(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of ""Bat Boy: The Musical" Scene Design"

"Bal Box: The Musical'" Scene Design 

by 

Christopher Shane Dills 



A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of 
Requirements of the CSU Honors Program 

for Honors in the degree of 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 

in 

Theatre Design & Technology. 

College of Arts and Letters, 

Columbus State University 



O 


r- 

K 



Thesis Advisor 



W^Y^o-cJQui HfyX (KaajuJiM 



Committee Member 



Committee Member 



CSU Honors Program Director 




-v~ 



CSU Honors Committee Member 



/i 
— c^ 



<£\ 



• 



VJ 



Date (^-IJL-O ? 
Date p-lfrf*& 
Date j? -&6g 
Date 1 fl/l ^fa% 



Date 



• 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/batboymusicalsceOOdill 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Dills 1 



SECTION 1: ANALYSIS 

- Francis Hodge's Given Circumstances Analysis, 

- Design Script Analysis,,...., 



Section 2: Research Images.................... 

- Film Noir ........................................ 

- Caves .............................................. 

- Meat Hooks & Revival Cross......... 

- Front Doorways.............................. 

- Tree/Forests .................................... 

- Exterior Windows................ 

- Weekly World News Covers ........... 

- Churches......................................... 

- Printing Presses............................... 

- Tabloid/Newspaper Printing........... 

- Revival/Tent Meeting ..................... 

- Slaughterhouse................................ 

- Warehouses 

- West Virginia Topography .............. 

- Wheeling. West Virginia................. 



33 
34 
37 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
50 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 



Section 3: Draftings & Paperwork.................. 

- Scene Ground Plans................................ 

- Cave Drop Elevations............................. 

- Platform Elevation.............. 

- Front Door Elevation/Section View. 

- Cage Plans .............................................. 

- Shelly & Hospital Room Window Plans 

- Revival Cross Plan.................................. 

- Rock Unit Plans...................................... 

- Tree Plans ............................................... 

- Scene Shift Plot 

- Fly Information....................................... 



58 
59 
68 

73 
77 
79 
80 
81 
82 
84 
85 
90 



Section 4: Process Photos ...... 



Section 5: Production Photos , 



91 

94 



Section 6: Postmortem,... 



io: 



Dills 2 



SECTION 1 

- Analysis - 



- Section I: Analysis - Dills 3 

FRANCIS HODGE'S GIVEN CIRCUMSTANCES: 

A. Environmental Facts 

1. Geographical Location: The Exact Place 

Hope Falls. West Virginia, Population 500 

2. Date: Year, Season, Time of Day. What is significant about the date? 

Present (2008), Fall at the beginning of the play and progresses into Spring by the 
beginning of act two and the revival. Time of day is generally midday except for the 
Christian Charity until the end of Dance with Me, Darling. During this portion of act one 
it is night time and it is storming, Hence the lightning flashes and power outages called 
for in the script and stage directions. The end of act two, when the towns people and Bat 
Boy are at the mouth of the cave, is also at night, or dusk. 

3. Economic Environment: Money, class level, state of wealth or poverty. What does 
economics mean to the characters? If you don't think economics matters to the 
characters, think again. 

Hope Falls, West Virginia is in economic turmoil, the coal mines have closed up and 
the people have turned to raising cows to earn their living. The problem is that the cows 
are not large enough, according to government regulations, to slaughter. Not to mention 
that the cows have suddenly begun to die due to what they are calling a "plague". There 
are twenty-three dead cows and they are looking for a reason, any reason, to place the 
blame upon. Edgar arrives on the scene and is a convenient outlet to place the blame 
upon. He is different, an outcast, and that scares the townspeople. 



Francis Hodge's Given Circumstances Analysis 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 4 

4. Political Environment: The specific relationship to the form of government and laws 
under which the characters live. Does the political setting and its law s affect the 
behavior of the characters? Look carefully throughout the script, for the author 
may be taking given circumstances for granted on the assumption that those who 
read the play will understand the context. If you do not think politics matters to the 
characters, think again, harder. It does. 

The economic situation in Hope Falls has put pressure on the mayor and the sheriff 
to come up with a solution and when Edgar is placed as the cause of the plague they are 
pressured into killing him. If Edgar is dead then the plague will end and the cows can 
grow big enough to slaughter, or so they believe. This pressure is clearly expressed in 
Another Dead Cow and Christian Charity (Reprise). This clearly shows that government 
is easily pressured into caving into what its constituents desire. Small town America 
is more subject to this than any place else. The people are so limited and trapped by 
their small town that they cannot see a bigger picture of things that are different and that 
different is not necessarily a bad thing. 

5. Social Environment: The specific characters in this play and how they function 
together or do not. Friendships and love relationships. 

There is a very tense social environment in the town of Hope Falls, West Virginia. The 
townsfolk cannot accept something that is different. It scares them, Edgar scares them, 
They come to blame him for the plague and they are easy to accept his responsibility 
because of their narrow mindedness. 

The townsfolk want the sheriff to kill the bat boy or they will run against him in the 
next election and kill the bat boy themselves. 

Meredith and Dr. Parker are going through a rough patch. She has not been romantic 

- Francis Hodge's Given Circumstances Analysis - 



Section 7; Analysis - Dills 5 

with him for quite some time and this has driven him to drinking and going out a lot. 
Generally spending a lot of time away from the house. This could also be because of the 
circumstances surrounding why he married Meredith and what Shelly reminds him of. 
This being Edgar. T hings seem to be turning around for Dr. Parker and Meredith when he 
agrees to help keep bat boy alive and Meredith agrees to sleep with Dr. Parker. She is just 
using him though and this drives Dr. Parker over the edge towards what happens at the end 
of the play. 

The Taylor family represents the townspeople of Hope Falls. They seem to be the 
author's way of verbalizing the way the townsfolk feel. They hate Edgar because of what 
is happening to Ruthie Taylor and later into the play because of the deaths of Ron and 
Rick. 

Edgar and Shelly fall in love with each other. This could be because Edgar is nice to 
Shelly and treats her right. Something Rick Taylor, her former boyfriend, did not. Or 
it could be because they have some sort of psychological connection due to the fact that 
they are half brother and sister. While this relationship appears sweet and romantic to the 
novice, outside viewer, it is also socially wrong and unacceptable in many ways. 

Meredith has an odd bond with Bat Boy from the very beginning. This is explained by 
the end of the play because she is Edgar's mother. 

6. Moral Environment: Formal and informal psychological controls. What is 
considered "right" and "wrong." Accepted codes of religious or spiritual beliefs. 
Who controls those? 

'"Right and Wrong" and what that means is precisely what is being questioned in 
this musical. The townspeople are very much what is considered right wing, Christian 
fanaticals. They cannot accept anything that is different than themselves. Something that 

- Francis Hodge's Given Circumstances Analysis - 



- Section 1; Analysis - Dills 6 

is exactly opposite of what is commonly considered the Christian way of life. Edgar just 
wants to be accepted and to find out who he is. He seems to be living a more "Christian" 
way of life than the townspeople. 

Morals are also questioned via the intercourse/rape between Thomas and Meredith. 
This being sexual intercourse outside of wed-lock and how Thomas felt obligated to marry 
Meredith after he found out that she was pregnant. Morals are also questioned by the 
relationship between Edgar and Shelly and how it is verging on incest. 

B. Previous Action 

1. What has happened before the present action begins. Explore how the past plays 
a part in propelling the present action, intruding upon the present and catching it off 
guard. 

The coal mines closed in Hope Falls, West Virginia and the townspeople turned to raising 
cows on the side of a mountain as their way of life and the means in which to get by. This 
provides the source of tension in the musical and the conflict but the entire action of this 
musical relies on one event. That event is the rape of Meredith by Thomas and bats and how 
that resulted in the birth of Edgar and Shelly. 

2. Description of the stasis up to the beginning of the play. What might happen if the 
stasis continued? Stasis is defined as "a state of static balance or equilibrium", 

Up to the beginning of the play the townspeople were looking for a way out, some way 
to live by. Everything they know is falling apart around them. Also. Meredith and Thomas 
seem to just be going through the motions of marriage out of some sense of obligation. If 
Edgar had not shown up, then Thomas and Meredith might have continued with their facade. 
Shelly would have continued to date Rick and been abused. The catharsis of the townspeople 

■ Francis Hodge's Given Circumstances Analysis - 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 7 

that occurs through this story would not have happened if the bat boy had not shown up. 

3. The intrusion: Describe the "something" that upsets the stasis. 

The Taylor kids repelling down into the cave that the bat boy is living in, bat boy biting 
Ruthie. and his subsequently being brought into town is what upsets the "stasis". 

C. Polar Attitudes of the Principal Characters: Every character in a play is conditioned 
by the world of his or her own prejudices, tolerances and intolerances, assumptions and 
"hang-ups." In the course of a play principal characters do not change in character as 
mueh as their attitudes change under pressure from forces outside their control. The 
development in a play's action is composed, therefore, of the changing attitudes in the 
principal characters towards their inner environment and towards their special world. 
It is usually easier to find the initial pole for each character by noting what happens to 
his or her character at the end. 
Edgar (Bat Boy): Innocence to confused hatred 
Meredith Parker: Loss/Remorse to Ownership/Responsibility 
Dr. Thomas Parker: Yearning to Anger to Regret 
Shelly Parker: Searching to Revelation 

The idea of a small town is very important. While Hope Falls is not an actual town in 
West Virginia. Wheeling, which is mentioned in the play, is. I utilized an article on Wheeling, 
West Virginia to get a better idea of what the town looks like and what its demographics are. 
This article helps relate the fictional world of the play to present, actual, locations. 



- Francis Hodge's Given Circumstances Analysis 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 8 

RESOURCES USED IN FRANCIS HODGE'S GIVEN CIRCUMSTANCES: 

Google Image Search, 28 April 2008. http://images.google.com 
"Wheeling. West Virginia." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 27 April 2008. 
28 April 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheeling, West Virginia 



Francis Hodge's Given Circumstances Analysis 



- Section I: Analysis - Dills 9 

DESIGN SCRIPT ANALYSIS 

1. Note the first impressions: how you sense the play or how you feel about it. It may 
pertain to the whole play or speeific scenes. 

a. If sensations occur as reactions to scenes give them a form. 

See research images for visual impressions of the play and justification for their relevance, 

b. If it feels a certain way, i.e. cold, brittle, try to put an image to it. 

See research images for visual impressions of the play and justification for their relevance. 

2. Take note of the following things: 

a. Synopsis - this outlines the play's acts, scenes or parts, referring to the specifics of 
location and time. 

A boy who is half-bat half-human is found, captured, and taken to the town of Hope 
Falls. West Virginia. He is not accepted and thought to be the cause of a cow plague. He 
becomes more and more human but Thomas Parker will not have it. Dr. Parker kills Ruthie 
Taylor and convinces the townspeople that the bat boy did it through his bite and that the bat 
boy is indeed responsible for the plague. The townspeople take matters into their own hands 
and hunt down the bat boy. He cannot have any sort of happiness, not even Shelly, who turns 
out to be his half sister. It is impossible for him to be accepted know matter what he does 
or how hard he tries. Ultimately Thomas Parker slits his own throat, then kills bat boy, then 
accidentally Meredith, leaving Shelly alone with the townspeople to lament about the loss 
and the prejudice. 



- Design Script Analysis 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 1 

b. List of Characters 

1. Note the number of characters and whether the author intended actors to 
double-up on parts. Note how many characters are on stage at the same time - the 
maximum number on stage. 

BAT BOY : Also referred to as "Edgar." A bat boy, 

MEREDITH PARKER : Wife to Thomas. 

THOMAS PARKER : Also referred to as "Doctor Parker." The town veterinarian, 

Husband to Meredith, 
SHELLEY PARKER : The rebellious daughter of Thomas and Meredith. Girlfriend of 

Rick, 
SHERIFF REYNOLDS : The local sheriff, coming up for re-election. Sometimes doubles 

as Delia. 
RICK TAYLOR : A rowdy, spelunking teenager. Kin to Ron and Ruthie. son of Mrs. 

Taylor. Boyfriend of Shelley, Commonly doubles as Lorraine and Mr. 
Dillon. 
RON TAYLOR : A rowdy, spelunking teenager, brother of Rick, and Ruthie, son of Mrs, 

Taylor. Commonly doubles as Maggie, 
RUTHIE TAYLOR : A rowdy, spelunking teenager. Youngest of 3. Kin to Rick and Ron, 

daughter of Mrs, Taylor. Commonly doubles as Ned, 
MRS. TAYLOR : An overprotective, aggressive mother. Mother of Rick, Ron, and Ruthie, 
Usually a drag role. Commonly doubles as Reverend Hightower and 
Roy. 
LORRAINE : A townswoman, Commonly doubles as Rick (a male drag role when 

performed this way) and Mr. Dillon. 
DELIA : A townswoman. Sometimes doubles as Sheriff. 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 1 1 

MAGGIE : The mayor of Hope Falls. Commonly doubles with Ron. 

DAISY : A townswoman. Commonly doubles as Bud and Pan, 

MR. DILLON : a rancher. Sometimes doubles as Lorraine and/or Rick. 

BUD : A rancher. Commonly doubles as Pan and Daisy. 

NED : A rancher, often played by a woman in drag. Commonly doubles as Ruthie. 

ROY: A townsman. Often doubles as Mrs. Taylor/Rev. Hightower. 

CLEM : A townsman 

REVEREND BILLY HIGHTOWER : A preacher and faith healer who holds a travelling 

Tent Revival/Barbecue. Commonly doubles as Mrs. 

Taylor and Roy. 
PAN : The Greek goat-god of nature. Commonly doubles as Bud and Daisy. 
VARIOUS WOODLAND ANIMALS : Appear in ( Wdren Children 
BATS : Appear in flashback sequence 
YOUNG MEREDITH : Meredith in a flashback sequence. Commonly played by Meredith 

herself. 
MEREDITHS FATHER : In a flashback 
MEREDITH'S MOTHER : In a flashback 
A DOCTOR : commonly doubles with Bud/Daisy/Pan, 
INSTITUTE MAN : commonly doubles with Mrs. Taylor/Roy /Hightower. 
CHORUS : singer/dancers, additional townsfolk 

There are many different formats that the cast could be arranged in. Double casting 
seems to be common in this musical. The double casting could be the writer's way of 
commenting on how people have many different personalities or perhaps how people are 
all alike and act as a mob. The double casting could also be a way to show how this story 

- Design Script Analysis - 



Section 1: Analysis - Dills 1 2 

is being told from Edgar's viewpoint. The songs. Hold Me, Bat Boy Another Dead C Vni; 
Christian Charity Reprise, Comfort and Joy Make a Joyful Noise, Children, Children. 
and the Finale have the most people in them. Most of the numbers and scenes are just the 
Parkers and Bat Boy. 

c. Act or Scene Descriptions 

I. Note what happens in each scene/act. 
ACT1 

THE CAVE : The Taylor children climb into the cave, they find the bat boy. the bat 

boy bites Ruthie. they take the bat boy into Hope Falls. 

HOLD ME, BAT BOY : Townspeople appear and sing about the plight of the bat 

boy. The Taylor children and then the sheriff take the bat boy through the town 

occasionally showing him to enquiring townspeople. 

LIVING ROOM CUE : The sheriff arrives at the Parker house with the bat boy in 

tow. The relationship between Shelly Parker and Rick Taylor is introduced. 

CHRISTIAN CHARITY : The sheriff convinces Meredith and Shelly Parker to keep 

the bat boy until Dr. Thomas Parker gets back home and can decide what to do with 

the bat boy. 

UGLY BOY : The bat boy is being unruly in the cage and driving Shelly nuts. 

WATCH A WANNA DO? : Rick comes to the Parker house and taunts the bat boy. 

Meredith kicks Rick out of the house, This is the beginning of the end of the 

relationship between Shelly and Rick. 

A HOME FOR YOU : Meredith wants to find out what will make Edgar happy, what 

he needs. She is being motherly to him. Does she already suspect that she is his 

mother? 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1; Analysis - Dills 1 3 

ANOTHER DEAD COW : The townspeople express concern over the health of their 

cows and the plague. They begin to point the blame for the plague towards Edgar. 

DANCE WITH ME. DARLING : Meredith and Dr. Parker strike a deal for Dr. Parker 

to keep Edgar happy and alive. This means blood. The rough relationship between 

Meredith and Dr. Parker is brought to light. 

MRS. TA ) L OR 'S L ULLA B ) ' : In Ruthie's hospital room. The Taylor family threaten 

the sheriff to do something about the bat boy or they are going to take matters into 

their own hands. 

SHOW YOU A THING OR TWO : The evolution of Edgar into an acceptable young 

boy. This song covers an extended period of time. 

CHRISTIAN CHARITY (REPRISE) : In the town hall. The townspeople confront Dr. 

Parker about not bringing Edgar to the revival. 

MAY 1 HAVE THIS DANCE? : The romance between Shelly and Edgar is hinted at. 

Dr. Parker confronts Meredith about not bringing Edgar to the revival. 

A HOME FOR YOU : Meredith shares her resolve to bring Edgar along with Shelly to 

the revival despite Dr. Parker's and the townspeople's objections. 

PARKER'S EPIPHANY . Dr, Parker realizes that he has lost Meredith, that she cares 

more about Edgar than she does about him. He resolves to get his revenge on Edgar, 

COMFORT AND JOY : Dr. Parker kills Ruthie and the townspeople reveal their 

concern about Edgar and the fate of the town. 

ACT 2 

A JOYFUL NOISE : The townspeople come to the revival tent in the woods outside of 

the town of Hope Falls to hear Reverend Hightower. 

COME ON DOWN! : Reverend Hightower invites everyone to come down and be 

- Design Script Analysis - 



Section 1: Analysis - Dills 14 

healed, He asks who wants to be healed, Edgar and the Parkers, minus Thomas, 

arrive at the revival and Edgar expresses interest in being healed. Everyone is 

shocked that he showed up at the revival, Thomas had promised that he would not 

allow Edgar to come. 

LET ME WALK AMONG YOU : Edgar tries to sway the townspeople into accepting 

him as an equal and to give him a chance. 

A JOYFUL NOISE (REPRISE) : The townspeople agree to give Edgar and chance and 

Reverend Hightower "heals" Edgar. 

ALL HELL BREAKS LOOSE : Dr. Parker arrives at the revival and ruins the party. 

He tells everyone that Ruthie Taylor is dead and that it is because of the bite that 

Edgar gave her. Thomas Parker also tells how it is Edgar who is responsible for the 

cow plague. These two pieces of information cause the townspeople to turn on Edgar. 

Rick Taylor attacks Edgar, trying to kill him. The final break up of Shelly and Rick 

is witnessed. The love of Edgar by Shelly is sealed/very clear. Edgar bites him and 

Thomas takes advantage of this to kill Rick like he killed Ruthie. 

STOP THE BAT BOY! : This information and now Rick's death cause the 

townspeople to form a Frankenstein style lynch mob to hunt down Edgar and bring 

him to "justice". 

THREE BEDROOM HOUSE : Meredith and Shelly head off into the woods, away 

from Thomas. They are looking for Edgar. Meredith outlines her plan to leave 

Thomas and get a house for herself. Shelly, and Edgar. Shelly expresses her love for 

Edgar and how she wants to marry him. Meredith will not hear any of this and says it 

is wrong. Shelly runs away from Meredith. She is going to be with Edgar no matter 

what. 

BABE IN THE WOODS : Edgar finds Shelly in the woods and they express their 

- Design Script Analysis * 



Section 1: Analysis- Dills 15 

love for each other. 

CHILDREN, CHILDREN : Pan appears along with other forest animals and 

encourages Shelly and Edgar to "express" their love for each other. It is implied that 

they "sleep" together. 

BURN, YOU FREAK. BURN : Ron Taylor arrives at the Slaughterhouse and thinks 

that Edgar is inside of it. Some of the townspeople arrive a little later and think Ron 

is Edgar. Mrs. Taylor goes so far as to throw a torch into the slaughterhouse and 

burns it down. She kills her own son. 

MORE BLOOD/KILL THE BAT BOY! : The death of Ron Taylor further encourages 

the townspeople to kill Edgar. They seem to be blind with rage and unwilling to hear 

reason. 

INSIDE YOUR HEART : Shelly and Edgar further seal their love for each other. 

Shelly offers her blood to Edgar to keep him healthy, Edgar reluctantly accepts. 

IS ALL THAT YOU TAUGHT ME A TIE? : Meredith arrives and stops Edgar from 

biting Shelly. Edgar confronts Meredith about how can she stop him from loving 

Shelly. Meredith tells Edgar how she is his mother. This drives Edgar away from 

both Shelly and Meredith. Incest is revealed. 

APOLOGY TO A COW : Edgar has killed a cow. He does not want to but he is now 

going to do what the townspeople expect him to be. He is going to be a savage, If he 

is going to be persecuted for being a freak he is going to be a freak. 

HELLO, FATHER : Dr. Parker and some townspeople find Edgar with the cow. 

Edgar confronts Thomas about how he is his father. The truth is revealed to the 

townspeople. 

REVELATIONS : The past is relived/told to the townspeople about how Thomas 

was developing pheromones, there was an accident, bats raped Meredith, Edgar and 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section /. Analysis - Dills 1 6 

Shelly were conceived. Thomas reluctantly married Meredith out of obligation, and 

how Thomas took Edgar to kill him but could not. He left him at the mouth of a cave 

for him to die but he did not. Bats took Edgar in and raised him. 

FINALE: I IMAGINE YOU'RE UPSET : Meredith tries to make it right with Edgar 

but there is no hope of this. Thomas is going to do what he should have done a long 

time ago. 

FINALE: 1 AM NOT A BOY : Edgar just wants to be left alone. He does not fit in with 

the townspeople, He wishes he had never learned anything about living and being 

human. Thomas slits his own throat, when Edgar goes to drink his blood he stabs 

Edgar, Meredith tries to stop Thomas but Thomas accidentally stabs Meredith too. 

Shelly is the only one left alive. 

FINALE: HOLD ME, BAT BOY : Shelly and the rest of the townspeople lament about 

the loss of Edgar and how he was never understood and that people should be more 

understanding of things that are different than themselves. 

3. Questions to Ask Yourself 

a. Does any one moment have significance over another? In what way does the play 
build up or down? 

There are three moments that have the most significance in the action of the play. These 
three moments are Show You a Thing or Two when Edgar evolves, the revival when the 
townsfolk accept Edgar as an equal, and lastly in the Finale when the truth comes out about 
the Parkers and Edgar, when Thomas finally takes responsibility for what happened. 

The play is cyclical in its structure. The action begins in the cave, goes to the town, and 
then travels back to the cave. It builds towards Edgar's acceptance in the middle of the play 
at the revival, which is just after intermission, and falls apart until we reach the cave again. 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 1 7 

The cave seems to be the only place where the truth is told and where people do not hide 
behind a social facade. It is a place where civility can be found, not in the town where the so 
called civil people live. The wild live in the man made town, the civil in the wilderness and 
unknown of the forest and cave, 

b. Is there a balance in the emotion throughout? Hon expressive is this language, how 
colorful? 

There is a broad range of emotion that is exhibited in the musical. Some examples of 
these and their range are exhibited in What You Wanna Do, A Home For You, A Joyful Noise, 
and the beginning of the Finale. What You Wanna Do shows hatred and bigotry. A Home 
For You shows longing and compassion. A Joyful Noise shows rejoicing, happiness, and 
acceptance. The beginning of the Finale also shows hatred and an eagerness to jump to 
conclusions and to take the easy way out. 

c. Is there an atmosphere in terms of being hot or cold? How contrasting are the 
scenes? 

There is a definite cold and dark atmosphere to the play. The cave and the darkness 
found in them seem to be an over arching motif in the play. The darkness and the unknown 
that lie within it are always present in the action of the play. Edgar does not know what he is 
venturing into, the darkness, but yet he is venturing into it. The question to ask is whether he 
is doing this willingly. All of the scenes have this motif, unknown based in reality by solid 
scenic pieces. 

d. What themes run through each scene? Is there an overall theme? 

ACT1 

■ Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 1 8 

THE CAVE : Ignorance, arrogance, domineering, overwhelming, confusion, 

uncertainty, unknown, questioning 

HOLD ME, BAT BOY : Exploration, exhibition, dominance, belittling 

LIVING ROOM CUE : Naivety, control, structure, rules 

CHRISTIAN CHARITY : Uncertainty, hope, curiosity 

UGLY BOY : Frustration, anger, bitterness 

WATCHA WANNA DO? : Hatred, anger, sex, passion 

A HOME FOR YOU : Love, remorse, hope, longing 

ANOTHER DEAD COW : Uncertainty, questioning 

DANCE WITH ME, DARLING : Control, manipulation, lust 

MRS. TA YLOR 'S L ULLA B Y : Anger, love, tenderness, revenge 

SHOW YOU A THING OR TWO : Love, teaching, hope, happiness 

CHRISTIAN CHARITY (REPRISE) : Uncertainty, hope, controlling 

MAY I HAVE THIS DANCE? : Love, happiness 

A HOME FOR YOU : Love, happiness, joy 

PARKER'S EPIPHANY : Anger, revenge 

COMFORT AND JOY : Anger, revenge, control, hatred 

COMFORT AND JOY (PART II) : Anger, revenge, control, hatred, confusion 

ACT 2 

A JOYFUL NOISE : Joy, happiness, hope 

COME ON DOWN! : Hope 

LET ME WALK AMONG YOU : Longing, hopeful, begging 

A JOYFUL NOISE (REPRISE) : Joy. acceptance, happiness 

ALL HELL BREAKS LOOSE : Confusion, uncertainty, anger, bitterness, chaos 

- Design Script Analysis - 



Section 1: Analysis - Dills 1 9 

STOP THE BAT BOY! : Anger, hatred, revenge, confusion, chaos 

THREE BEDROOM HOUSE : Uncertainty, longing, regret, hope, optimism 

BABE IN THE WOODS : Love, hope, longing, optimism 

CHILDREN, CHILDREN : Love, hope, longing, happiness, optimism 

BURN, YOU FREAK, BURN : Anger, uncertainty, chaos 

MORE BLOOD/KILL THE BAT BOY! : Anger, hatred, chaos 

INSIDE YOUR HEART : Longing, remorse, regret, hope, optimism 

IS ALL THAT YOU TAUGHT ME A LIE? : Confrontation, loss, confusion, hate, 

longing, hope 

APOLC )G ) ' TO A I X) W : Confusion, regret, remorse, giving in 

HELLO, FATHER : Confrontation, anger, confusion, regret, remorse, loss 

REVELATIONS : Regret, remorse, loss, acceptance, reluctance 

FINALE: 1 IMAGINE YOU'RE UPSET : Regret, remorse, loss, upset 

FINALE: I AM NOT A BOY : Regret, remorse, loss, confusion 

FINALE: HOLD ME, BAT BOY : Hope, regret, remorse, loss 

There is a definite recurring theme of uncertainty, hatred, bitterness, longing, and regret 
throughout the show. The show builds from confusion, uncertainty, and hatred to joy and 
hope and then devolves back into confusion, uncertainty, hatred and chaos through the 
end of act two. This further emphasizes the cyclical structure of the play. 

e. Is there an apparently fragile or solid structuring? 

There is solid structuring. There is a clear journey from the cave, to the town, and then back 
to the cave. The evolution of the bat boy is parallel to this journey. The cave is inescapable, 
no matter how hard Edgar tries or how far he ventures into the "civilized'' world he is who he 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 20 

is and he finally realizes this by the end of the play and he is okay with it, 

f. Does the portrayal of life seem to rise, fall, tilt, or sway? 

The portrayal of life is thoroughly examined in the show. The play examines how an 
outcast can be taken into an unknown world and made to be a part of it Or more importantly 
how one really can never get rid of who you truly are. No matter how hard Edgar or 
the Parkers try, Edgar is and will always be a bat boy who needs blood. Is it okay to be 
different? Who is more civilized Edgar or the townspeople? Edgar is innocent and wanting 
to learn while the townspeople are so jaded, prejudiced, and begetting that they cannot accept 
anything or anyone that is different than themselves. 

g. How can you best describe the various moods created by each situation? 

The play is a roller coaster ride of moods. Dark and mysterious full of hate and fear in 
Another Dead Cow to bright and joyful full of love in Children, Children. This reflects the 
many different aspects of people and how situations effect them. 

h. Are you more focused on one aspect, one issue or one scene? 

I am most focused on how Edgar cannot escape his roots no matter how hard he tries. 
Also, the commentary on who is more civilized, the townspeople or Edgar? 

i. What quality of light is there? Are there dark secrets? 

There is a dark and mysterious quality to the light in the play. The mysterious quality 
of the unknown that lives in the darkness. Edgar is venturing into the unknown world of 
civilized man. Is the town of Hope Falls really civilized or is the forest and the cave the 
place for truth and acceptance? An art style named Chiaroscuro plays with the idea of light 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 21 

and its qualities This led me to the film style ealled Film Noir. The most notable example 
of the film noir style is Orson Welle's Citizen Kane, Film Noir is shot entirely in black and 
white and this pays homage to the Weekly World News which is the tabloid who originated 
the story of Bat Boy, All of their issues are printed in black and white ink. 

j. What are the most obvious historical period details? 

This play is placed in present day. It is interesting that it has a depression time period feel 
to it. The townspeople are in an economic struggle and are looking for any way out. They 
seem to be stuck in the past. 

k. Do you feel spatial relations? Are people and scenes huddled together, or spread out 
and airy? 

The play seems small, intimate, and huddled together. Huddled together is a good 
descriptive choice for the play seeing as how secrets and talking about people behind their 
backs is prevalent in the play and this action is commonly done in groups of people who are 
huddled together. There is a since of confusion and clutter in the play. What is right, what is 
wrong and who actually defines these terms. The cave is dark and full of unknown twists, the 
bat boy's life is like the cave, jumbled, confusing, dark, mysterious, and unknown. 

1. Which places from your experiences and memory come to mind from one location, 
then another? 

One place in particular reminds me of Hope Falls, West Virginia and the setting of Bat 
Boy: The Musical. This would be the town of Franklin, North Carolina, where my family is 
from and many of them still reside. 



Design Script Analysis - 



Section 1: Analysis - Dills 22 

m. What does it remind you of? 

Franklin is a small town in a very rural part of North Carolina that relies on a very few 
big businesses to keep the town afloat. Lumber is the big business in Franklin, this is just 
like the coal mines in West Virginia, If the lumber company was to fail, the townspeople 
would be at a loss for how to make a viable living 

n. How do the issues measure up against one another? Is there weight or mass to 
them? What is hollow? 

The issue of prejudice and bigotry, being okay with who you are. and the struggle with 
what does civilized and wild really mean are the most important issues presented in the 
musical, The civilized and prejudice factors have the most weight, The jungle of mankind is 
always looming over the story and the characters. 

o. What appears positive, what negative? 

The terms positive and negative reminds me a lot of Film Noir and the art term 
Chiaroscuro, These motifs and artistic styles tie in with the dark and mysterious imagery 
presented in the musical. They would be a good way to manifest these themes and motifs 
visually. See the research images and documents for more information on these styles. 

p. How does the play make you feel in terms of happiness or sadness? 

This musical makes me sad. No matter how hard Edgar tried he was never accepted, he 
searched and searched for who he was and for acceptance to never find it. The townspeople 
are nothing more than a mob who cannot think for themselves and this makes me worry 
about the state of people and society. This musical is a commentary on society, prejudice, 
bigotry, and the eagerness to point fingers, 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1; Analysis - Dills 23 

q. What may contribute to your favoring an issue or character? 

The hatred, the prejudice, and the unwillingness to accept something that is different 
contributes to liking Edgar and identifying with him. As a theatre major, perusing something 
that is considered a mistake when it comes to a viable career, I have to overcome adversity 
and people saying that my career choice is a mistake. I have to stand by who I am, just like 
Edgar, and fight for what I believe in. 

r. How do the characters balance out to one another? Do any appear as odd geometric 
shapes, or remind you of an animal? 

BAT BOY : Also referred to as ''Edgar." A bat boy. 

MEREDITH PARKER : Wife to Thomas. 

THOMAS PARKER : Also referred to as "Doctor Parker." The town veterinarian. 

Husband to Meredith. 
SHELLEY PARKER : The rebellious daughter of Thomas and Meredith. Girlfriend of 

Rick. 
SHERIFF REYNOLDS : The local sheriff, coming up for re-election. Sometimes doubles 

as Delia. 
RICK TAYLOR : A rowdy, spelunking teenager. Kin to Ron and Ruthie, son of Mrs. 

Taylor. Boyfriend of Shelley. Commonly doubles as Lorraine and Mr. 
Dillon. 
RON TAYLOR : A rowdy, spelunking teenager, brother of Rick, and Ruthie, son of Mrs. 

Taylor. Commonly doubles as Maggie. 
RUTHIE TAYLOR : A rowdy, spelunking teenager. Youngest of 3. Kin to Rick and Ron, 
daughter of Mrs. Taylor. Commonly doubles as Ned, 

- Design Script Analysis - 



Section 1: Analysis- Dills 24 

MRS. TAYLOR : An overprotective, aggressive mother. Mother of Rick, Ron, and Ruthie. 

Usually a drag role. Commonly doubles as Reverend Hightower and 

Roy. 
LORRAINE : A townswoman. Commonly doubles as Rick (a male drag role when 

performed this way) and Mr. Dillon. 
DELIA : A townswoman. Sometimes doubles as Sheriff, 
MAGGIE : The mayor of Hope Falls. Commonly doubles with Ron. 
DAISY : A townswoman. Commonly doubles as Bud and Pan. 
MR. DILLON : a rancher. Sometimes doubles as Lorraine and/or Rick. 
BUD : A rancher. Commonly doubles as Pan and Daisy. 

NED : A rancher, often played by a woman in drag. Commonly doubles as Ruthie. 
ROY : A townsman. Often doubles as Mrs. Taylor/Rev. Hightower. 
CLEM : A townsman 

REVEREND BILLY HIGHTOWER : A preacher and faith healer who holds a travelling 

Tent Revival/Barbecue. Commonly doubles as Mrs. 
Taylor and Roy. 
PAN : The Greek goat-god of nature. Commonly doubles as Bud and Daisy. 
VARIOUS WOODLAND ANIMALS : Appear in Children. Children 
BATS : Appear in flashback sequence 
YOUNG MEREDITH : Meredith in a flashback sequence. Commonly played by Meredith 

herself. 
MEREDITH'S FATHER : In a flashback 
MEREDITH'S MOTHER : In a flashback 
A DOCTOR : commonly doubles with Bud/Daisy/Pan. 
INSTITUTE MAN : commonly doubles with Mrs. Taylor/Roy/Hightower. 

- Design Script Analysis - 



Section 1: Analysis- Dills 25 

CHORUS ; singer/dancers, additional townsfolk 

s. Are some characters more colorful Chan others, do they have a relationship to 
texture? 

Meredith and Dr. Thomas Parker are more colorful than others. Their relationship and 
rough history really add a rough texture to their lives. A texture that most would not want 
to touch or live through but that still has an appealing quality to it. Perhaps like a surface 
coated with shattered glass. It is pretty to look at but when you actually touch it or live their 
relationship it will cut you and be very unpleasant. 

t. What friends or family come to mind for characters? 

Meredith reminds me of my own mother and 1 would argue every mother That is the 
idea of her character, the audience must be able to identify with her. Most every mother just 
wants the best for her children and to make people happy. The comment about how Meredith 
cries every time a stray dog dies is very telling. 

The townspeople remind me of many people who live in small towns especially in the 
southeastern area of the United States. My family is from a small town in Western North 
Carolina. A town where everyone generally knows everyone else and are very nosey. When 
people move into my family's home town everyone knows about it. Especially if they are 
from a very different part of the country or the world. It was not until the very recent past 
that ethnic food restaurants began to appear in the town. 

u. Is there a quality of line which can best express character and location? What 
quality of line suggests the differences between characters? Is one more fine and ornate 
like a scribble, another greyer and woollier like a smudge? 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 26 

This play, its characters, and their relationships can best be described as two dark, bold, 
perfectly straight parallel lines. They are two very pronounced, distinct markings/beings 
that look and behave very similarly yet never cross and cannot cross by definition, One line 
would represent Edgar and the wilderness/cave that he came from and the Townspeople and 
the manmade urban jungle of a town that they come from. 

v. The tensions that arise between characters can be best expressed in which kind of 
visual mark? 

The tension of something that is different and unknown infiltrating what is comfortable is 
the unavoidable conflict in the action of the musical, This can be best described via a visual 
marking in the form of parallel lines like previously stated. 

4. Research the author in more detail. 

LAURENCE O'KEEFE (MUSIC AND LYRICS) 

Also known as Larry, is a composer and lyricist for Broadway musicals, film and 
television. Until recently he was best known for writing the score for Bat Boy: The Musical, 
which ran off-Broadway from March 3 to December 2, 2001, followed by over 200 regional 
and amateur productions all over the USA. Bat Boy received eight Drama Desk Award 
nominations, including nods for Outstanding Music and Outstanding Lyrics, and won both the 
Lucille Lortel Award and the Outer Critics* Circle Award for Best Off-Broadway Musical. 

In 2001 . O'Keefe received the Jonathan Larson Performing Arts Foundation Award. In 
2004 O'Keefe won the Ed Kleban Award for Outstanding Lyrics, a $100,000 prize. There 
are two Kleban Awards every year, one given to a lyricist, the other to a book writer. There is 
no Kleban award for composers. In American arts and letters, only the Pritzker Architecture 
Prize and the MacArthur Foundation "genius grants 01 come with a bigger purse. 

- Design Script Analysis - 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 27 

Bat Boy opened at the Shaftesbury Theatre on London's West End on September 8, 2004. 
and ran till January 12, 2005, Bat Boy has also been produeed to acclaim in Seoul. South 
Korea, and Tokyo and Osaka in Japan, and at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. 

With his wife and co-writer Nell Benjamin, O'Keefe has also written two musicals for 
Theatreworks USA: Cam Jansen, and Sarah, Plain And Tall. Benjamin and O'Keefe also 
collaborated on a short musical entitled The Mice, which was produced by Hal Prince as a part 
of the three-show evening 3hree in Philadelphia, in 2000. Benjamin is also a Kleban Award 
winner for her lyrics, 

O'Keefe and Benjamin's current project. Legally Blonde: The Musical, opened in San 
Francisco in February 2, 2007, and opened on Broadway at the Palace Theatre on April 29. 
2007 and closed on October 19, 2008. For their work on Legally Blonde, they received 
Drama Desk nominations for Outstanding Music and Outstanding Lyrics, as well as a Tony 
Award nomination for Best Score. 

O'Keefe is a graduate of Harvard College, where he studied anthropology and was an 
active member of the Harvard Lampoon and the Krokodiloes. He got his start in musical 
theater through Harvard's Hasty Pudding Theatricals, performing in two of the Pudding's 
drag burlesques, composing two others (notably Suede Expectations, book by Mo Rocca), and 
penning the libretto of a fourth (Romancing the Throne). 

BRIAN FLEMMING (BOOK) 

Brian Flemming (born 6 June 1966) is an American film director and playwright. 
Flemming was born and raised in the San Fernando Valley and studied English at the 
University of California. Irvine. 

Flemming worked as a script reader for New Line Cinema while making his first feature 
film. Hang Your Dog in the Wind in 1997. To promote his film. Flemming co-founded a film 

- Design Script Analysis - 



■ Section 1: Analysis - Dills 28 

festival in Park City. Utah, called "the Slumdance Film Festival", a pun on the name of the 
Slamdance Film Festival (which in turn referred to the Sundance Film Festival). 

Slumdance brought Flemming to the attention of independent film maker John Pierson, 
who previously discovered Spike Lee. Michael Moore, and Richard Linklater. among others, 
Pierson later hired Flemming to work as a director and segment producer for Pierson's 
Independent Film Channel magazine-style show called Split Screen, which also featured a 
segment about Hang Your Dog in the Wind, 

In 1999 Flemming created an audio documentary. The Rabbi vs. Larry Flynt, about a 
debate on pornography between Rabbi Shmuley Boteach and Larry Flynt, 

Bat Boy: The Musical is based on a story about a half-bat half-boy from the tabloid 
Weekly World News. Flemming co-wrote Bat Boy with Keythe Farley and Laurence O'Keefe. 
The musical grew from small beginnings in a Los Angeles theater called the Actors" Gang 
to winning LA Weekly's Musical of the Year Award for 1997, plus four Ovation Award 
nominations and six Drama-Logue Awards. 

Bat Boy: The Musical made its way to Off-Broadway in March 2001 , where the play won 
the Lucille Lortel Award for Best Musical, the Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Musical 
Off-Broadway and six Drama Desk nominations. The Neyr Yorker described Bat Boy as, a 
"giggling cult hit". The New York Times wrote, "It is astonishing what intelligent wit can 
accomplish", The musical ran in New York through December 2001 and has since been 
staged thousands of times throughout the world, in several languages. 

Flemming's second feature film, a faux documentary about the assassination of Bill Gates 
called Nothing So Strange which debuted at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival. Variety called 
it. "a crackling good movie,., [that] may be the ideal prototype film for the digital age". The 
film won the Claiborne Pell New York Times Award for Original Vision at the 2002 Newport 
Film Festival and received international media exposure. Bill Gates said through a spokesman 

- Design Script Analysis ■ 



Section 1: Analysis- Dills 29 

that he was "very disappointed that a movie maker would do something like this". 

After failing to obtain a major studio distributor, Flemming and his co-producers chose 
to distribute the film themselves. On 23 October 2003 the film had a simultaneous debut 
in theaters and as an Internet download, becoming the first film ever to be commercially 
available in all countries at the same time. In April 2004. the film was released on DVD and 
is now available in more than 200 countries. 

In addition to working in film and theater. Flemming is an activist on copyright issues, 
He has released Nothing So Strange as an "open source" project, which means all of the raw 
footage that makes up the film is released without copyright restrictions for anyone to use. 
The final cut of the film, however, remains protected by copyright. 

Flemming founded the organization Free Cinema, which encourages feature filmmakers 
to create films under two rules: 

1 . No money may be spent on the production, and 

2. The film must be released under a copy left license. 

Flemming says that filmmaking can now be "as inexpensive as writing novels'" and 
that the copylefting practice is a way for new artists to gain notice and distribution in a 
marketplace dominated by large corporations. Free Cinema was inspired by the Open Source 
Software movement, which is guided by similar principles of freedom. Flemming is also the 
owner and operator of Fair Use Press, which distributes e-books critical of public figures such 
as Bill O'Reilly and Arnold Schwarzenegger for their stance on intellectual property law. 

During the 2007 Slamdance film festival. Flemming saw a demo of the video game Super 
Columbine Massacre RPG! and hearing about it having its nomination pulled by the festival's 
founder, convinced fellow jurors to award it a "Special Jury Prize" for Best Documentary (an 
unofficial award not endorsed by the festival). The festival's founder, Peter Baxter, later told 
Flemming that legal considerations prevented SCMRPG from receiving the award. 

- Design Script Analysis - 



Section 1 ; Analysis - D i 1 1 s 3 

In 2005, Flemming released his documentary The God Who Wasn t There, Through 
interviews with biblical and folklore scholars, Flemming investigates the evidence for the 
existence of Jesus, concluding that it is highly improbable he ever lived. Then, Flemming 
discusses the beliefs of conservative Christian fundamentalists, Christian moderates (who 
he argues simply enable the fundamentalists), and returns to confront the principal of the 
Christian school he attended as a child, 

The documentary came out of the research he did for his next film. Danielle, about a 
girl who discovers proof that Jesus never existed and, as a result, is attacked by Christian 
fundamentalists who believe she is the Anti-Christ, 

In April 2006, Flemming, along with the Rational Response Squad (an internet radio 
show), began the "War on Easter' to "provoke conversation about the dangers of religious 
belief '. Participants were invited to place DVDs of the documentary or downloaded flyers 
in or near Christian churches and send in photos of these actions in exchange for DVDs. 
Flemming posted the photos on a website. 

In late 2006, Flemming and the Rational Response Squad started the Blasphemy 
Challenge, which called on participants to upload videos to YouTube in which they "damn 
themselves to heir by making their own statement which must include the phrase: "I deny the 
Holy Spirit'", thus committing blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. The first 1001 users who did 
so received a DVD of God Who Wasn 'i There. 

Between his major projects, Flemming has worked as a photographer (London Mail on 
Sunday, Los Angeles Times. L.A. Weekly), journalist (Filmmaker and Movieline magazines), 
awards show writer (1998 and 1999 Independent Spirit Awards), and songwriter. 

KEYTHE FARLEY (BOOK) 

Keythe is a graduate of UCLA and is an active member of the Actors' Gang and Evidence 

- Design Script Analysis - 



Section 1: Analysis- Dills 31 

Room theatre companies. Keythe has written for, produced and/or voice-directed episodes 
of Rugrats, As Told By Ginger and The Wild Tliornberries for Klasky/ Csupo Inc. Keythe 
is also the co-autor of Bat Boy: The Musical (with Brian Flemming and Laurence O'Keefe) 
which is the recipient of the 2001 Outer Critics Circle and Lucille Lortel Awards for Best Off- 
Broadway Musical. 



- Design Script Analysis 



- Section 1: Analysis - Dills 32 

RESOURCES USED IN DESIGN SCRIPT ANALYSIS: 

"Bat Boy," Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 22 April 2008, 28 April 2008, 

http://en. wikipedia, org/wiki/Batboy 
"Bat Boy: The Musical," Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 28 April 2008, 28 April 2008. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bat_Boy: _The Musical 
"Brian Flemming." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 16 October 2008. 1 3 November 2008. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Flemming 
"Chiaroscuro," Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 23 April 2008. 28 April 2008. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiaroscuro 
Google Image Search. 28 April 2008. http://images.google.com 
"Keythe Farley." The Internet Movie Database. 13 November 2008. 13 November 2008. 

http://www. imdh. com/name/nm026 7660/ 
"Revival meeting." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 26 January 2008. 28 April 2008. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revival_meeting 
"Slaughterhouse." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 28 April 2008. 28 April 2008. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slaughterhouse 
"Tent revival.' 1 Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 22 April 2008, 28 April 2008. 

httpJ/en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Tent revival 
"Laurence O'Keefe (composer)" Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 6 Novemeber 2008. 

13 November 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurence_0 'Keefe (composer) 
"Weekly World News." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. 23 April 2008, 28 April 2008. 

http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Weekly _ World News 



- Design Script Analysis 



Dills 33 



SECTION 2 

- Research Images - 



Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 34 



FILM NOIR plays with the ideas of light 
and dark and silhouette. Light is used to 
draw and establish focus. Deep focus, or 

everything being in focus is common. 





The shadow of blinds provides an interesting 
modeling across the person and adds a sense 
of mystery to him and a sense of forboding. 



iinii» —« 






J 


1 





Chaotic nature and the lines of white and their 
contrast with the black. The lines converge to 
the person in the center and draw focus to him. 
They make him appear small and dominated. 



How the light coming through the window 
and the door establish their shape yet the wall 
is dark and mysterious. The shadows add an 
eerie feeling to the image. 



Film Noir 



Section 2: Research images - 



Dills 35 





ABOVE: Breaking down of the essentials of 
architecture and playing with light and shadow 
being cast upon the shapes of the windows and 
molding. 

LEFT: The interesting dynamic of the woman 
looming over the man and the contrast 
between light and dark and how it draws focus. 

BELOW: The epic nature of the environment 
and how it looms over and belittles the people. 




Film Noir - 



- Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 36 




The shadow of the person in the 
background is mysterious. Like the bat boy, 
is he dangerous. That you cannot see his 
features is threatening. 




Shadow and the silhouette of the unknown 
is interesting. What exactly is it that we are 
seeing? Is it a man with a knife? 





ABOVE: The interesting light angles and 
how it makes the woman look other 
worldly and mysterious. 

LEFT: The silhouette of the people and the 
mysterious quality of the fog and how it 
hides the objects within it 



- Film Noir 



Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 37 




Caves 



Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 38 




^J'bevri Deep 




- Caves - 



- Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 39 








These caves with their unique juxtaposition 
ofmanmade and natural is interesting. This 
provides a dynamic of the organic battling with 
the imposed man-made structure. This dynamic 
parallels that of the bat boy and the townspeople 
of Hope Falls. 





- Caves 



Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 40 





- Caves 



Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 41 




LEFT: Notice the shafts of light 
and how the cave dwarfs and 
looms over the smaller man made 
structures and stairs below. It is also 
interesting how the natural light 
and the street lights mimic each 
other. 



RIGHT: The vegetation on the 
rocks provides an interesting 
texture. They provide a softness to 
the harsh rock walls. This foliage 
could make the cave in Bat Boy less 
harsh and cold. 




Caves - 



Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 42 




LEFT: Inspiration for the revival cross. Needed 
to look like stained glass but also be cheap. 
They mention in the play that it is made out of 
vinyl. 








■Mr**) 


fe~f^ 


* 


* teifc^l 




3D 

■ 




i 111111 . 

1 . MS W 3 










i 
i 



BELOW: Meat hooks 

for the interior of the 

slaughterhouse. They 

are cold and imposing. 

They hang from the 

ceiling and have an 

interesting shape. Not 

having meat on them is 

an interesting look. ' 





Meat Hooks & Revival Cross 



Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 43 






" 19* 


































r i 
1 i 
















• 1 














1 : \\>i 


. 


'■**"^W^1 


ft ' 1 












■!■< , j 
















1 


fl[ 


i, ■ 


1 

1 ■-' 


^H 








1^ J 












■<<#x 


> " 




■ ■ ■"" "■ 








ii 


I 

i 












H _] 


















| 

1 
















f 


i_ I 


i 








* 




FRONT DOORWAYS 

have an interesting 

dynamic to them. 

They are usually 

accompanied by 

windows both 

within the door 

itself and on 

either side of the 

door. For taller 

entry ways a trans 

light above the 

door might be 

incorporated. 



LEFT: The simple lines 
of this doorway with its 
arts and crafts inspired 
molding will work well 
for the Parker's front 
I door. The solid molding 
running across the top is 
of particular interest. 



Front Doors - 



- Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 44 




ABOVE: The shape of the trunks 
of the trees, the vertical lines 
of the dark trunks juxtaposed 
against the golden and green 
leaves. 



RIGHT: The dark shadows of the trees 
and the density of the forest. How the 
shapes and the reflection of the trees 
in the water are mysterious and eerie. 



Trees/Forests 



- Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills45 



L* 5 f^ A\ £&&&* 




■n 


1 1 


1 1 


i 


1 

1 


1 1 


f.l ; 


■.!■*■ 




LEFT: Hospital/Industrial windows. The clean shape and the 
interesting way of opening, only a third of the window being able to 
open, is interesting. 



BELOW: The shape and lines of the 
windows on the second floor of the 
house. 




Exterior Windows - 



Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 46 




HIS GIANT EYES SEE Iff THE DARK & HtS EARS 
AR£ BETTER 7H AH RADAR, SAY SCIENTISTS 




WEEKLY WORLD NEWS BAT 

BOY COVERS are always in 

black and white and packed 

with very graphic images and 

bold text. The text is always 

of some eye catching and 

provocative subject matter. 




Weekly World News Covers - 



Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 47 




■L* 1 




CHURCHES always have a cross 

somewhere in them and the windows 

of the churches seem to be important. 

The sunlight shining through them is 

visually interesting and the color of 

the glass provides texture, color, as 

well as modeling. 



- Churches - 



- Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 48 



' 1 '"H ralfg!'- I' VMS 




WEB PRESSES are the type of 

presses that the Weekly World News 

is printed upon. The industrial lines 

and structure of the scaffolding is 

interesting and could provide an 

interesting juxtaposition with the 

naturalness of the cave. 




Printing Presses - 



Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 49 




Printing Presses 



Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 50 



ROLLS OF PAPER used on the 

Web Presses are very large. 

They are stored stacked floor to 

sealing in warehouses. When 

stacked so tall they dwarf 

people and are very imposing. 

When their covering is torn 

and they are exposed to the 

elements they can begin to 

resemble a more natural cave 

structure/environment. 




- Tabloid/Newspaper Printing - 



Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 51 



LEFT: More of the large 
rolls of paper, these 
being stored on their side 
instead of being stacked 
top and bottom. 



BOTTOM LEFT: The 
man on top of the rolls 
of paper reminded me of 
the bat boy climbing in a 
cave. Could I incorporate 
the idea of these rolls 
of paper into the cave 
environment? 




Tabloid/Newspaper Printing - 



Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 52 






ABOVE: The beams and 
structures of the camp 
meeting church. It resembles 
that of the scaffolding the 
surrounds a Web Press. 



BOTTOM: The supports of the tent, both the 
poles as well as the guide lines that keep the tent 
taught and upright are the most visual and easily 
recognizable parts of a tent revival. 



Revival/Tent Meeting 



- Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 53 




SLAUGHTERHOUSES 

come in all shapes and 

sizes. I was looking for 

more urban/warehouse 

types of facilities that 

would fit into the film 

noir aspect. Large 

windows and clean, 

modern, industrial 

shapes and lines. 




BELOW: Meat hanging 
on meat hooks inside of a 
slaughterhouse. This is too i 
graphic for the musical. 
The hooks should be bare. 
Bare hooks can be just as 
visually interesting though 



Slaughterhouse 



- Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 54 





WAREHOUSES are dark and vast 

environments with most of the light 

coming through large windows 

or from overhead pendant lights. 

There are a lot of shadows and 

places to hide in these types 

of buildings and their facades 

are usually stone or brick. They 

resemble a cave in many ways. 



- Warehouses - 



- Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 55 



WEST VIRGINIA 
TOPOGRAPHY 

is very 

mountainous 

and dotted 

with tiny towns 

much like that 

of Hope Falls. 




- West Virginia Topography 



Section 2: Research Images - 



Dills 56 



***. 



WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA 

is an actual town that is 

mentioned in Bat Boy: The 

Musical. It has a small town 

feel about it, the buildings 

are generally low lying and 

the skyline is quite flat. It 

has a main street, Andy 

Griffith Show feeling to it. 




- Wheeling, West Virginia 



- Section 2: Research Images 



Dills 57 




S^^-.siSSifSI mm 






Wheeling, West Virginia 



Dills 58 



SECTION 3 

- Draftings & Paperwork - 



I *!S 






> fi I o 3 3 

^ ; ? rfBi (H 



-£§4- 



5) cu l- 



;£!£» 



S S 2 



.- 

» 

5 



H 



4 



ft W! 






' i' \ 








© 






t 
■5 




\ 
\ 






1 - ? J S 

f | 5 * 

I I i g 

* | - 



IS* 



"II " I « | "" s 




!NT 



\ 



\ 



\ 

\ 



\ 
\ 






tt UK 



1 •" J | 



5™ u -* ^ 5 i7J ft iH K"S 



s. 






S 8 






111 \ 






5 

SS 

? 






?J 



o 



I 








CO 
LU 

\- 

o 



3 
O 



<T3 

C 



CD 

sz 

CD ^ 

T5 C 

W U 

— X 



c o £ 

2 ti T3 

3 3 q; 
03 U (j 

- 1 ^ O 

° £ .£ 



O 



13 

C ° 

O 13 

5= -a j_, ^ 

(D cd o -£ 

O O O <L> 

h- h- Q Z 



5 



Uj 



00 

o 

I 
I 

2: 

o 

1 



A 











c 




.o 








4o 




SP 




^> 




Q) 








Uj 




Cl 




p 








CD 






^. 




/* 




O 






!—' 


0) 


: 


£> 




CXS 




4^ 




<o 




v*. 




(U 




+«» 




C 




& 




o 



V 



/ 



/ 





i i 


<XJ 


c 


.o 


o 


</> 


+o 


SJ 


55 


£ 


-CD 


<L> 


Uj 


-C 


CL 


K 


s 




Q 


O 


■3 


CQ 


c3 


OQ 


£ 


r- • 



13 
O 

"O 



0> 



cu 
w o 

0) -Q 

-° * 
= x 



c o S 

03 O o 

4- TO ^ 

O £ c 



o 



CD 
JD 



CO 

LU 



^ Z5 

C ° 

O D i o 

5= -Q tl *" 

<L) <D o .£ 

■Q -° c Id 

O O O 

h- l~ Q Z 



? 



Uj 

3 



00 

o 

I 

<\l 

I 

o 

I 



o 








■~x 


. 








- 












-— 














\ 

/ 



2 

Uj 

I 

8 

-J 

S 5 

+-» 
CD 

/ o 





cs 


c 


2 


o 


^ 


s 


^ 


.qj 




Uj 


0) 

IS 


1 




Q 


£ 


\l 


o 


CX5 


OQ 


O 


+-> 


# -j 


cu 


Y* 


OQ 


o 



k_ 
CD 

CD 

CD 
T5 C 
CD 15 

cu -Q 
= x 



c ^ ^ 
«J ro -m -o 

3 D 3 d) 
O 03 O (j 

>^ o 



03 



CO 

UJ 

I- 

O 



s ° 

c 5 

c ° 

^ -= c Ja 

o b£ o 

5= -Q +_, *■• 

CD CD O -£ 

-° -° c ^ 

O O O CL) 

I- h- Q ~Z. 



X 



Uj 



oo 

o 
o 

1 






.o 







t 



/ 



> 



2 

0) 

CO 

**. 













TO 


c: 










.3 


£ 




^ 


CD 
Uj 




0) 


1 




Q 


i* 


>s 


o 


cc 


OQ 


o 


+-> 


p= 


as 


K> 




CQ 


<o 







00 

o 

I 

CM 



O) 


II 


2: 


^ 


o 


«-*. 


p 


uJ 


K 
^ 


-J 


y 


<o 


u 




:d 





c: 
o 



\ 



2 

2 
<3 



-*K 



/ 












c 
+J co 

O ™ 

£ ° 

Z o 



D 
CJ 

>v 

03 

o 



CD 
CD 



CU 

o 



c 

CD 

s_ 

CD 
JO 



CO 

UJ 



O 3 

0) CU 

O O 

|_ |__ 



t; £ o 

(U +J 

° 5 o 

i 3 i JQ 



! 


c\3 


c: 


sic 


O 
+2 


rj 


$ 


£ 


cu 


0) 


Uj 


-c 


Q. 


K 


s 




Q 


O 


f S 


OQ 


c3 


4~> 


85 



5t 






\ 
/ 



.o 

2 

Uj 

Q 
S 

<3 

to 

c 






Uj 

3 



CO 

o 

I 

M 

i 

o 
p 

i 



/ 






CO 

UJ 



+j 05 

o «j 

g ° 

c 5 

c ° 

O 3 

jQ -Q 

O O 

h- h- 



3 

OJ 
TO 

o 



o 

c 



0) 



X 



T3 
<U 
CJ 



c 
'53 



<u 



-Q 
£ O 

d) 4-» 

i-8 g 

i 3 , JQ 





! ■ 


<* 


c 


.o 


o 


</) 


-Uj 


^ 


55 


^ 


> 


Q) 


Uj 


^ 


a 


^ 


e 




Q 




• s 


CQ 


<3 


4o 

,2? 


£ 





/ / 



/ / 

..o-.t 



\ 






\ 



CO 

o 

CM 

CM 

i 
00 



\ 



\ 



\ 






/ / 





\ 




b 

2 



\ 



/ / 



5: 

o 

i 



\ 



\ 




c 
o 

> 



c 
o 



\ 



\ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



\ 



V 



\ 



\ 
\ 

\ 



\ 





/ 



\ 



\ 



X 



c 

CL 

■D 

C 
D 
O 



/ 



5 



** 

* 



/ 



X 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ \ 



00 

o 

(XI 
(XJ 

i 

oo 

if 

o 

i 



/ / 

„0-.E 



/ 



\ 



\ 



/ / 



/ 



> I ! 


_□ !.'.; i 


. 


















/ 



A 
\ 

\ 



oo 

O 

(XI 
CM 

ob 
O 

I 



\ \ 



I 



/ 



/ 



\ 



/ / 



\ \ 




\ 



\ 



c 
o 

"+J 

CO 

> 

LU 

u. 
CO 

<u 
en 



/ 



/ 



/ 
/ 



\ 









/ 

/ 



„9 
/ 



CO 

o 

I 

(XI 

r\j 
i 

00 



\ 



/ 



/ / / 



I 



\ 



/ 



\ 



V 



\ 



\ \ 



/ 




I 



/ 



/ 



































evation 




■ 






i rr^ 




■ 


LU 






xA 







0) E 
<u £ 2 

I- o *-- 



o a 
o w 



ro O 
ro 7D 



.52 _o 

|E £ 

. cn 

CD C 

S a 

*j OJ 

O c 

en ro 

CD -C 

c u 

i/i = 

a; § 

H CD 

8f 

D E 



o 
o 



c 
o 
'(/I 

c 

| 



a> 


OJ 


5 


c 




n 


i 


in 








h- 


in 


U 




a 




re 


u> 




ai 
CD 

o 










0) 

u 
re 


y 1 

X 


0) 

c 

CD 




o 



Q. O. u T3 





5 


y 






O 


n 






1 1 






(/) 








1 




3 




re 


< 


o 




CD 

E 




OJ 




c 


n 






<i> 


m 


(/) 






E 


U> 


i 


IV, 


m 


.e 


a 


cd 


C5) 


<j 


C 


£ 


X 


re 


re 


o 


a> 


X 


M 


h- 


a 



o 


<i) 




JO 


r 




m 


* J 




CI 


o 




TJ 






o 
E 


a> 

X 


O 
O 


*— 


TO 


o 



x \ \ \ -. \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ WW \ \ WW 
\ \ \ \ S \ W \ \ \ W \ \ W WW \ \ WW 
WW \WW WW WWWWW WW 
WW s\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ ■" . \ \ WW \ \ \ \ \ \ \ 



.X\\\\\-sN\\\\ 

!\\\\\\\\\\\V 

.WW'x'WWW 

\W WW WW 

. \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ 

.W.WWW W\ 

.ww.wwwx 
.\wwwww 





w 


w 


w 


w 





r 








-n (- 


3 




+J 




CD 3 


u 


IL> 










I 






TO Q 
CD Z, 


re 

Q 


c 
o 


o 
o 




</) in 




E 


"O 


— 


_ CD 


< 


CL) 




O) > 

C O 


O) 


o 

<4— 


.c 


II 


"6 P 


L. 


re, 


^_ 




O en 
E en 

c/> Q. 


u 

o 
E 
a> 


D. 
00 


o 

o 
S3 


OJ 


TO Q- 


c 




w 




m rr 


h 






-J 

S 

to 



\\\\ \ w w w w ■■ 
\ \ \ \ i k ••■-. \ \ \ \ \ \ \ ^ 
WW \WW w\\- 

\ \ \ \ K \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ - 

\ \ \ \ L \ \ ww \ \ n 



WW s \ W W \ \ \ 
WWW'WWXW 
W W W \ \ \ \ \ \ \ 
WW \WW WW 
v \ \ \ W \ \ V v \ \ \ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



oo 
o 

4 

C\J 

c6 



I 



o 




o 




Q 




M— 




O 


c 


L- 


o 


o 


+J 




SP 


<D 


^ 


+-» 


CD 


C 


Uj 


L_ 




CD 




J* 




L_ 




03 




O. 





re 


0) 


m 


>v 


J_ 


c 


n 




> 




11) 




a 


T3 


^_ 


0) 


r 


cu 


> 

o 


o 


TO 

n 


1 1 


O) 






-1 


ci) 


Hi 






m 


Li 


4-, 




n 


U~ 


U) 

o 


n 


o 


o 


n 


c 


>i 


■o 




UL 


c 



\ 
\ 




\ 

: \w 
\w 



-w 
w 



CD 



\ 


\ 


4-» 


\; 


\ 


X 


\ 




LU 

CD 
if) 

O 



CD 
+-» 

at 

31 
CO 



o 

CD 
Uj 



/ / 



/ 



/ / 



/ 



/ 



/ / 



/ 



\ \ 













00 








CD 








4 








OJ 








00 




8" 


^ 










O 


0" 


/ 


§ 








1- 








^ 




k 


CD 


1 








s 

c 


























o 






.2/1 2 






-C3 










<J 






-8 




CD 












00 






/ 
















o 












Q 





3 1/2" 



/ / 



/ 



/ 



\ 



\ 



00 

+ 



\ \ 




\ 



\ 



o 

o 
o 
Q 






Uj 



Latch 
to keep 
door 


"o 

CD 
V) 

o 
u 


"O 
QJ 

J* 
U 

o 












1- 

o 
o 
Q 


\ 








s 

CD 

-a 
go 










t 

o 
go 










1 
V) 


f 












CD 

CJ 



w "D a; cu cd cu >_• 

gj aj _c o -c o) o 

o 2 ' M TO + ~' ro o 

.E O O u "D u T3 

x § +-> c 















CD 

T3 






GO 










o 

sz 
go 












J/} 








CD 








Cag 




■ 



CO 



O 



o 


c 


<o 








4-J 


cu 


a; 






r~ 


o 


cu 


cu 






o 


-Q 


jz 






Q 


0) 


4-J 

cu 


<: 






3 


SI 


-Q 


cu 




. 


T5 


+-" 


to 


JZ 




c 


O 


o 


11 


*-> 




cu 


O 


■M 

T3 


a 
cu 


-C 
u 


cu 
o 


Q. 
O 


4- 1 

CO 


CU 


o 


(V5 


~5 


CU 


CD 


T3 

a; 


OJ 


*-> 

03 


4-> 

X 


CD 

c 


n 


0) 


C 
03 


a. 
a) 


O 


o 


-t-j 
cu 


.Q 


T5 
CU 


JZ 


- 


4— ' 


X2 


O 

4-> 


o 

*-> 


CU 


CU 
-Q 


CO 
CU 


"D 


CO 


u 


03 


-Q 


CI) 




— 


O 


CD 


■t- 1 


0) 

c 
to 


cu 

CD 
03 
O 


CO 

cu 


"cu 

0) 


-Q 
O 

4-J 


CO 

ZJ 

E 


n> 


en 


*-> 


i_ 


C|) 


0) 


cu 


CO 


CO 


o 


m 


r 


JZ 


u 





o 


CTS 


:? 


-(-J 


cu 


< 


Q 


CJ 



^ 



-J 

3 



CO 

o 

I 

N 

i 

00 

§ 

1 













1 


CD 

T3 




CO 

CD 

C 








o 

_l 

1 








75 








Cage 






















cs 




O 








to 




S 




£ 


CO 




c 


<D 


to 


IS 


CL. 




CD 


o 


.(3 


OQ 




+>j 




cc 




OQ 





^ 



/ 



/ 



/ 






1-H-.S 






/ 



/ / 



V 



\ 



^ 

#= 







V 



.o 

O 



CO 



"^ 4-» 



T3 
(D 

i_ 
CD 
> 
O 

o 

(D 



4-- T3 

d a; 
o a> 

si 

I ° 

o ^ 



CD 
TJ 

CD 

C 

'c 

O 
CD (O 

+-» C 

<: E 

CD i_ 
£ O 

'03 > 

°- i 

<D > 

jQ * 
_ C 



T3 O 

O CD 

O co 

£ CD 

— CU 

7r 00 



.o 
Uj 



v 



// 



/ 



/ 



^ 



UJ 

-J 



00 

o 

I 

i 

i 









-S: ^ 




<s 


o 




<7> 


T3 

C 




^ 


§ 




^ 


"CTJ 




Q) 


+-> 




;C 


Q. 




1^ 


CO 

O 




• . 


a: 




$ 


1 o$J 




QQ 


JtO 


+-» 




cc 


CD 




OQ 


« 







c 

03 

TO 

_l 


O 

O 



CD 

E 




■M 


$ 

>, 


o 




£ 


Q. 


— 




T-l 


u- 


Q, 




CD 


O 


CO 




U 
TO 


H 


4-J 

r 




u- 


O 


O) 




C0 


CO 






u 


CO 

E 


o 
O 




TO 


o 


TO 


CD 


CO 


-Q 


-Q 



/ 



/ 



/ 



03 


•l-J 


-C 


V 


■I-' 


u 


( ) 


03 


v_ 


-Q 




CD 


r 


c 


■M 


TO 


$ 


CJ 


T3 




a> 




L_ 




CD 




> 




O 




CJ 





CD 



/ — 

X 



3 
O 

T3 


E 

CT3 



CO 
LU 

I- 

O 



CD 



CD 
..D 

O 
*-> 

s— 
CD 

■M 

£ g 

CD -55 

t3 CD 
O "O 

o f 

^= jc 

E^ c 

CD O) CO 

£= In -J 

CD CD <- 

w CC 

CD Q) m- 

y -c cd 

£^° 

- I J2 

£= CJ 

cd ro 
+-> CD 

CD 
"O i 



"D 



c 
o 



u 

_CD 

M- 

CD 

i- 

_Q_ 

CD 

sz 

o 

CD 



T3 
CD 



en 

c 

JC 
D) 

CD 
CD 
00 

CO 
CO 

o 
u 

CD 



CO 

SZ 





TO 
Q. 


CD 

T3 


O 
T3 




CD 


(O 

c 


o 


+-J 


O 

4-< 




£ 


=3 


"U 


o 


O 




CD 


c~ 




CO 


_<Z 




o 


o 


u 


-t-J 


c 


CD 


cc 


_i 


TO 


CD 


■t-' 


CJ 




r 


+-J 


-O 


i_ 


(0 


cc 


CT3 


f- 


CO 


CD 


i_ 


$ 


O 


-Q 


CD 

r 


o 


o 


O 


rn 


*4- 


0) 


-t-j 


CO 


0) 


SZ 


~D 


CD 


jD 


-t-> 


CD 


-a 


O 


*4— 

n 


CD 

C 


u 


0) 


CD 


■fci CO 

-C +-" 


c 

CD 


u 


u 


D) -C 


CJ 


CD 


CO 


:= O) 


UJ 



Q_ J= 



CD _J "O 

SZ C 



^ 



2 

CO 



00 

o 



o 

Q 

i 



/ 



/ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



/ 



\ 





<TJ 




.o 








</> 




^ 




^ 


CO 
CO 




o 


CD 


6 


K 


"co 




> 


• • 


5 

\ CD 


o 


cc 


i QQ 




+-< 




CX5 




QQ 







/ 



/ 

I 

f 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



\ \ 



\ 






^ 






\ 



, 



/ 
/ 



/ 



\ 



\ 



/ 



/ 



/ 






\ 



i 



8 



CJ 

o 

L. 

CD 



CD 

-q 

co 
.^ 
o 

03 
JO 

CD 



CL 

E 



/ 



' 



% 

Uj 



<u 



3 
O 

"O 
CD 
+-" 
CJ 

13 
i_ 
+-> 
CO 

C 

o 
CJ 

CD 
JD 



CO 



°3 
to 

CD 



-*- O 

CD - 

> ^J- 

C \ 

Z) m 



CO 

LU 

O 



cj .i! 

I- 
O 



CO 

LU 

O 
Q 

o 

DO 

03 
DO 



<D 


t 


O 




O 


o 






fl> 


i_ 


4-> 






M— 


71 




CL 


E 
o 

M— 


O 




J* 

CJ 
O 


to 
Q. 
O 

4—* 


cm 


_ 


M— 






U") 


O 


13 


4—i 


-C 


CO 

o 
o 




i 


1- 


— 


CD 




o 


03 


u 


k_ 




+-> 


o 


CD 


CD 


~3 


<4— 


£ 


po 


c 


o 


TO 




CD 





cxs 




.o 


4-J 






CO 


c 


s 


:r> 


^ 


-i* 




o 


Q) 


o 


-c 


cc 


h- 


<fc 




CD 


^ 


i «. 


o 

QQ 


CD 
CD 




4-i 

CO 


OQ 







CL) 



to 

CO 

o 



c u 



CO 

u Id 

*-• £ 

ZS J5 

O Q. 

_ro -Q O 

u £ CD 

O 4^ 



o 

CL 
CL 

13 
CO 



CD 



CD 

D 
O 
£Z 
CD 



— OS 

J2 E 

CD 03 
> O 

CD **~ CD 

— ^ -Q 



13 *■* to 

1 Si! 

CD CD I - 
— _Q 



U -^ 03 

03 £ CD 

CD *- 

CD CD _ 

CD CD £ 



to 
CD 

.*! 

O = 
+-» 03 

T3 CD 

CD CJ 

X 03 

tiZ <+- 

TO « 

CO 

CD 03 

jQ _CD 

O CL 

4-> 

II 

CD Z5 
-C C 

■M *- 

£ E 

O 



CD 

JC 
+-> 

T3 

C 
03 

E 
o 

V4— 
4-> 

_03 
CL 
CD 

■M 

c 

CD 
CD 



CD 

-Q 

CL 
03 
CD 

CD 

SI 

4-> 

CD 
CJ 

13 
T3 
CD 



= <-> O 



^ 



UJ 

-J 

2 

co 



00 

o 

I 
I 

o 

Q 

i 



W CD 

CD ^ 

° i- 

I - 



CD o 

««: 

O <^ 
CO O) 
03 03 

E tt 



/ 



/ / 

u9-.l 
/ 



/ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 









\ 



: 



§ 



CO 
LU 









M— 


(1) 


CO 






CD 






JZ 


o?J 




O 
*-> 

co 


JZ 
■t-J 

c 


CO 

O 
(J 






JZ 
+-> 

T3 

c 

CT3 

E 




II 


■M 

OJ 
> 


03 
CO 




CD 
_CD 

1 j 


"C3 
CD 
U 


4-J 

o 

CL 




JZ 

4-> 






CD 

<: 
o 
*-> 

CD 

JZ 

4-> 


■— "1 

-C 
O 

o 




13 
(J 

c£ 

a> 
> 

o 


03 
Q. 

CD 

JD 

1 


CL 
3 
CO 

1— 
O 

CO 
CD 


o 


CO 
CD 
T3 
CO 

"to 

0) 


o 

03 
CL 

CD 

JZ 
*-> 




ui 
-j 

o 


o 


<: 




1 


10 


-L. 
CD 


CU 
X 


(J 

03 


L_ 
CD 




1 

to 


CD 


>, 




-t-J 


3 


i+- 


M— 


CD 




CTi 


T3 
co 

o 

03 
JD 

CD 

sz 

■M 

CL 

3 

JD 
E 


CL 




co 

CD 
> 

CD 


E 

03 

o 


O 

c 

CU 
CU 


03 

CD 
JQ 


CD 
CO 
03 
CD 


CD 
JD 




2: 

o 


CO 

V4— 

O 

*-> 

3 
O 

CO 
Q. 

O 
+-> 


X 

(XI 


X 

C\J 

JZ 
ID 


CJ 

03 
JZ> 

o 

+-> 

"U 

CU 
CO 

3 


-Q 

-a 

3 
O 
JZ 
CO 

CU 

i— 
CU 

c 


O 
*-> 

E 

03 

o 

M— 

CU 

JZ 

4-> 


CL 

o 

■M 
CO 

3 

E 
E 

s— 
O 


CL 

03 
CD 

CD 

JZ 
+-> 

CD 
(J 

3 
T3 




i 


o 
o 


13 

> 


JZ 


0) 


CU 

JQ 


h- 


_o 


CD 

o 






■M 


_(D 


a; 


O 
03 


^ 


co 

03 
CD 


03 

o 


*4— 

03 


4-J 

CD 


o 

o 




- Bat Be 
ladder. 


03 
+-> 

u 

1 


u 

s— 
O 

M— 

c 

CD 


CD 

CD 
CD 
_J 


CO 
CD 
CU 
_l 

i 


03 

C 
CD 
CL 
O 


4-> 

CO 
<U 

u 

CD 
CL 


CL 

CD 

JZ 
1- 

i 


C 

o 

CO 

CT3 

E 


CD 

CD 
CT3 
*-> 
CO 














CVJ 






.o 


-to 




§ 


5 




^ 












K 






.CD 


^ 


'^ 


o 


CD 


OQ 


CD 
03 


•kj 


4-J 


<TJ 


OD 


OQ 













CXJ 




o 








</> 




s 




^ 


CO 


03 


03 


IS 


5: 




CD 




<D 


:* 


>£ 


o 




00 




+-> 




cc 




QQ 





-c ro ^-, 





re 




_■ 


fl) 


a> 


d) 


j_ 






VI 


y 


0) 


o 



< t: 



+-I 


i/i 






.c 


ro 


*"* 


**- 


tu 





a 


a) 


ii 


i/i 


f^ 


0) 


n 


-C 


O 


4-1 


a 


o 


■ 




(/> 


TJ 


0) 


C! 


JL. 


n 




o 


r 


TO 





0) 


01 


U 


c 


o 


T^ 


*- 


1 


1/1 


■i; 


[1 


n 


<l> 


(ij 


a) 


a 


c 



s § » 
M "£ ill 

•t = -Q SJ "I 

ai 5 o ro 
in *■* . 



CD in 

E *- 



a> 
P 3 



I s = 

TO *-■ Xj 

0) "D CD 

in <U r 

a> -n o 

.c u v 

I- ro 



,J to "> 

a> ,, cd 

£ c 5 

<D en 

n 3 <D C 

"D -o • E 

CD c -* w 

n .9 i; a 







r 




"O 






I/) 

a' 




a- 




C 
3 
O 


1/1 




o 






a. 






C 

c 
ra 


in 



5 


'c 
3 


t 
o 
u 


a: 




3 


CI) 


E 




r 






> 


n 


IT. 




CD 
















o 














c: 






F 


o 


(t. 


ra 

c 
o 

3 
— 


3 




o 


"D 

cu 

3 


u. 

CD 


CD 
.C 

C 

J' 






ci> 




\ 


CI) 




3 
o 


.a 
o 


a. 1 

T) 


CD 

a 

TO 


i 


. • 


= 


■•^ 


1/1 


4 - J 


a 


I/) 

LU 


CD 
> 

TO 
l/l 




c 


id 
i/i 

TO 


ui 

F 


(- 

O 


01 

w 

a: 


i_ 

3 




(0 
l/l 


z 


^ 


h- 


x: 


CM 


75 



cu a> 
•2 ■£ 



00 

O 

I 

K 

I 

CO 



2: 


\ 


o 






UJ 

5 


§ 


00 


a 




o 





-J 
CD 

+_i 

to 



CD 

-J 

CD 
C3i 

"3 
+-• 

k. 

0) 

c 
3 




cc 
cb 

re 

+-/ 

eo 

CD 

c 
3 




■c 

CD 

0) 

CO 



00 

o 



CU 

o> 

ID 
CL 





















































(U 




































% 


C 

3 


4-< 

c 
3 


oi 

c 


. 


c 


- 


& 


eg 




















* in 


i; 


j* 


O 


TD 


O 


T3 


ID 


(D 




















CU "O 

D 3 


£ 


e 


o 


3 


o 


3 


CO 


CO 




















a: 


_j 


-z. 


§ 


z 


§ 


CU 


cu 




















t ° 

5 wi 


lo 


l/l 


•D 




p 




E 


E 




















& 


jz 


_c 


3 

o 


o 


O 


O 


■o 


"O 




u 

X 

E 


^ 


LT) 


00 

t-H 


5T 


r-- 

rN 


r» 


00 


CO 

< 


? 


5 


£ 




g 




o 

X 


o i 

X ! 


LU 

o 

LU 


0) CU 

s> s> 
u u 


cu cu 
ft Si 


0) 

Si 


m 


ro 




o 


o 


o 




o 


O 


(M 


ro 


a 


u u 


U 


CO 

l/l 






i-H 


rt 


rH 


^ 


rf 


rt 


rt 


1-1 


52 


u 

L0 


CL -1 


a. -i 

10 10 

u u 


l/l 


LL 


U 




rii 


cjl 


cii 


D) 


en 


en 


Dl 


en 


LL. 




LO 10 


u 








a. 


0- 


a. 


a. 


a 


Q. 


CL 


CL 












rH 


(N 


J^ 


11 


ro 


* 


LD 


lO 







^^ 


I/) 

u 




"In 
5 


5T 


o 

c 


<a 




















u 

X 




in 


o3 « 

TO 




o 

C ^_^ 


IN 

E *" 


O IN l/l 
(N *— 5 




















E 

u 


CU 

ft 
u 


01 

> 

ID 
U 


5" 

— ai 


01 
> 

ID 

u 


n3 


D Ul 

0) o 

s 1 


IN 

en 


^■cl-E 

0) L0 g 




















if) 


cr 


_J 


o: ^.^ 


l/l 


E 

10 






JZ o -* 






















LO 


l/l 


LO 
U 


u 


5 


ID 


Ul X 




NI 




±no 




ddO 


J 




.no 1 ni 


*J 












i j- 1 ! 


















4_, 






CT 




1_ 






l_ 


E 


i/i! 












o3 




C 






ID 


XI 
V 

LTD 


1 

u 




"D 
<U 

CO 


« 75 


J P 

C| 1_ 0) 


CU - 

^ aj ui 






3 


C 

3 




0) 


'c 


3 




LU 


•8 


i/j 


If 

>- 


l/l 


35 

Q 
l/l 
o 

X 


^igj* 5 






.* 


^ 




JD l/l 

)03 b 


3 


£ 




u 

LU 


cr 

L0 




U 


a 5. 


L-l folu 

8 U - 


U 


X -b c en 






u 


a: 


D 
X 


ID 


o 

o 


U 




y 
3 

LU 


65 

_l 
l/l 


£ 


E 
m 

> 




l/l l/l 

o o 

X X 


Q 




a 


*T 




i_ 
b 


Q 


M- 






l/l 


L0 




c 
O 


a 


oj 

ID 

a 




u 
I/) 




■VTi' 'V Oif 2? a: 


cc 

lo 


_J 


_J 
V) 

O 






_j 


a: 




j 


c 


t 








■V--V-»S* - ^B»*\k: <■" 


l/l 






i/i 


LO 


u 


1 


t 











39V1SN0 


















































3DV1S 


ddO 








IdO 




N 













C < 




















r^ 




Ch 




























































o> E 




















en 




d> 




































Q. 




a. 


















o> ^ 






































u 




Yo 




























































£ 














z 




m c . 




































o 


§ 


- S <= 






















4-J 














CO 


O 


l/l o o 




















01 




ID 














LU 


W 

Cu 


•o in S3 




















Si 
U 




CO 














"Z. 




O l (u Q. 
























CU 
















Q- 




















01 




S 


















JD C 




















-C 
















U) 
























t- 




"D 


















ft E 

en ■.— 
a; h 
























O 

X 


















= @ 




















rH 






















* .E 




















tH 



















CO 



z 
O 

Q 



ro 
a 



< 

Q 
D. 

3 









rr 


fc 


£ 

L. 

U 


OJ 
it 
fD 


It 


5 


o_ 


c 




afte 
with 


o. h 
co > 








o> 

t CO 
CO (Nl 


CO 

sz 




"sT 


■* 




in D 

3 g 
i > 


a 5 

■* T3 




lO «5 O 

c 


rC r-{ 








ro & 


§ 


§ 


c^ 


0) 


01 

£ i 


C^§ 




£ o c > 


0) 0) c 








r-\ 


QJ 


cu 


« m 


CJ h 


g LT 


6) _ 




01 ^ 01 


01 Ll 1) L 








u_ <1J 


C 
CO 


c: 

co 


LO "" 


"" 


"« 


6* oj 


en ro 




10 "" LO 4J 


U CO U U 
LO CO LO 








o -a 

03 


«- 


o 


o 


01 c 


o a 

in 




^~ >^ in 


u- ^ 








-a ,i - 


*- 


o 


O 






o 4; 

a.<° 

c2 


a ° 




o o g 


o o j 








c 

01 


o 


13 


T3 

C 


"O 

c 


£ = 




X) j^^ 


•o -o i 










a 


Q 


C 


LU 


LU 




c i fi 


c c 


111 






4-J 
< 


|S 


& 


LU 










LU ]LU 


LU LU 


u 

LU 






LO 


LTI 


L0 








i- 


T 




lO 


ID 


r>o ro 








CM 


CN 


(N 


O 


o 


o 


ro 


ro 




ro 


ro 


<* <» 


Q. 












ro 


ro 


ro 














>] 






Ol 


Ol 


a 


rii 


6i 


Ol 


di 


Ol 




Ol 


Ol 


Ol Ol 


U_ 






D- 


a 


Q- 


CL 


a- 


CL 


CL 


Q. 




CL 


CL 


Cl 


CL 
















































,_^ 


§ 




J g 














m 






l/l 


*H 


o 




tH o 










CJ 

X 

E 


*-> 

c 

CO l/l 

IS 


O 

o 

X 
ro 


u 

X 

E 


c 
co in 


o 
o 

X 
CD 


_ IN 

CD *-" 

Q 5 

in o 
o -a 


■o 

c 

g So 

rN 




rM T3 
2 " -- 

CL § 5 m 

in o <N 

O TD 0) ~— 


C- ro in 
| 5^ I 








u 




HI 


u 




OJ 


X c 


Ol 




X C Ol 


u 








CO 


ro 


s 


CO 


ro 


£ 


5 


CO 

_l 




5:^ 


CO « 


| nx 1 ±no J ± 


10 NI I NI 


>: O 


co 

3 




in 












Q 


r- 
LU 
LO 

CL 


o 
Q 




o 

"O 


Q. 
O 
CL 




^ o 


OJ 


in 

oi 
n 
u 
6 

co 


■o 

TO 






in 
£ 






01 

o 


c 
o 


in in 
01 Ol 

sz sz 
u u 
c c 

01 01 

□D co 


CO 1_ 

U o 


o 


LU 
U 
LU 

CL 


O 1 c 

a) 
oi oi 


co 


u 

SZ 

in 
ro 

LL 






u 
C 

co 




Ol 
CO 

U 


s: 

CO 


3 

Z 
< 


o 

CO 

u 


o 

sz a 

in 

CO >4- 

tfc o 


CO 


r i 


.c 
U 


r\l 






rM 






u 


LU 

—I 


sz 


CN CN 


01 


CO 


v-/ 


01 ^ 




















U 


in 




^: 


OJ 


Z 
LU 

u 
co 


ID O 

u w 


CL 
















Cl 




CO 
LL. 




fi 


U 






DC 








DC 




LO 








-I CC 








cc 

CO 




co 








l/l 










CO LO 










Q 








D 










a o 








NO 


3A0W 


NO 


13S3>J< 


J 


ddO 




ddO 


3A0 


H 


39V1SN0 NO 3A0W 








ID 






O 






■* 






ID 


ro 




00 




r\i 






ro 






ro 






ro 




<* 








H 


































di 




di 






rji 






6i 






ch 




o 








13 


Q. 




Q- 






Q_ 






a. 






0- 




a 




















= _ 
















*■ 












0) 






























z 


Ol 




in 






O) 


OJ 






in 




Ol 


CO 




ro 






o 
CO 

LU 


c 
5 E 




D 
O 






c 
^E 






4-1 


o - 

3. >- 

.;„ -O 




c 
5 E 


P : 


To 

X 


U "<u 

in 






z 

LU 
CJ 
CO 


o 
fc ° 

CO 
Q- 




OJ 

sz 
oi 

=> 
CO 
CO 






, o 

CO 

ci- 


5 

OJ 

ro 
Q 




Q. 

in 
o 

X 


1° re 




, o 

V ° 
_X LU 

CO 

a 


CT 

§ E 

o sz 
sz \- 
LO 


c c c 

, n a 

>! X3 <U 

^ w CC 

sz 
U 






ro 




T 






in 






ID 






r^ 




00 










































T_l 




T-H 






rt 






^ 






rt 




T-C 







CQ 



00 

o 



O 
Q 



en 

IV 

a. 





0) i3 






















ro s 










LU 




























i— 1 


19 




















oo" ;t» 










(SC 




















«H -H~ 


>• 


;*- 




b 


W in 




















:ene 

ade 

cene 

crim 


0) 

c 
o 

I 


OI 

c : 

o -a 

x c 


< 

u. 
O 




















l/l "-: CD in 




< 
























x: jz 


z 


O 


O 




















o o 


O 


p 




LU 


cn a 

LU 
LU 




















TD 13 










az 


















LU 

u 

111 


c c 

LU LU 
ID U3 


m 








h- 




















ro 


id 












El 

h 

Li. 


Oi : cn 
Q. Cl- 


in 

cn 
0. 


in 

cn 
a. 


in 

cn 
a 






















in 


tH 


i-H 


tH 


rsi 


.H 


n 






•-< 






l-M 


rsi 




- 1 - ml/1 


_ 

o 
n 

c 


§ 

o 
■o 

c 


03 — - 


u 

X 


l/l o 

Q) H 


5 


S 


So 


tH 


r>. 

r\l 


17) 

5 
o 
■o 
c 


IN 
E ~ 






Scrim ( 

3 fend; 

Light 


5o 

IN 

"oi 
jr 
cn 


Large W; 
(28) 

Hospit 
Window 


E 
i_ 
u 
cn 


MS 

— &HJ 
CO 


a; 

> 
ro 
u 
_i 
in 


ft 
u 

tc 
cn 

u 


0) 

ft 

U 

_j 

in 
U 


CD 

> 
ro 
U 
in 
U 


Small Wi 
(32) 

Mediu 
Windows 




±no 


ino ni 




t\ 


I 




ino 








u, "!*■ 












1 






X) 






cn 




±Z 0) 


















i_ 


CT 




c 


•* 


c c 








aj 






0) 
J3 


i- 


ro 


c 




c 


in 


=> O 
X 


l/l 


in 


0) 
SZ} 


in 


ro 
sz 


0) 


ro 

JZ 


o 


in 
in 
HI 




b 


cn 


sz 


0) 


E o 

0) 


U 


CQl 


|ffl 


«J 


^ 




jz 'id 

■u JZ 


Q. 


(0 SZ 

op 


u 

c 

QJ 
CD 


6 


£ 


c8 


-" It 

>1 SZ 


ro 


ro 


X 


a 




<* U 


o 


ai ro 
_* in 

ro 


CD 


J3 
TO 


o J= 
o cn 




T,U 


Q. 


Q 


"ro 


ro 




"D 
"O 
< 


o 
O 


rsi 


N 


_J 


ro 

tn 


c 
ro 

> 


sz 




in 

o 
X 


in 
O 

X 


'5. 
in 
o 


a 

01 

o 








a. cn 




















X 








°- 




















X 






on 


* 


in 

Q 


_l 

in 
Q 


u 
in 

x> 


<* 


_J 


-J -J 


oz 


a 


on 


a: 






l/l 


UI 


Ln 


in 


mm 


m 


m 


m 


m 




3A0W 


ddO 


3DV 


ISdd 







3»IblS 






r-- 


(N 

in 






























cn ; 


cn 






























Q_ 


Dl 




























(5 

z 
o 
(/) 

UJ 


cn i P 

c P~ 

-J fc Lo ui 


r— i 

"d 

c 
ro 

£ 
o 

E 






2 
O 






















z 

UJ 

u 
en 


arker 
Roq 
ome F 
Repri 






in 
























Q- j X 


O i 




a: 
























1 r 


U ; 




LU 

H 


















































CTl 






























TH 
































o 

<a- 
<l> 

en 
ID 

a 



a 

LLI 

Q 

3 





en 






cu cu 






CU in 


1LT 

C 




















fO 






c c 
cu cu 








:■ 


jz 




JD 










_ 






Cn jj 
C D 
O O 




CU 


l_l 
in en 




c& c& 






in 


cu 
n 

«f in 




CU 5 

E^ 
> 










>• 






W 




c 


: 


~ , 


4-» AJ 






cu — 


offstage le 

and Chaecter 
Tree *2 




u 
















O o 

en 
a> 

£ E 

c b 
en en 




en 

a 


in in 
in in 


<J U 


X 
X 
X 
X 

< 


TO 

CO 

CU 

jz 

•0 

c 


TO 
CO 

UJ 
-C 

O 

C 







m cm 

ID *t 

l - J cu 

ID X> 

c 




c 
c cE 
cu 

"O ' : 

2 2 

u fc 










ID 

C 

c 


01 
3 






UJ 


cu 

CD 






jz jz 

1 § 




u_ 


u_ 






ro cu 


c 

ID 
CL 




= 

X 










>- 




u 

LLI 


co 




CO 


CO CO 


Ln 


in in 






















>* 




CL 
>j 


Ln 
61 




Ln 

en 


in in 
en en 




id yj 
en 






















en 




li. 


a 




a. 


Q- 


a 


a 


a. 


CL 






















a 






1/1 










in 




^ 




1 

















— 


tn 


C 




in 






ID CO 


in 




♦^ — v ^ -x m 


-j* ~s 
















O 









U 

X 

E 
u 







5 C!. 


*HD*WD*i« 


* m 


m 


c ~ 
cu 

cu -c5 

5: u 


"c 
cu 

!E 

u 


c 


Co 

O 
O. 




in 


X 






U _ 
_ ro 
id >-< 
> «-' 
> 




in m 

0) 0) 

cu cu 


(J _ 
_ ro 

ID iH 
> >-- 
> 




cu2 J -i(u2 J '- | a>J J 
Ircu ^ 5: cu vlrcu 

>(^Co>(^CD>^ 
V "C ** V t '* v 1 


4,6,8,1 
e Move 
4// fee 
4,6,8,1 


CU rH 
CU - 

p- 00 

_ ID" 
< IT 




cu 
cu 
P- 

< 


ID 

* > 


in 
C2 

cu 
in 

3 




cu 
CL 




L0 


t t 


cu 
a: 


r 


















""" O 




X 




ni ino 


NO 


ino 


NO | 3A0W 






3AOW 










3AOW 


_J 




































UJ 






































u_ in 






m 




in 


in 


























=1 






cu 




cu 


CU 

































JZ 




.c 


jz 


























,_ x: 






u 




u 


u 


























)r, 






c 
cu 




c: 
cu 


c 
CU 


























— cu 

CU SZ 




a. 

y 


CO 

IN 




CO 

IN 


CO 
IN 


























LO 










































C£ 




_l 


or 
































00 




LO 


I/) 


























Ct 






Q 




D 


Q 






















in 




_ 


NC 


) 


ddO 


| 
















NO 






00 






in 




ID 






,_, 










^1- 






Ln 








ID 




ID 










r^. 










r^ 






en 








en 




d> 










01 










Ol 




u 


a. 










Q- 






0. 










CL 










a. 








_ 






















CU 




















"cu 














p 








sz 










cu 




'z. 


^_, 




W 























H 










u_ <" 




O 

LU 


c 

"is 




z 

3 












g CD 5 










r 5 

ID 
CU 






JJ CU 
2 "D 




l 




LU 
U 

to 


> 
> 

cu 


& 












5 SJi 














PI 




<u £ 

X « 

UJ 3 
ID 










< 














H 








U 










in 




»H 
















IN 










m 










<t 
















































IN 
















IN 










IN 










IN 





6 

CQ 



01 

cn 
ro 



Q 

UJ 

fee 

O 
O- 

3 









"O 


































l_ 


L 


O) 














QJ 










o 


3 














if) 












O 


e 














fD 










"d- 




in 














0) 












•. u 






u u u 


u 


u 


u 


u 


u 


OJ 












^ M 


> cn 


-O 


'i/l "<n in 


ij) 


l/l 


U) 


Ul 


1/1 














3 


in c 


i_ ro 


3 3! 3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 














| *E = 


cm" > 


OJ — 1 


£ z z 


Z 


Z 


Z 


Z 


^ 


171 












OJ 




"O 


E =. 














ro 












l/l ° T> 


0) 

c § 

OJ o 


"g!^ s 


5 


§ 






§ 


a 

0) 












v- cn c 


,y u 


* cn 


O T3 


■D 


X5 


■o 


TO 


"D 


TJ 


JZ 












1 O C i— i 


1/1 


OJ 


OJ 


OJ 


ttJ 


0) 


0) 


0) 


OJ 


4-> 












ii" 


t o 


c 

B JZ 


E 


E 


E 


E 


E 


E 


E 


E 


j_, 












o 


H 


i- 


i- 


h- 


H 


h- 


F 


i- 


.OJ 












UJ cn 




> 






























0) 


■D 
































CD 


c 


OJ 


































UJ 


> 

UJ 






























m ! vO 


o 


r\i 


<* ■* 


■* 


■* 


"* 


<a- 


^r 


^r 


■<t 












E3 r>~ 


CO 


CO 


CO CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


co 


CO 












El cn 


di 


cn 


cn cn cn 


a 


cn 


cn 


cn 


a 


cn 












u_ 


0- 


a 


0. 


a. 


O- 


o_ 


a. 


a 


a. 


o. 


CL 


CL 














































0) 






t-H 


fM 


= 




* 


* 


* 


^ 

* 


3 












| .-^ 10 4-| 

!u 1 = .2 .2 


Jf] O j3 > c 

cj 1 R 1 ° 

|£ oo 0> 33 

- * I s s 


E 

U 


l^ (^ < OJ 


a> 

cr 

cn 


OJ 
u 

c 


OJ 
u 

c 


OJ 
CJ 

c 


OJ 

u 


o 

j* ro 

u or 












— *j bO 


76 


(5 


3 

o 

CO 


3 
O 
CO 


3 
O 
CO 


3 

o 

CO 


ro 












• < <jT 


1) J Q. 
> 5 


< ^ Z < CL 


E 


> 

J_> 4-1 4J U. 


ro 
CD 


4-* 


4-* 






j-i ~— 












■K! ' 


> 




un 


fa ro ro 




fD 


fD 


fD 


ro 


ro 














| z 






CDicOlcO 

1 i 




CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 












1 3A 


ON 


3A0W 








NI 




































| tj 


1 4-J 






1 ! ° S 






CO 




















Dl 

c 




||a5 


cn 

c 




4-> 

c 
3 


c 

3 


CL 




















t 

co 


a in w 
2 r- cn 


4-j a. (/> </) 

.!= ro ti 

10 "2 r- O 


o 




^j 


c v 






oi" 






















c c n 


C C n 










^ 


^ 
























ro O -J 


..'. ro o — ' 


OJ 






OJ SZ 


u 


u 


5 




















Q. 


o 


UJ 


o 






Q. 

y 


x 2? 

UJ -* 
ro 

l/l 


o 


o 
or 






















3 


1/1 w M 

3 < £• 


a: 

F 


ui in J»: 
n i/i "5 

3 < J3 






UJ 

u 






i 




















l/l 


u < 


i/i 


U < 


ro 

_l 




1/1 


_j 
i/i 


a: 
in 


u 
i/> 

3 


















u 
fJl 

3 


u 

01 

3 


u 
l/l 

3 




I dd0 


NO 


NO 




















3A0W 


ddO 




1 ^ 




o 


r\i 


<* 






















IO 


o 


I ' lv " 




CO 


CO 


CO 
























CO 


cn 


i" 1 o> 




Cn 


ch 


oi 
























cn 


cn 


;(« ! Q- 




Q. 


Q. 


a 
























CL 


0. 






































* 


13 




































Z '"- 








fD 




























0) 

3 


*■ 0) 


O 


3 




O 




























ti c 


(/j 

UJ 

2 
UJ 

U 
l/i 


O . 

>" fc 

<u ro 
"D 01 

oi X 

c 




Q. 
< 




























.. P = 
0) OJ 
■fD U "1 

E Dl 3 
s fD 

E 


o a 
x & 

ro 




LO 




UD 


































rsj" 




r\j~ 




































Bat Boy: The Musical 



Fly Information 



UPDATED ON: 9-28-08 



Item Height In Relation to Proscenium Opening 


Cave Drop 


SR 


0' 


Lands on the Deck Floor. Should be even with SR edge of 
the platform. 


CSR 


8' 


Lands on top of platform. l'-6" should be into the center 

8' section of the platform that corresponds with the 

center jut out. 


CS 


16' 


Centered on Center Line 


CSL 


8' 


Lands on top of platform. l'-6" should be into the center 

8' section of the platform that corresponds with the 

center jut out. 


SL 


4' 


Lands on 4' Platform SL. Should be even with SL edge of 

platform. 


Cross 


12' 


Centered on Center Line 


Hospital Window 


10' 


Centered in Distance from Center Platform Jut out and 
the End of the Platform Facade. SR of Center Jut Out. 


Shelly Window 


10' 


Centered in Distance from Center Platform Jut out and 

the End of the Platform Fagade. SL of Center Jut out. Do 

not include the far SL steps. 


Small Windows 


18' 


2' from SR & SL Proscenium Opening/Platform Edge 


Medium Windows 


16' 


6' From SR & SL Proscenium Opening/Platform Edge 


Large Window 


12' 


Centered on Center Line 


Pendant 
Lights 


#1 (SR) 


10' 


2' From SR Proscenium Opening, Toward Center Line 


#2 (CS) 


10' 


Centered on Center Line 


#3 (SL) 


10' 


2' From SR Proscenium Opening, Toward Center Line 


Meat Hooks 


#1 (SR) 


8' 


5' from edge of SR proscenium opening, towards 
offstage. 


#2 (SR #2) 


11' 


3' from edge of SR proscenium opening, towards 
offstage. 


#3 (SR #3) 


9' 


2' from edge of SR proscenium opening, towards 
offstage. 



Page 1 of 1 



Dills 91 



SECTION 4 

- Process Photographs - 



Section 4: Process Photographs 



Dills 92 




- Section 4: Process Photographs - 



Dills 93 





Dills 94 



SECTION 5 

Production Photographs - 



- Section 5: Production Photographs 



Dills 95 





- Section 5: Production Photographs - 



Dills 96 





Section 5: Production Photographs - 



Dills 97 





- Section 5: Production Photographs 



Dills 98 




Section 5: Production Photographs - 



Dills 99 





- Section 5: Production Photographs - 



Dills TOO 





Section 5: Production Photographs - 



Dills 101 





- Section 5: Production Photographs 



Dills 102 





*■ 




; < 


Burn You Freak, Burn! 
M 1 
















i^l 


it *| 

& ! 




la 
el 


l| HI 











Dills 103 



SECTION 6 

- Postmortem - 



- Section 6: Postmortem - Dills 1 04 

Postmortem for But Boy: The Musical 

I began the process of designing this production of But Boy: The Musical during the 
month of May 2008. I was attempting to get ahead and begin the process early so that the 
scene shop could begin building the set over the summer. This show was slated to be the first 
production of the 2008-2009 theatre season. It was also to be the first musical in the new Theatre 
on the Park, making it the the first musical to be staged by the Columbus State University 
Department of Theatre since Once Upon a Mattress during the 2006-2007 theatre season. I 
wanted to ensure that we had enough time to get this show on its feet and solve any problems 
that might arise. 

The overall concept for this production was man versus beast and what is the actual 
definition of what makes a person civilized. The show asks the question: is it truly the bat boy 
who is wild or is it the townspeople of Hope Falls? The director's goal was to show how truth 
is only revealed in the bat boy's environments of the cave and the forest and that no matter how 
hard he tried he could not escape who he truly was. This show wants the audience to realize that 
we should all accept and be happy with who we are. To express these notions visually. 1 make 
the bat boy's cave an ever present figure that loomed in the background as well as encroached 
upon and up the proscenium arch. These elements were the upstage cave platform and the rock 
units at the downstage right and left corners. 

The large upstage cave unit platform also provided an answer to the requirements of 
the show's staging. The closing song of Act I, "Comfort and Joy", requires all of the locations 
previously seen in the show to be seen all at once on the stage. These included the town hall, 
the Parker living room. Shelly's bedroom, and the hospital room. The large number of locations 
meant that multiple set wagons were not possible. A tall platform incorporated into the set as 
Shelly's Bedroom and the Hospital Room would be the solution. Ultimately, the cave served to 



- Section 6: Postmortem - Dills 1 05 

further the story and provided adequate sight lines for a complicated musical number. 

The largest challenge that 1 faced during this process was communication and getting my 
ideas, both on paper and verbally, across to other people. Something that I have noticed is that 
1 tend to do everything myself because 1 find it easier than explaining what I desire to someone 
else. This was impossible for this production, nothing would have been accomplished if I had 
operated like this. In addition to delegating work to the build and paint crew. I had to accept 
the quality of work that was given to me. 1 had to realize that my expectations of others and 
their work are often too high and I need to be grateful for the work given me and work on better 
relating what I expect the final product to look like. 

Being a student in such a leadership position as Scenic Designer can be intimidating and 
overwhelming. Working alongside faculty designers and directors as equals is stressful. They 
have years more experience than I do. Not letting them run over me with their ideas and getting 
them to hear my ideas proved to be challenges. Such a creative team of people can be very 
strong willed and outspoken. I had to find the fine line of hearing the others on the design team 
out, taking what was helpful from of their ideas, incorporating them into my own ideas, and 
keeping the original flavor of my own ideas/design. 

I think there was a great deal of miscommunication or a failure to communicate between 
the design team, directors, orchestra, the choreographer and myself. Too often during the 
rehearsal process, things that were needed were not communicated to the people who needed to 
know, some people would say that they were going to take care of certain things and then did 
not. I should have been more on top of following up with people and being more involved and 
available during the rehearsal and building process. 1 did make it a point to stop by the scene 
shop on a daily basis and discuss the progress of the set with the shop foreman/technical director. 

Several aspects of this design did not work when it came to the final product. The 
moveable trees proved to be harder to execute, build, and rig than expected. We did not have 



- Section 6: Postmortem - Dills 1 06 

enough hardware to make all four trees function and I kept trying to get the hardware for free. 
I was not successful and that caused us to be rigging the last tree the day of the first technical 
rehearsal. While the trees were a great idea, they proved to be hard to move and four of them 
were one too many for the stage. We eventually cut one of the trees from the set. meaning that 
we did not need to purchase the extra set of hardware for the fourth tree. That hardware and rope 
was several hundred dollars that we could have saved. 

Another part of the set that could have been reworked was the size of the cave drops. 
They should have been built, rigged, and flown out before the cave platform was constructed. 
Also. 1 did not take into account the height of the borders. The borders cut off the top of the cave 
drops meaning that they were taller and larger than they needed to be. If they had been smaller 
they would have been much easier to handle and rig. Their size caused a great deal of problems 
because it took a large number of people to move. We rarely had enough people working in the 
shop to move the pieces and rig them safely. 

Time management, via myself and the scene shop, was a challenge. One of the first items 
in the set to be approved by the director was the upstage cave platform. Therefore, it was the 
first item to be drafted and turned into the scene shop for construction. The technical director 
and theatre practice crew were very efficient in building and legging the platforms, but these 
should have been completed after the flying elements were fully rigged. Not being able to lay 
the pieces flat on the stage floor added to the difficulty that we had in rigging the flying scenic 
elements. 

Designing the set for Bat Boy: The Musical was a learning experience and has made me 
a better, more effective designer and theatre practitioner. 1 will take what I learned with me into 
graduate school and on into the professional theatre community.