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Full text of "Barratt's Chapel and Methodism, historical address delivered before forty-third Wilmington annual conference, at Asbury Methodist Episcopal church, Wilmington, Delaware, on Friday, March 17th, 1911"




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BARRATT 



Barratt's Chapel and 
Methodism 





PAPERS OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF DELAWARE 

LVII 



BARRATT'S CHAPEL 
AND METHODISM 



HISTORICAL ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE 
FORTY-THIRD WILMINGTON ANNUAL CON- 
FERENCE, AT ASBURY METHODIST EPISCO- 
PAL CHURCH, WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, ON 
FRIDAY, MARCH 17th, 1911 



BY 

HON. NORRIS S. BARRATT 

Judge Court of Common Pleas No. 2, Philadelphia, First Judicial District 

of Pennsylvania ; Member of the Historical Societies of 

Delaware, Pennsylvania and Virginia 



THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF DELAWARE 

WILMINGTON 

1911 



PAPERS OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF DELAWARE 

LVII 



BARRATT'S CHAPEL 
AND METHODISM 



HISTORICAL ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE 
FORTY-THIRD WILMINGTON ANNUAL CON- 
FERENCE, AT ASBURY METHODIST EPISCO- 
PAL CHURCH, WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, ON 
FRIDAY, MARCH 17th, 1911 



BY 

HON. NORRIS S. BARRATT 

Judge Court of Common Pleas No. 2, Philadelphia, First Judicial District 

of Pennsylvania ; Member of the Historical Societies of 

Delaware, Pennsylvania and Virginia 



THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF DELAWARE 

WILMINGTON 

1911 



Press of 

The new Era printing Compani 

Lancaster Pa 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Hon. Norris S. Barratt Frontispiece 

Barratt's Chapel (Chromotype) Facing page 3 

St. George's M. E. Church, Philadelphia " 4 

James Barratt, Sr " 6 

James Barratt, Jr " 8 

Rev. John Wesley " 10 

Rev. Joseph Pilmore " 12 

Captain Thomas Webb " 14 

Alfred Barratt " 16 

Philip Barratt, autograph 17 

Caleb Barratt Facing page 20 

General George Washington *' 22 

Hon. Nathaniel Barratt Smithers " 24 

Col. Allan McLane " 26 

John Dickinson " 28 

Governor David Hazzard " 30 

Governor Thomas McKean " 32 

PeiTy Hall, Baltimore " 35 

Governor Richard Bassett " 36 

Bishop Francis Asbury " 39 

Bishop Francis Asbury (Burial Slab) " 40 

Judge Andrew Barratt's " Bible " " 42 

Dr. Elijah Barratt " 43 

Bishop Thomas Coke " 47 

Philip Barratt's Homestead (Chromotype) " 49 

Lovely Lane Church, Baltimore, Md. " 50 

Rev. Thomas E. Martindale, Salisbury, Md " 52 

Rev. F. J. Cochran, Pastor BaiTatt's Chapel, 1911 " 54 



ui 




BARRATT'S CHAPEL AND METHODISM 




MONG the historic buildings of Del- 
aware Barratt's Chapel, known as 
the ''Cradle of Methodism," 
holds a prominent place, not 
only because it is the spot 
where Bishops Thomas Coke 
and Francis Asbury first met in Amer- 
ica and arranged the preliminaries for 
forming the Methodist Episcopal Church 
in this country, but for the additional 
reason it was there sacramental ordinances 
were first administered in America by duly 
authorized Methodist preachers to Methodist com- 
municants. It has a history to be proud of and Meth- 
odists are proud of it. To them it has always been a 
sacred place. To those who know its history the re- 
vivals of religion, the prayers and blessings, the un- 
selfish work and labor of those great preachers Coke, 
Asbury, Garrettson, Pilmore, Cooper and others who 
as faithful ministers of Christ carried the message 
of salvation to the people of this country, this chapel 

3 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

cannot be entered without emotion. It is also the 
third oldest Methodist church edifice in the world, St. 
George's, Philadelphia, the first, having been dedicated 
November, 1769. I do not intend to give you an ex- 
tended account of the origin of Methodism, when there 
are so many histories of it easily accessible. Tyer- 
man, Stevens, Lednum, Bangs, Daniel, Wakeley, 
Simpson, Buckley, and a host of others have done such 
full justice to the subject that it leaves nothing to be 
desired. It seems like an affectation of ecclesiastical 
learning to even refer to them and I merely do so now, 
by way of grateful acknowledgment for my indebted- 
ness for many facts and as a verification of family 
traditions — ''Which we have heard and known and 
our fathers have told us — That the generation to come 
might know them, even the children which should be 
born; who should arise and declare them to their 
children. ' '^ 

As Delawareans by birth and ancestry, it is interest- 
ing to us particularly, because this great religious 
work was planned and commenced by our forefathers. 
Among my ancestors on the Delaware-Maryland Pen- 
insula were: 

Philip Barratt, who was in Cecil Co., Maryland, 1678 
William Merritt, who was in Cecil Co., Maryland, 1676 
Francis Neall, who was in Talbot Co., Maryland, 1661 
James Wilson, Sr., who was in Talbot Co., Maryland, 1690 
Thomas Nock, who was in Talbot Co., Maiyland, 1691. 
Thomas Eyre, who was in Northampton Co., Virginia, 1657 
Thomas Heathered, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1679 
' P.salms LXXVIII., 3 and 6. 

4 




,.;.j SAINT GEORGES ChU,>O.S ial1 
FOURTH STREET BELOW VINE STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PENNA., REV. JACOB S. HUGHES, 
PASTOR. THE OLDEST METHODIST CHURCH IN CONTINUOUS USE IN THE WORLD. 

SYNOPSIS OF ITS HISTORY ON NEXT PAGE. 



SAINT GEORGES METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

on the east side of Fourth Street near Vine Street, Philadelphia. It 
was erected in 1763 by some members of the German Reformed 
Congregation who, becoming embarrassed, they were for a time 
imprisoned for debt, and the Church was sold by order of the Pro- 
vincial Assembly. It was purchased by a weak-minded young man 
for ^700. His father sold it to one of the Methodists for ^650, Penn- 
sylvania currency, in November, 1769. It was immediately occu- 
pied by the Methodist Society and dedicated by Rev. Joseph Pilmore. 
Captain Thomas Webb preached the first Sabbath sermon. In 1777, 
when the British Army occupied Philadelphia, after the Battle of 
Brandywine, it was made a riding school for their cavalry'. Francis 
Asbury, on his arrival in America in October, 1771, preached his 
first sermon here, as did subsequently Thomas Rankin and Dr. 
Thomas Coke. The first Methodist Conference in America, held in 
1773, met in this Church, as did the second in 1774 and the third 
in 1775. Bishop Asbury labored for its completion ; in 1772 he 
raised /"ISO on its debt ; in 1782 he took a subscription of ^270 for 
its ground rent, and in 1786 he was trying to raise /"500 to pay the 
entire debt incurred for its improvement. About 1791 the galleries 
were finished. From it has sprung directly or indirectly all the 
Methodist Churches in Philadelphia, and to-day it is the oldest 
Methodist Church in continuous use in the world. 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

John Cubley, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1683 
John Curtis, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1679 
Richard Walker, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1680 
Nathaniel Hunn, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1689 
John Clarke, Sr., who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1679 
Garrett Sipple, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1698 
William Brinckle, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1698 
Elizabeth Green Manlove, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1652 
Ann Farrell, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1690 
John McNatt, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1698. 
Abner Dill, who was in Kent Co., now Delaware, 1752 

They all owned from one to two thousand acres of 
land, and most of them were of the Church of Eng- 
land; the balance were Friends or Quakers. Thomas 
Heathered refused to pay taxes to William Penn in 
1684.2 Thomas Eyre was the agent of Penn to estab- 
lish Quaker meeting houses on the peninsula.^ John 
Curtis was a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly 
from Kent County 1682-3, and was a Provincial Coun- 
cillor of Pennsylvania 1689-1690-1691-1697-1698.'^ 
Eichard Walker was granted the tract of land upon 
which Dover, the capital of Delaware, was laid out in 
1717 by three commissioners, one of whom, William 
Brinckle, was also an ancestor.^ 

' Henry C. Conrad's " History of Delaware," Vol. I., p. 64. 

Register Maryland Society Colonial Wars, John Curtis; Register 
Pennsylvania Society Colonial Wars, John Curtis; Register Colonial 
Society of Pennsylvania, pp. 32 and 33, Philip Barratt; Register 
Pennsylvania Society Sons of Revolution, 1906, p. 37, Philip Bar- 
ratt; Register Society of War of 1812, p. 34, 1908, Philip Barratt. 

'Hilda Justice's Warner Mifflin (1905), p. 11; Virginia Magazine 
of History and Biography, Vol. XIX., pp. 10-12. 

* Henry C. Conrad's " History of Delaware," Vol. I., 275 ; Penna. 
Archives, 2d Series, Vol. IX., pp. 659-623. 

" Conrad's " Delaware," Vol. II., pp. 580 and 633. For an exeel- 

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Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

I say our forefathers advisedly, because most of the 
old Delaware families, those who have been here two 
hundred years and upwards, are related in some 
degree to each other, so that it is entirely safe to 
address most of you as cousin. I am myself descended 
from Philip Barratt's two sons. Judge Andrew Bar- 
ratt and Caleb Barratt. My grandfather, James 
Barratt, was the son of Caleb Barratt, and my 
grandmother, Ellen Leighton Dill, was the only 
daughter of Dr. Eobert and Ann Barratt Dill. He 
was Adjutant General of your state during the 
war of 1812. She was the daughter of Judge 
Andrew Barratt, so my grandfather and grand- 
mother were first cousins once removed to each 
other. This made me third cousin to my father, James 
Barratt, Jr., third cousin once removed to myself and 
full fourth cousin to my own children, — rather absurd 
relationships I think you will agree with me.® 

I feel proud of the fact that Philip Barratt, my 

lent account of this period see " The Days of Makemie, 1680-1708," 
Presbyterian Board of Publication, 1885. 

•See "Barratt Family," Henry C. Conrad's "History of Dela- 
ware," Vol. III., p. 892. Judge Conrad in his valuable history men- 
tions nine families, viz.: Rodney, Read, Bayard, McLane, Mac- 
Donough, Barratt, Ridgeley, Clayton and Dupont in their respective 
periods as the influential families of Delaware, 

James Barratt upon his removal to Philadelphia in 1831 with his 
uncle Samuel Neall carried on the grain business at Pine Street 
Wharf, as Neall & Barratt. He helped organize the Corn Exchange 
and was its president in 1859. He was a member of Ebenezer Church, 
Southwark, prior to incorporation; class leader, 1833; trustee, 1835; 
Stewart, 1837. See "History of Ebenezer M. E. Church" (1890), 
pp. 103, 104, 157, 158, 160, 173. 

6 




^j^j^jr-foV ^J^S^<^iS2^ 



1797-1862 

REPRESENTATIVE SUSSEX COUNTY 1831. DIRECTOR, 1831-1832, FARMERS BANK OF 
DELAWARE. MEMBER OF UNION LODGE, NO. 7, F. AND A. M., OF DOVER. REMOVED 
TO PHILADELPHIA IN 1831. AN ORIGINATOR OF PHILADELPHIA CORN EXCHANGE AND 
PRESIDENT 1859. MEMBER OF FIRM OF NEALL & BARRATT, GRAIN MERCHANTS, PINE 
STREET WHARF. PHILADELPHIA. 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

great-great-great-grandfather, did his part by donat- 
ing the ground and aiding in the building of the chapel 
which has since borne his name, and which now re- 
mains as his monument. By reason of it I have been 
asked to tell you of Barratt's chapel and early Meth- 
odism, and urge its preservation by endowment. It 
did not need your cordial welcome, although I appre- 
ciate it, to convince me that I am among my own 
kindred. I realize at once that my name is MacGregor 
and that my foot is upon my native heath. I have 
now that feeling of home which is so unusual to Amer- 
icans, because you rarely find eight generations who 
inhabit the same house or the same spot such as you 
would find in the British Isles, France or Germany 
where the '' homestead" is entailed, except perhaps it 
be in old Kent County, where the home feeling and its 
cherished memories which can never be effaced have 
always been maintained. 

The unpretentious and modest building in which 
American Methodism as a church had its birth, al- 
though to the rude forefathers of the hamlet, and 
among them our own, it was the grandest country 
chapel the Methodists had in America, is in striking 
contrast to the great majority of the splendid gothic 
Methodist churches of today. '^ Contrasted they illus- 

^ Captain John Smith in his " Pathway to Erect a Plantation " 
tells us of the first place of divine worship in Virginia. " Wee did 
hang an awning which is an old saile, to three or foure trees to 
shadow us from the Sunne; out walls were rails of wood; our seats 
unhewed trees till we cut plankes; our Pulpit a bar of wood nailed 

7 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

trate progress and the wonderful changes that have 
taken place in the last one hundred and thirty-one 
years. It was a greater undertaking and a matter 
of more importance to build a modest chapel in the 
midst of a forest in those days than for us to build the 
finest church edifice. The very plainness and colonial 
simplicity of Barratt's ChapeP where there are no 
''rich windows that exclude the light and passages 
that lead to nothing" points the moral that the life 
which it typifies and is an inseparable part is that in 
which the best men have been nurtured, and it helped 
to produce and strengthen those rugged virtues for 
which the early Methodists were noted. What Mount 
Sinai was to the ancient Jew, Mecca to the true Mo- 
hammedan, and Independence Hall to the patriotic 
American, Barratt's Chapel is to the Methodist, the 
cradle of his faith — a shrine. That it is a shrine like 
one of the holy places of Jerusalem in the affections 
of pious Methodists who know the history of their 
church, is attested by the fact that while occupying an 
isolated position of lonely greatness in a country dis- 
trict with a meagre church territory and Dover the 
largest town twelve miles away, it is still used as a 
place of public worship, visited yearly by thousands, 
not forgetting that at its annual anniversary of Coke's 

to two neighboring trees. This was our church till we built a homely 
thing like a barn set upon cratchets, covered with rafts, sedge and 
earth: so also was the walls; the best of our houses were of like 
curiosity that could neither well defend from wind nor rain. 

'Barratt's Chapel and picture, Vol. II., Conrad's " Historj' of 
Delaware," pp. 664-782. 

8 




1826-1873 

REPRESENTED SEVENTH WARD IN COMMON COUNCIL, PHILADELPHIA, 1862-1865. JAN- 
UARY 12, 1865, COMMISSIONER TO PAY BOUNTIES TO VOLUNTEERS, AND DISTRIBUTED 
OVER TWELVE MILLION DOLLARS. MAY 25, 1865, PORT WARDEN. 1867, VICE-PRESIDENT 
CORN EXCHANGE. MEMBER COMPANY D, FIRST REGIMENT, PHCENIX HOSE COMPANY, 
LODGE 51, F. AND A. M., AND UNION LEAGUE, PHILADELPHIA. 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

and Asbury's meeting, which is always fittingly ob- 
served, the attendance is from 1,000 to 1,500, who 
gladly come from all over the peninsula as well as 
from distant cities to take part in the services. 

This is commendable and as it should be. Gover- 
nor Pennypacker of Pennsylvania had this thought in 
mind when he said: 

'^Xo people are ever really great who are neglectful 
of their shrines and have no pride in their achieve- 
ments. The history of the world shows that a correct 
sentiment is a more lasting and potent force than 
either accumulated money or concentrated authority. 
The theses which Luther nailed to the church door at 
Wittenberg still sway the minds of men," 

I shall tell you of the building of Barratt's Chapel, 
the causes that led to it. and its history, from which 
you will perceive why it is regarded with such peculiar 
veneration by Methodists.^ 

What Dr. Stille said of Dickinson is equally appli- 
cable here. In undertaking the work which has been 
assigned me I have been led to discuss many historical 
questions which may appear at first to have little con- 
nection with Barratt's Chapel and early Methodism or 
Philip Barratt but according to the plan I have adopted 

* Barratt's Chapel and picture, " Encyclopaedia of Methodism," 
Bishop Simpson, p. 90, 1878 ; Barratf s Chapel and picture, '" Rise 
of Methodism." John Lednum. p. 265. 1S59; Barratt's Chapel and 
picture, " Lost Chapters," J. B. Wakeley. p. 203, 1S5S ; Barratt's 
Chapel and picture, " History of Delaware," Judge Conrad, Yol. 11., 
pp. 664-782, 1906. 

9 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

it was essential to a proper understanding of both that 
some fair account of Philip Barratt's environment 
should be given. 

The first Methodists to come to America were its 
leaders, John and Charles Wesley, who spent the years 
1736-7 in Savannah and Frederica, Georgia, where 
they formed a society. Charles was in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and preached, and John preached in Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, before their return to England. 
This was the first and only time either was in America, 
and it cannot be said that their work was attended with 
success. George Whitefield came in 1738 and preached 
from Georgia to New England, and Mr. Wesley says 
of him, *'and all men owned that God was with him 
wheresoever he went, giving a general call to high and 
low, rich and poor, to repent and believe the Gospel.^^ 
In 1758 he was followed by Robert Strawbridge and 
Philip Embury, who were in 1760 reinforced by Cap- 
tain Thomas Webb, Robert Williams, Richard Board- 
man, Joseph Pilmore, from 1804 to 1821 Rector of St. 
Paul's P. E. Church, Philadelphia, John King, 
Thomas Rankin and others. 

Professor Chas. J. Little says of them: ''Williams 
was an Irishman — Rankin was a Scotchman, the others 
were English. They were all young men, Pilmore, the 
oldest, being thirty-five, Asbury, the youngest, twenty- 
six. Pilmore educated at Kingswood School; the 
others. King excepted, had no such training. Williams 

" Tracy, " Great Awakening," p. 222; McMaster's " History of the 
People of the United States," Vol. II., p. 580 ; MeConneU, " The 
English Church in the Colonies," pp. 141-142. 

10 




REV. JOHN WESLEY 

BORN, EPWORTH, Li MCOLNSH I R E, ENG., JUNE 17, 1703 
DIED LONDON, ENG., MARCH 2, 1791 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

was madly in earnest; King was blunt, simple, cour- 
ageous; Boardman was pious, good natured, sensible, 
greatly beloved by all who knew him. Pilmore was 
Yorkshire built in body and character, intrepid, elo- 
quent, full of unction and of power ; Rankin austerely 
earnest, untiring in his devotion to his Master, but 
without unusual gifts of mind or character. Williams, 
King and Asbury died in America as Methodist 
preachers. Webb, Boardman, Wright, Rankin and 
Shadford left America when the troubles of the Revo- 
lution thickened about them and never returned. ^^ 

Captain Webb was the apostle of Methodism in Dela- 
ware, as well as of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and 
it is stated he first preached in Wilmington in 1769, 
which was at that time hostile to Methodism. 

While the early Methodists were derided for their 
extreme strictness in dress and manners, yet we must 
remember that in the colonial times there was more 
formality and narrowness than prevails today. So 
in that respect they were more in accord with their sur- 
roundings than one would now suppose and it is mani- 
festly unfair to judge them by the standards of today. 

In Wilmington among those who joined the society 
were Isaac Tussey, Isaac Hersey, Thomas Webster, 
David Ford, Robert and Adam Clark. While Meth- 
odism was introduced in New Castle as early as 1770 
it was fifty years before they built a church, and in 
Wilmington progress was less encouraging than New 

" Chas. J. Little, " Methodist Pioneers," p. 217, Centennial Con- 
ference, 1885. 

11 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

Castle. Asbury Church was built about 1790. The 
population of Kent County in 1780 was about ten 
thousand. The English predominated.^^ jn religion 
it was Church of England and Quaker. Infidelity pre- 
vailed both in England and America, of which Thomas 
Paine was an active exponent. ' ' Christianity was re- 
duced to the lowest terms," says Mr. Lecky. Montes- 
quieu tells us ' ' Not more than four or five members of 
the House of Commons are regular attendants at 
church, ' ' and Bishop Meade of Virginia adds, ' ' Scarcely 
a young man of culture could be found who believed in 
Christianity." It was not unusual at this time when 
a young man of position in England had no prospects 
or profession or was unsteady to put him in the church 
and then for the good of his family he was sent to one 
of the American Colonies, or may be he was one of that 
motley company of damaged reputations who had re- 
sponded to the invitation to emigrate, or as Dr. McCon- 
nell tells us ''took to colonial work as a refuge from 
poverty or scandal. ' ' And in America, far from home, 
as he regarded it, and its restraining influence, he often 
did not mend his ways. He was exiled to some extent 
and he felt he was entitled to all the pleasure he could 
obtain. His habits were charitably described as ' ' easy 
going." He attended horse races, gambled, hunted 
foxes, often drank to excess and generally led the jovial 
life of the English squire. This was especially so in 
Delaware, Maryland and Virginia, although there 

" Scharf s History of Delaware, "Methodism in Dover," Vol. II., 
1062. 

12 




REV. JOSEPH PILMORE 

THE FIRST PASTOR OF ST. GEORGE'S M. E. CHURCH, PHILADELPHIA, 

WHO PREACHED AT 'BARRATT'S CHAPEL " 

BORN, ENGLAND, OCTOBER 31, i730 

DIED, PHILADELPHIA, JULY 24, 1825 

[^From copy in possession of Norris S, Barratt] 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

were many notable exceptions among the colonial 
clergy whose churchmanship, piety and position were 
undoubted, and on Sunday he officiated and preached 
at his parish church. Emerson was thinking of this 
type when he exclaimed, "Alas for the unhappy man 
that is called to stand in the pulpit and not give the 
bread of life. " It is not remarkable that the Anglican 
church declined and that he lost the respect and lacked 
influence with our God-fearing ancestors. Although 
it might also have been said with a degree of truth of 
some of the laity at this period as it had been said ear- 
lier of Claiborne of Kent Island, that "He could be 
churchman, puritan, caviller or roundhead with equal 
ease and equal sincerity. "^ ^ With such conditions 
prevailing, the time was ripe for a religious revival, 
as the Church of England gradually lost ground and 
lost character. In addition to this our forefathers 
after the Revolution commenced and when we we;re 
rebels resented and felt insulted by the reading of the 

" Letter April 10, 1724, Giles Rainsford, " Historical Collections 
American Colonial Church," Wm. Stevens Perry, Vol. IV., p. 233. 
Also "Men, Women and Manners in Colonial Times," by Sydney 
Geo. Fisher, Vol. I., p. 61; Bishop Meade's " Old Churches," I., 162; 
Hawkes, "Maryland Contribution," 63; Rev. James Williamson, 
rector of All Saints, Calvert Co., Md., an idiot and tory; Rev. James 
Donaldson, rector of King and Queen, St. Mai-y's Co., a good tory 
and a rake ; Rev. Daniel Mainadier, rector of St. Peter's, Talbot Co., 
a whig of the first rank and reputed a good liver but a horrid 
preacher; Rev. Thomas Phillips, rector of Christ Church, Kent Island, 
tried for his life in Virginia for shooting a man. Reformed " Report 
to Bishop of London," 1723, Vol. IV., "Historical Collection Ameri- 
can Colonial Church," Wm. Stevens Perry, D.D., 1878, pp. 128-129; 
Anderson, "English Church in the Colonies," Vol. III., p. 149; Mc- 
Connell's " English Church in the Colonies," pp. 101-111, 1894. 

13 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

prayers and collects ordered by special command of 
his Majesty King George III. for the express purpose 
of invoking Divine assistance in subduing his unhappy 
deluded subjects in America now in open rebellion 
against the crown. As Dr. Tiffany says: In losing 
affection for King men lost affection for the Church 
and the cry was : No King — no Bishop.^ ^ The ' ' prayer 
for our enemies" especially enraged them. As you 
have probably never heard it I will read it — "0 
Blessed Lord, who hast commanded us by thy beloved 
Son to love our enemies ; and to extend our charity in 
praying even for those who dispitefully use us, give 
grace we beseech thee, to our unhappy fellow subjects 
in America, that seeing and confessing the error of 
their ways, and having a due sense of their ingratitude 
for the many blessings of thy Providence, preserved to 
them by the indulgent care and protection of these 
Kingdoms, they may again return to their duty and 
make themselves worthy of thy pardon and forgive- 
ness : Grant us in the meantime not only strength and 
courage to withstand them, hut charity to forgive and 
pity them, to show a willingness to receive them again 
as friends and brethren, upon just and reasonable 
terms and to treat them with mercy and kindness, for 
the sake of thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen."^^ 
Religious conditions were also unsatisfactory with 

"American Church Series, Vol. VII., p. 45, C. C. Tiffany, New 
York. 

" Dr. Julius P. Sachse, " Form of Prayer for Fasting and Prayer 
Appointed by George III. in December, 1776, on the Breaking Out 
of the Revolution," p. 13. Am. Philo. Soc, 1898. 

14 




CAPTAIN THOMAS WEBB, 

OF THE BRITISH ARMY, LOST H:S RIGHT EYE AT QUEBtC IN 1759 
WITH GENERAL WOLFE. THE APOSTLE OF METHODISM IN DELA- 
WARE, PENNSYLVANIA AND NEW JERSEY. HE HELPED DR. PILMORE 
TO PURCHASE ST. GEORGE'S. DIED, BRISTOL, ENGLAND, DEC. 20, 
1796, AGED SEVENTY-TWO YEARS. 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

the Baptist Churcli, but let us hope they were not as 
bad as the report of the Cowmarsh Baptist Church, 
which was: "No minister — no fixed salary — nor many 
rich."i« 

"Never," says the North British Review, "has a 
century risen in England so void of soul and faith as 
that which opened with Anne (1702) and reached its 
misty noon beneath the second George (1732-1760), a 
dewless night succeeding a dewless dawn. The Puri- 
tans were buried and the Methodists were not born." 
This testimony is convincing that a condition then 
existed which Methodism subsequently met and over- 
came, because whatever has been charged against her 
it has never been said that Methodism had not soul and 
faith.^^ And in recognition of this great work Eng- 

This prayer has a familiar sound. Perhaps its foundation was 
Chas. Townshend's celebrated speech in the House of Commons to 
which Col. Barre made his brilliant reply: "They planted hy your 
care! No; your appression planted them in America. They fled 
from your tyranny to a then uncidtivated, unhabitable country. . . . 
They nourished by your indulgence! They grew by your neglect of 
them. . . . They protected by your arms! They have nobly taken 
up arms in your defence; have exerted a valor amid their constant 
and laborious industry for the defence of a country whose frontier 
was drenched in blood, while its interior departments yielded all its 
little savings to your emoliunent. And believe me — remember I this 
day told you so — the same spirit of freedom which actuated that 
people at first will accompany them still. ..." ("Life of Chas. 
Jared IngersoU," by William M. Meigs, p, 14, 1897.) 

" Pa. Mag. Hist, and Biog., Vol. 9, 199. 

""The Century's Religious Progress," by George Edward Reed, 
S.T.D., LL.D., p. 147. 

Bishop White was mistaken, when February 7, 1794, he reported 
to the Bishop of London that a considerable proportion of those 
who during the destitute condition of our Churches in and after the 

15 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

land in 1876 placed memorials of John Wesley and 
Charles Wesley in the south aisle of her Temple of 
Fame, Westminster Abbey in London. In accepting 
them Dean Stanley of Westminster said: ''They 
preached those great effects which have never since 
died out in English Christendom." He also said at 
another time: ''The Methodist movement in both its 
branches, Arminian and calvinistic, has moulded the 
spiritual character of the English-speaking Protest- 
antism of the world." 

Emerson says that nothing great was ever achieved 
without enthusiasm, and we know now it was the soul, 
faith, energy and untiring self-devotion of the early 
American itinerants of which Asbury, Garrettson, 
Webb, Pilmore, Abbott, Watters, and Cooper were the 
type which built the foundations upon which the church 
rests so securely today. 

Barratt's Chapel is situated near Frederica, South 
Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, State of Delaware. 
It can be reached either by way of Dover or Felton on 
the Pennsylvania Railroad. South Murderkill Hun- 
dred as late as 1780 was a dense primeval forest of 
gigantic oaks and pines except the marshes and 
cripples near the Murderkill Creek and here and there 
where the indefatigable pioneer had cleared one hun- 
dred to one hundred and fifty acres of his land for 
farming purposes. It was built in May, 1780, upon 
grounds donated for that purpose by Philip Barratt, 

war joined the Methodists are returning, as those who did return were 
inconsiderable. Wilson, " Life of Bishop White," p. 167, 1839. 

16 






^y^/^.{XJ^C^^~^ 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

a member of the General Assembly, lately High Sheriff 
of Kent County, through whose exertions, aided partic- 
ularly by his father-in-law, Waitman Sipple, the pro- 
ject was accomplished. 




t%*^^2^^. ^O/ 



The deed bears date August 17, 1780, and is from 
Philip Barratt to Eeynear Williams, David Lewis, 
Waitman Sipple, Samuel Smith, Caleb Furbee, Jona- 
than Furbee, Andrew Purden, William Virden, and 
Daniel James, trustees for part of a tract of land 
called ''William's Chance," beginning from corner of 
brick building now carrying on, and intended for a 
preaching house or chapel.^ ^ It provides that those 
entitled to preach shall be persons appointed at the 
yearly conference of the people called Methodists, 
held in America to preach and expound God's word, 
and no other doctrine shall be taught than is contained 
in the Rev. John Wesley's notes on the New Testament 
and four volumes of sermons, etc. 

The building is almost square in appearance, being 
42 by 48 feet, two stories high with a gallery inside 

" Recorded at Dover, Deed Book W, Vol. 1, p. 247- 

17 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

and is built of brick said to have been imported for 
that purpose from Holland. This I doubt very much, 
as good brick clay could be obtained nearby. The high 
pulpit which very nearly concealed the preacher from 
the view of the congreation unfortunately has been re- 
moved, and it should be restored although the same 
seat upon which Bishops Asbury and Coke and the 
early fathers of the church sat is yet preserved, other- 
wise the chapel presents very much the same appear- 
ance today as it did when finished. Previous to the 
erection of the chapel it was customary for the people 
to meet at the drawbridge or go to each others ' houses 
which were miles apart, as agreed upon beforehand, 
for the purpose of having prayers or listening to the 
exhortations of some itinerant. In October, 1778, 
Freeborn Garrettson preached with his usual virility 
in Murderkill at the house of David Lewis, and among 
those converted or awakened to self -consciousness 
were Philip Barratt, Sheriff of Kent County, and 
his brother-in-law, Jonathan Sipple, Coroner of Kent, 
whose house became a preaching place as well as 
Philip Barratt's. After his death in 1780 his father, 
Waitman Sipple, Jr., took his place. This often re- 
sulted in from two to three hundred people being 
present, which was more than could be comfortably 
accommodated, especially on Sundays or during re- 
vivals. The inconvenience was particularly felt dur- 
ing the winter season. A regular place of meeting 
was sadly needed, and it was to supply this want and 
to have a fixed place of public worship where regular 

18 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

services could be held that determined Philip Barratt 
to erect this chapel.^ ^ We can think of Philip Barratt, 
Asbury and all the original trustees of this chapel con- 
sulting together about its erection in the living-room 
of the Barratt farmhouse, and while they may not 
have used the exact words the thought was there which 
Euskin in ''The Lamp of Memory" so beautifully ex- 
presses when he says ''When we build, let us think we 
build forever — let it not be for present delight nor for 
present use alone — let it be such work as our descen- 
dants will thank us for and let us think as we lay stone 
on stone, that a time is to come when these stones will 
be held sacred because our hands have touched them 
and that men will say as they look upon the labor and 
wrought substances of them 'See this our fathers did 
for us.' " Mr. Asbury arranged the rules of the 
chapel when it was opened, appointed stewards and 
made arrangements for the preachers to meet and 
instruct the children. 

Philip Barratt was the youngest son of Philip Bar- 
ratt, planter, of Bohemia Manor, Cecil County, Mary- 
land. His father is supposed to have been the emi- 
grant. He settled upon the Sassafras River prior to 
1678 and his last wife was Jane Merritt, daughter of 
Thomas Merritt. By her he had four children, An- 
drew Barratt, Catherine Barratt, Eoger Barratt and 

" See Rfev. Robt. W. Todd's " Methodism on the Peninsula," 1886, 
pp. 49, 307, 281, 286; George Alfred Townsend's "Poems," Dover, 
p. 227, 1899. Bishop Asbury's personal Bible, the one he used at 
this time is now preserved in the United States National Museum, 
at Washington, D. C. 

19 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

Philip Barratt. Philip Barratt's birth is recorded 
by Rev. Dr. Richard Sewell, of the Church of England, 
the Rector in St. Stephen's Parish Church, Cecil 
County, Maryland, as October 12, 1730. Philip Bar- 
ratt, Sr., died in August, 1733, his widow, Jane M., 
married Joseph Price, a farmer of Kent County, Dela- 
ware, where she subsequently resided upon the tract of 
land upon which Barratt's Chapel was afterwards 
erected. Upon her marriage she brought her two 
minor sons Roger and Philip with her, and it was in 
this manner our Philip Barratt became a Dela- 
warean.-^ Roger Barratt married Miriam Robinson 
and numbers among his descendants the late Barratt P. 
Conner, James Barratt Conner and Alvin Barratt Con- 
ner of Felton, your present efficient State Senator 
from Kent County, and Rev. Dr. Horace Edwin Hay- 
den of Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, the well-known 
historian and author. In 1755 Philip Barratt married 
Miriam Sipple, daughter of Waitman Sipple. Philip 
Barratt was commissioned High Sheriff of Kent 

"Will John English, January 8, 1678, Liber 2, Cecil Co. Wills, 
folio 89, Philip Barratt ; Land Commissioners Office, Annapolis, Liber 
D.S.F. 35, p. 308, Philip Barratt; Rent Roll, Vol. 2, Kent Cecil, No. 
2, p. 296, Annapolis, Md., Philip Barratt; St. Stephen's Parish 
Records, Md. Hist. Society, Philip Ban-att ; Will of Philip Barratt, 
Liber CO., No. 3, p. 847, Land Office, Annapolis, Md. ; Deed Joseph 
Price et ux. to Andrew Barratt, 2 Nov., 1752, Cecil Co. Deed Book, 
7, p. 508 ; Will Andrew Ban-att, 10 Sept., 1790, WiU Book 5, Cecil 
Co., p. 248; Deed Andrew Barratt to Catherine Barratt for two 
slaves, George and Grace, also two slaves to his granddaughters 
Mary and Carrie Williams, deed dated August 28, 1790, Cecil Co. 
Records, p. 53; Scharf's "History of Delaware," Vol. IL, note, p. 
483, and pp. 582, 1040, 1141, 1157-410, 1145, 1039, 1126, 1151, 1169. 

20 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism, 

County, October 6, 1775, and served until September, 
1779, when lie was elected a member of the Assembly 
from Kent County.^^ 

The Assembly met in Wilmington, October 30, 1779, 

'^ In the campaign of 1775, when Philip Barratt was elected Sheriff 
of Kent, Caesar Rodney, who signed the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, wrote to his brother, Thomas Rodney, from Philadelphia, 
September 26, 1775 : " One circumstance, relative to your politics 
gives me infinite concern — it is this (as related to me) that you 
intend to leave Mr. Barratt out of your ticket as Sheriff. , . . Mr. 
Barratt has much at stake and I believe an honest man therefore 
hope you and your friends will carry him steadily." Caesar Rodney 
felt that Philip Barratt's absence from the ticket imperiled his poli- 
tical future when he significantly added : " and perhaps events 
brought about in consequence of it that neither you or I would wish." 
Original letter New York Public Library, Astor and Tilden Annex. 

The fear expressed by Caesar Rodney in September, 1775, in this 
letter, was realized one year later when his brother, Thomas Rodney, 
and his friends were defeated as delegates to the convention to be 
held at New Castle, August 27, 1776, and which formed the Delaware 
Constitution of 1776. The reason for this defeat is told by Caesar 
Rodney in a letter of August 21, 1776 (Scharf, "History of Dela- 
ware," p. 233) : "Last night by the post I received an account of 
your defeat at the election and in which I was not disappointed, 
being convinced you continued to be too sanguine in your expecta- 
tions without taking the necessary steps to carry a point of that sort ; 
added to all the rest of your bad policy, you suffered Caldwell's Com- 
pany to march away just before the election when there was no 
necessity for it, as the other companies were not half full in any of 
the counties. Parke tells me the conduct of your light infantry here- 
tofore had drawn down the resentment of the people which put it in 
the power of that party who were opposed to you to make this use 
of it." 

The views expressed in this letter by Caesar Rodney are sound; it 
shows him to have been a judge of men and a keener politician than 
his brother Thomas. It is peculiarly interesting in connection with 
his first letter of 1775, when he insisted Philip BaiTatt should be 
supported by Thomas Rodney for sheriff and put upon his ticket, 
and in view of the further fact that Philip Barratt himself was again 
elected sheriff at this election. 

21 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

and while the minutes from 1776 to 1782 are not in ex- 
istence Philip Barratt seems to have taken such a 
prominent part that many of his legislative services 
are foimd in the minutes of the Council, as the Senate 
was then called, more especially when its concurrence 
was necessary. Briefly they show — December 8, 1779, 
Nicholas Van Dyke and Philip Barratt a Committee to 
settle and adjust accounts of State Treasurer ; Decem- 
ber 20, 1779, Philip Barratt and John Cook, Committee 
General Loan Office ; December 22, 1779, Philip Barratt 
voted for John Dickinson, Nicholas Van Dyke and 
George Eead, who were elected delegates to the Con- 
gress of the United States. 

December 23, 1779, Philip Barratt was appointed by 
the Assembly to pay the militia of Kent County £3,600, 
he to be accoimtable for the expenditure thereof and 
to render an account of his proceedings in the premises 
to the General Assembly at the next meeting. The 
records of the Adjutant General's Office, War Depart- 
ment, Washington, D. C, show Philip Barratt served 
as a member of a Committee of public accounts ap- 
pointed by the General Assembly in 1782. February 
4, 1782, he presented to the Council certain letters and 
certificates of General Washington and secured the 
necessary legislation. He took a prominent part in 
the assembly until 1783, doing his utmost to aid the 
patriotic cause.^^ He was the owner of a large landed 

°^ Minutes of Council Delaware State, 1779-1792, pp. 178, 179, 
461, 472, 488, 489, 495, 496, 631, 643, 658, 711, 712, 762, 783, 807, 

22 



%^': 



i 






ADDRESS OF THE BISHOPS OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 
"To THE President of the United States : 

>^ Sir.— We, the bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, humbly beg leave, in the name( 
our society, collectively, in these United States, to express to you the warm feelings of our hearts, 
and our sincere congratulations on your appointment to the presidentship of these States. We 
are conscious, from the signal proofs you have already given, that you are a friend of mankind ; 
and under this established idea, place as full confidence in your wisdom and integrity for the 
preservation of those civil and religious liberties which have been transmitted to us by the 
providence of God and the glorious Revolution, as we believe ought to be reposed in man. 

" We have received the most grateful satisfaction from the humble and entire dependence 
on the great Governor of the universe which you have repeatedly expressed, acknowledging 
Him the source of every blessing, and particularly of the most excellent Constitution of these 
States, which is at present the admiration of the world, and may in future become its great 
exampler for imitation ; and hence we enjoy a holy expectation, that you will always prove a 
faithful and impartial patron of genuine, vital religion, the grand end of our creation and 
present probationary existence. And we promise you our fervent prayers to the throne of grace, 
that God Almighly may endue you with all the graces and gifts of his Holy Spirit, that he may 
enable you to fill up your important station to His glory, the good of His Church, the happiness 
and prosperity of the United States, and the welfare of mankind. 

" Signed in behalf of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

" Thomas Coke, 

"New York, May 29, 1789." "Francis Asbury. i 

The following is the reply of President Washington : 

"To thr Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the 
United States of America. 

" Gentlemen. — I return to you individually, and through you to your society collectively in 
the United States, my thanks for the demonstrations of affection, and the expressions of jo) 
offered in their behalf, on my late appointment. It shall be my endeavor to manifest the purit} 
of my inclinations for promoting the happiness of mankind, as well as the sincerity of m) 
desires to contribute whatever may be in my power toward the civil and religious liberties ol 
the American people. In pursuing this line of conduct, I hope, by the assistance of divint 
Providence, not altogether to disappoint the confidence which you have been pleased to repos( 
in me. 

"It always affords me satisfaction when I find a concurrence of sentiment and practici 
between all conscientious men, in acknowledgments of homage to the great Governor of th( 
universe, and in professions of support to a just civil government. After mentioning that 
trust the people of every denomination, who demean themselves as good citizens, will hav 
occasion to be convinced that I shall always strive to prove a faithful and impartial patron o \ 
genuine vital religion. I must assure you in particular, that I take in the kindest part th 
promise you make of presenting your prayers at the throne of grace for me, and that I likewis 
implore the divine benediction on yourselves and your religious community. 

"George Washington." 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism, 

estate of 800 acres surrounding the chapel, which 
upon his death he devised to his children, Judge 
Andrew Barratt, Caleb Barratt, Dr. Elijah Barratt, 
Nathaniel Barratt, Philip Barratt, 3rd, Miriam Bar- 
ratt and Lydia Barratt, and all historians agree that 
he was a most earnest supporter of Bishop Asbury 
and was one of the friends like Dr. Edward White of 
Dover, Eeynear Williams of Milford, Judge Thomas 
White, Harry Dorsey Gough and Eichard Bassett, who 
opened their houses for this purpose and aided and 
protected him and other suffering itinerants in the 
troubled times of the Eevolution. He also owned two 
sloops, the "Friendship" of twenty tons, and the 
''Dolphin" of fifteen tons, in which he shipped pork, 
beef, corn, bark and staves to Philadelphia via the 
Murderkill Creek which ran through his plantation and 
which was navigable to what is now the town of Fred- 
erica for sloops, shallops or light draught schooners. 

Bishop Asbury made the following note in his journal 
under date of Monday, March 20, 1780: "Eose early, 
wrote an hour, then rode twenty-four miles to Caleb 
Furbee's to preach; was late but came before Caleb 
Boyer was done meeting the class. Spoke on John 
III. 24, and felt quickenings. Went home with Wait- 
man Sipple; he and Philip Barratt determined to go 
about the chapel and to set it near the drawbridge." 

Asbury in his journal has the following entries: 

808, 812. Also see Henry C. Conrad's " History of Delaware," Vol. 
III., p. 892 ; Vol. 10, " Colonial Records," p. 270 ; Penna. Archives, 
2d Series, Vol. 9, p. 672. 

23 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

''Saturday, May 8, 1779, yesterday being a public 
fast day, we had a large congregation and a solemn 
time while I preached on the fast of the Ninevites. I 
found about forty in society at the Drawbridge. 

''June 16, 1779, preached at Barratt's. 

"August 8, 1779, rode to the Drawbridge, preached 
to 300 there. 

"August 22, 1779, rode to the Drawbridge, preached 
to 300 there. 

"September 5, 1779, at Williams, then rode to the 
Drawbridge, preached to 300 there. 

"October 3, 1779, rode to the Drawbridge, preached 
to 200 there. 

Johnnycake bridge here mentioned was higher up 
than the present crossing into Frederica, which was 
built at a later date across a marsh and cripple and was 
at a place called Johnnycake crossing on the same 
stream which had fast land on both banks and was on 
the north side of land lately owned by Mrs. Mary 
Darby.2^ Philip Barratt married Miriam Sipple, and 

"Scharf in his "History of Delaware," Vol. II., p. 1169, states: 
" The family names of early settlers in Murderkill Neck and espe- 
cially of those who afterwards rose to a controlling influence in the 
affairs of the neighborhood and who having died, are now remem- 
bered only by what they have done may be mentioned in the f oUoiving 
order : "Wan-en, Barratt, Nowell, Sipple, Gray, Chambers, Van Natti, 
Neill, "Walton, Darnell, Cramer, Montague, Boone, Loekwood, Ed- 
munds, Hewston, Fisher, Cole, Lindale, Smith, Anderson, Smithers, 
"Wilson, George, Manlove, Bowers, Reed, Grier, Clark, Harper, 
Melvin, Burchenal, Hirons, Vickery, "Williams, "West, Baker and 
Emory — 

' Lamented dead and names of men, 
Who built the school house, drained the fen.' 
24 




NATHANIEL BARRATT SMITHERS, LL.D. 

BORN OCTOBER 8, 1818; DIED JANUARY 16, 1896; SON OF NATHANIEL SMITHERS AND 
SUSAN FISHER BARRATT. HIS MOTHER WAS THE DAUGHTER OF DR. ELIJAH BARRATT, 
SON OF PHILIP BARRATT. ADMITTED TO KENT BAR IN 1841, AND WAS FOR MANY YEARS 
THE FOREMOST LAWYER IN THE STATE. IN REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTIONS 1860, 
1868, 1880. SECRETARY OF STATE IN 1862 AND AGAIN IN 1895. MEMBER OF CONGRESS 
IN 1863 AND A FRIEND AND SUPPORTER OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN. 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

Caleb Furbee married Anna Sipple. They were 
daughters of Waitman and Mary Hunn Sipple, and 
Mary Hunn Sipple was the daughter of Jonathan 
Hunn. So we have here a father and his two Sons- 
in-law. In November, 1780, the first quarterly meet- 
ing was held in the chapel and it is recorded one 
thousand people were in attendance. Dr. Samuel 
Magaw, "a kind, sensible, friendly minister of the 
Episcopal church," rector of the Episcopal church 
in Dover, afterwards rector of St. Paul's P. E. 
Church of Philadelphia, preached Saturday afternoon 
*'an excellent sermon, "^^ says Asbury, on "Who 
shall ascend into the hill of the Lord"; Brothers 
Hartley and Glendenning exhorted. We all stayed 
at Mr. Barratt's. Mr. Magaw prayed with much 
affection, and we parted with great love. The 
next day, he continues, Sunday, November 5, we had 
between one and two thousand people. Our house 
was crowded above and below and numbers remained 
outside. Our love feast lasted about two hours. 
Some spoke about the sanctifying grace of God. I 
preached on John 3 : 16-18, a heavy house to preach in. 

The latest dates found on any headstones of the Van Nattis or 
Nowells are 1787. The private burial ground of the "Warrens is the 
oldest but that of the Barratt's best denotes wealth and refinement. 
These inhabitants had social culture and repute before Frederica was 
a town and most of them were related." 

" Dr. Magaw was the last minister sent to America in 1767 by the 
Venerable Society for the propagation of the Gospel. He minis- 
tered from 1767 to 1780. Scharf's "History of Delaware," Vol. II., 
pp. 1055 and 1101. Afterwards rector St. Paul's P. E. Church, 
Philadelphia, 1781. 

25 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

Brothers (Caleb B.) Peddicord and (Joseph) Crom- 
well exhorted. 

This may be regarded as the dedication of the chapel 
though services had been held in it earlier in the year. 
Three days after this quarterly meeting, Wednesday, 
November 8, 1780, we find this record in Mr. Asbury's 
journal: Engaged the friends to subscribe seven hun- 
dredweight of pork toward the meeting house at Bar- 
ratt's, showing the people contributed in merchandise 
as well as in money and labor. The first time Mr. 
Asbury refers to this new edifice by its name is under 
date of September 28, 1783, when he records preaching 
Sunday afternoon ' * at Barratt 's Chapel. ' ' 

In early times the colonists agreed ''There is no 
room in Christ's triumphant army for tolerationists," 
the only notable exception being Lord Baltimore, who 
had a law in favor of religious freedom passed in 
Maryland as early as 1649.2^ So that as Mr. Justice 
Wilson of the Supreme Court of the United States 
remarks, before the doctrine of toleration was pub- 
lished in Europe the practice of it was established in 
America.26 Dr. Charles J. Stille in his learned article 
on ''Eeligious Tests in Provincial Pennsylvania" 
(Vol. IX Pennsylvania Magazine of History, page 374) 
so completely sustains this that I cannot refrain 
from quoting him. I do this with less diffidence as 

" Rev. Ethan Allen, " Who were the Early Settlers of Maryland?" 
BaltuBore. McMahon's " History of Maryland." 

""The Works of James Wilson," James D. Andrews, Vol. I., 
p. 4, Callaghan & Co., Chicago. 

26 




ALLAN MCLANE. 
BORN AUGUST 8, 1746; DIED MAY 22, 1829. 



A FRIEND OF PHILIP BARRATT AND FRANCIS ASBURV. 
AT DUCK CREEK CROSS ROADS NOW SMYRNA, DELAWARE. 



in 178f. he gave the ground for asburv church 
(see over) 



ALLAN McLANP:. 

It is a remarkable fact that early Methodists like Philip Barratt, his 
son Dr. Elijah Barratt, Hon. Richard Bassett, Judge Thomas White, 
Col. Allan McLane and Harry Dorsey Gough of Perry Hall, who were 
personal friends, through Asbury's influence either gave ground or 
erected chapels. 

Allan McLane, born in Philadelphia, Pa., August 8, 1746, and re- 
moved to Kent County, Delaware, 1774. In 1775 was appointed Lieu- 
tenant in Colonel Caesar Rodney's Regiment of Delaware Militia, and 
in 1776 joined Washington's army and was distinguished in actions at 
Long Island, at White Plains, Trenton and Princeton. Commissioned 
Captain and assigned to Colonel John Patton's Additional Continental 
Regiment, January 13, 1777. His partisan company was in service on 
outposts of Philadelphia, Pa., during its occupancy by enemy, 1777- 
1778; attached to Delaware Regiment, Continental Establishment, 
December 16, 1778, and to MajorLee's Partisan Corps, July 13, 1779; 
February 4, 1782, as a member of Assembly from Kent County Philip 
Barratt offered a resolution at request of Allan McLane empowering 
State Treasurer to purchase a sum of money in specie for benefit of 
officers of Delaware regiment who were made prisoners ou Long Island ; 
present at siege of, and surrender at, Yorktown, and retired from ser- 
vice November 9, 1782. Member of Lodge No. 2, F. and M. of Phila- 
delphia, 1779. 

He and his wife were Methodists and his children, including Hon. 
Louis McLane who was a member of Gen'l Jackson's Cabinet and 
Minister to England, and father of Hon. Robert M. McLane Governor 
of Maryland (1884), were baptised by Bishop Asbury. 

/;/ /lis Journal Asbury states : 

1797 July 12, I rode to Wilmington and stopped at Allen McLane's, 
now living there. 

1801 July 31, I stopped with Allen McLane at Wilmington. 

1802 April 28, I lodged for the night with Allen McLane — my fever 
rose. 

1802 Aug. 2, I proceeded on to Wilmington in the rain and lodged 
with Allen McLane. 

1804 ^lay 13, I dined with Allen McLane — rode 45 miles to-day. 

1814 April 3, I baptised the children of Allen and Louis McLane 
these people have not forgotten the holy living and dying of their 
mother, nor her early and constant friend, the writer of this Journal. 

The friendship between the McLanes and the Barratts did not sur- 
vive the third generation. See account of duel, 1807, between John 
Barratt and Louis McLane, who were then studying law with Hon. 
James A. Bavard, mentioned bv Judge Conrad in his " Historv of 
Delaware." Vol. Ill, p. 895. 

After the war he settled at Smyrna, Delaware. He was a member 
of the State Convention that ratified the Constitution of the United 
States in 1787, was a member and Speaker of the Delaware Legisla- 
ture, for si.x years was a privy councillor, for many years Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas and United States Marshal of the Delaware 
District from 1790 to 1798. Also collector of the Port of Wilmington 
from 1808 to date of his death, which occurred May 22, 1829. Buried 
in Asbury Church cemetery, Wilmington, Delaware. See "Barratt 
and Sachse Freemasonry in Pennsylvania, 1727-1907." Vol. II, p. 109. 
Conrads " History." Vol. Ill, p. 877. 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

De Quincy tells us ''people read nothing in these days 
that is more than forty-eight hours old, so I am daily 
admonished that allusions, the most obvious to any- 
thing in the rear of our own time need explanation." 
Hear what he says about this intolerance. 

''In New Jersey, after the surrender of the Charter, 
when the Colony came directly under the royal author- 
ity, in 1702, liberty of conscience was proclaimed in 
favor of all except Papists and Quakers; but as the 
latter were required to take oaths as qualifications for 
holding office or for acting as jurors or witnesses in 
judicial procedings, they, of course the great mass of 
the population, were practically disfranchised. But 
the story of the arbitrary measures taken by the Gov- 
ernor of this Colony, Lord Cornbury, to exclude from 
office or the control of public affairs all except those 
who conformed to the Church of England is too well 
known to need to be retold here. In Maryland the 
English Church was established in 1696, and one of the 
first acts of the newly organized Province was to dis- 
franchise those very Catholics and their children by 
whom the doctrine of religious liberty had been estab- 
lished in the law of 1649. In Carolina, after the fan- 
ciful and impracticable Constitution devised for it by 
the celebrated philosopher John Locke had been given 
up, by which the English Church had been established 
and endowed in the colony, the church feeling was so 
strong and the determination to secure its supremacy 
so unjaelding, that an Act was passed in 1704 requir- 

27 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

ing all members of the Assembly to take the sacra- 
ment according to the rites of the Church of England. 
**The result of this review is to show that in all the 
Colonies I have named, except perhaps Rhode Island, 
liberty of worship was the rule, excepting, of course, 
in the case of the Roman Catholics. Throughout the 
Colonies, at the beginning of the eighteenth century, the 
man who did not conform to the established religion of 
the Colony, whether it was Congregationalism in New 
England, or the Episcopal form elsewhere, was not in 
the same position in regard to the enjoyment of either 
civil or religious rights as he who did conform. If he 
were a Roman Catholic, he was everj^where wholly dis- 
franchised. For him there was not even the legal right 
of public worship. If he were a Protestant differing 
in his creed from the type of Protestantism adopted 
by the rulers, although he could freely celebrate in 
nearly all the Colonies his peculiar form of worship, 
he was nevertheless excluded from any share in public 
affairs. He could neither vote nor hold office, and he 
was forced to contribute to the support of a religious 
ministry whose teachings he in his heart abhorred. 
And this condition of things, extraordinary as it seems 
to us now, had not been brought about by any 
conscious, arbitrary despotism on the part of the rul- 
ers, but was the work of good but narrow-minded men 
who were simply following out the uniform practice 
of the Christian world, and who no doubt honestly 

28 




JOHN DICKINSON. 

BORN MARYLAND, NOVEMBER 13, 1732; DIED DELAWARE, FEBRUARY 14, 1808. 

(see over) 



JOHN DICKINSON 



I 



I 



was the " Penman of the Revolution. In the literature of that strug- 
gle his position is as pre-eminent as Washington in war, Franklin in '■ 
diplomacy, and Morris in finance." The Dickinsons first settled in ^ 

Virginia, but were in Talbot County on the eastern shore of Maryland 
in 1659. John Dickinson was born at Crosia-dore, November 8, 1732. 
His mother was Mary Cadwalader of Philadelphia. His father, Samuel 
Dickinson, removed to Kent County near Dover in 1740. Dickinson 
and Philip Barratt knew each other from boyhood and were friends 
although they did not always act together politically. July 19, 1770, 
Dickinson married Mary Norris the daughter of Isaac Norris, the 
Speaker, of Fairhill, Philadelphia. December 22, 1779, as a member 
of the Delaware Assembly Philip Barratt voted for John Dickinson, 
Nicholas Van Dyke and George Read who were elected delegates to 
the Congress of the United States. Philip Barratt later was asked to 
vote against Dickinson. His reply was, as related by Hon. Nathaniel 
Barratt Smithers "I will not do it he is from my own county, we 
were boys together and he thinks he is right." Asbury was forced 
to seek shelter and protection of Judge White and Philip Barratt in 
Delaware which their official positions enabled them to afiFord him, 
but it was not until John Dickinson gave Asbury a letter of commenda- 
tion to the Governor of Maryland that he resumed his work within that 
State, which he had discontinued from March 10, 1778— as he could 
not take the required State oath. He also recalled his experience of 
June 20, 1776, " I was fined near Baltimore five pounds for preaching 
the gospel." We must not forget also the close relations politically of 
Pennsylvania and Delaware, as up to the Revolution Delaware had the 
same Governor as Pennsylvania but a different Assembly. 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

thought that in so acting they were dong the highest 
service by obeying the will of God." 

Today anyone whether he be Protestant or Catholic, 
Jew or Gentile, Christian or Mohammedan, may in 
this country worship his God in any way he pleases not 
injurious to the equal rights of others. Congress 
under the Constitution and its amendments can make 
no law respecting an establishment of religion or pro- 
hibiting the free exercise thereof as the whole power 
over the subject of religion is left exclusively to the 
State.2^ 

Eeligious liberty is our dearest possession, and while 
secured to us by our State Constitution, we should not 
forget its origin or that it has only been ours little 
more than a century.^^ The Constitution of Delaware 
of 1792 provides that it shall be 'Hhe duty of all men 
frequently to assemble together for the public worship 
of the author of the universe, and piety and morality, 
in which the prosperity of communities depend are 
thereby promoted ; yet no man shall or ought to be com- 
pelled to attend any religious worship or support of 
any place of worship, or to the maintenance of any min- 
istry against his own free will and consent; and that 
no power shall or ought to be vested in or assumed by 
any magistrate that shall in any case interfere with, 

"Davis vs. Beason, 133, United States Reports, p. 342; Holy 
Trinity Church, 143, United States Reports, p. 471; In Re Spies, 
125, United States Reports, p. 181; Reynolds vs. U. S., 98, United 
States Reports, p, 145. 

" " Law of Delaware," Vol. I., p. 28. 

29 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

or in any manner control the rights of conscience, in 
the free exercise of religious worship, nor a preference 
given by law to any religious societies, denominations 
or modes of worship. No religious test shall be re- 
quired as a qualification to any office or public trust 
under this State. The rights of conscience and relig- 
ious liberty as you will at once perceive are fully 
protected by this declaration in the Constitution of 
Delaware of 1792, and it is also worthy of mention that 
Judge Andrew Barratt was one of the eight delegates 
from Kent County who helped to frame the constitu- 
tion of which this is a part. Ministers not ordained 
were silenced by the public authorities and the very 
men who had left England to gain an asylum for relig- 
ious freedom were refusing toleration to any religious 
opinions but their own. While Pennsylvania and Del- 
aware were not without their sins of intolerance, yet 
they evinced a more liberal spirit than characterized 
some of their sister States. 

Pennsylvania was peopled by the Dutch, Swedes, 
English, Germans, Welsh, Scotch, Irish, and they 
brought with them their different religions — Quaker, 
Lutheran, German Calvinists, Episcopal, Tunker or 
Dunker, Mennonites, Schwenkfelders, Mennonites, 
Moravians and Presbyterians. It must not be forgot- 
ten that while Pennsylvania was peopled by Quakers 
and Germans, it was also the stronghold of the Pres- 
byterians, as the first American Presbytery was estab- 
lished there in 1705. 

30 




BORN MAY 18, 1^81 ; DIED JULY 8, 1864. ENSIGN WAR OF 1812; GOVERNOR OF DELA- 
WARE JANUARY, 1830; JUDGE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, 1844. HE WAS A RESIDENT 
OF MILTON AND A BUSINESS PARTNER OF JAMES BARRATT PRIOR TO 1830. HE WA^ 
RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF THE LEADING METHODIST LAYMEN IN THE STATE. HE FRE- 
QUENTLY ATTENDED SERVICES AT BARRATT'S CHAPEL. 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

This then was the condition of affairs ecclesiastically 
speaking when John Wesley, the apostle of Methodism, 
determined to send a missionary to America in the 
person of Francis Asbury who arrived in 1771, then in 
the twenty-sixth year of his age, having been born on 
the twentieth of August, 1745, in Handsworth, about 
four miles from Birmingham, Staffordshire, Eng- 
land. From the period of his arrival he commenced 
preaching the Word and making converts to the cause 
with a full knowledge of all the difficulties enumerated, 
and in many places with great personal danger to him- 
self. In Asbury 's journal he says : ''Oct. 8, 1779. Our 
difficulties are great, we have not a sufficient number 
of proper preachers. Some who are gifted cannot go 
into all the States on account of the oaths, others are 
under bail and cannot move far," and again March 
15, 1780, ''Bro. Garretson expects to come out of jail 
by the favor of the Governor and Council of Maryland 
in spite of his foes. So the Lord works for us. ' ' This 
was indeed a time of trial and suffering. There were 
only ten preachers altogether and they were all English- 
men and supposed to be loyal to King George with the 
exception of William Watters of Harford County, 
Maryland, who was the first native American to become 
a regular itinerant preacher. These noble men with 
Asbury at their head suffered every privation and per- 
formed herculean labors, preaching in private houses, 
balconies, market places, barns, and in the country in 
forests and open fields in order to minister to the relig- 

31 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

ious needs of their flocks, or as Wakeley eloquently 
says ''With no sword but that of the Spirit, no banner 
but that of the Cross and no commander but our spir- 
itual Joshua, the leader of the Lord's host, they went 
forth to glorious war having for their motto 'Victory 
or Death.'" They were the heroes of Methodism, 
their great object being to promote Christianity in 
earnest. 

Christianity (as Judge Duncan held in Updegraph 
vs. Commonwealth, 11 Sergeant & Rawle, 394) is and 
always has been a part of the common law of Pennsyl- 
vania — Christianity without the spiritual artillery of 
European countries, for this Christianity was one of 
the considerations of the royal charter, and the very 
basis of its great founder William Penn; not Chris- 
tianity founded on any particular tenets ; not Christi- 
anity with an established church and tithes and spir- 
itual courts, but Christianity with liberty of conscience 
to all men.2® 

But by comparison, darker days were yet to come. 
The murmurings of a people enraged by the stamp 
act, oppressed by taxation and unjust laws, began to 
be heard. The Farmer's letters of John Dickinson 
stated the colonial view, and produced a profound im- 
pression that England was acting unfairlj^ If any 

" Lectures, " The United States a Christian Nation," by Mr. Justice 
David J. Brewer of U. S. S. Ct., also, "Our Duty as Citizens and 
The Promise and Possibilities of the Future," 1908. Also see " A 
Reply to Justice Brewer's Lectui-es," by Isaac Hassler, Young Men's 
Hebrew Association of Philadelphia, 1908, denying the United States 
is a Christian Country. 

32 




THOMAS McKEAN. 

BORN CHESTER CO., PA., MARCH 19, 1734; DIED PHILADELPHIA, JUNE 24, 1817. 

(see over) 



THOMAS McKEAN 

one of the friends of Philip Barratt, who on several occasions did 
kindly acts for early itinerants at his request. Born in Chester County, 
Pennsylvania, March 19th, 1734. in 1757-1758 Clerk of Assembly of 
Delaware. In 1756 Deputy Attorney General Sussex County. 1762 
was chosen with Caesar Rodney to revise and print the laws. Dele- 
gate from Delaware to Stamp Act Congress 1765. Judge Court of 
Common Pleas Delaware 1765-1766. In 1771 Collector of Customs 
New Castle. Member of Constitution Convention of Delaware of 1776. 
Dec. 20, 1777, Commander-in-Chief of Delaware authorized by Assem- 
bly to pay Thomas McKean ^90 and Philip Barratt ;^29 for public ser- 
vices (Minutes of Council of Delaware p. 178). Member of Assembly 
1773-1779 although he really lived in Philadelphia. Signer of Declara- 
tion of Independence. From 1774-1783 member of Congress from 
Delaware. President of Congress and Chief Justice of Pennsylvania 
1777-1797. When in Dover it was his custom to spend at least a night 
with Philip Barratt as he had done on his way from Sussex in 1756- 
1762. On Tuesday, January 14, 1783, Thomas McKean, Philip Barratt 
and Nathaniel Waples of the House, and John Banning and Joshua 
Polk of the Council were appointed a joint Committee of Public 
Accounts (Minutes of Council, p. 762). Governor of Pennsylvania 
1799-1808, nine years altogether. In 1781 he occupied three offices. 
Member of Congress from Delaware, President of Congress and Chief 
Justice of Pennsylvania. He died June 24th, 1817, aged 87 years and 
is buried in Christ Church, Philadelphia. 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

pretext were needed in addition to tlie intolerance of 
tlie mass of the people at this time, and calculated to 
increase and inflame their prejudice and mistrust of 
Methodists, especially preachers who were generally 
looked upon as fanatics and misguided people, it was 
supplied by John Wesley's supposed opposition to the 
American Eevolution which had now commenced. Dr. 
Buckley truly says, ' ' The venerated Wesley dabbled in 
political affairs in the old country and his followers 
were looked at askance on that account in this coun- 
try." So the hardships Methodists were obliged to 
endure were increased, they were despised, persecuted 
and derided. It was hardly safe for a man to openly 
avow himself and it no doubt kept hundreds away 
from the Methodist faith who might have been open 
to conviction and favorably disposed. The colonial 
government ended with the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence on July 4, 1776, and as George Alfred Townsend 
remarks in his ^' Early Politics of Delaware," the 
"Church of England ministers left the country and 
their flocks fell to the Methodists." Methodism there- 
fore had its highest social status on the Delaware pen- 
insula, where it succeeded the Anglican church. 

March 27, 1778, Asbury writes in concealment at 
the house of his friend. Judge Thomas White, of Kent 
County, Delaware: ''I intend to abide here for a sea- 
son until the storm is abated. The grace of God is 
a sufficient support while I bear the reproach of men 
and am rewarded evil for all the good which I have 

33 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

done and desire to do for mankind. I want for no 
temporal convenience and endeavor to improve my 
time by devotion and study. ' ' On the second of April, 
1778, the Light Horse Patrol under Brigadier General 
Smallwood in pursuance of an order of Congress of 
26th of March, 1778, came to the house and arrested 
Judge White and bore him off, leaving his wife and 
children with Asbury in great distress of mind, who 
spent the next day in fasting and prayer. Judge 
White having been seized upon the charge of being a 
Tory and a Methodist after five weeks' detention was 
allowed to return home on parole wliich Congress 
did not discharge until August 3, 1779 (Journal Con- 
gress, 1776, p. 30). 30 

Stevens in his "History of Methodism" says: "In 
the year 1778 when the storm was at its highest and 
persecution raged furiously, Asbury advisedly con- 
fined himself to the little State of Delaware where the 
laws were rather more favorable and the rulers and in- 
fluential men were somewhat more friendly. For a 
time he had even then to keep himself much retired. 
He found an asylum in the house of his firm and fast 
friend, Thomas White, one of the Judges of the Court 
of Common Pleas in Kent County. From this place 
of retreat he could correspond with his suffering breth- 
ren who were scattered abroad. The preachers often 
met him in the hospitable family of Judge White, and 

""History of the Methodist Episcopal Church," by Rev. Abel 
Stevens, Vol. I., pp. 307-314, 316, 159, 319, 321; Vol. II., pp. 173, 
360. " Women of Methodism," Stevens, p. 220. 

34 




THE HOME OF HARRY OORSEY GOUGH, ON THE BEL AIR ROAD, TWELVE MILES FROM BALTIMORE, MD., WHERE 
BISHOP ASBURY WAS ENTERTAINED. ALSO PHILIP BARRATT, GOVERNOR RICHARD BASSETT AND JUDGE THOMAS 
WHITE WERE THERE FROM TIME TO TIME. IT WAS PARTIALLY DESTROYED BY FIRE BUT WAS REBUILT BY 
JAMES CARROLL IN 1823. 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

lie privately held with them a conference in 1779. The 
family which thus gave refuge to him and to not a 
few of his brethren during this stormy period were 
notable in the early days of Methodism. Like that of 
Gough at Perry Hall,^! of Bassett at Bohemia Manor 
and of Barratt at Barratt's Chapel, Kent, its name 
continually recurs in the journals of Asbury, Coke, 
Garrett son, Abbott and in other early Methodist pub- 
lications.^2 xjp ^^ ^i^^ ^^^^g ^f j^^g conversion, Philip 
Barratt was a member of the Church of England, as 
were his friends. Judge Thomas White^^ and Hon. 
Eichard Bassett.^* 

"^ Henry Dorsey Gough was the friend of Judge Thomas White, 
Philip Barratt and Richard Bassett. His home, "Perry Hall," 
twelve miles from Baltimore, was where he entertained Asbury. He 
and his wife Prudence Gough were prominent Methodists. Their 
daughter Sophia Gough in 1787 married James Carroll. They num- 
ber among their descendants James Carroll and Charles Ridgely 
Carroll, the Van Ness's, Ridgeleys, Sargents, Milligans, Poultneys, 
Shippens, Denisons and the Edwin Sehenck's, all prominent families 
of Baltimore. "Eneyclopsedia of Methodism," by Matthew Simpson, 
1878, p. 415. "Carroll Family," Old Kent, Maryland, by Hanson, 
Baltimore, 1876, p. 155. Lednum, Rise of Methodism (1859), chap. 
XXIII., p. 153. Life of Rev. Wm. Black of Nova Scotia— Recolle* - 
tions of an Old Itinerant, p. 191, 192, 193, 201. 

" " Methodism in America," by John Lednum, pp. 265, 410, 267- 
270, 205, 206. Also see journals of Coke, Asbury and Abbott. 

" Henry C. Conrad's, " Samuel "White and Judge Thomas White," 
XL., Papers Hist. Soc. of Delaware, 1903. Also Lednum's " Rise of 
Methodism," p. 267. Judge White witnessed the signature of Philip 
Barratt to his deed donating the ground for Barratt's Chapel. 

" Richard Bassett was born on Bohemia Manor, as was Philip 
Barratt, and they were always friends. Fourteen days after he be- 
came Governor on January 23, 1799, he appointed Andrew Barratt 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the State of Delaware. 
(Deed Book F, Vol. II., folio 166, Kent Co.) The Delaware Mirror 

35 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

He realized the annoyances sure to follow, or as it is 
ably put by Dr. Stevens: ''These memorable historic 
families who though associated with the highest social 
circles of their times, counted not their opulence nor 
their lives dear unto them, choosing rather to suffer 
persecution with the people of God." Philip Barratt 
died on the twenty-eighth day of October, 1784, aged 55 
years, two weeks before the memorable meeting of 
Bishops Coke and Asbury at the chapel now known by 
his name. By his will, dated May 18, 1783, and which 
was probated November 23, 1784, he devised his real 
estate to his children above named, and requested his 
friends, Judge Thomas White, Governor Eichard Bas- 
sett and Eichard Lockwood, to partition the same 
among them. His beloved wife, Miriam S. Barratt, 
and son, Andrew Barratt, he appointed executors.^^ 

All church historians, including Bishop Simpson 

of the Times, December 18th, 1802, states Governor Bassett removed 
Hall, Rodney and Dr. Tilton because they were republicans and not 
a republican remained in commission from Governor down to Con- 
stable. He drew and witnessed Philip Barratt's will. See Hon. 
Robert E. Pattison's " Life of Richard Bassett," XXIX., Papers of 
Hist. Soc. of Delaware; "Colonial Mansions," by Thomas Allen 
Glenn, 1899, p. 136 ; "Ancient Families of Bohemia Manor," by Rev. 
Chas, Payson Mallory, VII., Papers Hist. Soc. of Delaware, 1888; 
Lednum's "Rise of Methodism," p. 272, 1859. 

'^Dr. Edward White was the nephew of Judge Thomas White. 
Member State Convention to ratify U. S. Constitution, December 7, 
1787. State Senate Kent Co., 1793. Member of House of Repre- 
sentatives with Philip Barratt in 1782. (Conrad's "History of 
Delaware," Vol. 1, pp. 155, 266, 276.) Dr. White became a 
Methodist in 1777, and in 1778 removed to Dorchester, Md. See 
Lednum's "Rise of Methodism," pp. 202, 220. After death of Philip 
Barratt of Barratt's Chapel he married his widow, Miriam Sipple 
Barratt. 

36 




RICHARD BASSETT 

1735—1815 

CAPTAIN CONTINENTAL ARMY; STATE COUNCIL OF DELAWARE, 1776-1786; 
UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION, 1787; UNITED STATES SENATOR, 
1787-1793; CHIEF JUSTICE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, 1793-1798; GOVERNOR 
OF DELAWARE, 1797-1801; FRIEND AND POLITICAL ALLY OF PHILIP BARRATT, OF 
BARRATT'S CHAPEL; BUILT WESLEY CHAPEL, DOVER DELAWARE. 

FROM COPY IN POSSESSION OF NOHRIS S. BARRATT. 



I 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

and Eev. Dr. J. M. Buckley, have fallen into an error 
in supposing that Philip Barratt was ''Judge Bar- 
ratt, " who in point of fact was his son, and in this way 
Judge Andrew Barratt has received credit for his 
father's work in the vineyard of the Lord in addition 
to his own, which although of a different character 
was no less earnest or effective. Asbury pathetically 
notes in his journal, February 26, 1810: ''Most of my 
old friends in this quarter have fallen asleep but their 
children are generally with me, and the three genera- 
tions baptised — Dined with Philemon Green and lodged 
with Andrew Barratt — Preached at Barratts Chapel. ' ' 
Some time after the decease of Philip Barratt on Mon- 
day, March 28, 1809, Asbury paused there with no little 
emotion in his rapid course over the country; "I 
preached [he writes] at Barratt 's Chapel and bap- 
tized some children. I had powerful feelings of sym- 
pathy for the children and grand-children of that holy 
man in life and death, Philip Barratt.'' When in ex- 
treme age shortly before his death on Friday, April 14, 
1815, the veteran Bishop passed over the same region, 
for the last time, he ascended the old pulpit of Bar- 
ratt 's Chapel and preached once more, amid its hal- 
lowed memories, though in great feebleness of body. 
Judge Andrew Barratt, then fifty-nine years old, the 
son of his old friend, was there to welcome him to 
dinner. ' ' Ah ! ' ' said the Judge, ' ' I know that my father 
and mother thought more of him than of any other man 
on earth, and well does it become their son to respect 

37 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

him." It must not be forgotten there was only eleven 
years difference in their ages. He took pleasure in 
his old age in recalling such recollections to early 
scenes and early friends continually occurring in his 
diary.^^ 

Journal of Francis Asbury, N. Bangs, New York, 1821. 

1779, May 3. Preached at Drawbridge to 40. (Barratt's), Vol. I., 
238. 

1779, June 16. Preached at Barratt's house. Vol. I., 240. 

1779, August 8. Preached at Drawbridge to 300. (Barratt's), 
Vol. I., 246. 

1779, August 22. Preached at Drawbridge to 300. (Barratt's), 
Vol. I., 248. 

1779, September 5. Preached at Drawbridge to 300. (Barratt's), 
Vol. I., 249. 

1779, October 3. Preached at Drawbridge to 200. (Barratt's), 
Vol. I., 252. 

1780, March 20. Barratt's Chapel— Philip Barratt. Vol. I., 275. 
1780, November 3. Barratt's Chapel — Quarterly meeting. Vol. 

I., 316. 

1780, November 3. Stayed at Barratts. Vol. I., 316. 

1780, November 5. Barratt's Chapel — preached. Vol. I., 316. 

1780, November 6. Barratt's Chapel — preached. Vol I., 317. 

1780, November 18. Barratt's Chapel — rode to and exhorted. 
Vol. I., 319. 

1781, January 24. Barratt's Chapel — preached. Vol. I., 325. 

1781, October 27. Barratt's Chapel — quarterly meeting. Vol. I., 
352. 

1782, September 27. Barratt's Chapel— preached 3 P.M. Vol. I., 
360. 

1784, October 2. Barratt's Chapel— preached. Vol. I., 374. 

1784, November 15. Barratt's Chapel — met Thomas Coke, Vol. 
I., 376. 

1789, July 31. Barratt's Chapel— preached. Vol. II., 52. 

1791, September 16. Dr. Elijah Barratt built Chapel, Camden, 
Del. Vol. III., 143. 

- Vol. II., Scharf's " History of Delaware," p. 1156. 

38 




BISHOP FRANCIS ASBURY 

BORN, HANDSWORTH, STAFFORDSHIRE, ENG., AUGUST 20, 1745 
DIED, SPOTTSYLVANIA, VA., MARCH 31, 1816 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

1809, March 27. Barratt's Chapel — preached and baptised. Vol. 
III., 261. 

1810, March 25. Barratt's Chapel — Lodged with Andrew Barratt. 
Vol. III., 286. 

1810, March 26. Barratt's Chapel— preached. Vol. III., 286. 

1813, April 20. Barratt's Chapel — preached, dined at Dover. 
Vol. III., 346. 

1815, April 14. Barratt's Chapel — preached, dined with Andrew 
Barratt. Vol. HI., 379. 

Upon Asbury's first appearance in Delaware as a 
missionary appointed by Wesley so earnest and con- 
vincing was lie in preaching the Gospel that conviction 
and conversion in large numbers followed. He visited 
all parts of the Delaware-Maryland peninsula and was 
most successful in interesting and awakening not only 
the plain people, but some of the most prominent citi- 
zens and their families, who through him became ser- 
vants of Christ and allied themselves with the Meth- 
odist Church. Dr. McConnelP^ places the number at 
one hundred thousand souls and laments, ''The Church 
in America lost the most active part of its membership 
at the very time it was about to need them most. 
He found Delaware in extremis in a religious sense, 
but when he died the Methodist Church was not only 
organized but firmly established and mainly through 
his efforts. Genial in manner, persuasive in speech 
and a warm-hearted living exponent of the Gospel 
which he preached, he was one of those rare personal- 
ities whom contact with and labor among men always 
leave a lasting impression for good. 

"Dr. McConnell's "The English Church in the Colonies," pp. 
144, 171, 172. 

39 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

As Dr. H. B. Eidgaway tells us: "He became at 
once the miglity personality around which Methodism 
gathered. What Washington was to the nation As- 
bury was to the Methodist Church — its center of 
strength. He was everywhere present animating by 
his zeal, guiding by his counsels and shaping into a 
living unity the widely scattered societies. He did not 
so much say to the preachers, Go, as. Follow where I 
go. . . . His love of family, country, possessions, wit, 
comfort — all were placed on the altar of methodism.^^ 

' He lived to turn his slower feet 
Towards the western setting sun. 
To see his harvest all complete, 
His dream fulfilled, his duty done.' " 

Charles Chauncey in 1743 in his ''Seasonable 
Thoughts" attacked revivalists in New England, and 
at the present day writers like T. M. Davenport, ana- 
lyzing the psychology of revivals, decry emotional 
preaching by which religious enthusiasm is excited 
and tell us the path of Christian nurture and not re- 
vival rapture is the saner method of awakening the 
religious sense, but however this may scientifically 
appear now, the earnest methods pursued by Asbury 
and his preachers produced results of which no Meth- 
odist need feel ashamed, and it is admitted the fervor 
of their piety, and the enthusiasm of their methods 

"Ridgaway, "Personnel of the Christmas Conference," 1885, 
p. 136. 

40 



BfSHOF 



.;>COFAL CHURCH 



BISHOP ASBURY, ON HIS WAY TO ATTEND THE GENERAL CONFERENCE AT BALTIMORE, 
DIED MARCH 31, 1816, AT THE HOUSE OF HIS FRIEND, GEORGE ARNOLD, IN SPOTT- 
SYLVANIA, VA. HIS BODY WAS SUBSEQUENTLY INTERRED UNDER THE PULPIT OF THE 
EUTAW STREET CHURCH, BALTIMORE. THIS CHUkCH IS BOUNDED BY EUTAW STREET, 
MULBERRY STREET, JASPER STREET, AND EUTAW COURT. BISHOP McKENDREE 
PREACHED THE SERMON. THIS SLAB INCLOSED THE DOOR OF THE VAULT AT THE 
BACK OF THE CHURCH. FORTY YEARS AFTER THE BODY WAS REMOVED, BUT WHERE 
IT WAS REINTERRED IS UNKNOWN. 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

tended to create a distinction between them and the 
lethargic clergy of the Church of England.^^ 

Andrew, eldest son of Philip and Miriam Barratt, 
was bom September 22, 1756, and on December 10, 
1778, married Ann Clarke, daughter of Hon. John 
Clarke,^*' who was an earnest and highly esteemed 
Methodist. He was admitted to the Kent County bar 
in 1779. The positions of honor and trust he held — 
Sheriff 1780-1792; member of Constitutional Conven- 
tion, 1792; Judge Court of Common Pleas and High 
Court of Errors and Appeals, 1799-1812 ; Speaker of 
the Senate, 1812-13 and 14; Commissioner under Act 
April 15, 1813, for general defence of State of Dela- 
ware; Presidential Elector, 1816 and 1820, besides 
other appointments by the Assembly — show the high 
regard in which he was held. He must have had great 
influence with the people of Delaware to have thus held 
public office almost continuously for forty years from 
1780 to 1820, within one year of his death.^^ 

On the tenth day of January, 1796, by a Deed of 
Emancipation duly recorded at Dover in Deed Book H, 
Vol. 2, p. 264, Andrew Barratt, to use his own words, 

""American Church Historical Series," Vol. 7, C. C. Tiffany, 
p. 45. 

" John Clark, Member of Boston Relief Committee, Kent Co., 
July, 1774 (Vol. 1, Scharf 218), Member Constitution Convention, 
August 27, 1776, Kent Co.; Judge Coiui of Common Pleas, Kent 
Co., Apiil 5, 1777, and again February 6, 1779, when he was com- 
missioned Chief Justice ( Scharf 's "History of Delaware," Vol. I., 
523 and 563). 

" Conrad's " History of Delaware," p. 892. 

41 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

''being fully persuaded that liberty is the natural 

birthright of all mankind and keeping any in perpetual 

slavery is contrary to the injunctions of Christ," for 

which reason ''he did manumit and set absolutely free 

all his negroes, thirteen in all, so that henceforth they 

shall be deemed, adjudged and taken as and for free 
people. "^2 

The question arises. Who persuaded Andrew Bar- 
ratt to do this noble act? Why Asbury of course. 
Andrew Barratt, while regarded as well-to-do for his 
day, could not have been worth more than twenty-five 
thousand dollars, so his voluntary manumission of 
his slaves, without which he could not carry on his 
farm, who were worth in the market several thousand 
dollars in gold, for conscience sake alone, is a devotion 
to principle such as can only excite our warmest ad- 
miration and commendation when one stops to con- 

" Scharf in Vol. II. of " History of Delaware," p. 1155, states 
Andrew Gray (the Grandfather of Hon. George Gray, now Judge of 
the Circuit Court of the United States) owned 465 acres and lived 
upon Bartlett's lot in 1775. This was devised to him by Andrew 
Caldwell (Kent Deed Book G, 2, 169), whose daughter, Jean Cald- 
well Gray, was first cousin of Miriam Sipple Barratt, wife of Philip 
Barratt. February 25, 1831, Andrew Gray sold this tract to Susannah 
"Warren except his burial ground (Deed Book D, 3 p. 332, Kent Co.), 
and on p. 1169, Vol. II., Scharf states in a note, Drumner Gray, an 
aged freeman, who died in 1840, could be seen in his cart drawn by 
his oxen early Sunday morning on his way to Barratt's Chapel, 
where in the gallery the colored people worshipped in those days and 
held class meetings before the white folks arrived. Back of these 
historic walls of Methodism and of the more recent mortuary city of 
evergreen and marble are the graves of those early Christians of the 
colored race." Drumner Gray said the last herd of buffalo on Murder- 
kill Neck was in a meadow on the farm of his master, Andrew Gray. 

42 



I 




DR. ELIJAH BARRATT 



SON OF PHILIP BARRATT, OF BARRATT'S CHAPEL. BORN APRIL 29, 1770; DIED APRIL, 
1809; STUDIED MEDICINE UNDER HIS BROTHER-IN-LAW, DR. NATHANIEL LUFF; READ 
IN 1791 ESSAY ON INFLUENZA BEFORE DELAWARE STATE MEDICAL SOCIETY, OF WHICH 
HE WAS A MEMBER; MARRIED MARGARET FISHER, A DESCENDANT OF JOHN FISHER, 
WHO CAME ON THE " WELCOME " WITH WILLIAM PENN. (See Fisher Genealogy.) 



Barratfs Chapel and Methodism. 

sider the financial sacrifice involved. It speaks well 
for Methodism and her teaching which was opposed to 
slavery. It required great moral qualities to do as he 
did and too much credit cannot be accorded him for 
it. His father Philip Barratt, his brothers Caleb Bar- 
ratt and Dr. Elijah Barratt, and a cousin Samuel Bar- 
ratt also manumitted their slaves. The fact that two 
of these deeds were acknowledged before "Andrew 
Barratt, one of the Judges of the Court of Common 
Pleas of the State of Delaware," is more than a coin- 
cidence.^^ In Andrew Barratt 's family Bible are the 
following entries in his handwriting: 

"Mariah, daughter of Bet, was born in May, 1813. 
This child I gave to Sack, its father, at the death of 
the mother, which happened in February, 1814, same 
day after my son." 

"Bill, the son of Liza, was born August 10, 1813. 
Harriet, daughter of Liza, was born, February, 1818. 
Negro Comfort, formerly the property of Grand- 
mother Sipple (nee Mary Hunn, wife of Waitman 
Sipple, Jr.), is supposed to be 74 years of age Christ- 
mas Day, 1813. She departed this life winter of 1817 
about 80 years of age." 

Andrew Barratt took a lively interest in all that ap- 

" Manumissions, Caleb Barratt, Deed Book K, Vol. 2, p. 227, 
Dover, Kent County, Delaware, 1808; Manumissions, Caleb Barratt, 
Deed Book Q, Vol. 2, p. 74, Dover, Kent County, Delaware, 1815; 
Manumissions, Caleb Barratt, Deed Book G, Vol. 2, p. 11, Dover, 
Kent County, Delaware, 1801. Dr. Elijah Barratt built a Chapel at 
Camden, Delaware, September 16, 1791. See Asbury's Journal, 
Vol. II., 143. Dr. Barratt was Justice of the Peace, 1793. Scharp, 
" History of Delaware," Vol. I., pp. 473-483; Vol. II., p. 1133. 

43 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

pertained to the Chapel upon which he expended the 
sum of $1,000 after the death of his father. He is 
described physically as a large, fine looking man and is 
always spoken of as the "pious Judge Barratt" upon 
the authority of Asbury, in whose journal his name 
frequently appears but always in brief, though signifi- 
cant allusion. Such (says Stevens) were some of the 
influential supporters of Asbury in his persecutions 
when the Revolutionary storm swept over the country. 
They protected him and at last procured him liberty 
to travel and preach. He seems to have had peculiar 
success in gathering about the Methodist standard in 
these days of its humiliation, devout families of the 
higher classes. In most of the middle provinces there 
were now examples of wealth and social influence con- 
secrated to the struggling cause; opulent mansions 
opened with pious welcome to the travel worn itiner- 
ants, and made not only asylums for them but sanc- 
tuaries of worship for their humble people. On Sun- 
day, November 15, 1784, wearied and worn by travel 
and preaching he arrived on Sunday during public 
worship, at his friend Barratt 's Chapel. A man of 
small stature, ruddy complexion, brilliant eyes, long 
hair, musical voice, and gowned as an English clergy- 
man was officiating. Asbury ascended the pulpit and 
embraced and kissed him before the whole assembly, 
for the itinerant recognized him as another messenger 
from Wesley come to his relief after the desertion of 
all his English associates, a man who had become a 

44 



Barr alt's Chapel and Methodism. 

chieftain of Methodism in England, Ireland and Wales 
only second to Wesley himself. This man whom 
Asbury mourning his death years afterwards, charac- 
terized him as ''the greatest man of the last century 
in Christian labors," not excluding Whitfield or Wes- 
ley, represented in the humble pulpit of Barratt's 
Chapel the most momentous revolution in American 
Methodism. He was the Eev. Thomas Coke, LL.D., of 
Jesus College, Oxford, but now the first Bishop of the 
western hemisphere. Asbury 's consecration to the 
episcopate was the first Protestant ordination of the 
kind in the new world, but Coke's was the first for it. 
Lednum mentions the following chapels in Delaware at 
the time of Coke's arrival in America. Kent County, 
Forest, Barratt's, White's, Bethel and Moore's. In 
Sussex County, Cloud's, Blackiston's, Friendship in 
Thoroughfare Neck, and Wesley Chapel in Dover. 

Up to the close of the year 1784 "the people called 
Methodists" in this country, as in England, were 
simply "societies," under the supervision of Mr. Wes- 
ley, none of their preachers being permitted to baptise 
or administer the Lord's Supper, but being required 
to counsel and direct all the members to follow their 
example in seeking these sacred ordinances at the 
hands of ministers who had been ordained by Bishops 
of the Established Church of England. There is small 
wonder that some of them, preachers as well as not a 
few of their people, grew very restive under such irri- 
tating restriction; especially after Lowth, Bishop of 

45 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

London, refused Wesley's request to ordain at least 
two priests who could administer the sacraments to 
American Methodists/^ but the affectionate reverence 
felt for Mr. Wesley and the towering influence of his 
American representative, the intrepid and self-sacri- 
ficing Asbury, had hitherto stayed the rising tide of 
dissent, with a brief exception of very limited extent. 
Now, however, the United States had been recognized 
by Great Britain as an independent nation, and ecclesi- 
astical independence was naturally coincident with 
civil and political freedom. Wesley did not intend it 
to be a separate church but a missionary movement 
within the Church of England, of which he was a mem- 
ber and which he believed to be the best church in the 
world. Dr. McConnell sums it up by stating: ''But 
the great spreading branch grew too heavy to be sus- 
tained by the slender stem of the American Church, 
. . . and it broke away by its own weight."^' 

Mr. Wesley showed himself equal to the demands 
of the situation. Hence his carefully prepared plan 
for organizing his American societies into an inde- 

" Steven's " Methodism," p. 75. McMaster's " History of the 
People of the United States," Vol. I., p. 56. 

* Dr. McConnell's " English Church in the Colonies," pp. 171-172. 

Thomas Vasey, two years after his arrival, for some reason 
accepted reordination at the hands of Bishop "William White of 
The Protestant Episcopal Church. He soon afterwards returned to 
London and accepted a curacy. But the old Methodist habit was 
strong, and he returned to the Wesleyan connection and was 
stationed at City Road Chapel, where he read the liturgy of the 
Church of England as Mr. Wesley's will directed. He subsequently 
lived in Leeds, where he died, December 27, 1826. 

46 




REV. THOMAS COKE, LL. D. 

THE FIRST BISHOP OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN 
AMERICA, WHO WAS PREACHING AT BARRATT'S CHAPEL, 
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1784, WHEN REV. FRAN- 
CIS ASBURY CAME UP IN THE PULPIT 



Barratt^s Chapel and Methodism. 

pendent Episcopal Church. Having ordained two of 
his preachers, Eichard Whatcoat and Thomas Vasey, 
deacons and elders, he set apart Thomas Coke, LL.D., 
a presbyter of the Church of England, and one of his 
own most accomplished and efficient helpers, as super- 
intendent of the Methodists in North America, con- 
secrating him for the same, after the form of the 
Church ritual, by prayer and the imposition of his 
hands, with those of two other presbyters. This 
occurred September 2, 1784, Dr. Coke being appointed 
by Mr. Wesley to act jointly with Mr. Asbury. With 
Messrs. Whatcoat and Vasey, the doctor landed in New 
York, November 3, and in two days reached Dover. 
He states in his journal: ''Here we were kindly re- 
ceived by Mr. (Richard) Bassett, of the Executive 
Council, who is building us a large chapel. Here we 
met Freeborn Garrett son. Sunday, November 14, 
Richard Whatcoat preached in the courthouse at 6 a.m. 
to a very good congregation. About eleven o 'clock we 
arrived at Barratt's Chapel, so called from our friend 
who built it, and who went to heaven a few days ago. 
In this chapel in the midst of a forest I had a noble 
congregation to whom I endeavored to set forth the 
Redeemer as our 'wisdom, righteousness, sanctifica- 
tion, and redemption.' After the sermon a plain, ro- 
bust man came up to me in the pulpit and kissed me. 
I thought it could be no other than Mr. Asbury, and I 
was not deceived." In his journal Mr. Asbury has 
this reference to the meeting : ' ' Sunday, 14, I came to 

47 



Barratt's Chapel and -Methodism. 

Barratt's Chapel; here, to my great joy, I met those 
dear men of God, Dr. Coke and Eichard Whatcoat. 
We were greatly comforted together." Evidently he 
had heard the sermon, for he adds, ''The doctor 
preached on 'Christ our wisdom, righteousness, sancti- 
fication, and redemption.' " The occasion was a quar- 
terly meeting at which were present "fifteen of the 
preachers and a host of the laity. ' ' One of the latter 
thus describes the scene: "While Coke was preaching 
jisbury came into the congregation. A solemn pause 
and deep silence took place at the close of the sermon, 
as an interval for introduction and salutation. As- 
bury and Coke, with hearts full of brotherly kindness, 
approached, embraced and saluted each other. The 
other preachers, at the same time, were melted into 
sympathy and tears. The sacrament of the Lord's 
Supper was administered by the doctor and Whatcoat 
tn several hundred, and it was a blessed season to 
many souls, while in the holy ordination they dis- 
cerned, through faith, the Lord's body and showed 
forth His death. It is the more affecting to my mem- 
ory as it was the first time I ever partook of the 
Lord's Supper, and the first time that the ordinance 
was ever administered among the Methodists (in this 
country) by their own regularly ordained preachers." 
So writes Ezekiel Cooper, then a young man of twenty- 
one, who was induced at this meeting to join the itin- 
erant ranks, and subsequently became one of the most 

48 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

useful and distinguished preachers of Methodism.^^'* 
Dr. Coke adds: ''I administered the sacrament, after 
preaching, to five or six hundred communicants, and 
held a love feast. It was the best season I ever knew, 
except one in Ireland. After dining with eleven of 
our preachers at Sister (Miriam) Barratt's about one 
mile from the chapel, Mr. Asbury and I had a private 
conversation on the future management of our affairs 
in America. He informed me that he had received 
some intimation of my arrival on the continent and 
that he thought it probable I might meet him that day 
and have something of importance to communicate to 
him from Mr. Wesley, and that he had therefore col- 
lected a considerable number of preachers to form a 
council; and if they were of opinion that it would be 
expedient immediately to call a conference it should 
be done." The council of preachers unanimously de- 
cided to call a Conference of all the preachers to meet 
in Baltimore on Christmas Eve; and Freeborn Gar- 
rettson was sent off to give notice throughout the con- 
nection. Dr. Coke further records that "Mr. Asbury 
and I have agreed to use our joint endeavors to estab- 
lish a school or college. I baptized thirty or forty 
infants and seven adults. We had indeed a precious 
time at the baptism of the adults. ' ' 

These are the facts that invest Barratt's Chapel 
with rare historic interest: 

*'" Rev. Ezekiel Cooper baptised the late Ambassador to England 
Thomas F. Bayard in the rites of the Methodist Church. 

49 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

1. The place in which Dr. Coke and Mr. Asbury first 
met. 

2. The place where sacramental ordinances were 
first administered in this country by duly authorized 
Methodist preachers to Methodist communicants. 

Stevens says, ' ' Thus we reach again the memorable 
interview at Barratt's Chapel, and here in the forest 
solitudes the momentous scheme of Coke's mission are 
fully disclosed. The first general conference of Ameri- 
can Methodists was appointed, and Garrettson set 
off like an arrow to summon it together and the pro- 
ject of Dickins for a Methodist College revived. It 
was with prayerful counsels, sacramental solemnities, 
liberal devisings and with singing and shouting that 
the young denomination prepared in the Woodland 
Retreat to enter upon its new and worldwide des- 
tinies. ' ' 

The Christmas Conference or the First American 
General Conference was held in Lovely Lane Church 
in Baltimore, Md., on Friday, December 24, 1784. 
Garrettson had sped his way over 1,200 miles in six 
weeks, summoning the itinerants to the Conference, 
and on his return found sixty out of eighty ministers 
present.^^ Bishop Coke on taking the chair presented 
his credentials, and in accordance with Mr. Wesley's 
design, says Mr. Asbury, it was agreed "to form our- 
selves into an Episcopal Church and to have Superin- 
tendents, Elders and Deacons," The laymen did not 

*• Dr. Bang's " Life of Garrettson," p. 146. 

50 



o 
< 

ro rn 
> t- 

r- < 




Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

participate in this convention and were therefore not 
bound by it, but the new form of church government 
met with their approval. Dr. Buckley says: ''The 
prayer-book was regularly used in these early days at 
least once on Sundays. Asbury even appeared in 
canonicals, but sturdy Jesse Lee rebuked him for it 
and the gown and band disappeared." 

The Lovely Lane Church in Baltimore is no more. 
It was torn down in 1787 by William Wilson & Son, 
tea merchants, whose warehouses on what was Lovely 
Lane, now German Street extended, were partly built 
of its materials. These warehouses in turn have dis- 
appeared and the ground is now occupied by the Mer- 
chants ' Club on German Street east of Calvert Street. 
The destruction of the Lovely Lane Church where the 
actual organization of the Methodist Church took place 
was a sacrilege and should not have been permitted. 

The American Methodist Historical Society has 
placed this tablet to mark the spot: "Upon this site 
stood from 1774 to 1786 the Lovely Lane Meeting 
House in which was organized December, 1784, The 
Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States of 
America." 

Now a word as to Methodism itself. As your late 
Chief Justice Lore truly said, Methodism is easily a 
leader in American Protestantism. 

Methodism and Americanism, so to speak, are 
closely akin. 

Each was a protest against tyranny and corruption 

51 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

of the old world. The one against religious corrup- 
tion and vice; the other against civic corruption and 
licentiousness. 

Each repudiated and broke loose from the forms 
and systems of the old world and started on new lines, 
with unbounded freedom, seeking new ideals and 
higher possibilities of human development. 

The psalmist tells us to ''Walk about Zion, and go 
round about her: tell the towers thereof. Mark ye 
well her bulwarks, consider her palaces; that ye may 
tell it to the generation following. "^^ — And this I have 
endeavored to do. To use the eloquent words of the 
Eev. Frederick Merrick: "We have spoken much, and 
very naturally and properly of Methodists and Meth- 
odism, of Methodist doctrines and Methodist usages. 
It could not have been otherwise. We have spoken 
eulogistically, perhaps at times too much so, but let 
not those of other church organizations who have 
heard or who shall read, these utterances, deem this an 
evidence of a narrow sectarianism. We claim to be 
liberal — to be truly catholic. We ought to be so. Not 
only is this the spirit of our common Christianity, but 
it was eminently the spirit of our founder. To all who 
honor and love our Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity and 
truth, we say Hail, all hail, the blessings of the highest 
be upon you. Gladly will we join hands with you 
against the common foe, fighting the good fight of 

" Psalm XLVIII : 12 and 13. 

52 




REV. THOMAS E. MARTINDALE, D. D. 

MEMBER OF WILMINGTON CONFERENCE. HE IS THE GREAT-GRANDSON OF PHILIP 
BARRATT. HE DISTINCTLY REMEMBERS HIS GRANDMOTHER, MIRIAM BARRATT, WHO 
MARRIED JOHN MARTINDALE. HE IS (l91l) PASTOR OF THE ASBURY METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH AT SALISBURY, MD. 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

faith until the kingdoms of this world have become 
the Kingdoms of our Lord. 

When Barratt's Chapel was projected a prominent 
man inquired what use was to be made of it. Being 
informed it was to be a place of worship for the Meth- 
odists, his reply was, "It is unnecessary to build such 
a house, for by the time the war is over a corncrib will 
hold them all." History shows this person's fears 
were not realized. No corncrib ever constructed could 
hold even a fraction of them, as they are today a world- 
wide Christian communion. Its regular clergy num- 
bers over twenty thousand, its actual membership over 
six million, four hundred and seventy-seven thousand, 
two hundred and twenty-four communicants, and its 
adherents fifteen millions of souls. And that there 
may yet be a closer communion is foreshadowed by the 
suggestion of Hon. Kobert W. Perkes, M.P. for Lin- 
colnshire, at the annual conference in England held in 
London, July 18, 1907, viz: "The establishment of 
Methodist bureaus in all parts of the world for mutual 
aid." 

As a nation, says George William Curtis in his ora- 
tion on Mr. Lowell, we did not invent the great monu- 
ments of liberty, trial by jury, the habeas corpus, con- 
stitutional restraint, the common schools, of all of 
which we were the civilized heirs with civilized Chris- 
tendom. So the Episcopal Church did not create epis- 
copacy, nor extemporize a liturgy, nor invent a creed. 
To apply to the church what Mr. Curtis says of the 

53 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

state, *'the higher spirit of conservatism was its own 
and it cherished a reverence for antiquity, a suscepti- 
bility to the value of tradition, an instinct for contin- 
uity and development, an antipathy to violent rupture 
— the grace and claim of an established order. And 
can we not say this is equally true of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church r^ 

The time has now arrived when the trustees of Bar- 
ratt's Chapel, through their Pastor Eev. F. J. Coch- 
ran, have asked permission of this Wilmington Con- 
ference to raise an endowment of $50,000 and place 
the fund in charge of the Board of Home Missions and 
Church Extension of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
to insure its preservation for all time. This object 
must appeal strongly to all American Methodists when 
called to their attention. A little from each one can- 
not fail but attain the sum desired from the Methodist 
Church at large, because Barratt's Chapel is the little 
crystal spring, the source from which flowed the 
mighty river of Methodism.^^ 

** " American Church History," by Chas. C. Tiffany, p. 290. 

**At Wibnington Annual Conference held March 17, 1911, Judge 
Norris S. Barratt, of Philadelphia, was presented to the Conference, 
and spoke with reference to the proposed endowment for Barratt's 
Chapel. The bible of Judge Andrew Barratt, used in the Chapel by 
Thomas Coke, Francis Asbury, Richard Whatcoat, Ezekiel Cooper 
and others was exhibited for Conference examination. 

Rev. F. J. Cochran, Pastor of Barratt's Chapel, presented the 
following : 

" Whereas, It has been predicted time and again that Barratt's 
Chapel would be abandoned as a place of worship on account of its 
proximity to other churches, which have been erected during the 
nineteenth century. 

54 




REV. F. J. COCHRAN 

PASTOR OF BARRATT'S CHAPEL, 1911 



I 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

Do not let it be said of us at least as far as Barratt's 
Chapel is concerned: 

" They all are passing from the land, 
Those churches old and gray, 

" We the trustees of said chapel, desiring to provide for the future 
prosperity and continuance of public worship at this place, made 
sacred by the pioneers of Methodism, the meeting place of Bishop 
Thomas Coke and Francis Asbury, the place in America where the 
Sacrament of the Lord's Supper was first administered by a regularly 
ordained minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the place 
at which announcement was made of the First General Conference of 
Methodist ministers now called the ' Christmas Conference,' to meet, 
which they did on Friday, December 24, 1874, at Baltimore, Md. 

" Resolved, That acting on the advice of our pastor, the Rev. F. J. 
Cochran, we endeavor to obtain an endowment for Barratt's Chapel, 
and kindly request of friends and the church at large their approval 
and cheerful assistance for this worthy object. 

" James W. Grier, 
" William E. Davis, 
" Caleb B. Williams, 
" Robert J. Russell, 
" Walter S. Camper, 
" Luther R. Robbins, 
" Trustees Barratt's Chapel and Cemetery. 
" December 2, 1910. 

" On hearing this the quarterly conference took the following 
action : 

* We, the members of the quarterly conference of Magnolia charge 
(of which Barratt's Chapel is a part) in quarterly conference 
assembled, December 19, 1910, heartily endorse the action of the 
trustees of Barratt's Chapel, December 2, 1910, concerning the en- 
dowment for the chapel, and earnestly recommend the Wilmington 
Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, at its next 
session in Wilmington, Delaware, March 15, 1911, to favorably 
recommend the endowment of this historic place to the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and to American Methodism in general. 

"H. C. Johnson, 

" Secretary. 
"R. K. Stephenson, 
" District Superintendent." 

55 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

In which our forefathers used to stand 
In years gone by to pray." 

Our ancestors built Barratt's Chapel and helped to 
organize Methodism for love of God and desire to ben- 

Besolved, That the Pastors be requested to bring before each con- 
gregation Barratt's Chapel Endowment, and secure free wiU offer- 
ings and 

Resolved, That we request the District Superintendents to present 
this matter to at least one of the Quarterly Conferences of each 
charge duiing the year. 

On motion of R, K. Stephenson the resolution was adopted as read 
and on motion of W. E. Tomkinson, the funds were ordered deposited 
with the Board of Home Missions and Church Extension. (Journal 
Wilmington Conference, 1911, p. 31 and 38.) 

Philadelphia Annual Conference 
Park Avenue Church^ Philadelphia. 

Apternoon Session, Tuesday, March 21, 1911. 

"Judge Norris S. Barratt and F. J. Cochran addressed conference."* 

"' From the Journal of the Philadelphia Conference, 124th session, 
p. 85. 

The Hon. Norris S. Barratt, Judge of Court of Common Pleas No. 2, 
Philadelphia, and F. J. Cochran, pastor of Barratt's Chapel, were 
introduced and addressed the Conference." 

"Endowment Plan for Barratt's Chapel Endorsed. — J. D. C. 
Hanna presented the following, which was adopted: 

"Resolved 1, That we have heard with great pleasure the admirable 
historical address of Judge Norris S. Barratt, and the address of 
Rev. F. J. Cochran, and we are in full sympathy with the movement 
to preserve Barratt's Chapel. We join the Wilmington Conference 
in endorsing the action pertaining to the Barratt's Chapel En- 
dowment." 

"Resolved 2, We recommend to the pastors that they present this 
cause to each of their congregations during the year, and if prac- 
ticable secure a free-will offei*ing for the same. 

"Resolved 3, We recommend that the District Superintendents 
present the subject to at least one of the Quarterly Conferences of 
each charge during the year." 

56 



Barratt's Chapel and Methodism. 

efit man. It stands today a shrine reared by their 
work and self-denial and speaks in no uncertain tones 
to the American Methodist of their humility and faith. 
Methodists will never forget what they did there. The 
duty of Methodists today is to preserve Barratt's 
Chapel, the cradle of Methodism, that it may always be 
maintained for the glory of God with all its thrilling 
associations for the instruction and the inspiration of 
Methodists yet unborn. 

One hundred and Twenty-Seventh Session of Baltimore Annual 
Conference — Sixth Session, Washington, D. C, April 3, 1911. 

Barratt's Chapel, C. M. Levister offered the following resolution 
and it was adopted. 

Resolved, That we commend the purpose of the Wilmington and 
Philadelphia Conferences in their efforts to perpetuate the historic 
Barratt's Chapel through a sufficient endowment, and that we will 
aid them in this laudable endeavor in every feasible way. 

E. L. HUBBAKD, 

W. W. Barnes, 
C. M. Levister. 
(Journal of Conference, 1911, p. 53.) 




57 



INDEX. 



A. 

Asbury Church, Wilmington, Del., 
12, 54, title page 

Asbury, Bishop Francis, 3; seats 
in chapel, 18; trustees of chapel, 
19; personal bible, 19; arranges 
rules, ib.; preached at Furbee, 
23; obtained subscription of 700 
cwt. of pork, 26; address of the 
bishop to General Washington, 
23 

Asbury, journal entries, quoted, 
24, 26; preaches at Barratt's 
Chapel, 26; arrives, 31, 36; 
quoted, 37; lodges with Andrew 
Barratt, 37; extract from jour- 
nal, 38; portrait, 39; memorial 
tablet, Eutaw St. Church, 40; 
persuades Barratt to manumit 
slaves, 42; preaches at Barratt's 
Chapel, 44; journal quoted, 47; 
mentioned, 49 ; appears in canon- 
icals, 51; Eev. Ethan Allen, 26 



Barratt's Chapel (Cradle of 
Methodism), 3, 7; simplicity of, 
8; situation of, 16; dimensions, 
17, 18; dedication, 26, 35; As- 
bury preaches, 37, 38; portrait, 
38; Andrew Barratt expends 
$1000, 44; historic facts, 50; 
quoted, 53; endowment to be 
raised, 54; trustees appeal, 55; 
historic address of Hon. Norris 
S. Barratt, 56; resolution en- 
dorsed by Wilmington, Phila- 
delphia and Baltimore Confer- 
ences, 57 

Brinckle, Wm., 5 



Boardman, Eichard, 10, 11 

Barre, Col., quoted, 15 

Bohemia Manor, 19 

Bassett, Eichard, 23, 35, 36; por- 
trait, 36; entertains Coke, 47 

Buckley, Eev. James M., 33-37, 
51 

Brewer, Mr. Justice David J., 32 

Bangs, Dr. Nathan, 4, 50 

Barnes, W. W., 57 

Baltimore, Lord, 26 

Barratt, Sr., Philip, in America, 
1678^, supposed to be emigrant, 
19; death of, 20 

Barratt, Philip, 4, 6; environment, 
10; birth, 20; donates ground 
for Barratt's Chapel, 16; auto- 
graph, 17; sheriff, 18-20; 
trustees of chapel, 19; marries, 
in Legislature during Eevolu- 
tion, 21, 22, 23; owns two sloops, 
23; determined to build chapel, 
23-35; death of, 36, 37, 41, 43; 
homestead, 49 

Barratt, Norris S., genealogy, 6, 
27; Conference addresses, 56 

Barratt, Sr., James, portrait of, 6 

Barratt, Jr., James, portrait of, 
mention of, 8 

Barratt, Alfred, portrait of, 16 

Barratt, Caleb, portrait of, 23; 
manumits slaves, 43 

Barratt, Dr. Elijah, portrait of, 
43; mentioned, 23; built chapel, 
Camden, Delaware, 38 

Barratt, Andrew, of Cecil Co., Md., 
20 

Barratt, Judge Andrew, of Kent 
Co., Del., 6, 23, 27, 35; delegate 
to Constitution Convention, 1792, 



58 



Index. 



30; executor, 36, 37, 41; manu- 
mits slaves, 42; records of 
marriage and births, 43; lawyer, 
sheriff, 1780-1792, judge, 
speaker of Senate, commissioner 
and presidential elector, 41 

Barratt, Catharine, 19 

Barratt, Eoger, 19; marries, 20 

Barratt, Miriam S., 5, 23, 36, 41, 
42; entertains Dr. Coke and 
Asbury, 49; marries Dr. Edward 
White, 36 

Barratt, Nathaniel, 23 

Barratt, Lydia, 23 



Coke, Thomas, 3; seat in chapel, 
18, 36; preached at Barratt 's 
Chapel, 45; portrait, 47; ap- 
pointed superintendent, 47; dines 
at Sister Barratt 's, 49 

Cubley, John, 5 

Curtis, John, 5; provincial council- 
lor, 5 

Clark, John, Sr., 5, 41; father of 
Ann Clarke Barratt 

Clark, Eobert, 11 

Com Exchange, Philadelphia, 6 

Clark, Adam, 11 

Conner, Barratt, P., 20 

Conner, James Barratt, 20 

Conner, Alvin Barratt, 20 

Cook, John, 22 

Cromwell, Joseph, 26 

Cornbury, Lord (quoted), 27 

Chauncey, Charles, attacks revival- 
ists, 40 

Clarke, Ann, 41; wife of Andrew 
Barratt 

Curtis, George Wm. (quoted), 53 

Cochran, Rev. F. J., to raise en- 
dowment, 54; portrait, 55 

Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, 5 

Carrall, James, 35 

Carrall, Chas. Ridgeley, 35 

Cooper, Eev. Ezekiel, 49 



Conference at Wilmington, Del., 

1911, 54 
Conference at Philadelphia, Pa., 

1911, 56 
Conference at Washington, D. C, 

1911, 57 
Campes, Walter S., 55 
Conrad, Judge Henry C, quoted, 

5, 6, 8, 9, 23, 35, 36, 41 



Dill, Ellen Leighton, 6 

Dill, Abner, 5 

Dill, Dr. Eobert, 6; Adjutant gen- 
eral, 1812 

Dickinson, John, 22 ; portrait of, 
28; biographical sketch, 29; 
farmer's letters, 32 

Dequincy (quoted), 27 

Davenport, T. A. (quoted), 40 

Duncan, Judge, 32 

Davis, William E., 55 

E. 

Eyre, Thomas, 4; Penn's agent, 5 
Emburg, Philip, 10 
Ebenezer M. E. Church, Philadel- 
phia, 6 
Emerson, Ealph Waldo, 16 

F. 

Farrell, Ann, 5 

Ford, David, 11 

Furbee, Caleb, 17, 23, 25 

Furbee, Jonathan, 17 

Fisher, Sydney George, quoted, 13 



George III., form of prayer, 14 
Garrettson, Freeborn, 18; comes 

out of jail, 31, 47 
Gough, Harry Dorsey, 23, 35 
Glendenning, Bro., exhorts, 25 
Green, Philemon, 37 
Gray, Andrew, 24, 42 
Gray, Hon. George, 42 



59 



Index. 



Gray, Drumner, 42 
Grier, James W., 55 

H. 

Heathered, Thomas, 4; refuses to 

pay taxes, 5 
Hunn, Nathaniel; 5 
Hersey, Isaac, 11 
Hayden, Kev. Horace E., 20 
Hartly, Bro., exhorts, 25 
Hazzard, David, portrait, 30 
Hunn, Mary, 43 
Hassler, Isaac, 32 
Hanna, J. D. C, 56 
Hubbard, E. L., 57 

J. 

James, Daniel, 17 
Johnny Cake Bridge, 24 
Justice Hildas, 5 
Johnson, H. C, 55 

K. 

King, John, 10, 11 



Lewis, David, 17 

Lamp of Memory (Euskin), 19 

Lovefeast at Barratt's, 25 

Locke, John (quoted), 27 

Liberty of vrorship in the colonies, 

28 
Lockwood, Kichard, 36 
Lowth, Bishop, refuses to ordain 

Methodists, 46 
Lovely Lane Church, Christmas 

conference at, 50 ; picture of, 51 ; 

destruction of, 51 
Lee, Jesse, 51 

Lednum, Eev, John, 4, 9, 35, 36 
Low, Chief Justice Chas. B., 51 
Levister, C. M., 57 
Little, Chas. J., 10, 11 



M. 



Merritt, William, 4 



McNatt, John, 5 
Meigs, William M., 15 
Montesquieu (quoted), 12 
Meade, Bishop (quoted), 12 
McConnell, Eev, Dr. (quoted), 10, 

12, 39, 46 
Merritt, Jane, 19 
Merritt, Thomas, 19 
Magaw, Eev. Samuel (prays at 

Barratt's), 24, 25 
McLane, Allan (portrait of), 26; 

biographical sketch, 27 
McKean, Thomas, 32; historical 

sketch, 33 
Methodist doctrine, John Wesley's 

notes and sermons, 17 
Methodism simply societies, 45 
Methodism, word about, 51 
Merrick, E«v. Fred (quoted), 52 
Mifflin, Warner, 5 
Maryland Society Colonial Wars, 5 
McMaster, John B., quoted, 10, 46 
Minutes of Council Delaware, 22 
Mallory, Eev. Chas. Payson, 36 
Martindale, Eev. Thomas E., por- 
trait of, 52 

N. 

Neall, Francis, 4 
Neall, Samuel, 6 
Nock, Thomas, 4 
New Castle, Del., introduction of 

Methodism, 11 
North British Eeview (quoted), 15 



Pattison, Eobert E., 36 
Pennypacker, S. W. (quoted), 9 
Pilmore, Joseph, Eev., 3, 10, 11; 

portrait of, 12 
Prayer for our enemies, 14 
Purden, Andrew, 17 
Price, Joseph, 20 
Peddicord, Bro., 26 
Pennsylvania peopled by different 

religions, 30 



60 



Index. 



Presbytery, First American, 30 
Perry Hall Mansion, 35 
Perry, Wm. Stevens, 13 
Pennsylvania Society Sons of the 

Revolution, 5 
Pennsylvania Society Colonial 

Wars, 5 
Perkes, Hon. Eobt. W., 53 

B. 

Eankin, Thomas, 10, 11 
Robinson, Miriam, 20 
Rodney, Caesar (letter from), 21 
Rodney, Thomas (mentioned), 21 
Read, George, 22 
Religious toleration, 26 
Religious liberty in Delaware, 29 
Ridgaway, H. B., eulogises As- 

bury, 40 
Record of marriage and births, 43 
Reed, Dr. George Edward, 15 
Roman Catholics, 28 
Russell, Robert J., 55 
Robbins, Luther R., 55 
Ruskin, John (quoted), 19 

S. 

St. George's, Philadelphia, 4; pic- 
ture of, 4; synopsis of history, 
5 

Sipple, Garrett, 5 

Stanley, Dean (quoted), 16 

Stille, Dr. Chas. J. (quoted), &, 26 

Shadford, Rev., 11 

Strawbridge, Robert, 10 

St. Paul's P. E, Church, 10, 25 

Sachse, Julius F., form of prayer, 
14, 27 

Sipple, Waitman, 17, 18, 20, 23, 
25, 43 

Smith, Captain John, 7 

Smith, Samuel, 17 

Sipple Jonathan, Coroner, 18 

Sewell, Rev. Richard, 20 



Sipple, Miriam, marries Philip 
Barratt, 20 

Smithers, Nathaniel Barratt, por- 
trait, 24 

Sipple, Anna, 25 

Sipple, Mary Hunn, 25 

Smallwood, Genl., arrests Metho- 
dists, 34 

Stevens, Rev. Dr. Abel, 4, 34, 36, 
46 

Simpson, Bishop, 36 

Slaves, manumitted, 42, 43 

Society of War of 1812, 5 

Schenck, Edwin, 35 

Stephenson, R. K., 55, 56 

Scharf, J. Thos. (quoted), 12, 20, 
24, 41, 42 

T. 

Tussey, Isaac, 11 

Tiffany, Rev. Dr. C. C. (quoted), 
14, 41, 54 

Townshend, Charles (quoted), 15 

Townsend, George Alfred (quoted), 
19, 33 

Thoroughfare Neck, 45 

Trustees, Barratt 's Chapel, ap- 
peal, 55 

Todd, Rev. Robt. W., 19 

Tomkinson, W. E., 56 



Updegraph vs. Commonwealth, 32 

V. 

Vasey, Thomas, 46, 47 

W. 

Wilson, James, Sr., 4 

Walker, Richard, 5 

Williams, Robert, 10, 11 

Wright, Rev., 11 

Webster, Thomas, 11 

Wesley, Rev. John, preaches in 

Georgia, 10; portrait of, 10; 

memorial, 16; notes of, 17; 



61 



Index. 



sends missionary, 31; opposition 
to revolution, 33, reverence for, 
46; appoints Dr. Coke, 47; men- 
tioned, 49 

"Wesley, Charles, Eev., preaches in 
Georgia, 10; mentioned, 13, 16 

Whitfield, George, preaches in 
Georgia, 10; mentioned, 45 

Whatcoat, Eiehard, 47, 48 

Webb, Thomas, 10; apostle of 
Methodism, 11 

Wakeley (quoted), 32 

Watters, William, 31 

White, D.D., William, 15, 16 

White, Dr. Edward, 23, 36; mar- 
ries Miriam Barratt 



White, Samuel, 35 

Wilmington, Del., Methodism in- 
troduced, 11; assembly meets, 
21 

White, Thomas, Judge, 23, 33; 
persecuted, 34, 35, 36 

Williams, Eeynear, 17, 23 

"William's Chance," 17 

Wilson, Justice (quoted), 26 

Washington, Genl. George, 22; as 
President, 22; reverse address 
from bishops 

Wilmington, Conference at, 55 

Wilson, William, 51 

Williams, Caleb B., 55 



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