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Full text of "Barrymore : records of the Barrys of County Cork from the earliest to the present time, with pedigrees"

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BARRYMORE 



RECORDS OF THE BARRYS OF COUNTY CORK 

FROM THE EARLIEST TO THE PRESENT TIME. 
WITH PEDIGREES. 



By the Rev. E. BARRY, M.R.I.A., V.P.R.S.A. 



'^Reprinted from the Journal of the Cork Historical and ArcJueological Society.] 



CORK. 

PUBLISHED BY GUY AND CO. LTD, 70 PATRICK STREET. 

1902. 



\ 



1248477 



\ CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

Barrymores ----- 1-72 

CHAPTER n. 

Barryroes - - - - - 73-138 

CHAPTER HI. 

Barryroes, Junior Branches (The Barrys of 

Rahanisky and Dundullerick) - - 139-214 



BARRYMORE. 



RECORDS OF THE BARRYS OF COUNTY CORK 

FROM THE EARLIEST TO THE PRESENT TIME. 
WITH PEDIGREES. 




CHAPTER I.— BARRYMORES. 

HE Norman-French name De Barri, now Anglicised 
Barry, has to be distinguished from the Enghsh name 
Berry, the French-Canadian name Des Barres, and the 
GaeHc Irish names O'Bdire, AngUcised O'Barry, and 
O'Bearra, Anghcised Beary. In the 'Annals of <-he 
Four Masters" the name De Barri is Gaelicised Barra, 
A Barra, Do barra, and An Barrack. At present, its 
Gaelic forms in Barry's country are the indeclinable form, Do Barra, 
Vv'hich is used after a Christian name, and the declinable form, nom. sing., 
An Barrack, gen. sing.. An Bharraig, thus: Tomds Do Barra, Thomas 
Barry, Baile an Bharraig, Ballinvarrig, i.e., Barry's Town. 

The name De Barri was on the Roll of Battle Abbey, an abbey built 
on the site of the battle of Hastings by King William I., A.D. 1066 — 1087, 
and consecrated A.D. 1094, in presence of King Wilham II. The Roll of 
Battle Abbey contained a list of the chief officers of King William I. at 
the battle of Hastings, A.D. 1066, and was kept in the treasury of Battle 
Abbey at Hastings from about the time of that abbey's consecration, 
h.T). 1094, until the time of its suppression in or shortly after A.D. 1533. 
In the Roll of Battle Abbey De Barn and many other companions-in- 



2 BARRYMORE. 

arms of William the Conqueror have not the names which they bore at 
the battle of Hastings, A.D. 1066, but the names by which they were 
known in A.D. 1094, or other year in which the Roll was written. 

We are told in the "Anglo- Saxon Chronicle" that, " Brytland (Wales) 
was in his (William the Conqueror's) power, and he therein wrought castles, 
and completely ruled over that race of men," p. 189. And the Welsh 
" Chronicle of the Princes " styles him " prince of the Normans, and King 
of the Saxons, the Britons, and the Albanians," p. 53, Rolls edition. That 
" Chronicle " mentions the defeat of the Welsh by the French at the 
river Rymney, in A.D. lO/O; that the French ravaged Ceredigion and 
Dyved (Cardiganshire and Pembrokeshire) in 1071, and Ceredigion m 
1072; that, in 1079, "William the Bastard, King of die Saxons, the 
French, and the Britons came for prayer on a pilgrimage to Menevia " ; 
that in 1080 the building of Cardiff began; and that "1091 was the 
year of Christ when Rhys, son of Tevv^dwr, King of South Wales, was 
killed by the French, who inhabited Brecheiniog ; and then fell the 
kingdom of the Britons. And about the first of July the French came 
into Dyved and Ceredigion, which they have still retained, and fortified 
the castles, and seized upon all the lands of the Britons." The "Annals 
of Waverley" add that in 1080 Iving William I. led his army into Wales, 
and subjected it to himself. 

Some time between A.D. 1070 and A.D. 1091, therefore, the coast of 
Glamorganshire was seized by the Anglo-Normans, and Barry Island 
and the adjacent coast land of Glamorganshire were allotted to a Norman 
ncblemian, who took the name De Barri from being ov/ner of Barry 
Island. He, or one of his immediate descendants, built Barry Castle on 
the mainland opposite Barry Island. 

The following account of the origin of the name De Barri was given 
in A.D. 1 191 by Gerald fitz \¥illiam De Barri, Archdeacon of Brecknock, 
ahas Geraldus Cambrensis, " Gerald of Wales " : " Not far distant then':e 
(from Cardiff) is a small island situated on the shore of the sea of Severn, 
which island the neighbours call Barri, from the name of St. Barroch, 
formerly an inhabitant of that same place, whose relics, too, are contained 
in a chapel which is situated there, and is enfolded in bonds of ivy trans- 
formed into a bier. Moreover, from the name of this island those noble- 
men of the maritime parts of South Wales who are wont to rule this 
island, together with the nearest lands, are denominated, taking from 
Barri the name De Barri, first as a surname and aftenvards as a family 
name."— " Itinerarium Kambriae," p. 66, Rolls edition. 

The Archdeacon's father, WiUiam De Barri, being a Baron of Pem- 
broke, and resident at Manorbeer Castle, near Pembroke, was neither the 
fiist nor the second De Barri of Barn Island Castle; but having been 



BARRVMORE. 3 

born circ. A.D. iiio, lie might well have been a grandson of the first De 
Barri. 

In A.D. iigi the Archdeacon described his father's castle thus:, 
" The castle called Maynaurpir, i.e., Mansio Pirri, is about three miles 
distant from the castle of Pembroke. It is conspicuous for its turrets and 
battlements, and stands on the top of a hill stretching from the west to 
the sea-port. On the north side, close to the walls, is an excellent fish- 
pond, remarkable for its extent and the depth of its water. On the same 
side there is a beautiful orchard, enclosed on one side by a park, on the 
other by a grove, famous for the wildness of its rocks and the height of 
its hazels. On the right hand of the promentary, between the castle and 
the church close by the pond and the side of a mill, a rivulet of never- 
failing water makes its way into a valley, sandy by the violence of the 
winds. To the west, and at some distance from the castle, the Severn, 
in a winding angle, enters the Irish Sea. From this point you may see 
the ships driven from Britain by the wind towards Ireland, bravely daring 
the fearful inconstancy of the winds and the furious, blind rage of the 
sea. The land is productive of wheat, and is well stored with sea fish, 
and imported wine ; and, better than all, from its nearness to Ireland, 
it enjoys a salubrious climate. Of all the lands of the whole of Wales 
Demetia, consisting of seven cantreds, is the fairest and choicest ; and of 
Demetia, Pembroke ; and of Pembroke, the aforesaid land. It remains, 
therefore, that of all Wales this place is the most pleasant. Therefore it 
would have been not wonderful, not unpardonable, had the writer extolled 
his native soil, the land of his birth, with more profuse titles of praise." 
— "Itinerarium Kambriae," lib. i., cap. xii.. Rolls edition, p. 92. 

William De Barri married Plangaret, daughter of Gerald de Windesor, 
by his wife Nesta, whose father was Rhys ab Tewdwr, last King of South 
Wales, A.D. 1077- 1091, and whose mother was Gwladus, daughter of 
Rhiwallawn, a prince of North Wales, and whose brother, Gruffudd ab 
Rhys, and nephew, Rhys ab Gruffudd, were renowned princes of South 
Wales. 

Gerald de Windesor's grandfather was Otho, an honorary baron at the 
court of King Edward the Confessor, and owner of manors in five English 
counties. Gerald de Windesor's father, Walter Fitz Otho, or Fitz Other, 
was Constable of Windsor Castle immediately on its erection by William 
the Conqueror, and possessed the manor of Eton, and some land in Old 
Windsor, besides some manors in the neighbourhood, as Stoke, Horton, 
and Burnham (see " The Earls of Kildare Addenda," p. i, where there is 
reference to Tighe and Davis, "Annals of Windsor," vol. i., p. 20). 

Gerald de Windsor is called Geraldiis praefectus de Vembroc in the 
" Annals of Cambria," and Geralt ysiiwart . . castell Penuro, " Gerald 



4 BARRYMORE. 

the steward of the castle of Penbroke," in " Brut y Tywysogion," that is, 
"The Chronicles of the Princes" of Wales. In the Rolls edition, the 
" Annals of Cambria," and the " Chronicles of the Princes," each occupy 
an octavo volume, but the writings of Giraldus Cambrensis occupy eight 
such volumes. From these authorities it appears that in A.D. logi Rhys 
ab Tewdwr, last King of South Wales, was slain, and Arnulph de Mun- 
gumeri, brother of Robert, Earl of Shrewsbury, was allotted Demetia, 
including Pembrokeshire, and built a castle at Pembroke. A.D. 1092 
Gerald, Constable of Pembroke, for Arnulph de Mungumeri, successfully 
withstood a siege and outwitted the Welsh, who at that time took all the 
other castles of Demetia and Cardigan, except one. (ieraldus Cambrensis 
adds that, "Without delay that Gerald, to root him and his deeper in 
these territories, married Nesta, sister of Grifhn, prince of South Wales, 
from whom, in course of time, he raised an egregious progeny of both 
sexes, by whom the maritime parts of South Wales were retained for the 
English, and, later on, the walls of Ireland were stormed" (vol. vi., p. 91). 

A.D. 1095. Gerald the steward, to whom had been assigned the 
stewardship of the castle of Pembroke, ravaged the boundaries of Menevia. 
" Chronicles." 

A.D. 1 1 00. Gerald negociated the marriage of Arnulph de Mun- 
gumeri with a daughter of Morough O'Brien, King of Ireland, and in 
due time Gerald's son, Maurice, married Arnulph's daughter, Alice. Later 
in 1 1 00 /irnulph de Mungumeri was banished by King Henry, and 
Demetia, with Pembroke Castle, was given to a knight named Saer. — 
"Chronicles." 

IIC2. King Henry expelled Saer from Pembroke, and granted the 
custody of the castle, with all its territories, to Gerald the Steward, who 
had been under Arnulph the Steward. — " Chronicles." 

A.D. 1 105. Gerald built the castle of Little Cenarch. 

A.D. 1 106. Owain ap Cadwgan, a prince of Powis, and second 
cousin of Nesta, the wife of Gerald, attacked by night and burned the 
castle of Little Cenarth, and carried off Gerald's wife and four children ; 
Gerald's own escape was due to his wife's contrivance. For this outrage 
Owain was outlawed, and had to fly to Ireland. But, in 1108, he was 
pardoned, in 1 1 1 1 he accompanied the King to Normandy, and in 1 1 1 3 
he was commissioned to help the King's son to seize or slay Gerald's 
brother-in-law, Prince Gruffudd, who had been an exile in Ireland from 
childhood to manhood, and on his return had spent two years, partly with 
Gerald, and partly with his Welsh kindred, in arms vindicating his lost 
inheritance. Near Caermarthen, Owain, after plundering some adherents 
of Gruffudd, was encountered and slain by Gerald and a party of Flemings 
going to join the King's son at Caermarthen. — " Chronicles of the Princes." 



BARRYMORE. 5 

A.D. 1 1 16 is the date of Owain's death in the "Annals of Cambria." 
As Gerald de Windesor appears no later in the "Annals" or 
" Chronicles," the presumption is that he did not long survive his enemy, 
Owain ab Cadwgan, and that the "Earls of Kildare Addenda" is wrong 
in putting his death so late as A.D. 1135. Whether, after her abduction 
by Owain ab Cadwgan, Nesta was ever restored to Gerald de Windesor 
does not appear. From the royal favour shewn to Owain from the year 
1 108 onwards, coupled with the notorious fact that Nesta bore a son to 
the King, Henry FitzRoy, father of Meiler FitzHenry, some time Jus- 
ticiary of Ireland, it does seem that the surrender of Nesta by Owain was 
not to her husband, but to the King. 

Whether or not Nesta's sons, Walter and Howel, and William Fitz- 
Hay, in Welsh Gwilim ab Aed, were legitimate is now unknown. But, 
notwithstanding an inquisition to the contrary in 133 1 (Escheat 5th, Edw. 
III., No. 104), it is abundantly evident that Robert FitzStephen, son of 
Nesta and Stephen, Constable of Cardigan, was legitimate. On his death, 
without heirs of his body, his vast possessions went to the De Carews, 
the representatives of his eldest uterine brother, William de Carew, the 
eldest son of Gerald and Nesta ; but should not have gone to them, but 
to the Crown, if Robert FitzStephen were illegitimate. And before and 
after 133 1 in the courts of law the Crown admitted and upheld the title 
of the Carews as heirs of FitzStephen. "Smith's History of Cork" says 
that the inquisition of 1 3 3 1 " was much influenced by the power of the 
first Earl of Desmond; that in 13 10 King Edward II. issued a precept 
to Maurice de Carew to distrain the lands of David Barry and Maurice 
Fitzgerald for services and dues to him as lord of several of their posses- 
sions." 

In 1603 Thomas Wadding wrote to Sir George Carew that he (Wad- 
ding) had seen under the exchequer seal of Ireland two judgments tor 
Caru against the King, Edward I. in one, and Edward II. in the other. 
These judgments affirmed that Fitzgerald, not yet Earl of Desmond, and 
Barry held of Carue, and that the wardship of them under age belonged 
not to the King, but to Carue {see "Calendar Carew MSS., A.D. 1603," p. 
440). 

In 1358 numerous writs confess that down to A.D. 1336 the Barrys, 
lords of Olethan, held their lands in the county of Cork immediately from 
the Carews, and not from the King in capite. 

King Henry's son, Robert, Earl of Gloucester, was no son of Nesta. 

The following are references to sons of Nesta in the " Chronicles of 
the Princes " : — • 

A.D. 1 135. Gruffudd ab Rhys and other Welsh princes attacked 
Aberteivi Castle, defended by Stephen, its constable, together with Robert 



6 BARRYMORE. 

FitzMartin, William FitzOrc, the sons of Gerald the Steward, and the 
Flemings. The castle was not taken, but three thousand of the Normans 
and Flemings were slain. 

A.D. 1 145. A force of French and Flemings under the sons of Gerald 
the Steward and (their brother) William, son of Aed, failed to retake the 
castle of Caermarthen after its capture by Cadell, son of Gruffudd ab Rhys. 
A.D. 1 146. Cadell, Maredudd, and Rhys, sons of Gruffudd ab Rhys, 
together with William, son of Gerald, and his brothers, and Howel, son 
of Owain, captured the castle of Gwys. 

A.D. 1 147. David Fitzgerald, Archdeacon of Cardigan, succeeded 
Bernard as Bishop of Menevia. 

A.D. 1 152. Maredudd and Rhys, sons of Gruffudd ab Rhys, captured 
the castle of Tenby, and gave it to William Fitzgerald. 

1 165. Rhys burned Aberteivi Castle, and imprisoned Robert Fitz- 
Stephen. 

1 168. Robert FitzStephen was released from the prison of the Lord 
Rhys, his friend; and Diermid, son of Murchath, took him with him to 
Ireland, and they landed at Lough Garmon, where they gained the castle. 
Incidentally, Geraldus Cambrensis, Gerald FitzWilliam de Barri, 
a grandson of Gerald de Windesor and Nesta, shews the power attained 
by the descendants of Nesta in the first and second generations. 

" About that time (i.e., 1 1 84) it happened that Rhys ab Gruffudd, prince 
of South Wales, came to meet the King's representatives, Baldwin, Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, and Rannulph de Glanville, Justiciary of England, 
for a conference at Hereford. And when at dinner in the house of 
William de Ver, Bishop of Hereford, by whom with great honour he had 
been received and entertained as a guest, he was seated between the 
Bishop himself and Walter FitzRobert, a noble baron, who was of the 
family of the De Clares, as also was the bishop, the Archdeacon, Gerald, 
came and stood before them, with only the table between him and them, 
and sufficiently courteously and wittily addressed Rhys in these words : 
' You can rejoice, O Rhys, and be glad that at this dinner you sit between 
two of the De Clares, whose heritage you hold, and two of the greater ; ' 
for he then held the whole land of Cardigan, which he had recovered from 
Roger, Earl De Clare. But Rhys, being a man of great intelligence and 
particularly prompt in repartee, immediately answering says : ' It is true 
that we have long time lost our heritage through the De Clares, but, as 
we had to lose it, we are glad, and ought be so, that we lost our lands so 
long, not through any mean and obscure people, but through men so 
bright (claros) and illustrious.' The bishop, too, added : ' To us also, as 
we had to lose lands we possessed so long, it gives much pleasure that so 
trusty and noble a man as Rhys now possesses them.' " 



BARRYMORE. 7 

But after the midday sleep, towards evening, when the bishop and 
great men, leading Rhys with them, had entered a summer-house and were 
seated together there, and Gerald, the Archdeacon, had entered with the 
others, and was seated, Rhys being disposed to joke and make fun, and 
taking Gerald for his subject, and as if wishing to make a return for what 
was said at dinner, says : " This Archdeacon and his kinsmen, who are 
called Geraldines, are descendants of my aunt Nesta, the sister of my 
father, Grifhn, and, indeed, they are great and trusty men, but cannot 
live except in one corner of Wales, namely, the cantred of Pembroke." 
Of the Archdeacon's reply the beginning is lost, and the remainder is : 
" Nay, more, in Wales the sons, of Nesta have held the seven cantreds of 
Demetia, namely, the eldest, William Fitzgerald, Penbroc and Ginelin ; 
Robert Fitz Stephen, Kerdigan and Kemmeis ; Henry FitzRoy, Nerberd 
and Penbidiauc ; Maurice, Landesteffan ; William Hay St. Clare, Howel, 
and Walter, Lanpeter and Swelfrei, with other lands. The two daughters 
of Nesta, namely, Hangaret, my mother, and Gledewis, were married to 
two barons of Ros and Penbroc. Besides these six or seven barons, 
David, Bishop of Minevia, who presided with pontifical authority over 
nearly all South Wales, had a son. Besides, although they had so large 
and great portions of Wales, yet, through the growth of family shoots and 
the sprouting of progeny, Nesta's sons, Robert and Maurice, with their 
nephews, Remund and Meiler, and also their sons and kinsmen, flew across 
the Irish Sea, and by their spiritedness made a beginning of the conquest 
of that kingdom, and for themselves and their own have retained thirty 
cantreds (i.e., baronies) or more out of the kingdom of Ireland, and by 
their aggression were the occasion of all the lands possessed there by the 
English. Since, therefore, the posterity of Nesta has had nearly seven 
cantreds in Wales, besides Kerdigan also, whose greater part they formerly 
possessed, and since they have conquered thirty, or more, in Ireland, 
neither truly, nor seriously, can it be said that the progeny of Nesta could 
not live except in a corner of Penbroc. But with perfect truth it can be 
said that the sons of Griffin seem wholly unable to live outside a minute 
portion of South Wales, of which, whilst they occupy merely seven or 
eight cantreds, claiming all the rest by hereditary right, they neither cross 
over to foreign lands nor as yet reconquer their heritage." As these 
things were said in a great audience, before the Archdeacon and Justiciary, 
and also not a few bishops and barons who had come up, Rhys for a short 
while blushed through shame, but as he was a sensible and discreet man 
he answered temperately enough in this manner, saying : " That, in fact, 
those sprung from Nesta were and are trusty and strenuous, and that they 
had made a great conquest in Ireland, if only it could remain to them." 
He added that, because these two nations, the Welsh and Irish, are 



Q BARRYMORE. 

ever fed on the hope of recovering from the English all the lands 
taken away from themselves. — " Geraldus Cambrensis," vol. i., p. 57, Rolls 
edition. 

By his marriage with Hangaret, daughter of Gerald de Windesor, 
Constable of Pembroke, and Nesta, daughter of Rhys ab Tewdwr, last 
King of South Wales, WilHam de 'Barry had four sons (i) Philip, his suc- 
cessor at Maynaurpir Castle; (2) Robert; (3) Edmond, not named by 
Gerald, his brother, but so named in a Gaelic pedigree of Richard Fitz- 
David, second Earl of Barrymore, in a copy of Keating's " History of 
Ireland " in the library of St. Colman's College, Fermoy ; (4) Girald. 
William de Barri had also a son, Walter, whose mother was not Hangaret, 
and who was slain in his youth. William de Barri had a daughter married 
in the diocese of Winchester (vol. i., p. 53). Robert, second or third son 
of William de Barri, accompanied his uncle, Robert FitzStephen, to Ire- 
land, A.D. I i6g ; was hurt in the assault on Wexford, and was conspicuous 
for bravery in Ossory and at Limerick. He lost his great teeth in 1185 
from injuries received in the assault on Wexford in 1169. But where or 
how he lived after 1169, or how long he lived after 1185, is not recorded 
by his brother, Gerald. "Archdall's Lodge," A.D. 1789, says this Robert 
was "the eldest son of William and Angareth," and "after his services 
in Ireland is said to seat himself at Sevington, in Kent," and "about the 
year 1 185 being killed at Lismore," etc. iiut, being elder than his brother 
Gerald, who was born in 1 146 or 1 147, this Robert was about forty years 
old in 1 185, while the Robert slain near Lismore in that year was only an 
" adolescens," that is, between fifteen and thirty years of age. 

A pedigree "taken down from Bridget Fitzgerald, alias Barry, in her 
last illness in the year 1 808, makes Robert, son of William and Hangaret, 
to have been the ancestor of the Mac Adam Barries of the manor of Rath- 
cormac, and begins thus : Robert and Philip de Barry were the nephews 
of Robert FitzStephen, who was the half-brother of Maurice Fitzgerald, 
both commanders-in-chief of the Irish expedition. Robert married O'Cul- 
lane of Castlelyons' daughter, by whom he had no issue, and by whose 
three brothers he was murdered, at Hightown, on his way to the Cove of 
Cork, where his English wife had arrived (as he was informed by her 
letter). She, on hearing of his murder, fled to England. Her brother- 
in-law, Philip, obtained from the King a grant of Robert's lands in Ireland. 
The English widow applied to the King for redress, but he, unwilling to 
break his grant to Philip, only ordered him to make some provision for 
his nephews. He, accordingly, gave the manor of Rathcormac to the 
eldest, the manor of Dongorney to the second, and the manor of the 
Little Island to the third." 

The stone on which this Robert de Barri was traditionally believed to 



BARRYMORE. 9 

have been seated at the time of his murder was formerly in a field at 
Ballynoe, adjoining Hightown. Mr. William Welsh, of Ballynoe, says the 
stone was buried when the field was being drained, many years before 
his own time. 

Sir William Betham deduced the MacAdam Barries of Rathcormac 
from Robert son of Philip, and grandson of William and Hangaret, but 
gave no reason for so doing. 

The fourth and youngest son of William de Barri was Girald, called 
Giraldus Cambrensis, "Gerald of Wales," from the country of his birth, 
and still more from his heroic efforts to make Wales ecclesiastically in- 
dependent of England. 

This fearless ecclesiastic and man of letters was born in A.D. 1146 or 
114.7, and in boyhood was incited to learning by his uncle, David Fitz- 
gerald, Bishop of St. David's. In 1 1 72 he finished his studies at Paris. 
In 1 175 he was the Archbishop of Canterbury's legate for Wales, and was 
made Archdeacon of Brecknock. In 1 1 76 he v/as nominated bishop by 
the Chapter of St. David's, without royal licence, and was recommended to 
the King by the Archbishop of Canterbury and his suffragans. To the 
Archbishop, who "added that Gerald, together with being a thorough 
cleric, was a man of immense spirit and energy," King Henry II. replied 
that neither for the King nor for the Archbishop was it necessary or ex- 
pedient that a too valiant or strenuous man should be bishop in the 
(:hurch of St. David's, lest either the crown of England or the cathedral 
of Canterbury should suffer damage. Thereupon the canons of St. 
David's and Gerald saw their lands and revenues confiscated, and Gerald 
returned to the university of Paris, where he lectured with success on 
canon law. Later on, the King said of him that if he were not a Welsh- 
man he would be worthy of the highest honour. In 1 1 79, while Gerald 
was still at canon law at the university of Paris, and no doubt at his sug- 
gestion, the canons of St. David's at the Lateran Council, A.D. 1 1 79, 
claimed metropolitan rights for their church. In 11 80 Gerald returned 
home, and was made administrator to Peter, Bishop of St. David's. In 
1 1 83 he accompanied his brother, Philip, to Ireland. In 11 84 he was 
invited to court, and accompanied King Henry to Normandy ; and in 
the following year he was sent to Ireland with Prince John, afterwards 
King of England. While there he was offered the Irish sees of Ferns 
and Leighlin by Prince John. Afterwards he was offered the Welsh see 
of Llandaff by Prince John, and that of Bangor by the chancellor, legate, 
viceroy, William de Lunchamp. When in Ireland in 1 199 he was offered 
the bishopric of Waterford, and the archbishopric of Cashel by his cousin, 
Meiler FitzHenry, then Justiciary of Ireland. Many times he might have 
been Bishop of St. David's if only he would cease to advocate its metro- 



lO BARRYMORE. 

politan claims. He would not have a bishopric from the civil power, and 
when he was spontaneously elected by the Chapter of St. David's, the 
forces of the crown repeatedly rendered his election nugatory. 

In 1 1 88 he accompanied and assisted Baldwin, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, in preaching the crusade throughout Wales, and presented a copy 
of his " Topography of Ireland " to the Archbishop, who read it day by 
day during his progress through Wales. Soon after Gerald gave a three 
days' public recitation of that work before the university of Oxford, and, 
during the three days, feasted all the doctors of the different faculties, all 
the scholars, all the knights in the place, and many of the burgesses. 

In 1 1 87, on the accession of King Richard, Gerald was sent by that 
King from France to pacify Wales, and was made coadjutor to William, 
Bishop of Ely, Justiciary of England, who, in 11 go, offered him the 
bishopric of Bangor. In i igi he refused the see of Llandaff, and in 1 192 
retired from court, and for seven years dwelt at Lincoln, engaged in study 
and in the composition of various literary works. In iigS, and again in 
1 199, "he was nommated bishop by the chapter of St. David's, whereupon 
he consulted his kinsfolk in Wales and Ireland on the advisability of 
again championing the rights of St. David's against the crown and the 
archbishopric of Canterbury. His cousin, Meiler, Justiciary of Ireland, 
did not directly thwart him, but offered him Irish bishoprics. His brother 
Philip answered hypothetically : " Brother, the business you attempt is 
arduous and laborious, also it is very expensive and dangerous, because, 
without any doubt, it will be reputed to be aimed not only against the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, but also against the King and all England, 
and the crown of the kingdom. If, however, as you assert to us, God is 
in question, and the dignity of the church of St. David, which you con- 
tend and intend to restore, and not ambition of earthly pomposity, you 
may securely assume this labour, because, in reality, you shall receive a 
reward for it, either here or hereafter" (vol. i., 182-183). 

After interviewing his kinsmen in Wales and Ireland, Gerald appealed 
to Rome, and in person pleaded his cause there in ii 99-1 200, 1201, and 
1202. In 1200 Pope Innocent III. appointed Gerald Administrator of 
Menevia, in temporals and spirituals, to the great chagrin of King John, 
and wrote to King John in his favour. In 1201 the same Pope ordered 
King John not to molest Gerald, and forbade the oath by which the 
bishops of St. David's bound themselves not to question the authority 
of Canterbury over St. David's. But Gerald failed to prove the former 
metropolitan rank of St. David's, and instead of his or the Government 
nominee's election being confirmed, a new election was ordered. Mean- 
while, by letter and by ambassador, and by his nephew, King Otho, then 
in great favour at the court of Rome, King John supplicated the Pope 



BARRYMORE. I I 

and warned the papal court, "that, if they either promoted Gerald, who 
was born in Wales and closely akin to the princes, or by any chance 
restored a metropolis in Wales whereby that nation would exult, the peace 
of his kingdom would be not a little upset through that wild unbridled 
nation so prone to rebellion." 

On the other hand, the Welsh princes wrote as follows: — 

To the Most Reverend Father and Lord, Innocent, by the grace of God, 
Sovereign Pontiff ; Lewelin, son of Jorvert, prince of North Wales ; Wenunwen 
and Madoc, princes of Powis ; Grifin and Mailgo, Res and Mareduc, sons of Res, 
princes of South Wales, health, and due subjection in all things. 

We notify to your Paternity what hardships and risk of souls the Welsh 
Church has endured ever since it was subjected to the power of England and Canter- 
bury, through royal violence, and not from reason and the authority of the Apos- 
tolic See. And so, in the first place, the archbishops of Canterbury, customaril} 
put as bishops over us and our nation, Englishmen, utterly ignorant of our 
language and of the customs of our country, who can neither preach the Word of 
God to the people, nor hear confessions, except through an interpreter. Further, 
they established them in ecclesiastical authority, not by canonical election, but 
rather by intrusion and violence ; or, if at any time they hold an election, they 
make it shadowy and unreal, summoning our clergy into England, and there, in 
the chambers of kings, compelling them to elect their pastor, however vile a casta- 
way he be in his own country. Besides, our bishops set over us in this way from 
England, since they love neither our country nor ourselves, but as they prose- 
cute our bodies with an innate hatred, so do they not also seek the gain of souls, 
desiring, indeed, to preside over us, but not to profit us, they exercise not at all 
the pastoral office amongst us ; but whatever they snatch from our land, though 
not justly, they carry away into England, and there consume all in those abbeys 
and lands granted by Kings of England for this purpose, that with, as it were, 
Parthian arrows from behind and from afar, they might excommunicate us as 
often as they are ordered. 

Also for that they do not love our country they sell, bestow, and alienate, as 
well to clerics as to laics, the lands bestowed of old in devout bounty by our pre- 
decessors on cathedral churches throughout Wales. And on that account, we, 
on our part, take from churches and occupy church lands, since we see all things 
given, as it were, for plunder. Wherefore cathedral churches in Wales are re- 
duced to the deepest misery and poverty, which churches would have been noble 
and wealthy had they good and suitable prelates. 

Furthermore, as often as the English in our land and we rise out, immediately 
the archbishops of Canterbury shut up all our land under interdict, and involve 
in a sentence of excommunication our nation in general and ourselves by name, 
who fight solely in defence of our native land and of liberty ; and to do the same 
they enjoin on our bishops, whom, as we have said, they create at their own will, 
and who in this obey them willingly. Whence it happens that as often as, in de- 
fence of our country, we engage in warlike conflict with a hoftile nation, whoever 
falls on our side, excommunicated they fall. 

Against these hardships, therefore, and many others, which the canons of 
Menevia, with their Elect, Gerald the Archdeacon, a venerable and discreet man, 
will show more fully to you by word of mouth, we seek remedies from your Holi- 



1 2 BARRYMORE. 

ness, asking and unitedly supplicating that with paternal love you would relieve 
from unmerited slavery your sons miserably afflicted by the English Church, for 
not more than the time of three bishops of Menevia ; because, before the time 
of those three who now were last, the church of Menevia was the primatial see of 
all Wales, just as also it was of old the metropolitan, subject, you know, solely 
to the Holy Roman Church. Wherefore, if you should think it meet to regard 
us over these matters with an eye of mercy, we shall, with a prompt and devout 
will, undertake for ourselves and our lands any service in our power that you will 
enjoin to be done for you and the Church of St. Peter. — Your, to us, dear Pater- 
nity, farewell in the Lord. — Vol. iii., 244-6. 

At home before his nobles Lewehn the Great, prince of North Wales, 
said : " it would be much better and more praiseworthy for Gerald to 
have championed the rights of St. David's, though unsuccessfully, against 
such great adversaries and all England, than that these rights should 
perish away through too much silence ; and that, so long as Wales shall 
stand, by the writings of the chroniclers and by the songs of the bards 
shall his noble deed be praised throughout all time." In an assembly of 
his nobles at Keneliauc, Wenonwen, prince of Powis, said : " Our Wales 
is wont many times to move many wars against England, but never has 
moved against her one so great and grave as in these our days through 
the Elect of Menevia, who for the honour of Wales by so great and so 
incessant and continuous efforts ceases not to harass and molest the King 
and the Archbishop, and England's clergy and laity all together. Our 
wars last through a summer, or, at most, a year or half-year, but his war 
has now endured for five years and more incessantly." 

Early in the contest Archbishop Hubert, in a letter to the Pope, had 
charged Archdeacon Girald with "being, perhaps, animated with confi- 
dence of blood, being related through consanguinity or affinity to most 
Welsh princes (Walliae magnates)." In his reply Gerald neutralised that 
charge by adding that he was similarly related to the King's barons in 
Wales : " He says the truth, and he would have written not less truly 
but more expressly if he had said nearly all the great men of the whole 
of Wales, of each nation, as well as of the King's English barons, who, 
warring egregiously, hold encastelated the maritime part of Wales for 
King and kingdom against the Welsh, on the father's part, as also of 
the princes (principibus) of Wales, from the maternal blood. Therefore 
he himself confesses our nobility ; we do not disavow it " (iii., 1 7, 1 8). 

Elsewhere, he tells us that this double descent was a reason for his 
election by the chapter of St. David's, expressly stating that his other than 
Welsh descent was Norman : " Since the clergy of Menevia would not 
have dared to elect a mere Welshman, they elected Gerald as if mixed 
und sprung from each nation, namely, the British and the Norman .... 
And yet, each time, as they presumed f) 'iiake an election or nomination 



BARRYMORE, 1 3 

without the King's assent, they were despoiled of their goods and revenues 
by the royal officials in accordance with an abuse existing at that time" 
(iii., 120, I2i), 

Not only the canons who elected him, but all others who befriended 
him in his suit at Rome agains the crown of England and the archbishop- 
ric of Canterbury fell under the ban of King John. To hinder Gerald's 
appeal to Rome the King issued this proclamation: — 

The King, etc., to all, etc., : We have heard that Gerald, Archdeacon of 
Brechinou, to the grave and manifest detriment of our dignity, and of the church 
of Canterbury, is constituting an archbishoprick in the bishoprick of Menevia, 
and in doing so says he has obtained our assent. One thing we wish you to know, 
that we have never given assent to this, and never shall, but shall utterly defeat 
him in this. Commanding you, and prescribing in the fidelity by which you are 
bound to us, as you love our dignity, that you no way assist him in his temerarious 
purpose, or give him counsel and aid towards it, but by every means you can 
that you thwart his proceeding in this matter. 

When Pope Innocent III. made Gerald administrator of the tempo- 
ralities and spirituals of the Diocese of Menevia, alias St. David's, King 
John issued this more threatening proclamation : — • 

The King, etc., to all, etc. : Be it known to you that Gerald, Archdeacon of 
Brechinou, manifestly labours against our crown and dignity, who behaves as 
Elect of Menevia, though we never assented to his election. Furthermore, con- 
trary to our crown and dignity, he has procured the temporals of the bishoprick 
of Menevia to be committed to him, which, by a long-continued and approved 
custom of our kingdom, ought to be in our hand while the see is vacant ; by impu- 
dent requests obtaining these and other things against us, such things as no one 
else since our coronation has attempted against us. And, as on no account shall 
we endure these things, we command you, as you love our honour and dignity, 
which, as our faithful subjects, you are bound to foster and maintain, that in 
nothing pertaining to this shall you counsel, or aid, or assent to the said Gerald 
the Archdeacon. But whoever shall have done otherwise shall have manifested 
that he is opposed to us and to our dignity. 

When the letter of the Welsh princes had reached Rome, King John 
proclaimed the archdeacon an enemy in these words : — 

The King, etc., to all the barons and faithful subjects throughout the bishop- 
rick of Menevia, etc. : All men know sufficiently by how many and how great 
machinations, as well at the Court of Rome as elsewhere, Gerald, Archdeacon of 
Brechein, has laboured his best to oppress us and our rights, and to beat down 
the dignity of our crown and to extinguish our kingdom's customs maintained 
from ancient times in elections of bishops. Through him it has come to such a 
pass that, by his wicked suggestions and malicious and venomous dilatations, not 
only the peace of your parts (of the kingdom), yes, the tranquility of all our king- 
dom is disturbed. Above all, through wickedly communicating with our enemies, 
he has concocted such statements as would inflict manifest injury on us and on 
our kingdom if his iniquity should prevail, and had progressed from the will to 
the deed. Wherefore, not undeservedly, we have numbered him among our 



1 4 BARRYMORE. 

enemies, bidding you and all who love us, and strictly prohibiting, that you con- 
sent not in any way to his promotion ; yes that you impede his promotion to the 
best of your ability. For it is not just that he should be loved and promoted by 
our faithful (subjects) who breathes forth perturbation to the injury and waste of 
the royal dignity and of the peace of the kingdom. 

As a proclaimed enemy of the King, Gerald was within measurable 
distance of martyrdom, but undismayed. However, his ofhcial champion- 
ship of ecclesiastical elections without state interference expired when the 
majority of the chapter of St. David's through the confiscation of their 
revenues and goods, and through other hardship's endured or threatened, 
voted not for Gerald, but for the Justiciary's nominee, at the new election 
ordered by the Pope. Thereupon Gerald again appealed to Rome, but, 
on reflection, withdrew his appeal ; whereupon the King issued the follow- 
ing proclamation .- — 

King, etc., to all the l^arons, etc., of Menevia, etc. : Be it known to you that 
our venerable father, Lord Hubert, Archbishop of Canterbury, has received Master 
Gerald into grace and familiarity, and at the instance of the same archbishop so 
his, etc. Also we would not that any harm should be done him or his on account 
of any past anger or enmity. Witness myself at Oxford, V. day of January (1204). 
—Vol i., 43 1 •435- 

In 1207, in the council at Oxford, King John being discontented with 
the new Archbishop of Canterbury, expressed regret for having opposed 
Gerald, and promised on oath not only not to oppose, but even to assist 
him to the utmost if he renewed the case of St. David's against Canter- 
bury, and subsequently in private he urged Gerald to that course, but 
unsuccessfully. 

From the outspokenness of Geraldus Cambrensis, and his personal 
intimacy with, and thorough knowledge of, the great men of his day, his 
historical works are of the utmost value to the historians of his time, 
though he is too outspoken to be invariably pleasing to either English- 
men, Welshmen, or Irishmen. One of the most important passages in his 
writing is in the treatise " De Principis Instructione," where he plainly 
intimates that Alexander the Third's bull in confiraiation of Adrian's 
bull bestowing Ireland on Henry II. is a forgery : " The tenor of the 
second privilege is this, just as by some it is asserted or feigned to have 
been granted, but by others it is denied that it ever was granted." In 
his " Expugnatio Hibernica " he takes care to mention the very suspicious 
circumstance that the ecclesiastic who brought these bulls to Waterford 
was afterwards not only made, but unmade, an abbot. Of course it was 
not a genuine bull of Adrian that needed propping with a forged bull of 
Alexander. Besides, as pointed out by Cardinal Moran, both these bulls 
are manifestly spurious, being dated at Rome when no real Pope was 
there. 



BARRY MORE. I 5 

After a long and brilliant life, Gerald de Barri died A.D. 1223, and was 
buried in the cathedral church of St. David's. A recent work on Gerald 
de Barri, " Gerald the Welshman," by Henry Owen, B.C.L., London, 1889, 
says : " Tanner, Bishop of St. Asaph, who died in 1735, in his ' Bibliotheca 
Britannico-Hibernica ' (p. 326), quoting from the Roll of the fourteenth 
year of Hugh (of Wells)), Bishop of Lincoln, states that the church of 
Chesterton, co. Oxon, was in 1223 vacated by the death of Magister 
Giraldus de Barri." That was a church that had belonged to Gerald de 
Barri, Geraldus Cambrensis. 

The concluding paragraph of Mr. Owen's interesting work on Gerald 
de Barri is this : — 

But with all his faults — jDerhaps in no small degree because of them — it is 
impossible for any careful reader to rise from a perusal of his works without a 
feeling of personal affection for the man, and of admiration for the character 
which he has so unsparingly exposed to view. In his pure and noble life, his 
hatred of tyranny in every form, his love of nature, his wit and humour, his 
earnest striving after reform, his indefatigable industry, his chivalrous courage, 
and his wonderful learning, the figure of the great Welsh Archdeacon stands out 
across seven centuries, towering above his fellows, as he did in actual life. " There 
arose not a prophet in Israel like unto him." 

William de Barri was succeeded at Maynaurpir by his eldest sur- 
viving son, Philip de Barri, who, circ. A.D. 11 80, was granted three can- 
treds or baronies of the kingdom of Cork by his mother's uterine brother, 
Robert FitzStephen, to whom, in A.D. 11 77, King Henry II. had granted 
half the kingdom of Cork, which half contained sixteen cantreds. 

Robert FitzStephen to all his lords, friends, and dependents, French, English, 
Welsh, and Irish, greeting. Be it known to you that I have given and granted to 
my nephew, Philip de Barri, three cantreds in my land of Cork, namely, Olethan, 
with all its appurtenances, and two other cantreds in the kingdom of Cork, just 
as they shall come by lot to him, for ten knights' service, to himself and his heirs, 
to be held of me and my heirs, for the service aforesaid, in land, in sea, in waters, 
in ways, etc., to be held as freely of me as I hold of our lord the King, save to 
me the service of the aforesaid ten knights. 

The original Latin text of the foregoing grant is inserted in the pedi- 
gree of the Earls of Barrymore in " Archdall's Lodge," A.D. 1787. 

At the end of February, 11 83, Philip de Barri with a powerful body 
of men crossed over from Wales to Ireland to aid his uncle, Robert Fitz- 
Stephen, and to protect his land of Olethan, which had been granted in 
1 1 80 by FitzStephen, but had afterwards been wrongfully taken from 
him by FitzStephen's son, Radulph, who, in 1 182, was slain, together with 
his father-in-law, Milo de Cogan, grantee of the second half of the king- 
dom of Cork. — "Giraldus Cambrensis," v., 350, 351, Rolls edit 

A tradition, communicated by the late Cornelius O'Brien, Esq., J. P., 
of Kilcor, to the present writer, says that Curraghglas, on the borders of 



1 6 BARRYMORE. 

the counties of Cork and Waterford, was where Milo de Cogan and 
Radulph, son of Robert FitzStephen, were slain. 

Philip de Barri seems not to have spent much time in Ireland. He 
returned to his Welsh castle, Maynaurpir, and devoted himself to hospi- 
tality indiscriminately to rich and poor. — " Giraldus Cambrensis," vol. i., 
1 89. His wife was a sister of the wife of Odo de Kerren, son of William 
de Kerren, eldest son of Gerald de Windesor and Nesta, and was a daughter 
of Richard Fitz Tancred, Castellan of Haverford West, and chief man 
among the Flemings of Ros. His issue were : (i) William, successor to his 
father in Wales and Ireland ; (2) Robert, who was tall and comely, and of 
tried bravery in the Irish wars in 1 175, and was distinguished in Leinster 
and Desmond, alias South Munster, in 1 1 80, and was slain at Lismore in 
1 1 85. — "Geraldus Cambrensis," vol. v., 326, 354, 386. He was a witness 
to the grant of three cantreds or baronies to his father by his father's 
uncle, Robert FitzStephen. In Irish he is called Roibeard Droma Finghin, 
from the place of his death, Drom Finghin, or Finghin's Ridge, a ridge 
of mountain extending from near Fermoy to Helvick Head, and most 
particularly that part of it near Lisfinghin, Finghin's Court, now Lisfinny, 
between Lismore and Tallow. Irish genealogists put him in the place of 
his grandfather, William de Barri, at the head of the De Barri pedigree. 
According to Sir William Betham this Robert de Barri was ancestor of the 
MacAdam Barries. (3) Gerald, who succeeded to the archdeaconry of 
Brecknock on his uncle Gerald's resignation of it in 1203. By Wharton 
and Lodge, and the Rolls editors, he is called William, and by Mr. 
Owen he is called Philip ; but unless his name was Gerald the following 
passage is pointless : " When the archdeacon was entering on his first 
journey to Rome, in being escorted clown, and at the final separation, his 
so often previously mentioned excellent brother, not without tears, sup- 
plicated him to make him a return for his brotherly love from their earliest 
years by taking care to promote in (due) time and place, in ecclesiastical 
revenues and principally in his archdiaconate and prebend this his younger 
son, to whom also at baptism he had given the uncle's name, and in view 
of that same had devoted him to letters and had assigned him to the 
clerical state." — " Gir. Camb.," vol. iii., p. 322. The words here translated 
" uncle's name," meaning " Gerald's name," are nonien f atrium in Whar- 
ton's edition, and nomen fatrinum in the Rolls edition, and meant 
"William's name," according to Wharton and the Rolls editor, but 
" Philip's name," according to Mr. Owen in " Gerald the Welshman " ; but 
surely here -patrinum was originally fatruium, the adjective of pairuus, 
"paternal uncle." and meant "Gerald's" name, for in view of that name 
Gerald's nephew was devoted, like Gerald, to letters and the clerical state, 
and not like Philip, or Philip's father, William, to arms and the military 



BARRYMORE. I 7 

state. Indeed, a few pages further on, Gerald calls himself his nephew's 
■patrwis, quod si patriio sicut deceret adhaesisset, " if he had adhered, as he 
ought, to his uncle" (p. 352). 

In A.D. 1 1 99, less than a year before his death, Philip de Barri had 
only two sons living, William and Gerald, the latter being then the nai7( 
junior. Another, and apparently eldest, son, Robert, was slain A.D. 1185. 
Philip de Barri had also a son-in-law, Walter Mangenell. In A.D. 1203 
William was Sijuvenis, that is, twenty-eight years old and upwards, and 
Gerald was an adolescentulus, that is, under twenty-eight years of age. 

Philip de Barri appears to have been born circ. 1137, Robert circ. 
1 1 60, William circ. 11 70, and Gerald circ. 1175. 

Philip de Barri died while his brother Gerald was at Rome in A.D. 
1 1 99- 1 200, and was entombed in the church of Maynaurpir, and was suc- 
ceeded by his elder surviving son, William de Barri, Lord of Olethan, who, 
in A.D. 1203, regardless of the King's proclamation, entertained his uncle 
Gerald at Maynaurpir, and supplied him with horses for a journey to 
London. On the 21st February, 1206, in the eighth year of his reign, 
King John granted and confirmed to William de Barri, son and heir of 
Philip de Barri, the reasonable gift which Robert Fitz Stephen m.ade to 
the said Philip, his sister's son, of three cantreds in his lands of Cork, i.e., 
Olethan, Muschiri-on-Dunnegan, and Killyde by the service of ten knights 
as the charter of the said Robert, which he had thereof testified {see 
" Smith's History of Cork," book i., chapter i, and Egerton MS., 75 B. M., 
as quoted in W. A. Copinger's "Historical Notes to Smith's History of 
Cork," book ii., chapter 2). An inspeximus of Robert FitzStephen's deed 
to Philip de Barri, his nephew, was made at the request of David Fitz- 
David de Barri, 11 July, 1291, and of John de Barri, 12 Dec, 1322. — 
"Lodge's MS. Records of the Rolls and Copinger's Historical Notes." 
Smith adds that FitzStephen's grant and King John's patent are enrolled 
in 21 Eliz. The cantreds of O'Lethan, Muscerie-on-Dunnegan, and 
Killyde became the baronies or hundreds of Oliehan, Oryrry and Ogorm- 
liehan in fiant of Elizabeth 3287 (6 121), 6 May, 1 578, and in other sixteenth 
century documents. The cantred of O'Lethan was the present barony of 
Barrymore, or most of it ; Muscrie-on-Dunnegan comprised the present 
barony of Orrery and Kilmore. Also, according to the "Pipa Colmani," 
a fourteenth century MS., Subulter, Clonmyn, and Kilcorcran, in the barony 
of Duhallow, and Cloncourth, in the parish of St. Colman's Well, county 
Limerick, were in partibus Muscrydonygan. Killyde is not a contracted 
form of Kinelaeda, now Kinalea, for each of the two Kinaleas was a barony 
held by Lord Barry Oge, not from the heirs of Robert FitzStephen, but 
from the heirs of FitzStephen's partner, Milo de Cogan. Nor was it 
Ibawne, which was held by the Barrys mostly from the Bishop of Ross. 

Apparently the name Killyde survives in " Killeady Hills," the name 

2 



lo BARRYMORE. 

of the hill country south of the city of Cork. To the west of the parish of 
Carrigaline, the northern slopes of the Killeady Hills do not appear to have 
ever been Barry territory, and the southern slopes are in the barony of 
Kinelea, which came to the Barrys, not through Robert FitzStephen as did 
Killyde, but probably through Robert FitzMartin, who, on the 8th Novem- 
ber, 1207, had a royal grant of twenty knights' fees in the cantred of 
Insovenach (Inis Eoghanain, now Inishannon, in Kinelea). The De 
Courceys as representatives of the De Cogans, FitzStephen's partners, 
claimed a head rent out of Barry Oge's baronies of Kinelea citra and 
Kinelea ultra, just as the De Carews, FitzStephen's representatives, had 
a head rent out of Barry More's lands until redeemed in the year 1336. 

The Carrigaline portion of the Killeady Hills never was Barry terri- 
tory. According to post mortem inquisitions at Beaver and Dufglas 
(Carrigaline and Douglas) on the 28ta of October, 125 1, Gerald de Pren- 
degast, then recently deceased, had held of the king in capite eleven 
knights' fees, eight ploughlands, and thirteen acres in Beaver and Dufglas. 
Evidently these lands were the most part of the fifteen knights' fees 
between the ports of Cork and Insovenagh (Inishannon, on the Bandon 
river), granted on the 8th of November, 1207, by King John to Philip 
de Prendigast. The said Gerald de Prendegast had held of Sir David 
de Barri fourteen knights' fees, four ploughlands, and sixteen acres at 
Balacha (Ballyhea), but that was in Muscry Donnegan. Also the said 
Gerald had held of David de Barri half a cantred in Corkoyhe, by the 
service of one knight, and John FitzThomas held that land of Gerald by 
the same service, which was never rendered (see Sweetman's " Calendar 
of Documents Relating to Ireland " in the Public Record Office, London. 
Perhaps the half cantred held by John fitzThomas FitzGerald from 
Gerald de Prendegast, and by him from David de Barri, was the small 
barony of Kinnatalloon, which was Fitzgerald territory, though situated 
in the Deanery of Olethan, 

On the whole, it seems that the cantreds or baronies of Olethan, 
Muscerie on Donegan, and Killyde, confirmed on the 8th of November, 
1207, by King John, to William de Barri, were coextensive with the 
ecclesiastical deaneries of Olethan and Muscry Donnegan in the diocess 
of Cloyne, and Ocurblethan, in the diocess of Cork. According to the 
Taxations of A.D. 1302, 1307, as given by Sweetman, the deanery of 
Olethan comprised the barony of Kinnatalloon, and the Cloyne part of 
the barony of Barrymore, exclusive of the Great Island and the parish 
of Mogeesha, which went with Imokilly, till taken from the Hodnets by 
the Barries in A.D. 1329. 

The deanery of Muscry Donnegan comprised the barony of Orrery 
and Kilmore and the Cloyne part of the barony of Duhallow, except 
Kilshannig parish, which was then in Muskerrylin. The deanery of 



BARRYMORE. 19 

Ocurblethan comprised the Cork part of the barony of Barrymore and 
the North Liberties of Cork, except, perhaps, the parish of Currykippane. 
In early times Lord Barrymore had a manor of Shandon, in Ocurblethan, 
but soon alienated the lands near the city. Smith's " History of Cork " 
says that "on the north side of the city stood Shandon Castle, built by 
the Barrys soon after the Conquest, or, as some say, by King John," p. 

370. 

In A.D. 1377 Peter de Cogan, representative of the above-mentioned 
Gerald de Prendegast, died seized of one-third of the manor of Shandon, 
in Ocourblethan, together with other lands. — "Close Roll," 21 Edw. III. 
Walter Galwey died the 14th September, 1581, seized of an old castle 
called the manor of Shandon by Cork in mortgage of David Oge Barrye. 
— Fiants of Queen Elizabeth, No. 5994. The manor of Rathanusky, in 
the North Liberties of Cork, was granted, in A.D. 1350, by William fitz- 
Robert de Barry to John Lombard, and in A.D. 1564 was in dispute be- 
tween the Lombards and James fitzRichard, Viscount Buttevant. — " Cal. 
Patent Rolls, Ireland," 7th of Elizabeth. In A.D. 1 576-1 577 the Ratha- 
nisky estate, and, about the same time, the old castle called the manor 
of Shandon by Cork, belonged to David Oge Barry, apparently by gift 
of James fitzRichard Barry, Viscount Buttevant. In the sixteenth cen- 
tury Ocurblethan was known as Ogormlehan. Thus, in Sept., 1570, 
Sir Thomas Norris, Sir Robert Gardiner, and Sir Nicholas Walsh, com- 
missioners to compound with the inhabitants of Munster for cess, pur- 
veyance, etc., agreed to £^2 yearly for three years for Ivelehan and Gorm- 
lehan (Olethan and Ocurblethan), alias Barrymore. — "Calendar Carew 
MSS." In the parish of Dunbolloge, in the old deanery of Ocurblethan, 
there was a Killeagh, in Gaelic, Cill Aedha, and in twelfth century script, 
Cill Aeda. It may have been from that Cill Aeda that the cantred of 
Ocurblethan was designated Killyde in the confirmatory grant of, whose 
date according to Sweetman was November 8, A.D. 1207. 

On the 22nd of 'February, 1221, William de Barri and Daniel, Bishop 
of Cloyne, with the assent and consent of the chapter of Cloyne, agreed 
that the bishop and his successors should retain in perpetuity the church 
of Coulcollyng (now Coole Abbey), six ploughlands, and the right of 
patronage, and the church of Dromor Odyrryn (now Templebodan), five 
ploughlands, and the right of patronage. — "Pipa Colmani," pp. 35-36. 

Eudo, but not William de Barri, was among the magnates to whom 
Henry III., on the 17 July, 1221, wrote that he had removed Geoffrey de 
Mariscis from the office of Justiciary of Ireland. 

Eudo de Barri, and David de Barri, who was, no doubt, William's son 
and immediate successor, had royal letters dated August, .1235. 

SirWilliamFitzPhilipdeBarri,ofMaynaurpirCastle,in Wales, and Lord 
of Olethan, in Ireland, left two or more sons — (i) David, successor to his 



20 BARRYMORE. 

father; (2) John (?) and (3) Phih'p an airgid, ancestor of the Lords Barry 
Oge of Kinalea, wherein under the name of the cantred of Insovenagh 
(i.e., Inis Eoghanain, Inishonan, Inishannon) King John, granted twenty- 
knights' fees, with twenty other knights' fees elsewhere to Robert, FitzMartin 
by tlic service of four knights. — "Smith," p. 24, and Svveetman. "Philip 
Barry," says Archdall, "in 1237 (21 Hen. III.) paid four pounds as an 
atonement for his offence in entering into war against the King with 
Richard Marshall, as appear by the Pipe Rolls, and in 1240 obtained 
a grant from King Henry III. of the lands of Inishoran (Inishonan) with 
liberty to hold a fair there ; and from him many of the families of the 
name derive their descent." The entry in the "Calendar of Carew MSS." 
is : " Inishonan, with fair, granted to Philip de Barri, 24 Hen. IV., Turr., 
Lond." 

Archdall is quite astray in saying that William FitzPhilip de Barri 
"probably assigned his estate in Ireland to his younger brother, Robert 
de Barry, who . . built the castle of Robertstown as a frontier to his 
territory against the invasions of the Fitzgeralds of Coshbride, powerful 
and dangerous neighbours " ; and that " he had two sons — David, his 
heir, and Philip." William FitzPhilip long survived his brother, Robert, 
who was slain, apparently issueless, as far back as A.D. 1 185. The Decies 
of Desmond, including Coshbride, was not granted to a Fitzgerald until 
A.D. 1260, and those usually known as Fitzgeralds of Coshbride were 
descended from a younger son of Thomas Fitzgerald, eighth Earl of 
Desmond, beheaded in 1468. 

The David de Barri who immediately succeeded William FitzPhilip 
de Barri as Lord of Olethan was that William's son. No other David 
de Barri, Lord of Olethan, could have been the David, son of Sir William 
Barry and Lord of Olethan in an ancient deed quoted in a post mortem 
inquisition on Stephen Coppinger at Bandon Bridge, 22 Oct., 1624, thus : 
"Know all present and future that I, David, son of Sir William Barry, 
Lord of Olethan, have given, granted, etc., to Sir Robert de Clavilla, my 
nephew, for his homage and services, a ploughland in the lordship of 
Carrigtwohill, which is called Ross McBrin, another on the hill near Kil- 
kerry, and a third in Doughallaghbegg, and two islands and twenty acres 
of land in Kill McClyne, near Fodry, at a rent of six silver pennies for ever." 

" David de Barry," says Archdall, " had a grant from King Henry III., 
dated at Merleburg, 26 Sep., 1334, of a Saturday market at Buttevant, 
and an annual fair there to continue for eight days, viz., on the vigil and 
festival of St. Luke the Evangelist, and for six days after, and also a 
Friday market at his manor of Carrectohill." The " Calendar of Carew 
MSS." shews where that grant is enrolled : " Fair and market at Butte- 
vant and Carrigtuohill granted to the Lord David de Barry, 18 Henry 
III., Tower of London." 



BARRYMORE. 21 

In A.D. 1235, about June, the King wrote to David de Barri, and in 
August to David de Barri and to Odo de Barri. — Sweetman. According 
to Archdall, "in 1235, six years after his grandfather, PhiHp, had endowed 
the friary of Ballybegg, David enlarged its revenues, and was made a 
knight, but was killed in the year 1 262." But of the endowments of Bally- 
begg Friary that by David was not six but thirty-six later than any by 
Philip, who died A.D. 1 1 99- 1 200, during the first visit of his brother, Gerald, 
to Rome. And for the death of Sir David Fitz William de Barri, Lord of 
Olethan, in 1262, there appears no authority but a vague entry in some 
Irish "Annals," thus : — 

"A.D. 1 261. A great army was marched by the Geraldines (Clann 
Gerailt) into Desmond to attack MacCarthy, i.e., Fineen. MacCarthy 
attacked and defeated them ; and in the contest were slain eight barons 
and five knights, besides others of the English nobles, as also John Fitz- 
Thomas and Barrymore (an Barrach mor). Countless numbers of the 
English common soldiers were also killed in the aforesaid battle." — 
"Annals of the Four Masters," O'Donovan's translation. 

" A.D. 1 26 1 . A great hosting by the Clann Gerald (i.e., the Geraldines) 
into Des-Mumha (Desmond) to attack MacCarthaigh ; and MacCarthaigh 
attacked them and defeated them, and John FitzThomas and his son 
and fifteen knights and eight noble barons along with them were slain 
there, besides several young men and soldiers innumerable. And the 
Barrach Mor was also killed there." — "Annals of Lough Ce." 

The entry of the death of the " Big " or " Great Barry " at the battle 
of Callan, five miles east of Kenmare, in the county of Kerry, was copied 
into the "Annals of the Four Masters," the "Annals of Lough Ce," and the 
"Annals of Connaught," apparently from the lost "Annals of Kilronan," 
a Connaught compilation. That entry is not in the " Annals of Friar 
Clyn," or of other Leinster writers, nor in the "Annals of Innisfallen," a 
Munster compilation, which says : "A.D. 1 260. William Dedni, Justiciary 
of Ireland, the Geraldines (clann Gerailt), and MacRichard de Burgo, with 
a great hosting of Englishmen, and Donnell Roe, son of Cormac Finn 
MacCarthy, with all he could glean or collect of the Gaels, these all came 
into the civil parish (tuath) of Kenmare against Fineen of Ringrone, son 
of Donnell God (MacCarthy) of Carberry, and fought an excessively 
bloody battle in Callan of Glanarought (Glenn O'Ruachtaigh) in Kerry, 
in which were slain John FitzThomas Fitzgerald, Seneschal of Munster ; 
Maurice, his son ; many other Englishmen, and two knights." 

The " Great " or " Big Barry " slain at Callan according to Ulster and 
Connaught annals, was, perhaps, David FitzWilliam de Barri, Lord of 
Olethan, or was a son or a nephew of his, or may have been a Barry of 
Castlebar, alias Castle Barry (Caislean an Bharraig), in the county Mayo, 
where at that time the Barrys had a cantred or barony. Such a Barry 



2 2 BARRYMORE. 

would have accompanied Walter de Burgo, Earl of Ulster, alias Mac- 
Richard de Burgo, from Connaught to the battle of Callan. 

Chronologically, David FitzWilliam de Barry might well have been 
distinct from the David de Barry who was Justiciary of Ireland A.D. 1 267, 
and died A.D. 1278. Philip FitzWilliam de Barri, the eldest of four 
brothers, of whom Gerald, the youngest, was born A.D. 1147, was born 
circ. A.D. 1 140. As Philip's son, Robert, was slain in battle A.D. 11 85, 
and appears to have been a fighting man in A.D. 1 1 80, Philip's son and 
successor, William, was born before A.D. 1 1 70, and William's son and suc- 
cessor, David FitzWilliam, should have been born circ. A.D. 1195, and 
might have had a son circ. A.D. 1220. If David FitzWilliam survived until 
A.D. 1 178, he was Justiciary at the age of 72, and died aged 83 ; but if he 
were slain at Callan A.D. 1261, his son or nephew, David, was Justiciary at 
47 and died at 58. 

According to Archdall, David fitzRobert (recte David fitzWilliam) de 
Barri was slain A.D. 1262, leaving a son, the David who died A.D, 1278, 
leaving a son, David Oge, the David who hved A.D. 1290. A pedigree of 
the Earls of Barrymore composed during the minority of the sixth earl, 
A.D. 175 1 -1 766, makes David fitzWilliam to have been himself the Jus- 
ticiary in A.D. 1267, thus: "William, son of Philip. . . Sir David was 
a son to him. Sir David was Justiciary of Ireland A,D. 1267, when he 
fought against the Clan Carthy; and he it was that built the monastery 
of Buttevant. Sir David's son was David Oge. His son was David," etc. 
The pedigree given, A.D. 1600- 1603, to Sir George Carew by David, Vis- 
count Buttevant, runs thus : i Barry, married a daughter of Gerald of 
Windsor ; 2 Philip ; 3 John ; 4 David ; 5 David, Lord Justice of Ireland ; 
6 David, who married Maud Bolton; 7 William Moyle, who married 
Margaret, daughter of the Lord Coursey, she died A.D. 1373 ; 8 Laurence, 
the first Barryroe; 9 James Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne; 10 Richard 
Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne ; 1 2 Richard Barryroe ; 1 3 James, Viscount 
Buttevant; 14 David, Viscount Buttevant in A.D. 1600. 

A Gaelic pedigree, composed circ. A.D. 1553, appended to Keating's 
" History of Ireland " before A.D. 1636, and therefrom copied into McFirbis's 
"Book of Genealogies" in A.D. 1650, runs thus in McFirbis's "Book of 
Genealogies," p. 285, and in his " Abbrev. Geneal." : i Robert; 2 Philip ; 

3 WiUiam ; 4 David Mor ; 5 David Og ; 6 William Maol ; 7 Laurence, 
the bald Baron (Baron Maol) ; 8 James ; 9 Richard ; 10 James ; 1 1 James ; 
12 Richard; 13 James; 14 David. 

A better, though later, copy of that pedigree is given at p. 359, vol. ix.. 
"Kennifeck MSS.," St. Colman's College, Fermoy : i Robert of Drom- 
fineen ; 2 Philip ; 3 William ; 4 David the Great (Mor) ; 5 David junior 
(Og); 6 David; 7 William the Bald (Maol), ie., the bald Baron; 8 
Laurence; 9 James; 10 Richard; 11 James; 12 Richard; 13 James; 
14 David ; 15 David ; 16 David ; 17 Richard. 



BARRYMORE. 



23 



Genealagh an Barraigh 

MOIR. 

Daibhidh. 

Mac Seumais 

ni. Risderd 

m. Seumais 

m. Seumais 

m. Risderd 

m. Seumais 

m. Labhrais, i. an Barun Maol 

m. Uilliam Maoil 

m. Daibhidh Oig 

m. Daibhidh Moir 

m. Uilliam 

m. Pilib 

m. Roiberd 

AIcFirbis's Genealogies, p 
McFirbis's Ahhrev. Genealogies, 



BARRAIGH. 
Barrack Ruadh. 



EUMOND, 

Mac Seain Riabhaigh 

m. Seoin bhacaigh 

m, Uilliam 

m. Seain Chiotaigh 

m. Daibhidh Losganaigh 

m. Daibhidh an buille 

m. Daibhidh Mhoir 

m. Uilliam 

m. Pilib 

m. Roiberd on Minerbi 

285, compared with the 



Barrach Og. 



TOMAS. 

Mac Uilliam 
m. Euda 
m. Pilib 

m. Uilliam Cnuican biligh 
m. Seaain 
m. Pilib 
m. Euda 

m. Pilib an airgid 
m. Uilliam 
m. Pilib 

m. Roiberd Droma Finghin 
Marquis of Drogheda's copy of 



by the late W. M. Hennessy for the present writer. 



Geinealach an Jari.a 
Barrach. 



Geinealach an 
Bharraigh Mhoir do 
chuaidh gan sliocht. 



Risteard. 

Mac Dajbhi 

m, Daibhi 

m. Daibhi 

m. Seamais 

m. Ristird 

m. Seamais 

m. Ristird 

m. Seamais 

m. Labhrais 

m. Uilliam Mhaoih. an Barun 

Maol 
m. Daibhi 
m. Daibhi Oig 
m. Daibhi Moir 
m. Uilliam 
m. Pilib 
m. Ribird Droma Finghin 

P- 359> vol. ix. Kennifeck Jl/SS., St. Colman's College, Fermoy. 



Eamon. 

Mac Seaghain Oig 

m. Seaghain bhacaicc 

m. Uilliam 

m. Seghain Chetaigh 

m. 

m. Daibhi an bhuille Mhoir 

m. Uilliam [recte Daibhi] 

m. Daibhi Oig 

m. Daibhi Moir 

m. Uilliam 

m. Pilib 

m. Ribird Droma Finghin 



Geinealach an 

Bharraigh Oig Rinne- 

curain. 



TOMAS. 

Mac Uilliam 

m. Pilib 

m. Eada 

m. Pilib 

m. Uilliam Chnoic an bhile 

m. Seaghain 



m, Philib an Airgid 

m. Uilliam 

m, Pilib 

m. Ribird Droma Finghin 



Pedigree of Barrymore. 

David. 

Son of James 
Richard 
James 
James 
Richard 
James 
Laurence the Bald 

Baron 
William the Bald 

David Junior 
David the Great 
William 
Philip 
Robert 



Barryroe. 

Edmond. 
Son of John the Streaked 

,, John the Lame 

,, W^illiam 

,, John the Left-handed 

,, 'David Losganach 

,, David of the Blow 



David the Great 

William 

Philip 

Robert from Minevia 



Barryoge. 

Thomas. 
Son of William 



Eudo 
Philip 
William of Knocka- 

villy 
John 
Philip 
Eudo 

Philip of the Money 
William 
Philip 
Robert of Dromfineen 



P. 285, McFirbis's Book of Genealogies, compared with his Ahhrev. Genealogies. 



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BARRYMORE. 



25 



Pedigree of the Earl of 
Barrymore. 



Richard 

David 

David 

David 

James 

Richard 

James 

Richard 

James 



'E. of Barrymore^ 
E. of Barrymore 

V. Buttevant 
V. Buttevant 
Barryroe 
L. Barryroe 
L. Barryroe 
L. Barryroe 



Laurence 

William the Bald, ?., 

David 



Barryroe 
. the Bald Baron 



David Junior 
David the Great 
William 
Philip 



X. of Olethan 
L. of Olethan 
L. of Olethan 
L. of Olethan 



Robert of Dromfineen 



Pedigree of the extinct 
Barrymore. 



Edmond 
John Junior 
John the Lame 
William 

John the Left- 
handed 



fh. Barrymore 
L. Barrymore 
L Barrymore 
L. Barrymore 



L. Barrymore 
fL. of Olethan 



David of the 
Mighty Blow 

William [recte. 
David] 

David Junior 

David the Great 

William 

Philip 



L. of Olethan 



L. of Olethan 

L. of Olethan 

L. of Olethan 

X. of Olethan 



Robert of Dromfineen 



Pedigree of Barryoge of 

RlNGCURRAN. 



Thomas 
William 
Philip 
Eudo 

Philip 

William of 
Knockavilly 



John 



Philip 

William 

Philip 



L. Barryoge 
L. Barryoge 
L. Barryoge 
L. Barryoge 

L. Barryoge 

L, Barryoge 

L. Barryoge 



L. of Olethan 
L. of Olethan 



Robert of Dromfineen 



P. 359, vol. ix. Kennifeck MSS., St. Colman's College Fermoy. 

These pedigrees were composed as early as circ. a.d. 1553, when Edmund Fitzjohn was 
Lord Barrymore, and Thomas Fitz William was Lord Barryoge ; and were afterwards added to 
successively, in the most flourishing branch. 



All copies of the Gaelic pedigrees composed circ. 1553 err by putting 
Robert of Dromfineen for William of Manorbeer at the head of the pedi- 
grees, and probably by omitting John after William fitzPhilip. Most 
probably the Lord Justice was a nephew of David fitzWilliam, and was 
the father of John and of David Oge, Lords of Olethan. 

The following entry and summary relate to David fitzWilliam : — 
"A.D. 125 1. A monastery was founded at Killnaraullagh (alias Butte- 
vant), in the diocese of Cork, by the Barry, who chose a burial place for 
his family in it." — "Annals of the Four Masters." 

A.D. 125 1, October 28. Post mortem inquisitions at Beaver (alias 
Carrigaline), and at Douglas (in the parish of Carrigaline), regarding 
Gerald de Prendergast, lately deceased, found that he had held of Sir David 
de Barri in capite, fourteen fees, four ploughlands, and sixteen acres, 
by service of two knights ; and, again, that he had held half a cantred in 
Corkoyhe (i.e., Cork) of David de Barri. — Sweetman. 

The next entry relates either to David fitzWilliam, or to a son or to 
a nephew of his. A.D. 1 267 : " David de Barry was Justiciary of Ireland." 
— "Grace's Annals, Book of Howth," etc. "When Lord Justice of Ire- 
land," says Archdall, "he subdued the MacCarthies and the Geraldines, 
and by taking from them the castle of Sligo and all their lands in Con- 
naught he put an end to those dissensions which had long subsisted 
between them and the Bourkes. On the loth September, 1273, King 



26 BARRYMORE. 

Edward I., by patent dated at Gloucester, granted him free warren in all 
his lands, being then Lord of Buttevant, and styled a rich, noble Baron." 
That patent was given by Prince Edward at Bristol, according to " Eger- 
ton MS.," 75, Brit. Mus. Sir David de Barri, ex- Justiciary of Ireland, 
died A.D. 1277, "Fragments of Irish Annals," Carew MSS., 596, p. i ; A.D. 
1278, Grace, "Book of Howth," and Archdall ; A.D. 1279, Clyn's "Annals 
of Ireland." He was buried at Buttevant, "where," says Archdall, "his 
tomb still remains in the choir opposite the altar." Smith's "History of 
Cork," written A.D. 1 749, says more fully : " In this place (Buttevant) are 
the remains of a sumptuous ruin of the ancient abbey of Friars Minors 
founded by David de Barry, in the reign of King Edward I., who lies 
buried therein; he was Lord Justice of Ireland, and his tomb remains 
in the choir, opposite the great altar. . . . The name Buttevant, ac- 
cording to tradition, takes its rise from a word given in a battle fought 
near the place by David de Barry, who here overthrew the MacCartys, 
and cried out, ' Boutez en avant,' i.e., ' push forward,' which is the 
present motto of the Barrymore family" (pp. 292-3, Cork, 1892). 

Sir David de Barri, Lord of Olethan, and ex-Justiciary of Ireland, was 
succeeded by Sir John de Barri, knt. A.D. 1282, August 8. An inquisi- 
tion at Kilmallock found inter alia that John FitzThomas (si. at Callan 
A.D. 1 261) had a cantred at Aylly held of John de Barry, for the service 
of two knights, and now worth £100 2, year, but in .the time of the said 
John, ;^200, and half a cantred at Corleleye, held of Robert FitzStephen, 
by service of one knight, and that the Lady Matilda de Barry, wife of 
Maurice Fitzjohn (si. at Callan AD. 1261), had dower. — Sweetman. That 
cantred at Aylly may have been the missing Barry cantred of Killyde. 

A.D. 1283, July I. Writ to order the Justiciary of Ireland that as 
John de Barri and Thomas FitzMaurice had long held their inheritance, 
he distrain them to become knights. — Sweetman. 

At the Record Ofhce, Dublin, part 2, "Close Roll" of 32nd year of 
Kmg Edward III., that is of A.D. 1358, has many entries relating to this 
Sir John de Barri. No. 25 says : 

The King to the same Escheator (i.e., Thomas Mynot), greeting. Whereas, 
lately wishing to be certified as to the cause of the seisure of David fitzDavid de 
Barry's manors of Olethan and Muscridonegan and appurtenances into our hand, 
we commanded you to make known to us in our Chancery of Ireland the cause 
of said seizure under your seal, distinctly and openly, and you returned to us 
that the cause of the seizure of the said manors into our hands was because John 
de Barri, knt., who held of us in capite the said manors, with appurtenances, by 
military service, alienated them to one Robert Coffyn, chaplain, to hold for him- 
self and his heirs for ever, our leave for this being unobtained, and by an Inquisi- 
tion taken before you at our command, and returned into the said Chancery, it 



BARRVMORE. 27 

is ascertained that Sir John de Barri, knt., in the court of the Lord Edward 
heretofore King of England, our grandfather, in the 13th year of his reign, by 
a fine levied before Robert Bagot and his associates, then our said grandfather's 
Justiciaries of the Bench of Dublin, recognised the manor of tbe castle of Olethan 
among other lands and tenements which had been his (John's) to be the right of 
David fitzDavid de Barri, and restored them to him, in the same court, to have 
and to hold to the same David and his heirs of the chief lords of these fees, by 
the services pertaining to them, for ever ; and the said John, by another fine levied 
in the court of our said grandfather, in the 14th year of his reign, before the said 
Justiciaries, recognised the manors of Bottavaunt, Lyscarevvell, and Adnogrothan, 
with appurtenances in Muscridonagan, to be the right of David fitzDavid him- 
self, and in that same court gave them back to him to have and to hold to the 
same David fitzDavid and his heirs of the chief lords of those fees by the services 
that appertain to the said manors, for ever, as can be more fully seen from the 
tenor of the said fines ; and that Sir John de Barry and David fitzDavid de Barry 
who thus acquired the same manors held them of Maurice de Carrew by military 
service, and when Sir Robert Coffyn obtained possession in the said manors he 
then held them of the said Maurice ; not that the said John or Robert at the time 
when the said manors of Olethan and Muscridonegan were thus alienated, held 
in capite any of those manors from our said grandfather, or from another Edward, 
lately King of England, our father, or from us ; and that the said manors, with 
appurtenances, are worth yearly £60 ; and that the said manors of Muscridonegan 
thus taken into our hands contain in themselves all the parcels contained in our 
writ concerning the cause of seizure therefrom, except the manor of Olethan. 
We command you to remove our hand from the said manors thus taken by you 
into our hand, and thenceforth to interfere no further, if they be in our hand 
from that cause and no other, save always our right in this part ; and to restore 
to those whose they were all profits therefrom received from the time of their 
seizure into our hand, as is just. Cork, April 28, 

No. 26 says: — The King to the same (Thomas Mynot, Escheator of Ireland), 
greeting. Whereas, lately wishing to be certified as to the cause of the seisure of 
96 acres of land of William de Barry, of Rathgoban, knt., and appurtenances in 
Carriktothill, by you into our hand, we command you to make known to us in 
our Chancery of Ireland the cause of the said seizure under your seal, distinctly 
and openly, without delay ; and you returned to us that the cause of the seizure 
of the said land into our hand was that John de Barry, knt., who held the said 
land and appurtenances of us in capite, as parcel of the lands and tenements of 
Olethan, alienated them to the said William de Barri to him and his heirs for ever, 
our licence for this being neither asked nor obtained. And, afterwards, by an 
Inquisition taken before you at our command, and returned into the said Chan- 
cery, it is ascertained that John de Barry, knt., in the time of the Lord Edward, 
lately King of England, our grandfather, was seized in his demesne as of fee of 
the said 96 acres of land, and appurtenances in Carriktothill, as parcel of the 
lands and tenements of Olethan, and alienated that land to the said William de 
Barry, of Rathgoban, to himself and his heirs for ever, and that when the aliena- 
tion of the said lands was made to the said William, and both before and after, 
the said land was held of Maurice de Carrew, and not of us, nor of any of our 
progenitors, in capite. And that the David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry who died last 
acquired to him and his heirs for ever a right, release, and quit claim from 



28 BARRYMORE. 

Thomas de Carrew, son and heir of the said Maurice, of all services which the 
said David was then bound to perform to him for his lands and tenements in the 
county of Cork. And so the said David became our tenant in capite in the loth 
year of our reign. And that this alienation was made in the time of the Lord 
Edward, lately King of England, our father, in the 12th year of his reign. And 
that the said land is worth annually in all issues 13s. 4d. And that the said land 
is held of David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry by service of suit at his court of Olethan. 
We command you to i-emove our hand fi'om the said land, with appurtenances 
so taken by you into our hand, and not insert it thenceforth, if it be in our 
hand for that cause and no other, save our right in this part, and to restore to 
those whose they were whatever issues have been received therefrom from the time 
of its seizure into our hand. Cork, 28th April. 

No. 2,7- The King to his dear clerk, Thomas Mynot, his Escheator of Ireland, 
greeting. Whereas, lately wishing to be certified as to cause of the seizure of 
120 acres of the land of John fitzDavid de Barry, knt., with appurtenances, in 
Coulristylan, by you into our hand, we commanded you to make known to us 
in our Chancery of Ireland the cause of the said seizure under your seal, and you 
returned to us that the cause of the seizure of the said land into our hand was that 
John de Barry, knt., who held the said land, with appurtenances, of us in capite 
as parcel of the manor of Olethan, alienated it to one William Bondyn to him 
and his heirs and assigns for ever, our leave for this not being obtained ; and, 
afterwards, by an Inciuisition taken before you at our command, and taken cog- 
nizance of in the said Chancery, it is ascertained that John de Barry, knt., was 
seized in his demesne as of fee of the said lands, with appurtenances, as parcel 
of the lands and tenements of Olethan, and gave that land to the said William 
Bondyn, to him and his heirs and assigns for ever ; and that the said John never 
held the said land and appurtenances of us, nor of any of our progenitors, in 
capite, but that he held the said land of Maurice de Carrew, then chief lord of 
the said land ; and that the said land is worth yearly 40 shillings ; and that 
David fitzDavid de Barry is now the chief lord of the said land, and it is held of 
him by service of doing suit at his court, and that that alienation was made in 
the time of the Lord Edward, lately King of England, our grandfather. We 
command you to remove our hand from the said land, if it be in our hand from 
that cause and no other, and thenceforth to interfere no further, save always our 
right in this part, and to restore to those whose they were whatever issues you 
have received from the time of the seizure thereof into our hand, as is just. 
Almarico de Sancto Amando, Justiciary of Ireland, at Cork, i8th May. 

No. 27, The King to the same Escheator, greeting. Whereas, lately wishing 
to be certified as to the cause of the seizure of 160 acres of the land of John 
fitzNicholas de Barry, and appurtenances, in Kylmoryn, by you into our hand, 
we commanded you to make known to us in our Chancery the cause of the said 
seizure under your seal, distinctly and plainly, without delay, and you returned 
to us that the cause of the said seizure into our hands was that John de Barry, knt., 
who held the said land and appurtenances of us in capite, as parcel of the lands 
and tenements of Olethan, alienated them to Nicholas de Barry, of Ely, the 
father of the said John fitzNicholas, whose heir he is, to himself and his heirs for 
ever, our leave for this being neither asked nor obtained, and, afterwards, by an 
Inquisition taken before you at our command, and taken cognizance of in our 
Chancery, it was ascertained that John de Barry, knt., in the time of the Lord 



BARRYMORE, 29 

Edward, lately King of England, our grandfather, was seized in his demesne as 
of fee of 160 acres of land and appurtenances in Kylmoryn, as parcel of the lands 
and tenements of Oleighan, and alienated that land to Nicholas de Barry, of Ely, 
to himself and heirs for ever, and that when the alienation of the said land was 
made to the said Nicholas, and both before and after, the said land was held of 
Maurice de Carrew, and not of us, nor of any progenitors of us, in capite, and 
that David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry acquired for himself and his heirs for ever a 
relaxacion and quiet claim from Thomas de Carrew, son and heir of the said 
Maurice, from all the services which the same David for his lands and tenements 
in the county of Cork was then bound to perform for him ; and so the same 
David became our tenant in capite, in the loth year of our reign ; and that this 
alienation was made in the time of the Lord Edward, lately King of England, 
our grandfather ; and that the said land is worth yearly in all issues 40 shillings ; 
and that the said land is held of David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry by service 
of doing suit at his court of Olethan. We command you to remove our hand 
from the said land and appurtenances so seized into our hand, if it be in our 
hand from that cause and no other, and thenceforth not to interfere, save always 
our right in this part, and to restore to those whom it concerns whatever issues 
have been received into our hand from the time of the seizure, as is just. Alma- 
rico de Sancto Almando, Justiciary, etc., at Cork, the 28 day of April. 

No. 82 recites that two townlands of David Walsh of Kylmoryn, in 
Kylmoryn, are held of William fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry, by service 
of suit at his court of Kylmoryn, but that when, in the time of Edward L, 
John de Barry, knt., alienated them to William fitzDavid de Barry and 
William, father of David Walsh, they were held, not of the King, but of 
Maurice de Carrew in capite ; and that David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry, 
in the tenth year of Edward III., acquired to him and his heirs for ever a 
release from Thomas de Carrew, son and heir of Maurice, of all services 
which the same David was bound to perform for his lands and tenements 
in the county of Cork, and so became a tenant of the King in capite. 

In No. 26 "Dublin Close Roll," 32nd Edward III., 2nd part, the word 
" father " ought to be " grandfather " in the clause " Edward, lately King 
of England, our father, in the 1 2th year of his reign." The corresponding 
extract from " Egerton MSS.," 75, British Museum, at page 1 77, Smith's 
"History of Cork," A.D. 1892-3, has " 12th year of Edward I.' 

Writs Nos. 26 and 27 in said " Close Roll," mention a David fitzDavid 
fitzDavid de Barry, who was Lord of Olethan in A.D. 1358; and Writs 
Nos. 26, 27, 82 mention that Lord's deceased father, David fitzDavid 
fitzDavid de Barry, Lord of Olethan in A.D. 1336; and Writ No. 26 so 
mentions the elder of these as if he were preceded by at least one other 
David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry, saying : " David fitzDavid fitzDavid 
de Barry qui ultimo obiit," that is, "the David fitzDavid fitzDavid who 
died last." There was, therefore, an uninterrupted series of five Davids in 
the right line of the lords of Olethan. 



30 BARRYMORE. 

The " Calendar of Patent and Close Rolls of the Chancery of Ireland" 
has a summary of a grant witnessed by the Sir John de Barri who was 
Lord of Olethan in immediate succession to Sir David, the ex-Justiciary : 
"King Edward granted to Thomas fitzMaurice the cantred of Ocassin and 
half the cantred of Oblyd, and thirteen townlands in Corcomroth, to have 
for ever. Witnesses, the Lord Robert, Bishop of Bath and Wells, and 
Chancellor of England ; the Lords William de Valence, John de Vescy, 
Odo de Grandison, Gerald FitzMaurice, John de Barry, John de Cogan," 
etc. The date of that grant is lost, but was some time in the years 1277- 
1287, when the witness Gerald FitzMaurice was fourth Lord of Offaly. 
— " The Earls of Kildare Addenda." More restrictedly that date was in 
the years 1 278-1285, when the witness Sir John de Barri was Lord of 
Olethan. 

According to the " Earls of Kildare Addenda," Thomas na Nappagh 
Fitzgerald (ob 1297), son of Maurice Fitzjohn Fitzgerald (ob 1261), 
married Margaret, daughter of John, Lord Barry of Olethan, and by her 
was father of Maurice, first Earl of Desmond. According to Miss Hick- 
son's pedigree of the Earls of Desmond, Maurice Fitzjohn Fitzgerald, 
second Lord of Decies and Desmond, married, first, Joan, daughter of 
John de Cogan, Lord of Beauvoir, or Carrigaline, and, secondly, Matilda 
de Barry (Inq. 21 Edw. !.),(') and was succeeded by his elder son by his 
first marriage, Thomas FitzMaurice, third Lord of Decies and Desmond. 
. . He was called an apa, of the ape ; he died 1 296 (Marlburgh says 
1298). . . He married Margaret de Burgh. She married, secondly, 
in 1299, without the King's licence, for which she paid fine, Reginald Rosel 
("Abbrev. Rot. Orig.," 28 Ed. I.); issue, three sons and a daughter — (i) 
Thomas FitzThomas, eldest son, obiit sine prole ; (2) Maurice FitzThomas. 
. . fourth Lord of Decies and Desmond, created Earl of Desmond, Aug. 
27th, 1329, etc. ; (3)John, called Sir John of Athassell, etc. ; (i) Joan, who 
married John " Kittogh," Lord Barry. 

Whether Sir John de Barry, Lord of Olethan in 1278- 1284, had or 
had not a daughter, first wife to Thomas an apa, it may have been the 
better to bar and forestall possible claims through his daughter or daugh- 
ters to the inheritance of his estates, that Sir John de Barri assigned, and 
in presence of the Justiciaries, surrendered Olethan in 1284, and Muskri- 
donegan in 1285, to David fitzDavid de Barri, alias David Oge de Barri. 

Sir John de Barri, knt.. Lord of Olethan, in his lifetime was succeeded 
by David Oge de Barri, whom Archdall calls " Lord of the Plane," that is, 

(0 " A daughter of Geoffrey de Mariscis (Muireis)," say the 'Annals of Innis- 
fallen,' "was the married wife of Maurice fitzjohn Fitzgerald, and a son of that 
Maurice was Thomas an apa." 



BARRYMORE. 3 1 

of Muskry Donegan, alias " Muskry of the three plains." " He," says 
Archdall, "founded a monastery of Minorites at Buttevant in the year 
1290." — "MSS. Annals of Ireland," quarto, in Trinity College Library, 
Dublin. He was the David fitzDavid de Barry at whose request an 
Inspeximus of Robert FitzStephen's deed to Philip de Barry was made 
out, the nth July, 1291, "The wife of David de Barry," says Archdall, 
"living anno 1298, was named Joan. She after married Eustace le Poer, 
and assigned to her son, John de Barry, for all her dower in Olethan, etc., 
the moiety of the cantred of Muskery, except two parts of the marriage of 
Philip, son and heir of Philip de Barry." She may have been the Joan, 
third daughter of Maurice, second Lord of Kerry, wrongly made wife of 
William Moyle Barry by Archdall. By her David Oge, Lord of Olethan, 
had three sons — (i) John ; (2) David, who married Maud Bolton of Wales, 
and had two sons, David, Lord of Olethan, and William Moyle, Lord of 
Ibawne ; (3) Richard, who married Beatrice, daughter of Sir Nicholas 
de Carrew. On the nth May, 1302, Richard fitzDavid de Barry going 
to England had leave to appoint Robert Cofhn and Roger le Blund his 
attorneys (Pat. 3 1 Edw. I., Ireland). 

David Oge de Barri, Lord of Olethan, successor of Sir John de Barri, 
knt, was succeeded by his eldest son, John fitzDavid Oge de Barri, Lord 
of Olethan, Muskery Donnegan, and Ibawne. About the time of his suc- 
cession, where the Calendars mention a John de Barry, they seldom par- 
ticularise whether it be Sir John de Barri, knt., or John fitzDavid Oge de 
Barry, Lords of Olethan, or Sir John, senior, or Sir John, junior, de Barry, 
of Ely O' Carroll, of which last one or other was the John le Nortlierne de 
Barry of Pat. 3, Edw. II., A.D. 1309. Thus, in London Calendars, 1285, 
May — One year's protection for John de Barri going to Santiago. 1286, 
January 6 — John de Barri, staying in England, nominates attorneys for 
one year. 1286, Feb. 23 — One year's protection for John fitzDavid de 
Barri, of Ireland, staying in England. 1287, June 20 — Beatrice, wife of 
John de Barri, staying in England, nominates attornies in Ireland for one 
year. 1290, April 23 — Petition of John de Cogan. The King had fre- 
quently commanded the Chief Justice and the Justice of the Common 
Pleas to take an inquest regarding the suits and services demanded, and 
the grievous distresses made by John de Barri against John de Cogan, to 
the damage of the latter and his tenants of ;^2,ooo. The King had 
commanded that no distress be taken, and that restitution be made of 
any distresses that had been levied. But nothing was done. Answer : 
Let him sue by writ, and take what the law gives him. 1291, Feb. 9 — 
John de Barri granted one year's protection, 1291, May 29 — John de 
Barri, staying in England nominates attornies. 1291, Aug. 6th — Two 
years' protection for John de Barri going beyond sea from England. 



32 BARRYMORE. 

The following summary regards the Barries of Ely O'Carroll (1295, 
Feb. 3) : Deeds of covenants by Sir John fitzjohn de Barry, Hugh de 
Barry, and William de Barry, reciting that they had supplicated the Lord 
Theobald Pincerna (Butler), of Ireland, to obtain for them the King's 
peace for certain wrongs said to be done by them. They bind themselves 
not to commit any infringement of the peace in the lands of the King, or 
of the said Theobald, from the time of executing these presents until he 
shall return from the court with the said concession, at which time they 
are willing to pay any forfeiture he shall impose, and give security for 
themselves and their followers. Failing this, he shall have right of entry 
on all their lands without opposition. They agree also to find as main- 
prisers the Lord John de Barry, their father; Tancred de Barry and 
Matthew de Barry, their brothers, who will bind themselves by the same 
covenants. Duncarnin, Friday, on the morrow of the Purification of the 
Blessed Virgin Mary, and in the 24th year of the reign of King Edward. — 
"The Red Book of the Earl of Ormond's Lands," in 31st of Edw. I; 
" Cal. Carew MSS." 

The following summaries relate to John fitzDavid Oge, Lord of Ole- 
than : — 

A.D. 1294. John de Barri summoned to attend the King in Gascony. 
— "Rymer," Grace. 

1295, Sept. 18, Canterbury. One year's protection for John fitzDavid 
de Barry, staying in Ireland. — " Cal. S. P., Eng." 

1296, January 3, St. Albans. John de Barri, William de Barri, and 
other magnates requested to obey John Wogan, Justiciary of Ireland, and 
to be on the i March at Whytheweyhaven. — " Cal. Pat. Rolls," 24 Edw. I. 

1296. John de Barry, going to Ireland, to have one year's protection. 
— " Cal. S. P., Eng." 

1299, John de Barri summoned to attend the King in Scotland. — 
Dowling. 

1300, June 6. Joan de Valencia, sometime Countess of Pembroke, 
wrote a licence for the alienation by John de Barri to the prior and monks 
of a perch of land in Manerbir, and the advowson of the church of that 
town. Enrolled 28 January, 133 1. — "Cal. S. P., Eng." 

1 301, March i, Lincoln. Licence for the alienation in mortmain by 
John Barry to the prioress of the convent of Acornebury of a perch of 
land in Penali, and the advowson of the church there. 

1 301, August 6, Westminster. Licence for the alienation in frank 
almoin to Agnes de Hareford and the other nuns serving God and St. 
John the Baptist in a street called Jonestrete, in the suburb of Cork, of the 
following lands -. — By William de Barry, a carucate of land in Cleynboly, 
in Inyshmor, and the advowson of the church of Dungorny ; by John de 



BARRYMORE. 33 

Barry, land to the value of ;£'20 a year in Muscry, Olethan, and Obaun 
(i.e., Ibane) ; by John, son of Gilbert, a carucate and a half of land in 
Garrantor in Obaun, and Killenlcth in Fuuerchragh, and the advowson 
of the church of St. Mary, Knockaragha, and two acres of land in Kil- 
coan in Olethan, with the advowson of the church of Kilcoan; by 
Philip, son of Robert, two acres of land in Kilmide in Kineletha, with 
the advowson of the church of that town, and two acres of land in le 
Chercheton in Inysmacnel, with the advowson of the church of Chercheton. 
— " CaL Pat. Rolls and Escheators' Inquisitions," 29 Edw. I ; " Cal. 
Carew MSS." 

1302, May II. Richard fitzDavid de Barry, going to England, has 
leave to appoint attorneys. — Pat. 31 Edw. I. 

1307. John de Barry built a house for Franciscan friars at Castle Ole- 
than, otherwise Castlelyons. — Archdall. 

1309, January 8. John de Barry, Philip de Barry, of Carrygdonegan ; 
Philip de Barry, of Kalbam (Kilbrin ?) ; Robert de Barry, and eighty-four 
other magnates, two knights from every shire, and two citizens from every 
city or borough, were summoned to Parliament at Kilkenny for the Mon- 
day within the octave of the Purification. On that day the Justiciary and 
King's Counsel, in presence of all summoned to that parliament, shew on 
behalf of the King, a statement In French, explaining the cause of sum- 
moning them, viz., the unheard of dearness of all saleable commodities, and 
suggesting not to overburden all with the consideration of such arduous 
business, but to have all the assembly select two prelates and two other 
prudent men to select from among themselves and the most prudent of the 
others present sixteen men who would have best knowledge, will, and 
power, with the assent of the said assembly, to apply counsel, aid, and 
remedy in the premisses. The whole assembly selected the Bishops of 
Ossory, Lismore, and Emly, John de Barry, and (his step-father) Eustace 
le Poer ; and these chose unto themselves the Elect of Leghlyn, the Earl 
of Ulster, the Prior of St. John of Jerusalem in Ireland, Maurice de Roche- 
ford, Jordan de Exonia, Fulco de la Freigne, John de Druyl, Walter 
Wogan, William de Roche, Hugh Canoun, and David le ( ), who, 

being sworn, etc., with the consent as well of the Justiciary and the 
Counsel of the King as of the said Council, made the following orders : — 
Whereas the greatest cause of dearness arise from robberies committed by 
persons of noble birth — (i) That every magnate should take upon himself 
the chastisement of his own ; (2) that in every county six approved men, 
or more, should be appointed, who, together with the sheriff and coroners, 
could inquire about all malefactors, and chastise and imprison them; (3) 
that the statutes regarding coining, forestalling, and the having arms for 
keeping the peace should be proclaimed, and strictly observed ; (4) and 

3 



34 BARRYMORE. 

that the right to take goods on credit should be abolished. — Pat. 3, Edw. 
II., I. Of these four statutes Grace's "Annals " say that they "would have 
been good and profitable if observed." However that may have been, it 
is manifest that, in 1309, John de Barry stood high with the crown and 
with Parliament as an intelligent and upright nobleman. 

1309, Aug 1 1. John de Barry had licence to alienate in mortmain to 
the prior and friars of the Carmelite Order of Drogheda a piece of land 
in Castellaythan (Castlelyons), in Munster, 40 x 24 yards. 

13 10. The King issued a precept to Maurice de Carew to distrain the 
lands of David de Barry and Maurice Fitzgerald, for services and duties 
due to him as lord of several of their possessions. — MS. 38, Lambeth 
Palace Library, London. 

1 309 or 1 3 10, Nov. 30. John fitzDavid de Barri and Maurice de Roch- 
ford appointed guardians of the peace in the counties of Cork, Kerry, and 
Limerick. — Pat. 3 and 4 Edw. IIM^ 

13 12. John de Barry recovered £^0 damages against John fitz- 
Andrew FitzDavid, Thomas FitzAmond, and Robert Delahay, for entering 
forcibly into his free chase of Buttevant, chasing and conveying away the 
game, and occasioning him other losses. — Archdall. 

1 3 14, Aug. 12. John de Barri and 28 other magnates ordered to give 
credence to the King's clerk, John de Hothun. — " Cal. S. P., E." 

13 16, Aug. 7, Lincoln. Grant for three years to John de Barri of 
murage for his town of Botevant upon all wares for sale brought into the 
town.— "Cal S. P., E." 

1 3 1 7, January 8. The King, at the instance of John fitzDavid de Barri, 
granted, in aid of the fortifications of that John's town of Botavaunt, 
;;^I05, required for the Treasurer's expences out of the murage already 
granted to the corporation of that town. — Pat 1 1 Edw. II., I. 

13 1 7, January 20. Henry de Cogan and David le Blound appointed 
to inquire into the differences between John fizDavid de Barry and 
Maurice FitzThomas. — Pat. 11 Edw. II., I. Joan, wife to John fitz- 
David de Barry, Lord of Olethan, was sister to Maurice FitzThomas, 
created Earl of Desmond, Aug. 27th, 1329. — Miss Hickson. 

1 3 1 7, January 8. The King, for services, pardoned John fitzDavid de 
Barri a fine of £$00 incurred by him and Philip Barry, of Kylbryn, for 
their transgressions. — Pat. 11 Edward II. 2nd Part. 

13 1 7, Nov. 16, The King to all, etc. : Know you that, at the instance 
of our loved and faithful John de Barry, we have pardoned William fitz- 
David de Barry, Thomas fitzStephen de Baxry, William fitzThomas de 

(2) In 1364 Sir John de Rochford had the lordship and castle of Kylblan, now 
Kilbolane.— " Pipa Colmani^" 



BARRYMORE. ±248477 35 

Barry, Robert fitzThomas de Barry, and Robert fitzStephen de Barry, 
the infraction of our peace which pertains to us of all trespasses and felo- 
nies committed by them against our peace in our land of Ireland up to 
the day of the present composition, etc. Witness, Roger de Mortuomari, 
at Castle Olethan. By the bill of the Lieutenant himself. 

1 3 1 7. The King, etc., for the service which John fitzDavid de Barry, 
knt., has done to us, we have pardoned him . . de Barry, David fitzDavid 
de Barry, John fitzDavid de Barry, Cambino Donati . . . Barry 
Robert fitzDavid de Barry, William Bendyn, and Philip fitzAdam de 
Staunton. — Pat. 11 Edw, II. 2nd Part. 

1319 May 17, ;;6^6oo assigned to Henry de Thrapstoun, clerc, to pay 
the wages of diverse magnates of Ireland, men-at-arms, etc., proceeding 
to Munster against the rebells John fitzThomas fitzMaurice and David 
de Barry, and their following, mostly of the kindred of the Burkeyns and 
Barrys. — Close 14 Edw. 11. 

1320. Enrollment of deed of John de Barry, Lord of Olethan, in 
Ireland, witnessing that, whereas an indenture had been made between 
Sir Nicholas de Carrew and him by reason of a marriage to be celebrated 
between Richard de Barry, brother of John, and Beatrice, daughter of 
Nicholas, for ;^500, to be paid to John according to the terms of the in- 
denture, and after the death of Nicholas, Sir John de Carrew, his son and 
heir, has assured the same sum to John de Barry by letters of obligation. 
The said John hereby acknowledges that he has been satisfied for the 
said ;^500. — " Cal. S. P. Eng." 

1322, Dec. 12, Cork. At John de Barry's request, an Inspeximus of 
Robert FitzStephen's deed to Philip de Barry.— " Egerton MSS.," 75,B.M. 

1322. Dec. 8, Hathelseye. John de Barri, etc., summoned to Carlisle 
for the war against the Scots. — Close 16 Edw. II., "Cal. Carew MSS." 

1323. John de Barry was one of the Irish magnates summoned to 
meet the King at Carlisle (for a campain in Scotland). — Grace. 

1324. John de Barry attended Parliament in Dublin. — Close 18 
Edw. II. 

1324. John de Barry, etc., summoned to Aquitain. — ^Vascon Roll, 18 
Edw. II. "Cal. Carew MSS." 

1326. John fitzDavid de Barry and four other noblemen ordered to 
abstain from illegal confederacies. — Close 20 Edw. II., Ireland. 

1327, Feb. 14. Letters to John de Barry and other magnates from 
the King, that he had appointed Thomas Fitzjohn, Earl of Kildare 
Justiciary of Ireland. — Close i Edward III., part i., " Cal, Carew MSS." 

1327, April 15, Peterborough. Richard de Barry, staying in Eng- 
land, has letters nominating his attorneys in all courts of Ireland for one 
year. — Cal. Patent Rolls, Eng. 



36 BARRYMORE. 

1329, April 18, Wallingford. Richard Barry, staying in England, has 
letters nominating his attorneys in Ireland for two years. — Cal. Pat. Rolls, 
England. This, no doubt, was Richard, a younger brother of John, and 
already mentioned under the year 1320. 

1329, Monday, the vigil of Abbot Brandon. The Roches and Barrys 
slew James FitzRobert fitzjames Ketyng, with others of his name, Sir 
Philip Hodnett, Hugh Canteton, with many of their blood, about one 
hundred and forty, as well of their blood as of their household. — Clyn. 

On the other hand, in the time of John (fitzDavid Oge), Lord of 
Olethan, the Barries of Ely O'Carroll, in the King's County, and of 
Castlebar, in the county Mayo, were exterminated. A contemporary 
writer. Friar John Clyn, in his "Annals of Ireland," has these entries : — 

A.D. 1325. On Monday, the feast of St. Dominick, confessor. Sir 
John de Barry, of Hely, a strenuous knight, and frequently proved in 
arms, was slain by the O'Carrolls. Also in that year John de Brimegham 
and Thomas le Botiller collected an army against O'Carroll, who this 
year left to the English and to the peaceable in Elycarwyl scarcely a 
house, castle, or town, unless burnt and destroyed. 

1326. The O'Carrolls killed Sir Mathew Myleborne, a trusty and 
prudent knight, English by nation, but Gaelic by use of speech, speaking 
only Gaelic. 

1335. On Thursday, the day of (All) Souls, the O'Carrolls captured 
Sir Richard de Mareys, Sir Robert Travers, and Sir Robert FitzDavid, 
and slew John le Brit and others. 

1346. On Saturday, the day after the Nativity of Blessed Mary, by 
Fulco de la Frene, was slain Thaddy, son of Roderick O'Carroll, Prince 
of Elycarwyl, a powerful, wide-ruling, wealthy, and warlike man, a chief 
enemy and persecutor of the English and of the loyal. He killed, exiled, 
and expelled those of De Barry, De Melbourne, and De Brit's kindred, 
and other Englishmen from his lands of Ely Carwyl, their fatherland 
and held and occupied their lands and castles, being a grievous tyrant 
to all loyal neighbours. — "Annales Hiberniae." 

Ely O'Carroll has become the baronies of Ballybritt and Clonlisk in 
the King's County. In the entry above at the year 1295, the home of 
the Barrys of Ely O'Carroll is written Duncarnin, a form probably of 
what has become Dunkerrin as the name of a parish in the barony of 
Clonlisk. The grant of 160 acres in Kylmoryn, in Olethan, now the 
barony of Barrymore by Sir John (fitzDavid More) de Barri to Nicholas 
de Barry, of Ely, in the reign of Edward I., is a connecting link between 
the Barries of the county Cork and those of the King's County. 

Writing circ. 1600-1603, Sir George Carew says : "There was a family 
of the Barries in Ely O'Carroll, but long since expelled by the O'Carrolls. 



BARRVMORE. 37 

The Barries in the counties of Kildare and Catherlough are of the family 
of Barrie. Mac Da More is descended from the Barries. He now dwells 
in Wexford. The Lord Barry's ancestors had in Connaught Castle 
Barrie and one cantred of land adjoining it. The Lord Barry's lands 
in Barrymore 207^ ploughlands; in Orrery, 100 ploughlands ; in Ibawne, 
120 ploughlands. Barry Oge has lands in Kinaley containing (sic) 120." 
The pedigree of the Mac Da More in the "Book of Leinster" makes him 
of Gaelic ancestry, paternally. 

The "Annals" mention the Barries of Mayo thus: — 
13 16. In Connaught O'Connor slew Stephen Dexter, Milo Cogan, 
some of the Barries and Lawlesses, with more English, about 80. — Grace's 
"Annals." 

1 3 1 6. This same year there came news from Connaught that O'Connor 
did kill many Englishmen, among whom were the Lord Stephen Droc- 
sones, Miles Cogane, and many of the Barres and Lawleses, about the 
number of four score. — " Book of Howth." 

The Gaelic annals do not mention the Barries in this war, but the 
" Annals of Lough Ce " and the " Annals of Clonmacnoise " make it a war 
of extermination, 

13 16. And he afterwards went to expell the Foreigners of the West 
of Connacht; and Baile-Atha-lethain was burned by him, and Stephen 
Dexter and Miles Gogan, and William Pendrecas, and John Stondun were 
slain there (viz. : these were noble knights), and William Laigleis was 
slain there, and a countless multitude along with them. — "Annals of Lough 
Ce," with which the "Annals of Connaught" substantially agree. 

In the " Tribes and Customs of Hy Fiachrach," John O'Donovan has 
this note on Caislen an Bharraigh : " This is the name by which the town 
of Castlebar, in the barony of Carra, is called at the present day, and in 
the "Annals of the Four Masters," at the years 141 2, 1579, and 1582. It 
signifies the castle of Barry, or Barry's Castle, and there can be no doubt that 
it received that name from a castle erected there shortly after the English 
invasion by one of the family of de Barry, who was afterwards driven 
out Downing, who wrote a short description of the county of Mayo 
about the year 1680, for Sir Wm. Betty's intended atlas, thus speaks of 
this town : " Next to Belcarra, four miles distant, stands Castle Barry, a 
corporation. It is called in the King's writ the most western corpora- 
tion, and has a very fair large bawn and two round towers, or castles 
therein, and a good large house in the possession of Sir William Bingham 
and his heir. This castle did formerly belong to the Burkes ; first of all, 
after the invasion, it is said to have belonged to the Barrys, of whom it 
took its name." Again, the same writer, in speaking of the priory of 
Ballyhaunis, says : " It stands on a fair hill, over a small river. It is said 



38 BARRYMORE. 

to have been a manor house belonging to the Lord Barry, about the 
beginning of the English invasion," pp. 160- 161, 

John FitzDavid Oge de Barri, Lord of Olethan early in the four- 
teenth century, should have been the John " Kittagh " Lord Barry 
who, according to Miss Hickson's pedigree of the Earls of Desmond, 
married Joan, daughter of Thomas FitzMaurice, Lord Justice of 
Ireland, in 1297, and sister of Maurice FitzThomas, created Earl 
of Desmond in 1329. By Archdall he is confounded at once with 
Sir John de Barry, of Ely O'Carroll, slain in 1325, and with John 
Kittagh de Barry, the Lord of Olethan who died in 1419. Nor 
was he the John fitzDavid de Barry, knt, pardoned in 13 17, nor the 
John de Barry, knt, who, going on a pilgrimage to Santiago, on the 13th 
October, 1332, had letters to appomt attorneys in England for one year ; 
for, from other entries, he appears not to have been a knight in 13 17, or 
at all, and to have died before the 30th of July, 133 1. According to 
Archdall, his son and heir was William, who, in 133 1, was taken prisoner 
in Cork by the Lord Deputy, Sir Anthony Lucy; and, again, he was 
father of David de Barry, who, by Beatrix, his wife, left issue David fitz- 
David, Lord of Olethan in 1332. But about the time of William's arrest 
a David fitzDavid fitzDavid was Lord of Olethan. Most probably that 
William was William fitzjohn, Lord Barry Oge, and certainly David 
fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry, immediate successor of John fitzDavid 
Oge, Lord of Olethan, was that lord's nepehw, and was the elder son of 
David, second son of David Oge, Lord of Olethan, and was the elder 
brother of William Moyle Barry, of Ibawne. 

David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry, nephew and successor of John 
fitzDavid Oge, Lord of Olethan, both in the Welsh and Irish estates, 
except Ibawne, was the David de Barry of the following summary : 

133 1. 5th Edward III., July 30, Lincoln. Commissioner of Oyer 
and Terminer to Gilbert Talbot, Justice of South Wales, John Giffard, 
William de Rupe, John de Stonford, and William Casse, on complaint 
by David de Barry that certain persons besieged his castle at Maynerbir, 
county Pembroke, broke the doors and the walls, carried away his goods 
there and at Pennaly, assaulted his servants, and murdered his servant, 
Edmond Barry. — " Cal. S.P., Eng." 

133 1, Dec. 8, Clarendon. Commission to Gilbert Talbot, Thomas de 
Chadsworth, and Richard Simon, on information that certain persons 
have carried away from the castles of Manerbire, Penaly, and Carru the 
goods of Richard Barry, Thomas de Carru, and William de Carru, and 
have forcibly possessed themselves of the lands of these same men, which 
were lately seized into the King's hand by the stewards of the county 
of Pembroke, on account of their outlawry, for non-appearance before 



BARRYMORE. 39 

John Gifford, William de la Roche, John de Stonford, and William Casse, 
Justices of Oyer and Terminer, to answer touching the death of Edmond 
Barry and the robbery of the goods of David de Barry, at Manerbire, 
county Pembroke, to discover the guilty persons, to cause them to be 
arrested, with the aid of the posse comitatus, if need be, and imprisoned 
until further orders, to recover the goods and lands for the King, and to 
return inquisitions of their proceedings herein. — " Cal. S.P., Eng." 

133 1. Release to Master William de Carru and Thomas de Carru, 
of county Pembroke, from a matter of felony. — Claus. 5, Edw. III., Eng. 

It may be that the Richard de Barry implicated with William and 
Thomas de Carrew, of Carrew Castle, in the sack of David de Barry's 
Welsh castles of Maynerbir and Pennally was David's uncle, married to 
Beatrice de Carrew, and already mentioned under the years 1302, 1320- 
27-29. 

1332. David fitzDavid de Barry required by Royal writ to assist 
Roger Outlaw, Lord Justice, in a treaty of peace with the King's Irish 
enemies and English rebels. — Archdall. 

1334, August I. David fitzDavid de Barry, Lord of Olethan, in 
Desmond (i.e., South Munster), is made prisoner by Donat Carbreht 
MacKarthey, a hundred of his men being slain on that day. — Clyn. 

1334, August 23. ii"200 for paying wages delivered to John de la 
Bataille, appointed to pay wages to the men-at-arms, hobelars, and foot- 
men, going to Munster, in the company of the Justiciary of Ireland (in 
addition to the number of twenty men-at-arms which the same Justiciary 
is bound to keep on his fee), to conquer Donenald (Domnald) O'Carbrach 
MacCarthy and MacDermot, felons, in the county of Cork, Brien O'Brien 
and MacConmara, felons, in parts of Thomond, and the O'Tothelys and 
O'Brynnes, in Leinster, who were in hostile insurrection. — Claus. 8, Edw 
III., Ireland 

1334, November 18. The King to the Treasurer, etc. Whereas, in 
the King's Court, before Thomas de Burgh, clerk, lieutenant of J. Darcy, 
Justiciary of Ireland, John Bishop, of Cork, was fined 100 marks for the 
escape of John fitzjohn Martel, convicted of felonies, and given, as a 
cleric, into the custody of the bishop, but whereas John Darcy had heard 
from credible witnesses that the said John fitzjohn was never delivered 
to the said bishop, but after conviction remained in Cork prison, at the 
suit of John de Cogan and in attempting to break prison was slain by the 
jaoler. The King, taking that into consideration, forgave the said 100 
marks to the said bishop for his services about the liberation of David 
fitzDavid de Barry, sheriff of Cork, and about the conforming of Don- 
enald (Domnald) O'Carbreagh MacCarthi and other Irishmen of the 
county of Cork to peace. — Claus. 8, Edw. III., Ireland. 



40 BARRYMORE. 

1356, April 2. The King orders the mayor and bailiffs of Cork to 
deliver to Donald Carbrach MacCarthy his brother, Dermot MacCarthy, 
a hostage for peace delivered to the King, to be a prisoner at the pleasure 
of the King until he should order otherwise. — " Dub. Cal." 

1335. Among those summoned to attend John Darcy, Justiciary of 
Ireland, with arms and horses, in his expedition to Scotland, were David 
fitzDavid de Barry, knt. ; Wilham de Barry de Raweram, Esq. ; and 
William fitzDavid de Barry, Esq. — Note, " Grace's Annals." Most prob- 
ably this William fitzDavid was William Moyle, Lord of Ibawne, and 
William of Raweram was WilUam fitzjohn. Lord Barry Oge of Rincurran, 
or William Barry, of Rathcormac. 

1336. David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barry got from Thomas fitz- 
Maurice de Carew a release and quit claim from all services to which the 
said David was subject for his lands and tenements in the county of Cork, 
viz., ten knights' service reserved in Robert fitzStephen's grant of three 
cantreds to his nephew, Philip de Barry. — Claus. 32, Edw. III., Ireland. 

1337. March 14, Westminster. David de Barry, staying in England, 
has letters to nominate Richard fitzDavid de Barry and Owen Cardigan 
his attorneys in Ireland for one year. — " Cal. S. P., Eng." 

1337, Aug. 3. David de Barry, of Castlelethan, in Ireland, going to 
Ireland, has letters nominating his attorneys in England for two years. — 
" Cal. S. P., Eng." 

1337, August 28. Grant to David de Barry in enlargement of the 
late grant to him by letters patent of the custody, during minority, of the 
heir and the lands in Ireland, of Peter de Cogan, tenant in chief . . . 
in consideration of his labours and his charges in defending the lands 
against attacks by the Irish, and in maintaining the King's rights in these 
parts.—" Cal. S. P., Eng." 

1339. David and Robert de Barry were summoned to the parliament 
then held in Dublin^ 

1339, February 5, Berkhampstead. Admission of John de Holburne, 
clerc, and Andrew le Blount, of Ireland, as guardians of William fitz- 
David fitzRobert de Barry, a minor, who is going to Ireland, in all courts 
m England, for one year. 

1339. "Year Book," 13th and 14th Edward III, page 24. An infant 
under age, brought an assise of Novel Disseisin in Ireland. It was pleaded 
in bar (on a fine executed) that the estate of the plaintiff was mesne be- 
tween the levying and the execution of the fine. The justices, without 
having regard to the plea, took the assise at large, and it passed for 
the plaintiff. Afterwards the judgment was reversed in the King's Bench 
by reason of this error, that they did not enquire concerning the plea. — 
From "Harleian," 741. It appears in the flacita coram rege, Michaelmas, 



BARRYMORE. 4 1 

13 Edw. III., Ro. 156, that the assise was brought by William, son of 
David, son of Robert de Barry, against David, son of David de Barry, 
of Castel-lethan ; Richard, son of David de Barry, and John Elagh 
O'Brassie. 

1339, November 10. David fitzDavid de Barry, staying in Ireland, 
has letters nominating Thomas de Wardon and John Baret as his attor- 
neys in England for two years. — " Cal. S. P., Eng." 

1343-4, March 8, Trym. Peter de Okebourn having shewn that of 
late, at Cork, in the King's Court, before John Moriz, deputy of John 
Darcy, Justiciary of Ireland, he had recovered against David fitzDavid 
de Barry [of Cas]tellethan, seizen (i.e., possession) of two messuages (i.e., 
residential holdings) and 80 acres of land in Kenlegstown by recognisance 
ot assise or dissise (a trial by jury for putting in or out of possession (?) 
and that the said David had again dispossessed him. The King ordered 
the sheriff of Cork to take bailiffs . . . the coroner and twelve jurors, 
and go to the said messuages and land, and thereon hold an inquisition, 
and if he found that the said Peter had been dispossesed unjustly by the 
said David, then to arrest David, etc., and recompense Peter, etc. — 17 and 
18 Edw. III., Ireland. 

1344. David de Barry received a summons from the King to attend 
him at Portsmouth, on the octave of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary, with 
20'men at arms and 50 hobbelars, to assist in the intended war against 
Philip of France. — Archdall, and note to " Grace's Annals." The Irish noble- 
men ordered to bring a like number of men were the Earl of Desmond, the 
Earl of Kildare, Fules de la Freigne, Edmund de Burgh, Walter de Ber- 
mingham, and Richard Tuyt. Only 10 men at arms and thirty hobelars 
each were required from Gerald de Rochford, Eustace Power, Milo de 
Courcy, the Lord of Athenry, and the captain of the Rocheyns. (In 
Edward's army at Crecy there were 6,000 Irish footmen). — Note to 
" Grace's Annals." 

1344, Nov. 21. The King committed to David fitzDavid de Barry, 
of Castellethan, the county of Cork, with appurtenances, just as other 
sheriffs, etc., and bade William fitzDavid de Roche, of Ballymolgole, lately 
sheriff of the said county, to deliver the said county to the said David. — 
17 and 18 Edw. III., Ireland. 

1344, Nov. 21. The King constituted David fitzDavid de Barry 
Seneschal and Keeper of the manor of Inchecoigne and town of Youghal, 
with power to hold courts. — 17 and 18 Edw. III., Ireland 

1345, June 7. A parliament began at Dubhnge, to which Morish 
FitzThomas, Earl of Desmond, came not; wherefore Randal Ufford, 
Lord Justice of Ireland, after the feast of St John the Baptist, without the 
assent of the nobilit}s went, with the King's banner displayed, to Moun- 



42 BARRYMORE. 

ster against the said Morish, Earl of Desmond, and did enter in the said 
Earl's lands, and seized them unto the King's use. . . . Also as 
many surities as were surety upon tne Earl of Desmond to the number 
of 26, as well earls as barons, knights, and others of the land, whose names 
are William Bourck, Earl of Ulster ; James Butlere, Earl of Wormond ; 
Richard Tute, Nicholas Werdone Morysh de Rupeforte, Eustace Power, 
Gerald de Rupeforti, John FitzRobert, Robert Barry, Morish FitzGerald, 
John Wallesle, Walter Faunt, Richard Coccrell, Harry Traharne, Roger 
Power, John Lenfant, Mathew FitzHarry, Richard Walles, Edmond de 
Bourke, son to the Earl of Ulster, knight ; Dawe Barry, William Fitz- 
gerald, Fouke de Fraxins, Robert FitzMorish, Henry Beckerly, John 
FitzGeorge de Rupe, Thomas Deleese de Bourgo, notwithstanding their 
charges and labours which every of them did with the said Lord Justice 
in the wars, persecuting the said Earl of Desmond, he seized their lands 
into the Prince's hands, and their bodies at the King's pleasure, four of 
the aforesaid persons excepted, whose names were the Earl of Ulster and 
the Earl of Wormond. — " The Book of Howth." 

1345. "Also by MacDermada were slain Sir Robert de Barry and 
Philip de Prendergast, taking the part of the King and the Justiciary 
against their relative, for they had married, Sir Robert, the Earl's sister, 
and Sir Philip, his sister's daughter." — Clyn. 

In Miss Hickson's pedigree of the Earls of Desmond, Maurice Fitz- 
Thomas, the Earl of Desmond in 1345, has only one sister, "Joan, who 
married John ' Kittagh ' Lord Barry " ; but here Friar Clyn, who wrote, at 
latest, in 1349, gives that Earl a sister married to a Sir Robert Barry, 
whose place in the Barry pedigree is unknown to the present writer. 

David fitzDavid, eighth Lord of Olethan, is called in the Gaelic pedi- 
gree, composed cir. 1553, Daibhidh an bhuille, "David of the blow," and 
more fully, in a later copy, Daibhi[dh] an bhuille mhoir, "David of the 
great blow." "He died," says Archdall, "the 12th of May, 1347, leaving 
by Matilda, or Mary, his wife. Sir David, his heir, in his minority." There, 
" Matilda, or Mary," is a misreading of Margaret. 

1355. The King took into protection Margaret, who was wife of 
David de Barry, her men, etc. — Pat. 29 Edw. HI., Ireland. 

David FitzDavid de Barry, ninth Lord of Olethan, was a minor in the 
years 1348-135 1. — "Plea Rolls," 22 Edw. III., case of James R. Barry, 1825. 

In 1358 he was said to have been lately under age : 

1358, July 10. 100 acres of land and 4 acres of medow in Rathclare, 
which belonged to Elias FitzMathew, deceased (who held by military 
service of Edmond de Harford, and he of David de Barry, lately under 
age, and in the King's custody), in the King's hands by reason of the 
minority of Roesia, daughter and heiress of the said Elias. — Pat, 32 Edw. 
Ill, Ireland. 



BARRYMORE. 43 

1358. David fitzDavid de Barry's manors of Olethan and Muscri- 
donegan were taken into the King's hands for alienations without royal 
licence by Sir John de Barry in 1 284-1 285, and similarly for alienations 
by Sir John de Barry, 96 acres in Carriktothill owned by Sir William de 
Barry, of Rathgoban ; 1 80 acres in Coulristylan owned by Sir John Fitz- 
David de Barry ; the lands in Kylmoryn owned by John, son of Nicholas 
de Barry, of Ely, and David Walshe's two ploughlands in Kylmoryn, 
parcells of Olethan ; but afterwards it was found by inquisition that when 
these alienations were made the said lands were held of Maurice de 
Carrew, and not of the King in capite, and that the David fitzDavid fitz- 
David de Barry who last (ultimo) died acquired a release and quit claim 
from Thomas de Carrew, son and heir of the said Maurice, from all ser- 
vices due to the said Thomas by the said David for his lands in the county 
of Cork, and so the same David became the King's tenant in capite in 
the lOth year of the reign of the present King (i.e., 1336), wherefore the 
King ordered hands off. — Claus. 32, Edw. III., Ireland. 

1364. The "Pipa Colmani," a roll of inquisitions and other docu- 
ments regarding the temporalities of the see of Cloyne, and began in 
1364, according to Ware, has the following paragraph in an inquisition 
of about that date : 

" David fitzDavid de Barry, Lord of Olethan, and William Caunton 
hold of the Lord [Bishop of Cloyne] all AfTadd (i.e., Aghada) by service 
of one knight's fee and 2 shillings and 4 lb. of wax annually." An undated 
memorandum adds that, " David Barry, the Sir David that now is, know- 
ingly detains unjustly a half ploughland of the episcopal lands of Cove, 
because a certain David le Honhan gave Sir John Barry, of whom this 
David Barry is heir, 40 shillings to agree to a patent inquiry as to whom 
by right belonged the said half ploughland, and the patentator came and 
said that the said land belonged to the church of Cloyne." 

1374. Cormac, Lord of Muskerry, was slain by the Barrys in Cork, 
and interred in Gill-abbey in that city, on the 14th of May. — Cronnally's 
" History of the Eoghanachts." Smith's " History of Cork," says : " was 
murdered in Cork by the Barrys, and buried in Gillabbey." 

The ninth Lord of Olethan was summoned to Parliament in 1374, 
1375. 1377. 1380, and 1381, as David de Barry, knt, and Lord Barry Oge 
similarly as Philip fitzWiUiam de Barry ; but their contemporary, the Lord 
of Ibawne, Sir William fitz William de Barry, knt., had no summons to 
these parliaments. — " Dublin Parliamentary Roll," 48 Edw. III., Carew 
MS.; Pat, 49 Edw. III. ; CI. i Rich. II. ; CI. 4 Rich II. ; 5 Rich. II. 

The ninth lord, like his father, was imprisoned by his enemies, and set 
free through the intervention of the Crown. 

1377. July, 28, Lymbrick. The King to John Northampton, gaoler 



44 BARRYMORE. 

of Cork, and to the mayor and bailiffs of the City of Cork. Whereas, the 
Justiciary of Ireland and the King's counsel had agreed that John Boy 
fitzRedmond fitzPeter Caunton and Edmund fitzGerald Caunton, de- 
tained in Cork Gaol for David fitzDavid de Barry, knight, and Mile 
Staunton, magnates of said county, detained in the prison of the said 
Redmond and his men, should remain in the custody and prison of the 
Justiciary himself until the said magnates should be set free. The King 
commands to have their bodies at the Youghal on the Wednesday next 
after the feast of St. Bartholomew for delivery there to the said Justiciary 
for the said causes. — CI. 5 1 Edw. III., Ireland. 

1377, March 15. The King to the sheriff of Cork, Nicholas fitz- 
Peter Clavyle having sworn that lately before James le Bottiller, Earl of 
Ormond, Lord Justice to King Edward III., he had recovered by the said 
King's writ at Cork his seizin (possession) against David fitzDavid de 
Barry, knt, and Margaret, daughter of Robert de Barry, of one weir 
and 20 acres of land in the Redeylond, and that the said David and 
others had unjustly dispossessed, the King orders the said sheriff to make 
an inquisition, etc. — CI. i Rich. II., Ireland, and " Egerton MSS.," 75 B. M. 

No doubt, Nicholas fitzPeter Clavyle was a descendant of the Sir 
Robert de Clavilla to whom David fitzWilliam de Barry, Lord of Olethan, 
gave, with other lands, " two islands and 20 acres of land in Kill mac clyne, 
near Fodry," and no doubt Nicholas's 20 acres in the reedy land and Sir 
Robert's 20 acres in Kill mac clyn were the same. 

1387, May 16. "To this lord," says Archdall, "and to his son, John, 
with others of his name and family, Robert de Vere, Marqguess of Dublin, 
Lord Lieutenant, directed his writs from Kilkenny, requiring them to 
preserve the peace in the county of Cork, and to punish offenders." 

In the Gaelic pedigree composed circ. 1553, David fitzDavid de Barry, 
ninth Lord of Olethan, is called Daibhidh Losganach, that is, David the 
Froggy. He died the 6th of September, 1392, and there is a writ re- 
garding the death of David de Barry, knt., who held of the King in capite. 
— CI. 16 Rich. II., 24, Ireland. 

1 392. He was succeeded by his son, John fitzDavid de Barry, tenth 
Lord of Olethan, who had livery of his estate, 26 Feb., 1393, by the 
name of John fitzDavid Barry, and was twenty-five years old and upwards 
at his father's death, and was then married to Ellice, the daughter of 
Gerald, Earl of Desmond. — Pat., 1 7 Rich. II. He is called John Kiotach, 
that is, "the left-handed," in the Gaelic pedigree, composed circ. 1553, 
and also in the pedigree given to Sir George Carew, in A.D. 1602, by 
David Viscount Buttevant 

1 40 1, May 8. The King committed to John fitzDawe (i.e., David) de 
Barry, knt, the office of sheriff of the county Cork. — Pat, 3 Hen. IV., Irld. 



BARRYMORE. 45 

1 40 1, 3 Dec. Justices appointed to take assise or dissise at the suit 
of John fitzDavid de Barry, knt., versus Henry MacGibbon, knt, and 
Philip de Barry, of Cathirdewagan, concerning lands in Moylawryth, 
Kewyrn, Okestown, Clonkyn, Ballycarber, and Lackyn. — Pat., 3 Hen. IV. 

1402, February 24. The King appointed John de Barry, knt, justice 
and supervisor of the peace in the county of Cork, the city of Cork and 
the town of Youghal alone excepted. — Pat, 4 Hen. IV., Ireland. 

1402, May 9. In the porch of the Friars Minor at Buttevant Sir 
Philip (recte John ut ter infra) de Barry, knt., Lord of Olethan and Mus- 
crydonygan, so agreed with Lord Gerald, by the grace of God, Bishop of 
Cloyne, that in future neither by himself, nor by another in his name, shall 
he place bonys, cowys, guydagia, or pedagia on his castle and lordship of 
Kylmaclenyn, and the tenants, permanent or not permant there; and 
regarding the burgesses of the said town of Kilmaclenyn he promises as 
above, that by no means shall he impose illicit burdens on them, unless 
through a just title of the Lord the King, or of himself Sir John, and of 
his predecessors previously shewn to the said Bishop of Cloyne, and with 
his hands placed between the Lord Bishop's hands he has promised fide 
media to observe all and singular these things in perpetuity. And should 
he, Sir John, qjtod absit, happen not to fulfil these promises in part or in 
whole, he has submitted himself without defence, citation, or process of 
law, that it may be lawful for the said Bishop to fulminate sentences of 
suspension and excommunication against the person of the said John, and 
to subject his house in the diocese of Cloyne to ecclesiastical interdicts. — 
"Pipa Colman." 

1404, January 20, Dublin. The King appointed John de Barry, knt. ; 
John Barry, the King's Attorney in Ireland, and Thomas Admot, during 
pleasure, justices in the county of Cork, to enquire, hear, and determine 
concerning all transgressions, etc., of the time, as well of King Richard 11. 
as of the present King.- — Pat, 6 Hen. IV., Ireland. 

1408, January 28, Kilkenny. The King forgives John Barry, knt., all 
manner of debts because he has been some years in the office of sheriff 
of the county of Cork, and by reason of the said office has borne the 
burdens of the wars in that county at his own cost — Pat., 10 Hen. IV. 

1408, Jime 14, Dublin. John Wynchedon and Walter Kerdyfe consti- 
tuted justices to take assise or dissise in the case of William fitzjohn 
Galway and Margaret, his wife, against John Barry, knt, sheriff of Cork, 
and others. — Pat, 10 Hen IV., 2d part Ireland. 

141 1. Donnell MacConnor O'Brien, Tanist of Thomond, was slain 
by Barrymore. — "Annals of the Four Masters " and "Annals of Lough Ce." 
In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries a Lord of Olethan was popularly 
called Barrymore, " the Great Barry," and similarly a Lord of Kinaletha 



46 BARRYMORE. 

was called " Barry oge," " Barry junior," and a Lord of Ibawne was called 
Barryroe, " the red Barry." 

1414, Nov. 8, Dublin. The King commissioned John de Barry, knight, 
to seize, wherever it could be found, a ship, laden with wines of Rochelle 
and other goods, and said to be at Cork ; to guard it, with the wines, 
goods, and total outfit ; to bring it to the city of Dublin, and to detain the 
mariners, etc. — Pat., 2 Henry V., Ireland. 

141 4 (i.e., 141 5), February 6, Dublin. The King, as petitioned, forgave 
John de Barry, knt., lately sheriff and keeper of the peace of the county of 
Cork, the amercements imposed on him for not coming to the King's 
courts to answer, etc., because through war with the Irish he could not 
come, and that his men and horses were slain. — Pat., 2 Henry V., Ireland. 

1419. Barrymore died. — "Four Masters." 

1420. Barrymore, i.e., John, died. — "Four Masters." 

From the double entry in the "Annals of the Four Masters," John 
Kittagh de Barry, Lord of Olethan, alias Barrymore, appears to have 
died in the first quarter of 1420, Roman and Irish computation, which 
was the last quarter of 1419, old English computation, according to which 
New Year's Day was not the first of January, but the 25th of March, the 
day of the Incarnation. 

According to Archdall, that Lord of Olethan died in or shortly after 
1403 : "In which year or soon after, it is presumed, he died, and was 
succeeded by his son, James, Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevant, who so 
styles himself in the grant he made of Island Cullyne to John Stapleton 
on Monday next after the Epiphany, 7 Henry IV., viz., 4 January, 1405, 
to hold at the rent of two shillings Irish." On the contrary, from the 
above entries under the years 1408, 1414, and 1420, it is manifest that 
Sir John Kittagh de Barry lived until 1420. And from the pedigree 
given in 1600- 1603 by Lord Buttevant to Carrew, it is certain that 
Sir John Kittagh de Barry was succeeded, not by James, who was 
his fourth son, but by William, the eldest son. There was no James Vis- 
count Buttevant before 1554. Besides, from entries before and after, it 
is manifest that the title Viscount Buttevant did not yet exist in 
1405. What, then, about the grant dated Monday before the Epiph- 
any, 7 Henry IV? It is a garbled copy, or a total forgery, that was not 
enrolled until 1624, over two hundred years after its supposed date. The 
case of James Redmond Barry before the House of Lords, in 1825, says : 
"The earliest document which mentions the title of Viscount Buttevant 
bears date 1406, and is enrolled on the Patent Roll, in the Rolls Office of 
Chancery, Ireland, of the Xllth year of King James the ist, and recited 
that John Barry, Esq., required a certain deed to be enrolled in chancery, 
dated the Monday next before the Epiphany, in the Vllth year of King 



BARRYMORE. 47 

Henry TV. (1406), whereby James Viscount Buttevant granted to John 
Stapleton, gent., the lands of Island CuUyne at the rent of two shillings 
Irish per annum." It may be remarked that the said John Barry, Esq., 
was a younger son of David, Viscount Buttevant, second son of James 
FitzRichard, Viscount Buttevant, whose ancestor, circ. 1406, was a James 
Barry, who was not a Viscount Buttevant but a Lord of Ibawne, where 
probably is Island Cullyne. 

John (Kittagh) de Barry, Lord of Olethan (ob 1420), as may be seen 
by documents in the Record Office, Dublin, was a son of David (ob 1392), 
son of David (ob 1347), son of David, son of David (oge), son of David 
(mor) ; and he was grand-nephew of William Moyle Barry, ancestor of the 
Lords Barryroe ; but by an inexcusable error in the pedigree by Viscount 
Buttevant, John Kittagh is there one of four sons of William Moyle Barry, 
the others being " Laurence, the first Barryroe ; Riochog, of whom the 
familyof Riochog,in Barrimore,descended; and James,of whom Macjames, 
in Oriri, descends. There was an entaile between John and Laurence." 
As, instead of being a brother, Laurence was only a first and second 
cousin of John Kittagh, similarly " Riochog " and James may have been 
cousins, not brothers, of John Kittagh. The " entaile," if there really were 
such, would create a presumption that Laurence Barryroe was nearest 
heir male to John Kittach Barrymore. Viscount Buttevant, author of 
the pedigrees of A.D. 1602, was descended from Laurence. These pedi- 
grees, herein inserted at pages 84, 85, are copious, if not exhaustive, 
regarding the descendants of John Kittagh, and set right many points 
given wrong by Archdall, and are the authority for what here follows 
where other authority is not given. 

By his wife, Elice, daughter of Gerald, Earl of Desmond, John Kit- 
tach de Barry, Lord of Olethan, alias the Barrymore, had four sons : i 
William, his successor ; 2 Richard, whose representative in the male line 
in 161 7 was William Barry, the blind harper ; 3 David, father of Garrald, 
father of John, father of Gerald, father of James Barrie ; 4 James, ancestor 
of the Barries of Ballinaltig and Castlelyons in the reign of Elizabeth. 

John Kittagh de Barry was succeeded by his eldest son, William fitz- 
John de Barry, eleventh Lord of Olethan. 

1434, Feb. 12. William de Barry, Lord de Barry, and William Walsh 
of Cork, have a commission to enquire regarding treasons in the county 
of Cork. — Pat, 13 Henry VI., Ireland. 

1 44 1, March 16, Dubhn. The King to the Treasurer . . and £'i„ 
at Michaelmas, of the 12th year (1433), from William Barry, sheriff of 
Cork, out of debts of divers persons, which tallys of the said sheriff he 
would not accept. — Claus. 20, Henry VI., Ireland. 

1442, January 9. Testimonial by Jordan, Bishop of Cork and Clone, 



48 BARRYMORE. 

the Deans and Chapter of the same, the Mayor, Bailiffs, etc., of Cork, 
William Lord Barry, Esq., sheriff of Co. Cork ; Morys Lord Roche, and the 
Sovereign and Commons of Yoghyll, to James, Earl of Ormond, late 
Deputy to Lyon Lord Welles (formerly Lieutenant in Ireland), and now 
Lieutenant to the King in this land ; stating that he had acquited himself 
justly and truly in his said ofRce, "and hath laboured with great hosts 
to the said city and county and the parts thereabout, whereas he hath 
chastised and warred the King's enemies and rebels, and put them in 
dread, and comforted greatly" the liege people without any extortion or 
oppression done to any true liegeman. Written at Cork, 9 January, 21 
Hen. VI., " Cal. Carew MSS." 

William Barry, of Oleghan (1458), granted to Thomas Fitz James, 
Earl of Desmond, and Ellis Barry, his wife, all his possessions in 
Mocolpe, Ballintarsney, etc. — 37 Hen. VI., "Cal. Carew MSS." 

1 46 1, Nov. 8, Wesbninster. The King granted to William Lord de 
Barry 20 marks annually for life out of the customs of the city of Cork 
by the hands of the mayor and bailiffs, or out of the customs of the towns 
of Kynsale, Youghal, and Dungarvin by the hands of the custom officers. 
—Pat. Ed. IV., Ireland. 

1463, June 22, Westminster. Writ of aid directed to the King's 
Lieutenant in Ireland, and his Deputy, William de la Barre, David Roche, 
Edmond Barret, the Mayor of Cork, the Mayor of Yoghell, the sub 
prior of Kinsale, and all other subjects of the King in Ireland, for the 
Archbishop of Cashel, and the Bishops of Exeter and Limerick, whom 
Pope Pius II. has appointed to enquire into the complaint of Jordan, 
Bishop of Cork, that William Roche, Archdeacon of Cloyne, schemed to 
disturb him in his possession of the bishopric, and by asserting that he 
was old and infirm, procured the appointment of himself as his coadjutor, 
and seized the fruits belonging to the bishopric, and that afterwards one 
Gerald de Geraldinis, a clerk in the diocese of Cloyne, formerly a servant 
of the bishop, caused certain instruments to be forged by which the 
bishop appointed him and John O'Hedian, Archdeacon of Cashel, as 
his proctors for the cession of his rule, and by means of John, Elect of 
Armagh, obtained a provision for himself. — "Foedera," p. 273. 

In the extract of 1463 William de la Barre is for William Lord de 
Barry. He was the first feudal Lord of Olethan who was styled Lord de 
Barry in Royal writs. By his marriage with Ellen, daughter of Lord 
Roche, he had two sons and a daughter — i John, his successor ; 2 William, 
who took his brother, John, prisoner, in whose rescue himself and his 
father were slain ; i Ellis, wife of Thomas Fitz James, Earl of Desmond. 
Some hold, but unreasonably, that she was sister, not daughter, of William 
(fitz John Kittagh) Lord de Barry. Thus, in her "Pedigree of the Earls 



BARRYMORE. 49 

of Desmond," Miss Hickson says : " Thomas, eighth Earl of Desmond, 
married Ellice, or Elizabeth, Barry, daughter of John Lord Barry, of But- 
tevant" Also a genealogical chart in the " Earls of Kildare Addenda " says : 
Thomas, eighth Earl of Desmond, married Elizabeth, daughter of John 
Viscount Buttevant. Russell vaguely but safely calls her "daughter to 
Barrymore." In 1458, the year of her marriage with Thomas, Earl of 
Desmond, then aged thirty-two years, she would be from about thirty- 
eight to sixty-eight years old as daughter of John Kittagh Lord de Barry, 
and would be twenty years younger, and by so much the more marriage- 
able, as daughter of William fitzjohn Kittagh Lord de Barry. The 
eleventh Lord of Olethan was succeeded by his elder son. 

Sir John fitz William de Barry, twelfth feudal Lord of Olethan, alias Barry- 
more, who by his first wife had one son, Thomas, thirteenth lord ; and by 
his second wife, Jilly, daughter to MacCarthy Reagh, had seven sons : i 
William, fourteenth lord ; 2 John, fifteenth lord ; 3 Robert, ob. s. p. ; 4 
Richard, ob. s. p. ; 5 J ames, ob. s. p. ; 6 David, Archdeacon of Cork and 
Cloyne, who was slain for having slain his brother William, ob. s. p. ; 7 Ed- 
mond, whose issue was illegitimate. In the pedigree composed in Gaelic, 
circ. A.D. 1 553, this Sir John fitz William, Lord of Olethan, is called John the 
Lame (Seajt bacacK). In the "Annals of Lough Ce" his death is entered 
twice: 1485 — Barry died (^;z Barrack dhec). i486 — Barrymore was slain 
(An Barrach Mor do marbhadh). Dhec of the first entry implies a 
natural death ; but neither Sir John bacach nor his father died that death. 
The "Annals of the Four Masters" have not the entry of 1485, and say 
at i486, "Barrymore, John (An Barrach Mor, Sean), the choicest of the 
English youths of Ireland, was slain on Christmas Day by Donogh Oge 
MacCarthy, Lord of Ealla, after he had gone on a predatory excursion 
against him." In a note Dr. O'Donovan adds : " It is stated in the Dublin 
copy of the "Annals of Ulster " that John Barry had rashly set out on this 
preying excursion on Christmas Day." 

Sir John Bacach Lord de Barry was succeeded by his son by his first 
marriage, Thomas de Barry, thirteenth Lord of Olethan, alias Lord Barre 
de Buttevant, alias Barrymore. "He," says Archdall, "on the 22nd of 
June, 1488, did homage to Sir Richard Edgecombe, the King's Com- 
missioner, on board the ship called the " Richard," in the port of Kinsale, 
and took the oath of allegiance then imposed by the King [Henry VII.] 
on account of the late imposture of Lambert Simnel in Ireland." The 
"Book of Howth" says that after the battle of Stoke, on the i6th of 
June, 1489, "This was the order of placing the lords of Ireland in the 
procession at the court in Greenwich where the King himself was : — The 
Earl of Kyldare, the Earl of Wormonde, Lord Barre de Buttevant, Lord 
Roche d© Fermoy, Lord Bermingham de Athanrie, Lord Coursaye de 



50 BARRYMORE, 

Kensale, Lord Preston de Gormanstown, Lord Nugent de Delwent, Lord 
Fleming de Slane, Lord Plunket de Kellen, Lord Saynt Larans de 
Howthe, Lord Barnvell de Tremletstown, Lord Plonket de Donsane" (p. 

190). 

Lord Gormanstown's place in that procession does not tally with his 
elevation to a viscounty by writ dated at Nottingham, 7 August, 1478, 
1 8th Edward IV., Roll 45, Tower of London, or else in his day a viscounty 
did not take precedence of baronies of older creation. 

Thomas, Lord of Olethan. alias Lord Barrymore, was succeeded by 
his half brother, not son, as Archdall assumed, William fitzjohn Bacach 
de Barry, fourteenth Lord of Olethan, alias Barrymore. In 1490, as 
William Barry, Lord Barry, he had protection to go to England with forty 
armed men. — " Cal. St. Pap., England." And in that year he was sum- 
moned to Parliament as premier viscount of Ireland, if we may trust a list 
of that Parliament in a maunscript book in the ofhce of the Ulster King 
of Arms, which list is certified by Thomas Preston, who was Ulster King 
at Arms from 1633 to 1643 : " Cases of precedence in Ulster's Ofhce," see 
case of James Redmond Barry claiming to be Viscount Buttevant before 
the House of Lords in 1825. 

On the 2nd of April, 1490, Pope Innocent VIII. in one bull declared 
Odo O'Driscoll, and not Blessed Thaddeus MacCarthy, to be legitimate 
Bishop of Ross, and by another bull appointed Blessed Thaddeus to the 
bishopric of Cork and Cloyne, in place of William Roche, resigned. In 
another bull, dated 16 July, 1492, Pope Innocent relates that he has heard 
with much displeasure that certain sons of iniquity, namely, Maurice, Earl 
of Desmond ; William Barry, Edmond Maurice de Geraldine, the com- 
munity of the city of Cork, besides the university of the city of Youghal, 
in the Cloyne diocese, and their chiefs, William and Edmund, and the 
subjects of the aroresaid city and university, besides Philip O'Ronayne, 
cleric of the diocese of Cork, hindered Thaddeus in the possession of his 
diocese. His holiness calls upon archbishops, bishop chapters, and laity 
to carry out the ceremonies of excommunication against the foregoing ; 
and calls upon all archbishops, bishops' prelates, and the noble Gerald 
Earl of Kildare, Florence MacKarryg (MacCarthy), prince of Carberry ; 
Tadeus, prince of Desmond ; Cormac, son of Tadeus ; young Donald 
MacKarryg, Maurice Roche, and their brothers, sons, and subjects to 
assist Thaddeus in the possession of his see, etc. Fortified with this bull. 
Blessed Thaddeus left Rome, for Ireland, but on the way died on the 23 
of October, 1492, at Ivrea. He had had the support of the Earl of Kil- 
dare's faction, including all the MacCarthys, and had been opposed by 
the Earl of Desmond's faction, including William Lord Barrymore and 
the citizens of Cork and Youghal. See article on Blessed Thaddeus 



BARRYMORE. 5 1 

MacCarthy, by Rev. P. Hurley, P.P., in the " Cork Historical and Archae- 
ological Society's Journal" for December, 1896. 

"In 1497," says Darcy McGee, "Perkin Warbeck again tried his for- 
tune in the South of Ireland, was joined by Maurice, tenth Earl of Des- 
mond, the Lord Barry, and the citizens of Cork."" In " Carew MSS.," vol. 
632, f. 255b, there is a contemporary account of an eleven days' siege of 
Waterford from the 23rd of July, 1495, by "Perkin Warbeck and Morris 
Earl of Desmond, to the number of twenty-four thousand men of their 
setting forth, with the aid of the Earl of Lincoln." In the " Carew Calen- 
dar's" summary of that account Lord Barry is not mentioned. 

William Fitzjohn Bacach Lord Barry married Julia, daughter of Cor- 
mac MacTeige MacCarthy, Lord of Muskerry, and had issue a son, John, 
and, according to Archdall, a daughter, Juliana, wife of Edmond de 
Courcy, and grandmother of John Lord Kinsale. On the authority of 
the "Annals of Nenagh," Archdall says that this Lord Barry was " a man 
esteemed for his valour, virtue, conduct, and liberality, and in universo 
morum honestate praeclarus" In the " Armals " his death is entered thus : 
"Annals of Lough Ce," A.D. 1500. "The Barrymore, was killed by his 
own brother, i.e., David Barry." — Rolls edition. 

"Annals of the Four Masters," A.D. 1 500. " Barrymore was slain by 
his own kinsman, David Barry, Archdeacon of Cork and Cloyne. David 
was slain by Thomas Barry and Muntir O'Callaghan" (O'Callaghan's 
domestics). "The Earl of Desmond disinterred the body of David in 
twenty days, and afterwards burned it" Dr. O'Donovan adds in a note 
that in the Dublin copy of the "Annals of Ulster " the reading is, " made 
meal and ashes of it." 

The pedigree given in A,D. 1602 by David Viscount Buttevant to Sir 
George Carew says : " William Barry, Vice-count Buttevant, slayne by his 
brother David. David slayne by O'Callaghan, and burned afterwards 
for killing his brother William, s. p." 

William Fitzjohn Bacach Lord Barry was succeeded by his son, John 
FitzWilliam de Barry, Lord Barry, alias Barrymore, fifteenth Lord of 
Olethan. He was slain by Thomas FitzThomas, Earl of Desmond 
at Ballynecranagh, and was succeeded by his uncle, John Fitzjohn de 
Barry, Lord Barry, alias Barrymore, sixteenth Lord of Olethan. In Gaelic 
pedigrees he is called John Reagh, Sean Riabhach, John the striped, 
There is reference to him, or to his immediate predecessor, in a letter from 
Thomas, Earl of Surrey, Lord Deputy to Henry VIII, July 23, 1520. 
■ The Archbishop of Dublin, the Viscount of Gormanstown, the Lord of 
Trimlettiston, and the Chief Justice returned on the loth instant from 
Waterford, where, with much difficulty, they had taken a day of truce 
between the Earls of Desmond and Ormond, to endure until Candlemas 



52 BARRYMORE. 

next. They have taken the Earls' oaths truly to serve the King, and the 
oaths of Lord Barry, Lord Roche, Sir John FitzGerot, Sir John of Des- 
mond, Sir Thomas of Desmond, Cormoke Oge, Sir James Butler, Sir 
Edmond Butler, and Sir Piers Power, etc." — "Calendar Carew MSS.," 
vol. ii. "Carew MS.," vol. 608, f. 69e,has a note of this letter's mention- 
ing Preston, Viscount Gormanstown, and styling Barry and Roche ' Lords,' 
not 'Viscounts.'" — "Calendar Carew MSS.," vol. ii., p. 390. Apparently 
Sir George Carew thought it possible that in A.D. 1520 neither the Lord 
Barry nor the Lord Roche was a viscount. If a viscounty were conferred on 
William Fitzjohn Bacach de Barry in or before 1490 it would have been 
limited very likely to his issue male, which expired with his son, John. Very 
often the Lords de Barrie and the Lords Roche were vice-comites of the 
county of Cork, that is, high sheriffs of the county of Cork, and their being 
so, and being peers, may have caused them to be mistaken for viscounts 
of the peerage. 

John Reagh Lord Barry married Ellen Fitzgibbon, daughter of the 
White Knight of Clangibbon, and had three sons — John, Edmond, and 
James. Archdall confounds him with John fitzWilliam, his nephew and 
immediate predecessor, and assigns him two daughters, Elizabeth, wife of 
Thomas Earl of Desmond, and Catherine, first wife of Cormac Oge Laidir 
MacCarthy, and by him mother of Teige MacCarthy, who married Julia, 
daughter of Donald MacCarthy Reagh. 

John Reagh Lord Barrymore was succeeded by his eldest son, John 
Lord Barry, alias Lord Barrymore, seventeenth Lord of Olethan. He is 
called John BowUraghe in the pedigree given by Viscount Buttevant to 
Carew. He was born ini A.D. 1 5 1 7 or 1 5 1 8, not being more than 1 7 or 1 8 
years old when Stevyn Ap Parry wrote to Thomas Cromwell, as follows : 

"A.D. 1535, October 6. . . Moreover there came in to my Lord 
James [Butler] one called my Lord Barrowe, who can speak very good 
English, and is of not more than 1 7 or 18 years. He is a great inheritor, 
and if he had right, and laid very sore to Cormak Oge and to one 
Makerte Ryaghe, the which is son-in-law to Cormak Oge, and is my 
Lord of Kildare's sister's son." — " Cal. Carew MSS." In that calendar 
he is mentioned, at A.D. 1537, in the text as Lord Barry, and in a note as 
John Viscount Barry. The next three references are to him rather than 
t;o his next brother : 

A.D. 1539, December 20. John Travers to Mr. FitzWilliams. "We 
have made the most painful journey, I suppose, ye have known this time 
of the year. We have been in Mounster, as at Clonmell, at Dungarwan, 
at Youghall, Cork, and Kinsayle, and hath put James FitzMorishe, other- 
wise called with you Lord of Desmond, in possession of as many castles 
in his country as he thought he was able to keep, and hath also plucked 



BARRYMORE. 53 

the chief strength that the pretended Earl of Desmond had, called James 
Fitzjohn. These be the names of them that were near unto him : Gerald 
McShane, the White Knight, the Lord Barre, who came at no Deputy 
many years ; and Makarte Rewghe, the Red Barry, and the young Barry. 
We have their pledges, their bonds, and their oaths also taken." — " Cal. 
Carew. MSS." 

A.D. 1 542, September 26. The Great Barry and others : 
Indenture, 26 September, 34 Henry VIII., between Sir Anthony Sentleger, 
Deputy; James Earl of Desmond, William Brabazon, Treasurer at War and 
Under Treasurer of Ireland ; John Travers, Master of the Ordnance ; and Sir 
Osborn Echingham, Marshal of the Militia, of the one part, and the Lord Barre, 
alias the Great Barry ; Machartymore ; Lord de Rupe, alias the Lord Roche ; 
Maghartie Reaghe ; Tady MacCormog, Lord of Musgrie ; Barry Oge, alias the 
Young Barre ; 0'Sul}T/-an Beare, captain of his nation ; Donald O'Challogan, 
chief of his nation ; Barry Roo, alias the Lord Reade Barry ; MacDonogho of 
Allowe, captain of his nation ; and Sir Girald Fitzjohn, of the other. 

(i) The latter parties will acknowledge his Majesty to be their natural liege 
Lord and King, and to be the supreme head of the English and Irish Church ; 
will obey his Deputies, and annihilate the usurped primacy of the Bishop of 
Rome and his favourers. 

(2) They will stand to and perform the arbitraments, decrees, and judgments 
which are to be made by the Bishops of Waterford, Cork, and Ross, the Mayors 
of Cork and Youghal, the Sovereign of the town of Kinsale, Philip Rpche, of the 
same, Esquire ; William Walsh, of Youghal, Esquire, and the Dean of Clone, in 
all contentions between them. 

(3) If any cause of contention shall henceforth arise, they will not procure 
any invasion, plunder, robbery, or any illegal act by which the King's peace may 
be broken, but exhibit their complaints to the said arbitrators, and stand to their 
order. In case the said arbitrators are not able to determine within twenty days 
after such exhibition, owing to the obstinacy and contumacy of the party defen- 
dant, they shall condemn the defendant in a reasonable penalty to be levied of 
his goods and chattels, and to be paid to the complainant andi injured party. 
Injured parties shall not seek any remedy by force, but complain to the Earl of 
Desmond and the three bishops above-named, who shall have power to summon 
the parties before them. If the said Earl and his colleagues shall not be able to 
make an order within twenty days, they shall condemn the parties attending not 
only in the fault laid to them but also in forfeiture of double the damage to the 
complainant ; and the obstinate party shall forfeit to the King an amercement 
and fine for contempt, which default and contempt, however, the said Earl and 
his colleagues shall previously make known to the Lord Deputy and Council, 
who shall direct the warrant to the said Earl and his colleagues to levy the said 
amercement and fine, to be divided into three equal parts, of which one shall be 
for the King^ and the remaining two parts for the said Earl and his colleagues. 

(3) If any contention should arise between them which cannot be determined 
unless by persons learned in the law, then the parties who have such cause shall 
not make any attempt by which the King's peace might be broken, but present 
their complaints to the Commissioners, or persons learned in the law, whom his 
Majesty shall send to Cork, Youghal, and Kinsale, wherever it shall seem most 



54 BARRYMORE. 

convenient to the Lord Deputy and Council, at two terms of the year, that is to 
say, Easter and Michaelmas. Any persons residing in the counties of Cork or 
Kyrrye, or in the dominions of any of the parties above-mentioned, who shall 
act in contravention of this indenture, and to the schedule annexed to it, shall 
confiscate not only such a sum of money as is recited in writings obligatory of 
this date, but also such amercements as to the Lord Deputy and Council shall 
seem good. 

(5) They will aid and protect all receivers, collectors, and other officers of the 
King. 

(6) They will perform and observe such other articles and orders as are omitted 
from this indenture, and contained in a schedule hereto annexed, ordained by 
the mature counsel of almost all the noblemen of this kingdom for the regulation 
of the State. 

(7) They will not procure or permit any crime, atempt, or offense against 
any of the King's subjects. 

(8) None of them will exact any black rent from the King's subjects inhabiting 
the city of Cork, the towns of Youghill and Kynsale, or elsewhere in this kingdom, 
under penalty of forfeiting the sums before mentioned. 

They have delivered their hostages to the Lord Deputy, and put their signa- 
tures and seals to this indenture. — Contemporary copy, Latin, pp. 7 ; vol. 603, p. 
60, " Carew MSS." 

At the end is the following abstract : 

Anno 31 regni Regis Henrici VIII. — Item : A peace between the Lord Deputy 
and MacMorice that he shall find to every great hosting and come in proper 
person, with eight kearne, victualled at his own charge, during the said hosting, 
and at every sudden journey, with all his power victualled for two or three days. 

Also this note : 

The copies contained in this transcript of nine written leaves do agree with 
the copies found registered in the old Council book. — John Chaloner. 

Another contemporary copy of the same, vol. 603, p. i lOa : 
The copies here called contemporary by the editor of the " Calendar 
of Carew State Papers" are not necessarily contemporary with the signa- 
tures of the noblemen and chieftains of the county of Cork on the 26th 
of September, 1542, but with the signature, long afterwards, of John 
Chaloner, Secretary of State for Ireland from May, 1559, to July, 1580. 
Chaloner does not even certify that these copies agree with the originals, 
but only with the copies in the Old Council Book. Note the word old. 
However that may be, it is not likely that the Catholic noblemen and 
chieftains of the county of Cork in 1 542 signed any document of which 
they knew the above Article i to be a part. 

1 548, August 27. The Mayor of Cork and others wrote to Sir Edward 
Bellingham : — '"Whereas Edmund Tyrrie, bayliff of this city, one of the 
best young men here, last week complained to the Earl of Desmond of 
certain lands holden from him by the Barries, whereupon the Earl de- 
livered said Edmund into the hands of Lord Barrymore to minister right 



BARRYMORE 55 

unto him, whom he took to his parhament in his own country, holden on a 
hill, and Edmund coming on the King's highway was by the Barries 
murdered by twenty-three foynes of an Irish knife to the very heart, 
besides other strokes on his body, etc. We dare not walk out of our gates 
by robbing and murdering. We have no friends but the Earl of Desmond. 
We beseech you have this shameful murder revenged . . . 

1548, November 18th. Same to same. . . Lord Barrymore hath 
delivered the murderers of the King's bailiff to be put to execution, which 
we have done. . . . certain of the wild Irish came to make a prey on 
the Earl of Desmond within four miles of us, Lord Barrymore going to 
do the like on certain other wild Irish by night, killed eighty of them, 
wherewith we are glad. — " State Papers in Council Book of Cork," p. xv. 

A.D. 1549. A document, headed "What Ireland is and how much," 
has this passage : " Those English nobles and most worshipful captains 
was degenerate from the English laws : In Kyery — The Earl of Desmond 
and his Gerotes ; Lord Barre of Buttemunt (Buttevant), Lord Rowche of 
Armoye (Lord Roche of Fermoy), Lord Barry of Kynnaley, Lord Con- 
don of Armevye (Fermoy), Lord Barre Rowe of the Rouhe (recte Ibawne), 
Lord Cowrsey of Kynsale, Lord Cowgan, Lord Barrett, White Knight, 
Knight of the Valley ; Desmonds of the county of Waterford ; Powers, 
Bourkes, in the county of Limerick ; Butlers in the county of Kilkenny 
and the county of Fiddyurd (i.e.. South Riding of Tipperary)." 

John Bowleraghe Lord Barry married, first, Elaine, daughter to Lord 
Roche, and, secondly, a daughter to Gerald Fitzjohn, Lord of the Decies ; 
and dying without issue, was succeeded by his next brother. 

Edmund Lord Barry, alias Lord Barrymore, eighteenth feudal Lord 
of Olethan. He is styled Viscount Barrie in " The copy of the book sent 
from Sir Thomas Cusake, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, to the Duke of 
Northumberland's Grace for the present state of Ireland," 1553, May 8 : 

"Munster, under the rule of such lords and captains as be there, and 
of the Earl of Desmond, is in good quiet, so that the Justices of the Peace 
ride their circuit in the counties of Limerick, Cork, and Kerry, being the 
farthest shires west in Munster, and the sheriffs are obeyed." " The lords 
and captains of those countries, as the Earl of Desmond, the Viscount 
Barrie, the Lord Roche, the Lord FitzMorris and divers other, which 
within few years would not hear speak to obey the law, beeth now in 
commission with the Justices of Peace to hear and determine causes, etc." 
— ^Vol. 3 1 1, p. 1 12, in " Cal Carew MSS." 

Edmond Lord Barry styles himself Edmund Lord Barrymor in the 
following memorandum : 

Memorandum where William FitzDavid MacGerod wrongefully deteynd from 
Christopher Lombard Wallinge, alias Wadingstowne, in the pety Island, remeyn- 



56 BARRYMORE. 

inge in mortgage with the said Christopher for xvi. marks. It as appereth more 
playnly For the whiche wrong hold the said Christopher hath taken psans (prisoner) 
part of the said William's Svaunte (servants) whoso remeyned with hem till the 
Lorde Barrymor Edmund upon his credyt suerteshippe hathe them enlarged con- 
dycyonately that the said William yerely shall inhabit the same accorrdinglely 
gevinge therof the fourth part proffit comodyties to the said Christoper and his 
assigns dureing that mortegage fre from all cherges, which, if the said Williame 
will not soe do and accomplish, The said Christopher shall and may let the same, 
or appoynt some other person to inhabit the same who and which I, the said 
Edmond Lord Barrymor, must and shall defend the same to the said Christopher, 
his use and assigns, without any vexacion or molestecion to the contrary by this 
presents. Wittnes hereunto I, the said Edmond Lord barry mor, have hereunto 
subscribed my signemanual the 28th of November, 1553. Et Regni Regine 
nostre Marie primo, present there being piers Copinger, The Mayor, richerd 
tyrry, georg Skyddy, Christopher gowlll, ballif, dj^ers others. 

See the foregoing memorandum, from among the Roche papers, at 
p. 135, Smith's "History of Cork," edition of 1892-3. 

Edmond Lord Barrymore married, first, Joane Elaine, daughter to 
James, Earl of Desmond. She ran from him, and then he married Shely, 
daughter to Donnell MacCarthy Reagh, and widow of Teige, son of 
MacCarthy More. Dying without issue, Edmond Lord Barrymore was 
succeeded by his younger brother, 

James fitzjohn Lord Barry, alias Lord Barrymore, and called Vis- 
count Buttevant by Florence McCarthy More and by Sir George Carew. 
He married, first, Ellis, daughter of Maurice Fitzgerald, of the Shean, in 
the barony of Coshmore, county Waterford, and by her had no issue. 
He married, secondly, Ellen, daughter of Teige McCormucke Oge 
McCarthy, of Muskerry, and widow of John Lord Power, and by her had 
an only daughter, Catherine, who married Richard Lord Power, son, by 
a first wife, of the said John Lord Power. 

According to an inquisition held at Youghal, on the 31st of March, 
1624, James fitzjohn Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevant, on the 9th of 
February, 1556, executed a deed conveying his manors of Carrigtoghill, 
alias Barriescourt ; Castle Oleighane, alias Castlelyons ; Buttevante, and 
LiscarroU, to his chaplain, David Hoddyn, who, by deed, on the i8th of 
February, 1556, reconveyed them to the said James fitzjohn for life, 
with remainder to the legitimate issue male of the said James fitzjohn, 
and with ulterior remainders successively to James fitzRichard Barry Roe, 
Lord of Ibaune, and his legitimate issue male ; Richard fitzDavid Barry 
and his legitimate issue male ; David fitzDavid Barry Roe and his legiti- 
mate issue male ; and, lastly, the right heirs of the said James fitzjohn in 
"le douce entayle." The jurors further found that the said James fitz- 
john Lord Barryroe, on the 20th day of March, 1557, died without any heir 
male of his body, legitimately begotten, whereupon the said James fitz- 



BARRYMORE. 57 

Richard Barrie Roe, by virtue of the said remainder to himself and the 
heirs male of his body, legitimately begotten, entered into possession of 
the said manors. 

Ignorant of or ignoring the entail of the manors and lands of James 
fitzjohn Lord Barrymore to James fitzRichard, Lord of Ibawne, Florence 
MacCarthy Reagh, alias MacCarthy mor, says in his pedigree of the 
Barrymores : " Immediately after the death of this James Barry, Vicecount 
Botevant, James Barry, of the Rathe, in Ybawne (who not long before in 
murdearinge of his coseins, Redmond Barry and his brother, had made 
himselfe Lord of Ybawne, otherwise called Barryroe's countrye), did 
by treason get into the possession of Barryscourt, which is the Lord 
Barry's chief house, and by stronge hand dispossessed this Ladye Cathe- 
rine, wife to the now Lord Power, which castell and country he possessed 
during his life, calling himselfe Vicecount of Botevant, which title and 
possessions David, his son, at this present dothe enjoy in prejudice to the 
right heiress of James [fitzjohn], the trew and lawful Vicecount of Bote- 
vant." — ^Vol. 635, "Carew Collection," Lambeth Library. In his Barry- 
roe pedigree Florence MacCarthy repeats the same tale : " This James 
[FitzRichard] to make himself Barriroe murdered Redmond and John, 
the sonnes of David Barry. Richard and David, the other two brothers, 
fled to the Earle of Desmond, who he likewise by practise were made 
away. Also, after the death of James Barry, Vicecount Buttevant, he 
dispossessed his daughter and heiress by force, and made himself vice- 
count." — Vol. 635, "Carew Collection." 

At page 199, vol. 607, "Carew Collection," Sir George Carew writes 
on this subject thus : 

"James fitzjohn Barry, Lord Viscount Buttevant, deceased, had issue 
one daughter named Catelina, who was married to Richard Lord Power, 
late deceased, grandfather to the Viscount Lord Power, and by him had 
issue John Power, father to the Viscount Lord Power, and Ellis Power, 
who is mother to the Viscount Lord Barry. 

"James fitzRichard Barry as co-lateral heir in fee-tail, succeeded the 
said James fitzjohn, and had issue David, late Lord Barry, and others ; 
and David has issue young David Barry, father to the Viscount Lord 
Barry. 

"The Lord Power, in Queen Elizabeth's reign, commenced suit for 
the whole lordship against David, late Lord Barry, in the right of his 
wife as heir general to the same [James] fitzjohn Lord Barry, but could 
not prevail. Yet the Queen, to avoid contention between both the lords, 
persuaded that the now Lord Barry's father should marry the Lord Power's 
daughter, which was done accordingly. Yet, notwithstanding the marriage 
and the entail between the Barrys, the Countess, being daughter to the 



58 BARRYMORE. 

late Lord Barry and mother to the now Lord Power, pretends to entitle 
the Lord Power as heir general to the Barrys." — " Carew Calendar," A.D. 
1618, pp. 391-392. 

Notes to the Barry pedigree given by David Lord Barry to Sir George 
Carew, in 1602, allege that "Edmond [fitzjohn Lord Barrymore] entayled 
his lands for default of yssu male of himselfe and his brother, then to 
descend unto James Barry, father to David Lord Barry, and to there 
heyres for ever," and that "James [fitzjohn Lord Barrymore] did in like 
manner as his brother, Edmond, entayle his lands upon James Barry, 
father to David Lord Barry " ; and that Katherine, daughter of James 
fitzjohn Lord Barry, and wife of Richard Lord Power, "passed a fine to 
David Lord Barry, who lived anno 1602" Other notes to that pedigree 
allege that Edmond More Barry, of Rathgobban, second and third 
cousin and nearest heir male of James fitzjohn Lord Barry, released all 
his right to James [fitzRichard] Lord Barry, father of David Lord Barry, 
now living A.D. 1602, and that Edmond More's niece, Margaret Barry, 
wife of William MacShane McCotter, of Ballycopineir, and Edmond 
More's first and second cousin, Ellen Barry, wife to Magner, released all 
their rights to David Lord Barry that lived A.D. 1602. If, however, the 
Barrymore lands and honours might descend in the female line, Juliana, 
daughter of John fitzWilliam Lord Barry, would have had a prior title to 
that of Katherine, daughter of James fitzjohn Lord Barry. 

There is independent evidence that Edmond More Barry, of Rath- 
gobban, renounced his right to the Barrymore lands and honours in favour 
of James fitzRichard Barryroe. The " Council Book of the Corporation 
of Cork," at pages 70-71, as published, has this entry : 

" 18 August, 161 7. Same day, etc. William FitzRobert FitzEdmond 
Barrie, harper, produced in open court the counterpawne of a deed of 
indenture, sealed and endorsed, with names of witnesses that were present 
at the sealing of the deed." 

"This indenture, made 18 March, 1560, betwixt James Barrie Lord Barrie 
Mor and Barrie Roe, on the one part, and Edmond Barrie, of Rathgobbane, 
son and heir to Gerald Barrie, son and heir to Richard Barrie, on the other part, 
Witnesseth that for divers benefits, etc., extended by the said James to the said 
Edmond, it was agreed between the said James Lord Barrie and Edmond as 
followeth : First, said Edmond Barrie for him and his heirs hath granted to 
James Barrie all and singular the manors, lordships, etc., in the towns and fields 
of Carrickthwohill, Castell oliethan, Kilmollocgh, alias Buttevant, Liscarrull, 
Orreriestearragh, the Great and Little Island in the haven of Cork, Themollage, 
Barrie's Rath, alias Rathlnbarry, and Lislahertie, and in all the towns and 
fields, etc., of the Lord Barrie More and of Barryro, in county Cork, with all 
services, advowsons of churches and courts, with their profits and fines, apper- 
taining to the Manors of Carricktwohill, etc., etc. To have all said Manors, etc., 
unto said James Barrie Lord Barrie, his heirs, etc., for ever. And, further, said 



BARRYMORE. 59 

Edmond hath made John Gowle FitzPatrick, of Corke, merchant, his lawful 
attorney, to give possession in the name of Edmond, etc., to said James Lord 
Barrie." 

By the entail of the lands and honours of James fitzjohn Lord Barry- 
more to his sixth cousin, James FitzRichard Barryroe, the heirs male of 
Richard, David, and James, the younger sons of John Kittagh Lord Barry- 
more, were disinherited. They appear thus in the pedigree given in 
A.D. 1602 to Carew by Viscount Buttevant : 

Many names in the foregoing genealogical tables reappear in the 
Fiants of the reign of Elizabeth as indexed by Mr. James Mills of the 
Irish Record Office. These are Robert MacEdmond More Barry, of 
Rathgobban, third cousin and next heir male of James fitzjohn Lord 
Barrymore, and that lord's other third cousins, the Barries of Castlelyons 
and the Barries of Scartbarry and Ballinaltig, the descendants of James, 
fourth son of John Kittagh Lord Barrymore. Also Gerald Dulache 
Barry, of Garran- [kennifeake, alias Rathbarry], and his son, James, de- 
scendants of David, third son of John Kittagh Lord Barrymore. 



Barry of Rathgobbane, 

Fiants of Elizabeth, No. 2249, 6 May, 1 573. Pardon, Robert MacEd- 
mond More, of Rathgabban, gentleman, in consideration of his having 
released all debts due to him by the Crown and all exactions and cesses 
for the Queen's service in Munster which had been taken from him. 

Richard, second son of John Kittagh Lord Barrymore, was grandfather 
of Edmond More Barry, of Rathgobbane, who, on the 1 8th March, 1 560, 
surrendered his right to the lordship of Olethaa Edmond More Barry's 
son, Robert, was in possession of Rathgobban on the 6th of May, I573- 
But Robert's son, William, was a blind and landless harper on the i8th 
August, 161 7. According to an inquisition taken at the King's Old 
Castle, Cork, on thei 20th September, 1626, David Viscount Buttevant, 
on the 1 8th October, 161 2, assigned the townland of Rathgobbane to " one 
Daniel MacCormuck O'Cahill." That Daniel O'Cahill, better known as 
Daniel duff O'Cahill, was the viscount's own harper. 

The townland of Rathcobane, midway between Midleton and Rath- 
cormac, contains 5 80 acres, of which 2 1 acres are in the parish of Gortroe, 
and the rest are in the parish of Templebodan, and all are in the barony 
of Barrymore. A considerable portion of Daniel duff O'Cahill's castle 
is still standing at Rathcobane, on the site of a rath or earthen fortress, 
which is popularly believed to have been the home of Gobban Saer, a 
famous church-builder early in the seventh century. 



6o BARRYMORE. 

Barry of Rathbarry. 

The Barries of Garranekinnefeake, alias Rathbarry, were descended 
from David, the third son of John Kittagh Barrymore, Lord of Olethan, 
alias Lord de Barrie ; and they possessed two ploughlands at Garrane- 
kinnefeake, which is now a small parish, containing 1,144 a-cres, and lying 
between Cork Harbour and the parishes of Midleton, Cloyne, and Ros- 
tellan, in the barony of Imokilly. They had also the half-ploughland of 
Titaskin, which now contains 3 1 7 acres. 

The said David Barry, of Garrankenifecaghe, alias Rathbarry, was 
father of Garrott, father of John, father of Garrott Dowlagh, i.e. of the 
ringlets, father of James, father of John. 

A.D. 1573, May 6, per fiant of Elizabeth 2,260, Gerald Dulache Barry, 
of Garran, gentleman, and others, were pardoned. 

According to an inquisition on the 20 September, 1626, Garrett Dow- 
laghe Barry, possessed of Garranekenefeake two ploughlands, Glassin- 
ygourlaghe 30 acres, and Taenteskin half a ploughland, died about forty 
years previously ; James fitzGarrett Dowlaghe Barrye was his son and 
next heir, and was of full age and married at the time of his father's death. 

Per Fiant 6485 of Queen Elizabeth, dated 28 March, 1601, James 
McGerrott Dwlagh, of Garrankynefeake, gentleman, with many others, 
had a pardon. According to an inquisition at Bandon Bridge, on the 14th 
of August, 1630, James fitzGarrett Dowlaghe Barry, and his son and heir, 
John fitz James, on the 5th of February, 1627, were raising money on 
Garranekinnefeake, alias Rathbarry, Tateskin, alias Tanestown, etc., two 
and a half ploughlands. According to the " Down Survey," the forfeiting 
proprietors in A.d. 1641 were John fitzjames Barry, Titaskin, 230 acres; 
James Fitzgerald, Garrane Kinefeaky, 1,150 acres. Both places went to 
the Earl of Inchiquin. 

In the case of Richard Earl of Barrymore, pit, versus William Basill, 
Attorney-General, deft, on the 8th of April, 1656, at Youghal, John Fitz- 
james fitzGarrett Dowlagh Barry, of Garrane, deposed that he had been 
" page of honor " to the noble Lord David fitzjames Visct Buttevant etc. 
As Garrett and Gerald are interchangeably names, it may be assumed 
that the James FitzGarrett Dowlaghe Barry, of Garrane Kennefeake, in 
1627, was the James fitzGerald who forfeited it in 1641. 

Barry of Castlelyons. 

The Barries of Castlelyons in the second half of the sixteenth century 
were a branch of the descendants of James Barry, fourth son of John 
Kittagh Lord Barrymore. 



BARRYMORE. 6 1 

4 November, 1584. Presentment of Country Jury, Cork: John, 
father of this James and Edmond, survived them both, and his lands are 
escheated. 

Fiants of Elizabeth, No. 2247, 6 May, 1573. Pardon John Moyle 
MacDavid MacRobert Barry, of Castellehan, gentleman ; Edmund Mac- 
Shane Moyle, of Castellehane, gentleman ; consideration as in 2249. 

No. 3093, 6th September, 1577. Pardon to John Meal Barry, of 
Castleyans, gentleman ; James fitzjohn Meale, of Balleneshiery ; and 
Edmond fitzjohn Meale Barry, of Balleemon. Fine, one cow each. 

7 November, 1584. Presentment of Town Jury, Cork: David, now 
Lord Barrymore, being in Rebellion, hath hanged the aforesaid James 
fitzjohn Meale, etc. John Moyl Barry, of Ballygoran, in the Lord Barry's 
contrie, dyed, whose sonne and heir was slayne in rebellion. We find 
,that the forenamed John Moyl was in rebellion, and died after coming in 
uppon protection, and was seized of Ballygoran, containing two plough- 
lands. — Lambeth Palace Library, vol. 627, folio 129, i, and 50. 

2 November, 1585. Inquisition at Youghal. "Also the jurors say 
on their oath that James MacShane Moyle was seized in his demesne as of 
fee of Balligoran in the said county, and of all the lands, tenements, and 
hereditaments of the same, or spectant to the same, containmg one plough- 
land, and being so seized at Karrignavar, in the said county of Cork, on 
the 22nd day of July, in the 23rd year of the reign of the said lady now 
Queen, entered into rebellion tratorously against the lady the Queen, in 
which rebellion he died." Eileain, daughter of Donnall McAirt O'Keiffe, 
of Gleannan phreachain [now Glenville, county Cork], was wife of James, 
son of John Moyle [Barry], of Coole [near Castlelyons, county Cork]. — 
O'Keeffe Pedigree, Brit. Mus. MS., Eg. 112. 

16 July, 1585, Fiant No. 4752. Pardon of John Oge MacShane Meel 
Barry, of Castlelyons. 

10 March, 1585-6, No. 4826. Pardon William fitzjohn Moell Barry, 
of Castlelyons. 

28 March, 1601, No. 6485. Pardon, Philip fitzRichard fitzjohn Meale, 
of Castlelyons ; Robert fitzjames fitzjohn, of Castlelyons ; William and 
Thomas MacShane Meale, of same ; Richard fitzjames fitzjohn Meale, of 
same ; Gerrott fitzjames fitzjohn Meale, of Clonemologh. 

15 November, 1602, No. 6701. Pardon, William fitzDavid Oge Barry, 
of Castlelyons ; Richard fitzjames Barry and John fitzRichard Oge Barry, 
late of same. 

Barry of Ballinaltig. 

These Barries were a branch of the descendants of James, fourth son 
of John Kittagh Barry Lord Barrymore, and were senior to the Castle- 
lyons branch. 



62 BARRYMORE. 

Fiants No. 2249, 6 May, 1573. Pardon, David MacEdmond Oge 
Barry, of Scartywarrig, gentleman. 

No. 2260, 6th May, 1573. Pardon, Robert Mac Richard MacEdmond, 
of Scartywarrigg. 

No. 5056, 3 November, 1587. Pardon, David fitzRobert fitzRichard, 
of Ballenalthy. 

No. 6248, 31st August, 1598. Pardon, Richard fitzRobert Barrie, 
of Baihnaltie. 

No. 6485, 28 March, 1601. Pardon, David and James fitzRobert 
fitzRichard, of BaUinalehie; Thomas and Richard fitzRobert, of same. 

No. 6701, 15 November, 1602. Pardon, WilUam fitzDavid Oge Barry, 
of Castellyons. 

Richard Barry, of Ballinaltig, and his two daughters are mentioned 
in pedigrees dictated by Mrs. Bridget Fitzgerald, alias Brighid na Sean- 
chas, that is, Bridget of the histories. She died at the age of ninety years, 
in 1 808, having been a valuable genealogical authority for her own neigh- 
bourhood. But as oral tradition was her sole source of knowledge, her 
statements regarding comparatively remote events abound with inac- 
curacies, without ceasing, however, to be extremely valuable. Her pedi- 
gree of the MacAdam Barries, Lords of the Manor of Rathcormac, has 
this colophon : " This pedigree was taken down from Bridget Fitzgerald, 
alias Barry, in her last illness, in the year 1 808 " ; and this passage : 
"John Barry, or Sean an truis, was the son of John Barry by Margaret, 
the daughter of Richard Barry, of Ballinaltig, and Hanna Fitzgerald, 
daughter of the Earl of Desmond. By Margaret he got the lands of 
Curraghplobode and Ballynanelagh, and had issue Richard, of Kilshannig ; 
John, of Curraghprevin ; and James, of Lisnegar." Mrs. Fitzgerald's 
pedigree of the Barries of Leamlara mentions Richard Barry, of Ballin- 
altig, and his second daughter, Ellen, mother of Ellen McCarthy, mother 
of Ellen O'Cahill, wife of a Garrett Barry, of Lemlara : 

"Ellen O'Cahill was the daughter of Ellen MacCarthy, daughter of 
Charles MacCarthy, who was general under Charles II. He left his 
daughter, the said Ellen, with a large fortune in trust with Richard, Earl 
of Barrymore, who kept the fortune, and gave her in marriage to Daniel 
O'Cahill, with the lands of Ragubbane only, on which the said Daniel 
built a castle. Ellen MacCarthy's mother was Ellen Barry, daughter to 
Richard Barry, of Ballinaltig, whose estate was eighteen ploughlands in 
the parish of Gortroe and ten in the parish of Ballinaltig. Said Richard's 
father was a Lord Barrymore and his mother was the Earl of Desmond's 
daughter. Daniel O'Cahill's son was Lodawick, whose daughter was the 
grandmother of Edmond Barry, late of Carrigtwohill" (of which Edmond 
Barry, the present writer, another Edmond Barry, is a great-grandson. 



BARRYMORE. 63 

In these paragraphs are many errors that need not be corrected in 
this place. It will suffice here to point out that in the pedigrees of A.D. 
1602, Richard [FitzRichard] Barry, of Ballinaltig, is neither the husband 
of an Earl of Desmond's daughter, nor the son of a Lord Barrymore 
married to an Earl of Desmond's daughter, but is fourth in descent from 
such a lord. On the other hand, however, these paragraphs have pre- 
served the precious facts that one daughter of Richard of Ballinaltig 
married John Barry, of Rathcormac, and that the other became an ances- 
tress of the Barrys of Lemlara and of the Barrys of Dundullerick. Through 
these two sisters the MacAdam Barries, of Rathcormac, Ballyclough, 
Tignegeragh, and Ballynaliina, the Barries of Lemlara, and the Barries of 
Dundullerick are alike descended from Earls of Desmond, Lords 
Barrymore, alias Lords of Olethan, White Knights of Clongibbon, 
O'Keeffes of Dunbolloge, and Barries of the Little Island. Also through 
these sisters the MacAdam and Dundullerick Barries are descended from 
Garrett Barry, of Lemlara, grandson of the Garrett who, in the pedigree 
pubhshed in circ. 1835, is said to have died circ. 1390. 

The Ballmaltig estate, on tlie death of Richard fitzRichard fitzEdmond 
Barry, did not pass to his two daughters, but to his two younger brothers, 
James and John, neither of whom is set down m the pedigrees of A.D. 
1602, and both of whom forfeited, as appears from the following extracts 
made by the late Charles M. Barry -. 

Patent Rolls, James I. Grant to Sir John Davys, knt. BalUnaltie 
and Scartivarrie, three and a half ploughlands, parcel of the estate of 
James fitzRichard fitzEdmond Barrie and John fitzRichard, his brother ; 
rent £1 ^s. ^.d. Grant to Lord Delvin, Theinescarty, one small carucate 
in Orririe, the estate of James fitzRichard Barrie, slain in rebellion ; rent, 
1 8s. od. 

Depositions of witnesses taken before us, Henry Tynte, Esq., and Thomas 
Warren, of Youghal, Alderman at Youghal, the 8th April, 1656, on the part of 
Richard Earl of Barrymore, by virtue of a commission unto us and others 
directed out of His Hignesses Court of Exchequer in Ireland, beaiung date the 
9th day of February, 1655. 

ist Deponent. John Barry, of Castlelyons, in the couny of Cork, gentleman, 
being aged yj years or thereabouts, and being examined, deposeth and saith to 
the I St Interrogatory hee sayth that he very well knew David fitz James Barry 
Lord Viscount Buttevant, great-grandfather of the claymant, etc., etc. Bally- 
naltig, Scart Barry, Coolequane, and Skehanagh were part of the ancient inheri- 
tance of James fitzRichard Barry and his brother, John fitzRichard, who being 
attainted, the late King James granted said lands to Sir John Davyes, Knt., his 
Attorney General, who, in the year 161 5, granted them to one Stephen Galway 
fitzWalter, of Cork, who, by deed bearing date 20th November, 161 5, granted 
the premisses to David fitzjames Barry, Viscount Buttevant, who disposed of 
same to David fitzRobert Barry, who was succeeded by his son, James fitzDavid 



64 BARRYMORE. 

MacRobert, who paid rent to Viscount Buttevant, and dying a year before the 
wars, his widow, Honora Ni Art O'Keeffe, held the lands until the great contribu- 
tions compelled her to let them go waste. Witness proves the handwriting of the 
grantor, Stephen Galway, and of the witnesses John Barry, of Dunbeggie ; Ed- 
mond Barry, of Ballyspellane ; and Daniel O'Keeffe." 

Undoubtedly the David fitzRobert Barry who purchased in a way the 
Ballinaltig and Scartbarry estate in 1615 was the David fitzRobert fitz- 
Richard of BalHnaltig, aUas BaUinalehie (Ballinalethie), in the Fiants of 
3 November, 1587, and 20 March, 1601 ; and was a son of the Robert 
MacRichard MacEdmond, of Scartywarrigg, in a Fiant of 6 May, 1573 ; 
and was a nephew of the forfeitors of that estate, James and John fitz- 
Richard fitzEdmond, and of their elder brother, Richard. This tallies 
in a way with a statement of Mrs. Margaret O'Hea, nee Fitzgerald, grand- 
daughter of Brighid na Senchas : " Said Bridget Barry's grandmother by 
the father, James Barry, was Frances Barry, daughter of James fitzDavid 
Barry, of Ballinaltig, real heir of eight and twenty ploughlands, and great- 
grandson of Lord Barrymore." That means that Robert, the grandfather 
of James fitzDavid fitzRobert Barry, of Ballinaltig, in 1624- 1640, and the 
father of David fitzRobert who compounded with Lord Buttevant for the 
Ballinaltig- Scartbarry estate in 161 5, was a younger brother of the Richard 
Barry said by Brighid na Senchas in her Lemlara pedigree to have had 
eighteen ploughlands in the parish of Gortroe, and ten in the parish of 
Ballinaltig, and to have been a Lord Barrymore's son. 

From a document seen among the family papers of the late Cornelius 
O'Brien, Esq., of Kilcor, by the present writer in 1876, it is evident that 
the David fitzRobert Barry who compounded with Lord Buttevant for 
the Ballinaltig and Scartbarry estate in 161 5 was not next heir to his 
uncles, the forfeiting proprietors, James fitzRichard fitzEdmond and his 
brother John. That document I deciphered thus : " David Barry, the 
v/ard's father, died loth February, 1624, the ward then being ten years 
old. The right heir of Ballinaly commenced suit for the whole lands 
against the said David, and against David fitzjohn Barry before David 
died, and proved the inheritance to be his, and that he . . . the same 
way . . . hand in the war tymes." 

The following are summaries of other docimients in the same collection : 

31 January, 1635. Power of attorney from James Barry fitzDavid, of 
Ballinaltighe, to William O'Bryan, of Coylenacurra, in the said county, 
gentleman, to pay Daniel MacCnogher O'Lomasnee ;^ioo for the redemp- 
tion of the ploughland of Skeaghanaghe, mortgaged by my father, David 
fitzRobard Barry ; also to pay Stephen Myaghe FitzGarrett, of Cork, 
jnerchant, the sum of . . . in redemption of the half ploughland of 
Ballinaltighe, mortgaged by me to the said Stephen ; also to pay Clement 



BARRYMORE. 65 

Simon, of Carrigluska, gentleman, ;£'ioo in redemption for the half plough- 
land of Ballinaltighe, leased by me to Thomas Hunter after mortgage 
. . . . for ;^200. 

December, 1635. Articles of agreement between James Barry, of 
Ballynaltighe, in the county of Cork, gent., and Onor Ny Kieffe, alias 
Barry, wife of the said James, on the one part, and Cahill MacCormoke, 
of D , in the said county, yeoman ; John Kinane, of the same, yeo- 

man ; and Thomas fitzRichard Barry, of the same, gentleman, of the other 
part. A lease. 

22 June, 1638. Bill of James Barry, of Ballinaltighe, for £\2, to be 
paid the 8th day of July, 1638, to William O'Bryan, of Coillnacurra. 

October, 1638. Bill of same to same, for 50 shilhngs. 

5th November, 1638. Bond for £-x,Q) due by same to same. 

According to Mrs. Margaret O'Hea, grand-daughter of Mrs. Bridget 
Fitzgerald, alias Brighid na Senchas, Frances Barry, daughter of James 
fitzDavid Barry, of Ballinaltig, was grandmother of Brighid na Senchas, 
thus : Said Frances married a [MacAdam] Barry, and was mother of 
James Barry, who was father of Bridget Barry (Brighid na Senchas). 
About the year 1870, Miss Mary Fitzgerald, of Rockview, stated to the 
present writer that Bridget Barry (Brighid na Senchas) married Thomas 
Fitzgerald, and had a son, Maurice Fitzgerald, of Gurteen, who married 
Ellen [daughter of John Barry, leassee of Ballinaltig, and], aunt of Dr. 
Milner Barry, and had issue James Fitzgerald, of Rockview, Carrigacrump, 
who married Teresa, daughter of Thomas Coppinger, of Rosmore, and 
had issue an eldest son, Maurice Fitzgerald, of Rockview, who married 
. . . . Cooke, and had issue Maurice, Teresa, Mary, etc. 

At the Restoration ot Charles II. Ballinaltig went to Charles McCarthy, 
of Carrignavar, and Scartbarry to the Earl of Barrymore, and Skahanagh 
and Coolequane were dower for Margaret Bryan, alias Baggott, and, in 
1679, passed to William O'Brien, a grandson of the above-mentioned 
William O'Bryan, of Coillnacurra, alias Kilcor. 

According to the pedigrees of A.D. 1602, John Kittagh Lord Barry- 
more had three brothers — Laurence Barry Roe, Lord of Ibawne; James, 
ancestor of the Fitzjames Barries of Annagh, in Orrery ; and " Riochog," 
of whom the family of "Riochog, in Barrimore, descended"; and there was 
an entail between John and Laurence. We have seen, however, that 
John and Laurence were not brothers, but first and second cousins, and 
therefore John may be presumed to have been only a remoter cousin of 
James and " Riochog." The history, therefore, of the Barry Roes, Lords of 
Ibawne, and, later on, Earls of Barrymore, on every ground, may take 
precedence of that of the Fitzjames Barries of Annagh. 



66 BARRYMORE. 

RECORDS OF THE BARRYS. 

FIRST CHAPTER. — BARRYMORE. 
NOTES AND CORRECTIONS. 

Page 3, line 30. For North Wales read Powis. 

Page 4, lines 21, 22. Expunge: and in due time Girald's son, Maurice, 
married Arnulph's daughter, Alice. And between lines 25 and 26 insert as a 
paragraph : Arnulph fled to Ireland, and his daughter, Alice, was subsequently 
married to Girald's son, Maurice. — " The Earls of Kildare Addenda," page 4. 

Page 4, line 29. Add : " Chronicles of the Princes," 

Page 8, line 2. For themselves read " theirselves." 

Page 8. Between lines 3 and 4 insert the following paragraphs on the Welsh 
and Irish descent of the Barries through Nesta. 

The De Barnes were not only of Welsh, but also of Irish, royal descent, 
through Nesta, who was a daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, last King of South Wales, 
and by her first husband, Girald de Windesor, Prefect of Pembroke, was mother 
of Angareth de Windesor, ancestress of the Barries of Ireland through her mar- 
riage with William de Barri, of Mainarpir Castle, a baron of Pembroke. 

Girald de Barri, Archdeacon of Brecknock, and youngest son of the said 
William and Angarath, says of himself : 

" Girald, by origin of Wales and of its southern part, and of the maritime ex- 
tremities of Demetia, not far from the principale town of Penbroc — in a word, of 
Mainarpir Castle, was of noble descent ; for his mother, united in marriage to 
an excellent man, William de Barri, was Angarath, a daughter of Nesta, the 
noble daughter of Res, Prince of South Wales, that is. Res, son of Theodore." — 
Vol. i., p. 21. 

In his " Descriptio Kambrise," written in a.d. 1194, the said Girald de Barri 
says : 

" This is the pedigree of the princes of South Wales : Res, son of Griphin ; 
Griphin, son of Res ; Res, son of Theodore ; Theodore, son of Cadelh ; Cadelh, 
son of Eneas ; Eneas, son of Oen ; Oen, son of Hoel Da, that is, Hovel the Good ; 
Hovel, son of Cadelh ; Cadelh, son of Roderic the Great. So from Cadelh, son 
of Roderic the Great, descended the princes of South Wales. 

" From Mervin in this manner descended the princes of North Wales : David, 
son of Oen ; Oen, son of Griphin ; Griphin, son of Canan ; Canan, son of lago ; 
lago, son of Ythewal ; Ythewal, son of Meuric ; Meuric, son of Anaudrech ; 
Anaudrech, son of Mervin ; Mervin, son of Roderic the Great. 

" But Anaraut left no posterity, whence also the princes of Powis have a 
separate pedigree. 

" This also seems noteworthy that the Welsh bards and chanters have a pedi- 
gree of the said princes in their ancient and authentic books, written, however, in 
Welsh, and they retain the same by memory from Roderic the Great to the 
Blessed Virgin['s cousin, Anna], and thence to Silvius Ascanius, and Eneas ; and 
from Eneas they extend the pedigree on to Adam. But since a narration of so 
distant, so most remote a kinship would seem to many to be mendacious rather 
than historic, we intentionally exclude it from this our compendium." — Book i., 
chapter iii. 

We may add that Rhodri Mawr, King of Wales, was father of Cadell ; Cadell 
of Howel Da ; Howel of Owen, King of South Wales ; and Owen of Meredith, 
King of Powis. Also Rhodri Mawr was father of Mervin ; Mervin of Llewelyn ; 



BARRVMORE. 67 

Llewelyn of Angharad, mother of the said Meredith, who left at his death, A.D. 
998, a daughter and heiress, Angharad, who, by her second husband, Cynfyn, son 
of Gwerystan, was mother of Rhiwallon, slain 1068, and of Bleddyn, who was 
King of Powis, and ancestor of all subsequent princes of Powis. In reprobating 
the abduction of Nesta by Owen, son of Cadwgan, son of Bleddyn, the "Chronicle 
of the Princes " brings out the fact that Nesta's mother was a daughter of Rhi- 
wallon, brother of Bleddyn : ''A.D. 1106. Cadwgan, son of Bleddyn and Gwladus, 
daughter of Rhiwallon, the mother of Nesta, were [full first] cousins, as Bleddyin 
and Rhiwallon, sons of Cynvyn, were brothers, from Angharad, daughter of King 
Maredudd.'' 

Though Girald de Barri, in A.D. 1194, traced back the Princes of Wales only 
ten generations to Roderick the Great, who died A.D. 877, and though he rightly 
objected to the pedigree being carried back to contemporaries of the Blessed 
Virgin, and thence through Aeneas to Adam, yet he might safely have gone 
twelve generations farther back, to JNIailcun, King of North Wales, who died A.D. 
547, or even three or four generations still further, back to Cunedda, who is 
mentioned by Nennius, thus : 

"The great King Mailcun reigned among the Britons, i.e., in the district of 
Guenedota because his great-great-grandfather, Cunedda, with his twelve sons, 
had come before from the left-hand part, i.e., from the country which is called 
Manau Gustodin, one hundred and forty-six years before Mailcun reigned, and 
expelled the Scots with much slaughter from these countries, and they never 
returned again to inhabit them." — Bohn's Nennius. In that passage Gale's edition 
has " Cundag," " eight sons," and " Manau Guotadin." The genuine part of the 
pedigree of the Kings of Wales commences with Cunedda, who seems to have 
been a Pict, and who dispossessed the Irish of North Wales in or about A.D. 400. 

In the preface to the Rolls edition of the "Annales Cambriae," the pedigree 
of Owen, King of South Wales, and sixth in ascent from Nesta, is traced upwards, 
first, through his father, Howel Da, of the Venedotian, that is, the North Welsh 
line of kings, and next through his mother, Ellen, heiress of the Kingdom of 
Demetia, that is, South West Wales. That double pedigree is from British 
Museum manuscript, Harleian, 3859, wherein it is believed, says Principal Rhys, 
of Jesus College, Oxford, to be in a hand of the early twelfth century, and copied 
from a compilation made probably not later than the year 954. For nineteen 
generations each branch of the pedigree is trustworthy : the Venedotian up to 
Cuneda, and the Dimetian up to Trifun ; but beyond Trifun and Cuneda, who 
flourished in the first half of the fifth century, both branches are increasingly 
unreliable. In that pedigree, which here follows, M. and map mean son, and 
merch daughter. The obituary dates are added from the "Annals of Cambria." 
B, D, K, N, W, being for Britons, Demetia, King, North, and Wales, respectively. 

Yvein Map Iguel, k.k , 950. M. Mailcun, k.n.w., 447. m. Anguerit. 

m. Catell, K., 909. m. (^atgoloun Eauhir. 111. Onmum. 

m. Rotri, K.w., 877. m. Einaun girt. m. Duvun. 

m. Mermin, K.w., 844. ni. Cuneda. m. Britguein 

m. Ethil m. Octern. m. Eugein. 

Merch Cinnan, k.n.w., 816. m. Patern pesrut. m Aballac. 

Map Rotri, K.B. , 754. m. Tacit. m. Amalech, who was a son 

m. Tutgual m. Cein. of Belli the Great, and his 

ni. Catgualar, K.B., 682. m. Guorcein. mother was Anna who is 

m. Catgollaun, k.b., 631. m. Doli. said to have been a cousin 

m. Catman m. Guordoli. of the Virgin Mary, the 

m. Jacob, K.B. , 613. m. Dumn. Mother of Our Lord Jesus 

m. Beli. m. Guordumn. Christ, 

m. Run. m. Amguoloyt. 



68 



BARRYMORE. 



Yvein Map Elen, 928. 

Merch Loumerc, 903. 

Map Hymeyt, k.d., 892. 

Map Tancroyst 

Merch Ovein, 81 1. 

Map Margetiut, k.d., 796. 

m. Teudos, 

m. Regin. 

m. Catgocaun. 

m. Cathen. 

m. Cloten. 

m. Nuogoy 

ni. Arthur. 



m. Petr. 

m. Cincar. 

m. Guortepir, k.d. 

m. Aiicol. 

m. Trifun, k.d. • 

m. Clotri. 

m. Gloilguin. 

m. Nimet. 

m. Dmiet. 

111. Maxim Gueletic. 

m. Protec. 

m. Protector. 

111. Ebiud. 

111. Eliud. 



M Stater. 

m. Pircs misser. 

m. Constans. 

111. Coiistantius and Helen 
Luiedauc, who went out 
from Britain to Jerusalem 
to seek the Cross of 
Christ, and brought it 
with her, thence to Cons 
stantinople, and it i- 
there ty this day. 



Between Trifun, alias Tiistin, and Clotri, alias Gwledyr, two later manu- 
scripts insert five names : Owain Vraisg, Blessed Kyndeyrn, Owain, Kyngar, 
Owain ; and a fourth MS. inserts six : Ewein Vreisc, Blessed Cyndwr, Ewein, 
Kyngar, Prwtech, Ewein. Owain Vraisg, alias Ewein Vreisc, may be for Aed 
Brosc of the Irish copy. Prwtec is for Protec. Instead of Clothri map Gloitguin, 
that is, Clotri, son of Gloitguin, the second MS. has Gwledyr ferch Gletwin ; and 
the third has Gwlydyr verch Glewdwin, both meaning Gwledyr, alias Clotri, 
daughter of Gletwin. Other variations in the MSS. need no mention here. 
Correctly, no doubt, Principal Rhys, following the Cymrodor, reads Protector, 
and Protec, a partially deciphered Protector, where the Rolls preface to " Annales 
Cambrice" has Ytec, and Ytector. According to Professor Momsen, Protector 
was a title conferred by Roman Emperors on Barbarian Princes in alliance with 
the Roman Empire. InA.D. 1895 on a pillar stone at Castell Dwyr an, Carmarthen- 
shire, there was found, FOTECORIGAS in Ogham characters, and beneath a 
cross in a circle was MEMORIA VOTEPORGIS PROTICTORIS, in Latin char- 
acters : the Ogham inscription meaning [the head stone] of Fotecori ; and the 
Latin inscription meaning : In memory of Voteporix, the Protector ; and the 
cross meaning that Fotecori, alias, Voteporix, died a Christian. 

According to Principal Rhys, in October, 1895, the Castell Dwyran inscrip- 
tions commemorate Vortipore, who was King of Demetia circ. A.D. 547, and is 
called Guortepir in the above given Demetian pedigree. On the contrary, Pro- 
fessor Momsen, of Berlin, holds that whoever is commemorated at Castell Dwyran, 
from being styled Protector, he must have flourished before the abandonment of 
Great Britain by the Romans, circ. A.D. 410; and the Berlin professor's dictum 
is corroborated from the above given Din^etian pedigree, where Protec and Pro- 
tector are respectively one and two generations elder than Maxim Gueletic, who 
was slain A.D. 388. Probably Protec and Protector of the Demetian pedigree in 
its Welsh form, as already given, were intended one or other for the Castell 
Dwyran Fotecori, alias Voteporix the Protector. Probably, also, Corach, the 
fourth name before Gartbuir, that is, Vortipore, in the Irish copies of the Dem- 
etian pedigree was the Protec of the Welsh form of that pedigree, and, like 
Protec for Protector, was a fragment of Fotecorach, which would be an old-Irish 
or middle-Irish form of the archaic-Irish genetive singular FOTECORIGAS, 
from nominative singular Fotecori, like middle-Irish genetives singular Cundrach, 
Cunrach, Ruadrach, Rudrach, from nominatives Cundri, Cunri, Ruadri, Rudri, 
etc. — "Book of Leinster." 

The three principal Irish copies of the Demetian pedigree are in the twelfth 
century MS., Rawlinson B 502 ; the fifteenth century MS., Laud 610, and the 
fourteenth century MS., " The Book of Hy Maini." In these manuscripts the 



BARRYMORE. 



69 



pedigree comes down to Tualodor, one generation elder than the Margetiud King 
of Demetia, who died A.D. 796, and in this form was first issued, circ. A.D. 766. 

From Tualodor back to Trestin the Irish version of the Demetian pedigree, 
as remarked by Principal Rhys, " proves virtually identical with that of the Kings 
of Dyved (Demetia) as given in the pedigree of Owen, son of Howel the Good." 
Here follow the corresponding parts from the three principal MSS. in Welsh 
and in Irish ; all but that from the " Book of Hy Maini" being taken from Prin- 
cipal Rhys's address to the Cambrian Archaeological Association, at Killarney, 
in August, 1 891 : 





WELSH. 






IRISH. 




MS. 


MS. 


MS. 


I. 


2. 


3- 


Harleian, 3859. 


Rawlinson, 


Jesus College, 


Rawlinson, 


Laud. 


Book of Hy 




B 466. 


20. 


B 502. 




Maini, 


Margetiud 


Meredudd 


Maredud 








Map Teudos 


Tewdost 


Teudos 


Tualodor 


Taulodor 


Ulodhar 


,, Regin 






Mac Rigin 


Rigind 


Rigind 


,, Catgocaun 


Kadvvgon 
Kynddelw 


Gwgawn 


Mic Catacuind 






,, Catheii 


Kadien 


Cathen 


,, Cactlienn 


Catien 


Caitind 


,, Cloten 




Eleothen 


,, Clotenn 


Clothienn 


Lochind 


„ Nougoy 


Novvy 


Ncnnue 


, , Nee 


Noe 


Nae 


,, Arthur 


Arthen 


Arthur 


,, Artuir 


Artuir 


Artuir 


,, Petr 


Pedyr 


Peder 


,, Retheoir 


Petuir 


Petair 


,, Cincar 


Kyngar 


Kyngar 


,, Congair 


Congair 


Congair 


,, Guortepir 


Gwrthyfyr 
Erbin 


Gwrdeber 
Erbin 


,, Gartbuir 


Gortiben 


Goiriibean 


,, Aircoil 


Avargvl 
Llawir 


Aircol Lawhir 


„ Alchoil 


Alcon 


Alcon 


,, Triphun 


Triusin and 
Tristin 


Tryphum 


,, Trestin 


Tresund 


Treisond 




Owain Vraisg 


Ewein Vreisc 


Aeda Brose 


Aeda 
Brosc 


Aeda 
Brosc 




Kyndeyrn 


Cyndwr 


Coralh 


C orach 


Corach 




Owain 


Ewein 


Echach Almuir 


Echdach AU- 
mair 


Eochhach All 
muir 




Kyngar 


Kyngar 
Prwtecli 


Artlchuirp 


Airtcbuirp 


Artchuiip 


,, Clotri 


Owain 


Ewein 








,. Gloitguin 


Gwlydyr 











Merch Glewd- 

win 

Clotri map Gloitguin, Clotri, son of Gloit the White, of the first Welsh column 
corresponds to Gwlydyr merch Glewdwin, Gwlydyr, daughter of Glewd the White, 
of the second Welsh column. After so many maps, the repetition of map, " son," 
before Gloitguin might be due to inadvertence, but the insertion of merch, 
" daughter," before Glewdwin must have been deliberate. Clotri, alias Gwlydyr, 
therefore, was the daughter of Gloit, alias Glewd, and was perhaps the wife of 
Cori [genitive Corach], and the mother of Aed Brosc, alias Owain A'raisg, alias 
Ewein Vreisc. In the Irish manuscripts the pedigree is carried back through 
Cori's father, Echaid Allmuir, that is, "Eochaid from beyond sea, "an Irish prince 
who acquired Demetia in Wales, and apparently was Protector No. i, and on to 
Eochaid Allmuir' s father, Art curb, who was prince of the Decii of Munster, and 
descendant and representative of Fiacha Suidge, brother of Conn Ceadcathach, a 
monarch of Ireland, who died circ. A.D. 212, and son of Fedlimid Rechtaid, a 
monarch of Ireland, who died circ. A.D. 174. 

In the Irish manuscript, the " Book of Hy Maini," the tale regarding the 
coming of the Deisi from Magh Breagh into Munster ; and in the Irish manu- 
script, the Leabhar na Huidre, the tale regarding the banishment of the Deisi 



70 BARRYMORE. 

from Mag Breg, say much the same ; but without mention of Breac and Eochaid 
Allmuiri : 

Art corb, son of Fiacha Suige, son of Feidlimidh Reachtaidh, had four sons : 
Breac Aengus Gaibuaithbeach, Eochaidh AUmuiri, and Soradh, who was the 
eldest, but born of a slave mother. A daughter of Soradh was abducted by 
Ceallach, son of Cormac Sovereign of Ireland, son of Art, son of Conn, son of 
Feidlimidh Reachtaidh, sovereigns of Ireland. Therefore Ceallach was slain by 
Aengus, brother of Soradh, in presence of King Cormac, at Tara, with a spear 
which had three balls hanging from each of two or three chains attached to the 
spearhead's socket-rim ; and when Aengus tugged back his spear from the corpse 
of Ceallach, one of these balls broke an eye of King Cormac, and the butt end 
of the spear went through the head of the King's steward from forehead to poll. 
Aengus reached his own house scatheless, and slew nine of Cormac's champions 
at Ath fuin. Later on, however, the Deisi, the clan or posterity of Fiacha Suige, 
son of Feidlimidh Reachtaidh, son of Tuathal Teachtmhar, were overthrown in 
seven battles, and were ejected into Leinster from their original Deisian lands, 
now the baronies of Upper and Lower Deace, southward of Tara, in the county 
of Meath. In Leinster Aengus was slain by three sons of King Cairbre Liffeachar, 
son and successor of King Cormac, and the Deisi drifted through Leinster to its 
south-western extremity beside Waterford Harbour, whence, after a long rest, 
they moved westward into the counties of Waterford and Tipperary, and poured 
eastward into South Wales, 'iheir Munster kingdom survived until the Anglo- 
Norman invasion of Ireland, A.D. 1169, and their Welsh kingdom of Demetia 
was merged in that of South Wales on the marriage of Ellen, heiress of Demetia, 
with Howel Da. That Ellen died A.D. 928, but her husband lived until A.D. 950. 
In the course of the tale on the coming of the Deisi from Magh Breagh into 
Munster, the " Book of Hy Maini " has this passage : 

Z>Ae'o\)A)-o co|in)c m^^i-o "ZDcBttjc ^l)c2lrv^cu)|ib cor)4X]'eKh'^}T ^rijf t>a 
TJiji 45ur "04 561)412 furi) c6)}i. 1. 6054?! ^siir Kof. Itii-D 605411 ^4rirt)U)]t co 
■ciri -Denn-D, coi)4-6 41)!) b4 n)4|xb. 11 '2l)c dsuf 4 U4 )f -Djb cejnelCri)rt)T;l)4in- 
4lle. t>)4 -04 ['o]ulo'64it, n)c H)5)n'o, 1i)c C4)T5l})t)-D, n)c Locl)]]i-D, <il)c N4e, 
1l)c 2lriT;ujit, '2l)c PeT;4)ri, 1l)c Con54)ia, 2l)c 3o;n^;be4i), "JDc mcor), Wc 
T^ixejI-oti-D, 2l)c 216-04, 21)0 Btiofc. Wc Cofi4cb, "^Dc e4C>)-D4cb, ^Un)U)|i, IDc 
^|XZ;cl)ll)rib. Taking cojinjC JH'C^j'D to be a mistake for t;4ri n)U1|X in'^-A, the 
passage means : Eogan and Ros, the two sons of Brec, son of Artcorb, go beyond sea, 
and reached not again their rightful land and kindred. Eoghan went over the sea to 
the land of Demitia and there died. His son and his grandson, from them is the 
Ceinel Cruimthain or Griffan family, at the over side, Whereof is [TJulodhar, son of 
Rigend, son of Caithend, son of Lochend, son of Nae, son of Artur, son of Petar, son 
of Cougar, son of Gorrtibean, son of Alcon, son of Treisond, son of Aed, son of Brosc, 
son of Cori, son of Eochaid, Alimuir, son of Artcorb." Instead of Aedh, son of Brosc^ 
the best MS., Rawlinson, B502, has Aed Brosc, similarly Welsh MSS. have Ovvain 
Vraisg and Ewein Vreisc. 

Tulodhar, King of Demetia, flourished circ. A.D. 766, being one generation 
senior to King Margetiud, who died A.D. 796; and his pedigree in date of com- 
pilation is an authority two hundred years older than the pedigree of Howel Da's 
son, Yvein, alias Owen, but has suffered more in transcription. Principal Rhys 
admits that the Tulodhar pedigree is right in tracing Tulodhar in the male line 
to Echaidh AUmuir, son of the Deisian prince, Art curb. 

The account of " the coming of the Deisi from Magh Breagh into Munster " in 



BARRYMORE. 7 I 

the " Book of Hy Maini " errs grossly in taking Art curb, who must have flourished 
early in the fourth century, to have been the father of Aengus Gaibuaithbeach, who 
blinded King Cormac, circ. A.D. 276 ; and to have been a son of King Feidlimidh 
Reachtaidh, who died circ. A.D. 174, or, according to the "Annals of the Four 
Masters," in A.D. 119. 

In the Leabhar na Huidre, an Irish MS. of A.D. iioo, the corresponding tract, 
entitled " the cause of the banishment of the Dessi into Munster," barely says that 
" Oengus Gaibuafnech was a violent man of the Dessi of Mag Breg," and that 
"good was the kindred of the Dessi, i.e., the clann, that is, the posterity of 
Fiacha Suigthe, son of Fedemid Rechtaid, son of Tuathal Techtmar." 

The full pedigree of Art corb forms the earlier part of the metrical pedigree 
composed for, and presumably in the reign of, Branfind, who was tenth in descent 
from Art corb, and was King of Deisi of Munster, and died A.D. 669. It is found 
less correctly in the pedigrees of Branfind's cousins, St. Forannan, one genera- 
tion older ; St. Senanus, three generations older ; and Felachad and his two 
brothers, two generations younger than Branfind. Some or all of these pedigrees 
are found in the " Book of Leinster," the " Book of Lecan," the " Book of Bally- 
mote," etc. 



Artcorb. 
Son of Mes [in] corbb. 
, , Mesgegra. 
,, Mesinfog [ ]. 
,, Corbb with fine British shoe. 



Son of Conri the Victorious. 
,, Cairpre Wrist-red. 
,, Fiacha Suidge. 
,, Feidlmid Rechtaid. 



Thus it is seen that the Barries, as also the Geraldines, at their first coming 
into Ireland, were descendants of the ancient Miletian monarchs of Ireland down 
to King Feidlmid Rechtaid, through the Kings of the Deisii, of Demetia, and of 
South Wales. 

Page 8. Prefix to line 26 : In substantial agreement with the pedigree given by 
Lord Buttevant to Sir George Carew in 1602. 

Page 14, line 18. For his, etc., read have we. 

Page 16, lines 6 and 7. For Kerren read Kerreu. 

Page 17, lines 30, 31. For Muscerie-on-Dunnegan, and Killyde, read: and 
Muscerie-on-Dunnegan, 

Page 17, line 34. For — was the small barony of Kinnatallon, etc., read : was 
the territory of Corca Oiche, which, as described by O'Huidhrin, was the whole, 
or the northern part, of the present barony of Lower Connello. 

On the 31st of August, 1899, the present writer saw at the Public Record 
Office, London, from an inquisition held on the 8th of August, 1282, at Kil- 
mallock, on John FitzThomas, that the said John FitzThomas, who was the 
great-granfather of the first Earl of Desmond, held a cantred from John de Barry 
at Kyllyde Hy Connil, in the county of Limerick, which cantred is now substan- 
tially the barony of Glenquin, county Limerick. That cantred of Kyllyde was. 
no doubt, the cantred of Killyde which had been granted by Robert FitzStephen 
to his nephew, Philip de Barri. 

Sweetman's calendar of documents relating to Ireland, preserved in the Public 
Record Office, London, after summaries of paragraphs regarding other lands of 
the said John FitzThomas in the then county Limerick, says : 

A cantred at Aylly ... of John de Barry for the sei-vice of two knights 
now worth ;£ioo a year, but in the time of the said John ;{^2oo. 

I read the original thus : 

Inq. P. M. loth Edw. I., No. 21. . . . Idem Johannes tenuit unum can- 
tredum apud Kyllyde Hy Connil et castrum in eodem comitatu de Johanne de 



72 BARRYMORE, 

Barry pro duobus serviciis militum et valet idem eantredus mpdo centum libras 
per annum in omnibus exitibus . . . valebat ... in tempore predicti 
Johannis ducentas libras. — Inq. P. M. X. Edw. I., No. 21. 

"The same John [FitzThomas FitzGerald] held one cantred at Kyllyde 
O'Connil, and a castle in the same county [of Limerick], of John de Barry for 
two knights' services, and the same cantred is now worth ;{^ioo yearly in all issues 
. . . ; but it was worth in the time of the foresaid John ;£200." 

Letters relative to the antiquities of the county Limerick, collected during the 
progress of the Ordnance Survey in 1840, say : 

"Killeady, barony of Glenquin, anciently in the west of Connello, which con- 
tained Glenquin. O'Heerin [in O'Heerin's topographical poem], passes out of 
O'Keeffe's and McAuliffe's country over Slieve Luachra into Claonglais, in the 
country of the Hy Connello. Claonglais is in the parish of Killeady, and barony 
of Glenquin, and the church of Killeady is described in all the ancient authorities 
as at the foot of Slieve Luachra. A fragment of the castle, to the north-west of 
the church, is conspicuous. About a mile to the west of this castle, in the town- 
land of Glenquin, is the lofty castle of Glenquin, from which the barony has 
taken its name." — ^Vol. i., p. 75. 

The Inquisition P, M. on Gerald de Prendergast, a.d. 1251, October 28, says 
regarding Corco Oiche : "The jurors also say that Gerard de Prendegast held of 
David de Barry a half-cantred in Corkoyhe by the service of one knight, and 
John FitzThomas held the same land of the same Gerard by the same service, 
but never rendered to the said Gerard nor by the said Gerard to David." At the 
London Record Office I had not time to decipher the paragraph regarding Corko 
Oiche in the Inq. P. M. of 8 Aug., 1282, on John FitzThomas FitzGerald ; 
but Sweetman's Calendar says that the said John FitzThomas held half a 
cantred at Corleleye (Corkoye?) of Robert FiezStephen by the service of one 
knight. The John de Barri from whom the cantred of Kyllyde was held by 
John FitzThomas was Lord of Olethan after 'David fitzWilliam de Barri, and 
before David de Barri, the Lord Justice, and seems to have been the brother of 
the one and the father of the other, and to have been the Barrymore slain, 
together with John FitzThomas, at Callan. In fact, he is the father of Lord 
Justice David in the pedigree by David Lord Buttevant ; only a copyist has 
shifted the words "He was Lord Justice of Ireland" from the son to the father. 

Page 78, line 17. For Muscerie on Donegan and Kyllde read : and Muscerie 
on Donegan. 

Page 79, lines 13 to 17. Expunge from MSS. to the end of the paragraph. 

Page 84, line i. For 1600- 1603 read : 1602. 

Page 84, line i. At end add : and altered in some particulars by the latter. 

Page 84, line 6. Draw a line horizontally from over Robert Barry to meet 
perpendicular line issuing from Philip Barry, as Robert was Philip's son. 

Page 84, line 7. For O'Kellies read: O'Kullans. 

Page 84, line 15. For Riochi read: Riochog, and also at line 16 for Rochy 
read : Riochog. 

Page 84, line 28. For Bowleclaghe read: Bouleraghe. 

Page 85, line 8 from the bottom. For (i.e., Cork), read: (i.e., Corco Oiche, 
now the barony of Lower Connello), 

Page 86, line 26. For that cantred at Aylly may have been, read : Aylly is 3 
misreading for Kyllyde hy connil, now Glenquin barony ; similarly Corleleye 
ought be Corkoyhe, now Lower Connello barony. 

Page 93, line 37. Add " Cal. S. P. Eng." 



BARRYMORE, 



n 



CHAPTER II. — BARRYROES. 




^a:^^ ^j| HE Barryroes are a branch of the Barrymores. The 
>^^^'^^'^ first Barryroe was Lawrence Barry, Lord of Ibawne, 
who was a son of Sir Wilhara Moyle Barry, Lord of 
Ibawne, who was a younger brother of Sir David fitz- 
David de Barri, who was the Lord of Olethan, ahas the 
Lord Barrymore, that died in A.D. 1347. A subsequent 
Lord of Ibawne, James fitzRichard, of the Rath, Barry- 
roe, succeeded to the Barrymore estates in A.D. 1557, and was summoned 
to Parhament in A.D. 1559 as Viscount Buttevant. He was ancestor of 
the extinct Earls of Barrymore and of the extant Smith-Barries. A first 
cousin and rival of the said James fitzRichard of the Rath Barryroe was 
David fitzDavid Barryroe of Rahanisky, etc., whose eldest son, Richard 
fitzDavid, was ancestor of the extinct Lords of the Manor of Roberts- 
town, and whose second eldest son, Redmond Barry, was ancestor of tlie 
extant Barries of Dundullerick. 

" Ibawne and Barryroe," says Smith, " compose one barony ; the first 
signifies "the fair territory," as indeed it is, in respect of the adjoining 
rough country of Carbery ; the other has its name from the Barrys. This 
barony contains eleven parishes, viz. : A part of Timoleague, Temple- 
Omalus, Abbey-Mahon, Donaghmore, part of Temple-Macquinlan, Lislee, 
Rathbarry, Kilkeranmore, Ardfield, Castroventry, and Kilmeen, being 
20,314 acres, and 146 ploughlands." — -Smith's "History of Cork," p. 216; 
Smith's derivation of the word Ibawne is erroneous. Ibawne is an Angli- 
cised form of the name Ui Bhaghamhna, and means literally, Baghamhuin's 
grandsons or posterity, and means topographically, the territory of 
Baghamhuin's posterity. For O'Baghamhna the Taxation of A.D. 1306 
hasO'Bathumpna ; and the "Book of Ballymote,"a Gaelic MS. of A.D. 1390, 
has Hui Badamna, dh and gh being pronounced alike in Gaelic, thus : 
■ the Corco Laige Cuil are from MacNiad's four sons, Duach, Eocho, 
Aengus and Ceallach. From Eocho are the Hui Badamna," p. 107, 2, 18 ; 
and "the Corco Laighe are from MacNiad's four sons, Duach, Eocho, 
Aengus, and Ceallach. From Eocho are the Hui Badamna," p. 201, i, 32. 
The topographical poem of O'Huidhrin, who died A.D. 1340 mentions 
the Hy Baghamhna third among the leading families of the Corca 
Laigidhe, the inhabitants of the bishopric of Ross, as they were in or 



74 BARRYMORE, 

shortly before the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland, thus : " O'Heidirs- 
ceoil (O'Driscoll), of Clear Harbour, King of Corca Laighdhe ; the 
O'FIoinns of Arda (near Skibbereen), the Hy Baghamhna, O'Cobhthaigh 
(O'Coffey and O'Cowig) of Glandore, O'Baire of (Durrus Peninsula, alias) 
Muintear Bhaire, and O'Heidirsceoil (Driscol) of Beare. In state papers 
the name is written O'Bakun, A.D. 1324; O'Baghaun, A.D. 1346; and 
O'Bahoun, A.D. 1385. 

The territory of the Hy Baghamhna, alias Ibawne, was the eastern 
extremity of what was politically the Kingdom of Corca Laighdhe, and 
ecclesiastically the bishopric of Ross, in or shortly before A.D. ii6g. In 
the Ecclesiastical Taxation of Ireland, A.D. 1306, the bishopric of Ross 
has three deaneries, O'Bathumpna (Ibawne), Corcyghteragh, and Boerri. 
O'Bathumpna contained Kilmoloda, Thamologe ( Timoleague), Disertrum, 
ahas Disertcrum (Disert, east of Clonakilty) ; Lislithig (Lislee), Dounagh- 
more, Croghargi (Kilnagross ?), Nathrug, and Killy. It also contained 
necessarily the Abbey de Fonte Vivo (Abbey Mahon) and probably Rath 
athbarry) and De Insula (Island), but in the Taxation these three are 
grouped with the cathedral church of Ross, Stradballyrossan, Killmacule, 
and Narid, alias Nadrid, apart from the three forementioned deaneries. 

The barony of "Ibawne and Barryroe" is a misnomer. Barryroe was 
never a barony or a half-barony distinct from Ibawne. The name ouglit 
be Ibawne or Barryroe, for it designated a territory called Ibawne from 
having been the O'Baghamhna's countiy before the Anglo-Norman in- 
vasion, A.D. ii6g, and called Barryroe from having been afterwards Barry- 
roe's country for five or six hundred years down to the beginning" of thi5 
century. 

William de Barry, of Maynaurpir, in Wales, was father of Philip de 
Barri, who possessed the cantreds of Olethan, Muscry Donnegan, and 
Kyllyde, in Ireland, and Maynaurpir Castle in Wales. The said Philip 
died at Maynaurpir in A.D. 1299-1300, and was succeeded by his elder 
surviving son, William fi'tzPhilip de Barri, who flourished circa. A.D. 12 13, 
in which year, according to the "Annals of Innisfallen." " a castle was built 
by Nicholas Baoi de Barri at Tymoleague," in Ibawne. The said WiUiam 
was succeeded by his son. Sir David fitzWilliam de Barn, Lord of Olethan. 
The said Sir David, who flourished A.D. 123 5- 1252, was not the Sir David 
de Barri who was Lord Justice of Ireland in A.D. 1267, and died circ. 
A.D. 1278. Between these two Sir Davids a John intervened. 

On the 8th of August, 1282, an inquisition at Kilmallock on John Fitz- 
Thomas Fitzgerald, slain at Callan A.D. 1261, found that the said John 
FitzThomas in his lifetime held one cantred at Kyllyde de Hy Connil and 
a castle in the same county [Limerick] of John de Barry for two services 
oi knights, and that same cantred is now worth one hundred pounds yearly 



BARRYMORE. 75 

in all issues [beyond deductions] ; but it was worth two hundred pounds 
yearly in the time of the foresaid John, 

The Barry pedigrees in the Gaelic language ignore that John de Barri, 
but not so the Barry pedigree given in A.D. 1602 by David Viscount 
Buttevant to Sir George Carew ; only the sentence, " He was Lord 
Justice of Ireland," that ought follow the name of David, son of John, is 
appended to John's own name in the most primitive extant copy, Lambeth 
Palace Library, vol. 635, fol. 194, and is appended to the name of David, 
son of David, son of John, in the Carew copies made in or after A.D. 161 5, 
those in Lambeth Palace Library, vol. 626, and Brit. Mus. Harl. 1425. 
The copy in Lambeth Palace Library, vol. 635, fol. 194, omits the names 
of John's father, William, and grandfather, Philip, and confounds a note 
on John, heir to his brother David, with a note on Philip or William, each 
of whom had a brother Robert, thus : " Jhon Barry, heyre to his brother 
Robert." Later copies omit that note and supply Philip's name, but not 
William's. 

Sir David fitzWilliam de Barry, therefore, was succeeded by his 
younger brother, John de Barry, who practically alienated the cantred of 
Kyllyde to John fitzThomas, ancestor of the Earls of Desmond. Doubt- 
lessly this John de Barri was the Barrymore said in the "Annals " to have 
been slain, together with John fitzThomas, and the latter's son, Maurice, 
at Callan, A.D. 1261. Doubtlessly, too, this Jolin de Barri was the father 
of Matilda de Barry, widow of the said Maurice. 

John de Barri, Lord of Olethan, was succeeded by his son. Sir David 
de Barri, who was Lord Justice of Ireland in A.D. 1267, and at his death, 
circ. A.D. 1278, was succeeded by his elder son, Sir John de Barry, who 
resigned Olethan in A.D. 1284 and Muskri Donnegan in A.D. 1285 to 
his brother, David fitzDavid de Barri, alias David Oge de Barri, called 
Vicecount Butevant in the pedigree of A.D. 1602, a title deliberately ex- 
cluded by Carew from the copy made by him in A.D. 161 5. " The Barries," 
he adds, "affirm that this David was the first Viscount Boutevant, but 
they err." — Lambeth Palace Library, vol. 626. David Oge de Barry, Lord 
of Olethan, had three' sons, of whom the eldest, John de Barri, was Lord 
of Olethan in succession to his father, and died without issue male, and 
the second eldest. Sir David de Barri, by his marriage with Mawde de 
Boulltron, had two sons, of whom the elder, David, succeeded to his uncle, 
John, as Lord of Olethan, and was ancestor of all subsequent Lords of 
Olethan down to A.D. 1557, as shewn in the foregoing chapter. 

Sir William fitzDavid de Barri, Knt, alias William Moyle Barry, alias 
the Barun Mael, the second son of Sir David fitzDavid fitzDavid de Barri 
and Mawde Boulltron, or Bolton, had Ibawne seemingly in succession to 
his uncle, John, since, in A.D. 1301, August 6th, licence was given to John 



76 BARRYMORE. 

de Barri to alienate land to the value of £20 a year in Muscry, Olethan, 
and Obaun. — Escheators' Inquisitions, 29 Edw. I. The presumption is 
that tlie said John de Barri so licensed was John fitzDavid Oge de Barri, 
then Lord of Olethan and Muscry Donnegan, and that he was also Lord of 
Obaun (Ibawne). A nephew of that Lord was Sir David fitzDavid de 
Barri, the Lord of Olethan and Muscry Donnegan who died in A.D. 1347 ; 
and another and younger nephew of the said Lord was Sir William fitz- 
David de Barri, Knt., alias William Moyle Barry, who possessed the three 
manors of Timoleague, Lislee, and Rathbarry, which, together, constituted 
the so-called lordship of Ibawne. 

Sir William fitzDavid Barry, alias William Moyle Barry, of Ibawne, 
may have been the William fitzDavid de Barri pardoned his transgres- 
sions the 1 6th Nov., 13 17 ("Calendar Pat and Close Rolls, Ireland"), 
and the William fitzDavid de Barri who purchased a royal writ in A.D. 
1324. He still more probably was the William fitzDavid de Barri sum- 
moned, A.D. 1335, to attend John Darcy, Lord Justice of^ Ireland, with 
horses and arms on an expedition to Scotland. He was the William, 
brother of David de Barri, against whom, in A.D. 1344, the sheriff, Nicholas 
de Barri, had a writ at the suit of Brother John Lurcher, prior of the 
Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, and for not returning it was displaced. 
The same Sir William appears to have been the William fitzDavid de 
Barri, Knt, who, in A.D. 1355, was one of the electors and sureties of 
Nicholas de Courcey, sheriff of the county of Cork, and who, on the 8th 
of December, 1355, with David de Rupe, Knt. (Lord Roche), Milo de 
Courcy, Knt (Lord de Courcey), and William fitzjohn de Barri, Knt 
(Lord Barry Oge), was appointed a guardian of the peace for the county 
of Cork. 

A.D. 1355, April 24. Writ to withdraw the King's hands from the 
manors of Rath, Tamelagh, and Lyslye, and two and a-half carucates 
(piloughlands) of land in Casselhusk, Tryscrynelan, Drumcoynge, and 
Dromkerry, of William fitzDavid de Barri, Knt. (taken into the King's 
hands on account of alienacions without licence, as if held of the King in 
capite), it being found on inquisition taken in accordance with a writ to 
enquire better, that the aforesaid manors of the Rath and of Tamelagh 
and two and a-half carucates of land are held of the Bishop of Ross as 
of his manor of Rosselhyr for the service of forty shillings rent, and suit 
at his fortnightly court, and that the said manor of Lysleye is held of 
Robert Fitzjohn, as of his manor of Rynnanylan, by the service of twenty 
shillings of royal service when scutage runs, and twenty-eight shillings 
rent, and suit at his fortnightly court—" Cal. Pat and Close Rolls, Ire- 
land." 

Sir William fitzDavid de Barri, Knt., aUas William Moyle Barry, 



BARRYMORE. ']'] 

married Margaret, eldest daughter of Milo, Lord de Courcy. In A.D. 
1372 she was one of the co-heirs of her brother, Milo fitzMilo, Lord de 
Courcy, and according to the Barry pedigree of A.D. 161 5, she died in 
A.D. 1373, and was buried in the Friary of Timoleague founded by her 
husband. Record in the "Abbey Booke of Timologg " : " Obiit Margerra 
de Coursey, uxor Domini Willelmi Barry primus fundator huius conven- 
tus 1373." — De Coursey Pedigree, Harleian MS., 1425, fol. 69. 

A.D. 1372. The King bad the Escheator to divide the heritage of 
Milo de Courcy, of Rynroun, etc., into four equal parts among the co- 
heirs, and to give to William fitzDavid de Barri, Knt, and to his wife, 
Margaret, the eldest of the four sisters and co-heirs of the said Milo, 
possession of the portion of the said Margaret by reason of their having 
issue. The other co-heirs were Richard Lenfaunt, son of Johanna, the 
second sister of the said Milo ; Johanna de Cantilupe, and Margaret 
Carrew, daughters of Katherine, the third sister ; and Margaret Courcy, 
daughter of Anastacia, the fourth sister. — " Cal. Pat et Close Rolls, I." 

Sir William fitzDavid de Barri, Knt, was succeeded by his son, Sir 
William fitzWilliam de Barri, Knt, who may have been the William 
Roche (Rothe-Ruadh, Roe, Red) de Barry, late farmer of the temporalities 
of Ross, ordered in A.D. 1379 to deliver them to the Bishop-Elect, Ber- 
nard O'Conghur.— "Cal. P. C. R. L" In A.D. 1385 King Richard II. bad 
all baihffs, etc., to protect William fitzWilliam de Barry, Knt, and his 
men, etc., his tenants in Obahoun (Ibawne) and Drommanagh in the 
county of Cork being for the greater part destroyed. — " Cal. P. C. R., I." 

Sir William fitzWilliam de Barri of Ibawne is not mentioned in the 
sixteenth and seventeenth century Barryroe pedigrees, obviously because 
he left no male issue. He was succeeded by his brother, Lawrence, 
whose name appears in all the Barryroe pedigrees, but in no contem- 
porary documents seen by the present writer. In Archdall's edition of 
"Lodge's Irish Peerage" this name is grossly misplaced. There in the 
pedigree of the Earls of Barrymore, descendants of this Lawrence, (i) 
David Oge Barry, living A.D. 1290, is father of (2) William Moyle Barry, 
who was alive in AD. 1372, and he of (3) Lawrence, and Lawrence of (4) 
John living AD. 13 12, and John of (5) David, and David of (6) David 
fitzDavid, Lord of Olethan AD. 1332 : the facts being that of those thus 
numbered No. i was father of Nos. 4 and 5, No. 5 was father of No. 6 
and No. 2, and No. 2 was father of No. 3. Lawrence heads the Barryroe 
pedigree by Florence McCarthy More. William Moyle, the father of 
Lawrence is skipped over, and Lawrence appears as son of David de 
Barri in the Barryroe pedigree by Lord Buttevant in A.D. 1602 ; but in 
that pedigree, as emended by Carew in A.D, 161 5, and in the Barryroe 
pedigrees in Gaelic, and in the Barrymore pedigree in Archdall's Lodge, 



yS BARRYMORE. 

William Moyle is father of Lawrence. The pedigrees of A.D. 1602 and 
A.D. 161 5 make brothers of the first and second cousins John Kittagh 
Barrymore, Lord of Olethan, and Lawrence Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne. 
That of A.D. 1602 adds: This John entayled his lands for default of 
yssu male of his own boddie uppon the yssu of his brother Lawrence. 
Lawrence Barrier Lord of Ybawne, his portion of land was Ybawne by 
Carbry. He was the first that was called Barriroe, of whom the Lord 
Barry, Vic. Butevant, now lyv 1602 descends. The pedigree of A.D. 161 5 
more curtly says : There was an entayle between John and Lawrence. 
Lawrence the first Barryroe. Of this Lawrence David Lord Barry, 
Vicecount Bottevant, who lived in anno 161 5, descended. 

Lawrence Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, married Orlaghe, daughter to 
O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, and had issue James. According to the 
pedigree of 161 5, he had also by her two younger sons, Robert and 
John ; but in the pedigree of 1 602 they are Robert and Thomas, and 
not by her, and are marked illegitimate. Robert, whose posterity lived 
in Ibawne was father of Thomas, who was father of Eddye, father of 
Richard, father of Eddye ; and Thomas, or John, whose posterity lived 
in Ibawne, was father of James, who was father of Redmond, and he of 
David. Lawrence, Lord of Ibawne, was succeeded by his son, James 
Barrie, Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, who, according to the pedigrees of 
1602 and 161 5, married a daughter of the Earl of Desmond, and had an 
only son, Richard. According to Miss Hickson's pedigree of the Earls 
of Desmond, Maurice, first Earl of Desmond, by his first wife, Margaret, 
fifth daughter of Richard, Earl of Ulster (Harleian MS.), and by his 
second wife, Margaret, daughter of Connor O'Brien, Prince of Thomond, 
had a daughter married to a James Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne. Chrono- 
logically, however, a daughter of Gerald FitzMaurice, Earl of Desmond, 
and sister of Ellice, wife of John Kittagh Barrymore, would have better 
suited this James, Lord of Ibawne. He was succeeded by his only son, 
Richard Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne. The pedigree of A.D. 1602 in Lam- 
beth Ralace Library, vol. 635, foL 194, says: Richard Barry, Barryroe, 
married a daughter to O'Driscoll, and had issue (i) James Barry, Barriroe ; 
(2) Jhon, s. p. (sine prole, without issue) ; (3) Redmond, slayne by his 
nephew, David Downe. The pedigree of A.D. 161 5 in Lambeth Palace 
Library, vol. 626, fol. 60, says : Richard Barryroe, Lord of Ybawne, 
married a daughter to O'Drischall, and had issue (i) James Barryroe, 
(2) John Barry, (3) Redmond, slayne by Davy Downe Barry. Richard 
Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, was succeeded by his eldest son, James Barry- 
roe, Lord of Ibawne. The pedigree in Lambeth Palace Library, vol. 
635, fol. 194, is by this lord's great-grandson, David Viscount Buttevant 
in A.D. 1602, and omits particulars humiliating to both of them. The 



BARRYMORE. 



79 



pedigree in Lambeth Palace Library, vol. 626, fol. 60, British Museum, 
Harleian, vol. 1426, fol. 32, etc., is the foregoing pedigree with additions 
by Sir George Carew, Lord Carevv in A.D. 161 5. The pedigree in 
Lambeth Palace Library, vol. 635, fol. 25, is headed: "This pedigree, 
with the notes, was given unto me by Florence McCartie," and in the 
"Life and Letters of Florence MacCarthy Mor" it is said to be in Carew's 
own handwriting. But it appears from the letter of Florence to Lord 
Burghley, 15 January, 1595, this pedigree was composed by Florence 
McCarthy More for the use of Lord Burghley, Queen Elizabeth's prin- 
cipal Secretary of State, and tliat the heading was originally added by 
Lord Burghley. 

The Pedigree by Viscount Buttevant in a.d. 1602, says : — 



El-ANE, daughter to Cor-=FjAMES Barry, =flLiN, daughter to Fynin 
mocke MacTeig Cartie, Barriroe. ] MacDermond Downe, 
Lord of Muskrye. 



MacDermond Downe, 
Lord of Carbry, and 
called McCartie Reoghe. 



I. Isabel, daughter^RiCHARD=p2. Moryda, to 



to James, sonn to 
Garrett, ihe Great 
Earl of Kildare. 



I 
James Barry, Vicecount 
Bdtevant, died prisoner in 
Dublin. 



MacMahon of 
Corkevaskin 
in Tomond. 



I. James Barry, 

s.p. 



Richard, murdered 
by his cosin, David 
Downe. 



David Do\VNE=f=ELLis,da. to 
Barry. | Barrie Oge, 

|-Redmond. 

j-2. Richard. 

j-3. James. 

[-4. John. 
Thomas, married |-Ei,ane. 
in Fuentarabia, [-Catheline, 
in Biscaya. 



That Pedigree Interpolated by Carew in a.d. 1615, says: — 

Elaine, daughter to Cormoke=pjAMES Bakryroe=pIline, daughter to Fynin McDermond Downe 



McTeg, Lord of Muskrye. 
By Donel McCarthy Reogh. 



Donald 
Dermond. 



Lord of Ybawne. I McCarty Reoghc. 



Isabel, daugh— 
ter to James, 
sonn to Ger- 
ald, Earl of 
Kildare. 



I 

James Barryroe, and after 
the deathe of James, Lord 
Barry, he was Lord Barry. 
He married Iline, base 
daiighter to Sir Cormoke 
McCartie Reaghe. 



:Ric H ard^More, daughter James 



ofthe Rathe, 
in Ybawne, 
wassupposed 
to be a bas- 
tard. 



to McMahon 
of Corkevskin 
in Tomond. 



Barry, 

s.p. 



Davy Downe: 
Barryroe, 
Lord of 
Ybawne. 



,=pELLIS, 

daughter to 
Barry oge. 
I 



Richard Barry, i. 


— Redmond. 


4. Thomas 


Elane. 


Catherine 


murdered by 2. 


— Richard. 


married in 






Davy Downe. 3. 


—James. 


Fuentarabie, 






4- 


—John. 


in Spayne. 







8o BARRYMORE. 

The Pedigree by Florence McCarthy More in a.d. 1595, says: — 

Laurence Barry, called Barnroe,=p 
Lord of Ybawne. | 

Daughter of Coimocke McTeg, Lord=fJoHN Barry,(i) called=f Daughter of Finin McCartie Reoghe. 
ofMuskry. Bastards by Sir Doned I Barriroe, Lord of I 
McCartie Reoghe. | Ybawne. | 

Doned Dermond, s.p., slayne by I 

Walter Fitzerald, s.p. I I 

I I 

Daughter of one of the Fitz-=pRiCHARD, of the David Barry, ^Daughter of Barrioge. 

gerald's in the County Rathe, in called Barriroe, I 

Kildare. Ybawne. Lord ofYbawne. 



I ^) I (3) I (^) I (3) I (3) I 

Base daughter to^jAMES Barry, i. Redmond Barky,=p 2. Richard, 3 David, 4. Johni — Daughter. 

Sir Cormocke I Vicecount of Barriroe, s.p. s.p, s.p. s.p. — Daughter. 
McCartie Reoghe | Botovant. 

Florence MacCarthy Mor, the writer of the Barry pedigrees of A.D. 
1595, and David Barry, Viscount Buttevant, the writer of the Barry 
pedigrees of A.D. 1602, were first-and-second cousins, as David's maternal 
grandfather, Cormac na haoine McCarthy Reagh, and Florence's father, 
Donogh MacCarthy Reagh were brothers. Both Florence and David ought 
have known the particulars of the two conflicting marriages of the elder 
James FitzRichard Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, who, by his first marriage, 
was great-grandfather of David, and by his second was granduncle-in-law 
of Florence. Though David Viscount Buttevant and Florence McCarthy 
Mor were near kinsmen, they were bitter enemies, and sorely defamed 
and damaged one another. In the pedigree of 1595 Florence charges 
David's grandfather with illegitimacy and David's father with usurpa- 
tion and murder. In the pedigree of 1602 Davic^ suppresses such flaws 
in his title to the lands and honours of Ibawne, e nd dwells on the mis- 
deeds of his legitimate granduncle, David Downe Barryroe. But that 
allegation of illegitimacy is inserted by Carew in the copy of A.D. 161 5. 
Florence heedlessly makes Lawrence Barryroe to have been the father 
of a John Barryroe, and that John to have been the husband of the 
daughters of Cormocke McTeig McCarthy, of Muskerry, and Finin 
McCarthy Reagh. But the Gaelic pedigrees of circ. A.D. 1550 here con- 
firm the pedigrees of 1602 and 161 5, that Lawrence was father of James, 
and James of Richard, and Richard of James, the Barryroe who was 

(i) This John was first contracted to McCartie's daughter ; but married to the Lord of Muskre's 
daughter and had yssu Richard ; but repentinge his errour tooke McCartie's daughter to his wife and 
repudiated the other, reputinge his son Richard as a bastard, being so censured by the Spiritual Court. 

(2) This James to make himself Barriroe murdred Redmond and John the sonnes of David Barry. 
Richard and David the other two brothers fled to the Earle of Desmond, who he likewise by practise were 
made away : Also after the death of James Barry Vicecount Botevant he dispossessed his daughter and 
heiress by force and made himself Vicecount. 

(3) These four brothers were murdred by the hand and practise of James, father to David, the now 
Vicecount of Botovant. 



BARRYMORE. 8 1 

husband of the said ladies. According to the late Mr. H. W. Gillman 
in this "Journal" for October, 1892, and according to the late Mr. R. F. 
Cronnelly's " History of the Eoghanachts," Cormac MacTeige MacCarthy, 
Lord of Muskerry, b. 141 1, d. 1494, was brother of Ellen, mother of 
Fmghin McCarthy Reagh, d. 1504, and therefore Lord Ibawne's two 
v/ives, Elynor, daughter of the said Comiac, and Ilaine, daughter of the 
said Fmghin, were first-and-second cousins. In their day, by the civil 
and ecclesiastical law, marriage without a papal dispensation was null and 
void if either contracting party was already betrothed to anyone akin 
to the other contracting party to the fourth degree, that is, to third cousin- 
ship inclusive ; and so, in Church and state, when Lord Ibawne, being 
already betrothed to Ilayne, married Elynor without a papal dispensa- 
tion, the marriage was null, and its issue was illegitimate. 

On the 1 1 Nov., 1 563, at the 24th Session of the Council of Trent, the 
betrothal impediment to marriage was restricted to the first degree, that 
of brothers or sisters ; but towards the close of the fifteenth century, 
when the above ladies were marrying, that impediment for Church and 
state extended to the fourth degree just as it did in the third quarter of 
the thirteenth century, when St. Thomas of Aquino wrote : 

Anciently consanguinity even to the more remote degrees was an impediment 
to marriage. . . . and reasonably as far as the seventh degree, because 
memory of the common root did not easily remain beyond that. . . . But 
afterwards, about these last times, the Church's interdict was restricted to the 
fourth degree, because it had become useless and dangerous to prohibit degrees 
of consanguinity beyond that. . . . Not affinity is caused by betrothals as 
by marriage, but something like affinity, and called justicia publicae honestatis, 
which is an impediment to marriage just as are affinity and consanguinity, and 
following the same degrees, and having efficacy from its institution by the 
Church on account of its decency. ... A dispensation was formerly, and 
is now, given more easily in the remote degrees of affinity, than in the remote 
degrees of consanguinity. ... If the affinity or consanguinity is proved, 

they have to be separated, even though they be actually contracted 

The contumacious can be excommunicated." 

Here St. Thomas states that, when he was writing, the impediment to 
marriage caused by betrothals "followed the same degrees," as did the 
impediments from consanguinity, and marriage-affinity, that is, was then 
"restricted to the fourth degree," which is third cousinship. According 
to Sanchez it stood at that till restricted to the first degree at the Council 
of Trent in 1563. 

In the meantime, as intimated by Florence McCarthy, the validity 
of the marriage of James, Lord of Ibawne, to Elane, daughter to Mac- 
Carthy, Lord of Muskerry, was questioned because of a pre-existing 
betrothal of him to her first-and-second cousin, Ilin, daughter of Mac- 



82 BARRYMORE. 

Carthy Reagh, Lord of Carberry ; and the Spiritual Court, which then 
had civil jurisdiction over matrimonial cases, pronounced the said mar- 
riage null and void, both civilly and ecclesiastically, its issue illegitimate, 
its contracted parties liable to excommunication if contumaciously ad- 
hesive to one another, and the previous promise of marriage to Ilin 
MacCarthy Reagh still obligatory. All primarily affected by that pro- 
nouncement acquiesced in it Lord Ibawne and Elane MacCarthy of 
Muskerry parted company. He married Ilin MacCarthy Riagh, as in 
duty bound, and Elane married, strange to say, Donal MacCarthy Reagh, 
v/ho was her rival's brother and her own first-and-second cousin. For 
that marriage, however, a dispensation in consanguinity was manifestly 
necessary, but from the peculiar hardship of Elane's case, and to close 
the whole controversy, that dispensation, we may be sure, was readily 
granted. The issue of that marriage were Donal, who died without issue, 
and Dermod, who was slain by Walter, son of Gerald, Earl of Kildare. 
On the death of Elane, Donal McCarthy Reagh married a second wife, 
by whom he had surviving issue. 

The issue of the marriage of James Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, and 
Elane MacCarthy of Muskerry was one son, Richard, called Richard of 
the Rath, from Rathbarry, his place of residence. According to Florence 
McCarthy Mor, A.D. 1595, this Richard was reputed illegitimate by his 
father, and according to Lord Carew, A.D. 161 5, he was supposed to be 
illegitimate. Though he was his father's eldest son, he did not succeed 
to his father's lands and honours, but suffered them to go to his half- 
brother, James, and next to his other half-brother, David. However, he 
seems to have been well provided for, and he made honourable alliances. 
His first wife was Isabel, daughter of James Fitzgerald, a son to Garrett, 
the Great Earl of Kildare ; his second wife was Mory, daughter to 
MacMahon of Corkebaskin in the county of Clare. By his first wife he 
hand one son, James, Viscount Butte van t, ancestor of the Earls of Barry- 
more and of the Smith-Barrys ; and by liis second wife he had one son, 
Richard, who was slain by David Downe Barryroa 

By his marriage with Ilin MacCarthy Reagh, James Barryroe, Lord 
of Ibawne, had two sons, James and David Downe. He was immediately 
succeeded by the elder of these, James fitzjames Barryroe, a Lord of 
Ibawne not mentioned by Florence MacCarthy Mor in 1595, nor styled, 
like his father, "James Barry Barriroe," but merley " i James Barry, s. p." 
by David Viscount Buttevant in 1602, and still more curtly "James 
Barry, s. p.," by Lord Carew in 161 5. Rightly, however, in the "Annals 
ol the Four Masters" he is styled " The Barry Roe," 2ln hAHiM^]) nn^-D, 
thus : 

"A.D. 1507. The Barry Roe, i.e., James, the son of James, went on 



BARRYMORE. 83 

a pilgrimage to Spain attended by many of the chiefs of his people ; and 
after having perfomied their pilgrimage they went into a ship to return 
back, and their death or their living has not been known ever sinca 
Upon the pilgrimage aforesaid along with the Barry (21ii b4ii|i4)5) was 
drowned Donnell, the son of Tiege, son of Gilla-Michael O'Fiaich, quali- 
fied by his knowledge of Latin and poetry to become chief professor of 
history for Ireland and Scotland." 

James fitz James Barryroe;, Lord of Ibawne, died without issue, as is 
aforesaid on the authority of David Viscount Buttevant and Sir George 
Lord Carew. His immediate successor was his younger brother, David 
Downe Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, barely named " David Barry " by his 
first-and-second cousin, David Viscount Buttevant, in the pedigree of 
A.D. 1602, but styled "Davy Downe Barryroe, Lord of Ybawne," by 
Sir George Carew, Lord Carew in the pedigree of A.D. 161 5, and styled 
" David Barry, called Barriroe, Lord of Ybawne," by Florence McCarthy 
Mor in the pedigree of A.D. 1595. Certainly, therefore, David Downe 
Barry was Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, in succession to his full brother, 
James, yet not with the cordial assent of all his kinsmen, for, according to 
David Viscount Buttevant, followed in this by Lord Carew, " he slew his 
uncle, Redmond, and murdered his cosin" (here standing for nephew), 
Richard, younger son of Richard of the Rath." According to the pedi- 
gree of A.D. 1595, this Lord of Ibawne married a daughter of Barrioge, 
and thus had issue (i) Redmond Barry, s. p. ; Barriroe, s. p. ; (2) Richard, 
s. p. ; (3) David, s. p. ; (4) John, s p. ; daughter, daughter. According to 
the pedigree of A.D. 1602, David Downe Barry had an illegitimate son, 
Thomas, married in Fuenterabia, in Biscaya, and by marriage with Ellis, 
daughter of Barrioge, had issue (i) Redmond, (2) Richard), (3) James, 
(4) Jhon, Elane, Catheline. The pedigTee of A,D. 161 5 says in Lambeth 
Palace Library, vol. 626, fol. 60 : Davy Downe Barryroe, Lord of Ybawne, 
married Ellis, daughter to Barry oge, and by her had issue (i) Redmond, 
(2) Richard, (3) James, (5) John, (4) Thomas, married in Fuentarabie in 
Spayne ; Elane, Catherine ; and says in British Museum, Harleian MS., 
1435, fol. 32, similarly: David Doune Barryroe, Lord of Ybawne, married 
Ellis, daughter to Barry Oge, and thus had issue (i) Redmond, (2) 
Richard, (3) James, (4) John, Thomas, married in ffuentirabie in Spaine ; 
Ellenor, Kath. The pedigree of A.D. 161 5 wrongly includes Thomas 
among the legitimate issue of David Downe Barryroe. In the pedigree 
by Lord Buttevant in A.D. 1602 and the pedigree founded on it by Lord 
Carew in A.D. 161 5 the third legitimate brother is wrongly named James, 
but is rightly named David in the pedigree by Florence McCarthy Mor 
in A.D. 1595, though there, wrongly, the name David is followed by the 
letters s. p. for the words sine prole, to signify that the said David Oge 



^4 BARRYMORE. 

died without issue. The name is David six times in the settlements of 
the Barrymore and Barryroe manors and lands in A.D. 1556, and the said 
David shall be seen hereinafter to have left legitimate issue. 

The sixteenth and seventeenth century Barry pedigrees mention no 
Lord of Ibawne's female issue before the two daughters of David Downe 
Barryroe, and omit to say whether these two ever married. It appears, 
however, from the Clandermoda McCarthy pedigree in Lambeth Palace 
Library, vol. 635, that David Downe Barryroe had a grand-aunt, an aunt, 
and a sister married respectively to a father, a son, and a grandson in that 
stout branch of the MacCarthies. The pedigree is headed : " Cartie of 
Clandermond in Carbrye, descended from MacCartie Reoghe. The lands 
which they of that sept had was forty-two ploughlands," and says : 
Donell, son of Donell, son of MacCartie Closage, married, first, a daughter 
to Barriroe, and had issue a son, Donoghe who had the castle of Kilco, 
with other lands, for his portion. Donell, son of Donell, son of MacCartie 
Closage, married, secondly, Morin, daughter to O'Sullivan, and thus had, 
with other issue — 1st, Dermond, and 4th, Cormocke. 

The said Dermond was father of Donell, who married Barryroe's 
daughter, and thus was grandfather of Owen Boy, slain in rebellion 
A.D. 1602. The said Cormac had Cloghune Castle, and by his second 
v/ife, a daughter of Barryroe, was father of Donell, who was attainted. 

In documents or copies of documents of his own time David Downe 
Barryroe is not mentioned by Christian name. He was the Red Barey 
of the first of the three following extracts, and the Barry Roo, alias the 
Lord Redde Barry, of the second, and either he or his son, Redmond, 
was the Lord Barre Rowe of the third, all three extracts being from the 
"Calendar of Carew MSS." 

A.D. 1539, Dec. 20. John Travers to Mr. FitzWilliam : 
. . . We have put James FitzMorishe, otherwise called with you 
Lord of Desmond, in possession of as many castles in his country as he 
thought he was able to keep, and have also plucked the chief strength 
that the pretended Earl of Desmond had, called James Fitzjohn. These 
be the names of them that were near unto him : Gerald Mac Shane, the 
White Knight, the Lord Bare, who came at no Deputy many years ; and 
Makarte Rewghe, the Red Barry, and the Young Barey. We have their 
pledges, their bonds, and their oaths also taken. . . — Vol. 602, p. 126. 
A.D. 1542, Sep. 26. The Great Barry and others. 
Indenture, 26 Sep., 34 Hen. VIII., between Sir Anthony Sentleger, 
Deputy ; James Earl of Desmond, etc., of the one part, and the Lord 
Barre, alias the Great Barre ; Macharhymore, Lord de Rupe, alias the 
Lord Roche ; Maghartie Reaghe. Tady McCormog, Lord of Musgrie ; 
Barry Oge, alias the Young Barre ; O'Sulyvan Beare^ captain of his 



BARRYMORE. 85 

nation ; Barry Roo, alias the Lord Reade Barry ; McDonogho of Allowe, 
captain of his nation ; and Sir. Gerald Fitzjohn of the other part. — Vol. 
603, p. 60. The rest of the indenture is already given under its proper 
date in the chapter on Barrymore AD. i S49 = " What Ireland is and how 
much." 

These English nobles and most worshipful captains was degenerate 
from the English laws: — 

In Kyery [Munster] — The Earl of Desmond and his Gerotes ; Lord 
Barre of Buttemunt ; Lord Rowche of [Fe]armoye ; Lord Barry of 
Kynnalea ; Lord Condon of [Fejarmevye ; Lord Barre Rowe of the 
Rouhe ; Lord Cowrsey of Kynsale ; Lord Cowgan ; Lord Barrett ; White 
Knight ; Knight of the Valley ; Desmonds of the county of Waterford ; 
Powers ; Bourkes in the county of Limerick ; Butlers in the county of 
Kilkenny and the county of Fiddyard. 

In Connaught — Lord Bourk of Konykecowle ; Lord Bourk of Glan- 
rekard ; Lord Bremegam of Aury ; Sir Miles Stanton's sons ; Sir Walter 
Barrett's sons ; Lord Nangle. 

Ulster — Savadge of Lekayle, knight ; FitzOwlyn of Twsbard ; Besets 
01 the Glyns. 

Meath — Dillons; Daltons ; Terels ; Dallamars. — Vol. 623, p. 173a. 

David Downe Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, was succeeded by Redmond, 
his eldest son by his marriage with Ellis, daughter of Barry Oge, that is, 
it seems, daughter of William Barry Oge, father of the Philip Barry Oge 
who had letters patent for his manor, lands, and head rents from Queen 
Mary, the 22 of October, the first year of her reign, by the name of Philip 
Lord Barry, alias Younge Barry, alias Barry Oge, and v/hose father, 
William, is therein mentioned. 

Of Redmond Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, and of his three younger 
brothers, Richard, David, and John, the. Barryroe pedigree by their 
second cousin, Florence McCarthy Mor, says : These four brethren were 
murdered by the hands and practise of James, father of David, the now 
Vicecount Buttevant. This James to make himself Barriroe murdered 
Redmond and John, the sonnes of David Barry. Richard and David, 
the other two brothers, fled to the Erie of Desmond, who he likewise b}' 
practise were made away. Also, after the death of James Barry, Vice- 
count Botevant, he dispossessed his daughter and heiress by force, and 
made himself Vicecount. 

The Barrymore pedigree by Florence MacCarthy Mor says : Im- 
mediately after the death of this James Barry, Vicecount Botevant [James 
fitzjohn Barrymore], James Barry of the Rathe, in Ybawne, who not long 
before in murderinge of his cosen, Redmond Barry, and his brother had 
made himself Lord of Ybawne, otherwise called Barryroe's countrye, did 



86 BARRYMORE. 

by treason get into the possession of Barryscourt, which is the Lord 
Barry's chiefe house, and by stronge hand- dispossessed the Lady Cathe- 
rine, wife to the now Lord Power, which castle and country he possessed 
during his lyfe, caUing himselfe Vicecount of Botevant, which title and 
possessions David, his sonne, at this present dotlie enjoye in prejudice to 
the rightful heiress of James Barry, the trew and lawful Vicecount of 
Botevant. 

The letter of Florence MacCarthy Mor to Lord Burghley, dated the 
29th of Noveanber, 1594, says: His [David Vicecount Buttevant's] father 
was a man of no regard until he attained to Barryroe's country by murder- 
ing the heyres thereof, and also got Barrymore's country by deceit and 
treachery, being not of Barrymora of Botevant's country nor kindred, nor 
having nothing to do with him, nor was ever established by any prince, 
and being Sir John of Desmond's only confederate to breed the last 
rebellion, he was therefore committed by the Lord Justice and the Lord 
General to the castel of Dublinge, where he was kept until he died. 
Which is no great monument of his loyalty, etc. — " Life and Letters of 
Florence MacCarthy Mor," p. 120. 

1595, January 15. Florence MacCarthy Mor to Lord Burghley: 

My humble and most bonden dutie remembered, I have, according 
to your Lordship's pleasure, sent here inclosed the names of the last 
Viscounts of Buttiavaunt, with such issue as remains of them, wherein I 
have also made mencon of the Barry Roes of Ibawne, otherwise called 
Barry Roe's contre, and of James Barry, this supposed Lord Barry's 
father, who descended of a bastard of Barry Roe's contry, as also by 
what means the said James did attaine first to Barry Roe's contry, and 
afterwards to the Lord Viscount Barrymore of Buttiavaunt's contry. — 
"Life and Letters of Florence McCarthy Mor," p. 130. 

In A.D. 161 5 Lord Carew, in copying the Barry pedigree given to him 
in A.D. 1602 by David Viscount Buttevant, interpolated the following 
words regardmg that Viscount's own grandfather, " [Richard] of the Rath, 
in Ibawne, was supposed to be a bastard." 

The "Annals of the Four Masters," in an obituary notice of James, 
son of Richard of the Rath, state that in his early days he had no hope 
or expectation of obtaining the title of Barryroe. 

A.D. 1 581. Barrymore (James, the son of Richard, son of Thomas, 
son of Edmond), who was in captivity in Dublin, died. This James was 
of the true stock of the Barry Roes. He was a man who had suffered 
much affliction and misfortune in the beginning [of his career], and who 
had [at first] no hope or expectation of obtaining even the title of Barry 
Roe. But, however, God bestowed upon him the chieftainship both of 
Barry Mael and Barry Roe ; and this was not all, but he was elected 



BARRYMORE. Sy 

chief over the Barry Mores, after the extinction of these chieftains whose 
hereditary right it was to rule over that seigniory till that period. His 
son, David Barry, was afterwards called the Barry by the Earl of Des- 
mond ; and his second son was by law lord over the Barry Roes. 

It is surprising that, according to the Four Masters, the father of 
Richard of the Rath was a Thomas, son of an Edmond, 

Thei success of James fitzRichard of the Rath against his first cousins 
is easily accounted for. In the first place, in the despatches of Lord 
Justice Pelham, he is charged with arrogance and obstinacy : and, so, he 
had audacity, the first element of success. In the next place, at Rath- 
barry, in succession to his father, he appears to have been wealthy and 
powerful. Possibly he had the whole manor of Rathbarry, which was 
one-third of Ibawnet His grandmother, Ilin MacCarthy, a daughter of 
MacCarthy, Prince of Muskerry, and a prospective daughter-in-law of 
MacCarthy, Priiice of Carberry, could not have been set aside by Barry- 
roe without liberal dower for herself and liberal provision for her infant. 
With a stain upon his birth, that infant, Richard of the Rath, when he 
came to man's estate could hardly have secured as wives a granddaughter 
of an Earl of Kildare, and a daughter of MacMahon of Corkabaskin, 
were he not wealthy and powerful. The chief source, however, of the 
success of James fitzRichard of the Rath was his marriage with Iline, 
illegitimate daughter of Sir Cormac MacCarthy Reagh, Lord of Carberry, 
Through that marriage, the forces of Carberry, one thousand or two 
thousand warriors, were transferred from the side of Sir Cormac's first 
and second cousin, Redmond, lawful Lord of Ibawne, to the side of Sir 
Cormac's son-in-law, James fitzRichard of the Rath, the would-be Lord 
of Ibawne. On the side of James fitzRichard of the Rath were also his 
grandmother's kinsmen, the MacCarthys of Muskerry ; and through them 
and MacCarthy Reagh the other Gaels of south-west Munster might be 
counted on against Anglo-Normans. On the other hand, as Ibawne was 
enclosed between Carberry and the Atlantic ocean, Redmond Barryroe 
was isolated from direct Anglo-Norman aid, except by sea, whereby aid 
could come only in driblets. Moreover, as the Government of England 
by becoming Protestant had discarded mere Papal matrimonial impedi- 
ments, it was not likely to harrass James fitzRichard of the Rath for 
taking possession of a lordship from which he had been debarred for 
nothing but one such impediment, an impediment, too, that was to be 
abolished also by a Catholic General Council, then sitting, the Council of 
Trent, A, D. 1 547-1 563. 

The victory of James fitzRichard of the Rath Barryroe over Redmond 
fitzDavid Downe Barryroe may be dated circ. A.D. 1550, the middle year 
of the reign of Edward VI. That victory must have been of prior date 



88 BARRYMORE. 

to the entail of the Barry more estates on the said James fitzRichard by 
Edmond fitzjohn Lord Barrymore, who, as seen in the foregoing chapter, 
was aUve on the 28th of November, 1553, but not on the 9th of February, 
1556. 

As already stated, on the authority of Florence MacCarthy Mor, when 
their eldest brother, Redmond Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, and their 
youngest brother, John, had been slain, Richard and David, the remain- 
ing two sons of David Downe Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, fled to the 
Earl of Desmond. In those days the Earls of Desmond were at the 
head of the Anglo-Normans of south-west Munster, and received tribute 
from the Gaelic princes, MacCarthy Mor and MacCarthy Reagh. Be- 
sides, Article 3 of the submission of the noblemen and chieftains of south- 
west Munster, on the 26th of September, 1 542, said : "Injured parties 
shall not seek any remedy by force, but complain to the Earl of Des- 
mond and the three bishops above-named" [the Bishops of Waterford, 
Cork, and Ross] "who shall have power to summon the parties," and 
soforth, as in the foregoing chapter. 

Neither jointly nor severally, however, did the British Government, 
the Earl of Desmond, the Lord Barrymorei, Barryoge, or any other friend 
of the fugitives try by force to reinstate them. All seem to have ac- 
quiesced in the usurpation of Ibawne by James fitzRichard of the Rath 
Barryroe on the understanding that, next after him and his legitimate 
issue male, his fugitive cousins, Richard fitzDavid Downe Barryroe and 
David fitzDavid Downe Barryroe and their legitimate issue male, should 
succeed to the manors, castles, and lands of Ibawne, just as if both mar- 
riages of the elder James fitzRichard Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, were 
equally lawful, and priority of inheritance were due to the issue of the 
earlier marriage. In order to make that understanding more palatable 
to James fitzRichard of the Rath and to his fugitive cousins, and because 
of a somewhat similar settlement by Edmond fitzjohn Lord Barrymore, 
who had no issue, James fitzjohn Lord Barrymore, who had a daughter 
but not a son, settled the Barrymore manors, castles, and lands, first on 
himself and his own issue male, of which he had none ; next on the three 
Barryroes in the order of James fitzRichard, Richard fitzDavid, and David 
fitzDavid, and on their issue male ; and lastly on the testator's right heirs. 
Thereupon James fitzRichard Barryroe settled the Barryroe manors, 
castles, and lands, first, on himself and his numerous issue male ; next on 
his fugitive cousins and their issue male, and next on James fitzjohn Lord 
Barrymore. 

Regarding the settlements of the Barrymore estates by Edmond fitz- 
john Lord Barrymore and his brother, James fitzjohn Lord Barrymore, 
the Barry pedigree by David Viscount Buttevant in A.D. 1602, says: 



BARRYMORE. 89 

"This Edmond entayled his lands for default of yssue male of himself 
and his brother, then to descend unto James Barry, father to David 
Lord Barry, and to their heirs for ever. This James did, in like manner 
as his brother Edmond, entayle his lands upon James Barry, father to 
David Lord Barry." — Lambeth Palace Library, vol. 635, fol. 194. 

The correlative settlements by James fitzjohn Lord Barrymore and 
James fitzRichard, de facto Lord of Ibawne, are embodied in the finding 
of an inquisition taken at Youghal on the 3 1 st of March, 1 624, and pres- 
erved in the Public Record Ofhce, Dublin, and printed in the case of 
James Redmond Barry, claiming to be Viscount Buttevant, in A.D. 1825, 
and hereinafter given in English from the original Latin as printed : — 

(No. 53). An Indenture Inquisition taken at Youghal, in the afore- 
said county, on the last day of March, in the year of the reign of our 
Serene Lord, James, now King, the twenty-second for England, France, 
and Ireland, and the fifty-seventh for Scotland, before David Lord Roche, 
Viscount Fermoy, William Barker, esquire. Supervisor of the Court of 
Wards ; Richard Roche, esquire, Attorney of the Lord the King for the 
province of Munster ; William Wiseman, esquire, Escheator for the 
county of Cork ; and Rowland Davenport, esquire, of the said county, 
by virtue of a commission of the said Lord the King, sealed under his 
great seal of this kingdom of Ireland, bearing date at Dublin the sixteenth 
day of February, in the year of the reign of the said Lord, now King, the 
twenty-first for England, etc, and the fifty-sixth for Scotland, to two or 
three or more of them thence directed, and annexed to this inquisition, 
of whom the said William Barker and the said Escheator should be two. 
to inquire by the oath of upright and lawful men of the said county of 
Cork what lands and what tenements James fitzjohn Lord Barry, Viscount 
Buttevant ; James fitzRichard Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevant ; Richard 
fitzjames, David fitzjames fitzRichard, and David fitzDavid, deceased, 
held, or any one of them held, of the said Lord the King in chief, both 
in Demesne as in service, the days on which separately they died, or any 
one of them died ; and how much of others, and by what service, and how 
much these lands and tenements were worth yearly in all issues, and at 
what time separately . . . persons . . . and who, one or many, 
may be the nearer heir or heirs and ... of age, and if he or they 
be married or not, and also concerning all the alienations made by the 
said several persons, or by any one of them, by the oath of upright and 
legal men, of the said county, whose names hereunder follow, vizt. : — 
William Mallefant, of Watersland, gentleman ; Robert Carew, of Garry- 
voe, gentleman ; Dominic Roche, of Ballynoe, gentleman ; John Roche, 
of Island, gentleman; Thadeus Oge Cartie, 'of Killballyvoryhie, gentle- 
man ; John Roche, of Castlekivine, gentleman ; David Roche, of Ballyny- 



90 BARRYMORE. 

bohie, gentleman ; James Hodnet, of Courtneshyary, gentleman ; William 
MacShane O'Hea, of BallymacWilliam, gentleman ; Donald MacDer- 
mody, of Courcestowne, gentleman ; David Roche, of Cullin, gentleman ; 
James FitzThomas, of Coil Capp, gentleman ; Garrett Condon, of Fennor, 
gentleman ; Patrick Sarsfield, of Ballyhence, gentleman. 

Who, being sworn on their said oath, say that the said James fitzjohn, 
late Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevant, was seized in his Demesne as of fee 
of and in the separate manors of Carrigtwohill, otherwise Barries Courte, 
Castleleighane, otherwise Castlelyons, Buttevante, and Liscarroll, with 
their appurtenances. And being thence so seized by his charter in due 
form of law perfected with delivery of possession thereupon executed 
bearing date the ninth day of February, in the third and fourth years of 
the reigns of Philip and Mary, feoffed thence one David Hoddyn, chap- 
lain, and his heirs of and in all and singular the premises with appurten- 
ances as is clear and appears by said charter shown in evidence to the 
jurors, by virtue of which charter the said David Hoddyn entered into 
all and singular the premises, with appurtenances, and was thence seized 
in his demesne as of fee simple. And being thence so seized by his 
charter, bearing date the i8th day of February, in the third and fourth 
years of the reigns of the said Philip and Mary, in due form of law per- 
fected, with delivery of possession thereupon executed, gave and granted 
all and singular the premises with appurtenances aforesaid to James 
Fitzjohn Lord Barry and the legitimately begotten heirs males of the 
body of the said James, and for failure of such male issue of the body of 
the said James Fitzjohn, Remainder thence, to one James FitzRichard 
Barri Roe, Lord of Ibawne, and the legitimately begotten heirs males 
of the body of the said James FitzRichard Barrie Roe, and for failure of 
such male issue of the body of the said James FitzRichard, Remainder 
thence to one Richard FitzDavid Barrie Roe and the legitimately be- 
gotten heirs males of the body of the said Richard FitzDavid. And for 
defect of such male issue of the body of the said Richard fitzDavid, 
Remainder thence to one David fitzDavid Barrie Roe and the legitimately 
begotten heirs males of the body of the said David fitzDavid Barrie Roe ; 
and for defect of such male issue of the body of the said David fitzDavid. 
Remainder thence to the right heirs of the said James fitzjohn in le douce 
entayle for ever, as by the said charter shown in evidence to the Jurors 
IS clear and doth appear : 

Moreover, the said Jurors on their said oath say that the said James 
fitzRichard Barrie Roe, till then commonly called Lord of Ibawne, was 
seized in his demesne as of fee of and in the several manors of Timo- 
legge, Rathbarrie, and Lislee, with their appurtenances. And being 
thence so seized, by his charter in due form of law perfected, and with 



BARRYMORE. 9 1 

delivery of possession executed, bearing date the 13 th day of February, 
A.D. 1556, and the 3rd and 4th years of the reigns of the King and Queen, 
PhiHp and Mary, thence feoffed one John O'Moyran, chaplain, and his 
heirs, of and in the said manors of Timoleague, Rathbarrie, and Lislee, 
with their appurtenances as by said charter shewn in evidence to the 
Jurors is clear and doth appear ; by virtue of which charter, into the 
foresaid manors of Timoleague, Rathbarrie, and Lislee, with their appur- 
tenances, the said John O'Moyran entered and was thence seized in his de- 
mesne as of fee simple, and the said John O'Moyran being seized as afore- 
said by his charter bearing date the 3rd day of March, A.D. 1556, and in 
the 3rd and 4th years of the reign of King and Queen, Philip and Mary, 
in due form of law perfected, and with delivery of possession thereupon 
executed, gave and granted the said manors of Timoleague, Rathbarry, 
and Lislee, with their appurtenances, to the said James fitzRichard Barrie 
Roe and the legitimately begotten heirs males of the body of the said 
James fitzRichard, and for failure of such male issue legitimately begotten 
of the body of the said James fitzRichard, Remainder thence to one 
Richard fitzDavid Barrie Roe and the legitimately begotten heirs males 

of the body of the said Richard fitzDavid and for 

failure of such issue male of tb.e body of the said Richard fitzDavid, 
Remainder thence to one David fitzDavid Barrie Roe and the legiti- 
mately begotten heirs males of the body of the said David fitzDavid. 
And for defect of such male issue of the body of the said David fitzDavid, 
Remainder thence to the said James fitzjohn Barrymore, Lord of 
O'Leighane, O'Gormenaghan and Oririe, and the legitimately begotten 
heirs males of the body of the said James Barrymore, and for defect of 
such male issue, of the body of the said James Barrymore, Remainder 
thence in fee simple to the right heirs of the said James fitzRichard Barry- 
Roe for ever, as by the said tallied charter shev/n in evidence to the Jurors 
is clear and doth appear 

The said Jurors on their said oath further say that the said James 
fitzjohn Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevant by virtue of the said tallied 
gift, perfected by the said David Hoddyne, chaplain, as is aforesaid 
entered into the said manors of Carigtoghill, otherwise Barryscourt, 
Castleleghane, otherwise Castlelyons, Buttevante, and Liscarrol, and was 
thence seized in his Demesne as of tallied fee with further remainders as 
is aforesaid according to the form of the said tallied gift made and per- 
fected by the said David Hoddy as is aforesaid. And he, the said James 
fitzjohn Lord Barry, being thence so seized as is aforesaid on the 20th 
day of March, A.D. 1557, died without any heir male begotten of his body. 
Afterwards through his death, without any legitimately begotten heir 
male of his body as is aforesaid, the said James fitzRichard Barry Roe by 



92 BARRYMORE. 

virtue of the said Remainder limited to himself and the legitimately be- 
gotten heirs males of his body, limited as is aforesaid in the tallied charter 
made and perfected by the said David Hoddye as is aforesaid, entered 
into the said manors of Carrigtoghill, otherwise Barries Courte, Castle- 
leighan, otherwise Castlelyons, Buttevant, and Liscarroll, and was thence 
seized in his demesne as of tallied fee, viz., to himself and the legitimately 
begotten heirs males of his body with further remainders as is aforesaid 
according to the form and efficacy of the said tallied gift made and per- 
fected by the said David Hoddyn. 

Moreover, the said Jurors on their oath say that the said James fitz- 
Richard Barry Roe by virtue of the said tallied gift made by the said 
John O'Moyrane, dated the 3rd day of March, A.D. 1556, as is aforesaid, 
entered into the aforesaid manors of Timoleague, Rathbarry, and Lislee, 
with their appurtenances, immediately on the perfection of the said 
tallied gift, and was thence seized in his Demesne as of tallied fee, viz., 
to himself and the legitimately begotten heirs males of his body, with 
further Remainders as is aforesaid according to the form of the tallied 
gift made by the said John O'Moyrane as is aforesaid. 

Moreover, they say that the said James fitzRichard Lord Barry, Vis- 
count Buttevant, being so seized of and in all and singular the manors of 
Carrigtoghill, otherwise Barries Courte, Castle O'Leighane, otherwise 
Castlelyons, Buttevante, Liscarroll, Tymoleage, Rathbarrie, and Lislee, 
with their appurtenances, in his Demesne as of tallied fee, viz., to himself 
and the legitimately begotten heirs males of his body, by virtue of the 
two several tallied charters, died thence so seized of and in the said 
manors of Caraigtoghill, otherwise Barries Courte, Castle O'Leighan, 
otherwise Castlelyons, Buttevante, and Rathbarry, on the lOth day of 
April, in 24th year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, having issue hve 
sons legitimately begotten of his body, viz., Richard, the first-born ; 
David, the second-born ; William, the third-born ; Edmund, the fourth- 
born, and John, the fifth-born. 

They further say that the said Richard, the first-born of the said 
James fitzRichard, was deaf and dumb, but of right intelligence. And 
that after the death of the said James Lord Barry the said David, his 
second son, similarly entered into all and singular the said manors of 
Carrigtohill, otherwise Barries Courte, Castle O'Leighan, otherwise 
Castlelyons, Buttevante, and Rathbarry, and had ... for their rents, 
issues, and profits. 

Furthermore, they say that the said David fitzjames Barrie had issue 
David fitzDavid, his son and heir apparent, who, indeed, died in the 
lifetime of his father, David fitzjames. And that the said David fitz- 
David had issue David, now Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevante, his son 



BARRYMORE. 93 

and heir apparent. They further say that the said David fitzjames died 
at Barries Courte aforesaid the loth day of April, A.D. 1617. And that 
at the time of his death he was possessed of and in the manors of Carrig- 
twohill, otherwise Barries Courte, Castle O'Leighan, otherwise Castle- 
lyons, Buttevante, and Rathbarry, with appurtenances, and till then 
received the rents, issues, and profits of the same as is aforesaid and not 
otherwise. 

They further say that the said David, now Lord Barry, Viscount 
Buttevante, is grandchild and next heir of the said David fitzjames, and 
next male heir begotten of the body of the said James fitzRichard Lord 
Barry, Viscount Buttevante, viz., son and heir of David fitzDavid, son 
and heir apparent of the said David fitzjames. And that the said David 
now Viscount Buttevante, immediately after the death of the said David 
fitzjames, entered into the said manors of Carrigtwohill, otherwise 
Barries Courte, Castle Oleghan, otherwise Castlelyons, Buttevante, and 
Rathbarry, and thence till now [has had] their profits. 

They further say that the said David Lord Barry, now Viscount 
Buttevante, on the 29 day of June, A.D. 1621, married Lady Alice, eldest 
daughter of Richard Earl of Cork. They further say that the said 
Richard Barry, eldest son and heir male of the body of the said James 
Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevante, died at Liscarroll aforesaid the 24th 
day of April, A.D. 1622, without any legitimately begotten issue of his 
body. 

They further say that the said David, now Lord Barry, Viscount 
Buttevante, is a blood relation and the next heir of the said Richard 
Barr\', deceased, and now is next male heir of the body of the said James 
fitzRichard Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevante, viz., son and heir of the 
said David fitzDavid Barry, who was son and heir apparent of the said 
David fitzjames fitzRichard, who was brother and heir apparent of the 
said Richard fitzjames Barry. 

They further say that the said David, now Lord Barry, Viscount 
Buttevante, at the time of the death of the said David fitzjames, was 
twelve years and one month old, and as yet unmarried. And that at 
the time of the death of the said Richard fitzjames the said David, now 
Viscount Buttevante, was seventeen years, one month, and fourteen days 
old, and married. They further say that the said manor of Carrigtuohill, 
otherwise Barries Courte, is worth yearly in all issues beyond deductions 
XLs. Ir. And that the manor of Bottevante aforesaid is annually worth 
in all issues beyond deductions XLs. Ir. And that the said manor of 
Rathbarry is annually worth in all issues beyond deductions XXs. Ir. 
And that the said manors of Carrigtuohill, Castlelyons, Buttevante, and 
Rathbarry at the said time of the death of the said James fitzRichard 



94 



BARRYMORE. 



Barry were held of Lady Elizabeth, lately Queen of England, and at 
the time of the death of the said David fitzjames, Richard fitzjames, were 
held and now are held of our Lord, King- James, in capite by military 
service, but by what military tenure the Jurors know not. In testimony- 
of which all and singular the said Commissioners, as well as the said 
Jurors, put their seals to this inquisition on the day and in the year said 
above : William Barker, o Rd. Davenport, o William Mellifont, Teige 
McCartie, James Hodnett, William Supple, Robt. Carew. Delivered 
into the chancelry of Ireland the xvii. Junii, 1624. 

In 1556 no immediate provision appears to have been made by James 
fitzRichard of the Rath for his dispossessed cousins, Richard fitzDavid 
Barryroe and David fitzDavid Barryroe. After the dates of the settle- 
ments of the Barrymore and Barryroe estates, in A.D. 1556, Richard fitz- 
David Barryroe is seen no more. He was slain at the instigation of his 
cousin, James fitzRichard of the Rath Barryroe, the usurping Lord of 
Ibawne, if we may believe Florence McCarthy More. When next seen, 
in a fiant of the 30th of September, 1574, David fitzDavid Barryroe, the 
last surviving son of David Downe Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, was still a 
landless exile ; and the elder two of his four sons, Richard, Redmond, 
David, and Thomas, were then in military service with Sir Cormac 
MacTeige MacCarthy, knt.. Lord of Muskerry. Between, however, the 
2 1st of November, 1576, and the 6th of September, 1577, the said David 
fitzDavid Barryroe acquired Rathinuskie, 8 ploughlands in the county 
of the city of Cork, Ballyloughery 3 ploughalnds, Ballyroberts, Bally- 
edmond, and Ballymore, each a ploughland, etc., all in the barony of 
Bairymore, and county of Cork. No doubt he acquired these lands by 
gift from his cousin, James fitzRichard of the Rath, Lord of Ibawne and 
Viscount of. Buttevant, and, at the same time, acknowledged the Viscount's 
superior right to the barony of Ibawne. 

No doubt, also, that tardy provision for his sole surviving first cousin 
was made by Viscount Buttevant, under pressure by Sir Cormac Mac- 
Teige McCarthy. Within three years after acquiring Rathanisky, David 
fitzDavid was slain. He was slain at the instigation of his cousin, the 
Viscount, says Florence McCarthy More. He was attainted and slain 
in the time of the rebellion of James fitzMorris, the traitor, says a record 
in the Public Record Office of Ireland, entitled: "A.D. 1584. Survey 
of Honors, Manors, Lordships, etc., in the Province of Munster, forfeited 
by Gerald Earl of Desmond, and others, 26th EHzabeth, membrane 88 " : 
Lands and possessions lately of ^ The town and lands of Rathenusky 
David Oge MacDavid Cyallo- with its appurtenances lying and 



heir, attainted and slain in the 
time of the rebellion of James 
Fitz Morris the Traitor. 



being about two miles [from] the 
city of Cork, containing by 
estimation six ploughlands, etc. 



BARRVMORE. 95 

According to that authority, David fitzDavid Barryroe was slain be- 
tween the 1 2th of September, 1577, tlie date of his latest pardon by iiant, 
and the i8th of August, 1579, the date of the death of James FitzMorris. 
The inquisition at Youghal, on the 6th of October, 1 5 86, mentions Richard 
fitzDavid instead of his father, David fitzDavid, and has Kilballylogrye 
in place of Cyalloheire, otherwise called Ballydolloghry, and Ballydeloher. 

The history of the descendants of David fitzDavid Barryroe will here 
be given after that of James fitzRichard of the Rath and his descendants, 
the Earls of Barrymore. 

Florence MacCarthy says that, after the death of James fitzjohn 
Barrymore, Viscount Buttevant, James fitzRichard of the Rath Barryroe, 
Lord of Ibawne, took forcible possession of Barryscourt Castle, the Lord 
Barrymore's chief house, and by force dispossessed the deceased Lord's 
only child, Katherine. 

To strengthen his title from the deeds of the 9th and 18th February, 
1556, and from forcible possession, James FitzRichard procured, on the 
1 8th of March, 1560, an assignment not only of the Barrymore but also 
of the Barryroe estates to himself from Edmond More Barry of Rath- 
gobbane, the nearest heir male of James fitzjohn Barrymore, scil., Ed- 
mond, son of Gerald, son of Richard, second son of John Kittagh Barry, 
Lord Barrymore. Later on, David, son of James FitzRichard, got 
assignments of all their rights to the Barrymore estates from the Lady 
Katherine, daughter of James fitzjohn Lord Barrymore ; Ellen Barry, 
daughter of John Barry, first cousin of Edmond More Barry of Rath- 
gobbane ; and Margaret Barry, daughter of that Edmond More's brother, 
T. Barry. 

On taking possession of the Barrymore estates, James fitzRichard 
Barryroe assumed the Barrymore titles ; and the crown acquiesced in his 
assumption of them. On 23 April, 1557, he had a pardon as "James 
Barry, of Barrescourt, Vicecount Barrymore, otherwise James called 
Barrymore and Barryroe." Lie was summoned to the Parliament of Ire- 
land, which met on the 12 January, 1559, and sat the first Viscount as 
James le Barry, Lord of Buttevant. On 27th April, 1561, he had livery 
as "James Barry, Viscount of Barrymore, alias Lord of Barrymore, kins- 
man and heir of James Barrie, late Lord de Barry." On 9th June, 1 564, 
in the list of ecclesiastical commissioners, James Viscount Barrymore has 
precedence of David Viscount Roche, and Richard Viscount Mount- 
garrett. 5 April, 1567: Commission to Sir James Barrye, knt, Lord 
Barryemore, Viscount Bowtyvaunt, to execute martial law in the terri- 
tories under his rule. Nov. 1 1 th, 1 5 7 1 : James Viscount Buttevant ap- 
pointed one of the Royal Commissioners to divide Munster south of the 
Shannon into counties, baronies, and ploughlands. 6 May, 1573 : Pardon 



96 BARRYMORE. 

to James Barry, knt, Viscount of Buttevaunt and Lord Barrymore. 29 
May, 1576: Commission to Sir James Barry, knt, Viscount Buttevaunt, 
to execute martial law in the territories under his rule. 

1578. 21 years' lease to Sir James Barry, knt. Vis. Buttevante, of 
site of house of friars of Castelleaghan, alias Castlelyons ; etc. ; 
friary of Tymolagg, and churchyard called Downe, etc., and Augustinian 
friary of Killenemallaghe, alias Botevante, etc. 

1578, May 6. Pardon to Nicholas Walshe, John Bayes, and Chris- 
topher Arthur for an alienation to them by James Barrie, knt., Viscount 
Buttevaunte, alias Viscount Barriemore, of the baronies or hundreds of 
Ybawne, Oliehan, and Ogormliehan, and the manors and lands of Rath- 
barrie, Tymolagge, Castellyons, Carrigtwohill, Barries Corte, Inshyne- 
backie, Donnegowrne, Rathynuskie, and Rathgobban, and licence to the 
same James Vise. Barrie to alien to the same the barony or hundred of 
Oryrry and the manors and lands of Buttevant, Liscarroll, and else . . 
the CO. of Cork. N. Walshe, J. Bayes, and Ch. Arthur were trustees in 
the grant of the manor of Lislee by James Viscount Buttevant to his 
son William, the 14th of June, 1568, and seem to have been trustees in 
settlements by which the Viscount gave Buttevant to his second son, 
David, and gave Timoleague to his third son, William, called in a fiant 
of A.D. 1582 William Barry, alias Barry Roe, of Timolegg ; and gave 
Rathynuskie to David Oga Barry, the last survivor of the four sons of 
David Downe Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, as shall be shown farther on, 
in treating of the Barrys of Ratliynuskie and Dundullerick. 

1579, June 6. At the suit of Lord Barry, his son, David Barry of 
Buttevant, received a pardon. 

On 2 Nov., 1579, the Earl of Desmond was proclaimed a traitor, and 
on the 4th Nov. Lord Justice Sir Wm. Pelham wrote that the Lord Barrie 
had taken Sir Thomas of Desmond prisoner. Sir Thomas, at that time, 
was aiding the crown against his half-brother, the Earl of Desmond. 

Other extracts from Sir Wm. Pelham's letter book, in the Carew 
collection are these : — 

20 Nov., 1579. Pelham to the Earl of Ormond : "To make inquiry 
of such traitors' goods as are in the several countries of the Lord Barrie, 
Lord Roche, Sir Cormoke McTeige, Sir James Fitzgerald, Sir Tibet 
Butler, the Lord Dunboine, or in any other place that hath protected them." 

23 Nov., 1579. Pelham to the Queen: "That the Earl of Desmond 
had burned the town of Youghal." 

26 Dec.j 1579. Pelham to the Earl of Leicester: "I am persuaded 
the traitors, if the Earl of Ormond and I both had been in camp, might 
Have been at Youghal before I could have learned what was become of 
them ; for Barrie, nor Roche, through whose countries he must needs 



BARRYMORE, 97 

and did pass, did not reveal it to any of the army ; neither would they, 
I think, have done it to the Earl if he had been there in person." 

1 6 Feb., 1580. Pelham to the Council in England: "The Lord 
Barrie, Lord Roche, and Sir Cormoke McTeige are appointed to answer 
the other partie of the county of Cork, if they may be trusted, but they 
three draw two ways, Roach and Sir Cormocke reasonably well affected, 
but Barrie extreme ill, and his son worse, if worse may be." 

21 May, 1580. Pelham to Sir Wm. Winter: "The Lords Barrie and 
Roche, with their forces, will be in camp on Friday next." 

4 July, 1580. Pelham to the Privy Council in England: "I have 
drawn to me the noblemen and gentlemen whose names are enclosed, 
and who incline to the traitors. I take them all with me to Limerick. 
The Earl of Clancartie, the Viscount Barrie, the Viscount Roche, Barrie 
Oge, Sir Cormocke McTeige, sheriff ; Sir Owen O' Sullivan, Sir Thomas 
of Desmond, and his son; Sir Owen McCartie. O'Callohan, O'Kiefe, 
Donell McCartie, Ainaster of Carberie ; Maurice Fitzjames, Donoughe 
McCormocke, John Roche, John FitzEdmonds of Clonne." 

1580, July 9, Limerick. Pelham to the Privy Council in England: 
"I assembled the lords and gentlemen of the county who had suffered 
the enemy in our absence to fly his cattle by them and to have relief 
within their countries. I dissembled my disliking, and by fair means 
allured them to this place under pretence that letters were here from her 
Majesty and under colour of a consultation with others of the Council. 
I departed from Cork on the 5 th, I arrived here on the 7th, having in my 
company the Earl of Clancartie, the Viscount Barrie, and others." 

Limerick, 9 July, 1580. The Lord Justice and Council to David 
Barrie : " Whereas, upon some accusation made against the Viscount, 
your father, for his undutifulness and negligence in the service of her 
Majesty, he is for a time restrained from returning into those parts, the 
rather because it is manifested unto us that he hath been not only the 
director of you in your late doings, but also hath since that time forbidden 
you to do such service in requital of your fault as we are informed you 
were willing to do ; we have thought good therefore to confer with you 
about the ordering of your father's country so as we may stand assured 
of your loyalty and dutiful behaviour, for which we will expect pledges 
at your hands, and therefore will you presently to repair unto us, which 
you may do with safety, notwithstanding any offence past" 

Limerick, July 12, 1580. The Lord Justice and Council to the Privy 
Council in England : " We assembled the principal lords and gentlemen 
of Cork. We allured them hither for farther consultation with the rest 
of the Council, and had them twice before us, and preceded with them 
first in one course to make them yield their several submissions, and next 



98 BARRYMORE. 

to have won out of them a mitigation of her Majesty's charges by some 
contribution to the army. The Viscount Barriei was the most faulty and 
most obstinate in his behaviour. They were unwilhng to burden their 
countries, but each of them yielded pledges, and some offered to serve 
with their own people at their own charges." 

Limerick, 22 July, 1580. Ten days' protection for David Barry and 
his followers to come to the Lord Justice. 

Limerick, 27 July, 1580. Pelham to the Queen: "The rebels have 
been relieved by the noblemen and chieftains of this province. I have 
lately laid hold upon them all, and keep yet in hand the best of them. The 
most obstinate and malicious is the Viscount Barrie." 

Asketten Aug. 23, 1580. Pelham to Sir Warham Sentleger : "Ob- 
serve what intelligence Davie Barrie has with the traitors. His father 
is like to answer to all faults before he finds liberty ; against whom the 
depositions you have sent me now are very material." 

Limerick, 26 August, 1 5 80. Pelham to Davie Barry : " We are glad 
to find by your letters of the 24th your readiness to reform the errors and 
faults of your youth. Touching your services upon the traitors whose 
heads were sent to Cork, we understand no less long since from Sir 
Warham Sentleger, for which we commend you. As for your petition to 
have a renovation of your protection, for that we are now to repair to 
Dublin to the Lord Deputy, we have given warrant to Sir Warham Sent- 
leger to deal with you and others in those parts." 

Limerick, 26 Aug., 1580. Pelham to Sir Warham Sentleger: "Davie 
Barrie sues to have the protection prolonged. I have sent him to you, and 
authorize you to enlarge his protection for a reasonable time." 

Limerick, 26 Aug., 1580. Same to same: "Notwithstanding any 
letter I have written at the request of Davie Barry, lay hands upon him 
and his brother, William, and keep them safe, unless good sureties may 
be had for them." 

August 28, 1580. From Pelham's estate of Munster, at his depar- 
ture : "As the Lord Barrie stood obstinately in his undutiful arrogancy, 
and was nevertheless accused of a number of misdemeanours, a collection 
of his offences was made, and he was committed by the Lord Justice to 
the Castle of Dublin, before the delivery of the sword to the Lord Graie, 
Lord Deputy." 

When reprimanded for leaving the way open to the Earl of Desmond 
to sack Youghal, Pelham charged Lord Barry with not having reported 
that the Earl of Desmond's object in passing through Barry's country 
was to sack Youghal. And when Lord Barry denied a knowledge of 
such ulterior object Pelham declaimed against his arrogance and marked 
him for destruction. The "Annals of the Four Masters " shew that Lord 



BARRYMORE. 99 

Barry had something beside Youghal to think of while tlie Earl was 
traversing Barry's country, and might have only completed his country's 
destruction by calling in the English. 

A.D. 1579. The sons of the Earl proceeded to destroy, demolish, 
burn, and completely consume every fortress, town, cornfield, and habita- 
tion between those places to which they came, lest the English might 
dwell in them ; and the English consigned to a like destruction every 
house and habitation, and every rick and stack of corn, to which they 
came, to injure the Geraldines, so that between them the country was left 
one levelled plain, without corn or edifices. The Earl of Desmond then, 
accompanied by his relatives and the greatest number of forces they were 
able to muster, proceeded to plunder and burn the [possessions of the] 
Roches and Barrys in the territories of Hy Liathain and Hy Macaille. 
They encamped before Youghal, and finally took that town, which at that 
time was full of riches and goods, etc. 

James FitzRichard, Viscount Buttevant, thus treacherously seized, 
and tyrannically imprisoned in Dublin Castle, died there on the 10 April, 
1 58 1. — Inq., 31 March, 1624. The "Annals of the Four Masters" notice 
his death thus : " 1 5 8 1 . Barry More (James, the son of Richard, son of 
Thomas (sic), son of Edmond, sic), who was in captivity in Dublin, died. 
This James was of the true stock of the Barry Roes. He was a man who 
had suffered much affliction and misfortune in the beginning [of his 
career], and who had [at first] no hope or expectation of obtaining even 
the title of Barryroe. But, however, God bestowed upon him the chief- 
tainship both of Barry Mael and Barry Roe ; and this was not all, but 
he was elected chief over the Barry Mores after the extinction of those 
chieftains whose hereditary right it was to rule over the seigniory till that 
period. His son, David Barry, was afterwards called the Barry by the 
Earl of Desmond, and his second son was by law lord over the Barry 
Roes." 

James FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant had five sons and five daughters 
by his wife, Ellen, daughter of Cormac na haoine McCarthy Reagh. 

1. Richard, who being deaf and dumb, was superseded in titles and 
estates by his next brother, David, and died unmarried at Liscarroll, 24th 
April, 1622. — Inq. 31 March, 1624. 

2. David, who succeeded to the honours and estates. 

3. William, who is said by Lodge to have left a son, David ; but 
Lodge or his printer there skips two generations. This William "had 
Ybawne for his porcion," and, meaning the same, " he had Barryroe for his 
porcion." So says the pedigree given by his brother, David Viscount 
Buttevant, to Sir George Carew. " William Barry by his father's guyffte 



lOO BARRYMORE. 

Barryroe." So says the pedigree given by Florence MacCarthy to Sir 
George Carew. 

6 May, 1573, he had a pardon as William Barry, of Court, Esqr. 

On the 26 August, 1580, Sir William Pelham, Lord Justice of Ireland, 
having imprisoned their father, James FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant, 
in Dublin Castle, ordered Sir Warham St. Leger to lay hands upon the 
brothers, David and William; but on the 24 August, 1582, these two, 
together with their younger brother, John, and many others of their 
name, were pardoned, provided that within six months they appeared 
before commissioners in their county, and gave security to keep the 
peace and answer at sessions when called upon. In the fiant (3,974 
(5,732) of Elizabeth) these brothers are styled "David Barry, of Butte- 
vant, in the county of Cork, Esq. ; William Barri, alias Barry Roe, of 
Timolegg ; John Barry, of Inshnevacky." William Barry Roe, according 
to the pedigree drawn up by his brother, married Shely (Julia), daughter 
to Ffinin McCartie Reagh — Shilia, daughter to Sir Ffinin McCartie 
Reoghe, in the pedigree by Florence McCarthy — and had issue two sons : 
(i) James Barry, of Lisleigh ; (2) Edmond, says the pedigree of Lord 
Buttevant ; (i) James, dispossessed of Barriroe's country by David Lord 
Barry ; (2) Edmond, says Florence McCarthy. 

An inquisition at Cork, on the 4th November, 1584, found that 
"William Barry, alias Barry Roe, dyed about a quarter of a year agoe, 
and had the use and proffits of Barry Roe's country, and the disposing 
thereof, we know not by what right. He had issue male of the age of 
eleven years. The Lord Barry doth owne the same country now." — 
Lambeth Palace Library, MS. 627, fol. 184. 

An inquisition at Timologa, ii April, 1594, found that on the 2 Sept., 
1 5 86, David Viscount Buttevant was in possession of the three manors of 
Ibawne, namely, Tymolagge, Rathbarry, and Lisleigh, and that his 
brother, William, was dead, leaving Shilina nyna Carhye (Juliana 
McCarthy), his widow, and his eldest son, James, a minor, and that the 
said Viscount had given, granted, and confirmed to the said Shilina the 
sum of eight pounds sterl. of current English money annually, in addition 
to the rents and other emoluments of the castle lands and tenements of 
Lisleigh, during the minority of James, elder son of the said William 
and Shilina. Of William Barryroe's younger son there is no further 
trace. The elder son of William Barryroe of Ibawne was James Barry, 
of Lislee, Esq. As James FitzWilliam Barrie of Lislie he had a pardon 
on the 28 March, A.D. 1601, in Fiant 6,485 of EHzabeth. 

By an inquisition taken at the King's Old Castle, at Cork, on the 
28th day of April, 1641, and printed, with two other valuable inquisitions, 
that of II April, 1594, and that of 31 March, 1624, in the case of James 



BARRYMORE. lOI 

Redmond Barry claiming the Buttevant peerage before the House of 
Lords, A.D. 1825, the jury say that James Barry, late of Lislee, in the 
county of Cork, Esq., with his wife^ Catherine Barry, alias Gerald, let the 
castle and three and a half carucates of Lislee on the 5 May, 161 9, to 
Sir Vincent Gookine, for 71 years, at £'J0 per annum, and on the loth of 
Nov., 1636, made a settlement of Butlerstown and other lands, in all 
three and a half carucates and three gneeves of land, on his son and heir 
apparent, William Barry, and Ellen Barry, alias Carthy, his wife. The 
jury further say that the said James Barry died on the 7 of February, A.D. 
1640, and that the said William Barry is his son and heir, and at the time 
of his father's death was thirty-one years old, and married. 

William Barry, of Lislee, Esq., was born in A.D. i6og, and in A.D. 1636 
married Ellen McCarthy, daughter of Cormac Oge McCarthy, of Kilcrea, 
and only sister of Charles MacCarthy, of Castlemore. The trustees in 
the marriage settlement were Charles McCarthy, of Castlemore ; his first 
cousin, Charles McTeige McCarthy, of Ballea ; and Fewre O'Loughill, 
of Castlemore, gentleman. The issue of that marriage was a son, David, 
decreed heir male to his uncle, Charles McCarthy, in 1703. William 
Barry, of Lislee, for sidmg with the confederate Catholics in A.D. 1641 
was attainted and deprived of his estates. At thp sessions holden at 
Youghal the 2d Aug., 1642, William Barry, of Lishly, was indicted of 
treason. At Kinsale, on the 21 February, 1653, Richard White, of 
Lislee, aged about 46, and John Arthur, aged 40, deposed concerning 
William Barry, of Lislee, in the barony of Ibawne, in the year 1641 : 
"that he was in arms in the actual rebellion, and raised about 150 men 
against the English in Barriro in arms against the English, and took, 
from Esquire Gookin and others, goods worth ^^3,000." — Depositions in 
Library of T.C.D. His estates were adjudged to Richard Earl of Barry- 
more by Cromwell's Court of Claims in 1656, but were granted by Charles 
n. to his brother, James Duke of York, afterwards King James II., and 
at the sales at Chichester House, about the yea-r 1 700, they were sold to 
a Mr. Vanhomrig, who sold them to the Rev. Doctor Synge. 

David Barry, son and heir of the forfeiting William Barry, of Lislee, 
always lived with his uncle, Charles McCarthy, of Castlemore, as his 
intended heir, and succeeded him in 1674. He was attainted in i6gi-6, 
in one list being styled David Barry, of Lislea, and in another David 
McWilliam Barry, of Lislew, in the county of Cork, Esquire. From 1688 
to 1704 he was in litigation with his cousins, the McCarthys of Ballea, 
regarding lands left him by his uncle, Charles McCarthy, of Castlemore. 
The late Charles M. Barry, assistant secretary to the Lord Chancellor, 
made copies of the various pleadings, answers, and other proceedings in 
this suit, as the person proving descent from David Barry could readily 



I02 



BARRYMORE. 



establish his right to the title of Viscount Buttevant "The following," 
he said, in sending it to the present writer, " is extracted from these plead- 
ings " : 



Charles McCarthy 

versus Donogh, Earl of Clancarthy 

David Barry and 

Owen McCarthy 



Bill filed 26th May (sic), i( 
Answered by Owen McCarthy, 
nth March, 1688. 



Charles McCarthy, of Castlemore, being seized in fee of the lands of 
Gurranemuddagh, Knockanerowe, and Carriginebleask, settled same by 
deed of feoffment in jointure on his intended wife, Margaret, daughter of 
Lord Sarsfield, in the year 1628, remainder to his heirs, remainder to the 
heirs of his uncle, Teige MacCormacke Carthy. Charles Oge McCarthy 
died without leaving son or daughter, and Dermot McCarthy, the son of 
his uncle, Teige, and father of suppliant, Charles McCarthy, of Ballea, 
became entitled to the said lands ; but by a proviso in the Act of Settle- 
ment they became vested in Donogh Earl of Clancarthy and Helen, his 
Countess, with power to make leases to the former proprietors, suppliant 
being in England, and the said Earl not knowing his claim leased the 
lands to David Barry as heir in tail to Charles Oge McCarthy, of Castle- 
more. The Earl dying shortly after, suppliant brought his claim before 
the Countess Helen, who admitted the justice of it, and made him a 
lease for 50 years ; but one Owen McCarthy alleges that he purchased 
the lands from David Barry for the consideration of £100. 

David Barry's statement : At a court held at Macroom for the dis- 
posal " of the Gentry Lands of Muskerry " in pursuance of the clause of 
the Act of Settlement, Callaghan, Earl of Clancarthy, made a lease for 
99 years, at ;£^ 2 3 i8s. 5^d., of Knockaneroe, Carriginebleask, and Gurrane- 
moddagh to David Barry, and promised to give him a lease of the re- 
maining lands of Charles Oge McCarthy, of Castlemore, said David 
Barry being his nephew, that is, son and heir of his only sister, Helena 
McCarthy, but could not do so until he got possession from Captain 
Dermot McCarthy, who held by an alleged custodian the said lands, viz. : 
Cloghroe, Cloghphilip, Gortdonoglimore, Culflugh, Kilnemucky, Killyno- 
varne, Drmiiboulighy, Bally-Martin, Kilcurrig, Glenleagh, in all nine 
ploughlands, but one Charles McCarthy, of Ballea, pretending that in 
the year 1625 Charles Oge McCarthy entailed said lands on his uncle, 
Teige McCormacke > Carthy, and his heirs. Charles McCarthy, of 
Ballea, is son and heir of said Teige McCormacke; and the Countess 
Helen preferred the claim of the said Charles McCarthy to that of David 
Barry. 



BARRYMORE. IO3 

The answer of Owen McCarthy, Esquire, to the Bill of Charles 
McCarthy, Esquire, that on a hearing before Michaell, Lord Primate, late 
Chancellor, David Barry was considered and decreed (Decree dated 1 703) 
heir to Charles McCarthy, benig his sister's son, and deponent got his 
father-in-law. Captain Dermot McCarthy, to intercede with David Barry 
to sell him Knockanroe, which he did for ^^130, having compassion on his 
large family of young children ; admits complainant was cousin of 
Charles Oge McCarthy, but David Barry was decreed his heir. 

John Bayly \ 

versus Charles McCarthy | 12th December, 1704. 

Ex. of Charles McCarthy, deceased. / 

Charles Oge McCarthy, of Castlcmore, left all his substance to David 
Barry, his nephew, who was his sister's son, and always lived with him 
as his intended heir. Charles Oge died 1674. David Barry sold Knockane- 
roe, Carriginebleask, and Gurranemoddagh, to Captain Owen McCarthy in 
1677. Charles McCarthy, of Cloghroe, pretended claim on an old for- 
feited entail, and filed bills, etc. ; but in the late troubles, being a colonel 
in the Irish army, he took forcible possession of the lands, which he kept 
until the surrender of Cork in 1690. 

In 1825, before the House of Lords, the viscounty of Buttevant was claimed 
on the ground that: "William Barry, who forfeited Lislee, died sometime subse- 
cpently to 1656, leaving issue by his said wife, Ellen, an only son, James Barry, 
who lived at Ballymacraheen, which is a sub-denomination of the Lislee estate, 
and left an only son, William Fitz James Barry, of Ballymacraheen," father of 
James Barry, of Mount Barry, father of James Barry, of Donoughmorc, father 
of the claimant, James Redmond Barry, of Donoughmore. 

Being subtenants to the Gookins, tenants of part of the Lislee estate, the 
Ballymacraheen Barrys were in an humble sense Lislee Barrys, and so may hav^e 
been taken for the noble Barrys of Lislee by ignorant people a century or more 
after the confiscation of Lislee ; but those gentlemen who made searches at the 
Record Office on behalf of Mr. James Redmond Barry ought to have seen there 
that of William Barry who forfeited Lislee the only son by his wife, Ellen, was 
not James Redmond Bariy's ancestor, James Barry, a sub-tenant at Ballymac- 
raheen, but was the David Barry who, in the reign of King William IIL, was 
attainted as David Barry, of Lislea, and also as David McWilliam I5arry, of 
Lislew, Esquire. 

Like the Barrys of Ballymacraheen, the Barrys of Ballylangy were tenants on 
the Lislea estate, in the parish of Lislea, and were, in that way, Barrys of Lislea ; 
and taking pattern by James Redmond Barry, of Donoughmore, the representa- 
tive of the Barrys of Ballymacraheen, Edward Barry, of Kinsale, representative 
of the Barrys of Ballylangy, claimed the viscounty of Buttevant, and at the close 
of 1843 employed Mr. John Lomasney to make out his case. Mr. Lomasney had 
been similarly employed previously for Edward Barry, 



I04 BARRYMORE. 

The pedigree of Edward Barry, of Kinsale, county Cork, as follows, viz. : 

William Barry of Lislee, 3rd son of James FilzRichard Barryroe, 
married to Shilahnyny Carthy. 



James Barry of Lislee, son and heir, married to Catherine Gerald. 



William Barry of Lislee, co. Cork, son and heir, married to Ellen Carthy, 
by whom he had three sons. 



I. James, who died childless. 2. Edmond. 3. Philip of Sheanagh. 
This William died in 1660. 

Edmond Barry of Ballylangy, near Lislee, second son and heir, married to 
— Minihane, and died in 17 10. 



William Barry of Ballylangy, co. Cork, son and heir, married to Honora Hodnett. 



Edmo.md Barry of Ballylangy and Carrigeen, son and heir, married to Johanna Foley. 

\ 

I 
William Barry of Ballinspittle, co. Cork, son and heir, married to Johanna Daly. 

I 
Edward Barry of Kinsale, co. Cork, claimant, married to Margaret Field. 

The fact that the issue of William Fitz James FitzWilliam Barry, of Lislee, by 
his wife, Ellen McCarthy, was an only son, David, is fatal to this claim also. 

4. The name of Edmond Barry, fourth son of James FitzRichard 
Viscount Buttevant, is followed by the letters " s.p." in the pedigree given 
by his brother, David Viscount Buttevant, to Sir George Carew in A.D. 
1602. Assuredly that Edmond died without issue. His name does not 
appear in the fiants of Elizabeth, nor had he a provision from his father, 
or from his brother, David. Apparently he died young, but, all the same, 
he has been made a peg whereon to hang pedigrees. One of these mis- 
leading pedigrees is thus certified : 

To all and singular to whom these singular shall come : I, William Hawkins, 
Esqr. , Ulster King of Arms of all Ireland, sendeth greeting. Know ye therefore 
that I, the said King of Arms, by the power and authority to me granted by his 
present Majesty, King George the third, under the great seal of this kingdom, 
Do hereby certify that on due search made in my office I find on record that on 
the 2ist of April, 1771, Captain Garrett Barry, of the Regiment of Bavaria, in the 
French service, took out in due form under my hand and seal of office the gene- 
alogy, and legalized on the 8th of May following by his Excellency George Lord 
Viscount Townshend, then Lord Lieutenant General and General Governor of 
said Kingdom, and countersigned by his Excellency's Secretary, Sir George 
MacCartney, wherein the said Captain Barry's pedigree is deduced from Edmond 
Barry, Esq., by his wife, Eleanor, daughter of James Butler, Baron of Dunboyne, 



BARRYMORE. 



105 



the said Edmond Barry being fourth son of James Barry, Viscount Buttevant, of 
said kingdom, so created the 27th of April, 1561. In witness whereof I have 
hereunto put my hand and affixed the seal of my office, at Dublin, the fourth of 
August, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-three. 

Signed William Hawkins, Ulster. 

James Barry, Viscount Buttevant, so=Eleonor A, daughter of Cormack nahoiny 
created 27th April, 1561. | McCarthy Reagh in co. Cork, Esq. 



Edmund Barry, Esq., fourth son. 



John Barry of Leamlary in the co. of= 
Cork, Esq. 



Garrett Barry of Leamlara in the co. 
of Cork, Esq. 



Eleonora, daughter of James Butler, 
Baron Dunboyne. 



Isabella, daughter of David Nagle of 
Monehanema, in the co. Cork, Esq. 



■Ellena, daughter of Denis McCarthy of 
Tuadrumun in the co. of Cork, Esq. 



I I 

Laurence Barry of=MARV, daughter of John Barry of Leam- = ELEONORA, daughter 



Ballyvotta in the co. 
of Cork, second son. 



Alexander Roche 
of the house of 
Fermoy, Esq. 



lary in the co. of 
Cork, Esq., eldest 

son. 



of Garrett Nagle of 
Monehanema in the 
CO. of Cork, Esq. 



James BARRY,=rCATHERiNE, daughter of Garrett Barry,=Eleonora, daughter of 
Esq. i Roger McSwiney of Esq. I Daniel O'Cahill of Bally- 



)ger ivic&wmey 
Downiskie, in the co. of 
Cork, Esq. 



vodagh in the co. of 
Cork, Esq. 



Garrett Barry, Lieut. -Colonel in the=ALiCE, daughter of Garrett Barry, Esq. 
Army of Bavaria. | 



James Barry, Lieut. -Colonel in the Army of Germany. = 

Garrett Barry, Captain in the Royal Legion of Bavaria, in the army of the Most 
Christian King of the French. 

The foregoing pedigree is inconsistent with the corresponding portion of the 
true Leamlara pedigree. 

Garrett Barry, of Leamlaiy, married a daughter of Poer of Shangarry, and 
dying about the year 1390 was succeeded by his son, John Barry, who married a 
daughter of O'Nunanee, of Castleishane, and had a son and heir, Garrett Barry, 
who married a daughter of White of Imokilly, and had a son, David Barry, of 
Leamlary, who married a daughter of Barrett of BallincoUy, and was father of 
John Barry who, on the 6 May, 1573, had a pardon as John McDavid McGerald 
Barry, of Leymlary, gent. — Fiant 2,260 of Elizabeth ; and on the 6th of September, 
1577, had a pardon as John Laudir Barry, that is, John Barry the Strong. — Fiant 
3080, Elizabeth. He married Catherine Roche, of the noble house of Fermoy, 
and was father of Garrett and Edmond, of whom the elder was pardoned with his 
father on the 6th of May, 1573, as Gerald Macjohn Barry, of Leymlary, gent, ; 
and both brothers were pardoned in 1601 as Garrett McShane Ladir, of Leamlara, 

8 



I06 BARRYMORE. 

and Edmond McShane Ladir, of same. — Fiant of Elizabeth, 6,485. Edmond's 
issue became extinct, but Garrett married Ellen McCarthy, of Tuadrommun, and 
was father of John Barry, of Leamlary, who married Isabella, second daughter 
of David Nagle, of Moneanimy, gent., who died 14 Nov., 1631 (Entry, vol. vii., 
p. 247). By that marriage John Barry, of Leamlary in 1633 and 1663, had a 
son, Garrett, who got a confirmatory grant in 1685. He married Ellen, daughter 
of Daniel Duff O'Cahill, etc. Thus, the John Barry, of Leamlara, whom 
William Hawkins would have to be a son of Edmond, son of James FitzRichard 
Viscount Buttevant, is the son of a David Barry, the son of a Gerald Barry in 
Fiant of Elizabeth 2,260, and was not a grandson but a contemporary of James 
FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant. 

According to another claim, the" Hon. Edmond Barry, of Killarney, fourth 
son of James FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant, was born 25 March, 1582, and died 
20 April, 1696. He married, first, Maiy, daughter of Henry Galway, of Gurteen- 
roe, near Bantry, and had a son, Gerald, a general in the French service, who 
died s.p. ; he married, secondly, Mary, daughter of Henry Mellifont, of Melli- 
fontstown, in the county of Cork, and had a son, Edmond, born 21 Aug., 1665, 
died 15 April, 1743. That Edmond Barry, of Killarney, married Mary, daughter 
of Lord Sandes, and had a son, David, born 4 March, 17 10, died 24 Oct., 1788. 
That David Barry, of Killarney, married Mary, daughter of Dermot Falvey, Esq., 
of Castle Lough, near Killarney, and had a son, Edward Barry, born 21 June, 
1763, and claiming the Buttevant title in August, 1843, being then of Cove, now 
Queenstown, county Cork. 

Borough of Cork to Wit. The Declaration of Edward Barry, of No. 56, Grand 
Parade, Cork, Esqr., aged upwards of 70 years. 

I, the above-named Edward Barry, do solemnly and sincerely declare that I 
am the surviving legitimate son of David Barry, late of Killarney, in the co. 
Kerry, gent., and that all his other sons and their male issue are dead, except one 
nephew of mine, the son of Edmond, a younger brother. I also declare that I 
have heard my father and others say that he was the legitimate eldest son of 
Edmond Ned Barr}', of said Killarney, who was the eldest legitimate son of the 
Hon. Edmond Barry, who was the fourth son of James FitzRichard Barryroe, 
Viscount of Buttevant. 

I do declare that I was intimately acquainted with the late Peter Barry, of 
Killarney, who died about the year 1770, at the very advanced age of 115 years, 
as I have heard and believe ; that he was my great uncle, that he was my father's 
uncle, and by many years the last surviving son of the before-named Honble. 
Edmond Barry. 

I further declare that the said Peter Barry was interred in a tomb erected to 
the memory of his father in Kilcummin church, near Killarney, that my father 
was buried in said tomb, in which none but the descendants of said Honble. 
Edmond Barry are permitted to be interred, and on which tomb there is a Latin 
inscription hereinafter truly copied : "LN.R.L I.H.LC. LH.S. Capt Edmond 
Barry and his family's Tomb. Barreus, " etc., etc., etc. 

I finally declare that from what I have heard, read, know, and believe, and 
also have seen in an old book preserved in my family, which book has been in 
my possession from the death of my father to the year 1841, when it was stolen, 
lost, or mislaid, in which book was recorded in different handwritings the time 
of the births and the deaths of many members of my family, and amongst the 



BARRYMORE. IO7 

rest the period of the birth and death of the said Peter Barry ; that I am satis- 
fied that I am the surviving legitimate son and heir at law of David Barry, who 
was the eldest legitimate son of Edmond Ned Barry, who was the eldest legiti- 
mate son of the Honble. Edmond Barry, fourth legitimate son of James Fitz- 
Richard Barryroe, Viscount of Buttevant, alias Lord of Barrymore. And I make 
this declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true, etc. 

Taken before me, etc., Dec. 10, 1842, 

Bn. Gibbings. 
Edward Barry's Declaration. 

Now, waiving mere improbabilities, it is impossible that an Edmond Barry 
who was born 25 March, A.D. 1582, had issue a.d. 1665, and died a.d. 1696, could 
have been the second youngest legitimate son of the James Viscount Buttevant 
who died 10 April, 1581, and whose youngest legitimate son, John, was old enough on 
the 24 August, 1582, to have a pardon for his misdeeds, and to have then a particular 
residence, Inshnevacky. Neither that John, nor, of course, his elder brother, 
Edmond, could have been born later than a.d. 1650, for on the 27 January, 
1 600- 1 60 1, together with John, then of Liscarroll, were pardoned his first and 
fourth sons, William and Edmond; and on the 28 of March, 1601, his third son, 
John Oge, was not only old enough to receive a pardon for his misdeeds, but also 
to have a particular residence — Tymolag. 

5. John Barry, fifth son of James FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant, 
was of Inshnevacky when pardoned on the 24 August, 1582, in fiant of 
Elizabeth 3,974, and of Liscarroll when pardoned on the 29 January, 
1585-6. He was styled John Fitz James FitzRichard Barrie, of Dundedy, 
when pardoned on the 31 August, 1598, in Fiant 6,248 ; and John Barri, 
of Liscarul, in the county of Cork, Esq., wife, Ellen ny Dermod Carthie, 
and [sons] WilHam Barrie and Edmond Barrie, of Liscarull, as pardoned 
on the 27 January, 1 600-1, in fiant of Elizabeth 6,465. Another son, 
John Oge Barry, of Tymolag, was pardoned on the 28 March, 1601, in 
fiant of Elizabeth 6,485. According to the pedigree by Florence Mac- 
Carthy, John, son of James Viscount Buttevant, married Ellen, daughter 
to Sir Dermod, Lord of Muskerry, and had issue a daughter, married to 
O'Donovan's son and heir. According to the Barry pedigree composed 
by David Viscount Buttevant in 1602, but copied in 161 5 for or by Lord 
Carew, John Barry, of Liscarroll, married a daughter of Teige McCarthy, 
of Muskerrie, who lived in 161 5, and had issue (i) William, who married 
a daughter of Sir Bryan Duff O' Bryan, of Carriggonell, knt.,and had issue (i) 
John Barryroe, who married Alice, daughter of Richard Earl of Cork, 
and widow of David Earl of Barrymore ; (2) James Barryroe, (3) John 
Oge Barryroe, (4) Edmond Barryroe, (5) Richard Barryroe ; (i) daughter, . 
married to O'Donovan's son and heir." There, among other omissions, 
some copyist has omitted the name "Sir Dermod, son of" before the 
name "Teige McCarthy." Lodge is astray in putting Julia instead of 
Ellen as the name of the daughter of Sir Dermod McTeige McCarthy, 



I08 BARRYMORE. 

of Muskerry, but he gives particulars not in the other pedigrees: that 
John of Liscarroll had a first wife, Joan, daughter of Edmond FitzGerald, 
the White Knight ; that his issue were of the second marriage ; that he 
died on the 31st of January, 1627 ; and that "his brother, David, on the 
30th of January, 1599, in consideration of his brotherly affection, and that 
the said John and his heirs might be subject to the crown of England, 
perfected a deed of feoffment of the manors, castles, and lands of Lis- 
carroll, Ballymackowe, Dundeady, etc., in the baronies of Orrerie and 
Ibawne, to the use of the said John and his heirs male ; remainder to his 
own right heirs, to hold in as large and ample manner as his lordship his 
father or any other lord of Orrery and Ibawne at any time enjoyed the 
same." The extinction of the issue male of John Barry, of Liscarroll, 
fifth son of James FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant, is certified in an 
inquisition taken in 1657 at the King's Old Castle, in the county of Cork, 
before J. Hodder. The jury found that Liscarroll, five ploughlands ; 
Ballymaccowe, five ploughlands ; Ffarrindigin, Ffarrinmulkenisse, one pi. ; 
Molgge, I pi. ; Rathenclare, i pi. ; Killegillane, Ballinipsa, i.e., Bowlane, 
C pi. ; Downedeady, 4 pi. ; and three-fourth part of Ballyholly, in 
Ibawne, on the 30th of January, 1599, were conveyed by David Viscount 
Buttevant, Sir Nicholas Walsh, knt. Chief Justice of his Majesty, and 
John Bayes, of Kinsale, physician, to John Skiddie FitzGeorge, of the 
city of Cork, alderman ; Ed. Cantwell, of Muckaricke, co. Tipperary, 
gentleman ; Adryane Walter, of Cork, merchant ; and Dom. Skiddie 
FitzGeorge, of same, merchant ; their heirs and assigns to the only use 
and behoofe of John Barry, Esqr., brother to the said Lord Viscount, 
during his natural life, without impeachment of waste ; and after his 
decease to the use of William Barry, the eldest son of the said John, and 
his heirs males, and for default of such issue to the use of James Barry, 
the second son ; John Oge Barry, the third son ; Edmond Barry, the 
fourth son; and Richard Barry, the fifth son, and their heirs males suc- 
cessively. Provided they do not enter into rebellion, in case of which the 
premisses were to revert to the grantors. The said John died seized of 
the premisses ; William, eldest son of the said John, died in the lifetime 
of his father ; John Barry FitzWilliam, son and heir of said William, 
after the death of his grandfather, entered into all and singular the 
premisses, and died without issue male. James Barry, second son of the 
said John, also died without issue male. John Oge Barry, the third son ; 
Edmond Barry, the fourth son; Richard Barry, the fifth son, and William 
Barry, the sixth son of the said John, who hath (sic) a remainder by the old 
deed, the 14th of February, 1641, entered into rebellion, and thereby all 
and singular the aforesaid premisses doth revert to Richard, Earl of 
Barrymore, now living, son and heir to Pivid, Earl of Barrymore, grand- 



BARRYMORE. IO9 

child to David Barry, Esq., deceased, and his heirs for ever. That said 
John Oge and William Barry are now living, without issue male, and 
that the said Edmond died the tyme of the Irish rebellion, and that the 
said Richard also died without issue male in the said time, and that the 
said John, in his lifetime, long before the Irish rebellion, did mortgage 
by his deed for a considerable sum to Sir Philip Percivall, knt.and that John 
Percivall, Esq., sonne and heir of the said Philip, now is seized of the said 
premisses by virtue of the said deede. — Extract from a Summary in the 
Library, R.I.A. 

Among those indicted of treason in the county of Cork at the sessions 
held at Youghal, in the county of Cork, the second of August, 1 642, were 
John Oge Barry, William Barry, and Richard Barry, of Downededy. 

In the pedigree of A.D. 161 5 the daughters of James FitzRichard 
Viscount Buttevant are Honora, wife of Patrick Condon ; Ellinor, wife 
of Sir Owen O' Sullivan, Knt. ; Johanna, wife of David Lord Roche ; and 
Ilaine, wife of Callaghan MacTeige MacCarthy, of Muskerry. 

On the death of James FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant, on the 10 
April, 1 581, as Richard, the eldest of his five sons, was deaf and dumb, 
though of sound understanding, the second son, David, assumed the 
deceased Lord's title. In his father's lifetime this David took part a 
while in the Geraldine rebellion, and was pardoned on the 5 of Sept., 
1577, and on the 6th of June, 1579, both times as David Barry, of Butte- 
vant, Esqr. On his father's imprisonment in 1580, he promptly burnt 
his chief residence, Barryscourt Castle, and all his other castles, forestall- 
ing Sir Walter Raleigh, who had a commission to seize Barryscourt. 
Also he promptly hung a spy sent to assassinate him. In Carew MSS., 
vol. 607, p. 71, among the charges to be proved against the Lord 
General the Earl of Ormond by Sir Walter Raleigh and others were : 
(9) "He suffered Davy Barry, by dallying with him, to spoil and waste 
all his own castles, which might have been kept for her Majesty's service, 
(11) A serviceable spy, being committed to the Lord General of trust to 
do service, was by Davie Barry taken and hanged for certain words 
privately spoken by this said spy to the Lord General." It may be re- 
marked that though in putting down the Desmond rebellion the Earl of 
Ormond slew over four thousand rebels, he would not obey orders, even 
from the Secretary of State, to carry out assassinations. And so he is . 
further charged with marring another assassination plot: "(16) Where 
two choice persons were entertained for the killing of the traitor Seneschal, 
and had undertaken the same, the matter not being revealed to any by 
the persons that entertained them, saving only to the Earl of Ormond, 
these executioners were no sooner arrived at the camp but they were 
apprehended by the Seneschal and charged with the practice, and for the 



no BARRYMORE, 

same executed to the great grief of the persons that entertained them." — 
" Cal. Carew MSS." 

David Barry, about that time, had trouble also with some of his 
Anglo-Norman Catholic neighbours: "A.D. 1582. The Barry, i.e., David 
Barry, defeated MauricCj the eldest son of Roche, and Maurice escaped 
with the loss of many horses and men." — "Annals of the Four Masters." 
The Abbe MacGeoghegan, in his " History of Ireland," mentions David 
Barry thus : " Captain Rawleigh repaired to Dublin to complain of the 
Barrys and Condons in the county of Cork, and obtained a warrant to 
seize on Barryscourt and other estates belonging to Barry, lord of that 
castle. Rawleigh received a fresh reinforcement and set out from Dublin 
to execute his commission. Barry being apprised of Rawleigh' s design, 
set fire to his castle, and the Seneschal of Imokilly lay in ambush to inter- 
cept his march, so that Rawleigh was obliged to effect his escape to 
Cork, sword in hand. Zouch, Governor of Munster, was in garrison at 
Dingle, where several of his men died of sickness. Having learned that 
the Earl of Desmond and David Barry were collecting their forces near 
Achadoe, in the county of Kerry, he marched with his army towards 
Castlemaine, and surprised the Earl, who was obliged to withdraw to a 
wood called Harlow Wood. At the same time Fitzgerald, commonly 
called the Senes-chal of Imokilly, made incursions in the neighbourhood 
of Lismore, and being attacked by a detachment from that garrison, he 
killed twenty-five of them and put the rest to flight. While Zouch was 
at headquarters in Cork, an occurrence took place disastrous both to 
religion and to the Earl of Desmond who defended it so gloriously. 
David Barry and Fitzgerald, Seneschal of Imokilly, though in arms for 
the common cause, had a dispute, which broke out into an open rupture 
at this time, and destroyed the harmony and union which ought to subsist 
between the supporters of the same cause. 

" Barry and Fitzgerald were encamped near Dromphinin, on the right 
bank of the Blackwater, which falls into the sea at Youghal. Desmond 
and his brother, John, who were posted on the opposite bank, were par- 
ticularly interested for the reconciliation of these noblemen who were 
to share in the perils of war ; and John of Desmond having under- 
taken to bring it about, repaired to the camp for that purpose. Zouch 
and Dowdal having learned through a spy that John of Desmond was to 
cross the river the day following, on his way to the camp at Dromphinin, 
set out during the night, from Cork, with a strong force. They arrived 
at break of day at Castlelyons, and posted themselves near a wood 
through which Desmond had to pass. This nobleman, not suspecting 
that an enemy was so near, had the misfortune to fall into their hands, 
with James, son of John Fitzgerald, Lord of Stonacally, who accompanied 



BARRYMORE. I I I 

him. Having refused to surrender, they were surrounded and taken by 
the enemy and brought to Cork, but Desmond, who was mortally 
wounded, died on the way. His head was cut off and sent to Dublin, 
where it was fastened to a pole and put upon the top of the castle; and 
his body tied to a gibbet on the gates of Cork, where it remained for 
three or four years, till it was at length carried into the sea by the wind. 
James Fitzgerald was put to death. 

"After this expedition, Zouch surprised the camp of David Barry, and 
dispersed his troops, avenging thereby the garrison of Bantry, which was 
put to the sword by Barry and MacSweeny" (p. 477-478). 

The "Annals of the Four Masters" say: "A.D. 1582. The son of 
the Earl of Desmond, i.e., John, the son of James, son of John, son of 
Thomas the Earl, fell by his enemies, unrevenged. The following is the 
true account of the manner in which he came by his death. John set out, 
accompanied by four horsemen, from the woods of Eatharlach, to hold a 
conference with Barry More, with whom he had entered into a plundering 
confederacy. He proceeded southwards across the river Avonmore, in 
the middle of a dark and misty day, and happened to be met, front to 
front and face to face, by Captain Siutsi (Zouch), with his forces, though 
neither of them was in search of the other. John was wounded and 
captured on the spot, and had not advanced the space of one mile beyond 
that place when he died," etc. Dr. O'Donovan says in a note that O'Daly 
says that a traitor, named John, conveyed information to Zouch ; and that 
Hooker and Cox state confidently that Captain Zouch acted on informa- 
tion from an Irish spy. 

On his overthrow by Captain Zouch, David Viscount Buttevant sub- 
mitted, and on the 24th of August, 1582, fiant of Elizabeth 3,974 contains 
a pardon to David Barr)^, of Buttevant, co. Cork, Esq. ; William Barry, 
alias Barryroe, of Timolegg, gent. ; and John Barry, of Inshnevacky, gent, 
[the three competent sons of the late Viscount] ; Richard fitzDavid Oge, 
and Thomas fitzDavid Oge Barry, of Rathenusky ; Richard MacShane 
MacShiames Barry, of Polchierry ; Nicholas fitz James Barry, alias Mac- 
James, of Broheny ; Edmond Barry, alias MacRobeson, of Balleclohey ; 
John MacDa MacShane, of Ballenechorry ; Gerald Bwy Barry, of Bally- 
necourt [alias Gerald of the Little Island] ; Gerald fitzRichard fitzjohn 
Barry, of Ballyvacie [in Ibawne], alias Gerald Kiese, and his brothers, 
Edmond, James, and William Rowe ; James fitzGarrott fitzRichard, of 
Dungournie ; Callaghan MacOwe'n I Challaghan, of Dromdony ; Robert 
Magner, of Magner's Castleton ; William Stanton, alias Maclvile, of 
Lotaghe ; Fineny MacArte I Kieffe, of Donbolge ; William Fitzjohn 
Hodnett, of Ballyvodigh, and other gentlemen of Barrie's country, pro- 
vided that within six months they appeared before Commissioners in 



I I 2 BARRYMORE. 

their county, and gave security to keep the peace and answer at sessions, 
when called upon. 

David Viscount Buttevant got back the Barrymore estate, subject only 
to a fine of £soo, which he was not pressed to pay until it had been 
assigned to Florence McCarthy. 

In August, 1584, Lord Deputy Perrot, in " Memorials " to be delivered 
to the Privy Council [in England] gives the title of Lord Barry to David 
Barry : " With whom " (i.e., Sir William Stanley, sheriff of Cork), " was 
the Lord Barrie, Lord Roch, and Sir Owen McCarthie thinking to meet 
me . . But . . I was forced to depart . . having ordered the county 
of Cork to be governed by the Justices Walshe and Meath, by the 
sheriff, and by Barrie and Roche." — " Calendar of Carew MSS." 

In 1585, in the parliament held by Sir John Perrott, this lord was 
sequestered by the House for having an elder brother, deaf and dumb, yet 
living ("Cal. Carew MSS.," 161 1, p. 147) ; but in 161 3 King James declared, 
says Lodge : " In regard the Lord Barry has been always honourably re- 
ported of for dutiful behaviour to our state and hath enjoyed without con- 
tradiction these many years the title of honour and living of his house, 
and that his brother, who is said to be elder, is both dumb and deaf, and 
was never yet in possession of the honours or living of his House ; we are 
pleased to command you if this question concerning his right to sit in 
Parliament be stirred by any person that you silence it by our command, 
and that you do admit him according to his degree to have place and 
voice in Parliament not taking knowledge of any doubt, which may be 
moved of his legal right thereunto." 

In A.D. 1588, David Viscount Buttevant repaired Barryscourt Castle, 
in which is a chimney piece with this inscription -. "A.D. 1588. I.H.S D.B. 
ETE. R. ME FIERI FECERVT," that is: "In the year of the Lord 
1588, Jesus, Saviour of Men, David Barry and Ellen Roche cause me to 
be made." 

A.D. 1592-3, March 22, Lord Buttevant, in the interest of his brother- 
in-law, Sir Owen O'Sullivan Beare, whose daughter had been jilted by 
Florence McCarthy, son and heir of Sir Donogh MacCarthy Reagh, wrote 
to Sir John Popham, Lord Chief Justice of England, against the sending 
home of the said Florence McCarthy, who had been confined to London, 
and for two years to the Tower of London, for having married Ellen, 
daughter and sole heiress of MacCarthy More, Earl of Clancare, contrary 
to the intentions of Government. But Lord Barry was not himself a 
persona grata at court, and Florence MacCarthy returned to Ireland forti- 
fied with the following Royal Letter to the Lord Deputy, which letter 
Florence MacCarthy took care to have inrolled : 

"Elizabeth, etc. Whereas, the Viscount Barry havinge in the last 



BARRYMORE. 1 1 3 

rebellion associate himself to the late traitor the Earle of Desmond, was 
afterwards received to his submission in the time of the Government of 
the Lord Graie, our late Deputie in that Realme, uppon condicion of a 
fine acknowledged by him for his said offenses to our said Deputie and 
Councell of the somme of five hundred pounds to our use^ the paiement 
whereof hath since been respited. Wee let youe understand that know- 
inge noe cause whie wee should anie longer forbeare the same, and 
havinge withall a disposicion to relieve Fflorence MacCartie and subjeicte 
of that our Realme who hathe desearved to have somme gracious con- 
sideracion to be had of him. Wee are pleased to bestow on him the 
benefitt of the said fyne of the Viscounte Barrie's, wherefore Wee will and 
comaunde you that uppon the Receipte herof youe cause the Record of 
the fine to be sought out and theruppon to procead by estcheate or other 
process of Our Exchequior to extend and recover the same. And beinge 
recovered to give Warraunte to the officers of Our Exchequior theare to 
make paiment therof to the said Fflorence MacCartie or his assigns as of 
Our ffree gifte and liberaltie without accomtpe impreste or other chardge 
to be sett uppon him for the same, and these Our letters shall be to youe 
and to them sufficient Warraunte for the doinge herof. Given under Our 
Signett at our Castle of Windesore the 8th of August, 1593, in the 35th 
year of our reigne, etc." — See "Life and Letters of Florence McCarthy 
Mor." 

Lord Buttevant promptly gave his bond to pay the debt in four instal- 
ments within nine months. Next, without leave, he rushed off to the 
English Court with unsubstantial charges of disloyalty against Florence 
McCarthy. Thereupon, in Ireland, Lord Buttevant's recognisances were 
escheated, and fourteen or fifteen of his ploughlands were given to Flor- 
ence McCarthy. — See the said above Life, etc. 

A.D. 1600. From the 23rd to the 27th of February Hugh O'Neill, 
Earl of Tyrone, spoiled that part of Barry's country that is now the 
barony of Barrymore and the North Liberties of Cork, and on the 2nd 
of April William, Protestant Bishop of Cork and Ross, wrote to Sir Robert 
Cecil, Principal Secretary of State : " It is certainly signified that Florence 
McCarthy sent one Richard Burk, a captain of some of the northern 
rebels, to spoile the Barony of Ybawne, belonging to the Lord Barrie, 
where the said Burk was slain by the nephew of the Lord Barrie's ; in 
this conflict was slain also the said nephew, who had the charge of 
Ybawne under the Lord Barry. On Burk's side, with himself, were slain 
nine of the best gentlemen he had and forty others." — See the said Life. 
The "Annals of the Four Masters" say: "A.D. 1600. O'Neill, after- 
wards proceeded to the gates of Cashel, and there came to him to that 
place the Earl of Desmond, who had been previously appointed by his 



114 BARRYMORE. 

own command and by his own authority, contrary to the statute of the 
Sovereign, James, the son of Thomas Roe, son of James, son of John, 
and they were rejoiced to see each other. They afterwards proceeded 
westward across the Suir by the route of Cnamhchoill, Sliab-muice, by 
the east of Sliabh Claire and Bearna-dhearg, through Clann-Gibbon, 
through the country of the Roches, and through the territory of Barry- 
more." 

O'Neill did not injure or waste any in these territories through which 
he passed, excepting those whom he found always opposed to him in 
inveterate enmity. He afterwards marched into the country of Barry- 
more, who was always on the side of the Queen. The Barry at this time 
was David, the son of James, son of Richard, son of Thomas, son of 
Edmond, and as he was loyal to the Queen, O'Neill remained in the 
territory until he traversed, plundered, and burned it, from one extremity 
to the other, both plain and wood, both level and rugged, so that no one 
hoped or expected that it could be inhabited for a long time afterwards. 

Before plundering Barry's country, O'Neill summoned Lord Barry to 
meet him at Glanmire by a certain day, but did not wait for that day, 
being certain that Lord Barry would not come. What purports to be 
O'Neill's let"ter is given thus in the "Calendar Carew MSS." : — 

" We have, for the maintenance of the Catholic religion to be planted 
in this realm, as also for the expelling of our enemies from their continual 
treachery and oppression used towards this poor country, undertaken a jour- 
ney to visit these places which as yet have not joined into that godly enter- 
prise. And for that your Lordship, by sinister persuasions, is altogether 
seduced to hold with the Queen of England and to serve against us and the 
Church, we thought fit to write unto your Lordship and to entreat you withal 
to add your helping hand in the accomplishing of our said enterprise, and 
to meet us at Glanmoyre, on Thursday next, or so soon as you may, with 
a good pledge for performance. Otherwise we will fytt that course which 
shall be little to your liking and your country. And also urge not, we 
pray, the ruin of your followers which we would be loath to work. Tippe- 

rary, 13 February, 1599. 

Signed, O'Neylle, Ja. Desmond." 

In the " Calendar" the next letter is headed : 

"Dermod, Bishop of Cork, and Owen Hogan, Vicar Apostolic, to 
Viscount Barry : We have received an excommunication from the Pope 
against all those that doth not join in this Catholic action. The same was 
first published in Ulster and in the North, and upon receipt thereof by us we 
have accordingly published the same. This much we thought good to 
certify unto you beforehand, and do wish you therefore to consider of the 
same like a good Christian, Catholic, and obedient child of the Church, 



BARRYMORE. I I 5 

as hitherto you were ; otherwise it will redound both to your soul's de- 
struction and your country's ruin, of which we would be sorry. 1 3 Feb., 

1599- 

Signed, Der. Cor. Episcopus, Eugenius Hoganius, Vic. Apostolicus." 

O'Neill's letter to Cormac MacDermod McCarthy is dated 13 Feb- 
ruary, 1599, at Arlo. His letter, however, to Lord Roche is dated 21 
February, 1660, at Muskericurcke, and that to Edmond Fitzjohn and 
Thomas Fitzjohn Fitzgerald, of Cloyne, is dated 23 February, 1600, 
at the Abbey of Ballenegalle. Three of these letters are dated, old style, 
with the twenty fifth of March for New Year's Day, that is, in old English 
style ; the remaining two are dated as letters now. 

In a note to the "Annals of the Four Masters," John O'Donovan 
quotes from a letter from O'Neill to Lord Barry this passage : " You are 
the cause why all the nobility of the South, with each of whom you are 
linked either in afhnity or consanguinity, have not joined together to 
shake off the yoke of heresy and tyranny with which our souls and 
bodies are oppressed." This may be from O'Neill's answer to Lord 
Barry's remonstrance. 

On receiving O'Neill's first letter. Lord Barry sent both his sons into 
the fortified city of Cork, and posted himself at Barryscourt Castle, and 
wrote this letter to O'Neill : 

"The Lord Barry's answer to Tyrone. Your letters received, and if 
I had answered the same as rightfully they might be answered, you should 
have as little like thereof as I should mislike and fear anything by you 
threatened gainst me (which manner of answer leaving to the construction 
and consideration of all those that are fully possessed with the knowledge 
of the law of duty to God and man). You may understand hereby briefly 
my mind to your objections, in this manner : how I am undoubtedly 
persuaded in my conscience that by the law of God and His true religion 
I am bound to hold with Her Majesty. Her Highness hath never re- 
strained me for matters of religion, and as I felt Her Majesty's indifference 
and clemency therein, I have not spared to relieve poor Catholics with 
dutiful succour, which well considered will assure any well disposed mind 
that if duty had not (as it doth), yet kindness and courtesy should bind 
me to remember and requite to my power the benefit by me received at 
Her Majesty's hands. You shall further understand that I hold my 
lordships and lands immediately under God of Her Majesty and her most 
noble progenitors by corporal service, and of none other, by very ancient 
tenure, which service of tenure none may dispense withall, but the 
true possessor of the crown of England, being now our Sovereign Lady, 
Queen Elizabeth. And though ye, by some overweening imaginations, 
have dechned from your dutiful allegiance unto Her Highness yet I have 



Il6 BARRYMORE. 

settled myself never to forsake her, let fortune never so much rage against 
me, she being my annointed prince, and would to God you had not run so 
far to such desperate and erroneous ways offending God and Her 
Majesty who hath so well deserved of you, and I would pray you to enter 
into consideration thereof and with penitent hearts to reclaim yourselves, 
hoping that Her Highness of her accustomed clemency would be gracious 
to you, wherein I leave you to your own compunction and consideration. 

"And this much I must challenge you for breach of your word in your 
letter by implication inserted that your forces have spoiled part of my 
country and preyed them to the number of 4,000 kine and 3,000 mares 
and garrans, and taken some of my followers prisoners, within the time 
by you assigned unto me to come into you by your said word (if ye regard 
it). I require restitution of my spoil and prisoners, and after (unless you 
be better advised for your loyalty) use your discretions against me and 
mine and spare not, if you please, for I doubt not, with the help of God 
and my prince, to be quit with some of you hereafter, though not now 
able to use resistance ; and so wishing you to become true and faithful 
subjects to God and your Prince, I end, at Barry Court, this 26 of Feb- 
ruary, 1 599." — From " Pacata Hibernia," O'Grady's edition. 

The following is the account of these events sent by the Commissioners 
and Council of Munster to the Lords Justices Loftus and Carey : 

"Tyrone has been in this province twelve or thirteen days. He lay 
three or four days 'in the Lord Roche's country, who it seems has agreed 
with him, for he (Tyrone) did little or no hurt to him, except to two or 
three gentlemen of that country, Roche's enemies. The Lord Roche sent 
presents of wine and aqua-vitae to the traitors, and had James Fitz- 
Thomas (the pretended Earl of Desmond) in the house with him. 

"Cormock McDermody, Lord of Muskerry, came into this town, and 
stayed here, but his brother and all his country repaired to the traitors, 
and have given them pledges. And what is more suspicious, his brother's 
pledge, which was delivered to Cormock's keeping, and was in his house 
of the Blarnye, was delivered out and given to the traitors ; for which we 
think good to make stay of Cormock. . . . 

"After the traitors had agreed with Muskerry, they suddenly and 
unlooked for returned upon my Lord Barry, and John FitzEdmunds, and 
have utterly spoiled them. They have entered the islands also, and not 
left a house unburnt, saving such as were under defence of a castle, to 
which we had sent a hundred soldiers. My Lord thought he could have 
defended his Great Island by that means, but they found another en- 
trance. Upon the first coming of the traitors he came hither and left 
both his sons in this town. Every man of account within this province — 
at least in the counties of Cork, Limerick, and Kerry — is 'either joined 



BARRYMORE. llj 

with them or patched with them,' except these two, who deserved to be 
cherished. . . Cork, 26 February, 1 599. Warham St. Leger," etc. 

On the 30th April, 1600, the Lord President and Council of Munster 
wrote to the Privy Council : 

" The Lord Barry of late hath done good service. . . We recom- 
m.end the Lord Barry to be relieved by some entertainment. His poverty 
is now such chiefly through the spoils which Tyrone did upon him, that 
he is not able to keep his men together either to attend the army unto 
the field or to preserve the country from further spoils." 

Carew wrote to Cecil, Secretary of State, urging him "to encourage 
my Lord Barry, who is now in blood with the rebels since his losses 
when Tyrone was in these parts. . . . He is exceedingly poor, and 
strong in followers. When I came into this province he met me between 
Youghal and Cork with 500 foot and 100 horse of his own." 

By way of relief, a company of foot was bestowed upon Lord Barry, 
but his petition for lands of James FitzThomas, O'Neill's Earl of Des- 
mond, was refused. At this time his own lands were Barries-Court, 18 
ploughlands ; Inchinibakye, 4 pL ; Castellyons, 30 pi. ; Botevant and 
Lescarroll, in Orerye, 40 pi. ; Timologa, Rathebarry, and Lislie, in 
Ybawne, 300 pi. ; total, 392 pi. Also the said Lord Barry hath the 
letting and setting to his own use three parts of every freeholder's lands 
within the manors aforesaid ; which do amount in all by estimation of 
Irish measure unto 1,000 plowlands. — "Calendar Carew MSS." 

On the departure of Tyrone from Munster in A.D. 1600, the younger 
son of Lord Barry was restored to his fatherj but the elder was sent to 
England, where Sir Robert Cecil failed to Protestantise him, as appeajs 
from Cecil's letter to Sir George Carew, 2nd August, 1600 : 

" I would be glad to hear what report is made of my usage of young 
Barry, of whom I protest I take as great care as I can. I have placed 
him at the Dean's of Westminster ; I have provided him bedding, and all 
of my own, with some other things ; meaning that for his diet and resi- 
dence there it shall cost him nothing. He hath been a little sick since 
he came, and is extreme Popish of his age, yet I have given order that he 
shall not be by any ways straynably dealt withal, because of distasting his 
father, although he refuse to go to church. . . ." P.S. in Cecil's own 
hand : " The fellow that waits on young Barry is very obstinate. I think 
he makes the boy worse." Evidently young Barry was not taken young 
enough. His son, however, in the reign of James the First, being posthu- 
mous, was a ward of chancery from his birth, and as such was brought 
up in the state religion ; and in the same way the heads of most other 
great Anglo-Norman families in Ireland were Protestantised. 

In May, 1601, Lord Barry was in command of the rising out of the 



I I 8 BARRYMORE. 

county of Cork, 1,300 foot and 120 horse, stationed at Aherlow, and 
afterwards at Killequigge, to resist the followers of O'Neill (p. 55). 

On June 14, 1601, as one of the Council of Munster, he signed an 
order for the arrest of his persistent enemy, Florence McCarthy. — 
"O'Neill's McCarthy More." 

On 4th Oct., 1 60 1, Lord Barry e. Viscount Buttevant, had "a warrant 
to levy all the risings out of the country, and to be at Galbilye by the 4th 
of October to withstand the joining of the Irish forces with the Spaniards," 
who had landed at Kinsale. 

On 22 January Carew, to the Privy Council, in his report of the ex- 
pulsion of O'Sullivan Bear, says: "And to give the greater expedition to 
the business, I assembled the rising out of the province to be commanded 
by the Lord Barry to the number in list of 1,600 foot, at their own 
charges. . . In pursuit of the rebels the Lord Barry, with the light 
Irish, followed them with the best expedition he might . . . but could 
not overtake them, being light, and free from all impediments." 

At the ford of Bellaghan, near Liscarroll, John Barry, brother to Lord 
Barry, with 8 horsemen and 40 foot, charged their rear, and slew and hurt 
many of them. — " Pacata Hibemia." 

That John Barry was sheriff of Cork in 1602 and 1603. Writing to 
Lord Deputy Mountjoy, on the 9 Oct., 1602, Sir George Carew said: 
"John Barry, sheriff of the county of Cork ... is the best struggling 
officer in effecting the commandments that are laid upon him that ever I 
:5aw. . . I am sure by him, without the aid of soldiers, to have my direc- 
tions performed, which by others if he were displaced I could not expect." 

"In recompense for these services," says Archdall, "King James I., 
by patent dated the i6th May, 1604, granted Lord Buttevant and his 
assigns a lease for 31 years, at the rent of ;;^35 lis. 3^d. Irish, of the 
estates of Fynnene MacOwen McCarthy, of Iniskyne, and of Dermod 
Moell McCarthy, slain in rebellion, whereof his Lordship had then a custo- 
dian by order from the Lord Lieutenant." 

15 Nov., 1602. Pardon to David Lord Barry e. Viscount Buttevant, 
and Lady Ellen Barry, his wife. 

A.D. 1607. The King granted Lord Buttevant a fair at Castlelyons 
on Thursday in Whitsun Week, at Timoleague on St. John the Baptist's 
Day, and at Castlelyons on the ist of March, and on the day after each. 

In 161 1 the Irish Lords Temporal were in number 25, of whom 6, as 
noted by Carew, were Protestant : Pro., the Earl of Kildare ; Pro., the 
Earl of Desmond ; Pro., the Earl of Thomond ; the Earl of Clanricard, 
the Viscount Barry, the Viscount Roche, the Viscount Gormanstown, the 
Viscount Mountgarret, Pro., the Viscount Butler of Tullagh ; the Lord 
Birmingham, Baron of Athenry ; the Lord of Slane, the Lord Coursy, the 



BARRYMORE. I 19 

Lord of Lixnawe, the Lord of Killeyn, the Lord of Delvyn, the Lord of 
Dunboyne, Pro., the Lord of Howth ; the Lord of Trimleston, infant the 
Lord Poer, the Lord of Cahire, infant the Lord of Dunsany, the Lord of 
Lowth, the Lord of Upper Ossory, Pro., the Lord Bourke ; Pro., infant 
the Lord of Inchiquin. — ^" Cal. Carew MSS.," p. 170. 

A paper in Carew's handwriting, and put under the year 1 6 1 1 in the 
Carew Calendar, but which, with that just given, may belong to the year 
161 3, says : "My Lord Barry brought with him in his company a chaplain 
of his being a Dominican Friar, named John MacDavid Cormocke, to 
Dublin in the time of the Parliament to be ruled and advised by him 
what to say and how to answer ; and so have all the Lords done who went 
to the Parliament Every of them brought his priest with him. My Lord 
Barry and my Lord Roche are the chief seminarists (sic) to relieve, 
maintain, and countenance priests, seminarists, and Jesuists now in Mun- 
ster." 

David Fitzjames Viscount Buttevant married Ellen Roche, a daughter 
(the youngest, says Lodge) of David Viscount Fermoy, and living in 
1602 ; issue two sons : (i) David, who married Ellis, daughter to Richard 
Lord Power, and dying, left her with child of a son, David, who was 
twelve years and a month old on the 10 April, 161 7, the date of the death 
of his grandfather ; (2) James, who' is mentioned by name in the pedigrees 
given by his father and by Florence McCarthy to Carew, and who was 
entrusted to Carew in Cork, in Feb., 1600, but is not further heard of. 
He was unknown to Lodge. 

(i) Honora, second wife of Gerald Fitzgerald of the Decies, without 
issue ; afterwards wife of Patrick Browne, of Mulrankerne, in the county 
of Wexford, and had issue (Lodge) ; two sons and seven daughters 
says the Funeral Entry of Patrick Browne ; who died on the 3rd of April, 
1637. She is mentioned by Florence McCarthy. 

(2) Hellena, thrice married — first, to John, son and heir to Richard 
Lord Poer ; secondly, to Thomas Earl of Desmond ; and thirdly, to Sir 
Thomas Somerset, third son of Edward Earl of Worcester, and created, 
8 Dec, 1626, Viscount Cashel. — Lodge, etc. 

(3) Married to James Tobin, of Kumpshinagh, county Tipperary. 

(4) Ellen^ married to son and heir to Sir John Gerrald, Seneschal of 
Imokilly, says pedigree given by her father to Carew ; married to Sir 
John Fitzgerald, of Ballymaloe, in the county of Cork, knt., son of Sir 
Edmond, and grandson of Sir John of Cloyne, says Lodge and Miss 
Hickson. 

(5) Catherine, who married Richard Burke, of Derrymaclaghny, county 
Galway. 

(6) Margaret, who married Robert, Earl of Roscommon. 



I20 BARRYMORE. 

According to Lodge, David Fitz James Viscount Buttevant married, 
secondly, Julia, second daughter of Cormac McCarthy, of Muskerry, and 
by her, who afterwards married Sir Roger O'Shaghnasse, Knt., had a 
daughter, who married Sir Dermod O'Shaghnasse of Gort. 

On the death of David Fitz James Viscount Buttevant on the lo April, 
1617, he was succeeded by his grandson, David FitzDavid FitzDavid 
Viscount Buttevant, who was twelve years and one mc^ith old at the 
death of his grandfather. On 14 April, 161 1, his wardship was granted 
to John Chichester; on 18 February, 161 2, to Edmond Fitz John Barry, 
of Ballyspillan, and Gregory Lombard, of Buttevant; on 20 July, 161 8, 
to Sir Thomas Somerset and his wife, Helen, who was Countess Dowager 
of Ormond and Ossory, and daughter of David Fitzjames Viscount 
Buttevant. Afterwards the Earl of Cork got control of him, and married 
him at the age of 16 years, 4 months and 19 days to his (the Earl's) eldest 
daughter, Alice. The Viscount succeeded his deaf and dumb granduncle, 
Richard, on the 24 of April, 1622, and was created Earl of Barrymore, 30 
Nov., 1627, by privy seal at Westminster, and 28 Feb., 1628, by patent 
at Dublin, "because of his attachment to (the Protestant) religion, in 
which he surpassed (i.e., differed from) all his ancestors, the splendour of 
his race, the amplitude of his possessions, the heroism of his valour ; and 
because the said Viscount Lord Barry, sprung from a most illustrious 
stock anciently in England, is descended from the English nobility's 
ancient race primitively planted in this kingdom; and he and all his 
ancestors in all the intestine seditions of this kingdom have ever stood 
with immoveable constancy of mind in their fidelity towards us and our 
crown. 

14 July, 1634, he satin Parliament (Lords' Journal, i. 2), and in 1639 
served against the Scots. In 1641 the confederate Catholics, among 
whom were all the Barrys, his cousins^ offered to make him general for 
Munster, but he declared he would rather be " Hangman General to his 
brother-in-law. Lord Dungarvan, at Youghal," not by any means a sine- 
cure; and on the 10 May, 1624, did join Lord Dungarvan in the assault 
on the castle of Ballymacpatrick, now Careyswille, where sixty men and 
one hundred women and children, in cold blood and hot, were slaughtered, 
including Lord Barrymore's own grandaunt, Honora, daughter of James 
FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant, and wife of Patrick Condon, of Bally- 
macpatrick. In July, 1642, Lord Barrymore took Cloughlea Castle, near 
Kilworth, another castle of the Condons, and was joined with the Earl of 
Inchiquin in the civil government of Munster. He commanded and main- 
tained at his own charge a troop of horse and two companies each of 100 
foot, and headed them at the battle of Liscarroll, 3 Sept., 1642, on the 
29th of which month he died. His body was buried, not with his ances- 



BARRYMORE. 12 I 

tors, but at Youghal, in the tomb of his father-in-law, his guide through 
hfe, Richard, first Earl of Cork. The history of his descendants may 
best be given in the very words of Archdall's edition of " Lodge's Peerage 
of Ireland," A.D. 1789: 

"29 July, 1 62 1 , he married Alice, eldest daughter of Richard Earl of Cork, 
and by her, who after married John Barry, of Liscarroll, Esq., and died 
in 1667, had two sons and two daughters : Richard, his heir ; James, an 
officer against the rebels, who died without issue in 1664 ; Lady Ellen, 
first wife of Sir Arthur Denny, of Tralee, in the county of Kerry, knt. ; 
and Lady Catherine, married to Edward Denny, of Castlelyons, Esq., 
next brother of the said Sir Arthur." 

Richard, the second Earl of Barrymore, was baptized in St. Werburgh's 
Church, Dublin, 4 Nov., 1630, and died in the same month, 1694 [decree 
of Dec, 1705, No. 15, and 26 June, 1727, No. 50]. 5 February, 1660, 
he was appointed a colonel of foot He took his seat in Parliament, 1 1 
May, 1 66 1, and, again, 7 October, 1692, on the Revolution. He had two 
grants of lands under the Act of Settlement, which also provided that 
the Countess, his mother, should be satisfied and paid the respective 
arrears due to her husband and son, JameSj for services done in Ireland 
before 5 June, 1649. 

His lordship married three wives : first, Susan, daughter of Sir William 
Killegrew, knt., by whom he had three daughters, Lady Mary, married 
to the Rev. Gerald Barry ; Lady Catherine, to John Townshend, of 
Castletown, in the county of Cork, Esq. ; and Lady Susan. In November, 
1656, he married, secondly, Martha, daughter of Henry Lawrence-, of 
London, Esq., and by her, who, in 1664, had issue Lawrence, his suc- 
cessor ; Richard and David, who both died young ; Lady Martha. . . 
In February, 1666, his lordship took a third wife, Dorothy, daughter and 
heir of John Ferrer, of Dromore, in the county of Down, Esq., by whom 
he had four sons and four daughters, viz. : James, who succeeded his 
brother Lawrence ; Richard (chosen in October, 171 3, M.P. for Baltimore) ; 
David John, of Mahona, or Barry's Hall, who was sheriff of the county of 
Cork in 1728, was M.P. for Belfast, and died in 1744, having married the 
daughter of — Crosbie, and widow of John Blennerhasset, Esq. ; Ferdi- 
nando William died young ; Lady Dorothy, married to Sir John Jacob, 
of Bromley, in Middlesex, Bart. ; Lady Anne, the first wife of Dr. Henry 
Maule, Bishop of Meath ; Lady Margaret, married to' Thomas Crosbie, 
of Ballyheige, in the county of Kerry, Esq. ; and Lady Elizabeth, who 
died young." — Lodge. 

Lawrence, the third Earl of Barrymore, was attainted, and had his 
estate sequestered by King James's Parliament, 1689; but 27 August, 
1695, took his seat in the House of Peers [Lords' Journals, i, 479], and 
2 Dec., 1697, signed the association and declaration drawn up and 

9 



122 BARRYMORE. 

entered into by the House of Lords in defence of King William's person 
and government and the succession in the Protestant line. 

In 1682 he married Catherine, daughter of Richard Lord Santry, but 
deceasing without issue by her (who remarried, first, in 1689, with Francis 
Gash, Esq., and, secondly, 8 Dec, 1729, with Sir Henry Piers, of Tris- 
ternagh, in Westmeath), was succeeded by his half-brother. 

James, the fourth Earl of Barrymore, who was born in 1667, and upon 
the Revolution appointed, 31 Dec, 1688, a lieut.-colonel in King William's 
army. 8 April, 1700 (12 K. William), a pardon was granted to his lord- 
ship by patent dated at Westminster for all crimes and offences com- 
mitted by him against his Majesty on or before 29 March foregoing 
[Lodge]; and, 15 March, 1701, he purchased from his brother-in-law, Sir 
John Jacob, his old regiment of foot for 1,400 guineas, with which he 
served abroad; was made, ist of June, 1706, a brigadier-general; a 
major-general, 1708, 1st January; was taken prisoner the next year at 
Campo Major, or Caya, by the Spaniards; and, 12 March, 1710, was 
made a lieut.-general of her Majesty's armies ; 14 February, 1703, he sat 
first in Parliament on his brother's death; and, 14 Nov., 171 5, was of 
the committee to prepare an address to his Majesty King George I., to 
congratulate him on his most happy accession to the throne. In the years 
1 710, 1 71 3 he sat for the borough of Stockbridge in the English Parlia- 
ment, and from Feb., 1714, to 1747 for that of Wigan, in Lancashire. 
In January, 171 3, he was called into the Privy Council, and continued a 
Privy Councillor to his death at Castlelyons, 5 January, 1747, where a 
magnificent monument of Italian marble to him was erected in 1753, with 
the following inscription beneath the bust : 

H. S. E. 
JACOBUS BARRY, 

Comes de Barrymore, 

ViCECOMES DE BaRRY ET BUTTEVANT, 

Baro de Ibane et Olethan, 

Ex ANTIQUA et ILLUSTRI FAMILIA ORIUNDUS ; 

Qui ab incunte ddolescentia 

Militiae ^eque et literis deditus, 

Sub felicissimo Annae regno 

ExERCiTUUM dux (qui Locum tenens Generalis vocatur), 

Merito fuit creatus 

Et serenissimae ejusdem reginae 

a secretioribus conciliis 

Virquidem, 

summa gravitate et constantia 

Patriae amans 

Et liberatis publicae vindex. 

DUM vero majora eum desideratant munia 

expatebantque boni omnes 

Uti ad levandam temporio sui calamitatem 

Magnus adjutor foret 

E vita decessit 

Die Januarii 5 to, 1747, 

iETATis 72 do. 



BARRYMORE, 1 23 

His lordship married, first, Elizabeth, daughter of Charles Lord 
Clifford, and sister to Charles Earl of Cork, with a fortune of i^ 10,000, 
and by her, who was baptized 13 Feb., 1662, he had one son, who died an 
infant, 30 May, 1707, and two daughters, Lady Charlotte, buried in the 
chancel of St. Michan's Church, i June, 1 708 ; and Lady Anne, married 
to James Maule, Esq., with a large fortune, but did not long survive her 
marriage. His second wife was the Lady Elizabeth Savage, daughter 
and heir to Richard Earl Rivers, and by her, who died 17 March, 1714, 
by the miscarriage of a son, he had the Lady Penelope Barry, who was 
married to Major-General James Cholmondley. 

On the 12 July, 1716, he married, thirdly, the Lady Anne Chichester, 
daughter of Arthur Earl of Donegall, and by her, who died in December, 
1753, and was interred at Castlelyons, had four sons and two daughters,* 
viz. : — (i) James, his successor. 

(2) Richard, chosen, in 1 744, M.P. for Wigan ; who, in May, 1 749, 
married Jane, daughter and heir to Arthur Hyde, of Castlehyde, Esq., 
M.P. for Cork, and by her, who died of the small pox, 19 Oct, 1751, had 
issue one son, who died in Dublin the same day. The said Richard dying 
23 Nov., 1787, at Marbury, in Cheshire, left his nephew, James Hugh, of 
Foaty, in the county Cork, his heir. 

(3) Arthur, died in October, 1770, and was interred in the family 
burial place. 

(4) John Smith Barry, of Marbury, in Cheshire, Esq., heir to his 
brother Arthur, born 28 July, 1725, who, in April, 1746, married Dorothy, 
elder daughter and co-heir of Hugh Smith, of Weald Hall, in Essex (who 
died in May, 1745, and was heir to his brother, Samuel Smith, of the 
same place and also of Hamerton, in Huntingdonshire, Esq., who died 
in Dec, 1732), and had by her two sons — James Hugh (of whom hereafter) 
and Richard. 

(i) Lady Catherine, daughter of James, fourth Earl of Barrymore, 
died in 1738. 

(2) Lady Anne, married to — Taylor, Esq., and died 21 March, 1758. 

James, fifth Earl of Barrymore, born 25 March, 171 7, was educated at 
Brazennose College, Oxford, where he took the degree of A.M., 8 March, 
1735 (his father being comphmented at the same time with that of LL.D), 
and, 8 June, 1738, married Margaret, the youngest daughter of Paul 
Davis, created Viscount Mountcashel, 21 January, 1705 (by Catherine, 
his wife, daughter of Callaghan, Earl of Clancarthy), and sole heir to her 
brother, Edward Lord Mountcashel, who died unmarried, 30 July, 1736; 
and had issue three sons and three daughters, viz. : (i) James, born 27 

January, 1738, died February, 1739; (2) , died an infant; (3) 

Richard, Viscount Buttevant; Lady Anne, born in 1740, died 12 July, 



124 BARRYMORE. 

1742; Lady Catherine, baptized 23 Dec, 1741 ; and Lady Margaret, 
both deceased. His lordship dying in Dublin, ig Dec., 175 1, having made 
his will 17 of that month [Prerog. Office] (and his lady deceased 6 Dec, 
1753)' he was succeeded by his only son. 

Richard, the sixth Earl of Barrymore, born in October, 1745 ; 16 
Oct., 1 767, he was made a captain in the gth Regiment of dragoons. He 
married Lady Emily Stanhope, third daughter of William Earl of Har- 
rington, and had issue (i) Richard, his successor [Ulster's Office]; (2) 
Henry, born 16 August, 1770; Augustus, born 16 July, 1773 ; and Lady 
Caroline [Ulster Office], born 17 May, 1768, and married, in July, 1788, 
to Count Melfort, descended from the Earls of Perth, in Scotland. His 
.lordship died i Aug., 1773, and was buried at Castlelyons [Ulster Office], 
and her ladyship died in 1782. 

Richard, the seventh (i.e., A.D. 1789) Earl of Barrymore, was born 
14. August, 1769 [Fielding's Peerage]. 

The case of James Redmond Barry claiming the Buttevant title before 
the House of Lords in 1825, carries on the pedigree, thus : 

Richard, the seventh Earl, married a lady of the name of Smith, by 
whom he had no issue, and dying childless, on or about the fifth day of 
March, I793) was succeeded by his brother. 

Henry, the eighth and last Earl of Barrymore, who married Anne, 
daughter of Jeremiah Coghlan, of Ardo, in the county of Waterford, Esq., 
by whom he had no issue. He died childless at Paris on or about the 
20th day of December, 1823, when the Earldom of Barrymore became 
extinct. The Earl's younger brother, Augustus, took holy orders, and 
died unmarried on or about the 27th day of November, 181 8. 

Walker's "Hibernian Magazine" gives the marriage of Henry Earl of 
Barrymore, lieut.-col. of South Cork Militia, to Anna Coghlan, of Youghal, 
daughter of Jeremiah Coghlan, of Ardo, county Waterford, at Cork, Feb- 
ruary, 1795 ; also the marriage of Count Melfort to Lady Caroline Barry 
in 1788. 

By his will dated 19th of July, 1799, James Hugh Smith Barry, Esq., 
left his great estates to his own children, John, James, Caroline, Narcissa, 
and Louisa ; remainder to his brother, Richard ; remainder to his kins- 
men, Henry, Earl of Barrymore, and the Hon. Augustus Barry, brother 
of the said Henry ; remainder to his own right heirs for ever. 

By a codicil, dated 6 July, 1801, a thousand pounds sterling a year 
was left to Henry Earl of Barrymore for life, and to the Hon. Augustus 
Barry, if he should succeed to the Earldom. On the death of Earl Henry 
his sister, Countess of Melfort, assumed in vain the title of Baroness de 
Barry. 



BARRY MORE. I 25 

Anna, relict of Henry, last Earl of Barrymore, died at Paris, May 
6th, 1832. 

The "Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society," 
May, 1 897, gives the following jottings by John Windele, a half a century 
ago, regarding some of the last Earls of Barrymore. 

In 1769 Richard [the sixth Earl] was in England mortgaging at no 
mean rate. In 1770 he conveyed away the rights of the parish of Kilma- 
looda, manor of Timoleague ; also a great part of the town, town plots, 
parks and fields of Timoleague, and part of the Castle Farm. On the 
21 Dec, 1770, he conveyed for ;^26o to Samuel Jervois, of Brade, the 
plot of ground called Shandon Castle of Cork. In 1771 he conveyed to 
Sir R. Tilson Dunne the right of alternate presentations to the rectory 
of St. Mary and St. Anne Shandon. 22nd July, 1771, Castlelyons Castle 
was totally consumed, burned down by an accidental fire. It is said that 
the ravages of the destroying element could have been easily stayed, but 
the tradespeople and artificers anticipating in the repairs and new build- 
ings which would be made on its destruction employment for themselves, 
did not make the necessary exertions to extinguish it. Richard [the 
seventh] Earl of Barrymore was living 13 October, 1793. Henry was 
Earl 26th of same month. Earl Richard mortgaged all his property 9th 
Nov., 1 791, for ;^ 1 30,000 [to William Moreland and Thomas Hammersly], 
and the Earl Henry sold his equity of redemption in that property to 
John Anderson and John Moore Travers [before 30 June, 1807]. 

Henry was mortgaging as much property as he could in the county 
of Kildare, county of Antrim, and county Tipperary. Henry lived at 
Anngrove, now the property of Francis Wise. 

In 1880 James Birmingham, Irish interpreter at Quarter Sessions East 
Riding, county Cork, and fourth in descent from Redmond Barry, of 
Cusane in 1738, gave his third or fourth cousin, the present writer, a more 
particular account of the burning of Castlelyons Castle than that of Mr. 
Windele : " Castlelyons Castle was burned by Andy Hickey, a tinker, 
and Lewis, his apprentice. They were at the top of the castle repairing 
the shoots when called down to have a drink of beer, and in their haste 
left a red-hot soldering iron on some woodwork. On their return the top 
of the castle was on fire. They could have put out the fire, but feared 
punishment if they stayed to do so, and they slipped away at once. When 
people ran to put out the fire, the housekeeper, an Englishwoman, would 
not let them in, as they might soil the carpets, and she undertook to put 
out the fire herself. When she gave up the attempt, it was too late for 
the others to begin. My grandmother saw the castle smouldering for two 
months. Lewis made off to the Nagles of Ballynamona, and settled 
down at Templeruan, close to the graveyard, as a periwig maker, and 



126 BARRYMORE. 

used a scull for his model. I knew him well. For seventeen years I 
lived as near to him as the Youghal clock gate is to this house in Friar 
Street. At the age of in he married a second wife, at 1 1 3 had a son, 
and died at 117, about thirty-five years ago. That son of Lewis is living 
at Shanballymore to-day. I never saw Hickey." Lewis can hardly have 
reached the age assigned him by Mr Birmingham, for dying at the age 
of 117, about thirty-five years before 1880, he was forty-three years old 
in 1 771, a rather advanced age for a tinker's apprentice as he was then. 
Without in the least impugning the bona fides of Mr. Birmingham, we 
may assume that in 1771 Lewis, as being then an apprentice, was about 
twenty years old, and that when he died, in 1845, his age was about 
ninety-four years. 

In the years 1798, 1799, Lord Barrymore had a yeomanry legion. 
Among the family papers of the late Cornelius O'Brien, J.P., Kilcor, are 
many regimental orders directed to his father, Lieutenant Henry O'Brien, 
1st troop, Barrymore Legion, and signed "Barrymore." 

An idea of the discipline in that legion may be formed from the 
following incident, of which the present writer heard from his father and 
from Dr. John Barry and many others. The writer's grandfather, James 
Barry, called Seamus Mor in Gaelic, and called Bravo by the Earl, after 
some trouble at the university of Louvain and some years of adventure in 
the Low Countries and Germany, was in the Barrymore Legion, but 
seemed to some to be overready to explain the use of arms to the peasan- 
try. One evening, returning with Lord Barrymore and others from a 
yeomanry meeting at Midleton, he turned northward at Carrigtwohill 
Cross. Thereupon Mr. Martin, of Johnstown, remarked : " There goes 
the biggest rebel in Ireland " ; and the Earl shouted : " Fore God, Bravo, 
do you hear what he says of you. Don't cut him down." Thus prompted. 
Bravo drew his sword and charged Martin, who fled, and being overtaken 
at the "Weasel" at the entrance to Johnstown, slid off his horse and 
under a dense whitethorn bush, which Bravo was furiously chopping when 
Lord Barrymore and others got up to the rescue. 

When last in Ireland, the Earl spent a fortnight at Barry's Lodge with 
the writer's granduncle, Richard Barry, J. P., whom the Earl used call 
cousin Richard, in acknowledgment of that Richard's descent from David 
fitzDavid Barryroe, first cousin of Earl Henry's ancestor, James fitz- 
Richard Barryroe, made Viscount Buttevant in 1559. 

The Earl used occasionally dine at Rockville, the house of Richard 
Barry's brother, William. Once at dinner there too many were calling 
on the tripe and cowheels, a favourite dish at that time, and to reserve it 
to himself Pierce Power, of Clonmult, pretended to spit into the dish. 
" Fore God, Power, that will not do you," said the Earl, pushing in his 
plate for more. 



BARRVMORE. 1 27 

The wife of Earl Henry was a Catholic, and he is said to have died a 
CathoHc. 

The Right Hon. Arthur Hugh Smith Barry, M.P., P.C., and his uncle 
Richard's sons and grandsons are the only extant descendants in the male 
line of James fitzRichard Barryroe summoned to Parliament as Viscount 
Buttevant in 1565 ; and the Barries of the Dundullerick branch are the 
only known descendants in the male line of that Lord's first cousin, 
David fitzDavid Barryroe, of Rathinusky. 

According to Archdall, Arthur, third son of James, fourth Earl of 
Barrymore, died in October, 1770. According to Dr. John Barry, of 
Carrigtwohill, the Hon. Arthur was secretly married by a Catholic priest 
in the Great Island to a wealthy Catholic, akin to Dr. John Barry's 
mother. 

Archdall says that the two sons of the Hon. John Smith-Barry, fourth 
son of the fourth Earl, were John Smith and James Hugh ; but the elder 
was James Hugh, and the younger was Richard, who was left by his 
elder brother an annuity of ^^2,650. According to the case of James 
Redmond Barry in 1825, James Hugh Smith Barry and Richard Smith 
Barry both died unmarried An old edition of " Burke's Landed Gentry" 
says that the younger brother, Richard, died without issue, and that " the 
elder, James Hugh Smith-Barry, of Marbury Hall and Foaty Island, 
born 1748, high sheriff of Chester 1775, died leaving two sons and three 
daughters, viz., John, of whom presently ; James, of Lota Lodge, who 
had by his father's will the Louth estate, and who married, but died 
without issue ; Caroline Augusta, married George, eldest son of Robert 
Courtenay, of Ballyedmond ; Narcissa, married the Hon. George William 
Massy ; Louisa, married Thomas B. C. Smith, Master of the Rolls. [By 
their father's will each of these three ladies had ;^ 10,000.] 

The eldest son, John Smith-Barry, of Marbury Hall and Foaty 
Island, born 1793, succeeded to most of his father's estates. He married 
Eliza, daughter of Robert Courtenay, of Ballyedmond, Esq., and had 
issue — James Hugh, his heir, born 1816, married, 1841, Eliza, daughter of 
Shallcross Jacson, of Newtown Bank, Cheshire ; (2) Robert Hugh ; (3) 
Richard Hugh, of Ballyedmond, Midleton ; (4) Robert Courtenay ; and 
Aileen Emma. 

James Hugh Smith-Barry had issue — (i) Arthur Hugh, now of Fota ; 
(2) James Hugh ; and Geraldine and Maude. The Right Hon. Arthur 
Hugh Smith-Barry, of Marbury Hall, Cheshire, and Fota, co. Cork, 
born 1843, married, first, Lady Mary Francis Wyndham Ouin, daughter 
of third Earl of Dunraven, and, secondly, Elizabeth, widow of Arthur 
Post, Esq., and daughter of General Wadsworth, of Genesco, U.S.A., 
Military Governor of Washington during die civil war. 



I 28 BARRYMORE. 



BARRY OF DONGOURNEY. 



In 13 1 5, the eighth of Edward II., a Sir Robert Barry was seized 
in fee of the castle of Dongourney. He was a second son of a 
Lord Barry of Olethan, and was ancestor of the subsequent Barrys 
of Dongourney, according to a pedigree composed fifty years ago 
for the present writer's second cousin, Wilh'am Fitzgerald of Castle- 
lyons, then claiming, as heir general of the Barrys of Dungourney, 
their right of presentation to the rectory of Dongourney. Also in 
Archdall's " Lodge's Peerage," A.D. 1789, a Sir Robert Barry is the 
stirps of the sixteenth and seventeenth century Barrys of Dongourney ; 
but the Sir Robert that was their stirps flourished not in A.D. 
1315, but in circ. A.D. 141 5, for fifth from the stirps in William 
Fitzgerald's pedigree is the Robert Barry of Dongourney who executed 
the feoffment of 1583, and fifth in Archdall is James Barry, sheriff of 
Dublin in 1577, grandfather of the first Lord Santry, and at thirty years 
to the generation the fifth in ascent from Robert Barry of 1583 and from 
James Barry of 1577 should have flourished circ. 1427-33. 

Besides, and above all, the pedigree given to Sir George Carew in 
1 600- 1 603 by David Viscount Buttevant deduces the Barrys of Dongour- 
ney from a younger brother of John Kittagh Lord Barry of Olethan, alias 
Lord Barrymore, who died A.D. 1419-1420 : " Riochi, of whom the famillie 
of Rochy in Barrimond (recte Barrimore) descended." The Barry family 
of Rochy (Gallice, Roche ; Anglice, Rock) in Barrymore being manifestly 
that of "the Rock, alias Dungourney," as Archdall has it. In ignorance 
of the Carew pedigree, Archdall wrote : " The affinity of the house of Santry 
to that of Barrymore the editor cannot ascertain, but their consanguinity 
being universally allowed, he presumes the following account taken chiefly 
from Mr. Lodge's MSS. will be rather an illustration of the subject 
now before him. And thus he proceeds : " Sir Robert Barry, of the Rock, 
in the county of Cork, knt., was father of Sir David Barry, whose son, 
James, married Lienor, daughter of John Fitzgerald, Knight of Kerry, 
and had two sons, the elder of whom, styled of the Rock, alias Dungourney, 
liad four daughters and two sons, viz. : Catherine, married to ■ — ■ Keating ; 
Ellen, to Darby Sullevane ; Mary, to David Barry ; the fourth to — 
Baker, by whom she had a son, Peter ; John died without male heirs in 
1673 ; David, who died before that period, leaving Robert, who succeeded 
his uncle at Dungourney, and was father of David, who died in 1725, 
leaving Patrick, David, Peter, and Robert living in 1729." Turning to 
the Santry branch, Archdall says that James Barry, second son of Sir 
James by the Knight of Kerry's daughter, was father of Patrick Barry, 



BARRYMORE. 129 

Constable of the Castle of Arklow [decree in chancery, lo Feb., 1584], 
father of James Barry, sheriff of Dublin in 1577, and afterwards alder- 
man; father of Richard, sheriff of Dublin, 1604, alderman 1607, mayor 
1610, M.P. 161 3, 1634, and 1639 ; father of Sir James Barry, Lord Santry, 
born 1603, died 1672. 

Through an oversight in Archdall's account of the Barrys of Don- 
gourney, John FitzGarrett Barry, who died in 1673, is put in place of his 
great-grandfather, John FitzDavid Barry, and the intermediate genera- 
tions are omitted. Again, according to Archdall, Sir Robert Barry, of 
the Rock, was father of Sir David, father of Sir James, whose elder son 
was of the Rock, ahas Dungourney, and whose younger son was ancestor 
of Lord Santry. On the contrary, in William Fitzgerald's pedigree. Sir 
Robert Barry, of Dungourney, has two sons : (i) Robert, who died without 
issue, and (2) Philip, who was father of John, father of David, father of 
Jolm FitzDavid, down to whom from Sir Robert the pedigree is probably 
correct, and down from whom it is certainly correct. It may be that John 
FitzPhilip was the Barry of Dongourney married to Lienor, daughter of 
John, Knight of Kerry, and that his son, David Fitzjohn, was the father 
of the wives of Keating, Sullevane, Barry, and Baker. 

John [FitzDavid] Barry, of Dongourney, is mentioned in a fiant of 
Elizabeth, No. 6485, dated 2*8 March, 1601 : Pardon "Garrett Barry, of 
Downegournie, and James FitzRobert Fitzjohn, of same." John FitzDavid 
Barry, of Dongourney, had two sons — first, Garrett, father of Honora, who 
married her first cousin, James FitzRobert Fitzjohn Barry ; and, second, 
Robert Barry, who executed the feoffment of 1583 and married a daughter 
of the Earl of Desmond, says the pedigree, meaning a daughter of Sir 
Thomas Roe Fitzgerald, of Connagh Castle, the eldest son of James 
Fitzjohn, Earl of Desmond, and, as Earl of Desmond, himself summoned 
to Parliament in the third year of Philip and Mary, though afterwards 
ousted by his brother Gerald. Sir Thomas Roe's eldest son, James Fitz- 
Thomas, also assumed the title, and died a prisoner in the Tower of 
London, A.D. 1608 or 161 2. From forty to fifty years ago the present 
writer heard from many that when Robert Barry was taking home his 
wife from Conna Castle to Dongourney the Earl wept bitterly seeing the 
smallness of his daughter's marriage cortege compared to those at all 
previous marriages of daughters of Earls of Desmond. 

By that marriage Robert Barry had two sons, Garrett, his heir, and 
James, called James FitzRobert Fitzjohn in the fiant of 28 March, 1601. 
This James having married Honora, daughter of his father's elder brother, 
Garrett, Fitzjohn filed a bill against his own elder brother, Garrett Fitz- 
Robert, but unsuccessfully, as the following shews : 



130 BARRYMORE. 

James FitzRobert Barry, of Coddstown, in the county of Cork, and 
Honora, his wife, plaintiffs. Garrett Barry, defendant. Decree 
dated last day of April, 1616. 

That defendant shall be established in possession of the lands of 
Dongornie, Rathkenan, Ballydonie, Rahorgan, Garrinogrie, Ballinogall, 
Carrigbrenagh, Nicholstown, Cowragh, and Balliknocke, in the county of 
Cork, pursuant to the award made by Lord Buttevant between the par- 
ties. — Record Ofhce, Dublin. 

Robert Fitzjohn Barry was succeeded by his eldest son, Garrett Fitz- 
Robert Barry, of Dongourney, gent, who presented Ulic Burke, his clerk, 
in 1616, and is marked as patron of the church of Dongourney in 16 14, 
1625, and 1634, in the Regal Valuation Books, and died in 1645, leaving 
two sons and a daughter — John, his heir ; David, who died in John's 
lifetime, and Margaret, who married Owen Cunningham, and had an only 
child, Mary, who married her mother's first cousin, James Barry, of Bally- 
dona, son of James FitzRobert Fitzjohn Barry, of Cottstown, and left 
issue. 

Garrett FitzRobert Barry was succeeded by his elder son, John Barry, 
of Dongourney, gent., who got a decree of innocence in 1663, and, to- 
gether with his brother David, mortgaged the Dongourney estate on the 
1st of May, 1666, to William Fitzgerald, of Glenane, near Killeagh, county 
Cork, for ;^ 1,300, to be paid on the 1st of May or ist of November in that 
year, or any following year, at his dwellinghouse at Glennane. In the 
Cloyne Register, at A.D. 1670, John Barry is mentioned as patron. He 
had a daughter, Elena, who married Garrett Oge Barry, of Ballymacsliney 
(will i6gi), and being sworn in, 1701, at Carrigtwohill before a Master in 
Chancery, said "that her father being about to die, desired that her 
husband, Garrett Oge Barry, be called in, and said to said Garrett Oge 
that he was sorry that he could not leave the town and lands of Don- 
gourney in the same way in which he got them to his nephew and heir, 
Robert, son of David, and that he gave him the key of the chest where 
his papers were." 

John FitzGarrett Barry was succeeded by his nephew, Robert Fitz- 
David Barry, of Dongourney, gent. According to the papers of William 
Fitzgerald, Robert FitzDavid was the last of his family in possession of 
Dongourney, and was murdered in 1696. The present writer often heard 
from his cousin and godfather, David Cotter, that Mr. Barry went to 
the house of Fitzgerald, the mortgagee, to pay the amount of the mort- 
gage, and was told to stay in the garden until Mr. Fitzgerald would be at 
leisure to receive him^ and when sent for was dead under a gooseberry 
bush, with the money beside him. Suspicion of foul play was aroused 



BARRYMORE. 13 1 

when Fitzgerald would not have the money but seized the Dongourney 
estate. The William Fitzgerald papers add that "information having 
been sworn against their father, or against themselves, for the murder, 
Maurice and James, sons of William Fitzgerald, handed over the Don- 
gourney estate and their father's part of the deed of feoffment to Sir 
Alleyn Brodrick, of Ballyannan, who was at the time, or shortly after. 
Chancellor of Ireland.' Of that personage Burke's "Peerage and 
Baronetage," A.D. 1846, says: "Alan Brodrick, an eminent lawyer, who 
having filled the chair of the House of Commons in Ireland and the 
offices of solicitor and attorney-general, was appointed Lord High Chan- 
cellor and elevated to the peerage of that kingdom, 13 April, 171 5, as 
Baron Brodrick of Midleton. His lordship was created Viscount Midle- 
ton 15 August, 1 71 7. Lord Midleton was five times placed in the com- 
mission as one of the Lords Justices of Ireland. He died in 1728," etc. 

That eminent lawyer accepted the title-deeds of the Dongourney 
estate from two illegitimate sons of William Fitzgerald, of Glenane, and 
put a stop to all legal proceedings against tliem and their father, and even 
went so far as to have him knighted. 

A bill to redeem the mortgage of 1666 was filed in 1728, and another 
in 1806, but the Dongourney estate continued with the Brodricks until 
sold about fifty years ago under the will of George Alan Brodrick, fifth 
Viscount Midleton. 

Robert FitzDavid Barry, of Dongourney, left an only son, David 
Barry, M.D., of Ballinaclashy, who, according to his marriage certificate, was 
married to Mary Magner by Garrett Barry, priest (will proved in Cloyne 
in 1706). He had four sons and three daughters — (i) Patrick James, his 
heir ; (2) Peter, who died unmarried, and was buried in Mogeela church- 
yard ; (3) Robert, who died through a fall in robbing a sparrow's nest ; 
(4) David, who married Mary Wilson, and died in a madhouse and with- 
out issue; (i) Elizabeth, according to one account, died unmarried; 
according to another, she eloped with Kidd, the piper, and had issue John 
p,nd Anne. John was father of John, Thomas, and Anne, and by his 
son John was grandfather of Thomas and William. Anne, daughter of 
Kidd, the piper, and Elizabeth Barry married John Lewis, and was 
grandmother of Richard Lewis, father of Mary, and of Martha, who 
married Joseph McKenna. (2) Margaret, second daughter of Dr. David 
Barry, of Ballinaclashy, married — Seward, and had issue an only son, 
Barry Seward, of Ballincurrig, who died without issue ; (3) Jane, third 
daughter of Dr. David Barry, married — Quick, and died without issue. 
Dr. David Barry died in March, 1725. 

Patrick James Barry, M.D., of Midleton, county Cork, eldest son of 
David Barry, M.D., of Ballinaclashy, was of Ballinaclashy when on 20th 



132 BARRYMORE. 

January, 1734, married Rebecca Chartres, daughter of Alderman Chartres. 
of Cork. He had issue an only daughter, Mary Barry, who was born in 1 740 
and died in 1/93, having married John Fitzgerald, who died in gaol in 1820, 
after thirty-six years confinement. The issue of that marriage were three 
sons and three daughters — (i) James Fitzgerald, barrister at law, who 
was a Protestant, and in 1805 presented the Rev. Matthew Purcell to 
the rectory of Dongourney. He married, but died without issue ; (2) 
Bartholomew, who died in 1831, unmarried and without lawful issue; 
(3) John, the major, who died unmarried and without lawful issue ; the 
daughters, Ann, Rebecca, Mary, all died unmarried. 
In 1 807 the following evidence was tendered : 

William Power, gent, aged no years: Proves that he knew Dr. 
Patrick James Barry ; that he lived in Midleton ; recollects his death 
upwards of forty years ago. That he left an only child, Mary Barry, who, 
after her father's death, intermarried with John Fitzgerald, Esq. That 
she died in or about thirteen or fourteen years ago, leaving the late 
Counsellor Fitzgerald, her eldest son. 

Witness recollects that Patrick James Barry was the eldest son of 
Doctor David Barry, formerly of Ballinaclass, in the county of Cork ; that 
the said Dr. David Barry was the son of Robert Barry, of Dongourney, 
Esq., which said Robert was in possession of said lands of Dongourney 
at the time of his death. 

That witness often heard, and it is the reputation of the country, that 
said Robert had been murdered at Dongourney through the means and 
persons belonging to William Fitzgerald, afterwards Sir William Fitz- 
gerald, who was the mortgagee of said lands ; but at the time of his death 
said Robert was actually in possession of Dongourney estate. 

That so long as witness recollects it was the reputation of the coun- 
try, and witness always considered the said Dr. Patrick James Barry as 
the heir of the Barry of Dongourney, and that no other person whatsoever 
was ever considered having any claim thereto but he. 
Barry Seward, upwards of 78 years : 

Proves that he was nephew to the late Dr. Patrick James Barry, 
witness's mother being sister to the said Patrick James. That the said Patrick 
James was the only son of David Barry, witness's grandfather, and that 
the said David was the son of Robert Barry, who was the last man that was 
in the actual possession of that property. Heard and believes, accord- 
ing to the reputation of the famjly, that said Robert was the son of David 
Barry and nephew of John Barry who obtained the decree of innocence. 
That witness was well acquainted with the reputation of the family as to 
the foregoing circumstances, the constant subject of conversation in his 
family when he was early in life being the title of the Barry family to the 



BARRYMORE. 1 33 

estate of Dongourney, and how they had been deprived thereof, par- 
ticularly with two of witness's aunts, who at the period were far advanced 
in life, and knew of their own knowledge several of the facts and circum- 
stances, and were constantly speaking thereof and relating all matters 
concerning the Dongourney estate to the younger members of the family. 
He also proves that Mrs. Fitzgerald was the only child of Dr. Patrick 
James, and that she was a Protestant, and left the late James, her son. 

William Coghlan, aged 60 years : Proves that Dr. Patrick James 
Barry was foster brother to witness's father ; that he often heard his 
father say that Patrick James was the son of David, also a doctor, who 
lived at Ballinclassy, and that David was the son of Robert Barry, and 
was the last of the Barry family that was in possession of the estate of 
Dongourney, it being the reputation of the family, and mentioned by 
ancient people, that said Robert had been murdered through the means 
of Sir William Fitzgerald, who had some claim to his property for some 
money that was due to him. That witness lived all his lifetime in said 
parish of Dongourney, and that it was always the reputation of the 
country that Dr. Patrick James was the heir of the Barrys of Dongourney. 
Knew that said Dr. Patrick James died leaving an only daughter, who 
afterwards married the plaintiff, John Fitzgerald, and that she died 
upwards of fourteen years ago, leaving the said James Fitzgerald, her 
eldest son, who died upwards of one year and a half ago. 

In Barry Seward's evidence there is an error, for Dr. Patrick James 
Barry was not an only son, but the only son that left issue. 

James FitzRobert Fitzjohn Barry, pardoned in a liant of 28 March, 
1 60 1, and plaintiff in 1616 in a suit against his brother, Garrett Barry, 
of Dongourney, gent., married his first cousin, Honora, daughter of 
Garrett, eldest son of John FitzDavid Barry, of Dongourney, gent., and 
had issue. 

James Barry, of Ballydona, who married Mary, daughter of Owen 
Cunningham, and granddaughter of Garrett, who was of Dongourney in 
1 616, and had issue a son, William, and a daughter, Margaret, and was 
succeeded by his son, William Barry, of West Ballydona house, gent. He 
was a celebrated swordsman, and had a son, James Barry, of Midleton, 
father of James Barry, of the Pound, Carrigtwohill, father of Patrick 
Barry, a sergeant, killed in Egypt, and in whom the line of William Barry, 
the fencer, of West Ballydona house, became extinct. 

Margaret Barry, of East Ballydona house, sister of William Barry, of 
West Ballydona house, married William Fitzgerald, third son of Sir 
William Fitzgerald, of Glenane, and had issue James Fitzgerald, of Bally- 
martin, who married Elizabeth O'Neill, and had issue a son and two 
daughters, William Fitzgerald, of Castlelyons ; Catherine, who married 



134 BARRYMORE. 

William O'Neill, and had issue Daniel and James ; (2) Margaret, who 
married John Denahy, and had issue John and William. 

William Fitzgerald, of Castlelyons, married — Cotter, and had issue 
James Fitzgerald, of Castlelyons, who married Ellen, daughter of William 
Barry, of Rockville and Dundullerick, and had issue William Fitzgerald, 
of Castlelyons, who, though a Roman Catholic, claimed the right of pres- 
entation to the rectory of Dongourney, in opposition to a Mr. Wilson, 
who claimed it either as being itself a bonum derelictum, or as being 
himself something to the Mary Wilson, wife of David Barry, youngest 
son of Dr. David Barry, of Ballinaclashy. Mr. Fitzgerald died unmarried 
in Melbourne, Australia. William Lawton, a great-grandson to the 
Margaret Barry married to a son of Sir William Fitzgerald, proved the 
claimant's [Wm. Fitzgerald's] line up to Robert, the father of Geraldus 
(Garrett Barry of Dongourney in 161 6) through Mary Cunningham, a 
daughter of Margaret, only daughter of Geraldus, and his testimony was 
believed by the jury. 

On the disestablishment of the Protestant Church in Ireland, Mr. 
John de Barry, of Midleton, claimed descent from and representation of 
the Robert Barry who, according to Archdall, was alive in 1 729, and was 
third son of the Dr. David Barry who died in 1725. 

According to Mr. John de Barry, Robert Barry, a younger son of Dr. 
David Barry, of Ballinaclashy, lived at Tiggal Castle, and married a 
Margaret O'Brien, of Kilcor, and had issue — (i) William; (2) Redmond, 
father of David, of Coughra, who married Ellen Egan, of Dooneen, and 
had issue Ellen, second wife of James Barry, of Desert ; (3) John ; 
Debora, who married John Cotter. William Barry, eldest son of Robert 
Barry, of Tiggal, married Honora O'Connell, of Ballyclough, and had 
issue Thomas, who married Margaret Cotter, of Castlemartyr, and had 
issue William Barry, of Killeagh, who married Mary Kenny, and dying 
in 1 86 1, left issue John de Barry, who married Kate Sullivan, and had 
issue John R., Thomas, Robert, ob. 1 870. 

Mr. John de Barry failed to corroborate his assertions that Robert 
Barry, of Tiggal, was Robert, son of Dr. David Barry, of Ballinaclashy, 
or was married to a Margaret O'Brien, of Kilcor. No such Margaret 
O'Brien appears in the O'Brien family papers ; and the overwhelming 
presumption is that Robert, son of Dr. David Barry, of Ballinaclashy, did 
not live to be marriageable, having lost his life in robbing a sparrow's 
nest, having been presumed to have left no issue when the right of 
presentation was claimed for William Fitzgerald, circ. 1850, and at least 
to have left no male issue when that right was exercised by Counsellor 
Fitzgerald in 1805. 



BARRYMORE 1 35 



THE SANTRY BRANCH OF THE BARRYS OF DONGOURNEY. 

A note to the Barry pedigree, given circ. 1601-1603 by David Viscount 
Buttevant to Sir George Carew, states that " Mac Da More is descended 
from the Barries. He now dwells in the county Wexford." On the 
contrary, according to the " Book of Leinster," O'Clery, MacFirbis, etc., 
Mac Da More, of the barony of Gorey, was descended from Murchadh 
nan Gaedhal, brother of Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, King of Leinster in 
1 1 69. According to Archdall, the Barrys of Newtown Barry and Arklow, 
in or near to Mac Da More's country, were a branch of the Barrys of 
Dongourney. According to Archdall, Sir Robert Barry of the Rock, in 
the county of Cork, knt., was the father of Sir David, father of Sir James, 
who married Elenor, daughter of John Fitzgerald, Knight of Kerry, and 
had issue an elder son, styled of the Rock, alias Dongourney, and a 
younger son, James, father of Patrick Barry, Constable of the Castle of 
Arklow. He was father of James Barry, sheriff of Dublin in 1577, and 
afterwards alderman, who had two sons, Richard, his heir, and Nicholas, 
father of Richard, father of James Barry, of Newtown Barry, county 
Wexford, whose only daughter, Judith^ brought that estate to her 
husband, Jolin, first Lord Farnham. Jane, sister of James Barry, of 
Newtown Barry, married Doctor Mercer, Fellow of Trinity College, and 
had a daughter, Mary, who died unmarried, and founded Mercer's Hos- 
pital. 

Richard Barry, of Dublin, merchant, eldest son of Alderman James 
Barry, was sheriff of the city in 1604, alderman in 1607, mayor in 1610, 
and M.P. in 161 3, 1634, and 1639. His will is dated 14 Sep., 1648. 

Sir James Barry, eldest of the three sons of Aldreman Richard Barry, 
was born in 1603, was Recorder of the city of Dublin, Sergeant at Law, 
Second Baron of the Exchequer, and Chief Justice of the King's Bench. 
He was knighted in 1634, ^-nd in 1660 was one of the commissioners for 
executing his Majesty's Declaration for the Settlement of Ireland, and 
was created Baron of Santry, county Dublin. He married Catherine, 
daughter of Sir William Parsons, Lord Justice of Ireland, and in 1672 
was succeeded by the eldest of his four sons. 

Richard, second Lord Santry, who was attainted in 1689. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Jenery, Esq., and had issue one son, Henry, 
and three daughters, one of whom, Catherine, married Laurence Earl of 
Barrymore ; secondly, Francis Gash ; and thirdly. Sir Henry Piers. 

Henry, third Lord Santry, was born in 1680, and was governor of 
Derry and Coolmore Fort. He married Bridget, only daughter of Sir 
Thomas Domville, Bart, had issue an only son, and died I734- 



136 BARRYMORE. 

Henry, fourth Lord Santry, was born in 17 10. In 1739, being con- 
victed of the murdeY of a footman, LaughUn Murphy, he was attainted 
of high treason, an'd sentenced to death, and his estates in the counties of 
Dubhn, Carlow^ and Meath were forfeited to the crown. On being 
spared his hfe and estates but not his title, he retired to Nottingham, where 
he died without issue A.D. 1 750-1, leaving his estates to his uncle, Sir 
Compton Domville. 



FITZJAMES OF ANNAGH. 

According to the pedigree of 1600- 1603, the Fitz Jameses of Annagh 
were named from James Barry, one of the three younger brothers of John 
Kittagh Lord Barrymore, ob. 141 9. 

The fiants of Elizabeth mention, No. 2247, 6th May, 1573, James 
MacNicholas Barry, alias MacShyams (i.e., MacSeamius, i.e., Fitzjames), 
of Anaghe, gentleman; No. 3974, 24th August, 1582, Nicholas Fitz- 
james Barrie, alias Macjames, of Broheny ; No. 4997, 17th May, 1587, 
Nicholas Barry, alias MacShiemis, gentleman ; No. 6465, 27 January, 
1 600- 1, Nicholas Barrie, alias Macjames, of Annagh; wife, Sawe ny 
Dalie ; James Barrie, of same ; wife, Ellinor Lombard ; Robert Barrie, 
John Fitzjames Barrie, John Iterman, alias Rirrie ; Edmond Buoy Barrie, 
David FitzGarrett Barrie, John FitzRedmond Barrie, of same ; Gerrott 
Fitzjames Barrie, of Annagh; 6558, 5th July, 1601, David FitzEdmond 
Roe Barry, of Anagh ; James FitzNicholas Barry, of same. 

On the 20th September, second of Charles II., i.e., 1626, a post mortem 
inquisition was held at the King's Old Castle, Cork, regarding James 
Barry, late of Annagh, who held of the King, but paid 9s. 7d. out of every 
carucate to Lord Barry, Viscount Buttevant — Annagh, i car. ; Wailshis- 
land, alias Ballinvallishie, 5 car. ; Lackinine, i car. ; Kilgrogane, half car. ; 
Ballintemple (i.e., Churchtown), i car. ; Ballincristie, i car. ; Rathe, i car. ; 
Carriggine, i car. ; Coolemore, i car. ; Balliadame, i car. ; Gortinroe, i 
car.; Cregan-courty, i car.; Ballinebooly, i car. He died 31 May, I599 
(recte 1579), and his son and next heir was then thirty years old and 
married. 

An inquisition held at Bandon Bridge, in the county of Cork, the 13 
January, 1630, the sixth of Charles II., found that Nicholas Barry, of 
Annagh, etc., in 1590, Sept. 4th, feoffed for certain purposes Conogher 
O'Callaghan, alias O'Callaghan of Dromynine, gent, and Tade O'Keiffe, 
of Buttevant, gent. ; that the said Nicholas, with James Barry FitzNicholas, 
and Nicholas, junior, son and heir of said James, executed other feoff- 
ments on 27 June, 1620, 12 September, 1621, and nth March, 1622; 
that said James FitzNicholas Barry, Nicholas Barry, junior, John Lom- 



BARRYMORE. 1 37 

bard, and David O'Keeffe, by their deed bearing date 31 August, 1629, 
demised and granted to Philip Perceval and Edmond Perceval the castle, 
town, and lands of Annagh, and the towns and lands of Imogan, Kilbridy, 
Knockilbridy, Ballynamucky, Downebarry, Jordanstown, Kilgrogan, 
Rochestown, Culleagh, Cwilmore, Lackin, alias Lackynyne, Garrynard, 
Gortinmore, Cragane-courtye, Ballynebowle, and Ballychristy, for a term 
of a thousand years ; that Nicholas Fitz James Barry, senior, died 4th 
Oct., 1629; that James FitzNicholas Barry is his son and heir, and was 
of full age and married at the time of the death of his said father. 

From the foregoing fiants and inquisitions it is evident that a James 
FitzNicholas Barry, alias Fitz James, died 31st May, 1579, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son, Nicholas Fitzjames Barry, alias Fitzjames, who 
married Sabia O'Daly, and dying, aged 80, on the 4th of October, 1629, 
was succeeded by his son, James FitzNicholas Barry, who married Ellinor 
Lombard, and had a son and heir, Nicholas Fitzjames Barry, junior. 
On the 31st of August, 1629, fivei weeks before the death of Nicholas 
Fitzjames Barry, senior, his son James, and grandson Nicholas, leased 
the Annagh estate, rent free for a thousand years, to the Percivals, for 
no apparent reason that the present writer has seen. Sir Philip Percival 
being a Privy Councillor to Charles I., Register of the Court of Wards, 
Escheator, etc., quickly acquired 78 knights' fees, containing 99,900 
statute acres of land in Ireland. He must have had the Barries of 
Annagh wholly in his power when getting them to surrender to him the 
castles and manor of Annagh. Five weeks afterwards Nicholas Fitz- 
james Barry, senior, was dead, and, when next heard of, James Fitz- 
Nicholas was a prisoner in Dublin. As quoted at page 302, Smith's 
"History of Cork," edition of 1892, the Percival MSS.. Brit. Museum. 
Add. 27,988, have these further notices of James FitzNicholas and 
Annagh Castle: 1641 : "On breaking out of the rebellion, James Fitz- 
Nicholas Barry broke his prison in Dublin, and repairing to Munster 
seized on the castle of Anagh. He soon after by treachery seized on 
Welchestown Castle." James FitzNicholas Barry, who had seized on 
Welchestown, agreed with the Earl of Inchiquin to quit it on the nth 
July, 1644, and gave the same to Serjt. Reymond, so that the three castles 
of Anagh, Welchestown, and Liscarroll were again in the hands of Serjt 
Reymond. "29 Aug., 1644. Lord Inchiquin writes to Serjt. Reymond 
that they must expect to be laid close siege to, and recommends particu- 
larly that he would be careful of Anagh." 

" 16 May, 1645. Liscarroll and Welchestown surrendered to the Earl 
of Castlehaven this day." 

1 8 May. Anagh was taken, and no quarter given ; the Lord Castle- 
connell induced them to surrender upon promise of quarter ; but Castle- 



138 BARRYMORE. 

haven asked if his men's swords were sharp, and causing them to be 
stripped, made his men to run them through. 

Mallow surrendered on quarter. Anagh stood very valiantly, and lost 
most of their men. At last, the castle being much shaken, Lieut. Fisher, 
the governor, and two or three others went out to the enemy who had 
promise of quarter, but were instantly cut to pieces. No castle in Ireland 
held out better, and the enemy [i.e., the confederate Catholics] lost 300 
of their best men before it." According to Smith, the castle of Annagh 
was demolished by "the late Earl of Egmond," that is, by the first Earl, 
who died i May, 1748. 

The O'Briens of Kilcor are descended in the female line from an 
Edmond Barry, of Annagh, who may have been the Edmond Buoy Barry, 
of Annagh, pardoned in a fiant of the 27 January, 1600-1, or the Edmond 
Roe Barry whose son, David FitzEdmond Roe Barry, of Annagh, was 
pardoned in that fiant. In any case, the Edmond Barry, of Annagh, from 
whom the Kilcor family is descended, was some junior member of the 
Fitzjameses of Annagh. 

In her pedigree of the O'Briens of Kilcor, Mrs. Bridget Fitzgerald, 
alias Brighid na Senchas, says : William O'Brien, of Kilcor, married 
Catherine, the daughter of Fitzjames Barry, of Annagh, in the county 
Limerick (sic). Vol. 9, 1-13, "Obituary Entries," has: "William O'Brien, 
of Killencurra, county Cork, gent., died 28 Sept., 1640, having married 
Katherine, daughter of Edmond Barry, of Annagh, in the county of Cork, 
gent." 

According to Brighid na Senchas in her MacAdam Pedigree, the 
Barries of Ballinahina also are descended in the female line from the 
Barries of Annagh : " Richard of Kilshannick was married to Elizabeth 
Barry, of Annagh, in the county Limerick" (sic). Said Richard was a 
younger son of Sean an truis, John Barry, of Rathcormac, alias MacAdam, 
and was lineal ancestor of the late Philip Barry, C.E., Harbour Board, 
Cork, grandson of the Philip Barry, of Ballinahina, who married, first, 
Mary Anne, daughter of Edmond Barry, of Rockville and Dundullerick, 
and was grandson of the Philip Barry who was married to Ellen Fitz- 
gerald, niece of Thomas Barry, of Dundullerick, and was grandson of 
Richard Barry, of Kilshannig. 



BARRYMORE. 



»39 



CHAPTER III.— BARRYROES, JUNIOR BRANCHES. 
THE BARRYS OF RAHANISKY AND DUNDULLERICK. 




HE Barrys of Rahanisky and Dundullerick are des- 
cended from David FitzDavid Barry Roe, who was 
third son, and after the death of his brothers without 
issue, male representative of David Downe Barrie 
Roe, Lord of Ibawne. 

Towards the middle of the twelfth century, 
William de Barri, a baron of Pembroke, dwelt at 
Maynaurpir Castle, in Pembrokeshire, and married Hangaret, daughter 
of Gerald de Windesor, Constable of Pembroke for the King, and 
progenitor of the Geraldines, of whom the seniors, through his eldest son, 
William de Carew, were the Carews, some time Marquises de Carew and 
Earls of Totnes, and the FitzMaurices, now Marquises of Lansdowne and 
Earls of Selbourne and Kerry; and the juniors through his youngest son, 
Maurice Fitzgerald, were the Fitzgeralds now Dukes cf Leinster and Earls 
of Kildare, and formerly also Earls Palatine of Desmond, etc. By his 
marriage with Hangaret, daughter of Girald de Windesor, and his wife, 
Nesta, daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, last King of South Wales, William 
de Barri had a son and heir, Philip de Barri, of Maynaurpir Castle, in 
W^ales. Circ. A.D. 1180, he was granted the cantreds of Olethan, Killyde, 
and Muskrie Donegan, in Ireland, by his uncle, Robert FitzStephen, to 
whom, in 1177, King Henry II. had granted half the Kingdom of Cork. 
Philip de Barri died A.D. 1199-1200, leaving by his wife, a daughter of 
Richard FitzTancred, Constable of Haverford West, an elder son and 
heir. 

Sir David FitzWilliam de Barri, Lord of Olethan, who was slain at 
the battle of Callan, A.D. 1261, and was succeeded by [his nephew?] 

David [fitzjohn ?] de Barri, Lord of Olethan, who was Justiciary of 
Ireland A.D. 1267, and died A.D. 1278, leaving a [son and] heir. 

Sir John fitzDavid de Barri, who^ in 1284, 1285, resigned in favour 
of [his brother ?]. 

David fitzDavid, alias David Oge de Barri, Lord of Olethan, who 
died circ. A.D. 1293, leaving an eldest son and successor, John, Lord of 
Olethan, who died without male issue circ. A.D. 1327-31, and a second 
son, David, who married Maud Bolton (alias Matilda de Bolton of Wales, 



1 40 BARRYMORE. 

afterwards wife of McCarthy Mor), and had issue an eldest son, David, 
Lord of Olethan in succession to his uncle John, and a younger son, 
William Moyle Barry, Lord of Ibawne, equally in succession to his uncle 
John. The elder of these brothers, David an bhuile Mhoir, was father 
of David Loscanagh, father of John Kittagh, father of WilUam Roe, 
father of John Bacagh, father of John Reagh, father of James fitzjohn, all 
Lords of Olethan, alias Lords Barrymore, alias Lords Barry. The 
younger of the two brothers, William Moyle Barry, was father of Law- 
rence, father of James, father of Richard, father of James, all Lords of 
Ibawne, but not peers, as far as appears. By his first marriage, which 
was set aside by the competent court for Church and State, James Fitz- 
Richard, Lord of Ibawne, had a son, Richard of the Rath, father of James 
fitzRichard of the Rath, who, by force, made himself Lord of Ibawne ; 
and afterwards, under the deed of his sixth cousin, James fitzjohn Barry- 
more Lord Barry, became Lord Barrymore and Viscount Buttevant. By 
his second and lawful marriage the elder James fitzRichard, Lord of 
Ibawne, was father of David Downe, Lord of Ibawne, who married a 
daughter of Lord Barry Oge, and had issue four sons — Redmond, Lord 
of Ibawne ; Richard, David, and John, and three daughters — Ellenor, 
Kate, and Ellis (?), married to — na Bre, in Ibawne. 

In or about A.D. 1 550-1 553, Redmond Barry Roe, Lord of Ibawne, 
and his brother, John, were slain by their first cousin, James fitzRichard 
of the Rath Barry Roe, who thereupon took possession of the lands and 
lordship of Ibawne. The other brothers, Richard fitzDavid Barry Roe 
and David fitzDavid Barry Roe, fled to James fitzjohn Fitzgerald, Earl 
of Desmond, to whom at that time the Gaels and Anglo-Normans of South 
Munster were directly or indirectly more or less subject, and whose right 
to his earldom, like the right of David Downe, father of those refugees, 
to the Lordship of Ibawne, was through his father's second actual, but 
first legitimate marriage. 

Of the following pedigrees from Vol. 635, Lambeth Library, the first 
was given to Sir George Carew when Lord President of Munster, A.D. 
1600-1603, by David Viscount Buttevant, and the second is headed: 
" This pedigree, with the notes, was given unto me by Flouernce McCartie," 
that is, by Florence McCartie, proclaimed McCarthy More by Hugh 
O'Neal, Earl of Ulster. Carew made some additions to the first pedi- 
gree, bringing it down later than A.D. 1603. 

The pedigree by David Viscount Buttevant wrongly has James in- 
stead of David for the name of the third son of David Downe Barry Roe, 
Lord of Ibawne. The name is David in the pedigree by Florence 
McCartie, and six times in the inquisition at Youghal, on the 31st of 
March, 1624. , - 



BARRYMORE. H^ 

By their flight to the Earl of Desmond, Richard fitzDavid Barry Roe 
and David fitzDavid Barry Roe had a respite from the fate of their eldest 
brother, Redmond fitzDavid Barry Roe, Lord of Ibawne, and John fitz- 
David Barry Roe, both of whom had been slain by their first cousin, 
James fitzRichard Barry Roe, who thereupon became de facto Lord of 
Ibawne. It does not appear that the Government, or the Earl of Des- 
mond, or the Lord Barrymore took any steps towards reinstating the 
exiles, or that either of the exiles ever prosecuted his title to the lands 
and lordship of Ibawne. We may assume therefore that, at least pass- 
ively, Richard fitzDavid Barry Roe and his brother David were assenting 
parties to the settlement of the Barrymore and Barryroe estates in 1556 
by James fitzjohn Lord Barrymore and James fitzRichard, de facto Lord 
of Ibawne, by which settlement the Barrymore estates were to belong, in 
the first place, to the said Lord Barrymore and his issue male ; in the 
second place, to the said Lord of Ibawne and his issue male ; in the third 
and fourth places, to the said Richard fitzDavid Barry Roe and David 
fitzDavid Barry Roe and their issue male ; and in the last place to the 
heirs general of the said Lord Barrymore ; and the Barryroe estates 
were to belong, in the first place, to the said Lord of Ibawne and his issue 
male ; in the second and third places, to Richard fitzDavid Barry Roe 
and David fitzDavid Barry Roe and their heirs male ; in the fourth place, 
to the said Lord Barrymore and his issue male ; and in the last place, to 
the heirs general of the said Lord of Ibawne. 

This settlement assumed that James fitzRichard Barry Roe, de facto 
Lord of Ibawne, and his first cousins, Richard fitzDavid Barry Roe, de 
jure Lord of Ibawne, and David fitzDavid Barry Roe, were all three 
equally legitimate ; and it gave precedence to the said James fitzRichard 
as being in possession, and as claiming through his grandfather's prior 
marriage. 

What has reference to that settlement is as follows, in the finding of 
the inquisition at Youghal on the 31st of March, 1624: "Which jurors 
on their said oath say that the same James Fitzjohn, late Lord Barry, 
Viscount Buttevant, was seized in his demesne as of fee of and in the 
separate manors Carrigtwohill, otherwise Barries Court ; Castleleighane, 
otherwise Castlelyons ; Buttevante, and Liscarroll, with their appurten- 
ances. And being thence so seized, by his charter in due form of law 
perfected, with delivery of possession of it furthermore executed, bearing 
date the gth day of February, the third and fourth years of the reigns of 
Philip and Mary, feofTed thence one David Hoddyn, chaplain, and his 
heirs, of and in all and singular the premisses with appurtenances, as is 
clear and appears by said charter shown in evidence to the jurors, by virtue 
of which charter the said David Hoddyn entered into all and singular the 



142 BARRYMORE. 

premisses, with appurtenances, and was thence seized in his demesne as 
of fee simple. And being thence so seized, by his charter bearing date 
the 1 8th day of February, in the third and fourth years of the reigns of 
Philip and Mary, in due form of law perfected, with delivery of possession 
thence furthermore executed, gave and granted all and singular the 
premisses, with appurtenances aforesaid, to James fitzjohn Lord Barry 
and the legitimately begotten heirs male of the body of the said James, 
and for failure of such male issue of the body of the said James fitzjohn, 
remainder thence to one James fitzRichard Barri Roe, Lord of Ibawne, 
and the legitimately begotten heirs males of the body of the said James 
fitzRichard Barri Roe, and for failure of such male issue of the body of 
the said James fitzRichard, remainder thence to one Richard fitzDavid 
Barrie Roe and the legitimately begotten heirs males of the said Richard 
fitzDavid. And for defect of such male issue of the body of the said 
Richard fitzDavid, remainder thence to one David fitzDavid Barrie Roe 
and the legitimately begotten heirs males of the said David fitzDavid 
Barrie Roe ; and for the defect of such male issue of the body of the said 
David fitzDavid, remainder thence to the right heirs of the said James 
fitzjohn in le douce entayle, for ever, as by the said charter shewn in 
evidence to the jurors is clear and doth appear. Moreover, the said 
jurors, on their said oath, say that the said James fitzRichard Barrie Roe, 
till then commonly called Lord of Ibawne, was seized in his demesne as 
of fee of and in the separate manors of Timolegga, Rathbarrie, and Lislee, 
with their appurtenances. And being thence so seized by his charter, in 
due form of law perfected, and with delivery of possession executed, bear- 
ing date the 13th day of February, A.D. 1556, and the third and fourth 
years of the reigns of the King and the Queen, Philip and Mary, thence 
feoffed one John O'Moyran, chaplain, and his heirs, of and in the said 
manors of Timoleague, Rathbarrie, and Lislee, with their appurtenances, 
as by said charter shewn in evidence to the jurors is clear and doth 
appear, by virtue of which charter into the foresaid manors of Timoleague, 
Rathbarrie, and Lislee, with their appurtenances, the said John O'Moyran 
entered, and was thence seized in his demesne as of fee simple. And the 
said John O'Moyran being seized as aforesaid, by his charter bearing date 
the 3rd day of March, A.D. 1556, and in the third and fourth years of the 
reigns of the King and Queen, Philip and Mary, in due form of law per- 
fected, and further with delivery of possession executed, gave and granted 
the said manors of Timoleague, Rathbarry, and Lislee, with their appur- 
tenances, to the said James fitzRichard Barrie Roe and the legitimately 
begotten heirs males of the body of the said James fitzRichard, and for 
failure of such issue male of the body of the said James fitzRichard, re- 
mainder thence to one Richard fitzDavid Barrie Roe and the legitimately 



BARRYMORE. 1 43 

begotten heirs males of the body of the said Richard fitzDavid ; and for 
faikire of such issue males of the body of the said Richard fitzDavid, re- 
mainder thence to one David fitzDavid Barrie Roe and the legitimately 
begotten heirs males of the body of the said David fitzDavid ; and for 
failure of such male issue of the body of the said David fitzDavid, re- 
mainder thence to the said James fitzjohn Barrymore, Lord of O'Leighane, 
Ogormenaghan, and Oririe, and the legitimately begotten heirs males 
of the body of the said James Barrymore ; and for defect of such male 
issue of the body of the said James Barrymore, remainder thence in fee 
simple to the right heirs of the said James fitzRichard Barry Roe, for 
ever, as by the said tallied charter shewn in evidence to the jurors is clear 
and doth appear." — Public Record Office, Dublin. 

The jurors further say that "James fitzjohn Lord Barry, on the 25th 
day of March, A.D. 1557, died without any heir male begotten of his body. 
Afterwards, through his death without any legitimately begotten heir 
male of his body, James fitzRichard Barry Roe by virtue of the said 
remainder limited to himself and the legitimately begotten heirs males of 
his body, as is expressed in the tallied charter made and perfected by the 
said David Hoddye as is aforesaid, entered into the said manors of 
Carrigtoghill, otherwise Barries Court ; Castleleighan, otherwise Castle- 
lyons ; Buttevant, and Liscarroll, and was thence seized in his demesne 
as of tallied fee, viz., to himself and the legitimately begotten heirs males 
of his body, with further remainders as is aforesaid, according to the form 
and effect of the said tallied gift made and perfected by the said David 
Hoddyn." 

By the settlement of 1556 an immediate provision was made neither 
for Richard fitzDavid Barry Roe nor for David fitzDavid Barry Roe ; 
and, according to Florence McCarthy, both of them were slain by the 
practice, that is, by the secret contrivance of their cousin, James fitz- 
Richard, and neither of them left issue. The pedigree by David Viscount 
Buttevant has neither of these assertions, which were true regarding 
Richard fitzDavid, but were not true regarding David fitzDavid. We 
have evidence above that Richard fitzDavid was alive on the 3rd of 
March, 1556. Every thing points to his death having followed fast on 
the death of James fitzjohn Lord Barry in 1557, or rather on that of 
James fitzjohn Earl of Desmond in 1558. He, no doubt, was that one 
of his branch who, according to a tradition current sixty years ago, was 
slain in a glen at Clash, or BaUinaclashy, near Lemlara. According to 
tradition [David fitzDavid], an officer, a real lord, having been defeated 
in a great battle in Ibawne, married a sister of Barry of Lemlara, and 
departed, leaving his children at Lemlara, where they were reared by 
their uncle as his own. In after life they acquired Rahanisky. It is now 



144 BARRYMORE. 

evident that the departure of David fitzDavid from Lemlara was not 
his death, but his second flight ; for he had a royal pardon on the 30th 
September, 1574, and another on the 12th of September, 1577, after 
he had acquired Rahanisky, and was attainted and slain, etc., at the 
time of the rebelHon of James FitzMorris, who was slain on the 18 
August, 1579. 

On his second flight, when his identity and that of his children was 
being concealed from his cousin, James fitzRichard, now Viscount Butte- 
vant, it may well have been popularly believed that David fitzDavid, like 
Richard fitzDavid, had been done away with, and had left no surviving 
issue. And when their identity was revealed to their powerful friend, 
the Lord of Muskrie, it was not long until their mouths were re-closed by 
the gift of Rahanisky Castle and ten thousand good acres from Viscount 
Buttevant 

Fiants of the reign of Elizabeth, admirably indexed by Mr. James Mills, 
and inquisitions and wills at the Public Record Office, Dublin, substan- 
tially correct and confirm and enormously supplement tradition regarding 
David FitzDavid Downe's descendants. But, first, it has to be noted that 
David filius David, David fitzDavid, David Mac David, David Mac Da, 
David Oge, Da Oge, and David Oge Mac David, all mean David, son of 
David; and, second, that the sons of David fitzDavid were (i) Richard, 
(2) Redmond Buidhe, Redmond the yellow-haired, or the sallow-com- 
plexioned ; (3) David, (4) Thomas. 

The two elder sons of David fitzDavid Barry Roe when first seen in 
the fiants were military retainers of the Lord of Muskry, and the elder 
of the two seems to have had charge of Ballygarvan Castle, between Cork 
and Barry Oge's country, and between Barrymore's country and Barryroe's 
country. Fiant of Elizabeth, No. 2264, 8 May, 1573 : "A pardon for Cor- 
muck Mac Teig MacCartie, of Blarny, county Cork, knt., sheriff of that 
county, and for forty-five of his kinsmen and followers, including Richard 
fitzDavid Barry, of Ballygarvan, and Redmond Bwy MacDavid Barry, of 
Carraghylombardy, yeomen." 

In the next fiant these two and their father are styled gentlemen. No. 
2469. 30 September, 1574. Pardon to David Fitzjames, of Kilbrye, 
county Cork ; Thomas Fitzjames, of same ; Edmond Power, of Shane- 
garye ; Edmond Oge Power, of the Inshye ; Gerott Condon, of Fynnor ; 
William Gogan, of Bealnahellye ; David Oge Barrye, of Bakyn Red ; 
Richard fitzDavye, of Ballygarvan ; Redmund bwy fytzDavye, of same ; 
James Russell, of Carrigrochan ; and Maurice Russell, of Aghmartin, all 
in same county, gentlemen. 

No. 2941, 21 Nov., J 576. Pardon to Cormac MacTeige, of Blarny, 



BARRYMORE. 1 45 

county Cork, knt, and over sixty others, mostly his followers, including 
" Richard Mac Daa Oge Barrie, of Ballygarvan, county Cork, horseman." 

Between the 21 Nov., 1576, and the 6 Sept., 1577, Rathinuskie was 
acquired and Ballygarvan was quitted. 

No. 3083, 6 Sept., 1577. Pardon of Keallaghane Mac Teig Mac- 
Carthy, of the great Castell, county Cork, gentleman, and of some thirty 
others, mostly kinsmen or followers of Sir Cormac MacTeig, including 
" Remund MacDavid Barry, of Rathnysky, gentleman." 

No. 3103, 12 Sept., 1577. Pardon of "David Oge Barry, of Rathy- 
nisky, gentleman," and others. 

No. 3287, 6 May, 1578. Pardon to N. Walshe, J. Bayes, and Cli. 
Arthur for an alienation to them by James Barry, knt., Viscount Butte- 
vaunte, alias Viscount Barrymore, of . . Rathynuskie ... 

No. 5994, 10 May, 1596, recites, from an inquisition, that Walter 
Galwey died the 14th Sept., 1581, seized of an old castle called the manor 
of Shandon by Cork, in mortgage of David Oge Barrye. 

No. 3974, 21 August, 1582. Pardon of most of the leading men of 
the name of Barry in the baronies of Barrymore, Orrery, and Ibawne, 
and amongst them " Richard fitzDavid Oge, of Rathenuskye, and Thomas 
fitzDavid Oge Barry, of same." " Provided that within six months they 
appear before Commissioners in their county, and give security to keep 
the peace and answer at sessions when called upon." 

A.D. 1584. A record in the Public Record Office of Ireland, entitled 
" Survey of Honors, Manors, Lordships, etc., in the Province of Munster, 
forfeited by Gerald Earl of Desmond, and others, 26th Elizabeth," has 
this paragraph : 

Lands and possessions lately of David Oge MacDavid Cyalloheire 
(that is, of Kilballyloughrie), attainted and slain in the time of the rebellion 
of James FitzMorris, the traitor : — The town and lands of Rathenusky, 
with its appurtenances, lying and being about two miles [beyond] the 
city of Cork, containing by estimation six ploughlands, which at the rate 
of sixty-six shillings and eight pence for every ploughland, are worth 
annually twenty pounds sterl. in legal money of England, to be paid at 
the feast of Easter and of St. Michael the Archangel, in equal portions. 

The remaining one-third of that page of membrane 88 is blank, being 
no doubt intended for David Oge's other lands, such as Kilballylogrye 
in the Youghal inquisition of the 6th October, 1586, alias Balidufflogir, 
Ballydolloghry, Ballydeloher, and with d aspirated — gh, and Bally omitted, 
Galloheire as above, David Oge MacDavid [d]e Galloheire. As the 
rebellion of James FitzMorris ended in his death on the i8th of August, 
1579, and as David fitzDavid Barry, of Rahanisky, was slain in that re- 
bellion, after having been pardoned on the 12th of Sept., 1577, the date of 



146 BARRYMORE. 

his death fell between the 12th Sept., 1577, and the i8th of August, 1579. 
He was succeeded by his eldest son, Richard fitzDavid Oge Barry. 

A.D. 1585, July 16. Fiant of Elizabeth contains the pardon of Richard 
Mac Da Oge Barry, of Rainyskie, gent., and three of his followers. 

A.D. 1586, Oct. 6. An inquisition at Youghal before Thomas Norris, 
esquire, Vice-President of Munster, regarding those concerned in the 
Earl of Desmond's rebellion, has the following paragraph : 

The jurors further say on their oath that Richard fitzDavid was seized 
in his demesne as of fee of Rathenuskye, and of all the lands, tenements, 
and hereditaments of the same, or to the same expectant, containing eight 
ploughlands. And of the town or hamlet of Kilballylogrye, and of all 
the lands, tenements, and hereditaments of the same, or expectant to the 
same, containing . . . ploughlands. And being so seized at Ogorum- 
leghan, in the county of Cork aforesaid, on the 5th day of January, in the 
twenty-third year of the reign of the said Lady the Queen (A.D. 1581), 
took arms and entered into rebellion traitorously against the same Lady 
the Queen, and still lives. — Public Record Office, Dublin. 

A.D. 1588, Sept. Again, according to Smith's "History of Cork," by 
an inquisition held at Shandon Castle, Cork, Richard fitzDavid, of Raha- 
nisky, was included amongst those concerned in the Earl of Desmond's 
rebellion. 

Why, or when, the Government excepted Richard FitzDavid's estates 
fiom forfeiture, and those of other Barries concerned in the Earl of Des- 
mond's rebellion, does not appear. For some reason, eight were exempted 
from forfeiture, and among the eight were Richard fitzDavid Barry, of 
Rahanisky ; Gerald fitzRichard Barry, of Ballynaclashy ; James fitzjohn 
Barry, of Pollkerrye ; and Eadye Barry, of Bregoge. 

Again, in the final revolt against Queen Elizabeth's Government, 
Richard fitzDavid and his brother, Redmond, together with Redmond's 
son, James, were implicated. 

A.D. 1601, March 28. Fiant of Elizabeth 6485 contains the pardon 
of Richard fitzDavid Oge Barrie, of Robertstown ; John MacThomas 
Brack, of same ; Redmond buoy fitzDavid Oge, of Kilenecurrie. 

A.D. 1601, May 29. Fiant of Elizabeth 6539 contains the pardon of 
James fitz [R]Edmond buoy Barrie, of Killynicurrie. 

John MacThomas Brack, resident with Richard fitzDavid Oge Barry 
at Robertstown, in 1601, was the latter's brother-in-law, and was a son 
of Thomas Brack, younger brother of Garrett l5rack fitzjames Fitzgerald, 
of Mocollop, who forfeited Mocollop for being concerned in the Desmond 
rebellion. He was eldest son of James. 

15 June, 1583, the will of Sir Cormac MacTeige McCarthy, knt, Lord 
of Muskerry, mentions his former retainer, Richard FitzDavid Oge Barry, 



BARRYMORE. 1 47 

thus : "And the keeping and guard of the castle of the Blarney within 
the grate to be chiefly to Donell Mac Oynilloyghey, and the coming in 
and out of Donocke Rwo MacShaine I Conill and Richard fitzDavy Oge, 
as the men chiefly to be trusted in the behalf of my said heir, Corniac Oge, 
they [to] yield free egress and regress unto my said wife, Joan, and to my 
children by her, into and out of that castle," etc. For which will in its 
entirety see Mr. H. W. Gillman's lucid paper on " Sir Comiac McTeige 
McCarthy and the Sept Lands of Muskerry, with a Historical Pedigree," 
■■ Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society," October, 
1892. 

No. 4416, fiant of Elizabeth, 3 June, 1584, contains the pardon of 
the four brothers, " Richard fitzDavy Oge Barry, of Rahanesky ; Red- 
mond boy fitzDavy Oge Barry, of same ; David Oge fitzDavid Barry, of 
same ; Thomas fitzDavid Oge Barry, of same, gentlemen," together with 
" David MacShane MacDavid [Barry], alias Daynynay, of same, horse- 
man ; Conoghor AlcBrian O'Daly, of same kern ; Dermot MacShane 
MacDermot, Donell MacShane MacDermott, Dermot MacShane Mac- 
Laghlin, and Donell MacShane MacLaghlin, of same, husbandmen ; 
security in the county Cork, and proviso that they behave well, and 
observe such ordinances as the Lord Deputy and Council shall make 
concerning the lands and goods which they had when in rebellion. 

No. 4468, fiant of Ehzabeth, 5 July, 1584, is the second of three con- 
taining pardons " for the MacSwines' galloglas," commencing with " Brien 
MacOwen MacSwyny, alias Brien MacOwen Yloghie, of Balligarwan, 
gentleman." 

No. 4469, fiant of Elizabeth, 5 July, 1584, is the third containmg 
pardons " for the MacSwynes' gallowglas," commencing with Donell Mac- 
Owen MacSwyny, alias Donell MacOwen Yloghie, of Moccrompy, gentle- 
man." 

Of these brothers, Brien and Donell McOwen Yloghie McSwyny, the 
one succeeded Richard fitzDavid Oge Barry as castellan of Ballygarvan 
when that Richard's father, David fitzDavid Barry, acquired Rathanusky, 
and the other, who was successively castellan of Blarney and Macromp, 
was, hke that Richard, one of the three most trusted personal partisans 
of Sir Cormac MacTeig McCarthy, knt. Lord of Muskerry, and had the 
castle and manor of Iniskean by Sir Cormac's will. 

Beyond all doubt, it was Sir Cormac MacTeig, through regard for 
Richard fitzDavid Oge Barry, that brought James FitzRichard of the 
Rath, Viscount Buttevant, to make adequate provision for that Richard 
fitzDavid Oge's father, David fitzDavid, last surviving brother of Red- 
mond Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, and last surviving son of David Downe 



1 4^ BARRYMORE. 

Barry roe, Lord of Ibawne. That provision consisted of eight or ten 
thousand acres, of which more than half were in the parish of Kilcully, in 
the county of the city of Cork, and were bounded on the north by Sir 
John of Desmond's Carrignavar estate, and on the west and south-west 
by Sir Cormac MacTeig's manor of Blarney and lands of Blarney and 
Karrikippane, and extended southwards into the suburbs of Cork. 

The Rathanisky estate not only bordered upon the lands of Sir 
Cormac MacTeig, but reached within two miles of Sir Cormac's chief 
residence and fortress, Blarney Castle, where at call Sir Cormac could 
have Richard fitzDavid Oge Barry. 

Regarding the Rathanisky estate, the " Calendar of the Patent Rolls, 
Ireland," Henry VIII., Edward VI., Mary, and Elizabeth to 1575, has 
the following summary: VII. Elizabeth, 7-10. Conveyance whereby 
William fitzRobcrt de Barry granted to John Lombard the manor of 
Rathmisk (recte Rathinusk) to hold for ever of the chief lord of the fee. 
August 4, twenty-fourth Edw. III., letter of attorney from William fitz- 
Robert de Barry authorizing Thomas Synam to deliver to John Lombard 
seisin of the manor of Rathmisk (recte Rathinisk), Aug 4th, twenty-fourth 
Edw. III. 

Bond of James Barry, Viscount Butte vant, to Edmund Lumbard, of 
Dublin, for ;i^500. — Nov. 7, 1 564. 

The condition of the preceding bond is that the said Viscount shall 
abide the award and determination of John Miagh, Stephen Coppinger, 
George Skiddy, John Hodny . . . and John Coppinger, of Cork, 
concerning the lands of Rathmisky (recte Rathinisky), page 491. 

No. 3287 (61 21), fiant of Elizabeth, contains a pardon to Nicholas 
Walshe, John Bayes, and Christopher Arthur, for an alienation to them 
by James Barrie, knt. Viscount of Buttevaunte, alias Viscount of Barrie- 
more, of the baronies or hundreds of Ybawne, Oliehan, and Ogormliehan, 
and the manors and lands of Rathbarrie, Tymolagge, Castellyans, Carrig- 
towhill, Barriescorte, Inshynebackie, Donnegowrne, Rathynuskie, and 
Rathgobban. And licence to the said James Viscount Barrie to alien to 
the same the barony or hundred of Oryrry and the manors and lands of 
Buttevant, Liscarroll, and elsewhere in the county Cork. — 6th May, twen- 
tieth Elizabeth, 1578. 

From these summaries and fiants 2264, 2469, 2941, 3083, 3103, 3974, 
and 5994, it appears that in 1564 James FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant 
established his rights to the manor of Rathanisky against the Lombards, 
and that in 1578 he got a royal pardon for having, in 1577, alienated it 
to his last surviving first cousin, David fitzDavid Barryroe. 

No. 1673 (6128), fiant of Elizabeth (28 January, 1 570-1), contains a 
pardon to Andrew Galveye, of Cork, merchant, of alienations and 



BARRYMORE. 1 49 

intrusions in the lands of Castlecore, alias Ballynecorowe, Richards- 
towne, Ballyewyne, Cargannygran, Ballynybantry, the great town, alias 
Ballymore, in the Great Island ; Annaghbeg, Quahirronagh, Monshyally- 
towne, Ballywellon, Ballyheyron, Knockycaran, the Castle in Shandon, 
thirty shillings chief rent in and about the castell in Shandone, Rathyny- 
tig, Ballymystell, Kylrossan, Knocknyshynane, and Ballyedmond, county 
Cork. Fine, 20 marks. — 28 January, xiii. 

Of the lands dealt with in that fiant the manor castle of Shandon was 
mortgaged by David fitzDavid Barry to Walter Galwey, who also had a 
Ballynecorry in his possession at the time of his death, A.D. 1581, and 
Ballymore, [FJAnnaghbeg, Rathynytig, Ballymystell, Kylrossan, Knock- 
nyshynane, and Ballyedmond, were part of the estate of David FitzDavid's 
eldest son, Richard, until i594.('>The above Andrew Galveye appears to 
have been a mere trustee for James FitzRichard Viscount Buttevant. 

In i6og, on the incorporation of the city of Cork, two of the thirty 
eight freeholders of county of the city of Cork were " Richard Barry, of 
Ratenisky, gent.," and his eldest son, " David Barry, of Ballyheine, gentle- 
man." 

A.D. 161 2. Award concerning the lands of Cahirbeg, Gortygowne, 
Gortylahshire, Gurtyroshe, and Garrivona, half ploughland, adjoining 
Ballyneslocry, Rahynitig, and Butlerstown, in dispute between Richard 
fitzDavid, of Rahynisky,in the county of Cork, Esq., and John McConoghor 
Duffe, of Butlerstowne, in the said county, husbandman, that all pro- 
ceedings on both sides be discontinued. Contemporary copy, without 
date or signature of arbitrators, in writer's possession. 

Richard fitzDavid Oge Barry, of Rathinusky and Robertstown, died 
the 20th of August, 1614. Ten years afterwards three indented inquisi- 
tions were taken at Cork to inquire what lands and tenements in the 
county of Cork and the county of the city of Cork he held on the day of 
his death from King James I. in capite, and what those lands and tene- 
ments were worth, and at what time he died, and who and how old was 
his next heir. Of these inquisitions the first and fullest was taken on 
12th of Januar}', 1624, and relates to all his lands. Therein he is styled 
Richard fitzDavid Barry, of Robertstown. A shorter one, taken on the 
24th of August, relates to his lands and tenements in the county of Cork. 
Therein he is styled Richard FitzDavid Barry, of Robertstown in that 
county. The shortest one' was also taken on the 24th of August, and 
relates to his lands and tenements in the county of the city of Cork. 

(OAs so much of these lands certainly passed to David FitzDavid, it may be 
that all of them were his in 1577. Chore Abbey, now Midleton churchyard, was 
the burial place of his descendants. 



150 BARRYMORE. 

Therein he is styled Richard FitzDavid Barry, of Robertstown, in that 
county. His lands were — Robertstown, i ploughland ; Ballydolloghry, 
I pi. ; Mitchelstown, alias Ballinvestially, i pi ; Rathynyty, i pi. ; Kil- 
rushane and Knockynyshanahy, j^ pi. ; Ballymore, alias the great towne, 

1 pi. ; Downygaule, 30 acres ; Ballyedmond, i pi. ; a head rent of 

2 shillings out of Ballingullae, a head rent of 4 shillings and fivepence 
out of Fanaghbegg, a head rent of 2 shiUings out of Ballyedmond ; 
Rahynysky, i pi. ; Ballynyheyny, i pi. ; Kilcully, i pi. ; Ballynistine, i 
pi. ; Rathpickane, i pi. ; Ballinvarnanig, i pi. ; and Ballinvarrig, i pi. 

The first inquisition recites that Richard fitzDavid Barry being so 
seized, on the 28th of March, 1594, vested the said lands in Thomas 
Myagh, fitzWilham, of the city of Cork, merchant, and Richard Cogane, 
of Bearnaheally, gentleman, in trust for the said Richard Barry, the feoffor, 
during his natural life, and after his death for David fitzRichard Barry, 
eldest son of the said Richard, the feoffor, during his natural life ; and 
after his death for the legitimately begotten and to be begotten heirs of 
the said David's body, with similar remainders successively to Garrett 
fitzRichard, John fitzRichard, Philip fitzRichard, James fitzRichard, 
Richard fitzRichard, Andrew fitzRichard, and William fitzRichard, seven 
younger sons of the said Richard, the feoffor, with further similar remain- 
ders successively to Redmond fitzDavid Barry, David fitzDavid Barry, 
and Thomas fitzDavid Barry, first, second, and third brothers of the said 
Richard, the feoffor, and with final remainder to the right heirs of the 
said Richard fitzDavid, the feoffor, for ever. 

The indenture further recites that the said Richard fitzDavid Barry, 
the feoffor, being so seized on the 21st November, 1605, feoffed Mylo 
Roche, of Ballymaclaurence, gent. ; John Fitzgerald, of [Carrigneveigh], 
gent., and Thomas Hurley, of Kilmallock, gent., their heirs and assign5= 
for ever of and in all and singular the said lands, except Ballyedmond, to 
stand and be seized of the stone house, town, and lands of Ballynyheyny, 
and the moyty or half endeale of the castles, towns, and lands specified 
in the said feoffment, with the appurtenances, containing seven or eight 
ploughlands by estimation, and one-half of the mill thereof, to the use, 
profit and behoofe of David Barry, son and heir-apparent of the feoffor 
and of Katherin Hurley, wife to the said David, and to the survivor of 
them, and after their decease to their joint issue male, and for want of 
such issue to such use as hereafter follow. For the rest of the lands 
aforesaid the feoffees and their heirs and assigns and the survivor 
of them, his heirs and assigns, shall stand and be seized of and in 
the other moyty of the premises and all other the castles, villages, 
and lands specified in the said feoffment, with the appurtenances, 
the ploughland of Ballydulogliry aforesaid to Katherin FitzThomas, 



BARRYMORE. I5I 

now wife to the said Richard FitzDavid Barry, the feoffor, during 
her natural life, she being therewith contented and exempted from 
any manner of dower or third of the premisses alwaies excepted) to the 
use, comoditie and profit of the said Richard, the feoffor, during his 
natural life, and after his decease to the use, profit and behoof of the said 
David fitzRichard Barry, eldest son to the said Richard, the feoffor, with 
remainders as in the aforesaid deed of feoffment, bearing date 28 day of 
March, 1594, with liberty to the said Richard, the feoffor, to mortgage 
parcel of said lands (Robertstown, Cwillyone, Ballynyheyny, and Rath- 
inusky excepted) for the sum of money for which the said Cwillyowen 
was mortgaged by Morris, late Lord Roche, unto the said Richard Barry, 
the feoffor ; and with liberty to the said Catherine Hurly, should she 
survive the said Richard fitzDavid and her said husband, David fitz- 
Richard Barry, to have the castel, town, and lands of Robertstown afore- 
said, and the mill thereof, and forego the stone house, town, and plough- 
land of Ballynyheyny during the residue of her life. 

The jury further say, that the said Richard fitzDavid, by his charter 
dated 29th of August, 1607, together with David Barry, his son and heir- 
apparent, feoffed one Gerald Barry, the second son of the said Richard, 
the feoffer of and in the town and lands of Ballyedmond aforesaid to 
hold to the said Gerald and the lawfully begotten or to be begotten heirs 
males of his body, with remainder to the right heirs of the said Richard 
Barr}% the feoffor, for ever. 

Furthermore, the jury say, that all the aforesaid premisses, with appur- 
tenances, are held of the King, James I., in capite by military service. 

The juries further say, that the said Richard fitzDavid Barry, the 
feoffer, died on the 20 day of August, A.D. 1614, and that David fitz- 
Richard Barry was son and heir of said Richard fitzDavid, and was thirty- 
one years of age, and married at the time of his father's death. 

14 March, 1624. There was granted a pardon of alienations for 
Richard fitzDavid Barry, of Robertstown, in the county of Cork, who 
being seized in fee of the castle and lands of Robertstown, one carrucate 
(i.e., ploughland) ; Ballydulloghry, i c. ; Mitchelstown, alias Ballinvis- 
teally, i c. ; Rahynity, i c. ; Kilrushane and Knockenishanaha, j^ c. ; 
Ballymore, otherwise Great Town, i c. ; Downogale, 30 acres ; Bally- 
edmond, I c. ; a rent of 2 shillings out of the lands of Ballingully, a rent 
ot 4 shillings and 5 pence out of Fanaghbegg, a rent of 2 shillings out of 
Ballyedmond, all in the county of Cork ; and the castle and lands of 
Rathyniskie, i c. ; Ballyneheiny, i c. ; Kilkully, i c. ; Ballyhastine, i c. ; 
Rathpickane, i c. ; Ballyvarnane, i c. ; Ballinvarrig i c, in the county of 
the city of Cork, by his deed dated 21 Nov., 1605, alienated the premisses 
to Miles Roche, of Ballymaclauras ; John Fitzgerald, of Carrigneveigh ; and 



152 BARRYMORE. 

Thomas Hurley, of Kilmallock, to hold for certain uses mentioned 1 1 said 
deed, and in an inquisition taken at Cork the 12 January, 1624. Fine, 
£^6 3s. 4d., 14 March, xxii. James I. 

Richard fitzDavid Oge Barry had ten sons and two or more daughters. 
His sons were — David, his successor ; Garrett, of Ballyedmond ; John, 
Philip, James, Richard, Andrew, and William, who are mentioned in the 
deed of 28 March, 1594; and Thomas and Robert, who are mentioned 
last in a deed of their eldest brother, David FitzRichard, dated 27 Nov- 
ember, 1627, and manifestly were born after the date of their father's 
settlement of his estates, without mention of them, on the 28 of March, 
1594. Philip and Andrew are not mentioned in the deed of 27 November, 
A.D. 1627, as if already dead without issue male at that date. The seven 
other younger sons are mentioned as alive in the deed of 27 November, 
1627. Of the daughters, one married Danyell O'Kiffe, and was mother 
of the Margaret Ni Danyell mentioned in the will of David fitzRichard, 
dated 3 December, 1627; another was Ellen, wife of Richard Nagle, of 
Moneanimney, gentleman, and ancestress of the Nagles of Ballygrifhn 
and Anakissy, and of the famous Sir Richard Nagle, Attorney-General 
for Ireland in the reign of James II. 

David Nagle, of Moneanimney, in the county of Cork and barony of 
Fermoy, gentleman, fifth son born, but by the death of his elder brothers 
without issue, heir of John Nagle, eldest son of Richard Nagle, eldest 
son of John Nagle, eldest son of Richard, eldest son of John Nagle of 
Moneanimney aforesaid. Which first-mentioned David Nagle took to 
wife Ellen, daughter of William Roche, of Ballyhowly, in the said county, 
esquire, by whom he had issue ten sons and ifine daughters, viz. — John, 
eldest son ; Richard, second son ; James, third son, all which died young 
and without issue ; Richard, fourth son, who took to wife Ellen, daughter 
of Richard Barry, of Rahanyskie, in the said county, gent. ; James, fifth 
son, who took to his first wife Ellen, daughter of John Lacy, of Athly- 
cagh, in the county of Limerick, gentleman, and to his second wife Gyles, 
daughter of Philip Kyerane, of Rahan, in the said county of Cork, gentle- 
man ; Edward, sixth son, died young without issue ; Garrett, seventh 
son. Master of Arts in the University of Paris, in the kingdom of France, 
and afterwards captain of a troop of horse in Germany, where he died in 
the Emperor Ferdinand's service, four years since , Pierce, eighth son, 
died young ; Morish, ninth son, as yet unmarried, and one son more, who 
died young without issue. Ellis, the eldest daughter of the first-men- 
tioned David, married unto Silvanus Spenser, eldest son of Edmond 
Spenser, esquire, the famous poet, by whom she had issue two sons — 
Edmond Spenser and William Spenser ; Isabel, second daughter, married 
to John Barry, of Leamlary, in the said county of Cork, gentleman; 



BAF^RVMORE. 1 53 

Ellenor, third daughter, married unto John Roche, of Ballynamony, in 
the said county of Cork, gentleman ; Ellin, the fourth daughter, married 
to Edmond Oge MacSwyny, of Downyskie, in the said county of Cork, 
gentleman ; Rose, fifth daughter, first married to Teige MacDaniell, alias 
MacDaniell of Disert, in the said county of Cork, gentleman, deceased, 
by whom she had sons and daughters ; and the said Rose secondly 
married to Teige MacCallaghane Carty, of Aghadeagh, in the said county 
of Cork, gentleman ; Katherine, sixth daughter, was married to Richard 
Condon, of Flemingstown, in the said county of Cork, gentleman, de- 
ceased, by whom she had issue sons and daughters ; Onora, seventh 
daughter, was married to John Hurly, of Knocklongy, in the county of 
Limerick, gentleman, and she died without issue ; Ellice, eighth daughter, 
married to Roger MacGrath, of Courtswood, in the county of Waterford, 
gentleman ; Margaret, ninth daughter of the said first-mentioned David, 
married to Edmond Roche, of Ballydwyle, in the said county of Cork, 
gentleman. 

The first-mentioned David departed this mortal life at the cittie of 
Dublin, the 14th day of November, 1637, and was interred in St. James's 
churchyard, Dublin. The truth of the premisses is testified by the sub- 
scription of the said Richard Nagle, eldest son living and heir of the said 
defunct, who hath returned this certificate unto my ofhce. — Thomas 
Preston, Esq., Ulster King of Arms, 22 Feb., 1637. 

Morris Hurly, of Knocklongy, in the co. of Limerick, esquire, second 
son, and by the death of his elder brother, Thomas Hurly, without issue, 
eldest son of Thomas Hurly, of same, took to his first wife Grany, daughter 
of Ogan O'Hogan, of Ardcrony, in the c. of Tipperary, gent., by whom he 
had issue six sons and five daughters. Thomas Hurly, eldest son and 
heir, married Lettice, daughter of Lucas Shea, of Kilkenny. John Hurly, 
second son, first married EUinor, daughter of Oliver Stephenson, of Dun- 
moylin, in the co. . . ., gent, by whom he had a daughter ; secondly, 
Ellinor, daughter of David Nagle, of Moneanimney, in the co. of Cork, 
gent., by whom he had no issue ; thirdly. Amy, daughter of Thirlagh 
MacGrath, of Ayliwullane, co. Tipperary, gent, land had sons and 
daughters. Edward, the third son, died unmarried ; James, fourth son, 
^.s yet unmarried ; fifth, Edmond ; sixth, Morris, died unmarried ; Kathe- 
rine, eldest daughter, first married to David Barry, of Rathynisky, in the 
CO. of Cork, gent ; secondly, to Mortagh O'Brien, of Annagh, co. Tippe- 
rary, gent ; Mary, the second daughtei, died married to John Lacy, of 
Dromnylea, in the co. of Limerick, gent. ; Ellenor, third daughter, married 
to John Barry, of Ballyclohy, alias MacRobinson, in the co. of Cork, esq. ; 
Ellin, fourth daughter, married to Richard Bourk, aHas MacWalter, cf 



154 BARRYMORE. 

Burreis, in the co. of Tipperaty, gent. ; Onora, fifth daughter, married to 
Morris FitzGibbon, of Ballynyhensy, in the co. of Limerick. 

The said first-mentioned Morris married, secondly, Grace, daughter 
of Sir George Thornton, of Downemane, in the co. of Limericic, knt, by 
whom he had no issue. He departed this mortal life the 3rd June, 1637, 
and was buried at the cathedral of Emly. Entered 11 Nov., 1637. 

That some kindred or affinity existed between the Barrys of Rahan- 
isky and the Cogans of Bearnahealy may be surmised from Richard 
Cogan's trusteeship in the settlement of the Rahanisky estates in 1594, 
and Pierce Cogan's trusteeship of them in 1627, and his executorship of 
the will of 1627. Perhaps Richard fitzDavid Barry, of Rahanisky, was a 
brother of Ellicia Barrye, alias Gogane, widow of William Gogane, of 
Bearnahealye, father of Pierce Gogaine, or Cogan, of Ballinecourtie, alias 
Courtstown. 

A.D. 1630. On the 20th of January, the fifth year of Charles I., by 
inquisition it was found that on the 30th of April, i6og, William Gogaine, 
of Bearnahealie, and his son and heir, Thomas, by deed conveyed the 
castle, town, and lands of Ballinecourtie, one ploughland ; Ballyadine, one 
ploughland ; and Cnockinycarry, forty-three acres, to Pierce Gogaine, 
second son of the said William, reserving ;£^20 yearly to the said William. 

A.D. 1632. On the 4th of April, 1632, by inquisition at Youghal, it 
was found that William Gogane, late of Bearnahealye, in the co. of Cork, 
gent., deceased, in his lifetime possessed the fee in reversion after the 
death of Ellicia Barrye, alias Gogane, late wife of William Gogane, grand- 
father of the said William, of the ploughland of Ballintagirt, and of the 
half-ploughland of Rathvine, and the fee in reversion, after the death of 
Ellen Carty, lately wife of Thomas Gogane, father of the said William, 
and the fee of Bearnahealy, i pi. ; Rathnynaltin and Ballyhynnykin, i pi. ; 
Ballyadam, i pi. and mill ; Ballynebearnye, i pL ; Towrine, j^ pi. ; Bally- 
voltigge, 1^ pi. in reversion after Ellice Barrye, alias Gogane ; Farren- 
water, |< pi. ; Rapiell, i pi. ; Knocknyskeagh, i pi. ; Ballingromulaghe, 
i< pi. ; Ballyhindbarrye, six acres, and a multitude of small head rents. 
The said William died on the 9th of February last past. William, his 
son and heir, was 15 years and 5 months old at the time of his father's 
death. Ellen Cartye, alias Gogane, lately wife of said William, is alive 
and dowable. Eight children — William, Thomas, Edmond, }ohn, Eilein, 
Joana, Ellen, and Catherine. 

Funeral Entry— William Cogan, of Bcarnaheal)', in the co. of Cork, 

gent. ; died 9 January, 1633 ; eldest .son and heir of Thomas C, esq. 

Funeral Entry. William Cogan, of Bearnahealy, in the co. of Cork, 

gent, deceased, was eldest son and heir of Thomas Cogan, of same, eldest 



BARRYMORE. 155 

son and heir of William Cogan, of same, eldest son and heir of Thomas 
Cogan, of same, eldest son and heir of William Cogan, of same. The 
first-mentioned William Cogan married Ellin, daughter of Teig MacDermot 
Carthy, second brother to Cormac MacDermot Carty, Lord of Muskry, 
and had issue five sons and four daughters — (i) William, married Ellen, 
daughter of Edmund Fitzgerald, of Ballymartra, in the co. of Cork, gent. ; 
(2) Thomas, died unmarried ; (3) Edmond, unmarried ; (4 and 5) John 
and James, died young, unmarried ; (i) Ellen, married Walter White, of 
Cork, gent. ; (2) Johanna ; (3) Ellen ; (4) Katherine, died. The first- 
mentioned WilHam Cogan died the 9th January, 1633. 

Katherine, widow of Richard fitzDavid Oge, of Rahanisky and Roberts- 
town, married, secondly, Owen MacTeige Carty, of Drisane. 

Funeral Entry. Owen Mac Teige Carty, of Drisane, in the co. of 
Cork, gent, deceased, eldest son and heir of Teige Carty, of same, eldest 
son and heir of Owen Carty, of same. The said first-mentioned Owen 
married Grany, da. of Sir Cormock MacTeige McCarthy, knt., some time 
Lord of Muskry, in the co. of Cork, by whom he had issue eight sons and 
five daughters — (i) Donogh, married Katherine, da. of John Barry, alias 
MacRobusten, of Ballyclochy, in the co. of Cork ; (2) Teige, married, first, 
Katherine, da. of David Lacy, of Athlyekagh, co. Limerick; second, 
Ellen, da. of Donogh O'Leary, alias O'Leary ; (3) Daniel, married Onora, 
da. of Morrogh McSwyny, alias Morrogh na Mart ; (4) Cormac, married 
Margaret, da. of said D. Lacy ; (5) Dermot, unmarried ; (6) Fynen, died 
unmarried ; (7 and 8) Callaghan and Phelim, as yet unmarried. The said 

Owen took as second wife Katherine. da. of Thomas Fitzgerald, of 

in the co. Waterford, relict of Richard fitzDavid Barry, of Robertstown, 
in the co. of Cork, gent, by whom the said Owen had issue one son, Owen 
Oge, as yet unmarried. The said first-mentioned Owen died at Drishane, 
the loth of November, 1637. Entered 15 Dec, 1637. 

Richard fitzDavid Barry, of Rathanusky and Robertstown Castles, was 
succeeded by his eldest son, David fitzRichard Barry, who was born in 
1583, and who married Katherine, daughter of Morris Hurley, of Knock- 
longy, gent, and had issue David Oge, Richard, Laurence, Philip, Joane, 
Katherine, Mary, Ellyne, Ann, and Grace. David fitzRichard Barry died 
on the 4 of December, 1627. His will, an inquisition taken after his 
death, and a pardon for alienations by him, are in the Record Office, 
Dublin. 

The inquisition was taken at the Tolseel, in Cork, on the 23 of 
September, 1628, and regards the lands of David fitzRichard Barry, in 
the county of the city, viz. : the castle and lands of Rathenuskie, i pi. ; 
"Ballenvarnane and Ballyhustance, i pi. ; Rathpeakane, i pi. ; Kilcronane, 



156 BARRYMORE. 

I pi. ; Ballynaheine, i pi. ; Kilkully, i pi. ; and Ballynvarrigge, i pi. The 
jurors say that by his deed dated the 27 November, 1627, he feoffed 
Peirce Gogaine, gent., and Thomas Hurley, gent, in trust out of the 
profits to pay £100 due of the feoff er, and to put by ^^300 for his eldest 
daughter, Joane, and £100 for every one of his younger daughters, 
Katherine, Mary Ellyne, Ann, and Grace, and £10 yearly towards the 
maintenance of every one of his younger sons, Richard, Laurence, and 
Philip, until they reach the age of twenty-one years, with like provision 
corresponding to its sex for the child then unborn ; and then to hold the 
said lands to the use of the feoffor's son and heir, David Barry, and the 
heirs males of his body lawfully begotten and to be begotten for ever, 
with remainder to the feoffor's second son, Richard, and the heirs males 
of his body lawfully begotten and to be begotten for ever ; with similar 
remainders successively to the feoffor's third son, Laurence, fourth son, 
Philp, and younger brothers, Garrett fitzRichard, John fitzRichard, James 
fitzRichard, Richard Oge fitzRichard, William fitzRichard, Thomas fitz- 
Richard, and Robert fitzRichard. "And for remainder over to the lawful and 
rightful heirs of me, the said David Barry, the feoffor. The jurors 
further say that by his deed bearing date the 3rd of December, 1627, the 
said David fitzRichard Barry feoffed John fitzThomas Gerald and John 
Lacie of and in the lands of Rathinuskey, Ballynvarnanne, Ballyhustane, 
Rathpeakane, Kilcronane, to the use, behoof and commodity of David 
Oge Barry, son and heir apparent of the said feoffor, and of Honora 
Barry, alias Gerald, the lawful wife of the said David Oge Barry, during 
both their natural lives, and the life of the survivor of them, and after 
their decease to their joint issue male, with remainder to their joint female 
issue. The jurors further say that said David fitzRichard Barry died the 
4th da}' of December, 1627, and that David Oge Barry was his son and 
next heir, and married. 

13 th February, 1628. Pardon of an alienation of lands in the county 
of the city of Cork by David fitzRichard Barry, of Robertstown, in the 
county of Cork, to Pierce Cogan and Thomas Hurley. — "Calendar of 
Patents." 

This is the last Will and Testament of David fitzRichard Barry : — 
In the name of God, Amen, the 3rd day of December, 1627, I, David 
fitzRichard Barry, sick of body, but of good and perfect will and memorie, 
God be praised, do make and ordaine this my last will and testament in 
manner and forme followmg. First, 1 commend my soule unto Almighty 
God, my Maker and my Redeemer, and my body to be buried in Cor 
Abbey. 

Item. I will that all such debts and duties as I owe of right or of 



BARRYMORE. 157 

conscience to any person or persons be well and truly contented and paid 
by mine executors hereafter named. 

Item. I leave and bequeath to my married and lawful wife, Catherine 
Barry, alias Hurley, all my cattle and corn as well in ground, reek or 
otherwise, together with all my household stuff and all the moveable 
goods, brass, pewter, and plate, without any division, only what plate 
my father left me, and which I do now leave and bequeath to my son and 
heir, David Barry. 

Item. Whereas, I have set and let unto my brethren, Richard and 
William Barry, the ploughlands of Ballynvisteligg, otherwise called 
Mitchelstowne, and Ratheinitigg, for three years, my will is and so I be- 
queath that my niece, Margaret Ny Danyell I Kiffe, shall have and 
receive at the hands of my said wife, Katherin (she receiving the same 
from the said Richard and William Barry), the sum of ten pounds sterl. 
for two years, payable unto the said Margaret Ni Donyell as aforesaid at 
the feast of Easter and Michaelmas by equal portions, the first payment 
to begin at Easter next. 

Item. I leave and bequeath to my brother, Thomas fitzRichard 
Barry, the sum of five pounds sterling, payable out of the said land as 
aforesaid, the third year of the said term. 

Item. I leave, and so my will is, that amongst other my debts, the 
debt that I owe unto one Mr. S be honestly paid. 

Item. I do make and ordain Fires Cogane, of Courtstowne, gent, 
and Thomas Hurley, of Kileduff, gent, executors of this my last will and 
testament and also my father-in-law, Mr. Morris Hurley, of Knocklongy, 
tutor and warden over my wife and children, and if there be any variance, 
discord, or controversie between my said wife and children, my will is 
that the said Morris Hurley and my said executors shall decide and end 
the same as to their discretion shall be thought meet and convenient. 

My will also is that my said son and heir, David Barry, and feoffees, 
upon my blessing, shall discharge and pay all my debts out of the issues 
and profits of my land as the same is expressed in the estate thereof by 
me made to the said feoffees therein named. And that also my said son 
and heir, David, shall well respect, perform and accomplish the intent 
and meaning of the said estate or feoffment. 

My will also is, and so do I enjoin my said feoffees and every of them 
to prefer a good and sufficient jointure upon Onur Barry, alias Gerald, 
the lawfully married wife of my said son and heir, David Barry, during 
her natural life, the remainder to be as it was agreed upon. 

In witness thereof I have hereunto put my hand and seal, the day and 
year within written. 

David Barry. 



158 BARRYMORE. 

Signed and sealed by the said David Barry as his last will and testa- 
ment in the presence of us whose names ensue, 

James Barry, Thomas James Barry, William Barclay, 
Edmond Fitzgerald, John Hurley, John Lacie. 

Proved 7 Dec, A.D. 1627, before the venerable manj Sir Robert 
Travers, knt, vicar, etc. 

The lands of David fitzRichard Barry were confirmed to him by King 
Charles the First, as the manor of Robertstowne, with manorial rights. — 
Letter of Ch. M. Barry to the present writer, the 27 February, 1872. 

David FitzRichard Barry was succeeded by his eldest son, David 
Oge Barry, of Robertstown and Rathanisky, gentleman, who in 1627, 
married Honora, daughter of Edmond Fitzgerald, of Castlemartyr, 
son and successor of John Fitzgerald, of Castlemartyr, Seneschal of 
Imokilly, and had issue three sons and two daughters — Richard, David, 
Edmond, Ellin, and Hellan, and died in 1643. He was succeeded 
by his eldest son, Richard Barry of Robertstown. Of him the late 
Charles M, Barry, Esq., wrote to the present writer thus : — " In 1654, 
when he had attained years of understanding, he was offered by 
Cromwell qualifications in Connaught and Clare," which, to quote a 
letter of King Charles II , after the Restoration, " he absolutely refused, 
and choosing rather to follow our fortunes abroad, served as lieutenant 
in the regiment of our dear brother, the Duke of York in Flanders, 
with much reputation to himself and country, and constant loyalty and 
faithfulness to us." 

The estates which David Oge Barry possessed in 1641^ and which 
were confiscated by Cromwell, were restored by King Charles II. to 
Lieutenant Richard Barry, who did not long enjoy them. The following 
is his will, which was proved in 1662 : — In the namei of God, Amen, I, 
Richard Barry, of Robertstowne, in the county of Cork, gentleman, though 
sick in body, yet of perfect sense and memory, do make my last will and 
testament in manner following. 

First, I bequeath my soul to God, who made and redeemed it, and my 
body to the earth from which it came, to be buried in the tomb of my 
ancestors at Coraby. 

Second, I bequeath unto my brother, Edmond Barry, all and singular 
my castles, houses, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, except such 
thereof as have been formerly assured unto my grandmother, and unto 
my mother, Honora Barry, as dower or joynture, which they are to enjoy 
during their natural lives according the contracts made foirmerly with them 
in that behalf, and after their decease their said several joyntures to revert 
to my said brother, Edmond Barry, and unto the heirs males of his body 



BARRYMORE. 



159 



lawfully begotten for ever, and my said brother, Edmond Barry, to enter 
into and enjoy my said estate, except before excepted, after my decease, 
and I do enjoin my said brother to pay unto my eldest sister, ElHn Barry, 
three hundred pounds sterling, and to my sister, Hellan Barry, three 
hundred pounds sterling, which was that was left them by my father in 
his last will and testament, and I do further enjoin my said brother, 
Edmond Barry, not to enter nor receive the rents, issues and profits of my 
said estate till such time as he gives sufficient surety to my mother and to 
my uncle, Richard Fitzgerald, of Ballymartyr, for the due payment of the 
said sums towards the satisfying and payment of my said sisters ; till that 
be performed the whole estate to remain with my mother and uncle to the 
uses aforesaid, and do further desire my mother and my said uncle, 
Richard Fitzgerald, of Ballymartyr, to pay or cause to be paid three score 
and three pounds that are due upon me to Captain Cornelius and other 
persons in England, and my estate is to continue in my said mother and 
uncle in hands till that payment be made or sufficient assurance from my 
brother, Edmond Barry, for the payment of it. 

Item. In regard that my mother, Hanora Barry, hath never a house 
fit for her to live upon her jointure at Rathinisky, nor other conveniences 
upon her said jointure, I do leave and bequeath unto my said mother the 
house of my two houses of Ballymore, in the Great Island, or Ballyde- 
louhery, with the ploughland whereupon the same standeth, during her 
natural life, she yielding and paying thereout yearly unto my said brother, 
Edmond Barry, the sum of ten pounds sterling yearly and every year 
during her life, and after her decease the same to revert unto my said 
brother, Edmond Barry, his heirs males for ever. 

Fourth, I do appoint my trusty and well beloved mother, Honora 
Barry, and my uncle, Richard Fitzgerald, of Ballymartyr, to be overseers 
of my last will and testament, and do desire them to see performed accord- 
ing the true intent and meaning hereof. In witness whereof I have here- 
unto put my hand and seal the 25th of September, 1661. Richard Barry, 
being present Rich. Barry, Edmond Barrye, John O'Hagh. 

Administration was granted to Honora, mother of the deceased 
Richard Barry, and to his uncle, Richard Fitzgerald, 1662. 

Lieutenant Richard Barry's will ignores his brother, David, who may 
have been imbecile, and leaves the family estates to their youngest brother, 
Edmond ; but as these were entailed estates, their formal restoration, in 
1664, by King Charles II. was to David, after their confiscation by Crom- 
well in 1654 and the death of Lieutenant Richard Barry in 1661. 



i6o 



BARRYMORE. 



Ballyduluogliry, i pi. 1. 

Michaellstovvne, i pi. 1. 
Rathinetigg, i pi. 1. 
Bally more 

Ballygobbnett 

Ballynehine 

Kilcully 

Cahorra 

Kilcronane 

Ballinvarrig 

Rahinisky 

Killindonnell 

Monearde 



Ralhpeakane 
Ballingohigg, Y^ pi. 1. 
Kilerussane, i pi. 1. 
Ffaunagh 

Ballydulea 
Ballyedmond, i pi. 1. 



A.u. 1641. 

David Oge Barry of 
Ballyduluoghry. 



David Oge Barry of 
Ballymore. 

David Barry of Roberts- 
town. 

Murtogh O Brine. 



David Barry. 



Richard Barry. 

Maurice Dulea of 
Ffaunagh, jr., Papist. 
William Dulea. 

John Connell, jr. , Papist. 



A.D. 1664. 
David Barry. 



David Barry. 

David Barry, by the name 

of Roljertstown. 
Hugh Cogherane and 

Trustees. 



Lieut. Hugh Cogherane 

and Trustees. 
Major Robert Ward and 

Trustees. 

David Barry. 

Duke of York. 

Tohn Barry. 
John Connell. 



A.D. 1703. 
Abraham Morris. 

Stephen Sweet. 
John Moore. 
William Smith. 

Sir Richard Pyne, 



Alderman John 
Newenham. 



George Rogers. 
Sir Richard Pyne. 



In thei column of owners in A.D. 1641 the names of David Oge Barry, 
of Ballyduluoghry ; David Oge Barry, of Ballymore ; David Barry, of 
Robertstown ; and David, of Rahanisky, all designate one same person. 
Richard Barry, of Ballingohigg and Kilerussane, was either next brother 
or fifth uncle of David Oge Barry, and must have died without male 
issue, as the forfeiting proprietor in 1690 was David Oge's son, Edmond, 
according to the will of a Williamite purchaser, George Rogers. How 
Ballyedmond passed from Garrett fitzRichard Barry, uncle of David Oge, 
to John Connell, or how Ballynehine, etc., passed from David Oge to 
Murtogh O' Brine, does not appear. 
The Duleas held under David Oge. 

In the above column of owners in A.D. 1664, all the Davids are for one 
same person, the second son of David Oge. How John Barry became 
jointly with John Connell owner of Ballyedmond in 1664, or what he was 
to Garrett fitzRichard, does not appear. 

The following names appear in the "Alphabetical Book of Indictments 
of Treason," beginning Michaelmas term, 3rd William and Mary, A.D. 
1690, Record Office Dublin: 

Barry, Edmundus, nuper de Ballydeloggerie, gen. 

F. dywy, nuper de eadem, gen. 
and again, 

Barry, Eddus, de Bally delogher, gen. 

Garrett de Robertstown, gen. 



BARRYMORE. l6l 

Garrett de Ballinaclashy, gen. 
Garrett de Lisanisky, gen., etc. 

On the 6th February, 1877, in a letter to the present writer, the late 
Charles M. Barry, assistant secretary to the Lord Chancellor, put Rahan- 
iskey for Lisanisky, and explained F. dywyasF. Dyery, that is, FitzDyery. 
Mr. McHenry, of the Record Office, reads this latter word as Edgar, but 
it may be Edus, and be, like Eddus, a contraction and repetition of 
Edmundus. 

" Garrett Barry, of Robertstown, may be for Garrett Barry, of Bally- 
volane, adjoining Robertstown, now Ballyroberts, who, towards the end of 
1690, filed a bill against the Earl of Barrymore and Lieutenant Connor 
O'Brien for cutting the woods of Ballyvolane, which came to the crown by 
his, deponent's, attainder. That Garrett Barry's estates were amalga- 
mated with Edmond Barry's adjoining estate of Robertstown after their 
confiscation in 1690. 

IX. 33, Cork 30. Sir Richard Pyne, knt. Chief Justice of the Chief 
Place, 29 Oct., 1702, consideration, ^^696 13 s. 2^d. The town and lands 
of Ballyvolhane, alias Ballyvoholane, Kilverstill, alias Killedells, 306a. 3r. 
8p. Rent, £2 i8s. ii^d. Ballydaheen, alias Ballydaw, 83a. 2r. ; Bally- 
roberts, alias Robertstown, alias Ballygobnett, 213a. Rent, 4/9kl. Total, 
603a. ir. 8p. Same barony and county — the estate of Sir Richard Naglc 
and Edmond Barry, Esquire, attainted, and which being granted to Henry 
Viscount Sidney was by two several deeds of lease and release, dated 
2 and 3 of November, 1698, for ;^3i7 i8s. 6d., conveyed to the said Sir 
Richard Pyne, subject to a chiefry of i,"io 13s. 4d. to the Earl of Barry- 
more. Inrolled 27 April, 1703. 

Sir Richard Nagle appears there, no doubt, as a mortgagee. The obso- 
lete name there given as Kilverstill was compounded of Kill and Meskill, 
and meant "Meskill's Church." 

A letter of the 6 Februaiy, 1872, from Mr. Charles M. Barry to the 
present writer gives further particulars concerning Edmond Barry, of 
Ballydeloghery, esquire : " When Edmond went to London to pay the 
debt to Captain Cornelius, he met Susanna, daughter of the widow, Anne 
Cornelius, whom he married, in 1664, getting £"750 fortune, and charged 
a jointure of ;£^I50 per annum for her on his estate in Ireland. Arthur 
Kettleby, of London; Sn- Edward FitzHarris, bart. ; and Sir Peter Tyrrell, 
bart, being trustees. She preferred a petition, in 1 700, signed in London 
in the presence of John Galway, of Cork, " to be secured in her jointure 
in the event of her surviving her husband, then living ; that he never bore 
arms or was concerned in any rebellion, but being servant to the late 
King James the Second's royal consort was necessitated to accompany 
her abroad." In the will of George Rogers, of Ashgrove, he recites that 



1 62 BARRYMORE. 

whereas he had purchased certain lands from the Commissioners of For- 
feited Estates, the property of Edmond Barry, Esqre., upon which a 
portion of a jointure is charged for said Barry's wife, and directs his son 
to pay same, should she survive her said husband. Will dated 1710. 
Miss Strickland, in her " Life of Mary of Modena, Queen Consort of 
James the Second," mentions the devotion of her attendants, who having 
asked permission from King William to join her abroad, His Majesty 
graciously granted same, and their estates were forfeited for their fidelity 
to their mistress. ' Writing in 1855 to Henry Barry, of Ballyadam, first 
cousin to the present writer's father, Charles M. Barry said : " There is 
much on record about Barry of Robertstown and Rahaniskey. The last 
representative I have trace of was Edmond fitzDavid, living about 1700. 
] find him described in an old pedigree of the Blennerhassets as Edmond 
Barry, Esquire, Foster Father of the late Queen Anne." 

Writing on the 2nd February, 1872, to the present writer, Mr. Charles 
M. Barry said : " Pray accept my sincere thanks for your kind remem- 
brance of me and most interesting communication. I have heard before, 
many years, that the Lemlara family claimed descent from the Rahan- 
isky branch. I can trace this family with ample proofs to Edmond Barry 
who forfeited in 1690, and was living in 171 o. At that period my proofs 
are rather defective, but you perhaps could assist me." 

That was in answer to a letter from me, connecting my ancestors, the 
Barrys of Dundullerick, with the Lords of Ibawne, by taking the Richard 
FitzDavid Barry who was of Rahanisky in 1586, according to Smith's 
" History of Cork," to have been the Richard fitzDavid Barry who was 
second son of David Down Barryroe, Lord of Ibawne, in Florence 
MacCarthy's Barryroe pedigree in the Carew collection, Lambeth Library, 
of which pedigree I had received a tracing on 26th October, 1871, from 
my friend. Gen. M. Atkinson, of South Kensington Museum. That 
identification was in the right direction, but incorrect ; because Richard 
FitzDavid Oge Barry, of Rahanisky 1 577-1614, was not ancestor of the 
Barrys of Dundullerick, but elder brother of their ancestor, Redmond 
buoy Barry, and was not son but grandson of David Down Barryroe, 
Lord of Ibawne. 

Mr. Charles M. Barry wrote to me as follows,: "5th February, 1872. 
My father, Garrett Barry, son of John Barry, of Ashgrove, in the Great 
Island, the representative of the Robertstown and Rahanisky family in 
the direct line, went to school with his brothers, circ. 1770, at Carrigtwo- 
hill, and they were domiciled with their great-aunt there. She was called 
Maustrass na Mona, and was MacCarty by birth and marriage. Our 
family were called 'Sleught Rishtard.' . . . They interred at Temple 
Robin, in the Great Island. ' 



l^ARRVMORE. 1 6 



3 



"6th February, 1872. My grandfather, John Barry, was born 1700." 
"8th February, 1872. My grandfather's mother was a McCarthy, 
and he had a younger brother, James Barry, father of the Rev. Michael 
Barry, many years parish priest of Midleton, and previously parish priest 
of Carrigtwohill. My father, Garrett Barry, married, first, Anne Cop- 
pinger, sister of Stephen Coppinger, of Midleton, by whom he had no 
family; and secondly, Emily Joly, my mother. I never heard any 
allusion to relationship to the Barrys of DunduUerick or Carrigtwohill, 
but the Barry of Leamlara, contemporary of my grandfather, John Barry, 
said to him : ' You know we are cousins.' This surprised my grandfather 
until the matter was explained, but how I cannot say." 

" 1 0th February, 1872. I intended to have sent you a full account of 
the Barrys of Rahaniskey from Richard fitzDavid to Edmond living in 
1 710, but will defer doing so until you shall have leisure to resume the 
subject. In the meantime, should you hear anything relating to the 
Barrys of the Great Island, circ. 1700 to 1770. kindly bear me in mind. 
1 found a mortgage registered by Francis Hely, Esq., of the Little Island, 
against Garrett Barry, of DunduUerick, and Edmond, his son, now of 
Ballinekilly, Michaelmas term, 1745. I take this Ballinekilly to be in 
the Great Island, adjoining Ashgrove, or Ballymacshaneroe, where my 
grandfather, John Barry, then lived. And if I am right in the locality, 
your progenitors and mine must have been acquainted, and probably 
acknowledged kindred through the MacCarthys. ... I shall conclude 
with an old tradition in my family, viz., that the eldest son should not 
go to sea, or he would certainly be drowned. This was twice fulfilled to 
my own knowledge. My father's eldest brother, James Barry, went to 
France, and having taken a medical degree in Paris was drowned on the 
return voyage. My eldest brother, also a member of the medical pro- 
fession, was married and settled in England, but falling into delicate 
health he was advised to try a voyage to Australia. To this we were 
averse from a superstitious notion. However, he went and derived much 
benefit, and coming to see us, said, ' You see, the prophecy has failed m 
my case.' He made a second voyage and a third voyage out, but on the 
return voyage the vessel, a very fine one, was never heard of from her 
departure from Port Philip. The prophecy plainly refers to James Barry, 
Eord Ibawne, eldest brother of David en down Barryroe, father of 
Richard and David, of Rahaniskey, and has been a tradition in our family 
for centuries," etc. 

"15th February, 1872. I propose writing some reminiscences of 
BaUinacurra. The old proprietors were Barrys. . . The head of the 
family was called Richard ny maunuffe," etc. 

" 27 February, 1872. I remember an old woman named Rose Hodnett 



1 64 BARRYMORE. 

who used to say that she could trace our family for seven generations. I 
wonder if the postmaster ever heard the epithet of Slioght Rishtard as 
applied to the Island Barrys." 

" 12 November, 1875. Referring to my father's grand-aunt, a Mac- 
Carthy by birth and marriage, and Maustrass na Mona, who lived at 
Carrigtwohill, I think the following extract from the will of Thady 
MacCarthy, of Lyredane, in the county of Cork, gent, nth November, 
1763, clearly identifies her: 'Sister, Catherine, wife of Owen MacCarthy 
na Mona." 

" 1 7 February, 1 877. Bridget Fitzgerald's statement that Barry of 
Lemlara and Barry of Rathaniskey were of the same stock is deserving 
of credit, inasmuch as she was very correct in other matters, and the fact 
being traditional, and the relationship acknowledged at different times. 
One tradition, that Barry of Leamlara claimed cousinship to John Barry, 
of Ashgrove, who represented the senior branch of Rathaniskey, and who 
died I J"]^, ageO 76 years. On explanation, the claim was admitted ; but 
it would appear that such explanation being required would shew that the 
connexion was remote." 

In November, 1855, Charles M. Barry had written to Henry Barry, of 
Ballyadam, partly as above, but with no claim to the representation of the 
Rahaniskey branch. I have frequently heard my father say that he went 
to school at Carrigtwohill about the year 1770, his father living in the 
Island ; he was placed with a relative, his grand-aunt, who lived, as well 
as I can ascertain, at Rockville. She was Maustrass na Mona, a Mac- 
Carthy by birth and marriage. My father's cousin, Dominick Sarsfield, 
was his schoolfellow. Mv father also spoke of a relationship to the 
Lemlara family. 

The foregoing is all that Mr. Charles M. Barry uttered to me in 
explanation and support of his claim to the direct representation of the 
Barry family of Rahanisky, and is not convincing. All else I could gather 
takes from the credibility of his claim. 

The late Mr. John Hyde, of Midleton, in or about 1869, wrote out 
his pedigree for me, thus : " James Barry, of Ballynahina, married Ellen, 
sister of Patrick Sarsfield, of Johnstown, and was father of Christina Barry, 
who married Ignatius Sarsfield, of Gurtnamuca, near Carrigtwohill, and 
had six sons and one daughter, viz. : — Patrick, a farmer at Gurtnamuca ; 
James, a shipowner at Cork ; Barry, a lieutenant in the Royal Navy and 
clerk to the Trinity House of Leith ; Dominick, a wine merchant at 
Madeira ; Thomas, a quarter-master in the Royal Navy ; Ignatius, a 
physician ; Lucy, wife of Philip Hyde, of Ballyanon," and mother of John 
Hyde. In or about 1779, a son of John Hyde told me that his grand- 
mother, Lucy Sarsfield, was a niece of the Rev. Michael Barr^, parish 



BARRY MORE. I 65 

priest of Carrigtwohill and afterwards of Midleton ; and that her grand- 
father, James Barry, resided not at the Ballinahina near Rathcormac but 
at the BalHnahina near Rahanisky ; and that at some previous time mem- 
bers of may family had some claim to it. He also said that Charles M. 
Barry was a cousin of his, but that I was not. 

Like Charles M. Barry, Mr. Hyde disclaimed kinship with the Barrys 
of Dundullerick. On the other hand, my aunts, Mary Anne Dwyer, 
widow, and Dora Barry, spinster, disclaimed kinship with Charles M. 
Barry, and with John Hyde. These ladies knew Charles M. Barry as a 
former clerk to their mother's uterine brother, Robert Barry, of Ballina- 
curra, shipowner ; they remembered Charles M. Barry's father, whose first 
wife was their first and second cousin, Anne Coppinger ; they remembered 
the Rev. Michael Barry, their former parish priest. Mrs. Mary Anne 
Dwyer knew intimately Mrs. Dr. John Nagle, daughter of Patrick Sars- 
field, of Johnstown, and knew about John Hyde and the Sarsfields of 
Gortnamuca, now Greenville ; but neither she nor her sister, Dora Barry, 
ever heard that they themselves were akin to Charles M. Barry's father, 
Garrett Barry, or to his cousin. Rev. Michael Barry, or to the Hydes, or to 
the Sarsfields ot Gurtnamuca, or to the Sarsfields of Johnstown, as distinct 
from the Sarsfields of Sarsfieldstown. Mrs. Dwyer went on to say, that 
her sister Johanna's people-in-law knew of no connexion between them 
and the father of Charles M. Barry, except that Charles M. Barry's father, 
Garrett Barry, of Ballinacurra, and the said Johanna's father-in-law, 
Maurice Fitzgerald, of Killeagh, Al.D., married sisters, Anne Coppinger 
and Charlotte Coppinger. Now, Maurice Fitzgerald, of Killeagh, M.D , 
was second son of Richard Fitzgerald, of Castle Richard, alias In- 
shinycranagh (will 1795), elder son of Richard Fitzgerald, of Inshiny- 
cranagh, (d. 1754^, son and heir of Lieutenant Maurice Fitzgerald, of 
Inshinycranagh (d. 1699), brother of Colonel Richard Fitzgerald, of Bally- 
martyr, and of Honora, wife of David Oge Barry, of Rahanisky and 
Robertstown, and mother of Edmond Barry, the forfeitor of Rahanisky, etc. 
In that way, Maurice Fitzgerald, of Killeagh, M.D., would have been third 
cousin of the direct representatives of Edmond Barry, of Rahanisky, if 
there were such ; but to all appearances there never was such. At all 
events, Garrett Barry, of Ballinacurra, or his father, John Barry, of Ash- 
grove, was not such. 

But though Mr. Charles M. Barry certainly is not descended from the 
forfeitor of Rahanisky, or the forfeitor's father, may he not be descended 
from one of the three younger sons of David fitzRichard Barry, of Rahan- 
isky, d. 1627 ; or from one of the nine younger sons of Richard fitzDavid 
Oge Barry, of Rahanisky, d. 1614, and so be senior to the Barrys of 
Dundullerick ; or may he not be representative of one of the younger two 



1 66 BARRYMORE. 

sons of David fitzDavid Barry, of Rahanisky, d. circ. 1580, and so be 
junior to the Barrys of Dundullerick ? Mr. Charles M. Barry gave no 
valid reason that he was in any way such, but the contrary. 

In 1776, Charles M. Barry's grandfather, John Barry, of Ashgrove, in 
the Great Island, was buried in the Great Island, at the graveyard ot 
Templerobin, in the townland of Ballymore, one of many townlands that 
from 1577 to 1 69 1 had belonged to the Barries of Rahanisky. But that 
is consistent with his being of a family long resident in the eastern half of 
the Great Island, whose parochial burial ground is Templerobin grave- 
yard. The senior branch of the Barries of Rahanisky did not bury there, 
but at Cor Abbey, now Midleton churchyard. 

A younger brother of John Barry, of Ashgrove, tenanted Ballinahina 
circ. 1745, but that townland had ceased to belong to the Barries of 
Rahanisky between the years 1638 and 1641. 

John Barry of Ashgrove's family was called Sliocht Risteaird, but so 
might dozens of Barry families with Richards among their ancestors. 

It was fatal in Charles M. Barry's family for eldest sons to go to sea ; 
but Lieutenant Richard Barry, eldest son of David Oge Barry, of Rahan- 
isky, safely sailed to Flanders and back, and no genuine eldest son iii the 
Rahanisky family is known to have been drowned, for the James, Lord 
of Ibawne, lost at sea was junior to his brother Richard of the Rath. That 
superstitious tradition in Mr. Charles M. Barry's family goes far to shew 
that they were not the Barry's of Rahanisky, but were some family long 
resident in the Great Island, and long prone there to navigation. 

Finally, Mr. Charles M. Barry was wrong in thinking that the " Lem- 
lara family claimed descent from the Rahanisky branch." The Lemlara 
family justly claims to have been seated at Lemlara ever since the four- 
teenth century. It is the Dundullerick branch that claims descent from 
the Rahanisky branch of the Barryroes through Redmond Buoy Barry, 
second son of the David FitzDavid Barry, who acquired Rahanisky in 
1577, and who is said to have been married to a Miss Barry, of Lemlara. 



BARRY OF DUNDULLERICK. 

This family is descended from Redmond Buoy Barry, second son of 
David Oge Barry, of Rahanisky, alias David fitzDavid Barrie Roe, third 
son, and eventually representative, of David Downe Barrie Roe, Lord of 
Ibawne. In 1556, at the settlement of the Barrymore and Barryroe 
manors and lands, David fitzDavid Barrie Roe and the heirs male of his 
body had a remainder to the Barrymore manors and lands after James 
fitzjohn Barrymore, Lord Barry ; James fitzRichard Barry Roe, Lord of 
Ibawne, and Richard fitzDavid Barrie Roe and the heirs males of their 



BARRYMORE 1 6/ 

bodies, and before the heirs general of James fitzjohn Lord Barry ; and 
a remainder to the Ibawne manors and lands after James htzRichard 
Lord of Ibawne, and Richard fitzDavid Barrie Roe, and their heirs males ; 
and before James fitzjohn Lord Barry and his heirs males, and the heirs 
general of James fitzRichard, Lord of Ibawne. After the death of James 
fitzjohn, Barrymore Lord Barry without male issue, and the death of 
Richard fitzDavid Barrie Roe without any issue, David fitzDavid Barrie 
Roe was next in succession to the Barrymore and Barryroe estates after 
the actual occupant, the said James fitzRichard, then Viscount Buttevant, 
and his issue male, which became extinct in the regular line at the death 
of Henry Earl of Barrymore, and now consists solely of the Smith Barries. 

In 1 5 76- 1 5 77, David fitzDavid Barrie Roe, then designated David 
Oge Barrie, acquired the castle of Rahanisky and eight or ten thousand 
acres of good land, which were erected into the manor of Robertstown 
for his great-grandson, David Oge Barry, on the i8th of February, 1638. 
To all appearance that estate was bestowed by James fitzRichard, Vis- 
count Buttevant, on his first cousin in reward for the latter's non-prosecu- 
tion of his right to the barony of Ibawne, as representative of both his 
elder brother, Redmond, and his father, David Downe, the two last 
legitimate Lords of Ibawne. David Oge, of Rathenuskye, was attainted 
and slain at the time of the rebellion of James FitzMorris, slain iSth 
August, 1579; so says the "Survey of Honours and Forfeited Lands by 
Gerald Earl of Desmond and others," 26 Elizabeth (1584). 

David fitzDavid, alias David Oge Barrie, of Rahanisky, had four sons 
— Richard Barry, who inherited his father's estate, and was great-grand- 
father of Edmond Barry, who lost it by confiscation in the reign of 
William of Orange, and died apparently without issue ; (2) Redmond 
Buoy, ancestor of the Barries of Dundullerick, who, to all appearance, on 
the death of the said Edmond Barry, in or shortly after the year 1710, 
became senior representative in the male line of the Barries of Rahan- 
isky, the Barrie Roes, Lords of Ibawne, and the Barrymores, Lords Barry 
of Olethan ; (3) David, who may have been Barry of Dundullerick, father 
of Philip fitzDavid Barry, of Muckross, who, by his will dated 1639, nomi- 
nated and appointed his " loving cozen, Mr. David Oge Barry, of Roberts- 
town," an executor and overseer of his wife. Gate Ni Richard, and of his 
children. Gaptain John Oge Barry, of Dundeady Gastle (second son of 
John Barry, of Liscarroll, fifth son of James fitzRichard, Viscount Butte- 
vant), plundered the inhabitants of Ibawne and Barryroe, and sent the 
plunder to the house of his aunt, Kate Barry, widow, at Muckross. So 
state depositions preserved in Trinity Gollege, Dublin, relating to the 
Irish rebellion of 1641. Possibly, too, Philip FitzDavid's wife. Gate Ni 
Richard, that is, Gate, daughter of Richard, was a daughter of Richard 



1 68 BARRY MORE. 

fitzDavid of Rahanisky and Robertstown, and her husband not otherwise 
a connexion of the Rahanisky Barries. (4) Thomas, who may have been 
the Thomas FitzDavid Oge Barry of Rathvillek who had a pardon in 
fiant of Ehzabeth, No. 5618. 

An inquisition was taken at Mallow on the 24th of April, 1605, re- 
garding John Oge Fitzgibbon, alias White Knight, deceased. Therein 
the jurors find that Thomas fitzDavid Oge Barry did produce before them 
one deede of feoffment bearinge date the Alonday after the feast of St. 
Marten, the bishop and confessor, in the twenty-fourth j-ear of the reign 
of Henry VI., late King of England, made by and from John fitzRichard 
fitzPatrick fitzMathew Condon, some tyme Lord of Leitrim and Monu- 
vaune, unto Thomas fitzRedmond fitzWilliam Condon, of Marshallstown, in 
the county of Cork, conteyning two ploughlands and one wood, commonly 
called Carraghgorran, buttinge, meared, and bounded as in the said deed 
is specified, the said wood being parcel of the Kiltymabins aforesaid, by 
which deede the said Thomas fitzDavid Oge Barry as well for and in 
behalf of Ellen Condon, his wife, as for the rest of her sisters aldeadyed 
as coheirs, etc. 

When the four sons of David Downe Barry Roe, Lord of Ibawne, 
had been defeated, and the first and fourth slain by their first cousin, 
James fitzRichard Barry Roe, afterwards Viscount Buttevant, the second 
Richard, and the third, David, fled to the Earl of Desmond. Afterwards, 
Richard was murdered, and thereupon David, whose wife was a sister of 
John Laidir Barry, of Lemlara, absconded, leaving his four sons to be 
reared at Lemlara. In youth the elder twOj Richard and Redmond 
Buoy, that is Redmond the sallow or the yellow-haired, took military 
service with Sir Cormac MacTeige MacCarthie, Lord of Muskrie, in com- 
pany with whom and many of his kinsmen and followers they had a 
royal pardon on the 8th of May, 1573, as Richard fitzDavid Barry, of 
Ballygarvan, and Redmond bwy MacDavid Barry, of Curraghylombardy, 
yeomen. On the 30th of September, 1574, in company only with gentle- 
men from the baronies of Imokilly and Kerrycurrihy, their father and 
themselves had royal pardons as "David Oge Barry of Bakyn Rea, 
Richard fitzDavye of Ballygarvan, and Redmond bye fitzDavye of same, 
all in same county, gentlemen." On the 21 November, 1776, in a pardon 
to Sir Cormac MacTeige, of Blarney, county Cork, knt, and his followers, 
the elder brother appears as Richard MacDaa Oge Barrie, of Ballygarvan, 
horseman; but on the 6th of September, 1577, though grouped with 
MacCarthies, the younger brother appears as Remund McDavid Barry, 
of Rathinysky, gentleman, he being no longer dependent on Sir Cormac 
MacTeige. On the 12th of the same month, their father had a royal 
pardon as David Oge Barry, of Rathynusky, gentleman, a fitting pro- 



BARRYMORE. 1 69 

vision having- at length been made for him by James fitzRichard Viscount 
Buttevant, no doubt^ at the urgent instance of Sir Cormac MacTeige 
through regard for Richard, who was one of Sir Cormac's three trustiest 
personal partisans, the three who were, as Sir Cormac's will says, " the 
men chiefly to be trusted in the behalf of my said heir, Cormac Oge." 
That provision consisted of 15 or 16 ploughlands. 

Soon after, the chiefry or head rent of Knockraha was purchased by 
Redmond Bwy Barry from James fitzRichard's son and successor, David 
fitz James, Viscount Buttevant. The case of Richard Earl of Barrym.ore 
against William Bassill, att.-gen., in June, 1656, alleged and proved, inter 
alia, that : " David fitzjam.es Barry, Lord Viscount Buttevant, was in his 
lifetime seized of . . . and two ploughlands in Knockraha, in the 
barony of Barrymore, and county of Cork, in his demesne as of ffee. 
And being so thereof seized, the said David fitzjames Barry by his deed 
of ffeoffment and entail, dated the sixteenth day of October, 1582, did 
convey the last recited premisses to Redmond Boy Barry in consideration 
of twenty-four marks sterling paid by the said Redmond Boy Barry to the 
said David fitzjames, to have • and to hold to the said Redmond Boy 
Barry, his heirs and assigns for ever, upon condition that whensoever the 
said David fitzjames Barry, Lord Viscount Buttevant, his heirs and 
assigns, should satisfy and pay unto the said Redmond Boy Barry, his 
heirs and assigns, the sum of twenty-four marks sterling, that then it 
should be lawful for the said David fitzjames Barry, his heirs and assigns, 
into the last recited premisses, with the appurtenances, to re-enter and the 
same to have again and enioy as of their former right. By virtue of which 
ffeoffment the said Redmond Boy Barry was seized of the last recited 
premisses with the appurtenances in his demesne of ffee, subject to the 
condicon of redempcon as aforesaid." 

On the 20th July, 16 14, Redmond fitzjames fitz John fitzjames Barry, 
of P . . , Lower Glanmire, by will disposed of the chiefry of Knock- 
raha. He died in 16 16. According to an inquisition at Youghal on the 
6th of October, 1585, James fitzjohn, of Pollekerrye, was in rebellion the 
13 th August, 1580, and was pardoned the 6th of August, 1581. 

Redmond Bwy must have transferred the chiefry of Knockraha to 
James fitzjohn or to Redmond fitzjames, or lost it by confiscation or 
otherwise, with Kilcor, in 1601. The occupants of Knockraha were a 
different family — John Barry of Knockraha, father of Richard Barry of 
Knockraha, father of John Barry of Knockraha, who died 11 April, 1637. 

On the 3rd of June, 1584, Redmond Bwy and his brothers received a 
royal pardon for their share in the Desmond rebellion, as " Richard fitz- 
Davy Oge Barry, of Rahanesky, gentleman ; Redmond boy fitzDavy 



^70 BARRYMORE. 

Oge Barry, of same, gentleman ; David Oge fitzDavid Barry, of same, 
gentleman ; and Thomas fitzDavid Oge Barry, of same, gentleman." 

On the 28th of March, 1 594, the eldest of these four, Richard fitzDavid 
Oge Barry, of Robertstown, in the county of Cork, and of Rathinusky, in 
the county of the city of Cork, gentleman, settled his estates on himself 
for life, with remainder to his eldest son and the heirs males of his body, 
followed by similar remainders successively to his other seven sons, and 
to his three brothers, Redmond Bwy, David, and Thomas, with a final 
remainder to the feoffor's right heirs. The part in which Redmond is 
mentioned runs thus: — "And for the lack of such heirs males then to 
thuse and behoofe and profitt of William fitzRichard Barry, eighth sonn 
to the said Richard fitzDavid, the feoffor, during the said William's life, 
and after his death to thuse and behoofe of the heirs males of the body of 
the said William lawfully begotten, or to be begotten, and for want of 
such issue males, then to thuse, profitt and commoditie of Redmond 
fitzDavid Barry, brother to the said feoffor, during his natural life ; and 
after his death, to thuse and behoofe of theirs males of the body of the 
said Redmond lawfully begotten or to be begotten ; and for default of 
such heirs males, then to thuse, behoofe, and commoditie of David Barry, 
second brother to the said Richard, the feoffor, during the said David 
Barry his natural life ; and after his decease to the use and profit of theirs 
males of the said David Barry his body lawfully begotten or to be begot- 
ten ; and for want of such heirs males then to the use and behoofe of 
Thomas fitzDavid Barry, third brother to the said feoffor, during his 
natural life ; and after his death to thuse and behoofe of theirs males of 
the body of the said Thomas lawfully begotten or to be begotten," etc. — 
Inquisition at Cork, 12 January, 1624, on Richard Barry. 

According to tradition, the wife of Redmond Bwy Barry was Honora 
O'Brien, and their son's wife was a lady named Roche and akin to 
Viscount Roche, of Fermoy. 

At the beginning of the seventeenth century, Redmond buoy was in 
possession of the two townlands of Kilcor, which he lost a first time 
through having harboured James fitzThomas Roe Fitzgerald, an outlawed 
Earl of Desmond. 

On the 28 March, 1601, he had a royal pardon as Redmond buoy fitz- 
David Oge, of Killenecurrie, and on the 2gth of May following, his son 
had a pardon as James fitzEdmond Buoy Barry, of Killynicurrie. Before 
and after the time of Redmond buoy, Kilcor belonged to the family of the 
late Cornelius O'Brien, of Kilcor, J.P. A pedigree of that family by 
"Mrs. Bridget Fitzgerald, alias Barry," alias Brighid na Senchas, opens 
thus: "Mortough O'Brien, of Duharrow, in the county of Clare [recte 
Tipperary], married the relation of David Lord Barrymore, from whom . 



BARRYMORE, I7I 

he purchased Kilcur, which was forfeited by Redmond Barry [Buoy] for 
harbouring the outlawed Earl of Desmond, and sold to the said Lord. 
Redmond, in some time after, claimed the property, and obliged O'Brien 
to fly for his life to the county of Clare, and there remain till death. His 
great-grandson, William, returned and recovered the lands, the title deeds 
being preserved by the faithful fosterer sewed up in her cloths . . . 
Mortagh, Morris, David, William." In that account the names Morris, 
David, William, are right, but Mortagh ought be Teige ; and Redmond 
buoy Barry was not a predecessor of Teige, but a contemporary of David 
and William, and was supplanted by William. An inquisition taken at 
the King's Old Castle, in the city of Cork, on the 27th of July, 1627, says 
that Morris MacTeige O'Brien died seized of Killnacurra on the 2nd of 
November, 1553; that his son and next heir, David fitzMorris, then of 
full age, and married, entered into the premisses immediately on the 
death of the said Morris, and bemg thence seized of a fee, died on the 3rd 
of May, 1602 ; and that William is his son and heir, and was eighteen 
years old and unmarried at the time of his father's death." Among other 
discrepancies, that inquisition ignores Redmond buoy Barry, who was ol 
Killnacurra in 1601, according to fiants of Elizabeth, and again in 161 1- 
161 7 according to pleadings in a chancery suit between him and William 
O'Brien in tlie years 161 5-7. 

William O'Brien there pleads that, about the year 1565, Killnicurry 
was taken from his grandfather, Morris MacTeige, by James Viscount 
Buttevant, and in 16 14 was restored to William himself by David Vis- 
count Buttevant, but subject to a seven years' lease to Redmond buoy 
Barrie. On the 21st of May, 161 7, William O'Brien gained a chancery 
suit for possession against Redmond buoy Barry, and that Redmond's 
son, James fitzRedmond Barry. The present writer was told by the late 
Cornelius O'Brien that a suit by his ancestor, William O'Brien, against 
David fitzDavid Oge Viscount Buttevant was left to the arbitration of 
the Earl of Cork and the Viscount Roche. Under their award, William 
O'Brien was in possession of Kilcor in 1622. 

The woods of Kilcor, in which Redmond buoy Barrie had sheltered 
James fitzThomas, the last rebel Earl of Desmond, in 1601, were well 
thinned in 161 1. At page 194, "Calendar Carew MSS.," 1603-1624, is : 
"A note of all such trees as are marked in the counties of Cork and 
Waterford for his Majesty's shipping by John Povey, ship carpenter, from 
the 4th of August, 161 1, to the loth of September following"; and in it 
tliis item : " In the Lord Barrie's [woods] of Killecurr, goo [trees]." 

The following are extracts from the enrolled chancery decree of the 
2 1st May, 161 7, in Roll 2, 3 James I. 

A memorandum that, whereas a complaint was exhibited unto the 



172 BARRYMORE. 

Honourable Courte of Chancery before the Most Hon. Lord Chancellor 
and Courte by William O'Brien, plaintiff, against Redmond Boy Barrie 
and other defendants, the tenor of which bill and all others the pleadings 
is. . . Your suppliant, William O'Brien, of Ballymaccow, in ihe county of 
Corke, gentleman, saith that, whereas your said suppliant's grandfather, 
Morris MacTeige O'Brien, of Killincurry, in the said county, deceased, in 
his lifetyme was seized in his demeasne as of ffee of the two ploughlands 
in Killnicurry aforesaid by descent from his ancestors, who were seized 
thereof in their demeasne as of ffee tyme out of mynde, and the com- 
plainant's said grandfather being so seized, about fifty years since, one 
John Barrie, then constable to the Right Hon. James Lord Barrie, came 
with force and violence to Killincurry aforesaid, and beying there did 
forceably and violently expulse and throw out your suppliant's said 
grandfather out of the possession of the premisses to the use of the said 
James Lord Barrie under coullor of a pretended tytle, that the said Lord 
Barrie did claime there out. and soone after the complainant's said grand- 
father died, and his sonne and heire, David O'Brien, who was father to 
this complainant, being but two years of age at the tiyme of his said 
father's death, made claime to the said lands within a year before the 
death of the said James Lord Barrie ; but yet in regard that he was verie 
yong, and by reason of the heat of the continual warrs in that part at that 
tyme, could never procede in any legal course to come by his said right, 
and soe died about twelve years since ; and then after his discease your 
suppliant being son and heir apparente unto his said late deceased father, 
who was but fourteen years at the tyme of his said father's death, made 
claime to the said two ploughlands by descent from the said Lord Barrie 
to prove and testify his right and title to the said two ploughlands of 
Kilnicurry aforesaid, whereupon the said Lord Barrie being well .... 
by the said testimoniall of witnesses, by his owne knowledge of the 
complainant's right, in discharge of his own conscience did, about June 
last, deliver the peaceable possession of the said lands unto your sup- 
pliant, and likewise did confess and by witnesses did certifie under his 
hand and scale that he had no right to the premisses, but that the right 
thereof is in your suppliant as aforesaid, as it may appear by the said 
Lord Barrie's acknowledgment, under his hand and scale, bearing date 
the 1 8th daie of June, anno 1614, to that effecte. Yet, nothwithstanding 
the said acknowledgment soe it is. Right Honourable, that one Redmond 
Boy Barrie and James fitzRedmond Barrie, sonne to the said Redmond, ot 
lUainasbuig [i.e., Bishop's Island], m the said county of Cork, gentlemen ; 
Teige O'Helie, William O'Clongonie Conor .... Feardoroghy 
O'Donnell, Donnell MacWilliam, Conhor O'Donnaghy, tenants to the 
said Redmond, and James, of the premisses, pretending some title for a 



feARRYMORE. I 73 

fewe years yet to come from the said Lord Barrie, did afterwards with 
the hke force and violence dispossess your complainant out of the said 
two ploughlands of Killnicurry aforesaid, and most wrongfully and con- 
trarie to all law, equity, and justice doth detayne and keep the same from 
your suppliant to his great prejudice and disinheritance. Now, forasmuch 
as your suppliant hath no indefference of jurors in the said countie of 
Corke wheareby he might bring his actione against the said defendants 
at common law for the premisses by reason of the countenance and 
alliance of the said defendants, and your suppliant's wante of means and 
favoure, and that he hath no witnesses nowe living to prove his title, but 
hopeth the defendants will confess to the same upon their oathes, wheare- 
fore your suppliant humbly praieth that your Lordship would be pleased 
to graunt his Majesty's most gracious writt of subpena to be directed to 
the said defendants requiring them theareby under a certaine paine 
thearein to be lymited and at a certain date to appeare before your Lord- 
ship in the high courte of Chancerie to answer the premisses, and then and 
theare your Lordship to take such further order thearein for your sup- 
pliant's relief such as to your Lordship shall be thought meete, and he 
shall praie. 

The answeare of James fitzRedmond Barrie, one of the defendants, 
to the bill of complainte of William O'Brien, of Ballimacowe, complain- 
ante. The said defendant takeing at all tymes all advantages of excep- 
cons to the manifold defects of the said bill, for answeare saith — that the 
Right Honourable David Lord Barrie, Viscounte Buttevante ; Andrew 
Barrett, of Ballinwillin, in the countie of Corke, gent, and George Meagh, 
of RahindufTe, in the said county, gent., by their deede indented bearing- 
date the first daie of April, in the 9th yeare of the raigne of our sover- 
aigne Lord King James of England, Ff ranee, and Ireland, betwixt the 
said Right Honourable David Lord Barrie, Viscounte Buttevante; 
Andrewe Barrett, of Ballincolley, and George Meagh, of Rahinduffe, of 
th' one parte, and Redmond Boy Barrie, of Killnicurrie, in the said countye, 
gent, of th' other parte, for diverse consideracons did demise, graunte, and 
to fearme, let unto the said Redmond Barrie the two ploughlands in Kill- 
incurrie, in the bill mentioned by the name of all that the fowneland, 
meddows, pastures, fleedings, boggs, moores, woods, etc., conteymng by 
estimation two ploughlands, for the tearme of seaven yeares from the 
feaste of the Annunciation of the Blessed Ladie the Virgin Marie last 
past before the date of the said deede, with a general covenante of the 
said Right Hone. Lord Barrie to warrant and defend the premisses unto 
the said Redmond and his assigns against all manner of persons what- 
soever as by the said deede, amongst other things more fullie doth and 
maie appear by virtue wheareof the said Redmond Barrye entered and 



174 BARRYMORE. 

was possessed, and this defendant and thother defendants by the com- 
mande or under the interest of the said Redmond Barrie did enter and 
occupy the said two ploulands in Killnicurrie in the bill mentioned, and 
this defendante saith that an agreement between the Lord Barrie and the 
complayneant since that makeing of the said lease ought not to impeach 
the said Redmond's estate, nor of this defendant and the rest of the 
defendants claymeing under the said Redmond. And this defendant 
saith that neither the said Redmond, nor this defendant, nor the other 
defendants did make anie such forceable entrie uppon the plaintiff's 
possessione as in the bill is set forth, but contynued theire possessione 
under the said demise. And as to the plaintiff's title made to the said 
two plowlands, and to the proofes and witnesses by him broght before 
the said Lord Barrie for the maintenence of the plaintiff's right, and as to 
the said Lord Barrie's certificate under his hand and seale, that he, the 
said Lord Barrie, had no right in the said two plowlands, but that the 
right thereof was in the complainant. This defendant saith that he hath 
credible heard and doubteth not but will so appeare unto this Honourable 
Courte that the same was cunningly obtained in the extremeatie of the 
said Lord Barrie's sickness, and which he, the said Lord Barrie, hath 
since for that disclaymed and disavowed. But the said Redmond Barrie 
claymeth in the said two plowlands but an estate for yeares as aforesaid, 
and therefore neither he, the said Redmond, nor this defendant can move 
without the aide of the said Right Hon. the Lord Barrie, Andrew Barrett, 
and George Meagh, the lessors, in whom the freehold is, make answeare 
to the tytle the complayneant in his bill setteth forth, and therefore this 
defendante doth most humblie praie that before he be compelled to make 
further answeare he may have . ... or process directed to the said 
Right Hon. the Lord Barrie, Andrew Barrett, and George Meagh, com- 
manding to aide hym in his answeare to the plaintiff's title, or that the 
plaintiff since that hee claimes an estate of inheritance in the said plow- 
lands may either commence his suite in this Honourable Court against 
the fforeholders of the same, or bring his action at Common Law against 
the Defendants, etc., etc. And this defendant saith that all the other 
defendants other than the said Redmond and James are poore husband- 
men and under-tenants and dwell well neare an hunderth myles from Dublin, 
and thearefore doth humblie praie that this defendant's accsione male be 
accepted for them all, and this defendant will undertake that whatsoever 
this Honourable Courte shall order or decree concerninge this possessione 
of the said two plowlands in Killnicurrie that thother defendants shall 
as absolutely submitt themselves thereinto as if they had put in their 
answeare, and he shall praie, etc. . . . May, 1615. The sherife of 
the county of Corke haveing the attachment to serve upon the defendants, 



barryMore. 1)75 

they understanding of it hid themselves in a castle for seaven daies, and 
being watched by some of the sherife's officers the[y] escaped secretlie 
thearhence, wheareby the attachment could not be served, all which the 
sherife returned to the courte, wheareuppon a 28 day of June, 161 5, it 
was ordered that a commission, etc., etc. 

. . . . The late Lord Barrie, under whom the defendants claime 
upon complaint made unto him some three yeares nowe neere past, did 
for the better satisfactione of his conscience examine divers good, aun- 
cient witnesses in concerning the plaintiff's right, whoe all acknowledged 
the same to be good, and theareuppon the late Lord Barrie makeing recit- 
all theareof and howe he was moven in conscience for the wrong don to 
the plaintiff did by his deed dulie perfected, bearing date the xviith of 
June, 1 61 4, give, graunte, release, and quite claime the said lands to the 
plaintiff and his heires to be held of his manner of Castlelyons by a 
certaine rent as formerlie they weare, which examinations of the title and 
perfectinge of the deede we kno were well testified to be at such tyme 
as the Lord Barrie was in perfecte sence and memorie. The Lord Chan- 
cellor and Courte doe order, adjudge, and decree that the plamtiff shall 
recover and hould the said two plowlands of Killnicurrie to him and to liis 
heires sondery the rents and ministracons contained in the late Lord 
Barrie's deede until the same shall be evicted by due course of Law from 
him. And that the nowe defendants should paie unto the plaintiff the 
sunmie of tenn pounds sterling costs at the King's Courts, the one and 
twentieth day of Maie, one thousand six hundred and seventeen. — 
Thomas Jones, A.B., L. Ch. 

When that decree was given Redmond buoy Barry was sixty-five 
years of age or more. James fitzRedmond Barry, son and heir of Red- 
mond Bwy Barry, had a royal pardon on the 2gth of May, 1601, as James 
fitzEdmond Buoy Barry, of Killynicurrie. He was not a party to the 
seven years' lease of Kilcor to his father in 161 1, yet he was a co-de- 
fendant with his father in the chancery suit for possession of Kilcor in 
1615-1617, as if between the years 161 1 and 161 5 he had got some 
marriage provision out of Kilcor. In 161 5- 161 7, he and his father resided 
at Illainasbuig, that is, Bishop's Island, near Watergrasshill. They were 
not owners in fee simple there, or soon ceased to be so. In 1641, William 
Barry, of Tignegeragh, was owner of Tignegeragh, Bishop's Island, and 
Barnettstown ; and, in 1661, the claim of William Barry, of the city of 
Cork, gentleman, states that " his father, David Barry, was seized in his 
demesne of fee of and in theploughlandsof Barnardstown, Bishop's Island, 
Tignegeragh, Ardnagihy, and Tornogue (now Mount Catherine), and 
died thereof so seized about forty years since, by and after whose death 
the premisses descended and came to the claymant as sonne and heyre 



176 BARRYMORE. 

to the said David." — Decrees of Innocence VIIl., ig. Bishop's Island, 
Tignegeragh, Ardnagihy, and Barnettstown were decreed to William 
Barry and Thomas Mitchel ; Tornogue was granted to the Duke of York. 

After A.D. 161 7, James fitzRedmond Bwy Barry is not mentioned m 
state documents seen by this waiter, unless he were the "James Barry, of 
the barony of Barrymore, against whom John Grady, of Cork, on the 27th 
of May, 1654, deposed that he, John Grady, was taking provisions to the 
Irish, and hath often seen the said Barry in arms in the year aforesaid" 
[i.e., A.D. 1 641]. According to trustworthy tradition, James fitzRedmond 
Bwy Barry, of Bishop's Island, in A.D. 161 7, was father of Edmond fitz- 
James Barry, who was of DunduUerick in 1660-1665, and whose senior 
representative in the male line is the present Pierce Barry, of DunduU- 
erick, gent, eldest surviving son of Edmond Barry, of DunduUerick, gent., 
eldest son of David Barry, of DunduUerick, gent., fourth son of Edmond 
fitzGarrett Barr}^ of DunduUerick and Carrigtw^ohill, gent., elder son of 
Garrett Barry, of DunduUerick, gent., elder son of Thomas Barry, of Dun- 
duUerick, son and successor of the said Edmond htzjames Barry, of Dun- 
duUerick in 1 660- 1 665. The present writer was told by his paternal 
aunt, Mary Anne. Dwyer, that our family resided for a while at Bishop's 
Island before going to DunduUerick. 

The present writer often heard his father repeat his pedigree, thus : — 
Edmond Barry, of Birch Hill and Midleton, eldest son of James Barry, 
of Birch Hill and Ahanisk, sixth son of Edmond Barry, of DunduUerick 
and Carrigtwohill, elder son of Garrett of DunduUerick, elder son of 
Thomas of DunduUerick, son of Edmond of DunduUerick, son of James, 
son of Redmond of Kilcor, a younger son of Barry of Rahanisky, who was 
of the same branch as the Earls of Barrymore. In the present writer's 
own hearing his father, born A.D. i/QO, often mentioned the expulsion of 
his ancestor, Redmond, from Kilcor, and for the last time so mentioned it 
at Castle Redmond, on the evening before his own cieparture for America 
in April, 1848. Then and there he passed from the subject of Castle 
Redmond to the subject of his ancestor Redmonci's castle at Kilcor ; 
and in answer to me he described Kilcor as being near Castlelyons, and 
my cousin, Maurice Fitzgerald, interjected that Kilcor was Cornelius 
O'Brien's place. In further reply to me, Maurice Fitzgerald said that 
Cornelius O'Brien knew well that our ancestor, Redmond, had owned 
Kilcor, and that when Cornelius O'Brien complained of being harshly 
treated about tithes by William Fitzgerald, of Castlelyons, who was my 
second cousin, Mr. Pyne, of Ballyvollane, retorted that the Barries, ances- 
tors of William Fitzgerald, had preceded the O'Brien's at Kilcor. 

In or about the year 1880, at Athenian Terrace, Oueenstown, where 
he then lived, the said Cornelius O'Brien, Esq., J. P., asked me had I 



BARRYMORE. I 77 

never heard that the Barries possessed Kilcor for a time. I answered, 
evasively, that very Hkely as Kilcor is in the heart of Barries' country it 
at some time was possessed by Barries. "That is not what is meant," 
said he ; " did you never hear of Redmond Bwy Barry ?" " I know," 
said I, " that Brighid na Seanchas says, in her pedigree of the O'Briens 
of Kilcor, that Redmond Buoy Barry forfeited Kilcor for having harboured 
an outlawed Earl of Desmond, and afterwards retook possession of it." 
"He was an ancestor of yours," said he; "he was one of the Rahanisky 
Barries." Mr. O'Brien's knowledge of his own family's history was ex- 
tensive and exact, and his family papers down from the year 1620 were 
abundant. His wife's grandmother was Dora Barry, daughter of Edmond 
Barr)-, of Dundullerick and CarrigtwohiU. Long before Mr. O'Brien's 
death, on the 29th of January, 1884, at the age of eighty years, his 
Kilcor estate had been put into chancery by his maternal uncle. Sir 
Richard O'Connor, knt., son of Sir Patrick O'Connor, knt. The follow- 
in chancery order shews the extent of the O'Brien estates in A.D. 1666 : — 

In Chancer}^ the i,*"th day of March, 1843. In the matter of John 
O'Connor, Esq., and Sir Richard O'Connor, petitioners ; Cornelius 
O'Brien, Esq., respondent. Upon motion of Mr. Reeves, solicitor for 
Edward Barry, Esq., the Receiver appointed in this matter, etc. It is 
ordered by the court that the several tenants of the lands and premises 
following, that is to say, the towns, villages, hamlets, lands, and fields of 
Coylnacurra, now called Kilcor, Ballyhamsery, Skeahanagh, Cooliquane, 
Waylstownmore, Cottstown, Knockanganniv, and Glanewillen, Elforts- 
town, and Meawlcosgrane, situate in the barony of Barrymore, and county 
of Cork in this matter mentioned, do pay their rents, etc., unto the said 
Edward Barry, the Receiver in this matter, etc. Robert Long, A.R. 

InAugust, 1863, Garrett Standish Barry, of Leamlara, Esq., J. P., D.L., 
and ex-M.P., wrote a letter in commendation of my brother, James Barry, 
M.D., then about entering her (late) Majesty's army medical department, 
and therein styled my brother his cousin. On that occasion my mother 
asked Garrett Standish Barry: "are the Barries of Lemlara and of 
Dundullerick all one branch of the Barries?" and he replied: "I always 
understood that your husband's family claimed descent from the Barries 
of Rahanisky." In truth, in the luale lines, the Rahanisky and Leamlara 
families are distinct as far back as the fourteenth century, though other- 
wise variously connected. 

In the summer of 1857, in driving through Rathcormac with my 
father's first cousin, Edmond Barry of Dundullerick, born A.D. 1794, 
I asked him whether we were related to the MacAdam Barries, Lords 
of the Manor of Rathcormac, except through our intermarriages 
with the Ballinahina branch of the MacAdam Barries. Much to my 



17^ BARRYMORE. 

chagrin he reph'ed, " the Barries of Rathcormac were an ancient 
legitimate branch of the Barries, but the Earls of Barrymore and 
we are said to be descended from a bastard." At first, I was 
shocked at that allegation, but afterwards I saw that it might be a 
clue to the precise origin of the Dundullenck line, and I hoped to find it 
explained in state papers, in so far at least as it affected the line of the 
Earls of Barrymore. Of people then living the most likely to know 
accurately the ground for that allegation was my uncle, James Cotter. 
His ancestors were celebrated Gaelic poets. His father was agent to 
both the Earl of Barrymore and Lord Riversdale. His mother, born 
[766, died 1833, married, secondly, a son of Edmond Barry, of Dun- 
dullerick and Carrigtwohill, and his mother's sister, Margaret, and first 
cousin, Elonoria, also married sons of that Edmond Barry. His own wife 
was Penelope, daughter of Thomas Barry, Esq., M.D., of Maghera, Castle- 
lyons, whose grandfather was a younger son of Thomas Barry, of Dun- 
dullerick, gent., fl. A.D. 1685. He himself was born in 1784, was well 
educated, was clerk of the Midleton Union from its creation down to his 
superannuation. He was consulted by Barrys and Coppingers about 
their pedigrees, was employed by them to copy and explain seventeenth 
century Latin legal documents, had access to ancient wills in the Bishop's 
Court at Cloyne, and was of good memory and understanding down to his 
death in 1867. Finding him reticent on genealogical matters, I thought 
it best to get what I wanted from him through his eldest son, David 
Cotter, my first cousin and godfather. I, therefore, asked David Cotter, 
as half a Barry himself, to aid me to elucidate the origin of our branch of 
the Barry family, and not to give me his own impressions just then, but 
fi.rst to carefully question his father regarding the legitimacy or illegiti- 
macy of him from whom the Barrys of Dundullerick and the Earls of 
Barrymore branched off. David Cotter looked grave then, and graver a 
week afterwards, when telling me, in my mother's back parlour, " that a 
Lord of Ibav/ne in Carberry married a second wife in the lifetime of the 
first, and was ancestor of the Earls of Barrymore by the first wife, and of 
us by the second ; that the descendants of the second wife were over- 
thrown in battle by the descendants of the first wife ; that an officer, a 
real lord, descended from the second wife escaped from the battle, married 
a sister of Barry of Lemlara, and departed leaving children, who were 
reared at Lemlara, and afterwards lived at Rahanisky ; that from the 
eldest of these were descended the later Barries of Rahanisky, and from 
another the Barries of Dundullerick ; that only through that Miss Barry 
of Lemlara were the Barries of Dundullerick descended from the Barries 
of Lemlara ; and that her younger son, from whom are the Dundullerick 
Barries, possessed Kilcor for a time. David Cotter had much to tell 



BARRYMORE. 1 79 

about the later Barries of Rahanisky ; but he could not or would not say 
whereto the officer went leaving his children at Lemlara. 

In 1836, David Howard of Lackabehy, then over ninety years old, 
told the writer's mother that one of the first of our Barries in that neigh- 
bourhood was murdered in Ballinaclashy Glen, between Lemlara and 
Midleton. In my bo}'hood I heard the same from many. The Barry 
murdered at Ballinaclashy was Richard fitzDavid Barry Roe rather than 
his younger brother, David. They both were murdered by the contriv- 
ance of their first cousin, James fitzRichard, Viscount Buttevant, and died 
without issue, according to Florence McCarthy, writing in A.D. 1595 to 
Lord Burleigh. But though Richard fitzDavid nowhere appears after the 
year 1556, David fitzDavid reappears as David Oge Barry, of Bakyn Rea, 
in a fiant dated 30 Sept., 1574, and as David Oge Barry, of Rathnysky, 
in a fiant dated 12 Sept., 1577; and David fitzDavid's posterity appear 
in many documents. It looks as if the m.urder of Richard fitzDavid at 
Ballinaclashy occasioned the precipitate flight of his brother, David fitz- 
David, from Lemlara, and a long concealment of David fitzDavid's 
identity in Muskry, or in Barry Oge's country, and of his children's 
identity at Lemlara. The actual murder of the childless brother, and the 
long concealment of the other and of his children, may ha.ve led outsiders 
for a while to the belief voiced by Florence McCarthy that both had died 
childless and by violence. For subsequent silence, or rather passiveness, 
the reward was Rahanisky. Down, however, into this century a tradition 
had adhered to the Barries of Dundullerick that their descent is from a 
bigamous Lord of Ibawne through his second wife, while the descent of 
the Earls of Barrymore is from that lord through his first wife. That 
tradition with the assumption in course of time that the first was the 
lawful marriage, ascribed to the Dundullerick Barries an origin unnatural 
for them to invent, or boast of, and which they would willingly have 
forgotten had not others kept its memory alive in sport or malice or as a 
curious historical incident. 

Down into this century, senchaidhes or professional genealogists 
flourished in the South of Ireland. One of these in the barony of Barry- 
more was a Mrs. Bridget Fitzgerald, called in Gaelic Brighid na Senchas, 
"Bridget of the Histories," who died, aged ninety years, in A.D. 1808. 
On the 16th of August, 1896, and again in December, 1898, Philip W. 
Creagh, Esq., J.P., told the writer that Mr. Creagh's mother, "who was 
not married until A.D. 181 8, remembered Brighid na Senchas, who had a 
gold-headed walking stick, and used go about to the houses of the 
gentry." According to David Cotter and others, an Earl of Barrymore 
once entered Bridget's house at Loughaphreaghaun, between Castlelyons 
and Rathcormac, to ascertain from her own lips that she held his descent 



l8o BARRYMORE. 

less honourable than that of some others of the Barries. When leaving, 
the Earl said : " have the honour, but I'll have the land," and forthwith 
he deprived her of her farm. David Cotter alleged Brighid na Senchas 
as an authority for his father's version of the co-origin of the Earls of 
Barrymore and the Barries of Dundullerick. 

For two generations or more Bridget's descendants v^-erc genealo- 
gists, and professed, no doubt truly, to possess genealogies taken down 
from the lips of Bridget during her last illness. Her genealogical know- 
ledge of the leading families in the neighbourhood was immense, but 
being wholly traditional, it was inaccurate regarding remote events, in 
some proportion perhaps to their remoteness. Besides, genealogies com- 
mitted to writing from her dictation in her last illness, at the age of 
ninety, almost necessarily were inaccurate. 

In i86g, the present writer noted down the following words of John 
Barry, of Carrigtwohill, Esq., M.D., born A.D. 1801, son of William Barry, 
of Rockville, Carrigtwohill, gent, born A.D. 1757, fifth son of Edmond 
fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and Carrigtwohill, gent., born circ. 
A.D. 1 71 2: "When I was about ten years of age, one Sunday as usual 
at my father's house at Rockville there was a large company. Among 
others, Standish Barry, of Lemlara ; William Coppinger, of Barry's 
Court ; and James Fitzgerald, of Cork, were there. Fitzgerald was 
called the Tractor, from a surveying instrument he had invented. He 
was a son of the celebrated Brighid na Senchas, and had been brought 
down from Cork by Wilham Coppinger to keep down the pride of 
Standish Barry. Fitzgerald shewed that the Lemlara family was junior 
to the Dundullerick family." In doing so, Fitzgerald had to trace the Dun- 
dullerick family back to the bigamous, and in the eyes of the company 
infamous, Lord of Ibawne, the source no doubt to which Fitzgerald's 
mother had traced the Earl to the Earl's grief and to her own loss. 
William Coppinger's object may have been to humiliate Dr. John Barry's 
father and uncles by parading their Ibawne descent, or in that descent 
to implicate Standish Barry, who was not of it, but was thought to be of it, 
at least by the Fitzgerald who wrote the following paragraph in a pedi- 
gree of the MacAdam Barries, "taken down from Bridget Fitzgerald, 
alias Barry, in her last illness, in the year 1 808 " : — " Richard Barry, the 
ancestor of the families of Lemlary, Ballyvolane^ Rahanisky, etc., arrived 
three hundred years after the conquest." That paragraph is a pile of 
blunders. There was no Richard in the Lemlara line in or about three 
hundred years after the Anglo-Norman conquest of Ireland. The 
Richard Barry who, with his Brother, David, arrived m Barrymore from 
Ibawne between three and four hundred years after that conquest, was 
an ancestor neither of the Barries of Lemlara nor of the Barries of 



BARRYMORE. l8l 

Rahanisky. It was tliat Richard's brother, David, that acquired Rahan- 
isky for himself and his posterity. Also the late Cornelius O'Brien, Esq., 
of Kilcor, which adjoins Ballyvolane and Ballyroberts, told the present 
writer that the Barries of Ballyvolane were not of near common descent 
with the Barries of Ra.hanisky, and that in the above-quoted paragraph 
the word Ballyvolane appears by mistake for Ballyroberts, which be- 
longed to the Barries of Rahanisky, and adjoined the Ballyvolane estate. 
Similarly, perhaps, Lemlara appears there by mistake for Dundullerick, 
by a lapsus linguae of a dying woman 90 years old, through the Barries 
of Lemlara and Dundullerick being cousins, and their estates being con- 
tiguous. 

On the 3rd of April, 1636, an inquisition at the King's Old Castle, 
Cork, found that on the 21st ciay of August, 1609, David fitz James, 
Viscount Buttevant, alienated Dundullerick — one ploughland to Shane 
MacOwen MacEgan and Boylagh MacEgan, who alienated the same in 
the time of King James L to P-ichard, first Earl of Cork, and his heirs 
and assigns. This and other lands similarly acquired in the barony of 
Barrymore by Richard, first Earl of Cork, were conveyed by him to his 
son-in-]aw^ David, first Earl of Barrymore. Dundullerick is among the 
lands included in a deed of settlement executed on the 24th of February, 
1682, at the intermarriage of Katherine, daughter of Richard Lord 
Santry, and Lawrence Lord Buttevant, afterwards Earl of Barrymore. 

At the sale of the Barrymore estates in 1807, Dundullerick, Bally- 
sallagh, Fontarabia, Loughcat, and part of Gurtnamuckey were purchased 
from John Anderson by Richard Barry, J. P., youngest son of Edmond 
Barry, of Dundullerick and Carrigtwohill, eldest son of Garrett Barry, of 
Dundullerick, eldest son of Thomas Barry of Dundullerick, son and suc- 
cessor of Edmond fitz James Barry, who' was of Dundullerick in 1660- 1665. 
The present writer was told on the 22nd of February, 1872, by a Mr. 
Barry, postmaster at Carrigtwohill, and grandson of a famous Gaelic 
poet, David Barry, of Woodstock, that Garrett, father of Edmond Barry, 
of Dundullerick and Carrigtwohill, acquired Dundullerick by marriage 
with a Joan Egan. But neither of that Garrett's wives, nor his father's wile 
was an Egan, but his grandfatlier's wife may have been so. That, if true, 
would mean that betv/een 161 7 and 1660 the first of the Barries to occupy 
Dundullerick was not Redmond Bwy, nor his son, James fitzRedmond 
Bwy, but Redmond Bwy's grandson, Edmond fitz James. The west 
quarter of Dundullerick is called Scrahan, and possibly, but not probably, 
is the place mentioned in the following summary of one of the deposi- 
tions at Trinity College: — No. 2142. John Peters, of Ballinaltig, in the 
parish of Castlelyons, on the 20 A-ugust, 1642, deposed to having been 



Io2 BARRYMORE. 

robbed by Walter Spencer, of Ballinaltig, husbandman, a servant of 
Barry of the Scrahane, and formerly a Protestant. 

The will of Edmond Cotter of Ballinspery, dated 15th August, 1660, 
and proved the 5th of June, 1661, says : "Item. I appoint, ordain, and 
authorize my well-beloved cozins, Edmond fitzjames Barry, of Dondo- 
lericke, gentleman ; Edmond fitzjohn Barry, of Ballynihuboirth, gentle- 
man ; and Thomas Fforrest, of Dongorney, yeoman, to be overseers of 
this my last will and testament, and to act everything therein belonging 
tc overseers m that nature." 

The will mentions the testator's wife ; sons — Garrett, James, John, 
Ned, and William ; daughters— Gate, Ellice, Ellen, Mary, and Ann ; 
grandson, Edmond Barry ; niece, Ellen Burke ; leaseholds — Ballyvillone, 
Lishiniskie, Ballyheatrick, Goolknidane, Bridgeland, Ballinspery, and house 
and park in Carrigtwohill. Edmond Gotter's mother was Elizabeth, 
daughter of a Garrett Barry. Edmond Gotter's son. Sir James Gotter, 
knt, ancestor of the baronets, challenged and slew in the Low Countries 
the Scotch general, Leslie, who had sold King Gharles I. to Gromwell. 
In July, 1863, Garrett Standish Barry, of Lemlara, J.P., D.L., told the 
writer's mother, and she me, that Edmond Gotter, of Ballinspery (now 
Annsgrove, Garrigtwohill), was akin to the Barries of Lemlara. In A.D. 
1 843 -1 848, the present writer frequently heard his father discussing the 
cousinship of Edmond Gotter, of Ballinsperigh, to our ancestor, Edmond 
fitzjames Barry of DunduUerick, and mentioning that his attention had 
been directed to the above passage from Edmond Gotter's will by a Rev. 
Mr. Gotter, of the Rockforrest family. In A.D. 1885, the late Mr. Patrick 
Hickey, of Ardnageehy, told the present writer that the Barries of Bally- 
nabortagh were a branch of the DunduUerick Barries. 

Edmond fitzjames Barry's son and successor was Thomas Barry, of 
DunduUerick, gent, who is mentioned under the year 1684 in a summary 
by Gh. M. Barry, thus : " David Barrv', gent, took a lease of the lands of 
Pluckanes, in the barony of Barretts, from Peregrine Spencer, Esq. 
Gattle distrained by other parties. Matter in dispute referred to the " final 
doome and judgment of Thomas Barry, of Dundolericke, and Pierce 
Power, of Glonmult gentlemen." Thomas Barry, of DunduUerick, is 
also mentioned in the MacAdam pedigree by Brighid na Senchas, thus : 
" John Barry, or Sean an truis, had issue, Richard, of Kilshannig ; John, 

of Gurraghprevin ; and James, of Lisnegar Richard, of Kilshanick, 

was married to Elizabeth Barry, of Annagh, by whom he had Edmond 
and James. Edmond was the father of Thomas Barry, of Tignegeragh, 

and of Redmond Barry, of Ardnageehy. James was married to 

Goold ; their son, Philip, was married to Ellen Fitzgerald, niece of 
Thomas Barry of DunduUerick ; their son Garrett [ot Ballinahina] was 



BARRYMORE. 1 83 

married to Ellen Galway ; their son Philip [of Ballinahina] was married to 
Mary Barry, of Dundullerick, and secondly, to Mary Rouan. It may be 
added that Mary Anne, daughter of Philip Barry, and his first wife, Mary 
Barry, of Dundullerick, was mother of Philip W. Creagh, J. P., now of 
Dundullerick, whose wife was Anna Maria, daughter and eventually 
heiress of James William Barry, of Dundullerick. 

Thomas Barry, of Dundullerick, married a daughter of Ludovick 
O'Cahill, of Ballyvodock Castle, gent., eldest son of Daniel Duff O'Cahill, 
of Rathgobane Castle, gent. There is an allusiort to that marriage in a 
stray paragraph of Brighid na Senchas' pedigree of the Barrys of Lem- 
lara : [The wife of Garrett fitzjohn fitzGarrett Barry, of Lemlara, gent.] 
" Ellen O'Cahill was the daughter of Ellen McCarthy, daughter of 
Charles McCarthy, who was general under Charles II. He left his 
daughter, the said Ellen, with a large fortune in trust with Richard Earl 
of Barrymore, who kept the fortune and gave her in marriage to Daniel 
O'Cahill with the lands of Ragubbane only, on which the said Daniel 
built a castle. Ellen McCarthy's mother was Ellen Barry, daughter to 
Richard Barry, of Ballinaltig, whose estate was eighteen ploughlands in 
the parish of Gortroe and ten in the parish of Ballinaltig. Said Richard's 
father was a Lord Barrymore, and his mother was the Earl of Desmond's 
daughter. Daniel O'Cahill's son was Ludawick, whose daughter was 
the grandmother of Edmond Barry, late of Carrigtwohill." As Brighid 
na Senchas relied wholly on oral tradition, knew little of general history, 
knew nothing of state papers, she naturally was inaccurate regarding 
distant events. Richard Barry, of Ballinaltig, was only remotely de- 
scended from a Lord Barrymore and an Earl of Desmond's daughter. 
Rathgobbane passed by purchase to Daniel O'Cahill, not from Richard 
Earl of Barrymore but from that Richard's great-grandfather, David 
fitz James Viscount Buttevant. Daniel O'Cahill's father-in-law flourished 
in the reign not of Charles II. but of Elizabeth. James Barry, of Lisne- 
gar was not son but grandson of John Barry, alias Sean an truis. 

Similar exception cannot be taken to vv'hat she says regarding her 
own contemporary, Edmond fitzGarrett fitzThomas Barry of Dundullerick, 
gent, who, after his father's death, resided at Carrigtv>'ohill but occupied 
Dundullerick East. He was born circ. 171 2, and his will, dated 30th 
March, 1783, was proved in 1884. Brighid na Senchas was born circ. 
1 7 1 8, and died in 1 808. 

The nearest kinship of the Barries of Dundullerick to the Barries of 
Lemlara is through the O'Cahills. Ludovick O'Cahill's sister having 
married Garrett fitzjohn fitzGarrett Barry, of Lemlara, and Ludovick 
O'Cahill's daughter having married Thomas Barry, of Dundullerick. To 
only one other family were the Barries of Dundullerick known of late to 



184 ■ BARRYMOKE. 

be akin through the O'Cahills. On the, 3rd of August, 1871, the writer's 
mother told him that in 1836 his father told her on the occasion of the 
deatli either of Laurence Barry, of Ballyleary, farmer, or of that Laurence 
Barry's wife, that those Barries were related to us through the O'Cahills. 

Daniel Duffe MacCormaic O'Cahill, harper, may have been a nephew 
or other kinsman of Daniel Oge O'Cahill, harper, who purchased from 
David fitzjames Viscount Buttevant Ballyreign. Ballyshangall, Johns- 
town, 23 September, 1585, and Ballymaccarbery on the 14th of January, 
1606. On the 8th of" April, 1656, at Youghal, in the suit of Richard Earl 
of Barrymore against William Bassill, attorney-general, John fitzjames 
fitzGarrett Dowlagh Barry, of Garrane, gent, then very old, deposed 
that he was page of honour to the noble Lord David fitzjames Viscount 
Buttevant, and knew Daniel Duffe O'Cahill, harper to the noble lord, 
from whom he held Rathgobbane. 

An inquisition at the King's Old Castle, Cork, on the 20th of 
September, 1626, says that David, late Viscount Buttevant, being seized 
of the fee of the town and lands of Rathgobbane, one ploughland, on the 
8th day of October, 161 2, in consideration of fifty pounds, feoffed Donell 
MacCormuck O'Cahill therein in perpetuity on conditions of redemption 
after the death of the said Donnell MacCormuck O'Cahill, and re-entry 
twenty-one years after redemption. 

On the 9th September, 162 1, William Hodnett, of Ballyvody, and 
John Hodnett of same, in consideration of £2JQ> feoffed the castle and 
south moiety of Ballyvody to John fitzjames Barry, of Garran Kene- 
fekigg, and Dermott McShane Curtane, of Bishop's Island^ to the use 
of Ludovicke Cahill, son and heir of Daniel O'Cahill, of Rathgobbane, 
for twenty-five years, and thereafter to the use of Daniel O'Cahill till 
redemption. — C. M. Barry. 

Inquisition, King's Old Castle, Cork, 1633 : — Thomas Barry, gent., 
mortgaged two carrucates in Corballie [in the parish of Lisgoold] to 
Daniel Duffe O'Cahill.— Lodge's MS. Records of the Rolls. 

An inquisition taken at the King's Old Castle, Cork, the 3rd of April, 
1639, says that on the 17th of August^ 1633, Cormac [MacDaniel] 
O'Cahill and his son and heir, Cormac Oge O'Cahill, alienated Lackyroe 
and Graige, one ploughland, to Daniel MacCormucke Cahill, of Rath- 
gobbane, in perpetuity in mortgage of ;£^300 ; and that on the 30 of 
Nov., 1637, the said Cormac MacDaniel O'Cahill alienated Ilanemoglassy, 
60 acres, to the said Daniel MacCormack Cahill, of Rathgobbane, in 
perpetuity in mortgage oi £\20; and on the 22 February, 1637, alienated 
Ballyreign, one ploughland, to Ludovic Cahill, of Rathgobane, gent., in 
perpetuity in mortgage of -£121. 

According to the " Down Survey," the lands possessed by Daniel 



BARRYMORE. 1 85 

Duffe O'Cahill in A.D. 1641 were: Rathgobbane, Corbally, Lackenroe, 
Ballyvodock West, Ballyreign, Ballinwinny South, and Killwillane, i.e., 
Killasbugmullane, i.e., Trantstown? — in all about four thousand statute 
acres, together with the impropriate tythes of Templebodan. He and 
his sons, Lodwick, Daniel Oge, and Cormac, are mentioned in depositions 
concerning the rebellion of 1641, and now in the library of Trinity Col- 
lege, Dublin. Lodwick O'Cahill, of Ballinvody, in the barony of Barry- 
more, were sworn to have been in actual arms ; but as an innocent papist 
Daniell Duffe O'Cahill got an estate by transplantation in the county of 
Galway, in substitution for his county Cork estate. Daniel Cahill de 
Ballyregin in a Subsidy Roll for 1663 may have been Daniel, son of 
Daniel Duffe O'Cahill. 

In December, 1664, Daniell Duffe and his eldest son, Lodowick, were 
dead ; Ellen O'Caliill, widow of Daniell Duffe, and her son, Michael 
O'Cahill, were in possession of Rathgobbane, and Daniel, son and heir 
of Lodowick O'Cahill, was at Glannageare with Redmond Fitzgerald, 
and on the 9th December, 1664, Daniell Cahill, of Glannageare, in the 
county of Cork, gent., and Redmond Fitzgerald, of the afforesaid town 
and county, and I'Catherin fitzGerald, alias Spencer, bound themselves to 
Michael Cahill, gent., and Ellen Cahill, relict of Daniell Duffe O'Cahill, 
both of Rathgobbane, under a penalty of i^2,ooo to refer their variances 
and differences concerning the real and personal estate of Daniel Duffe 
O'Cahill, late deceased, to the arbitriment of Captain Morrish Fitzgerald, 
of Inchynicr[an]agh ; Mr. John Roche, of Ballenloghy ; Mr. Garrett 
Barry, of Leamlary ; Mr. John Supple, of Ballenloghy, the umpireship 
thereof to Mr. Morrish Nagle. — Original in writer's possession. 

Therein the necessity for the signature of Catherine Fitzgerald, alias 
Spencer, goes to prove that Redmond Fitzgerald, of Glannageare, near 
Castlemartyr, was her second husband, and that Daniel FitzLodowick 
O'Cahill was her son, through her prior marriage with Lodowick O'Cahill. 
Again, the selection of Morrish Nagle as umpire, and of Garrett Barry 
and one of the Roches as arbitrators, goes to shew that Catherine Fitz- 
gerald, alias Spencer, was a daughter of Syh^anus Spencer, the poet's 
eldest son, whose wife was sister of Morish Nagle, aunt of Garrett Barry, 
and sister-in-law of two of the Roches, and was herself a Roche by her 
mother. Garrett Barry had a further right to interfere, being married 
to Ellen, daughter of Daniell Duffe O'Caliill. Captain Morish Fitz- 
gerald, of Inchynicranagh, alias Castlerichard, was a younger brother of 
Colonel Richard Fitzgerald, of Castlemartyr, near Glannageare, and may 
have been akin to Redmond Fitzgerald, of Glannageare. 

30th May, 1679, Daniell fitzLodowick Cahill, of Rathgobbane, gent., 
discharged to his uncle, Michael Cahill, of Ballyconnell, in the county of 

13 



1 86 BARRYMORE, 

Galway, gent, all challenges concerning the lands of Lackenroe and 
Bailinwinny, and the impropriate tithes of Teniplebodan, and the estate 
set out by transplantation in Connaught to Daniell DufEe Cahill, de- 
ceased, grandfather of the said Daniel FitzLodowick, and concerning 
the agreement made with, or any payment received from, the Earl of 
Barrymore concerning Rathgobbane. This release not to extend to 
Daniell FitzLodowick O'Cahill's title to the inheritance of the plough- 
land of Inishiboy, in the parish of Kilneconta, barony of Kiltarton, and 
county of Galway. — Original in writer's possession. 

In pursuance of an indented deed, dated 30 April, 1690, Daniel Mac- 
Lodowike Cahill, then of Ballyvody, gent, seems to have assigned to 
Michael Cahill, then of Corbally, gent., and his heirs males, Lackenroe, 
South Bailinwinny, and the impropriate tithes of Templebodan. The 
further history of Daniel fitzLodowic O'Cahill, and of his uncle, Michael 
O 'Cahill, is unknown. Their lands were lost to them in the Williamite 
confiscations. 

By his marriage with a daughter of Lodowick O'Cahill, Thomas 
Barry, of Dundullerick, had two sons, Garrett and Thomas. The younger 
of these married a Miss Davis, a Protestant, and had issue David Barry, 
of whom the writer's grandfather used say : " You would think that he 
came from the court of Versailles." — M. A. Dwyer. That David Barry 
resided at "Highland," wrote Henry Barry, of Ballyadam, circ. 1554; at 
" Ballinaltig," said the writer's aunt, M. A. Dwyer, in 1 869. But here 
Highland and Ballinaltig are for Hightown. On or shortly before the 
15th August 1885, Thomas Leahy, grandfather of the present Thomas 
Leahy, of Killamuren, told this writer that Daw Cronovain, that is, David 
of Cronovan, the father of Dr. David Barry, of Maghera, Castlelyons, 
held the three contigxious townlands — Hightown, Ballynoe, and Crono- 
van. Since then I have heard the same from many old people in the 
parish of Gortroe, such as Richard Barry, of Ballinwilling, and John 
Ahern, of Kippane. David Barry, of Hightown, married a Miss Daly. — 
(Henry Barry, 1853; M. A. Dwyer, 1869; James Barry, of Ballyda, 22 
Oct, 1885.) James Barry said to me on that day that "he remembered 
the cutting down of Lackabeha oakwood . in Kilshannig demesne in 1 808, 
and the hanging of the Carawats in 1 8 1 2 ; that he was son of James, son 
of William, son of Richard Barry, all of Ballyready ; that the wife of his 
said great-grandfather Richard was Honora Daly, of Disert in the parish 
of Gortroe, the place where Robert Barry, of Ballinacurra, was born, and 
where Mrs. Quirk lives now ; that his said great-grandmother had three 
sisters — one married to Cotter, then or afterwards of Rathdrum ; :mother 
married to the ancestor of the apothecaries Ned, Tom, etc. ; and the 
third, called Caitlin na Siodoige, " Catherine of the Cake," married to 



BARRYMORE. 1 87 

O'Donoghue, who had a flour mill at Ballinakilla^ and whose son was 
hung on a charge of stealmg a horse from Wilson of Bininagh." Instead 
of "ancestor of the apothecaries Ned, Tom, etc.," James Barry ought 
have said, "father of Dr. Thomas Barry, and of the apothecaries Ned 
and Garrett Jiarry," but being over eighty years old Mr. James Barry 
was not over careful of his phraseology. Mr. Barry added : " my great- 
grandfather, Richard Barry, of Ballyreddy, took a lease of Ballyda, and 
gave a part of it to his brother-in-law, Daly. The lease expired forty 
years ago, and Patrick Daly and my first cousin, Patrick, son of Ned, 
were evicted. Ellen, daughter of said Richard Barry and Honora Daly, 
married a brother of Bishop O'Brien, and was mother of Father Tade 
O'Brien. My uncle Ned married Miss McDermot, daughter of a silver- 
smith. My uncle John married a daughter of John Beg Barry, of Lisne- 
gar, got Knocknabouley, and went abroad to Jamaica, or some such 
place. My uncle Michael married Elizabeth, aunt to Thomas Dennehy, 
the resident magistrate, and to John Dennehy, of Ballynafauna. My 
father lost everything by the failure of Leslie's bank, of which he was 
a shareholder." 

Henry Barry wrote that Miss Daly, wife of David Barry, of Hightown, 
was of Ballisane. I have heard Ballyghssane so pronounced. But the 
Dalys did not live at Ballyglissane, but at Ballyda, adjoining it, and not 
at Ballyda till after Miss Daly's marriage with David Barry. 

By that marriage David Barry, at one time resident at Cronovan, at 
another at Hightown, had four sonst — (i) Thomas Barry, M.D., of 
Machera, Castlelyons ; (2) Garrett Barry, surgeon and apothecary ; (3) 
Edmond Barry, apothecary ; (4) James, who died unmarried. The de- 
scendants of Thomas, Garrett, and Edmond shall here be given after the 
descendants of their second cousins, the sons and daughters of Edmond 
Barry, of Dundullerick and Carrigtwohill. 

Thomas Barry, of Dundullerick, was succeeded by his elder son, 
Garrett Barry, of Dundullerick, gent, who was at law in 171 1 with his 
cousins, the Barretts and Goulds, of Muskry. — Charles M. Barry. 

In 1 719, John Barrett, Esq., of Rahan, leased Lyredane to Charles 
McCarthy, of Pluckanes, gent., for a term of twenty-eight years, at £,\^ 
yearly. Witnesses, Garrett Barry, of Dondolerick ; William Harding, of 
Rogarane ; and Ignatius Goold, of Knockraha. 

The following is a specimen of a Catholic will in the penal times, 
when the first Protestant discoverer could claim all valuable landed 
property acquired by Catholics after the revolution which dethroned 
King James II. The will carefully abstains from disclosing the testator's 
lands : — I do hereby constitute and ordain my well-beloved friend and 
cousin, Mr. Garrett Barry, of Dundullerick, sole executor of all my wordly 



1 88 BARRYMORE. 

substance. Witness my hand and seal this 20th day of March, 1726, 
John Shighan. Witnesses present, James Fitzgerald, Thomas Connell, 
James Desmond, Daniel Funery. — Record Office, Dublin. 

A caveat was entered by Charles MacCarthy, of Lyredane ; Edmond 
Barrett, of Glinn ; and Denis MacCarthy, of Ballimacowe, who alleged 
that John Sheehan having made a journey into the barony of Barrymore 
to recover some leases was taken ill at the house of Garrett Barry, who 
influenced him to make the above-mentioned will. — Henry Barry's papers. 

The caveat was withdrawn in these terms : Whereas, upon the death 
of John Sheehan, gent, lately deceased, we, the undersigned, Charles 
McCarthy, of Lyredane ; Edmund Barrett, of Glin ; and Denis McCarthy, 
of Ballymacowe, in the county of Cork, gentlemen, did enter caveat in 
the Consistory Court of Cloyne against Garrett Barry, of Dundullerick, 
in the barony of Barrymore, and county of Cork, gentleman, executor of 
the last will and testament of the said John Sheehan, and whereas we are 
now fully satisfied that the said Garrett Barry is richly and lawfully justified 
to take out letters of administration to the goods and chattels of the said 
John Sheehan ; we, therefore, the said Charles MacCarthy, Edmund 
Barrett, and Denis McCarthy do hereby remove, release, and relinquish 
all pretensions and demands of us or any of us unto the said caveats and 
any right of administration unto the said John Sheehan, hereby revoking 
all such right and pretensions whatever. In witness whereof we have 
hereto put our hands and seals the ist of November, 1728, Charles 
McCarthy, Den. McCarthy, Em. Barrett, Thomas Barry, Anne McCarthy. 

As the caveat was in the name, first, of Garrett Barry's brother-in-law, 
Charles McCarthy, of Lyredane, John Sheehan seems to have been 
wholly or principally a cousin of Garrett Barry, through Garrett's wife, 

In 1 73 1 Garrett Barry, of Dundullerick, made a tomb for him and 
family beside the tomb of the Lemlara family in Lisgoold graveyard. 
The inscription is : "This tomb was erected in the year 1737 by Garrett 
Barry, Esq., as a burying-place for him and family." On the 17th 
December, 1868, at the burial of Henry Barry, of Ballyadam, Michael 
Barry, of Cork, first cousin to the writer's father, and Maurice Fitzgerald, 
manager Munster Bank, Midleton, the writer's first cousin, impressed 
upon the writer that they had frequently heard, especially from the 
writer's uncle, James Barry, that both families previously buried together, 
and that our family retains the old burial place. I understood from my 
mother that Edmond David Barry, of Dundullerick, told her that Garrett, 
his great-grandfather, moved out from the original burial ground, but 
Edmond Barry's sons, and all others of our branch who have spoken to 
m© on that subject, have had the other impression strongly impressed on 
their minds. At the month's mind for the late Charles Standish Barry, 



BARRYMORE. 1 89 

of Lemlara, J. P., it was stated by the Rev. James Barry, C.C., Glanworth, 
that formerly the Barrys of Lemlara buried at Chore Abbey, where now 
is the Protestant church Midleton. Chore Abbey was equally the burial 
place of the Barries of Rathanisky, of whom the Barries of Dundullerick 
are a junior branch. Perhaps, then, the explanation may be that Chore 
Abbey was where, in a wide sense, the Barries of Dundullerick and 
Leamlara were buried together, and that both families together lost their 
right of burial there by the enforcement of the Act of Parliament against 
interments in the precincts of suppressed abbeys, and that both, about 
the same time, commenced to bury side by side at the middle of Lisgoold 
graveyard. The tomb of the descendants of Thomas, younger son of 
Thomas Barry, of Dundullerick, is midway on the west side of Lisgoold 
graveyard. 

In March term, 1745, a mortgage was registered by Francis Healy, 
Esq., of the Little Island, against Garrett Barry, of Dundullerick, and 
Edmond, his son, now of Ballinakilla. — Charles M. Barry to writer, 10 
February, 1872. Garrett Barr)^ of Dundullerick, married, first, Dorinda 
MacCarthy, daughter of Capt. Teig McOwen McDonal MacCarthy, of 
East Ballyneadig, and sister of Charles McCarthy, of Lyredane, gent, 
whose daughter, Catherine, was mother of the Misses McCarthy, of Kyrl's 
Quay, Cork. Through that alliance Garrett Barry's great-grandson and 
daughters, the writer's father and aunts, claimed kindred with the Earls 
of Clancarthy, the MacCarthies of Carrignavar, who but for an attainder 
would be Viscounts Muskerry ; the MacCarties, Masters na Mona ; the 
O'Donoghues of the glen, and the MacCarthy Mores of Muckrus. That 
relationship was acknowledged by Justin McCarthy, senior, of Carrig- 
navar, Esq., and by the Misses McCarthy of Kyrl's Quay, Cork, daughters 
of Owen McCarthy, last Master na Mona, and granddaughter of Charles 
McCarthy, of Lyredane. In 1868, Dr. John Barry, of Carrigtwohill, told 
the writer: "on the death of my father in 1824 I was preparing to 
embark at Cork for Canada, but received a letter from Justin McCarthy, 
of Carrignavar, Esq., father to the present Justin, inviting me to spend a 
fortnight at Carrignavar, with the object of inducing me to accept the 
Carrignavar dispensary then about to be established. He said he took 
an interest in me as the son of his relative, William Barry. On the 
morning after my arrival we rode to Cork to pay a visit to his old cousins, 
the Miss McCarthys, of Kyrl's Quay, to whom he introduced me as a 
son of their near relative, William Barry, of Rockville." 

On the I ith August, i86g, the writer's aunt, Mrs. Mary Anne Dwyer, 
told him that "the Misses McCarthy, of Kyrl's Quay, Cork, were always 
looked upon as cousins of ours. From the confident way in which they 
were spoken of as cousins they could not have been very remote. When 



1 90 BARRYMORE. 

I was about twelve years of age, going to school in Cork, and staying 
with my aunt, Mary Riordan, she took me to visit them. They appeared 
at that time older than my father, and were, I should say, first cousins of 
my grandfather rather than second cousins of my father." Mrs. Dwyer 
added, that though these Misses McCarthy were then our nearest kins- 
folk, in Ireland through Dora McCarthy, their paternal branch in the 
male line, that of the Masters na Mona, was not Dora McCarthy's branch, 
of which the male representatives had changed their religion and settled 
in England. 

In the appendix to " The MacCarthys of Gleannacroim," by Daniel 
MacCarthy Glas, is a chapter on the MacCarthys of Ballyneadig, on the 
river Lee, barony of Barretts, county Cork, and of Lyredane, near Mallow. 

As there stated, this family claims descent from Donal MacTeige 
MacCarthy, fourth son of Teige MacCormac Oge Ladir MacCarthy, Lord 
of Muskerry, born 1472, died 1566. 

Teige MacCormac MacCarthy, Lord of Muskerry, married Catherine, 
daughter of Donal MacCarthy Reagh, Prince of Carbery, by Ellinor, 
daughter of Gerald, eighth Earl of Kildare, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 
and left issue — (i) Sir Dermot MacTeige, Lord of Muskerry, b. 1501, d. 
1570, ancestor of the Earls of Clancarty, the MacCarthys of Carrignavar, 
Aglish, Incherahi, etc. ; (2) Sir Cormac MacTeige, Lord of Muskerry, d. 
1588, ancestor of the MacCarthys of Mourne and Courtbrack, called 
Masters na Mona, and of the MacCarthys of Ballea ; (3) Sir Kallahan 
MacTeige, Lord of Muskerry, d. 1584, whose son forfeited in 1641 ; 
(4) Daniel MacTeige, called Donal ny Countie, d. 1581. He married 
Ellen, daughter of Teige MacDermod MacCarthy, of Coshmange, and by 
her had, according to the Lambeth pedigrees, "dyvers children," of 
whom three are mentioned — Dermod, Taig, and Donogh. 

Donal MacTeig (alias Donal ny Countie) was, there is good reason 
for believing from a family record, the ancestor of the MacCarthys of 
Ballyneadig and Eergus, on the river Lee, Cork, and through them of 
the MacCarthys of Lyredane. 

Capt. Teige McOwen McCarthy, of Ballyneadig, is named on the 
tomb of the MacCarthys of Ballyneadig in the choir of the abbey of 
Kilcrea as the grandfather of Timothy MacCarthy of Lyredane. And 
Teige McOwen McCarthy claimed (1700) as administrator to his father, 
Owen MacDaniel MacCarthy, who died 20th October, 1691, aged 90, a 
leasehold interest in the town and lands of East Ballyneadig, county 
Cork, which claim was adjudged within the Articles of Limerick. 

Capt Teige MacOwen MacCarthy, of Ballyneadig, was father of 
Charles MacCarthy, of Lyredane, who married a daughter of Radly, of 
Knockrour, and had issue three sons. — Timothy, Charles, Callaghan, and 



BARRYMORE. I9I 

three daug-hters — one, Dorothy, married to George Fitton ; a second, 
Catherine, who was living in 1 764, married to Owen MacCarthy, Master 
na Mona (who died 5th November, 1770, aged 84, leaving an only son, 
Charles, a colonel in the service of the King of Portugal, and governor of 
Miranda ; and three daughters resident in Cork — Mary, married to — 
Barry; Anne, died aged 7^\ and Catherine, died in 1832, all buried in 
Kilcrea) ; and a third, Anne, married in 1730 to Justin MacCarthy, of 
Dooneen. 

Timothy MacCarthy, of Lyredane (eldest son of Charles MacCarthy, 
of Lyredane), born 1714, married Joanna, daughter of Denis MacCarthy, 
of Dooneen, and had issue three sons, first, Charles ; second, Callaghan, 
who married Miss Hennessy, of Ballymacmoy ; and third, Thady. He 
died in 1763, aged 49 years. 

Charles MacCarthy, of Whitechurch, north liberty of Cork (eldest 
son of Timothy MacCarthy, of Lyredane, born 1738, married, first, m 
1764, Mary, eldest daughter of Geoffrey O'Donoghue, of the glen, by 
Elizabeth, daughter of Randal MacCarthy More [of Mucruss, Killarney]. 
He married, secondly, 12 November, 1766, Mary, daughter of Michael 
Finucane, M.D., of Ennis^ and conformed on the 14th May, 1769. He 
died 25 Jan., 1 807, leaving an only son, Michael Stephen Joseph MacCarthy, 
born 26 December, 1771, Colonial Paymaster-General at the Cape of 
Good Hope. He put in a claim to a lease for lives, renewable for ever, 
and profits in the lands of Rathduff, which lands had been bequeathed 
to his father, Charles, by his grandfather, Timothy, by his will dated i ith 
November, 1763, and of which one of the executors was Joseph Abell. 
A bill of discovery was filed in the Equity Exchequer 22 December, 1787, 
against James Abell and others, and in May, 1 790, a bill was filed against 
Brabing Connor, James Abell, and others ; but in vain, as Timothy 
McCarthy was a Roman Catholic on the i8th August, 1759, when the 
article conveying the lands of Rathduff to Joseph Abell in trust for 
Timothy MacCarthy was executed. 

Michael S. J. MacCarthy married 24 January, 1791, Mary, daughter 
of Captain Samuel Mead, R.N., one of H. M. Commissioners of Customs, 
and had an eldest son, Charles Edward MacCarthy, born 1800, married 
1 83 1 Elizabeth Augusta, daughter of John Goldsborough Ravenshaw, 
a director of the Hon. East India Company, and had surviving issue one 
son, Charles Desmond MacCarthy, born 13 December, 1832, educated at 
Rugby and Trinity College, Cambridge, M.A. 

The two following summaries made m 1855 by Ch. M. Barry for 
Henry Barry, of Ballyadam, relate to Charles McCarthy, brother to Dora 
McCarthy, first wife of Garrett Barry, of Dundullerick. 

1706. Sir Matthew Deane having a very great regard for Charles 



192 BARRYMORE, 

McCartie, of Lyredane, made a lease to him of the lands of Grenagh, 
in the barony of Barretts, which lease was made to " Michael Barry, his 
friende," in trust ; but afterwards Francis Healy having filed a bill of 
discovery, Nathaniel Spencer, Esq., of Rinny, was appointed trustee in 
place of Michael Barry. 

1 719. John Barrett, Esq., of Rahan, leased the villages, lands, and 
tenements of Lyredane to Charles McCarthy, of Pluckanes, gent., 28 
years, at ^^"46. Witnesses, Garrett Barry, of Dondolerick ; William 
Harding, of Rogarane ; and Ignatius Goold, of Knockraha. 

In November, 1855, in a letter to Henry Barry, Ch. M. Barry said: 
"I find Daniel McCarthy, of Rathduffe, and Teige, of Lyredane, fre- 
quently mentioned in connexion with the Barrys." 

On the 24 November, 1875, Ch. M. Barry wrote to the present writer 
that "Robert Rogers, of Lota, purchased from the Hollow Sword Blades Co. 
Rathduff and other lands, the estate of Colonel John Barrett and Teige 
McCartliy, of Aglish. He leased Rathduff to Thomas Bernard, of 
Monard, Esq., at a small rent and £^1 lOs. fine. Several years subse- 
quently Bernard acknowledged that he took the lease in trust for Charles 
MacCarthy, Esq., who became a Protestant, was barrister-at-law, and 
married to a Miss Brabing, of Dublin, with a fortune of i^ 1,000. That 
the £()2 I OS. was his money. His father, Daniel MacCarthy, gent., held 
the lands before this lease. 

15 December, 1877. Same to same: "I find an entry of a marriage 
of Charles McCarthy, of Rathduff, with Alice Giffard, of Aghern, and, at 
the same time, John Pyne, of Ballyvolhane, to Dorothy Giffard, her sister. 
Charles McCarthy was of the Lyredane branch, and his sister or niece 
was the wife of Owen, Master na Mona." 

It seems that Daniel McCarthy, of Rathduff, was succeeded by his 
son, Charles McCarthy, barrister-at-law, who married a Miss Brabing, of 
Dublin, and was succeeded by his son, Charles, who in 1738 married 
Alice Giffard, of Aghern. From Charles, son of Charles, son of Daniel 
McCarthy, Rathduff passed to Timothy McCarthy, of Lyredane. son of 
Charles McCarthy, of Lyredane, son of Capt. Teige MacOwen McDaniel 
McCarthy, of East Ballyneadig. 

On the 18 August, 1759, in evasion of the penal laws, the lease for 
lives renewable for ever of Rathduff was conveyed to Joseph Abell, a 
Protestant, in trust for Timothy McCarthy, a Catholic, and on the nth 
of November, 1763, was willed by the said Timothy McCarthy to his 
eldest son, Charles ; but subsequently, by a breach ot trust, was appro- 
priated by Abell. Charles McCarthy conformed to the Protestant Church, 
but was too late to retain or recover Rathduff. 

By his first wife, Dora McCarthy, Garrett Barry, of DunduUerick, had 



BARRYMORE. 193 

two sons and three daughters — (i) Edmond ; (2) Garrett, who Hved at 
Ballyedmond, and in 1762 married Margaret Morrough, of Castlemartyr. 

Bond on marriage between Garrett Barry and Catherine Morrough, 
of Castlemartyr, perfected the 27th day of November, 1762 : — We, Garrett 
Barry, of Ballyedmond, in the county of Cork, gentleman, and James 
Fitzgerald, of Ballymartin, in the said county, farmer, are holden and 
firmly bounden to the Right Reverend Father in God, Robert, Lord 
Bishop of Cork, in the sum of i," 1,000. . . . That Garrett Barry may 
solemnize marriage with Catherine Morrough, of Castlemartyr, in the 
diocese of Cloyne, Spinster. — Garrett Barry, Ja. Fitzgerald. 

By his marriage with Catherine Morrough, Garrett Barry, of Balh'- 
edmond, had three daughters — (i) Anne, who married Mr. O'Flynn, of 
Cork, grocer, ancestor of Denis Barry O'Flynn, M.D., Glanmire ; (2) 
Bridget, who married a Mr. Noonan, and died without issue ; (3) Mary, 
who died unmarried. About the year 1760, on the death of Garrett 
fitzThomas Barry, of Dundullerick, his second son, Garrett Barry, of 
Ballyedmond, claimed half of Dundullerick, either under his father's will, 
or rather through one of the penal laws against Catholics, whereby power 
was given to younger sons of Catholics to take a son's share of their 
father's lands. It was agreed that the younger brother should divide 
and the elder choose. Garrett gave with the house 360 acres, and without 
the house 390 acres. Edmond, though having nine children, chose die 
larger but houseless portion, now the estate of Captain James Creagh 
Barry, and forthwith vacated the house, and accepted the hospitality of 
Lemlara House for his family until in six weeks he had Rockville, Carrig- 
twohill, enlarged and ready for them. Garrett got into debt, and mort- 
gaged his moiety to his nephew, David Barry, grandfather of its present 
owner, Pierce Barry, Esq. — Mary Anne Dwyer, 1868, and 26 Aug, 1872. 

Abigail, daughter of Garrett fitzThomas Barry, of Dundullerick, 
married James Fitzgerald, of Ballymartin, gentleman, whose father was 
William, son of Sir William Fitzgerald, of Glenane, and whose mother was 
Margaret, daughter of James Barry, of Ballydona, son of James, younger 
son of Robert fitzjohn Barry, of Dungourney, gentleman. Bond Lycen:e 
of Marriage between James Fitzgerald, of Ballymartin, gentleman, 
and Abigail Barry, of Dundullerick, spinster, perfected the i6th of April, 
1762. Know all men that we, James Fitzgerald, of Ballymartin, in the 
county of Cork, and Garrett Barry, of Dundullerick, m the said county, 
gentlemen, are holden and firmly bounden to the Right Rev. Father in 
God, Robert, Lord Bishop of Cork, in the sum of i, 1,000. Dated the 
16th day of April, 1762. The condition-. James Fitzgerald may solem- 
nize marriage with Abigail Barry, of the parish of Templebodan, in the 
diocese of Cloyne, spinster. Ja. Fz Gerald, Garrett Barry. The signa- 



194 BARRYMORE. 

tures to this and to the previous bond are the same, and this Garrett 
Rarry was not James Fitzgerald's father-in-law, but brother-in-law. By 
that marriage James Fitzgerald had one daughter, Mary, who married 
John Lomasney, of Aghern ; issue : — (i) William, heir to his grandfather, 
Vvilliam^ Lomasney, of Ballynela. He married a widow English, and died 
before 1839, without issue; (2) James, who went to the West Indies; 

(3) Michael, who died wealthy in Jamaica; (i) Mary, died unmarried; 
(2) Abina, who married Dr. McDermott, and had issue two sons and 
two daughters ; (3) Catherine, a nun in Presentation Convent, Cork ; 

(4) Margaret, second wife of — Sheridan, Esq., inspector of national 
schools. Like his younger sons, John Lomasney, of Aghern, died in 
the West Indies. James Fitzgerald, of Ballymartin, near Clonmult, 
married, secondly, Miss Poweir, of Clonmult, and had a daughter, Mrs, 
Kennedy; and married, thirdly, Eliza O'Neill, of Ballycaheragh, and 
had a son William, who married Anne, daughter of James Cotter, of 
Castlelyons, and had an eldest son, James, who married Ellen, daughter 
oj" William Barry, of Rockville, and had a son. William Edmond Fitz- 
gerald, who died unmarried in Australia. 

Mary, daughter of Garrett fitzThomas Barry, of Dundullerick, married 
Maurice Murphy, of Lismeelcunnin, gentleman. His father, according 
to Catherine Murphy, second wife of the writer's maternal uncle, John 
Murphy, of Coolahullig, alias Rocklodge, Coachford, in the county of 
Cork, was Captain Murphy, of Lismeelcunnin, near Kanturk, who, though 
a Catholic, served under Colonel Aldworth against Kmg James 11. He 
married Johanna Nagle, of Anakissy, and his only son, Maurice, married 
Mary Barry, of Dundullerick. In the penal times Lady Aldworth often 
drove to Lismeelcunnin to induce Maurice Murphy and his wife, Mary 
Barry, to allow even one of their sons to be reared a Protestant, that 
Lismeelcunnin might be preser\^ed in their family, but they would not 
consent, and so that property was lost. The issue of the marriage of 
Maurice Murphy, of Lismeelcunnin, and Mary Barry, of Dundullerick, 
were five sons and two daughters : (i) John, who by his extravagance 
completed the ruin of the family, married, and had a son, Barry Murphy, 
whose daughter, Mrs. Rodgers, left a daughter married to a Dublin 
solicitor named, I think, Fitnam ; (2) Maurice, who married, but died 
without issue ; (3) Denis, married Miss Catherine Egan, of the Monks- 
town family, and had three sons and three daughters: (i) Barry, who 
died unmarried ; (2) Denis, who married Miss Grace Noonan, and had 
issue Denis Murphy, M.D., who died in Cincinnati, and Rev. Alfred 
Murphy, S.J. ; (3) John, who married Miss Shine, and had a son, who 
went to Cincmnati, and a daughter who died unmarried; (i) Catherine, 
who was second wife of John Murphy, of Coolahullig, alias Rocklodge, 



BARRYMORE. 1 95 

and died without issue ; (2) Mrs. Torpy, who had many children ; (3) 
Mrs. Roche ; (4) Richard, fourth son of Maurice Murphy, of Lismeel- 
cunnin, hved for man}^ years with his first cousin, Richard Barry, J. P., 
Barry's Lodge, and died unmarried ; Barry, fifth son of Maurice Murphy, 
of Lismeelcunnin, died unmarried ; Dora and Johanna, the daughters of 
Maurice Murphy, of Lismeelcunnin, died unmarried. 

Ellinor Barry, of Dundullerick, married, on the 25th of August, 1737, 
to Thomas Barry, of the cit}^ of Cork, merchant, must have been a 
daughter of Garrett fitzThomas Barry, of Dundullerick, by his first 
marriage ; but none of the writer's aunts or other informants had ever 
heard of her, probably because she may have left no issue. 

Bond of marriage between Thomas Barry, of Cork, and Ellinor Barry, 
of Dundullerick, spinster, 25th of August, 1737. "By these present let 
all know that we, Thomas Barry, of the city of Cork, merchant, and 
Edmund Barry, of Dundullerick, in the county of Cork, gentlemen, are 
held and firmly bound to the Reverend Father and Lord in Christ, 
George, Lord Bishop of Cloyne, in five hundred pounds sterling of good 
and lawful money of England to be paid to the same Lord Bishop or to 
his attorneys, heirs, or successors, to making which payment we bind us 
and each of us the executors and administrators of us and of each of us by 
himself for the whole in solidum firmly by the present, sealed with our 
seals. Dated 25th day of the month of August, 1737. 

" The condition of the above obligation is such that if at all times 
hereafter there shall not appear any canonical lett or impediment, but 
that the above bounden Thomas Barry may solemnize matrimon)' vvith 
Mrs. Ellinor Barry, of Dundullerick, and that there is no pre-contract 
of marriage of either of the said parties with any other, nor suit depend- 
ing in any court concerning the same, and that the consent of parents 
and friends of both parties be thereunto first had and obtained, and 
lastly, that the said matrimony be publickly solemnized according to 
the canons of the Church of Ireland. That then the present obligation 
to be void and of no effect, otherv\^ise same to remain in full force and 
overtue in law. Thomas Barr)^ Edmond Barry. Signed, sealed, and 
delivered in the presence of Ann Manning and James Hanning, regis- 
trar." N.B. — The above Edmond Barry was the eldest son of Garrett 
fitzThomas Barry, of Dundullerick. 

Garrett fitzThomas Barry, of Dundullerick, married, secondly, Eliza- 
beth daughter of Luke Coppinger, son of William Coppinger, merchant, 
high sheriff of the city of Cork 1687, and outlawed for high treason 
under King William of Orange. In " Pedigree of the Coppingers of 
Ballyvolane and Barryscourt, co. Cork by Mrs. Morgan John O'Connell, 
A.D. 1883," Elizabeth, daughter of Luke Coppinger, is said by mistake 



196 BARRYMORE. 

to have married Edmund Barry, of Dundullerick. He was. her stepson. 
In that pedigree he is rightly seen lower down as " Edmund Barry, Esq., 
of Dundullerick and Rocklodge" (Rockville, Carrigtwohill), co. Cork, 
married to Johanna, daughter of John Coppinger, of Granacloyne, son 
of Thomas Coppinger, of Ballyvolane, elder brother of the said William 
Coppinger. 

Marriage licence bond. " By the present let all know that we, Garrett 
Barry, of the parish of Templebodan, of the diocess of Cloyne, gentleman, 
David Barry, of the city of Cork, gentleman, and John Boyce, gentleman, 
are held and firmly bound, etc., in five hundred pounds sterling, etc. 
Dated 20th August, 1730, etc. That the above bounden Garrett Barry 
may solemnize matrimony with Elizabeth Coppinger, of the parish of 
Rathcony, in the diocese of Cork, spinster. Garrett Ba[rry], Da. Barry, 
Jno. Boyce." 

By his marriage with Elizabeth Coppinger Garrett fitzThomas Barry 
had one daughter, Bridget, who married Mr. Maurice Hannigan, of Castle- 
lyons, and had three daughters — Mary, Bridget, and Margaret, for whom 
their father left a considerable sum of money, which his executors, James 
Cotter, of Castlelyons, and O'Brien, of Kilcor, did not put to interest, but 
lessened year by year freely, that soon all was spent, and these 
ladies were penniless. Mary married a Sergeant Osbourne, and after 
his death, s.p., was housekeeper to her first cousin, Richard Barry, J. P., 
Barry's Lodge ; Bridget married Daniel Buckley, carpenter, and had 
issue Daniel Buckley, Cork Road^ Midleton ; Margaret married James 
Nagle, of the Nagle Roe sept, and had issue (i) James Nagle, solicitor, 
Midleton, and afterwards Clerk of the Crown, Dublin, who married Miss 
Madden, and died without issue; (2) [David?] Nagle, M.D., the writer 
remembers himself, but not his Christian name ; (3) WiUiam, who was in 
the Customs, Dungarvan ; .(i) Mary, died unmarried; (2) Johanna, died 
unmarried ; (3) Margaret, married George Fitzgibbon, of Midleton, and 
had issue — David, who died unmarried, and George, who married Miss 
Carrie Eastway, and left issue. 

In the latter years of Garrett fitzThomas Barry, Dundullerick was held 
in secret trust for him by the Tookers of Ballindinis, Protestants, in evasion 
of the penal laws against Catholics. On the 8th of July, 1869, Captain 
R. B. Tooker, of Cork, grand master of the Orangemen of Munster, told 
the present writer that he Captain Tooker had heard so in his childhood 
from his father, and also from Colonel Beare, of whom he was heir-at- 
law. Captain Tooker added, as a proof of friendship between his family 
and that of Dundullerick, that one of the sons of his ancestor, Richard 
Tooker, of Mount Wakeham, now Ballindinis, who in 171 2 married 
Elizabeth Longfield, of Castlemary, was named Barry James Tooker, 



BARRYMORE. 1 97 

and was the only James ever in the Tooker family. Captam Tooker 
shewed the present writer an indenture on parchment, and dated 1750, 
between Henry Mitchell, Esq., of Mitchellsfort, administrator of Richard 
Tooker, Esq., of Mount Wakeham, eldest son of John Tooker, Esq., of 
Ballindinis, of the first part, and John Harding, of the city of Cork, 
saddler, of the second part. That indenture mentioned Barry James 
Tooker and another, minors, sons of Richard Tooker, of Mount Wake- 
ham, and Elizabeth Longfield, of Castlemary. Barry James Tooker died 
soon after 1750, having two sisters and seven brothers, none of whom 
left issue ; but Richard Captain Tooker thought he had other documents 
mentioning the Barrys, but could not then find those documents. The 
Powers of Clonmult were another Catholic family with which his own 
was on friendly terms in the penal days. Patt Barry, father of the post- 
master of Cork, told him an additional particular, that at Dundullerick 
everything, even to the hounds, was held in the name of Tooker. 

On the 9th of July, i86g, Miss Dora Barry, the writer's aunt, told 
lum that "her uncle, Richard Barry, Esq., J. P., Barry's Lodge, was named 
Richard after his godfather, Richard Tooker (son of Richard Tooker and 
Elizabeth Longfield), and when young was called in the family Dickey 
Tucker. Richard Tooker gave his godson twenty cows, and offered to 
take farms on long leases for her grandfather. It was Richard Tooker 
that protected Dundullerick. 

All this, even to the ownership of the hounds, the present writer had 
heard previously in 1868 from Dr. John Barry, of Carrigtwohill, and in 
earlier years from many others. 

Garrett fitzThomas Barry, of Dundullerick, died 1760, aged 80 years, 
and was succeeded at Dundullerick East by his elder son, Edmond, and 
at Dundullerick West, including Scrahan and Ballysalagh, by his younger 
son, Garrett, junior. 

Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick, and Rockville, Carrig- 
twohill, gentleman, elder son of Garrett fitzThomas Barry, of Dundul- 
lerick, gentleman, was born 171 2. His will is dated 30th of March, 1783, 
and was proved in 1784. In conversation with the present writer, 8th 
October, 1872, David Mulcahy, of Garrane, Carrigtwohill, farmer, who 
was then about eighty years old, and was always very intelligent, spoke 
of that Edmond Barry, of Dundullerick, as Eamann ac Garroid, that is 
Edmond," son of Garrett, or Edmond fitzGarrett, it being usual colloquially 
to use ac for mac, "a son," in such Gaehc phrases. In the foregoing 
marriage licence bond of 25th August, 1737, he is styled Edmond Barry, 
of Dundullerick, in the county of Cork, gentleman ; but the mortgage 
registered against him and his father in March term, 1745, by Francis 
Healy, Esq., of the Little Island, styles them Garrett Barry, of Dun- 



19^ BARRYMORE. 

dullerick, and Edmond Barry, his son, now of Ballinakilla.— Ch. M. 
Barry, loth February, 1872. Later on, he again resided with his father 
at Dundullerick, and on his father's death removed to Rockville, Carrig- 
twohill, his own moiety of Dundullerick being then without a fitting 
dwelhnghouse. In or about 1745 he married his stepmother's second cousin, 
Johanna, daughter of John Coppinger, of Granacloyne, in the county of 
Cork, gentleman, a younger son of Thomas Coppinger, of Ballyvolane, 
in the county of the city of Cork, gentleman, attainted of high treason, 
and outlawed for his loyalty to King James II., son of Stephen Coppinger, 
of Ballyvolane, gentleman, said on his tomb to have been chief of his 
name, son of Thomas Coppinger, sometime mayor of Cork, and described 
in funeral certificate as "chief of the name in the kingdom of Ireland." 
On the female side Mrs. Johanna Barry was descended from the Galways 
of Lota, and the Goulds, leading citizens of Cork, and the Meades, now 
Earls of Clanwilliam. She was akin to the Roches, now Barons Fermoy ; 
the Stackpoles, the Nagles of Anakissy, etc. From her brother William 
IS descended the present Thomas Coppinger, J. P., Midleton : see "History 
of the Coppingers," Manchester, 1883-4. ^Y his marriage with Johanna 
Coppinger, Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and Carrigtwohill, 
had issue seven sons and two daughters, namely, Garrett, Thomas, 
Edmond, David, William, James, Richard, Dora, and Maryanne, all born 
at Dundullerick, and all mentioned in order of male and female seniority 
m his will, which is as follows, extracted from her Majesty's Court of 
Probate: — "The District Registry at Cork. In the name of God. Amen. 
I, Edmond Barry, formerly of Dundullerick, and now of Rockvill, in the 
county of Cork, gen,, being for some time past weak in body, but of 
perfect mind and memory, thanks to Almighty God, and calling to mind 
the uncertainty of all worldly affairs, do make this my last will and 
testament in manner following : Firstly, I recommend my soul to God and 
my body to the grave, to be interred at Lisgoold, where the remains of my 
father is, in such decent manner as my wife shall think proper to direct, 
and as to my worldly substance of what kind soever, I give and dispose 
off as follows : I give, leave and bequeath unto my son, Garrett Barry, his 
wife, and each of their children one British shilling to each ; unto my son 
Thomas Barry, his wife, and their child, one British shilling each ; unto 
my son Edward Barry and his daughter one British shilling each ; unto 
my son David Barry one British shilling; unto my son William Barry 
and his wife, one British shilling each ; unto my sons James and Richard, 
one British shilling to each ; unto my daughter Dora and her husband, 
Thomas Coppinger, and their children, one British shilling to each. I 
give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Ann Barry the sum of two 
hundred pounds sterl, which sum is to be paid her whenever she marrys 



BARRYMORE. 1 99 

with the consent of her mother, and no sooner. 1 constitute, nominate, 
and appoint my dearly beloved wife, Johanna, sole executrix and ad- 
ministratrix of this my last will and testament, to whom I give, leave, and 
bequeath all my worldly substance in lands, houses, leases, bills, bonds, 
notes, cash, household furniture, cattle of what kind soever, and all other 
worldly substance that I shall die possessed of or entitled to, subject 
nevertheless to the payment of all and every the aforesaid bequests and 
legacies, and the payment of all my just debts and funeral charges — - 
revoking, annulling, and making void all former wills and bequests, rati- 
fying and confirming and allowing this only and no other to be my last 
will and testament. Given under my hand and seal in the presence of 
the hereunto subscribing witnesses this 30th of March, 1783 — eighty- 
three. Edmond Barry (seal). Garrett Barry." 

"The above last will and testament of the above-named Edmond 
Barry, gentleman, deceased, was on the 8th day of May, one thousand 
seven hundred and eighty-four, proved and approved of in the Con- 
sistorial Court of Cloyne before the Revd. R.obert Berkeley, Clerk, D.D., 
Vicar-General of the Diocese of Cloyne, and the burthen of the execution 
thereof, together with administration of all and singular the goods, rights, 
credits, and chattels of the said deceased were granted and committed 
unto Johanna Barry, widow and relict of the said deceased, and sole 
executrix in the said will named, she being first sworn and soforth. Dated 
the day and year above written. John Hanning, Regr." 

At the time of his death, between the 30th of March, 1783, and the 
8th of May, 1784, Edmond fitzGarrett Barry was 72 years old, according 
to the following statement of his granddaughter, Mrs. Mary Anne Dwycr, 
to her nephew, the present writer : "After my marriage [29th November, 
1829], my father [James, sixth son of Edmond fitzGarrett Barry] said 
to me, that his own father died at the age of seventy-two, and that he 
himself was already that age, and had an impression that he should not 
live to a greater age than his father's. I told him that his mother lived 
to eighty-four years, and that he might live as long as she did. He died 
shortly afterwards, 6th July, 1830, and after his death a book was found 
at Rockville giving his age as seventy-one and not seventy-two." Mrs. 
Johanna Barry suryived hex husband over twenty years, and at her death 
left all she had to her fifth son, William Barry. 

Garrett Barry, of Curraheen, Carrigtwohill, gentleman, eldest son of 
Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick, and Rockville, Carrigtwohill, 
gentleman, married Ellen, daughter of < — Power, of Snow Hill, in the 
county of Waterford, a gentleman whose family was most respectable. 
By that marriage Garrett Barry, of Curraheenj had one son and two 
daughters — Edmond, Johanna, and Ellen. Edmond Barry, of Curra- 



200 BARRYMORE. 

heen, gentleman, only son of Garrett Barry, of Curraheen, gentleman, 
married Julia, daughter of Timothy McCarthy, of Kilfadimore, and aunt 
Ci Timothy McCarthy Downing, M.P. for the county of Cork. Her 
obituary notice in the " Cork Examiner " of the 1 2th of January, 1 869, is : 
"On the loth inst, at her lodgings, Nile Street, in this city, at the 
advanced age of ninety-eight years, Julia, relict of the late Edward 
Barry, Esq., of Curraheen, Carrigtwohill, and daughter of Tim mac Tom 
MacCarthy, Esq., of Kilfadimore House, county Kerry." By his marriage 
with Miss Julia McCarthy, Edmond Barry, of Curraheen, whose Christian 
name is Edmond, not Edward, in the will of his uncle, Richard Barry, of 
Barry's Lodge, had with an elder son Garrett, a younger son lost at sea, 
and two daughters, of whom one married — Osbourne, of Tuckey Street, 
Cork, and the other married, first, — Shanahan, and secondly, ■ — 
O'Connor, and died s.p. Garrett Barry, inspector butter weighhouse, 
Cork, elder son of Edmond Barry, of Curraheen, married his first cousin, 
Mrs. McCarthy, widow, whose father was O'Sullivan, of Sinnagh, and 
whose first husband was killed in a coach accident^ and whose daughter 
by her first marriage became a nun. Of her second marriage there was 
no issue. In August, i86g, Garrett Barry, retired butter inspector, told 
me, the present writer, that in his youth he had spent much of his time 
at Ahanisk with his grand-uncle, my grandfather, James Barry ; he was 
pleased at my declaring him representative of the Dundullerick family, and 
called his wife's attention to it, and said that [his father's first cousins] 
Fatt Barry, of Cork, and Garrett Barry, of Greenville, once made game 
of him about it, ; he knew comparatively little of his family's past history 
through having been bred in the city, but he gave me some notes regarding 
the Barrymores. He was then suffering from heart disease, and died 
not long aftenvards. 

Johanna, daughter of Garrett Barry, of Curraheen, gentleman, married 
Francis Roche, of Cork, gentleman, and had issue Andrew Roche, twice 
mayor of Cork, who married a daughter of Captain William Galwey, 
uncle to Coroner Galwey, and died s.p. 

Ellen, daughter of Garrett Barry, of Curraheen, gentleman, married 
John Creedon, of Mount Desert, gentleman, and had issue Teddy, Joe, 
etc., and a daughter, who by her first husband, — Cunningham, had no 
issue, but by her second husband, — Nugent, had one daughter, who 
married — Dillon, of Newfoundland. 

Thomas Barry, second son of Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dun- 
dullerick and Rockville, married Miss Bernard, and had issue a daughter, 
who died young. 

Edmond Barry, of the city of Cork, butter weighhouse inspector, third 
son of Edmond Barry, of Dundullerick and Rockville, gentleman, married 



BARRYMORE. 20 1 

first, Miss Goold, and by her had a daughter, who married a Mr. Goold, 
and soon after died s.p. Edmond Barry, butter weighhouse inspector, 
married, secondly, Miss Catherine Conlon, of Limerick, and by her had 
three sons and two daughters. 

Edmond Barry, junior, of the city of Cork, gentleman, who married 
Miss McNamara, and had issue three daughters (i) Mary Anne, who 
n.arried William Harrington, of the city of Cork, druggist, and had a 
sr n, William Harrington, of the city of Cork, druggist, J. P., father of Stanley 
Harrington, J.P., Commissioner of National Education ; Wm. B. Harring- 
ton, Ignatius Harrington, etc. ; (2) Mary, who married John Copinger, of 
Peafield, county Cork, M.D., and had with other children a son, Richard 
John Copinger, solicitor, secretary Cork, Blackrock and Passage Railway, 
for whom see pedigree of the Family of Copinger in " History of the 
Copingers or Coppingers," where his descent is traced from Stephen 
Copinger, M.P. for the city of Cork, 1559, and mayor of the city of Cork, 
1564, 1572. 

Richard Barr)^ of the city of Cork, surgeon dentist, son of Edmond 
Barry, third son of Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and Rock- 
ville, married, first, a daughter of — Galwey, of Goulaspurra, Cork, wine 
merchant, and secondly. Miss Mahony, and died without issue on the 
14th of November, 1869, at his residence, 85 Patrick Street, Cork. 

Michael Barry, of Sidney Place, Cork, butter merchant, son of Edmond 
Barry, third son of Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and 
Rockville, died unmarried ; and so died his sisters, Dora and Hetty. 

David Barry, of Dundullerick and Dunkerron Castle, gentleman, 
fourth son of Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and Rockville, 
is styled David Barry, of the city of Cork, mariner, in a lease of Black- 
water, in the barony of Dunkerron, and county of Kerry, made 1785 to 
him by John O'Mahony, Esq., of Dromore. On the i6th of November, 
1793, as David Barry, late of the city of Cork, mariner, but now of 
Blackwater, he got a new lease of Blackwater at a yearly rent reduced 
from ^^36 to £1^ for the lives of himself [his wife], Emma Taylor, fifth 
daughter of Joseph Taylor, late of Dunkerron, Esq., deceased, and [his 
nephew] David Barry, second son of William Barry, of Rockville, in the 
county of Cork. In 1799 he is styled David Barry, of Dunkerron, in the 
county of Kerry, Esq., by his solicitor, John Barry, in a receipted bill of 
costs reduced before payment from ;£^234 to £^0. 

In 1800 David Barry, of Dunkerron, in the barony of Dunkerron, and 
county of Kerry, gentleman, sublet Blackwater at ;^53 yearly, leaving a 
profit of £2J yearly. In 1808 David Barry, of Dunkerron, in the county 
r.[ Kerry, gentleman, made a lease of the castle, house, and twenty acres 
01 the lands of Dunkerron to James Magill, of Dromore, Esq., at the 

14 



202 BARRYMORE. 

yearly rent of ;^ioo for the natural life of J. Magill and the residue of 
twenty-one years, provided David Bariy's present interest or any future 
interest of him or his should last so long. The lease to Magill gives a 
right to seaweed off the other part of Dunkerron, as is conveyed by 
Joseph Taylor to David Barry, and is reserved by said Joseph Taylor in a 
lease of that part of Dunkerron to Duckett Maybury, bearing date 5th 
of January, 1792, the total acreage of Dunkerron being iig acres i rood 
34 perches plantation measure, or 193 acres 2 roods English statute 
measure. After letting Dunkerron, he resided with his brother Richard 
at Barry's Lodge, Carrigtwohill, and in 18 14 made a lease of a house at 
Dundullerick as David Barry, now of Barry's Lodge, in the barony of 
Barrymore, and county of Cork, and in 181 5 accepted a surrender of 
Magill's lease of Dunkerron Castle as David Barry, Esq., of Barry's 
Lodge, county Cork. After the death of his brother Richard, he resided 
at Dundullerick West, having purchased by way of mortgage his uncle 
Garrett's leasehold interest in Dundullerick West and Ballysalagh, 359 
acres 3 roods, and having been bequeathed the fee simple of these lands 
by his brother Richard. He is named David Barry, of Dundullerick, in 
the county of Cork, in a lease of Scrahans, a subdenomination of Dun- 
dullerick West, by him on the 20th of March, 1 8 1 7, to John Broder, farmer. 
These eight documents regarding the said David Barry are in the 
possession of his grandson, Pierce Barry, of Dundullerick West. 

Sometime between the 5th of January, 1792, and the i6th of Nov., 
1793, David Barry, fourth son of Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dun- 
dullerick and Rockville, married Emma, fifth daughter of Joseph Taylor, 
Esq., of Dunkerron, and aunt of Thomas Taylor, IVT.D., to whom her 
son, Edmond Barry, of Dundullerick, sold his interest in Dunkerron 
Castle, house and lands for i^2,ooo. For having done so he often ex- 
pressed regret to the present writer. Philis Taylor and Harriott Taylor, 
two of Mrs. Barry's sisters, long survived her. She and they ought to 
have had a place beside their brothers Joseph and Thomas in the Taylor 
pedigree in " Burke's Landed Gentry." According to that pedigree, sup- 
plemented between brackets, Joseph Taylor, Esq., of Dunkerron, married 
Mary, daughter of Rev. Thomas Palmer, rector of Kilmore, 1689, and 
had a son, Joseph Taylor, Esq., of Dunkerron, who married the daughter 
of an Indian rajah, and had [with five daughters, of whom the fifth, Emma, 
married David Barry, gentleman, and Philis and Harriott died un- 
married] with a younger son, Thomas, father of Alfred and Emma, 
an elder son, Joseph Taylor, major Bengal Artillery, who married an East 
Indian lady, and left issue (i) Thomas Taylor, M.D. ; (2) Alfred, major 
H.I.C.S., married, and left two sons — Adrian, J. P., and William ; (3) 
David; (i) Mary, married to Mr. Stretton, surgeon, Dublin; (2) Eliza, 



BARRYMORE. 



203 



married to Lieut. Thomas Strange, R.N. ; (3) Emma, married, 27th 
December, 1825, to James Franklin Bland, Esq., of Derryquin Castle, 
county Kerry. 

Thomas Taylor, Esq., M.D., of [Dublin, and afterwards of] Dunkerron 
[by purchase from his first cousin, Edmond Barry], married [his first 
cousin] Emma, daughter of Thomas Taylor, Esq., and left an only son, 
Joseph Taylor, Esq., of Dunkerron, county Kerry, J.P., who married 
Anne Morton Duckett, and had issue Thomas, William, Henry, [oseph, 
John, Richard, Alfred, Adrian, Anne, Emma. 

Dunkerron Castle has passed by sale from the Taylor family to — 
Colomb, R.N., M.P. 

By his marriage with Emma Taylor, who died in 1800, David Barry 
had issue two sons and one daughter (i) Edmond, his heir, born at Cork 
the gth October, 1794; (2) Joseph Barry, Esq.. M.D., J.P., Midleton 
Lodge, born at Cork 8th November, 1796, and died s.p. tlie i8th of 
September, i860, having married Ellen, seventh daughter of Sir John 
Power, bart, of Eddermine House, county Wexford; marriage articles 
dated igth of April, 1852; marriage portion, i^io.SOO. Emma, born 
at Cork 28th September, 1798, married Edward Davy, chemist, and had 
issue Edmond Davy, M.D., married and had issue Humphry, in orders 
of Church of England ; Henr>^ M.D. ; Joseph, Harriott. Wilhelmina, 
Philis. 

David Barry, of Dundullerick and Dunkerron, gentleman, died at 
Dundullerick on the 20th of August, 1820, and was succeeded by his 
elder son. 

Edmond Barry, of Dundullerick and Dunkerron, gentleman, who was 
born at Cork on the 9th October, 1 794, sold his interest in Dunkerron to 
his first cousin, Thomas Taylor, of Dublin, M.D., and married Sarah 
Isabella Creagh, daughter of Pierce Creagh, of Rockforest Lodge, gentle- 
man, whose mother was Sarah, daughter of Pierce Nagle, of Anakissy, 
gentleman, grandson of the Pierce Nagle, of Anakissy, gentleman, who 
was high sheriff for the county of Cork 1689, and was brother of Sir 
Richard Nagle, knt, M.P. for the county of Cork, and attorney-general 
to King James II. The settlement on inteniiarriage of Edmond Barry 
with Miss Creagh is dated 21st Nov., 1836, and recites that by indented 
deed of sale dated 30th June, 1807, Richard Barry, of Barry's Lodge, 
gentleman, bought in fee simple from William Moreland and Thomas 
Hammersly, of Pall Mall, Westminster, esquires, and John Anderson, of 
Fcrmoy, Esq., part of Dundullerickj containing 372 acres i rood 32 
perches, theretofore demised to William Barry, gentleman, and that part 
of Dundullerick called Ballysallagh, containing 351 acres 2 roods i perch, 
theretofore demised to the said Richard Barry ; also that part of the 



204 BARRYMORE. 

lands of Gurtnamuckey theretofore demised to Thomas Andrews, all 
which lands said William Moreland and Thomas Hammersly had on 
November gth, 1791, bought from the Right Hon. Richard Earl of 
Barrymore ; that said Richard Barry at his death devised to his brother 
David the part of Dundullerick and Ballysallagh, containing 351 acres 
2 roods I perch, charged with a smn of ;^500 ; that David at death de- 
vised the same lands to his eldest son, Edmond, charged with a sum of 
i, 1,000 for his son, Joseph Barry, and a sum of ;^400 for his daughter, 
Emma Barry, otherwise Davy. It further recites that Sarah Isabella 
Creagh has ;^700 Irish in her own right through a codicil to the will of 
her late grand-aunt, Mrs. Ann Glover, of the city of Cork, widow of 
John Glover, of Johnsgrove, in the county of Cork, gentleman ; also ^^300 
Irish on foot of a judgment in the court of King's Bench obtained by 
Catherine, widow of Cornelius O'Brien, late of Kilcor, in 1814, and 
assigned by her the 20th of January, 181 7, to said Skrah Isabella Creagh ; 
which sum of one thousand pounds Irish increased to one thousand pounds 
sterling out of trust funds mentioned in a deed between the said Pierce 
Creagh, his wife [Isabella Leeson, daughter of a Madrid merchant, whose 
wife was a Miss Donovan], the said Sarah Isabella Creagh, and her 
brother William, shall be paid to the said Edmond Barry on his marriage 
with the said Sarah Isabella Creagh as part of her fortune ; that in 1 807 
judgment was obtained in the court of King's Bench against John Lord 
Carbery for a debt of two thousand pounds Irish and costs by the 
trustees to the marriage settlement of Catherine and Cornelius O'Brien, of 
which one thousand remaining due became the property of said Catherine 
as having survived her husband, and is now vested in Pierce Creagh, 
the administrator of her will, and shall be handed to said Joseph Barry, 
on behalf of said Edmond, as part payment of the ;^ 1,000, now through 
accumulation of interest i^ 1,400, with v/hich Dundullerick was charged 
for him, the rest to be paid out of the i^ 1,000 received by Edmond in 
hand, Edmond Barry paying interest at 5 per cent, on this last ;^ i ,000 Irish 
1.0 Isabella Creagh for life, and charging .:£^i,500 for the younger children 
issue of the marriage, and £1^0 jointure for Sarah Isabella on Dun- 
dullerick, which Edmond Barry assigns to William Creagh, of Rockforest 
Lodge, Esq., son of the said Pierce and Isabella Creagh, and Joseph 
Barry, of Midleton, in the said county, M.D., brother to the said Edmond, 
of the third part, to have the jointure paid, and in trust for Charles 
Joseph Curtin, of Carrigoon House, in said county, and James Barry, of 
Ahanisk, esquires, of the fourth part, to see the i^ 1,5 00 paid the younger 
children, who by Edmond Barry's will shall not have Dundullerick, and 
in the proportions which his will shall direct, or otherwise share and share 
alike. The issue of this marriage were — (i) David, born 15th September, 



BARRYMORE. 205 

1839, died unmarried i6th February, 1864; (2) Pierce, born 2nd Nov., 

1840, is unmarried ; (3) Josepli, born ist February, 1842, died unmarried 

1 ith January, 1864 ; (4) Edmond, born 31st October, 1844, married Mary, 
only daughter of l^^Ir. John Higgins, of Midleton, and has issue Edmond 
John, born 26th March, 1873 ; John Joseph, born 8th December, 1884; 
William, born 15th June, 1886; (5) William, born 13th January, 1852, 
died at Clongowes' Wood College; (i) Isabella, born 23rd August, 1838, 
and died young; (2) Emma, born nth March, 1843, and died in infancy. 

Sarah Isabella, wife of Edmond Barry, of Dundullerick, gentleman, 
d:ed the i8th of June, 1861, and he himself died at Dundullerick the 17th 
ct June, 1862, and was succeeded by his eldest son. 

David Barry, of Dundullerick, gentleman, who was born on the 15th 
September, 1839, and died unmarried on the i6th of February, 1864. He 
was succeeded by his next brother, 

Pierce Barry, of Dundullerick, gentleman, who is the representative in 
the male line of the Barry Roes, Lords of Ibawne, through Redmond Bwy 
Barry, second son of David fitzDavid Barry, of Rahamsky, last sundving 
son of David Doune Barry Roe, Lord of Ibawne. His heir presumptive 
is his brother, Edmond Barry, of 9, St. Patrick's Terrace^ Cork, 
gentleman, who has inherited the Glanbeg estate of his uncle, Joseph 
Barry, M.D., J.P. 

William Barry, of Rockville, Carrigtwohill, gentleman, fifth son of 
Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and Rockville, gentleman, 
according to his son, John, was born 1757, and died the 24th of January, 
1824, aged sixty-seven years. He was married and had issue at the date 
ci his father's will, 30th March, 1783. His wife was Margaret, eldest 
daughter of James Barry, of Desert, in the barony of Barrymore, and 
county of Cork, gentleman, whose will is dated 21st November, 1793, but 
who died the 19th of November, 1793, aged sixty-five years, according 
to the inscription on his tomb at Ardnagehy. Said James Barry and his 
brother, Robert Barry, of Glenville, are mentioned in the will of Thomas 
Barry, of Tignageragh, gentleman, daled i6th November, 1778, and were 
his first and second cousins, and were great-grandsons of Edmund Barry, 
of Tignegeragh, gentleman, whose will is dated 22nd April, 1675, and 
whose father was Richard Barry, of Kilshannig, gentleman, son of John 
fitzRedmond Barry, of Rathcormac, Esq., and whose wife was a daughter 
of Thomas Sarsfield, of Sarsfield's Court, an alderman of Cork, and a 
prominent Confederate Catholic in 1641. By his marriage with Margaret, 
eldest daughter of James Barry, of Desert, William Barry, of Rockville, 
had issue — 
I. Edmund, who died in infancy. 

2 James Barry, of Dundullerick, gentleman, born 1782, and died 1846, 



206 BARRVMORE. 

having married in 1818 Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Barry, of 
Kilbolane, gentleman, and had issue — (i) William Barry, of Dun- 
dullerick, gentleman, who died unmarried 3rd February, 1875; (2) 
Edward Barry, barrister-at-law, secretary to Sir Edward Sullivan, 
Master of the Rolls, died unmarried gth June, 1873 J (i) Anna Maria, 
married (i860) her cousin, Philip W. Creagh, solicitor, had issue- 
Captain James Wm. Joseph Creagh, born i8th Sept., 186^ : Philip 
William Creagh, veterinary surgeon, Fermoy, born 5th July, 1866; 
Eliza Mary Josephine, born i8th June, 1862, died 15th August, 1866; 
(2) Margaret, died unmarried 5th October, 1893. 
3 David Barry, of Barry's Lodge, gentleman, married Julia, daughter of 
Counsellor Geran, of Mitchelstown, and had issue — Richard Barry, 
of Barry's Lodge, gentleman, famous as a gentleman rider, died 
unmarried, 1895 ; Mary, married to John Burns, of Aghern, gentle- 
man ; Margaret, Julia. 

4. Edmond Barry, M.D., died unmarried soon after having taken out his 

degree. 

5. Richard Barry, of Greenville, gentleman, married Catherine, eldest 

daughter of John Galwey, of Rocklodge, Monkstown, county Cork, 
and Doon, county Clare, gentleman, third son of John Galwey, of 
Lota, county Cork, and Westcourt, county Kilkenny, gentleman. 
John Galwey, of Rocklodge, married, first, Miss Butler, who brought 
him the Doon estate ; he married secondly, Emily, sister of Nath. 
Gould, of Knockraha, gentleman, and had one son, Edward, who 
inherited the Doon estate, and five daughters — (i) Catherine, married 
to Richard Barry. Her fortune was £1,500; (2) Jane, married to 
Rev. Mr. Warren, and had issue Thomas Robert Warren, Dep. Insp. 
Gen. R.N., J. P. ; Major John Warren, J. P., Ballyglissane, county 
Cork ; (3) Mary, married to Osbourne Sampaio, Portuguese Consul, 
Cork ; (4) Elizabeth^ married to Moore Lebarte, of Bagatelle, 
Clonmel ; (5) Frances, married, first, to Justin McCarthy, s.p., and 
secondly, to William Henley, of Upper Downing, Kilworth. By his 
marriage with Catherine Galwey Richard Barry, of Greenville, had 
issue — (i) Richard, an idiot, died aged twenty years ; (2) John Barry, 
landing waiter in H. M. Customs, Cork, married Rebecca Mary 
Moore, daughter of Captain Samuel Moore, of Portarlington. 
Mrs. Lynch, of Youghal ; John Barry's sisters, Emily Blackburn, oi 
Chicago, and Mary T. Barry, appear to have written to the family 
giving many particulars unknown to them. Ihe writer has seen 
this correspondence. The union was not a happy one, as John Barry 
was in bad health, and religious differences occurred eventually. 
John Barry joined his sister in America, and died at her house ; his 



BARRYMORE. 207 

wife joined her father in England with her children, two sons and 
one daughter — Peter, died unmarried ; Rebecca, unmarried ; Donald, 
married Emma, daughter of Chas. Withers, Esq., of St. Albans, 
Herts, and had issue — Donald, married Gertrude Mary, daughter 
of Thomas Hill, M.D., of Grampound, Cornwall ; Frederick, 
unmarried ; Edward Patrick, Captain 2nd Life Guards (married 
Margaret Russell, daughter of Frederick Stoneham, Esq., Crayford, 
Kent, and Martha Russell of Swanscombe Manor, Kent, and who 
have issue two sons, William Edward and Frederick Donal) ; 
Walter George, unmarried ; Henry O'Neil, unmarried ; Arthur 
David, unmarried ; Emma, unmarried ; Catherine, unmarried. 
(3) Garrett Barry, of the Hon. East India Company's Navy, died 
unmarried ; (4) Edward, (5) Heniy, (6) Edmund — these three went 
with their father to Chicago, and died unmarried, so says their 
cousin. Major Warren; (i) Emily, married Charles Richard Black- 
bum, a nephew. Major Warren says, of Chief Justice Blackburn, and 
has issue a son, Barry Blackburn, and two daughters. 
6 William Barry, lieut. R.N., son of William Barry, of Rockville, died 
unmarried. 

7. Thomas Barry, of Rockville, gentleman, son of William Barry, of 

Rockville, married, about the 15 th of November, 1829, Julia, daughter 
of Stephen Murphy, of the city of Cork, draper, and had issue — (i) 
William Barry, of Rockville and Greenville, M.D., assist.-surgeon 
H.M. 36th Regiment of foot. He married a daughter of Count 
RiviUoli, and died the 17th day of June, 1887. All his children 
by his marriage with Miss Rivilioli died in childhood except 
Thomas and Beatrice, and perhaps Stephen ; (2) Thomas, heir 
to his uncle William, died unmarried ; (3) Stephen Barry, of Broom- 
field, county Cork, gentleman, a successful breeder of racehorses, 
who died unmarried on the 17th May, 1899; (i) Ada, unmarried; 
(2) Mary, unmarried. 

8. Garrett Barry, of Greenville, gentleman, J. P., owner of the famous 

racehorses Arthur and Waitawhile, died unmarried. 

9. Patrick Barry, of Cork, gentleman, died 1861, having married Mary 

Anne, daughter of Stephen Murphy, of the city of Cork, draper, and 
had with an elder son, Stephen Barry, of H. M. Customs, Cork, and 
a daughter, Kate, who both died unmarried, a younger son, William 
Henry Barry, of Ballyadam, gentleman, J.P., who was heir to his 
uncle, Henry Barry, of Ballyadam, and was for many years post- 
master of Cork. He married in 1857 PauHne Roche, only child of 
William Roche, son of Lawrence Roche, whose brother, John Roche, 
amassed great wealth during the French wars, and built Aghada 



208 BARRYMORE, 

House. John Roche's only daughter, married to — O'Brien, of 
Whitepoint, Queenstown, J. P., left a daughter, who married her 
cousin, WiHiam Roche, and with her husband died shortly after the 
birth of their only daughter, Pauline, who was entrusted to the 
guardianship of her uncle, Dr. O'Brien, of Liverpool, and at marriage 
had a fortune of ;^ 7,000. The issue of the marriage of William 
Henry Barry and Pauline Roche are — (i) Henry, born 1862 ; (2) 
William Gerard ; (i) Pauline ; (2) Edith, married — Hayes, surgeon- 
major H. M. Army Medical Department, and has issue ; (3) Mary, 
marrie'd Cecil Smith Barry, second son of Captain Richard Smith 
Barry, of Ballyedmond, and first cousin of the Hon. Arthur Hugh 
Smith Barry, P.C. [now Lord Barrymore] ; (4) Henrietta, (5) Kate. 

10. John Barry, Esq., M.D., medical officer of the Carrignavar dispensary 

district, and next of the Carrigtwohill dispensary district. He married 
Ellen, daughter of Mr. David Kearney, of Newcastle, county Tippe- 
rary, and died in December, 1879, leaving two sons and a daughter — 
(i) John, (2) Henry, M.D. ; (i) Eveleen, who on the 27th December, 
1872, married E. Browne Quirk, second son of Philip Quirk, Knockala 
House, Brombro, Cheshire ; issue — Lionel Quirk, Greenville House. 

1 1. Henry Barry, of Ballyadam, gentleman, barony constable of Barry- 

morei, coroner of tlie east riding of the county of Cork, Belgian Consul 
for the port of Cork, Knight of the Order of Leopold, etc., married 
a Miss Mary Lynch, and died on the i6th of December, 1868, 
without issue. 
I Johanna, the eldest daughter of William Barry, of Rockville, was born 
on thei 1st of July, 1784, and died unmarried 1873. 

2. Ellen, second daughter of William Barry, of Rockville, married James 

Fitzgerald, of Castlelyons, gentleman, and had issue an only son, 
William Edmond Fitzgerald, who died unmarried in Australia. 

3. Mary, third daughter of William Barry, of Rockville, died unmarried. 

James Barry, of Lackabeha, alias Birch Hill, and of Ahanisk, gentle- 
man, sixth son of Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and Rock- 
ville, from his great size was called in Gaelic Seamus mor ; similarly his 
brother Richard was called Risteard mor. He was born at Dundullerick 
1759, and died at Ahanisk on the 6th of July, 1830. In his father's will, 
dated 30th of March, 1783, he comes sixth son, and like everyone of the 
testator's descendants then living only comes there for a British shilling, 
the will being made wholly in favour of the testator's widow. He, James 
Barry of Birch Hill, and his brother, William Barry, of Rockville, are 
mentioned in the will of tlieir father-in-law, James Barry, of Desert, 
gentleman, thus : " I do appoint my brother-in-law, Martin Barry, of the 
city of Cork, James Barry, of Birch Hill, and William Barry, of Rockville, 



BARRYMORE, 209 

m}' executors to this my last will, hereby revoking any former will by 
me made. Given under my hand and seal the 21st day of November, 
I 793. James Barr}^" He is mentioned in the will of his brother, Richard 
Barry, of Barry's Lodge, J. P., dated 5th July, 181 7, and proved the 2gth 
October, 181 8, thus: "And as to and concerning my freehold estate and 
interest of and in the lands of Longstown and Woodstock respectively, 
situate in the barony of Barry-more, and county of Cork, I give, devise 
and bequeath the same, subject to the rents and covenants mentioned and 
contained in the lease under which I hold the same, unto my brother, 
James Barry, and his assigns for and during the term of his natural life, 
and from and after his decease I give and devise the same and all m.y 
estate therein unto my nephew, James Barry, youngest son of my said 
brother, James, his heirs, administrators and assigns." The following is 
his own will : " In the name of God. Amen. I, James Barry, of Ahanisk, 
IV the county of Cork, gentleman, being of sound mind and memory, do 
become entitled to as one of the next of kin of the late Count Stackpoole, 
m.ake and publish this my last will and testament. Whereas, I have 
already provided for my eldest son, Edmond Barry, and for my daughters, 
Joanna Fitzgerald and Mary- Ann Dvvyer, according to my abilities, I 
merely leave them now an equal share of any property I may have or 
become entitled to as one of the next of kin of the late Count Stackpoole, 
of France, with the rest of my unprovided children ; and as to any other 
estate or property which I have or may be entitled to, I leave, devise 
and bequeath the same as follows : As to the lands of Lackabehy, in the 
barony of Barrymore, and county of Cork, part of which is leased to my 
son, Edmond Barry, at a low rent, which was his provision, I charge and 
incumber the same, that is my interest therein, with the yearly annuity 
of thirty pounds per annum for my dear wife, Abigail, during her life, by 
two equal half yearly payments, to be payable on every first of May and 
first of November, the first payment thereof to be made on whichever of 
such days shall next happen after my decease, the same to be paid her 
by my son, James, out of said lands, and for which I give her full power 
to destrain said lands, and to dispose of such distress according to law. 
And as to my estate and interest in the said lands of Lackabehy and my 
lands of Ahanisk, subject as aforesaid, I hereby charge and encumber 
them with the sum of three hundred pounds sterling, that is to provide 
for my three daughters unmarried, namely, Ellen, Dorothea, and Abigail 
Barry, a sum of one hundred pounds each to be paid thereout by ray son 
James, with legal interest at six per cent, from the day of my death, and 
I direct that my son, James, shall provide for my said unmarried daughters 
until they are married or provided for, and the interest of their hundred 
pounds to go towards their clothing ; and subject to these provisions I 



2IO BARRYMORE. 

leave, devise and bequeath my estate and interest in said lands of Lacka- 
behy and Ahanisk unto my said son James Barry. I also leave and 
devise unto my said son, James, my estate and interest in the lands of 
Ballyadam, and the estate and interest in the lands of Ballyleara (which 
came to me by right of survivorship upon the demise of my brothers 
William and Richard), and which right I insist upon unto my said son, 
James Barry. My household furniture I give the use of to my said wife 
for her life, and then to go to my said son James. And as to my live 
stock and farming implements they are to go to my said son James. 
And as to any property I may be entitled to as one of the next of kin 
of said Count Stackpoole, I leave, devise and bequeath the same in equal 
proportions to and amongst all my children. And as to any other 
estate or property which I may be entitled to and not hereby disposed 
of, and particularly any money which I may be entitled to from my 
nephew, Garrett Barry, for overholding the lands of Longstown and 
Woodstock, I leave, devise and bequeath the same unto my said son, 
James Barry, who is my residuary legatee, and I hereby nominate and 
appoint Thomas Dwyer,- of Midleton, and my said son, James Barry, 
executors of this my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have 
hereunto and to a duplicate hereof of the same tenor and date hereof put 
my hand and seal this ninth day of June in the year of Our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and thirty. — James Barry. Signed, sealed, pub- 
lished and declared by the testator as and for his last will and testament in 
the presence of us, who have at his request and in his presence and in the 
presence of each other hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses — ■ 
James Cotter, Michael Guiry, Jeffery Bateman." 

James Barry, of Birch Hill and Ahanisk, married Abigail, second of 
the three daughters of James Barry, of Desert, gentleman, by his first 
wife, Ellen Barry, who was a first or second cousin of James Barry, of 
Ballinaltig, gentleman, born 1732, father of the celebrated John Milner 
Barry, M.D. The other daughters of the said James Barry, of Desert, 
by his first wife, were Margaret, mentioned already as wife of William 
Barry, of Rockville, and Mary, who married a Mr. Riordan, of Cork, and 
died s. p. By his second wife, Ellen, daughter of David Barry, of 
Couragh, James Barry, of Desert, had many sons, of whom the youngest 
was Robert Barry, of Desert, and subsequently of Ballinacurra, merchant 
and shipowner, within the writer's memory. In the writer's possession 
is a notebook bound with a pocket almanac of the year 1763, in which 
James Barry, of Birch Hill and Ahanisk, has entered the birth of his 
eldest son and the age of his wife and her sister Mary, thus : Ned, born 
Friday, 7 May, 1790; christened 13th; godfather and mother, William 
Barry and Joanna Barry. 



BARRYMORE. 211 

Abigail, born nth February, 1766; Mary, born 23 March, 1768. 

Abigail Barry married, first, James Cotter, of Castlelyons. In the 
Catholic marriage register of the united parishes of Rathcormac and 
Gortroe, which goes back to 1770, the entry of that marriage is as follows : 
"A.D. 1783, Feb. 23. Conjunxit T. D. Simon Ouin, Jacobum Cotter, 
de Castlelyons, et Abigalem Barry, de Desart, obtenda dispensatione 
super Bannis, presentibus Jacobo Cotter, Jacobo Barry et Patritio Barry. ' 
The issue of that marriage was an only son, James Cotter, clerk of the 
Midleton Union, who was born 1784, and died 1867, at his home at 
Carrigtwohill. By his wife, Penelope, eldest daughter of Thomas 
Barry, M.D., of Moghera, Castlelyons, he had three sons and two 
daughters — -(i) David, died unmarried; (2) William, died unmarried; 

(3) Patrick, clerk of Midleton Union in succession to his father, died 
unmarried ; (i) Abigail, married David Sisk, and with him went to the 
United States of America ; (2) Elizabeth, married her second cousin, 
James David Barry, in America. James Cotter, married to Abigail Bany, 
of Desert, died on 17 March, 1784. Flis widow, who survived until the 
17 March, 1833, married, secondly, 1789, James Barry, sixth son of 
Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and Rockville. The issue of 
that marriage were — (i) Edmond, Barry, of Birch Hill and Midleton, 
gentleman, who was born the 7th of May, 1790, and died October 1853, 
having married, on the 7 March, 1832, Mary Anne, daughter of Maurice 
Tohn Murphy, of Clontead, in the barony of Muskry and county of 
Cork. She was born on St. Swithin's Day, 1808, died the 3rd of 
February, 1880, and was interred in her brother John's tomb in Coach- 
ford Catholic churchyard. Edmond Barry's survivmg issue of that 
marriage were (i) Margaret Barry, born August 6th, 1834, died unmarried 
July 13th, 1876; (2) Edmond Barry, born 7th March, 1837, parish priest 
of Rathcormac, M.R.I.A., V.P.R.S.A.I., compiler of this Historical and 
Genealogical Account of the Barry Family ; (3) James Barry, M.D., 
medical ofhcer Carrigtwohill Dispensary District ; a retired surgeon- 
Riajor H.M.A.M.D. ; served in England, Ireland, Northern India, Central 
America, and the West Coast of Africa ; is a J.P. for British Honduras. 
He married, in 1870, Alice, daughter of James Edward Marshall, whose 
father was rector of Athlone. The issue of Dr. Barry by his marriage are 
— (i) James Barry, Licentiate in Medicine and Surgery, medical ofhcer 
Rathcormac Dispensary District, born ist May, 1871 ; (2) Edmond Barry, 
of Kildinan, born 15th April, 1872; (3) Joseph Barry, born Feb, 1876; 

(4) Henry, etc. 

James Barry, junior, of Ahanisk, and subsequently of Glandore and 
Skibbereen, gentleman, second son of James Barry, senior, of Birch Hill 
c'nd Ahanisk, married Sarah, eldest daughter of James Curtain, of Carri- 



212 BARRVMOKE. 

goon, gentleman, and his wife, Teresa, second daughter of William 
Creagh, of Oldtown, gentleman, and his wife, Sarah, daughter of Pierce 
Nagle, of Anakissy, gentleman, and relict of Edward Nagle of Cloghei 
Castle, gentleman. In Gaelic, just as James Barry, senior, of Ahanisk, 
was known as Seamus Mor, "Big James," so James Barry, junior, of 
Ahanisk, was known as Seamus Leathan, " Broad James." He mis- 
managed his property, and died without issue 1863, aged 7i. His wife 
predeceased him. 

Richard, third son of James Barry, senior, of Birch Hill and Ahanisk, 
died in infancy. 

Ellen, eldest daughter of James Barry, senior, of Birch Hill and Aha- 
nisk, died unmarried. 

Johanna, second daughter of James Barry, senior, of Birch Hill and 
Ahanisk, married Richard Fitzgerald, of Tallow, gentleman, only son of 
Dr. Maurice Fitzgerald, of Killeagh, younger son of Richard Fitzgerald, 
of Castlerichard, representative of the Fitzgeralds of Castlemartyr, 
Seneschals of Imokilly. Issue — (i) Maurice Fitzgerald, manager Munster 
Bank, Midleton, married Mary, only child of S. Creagh, of Limerick ; issue 
three daughters and one son, Richard Fitzgerald, medical otiicer Walsli- 
townmore Dispensary District, representative of the Seneschals of 
Imokilly, born 24th August, 1868; (2) James, married, and has issue in 
Australia ; (3) Richard, married, and has issue in Australia ; (4) Edmond, 
married, and has issue in Australia ; (i) Mary Anne, unmarried. 

Dora, third daughter of James Barry, senior, of Birch Hill and Aha- 
nisk, died unmarried. 

Margaret, fourth daughter of James Barry, senior, of Birch Hill and 
Ahanisk, died an infant. 

Mary Anne, fifth daughter of James Barry, senior, of Birch Hill and 
Ahanisk, married, on the 29th of November, 1829, Thomas Dwyer, of the 
Brewery, Midleton. They died without issue, he m March, 1839, and 
she in December, 1879. 

Abina, sixth daughter of James Barry, senior, of Birch Hill and 
Ahanisk, married Con O'Neill, gentleman, and died without issue. 

Richard Barry, of Barry's Lodge, gentleman, J. P., youngest son of 
Edmond fitzGarrett Barry, of Dundullerick and Rockville, gentleman. 
11-= was named Richard after his godfather, Richard Tooker, a Protestant, 
who, in evasion of the penal laws against Catholics, held Dundullerick in 
secret trust for Richard Barry's grandfather, Garrett Barry, a Catholic. 
In his youth Richard Barry was in the office of the great wine merchant, 
Sampeio, and spent much time at Lisbon ; afterwards he bought corn 
extensively at Barry's Lodge, at first called Barley Lodge. He got a 
Icirge fortune with his wife, Honora, daughter of Garrett fitzThomas 



BARRYMORE, 213 

Barry, gentleman, a first and second cousin and legatee of Francis Barry, 
of Tignegeragh, gentleman. Richard Barry's wife was a first cousin of 
the wives of his brothers. William and James. John Barry, an uncle of 
these three ladies, died without issue and intestate in Spain, and his 
wealth, amountmg to many thousand pounds, was distributed amoncst his 
next of kin, and much of it came to these three ladies. 

The date of the last will of the said Richard Barry was the fifth da\- 
of July, 1 81 7. Administration to that will was taken out on 2nd day 
.:,f October, 181 8. 

Dora, eldest daughter of Edmond Barry, of Rockville and Dun- 
dullerick, gentleman, married Thomas Coppinger, of Barry's Court, 
gentleman (see Coppinger pedigrees), who, after his marriage, resided 
at Rossmore, and had issue — (i) Edmond Coppinger, of Rossmore, 
gentleman ; (2) William Coppinger, of county Waterford, gent. ; (3) John 
Coppinger, of Midleton, brewer ; (4) Joseph Coppinger, of Midleton, 
brewer; (i) Johanna, married Stephen J. Coppinger, of Midleton, gentle- 
man, and was grandmother of the present Thomas Coppinger, of Midleton, 
gentlem-an, J.P. 

Mary Anne, second daughter of Edmond Barry, of Rockville and 
Dundullerick, gentleman, married (about 1784) philip Barry, of Ballyna- 
hma, gentleman, and had issue a daughter, Mary Anne, who married 
James Creagh, of Ballygriffin, gentleman, and was mother of the present 
Philip W. Creagh, of Dundullerick, gentleman, J.P. 

The junior branch of the Dundullerick family is descended from 
Thomas Barry, a younger son of Thomas FitzEdmond Barry, of D'ln- 
dullerick. The said Thomas FitzThomas Barry married a Miss Davis, 
and was father of David Barry, of Hightown and Cronovan, who married 
a Miss Daly, of Desert, and thereby had four sons — (i) Thomas Earr)-, 
M.D. ; (2) Garrett Barry, M.D. ; (3) Edmond, an apothecary, and (4) 
James, who died unmarried. First, then. Dr. Thomas Barry, eldest son 
of David Barry, of Cronovan, lived at Mohera, Castlelyons, and by his 
first wife, Grace, sister of Pierce Power, of Clonmult, he had five sons 
and seven daughters — (i) David, (2) Thomas, (3) Pierce, (4) Garrett, 
(5) Edmond, only the eldest of whom. Dr. Thomas, left issue. The 
daughters were — (i) Pennie, wife of James Cotter, of Carrigtwohill, 
gentleman ; (2) Mary, wife of a Mr. Lane, of Cloyne ; (3) Grace, married 
to a Mr. Riordan ; (4) Ann, married to William Fitzgerald ; (5) Elizabeth, 
married to a Mr. Power ; (6) Margaret ; (7) Nano. Dr. Thomas Barry, 
of Mohera, married, secondly, a Miss Pierd, of Cooleabbey, and had 
is.^ue a daughter, Rose Ellen. 

David Barry, M.D., Fermoy, eldest son of Thomas Barry, M.D., 
Mohera, married Mary Peacock-Cook-Collis, of Castle Cook, and had 



2 14 BARRYMORE. 

issue — (i) Thomas D. Barry, who married Jeanette, only child of Captain 
Smith, H. M. Royal Waggon Train, of Pwllinegen, Monmouthshire, and 
had issue — (i) Edmond H. W. Barry, clerk in Orders, unmarried ; (2) 
Garrett James, married, and had four daughters, one of whom is still 
living ; (3) Thomas David Collis, surgeon-captain, who married and had 
issue, Thomas and Denis. 

Thomas D. Barry has three daughters — (i) Jeanette, married to — 
Linton ; (2) Alice Mary ; (3) Edith Collis. 

William, second son of David Barry, M.D., Fermoy, died in child- 
hood. The third son, David T. Barr}% M.A., clerk in Orders, Fischely 
Rectory, Norwich, married Anne, daughter of Surgeon-Captain McKee, 
and had issue— (i) William Russell, B.A„ Judge B.S.C., Allahabad; 
David, second son, married his cousin, Mary Dounton ; (3) Rev. George 
Duncan, B.A., married a daughter of Commander Reid, R.N., and has 
issue a son. The fourth son of Dr. David Barry, Fermoy, Zachary, D.D., 
clerk in Orders, married Elizabeth, daughter of Captain Caleb Robertson, 
and had issue — (i) Collis, married; (2) Caleb Robertson, married; (3) 
Fred, died unmarried ; (^4) Arthur Edmond, married ; (5) Hugh. 

Dr. Garrett Barry, second son of David Barry, of Hightown and 
Cronovan, has now no extant issue. Edmond, third son of David Barry, 
or Hightown and Cronovan, married a sister of Dr. Geran, of Kilworth, 
and had issue David, John, Garrett, Matthew, Anne, and Mary. David 
married and had a numerous family. 

THE END. 



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