors, of this Magazine, we are 
happy to learn from one of his 
hiogiaphers, that be was a be- 
lieTcrin the doctrine of the Tri- 
nity. With respect to the points 
of difference, whilst we think it 
our duty zealously to contend for 
4vhat we deem to be the truth, 
suid to oppose what we deem to 
be taor, from a regard to the 
authority and glory of God, to 
<Hir 'Own happiness, and to the 
happiness of our fellow-creatures, 
yet wherever we behold the marks 
of true and unfeigned humility, 
we can scarcely refrain from say- 
ing, *• This is the 6uger of God." 
There is a quotation also from 
one of his sermons, in his Life in 
ihe Biographia Britannica, which 
gives as dreadful a view of human 
nature in its fallen state, as we 
recollect ever to have seen. 
"Surely, (said we to ourselves, 
after reading it,) knowing, as 
Dr. Gale did, that such he him- 
self bad been, he could not but 
add, with the apostle, Such was 
J: but I am woihed^ hut 1 am 
Bamctifiedf hut I am Justified in 
ike name of the Lard JesuSf and 
h^ the Spirit of our God. He 
could not believe that so depraved 
a Hionster could have been re- 
ceived into the divine favour, 
unless Jesus Christ had loved 
Jkim, and washed him from his sins 
im his own hlood, and made him a 



King and a Priest unto God and 
his Father, Rev. i. 5, 6. Indeed 
he could not be truly humble in 
the sight of the eternal Majesty, 
without believing in the Freeness 
of that Sovereign Grace, to which 
the apostle Paul ascribes his own 
salvation, when he says, This is a 
faithful saying, and worthy of 
all acceptation, that Christ Jesus 
came into the world to save sin- 
ners, of whom I am chief: how^ 
heit, for this cause I obtained 
mercy, that in me first Jesus 
Christ might shew forth all long' 
suffering, for a PATTERN to 
them who should hereafter believe 
on him to life everlasting, 1 Tim. 
i. 16; — and which led the same 
apostle to say, that they who are 
justified, are justified freely by 
his grace through the redemption 
that is in Christ Jesus, wham 
God' hath set forth to be a propi" 
tiation through faith in his blood. 
Where is BOASTING then ? It is 
excluded. By what law? of 
works? Nay, but b^ the law of 
faith. Rom. i. 24, 26, 27." In- 
deed, we do really believe that 
there cannot subsist true hu- 
mility without orthodoxy. And 
wherever we see arrogance of 
spirit or of language, in whatever 
form of words the person may 
express his creed, we cannot he- 
sitate to conclude, that his real 
sentiments cannot be right. 

Works. 1. Reflections on Mr, 
Wail's History of Infant Bap. 
tism, in several Letters to a 
Friend. 1711. 8vo. Seethe Co- 
ver of this Magazine for March. 
2. A Thanksgiving Sermon, Nov. 
6, 1718. 3. Sermons preached 
upon several subjects, by the 
late Reverend and Learned Dr. 
John Gale ; to which is prefixed, 
an Account of his Life, in 4 vo- 
lumes, Byo. 1726, 2d edit. Of 
these works. Dr. Campbell con- 
cludes hia LiC^ ^v\!^ ^V^%i ^^ \% 



r 



152 



LBTTEft FHOM THE REV, MR. NEWTOK. 



them the justification of all that 
has been said of his parts, or his 
piety, will be found ; and there 
is no question they will preserve 
his reputation, and their own, as 
lon^ as there shall be any taste 
for strong, and yet clear reason- 
ing ; masculine unaffected elo- 
quence, flowing from the just dis- 
tribution of the parts of a dis- 
course, and not a pomp of chosen 
words, and sounding epithets ; or 
men retain any sense of those in- 
teresting and important truths, 
which he has so represented as 
to be sure of their making an im- 
pression on the heart, by their 
tilling the whole measure of the 
understanding," provided (we 
should add) they be accompanied 
with the renovating influences of 
the Holy Spirit, without which 
even a Paul must plant, and an 
ApoUos water, in vain. 



A LETTER 

Trwn the Rev: Mr. Newton to a 
Baptist Minister, whose Wife 
was at the point of death. 



Jan, S3. 1787. 

Mr DEAR Friend, 

I feel, but I do not fear, for 
you. The God whom Ihou serv- 
est he can support and deliver 
you. He is all sufllicieDt, and his 
promise is sure. 

Pleuty of advice is at hand, but 
I dare not offer yon much iu this 
way. You are in the heat of a 
trial ; I am at present in quiet. 
It would be easy for me to press 
patience and resignation upon 
you, and to remind you that a 
pardoned sinner ought never to 
complain. You could speak the 
same language to me, if I were in 
your case, and you were at ease. 

Yet though we may and ought 
4o compassionate one auother un- 



der our various trials, and t 
speak with tenderness where the 
heart is wounded ; there are 
truths which, if trouble hides 
them from our view, it is the office 
of a friend to recal them. You 
and I are ministers. As such, 
how of^en have we commended 
the gospel as the ro ty, affording 
those who truly receive it, a balm 
for every wound, a cordial for 
every care ! 

How often have we told our 
hearers, that our all-sufficient and 
faithful Lord can and will make 
good every want and loss ! How 
often have we spoken of the Hght 
of his countenance as a full com- 
pensation for every suffering, and 
of the trials of the present ufe as 
not worthy to be compared with 
the exceeding abundant and eter- 
nal weight of glory to which they 
are leading! We must not there* 
fore wonder, if we are sometimes 
called to exemplify the power of 
what we have said, and to shew 
our people that we have not set 
before them unfelt truths, which 
wc have learut from books and 
men only. You are now in a 
post of honour, and many eyes 
are upon you. May the Lord 
enable you to glorify him, and to 
enconrdge them, by your exem- 
plary submission to his will ! 

You are doubtless allowed to 
pour out your heart before him, 
and even to pray for Mrs. R.*s re- 
covery, and I will join with you 
so far as I dare. I likewise have 
had my trials, but I am still lia- 
ble to one very different from all 
I have yet experienced. But I 
am so shortsighted as to events 
and consequences, that in any 
supposable case' 1 seem to trem- 
ble at Ibe thonght of having my 
own choice, even if it were allow* 
ed me to choose. In my better 
judgment I am pleased to think, 
that infinite Wisdom and Good- 



AN ANTIDOTE TO INFIDELITY. 



15 J 



less ^lave engaged to manage for 

I am sure that afflictions do 

not happen at randoiD» nor spring 

^^mt of the ground ; that the Lord 

"^akes no pleasure in afflicting us ; 

^nd that if the desires of our 

lieart are not always given us, it 

is because we often know not 

-what we ask. I pray for her, that 

he may enable her quietly and 

cheerfully to commit herself into 

bis hands; and I pray for you, 

that you may do the same. You 

may be assured he will not try 

you beyond what he will enable 

you to bear. If it be for your 

good, especially for your chief 

goody hia glory f she shall recover; 

be will restore her, though a 

hundred physicians had given 

her up. If otherwise, I doubt 

not but he will help you to say, 

Thy will be done. And hereafter 

you shall see that his will was 

best.* 

My dear Eliza was not indeed 
a wife, but she was very near my 
heart. A few weeks or days be- 
fore her removal, had it been 
hwful and agreeable to the will of 
God, I think I would have re- 
deemed her life at the price of a 
limb; yet when the stroke came 
very near, it was so circum- 
stanced, so alleviated, so sweet- 
ened, that could the lifting up 
of my finger have detained her, 
and restored her to perfect | 
health, I could not have lifted it 
up. Perhaps I never suffered 
more, perhaps I never suflered 
less, than when I saw her in the 
agonies of death. Then I found 
that the Lord was all-sufficient 
indeed ; and I trust you will find 
him so. 

Accept this hasty line as a to- 
ken of my sympathy, I was not 
]»illing to wait till I could find 



more leisure. May the Lord bless 
you both. And may we all so 
weep as^ becomes those who ex- 
pect, ere long, to have all our 
tears wiped away. 
I am sincerely and affectionately 
Yours, 

John Nbwtok. 



AN 



ANTIDOTE TO INFIDELITY, 



Beware lest any man spoil yam 
through Philosapky and vam deeeii^ 
after the tradition of men, after tha 
rudiments of the world, and not after 
Christ. Col. ii. 8. 



* She died the day tiui letter wae 
•tiuen. 



There never was a period in 
the history of the Christian 
Church, when an attention to this 
precept of the Apostle was more 
necessary than iu the present day. 
The grand adversary of mankind, 
after having for many ages at* 
tempted to prevent the spread of 
the Gospel, by keeping the world 
in ignorance, is now endeavour^ 
ing to effect the same purpose 
by means of the knowledge which 
Christianity has principally circu<* 
lated. He is aiming to convert 
the press, which has hitherto been 
so powerful an auxiliary to the 
cause of religion, into the instni* 
meut of its destruction, and by 
its agency to scatter the baneful 
seed of blasphemy and unbelief 
throughout the land. Thje Bible, 
however, would not be the reve«> 
lation of God, if it did not con* 
tain within it, a sufficient antidote 
to such awful doctrines. Its evi* 
deuces are, like the characters it 
forms, founded upon a rock. 
In vain shall the rain descend^ 
the winds blow, and the whirU 
wind and storm attack its base — 
it is immoveable — " the gates of 
hell shall uot prevail against it/' 






154 



SBPAKATION FROM TBB WORLIK 



It becomes the Christian, in 
such a scoffiog and infidel age as 
the |!nresenty to be most wise and 
circumspect — " to gird on his 
whole armour." Let him remem- 
ber he is " the light of the world, 
and in the midst of a crooked 
and perverse generation f that 
one of the best arguments he 
can afford of the truth of religion, 
is by living well This proof it 
is more difficult to gainsay, than 
many others of a more learned 
and elaborate nature. It is the 
best actual evidence of the truth 
of the Bible that can eiist What 
a testimony to the lives and man- 
ners of the primitive Christians was 
borne by the Heathen, when they 
excbimed, " How these Chris- 
tians love each other!" Alas! it 
is to be feared this spirit of love 
and communion is much dimi- 
nished in the present day, and 
that religion is too much a matter 
of profession, and too little a bu- 
siness of the heart. 

How lamentable it is to consi- 
der, that although there are so 
many thousands who believe that 
the Bible is a revelation of the 
will of God to man, so very few 
comparatively are influenced by 
its doctrines, that one of the most 
puzzling arguments of its adver- 
saries is taken from the lax and 
disorderly conduct of its profes- 
sors ! Brethren, these things 
ought not so to be. The king- 
dom of God is not of this world. 
His f^nice will produce good fruits 
in yo<ir lives. If you are en- 
tangled in the concerns of this 
life, to the prejudice of religion; 
if the love of money, which is the 
root of all evil, has taken posses- 
sion of your soul ; if you are con- 
tinually employed in using every 
means, both just and unjust, to 
increase your property ; if you 
your brother, because he 
V you uttend to the du- 




ties of the Sabbath in a coht, for* 
mal manner, as a meie matter af 
duty ; if you neglect private and 
family prayer; — is it a wonder 
that religion, through your exaan 
pie, is brought into contempt; 
that it is represented as a aystefli 
of pretension and hypocrisy 1 
" Let therefore your lights be 
homing ;" show to the worU the 
reality of yoor faith, and the ge- 
nuine effect of the love of Christ 
in your hearts. Yon will then be 
the most effective advocates for 
the Gospel. Vonr henrtt will 
then be sanctified, and your lives 
will be holy. You will loTe yonr 
neighbours, and employ yottr« 
selves in acts of kindness for his 
welfare. You will deny all nn* 
godliness and worldly luslii and 
live soberly, righteously, and 
godly, in the present evil worid. 
Prayer and divine meditation wiU 
teach you the vanities of the 
world ; will enable you to endure 
all the afliictions and trials of life 
with patience and resignationt 
looking to that " inheritance which 
is incorruptible, undefiied, and 
which fadeth not away." 

It is such characters as these 
that blow away the sophistries of 
human vanity, like chaff before 
the wind ; which carry home to 
the mind a conviction of the 
truth of Christianity ; and which 
produce the sentiment so often 
expressed, "Let me die the death 
of the righteous, and let my last 
end be like his." 



SEPARATION 
FROM THE WORLD. 



Rblioion and the world are 
so widely different in their nature 
and their tendency, that however 



tBPARATIOK FROM THB WOBLD* 



15J 



maukiod may attempt an amalga* 
matioa, their efforts will be just 
as fruitless as it would have been 
to mix together in one substance 
the iron and clay, in the image 
seen in Nebuchadnezsar's dream. 
Many are the commands which 
mre given to the Christian world, 
enjoining its keeping itself so se- 
parated, as that its members may 
be known by all men to have 
been with Jesus. Our divine 
Ijord and Master savs, *' Ye can- 
not serve God ano Mammon." 
Their demands are so opposite, 
tlieir injunctions so adverse^ and 
their commands so contrary, that 
in loving one we must hate the 
other; and while we serve ei- 
ther, we disobey the other. 
Come and taste the good I offer, 
says the world : — " Depart ye — 
Depart ye — go ye out from thence 
— touch no unclean thing/^ 
saith the Lord. So that decision 
in this momentous affi&ir is of the 
utmost importance: '* I would 
that thon wert either cold or 
hot." 

But my further design in this 
Essay is to show, how a Christian 
may fall into the ways of the 
world ; and at the same time to 
point out its evils, and to hint at 
the importance and advantage of 
maintaining an evident distinc- 
tion. 

In showing how a Christian 
may fall into the ways of the 
world, I would remark, that this 
is done by conforming to worldly 
customs, such, as dress, vain 
and trifling conversation, amuse- 
ments, drc. &c. Now when these 
are considered abstractedly, they 
may not look like evils, but view- 
ing them in connexion with their 
consequences, and with the ef- 
fects they produce, they assume 
a much more forbidding aspect. 
For instance; the Christian be- 
holds some fiishionable garb, or 



gay robe, which suits his inclina- 
tion, and wishes to have it and 
wear it. Now dress, consider* 
ed simply and abstractedly, can 
have no evil in it; but if we 
connect it with the ideas of 
the person's being proud of a 
garment, of his setting his affec- 
tions on dress, and letting bis 
thoughts run after any thing of so 
trivial a nature, to the neglect of 
his more important concerns, 
then the case is much changed. 
I would not be understood, from 
the sentiments here expressed, as 
advocating any thing like precise* 
ness or uniformity in dress ; by 
no means : I think every one has 
a degree of respectability to sup* 
port, and ought to dress conform- 
ably to his situation. But when 
I see any persons, whose lot it is 
to walk the ordinary paths of 
life, attempting to sliow some su* 
periority by dress, and wishing 
to obtain esteem from the fine- 
ness of their attire, I either think 
they must have a vain mind, or 
that religion is at a low ebb, or 
both. But the evil does not re$t 
here. When we possess any thing, 
it is generally our desire to have 
it known; particularly if we 
think we shall be the more highly 
thought of for such possession. 
Thence the love of dress leads to 
the breaking down of a more 
important distinction between 
Christians and the world— to their 
associating ' with worldly com* 
pany. They who are enjoyins 
much of the presence of God, 
and living in a daily intercourse 
with him, are not the company 
which such will seek. No ; they 
will seek such as have views cor- 
respondent with, and inclinations 
similar to, their own. Therefore 
to the world they must look.. 
Here they associate with such as 
cannot come up to Christians in 
conversation, because they have 



1 ji') 



}' H I I. ! r 1 1 L N R \ S O r I N 1 ' J N 



DO cxpcrimenlal acquaintance i adniiUcd." O that more of tbi^ 
with those truths* which are their spirit pervaded the minds of prc^ 



«upi>orf, their food, their comfort, 
their hope, and their eojovment. 
Not having experienced the in- 
fluence of these things on their 
hearts, to hear them conversed 
upon has no interest with them, 
and they will shun such persons 
as cannot, or will not, converse 
on subjects more correspondent 
with their views; so that if a 
person professing Christianity 
would associate with them, he 
jQusi so far dishonour his profes- 
iion, and slight his Lord and 
Master, as to enter on and join 
in conversation ou things of the 
world. Alas, here is a sad change ! 
leanness here enters the soul ; 
and the mind, which not long 
ago appeared as the well -favour- 
ed kine, or the plentifully filled 
ears of corn in Pharaoh's dream, 
' degenerates into their opposites. 
Having drunk into the spirit, the 
amusements of the world next 
claim a place in such a back- 
slider's heart : and here a still 
wider gate is opened, altogether 
confirming that aphorism of the 
Prophet^ '* The heart is deceitful 
above all things, aiKl desperately 
wicked." 

From these imperfect remarks, 
the importance of keeping our- 
selves separate from the world is 
fery evidient. I allow there is ne- 
cessary business, which calls the 
attention of the Christian into the 
world, and that to neglect this is 
highly cult)able, yea, criminal. 
The apo&lle commands diligence 
10 business, but unites with it fer- 
vency of spirit, and an habitual 
serving of the Lord. But this is, 
I apprehend, widely different from 
associating from inclination with 
the world. " 1 would not," says 
an eminent divine, now fallen 
asleep, " 1 would not enter any 
^mpany where my Master is not 




fessors io these latter days ! Mi 
thinks if this were the case, rel 
gion would appear more like 
candle set on a candlestick, aai 
the churches more resemble i 
city set on a hill, which cannot 
hid. Ministers would behoU 
more living epbtles, if thof 
which are such were seen am 
read of all men : more of thc^ 
spirit of love would be felt aod^ 
enjoyed, and Zion would becomt^ ^ 
a praise to the whole earth. 

*' Lord, keep me from each Tain desire. 

From worldly liope and ftar ; 
O fill ray heart with holy fire. 

With love aad childlike fear. 

In wisdom's ways preserve ray feet ; 

There ^aard and keep my soul : 
May I enjoy commanion sweet ' 

Wiih Uiee, my God, my alL* 

PHILO, 

Bradford, Nov, IS. 1850. 



Opinion of the piotu Philip 
Henri/ on the Laws against 
Protestant Dissenters ami Ro* 
man Catholics, 



it 



The great subject of debate 
at this time (IG87) in the natioQ 
was, concerning the repeal of pe- 
nal laws and te^fs. Mr. Henry's 
thoughts were, as to the penal 
laws, that if those against the 
Dissenters were all repealed, h^ 
would rejoice in it, and be very 
thankful both to God and man ; 
for he would sometimes say, with- 
out reflection upon any, that he 
could not butjook upon them as 
a national sin ; and as for those 
against the Papists, ' If (said he) 
our lawgivers sec cause to repeal 
them in a regular way, I will 
endeavour to make the best of it^ 
and to say, The will of the Lor4 
be done.' " 

Life^ chap, viii. 



3ru\)tnae B^artment. 



PHILOSOPHICAL 
REFLECTIONS. 



No. XXIV.— rHOiV. 



•■wmnti 


Unckoii 


dbj 


BKlj, 






imd 


upon. 


adrdHoal 






of*™ 


ntbiiml 


FintCuK 


Tho 


onn'd 



ForiiMICC 

Mankind are more accuBtomed 
to vklae IbinsA from tbeir beautji or 
nril;, ihao from their utility : thus 
iron, that mott vklnable of euIk 
itances, » generally (^mptojcil wilh- 
' ont either a gratefal or so inquiring 
thoogbt. We are ao familiar with 
it* application, that wo treat it at 
one of tboio e*ery-ilaj Buhjecti 
which demand no allenlioo, aod de- 
•FTve no investigalion. 
ii in gcnt^ral and increasing use, for 
which wo arc intlebted to tbc few 
who have felt interested in its pecn- I 
liar properties, and by persevering | 
nq»eriment have more fatly disclosed 
Hi MBlore ; but even among Ibcm, i! 
btotMfcaredjlhatbut fewari; soun- 
der the inSu en co of pious princijile, as 
gntefullj til discover and arknow- 
katt^ Ihe wisdom, pnwer.and licnc- 
ftcence of the Great Creator, in Ihi^ 
tarprislng qualities willi which it b 
mdowed. 

This metal nol only occurs in com- 
mon with others in (he bowols cf 
the carib, bnt mny h» aaid to per- 
i«d« natnrc, not cxeeptin); the nu- 
neronx tribes of vegelablcs, or tlic 
litidi that circalato in the animal 
economy. All Ihe purposes whirh 
in Mich a connexion it may scrvr, 
■faort-wghted man has not yet been 
lAle to ditcovcr; but it is known lu 
contribute to the variety of colonrin 
(Mrtlm and stones. The stale in wbiclj 
ttab metal is found is far from uni- 



• We laleljr m> h delinilion of " Nh 
lore," whan uied m ibii lenir, wiii 
which wa were moch pleand ; — " Ha 
tMT»m — (*■ FiogttolQsii." Bo. 



Corm, as philosopben number more 
than thirty kinds. 

We proceed to notioe aome of ita 
properties. It iiofablniih-gray co- 
iDor; ils readiness to ruit is wdl 
known, and olten deplored, but ita 
oxides, of which ebemiib reckon 
two, the black and tbo red, are of 
fjeat imporlanoe. It is one of the 
l^ardest and most elastic of metals, 
and is very tenacious; it it sono- 
rous, and exceedingly dnetile. la 
proof of its doclility. Dr. Black re- 
marks, that a wire, only one-tenth 
iif an incb in diameter, will suspend 
a weight of 4S0lbs. ; and that a wire 
uf well tempered steel, of the lamo 
dimensions, will support a wel;;bt of 
nearly 600lbs. Somewhat analo- 
gous to this property is the peculiar 
ijuality that dislingnishes it, by 
which one piece may be aniled to 
another without melting either of 
tbc pieces, but simply by beating 
them, and beating ihera into one 
mass, or, at least, the extremities, or 
those parts of them that ate required 
' to be joined;— an operation most 
common, and called vetdiiig. — This 
metal is not only attracted by Iho 
magnet, bnt possesses the pruperty 
of becoming ilseirmagnetjc. loef- 
lect this, it is merely necessary to 
suspend a bar of it perpendicularly. 
After some time it becomes maj^c- 
tic. The (ameTiroperly is occasion- 
ally communicated to it by friction j 
but this requires considerable ex po> 
rience.— Iron, itis well known, baa 
alio the property of giving 6re by 
collision with flint, yet it is fnsed 
with great difficulty, becoming first 
while, then cmilliuglirillianlspnrka, 
ind at last melting. It is, notwilh- 
jtaoding, soluble in all acids, im- 
parting to them an astringent taste. 
— It has moreover variooH salts, 
which aro ofesseulial use. 

This metal is employed in three 
slates; that of cast iron, wrought 
iron, ond steel. That dislingaished 
chemist, Mr. Park, with lua «t»ri 
precision, lias Wwis lioscVAiwi \\vt»A 
different statLi-. " C»*V VtaQ "» ** 
msUI in iwfirsV»late,^m4«'«B4.^«»- 
bio I)y the comV»wa-\\o^ "^ ttM\io' 



158 



JUVENILE BEPAIITMENT. 



and ONigen. Wronght iron differs 
from the fornier, in being deprived 
of Ibis carbon and oxygen b}' conli- 
nncd beat and repeated hammering, 
>vhich render the metal malleable. 
Steel is made of wrought iron by 
various processes, whereby the me- 
tal resomes a small portion of car- 
bon, and acquires a capacity of re- 
ceiving different degrees of hard- 
ness.'* 

Even a glance at the properties of 
this surprising metal, prepares us for 
the consideration of its utility. To 
enter into a minute detail of its use^ 
would be as volumnious as it would 
bo difficult ; and the probability is, 
that while the attempt was making, 
tome new property belonging to it, 
or some new application of its pro- 
perties, would be discovered. In 
the earliest stages of society some of 
its uses were known, and from tho!«e 
distant periods to the present time it 
has been increasingly employed. 
There is not a human employment 
in which it is not useful, nor an ar- 
ticle manufactured independently of 
its aid. It is equally important in 
the simple operations of husbandry, 
and in the more intricate perform- 
ances of the artisan. 

It would not be easy to say in 
which of its states it is most useful. 
When converted into steel, it is em- 
ployed both for ornament and utility ; 
hot it is particularly important in the 
manufacture of edge tools, whose ex- 
cellence depends on the proper tem- 
per given them from this state of the 
metal. In the state bf wronght iron, 
its uses are endless, and many of 
Ibem too obvious to need enume- 
ration. It is, perhaps, its employ- 
ment in the remaining state of cast 
iron which has recently most ex- 
cited our surprise. Immense and 
elegant bridges have been construct- 
ed of cast iron ; as, for instance, that 
over the Thames near Cheapside. 
Tlie use of stone in our pavements 
|ias been threatened to be super- 
seded by the employme^ of cast iron 
in the carriage way on the Surry 
side of Blackfriars bridfb, and a 
portion of the foot-way near Fins- 
bury-squarc. In the former Of these 
instances, the regularity of the ap- 
peMrance of the road could not but 
Uiiuct the Mention of the beholder. 



It bad the orderly arrangemept of 
rolls in their united state, wbet| 
taken from the oven ; and the vari- 
ous squares of which it was com- 
posed were connected together like 
the parts of a dissected map. A t the 
west end of London it has also been 
employed in the large fluted pillars 
which adorn several of the new 
buildings, and which, in addition to 
their neatness, are expected to re- 
commend themselves by their do<- 
rability. 

The salts of this metal arc of great 
importance in our manufactures; 
and oven its oxides are of essential 
utility in medicine, paintiuj^, ena- 
melling, and dying. 

But its important magpe^c pro- 
perty, and the consequent inventioQ 
of the mariner's compass, should fill 
us not merely with admiration, bat 
with gratitude. Dryden has well 
described the state of navigation 
before this discovery. 

** Rode as thoir ships was navigatioa 
then. 

No useful compass or roeridiao known : 

Coasting, they kept the land within their 
keiK 

And knew no north but where the pole- 
star shone." 

But now the i^ariner commitf 
bis vessel to the ocean with oompa^ 
rative confidence, and, in the darkeal 
sky, steers his trackless way without 
anxiety. By his compass be cuts the 
nearest course to any country, and 
readily satisfies the demands of 
commerce, or promptly carries the 
supplies of enlightened benevolence 
at the affecting calls of igqorano^ 
and misery. 

As the liecdle points tp the northt 
so has it often been desired that thti 
bias of the min4 migiit uniforoilj 
tend to Jesus Christ : nor can there 
be a more lienevolent wish than that 
the corrected affections of the youth- 
ful reader's mind, may as uniformly 
lead him to delight in God, to da* 
peiid simply upon the merits of the 
Redeemer tor escape from the wrath 
to coinc, and upon the influences of 
the Holy Spirit fur that meetnessfoir 
heaven which no inferior power can 
produce. Should this wish M 
granted, all his talents, and all hia 
altainmenU, V\VV t)« ci^iiaeorated im^ 
tiie»eme«ot^cA. li%'^* 



\ 



159 



ROBERT MUSTOE. 

RoBF.itT MtiSTOE waa bom in 
1733 »t Fulbrook, one mile from 
Surford, in the county of Oxford. 
Bia parenti were faoncit and indus- 
trioiu, and Robert followed their 
example. Ho had been trained iin 
in Ml atteadsnco at Ibe pariifa 
church, of which hii father wu the 
pteit. Though living many years 
witfaont the fear of Ood before hii 
ejea, that God whom he knew not, 
was pleaMd to preierve him from 
ntan; groner crimes, throuKfa a de- 
ifost of (he ejes, which almost pre- 
vented him from reading the scrip- 
Inm, even In the largest Ijpe. The 
irakind treatment which be received 
fnim his gonng companions on this 
account, induced him to get atone, 
that he might read without - being 
rodel; langhed at by the unfeeling 
lerilen. We tee in this a proof of 
'ihe wijdom and goodness of Gud, in 
the eflvcta which follow from bodilj 
trtelt. He was unable to read for 
many yean before hit death. 

liie first time he remembered 
|it(«ring the Gospel from a Dissenter 
waa id his youth, at the village ol 
S. A xcaloui itinerant was thv. 

Eeacher, who was treated very nn- 
ndly by tome of the ungodly 
hearcrt; but nor friend Mnstoc 
wannly contended on his behalf, 
bdkring he vrii a good and faitlifut 
BBMoBfer. No funher effect, how- 
ij*«r, appeared to be produced on 
Ua mind. He always bated perse- 
mtiOB. When arrived ttt manhood , 
be entered upon a settled life, and 
Providence rommil ling several chit- 
dr«B to his care, be brought tliRm 
np in haJiiti of fabnesty, teaching 
Ibem to labour with thnir hands fcir 
Om ntoedful thing* of this life. 1 1 
pteaiad God to take away hi* part- 
BM while the children were of len- 
der yean; and he nobi; strove to 
tb« mtmoil to rare tbo ptrinh the 
vof their tBuateaaoce: de- 



spising that meanneM which leads 
loo many to seek for aid, while tfaej 
live in comparative indolence. 

About Ibirly years sin^, the Bap- 
list place of worship in Burford was 
supplied by ncigbbuuring ministers, 
ind our friend attended on the word 
preached with great constaney. 

November 1, 1801, Robert Mas< 
toe became a member, having some 
years before opened bit bouse fi)t tli9 
preaching of tlie gospel at Fulbrook. 
On bis dying-bed he deplored liif 
having done this from improper mo- 
.:„». " How vain I was," said he. 



merit something from God tor it!" 
His oonseience was very tender, and 
he was deeply affected when he said 
this. He was peculiarly altaobeil 
to Mr. Harris and Mr. Smith, who 
were the flrst ministers settled at 
Burford fur many yean past AHer 
the death of Mr. Smith in m07, the 



felt grief. About this time, too, cir- 
cumstances occurred which deprived 
him of the power of inviting the mi- 
nisters to preach at his house. In 
tlie year ISIS, the present pasloi 
was desirous to know liis stale of 
mind respecting the ordinance of 
Baptism, to wliicli ho had nuvur al^ 
tended. He was, to our joy, fully 
convinced, and quite willing upoD 
(his occasion to attend thereunto; 
(liungh past his ei^hlg-ttamd ifear, 
and very feeble, besides being Tillle 
belter than blind. Neither age, 
blindness, trouble, nor any oliier 
tliiug could discourage him. Huwaa 
conveyed to Bourtou-on-lhe-Walcr, 
(no baptistery being buill at Burford 
Iben.) and there be joyfully imitaletl 
bis Lord and Master; being led 
down to nnd from the water. Our 
dear brother Mr.T. Coles rejoiced 
greally at this noble ias(&i\c« oV 
Christian deciswn; Mv4 wt \w\^ 
that many, on readias Viiw, ■*'* \>*. 
fionitrained to tvy , " IaV »^& 16*> •■'^^, 



152 



LBTTEft PItOM THE RSV. MR. NEWTOK. 



them the justification of all that 
has been said of his parts, or his 
piety, will be found ; and there 
is no question they will preserve 
his reputation, and their own, as 
lon^ as there shall be any taste 
for strong, and yet clear reason* 
ing ; masculine unaffected elo- 
quence, flowing from the just dis* 
tribution of the parts of a dis- 
course, and not a pomp of chosen 
words, and sounding epithets; or 
men retain any sense of those in- 
teresting and important truths, 
which he has so represented as 
to be sure of their making an im- 
pression on the heart, by their 
filling the whole measure of the 
understanding/' provided (we 
should add) they be accompanied 
with the renovating influences of 
the Holy Spirit, without which 
even a Paul must plant, and an 
Apollos water, in vain. 



A LETTER 

Frwn the Rev: Mr. Newton to a 
Baptist Minister^ whose Wife 
was at the point of death. 



Jan. 23. 1787. 

My DEAR Friend, 

I feel, but I do not fear, for 
you. The God whom thou serv- 
est he can support and deliver 
you. He is all sufficieoty and his 
promise is sure. 

Plenty of advice is at hand, but 
I dare not offer you much in this 
way. You are in the heat of a 
trial ; I am at present in quiet. 
It would be easy for me to press 
patience and resignation upon 
you, and to remind you that a 
pardoned sinner ought never to 
complain. You could speak the 
same language to me, if I were in 
your case, and you were at ease. 

Yet though we may and ought 
Ip compassionate one another un- 



der our various trials, and to 
speak with tenderness where the 
heart is wounded ; there are 
truths which, if trouble hides 
them from our view, it is the office 
of a friend to recal them. Yon 
and I are ministers. As such, 
how often have we commended 
the gospel as the ro er, affording 
those who truly receive it, a balm 
for every wound, a cordial for 
every care ! 

How of^en have we told our 
hearers, that our all-sufficient and 
faithful Lord can and will make 
good every want and loss ! How 
often have we spoken of the light 
of his countenance as a full com- 
pensation for every suffering, and 
of the trials of the present We as 
not worthy to be compared with 
the exceeding abundant and eter- 
nal weight of glory to which they 
are leading! We must not there* 
fore wonder, if we are sometimes 
called to exemplify the power of 
what we have said, and to shew 
our people that we have not set 
before them unfelt truths, which 
wc have learut from books and 
men only. You are now in a 
post of honour, and many eyes 
are upon you. May the Lord 
enable you to glorify him, and to 
encourage them^ by your exem- 
plary submission to his will ! 

You are doubtless allowed to 
pour out your heart before him, 
and even to pray for Mrs. R.*s re- 
covery, and I will join with you 
so far as I dare. 1 likewise have 
had my trials, but I am still lia- 
ble to one very different from all 
I have yet experienced. But I 
am so short-sighted as to events 
and consequences, that in any 
supposable case' 1 seem to trem- 
ble at the thought of having my 
own choice, even if it were allow* 
ed me to choose. In my better 
judgment 1 am pleased to think, 
that infinite Wisdom and Good*- 



I 



AN ANTIDOTB TO INFIDBLITT. 



153 



.ess bare engaged to manage for 

. I am sure that afflictions do 

Slot happen at random, nor spring 

^>nt of the ground ; that the Lord 

'^akes no pleasure in afflicting us ; 

9nd that if the desires of our 

lieart are not always given us, it 

is because we often know not 

mrhat we ask. I pray for her, that 

he may enable her quietly and 

cheerfully to commit herself into 

his hands; and I pray for you, 

that you may do the same. You 

■lay be assured he will not try 

you beyond what he will enable 

you to bear. If it be for your 

good, especially for your chief 

goody hia glory f she shall recover; 

he will restore her, though a 

hundred physicians had given 

her up. If otherwise, I doubt 

not but be will help you to say, 

Thy will be done. And hereafter 

you shall see that his will was 

best.* 

My dear Eliza was not indeed 
a wife, but she was very near my 
heart. A few weeks or days be- 
fore her removal, had it been 
lawful and agreeable to the will of 
God, I think I would have re- 
deemed her life at the price of a 
limb{ yet when the stroke came 
very near, it was so circum- 
stanced, so alleviated, so sweet- 
ened, that could the lifting up 
of my finger have detained her, 
and restored her to perfect 
health, I could not have lifted it 
up. Perhaps I never suffered 
more, perhaps I never suffered 
less, than when I saw her in the 
agonies of death. Then I found 
that the Lord was all-sufficient 
indeed ; and I trust you will find 
him so. 

Accept this hasty line as a to- 
ken of my sympathy » I was hot 
M^iiiin^ to wait till I could find 



* She died the day Uib letter wm 
•fiutii. 



more leisure. May the Lord bless 
you both. And may we all so 
weep as^ becomes those who ex« 
pect, ere long, to have all our 
tears wiped away. 
I am sincerely and affectionately 
Yours, 

John Nbwtok. 



AN 



ANTIDOTE TO INFIDELITY. 



Beware lest any man spoil yam 
through Philosophy and wan deceit^ 
after the tradition of men, after the 
rudiments o/ the world, and not after 
Christ. Col. ii. 8. 



There never was a period in 
the history oi the Christian 
Church, when an attention to this 
precept of the Apostle was more 
necessary than in the present day» 
The grand adversary of mankind, 
after having for many ages at* 
tempted to prevent the spread of 
the Gospel, by keeping the world 
in ignorance, is now endeavour- 
ing to effect the same purpose 
by means of the knowledge which 
Christianity has principally circu<» 
lated. He is aiming to convert 
the press, which has hitherto been 
so powerful an auxiliary to tha 
cause of religion, into the instni* 
meut of its destruction, and by 
its agency to scatter the baneful 
seed of blasphemy and unbelief 
throughout the land. Thje Bible, 
however, would not be the reve* 
lationofGod, if it did not con* 
tain within it, a sufficient antidote 
to such awful doctrines. Its evi« 
deuces are, like the characters it 
forms, founded upon a rock. 
In vain shall the rain descend^ 
the winds blow, and the whirl* 
wind and storm attack its base — 
it is immoveable-—" the gates of 
hell shall not prevail a|ainst it/' 



154 



SBPABATION FROM TBB WORLIK 



It becomes the Christian, in 
inch a scoffing and infidel age as 
the |!nresenty to be most wise and 
circumspect — *' to gird on his 
whole armour." Let htm remem- 
ber he is " the light of the world, 
and in tlie midst of a crooked 
and perverse generation;'' that 
one of the best arguments he 
can afford of the truth of religion, 
is by iivin§: well This proof it 
is more difficult to gainsay, than 
many others of a more learned 
and elaborate natnre. It is the 
best actual evidence of the truth 
of the Bible that can eiist. What 
a testimony to the lives and man- 
ners of the primitive Christians was 
borne by the Heathen, when they 
exclaimed, " How these Chris- 
tians love each other!" Alas! it 
is to be feared this spirit of love 
and communion is much dimi- 
nished in the present day, and 
that religion is too much a matter 
of profession, and too little a bu- 
siness of the heart. 

How lamentable it is to consi- 
der, that although there are so 
many thousands who believe that 
the Bible is a revelation of the 
will of God to man, so very few 
comparatively are influenced by 
its doctrines, that one of the most 
puzzling arguments of its adver- 
saries is taken from the lax and 
disorderly conduct of its profes- 
sors I Brethren, these things 
ought not so to be. The king- 
dom of God is not of this world. 
His ffmce will produce good fruits 
in ^our lives. If you are en- 
tangled in the concerns of this 
life, to the prejudice of religion ; 
if the love of money, which is the 
root of all evil, has taken posses- 
sion of your soul ; if you are con- 
tinually employed in using every 
means, both just and unjust, to 
increase your property ; if you 
love not your brother, because he 
is poor; if you attend to the du- 



ties of the Sabbath in a cold, for- 
ma] manner, as a mere matter af 
duty ; if you neglect private and 
family prayer; — is it a wonder 
that religion, through your exam-* 
pie, is brought into contempt; 
that it is represented as a system 
of pretension and hypocrisy 1 
" Let therefore your lights be 
horning ;* show to the world the 
reality of your faith, and the ge- 
nuine effect of the love of Christ 
in your hearts. Yon will then be 
the most effective advocates for 
the Gospel. Vonr hearts will 
then be sanctified, and your lives 
will be holy. You will loTe your 
neighbours, and employ yonr« 
selves in acts of kindness for his 
welfare. You will deny all un- 
godliness and worldly lusta^ and 
live soberly, righteously^ and 
godly, in the present evil world. 
Prayer and divine meditation will 
teach you the vanities of the 
world ; will enable you to endure 
all the afflictions and trials of life 
with patience and resignatioot 
looking to that " inheritance which 
is incorruptible, undefiled, and 
which iadeth not awav." 

It is such characters as these 
that blow away the sophistries of 
human vanity, like chaff before 
the wind ; which carry home to 
the mind a conviction of the 
truth of Christianity ; and which 
produce the sentiment so often 
expressed, "Let me die the death 
of the righteous, and let my last 
end be like hb." 

M.M. 

Hammertmith* 



SEPARATION 
FROM THE WORLD. 



Rblioion and the world are 
so widely different in their nature 
and their tendency, that however 



tBPARATIOK FROM THB WOBLD. 



155 



tnaukiod may attempt an amalga* 
matioa, their efforts will be just 
as fruitless as it would have been 
to mix together in one substance 
the iron and clay, in the image 
seen in Nebuchadnezsar's dream. 
Many are the commands which 
are given to the Christian world, 
enjoining its keeping itself so se- 
paratedy as that its members may 
be known by all men to have 
been with Jesus. Our divine 
Lord and Master says, *' Ye can- 
not serve God ano Mammon." 
Their demands are so opposite, 
their injunctions so adverse^ and 
their commands so contrary, that 
in loving one we must hate the 
other; and while we serve ei- 
ther, we disobey the other. 
Come and taste the good I offer, 
•ays the world : — " Depart ye — 
Depart ye — go ye out from thence 
— touch no unclean thing,'^ 
saith the Lord. So that decision 
ID this momentous affi&ir is of the 
utmost importance: '' I would 
that thon wert either cold or 
hot." 

But my further design in this 
Essay is to show, how a Christian 
may fail into the ways of the 
world ; and at the same time to 
point out its evils, and to hint at 
the importance and advantage of 
maintaining an evident distinc- 
tion. 

In showing how a Christian 
may fall into the ways of the 
world, I would remark, that this 
it done by conforming to worldly 
customs, such, as dress, vain 
and trifling conversation, amuse- 
ments. Sic. &c. Now when these 
are considered abstractedly, they 
may not look like evils, but view- 
ing them in connexion with their 
consequences, and with the ef- 
fects they produce, they assume 
a much more forbidding aspect. 
For instance; the Christian be- 
holds some fiishionable garb, or 



gay robe, which suits his inclina- 
tion, and wishes to have it and 
wear it. Now dress, cou^der* 
ed simply and abstractedly, can 
have no evil in it; but if we 
connect it with the ideas of 
the person's being proud of a 
garment, of his setting his affec- 
tions on dress, and letting fats 
thoughts run after any thing of so 
trivial a nature, to the neglect of 
his more important concerns, 
then the case is much changed. 
I would not be understood, from 
the sentiments here expressed, as 
advocating any thing like precue* 
ness or uniformity in dress ; by 
no means : I think every one has 
a degree of respectability to sup* 
port, and ought to dress conform- 
ably to his situation. But wfa«il 
I see any persons, whose lot it is 
to walk the ordinary paths of 
life, attempting to show some su* 
periority by dress, and wishing 
to obtain esteem from the fine- 
ness of their attire, I either think 
they must have a vain mind, or 
that religion is at a low ebb, or 
both. But the evil does not rest 
here. When we possess any thing, 
it is generally our desire to have 
it known; particularly if we 
think we shall be the more highly 
thought of for such possession. 
Thence the love of dress leads to 
the breaking down of a more 
important distinction between 
Christians and the world— to their 
associating ' with worldly com* 
pany. They who are enjoying 
much of the presence of God, 
and living in a daily intercourse 
with him, are not the company 
which such will seek. No ; they 
will seek such as have views cor- 
respondent with, and inclinations 
similar to, their own. Therefore 
to the world they must look.. 
Here they associate with such at 
cannot come up to Christians in 
conversation, becausa iIl«^ Vi%.^^ 



\oi'> 



r H I 1. 1 P 11 1 , X R V s o r 1 N I () N . 



DO expcriinenlal acquaintance 
with those truths, which are their 
fupporf, their food, their comfort, 
their hope, and their, eojovnient. 
Not bavinc* experienced the in- 
fluence of these things on their 
Iiearts, to hear them conversed 
upon has no interest nith them, 
and they will shun such persons 
as cannot, or will not, converse 
on subjects more correspondent 
with their views; so that if a 
person professin^jr Christianity 
would associate with them, he 
JQUSt so far dishonour his profes- 
iion, and slight his Lord and 
Master, as to enter on and join 
in conversation on things of the 
world. Alas, here is a sad change ! 
leanness here enters the soul ; 
and the mind, which not long 
ago appeared as the well -favour- 
ad kine, or the plentifully filled 
ears of corn in Pharaoh's dream, 
* degenerates into their opposites. 
Having drunk into the spirit, the 
amusements of the world next 
claim a place in such a buck- 
slider's heart : and here a still 
wider gate is opened, altogether 
confirming that aphorism of the 
Prophet^ " The heart is deceitful 
abovie all things, and desperately 
wicked/' 

From tliese imperfect remarks, 
the importance of keeping our- 
selves separate from the world is 
very evident. I allow there is ne- 
cessary business, which calls the 
attention of the Christian into the 
world, and that to neglect this is 
highly cul|)able, yea, criminal. 
The apostle commands diligence 
in business, but unites with it fer- 
vency of spirit, and an habitual 
serving of the Lord. But this is, 
I apprehend, widely different from 
associating from inclination with 
the world. '* I would not," says 
an eminent divine, now fallen 
asleep, ** 1 would not enter any 
^mpany where my Master is not 



admitted." O that more of tb 
spirit pervaded the minds of prc^'^ 
fessors in these latter days I Me^ 
thinks if this were the case, reli-' 
gion would appear more like a 
candle set on a candlestick, aad 
the churches more resemble a 
city set on a hill, which cannot be 
hid. Ministers would behold 
more living epistles, if those 
which are such were seen and 
read of all men : more of the 
spirit of love would be felt and 
enjoyed, and Zion would becomt^ 
a praise to the whole earth. 

" Lord, keep me from each rmin desire^ 

From worldly hope and ftar ; 
O fill my heart with holy fire, 

Wi(b love aad childlike fear* 

III wisdom's ways preserve my feel ; 

There guard oiid keep roy soul : 
May I enjoy commanion sweet ^ 

With ihee, my God, my alL* 

PHILO, 

Bradford, Nov. IS. 18J0. 



Opinion of the pious Philip 
Hetiry on the Laws against 
Protestant Dissenters and Ro^ 
man Catholics, 



" The great subject of debate 
at this time (IG87) in the nation 
was, concerning the repeal of pe- 
nal laws and tc>ts. Mr. Henry '« 
thoughts were, as to the peiial 
laws, that if those against the 
Dissenters were all repealed, Iiq 
would njoice in it, and be very 
thankful both to God and man ; 
for he would sometimes say, with- 
out reflection upon any, that he 
could not but look upon them as 
a national sin ; and as for those 
against the Papists, ' If (said he) 
our lawgivers see cause to repeal 
them in a regular way, I will 
endeavour to make the best f4 it^ 
and to say, The will of the Lor4 
be done.' " 

X.»/lr, chap, viii. 



f u^entte department* 



PHILOSOPHICAL 
REFLECTIONS. 



No. XXIV.— /BOW. 

•■ Whn wsTtb H RckoB-d b; ufflilj. 



IWpi'it in puticla tliiaii|h Nusre'i* wosit, 
Tor am tountlBU, jet kw« (Bui'd bjr mM." 

Mankind ore more accustomed 
to xalae Hiineti from tb«ir beauty oi 
nritf , than from their utilil; : thui , 
iron, that moit Talaable or boIi- , 
■tancei, li generally omplojcd wiih- 
' out either a gratefal or an inquirioi 
tbongliL We ue so familiar with 
iU applicRtion, that wo treat it as 
one of tho«e oTery-daj inbjecfs 
which demand DO atleulioD, and de- 
■crve no iDTeitigalion. It ii tra^, it 
[• in gcii<!ral and increasiog Die, for 
which wo am inrfthled to the fe« 
If ho have felt interested in it* pecii- 
liar propertiea, and by pencvering 
experiment have mnre fully discloseil 
Hs Balnrc ; but even among them, il 
htobe feared, tbal bat few are so un- 
der theinHocnCH of pious principle, as 
l^tefully til discover and acknow. 
ledge the wisdom, pnner, and hcne- 
ficence of ttw- Great Cruator, in ihr 
■nrpriRlng qualities trilb which il h 
endowed. 

Thia metal not only occurs in com- 
mon with olhen in the bowels of 
the cartb, but mciy bi» said (o per- 
vade natnrc, not excepting the nn- 
ineTDiis tribes of vegetables, or tlin 
Imda that clrcnlato in the aiiimul 
econoiny. All the purposes whirb 
in ineh a connexion it raay sent?, 
■bort-f igbted. rnati has not yet been 
■Me (o discover; but it It known lu 
mnlribute to tlic variety of colour in 
earth* aud stones. 'Die Hlalc in whicb 
tlbi metal is found is far from uni- 



• We laielj saw a dcfiniiion of ■ 
lare," when uMd u\ ibin tentt, 
whieh we were aiach pleased 
tufk—tbrnFiogtrofOad," 

roL. XIII. 



Ed. 



form, as philosopbers namber more 
I ban thirty kinda. 

We proceed to notioe aome of iti 
properties. It isofahlniih-gray eo> 
ioDr; its readiness to riul is well 
known, and olteo deplored, but ita 
oxides, of wliich cbemista reckon 
Ivo, the black and the red, are of 
great importance. It ia one of tbo 
hardest and most elaatio of melala, 
and is verj tenacioui; it is soniH 
rous, and esceedioglj daolile. In 
proof ofitadDcUlity, Dr. Black re- 
marks, that a wire, only ono-tenth 
uf an inch in diameter, will suspend 
a weight of 4&0lbs. ; and that a wire 
of well tempered steel, of the samo 
dimensions, will support a nelfcht of 
nearly 600lhs. Somewhat aualo- 
goa% to Ibis property is the peculiar 
quality that dtslingoisbea it, bj 
vhich one piece may be united to 
.inotber wilbont melting either oT 
iho pieces, but simply by beaUng 
them, and beating them into one 
Riais, or, at least, ibe extremities, or 
[hose parts of them that are required 
10 be joined; — an operation most 
common, and called weldiiig. — Thia 
metal is not only attracted by tha 
magnet, but possesse* tbo pmpertj 
of beciiming itself magnetic. To ef- 
leot this, it ia merely necessary to 
luspenda bar of it perpendicularly. 
After lomo time it becom^cs magnc' 
lie. The sameVoperly is occasion- 
Eilly ctHomunicated to it by friction ! 
but this require* considerable oxpo- 
rience. —Iron, it is well known, baa 
also the property of giving fire by 
collision with Hint, yet it is fnsed 
with great difficulty, becoming Drat 
while, Ibcii emitting brilliimt sparks, 
and at last melting. It is, notwilb- 
standing, soluble in all acids, im> 
puling to them an astringent Uiste. 
—It baa moreoier various salts, 
which are of essential use. 

Thia metal is employed in thrre 
states; that of cast iron, wrought 
iron, and steel. That distinguished 
chemist, Mr, Park, witli his usual 
precision, baa Ihwa AtsM'ftitA \\ic»n 
different alati;*-. " Cait wo'tt '» *^ 
meUI in iia fint aVute, tfttviCT** W- 
hlo ly the cornVwatoon "^ «i^^* 



158 



JUVENILE BEPAIITMENT. 



and oxigen. Wronght iron differs 
from the fomier, in being deprived 
of ibis carljon and oxygen by conti- 
nued beat and repeated bammering, 
>vhicb render tbe metal malleable. 
Steel is made of wronght iron by 
various processes, wbeireby tbe me- 
tal resumes a small portion of car- 
bon, and acquires a capacity of re- 
ceiving different degrees of hard- 
ness." 

Even a glance at the properties of 
this surprising metal, prepares us for 
the consideration of its utility. To 
enter into a minute detail of its use9 
would be as volumnious as it wonld 
bo difficult ; and the probability is, 
ttiat while the attempt was making, 
tome new property belonging to it, 
or some new application of its pro- 
perties, would be discovered. In 
the earliest stages of society some of 
its uses were known, and from Ibo^e 
distant periods to the present time it 
has been increasingfly employed. 
There is not a human employment 
in which it is not useful, nor an ar- 
ticle manufactured independently of 
its aid. It is eqnally important in 
the simple operations of husbandry, 
and in the more intricate perform- 
ances of the artisan. 

It wonld not be easy to say in 
which of its states it is most useful. 
When converted into steel, it is em- 
ploy<)d both for ornament and utility ; 
but it is particularly important in the 
manufacture of edge tools, whose ex- 
cellence depends on the proper tem- 
per given them from this state of the 
metal. In the state bf wrought iron, 
its uses are endless, and many of 
them too obvious to need enume- 
ration. It is, perhaps, its employ- 
ment in the remaining state of cast 
iron which has rectotly most ex- 
cited our surprise. Immense and 
elegant bridges have been construct- 
ed of cast iron ; as, for instance, that 
over the Tliames near Cheapside. 
Tlie use of stone in our pavements 
bas been threatened to l>e super- 
seded by tlie employme^of cast iron 
in the carriage way on the Surry 
side of Biackfriars brid^, and a 
portion of the foot-way near Fins- 
bury-squaro. In the former Of these 
instances, the regularity of the ap- 
peMraace of tbe road could not but 
Miiract tbe MitenUoo of the beholder. 



It bad the orderly arrangement of 
rolls in their united state, when 
taken from the oven ; and the vari- 
ous squares of which it was com- 
posed were connected together like 
the parts of a dissected map. At the 
west end of London it has also been 
employed in the large fluted pillars 
which adorn several of the new 
buildings, and which, in addition to 
their neatness, are expected to re- 
commend themselves by theur du- 
rability. 

The salts of this metal arc of great 
importance in our manufactures; 
and oven its oxides are of essential 
utility in medicine, paintiuj^, ena- 
melling, and dyin|f. 

But its important magne^c pro- 
perty, and tbe consequent inventioii 
of the mariner's compass, should fill 
us not merely with admiration, bat 
with gratitude. Dryden has well 
described the state of navigation 
before this discovery. 

** Rade as their ships was navigatioa 
then. 

No useful compass or roeridiao known : 

Coasting, they kept the laod within their 
keiK 

And knew no north but where the pole- 
star shone." 

But now the mariner commitf 
bis vessel to the ocean with compa- 
rative confidence, and, in the darkest 
sky, steers bis trackless way withoul 
anxiety. By his compass he cuts the 
nearest course to any country, and 
readily satisfies the demands of 
commerce, or promptly carries the 
supplies of enlightened benevolence 
at the affecting calls of ignorance 
and misery. 

As the needle points to the northt 
so has it often been desired that the 
bias of the min4 might uniformlj 
tend to Jesus Christ : nor can there 
be a more lienevolent wish than that 
the corrected affections of the youth- 
ful reader's mind, may as uniformly 
lead him to delight in God, to de- 
pend simply upon the hierits of the 
Redeemer for escape from the wrath 
to coinc, and upon the influences of 
the Holy Spirit fur that meetnessfol: 
heaven which no inferior power can 
produce. Should this wish h4 
granted, all his talents, and all his 
altainmenU, viWV titt t^Tuwiorated tt 
lA\e MTNice ot ^oA, IJ J^ J . 



*' . « • 



\ 



159 

^ttuarp. 



OBERT MUSTOE. 

IT MiiSTOE was horn in 
Fulbraok, one mile Trom 
Id the coiintv of Onford. 
inti wire faoncit «nd indu»- 
ftod Robert followed their 
I. Mo had been trained up 
attendance at the paritn 
of whieh his falbt^r wai Uic 
IlionKh living manj jeart 
the fear of God before hli 
at God whom be knew not, 
ued to pteseTTs him from 

the eyes, wbich almost pre- 
lim from reading Iho scrip- 
ren in the largest type, llie 
treatinent which he received 
jonng uompauioni on thit 
; induced him to |:et alone. 

might read witbont ~ being 
■nffhed Ht hf the nnfeeling 
We see in this a. proof of 
lom and goodncsi of Gud, Id 
Bta wbich follow from bodilj 

He was anable In read for 
ears before bis death. 

fint timo he remembered 

the Gospel from a Dissenter 
Ini yontlt, at the Tillage of 

lealous itinerant wu the 
IT, who was treated *erj on- 
b; aome of the nngodly 
; hut nnr friend Mnstoc 
contended on his behalf, 
ig he was a good and failhrul 
(or. No further effect, bow- 
ppeared to he prodnccd on 
d. He always liated ptrsc- 
When arrived «1 manhood, 
red upon a settled life, and 
incc ru m mitt ing several chil- 

his care, he brunght tliom 
baliiti of honesty, teaching 
I labour with their hands fui 
idfu) things of this life. It 

God to take away his part- 
ite the children were of tcn- 
n; and he nobljr alrove lt> 
aott to tare the parinb (he 
(of their mualeoaBce: de- 



spising that meanneu wbich leatb 
too many to seek for aid, while thcj 
live in comparative indolence. 

Aboat thirty years lin^e, the Bap- 
list place of worship in Burford waa 
tupplled by neighbouring ministers, 
tnd our friend attended on the word 
preached with great constancy. 

November 1, 1801, Robert Mas- 
toe became a member, having some 
years before opened his bouse Cor the 
preacblngof tlio gospel atFalbrook. 
On his dying-bed he deplored liif 
haviog dons this from improper mo- 
livca. " How vain I was," said be, 
" thinking what a great thing 1 had 
done, and that I should ho sure to 
merit aometliing from God (or it!" 
Hii conscience was very tender, and 
he was deeply affected when be said 
this. He wa« peculiarly attached 
to Mr. Harris and Mr. Smith, who 
were the first minislen settled at 
Burford fur many years past After 
the death of Mr. Smith in 1H07, the 



felt grief. About this time, lou, clr- 
cumsttncesoocarredwhichdeprived 
blraofthe powerof inviting the mi- 
nisters to preach at his bouse. In 
the year 181&, the present pastor 
was desirous to kuow his stale of 
mind respccllni; the ordinance of 
Eaptisra, to which ho bad never at^ 
tended. He was, to our joy, fully 
convinced, and quite willing upon 
attend ther 



tliuiigli past his eightg'ittond ymr, 
and very feeble, besides being lillle 
better than blind. Neither age, 
lillndness, trouble, nor any other 
lliiug could discourage him. He waa 
cnrvejed to Bourlou-on-the-Watcr, 
(no baptistery being buijl ^t Burford 
tlicn.) and Ihero he Joyfully imitated 
his Iiord.and Master; hciog led 
down to nnd from tlio water. Onr 
dear brullier Mr. T. Coles rejoiced 
grcally at tliis noble ta3itM^c« tA. 
CImstian decision-, va& ^e \vft^ 
that many, on r*»4\n5 Vlvw, Wia Xi^ 
constrained to «ay, " l*t, ^ %» mA. 



160 



OBlTUARt. 



do likewise/' This solemn sceuo 
was wituessed, with pleasare of do 
5m all degree, by the writer, August 
6, 1816. 

Tho settlement of his pastor in 
1816, gave R. Mustoe very great 
satisfaction, because he desired to 
see Jerusalem a quiet dwelling- 
place, lie contimied to attend con- 
stantly on the LordVday, and was 
spared to see the house of his God 
enlarged greatly in the autumn of 
1819, and then said he was ready to 
depart ; having seen God's salyation, 
and feeling persuaded Zion would 
prosper here. He narrowly escaped 
falling headlong from the gallery 
the first time he took a view of it, as 
far as his sight would allow, after 
the enlargement. The time was 
now drawing nigh, -which we ex- 
pected with pain, and which he al- 
most always anticipated with joy. 
He joined with 'us in worship Fe- 
bruary 13, 1S20, and he came no 
more ! Many delightfbl hours bad 
been passed in conversations the 
most spiritual ; for he delighted in 
•peaking of the things of God to his 
fellow-members, and now we saw 
that in the prospect of death, he was 
an ** Israelito indeed, in whom was 
BO gnilo.'* His heart was fixed, his 
hope in Jesus was firm, his views of 
salvation through the cross, clear 
and steady. Even when reason wa- 
vered, he discovered still his love to 
God. One of the last things ho 
spoke to his pastor was, on being re- 
minded of looking forwards to the 
Zion above, '* I must look to Mount 
Calvary too,*' said he. His spirit 
received a peaceful dismission from 
a worn-out tabernacle, (in which it 
bad resided eighty-seven years,) on 
the 14tli of Apnl, 1820. Some cir- 
cumstances, connected with this 
event, appear worthy of notice, es- 
pecially by members of churches. 

1. The obituary of this man fur- 
nishes an example of decision of 
character. 

He was baptized at eighty-two 
years of age ! though he had been a 
member for years, and ws almost 
blind, with a body bending to tho 
earth. He sustained no injury there- 
by, but he obtained the testimony of 
M good conscience. This enabled 
h/m to cnconm^a otiicrs in the dis- 



charge of duty, and by this evidebce 
of faith in love towards the Redeem- 
er, he glorified God. 

2. No member of a church proba' 
bly was mere beloved than this man. 
Ho was very poor, and very illite- 
rate; a feeble old man for many 
years before the vmter knew him. 
But he was eminently peaoefnl, spi- 
ritual, and most peculiarly afiection- 
ate. No member over gave less occa- 
sion of pain to a pastor or a chorch. 
His humility was, above all, conspi- 
cuous. Thus he loved all^ and was 
always beloved by all. 

3. He was very disinterested in 
serving Jesus his Lord and Master. 

On a LordVday he walked from 
and to his dwelHug-place, subsisting ^ 
upon a few moathftilsof the plainest ' 
food. He was even unwilling to re- 
ceive the help oflercd him as to bo* 
dily necessity, and constantly paid 
his penny per week for supporting a 
Gospel ministry, though dependent 
on the parish. His gratitude for the 
smallest favours, and contentment^ 
were eminent at all times. 

4. His attachment to the means 
of grace was peculiarly stron|f. 

On a Sabbath-day, if Robert Mas- 
toe was missing, we felt persuaded 
it was from entire necessity. Win- 
ter and summer were thesame, only 
as the approaching evening com- 
pelled him to leave us earlier than 
he wished. At the Lord's table he 
was melted with tender feelings of 
love to his brethren and sisters, and 
delight in his Lord, with mingled 
contrition and joy. His melting lan- 
guage seemed to melt us all. He do- 
sired to die amongst us,or to be taken 
hence as soon as he Was prevented 
coming to the house of God. No 
persons could look at him without 
being ashamed of inconstancy in at- 
tendance. 

5. God gave him length of days^ 
and showed to him his salvation. 

He had much eiyoyment in cild 
age, hv was greatly beloved, he y^^m 
in many respects very usefiil, and 
brought forth fruit in old ago. He 
rejoiced greatly in the state of the 
church, when on his d^iug bed. 
And his views were clearer as be 
drew near to the world appbinttd 
for bis Cuturc residence. Ilis was 
Wic o\d f^ijfi o^ \^^V^» ^^ Vvi ^v| 



OBITUART. 



ICI 



Inyn were to bim ** a crown of f^ory, 
for he was foiind id the wajr of ri^cb- 
teoasDOM," Prov. xvi. 31. The tes- 
tiiDony bonie at bis interment was 
allowed by all to be jnst; be came 
to his ^ Kra?e in a full ai^e, like as 
m shock of corn comelh in its season," 
Jobv. 28. 

May (Sod raise op many such 
aged and lionoarable old men in all 
tbo cbvrcfies of bis Son ! Reader, 
look mt this pattern — Oo, and do 
likewise ; and pve to God the ^lory, 
for this is all the work of bis free 
and sioverci^n grace, in Christ Je- 
um, throni^ the DiYine Spirit — ^to 
whom be gUMry for evermore. Amen. 



RECENT DEATHS. 



RiT. T. NORTHCOTfi TOLLER. 



On Monday, Feb. 26, 1821, en- 
tered into the joy of bb Lord, it may 
ke said, suddenly — for he was, three 
ninates before his death, in tbe t*n- 
joynent of bis usual state of benlf h 
— hot not without Constant previous 
■Mditation upon, and looking^ fur, 
that joyful yet solemn event, tbe 
Reverend Thomas Northcote Toller, 
pastor of the Independent Church 
mt Ketterinfl^ almost forty- three years, 
having survived bis lieloved friends, 
tbe Rev. Mr. Palmer of Hackney, 
about seven years and three months ; 
91 r. Fuller, nearly six years; and 
the Author of Thornton AJ[>bey, op- 
wards of twenty-three years. 

Mr. Toller possessed |p^at re- 
spcctabilily of character, and very 
auperior ministerial talents. His 
pfcachtngc fixed the attention, and 
iBterested the heart. He narticu- 
Uuiy oxcelled in copious, familiar, 
mud yet ^slegant illustration, and in 
Ikoa hrio^ip his subject, however 
mbstmse, within the comprehension 
of the weakest of his liearers, kl'^he 
•ame time that 4 here was noXhkHl^o 
offend the roost jtulicions. He throve 
not only to preach tbe truth, but 
miso to oonvince his congregation 
that what he delivered was the truth. 
Nor did he address tbe understand- 
ing only, but also tbe affections and 
4he coBseience. The whole was 
kflji^teiked by tbe earnesto^sf and 

VOL0 xni. 



solemnity, united with jndicions- 
ness, of his delivery. He was deep- 
ly affected biraself, frequently to the 
shedding of team, with the import- 
ance of bis subject ; and hence his 
discourses could not fail, under tlio 
inflaence of the Holy Spirit, to make 
a strong and lasting impression upon 
others. 

But though his sermons were so 
excellent, he excelled still more iu 
bis addresses to tbe Divine Majesty. 
He seemed by the solemnity of liiii 
manner, and the chaste sublimity 
of his language, to usher bis fellow- 
worshippers into the immediate pre- 
sence of tbe King eternal, immortal, 
and invisible. His acknowledgment 
of the Divine Perfections inspired 
them with reverence and love ; bia 
confession of sin excited self-abase* 
ment; tbe doctrines of the Atone- 
ment, and Justification by FAith 
alone, excited ho(>e ; and the prospect 
of the grave opening to receive them, 
and tiM realising view of a judgment 
to come, prepared them fbr the Im- 
portant realities concerning which 
he was about to discourse. -In a 
word, we do not recollect ever to 
have heard prayers which so much 
tended to exalt tbe Divine Charao- 
ter and Perfections, to abase tbe sin- 
ner, and -to exemplify tbe language 
of the inspired apostle, — " But ye 
are come unto mount Sion, and unto 
the city of the living God, the hea- 
venly Jerusalem, and to an inno» 
merable company of angels ; to the 
general assembly and church of the 
firstborn, which are written in hea- 
ven, and to God the Judge of all, 
and to the spirits of juAt men made 
perfect ; and to Jesus the mediator 
of the new covenant, and to the 
blood of sprinkling, that Kpeaketk 
better things than that of AbeP-* 
united with the solemn caotiona 
contained in the subsequent verses. 
The Independent Church at Ket- 
tering has been blessed with the la- 
bours of severnl eminent Pastors. 
The first of these was the Rev. John 
Maid well, M. A. ejected from the 
rectory of Kettering, Aug. 94, 1064, 
who wis a great sufferer by imprlsoii- 
ment, kA iar his nonconformity. The 
church in his time contained 184 
meml»ers, among whom were Ed- 
ward GiU and B\\\«^^Vnft> \\a W 



162 



CBITUAHT. 



tbers of tbe eelebraied miDistere of 
Ibose names. He died Jan. 9, 1002, 
and was succeeded by Mr. Thomas 
Milway. Mr. M. died in 1696, and 
was succeeded by Mr. She|>berd. 
Mr. S. was succeeded by Mr. Wil- 
liam Tery.^ Mr. T. was succeeded 
May 5, 1709. by Mr. John Wills. 
Mr. W. and a part of the church se- 
cedinfc in August 1715, the remain- 
ing majority chose in his stead Mr. 
William Milway, jnn. The follow- 
in)^ are t he succeedinj^ pastors. 1 72 L, 
the Rev. Thomas Saunders; 1736, 
the Rev. Benjamin Boyce ; both of 
whom were very excellent men, and 
the latter of whom died Oct. 24, 
1770;— July 1772— Sept. 1774, the 
Rev. Mr. Fuller, who we believe is 
now living at Chesham; and May 
1778, our late venerable friend, who 
was educated at Daventry under 
Dr. Ashwortb, and at whose ordi- 
nation tho Rev. Mr. Robins, Tutor 
of that Academy, delivered a greatly 
admired charge, and the Rev. Mr. 
Gregson of Rowell addressed the 
church. 

Mr. Toller has left a widow and 
•everal sons; and also, by a former 
wife, a son, who was educated at 
the Academy at Wymondley, under 
the superintendence of the late ex- 
cellent and Rev. W. Parry, and who 
is now in the ministry. — It only re- 
mains for us to pray, with respect 
to the former, that the God of their 
husband and father may be their 
God ; and with respect to the latter, 
that upon him may drop the mantle, 
and may descend and rest a double 
portion of the spirit, of his departed 
parent. 

Mr. Toller*8 Funeral Sermon was 

f reached by the Rev. Robert Hall, 
t would give ns very great pleasure 
to have it in our power to introduce 
..a Review of it into one of our future 
Nombers* 



ALDERMAN PAGE. 



fice near fifty years, bein^ electt^ 
to it May 9, 1771. > He died on the 
day on which he finished bis seven* 
ty-fiflb year. His health had bees 
for some tine declining, and U» 
medical attendant expeoto«t hh 
death wonld probably be siiddeB. 
On the Wednesday morning he had^' 
a seizure before he arose ; out as it 
soon went off, he reftned to scnd- 
for advice, though he staid within 
that day and the next; but 6n Fri- 
day he went up into (Jie city, and 
replied to one who asked how he 
did, " Pretty well for me." On bis 
return, he appeared better in health 
and spirits than he bad been for some 
days. A fter su|^per, he sat reading 
till about eleven o*clock, when he 
laid down bis book, examiBed bis 
doors as usual, and said aloud, »t 
the bottom of the stairs, ^' I am go- 
ing to bed," which were the last 
words he spoke. In about a fraarter 
of an hour, he rang bis -bfAl ; on 
which, the servant running ii]>, fomMf 
him speechless. On being helped 
up, he endeavoured in vaiii to ex- 
pectorate, made signs to be laid 
down again, and soon after died. 

He was esteemed in the obordi 
and in the world as a man of strict 
integrity, for many years dUigently 
discharging the duties of an uprigbt 
magistrate, and using the office of « 
deacon well. He was constant in 
his attendance on divine worship, 
giving good evidence of godly sin- 
cerity, and holding the mystery of 
the faith in a pure conscience. 

MRS. CRISP. 



DlJED, Feb. 24, Alderman Page 
of Bristol. He had been an honour- 
mble member of the Baptist church 
In Broadmead above fifty-f ve years, 
liaving been baptized Jan. 7, 1766. 
He was the senior deacon of the 
church, and had snstaloed that of- 



Died, Feb. 26, Mrs. Crisp, the 
wife of the Rev. Thomas Steffe Crisp, 
aged twenty-seven years, after a Ions 
and very painful illness, in which 
she manifested remarkable patience, 
and submission to the divine will, 
^VfiiJ^^^ supported by the consola- 
^HlMfiiOf the gospel, looking for tbe 
meragr of our I^rd Jesus Christ unto 
eternal life. She was a native of 
Huntingdonslifre: her maiden name 
was Vipau. She has left three small 
children. Ail that know her afflic- 
ed hiiiiband, will pray that he may 
be supported under so heavy a b«l- 
rcavcraent. 



\. 



* iOES JAHtS SMITH, £•«. 

At tlie boDM ef Joaepb Outter- 
idge, Baa. at DenjBwk Hill, on 
»iiidij,tke2&tharFeb.JobnJamei 
Smilb. Esq. nunj years a deaoon 
«r tbo ofanrdi at WatTurd. Mr. 
Snilk waa a ChraliBn of ibe good 
oM Mrt ; andi a oii« aa ibe Apo*lle 



John trouM hat* agreed to ncdvt 
into the aane cliureh with " lira 
weIl-beloTe&.GAiui, whom ho lofed 
in Un tratb." 

EER&TA. 

Pige 113, for » Uuj Rutland," rtU 

" Elinbetb Rnilaod;" and Ar "Sept. 

S3," reoJ* Sept. 16." ' '^ 



XUbto. 



Oritnt Hkrptng: a ianQory Potm, 
ta n« Part*. By Jehi Lavttm, 
MiuienMry at CtleuUa. 7ii. 
Tub loteliett cbord* of tbe barp 
ha*« ollaa iieea itruok by tizilei and 
wandetai; bnt io addition to hit 
vohinlarT txih, tb« charaoter of i 
MJMmuaj tbrowt around Mr. Law- 
•oa and Ua writinKi a deeper inte- 
reat We cannot feel olhenriH^, 
wHh reapeet to tboae noble *piri(«, 
who have reiigned ail we, and they, 
oeaat BMMt dear to the heart, and 
whom w« alwHi admire, bnt dare 
notMlow. 
In a work like tbli, nnoh that li 
Dciaarily be found 



MiKiwd I 



> novel to Engliih 
poetfj, that it would not be powible 
to trmd in tbe itepa of any fonner 
delineator. Tfani the poem openi. 
' The orient panorama, iloning grand. 
Strange to tbe eye of poeiy ; tbe deplhi 
Of jODglc (hade ; the wild immBDnty 
Of £iretli,rank wKhplenitud«,where(reei 
Foreign to tong d laplay i hsir mighty form*. 
And clothe IhcnaeivM with alTthepooip 

of bloMom; 
Tbe fcnid hcaTan, tba hot canintahig 

Hh fleice daliriom of noilh-weitem 



When the foil cloudK 

gale: 
Tbe Tillage ibronged «iih uble [ 






P. 1. 



After a glance at the martial con- 
rabiona of Eorope, tbe aonnd of 
wboie tmmpeti, and the dtoating 
of wboio mighty onea, had reached 
•ven to tlm Bhoni> of India, the aiii»- 



■Irel tnnu to caimer thooghlai to 
tbe ipread of the gospel ; Io the obli- 
gation which ail lie nnder to aaaiat 
in Ihia mighty nndertaking. Tbtm 
coming nearer home, he dwelli te 
aomo time npon the wonblp and 
[ abominationi of the Hiadooa. A 
I baman aacrlBoe to Kalee, goddeaa 
of deatraetion, is Ihiu vividly do- 
scribed. 
- Died the pde boy thji night, for be 

ThroDgh the dark tUIbh to tbe place of 

death, ■ ^ ■' 

Where oft hM) died befaiehto ether boya. 
Steady, infleiibte, Iha Brahman* walk 
Behind, berore, oa eilber ude, and calta 
Cfaatloi and uoke and tmile. Suiaa 

there are leio 
And wriokled, and betray that they ire 

With peoTiih (elf-eoncelt the; boaii of 

•kill 
In leanud book^ and lighteou* tct^ 

uid ■pallet 
With toothlai* rage In pioni controieriy : 
Other* of broad and brawny timb, tad 

*tep 
Piood and majeilic, tow (ho graceful 

And, anccmcerned in mattars of diipulc. 
Swagger with bloated face, and ogling 

And moaltn-gitded loini and ilipebod 

FrinBipbuit. Yeongar onei are there. 

And ili^ march in the Infernal thtaog." 

P.3<. 
" Eager Aay eoitva ! they orga the Iron. 

bling yath | 
Poor fellow I bow he faalteti. with cold 

Bathing hi* forehead, and with njiiiiJi. 
lau tongue, 

IL % 



ig tMtlfc Of euisu aick 
Mid tanet 
Tticr* atandi Iha UmpUi wiih iu gtio- 



Thcie bcndi tbe neck of the pooi qiuk- 

A hDmu HcnGcB. The batcbel Tilt* '. 
That cr»h ilaaeti beard. Th« BugglinK 

blood 
Ii on ilie groDDd. Tli4 ptlejti have 

doDO Ibdr woil. 
And coldlj wall awaj." F. 33. 

Tk&l haman ikcriBcei arc to IliU 
day performed in India, there h but 
too mach indiipu table evidence. 
Some iURtaoces have uome to the ear 
of govenunent; but, altbangh re- 
warda have been ofiiered for the ap- 
prebenaioii of the norderen, u 
night have lieen aalicipated, tbey 
iMve Dover been diicoreied. To 
doncetl them wai of oonne an ant 
of piety. TheK pklnrea, and olben 
rimilar to then, cannot be too fre- 
qneotJy held np in this day, when 
(o many make it their bnaioeu to 
Tarniah over all the atrocitiei of the 
Dative*, and to discover all that is 
inire, and rooial, and great, in their 
Hb'tminnlinns. A very late writer 
n|KiD India remarki, tint it it a 
great pity thoae good men (the Mii- 
nouancs) should spend im> diqcIi Ia~ 
boor in convertiog the nativeii to tbe 
Cliristian faitb, when they might, to 
•o mach better purpose, insltuot 
tbom from tlieir own uiutera, which 
VKlioit to forgiveness and forbeaT- 
ance, holtliug out tbe example of 
Uie sandnl-lri'c, which pcrfamestlie 
axe that fplU it. - I'alse impreiuioni 
Mke these, lively detcriptiiina of the 
real state ol India ire most likely to 



Mr. LawioD tovchea upon each 
of the dcitica, and the wonhip and 
tharaoterutlca of each, till, haling 
Iravened the circle, be retumi to 
tbe gotpel, Mid its celestial loveli- 
nem. Orthiatbeieoondpwtofths 
poem is principnily compoted. The 
aabbftlh nornibg is tlio aoarcu of 
many beautiful reBcctions, aud the 
coulrut belweeo the aahbaiha which 
aroiled upon his iitfancy, and tboie 
which he has since spent ia heathen 
laiiilj, is very strikiug, 
" U leeni not like lie labbslh. In my 



I felt 



It withjn tkatblnaed day »t Ktu 
The omiihop then wai klill, 

^ ' loon nor ■piDiiing-ithn'l 

longlita 



id of h 
wu beard. 
HeihcMglit en boon like tbMB I *a«ti 
A richer Incraace hi tbe Aodj •wcci- 

To me the cowslip irilh the goldo* wjn. 
Uplifted SMae lo hear^ other* dM>» 

caM, 
More beaBleoni rmiledt and nalnre h^ 

To God, ^ 

Uy fiiher iDng, La h>MiI an early aa> 

then; 
I felt UiB mellow note and ihoo^l of 

heaTCn." P, 146. 



Equipped in silken gown, withdroliaf 

iprigi 
Beipriokted. Now ibe aralllwl aliawt 

Fordi fraiB Iha drawer^ aad o'er ihft 

slionlden cast ; 
And liigli o'er ncaily plaited cap and ell 
Sat the grare Iwnnct, cfaaHe, of sober 

Uy band in hcts we sallied rtiroogh ihe 
ilrMts." P. jaa. 

The piotare which follow* of tha 
anro^ted traffiok itf an lodian sab- 
bath, u ver^ aiuBated,. aad buldi uii 
lo the imagiaktioB a portrait, which 
must, from iti natural groii|Mng umI 
effect, be a ooneot cno. 

Among tbe sabbath reflcctiont, ic 
QUO peculiarly striking, arising from 
the reverting of tbe oy« to the day* 
of bone. 



And foMeied all hii infimt honrs. He 

lOTCS 

Each pictoied reeoUectioa of (be roof, 
Ohscuiely seen between the ebcltetjeg 

Nor ^an the lapse oftime obtllerato 
The riling image* of past delight. 
Hean were the offering, worthless were 

the meed 
To have led a land, a home, he coeld 

Oft while fai* hoary parents, bowed with 

Still lenaais of Ihe hunble cot (rndcKifd 
To tliem bcHOK ihc Kent of leag-B«d 
joy.) 



BETlBWi 



ISS 



JCid d^rly pnjtn toffufe the feiliiig ejf e, 
Sfeapping big tern is memory of tlMir 

•on* 
Whose absenpe tliej Moit feeU bat ne'er 

lament ; 
iSrief answert grief» and he in distant 

Jand 
Vnknown^ unseen^ indnlges the deep 

agh» 
Aad cherishtt aflectkm*t keeiie»t pang.*' 

P. 153. 

The Utter oompirtments are call* 
ed " Demth/' •' Hope in Death," and 
the ^ Solileovy;^ that », of a re^i- 
irhBtr spirit The desoriptioB of the 
Irish Wake needs the author's as- 
sertion to render it credible. 

Tbroughont the volame, mnch 
that is original and beautiful will be 
■llisGovered, and we doubt not, the 
reader will be both interested and 
improved by its perusal ; yet we oan- 
iiot help wishing, that Mr. Lawson 
iiad bestowed npon some parts a 
lufrber polish. Had the quantity 
been somewhat less, the quality in ah 
ptobabitity would have been higher. 
We cannot resist the temptation 
bere afforded us, of inserting the 
•opinion of that oxeelient poet and 
cnristian, Mr. Montgomery, on the 
fwern BOW before us. 

^ Of Mr. Lawson's poem, 1 t;an 
asswe you, that after the deduc- 
tions that must he made for occa- 
donally dissonant verse and obscu- 
fity of phrase, there remains much 
to delight, and inform, and edify 
4be reader; and no Englishman can 
peruse it, in the right spirit, without 
io^inf bb>own countr;^ more for the 
blessings with which it is crowned ; 
and at the same time fervently de- 
wrings till desire becomes prayer, and 
firmmBr imwee in exertion eorreeptrndinf 
with tie eymptUhjf excited^ that all 
the dark places of the eartb which 
are ftdl of the habitations of cruelty 
and wickedness, may yet become 
imrticipants of the same mercies 
with which this land is distinguish- 
f d, and which are, by the purchase 
of the Redeemer's blood, a common 
inheritance for mankind, though fcw 
comparatively know to what they 
were bora, wlnle they are by nature 
liein of a far different patrimony, 
vA fewer enter into the present 
possession because of unbelief, hard- 
■eu of heart, and contempt of God's 



holy wnrd and commaadflieni Blay 
the ingettloaa and awiaUe author 
be signally raocMsftkl in making the 
truth as it is in Jesus known In tho 
uttermost regions of the east ; and 
whetlier he there touch the harp 
of Zion, or sound the gospel trum- 
pet, may thousands hear the joyM 
sound, and bless his labours for it." 

J. MONTGOM BRT. 

An Anpeal to the Legiihture emd tie 
Public, more epecuuiy to tKiunien 
from the EitahHshod Church, tf 
every Denomination, on the Teit' 
deney^Mr. Brougham' $ Bill for 
the iJueatum of tM Poor, to aur- 
ment the Poor's Rate, Src. jnr. Sa 
James Baldwin Brown, Esq,LL,0* 
1<)3 pp. sewed. 

Wb have read several strictures 
on Mr. Brougham's intended Bill, 
and were not a little amused with 
the disappointment which they ge- 
nerally express, that the liili should 
have originated with him. In the 
little we happen to know of the 
learned gentleman and his commu- 
nications, we find complete deliver- 
ance from all surprise on the sul>- 
ject He has certainly talked a 
great deal about the importance of 
education, and the Edinburgh fte- 
viewers very naturally laud and 
magnify all he writes or says on this, 
or any other subject. But it ap- 
pears to us as very questionable whe- 
ther Mr. B. ever attached much im- 
portance tohis own proposed measur^. 
Wc are perfectly satisfied that if he 
had studied the most effectual pietliod 
of checking the progress of know- 
ledge among the lower classes, he 
could not have devised one that hiitt 
the promise of greater success. ' He 
most have known that the persons to 
whom his Bill intrusts this business, 
are, of all others, those by whom it is 
most likely to be neglected ; and that 
dissenters have not been so uncon- 
cerned about the education of their 
own children, and the children of 
tlie poor, as to be justly intitled to 
the learned gentleman's indifference 
and scorn. In the estimation of 
their enemies, what signify the 
opinions and feeliugs of" sectaries," 
who have neither talents nor virtuis 
sufficient to render them worthy qC 



I 



16S J^XVIBW. 

«I^C0 OB tbe lubJMt! AU this not « eonclMiwc UAtimooj. whi^ i^ff 

nay he yreny trae im tbe ettioiatioD ought to be, if asj thins— bat u letd— - 

of Mr. B. and bis frioMls tbe Edin- non/ of a jmflU/cdcnstare onlj jopcv 

borf b Reviewen. Yet we qrast be f^^'^'jT ^ ^ qnniUmtd, wd cu^ 

allowed to state our oonviction, that ^ e •f hf^f dwpKnred. In the inhi^ 

tbe proposed Bill not only wea^ tbe P*^*^ f f^ **^ JlSl^SISf"*"*^"; 

worst features of intolerance, but S' V*""" w *' V'^ ^^ tSL^i? "^ 

WW*.. ivM.ui^ «• ■uuM««w7y uu» j^j.^ Broatfham'i active lifet the Ednca? 

pri^iMes a mode of edacaUon. ^j^ Committee u evidendy. and peiw 

thougb expensive, yet far less cfl^ t.p, .HowaUy. hit hobbyiborM. In 

aent than that which these despised his partial eyes tbe returns obtained by 

sectaries gratuitonly afford to a very it have few, if any, faolu; and, then- 

laripe prc^rtion of the children of fore, though verified bat by the tigna- 

tbepoor. ture of the parochial minittei^ who has 

Tliere is a class of persons which pleased bimaelf in his nisi»cr of making 

will derive benefit from the Bill, and them— be boldly gives ffiem aU t>e 

it u to be hoped they will be fully *«'ce and efficacy of an oath, itnpiMng 

aware of their obligations to the ho- ■; ^*>« ••«»* ^»'"«' }^^ P^7 qnwtfoniog 

nonrable geotlemui who proposed their correctnets, (as q»""°gf/^fce f.^ 

it These are the parish priest and "V. »^«J^ "fJ' ^ f^u^^il:^ f'^^ 

Vr *"™ "'** ™ ^^rw* .L -1 privilege, which of all otheit the law it 

<be pansb clerk. To the one it fhe most sumptuously jealoat in preterr. 

gives power, and to the other pro- |ng, ,hat ol a iM voce eiamioaHon. 

perty ; and m the fair visions of the Strangers see not, however, vrith a pa- 

rature, Mr. B. must have contem- rent's eyes; and others have, therefore, 

plated, with the purest satisfaction, openly maintained, and do still main- 

tbe divine, and his now exalted co- tain, that in nine cases out of tea thota 

•djntor, enjoying the provisions of returns are {grossly incorrect* and mate* 

the Bill. fially defecuve. Nor does t|iis charge, 

^. ^, /% Ml if sustained, necessarily impeach tbe ve- 

There goes the parson; O illoitnoas racilyofiberevciendgcntleWTbywhom 

spark! , ... ^ . ,. the returns were made. Tbe individuals 

And ihere. scarce lest illu5trtou>, goes bis ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ severally made, had 

^'^'' ' not the leisure — and if they bad, would 

Wo are very much pleased with have wanted the anthoritv to make a 

Dr. Brown's pamphlet. It is judi- census of the educated and uneducated 

clous, and temperate ; and contains ^^ their parishioners, numbering from 

m ftuthful analysis of the intended house to hoose ; whilst from their titoa- 

Bill, and a complete exposure of its <">" '"^ j!*»>^^ *»»«y ''^W be pecolir 

baneftil tendency. In our opinion •'1^ n»»«nfo"n«<«! «»d subject to very 

Dissenters aie mistaken if they sup. «"«:?°' «'">" \V*"^^rl5" ^?"^ 

^^*uJ .»»^«»* ntii »^..i^ iL uL c®"W <lo no more) the sUte of educalioa 

pose the present Bill would be be- ^ ^^^ dlsinting part of tbe po- 

nefieial under any modificatioiL p„,„ji»„^ ^f ^^^^ j^ >„^t 5 J^^ 

The returns of the number of chil- ihan j, their due to assert, that for the 

dren under a course of instruction mQstpart,botb grown-up persont and chil* 

in Sunday iMshools, are shown to be dren are, at least, as well iostrneted in 

grossly incorrect. Dr« Brown says, the common roditnentt of learning as 

« The clause makfaig the parliament- 'Y" neighbours of the ettablbbed 

ary returns to the inquiries of tbe edu- «»!"«^ '»«V"« ,? ^^ '^* ™^ ''^ *'^* 

cation-commiltce evidence, is also ex- '*•'»> themselves, 

tremcly objectionable, alike in principle The author of this pamphlet shows 

^dpracucc. It IS obiectionablejn pnn- ^i^^Iy that the operations of this 

aple, because It make, thatjriclehce, bj,, jf j^ y^ ^,|^^^ ^^ ^j„ |^ 

:'^fb/;^"d^!!Ji:n^?:S;^^^^^^^^^ -F^^-aily ^o DlssenteJ, harassing 

one ought, in contemplation of law, to f^^ vexatious. He justly says, 
be acquainted, or, from iu being printed « Those who spend their days either 

by royal authority, may readily ac- jn the routine of public life. In tbe me- 

quaint himself, before he is called upon tropolis or large towns, or but among 

to answer its contcnU. Still more is it „,^n ©f their own religious seniimenu, 

objectionable in practice, from the in- j^^g ^ ^^j^ inadequate idea of the U' 

crease of expense, &c which its being rentable eifccts of a difference of opi- 

put in evidence will brm^ on the parties „|^n iu matters of faith and modes of 

to every suit In which it U employed, worship, in many parts of this enligbt- 



«Bed kiofdoa. WhcD TXawtntttt find 
wiaiiter* of tba g<Mp*' I" "><> e>t>bli>faed 
«t«reb, (lioBgh um of •dncadon and 
faJbriaatlaa, w bigoMd to the iafallibi- 
lilj of (heir faith and riMf, aa, EOUIrarj' 
to all law, ciiil and caooaical, lo raruic 
to marrj, or to inter thoiE who haT° 
not bean bapliud accordiaf; to thcii 
jvbric i when the Mraag arm or ihe law 
kielf ii needed, ;ct iiinelTcclaal, topo- 
Icct their miniileri from iaialr, and their 
wonhipping auetnbKci froDi auliageanO 
dknrluiiiea ; thej nrelj maj be aicuKtl 
ttt fiBeliog nore than ordinacilj jealgu^i 
of anj acccuiaa of power 



" OiuantartDfairdcDomJuatlaoi . . 
in principle, be hoitile to thu Bill, and 
IB u far a* by law tlicj can, *ill uatn. 
rallj oppoae iti eiacution, Mring tha: 
■111 oi aearlj all in profiilani, are 
■Towedlj framed with no ftisndlj le. 
ftieoea to tteir priociptci, or to ihem." 

Wtt perfect); ngne with the le«n^ 
ed antbor, that DiMonlcra vill 
be tme to tlieniKlvea, nor to pos- 
teritf, ir Ihej do not oppose to the 
Terr otmoal of their power tltU ii 
teniled meaatire. They are too ni 
■mrooi, too reipectablo, too bene- 
viriMit, aad too lojal, to have Ifaeii 
appeal to the legislature rejected, 
Wben temperately, but flrml]', ex- 
prtmed. Tbej are Ib ever; direo- 
tlon, accordJDg to their abiUt;, car- 
i^in^ Into effect tbe benevolent iriih 
ofour late revered King, that cTery 
ine of kit mbjecta inif b( be nhle to 
rearf the leriptarei. And odt pre- 
^mi augiut Sovereign baa annreil 
Ihem from the throne, that ho will 
■laiiitain their Mbertici inviolate. 

We arc aorry our limiU prevent 
Mr (iviog further extract! miiD thii 
nluable pamphlet We itrougly 

m) it however to the care- 

il of all onr readcn- 



ri-KVr. 167 

Mr, Toplady waa th« antlwr of 
many other work*, a liat of nxteen 
of wbieb now liei before ni, among- 
which ii hii celebrated " Historic 
Proof of the Doctrinal Calvinism of 
tliB Clmrcb of England," in 2 vola. 
8to. 1774. 

The present work contains Modi 
tatloni OB 

Affliction— Benevolence— Clitia- 
tian Ministers — Consolation — Deatli 
and Glory — TiieDivincImmatability 
—The Divine Purposes- The Di- 
vine Wisdom -EBectual Calling— 
Efficaeinus Grace — Election — and 
many other subjects. 

The following extract is from the 
Meditation on Sanctlli cation. 

Eaamine yoonelvci whathar yon 



'cial 



Er faith ; 



DlwstMMii Bttinmmt r 



A.B. lata yiMrsf Broad Htmbuiy, 
Jtevon. A n*w Ediliim, mrrBngeil, 
mik an Index. 12mo. Bds. 134 pp. 
isao. 3a. 6d. 

We are indebted for this new 
edition of a very excellent work to 
the Rev. Thorou Gongh, the re- 
spectable pastor of the Baptiatcbordi 
ft Weatbai? Ltigh. 



power of converting 
grace hath began to work eSeciaallj 
npon your heart!- k In a word, whether 






called rram a state uf aalure lo a state 
of grace. Thaagh we are not called Jo 
be apoillei, yet all wbo sppcar with 
Chriit ia glory are called lo be fainti. 
And what is a laint ! One who ii liaU 
lowed. Ekr let anart, bj divine grac^ 
iccorGodionewlu* 
pirlsker of tbat faith which 
relies, singly relies, on the blood and 
rlgbteoDsness of Chriit, for JuitiGcation 
with God ; and who ii a subject of tha* 
bolineis without which none ihall see 
ihe Lurdi one wbo lesvei s!I things, so 
Far OS they coasisl not with faiih and a 
good conscience j who coants aU that 
earth can give but drois and dang, when 
compared wiili the cieellenej of ihe 
knowledge of Christ, and with the pri- 
rilege of being TonTid in him ; who rises 
op into the moral likeness of God, and 
follows the Lord that bought him, in 
lanetiEcalion of the Spirit, and belief of 
Ihe trnih. Such persons have fetlow- 
ihip with the Father, and with Iiia Son 
.lesns Christ: they have a mawfeat in- 
lerest in tha favour of the former, and 
in tlie merit! of the lailer. Walkiag la 
the fear of the Lord, and in the con- 
rnttsof the Holy Ghost, they are built np 
into taaiples for God: their grace, ibeu 
peace, aud their joy are niottiplied." 
This book deserves a widu circn- 



Hitbny ^ IiUoltrgitet ; with Oiitna- 
timu on til* UnrttantbUttit ani 
Lgmtiea of Peritmtioa, and on 
th* Sqmtg axd WUdom af tuire> 



tflS 



IMTBLLI0BVCB, &C. 



strieiid JRdigitmu UUriy, By 
JTumuu CUtrht. 8vo. Bds. 468 pp. 
10« 6d. 

The history of pcrseculioii is al- 
most coextensive with the history of 
the world ; and yet, as Earl Mnns- 
field justly remarks, ** there is no 
Ihin^ more inconsistent witli the 
rights of human nature, more con- 
trary to the spirit and precepts of the 
Christian religion, or more iniquit- 
ous and unjust." It is contraiy to 
common sense; for what can be 
more absurd than 

To make men orthodox 
With blt>w8 and with knocks^ 
And to hammer faith into their brains? 

And it is equally impolitic. Per- 
•ecution was amonpt the fore- 
most of the vices which brought on 
the destmctioii of the Roman em- 
pire in the west, the civil war in 
England, the dismemberment of 
Poland, and the late Revolution in 
France : and when did the British 
•mpiro ever more flourish than since 



the ^ori<Mii and Iwppy meeeisioi ef 
the lUuttrioua Hoote of BniiMwick 
to the throne of these realms T 

Tlie present interesting work pro- 
ceeds from the pen of a respectable 
Baptist minister of Watertord. \% 
re^tcbes from Cain, the first jierse- 
cutor, to the dissolution of the Wcst^ 
em empire in Augustulus. It com^ 
prebends, in no imall degree, iiol 
only the history of the Jewish and 
other ancient nations, but of Chria* 
tianity during the first five centuries. 
And as the materials are ample, sa 
it is ably executed. It deticrves to 
be generallv read, and is, espc^ctany, 
a book highly proper to be put into 
the hands of youth. 

In the remaining part of tbe.'work, 
wc recommend to tlie antbor the 
confining of himself to a hiktiiry of 
facts. In the present volume, the 
unreasonableness, the injustice, and 
the impolicy of perseeution are so 
abundantly shown, that any addi- 
tional observations upon those heads 
are unnecessary. 



9nteUigettce« s^c 



y. 



BURMAH. 



lalereitui^ Lttttt refttrtd to tn our loKt, 
Fag€ t<5. 

Rangocn, Dec. 8, 1819. 
Bs¥. AVD DSAa Sis, 

Being about to leave Rangoon on a 
visit to the court of Avm, we feel It our 
daty to fetate the reason. 

Till within • month or two ago oar 
affairs appeared in a prosperoui state. 
Many daily heard the gospel-— cases of 
koperal inquiry frequently occurred — 
no serious opposiiiun appeared— and 
lour persons, the first-fruits of Burmah, 
gave evidence of having obtained the 
grace of God ; three of whom have been 
baptised. 

Some tiroe,howevtr, before the baptism 
of the two last, the death of the emperor 
gave a different aspect to affairs. The 
Mrmer emperor was hostile to the priests 
of Boodh. On hb death, the hopes of 
the priests began to revive ; and the new 
emperor's friendly dispositien has ten- 



ded to restore the reKgiovs estabfisls- 
ment to its former privileges and rank. 
Soon after these events began to trans- 

fiire* our fifth inquirer, a teacher of 
earning and inflnencei was accused be* 
fore the viceroy of heretical sentiments. 
The viceroy directed further inquiry to 
be made. Our friend went to the head 
of ecclesiastical affairs in Rangoon, diade 
his peace with him, and discontinaed 
his visits lo the sayat. This circamstanee 
spread an alarm araoogalJ our acquaint* 
ance, and occasioned a complete falling 
off at the sayat ; and» with the escep- 
tion of the teacher above named« and 
those who have already joined US| we 
are completely deaerteo. 

It appears to us that there remains 
hut one course — to go directly into the 
imperial presence* lay our roissionarj 
designs before the throne, and solicit to- 
leration for the Christian religion. Bj 
this proceeding, we hope to discover the 
real sentiments of the emperor. We 
hope to ascertain, whether he is devote4 
to BoodhisD, or has imbibttcV la a^j 



IMTBtilfCiSlTCS, SCCi. 



dw Wf U m n ct hi* grand hi her. 1 icdI 



dMW, tbeafWoM 
■■il diigab** ibtm 



1 of policj. If The fcrncT be 
(b« OHi ha Hill in&lntiit out mii- 
noDBty varki and wc atioll beuDdmihe 
nroiulj of leaTing hh diwiialiim. II 
ibr Imiirr. he will, «e hope, gne ui ■) 
Ic»I »ch priTire aiicuDngenml as 

Ifi approaeliing (he ihmne, ve (ieiire 
iBdapenil an the pmcnceofosriiitiour. 
'Ke limie indeed no tithrr gnood of 
kopc. We trud thai, if Ihc tet line 
to la*€MT Buimh it emu. He *bo » 
•tcelleHi m varking, vtll open ■ wide 
«ad rfl^ctyal door But if the Lord 
hae ullirr purpotct, il hecoiM* u* mtak- 
1} (D uquioce 

(ion ID the ijiniHihii-i and prajer* ol 

Rr». mid dear Sir, 
Yovt d«*<Hed leiiBiili in the Lord, 
A. jDoaon, Jan. 

J. CulKiK. 

nt C mMfmJ.Stc- iif iht Bay; atari, f!. 



nr power, to 1m m imperatiT* 

S, That in h«Te witnetwd, with great 
id increaiing Mtiifactian, ibe highly 
MieGciel inBuenee on Uu maiat and 

tended the disintecesled and henevo. 



uFpubiii 



ID of 



clion of all clu 

liitineiien uf lecti 

etpectBllj of Sdd^ 



i>F the poor 
■ad parlin, 
dev kImwIi. 

9. That t1>e bill iutroduced hitn Par- 
liament b; H. brougham, Eiq. cnlitled; 
•• A Dill rot belter pnxidiog the raeaDi 
HajeMj'iSuhjecii,* 



ir decidi 
;i.|]y e. 



ralci 



liable 



lied 



tiitplioni,b;dciIroTing the fandiwbidi 
ue nfceaiar; id Iheir iupport, by dle- 

: .1... __^| ^jyj ,j„J„i,^ ,^ 

arrangrmenlii, wiltaotit 



;oiinginR Ihat a 
>Db>eiliiig ihni- 
dhich ihe ednc 



THE CONTINENTAL SOCIETY. 

Thi funds are eiirtmely loo, anil ill 
iDcane inadeqiiale lo lU deinindi. The 
BDnnal lubKripliontdu nil exceed LlSO. 
while ibe Jfrailj eipendilure is above 
Laoa. 1 he Cufliniiiee miite Ihe ■ueo-, 
tion '•( ihe liiends of icue relighiB lo this 
inporiaiii objecl. For if Mcieliet ate 
Ubciallj nipporMd which are fDrmed 
let Ihe du|ienHin of Ihe tciipiures 
tbroagh Ike i.*rU, and fur atungeliwic 
IIm ktathnt Motimif. dnb HDHDRib 
MiiiLiOka i-f sobIi. who air our near 
Keighbours and to whun we aie bound 
hj naiij tio, ^Duld UMi escape ooi 
icgatd t and lorelj theoaly •■ eittj ihii 



effeciuall* promoled ;and b* 

!• (p icutd instead of iccelo- 

Felingtbe professed design < 

4. Thtl to man; of the I 

i*naci>Bents of that bill we 

inTlncible Dhjpclioni •■ becio 



their coadiliun. wilJ nui fail of wppor; 



Hi. BROUGUAU-s BILL. 

Ds, Williami*! Librirj, BedcTOSa- 
Hreei, Feb. 16. 1S41 —At an £itlraor- 
dinar; Heeling of the General Bod; of 
FrMCilant Visienliug MiiiisieTS of lie 

Three Denoninalm he Inlluwing Re. 

(olalions were nniiiiauust; adopted. — 

1. Thai we aie deeplj imprasud wiili 
the GOiiTlciion of the supreme impo;- 
tMce uf universal educaiinn lo the graai 
inieiesi* of motol* and religion ; and 
that we hate •!■■;■ coniidertd the pio 
pMknk of cdMHiio^ lo iba fuithcit ei 



indamental 



lU moBi oangerons power on 
id dignitstiei of the estab- 
:h. wiihoBt proTiding taj 
sriequale checks against the ahnsc of 
that poweri and b; lu doing etpose ibe 



I of d<» 






»lh« 



luppnrt of liie Khools lo be rsti 
■ hile bylheConslilBiion orihuiesehoola 
I la^ propoTlion of the moti indigent 
part uf ihe poputalion, who can ailend 
only on Snndij icbnols, "ill dettre no 
benefit from them ; beeanie tbej are 
wholly confined to the instmeiion of 
boys, and no pnnision whatever is nado 
" he rerj iniporlaul objecl of female 
It ion ; and because, by Including 
all indi'iduali who are not members of 
the ritublished ehnreh Bnder an unjott 
and insidious proscription, in eirtnallf 
pronounciHg Ihem unworthy ef being 
inlTuitrd with the edncaiion of the chit 
dren oflheir fcllow-ciliiens, or with any 
•hare in ihr nanageiDent oi control of 
schools uf which ibe majority of icbolan 
nay not be children of ehatchnea, and 
where ercn iheir own children may be 
entered, the billuicreasei Ihe cisil dis- 
abilities, and eneniaches on tlie lell. 
giuni liherly of diisenlers. 

i. That for the reasons oboeo men. 
lionod, wiiboai enieiing into more par* 
licular eicepiions, ■ petition bo pre- 
*(Bt*d t» Inlh hOBMt ot tuOCvtiona. 



170 



TNTBLLlOBNCSy 8CC< 



nnyinft thmt tlie bill mmy iMt be pMtcd 

into a Jaw. 

(Signed) Jobw Birroa, DJ>. Chunnan. 

To the HonovrabU the Commons of the 
UtuUd Kingdom «f Grent Britam and 
IrdaeU, i» PorUamaa aatembUd^ 

The bomble PetitioQ of tb* Congrega- 

tiODt &C. 
9D0W£T9» 

That yoar Petitioiien are not sar- 
passed hy aoy deacription of tbeir fel« 
low-subjectt in tolicitadc, that ** all 
danes of the people maj reap the great 
benefit of ioprovement in knowledge* 
noraiSf and religion, which are the main 
support of every nation." 

That* influenced bj this principle, 
your Petitioners have contributed their 
sealous exertions in instituting and sup- 
' porting schools for the instruction of the 
children of the poor, without distinction 
of sects or parties, and more especially 
of Sunday Schools ; the latter contain- 
ing, in England alone, more than five 
hundred Uioosand Molars; which 
scliools have ha^ a most beneficial in- 
fluence OB the moral and religious state 
of our country, and are rapidly increas- 
ing in number and utility. 

That your Petitioners have observed, 
with great concern, the introduction of 
a Bill into your honourable House, en- 
titled, " A Bill for better providing the 
Means of Education for his Majesty's 
Subjects," which, they are decidedly 
(Convinced^ is calculated materially to 
injure tho^ iniraluable institutions, by 
destroying the funds which are necessary 
for their support; and by discouraging that 
seal and assiduity, and subverting those 
arrangementf, without which the edu- 
cation of tite lower claaaes cannot be 
je#ectnally promoted. 

Jhat your Petitioners particularly de- 
plore the unhappy effects which such a 
3ill must have on a large proportion of 
the most indigent part of the popula- 
tion, who can attend only on Sunday 
Schools ; as also on the female children 
of the poor, for whose education it 
makes no provision whatever. 

That your Petitioners view with ap- 
prehension tbe pndpi^ and most danger* 
oos power whicb this Bill confers on the 
clergy and di^itap^l of the Establish- 
ed Churchy without providing any ade- 
quate checks against the abuse of that 
power; thereby exposing the lower 
classes of Dissenters to insuft and to op- 
pression. 

That your Petitioners, whose loyalty 
•nd attachment to the constitution of 
their country have ever been nnques* 
lionable, regard this Bill as t measure 



which woald nlgect ikem to an i mJ M l 
and invidioBS proscription* by virtually 
nrononncing them unworthy of being 
intrusted with the education of Ibe 
children of their fellow-citisens, or with 
any share of the management or csa- 
trol of schools, at which the minority of 
scholars may not be the children of 
churchmen, and where even their own 
children may be entered ; and, by sach 
means, increase the civil disabilities, 
and encroach on the religions liberty ef 
Dissenters. 

That your Petitioners, for the rcasom 
already mentioned, without entering 
into more particular exceptions to tbo 
Bill, humbly entreat your hononralUo 
House, that it may not be passed into 
a law. 

And your Petitionen, aa in dnty 
bound, sliali ever pray, &c. 

N.B. Congregations in the conntry 
may, if necessary, send their Petitions 
to the Care of the Rev. Dr. Morgan, at 
Dr. 'Williams's Library, Rodcioss-elroel^ 
London. 

THE SOCIETY 

roa 

Promoting Religious Kmmlotfge 
among the Poor. 

It is impossible for any benevolent 
mind to contemplate, without the moat 
pleasing emotions, the exertions that ore 
made for the general diffusion of Divine 
Knowledge, and the extension of Christ^ 
Kingdom in the earth. That anob 
exertions shall not be in vain, we may 
indulge the roost confident hope. Tbo 
various Bible, Missionary, and Tract 
Societies, which have, within the last 
twepty years, been called into existeooa^ 
are the glory and boast of our landj^ 
and coostitutiB a much surer foondatioa 
of hope, that we shall be a sparedf and 
not a destroyed people, than the most 
numerous and v^ll disciplined of our 
fleets and armies- . 

Of the numerous Institutions formed 
for the spread of ptire and pndefiled re- 
ligion, '* The Society for promoting Re- 
ligiotis Knowledge among the Poor," 
has the honour of beiiig one of the old- 
est. It has been in exutence, and active 
operation, upwards of seventy years. It 
was established August 8, 1750, by a 
few persons of pious, liberal, and en^ 
larged minds, who being deeply im- 
pressed with a sense of the deplorable 
Ignorance which prevailed, esj^ecially in 
the lower ranks of the comrounity,agreed 
to associate for the purpose of disserai^ 



IMTELUOBNCB, 8ce, 



171 



vatiag MBQBg ffocli tbo knowledge of 
DiviiM Truth* by foraUliiDg them with 
BibJcf* uid with otbcr pbia practical 
Books oo religioos tubjecti. 

There it one feature of tbit Institotion 
jMBculjar to itselt Each subicriber of 
Dim Guinea annoally, it entitled* ac- 
cording to a ttrict and fair rotation, to a 
oominaiion of bookt of the Talne of 
Forty Sbillingtv and sabscribert of Two 
Oninems annually are entitled to a no> 
laination of books of Four Ponndt ra- 
1ue« and to in proportiout of which no- 
lice it regularly tent, and tofficient 
linM allowed fur claioiing thero. So 
that tbould any doubt exist at to the 
appropriation of the contributiont to 
<Kher Societiet, and the amount of good 
effected by theni>no toch doubt can eiist 
here ; at every individual becoiuet the 
distributor of hit own liberality* and the 
witneit of itt happy resultt. 

If any retpect be doe to an Institution 
for itt venerable antiquity, for its effi- 
cient inttmmenulity in promoting the 
cause of vital godlinett» and for its 
adaptation for still greater usefuinets« 
this Society will not be suffered to lan- 
guish* still less to be dissolved. The 
I'act need only be stated, that this Asso- 
ciation* the result of the united wisdom 
and piety of our forefathers, is in a de- 
clioing state, to induce the friends of 
Son to come forward to the help of 
the Lord against the mighty. — Annual 
Subscriptions and Donations received 
by Ebeneter Maitland, Esq. Treasurer, 
jdlapham Corflrinon; Rev. W. J. Abdy, 
'A.M. Horselydewn ; Rev. A. Rees, D.I). 
7. KingVroad, Gray's-inn-lane ; Rev. J. 
Cflavton, Manor-House, Walworth ; Rev. 
X ifippon, D.D. Grange-road, Bermond- 
sey ; Rev. R. Hill, A.M. Sorry-road ; 
Itestrs. Whltmore and Co. Bankers, 
L.omtNird- streets and by Mr. James 
Worton» Secretary, 47, Fish-street-bill; 
Mt. John Cooper, CoUfSctor, 11, Pump- 
row. Old-street-road; and Mr. John 
Barfield, Bookseller to the Society, 91, 
>Vardour*ttreet, Sohp. 



NEW BAPTIST CHAPEU 
ALFRin • Placi« Kent - Road. 



ORDINATIOX. 

Jav VA RT 1, 18S1, Mr. William Toung 
wat ordained pastor of the church meet* 
ing in the above Chapel. Mr.Wilmshurst 
commenced with reading and prayer; 
Mr. Pritchard stated the natore of u 
Gospel Church, asked the usual ques- 
tions, and received Mr. Young*t confet- 
sion of faith : Mr. Ivlmey offered the 
ordination prayer; Mr. W. Shenstone 
gave an affectionate and impressive 
charee from Deut. isxii. iS ; Mr. Chin 
concluded in prayer. 

In the evening, Mr. Williams of Oraf« 
ton-street addressed the charch from 
Col. iii. 15. 



NEW CHAPELS 

Belonging to the Particular Baptitti^ 
in Monmauiktkire, 



Cm Tuesday, November 1, 18S0, the 
above Chapel was opened for public 
worshipj «hen three sermons were 
preached ; that in the morning by Mr. 
R. Stodhart* of Pell-street, from Psalm 
aivii. 4; that in the afternoon by Mr. 
W. Shenstone, of Alie-street, from 1 Cor. 
2v. S5: and that in the evening hy Mr. 
J. Chin, of Walworth, ixom Acts xu S3. 



Tlie services weie inttfettang thd well 
attended, and it is hoped that this little 
eaote will prove a bletsing to that long 
neglected neighbourhood. 



PfiN-ALLT. 

Oct. 10, 1820, a new Chapel was 
opened at Pen-all t, about three miles 
from Monmouth. On this occasion four 
sermons were preached. Messrs. Fry 
ofColeford. Psalm cxaii. 9; Phillips of 
Caerleon, Psalm xaxiv. 4; Lewb oX 
Chepstow, Matt. iii. 13 ; and James of 
Pontrhydyron, Zee. vi. 13. Prayer, by 
Messrs. Wright of .Bishop's- wood ; Jonef. 
Talycned; James, Pontrhydjrun; and 
Daviei, Hereford. The place was well 
attended, and much of the Divine pre- 
sence was enjoyed. This place being in 
a very benighted state as to the gospel, 
like most places around it, it was consi- 
dered a very desirable object, to intro- 
duce the glad tidings of salvation among 
the inhabitants. This was at length 
effected by Mr. Wright. He laboured 
much in preaching the word from houA 
to house among thero, but not without 
some encouragement, and it appears that 
his labours were not in vain. Though 
there is not one member belonging to 
the baptists at present in the place, yet 
we believe that there are a few enlight- 
ened cliaracters amidst the ruins of the 
fall. Many of these poor people la- 
boured hard in erecting the building; 
and they appear to be very sealous with 
tlie cauio of Christ, and anxious to hear 
the word of God, and seem comfortable 
under the joyful sound. May the Lpr^ 
tend now pros^rit^ I 



IHTBILIGENC*. &«. 



_ .OdT.95. 1810, m new placg cf wOfihip 
«n opened KlMonmoutb. ScioiUDa br 
Ueun. Fry of Coleford, from Milt. i*tii. 
SO; WilJuini of Rygfeid, Luka 1^.7; 
Hawkim of Eaitcombt, Acli. irii. 18 
Frayiri bj McMrl. HorJick of Penall -, 
SUnaen, (Indepcuieut) ; Ra|cii or 
Oamwmj; Knd JonMofTaJjcDcd. Both 
pUcei. Pen.alll tpd Monmoalh, mn Mp- 

Etied b; Mr. John Jonei of Cefn-Uawr, 
M iludeDt u Abargavennji. 

GLASGOED CHAPEL. 
NoT.tl, 1830, anew MFFtitifi.lroiiic 
«rai opancdi caJIcd Ihe Glugotd ChapcJ, 
in Ihs pariih of Llanbadock. Sccmoni ; 
WtUk—bj Hcun. Hiley. Llaawtnaith, 
Pru*- ii. 1— 5; Eiani. Penjgam, Job 
XTiit 9 ; — Engtith'-'niomM, Abcrga- 
TCnn;. Pialm iit. 11 ; Phillipi, Cacr. 
l«on, P»rnl i. 9. Prayera. b; Mc»n. 
Jon».(Stud*nl);Jani*i,Po>iirli*djrun; 
•nd Uicliul, Sioii Cliapel. Htmni. by 
HrJametorPonlibydjiuD, Ei^ peine of 
Ihe bailding, about one hundred pnundi ; 
■ubKripiion, fiirty-iia p>iund< ; eollec- 
tiani at Ihc opening fifihe chapel, ele- 
ven puBBdi : lemiin, absul fitly pounds. 

KHAGLAND. 
Dec. iS, 1R10. a new Cliapel *» 
•pctwd »i Rhagland. SarmODi, by 
Mewn. Wykc of Abergarenny, Pulm 
cii. 16i Phillips, C»rleon,Jer. mi. <3i 
Jonn of Miinnioulh, 1 John ii. 1 ; Da 
v)« of Heieruid, Mai. Hi. \6. Preyeri. 
T.Junei.Sladnit, W. John, dittaj and 
H. Jonei, Tatycned. 



ASSOCIATION. 

CORNWALL. 

On Wednwday. December ST, IBM, 

Am iwlF-yearly meeting of'Baptiat mi- 

nhlett and chnrchei of (he wrslem parts 

Si ihif coaniy, «■< held u Ueliton. 
[euri. Crren and Smilh jniached on 
the uccaiioni the farmer tn the .morn- 
ing. On Ihe mintMerJDl character of 
FanI, from Oal. *t. 14) the latter in Ihe 
neningi On llie iinportance of using 
eTCr; means for the salnlioii of sodI^ 
from PrtiT.iiiT.il, IS. On the pre- 
ceding efening, Mr. Clarke preaehed> 
On lira Tsriont hindrance! IB prayer, 
from 1 Peter liL lalter part of trrtc T. 
Meisn. Data, Healh, Lincaln. Green, 
mud Clarke engaged in the daiatianal 

The next nwetJng will be held, Ood | 
wiJIing, at Pcnnnct, in Eaitn week, i 
Brother £mi* topnaeh, \ 



ORDINATION. 

CAMBRIDGE. 
0» Wednnday, Deceiaber SO, 1B£0, 
the ItcT. S. Tbttdej, late of Honenun 
Acodetnj, was oidnined la tbr putoral 
office OTer Ihe church and congreBaliiHI, 
Downtng-itreet, Cambridge. Tie lo- 
lemniliei of Ibo day were comtnenced 
bj Ihe BeT. T. Towne of Ro^itou, who 
read luilable portions of icriplnre, and 
edgaged io prayer. Mr. Morel) of St. 
Neot's, with mach force and ability, 
described (he nature of a goipel church. 
The niuBl qneilioni w«re proposed by 
Ihe RcT. Mr. Ht)plini of Lincoln, who 
atsa TeeeiTed ihe confiesiian of faith. 
Mr. Chaplin of Biihop'i-Startfbrd offeiC 
cd the ordination prayer, iccompanied 
with Ihe laying on of hands. An iin> 
preMJTc ohargr uas dellrered la the nf> 
nisler, by tlie Re.. W. B. Collyer, D.D. 
F.A.9. ofPeckham. Tbe sermon to lbs 
people, diittnguis'ied by ils apprapi|> 
aleneu and liilrlily, was preached bj 
Ihe BeT. W, ClaylOD of Saffron Waldeo. 
Mr. Drake of Grecn-alreet caticlnded 
with prayer. Mr. Dohson of Chishifl 
announced ihe bymni; and Mr. Wil- 
- Inffron Waldeo 



I the e 



preached tha 



On Ihe preceding cTening. ihe Rer, 
Dr. Colljer eloquently adiocated the 
cause ut the Caiubridge Beiievulent So- 
citty, Di Mr. Edmonds's Meeiinghause 

collection was made. Oti each ocesiion 
numcroui and respectable audilt>ricB 
wero BSiembled, and a rooie ihan eom- 
man ilegree of deTotionnl feeling and 
deep iniereat appeared eTidently l» 



NOTICES. 



Tni 



TCtaari of (he Hert- 

fonishnfl Union will be tield at St. Al- 
baii'i. on Wednesday, April )S, 18ft, 
when the R>!t. Mr. Leifahild of Kan- 
iingtoD is cipected la preach. 

Tbb Wills and Somerset Auocialian 
will hold Iheit neil Meeling at Ur. 
Saaadeis's Ueeting-honsc i» Froma, on 
the Tuesday in the Easier Week, when 
(he BrMbicn Edminsoa of Bratton, 
ShoTtller of Melkshan, and Seymour »f 
Bradt'ord, ara eipeded Io preacb, 

Tbr Aannal Heeting of the Bedford- 
ihha Union of Christian* will be held it 
Bedford, on Wednesday, May «, 18SI, 
when the Rct. Mr. Edmonds of CaiB* 
bfidga, and the- Re*. Mr. Anthony of 
Bedimd, an vs^ctcd N preach. 



ITS 



3tis^ Cj^ronitle. 



• « 



Thv coodttcton of the Baptut Irish Society are left not only withoot 
fuidty bvty^for the first tiiae siiice its oommenoemciit, are ia consiclerable. 
arrears to tiieir Treasurer ; besides that another bill, amoontiog to £d6&, 
kas boon aocepted for payment Cooscions, however, that they have no 
•tier ends to promote in IreiancH bat to *' woric the work of God,^ and 
bf means which H£ has promised to render efiectual, they cannot bnt 
liope that the pecnntary sapplles fiill be provided* It is very encouraging 
to the Committee to know, that the plan and pursuits of the Society meet 
with the approbation of those who are peculiarly competent to form an 
unbiassed opinion. An instance of tliis iund appears in the sentiments of ICr. 
John Marshman of Serampore, (eldest son of the Rev. Dr. Marshman,^ 
who, onr readers know^ has been much employed in promotiag schools for 
the naUves of India. 



'Extf/oet ofaLiiterJrtm Mr,.hhn Mank" 
wum, to the Secretary, dated 

Serampore, October 30^ 18S0. 

■ ■ " 1 feel peculiar pleMure ia say* 
faig how greatly we have felt encoarage- 
ment from tlie success which has attended 
the labours of your Society in Irtland* 
while engaged in a work similar to that in 
which we have now embarked for more 
Chan fonr vears. The slote of society 
among the lower orders in both countries 
seems to have a considerable degree of 
^nity ; and as U is* the indoenoe of tlicse 
vfibrts in the renovation of character 
whkb forms the chief object of ultimate 
hope, the progre» which has been made 
byrfhe Irish Society towards the accom- 
plbhrnent of this object* is calculated to 
afford high- encouragement to those en- 
gaged in similar nndertakings. That these 
efforts will finally be crownod with snceesa 
there can be no donbt ; the siroultaneoos 
exertions now making wherever ignorance 
is to be found, is a pledge of the most 
pleasing nature ; while every blow aimed 
at ignomnce and vice in one country, pro- 
duces a powerful reaction on all other 
cooDtries on which the light of knowledge 
is now dawning.** 

' Mc Marshman proceeds to give an 
•ocoont^f the CoVegv at Senmport^ " io 



' train up aative Christian youth in the & 
teratuie of the East, and the sdenoe oC 
the WcsU" Thev have made consider- 
able progress an toe buildings : the centre 
builduig covers a third of an acie, and 
contains the library, examination haNs» 
and side roosas for the ozhibkion of exeiw 
cises. They have forty Christian youths 
under instruction in the Sanscrit language^ 
(the learnnfj language of the East,) many 
of whom are mMting rapid progress; and 
the first scholar, who b a member of the 
church, and who walks consisCvntly» has 
made so reaiarkable a proficienf^ as tO' 
have astonished the native pundits. 



I 



I 



From the Rew, Jotiah Wilton to tU 
Secretary, 

Balima, Feb. 17* 1821. 

Mr ncAaBaoTHEB* 

Almost eveiy day since my last lias 
been spent ansoBg the schools. Andthougb 
it might be eipected that the similarity ol 
characten &e. that prevails in the teacbefs 
and in the scbolarst and the identity of 
the olijecit panned, would occasion • 
want of interest \ or ihat tlbb ^^Kt»e««^6t% 
oppoiiiioa oi r^hoia ^Wk ana V^onfii^ >» 



174 



IRISH CHRONICLS. 



those objecby itould produce disooarage- 
ment ; jret nothing of this seems to pre- 
vaU. On the contrary, the interest and 
confidence of old friends seem to be in- 
creased, and new friends are occasional ij 
appearing, who manifest a Ihrelj interest, 
aed exett a oommaoding ii^oence. Of 
the truth of these remarks you wilt have 
unequivocal evidence in the return that 
will be made of the schools for the current 
quarter. The inspection is not yet com- 
pleted, but hitherto, in most cases it has 
been truly gratifying. 

I say thus much now, because efforts 
the most unparalleled have been made (o 
sapi>reai tbie schools entirely in many 
placet; and artifices, some the niosf pue- 
nle, others the most diabwUcal, have been 
resorted to, to intimidate the children aud 
theparents* but with very little success. 

The advantages of a scriptural educa- 
tion are daily manifested, and iacreasingly 
felt; and I feel assured that nothing but 
the establishment of a similar system, 
will prevent the successful operation of 
that at present in existence. The gentle- 
men of the country show that they now 
appreciate the advantages enjoyed by the 
poor, by their increased exertions to aid 
the cause; and the peasaotry, by their 
determination to send their children to 
the schools; of which determination, 
amongst others that have been expressed, 
I will mention one. A priest asked one 
of his flock to subscribe a penny per week 
in aid of a school to be establbhed. — He 
refused. He was pressed hard, but to no 
purpose. He was threatened. Still he was 
firm, and assured the Father Confessor, 
that *^ until the Pope handed largely out 
of his own coflers, and was imitated by 
the bishops, and this was followed up by 
the subscriptions of the priests, so that a 
good foundation might be laid, not one 
pfuny of his money should be given to 
such an object, while there were free- 
schools at hand." 



Xstraett fnm thi Jaunud of th* Rev, 
Jtaae M<Cartiky. 

TuUamore, Feb. 18, 1821* 

JittVART 1, 18)1.— Rode ten miles, 
and preached at Rahue Meeting-boose at 
ten o'clock, and was exceedingly well at- 
tended. Lhad my fears that they were 
influenced by an old supersiilious notion, 
which prevails in other countries as well 
as poor Ireland, that unless the first dav 
of the new year is commenced well, ill 
^"k wW Mttfod ihem the rematoder of it, 



but I believe that they wereactnated fl^ d 
spirit more noble and divine. The r«. ' 
mainder of the week I was very unwell 
for two days, but Providence hleanng siiil> 
able means, I was enabled to resume my 
labours. 

Monday, the 8lh. — Inspected the 
school there. About fifty children giva 
regular attendance now, and the new re* 
peaters, being eight in number, bad com- 
mitted to memory eleven chapters since 
the last inspection. The remainder of 
the week preached at my own cottage^ 
and in the neighbourhood. Saturday, I 
rode about twenty miles, and preached at 
Cumomnch, in the county of Longford, is 
the evening. While sitting at the fire, be' 
fore sermon, an old man, who has been' 
derk of the church about thirty years, said, 
"Sir, I wifth very much to have the 
words of Christ explained to me, ' He 
thai believeth on me, hath everlastix^ 
life.*" This led me to meet his wbhes, not 
only by unfolding that salutary doctrine 
of an unconditional salvation, through the 
righteousness of Christ, but by preaching 
from that momentous questron: '^What 
must 1 do to be saved V* which seemed to 
arrest the attention of all present. 

Brother Bamett, the roan I baptised 
some years ago, is now jealously engaged 
in spreading the knowledge of the troth 
every moment he can spare from his busi- 
ness. He reads and expounds the wor«f 
of life gratis at Cumomtich, and In his own 
neiffhbourhood, in my absence; and his 
wilRng labours I hope will be follwwed 
by much good. — Monday, 15* I In* 
spected the school there, and fbood forty- 
two children preKnt. 

I rode to Longford. Was sorry to find 
I could not preach in the sessions'-houMt. 
Was informed by the schoolmaster that a 
gentleman had called on him, who wa» 
exceedingly anxious to see mtm When 
the coogreeation was dismissed, thb seii- 
tleman made himself known to me. I in- 
vited him to my lodging. On the way be 
said, *' About three years ago> I beard yoa 
preach in the town of K from those 



precious words : * Thou hast a flew 
even in Sardb, which have not defiled 
their garments ; and they sliall walk with 
me in white, for they are worthy ;' which 
sermon (said he,) under the Divine fai- 
fluence, was made the power of God to 
my salvation. SuKe that period, the doc- 
trine of imputed righteousness, with its 
accompanying doctrines, is peculiarly pre- 
cious to ray soul. 1 have long earnestly 
desired to see you, to let you know that 
you were the instrument of my conver- 
sion. 1 am a student in the collie ol 
Dublin : I mean to take my degrees for the 
miuistry, and if ii please God lo spare my 



\ 



IKIBB CHRONICLE. 



^;«b«n, ithkLyoii nmie knova to im," 
li Bt repelled the piincipal put of ■ con- 
I tnmnT nbUb I hid wilh ■ gentkinui 



a or Jetui; which he nid wu ao 
ilcd on hu mind, thil be wdbM rC' 

rr'it thniagh all the duDcuiE icenei 

[ •TDft, and *o &u-d fail niDdpTea, Ihil he 

I m BCTM linoe diipoeed to doabi of ib^ 

! Mlh. Tbi* JMtuiee of dnfolneM lifted 

[ Mf MM nuking heed ebote the (ran, end 

!■ oanDcadBeDOte (ban eTerofthc DiiHtj 

I if ittaumit pnacbia^ I bare opened 

ttDdoon Ihii time between I^ngford tnd 

Sajle, *heTc I lian made apponlmenti 

toBaaeb, onmy rdurn. 

Th«nd*Ti the IBlb. — lotpected the 
liMicfatd Schoal. Tbere an uity-lbite 
cbBttKB OB the lUt, i>hu allend remark' 
Mj well. I fonnd dily-iii pmcnr, Sf- 
Men of whOB had caaumlted twentj-fimi 
cbapten to Dcmoc}* unce the SOlh of latl 
Dim nilmi I pnadwd in Kana|b in tlic 
"-- t oppoddoQ i> manileMeil 



173 
t be eailij 






tmJTnti and I tliink we bad a profitable 

Fiidij, (be 19tb, 1 impeded the icbool. 
TbecB aie liitj-fbur oanwi on the lUt, and 
I coaQted uilj-two proenti fbaneenot 
whom had commilled to memory forty- 
ogbt cbapUii in the New Tutameiit, 
from the lit ol Decambei', 1810, la tbt 
19lb of Juiiiaiy, 18tl. I oontinurd in 
tbe Kboot fiDm elcTen o'clock nnlii lonK 
dme afler the eaiidlei were lighted. 

Sondn, Sl> preached twice at Fee- 
bane. W« had a bappy limu at com- 
DunioD, and am rejcnced to hv, that tbe 
dumb i* aliU, with the eioeplion of od'- 
oi two nianben, going on wdL I had 
Img and ptaanng convertalion witb the 
r^tlK^k girl, wbo ii inquiring after dirine 
tnuh, and I have no doabl but ibe ha« 
afaandoned ererj dependence on tbe merit 
of human work) for her wthraUon. 
■■Id that her alter, through her taeuu, i) 
DOW liegianing to lee Ibe marrelloiu light 
of tbe gotpeL Our God it working in am 
day, and who can let him I 

On Satiuday the Sd, at niae o'clock in 

the momiog, called on Lord D and 

obtrined hu ptoadie of fiie poundi to- 
waidi building a meeting-houie at Abbey- 
IflK. Hii lo^Bblp has given an eligiblQ 
lot of land Tor the chapel, and fire poundi 
HI annum for the general purpoaet of Ihu 
Bodely. I know not where hi>e<]iial i> tc 
he fbiuid. Giber gentlemen in the nelgh- 
boorhoodiiDfiuenccd hy the example oJ 
hii lordibip. lubiciibed lowaidilhe object. 
If Ibe building doe) not gn on mow, ' 



nrc the injnry done wifl s 
lepaiicd. 

Friday, Saturday, Suiday, (the Hh of 
Fehraary,} Monday, and Tueidij, I 
praacbed in Abbeylcin and ili Tidnlty, 
Wednetdiy pTcached U> about two hun- 
dred penona in the niarkeMuwa, Houut- 
iDlb ; Saturday at my own cot, and OB 
Sunday, (the lllh), kl Rahue. 



JOURNAL. 
SuHoar, December 51. — Preached lo. 
■y in Tallow to about thirty pi 

e rapid ai| 



f anttject wai > astemn one 



■pid aifbl of time.— May it make 
deep and laMing impmiian on my own 
mind, ai well ai on the miodi of Ihoie 
who beard it ! I aomellmea think, If we 
could hiTs tbe ma* newt and fee^ aH 
ibmugh life, which we are likdy to^ia 
at iu doungbour, Ihey would iarniB into 
onr pvblic wrricea a peculiar tttriouinen, 
■olemnitj, and aitlanr. 

HotxAiy, Janaary l,^Preacbed tU* 
morning alao in Tallow. A conddeiabta 
■hare of ohloqay altachei itwlfeTen to the 
circumiUnce of attendiug preaching lit 
Ifali barren *od wicked (ixK. The nr* 
dghtof aBibleii Mfficient to excite the 
dupiEUore, and draw fonh llie urcaina 
of the detoteei of Boiae. Paaalng along 
the ilreet thia EBomiog, from the phce of 
mecdhg, a liule buy wat carrying boiM 
the Bible under hia am, who wai Ihni 
■ccoifed by a man (landing at hii doori 
" la Ihat tbe KUe jon have got under 
your arm. Bob T ■■ It ii what job have 
not got," replied the youthful betnr of 
the ncred tievare. " That ii a droit 
lUng yoD hare gut," lejgined the reriler 
of Gud'a moat holy word. The remark 
-j__., . . ._! . laagli ag Jnat 



was eridenlly m 
Di. SleasedJe 

" iron my face, for Iby dear name. 
Shame and reptoacbea be; 
I'll hail reproach, and wekoow sliutr. 
If Ihon remember me." 

Sunday, 14.— Freached toJtT in Mid' 
dieton, to about fifty hearera, and enjoy«d 
a pleasant, and I trait a profllable, oppor. 
tunity. Hire are two or Iliree warm 
Christian friendi, with whom it is refirsh' 
irg and delightfnl lo auociate. Heard 
Ihe clergyman of (he parish preach an ei- 
celleul gospel aenoon. and wai moch 
pleased lo find aome of Ihe profit read. 

Konalne'a Semtons on rhe Lnw and the 
Ooiprl. I hopr the Lord has a worli it 
acGooiptiib in tbli'^^m. 



176 



IRISH CHBONICLS* 



Sunday, tbe tSStk-^Preached tcMlaj in 
Tallow. Tlie congregation moderately 
Urge, and very atttcni'ive and seriout. A 
yonng roan from Yooghall being present, 
-we held a prayer- meeting after. the even- 
Lig*s service, and implored the Ucssing uf 
God on the preaching of his own word, 
liord, hear our prayers, and give tbe 
increase. 

Friday, Ft-bruary 9. — Preached this 
evening in Tallow to about twenty four 
hearers, who heard the word with appa> 
Tent seriousness, attentioni and satisfac> 
tlon. May they indeed enjoy the blessed- 
ness of the people who know the joyful 
aound ! 

StHiday, the lltli.-«*Spent this day in 
liermoy, and iijMjn the wliote was kindly 
received. Consulted with Mr, Brace, the 
l^Iclbodist preacher, rr9|>ecting their hours 
of worship, which £ k»und to lie ten in 
the morning, and seven in the evening. 
I pfoposed preaciiing at eight and five ; 
bnt Mr. Bruce told me, I sliouid not have 
a congregatiuu at eight in the amniing. 
He therefore proposed my preaching for 
lura at ten, which I gladly embraced, and 
tptiipated my intention of preaching in 
Uie Court-house at iive o'clock ; bot be- 
^ told by Mr. Bruce, I might at well 
occupy their house at five, as it did not 
uiterfere witk their hour, I gladly availed 
myself of the very friendly offer, and 
preached at five to about siity people. 

I wa« very, kindly received by a Mr. 
Whitney, and others, from whom I re- 
oeived aome accounts of Brother Thomas, 
highly gratifjfing, and frem wliicb we may 
be led to ho|ie bii labours have not been 
altogether in vain. William Bearden, a 
man wlio goet round the country reading 
tjie Irish Tettament,. travelled with me, 
and greaily opened the wav for me. Af- 
ter the rooming^s service, without saying a 
word to me of his intention, be went to 
Bathcormuck, a village between tliree and 
four miles from Fermoy, and brought two 
people to the afternoon's service, to whom 
iif! introduced me, and who warmly in- 
tiled mc to visit ihem next day. 

Monday, the 19th.««Went aooordingly 
to Buthcormuck, which place we reached 
tboat twelve o'clock. Having given out 



that I wooM preach in TaUo« in tl»even* 
ing, I could not stop with tliem nmre 
than two boors. I mentioned to them, 
that if a few people oonld be collected at 
once, I slwukt endeavour to speak a few 
words to then. At such an onsriisonable 
hour, I liardiy expected atiy person 
would attend ; bot, to my astoimhment^ 
in a few ssinutes they came dropping in» 
till we had a congregation of between 
thirty and forty people. A most interesting 
congregation they proved to be : they re- 
ceived the word with |(ladness, and erU 
dent marks of the most lively saifsfaction, 
I spent a most delightful and happy hour; 
seemed elevated lo the very gate of hea- 
ven, and found it good to wait vpon God. 
I was warmly solicited to visit them on n 
Sabbath, and I sliould delight to do so; 
but the distance is greats tmeniy* two 
lung miles from this. After preaching at ihtt 
place, I walked eleven long Irish miles to 
Talbw, where 1 arrived, weaty and fa- 
tigued In body, bot gn^aily reffeshed in 
spirit. The people were assembling, and* 
weary as I was, I went immediatdy to 
preaeh» and enjoyed another Dredona 
season. About 6>sty people attended, and 
what was better, I hope the Lord was 
amongst us of a truth ; a very marled nt- 
teniion was visible, and a pleasing soIobk 
nity seemed to sit on every countenance, 
while I testified unto them the gospel of 
tlie grace of God. I am sure you will join 
with me in praying that the *'God of 
all ^race may give testimony to the watd 
of his grace." 

Upon the whole, I think this has beea 
one of the most delight IM days I ever 
spent. Oh that it may be a loken for 
good to some precious souls I 

I met with a steady looking young nNHiy 
who seems very much attached tor Bap* 
tist prhadplcs. He intrckluoed iho suhjeefy 
and remarked, tlwt he thought reascHi Stsdf 
was Bufliclent to teach a man, that ih« 
time wlien he was brought to tlie know- 
ledge of the truth was the proper time to 
receive Baptism. 1'his young man waa 
broufiht up a Roman CathoHc, and can 
speak the Irish l«mguage. I hope to bo» 
come better acquainted with him. 

Jobm Hamilto«. 



The Rcr. Mr. Morgan of Birmingham hat the heft thanla of the SccreUryrfir hsving 
obtained for theSodelyU %ae Twenty Tttamenti. Theu toeie jummted by tha Cuil- 
orir.N of a family, tfi eonsemitnce of Mr, Morgan leaving rfpmcnfsd in a sermon *■ tht 
dryiorable itate of the people oflrllund.** 



177 



Miegiomttf Heralli. 



BAPTIST MISSION. 



KENT. 

Wb meotiooed, in our Namber 
for February, that our friends in 
this county had kindly resolred 
to make a general collection 
through all their churches, in 
order to assist the Mission in its 
present difficulties. In announc- 
ing their desien, we ventured to 
express our fdeasing confidence, 
that what had been so promptly 
and liberally devised by our dear 
brethren, composing the Com- 
mittee of the Auxiliarv Society 
for the county, would be met 
with equal cordiality and kindness 
by the friends at large. To say 
that the event has justified our 
expectations is saying too little ; 
It has far exceeded them. Al- 
though Kent has suffered pecuii- 
mrfy by the foilure of the hop 
plantations in the last season, the 
produce of tfiis kind and vigor* 
ous measure has been more than 
three hundred and seventy paunde. 
We feel that our humble acknow- 
ledgments are due, in the first 
instance, to Him who instructs 
the liberal to devise liberal things; 
and then to our brethren who 
formed the respective deputa- 
tions, and to the churches and 
individuals who so generously as- 
sbted them; including many of 
diiferent denominations firom our- 
selves, whose kindnesii on this 

VOL. xin. 



occasion, entitles them to the af- 
fectionate esteem of the whole 
Society. The following letters will 
give more particular information. 

From Vf Rtv, George Atkmton t# 
Mr.D^. 

Margate, March S, 1891. 

Afr DBAm Broth BR, 

I am tore yoo will rejoice with me In 
the success which has atteiided our horn* 
ble, bat well meant, attempt to promote 
the Redeemer's caase, by serving the 
Mission in its present embarrassed state. 
Brother Giles retnmed home on Thorvday. 
As nearly as he was able to calculate, the 
proceeds of their toar through East Kent 
would be about ^150. T am bappj to 
add, that in the western division of the 
county, the sum of ^tli 18«. Id, lias 
been raised on this interesting occailaii. 
It is a gratifying circumstance, that, where- 
ever we went, such was the sympathy ma« 
nifested by Christians of all denomina- 
tions, and such the almost universal iLind* 
ness of our Pssdobaptlst ministering bre- 
thren, that the work, iastead of being a 
source of vesation and disappointment^ 
afforded as real pleasure. 1 hope the bu* 
stncss will be taken up throughont the 
cuuntiy, and then it will be seen how 
many friends there are who are ready to 
help the Society iu lu dbtresa. Them 
has been much in our experience to en* 
courage others. 



From ika iZev. WUUam Gilet to the tame, 

Chatham, Marchf 1821. 

Wb feel, I believe, unfelgnedly thanit- 
fnl to a gracious God, who bath merd- 
fuUy preserved us, given us favour in the 
infes of all denominations, and prospered 
the work of uor hands. The fruit of all 
our labour will be, I believe, a present 
Kit to the Society of not less than .f 550. 
We were, and so were all ihat have heard, 
of our success, astonished, when we con- 
sider the pressure of the times, and th^ 
comparatively little interest that hasy^t 
been excited in some f^tu qC l^ siwkciX^ 



MlUIOHAlT H£KALB. 



to MiuioMTj objeeti. We eooiider tlili. 
hoKCTEfi ibe leut of the adiintwa Ihit 
will be deri'Bii from out lour. Vft were, 
I ibltik, unoiually auided in pnuhing 
Chriit ID the Mobtc; firi, iJmm of Mi 
Krmoni wtra 6hKtek [o UftklUDil M 
glory of hii luDgdom, ia ill connMlDn 
»ilb UiuioiuiT cierdoni. Out iab9ar 
b» been gml, but our health uid *tn;nft>h 
have b«D mercirully prtiemd. We 
wece received at eTCt; place with much 
ital cliriiUan boi|iItalny; and »e could 
Dot but utinicri Ibat Chiistiaiu of ill de- 
HDiiiIualMrs Mcraed to cwiSdbr Ibt Bkp- 
tlit tfUdon Bi a work that God bad buich 
It and an abject ia wbkh (bey bad 



r, bail u&rMty knewh ahy tl 



t fulljr 



to Ibem u ilraoce neWi. Wi 
c^Diioced, that should Iboiuni 
have taken, be followed up by oar bie- 
Ihien in all the countlel in finglendi we 
abal) Dot only *l once be dellirefed fnini 
OBt erobarnuaient. but out retooHri will 
.M n much furtbeied u to rniblc n> to 

Sllcnd our eSbrt*. We would adriie all 
I'at may be diipoed la epibvL Id tbii 
^bod ooik, to haie printed clrculiui sitit 
io all Iba congregaliont in ihe coanty, al 
lowing thernMlTri iiffiaeot time in each 
Jown, (o M to be aUe lo malce pciunal 
applicBlioiu to indlTldoal.t. and afiei lucli 
■nplicitlon* lo preach aud, if tbey can. 
bblaln culteclioiu. PemAial application! 
will |»0T0 tbc loou pToductWr, and wilt 
'iffbrd an oppoitunity uf caiieyinginfonu- 
alion to many indiTiduoli who ue not lu 
the habit of attertdiog our placet of wor- 
•btp, wliere tnfonnatiun ii generally coln- 
nuntcaied. 

We trust that tlie zeal of tbne 
vorlhy brethren will provoke very 
maDy, and thut tlte privilege 
awaits m of recording ntaay such 
instancM of Sffeelionate iiiid siic- 
cessftil leal on behall of the So-, 
t'iety. 



WALLIKGFORD, B^RKS. 

Oh Sonday, October 1& fBtl, Hn 
Be<nith Annual Meertn^ of tbc WiUIn^- 
|liid AuiillaTy tlapiin MhilanMy Bo 
.dety, wai hdd at WalUngfiiid. Three 
'iermmu were pleached on iheoccniioD; 
two Ky Ibe Ret. John Chin of Waiworlh. 
Wid one by llie Mvt. Joieph'Tyiu. The 
callrcilom and tiibiciiptloM amoDMed to 



Sfttvtisa STntelUjrmcr. 

BATAVIA. 

From this Mation — inmorlanr, 
not merely on account of^itt uu> 
merous resident populaiion, but 
as maiatainiog commercial iaiet- 
conne with the whole of Eastern 
Asia — wc have htely recaived 
letter*, dated in Siij Iflit. In n, 
Terence to the ioHm of labour in 
whicft be hal Mrtf been iM|a|ed 
upwards of seren yean, Mr. Ko- 
binion observci: 

"The time Ii come, whefaTtnaeb need 
a feltOw-labtHnTri n« imt hwieam, 
and my Mr«i%tb dh^niahn. I do not 
tay, tliM iheie ii ■ great door open, btit k 
11 hi|eh lime for oi to Wlempt Mmelhii^ 
on a larger scale, and to make, If pouilile, 
a n-Euikr and MglUdtrccted alt*k tm Ma- 
bam mediniani. We KAiit, tf yoa trfH ■■■' 
liil ut. make a iLrennoiu eSbrI ID cMaUU 
tchiiuli; we muiteo ril round ibe coun> 
try, whtre iVe Malay language u ipolun, 
and prrMli and dllipeTte reti^Dia tMco. 
Other iracti most be «rrttten; tchoot 
booki, and boob) oantaining ilie Snt pnt- 
a\Aei uf uteful kuowledn must be pre- 
pared and ciiculHied ; and, in ihott, even 
effort riiutt be made to eiJIightni the 
puUic miad, and to (tiepaie ihi 
-' I^rd. Mnl • - ■ 

that fort. W, _ _. ._^ 

iiclory ; lire liege will be U>n^ and uc- 
ceu will long anieac donblfdl ; lome of 
us •hat) mmt likrty die in ihe attempt, 
but o(h«ra will liie to be»r the ibovL u( 
*Fiioiy." 

In ,describinR the manner in 
Kliich tie has lately been oecu< 
{tied, be tnodesllyrediailiA: 

•I Wbat I haTB done during tba latt 
Ibrce niantlii will not appear macbi 
Ibongh I ha*e been canilanily U^yH. 
I DiHiUenced am'ifng a khort UlNMatlMi 
on Malay otthagrapbj, bat a* lis ndijen 
wai an exceedio^v ^iiSicnJt one, I coiiM 
procn'd but llowlj ; howtTrr, I ban 
cottECleV a tew lon^ materfalt, and I 
miai. after « lime, ihfnk of rfieping Md 
arianglif them. SomrlHng of Ihti kind 
ii Terv nM<Mai-y, in nrder lo elocWtaia, to 
our Mimionary breihren, the prindplea of 
iHbTetydiSndlonhOgtapliyi forltlib 

\ 



K IBi 



MIS^IOKARY V9EM.P. 



J 79 



be rureHed, that therp U no wQrk eztJint. 
«Ui«D is jufficicnilj fuU on Um tnbjcct. 
While writing reoi^rks for .this diuerUi- 
tion, I discofered mainr errors an mj 
Spelling Book, though I had reallv be* 
stowed much laboar upon it, so that I 
bare been oUiard to revise and correct 
the whoIe« and huve it re-copied. I have 
alfo nvide a rough, and ratber frre, trans- 
htion« of the Hubamwedan Ilutorj of 
Abraham, from filalay into English. Thb 
1 iotend to ret ise and forward to the So- 
ciety. It is a childish siury, but it may 
perbapa be of wme little se price in the 
bands pf the Society. A few extracts from 
(be Mohammedan History of Da?id» also 
tumlalitd from the Malay, finish the pro. 
diicti^ns of my pen &h the last ouarter* 
These extracts I shall inclose in the pre- 
s**nt letter, leaving it to the discretion of 
the Society to dbpose of them as tiiey 
think proper. 

" I ^piebcnd that extracts from Malay 
]9ooks may be useful, and therefore intend 
to turn my atteuiiou a little to that sob- 



" I have continoed to preach as usual, 
wiibout any interruption from sickness, 
though I cannot boast of good health. On 
the subject of success I can say but little : 
«nc or two inddents, however, may be 
worth mentioning. A young roan of 
hopeful piety lias joined our prayiug 
Criendv About a year agOt be livpd 
without any serious thoughts of religion, 
and did not even attend worship. We 
liave now seven persons, besides myself, 
wlio ci^aze in prayer at our prayers 
meeting^ m regular turn. The Cbnia- 
roan roeiitioned in my letter to Dr. Ry- 
land, of April last, whu burnt the appen- 
dages of his paper god, now lies very ill, 
•ad is not likely to recover. Previously to 
bis iUuess, he had fur sometime absented 
birosclf from worship; but one Sabbath- 
day, being taken suddenly ill, he became 
quite alarmed, and sent for iWan to vi^it 
him. The'an and Mr. Diering went tbe 
fame day, and I called on Uia the day 
jfoUowing, and have continued to vi»ii him 
(Mice, twice, or three times a week ever 
iince. I am in doubt as to the state of 
bis aonl, but am not destitute of h9pe. I 
pray with him erery time I visit hin^ and 
km aeems desirous of obtaining mercy, and 
belicring on Christ, lie says, and I reaUy 
Wieve him* tJiat be lus not llie least 
confidence in any of the Chinese idols. 
ila Cells me thai he prays, and I have no 
doubt that he attempts it; but still his 
Mind appears very darkt and I fear be lias 
Doeonect ideas of the deocitfuineia of his 
^ovn heart ; it is however affecliiigf and a 
litUis eacouragnig, .to hear a poor idolater, | 
wiiile lying on a sick bod, in prospect of J 



defitbf say, * I Imoyv that none but Jesus 
can save me ; 'I pray tp liim, and I will 
die under His feet.* 

- An old Portuguese woman died lately 
in Batavia, of whose conversion I liave 
but little doubt. She lived till old age in 
shi and ignorance, but began, something 
less than a year ago* to attend Malay 
worsliip, when, there is reason to hope, 
the Lord opened her eyes» and taught her 
to flee from tiie wrath to come. From the 
time of her first attending she was a con* 
stant bearer, till she was confined at home 
by her last iUiiess. Asking lier one day 
whether she was afraid to die, she re. 
plied,** I have been a great sinner, and 
when I think of my sins, I am afraid ; but 
when I think of the lieath of Jesus, I Imva 
hope." An old man, who has been my 
host at Tugoob, durhig the six fears that I 
have t>een in the haUt of visiting that 
village, now lies ill, and proliably will soon 
go the. way of all living. I visited him 
yesterday ; he talks like a Christian, and 
1 hope that be does depend on Jesus 
Christ alone for salvation. An old China* 
woman has lately expressed a wish for in* 
struction ; aixl as she is ill, and not alile 
to attend worship constantly, I have ap- 
pointed every Friday evening to go and 
instruct her at her own house. She seems 
to have no faith in the Chinese gods; and 
to tell tlie trmh, I fear she has no serioua 
concern about litr soul ; but I intend to 
visit her a little longer, in hopes of doing 
tier good.^* 

The followii^g sum mgry view if 
giveo of the visible effectf which 
have resulted from his labours 
during his residence at Batavia. 
Our readers will feel tbe force of 
Ibe ioterrogatioD with which it 
concludes, 

** We have now, at Batavia;* fbor ipem- 
4iers, who have been Uipiiaed in Java ; 
and we have besides tliem, five men of 
hopeful piety, who pray in turn at our 
prayer-meetings. There are also a few 
women, who seem to be pious ^ and two 
persons, if no more, appear to have died 
in the Lord; to say nothing of a poor 
Chinamaitf who says lie w^ldio under the 
feet of Jesns. Add these together, and 
you will find them more than ten,tlie num- 
ber £>r which Sodom might have bcro 
saved ; and shall Java then be rejected i" 



The following extract from the 
Mahommedan history of David, 
meationed by Mr. Robinson, will 



ISO 



M188I0NART HERALO. 



give our readen some idea of this 
curious Oriental production. 

One day the children of Israel came 
to Davidf to request him to show them 
bow the judgment will be oondocted on 
tbe. day of resurrection. Oavidj said, 
*• Very good ! come to me at some festi- 
val, and I will show you." About this 
time a very difficult cause was brought 
before David. A woman was accused of 
stealing an oz, and killing it for food. The 
woman pleaded, that she was ready to 
die with hunger, and that the ox came to 
ber of his own accord, and said,** Kill me, 
and eat me, for I shall make excellent 
foud for you." David seemed satisfied 
with this apology ; but tbe owner of the 
ox was not ; and he strenuously demanded 
justice. At this time Gabriel appeared 
to David, and said : " Command all the 
children of Israel to assemble to-morrow 
on tbe plain, ihat they may see a speci- 
men of the judgment, which will take 
place at the day of resurrection." Ac- 
eordingly the people assembled ou the 
next day, when David ascended a pulpit, 
and tbe woman« with tbe owner of (he 
ox, were brought before bim. In the first 
place David read a verse from one of hb 
Psalms, which produced universal si- 
lence ; all listening to bis voice. He then 
addressed the owner of the ox, saj^iog, 
"Do you remember, tbat on tbe day ^ou 
left *Sbam for t Mesir, von entered into 
the service of a chief, who was travelling 
with five hundred loaded camels, and that 
yon drove the camels into a plain, ubere 
you murdered their owner, and buried him 
m the sand ; and that you proceeded into 
Mesir with tbe camels and merchandize, 
where you remained forty days, and after- 
wards returned to Sham, and told tlic 
children of Israel, that tbe property which 
you brought with you was all your own ? 
Thus you made yourself a great man in 
the earth ; and vour riches have continued 
to increase until this day. Now the man 
whom you murdered was the husband of 
this ^oman, and the father of her two 
children." When the owner of the ox 
beard this speech, he denied the charge, 
saying, '* t never murdered a man in my 
whole life, nor did I ever take any one's 
property.** His hands immediately cried 
out, ** O prophet of God ! on that day 
we cut the roan's throat ;** and bis feet 
said, *' O pmphet of God ! we buried 
bim in the sand." Thus bis lirobi bare 
testimony against bim, and his mouth 
could say nothing more in hu defence. 
In this manner will God judge men in the 

day of resurrection, when their mouths 
.will be shut, and their bands and their 

|bet testify concerning their deeds. David 



then ordered tbe robber^ bead to te 
struck off, and studi upon a pole, and stl 
hb property to be given to tbe woflNil 
whose husband be bi^ murdered. 



SAMARANG. 



'Sjrru. 



f Egypt. 



This station, which affords 
much greater facilities than Bati- 
via for intercourse with the ori* 
ginal inhabitants of Java, has ac- 
quired a mournful interest in the 
history of our Society, as being 
the spot on which one faithfiS 
Missionary resigned his life in the 
service of his Lord aild Master ; 
and another became so enfeebled 
by sickness, as to be compelled to 
relinquish the work in which his 
heart delighted, and return to die 
in his native land. Mr. Bruckner, 
our surviving Missionary there, 
has deeply felt these l>ereaTing 
Providences, but steadily perse- 
veres in his efforts to make known 
to these poor benighted heathen 
and bigoted Musselmen, the way 
of salvation. Besides the trans« 
lation of the New Testament, 
which, it appears, has advanced 
to the end of Colossians, he is 
constantly engaged in visiting the 
surrounding villages, to converse 
with the inhabitants. We have 
lately received his Journals for 
June, July, and August last, which 
furnish some interesting particu* 
lars respecting these labours. Our 
readers will kindly make allow- 
ance for Mr. Bruckner's want of 
thorough acquaintance with our 
English idioms. 

Jtt^ 4. — ^Tbe other day I went to the 
town of tbe Chinese, anuNig wbom I liad 
formerly distributed a number of books; 
sucb as NewTestamentTracu, Catcchismt, 
&c. I went into several houses, to bave 
conversation with them on religion. I 
came to some place where I beai^ dread* 
ful croanings, like a person under the 
heaviest burden of affliction; hut those 
who were near to it, were not at all con- 
cerned about it. 1 asked tbero what it was ; 
and was informed that tliere was a dead 
pf^rson in tbe house, who was bewailed 
^ by Iboie fscoa&s* I embraced theopporto- 



MlSSIONAnV HCUALI). 



181 



tiitj to rertiind them of their own drnih ; 
but as Ibis matter did not seem worth their 
■ttentioD* I began Co speak abuot the re- 
ftorrectkm of the dead. This was matter of 
laughter for toch wise prople as thejp ima- 
gifted themselves to be. I asked them wlie- 
ther ihey thought it impossible for such a 
blight^ 6od« who had made lieaven and 
carih. and all in it, to raise the bodies of 
the dead. B^ this they were quite si- 
lenced. I spoke farther on the Gospel 
troths to them, and they seemed to listen 
with attention. Shortly after, I went into 
tiNBC Javanese village. 'Vhe head man 
of it appeared soon lo bid me wcl^me. I 
■oon began to tuin the conversation on 
religion, espedally as I observed his fast- 
ing. 1 aoon came with him on Jesus 
Cbfittt and the redemption bv him. I 
isknl him whether he and his people 
wimld like to know and hear somelhmg 
inor«~of the Gospel. He told me, that oI«l 
and steady people did not like to hear of 
Jcaui ; yet I did not hesitate to tell him 
who Jesus was, and that salvatiun was to 
be had in no other than alone in him ) yet 
he took an I mentioned to him in good 
Iiumour* 

A short time ago I went up the country, 
•boat three milts distant. Kiileriiig a 
small village, I met several persons. I 
began Immediately to address them on the 
subjf-ct of reUgiin ; this seemed rather 
strange to them, that a European ihotild 
liave soch a discourse to them. They lis- 
tened with so much attention, os if they 
woald swallow my words. I told them, 
that God thus loved the woild, that he 
had given his only begctten Son, &c &c. 
Bj and by arrirc*d a Chinaman, who 
lived in the same vill.ige, who by his al- 
ways living among the Javans had some 
dear notions about tlie only and true God ; 
neither did lie seem to be guilty of idola- 
try. 1 spoke es|)eciully lo him of the 
way of salvation by Jesus Cbri>t : all was 
new and stranj;*: to him, and mutter of as- 
tonishment, lie nsked me several ques- 
tions in the presence of the others, uhich 
I answered and resolved to him witii the 
greater pltasure, as I saw their attcntioli. 
Night drawing near. I was obliged to bid 
them farewell (ot the present ; tlicy thank- 
ed roe very heartily lor tlie conversation 
with them. 

Further : I went into another village in 
the neigh tKuirhood of Samarang; after 
convening with a man who seemed to be 
very rigid in his ivligious tenets, I went 
farther on to some oth«r house. There I 
found a man, wlio liittened very attentive 
to that 1 lold liim of Gotl's way of saving 
sinners whf> believe in Jesus. As he was a 
Mnsseiman, he had certainly heard of 
Jesns's name ; but that remission of sin 
•od Gtid's gnee were oblMiucd by faith in 



him, was strange matter to him. He ex- 
pressed himself that he felt the truth in 
his heart of that I had told him, that he 
was willing to follow my words, and very 
anxious to know more about it. Koowii^ 
these eastern deceitful assertions^ I re- 
minded him of Godli omniscience, whu 
penetrated, wuh his all-seeing eye lutp 
our hearts, and that the sincerity of our 
hearts was %'ery pleasing to him. Ha 
asked roe several things about his religi- 
ous cercmunies, such as fasting, (which he 
just kept,) &c. which I answered with the 
utmost caution^ not lo cive any offence or 
raise prejiulice. told him merely, ihat h 
hardly could be called fasting to abstain 
from fnod and sleep at day,iime, and te 
indulge at night as much as they liked. I 
visited him shortly after a second time* 
though he did not appear so anxious to 
me as the first time about the way of sal* 
vation ; yet be maintained that he waa 
very wlUing to listen, approving at the 
same time all I said to him. 

Another day I went to some villaee, 
where 1 intended to converse with the m« 
habitants on the Gospel. AHer they had 
related to me a number of things respect- 
ing their lands and houses, &c. 1 told tlieoi 
that it was not merely necessary to care* 
for I he bnity, but esiiecialiy for the soul; 
and in order to bring it more home upon 
them, and to introduce the CuHpel te 
them, I asked what they thought would 
become of thfir souls heieafter.| They re» 
plied, this question was too deep for theo^ 
as they never had troubled their niinds 
with such things. I expressed that I pi- 
tied them very much. In the mean time 
sfKue had gone to call tho priest of tlie 
village, who soon arrived : he was an old 
venerable looking man. I asked hits 
whether he could read and write? He re- 
plied, he cotild read a little, but write he 
could not. I entered in a conversation 
with him on religion, in the presence of 
the people, who were staring at as, as if 
they heard something quite ih-.w. I spent 
a very pleasant h..ur with th«m I hope le 
visit them as of: en I can. i must obficrve 
tliat the people higher up the country aie 
far less acquainted uiih the particular te- 
nets of the Mahometan religion, though 
they are. call<*d Miisselmans, than the peo- 
ple along the sea- shore, and arc therefore 
the fittest subjects for the Gospel, as their 
prejudices are less. Tlius I might enter- 
tain you with a number of thinp of that 
kind : but 1 fear I have been already toe 
prolix. 

On Sundays I have regular preaching in 
Malay to a ^w poor people, who profess 
themselves Christians. 'J'huugh I see. that 
the number of hearers doe^ not increase. 
I will not ^We \i uy tA \o\\^ «& ^^\<«e\« %\^ 
two 01 lhiee« Aju oVvi m^s^ va^Qswi^>^^»% 



liiSSiOHABT ilESAtV. 



fM 



^}u3L had wgultrly ■ttended, ^ trw 
thit be could not come ; 1 vbited Win in 
liis house, reminding him tbat of which 1 
bad spoken rrpeatedtj to them* uanidjf. 
^ o«r Mlvdtion in Jews Cbmt, as we 
trere all miaerabie and lust sinners wilbont 
biro. He replied to me with tears in his 
eyes, that he was m iinner. You may 
toppose that 1 would rather Irave beard 
•uch It language with tears wiihottt that 
H9, Thoutfh I suppose he had lived ail 
his life lime In whoredom, h« was still so 
•elf.righi«>us. I «»ked him whether he 
'was not called a Christian. Yes, he said, 
i^ow, I «mI, if you, behiK called a 
ChristiHn, haire niK loved Jesus Christ 
Villi ail yoor heart, and expres*d this 
love by living according to his precepts, 
Ihen you are a great sinner, thou^^h you, 
liertiaps, have not oooMnitted maruer and 
theft. This put him to silence. After 
Tccomroending him lo think about these 
things I had spoken to him abont, and to 
pray to God tor light and assistance;, I 
left him this time. 

With mv attempt of translating ilic 
Kew Twlanwrnt into Javanese, 1 am oome 
lo the end of Pnurs Epistle to the Colos- 
iians. I have also begun the revision of 
the Gospel of Rlaiihew. to adapt it more 
tfbr the us^ of the na-ives. 1 wish some 
^rt of it couhl l)e printeii fur the distri- 
ImtifHi among the Javans ; but before this 
ean be d«»i>e 8«>me time will elapse, as the 
-type's not ^el have been cuL I had lately 
« ♦horl visir by Mr. Ward from Bencoolen, 
iHid he has taken several oopies of the Ja- 
Tanese character with him iu order to cut 
them there in case tlie Society at home 
iMVc not yet done Bny thing in it. I sup- 
•twse that work could be done jn Benooo- 
letr as well end even as cheap as at home, 
provided Mr. Ward is supplied whh ma- 
terials for it ; these I think he has re- 
quest«Kl fmni the Society. I hope bis 
teqoebt may be granted, that we might 

git a ftmnt of Javanese types; though it 
i doubtful whether a printing-press will 
here he permittetl, as my request to go- 
vernment fw it has not yet been answered. 



SUMATRA. 

The expectation expressed in 
oor last Number, has been re- 
ftliscd, and we have now the 
pleasure of laying before otir read- 
ers a connected statement of the 
proceedings of our friends on this 
island, from the period of their 
living St. Helena, till the month 
f October k$t. 



A jmmt iMttr frmm MmrM. Xmim ni 

Burton, to the CommitUes doied Bm^ 
coolen, Juno t4, giveM the JoUovrnf 
Aeccwtt if tknr o/rri»ok 

Yov are, no doubt, acquainted^ with 
every thing necessary to be communicated 
relative to oor T03'age as far os St. Helens, 
through the medium of letters addfessed 
by us to Dr. Ryland aiid Mr. Dyer. It 
now remains for um to inform you, th* 
we sailed from that port the ItiYi of Apdl» 
after bavins experienced great kindness 
from several of the inhaWtants, especially 
Mr. and Mrs. Vernon. Our passage from 
Su HeTeiia lo Bencoolen has hech rety 
pleasant, though somewhat longer than 
we expected : but in taking a retrospect 
of the manner in which we spent the 
time, we hope it was not altogether lost. 
Tlirough the tender mercy of our |ieavcnly 
Father tiie health of our dear wUes wa* 
much heller than during the former part 
of our voyage, so that wc had more time 
at our disposal, a This was prindpill/ 
employed in going among the sailors — 
iRJking to them respcding their etcrnat 
interests, and distributing trtcts— -and 
teaciiing in our cabins those who could 
not read. There were not, we heHeve, more 
than three or four onaWe to read that did 
not come to be instructed, uid two of these 
were foreigners, who could read the Word 
of God in their own lan^age. but had it 
not. We have the satisfacibn to stat^f, 
tlvit the progress made by these men wal 
pleasing and rapid ; and we have the au- 
thority of some of the officers to say, that 
there was an evident alteration in their 
deportment j and from our own observa- 
tion we can assert, that reading the Bible 
and religious books was much more fre- 
quent, and swearing much less common 
throughout the sWp's company. We wish 
it were in our power to say more than 
Ihb. hut it is not, though of some wc 
would fain hope well. The respect and 
kindness of the captain and officers were 
uniform through the voyage; and from 
two gentlemen in the civil department of 
the company's service, who were pasaen- 
sers from St. Helena, we received mudi 
friendly attention. 

We came to an anchor in Bencoolen 
roadsehc 9th iust. and by a boat which 
came on shore the same afternoon, tent 
our letters of introduction to the Gover* 
nor and the Rev. Mr. Winter (the Chap- 
lain), but were disappointed in hearing 
that Mr. Ward was not here. Tlie next 
morning we received an intimation froB 
Sir T. S. Raffles, that he would be glad 
to see us on shore as early as convenient, 
assuring ur tbat preparation was made for 
our immediate accommodalioiu Shortly 
1 after, Mr. Winter came on board to set 
\ Mi and \uVAft u% \» \ft*\»i\»fc> ^mASI «* 



MISSIONARY HERALD. 



183 



'I 



MlilJ comfortably remove to a permanent | as he. could ; adding, tliat there should 
ictideiicf . Ha ioformed ui tliat Mr. I not be len than two or three at any pltc« 



Wacd had left lor BatavU levcn] montha 
ago, with tbe intantion of returning very 
MoOf bitt that nothing had been heard of 
bim liiice ; that he had purcbaaed a large 
hunie b«(ore his departure with a view to 
• Mission establishment; that the press 
was there* wid that the Governor had 
gjiven directions for tlie house to be pre- 
pared for oar reception. 

We all left the slup with Mr. Winter as 
•eon at oor baggaflc could be got re ady, 
aad landed about four o'clock* wlicn we 
preoecded to his house* wlusre we met 
with the troest hospitalitv, aud received 
the kindest and most christian attentions 
from himself and Mrs. W. 

6n the morning of Monday, the 12th 
UutU we aoeompaiued Mr. Winter to Go- 
vemment House* when be introduced ui 
to Sir T. S. HaflSes* with whom we had a 
thort* but pleasant* interview. He re- 
ceived «s in the mos^ friendly manner ; 
welcomed us to the settlement* and told 
US omr cieitlons were much needed ; that 
there waa • wide field of usefulness open 
before us* and that he wonld facilitate 
oer endesivopn at much as pouible. 

Wc have seen Sir Stamford twice since 
wc fint waited noon him ; and nndersUnd- 
ing that Mb -Ward had written to Eng- 
land by his request, respecting Mission- 
MncB fur this place* and being informed 
that he aald one would be sufficient* we 
ventured to ask tbe opinion of bis Excel- 
lency* ander an apprehension that we 
aught receive instrocdons to separate. 
We were induced to do this to prevent 
incurring any unnecessary expencc in our 
estaUisiimeut. He was pleased to ex- 
press a hoiic that neither of us would re- 
move* and said he had written to Dr. 
Bylapdy requesting him to send as many 



to render (heir labours effective, much 
lets at Sumatra* where tlien; are no fewer 
than three niHKofis of souls perishins in 
the vortex of ignorance and misery, while 
none of them are siMfigly prejiuliced ii| 
favour of their falsfi religion, and by far 
(he prettier part of tlicm entirely destitute 
of all ideas respecting any. He informed 
lis, that the inhabitants of a small island 
near the coast* called Polo NIas, to the 
number of a hundred thousand, had very 
recently sent to him to inquire of what reli- 
gion they slioold lie. He referred us to the 
Native School alrrady established here« 
in which eiglity children are instructed iq 
reading and writing the Mala3'an lanffuagd 
and said he wished them to be universal 
in the island. In fact, Gentlemen, the 
prospect he opened before us, and the 
work whirh he laid out for us to do, were 
such as gladdened onr heaits, and would < 
we hope, those of any Mlssionartee oi 
Jtsns Chri:>t. 

With respect to the climate, it Is oe^ 
tainly as healthy as ony in India; and 
though Fort Marlbro' lies lo\v and near ths 
sea, it is cnntinnaMy rcfrebhed by the se« 
and land brerxes, which render the heal 
very tolerable in the house during tbs 
day, and out of doors it is quite |4easan| 
in the morning and evening. 

Our brethren then proceed to 
express their coiicero at findina 
that every article of provision anq 
weariug apparel is exorbitautlj 
di.'ar, and to suggest that the ex< 
pense might be considerably les- 
sended, by occasional suppHei 
being sent out from this country. 

(To he continued. J 



CeaCntetSfiif fa !*« Baptist Missiomiry Society, from February 1, to March 14. 18(1 

(not including individual Subteriytions.) 

FOB THE MISSION. £ u I 

Little WiM-s(rect, Female Aoxiliaiy Socie(y, by Miss Gale 16 9 1 

AiHe-Street, Female Anxiliary Sucie(y, by Rev. W. Shemstone 5 

Kent Aoxiliaiy Society, by T. Brindley, Esq. Treasurer 8111 6 

Wonted. QoUeclion, by Rev. 11. Clark .-.. 18 18 9 

Kordiern Dis(rh:t of the Sooth Eust Welsh Baptist Association, by Rev. 

JdmEvttis 10 U 

Kevcastle Auxiliary Society, by Mr. J. L. Angus • • 156 4 9 

Heme! Hempstead, Female Auxiliary Society, by Rev. J. Clark 10 12 S 

Clapton^ Piidobapti&t Friends at, by Mr. S. Coiider • 4 4 

Sbipley,Strt»criptions,by Rev. I. Mann 7 10 6 

Duiitcrmliqe, N. B. Ditto by Mr. Dewar 6 18 6 

Lyndhotst, Collection, by Hcv. J. Stiffcry • 4 4 3 

Frenchniore, Ditto by Dill a •••• 1 17 fi 

Produce of 100 Pocket Bo<»ks, prcscnttMl by a Female Fricud hi Ireland 1111 % 

Sustn, Baptist Association, by Mr. Dicker • ^ ^ ^ 

WilHam Baldodir, Eyg Mar/ii>^% near Jy;»f es • ^ % 



164 



MrSStONARY HBftALU. 



FOR NATURE SCHOOLS. 
LyniCf HaTf.^ean SuUcripiioo, for a Female Hindoo Scbool, on 
)BriHsh and Foreign Systenit conducted bj Mn. Rowe» 

atDigab T 10 

AFriend •• 2 10 



tlie 









{ 



10 O 



EXTRA COLLECTIONS 
Zion-streetf Walworth, Rev. 

JohnChin 9 6 4} 

£aKle-street| Rut. Joseph Ivimey, 

Two-lUirdtof a Collectiont 
one-ihird l*eing appropri- 
ated to the Irish Society f 16 
Addition to the Gtllcction at 
. Burton-street» by Rev. John 

Edwards 12 

Ji)huGurney,Es^ -•• 10 10 

AViliiam Subine.Esq. hlingtm 10 10 
Joseph Braduey, Esq. C^p/Mim 10 10 

J&,C.EnfieUl 15 

DIr. John Cowell, Ware 6 



Brorasgrove, Collections, by 
Messrs. Scroxton & Thomas 9 

Kewark, Collection, (with Sab- 
scripfions. £S li.)»»«»»« 12 

EastKent. by Rev. W. Giles &T. 



Asliford 
Betlicrsdcn 
Bmadslwrs 
Canterbury 
Cranbrook • < 

Deal 

Dover 

Eycthom • • 
Fofkftone • • 
Lnmber hurst 
Marden • • • 
3Iargatc 



8 
3 
7 

16 
9 
6 
5 

13 
6 
6 
6 

17 
Ditto, Gleanings by Mrs. 

Atkinson . . • .• 5 

Ramsgate • • • • • 4 





IS 6 

Shirley 

10 7 

10 

1 
19 

3 4 

2 6 
10 

6 




6 
5 





4 

8 





15 



AND DONATIONS. 

Rye 11 O 

Sandhnm 11 14 7{ 

Sroarden, Mr.Coppins** 5 

Ditto, BellChapd*** 2 4 6 

St. Peter's 5 O 1 

Tenterden •••••• 6 6 

VVadhurst ••..• 250 



158 14 1( 

West Kent, by Rev. G. Atkinson, J. Ezall, 
aind W. Groser : 

Betscis Green *• It 

Bom Green • • S 

Chatham 40 

Cray ford •••• • 5 

Dartrord..*. 8 17 

Ey nsford and Foot's Cray 53 
Greenwich and D 'piAtrd 29 
Lenham ....•••••••• 4 

Lesne»s Heath •••••••• 3 

Maidstone ........... 20 

Milton 3 

Qoeenborough •••••••-•* 3 

*Sevenoaks • 20 

Ditto, General Baptists 2 

Sheernt'ss 9 

I'onbridge • 1 

TonbridgeWdls 10 

Woolwich 12 




8 

O 



7" 

f 



8 



S 

s 



6 
1 




IT 

4 











4 

6 



3 10 
3 2f 
5 O- 
O 7f 
O «{ 



West Kent.... 219 5 
East Kent . . * * 158 14 



n 



Totai for Kent.- 377 19 3 



* Tills sum WAS noticed in the Herald for last nkonth, but forms a part of the money 
cullrctcd in the Comity on this occasion. 

*«* We arc obliged to content onrselves, for the* present, with the above general no^ 
ticc of these very liberal Collections. The names of individual Subscribers will duty 
appear in the next Annual Report* 

^ TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Tnr. (hanks of the Committee are presented to Mrs. Weetland# of Boston, tor nins 
Vo1uroe<t of the Baptist Magazine, and Vol. II. of the Periodical Accounts, conveyed 
by Mr. S. Mnr«t(i^ 

Our friends in North Wilts and Gloucestershire are respectfullv informed, tiuU the 
Collcctiou^mnflc by Mr. Saflery, a few months ago, are included in the amount pub- 
lished m tht;last Herald, as received from the Hants and Wiha Society. In fulme, it 
is intended to acknowledge the Collections as they respectively come to hand. 

The donation of £^0, entered last month, as from a Friend by Dr. Stuart, was 
Ytrcsented, as we have since been informed, by Mr. Paxton, Berwick on Tweed. The 
Subscription accompanving it will be duly noticed in the Report. 

The Editor grhtcftill^' neknowledgcs the kindness of icvrral friends in different 
parts of the Country, who have furnished him with copies of No. Vlll. of the Periodi- 
cal Accounts, in c mn^quence of the notice in tlie last Herald. He begs, at the same 
time, to repeat Iiis request, that letters on Mission business may be addressed, not to 
Ms residence at Bulttrfva, ))ut to the Sodcty^t House, 9, Wardrobe-place^ Dooton*' 
vClfiBntonM, ' 



TU£ 



l$upti^t 0iutiutint, 



MAY, 1821. 



MEMOIR OF MRS. DEPi'T. 



XXI8TOBICAL records, aotiqua- 
rno researches, and moral and 
chrittian sketches of character* are 
continually presented to our view, 
and are perused with interest ac- 
cording to the taste of the readers. 
Perhaps it may be justly affirmed, 
that to those who peruse this 
Magaiine^and other publications 
of a similar nature, tne Mimon- 
my Herald is the first to excite 
attention, and by its animating 
and most important tidings, is 
calculated to rouse the dormant 
mind; and whilst it proclaims that 
the nations of the world are be- 
coming the kingdoms of the 
Lord, and that his name shall 
endure for ever, the pious in- 
dividual b led to pray more 
earnestly that he may act as a 
useful subject of that spiritual 
kingdom. The afflicted despond- 
' ing Christian turns to the Obi- 
tumy, where the memorials of the 
dead are recorded, anxiously de- 
sirous to know how those who 
died in the Lord were supported, 
and with tears of ioy reads their 
testimonies to the faithfulness and 
tender care of the Saviour^ and 
b encouraged to believe, that 
when he is called to pass thiiniigh' 
the valley of the shadow; of 
death, he shall find the samV Al- 
mighty arm to conduct him safely 
through, aud admit his happy 
spirit into heavenly mansions. 

A short account is now pre- 
•cnted of Mrs. Elizabeth Dent, 

VOL. xtii. 



the daughter of the late Rev. John 
Ryland of Northampton, who was 
bom August 24, 1754, and mar** 
ried to Mr. Joseph Dent* of Mil- 
ton, the senior deacon of the 
Church in Collegc-lane, Novem« 
her 1, 1774. 

Many to whom she was weD 
known, not only lament the great 
loss sustained by her bereaved 
relatives, but are desirous of some 
informaftion respecting the de- 
cease of one so deservedly es- 
teemed. Her disposition was 
remarkably cheerful, affectionate, 
and benevolent. Her mind was 
active, animated by the most ar- 
dent desire to be useful, and 
deeply conscious of the obliga- 
tion laid upon every Christian, 
to employ the talents communi- 
cated by the Most High, for th6 
good of others and the glory of 
God. From i^t year 1793 to 
1816, (with the exception of a 
short interval,) the most delight- 
ful employment in which Mrs. 
Dent was engaged, was the in* 
struction of the young. It was 
her first object that the truths of 
Christianity should be so received 
by them, as to be the directing 
principles of their lives, their 
support under affliction, and th« 
best preparation for a future 

* Mr. Dent joined the church «t 
Norlhamptou September 11»1767» a loug 
with Mn. Dent*! brother* and William 
Button, &c. who have boih beea loiv^ 



18G 



MLMOIR OF MRS. DBNT^ 



State; fo promote which import- 
ant and permanent effects, her 
tVeqnent petitions Tr^e offered 
fervently for them both, whilst 
residing in her family, and after 
their removal. With several of 
her yonng friends she maintained 
an affectionate correspondence, 
feeling with them in all their trials, 
and encouraging them to look to 
that God who wonld be their all- 
sufficient refuge in the time of 
trouble ; and she was consoled and 
encouraged herself by their let- 
ters, which were proofs that her 
mstructions had been the means 
of showing them the path of life 
and felicity. Under the most 
painful bereavement of a beloved 
daughter, she received their most 
tender assurances of sympathetic 
regard ; and about ten days be- 
fore her own decease, a letter 
from one whom she much loved, 
imparted heart-felt pleasure, 
which she particularly mentioned 
to some of her family. 

Mrs. Dent's habits of devotion 
induced her to employ the earliest 
hours of the morning in the most 
pious manner. Ouewhowasher 
pupil many years ago, when she 
resided at Northampton, has 
mentioned in a letter, since her 
death, the impression made by 
her example. '* Have not a Ful- 
ler, a Sutcliff, artd a Pearce, re- 
joiced to welcome her to the 
holy throng ; and with joy looked 
back to those happy seasons of de- 
votional exercises which they en- 
joyed in her society below ? We 
cannot forget at what an early 
hour she used to rise for converse 
with her heavenly Father, and 
how frequentlv her countenance 
was irradiated by that cheerful 
serenity, which seemed to tell us 
she had been with Jesus. I love 
to think of her excellencies, her 
prayers, her conversation, her ac- 
tivity, her usefulness. Many of 



her young people have been reC- 
giousl^ impressed under her 
tuition; many aged and dejected 
Christians have been comforted 
and encouraged by her eouasel 
and example; and I doubt not 
the minbters of Christ strength- 
ened in their works of faith and 
love by her holy leal and fervent 
prayers.'* 

During the hst two or three 
years, Mrs. Dent felt much in- 
creasing bodily indispositioB, 
from an asthmatic complaint, and 
in the winter viras frequently un- 
able, on the Sabbath, to go te 
the house of God at Northamp- 
ton, where her revered father and 
her brother had so long laboured. 
But the prosperity and happi- 
ness of that church, of which she 
had been a member neariy fifty 
years,* occupied her thoughts, and 
its welfare excited her most fer- 
vent prayers. 

A small number, who met with 
her at an adjoining place of wor- 
ship, fitted up for divine service, 
in the village where she resided, 
shared likewise her christian re- 
gard. Two or three, like herself, 
were prevented by afRiction firon 
a regular attendance at places of 
worship at a distance, and on 
this account she felt a strong de- 
sire to have the Lord's supper 
administered to them. In the 
Baptist Magazine for November, 
page 472, Mrs. Dent perused 
some remarks relative to this sub- 
ject, which gave her peculiar 
pleasure. Application was made 
to the church at Road for permis- 
sion for some of their members to 
unite with others who belonged 
to the church at NorthamptoUi 
(the whole number amounting to 
eighteen, residing at Mihon^) t6 
receive the Lord's supper toge- 
ther, when they were unable to 
I ^-^— ^^'^— — ^— ■»» 111 I »«— — .p.^ ' 

* She was baptised on a profistsiiHi of 
faiih, by her father, NoTcmber 10» 1771* 



A 



MBMOIR OF MRS. BENT* 



iftend at tbeir respective places. 
Ik Rev. Mr. Heigbton and his 
chorch assented to the request ; 
kat the final determination of the 
chirch at Northampton not hav- 
bg been receired^ Mrs. Dent had 
lot this desire of her heart ful- 
IDed : bat to her longing soul 
he heavenly summons was sent, 
• Come up hither, and unite with 
angels and the spirits of the just/' 

A painful occurrence took 
Aa€el>ecember21,1820. Whilst 
frs. Dent was at dinner, a piece 
if meat lodged in her throat, and 
U cfibrts to remove it were in- 
ffcctual. It remained there till 
he following day, and was then 
weed down by a surgeon. She 
lad always possessed great per- 
onal couragCy could endure 
inch bodily afiliction without 
MHBplaining, and was ever ready 
support others in the most try- 
Dg circumstances. In a note tp 
icr daughter, three days after, 
he wrote, ** Through rich mercy 

have been preserved; I have 
leen preserved, and am still 
pared to sing of mercy and of 
adgment It was for the time it 
aited a terrible operation in per- 
wmtng. May every returning 
fear be filled with blessings to 
fon and your dear boy." The 
bOowing morning Mra. Dent, 
Jiough tree from pain, yet was 
nach worse, being troubled wifli 
icontinual cough, and great dif- 
iculty of breathing. She was 
pleased at seeing the eldest sou 
}f her late brother, Mr. James 
Kyland, having felt much for him 
IM the rest of the fiimily, who 
irere left, at the death of their 
hther, entirely dependent on 
iheir own exertions. She affec- 
tloaately recommended him to 
leak the Lord. To her own dear 
sMdren, and to her afflicted hus- 
lliad, she spoke with great ten- 
|mMSS» and seemed happy in 



18t 

having them with her, and re- 
peatedly said to her son, ** Praise 
the Lord, praise the Lord for his 
goodness." Two days before 
she died, she said, '* Oh those 
dear little pronouns, how sweet 
they are I to be able to say, Mjf 
God, cur God V In the evening 
of the same day she said, '* Oh 1 
those poor dear friends who meet 
over the way,* I hope the Lord 
will preserve them in peace.'' 
On the Thursday, after Dr. Kerr 
had seen her, she said, *' They 
do not expect to do me any good» 
but I had him for satisfaction. I 
hope you are all satisfied ; I hope 
my son is satisfied." Hersonpray- 
ed by her the two preceding even- 
ings ; and seeing him much 
affected, she begged him to com- 
pose himself, or he would hurt 
himself and her too. He said» 
" Oil, mother, I would not hurt 
you in the least for the worid.** 
She replied, " Then do not de- 
spair, do not despond ; remember 
they looked unto him, and were 
enlightened. It will all be for 
the best" When he and his wife 
were taking leave of her that 
night, she said, " The Lord bless 
you and yours, and make you a 
blessing." With much compo- 
sure she afterwards informed her 
distressed husband, that she 
wished Mr. Biundell to be re- 
quested to commit her remains 
to the tomb, and Mr. Heighten to 
preach a sermon at Milton, from 
Luke xii. 40 ; *' Be ye therefore 
ready," &c. and selected three 
hymns for the service: OIney 
Hymns,Book 1, 81 ; Watts, Book 
II, do ; Rippon, 310. 

A servant of Dr. Ryland's, 
who formerly lived with Mrs. 
Dent, having come at this time 
from Bristol to see her mother, 
came over from Northampton to 

* At a hoat« fitted ap for worship bj 
her husband. 

*r O 



189 



MEMOIR OF MR. GE0R6R THOMPSOIT. 



Milton, and sat up with her the 
last niffht, who reJated some of 
her lar)t expressions. To her she 
said, " Ah, Betty ! dying is hard 
work ; but Jesus is with rae. 
What a mercv is it, that I feel 
his presence, which is better than 
life ! Pray for me, that I may 
have faith and patience to the 
end. Blessed be God, for his 
unspeakable goodness to me, in 
affording me my reason in my last 
moments. 

• Why should we start, and fear to die ? 
What fiiu'roos worms we mortals are ! 
Pemh is the f^e of endless joy, 
And yet we dread to enter there/ 

I am at peace with every one. I 
know I have been peevish, and 
to you many times, but my sins 
are all forgiven me. Pray that 
I may have faith and patience." 
The servant then asked, if she 
should raise her head. "No!' 
bv no means. Do not touch me. 
Do not speak to me. Do not 
leave rae. Mind and remember 
what 1 say to you." She seemed 
absorbed in heavenly contempla- 
tion, grasped the servant's hand, 
and said with rapture, ** Glory ! 
Glory ! It is heavenly glory ! 
All is well r About a quarter 
of an hour after, she expired, at 
two in the morning, December 
21), 1820. 

Twentv- five days before her 
death, Mrs. Dent wrote thus to 
Mrs. Ryland of Bristol: '< My 
dear sibter, how rapidly does time 
pass! We are just entered into 
the last month of the year; per- 
haps it may be to one or other of 
u> our last year : but this does 
not distress me, as I would wish 
to be found ready, with my loins 
girt, u-atching and waiting against 
iiiy Master sendelh for me, to 
enter into his presence^ and then 
.and there, in that heavenly court, 
I shall serve him as I ought, 
mthout Sin." 



MEMOIR 



or 



MR. GEORGE THOMPSON. 



The office of deacon is very 
important in a Christian chunii. 
The comfort of the minister, the 
consolation of the poor, the har- 
mony of the society, the glory of 
Christ, is deeply affected by the 
character and conduct of dea- 
cons. When they hold the myi« 
tery of the faith in a pure eoth 
science, they are pillara in . the 
spiritual building, and their re- 
moval is severely felt The me- 
mory of George Thompson, as a 
man, a Christian, and a deacon, 
will long be dear to all wbokneir 
him. 

He was bom in 1776» at 
Scotchwood, Northumberland. 
At an early age he entered into 
the same service in which he 
died, having retained his situation 
for the long period of thirty years. 
But a higher than any earthly 
master was pleased to call him to 
the knowledge of himself in the 
days of his youth. When eigh- 
teen, he was baptized, in 1794, 
by Mr. Skinner, Baptist minister 
at Newcastle-on-Tyne. Shortly 
after this, he removed to Chester, 
to the Lead-works of Walker, 
Maltby, and Co. his employers, 
where he spent the remainder of 
his life. The brethren at Chester 
soon discerned the worth, the 
prudence, piety, firmness, and 
generosity of this excelhsnt man, ' 
and elected him to fill the office 
of a deacon. A difficult situation, 
for at least fifteen years, has it 
been to him, from the heavy and 
repeated and protracted trials, 
through which the church at 
Chester has been called to pass* 
Ever since the removal of^liir. , 
Aston, they have never been 
blessed, for any period of cooti« 
nuance, with a settled miiustq^ 



\ 



MBMOIB OF MR. GBOftOE THOMPSON. 



189 



By the death of some members, 
and the departuie of others, by 
pecuniary embarrasfments, by 
iptestioe discords, by the unholy 
Sves of several, the cause has 
been weighed down, and minis- 
lers discouraged from fixing with 
them. Nor has the church 
escaped altogether some injury, 
from the repeated removals of 
their ministers. To some pro- 
fessors, such circumstances would 
bave afforded small anxiety ; but 
Mr. Thompson was formed of 
other materials: the prosperity 
of Zion was his chief joy, the 
depresiion of Zion his principal 
sorrow. 

He was eminent for public tpi- 
rii. He took a deep interest in the 
Missionary cause, in the salvation 
of sinners, and in the triumphs 
of the cross, both at home and 
abroad. While be discovered a 
lively sensibility towards every 
Christian church, the church at 
Chester lay uppermost in his 
tbooghtSy and engaged his every 
energy. He hesitated at no la- 
bours in this good work ; and 
neither journeys, nor letters, nor 
money, were spared by him to 
{promote the peace and advance 
the honour of the church at 
Chester. 

He was eminent for liberalHy, 
Liberality is not confined to the 
opulent. It is essential to vigor- 
ous and thriving Christianity, 
both in the rich and poor. The 
degree of it is to be measured, 
not by what is given, but by what 
is left of a man's substance. Our 
Lord, it is well known, attached 
greater value to the widow's mite, 
than to all the large donations of 
the rich. It is not wise to com- 

Ere ourselves with others: it is 
tter to look at a perfect model, 
even at the First-born, who has 
fal this grace, as in all things, 
the pre-eminence. Bat even in 



this day, when Christians, from 
the circumstances of the times, 
have been excited to excel in 
liberality, the conduct of George 
Thompson will suffer no injury 
from a severe scrutiny. His sa- 
lary was small, and his family was 
large. To devote any portion of 
a scanty income to the cause of 
Christ, required, in the first in- 
stance, much self-denial and per- 
severing economy in domestic 
affairs. He was blessed with a 
wife of one heart with him in the 
great cause. And through her 
management, her labours, her 
perseverance, they contrived to 
eave a considerable sum yearly 
for the immediate service of the 
sanctuary. In addition to the 
permanent burden which he car- 
ried as a deacon, he came cheer- 
fully forward with his money in 
benevolent undertakings, and sel- 
dom turned away his ear or hit 
hand from the supplicant in be- 
half of Gospel institutions. From 
regard to the feelings of a mourn- 
ing widow, particulars are here 
omitted, well known to the writer, 
which if mentioned would place 
on high ground the liberality of 
our departed brother. 

He was eminent for prudence,' 
Wisdom and generosity are not 
always related. Even in real 
Christians, extensive knowledge 
and wide beneficence, clear views 
of gospel truth and warm philan- 
thropy, are not inseparable com- 
panions. Our departed friend 
had a large share of the wisdom 
from above, " which is pure, 
peaceable, gentle, easy to be 
entreated, full of mercy and good 
fruits." In all cases, the church 
sought and respected his coun- 
sels. With a heart anxious for 
the Redeemer's honour, and the 
true prosperity of the churchy 
and a min^ much conversant 
with the New Te^laniciiX) Vi^^v^-d.^ 



190 



MBMOIB QF MB. GBOBOB THOMP80K* 



kept from the crooked paths of 
ivoridly craft, and was direcUd 
io the faithful observance of the 
rules appointed by our Lawgiver, 
lor the maintenance of order, and 
the advancement of truth and 
purity among his people. 

Steadfastness in his profession. 
During several years of his dea- 



pleased the all-wise God to afflict 
this excellent man with a painful 
attlmm far a emuideiBble portion 
of his life. The severity of bb 
sufferings often nnfitted him for 
business throogh the weok» and 
prevented his attendance ob the 
public means of grace in Qod's 
house. In this fiery furnace he 



conship, the Baptist cause was remained many vears, enjoyiag 



repeatedly so low at Chester, that 
the public worship of God was 
kept up with much difficulty; 
but his zeal and perseverance 
were never seen to fail. He lived 
a hidden life of faith on God's 
Son, and had access to that Ri- 
ver of life which gladdens the 
city of our God. Washing in 
that fountain, he renewed his vi- 
gour ; and while many fell away, 
and walked no more with the 
church, he advanced cautiously I 



the comforts, and displaying the 
efficacy, of Divine Grace. He 
murmured not at his heavy asd 
protracted illness. " It b the 
will of the Lord that I shooM be 
afflicted,^ was his saying; asd 
there he rested. But he was 
blessed with more than resigna* 
tion : he had joy and hope and 
lively consolation from the doc- 
trines of the gospel. The blood 
of Christ was all his hope; the 



and firmly in the rugged road of 
profession. If there was any 
difference in his speed, it was 
most rapid towards the close. 
Sympathy with the church, kind- 
ness to the minister, affection to 
the people of God, and activity 
in what his health permitted him 
to do, rose and swelled during 
his last illness. 

Diligence in business. It is 
painful to notice, that some pro- 
fessors appear to transfer nothing 
pf christian principle into daily 
business. No line of separation 
exists between them and moral 
inen of business; and some of 
them even fall below the standard 
'of many who discover in spiritual 
matters, a total wapt of^ godly 
fear. Mr. Thompson had not so 
learned Christ. During a period 
of thirty years, he so conducted 
himself as a servant, as to secure 
the uninterrupted favour of his 
employers; and his faithfulness 
to Christ rendered him faithful 
^o them. 

Patience in jaffliction. It 



enjoyment of Christ's preaeacf, 
the sight of Christ's glory is iMa- 
ven, was all his joy. The Sab- 
bath before his dissol«tion, be 
derived much consofaitioii fiom 
the manifestations of God's pre- 
sence, and often refeired to the 
well-known hymn, 

*' There is a fountaio filled with Mood«'* 

repeating, as expressive of his 
present feelings, the last stdoya : 

*' Then in a nobler* sweeter loiig, 

I'll sing Uiy power to saTe# 
When this poor lisping, staounftring 
tongue 

Lies silent in the grave.'* 



His wife and children he com- 
mended to God with affection 
and confidence. He entreated 
his sorrowing spouse to abstain 
from excessive grief, and to re- 
member that their short separa- 
tion would be followed with an 
eternal re- union. 

After suffering much from his 
distemper, he fell asleep in Jesus, 
in the morning of April 29, 1810. 

The memory of such deacons 






ON CHRISTIAN DILIvJ KN l [:. 



JOl 



<rugkt to be clierisbed in a day 
wl^n, amidst the incresBe of pro- 
ftsiioB at home, mud very great 
•exertions for the difusioa of the 
cospd ia distant lands«tt is to be 
ieued, that attachment to scrip- 
tural doctriae, regard to Christ's 
authority, love to the people of 
God, the cultivation of a dev^ 
tional spirit, are not equally ad- 
Tancing in the churches of our 
Lord, Some of our churches 
being very depressed, let our mi- 
nisters and deacons seriouslv and 
humbly inquire, what portion of 
bfauae attaches to them. Let each 
of us consider his ways, and turn 
nnto the Lord. Let us remember 
whence we have iaUen, and do 
our first works. Without an effu- 
sion of the Holy Spirit upon us, 
we cannot expect either a conti- 
ice of the spiritual vigour 
~ yet remains, or a revival of 
the great work in us, as indivi- 
duals or as churches. Do we 
value, do we seek, earnestly seek, 
that DHTiae influence! Are we 
coming behind in no gift, wait- 
ing for the coming of our Lord 
Jesus Christ 1 Are we drinking 
into his spirit, walking in hb 
footsteps, aiming in every thing 
at his glory I The night is far 
spent, the day is at hand, our 
salvation b neater than when we 
believed. The glorious appear- 
ance of our great God and Savi- 
our b ready to burst forth; let 
us then gird up the loins of our 
minds, and be stedfast, immove- 
able, always abounding in the 
work of the L<ml. 



ON CHRISTIAN DILIGENCE. 
Part L 



If we compare the religion of 
Christ, as it appears in the New 
Testament, wiUi the lives of most 



Cbristians, the difiereoce is great ; 
not only in the unavoidable con- 
sequences of our moral depravity, 
but also in those things in which, 
bv holy diligence, the resem- 
blance might be rendered visible. 
The first Christians ate their 
meat with gladness and singleness 
of heart ; the epirit of devotion 
pervaded tiieir thoughts, directed 
their conduct, and heightened 
as weU as regulated their enjoy- 
ments. Tlie waves of persecution 
roiled over them, yet in looking 
for the mercy of our Lord Jesus 
Christ unto eternal life, they found 
abundant consolation; this was 
as an anchor, both sure and 
steadfast to their souls. The 
source of their ei\joyment was 
doubtless divine influence; the 
Spirit of God wrought effectually 
within them, subduing their sins, 
and sanctifying all their difficul- 
ties : this, however, was connect- 
ed with a tender regard to the 
will of God, and with a xealous 
desire to promote his glory. They 
did not live unto themselves, but 
unto him who died for them, and 
rose again. This armed them 
with courage, and strengthened 
them with confidence in God ; in 
the face of imminent danger, they 
obeyed the dictates of their en- 
lightened consciences, and con- 
secrated themselves to the cause 
of their Lord and Master. Nor 
is there anv reason to doubt, but 
that if our piety equalled theirs, 
our coDsolations would be equal 
also. There is no change in God 
— the blood of the cross is as 
efficacious now as it was then — 
divine influence is alike powerful, 
and all the promises of God are 
yea, and amen, in Christ Jesus. 
The cause why we are so often 
sorrowful, is in ourselves. Were 
we diligent in the discharge of 
christian duties, from proper mo- 
tives, we shou\<\ ie^o\^^ vci ^^ak 



ig€ 



ON CHRISTlAK DIITOBKCB. 



blessed assurance of complete 
victory over all our ^ nemies, aud 
of shortly participating in the 
bliss of heaven. This would bear 
up our spirits under personal or 
femily afflictions, and afford us 
comfort in passing through the 
vicissitudes of mortal life; — it 
would enable us to triumph in 
the prospect of death, even in its 
bitterest forms. Christians are 
great losers by negligence in reli- 
'gion; not being comfortable in 
divine things, they feel more 
heavily the burden of their earth- 
ly cares. If they are not happy 
in God, they cannot be happy at 
all ; they must enjoy him in all 
things, and all thmgs in him, or 
they can enjoy nothing. The 
"world is a mere blank without 
God ; our possessions and friends 
are attended with vanity and vex- 
ation of spirit, unless He bless 
and sanctify them to our use; 
yet in the midst of the greatest 
trials, he keeps them in perfect 
peace whose minds are stayed 
tipon him, because they trust in 
him. The loss arising from neg- 
ligence in the ways of God, is not 
confined to this world ; we may 
be happy in the world to .come, 
yet not ehjoy that measure of 
happiness there, that would be 
the consequence of greater de- 
grees of holiness here. The more 
we are like Christ, the greater 
iSHU be our capacity to enjoy him ; 
the more we abound in the works 
of faith, and in the labours of 
love, the greater will be our re- 
ward in the kingdom of our Fa- 
ther. The world of nature 
abounds with variety of beauty 
and excellence; among the an- 
gels there are thrones, dominions, 
principalities, and powers. The 
saints may be all perfectly bless- 
ed in "^leaven, yet not similarly 
employed, nor equally endowed; 
juii as a number of vessels may 



be alike filled, though of dlffeieal 
dimensions. Holiness refines, 
dignifies, and expands the mind. 
The sacred writers being aware of 
the importance of holy diligenc^ 
and of the danger of ioattentioa, 
admonish their readers to guard 
against the latter, by maintaining 
the former. 

In the exercise of diligence, wt 
must 

I. Cuitivaie a jn<m» qffketkm 
for the whole of God's wobd; 
frequently reading it, with earnest 
prayers to him for the teachings 
of his Holy Spirit. That state of 
mind in which we look, either to 
the whole, or to a part of that 
holy book, almost with indiffer- 
ence, is much to be dreaded ; it 
begets within us a coolness to- 
wards devotional exercises in 
general, and exposes us to great 
temptation. On the contrary, to 
delight in them animates us with 
the energy of true piety, and pre- 
pares our minds for all the ser- 
vices of religion. In reading the 
word of God, we should not in- 
dulge a criminal partiality to- 
svards any part of it; but search 
it through and through, in the 
length thereof and in the breadth 
thereof. As something must be 
wrong in our creed, if in conver- 
sation we perpetually dwell on; 
the ancient settlements of God, 
his Unchangeable purposes, and 
his everlasting love; so in our 
reading the scriptures, if we con- 
fine ourselves to select parts of 
tliem, in which the doctrines are 
taught, it argues an improper 
tone of feeling, which may im- 
perceptibly lead u^ to think that 
none but those who come up to 
our standard can be Christians* 
It will so contract our miuds, 
that if persons do not ring changes 
upon certain words, we shall Sma- 
giue that they are legal; and that 
they do not understand the liberty 



I 



ON CHBtSTfAN DILIGENCS* 



<93 



tif the gospel. To be familiar I 
with the epistles of Paul, and to | 
know but little of the evaogelists; 
to fix on a few chapters to the 
Romans, as on a peculiar treasure, 
ind seldom or never to read the 
prophecies of Jeremiah and Exe- 
kiet ; to be often rejoicing that 
all things, even sin itself, shall 
work together for good to them 
that love God, and are the called, 
according to his purpose, and 
never to feel the sympathy ex- 
pressed in *' Why will ye die, O 
house of Israeli'' greatly pro- 
motes this narrowness of mind. 
Human authors cannot be under- 
stood, if only a few pages of them 
be read ; much less can the word 
of God, every page of which dis- 
plays divine wisdom. It is ac- 
knowledged, that in some parts of 
ir, doctrinal, practical, and expe- 
rimental godliness are peculiarly 
eihibited; that on this account 
such parts will be read by Chris- 
tians with greater pleasure than 
some others ; but a proper attach- 
ment to the sacred volume is not 
ibunded on the excellency of any 
separate part, but on the har 
moay, beauty, and connexion of 
the whole. ** Ail scripture is given 
by inspiration of God, and is 
profitable for doctrine, for re- 
proof, for correction, for instruc- 
tion in righteousness; that the 
nun of God 'may he |>erfect, tho- 
roughly furnished unto all good 
works." We should also observe 
the benevolence breathed in that 
holy book. Not only glory to 
God in the highest, but on earth 
peace, good will toward men. If 
we well understand these princi- 
ples, we shall obey from the heart 
the form of (foe trine delivered to 
us, and know that religion cou- 
suts not in words, but in thini;:t. 
In all his works, God pursues his 
own glory ; if we drink deeply 
iBto the spirit of the gospel, this 



also will be our first object of 
pursuit. He has loved his people 
with a love beyond all expression; 
if love to God therefore be the 
goveniing motive of our conduct, 
we shall be ready, if he require, to 
lay down our lives for the brethren. 
It is not in a few detached pas* 
mges, broken off from their con- 
nexion, but in the whole of reve- 
lation, as in a glass, that we be« 
hold the glory of the Lord, and 
are changed into the same image 
from glory lo glory, even as by 
the Spirit of the Lord. God gave 
the Israelites not only the hills 
and the mountains in the land of 
Canaan, but the valleys and the 
plains; not only the rivers aud 
the brooks, but every purling 
stream was theirs. He gave them 
the whole land in possession, with 
all its riches and fiitness. He- 
has also given to us the writings 
of the Old and New Testament ; 
<* a broad land of wealth un- 
known !" Let us take heed lest, 
through criminal negligence, we, 
like them, possess ourselves only 
with the treasures of a part of it. 
If we say with David, *' O how I 
love thy law ! it is my mediution 
all the day/' We shall also say 
with him, '* Through thy precepts 
I get understanding : therefore I 
hate every false why." 

\l. As well might the hnsben^ 
man expect to reap without sow* 
ingt as the Christian expect to 
^j^*y l^^ ordinances of God's 

AotMSir/Motf/ PRIVATE PRAYER. 

The mouruful complaints of some 
good people would induce one to 
think, religion had disappointed 
their expectations. They enjoy- 
ed a little comfort in the hrst part 
of their christiitn profession, but 
\\m has given place to painful 
anxiety and to distressing feqr; 
instead of rejoicinfv with joy un- 
speakable and full of glory, tlicy 
are almost alvi2L^«d«^«eV^. 'XVo^ 



194 



THE OUT-POUHINO OF TUB HOLY SPIRIT. 



shows that they have forsaken 
the Lord ; he does not willingN 
afflict nor grieve his people. He 
aays,'' O that thou hadst hearken- 
ed unto my commandments I then 
had thy peace heen as a river, 
and thy righteousness as the 
iiraves of the sea I" He has also 
said^ ** If his children forsake 
my law, and walk not in my 
judgments ; if they break my sta- 
tutes, and keep not my com- 
mandments; then will I visit 
their transgressions with the rod, 
and their iniquity with stripes.'^ 
But O tlie heart- melting nature 
of that expression ! " Neverthe- 
less, my loving-kindness will I 
not utterly take from hin^ nor 
suffer my faithfulness to faiL" 
Fsalm Ixxxix. 80 — 33. Effectual 
fervent prayer would change the 
shadow of death into the morn- 
ing, and cause the Sun of Righte- 
ousness to arise upon us with 
healing in his wings. It is the 
Christian's privilege to hold com- 
munion with the Father, and with 
bis Son Jesus Christ ; if this be 
ne^ected, God will not favour us 
with the light of his countenance. 
The established method is, *' I 
will be inquired of by the house 
of Israel, to do it for them." If 
our iniquities h&ve separated be- 
tween God and our souls, and 
our sins have hid his face from 
us, we ought not to say, ** Our 
way b hid from the Lord, and 
our judgment is passed over from 
pur God." We should draw nigh 
junto him, and pour out our souls 
before him ; the saints in all a|;es 
Jiave found comfort in calling 
yipon him. He has promised, 
leven to his backsliding children, 
^* I will heal their backsliding, I 
vvill love them freely: for my 
auger is turned away from 
him." The institution of hea- 
fren has connected the boun- 
/ies of Providence and the bless- 



ings of grace, with perseveritt 
industry. The hand of the dili- 
gent maketh rich : the desire of 
the slothful killeth him. <' TUe 
heed to thyself, and keep liij 
soul diligently, lest thon foi^get 
the things which thine eyes have 
seen, and lest they depart from 
thy heart, all the days of thy 
life." If Israel cast off the thing 
that is good, the enemy shall par* 
sue him. Enter into thy closet, 
and pray to thy Father, who is 
in secret, that he who seeth in 
secret may reward thee openly* 

"Prater mtkes the darkened dond 

withdraw, 
Prajer clinibt the ladder Jiicob taw ; 
Gives exercise to faith and love. 
Brings every blessing from above.** 

B. Q. 



Out-pouring of the Holy Spirit* 

ToiheEdiiw oftht B^ptiH JtUgmzine. 

Sir, — Most of your readers 
have no doubt perused, and it 
may be hoped, many of them 
have been deeply impressed with 
the important suggestions, ad- 
dressed to them in your last num- 
ber, in a proposed plan to '* unite 
ail sincere christians in earnest 
prayer for the general out-pourmg 
of the Holy Spirit" ' 

The necessity of snch a union 
of spirit among the disciples of 
Christ, in secret and social sup- 
plication for the greatest Messing 
that can be imparted to the 
church, or the world, cannot be 
questioned by any truly serious, 
or reflecting person. It may 
therefore reasonably be expected, 
that the *' hints" which are so 
suitably suggested, will not only 
be universally approved, but very 
generally adopted, and we may 
then confidently look for the pro- 
mised blessing. The ojiject |iro- 



\ 



LBTTBB OF MR. 8WA1V. 



195 



pofledy firom its nattticaiid len- 
deoGj, OMttt tmmimtaii itself to 
thecoatcieoce of every consisteott 
ehristian ; it leaves no room for 
objeclioo, and possesses aa. in- 
terest and advantage almost pe- 
culiar to itself; it is an object 
concerning which all genuine 
christians mnst be of one heart 
and one soul, and therefore one 
in which they may allcordiallv 
unite* It would, -i apprehend, 
considerably promote this good 
design, if all those who adopt it 
would, both in the closet and the 
family, institute a course of read- 
ing from those authors who have 
written on the person, work, of- 
fice, and influence of the Holy 
Spirit, such as Howe, Owen, 
Watts, Doddridge, Edwards, 
and others, next to a serious 
perusal and consideration of the 
word of God, especially those 
prophecies and promises which 
relate to the effusion of the Holy 
Spirit. This course may be pro- 
fitably pursued by those who are 
in the habit of reading to their 
lamilites on Lord*s-day evenings. 
It will fnrnish'materials for medita- 
lion and prayer ; it will excite the 
sittention, inform the judgment, 
enlarge the views, and animate 
the hopes of pious persons, on 
thu momentous subject. It would 
also tend to preserve in the minds 
of your readers a lively interest 
towards it, if your correspond- 
ents would occasionally insert an 
affectionate address to professing 
Christians, on this all-important 
object. G. B, 

LETTER OF MR. SWAIN. 



ness which terminated a month 
afterward in bis own dissolution. 
Being furnished with it by a 
son of the person to whom it was 
addressed, and having his per- 
mission to make it public, I sub- 
mit it to you for insertion in the 
BaptUi Afagazme; assured that 
many persons, who affectionately 
cherish the remembrance of the 
writer, will peruse it with plea- 
sure. I am. Yours, &c. 

Samuel Blioh. 

WhiteehMpdt IforcA it, 18S1. 



ToikeSdUar ofiheBtipiiH Magazine, 

Sir, — The following uniintsh- 
ed letter was written by the late 
Mr. Swain of Walworth to one of 
his sick friends, during that ill- 



'« Wulworth, Mamh 17, 1795. 

*' Deab Brothbb, 

** I have several times laid my 
plan to come and see you, but it 
has been disconcerted by one 
thing or other, which I could not 
foresee ; and now I am so ill my- 
self, as to render it impracticable 
for me to come, till I am better: 
but I should be glad to hear, by 
a line or message, how you do ; 
and how it fares with your soul in 
affliction. 

*' I know by present expe- 
rience, that disorder of body of- 
ten unfits the mind for medita- 
tion and prayer, as well as for 
reading the scriptures with profit ; 
and Satan will take the advantage 
to accuse and discouraee us at 
such a time; but our heavenly 
Father * knoweth our frame, and 
remembereth that we are dust.' 
And if we are enabled patiently 
to bear his will at such seasons, 
and quietly to wait his time of 
deliverance, we have reason to 
be thankful; and if we cannot be 
as fervent, and persevering iif 
^supplication at such times, let 
its be the more frequent in short 
ejaculations of heart to the Lord, 
and we shall find that when we 
are weak then we ere strong. 

*' I have had uncommon rea- 
son to bless the Lord for what he 
has done for me ^% ai mvxv^vex ^\ 



196 



BAPTIST CHTTBCH AT BRIDLINGTON. 



Christ, and for the church and 
congregation this year, liltle as 
there is of it past: yet I am 
made to feel my weakness, and 
see my short comings in his ser- 
■vice, to such a degree very fre- 
quently, that I am constrained to 
groan, being burdened, and cry, 
< O wretched roan, who shall 
deliver meT But the sweet ex- 
pectation of being for ever with- 
out sin, and therefore without 
weakness and sorrow, cheers my 
heart like a cordial, (and so I 
trust it does yours,) and makes 
roe sing, 'Thanks be to God, 
which giveth us the victory, 
through our Lord Jesus Christ.' *' 



BAPTIST CHURCH AT 
BRIDLINGTON. 



It appears from the records of 
the Baptist Church at Bridling- 
ton, that this Society was first 
formed November 16, 1698, in 
the presence of the four following 
ministers: — John Ward, Henry 
Wolf, Henry Blackett, and Rich- 
ard Pitts. Tradition informs us, 
that a former in Scotland, who, 
before he would have his child 
sprinkled, expressed to his pastor 
his doubts respecting infant bap- 
tism, not obtaining satisfaction 
on that head, visited London, 
iind there was baptized by im- 
mersion, pn a profession of his 
faith in Christ. On his return to 
Scotland by sea, a storm drove 
jthe vessel into Bridlington Bay ; 
where tbey put on shore for a 
day or two. Here meetine with 
a Mr. Robert Prudom, and con- 
versing on the subject of Baptism, 
be (Mr. Prudom,) was convinced 
of the truth of Believers' Bap- 
lism, was bimfelf baptised, and 
4>egan the interest at Bridlington. 

The number of members at the 



\ 



formation of this charcli wis 
twenty-five. The Church-book 
contains the following record. 
^* The church did, with consent,' 
call forth their teacher, Robert 
Prudom, to preach the gospd, in 
order to regular ordination, and 
to administer all Christ's ordi- 
nances. John Oxtoby was also 
chosen to th^ office of deacon.'* 
Mr. Prudom was originally of tb« 
Presbyterian denomination ; a 
gentleman of good property, and 
especially of sterling piety. He 
pubbshed a small book, of 198 
pages, entitled, " Truth Unveiled 
by Scripture Light," &c. ; in an 
Appendix to which work, the 
author has related his own life 
and christian experience, which 
is truly excellent The Rev. Ben- 
jamin Keach, in a recommenda- 
tory preface to this book, speaks 
very highly both of the author 
and of his performance. His son, 
Mr. David Prudom, was for many 
years a deacon of this church. 

In 1713, the Rev. George 
Braithwaite, A.M. became ttie 
pastor of this church, on the 
death of its first pastor. He came 
hither from Hawkshead-bill, in 
Lancashire, and after many years 
removed from hence to Devon- 
shire-square, London, about 
1733. 

In 1723, June 19, 20, an Asso- 
ciation of Baptist churches was 
held at Bridlington. Junipcc, 
Dyehouse, Hexham, Hamster- 
ly, and Hawkshead-hili were 
churches thus associated. We 
find also, in the same year, that 
there was a branch of the church 
at Bridlington in a village called 
BaintoQ, seventeen miles distant; 
but this branch has long since 
ceased to exist. 

1737. The Rev. Richard Ma- 
chih was, op May 22, dismissed 
from the Baptist Ch pre b. Lime- 
house, London, (the Rev. David 



BAPTIST CHURCH AT BRIDLINGTON. 



197 



Aees being pastor at Limehoose,) 
fliat lie (Mr. Macbin) migbt take 
tbe pastoral cbarge at Bridiiog- 
lon. He was ordaiaed June 5, 
17S7, and died October 30« 
1743. 

Mr. Braithwaite published two 
funeral sermons, and two small 
treatises; and Mr. Macbin two 
sermons. 

After Mr. Macbin's decease, a 
Tery valuable young man came 
from tbe cburcb at Rawdon, to 
labour bere : a Mr. Jobn Mitchell. 
He came to Bridlineton in 1746 ; 
bnt in 1748, retired to bis native 
place, and died of a consumption, 
April 14, in tbe same year, aged 
twenty-seven. 

1752. Tbe Rev. John Oulton, 
M. A. had an invitation to settle at 
Bridlington. But though his visit 
to Bridlington was protracted to 
some years, yet Mr. Oulton was 
never ordained here, but ulti- 
mately settled at Rawdon, where 
he died in 1804. His father, Mr. 
John Oulton, senior, was long the 
]>astOT of the Baptist churches at 
Leominster and Liverpool. He 
removed (rom the former to the 
btter in 1748. He left Liver- 
pool, in a superannuated state, in 
1705, and died at his son's house 
at Rawdon. 

1761, October 8, the Rev. 
Thomas Wilbraham was ordained 
pastor over the Baptist church at 
Bridlington; the Rev. William 
Crabtree of Bradford assisting in 
that service. Mr. Wilbraham, 
mlthougb at this time quite blind, 
yet was a very acceptable preach- 
er. After a little while, however, 
he embraced the peculiarities of 
Robert Sandeman, renounced the 
work of the ministry entirely, be- 
came a schoolmaster, and died, 
a few years ago, at Halifax. 

1767. During this vear, the 
KcT. Joseph Gawkrodger was 
settled at Bridlington. Mr. Gawk- 



rodger was bom in Dublin, where 
his fether was a clergyman, but 
was brought to England, and into 
the parish of Bradford, when very 
young. About 1750, be was bap- 
tized at Rawdon, by the Rev. 
Jonathan Brown. In 1752 he 
was called out by the church at 
Rawdon to preach; and by his 
labours the Baptist church at 
Shipley, nearBradford, was raised, 
over which he was ordained, but 
from which he departed to Brid- 
lington in 1767. At Bridlington 
Mr. Gawlcfodger laboured, with 
great acceptance, for nearly 
twenty-seven years; but in No- 
vember, 1794, he resigned his 
pastoral cbarge, and died No* 
vember23, 1798. 

July, 1795, the Rev. Robert 
Hamies, a member of tbe Baptist 
church, Saltbouse-lane,Hull, was 
ordained pastor over the church 
at Bridlington, and continues 
tbe pastor of the church there to 
this time, (December, 1820.) 

1817. May 15, seven meoH 
bers of tbe church at Bridlington 
were united with others, and 
formed into a church atHunmao- 
by, a village eight miles north of 
Bridlington. The Rev. John Hi- 
thersay is tbe pastor, and theii' 
state is prosperous. 

Ministers sent out by tbe 
church at Bridlington : 

W. Hague, baptized by the Rev. 
Joseph Gawkrodger Aug. 2, 1767. 
On December 12, 1770, he, and 
seven other persons, were dis- 
missed to Scarborough, a church 
formed there, over which Mr. 
Hague has presided nearly half a 
century. He is still alive ; but Mr. 
Sykes, from Dr. Stead man's Aca- 
demy, Bradford, has been pastor 
at Scarborouglf from Dccem her 4, 
1816, Mr. Hague having re- 
signed. 

I. Mann; baptized June 6, 
1802, by tbe Rev. Robert Ha- 



198 



JWEKILE BBPARTKEKf. 



mies; called to tfie ministry 
180d. Now pastor of the Bap- 
tist church at Shipley. 

Johu Holtby; baptized Sep- 
tember 3» 1809, b^ Mr. Hamies ; 
called to the ministry October^ 
1810; died about 1813. 

I.M. 



ANECDOTES OF TETZEL, 
Wham Luther opposed in 1517. 



" One TetzeU a Dominican, 
and a retailer of indulgences, had 
picked up a large sum at Leipsic. 
A gentleman of that city, who 
had no veneration for such su- 
perstitions, went to Tetzei» and 
asked him, if he could sell him 
an indulgence before hand, for a 
certain crime, which he would 
not specify, and which he in- 
tended to commit. Tetzel said, 
* Yes ; provided they could agree 
upon the price.' The bargain 
was struck, the money paid, and 
the absolution delivered in due 
form. Soon after this» the gen- 



tleman, knowing that Tetiel wis 
going from Leipsic, well loadedl 
with cash, wav-laid hin, robbci 
him, and cudgelled liiai; 4uid 
told him at pari tog, that this was 
the crime for which he had pwt* 
chased an absoiutioo. George, 
Duke of Saxony, ■ sealoos friend 
to the Court of Rome, hearing el 
this robbery, at first was very 
angry, but being informed of the 
whole story, he laughed heartilyi 
and forgave the criminal;'* 

" The Emf^eror Maximilian, 
being at Inspruck, was so offend- 
ed at the wickedness and impu^ 
deuce of this Tetzel, who had 
been convicted of adultery, that 
he intended to have him seized 
and put in a bag, and flung 
into a river; and would have 
done it, if he had not been hin* 
dered by the solicitations of Fre- 
deric, Elector of Saxony^ who 
happened to be there, very op^ 
portunely for Tetzel." 

Villeri'i Eituy on ih9 Reformth 
lion, p, It^. — VilUrs rrfert ta 
Jortin^i JAfB tf Ertumus; mid 
Jortin refers to Seektndorf, 



gubentle department 



HISTORICAL ESSAYS. 



No. XVII. 



On the CorrtrntumofChrisiiMit^^and 
the succeuful Expotwe of thai Cor- 
ruption, during the itefgn qf 
Rtehard 11. A. D. 1377—1399. 

\Vr liad occasion to observe, in 
ConcHdiPc; our last cKsay, that a 



reformation had begun to dawn. 
Tlie tnorning star of a brighter day 
had risen at the close of the last 
reign, and shuoe resplcndontly in 
this, in the person of Wickliffe. The 
corruptions, tyranny, and extortion 
of the Court of Rome, so long con- 
tinued, and so progressively ln« 
crease4l,had tired even bigots niem- 
selvcs. That power, which arro* 
gated to itself immediate divine 
appoint roent, men began to consi- 
der as the offspring of ambition ; and 



JUVENILE DEPAETMENT. 



199 



Ibe note Acrious, to raspect, and 
BOft jnstly, of infernal rather than 
lieaTenly origin. Extremes are dan- 
Serona. Saceeeding popes bad 
Muhed their pUns too far; and Satan, 
Iheir grand patron, had outstepped 
Ibe bounds of his own poKoy. 

T1^ state of the poblie mind was 
nateiially acceleraled by Uie memo- 
rable latMrars of the great reformer 
ihnrady named ; a glanee at whose 
bktory ia most applicable to oor 
ppeaoal aobject He was a. natiye 
9f Yorkshire, and finished his edn- 
BBlioii at the UniTersity of Oxford. 
Bit early pnrsoits afibrd an example 
irorthy the attention of our yonthful 
readers; for while he attended with 
dilig«ioe to hb studies in general, 
hia chief delight was his Bible: a 
itady the more remarkable in those 
daya of darkness. The neglect of 
thia saered book is in any case in- 
ezciisable ; but how much more so 
in our age, when to possess it is so 
common, and to circulate it so 
bshionable! Wickliffe's acquaint- 
ance with the holy scriptures, admi- 
rably prepared him for the interest- 
ing labours in which he afterwards 
engaged, and doubtless suggested 
to him the simple means, under the 
divine blessing, of enliglitening the 
minds of his fellow-countrymen —the 
translation and drculation of the Bi- 
ble. His first opposition to the cleri- 
cal impositions of the day, was a de- 
fence of the university against the 
mendicant friars, who were in the 
habit of enticing the young students 
to their convents ; and, as success 
generally increases seal, his triumph 
over this practice encouraged him 
to attack the order itself, in several 
tracts, exposing the shameful pre- 
tence of imitating Christ and his 
disciples, by living an indolent bat 
hixurious life, on the bounty of their 
delnded friends. His scriptural |>ro- 
dnctions made a deep impression, 
and he received, not only the ac 
knowledgments •>f the university, 
but obtained the mastership of Baliol 
College in 1361, and the living of 
Fillingham, in Lincolnshire; and, 
subsequently, the appointment of 
Warden of CantcHiiury Hall. 

A new archbishop however, not 
mider the influence of christian 
prindplcsy caused his removal from 



the last-mmitioBed station; and 
Wickliife inconsistently, but unsuo- 
cesaAilly, applied to the pope for 
his kind interference. But he had 
exerted himself already too much 
against popery to expect a popeVi 
favour; nor should he have sought 
it, seeing that one of the positions 
for which he contended was, that 
the Court of Rome had no juruklio- 
tion over the universal church, and, 
consequently, that it ought to have 
no influence in England ; — a position 
too, which monarchs, actuated by 
mere policy, could maintain, when 
it suited their purpose. 

We have seen that the oppres- 
sions of the clergy had prepared the 
minds of men for receiving the doc* 
trines of Protestantism. Wickliffe's 
partisans, therefore, daily increased. 
The most distinguished characters 
read hisworks attentively ^ndthongfat 
with him : nor did they conceal their 
sentiments. The monks became 
alarmed for their orders : they drew 
up nineteen articles from his writings, 
and made their complaints to their 
masteSk His Holiness, who coold 
not have been an indifferent specta- 
tor of this gpreat man's exertions, 
embraced bo favourable an opportu- 
nity of resentment, issued his Imlls 
against the reformer, and diR'ctcd 
that ho should be tried. The indigna- 
tion of the clergy was increased by 
his decision in favour of the king, on 
the question submitted to him by 
Richard and the Parliament, whether 
the pecuniary impositions of the 
Court of Rome might be lmrfuU§ 
resisted or disregarded; and the 
meeting at St. PauFs, fur his trial, 
followed. 

Wickliife, accompanied by the 
Duke of Lancaster and Earl Percy, 
attended. An angry conversation 
lietwecn these nobles and the Bishop 
of London, in the presence of an 
immense assemblage of people, was 
all thnt occurred at tliis time; and, 
on a Kccond Occasion, at Lambeth, 
no better success attended bis ene- 
mies. The converts to his opinions, 
or Wickliffites as they were called, 
assembled in crowds, and their me- 
naces, added to the order of Sir 
Lewis Clifford, who entered the 
meeting to prevent the proceedings, 
caused the di^appointtueixt. ^^ ^v!» 



soo 



JVVSNILE DEPARTMENT. 



cKpcdcd jadpces ; and the dispersion 
of the muititudc, after an admonilion 
. In ilisnoiitinue the prop^ation of 
his pernirions opinions, was all that 
ensued. Tliis vain admonition served 
no other purpose than to ^loss over 
the defeat of his adversaries, p^ivinfi^ 
them a little pretext for eallinji^ the 
meeting^: thntit had no effect on the 
noble mind of the reformer is mani- 
fest from his work on the truth nf 
the sacred tcripturet, which he pul>- 
lished soon nfler. 

In 1380 Wiekliffe completed his 
memorable undertakinjc* the transla- 
tion of the holy scriptures into the 
£nfi^lish lanfcuaj^e, which was spredi- 
ly copied hy many of his friends ; 
and althou}(h it has been contended 
that this work had been previously 
performed by some of his predeces- 
aors, it is more fc<'nerally believed 
tlimt the honour belonfE:8 to this dis- 
tingnMwd muui; and it is certain 
that his translaticm was in f?eneral 
use until the invention of printing. 
He pursued his valuable labours, 
and proceeded to expose the ridicn- 
JlNM doctrine of transubstsntiiitiun. 

Two years after thf publication of 
bis Bible, he was summoned before 
the pope, to answer for his heretical 
doings, when he replied in the true 
style of a reformer, that Christ taught 
him rather to obey God than man. 
Infirmities now increasingly npon 
him, be retired tt» close bis valuable 
life at the rectory of Lutterworth, 
ivlicre he died of an attack of the 
palsy in 1384. The Conncil of Con- 
stance, in 1428, in the true spirit of 
popery, had bis body disinterred, 
and burnt, and its ashes cast into 
the Swiit. Vain and infernal ma- 
Hce! Whilst he was livin;^, he 
was actuated by that spirit that 
earcth not for those who can kill 
the body, but after that have no more 
that they can do, and was deeply 



imbued with the fsar of Him, wbo 
has power to oast both body and 
soul into hell; and dow be wit 
doubtless in the enjoyment of that 
life and bliss which fmaf^natioB 
cannot picture, nor the utmost 
rancour affect. 

His life was a life of unwearied 
ond successful labour. More than 
two hundred volumes attest his dili- 
gence, and his conduct exeraplUMI 
the happy tendency of hia senti- 
ments. . Tlie review of his history, 
and that of the period in which he 
lived, is full of instruotioo, and 
should inspire with zeal in so good 
a cause ; for it is the same cause in 
which every Christian is engaged— 
the de8tru(!tion of the kingdom of 
Satan, and the promotion of the 
kingdom of Christ. To be circum- 
stanced as Wickliffe could not UXi 
to the lot of many mortals, but to be 
favoured with the means .of doing 
good, to have opportunities of ex- 
posing error and defending trnlb, 
and to assist in the circulation of the 
sacred scriptures, especially since tlie 
ft>rmation of Bible As9ociaii9n$^ is 
within the ability of the humblest 
and the youngest Christian, and 
should be accounted his privilege^ 
his duty, and delight! and O that, 
while the same awflil supcrstitfo| 
exerts and aims to ineiease its In- 
fifience, even in onr own fiivoured 
land, the same feeling may actuate 
Protectants, and a donble portion of 
the Spirit be ponred out upon the > 
members of the church of God, thai 
the pros|)erity of Antichristian prin- 
eiples may never be viewed with in- 
difference, but pure and undclll^ 
religion widely extend its benign 
and lasting influence through their 
peaceful, but powerful, instrumen- 
tality ! 

n. S* A. 



fOl 



^ttuat^. 



MRS. CONWAY. 



[Saturday, December 9, 1820, 
CoDway, senior, tho wifo of 
Beorre Conway, of Pontncw- 
rUi-pIate Works, departed this 
Ib the sixty-sixth year of her 

B had been a constant member 
baptist chnrcb for the space of 
f fifty years, dnring the greater 
if which time, slie was exercised 
■erere bodily affliction, which 
mi enabled to support with 
DhristlaD fortitude, and entire 
utibn to the di? ino will. Of 
t mair be truly said, that she re- 
1 in hope, was patient in tribu- 
I, and continued instant in 
;r« She gave abundant e?)dence 
r entire dcpeudonce on Christ, 
Ami she quietly Wtiited for the 
tion of the Lord, 
owas buried at Pontrhydymn 
tin-house, on Thursilay, the 

when tho Kov. M. Thomas of 
faTenny preached in English, 
r particular request, from Prov. 
.10: «« The name of the Lord 

•trong tower; the righteous 
ifh into it, and in safe;'' which 
a at all times alTorded her strong 
riaUon and support, and which 
Bentioncd for upwards of thirty 
I before her death, as being the 

upon wliich licr funeral dis- 
le sheuld be founded. 
r« James, minister of the place, 
irards preached in Welsh, from 
a xo. 12 : '* So teach us to num- 
or days, that wo may apply our 
a onto wisdom." . 
e had eleven children arrived at 
rity, all of whom surrounded 
jiag bed, and now enjoy the 

satisfaction of having contri- 
I all in their power to alleviate 
aina of expiring nature. The 
al was numerously and very 
ctably attended, and aI)ovo 
of her neat relations ware seen 

yu xiiu 



in the proeesiion, who were anxiou^ 
to pay their last tribute of respoct 
to her remaina. 



MR. JOHN ATKINSON. 



May 18, 1820, died, at Hull, aged 
seventy- three, Mr. John Atkinson, 
who, for upwards of forty years, had 
been enabled, through grace, to 
maintain a steady, uniform, and ho- 
nourable profession of the religion of 
our Lord Jesus Christ 

His first impressions were received, 
under the hiinistry of a Mr. Pickles, 
at tlie Independent Ohapel at Be- 
verley. The Lord #as pleased to 
deal very jpntly with him ; his con- 
victions or guilt were not so keen, 
nor his distress of mind so great, as 
some have experienced ; but, as be 
expressed himself to me but a few 
days before his departure, *' ho drew 
him to himself with the cords of love, 
as with the bands of a man.*' 

He soon after removed to Hull, 
and became a hearer of the late 
highly-respeoted Mr. Lambert, of 
that town, and united with the 
church under liis pastoral care. How 
long he continued with that society 
I cannot say; but in January, 1789, 
Mr. Atkinson was baptized upon a 
profession of fiuth, and was received a 
member of thf\ church in Salthouse- 
lam% Hull, then under the pastoral 
care of Mr. Beatson. As to his doe- 
trinal views, Mr. Atkinson was ^ 
Calvinist The perfection of the 
obedience of Jesus Christ, the vica- 
rious nature of his sacrifice, and the 
|)erpetuity and prevalency of his in- 
tercession, were ' the truths upon 
which he meditated with pleasure, 
and conversed with delight He 
bad a deep sense of his person- 
al onworthinest, and well knew, 
that all he enjoyed, or hoped 
to receive, proceeded from the 
ricJies of divine grace. At the sane 



£0t 



OBItUAKY, 



liraCt the pre?ulioff disposilions of 
his heart, and the deportment of his 
life, fully evinced, that ** the ffmce 
of God, which bring^th talfatiou, 
had tanght him that, denying un- 
godliness and worldly inst«, he 
sbonld live soberly, righteoasly, and 
godly, in this present world;" 
M^bilst he was looking forward in 
Inimble but confident expectation of 
a better. He was fond of reading, 
and being favoured with a very re- 
tentive memory, he was a most 
pleasant and pitifitable companion 
in the things of God. But pierbaps 
the peculiar grace of the Holy Spirit, 
which formi^ the prominent feature 
of his religious character, was sub- 
ipission to the divine will, under the 
painful, but all-wise, dispensations 
of his Providence. In this respect, 
Ills deportment and language were 
such as frequently astcmisbed the 
niiids of his most intimate friends; 
•ud which none but the God of pa- 
lienoe could inspire. It pleased him, 
t^ho ** worketh all things after the 
<H>unsel,of his own will," to dcpri\c 
Qur dear brother of an amiable 
partner in life, and three beloved 
cihildreii, two of whom were taken 
from him at different periods in a 
audden and unexpected manner. 
At the time when ne sustained the 
loKS of the latter of these, he said, 
*' The Lord now has strip|)ed mc of 
all ; but it was the I^rdwlio gave, 
Hnd it is the Lord that hath tnkcii 
uway; blessed be the name of the 
i^ord." 

During the last few years of his 
life, a complaint in his legs disabled 
him from going to Uie house of God 
tlut the Lord was pleased in a great 
ipeasure tQ supply tbe'loss of public 
means, by blessing to him the read- 
ipg of his word; and severe as bis 
afflictions were, he frequently spoke 
4if them aa being comparHtively 
light, and God in au eminent degree 
j(ave him patience to endure. 

For some time past, his outward 
man^ppcanrd to be decaying ; and 
Vriday, May 1^ was the last day of 
his being able to leave h^ room.' lu 
tiie allU?rnoon of that day, be said, 
*' I think I shall not be long here ; 1 
feel the pins of my tabemacio to be 
loosening fast'' It being said, '* God 
«july knows when the snmniioD.^ may 



come ;*' he replied, " M j timet art 
in his hand ;** and 

'* KoC a single ihalt can hit. 
Till the God of love tcet fit." 



On the next day, he felt himself 
much weaker, and said but little; 
but on some of the precious pro» 
mises of scripture being repeated to 
him, he expressed his satisfaction, 
and spake of the support and com- 
fort which they afforded him, and 
affectionately gave bis last advicv to 
his son-in-law, (with whom he rs- 
sided,) respecting his future comlact 
in the world, and the maoagemeat 
of bis children. 

Lord's-day morning, May 14^ he 
awoke his son-in-law, and aaid, it 
was time for him to go to the prayer- 
meeting. Being asked whml kind 
of a night he had bad, he replied, 
** Very restless." His aon-ia-law 
said, *' I had better stop with jou.** 
'* No," answered he, ** you oan do 
mo no good, go ; fbr 

** I have known tlie worth of prayci^ 
Aud luvcd lo be often there.** 

The remainder of that day was prin- 
cipally spent by him in reading, and 
in conversing of tho things of God* 

The next day be said but little till 
the evening, when several persona 
called to see him. Ho exerted his: 
lit lie remaining power to viodicnUi 
tho cause of God, and speak of Jefoa 
as flic only Saviour of sinners. 

On l*uesday he ap|>earcd to he. 
tvniidtniig in his mind; bnt oi^ 
Wodiiosday he was perfectly aensi- 
b|(% and was much pleased at the 
Slight of his graud-cliildren. Uii 
tbongbts 11 ere stiU occupied om 
divine things; ami be spake vilk, 
f^rcat plvasiurc of tlie inexbaaalihle 
t'ulncsM of Jesus Christ, and the- 
completeness of believers in him; 
and referring to the immutability of. 
the covenant of grace, he aaid,, 
** lliat is all my siUvatiou^ and all 
my desire." 

A fi iiMid present a.skcd him« if 
there was any pas,sago which he 
would make cliuicu of, as a text 
for his funeral sermon. He replied* 
^ Yc-s ; Pveciout hi the sight if tkt 
Lord it tlie death vf his saiftis: that 
I think is applicaUc to nin." He. 
then closed his ov^s, as if fcillinr tulu 



OdlTVAftY. 



SOi 



lonber, ind appeared to sleep 
ilbrtahly antil aliout one oVlock, 
sn» witlioat a itniggie, bit immor- 
ipirit wan diMnissed fVoni the 
y, and ascended to bis Fatber 
IhbGod. 

Wm.Aebon. 

racily Jwu 12. i8«0. 



NANCY MARLOE. 



9ltD November 97, 1820, after a 
fft eonfinement, Nancy Marloe, 
IIm sixteonib year of her age. 
rbe teachers of the Baptist Sunday 
booly obserTiog a particular seri- 
aesa in her whole heliaviour, in- 
taped tlie hope that she was the 
>ject of relifpoiis impri^ssious. 
e often lamented that family du- 
I prevented her from attending 
» achool as rcf^ularly as she wish^. 
e was exact in observing the ap- 
Intcd time of attendance, and 
mestly desired, nut only to re- 
ive, but to impart instruction, 
e cheerfnlly engaged in teaching 
s sMaller classes, when a s ufliciciit 
aber of teachers was not present. 
mat a month l)cforc her decease, 
Bploms of indisposition appealed. 
Mr mother, who is a member of 
B Baptist church in this place, fre- 
eatly conversed with her about 
s things of God, in which eonver- 
tkNi she. joined with the greatest 
light Dnring her illness, the ox- 
Hent little tract, entitled '' Little 
ae,'* was put into her hand, with 
Mob slic expressed herself much 
laaed: but the Bible was her 
ief treasnre. The last time the 
riter of this called to see her, bo 
qpiired wliat she thought of herself. 
16 replied, that she was a helpless 
iMr; but that Christ died for sm- 
n. Being asked if she prayed, 
e replied, ** O yes." •« W hat do 
« Dray for?" '* That the Lord 
MM have mercy upon me." '' And 
\ yoa think the Lord hears yonr 
ayenr "Yes." "Why do yon 
ink ao ?" "1 have prayed that 
> would pardon ny sins for the 
knof Ctin8t,and 1 feel that he has 
vdoned them." During prayer, 
»r taraiit Ament proved t^^t she 



felt interested in the supplications 
wbiob were presented on her behalf. 

Some young ftiends calling to see 
her, she said, " Do not weep for ne ; 
I have no desire to ^live; \ av 
happy." At another time she said, 
" O Lord, open thy heavenly gates, 
that my soul may enter in." She 
frequently expressed herself happy 
in the assurance, that the Lord 
would admit her into bis kingdom* 
She was frequently engaged in 
prayer, and evidently eqjoyed ldloir> 
ship with Gkxi. She tfans addressed 
her brother, *' James, if I die and. go 
to heaven, I wish yon to follow me. 
,You must be a good lad, and then 
you shall come ; and when we meet 
ag^n, we shall Join band in hand, 
and sing praise to the Lamb for 
ever." Thew were nearly the last 
words she spoke. 

At her funeral a hymn was snog, 
which she bad selected for tbeoeea- 
sion, one verse of which is dctorip- 
tivc of her fkitb and hope : 

•* Metbiiiks. 1 lee her joyful stand. 
Before the Qod of heaven; 

He smilet-^he enters Zion's land. 
And her reward is given.* 

Tears flowed copiously from many 
eyes : the girls of the school espe- 
cially, wept, while they bid a long 
farewell to one whom they dearly 
loved. Her death was afterwarda 
improved, in a sermon from Bodes, 
viii. S : J'hert %$ no dUcAargt m that 
war* 

C.T. 

Oldham, Lancashire, 



MR, LUDGAT£.-^Agcd 36. 



Mr. Joseph' Ludgate was bom at 
Dinton, Bucks, in 1784. His parents 
were destitute of religion and Amity 
economy ; oonsequently be became 
literally a beggar, and one of the 
greatest profligates. Though hia 
parents professed to be of the Ghurcb 
of England, he never knew them to 
go tiMre, nor to any other place of 
worship, till they were carried to be 
buried, which took place when be 
was about seventeen. 

He being the youngest of the fii* 
mily, his fotfaer was considerably at- 
tached to him^ aiia^^fo^^WvKv^Kv 



204 



T>]|IT0A«T, 



toailtnd Uie alehouse ; to wbicfa be 
WM fo much addirled, that be itole 
bis bfolber'a monej to spend tbere. 
A boot this time some clergymen in 
the aeigbbourbood estibHsbed a 
free school, at wbicfa bo attended for 
aboQt three quarters of a year, and 
inado considerable profidency. In 
consequence of tbb, be was obliged 
to attend the Cborch of England, to 
which bo became exceedingly at- 
tached ; but was still nnder I lie aw« 
fa\ reign and power of sin. Thns be 
eontinaed till seventeen years of 
age, being full of deceit and wick- 
edness ; and no one caring to employ 
blm, bo became exceedingly pinch- 
ed with poverty. But the set time 
to favour him was near at bancL 
ifo was inflaenced to attend the 
gospel, by tho earnest persuasion of 
a young person. Though curiosHy 
prompted biro to go, yet the Lord 
over-ruled it for good, by fastening 
•onviction on his conxcieiicc ; which 
led to his conversion, and his attach- 
«nriit to the people of Gud and the 
K.'uise of Christ. At this time, the 
I iord in mercy was f>leasrd to de- 
Jivcr him from his povcrly and dis- 
(rr:;M, by placing him with a godly 
mastrr of the Church of En^and, 
whose goo<l example and situation 
were made a blessing to him, both 
in iMidy and sonl. }fow he became 
a regular attendant on the gospel, 
#ifher at the Baptist Meeting, 
tVaddMdoD-hill, or at Aston Sand- 
funl Church, and increased in know- 
Irdgo and piety. Seeing the ordi- 
nnnro of bolievers' baptism adminis- 
trrcd, and comparing it with the 
New TeMamcnt, he was convinced 
that baptism by immersion was Ihc 
scriptural mode; and being much 
attac:hed to the minister and people 
ut Wadilcsdon-hill, he joined that 
church, whero be continued an ho- 
nourable member fourteen years, 
and in bis master's service till 
ids marriage, which tnok place 
in IHll. And now a very diflcrent 
scene opened to his view. Instead 
of suu-shiny days, the clouds bo- 
gan to rise; and doring eleven 
ynarsv in a married state, mer- 
oJCA and afflictions were his daily 
<tum)»anions. During- this time be 
had hisilisroission from Waddesdon- 
■>»> to the BaptUtClHirab alSxa*' 



boome, wberebe became ta active 
member and deaenn, and waa eaUcti 
to tiie work of tiie asinistry, and im 
•the neigbbooring villagea easplojed 
the talent which GM luid gives Um, 
in instructing bis poor fellow-BnBcra . 
in the knowledge of Jesus Christ. 
Tbere being a heavy debt od the 
meeting-bouse at Swanboame, be 
thought it bis doty, being also desired 
by bis friends, to go out to different 
places to collect a little money to- 
wards the liquidation of the same ; 
and being on a journey to Kettering, 
he was overtaken with a very heavy 
rain, in which be caught ookl, that * 
brought on a consumption, which 
in about ifteen montlM termiwded 
in death. Medical assistance was • 
procured, but in vain; and thew gb . 
he had flattering hopes of recovery. 
yet he gradually grew weaker. 
During bis illness, be waa mmA fii-' 
voured with a strong faitb,a calm and 
peacefnl mind, and nnsbaken conft* 
deuce in his God, and was wholly re- 
signed to his will. He generally 
spoke to bis friends of the preciotts- 
ness of Jesus to his soul, and of his 
hope being firmly fixed on bim as 
the rock of ages. 

A short time before bis death, on • 
seeing two intimate friends enter 
the room, he said, " My friends^ ■ 
dying is ban! work. O bow aevert - 
are my pains P One of them re- 
plying, *' My dear friend, hodilv 
pain only, 1 trust;'' be replied, 
** Blessed be my Jesus, no th i ny ? 
else ; my mind is happy in the » 
Lord.^ Being surrounded by some ' 
of his domestic friends, and tn wtfj^ 
great pain, he said, *' Pray donll 
leave me till my blessed Jesus cornea 
to take me away." At another 
time he said, " 1 am almost at home; 
the door is almost open to receive 
me." On. the day before his death, 
he said to some of his ft-iends, ** 1 
am surprised to thiuk that I 
am going to die without pain.'' In' 
this composed state ho remaineil 
till the next day, when he sweetly 
fell aslo^ in Jesus, without a strug- 
gle or a groan. *' Mark the perfect 
man, and behold the upright; the 
end of that man is peace." 

His remains were interred in tite 
Meeting-yard, Swanboomc,en Wed- 
nesday, Janoary 3, 1831; and ai| 



EfiVl^W. 



£05 



lilcourse was prMched 
rge Foskett, Newport- 
ia, to a crowded con- 
ooi 1 Cor. XT. 10, first 
;t selected bybimself. 

D. W. J. 
SNT DEATHS. 



CREW TATHAM. 

Ilh of NoTcmlicr last, 
40th year of his as^e, 
M Crew Tathain, senior 
be Baptist Church at 
His departure, an etcr- 
him, will be long^ and 
by the church, and sin- 
Itcd by all who know 
difficult somclimcs to 
I so, Father, for so it 
d in thy sight !" A wi- 
wr children arc left, 
MSnt their loss. 



SEOR6E FORD. 

kprilO, 1821, died, at 

n Mile-end, the Rev. 

i» who has been many 

litbful and affectionate 

Independent Church 

He was in London on 

tlie 4th, and after his 

thrown by a stroke of 

complete insensibility. 

removal will be deeply 

the very wide circle of 

ince. 

Id be happy to give a 
cd account of this ex- 
ier. 



. C. HUNTER. 

died of a decline, aged 
the Rev. C. Hunter, 



Richmond,- Yorkshure. Three Bap- 
tist and three Independent ministers 
attended his funeral. His funeral 
sermons were preached, at Rich- 
mond by the Rev. Mr. Hughes of 
Battetsea, and at Rath by the Rey* 
Mr. Underwood. 



REV. T. SCOTT. 

Died April 16, 1821, at AstonSaiid- 
ford, in a good old age, the Rev. and 
venerable Thomas Scott, author of 
an excellent Commentary on the Bi« 
ble,and of other very valuable works. 
He was an eminent divine, as well 
as a man of a most amiable dispo- 
sition. Our late friend Mr. Fuller^ 
of Kettering, used to say of him^ 
that he scarcely knew a person 
whose religions sentiments so nearly 
coincided with his own. 

Since the above was written, w% 
have been informed that our highly 
esteemed friend and brother ** de- 
parted to a better world in perfecl 
peace, about seven o'clock in th« 
evenin^f. Not a struggle, nor a 
groan, nor a sigh, discomposed hia 
last moments. With his intellect 
perfectly clear, he quietly and gra- 
dually ceased to breathe, while hia 
wife and his son and daughter could 
look on and be comforted. Blessed 
be God ! not one thing that he had 
feared came upon him. Indeed, one 
after another all his fears dispersed.'' 
— Our next number will (D. V.) 
contain some very interesting parti- 
culars communicated by an old and 
intimate friend. 



REV. W. FREEMAN. 

Died lately at Bedford, the Rev. 
William Freeman, the worthy pastor 
of the Baptist Church at Cardington 
Cotton End, aged about 60. 



36let)te\0« 



tiilaty, Vol IV. hj T. 
o. 12s. ; 12mo. 5s. 6d. 

cannot soon fiiccome 
3 easily exhausted. It 
sader to live in the bc- 
imc, and mth tM ^cnc- 

r/. 



rations. It makes htm Acqaainte4 
with ancient manners, opinions, arts, 
sciences, governments, and religions. 
It gives him a view of the rise, na- 
ture, glory, decline, and fall of the 
m«)st celebrated amviv^iu Kxk^ 



206 



R£V1BW* 



the midst of past ages, it awikens 
all the s}*mpathies of his miod : he 
cannot help feeling interested, bat 
is irresistibly, yet insensibly drawn 
into pensi've or pleasing rejections. 
From the history of that which is 
past, he derives instnicfion for the 
futsrc; and he is enlightened on 
many moral, intellectual, and politi- 
cal subjects, in a manner that he 
conid not be from any other aiiarter. 

We have Tolumcs of nistory, 
which contain the wealth of the 
most powerful and cultivated minds. 
TVe can point to ponderous tomes, 
which exhibit great intellectual 
strength; which present a view of 
events, in connexion with their 
causes and consequences; and 
which display, in elegant language, 
wonderful depth of thought, and pa- 
tience of research. If wc thought 
the sons of pleasure and dissipation 
would listen to our voice, we would 
exhort them to become readers of 
history. In this study they would 
participate of pleasure, without a 
degradation of their nature ; since it 
would impart to them purity of taste, 
and manly habits, and would give 
them at once a feast of pleasure and 
instniction. 

It is, however, much to be re- 
gretted, that our most fascinating 
and popular hi&torians have been the 
abettors of infidelity, and have ap- 
peared in the front ranks of the ene- 
mies of our holy religion. It cannot 
be sufficiently deplored, that histo- 
rians possessed of erudition, taste, 
titrength of reason in other respects, 
and fmc powers of imagination, 
have defiled their works with the 
most wicked principles, and with 
anecrs at the sacred volume. Who 
can read the histories of Hume and 
Gibbon, without lamenting that 
men of such talents should employ 
them to so vile and despicable a 
purpose ? 

Histories tainted with infidel 
principles, are adapted to do incal- 
culable injury to society, to morals, 
and to the eternal interests of man- 
kind ; and we roust say that wc 
tremble when we see such works 
Mt into the hands of youth. Not 
oeing furnished with arguments in 
^tofoiice of Christianity, they arc nn- 
mblo to ^IsMctru ib» diSowaiQC be- 



tween sopMstry and legitinnilin nth 
Boning, — between deceit mmI 110^ 
neity ; and they ^ net know btm 
to detect the latent poison wIMiii 
administered in works of tfaan de^ 
scription. It 18 manifest, t h e ie fcw^ 
that such pFodnoCions must tend to 
the ruin of yoatb. 

We have long wiihed to fee ■ 
good history written by a person 
like the author of tbhi work ; ttiat i» 
to say, possessing evangelical prin- 
ciples, an enlightened undcrsUoA- 
ing, and a correct judgment. 

In this fourth vflJume we find Mr. 
Morel I deriving his materials fnm 
the best authorities, detaiUng events 
in an interesting manner, displaying 
liberality upon delicate topics, and 
inculcating lessons of wisdom and 
piety. 

One great excellence of o« 
anther's work Is, that he supplies 
valuable reflections upon the varioos 
periods and events described In his 
history; reflections which do ho- 
nour to his head and heart, and 
which cannot fail to instroctand im« 
press the reader. We have indeed 
found in this volume some trifling 
errors; but these, we have nodonb^ 
will be corrected in the next edition. 
We do not always agree in opinion 
with our author, but he has a right 
to form his own opinions. 

We feel it our duty to say, that 
Mr. Morelfs Studies in History 
is an invaluable work for the rising 
generation, and may be read to 
great advantage by persona of a 
more mature age. Into boarding' 
schools, especially, wc shall bt 
glad to hear that it is universally 
introduced. We have not a 
doubt of its becoming a standard 
work, and that it will prove a blest* 
ing to future generations. 



I 



Ifjfcmvirs of the Life and Wriiingi^ 
and Religious Connexions, of Jotm 
Owen, D, D. By William Ormt. 

Mr. Clnrkson, who preached the 
funeral sermon for Dr. Owen, ob- 
served, *' that the acconnt which is 
due to the world, of this eminent 
man, d^Mcved n volame. Cotton 



R£V1R^* 



207 



Iher, in that singnlai* work, 
Nfnalia Americana Christi,' 
lisbed tvrcniy years afterwards, 
laned, * that the church of Go<l 
wronged, in that the life of the 
it John Owen was not written.' ** 
>! the first, and the only account 
im which can he dcpendeil on, 
Hr. Orme informs us, appeared 
ut twenty years after tliat, prc- 
d to the folitt editioaof his scr- 
la and tracts; but it ia both in- 
dnte and imperfect, and does 
contain so many pages as the 
;tor had written books. When, 
■eirev, the le<irning and labours 
Ir. Owen, and the times in which 
ived, are considered, no one will 
Tel that the present writer has 
ight it proper, to devote a sepa- 
I work to the life of so good, so 
it, and so useful a man. Our 
lOr mast have used great and 
WTWing labour in collecting ma- 
il* for this work; and he has 
idoly succeeded in giving us 
Boira of Dr. Owen, of consider- 
I Tilae. Their oris^in he thus. 
«a«Bts : — " Tlio pU*aHuic derived 
a Ilia writings, led me, a few years 
, Merely for my own satisfaction, 
Bftke some inquiry respecting 
r author. Not findii»g 5ucb an 
MMit as satisfied me, 1 began to 
•k that a careful examination of 
Dimerous works, and of the con- 
poranaous productions of his 
, might enable me to afford a 
99 and more correct view of him, 
i had yet been given.*' Besides 
Ksnting, in the character, con- 
i, and labours of a learned and 
111 servant of God, an example 
he highest worth, the present 
me affords not a little very im- 
lant information coneerning the 
Dtful time in which Owen lived. 
I, as it apf>ears to us, it is no 
m part of its value thaVit enables 
o refute infidel and clerical, and 
nay add, iuterestcd or malignant 
ders, which have been often and 
iidantJy cast on the Puritans and 
(Conformists ; men, generally, of 
m no one has ever spoken evil, 
NWt Justifying the belief that his 
rmation was partial, his preju- 
m ^annical, or his heart un- 

'm 

n^t man^ who in the least un- 



derttanda baman nature, would ex- 
pect anantfaor, so frigid, selfish, and 
perfectly sceptical, as Hume, to 
write one word of truth, when 
recording the actions of persons 
animated with love to God, and who 
were ever wilting to sacrifice all 
that is valnable in this world, so 
that .they might obey the divine 
law, and benefit the human mee? 
Nor will it in the lea^t surprise us. 
that interested priests should labour 
in a Satanical vocation, by accu.<«ing 
their " holy brethren,'' who were 
" partakers of the heavenly calling." 
But while no wise, reflectiii!^, and 
impartial person would be in much 
danger of crediting the preachers 
and writers to whom we have al- 
luded, it is of importance to be 
able to oppose facts to their calum- 
nies ; a pleasure which the reader of 
the work before ns will richly 
enjoy. He will find much too, that 
will amply repay his attention to 
these Memoirs, on the nature, prin- 
ciples, and iuestimable importance 
of religious liberty; without which 
freedom, man exists in a cheerless 
wild, not abounding' with food nor 
wells of water, but with toads and 
serpents and savages. Religious 
liberty conduces to the planting of 
another Eden, in which the trees of 
righteousness g^row, which the dews 
of heaven refresh, and on whinli tho 
snn splendidly shines ; and he who 
rises from the attentive |)erusal of 
Mr. Orme's book, without under- 
stiinding it better, or valuing it 
more — unless in relation to this ob- 
ject his knowledge is extensive, and 
his heart already just — must have a 
powerless understanding, or an un- 
generous nature. 

The theological sentiments of onr 
author we regard as scriptural; 
and there are such clear, frequent, 
and useful representations of evan- 
gelical truth in his work, as greatly 
enhance its importance. 

We tliink he is not wanting in 
attachment to his own d(*uoniina- 
tion; but it would lie unjust to re- 
fuse him the praise of uniformly 
writing as we should expect him to 
do who possesses sound piety, ge- 
ncrons sentiments, and honest aeal. 
on sulj^jccts of high and VLXi\\^\%<^ 
importance. 



More Minor MoraU; wr m Intro- j 
ductioA to Iht WtMltr Pmmilii: 
Kith AvM EUmnor'M SUriu inr 



The writer of fhii Iiifbl; CDter- 
taining auci oserul volarae, intro- | 
daces it wilb a modeit preface, 
froni which the following extract ii 
taken: i 

" If, on the whole, tite cririci iboQld 
nnt be diipleticd wilb fhii Eiiij od 
Minor Moral), ii vill be continued; ba( 
if. on ihe conlrirj. Ilia; ihautd rrowD 
at it, the writer will not oerit ihe cha- | 
lacter of irrogmnE obtruHnenen i tad ' 
their ■cquinluice will) Aonl Eleanor 
and Ihe Winter Fitnil* will terminate, | 
like Ihat of many other people, with : 
Iheir Gminitoduciion lo each other." 

In inch a worM ai this, we are | 
alwnya happy lo meet with those ' 
whu are well inrormed and comam- j 
nicalivc, aa well as benevolent and I 
pious; and it is on thii account as j 
well as becansc wc are concerned , 
Tor the beneSt of others, that we 
very macli desire a farther acquaint- 
ance with Aunt Eleanor and tbc 
Winter Family; lo whom, while 
(hey remain unchaoK^d, we shall be 
(greatly to blame if we d« not intro- 
duce all our youtliful ftiewla. 



toward* the dRcttonof a n«w |)bee 
of worship at Penrith, the town 
where they were flnt delirered.'' 
We cofdiallj wish snccesn may at- 
tend tbc Author's pertonal applica- 
tions for the purpose of selling bis 
~ ' ' accumprish snlmporiatitair 



Itingdooi. 



1 dark pact of the 



Eight Ltetnra on lAe Ciriniaa Sab- 
bath ; bg WilUam Tkam, MinitUr 
vfth* Goipel at Penrith, Cumber- 
land. — Second Edition, enlarged. 
London, 1821. 

These lectures embrace all the 
topics COD nee led with the " Spe- 
ciality, Authority, and Sanctity or 
(ho Christian Sabbath ;"— the " pro- 
fanation of Ihe IjOrdVday by the 
natiiin in general, and by inilivi- 
dnals in particular;" — tbo" non-ad- 
vantage and evil consequences 
of Sabbath-breaking ;" — and the 
" Means and Motives for the belter 
observance of the Iiord's-day." It 
is upon the whole a well executed 
pcrformanre, and may be ren'd with 
pleasure and advantage. The design 
ofthc Author in printing it, ia singu- 
larly ingenious, and aO'urds aiinlher 
j^Broof of the various ways in which 
Wf^ " libnral dcviselh liberHl things." 
^"' an Advertise moot wo Hud that 
T prafiu arising from llio> snle of 
V kclmos, iriJJ |w apinnpriatf i\ 



Samkg Srkaol StOehtt; « Mmiir 
daeriptive if Ue iei^gn Opcratisii' 
afUiMt ItutitiOumt. 2a. 
The institntiotiarSaMdayScbooIf 
forms a moat important epoch in (be 
history of the chnrch. The bauins 
which they have on ita intenals wai 
in some degree seen by their CMly 
promoten ; but it is in (heir history 
alone that we can folly tt»ee Iheir 
real tendency. We baTcknoVniiK 
stances of individual cot^regalimt 
being oonaidcrably replenUhi^ Aom 
the Sunday School. It has aHMed 
teachers from among (be adwlart 
for a new set of learners, and tbo 
germ of ministerial talent baa first 
discovered itself ill the rude effarta 
wliich are sometimes made to convey 
divine tntth to the young awl ig- 
norant mind. Several of those soal- 
ousand excellent men, loo, who are 
now raising the Redeemer's stand- 
ard in the regioni of idolatry and 
superstition, have first fanned tte 
flame of their holy ardour in the en- 
gagements of the Village Snnday 
School. It may, however, bethought 
by some pcrsotu that too much is 
said respecting these lostiiutioiis. 
and tliat they are appreciated macb 
too highly. That they posaew a 
value, it is allowed; hut that value 
is by no roenns equal to what is at- 
tached to them by their adiv* 
friends and supporters, litis, hl>w- 
evcr, ia nr^ the opinion of the amtboa 
of Ibis litUe volume. 






:r bean 



rnlhcr. 



nled, D 



\a higber in usefalncu, n 
bcciu» ihey liaienot risen hlgtaenoiub 
in public opinion. Tboie will evar ha 
in proponion to one snolhcr. IfChrii- 
lisni in general »ere awataofihe anap' 
pictioblc adrantagei for ofcralneti, 
I, which WVotiK Vo A^ oSLoc of a Sunday 

', 5t:\MKil \«UsSl*t. (JvUBfeXe %4 \Vt TIWBS 



UTERART IHTELLIUBNCI!. 



•ay Mond u| 



1 dcJinle e*r,1 tliEie 
, eriuaded. )m thai: vani 
r qualified BUd raluabla inirraclun, 
ihleh h>i hillieito been n pninrully 
cki and If A luScieDlnanbeioriucli 
Mcher* were faund. erer Mgei to oftvt 
keiniel*ei lo the office, then Ihechatnc- 
tf* at tho>e eicellout Iiulilulioiit miuld 
aprave, and llic tro* point ofjucc'rgs 
« TBpidlj uiiined." 

" Id Teal imporlnnce Sunday School 
1*1 it u lions cUiiu a place aecond i[i iirini: 
alto the pablic luiniilry." Pp. {tti. Hi. 

ThatthcK HntimeDU bave lii'i:n 






binkis 



i very prot.alili-. 
ill IS deicriptiTe of the bemgn npe- 
^M of thoae iDititutioBS. 1'lip 
baracter* are, tlio {^iioday Siilinol 
07 (who is iiippoxeil to be the ivri- 
ir of tbe narrative) and pri, tlicjr 
■rents nnd teacbers. Tbey are ' 
enenil well ilclineatcd, and soi 
r them highly deserve iinifalj( 
\t boolc ia indeed wrillen ilioj^. 
wr in a very eii(;aging manner. 1 
I highly catCLitated to lntei«s( u 
iformeil joung; persons. Tbcrc- 
neral parts which, ir the spart 
illed In this work would alluw, 
nald reaililf cxlrart; batwc in 
contented to refer the reajci 
w work iUcir. We must, howii 
lentus with the fotToning acuoi 
flbo writer's retmspcct 



:e the li 



I of n 



Lndaj School, Toi 1 

an twenty feiiTi, 1 navn icen ami 
Ki«D much huiti of the goud and ill oi 
tt I haie lived long enough to hnvc 
■d Ihe inlegrit/ nf (be piinciplet I im. 
bed at school, put lo the teit of iii.in y 
•Itjnudia protei by myowncipi^. 
•no, Iliat they atford, buth in prus- 
ritj and Bdiersiiy, a certain nnr) n 
adyiuppoit. And if, ai ttill evtc be 
■ ca«e more or leu, they have wuib- 
■M. (like llie conductor wliicL xg 
tct for [he greater lecatiiyoran eili- 
e,} been Uie nMan> of allrnciing to- 
ird* ate an angry cloud, that oiight 

nly found- "' ' '"'" 



It befal. 






r'' "J." 



m the lafeguard of the building." 
Vohave above, and we thiak (iisl \y. 
pnnted lentiDienti of approbaiiun 
tbi* agreeable little work; bntivc 
imot, in jiutjco to tiie pnhlk-. 



close wilhont atating onrdisnppoinl- 
mcnl at the Joose and indiiitinct 
manner in which tome of the dee- 
Irines of tlie gnapci are exhibited. 
That so pious a writer as tbe present 
appears to be, slioulU bavo stated the 
converqiou of the mother, (ur in- 
stance, in tbe way be has, can only 
be aecouuled for ou the suppiaition 
of his having imitated tbe polished, 
hjt weak, and we had almott aaid 
cITcmiaalo, atjlo of some modern 
nurlis of imagloaliuD. 

" How jucli altcniionj (of the reacli- 
er>) often rcpcaleil, and accDrapanird, at 

iuii%| have operated on ruy mitiherV 
miucl, it ii needleii lo relate. Ihry 
won lier heart ; llii-j exdted in her 
the Dlmoit gratitude) ilietoolhingcunsA- 
lalioa), end lympalliiiini- concern dii- 
played bjf the eicelleiit j:Ouiig no- 
roei>, flowed into her wounded ipiril like 
hatai ; and while lliej, ia )sb«qaent 
vliiti, led ber oil gradually Ip perceive 
(he idaiiiaiion of llii aaipel (o her D>in 
eii^enciei. at well at thana of h<ir child, 
she lolluwed tliaiu Mep hy step in 
Iheipirllof belicting acouieiceiice, undl 
ihe Aiund liertcif at the fqot of Ihe 
throne of grace, and her faith beheld the 
Sationr." 

Though Hie Author has not ae- 
kiiDwIedgei] bimaelf, we think wo 
hnvc met with him before, and shall 
have no objection to meet with him 
sgain. 



LITERARY INTELLIGENCE. 
Juti PttbJUhed. 

Providence and Grace iliuilriled, by 
nme Account or Ihe Life and Christian 
ilipericnce of Mra. Sarah Bakrr. In- 
ended cnieSy for Voune Periuns. 

Meoioir) til Carulino E. Smelt; willi 
. neat Engraving. 

Miicallaneoui Though 1 1 on Divine 
^Dbjecl); together wilb Eiltacli ftom 

me of the best religioui ADtJiuci, 

id tht Prei*. 

A Defence of the Bapiiata; or, the 

Bapliiiarfjf Bflieven by Imnieriion the 
'nly Bsptiiniuf the Clirltiian hiipeni*- 
ion : by George Gibba, Uiniilet of Ibe 
Saptiii Chutcb, Sl Cleraent'j, Notnich. 
A Volume of Sermona ■■ 00 Ihe Nature 
iind Effecla of Repentance nnd Faiih ;" 
irom the pen of Iho Rev. James Carlite, 
Minialer of the ScoU C\iwcbi Uufx 
ilbbej'iDttUm. 



210 



SFittelligence^ Sfc. 



CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. 



Estraet of a Litter frnm some f*f the New 
SetUert to their Poiior in En^and, 

Salem Toum, Mr. Craham*t Toun, 
Albany District, Jan, t, 18*21. 

To our ever dear and much honoured 
PaUor. 
This if a new districr, about 110 
miles in length, and from SO to 50 miles 
in breadth, inhabited chiefly by the 
English settlers. Bathnrst the capital, 
where we expect soon to have a land- 
roost, is very pleasantly situated, about 
95 miles from this place, and 10 from 
the sea. It at present chiefly consists 
of tents ; but they are erecting a large 
house fur the magistrates and other 
l^overnnent officers, and likewise there 
«re a few individuals, tradesmen, who 
have had hearths granted them, and 
are beginning to build. The place 
where our party is located is much 
preferable to many others: it is in 
tt valley, which in many places is half a 
mile iu width, and extends in leneth 
about six miles, a fine river running 
through it. We have each a certain 
portion of ground adjoinins the river, 
and can cultivate as far back as we like. 
The air is very salubrious, and we have 
reason to bless the Lord that we all en- 
joy a good state of health, notwithstand- 
ing we have been for some time lying in 
tents, and have been exposed to the 
heavy dews, and at times to very heavy 
rains, but particularly to the Intense 
heat of the sun, the scorching rays of 
which at this season would almost suffo- 
cate as had we no other covering than 
a tent. Our gardens have yielded us a 
pretty good supply of vegetables, but 
we have every reason to expect a much 
better crop in future, because from ex- 
perience we are become better acquaint- 
ed with the nature of the soils, the man- . 
ner of cultivating, the proper seasons ' 
for planting, sowing, &c. We were 
enabled to get about an acre each 
ploughed and sown with wheat; and 
till within this month there was every 
appearance of a fair crop : but we have 
Iwen disappointed in this, a blight (or 
what the Dntch farmers call the rust) 
Itavmg seized the corn, and instead of 
the ears fiiiiog there remaiaiog nothing 



but straw and chaff. This, we lament ■ * 
to say,- has been the ease through a 
grcMt part of the colony. It bas beca 
occasioned, many say. through the quack 
succession of very cold and heavy rains 
to the scorching heat of the sun. Bat 
adored and praised be the Lord, tliat 
not withstanding this disappointment,God 
still graciously provides for us, and we 
trust and believe he will. The govern- 
ment still continues to supply ui with 
rations, and we cannot sufficiently ac- 
knowledge the divine goodneaa in this 
respect, when we look back, nod eon- 
sider that we had no right to expect on 
our landing any further assistance from 
government. Had not tliis provision 
been made, in what a sitaation should 
we have been I Indeed it is impossible 
to describe the distress we might have 
been reduced to ; no market to go te, 
and exposed to the extorsive demands 
and uncertain supplies of the Datck 
farmers. 

Wc have been enabled to porcbaae a 
small stock of cattle, and have got more 
milk and bolter than we can conaame. 
We have likewise sheep, goats, pigs, 
and poultry. What reason then nave 
we for gratitude and thankfulness 1 
Sorely we can sav. Hitherto the Lord 
hath helped us. When we look back to 
the time whtrn we first caroe on board, 
and reflect on the fine voyage wc had, 
and on all the blessings we hnve re- 
ceived since then, we can say, Good- 
ness and mercy have followed us ; there* 
fore we will call upon our souls, and all 
that is within us, to bless his holy name. 
From the observations we have made 
on the conduct of iudividnaU in oor 
party, we can say generally, that the 
greatest part of titem seem to be very in- 
dustrious and content in their situations ; 
and it is a pleasing thing to remark, 
that many who led their native land in 
great poverty and distress, with linrdl/ 
a peni»y in their pvekets, have now get 
a cow or two, ond are already in a mea- 
sure become independent Many of the 
party liave been, and are employed, at 
Graham's Town, about fourteen miles 
from hence. They get good wages. 
Labourers about Ss. 6d. per day, and 
tradesmen frum 6i. to lOi. per day. 

From our local situation, being 50 or 
60 miles distant from the Caffres, and 
from SO to lOO from must of the Hot> 

\ 



INTBtUCENCB, &C. 



811 



ff ntots, and liJiewije not hamg yet 
learned the hngnagt , we hare oot bc«a 
able, as we fondly anticipated we •houldf 
to poiat tlioM pool beiubans* who are 
4Mri%hin| for lack af koowledgat to the 
Lamb ol God that laktlb away ilia sio9 
of the world ; but we truit a way will 
ere long be opened, whereby we may. 
Tile and unworthy as we are. be made 
the inscromtDts of cootribaliiif in some 
•eaiure to the salratiun of immortal 
eoal9» and to the glory of that Sa- 
viour who has done so much for ua. 



BAPTIST CHURCH AT NEWPORT, 
MONMOUTIiSHIR£. 



NxwPomT is situated on tlie river Usk, 
iftoat three miles from the Bristol Chan- 
eielt and it eminent for its commercial 
iniercoarse wiih various parts of this 
ttiwgdoai and Ireland. But the religious 
interest of Newport was ftliamefully neg- 
lected till of late years, with the eicep- 
tion of one pUee of woraliip belonging 
to the Independents. A few years ago 
other conneziont established their iute* 
rests in the town; and in the year 1807 
Messrs. J. Hier and J. Edmunds, minis- 
ten at Beihesda, three miles from New- 
port, comracaced preaching in tlie tuwu 
at the request of a few female friends, 
«rlio were members of the neighbouring 
cborches. They laboured under the 
ancoovenieney of an uncomfortable place 
4»f worship for several years, owing to 
4he increase oi hearers ; in conscqaence 
«f which t^y were necessitated to re- 
snoTe to three different places at differ- 
ent limes. The blessing of Ood evi- 
dently auended the ministry of the word 
4of life to the conversion of several indi- 
viduals, who became desirous of sub- 
milting to the authority of the King of 
iCion; consequently the ordinance of 
ibaptism was publicly administered b^ 
the Rev. James Edmunds in a conveni* 
•Bt place near the town, in the presence 
of a large concourse of people^ on March 
t^ 181S, since which time they have 
bad frequent additions to their number. 
The private room in which they met at 
that time being small and confined be- 
casie incommodious and uncomfortoble, 
which induced them to deliberate on the 
•ligibilit^ of erecting a convenient place 
^ worship^ which ai length they accom- 
plished, and it was opened for divine 
^rvice May 20, 1817. In the course 
€i this year the friends in the town were 
/ormed into a church of fifty-six mem- 
bers, and the Rev. i. Morris* of Pen- 

* Ml. Morris was ordnined at Fen* 



Deacons, 



rhywgocb in Caenparthentbire, settle^ 
over them oa a pastor the September 
foUoi^iog; since which time JQO meoio 
bers have bc^n added to the church : 
and in tite year 1819, January 1, the 
Rev. J. Harris was ordained as aa. aa* 
si^taut, together with five ileacc*iisu 

The expense which atrendc.d tbeerec* 
tion of the new roeet>ng.liouae« amount- 
ed to nearly «£850, which, by our exer- 
tion* the aid of a penny-a week Sdcieiy^ 
and the liberality of neighbouring geti- 
lie men and friends, we have reduced to 
^320, for the liquidation of which we 
feel ourselves necessitated to make a 
»till further appeal to public benevo* 
lence, hoping that the friends of the 
cause of Christ will favour our case with 
their wonted support when called upon. 

William Williams,' 
Daniel Tomu>b, 

JOUV FRANCIBa, 
JOBN RiCKETT, 

Signed, April 6, 1841, at our 
Church- mcetiug. 

Seciehf for the Relief of Aged mnd 
lujirm Bapliti Ministers, Insiihtied 
ai Bath, 1810. 

The Annual Meeting of this Society, 
will be held ot the Vestry of the Bap- 
tist Meeting, Somerset-streer, Bath, on 
Wednesday the 15th day of June next, 
at twelve o'clock. In the interim, the 
beneficiary members, annual subscribers, 

rhywgocb, July 19, 1810, and under 
the blessing of heaven on his labouxt 
there, the meeting-house soon became 
too small; an enlargement became ne- 
cessary, which was accomulished. He 
also has been the means of establishing 
four other churches in that neighbour- 
hood ; viz. SharofitSithin, Porthyrhtidt and 
Pontbrenduararaeth, and has bnptiecd 
upwards of SCO persons. At the last- 
mentioned place there was a Baptist 
cause established about the year 1797* 
when Mr. Morris was baptized in the 
eleventh year of his age. fiut after 
that the whole church (except Mr. M. 
his father, mother, brother, and sister, 
who became members at Cwmivor) 
turned Armmians, then Socinians, and 
after that came to nothing, fiut it is 
worthy of observation, that Mr. M. is 
the first who was baptized to commence 
the former church, and also the first 
who baptized in the same water at the 
commencement of the present churchy 
who meet in the same old bam that 
they formerly did, where there is a pul- 
pit and a few Mats. 



al2 



IKTELLIOBNCB, &C. 



and congTjegftioniy ''who are disposed to 
aid tbe fdnds of tliis Society by a collec- 
tion, are respectfully requested to pay 
their subscriptions and collectiontf to 
any member of the committee, who are 
desired to remit all sums received op 
account of the Society, to the secretary, 
the Rev. J. P. Porter, Bath. The com- 
mittee avail themselves of this occasion, 
to suggest to their brethren in the minis- 
try, who are members of this Society, 
that if each of ibem would make a collec- 
tion (either public or private) the aggre- 
{;ate, although tJie sums were individoal- 
y small, would be a valuable accession 
to the comforts of the aged or in6rm, as 
one half of such collections would be im- 
mediately divided among the claimants. 

The beneficiary members intitled to 
claim on the funds of this Society, those 
who claimed last year as well as others, 
are reminded that their' application 
MUST be in tbe hands of the secretary, 
on or before the ISth of May, or it can- 
not be attended to ; and those of them 
who retain the pastoral office, mast ad- 
company thefr application with a certifi- 
cate from their respective churches, that 
they retain 6uch o^ce, (notwithstanding 
their claim on this Society) with the 
consent of the majority of the members, 
present at a church meeting held by 
public notice, for the especial purpose 
of giving such certi6cate. 

%* The late Mrs. Smith, widow of 
Mr. John Smith, Deacon of th^ Baptist 
Church at Bath, has liberally bequeath- 
ed one hundred pounds to this Society. 

Baptist Ministers not yet enrolled as 
members of this Society, are respectfully 
reminded, that after the Slst of June 
next, they cannot be admitted to share 
its advantages. 



BRITISH INDIA SOCIETY. 



The Act 53 Geo. III. c. 1^5. declares, 
that ** it is the doty of this country to pro- 
mote the interest and happiness of the 
native inhabitants of the British domini- 
ons in India; and that such measures 
'ought to be adopted, as may tend to the 
introduction among them, of useful 
knowledge, and of religious and moral 
improvement." We are happy to hear 
that the natives themselves have co-op- 
erated with the servants of the East In- 
dja Company, &c. in founding schools 
and school-book Societies ; tind that at 
Calcutta they have instituted a Hindoo 
College, for '* the tuiiioii of the sons of 
respectable Hindoos in the English and 
Indian Languages, ftild in the literature 



and acience of Europe mad Am.^ Tbetv 
have been similar proceedings in Bom- 
bay and at Madras. 

In consequence of this intelligencei 
and of Mr. Ward's Letter an the Educa' 
turn of the Notivtt of Jadto* addressed to 
the Right Honourable J. C. Villiers» to* 
gether with Extracts from the Reports sf 
Native Schools established by the Seraa* 
pore Missionariest and very interesting 
Reports from tbe Native So€iatiea» a 
Meeting is to be held during the present 
month, at the Thatched House, St. 
James's- street, to form the above-named 
Society. A Subscription will be opened 
through Great Britain and Ireland. 
Subscribers of One Guinea per annuDt 
or of Ten Guineas, will be Members en- 
titled to vote ; and of Three Onineas per 
annum, or of Thirty Guineas, will be 
Governors. There will be Annual Meet- 
ings, a Patron, President, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Secretaries, a Treasarer,a Commit* 
tee, &c. 



HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



\ 



The sincere supplicants for the spread 
of Divine troth with its attendani 
blessings in the hitherto much neglected 
villages of our native isle, will rejoiee to 
hear, that the good cause of Home Mis- 
sions continues to widen, as it advances, 
and that through the operations of tita 
Baptist Itinerant and the Home Mis- 
sionary Societies, accompanied with tbe 
blessing of the Most High, many a mo- 
ral desert has begun to bloom and bear 
the rich produce of abundant fruit. In 
contemplation of the pleasing fact that 
the Christian public are beginning to re- 
member their kipsmen according to the 
flesh, we record whh pleasure, that a 
most numerous and respectable meeting 
was held on Wednesday tltO' 14th of 
Feb. 18S1, at the Fitsroy School- rooms 
of the North West London Auxiliary 
Home Missionary Society, at which the 
Rev. Rowland Hill presided ; several 
highly interesting appeals were made, 
by the Rev. Messrs.* Thorn, Cobbio; 
White, Humphreys. Thompson, Messrs. 
Moens, Gibson, T. Thompson, C. Hyatt, 
jnnr. and a liberal collection made. We 
trust that the gratification of recording 
similar efforts in behalf of the Baptist 
Missionary Society will shortly be mi- 
forded us, and that the noble amount oi 
e£70 raised in one year by an Aujtiliary 
Society for Home Missions, will no loa- 
ger be a solitary instance of domestic 
effort. 



IMTELLIOEIICS. 8CC. 



CIS 



-CIVIL ItIGHT9 OF DTSSENTXR.S. 

Ijut rfthtCnmmiltienf Dqiutici, oppnnt- 
ti Is pnlcd llie Civil Sigbli a/ the 
TTtrtt DaumiHalimu »f Prglctlonl Dil- 
mtm,]*' At Ytar IBJI. 

Inhn Chiii 



William Smiih.EK). 

W-l". Cfcairman. 
J. Guiteridee, Em]- 

Dtpnfif Chairman. 
Jame* doltiiu, £«!. 

Edward Baik, Esq. 
iann EulBile, Em). 
W.A.Hanliej,Ev). 
UaTid Be>an. E>^ 
JoKpU DannelliEtq. 
Joho Benilej, Eiq. 
■W. rurnrd. E.1}. 
Jarac) Gibion, Eii|> 



Fit me. Enq. 
R.Wai.ie»Tight.E(<l 



T. Wood. Esq. 
W. Maiitoii. Eiq. 

loard, Esq. 

G. KamiiKiiidi £sq. 

B. V. Willi, Eiq. 

Wioler, Eiq. 

J. Benwell, Esq. 



ASSOCIATIONS. 

NokTBAMrTONiuiai, 34 Charchei. 
Anubf. Jaiuei; Blah;, B. Etuis; 
BiauDnaDi Noiman) Bogbrouk, Wheel. 
pt \ BDrlon-opon-Trenri ' * ; BrAjbrook, 
Ajer; Clipnone. Hack; CuNm|ham, 
Slichoti; Dunstable, ADderwn; Llerbj-, 
Bkt ; Fennj Stialford, Crodge ; Puilon, 
BorWn; Gretioii, • •; Guiliborough, 
••l Hacklelon. KoDvlei; Kiillchiig, 
J. K. Hall; Lofcoe, S-aine; Lilian, 
Dime I ; LoDtihboroaKh, Capes; Lin- 
coln. Daiias; Uunllan. Wtieeleii N««' 
■rk, Pcrkioi; Notiinghaip, Jarman { 
' lli,rll>a«pl<»a, Sluodell % Oakliam, • ■ | 
Olacyi Simmani ; Hold, Heighton| 
5be«p«hcad, Peieti; Southwell, Mnuun ; 
Si. Albaiu, ■ *i So lion- in -the- El mi, 
'Bordiiti SDlton in AihficJd, **iSwin' 
wkk, Fkicher) Walgrave, ••. PSB 
Uembera. Clear IncreairrW Noilhanip. 
lao, Maj «»— 8S. " . - 



Ctudge. 

Duiel, Hall (J. K.). Hcighion. Jamei 
(PialiB ci»ti. »), Jarman (Hcb. ill. 
14), Millar, Nichuli, Preilaiid, Sim. 
Boni (f CbTon. li. IB). Subject oflb* 
prcalar Leller, The Efficacy of Praicr 
The neat AHOcittlon ii to be held at 
^elteiing, June IS. 13, IHl. 



NEW CHAPELS OPENED. 

NAPTON, SOUTHAM. 

On Wedeadaj.NoT. IJ. IBSO. a pUU 

nd neat placa ef noiihip, of the Bap- 

tiK dCDoAination, naa opened ai Nap- 

tw.s populotn TiUag*, about iliicc miles 



from SoBiham, m WtntiekiUra. Rev. 
Meaiti. Franklin of Cofenlrj, Grifiiha 
uf Long-Buckbj, and Botlomle; of Uid- 
dleton, preached upon ibe occaiioo. 
Tbe lerrieei were nail an ended, and 
there appeari to b* a pleating proipeM 
uf uiefnlneii in that long uaglecled part 
(if the coontj. 

♦ 

STEEfLAKE, 
Sowiaar, Hiaa HaLivaz. 
Oh TTmndaj, March 15, IStl. a DC* 
Sapiiu Chapel miopeiled aisteeplane, 
10 A. M. Mr. Blann ofSfaipte;, former, 
ly 111* pastor of Ihe church meeling ia 
ihii place, read, prayed, and preached, 
from « Cor. liii. h. Dr. Slcadman of 
Biadford. preached also (rom Iia. lii. 7. 
•nd concluded. Half-patt t. P. H. U^ 
Halton (Independent Miniiler at Soweii- 
I>T Sprayed ; and Mt.Cackin(ladepen dent 
Uiuisler at Halifax), preached from 
Dan. ii. 44, and concluded. £<enlng, 
llaif'pait 6, Mr. Jackton of Hebdeik 
bridge, piajred ; and Mr. Djer nf Bacup 
(iteachEd fcom Phil. iii. B, and con. 
eluded. The colleclions toward! liqaid< 
aliug the debt amounted lo,/34 16i. eJ. 
rill.' old cbopcl Bl Sleeplana bad not 
bren built abore leTenly jeori, but 
built to rer; illghlly, as to 
■ te very dangeroas when 
lie. The present is a food 
ilding, 4t feet by 33 in- 
itde i and has coil about ^600, much of 
which i) atteady paid. In (be year 
lB14a poor girl, who was then bat quite 



Hveje 



It pairs. 



rail 



lier balf.prnnies for that abjecl, and had 
faied 3(. W. for ihe new chapel by ibe 
time its crec'ton cummenced. Tlie iu. 
leieit bete ii in a ih living ilate. 



BATTLE, SUSSEX. 
Om Tuesday, February «. 1B31, i^ 
new Meeiingbnase, called 'Lwa Cbapel. 
belonging lo the Ba|iiiit dc nominal ion, 
wat opened for public worihip. In tl|» 
morning Ihe Bct. Mr. Iviiuey of Lon- 
don read and praved ; the Ret. Mr. 

Sliirle "• " ■ ' - 

Fa. CI 

afteinoon ll'e lUr. Mr. Vress (Indj^ 
pendenl)oIIIeallilietd read and prayed; 
(ha Ac*. Mr. Iviraey ot London preach- 
ed from P>. ixvii. 4 ; and the Iter. Mr. 
Tidd of Wadhunt cunrludcd in prayer. 
In Ihe eienwK the Re*. Mr. Di>ia(lnde- 
peodcni) of Haatin^* '**'^ ^^ V^l^'^'i 



206 



REVIEW* 



the midst of past nges, it awikens 
all the fryinpathies of his mrnd : he 
cannot help feeling interested, bat 
is irresistibly, yet insensibly drawn 
into pensrvc or pleasing rejections. 
From the history of that which is 
past, he derives instruction for the 
future; and fan is enlightened on 
many moral, intellectnal, and politi- 
cal sabjects, in a manner that he 
conid not be from any other auarter. 

We have volumes of nistory, 
which contain the wealth of the 
most powerful and cultivated minds. 
TVe can point to ponderous tomes, 
which exhibit great intellectual 
strength; which present a view of 
events, in connexion with their 
causes and consequences; and 
which display, in elegant language, 
wonderful depth of thought, and pa- 
tience of research. If wc thought 
the sons of pleasure and dissipation 
would listen to our voice, we would 
exhort them to become readers of 
'history. In this study they would 
participate of pleasure, without a 
degradation of their nature ; since it 
would impart to them purity of taste, 
and manly habits, and would give 
them at once a feast of pleasure and 
instruction. 

It is, however, much to be re- 
gretted, that our most fascinating 
and popular hi&torians have been the 
abettors of infidelity, and have ap- 
peared in the front ranks of the ene- 
mies of our holy religion. It cannot 
be sufficiently deplored, that histo- 
rians possessed of erudition, taste, 
strength of reason in other respects, 
and fine powers of imagination, 
have defiled their works with tlio 
most wicked principles, and with 
sneers at the sacred volume. Who 
can read the histories of Hume and 
Gibbon, without lamenting that 
men of such talents should employ 
them to so vile and despicable a 
purpose? 

Histories tainted with infidel 
principles, are adaptcil to do incal- 
eulable injury to society, to morals, 
mad to the eternal interests of man- 
kind ; and wo roust say that we 
tremble when we see such works 
put into the hands of youth. Not 
(eing fumislied with arguments in 
defence of Christianity, they arc nn- 
mbh to 4i^tm tJie diffoc^Aoe be- 



tween sopMstry and legitioMte 
soning, — between deceit mm! Iio^ 
nesty ; and they do net know tew 
to detect the latent poison wMcliii 
administered in works &i X\m de^ 
scription. It is manifest, t h c re tore^ 
that such prodnoCions must tend to 
the ruin of youth. 

Wc have long wished to see • 
good history written by a person 
like the author of this work ; that is 
to say, possessing evangelical prin- 
ciples, an enlightened understand- 
ing, and a correct judgment. 

In this fourth yoJumc we find Bfr. 
Morell deriving his materials from 
the best authorities, detailing oyents 
in an interesting manner, displaying 
liberality upon delicate topics, and 
inculcating lessons of wisdom and 
piety. 

One great excellence of our 
author's work is, that he supplies 
valuable reflections upon tbe varioos 
periods and events described fan hb 
history; reflections which do ho- 
nour to his head and heart» and 
which cannot fail to instrnctand im* 
press the reader. We have indeed 
found in this volume some trifling 
errors; but these, we have no doubt, 
will be corrected in the next edition. 
We do not always agree in opinion 
with our author, but he has a right 
to form his own opinions. 

We feel it our dniy to say, that 
Mr. Morell's Studies in History 
is an invaluable work for the rising 
generation, and may be read to 
great advantage by persons of a 
more mature age. Into boarding- 
schools, especially, wc shat! ba 
glad to hear that it is unli-ersatly 
introduced. We have not a 
doubt of its becoming a standard 
work, and that it will prove a blesa* 
ing to future generations. 



' 



ifcmoirs of the Life and Wriiitigf^ 
diid Religious Connexions, of JoAn 
Owen, D, D. By WiUiam Omu. 

Mr. riarkson, who preached the 
funeral sermon for Dr. Owen, ob- 
served, " that the account which is 
due to the world, of this eminent 
man, doam^^d n volume. Cotton 



RBVlBVr* 



e07 



Iftther, in that singnlai* work, 
Mugnalia Americana Christi,' 
ablished twenty years afterwards, 
eclared, * that the church of G<m1 
ras wronged, in that the life of the 
ireat John Owen whs not written.' " 
Yet the firsthand the only account 
f hint which can he depended on. 
8 Mr. Orme informs us, appeared 
bout twenly years after that, pro- 
sed to the folio editioaof his scr- 
lOOs and tracts ; but it is both in- 
courate and imperfect, and does 
ot contain so many paf(es as the 
loctor had written hooks. When, 
owcver, the le«irning: and lahours 
f Dr. Owen, ainl the times in which 
• Hved, are eouKidored, no one will 
iMTvel that the present writer has 
bought it proper, to devote a sepa- 
ate work to the life of so good, so 
veaty and so nsefnl a man. Our 
nthor mast have UKcd great and 
lOnevering labour in collecting ma- 
eriala for this vrork; and he has 
crtaioly succec^led in giving us 
if emoirs of Dr. Owen, of con»ider- 
ble Tfthie. Their ort'^in he thus. 
epresests: — *^ The ploasurc derived 
ron bis writings, led me, a few years 
fo, merely for my o\»n satisfaction, 
o make some inquiry respecting 
heir author. Not finding mucIi an 
cooont as satisfied aie, 1 began to 
kink that a careful examination of 
118 namerous works, and of the con- 
emporanoons productions of his 
ipe, might enable me to afford a 
ullcf and more correct view of him, 
luU had yet heen given.*' Besides 
ireaonting, in the character, con- 
Inot, and labours of a learned and 
laefal servant of God, an example 
*f the highest wortb, the present 
olnme affords not a little very im- 
lortant information concerning the 
ventful time in which Owen lived. 
Lnd, as it apj)ears to us, it is no 
Boaa part of its value thaVii enables 
IS to refute infidel and clerical, aiid 
re may add, interested or malignant 
buiders, which have been often and 
boudantJy cast on the Puritans and 
foDconformists ; men, generally, of 
rhom no one has ever spoken evil, 
rithoat Justifying the belief that his 
nlbrmation was partial, his preju- 
loes tyrannical, or his heart un- 

What maD^ who in the least un- 



derstands hmoan nature, would ex- 
pect aaantfaor, so frigid, selfish, and 
perfectly sceptical, as Hume, to 
write one word of truth, when 
recording the actions of persons 
animated with love to God, and who 
were ever willing to sacrifice all 
that is valuable in this woild, so 
that they might obey the divine 
law, and benefit the human race? 
Nor will it in the ieajtt surprise us, 
that interested priests should labour 
in a Satauical vocation, by accusing 
their '* holy brethren,^' who wcro 
** partakers of the heavenly calling/' 
But while no wise, reflecting, and 
impartial person would be in much 
danger of crediting the preachers 
and writers to whom we have al- 
luded, it is of importance to be 
able to oppose facts to their calum- 
nies ; a pleasure which the reader of 
the work before us will richly 
enjoy. He will find much too, that 
will amply repay his attention to 
these Memoirs, on the nature, prio- 
ciplea, aud iuestimable importance 
of religious liberty ; without which 
freedom, man exists in a cheerless 
wild, not abounding* with food nor 
wells of water, but with toads and 
serpents and savages. Religious 
liberty conduces to the planting of 
another Eden, in which the trees of 
righteousness grow, which the dews 
of heaven refresh, and on whinh tho 
sun splendidly shines ; and he who 
rises from the attentive |icrusal of 
Mr. Orme's book, without under- 
standing it better, or vaiuing it 
more — unless in relation to tliig ob- 
ject his knowledge is extensive, and 
his heart already just — must have a 
powerless understanding, or an un- 
generous nature. 

The theological sentiments of our 
author we regard as scriptural; 
and there are such clear, frequent, 
and useful representations of evan- 
gelical truth in his work, as greatly 
enhance its importance. 

W^e think he is not wanting in 
attachment to his own donoinin:i- 
tion; but it would he unjust to re- 
fuse him the praise of uniformly 
writing as we should expect him to 
do who possesses sound piety, ge- 
nerous sentiments, and honest seal, 
ou suljjects of high aad uuvs^xv^iK 
imporlauce. 

1L« 



Mor* Miner MorgUi vf «a Intro- 
dutlioa to tht Wattr Fanuli/ : 
with AvM Elttmor'i StarJet I'n- 

Tkb writer of tliis hislitj enter- 
tninin; aud nseful volume, intro- 
daccs it witb a Biodnt jirerace, 
froro which the followiiig; extract ia 
taken: 

" If, on Ihe whole, tile criljo iboold 
nnt be diiplcBicil with thii G>ut od 
Uinor Mo»li, il »lll becanlbaed; but 
if, on the csntrarj, Ihe; ihould frawD 
■I il, Ihc vriler will not roecjl (be cha- 
luler or arrogant obtroiireneM ; aad 
their aequainlance willi Aant Eleanor 
■Dd Ihe Winter Family will terminals 
like thai of mauj oilier people, with 
tbeir firit iniroduciion (o each other." 

In such a world ss this, we are 
alwajiB happy to meet with (hoK 
whu arc vrcll inrormed and cdmma- 
nicativc, as well as brnevoleat apd 
pioui; and it is on this accouDt its 
well ai bee an so wc are coQccmed 
Tor (he benefit of others, that wo 
very much desire ■ farther acquaint- 
ance with Aunt Eleanor and the 
Winter Fainil;; to whom, while 
Ihej remain unchanged, we shall be 
Ktoatly to blame if we do not intro- 
duce all onr jouthful friends. 

*♦*-■- 
Eight Leetwrtt oa the CArirtian Sab- 
bath; by WiUiam Tkom, Minitler 
of tit Gotpel at Penrith, Citmber- 
fan^— Second Edition, enlar^, 
London, 1821. 

There lectures embrace all the 
topics connected with the " Spe- 
cialitj. Authority, and Sanctity nf 
Ihe Christian Sabhalb;" — the " pro- 
fanatiau of Ihe Lord's-day by the 
nation in j^eueral, and by inilivi- 
dnals inparficnlar;"— the" non-nd- 
vautage and evil consequences 
of Sabbath-breaking ;" — and Ihv 
" Means and Motives for the better 
observance of the Lord'a-day." It 
is upon the whole a well cxecntod i 
performance, and may bo rea'd with 
pleasure and advantage. The design 
ofthc Author in printing it, is singu- 
larly ingenious, and alTurds another 
proof of the various ways in whinh 
the " liberal dcviselh liberal things." 
JBy no Advertisement wo find thai 
"tlir pmfitt itriuag from liio" sale ot 
i/icfc li-vUitOK, iriU |» apinoprintpil 



lowarda the Miction or a n«w place 
of worship at Penrith, the town 
where they were first dolirered." 
We cordially with snccesi may at- 
tend Ibo Anther's personal applica- 
tions for the purpose of selling hit 
work, toaccompRth so important an 
object in that dark pact of the 
kingdom. 



Sundm^ School SketeKu; « JfeMoir 

deteriptiee of lie btnigii Optratioa 

ofthiMe ImtittUioiu, 2a, 

The institution of Sanday Sohoolf 

forms a most important epoch in the 

history of (be church. The bearing 

which they have on its intereatt wat 

in tome degree seen by their early 

promoton; but it is in tbeir hbtoiy 

alone that wo can fnlly trace (bdr 

real tendency. We ha*e known iiH 

stances of individual o 



the Sunday Sohool. 
teachori from among the i 
for a new set of learoera, and the 
germ of ministerial talent bat Gnt 
discovered itself iu the rude effiNl* 
which arc sometimea made to convey 
divine tmth to (he young and ig« 
noranl mind. Several of tfaoae seal- 
ousand excellent men, loo, who are 
now raising the Redeemer's alaml- 
ard in the region! of idolatry mid 
superstition, have first fanned (be 
fiame of tbeir holy ardour in the en- 
gaKoments of the Village Sunday 
School. It may, however, be tbooght 
by some peiw>ns that too muob ii 
said reapecting^ Ibeie InsliUitioai, 
and lliat they are appreciated much 
too highly. That they povaeM a 
value, it is allowed; but that valne 
it by no mcana eqnal to what ia at- 
taclit'il to them bj their active 
friends anil suppprtcra. Tbia, how- 
ever, is n(^ the opinion of the nHlhor 
of this little volume. 

" I sni far from believtng,* saji hr, 
" Iliat Ihe ulilily nf Sundi; Sehooti bai 

ather, that one reason why the^ 



riMn higher 






Id public opinion. Tbeie will ever b« 
in prapoilinn to one another. If Chris* 
tian) in general were awaie uf (he anap- 
prednble advantages for uiefolneii, 
wti't<:Vi\>e\im^ Xu \\« afice of a Stinday 



wti't<:Vi\>e\ima Xu \\« afice a 
Si:\»Oo\ tendiw. ^>4mW>! 



t-lTERAaT IMTELLIUSHCE. 



sog 



iliGcd ■ 



.lutUc i 



Sich 111! 

It; and If n luflicicDl nnnbi^r ul sneli 
■chcr* weie (ound. ever eager tu olTer 
enitel<ei (o ihe office, (heilthecbaiac- 
n at tbme cicclleDi Iniiiiutioui wouJH 
iprove. aati the tra« print of buccp» 
' luldlj uiaiDCd." 
" In Te*l inipoTlance Suiidav gchnol 
siitutiunt cUiia ■ place aecoiid Id imTii: 
.tta the public ininittrj." Pp. ^,81. 
Thatlheie icntiineDts brLve liccn 
i«ngtbenecl by tlie conteniphilinn 
lira characters ikelclied in tlik 
(emiur, wc tbiok is very prcjli^iiilc. 
itia doicriptive of the kui^^u npc- 
ihit of thoie Inititutions. 'I'Iil- 
Mneteri ve, tUo {^iimlay Snhnal 
>j (who b soppaxed to be the « ' 
rof I he narrative) aud girl, tli 
iranis aad tencbcrs. They are 
Aeni well delineated, ai-id w 
' them hij^hlj ileierTe iiiiilalj 
he book i> indeed irritten .-illi>; 
■r in a Tcry enj^aging mnniiri , a 
highly calculated to inlercat \\i 
braietl joung persons. There : 
veral parti which, if the ipnre 
Ited In this work would alluw, vc 
Duldreadiry extract; bnttvoi 
■ conlenteil to refer the romli 
B work itwir. Wo must, tun, 
JKWia wilb the rDtlowing acci 
ifie writer's retrnRpccL 

" Since the [inie of raj oaillln:; 



Ih! 



d long . 



,ugh „ 



ilegril; of ihc priiicipli 
Wd el ichoDl, put «) llie teit of mm,-,- 
>b; aiul la profe, bjr ni; oivn cipi'- 
BCe, Ihit the; alFard, bulb in prus- 
■Hj aod adieriiij, a certniii ami n 
•djiupport. AnJ if, ■> will ei^-v he 

itt, {His the ctinduclor vWiih ^,- 
ct for the greater lecutily Dt nn cdi- 
been tlie mean) of altficiiug lo- 
rds me an angry cloud, (htt luigtit 
•rwise bsKE paued oier, t have iini- 
aij fuand ihen, t* well as in ilioie 
n» nhich mult befal, whclbei nv are 
pared for Ibeia ur not, my rcli<{iour 
iciplci (to carry on Iho aUuiiDn) hatr. 
• the ufeguard aflbe building." 
Tohave above, antlwelhini; justly, 
ircued senlimeRtsof appr'iltnti-iii 
lU* agreeable lilllo work; lutwr- 
Hurt, in justice to fhe public. 



[ cloK without stating onrdiinppnint- 
j incnt at the Jonse »nd indistiact 
manner in which some of the doc- 
I Irines of the gospel arc exhibited. 
. Tliat so pious a writer as Ibe prvsont 
appciirs lo be, rIiouIU have stated tlio 
ciinverqioQ of the molhor, for in- 
stance, in tbo way lie has, can only 
be accounted for on the luppoution 
of his having imitated the pnliafacd. 
but weak, and we bad almost said 
clfeniinato, style of some modem 
ivorksof imagiaatioD. 

" How iDCh altenlioni (of the teicb- 
er>) ofti^n repealed, and accunpanied, at 
ibey Here, wiLh tnanj icli of kindiieaa, 
iiKi^t have operated on my nuiihei'g 
miui), it ii DeedloM la relate. I'hey 
won her heart; thry eicilcl in lier 
ihe utmoit gntitude ; Ihe nalhing cudM' 
lalioni, and sympatliistng concern dii- 
plajred by Ihe excellent joung wo- 
mtii. Bowed Into Jier wounded ipirit like 
balm ; and while they, in subsequent 
Tiiiti, led her on gndoally tp perceiTs 
Ihe adapiailon of Ihe Boipel to her oin 
eiigenciei, ii well at tboM of hur child, 
>)ie lallaned them Hep by itep in 
Ihoipiritof beliciingacnuiejcuncr, unlit 
the haoi heiicif at llie fqol of tha 
ihioiie of grace, and her faitli beheld tlie 
Sa»iour." 

Though the Author has not ac- 
knowledged liimsetr, we think we 
linTc met with liim befon), and iihall 
liavc no objection to meet with him 
again. 



LITERARY INTELLIGENCJi:. 

Juit PttbVuhed. 

Trovidence and Urace illuitraled, by 
tome Account of the Life and Chriiiian 
Gipericnee of Mr>. Sarah Baker. In- 
tended cniefly for Youni! Persons. 

Memoinnl Caroline E. Sfaelt; wilb 
1 neat Engra.ing. 

Miscollanenui Thougbti on DiTina 
^abjecti; logeiher wUh Eilracti from 
some of ibe betl religioui ADihurs. 

In Ihe Prat. 

A Defence of the Bapiisti; or, Ibe 
0spIuBiri>r Belieren by Ininieiiion (lie 
mly Bapliiuuf ihe CUiinian Dispema- 
inn : by George Gibbi, Mintilcr of Ihe 
aaptiitCborcfa. St. Ctemeni'i. Norwich. 

A Volume of Sermons " on Ihe Nature 
ind EOecti of Repentance and Faith ;" 
rom Ih< pen of Ibe Rev. Jamei Carlile. 
Uiniiler of ihe SvM CkLWtfa, Um-iTx 

\bbe^,DabUa. 



210 



SFiitelUgence* Sfc. 



CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. 



Estratt of a LeiUrfrnm some rf the New 
SetUert to their Potior in En^and, 

Salem Toton, Mr, Craham't Toun, 
Albany District, Jan. 2, 18^1. 

To our ever dear and much honoured 
PaUor. 
This is a new districr, about 110 
miles in length, and from SO to 50 miles 
in breadth, inhabited chiefly by the 
English settlers. Bathurst the capital, 
where we expect soon to have a laud- 
roost, is very pleasantly situated, about 
95 miles from this place, and 10 from 
the sea. It at present chiefly consists 
of tents ; but they are erecting a large 
house fur the magistrates and other 
l^overnment officers, and likewise there 
mre a few individuals, tradesmen, who 
have had hearths granted them, and 
are beginning to build. The place 
where our party is located is much 
preferable to many others: it is in 
tt valley, which in many places is half a 
mile in width, and extends in length 
about six miles, a fine river running 
through it. We have each a certain 
portion of ground adjoinins the river, 
and can cultivate as far back as we like. 
The air is very salubrious, and we have 
reason to bless the Lord that we all en- 
joy a good state of health, notwithstand- 
ing we have been for some time lying in 
tents, and have been exposed to the 
heavy dews, and at times to very heavy 
rains, but particularly to the intense 
heat of the sun, the scorching rays of 
which at this season would almost suffo- 
cate as had we no other covering than 
a tent. Our gardens have yielded us a 
pretty good supply of vegetables, but 
we have every reason to expect a much 
better crop In future, because from ex- 
perience we are become better acquaint- 
ed witli the nature of the soils, the man- 
ner of cultivating, the proper seasons 
for planting, sowing, &c We were 
enabled to get about an acre each 
ploughed and sown with wheat; and 
till within this month there was every 
appearance of a fair crop : but we have 
Iwen disappointed in this, a blight (or 
what the Dotch farmers call the rust) 
liaving seized the corn, and instead of 
t^ ears fiiliog tliere remaiaiog nothing 



c 

1 



but straw and chaff. This, we lament 
to say,- has been the ease through a 
great part of the colony. It bas bees 
occasioned, many say, through the qvkk 
succ^siou of very cold and heavy rains 
to the scorching heat of the sun. Bat 
adoied and praised be the Lord, tliat 
notwithstanding this disappointment,God 
still graciously provides for at, and we 
trust and believe he will. The govern- 
ment still continues to supply as with 
rations, and we cannot sufllaently ac- 
knowledge the divine goodness in this 
respect, when we look back, and con- 
sider that we had no right to expect on 
our landing any further assistance from 
government. Had not tliis provision 
been made, in what a sitaation should 
we have been I Indeed it is impossible 
to describe the distress we might have 
been reduced to ; no market to go te, 
and exposed to the extorsive demands 
and uncertain supplies of the Datck 
farmers. 

We have been enabled to porcbaae a 
small stock of cattle, and have got MMre 
milk and bolter than we can consaaae. 
We have likewise sheep, goats, pigit 
and poultry. What reason tiken nave 
we for gratitude and thankfulness 1 
Sarely we can sav. Hitherto the Lord 
hath helped us. When we look back to 
the time whtrn we first caroe on board, 
and reflect on the fine voyage wc had, 
and on all the blessings we have re- 
ceived since then, we can say. Good- 
ness and mercy have followed us; there- 
fore we will call upon our souls, aad all 
that Is within us, to bless his holy name. 
From the observations we have oaade 
on the conduct of iudividoaU in our 
party, we can say generally, that the 
greatest part of tliem seem to be very in- 
dustrious and content in their situations ; 
and it is a pleasing thing to ramark, 
that many who left their native land ia 
great poverty and distress, with bard^ 
a penny in their pockets, have now got 
a cow or two, and are already in a mea- 
sure become independent. Many of the 
party liave been, and are ampluyed, at 
Graham's Town, about fourteen miles 
from hence. They get good wages. 
Labourers about 3f. 6d. per day, and 
tradesmen from 6i. to lOi. per day. 

From our local sitoatioot being 50 or 
60 miles distant from the Caffres, and 
from SO to 100 from must of the Hoe> 



\ 



INTBLLICENCB, &C. 



811 



ff citoti, tnd likewjje not htTiiig yet 
learned the Jangaagtf we have uot beea 
able, as we fondJy anticipated we •houldf 
to point tlioM poor beaibeiit» who are 
perhhing for lack ef koowledgc* to the 
Lamb ot' God that taktth away the sins 
of the world; but we trust a waj will 
tie long be opened* whereby «e may, 
▼ile and unworthy as we are. be made 
the iniCromcntt of contributing in some 
Meaaure to the Mlvaliun of iamorraJ 
•oulsy and to the glory uf that Sa- 
viour who has done so niucli for us^ 



BAPTIST CHURCH AT NEWPORT, 
MONMOUTIiSHIRE. 



Newport is situated on the river Usk, 
■boat three miles fros the Bristol Chaii- 
«elt and is eminent for its commercial 
iniercoorsc with various parts of this 
tiingdoni and Ireland. But the rcli^^ious 
interest of Newport was »hameruUy neg- 
iccted till of late years, with the eicep- 
tion of one plaee of worsliip belonging 
to the Independents. A few years ago 
otber connexions established their inte- 
rests in the town; and in the 3'ear 1807 
Messrs. J. Hier and J. Edrouniis, minis- 
ters at Beihesda, three miles from New- 
|>on» conmcnced preaching in the luwn 
nt the request of a few female friends, 
«rlio were members of the neighbouring 
«burches. They laboured under the 
snconvenieney of an uncomfortable place 
4»f worship for several years, owing to 
the increase el hearers ; in con&cqtiCDce 
of which t^y were necessitated to re- 
oiove to three different places at differ- 
ent times. The t»lc?ssing of Ood evi- 
dently aUended the ministry of the word 
4>f life to the conversion ot several indi- 
iriduuls, who became desirous of sub- 
milting to the authority of the King of 
if ion; ronscquenily the ordinance of 
teptism was publicly administered by 
the Rev. James £dmunds in a conveni- 
ent place near the town, in the presence 
of a large concourse of people^ on March 
i4b 1813, since which time they have 
bad frequent additions to their number. 
The private room in which they met at 
that time being small and confined be- 
came incommodious and uncomfortable, 
which induced them to deliberate on the 
eligibility of erecting a convenient place 
•f worship^ which at length they accom- 
plished, and it was opened for divine 
service May 20, 1817. In the course 
of this year the friends in the town were 
formed iiiio a church of fifiy-tix mem- 
bersp and the Rev. i. Morris* of Pen- 

* Ml. Morris was ordained at Fen* 



Deacons, 



rhywgoch in Caenparthenihire. settled 
over them as a pastor the September 
following; since which time JQO inei»- 
bers have bern added to the church : 
and in the year 1819, January X, ib« 
Kev. J. Harris was ordainctd as aa aa* 
sisiaut, together with five deacons. 

The cipense which atrendcd ibe erec- 
tion of the new meet>ng.liouse, amount- 
ed to nearly «£850, which, by our exer- 
iiao« the aid of a penny-a week Sdcieiy^ 
and the liberality of ocighbooring gen. 
lie men and friends, we have reduced to 
J,$SOm for the liquidation of which we 
fiel ourselves necessitated to make • 
»lill further appeal to public benevo^ 
lence, hoping that the friends of the 
cause of Christ will favour our case witb 
their wonted support when called upon. 

William Williams/ 
Daniel ToMuts, 
JouK Francibs« 

JOBN RiCKETT, 

Signed, April 6, 18)21, at our 
Church-mtetiug. 

Society for the Relief of Aged rnnd 
lujirm Baptist Ministers, Instituted 
at Bath, 1810. 

The Annual Meeting of this Society, 
will be held ot the Vestry of the Bap- 
tist Meetings Somerset-street, Bath, on 
Wednesday the 15th day of June next, 
at twelve o'clock. In the interim, the 
benrficiary members, annual subscribers, 

rhywgoch, July 19, 1810, and under 
the blessing of heaven on his labouit 
there, the meeting-house soon became 
too small; an enlargement became ne- 
cessary, which was accomulished. He 
also has been the means of establishing 
four other churches in that neighbour- 
hood ', viz. SharoUtSitkin, Porthyrhtfd, and 
Pontbrenduararaeth, and has buptiKcd 
upwsrds of 200 persons. At ihe last- 
mentioned place there was a Bapti»t 
cause established about the year 1797* 
when Mr. Morris was baptized in the 
eleventh year of his age. But after 
that the whole church (except Mr. M. 
his father, mother, brother, and sister, 
who became members at Cwmivor) 
turned Arminians, then Socinians, and 
after that came to nothing. But it is 
worthy of observation, that Mr. M. is 
the first who was baptized to commence 
the former church, and also the first 
who baptised in the same water at the 
commencement of the present churchy 
who meet in the same old bam that 
they formerly did, where there is a pul- 
pit and a few Mats. 



ai2 



IKTELUOBNCB, &C. 



and congregftionff 'who are disposed to 
aid the fonds of tliis Society by a collec- 
tion, are respectfnlly requested to pay 
their subscriptions and collection^ to 
any member of the committee, who are 
desired to remit all suras received op 
account of the Society, to the secretary, 
the Rev. J. P. Porter, Bath. The com- 
mittee avail themselves of this occasion, 
to suggest to their brethren in the minis- 
try, who are members of this Society, 
that if each of them would make a collec- 
tion (either public or private) the aggre- 
gate, althouih the sums were individual- 
ly small, would be a valuable accession 
to the comforts of the aged or infirm, as 
one half of such collections would be im- 
mediately divided among the claimants. 

The beneliciary members intitted to 
claim on the funds of this Society, those 
who claimed last year as well as others, 
are reminded that their' ap4)lication 
MUST be in the hands of the secretary, 
on or before the 13th of May, or it can- 
not be attended to ; and those of them 
who retain the pastoral office, mast ad- 
corapany tiierr application with a certifi- 
cate from their respective churches, that 
they retain such o$ce, (notwithstanding 
their claim on this Society) with the 
consent of the majority of the members, 
present at a church meeting held by 
public notice, for the especial purpose 
of giving such certificate. 

%• The late Mrs. Smith, widow of 
Mr. John Smith, Deacon of thd Baptist 
Church at Bath, has liberally bequeath- 
ed one hundred pounds to this Society. 

Baptist Ministers not yet enrolled as 
members of this Society, are respectfully 
reminded, that after the 21st of June 
next, they cannot be admitted to share 
its advantages. 



BRITISH INDIA SOCIETY. 



Thb Act 53 Geo. III. c. 1^.5. declares, 
that " it is the duty of this country to pro- 
mote the interest and happiness of the 
native inhabitants of the ]3ritish domini- 
ons in India j and that such measures 
'ought to be adopted, as may tend to the 
introduction among them, of useful 
knowledge, and of religious and moral 
improvement." We are happy to hear 
that the natives themselves have co-op- 
erated with the servants of the East In- 
dia Company, &c. in founding schools 
and school'book Societies ; bnd that at 
Calcoha they have instituted a Hindoo 
College, for ** the tuition of the sons of 
respectable Hindoos in the English and 
Indian Langnages, ftiid in the literature 



and jcieuce of Europe and Aais.* . Thn* 
have been similar proceedings in Boia- 
bay and at Madrai. 

In consequence of th'ts intelligenoei 
and of Mr. Ward's Leiler on the Edm<»- 
turn of the Nativti of ladio* addressed to 
the Right Honourable J. C. ViUiers» to- 
gether with EsimcU from the ReptrtM tf 
Native Schools established by the Seraa* 
pore Misiionaries* and very interesting 
Reporti from the Native SocieCie% a 
Meeting is to be held during the present 
month, at the Thatched House, St. 
James's- street, to form the above-named 
Society. A Subscription will be opened 
through Great Britain and Ireland. 
Subscribers of One Goinea per annom* 
or of Ten Guineas, will be Members en- 
titled to vote ; and of Three Guineas per 
annum, or of Thirty Gaineas. will bt 
Governors. There will be Annual Meet- 
ings, a Patron, President, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Secretaries, a Treasarer«a Commit* 
tee, &c. 



HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETT. 



The sincere supplicants for the spread 
of Divine truth with its attendant 
blessings in the hitherto much neglected 
villages of our native isle, will rejoiee to 
hear, that the good cause of Hone Mis- 
sions continues to widen, as it advances, 
and that through the operations of the 
Baptist Itinerant and the Home Mis- 
sionary Societies, accompanied with tbe 
blessing of the Most High, many a mo- 
ral desert hns begun to bloom and bear 
tbe rich produce of abundant fruit. In 
contemplatiun of the pleasing fact that 
the Christian public are beginning to re- 
member their kifismen according to the 
flesh, we record with pleasore* that a 
most numerous and respectable meeting 
was held on Wednesday the> 14th of 
Feb. 1821, at the Fitsroy Schoolrooms 
of the North West London Auailiary 
Home Missionary Society, at which tbe 
Rev. Rowland Hill presided ; several 
highly interesting appeals were made, 
by the Rev. Messrs.- Thorn, Cobbin; 
White, Humphreys. Thompson, Messrs. 
Moens, Gibson, T. Thompson, C. Hyatt, 
jnnr. and a liberal collection made. We 
trust that the gratification of recording 
Similar efforts in behalf of the Baptist 
Missionary Society will shortly be al^ 
forded us, and that the noble amount of 
o£70 raised in one year by an Auxiliary 
Society for Home Mtssioos, will no lon- 
ger be a solitary instance of domestic 
eflfort. :*■•''■ 



\ 



INTELLIGKKCB, 8CC. 



CIS 



CIVIL RIGHTS OF DTSSBNTKR5!. 

I»t ifthtCnmmiUnifDifuliii, appoint- 
•d ID pnttcl (he Ciril BighU of cht 
Tfcrre ihiunijiaftDiu ef Prnnlont Da- 



WilTiamSmuh.Eiq. 

Itl.r. CAoiriiKni. 
J. Cuiteridee, Etq. 

Ufpiify Cheirman. 
Junn Colliiu, Eiq. 

Edwud Buk, Euj. 
3uii» Eidiile, E>q. 
W, A. Umnktj, Esq. 
UiTid Be*an, Eiq. 



lohn Chmlit.Esq. 
W. Fttme. K.q. 
R.W«ii.e»r>gbt.EMi 
S. Jsckioii, Eiq. 
B Stiao, Esq. 
If. W.vnio»iEt,E9q. 
T. Wood, Ejq. 
W. MBntuii. Esq. 
J. Sionard, Eiq. 
|G. Hammond, Em). 



JoMpb BaaaelLEtq. B. P. 
/oba Beoitri, £>q. R. Wiaier, Eiq. 
■W. Tilfoid, Eiq. J. Benwtll, E.q. 
Jamti GibioD, EH]- { 



ASSOCIATIONS. 



NomTStHFTONiuiBa, S4 Chnrchei. 
Anubj, JiniCfj Blah;, B. Ethid; 
Situniton, Normui; Bugbrouk, Wbttl- 
CT ; BBrlon-upao-Trenl, ■ * ; BrnjbcDDk, 
Ajer; Clipatonc. Muck; Collinghani, 
MjcboU; Dunilibie, ADdcnon 1 Detbj, 
Birl ; Ftniij Stialford, Crudge ; Fuiiun, 
llarlon; Gr«tIoii, * *; GuiJsbaruogh, 
••: Kackkloii, Knowki> Kcllcting, 
J. K. H«ll ; Lotcoe, Swiiiic ; Lntan, 
Daniel; Lou )|h borons li. Cipei; Liu- 
^In,DaTmiUuulton.Whuli.'r; Nen- 
ack, Pcikini; Notiingham, Jirmanj 
' XurthiBpion, Blundclt; Oikliain, • •; 
iOIm;, Siiainani; Uoad, HcighOm; 
■ id.Pei«.iiSoiilbw«ll,Mi 



Albao 



n-thc-E 



-BDrdilii Sol ton in Aihadd, *>;Swan- 
«kk, Flelchrr; Watgravc, ■*. 17.^3 
Menbcn.Clt>r Increutr^sa Notlhanp. 
ton. Ua; i3— U. Engaged, Hinti 
nandcll. Bui d ill, Builon, Crudge, 
Daniel, Hill (J. K.), ltcit(hlgn. JaoiM 
(Pialm cuiii.ia;, Jutman (Heb. iii. 
U)> HtlJar, Nicholl, Preilaiid, Sim- 
mont (t Chron. vl. IS). Subject of the 
Grtalai Letter, The Eficac; of Prater. 
The neit Aaiaciatian ii lo be helil al 
ftMKriog. Jane 13, 13, IMl. 



NEW CHAPELS OPEXED. 

NAFION, SOOTHAM. 

On Wedaadaj.NoT. 15. ISSO. a plain 

aad neat place of aoiihip, of the Bap- 

liM denodlnation, nu opened at Nap- 

ioD,a popDloui villagei abaut tbicc inilc: 



from SouihBK, in Warwickilnr*. Ra*. 
Uetiri. Franklin of Coientrj, Oriffithi 
of LoDg-Buckh;, and BolLonley of Mid: 
dieion, preached upon ihe occaiion. 
The lervicei were wall atlended, and 
there appean to be a pJeaiing protpect 
of Diefalneu in ihM loag ueglected part 
o( I be coDotif. 



STEEPLANE, 



Sow: 
Oh Thnriday, March 15, IBtl, a utif 

10 A. ni. Mr. niann of Shlplrj, furmer* 
Iv the pallor of (he chuich meeting in 
Inn placr, read, prajed, and preached, 
ftom ( Cor. Tiii. .1. Dr. Sleadman of 
Bradford, preached alio from luk Ju. T. 
andconcluded. Malfpail t. P. M. Ur; 
(Independent Hiniiterat Sower- 
■" .CockinCI - 

concbSed 



■ched t 



1 Phil. 



■d. ThccoileclioMloKardiliquid- 
aling Ihe debt amounted ro^34 16.. 6i. 
The ok) chopcl al Sieeplane had not 

wai nC first built to ler; ilightly, ai to 
bfcomt of late very dangeroni wbeu 
filled nilh people. The preient is a good 
lubsianlinl building, 41 feet by 33 in- 
side 1 and hai coil about ^604, much of 
which n already paid. In the year 
1814 a poor girl, who was then but quite 
a chiM, bearioK talk of thii new chapel, 
the h» been for five yeait pait iBTing all 



;t half-p< 



objec 



3.. 6rf. 


Ibr 


M:z:^';\t 


be 


bete i> 


"' 


hri.ing .lale 


U. 


BATTLE, SUSSEX. 







Oh Tuesday, Pebrnarj tr. 1891, a 
new Meeting. hnOK, called Zion Cbapel, 
belonging lo Ihe Bapiiil dciiuaiinBiioD, 
wu opened fo> public worihip. In tl|e 
morning Ihr. Be*. Mr. Iviiney of Lan< 
dun read and piaved ; Ihe Rut. Mr. 
Sliiiley of Seiei) O^V-, preached from 
n ^■. ... ,nd Ihe Bei«.Mr Smiih 



pendent) of Heallifield read and pra^ied) 
Ihu RcT. Mr. [(ime; of London preach- 
ed froa IS. Jitu. 4 ; and Ihe Re>. Mr. 
Tidd of Wadharil eunrlmled in prayer. 
In Iheeveninc tbelter, Mr.DatI>(]nde- 
prndenl) of Hailiop lead aad ^tv^t-i-. 



€14 



1XT£LL1GENCB, &€• 



the Rev. Mr. Hoby of Londoa preached 
/r<MB 1 Cor. i. tl, and concladed in 
fraver. 

. The Mrviees of the day afforded mach 
^leasaie to all who were preaent. It 
vat peculiarly gratifying to the friends 
of evaogelical uuth to witness a larger 
congregation asseinbled together, on this 
interesting occasioUf fur public worship, 
tlian has been witnesied in this town 
lor many year*. By the persevering 
cscrtions of a few pious indindiials. the 
cause of Christ has been carried on 
amidst much discouragement ; and it is 
hoped that tlie tide of immorality and 
infidelity, which has long deluged the 
to«rn and neighbourhood of Battle, has 
been anestcd in its progress. Fur two 
•r three years past the congregation has 
gradually increased so as to require a 
much larger place of worship ; but being 
|br the most part poor, and suflfering 
from the pressure of the times, they are 
■nable to defr^^ the whole expense 
of their new place; consequently an 
appeal on their behalf must be made 
lu ibe benevolence of a religious public, 
which appeal, it is hoped, will not be 
made in vain. 



ORDINATION. 



NEW CHURCH am» ORDINATKnr. 



BATTLE, SUSSEX. 

On Wednesday, February 28, 18S1, 
Ur. James Punlis (late student at Step- 
ney Academy) was ordained Pastor of 
the Particular Baptist Church at Buttle, 
Sussex. The Rev. Mr. Davis (Inde- 
pendent) of Hastings commenced the 
•ervice by reading the scriptures and 
praying; the Rev. Mr. Hoby of Lon> 
don delivered a very appropriate intro- 
ductory address, requested of the church 
a public recognition of llio union that 
had been formed, and asked the usual 
questions; the Rev. Mr. Ivimey of Lon- 
duii offi^rad up the ordinaiioo prayer in 
a very impressive manner, and deliver- 
ed an excellent and affectionate charge 
from t Tim. ii. 15; and the Rev. Mr. 
Tidd of Wadhurst concluded in prayer. 
The hymns were read bv the Rev. Mr. 
Press (Independcut) of Heathfield. 

In the evening the cougrcgutifm again 
assembled ; when the Rev. 5Jr. Hoby of 
Loudon read and prayed ; the Rev. Mr. 
Giles of Chatham addressed the church 
from 1 Thess. v. 13; and the Rev. Mr. 
Ivimey of London concluded in prayer. 

The services of the day were truly 
gratifying, and will long be remembered 
93 VNiy. as a time oV rcfzcshing from 
t of ihe Lord. 



Welchpool* Momtgomebysbibb. 

AuorsT 1, 18^, at Welcbpool, Mont- 
; gomeryshire. Service coainienccd at 
two in I lie aftemoou. Brother Crump- 
ton of Salop read and prajedt after 
which Mr. Palmer proceedMl to fora 
the church of members dismisicd from 
the church in Shrewsbury for the par- 
pose, with others recently bapttied at 
Welcbpool. After the usual queaiioos 
Mr. Palmer prayed ; an unanimous call 
was then given by the newly formed 
Church to Brother Ask ford to become 
their pastor. Mr. Jones of Newtown 
described the uature of a go^ptl church, 
and received Brother Ash ford's con- 
fession of faith; Mr. Jones offered up 
the ordination prayer with imposition of 
hands; Mr. Palmer gave the. charge 
from Rev. ii. 10; Mr. Edwards of Wild- 
street, London, addiessed the people 
from Acts V. 11,23. The church and 
congregation assembled in the evening, 
when Brother Mealry read and prayed ; 
and Mr. Jones preached to the people. 
Our present meeting is a room fitted 
up by Brother Crumptoii in 1811, sub- 
ject to a lease of tweniy-one years from 
that period ; the place has been sup- 
plied by the Shropshire Itinerants once 
every fortniglu, but after ten years 
preaching there seemed no prospect of 
a cause being established^ when, by a 
chain of events in Providence, Brother 
A>hford returned to his uaiive town ; he 
was appointed by the Shropsbira Itine- 
rant Committee lo supply the place re- 
gularly, which he did tot eighteen 
months. Through the blessing oif Ood 
the above is the happy result ; the so* 
lemu and affecting services of this dav 
will, we trust, be long eheriahed with 
gratitude to the great Head of the 
church, who verily fidfilled his pcoBiac : 
Lo, I am yith you alway, even to the 
eud of the world. Since this, ot^cia 
have been added by Baptism. 



ORDINATIONS. 



\ 



NEWCASTLE EMLYN. 

CAEUABTUBNSHIRS. 

MoBOAY, June IS, 18t0, the Rev. 
Timothy Thomas, Jun. was set apart to 
the pastoral office over the Pacticolar 
Baptist Church at Newcastle Emlyn, 
Carmarthenahire. 

Public worship commenced by reading 
the Scripture, and prayers by the Rev, 
J. Morgans of Blaenyilos, and the Rev. 
Simon James of Nevin. Rev. Benjamiis 
Davis of Cilfowyr, stated the natgre of 



INTELLIQEMCB, tU, 



ei5 



a fospcl chnrchf milced the usorI qan- 
tioDS* and received from Mr. Thoniai a 
dettr, coBciWf and satisfactory confes- 
sion of faith. The ordination prayer 
with, tlie lajing on of hands, was offered 
up by Mr. Davis; Rev. J. Herring of 
CaidigAU delivered an excel ieat and 
affectionate charge firom t Cor. ii. 16* 
•• And who is sufficient for these things.'* 
aad tiic Rev. J. Watkins oi' Cariuart]ben 
mddreased the Church in a very appro- 
priate discoursCf from 1 Cur. zvi. It. 
" Let no man therelore despise him." 

In the evening the Rev. Timothjr 
Thomas, sen. of Aberdeen prayed ; Rev. 
J. Davis of Carmarthen preached from 
Acts xiti. 26 ; and the Rev. S. Jomes of 
Kevin, from Luke xxiv. 47. Thus closed 
a day of sacred gratitude for the past, 
aad a lively hope of the future prospe- 
rity of Sion. 

BROMLEY, MIDDLESEX. 

On Thursday, October 26, 1820, Mr. 
3osiab Deuham» (Student from Stepney 
Academy) was ordained pastor over the 
Particular Baptist Church, in Brwmley- 
lane - buildings, Bromley, Middlesex, 
vihen Mr. Grifliii read a portion of Scrip- 
ture — engaged in prayer — asked the 
usual questions, and delivered an af- 
fectionate address to the church. Dr. 
Rippon offered up the ordination prayer. 
Dr. Newman delivered an appropriate 
charge, and Mr. Douglas concluded 
with prayer. 

Great ToaaiNOioN, DEvoxsfiiuc. 

This is one of the placs whic4i is in- 
debted to the benevolem seal of Opie 
Sfoith, E«q. of Bath. Mr. PuUford, who 
was sent here in 1819, was set opurt as 
Uie pastor of the church, which has been 
partly colleciedi>y his labours, Dec. 13, 
1820. Mr. Sharp of Bradnich delivered 
the introdoctory discourse; Mr. Hum- 
phrey of Coliumpton offered the ordina- 
tion prayer; and Mr. Singleton of Ti> 
verton deUvered Che charge to the mi- 
nister, from 2 Tin. iv. 5, and addressed 
the church from 1 Thess. v. 13, 13. 
Tills cause, which has been greatly op- 
posed, is DOW likely to be established. 



KINGTON. HEREFORDSHIRE. 

Oit Thursday, December 14, 1820, 
Mr. Samuel Blackmore, late a student 
at Bristol, was ordained pastor of ilie 
£aptiit church at Kington, Hereford- 
shire. Mr. Preeca of Tenbury com- 
menced the service with reading and 
prayer. Mr. David Evans of Dolew, 
Radnorshire, delivered the introductory 



diacoone, and received from Mr. Black* 
more an iacereating accoant of his reli< 
gious experience, hb entrance on tho 
ministry, his reasons for diasent, and his 
views of divine UUth. Mr. Thomas Ed- 
monds of Leominster offered up the or* 
dination prayer ; Mr. U. Page of Wor« 
ceater delivered the charge, from Col. 
iv. If, •' jiay ia ikroliippos," £cc. and 
concluded the morning service with 
prayer. In ibe evening Mr. John Evans 
of Brecon prayed* and Mr. John Jones 
of Newton, Montgomeryshire* preached 
to the church, from 3 Cor. xiii. 1 1, ** Be 
perfect, be ajf good cosufort*" &c* end 
concluded with prayer. 

The vicinity of Kiaglon was till lutclf« 
like the greater part of tlie county in 
wliich it is situated* a place of gru&«( 
darkness. By tlie persevering labours 
of neighbouring auAisters, especially 
Mr. David Evana of Dolew, a small so- 
ciety was gathered, mtidi a small meeting- 
house built, about twelve years ago. 
Nearly ai the same time, Mr. C*eorgo 
Browu, now of Pendlchili, LHiica^^hire, 
was called to the pastoral I'fiice. His 
labours were much blessed, the meeting 
was repeatedly enlarged, and the church 
gradually increased to its present slate, 
consisting of about sinty-five member>. 
Mr. Blacicmore*» prospects are encou- 
raging. May the divine blessing on hist 
ministry, and the influence of a humble, 
holy conversation in those committed 
to his charge, contribute to enlighten 
and improve a tract of country, which, 
in a degree, equal, if not superior, to 
most parts of the inland,' claims the ai- 
tenlioB aad compassion of Christians^ 



The Rev. J. H. Hinton, late of Ha- 
verfordwest, lias accepted the cull of 
the Baptist Church* HosierVlanc, Read* 
iiig, and we arc happy to hear wiik 
prospects highly encouraging. 

NOTICE. 

wjilwouth. 

The Annual Soriuon to Young People 
will he preached at the Rce. Mr. Davis*« 
Chapel, East-street, by the Rev. Mr. 
Morrison of Brompion* fur the bcneili of 
the Female Charity School and School 
of Industry. Service to begin at Fuor 
o'clock in the after noon. 
• iW ^ » 

ERRATii in our lut Numhr, 

P. 14;l. C. « L. 4 fromb. For "changes'^ 
read •• charges.'* 
144. C.«. L. 1. For "the" reod "be." 
178. C. 1 L. 9 from b. For ** lazL" 



LONDON ANNUAL MEETINGS IN MAY. 

Tutsiajf Iff.— Amyn.—CBUBCR MittiONART Socibtt. Freemasons' Halle 
Great Queen*itrcet« Lincoln's-inn Fields, The Right HoDonrable the Preiideot m 
the Chair. No persons to be admitted without tickets. The fist Anniversary 
i>ermon was preached Monday evening at St. Bride's^ Fleet-street, by the Rev. Win. 
Juwctt, M* A. 

Wefinesday, 3(1.— Mffmii^.^-Half-past Ten. — Sooibty for promotiko 
Chrtstxanity amongst the Jf.ws. Sermons at St. Paul's, Corent-garden, by 
the Ilev. Wm. Bushe.M.A. Rector of St. George's, Dubiio. — And Friday the 4th ; 
open at eleven ', Chair (Sir Thomas Baring, Bart. M.P.) at Twelve* Annual Meet- 
ing at the King's Concert Room, Haymarket 

Morning, — At Eleven.— Britiih and Forizcn Bxblb Sooibty. Seventeenth 
Annual Meeting at Freemasons' Hall.Tbe Rt. Hon. LordTeignmouthinthe Chair. 
Thundayf 5d, — Af^mtMr.— Half-past Ten.— Pratbb Boor and Homilt 
Society. — Sermon at Christ Church, Newgate-street^ by the Rev. Edward Garrard 
Marsh, M.A. Muiister of St James's Chapel, Hampstead. — And the $ame day, the 
Ninth Annual Meeting at Stationers* Hall. Chair at Two. 

Saturday, 5th,-^N{)on» — London Hibernian Sooibty fob bitablishihs 
Schools, and cibcvlatino tbb Holy Scbiptubes* in Ireland. Annual 
Meeting at the City of London Tavern. 

Sunday^ 6th. — London Female Penitentiary Socibtt. Annnal Sermon . 
at Tavistock Chapel, Broad Court, Drury-Iane, by the Rev. Lewis Way, A.M. 
Prayers to commence at Eleven. — And Monday tlie 7 tfc.— Fourteenth Annual 
Meeting at Stationers' Hall, the Right Honourable Lord Carrington to take the 
Ch^ir precisely at Twelve. — ^Tickets to be had of the Secretary, Thomas Pellatt, 
Esq. Ironmongers' Hall, and at the Institution at Pentonville. 

Mondayp7th, — Momtt^.— London Itinerant Society. To breakfast at 
Six at the City of London Tavern. Chair (Samuel Robinson, Esq.) at Seven. 

Noon. PortofLondonSocietyporpromotino Religion among Seamen. 
City of London Tavern. The Right Honourable Admiral Lord Gambier, G.C.B. 
in the Chair. — And Tuesday the Bth, at Eleven and Three. Two Anniversary Ser- 
mons on board the Society, Floating Chapel, moored off Wappiog Old StairSf by the 
Rev. Drs. Bogue and Waugh. 

Tuiiday, Sth. — EveningtSiz, Irish Evangelical Society. City of London 
Tavern. Thomas Walker, Esq. in the Chair. 

Tuesday, 9th, — Evening, Half^past Six. Continental Socibtt. Sermon at 
the Church of the United Parishes of St. Andrew by the Wardrobe and St. Annet 
Blackfriars, by the Rev. W. Marsh, M.A. Vicar of St. Peter's, Colchester. — And 
Wednesday the 16th, Noon, Annual Meeting at Freemasons^ Hall, Great Queen- 
straet, Lincoln's-inn Fields,Sir Thomas Baring, Bart. M.P. President, in thejChair. 
Wednesday, 9th, — Mominst Half-past Five. Sunday School Union. Annual 
Ateetiug. To breakfast at the City of London Tavern. 

Wednesday, 9th.'^Momingf Half-past Ten. London Missionary Socibtt. 
^rnon at Surry Chapel by the Rev. George Clayton of Walworth. — Same Day^ 
Etsening, Six. Sermon at the Tabernacle by the Rev. T. Craig of Booking. — 
Thursday the 10th, Mamimg, Half-past Ten. Meeting for business at Queen-street 
Chapel. Evening, Six. Sermon at Tottenham-court Chapel by the Rev. John 
Drown of Diggar, Scotland — Friday the lUh,Moming, Half-past Ten. Sermon at 
St. Bride's, Fleet-street, by the Rev. Dr. Williams of Stroud, Gloucestershire. 
— Et;efitn^,S'ix. The Lord's Supper at Sion Chapeli Silver-street Chapel, Tonbridge 
Chapel, and Orange-street Chapel. 

Satunlay, "^Uth* — floning. Six, Religious Tract Society. Twenty-second 
Annual Meeting. To breakfast at t^e City of London Tavern. Chair (Joseph 
Ueyner,Esq.) at Seven. 

Morning, Half-past Ten for Eleven. — Protestant Society fob tvb Pro- 
tection OF Religious Liberty. Annual Meeting at the London Tavern, 
Bishopsgate-street Some distinguished Friend to Religious Freedom is expected 
to preside. 

Monday, i 4th, ^'Evening, Half-past Six. Home Missionary Society. 
Annual Meeting at the City oT London Tavern. Thos. Wilson, Esq. in the Chair. 
Tuesday. 15th, — Noon, BntTiSR and Foreign School Society. Sixteenth 
Aunual Meeting, at Freemasons' Hall, Great Queen-street. 

Thursday, 17th, — Marwing, Eleven. Obpbanb' Worbiho School, City 
Road. Sermon at the Chapel in the School by the Rev. John Clayton, junior, 
pinner at Four, at the Old London Tavern, Bishopsgate-street. 

COUNTRY MEETINGS IN MAY. 

S/h, Blackheath AaxiViarj Bible Society* at the Greeti lAaiv, l&WVVv«a.Uv. Cbair 
io be taken at Noon, — ]6tb» lale of Ely Atiociaiion at. \^umc\\.— ^tl^^^^t^OLv^v 
vsJi/re Ditto, «( fVaddesdon Ilill.— 99\h and ^0\Yl,lL«^tl.I]^V\o,lX^\ircl\^^m^ 



217 



9t(0{) Cj^ronicle* 



The Committee feel happy ia having^ it in llicir power to lay before 
Hieir Friends the Retnrns of the Saperiotcndents of the Schooln, by /Virbich 
fliey will gee the advantages which are commanicated to the peasantry of 
Irebmd by the scripturai education afforded by the Society. It should be 
the constant prayer of all who wish the evangelical emancipation of 
Ireland/ that HE, '' with whom is the residae of the Spirit," will '< pour 
oat the Spirit from on high ;** without which, even the memory bein^i^ 
stored with *^ the words which the Holy Ghost teachetb/' will not be suf- 
Bcient to renew the heart, and sanctify the condoct 



PRESENT STATE of thi SCHOOLS 

IN THS 

PROVINCE OF CONNAUGHT, 

or THE 

BAPnST IRISH SOCIETY, 

In a Letter from the Rev* Josiah Wilson, 
the Superintenflentf to the Secretary, the 
Rev. J. Jvimey, dated 

Dublin, March 26, 1821. 
Mt bsar SiRf 

I HAVE again the satiifaction of inform- 
ing yoa^thBt Dot withstanding the late very 
serere ttorros, oar school bark ii steadily 
parsoing her course to the desired haven. 
The gale has recently been heavy, and the 
waves have risen high; bat H£, whose 
province it is to calm the perturbed ocean, 
thoagb he may not yet have said, *' Peace, 
be still I*' bat manifestly restrained its 
power, and, in many instances, caused Its 
viulmce to subserve his own purposes. 
Mow short-atghted is man ! How impo- 
tent bis rage 1 and how vexatious to him 
who indulges it, when even his malice is 
over-ruled to accomplish the object which 
be intended to frustrate. This has been 
the case with respect to some of the 
schools : the very violent measures that 
have been adopt «i to snppreas them, have 
caused them to be unusually well attended. 
So (roe it is, that Jehovah ** maketh the 
wrath of man to pnuse him;*' and we 
may be assured the latter part of the text 
will be fulfilled, " the remainder of wrath 
be will restrain," 

This fact has been established also in 
another way, in reference to the tcripturei 
being used in the schools. You have, of 
ooiiriCi heard of a new Society having been 



formed in this city, for the education of 
the poor of Ireland ; one of its fundamen- 
tal principles is, that the Bible shaU not be 
a schoolrbook ! 

This circumstance has excited a lively 
zeal in the friends of the Holy Scriptures; 
and some who were previously almost 
inactive, are now alive to the subject, and 
contribute cheerfully to support those 
schools in which the Bible is used. One 
gentleman showed me a card that was left 
nim, requesting a subscription to n sclioot, 
from whence tlie scriptures were excluded, 
that was estahfished under the immediate 
patronage of the •* Archangel Michael r* 
There is reason to suppose that this caul 
pleaded very successfully for our scboolal^ i 

You have already received the accoont 3* 
of the schools in the couniies of Ctrk§f^ 
Clare, Tipptrary, Wistmeatht &c. ; I r»» 
joice that these seem to be rivalling those 
whicii are under my supcriutcndcnoe In 
the county of Conuaught. In thej(/h/. 
(me schools under my care, there are near^ 
five thousand children ; one thousand of 
whom are reading that word wliicli is so 
highly prized by those who know ill 
value, and so much opposed by those . 
who are ignorant of iL 

Of the one thousand readers, eight 
hundred are committing the scriptures tp 
memory ; all of these can repeat from cti^ 
to four chapters each; 450 can repeat 
five cha|)ter8 each; 240, ten cliaptery 
each ; 100, tfie whole gospii of St. Joha 
each ; 60, twenty-five chapters each ; 5CC 
thirty chapters each : 10, forty chapters 
each; 3, serectj cliaptcrs each; nnd 
one, a hundred chapters in l/ie Ket$ 
Testament! What the result of such 
a practice may be, HE only knows, whose 
prerogative It Is la coBix»»j\d VVvtXiVvAwxv'i, 



fl» 



IRISH CBRONICLBr 



Different opinions erid^nlf j prevail among 
men oil the sahjtxt ; but it remains to be 
proved, that a ir.ind wi!l be injured which 
U thus stored itiih the word of God; that 
Mch Bible scholars will heoone wont 
children, worie ciiivns, or leu oseful 
merobert in the church^ To this it may 
be added, that all the committers practise 
writing and cyphering, and that consider^ 
«blo pruficicncj h9s bceu made by thim, 
partiCTiIarly by tlie biys* who arv in ge- 
neral very anxious to acquire a good 
knowledge of both. 

The " Congregational Schools** merit 
particolar notice, fur the infumiation of 
th«r beneTotent supporters. 

Tho • Hariow ScKoor has 105 girls 
occasionally attending ; 55 of wbtim I saw 
at the last inspection, with ooOMdcrably 
impmred manners and appearance: all 
present were either learning their letti-rs, 
their spellings, their scriptiire>tasks, or 
using that rcry oseful instrumeut tlie 
nrecUe, which they had never used bcfuic. 
Five girls have left the school since its 
commencement, for serritucie in difTiTem 
families. The misire»s is Airs. Henry, a 
widow, in tlie Tuwn!aud uf LangiaJI, 
Cbonly of Sli»o. 

The •• Liiilc Alio-Xrf et Schuol," Mrs. 
Iklariyn mbtress, v^ho is alv a widow, b 
m Uroroanain, county of Leiirira ; enjoy- 
ing the advantage of one or more ladies 
Wing generally present. At the last in> 
spection, 83 out of 121 children wore 
prcimt; 29 of whom are comiuiiiiug ih( 
scriptures to memory, and the greater 
part are making great advances in the use 
- •£ the needle. 

"ITie •* LJon-strcet Walworth School 
l| reapiug the advantage of not being 
DftMy in fixing on a roii^iress. A very 
raitable one, as lo cimractcr and talent, 
has been now found in the pen-on of 
Mn. James, who has established the 
fchool in River's Town, county of Sligo, 
•nd has already 67 giil% whose progress 
in so few months is very gratifying. This 
school is superintended by a most respect* 
able lady; the governess in whose family 
alto, delights in such labours of love. 

The " North^nd Crayford School" is 
Sn Doorish, county of Sligo; Mrs. Sweeny 
nustrrss. In tias school, as well as some 
others, several of the girls out of 57 
which belong to it, never had a needle in 
their hand before. This woman's hosbdnd 
L*> li«iog, but not with Her, she being a 
herttic I She was some time ago brought 
to a knowled^ of the truth, and because 
sh<> could not conscientiously attend mass, 
confession to the priests, &c. slie was 
abandoned by Iiim wlio was lawfully bound 
to be her protector. She will now, I 

^t not, bw Mbit to obtain a tubslstepce, 



in a way perfectly cone«lM Nfli llci i 
indinatiuns, and advaniapeous to some of 
the rjsuig cf neratiun. 

The " iKckncy School* is one that has 
been of great use to both master and 
scholars. The master's name is Wallace ; 
his school is in Raihnamauck, county of 
Mayo. He has not ouly been brought to 
see tlie errors of the Church of Roncie, but 
by attentively reading the scrifiiaresv has» 
I doubt not, been " changed from dark- 
ness to light, and from the power of Satan 
unto God.* He is an able teacher, and 
indcfatigmhic in bis business, and has a 
schoul containing 76 cliildrcn. 

TIic ** Hammer^mith ScbooT b kept by 
Ahs. CaUwell. in tke lownknd uf CoU 
lien«, county of Mayo, who was cdueacod 
in one of the Charter-sckools of iTulwd ; 
hcrhu»band is a weaver, but does not eo> 
jov good health. He asust» her in the 
^cl)ool, which is a great service to the 
childien. There are both boys and girls 
iu this ^chool. and at the last inspection 
ihere were sevcniv-five present. 

The " Chatham School** b in Baflina* 
carrow, where our lri*h Reader, the in- 
comparaU'* Wiliium Moore, resides; and 
near the residence of that tried friend of 
Ireland. Colonel Per cival. Tbt master b 
F. llarr(;wby, «ho, I doubt not, b con* 
verted from the wU'kedmeu, as well as the 
crrcn of his former ways. He and hb 
scholars are emulous that thb should be 
the host school on tlie eatablishment : in 
proo! of which, I mention, that at a recent 
ex^^minatioh every scholar in the reading 
clixbs obtutned n premium. Here were 
one hundred and four present at the last 
hispeciion. 

The ••Trowbridge School" u in the 
county j.fSUgo, in thcvlllageof Rathcor- 
m':rk. The master, T. Gibson, is the parish 
clerk, and of coors«; a Protestant, but 
i:reat!y csrocmed in the neighbourhood. 
He krpt a pay school for several yearv 
but was obliged to discontinue i>, fromthu 
increased poverty of the people. He has 
in hhj'ree icAof>f seveutv children attend* 
ing. It is very near the chapel doors of 
a priest, who is on inyeterate enemy to 
Bible schools. 

The " Eagle-street School," ihouj^ th« 
last mentioned, is not the least m inif 
portance. It is kept by Patrick Henry, 
in Roasky, county of Mayo ; an exoeUeut 
Irish scholar, and very desirous of .for* 
wardins his children, of whom he has 8i 
under his care. The neighbourhofKl of 
this school was formerly the rendezvous of 
a gang of robbers ; may we not hope that 
the " den of thieves^ will become ** ao 
house of prayer ?" 

These, Sir, are the particulars of the 
ichooU under m j care at the present tint ^ 






IHIUI CRKONICLK. 



•19 



H It not (at mtiM mtke ooinineii|8, but to 
Slate facts, iimI therefore I coDclude by 
njing, thmt I mb 

Yoarft »iRfctioiwtcly, 

J. Wit^ow. 
P.6. I anbappy toaddythat I hrought 
frofm Connaotsbt with me to Dobiin, 
whitre I am a&slsting Mr. West la Oillcct. 
ing for th« Socirt^, tliirly pouTids ; and 
added KCvan lo it in Athloiie. 

%• There are four of the " Congrega- 
tional Scboola^ in the County of Clare, nf 
which the Secretary is onty acquainted 
with the following particulnrs. 

The two •• Norwich School*,** situated 
at Scariff and Torn<!rany, are composed 
eotirely of fctoale children, and arc under 
the care of snitalile mi^tfesscs, who teuch 
tbeai, in additioD to reading and writing, 
knhtingand nee<lle worl:. They consist 
«f forty«eight tclioiarB, who repeated 
twenty-eight chapten : thev; schools are 
tapported at «f 8 per annum each, and are 
paid for by two ladies at Norwich. 

The " Bristol School" contnitis one hun- 
dred andYourteen children, of whom thirt;- 
•even read the scriptures ; it is kept by 
J. Malony in Torngranv. There were 
ptresent at the last inspection one hundred 
und 6ve, who nrpcatcd twenly -eight 
chapters. 

The * ScTcn Oaks School is in Sc^riff, 
L. Gnerin, master. It ct)n tains one hun- 
dred and twenty seven children : present 
at last iuspoction, one hundred. Ilwrv 
are twenty*two readers of tf>e scriptures, 
who lepeated eighteen chupters. 



wh<ile umil dark night. While I was 
showing ihem the diAercut objects of 
worship they had, and ihcir ignorance of 
the only way of worship, a woman ex« 
daimedi '< I am greaily mutakea if you 
have not cariied the btadt before now 
vourwlf.*' 1 told her that X bad not, but I 
knew piiesicraft os wUl mn the prieMs did 
themselv^. Thc^* desired mc to returu 
the next day, which was Sunday. Ltnlj 
u\ the morning a man called at my bonse, 
where I wai. to collect towards building 
a chapel i There were present the hu^ 
band, wife, and swi. The huaband madt 
no reply» but the wife broke ulence, and 
told him, tliat «t>« peaaj^ */ their mamef 
the priest should never handle nore; and 
a c)ia|)el door they would nevar tuter 
again ; for tJiat they had found the waj 
to lieaven wUhotU Moary and vithsui 
price. 



From tJtS 



Rev, Mr. Keen 
J. Wat, 



to the Ret. 



MMirmct tf a T^Ur from Mr. Iliiliajn 
Mooter iated 

March 17, IBSl. 

Even in that country, where the greatest 
•ppoMtion is made to the schools* ihc 
tjuth is prevailing ore? error to a v-ry 
l^reat extent. 1 hnvc spent nearly three 
weeks amoDg thc-m. and have cxouscd 
the soperititions, biaspiieniies, and ^or' 
cedes of the priests, wiihuut ^u'^^P^ ^^y 
offence* or provoking any contradictiun. 
TLe Sabbath readers of tlic Irish scriptiuos 
bave done wondtrs, iu preparing the 



Cork, ^arch 18, 18il. 
My DiAa Sir, 

Last night I returned from visiting and 
inspf'cling the schools, and now vrrite you 
the uccuunt of iLcir state ; which, npoa 
the whole, and amidst much opposition, I 
may pronounce prosiMTous. 

Tlie school whicli (he Committee de- 
sired me to opeu, on the application of 
the Rev. Mr. Sadler, has been delayed 
longer than we could have wished, in con- 
sequence of the house not being ready ; 
and also of our not being able to obtain a 
buiuble master. Tlirsc obstacUs are at 
length removed, and the school has com- 
menced operations. There is, howcTcr« 
one difficult v still existing, viz. the howiB 
is ** too strait." Tlie number of chiidrea 
now in it is 95 : several have been refused 
admisuon for want of room to nccom- 
modate them. If the school should ga 
on as it has commenced, I hope we 
shall be able to knock down one of tha 
walls, and build up another at some dis- 
tance from the present lK)andarie8« I'hAf 
would not he attended with much expense, 
an the mtiusion is neither compoied of 



peopb:*s minds fur a more clears explana- j Portland stonCtnor Irish granite; nothings I 
tioa than they are ca])aI>U.* of glvhig them, assure you, 



when any doubtful questions are proposed. 
I lately visited a great nuntbcr of persons, 
whom 1 had never seen before, wlio were 
assembled to b(ar from liic an cxplana* 
lion of the scriptures ; and I was told by 
Bryan Hart, one of the Siibb^th reiulers, 
that I might freely ]M>int out the ** strong 
Mtfsioo,'' as it wai their earnest desiri*. 1 
cootinocd iiistructing them four hours and 
f^as tbcQ about to leave them, but others 
aame la, aad caojcd joe to cputiuue the 



I 



but a Ktile humble mud, which, 
in this country, is by no means diffiailt to 
quarry ; and. in such an er<*ctioD as the 
one in qnestion, does not rrquire much of 
the arts of a cunning workman ; though 
less evil, and more good, will, in all pro- 
bability, be done In It, than iu many a 
splendid edifice. 

As almost all the good in the world is 
done by ladies, I am happy to inform yon 
that a lady is \.\\e W^C: a\\^ w^v\ c\*A\\> 



ai2 



IKTELUOBNCB, &C. 



and congreMtionff 'who tre disposed to 
aid the fdnds of this Society by a collec- 
tioDt are respectfnlly reqaested to pay 
tlieir subscriptions and collection^ to 
any member of the committee, who are 
desired to remit all suras received op 
account of the Sodetyi to the secretary, 
the Rev. J. P. Porter, Bath. The com- 
mittee avail themselves of this occasion, 
to suggest to iheir brethren in the minis- 
try, «vho are members of this Society, 
that if each of them would make a collec- 
tion (either public or private) the aggre- 
eate, althouih tlie sums were individual- 
ly small, would be a valuable accession 
to the comforts of the aged or infirm, as 
one half of such collections would be im- 
mediately divided among the claimants. 

The beneliciary members intitled to 
claim on the funds of this Society, those 
who claimed last year as well as others, 
are reminded that their' application 
MUST be in the hands of the secretary, 
on cr before the 15th of May, or it can- 
not be attended to ; and those of them 
who retain the pastoral office, mast ad- 
company tlieFr application with a certifi- 
cate from their respective churches, that 
Xhe^ retain such office, (notwithstanding 
their claim on this Society) with the 
consent of the majority of the members, 
present at a church meeting held by 
public notice, for the especial purpose 
of giving such certificate. 

%* The late Mrs. Smith, widow of 
Mr. John Smith, Deacon of thd Baptist 
Church at Bath, has Dberally bequeath- 
ed one hundred pounds to this Society. 

Baptist Ministers not ytt enrolled as 
members of this Society, are respectfully 
reminded, that after the Slst of June 
next, they cannot be admitted to share 
its advantages. 



BRITISH INDIA SOCIETY. 



Thb Act 53 Geo. III. c. 1^5. declares, 
that ** it is the duty of this country to pro- 
mote the interest and happiness of the 
native inhabitants of the ]3ritish dbmini- 
ons in India; and that such measures 
'ought to be adopted, as may tend to the 
introduction among them, of useful 
knowledge, and of religious and moral 
improvement." We are happy to hear 
that the natives themselves have co-op- 
erated with the servants of the East In- 
dia Company, &c. in founding schools 
and school-bouk Societies ; tind that at 
Calcutta they have instituted a Hindoo 
College, for '* the tuition of the sons of 
respectable Hindoos in the English and 
Indian Langnages, ftild in the nrerature 



and jcieuce of Europe and Am.* Therp 
have been similar proceedinp in Bom- 
bay and at Madras. 

In consequence of thb intellurancei 
and of Mr. Ward*s Leiler on the Educa- 
tion of the Nativti of ladto* addressed tQ 
the Right Honourable J. C. Villiers» to* 
gether with £jrtrac« from ikt RqMrU tf 
Native Schools established by the Serms* 
pore Missionaries, and very interesting 
Reportt from the Native Sociatiesb a 
Meeting is to be held during the present 
month, at the Thatched House, St. 
James's street, to form the abore-naned 
Society. A Subscription will be opened 
through Great Britain and Ireland. 
Subscribers of One Goinea per annam* 
or of Ten Guineas, will be Members en- 
titled to vote ; and of Three Guineas per 
annum, or of Thirty Guineas* will be 
Governors. There wUl be Annual Meet* 
ings, a Patron, President, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Secretaiies, a Treasorerja Comnu(« 
tee, &c. 



HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



The sincere supplicants for the spread 
of Divine truth with its attendant 
blessings in the hitherto much neglected 
villages of our native isle, will rejoice to 
hear, that the good cause of Home Mis- 
sions continues to widen, as it advances, 
and that through the operations of the 
Baptist Itinerant and the Home Mis- 
sionary Societies, accompanied with tbe 
blessing of the Most High, many a mo- 
ral desert has begun to bloom and bear 
tbe rich produce of abundant fioit. In 
contemplatiun of the pleasing fact that 
the Christian public are beginning to re- 
member their kinsmen according to the 
flesh, we record whh pleasare» that a 
most numerous and respectable meeting 
was held on Wednesday tlie 14th of 
Feb. 1821, at the Fitsroy Schoolrooms 
<'f the North West London Auailiarj 
Home Missionary Society, at which the 
Rev. Rowland Hill presided ; several 
highly interesting appeals were made, 
by the Rev. Messrs. Thorn, Cobbin; 
White, Humphreys. Thompson, Messrs. 
Moens, Gibson, T. Thompson, C. Hyatt, 
jnnr. and a liberal collection made. We 
trust thit the gratification of recording 
similar efforts in behalf of the Baptlet 
Missionary Society will shortly be aC 
forded us, and that the noble amount of 
o£70 raised in one year by an Autiliary 
Society for Home Missioos, will no Ioh* 
ger be a solitary instance of domestic 
effort. - ... 



\ 



' IMTSLUOEHCE, Scc 



-ClVn. RIGHTS OF DISSENTER!. 

Liitt af tht CnmmiUecof Dejnituu'ppciiit- 
•rf tf pnltel Ibc Civil S^Au of the 
Thrtt Dnefliaafunu af Prolnlcml Dii- 
tenten, f*r its Yrar IBtl. 



William Smiih.Eic)- 
ii.V. Chaitmim. 

J. Guitcridge. Etq. 
DtfHly CAotman. 

JaiDC* Colliiu, £>!]• 



loha Chriilir. Esq. 

W. Fttme. K.q. 

(tWiiiicwngbuEiq 

S. J*ckMi>, £=q. 

B Shaw, Ein. 

H.Wmvnio.iil.,E«l. 
Edwud Boili, Em. T. Wood, Esq. 
3uni EmU'iIc, Eiq. W. Marituii. £iq. 
W. A. Hmkcj, Etq.jj. Slontcd, Eiq. 
Usitd BcTMi, Ei^. 'G. HimiDDiid, En. 
JoupliBanatlJ.EH.lt. I>. Willi, £iq. 
John Ucutltj, E>Q. R. Winter, Kiq. 
W. Titrnrd, £>'j. 'j. Benwell, Eiq. 
Jsaea Gibion, Eiq. | 



ASSOCIATIONS. 

NoiTDAUTTONtUIBI, 54 Churchci. 

Anub;. Jineii Blibj, B. Ethui ; 
BiBDuitoii, Noimuii Uugbrouk. Wberl- 
cr ; Batlon-upoD-Trcnt, * * ; Bmjbtoak, 
Ajer; ClipilODc. Muck; Cullinghim, 
Miclioli; Duntiable, Aodtrsoni Uerb;, 
Birl ; Fvanj Stratloid, Grudge ; Puiiun, 
Kitton; GrcHDii, * *; OultiboruDgh, 
■•: Hukkiwi, Koowlti; Kciieiing, 
J. K, HalJ-, LoKoe. Sitiine; Lolmii 
Dulel ; L.ou|(lTbaroaKli, Capr*; Lin- 
fCoFii, Da'in { Uuullun, Wfaccler ; New. 
■tk, Farktiu; NottinKhiDi, Jiimiii j 
Murlbaaploa, Bluadel); Oikliam, ■ *j 
iOlMji Simmoni; Hold, Heightonj 
Sbeeptbeid, Peieiti Soiilli<rell, MuMon | 
St. Albaat, ■ ■; Sullon-iu-the-Elaii, 
-BurdiK; Saltan in Aib 6c Id, ■■iSwan- 
wick. Flctelieti Walgnve, •*. tr.ta 
Ucmben. Clear Increav ,50. Northantp' 
(oiW Uaj 13 — Si. Enijaged, Heuii 
Blntdell, Buiditt, Burton, Grudge, 
DaaicI, IlttI (J. K.), IlciKhlun, Jamn 
(Pialm ewiTi.lS), Jarman (Heb. iii. 
14), Millar, Michula. Pretlaiid. Sim. 
taont (f Chton. vi. 18). Subject of the 
Circnlar Lelier, The Efficacy of Praier. 
The Mit Awotiaiion it (o be held al 
ftetieimg, June IS, 13, IMl. 



NEW CHAPELS OPENED. 

NAPTON, SOUTHAM. 

On Weduday.NoT. 15. 1810, a plai 

•Bd neat place of KOrahip, of the Ba[ 

tiat denortiDBlioDi "u opened al Nap- 

iouia papnloa* Tillage, about thKc milcr 



«13 

[rom Soniban, h Wttwickalnre. Re*. 
Ham. Franklin af CoTenrrj, OriSthi 
of Loug-Buckbf, and BDllomlej of Uid- 
dlelon. preached upon the occaiion. 
The lenicei irere well aliendedi and 
there appean lo b* a pleating |»o>psct 
&( uaeralneii iii ibot long uaglcclsd part 
df the connty. 



ST£EL>LANE, 

Sowisar. Hiaa Uaciras. 

Oh Thuriday, March 15, 1811, a naif 

Be piiti Chapel wu operied at^teeplane, 

10 A. M. Mr. Mann of Sbiplrj. furmer- 

■ - urof (he church meelirig in 

read, prijed, and 



i. - -, . . . 

from 1 Cor. tiii. .^ Dr. Stea 
Bradford, preached iIm ftoui Ita. Iii. 7, 
■ndconcluded. Ilalf-pait 1. P. H. Mr', 
Hallun (Independent Minister at Sawer> 
bT)prayed ;andUr.Cocliin(IndopcndeDt 
ivWsier at Haiifui}, preB<:hcd from 
Dan. ii. 44. and concluded. Evening) 
Ilairpnii e, Mr. Jackson of Hebden- 
bridgc, prated ; and Mr. Djer of Bacup 
preached Irom Phil. iii. B, and con- 
cluded. The collf clioni toHitdt liquid- 
aling Ihe debt amounted Id^34 I6i. 6i. 
The old ehopel al Sleeplene bud iiol 
been built aboie jeienly yean, bnt 
«a] nl firsi built 10 very iligliily, as to 
brcome of late very dangerDui nhea 
filled Milh people. The present is ■ good 
substdiilisi building, 41 feel by S3 in* 
Hde 1 and hai cost about ^600, moch of 
which ii already paid. In Ihe jeat 
1814a poor^irl, who was theD bnt quite 
a child, bearmir talk of iliii new cbapal. 
she has been for Gie jeais past sa*ing all 
her half-pennies for ihat objecl. and bad 
SBTCd 3s. 6d. for the new chapel bj Iha 
lime ils erection comneoced. TIic iu- 
ming . a e. ^ 



B.irrLE. SUSSEX. 

On Taeiday. Febigar; 17, 1B91, a 
new Meeting bouse, called Ziiin Chapel, 
belonging lo llie Ba)>Lisi dci'UDilnaiion, 
was opened for public worship. In iba 
laoming Ihe Ree. Mr. Ivimey uf Lort- 
don read and praved ; ihe Res. Mr. 
Shirley of Seveo b.<k> preached froia 
P*.ciiiii. 14-, and i be Rev. Mr Smith 
of Rye concluded in prayer. In (hie 
■fleinoan the Ite.. Mr. Vresa (Ind)^ 
pendent) of HealhGeld read and prayeifj 
Ihe ftcT. Mr. iTimey ut Loiiduo pieacb' 
ed Ihim Ps. iiTii. 4i and (he Rei. Mi. 
Tidd ofWarfbDnleuaelnded in prayer. 
In ihe etenini (he Rei, Mr. Oiti>(Indc- 
prndcni) of Hastings read aul qia^edt 






€14 



1N*T£LL1GENCB, &€• 



Ihe Ker. Mr. Hoby of Loodoa preacbcd 
from 1 Cor. i, tl, and coocluded in 
fraver. 

. The MfTiMs of the day afforded much 
^leasara to all who were present. It 
was pcculiArlT gratifying to the friends 
of evangelical uolh to witness a larger 
congregation aasenbled togetbert on this 
interesting occasioiif fur public worship, 
tlian has been witnessed in this town 
lor many year*. By the persevering 
exertions of a few pious indindasls, the 
cause of Christ has been carried on 
amidst much discouragement ; and it is 
hoped that tlie tide of immorality and 
infidelity, which has long deluged the 
to«rn and neighbourhood of Battle, has 
been arrested in its progress. Fur two 
•r three yeai's past the congregation has 
gradaally increased so as to reqoire a 
much larger place of worship ; but being 
|br the most part poor, and suflfering 
from the pressure of the times, they are 
■nable to defra^f the whole cxpen&e 
of their new place ; consequently an 
appeal on their behalf must be made 
to the benevolence of a religious public, 
which appeal, it is hoped, will not be 
made in vain. 



ORDINATION. 



NEW CHURCH am» ORDINATIOir. 



BATTLE, SUSSEX. 

On Wednesday, February 28, 18S1, 
Ur. James Punlis (late student at Step- 
ney Academy) was ordained Pastor of 
the Particular Baptist Church at Buttle, 
Sussex. The Rev. Mr. Davis (Inde- 
pendent) of Hastings commenced the 
aervice by reading the scriptures and 
praying; the Rev. Mr. Hoby of Lon- 
don delivered a very appropriate intro- 
ductory address, requested of the church 
a public recognition of iho union that 
had been formed, and asked the usual 
questions; the Rev. Mr. Ivimey of Lon- 
don offi^rad up the ordination prayer in 
a very impressive roainicr, and deliver- 
ed an excellent and affectionate charge 
from t Tim. ii. 15; and the Rev. Mr. 
Tidd of WddUurst concluded in prayer. 
The hymns were read bv the Rev. Mr. 
Press (Independent) of Heaihfield. 

In the evening the congrcguticm again 
assembled ; when the Rev. Mr. Hoby of 
Loudon read and prayed ; the Rev. Mr. 
Giles of Chatham addressed the church 
from 1 Thess. ▼. 13; and the Rev. Mr. 
Ivimey of London concluded in prayer. 

The services of the day were truly 
gratifying, and will long be remembered 
by many, as a time oV rclxcshing from 
the praenet: vf the Lord. 



Welchpool, Montcombbysbibk* 

August 1, 18^0, at Welchpool, Mont- 
gomeryshire. Service commenced at 
two in the aflemoou. Brother Crump« 
ton of Salop read and prayed, after 
which Mr. Palmer proceeded to fOTOi 
the church of members dismissed from 
the church in Shrewsbury for the par- 
pose, with others recently bapttiea at 
Welchpool. AAer the usual questions 
Mr. Palmer prayed ; an nuanimous call 
was then given by the newly formed 
Church to Brother Ashford to become 
their pastor. Mr. Jones of Newtown 
described the nature of a gospel church, 
and received Brother Ashford's con- 
fession of faith; Mr. Jones offered up 
the ordination prayer with imposition of 
hands; Mr. Palmer gave tbe. charge 
from Rev. ii. 10 ; Mr. Edwards of Wild- 
street, London, addiessed the people 
from Acts V. 11, S^. The church and 
congregation assembled in the evening, 
when Brother Mealry read and prayed ; 
and Mr. Jones preached to the people. 

Our present meeting is a room fitted 
up by Brother Crumptoii in 1811, sub- 
ject to a lease of twcniy-une years from 
that period ; the place has been sup. 
plied by the Shropshire Itinerants once 
every fortniglit, but after ten years 
preaching there seemed no prospect of 
a cause being established* when, by a 
chain of events in Providence, Brother 
A>hford returned to his uaiive town ; he 
was appointed by tbe Sbropsbire Itine- 
rant Committee to supply tJie place re- 
gularly, which he did for eighteen 
months. Through tbe blessing of Ood 
the above is the happy result ; tbe so* 
lemn and affecting services of this day 
will, we trust, be long cherished with 
gratitude to tbe great Head of the 
chufch, who verily udfilled his pcomiae : 
Lo, I am svith you alway, even to tbe 
eud of the world. Since this, ot^cit 
have been added by Baptism. 



ORDINATIONS. 



NEWCASTLE EMLYtf. 

CAEUABTUBNSHIRS. 

MoiiOAY, June IS, 1890, the Rev. 
Timothy Thomas, Jun. was set apart to 
the pastoral office over the Particular 
Baptist Church at Newcastle Emlyii, 
Carmarthenahire. 

Public worship commenced by reading 
the Scripture, and prayers by the Rev. 
J. Morgans of Blaenyfl'us, aud the Rev. 
Simoo James of Nevin. Rev. Benjamiit 
Davis of Cilfowyr, stated the natgre of 



INTELLIQENCB, tU. 



ei5 



a fospel dinrch* aslced tlie usorI qan- 
tioDSf and received from Mr. Thomas a 
cl«ftr, coBcisef and taiitfactory coiifes- 
•ion of faith. The ordination prayer 
with the lajring ou of handt, was offered 
op bj Mr. Davit; Kcv. J. Herring of 
C«rdigaa delivered an excel ieat and 
affectionate charge (rota t Cor. ii. 16* 
** And who is safficient for these things?* 
and the Rev. J. Walk ins ol' Carmarthen 
addressed the Church in a very appro- 
priate discourse, from 1 Cur. svi. 11. 
" Let no man therelore despise him." 

In the evening the Rev. Timothjr 
Thomas, sen. of Aberdeen prayed ; Rev. 
J. Davis of Carmarthen preached from 
Acts xiii. 26 ; and the Rev. S. Jomes of 
Nevin, from Luke x&iv. 47. Thus closed 
a day of sacred gratitude for the past« 
and a livelj hope of the future prospe- 
ntj of Sioa. 



BROMLEY, MIDDLESEX. 

On Tliursdaj^, October 26, 1820, Mr. 
Josiah Denhaiu, (Student from Stepney 
Academy) was ordained pastor over the 
Particular Baptist Church, in Bromley- 
lane - buildingSv Droroley, Middlesex, 
vrhen Mr. Griffin read a portion of Scrip- 
ture — engaged in prayer — asked the 
usual questions, and delivered an af- 
fectionate address lo the church. Dr. 
Rippon offered op the ordinaiiun prayer. 
Dr. Newman delivered an appropriate 
charge, and Mr. Douglas concluded 
with prayer. 



Great ToaaiNOTON, DevoK 

Tnis is one of the placs frhich is in- 
debted to the benevolem seal of Opie 
Sasith, Esq. of Bath. Mr. Pulsford, who 
vras sent iiere in t819, was set opart as 
Uie pastor of the church, which has been 
partly colieciedi>y his labours, Dec. 13, 
1820. Mr. Sharp of Brodnich delivered 
the introdoetory discourse; Mr. Hum- 
phrey of Collumptoii offered the ordina- 
tion prayer; and Mr. Singleton of Ti- 
verton delivered Che charge to the mi- 
nister, from 2 Tim. iv. 5> and addressed 
the church from 1 Thess. v. 12, 13. 
This cause, which has been greatly op< 
posed, is DOW likely to be established. 



dlscoorte, and received froB Mr. Blaek* 

more an iacerettiug accoant of hit reli« 
gious experience, his entrance on tho 
ministry, his rensoqs for dissent, and his 
views uf divine UUih. Mr. Thomas Ed • 
moads of Leominster offered ap the or* 
dination prayer ; Mr. U. Page of Wor« 
ceiter d^vered the charge, from CuJ. 
iv. If, •< &iy ia Ardtippus,*' £cc. and 
concluded the laorning service with 
prayer, to ibe evening Mr. John Evans 
of Brecon prayed* aiMl Mr. John Jones 
of Newton, Montgoioeryshire* preached 
to the church, from 8 Cor. xiii. 1 1, ** Be 
perfect, be of good cosufort*" &c* end 
concluded with prayer. 

The viciaity of Kiugt<m wot till Iutely« 
like the greater part of Uie county la 
which it is situaled* a place of ^tosh 
darkness. By tlie persevering Jaboura 
of neighbouring aiuiisters, especiaJlj 
Mr. David Event of Dolew, a bmall so- 
ciety was gathered, and a small meeiini:- 
house built, about twelve years ago. 
Nearly at the same time, Mr. Ueorge 
Brown, now of Pendlchill, Lnnca^thire, 
was called to the pastoral <>fiice. His 
labonrs were much blessed, the meeting 
was repeatedly enlarged, and tlte church 
gradually increased to its present state, 
consisting of about sisty-five members. 
Mr. Blacicmore*» prospects are encou. 
raging. May the divine blessing on hm 
ministry, and the influence of a humble, 
holy conversation in those committed 
to hii charge, contribute to enlighten 
and improve a tract of country, which, 
I in a degree, equal, if not superior, to 
siiiuR. I most parts of the island,' claims the at- 
tentioB and compassion of ChristiajUto 



KINGTON. HEREFORDSHIBE. 

Oit Thursday, December 14, 1820, 
Mr. Samuel Black more, late a atudent 
at Bristol, was ordained pastor of ilie 
£aptiit church at Kington, Hereford- 
shire. Mr. Preeca of Tenbury com- 
menced the service with reading and 
prayer. Mr. David Evans of Dolew, 
Kadnorshire* delivered the introductory I 



The Rev. J. H. Hinton, late of Ha- 
verfordwest, has accepted the call of 
the Baptist Church, HosierVlane, Read* 
ing, and we arc happy to hear with 
prospects highly encouraging. 

NOTICJE. 

WALWORTH. 
Tlte Annual Sermon to Young People 
will be preached at the Rer. Mr. Davi»*« 
Chapel, East-street, by the Rev. Mr. 
Morrison of Brompton* for the bene/ii of 
the Female Charity School and School 
of Industry. Service to begin ai Four 
o'clock in the afternoon. 
• m ^ m 

EaRATii in our Uui Numhr. 

P. 143. C.f L. 4 from b. For ••changes" 
read ** charge*.** 
144. C.2. l« 1. For'Mhe*' read "be." 
178. C. 1 L. 9 from b. For ** 18:21" 



LONDON ANNUAL MEETINGS IN MAY. 

Tuadajf Iff.— Amyn.— >Cbubcr MittiONART Socibtt. Freemasons' Hall* 
Great Queeii*Strcet, Lincoln's-inn Fields. The Ri^ht Hoooarable the Pretideot in 
the Chair. No persons to be admitted without tickets. The fist Anaiversarj 
Sermon was preached Monday evening at St. Bride's^ Fleet-street* bj the Rev. Wm. 
Juwett, M. A. 

Wefinesday, 2d, — Mmndng, — Half-past Ten. — Sooibty for promotiico 
CvRTSTXANiTY AMONGST TBE Jf.ws. SeHDons at St. Paol'St CoTent-garden, by 
the Rev. Wm. Bnshe.M.A. Rector of St. George's, Dablio. — And Friday the 4th ; 
open at eleven; Chair (Sir Thomas Baring, Bart. M.P.) at Twelre* Annual Meet- 
ing at the King's Concert Room. Haymarket 

Morning, — At Eleven.— British and Forbicn Bxbls Sooistt. Seventeenth 
Aunoal Meeting at Freemasons' Hall. The Rt. Hon. LordTeignmouthinthe Cbair. 

Thunday, Sd, — Af^mtiuF.— Half-past Ten.— Pratxb Book and Homilt 
.SociETT.-— Sermon at Christ Church* Newgate-street* by the Rev. Edward Garrard 
Marsh, M.A. Minister of St James's Chapel, Hampstead. — And th4 fane day* the 
Ninth Annual Meeting atStationers* Hall. Chair at Two. 

Saturdayt 5th,-^NoaH» — London Hibernian Society fob bstablisbih* 

SCUOOLS, AND CIBCVLATINO TBB HoLY SCBIPTUBEt, IN IbELANO. Annual 

Meeting at the City of London Tavern. 

Sunday^ &tfu — London Female Penitentiary Society. Annnal Sermon 
at Tavistock Chapel, Broad Court, Drury-lane, by the Rev. Lewis Way, A. M. 
Prayers to commence at Eleven. — And Monday i!ie 7 tfc.— Fourteenth Annnal 
Meeting at Stationers' Hall, the Right Honourable Lord Carrington to take the 
Ch^ir precisely at Twelve. — Tickets to be had of the Secretary, Thomas Pellatt* 
Esq. Ironmongers' Hall, and at the Institution at Pentonville. 

Mondtty,7th, — Momtt^.— London Itinerant Society. To breakfast at 
Six at the Uity of London Tavern. Chair (Samuel Robinson, Esq.) at Seven. 

Noon. Port ovLondonSociett FOB PROMOTING Religion among Seamen. 
City of London Tavern. The Right Honourable Admiral Lord Gambier, G.C.B. 
inllie Chair — ^And Tuesday the 9th, at Eleven and Three. Two Anniversary Ser- 
mons on board the Society, Floating Chapel, moored off Wappiog Old Stairs* by the 
Rev. Drs. Bogue and Waugh. 

Ttutday, 8<A. — Evening,%\x, Irish Evangelical Society. City of London 
Tavern. Thomas Walker, EUq. in the Chair. 

Tuesday, Qth. — Evening, Half-past Six. Continental Socibtt. Sermon at 
the Church of the United Parishes of St. Andrew by the Wardrobe and St. Anne* 
Black friars, by tlie Rev. W. Marsh, M.A. Vicar of St. Peter's, Colchester. — And 
Wednesday the 16th, Noon, Annual Meeting at Freemasons^ Hall, Great Queen- 
street, Lincoln's-inn Fieids,Sir Thomas Baring, Bart. M.P. President, in thejChair. 

Wednesday, 9th. — Morning, Half-past Five. Sunday School Union. Annnal 
Bileeting. To breakfast at the City of London Tavern. 

Wednesday, 9th.^-Moming,' Half-past Ten. London Missionary Socibyt. 
^rnon at Surry Chapel by the Rev. George Clayton of Walworth. — Same Day, 
E>:ening, Six. Sermon at the Tabernacle by the Rev. T. Craig of Booking — 
Thursday the iOth, Momtng, Half-past Ten. Meeting for business at Queen-street 
Chapel. Evening, Six. Sermon at Tottenham-court Chapel by the Rev. John 
Drown of Biggar* Scotland — Friday the lUh, Morning, Half-past Ten. Sermon at 
St. Bride's, Fleet-street, by the Rev, Dr. Wiiliams of Stroud, Gloocestersbtre. 
— £t;eNtti^,S'ix. The Lord's Supper at Sion Chapel* Silver^street Chapel* Tonbridge 
Chapel, and Orange-street Chapel. 

SaturtUy, "^Uth'-^fianing, Six, Religious Tract Society. Twenty-second 
Atinual Meeting. To breakfast at t^e City of London Tavern. Chair (Joseph 
Heyner,Esq.) at Seven. 

Afamiii^, Half-past Ten for Eleven. — Protestant Society fob yve Pro- 
tfction of Religious Liobbty. Annual Meeting at the London Tavern* 
Bisliopsgate-street Some distinguished Friend to Religious Freedom is expected 
lo preside. 

Monday, i 4th, ^•'Evening, Half-past Six. Home Missionary Society. 
Annual Meeting at the City oT London Tavern. Thos. Wilson, Esq. in the Chair. 

Tuesday. 15th. — Noon, BatTiiR and Foreign School Society. Sixteenth 
Annual Meeting* at Freemasons' Hall, Great Queen-street. 

Thursday, 17th. — Morning, Eleven. Obpbans* Wore in g School, City 
Road. Sermon at the Chapel in the School by the Rev. John Clayton, junior, 
pinner at Four* at the Old London Tavern, Bishopsgate-street. 

COUNTRY MEETINGS IN MAY. 

S/h, S/ackheath Aaxiliary Bible Socictyi at l\ie Greeti lAati, l&\%^VVv«a.Uv. Chair 

" he taken at Noon. — 16tbp Ule of Ely Aaiocialion at. "fiuratW— ^ft^,'^x^Oi\\^v 

bJre Ditto, at Wmddtsdon llill— «9lh nnA 30th,'EwttTL'DVVXo. ix^wsiVw*. 



217 



Svis^ Cj^ronicle* 



The Committee feel happy ia having^ it in Ibcir power to lay before 
their Friends the Retarns of the Saperintcndents of tlic SchoolK, by ^virbicb 
they will gee the advantages which are commanicated to the peasantry of 
IreUmd by the scriptural education aflbrdcd by the Society. It should be 
tlie constant prayer of all who wish the evangelical emancipation of 
Ireland,' that H£, '< with whom is the residue of the Spirit/' will '< pour 
out the Spirit from on high;*' without which, even the memory being 
stored with ** the words which the Holy Ghost teachetb/' will not be suf- 
iioient to renew the heart, and sanctify the conduct 



PRESENT STATE of thi SCHOOLS! 

IN THS I 

PROVINCE OF CONNAUGHT, 

or THE 

BAPnST IRISH SOCIETY, 

In a Letter from the Rev» Josiah Wilson, 
the Superintentientt to the Secretary, the 
Rev. J, Jvhney, dated 

Dublin, March U, 1821. 
Mt bbar Sir» 

I HAVE again the satlifaction of inform- 
ing yoa^that notwithstanding I he late very 
aeTcre ttornu, oar school bark is steadily 
parsolng her course to the desired haven. 
The gale has recently been heavy, and the 
waves have risen high; bat HE, whose 
province it is to calm the perturbed ocean, 
though he may not yet have said, *' Peace, 
be still !*' has manifestly restrained its 
power, and, in many instances, caused its 
▼iuience to subserve his own purposes. 
Mow short-sighted is man ! How impo- 
tent his rage ! and how vexatious to him 
who indulges it, when even his malice b 
over-ruled to accomplish the object which 
he Intended to frustrate. This has been 
the case with respect to some of the 
schools : the very violent measores that 
bare been adopt «i to suppress them, have 
caused them to be unusually well attended. 
So true it is, that Jehovah ** maketh the 
wrath of man to praise him ;" and we 
may be assured the latter part of the text 
will be fulfilled, ** the remainder of wrath 
he will restrain." 

Tbi«i fact has been established also in 
another way, in reference to the tcriptiMrei 
being used in the schools. Yon have, of 
ooiirsci heard of a new Society having been 



formed in this city, for the education of 
the poor of Ireland ; one of its fundamen- 
tal principles is, that the Bible thaU not be 
a school-hook ! 

This circumstance has excited a lively 
zeal in the friends of the Holy Scriptures; 
and some who were previously almost 
inactive, are now alive to the subject, and 
contribute cheeTfully to support those 
schools in which the Bible is used. One 
gentleman showed me a card that was left 
nim, requesting a subscription to .1 school, 
from whence the scriptures were excloded, 
that was established under ihc immediate 
patronage of the ** Archangel Michael T* 
There is reason to suppose that this caul 
pleaded very successfully for our ach69kk% • v 

You have already received the accoiia| Jl 
of the schools in the coauties of Gn%V^ 
Clare, Tippirary, IVcstmeath, &c ; I nf- 
joice that these seem to be rivalling thotf 
which are under my supcriutcndcnoe in 
the county of Conuaught. In ihtijifiv' 
one schools under my care, there are nearly 
five thousand children ; one thousand of 
whom are reading that word which is so 
highly prized by those who know id 
value, and so much opposed by those . 
who are ignorant of iL 

Of the one thousand readers, eight 
hundred are committing the scriptures tp 
memory ; all of these can repeat from lih^ 
to four chapters each; 450 can repeat 
five cha])ters each; 240, ten cliapters 
each ; 100, tfie whole gospti of St. John 
each; 60, twenty-five chapters each ; 50^ 
thirty chapters each : 10, forty chapters 
each; 3, seventy chapters each; and 
one, a hundred chapters in tJie Ket$ 
TettamentI What the result of such 
a practice may be, HE only knows, whose 
prerogative It Is to comuuivd Wv^VA^as^^ 



fl» 



IRISH CBRONICLB^T 



Different opinions erid^nlTj prevail among 
jiu-n oil the sahjtxt ; but it remains to be 
proved, that a mind wi!l be injored which 
IS thus st'jred itith the word of God; that 
Mch Bible scholars will heoone worst 
children, worie ciiivns, or leu oseful 
members in the church. To this it may 
be added, that all the committers practise 
writing and cyphering, and that consider^ 
«bU pruficiencj has been made by thi-m, 
partiCTiIarlj by the b')ys« who ar« in ge- 
neral very anxious to acquire a gM>d 
knowledge of both. 

The " Congregational Schools** merit 
particular notice, fur the infumiation of 
their benevolent supporters. 

Th« • Hariow School has 105 girls 
occabiooaUy attending ; 55 of wbtira I saw 
at the last inspection, with oMuidcrably 
improved manners and appearance: all 
present were either learning their lettirs, 
their spellings, their scrif)tiire>tasks. or 
using that very oseful instrument the 
neecUe, which they had neircr used bcfuic. 
Five girls have left the school since its 
commencement, for servitucie in difiVreiit 
femilies. 'i'hc misiress is Airs. Henry, a 
widow, in tlie Tuwnlaud of LangixiJ], 
Cconty of Slijzo. 

The "Little Alie-alrretSchuol,** Mrs. 
Uariyn mistress, who is n\%o a widow, u> 
iu Uroroanain, county of Leiiiiro ; enjoy- 
ing the advantage of one or more ladies 
Wuig generally present. At the last in- 
spection, 83 out of 121 diildien were 
prafcnt; 29 of whom are cumiuUuiig the 
scriptures to memory, and the greater 
part are making great advances in ilie use 
^ mt (he needle. 

The •< Uon-fctreet Walworth School'' 
^ ^ reapiug the advantage of not being 
nuty in fixing on a miiiiress. A very 
raltable one, as to clinracttr and talent, 
has been now found in the person of 
Mrs. James, who has establislied the 
fchool in River's Town, Diunty of Sligo, 
and has already 67 giil% whose progress 
in so few months is very gratifying. This 
school is superintended by a most respect- 
able lady ; the governess in whose family 
also, delights in such labours of love. 

Tlie «• North-end Cray ford School*' is 
Sn Doorish, county of Sligo; Mrs. Sweeny 
laistress. In tlUs school, as well as some 
others, several of the girls out of 57 
which belong to it, never had a needle in 
their hand before. This woman's hosbdnd 
i^ li« iog. but not toitk her, she being a 
hentic I She was soma time ego brought 
to n knowled^ of the truth, and because 
ah<? could not conscientiously attend mass, 
confession to the priests, &c. slie was 
abandoned by Idm wlio was lawfully bound 
to be her protector. She will now, I 
'^"ht Dot, bi abl9 to obtain a tubsuteuoc, 



in a way perfectly cong«iM NflftlKl 

indinatioiu, and advantageous to some of 
the rising generation. 

The " Inckncy School* is one that has 
been of great use to both master and 
scholars. The master's name is Wallace ; 
his school is in Rathnamauck, county of 
Mayo. He has not ouly been brought to 
see the errors of the Church of Romef bat 
by attentively reading the scririiiires» has, 
I doubt not, been ■* changed from dark- 
ness to light, and from the power of Satan 
unto God.* He is an able teacher, and 
indefatigable in bis business, and baa a 
school containing 76 cliildrcn. 

Tlie " Harorocr^mitb ScbooT is kept bj 
lUis. CaUwell, in ika lownland af CoU 
lien^, county of Mayo, who viaa educated 
in one of the Charter-schoob of IralaDd t 
her husband is a weaver, but doea not en- 
joy good liealih. He assists her in the 
>clic>oi, which is a great service to the 
cliildrcn. There are both boya and gMa 
ill this «rhool. and at tlie last inspection 
ilicre were srvcniy-five present. 

The " Cliaiham Scliool" b in Baffina. 
carrow, nhcn* our Irish Reader, the in- 
comparaU** Willium Moore, residea; and 
near the rvsidence of that tried friend of 
Ireland, Coloiitrl Pet cival. Ilia master b 
F. Harrowby, « ho, I doubt not, b con* 
vetted from the wiclttdneMt, as well as the 
trrors of his former ways. He and hb 
scholars are emulous that tliis should be 
the host school on the eatabUshment : In 
prool of which, I mention, that at a recent 
exumiiiaiioti every scholar in the reading 
rlas.H obtained n premium. Here were 
one hundred and four present at the last 
uispeciion. 

ihc -Trowbridge School" b in the 
county cif Sligo, in the village of Raihcor- 
ir.irk. 'Hie master, T. Gibson, is the pariah 
clerk, and of course a Protestant* but 
^rtuily csrecmtd in the neighbourhood. 
He kept a pay school for several year^ 
but was<jbHged to discontinue i>, fromtha 
iucieascd poverty of the people. He baa 
in his^rce icAo'*/ sevcutv children attend* 
ing. It is very near the chapel dooraof 
a priest, who is an inveterate enemy to 
Bible schools. 

The " Eagle-street Schod," ihough th« 
last mentioned, is not the least in ini« 
portance. It is kept by Patrick Uenry| 
in Roasky, county of Mayo ; an exoeUeiit 
Irish scholur, and very desirous of .for* 
wardins his children, of whom he has 8i 
under his care. Tlie neighbourhoofl of 
this school was formerly the rendcxvoos nf 
a gang nf robbers ; may we not hope that 
the " den of thieves" will become ** ao 
house of prajfer ?" 

These, Sir, are the particulars of the 
scUoob under m j care at the present tint ^ 






imu cnsoNicis. 



«9 



-fi U-not for BMt-lD make oomnMi^i, but to 
slate facts, and tlwrrfore I conclude by 
mtkjmg, that I ud 

Yoarl aiKictionitcly, 

J. WlL«OW. 
P^. I mn bappy to add, that I brought 
flpom Connanght with me to Dublin , 
ivfame I am asislsthig Mr. West \a criUcct. 
ing for the Society* thirty pounds; and 
added aevan lo it in Athlone« 

%• There are fonr of the ** Congrega- 
tional Schools^ in the County of Clare, nf 
which the Secretary is onty ucquainled 
with the foHowing particulars. 

The tvro '* Norwirb Schools,** situated 
at Scaiiff and Tomgrany, are composed 
entirely of female children, and are under 
the care of suitable mistresses, who teach 
tbem, in addition to reading aikl writing, 
ki^tting and needle- wjork. They conMst 
of forty-eight scholars, who repeated 
twenty-eight chapters : these schools are 
aapported at ^'8 per annum eacfi, and ore 
paid for bf two ladies at Norwich. 

The " Bristol School" contains one hun- 
dred and Yourteen children, of whom tlinrty- 
•even read the scriptures ; it is kept by 
J. Malony in Ttirngranv. There urcre 
|irescnt at the last inspection one hundred 
and five, who repeated twenty-vi^lit 
chapters. 

The •* Seven Oaks Schoul** is in ScnrifF. 
L. Guerin, master. It contains one hun- 
dred and twenty seven children : prrsent 
at last iuspcction, one hundred. There 
are twenty-two readers of the scriptures, 
who repeated eighteen chapters. 



Sainact «/* A Tmut from Mr, Wiliiam 

JliMTf f mOitd 

March 17, 1BS1. 

Even in that countryj where the greatest 
•ppontion is loaHe to the schools, (lie 
truth is prevailing over error to a vry 
great cxteuL I have spent nearly three 
weeks among them, and have exi>os<d 
the snpentitions, blasphemies, and sor- 
ceries of the priests, wiihuul giving any 
o6[ence, or provoking any contradiction , 
The Sabbath readers uf tlie Trish scrtpturos 
have done wonders, in preparing the 
peopU;*$ minds f(>r a more clear .explana* 
taon-tban they arc caimbk' of giving themi 
whrn anydoubliul questions are proposed. 
I lately visited a great number of persons, 
whom I had never seen bt^fure, who were 
assembled to bear frpin ihe an explana- 
tion of the scriptures ; and I was told by 
Bryan Hart, one of the Sabb<ith readers, 
that I might freely point out the '* strong 
delusion, as it was their curnest. desire. 1 
coatinued ii^structiiig them four hour% and 
yf^t tben about to leave them, but others 
eaae la, and caused jse to cpiitinuc the 



whole until daik night While I was 
showing them tlie different objects of 
worship they had, and their ignorance of 
the only way of worship, a woman ex« 
daimed, *' I am greaily mistaken if yoi4 
have not cariied the beadt before now 
voiirseif.*' 1 told her that I had not, but 1 
knew priestcraft as well as tli« priests did 
themselvip. Thcv desired me to return 
the next day, which was Sundity* £arlj 
m the morning a man called at my bouM^ 
where I was, to collect towards building 
a chape/ / There were present the hu^ 
band, wife, and san. 'I1ie busl>and made 
no reply, but the wife broke silence, and 
told biro, that «pa penny ff their fumtjf 
the priest should never handle. more; and 
a chM|iel door ihey would never enter 
again ; for tliat they had found the waj- 
to lieavea wUkttU wumcjf and vithsfU 
price* 

From tia Rev. Mr. Keen to the Her. 
J. West. 

Cork, March 18, 1881. 
My diak Sir, 

Last night I returned from visiting and 
insprtcling the schooU, and now write you 
the account of their &tate ; which, upon 
ihc wliole, and amidst much opposition, I 
may pronounce prosperous. 

The school which the Committee de- 
sired me to opeu, on the application of 
the Kev. Mr. Sadler, has bt-en delayed 
longer than we could have wished, in con- 
sequence of the house not being ready ; 
ai>d also of ow not btring able to obtain a 
suitable master. Tliese obstacli'S ore at 
length removed, and the school has coas* 
menced operations. Hicre is, howcveft 
one difficult V still existing, viz. the how 
is '* too strait.*' llie number of childreB 
now in it is 95 : several have been refased 
admission for want of room to nccom* 
modalc them. If the sdtool should ^e 
on as it lias commenced, I. hope we 
shall be able to knock down one of the 
walls, and build up another nt some dis- 
tance from the present boundaries. 11^ 
would nut be attended with much expense, 
as the mansion is neither composed of 
Portland stone^nor Iiish granite; nothing,! 
assure you, but a Ktilc humble mud, which, 
in this country, is by no means difiailt to 
quarry ; andt in such an erection as the 
one in question, does not inquire much of 
the arts of a cupning workman ; though 
less evil, and more good, will, in all pro- 
babllit Vf be done in it, than in many a 
splendMl edifice. 

As almost all the good Sn the world is 
done by ladies, t am happy to inform yon 
that a lady is the U(e %\\^ sovX ^1 ^\\> 
school', w V.\\9Ll\\.\v%,\*^<i'^<iTvv(a!s%!km€^ 



22^ 



: i:\-\i c MRoNici.r. 



at the niastcr provicicd b^^ the Society : I the schools, which was not former] f 

■ball* DO doubt, be able to lend the Sodety | cstablisbed to socb good adnuita|e. HV 

pleasins mtriligence of its liitiire nseftiU 

nesiu I moft, for the pctient^ leave lit, 

and conduct too to tbetecondoo the Bit» 

which it ai Newsam Town* and has latelj 

leceived the shock of an caithqoake ; so 

common in this oountrj* where the schools 

are situated. The consequence is, there 

are onlj S3 children at present in tlib 

schooL 
The next school is at Inch, and contains 

at present 56 children, who seem to be 

improving a little ; it has, liowever, one 

of the masters of «* the old school," all of 

whom I am removing as last as I can 

with safHj. 

The next is at Kilmagrass : I found 54 
thiMien present. Tiiis is Sullivan's 

school, which I wrote jou about not long 

since. 

The last school which I have to men- 
tion is in tlie town of Bandan, and is at 

present bleeding of the wounds it received 

not long since. The number of children 
b53. 

The total number in the five schools is 
J71. 

I will thank you to send me some books 
of different descriptions immediately, as 
all the schools want books. Some sheets 
with large print, and easy lessons, 
would be of great service in tne scboolsb 
and a great saving of books. You 
will see by the letter which accompanies 
this from Mr. Sadler, that he is anxious 
to see something of thb sort introduced 
into the schools. I have two pounds ten 
shillings in hand, and shall print imnie> 
diately class papers, which I mentioned to 
joa some time since, and which 3'ou autho- 
nnd me to print ; I can also print what 
Mr Sadler mentions, at very little expense, 
if you approve, as I hope you will. 
Yours affectionately, 

C. T. Kisy. 



From the Bev> Mr. Thamat to the 
Secretary. 
Limerick, Hatch 20, 18S1. 
Mtdsak Sib, 

I have just returned from inspecting tlie 
•diools in the county nf Clare, and 
Nenagh,fai the county of Tipperary ; and 
am happy to say, that tiiey are in a pros- 

Esrovs state. Two of them have been 
jured from opposition, hot thev are now 
doing welL Ijie rest are very fiiU, and I 
am greatly gratified with the progreu the 
children have made, and the great num- 
ber of chapters committed to memory by 
such children as can read ; though they 
have been, on pain of excommunication, 
prohibited to commit a sinsle verse to 
1 iDcloso a note from a kind 
4 uader whom I have placed one of 



\ 



has built a school-room, aad now Is aboa^ 
to build aiiothtr» as the preseot will duC 
hold 'the nomher of children that wonU 
attend. He has also given a goiiiea» sod 
his worthy lady another; which I have 
sent to Mr. West: they will be sub^ 
scribers. , 

The Irish Readers have taimht several 
adults and children to read the Irisli scrip- 
tures. The adults now read the scriptures 
for their families, who formerly spent 
their time in sin. I wuh for as many 
tracts as you can possibly send. 

I preached at Newmarket and Scariff*, 
in the county of Clare ; and at Mount Shan- 
non, in the coantj of Galway, to a large 
room-full of people, who appear very glaid 
to hear me, and request I would come as 
oAen as possible ; they say, 1 must stop 
with them a few days when I go next. 
Mount Shannon is about 50 miles from 
here. I preached at Kilfinan, in tlie 
county of Limerick, two evenings, and 
had double as many the second evening, 
which was a very gpod congregation ; and 
I have been much delighted with another 
person, to whom the Lord has lieen grad* 
ously pleased to make me oieful. I had 
a good hope of her for some time ; bat, 
with truth, I hope I can now say, she 
is a true believer. 

I continue to preach five times a week 
in Limerick ; three times to the 79th re- 
giment, wlien the congregations are 
crowded, and nothing, can exceed their 
attention. I have good reason to believe 
that several of them are turned to the 
Lord with purpose of heart. Two of the 
men came part of the way home with me 
on Sunday evening, when they said, " We 
never saw such work in our regiment be- 
fore ; several in each company sitend tlieir 
spare time In reading the Bible, and ilk 
prayt-r." I said, •'What a mercy that 
we can come to the Saviour just as we 
are, without any preparation to recommend 
us to his favour, but a sense of onr guilt 
and our misery!" Theyre.plied, *«Alib 
Sir ! we have not lone known that" 

I considered it pnident to discontinue 
the Kilfinan School at the end of last 
Quarter ; therefore it is not mentioned fai 
the statement : I hope to esUblish it to 
advantage the commencement of neit 
quarter. 

Praying that the Lord may abondantfy 
bless the Society's efforts, I am. 
Their unworthy servant, 

Wir. Thomas. 

P. S. The fourteen schools under my 
care contain 1,185 children : of these, 
fSS are reading the scriptures, who, 
among tiiem, can repeat 159 chapters ki 



£fil 



^t00tonar? fleralti. 



PTIST MISSION. 



Re l^tatminipi. 



lEDFORDSHIRR 



Divo to the notice which ap- 
•or Number for Mmrch, » meet^ 
Kkl at the Old Meeting bouM, 
on Wednesday, the Slst of 
I form an Auxiliary Miauonary 
V the County. 

Homing of that day, after prayer 
fw, John Dyer, Sectary of the 
liirioDary Society, an eicellent 
wai preached by the Rev. Ro- 
of Leicester, from John i. 35* 
I ike next day after John ttooi, 
fkit dudpUt ; and Uokmg vpon 
h€ walked, he aaiih. Behold the 
Tad I Mr. Hall alto dosed the 
prayer. 

;ain in the afternoon, when the 
rat formed, not eidosively in 
' one denomioation, but on tlie 
wind pie which h«i, for many 
m adopted by our liretiuren in 
tff^ in piomoting itinerant la- 
ueir own neighbourhood. To 
vever, to every oootribntor, tlie 
m freedom of choice as to the 
ion of his contribution, it is ju- 
cnacted, by one of tlie rufes, 
b« payment of each subscription 
^lioD, it shall be distinctly spe> 
rhkh of the various Missfooarj 
• the same sliaU be applied. At 
ng the diair was ably filled by 
ier» Esq. of Biggleswade ; and 
IS resolotions were moved and 
bj the following nunisters : the 
knderson of Dunstaiile, Hillyard- 
d» Morell of St. Neots, Sim- 
Olncy, Bull of Newport Pag* 
Itt of Great Staog^ton, J>yeff of 

. XIII. 



Battowa, Uobson 0^* Moldoo, Cottrlsf f^ 
Ridgroounf, Seckerson (Wesleyan) of 
Bedford, Manning of Gamlingay, Iliiidft 
of Sharubrook, Hemming of Kimbolfon, 
West of Harrold, Daniel of Luton, An- 
thony of Bedford, and Middlediicb of 
Biggleswade. 

The worthy Chairman was requested to 
accept the office of Treasurer t6 the So- 
cieiy, and Messrs. Hinyard and Middie- 
dltcn were appointed Secfelaries. 

The evening service was ooiAnenoed in 
prayer by tiie Rev. A. B. Seckerson, of 
the Wesleyan denomination, after which 
a very appropriate sermon was ddhrered 
by the Rev. S. Hillyard, minister of tJw 
place, from Psalm zori. 10—13, Say 
among the heathen th^t thtLurdreignaih ; 
the world alto thall be mtablithed ihoi it 
thaU not be mooed ; he AaU Judge tba 
people righieontifi. Lei tho hemtnt fw^ 
Jokop aatd kt tho mrtk begUd; let ikm 
ten roar, and the fubtom vieroof. Let 
the field bejonfaU mod ail that it therein ; 
then thall all the trees of the ttood refotee 
btfora the Lord; fir he eometKftr he 
ioauth tojndge the earth; hethaUJadg^ 
the world with rightoomanait, and the peo» 
pU with hit truth. Rev. £. Daniel con- 
cluded in prayer. 

We believa that we express tb« general 
sentiment when we lav that the whole ef 
these servioea wem, in a high degree, 
pleasing and edifying; and calculated, 
under a divine blessing, to dilFuse a flvdy 
interest in the aacred canse they were de- 
signed to promote. Seveial of the minis- 
terinff brethren, with a fraukneu which 
did them honour, acknowledged that they 
had not been sofiidaitly attcntivo to the 
daims of fhe heathen world, and avowed 
their determination to aid the Sodety to 
the utmost of tbdr power. Besides seve- 
ral handsome subscriptions and donations^ 
the sum of «£4S ft. was' collected at the 
doors ; which was presentod to the &p- 
tist MisiiMMij Society. In kind consi- 
deration of toe pnNDt low state of its 
funds. 



t22 



MlSSlONAttT HERALD. 



REV. MR- WARD. 



We feel great pleasure in au- 
nouDciDg th»t Hr. Wui arrived 
safely at Lavefpool on Saturday 
evening, the 14th inst (April,) 
after a passage of nineteen days 
from New York. The friends •f 
religion in the United States have 
shewn him great kindness, and 
contributed about 9000 dollars 
towards the College at Serampore. 
Mr. Ward was mercifully pre- 
served IB ffood heahh, though, at 
one period, the cold was so imr 
tense as to freeze his breath on 
his pilk>w. It is his intention, 
without dehiy, to make the ne- 
cessary arranffenents for return- 
ing to Bengal with Mrs, Marsh- 
sisn and her femily ; and it is 
probable that they will leave 
Engkind some time in the month 
of June. 



Our readers will observe with 
pleasure, that the Society has 
(een aided by some very liberal 
donations in the course of last 
month; and among these, they 
will notice, with peculiar gratiti- 
cation, the generous contributions 
of some distinguished members 
of the established Church. It is 
merely an act of justice to state, 
that the condescending kindness 
and promptitude with which the 
apphcation of the Seeretai^ was 
honoured by the individuals al- 
luded to, added not a little to the 
vakie of their donations. 



lebrity as a botanist. By the fof- 
lowing extract from a recent 
communication to Dr. Ryland^ 
(2dd of October laet,) it will be 
'seen that his fondness for this 
pleasing branch of science has 
led to results, which will proba- 
bly promote, in no small degree, 
the future welfare of the inha- 
bitants of India. 

•* I bless God, I mi as healtliy asl 
ever lemeiabcr to have beeiu I have fiir 
soma time back had much at heart tlit 
fonaation of an Agricaltiual Society hs 
India. Some voatha apo I bad a con^ 
versatkNi whh Lady HaHings on the sulv 
ject, who enooaraged me to oaka an aS* 
tempt ; in Gonseqoence of wbicb I pub* 
lithed a prospectas* and chcslated it 
throaghottt ladia. Thexcsiikis»thatoQthe> 
14th of September, an Agricultnral and Hor« 
ticoltural Society was feraiedk wUoli con» 
sists already of aboat fifty memben* By 
desire of Hie Society I wrote to Lord Ha«» 
iDgs, requesting him to become its Pabmv 
to which he aooeded. Senstal of the omsl 
opulent natifes have joined It; and I hope 
it will ultimately be of gieat benefit ta th« 
Country, and conttibote to prcpaia its ii>- 
habitants for the time when * they shell 
beat their swords into pbwshares^ and theif 
spears into proningboohs.* " 



Mottifsn SvttViismt. 



SERAMPORB. 



F&OM his early years the vc* 

aerable Dr. Carey has been 
strongly attached to the cnltim- 
tion of a garden^ and, since his 
residence in India, is well known 
to have acquired considerable ce- 



The following interesting ac- 
count of the progress of the Col- 
lege at Serampore is exlracted 
^m a Letter, kitely receiTcd 
(Vom Dn Marshman, by a Gen- 
tleman in LiverpooL 

*< The College is is an advandag elalcw 
and we haTe strong reason to hope It ^M 
prove an extensive blessing to die ca«se 
of God hi India. The boildmgs appear 
to MS a most important part, aa withoal 
them a single step cannot he lakea ia » 

> place where there are none to he hired 

; lor the pnrpoK as hi England ; and whf 
these are campleted* I haTO little doabs 
that the CoNego wiH be fitily snppoited. 
We have been hitherto c ao ee ding lj fa- 
voured of PfovKlcnce hi the stepa wehava 
taken hendti. We have been enabled^ 
byparchaaing five or six povodaof ground^ 
to obtahi confessedly the best sitnatioB 
lor the Cuttegr ia the Presidemy of Awt 
WilKaro, ^id perhaps in India, when 
the retired ^tuation of Serampore, and'yee 
its vicinity to the capital-, are con sid e r ed*- 

! It is a fine open spot on the baniM ef the 
river, and precisely opposite the conntry 

\ T«iiA«!VQ& qI Vhc Ggveruor General of Ii^ 



.\ilSSIONAKY HERALD. 



9.t^ 



• Vid, from which the rirer partb it» which 
is th«re abom 600 jards wide. But what 
renden it or the greatnt value to us ii, 
tiiat it is ooniiguoDS to the pfpniisei on 
which wo live» m that the Otoroogh and 
porpetnal wperiBtcudence of the College 
is theifhy secured, it hciog improbable 
that an iiistiiution» in which we so much 
delight, sliooid not be watclifuUy suptr> 
iotcndcd when it is next door to os. On 
this spot it appeared desiralile to erect a 
building suiEcientlj spacious to contain 
the natiYes, who will naturally assemble 
there from all parts uf tlie country, when 
the evamiiiaiions and dbpatations are held 
in their own language, a measure whicli 
will carry the savour of the truths dis- 
cussed there from year to year througliout 
the country. On this, therefore, we have 
D«aify completed a building which con* 
taois a library and museum below, a halt 
for esamination, &c. above, and a &uite 
«f rooms above and below on each side, 
amonnting to twelve, us on each side. 
Hie hall, above which is the chief room, 
will be 66 feet wide, and 95 long, termi- 
nating in a bow of a semkircolar form, 
91 feet in dmmeter, and having seven 
windows to throw light through the halL 
Tliese windows terminate in a semicircle, 
and are Id feet in height. The halJ will 
he supported by two rows of pillars of the 
Ionic order. Ttie extent of tlie front is 
191 feet, the plinth is 4 foct, the library 
*gO in height, and the hall wUl he 84^ 
Tlie whole iiei^ht will lie nearly 60 feet. 
The entrance will contain a veranda, sup- 
ported by six pillars of tlic Doric order, 
5 feet at the base. The number of doors 
and windows in the whole buildlnp; will 
be I9f ; they Ue in general 12 feet by 5. 
The expense of this hoilding, and suites of 
rooms separate from it lor four professors, 
we mtend to meet ourselves, unless pre- 
vented by the liberality of the public. 
We at first intended to devote thereto 
tOfiOO rnpees, bat on carefully weighing 
the case, and the vakt importance of the 
object to tlie enlightening of Indiat we 
determined, if it appeared necessary, to 
meet the whole, though it slioold be 
80/KX> or «f lOiOOO, which we expect 
wiN cover tlic whole of the buildings. 
After thisk we trust tite Lord will stir up 
the pablic to support it, and if not, bleas 
and enable ns to meet all deficiencies. 
The unoccupied rooms can be occupied 
by students till we can obtain four able 
profetsois. The whole of tlie College 
pranlsea will, I think* include tight acfft, 
which leaves abundant room for the 
election of rooms for the students, nume- 
rous as thev may be, and the principal 
baildingi being fioisbcdi the cost of thesr 
w^bea 



** Our College will be open to all \ and 
no Pndobapti^ or Episcopalian, or Cal- 
viuist, or Arminian, or even Roman Catho- 
lic will ever be constrained to attend a 
lecture which would offend hb conscieuce* 
We humbly trust that it will ha mnde a 
blessing to the cause ; eveiy pkms youlht 
who can make known the truth In English 
may here receive what instruction ha 
needs ; every pious Native youth, whose 
heart is toward the service of the sane* 
tuary, will, we trust, be thorooahly fuiw 
nished ; ev^ry Native vouth of talents 
Christian by mere praiession, may here 
receive that Indian classical edocation» 
which will raise him inliteratuie above tha 
generality of the Brahmans, while lie is 
also instructed In the scriptures, and 
enable him to delcnd and do honour to 
Christianity, whether he serve society in 
a legal, medical or literary capacity, or 
be engaged in oommcrce : and from a]^ 
these wc may reasonably hope, that a 
body of Native Translators will be foraied« 
which will improve the Translations in 
their own languages, far beyond what any 
foreigner will soon be able to do ; an^ 
fiiwillr, every ihgenoous heathen youth* 
who loves knowledge, and Is aMe to sup- 
port himself, may attend the lectures in the 
College, and live ont of it, according to 
his own kleas of cast, as long as he com- 
plies with its rules in point of morality 
and diligent attendance. It is his bosinesa 
toeuurd his mind against that light whkh 
wiU shine around him on every wt^ 



SUMATRA. 



(ComhiuUfrom Ptigt 19$,) 

* 

Messrs. Evans aod Burton, m 
a postscript to their letter, dated 
the 28th of June, add : 

** The above is a cm of a latter whicb 
we forwarded by the Honourable Com 
pany's ship London, which sailed oo the 
morning of the f 5th. The evening of the 
same day brought Ui the agreeable fattrl- 
ligence of the arrival of Mr. Ward, in a 
sliip from Ratavia. Since bb has been on 
^bore, we have been mach occupied in 
consulting upon the best means of niitbCr* 
ing our grand object. Tfffin a deliberate 
coinsideration of all the circumstances 
with which we aia at present acquainted, 
it appears that the most probable means 
of pronotifig the Saviour's cause among 
the benifffated hihablnints of this Island, b 
tha estaUiihnicnt of another station* ut • 
little distance, upon tha same side of tha 
coast. This tha Qot«tuot xVteSu t«r) 



924 



1II8810NABY HERikLD. 



derirmblet tnd recommeodi TaptDoIi or 
NataJ, where there is immediate access to 
the Battas* a nomeroos set of people, and 
but little known; thoogh from what in- 
formation has been co1Iected» their total 
iguorauce, and abject conditiont call kmdlj 
upon the benevolence of those who lore 
the Redeemer. Brother Bortoo has ei« 
pressed his willingness to attempt the 
arduous undertaking, should further in- 
quiries encourage it, and we thinic the 
first expense will not be increased, while 
the plan of operations will be much en- 
larged ; and we trust that the blessing of 
God upon oar separate exertions, will ren- 
der them. In the greatest possible degree, 
instrumental in ucqoaiiiting the wretched 
Swnatramt with the blessed Jesus, who 
came into the world to save sinners. We 
most earnestly entrvat your prayers to the 
Father of mercies, and God of all grace, 
that he will pour out upon us the in- 
fluences of his Huly Spirit, that oar hearts 
may be filled with love to him, and to the 
Saviour, and to immortal souls--*that he 
will gaide us in all our ways — that he 
will strengtlien us in all our difiicalties 
and in all our elfortSfaDd that be will keep 
Qi from oil evi/." 

lo a letter from Mr. N. Ward to 
Mr. Dyer, dated June 28, he spe* 
ciiies a variety of eniploymeat for 
the printing press, which he has 
in prospect, pot merely for Suma- 
tra, hut for our Missionaries in 
Java also. The request with which 
he closes this communication is 
one in which, we believe, every 
pious Missionary will unite: — 

** And now, my dear Sir, pray for us. 
We are placed in a land where all around 
tends to freeae the afRections, to destroy 
spirituality, lo deceive the mind, to sepa- 
rate ns from our God. May the Spirit of 
the Lord move upon the face of the great 
chaotic deep in these parts, and breaths 
Into it the breathe of eternal Ufe !*' * 

The Committee have further 
lieen gratified by a communica- 
tion from his Excellency Sir T. S. 
Raffles, dated July 17, 1820, th^ 
sentiments of which are so ho- 
Bourable, both to the distin- 
guished , writer, and to the Mis- 
sionaries, that we cannot forbear 
inserting an extract. 

«*It-affbrds me much gretiication to 
flMi, that the Society has dirt cted lis at- 
>^»/^ IK^ dklr JliilbeitD untroddea field,- aod 



\ 



selected Missionoifes, wbose balilts, 
ners, and educatloa, pecoHariy qoai^ 
tliem to do credit to the cause, and to lulfl 
the expectations of tliose who selected 
them. They are the first BAisrionaiies 
who hsTC trod on Sumatran ground ; and 
if they do not do much themselws, they 
will doubtless pave the way for others. 
The Society mu»t not eipect immediate 
results: the general standard of socicfy oo 
tliis island is too low to adroit of rapid ad- 
vancement ', but they will be able to give 
you much valiiaUe and highly-interesting 
mformation, and to train up the rising 
generation in habits of humility and dis- 
cipline. 

•• Mr. and Mrs. Evana, with the assist- 
ance of Mr. Ward, propose tlie eaiablbb- 
ment of a seminary at If ariborough ; and 
I have been luippy to aid the undertaking, 
by transferring to them the children of nor 
free schooL On this point they will doubt- 
less be able to Inform you more fully them- 
selves. Mr. Ward proposes to retain the 
press, in the bope that it may eventually 
contribute to assist the funds of the Missiuii. 

'* Mr. Bart<ni purposes nroceeding to 
the Northward, and establishing himself 
in the Batu Country, where an entirely 
new and peculiarly interesting prospect 
will lie before him. I do not estimate the 
population of tliese people at moch less 
than a million. Pulo Nias, an blaod 
oontaining a very eitenslve populadon, 
and lying off the west coast of Sumatra, 
will also attract his attention. None of 
these people have yet embraced Maho- 
metanism, neither are tiiey Hhidoos ; and 
it b doubtful if they hate any icligion 
at all. 

** I hope the Sodetv will not think of 
wiilidrawing either of tliese useful men 
from Sumatra ; the field fe sufficiently ex- 
tensive for many more, and tlio^gh tlieir 
progress may be slow at first, it may be 
expected to increase In an accelerated 
ratio as they proce<Hl. If they do not do 
much, it will be owing to the want of fur- 
ther aid, and not the want of subjects to 
work upon. 

*' I bfg the Society will be assured^ that 
I shall be most happy to extend to tliese 
gentlemrn, and to the views of tlie Society 
in general, the fuH measure of my patron- 
age and support : convinced of the high 
importance of the ciCase in which they 
are engaged, and of the benefits of their 
labours in promoting civilisation, and ei* 
tending the sphere of ustrful knowledge." 

We have heen favoured with 
the perusal of another letter from 
Governor Raffles to a friend in 
England, written on the same 
day, whi^h cot tains someAirther 



HIBSIONABY HBIAI.D. 



S«« 



imteUigCBCc reipMfing the people 
among wham Hr. Burtan pio- 

KM* to reside. Aft<# mentioning 
r. Burton*! intenlioii, be pTx>- 
ceeds: 

•■ Tlw itkl fat hb ricrtioTu u new ind 
ialnnlin^uid Ibopcbewitt bmrt encrR; 
•nd coanie cnoujb to tiplon It. Tha 
■oHd knowi 10 lilllc of tlina peoptr, inii 
Xhtit Iwbili »nd cuMunu tn to p»eiili«r, 
lint ill the infofisaliDn he cullcci* will be 
awfiit. Yon Kt of CDUPM awire tliBl lb«j 
■ni CeniiibBli. The pnpulaiioa of tlw 
BaKs Gouiilrj doe* Dot Ml ilion of a nil' 
lioo, aad thnaghnil lie ctimtry it It tki 
■nariaUe lot, mat wnlif thMi jtritantn (afai 
w ««■ iLruld b* utm, hut tht eapitid 
fnOAmaa iktuU mUt ht iffihud fir Ikt 
ttt (rut erima, b« mrinx (** prtio"<- 
«Livf. Yon uay idy opon ihnfMt, ih 
cMJu (Sr i* M cannon with ihMo bi 
baa^ig ia Eogtuul. I hare falely puKd 
■MW pwtDfnj lime in iMi put of ibt 
■ooMiy, aDd can towcb liit the cociecineu 
•TwbU t Malr." 

Are not "tkedark placn of ike 
^wrth Ml ^ the habitatioHi of 
ermeUgr 

Oatbe37lhorihe«ime moalli 
(July,) Mr. Evans writes Dr. By- 
hntl ; an<), after adverting to tlw 
proposal of ealablisbing a oe« 
■tattoo in the northern pxrt of the 
itland, be mrations lb4t, witb a 
Tteworiigbteniiig ibe expeniesof 
the Hisiion, be and Mr. Ward 
hud acceded to a plan, Icindl^ 
tngeeited by tbe Governor, to 
«slaDli*h a seminary at Ben- 
coolen ; and tbat Ibe pupils of an 
Oipban School, previously estab- 
lished, were to be transferred Id 
their care. He adds, that they 
intended to procure a young man 
from Bengal as an assistant, in 
order that this new engagement 
may not interfere witb tbe time 
sacred to employment more di- 
Tvclty of a missionary nature. 

Mr.Burton'sletterloMr. Dji . 
aArr they bad resolved on the 
important step of a removal, pre- 
sents an interesting specimen of 
a Missionary taking np hiscrois 
to f<4low tbe Redeemer. 
" When Si> Tbtnaas mrnilaacd that 



there wai » iKdicaJ atf* si cithtr af tha 
stMioDii It icened at once to put • told 
ncgtdve upou the renUTal of riiber bto- 
llier Enni or myielf, and of codtw bn- 
Diei (NslhiiiM) Watd could not lews 
iMpttM. But,ifl«lhliiliingtb«Mbject 
oMrlait oening, mj deii Mary and t 
dnM lo iho reiotalion lu offin- oundn* 
at Mlwlunariei tn the pout Ballai, if Ibe 
utUet Licttinn approred of onr going. 
We pnijioacd il to Ibpm thii momlng, and 
allare ofoptnion Ihalit appeart iIk nioit 
cffeciual ncBKirelhit can be adopleil fur 
ihe fuitherance of the gnat object of out 
HiBion. We haie lliertfure delenmnrd. 
id Ihe Miengtb of our DIiIhk Miiiec, is 
deTDie ooiieWei lo it. We thall cnl^iuly 
lia>e tome ritfficullia la encouoier. onil 
rouch leir-dfoial to piaGtiie, la a country 
rfhert the inhabltaoti are Ciniiibals, and 
irbere our iiitercauise witb Garopean jo- 
wni moM probaUj be limited lu oiu: 
indivldDai); bot wo Initt that Hi; 
hai tallberlo mado • darknen liglit 
Ixtort at, crooked thlngi itriiiuht, aiiJ 
1^ placei tmootb,' will not fail ui in 
uiiempliDg to giie Ihe words of etecual 
lifij to thoH) wh'i are periihiag foi lack of 






wilt ID 



(bite 



■blv d. , 

alf oat Dvcd aecotdiiig lo tu> ricbn ia 
(lorj h; Cbiiit Jetai.' 

" Did out friend) know bow mncb lio- 
mititj, aral, knowledge, )a>r, wiidoin, aiiil 
devotedncB of bcDtt, are eiaeiKtat to Totiu 
■ good MiMloQv; of JewuCbtiit, tliey 
would et« bear u* on tlieit besili with 
gieal affection at • tbiuse of gtaw." 

Of the interruption which took 
place, subsequently, in coose. 
quencc ofMr. Burton's dangerous 
illness, our readers have already 
been informed. He bad, however, 
so far recovered, as to be able, on 
the 29tb of September, to salt for 
'nippanooti and Natal, wilh a 
view to discover which would be 
the more eligible statioa of (be 
two. We shall look for furthei. 
information witb much anxiviy. 



KINGSTON. 



Trb Herald for December 
hut contained some accounts of 
Ihe large additions made lo tlie 
church in this place. In uiswcr 
to some inquiries respecting i)ie 
ilatenenis that are given by these 



LONDON ANNUAL MBETINGS IN MAY. 

Tunday lit.— -AWn.— CnuBcn Mimiohart Society. Freemasons' Hall, 
Great Queeii-atrcer« Lincoln's-inn Fields. The Right Honoarable the Presideot m 
the Chair. No persons to be admitted without tickets. The 91st Anniversary 
Sermon was preached Monday evening at St. Bride'sj Fleet-street, bj^ the Rev. Wnu 
Juwett, M. A. 

Wednesday, 3</.— Mtfmii^.'^Half-past Ten. — SooiBrr for promoting 
CuRTSTiANiTY AMONGST THE Jfws. SerTOODS at St. Paors, CoveDt-garden, bj 
the Ilev. Wro. Boshe.M.A. Rector of St. George's, Dablin. — And Friday the 4th ; 
open at eleven ; Chair (Sir Thomas Baring, Bart. M.P.) at Twelve. Aonaal Meet- 
ing at the King's Concert Room, HaymarkeL 

Morning, — At Eleveii.— British akd Fobbicn Bible Society. Seveoteenth 
Annual Meeting at Freemasons' Hall. The Rt. Hon. Lord Teignmouth in the Chair. 
Thursday, Sd. — If orntitf.— -Half-past Ten.— Pkayeb Book abd Hosiilt 
Society. — Sermon at Christ Church, Kewgate-stree^ by the Rev. Edward Garrard 
Marsh, M.A. Minister of St. James's Chapel, Hampstead, — And tAe $ame day, the 
Ninth Annual Meeting atStationers' Hall. Chair at Two. 

Saturdayt 5ih,-^Noe9u — London Hibehbiab Society fob BSTABLiSHiwa 
Schools, and cibculatino the Holy Scbiptubes, in Ireland. Annual 
Meeting at the City of London Tavern. 

Sunday^ 6I^^London Female Penitentiary Society. Annual Sermon 
at Tavistock Chapel, Broad Court, Drury.lane, by the Rev. Lewis Way, A.M. 
Prayers to commence at Eleven. — And Monday ifie 7t^—- Fourteenth Annual 
Meeting at Stationers' Hall, the Right Honourable Lord Canington to take the 
Chdir precisely at Twelve. — ^Tickets to be had of the Secretary, Thomas Fellatt, 
Esq. Ironmongers' Hall, and at the Institution at Pentonville. 

Monday, ?th, — Montn^.— London Itinerant Society. To breakfast at 
Six at the City of London Tavern. Chair (Samuel Robinson, Esq.) at Seven. 

Noon. Port OF LondonSocibty for promoting Religion among Seamen. 
Cit V of London Tavern. The Right Honourable Admiral Lord Gambler, G.C.B. 
in the Chair. — And Tuesday the Bth, at Eleven and Three. Two Anniversary Ser- 
mons onboard the Society, Floating Chapel, moored off Wappiog Old Stairs, by the 
Rev. Drs. Bogue and Waugh. 

Tiutday, 8tA. — Evening,Six, Irish Evangelical Society. City of London 
Tavern. Thomas Walker, Esq. in the Chair. 

Tuesday, Qth, — Eaeninf, Half-past Six. Continental Society. Sermon at 
<thc Church of the United Parishes of St. Andrew by the Wardrobe and St. Annot 
Blackfriars, by the Rev. W. Marsh, M.A. Vicar of St. Peter's, Colchester. — And 
Wednesday the Idth, Noon, Annual Meeting at Freemasons^ Hall, Great Qneen- 
sireet, Lincolo's-inn Fields,Sir Thomas Baring, Bart. M.P. President, in thejChair. 
Wednesday, 9th, — Morning, Half-past Five. Sunday School Union. Annual 
Meeting. To breakfast at the City of London Tavern. 

Wednesday, 9th»^~Moming, Half-past Ten. London Missionary Society. 
^rnon at Surry Chapel by the Rev. George Clayton of Walworth. — Same Day, 
Evening, Six. Sermon at the Tabernacle by the Rev. T. Craig of Bockini^. — 
Thursday the iOth, Marmng, Half-past Ten. Meeting for business at Queen-street 
Chapel. Eoeniiig, Six. Sermon at Tottenham-court Chapel by the Rev. John 
lUown of Biggar, Scotland — Friday the tUh, Morning, Half-past Ten. Sermon at 
St. Bride's, Fleet-street, by the Rev. Dr. Williams of Stroud, Gloucestershire. 
— Ei;eNtn^,Six. The Lord's Supper at Sion Chapel* Silver^street Chapel, Tonbridge 
Chapel, and Orange-street Chapel. 

Satunlay, ^.^th.-^JIorning, Six, Religious Tract Society. Twenty-second 
Annual Meeting. To breakfast at t^e City of London Tavern. Chair (Joseph 
Ut'yner,E9q.) at Seven. 

Morning, Half-past Ten for Eleven. — Protestant Society for tbe Pro- 
TrcTiON OF Religious Libbbty. Annual Meeting at the London Tavern* 
Bishopsgate-street Some distinguished Friend to Religious Freedom is expected 
to preside. 

Monday, 14th. — "Evening, Half-past Sis. Home Missionary Socxett. 
Annual Meeting at the City oT London Tavern. Thos. Wilson, Esq. in the Chair. 
Tuesday, I5ih, — Ninon. BrItish and Foreign School Society. Sixteenth 
Annual Meeting, at Freemasons^ Hall, Great Queen-street. 

Thursday, 17ih. — Morning, Eleven. Orphans' Woreibo School, City 
Road. Sermon at the Chapel in the School by the Kev. John Clayton, junior. 
I>inner at Four, at the OJd London Tavern, Bishopsgate-street. 

COUNTRY MEETINGS IN MAY. 

Sih, Blackheath AaxillsLTy Bible Society, at ibeGTcetilAaiv,ia\%t\\i*a«A. CWvt 
to be taken at ^oon.— ]6th» Isle of Ely Associaiion at liuratW— ^tSA^^xxOCwv^ 
AMmMre Ditto, at Waddesdon Hill.— t9\h wA 30iV\,¥.«iti.'D^Uo»iX^w^%\ft. 



217 



Sti&i C{)ronicle* 



Thb CominUtee feci liappy in haTing it in Ifaoir power to lay Vyefurt 
tiieir Friendg the Retarns of the Saperintendents of tlie Schools, by ^wbich 
they will see the advantages which are communicated to the peasantry of 
IrehuHl by the scriptural education afforded by the Society. It should be 
the constant prayer of all who wish the evangelical emancipation of 
Ireland/ that HE, '< with whom is the residue of the Spirit/' will '' pour 
cot the Spirit from on high ;" without which, even the memory being 
stored with '' the words which the Holy Ghost teaehetb/' will not be suf- 
MeBt to renew the heart, and sanctify the condoct. 



PRESENT STATE or xni SCHOOLS 

IN THB 

PROVINCE OF CONNAUGHT, 

OF THE 

BAPTIST IRISH SOCIETY. 

Jna Letter from the Rev» Josiah Wilson, 
the Superintend ent, to the Secretary, the 
Rev. J. Jvimey, dated 

Dublin, March i6, 1821. 

Mr BBAR SiK, 

I BAVB ag«in the satiifaction of inform- 
big yoo^that notwithstanding I he late very 
acTere atorros, our school bark it steadily 
partoing her course to the desired haven. 
Ttie gale has recently been heavy, and the 
waves have risen high; but HE, whose 
province it Is to calm the perturbed ocean, 
though he may not yet have said, *< Peace, 
be still !'* baa manifestly restrained its 
power, and, in many instances, caused its 
▼iuimce to subserve his own purposes. 
How short-sighted is man ! How impo- 
tent his rage I and how vexatious to him 
who indulges it, when even his malice is 
over-ruled to accomplish the object which 
be intended to frustrate. This has been 
tlie case with respect to some of the 
schools: the very violent measures that 
have been adopted to snpprois them, have 
caused them to be unusually well attended. 
So true it is, that Jehovah ** roaketh the 
wrath of man to praise him;" and we 
nay be assured the latter part of the text 
will be fulfilled, ** the remainder of wrath 
be will restrain." 

This fact has bren established also in 
another way, in reference to the teriptures 
being uted in the achooU. You have, of 
course, heard of a oew Society having been 



formed in this city, for the education <f 
the poor of Ireland ; one of its fundamen- 
tal prinaples is, that the Bible thall not be 
a ichool^ook ! 

This circamstance has excited a lively 
seal in the friends of the Holy Scriptures; 
and some who were previously almost 
inactive, are now alive to the subject, and 
contribute cheerfully to support those 
schools in which the Bible is used. One 
gentleman showed me a card that was left 
him, requestiiig a subscription to a school, 
from whence the scriptures were excluded, 
that was established under the immediate 
patronage of the •* Archangel Michael f* 
There is reason to suppose that this caid 
pleaded very successfully for our scboQla^-*^ 

You have already received the acooan|_^ 
of the schools In the conuiies of CM^T^ 
Clare, Tipptrary, Wtstmeath, &c. ; I re- 
joice that these seem to be rivalling those 
which are under my supcriutendence an 
the county of Comiaught. In thtifSftv" 
one schools under my care, there are near^ 
five thousand children ; one thousand of 
whom are reading that word wlilcli is so 
highly prized by those who know its 
value, and so much opposed by those . 
who are ignorant of it. 

Of the one thousand readers, eight 
hundred are committing the scriptures tp 
memory ; all of these can repeat from ihe 
to four chapters each; 450 can repeat 
five chapters each; 240, ten cliapters 
each ; 100, the whole gospil uf St. Joha 
each ; 60, twenty-five chapters each ; 5G^ 
thirty chapters each : 10, forty chapters 
each; 3, seveiity chapters each; and 
one, a hundred chapters in the Kct» 
Testament! What the result of such 
a practice may be, HE only knows, whose 
prerogailve U U \» comT&axv^ v\v^\^^ai^<^ 

_ I • • • 



fl» 



IRISH cbroniclb: 



DifTerent opinions CTid«nf f j prevail among 
men onthe sahject; but it remains tube 
proved, ilittt a mind wi!l be injored which 
IS thus stored with the word of Qod ; that 
•uch Bible scholars will become worse 
children, worse ciiixrns, or less useful 
members in the church. To thb it may 
be added, that all the committers practise 
writing and cyphering, and that consider- 
whW proficiency b«s been made by thcra, 
jMurticiilarly by tlte UtjSi who ara in ge- 
neral very anxious to acquire a good 
knowledge of both. 

Hie " Congregational Schools" merit 
particular notice, for the information of 
their benevolent supporters. 

Thm «• Harlow SchooK* has 105 girls 
occasiomUy attending ; 55 of whom I saw 
at the last iuypectioo, with odDsidorably 
improved manners and appearance: all 
present were either learning their letti^rs, 
their spellings, their scrif)ture>tasks. or 
Vftinc that very useful instrument tlie 
Jieetue, which they had never used bcfuie. 
Five gtrls have left the school since its 
oomroenccment, for servitude in different 
ftmilies. The misirebs is Mrs. Henry, a 
widow, in tlie TownUiid of LangliUI, 
Ibnnty of Sligo. 

The ** Utile Alie-strrct School,** Mrs. 
iJartyn mistress, v^ho is also a widow, i& 
lu Uroroanain, county of Leitrim ; enjo3'- 
inff the advantage of one or more ladies 
Wnig generally present. At the last in- 
spection, 83 out of 121 children More 
present; 22 of whom are cummiiiing th( 
acripturet to memory, and the greater 
|Hirt are making great advances in the use 
... •£ the needle. 

The. •* Uon-street Wul worth School*' 
% reaping the advantage of not being 
^Miy in fixing on a misttress. A very 
raf table one, as to clinrnctcr and talent, 
has been now found in the person of 
Uri. James, who has established the 
ichool in River's Town, county of Sligo, 
and has already 67 giil% whose progress 
in so few months is very gratifying. This 
Khool it superintended by a most respect- 
able lad^ ; the governess in whose family 
also, delights in such labours of love. 

The «• North-end Crayford School" is 
fa) Doorishj county of Sligo; Mrs. Sweeny 
lustress. In tliis school, us well as some 
others, several of the girls, out of 37 
which belong to it, never had a needle in 
their hand before. This woman's hosband 
isli%iog, but not with her, she being a 
hertticl She waasomc time ago brought 
to a know led^ of the truth, and because 
•lie could not conscientiously attend mass, 
confession to the priests, &c. slie was 
abandoned by liim wlio was lawfully bound 
to be her protector. She will now, I 
d^abt Dot, bm aWa to obtain a tubauteuoe, 



in a way perfectly congtfiM nflflfiei mm 
inclinations, and advantageous to some of 
the rising generation. 

The " I&clniey School* is one that has 
been of great use to both master and 
scholars. The master's name is Wallace ; 
his school is in Ruthnamauck, county of 
Mayo. He has not only been brought to 
see the errors of the Church of Rome, bat 
by attentivelv reading the scri{4ares, has, 
I doubt not, been " changed from dark- 
ness to lislit, and from the power of Satan 
unto God.* He Is an ablp teacher, and 
indefatigable in his business, and has a 
school containing 76 children. 

The ** Hammersmith Scboi^ is kept bj 
Mis. CaUwell, in the toarnland of Col- 
lien**, county of Mayo, who was educated 
iuoiie of the Charler^schools ef Ifelaod ; 
her liusband is a weaver, but does not en- 
joy good health. He assists her In the 
.«cIiool, which is a great service to the 
children. There are both boys md girls 
in this >rhool. and at the last inspection 
there were seveniy-five present. 

The " Chatham School** b in SalliBa. 
carrow, where our Irish Reader, the in- 
comparabi*' Williuni Moore, lesides; and 
near the residence of that tried friend of 
Ireland, Colonel Petcivai. The master Is 
F. liarcDwby, who, I doubt not, is con- 
verted from the wwhtdtieu, as well as the 
crrvn of his former ways. He and his 
scholars are emulous that this should be 
the best school on the estahlishmeiit : in 
prool of which, I mention, that at a recent 
exiiminatioh every bcholar in the reading 
c\ns» obtained a premium. l*here were 
one hundred and four present at the last 
uisprciioii. 

The ••Trowbridge School" is in the 
county of Sligo, in thevillageof Rathcor- 
mick. The master, T. Gibson, is the parish 
clerk, and of course a Protestant* but 
greatly csiecmed in the neighbourhood. 
Ifc kept a pay school for several year^ 
but wtts obliged to discontinue ii. from the 
increased poverty of the people. He has 
in hL»/rcc »cA<k»i seventy children atteixU 
ing. It is very near the chapel doors of 
a priest, who is an inveterate enemy to 
bible schools. 

The " Eagle-street School," thoogh the 
last roeniioncd, is not the least m im? 
portance. It is kept by Patrick Uenryi 
m Roasky, county of Mayo ; an exoeUciiC 
Irish scholar, and very desirous of .for- 
wardine his children, of whom he has 81 
under his care. The neighbourho(Kl of 
this school was formerly the rendezvous of 
a gang of robbers ; may we not hope that 
the *' don of thieves^ will become ** an 
house of prayer ?" 

These, Sir, are the particulars of the 
scVioo\i \iivd«i vn*;) cva «l\h« ^^ceaeiU tine ^ 






IRIftH cnmONICLI. 



«9 



-fi Unol for ise Id naikc oomnien^s, but to 
state factfl, and tbcrrfore I coDdude by 
sajing, that I ud 

Yovrl aifectioiMitely, 

J. \V|L«OW. 

P.8. I an bapfvy to add, chat I brought 
Cannangbt with me to Dablin, 
I am a&sbtiag Mr. West iu ollcct- 
ing for the Society, thirty pounds ; and 
added vevan lo it in Athlone. 

%• There are four of the " Congrega- 
tjonal Schools^ in the County of Clare, of 
which the Secxetary is only acquninted 
with the foHowlng particulars. 

The tvro " Norwich Schools,** situated 
at Scariff and Tornj;r;iny, are composed 
eotiiely of Icmale children, and arc under 
the care of snitatile ini*ttiesscs, who teach 
tbeflu, in addition to reading and writing, 
knitting and needle woris. They consist 
•f tbrty-elght scholars, who repeated 
twenty-eight chapters : these schools are 
aopported at ^'Q per annum eacf), and are 
paid for by two ladies at Norwich. 

Tlie " Bristol School" contains one hun- 
dred aadYourtecn children, of whom thhrty- 
levcn read the scriptures ; it is kept by 
J. Malony in Torngranv. There were 
liresent at the last inspection one hundred 
and five, who repeated twenty-