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THROUGH THE GATES 



THE. 



BATTLEFIELD 



NINETEEN-THIRTY-SEVEN. 



MARY ELLEN LEE 
Editor 

KATHERINE BURGESS 
Business Manager 



PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE STUDENT BODY OF THE 
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



MARY WASHING s . LEGE-VMW 



DEDICATION 

We, the student body, in appreciation 
for all the advice, inspiration, and as- 
sistance so cheerfully and helpfully 
rendered us, do in this year, 1937, ded- 
icate our "Battlefield" to Eileen Kramer 
Dodd, who, through observation, study, 
and experience has developed the art of 
understanding, analyzing, and encour- 
aging those with whom she lives. It is 
through contact with such a one that the 
youth in quest of knowledge is able to 
find her standard and the ideal by 
which she may be guided. 




EILEEN KRAMER DODD 



FOREWORD 

1 HE Foreword is not essential to the Year Book; 
does it not now lie open before you waiting for 
eager hands to turn swiftly to the galaxy of faces 
of comrades and of scenes of work and play where 
days have gone by like a song. The 1937 Staff has 
fashioned together the written page and the pic- 
tured page of the Present with the cement of sen- 
timent. This same Staff, however, assumes to be- 
come prophetic of the Future for those other 
Staffs that will follow the trail. Theirs the task 
next year and other years to picture by word and 
camera yet more splendid buildings — we believe 
— and a campus more beauteous. Theirs will be 
the privilege to tell of a progress that will find ex- 
pression in a noble vision realized a-top a sunlit 
hill whereon will be a College, laurel-crowned, 
standing, with even finer dignity and influence, 
on the rolling slopes just above the 
little city so passing fair. 



CONTENTS 



THE COLLEGE 

THE CLASSES 

ORGANIZATIONS 

ATHLETICS 

FEATURES 




THE COLLEGE 




VIEWS 




A-DOWN THE RAVINE, TREE SHADOWED 




A GORGEOUS CORSAGE FOR LEARNED WALLS 




TALL, INSPIRING COLUMNS OF CLASSIC BEAUTY 




MORE FRIENDLY THAN PRETENTIOUS 




THE GIRL-SPIRIT OF MARY BALL WOULD LIKE THIS 




STRANGE THAT A STOICAL TRIBE OF SEACOBECK INDIANS ONCE ROAMED HERE 




WILLARD HALL KNOWS THE QUICK, EAGER STEP OF THE BEST -BELOVED 




LILAC PERFUME ON THE AIR 




MILLIONS FOR A DAISY CHAIN BUT NOT ONE DAISY WILL TELL 



MORGAN L. COMBS 

A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ed.D. 
President 



A.B., University of Richmond; A.M., University of 
Chicago; Ed.M. and Ed.D., Harvard University; 
student, University of Berlin; travel and study in 
Europe, summers 1933 and 1935. Superintendent 
of Schools, Buchanan County, Virginia; State 
Supervisor, Secondary Education for Virginia; 
Professor, Secondary Education, Boston Univer- 
sity; Director Research and Surveys, Virginia 
State Department of Education; Professor of Edu- 
cation, College of William and Mary, Summer 
School; Professor of Education, George Wash- 
ington University, Summer School. Member, Phi 
Beta Kappa, Tau Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Kappa, 
and Alpha Phi Sigma. Author and editor nu- 
merous bulletins, publications, and reports. 
President, State Teachers College, 
Fredericksburg . 




DR. MORGAN L. COMBS 
President 



IN THE FALL OF THE PRESENT YEAR 

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

APPOINTED 

DR. EDWARD ALVEY, JR. 

PROFESSOR OF EDUCATION AND 
DIRECTOR OF TEACHER-TRAINING 

TO 

THE DEANSHIP OF THE COLLEGE 

THEREBY CONFERRING ON HIM AN ADMINISTRATIVE HONOR 

AND ON THE COLLEGE ITSELF 

ADDED ACADEMIC PRESTIGE 




DR. EDWARD ALVEY, JR. 
Dean of the College 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 




Dr. Elizabeth W. Baker 

English 

Mr. Wilmer C. Berg 

Supervisor of Training School 

Miss Margaret D. Calhoun 

Librarian 



Dr. Hobart C. Carter 

Mathematics 

Dr. Robert F. Caverlee 

Biblical Literature 

Miss Marion K. Chauncey 

Music 



Dr. Roy S. Cook 

Head of Science Department 

Mr. Oscar H. Darter 

Head of Social Science Department 

Dr. Richard Beale Davis 

English 



Dr. Eileen Kramer Dodd 

Education 

Dr. James Harvey Dodd 

Head of Commercial Education 
Department 

Miss Dorothy Duggan 

Art 



Miss Eva Taylor Eppes 

Head of Music Department 

Miss Minnie Dunn 

Supervisor of Training School 

Mr. C. Allmand Edwards 

Principal of Training School 



Mrs. Leon Ferneyhough 

Treasurer 

Mr. William N. Hamlet 

Mathematics 

Miss Elinor Hayes 

Supervisor of Training School 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Miss Louise Jennings 

Secretary to Dean of College 

Mr. Richard M. Kirby 

Commercial Education 

Dr. Bertha M. Kirk 

Head of Physical Education 
Department 



Miss Mary E. McKenzie 

English 

Miss Mildred O. McMurtry 

Language 

Miss Annabel Merrill 

Home Economics 



Miss Helen Mills 

Supervisor of Training School 

Miss Lola E. Minich 

Commercial Education 

Miss Florence A. Morgan 

Secretary to President 



Dr. C. G. Gordon Moss 

Social Science 

Mr. Gustine H. Parker 

Commercial Education 

Dr. Allen S. Peirce 

Science 



Miss Carolease Pollard 

Assistant to Treasurer 

Mrs. R. Tipton Mooney 

Social Science 

Mrs. Eula Porter Robins 

Home Economics 



Miss Sarah Rogers 

Physical Education 

Mrs. Dalia L. Ruff 

Dietitian 

Miss Helen M. Schultz 

Science 




FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 




Dr. Mildred E. Scott 

Resident Physician 

Dr. George E. Shankle 

Head of English Department 

Miss Mary Margaret Shaw 

Head of Home Economics 
Department 



Dr. Caroline B. Sinclair 

Physical Education 

Miss Nettie Taliaferro 

Assistant Registrar 

Mrs. Blanche D. Taylor 

Hostess 



Miss Grace E. Taylor 

Hostess 

Miss Jimmie Louise Thurman 

Supervisor of Training School 

Miss Elizabeth Trible 

Resident Nurse 



Miss Louise E. Walraven 

Hostess 

Mrs. Nannie Mae M. Williams 

Registrar 

Miss Catesby W. Willis 

Social Science and Language 



Miss Nora C. Willis 

Music 

Dr. Walter J. Young 

Education 




CLASSES 



THE NINETEEN-TH IRT Y-SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




RUTH CHESHIRE 
President 



Sponsor 
MR. O. H. DARTER 



CATHERINE RUCKER 
Vice-President 



NANCY LEE SEANOR 
Secretary 



MYRTIS HAYES 
Treasurer 



FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY 

1 HE Freshman class of 1936-37 was marked not by their size, even though they 
filled their dorm to capacity; not by their unusualness, even though there were 
many outstanding personalities and many talented members; but by their self- 
sufficiency, their independence of their upperclassmen, and their complete dis- 
regard for established precedents. A great many eager Freshmen entering college 
can be likened to a young puppy who goes sniffing about in a new place. We did. 
We searched every inch of our sloping, lovely campus, coming sometimes upon 
Autumn painting the leaves in riotous colors. Everything was new to us. We were 

« 31 » 



THE NINETEEN - TH I RTY - SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Bernice Acworth 

Jane Adams 

Christine Allport 

Martha Anderson 



Ruth Anderson 

Margaret Andrews 

Virginia Ankers 

Rose Atkinson 



Peggy Austin 

Mary Ann Bailey 

Virginia Bailey 

Marjorie Ball 



Louise Barger 

Virginia Barnes 

Virginia Barrett 

Lorraine Beck 



Martha Lee Bennett 
Helen Boothe 

Gayle Bowman 

Mildred Boykin 



Sara Bradshaw 

Hazel Briggs 

Margaret Brooks 

Anny Brown 



Sallie Brown 

Neva Burcher 

Mary Burnett 

Irene Bush 



for the first time virtually on our own and after a thorough period of Freshman 
training we found out just how "virtually" it was to be! 

The first social event of the year was the Kid Party, which was marked by the 



« 32 » 



THE NINETEEN- THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



same enthusiasm and ingenuity which was to mark each of the following Fresh- 
man events. We paraded in ginghams and ruffles, curls and bare knees, with 
fingers in our mouths endeavoring to look innocent with not very great success. 



Carolyn Carey 

Margaret Carpenter 
Lila Carter 

Celia Cartwright 



Eloise Caverlee 

Ruth Cheshire 

Phyllis Child 

Helen Clark 



Isabelle Clemmer 

Laura Conlon 

Frances Cook 

Margaret Cooley 



Martha Con- 
Ruth Ware Cowles 

Dorothy Crafton 

Mary Creedle 



Lorraine Crute 

Joyce Crump 

Dolores Cullen 

Margaret Cutler 



Jeanne Davenport 

Dorothy Davis 

Elsie Lee Davis 

Katherine Davis 



Jane Day 

Dorothy DeHart 

Bess Dobbins 

Mildred Dodson 




33 



THE N INETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Elsie Dunn 

Gladys Dutrow 

Georgie Lou Easterling 
Blanche Edge 



Courtney Edmond 

Geraldine Edmondson 

Sophia Eisenman 
Jane Eley 



Mary Estes 

Doris Eubank 

Elizabeth Evans 

Kathryn Everhart 



Aileen Farmer 

Jo Lee Fleet 

Ruth Flippo 

Elizabeth Frazer 



Barbara Gaines 

Nellie Gardner 

Sylvia Garfinkel 

Elizabeth Gay 



Virginia Gayle 

Hilda Goode 

Frances Green 

Elizabeth Hall 



Charlotte Hall 

Evelyn Hamilton 

Corinna Hammack 

Clara Harrell 



And following this informal party came the very formal reception given by the 
Student Council when we dressed in our best and went down the receiving line 
in fine form. 



«34 



THE NINETEEN-THIRT Y-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



In the late Fall came Freshman Play Day. Games are amazing fun, we found, 
particularly hockey. Even the bruises had an interesting air about them. 

Days went by with groans for the rising bell to happy sighs when classes were 



Hilda Harrell 

Victoria Harris 

Ella Harrison 

Constance Hawthorne 



Myrtis Hayes 

Helen Hess 

Eva Hevener 

Sara Hewell 



Mildred Hilton 

Martha Holloway 

Winifred Hudson 

Rosanna Hunt 



Josephine Inskeep 

Marjorie Inskeep 

Rosalie Johnson 

Sarah Johnson 



Evelyn Jones 

Garner Jones 

Katherine Jordan 

Mildred Joyce 



Margaret Karnes 

Lee Wingate Keith 

Mary Byrd Kegley 

Mary Overton Kent 



Eleanor Kerfoot 

Kay Kershaw 

Virginia Kilduff 

Mabelle Knopf 




« 35 » 



THE NINETEEN- TH IRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



» s A 




Evelyn Lane 

Gladys Lane 

Evelyn Lasley 

Mabel Layman 



Virginia Lewis 

Willis Lewis 

Myrtle Liverman 

Matilda Logan 



Lucille Long 

Virginia Love 

Louise Luter 

Mary Maxwell Lyons 



Jean McCaffrey 

Doris McCormic 

Ella McConnell 

Margaret McCulloch 



Katrina McNeal 

Elizabeth Manning 

Virginia Marshall 

Eunice Martin 



Beulah Mason 

Margaret Mason 

Regina Matz 

Eugenia Moore 



Meta Moore 

Vivian Moore 

Charlotte Morgan 

Frances Moseley 



out. There was the library to browse in, the gym to play in and a marvelous thing 
called Convocation every Wednesday night. Even the girls who thought a short- 
hand book would be useful on such nights gave it up and surrendered to enjoyment. 



« 36 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



The election of the class officers, however, really put the wheels of the machine 
in motion. Amidst wild shouting and cheering, Ruth Cheshire was made Presi- 
dent of her class. Other officers were Kay Rucker, Vice-President; Nancy Lee 



Elizabeth Moss 

Cleo Musick 

Virginia Nichols 

Mary Mitchell Noble 



Marie Oricchio 

Elaine Owens 

Erin Pace 

Lottie Padgett 



Joanna Pappandreou 

Grace Patterson 

Eleanor Payne 

Roberta Fox Payne 



Mary Perkins 

Janice Peronne 

Elizabeth Perrow 

Dorothy Persons 



Mel Verdine Phillips 

Virginia Plaster 

Marjorie Powell 

Charlotte Pride 



Effie Pringos 

Virginia Pruitt 

Sarah Puckett 

Cora Pulley 



Helen Purvis 

Virginia Ramsey 

Senora Rawls 

Frances Reed 




« 37 » 



THE NINETEEN- TH I RTY- SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




$%' 7 ft 



Virginia Reel 

Gertrude Richardson 

Katherine Roberts 

Helen Robinson 



Constance Rollins 

Ann Rooney 

Helen Roop 

Helen Rose 



Kate Ross 

Catherine Rucker 

Mildred Rust 

Ellen Sanders 



Marian Schultz 

June Seamans 

Nancy Lee Seanor 

Oneta Shackelford 



Mildred Shaddick 

Henrietta Shanklin 

Nannie Sharp 

Rachel Shelton 



Anne Short 

Virginia Simmons 

Katherine Simpson 
Mabel Sims 



Norvella Sledd 

Ann Smith 

Helen Smith 

Lorraine Smith 



Seanor, Secretary; Myrtis Hayes, Treasurer; and Mary Estes, President of the 
Freshman Commission. We were a fully organized class now and ready for the 
Goat-Devil contest. Seeing sleepy-eyed girls, shivering in the cold gray dawn, 



38 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRTY- SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



while they stirred up dead leaves, was an every morning occurrence in the search 
for the Devil's flag. Even though, as goats, they lost the contest their spirits were 
undaunted and they entered each oncoming event with their usual zest. 



Penelope Smith 

Ellen Smoot 

Florence Stell 

Margaret Strong 



Sarah Lee Suskins 

Sallie Sutton 

Elizabeth Taylor 

Laura Taylor 



Romola Taylor 

Verna Thomas 

Nan Thompson 

Iris Tomlinson 



Madeline Traina 

Louise Tucker 

Cecilia Valentine 

Annie Wade 



Fay Wakeman 

Virginia Walker 

Janice Watson 

Rebecca Wheless 



Edith Whitley 

Mary Louise Wilcox 

Patricia Willard 

Audrey Wood 



Amelia Wornom 

Kathryn Wygal 

Ila Yeatts 

Virginia Yeatts 




« 39 » 



THE NINETEEN - THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Mary Jane Young 

Mary Lee Young 

Emma Ziegler 



And so on and on towards Christmas until the last night before the holidays 
when we darted about throwing presents into rooms for our peanuts, singing and 
laughing, shouting, "We're going home!" 

That last night was glorious. The dining hall was decorated until it looked like 
a glittering room out of a palace. We trailed about in our formal gowns, opening 
presents, calling across tables piled high with colorful gifts. 

After a long time, we fell into bed and the next morning we awoke to the softly- 
sung chorus of "Silent Night, Holy Night." It was our glee club, guietly moving 
through our halls. How we loved those carols. 

When the Freshmen's sister class, the Juniors, gave their benefit, they staged a 
beauty contest and there never was a more breath-taking array of beauties on dis- 
play at one time. When Helen Clark, fragil fluff of femininity, came in second, did 
the class get thrilled and did they cheer? They did both. The frosh had scored 
another point. 

The ingenuity which was so marked at the kid party was expressed again in the 
cabaret given in March for their sister class, the Juniors. The hall was trans- 
formed into a night club with tables surrounding the orchestra and dance floor. 
It was difficult to determine whether the guests enjoyed dancing to Roland Le- 
veque's music most or watching the attractive dancers and singers in the floor 
show. 

Finally preparations for May Day and the daisy chain began to take form. May 
Day, oh boy, what joy! 

With the oncoming of summer, days were filled with skating, riding, swim- 
ming, and day-dreaming of this and that and other things. 

Time marches on, which is trite but true, and at last the class reached the end of 
their first year moving proudly on toward their ultimate goal. 

« 40 » 



THE NINETEEN -THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




MARY ALSTON BURGESS 




JANE SINCLAIR 


President 




Sponsor 


Vice-President 




MR. 


G. H. PARKER 


NANCY HERR 






CONCETTA MANGUS 


Secretary 






Treasurer 



SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 



Based on the fact that Sophomores are wise and 
know everything 

X"VND so we are, Sophomores — 

And so now we may look with composure upon the doubts and misgivings of 
our Freshman year. Remember perhaps a trifle wistfully, the newness of campus 

« 41 » 



THE NI NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Margaret Ashby 
Helen Berry 
Ruby Boole 



Eleanor Barnett 
Nan Birchett 
Dorothy Booth 



Nellie Beale Verna Bergeson 

Frances Boggs Charlotte Booker 

Marie Booth Mary Williamson Bowles 



life; feel a justifiable glow of pride at our successes, and yes — triumphs. For 'tis 
common proof that Caesar and his army ne're worked harder than the troops of last 
year's Freshmen. Plucking daisies — capturing daisies — chaining daisies. We'll 

« 42 » 



THE N INETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Eulalia Bowling Miriam Boyer Sue Bradenham Mary Brame 

Frances Brooks Maude Brown Mary Burgess Esther Burruss 

Juanita Carpenter Miriam Carpenter Glovena Cason Sara Ann Chandler 



remember in years to come, the sometimes riotous gayety of Frances Willard. Was 
there ever a Solomon who could devise a more ingenious manner of Christmas 
greetings than inscribing a dormitory hall with Old Dutch Cleanser? 

« 43 » 



THE N I NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Mary Woodley Chapman Rosalie Chaurtcey 

Dorothy Cockrell Edith Cockrell 

Doris Cooper Zella Cornwell 



Ruth Chesley 

Dorothy Coddington 

Arcelle Coulbourn 



Elizabeth Clopton 
Virginia Cooley 
Anne Covington 



But here! Sophomores are above all that; we must needs walk with dignity, 
wrap ourselves in garments of austerity, poise and wisdom. We needs must ab- 
sorb ourselves in the grave condition of an economic, industrial, and political 

« 44 » 



THE N INETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Grace Cox Ruth Curry Frances Cutchin Emily Day 

Virginia Dickinson Dorothy Diehl Elizabeth Dinges Winifred Dosch 

Nancy Dove Helen Downer Frances Downing Marjorie Eastman 



world, and then compile and launch our viewpoints on socialism. 

We must ponder carefully as to the advisability of a minstrel, a circus, or a 
lecture on world peace for our annual benefit. 

« 45 » 



THE NI NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Virginia Ebaugh Madora Forbush Hazel Ford Margaret Fraser 

Ella Mae Frye Elizabeth Garden Mary Garth Agnes Gayle 

Virginia Gonzalez Eleanor Gose Katherine Greaver Margaret Guinn 



This is not a biography of our class: our lives have just begun. We Sophomores 
are now making history! 

We this year are deciding into what channels our lives shall go. Will part of 

« 46 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRT Y-SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Jewel Hallett 

Ethel Hartman 

Nancy Herr 



Louise Harris 
Anne Hazlett 
Evelyn Herring 



Lucy Harris 
Lucille Healy 
Dorothy Hill 



Ruth Harris 

Mary Helsabeck 

Ida Hill 



us remain — learning from our Alma Mater how to better equip ourselves for life — 
will part of us, in a very few months, go out into the world determined to face and 
solve its problems? These things, with proverbial sophomoric wisdom, we take 



«47 



THE N I NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Mary Hinton 

Jane Iden 

Adeline Kirkpatrick 



Ruth Hooker 

Jeanne Johnson 

Sara Lanford 



Marjorie Horner 

Nina Jones 
Margaret Larson 



Helen Hyde 
Virginia Jones 
Mary V. Leary 



into weighty consideration, and even solve with the wisdom of Roman Senators. 

Was it Shakespeare or Irving Berlin who introduced a day of June into the 

month of January? Here on the ninth of the first month of the year, a day so alive, 



48» 



THE NINETEEN - TH I RTY - SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Virginia Leatherbury Flora Lee Hazel Leigh 

Sara McGlaun Concetta Mangus June Mankin 

Maxye Martin Mary Ellen Mays Katherine Meek 



i I 

Julia Lincoln 
Dorothy Martin 
Katherine Miles 



warm and beautiful; two seniors are playing golf — playing golf? In white ox- 
fords — summer sports suits? In Fredericksburg — on a day in January — impos- 
sible — but true! 

« 49 » 



THE N I NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Geraldine Mims Mary Lou Monroe Mildred Morris 

Edna Motley Jessie Nexsen Kathryn Nicholas 

Elnora Overley Frances Palmer Louise Parks 



Ruth Moseley 

Doris O'Brien 

Marguerite Peterson 



Are they enjoying themselves in the most wholesome — healthy carefree man- 
ner? Two young women, representatives of shall I say, the cream of the college? 
Sophomores — can we understand that blitheness, cheerfulness, optimism, can 

« 50 » 



THE N I NETEEN - T H I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Marjorie Remes 

Virginia Shenk 

Jane Sinclair 



Henrietta Roberts 

Barbara Shepherd 

Elsie Smith 



Lelia Saunders Anne Shaffer 

Sarah Ann Shield Willie Sims 

Maude Rae Smith Catharine Snellings 



be so closely interwoven with maturity, responsibility, veins of serious thought? 
Can we, Class of '39, have stumbled on to the secret of wisdom? 
Taking our cue from the stars, inscrutable in mute constancy, yet stars are 

« 51 » 



THE NINETEEN - THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Margaret Steele 
Roxie Sutherland 
Frances Thomas 



Sally Stoakley 
Maree Sweeney 
Hilda Thornton 



Juanita Stokes 
Phoebe Taliaferro 
Marion Timberlake 



Gaynelle Street 

Eleanor Thomas 

Janet Trenis 



known to twinkle in humor and good will — from the seniors — blackrobed and 
quiet, yet their ringing laughter is often heard; from a brook below the viaduct 
that has a season of calm stillness — it too sometimes bubbles in pure mirth. 



« 52 » 



THE NINETEEN - TH IRTY - SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Etta Turner 
Charlotte Willis 



Leonora Weiss 
Hildrup Wingo 
Mary Woolfolk 



Alyce Wenner 

Blanche Wood 

Irva Young 



Evelyn Wilkinson 
Georgiana Woodhouse 



Total then, if you please, our evaluations of living this thing O'Brien calls 
Strange Interlude (Life) and you will find we have come into a very commend- 
able philosophy that older heads and wiser heads would do well to emulate. 



53 » 



THE N INETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 



These then will be written on our pages — 

Gay episodes . . . Tears . . . Laughter? 

Of course! 

Love . . . Courage . . . Conviction? 

Definitely! 

Class History? 

No! 

Life? 

Always! 




54 » 



THE NINETEEN -THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




JEAN PLANTE CLARICE TAYLOR 

President Vice-President 

Sponsor 
DR. C. G. GORDON MOSS 



HELEN PRESSLEY 
Secretary 



DOROTHY BALLANCE 
Treasurer 



JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY 



(JN the hottest of fall days, those who have since become the "Individual Ju- 
niors" arrived. Upperclassmen and faculty at that time didn't recognize our unique 
qualities, for, on the surface, we were much like all the other Freshmen of the past; 

« 55 » 



THE N I NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Evelyn Andrews 



Katherine Armistead 



Dorothy Ballance 



Irene Blasdel 



Varina Britt 



Regina Brown 



Beatrice Campbell 



Helen Carter 



eager to do the right things, a trifle awkward, very numerous, and utterly ig- 
norant of the complexity of our surroundings. 



« 56 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Mary Jack Clary 



Frances Cox 



Elizabeth Ann Collier 



Jessie M. Crockett 



Nancy Cooper 



Mary Lawrence Davenport 



Annabel Cowles 



Charlotte Davis 



Soon, as we would now psychologically express it, we became adjusted and 
life took on a new meaning. We worked hard, actually studied (for the first six 
weeks) , strove for recognition, and gained it. 

When November came, we "got organized." Mary Kettenbeck was elected 
President, Elizabeth Trimble, Vice-President; Edith Weeks, Secretary; and Lil- 
lian Boswell, Treasurer. 

During the year, we worked hard. We gave our sister class, the Juniors, a 
Pirate Party, and presented a benefit that was very successful. When June came 

« 57 » 



THE N I NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Virginia Jane Davis 



Nina Mitchell Forrest 



Gladys Dickerson 



Winifred Goodwin 



Virginia Easley 



Anna Mae Harris 



Lena Florentine 



Mary Grace Hawkins 



and we were turned into Sophomores overnight, we thrilled with pride. 

As Sophs, our green appearance was much altered; compared with the incom- 
ing Freshmen, we proudly transformed into a brilliant orange color (experience, 
the new shade was called). By this time, our reputation was well established. 
Elizabeth Trimble had become our President, Irene Blasdel our Vice-President, 
Edith Weeks our Secretary and Lillian Boswell our Treasurer. 

Miss Grace Taylor, our very capable sponsor, assisted us untiringly. When the 
end of the year came, we looked back upon our achievements. Meditatively, we 

« 58 » 



THE NI NETEEN - THI RTY- SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



Margaret Haynie 



Helen Hill 



Edna M. Hersh 



Mary Cornelia Irby 



Elizabeth Jones 



Virginia Jordan 



Stirling Kerr 



Mary Kettenbeck 




chewed on our pencils (a habit we have now entirely eliminated) and thought. 
Let's see, there was that unique benefit, "The Sophomore Beauty Contest." One 

« 59 » 



THE NINETEEN- THI RTY- SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Mary Gardner Keyser 



Vivian Doris Lafoon 



Lena Lovett 



Mary Ellen Lee 



Marjorie Mankin 



Irma McConchie 



Louise McGee 



Martha McGee 



of the best times we ever had was in giving that. Then, that party for the Seniors, 
the tea for our class president upon her return after having been in an accident, 

« 60 » 



THE N INETEEN - TH IRTY - SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Jean Moore 



Katherine Pearman 



Annie Mae Morris 



Jean Plante 



Louise Otley 



Helen Wade Pressley 



Lucille Painter 



Mary Robert Pugh 



and surpassing all, we Billy Goats won the cup! 

Time passes as time will, and as September appeared on the calendar, we 
turned again to S.T.C. to see just how we would feel as upperclassmen. Ahem, 
it is just stupendous, isn't it, Juniors? We have lost many of our old members, but 
have been reenforced by the transfers from other colleges. Jean Plante is our 
President, and members of our class hold many of the most important positions on 
the hill. Another of renown, Dr. Moss, is our sponsor. Our "Beauty Contest" was 
such a success last year that we have decided to make it traditional. The contest 

« 61 » 



THE NINETEEN- THIRTY- SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Connie Reynolds 



Flora Ryan 



Zillah Rhoades 



Grace Schultz 



Alice Rife 



Bertha Shapleigh 



Delia Ricks 



May Lawrence Showard 



this year surely made history. Everyone had fun at the "Tacky Party" that we 
gave the Freshmen, too. They gave us a lovely party in return. In the field of 
sports, we improved immensely. We defeated every team in hockey except the 
Seniors, to whom we naturally defer out of pure politeness. We presented a Con- 
vocation program, pop programs, and other events of interest, especially the 
Junior-Senior Prom. Really, that was an occasion not to be missed! 

As the end of another year draws near, we look forward in eager anticipation, 
our eyes fixed upon that Devil-Goat Cup. Dare we hope to retain it for another 

« 62 » 



THE NINETEEN. THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



Kathryn Snead 



Lucille Snellings 



Marie Springer 



Calvert Spillman 



Patsy Staley 



Clarice Taylor 



Zelma Timberlake 



Elizabeth Trimble 




year? Yes, we do hope, bolder than merely hoping that, we are hoping to keep it 
in our possession next year. 

« 63 » 



THE N INETEEN- THIRTY- SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




Margaret Twiford 



Ann Wallace 



Elizabeth Woodbridge 




It has been a most pleasant year for us, one of many joys, and happy memories. 
Who knows what the Senior year holds for us? Looking back over our past, we 
suddenly realize that our future must be a bright one to make the past history a 
totality, so as individual members of the Junior Class we each invite you, 
Grow old along with me, for truly 
The best is yet to be. 
« 64 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




ALICE PHILLIPS VIRGINIA COMANN 

President Vice-President 

Sponsor 
MRS. J. H. DODD 

LUCY FLEET HEAD FRANCES McLEOD 

Secretary Treasurer 



«65 



THE N INETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




ELIZABETH ABBEY 

Major: Home Economics 

Minors: Science and Social Science 

THE unusual is here in a double sense. Betty lets out one 
compartment of her heart to the interests of the Old World; 
the other compartment to the rushing interest of young 
America. The Atlantic Ocean will prove her highway 
between the old and the new. Again Betty accepts the 
pursuit of an education for the sake of the culture and in- 
terest in it, not for the sake of a grade or a position behind 
the academic desk. We like her fine, even way of meet- 
ing the day's problems; if we were not afraid of the Mosaic 
laws we would envy and covet. 



JANE FRAZER ALRICH 



Major: Music 



Minors: English and History 



BY virtue of guality the campus unanimously places Jane 
in the category of songbirds. Sing, sing on the campus 
and on the keyboard combining melodies and words. Not 
only is Jane an excellent pianist but she is also an organist 
and graciously gave her services to one of the local 
churches. She reads music admirably and delights every- 
one with her first soprano in the Glee Club. Her member- 
ship in Alpha Phi Sigma is efficiency plus, her good fellow- 
ship in Y.W. declares itself in attitude plus, and her per- 
sistence in pursuit of education all the way from Spotsyl- 
vania Courthouse to F.S.T.C. rates plus. 



DOROTHY VANDERGRIFT BALL 

Major: Physical and Health Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

DOTTIE BALL is another of the beloved Physical Education 
Majors. She has been a member of the Athletic Associ- 
ation for four years, and a member of the A. A. Council for 
three. The class teams have always had her support dur- 
ing her four years. As a member of the hockey, baseball, 
basketball, volleyball, and swimming teams, she has done 
excellent work. She has been Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Dance Club, a member of House Council, and English 
Club. Alert, smiling, and cheerful, that is Dottie. 



« 66 • 



THE NINETEEN - TH I RTY - SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




TEMPLE LEE BEAZLEY 

Major: Elementary Education Minors: Music and Social Science 

TEMPLE LEE BEAZLEY— Temple is from Saluda, Virginia! Although we hear about her only now 
and then around the campus, if you were in Mary Ball you would hear "When Did You Leave 
Heaven" every night around ten forty -five when Temple would start towards the telephone booth. 
But Temple did keep quite busy with her studies and extra-curricular activities just the same. She 
was a member of Alpha Tau Pi, the German Club, Y.W.C.A., the Athletic Association and the 
basketball and hockey teams. Keep on singing, Temple Lee! 



MARY ELIZABETH BECKWITH 

Major : Commercial Education Minors : English and Social Science 

MARY ELIZABETH BECKWITH, known to us as Becky, may truly be classified with that group of 
girls who are the friendliest of the Seniors. Becky always has a smile for you, and a bit of excel- 
lent wit. The town of Fredericksburg claims her for its own. Becky is one of the Commercial 
majors and minors in English and Social Science. She holds membership in the Y.W.C.A. Com- 
mercial Club, and Town Girls Club. Loving to dance, naturally she belongs to the German Club. 
All who know this Senior concede she is extra fine quality. 



ABBIE BOURKE 

Major: Home Economics Minors: Science and English 

DID you ever wish you could be pretty, intelligent, well poised, popular, and a good dancer? 
Abbie has never wished for any of these, but she has them all. Abbie has edited the "Bullet" suc- 
cessfully for two years. She is a member of Alpha Phi Sigma, Home Economics Club, German 
Club, Science and Dramatic Clubs. She is the last word in social graces and has been in the May 
Court since her Sophomore year. She was secretary of the Leaders Club last year. Here's to a 
real girl — she's worthwhile. 

« 67 » 



THE NINETEEN- THI RTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




HAZEL BRICKER 

Major : History Minors : English and Home Economics 

THERE is in our midst a girl from the lonely Shenandoah Valley, Hazel Escue Bricker of 407 
Fourth Street, Shenandoah, Virginia. Hazel came to us from Harrisonburg State Teachers Col- 
lege to major in History and minor in English and Home Economics. She lends her cheerful and 
valuable support to the Grace K. Tanner Home Economics Club, the Matthew Fontaine Maury 
Science Club, and the Athletic Association in all of which she has membership. Hazel will have 
a good time wherever she goes with her unusual personality, and her ability to make friends. 



KATHERINE MAE BURGESS 

Major: Social Science Minors: Commercial Education and English 

WE would like to have the privilege of being Katherine's head supervisor and as such write her 
record sheet as she fares forth next month like this: Fair of face, sweet in manner; consistently 
neat and well groomed. Pleasing personality, makes friends easily, accepts a responsibility and 
stays with it till dispatched. Fine code of ethics and high standards of behavior. Knows the art 
of withholding unkind criticism. Deals with problems and people without friction. Efficient in her 
work. Has unusual mental poise. Willing to recommend Miss Burgess without reservation. 



DOROTHEA CHENAULT 

Major: Home Economics Minors: English and Science 

WHO of us would not be proud to know that curly-headed girl from 4400 New Kent Avenue, 
Richmond, Virginia, Dorothea Christine Chenault? Dot transferred from Harrisonburg State 
Teachers College in her Junior year. While here she has become an asset to the Grace K. Tan- 
ner Club, the Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club, and the German Club. Those who know 
Dot feel that her ability and her personal charm will insure her success no matter what she de- 
cides to do in the future. Good luck always, Dot. 



« 68 » 



THE NINETEEN -THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



DOROTHY CHITTUM 

Major: Home Economics 

Minors: Science and Social Science 

A GREAT many of our Senior Class seem to come from 
Richmond; here is another one, Dorothy Mildred Chittum. 
The Grace K. Tanner Home Economics Club, and the Mat- 
thew Fontaine Maury Science Club will miss her loyal sup- 
port, as will the Baptist Student Union Cabinet of which she 
is an active member. While she is not as well known as she 
might be, because she commuted for quite a while, it is a 
real pleasure to know her and to gain her friendship. 
Ability and worth carry people very far — even in these 
days, Dorothy. 



DOROTHY CLARK 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

ONE of the shy, rather retiring members of this jolly Senior 
Class is Dorothy Marie Clark who lives at 820 Chimbo- 
razo Boulevard, Richmond, Virginia. She is majoring in 
Elementary Education and minoring in English and Social 
Science. Although she is guiet and reserved, she has 
shown her ability while here and is a valuable member of 
Alpha Phi Sigma and the International Relations Club; to 
both of these she is loyal. Dorothy has a charm all her own 
and we know that success will be a reward for her indus- 
try and perseverance. 



ELIZABETH CLARK 

Major: Physical Education 

Minors: Elementary Education and English 

HOW would you like to be rated thus, and rated so because 
you rate so and not because you had to be rated for a 
write-up? Health so radiant that it is like unto an inspira- 
tion. A consistent way of seeing life through wholesome 
glasses. A phenomenal accuracy in weighing values. 
Individuality of viewpoint but willing to see the other 
person's viewpoint and open to conviction. Big enough to 
leave out the purely personal and pull like a good hench- 
man with the group; to undertake a project or a game with 
eagerness and finish with enthusiasm. 




69 » 



THE N INETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




JACQUELINE CLARK 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors : Physical Education and History 

JACK'S interests on the campus were varied. Y.W. Cab- 
inet found her reliable, so much so that she became vice- 
president of the association. Jack went out for sports and 
made some of the teams. As secretary of A. A. she served 
efficiently. Glee Club valued her; Alpha Phi Sigma 
honored her. As a Freshman she was the representative to 
Student Council; as a Sophomore, president of her class 
and member of the Leaders Club. Jack will be remembered 
easily, pleasantly, and lastingly. 



VIRGINIA LEE COMANN 

Major: Commercial Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

IT was to the advantage of Fredericksburg when a certain 
transfer, Virginia Lee Comman, adopted our Alma Mater 
for her own. Her election to the vice-presidency of the 
Senior Class was deserved recognition. In addition, she 
has worked with the Commercial and German Clubs, and 
Y.W.C.A. As for description, we need only say, she's 
endowed with a striking personal appearance and com- 
manding personality. Virginia comes from the south- 
western part of our state — to be exact, Norton, Virginia. 



MARY ELLEN CREHAN 

Major: Science Minors: English and Social Science 

MARY ELLEN CREHAN— another real Yankee— came to 
S.T.C. from 42 Brookford Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
She was another reserved, studious girl. But regardless of 
her quiet life at college, she did participate in some of the 
social activities. She was class representative to Student 
Council during her Senior year and also Vice-President 
of the Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club. In addition 
to these organizations, she was also a member of the Inter- 
national Relations Club, the Modern Portias, the Riding 
Club, the Y.W.C.A., and Alpha Phi Sigma Fraternity. 



« 70 » 



THE NINETEEN- THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




LUCILLE CROCKETT 

Major: English Minors: Elementary Education and Social Science 

THE little girl with the happy smile — that's Lucille Crockett from Wythville, Virginia. She knows 
all about the art of teaching 'cause she taught a year before coming to F.S.T.C.; East Radford was 
Lucille's first college. While here she has been active in the English Club. Remember how at- 
tractive her doll show was last year? As a member of the Senior Class, Lucille has served on com- 
mittees and contributed much to the activities of the class. We shall remember you always, 
Lucille, and to you, the best forever, and always. 



ELIZABETH DAVIS 

Major: Elementary Education Minors: Social Science and French 

AN interesting member of our Senior Class is Mary Elizabeth Davis of Raccoon Ford, Virginia. 
She transferred from Wilson Teachers College in Washington, D.C., in her Junior year. We feel 
that she is a decided addition to our class. Since she has been here, she has become a member of 
the Riding Club and the Young Woman's Christian Association. We know that Betty will succeed 
as a teacher for she has the ability to get along with people and she makes friends easily. Good 
luck always, Betty. 



ALICE PERKINS DEW 

Major: Elementary Education Minors: English and Social Science 

ALICE as nearly approaches a perfect college woman as any one on our class roll. Many can do 
one thing fairly well but few can do many things on a sustained high level of ability. Alice is 
versatile. She has dramatic talent. She has definite business ability as is evidenced in her sev- 
eral years of work as Advertising Manager of the "Battlefield." She thinks for herself and reads 
discriminatingly and as a result is a delightful conversationalist. Recommendation? She needs 
none; she is a recommendation. 

« 71 » 



THE NINETEEN - THIRTY -SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




CATHERINE ELIZABETH DRYDEN 

Major: Mathematics Minors: Science and Social Science 

CATHERINE ELIZABETH DRYDEN, from 186 Spring Road, Vineland, New Jersey, is another one 
of these northerners who was outstanding at S.T.C. both socially and scholastically. The offices 
she held were President of Alpha Phi Sigma, Vice-President of said fraternity, and Tennis Chair- 
man of the Athletic Association. She belonged to the Leaders Club, the International Relations 
Club, the Science Club, the Y.W.C.A., and the hockey, baseball, and the basketball teams. Al- 
though "Kay" was usually guite reserved, one will always remember that little "giggle" of hers. 
It was "catching" too! 

ELLEN EASTERLY 

Major: Physical Education Minors: Elementary Education and English 

DON'T we all know that gay Senior, Ellen Easterly, from 3803 Chamberlayne Avenue, Richmond, 
Virginia! Ellen shows her particular ability in the field of dramatics, having taken prominent 
parts in the Dramatic Club productions. Besides being a member of the Dramatic Club, she is a 
member of the Modern Portias, Athletic Association, Hockey, Basketball, and Baseball Teams. 
She is the Senior Class Reporter. Her lovable personality will carry her a long way in her chosen 
field. 



Major: Social Science 



MARTHA EPES 

Minors: Commercial Education and English 

HAPPY and gay, everybody's friend — that's Martha Epes. To know her is to admire her. Martha 
came to F. S.T.C. from Blackstone College, and incidentally she is from Blackstone, Virginia. Mar- 
tha should be the ideal teacher for the future school children. Whether at work or play, this at- 
tractive little Senior is always at her best. "Why should I worry?" is Martha's motto, for she knows 
that to all who look ahead will come the best of everything. F. S.T.C. will truly miss you, Martha, 
but our loss will be somebody's gain no matter where you go. 



« 72 



THE NINETEEN - TH I RTY - SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



CHARLOTTE FRAZER 



Major: Home Economics 



Minors: Science and History 



LUCKY is the girl who can really cook and sew, and en- 
joy it. Charlotte Frazer can do both, and we think she en- 
joys both. As Secretary -Treasurer of the Home Economics 
Club, an active member of the Science Club, and Alpha 
Phi Sigma — national honorary society — she has contribu- 
ted much to the life of our campus. We always like Char- 
lotte to serve us in the tea room because she gives extra 
large ice cream cones; then too, that happy, cheerful smile 
is always an incentive to stop at the tea room. 



MAMIE GILLESPIE 



Major: Home Economics 



Minors: Science and English 



HAVE you ever read a book whose every page presented 
new and more desirable characteristics? If so — you have 
an idea of Mamie. We find them like her but once in a 
while. She is a studious and hard worker, always seeking 
to please. Equal parts of intelligence and capability, and 
a keen sense of humor make Mamie a person well worth 
knowing. She is majoring in Home Economics and minor - 
ing in Science and English. She is a member of the Home 
Economics Club and the Science Club. Her home is in 
Tazewell, Virginia. 



MARGARET GRAVES 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors : History and English 

IF a mouth or a nose indicate phases of character then so 
does a voice. We know it in the case of Margaret for her 
voice is an index of what she is and it tells just what she 
wishes to be known. It is a pleasant voice but a positive 
voice and one that has brought one hundred per cent re- 
turns while she has served as treasurer of Alpha Tau Pi. 
This Senior came to us from Harrisonburg and what that 
worthy sister college lost our Alma Mater gained. When 
Margaret leaves us in June we know with confidence that 
she will become a living advertisement of the College that 
adds to its desirability. 

« 73 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRT Y-SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




SARAH BURT GRAY 

Major: Physical Education 

Minors: Science and Social Science 

SARAH BURT is gentle mannered and soft voiced to the 
point of measuring up to a Shakespearean standard. She 
is a restful type for not a gesture nor a tone of voice but 
pleases the eye or the ear. She is a graceful girl, too, and 
will add to any discriminating social occasion. And yet 
with all these heaven-given qualities she is both unspoiled 
and earnest, and she so apportions her time that scholar- 
ship holds its rightful sway. This Senior is a nicely mixed 
compound from out life's crucible. 



GERTRUDE GRIFFIN 

Major: Commercial Education 

Minors: English and History 

FROM Edgerton, Virginia, we find another one of our seni- 
ors, Gertrude Griffin. Because of her enthusiasm for Com- 
mercial Education, she has taken an active part in the Com- 
mercial Club. Her interest in English was easily recognized 
by her active participation in the Modern Portias. Sincere, 
friendly, and always willing to lend a helping hand is Ger- 
trude. "Not too serious, not too gay, but a good old pal in 
every way." If you once meet Gertrude, you will desire 
to know her better. 



ELIZABETH HALEY 

Major: Commercial Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

HER delightful sense of humor and the sparkling air of con- 
geniality which predominates her every move, are but 
two of the pleasing characteristics that make our "Buff" 
what we all know her to be — an entertaining conversation- 
alist, a swell pal, and a real, honest-to-goodness friend. 
"Buff" has contributed much to the various organizations 
on the hill. She holds the position of Secretary of the Peace 
Committee, is a member of Alpha Tau Pi, and is Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Commercial Club. She is from Toana, Virginia. 



« 74 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRT Y-SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




JULIA HARRIS 

Major: Home Economics Minor: Physical Education 

JULIA HARRIS knows that there are two good rules for healthy living — proper food and exercise. 
And very wisely she has dedicated her college career to the study of both of them. Part of her 
days are spent in the Home Economics Laboratories, and the remainder on the athletic field. We 
consider such a course to be the product of sane thinking in the mind of an intelligent girl. If 
Julia can bake a cake with the same success that she demonstrates in hitting a home run, then, 
indeed, will the modern generation have bridged "Mother's Cooking" with the feminine ath- 
letic champions of today. 

LUCY FLEET HEAD 

Major: Science Minors: History and English 

LUCY FLEET is endowed with many fine gualities. Her sincerity, kindliness, and good humor 
have been the open sesame to numberless friends, and have made for fine recognition on the hill. 
She has an earnestness in her work in her affiliation with many organizations which has made her 
membership a benefit to those groups. She has been Vice-President of Freshman Commission, 
Alpha Phi Sigma, German Club, Leaders Club, and in the present year is President of the 
Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club and also an officer in the Senior Class. 



PHYLLIS HERSH 

Major: English Minors: Commercial Education and Social Science 

ONE of the very likable members of our Senior Class is Phyllis Hersh from Balboa, Canal 
Zone. Her interests have been scattered over a varied field of social and civic activities. Phyllis 
was Treasurer of Freshman Commission. She has been a member of the Dance Club and the 
Commercial Club since her Freshman year. She is a member of the German Club, and she was 
Chairman of Devotionals for one guarter. A winning personality, a pleasing smile, a friendly 
word for everyone — these are the things that make us remember Phyllis. 



75 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRTY -SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




LUCILE HOLLOWAY 

Major: French Minors: Science and Social Science 

FROM Port Royal, Virginia, we have another red-haired member of the Senior Class, Lucile 
Holloway. She is a valuable member of several organizations on the hill. She is a member of the 
German Club, the Riding Club, Alpha Phi Sigma, the Athletic Association, the Dance Club in 
1934-35, and the Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club. All of these clubs will need someone 
who can fill her place. Loyalty and determination are two characteristics of a good teacher as 
well as of a leader, and Lucile possesses both of these to a great extent. 



LOIS GAYE HOLMES 

Major: Elementary Education Minors: Social Science and Commercial Education 

LOIS is one of those guiet, easy-going town girls who says very little and does a great deal. Lois 
has been a valuable member of all the clubs to which she belonged. Her dramatic ability has 
been exhibited on more than one occasion when the Dramatic Club sponsored performances on 
the hill; her spirit of helpfulness has aided in the production of many others. The Athletic Asso- 
ciation and the Riding Club were two organizations of which she became a member because of 
her own personal desire, and the Commercial Club has found her a cheerful helper. 



PEARL E. HUDSON 

Major: Elementary Education Minors: Social Science and English 

WASHINGTON was not the only person of authority who crossed the Delaware. Virginia Hall 
proudly salutes and willingly broadcasts that it has a Pearl of a President. She so wears the toga 
of authority that there is no mistaking she expects a rightful response, yet there is something so 
genial about this stunning girl that one does her bidding without scarcely sensing the metal 
within the velvet glove. Pearl is majoring in Elementary Education; even now we can see the 
adoring eyes of her students and her desk laden with the red, red apple and the red, red rose. 

« 76 » 



THE NINETEEN -THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



ALICE ELIZABETH JOHNSON 

Major: Physical and Health Education 

Minors: English and Science 

A LIVING interpretation of a good sport is Lib. She has 
played on every team her class put into the field. She adds 
to her activities by playing a saxophone and being ex- 
ceptionally fine in Creative Dancing. As Vice-President 
of A. A. and a member of its Council, Lib has been a pro- 
gressive executive. Her ability to climb results from much 
mountain practice — she comes from Narrows, Virginia, 
and will take successfully any "steep" whether it is visible 
or invisible. 



ELIZABETH KALNEN 

Major: Social Science 

Minors : English and Physical Education 

ELIZABETH KALNEN— known only as "Becky" Kalnen— 
added much humor to our many class and student body 
meetings! Becky — will any of us ever forget her? We are 
looking forward to the day when she will go "girlish"! 
And wasn't she a scream in our Junior Benefit as Ed Wynn? 
She loved "A. A.," it seemed, for she played on practically 
every team! During her four years she was on her dormi- 
tory soccer, speedball and basketball teams; the class 
hockey, basketball, and baseball teams; and the "Devil" 
hockey, basketball, and baseball teams. 



OLIVIA MEADOR KEARNS 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors: Physical Education and Social Science 

OLIVIA came to S.T.C. from 904 Madison Avenue, Win- 
ston-Salem, North Carolina. During her four years at col- 
lege she has been unusually outstanding in the social ac- 
tivities at the College. She has held the offices of President 
of the tri-unit dormitories, Madison, Ball, and Custis; Vice- 
President of the Junior Class and Secretary of Alpha Tau Pi. 
She is a member of the Student Council, the Leaders 
Club, Alpha Phi Sigma, the Creative Dance Club, the Col- 
lege Orchestra, the Athletic Association, the Glee Club, 
and the Y.W. Choir. Olivia, although somewhat reserved, 
is one of the friendliest girls on the hill. 




« 77 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRT Y-SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




Major: French 



PAULINE KING 

Minors: Art and Social Science 



WHAT a horoscope that girl has. Born under an artistic 
meridian the influence of her particular star fostered a cre- 
ative talent for art work, and a fine individual interpreta- 
tion of music. With all, though, Pauline happily propor- 
tions the practical with the artistic and in her affiliation 
with numerous organizations she has invariably been a 
steadying and helpful factor. She is well worth cultivat- 
ing and happy is the girl who has her for a friend, for with 
Pauline a friend can have no faults. 



FRANCES KIRKWOOD 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

FRANCES looks at you with a pair of bonny blue eyes 
wherein lies a guiet friendliness that does not fail, but 
which look through a pair of philosophical lenses that 
enable her to approach a problem, analyze that problem, 
and solve it with an unruffled ease coveted by many. There 
is something wholesome and steadying in her relation to 
her comrades whether that relation be one of friendship, 
group contact, or officially in the many organizations that 
have honored her. There is no higher tribute to be paid 
this Senior. 



VIRGINIA ANN LIPSCOMB 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors : Music and Social Science 

ANN-HATH-A-WAY, Ann-hath-a-way all of her own. True 
she majors in these studies but the finest thing she majors 
in is her unselfish distribution of her own time and talents 
in the interest of the College. It may be the earnest assum- 
ing of authority, or it may be her numerous affiliations with 
clubs and organizations; it may be her talent at the piano, 
her voice in the group, or better still her influence on the 
campus, but wherever she casts in her lot, she becomes an 
asset to the group. 



« 78 » 



THE NINETEEN -THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




FAY LUTHER 
Majors: Music Minors: Social Science and English 

"SHE shall have music wherever she goes" — this characterizes that vivacious Senior, Fay C. 
Luther. With a smile on her face and a song in her heart, Fay has won a place on the hill that will 
be hard to fill. The cutest freshman of 1933 was President of the Glee Club, member of Y.W.C.A., 
Alpha Phi Sigma, I.R.C., Y.W Choir, German, Dance, English, and Leaders Clubs. Literary? 
Yes, for the literary editor of the "Battlefield," feature editor of the "Bullet," and Senior historian 
is the little girl from 162 Marshall Terrace, Danville, Virginia. 



FRANCES MAYSE 

Major: Physical Education Minors: Mathematics and Social Science 

ANOTHER one of the many transfers who came to us is Frances M. Mayse of Purcellville, Virginia, 
who transferred from Farmville State Teachers College in her Sophomore year. Billy, as she is 
best known, has been active in many of the clubs and organizations on the campus. Billy played 
on the Devil and Varsity teams and she is a member of the Athletic Association. Her ability and 
general air of cheerfulness have carried her along very well through school. 



HELEN PECK McCLAUGHERTY 

Major: Physical Education Minors: Commercial and History 

THE Alchemist was lavish with this blond when he put so much of grace in one pattern and, not 
content, he added a sunlit disposition. Peck will use these attributes not only in self-enjoyment, 
but with them she will gladden any environment by putting a little bit more of the artistic into the 
common light of day. With her interpretation of the spirit of play, she will put a premium on the 
value and the appreciation of buoyant health. She makes friends, too, without half trying. 

« 79 » 



THE NINETEEN -THIRTY- SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




KARIS JEANNE McELROY 

Graduate from Hollins 
Normal Professional Certificate from Fredericksburg 

KARIS must have the Irish in her veins for the name suggests stretches of heather-scented hills on 
the emerald isle, but the sweet manner and the whimsical smile just are Irish. This girl came to us 
from Hollins College for the first quarter only, so that our own College scarcely has had a chance 
to incorporate her in the College status in a general way. Hollins has in her a splendid repre- 
sentative and we are glad to have had her comradeship if for only a term. There is a latch -string 
from here to her door. Come back, Karis, at any time and bide a wee with us. 



FRANCES ELIZABETH McLEOD 

Major: History Minors: English and Physical Education 

FRAN, able treasurer of our Junior and Senior Classes, came all the way from the Palmetto state and 
has proven to be a perfect representative. She was a member of Mary Ball House Council, Glee 
Club, German Club, Athletic Association and a participant in various class basketball teams. It 
was a terrific shock when Fran appeared the first day of her Senior year with her traditional long 
hair short, but we soon got accustomed to her short curls and forgave her for the cutting. She is a 
grand person and an active student whose smile and personality can never be forgotten by her 
classmates. 

MARY FRANKLYN MILLER 

Major: Dietetics Minors: Physical Education and Science 

MARY, who was the able President of the German Club during her Senior year, was the kind of 
person who looked as perfectly attired in a gym suit after participating in a basketball, hockey or 
baseball game as she did at the Germans in a long flowing frock. Her place in Freshman Com- 
mission gave her introduction on the campus, and during her college years she has been an out- 
standing student, who endeared herself to many of her fellow classmates. Her position as Presi- 
dent of the German gave her entry into Leaders Club. Mary is one of the most versatile students 
on the hill. 



THE NINETEEN-THIRT Y-SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 



MARY CHAPMAN MITCHELL 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors: English and Science 

MARY CHARLOTTE, dark haired and interesting, knows 
an unusual lot about the tragedies of Shakespeare and 
though she minors in English we think this literary prefer- 
ence is an innate appreciation rather than a matter of 
academic requirement. She holds membership in Alpha 
Phi Sigma, Modern Portias, the Glee Club, and the German 
Club. She has a sense of humor that delights, an unusual 
personality, and a pair of luminous brown eyes that brought 
results in romance. 




NANNIE MOORE 



Major: History 

Minors : 



Commercial Education and English 



NANNIE MOORE, the girl from Odd, Virginia, came to us 
from Blackstone College, and during her time here on the 
hill she has won the admiration of all of us. This quiet and 
reserved girl is always willing to lend a helping hand. 
While at Blackstone, Nannie was interested in Y.W. work, 
and our own Y.W.C.A has profited by her presence here. 
Always happy, yet not too frivolous Nannie, as she goes 
about on the campus, making friends with all those with 
whom she comes in contact. 



CAROLINE MORRIS 

Major: English Minors: French and Social Science 

CAROLINE MORRIS, residing at 701 Prince Edward Street, 
was outstanding in the Town Girls Club during her four 
years. She was Reporter in it while a Junior. She held mem- 
bership in the International Relations Club during her 
Junior and Senior years and in the Science Club during her 
Sophomore and Junior years. Her ability in English was 
shown during her last two years in the Modern Portias. 
We shall always remember Caroline with a friendly "hey" 
for all, and we are sure the Town Girls will miss her cheery 
presence. 



« 81 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRT Y-SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




RUBY MOTLEY 



Major: Latin 



Minors: English and History 



OUR hats are off to a girl who has what it takes to complete 
a four-year course in three years. To a girl who not only 
made a four-star scholastic record, but who entered into 
extra-curricular activities too numerous to list. Her mem- 
bership has been particularly outstanding in I.R.C., Modern 
Portias, Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club, and Alpha 
Phi Sigma. We have found out that it takes Ruby little time 
to climb the rungs in the ladder to success. Perhaps that 
accounts for her scholastic record, and a host of friends. 



FRANCES GRAY NASH 

Major: English Minors: Science and Social Science 

FRANK was one of our town girl classmates. She lives at 
724 William Street, Fredericksburg. Really we just 
couldn't have existed without "Frank"! She was friendly to 
everyone on the campus and was always willing to par- 
ticipate in programs given in various organizations. Dur- 
ing her Senior year she made a splendid Y.W.C.A. Presi- 
dent. She was Treasurer of the Leaders Club, President 
of the Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club, Secretary of 
the State International Relations Club Association, and so 
many other organizations have come into her scope that we 
just can't list them here. 



KATHRYN ELIZABETH NEBELUNG 

Major: Commercial Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

KATIE is a very amiable person with a sincere, pleasing 
and charming personality. Beginning her four-year jour- 
ney as a member of the Freshman Commission, she has 
served in various organizations; namely, "Bullet" Staff for 
the past three years, typist, alumnae editor, and business 
manager, vice-president of Commercial Club, and Ger- 
man Club. Katie hails from Portsmouth, Virginia. S.T.C. 
will surely miss this petite vivacious personage with her 
delightful mannerisms. 



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THE NINETEEN-THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




VIRGINIA NORTHAM 

Major: Commercial Education Minors: English and Science 

KEEN as the north wind is Virginia Northam of Church View, Virginia. The Commercial Club, 
"Commercial Echoes, " and the Commercial Club Executive Council will confirm that statement. 
In her Freshman year, Virginia played excellent basketball for her team; in her Sophomore year 
she played yet better basketball for her team. For the past two years we have admired her ex- 
travagantly in her role of a deft drummer in the college orchestra. 



ELIZABETH OSBORN 

Major: English Minors: Social Science and French 

AS classic as the literature in which she has excelled is Betty who has been President of the 
Modern Portias for the past two years. She came to the foreground as a member of the Freshman 
Commission, and since this debut has been active in the International Relations Club, the "Bullet," 
Athletic Association, Glee Club, and Y.W.C.A. Her activities in all organizations during her col- 
lege days marked her as one with a goal, and as one who knew how to go about attaining it. 
Quiet, sincere, and deep, Betty is an inspiration to her friends and comrades. 



JUANITA OWEN 

Major: Social Science Minors: Elementary Education and English 

JUANITA, the girl from Long Island, Virginia, who seems to be swept along by the wind as she 
scurries about the campus is a person you envy for she refuses to worry. If to study for a test or to 
sleep is the guestion, she sleeps. Yet Modern Portias and Alpha Tau Pi will stand witness that she 
is very wide awake. In her Senior year Nita has held office in the Dramatic Club and has been a 
member of the Athletic Association and the German Club. For two years she has been as ex- 
guisite as a cameo as a May Court attendant. 

« 83 » 



THE NINETEEN -TH I RTY -SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




LOIS CHRISTINE PETERSEN 

Major: Latin Minors: English, History and Social Science 

LOIS CHRISTINE PETERSEN, better known as Pete, was the happiest-go-lucky girl in our class. 
Everything was a joke to her. Will she ever have a serious moment? We wonder! She is one of 
the few Yankees we had as a classmate. Pete lives on West Avon Road, Unionville, Connecticut, 
in case you want to go up to see her. Can you imagine Pete teaching Latin? She was Treasurer of 
the Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club and in addition she belonged to Alpha Phi Sigma 
Fraternity, the International Relations Club and the Y.W.C.A. 



ALICE MARIE PHILLIPS 

Major: English Minors: Elementary Education and Social Science 

ALICE, President of her lunior and Senior Classes, has never lost her smile though she has worried 
more over them than they were worth. She has come through, though, with colors flying high 
and is a beloved leader. Yet with all this responsibility Alice has found time for the German Club, 
Dramatic, English, and Leaders Clubs and Alpha Tau Pi. 

Alice is the third of three sisters who have come to us from Rotan, Texas. We like them and 
would, if we could, legally adopt the Phillipses. 



LUCY LELIA PIERSON 

Major: Home Economics Minors: Science and Social Science 

IT is not often that youth at tender age learns the value of budgeting time in a curve all-inclusive 
— interest in friends, interest in work, interest in constructive projects that are impersonal. Lucy 
approaches a day glad of its challenge to attain; she knows how to balance a diet but she also 
knows how to balance a day. We are glad institutional reguirements put this Senior into uniform 
and sent her into economic responsibility in the south unit of Seacobeck. You were appreciated 
Lucy, and liked very much. You gave added efficiency and tone to our surroundings. 



« 84 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



SELMA MAY PILAND 

Major: Social Science Minors: English and French 

FROM Holland, Virginia, came Selma in 1933. So suc- 
cessful was she in her studies that soon she became a mem- 
ber of Alpha Phi Sigma. 

Being blessed with a naturally fine voice, she was a mem- 
ber of the Glee Club, and in her Senior year served as club 
treasurer. She was also in the Y.W. Choir. 

She has been active in Modern Portias, International Re- 
lations and Y.W. For several years Selma was on the "Bul- 
let" Staff and in '36-'37 she was its circulation manager. 
Her conscientiousness and splendid execution of duties 
will not be forgotten by her co-workers. 



LORENE MOFFETTE POTTER 

Major: Science Minors: French and Social Science 

LORENE MOFFETTE POTTER hails from Bowling Green, 
Virginia. Her winning personality gave her the honor of 
Presidency in the Baptist Students Union and Vice-Presi- 
dency in the International Relations Club during her Senior 
year. She was a member of Alpha Phi Sigma throughout 
her four years. Lorene majored in Science and thus be- 
came a member of the Matthew Fontaine Maury Science 
Club. She held membership in the Y.W. and the Leaders 
Club. We really believe the saying that, "Good things 
come in small packages." 



FLOSSIE RATCLIFFE 

Major: Commercial Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

IT is nice to be distinctive in manner and interestingly dif- 
ferent in the way you say things and do things. Flossie is 
heir to both and with such assets plus her ability there is a 
career in the offing for her in the commerical world. Flos- 
sie already looks like the finished private secretary, nor will 
we be at all surprised to see some very fine publicity before 
many years concerning Miss Ratcliffe's placement with one 
of those big, million-dollar corporations that still go sailing 
along on a gold standard. 

« 85 » 



THE NINETEEN -THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




DOROTHY RAMEY 

Major: Commercial Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

WE would the campus had more girls like Dorothy. Dot, 
with her gracious and commanding personality, her grand 
posture, her perfect walk, her — Oh! everything about her 
— just exactly right. As a caption to her gualities, she was 
crowned Queen of the May last year, and nobly did she 
enact a natural role. Here's to her, the living essence of 
refinement, breeding, and charming etiguette, a possessor 
of these things in the May court, classroom, and on the 
campus. Because she knows how to wear them, we recom- 
mend orchids to Dorothy — Fredericksburg, Virginia. 



EVELYN PAULINE RIGGS 

Major: Social Science Minors: English and French 

WERE it not for Evelyn, the Glee Club would find the books 
missing more often. Being Glee Club librarian was one 
of her trivial duties because many organizations claimed 
her as a member. Being musically inclined, Glee Club 
always found something for her to do, so in '35-' 36 she was 
reporter and in '36-'37 she was in Y.W. Choir. She has 
been reporter and associate editor of the "Bullet" Staff. 
Evelyn was one of the members of Modern Portias, and 
managed to attend the Germans. Y.W. also claims her. 



ELLA GORDON ROWE 

Major: Commercial Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

THIS red-headed Senior is everybody's friend, and if you 
once meet her you will naturally want to see her again. 
Ella Gordon Rowe is one of our outstanding girls, and her 
contributions during her four years here are numerous. 

As a freshman Ella Gordon was a member of Commis- 
sion. From then on she displayed her leadership gualities 
as Devotional Chairman of Y.W.C.A., Freshman Commis- 
sioner, President of Frances Willard, and a member of 
Student Council. Alpha Phi Sigma, Leaders Club, and the 
Commercial Club are other organizations to which Ella 
Gordon has contributed. 



« 86 » 



THE NINETEEN - TH I RTY- SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




EMILY CLAY ROWE 
Major: Science Minors: Mathematics and Social Science 

CAPABLE, well-read, that's Emily Clay, our neighbor classmate from 1211 Caroline Street, Fred- 
ericksburg, Virginia. She seems a veritable storehouse of knowledge — why she always has the 
answer to that particular question right at at tongue-tip. But all of Emily Clay's energy wasn't 
turned to scholastic attainment for she has been outstanding in the clubs and fraternities of the 
College, holding a major office in Town Girls Club, Science Club, International Relations Club, 
Virginia Association of International Relations Clubs, and Alpha Phi Sigma. It might be said here 
that she possesses outstanding ability to regulate finances. 

FRANCES SHERMAN 
Major: Commercial Education Minors: English and History 

FRANCES SHERMAN has about all the Greek Letters on the hill attached to her name. She is 
President of Pi Omega Pi, and at the same time, is Vice-President of Alpha Phi Sigma. She is a 
member of the Commercial Club, the Leaders Club, Modern Portias, and has twice served as 
Publicity Chairman on the Y.W.C.A. Cabinet. As treasurer of the Y.W.C.A. she has proven in- 
valuable. Frances is diligent, reliable, persevering, and painstaking, possessing a most coveted 
sense of dry humor, and disarming geniality. Frances is from Norfolk, Virginia. 

REBECCA SILVER 
Major: Elementary Education Minors: English and History 

SOMETHING cool and pleasing about the metal, silver; something quiet and appealing about 
Silver, the girl. It is easy to visualize the influence of this Senior on the group before her. A posi- 
tive manner yet it will be one that commands respect, for it will be tempered with a clear-cut 
spirit of give and take, the giving done with a spirit of wishing to be of service; the taking with 
appreciation for the gesture from the other person. Rebecca is not English but she has in a pro- 
nounced degree that poised way of looking at a problem so characteristic of our cousins across 
the sea. 



« 87 » 



THE NINETEEN - THI RTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




FRANCES CURTIS SMITH 

Major: Elementary Education Minors: Social Science and English 

PICTURE a girl whose bearing is rather reserved, but who possesses a delightful sense of humor, 
and a smile that readily wins you. Such a girl is Frances Curtis. It is difficult to think of Y.W. 
without thinking of this right-arm official. With egual ability she has put her shoulder to the 
efforts of honor fraternities, to the loyal support of the King's English, to a zealous support of the 
interests of the athletic program, or to a response to the call from other groups, all of whom recog- 
nized her worth. Frances is from Hampton, and proud of it. 

JAQUELIN RANDOLPH SMITH 

Major: Social Science Minors: English and Science 

JAQUELIN — that is a name which calls up all sorts of lovely gualities. The girl herself is frank 
without being unkind; friendly without being familiar; refined without being prudish; well-bred 
because it is her heritage; eligible to be a May Day Queen, but better still an every-day gueen be- 
cause Heaven made her so; modern to a desired degree, yet with charms and graces as sweet and 
old-fashioned as a garden bouquet and as discriminating in ideas and attitudes as her ancestral 
lines of Jefferson and Randolph would have her. 

MARGARET VIOLA SMITH 

Major: Commercial Education Minors: Physical Education and English 

BY birth certificate and by baptism she is Margaret Viola Smith, but to her scores of friends she is 
Peggy. Peggy is good to look at; good to play with; good to work with, for she has team-work 
and cooperation reduced to an art in her dealings with the organizations with which she is 
affiliated as a member, or as an official. Peggy is an example of the story of the talents, having 
been given neither one talent, nor two talents, but the whole ten, and she uses those talents to 
their best advantage in service for her comrades and her College. 



« 88 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



VIRGINIA JOYCE SNIDOW 

Major: English Minors: Social Science and French 

NOW in truth there is a girl in whom desired gualities are 
so nicely proportioned that the most exacting standards will 
approve her as a representative Senior. We wish her Aca- 
demic path had crossed ours in her pigtail days instead of 
her Senior year; we shall see her go grudgingly when the 
session's bells ring out the Class of '37. Just what disposition 
the placement bureau will make of Virginia Joyce remains 
undisclosed as yet, but whatever classroom draws her 
from out the educational lottery draws a scholar and a lady. 




VIRGINIA SPAIN 
Major : Mathematics Minors : French and Social Science 

QUIET, sincere, and true in all she undertakes — that is 
Virginia. During her four years at Fredericksburg she has 
proven to be one of our conscientious girls. Her remarkable 
scholastic record tells its own story; she knows how to jug- 
gle figures in Math like a magician, she moves through the 
maze of Social Science with the greatest of ease, and as for 
French, she speaks it in such fashion as to make one wonder 
if it should be Paris insead of Suffolk. And yet Virginia has 
found time to contribute to honor sorority interests. 



RUTH STAPLES 



Major: Latin 



Minors : English and French 



FIVE minutes with Ruth is all that is needed to convince 
you she is a staple standby. In Latin she is proficient to the 
point that she can converse in the tongue like unto a 
Roman senator. And yet with all this learning on her 
slender shoulders she is delightfully vivacious. Ruth also 
budgeted her time so that she had a quota of hours both 
for an honor sorority and to walk and talk with the Portias. 
We do not presume to be prophetic but we believe that 
Ruth will acquire honor for herself and for her College 
Mater. 



THE N I NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 



EDITH CHEATHAM TAYLOR 

Major: Physical and Health Education 

Minors : English and Social Science 

CHEATHAM has supported her class teams by playing 
hard and faithfully at baseball; hockey, of which she was 
the manager for her class team; basketball and volleyball. 
She soon gained a place on the A. A. Council as Chairman 
of Swimming. As a swimmer she ranks high, having passed 
her Senior Life-Saver's examination. Nor have her interests 
been directed only toward her major field; Cheatham has 
served on the Business Staff of the "Bullet," and is a mem- 
ber of the Dance Club, the English Club, and the Dramatic 
Club. She's a stepper, that Cheatham! 



PHYLLIS TEED 



Major: French 



Minors: Latin and History 



PHYLLIS is silhouetted against a Metropolitan background, 
swirling old New York, yet she has adapted herself to the 
scheme of living in this little city and without the usual line 
of contrasts. She is a girl of conversational ability and also 
knows the rare art of listening. It is only the few who are 
conceded such a twofold compliment. Come across that 
Mason-Dixon line as often as you can, should you go back 
north, for you will always find your College home waiting 
to give you a warm hand of welcome, Phyllis. 



ELOISE TRUSSELL 



Major: English 



Minors: French and History 



TRUE-BLUE Eloise Trussell comes to us from 341-57th 
Street, Newport News, Virginia. We didn't see so much of 
Eloise around the campus, as she seemed to be rather re- 
served, but what a grand friend she is to have. You talk 
about being jolly! Say, you would never have a dull mo- 
ment with Eloise! And when it comes to mixed dances, 
Eloise is "right there"! She was secretary of the Glee Club, 
and a member of the Modern Portias, the German Club, 
the International Relations Club, and the Y.W. Choir. 



« 90 » 



THE NINETEEN - TH IRTY - SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




KATHERINE CELIA TURNER 
Major: Home Economics Minors: Social Science and Science 

KATHERINE hailed from Glen Lyn, Virginia, in '33 and from the first day seemed to slip into her 
major preference with as much ease as if she were a practiced dietitian. She has certainly looked 
the part this past quarter in the role of head waiter in one of the units of the dining room. Kitty 
takes her work seriously, but happily and with effortless interest, for it is a genuine interest. She 
has found time to take part in many extra-curricular activities and always has found time for 
perfect grooming with a bit of red thrown in. She has a flair for that color. 



IDA LEE TWISS 

Ma j or : English Minors : French and History 

IDA LEE majors in the King's English, loves it, lives up to its standards and its literature. There is 
in it a thing of beauty and a thing that gives definite joy. She has what the world is waiting for — 
such a happy smile and genial manner that she is a welcome factor in any group. She may aspire 
to the schoolroom; if so, she will create round about her a happy little community within its walls; 
if she aspires to a home she will reign therein like a queen. 



GENEVIEVE TYSON 

Ma j or : Home Economics Minors : Science and English 

GENEVIEVE accomplishes things. Whether it be the Grace K. Tanner Home Economics Club, 
Alpha Phi Sigma, or the Science Club in which she is working (she takes an active part in all of 
these activities) one may be sure that the task will be well done. Someday when she has written 
her name high on the column of fine attainment, and we definitely prophesy this, another monu- 
ment will grace Baltimore, the "Monumental City," which is her home city, with its proud tra- 
ditions of the Old South. There is an ambition for you, Genevieve, let's see you go places — 



91 



THE N INETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




MARGARET TYSON 

Major : Social Science Minors : English and French 

MARGARET chose wisely when she made a special study of Social Science. It is a field that needs 
just such a girl of broad sympathy, of earnest endeavor to make a contribution in her own little 
world. Margaret wins the confidence of any one by her ingenious manner and unaffected inter- 
est in a present need. We are a little bit rebellious over the fact that Margaret did not live with us 
on the hill, for it would have profited us much to know her better. There is sterling worth here that 
will stand appraisal. 

DOROTHY VERLANDER 

Major : Elementary Education Minors : French and Social Science 

DOT came to us from Westhampton in her Junior year and in her new surroundings carried on a 
program of sustained scholarship, versatility, and good humor. As a member of Alpha Tau Pi, 
Glee Club, and International Relations Club, she has rendered valuable service to these organ- 
izations. We like, too, her keen wit and her pleasantries of manner and conversation — fine at- 
tributes to have in this fickle old world. We have served official notice on Westhampton that we 
will take all the Dorothy Verlanders we can get. 



NINA WADE-DALTON 

Major : Commercial Education Minors : English and Social Science 

CHARMING intelligence and good sportsmanship are qualities characteristic of Nina. She is in- 
teresting and has that rare gift of sympathetic understanding of people. Nina does not kill herself 
studying because she is fortunate enough to be blessed with intelligence. She's majoring in 
Commercial Education, minoring in English and Social Science. She has served as associate 
editor of the "Commercial Echoes", and is a member of the Dance Club. Nina has been a member 
of the German Club since her Freshman year. She lives at 315 Battle Street, Manassas. 

« 92 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRT Y-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



HELENE WALLACE 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors: English and History 

ATTRACTIVE, yes. Popular, yes. An S.T.C. girl, yes, and 
one whom we are proud to claim. Popular with the girls, 
and especially the boys, Helene has traveled extensively 
from the east coast to the west — and does she like Califor- 
nia? Just get her started. As Secretary of the Town Girls 
Club, and active in Alpha Tau Pi, Helene has contributed 
a great deal to our College. She rides well, too; the horse 
show verified that. Yes, she has graced our May Court, 
and again we say that we are proud to name Helene as one 
of the Seniors of '37. 



ESTELLE DE SAUSSURE WARREN 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

THERE is a rare and pleasing combination of the practical 
and the ideal in Estelle who is a scholar, a girl of action, and 
with it all somewhat of a dreamer. It is good to have her as a 
friend, for she gives without stint or strain sympathetic under- 
standing and a loyalty that knows no wavering. She is the 
valued president of Alpha Tau Pi and also is a member of 
Alpha Phi Sigma sorority, International Relations Club, 
and the Leaders Club. 




MADELINE WARRICK 



Major: Mathematics 



Minors: French and English 



YES, she is a special girl in more ways than one. She hands 
out our special delivery letters on Sunday mornings as well 
as being especially nice to play the piano for us. Mickey 
came to F. S.T.C. from Averett College. She has been active 
on Y.W. Cabinet, in Alpha Phi Sigma, and in the orchestra. 
We could always call on Mickey to play for us, and always 
we knew that she would love to do it. She came from Ten- 
nessee — to be exact, Erwin. Stay as sweet as you are, 
Mickey, and you will always be one of the very best. 



« 93 » 



THE N I NETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 




VIRGINIA ANN WESTBROOK 



Major: Education 



Minors: English and History 



SHE'S the girl from many colleges. First to Virginia Inter- 
mont, and then to William and Mary, but finally to good old 
F.S.T.C. Even though Virginia has been with us a short 
time, her pleasing personality plus those sparkling eyes 
have caused us to think that she has been here always. 
' 'Not too serious, not too gay; but a rare old sport in every 
way" — such is Virginia. We can see happiness ahead for 
her in all she does, says, or shall we say with whom she 
may meet? May you never forget F.S.T.C, Virginia. 



MARTHA WHITAKER 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors: Music and Social Science 

WOULDN'T you like to be cute, pretty, intelligent, a good 
dancer, and possess a way with boys as well as girls? 
Martha has all these traits in her crown plus a decided gift 
for singing. She was a member of the German Club, May 
Court, reporter for Alpha Tau Pi, Secretary of the Glee 
Club, and a member of the Y.W.C.A. Martha is from Em- 
poria, Virginia, and is a girl that will long be remembered 
on our campus for her attractive manner and lovely voice. 



MARGARET WHITE 

Major: Elementary Education 

Minors: English and Social Science 

WHO is the jolly Senior with the lovely red hair? The 
answer is very simple, Margaret Aileen White, of course. 
From Colerain, N.C., came this very attractive girl to 
Fredericksburg. She has the gift of personality which every 
teacher should possess, and her genial manner for making 
friends also contributes to the make-up of a good teacher. 
While at S.T.C. this red-headed miss has been very active 
in Alpha Tau Pi, and in the Glee Club. To both she has 
been loyal and both will be in need of someone to fill her 
place. The best of everything always, Margaret. 



94 » 



THE NINETEEN-THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




MARGARET ELLEN WHITE 

Major : History Minors : Art and Science 

THERE is a sustained spontaneity and vivaciousness in this petite Senior which is as natural as her 
two eyes. She is the incarnation of unselfishness and will give you both the cloak and the coat if 
you ask them from her. That Bob White is majoring in History is startling for she is the type for 
French; she minors in Science but we cannot see her making companions of atoms and mole- 
cules, but we can see her following verse of drama and sentiment. 



IRENE ELLEN WILLIAMS 

Maj or : French Minors : English and Social Science 

IRENE ELLEN WILLIAMS was one of our town girls for three years, but she came to live with us in 
Mary Ball during her senior year, and were we glad! Irene was always willing to participate in 
the many programs we gave and she never failed to do her "act" unusually well. During her 
Senior year she made an efficient President of the International Relations Club, and the year 
prior Irene was Chairman of the Program Committee. In addition to maintaining a high scholastic 
standing, she was a member of the Glee Club, Leaders Club, Modern Portias, Alpha Phi Sigma 
andYW.C.A. 



MARY NELL WOOLFOLK 

Major : Elementary Education Minors : History and English 

EVERY day Mary Nell drove sixteen miles in pursuit of her education. Her vacant hours were 
divided between the library, where she acguired the knowledge which helped her achieve the 
fine grades, and the town girls room. As a member of Town Girls Club she was better known by 
that group than any other in College, and those who knew her, loved her. Alpha Tau Pi claimed 
her as one of its most dependable and regular members, and regardless of the distance between 
college and home, she managed to be above the average in attendance at the meetings. 

« 95 » 



THE NINETEEN -THIRTY-SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 




RUBINETTE YOUNG 

Major : Home Economics Minors : Science and Social Science 

THE President of the Home Economics Club, the Treasurer of the Leaders Club, is one of our very 
best. Home Economics is Rubinette's pride and joy, for we see her smiling as she wears the white 
uniform, and keeping the tea room at its best. To know her is to admire her, for she is true blue to 
everything in which she participates. If only we could cook as you do, Rubinette, and if only we 
could appear as happy! From Rhodesville, Virginia, she came to us, and from Freshman training 
to graduation, Rubinette has been a loyal F.S.T.C. girl. 



JOSEPHINE ZAPPULA 

Major : Elementary Education Minors : English and Social Science 

JOE ZAPPULA is the girl who always emerges when she is most needed. Her kindnesses have 
been felt by many. Willing, eager to do anything for anyone at any time, Joe makes us wish that 
there were more like her on the hill. Quiet, unassuming, appreciative, and good-natured, you'll 
make Petersburg proud, and the hill will miss you, Joe. 




« 96 » 



THE NINETEEN - TH I RTY - SEVEN BATTLEFIELD 



SENIOR CLASS HISTORY 

A BACKWARD GLANCE 

IS it not delightful and even inspiring to turn back the pages of time and live 
again the pleasant memories of bygone days? 

As we the Seniors of '37 prepare to bid farewell to our Alma Mater, we pause 
to glance backward into the mirror of time to see there reflected four years of 
life — never to be forgotten. 

In the fall of 1933 trains, buses, and automobiles from the north, east, south, and 
west were looking for the town of Fredericksburg, Virginia, for they were bring- 
ing three hundred excited girls to F.S.T.C. to become members of the student 
body and to bear the name of Freshmen. 

We were just out of high school and thought we knew either all the answers or 
most of them to almost anything, College or otherwise. When we arrived on the 
hill, though, with so much newness round about, chins grew tremulous and we 
were glad to have the Y.W. girls pilot us around and humbly grateful for the 
friendliness lavished on us by faculty and students alike. We raced for pen and 
ink to write home that we liked the College just fine. 

Quickly we realized the meaning of such terms as roommate, study hour, light 
bell as well as all the other bells, for some of us began to think that this College had 
a monopoly on all the bells in the country. 

Classes were fun and the idea of being called "Miss" caused us to begin to ac- 
guire some of the dignity we observed in the upperclassmen. In turn, we tried to 
give that dignity to the Freshmen this year. . 

Time passed guickly and soon we had completed our Freshman training and we 
were told that we had passed the exam and were really Freshmen. Our class 
officers were elected, we had our first pictures taken for the "Battlefield" and 
then we went home for Thanksgiving. After that we thought in terms of the Doll 
Show and Christmas; the Doll Show is sponsored by Freshman Commission. The 
days went by swiftly and off we went again for the Christmas vacation. How 
happy and proud we were on our return to present our first benefit. It was a 
"Nite Club" and the upperclassmen began to think we must have come from the 
big cities; at any rate the benefit seemed to suggest the idea. 

As June came upon us we realized that the time had come for us to prove our 
ability in the art of making a daisy chain. Into the fields we went, picked the 
daisies, wove the chain, and stretched the white-gold thing on the lawn in record 
time, thereby getting an ice cream treat for work well done. The next day we saw 
the Sophs carry it on Class Day and then we returned to the dorm rather sadly, for 
we realized we could never again be called the Freshmen of F.S.T.C. 

When we came back in the fall of '34 we were important Sophomores looking 
forward to a great year with Jac Clark as our president. Now we were no longer 

« 97 » 



THE N INETEEN - TH I RT Y - SE VEN BATTLEFIELD 



insignificant lookers-on; we had passed the "green stage"; we were at home and 
we were ready and eager to help the incoming Freshman class of 1934. 

We had won some recognition, too, for many of our group were on Y.W. cab- 
inet; several had placements on the staffs of the two College publications and in 
other organizations. Some of us were brave enough to go to the Training School 
and practice our chosen profession on the cherubs. Throughout the year, with 
the help of our sponsor, Miss Young, we pulled together with fine unity. We were 
loyal devils and by continued enthusiasm and hard work we carried off the cup 
that year. 

Looking back on our Junior year, we remember that many left us to teach or to 
enter the business world. However, the large majority of the class remained and 
under the leadership of Alice Phillips, our president, and Mrs. Dodd, our sponsor, 
we carried on in excellent spirit. We presented the "Amateur Radio Program" 
which brought to the mike many celebrities unknown at that time. Then May Day 
and with a Junior to rule over the festivities; the Juniors, too, introduced boys for 
the first time at the prom and what excitement for everyone, especially for Se- 
niors. 

At last moving up day, which is the day of all days and anticipated by all who 
enter the gates of college as Freshmen. The Seniors robed and ringed us and 
made it publicly known we were the Seniors of 1937. 

September came and we returned to S.T.C. happy and yet sad, for we realized 
this year would mark the ending of four wonderful years. No one but a Senior 
knows how it feels to be a Senior. The first night we marched in at Convocation 
in cap and gown the thrill of being a Senior was truly borne in on our hearts. 

And now as we realize that we have attended the last class, the last German, 
the last prom, given the last benefit, fought the last devil-goat game, and received 
our last Annual we realize with something akin to the sacred the real meaning of 
coming to College. 

Today is our day; we have dreamed about it and literally prayed for it — to be 
the sweet girl graduate. And yet with sadness we bid farewell to the place where 
we have worked together, played together, and made friendships which will last 
through all the years to come. Here on the hill each of us has tried to do her part 
and now we shall venture out on the highway of life but we shall not forget to 
look back many times remembering that "high upon a hilltop our Alma Mater 
stands" where the Class of '37 lived, and laughed, and worked and learned to 
hold her dear. 




ORGANIZATIONS 




LEADERS CLUB 



Ann Lipscomb President 

Alice Dew Vice-President 

Lucy Fleet Head Secretary 

Rubinette Young Treasurer 

1 HE Leaders Club is so called because its membership consists of 
all the leaders of every organization on the hill, making a total of 
twenty-eight of these officials. Under the general term of organiza- 
tions are listed the major activities, classes, editors of student pub- 
lications, honor sororities, house-presidents, and all clubs depart- 
mental or purely social. 

Since the leaders of these groups represent a comprehensive 
cross-section of the activities on the hill, the chosen officials are 
placed in a position to be, in large measure, the spokesmen for the 
student body. Admirable opportunity is offered in the regular meet- 
tings for the individual official to present her own group problem 
and also to offer constructive suggestions for the advancement of 
the program as a whole. 

The purpose of the Leaders Club is to offer recommendations for 
improvement in conditions when deemed necessary, to strive to 
bring about a finer sense of responsibility from the student body, 
more nearly a consistent cooperation, and the rightful interpreta- 
tion of an honor system at its best. 

« 101 » 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 

ilONOR in all things, a sense of responsibility to an assumed obligation, 
friendliness in our relationships, loyalty to our schoolmates, and an at- 
titude of cooperation constitute the principles by which we endeavor to 
serve our College. 

These are our objectives and these the goals we wish to reach as nearly 
as possible through sympathetic and earnest leadership rather than by 
authoritative governing, for we feel that the Association should embody 
the principles of self-government and democracy which can be realized 
only through the cooperation of the students themselves. 

The Student Government functions through the Student Council which 
is constituted of the officers of the Association, representatives from the 
four classes, from the dormitories, from the Day Student personnel, and 
from the Y.W.C.A. The President of the Association keeps in close touch 
with this organization through her affiliation with the Student Council. 
The dormitory representatives, termed House Presidents, are of Junior or 
Senior standing; it is their task to build into dormitory life a spirit of prac- 
tical and ethical interest. The class representatives try to establish con- 
structive support between the classes and the Association. The Day Stu- 
dents' representative is a connecting link between the Day Student group 
and the group living on the hill. The president of Y.W. is an ex-officio 
member of the council. 

Student Government holds dear its vision that gradually student govern- 
ment will mean the individual assuming of the welfare of every student and 
of the college till it is like unto a sacred stewardship. 






. 












~*.Z~-' 



ANN LIPSCOMB 
President 




STUDENT COUNCIL 

Ann Lipscomb President 

Frances Kirkwood Vice-President 

Louise Otley Secretary- 
Elizabeth Trimble Treasurer 

Ella Gordon Rowe House President Willard Hall 

Pearl Hudson House President Virginia Hall 

Olivia Kearns House President Madison Ball Custis 

Mary Crehan Senior Class Representative 

Calvert Spillman Junior Class Representative 

Barbara Shepherd Sophomore Class Representative 

Frances Gray Nash, ex-officio President Y.W.C.A. 

« 103 » 




FRANCES GRAY NASH 
President 



YOUNG WOMAN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

THE Young Woman's Christian Association denotes spirituality 
and embodies all that means friendship, courage, faith, hope, good 
will, and loyalty. It seeks to meet a deep need felt by the students 
for a contact with God. After the hurrying to and from classes, in 
the evening we pause for a few minutes of meditation at Vespers. 
On Sunday evening we gather at devotionals when our thoughts 
turn to praise and worship of God. All times Y.W. seeks to maintain 
a spirit of Christian fellowship among all of us here on the hill. 

Many informal Y.W. teas are given affording a delightful oppor- 
tunity for us to meet and to become better acguainted. Often, chat- 
ting over the tea-cups, we form lasting friendships with those whom 
we might not otherwise have met. It is the aim of the organization to 
teach true happiness, which comes only by way of service for others 
and to inspire in the hearts of all the desire to seek the true and 
noble appreciations and understandings of life. 

« 104 » 



Y.W.C.A. CABINET 

Frances Gray Nash President 

Jacquelin Clark Vice-President 

Frances Curtis Smith Secretary- 
Frances Sherman Treasurer 

Flora Ryan Freshman Commissioner 

Dr. Young, Mrs. Dodd, Dr. Cook Advisers 

Ann Lipscomb Ex-officio 

CABINET MEMBERS 

Betty Garden Chairman of Campus Social Service 

Virginia Jordan Chairman of Church Relations 

Doris Lafoon Chairman of Devotionals 

Maude Rae Smith Chairman of Entertainment 

Bertha Shapleigh Chairman of Finance 

Madeline Warrick Chairman of Music 

Pauline King Chairman of Publicity 

Mary Jack Clary Chairman of Social Committee 

Elizabeth Woodbridge Town Girl Representative 

Helen Hyde 1 

I Chairman 01 Vespers 

Fay Luther J 

Dorothy Miller Chairman of World Fellowship 



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FRESHMAN COMMISSION 



J.HE Freshman Commission serves as a connecting link 
between the Freshman Class and Y.W.C.A. It has as its pur- 
pose the creating and the promoting of any activities that 
would enrich the lives of others. Particularly interesting is 
the Doll Show given annually in December, a project in 
which the entire Freshman Class has a part. After the va- 
rious set-ups have been on display for two days and have 
been judged for awards, enough of the dolls are sent to the 
little children at the Blue Ridge Sanatorium to provide a doll 
for each child; the remaining dolls are sent to the Knights of 
Pythias, in Fredericksburg, who take over at Christmastide 
the distributing of toys to the poor children of the city. The 
Commission also sponsors devotionals every evening in 
Willard Hall, group singing once a week, and the publica- 
tion of the Y.W. Notes. In the spring, the Commissioners 
assist in the directing of the Freshman benefit. 

« 106 » 



All the world 
loves a lover 
and every Freshman 
loves her doll 




CHRISTMAS "«CRATCHITS 




it I 



EDITORIAL STAFF 




THE BATTLEFIELD 



iHE year book, "The Battlefield," so termed because the College 
itself is located where the marching of tramping feet was heard in 
days gone by, exists solely to give by the printed line and the pic- 
torial page a bit of happiness now and possibly a reminiscent pleas- 
ure later on. The assembling of the contents of this Annual, the or- 
ganization of material, and the compilation of the book is done by 
the Editorial Staff and the Business Staff — two groups that literally 
have but a single thought and that is to offer a memory book which 
will add interest and pleasure to hill-top life. 

« 108 » 



THE BATTLEFIELD STAFF 

EDITORIAL STAFF ' 

Mary Ellen Lee Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Grace Hawkins, Jane Sinclair, 

Mary Alston Burgess Associate Editors 

Fay Luther Literary Editor 

Verna Bergeson Assistant Literary Editor 

Pauline King, Rosalie Chauncey, Irene Blasdel Art Editors 

Doris Lafoon, Elizabeth Dinges, Ellen Easterly Athletic Editors 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Katherine Burgess Business Manager 

Juanita Carpenter Assistant Business Manager 

Alice Dew Advertising Manager 

Miriam Carpenter, Frances Brooks .... Assistant Advertising Managers 
Maude Rae Smith, Dorothy Ballance, Mary Williamson Bowles, 

Virginia Jones Typists 

ADVISERS 

Mrs. Charles Lake Bushnell 

Miss Dorothy Duggan Miss Mildred McMurtry 



BUSINESS STAFF 




« 109 » 




EDITORIAL STAFF 



THE BULLET STAFF 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Abbie Bourke Editor 

Evelyn Riggs Associate Editor 

Mary Grace Hawkins Assistant Editor 

Irene Blasdel Assistant Editor 

Frances Curtis Smith Columnist 

Helen Pressley Columnist 

Mary Franklyn Miller Fashion Editor 

Ann Rooney Reporter 

Katherine Kershaw Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Katherine Nebelung Business Manager 

Georgiana Woodhouse Assistant Business Manager 

Doris O'Brien Advertising Manager 

Ann Smith Assistant Advertising Manager 

Selma Piland Circulation Manager 

« 110 » 



THE BULLET 



I HE "Bullet," our college newspaper, is 
published twice each month by a staff made 
up of students under the supervision of the 
faculty sponsors, Dr. George E. Shankle, Head 
of the English Department, and Mr. G. H. 
Parker, Professor of Commercial Education. 
The aim and objective of the staff through- 
out the past year has been to cover not only 
news stories of interest to the students on the 



campus but also those stories of significance 
to the alumnae and future students of the 
College. In addition to the news element of 
the publication, there is also an attractive and 
in many instances enlightening feature sec- 
tion. 

The editor of the "Bullet" is elected by the 
student body; the business manager is elected 
by the members of the staff. 




BUSINESS STAFF 




THE 
BAYONET 



Irene C. Blasdel Editor-in-Chief 

Doris O'Brien, Mary Lou Monroe Associate Editors 

Juanita Carpenter Business Manager 

Dr. Roy S. Cook Faculty Adviser 

1 HE Bayonet is the College handbook, published annually, and 
given to all students at the College. This small book contains in- 
formation concerning the Y.W.C.A., the Student Government, and 
the Athletic Association. The Constitution of the Student Govern- 
ment is given in full, so that the students may be well acguainted 
with the regulations governing their activities. The point system, 
which shows the relative importance of positions on the hill is in- 
cluded in this book. 

The handbook is distributed by the members of the cabinet of the 
Y.W.C.A. to all new students before their arrival at College. The 
"Bayonet" is not a literary production, but a compilation of facts 
concerning the three major organizations of the College, together 
with some helpful suggestions for the new students. 

« 112 » 



MODERN PORTIAS 



OFFICERS 

Elizabeth Osborn 

President 

Virginia Snidow 

Vice-President 

Jaquelin Smith 

Secretary- 
Irene Blasdel 

Treasurer 

Mary Grace Hawkins 

Reporter 

Dr. George E. Shankle 
Sponsor 



MEMBERS: 

Dorothy Ball, Mary Crehan, Nancy Cooper, Louise Coulbourn, Lucille Crockett, 
Alice Dew, Virginia Easley, Elizabeth Edwards, Mitchell Forest, Gertrude Griffin, 
Pearl Hudson, Elizabeth Johnson, Mary Kettenbeok, Fay Luther, Mary Chapman 
Mitchell, Caroline Morris, Ruby Motley, Frances Gray Nash, Jaunita Owen, Alice 
Phillips, Jean Plante, Flossie Ratcliffe, Evelyn Riggs, Frances Curtis Smith, Kathryn 
Snead, Ruth Staples, Cheatham Taylor, Eloise Trussell, Ida Lee Twiss, Margaret 
Tyson, Marcella Wells, Irene Williams. 

1 HE Modern Portias is a literary club sponsored by the Head 
of the English Department of the State Teachers College at 
Fredericksburg, Virginia. Membership in this organization 
is open to English majors and teaching minors of Junior and 
Senior rank. The purpose of the organization is to foster the 
study of English classical literature, to develop a keener ap- 
preciation for correctness in form and for true merit in the 
content of literature, and to contribute to the general cultural 
and social aspects of the life at the College. The club meets 
for one hour once a month. These meetings have a social as 
well as literary value. The slogan of the club is one hundred 
per cent membership, one hundred per cent attendance at 
all regular meetings, one hundred per cent support of worthy 
student activities, and one hundred per cent support of the 
policies of the President of the College. 




« 113 » 




DRAMATIC CLUB 



OFFICERS 

Alice Dew President 

Elizabeth Clarke Vice-President 

Juanita Owen Secretary and Treasurer 

Doris Laf oon Reporter 

Miss Jimmie Louise Thurman Sponsor 

1 HE Dramatic Club is that organization composed of students who have been 
chosen as members after participation in some performance sponsored or di- 
rected by the club. Its purpose is to acquaint those members with past and pres- 
ent stage classics and successes; to familiarize those manifesting keen interest in 
the theater with stagecraft, production technigue and art, and to present to the 
public, plays of a convincing worth and entertaining variety which are suitable 
for entire female presentation. The club directs four performances annually, the 
first of which this year was, "After Wimpole Street," by Wilbur Brown, given 
under the auspices of the Y.W.C.A. This play had an especial appeal both to 
those who are Browning enthusiasts, and to those who saw "The Barretts of Wim- 
pole Street," because 'After Wimpole Street" gives an insight into Elizabeth and 
Robert Browning's married life at Casa Guidi, Italy. On March 12, Alden Nash's 
'And Let Who Will Be Clever" was presented as the club benefit; "Pink and 
Patches" was given at convocation. In addition, as part of graduation exercises, 
the Dramatic Club gave lane Austen's classic, "Pride and Prejudice." As is 
customary, the commencement play cast includes seniors, both non-club members 
and members. The scene of presentation is the beautiful open-air theater. 

The sponsor, the officers and the executive board select the plays, choose the 
casts, and the entire club cooperates in the actual presentation of the plays. 



« 114 » 



GLEE CLUB 



Fay Luther President 

Virginia Jones Vice-President 

Eloise Trussell Secretary 

Selma Piland Treasurer 

Evelyn Riggs Librarian 

Miss Eva Taylor Eppes Director 

I HE Glee Club has a definite twofold objective, for in ad- 
dition to the enjoyment and the cultural value to the imme- 
diate personnel it contributes with recurring frequency to 
many occasions on the hill. At Christmastide, the season 
knows an added joyous note because of the carol singing. 
The regular Glee Club concert on a chosen convocation 
evening invariably wins much appreciation from the au- 
dience. The operetta in lighter vein is a red-letter benefit. 
The services of the Glee Club, however, are not limited to 
campus boundary, for this group of singers responds gra- 
ciously to requests for musical programs both from local and 
within the state clubs and organizations. 

Members of the Glee Club are selected by the director of 
music at the beginning of the school year; the weekly chorus 
club hour is one of eager, intensive study and appreciation 
for this art. 





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OFFICERS 

Catherine Dryden President 

Frances Sherman Vice-President 

Virginia Spain Secretary -Treasurer 

Mrs. J. H. Dodd Sponsor 



ALPHA PHI SIGMA 

GAMMA CHAPTER 

.A. FEW years ago, it was felt desirable to 
have some means of honoring those students 
of the college who had attained high schol- 
astic rating. A faculty committee was ap- 
pointed by the college president, Dr. M. L. 
Combs, to investigate the possibilities of es- 
tablishing at the Fredericksburg State Teach- 
ers College a chapter of a nationally recog- 
nized honor fraternity. After due considera- 
tion the committee reported favorably on 
Alpha Phi Sigma. 

On June 2, 1930, a meeting of forty select 
students who had the highest academic 
record in the student body was called to- 
gether by Dr. Combs for the purpose of de- 
ciding upon the establishment of Alpha Phi 
Sigma. After a thorough discussion the stu- 
dents voted unanimously for the installment. 
Four days later, on June 6, the Gamma Chap- 
ter was installed by Mr. Byron Cosby, the 
national president of Alpha Phi Sigma, with 
fifty-five charter members and three honor- 
ary members selected from the faculty. 

In June, 1931, the fraternity decided to in- 
vite the valedictorians and salutatorians of 
respective schools to become members of the 
organization. The following January mem- 
bership was extended to faculty members of 
the college who are members of other hon- 
orary fraternities. It was also decided that a 
loan fund of $100.00 be granted each year 
preferably to some member of the fraternity. 

Two years ago, because of the great in- 
crease in the enrollment, the fraternity raised 
the standards for entrance and promotion. 
In spite of higher reguirements, this year's 
first formal initiation saw the admission of 
thirty-eight new members, the largest group 
ever admitted at one time in the history of 
Gamma Chapter. At present the total enroll- 
ment, active and field, is approximately two 
hundred and seventy-five, eight of whom are 
honorary members. 



« 116 » 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Dr. M. L. Combs, Mrs. C. L. Bushnell, Dr. Edward Alvey, Jr., Mr. O. H. Darter, Dr. C. G. G. Moss, 
Dr. Roy S. Cook, Mrs. N. M. Williams. 

MEMBERS OF ALPHA PHI SIGMA 

THIRD DEGREE — Jane Alrich, Nan Birchett, Beatrice Campbell, Catherine Dryden, Virginia Dickinson, 
Elizabeth Edwards, Anna Mae Harris, Frances Kirkwood, Pauline King, Ann Lipscomb, Doris Lafoon, 
Ruby Motley, Betty Osborn, Jean Plante, Lorene Potter, Lois Peterson, Emily Clay Rowe, Frances Sher- 
man, Margaret V. Smith, Virginia Spain, Calvert Spillman, Lucy Tompkins, Elizabeth Trimble, Irene 
Williams. 

SECOND DEGREE — Dorothy Ballance, Juanita Carpenter, Arcelle Coulbourne, Mary Jack Clary, Dorothy 
Clarke, Jacgueline Clark, Louise Godwin, Fay Luther, Henrietta Roberts, Grace Schultz, Margaret 
Twiford, Phoebe Taliaferro, Genevieve Tyson, Madeline Warrick. 

FIRST DEGREE — Virginia Ankers, Revere Ashley, Elizabeth Alexander, Martha Lee Bennett, Neva Burcher, 
Mary W. Bowles, Ellen Baab, Abbie Bourke, Irene Blasdel, Elizabeth Clopton, Ruth Chesley, Jessie 
Crockett, Murlene Crush, Phyllis Child, Elsie Dunn, Gladys V. Dutrow, Emily Day, Virginia Davis, Jo 
Lee Fleet, Sylvia Garfinkel, Hilda Goode, Victoria Harris, Ella Harrison, Lucille Holloway, Lucy Fleet 
Head, Lucy Harris, Lucille Healy, Katherine Jordon, Josephine Kislitzin, Olivia Kearns, Adeline Kirk- 
patrick, Irene Lundy, Matilda Logan, Mabel Layman, Myrtle Liverman, Barbara Mason, Eulaleur Mason, 
Eunice Martin, Virginia Marshall, Frances Moseley, Mary Lou Monroe, Frances Mayse, Elaine Owens, 
Mary R. Pugh, Selma Piland, Frances Packett, Edith Pomeroy, Helen Roop, Flossie Ratcliffe, Ella Gordon 
Rowe, Alice Rife, Dorothy Ramey, Frances C. Smith, Bertha Shapleigh, Ruth Staples, Doris Stagg, Clara 
Vondra, Janice Watson, Katherine Wygal, Hildrup Wingo, Estelle Warren, Mildred Williams, Elizabeth 
Woolfolk. 




« 117 » 




ALPHA TAU PI 



OFFICERS 

Estelle Warren Archon 

Olivia Kearns Secretary- 
Margaret Graves Treasurer 

Ann Lipscomb . . . Member-at-Large on Executive Committee 

Alice Dew Counsellor 

Mildred Buckner Chaplain 

Temple Lee Beazley Sergeant-at-Arms 

Helen Wallace Critic 

Martha Whitaker Reporter 

Rebecca Silver Librarian 

Dr. W. J. Young Sponsor 

MEMBERS 

Walter J. Young Philopaidessi 

Elinor Hayes Philopaidessi 

Estelle Warren Philastrasi 

Frances Curtis Smith Novice 



NEOPHYTES 

Temple Lee Beazley, Mildred Buckner, Elizabeth Clark, Nancy Cooper, Alice 
Dew, Margaret Graves, Elizabeth Haley, Pearl Hudson, Olivia Kearns, Frances 
Kirkwood, Mary Ellen Lee, Ann Lipscomb, Karis McElroy, Louise McGee, Jua- 
nita Owen, Alice Phillips, Helen Pressley, Flora Ryan, May Lawrence Showard, 
Rebecca Silver, Dorothy Verlander, Helene Wallace, Martha Whitaker, Mar- 
garet White, Mary Woolfolk. 

« 118 » 



ALPHA TAU PI 



ALPHA TAU PI Society is a national, professional frater- 
nity open to junior and senior majors and minors in elemen- 
tary education. Men and women pursuing degree courses 
are eligible upon maintaining a superior grade of work and 
election by the local chapter. In May of 1934, Doris Taylor, 
then a rising junior, suggested to Dr. W. I. Young an organ- 
ization from which grew in July of that year a full-fledged 
fraternity. Alpha Chapter now occupies attractively fur- 
nished guarters in Custis Hall where its meetings are held. 

The fraternity aims are to stimulate interest in degree 
courses, to consider problems and develop leadership in the 
elementary field, to encourage interest in child welfare, and 
to carry a fraternal spirit into the field. The colors are gen- 
tian blue, red, and gold. 

The meetings include programs designed to prepare the 
student for successful teaching and features which contribute 
to the social life of the members. The members count fellow- 
ship within its circle one of the memorable phases of their 
college life. 




« 119 



PI OMEGA PI 



ALPHA EPSILON Chapter of Pi Omega Pi, National Com- 
mercial Teachers Honorary Fraternity, was installed at the 
Fredericksburg State Teachers College May 29, 1936, by Mr. 
C. H. Parker, member of the faculty of the Commercial Ed- 
ucation Department. The charter members of the chapter, 
from the faculty, are Dr. J. H. Dodd, Mr. George Kirby, and 
Miss Lola Minich; from the students, Louise Jennings, Frances 
Sherman, Adele Mansfield, Ethel Nelson, Audrey Rose, 
Marion Goodman, and Page Whitehead. 

The purposes of Pi Omega Pi are to create, promote, and 
extend interest and scholarship in commercial education; to 
aid in civic betterment in colleges; to encourage and foster 
high ethical standards in business and professional life; and 
to teach the ideal of service as the basis of all worthy enter- 
prise. Active members are juniors and seniors in college 
who have superior standing in commercial education and 
average standing in all other studies. 




« 120 » 




PI OMEGA PI 

ALPHA EPSILON CHAPTER 

OFFICERS 

Frances Sherman President 

Beatrice Campbell Vice-President 

Margaret Smith Secretary-Treasurer 

Margaret Twiford Historian 

SPONSOR 
Mr. G. H. Parker 

MEMBERS 

Frances Sherman Margaret Smith 

Beatrice Campbell Margaret Twiford 

Jesse Crockett Dorothy Ballance 

Jean Plante Miss Lola Minich 

Evelyn Bickers Mr. G. H. Parker 
Dr. J. H. Dodd 

« 121 » 



COMMERCIAL CLUB 



OFFICERS 

Evelyn Bickers 

President 

Katherine Nebelung 

Vice-President 

Zillah Rhoades 

Secretary 

Annabel Cowles 

Treasurer 



1 HE purpose of the Commercial Club is to promote interest 
in the business world and in the study of commercial sub- 
jects, to encourage a social spirit by offering opportunities for 
wholesome social contacts, and to become familiar with mod- 
ern progressive business methods and systems, endeavoring 
by such means to raise and maintain a higher standard of 
training for business. 

The Commercial Club has had a most active year. In 
October the club started its activities by taking a trip to 
Washington. Dr. Dodd's farm was the scene of a very de- 
lightful weiner roast in the fall of the year. The Commercial 
Club made history when a record number attended the ban- 
guet dinner. The occasion was doubly important in that Mr. 
Harry C. Spillman, internationally known speaker, addressed 
those attending the dinner. In March Woodward and Lothrop 
presented a style show which is sponsored annually as the 
club's benefit number. A second trip was made in April to 
Richmond. 

The "Commercial Echoes," which is an instrument of the 
Commercial Club, is a booklet put out at intervals. This pub- 
lication relates the activities of the club and the alumnae. 




« 122 » 




^fct 



COMMERCIAL ECHOES 

STAFF 

Peggy Smith Editor 

Maude Rae Smith Associate Editor 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 
Juanita Carpenter Virginia Northam 

Hilda Harrell Dorothy Ballance 

Madora Forbush Business Manager 

Mary V. Leary Associate Business Manager 

BUSINESS ASSISTANTS 
Jessie Crockett Nan Birchett 

Virginia Dickinson Mary Williamson Bowles 

« 123 » 




INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 



CLUB 



Irene Ellen Williams President 

Lorene Moffette Potter Vice-President 

Anna Mae Harris Secretary 

Emily Clay Rowe Treasurer 

Elizabeth Osborn Reporter 

Oscar H. Darter Sponsor 



AMID pressing problems concerning world affairs, the Interna- 
tional Relations Club holds out to the College the connecting link 
which fosters good will and understanding of current problems both 
of a domestic and international nature. 

Under the auspices of the Carnegie Endowment for International 
Peace this organization has striven to take its place on the campus 
as one of the most effective agencies for the cause of peace. Its 
influence was recently evidenced in a peace poll in which fifty per 
cent of the student body voted for the promotion of international 
relations as the best means of preventing war. 

The design most universally accepted for the Peace Flag of the 
world is employed as one of the details in a division page in this 
book, the doves representing good will and their number corre- 
sponding to the number of nations in the world. 

To become a member of this club a student must have a major or 
a minor in the Social Science Department and an average of B, and 
must have manifested a definite interest in the work of the club. 



« 124 • 



MATTHEW FONTAINE MAURY 
SCIENCE CLUB 

Lucy Fleet Head President 

Mary Crehan Vice-President 

Mary Jack Clary Secretary 

Lois Petersen Treasurer 

SPONSOR 
Dr. Roy S. Cook 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Miss Helen H. Schultz Dr. Alan S. Pierce Mrs. Roy S. Cook 

THE Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club, sponsored by 
the Science Department, is open to science majors and minors 
who have had at least one year of science. Its purpose is to 
foster a deep appreciation of science as a cultural field, to 
broaden the scientific horizon and to encourage a more pro- 
found interest in the subject. 

Monthly meetings are held, at which topics of interest are 
discussed. Specialists in the various sicentific fields are in- 
vited to speak to members of the club from time to time. 




125 



JUL A, 

CLUB 



Mary Franklyn Miller president 

Alice Rife secretary 

Mary Jack Clary treasurer 

Sponsor 

Mrs. Charles Lake Bushnell 




^oster o 



Temple Lee Beazley 
Eulalia Bowling 
Katherine Burgess 
Jacqueline Clark 
Margaret Clark 
Virginia Comann 
Nancy Cooper 
Louise Coulbourn 
Marjorie Eastman 



Margaret Graves 
Sarah Burt Gray 
Elizabeth Haley 
Lucy Fleet Head 
Phyllis Hersh 
Lucile Holloway 
Stirling Kerr 
Ann Lipscomb 
Fay Luther 



ibers 

Helen Peck McClaugherty 
Frances McLeod 
Mary Chapman Mitchell 
Virginia Northam 
Juanita Owen 
Alice Phillips 
Dorothy Ramey 
Evelyn Riggs 
Emily Clay Rowe 



Frances Sherman 
Frances Curtis Smith 
Margaret Smith 
Jaquelin Smith 
Maree Sweeney 
Eloise Trussell 
Nina Wade-Dalton 
Martha Whitaker 



« 126 



TOWN GIRLS CLUB 

Betty Abbey President 

Elizabeth Woodbridge Vice-President 

Alice Dew Secretary 

Helene Wallace Treasurer 

SPONSOR 
Mrs. R. T. Mooney 

1 HE Town Girls Club, consisting of sixty-five members, is an 
organization whose membership is entirely that of the non- 
boarding students of the College. This group enjoys the use 
of a clubroom in Monroe Hall which is easily accessible in 
its relation to the classrooms. 

The purpose of the Town Girls Club is twofold: first, to 
establish and maintain a spirit of friendliness and mutual 
interest among those girls commuting from nearby vicinities 
who have little opportunity to come in contact with real col- 
lege life; second, to make for a kind of unity and cooperation 
between the day students and boarding students. 

A monthly luncheon, given by the group itself, affords a 
very delightful social hour for this club. Another of the most 
outstanding social functions is the Christmas Formal Dinner 
when the Town Girls are the guests of the girls on the hill in 
the college dining room. 




HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

Rubinette Young President 

Genevieve Tyson Vice-President 

Charlotte Frazer Secretary-Treasurer 

Katherine Turner Reporter 

SPONSOR 

Miss Annabel Merrill 

1 HE Home Economics Club is affiliated with the State and Na- 
tional Home Economics Associations. Only students who are majors 
or minors in Home Economics are eligible for membership. The 
program of work is designed to develop personality, leadership, 
self-reliance, initiative, social poise, and professional interest. 

The club has two meetings each month, one a business meeting 
including an educational program for which consumer education 
was selected as the central theme this year. The programs included 
outside speakers and active participation by the club members. The 
other meeting is strictly social, including parties, dance cabarets, 
picnics and teas. 

Money -making projects of professional value such as serving 
Sunday breakfasts and dinners for organizations were carried out 
successfully. Funds were contributed to improve conditions of mal- 
nutrition in the College Training School. 

The club offers to its members a wealth of possibilities for gaining 
a broader conception of the field of home economics and its pro- 
fessional opportunities and finer appreciation of its leaders. 



- 
— ' i > t~ 


®-rS5^ 


SSSTS 

—■S3 


9 « ft 






> ■ I 


; » • " - * * $ £ 



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■ f & V 

mi Ba. 






■ 4k V" r- 




RIDING CLUB 



iHE Riding Club of the State Teachers Col- 
lege, numbering eighty members and pledges, 
sponsors the horseback riding on the hill. 

Instruction is given beginning, intermediate, 
and advanced students. As the ability of the 
rider progresses she is promoted from the third 
to the first level of attainment. Those who wear 
the emblem of the first level are allowed special 
privileges, such as jumping and overnight trips. 

All riders are trained in the ring and a rigid 
test is passed before they are allowed to ride on 
the roads and trails or to go on breakfast and 
supper rides. 

All members compete in the annual Horse 
Show held in May. Every student is invited to 
become a member of this organization and to 
join in its fun. 



OFFICERS 

Jaquelin Smith President 

Henrietta Pratt Vice-President 

Dorothy Ramey Secretary-Treasurer 




« 129 » 




COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 



Violinists 

Olivia Kearns, Nancy 
Cooper, Jean Daven- 
port, Gladys Dickin- 
son, Lorraine Beck, 
Charlotte Morgan 

Trumpeters 

Irene Bush, Betty 
Deckert 

Drummer 

Virginia Northam 

Pianist 

Madeline Warrick 

Pianist and Director 
Ann Lipscomb 



J.HE personnel in this group organized 
itself into a modest orchestra primarily 
because of an eagerness to find expression 
for an innate love for music but also be- 
cause it felt that a definite contribution 
could be made to the recreational hours 
many times on informal occasions when 
the desire was uppermost on the part of 
the dancers for the swing of the organ- 
grinder or the measured tread of the fox 
trot or the lure and glide of a waltz. The 
appreciation for the efforts of these ama- 
teur musicians has been generous and has 
served amply and graciously for the only 
compensation sought. 



« 130 » 




ATHLETICS 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

1 HE destinies of the entire athletic program at S.T.C. are guided by the hands of 
the Athletic Association and its governing body, the Athletic Council. Intra- 
mural athletics hold a very unique and important place in the life of the average 
girl. Their successful organization and operation in practically every sport has 
contributed much to the wise use of her leisure hours. Intramurals contribute to 
the mental, social, ethical, and physical qualities of every girl who participates. 
It gives her command of certain fundamental processes, contributing much to her 
health, her character, and her citizenship. All students are eligible for member- 
ship in the A. A. and may become an enrolled participant upon the attainment of 
seventy-five points which are awarded according to a point system that recog- 
nizes all the athletics offered on the hill. In addition, AA. has sponsored May 
Day efficiently for the past two years. The selection of theme, music, dances, char- 
acters, and the costumes gives valuable experience in organization and leader- 
ship. In the pages that follow is a fair example of the work of AA. — a progressive 
organization — that yearly sees the achievement of its aims nearer with the ever- 
increasing interest of more and more girls. 

The activities of AA. are many and varied to suit individual needs and ca- 
pacities. At the cabin there are nights of such serene and majestic beauty that 
perhaps there is no girl who would not be better and wiser for spending some 
hours there. When the atmosphere is charged with dewy fragrance, the shadows 
long, and the breeze rustles through the trees, there is something about the cabin 
that leaves one entranced with its tranquillity. Creative dancing gives us a chance 
to express our interpretation of music. The ping of the balls against the tennis 
rackets is melodious to our ears in being a refuge from the cares of the day. We 
bring a bit of the grace of the Grecian Olympiad to our campus with the throwing 
of the discus and the twang of the bow strings and the resultant satisfaction that must 
have been experienced by the bowmen of Robin Hood's day. Golf, one of Mod- 
ern America's most popular sports, finds many followers among our students who 
delight in attempting to find that shortest distance between the tee and the green. 
To witness one of our hockey games, to follow the little white ball up and down the 
field, is one of the most pleasing thrills offered. Outside social contacts come in 
the form of the annual state hockey conference and in trips to exhibition matches. 
In the spring when the days are getting warmer and the trees beginning to bud, 
baseball affords a pastime for whiling away many happy hours. Indeed, "A game 
for every girl, and a girl in every game" is an appropriate motto for one of the 
most important of the campus organizations — the Athletic Association. 



« 133 » 




ATHLETIC COUNCIL 



President Peggy Smith 

Vice-President Elizabeth Johnson 

Secretary Jacqueline Clark 

Treasurer Peck McClaugherty 

Chairman of Sports Dorothy Ball 

Hockey Chairman Elizabeth Clark 

Basketball Chairman Helen Pressley 

Swimming Chairman Cheatham Taylor 

Hiking Chairman Ellen Easterley 

Horseback Riding Chairman Dorothy Hill 

Baseball Chairman Jo Grant 

Tennis Chairman Mary Kettenbeck 

Golf and Archery Chairman Reginia Brown 

Dance Chairman Maude Rae Smith 

Cabin Chairman Alice Rife 

Reporter Helen Hyde 

« 134 » 



MODERN DANCE CLUB 



President 

Maude Rae Smith 

Music Committee 
Addibel Freeman 
Patsy Staley 
Helen Hyde 
Fay Luther 

Scrapbook Committee 
Olivia Kearns 
Peck McClaugherty 
Jessie Crockett 

Pianist 
Fay Luther 



THE Creative Dance Club is sponsored by the Ath- 
letic Association, and is composed of those students 
who have had one quarter of creative, and are inter- 
ested in the creative dance as a form of art in the de- 
veloping of grace and charm. The dancing stresses 
the use of natural body movement for the expression 
of motion which results in a fine responsive body, full 
of strength and vitality. 

Used with good music, creative dancing will de- 
velop in the student an appreciation for those ideal- 
istic things in life which are frequently crowded out 
of our environment by the rush of the day's routine. 

During the year the Dance Club divides its work 
into three big divisions: in the fall quarter it has the 
Convocation program; in the winter quarter the girls 
go to Washington and take part in the Symposium; 
and in the spring the club takes a large part in the 
May Day activities. The club also plans outings to the 
Cabin where suppers are cooked over the open fire, 
followed by interesting discussions and the develop- 
ment of ideas for the betterment of the club. 

Creative dancing is the one thing that correlates all 
the arts, thereby contributing to the capacity of the 
student for a more real and complete life. 





All American — and high 




A modern discus thrower 



Swiftly homing 
to the coveted 
bull's-eye 





■■' ■ - '-'%$» 




^ 




A trail of health 
and happiness and 
sometimes a birdie 





A practiced eye is needed in a close decision 




Friendly enemies 




Let the timid soul take 
courage, with these stal- 
warts round about, for that 
first dive off the board 



«139 




Gone English with American style 



140 




FEATURES 



Syitinatlme. on the. kill- 






COURT 



Abbie Bourke 
Jacqueline Clark 
Sarah Burt Gray 
Elizabeth Haley- 
Lucy Fleet Head 
Mary Jack Clary 
Margaret Haynie 
Frances Brooks 



Miriam Carpenter 
Martha Lee Bennett 
Eloise Caverlee 
Helen Clark 
Elsie Lee Davis 
Anna Jane Eley 
Louise Luter 
Alive Ives 




Mary Franklyn Miller 
Juanita Owen 
Dorothy Ramey 
Cheatham Taylor 
Helene Wallace 
Virginia Jordon 
Alice Rife 



Lottie Padgett 
Sarah Puckett 
Virginia Simmons 
Doris Eubank 
Margaret Wallace 
Annabel Cowles 
Annie Wade 




Ma.'cu <Lllen J^ee 

£-.d'Ltot-ln-(ikUK ofi the JZattlefiiela. 




-finn /-.Ivlcomlr 

A'telldent on -student Lxovetnment 




d-LLa. ufo'iclon /<ou/e 
-tfouie Pteiident ofi WllLttti '-tfa.il 




tclu J-utket 

ftteiident of the (jLe (llub 




Mtztaa'cet Smith. 

flteilJlent oft -QtkLtlc -Qiiociation 




/-'teiia.ent ok l/ounq Woman 5 (sktiitLcin -fi5iocLO.tLon 




Winnet ok the KiiMdnii Liup, 1936 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Located in f( 'America's Most Historic City" 

A standard four-year institution — member of the Asso- 
ciation of Virginia Colleges, American Association of 
Teachers Colleges, Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools, and the National Association of 
Commercial Teacher-Training Institutions. 

Strong faculty composed of men and women of sound 
scholarship, high ideals, and broad cultural background. 
Modern plant located on one of the most picturesque and 
alluring campuses in the South — a place of incomparable 
beauty. Ample housing facilities, including four new dormi- 
tories with private baths and all conveniences. 

Social and recreational facilities unsurpassed — roof garden ; 
commodious indoor and outdoor swimming pools; pictur- 
esque golf course; open-air theatre; rustic camp with all 
conveniences; tennis courts; gymnasium; athletic fields; 
and available saddle horses. 

Superior accommodations and broad cultural and educa- 
tional advantages at minimum expense. 

It confers the A.B. and B.S. degrees in the Arts and Sci- 
ences, as well as in the fields of Education leading to 
Teaching, School Supervision and Administration. The 
courses of instruction also include a wide range of pro- 
fessional, specialized, and technical subjects leading to 
the B.S. degree in such fields as Commerce and Finance, 
Business and Secretarial Training, Dietetics, Home Eco- 
nomics, Music, Art, Physical and Health Education, 
and pre-professional and foundation courses — the only 
college in Virginia specializing in the training of Com- 
mercial teachers; it also offers a two-year course for 
elementary teachers. 



THE HUB 




Extends best wishes to the entire Class 


of 1937, and may the coming season 
be a most enjoyable and profitable one. 




WE SPECIALIZE IN 
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR 




COMPLIMENTS OF 


APPAREL AND EXTEND 


B. GOLDSMITH & SON 

INCORPORATED 


TO YOU AN INVITATION 
TO VISIT US WHEN 


Clothiers and Haberdashers 


DOWN TOWN. 

CORDIALLY YOURS, 


920 MAIN STREET 


THE HUB 

908 MAIN STREET 


Woodward & Lothrop 

10th, 11th, F and G Sts. 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 


THE 

STRATFORD 

HOTEL 




FIREPROOF 


sc 


Fredericksburg's Newest 




and Finest Hotel 




ON HIGHWAY ROUTE 1 


"The Store Worthy of 




the Nation's Capital" 


E. G. HEFLIN 

Owner • Director 



MONROE INN 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

High-Grade Candies 
and Novelties 

Charles and William Streets 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 


Compliments of 

BOND'S DRUG STORE 

Caroline and William Sts. 


YOUNG'S BAKERY 

Bread ■ Cakes 
Pies 

715 MAIN STREET 
Fredericksburg, Va. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
A FRIEND 


Open by Appointment Phone 910 
Your Beautician 

'Princess Anne Beauty Shop 

PRINCESS ANNE HOTEL 

PRICES 

Shampoo 50c Manicure 50c 

Finger Wave 50c Marcel 75c 

Hand and Arm Scalp Treatment . .$1.00 

Massage 75c Croquenole 

Facials $1.00 Permanent $3.50 

Eugene Permanent $5.00, $7.50, $10.00 


ULMAN'S 

LIFETIME JEWELRY 

903 MAIN STREET 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 


Machineless Permanent $5.00, $7.50, $10.00 

Grace C. Burns Fredericksburg, Va. 


j^^^\^ THE LITTL 

(( A&Oll • • • and the R 

V f^ ^ JJ are widespread 

^kX ESTABLISHED JM 1 J 

^aL l8M 1^£_ nave won and 


E RED SCHOOL HOUSE 
ed Front A. & P. Stores . . . 

American institutions. Both 
hold the implicit confidence 


(| FOOD STORES || ^ ^„ A m ~-,Vo 


n people through merit alone. 



SUPERIOR ICE CREAM 

IS MADE FROM 

Pure Pasteurized Milk and Cream and is 

a Healthful Food Product 



MANUFACTURED BY 
FARMERS CREAMERY COMPANY 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Bell Brothers Furniture Company 

INCORPORATED 

Fine Furniture and Rugs 
Homes Furnished Complete 

TELEPHONE 101 FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

ESTABLISHED 1897 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


THE 




FREE LANCE 


SUNSHINE LAUNDRY 


STAR 


LAUNDERERS AND 


FREDERICKSBURG'S 


DRY CLEANERS 


Daily Newspaper 


FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 


• 




COMPLETE LOCAL NEWS 


r 


AND FULL 




ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICE 


"The Sunshine Way 


* 


Makes a Brighter Day" 


One of Virginia's Best 
Newspapers 


GEO. FREEMAN, JR. 




AND SONS 






COMPLIMENTS OF 


For Finer Foods 






J. C. PENNEY CO. 


PHONES: 




24 331 73 

• 


i 


DELIVERY SERVICE 




• 


Fredericksburg, Va. 


Special Attention to 




Phone Orders 





COMPLIMENTS 

PITTS THEATRES 

INCORPORATED 

BENJAMIN T. PITTS 

President and General Manager 

♦ 

Main Office: 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 

Telephone 275 and 569-J 


Happy Motoring 

BUY AT 
ESSO STATION NO. 683 

National Highway and Hunter St. 
and 

ESSO STATION NO. 346 

Princess Anne and Hawke St. 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 

• 
BREWER M. BECKWITH 

Manager 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

Coca-Cola 

BOTTLING WORKS, INC. 

S 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 
A. L. KREGER 

Manager 


(JUhere the 
Romance of the Old 
Meets the Progress of 
the New. 

CITY OF 

FREDERICKSBURG 



MILLER'S 

SPECIALTY SHOPS 

• 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 


CHARLES A. CARMICHAEL 
PRINTING 

Books • Stationery 

422 WILLIAM STREET 


Phone 226 Established 1870 

Virginia Cured Roe Herring 

Spice treated and have a flavor all their 
own. Packed in kits for shipment. 

HARRIS AND RRO. 

613-615 Commerce Street 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 


Bulifant & Pritchett, Inc. 

Successor to Candies Incorporated 

"The Home of Strictly- 
Fresh Candies" 

WHOLESOME CONFECTIONERY 
402 William Street 

Telephone 1037 


It's smart to be thrifty 

FLORENCE EINHORN 

The Florence Fashion Shop 

INCORPORATED 

Always Something New 

SPECIALISTS IN SAMPLE DRESSES 
Special Orders Taken Sizes 11-20 

Pitts Colonial Theatre Building 
Phone 848 Fredericksburg, Va. 


R. G. HILDRUP 

24-Hour 
Taxi and Freight Service 

PHONE 234 

COMMERCE STREET 
Fredericksburg, Va. 


WE INVITE 

YOU AND YOUR GUESTS 

TO DINE AT THE 

OCCIDENTAL 
RESTAURANT 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

On U.S. No. 1 Phones 9139-1020 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

FREDERICKSBURG 
• PASTRY SHOP • 

WILLIAM STREET 

PHONE 75 



THE COMMERCIAL STATE BANK 

FREDERICKSBURG • VIRGINIA 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $160,000.00 

E. M. YOUNG, Chairman of the Board 

G. W. SHEPHERD, President W. MAYO SMITH, Cashier 

J. L. SAVAGE, Assistant Cashier 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



COAL AND COKE 
FUEL OIL 

Virginia Cured Hams 

C. H. Montgomery & Co. 

Phone No. 8 



J. W. MASTERS 

INCORPORATED 

lumber and Paint 

601 MAIN STREET 

PHONE 111 



SHELTON AMI TRUSLOW 

Odorless Dry Cleaners 

WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
Prompt Service Telephone 523 

1006 MAIN S TREET FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



THE PRINCESS ANNE HOTEL 

FREDERICKSBURG in Old Virginia 

Noted for its Excellent Food • Moderate Rates 
Supreme in Comfort • Individual Garages 

LOCATED IN THE HEART OF THE CITY 

"The Leading Hotel in George Washington's Country" 
G. H. HARDING 

President and General Manager 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. B. Payne, Inc. 

Coal ' Wood 
Fuel Oil 

DEALER OF 

Timken Silent Automatic 
Oil Burners 

A. G. A. Stove 

The Cooking Marvel 


For health's sake 
eat 

Betty Lewis Bread 

CITY BAKERY, INC. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

ALLISON AND YOUNG 

Real Estate 



The Place to shop for 
your food needs 



QUALITY FOODS 
• LOW PRICES • 
BETTER SERVICE 
LARGE VARIETY 

Penders Store 



JULIAN J. GARNER 
Wholesale Grocer 

CONFECTIONERY 
TOBACCO • CIGARS 

Fredericksburg, Va. 



THE BRENT STORE 

Your Shopping Center 

PHONE 70 



LINGERIE • HOSIERY • UNDERWEAR 
GLOVES • NOVELTIES • NOTIONS • 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



• DRY GOODS 
MILLINERY 



THE NATIONAL BANK 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 
Oldest Bank in the City 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS DEPOSITS 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 



QUALIFIED TO SERVE 

An active institution whose management is conservative and 

whose policies are based upon the principles of 

sound and prudent banking 



THE PLANTERS NATIONAL BANK 

in FREDERICKSBURG 

DR. F. H. REICHEL 

Chairman of the Board 



WM. K. GOOLRICK 

President 



PAUL KARSTEN, JR. 

Cashier 



CAPITAL $100,000.00 



SURPLUS $50,000.00 



S. T. C. Students are Always Welcome 
We invite you to make the ULMAN Store "your store" 

WEARING APPAREL FOR LADIES AND MEN 

JOSEPH H. ULMAN 

Next door to People's Drug Store 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



CR1SMOXD-S 

The College Girls' Shoe Shop 

ONLY THE BEST STYLES 

and do they Fit I 

TRY THEM 

911 MAIN STREET 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



THOMPSON'S 

Flower Shop 

722 MAIN STREET • HOTEL MAURY 
PHONE 266 

Floral Designs ■ Decorations 

Flowers for All Occasions 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



Compliments of 

SOUTHERN GRILL 

The Most Modern 
Restaurant In 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Our Friends Are Our Support 

We value your friendship highly and in turn 
endeavor at all times to supply you with the 
best the market affords in building materials at 
reasonable prices. Get our Plan Books and Free 
Estimates before you build your new home. 

EDGAR M. YOUNG 

Lumber and Building Materials 

Fredericksburg, Virginia • Phones, 25-26 



Distinctive Dance Music . . . Flayed ff As you li\e it" 

ROLAND LEVEQUE 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

Perennial favorites since 1933, for all Formal Receptions and German 
Club Dances at the Fredericksburg State Teachers College 



THE FARMERS 

AND 

MERCHANTS STATE BANK 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 



It. A. KISHPAITGH 

Stationery and Printing 

Waterman Fountain Pens • Kodaks and Films 
Souvenirs 

LET US FURNISH YOUR VISITING CARDS AND INVITATIONS 



FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

America s Most Historic City 

and 

George Washington s Boyhood Home 

WELCOMES YOU 
Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce 



Compliments of 

Wilson Brothers 

Building Materials of All Kinds 



JUIISON SMITH 

MAIN STREET 

FREDERICKSBURG • VIRGINIA 



W 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 
FOR THE 

1937 "BATTLEFIELD" 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF A 



FRIEND 




• Artists and 
Makers of Fine 
Printing Plates for 
Black or Color 

The Largest 
College Annual 
Designers and 
Engravers in 
America . . . 



Jahn & Oilier Engraving Co. 



8/7 W. WcLlkinqton £L»d. 
C- n l c a. a o , _v 1 1 L n o i i 



T h e t e Is no Substitute foot a u a. 1 1 t u 



THIS BATTLEFIELD PRINTED BY THOMSEN-ELLIS CO., BALTIMORE 



MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE - VMV