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THE 

THE BATTLE OP ALMA, 



AND 



ITS INCIDENTS. 



THE 

THE BATTLE OF ALMA, 



AND 
ITS INCIDENTS. 



ENTERED AT STATIONERS' HALL. 
[ The right of translating this Work is reserved by the Author.'] 



THE 



BATTLE OF ALMA, 



AND 



|Js Intimitis. 



- IWl - 



BY 



AN OFFICER. 



' tm - 



LONDON : 
T. HATOHARD, 187, PICCADILLY. 

1854. 



2*3. A. 



V- 



C0 

$te Imperial fKajeirtg 
THE EMPEROR NAPOLEON III., 

THIS 
PROSB AND METRICAL DESCRIPTION 

OF. 

%\t gsittlt fff $Ima, 

. IS MOST 

_. » 

RE8PECTFULLY INSCRIBED 

BT 

THE AUTHOR. 



THE 



BATTLE OP ALMA. 



B 



THE BATTLE FIELD. 



Divested of technicalities, which to professional 
men are superfluous, and by the uninitiated incom- 
prehensible, the site of the battle of Alma may be 
easily described. Advancing towards it, as seen 
by the allied forces, a vast amphitheatre presented 
itself, of luxuriant vineyards laden with grapes, 
and gardens of surpassing beauty, in which the 
apple, nectarine, peach, and pear tree, all the 
flowers and fruits best known in England, ripened, 
bloomed, and flourished in a fulness of maturity, 
that as regarded home productions, threw all com- 
petition in the shade. 

b 2 



4 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

Through the centre of this valley runs a great 
road, across, which, at about two and a half miles 
from the sea, the Russians had established their 
position. Precipitious cliffs from three to four hun- 
dred feet high (those attacked and carried by the 
heroic French Zouaves) strengthened the Russian 
left — which cliffs, gradually diminishing in height, 
swept round inland, and formed the amphitheatre 
adverted to, terminated by a pinnacle or mass of 
rock, again jutting boldly forward into the plain, 
occupied by the extreme right of the Russians ; 
and having between it and the higher cliffs at 
the other extremity (Prince MenschikofFs left) an 
opening or entrance of about two miles wide into 
the amphitheatre within ; fringed by the Alma, a 
shallow stream or rivulet fordable by men in most 
places. Fronting the allied army, on the river's 
near side, stood the villages of Bouliouk on the 
left, and Almatamak on the right hand. The 



THE BATTLE OP ALMA. 5 

opposite bank of the Alma (spanned by a wooden 
bridge) ascending abruptly by rugged slopes, until 
it formed an inner ridge, or rising ground from 
sixty to one hundred and fifty feet high, running 
parallel to the river, obstructing the entrance to 
the larger amphitheatre described ; and this inner 
ridge or hill side, had consequently, to be sur- 
mounted in order to reach the key of the Russian 
position, which was the protruding pinnacle of 
rock alluded to as forming one of its boundaries 
at the entrance of the valley. 

For the effective defence of this point, and in 
short of the entire position, the best possible pre- 
parations had been made. Half way down the 
hill in front, a trench was excavated several hun- 
dred yards in length, to afford shelter whilst re- 
pelling an advance. Artillery was posted on every 
spot that commanded the river fords, and practi- 
cable approaches. The willows and other trees on 



D THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

the banks of the Alma were cut down, to deprive 
assailants of the slightest cover, and posts erected 
at measured distances, to show the ranges of the 
guns and line of fire best adapted to destroy. A 
covered battery, somewhat retired on the right, 
mounting seventeen heavy guns, many of them 
thirty-two pounders, flanked the whole of the right 
of the position, and commanded the village and 
fords of Bouliouk. Upon the table lands, afforded 
by the slopes of the inner ridge, the enemy's 
infantry were placed, and on the heights above 
his great reserve, amounting in the whole (cavalry 
and artillery included), at least, to fifty thousand 
men— covered and supported by the fire of one 
hundred and eighty cannon. 

Such then was the field, — with its con- 
comitants. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



ALMA. 



THE ADVANCE. 

War emblazoned — toil inured, 
Gathering throng the allied host, 
Sickness, suffering, want endured, 
On Crimea's rugged coast, 
For the drum and bugle blast 
Now awaken echo's train, 
Slumbering 'mid the autre 's vast 
Piled round Almatamak's plain, 

Crossed by Alma's flood, 
Which ere long for thousands slain 

Mourned in tears of blood : — 
No— the modest trembling stream 
Blushed at foiled ambition's dream. 



8 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

Gallant Gaul, and Britain brave, 

Side by side behold, 
On their right the Moslem grave 

Famed in fields of old ; 
O'er the whole St. Arnaud ruled, 1 
Marshal meet of such array, 
Afric trained and battle schooled, 
Chief of warrior chiefs that day 

As his rank bespoke : — 
Eaglan 2 leading to the fight 
England, Ireland, Scotland's might, 

" Britain's hearts of oak ;" 
Nor had ever summer airs 
Prouder banners spread than theirs. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



THE POSITION. 

Worthy of her ancient fame 
Eussia takes the field, 
Howsoever much to blame 
Never known to yield ; 
Bugged as their father-land, 
Fierce in spirit, strong of hand, 
Beady at the Czar's command 

Willingly to die ; 
Mark where Bussia*s warrior band, 

Hold yon mountain high ; 
Forty thousand — bayonets told — * 
Full six thousand horsemen bold, 
Whilst two hundred cannon vast 
Bound a deathshade deeply cast, 
Where, by mine and firm stockade, 
Every nook's a fortress made ; 
Upward, guns of largest size 
Midway rake the hillock's rise, 



10 THE BATTLE OF ALULA. 

And from neighbouring rocky steep 
Stream, and gorge, and valley sweep, 

Flanking ford and pass, 
Peering forth from caverns deep, 

Masked midst flowers and grass : — 
Till exhausted skill at length 
Proudly views its massive strength, 
And, each stratagem essayed 
That hath foeman's footstep stayed, 
Menschikoff* might justly deem 
Armed assault a maniac's dream, 

Laughed at as a jest, 
Waiting but at one fell swoop 
On the coming foe to stoop 

From this Eagle nest, 
As his eye with conscious pride 
Glanced along the mountain's side ; — 
Nor had sunbeam ever sat 
On a host more fierce than that ! 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 11 



THE BATTLE. 



Hardy Briton — fiery Gaul, 
Whom no sights or sounds appal, 
Here a stubborn foe you find, 
Be not to his prowess blind ; 
Gird your loins, 'mid cannon's roar, 
Trumpet's scream, and rocket's hiss, 
E'en your sires renowned of yore, 

Ne'er saw field like this ; 
For — in horrors undefined, 
Death's pale horse here stalks before, 

Leaving hope behind. 

Marshalled first, in wedge-like form, 5 
Forward dashes knightly France, 
Prompt to break 'mid battle's storm 

Still the foremost lance ; 
Gallia boast them as thine own, 
Finer soldiers — braver men, 
Ne'er upheld thy laurelled throne, 

Better fought than then ! 



12 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

Through the valley on the right, 
Charging heedless of the slain, 
Canrobert 6 his Eagle's flight 

Points the heights to gain ; 
Led by one whose Princely name,* 
Highest stands in kingly fame, 
Once more, hailed with fierce acclaim, 

At those fatal fords, 
Where recross, midst shrouding flame, 

French and Eussian swords. 8 

Onward France ! the foe aghast, 
Sees the ford and village past; 
But, avoid yon mountain steep, 9 
Beetling o'er the foaming deep, 
Full four hundred feet on high, 
Steeply towering to the sky, 
Up, whose rocky face to strive, 
Mortal man shall not survive ? 

Honoured France ! thy mettled blood, 
Heeds not mountain, tower, or flood ; 
Higher yet — and higher still, 
See ! they climb yon deadly hill, 
Hanging there, a mote in size 
O'er the black cliff's rifted rise, 
Clinging fast with clutching hand, 
Where a goat could scarcely stand, 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 13 

Or, as valour's self may end, 
Mangled, writhing, prone descend: — 
Still — at length a gallant few, 
Gain the top and form anew, 
Where, e'en Menschikoff that morn, 
Deemed attack " a hope forlorn ;" 
Sergeant Fleury 10 past the rest 
Pushing on with dauntless breast, 
Till he gains the watch tower walls ; 
And near Prince Napoleon falls ; 
Honored be his laurelled head, 
Numbered with— the deathless dead ! 

Then once more, proud Eussia sees, 
Foes whom here, no snow-storms freeze ; 
Nay beholds o'er forts reduced, 
Sight to quench her cherished pride, 
Moscow's Eagles, reproduced 

At the Alma's side ; 
All their pristine glories bright 
Clothed in renovated light ! 

France, what thus these heroes dare, 
Thousands of thy sons still sigh, 
Breathing as an earnest prayer, 
Hour like this, for thee, to share — 
See such sight — and die ! 



14 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

But, whilst Bosquet's 11 gallant bands 
Thus outflank them on the height, 
Seek we, how the battle stands, 

Towards the Russian right ; 
Where heroic Eaglan sage, 
Calmly scans war's blood-stained page, 
And in characters of fire 
Watches Bussia's vengeful ire, 
Told by symbols that reveal 
Europe's future woe or weal. 

Firmly as the steadfast rock 
Which defends their island shore, 
Meets the wintry tempest's shock, 
But its utmost rage to mock ; 
Moves each British corps ; 
In contiguous columns twain, 12 
Traversing the flowery plain, 
Towards a ford where Alma's bank 
Seemed least clothed in verdure dank ; 
Though with batteries o'erspread, 
Bristling from its sedgy bed, 
Up to where a massive mound, 
Intersects the higher ground, 
Wherein ambushed death reclines 
Canon-shaped in triple lines ; 
And displays a sylvan scene 
Fair as youthful love would paint, 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 15 

Such as Eden might have been, 
Marred by deadly taint. 

On they rush-— a lurid gleam 
Scintillates from mound and tower, 
Lights with death the livid stream, 

Shrouds an iron shower, 
Harrowed, torn, the ground upheaves 

As where ploughs have passed, 
Thousands fall, like autumn leaves, 

Seared by wintry blast ; — 
Yet unmoved, with steady nerve, 
Lo ! the modern Spartan's dress, 
Decimated — do not swerve, 

But still onward press, 
As deployed — their lines advance — 
" Go it England" 13 — forward France ! 

And the day's your own ; 
Though its horrors to enhance, 
Plain and path with fire are strown ; — 
Dimly seen by lightning's glance, 
Flowing blood and shattered bone ; — 
Whilst the village in a blaze, 
Flashes, flickers, and decays. 

Through the water, up the bank, 
Now they struggle, rank o'er rank, 



16 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

Dashing into vineyards wide 
Spreading o'er the river's side, 
Where, the fruit they calmly strip 14 
Just to cool the parching lip, 
Then refreshed in heart and will, 
Grasp their arms and mount the hill ; 
Led by Brown, at sixty-five, 15 
Shouting, as they upward strive, 
" England ! Ireland ! sturdy Gael ! 
Now your trusty bayonets try, 
Heedless of this iron hail, 
Forward — do, or die l" 
Yelling fiercely at the thought, 
Scotland's blood is mantling high, 
Nearly unto madness wrought 
By the Guardsman's thrilling cheer, 
And by Campbell's startling cry, 
" We'll have none but bonnets here !" 16 
Which in friendly guise defied 
Heroes never yet denied — 
And who charging, breast to breast, 
With them cross the rampart's crest 1 * 

There, flowed forth no scanty flood, 
Britain, of thy richest blood, 
For, commingling as of old, 
Ardent Knight and Bowman bold, 
Lordly heir, and peasant brave, 
Found alike a soldier's grave. 



THE RATTLE OF ALMA. 17 

Nor, did an unworthy foe, 
Meet their vigour's fiercest blow ; 
Long for dogged nerve renowned, 
Inch by inch they hold their ground ; 
Or e'en failing to defend, 
Like a fiery cloud descend 

Fiercely to destroy, 
Fatal as the simoon's breath, 
Spreading desolation, death, 

Where was life and joy : — 
Lo ! the fruits ambition bears, 
Widow's scream, and orphan tears ! 



But — as when in hunter's toil, 

Lured to death, yet unsubdued, 

'Midst appliances to foil, 

Mangled, writhing, gore imbued, 

Still the Lion sternly shares 

All vindictive malice dares, 

And though maimed, and wounded sore, 

Turns to make one effort more ; 

Breaks through every tangled tie, 

And in strength — the whirlwind's sweep, 

Hurls the foes who seek to fly, 

Headlong o'er the steep : — 
Thus— reforming, where destroyed, 
Closing o'er their comrades slain, 

c 



18 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

Still the stern brigades deployed, 
Closed — and charged again ; — 
Princely Cambridge at their head, 18 
Leading midst unnumbered dead. 
Then, whilst steel was steel opposed, 

* 

Waned the deadly fire around, 
For no smitten foe disclosed 
Aught but arm-dealt wound ; 
All in one sad livery drest, 
Cloven skull, or gaping breast. 

Fainting in the sun's fierce ray, 
Struggling up that dread defile, 
Hope still cheered the warrior's way, 

Throned on woman's smile, 
Shedding o'er that field of strife, 
Promised blessings, honours, life — 
And, bright thought, all else above, 
Laurels gained for those we love. 
Strike then, England, for the past, 
Hearts at home and ancient fame ! 
On them, Scotland, like a blast 
Fraught with scorching flame ! 
Dear old Ireland, be not last 

To uphold thy name, 
" Faugh-a-ballagh's" 1 ^ stirring cheer, 
Ne'er was wanted more than here ! 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 19 

Long, in savage clasp embraced, 
Hostile ranks were interlaced ; 
Till deploying as they fought, 
Britain's flanks were forward brought, 
Like red serpents still unrolled 80 
Some fresh victim to enfold ; 
Then, with a terrific shout, 
Closing on the weakened foe, 
Flight became a perfect rout, 
Checked advance an overthrow ; — 
For, victorious on the left, 
France o'erlapped the " heady fight," 
Having Bussia's helmet cleft, 

In her 'hour of might ; 
And avenged, at one fell blow, 
Years of hatred, guile, and woe. 



c 2 



20 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



THE RETREAT. 

Soon diversely scattered wide, 
Ebbed the blood-stained human tide ; 
Leaving, as when storms are o'er, 
Wrecks abandoned on the shore ; 
Not as men bereft pf hope 
On some future field to cope, 
But, like wearied boar at bay, 
Conquered, yet resolved to slay. 
Whilst face-stricken, nearly blind, 
Hot pursuit and death behind, 
Menschikoff 81 the country crossed, 

And with heart forlorn, 
Witnessed — all but honour — lost 

Since that fatal morn. 

Proof, if proof were still required ? 
That, though Kings be power elate, 
Confident in strength acquired, 
Heaven decrees each battle's fate ! 
And — the pride which man applauds, 
All that fool's distinction deem, 
Are but folly's tinselled gauds : — 
Life itself— a passing dream. 



THE 



BATTLE OF ALMA. 



XWWWNIW 



NOTES. 



NOTES. 



NOTE I. 

1 O'er the whole St. Arnaud ruled, 
Marshal meet of such array ; 

Page 8, line 6. 

Marshal St. Arnaud, generalissimo, and com- 
mander-in-chief of the allied armies. Born in 
Paris on the 26th of August, 180] . At the age of 
fifteen entered the garde des corps, and became 
a sub-lieutenant in the infantry of the line, but 
subsequently left the army, and did not return to 
the service until 1831. Took an active part in 
the war of La Vendee, as orderly officer to Mar- 
shal Bugeaud. Distinguished himself at the 



24 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

siege of Constantine ; received the decoration of 
the Legion of Honor ; and in 1840, having dis- 
played great courage and talent in a series of 
battles in Algeria, was raised to the rank of Com- 
mandant in the 18th regiment of infantry. In 
1842, made Lieutenant-Colonel 15th regiment — 
in 1844, Colonel 32nd regiment — and in 1847, 
Major-General : — having also been successively 
promoted to the rank of officer and commander 
in the Legion of Honor. In 1850, General St. 
Arnaud commanding the province of Constantine, 
as such, made a brilliant campaign against the 
Kabyles. Subsequently returned to France; re- 
ceived the command of the 2nd division of the 
army of Paris ; and soon afterwards was made 
minister of war. In 1 852, promoted Marshal of 
France ; named senator ; and received the grand 
cross of the Legion of Honor. 

the approval of all the nations, Marshal 
d took command of the allied armies, as 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 25 

commander-in-chief. And, after a display of 
physical courage, talent, and energy, only ex- 
ceeded by the heroic magnanimity with which, 
whilst actually suffering the agonies of death from 
a fatal disease, he continued to fulfil his functions 
to the last ; — gloriously perished in the execution 
of his duty, dying of long-standing heart disease, 
on the 29th September, 1854 ; after achieving 
(all circumstances considered) one of the greatest 
victories upon record. Among the manifold 
heroes of whom France can boast, his name may 
be proudly enrolled — for, to the political opponent 
or private slanderer, it will be sufficient to reply, 
that, viewed from a distance through a distorting 
medium, there appear to be spots upon the sun. 
France and Europe, by his decease, have sustained 
a loss it will be difficult to repair. 



26 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



NOTE II. 

3 Raglan leading to the fight, 
England, Ireland, Scotland's might, 

''Britain's hearts of oak !" 

Page 8, line 10. 

General Lord Raglan, commander of the British 
forces in the East, had under him at the battle of 
Alma, Lieutenant- General Sir George Brown, 
commanding the light division — Lieutenant-Ge- 
neral His Royal Highness the Duke of Cam- 
bridge, commanding the first division — Lieu- 
tenant-General Sir De Lacy Evans commanding 
the second division — and Lieutenant-General Sir 
Richard England commanding the third division. 
Fourth division, Lieutenants General Sir George 
Cathcart, and Cavalry in reserve. 

To dwell upon the services or talents of Lord 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 27 

Raglan might here be considered supereroga- 
tory; but the following extract from Marshal St 
Arnaud's despatch, will be read throughout the 
land with exultation : " The English attacked 
the Eussian positions in admirable order, under 
the fire of their cannon, carried them, and drove 
off the Russians. The bravery of Lord Raglan 
rivals that of antiquity ; in the midst of cannon 
and musket shot he displayed a calmness which 
never left him." In short, the presence of mind, 
promptitude, and placid determination of Lord 
Raglan, during the entire day, in the hottest of 
the fire, and most exposed positions, excited 
universal admiration — in courage, sagacity, and 
experience, his Lordship is unsurpassed by any 
existing omc'er of his standing. 



28 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



note in. 

3 Forty thousand — bayonets told— 
Full six thousand horsemen bold. 

Page 9, line 11. 

44 The Russian army reckoned forty thousand 
bayonets from all parts of the Crimea; in the 
morning there arrived from Theodosia, six thou- 
sand cavalry, and one hundred and eighty pieces 
of heavy and field artillery. n — Mabshal St. 
Abnaud's Despatch. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 29 



NOTE IV. 

4 Menschikoff might justly deem, 
Aimed assault a maniac's dream. 

Page 10, line 10. 

Prince Menschikoff commanded in chief — 
General Kirukoff the right — and General Gorts- 
chakoff the left wing of the Eussian army. And, 
that Prince Menschikoff considered his position 
on the heights of Alma impregnable there can be 
no doubt, as in an intercepted despatch, addressed 
to His Imperial Majesty the Czar, he promises 
speedily to inform him of the entire defeat of the 
invaders. In fact, when it is considered that fifty 
thousand men so advantageously posted, with one 
hundred and eighty cannon, had to be attacked, 
up the face of a steep hill, by thirty thousand in- 
fantry, supported by an artillery force not pos- 



30 THE BATTLE OF ALMA* 

sessed of one half the number of the enemy's 
guns, and of inferior calibre, such a conviction 
on Prince Menschikoff 's part appeared to be war- 
ranted by circumstances. That these obstacles 
were overcome, and a victory gained over such 
opponents, so located, in itself speaks volumes in 
favour of the daring enterprize, inflexible courage, 
and heroic perseverance of the conquerors, whose 
military qualities, when thus happily united, are 
capable of achieving anything, not in itself a phy- 
sical impossibility. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 31 



NOTE V. 

* Marshalled first, in wedge-like form, 

Forward dashes knightly France. 

Page U, line IS. 

" All the French divisions marched first, with 
the brave first division of the gallant Ganrobert at 
their head. Our order of march was en losange, 
and the English forming the two north flanks, 
marched next to us." — Notes by a French Naval 
Officer. 



THE BATTLE C 



" Ciinrobcrt his Eagle's flight, 
Pointa the lieighta to gain. 

nmu,m»t, 

General Canrobert, second in command of the 
French army, an officer of great gallantry and 
distinguished service, is thus eulogized in Mar- 
shal St. Amaud's despatch : " General Canrobert, 
to whom is due, in part, the honour of the day, 
was slightly wounded by the splinter of a shell, 
which struck him in the breast and hand, but he 
is doing very well." General Canrobert, a very 
able tactician, as well as chivalrous soldier, is 
looked up to with great confidence by the French 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 33 



NOTE VIL 

7 Led by one whose Princely name, 

Highest stands in kingly feme. 

Page 12, line 5. 

His Imperial Highness Prince Napoleon, com- 
manded the third division of the French army ; 
and in Marshal St. Arnaud's despatch is thus ad- 
verted to : " Prince Napoleon, at the head of his 
division, took possession of the large village of 
Almatamak, under the fire of the Eussian bat- 
teries. The Prince showed himself worthy of the 
great name he bears." To which, it may be 
added, that his Imperial Highness was received 
throughout the day with enthusiastic shouts of 
" Vive TEmpereur!" (in which even the wounded 
frequently rose from the ground to join) and 
other acclamations, deservedly elicited by his in- 



34 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

trepid conduct and heroic demeanour where 
danger and death were imminent upon manifold 
remarkable occasions :— commenting upon which, 
a sergeant of Zouaves summed up the Prince's 
qualifications with a knowing wink, by observing — 
" That cock's of the right kind, comrades — he 
should have served with the Old Guard!" In 
fact, there can be no doubt Prince Napoleon in- 
herits the hereditary military talents, and unques- 
tionable personal courage, which are known to be 
the characteristics of his illustrious family. 



i 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 35 



NOTE VIII. 

8 Where recross, 'mid shrouding flame, 
French and Russian swords. 

Page 12, line 10. 

The feelings of the French nation generally, as 
regards Russia, may be best estimated by an ex- 
tract from the notes of one of their own country- 
men : " Oh ! the glorious and beautiful spectacle ! 
two armies were about to join battle under our 
eyes. Our friends, our brethren in arms, at last 
were on the point of finding themselves face to 
face with the enemy so long wished for, so long 
desired. France was about to cross swords with 
Bussia — how great the duel !" Except from per- 
sonal observation, it is impossible to appreciate 
the patriotic enthusiasm and devotion by which 
the heart of every Frenchman is influenced upon 
this subject. 

d 2 



THB BATTLE OP ALMA. 



* But, avoid yon mountain steep, 

Beetling o'er the foaming deep — 
Up whoso rocky face to strire. 
Mortal man (hall not Burrive J 

stmU,m, 



The precise nature of the exploit adverted to, 
and the difficulties surmounted, are thus described 
by a spectator : " Our centre" (the French) " was 
now in motion, and advancing in good order on 
the village. At noon it approaches that position 
which is covered by a cloud of Russian skir- 
mishers. . The cannons roar, and the fire spreads 
everywhere. During this time we see our right 
pass the river at its mouth ; other columns push 
Li-v-, pagging the stream any way they can. 
n we are astonished to see our men 
these seemingly inaccessible peaks. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 37 

clinging to everything, and swarming along like 
ants. After twenty minutes' climbing we see them 
rising on the crest of the hill, crowning every 
elevation, and before Menschikoff could have be- 
lieved his eyes, we have ten thousand men out- 
flanking him on his left. Then he bethinks him 
of driving back the danger, and launches against 
Bosquet's Zouaves thirty pieces of artillery and 
several columns of infantry. It is, however, too 
late. Our troops do not give way a foot, six 
pieces of artillery have succeeded in passing the 
bridge, and advance to support Bosquet. When 
Lord Baglan saw our divisions of the right climb- 
ing the granite walls of the heights which shut in 
the river, he applauded and shouted, 4 They are 
not men, they are lions and tigers.'" And most 
certainly, viewed in any light, this was an achieve- 
ment which will always claim a conspicuous posi- 
tion on the records of military daring. 

Many of the attending incidents were deeply 



38 THB BATTLE OF ALMA. 

interesting, but space will here admit of only one 
selection. Traversing the edge of the cliff which 
the Zouaves had so nobly scaled and carried, in 
search of any misery it might be possible to re- 
lieve, on the morning after the battle, my atten- 
tion was at length attracted to a French officer 
who lay dead within a few yards of the verge of 
the rocks, face downward, with the bodies of 
three Eussian soldiers around him. One of them 
still grasped the strap of the French officer's 
epaulette, though the sword of the latter had 
evidently, whilst he was so held, been thrust 
through the Muscovite, in whose breast it re- 
mained ; the Eussian, even in death, keeping hold 
of a discharged pistol, which, with a bullet wound 
in the officer's neck, told their own story of savage 
though unequal combat, terminated by the de- 
struction alike of the assailants and the assailed. 
Although by no means an isolated instance in 
which the same description of evidence proved 



THE BATTLB OF ALMA. 39 

that even greater disparity of numbers had as 
fiercely contended on this " field of death ;" fronf 
the peculiar disposition of the bodies, I paused to 
examine this group ; and upon gently turning oyer 
the French officer's body, became at once enlight- 
ened as to causes and results. Beneath, and 
gathered under him, clearly whilst dying, as it 
bore the imprint of a gory hand in many places, 
was a small tricolored flag, which, as well as a 
portion of its short staff, was torn and ball-shat- 
tered, actually riddled in such a manner as to 
render it incomprehensible how it could have 
been carried even thus far. The flag was so 
crumpled up, I know no better term, as to be 
quite concealed by the officer's body (surrounded 
by the others) when stretched out to die : and the 
last effort of the same blood-stained hand, had 
been to remove his decoration of the Legion of 
Honor, and to thrust it inside the breast of his 
coat, where the officer's cross and ribbon still 



40 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

remained in his grasp, squeezed against the 
miniature of a young and handsome woman, sus- 
pended round his neck; whose placid counte- 
nance, thus associated with the horrors around, 
appeared as if smiling at these ghastly proofs of 
the instability of human life, its love, ambition, 
hopes, and happiness ! On his person there were 
but few papers, and those rendered nearly illegible 
by blood stains. I made out, however, among 
them, many scraps of, to me, original verse, and 
therefore esteeming him a brother of tho gentle 
art, I resolved that the head of the troubadour 
should not remain unb.uried. And was still 
busied in providing for him such a grave as a 
mattock and sheltered nook afforded, when a pass- 
ing patrol claimed and carried off the flag, after 
closely questioning me as "to where it had been 
found?" but in evidently a softened tone, after 
they made out the nature of my employment, and 
had fully satisfied themselves that I was an 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 41 

Englishman. I learnt from them, the deceased 
was a gallant and promising soldier, the orphan 
son of an officer who had served under Napoleon 

« 

the First, remarkable for the mildness of his dis- 
position and literary attainments ; who, after scal- 
ing the cliff with the color slung across his back, 
was last seen forcing his way through a host of 
enemies, and striking down all before him, until 
thus slain by a pistol-shot in the moment of 
victory. The missing color, it was feared, had 
been lost ; and the exultation with which its re- 
covery was hailed, amounted almost to frenzy. 
As a national characteristic, military enthusiasm, 
which tends to foster among the populace, gener- 
ally, an almost universal desire to become soldiers, 

is, without doubt, more predominant in France 
than any other country whatsoever; and their 

natural disposition and personal qualifications 

are unquestionably well adapted to the profession 

of arms. 



THE BATTLE OS ALMA. 



10 Seqeant Henry past the rest, 
Poshing on with dauntlana breast, 
Till he gains the watch-tower walls ; — 
And near Prince Napoleon folia. 

Upon reaching the top of the cliffs, the Zouaves 
before they could reform after the perilous ascent, 
were for a moment checked on the very brink of 
the precipice; when, disregarding certain death, 
and in the face of a tremendous fire of musketry, 
Sergeant Ma} or Fleury dashed forward with the 
tricolor, vociferating " Vive l'Empereur !" but 
ivhiisl heroically planting it close to the base- 
igular tower, was shot dead, 
i adverted to in preceding note. 



h ad\ 

Li 



THE BATTLB 0* ALMA. 43 



NOTE XL 

11 Bat whilst Bosquet's gallant bands 

Thus outflank them on the height. 

P^el4,UneL 

General Bosquet, a celebrated brave and ener 
getic officer, commanded a division of the French 
army at the battle of Alma. He is thus men- 
tioned by Marshal St. Arnaud: "On the 20th, 
from six o'clock in the morning, I carried into 
operation with the division of General Bosquet, 
reinforced by eight Turkish battalions, a move- 
ment which turned the left of the Bussians and 
some of their batteries. General Bosquet ma- 
nceuvered with as much intelligence as bravery. 
This movement decided the success of the day." 
And the General can be truly said, upon this 
occasion, to have increased a reputation of which 
his country may be proud. 



THB BATTLE OP ALMA. 



" Id contiguous columns twain, 
TniTeniing the flowery plain. 



" The combined armies advanced on the same 
alignment, her Majesty's troops in contiguous 
double columns, with the front of two divisions 
covered by light infantry and a troop of horse- 
artillery. 

" On approaching to near the fire of the guns, 
which soon became extremely formidable, the two 
leading divisions deployed into line and advanced 
to attack the front, and the supporting divisions 
followed the movement. Hardly had this taken 
place, when the village of Bouliouk, immediately 
opposite the centre, was fired at all points, creat- 
ig a continuous blaze for three hundred yards, 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 45 

obscuring their position, and rendering a passage 
through it impracticable." — Lord Baglan's De- 
spatch. All difficulties were, however, sur- 
mounted, as related in the text, and the troops 

pressed forward to the attack "with the utmost 
gallantry and steadiness." 



NOTE XIII. 

13 Go it, England !"— Forward France ! 
And the day's jour own, 

Page 18, line 10. 

"Go it, Guards!" an exclamation effectively 
used by Major General Bentick, in the very hottest 
of the fire at Alma. " Go it !" however, appears to 
have been previously vernacularized by even Eoyal 
authority, as his late Majesty King William 
IV., when Lord High Admiral, thus pithily 



46 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

defined his intentions in a despatch to Admiral 
Sir Edward Goddrington antecedent to the battle 
of Navarino, "Go it, Ned!" Doubtlessly, how- 
ever, all the Lady Tittletommys of the day, and 
their snivelling counterparts in petticoats, will be 
horrified at its importation into rhyme. " As sen- 
timental phraseology"— observeth Mr. Nincom- 
poop, Professor of Zoology, and A.S.S. — "is in 
truth the roseate enhancing bloom upon the peach 
of poesy — the great essential, as regards rythmical 
refinement" It may be questionable, however, if 

the professor, turning from the elegant, to the 
useful in his own profession, could, off hand, 

define the precise number of joints in a pig's tail. 

" So difficult are beauties to distinguish, even in 

our study's course." 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 47 



NOTE XIV. 

14 Dashing into vineyards wide 
Spreading o'er the river's side,— 
Where the fruit they calmly strip 
Just to cool the parching lip,— 
Then refreshed in heart and will, 
Grasp their arms and mount the hilL 

Page 16, line 8. 

This is only a plain statement of what actually 
occurred-— the men paused in the vineyards to 
refresh themselves with the grapes as calmly as if 
" at ease " upon parade. Even theirs, however, 
did not exceed the coolness said to have been ex- 
hibited by a splendid six-foot specimen of Tippe- 

rary produce, Captain O'T , who, when about 

to lead a charge, whilst shot were flying in all 
directions, roared out, " I wonder, Jack, what 
discount Moses would be after allowing, 'any 
friend in the city/ to take my bills off his hands 



48 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

to-day, (bad luck to him !) if he saw me cutting such 
a caper as this, at the head of a company of the 88th, 
and my cursed acceptances not due for a month to 
come ? Be Dad ! it would take the starch out of his 
shirt collar, my friend. Ellen dear ! I would have 
no objection to your seeing me though. But here 
goes — trail arms — forward — charge bayonets — 
double quick — Faugh-a-ballagh, my lads, and the 
devil take the hindmost!" This provident calcu- 
lator on exigent contingencies as regarded discount, 
went however safely through the day, without 
doubt to the great gratification and ultimate profit 
of his accommodating, yet under the circum- 
stances, anything but admiring friend, Mr. Moses, 
of Wellsqueezem Street. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 49 



NOTE XV. 

15 Led by Brown at sixty-five, 
Shouting as they upward strive, 
England ! Ireland ! hardy Gael ! 
Now your trusty bayonets try, 
Heedless of this iron hail, 
Forward ! — do or die ! 

Page 16, line 7. 

Lieutenant- General Sir George Brown com- 
manded the light division at Alma ; and is alike 
honoured as a soldier, and valued as a man, on 
whose head the sun of sixty-six summers has but 
tended to shed matured energies and increasing 
honours. The facts as narrated, are simply the 
truth — require no comment, and need ao eulogy. 



50 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



NOTE XVI. 

16 And by Campbell's startling cry, 
" Well have none but bonnets here !" 

Page 16, line 18. 

Major-General Sir Colin Campbell commanded 
the Highland Brigade on this occasion. Than 
whom Scotland, as she boasts no higher name, 
never yet produced a greater soldier, or a chieftain 
more beloved. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 51 



NOTE XVII. 

17 And who charging breast to breast, 
With them cross the rampart's crest. 

The first British division commanded by his 
Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge, namely 
the Grenadier, the Coldstream, and Scotch Fusilier 
Guards, and the Highland Brigade, under Major- 
General Sir Colin Campbell, consisting of the 
42nd, 79th, and 93rd regiments, carried the re- 
doubt after a deadly struggle, in which much of 
Britain's best blood, in all ranks, was profusely 
poured forth, the only emulation appearing to be 
who should best and most energetically perform 
the duties of their several stations; — for, this 
second Thermopylae, found heroes as devoted as 

e 2 



52 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

the three hundred, hut happily more fortunate in 
the end. 

Across the very ground whereon the 7th, 23rd, 
and 33rd regiments had been literally destroyed, 
the Highlanders and Guards, over the bodies of 
their fallen comrades, proceeded (as described 
below) to attack the mound or earthwork, that 
had proved so fatal to its former assailants, and 
which presented as formidable an obstacle as it is 
possible to imagine. With a deep trench in front, 
seventeen brass thirty-two and twenty-four pounder 
guns, were mounted on a turfed breastwork, occu- 
pied by two thousand troops of all arms, the 
battery and its approaches being also flanked and 
enfiladed from all quarters by the fire of large 
masses of infantry posted on the higher grounds. 
A loud cheer by the Guards, was replied to with 
a thrilling yell by the Highlanders, as the enemy's 
cannon and musketry fire opened upon them 
within a distance of one hundred yards. "By 



THF BATTLE OF ALMA* 53 

heavens ! as we were rushing up the hill, I felt 
the blood tingling in my very toes. And when 
the pipes, distinctly audible above the battle's din, 
rang in my ears, and I looked upon the Campbell, 
somewhat in advance, leading up to the cannon's 
mouth, crying out at the top of his voice, ' Well 
hae nane but Highland bonnets here!' In the 
delirium of my love for Scotland at that moment 
— and the thought, that even an arm so humble 
as mine was there, to support her honour — my 
heart leaped, and my teeth set, and my temples 
throbbed, until I became actually giddy with ex- 
citement, as I grasped my claymore, and they 
brought their bayonets to the charge, and we all, 
once more shouting * Scotland for ever ! ' rushed 
through the fire at the redoubt, with a determina- 
tion to carry it or perish. And with the Guards 
we did do so, though dearly, too dearly was the 
triumph purchased." 

National mental impulses, the result probably 



54 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

of education as well as temperament, flow however 
in channels equally obvious to the observer, as 
all other national characteristics. " How did you 
feel, Tom?" said a gigantic guardsman to his 
athletic, light haired, blue eyed comrade, as they 
lay down on their straw for the night — " how did 
you feel, when that infernal fire from the redoubt 
opened upon us in front, almost close enough to 
singe our whiskers ?" " Feel?" was the cairn re- 
joinder — " why I felt I had a musket in my hands, 
and a heart behind it, and remembered my dear 
old widowed mother at home would expect to be 
be able to say to our neighbours in Somersetshire, 
that her son had stood up to them like a man." 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 55 



NOTE XVIII. 

18 Princely Cambridge at their head, 
Leading midst unnumbered dead. 

Page 18, line S. 

Lord Raglan's Despatch states: "His Royal 
Highness the Duke of Cambridge brought his 
division into action in support of the light division 
with great ability, and had for the first time an 
opportunity of showing the enemy his devotion to 
Her Majesty, and to the profession of which he is 
so distinguished a member." When about to 
storm the redoubt, His Royal Highness, rushing 
to the front of the Guards, gave the order to 
charge, and afforded many other proofs of his 
ability and courage as a chivalrous leader. 



56 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



NOTE XIX. 

19 Faugh-a-ballagh's ! stirring cheer, 
Ne'er was wanted more than here. 

Page 18, line 25. 

Faugh-a-ballagh, " clear the way !" the motto on 
the colours of the Cannaught Bangers, the 88th 
regiment. It was also the war-cry of an ancient 
Irish sept or clan, and is associated on the battle 
field with many glorious reminiscences. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 57 



NOTE XX. 

90 Like red serpents still unrolled 

Some new victim to enfold. 

Page 19, line 5. 

"At last at half-past three there is a great 
movement visible on the right of the Russians. 
It is the English troops making their appearance. 
They are in two parallel lines. The Russians 
resolve to attack them, and all at once three enor- 
mous columns which formed the Eussian order of 
battle. on the right, formed close column, fixed 
bayonets, and rushed at a run on the first line of 
the English. This resists; the second line ad- 
vances to its support, and then the lines in front 
which unroll themselves like long serpents lap 
over the extremities enclosing the Russians be- 
tween them. In this order of attack the English 



58 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

bj stretching out & little hare the great advantage 
of being able to surround the enemy. If the 
centre of the English lines had been pierced, all 
was over — the English army would have been 
destroyed. But these brave fellows bore the shock 
without breaking; and at this very moment a 
French battery of horse artillery came up and took 
the Russian mass on its flank. Then came a 
frightful pell-mell ; there was no more firing, they 
stabbed one another with the bayonet. At the 
end of a quarter of an hoar the Russian mass was 
destroyed, and the English lines re-forming in 
close order, to close np the numerous gaps, rushed 
on the Russian right From that time all went 
down before us, and the Russians were soon in 
iuU-r---a»t,"_ Notes of a French Naval Ofi^cer. 



il 



THE BATTLE 07 AULA. 59 



NOTE XXI. 

91 Menschikoff the country crossed, 
And with heart forlorn 
Witnessed — all but honor — lost 
Since that fatal morn. 

Page SO, ttne 11. 

Whatever may be the extent of Prince Menschi- 
koffs want of temper— or the bad taste exhibited 
by him at Constantinople and elsewhere as a 
. diplomatist, of his being a great general, a most 
persevering, gallant, devoted and faithful soldier, 
there cannot now remain a doubt. Although 
severely wounded in the face and hand at Alma, 
he has since continued to conduct many important 
operations at Sebastopol and vicinity, with heroic 
fortitude under the most trying and adverse cir- 
cumstances, for which it would be a mistake to 



60 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 

deny him the credit he deserves. Most men can 
fight a winning battle, but it requires no common 
degree of moral and physical courage to bear up 
with undiminished energy against reiterated dis- 
comfitures. To Prince Menschikoff this species 
of merit will be accorded by all parties — and he 
has fortunately to deal with two great nations who 
can feelingly appreciate and honour the struggles 
made by (even mistaken) patriotic gallantry, 
notwithstanding it is, and has been pertinaciously 
exerted in a manner detrimental to their interests. 
To conquer an opponent so determined, adds ma- 
terially to the zest of victory, and — next to having 
no such foe to conquer — is, the greatest blessing to 
be desired. 



A LIST 



OF THE 



OFFICEBS, NON-COMMISSIONED OFHCEBS, 

AHD 

SOLDIERS OF ALL ARMS, 

KILLED AND WOUNDED 

AT 

THE BATTLE OF ALMA, 

SEPT. 20, 1854. 



THB BATTLE OF ALMA. 63 



NOMINAL RETURN OP CASUALTIES 

WHICH OCCURRED IN ACTION OH 

THE BI7EB ALMA, CBIMEA, 

SEPT. 20, 1854. 



General Staff. — Lieutenant T. Leslie, Royal Horse Guards, 
Orderly Officer to the Commander of the Forces, wounded 
severely ; Captain H. E. Weare, 50th Regiment, D.A.A.G., 
wounded severely. 

FIRST DIVISION. 

Staff. — Captain H. W. Cust, Coldstream Guards, Aide-de- 
Camp to Major-General Bentinck, killed. 

GRENADIER GUABD8 (3RD BATTALION). 

Killed. 

Primates. Daniel Palmer James Broad 

William Gordon James Baker Nehemiah Smith 

Charles Gillard Henry Firman William Bowe 

Noah Gosling Noah Fishlock John Champion 

Wounded. 

Grenadier Guards. — Lieutenant-Colonel Hon. H. Percy, 
wounded slightly; Lieutenant B. Hamilton, wounded 
slightly ; Lieutenant J. M. Burgoyne, wounded slightly. 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Pint Divitiort — Grenadier Otuadi continued. 



Henry Russell 
John Cranfifild 
Joseph Coles 

Corporal*. 
Thos. Edmundson 
William Rod per 
Henry Martin 
Benjamin M assay 
Thomas Burrow 

Private*. 
William Moore 
George Felsham 
Robert Baker 
Henry Coles 
James Moulden 
Elijah Robey 
John Durber 
Thomas Cunliffe 
John Powell 
Goorge Wheeler 
James Hilton 
Thomas; Burrow 
Henry Badcock 
Joseph Gibling 
Frederick James 
John Rioketts 
William Steel 
James Yarney 
Thomas Harter 
Robert Farmer 
John Young 



Henry Lomh 
hh- ' ' Hmott 



Samuel Miller 
James Kelly 
Joseph HOI 
Jeremiah Cropley 
James Naginton 
William Stone 
William Pointer 
James Talbot 
John Wood 
C. Goodenham 
John Butler 
William Farmer 
Robert Gerrett 
Samuel Little 
William Moodey 
William Men 
Samuel Nichols 
William Robins 
Thomas Riley 
Robert Wirdnam 
John Alexander 
Giles Lewis 



Thomas Shergold 
James Pearce 
George Maskall 
Thomas Reading 
John Harrison 
Jacob Young 
George Smith 
Joseph Tomlinson 
Thomas Rolfe 
Charles Hatter 
Samuel Barrett 
Edward Griffiths 
Isaiah Hawkins 
Robert Smith 
James Limgeson 
Robert Pitcher 



John Berets 
George Buck 
George Marshall 
James Smith, 1st 
Launcelot Hall 
Edward Panting 
William Carter 
William Leat 
James Smith 
Thomas Smith 
Hemy Reeves 
John West 
William Fellowee 
John Martin 
William Minter 
Francis Wright 
Joseph George 
Thomas Banting 
Henry Curzons 
Robert Martin 
Henry Salter 
Thomas Stone 
Henry Hope 
Robert Drew 
George Hett 
George Brettan 
William P. Skinner 
James Rawlinson 
William Ailing 
EliasBull 
William Beatson 
John Entwisle 
William Muffit 
William Mitchel 
James Martin 
Richard Margetts 
George Oats 
Thomas Pithouse 
George Spencer 



LIST OP KILLED AND WOUNDED. 



65 



1ST BATTALION COLDSTREAM GUARDS. 

Killed. 
Coldstream Guards — Captain H. W. Cust, killed, A.D.C. 

Wounded. 

Coldstream Guards. — Lieutenant G. 

severely. 



Privates. 
Charles Butcher 
George Bess 
David Clow 
W. Clatworthy 
William Farrant 
Jonathan Flint 
John Hatton 
George Holland 



Joseph Hopkins 
Nebr. Jefferies 
E. Jenkinson 
James Lilley 
Robert Winter 
Kobert Milburn 
William Newell 
William Nicholas 
John Butter 
William Sproat 



Baring, wounded 

Fred. Southcott 
WiUiam Smith 
William Spark 
William Scrutton 
Charles Woods 
William Warman 
John Yeo 
E. M. Creagh 
John Groom 



1st battalion scots fusilier ouards. 

Killed. 



Sergeants. 
Francis Robbie 
Joseph Lane 
Nicholas Lane 

Corporals. 
John Blythe 



Corporals. 
Isaac Bond 
William Bailey. 

Privates. 
Francis Cole 



James Seaton 
Alexander Dickson 

Privates. 
Alexander Aird 
Frederick Blake 
G. Davis (3665) 
Robert Forbes 

Died of Wounds. 

Henry Cobden 
George Duff 
W Martin (3429) 
Frederick Moore 
J. S. Ogilvie 

Wounded. 



Thomas W. Hogg 
William Miln 
John Main 
George Payne 
John Richardson 
George Scatchwell 



Thomas Philips 
Edward Pelham 
John Stanley 
William Stokes 
Archibald Smith 



Scots Fusilier Guards. — lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Dalrym- 
ple, wounded slightly ; Lieutenant-Colonel C. A. Berkeley, 
wounded severely; Lieutenant-Colonel H. P. Hepburn, 
wounded severely; Lieutenant-Colonel F. Haygarth, 
wounded severely; Captain Lord Chewton, wounded 



66 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



First Division — Scots Fusilier Guards continued. 

severely ; Captain J. D. Astlev, wounded severely ; Cap- 
tain W. G. Bulwer, wounded severely; Captain C. F. 
Buckley, wounded severely ; Captain K. Gipps, wounded 
slightly ; Lieutenant Lord Ennismore, wounded severely; 
Lieutenant Hon. H. Annesley, wounded severely. 



Sergeants. 
Richard Bye 
Peter Chalmers 
Andrew Gair 
George McLeod 
James Seers 
George Stewart 
John Vatter 

Corporals. 
James Adams 
Daniel Cameron 
John Craw 
Joseph Fall 
Colin Gilchrist 
James Millard 
George Smith 

Drummer. 
Alex. Anderson. 

Privates. 
Joseph Adkins 
Stephen Ayling 
David Anderson 
Thomas Black 
T. Balcanquhal 
John Gatehouse 
Robert Geddes 
David Harris 
William Hill 
John Hobbs 
Robert Holloway 
A. Hannah 
^"^rt Johnstone 
m Joy 
i Jones . 
Loader 
Little 



William Lawrance Charles Bowley 
H. Lawrance, Jun. Andrew Brenner 



John R. Moore 
Wm. McLagan 
T. McLearey 
T. McRoberts 
George McLeod 
James Mesher 
John Mitchell 
Andrew Morton 
W. McPherson 
Patrick McKeero 
James Wylie 
George Watts 
Thomas Willson 
James Walker 
John Ward 
James Wilson 
Charles Weller 
James Warren 
George Wariner 
Robert Whitton 
James Young 
John Young 

Sergeants. 
W. McGregor 
Morgan Jones 



Robert Bordon 
Geo. Biddlecombe 
George Brown 
William Boyd 
Andrew Brodie 
Alexander Black 
George Cross 
Alfred Carpenter 
Joseph Coulton 
J. Cameron (3rd co.) 
Wm. McChire 
John Cameron 
Peter Craigie 
Robert Don 
William Douglas 
George Duncan 
Daniel Dare 
George Ester 
Warin Eskins 
Brice Fripp 
James Findlav 
Thomas Gordon 
James McGhee 
John Morris 
George Owler 



James McKeckine Thomas Owen 



William Frost 
John Stratton 
James Charleston 

Corporals. 
Joseph Poynty 
William Stewart 

Privates. 
John Austins 



Henry Organ 
James Oak 
James Payne 
George Pulley 
John Parker 
Thomas Presdie 
Joseph Page 
T. Phillips (5th oo.) 



LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED. 



67 



First Division — Scots Fusilier Guards continued* 



Elijah Richens 
Alexander Boss 
Peter Raffil 
Fred. W. Rogers 
William Scott 
John Slow 
George Sked 
Richard Smith 
George Saywell 
Alexander Shaw 
Thomas Wood 
Thomas Walters 



James Alexander 
John Burns 
Thomas Bywater 
Sinclair Bruce 
John Corben 
George Clinton 
Hugh Fergusson 
John Flint 
John Hiscock 
John Johnstone 
Daniel Lindsay 
George Lindores 



George Leslie 
William M'Neil 
James Munsie 
Thomas Parry 
Charles Ross 
Robert Smith 
James Scott 
Joseph Workman 
Thomas Paine 
James Gibson 
James Henry 



42nd regiment Highlanders. 



Privates. 
John Macleod 



Thomas Elliott 

Colour Sergeant. 
James Lounden 

Sergeant. 
James Stewart 
Privates. 
Thomas Lyall 
Alexander Forbes 
William Hunter 
William Fraser 
John Higgle 
Andrew Lyon 
William Taylor 
Archibald M'Alpin 



Killed 

David Hart 
Neil Campbell 

Since Dead. 

Privates. 



Richard Fadden 
William M'Kenzie 



Donald M'Donald 



Wounded. 



Benjamin Norfolk 
Henry Hamilton 
William M'Math 
John Park 
Thomas Leitch 
William Barber 
Adam Laidlaw 
William Forrester 
John Buchanan 
George Butler 
Alexander Duncan 
James M'Donald 



John M'Nish 
Robert Michie 
George Johnstone 
Timothy Lynch 
George Howinson 
Alex. Robertson 
Peter Fraser 
Wm. Cruikshanks 
William King 
John Graham 
James Skene 
David Muir 



79TH HIGHLANDERS. 

Killed. 
Privates. 



James Watson 



John Baird 
f 2 



68 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



First Division — 79th Highlander* continued. 

Wounded. 



Corporal. 
William Thorn 



Privates. 
John Browne James Anderson 

James Dunbar William Kilgower 
Edward M'Luslrie Thomas Chapman 



93BD HIGHLANDERS. 

Killed. 
93rd Regiment. — Lieutenant R. Abercrombie, killed. 



Privates. 
John Cameron 



Sergeants. 
David Phillips 
Alex. M'Donald. 

Privates. 
Robert Adams 
William Urquhart 
James Bain 
John M'Donald 
David M'Pherson 
Neil Flanagan 
John Heggins 
William Poison 
W. Fergusson 
Alexander Todd 



William M'Leod William Wyllie. 
Robert Paton 



Wounded. 

James Chalmers 
James Burns 
David Nichol 
George Ross 
George Aymers 
James Gordon 
George Garroty 
William Paton 
Alex. M'Donald 
John M'Kinon 
John Torry 
William Morrison 
Donald Poison 
John Burnie 



Ramsay Robertson 
Thomas Carson 
George Feckney 
Donald Melville 
Hugh McGunigall 
Alexander Paul 
John Gordon 
John Leslie 
John McKay 
James Shaw 
Alexander Austin 
William McDonald 
D. Munro. 



Since Dead. 
Sergeant, David Stephen. 

Total. — 2 officers, 3 sergeants, 41 rank and file, killed; 
'6 officers, 21 sergeants, 1 drummer, 354 rank and file 
unded ; 1 rank and file missing. 



LIST OP KILLED AND WOUNDED. 69 



SECOND DIVISION. 

Staff. — Lieutenant-General Sir De Lacy Evans, severe con- 
tusion, right shoulder ; Lieutenant-Colonel Hon. P. E. 
Herbert, 43rd Regiment, Assistant-Quartermaster-General, 
severe contusion back of neck ; Captain Thompson, De- 
puty-Assistant-Quartermaster-General, on shoulder blade; 
Ensign St. Clare, 21st Regiment, Acting-Interpreter, shot 
through right arm; Captain A. M. M'Donald, 92nd Regi- 
ment, Aide-de-Camp, wounded severely. 

30th regiment of foot 

Killed. 

30JA Regiment. — Lieutenant F. Luxmore, killed. 

Corporal, Robert Emery. 

Privates. Michael Gaflhey Thomas McNally 

Alexander Beattie Joseph Henshaw George Mitchie 

Robert Bell Robert Jackson John Vokes 

Henry Chivers Donal Mclnness 

Wounded. 

Captain T. H. Pakenham, wounded severely; Captain G. 
Dickson, wounded severely; Captain A. W. Conolly, 
wounded slightly ; Lieutenant and Adjutant M. Walker, 
wounded slightly. 

Sergeants. John Burley Samuel Elliott 

Nicholas Day Martin Byrne David Fender 

Dominick Lydon John Chamberlain Michael Foley 

Corporals. John Clancy Michael Garrahan 

Samuel McFadden T. Clarke, 1st Henry Goddard 

John Page John Conolly Patrick Grady 

James Sweeney John Conolly, 2nd William Hale 

Drummer. Walter Cook Harry Hardy 

John Bolds Patrick Corcoran John Hardy, 2nd 

Privates. Thomas Davis, 1st Martin Hartney 

Hugh Anderson William Dean Thomas Healy 

George Barker Elijah Denton Patrick Higgins 

Thomas Bookey Thomas Devlin John Hodson 

James Britt Peter Dyer Daniel Hogan 



70 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Second Division — ZOth Regiment of Foot continued. 



Thomas Isherwood 
Thomas Judd 
John Kershaw 
David Lainff 
Charles Lockrey 
William Luton 
David M'Cabe 
Francis Miller 



William Moriarty 
Edmond Murphy 
Thomas Needham 
James Newton 
James Oxenham 
William J. Pairson 
James Payne 
Francis Ready 
James Rooke, 1st 



Alexander Smith 
John Smith, 14th 
Samuel Stratton 
Thomas Tindall 
Robert Venn 
Robert Walker 
Richard Walsh 
George Wilson 



55th regiment of foot. 

Killed. 

bhth Regiment. — Brevet-Major J. B. Rose, killed; Captain 
J. G. Schaw, killed. 

Sergeant. Privates. William M'Cay 

Michael Walsh Richard Reves Edward Corr 

Corporal. John Berry Richard Darcy 

Lewis Steltzer Michael Byrnes Thomas Carty 

Thomas Russell Michael Foley. 

Wounded. 

Major F. A. Whimper, wounded dangerously; Brevet- 
Major J. Coats, wounded severely; Lieutenant G. E. 
Bisset, wounded severely; Lieutenant E. Armstrong, 
wounded severely ; Lieutenant and Adjutant J. Warren, 
wounded slightly. 



Colour-Sergeants. 
Michael Keeshan 
William Parsons 
John Flanagan. 

Sergeant. 
John Glynn. 

Corporals. 
Thomas Holoham 
Robert Elms. 

Privates. 
James Baker 
Michael Bray 
Wm. Brinkworth 



John Cooney 
James Dally 
Harold Dann 
John Daniell 
Robert Edwards 
John Evans 
William Fisher 
Walter Hill 
Lawrence Holman 
Edwd. Hutchinson 
Thomas Boag 
John Barrow 
John Connell 



William Craig 
John Givins 
Edward Hughes 
William Kenny 
Jonathan Knopp 
Archibald M'Nicol 
John Mera 
Edward Minoge 
John Tindall 
John Vanson 
Thomas Aylward 
Enoch Cross 
James Guerin 



LIST OF KILLED AMD WOUKDKD. 



71 



Second Division— 55th Regiment of Foot continued. 



James Hill 
Norman M'Donald 
George M'Nally 
John Barry 
Archibald Blair 
Thomas Berry 
Owen Carly 
John Doyle 
James Glassgow 
Patrick Grael 
Charles Harris 
Henry Harman 
Joseph Hill 
John M'Alpin 
Donald M'Leod 
Peter M'Vean 
John Murphy 
John Nixon 
William Sedgwick 
William Sheaver 



John Trimmings 
Daniel Woods 
John Hamilton 
William M'Gregor 
John Young 
William Berry 
Robert Colclough 
Henry Godferry 
Michael Conway 
John C. Hare 
Thomas Heny 
Thomas M'Mahon 
Andrew Meara 
James Oakley 
William Rodway 
Andrew Ryan 
James Lawrence 
James White 
John Whitehead 
James Marr 
Philip Butler 



Denis Broderick 
John Flood 
John Galwoy 
Daniel Hillier 
Samuel Miller 
John O'Donnell 
Enoch Pugh 
Semer Pothcary 
Andrew Ramage 
George Sales 
Thomas Smith 
William Townsend 
Thomas Ayleward 
Enoch Cross 
James Guerin 
James M'Garitty 
James Hill 
Norman M'Donald 
James M'Nally 
Philip Kingham 



418T REGIMENT OF FOOT. 

Killed. 



Privates. 
John Holmes 

Sergeant. 
Philip Bees 

Corporal. 
David Jones 

Privates. 
George Brown 
Michael Flannigan 
Thomas Hannon 
George Cox 



Michael Hughes Samuel Putlan 
Joseph Lefevre 

Wounded. 



John Pender 
Stephen Bradley 
Jesse Burtonshall 
Michael Cullinan 
James Byrnes 
James Johnston 
Patric Lawler 
Wm. I. Walton 
Walter Ewins 



James Fowler 
David Jones 
Andrew Kelly 
William Lamb 
Wm. M'Goldrick 
Denis Naughton 
John Kennedy 
John Skinner 



Sergeant, 
John Lomax 



47th regiment of foot. 
Killed. 
Corporals. 
Daniel Barber 
Henry Crowe 



Private. 
Samuel Huddy. 



72 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Sergeant-Mayor. Bryan Mahon 



Second Division — i*I1h Regiment of Foot continued. 

Wounded. 

47th Regiment, — Lieutenant T. Wollocombe, wounded se- 
verely; Lieutenant N. G. Philips, wounded severely; 
Lieutenant J. G. Maycock, wounded slightly. 

Joseph Luff 
Andrew Loham 
Michael Maher 
John M'Guire 
Henry Dennis 
George Lee 
Henry Byng 
Michael Haverty 
Joseph Mallet 
William Paget 
John Power 
George Hayes 
John M'Dermond 
Daniel Barrett 
Matthew Dogherty 
Daniel M'Lean 
William Akers 
Charles Langtree 
Thomas Gough 
Isaac Court 
Joseph M'Kay 
Christopher Kirwan 



Young 

Sergeants. 

— Oneill 

— Newport 
Robert Court 

Corporals. 

— Twomey 

— Lyon 
John Haney 

Drummer. 



James Mara 
Daniel Cowey 
John Savage 
John Allen 
George Evans 
Michael Mackey 
Samuel Badman 
Edward Boam 
Charles Harris 
Daniel Ivers 



Edward Bygroves John Mannion 
Privates. Patrick Havre 



James Lacy 
John Egan 
Patrick Biirke 
Cor. O'Connor 
James Kettle 
Thomas Clutlow 



Varner Matthews 
John Oneill 
William Reddy 
John M'Namara 
Edward M'Carthy 
William Holland 



Timothy M'Namara George Jones 
— Sainsbury Samuel King 

Patrick Magee Charles Williams 



40th regiment of foot. 



Killed. 



Sergeant, John Hayes 



Private, Charles Fraser 



Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant. 
William Holman 

Sergeant. 
Benjamin French 

Corporal. 
Michael Flamery 



Wounded. 

Drummer. 
John Blaney 

Privates. 
Joseph Ashby 
Isaac Longford 
William iivock 



Edward M'Grath 
Joseph M'Kinlay 
Daniel Roeman 
John Smith 
Thomas Willis 
James Livock 



LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED. 73 

Second Division continued. 

95th regiment of foot. 

Killed. 

9bth Regiment. — Captain G. J. Dowall, killed; Captain 
J. G. Eddington, Killed; Lieutenant E. W. Eddington, 
killed ; Lieutenant R. G. Polhill, killed ; Lieutenant and 
Adjutant J. C. Kingaley, killed ; Lieutenant W. L. Brav- 
brooke, Ceylon Rifles, attached to 95th Regiment, killed. 

Sergeants. Abraham Cross Hugh M'Cann 

W. Blackshaw Patrick Donoghue James Nelson 

Stephen Huggard Thomas Frost Goldsmith Oldring 

R. Woolnough Samuel Fry Charles Pegg 

Corporals. Patrick Hagen Stephen Roddle 

Alfred Rogers Thomas Hall John Shea 

Andrew Matthews John Herr Daniel Sullivan 

John Delaney James Hodgkinson Patrick Sullivan 

Privates. John Johnstone Henry Skinner 

Thomas Avery George Jeggett William Sims 

William Blakewell Peter Juff Thomas Tim son 

Henry Branson Hugh Magenis William Wells 

Henry Brooker John Martin Moses Woy 

James Casey William McCarthy John Ring 

William Chapman Thomas Murphy James Reilly 

Michael Connor Henry Moon Daniel Sullivan 

Wounded. 

Lieutenant-Colonel W. Smith, wounded severely ; Major H. 
Hume, slight contusion; Brevet-Major A. T. Heyland, 
arm amputated ; Captain V. Wing, wounded ; Captain J. 
W. Sargent, wounded slightly ; Lieutenant A. Macdonald, 
slight contusion; Lieutenant R. Gerard, contusion in 
abdomen; Ensign W. Braybrooke, wounded; Ensign 
J. H. Brooke, wounded in two places; Ensign B. C. 
Boothby, foot amputated; Ensign E. Bazalgette, wounded; 
Surgeon A. Gordon, slight contusion. 

Sergeants. George Poulteney William Rontier 
R. G. Walker Thomas M'Dowell Joseph Whaley 

Thomas Wetton George Garratt George Davis 



74 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Second Division — 95th Regiment of Foot continued. 



John Murphy 
William Logan 
Thomas Hodgson 
James Baghurst 

Corporals. 
Patrick Aldworth 
George Seymour 
Alfred Wilson 
George J. Gunyon 
Martin Larkin 
James Dulahan 
James Walsh 
Thomas Death 
Drummer. 
William McElwer 

Privates. 
Daniel Atkins 
Thomas Anderson 
George Adams 
Thomas Bonython 
Morris Brown 
George Beresford 
John Bowers 
William Bevis 
William Bliss 
Joseph Blythe 
Henry Boon 
Samuel Booton 
Kichard Barry 
Eugene Brennan 
Thomas Baxter 
Joseph Barnett 
Joseph Burgess 
John Cooknell 
Daniel Collins 
Samuel Clarke 
William Culhert 
John Clarke 
George Cooper 
George Carter 
ohn Callaghan 



John Crouch 
Thomas Card 
John Connor 
Jesse Daw 
Dennis Daley 
George Day 
Thomas Delaney 
James Downey 
J. Donoghue 
Matthew Flynn 
James Fielding 
Robert Farthing 
James Goulden 
Thomas Goulding 
Patrick Hayes 
James Hale 
John Hazeldine 
John Harrison 
Joseph Harrison 
Martin Harrison 
John Hill 
Dennis Herlaha 
Thomas Healy 
Arthur Holmes 
John Jones 
John Jacques 
William Jones 
Thomas Jones 
Ephraim Karley 
Francis Keeling 
John Lamb 
Daniel Leary 
Jeremiah Lordon 
Benjamin Levey 
James M'Shean 
Edward Mason 
John J. Monger 
Patrick Murphy 
J M'Gmicuddy 
Thomas Madden 
James M'Ardle 



Robert M'Court 
John M'Castlin 
James M'Kernar 
Thomas Norris 
William Donnel 
James Osborne 
Charles Philp 
Benjamin Pearce 
George Pollard 
Thomas Pratt 
James Ripley 
Joel Rose 
Charles Rose 
Samuel Rawlins 
James Reardon 
Samuel Risby 
John Russell 
Thomas Rangden 
James Taylor 
Henry Seckington 
Nicholas Smith 
James Scott 
John Seaborn 
Frederick Shaw 
John Smith 
Fred. Hollybrass 
Eugene Sullivan 
James Stewart 
Wm. Shepperson 
Darby Shea 
William Trainor 
John Turner 
John Tunnicliffe 
John Savin 
Robert Ward 
Robert Woodward 
Patrick Ward 
John O'Keefe 
Joseph Murphy 
Sydney C. Montague 
James Irwin 



LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED. 



75 



Second Division — 95th Regiment of Foot continued. 

Missing. 

Corporal. Privates. 

William Groomsell William Clements Walter Wright 

Total — 9 officers, 6 sergeants, 71 rank and file, killed ; 25 
officers, 25 sergeants, 4 drummers, 355 rank and file, 
wounded ; 3 rank and file missing. 



THIRD DIVISION. 



4th regiment. 

Killed. — None. 

Wounded. 

4th Regiment. — Lieutenant-Colonel H. C. Cobbe, wounded 
slightly ; Captain G. L. Thompson, wounded slightly. 

Privates. Thomas Saunders Robert Hubison 



Leonard Warden James Bright 
Michael Corry John Silverthorn 

Missing. 
Privates. 
Garret Gordon Michael Curley 



Michael Meakle 
John Williams 



William Kennedy 



44th regiment of foot. 

Killed. 
Private, Thomas Horsfall. 

Wounded. 

Privates. 

Corporal. Thomas Mitchell James Hoey 
John Walsh Robert Crook Thomas Hogan 

Thomas Deigan Henry Suddy 

Total — 2 rank and file killed ; 2 officers, 15 rank and file, 
wounded ; 3 rank and file missing. 



76 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



FOURTH DIVISION. 

2 1st regiment of foot. 

Killed. 
Private, Thomas Dorrick. 

RIFLE BRIGADE — (18T BATTALION). 

Wounded. 

Private, Richard Rose. 

Total — 1 rank and file killed ; 1 rank and file wounded. 



LIGHT DIVISION. 



7TH ROYAL FUSILIERS. 



Killed. 
1th Regiment. — Captain the Hon. W. Monck, killed. 



Colour-Sergeant. 
Joshua Purcell. 

Sergeant. 
Eli Everett. 

Corporals. 
Robert Wickfield 
Charles Elliott. 

Privates. 
James Bowman 
George Clinton 
Jesse Jones 
Henry Woolford 
William Bennett 
Chris. Calverley 



Joseph Irwin 
John Barsaow 
John Bisgrove 
Joseph Chappell 
John Dance 
John Guest 
John Harris 
Henry Wilson 
Hugh Amhler 
William Ball 
Rohert Cooper 
Richard Ilott 
John Jackson 
James McDonald 

Wounded. 



James McKearnon 
James Parke 
William Todd 
Robert Bates 
William McCloy 
Alexander Bridges 
William Crook 
Richard Green 
John Robinson 
James Swailes 
Michael Tyrrell 
William Brown 
Abraham Thompson 
William Barnett 



Captain C. L. Hare, wounded severely; Captain C. Watson, 

wounded severely ; Captain W. H. I). Fitzgerald, wounded 

severely ; Lieutenant D. Persse, wounded severely ; Lieut. 

"^ E. Appleyard, wounded slightly ; Lieut P. G. Coney, 

nded severely; Lieutenant the Hon. A. C. H. Crofton, 

ided slightly; Lieut. G. W. W. Carpenter, wounded 

rty ; Lieut. H. M. Jones, wounded severely. 



LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED. 



77 



Light Division — 7th Royal Fusiliers continued. 



Sergeants. 
John Kirkby 
John Potham 
James Whitaker 
Chris. Barry 
Arthur S. Charter 
John Donnolly 
John Mealia 
E. Newcombe 
William Latimer 
Simeon Maud 
Fredrick Rowe 
Joseph Buckley 
W. Hainsworth 
George Vincent 
John Coulter 
Lemuel George 
John Duggan 
Owen Connolly 

Corporals. 
William Maitland 
William Senior 
George Whittle 
George Burrowes 
John Fawcett 
Henry Williams 
Philip Frost 
James Downes 
John C. Creighton 
Christopher Severs 

Privates. 
Whitfield Breett 
Elliott Brook 
George Broughton 
James Carver 
Peter Clarke 
M. Dennison 
Paul Farren 
John Goodhall 
George Gouge 



Andrew Hardacre 
John Harrison 
Thomas Hanley 
Mark Hinchcline 
William Hill 
David Knight 
John Lees 
Patrick Bannon 
Michael M'Carthy 
Isaac Paice 
John Painter 
Patrick Sheridan 
William Small 
Charles Green 
John Bath 
Robert Burgess 
Thomas Burke 
Denis Cleary 
Owen Curry 
Charles Frewen 
Thomas Hicks 
Joshua Huggon 
George Leat 
Thomas Lovall 
Patrick M'Hugh 
Patrick M'Namara 
Mich. Meeleady 
Thomas Mead 
John O'Connor 
Richard Sergeant 
Charles Winters 
James Withers 
Charles Boyle 
Robert Cowe 
James dimming 
Michl. Dean 
James Coussell 
George Day 
Francis Dowhng 
Walter Duffy 



John Y. Fry 
Arch. Garvin 
William Gaynor 
William Goding 
Thomas Goldsmith 
James Garmley 
James Lang 
John Lawrence 
William Manham 
Thos. Richardson 
Patrick Boyle 
William Britton 
Joseph Caiter 
Thomas Court 
John Harden 
James Higgins 
Richard Howard 
Charles Hurling 
William Ferns 
William Kerr 
Robert Luce 
William Lynch 
Thomas McGragh 
James Redman 
Henry Sherlock 
William Skeith 
George Spofforth 
Richard Staddon 
James Tattersall 
William Trainer 
Charles Tyson 
Charles Williams 
Henry Pye 
Daniel Bamford 
Goodyair Bowles 
Luke Bramwell 
Henry Martin 
John Driscoll 
Thomas Gunter 
Thomas Holmes 



78 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Light Division — 7th Royal Fusiliers continued. 



Henry Jenkins 
Thomas Nicholson 
William Sheppard 
George Mawson 
John Glarkson 
Robert Clements 
Ambrose Coleman 
William Field 
Thomas Harris 
Charles Hammand 
John Hart 
John Lindsay 
John Mason 
James Moan 
George Phillips 
Samuel Sage 
Adam Wilson 
William H. Wood 



James Bartley 
James Dempsey 
James Giles 
Henry Gardiner 
Edward Lawrence 
Patrick Martin 
J. W. G. Peake 
Francis Porter 
John Ryans 
Charles Smith 
Joseph Timms 
Benjamin Ward 
Robert Williamson 
Robert Walladge 
George Batison 
John Crawley 
John Dagnan 
Thomas Gale • 



John Hardman 
John Herd 
William M'Vity 
Joseph Hodson 
John Mason 
James Mole 
Owen Smith 
Thomas Hargadden 
George Roach 
John Sheridan 
John Mullin 
Joseph Johnson 
William Dawson 
John Carroll 
Henry Jackson 
Drummer. 
Michael Huston. 



Missing. 
Privates. 



David Askwith 



James Field 



23rd royal welsh fusiliers. 

Killed. 

23rd Regiment. — Lieutenant-Colonel H. G. Chester, killed; 
Captain A. W. W. Wynn, killed ; Captain F. E. Evans, 
killed; Captain J. C. Conolly, killed; Lieutenant F. P. 
Radcliffe, killed; Lieutenant Sir W. Young, bart., killed; 
Second Lieutenant H. Anstruther, killed ; Second Lieut. 
J. H. Butler, killed. 

Sergeant-Major. Privates. 

H. Jones G. Dobson 



Colour-Sergeant. T. Maloney 
R. Hitchcock J. Wells 



Sergeant. 


C. Barnett 


Tarda 


M. Clack 


winter. 


J. Grooms 


3 


J. Handrahan 



H. Hine 
L. Kelly 
J. Lynch 
P. Peterson 
T. Seymour 
J. Harrington 
J. Knightley 
E. Jones 



LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED. 



79 



Light Division — 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers continued. 



T. Lynch 
H. Marsh 
T. Owens 
E. Williams 
J. Badcock 
J.Hall 
John Fry 
H. Husband 



W. Lines 
W. Martin 
D. Povey 
J. Powell 
T. Randall 
J. Stevens 
James Fry 
J. Williams 

Wounded. 



S. Draper 
H. Goddard 
G. Lowman 
T. Spiller 
R. Walters 
T. Conroy 
G. Evans 
J. Evans. 



Captain W. P. Campbell, wounded severely; Captain E. C. 
Hopton, wounded slightly; Lieutenant H. Bathurst, 
wounded severely; Lieutenant F. Sayer, wounded slightly; 
Lieutenant and Acting-Adjutant A. Applewhaite, wounded 
severely. 



Sergeants 
J. Hill 
J. Burke 
E. Smith 
J.Walsh 
P. Norris 
T. Lloyd 

C. Balfour 
L. O'Connor 
J. Kerr 

Corporals. 
W.Hall 
H. Devonshire 
J. Powell 
S. Horner 
J. Ludgate 
J. Mason 

D. Williams 
S. Windsor 
W. Clack 

J. Jones 

D. Payne 
T. Wills 

Drummers. 

E. Cleville 



J. Wooley 

C. B amp ton 
J. Royal 

Privates. 
J. Baker 
J. Beechey 
M. W. Clarke 
W. Cross 
W. Cruize 
L. Curley 
0. Davis 
W. Dunnecliffe 
T. Edwards 

D. Evans 
W. Horn 
H. Hurlston 
A. James 
W. Lampey 
M. Maityard 

E. Major 
W. Milden 
T. Mullins 

T. O'Gormand 
J. Rooney 
J. Smith 



W. Squires 
P. Back 
W. Batts 
J. Clarey 
J. Gibson 
J. Gullock 
E. Harris 
T. Smith 
J. Smith 
W. Stone 
J. Wilkinson 
J. Allen 
W. Allen 
C. Baker 
J. English 
S. Gibbs 
G. Goslin 
T. Harrison 
W.Hunt 
W. Jordan 
W. Newman 
J. Poulton 
G. Tee 
C. Thrupp 
J. Walker 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Light Divition — 23rd Royal Wthh Fmiliert continued. 


W. Anderson 


C Ryan 


J. Glass 


T.Archer 


J. J. Shawe 


G. Lush 


J. Bowleg 


R. Swadling 


R.Bagge 


J. Collins 


A. Walden 


R. Bennett 


W. Erane 


H. Wilton 


W. Braden 


W. H. Floyd 


C. Wotton 


J. Burrows 


W. Fletcher 


G. Howarth 


J. D. Didcote 


W. Gammon 


W. Andrews 


E. Ghent 


R. Johnstone 


R. Blaney 


T.Hall 


T. Kinchen 


T. Buntler 


W.Hill 


A. Martin 


W. Burrows 




T. Moody 


C. Davis 


W. Moore 


T. Keycroft 


-Egan 
T. Elliott 


M.PudweU 


D. Twinning 


H. Price 


T. Webb 


J. Keogh 


G.Rolf 


D. Birch 


J. BeU& 

A. McDonald 


W. Simpson 


H, Chalk 


J. Sackett 


T. Clulee 


A. McKeen 


T. Taylor 


T. Conolly 


T. Murray 


J. Geary 


H. Collett 


W. Neal 


J. Hams 


T. Gittins 


W. Pavey 


J. Ingham 


— Hodgetts 


J. Porter 


D. Lillnord 


J. Hughes 


G. Shields 


C.Page 


T. Millington 
J. Mitchell 


T Tulte 


W. Patianoe 


H. Wall 


G. Brookland 


W. Murray 


J. Walls 


T. Owena 


J. Eailly 


J.Brady 

Muting. 

Private*. 


G. Nicholle 


T. Thompson 


J. Warburton 




10TH SEGI31ENT O 


F FOOT. 



Killed. 

■'tit — Lieutenant and Adjutant A. Cardew, killed; 

Ensign G. D. Stockwell, killed. 
rat. Privatet. Patrick Gaynor 

ilk William Stillwell Thomas McNicholl 

tar, Frederick Giles Thomas Fumival 
dn Thomaa Pye Luke Spenoer 



LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED. 



81 



Light Division — 19th Regiment of Foot continued. 



George Bastion 
Daniel Quinn 
William Brown 
Lawrence Griffin 
Reese Jones 
John Leara 
William Thomas 
Henry Allen 
John Blackburn 
John Doherty 



Edward Scanlan 
Thomas Baker 
Charles Conway 
Terence Downes 
Aron Eatell 
W. Fitzpatrick 
James Hanlon 
John Hitchcock 
Richard Avery 
John Dobbins 

Wounded. 



Thomas Doyle 
Michael Kelcher 
George Luttrell 
Peter Lynam 
Joseph Scullen 
William Walsh 
Walter Ward 
Alexander Young 
Samuel Reeves 



Lieutenant-Colonel R. Saunders, wounded severely ; Major 
H. E. M'Gee, wounded slightly; Captain R. Warden, 
wounded slightly ; Lieutenant R. Wardlaw, wounded 
severely ; Lieutenant L. D. Currie, wounded severely. 



Colour-Sergeant. 
William Rawding 

Sergeants. 
James Rawding 
Patrick Daly 

F. Arthur 
John Carville 

G. Hardgrave 
John Smith 
Frederick Lee 
Charles Price 
Finlan Bergin 

Corporals. 
Thomas Farrar 
William Bromhley 
William Pope 
John Fain 
Matthew Young 
Patrick Barlow 
John Annon 
John Alwell 
John Brown 
Thomas Cox 
Michael Connors 



John Fagg 
Andrew Buchanan 
John Lloyan 
William Voisey 
Thomas Maddigan 
Francir Murray 
James Dodds 
Richard Adkinson 

Drummer. 
Thomas McCarthy 

Privates. 
Patrick Byrne 
James Darsey 
William Eade 
William Jones 
Stephen iTarise 
John Williams 
Thomas Lacey 
William Smith, 1st 
R. Newcom 
R. Roberts 
John Rogers 
John Butler 
William Liddle 



John Brennan 
John Nicholson 
John Parker 
Michael Conoly 
Michael Creswell 
Richard Davis 
James Harriss 
Francis Lyons 
Richard Morgan 
William Collett 
Patrick Cowan 
George Grant 
Denis Lyons 
William Taite 
Peter Young 
James Sault 
Maurice Donohoe 
John Jolly 
Paul Peel 
Francis Armstrong 
William O'Hare 
Daniel Davis 
Thomas Scanlon 
James Carroll 
o 



82 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Light Division — 19tk Regiment of Foot continued. 



James Goulding 
Thomas Jones 
Michael Neale 
James Watson 
John Jarvis 
William Barrett 
Charles Aistin 
James Alderdice 
William Andrews 
William Bailey 
Patrick Biggins 
John Blythe 
Michael Burke 
Patrick Campbell 
Robert Campbell 
Henry Candling 
Thomas Chadwick 
John Clare 
Joseph Clarke 
Martin Doolan 
Thomas Donoghoe 
William Doran 
William Gooch 
Michael Horrigan 
Patrick Kehoe 
Hugh McNamara 
Patrick McNamara 
John McNearney 
Michael Noonan 
Michael Moroney 
Thomas Bailey 
George Jefferies 
William Battison 
William Harris 
Lawrence Hickey 



John Hennessy 
James Stephens 



Thomas McElroy 
Wm. McGuiggan 
James Taylor 
William Walsh 
Edward Munell 
John Camion 
Thomas Wheatiey 
Philip Gaffhey 
Elijah Fenaher 
John Hanlon 
Patrick Hayes 
James Herrity 
James Hurley 
John Keating 
James Lenoard 
Patrick Moloney 
Andrew Murphy 
Michael Morriss 
Henry Peacocke 
Edward Rafarley 
Michael Shannon 
Thomas Williams 
James Brophy 
Patrick Carse 
Edward Edwards 
Richard Hearon 
Michael Hurst 
William Kelly 
Peter Logan 
Michael McCall 
Thomas Martin 
Richard Pittman 
John Parker 
John Salan 
John Sweeney 

Missing. 

Privates. 
Bernd. Rourke 
John Boland 



Thomas Turner 
John Vines 
James Wall 
Thomas McGuire 
John Mullins 
Jer. Houraghan 
William Burke 
Martin Doolan 
James Carroll 
Thomas Higgins 
William Smith 
Peter Quigley 
William Turner 
Michael Foley 
J. Connolly 
William Harrison 
Michael O'Brien 
Charles Carroll 
Aaron Smith 
T. Downes 
B. Raffles 
J. Sullivan 
J. Murphy 
T. Murphy 
T. Murdagh 
P. Purcell 
W. Rawson 
G. Richards 
John Shepphard 
Jacob Solomon 
Wm. Twomey 
John Walker 
Thomas White 
William Dubage 



Patrick Lawler 
George Richards 



LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED. 



83 



Light Division continued. 

33bd regiment of foot. 

Killed. 
lieutenant F. Du Pre Montagu, killed. 

Colour- Sergeant. George Anderson George Hunt 

Mark Barber 



Thomas Brown 
George Crabtree 
George Osborne 
Robert Allune 



Charles Byrne 

Sergeants. 
Pharaoh Feather 
William Ryan 

Corporals. 
William Bates 
Maurice Ward 
Henry Crossley 
William Bennett 
John G. Lee 

William Websdell Peter Horey 
Alexander Haines John Spencer 



William Mullen 
John Riddle 
Fred. Woodhouse 
John Woodward 
James Dare 



Martin Mulkerrin George Skeggs 
William Bassett James Doyle 



James Butcher 
John Oalnan 
Charles Masters 



Privates. 
Francis Ball 
Samuel Barnes 
Patrick Grady 
Joshua Shepherd 
Wm. ShacMeton 
James Sullivan 



John Stebbings 
George Bettle 
Martin Carty 
Edward Corrigan 
Henry Futters 
Thomas Hogan 
James Hoyle 



Martin Higgins 
James Lacey 
James Quia 
William Smith 
Thomas Suttie 
Charles Beete 
Thomas Hopkins 
Robert Monaghan 
Joseph Stott 
William Smith 
James Whitty 



Wounded. 
$&rd Regiment — Major T. B. Gough, wounded severely; 
Captain H. C. Fitzgerald, wounded slightly; Lieutenant 
A. B. Wallis, wounded severely ; Lieutenant W. S. 
Worthington, lost one leg ; Ensign C. M. Siree, wounded 
severely ; Ensign J. J. Greenwood, wounded slightly. 



Colour-Sergeants. 
George Spense 
William Mason 
Thomas Bairstow 
William Sugden 

Sergeants. 
Robert Forsyth 
Robert Vince 
Thomas Checkley 



Elisha Hancock 
George Townsend 
Richard Giles 
Edward Morton 
Herbert Gilbert 
Robt. Felningham 
Patrick Hoare 
James Cockroft 
William Keane 



Corporals. 
James Caffray 
William Weir 
Alex. S. Little 
John Dagley 
Richard Wood 
William Sutton 
John Webb 
William Stewart 
G 2 



84 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Light Division — 33rd Regiment of Foot continued. 



Charles Lawder 
James Blake 
Geo. Newcombe 

Drummers. 
John M'Hugh 
John Cassidy. 

Privates. 
Thomas Banyards 
Patrick Brazzell 
William Denson 
William Broome 
William Clarke 
Patrick Conroy 
Charles Cotton 
James Daley 
Thomas Dermody 
Andrew Davis 
John Gillespie 
John Giles 
James Griffin 
William Handslip 
Michael Mara 
Michael Moran 
Michael Moriarty 
Robinson Parker 
James Russell 
Charles Woodward 
Patrick Finn 
John Quinlan 
James Cairns 
William Austen 
Joseph Merriott 
Patrick O'Brien 
Thomas Craig 
James Anderson 
Jeremiah Burns 
Peter Cassidy 
Henry Cassidy 
James Green 
MatthewHolloran 



Henry Iredale 
Charles Jackson 
John Kelly 
Patrick Klely 
John MacDermott 
John M'Laren 
Edward Porter 
George Rowell 
Wm. Rushworth 
George Stainley 
Andrew Scery 
James Bryan 
Thomas Beazley 
William Burton 
John Hilton 
SidneyE dmonds 
John Flahavans 
John Glover 
John Herson 
Thos. Henderson 
William Howarth 
Richard Graham 
Thomas Lyons 
Henry Jones 
William Phillipps 
Thomas Riley 
Martin Riedy 
Thomas Parnell 
Daniel Fitzpatrick 
Edward Stanton 
James Shea 
Thomas Caple 
Aaron Richards 
George Marshall 
John Barrett 
Patrick Fisher 
John Green 
Michael Fahey 
Patrick Hackett 
Robert Jonston 



William Knight 
George Lamb 
Thomas Morrissy 
Henry Miller 
John O'Brien 
Patrick M'Laughlin 
John Quin 
William Thompson 
Michael Walsh 
Michael Whelan 
Richard Whitworth 
William Brown 
Michael Delahmuty 
Arthur Branagan 
Patrick Clarke 
Frederick Deaton 
Thomas Fitzharris 
George Killick 
Thomas Kneale 
Bernard M ' Combish 
James Robins 
David Roberts 
Stephen Rohan 
Herbert Sunters 
Thomas Spraggins 
Robert Taylor 
Joseph Rogers 
William Ward 
William Walkley 
James Gilmartin 
Alexander Purvis 
Patrick Bond 
Thomas Carroll 
Michael Carty 
Jeremiah Crowley 
James Fitzgerald 
Patrick Foley 
John Foster 
John Gascoigne 
Michael Goode 



LIST OF KILLED AMD WOUNDED. 



85 



Light Division, — 33rd Regiment of Foot continued. 



Martin Hoey 
Michael Hoolahan 
William Lindsay 
William M'Gaw 
John M'Mahon 
Job Mayer 
Henry Peard 
John Pearman 
Isaac Nuttall 
John James 
William Aldred 
Charles Biddle 
Henry Bradley 
Michael Gardiner 
Patrick Hogan 



John Jackson 
William Keenan 
Alfred Merriott 
James Deerey 
Mark Morris 
Wm. Pennefather 
George Penneston 
Koger Whittaker 
T. Woodhouse 
Joseph Dunn 
Thomas Whitehad 
Henry Beebee 
Jonas Briggs 
Patrick Cranley 
Thomas Connell 
John Davis 



James Gaffhey 
Patrick Hogan, 1st 
Patrick Hogan, 2nd 
James Hughes 
Simeon Longstaff 
John Ogden 
James Power 
Phillip Power 
John Quinn 
Thomas Beader 
Henry Smith 
Allen Shaw 
James Tracey 
John Mayes 
Kobert Kirk. 



Since Dead. 

Privates. 
James Allen Thomas Pelling 

Musing. 
Private, J. Minneagh. 

77th begiment of foot. 
Killed. 



John Connors 

Corporals. 
Charles Richards 
William Perry 

Privates. 
Michael Hughes 
William Lyons 



Privates. 
Thomas Kennedy 

Wounded. 
Albert Hicks 
Thomas Large 
James Masterson 
Richard Emery 
Henry Clarke 
John Wallace 
Thomas Padden 



John Bright 

James Sauce 
George Hundlehy 
Henry J. Williams 
John Harris 
James Thompson 
Edward Pitt. 



Privates. 
James Kernon 



88th begiment of foot. 

Killed. 

Patrick Lyons Edward Duffy 

Maurice Scanlon 



86 



THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



Light Division — 88<A Regiment of Foot continued. 

Wounded. 
88th Regiment. — Quartermaster T. Moore, wounded slightly. 

Colour-Sergeant. Peter M'Nab Patrick Scheal 

George M'Nally Peter Burke John Gallaher 

John Higgins Martin Day 

Thomas Shearman Alex. McClernan 

Thomas KUlilea Constantine Smith 

Maurice Tangney Thomas Horrigan 
Patrick Farrell 



Sergeant. 
James Fallon 

Privates. 
Michael Grealy 
Daniel Gwynn 



Missing. 
Private, Hugh Cameron. 



RIFLE BRIGADE (2ND BATTALION). 



Sergeants. 
W. Simpson 
James Swallow 
Corporal. 
John Robinson 



Killed. 

Privates. Edward Hexter 

Henry Calton Corn. Finnucane 

William Kennedy George Eobinson 

Thomas Pine Charles Rasoii 
Michael M'Bride 



Wounded. 
2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade. — Captain, Earl of Errol, 
wounded in the hand. 

Sergeant James Bennett 
Lucas Lucas. Jesse Burchill 

Buglers. Augustus Beeton 

Isaac Dyre James Gray 

George febetherte William Farrar 



John Davis 

Privates. 
Thomas Allen 
Henry Cooper 
— Griffiths 
John Sands 



William Long 
Henry Price 
William Illman 
Richard Lloyd 
George Coombes 
Charles Rhodes 
Joseph Hicks 



David Jones 
William Mills 

William Mulligan George Warren 

Thomas Rally John Cooley 

Morris Nailon Charles Howell 

Richard Hawkins Patrick Howley 

Alexander Stewart Richard Summers William Taylor 

John Owen Richard Marton Thomas Ford. 

Samuel Wolf Elijah Coston 

Total — 12 officers, 10 Serjeants, 2 drummers, 188 rank and 
file, killed; 29 officers, 48 Serjeants, 12 drummers, 682 
rank and file wounded ; 9 rank and file, and 2 drummers, 
missing. 



LIST OF KILLED AKD WOUNDED. 87 

BOYAL ARTILLERY. 

KMed. 

Artillery. — Captain A. Dew, killed ; Lieutenant A. Walsham, 
killed ; Lieutenant E. H. Gockerell, killed. 

Troop or Battalion. Bank and Names. 

Battery. 

E 8 William Mortlock, corporal. 

G 11 Alexander Laing, wheeler. 

E 3 Samuel Beck, s. smith. 

H 11 EzekLel Benny, gunner and driver. 

B 3 John Greatrix, ditto. 

B 3 George Beach, ditto. 

B 3 John Hamilton, ditto. 

W 11 Joseph Perkins, driver. 

C B.H.A. William Crew, ditto. 

Wounded. 

Royal Engineers.— 'Lieut. H. Teesdale, wounded severely. 

A 8 J. Wass, sergeant. 

A 8 Samuel Martin, sergeant. 

A 8 James Paisley, gunner and driver. 

E 3 Henry Bradlev, ditto. 

E 3 George Radcliffe, ditto. 

E 3 Patrick Brennan, ditto. 

E 3 Henry Harris, ditto. 

W 11 John Holland, ditto. 

G 11 J. Jones, bombardier. 

G 11 G. Poole, gunner and driver. 

G 11 D. Rea, ditto. 

B 3 James Reid, corporal. 

B 3 James Grilly, gunner and driver 

B 3 John WaUis, ditto. 

B 3 Edward Wadsworth, ditto. 

B 3 Andrew Robinson, ditto. 

B 3 J. B. M'Cann, ditto. 

W 11 George Copeland, ditto. 



88 THE BATTLE OF ALMA. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



1st Division. — 2 officers, 3 sergeants, 41 rank and file, killed; 

16 officers, 21 sergeants, 1 drummer, 354 rank and file, 
wounded ; 1 rank and file missing. 

2nd Division. — 2 officers, 6 sergeants, 71 rank and file, 
killed ; 25 officers, 25 sergeants, 4 drummers, 355 rank 
and file wounded; 3 rank and file missing. 

3rd Division. — 1 rank and file killed ; 2 officers, 15 rank and 
file, wounded ; 3 rank and file missing. 

Uh Division. — 1 rank and file killed; 1 rank and file 
wounded. 

Light Division — 12 officers, 10 sergeants, 2 drummers, 183 
rank and file, killed ; 29 officers, 48 sergeants, 12 drum- 
mers, 682 rank and file, wounded ; 9 rank and file missing. 

Artillery. — 3 officers, 9 rank and file, 26 horses, killed ; 
1 sergeant, 20 rank and file, wounded. 

Engineers. — 1 officer wounded. 

Medical officer. — 1 surgeon wounded. 

Great total — 26 officers, 19 sergeants, 2 drummers, 306 
rank and file, 26 horses, killed ; 73 officers, 95 sergeants, 

17 drummers, 1,427 rank and file, wounded; 2 drummers 
and 16 rank and file missing. 



Note. — The names of the heroic French soldiers who fell, or were 
wounded at Alma, will be given in another Edition, no 
authorized list having yet been received. 



LONDON : 
O. J. PALM BR, 8AV0T STRBBT, STRAND. 



June, 1854. 




PUBLISHED BT 



THOMAS HATCHARD, 

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THOMAS HATCHARD. 13 

CRACLIA, C.-A POCKET DICTIONARY of the Italian 
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GRAY, MRS. H -HISTORY of ROME for Young Persona. 
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B 7 



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— THE HISTORY of ETRURIA. Part I. TARCHUN 
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THOMAS HATCHARD. 17 



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THOMA8 HATCHARD. 19 



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THOMAS HATCHARD. • 21 



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— THE COTTAGE LIBRARY. Yol. 2. THE SACRAMENT 
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22 WORKS PUBLISHED BT 

OXENDEN, REV. A. 

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OXFORD, BISHOP OF.-FOUR SERMONS. Preached before 
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PARKER, MISS F. S.-TRUTH WITHOUT NOVELTY; or, 

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" Sound and practical/'— BriUsk Magazine, 

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PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS TOWARDS ALLEVIATING 
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THOMAS HATCHARD. 



23 



PRAYERS, FAMILY AND PRIVATE. 

A FORM of PRAYERS, Selected and Composed for the Use 
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24 WORKS PUBLI8HBD BT 



PRAYERS, FAMILY AMD PRIVATE. 

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S and PRACTICAL REMARKS on the POR- 
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THOMAS HATCHARD. 25 



QUESTIONS on the COLLECTS of the CHURCH of ENG- 
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THE RECTOR in SEARCH of a CURATE. Post 8vo. 

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REFLECTIONS upon the COLLECTS of the CHURCH. 
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26 WORKS PUBLISHED BT 



ROSS, REV. A -A MEMOIR of the late BEY. ALEX- 
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a Selection of his Sermons. And a Preface by the Venerable John 
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strife which is so keenly carried on between the truth of Scripture and the 
perversions of Rome."— Church qf England Magazine. 



RUSSELL, DR.-THE HISTORY of MODERN EUROPE. 
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By B. W. 1 8mo. Is. sewed, Is. 6d. cloth. 



THOMAS HATCHARD. 27 



SERMONS and EXTRACTS CONSOLATORY on the LOSS 
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SHAKSPEARE.-THE PLAYS of WILLIAM SHAKSPEARE, 
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I. 



28 WORKS PUBLISHED BT 



SHERWOOD, MRS. 

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style and purpose, which had the effect of forte, 
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irked by that unaffected piety and sound sense 

revered author. The little volume deeetres a place 

.tious 



1 



THOMAS HATCHABD. 29 



SIMEON, REV. C.-MEMOIRS of the Rev. CHARLES 
SIMEON, M.A., late Senior Fellow of King's College, and Minister of 
Trinity Church, Cambridge j containing his Autobiography, togethei with 
Selections from his Writings and Correspondence. Edited by the Rev, 
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SINCLAIR, REV. W.-THE DYING SOLDIER. A Tale 
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— A MANUAL of FAMILY and OCCASIONAL PRAYERS. 

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30 



WORKS PUBLISHED BY 



8TOWELL, REV. H.-TRACTARIANISM TESTED by 
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* 

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.Y PRAYERS, in a Series for a Month. Thirtieth 
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THOMAS HATCHARD. 31 



TRACTS FOR DISTRIBUTION. 

THE GERMAN TREE. A Moral for the Young. 

By the Rev. T. GOODWIN HATCHARD, M.A., Rector of 
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32 WORKS PUBLISHED BY 



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VILLAGE CONVERSATIONS on the LITURGY of 

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THOMAS HATCHARD. 



33 



TRACTS FOR DISTRIBUTION. 

By the tame Author, 

VILLAGE CONVERSATIONS on the PRINCIPAL 

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34 WORKS PUBLISHED BT 



TUDOR, H.-DOMESTIC MEMOIRS of t Christian Family- 
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TM« DKSIGVS BT 

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TYTLER, MISS A. F.-LEILA AT HOME; t Continuation 
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- LEILA ; or, the Island. Sixth Edition. Foap. 8 vo. cloth, 6a. 






THOMAS HATCHABD. 35 



TYTLER, MISS A. F. 

— LEILA in ENGLAND. A Continuation of " Leila; or, tbe 
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— MARY and FLORENCE; or, Grave and Gay. Ninth 

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better bestowed."— Quarterly Review, 

TYTLER, MISS M. F -THE WOODEN WALLS of OLD 
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