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Full text of "Battlefield, 1925"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/battlefield192500univ 



h^ ^B^ttl^a^ li 




19Zj5 



Co tlje fou of fou— tijis!... 

IMe ier\}t pou toell if toe £terbe our btit. nor hots 
gerbice seek other acknotolcbgrnent than fabor in 
pour eprfi. 9nl) So, if thin bolume brings to pou a 
bit of pleasure in ligbtcr bcin of ?|ours ^pent; if it 
brings before pou a Scene, a face b)l)icl) speaks of 
iRare Comrabesljip; ape. if it brings back on tfjeijeart 
a mcmorp=burben balf glab. talf sab, of tfje tenber 
grace of a 3iap QCtat ?|aS Jf leb— tftcn, toe are content. 



YIQ^ 



aro 

ScaiJemic Mtan 

toboSe lobablc personalitp permeates tf)e tnfjole life 

of tfje college anb upon mbose toljolcsome 

counsel intiibihuals anb groups 

fjabc leaneb most profit- 

afalp. tljis issue 

of 

Pattlefielti 

is affcctionatclp btbicateb 




THE BATTLEFIELD^gteW^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Contents 



iiiiiiii 



Book 1 The College 



Book 2 



Seniors 1 

.Juniors [ The Classes 

Sophomores f 

Freshmen J 



Book 3 



Organizations { Jctivities 

Clubs \ 



Book 4 Athletics 



Book 5 



Statistics \ Features 

Short Stories 



Book 6 Hiimo 




0nv College 




Qionroe l^all, Cftrougl) Cree0 




Pillars— ^onroc Oall 




Rising ^un Cauern 



Jfreberitfesiliurg 




o 

B 

n 



THE BATTLEFIELD^ 




■j«-: 



NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



threes! 



iiiiiiii 

// zve could gro-zv as trees grozi-, 

Unconsciously, quietly; 

If we could but expand and hud and bloom, 

Lift up our souls, take in the sun and air, 

Bend to adversity as trees bend in the wind, 

irith no protest save a soft rustling; 

If we could hold the snozvs of life 

frith faith that Spring would come again; 

If we could meet defeat with scarlet challenge. 

Let loose the dead leaves of the past. 

And wait in patience for new life and leaf. 

Then would zve not deface God's image, 

But take, serene in faith and patience. 

The very little life may bring to us, 

And lift it, heaven-lit, to the stars! 

— Virginia Musselmax. 



17 




A. B. Chandler^ Jr. 
President 



18 



-f. 



/ 







- Mrs. Charles Lake Bushnell 
Dean of Jf'oineii 



19 




THE BATTLEFIELD^.gfe^feNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Jfatultp 



W. N. Hamlet 

Professor Aiaihetnatics and Science 

Mrs. B. Y. Tyner 

Professor Ancient and Modern Languages 

B. Y. Tyner 

Dean and Professor Education 

Dr. W. J. Young 

Professor Social Science 

Abie Louise Day 

Professor of Education and Social Science 

Ethel Isabel Summy 

Supervisor High School and Professor Education 

Mrs. Dalia L. Ruff 

Dietitian and Assistant Dean of Women 

Mrs. J. C. Ferneyhough 

Treasurer and Bookkeeper 

Nannie McCleary 

Secretary to President 

Molly Coates 

Secretary to Dean and Assistant Commercial Department 



20 



THE BATTLEFIELD^ g^i!|p^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




THE BATTLEF1ELD#^^^^N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 

Jfacultp 



Alice Curry 

Professor Commercial Education 

Mrs. Kathleen Berger 

Assistant Professor Commercial Education 

Eva Taylor Eppes 

Assistant Professor Music 

Sally H. Norris 

Assistant Professor A-Iusic 

Bess Huey 

Assistant Professor Music 

Nora Churchill Willis 

Piano Instructor 

Helen Rainey 

Librarian 

Olive Garrison 

Professor Fine and Industrial Arts 

Maude M. Jessup 

Assistant Professor Fine and Industrial Arts 

Leah Lewis 

Assistant Professor Fine and Industrial Arts 



22 



THE BATTLEFIELD^/ 



! .,~'j ,.'-//„'/ /, 



mi 



iij?i NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




23 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^fiS5^LNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 

JfatuUp 



Lulu Daniel 

Professor English 

Louise Boje 

Assistant Professor English 

Maria Holmax 

Assistant Professor Mathematics and Science 

Emily Hayes 

Professor Home Economics 

Annie G. Clark 

Post Mistress 

Mrs. Beryl Willis 

Supervisor Third and Fourth Grades 

Esther Maakestead 

Supervisor First and Second Grades 

Mrs. Helen Carmichael 

Supervisor Fifth and Sixth Grades 

Dr. C. Mason Smith 

School Physician 

Elizabeth Moran 

School Nurse and Instructor of Health Education 



24 



THE BATTLEFIELDif 'tAlfllijjI^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




25 



Jfacultp 



Pearl Hicks 

Professor Physical Education 

Isabel Chappell 

Assistant Professor Physical Educatioji 

Ida B. Lacey 

Supervisor Elementary and Rural Schools 

Mrs. Horace Marsh 

Supervisor Junior High School 

Katherine Jessup 

Supervisor Junior High School 

Josephine Jerrell 

Principal Falmouth Training School 

Eleanor Hayes 

Supervisor Lee Hill School 

Ruth Ferris 

Supervisor Lee Hill School 



26 



THE BATTLEFIELD^ ^5^7IJ^^' 



.NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




27 



THE BATTLEFIELDif .ifil3Tl[|mNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Cbbication 



I've heard it said that larnin' spiled a man, 

En made him shifless. Thet the man war knozved 

His books want no good with er plow, — 

En wotddn't be fitten to come oiit'n the rain, nohow. 

I dunno. I ain't hed no larnin' much, 

But Lize sez when Will zvuz born, "Sam, 

You en me' s ig'n'ant, but you jest look; 

He's gonna go to school en lam his book!" 

So inil wuz packed to school 'fore he could talk. 

En went thar ever' year. He want no he'p 

In winter, but when school wuz out he worked. 

En Lize said he desarved pay, 'cause he never shirked. 

When he graj'ated, she 'lowed 

He hafter go ter a shonuff college, so I 

Sold the ten-acre lot, en he went. We got along 

As best we could, but life want no sweet song. 

When he come back, first thing I knowed. 
He fi.\ed the back field from washing, laid 
Tiles to drain the land, without my knowledge. 
En said he lamed all thet in College! 
Now he' s breedin' stock, en startin orchards. 
En paintin' the fence, en laying a barn; 
We got the best farm in County Riddit, 
En, darn my soul, his larnin' did it! 

Virginia Musselmax. 



28 



NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Dr. Walter J. Young 
Junior-Senior Advisor 



30 



THE BATTLEFlELDif ^few^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FI^ 





Fraxcks Emily Abbitt 

Newport News, Va. 

B. S. Degree in Physical Education 

Class President '23-'25 

Tournament Secretary, Athletic Club '2+-'25 

Captain, Degree Baseball Team '23-'2+ 

Hockey Squad '2+-'25 

Fire Commander '23-'25 

Degree Representative, Student Council '23-'24 

Virginia Reel Club '23-'25 

Hampton Roads Club '23-'25 

Y. W. C. A '23-'25 



THE BATTLEFIELD#^|^^feNlN ETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Willie Bivens 
Wingate, North Carolina 

B. S. Degree in Music 

Alumnae Editor, "Bullet" 

Battlefield Staff '23-'24 

Class Treasurer '23-'24 

President, Dramatic Club '23-'24 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '22-'23 

Glee Club 
Carolina Club 

Class Basketball Team '23-'24 

Virginia Reel Club , V)/ 




THE BATTLEFIELD^^ 



hw6,NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 





Page Harrison* 
Deal, Va. 

B. S. Deiiree in Physual Eduintion 

Athletic Association '22-'24 

Athletic Club '2+-'25 

Class Basketball Team '22-'25 

Captain, Class Baseball Team '22-'25 

Tennis, Singles and Doubles '23-'25 

Skeleton Club '23-'24 

Athletic Representative '23-'25 

Manager, Varsity Club '24-'25 

Hockey Squail '2+-'25 

/ wm. 33 



THE BATTLEFlELD^ ^p^^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Mary Lightner 

Falmouth, Va. 

B. S. Degree in Pliysieal EJutalinn 

Class Secretary '23-"25 

President, "The Town tSirls' Club" '23-'24 

Cheer Leader '23-'24 

Captain, Degree Basl(etball '23-'24 

Degree Baslietball '23-'25 

Skeleton Club '23-'25 

Virginia Reel Club '23-'25 




TH^^^^FlELD#.^i|j[^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Helen Mills 
Marye, Va. 

B. S. Decree in Siieii.e nnd Math. 

Athletic Club '24-'25 

Class Baseball Team '24-'25 

Class Basketball Team '24-'25 

Hiking Club '24-'25 

President of "The Caroline-Spottsylvan'a Club" . . . '24-'25 

Alumnae Editor of "The Battlefield" '24-'25 

Virginia Reel Club •24-'25 

iS-^'^'ll^gr^^ , ^ i''/ 35 

il 





Anne Murray 

Hampton, Virginia 

B. S. Degree In Physical Education 

Y. W. C. A. Big Cabinet '21-'22 

Athletic Association Entertainment Committee .... '21-'22 

Secretary and Treasurer of the Virginia Reel Club . . '23-'24 

Degree Baseball Team '23-'24 

Degree Basketball Team '23-'2+ 

Degree Representative, Student Council '23-'25 

Skeleton Club '23-'25 

President, Hampton Roads Club '23-'25 

Hockey Squad '22-'26 



36 




THE BATTLEFlELDif ^i|5[^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Indie Lowrv Sinclair 

Naxera, Virginia 

B. S. Degree in Phyiical Ediicatinu 

Class Baseball Team 

Class Tennis Team 

Captain, Basketball Team 

Hockey Squad 

Manager, Varsity Squad 

Varsity Squad 

President, Athletic Association 

President, Athletic Club 

Skeleton Club 

President, Hiking Club 



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37 



THE BATTLEFlELDjg'.^^t^^N'N^TEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




SCNIQR MENRGERIE 



38 



THE BATTLEFIELD#.^pJj[!^i:NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




39 



THE BATTLEF1ELD#^|^1^N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Autumn 



I like 

Autumnal quiet: 
The unbroken stillness 
Of tall trees, 
Of misty hills. 

Autumnal rain : 

The steady torrent 

Of amber wine 

Poured thru purple leaves. 

Autumnal sunshine : 
A dignified mellowness 
Of dying leaves 
Of waning color. 

— Cele McLaughlin. 




40 



THE BATTLEFlELD#l3|pj||^;^NlNm£NJ^EN^^ 



funior Clagg 




OBIIa Callep 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 



Class Dfficets 

President Ella Talley 

Vice-President Juliet Ware 

Secretary LuRAY Lewis 

Treasurer Frances Walker 



42 



THE BATTLEFlELDj'^ppril^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Parke 3nDcrson 

Covington, Virijinia 




Fredericksburg, Virginia 



43 



^E^^mTEFIELp#;^^^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Lilp a^ae 15coob0 

Ne-zvport Nezvs, J'irginia 



l^irginia IBopD 

Roanoke, Virginia 



44 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^felp^NlNETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 



Dototftp €t)ile0 

Fredericksburg, J'irginia 




Catherine €oa«s 

Oak Grove, Virginia 



45 



^^J^^^E^LD#^&P^^N£ETEEN TW£^-mE 




airs, imbzl jTruttiget 

Birmingham, Alabama 



Rutip Dcatt 

IVood'ford, Virginia 



46 



THE BATTLEFlELD#iq^5[^|feNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



W and ford, rin/in'ni 




ILucp IDoiiston 

Jlt'xandria, J'infin'ia 



47 



THE B ATTIEF1 ELD#^[cti^N1 NETEEN TWENTY-FI VE 



Lurap LeUiis 

Village, Virginia 



Q^arp 3Ietet 

Penola, Virginia 




48 



THE BATTLEFIELD^.qpJ^!Ip^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Fredericksburg, Jircfniia 




Srene Kogets 

Marion, South Carolina 



49 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^p^^feNlNET EEN TWENTY-FIVE 




3io{)n Buff 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 



Josephine ®mit{) 

Sharps, I'irginia 




fc;M/..; 



50 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^p|P"]^^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Jf'oodford, Virginia 


^H^ "OlK ^^^^^ 






An ^^^^^^B 




^^B v»- ^^^^^^H 




Hi 


Loui0c ^teuart 

Relay, Virginia 



51 



THE BATTLEF1ELD^.^P|]|^1N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



jFtancis malktt 

Culpeper, Virginia 



Qiatgaret button 

Graham, Virginia 




52 



THE BATTLEFIELD#|miyj^i>j^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



31uliet Ritcfjie mare 

Diinnsville, J'lrgin'ta 




l^irginia COilliams 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 



53 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^|mt^feN'N ETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



)opt)omorE Clagg ^oem 



Come, Sophomore, ive've a cask of -wine. 

To toast all from its juices, 
And by this token we must leave 

Our songs of parting wishes. 

We'll ever wear a gracious smile, — 

All decked in floral glory. 
For we have worked to win a name 

That tells the Sophomore' s story. 

JVe've clung together, best we could, 

Like leaves unto the trees. 
But now, like Time, the wind comes on, 

And Fate will be the breeze. 



Our life may seem so toilsome, 
But we can make it fair 

If we but climb above ourselves, 
And watch with steady care. 



In the years of unknown future, 
May we find a pathway clear. 

And watch the mist of time lift up. 
And flowers there appear. 



-Lucy Hobson. 



<1^'^ ^ 



54 




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55 



THE BATTLE FlELD^^fefii^^NlNETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 




Miss Pearl M. Hicks 

Sophomore Faculty Advisor 

56 



THE BATTLEFIELD; 



m 



liif:^ NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 



)opf)omorE CIag£; 




Class Motto 
Carpe Diem 

Class Floiver 
Ragged Robin 

Class Colors 
Blue and Gold 



Cla0S ©fficers 

President Mary Krieg-Fromm 

Vice-President Agnes Gregg Curtis 

Secretary and Treasurer Dorothy Childress 



57 




THE 



^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Lucille Alvis 
Corbin, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Never studying. 
Ambition — To win fame. 
Comment — "Kindness in wisdom.' 



Mazie Amory 
Crafton, Virginia 

House President, Virginia Hall, '24-'25. 
Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., •24-'25. 
Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '23-'24-'25. 
Hiking Club, '23-'24. 

JVorst Fault — Not being able to 
dance or jig. 

Ambition — To be a jigger. 
Comment — "Charm strikes the sight, 
But merit wins the soul." 

Betsy Bassett 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Sophomore Representative, Student Council, '24-'25. 

Chairman Social Committee, Y. W. C. A. 

CJlee Club, '24-'25. 

College Orchestra, '24-'25. 

Bullet Reporter. 

President, Twin City Club. 

Kampuss Katz. 

JVorst Fault — Making candy and eat- 
ing most of it. 

Ambition — To direct the Fredericks- 
burg Symphony Orchestra. 

Comment — "To do many things and 
to do them well is truly a rare art." 



58 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




i:NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Doris Beard 

Middlebrook, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '23-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., 'i+.'^i. 

Athletic Club, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Making up too mucli. 
.imbition — To be a movie star. 
Comment — "Virtue is bold and good- 
ness never fearful." 



Gladys Beck 
Petersburg, Virginia 

Hiking Club, •23-'24. 
Musicians' Club, '24-'25. 
Glee Club, '23-24. 

Worst Fault — Monopolizing the mu- 
sic room. 

Ambition — To be a janitor in a Bos- 
ton Conservatory. 

Comment — "Though you may not 
know it, I am neither quiet, solemn, 
tired nor divine." 



Pratt Bevan 
Weedonville, Virginia 

Y. W. C. A., '23-'25. 
Hiking Club, '24-'25. 

fTorst Fault — Being unable to under- 
stand. 

Ambition — To join in a conversation. 

Comment — "She has an understand- 
ing heart." 



59 




THE BATTLEFlELD#,MfT^t^NlNmEN TWENTY-FM 




Lucy Billingsly 
Lignum, Virginia 

Y. W. C. A., '23-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '23-'25. 
Glee Club, '23-'25. 
Big Cabinet, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Never leaving the 
campus. 

Ambition — To live with Moselle. 

Comment — "Two friends, two minds 
with one soul inspired." 



Virginia Biscoe 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Town Girls' Club, '23-'25. 

fforst Fault — Never missing a dance. 

Ambition — To earn a Phi Beta Kappa 
key. 

Comment — "Some think this world 
is made for fun and frolic; and so do L" 



Katherine Blanton 
Newport News, Virginia 

Red-Headed Club, '2+-'25. 
Y. W. C. A., '23-'25. 
Hiking Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Talking too loud. 
Ambition — To get fat. 
Comment — "Her voice is low and 
sweet." 



60 



THE BATTLEFIELD^! 




NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 



Ruby Lee Blaydes 
Guinea, Virginia 

Athletic Club. '24-'25. 

Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 

Hockey Squad, '24-'25. 

Varsity Squad, '2+-'25. 

Class Basketball Team, '24-'25. 

Class Baseball Team, '24-'25. 

Track Team, '24-'25. 

fTorst Fault — Entirely too proficient 
in Sociology. 

Jmbition — To be a "perfect" guard. 

Comment — "Troubles sit but lightly 
on her shoulders." 



Willie Lee Booth 
Portsmouth, Virginia 

Hiking Club, '23-'25. 
Twin City Club, '24-'25. 
Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

IForst Fault — Talking too much. 

Ambition — To cultivate a demure 
manner. 

Comment — "I neither hesitate nor 
fear to speak my every thought." 



Louise Bracy 
Brodnax, Virginia 

Glee Club, •23-'25. 
Y. W. C. a., '23-'25. 
Hiking Club, '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — Too many beaux. 
Ambition — To own "Wallace's" 
truck. 

Comment — "Neither too careless nor 
too sad. 
Neither too studious 
nor too glad." 




61 



THE BATTLEFIELD^; 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Virginia Branch 
Newport News, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 

Secretary, Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Red-Headed Club, '24-'25. 

Glee Cliib, ■24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Having a full stock of 
jokes. 

Ambition — To wear fifteen frat pins 
at one time. 

Comment — "Woman at best is a con- 
tradiction." 



AlLEEN BrADSHAW 

Windsor, Virginia 

Virginia Reel, '24-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 

Hiking Club, '24-'25. 

Kampuss Katz. 

frorst Fault — Too simple and de- 
mure. 

Ambition — "Eels," breakfast, dinner 
and supper. 

Comment — "She is coy, she is shy, 
there's a twinkle in her eye. She's a 
flirt." 



Allien Brooking 
Orange, Virginia 



V. \V. C. A., '23-'25. 



Worst Fault — Too talkative. 

Ambition — To have some one carry 
her laundry. 

Comment — "The girl who wins is the 
girl who works." 



62 




THE BATTLEFIELD^. 



Eloise Brown 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Assistant Exchange Editor, "Bullet," '23-'24 

Advertising Manager, "Bullet," '2+-'25. 

Hiking Club, •23-'24. 

Y. W. C. A. 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

Fire Captain. 

Glee Club, '23-'25. 

College Orchestra. 

Athletic Club, '24-'25. 

IVorst Fault — Knowing all the news 
Ambition — To write sensational col- 
umns for the newspapers. 

Coijuiient — "She talked and talked 
and infinitely talked." 

Geraldixe Bruster 
Bluefield, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Red-Headed Club, •24-'25. 
Southwestern Club, '24-'25. 
Battlefield Staff, '24-'25. 
Hiking Club, •24-'25. 
Hockey Squad, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Worrying over Battle- 
field ads. 

Ambition — To "curl" Miss Summy. 
Comment — "A smile for all, a wel- 
come glad, 
Serious, diligent, and 
seldom sad." 



Esther Campbell 
Knops, Virginia 

Y. W. C. A., •23-'25. 

Jf'orst Fault — Emulating Miss Lacey. 
Ambition — To be seen and not heard. 
Comment — "Mirable Dictu! She 
woke up longer to see the birdie." 



NINETEEN TWENTY-FFv'E 




63 



THE BATTLEFlELD#gMTl1 ^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Mrs. Ruth Canady 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Tov\n Girls' Club. 

Worst Fault — Being a reckless driver. 

.Imbit'wn — To get the Ford here on 
time. 

Comment — "A happy disposition is 
an invaluable possession." 



Ruby Carlton 
Dunnsville, Virginia 

Y. W. C. a., '23-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Dancing too much. 
Jmbition — To teach dancing. 
Comtnent — "A fair face, a dazzling 
dress and a graceful manner." 



Miriam Carmel 
Phoebus, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 
Athletic Association, '24-'25. 
Class Baseball Team, '24-'25. 
Class Basketball Team, '24-'25. 
Athletic Club, '25. 
Hockey Squad, '25. 

IVorst Fault — Moving too slowly on 
the basketball court. 

Ambition — To find some of the pills 
Alice-in-Wonderland took. 

Comment — "The good die young. 
My! But I must take care of myself." 



64 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 



Virginia Cathell 
Moncure, North Carolina 

Virginia Reel Club, •24-'25. 

Carolina Club, '24-'25. 

Vice-President, Student Go\-ernment, '25. 

Y. W. C. A. Big Cabinet, '24-25. 

Hiking Club. '24. 

Bullet Staff, '25. 

ITorst Fiuill — Breaking rules. 
Ainbition — To be a radical. 
Comment — "The cro"wn and glory of 
life is character." 



Dorothy Chandler 

Onancock, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, •23-'25. 
Hiking Club, '23-'24. 
Eastern Shore Club, '23-25. 

Worst Fault — An unsociable disposi- 
tion. 

Ambition — To be a stone "crusher." 

Comment — "What was that rattling 

noise I heard? Who rapped my skull?" 



Madolyn Carpenter 
Newport News, Virginia 

Fire Chief, Betty Lewis, •24-'25. 

Jt'orst Fault — Knowing too much 
about tennis. 

Ambition — To captain the woman's 
polo team. 

Comment — "Ahorse! Ahorse! My 
kingdom for a horse!" 



65 




THE BATTLEFIELD^ 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Charlotte Chappell 
Columbia, South Carolina 

President, Hiking Club, '24-'25. 
Sophomore Representative, Student Council. 
Virginia Reel Club, •23-'25. 
Cheer Leader, '23-'2+. 

Worst Fault — Boosting Clemson. 

Ambition — To establish the Chappell 
School of Education. 

Comment — "How full of briars is 
this working day world!" 

Mildred Chase 
Onancock, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '2+-'2S. 
Social Reporter of "Bullet," '23-'24. 
Eastern Shore Club, '23-'25. 
Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Devotion to learning. 
Ambition — To write the book, "The 
Men I Have Known." 

Comment — "She is pretty to walk 
with. 
And witty to talk with, 
And pleasant, too, to 
think on." 



Rachael Chenault 
Newton, Virginia 

Athletic Club, '23-'25. 

Class Basketball Team, '23-'25. 

Class Baseball Team, '23-'25. 

Hockey Squad, '24-'25. 

Track and Field Team, '23-'24. 

Glee Club, '23-'24. 

Varsity Squad, '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — "Throwing goals." 
Ambition — To be State champion of 

basketball. 

Comment — "If thou dost play with 

her at any game, thou art sure to lose." 



66 



THE BATTLE FlELDi 



.NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 



Dorothy Childress 
South Boston, Virginia 

Secretary-Treasurer, Sophomore Class. 
Big Cabinet, Y. VV. C. A., '2+-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, •23-'24. 
Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Eternal jollity. 

Ambition — To be Treasurer of tiie 
U. S. 

Comment — "She has the charm of 
cheerfulness and good fellowship." 



Esther Chinn 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 

JForst Fault — Dressing too gayly. 
Ambition — To be a basketball star 
Comment — "There is a lady sweet 
and fine." 



Marion Clarke 
Phoebus, Virginia 

Art Editor of Battlefielii. '23-'2+. 
Virginia Reel Club, '23-'25. 
Hiking Club, '23-'25. 
Athletic Club, •24-'25. 
Sophomore Baseball Team. 
Hampton Roads Club, '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — Feigned indifference 
Ambition — To draw a masterpiece 
Comment — 

"Oh! hour, of all hours, the most 
blessed on earth ; 
The blessed hour of our dinners " 




THE BATTLEFIELD^; 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Ruth Clarke 
Newport News, Virginia 

Hiking Club, '24-'25. 
Glee Club, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '23-'25. 
Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 
Big Cabinet, Y. W. C A., '23-'2S. 

Worst Fault — Man-hater. 
Ambition — To get fat. 
Comment — "I will be happy and gay, 
I'll be sad for no man." 



Elizabeth Crismond 

Spottsylvania, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, •24-'25, 

Athletic Club, •24-'25. 

Class Basketball Team, '24-'25. 

Glee Club, '23-'25. 

Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 

IForst Fault — Refusing to play the 
piano when called upon. 

Ambition — Just to settle in Spottsyl- 
vania. 

Comment — "Music hath charm, to 
soothe the savage breast." 



Anne Lee Cunningham 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Musicians' Club, '23-'24. 
Glee Club, '23-'24. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Never having anything 
to say. 

Ambition — To succeed Miss Day. 

Comment — "I chatter, chatter as I 
go." 



68 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Agnes Curtis 
Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama 

Hampton Roads 23 25 

Vice-President Sophomore Class 24 25 

Social Editor, Bullet, 24 25 

House President, Betty Lewis Hall, '24-'25. 

Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Being entirely too 
pretty. 

Ambition — To write "Experience in 
Panama." 
Comment — 

"With dusky hair, and duskier eyes, 

With a manner both charming 

and cool, 

Every one agrees that she should 

Rank the prettiest girl in 

school." 



Marion D.avis 

Sharps, Virginia 

Glee Club, '23-'25. 
Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Musicians' Club, '23-'24. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Northern Neck Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Those beautiful eyes. 
Ambition — To be in the movies. 
Comment — "Of manner gentle, of af- 
fection mild." 

Virginia Davis 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Town Girls' Club, '23-'24-'25. 

JJ'orst Fault — Getting to school on 
time. 

Ambition — To be a critic teacher. 
Comment — "A friend in need." 




69 



THE BATTLEFIELD^ 




:^N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Kathryn Day 
South Bend, Indiana 

JForst Fault — A Western drawl. 
Ambition — To be unconventional. 
Comment — "Full of fancy; full of 
jollity and fun." 



Amy Florence Dickerson 

Spottsylvania, Virginia 

Athletic Club, '24-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '23-'24-'25. 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

Spottsylvania and Caroline County Club, '2+-'25. 

Worst Fault — Too boisterous and 
noisy. 

Ambition — To be principal of a 
school. 

Comment — "Silence is more eloquent 
than speech." 



India Diggs 
Portsmouth, Virginia 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 

Assistant Advertising Manager, "Bullet," '24-'25. 

Business Manager, "Battlefield," '24-'25. 

Hiking Club, •23-'24. 

Twin City Club, '23-'25, 

Virginia Reel Club, '23-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Too dependable. 

Ambition — To have a breathing spell 
from work. 

Comment — "Never put off until to- 
morrow what you can do today, — 
that's India." 



70 



THE BATTLE F1ELD#J 




NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 



Jessie Doughtie 
Franklin, Virginia 

Y. W. C, A., •23-'25. 

Treasurer, Language Club, '24-"25. 

JVorst Fault — Being a flapper. 
Ambition — To vamp the men. 
Cotnmeiil — "She is peaceful, timi 
and demure." 



Henrietta Dreifcs 
Alexandria, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '23-'25. 
Athletic Club, '24-'25. 
Hiking Club, '23-'25. 

If'orst Fault — Jolly, good nature. 

Ambition — To weight about one hun- 
dred pounds. 

Comment — "It's a friendly heart that 
has plenty of friends." 



P. Haxmer Duxkley 

Onancock, Virginia 

Assistant Business Manager, "Bullet," '23-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '23-'25. 
Eastern Shore Club, '23-'25. 
Y. W. C. A., '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — That daily letter. 
Ambition — To be the grocer's wife. 
Comment — "Think before you leap. 




THE BATTLEFlELDif ^l^^feNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Ethel Dunn 
Baskerville, Virginia 

\. W. C. A., '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — A smile for every one. 

J wbition — To be iiead nurse at Johns 
1 lopkins. 

Comment — "Knowledge is the wing 
wiierewith we fly to heaven." 



Julia Ellison 
Heathsville, Virginia 

Glee Club, '23-'25. 
Musicians' Club, '23-'25. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '23-'25. 
VliKiiiia Reel Club, '23-'25. 

Il'orst Fault — Unbounded energy. 

.Imbition — To say something definite. 

Comment — "Happy am I, from care 
I'm free. 
Why aren't they all con- 
tented like me?" 



Ellen Cope Evans 
Laneville, Virginia 

Athletic Club, '24-'25. 

Captain, Class Baseball Team, '24-'25. 

Class Basketball Team, '2+-'25. 

Class Track Team, '24. 

Varsity Squad, '23-'25. 

Hockey Squad, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Taking life too seri- 
ously. 

Ambition — To play side-center on the 
heavenly squad, with Jessie playing 
center. 

Comment — "I'm the most reasonable 
person in the world if I'm treated 
properly." 



72 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIYE 



Virginia Frazier 
Graham, Virginia 

Big Cabinet, Y. \V. C. A., '24-'25. 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

President, Southwest Virginia Club, '24-'25. 

Woist Fault — Reminiscing of "R. M. 
W. C." 

Ambition — To lead the World's 
Court of Justice. 

Comment — "Study — thy name is 
'J'nga'-" 

Emily Fleming 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '23-'25. 
Twin City Club, •23-'25. 
Athletic Club, •2+-'2S. 
Tennis Team, '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — Looking innocent. 

Ambition — To get a Ph. D. 

Comment — "Sometimes from her 
eyes I did receive fair, speecliless, mes- 
sages." 



Ellen Fox 

Newport News, Virginia 

Hiking Club, '23-'24. 

Hampton Roads Club, '23-'25. 

Second Vice-President, Student Government, '23-'24. 

Captain, Class Basketball Team, '23-'24. 

Chairman Devotional Com., Y. W. C. A.. '24-'25. 

Class Baseball Team, '23-'24. 

Class Basketball Team, '23-'24. 

Varsity Team, '23-'24. 

Worst Fault — Too frivolous in dress. 

Ambition — To be private secretary to 
the Academic Dean. 

Comment — "A rag, a bone, a 'Hank' 
of hair." 



73 




THE BATTLEFIELDif 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Wanda Fox 
Orange, Virginia 

V. W. C. A., '23-'25. 

Literary Editor, Bullet, '23-'25. 

Dramatic Club, '23-'25. 

Hiking Club, '24-'25. 

College Orchestra, '23-'25. 

President, "Entre-Nous" Club, '24-'25. 

fTorst Fault — Borrowing curling 
irons. 

Jmbition — To digest Virgil. 

Comment — "There was a little girl 
who had a little curl." 



Rose Friedman 
Danville, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
(ilee Club, '24-'25. 
Hiking Club, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Never getting over 
"C." 

Ambition — To make A+ on every- 
thing. 

Comment — "Just call me a scholar; 
let that be my praise." 



Mary Krieg-Fromm 
Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Secretary-Treasurer, Junior Class, '23-'24. 

Hiking Club, '23-'24. 

Virginia Reel, '23-'24. 

Hampton Roads Club, '23-'24. 

Junior Q. Q.'s, '23-'24. 

Dramatic Club, '23-'24. 

Kampuss Katz, '25. 

President, Sophomore Class, '25. 

Battlefield Staff, '25. 

JVorst Fault — Never smiling. 

Jmbition — To become a front-row 
chorus girl. 

Comment — "A friend to every one, 
and always smiling." 

74 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Helen Frothingham 
Hampton, Virginia 

Hampton Roads Club, '23-'24. 

(Jlee Club, '2+. 

Virginia Reel Club, '24. 

Hiking Club, '23. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24. 

Fire Captain, '24. 

Worst Fault — Trying to get things. 

.hnbition — To own a permanent 
wave. 

Comment — "Give my tiiougiits no 
tongue." 



Verle Garner 
Baskerville, Virginia 

Hiking Club, '24-'2S. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '24-'24. 
Glee Club, '23-'24. 

Jl'orst Fault — Taking life easy. 
Jmbition — To be a judge. 
Comment — "Alas ! a woman who 
thinks." 



Grace Goodwin Giannotti 
Newport News, Virginia 

Hampton Roads Club, '23-'24. 

Worst Fault — That deep bass voice. 

Ambition — To be secretary to a Vir- 
gmia Senator. 

Comment — "Whose little body lodged 
a mighty mind." 



75 




THE BATTLEFIELD^ 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Alice Miller Goldsworthy 

Alexandria, Virginia 

Virginia Reel, '24-'25. 
Hiking Club, '24-'25. 
Fire Captain, '24-'25. 

Jf'orst Fault — Heart throbbing An- 
napolis way. 

Ambition — To .keep order in the Li- 
brary. 

Comment — "Ah! she's a jolly good 
fellow." 



OciE Rachael Graham 
Hamilton, Virginia 

Vuginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Hiking Club, •24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Boosting "Loudoun." 
Ambition — Bound for V. P. L 
Comment — "Once your friend, al- 
ways your friend." 



Mildred Gwaltney 

Windsor, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, ■24-'25. 

fTorst Fault — Too sullen; how about 

smiling? 

Ambition — To find "Him." 
Comment — "Laugh, and the world 

laughs with you." 



76 



TH^^m'LEFIELD^.^ip'l^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Olive Hall 
Richmond, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Your pleasant and 
friendly ways. 

Ambition — To supervise a Junior 
High School. 

Comment — "Worry and I have never 
met." 



Lena Hamburc; 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Wit Editor, Bullet, '2+-'25. 
Twin City Club, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Athletic Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Chewing gum. 
Ambition — To make Varsity. 
Comment — "Of all jolly good fel- 
lows." 



Dorothy Wailes H.'\nk 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Dramatic Club, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '25. 
Kampuss Katz. '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — That garrulous tongue. 
Ambition — "I like Norfolk and Hud- 
son coaches fine." 

Comment — "Give me the moonlight, 
Give me the man. 
And leave the rest to 
me." 



77 




THE BATTLEF1ELD# ^||^^^N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Electa Price Hanmer 
Keysville, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '23-'24. 
Red-Head Club, '24-'2S. 
Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Assistant Editor, Bullet, '23-'24. 
President, Junior Class, '23-'24. 
President, Student Government, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — r"Tight." 
Ambition — To arrive on time. 
Comment — "Ye come late, yet ye 



Elizabeth A. Harmon 

Wachapreague, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Eastern Shore Club, '23-'24. 

Worst Fault — Aversion to borrow- 
ing- 

Ambition — To iiave an annual light- 
cut. 

Comment — "Unthinking, idle, wild 
and young, I laughed and danced and 
sung." 



Grace Mae Harper 
Newport News, Virginia 

Glee Club, '24-'25. 
Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Hiking Club, '24-'25. 

IJ'orst Fault — Giggling too much. 

Ambition — To be a "second" Irene 
Castle. 

Comment — "Dance, laugh and be 
merry." 



78 



THE BATTLEFlELDj^.5 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Bessie Virginia Harwood 
Appomattox, Virginia 

Glee Club, '24-'25. 

Virginia Reel Club, •24-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '2+-'25. 

Worst Fault — Loving to teach. 
Ambition — To get a degree (M. A.) . 
Comment — Big eyes of blue, a friend 
that is true. 



Lucy Hern 

Fredericicsburg, Virginia 

Y. W. C. A., •24-'25. 
Town Girls' Club, '24-'25. 

IForst Fault — Wearing a "Theta" 
pin. 

Ambition — To drive a different car 
daily. 

Comment — "Who chooses me will 
get as much as he deserves." 



Council Headley 
Sharps, Virginia 

Sophomore Baseball Team, '24-'25. 
Northern Neck Club, '24-'25. 
Athletic Club, '24-'25. 

JTorst Fault — Fondness for balcony 
seats. 

Ambition — To grow big like Miss 
Hicks. 

Comment — "And I — what is my 
fault? I cannot tell." 



79 




THE BATTLEFIELP|^.^i|jit^g^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Lois Henry 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Sophomore Baseball Team, "24'-25. 
Entre-Nous Club, '24-'25. 

JForst Fault — Unruffled calmness. 
Ambition — To win the hiking title. 
Comment — "The mirror of all cour- 
tesy." 



Alma Hite 
Buffalo Junction, Virginia 

JVorst Fault — Being too gay. 
Ambition — To go on the stage. 
Comment — "A tongue chained up 
ithout a word." 



Lucy G. Hobson 
Dendron, Virginia 

Class Poet, '24. 

Glee Club, '24-'25. 

Bullet Staff, '24-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 

Jf'orst Fault — Your voice is too gruff, 
my dear. 

Ambition — To begin something, 
mostly petitions. 

Comment — "The choicest things 
come in small packages." 



80 



THE BATTLEF1ELD#^&s5t[1^N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Frances Booth Hundley 
Centre Cross, Virginia 

Vice-President, Freshman Class, '23-'24. 
Freshman Representative, Student Council, '23-'24. 
Sophomore Representative, Student Council, '24-'25. 
Captain, Freshman Baseball Team, '23-'24. 
Fire Chief, Bettv Lewis, '23-'24. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '23-'24. 

JVorst Fault — M a k i n g monkey 
shines. 

Ambit'toH — To find Darwin's missing 
link. 

Comment — ''Mischief lurks nearest 
those we think divine." 



Esther J.acobs 

Newport News, Virginia 

Hiking Club, '24-'2S. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Wasting time and 
money. 

Jmbitton — To graduate in June. 

Comment — "I could have been wicked 
— I didn't have time." 



Mvrtice J.AMES 
Irvington, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, ■24-'25. 
Northern Neck Club, •24-'25. 

JForst Fault — Playing Josephine to 
Napoleon. 

Jmbition — To teach at Falmouth. 

Co?nment — "Sometimes I jes sit and 
think, sometimes I jes sit." 




81 



THE BATTLEFlELD#i 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Lena Johnson 
Woodford, Virginia 

Vice-President, Athletic Club, '24-'25. 
Class Baseball Team, '23-'24. 
Class Basketball Team, '23-'24. 
Class Tennis Team, '24-'25. 
Varsity Team, '23-'24.- 
First Varsity Squad, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — "Tec"-nical fouls. 

Ambition — To- put Rudolph in the 
background. 

Comment — "Who can find a virtuous 
woman, for her price is far above 
Rubv-Lee's." 



Sara Juren 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Hiking Club, '23-'24. 
Twin City Club, '23-'24. 

JVorst Fault — Fussing. 
Ambition — To be a C. P. A. 

Comment — "All great people are 
dying, and I am not feeling well." 



Lucy Ellen Kay 
New London, Virginia 

Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 

JForst Fault — Speaking boldly in Stu- 
dent Body meetings. 

Ambition — To know how to cook and 
sew well for "Him." 

Comment — "A sunny temper gilds 
the edge of life's blackest cloud." 



82 



THE BATTLEFIELDi 



iNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Ethel Kathleen Kessler 
Newport News, Virginia 

Varsity Team, '23-'24. 
Sophomore Basketball Team, '24-'25, 
Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'2S. 
Vice-President, "Entre-Nous" Club. 
Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 

TVorst Fault — Shooting a line. 
Ambition — To be a Ph. D. 
Comment — "This is a lady who has 
no tongue, but thoughts." 



Dollie Kidd 
Newtown, Virginia 

Y. W. C. A., •24-'25. 
Big Cabinet, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Sleeping too much. 

Ambition — To get up early just once. 

Comment — "Early to bed, earlv to 
rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and 
wise." 



Isabel Lacy 
South Boston, \irginia 

Hiking Club, '23-'24. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '23-'24. 
Secretary, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Glee Club, •23-'24-'25. 
Senior Q. Q.'s, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Waiting for those Sun- 
day "Dates." 

Ambition — To live in Richmond. 

Comment — "A guide, philosopher, 
and a friend." 




83 



THE BATTLEFIELD^^ 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




M. Louise Lankford 
Franktown, Virginia 

Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Track Team, '23-'24. ■ 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Eastern Shore Club, '23-'24. 

n'orst Fault — Non-patronage of the 
Tea Room. 

Jmbition — To room in 303. 

Comment — "Tiiou shouldst eat to 
lire, not live to eat." 



Virginia Maye Leath 
Yale, Virginia 

Little Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Glee Club, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Doing for others. 

Ambition — To nurse in the Mary 
Washington Hospital. 

Comment — "Whole-souled, big- 
hearted, generous — that's Maye." 



Sadie Evelyn Levinson 
Newport News, Virginia 

Glee Club, '24-'25. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '23-'24. 
Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — A gentle sarcasm. 
Avibition — To own a season ticket to 
Baltimore. 

Comment — "Not too sober. 
Not too gay; 
A rare good fellow 
In every way." 



84 



THE BATTLEFIELD#^^^l^NimK^^NTY-FIVE 



Freeda Levy 
Newport News, Virginia 

Glee Club, 'ZVZS. 
Hiking Club, '2+-'25. 
Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Red-Head Club, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Flaming red hair. 

Ambition — To affect a dignified air. 

Comment — "We catch the thrill of a 
happy voice and the light of a pleas- 
ant smile." 



Nancy Langhorne Lewis 
Richmond, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Glee Club, '24-'25. 

JForst Fault — Rolling those big 
brown eyes. 

Ambition — To speak broad "A." 
Comment — 

"It's the songs ye sing, 

And the smiles ye wear. 
That's a-making the sun 
Shine everywhere." 



Mary Limerick 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Town Girls' Club, •24-'25. 

JForst Fault — Speeding. 
Ambition — To own a Packard. 
Comment — "For worth is more than 
being merely seen or heard." 




85 



THE BATTLEFIELD^: 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Bernice Loehr 
Waverly, Virginia 



Glee Club, '2+-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 



Worst Fault — Forgetting to go to 

class. 

Ambition — To be an ideal teacher. 

Comment — "Work is better than 
words." 

Irene Frances Long 
Elkton, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '23-'24. 

Hockey Squad, '2+-'25. 

President, "Daughters of the Sky" Club, ■24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Disliking Math. 

Ambition — To teach Math and Sci- 
ence in Shenandoah Valley. 

Comment — "The Future holds suc- 
cess for this Science Shark." 



Edna Lumpkin 
Farnham, Virginia 

Little Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '23-'24. 
Northern Neck Club, '24-'25. 
Glee Club, '23-'24. 

JVorst Fault — Tendency toward the 
clergy. 

Ambition — Ralph, and Lynchburg. 

Comment — 

"None knew her but to love her, 
Nor named her but to praise." 



THE BATTLEFlELDif ^ppyi^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Dorothy Maney 
Newport News, Virginia 

Class Basketball Team, '24-'25. 
Hockey Squad, '24-'25. 
Athletic Club, '24-'25. 
Hampton Roads Club, '23-'24. 

Worst Fault — Accenting tlie left loot. 

Ambition — To out jump Jessie. 

Comment — "I was born, sir! ^Vhcn 
the crab ascends — my affairs go bacii- 
ward." 



Frances Elizabeth May 
Hampton, Virginia 

Glee Club, '24-'25. 
Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 
Little Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., •24-'25. 
Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 



gle. 



Jl'orst Fault — An irrespressible gig- 



Ambition — To grow tall. 
Comment — 

"Is she not more than painting can 

express. 
Of youthful poets fanc^vhen they 
love?" 



Mary A. May 

Burkeville, Virginia 

3 -'24. 



Virginia Reel Club 
Glee Club, '23-'24. 



Ji'orst Fault — Blushing. 
Ambition — To be Hoyle's assistant. 
Comment — "Tho' on pleasure bent, 
she had a frugal mind." 




87 



THE BATTLEFIELD# 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Una McAlexander 
Orange, Virginia 

irurst Fault — Knowing too much his- 
tory. 

Ambition — To be Dr. Young's as- 
sistant. 

Comment — 

"Oh! blessed, with temper whose 
■unclouded ray 
Can make tomorrow cheerful as 
today." 



Myrtle G. McGrath 
Cape Charles, Virginia 

House President, Frances Willard Hall, '24-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., •24-'25. 

Glee Club, '2+-'25. 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'2S. 

Eastern Shore Club, '24-'25. 

Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Inefficient. 
Ambition — To be less conservative. 
Comm&nt — "Deep blue eyes overrun- 
ning into laughter." 



Christine McIntyre 
Bealeton, Virginia 

Hiking Club, '23-'24. 
Musicians' Club, '23-'24. 

Worst Fault — Falling in love. 
Ambition — To be a "duck-walker." 
Comment — "Man delights not me." 



THE BATTLEFIELD^. 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Roberta McKenney 
Thornburg, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Being despondent. 

Ambition — To be a teacher at Marye. 

Comment — "I am sure cares are an 
enemy for life." 



Mary IVIcKinney 
Montross, Virginia 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
President, Northern Neck Club, '24-'25. 
Fire Captain, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '23-'2+. 

Worst Fault — Loafing on the job. 

Ambition — To answer a question in 
class. 

Comment — "We gazed and gazed, 
and still our wonder grew." 



Cecilia McLaughlin 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Director, Junior H. S. Dramatic Club, '24-'25. 
Dramatic Club, '23-'24. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '23-'24. 

IForst Fault — Overfondness for cows 
and goats. 

Ambition — To beat Cicero at liis own 
game. 

Comment — "Comic matter cannot be 
expressed in tragic verse." 




THE BATTLEFIELD^: 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Mary McLaughlin 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Associate Editor of Battlefield, '24-'25. 
Secretary, Athletic Association, '23-'24. 

iVorst Fault — Punctuality. 

Ambition — To. keep her modulated 
voice. 

Cotnment — "Exceedingly wise, fair- 
spoken and persuading." 



Velma McNeal 
Fairport, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '23-'24. 
Vice-President, Northern Neck Club, '2+-'25. 
Glee Club, '23-'24. 

JVorst Fault — That Richmond train. 
Ambition — Cann I or Cann I not? 
Comment — "The more I see of the 
many, the less I can stick to the one." 



CoRDAY Savage Mears 
Hampton, Virginia 

Vice-President, Hampton Roads Club, '24-'25. 
President, Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Junior Track Team, '23-'24. 
Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., •24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Having Y. W. Candy 
on the hall on time. 

Ambition — To sing in Grand Opera. 

Comment — "Never worry — let the 
other fellow do it." 



90 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Katharine Micks 
Orange, Virginia 

Varsitv, '24-'25. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Class Basketball, '24-'25. 
Editor-in-Chief, Battlefield, '24-'25. 
Hockey Team, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Being too efficient. 
Ambition — To reform the world. 
Comment — "For what I will, I will, 
and there's an end." 



Madeline H. Venn Milbank 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Associate Editor, Battlefield, '23-'24. 
Dramatic Club, '23-'24. 
Editor-in-Chief, Bullet, '24-'25. 

JVorst Fault — Sentimentality. 

Ambition — To meet the ideal Prince 
Charming. 

Comment — "Life is a sleep, love is a 
dream, and you have lived, if you have 
loved." 



Margaret L. Venn Milbank 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

U'orst Fault — Tendency to argue. 

Ambition — To wear pink organdie 
successfully. 

Comment — "Who must, in all things, 
look for the how, the why, and the 
wherefore." 





91 



THE BATTLEFIELD, 



'ijrrzi 



.NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




LrsiE Minor 
Newtown, Virginia 

Junior Baseball Team, '23-'24. 
Sophomore Baseball Team, '24. 
Glee Club, '23-'2+. 
Field and Track Team, '24, 
Basketball Committee^ '24-'25. 
Fire Chief, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Ringing the fire bells. 

Ambition — To belong to Fredericks- 
burg Fire Department. 

Comment — "Friendship for each, and 
faith for all." 



Elizabeth Moore 
Newport News, Virginia 

Fire Captain, '24-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 

JTorst Fault — Borrowing an alarm 
clock. 

Ambition — To own one. 
Comment — 

"Whatever skeptic could inquire, 
For every wherefore she had a 
why?" 



Elizabeth Morecock 
Newport News, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Hopping Proms. 
Ambition — To be serious. 
Comment — 

"Sport that wrinkles care derides. 
And laughter holding both his 
sides." 



92 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Bessie Motley 
Milford, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Spreading scandal. 

Avihitlon — To catch up in gym class. 

Comment — "As sweet in thought as 
a lily." 



Louise Motley 
Milford, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Too efficient in Home 
Economics. 

Ambition — To be a homemaker. 

Comment — "In her tongue is the law 
of kindness." 



Elizabeth Muir 
Reedsville, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, ■23-'24. 
Northern Neck Club, '24-'2S. 

Worst Fault — Talking too loudly. 
Ambition — To teach history. 
Comment — "Sweet and low is her 
voice." 



93 




THE BATTLEFlELD#^i^l^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Sara Omansky 
North Emporia, Virginia 

(Jlee Club, '23-'24. 
Hiking Club, '23-'24. 
Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Never smiling. 

Ambition — To have a host of friends 
always. 

Comment — "Once a friend, always a 
friend." 



Elsie Page 
Tabb, Virginia 
JVorst Fault — Thinking too deeply. 
Ambition — To join the Follies. 
Comment — "Speech is great, but si- 
lence is golden." 



Inez Parker 

Franklin, Virginia 

JVorst Fault — Not writing to Blacks- 
burg. 

Ambition — To live at Luray. 

Comment — "I have a heart with room 
for every joy." 



94 



^E BATTLEFlELDj^^:;S^'3^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Katherixe Perr\ 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Town Girls' Club, •24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Studying too little. 
Amhttton — To teach Math. 
Comvient — "Study, study, and still 
more study." 



Elva Powers 
Caret, Virginia 

Jf'orst Fault — Promiscuous use of 
powder and paint. 

Ambition — To be a successful teacher. 

Comment — "Duty is the pathway to 
glory." 



RrxH Hope Prebble 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Secretary, Student Government, '24-'25. 

Joint Council, '24-'25. 

Student Council, '24-'25. 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., •24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Timidity in Sociology 
Class. 

Ambition — To publish her own text- 
book for Sociology. 
Comment — 

"Always ready and willing to try, 
Never letting her work go by." 



95 




THE BATTLEFIELD^^ 




I^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Nell Pound 
Griffin, Georgia 

Town Girls' Club, '24-'25. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, •24-'2S. 
Glee Club, 2+-'25. 

Worst Fault — Mistreating the kids 
in training school. 

Ambition — To sing "A Song of Six- 
pence." 

Comment — "Circumstances; I make 
circumstances." 



Jessie Roberts 
Windsor, Virginia 

Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 
Fire Chief, '24-'25. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '24-'25. 
Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Tousled hair. 
Ambition — To be as neat as a pin. 
Comment — 

"A httle powder, a little paint. 
Makes a little girl. Oh! very 
quaint. 
Rumor has it she's a saint; 

Well, by golly, we'll tell you 
she ain't !" 



Susie Saunders 
Champlain, Virginia 

Glee Club, '24-'25. 
Hiking Club, '24-'25. 

ff'orst Fault — Never-ending opti- 
mism. 

Ambition — To climb the golden stairs 
to a degree. 

Comment — "Always smiling, always 
happy." 



96 



THE BATTLEFlELD#g 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Louisa Sharp 

Waverly, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Too retiring in his- 
tory class. 

Ambition — To be principal of a Jr. 
H. S. for boys. 
Comment — 

"Learning by study must be won, 
'Twas never handed down from 
son to son." 



Mabel Simmons 
Kilmarnock, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Hiking Club, '23-'24. 
Northern Neck Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Singing. 

Ambition — To be an Opera Singer. 

Comment — "A maiden never bold." 



Ell H. Smith 
Golansville, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Not preparing her 
work. 

Ambition — Just to loaf. 

Comment — "How blessed thou art 
that hath a friend." 




97 



THE BATTLEFIELD#^^1^^NimE^^^^^^^ 




Mary Alice Spillman 
Index, Virginia 

Maurv Literary Society. 
Track Team. 
Virginia Reel Club. 
Northern Neck Club. 

JJ'orst Fault — Never having anything 
to say. 

Ambition — To write a book on "Why 
It Pays to Be Original." 

Comment — "A mighty spirit fills that 
little frame." 



Jessie Squire 
Hampton, Virginia 

Class Basketball Team, '23-'25. 
Class Baseball Team, '23-'25. 
Varsity, •23-'25. 
Hockey Squad, '24-'25. 
Hampton Roads Club, '23-'25. 
Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 

JForst Fault — Winning athletic 
trophies. 

Ambition — To break the World 
High-Jump Record. 
Comment — 

"Come and trip it as ye go 
On the light fantastic toe." 



Pazel Elizabeth Stump 
Roanoke, Virginia 

Southwest Virginia Club, '2+-'25. 
Glee Club, '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — Not knowing how to 
be attractive. 

Ambition — To rival Irene Castle's 
record. 

Comment — 

"Unthinking, idle, wild and young, 
I laughed and danced and talked 
and sung." 



W^'^^- 



THE BATTLEFIELD#.^fc^l5^lNimEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Clara Tuck. 

Virgilina, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Too serious. 
Ambition — To use the rolling pin. 
Comment — "The mildest manners 
and the gentlest heart." 



MOZELLE ViRTS 

Waterford, Virginia 



Big Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., •2+-'25. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '23-'24. 
Glee Club, '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — "Canning." 
Ambition — "To believe a man's line." 
Comment — "'Tis better to boss than 
to be bossed." 



EsTELLE White 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

Junior Representative, Student Council, '23-"2+. 
Little Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '2+-'25. 
Kampuss Katz, '24-'25. 
Glee Club, '23-'25. 

Worst Fault — Giving Simon - Benet 
Tests. 

Ambition — To settle down for a 
quiet, contented life. 

Comment — "A maiden never bold of 
spirit, so very still and quiet." 




%(S(3S;g¥§St^-<^«£y!*.Ml^0K£ifl^H(tf*.S -*'^-A.'*^*5i&-'y 



99 



THE BATTLEFlELDj^S 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Alice Wilkins 
Colonial Beach, Virginia 

Virginia Reel Club, '24-'25. 
Northern Neck Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Loneliness. 

Ambition — To find some one else to 
tease. 

Comment — "A merry laugh and a 
twinkling eye." 



Mildred Wiltshire 
Upperville, Virginia 

Vice-President, Y. W. C. A., '24-'2S. 

Little Cabinet, Y. W. C. A., '24-'25. 

Glee Club, '23-'25. 

Vice-President, "Daughters of the Sky" Club, '24-'25. 

Worst Fault — Too peppy. 

Ambition — To go to the Foreign 
Field. 

Comtnent — "A friend in need is a 
friend indeed." 



Ruth Wornom 
Poquoson, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Too studious. 

Ambition — To head a sociological re- 
search. 

Comment — "Better than gold is the 
thini<:ing mind." 



100 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Grace Wyatt 
Wachapreague, Virginia 

Vice-President, Eastern Slaore Club, '23-'24. 
Glee Club, '24-'25. 
Junior Q. Q.'s, '23-'2+. 

Worst Fault — Never having any worli 
to do. 

Ambition — To be a town-crier. 

Comment — "Story? God bless you, 
I have none to tell, sir." 



Mary S. Young 
Warfield, Virginia 

Worst Fault — Delaplain. 
Ambition — To travel. 
Comment — "Known but to few, but, 
oh! how dear to those." 




101 




THE BATTLEFlELD#^i|j[l^^NlNETEEN TWENT^H^ 

iiiiiiii 

WAS on a cold night in December, in the year 1935, that 
the students of the renowned S. T. C. at Fredericksburg 
were assembled to hear "the latest" on the radio. Their 
president was tuning in, and suddenly a look of surprise 
filled their interested faces when they realized they were 
to be, as it were, introduced to some of the alumni. 

In a dusty corner in the "Black Cat" sat two of the old students, 
who had met by chance in the great metropolis. In a secluded cor- 
ner, seemingly entranced by the atmosphere of the village, sat Mrs. 
Charles Carlile, nee Kathryn Day, attired in the latest fashion, and 
with her sat Lady Hank, now a Connoisseur of Etiquette at "Oaks 
Mere on the Hudson." Suddenly they were aroused from their 
stupor by the noise of music, and, on looking up, Mrs. Carlile beheld 
her former roommate, Mary Fromm, now the leading dancer for all 
charity benefits. Since Mary did not recognize her old friends, Mrs. 
Carlile called to her, and in a few moments the three were completely 
lost to their surroundings, so enveloped were they in the past. 

"Guess the latest!" cried Mary, "I just met Cele and Mary 
McLaughlin, who told me they have gained success with dramatics 
and have started a school of their own!" During the conversation 
the following wafted back to the home of the former students: 

Jesse Roberts and Aileen Bradshaw are giving all "that school- 
girl complexion" by masseuses and vanishing creams. 

Across the street, at "Parisdennes," Electa Hanmer, Louise 
Lankford, and Hamner Dunkley are creating the latest in the femi- 
nine wardrobe. 

Dot Childress is the private secretary of Pierpont Morstan. 
Her assistants are Isabelle Lacy and India Diggs. 

For the same concern Eloise Brown, Lillian Vanlandingham, 
and Willie Booth are efficiently keeping the books. 

At old Fredericksburg, Ellen Fox is now treasurer and business 
manager at S. T. C. 

"On my way here I stopped at the Carnegie Library in Pitts- 
burg, and guess whom I saw sitting at the main desk?" said Kathryn. 
"None other than Elizabeth Moore and her assistants, Kathleen 
Kessler and Alice Goldsworthy. 

102 




THE BATTLEF1ELD#^^11^^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



I went to the courthouse in Philadelphia last week to get inside 
information on the case of the late Henry W. Smithson, who is get- 
ting a divorce from his wife, formerly Estelle White, an old Song- 
Bird of S. T. C. I was amazed to see Bernice Loehr and Nancy 
Lewis, the prosecuting attorneys. Judge Hundley was presiding — 
and seemed to be much at ease. 

The other morning on the train I noticed in the paper an 
announcement of the wedding of Miss Louise Bracey to Mr. Jim 

. Among the guests were Mrs. Whitescott, nee Miss 

Dorothy Maney, and Misses ^Llry May and Grace Harper — who 
are still on the faculty list at Falmouth. 

I met Madolyn Carpenter this morning coming from the Uni- 
versity Club, where she had delivered an address on "Better Train- 
ing for Children." She has opened a school at Quantico, being 
assisted by Hazel Stump. It is rumored that all the officers seem 
to have gone back to their childhood days." 

"Oh! Mary, remember Bill Milbank? Well — I noticed in the 
American Magazine last night a charming story on "Why I Fell 
for the Prince" — by none other than she. The amusing illustrations 
were drawn by Marion Clarke." 

"And Kat," said Dot, "you can't imagine my surprise when I 
met two wealthy ranch owners — Tommy Fleming and Irene Long — 
who say there's no place like the "Wild and Woolly West." They 
also said living on a ranch next to theirs is Lucille Alvis, Esther 
Campbell and Catherine Pitts. They are having great success in 
raising chickens. 

Passing through Lexington, I happened to see Agnes Curtis, Bet 
Morecock, and Velma MacNeal — "used to be" debutantes, now 
patronesses of the annual hops at V. M. I. Attending the same hop 
were Elizabeth May, Corday Mears, and Ruth Clark, who were 
still "ladies-in-waiting" for that "All Fortunate Man." 

I never enjoyed anything so much as that Algy Field's Minstrels. 
The leading actors were our old-time friends, Mazie Amory, Bet 
Basset, Liz Crismond, Lucy Hobson, and Freeda Levy. 

At Columbia, still drinking of that Pierian Spring, are Pratt 
Bevan, Jessie Doughtie, Wanda Fox, Una MacAlexander, and Mary 
McKenney. Ruth Prebble is now head of the Commercial Depart- 
ment there. She has revised Gregg's Shorthand Manual, and now 
her edition is winning fame. Myrtle McGrath, obtaining experi- 
ence from the "Little Red Lane," is flipping pancakes at Childs. 

103 




THE BATTLEFlELDj^ggflfl^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Did you know Jessie Squire has just returned from the Olympics, 
bringing home the Laurels, as is her custom? On the same steamer 
were Gladys Beck, Council Headley, Copey Evans, Ruby Carlton, 
and Katherine Micks, who are making a sight-seeing tour of the 
world. The capable chaperone was Mrs. Preston Shelly, formerly 
Miss Lucy Billingsley." 

"Oh, Dot, is it true that Mozelle Virts is Cann's assistant in the 
ticket office at R., F. & P.? I can't imagine it, and to think Louisa 
Sharp is still selling tickets at the Pitt's "Leader," which is now 
under the management of Eva Duncan, assisted by Ethel Godsey." 

Lucy Hearn and Grace Giannotti are now traveling secretaries 
for the Woolworth Company. 

Henrietta Dreifus is now holding down the important position 
of housewife, and, at odd times, gives special lessons in bookkeeping 
to Magruder Micks. 

It is true, in that same old historic town of Fredericksburg, the 
critic teachers for S. T. C. are the Misses Bess Motley, Louise Mot- 
ley, Mabel Simmons, Mabel Self, Lucy Ellen Kay, and Catherine 
Blanton. On the faculty the leading English teacher is Mildred 
Gwaltney, who hasn't forgotten the few handsome shieks of the town. 
At Sargeant now, the professors of physical education are Ruby Lee 
Blaydes, Rachel Chenault, Lena Johnson, and Lois Henry. 

At church last Sunday I heard an interesting lecture delivered 
by the Reverend Mildred Wiltshire. After the service I met Ethel 
Dunn, Maye Leath, Ruby Williams, and Florence Dickerson, who 
are canvassing the country with her in interest of China's welfare. 

Edna Lumpkin and Alma Hite are foreign missionaries. 

Did you ever think Mildred Chase would be a model? Well, 
she's helping Coles Philips advertise hole-proof hosiery. Marion 
Davis and Esther Chinn are running her a close second. 

I met Dorothy Chandler today, and she said she had fallen hope- 
lessly in Love. She also said she'd just received a letter from Vir- 
ginia Branch, who has been elected Society Editor for the New 
port News Daily. Her assistants are Virginia Biscoe and Helen 
Frothingham. 

Miriam Carmel, Lena Hamburg, and Sadie Levinson are open- 
ing a Seaside Hotel at Virginia Beach. The first to accept their 
hospitality for the summer season were Roberta McKenney and 
Christine Maclntyre. 

Sarah Juren has just left for France, to open a special Com- 
mercial School. 104 



THE BATTLEFIELD#^6|j[5|^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 

The funniest thing I know, however, is that Verle Garner has 
started her Campaign for Governor of Virginia. Her campaign 
manager is Virginia Cathell, assisted by Doris Beard and Mrs. Ruth 
Cannaday. 

I heard Myrtice James has been elected Mayor of Detroit. Ap- 
plying to her for a public position is Allien Brooking and Grace 
Edmunds. 

I attended the races last month in Los Angeles. The autos 
driven by Elizabeth Harmon, B. V. Harwood, and Ocie Graham 
tied for the cup. This shows that old S. T. C.'s speed. 

Yesterday I met Dolly Kidd, who is a medium; among her 
most interested patrons are Misses Mary Limerick and Olive Hall. 

My deahs, let me tell you — Charlotte Chappell has not forgot- 
ten her old Saturday hikes. She's walking those old rats at N. Y. U. 
once a week on bird walks thru Central Park — Miss Cause's only 
successor. 

Yesterday I bought a Victrola record entitled "I Call Her My 
Keyhole 'Cause She's Something to A-Door," sung by Nell Pound. 

Grace Wyatt, Lou Milbank, and Mary Alice Spillman are 
making a trans-continental flight. 

The noted suffragist, Alice Wilkins, is in town. With her were 
Dot Weaver, Mary Young, and Edna Webb. 

Elsie Minor and Elsie Page are now interested in fireproof 
building and have come to N. Y. to get new data. 

Dr. Inez Parker has opened her new dental office today. She 
just came up on the ferry-boat that Susie Saunders is running. It 
seems Bonnie Tyler and Ruth Wornam are both applying for the 
position as nurse in the office. Isn't that strange? 

Elva Powers has just announced her engagement to Jack Hope- 
lesspoon. 

Ell Smith, Catherine Perry, and Mary Snyder are up in Alaska, 
having become owners of a wealthy gold mine. 

The moments flew swiftly, and as the three former classmates 
passed out of the doors it seemed as if they had rolled back the uni- 
verse and lived over the days of '25. 

So entranced were they by the conversation that a huge sight- 
seeing bus would have knocked them down had it not been for the 
capable traffic cop, Capt. Julia Ellison, at the corner of Tinkan 
Alley and One-Way Avenue. 

105 



THE BATTLEFIELD^ lif^ipiNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




MI3TDRY CinY-mnTHFin JUrimR-5EniDR RCCEPTlOh 




JUNIOR 



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THE BATTLEFlELD^^^^^PlpI^' 



la^iNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




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KnDCK-lh5 F^"^^ 




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THE EMIDR-m-CHIEF 



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Miss Isabell M. Chappell 

Freshman Faculty Advisor 

110 



THE BATTLEFIELDj\^i;^^feN]NET^^^^FM 




Jf resitjman Clas? 

Class Colors 
Green and Gold 



Clas0 ©fftccrs 

Ullllll 

President VIRGINIA MussELMAN 

Vice-President MiLDRED CRAWFORD 

Secretary Jane Whitehead 

Treasurer Kathrene Hatchett 



111 



THE BATTLEFIELDj^.^pJj|^^^TEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




^ n-OlWi*"^!,' if 



112 



THE BATTLEF!ELDif.^iw1^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 

Jf resitjman Clasis 



Abernathy, Aileen 


Haile, Matilda 


Parrott, Frances 


Allen, Anne 


Hamilton, Lois 


Payne, Elizabeth 


Allen, Bess 


Hanmer, Dorothy 


Payne, Nancy 


Anderson, Emeline 


Hanowell, Lucille 


Pepmier, Irene 


Andrews, Thelraa 


Hanson, Lillian 


Phillips, Margaret 


Baker, Fannie 


Harding, Katherine 


PoJfenbarger, Hypathi 


Beaslev, Lillian 


Harris, Dorothy 


Phillips, Ruth 


Belote," Hilda L. 


Hart, Alma 


Pollard, Frances 


Belote, Hildah T. 


Hatchett, Katherine 


Pollard. Lillian 


Bing. Ruby 


Hatton, Mary 


Pollard, Sara 


Bonniwell, Lois 


Haynie, Elsie 


. Pond, Dorothy 


Boothe, Maude 


Head, Julia 


Ponton, Ruth 


Broaddus, Linda 


Headley, Aileen 


Ponton, Willie 


Broaddus, M. Susie 


Herriott. Glendora 


Porter, Marian 


Brown, Etta 


Hiller. Cecilia 


Post. Dorothv 


Burke, Elizabeth 


Hogan, Ann 


Quinn. iMary 


Burke, Gertrude 


Ilolton, Dorothy 


Rosenblatt. Anna 


Bushong, Sallie 


Huffman, Clara 


Rosenblatt. Frances 


Cain, Florence 


Hocknian, Maude 


Raiford. Louise 


Cain, Lucile 


Hunt, Audrey 


Rhea, Irene 


Childress, Henna 


Tackson, Genevieve 


Rhodes, Laura 


Chiles, Marv 


Jenkins, Katherine 


Righter, Bertha 


Christian, Duval 


Jernigan. Grace 


Roane, Nancv 


Clarke, Delma 


Jester, Mabel 


Rollings. Clarice 


Cluverius, Grace 


Jett, Flora 


Rollings. Vivian 


Cockrell, Virginia 


Johnson, Elizabeth 


Rose. Marie 


Collins, Annie 


Johnson, Helen 


Rosemond, Louise 


Colvin, Eleanor 


Johnson, Marie 


Ruff. Virginia 


Conn, Estelle 


Johnson, Ruby 


Russell, Reva 


Conn. Ethel 


Jones. Susie 


Roberts, Hazel 


Connelly, Elaine . 


Jordan. Laura 


Saunders. Louise 


Book. Emma 


Kellani, Norma 


Scott. Florence 


Cooper, Frances 


Kilmon. Rosalie 


Sebrell. Sue 


Corder, Maude 


Kindervater. Mildred 


Shelton. Marguerite 


Costin, Edith 


Keyser. Flora 


Shepherd. Elizabeth 


Gotten, Juliet 


Kaplan. Bessie 


Smith. Dorothy 


Courtney. Esther 


Lane, Rosa 


Smith. Ell 


Cozart, Claire 


Lewis, Anne Lee 


Springs, Flora 


Crawford. Mildred 


Lewis, Alice 


Stotz, Annie 


Chase, Olivia 


Lincoln, Gwendolyn 


Stevens, Grace 


Davis, Margaret M. 


Lokey, Marian 


Stone. Alice 


Decker, Elizabeth 


Lubkovitz. Ida 


Stone. Frances 


Dreifus, Teckla 


I-vnch, Louise 


Stringer. Margaret 


Drummond, Bertie 


Linch, Mabel 


Taliaferro. Nettie 


Drummond, Mildred 


Lvnch, Thelma 


Taylor, Elizabeth 


Dunton, Joe Lee 


Marshall, Mary 


Tarplev, Pauline 


Edmunds, Grace 


Martin, Fay 


Thomas, Elizabeth 


Engleby, Margaret 


Martin, Mary 


Thomas, Ethalia 


Escher, Julia 


Mason, Grace 


Thomas, Jessie Lee 


Eubanke, Mildred 


Masters, Mildred 


Thomas, Marian 


Everett, Kathryn 


MaNwell. Virginia 


Thompson, Elnora 


Farish, Alice 


McCrarrick, Margaret 


Thornhill, Madolvn 


Field. Evelvn 


McCarthy, Virginia 


Thornton, Allie 


Fisher. Sadie 


McEnally, Dorothy 


Throckmorton, Josephi 


Fitchett, Sallie 


Mears, Katherine 


Thurston, Verna 


Forbes. Valerie 


Me'ia, Carmen 


Tiller, Dorothy 


Forkner. Florence 


Miller, Edna 


Towles, Mabel 


Forrester. Ruth 


Miller, Elizabeth 


Walcott, Emilv 


Franks, Annie 


Miller, Marco 


Walker, Sallie B. 


Fraughnaugh, Virginia 


Mister, Julia 


Walton. Gladvs 


Gallagher, Beatrice 


Moody, Elizabeth 


Warner, Vergie 


Gardner, Alma 


Moore. Agnes 


Warren, Kathrvn 


Gillet. Gladys 


Moore. Elmer 


Waterfield, Nellie 


Gladstone, Annie 


Moore. Alphra 


Wayne, Swannie 


Glascock. Ruth 


Moore. Lillian 


Webb, Edna 


Gleen. Pansy 


Morris. Ruby 


Weger, Katherine 


Gordan, Hannah 


Musselman. Virginia 


Whaley, Gladys 


Graham. Margaret 


Mvers, Winifred 


Whitehead. Jane 


Gray. Nannie 


Neville. Hattie May 


Whiting, Frances 


Green. Anna Paige 


Noell. Anna May 


Wilkins, Claudia 


Greenlaw, Susie 


Norman, Bertha 


Wilkinson, Dorothy 


Gregory, Lily 


Norman, Elma 


Wine, Marguerite 


Gresham. Frances 


O'Brien. Virginia 


Wine. Nellie 


Griffin, Edna 


Olds. Mildred 


Wirth, Faith 


Groton, Maria 


Overman, Georgia 


W^ollard, Barbara 


Guy, Susie 


Palmer, Ro-a 


Wornom, Diana 


Hankla, Emily 


Parks, Annie 


Wright, Virginia 



113 



THE BATTLEFIELD^^ilpl^^NlNETEEN TW^^TO 



paa=a=a! 




(Bei?trj the True Tale of Hoiv the Freshmen Got the Sophomore^s Goat) 

ilNCE upon a time there was a goat. No. We're not speak- 
ing of goats in general, but a nice, white, fat, long-horned, 
long-haired, efficiently butting goat, which for the sake of 
euphony we will call "Billie." Billie, the playmate of some 
dozen little pickaninnies, had been transported from his happy 
home m town to the Hill, where he was "in seclusion," waiting until the 
appointed hour, 6 P. M., when he was to make his de-Butt in the dining- 
room, to be sponsored in his particular stunt by the Sophomores, who had 
planned to render long, loud, deafening, and, with one accord, the chal- 
lenge iiTi7 > . w r? ; ) w 

" He ve got the rresnmen s goat ! 

We've got the Freshmen's goat! 
Any old team can get up steam, 
But we've got the Freshmen' s goat!" 

However, from out the past, the same old story of plans, whether 
they be laid by mice or men — or Sophomores — was re-enacted. 

Due to various and sundry hints, observations, calculations, consulta- 
tions of horoscopes, and crystal gazings, the Freshmen knew something 
was up, and, with apologies to a still more illustrious Billie, they said, 
"Who steals my goat, steals all." 

Then two Freshmen did some work that should go down in history 
with Lecoqu, Sherlock Holmes, and Hawkshaw, the detective. With 
stealthy steps, they silently slithered through the cellar. Nothing there. 
Then the barns were explored. Everything clear. 
Each tree was carefully noted and observed, to 
see if around its trunk was a rope that might be 
designed to hold a recalcitrant goat. 

At last, by the theory that 2 + 2 sometimes 

makes 5, and by the process of elimination, a 

plausible theory was reached. Away rushed the 

two conspirators, separating to 

avoid suspicion. When they met 

at Wallace's garage, they plunged 




THE BATTLEFlELDif ^^IfilTTni'^^iNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



in hoping much, but expecting little. Hold and below, an immense white 
shape, with gleaming red eyes, fire-breathing mouth, and two incredibly 
long horns rose up before them ! Meeting an unknown goat in an unknown 
garage is not an everyday occurrence, and the two Freshmen made tracks 
out of the door in such a remarkable fashion that a streak of lightning 
would have looked like a slow-motion film in a movie in comparison. 
Finally they mustered up courage, grabbed the rope, anci led Billie through 
a crack in the door. 

Coming into possession of a goat so unexpectedly is a trifle bewilder- 
ing — even worse than having a white elephant on your hands. The ques- 
tion was — what could be done with him? Pictures of leading that goat 
through mud and snow, far away from all Sophomores and civilization, 
did not seem as attractive as they had expected. 

But as the Frosh wandered disconsolately with Billie toward the 
back door of the Faculty House, young Lochinvar drove up in a Ford 
truck, to deliver some groceries. With a yell of heart-felt relief, the girls 
and the goat jumped in, considerately giving Billie the seat of honor by 
the driver, while Kitty sat on the outside, and Muss vainly endeavored 
to cling to the back with one hand, and to hold a guano sack over Billie's 
head with the other, to prevent the dear thing from catching cold. After 
a muddy and hysterical ride down the plank road, they came at last to 
the entrance of a little lane, well known for two reasons. First, it is a 
short cut to the Little Store. Second, it is the muddiest place in the Old 
Dominion. In a distance of a hundred yards, there are five creeks, three 
hundred and seventy-nine mudholes, one hairpin curve emphasized by a 
precipice and a barb-wire fence. These statistics are warranted to be cor- 
rect. They come from first-hand knowledge. Besides, Venus hasn't a 
thing on that road for curves. 

About half-way down the lane, Billie was attacked by a sudden fit 
of nostalgia. He reared back on his hind legs, stuck his nose in the air, 
and bleated in heart-broken tones — 

"Baa-aa-aaaa-aaa. Baa-aaaa-aaaaa-aa-a !" 

With sympathy in their voices and murder in their hearts, the girls 
paused to pet and console him with "Nice Billie! Good old Billie! Come 
on, Billie! Ni-i-ice Billie!" Billie reluctantly moved forward again, until 
they came to the largest creek, with a narrow plank across it. There 
Billie balked. As he saw it, no self-respecting goat would go across any- 
thing as precarious as that plank. So there they halted, the girls on one 

115 




THE BATTLEFlELD#,g^51^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



side, Billie on the other, with the taut rope and the narrow plank between. 
Finally the noble hearts of the girls were wrung with sympathy. 

"Miss Moran is there to give us castor oil, but who'll tend to the 
goat?" 

They, therefore, recrossed the bridge, picked Billie up, gently but 
firmly — Kitty holding up the front end, IVIuss the rear — and carried him 
safely across the raging flood. Billie repaid their efforts and self-sacrifice 
by giving them gentle little butts as they walked on. Since the horns of 
a goat are particularly designed by an all-seeing Proyidence for the pur- 
pose of defense, the Prods of those horns are not the most efficacious means 
of preserving silk hose intact. This also is first-hand knowledge. 

At last the hairpin curve hove into sight, and Billie's patience broke. 
He gave one stricken "Baa-a-aa!" turned and fled, but not in vain had the 
girls been given "running in place twenty times. Ready — begin !" He was 
recaptured, and while Kitty held him, Muss ran up to the big road for 
help. She flagged a passing car, and the three began their adventures 
anew. The school was patrolled on all sides by desperate Sophomores, 
so they drove around it several times looking for an opening. The last 
time they picked up a Sophomore to help them, and made a dash for the 
side door of the dining-room, and after an excited cry of "I tagged you, 
so you're my prisoner," the trio made their triumphal entry into the dining- 
room, to the tune of — 

"We've got the SOPHOMORE'S goat!" 

Ask Cele. 

It may be a bit unseemly for the following expose to be incorporated 
in this story, concerning the debit side of the Sophomores' banking account, 
but, nevertheless : 

Grace Jernigan, in those few mad minutes of fast, furious, and hectic 
action, stopped long enough to snatch from the back porch two of the 
choicest bunches of celery, with whose tempting stalks and leaves she 
tickled Billie's nose, and fed Billie's mouth, thereby beguiling him, and 
keeping him from declaring to the public his whereabouts. 

Item: 

2 Bunches Celery @ 2Sc $0.50 

Please remit. 

Mrs. John Ruff, Dietitian. 

Two thousand six hundred years ago, Aesop said: "You Never 
Can Tell." 

116 



THE BATTLEFIELD^ 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Clubs; anb (^rgani^ationsi 

iiiiiiii 

PAGE 

Student Government 118 

Y. W. C. A 120 

Battlefield 122 

Bullet : 124 

Kampuss Katz 126 

Virginia Reel Club 127 

Glee Club 1 2 8 

Music 129 

Hiking Club 1 3 

Fire Department 132 

Entre-Nous 1 3 3 

Eastern Shore Club 134 

Twin City Club . 1 3 5 

Northern Neck Club 136 

Southwest Virginia Club 137 

Caroline-Spottsylvania Club 138 

Hampton Roads Club 139 

Alumnae 140 

Shenandoah Club 142 

Red-Headed Club 145 



117 



THE BATTLEFIELD^: 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Mazie Amory 
Anne Murray 
Gladys Gillet 



^tuDcnt Council 

Myrtle McGrath 
Charlotte Chappell 
Dorothy Holton 



Agnes Curtis 
Betsy Bassett 
Jane Whitehead 



118 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^^p|5[^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




SDfficers 



IRGINIA CaTHELL 




Ruth Prebble 


rice-President 


Electa Hanmer 
President 


Secretary 


Virginia Boyd 




Mildred Crawford 


Ex Officio 




Treasurer 



119 




120 



THE BATTLE FlELD#^ fe^|^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



f . OT. C 1. 




Mntto: 
Not b}' might, nor by power, but 
my spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts. 



Officers 

ViRGINrA BOVD 
President 

Mildred Wiltshire 
lice-President 

Juliet Ware 
L nder-Graduate 
Representative 

Isabel Lacv 
Secretary 

Corday Mears 
Treasurer 



Committees 



Ellen Fox 
Devotional 

Mildred Wiltshire 
Membership 

Corday Mears 

Finance 
Elizabeth May 

Publicity 

Mrs. B. Y. Tyner 
Faculty Adviser 



Mildred Wiltshire 
World Fellovi-ship 

Betsy Bassett 
Social 

Maye Le.ath 
Social Service 

Estelle White 
Bible Study 

Electa Haxmer 
Ex-Officer 



121 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^||jf^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Pattlefielb ^taff 



Mary McLaughlin 
First Associate Editor 

Emma Cooke 

Second Associate Editor 

Ella Talley 

Wit Editor 



Miss Olive Garrison 

Faculty Adviser 

Margaret Sutton 

Assistant Art Editor 

Frances Whiting 

Assistant Business Manager 



Lucy Houston 

Organization Editor 

Geraldine Bruster 

Assistant Advertising Manager 

Helen Mills 

Alumnae Editor 



THE BATTLEFlELD^.^iW|^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Pattleftelb ^taff 



Katharine Micks 
Editor-in-Chief 

Mary K. Fromm 
Ad-vertising Manager 



India Dices 
Business Manager 

Virginia Williams 
Art Editor 



THE BATTLEFIELD^; 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




JBuUet ^taff 



Faculty Advisor — Miss Louise Bo, e 

Madeline Milbank Editor-in-Chief Hamner Dunkley Asst. Business Manager 

Virginia Musselman Asst. Editor Eloise Brown Advertising Manager 

Dorothy Chiles Business Manager India Diggs Asst. Advertising Manager 

dBDitorial ^taff 

Literary Editor — Wanda Fox 

Ida Lubkovitz Asst. Literary Editor Emma Cooke Exchange Editor 

Agnes Curtis Social Editor Dorothy Post Asst. Exchange Editor 

Lucy Hobson Asst. Social Editor Willie Bivens Alumnae Editor 



laepotters 



Frances Whiting Social 

Page Harrison Athletics 

Betsy Bassett Y. W. C. A. 



Cecile McLaughlin ....Dramatics 

Virginia Cathell Student Government 

Lena Hamburg , Wit 



124 






THE BATTLE F 1 E L Dj^.^g|j[1^iN INETEEN TWENTY-F IVE 



.^ 



f 



tL iWe ?^uUe^,^ 4 



•fii 



Artists' Course |p5S:5Si;s5::s:^afa5«=B::;«aji:aa;!^| Theatrical Gossip 

.».o,.i:r7s,=..«. H a illErrp Cfjrifitmas « .,L";;r.'.:;.;™;rC".';r,: 



■■i 


til. cherk, »er« to ru.Wy. HI. eyii 
HI, r>» w« IK up wllh Ibf hBpplait 
H. shmk' liDDili Bll «rDUDJ. Id lh» OBr- 

Befare «e all Hdih 11. tbli Jelly oW 


Elided SlBBg 


Ir 


Romances Of 

Fredericksburg 


The Student 

Government 



125 



THE 



NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




i^ampugs mat} i^lub 





Motto: We're the Katz Ears 






Flower: Kat-Tails 






Home: Katskill Alountains 






Song: Kitten on the Keys 






Color: Maltese Grey 




Alley-Kat Childress 


Stray-Kat Parish 


Angora-Kat May 


Tom-Kat Chase 


Angora-Kat Fromm 


Store-Kat Roberts 


Store-Kat Cockrell 


Back-Kat Glascock 


Tom-Kat Squire 


Maltese-Kat Crismond 


Harbor-Kat Hank 


Maltese-Kat Sebrell 


Alley-Kat Curtis 


Persian-Kat Helton 


Stray-Kat Taliaferro 


Stray-Kat Cozart 


Store-Kat McGrath 


Barn-Kat White 


Black-Kat Bradshaw 


Harbor-Kat McCarrick 


Barn-Kat Whiting 


Harbor-Kat Bassett 


Toni-Kat Morecock 


Persian-Kat Williams 



126 




gui[[DRn[[fUL mi m sierdtdid 

wimDLif^[nnMum,nDnDDQOLh 
wrnruDnDint in[iWD 

MMi n[nra-^[[-ra3-j[si[ayis[-5[[:im3.-Rui« nur] 



127 



THE BATTLEFIELD^! 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




(§lee Club 



Parke Anderson 
Betsv Bassett 
Gladys Beck 
Lucv Billingsley 
Willie Bivens 
Louise Bracey 
Virginia Branch 
Eloise Brown 
Florence Cain 
Charlotte Chappell 
Ruth Clark 
Mildred Crawford 
Marion Davis 
Elizabeth Decker 
Eva Duncan 
Julia Ellison 
Margaret Englehy 
Sadie Fisher 
Rose Friedman 
Helen Frothingham 
Alma Gardner 
Verle Garner 



Gladys Gillett 
Lois Hamilton 
Electa Hanmer 
Lucile Hanowell 
Bessie Harwood 
Lucy Hobson 
Katherine Jenkins 
Helen Johnson 
Isabel Lacy 
May Leath 
Nancy Lee 
Sadie Levinson 
Freeda Levy 
Nancy Lewis 
Bernice Loehr 
Marion Lokey 
Edna Lumpkin 
Myrtle McGrath 
Velma McNeal 
Elizabeth May 
Elsie Minor 



128 



Julia Mister 
Hattie Mae Nevell 
Sara Omansky 
Nell Pound 
Clarice Rollings 
Vivian Rollings 
John Ruff 
Susie Saunders 
Mabel Self 
Louise Steuart 
Hazel Stump 
Elizabeth Lee Taylor 
Ethalia Thomas 
Marion Thomas 
Josephine Throckmorton 
Mozelle Virts 
Juliet Ware 
Estelle White 
Frances Whiting 
Mildred Wiltshire 
Mildred Gwaltney 



THE BATTLEFIELD^. 




NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 




^iano department 



Miss Nora Churchill Willis, Instructor 

Frances Abbitt Virginia Frazier Anna Noel! 

Parke Anderson Beatrice Gallaglier Sallv Norris 

CJladys Beck Grace Giannotti Mildred Olds 

Hilda L. Belote Lilv Gregory Elsie Page 

Tilda T. Belote Anna Paige Green Elizabeth Payne 

Maude Booth Edna Griffin Margaret Phillips 

Geraldine Bruster Maria Groton John RuflF 

Miriam Carmel Flora Jett Irene Rogers 

Herma Childress Rosalie Kilmon Josephine Smith 

Katherine Coatcs Virginia McCarthy Alice Stone 

Virginia Cockrell Roberta McKenney Annie Stotz 

Elaine Connelly Fav Martin Alice Wilkins 

Elizabeth Decker Jul'ia Mister Claudia Wilkins 

Ruby Dratt Elizabeth Moody Frances Walker 

Doris Driscoll Marguerite Wine 



129 




130 



THE BATTLEFIELD#^itT[^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



?|ifems Club 






ET'S go girls! Fall in by twos! Ready! Left! Left! 
Left! One! Two! Three! Four! Let's sing "Skitter- 
merink," etc. These and similar shouts greet the ears of the 
passers-by as the Hiking Club swings past of a Saturday 
morning, all pepped up for a brisk tramp over hill and 
dale. It may be rough, it may be smooth, it may be mud, or it may be 
snow, but always it's heaps and heaps of fun as through briar patches, 
under barbed-wire fences and over rickety stiles, the hikers wend their 
way. The trying and sometimes serio-comic experience of losing or other- 
wise damaging one's attire does not dampen the sportsmanlike spirit of 
"There or bust," for a sport's a sport for a' that, and we gradually climb 
to the "Castle of Good Health." So what say you, girls? Three cheers 
for the Hiking Club : Hip ! Hip ! Hooray ! 



90em6er0 



Bevans, Pratt 
Blanton, Catherine 
Bonniwell, Lois 
Booth, Willie 
Brooks. Lily Mae 
Cain, Lucille 
Carmil. Miriam 
Chappell, Charlotte 
Collins. Annie 
Conn, Estelle 
Conn, Esther 
Cooke. Emma L. 
Cooper, Frances 
Everette, Catherine 
Eubank, Mildred 
Field, Evelvn 
Fisher, Sad'ie 
Freidman, Rose 
Graham, Margaret 
Graham, Osie 
Hale, Matilda 
Hamburg, Lena 



Hamilton, Lois 
Hankla, Emily 
Hanmcr, Dorothy 
Harding, Catherine 
Hatchett, Kitt> 
Headly, Council 
Hiller, Cecillia 
Hundly, Frances 
Jacobs, Esther 
Johnson, Ruby 
Jones, Susie 
Juren, Sara 
Lane, Rosa 
Levy, Freeda 
Lokey, Marion 
Lynch, Louise 
Masters, Mildred 
Mears, Corday 
Miller, Edna 
Mills, Helen 
Morecock, Betty 
Morris, Ruby 
Musselman, Virginia 

131 



O'Brien, Virginia 
Omanskv, Sara 
Phillips,' Ruth 
Ponton, Ruth 
Ponton, Willis 
Quinn, Mary 
Righter, Bertha 
Rosenblatt, Annie 
Rosenblatt, Frances 
Saunders, Susie 
Smith, Dorothy 
Sutton, Margaret 
Thomas, Jessie Lee 
Thomas, Ethalia 
Throckmorton, Josephine 
Tiller, Dorothy 
Walcott, Emily 
Walker, Sally B. 
Warmer, Virge 
Weger, Kate 
Wilkinson, Dorothy 
Wirth, Faith 



THE BATTLEFIE LD^^lj^i^J^NmCT^BJJ^^^-FIVE 




Jf ire department 



CommanDer 

Frances E. Abbitt 



Katherine Micks 
Elsie Minor 



Page Harrison 
Miriam Carmel 
Mildred Chase 
Eloise Brown 
Marian Davis 
Verle Garner 



Chiefs 



Captains 



Madolyk Carpenter 
Kathleen Kessler 



Jessie Roberts 
Rachel Chenault 
Helen Frothingham 
Elizabeth Moore 
Lucy Billingsly 

132 



Alice Goldsvvorthy 
Jessie Squire 
Mildred Kindervater 
Estelle White 
Madeline Milbank 
Doris Beard 



THE BATTLEFIELD^.^P^I^NINETEEN TWEN^M 




€ntre=i^ou£; 



Latin anD JFrencJ) 

I !eu?--de-Lis 

President Wanda Fox Vice-President Kathleen Kessler 

Secretary Elizabeth Johnson Treasurer Jessie Doughtie 



Jessie Lee Thomas 
Lois Henr\' 
Eva Duncan 
Susie Broaddus 
Olive Hall 
Ethel Godsey 
Mildred Chase 
Catherine Blanton 



Elizabeth Moore 
Dorothy Maney 
Julia Ellison 
Carmen Mejia 
Alice Stone 
Fannie Pollard 
Fay Martin 
Frances Wallcer 

133 



Virginia Biscoe 
Grace Mason 
Katherine Mears 
Anna Paige Green 
Elizabeth Sokes 
Aileen Headley 
Lily Mae Brooks 
Virginia Cockrell 
Nancy Warren Gray 



THE BATTLEFlELDifl 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




eastern ^fjore Club 



Officers 

President Dorothy Chandler 

Vice-President Reva Russell 

Secretary-Treasurer Elise Taylor 



Hilda Belote 
Lois Bonniwell 
Edith Costin 
Bertie Drummond 
Mildred Drummond 
Eva Duncan 
Hamner Dunkley 



90cm6ers 

Annie Gladstone 
Ethel Godsey 
Maria Groton 
Susie Guy 
Grace Mason 
Myrtle McGrath 
Kathryn Mears 



Julia Mister 
Margaret Phillips 
Margaret Stringer 
Kathryn Warren 
Nellis Waterfield 
Edna Webb 
Susie Jones 



134 



THE BATTLE FlELD#liCm^a^NlNETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 




i:itjin Citj) Club 



2E)ffiC£r0 



President 

Secretary- Treasurer . 



...Betsy B.assett 
..Emily Fle.ming 



Norma Kellam 
Margaret McCarrick 
Carmen Mejia 
Faith Wirth 
Katherine Harding 
Cecelia Hiller 



Mtmbtv& 

Georgie Overman 
Frances Rosenblatt 
Anna Rosenblatt 
Virginia O'Brien 
Annie Stotz 
Thelma Lynch 

135 



Edna Griffith 
Lena Hamburg 
Ida Lubkovitz 
Willie Booth 
Madelyn Thornhill 
India Diggs 



THE 



; NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 




Mott\)tvn Mnk Club 

©fficers 

President Mary McKenney 

Vice-President Velma McNeal 

Secretary Katherine Coates 

Faculty Adviser , Mrs. A. B. Chandler 

Motto: Rambling 

Flower: Wild Violet Colors: Violet and Silver 

Song: Running Wild 

Maud Booth Alma Gardner Nancy Lee Mabel Simmons 

Mrs. A. B. Chandler Frances Gresham Marion Lokie Josephine Smith 

Olivia Chase Elsie Haynie Edna Lumpkin Mary Snyder 

Katherine Coates Council Headley Mary McKenney Flora Spriggs 

Virginia Cockrell Mary Hatton Velma McNeal Mabel Tovvles 

Elaine Connelly Genevieve Jackson Elizabeth Muir Alice Wilkins 

Marion Davis Myrtice James Aphra Moore Caludia Wilkins 

Ruth Forrester Katherine Jenkins Annie Parks Barbara Woolan 

Beatrice Gallagher Flora Jett Mabel Self 

136 



THE BATTLEFIELD^^fi^^l^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




)OUtf}ttie£(t 'Virginia Cluti 

"In the Blue Ridge Mountains rjf J'irginia, 
On the Trail of the Lonesome Fine" — 



Motto: "United We Climb" 



Floiver: Mountain Laurel 



President Virginia Frazier 

Secretary-Treasurer LouiSE Lyn'CH 



Margaret Engleby 
Virginia Boyd 
Margaret Sutton 



Marion Thomas 
Mrs. C. L. Bushnell 
Miss Elizabetli Moran 



Parke Anderson 
Geraldine Bruster 
Hazel Stump 



137 



TH E BATTLEFIELD^^fe^ ^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Caroline anli ^pott^plbania Club 

iiiiiiii 

President Helen Mills 

Vice-President Gladys Gray 

Treasurer RuBY Dratt 

Secretary SuSlE BroadduS 

Motto: "A live wire never gets stepped on." 

Colors: Purple and Gold 

Flower: Pansy 

138 



THE BATTLEFIELDi 



rl^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




JIampton i^oabfi Club 

IIIUIII 

President Anne Murray 

Vice-President VIRGINIA Branch 

Secretary-Treasurer CoRDAY jMears 



^emtiers 



Virginia Branch 
Elizabeth May 
Gwendolyn Lincoln 
Elizabeth Sheppard 
Mary Quinn 
Anne Collins 
Edna Miller 
Marion Clarke 
Sadie Fisher 



Mildred Masters 
Kate VVeger 
Sadie Levinson 
Cjrace Harper 
Mazie Amory 
Lily Mae Brooks 
M riam Carmel 
Virginia \^^right 
Helen Frothingham 
Esther Jacobs 

139 



Freda Levy 
Lois Hamilton 
Mabel Jester 
Emma Cooke 
Estelle Conn 
Laura Rhodes 
Ruth Clark 
Ethel Conn 
Frances Cooper 



THE BATTLEFlELDif ^p|p^!^,NlNET^ TWENTY-FIVE 




Zht Cea Eoom 



"That's where my money goes." Pies, candy, tarts, ice cream, sandwiches. 
Where? "The Little Red Lane" — all to swell the coffers of the Student Building 
Fund. 

The Tea Room is open from 8 :30 A. M. until 5 P. AL and again at recrea- 
tion hour. All hours of the day girls may be found there, eating and drinking — a 
regular coffee house. 

Here's to the Alumnae Building! 
May her coffers continue to fill! 



Cf)e Little KeD Lane 



Sand'u 



To the Little Red Lane lue isend our it 
No matter nv/iat or ii'hen the day. 
For there ice find good things to eat; 
I tell the truth, they can't be beat. 
Pies and tarts, puffs and cake — 
The very best that they can bake. 

To the Little Red Lane we irend on 
Why not be "broke" another day? 



hes, sandii-iches, five and ten — 
Oli-ves, cheese, their salvor lend. 
Finest sundaes, drinks and candy. 
H' ho said those "dancgs" iceren't simply dandy? 
Blackest coffee, piping hot, 
.ind Waffles that just hit the spot. 



cay- 



140 




THE BATTLEFlELD#apTT|li^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



^too gear #ratiuateg W^o J|abc laeturneti 
to College 



iiiiiiii 

C/ieers here can best he led 
By Juliet Ware, ivith hair so red; 
It's true she makes a lot of noise. 
But she is back training her foice. 

Elizabeth Morrison left us in '21. 
But the task ivas nnt done; 
Of Physical Ed. she iL-as in quest. 
So she returned for her B. S. 

Helen Mills, our "Little" Math, shark. 
Can work Algebra in the dark; 
That is the result, you can plainly see. 
Of returning to college far her degree. 

Myrtle Biscoe, better known as "Mutt," 
Did not want to he a nut; 
She did a wise thinci. you'll all agree; 
She came back to F. S. T. C. 

In nineteen hundred and twenty-three, 
Mary Lightner returned to S. T. C; 
The question is: "Was it Gym or Jack 
Tha: made our Eittle Mary come hack?" 

Lucy Houston, our little pee-wee, 

Left Normal School ranks in '23; 

Now she is back in Fredericksburg College, 

In Physical Ed. to gain great knowledge. 

Gladys Gray, witty and jolly. 
Discovered in one year the folly 
Of trying to teach school without a degree; 
So that's why she came back, you see. 

"Two-year graduates," one and all. 
Whether you are targe or small. 
We want you at State Teachers' College — 
Come back and increase your knowledge. 



Miss Josephine Seville, the first four-year graduate of this college, is teaching 
Commercial Education at Emporia, Virginia. 



Miss Frances Ecicenrode, who took her degree in '23, is staying at home wifli 
her parents. 

The three young ladies who tooic their degrees last year — namely, Misses Sally 
Norris, Leah Lewis, and Molly Coates — are back at the college this year. Miss 
Norris is engaged in teaching Public School Music; Miss Lewis is in the Art Depart- 
ment, and Miss Coates is giving half-time to work in the Dean's office and half-time 
to teaching Commercial subjects. 

141 



^ ^^^FIELDif ^^J^^NINETEEN TWEN^^^E 




^tjenanboaf) ^allep Club 

iiiiiiii 

President Irene Long 

Vice-President Mildred Wiltshire 

Secretary John Ruff 

Motto: "The Higher the Ch'mb, the Broader the View" 

Flower: Trailing Arbutus 

^em6er0 

Marguerite Wine Virginia McCarthy Maude Hockman 

Nelle Wine Mary Marshall ' Doris Beard 

Maude Corder Virginia Davis Mrs. Ruff 

142 



THE BATTLEF1ELD#^^1|1^N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



(iob'si Country 



/. 

Oh! the long, red road zvhich winds around, 
Over hill and dale, where good health' s found! 
How I love to ride, or on foot to roam, 
Far of from people, all outdoors, home, — 
Till my lungs are filled, and viy heart is thrilled 
With the sweet, fresh air of winds distilled; 
■ While my pulse heats fast with keen delight. 
And my soul drinks in with joy the sight 
Of rivers and fields, of flowers and trees, — 
Hotv the touch of Nature my heart doth please! 



II. 



My soul, unfettered, all good doth share, 

Alone with Nature, so pure and fair, — 

/ seem to nestle near earth' s breast, 

As earth' s red sail by my feet is pressed, 

And so I'm happy, until (sad fate), 

I need must return to where men hate. 

And there, midst turmoil and strife and dread, 

Cover my soul, while I earn my bread 

For another week, till again I'm free 

To go forth once more and God' s face see. 

And hear His voice (though it's still and small). 

Out of earth' s goodness, unto me call ; 

Now my soul responds, and I am glad once more. 

In God' s ozcn country, truth to adore. 

— Selected. 



143 




THE BATTLEFIELD 



NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



^t)e i^eb Jleab 0ivi 



There are cj'irls zvitli eyes o' blue, 

And curly locks so fair, 
But she isn't any szceeter 

Than viv girl Kith her bright red hair. 

There are girls ivho attract attention 
U^ith brown curls, oh! so rare, 

But she doesn't cast a shadoxv 

.hound my girl's bright red hair. 

Some girls are chosen beauties. 

The world will all declare. 
But among them will be shining 

Mv girl with her bright red hair. 

LUCV HOBSON. 



(\-^ -j 



144 




145 



THE BATTLEFIEL^^^^^^^lNETE^^^^r^ 

Pallatre ^ftletic 



iiiiiiii 

Perhaps some tweiity years or more, 

PFIien all who once were here are far 
Aivay, forgetful of the store 

Of niem'ries, dim as yonder star, 
Ji'ith Algebra and Latin on a par, 

Ji'ith Social Science in its dim decay, 
A thought will come, grim as the Russian Czar,- 

Yes, you will think of our Athletic Day! 

Perhaps you will recall a?ieiu. 

In consternation ever strong. 
Your old excuses, used in lieu 

Of getting tangled in that throng 
That raced around the track so long ; 

And you, sad you, forgot to weigh 
Your vaules, cut your class — did wrong, — 

Yes, you U'ill think of our Athletic Day! 

So7ne far-off day, when it is cold. 

And hifnig snow blow's through the air. 
Then you will think of that old 

Icy gym, and all your troubles there. 
Some day, some hot June day so rare. 

When summer sun sends sizzling ray, 
A page from out your mem'ry tear; 

Yes, you will think of our Athletic Day! 

Envoy 

Some hour when you have ne'er a care. 
You'll think of what I've had to say ; 

And you'll re-live the Past with bitter stare. 
Yes, you will think of our Athletic Day! 
— Muss. 

146 




F1THOC5 



THE BATTLEFIELDif Ig™-3;^N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



iiiiiiii 
Athletic Club - - - 




PAGE 

149 


Athletic Cheer Leaders 
Basketball Squads 


Committees, 


Sc 


HEDULES ISO 
151 


Senior-Junior Teams 
Baseball | 






152 


Tennis 1 
Basketball 






153 


Sophomore Teams 
Baseball ] 






154 


Tennis \ 
Basketball 






155 


Freshman Teams 
Baseball 1 






156 


Tennis f 
Basketball 






157 


Roll Call 






158 


Hockey 

Senior-Sophomore } 
Junior-Freshman j 






-._ .- 159 









147 



--Jzz^^. 



THE B ATTLEFlELD#gp^1 ^NlNE 



^PiUj> #oattE:ale! 




NE clear January night three stealthy figures were seen coming 
slowly down the road. They were moving haltingly, for one 
of the trio didn't particularly care to go; indeed, several 
times he flatly refused to budge. He was none other than 
our hero, Billy, of the Goat family, while his friends (?) 
were the Misses Musselman and Hatchett. You see, Billy was a very 
intelligent animal, and he just knew that he was the Soph's goat; further- 
more, he was rather proud of such an honor. Suddenly he had a happy 
inspiration and decided upon the spot to make a wild dash for freedom 
(as all heroes do, sooner or later). So he dashed away, and his captors 
dashed after him. Fate was against him, for bearing down upon him 
appeared a two-eyed monster, alias Automobile, and out of this jumped 
two boys, who joined in the chase. 

That was a valiant fight, my readers, but I regret to say that, since 
he was one and they were four, he was again taken captive and put into 
the car. Suddenly several Sophs spied the car and bore down upon it; 
and then began the GREAT GOAT FIGHT that shall go down upon 
the pages of History in S. T. C. It was a good fight, though, and a very 
courageous one, even if there were just a few Sophs against the swarm 
of Freshmen. Finally the Sophs did recapture their goat, and as Billy 
had fought so heroically for his side, he was allowed to eat another crate 
of celery. Completing this satisfying task, he departed in peace, having 
cut his little niche in the Hall of Fame. 

Sophomore Goatee. 




... . I. .1.1.1... ii. I 




148 



IY7^ 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




'^^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




^tijletic Club 



Committees 



Officers 



Anne Murray Refreshment Indie Sinclair President 

Elizabeth Crismond Entertainment Lena Johnson Vice-President 

Marian Clarke Advertisement JuHet Ware Secretary- 
Jane Whitehead Decorating Lois Henry Treasurer 

Motto: 
"There is but one temple in the Universe, 
and that is the body of man." — Novalis. 



We're the girls of Fredericksburg you hear so much about. 
The people turn and stare at us whenever we go out. 
We're noted for our wisdom, and the clever things we do. 
Most everybody likes us. We hope vou like us, too. 
Yipsy— Yow! Vow! Yipsy— Yee! Yee! 
Yipsy — Yow ! Yow ! Soak 'em Varsity ! 

We will rough-neck 

'Til they holler, Cut it out, out, out! 

Say! Saj- what? 

That's what I What's what? 

That's what they all say! What do they all say? 
Fredericksburg! 

149 



THE BATTLEFIELD^. 




iNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




^tjletic Club 



Cfteet jLeaDetg 

Juliet Ware Gladys Gillet 

Elizabeth Crisimond 



Committees 



^cfteDuIes of jFirst anD ^econD ^quaD ©ames 

SCORE 

Feb. 7, 1925 — Fredericksburg vs. Marjorie Webster, at Washington 28-16 

Feb. 14, 1925 — Fredericksburg vs. University of South CaroHna 32-26 

Feb. 28, 1925 — Fredericksburg vs. Richmond City Normal, at Richmond 50-26 

Mar. 5, 1925 — Fredericksburg vs. William and Mary 31-20 

Mar. 7, 1925— Fredericksburg vs. Marjorie Webster ^ 75-29 

Mar. 14, 1925— Fredericksburg vs. C. & 50-0 



150 



THE BATTLEFIELDjff f^^lJ^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




i6l^^ 







jTitst l^arsitp 



Page Harrison'^ Manager 

Hilda Belote Katharine Micks 

Dorothy Maney Jessie Squire 

Teclcla Driefus Ruhr Lee Blavdes 



Rachel Chexault, Captain 

Lena Johnson 
Indie Sinclair 
Virginia Musselman 



Anne Hogan 
Kittv Hatchett 




^cconD Varsity ciaudia wiikins 

Elizabeth Crismond Mildred Eubank Matilda Hale Miriam Carmel 

Bertha Norman Elmer Norman Ruth Ponton Mary Hatton 

151 



™£^^TLEF1ELD#^^51^^^N1NETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




^enior<31uniot ISasefiall 

Helen Mills Frances Abbitt Elizabeth Morrison 

Mary Lightner Virginia Boyd Page Harrison 

Gladys Gray Indie Sinclair Lucv Houston 



Ccnnis 

Singles 
Page Harrison 




Cennis 

Doubles 
Page Harrison 
Indie Sinclair 



152 



THE BATTLEFIELD# 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




^enior=3Iunior IBasbetball 



Frances Walker Juliet Ware Elizabeth Morrison 

Pep Williams Lucy Houston Helen Mills 

Indie Sinclair Page Harrison V^irginia Boyd 

Our class spirit's never dead ; 

Our team's gonna rise again! 
We're gonna win, that's what we said; 

Our team's gonna rise again! 

Chorus 
I know it. 

Yes, I knows it — Whee ! 

Our team's gonna rise again ! 

Down in de gym upon our knees ; 

Our team's gonna rise again ! 
Thought I heard those sneeze ; 

Our team's gonna rise again ! 

153 



THE BATTLEFIELD^ 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Lois Henrj' 
Elsie Minor 
Marion Clarice 



^opt)omote IBaseliall Ceam 



Mildred Gwaltney 
Council Headley 



Cope Evans 
Rachel Chenault 



Lena Johnson 
Ruby Lee Blaydes 
Miriam Carmel 



Cennis 

Singles 

Madolyn 
Carpenter 




Ccnnis 

Doubles 

Emily Fleming 
Lena Johnson 



154 



THE 



NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




^opf)omote '2i3a0feet6all Ceam 



Rachel Chenault, Capt. 
Katherine Micks 
Elizabeth Crismond 



Kathleen Kessler 
Lena Johnson 
Cope Evans 

155 



Dorothy Maney 
Miriam Carmel 
Ruby Lee Blaydes 



THE BATTLEFlELD#™p^l3^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




jFre0i)man IBasefiall 

Top Line {left to right)— ^3.\\k B. Walker, Hilda Belote, Mildred Eubank, 
Dorothy Hanmer, Alma Gardner. 
Second Line — Grace Mason, Matilda Hale, Athalia Thomas. 
Bottom Line — Virginia Musselman, Anne Hogan, Claudia Wilkins (Captain). 



Cennis 

Doubles 




Cennis 

Singles 

Virginia 
Musselman 



156 



THE BATTL^^LD#.^fe|5[l1^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




,..,, ,^, , jTtcs&man TBasketball ,. .r , 

Mildred Jiubank V irginia Alusselman 

Anne Hogan Teckla Driefus 

Dorothy Hanmer Irene Pepmier 

Alary Hatton Claudia Wilkins 

Katherine Hatchett (Captain) 

€btet Leaders 

Gillet Lynch 

157 




THE BATTLEFIELD^agW^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



mmtit EoU Call 



Cenni0 

In doubles, Kittle and Flo went down in defeat, after a strenuous 
and valiant battle. The Sophs were as surprised as we, but poor things — 
they wanted it so badly. 

The sad, sad story repeated itself in singles, when Musselman and 
Harrison spent two afternoons trying to decide which should have the 
honors. Page won, but we don't care. We beat them all yelling, anyway. 

l5mtbaU 

We practiced baseball in gym classes until there wasn't a spot on the 
floor or the ceiling that we hadn't hit, and we had a good team, if we 
do say it ourselves. Our swipes at that ball would have done credit to 
Babe Ruth, and in the way of baseball, as in other things, we didn't let 
a thing get by us. So when the Sophs beat the Seniors, we prepared to 
beat or bubst. Say! That was some game! Hogan's twirls had them 
all rattled, and Gardner put them out on first like clockwork. The queer 
thing was that in the end they pulled us for a higher score, and managed 
to win 1 We challenged them to a second game, but forgot to put R. S. 
V. P. on the letter. We never heard from them. 



IBasbettiall 

The crisis of our athletic lives came in basketball. Everybody in the 
Freshman class came out for the team, and those who didn't make it were 
sports and remained to yell. In the first game with Sophs, we were so 
busy getting their goat that they turned around and got ours, to the tune 
of 31-26. 

The next night we nearly doubled their score, and the balconies 
almost came down on us when we won — 28-16. 

The tie was played off finally, and the Sophomores won, in spite of 
our efforts. We congratulate them, and we realize that, after all, it's 
not who won or lost, but how we played the game — and we did our best. 

158 



THE BATTLE F1ELD#? 



^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




3[unior— Jftesftman IDockep ^quaD 



Claudia Wilkins 
Hilda Belote 
Anne Hogan 
Matilda Haile 
Luc\' Houston 



Lucy Hobson 
Dorothy Hamner 
Willie Ponton 
Mildred Eubank 
Ruth Ponton 
Mary Hatten 



Virginia Boyd 
Madeline Carpenter 
Kitty Hatchett 
Irene Long 
Teckla Dreifus 



o 




w 


1 




1 


g. 









§iop{)omore— Senior Iljocbep ^quaD 



Elizabeth Crismond 
Emilv Fleming 
Ruby Lee Blaydes 
Frances Abbitt 
Jessie Squire 



Dorothy Maney 
Anne Murray 
Katherjne Micks 
Cope Evans 
Frances Hundley 
Charlotte Chappell 

159 



Lena Johnson 
Rachel Chenault 
Indie Sinclair 
Miriam Carmel 
C^eraldine Bruste 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^pjy^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 

d^ur Virginia 

/. 

Our J'irginial bright, merry land. 

Beyond expression dear! 
I know there is no fairy land. 
No country e'er by God planned. 

So filled zi'ith all good cheer ; 
Dear land of tenderness and love, 

Bless'd land of joy and beauty. 
Thy virtues all men must approve, — 

Brave land of faith and duty! 

II. 

Thy mountains grand and lowlands green 

Bring wealth and plenty forth. 
No fairer State ivas ever seen 
Than Thou — who sittest like a Queen 

Between the North and South; 
Thy sons (my heart has confessed) 

Are noblest and most true ; 
Thy daughters are the loveliest 

That e'er in this ivorld grew. 

III. 
Here — where my fathers wrought and fought. 

And lived — and loved — and died; 
Here where the breath of life I caught 
And of the love of God was taught, 

Hoiv bless'd it is to bide; 
For, oh! thy fields the fairest are. 

Thy hills and dales the dearest. 
Thy skies are bluest — and each star 

Shines over thee the clearest. 

IV. 

Glad are the streams that through thee flow. 

Smooth are thy broad bay's ivaters. 
All good on thee God doth bestow. 
But, better than all else I knozv. 

Are thy brave sons and daughters; 
Dear land of liberty and peace. 

Of happiness and glory 
There never ivas a lovelier place. 

In truth, — nor yet in story. 

— Selected. 

160 



on 



THE BATTLEFIELD#M(m=35&NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



®t)C2ie arc tfje 
'SI' 



>w»> 



¥ 

ViRGiNiy\ Williams Most Talented 

Cecilia McLaughlin_ Best Dancer 

Agnes Curtis Prettiest 

Jessie Squire Most Athletic 

Juliet Ware Best All Round 

Ella Talley _' Most Original 

Emily Hankla Most Studious 

Betsy Bassett Most Popular 



162 




'A fiatier'ing painter ix-ho made it his care 
To draiv men as they ought to he — not as they are." 

— GOLDSxMITH. 

163 



Q^ost CalenteD 




I3est Dancer 



"But, oh! site dances sucJi a iiay 
No sun upon an Easter Day 
Is half so fine a sight." — Suckling. 



164 



^*:.- 




"And her face so fair — stirred i^it/i her dream 
As rose leaves ijith the air. 

— Byron. 

165 



Prettiest 




Q^ost athletic 



"He that climbs the tall tree 
Hath icon the right to the fruit.' 
— Scott. 



166 




"ff'/io does the best his circumstances alio 
Acts nobly; angels could do no more." 



does icell- 
— Young. 



13e0t ail EounD 



167 




9io0t ©tiginal 



168 



"H'e can he more clever than o 

But not more clei'er than all." 

— La Rochefoucauld. 




"Whence is thy ieiirn'ing? Hath iky toil 
O'er books consum'd the midnight oil?" 
—Gay. 



169 



^ost ^tuDious 










^ 



170 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 



l^antierlu£(t 



I'd give my soul for a ship toilny, 
A ship all silver and rose ; 

I'd take you zvith me and sail away 
To the "Land of Ko-One-Knoius." 

We'd laugh and love in pagan glee 
And count the stars by night; 

JVe'd swim and lie in a turquoise sea 
Like shadows dark and light. 



Cele McLaughlix, '25. 



171 



THE BATTLEFIELD^.? 



i^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



0ii^^ Hutintia'g Bis^appointmcnt 




ISS LUCINDA was very busy. In fact, she had been busy 
quite two hours. She had baked a chicken, made biscuits, 
and she was now engaged in making a cake. As this was a 
rather difficult task, Miss Lucinda's face was careworn and 
tired. Perhaps you are wondering why she should be so 
careful with this particular cake. The reason is very simple. Miss 
Lucinda, being a strict and faithful church member, was, of course, obliged 
to invite the pastor to supper; and the fact that the pastor was a widower 
with no children and a good salary did not tend to decrease the lavishness 
of the good lady's preparation, though, of course, I do not mean to infer 
that this influenced her at all. 

Miss Lucinda finished the cake and set it away; she inspected the 
biscuits to see if they were brown enough, and glanced at the chicken. 
This done, she proceeded to lay the cloth. She loaded the table with her 
choicest silver and whitest china, and as soon as the chicken appeared to 
her practiced eye to be well done and good enough for even a minister, 
she placed it on the table. Then, after adding the other dishes which were 
to contribute to the good cheer of the meal, she inspected the cake. Find- 
ing it to be absolutely perfect, she sat down to wait for her visitor. All 
at once she jumped up. 

"Well, I do declare," she exclaimed, "if I haven't forgot to take off 
this apron, and my hair ain't combed, and I ain't got a speck of powder 
on my face !" 

She fled to her bedroom, dropping her apron as she ran. 
A few minutes later a buggy, drawn by a bony, long-necked horse, 
drew up to the gate; and there issued from the buggy no less a person 
than the Reverend Mr. Brown, of the Methodist Church. The Reverend 
Mr. Brown was very tall and thin; he wore a black suit and a tall silk 
hat. Some contended that he had inherited it from his great-grandfather, 
but of this I am not able to judge. At any rate, the Reverend Mr. Brown, 
accompanied by his hat, which he had removed when he got out of the 
buggy, either from respect for Miss Lucinda or a tender love for the hat. 
(I am not absolutely certain as to his nature, but I am inclined to the latter 
view.) Anyway, the Reverend Mr. Brown, having tied his horse, ascended 
the steps of Miss Lucinda's cottage with a very meek and saintly air. Miss 
Lucinda, having improved her appearance in every possible way, was wait- 
ing with visible signs of nervousness for her visitor. When she heard the 
Reverend Mr. Brown's step on the porch she hastened to open the door. 

172 




THE BATTLEFIELDJf .f!ifiril[W^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



"Ah, good evening, Sister. How are you today?" tlie minister in- 
quired with a low bow. 

"I'm feelin' right well today, thank you. Brother Brown," returned 
Miss Lucinda. "Step in." 

The minister complied, and, having succeeded in depriving him of 
his hat. Miss Lucinda led the way to the dining-room. The Reverend 
Mr. Brown, having noted with great pleasure that the chicken was very 
brown, and having rapidly inspected the silver and decided that it was 
genuine, condescended to take a seat at the head of the table and began 
carving the chicken. Miss Lucinda took the foot of the table and em- 
ployed her time in a very lengthy task, namely, that of passing the various 
dishes to the hungry minister, who ate with every appearance of enjoyment. 

When he had caused the greater part of the supper to disappear. Miss 
Lucinda arose from the table and went into the pantry to get the cake. 
As soon as she disappeared the Reverend Mr. Brown jumped up and in- 
spected the contents of the china closet and buffet. Then he hurried back 
to the table and, judging by the smile that lighted up his face, the contents 
must have been highly satisfactory. 

"Yes," he murmured to himself, although of what he was speaking 
I will not attempt to guess. "Yes, I'm certainly going to ask her, and I'm 
sure she'll agree, for nobody would refuse me." 

Just then Miss Lucinda appeared, flushed, but smiling, bearing the 
wonderful cake. 

"Ah, Sister," observed Reverend Brown, with a very melancholy 
expression, "you don't know what it is not to know the comforts of home. 
I remember when my late wife was living, the meals she used to cook! 
But them times is past, and I suppose it's no use hopin'?" and he looked 
very meaningly at Miss Lucinda. 

That good lady showed such surprise (although it might have been 
joy) that she nearly dropped the cake. However, she managed to get 
the cake on the table. 

"Well, I don't know, Brother Brown," she returned with a very sweet 
smile. "You know you can always hope." 

The Reverend Mr. Brown was so overjoyed at this that he ate four 
slices of cake in succession before he spoke again. 

"Well, Sister," he observed as soon as he swallowed the cake, "I've 
been thinking, as you're all alone and I'm alone, that it would be — " 

A sharp knock sounded at the door. Miss Lucinda, who had listened 
enraptured to the words of the Reverend Mr. Brown, hurried to the door 
with what in a less religious lady might have been termed a fit of anger, 
but, of course, in her case could not have been called more than a slight 
disappointment. She jerked open the door and confronted a small boy, 
who stood there clinging to a large flatiron. 

173 




THE BATTLEFIELD^gplTl^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



"M-Miss Lucindy?" he stammered, offering the iron to her, "Mama 
s-s-sent your iron b-back, and she says th-thank you." 

"All right, Jimmy," said Miss I.ucinda, having taken the iron, closed 
the door in his inquisitive face. Then, putting the iron down, she returned 
to her place at the table. 

"What were you s-saying, Brother Brown?" she inquired innocently. 

"Well, Sister, I mean Miss Lucinda, Ah — Lucindy, I was a-saying 
'that being's we was all alone in the wrold, we ought — ' " 

Bang! Crash! Miss Lucinda in her excitement had clutched at the 
table and swept the dish containing the remains of the chicken into the 
floor, where it lay shattered in a dozen pieces! 

"Ah, Sister! What an unfortunate accident! Allow me to assist 
you." And the distinguished pastor fell on his knees and commenced pick- 
ing up the pieces of china. When they had cleared away all evidences of 
the "unfortunate accident" the Reverend Mr. Brown once more resumed 
his seat. For some minutes he was so occupied with the cake that he did 
not attempt to make known his thoughts; but after fortifying himself with 
two slices of cake he commenced again. 

"Well, Sister, as I was a-saying" — he coughed and changed the posi- 
tion of his feet — "as I was a-saying when — " 

"Yes?" breathed Miss Lucinda. 

Footsteps sounded on the porch, a timid knock at the door. 

"Come in !" Miss Lucinda's exasperation was so great that she could 
scarcely form the words. A small girl entered and edged up to her. 

"Well, Alice?" said Miss Lucinda, very kindly considering her dis- 
appointment. (Alice was the small daughter of the widow, Mrs. Lan- 
throp, who was a beloved neighbor of Miss Lucinda's.) 

The little girl spoke in a whisper that could have been heard ten feet 
away. "Mama says if the preacher has finished eatin' you could send her 
her silver 'cause she is a-gonna have company." 

Now at this point the patience of the long-suffering lady deserted her. 
She pushed Alice outside with much force and slammed the door. Up 
to this time the Reverend Mr. Brown was a very ardent wooer, but on 
discovering that the silver belonged, not to Miss Lucinda, but to Mrs. 
Lanthrop, he found his ardor to be cooling, and he decided that, after all, 
he was not quite ready to enter matrimony. 

Miss Lucinda came back to the table with a very red face. The 
Reverend Mr. Brown tried and finally succeeded in getting out of the 
very low chair in which he had been sitting. 

"Well," he remarked, "as I was a-saying (Miss Lucinda straight- 
ened up and hope beamed once more in her eye), I reckon I'd better start 
home. It looks mighty like rain." 

Mabel Towles, '26. 
174 



THE BATTLEFIELD^^il^f^feNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 





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Hor; 



What everyone likes to dc 
Action when you first com< 
For Latin Students only, 

singular. 
May I have the next? 
Do you know this? 
What evervone thinks she 
The bane of our existence 
A very select club — abbr. 
What the Varsity did. 
The time we get up — abbr. 
Impolite for donkey. 
State of our pocket book: 

Jlusical note. Ask Miss 
Whom does Jessie like? 
State of mind often lost. 
Often slung. 
Time of History. 
Strong in us all. 
Something long in coming 
Put in anything you war 
Wliat many girls do. 
The most popular girl in ; 
Where He goes — abbr. 
Same as 79. 



>ica} 



Ending of genitiv 



Long looked forward to. 

What we will weigh in June. 

A Freshman. Also a pet found in man 

Old spelling for xou. 

Mildred Crawfofd's idea of Heaven. 

A preposition. We couldn't think of 

Sentiniental for lover. 

A man's name. Ask Henriet. 

The first thing we do when our trunks ■ 

We don't know. Do you? It sound 

Who sends us checks? 
We all like to do this. 
That American as we speak it. 
For Dr. Young's History class Geog. 
of the Western hemispheri 



We don 

An excellent excl; 
Always present in tinii 
Latin again. 
What the goat said. 
Cele's favorite animal, 
What we do with our 
We like to look just- 
Exclamation. 
What the smart ones 
A rare but pleasant s 
Where we go at 7:15. 



blow up. 
used by girls, 
f sickness. 



175 




THE BATTLEFIELD#^gf^1^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Wf^ol — a JfregJjman 



U'ho is it comes in September 

With a question-mark on her face 

And knocks on the doors of S. T. C. 
To be ushered to her proper place? 
A FRESHMAN. 

Who is it begins work ivith assurance 

Of receiving grand grades and great fame. 

Since she is a graduate of a high school 
Which has such a ivonderful name'? 

A FRESHMAN. 

Who is it receives "C" on English, 
Which causes much indignation. 

Because in her wonderful high school 
"C" was considered condemnation? 
A FRESHMAN. 

U ho is it drops her high school importance 
And begins the new task with vim. 

And with sleeves rolled up and collar turned i, 
Goes after the thing and wins? 
A FRESHMAN. 

Who is it, true to her studies, 

True to her college sports. 
Plays in the games or yells in the yells 

To give her college support? 
A FRESHMAN. 



176 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



m 



I^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




iSational S>f)rine 

Dedicated May 9, J92S 



177 



B^^^XIi^XSP^flffl^^^''^^'^^^'^ TWENTY-FIVE 




Kenmore Day 



pefore a JSational g^ftrine — **i^enmore'* 



iiiiiiii 




N May the ninth, in the year of Our Lord, one thousand nine 
hundred and twenty-five, "Kenmore" was dedicated, thereby 
becoming a Shrine of these United States of America. 

Some one has said that in each age a few men of genius 
undertake to cHmb the steep ascent towards the stars — men 
who are the world's chosen personahties standing above the cloud-Hne of 
history. A chosen few they are who make the climb, either of their own 
volition or because they hear the call to service, and hearing, answer with — 
Service. It is sadly true that the Moving Pageant of men and women is 
slow to acknowledge these men, valiant of heart, mighty in purpose, noble 
of soul, who, like a Washington, pay the price. But of a surety decades 
and centuries eventually interpret aright the motive, the purpose, evaluate 
the cost to these who served to the death and, lo ! then it is that a nation 
looks on these, their sons, and seeing them in a clear white light, under- 
stands their greatness of soul. Then it is a nation gives, exhaustlessly, its 
love and gratitude. 

178 




THE BATTLEFIELD#afeS|iNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



And so it was that on a rare day in May, the Httle city of Fredericlcs- 
burg and thousands of visitors who made their pilgrimage from far and 
near paused for an hour and a day to pay homage to the spirit of Wash- 
ington, who had known and loved the stately building standing on the 
widely sweeping lawn of "Kenmore," removed scarce a block from Medi- 
tation Rock, still keeping silent tryst with the gleaming day or the calm 
night; removed scarce a block from his mother's home, between whose 
great rows of box-woods he and the matchless Lafayette walked in the 
quiet of lavendar-scented garden, while they talked of the Birth of a 
Nation — America. Here on this day of dedication matrons in high pow- 
dered coiffure and hooped skirts strolled with dignity; exquisite young girls 
in frocks of lacy flounces and garden hats made their courtesy; tiny chil- 
dren, clad in quaintly long dresses, bewitched all on whom they smiled; 
old-fashioned coaches rumbled through modernly paved streets; fine 
ladies and escorts in gorgeous riding habits and plumed hats sat restless 
mounts. Such was the local coloring on this lovely occasion which brought 
back to the heart, for a few hours, the tender grace of a day that is gone. 

In these surroundings, of a truth, hover the intimate associations, the 
tender memories, the battles fought in silence of soul by a heart courageous. 
Who knows but that the patriot at eventide stood beneath the trees of his 
own planting, and glimpsing the stars above keeping watch like sentinels, 
read in them a beckoning to the way of Freedom ; who knows but that in 
the dawn of fresh new days he heard from the breezes sighing through 
verdant foliage the call to lead heroic souls, following the gleam which 
would lead to holy Nationhood. 

And more and more in the centuries that are yet to be, Kenmore will 
become that sacred spot where men and women will salute with both hand 
and heart the noble Washington who read out of his life personal ambi- 
tion and seizing gleaming sword fared forth with other brave souls to 
fashion this glorious thing we call Freedom; to make of a dream this 
thing we now know as America Beautiful. 



179 



TH£ BATTLEFIELD^.^^j|^^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 




Interior of Kenmore 

180 



THE BATTLEFIELD# 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



"amo£( ©uito" 




AS, Suh, it's jest dis way, Bruddah Portah, Ah ain't got 
notin' agin dem Germans as Ah ain't lost nuthin' in France, 
an' Ah jest knows dat ef dar's any way ob stayin' out ob dat 
ahmy dat I'se gwine ter take it." 

"Brothah Portah," hearing his name and feeling that 
some recognition of the comment was expected, stretched to his full length, 
winked an eye, then unconcernedly resumed his nap in the sunniest corner 
of the sunny woodshed. Amos whittled on in silence. A gay little breeze 
danced around to where the perturbed negro sat deep in thought. With 
the gay little breeze came odors of baking gingerbread. The look of 
anxiety on that darky's face gradually gave way to a grin which spread 
until it reached from ear to ear. Smacking his lips in anticipation and 
sniffing the air like a hound on the chase, Amos turned kitchenward. 

Before he reached his destination, however, he heard the squawking 
of hens in the vicinity of the flower garden and Miss Lucy's angry voice. 
Nearer and nearer she came. Her presence roused him to action. 

"O, Lawd, halp us. Miss Lucy am a-comin' an yo' knows her." 

Amos gathered all his strength for one mighty race and started for 
the flower garden. He cleared the fence at one leap and was upon the 
astonished chickens before they could escape. After he put them back into 
their coop he stopped for a season of resting. Amos often had seasons of 
resting. He was as trifling a negro as ever breathed; he toiled not, neither 
did he spin. Working only when he could not get out of it, sleeping at 
any hour and at any place that he could slip a nap, and eating everything 
that came within his range — he was the epitome of undesirable labor, 
with, so far as could be ascertained, only one redeeming characteristic — 
his amiable disposition, and that was too amiable at times. 

While Amos was resting his mind wandered back to the subject which 
occupied most of his thoughts — his joining the army, or, to be more exact, 
his not joining. To save his life, he could see no way out. The Judge 
had tried to appeal to his patriotism, but to no avail. 

"Why, Amos, you join the army, get you a new uniform, and the 
next thing you know it's 'Good-bve Timmonsville; Hello, France.' " 

"Naw, suh, Jedge, Fse afearcu dat it's gwine ter be 'Good-bye, Tim- 
monsville; Hello, Saint Petah.' Ah don't want ter be a-walkin' no golden 
streets jest yet." 

Judge Talbert, knowing the coon as he did, was not worrying about 
Amos and his golden streets ! 

181 



IHE ^^EFlELD#.^^^t^^NlNETEEN TWE^Y-FIYE 

As he sat there meditating odors of gingerbread came most insistently 
to his nostrils — gingerbread such as only Amos' espoused knew how to 
bake. He picked himself up and again started toward the kitchen. 

He passed the open library window and heard voices within. Lean- 
ing closer, he heard the Judge reading the paper to his daughter. 

"The War Department today declared John Heyward unfit for any 
army service on account of partial blindness. IVIr. Heyward is one of 
Timmonsville's promising young men, and — " 

Amos had heard enough. Light dawned in his eye. He scratched 
his head, gazed into space a moment, then proceeded with renewed energy 
around the corner of the house. As he neared the kitchen steps, he began 
to walk falteringly. He felt his way along the wall, fumbled at the back 
door and finally let himself into the presence of his mate, who, eyeing him 
with apparent indifference, continued her "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." 
He was the kind who had to be ignored. 

Woman's love is an elastic thing — it needs must stretch to cover a 
multitude of failings. Now, whether or not 'Liza's feeling toward her 
husband were of that nature, we cannot say. However, Amos thought 
so and took advantage of the situation. He groped his way toward the 
direction of the music. 

"Whah is you, 'Liza?" he asked in a quavering tone. 

Now, for Eliza to be asked where she was in broad daylight was 
something new. Her two hundred pounds were far from invisible. She 
placed her arms akimbo, looked at him steadily, and said in a voice whose 
meaning he could not mistake, "What's de mattah wid you, niggah? Git 
outen heah an' git me some coal." ' 

"Wha's de bucket, honey? I can't see it." 

"You can't see it? Why, it's a-settin' right dar undah yo nose." And 
she pointed an emphatic finger. 

"Honey, don' talk lak dat to yo' ole man; he's blind, honey. He 
cain't see." And his voice trembled convincingly. 

His tale of affliction fell on deaf ears. 

"Yas, I knows it," she answered sarcastically, "blind from settin' in 
de sun all mawnin' while I'se in heah a-makin' yo' livin'. I needs dat coal. 
Hit's most time fob dinnah, and Miss Lucy'll be mad." 

"Yas'm, dat's so. I'se done had one encounterment wid Miss Lucy 
dls mawnin' and she all but tuk de wool fum ma haid." 

Amos' eyes wandered to the serving table. There before him was 
that gingerbread. For the moment he forgot the part he had chosen to 

182 




THE BATTLEFlELD^faSWil^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



play, and he put out his hand to claim it for his own. His wife, seeing 
the movement, said in surprised tones, "Why, I sees dat youse got yo' 
eyesight back." 

"Naw'm, I ain't, honey. I kin see a lil bit out ob de left eye. I tol' 
you all de time dat Ah could see outen de lef eye. Ah, Lawd, an" to 
think dat I waz gitten ready to jine de ahmy to fight fu ma 'Liza an" to 
fight fuh ma country." And he lamented right earnestly. "O, Lawd, Fse 
scairt dey won't let me in if Fse blind. O, Lawd, O, Lawd." 

'Liza melted somewhat. "Ah don't know, honey, dey's 'xaminin' dem 
today. Mistah Doctah Abel is. Yo' go down dis aftahnoon." 

The undertaker would have been welcomed by Amos. Nevertheless, 
he went to the hall where the examinations were being made. When his 
turn came he was stationed several feet away from a chart and asked to 
read. His sight most conveniently deserted him, and he swore that he 
could not see. Hats and pencils were being held up with no better results. 

"Why, Boss, you-all ain't a-holdin' nuttin' up, is you? I cain't see 
nuttin'." 

The examiners were wise. They had dealt with just such as Amos 
before, so they passed him on. 

When that gentleman of color received notice to proceed to Army 
Service he was so dumbfounded that for once words failed him. His ruse 
was not as clever as he had thought. 

Within the week he made his debut at camp. 

Well, while there was life, there was hope — and he was still able to 
think. 

Days passed. 

One morning a lieutenant of the company, known as the "Dark 
Cloud," in conversation with the captain, asked if he had noticed a dark, 
loose-jointed darky who went around with the air of Diogenes — not look- 
ing for an honest man, but for something which he seemed to have lost; 
picking up every piece of paper he saw, examining it, throwing it down, 
over and over again, day after day. 

Even as they talked down the company street came their man, pick- 
ing up papers, throwing them down, shaking his head and muttering, 
"Naw, dat ain't it. Maybe dis is. Naw, it ain't." 

They agreed that he was a dangerous character to have around, so 
they sentenced him to the guard house. 

Days lengthened into weeks and brought no change. When he was 
released from the guard house he resumed his search as before. 

183 



T^^^^E^^^D#^p^|^feNll^E^W^^FIYE 



Application was made for his discharge. Certainly a crazy negro 
was not an asset to any army. When the necessary procedure had been 
made Amos was summoned to the captain's office. According to his cus- 
tom, he picked up a paper from the desk, examined it on both sides, and, 
shaking his head sadly, said, "Naw, suh, dat ain't it." 

The captain handed him his discharge and leaned back relieved. 

Amos looked at it carefully, then, nodding his head emphatically, 
exclaimed, "Yas, suh, dis heah am it. Hit's jest what I'se been a-lookin' 
fuh. Yas, suh, thank ye, suh!" and walked out. 

The captain looked at the lieutenant. The lieutenant looked at the 
captain. 

"Well, I'll be — " said the captain. 
"And so will I," echoed the lieutenant. 

Mildred Crawford. 






184 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



(H'ilh Apolngies to RudyarJ Kipi'mij) 

If you can rise in early morn at seven, 

When those about you sleep on thru to lunch. 
And never give a thought to one thing even, 

While you go on to zcork ivithout the bunch; 
If you can dress to make yourself attractive. 

Yet crave not every style you see displayed; 
Enjoy the love of dancing, yet not too active. 

For by those who dance the piper must be paid; 

If you can study and not make studies your master, 

Take tiotes and read them after hours have flotvn; 
If you can meet with Pass or Flunk, which spell disaster. 

And treat those two impost ers as your oicn; 
If you can master Teaching, English, and Pr. of Ed., 

And not acquire as well a prudish look, 
But stick while all others from them have fled, 

And get your "A" put down in a little red book; 

If you can take a half of your allowance 

And spend it on your best friends here and there. 
And then get a bid to his best dance 

And find there isn't enough for taxi fare; 
If you can wait for the one important letter. 

Yet stand to see those letters but none for you, 
But resolve ne'er to be a quitter, 

For tomorrow may bring you two; 

If you can talk with profs, and watch your grammar, 

Or walk with high lites, nor lose the "tiormal" touch; 
If neither girls nor loving mates can hurt you; 

If all girls count with you, but none too much; 
If you can fill the passing school day 

With twenty hours' worth of S. T. C. routine — 
Yours is Fredericksburg and everything that's in it; 

And — which is more — you'll be a sport, my mate! 

Tai.ley and Levinson. 



185 



^£^^IJ^^i£L^^'^W^^^^''^^'^^^^ TWENTY-FIVE 



^ Jf atuUj> l^omance 




NE Rainey day, a Young city guy named Lewis Tyner was 
seen riding up to the Hamlet in his big Chandler car. The 
car stopped at the village store and out he jumped, wear- 
ing several Coates to keep off the dampness. Into the store 
he dashed, and while he was purchasing a box of Norris 
candy, he was conscious of the suspicious glances of the Hicks who were 
Jess Up from the country. 

On coming out of the store, because of the dense Hayes caused by 
the rain, he got into a Willis-Knight instead of his own car. Immediately 
there arose such cries as "Hold that man ! Get the Car, Michael/" In 
a short time, however, everything was settled, and he was allowed to go 
on his Ruff way to the Garrison, just outside the village, where his bride- 
to-be awaited him. 

Arriving there, he found the bridal party in a turmoil, for, unfor- 
tunately, his fiancee had torn her Lacey gown. But the best man, Daniel 
Boje, was ingenious, as all Frenchmen are, so he called to one of her 
attendants and said, "Go look under the lilac Bush, Nell, and bring me 
that package of Gauze I saw there today." Soon, through his cleverness, 
the dress was patched, and his heroine rode to the Chappell, where they 
became the same as one ! 

On their honeymoon they chanced upon the big Clark Brothers Circus, 
and as they were taking in everything that came their way, they tried this. 
In one of the big side shows they saw the great Jerrell Curry and his fiery 
steed. Wandering farther on, they saw a certain lady by the name of 
Moran giving Eppes-som salts to the monkeys, and to destroy the bad 
taste she was adding Wm-Berger cheese to the dose. They also took a 
thrilling ride on the Ferris wheel, and, looking down among the crowd, 
they recognized none other than the Misses Huey, Holman, Summy and 
Maakestad, who were seemingly having the time of their lives. 

But stay! We must not intrude upon their Honeymoon any longer. 



Our tale is told. 



Parke Anderson. 



THE BATTLEF1ELD#.^ 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



tlTfje €bolution of our ^tuimmins J^ool 




]NCE a fair damsel of certain proportions came to our Col- 
lege seeking knowledge in the gentle art of "Halt ! One ! 
Two !" She was none other than Miss Anne Murray. Being 
an immaculate creature, she required her daily bath, and 
there is where my story comes in ! The "Powers-that-be," 
being in an amiable mood, soon fashioned in Monroe Building a bathing 
structure, especially made for her majesty, and my, how she enjoyed her 
daily immersion! All went well until one hot day! Then it was that Miss 
Frances Abbitt, a rather diminutive creature, longed for a bath. She 
longed and longed, but alas ! All the tubs in Francis Willard were occu- 
pied. So Miss Murray heroically offered her tub ! Miss Abbitt then gaily 
tripped over to Monroe Hall, but alas ! When she saw the huge expanse 
of water she screamed out, "Oh, my! horrors! I can't swim! Why, the 
water's way over my head! What am I to do?" Suddenly she was 
visited by a "happy thought"! (Mark it down, readers!) She took her 
towel and, filling it with air, made a pair of water wings and dived in! 

Since then Anne Murray's tub has been known as the Swimming 
Pool! 

Parke Anderson. 




187 




THE BATTLEFIELD#,gMiSkNlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Eetent ^trtiitiong to tfte Hibrarp 

How to Ask Intelligent Questions Alice Stone 

The Whens and Whys of Jokes Virginia Branch 

My Experiences as a Ballet Dancer Lucy Ellen Kay 

Three Hundred Ways to Kiss Indie Sinclair 

Experiences in Raising Billie Buick Miss Hicks 

Key to Calories Miss Eppes 

Why I Don't Like to Play Basketball Rachel Chenault 

"Home Nursing" Dorothy Weaver 

How to Get Young Elizabeth May 

How to Run the Tea Room Efficiently Geraldine Brewster 

"Men I Know" Aiiss Annie Clark 

Memories of Xmas Everybody 

Beauty Secrets Jessie Roberts 

Vamping Secrets Nancy Lewis 

Ways and Means of Raising Oysters Estelle White 

My Experiences on the Stage Mary Fromm 

Old King Cole Gladys Gillet 

Why I Like Wrigley's Chewing Gum Misses Hicks and Summy 

llllllll 

^ororitie£( EJjat Wtni Jiational ^fjisi |?ear 

Patron, BuNYAN TyNER 

Pan Hellenic Council The Administration 

Eta Bita Pi Una McAlexander 

Date Gummers Ella Talley 

Mu Cow Mu Anne Murray 

Kappa Climax Kathleen Kessler 

Pi Face Velma McNeal 

Sigma Cat Meow , Ruth Clark 

Baa Baa Phi Charlotte Chappell 

Eta Green Apple Iva Payne 

Boo Boo Boo. Madolyn Carpenter 

Drink a Lot Korn Lika Bottle 

Getta Damma Getta Mr. Chandler 



Jloofeg Cfjccfecb (Bwt in tfjc Hifararjt for 19244925 

Names of Books Times Checked Out Names of Books Times Checked Out 

Sears-Roebuck Catalogue 9,999,999 Advice for the Modern Woman....... 5,555,555 

How to Reduce 8,888,888 How to Solve Cross-Word Puzzles 4,444,444 

Marriage Bureau Review 7,777,777 Effective Correspondence 3,333,333 

Methods of Curling Professors 6,666,666 Elinor Glyn's Philosophy of Love.. 2,222,222 

Proper Use of Cosmetics 5,555,555 Etiquette 1,111,111 

How to Studv 000,000,000 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^^j!^NlNETEEN TWENTY-F^ 

l^oulb 3t ^eem i^atural 

to see Julia Ellison in a hurry? 

if Louise Steuart didn't curl Dr. Young? 

if Ella Talley failed to be frank in class? 

for Rachel Chenault to miss a goal? 

for the student body to have plenty of time to loaf? 

for Dorothy Childress not to be treasurer of some organization? 

for Cele McLaughlin not to be looking for "Pa's cows"? 

for Laura Rhodes not to be hungry all the time? 

to see Magruder Micks without her red hose? 

to see Hazel Stump without her gum? 

iiiiiiii 

Cele McLaughlin made Geography L 

Frances Abbit signed up to specialize in Physical Education. 
Miss Summy didn't weigh her values. 
Indie Sinclair gave a fire drill at 1 :30 A. M. 
Lucy Billingsley stayed away from town for four days. 
Mrs. Bushnell bobbed her hair. 

Mildred Crawford kept a straight face for ten minutes. 
The degrees were given a class cut for transportation. 
Emily Hankla put only two hours on History. 
Mildred Wiltshire didn't choose a religious topic to write on. 
Elizabeth iVIoore had more questions to ask. 
Henrietta Dreifus "found it." 

Katherine Micks didn't have a date with Edgar Bernard on Friday night. 
Lou Milbank lost her heart in Fredericksburg. 
Bill Cole was taken for a taxi driver. 

IIIIIIII 

Jf algc anb ^rue tKcgt 

1. The average S. T. C. girl would refuse to ride from town. 

2. The Episcopal girls would doubtless give up spring vacation for Lent even if 

they did get it. 

3. Most girls at S. T. C. are usually broke. 

4. Cele McLaughlin pulled "A" on Dr. Young's Geography. 

5. Most S. T. C. girls stay at school during Xmas. 

6. Mr. Tyner taught aesthetic dancing for many years. 

7. Most girls at S. T. C. like "Noisy Hour" better than "Quiet Hour." 

8. Mr. Chandler made a speech without saying Co-op-EE-rate. 

189 




THE BATTLEFIELD#g^1]t^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



iiiiiiii 

Miss Day {in History Class) : "My doctor told me to take exer- 
cise with dumb-bells every morning. Will the class meet me in the morn- 
ing?" 

Virginia Branch : "When I was at William and Mary, at the end 
of one of my examination papers I wrote the professor a note, saying how 
much I had enjoyed the course." 

Laura Rhodes: "What did he do?" 

Virginia Branch: "Said I could take it over if I enjoyed it so 
much." 

Myrtle McGrath : "Betsy, lend me a dime." 
Betsy Bassett : "What?" 
Myrtle McGrath : "Lend me a quarter." 
Betsy Bassett: "I heard vou the first time." 



Dr. Young: "Miss Micks, who was the tenth President of the 
U.S.?" 

Miss Micks {studying next lesson) : "I dunno. Didn't hear the 
question." 

Dr. Young: "All right. Miss Wright." 

Miss Wright {studying next lesson) : "Sorry, but I didn't hear 
the question." 

Dr. Young: "Next, Miss Clarrott." 

Miss Clarrott: "I didn't hear the question. What was it?" 

Dr. Young: "Well, I don't know now myself. What was it?" 



Mildred Chase {coming hack from Washington) : "I tell you, It 
will take me a long time to get back to Normal again." 

Rosalie Kilman: "You mean State Teachers' College, Mildred." 



F. T. C. Student {at Fuerherd's) : "Two milk shakes." 
F. T. C. Student {later) : "Change mine to a dope." 
Clerk: "What do you think this is, a sleight-of-hand show?" 

190 




THE BATTLEFlELDif tT|ClTT[!3J^NlNETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Mary Fromm (to Charlotte Chappell) : "Charlotte, I read here 
that Caesar pitched his tents in seven nights." 

Charlotte Chappell: "Why, that's nothing. Katherine Day 
has been sHnging the bull for nine months, and isn't tired yet." 



program for me?" 

Carmine Mejia (to Mr. Truer) : "Will you please arrange my 

Mr. Tyner: "Why?" 

Carmine Mejia : "Because on one day I'm full and on the other 
I'm empty." 



Louise Steuart: "You seem to cough more easily this morning." 
Parke Anderson : "I ought to. I practiced all night." 



Myrtice James: "Betsy, what does a mink look like? Is it any- 
thing like a cat?" 

Betsy Bassett : "Yes, exactly like a cat, except it has four legs." 



President of Student Government: "Have you ever been up 
before me?" 

Frightened Student: "I don't know. At what time do you 
usually get up?" 

President: "Next case on the docket." 



Nancy Lee: "My grandfather built the Rocky Mountains." 
Bill Millbank: "That's nothing. Do you know the Dead Sea? 
Well, my grandfather killed it." 



Bet Morecock (on Valentine's Day in Adams Book Store) : "Will 
you show me some cards?" 

Clerk: "Here's one thats nice, entitled 'To the Only Man in the 
World I Love.' " 

Bet Morecock: "All right. Will you give me half a dozen, 
please?" 

191 



TH^J /^LE F I E LD#^p|5[l^NlN ETEEN T WENTY^Y| 

Kitty Coaxes : "Whenever I look at Gladys Gray I think of a 
hymn." 

Ruby Dratt: "Which one?" 

Kitty Coates: "How Firm a Foundation." 



S Sragebp in ^Tftrec Ictttrs 

I. 

F. T. C, 

September 1, 1924. 
Dear Dad: 

Arrived O. K. Everything is fine! The girls are lovely. We 
are having a dance tonight, a tea tomorrow afternoon, a reception 
tomorrow night. A bunch of girls have come in to take me to their 
room for a box supper. 

Hastily but lovingly, Sue. 

II. 

F. T. C, 

October 21, 1924. 
Dearest Dad: 

Oh! I'm so homesick. The studies are so hard, and the rules 
and regulations are awful. Will you please tell Mother to send me 
some food ? Would write, but have to study — that's all I do. 

Avec beaucoup d'amour, Sue. 

III. 

F. T. C, 
December 20, 1924. 
My Dearest Dad: 

I've flunked out! Will you please wire me money to come 
home on. 

Ambitiously, Sue. 



Dot Holton: "Have you heard how the httle boy got his mouth 
burned?" 

Marie Rose: "No, how?" 

Dot Holton: "Well, he was singing Red-Hot Mama." 



The Teacher: "What were the dying words of Lord Chester- 
field?" 

Class: "They satisfy." 

192 



THE BATTLEFIELDi 



m. 



1^ NINETEEN TWENTY- FIVE 



JluUetin Jioartr 



LOST: Three credits in Math. I. 

Cele McLaughlin. 

WANTED : To know the marriageable 
age. The Critic Teachers. 

LOST: Byronic sentimentality. 

Parke Anderson. 

WANTED: Soph's goat. 

Freshman Class. 



LOST : A Cann. 



FOUND: A Cann. 



Velma ^NIcNeal 



Frances Walker. 



LOST : Five pounds. 



Anne Murray. 



WANTED : More privileges. 

The Student Body. 

WANTED: A date with an honest-to- 
goodness man. Betsy Bassett. 

WANTED: A M-A-N. 

Mildred Gwaltney. 

LOST: Ail right to express your opin- 
ion. Student Body. 



WANTED: Another horn to toot. 
Nancy Lee. 

WANTED : Something to dwell on. 
Mr. Hamlet. 

WANTED: Some of King's chicken 
salad. Elizabeth May. 

LOST: Tone on the Hill. 

Mrs. Bushnell. 

LOST : Democracy in school. 

Miss Summy and Mr. Tyner. 

WANTED : An engagement with Miss 
Parke Anderson. 

A Professor in School. 

WANTED: Somebody to tell me some- 
thing I don't already know. 

Doris Beard. 

WANTED: Students with Good Atti- 
tudes. The Faculty. 

FOR SALE : All we know. 

Freshman Class. 

LOST: All previous reputation as a stu- 
dent. Alary McLaughlin. 



W. BiVENS: "A musician I'll marry, I'm telling you that; 

Because he'll find it easy to find me A-Flat." 



Miss HuEY: "What is your impression of harmony?" 
Nell Pound: "A freckled-face girl with a polka-dot dress leading 
a leopard." 

Lucy {studying anatomy, and tired of hearing Juliet fuss about har- 
mony) asks: "What is harmony, Juliet?" 

Juliet {very disgusted) : "The anatomy of Music." 

193 



THE BATTLEFIELD#^^|l^NlN ETgNJWENTY-FIVE 



3f |9ou CouliJ aitoaps ^ap Mfjat |9ou Sftink— 

\Yhen says: "Little children, always weigh your values." 

When says: "I didn't like that poss-work. Bring the ball 

back to center. Don't jump too soon." 

When says: "Young ladies, please keep quiet, please keep 

quiet. For Gawd's sake, keep quiet!" 

When says: "Let us all co-op-ee-rate by coming fow-ward 

'toe' the platform." 

When says: "Me'n Dean Tyner decided ." 

When says: "I'm going to check up on chorus books to- 
morrow.'" 

When says: "Asleep on the job again!" 

When says: "Now, what tree is this?" 

When says: "I take it. Check!" 

When says: "Now in Cleveland !" 

When says: "Do tell!" 

When says: "Where is my baton?" 

"^ ^ab Case of tfje ^orgcflp" 

/ met a horsefly on the street, 

A horsefly limp and weak; 
And when I noted his distress. 

He thus to me did speak: 
"My kingdom for a horse" he said. 

And rubbed his rusty beak. 

"Where flourished once the hitching-post. 

Oh! tell me what is seen? 
Long lines of black and shining hoods. 

All filled with gasoline — 
I get gastritis from the stuff. 

And carbon in jny bean." 

— Kansas City Star. 

Walter Berger {accustomed to granulated sugar and cream) in 
Washington cafe: "Mother, what is this?" 

Mrs. Berger: "That is whipped cream, son." 

Walter {with twinkling eyes, diving into the pulverized sugar) : 
"Mother, was the sugar spanked, too?" 

194 



THE BATTLEFlELDj^.^^|j[lf|^NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 

trtje iHaiben's! l^alm of Hife 



Te// 7Wg not in mournful numbers 

Spinsterhood's horrid dream, 
For there' s many a wife who wonders 

Why men are not what they seem. 

Life is real, life is earnest, 

And the altar' s not its goal; 
Maid thou art and maid remainest 

Strikes no terror to my soul. 

Art is long and time is fleeting. 

And my heart, though stout and brave, 

Like a muffled drum is beating 
At the thought anothei-' s slave. 

In the world's broad field of battle 

In my active busy life, 
When I meet a crusty bachelor, 

I thank Heaven I'm not his wife. 

Wives of great men all remind us 
We might help some man to climb 

And ascending leave behind us 
All the joys for which we pine. 

Joys no doubt which many a woman 

In the matrimonial game. 
Having traded them for phantoms, 

Would be glad to have again. 

Shall I then give up the struggle 
And accept an Old Maid Fate, 

Or, persistently pursuing. 

Learn to labor and to zvaitf 

— Selected. 
195 




m:^TTLEFI^#^p|j[l3^NlNETEEN TWENTY^^ 



Eeabin' an' Eiten' an' ^ P C 

iiiiiiii 

Is seen from the viewpoint of tlie administration of the State 
Teachers' College at Fredericksburg, the following may be 
put down as a brief summary of the outstanding advance- 
ments made by the College since the last publication of The 
Battlefield : 

(1) Increase in student enrollment. The total enrollment for the 1924-25 
session is 412, an increase of 70 over last session. 

(2) Increases made in the Faculty. There are five additional members of the 
Faculty this session. 

(3) The installation of new gymnastic equipment. 

(4) The completion of the athletic field and the consequent enlargement of 
the athletic program. This field is a fifth mile cinder running track and the space 
between is level and grassed. Hockey and Soccer are being added to the outdoor 
athletic program during the session. This College is used as an athletic center for 
high school meets, both in basketball and in track athletics. 

(5) Increase in the number of students pursuing advanced courses for a degree, 
this increase being 125 per cent over the number in the third and fourth years of last 
session. 

(6) The addition to the curriculum of college subjects as majors for the degree 
designed to prepare for teaching the academic high school subjects in the senior high 
schools of the State. 

(7) The enlargement of the summer quarter, both in respect to the numbers 
in the Faculty, the student enrollment and added courses. 

(8) The publication during the year of the following bulletins: 

(a) Degree for Teachers, October, 1924. 

(b) Suggestions for the Teaching of English History in the Junior 

High School, January, 1925. 

(c) Summer School and Winter School Announcements, February, 

1925. 

(d) Summer Quarter Catalog, April, 1925. 

(e) Winter School Catalog, June, 1925. 

(9) The establishment on the edge of the campus of our own elementary and 
junior high training schools, under the professional and fin:;ncial control of the College; 
and the establishment at Falmouth of a complete elementary training school in co-opera- 
tion with the Superintendent and the School Board of Stafford County. 

(10) The construction of an addition to the Faculty Annex, in order to pro- 
vide six rooms for members of the Faculty. 

(11) The installation of new kitchen equipment and new equipment in the 
boiler-room and pumping station. 

(12) An addition to the Betty Lewis Dormitory to care for the overflow students 
now placed in the city, and for a few additional students. 

A. B. Chandler, Jr., President. 
196 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




NINETEEN TWENTY-FIVE 



Strange Mi^to\)tm^ in a i^ormal ^cJjool 




ROSPECTIVE teachers at the Fond du Lac County Normal 
School were recently asked to describe Senator La Follette 
in an "identification test." One young woman described the 
Progressive candidate for President as "a Frenchman who 

came to America during the war." She admitted she had 

always lived in Wisconsin. Another student said Teapot Dome was "an 
old tomb discovered in Egypt about a year ago." A few of the more 
startling answers were: 

Ober-Ammergau — A great German politician. 

Herrin — A title used in Germany. 

Frances Willard — American pugilist. 

Pinchot — A race horse. 

Obregon — A province In Germany. 

De Valera — A bandit in Mexico. 

Lloyd George — King of England. 

Ford — Ran for President and backed out. 

Helen Keller — A great airplane flyer. 

John Wanamaker — A watchmaker. 

Mussolini — A region in the southern part of Eurasia. 

Tariff — A city in France. 

Leonard Wood — An aviator. 

Venizelos — Country in South America. 

Henry Cabot Lodge — Place where societies meet. 

Volstead — Experimenter about laws in physics. 

Fiume — A mountain in Japan. 

Babe Ruth — World heavyweight champion. 

Muscle Shoals — A great coal mine in Italy. 

Firpo — African prize-fighter. 

Steinmetz — A kind of piano. 



"Hard at it, Mrs. Gray?" 

"Yes, iVIrs. Blucher; this is my washing day, and looking after a 
family of ten doesn't leave much time on my hands." 

"Is that Kitty's voice I hear at the piano in the parlor?" 

"Yes, that's her. I don't know how Fd get along witliout tiiat girl. 
Always on these days she picks out her nicest pieces, like 'Sweet Rest By 
and By,' 'Mother's Growing Old,' 'Love Will Roll the Clouds Away,' and 
sings them for me while I"m running the clothes through the first water. 
'Tain't every girl who'd be so thoughtful, I can tell you." 

197 



THE BATTLEFlELD#^PJjll^NlNB^^^^^™ 



Jflunfeeb 

They sat together, 
Worked together, 
Roomed together, 
Ate together, 
All quarter long. 
Played together. 
Strolled together, 
Happy as a lark. 

Then — 

Crammed together. 
Flunked together. 

And said — 

"Of all sad, sweet words of both tongue and pen, 
The saddest of them all is we have flunked again. 




198 



DUR 




inMTDLLDWinDFRDfS 
WILLQEfDUMMHE 

nmDun[[nmi5DrnnnT 

RELIH[]L[ nERCHnnT5 
WhD MnV[ CDnTRIGUT[b 

nniE f^iniLY tdtme 
5U[[[55DfTHIWDLUnt 
WE □E5r[nKYDUR 

pniRDnnDE in return 



The Bond of 
Friendship— 

Your 
Photograph 




Judson Smith, 

Photographer 



To be Properly 
Educated 

Go to the State Teachers 
College at Fredericksburg, 
and buy your Dresses, Suits, 
Hats and Dry Goods, from 




1 I 

♦ 1 



C. W. JONES 



i 
5 
i 
I 

i Fredericksburg's Largest Store 

i 

i 
\ 
i 
( 



W. A. BELL E. C. BELL ? 

I 

♦ 

W. A. BELL & BROTHER 1 

1 j 

The LARGEST Furniture and House Fur- * 

nishings Store. If you CAN'T find it, | 

GO TO BELL'S, and you CAN GET | 

IT. We Furnish the Home Complete. J 



W. A. BELL & BROTHER 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 

PHONE 101 EVERYTHING FOR THE HOME 

SUITS : DRESSES : WRAPS : BLOUSES : j 
j SKIRTS : SWEATERS : 1 

I MILLINERY : 1 



Van Raalte Silk Hose and LIndervvear 
LaCamille Front-Lace Corsets 



HIRSH'S 

Fredericksburg's Best Store 

Q24 Main St., Fredericksburg, Va. 



..— > 






Spotsylvania 

Power Company 

Fredericksburg, Va. - Ashland, Va. 



HEAT- LIGHT 
POWER 



May We Serve You? 



HOME OFFICE: LAW BUILDING 
FREDERICKSBURG : VIRGINIA 









Adams Book Store 

Fredericksburg 
Virginia 



Compliments of 



Richard N. Lanier 



I 



Your Kodak pictures will be 
a reminder of College Days, 
and you want best results. 
Send us your films. We are 

Eastman 
Representatives 




FREDERICKSBURG 
VIRGINIA 













I J. T. BRAUER 

I 

1 Fruits 

t 

t Vegetables : Groceries 
1 Fresh Meats 



FREDERICKSBURG 
VIRGINIA 



Liberty 
Confectionery ( 



Always Ready 
TO Serve 




Cafe 



Nick Calamos, Proprietor ' 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 1 

) 




t i 



M. M. LEWIS 
Druggist 

The REXALL Store 



CANDY : SODA WATER ! 
CIGARS 

Mail Orders Given Prompt 
Attention 

COMMERCE STREET 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



ARMSTRONG 
MEAT MARKET 

Fresh Meats, Vegetables 

Fresh Fish and 

Oysters 



209 Lafayette Street 
PHONE 163 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



Yellow Cab Service ! 



i€^^^.-/0 



Rain, Hail or Shine — 
At Your Service All the Time 



Wheeler ^ Thompson 

PRINCESS ANNE STREET 

Phone 505 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Visit 

A. C. Wooding 

for Your Wants in 

DRY GOODS : NOTIONS 
LADIES' FURNISHINGS 

CD 



309 COMMERCE ST. 

Phone 266 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Shoe Service 

In Its Broadest Sense Means 

Fit, Style and Wear 

D 

We make a specialty of giving 
you footwear with these three 
features at a price which gives 
you Maximum of All Three 
for the money invested. 

D 

Ji'e Fit the Foot That Is 
Hard to Fit 

E. J. Embrey 
Shoe Company 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



SMITH, DODD 
& COMPANY 

INSURANCE 

CZ] 



Law Building 

FREDERICKSBURG 

VIRGINIA 



Established 1811 




Food Products 

TKe sign oF 

Quality 



displayed 
in Create 
ROYAL SCARLET 



production of a series of Posters 
1 Elevated and Subway Stations 
New York. 



is the sign of Quality. J 

Whenever you want the Finest Food Pro- j 

ducts in the World, be sure to secure this J 

ONE RELIABLE BRAND ♦ 

R. C. Williams cff Co., New York J 



Dr. J. Garnett King 

and 

Dr. C.P.Kennedy 

Dentists 



906y2 Main Street 
^'REDERICKSBURG, VA. 



4-- 









Eait 
Superior Ice Cream 



Manufactured by 

Farmers' 
Creamery Co. 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Fredericksburg 

Motor Co. 

Inc. 



S 



613-517 Princess Anne Street 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 






B. GOLDSMITH i 

& SON, Inc. I 

The Exclusive Agents J 

jor j 

GOTHAM I 

GOLD-STRIPE I 

SILK HOSE I 

• 

For Ladies • 

t 

$1.85 1 

i 
I 

The Silk Stocking That [fears i 
t 
I 



C. C. JOHNSON 

Dealer in 

FANCY AND STAPLE 
GROCERIES 



Phone 468 

4U Commerce Street 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



ADIES GENTLEMEN 

SOUTHERN 
TAILORING CO. 

724 Main Street 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

J. S. SNYDER, Manager 



I 

J Fredericksburg Newspaper 

i THE DAILY STAR 

I $3.75 Per Annum 

i THE FREE LANCE 

i Tri-Weekly 

\ $2.50 Per Year 









f ( 



I 1 
I i 



George S. Gouldman 
&" Company 

"Say I! ivith Floivers—" 

Corsages, Bouquets 

and 

Graduating Bouquets 

A Specialty 

Palms and Ferns 

Phone 124 913 Main Street 









CURTIS' 
RESTAURANT 



ALL AMERICAN 

100% SERVICE 



809 Main Street 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Pat took Mike to see the Twentieth-Century 
Express go through one of the very long 
tunnels. 

Pat: "Mike, what do you think of that?" 
Mike: "Be gorrie — it would be hell to pay 
if it missed that hole." 



A typical red-headed Scotchman was watch- 
ing a New York policeman scatter the crowds 
with his club. 

Donald {to policeman) : "Why do you use 
the club?" 

Policeman: "Why, to scatter the crowd. 
Wouldn't you do this in your country?" 

Donald: "No! We'd pass the hat!" 






! Your Patronage Solicited 

j The 

J Sanitary Barber 

I Shop 

f Finest in City 

! Private Ladies' Department 
James B. Payne 913 Main Street 

I Next Door to Pitt's Leader Theatre 



The 1 

Main Street Tea | 

Room j 

H. DUGAN t 

Ser'ves a Substantial Meal of Quality | 

.4t a Reasonable Price 1 

SHORT ORDERS J 

807 Main Street j 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA j 



THE MAITLAND 

Fredericksburg's Most Altraiti-ve 

Restaurant 

Continuous a La Carte Service 

... 12 to 1:.!(J 



DlNNE 



7:30 



THE MAITLAXD 

Ten-Fifteen Princess Anne Street 



H. W. PROCTOR 

A Full Line 

of 

Dr\ Goods and Notions 

at the 

Lowest Prices 

220 Commerce Street 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 









Office, 63 
Res;de!;ce, 243-W 



DR. J. P. STIFF 

200 Commercial Bank Building 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 






When at Fredericksburg 
Stay at the 

PRINCESS ANNE 
HOTEL 

Up to Date in Every Detail 

C. A. Abbey, Mgr. 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



( j 

i hemstitchlng i 

i picot edge i 

pleating i 

buttons covered | 

Mrs. Oscar Gexther | 

903 National Boulevard | 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA • 



Andy came upon his friend Sandy, 
vas looking sad. 
"What is it, Sandy?" 
"I lost my luggage." 
Andy: "How did it happen?" 
Sandy: "The cork came out!" 



Pat worked in a freight yard. He always 
heard people say "Hello" when they answered 
the telephone. He answered it when it rang 
one day. The party at the other end of the 
line said: 

"Is this 3689?" 

"Gowan — what do vou think I am, a box 



A Scotchman, just home from a trip, was 
trying to tell Sandy how big Lake Winnepeg 
was. 

"Aye, Sandy, the hull of Scotland would dis- 
appear in it and all that would be left would 
be the smell of whiskey." 



On their way to Washington one day, Miss 
Jerrill and Mrs. Willis sat next to a drunken 
man. 

Mrs. Willis to Miss Jerrill: "How many 
children have you?" 

"Thirty." 

Drunken man got up and left. "Gosh, I'm 
gonna quit drinking." 



1\ /fAKE a new home of your 
-'^ -*■ old one with two coats of 
paint. Give us the size of your 
building and let us tell you how 
small your paint bill will be. 

Fredericksburg Hardware Co. 

Fredericksburg, Va. 



This Is The Store 

All Discriminating Students and Faculty 

Like to Patronize 

WHY? 

Because We Live to Serve 



GOOLRICK'S MODERN PHARMACY 

W. J. LACY 
901 MAIN STREET :: FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



CALL ON 

CHICHESTER 
& COMPANY 

For All Kinds of 

INSURANCE 



FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 






MUSIC 1 

ior \ 

Dancing and Entertainment | 

i 

The 

WOODING 

ORCHESTRA 



FREDERICKSBURG 
VIRGINIA 






HARRIS & BRO. 

Dealers In 

Groceries and Country 
Produce 

Virginia-Cured Roe Herring 
A Specialty 



613-615 Commerce Street 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



CHEVROLET 
REO 

McCormick-Deering 

Tractors 
International Trucks 



Virginia Motor Co. 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 

Phone 590 P. O. Box 2+1 



R. A. Kishpaugh 



Stationerv 



Printins 



Victrolas 

Victor Records 

Waterman Fountain Pens 

Ansco Cameras and Films 



Everything for the College 



..-4- >.— 



BOSTON 
VARIETY STORE 

Bargains 

A Iways Satisfactory 



Main' Street 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 




Good Things to Eat 



jeuerherd 



Quality Shop 
Where Only the Best Is Good Enough 






J. C. PENNEY CO., Inc. 

A NATION-WIDE INSTITUTION 

Operating 571 Stores 
From Coast to Coast 



Selling 

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 
Shoes and Dry Goods 

At 

LOWEST-IN-TOWN PRICES 



825 MAIN STREET 



FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



The 

Commercial State Bank 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

1 Capital $ 50,000.00 

I Surplus $100,000.00 



I Make This Bank Your Bank 
I 

I E. M. YOUNG, President 

t GEO. W. SHEPHERD, Cashit, 



W. MAYO SMITH, .'Jsst. Cashier 



FREDERICKSBURG 
STATE TEACHERS' COLLEGE 

Tivo-Year Diploma Course for teaching (a) Primary Grades; 
(b) Grammar Grades; (c) High School Grades in Junior High 
School; (d) Home Economics; (e) Commercial Subjects. 
Four-Year B. S. Degree Courses leading to teaching or super- 
vising in Elementary or High Schools: 

(a) Academic Subjects {English, History, Math., 

Science, Latin, French). 

(b) Physical Education. 

(c) Fine and Industrial Arts 

(d) Commercial Subjects. 

(e) Public School Music. 

A standard Teachers' College, holding membership in the Amer- 
ican Association of Teachers' Colleges. 

Summer quarter begins June 15th. Regular winter school 
courses given in summer quarter. 
Send for winter or summer school catalog and late bulletins. 



A. B. Chandler, Jr., President \ 

Fredericksburg, Va. i 



R. G. HILLDRUP 



i RED TOP TAXI 



PLEASURE CARS OF ALL KINDS 

Baggage, Transfer and Heavy Hauling 

Long-Distance Trips at 

Special Rates 
Storage for Furniture 



FREDERICKSBURG - VIRGINIA 



' 1 ^HE strength of 
-■- by its statement 


a bank may be indicated 


of condition, but it is also 


measured by the 


extent and quality of serv- 


ices it is purposed to 


render. Again we wish to 


stress our ability to 


satisfactorily handle your 


bank account. 

The Planter 




s National Bank 


Capital, Surplus and Profits 


$150,000.00 


>..—.— ......—.—.— —^.-^—^ — ..•».-^~ 


^ ^.^.-...—..-...-^ ,.-.►... — . — ..•^.-..~...... — f 



J. LEWIS WALLACE, President HUGH D. SCOTT, Cashier j 

GEORGE A. SCOTT, Assistant Cashier i 

• 

94 YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL BANKING | 

The I 
National Bank of Fredericksburg, Va. 

The Rock of Gibraltar — "Safe for Savers" 



U. S. Government The Story of Our 

Depository ^AFE : STRONG Growth 

SECURE Deposits, 1917, 

Modern Burglary ( ■ ■ ■ $+12,554.92 

Alarm System ^""^ "* V'rgmia Deposits Jan. 1, 1924, 

Depository $1,141,987.11 

Insurance Polite Service Deposits Jan. 1, 1925, 

Against Robbery $1,222,874.31 

and Burglary Over 150 Per Cent Gain 



Compound Interest on Savings Capital Stock and Surplus, $120,000.00 

You Are Protected by Over a Million Dollars of 

Gilt-Edge Resources 




AN UNPARALLELED TRIUMPH | 

This is the universal verdict concerning the New Remington Standard 12 — a ver- j 

diet which is reflected in the choice of business offices and business schools every- | 

where. • 

Examine this new model and see the many fundamental improvements that Rem- J 

ington has made in typewriter construction. We invite comparison on every count — j 

whether ease and speed of operation, quality of work, up-to-date time-saving fea- ( 

tures or reliable service. : 

Send to us for booklet which tells you what leading business educators the coun- j 

try over say about the surpassing merits of this latest Remington. j 

Remington Typewriter Company i 

705 EAST MAIN STREET :: RICHMOND, VIRGINIA | 

REMINGTON standard Since the Invention j 
of the Writing Machine 4 



Established 1882 



Brent Stores, Inc. 

(Three Stores in One) 1 

! I 

I DRY GOODS :: HOSIERY j 

I UNDERWEAR j 

! NOTIONS i 



I 

i 

Ladies, Misses, and Children's 1 

READY-TO-WEAR j 

I 

I 

i 



MILLINERY 



The College Girls' Store 
BRENT STORES, Inc. 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 
826-828 MAIN STREET Our Sloffan— CO-OPERATION 

WE CATER TO THE LADIES' WANTS 



■...,._> ♦_.._*_» 



All College Girls 

Buy 

Their Jewelry 



C^f 




RICHMOND MAID 

PHOSPHATE 
BAKING POWDER 

PURE 



1 from 

! S. S. KAUFMAN 

T The Lfadiiiy Jeiueler 

i AT THE SIGN OF THE CLOCK 
) 

4..^^._^»^.—.....^_...-..._..._..— .—._.♦. 

Teachers 
Everything You Need 

Virginia 
School Supply Co. 

2000 Marshall Street 
!ox 1177 :: RICHMOND, VA. 



West Disinfecting 
Company 

Manufacturing 
Chemists 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 
J 



Compliments 
of 

^ /:\ /7 

|l''/lt-~t:iVB:«V. g 



■f— — • 









^-... 



NORRIS 

Jewelry Store 
R. R. BUFFINGTON 

Slale Licensed Optometrist 

Main Street 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

—. — . — . — . — . — ..- .. — . — . — • — . — .—• f 



A Scotchman, his wife, and sister were out 
sailing. As the boat landed, the Scotchman 
jumped to the landing. As he jumped he did 
two things: spilled his money out of his pocket 
and upset the boat with its passengers. Be- 
fore turning to help them, he picked up his 
money and counted it to see if he had all of ;t. 



A Scotchman who had been playing golf for 
over fifty years had been missing from the 
course for several davs. His friends asked 
him why. 

He said, "I had to give it up." 

■■Why?" 

'■1 lost mv ball." 






WASHINGTON WOOLEN MILLS 

Ladies' Cloaking and Suiting 

Material 

Ladies' Knickers 



A SPECIAL LARGE LINE OF SERGES 



Phone 111 
601 MAIN STREET :: :: FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



1 WASHINGTON WOOLEN MILLS 

J Retail Department 

I 819 MAIN STREET :: :: FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 
t 



! 

t 

I 

Deal zvith ] 

i 

J. W. MASTERS I 

I 

In Lumber of All Kinds i 

I 

Lime :: Plaster :: Cement i 

Brick : : Tin 
Roofing, Etc. 



"A Bank for All ihe People" 



Capital, $50,000.00 Surplus and Prorits, $175,000.00 

Deposits, $1,600,000.00 

i 

3'( Interest Paid on Savings Accounts * 



The 

FARMERS and MERCHANTS 

STATE BANK 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



M. G. \^^LLIS, President JNO. G. GOULDMAN, JR., Cashier 



BROWN & CRISMOND 

Good Shoes 



All College Girls come to us for their best shoes. The 
very latest style, best attention and largest stock to select 
from are found in this store. When in need of the best 
in footwear be sure to come to :: :: :: 



BROWN & CRISMOND 

FREDERICKSBURG :: VIRGINIA 



BOND'S DRUG STORE 

The Oldest 

And We Try to Make It the Best Drug Store 

In the State 



In the years to come when the memories of school- 
days take possession. of you — it is our hope that we 
have served you in such a way as to merit a place 
in these memories. :::::: 

W. L. BOND FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



, — . — . — . — ...... 

... — ►—. — . — ..>. 



JANNEY-MARSHALL CO., Inc. 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 

D 

Jobbers of 

FINE CANDIES 

"Cigarettes : Cigars : Tobacco" 

D 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



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SERVICE 
MOTOR 
COMPANY 

Agency for BUICKS 

Come — Get a Fair Deal! 



COMMERCE STREET 
FREDERICKSBURG :: :: VIRGINIA 



Time Schedule 

BEGINNING 
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1925 

The FREDERICKSBURG, 

CULPEPER and LURAY 

BUS LINE 

will double the number of busses now in service, 
leaving Fredericksburg at 8 A. M. and 1:45 P. M., 
and leaving Culpeper at 10:30 A. M. and 4:30 P. M. 



Leave 
Culpeper . 
Stevensburg 
Lignum . . 
Flat Run . 
Wilderness 
Chancellorsvi 
Five-Mile Fork 

Arrive 
Fredericksburg 



Easteound 
A. M. P. M. 



lie 



P.M. 
12:05 



4:30 
4:47 
5:00 
5:17 
5:25 
5:37 
5:50 

6:05 



Le.ave 
Fredericksburg 
Five-Mile Fork 
Chancellorsville 
Wilderness . 
Flat Run . . 
Lignum . . 
Stevensburg 

Arrive 
Culpeper . . 



Westbound 
A. M. P. M. 



1:45 
1:57 
2:10 
2:25 
2:35 
2:47 
3:00 



:35 3:20 




Ideals in Annual Architecture 

Not to build a book that is merely elaborate, not to build a book that will be 
as expensive as possible, but to create a volume that will be a printed expres- 
sion of the school itself — to construct a book that will be a real monument to 
that intangible thing called school spirit — to work with the staff in a spirit 
of mutual helpfulness and cooperation. Such is the Whittet & Shepperson 
Ideal, an ideal justified b\' more than a half-century's experience. :: :: 

WHITTET £^ SHEPPERSON 



A Half Century' 

RICHMOND 



Experience m College Printing 

\IRGINIA 



The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 
The DAVID J. 
MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 




// ;.( finislicd! 

The Rtittlffit'ld's last meet! 

ffe lire lian and tired, but the ivnrk ivas siveet. 

Here's a smile to those v.-ho love us 

.hid rec/ret to those idio hate 

When cinxioitsly zve're zcuitinff 

Our oivii dear School Book's fate. 

JJ'e trust that -zee have given 

To the Battlefield our best. 

Jl'e feel that zie have striven 

To deserve contented rest. 

JVaterloo? Sh-h-h-h! 

ffe hope not.'.' 

Don't \ou? 





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r o. 




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CALL ni35 nORAN 

FINIS 



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