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Full text of "Battlefield, 1950"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/battlefield195000univ 



WHETEEJi FIFTY 



ATTLEFIEL 



Mary Washington College 

of the 

University of Virginia 



Leora May Knapp Editor 

Elizabeth Taliaferro Bunnell . Business Manager 




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BATTLEFIELD 

Presents 

7^inetee?i Forty-nine and 

"Nineteen Fifty 



Mary Washington College 

of the 

University of Virginia 



DEDICATED TO 



Mrs. Charles Lake Bushnell 

'Dean of Women 



To you, Mrs. Bushnell, we can never say 
goodbye. Your touch, confident and delicate, 
will always be everywhere at Mary Washing- 
ton. Your personality, electric and gentle, has 
penetrated the minds and hearts of all who 
have ever known you here. 

We will not say goodbye, Mrs. Bushnell, 
but to you we dedicate this book for the thou- 
sands of students whose characters have been 
shaped by your integrity, whose moments 
were made brighter by your gaiety, and whose 
lives will always be strengthened by your 
goodness. 



FOREWORD 



It was the warmest winter in ages, this was 
the year of better living. As Nineteen Fifty 
approached we felt safer in a gayer, less neu- 
rotic world. This was the year seniors paused 
for one last look, and freshmen dreamed of 
conquering the world. A whole new era was 
opening. All of us were hoping — dreaming — 
thinking. 

Here in prose and pictures we have some of 
just such thoughts and dreams — from all of 
you, for all of you. Here may be the recollec- 
tion of what might have been, the beginning 
of what will be. 




CONTENTS 







ADMINISTRATION 



CLASSES 



FINE ARTS 



SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 



HISTORY AND THE 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 



LANGUAGE AND 
LITERATURE 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND SPORTS 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

BATTLEFIELD GOES TO 
A MAV.C. WEEKEND 








ADMINISTRATE 




>>--* 





DR. MORGAN LaFAYETTE COMBS 



President of Mary Washington College 

of the 

University of Virginia 




DR. EDWARD ALVEY, JR. 

Dean of Mary Washington College 

of the 

University of Virginia 




MRS. CHARLES LAKE BUSHNELL 
Dean of Women 



14 



ADMINISTRATION 

We are justifiably proud of the individuals 
who make up the Administration of the Col- 
lege. It is they who plan and direct practical 
operations which lie behind our activities 
here. From the moment our Applications 
arrive at M.W.C. to that more distant mo- 
ment when we hold Diploma in hand, the 
Administration is functioning in our behalf. 





Louis C. Glenther, Registrar 



Edgar E. Woodward, Treasurer 

Policies concerning such significant matters 
as faculty, curriculum, staff, and buildings are 
shaped and carried into effect by President 
Combs in conjunction with this body. Its 
work also includes supervision and aid in spe- 
cial student problems, class schedules, and 
various social activities. Thus the efficient 
and conscientious endeavors of the Adminis- 
tration enable us to proceed systematically 
and smoothly through college. 



Reynold H. Brooks 
Director of Public Relations 



Mrs. Margaret S, Rlssell 

Director of Student Personnel 
and Superintendent of Off-Campus Students 



Dr. Warren G. Keith 
Director of Admissions 





Elizabeth Trible, Dr. Nancy S. Whitticar, Elizabeth Keckler 

INFIRMARY STAFF 



COLLEGE SHOPPE STAFF 

Mrs. Mattie L. Sholes, Mrs. Annie J. Brauer, Charlotte Staples 





Mr. and Mrs T. J. Honaker 



Vincent H. Willetts 



DIRECTORS OF THE 
COLLEGE SHOPPE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF 
BUILDINGS 



DORMITORY HOSTESSES 

Mrs. Hester Jacobus, Mrs. Rosalie Hill, Charlotte Staples, Mrs. Lefa Faulkner (Director), Mary Stephenson 





OFFICERS 

President Betty Jean Lyle 

Vice-President Patricia Head 

Secretary Mary Lee Keener 

Treasurer Lucy Ring 

The purpose of the Student Government 
Association of Mary Washington College is to 
aid each student in promoting personal re- 
sponsibility and honor, in addition to instilling 
principles of loyalty and democratic behavior. 

HOUSE PRESIDENTS 

Westmoreland Marjorie Diener 

Mary Ball Nancy Parks 

Custis Sarah Miles 

Madison Jean Sprower 

Virginia Catherine Thomson 

Willard Jane Gregg 

Betty Lewis Eloise Clark 

Cornell Edwina K. Chapman 



Betty Jean Lyle, President 



STUDENT 



REPRESENT AT I VES 

Senior Anne Osborn 

Junior Mary Lee Oliver 

Sophomore Janet Heilmann 

Freshman Rebecca Spitzer 

Town Girl Florence Overly 

Off-Campus Commission . . Nellie Grieve 



EX-OFFICIO 

Y.W.C.A Mary Cottingham 

Freshman Commissioner . Elizabeth Walker 

A.R.A. President Nan Taylor 

Veteran s Representative . . Thomas Vivian 



Officers: Keener, Ring, Head 




18 




Gregg, Overly, Oliver. Parks, Clark, Miles, Walker, Taylor, Thomson, Cottingham 



GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATIO 



Spitzer, Chapman, Heilman, Diener, Grieve, Osborn, Sprower 




19 




Mary Cottinaham, President 



OFFICERS 

President Mary Cottingham 

Vice-President Carolyn Lee 

Secretary Evelyn Henderson 

Treasurer Patricia Wise 



Thoughts of our Y.W.C.A. have many asso- 
ciations: The affable girls in white greeting 
incoming freshmen at the train station . . . 
The good spirit and fun of Peanut Week . . . 
The warm sociability of Sunday afternoon 
teas . . . The Y Benefit, the Freshmen Talent 
Show ... A quietly inspiring Chapel program 
. . . Simple and comforting vespers at the close 
of an active day . . . The profound spiritual 
significance of Religious Emphasis Week. 

Yet "Y" is much more than such things. It 
is that indescribable essence of service, self- 
sacrifice, and love at and for Mary Washing- 
ton. 



YOUNG WOMEN'S 



CABINET 
Freshman Commission Advisor Elizabeth Walker 

Executive Secretary Ann Recker 

Association Betty Gavett 

Campus Social Service Anne Stone 

Chapel and Devotionals .... Josephine Summers 
Community Social Service .... Phyllis Maddox 

Entertainment Mildred Jones 

Finance Hannah Lou Southwell 

Interfaith Representative Yvonne Powell 

Music Betty Lou Miles 

Property Virginia Briant 

Publications Marjorie Southcott 

Publicity Miriam Sollows 

Social Nancy Miller 

Vespers Lenora Ladd 

World Affairs Nancy Stacey 

President, Senior Commission . . . Rachel Nickey 
President, Freshman Commission . . . Jane Allen 
President, Student Government . . Betty Jean Lyle 
President, Athletic Recreation Association . Nan Taylor 

House President, Willard Jane Gregg 

House President, Cornell . . . Edwina K. Chapman 



Officers: Lee, Henderson, Wise, Walker, Recker 




20 




First row Southwell. Stacey. Southcott. Second row: Mr. Carter, Miller, Dr. Hilldrup. Gregg, Summers. Third row: Jones, Ladd, Sollows 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIO 



First roic: Mr Allen, Nickev, Miles. Second row: Briant, Dr. Darter, Gavett. Third row: Maddox. Stone, Powell. Fourth row: Lyle, Taylo 





CLASSES 






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SENIOR CLASS HISTORY 



*»nd we were going to loaf this year ' . . . We find our- 
selves deluged with work . . . We also manage to find 
time for Bridge and Canasta . . . We heave sighs of re- 
lief when our check-sheets come in . . . We quite joyfully 
pay our Diploma Fee . . . With the thoughtful assistance 
of Mrs. Bushnell, we are nicely fitted with caps and 
gowns . . . We get a spine-tingling thrill at wearing them 
the first time at Convocation . . . We notice that out 
outgoing and especially incoming mail has dwindled 
considerably since freshman year . . . We envy those 
fortunate ones with maximum cuts . . . We marvel at 



those doing Honor's work . . . We produce a really won- 
derful Benefit . . . We are proud of our own May Queen 
and Student Government President . . . We take our 
very last college exams . . . Quite suddenly we find our- 
selves in the midst of the exciting events of Graduation 
. . . We pack up the sundry accumulations of four years 
in our parents' automobiles . . . We exchange congratu- 
lations, addresses, and tearful goodbyes . . . With a 
common love in our hearts for M.W.C. and a wealth of 
precious memories, we go our separate ways. 



24 




Officers. Smith, Mitchell, Mcintosh, Weatherly, Dr. Insley, Sommers 



Senior Class Officers 



President Marceline La von Weatherly Treasurer Mary Jane McIntosh 

Vice-President Jeanne Elizabeth Sommers Historian Martha Oden Smith 

Secretary Billy Jean Mitchell Sponsor Dr. Earl G. Insley 



25 




JANE MARIE ADAMS 
Washington, D.C. 
Psychology 



ELLEN LEE ARENDALL 
Vernon Hill, Virginia 
English 



S E N I O 



EMILY KING AVERY 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

History 



CAROL JOAN BAILEY 

Herndon, Virginia 

Biology 





ELIZABETH MARSHALL 
BAMBER 

Bethesda, Maryland 

Mathematics 



MARY JANE BASSETT 
Worcester, Massachusetts 
Psychology 



26 



MARTHA PATRICIA BAUM 
Quitman Brooks, Georgia 
Dramatic Arts and Speech 



BARBARA JEAN 

BIRKENMEYER 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

English 




CLASS 




BARBARA ANN BOOKER 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
Psychology 



FLORENCE HELEN BORDEN 
Colonial Village, Pennsylvania 
English 



GERALD I NE LOUISE 
BOSWELL 

Arlington, Virginia 
Psychology 



HELEN IRENE BOUNDS 

Lexington, Virginia 

English 




17 




JOAN MARIE BRAUNER 

Washington, D.C. 

Art 



DUDLEY FLOURNOY BRETT 

Richmond, Virginia 

English 



CLASS 



VIRGINIA ELIZABETH 
BRIANT 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 
English 



ANNE MARJORIE BURTON 

Richmond, Virginia 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 





BARBARA JANE CABLE 
Thomaston, Connecticut 
French 



JEAN MONITT CALDWELL 

Pearisburg, Virginia 

Music 



28 



ANN HATHAWAY CALL IS 

Hilton Village, Virginia 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



CATHERINE RAE CAP I ZOLA 

Minotola, New Jersey 

Music 




OF '5 




MARTHA ELIZABETH CARR 
Lynhaven, Virginia 
Dramatic Arts and Speech 



NANCY JANE CHAPMAN 
Danbury, Connecticut 
History 



CHARLOTTE TRENT 
CHARLES 

Keen Mountain, Virginia 
Psychology 



MILDRED ZULIEME 
CHARLTON 

Fork Union, Virginia 
Mathematics 




29 




HELEN HOPE CHILES 
Natural Bridge Station, Virginia 
Dramatic Arts and Speech 



ISABELLE GEORGE 
CLADAKIS 

Tarpon Springs, Florida 
Chemistry 



S E N I O 



PATRICIA CLAUD 

Drewryville, Virginia 

History 



ELISE CUMMINGS CLEARY 

Savannah, Georgia 

Psychology 





ARLINE SUTHERLAND 

CLEMENTS 

Sutherland, Virginia 
Biology 



MAE ROLIN COFFMAN 
Richmond, Virginia 
Chemistry 



30 



SHIRLEY LEIGH COLE 

Chilhowie, Virginia 

Music 



MARY WATTS COTT INGHAM 

Bennettsville, South Carolina 

Chemistry 




CLASS 




MARJORIE LOUISE CROSS 
Portsmouth, Virginia 
Mathematics 



VIOLET M. CUNEO 
New Rochelle, New York 
Political Science 



JACQUELIN CURTIS 

Brandy, Virginia 

Art 



ELIZABETH ANNE CUSTER 

Staunton, Virginia 

Psychology 





OLGA DAVIDOVICH 
New Brunswick, New Jersey 
Political Science 



ELSIE LEE DAVIDSON 
Buena Vista, Virginia 
Economics and Business 



Administration 



CLASS 



JANE BLAKE DAVIS 

Staten Island, New York 

Biology 



ELIZABETH DAWIDEIT 

Oakland, Michigan 

Sociology 





ALICE LOUISE DEENS 
Ambler, Pennsylvania 
Art 



CHARLOTTE E. DELANO 

Avalon, Virginia 

Music 



32 



NORMA MARIE DENECKE 

East Aurora, New York 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 



MARY JEAN DIAZ 

Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Chemistry 




OF '5 




MARJORIE LOUISE DIENER 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Music 



NATHALIE DAL BY DODSON 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Psychology 



ELMIRA JANE DOOLITTLE 

Stony Creek, Connecticut 

Psychology 



CHRISTINE DOUMAS 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

Psychology 




33 




JANE LEE DREIFUS 
Alexandria, Virginia 
Chemistry 



MARGARET ANNE EANES 

Ashland, Virginia 

English 



S E N I O 



MARCIA ANNE EGLOF 
Niagara Falls, New York 

Psychology 



ELIZABETH ANNE ELLIS 

Middletown, Connecticut 

Sociology 





GARLAND DORSEY ESTES 

Halifax, Virginia 
English 



BARBARA JEAN EVANS 
Elmira, New York 
Home Economics 



34 



JOYCE FAY EVANS 

Newport News, Virginia 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 



VIRGINIA STITH FELTS 

Courtland, Virginia 
English 




CLASS 




JEAN FRANCES FERGUSON 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Political Science 



MARY ELIZABETH FISHER 

Stafford, Virginia 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



HELEN MARIE FOUSSEKIS 

Petersburg, Virginia 

English 



NANCY LEE FOX 

New York, New York 

Art 




35 




PEGGY LITTON FOX 
Danville, Virginia 
Mathematics 



MARTHA JANE FRAZIER 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 
Home Economics 



CLASS 



CONSTANCE ELIZABETH 
FROEHLER 

Evanston, Illinois 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



BARBARA ANN GALLIHER 

Bristol, Virginia 

Art 





JANE BESLER GARDNER 
New Rochelle, New York 
English 



ELIZABETH TREW GAREY 

Elmira Heights, New York 
Dramatic Arts and Speech 



36 



ANNE ELIZABETH 
GARLETTE 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Spanish 



VERNA GASSER 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Sociology 




OF '5 




ELIZABETH REE GAVETT 
Harrishurg, Pennsylvania 
English 



KATHRYN FRANCES 
GENOVESE 

Falls Church, Virginia 



Biology 



MARY ANN GILLESPIE 

Monterey, Virginia 

Psychology 



NELLIE MARGUERITE 
GRIEVE 

Adams, Massachusetts 

Economics and Business 
Administration 




37 




ANN MARIE GUTHRIE 
Richmond, Virginia 
Biology 



MARY JANE GUTHRIE 
Rocky Mount, North Carolina 
Psychology 



SENIOR 



BEVERLY ANN HACKETT 

Arlington, Virginia 

English 



MARY FRANCES HAMRICK 

Bristol, Virginia 

Sociology 





JANET MIRIAM HANSON 
Worcester, Massachusetts 
Psychology 



VIRGINIA RUTH HARDY 

Arlington, Virginia 

Art 



38 



BETTY LOUISE HARPINE 

Nokesville, Virginia 
French 



PATRICIA JOANNE HARRISS 

Chicago, Illinois 

Chemist rv 




CLASS 




JOANNE EMILYNE HASH 

Bedford, Virginia 
English 



JEAN BEATRICE HAWKINS 

Richmond, Virginia 

Music 



PATRICIA LOU HEAD 

Falls Church, Virginia 

English 



CORRINNE FRANCES HEK 

Lynchburg, Virginia 
Sociology 




39 




DOROTHY FREDA HELD 
Tenafly, New Jersey 
English 



EVELYN MALISSA 
HENDERSON 

Martinsville, Virginia 
Sociology 



CLASS 



ELAINE PEAKE HENSON 

Hampton, Virginia 

English 



LOIS MAE HERDINA 

Pine City, Minnesota 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 





NANCY GRIFFIN HERRING 
Alexandria, Virginia 
Psychology 



CATHERINE THORBURN 
HILLDRUP 

Chancellor, Virginia 
History 



40 



GEORGE HODGES 

Pineville, Kentucky 

English 



JANET MARY HOOS 

Union, New Jersey 
Psychology 




OF '5 




HELEN HOPKINS 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Art 



BARBARA HOVE 
Newberry, South Carolina 
Psychology 



ELIZABETH HOVE 

Newberry, South Carolina 

Music 



BARBARA HELEN HUBER 

Staten Island, New York 

Spanish 





JEAN ELIZABETH HUGHES 
South Norfolk, Virginia 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



ELIZABETH WESCOTT JACOB 

Exmore, Virginia 

History 



SENIOR 



SHIRLEY YVETTE KAY 
Watertown, New York 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



CATHARINE POTTER KEELY 

Amsterdam, New York 
Chemistry 





MARY LEE KEENER 
Amelia, Virginia 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



SYLVIA MAE KILDUFF 
Burgess Store, Virginia 
Psychology 



42 



GEORGENE MARIE 
KIRKENDALL 

Worcester, Massachusetts 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



MARY PATRICIA 
KLOSTERMAN 

Tampa, Florida 

Chemistry 




CLASS 




LEORA MAY KNAPP 
Wilmington, Delaware 
English 



VIRGINIA LOUISE KNOELL 

Orange, Virginia 

Mathematics 



MARY LYNE KUCERA 

Roanoke, Virginia 

Chemistry 



LENORA FLORENCE LADD 

Alexandria, Virginia 
Mathematics 




43 




ALMA BAYLESS LAYNE 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 
Home Economics 



CAROLYN STOCKTON LEE 

Augusta, Georgia 

Psychology 



CLASS 



LILLIAN JANE LEE 

Washington, D.C. 

Psychology 



CHARLOTTE BUGG LEONARD 

Richmond, Virginia 

English 





MAUD BENNETT LEVEY 
Richmond, Virginia 
English 



BARBARA LOUISE LLOYD 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



44 



MARY ANN LUTZ 

Eclinburg, Virginia 

English 



BETTY JEAN LYLE 

Goshen, Virginia 

Music 




OF '5 




MARY JANE McINTOSH 

Leesburg, Virginia 
English 



RUTH IRENE MAYNARD 
Old Saybrook, Connecticut 
Sociology 



JEAN MARIE MELVIN 

Baltimore. Maryland 
Psychology 



JANE MOONEY MERCER 

Occoquan, Virginia 

Biology 




45 




CONSTANCE ELIZABETH 
METZGER 

Richmond, Virginia 
Chemistry 



BETTY LOU MILES 
Gaithersburg, Maryland 
Music 



S E N I O 



SARAH ANNE MILES 

Martinsburg, West Virginia 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 



MILLICENT MILHAUSER 

Rockaway Beach, New York 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 





AUDREY HELEN MILLER 
West Palm Beach, Florida 
Psychology 



JOYCE EVELYNNE MILLER 
Northampton, Massachusetts 
Psychology 



46 



ROSEMARY AGNES MILLER 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Music 



BETTY JANE MINNICK 

Lynchburg, Virginia 
Home Economics 




CLASS 




JEAN CARVER M INTER 

Front Royal, Virginia 
Psychology 



BILLIE JEAN MITCHELL 
Alexandria, Virginia 
English 



SILDA GUILLAN MITCHELL 

San Salvador, El Salvador 
Sociology 



MARGUERITE ANN 
MONTGOMERY 

Midlothian, Virginia 
Psychology 




47 




MARY LIBERTA MOUNT 
Trenton, New Jersey 
History 



LOLA GAINES MURRAY 
Mathews, Virginia 
Psychology 



CLASS 



GRACE HOUGHTON MYRICK 

Suffolk, Virginia 

English 



MARY THERESA NEMCHICK 

Bridgeport, Connecticut 

Span ish 





JACQUELINE LAURA NEWELL 

Miami Beach, Florida 

Art 



RACHEL JEAN NICKEY 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Psychology 



48 



SALLY PERKINS OAST 

Portsmouth, Virginia 

Psychology 



BARBARA FRANCES OGDEN 
Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan 

Economics and Business 
Administration 




OF '5 




ANNE MORROW OSBORN 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
Dramatic Arts and Speech 



FLORENCE CORINNE 
OVERLEY 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 
Psychology 



MARY LOUISE PAASCH 

East Orange, New Jersey 

Biology 



ATHA FOTENIE PATELOS 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Music 




49 




NANCY LEE PARKS 
Bedford, Virginia 
English 



LESS IE GAYNELLE PARRISH 

Emporia, Virginia 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



SENIOR 



DELIA GENE PATE 

Roanoke, Virginia 

English 



MARGARET LEE PENN 

Durham, North Carolina 

Psychology 





GRACIA MAY PLYLEY 

Ridgewood, New Jersey 
Psychology 



L ILL IE MAUDE POWELL 

Aldie, Virginia 

Psychology 



50 



YVONNE LOUISE POWELL 

Woodsboro, Maryland 

Chemistry 



RUTH SELLMAN PROFFEN 

Baltimore, Maryland 

English 




CLASS 




KATHERINE ANN RECKER 
Alexandria, Virginia 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



MARY JANE REDMAN 
Bangor, Maine 
Sociology 



NANCY LEE REDMAN 

Richmond, Virginia 

Historv 



NAN JOSE RILEY 

Bena, Virginia 

History 





ALICIA RIVERA 

Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Psychology 



PEGGE O'NEIL RUDACILLE 

Front Royal, Virginia 

Economics and Business 
Administration 



CLASS 



MURIEL ELIZABETH RUSTAD 

Norge, Virginia 

A4usic 



ALICE BROOKING SAMPSON 

Gortonsville, Virginia 

Sociology 





BARBARA LEE SAUL 
Brooklyn, New York 
Political Science 



LUCILLE ANNE 
SCHOOLCRAFT 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Political Science 



52 



MILDRED LOUISE SEUFFERT 

Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 

History 



DOROTHY JANE SHEALLY 

Hopewell, Virginia 

English 




OF '5 




MARTHA WARING SHINN 

Fredericksbrug, Virginia 
Psychology 



ELIZABETH IRIS SIMMS 
Endicott, Virginia 
Home Economics 



ROWENA LAURA SIMPSON 

Hampton, Virginia 

Music 



ELIZABETH MARGARET 
SIMURO 

Washington, D.C. 
Sociology 




53 




REBA LORRAINE SISSON 

Mila, Virginia 

English 



AUDREY LEE SMITH 
Woodsboro, Maryland 
History 



S E N I O 



MARGARET JOYCE SMITH 

Fallston, Maryland 

Art 



MARTHA ODEN SMITH 

Alexandria, Virginia 

English 





MIRIAM LOUISE SOLLOWS 

Maplewood, New Jersey 
Art 



JEANNE ELIZABETH 

SOMMERS 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
Psychology 



54 



NELL JANE SOSEBEE 

Fort Worth, Texas 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 



CAROLYN JEAN SPROWER 

Freeport, New York 

English 




CLASS 




ELEANOR LAY SULLIVAN 
Washington, D.C. 
Psychology 



MARY JOSEPHINE SUMMERS 

Roanoke, Virginia 

Art 



MAR I BEL SUTHERLAND 

Bedford, Virginia 
English 



NAN CLARKE TAYLOR 

Suffolk, Virginia 

Psychology 





PATRICIA ANNE TEASLEY 
Sandston, Virginia 
Psychology 



MARY MARGARET TERRELL 
Forest, Virginia 
Home Economics 



CLASS 



JANE NEVILLE THOMPSON 

Amherst, Virginia 

History 



ELIZABETH HARDWICK 
THORNE 

Detroit, Michigan 
Art 





DIANE ELIZABETH 
TRIMBORN 

Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 
Psychology 



MARY ELIZABETH TURNER 

Chestertown, Maryland 

Music 



56 



CATHERINE C. W. VENEZIO 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Psychology 



BETTY JANE VINCENT 

Newsoms, Virginia 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 




OF '5 




VIRGINIA RANDOLPH 
WALLACE 

Nathalie, Virginia 
Psychology 



ANN COURTNEY WARD 

Norfolk, Virginia 
Psychology 



ELLEN PARKHURST WARE 
Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 

Sociology 



DORIS ANN WATTS 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

English 




57 




MARCELINE LA VON 
WEATHERLY 

Georgetown, South Carolina 
Music 



RUTH AGNES WEAVER 
Rock Castle, Virginia 
Chemistry 



S E N I O 



DOROTHY ANNETTE WEBB 

Norfolk, Virginia 

French 



PAULINE MAYSE WEBB 
Fort Defiance, Virginia 

Economics and Business 
Administration 





DOROTHY WHITE 
Lorton, Virginia 
Biology 



LOYCE ANN WHITE 
Norfolk, Virginia 
Art 



58 



EDITH LEE WILHELM 

Fincastle, Virginia 
Mathematics 



DORIS JEAN WILLIAMS 

Roanoke, Virginia 

French 




CLASS 




SARAH MARGUERITE 
WILLOCK 

Hampton, Virginia 
Dramatic Arts and Speech 



ANN PATRICIA WILSON 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
Political Science 



MARY NATALIE WILTON 

Seattle, Washington 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 



NANCY LEE WINSBRO 

Luray, Virginia 

History 




59 




JEWELL CARMEN WINSTEAD 

Petersburg, Virginia 

English 



MARTHA ANN WORSHAM 
Richmond, Virginia 
Psychology 



CLASS OF '5 



RUTH DALBY WRIGHT 

Norfolk, Virginia 
Art 



ANN NORA WRIGLEY 

Arlington, Virginia 

History 




LOIS BEVERLY 
YOUNGS 

Arlington, Virginia 
Mathematics 



ELIZABETH CARMEN AIDA 
MARGARET ZIPF ZEPPENFELDT 

Barrington, New Jersey Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Biology Psychology 




60 




Frances V/illard Hall 




JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY 



Happily meeting again both faculty and friends . . . 
Regret in missing many faces . . . Resolving to make the 
last two years even better than the first . . . Carefully- 
planning major fields of study . . . Exclaiming over 
friends' engagement rings and fraternity pins . . . Spend- 
ing more time in Trinkle, more effort on assignments 
. . . Bids to honorary fraternities . . . Thursday night 
Forums . . . The good-natured rivalry of Devil-Goat 
Day . . . Strains of I'd rather be a Devil than a Goat 
and vice versa ! . . . Tapping of candidates for Cap and 
Gown . . . Sponsoring the Beauty Contest . . . The long- 



awaited Junior Ring Dance . . . Promenading under the 
arch with that particular boy . . . Proudly wearing and 
displaying shiny new Class Rings . . . The unfailing 
splendor of May Day ... As the semester closes — bulg- 
ing scrapbooks . . . Discussing plans for the summer . . . 
Wishing luck to departing friends, the seniors ... Im- 
pressed and not a little sombered by the thought of just 
a year hence . . . The emergence of adeeper appreciation 
and love for Mary Washington . . . Tri-Unit, here we 
come! 



62 




Officers. Mr. Carter, Hamilton, Meriwether, Oliver, Hardwick, Weissblatt 



Junior Class Officers 



President Mary Ruth Hardwick Secretary Betty Meade Meriwether 

Vice-President Shirley Joan Hamilton Treasurer Joan Weissblatt 

Sponsor Mr. Clyde Carter 



63 






J U N I O I 

Gertrude Boiling Alfriend 
Kathryn Hope Allcorn 

Molly Condit Bettcher 
Dorothy Carolyn Bowers 

Gretchen Cutter Anderson 
Louise Adele Ash 



Marian Boyd 
Eddie Marion Brazill 

Jacqueline Lou Atwood 
Frances Reynolds Baker 

Jean Brown 

Elizabeth Taliaferro Bunnell 

Barbara Anne Baute 
Dorothve Anita Belden 



Ingeborg Magdalene 
Busemann 

Betty Gregg Butler 



Roselyn Mae Bell 
Lois Armine Bellamy 



Belen Maria Camacho 
Ruth Elizabeth Carroll 






CLASS 

Frances Virginia Carter 
Edwina Kent Chapman 

Barbara Davis 
Elizabeth Lacy Davis 



Frances Egerton Chesson 
Eloise Elizabeth Clark 

Louise Brannan Davis 
Mary Irene Dean 

Heleh Charles Coclin 
Audrey Lathenia Conkling 

Ruth DeMiller 
Joan Gibson Diehl 

Barbara Lee Corr 
Laura Ann Costarelli 

Joy Ann Doolittle 
Jo Alys Downs 

Barbara Anne Craig 
Marilyn Hartley Crosby 

Edwina Madelyn Doyle 
Mary Sue Ekelund 








65 




CLASS 

Marjorie Elna Erickson 
Eleanor Hemphill Evans 

Edna Lorraine Frantz 
Betty Joan Gardner 

Lois Ann Feagans 
N'ilda Rosa Fernandez 

Leda Maria Giatti 
Ruby Lois Gibson 

Marie Helen Ferrari 
Elizabeth Louisa Fitzgerald 



Frances Law Glass 
Joy Goldman 

Elizabeth Seekell Fletcher 
Ann Bailey Flythe 

Louise Marie Gortner 
Dorothy Page Gravatt 

Martha Jane Foster 
Mary Jane Francisco 

Julia Watson Graves 
Jean Grav 




■E .fl&Z££rr 



66 




OF '51 

Jane Edmond Gregg 
Shirely Joanne Hamilton 

Winnifred Ethel Horton 
Griselda Sue Howard 

Donna Hankla 
Mary Ruth Hardwick 



Sally Ann Howard 
Oliver Morel Howie 

Cynthia Harvel 

Sarah Elizabeth Herring 

Drusilla Ann Howson 
Xlarquerite Fannie Hubbard 

Jacqueline Doreen Hobbs 
Nancy Leigh Holladay 

Barbara Jean Hunt 
Marilyn Jane Hughes 

Suzanne Holladay 
Hester Walton Holland 

Carolyn Paige Hudgins 
Virginia Ann Hunt 






67 




JUNIOR 

Patsy Jane Hyans 
Viola Nancy Iacozza 

Martha Rhodes Lancaster 
Helen Louise Larson 



Marion Jenkins 

Jessie Childers Johnson 

Ann Page Lawson 
Nancy Ameilia Leonard 

Josephine Allen Johnson 
Barbara Ann Kelly 



Jacqueline Christine 
Lightner 

Elizabeth Perry K lacLeod 



Irene Helen Kessler 
Dorothy Anita Kinsey 

Anne Ellanor McClerkin 
Marquerite Jane McNeil 

Mary Louise Kirkendall 
Constance Marie Kontopanos 

Helen Peter Macheras 
Judy Christina Mack 






CLASS 

Phyllis Jean Macldox 
Nancy Francis Meagher 

Sarah Agnes Mount 
Joan Mary O'Brien 

Cynthia Conwell Medley 
Margaret Kirkvood Menzies 



Mary Lee Oliver 
Virginia Lee Pace 

Betty Meade Meriwether 
Jane Byington Millar 

Catherine Lacey Pappas 
Mary Jane Park 

Nancy Elizabeth Miller 
Frances Margarete Minnick 

Leah Jane Patterson 
Patsy McGowan Payne 

Eigenia Helen Moran 
Keren Underwood Morey 

Virginia Peirce 

Ann Kumball Penney 






69 




CLASS 

Doris Juanita Pike 
Ann Custis Powell 

Cornelia Anne Rudolph 
Anne Farrington Ruggles 

Mary Anderson Puryear 
Carol Ray 

June Barbara Rush 
Gave Murrell Sanderson 



Norma Resnikoff 
Marie Therese Rhodes 

Theresa Marie Saunders 
Blanche Phyllis Schiller 

Johanna Waller Ridgely 
Lucy Anne Ring 

Bety Ann Schmutz 
Cecil Scott 

N largaret Lee Rowe 
Pattie Theresa Royer 

Elsie Corner Scott 
Janet Sue Scott 






W M: 



70 





or '5i 

Harriette Priscilla Seeley 
Billie Jane Selfe 

Marjorie Kay Southcott. 
Hannah Lou Southwell 



Margaret Ann Shropshire 
Betty Jo Shufflebarger 

Martha Sturtevant Stack 
Beverly Willcox Steel 

Capitola Black Shultz 
Elizabeth Anne Smith 

Ruth Shirely Stess 
Joyce Stoutamyer 

Lucy Hunter Smith 
Joan Frances Smythe 

Dorothy Ellen Stultz 
Sue Clark Swyers 

Betty Jean Snidow 
Ruth Virginia Southard 

Nancy Stew art Tate 
Anne Elizabeth Taylor 








JUNIOR 

Leilia Ashton Tebhs 
Jean Elizabeth Tomko 

Phyllis Lee Wampler 
Joan Weisblatt 

Mary Fraser Tremain 
Nancv Trice 



June Andrea Weledniger 
Elaine Aldona West 

Barbara Anne Trosper 
Betty Ann Utz 

Betty Anne Wilkinson 
Shirley Aileen Williams 

Ada Rita Vergne 
Edythe Mae Wagner 

Joycyle Anne Wilson 
Patricia Ann Wise 

Susan Rebecca Walker 
Marquerite Suzanne Walsh 

Lenora Harriet Wisner 
Lucv Brooke Woods 





\ 





71 




CLASS 

Jane Wilson Yoe 
Doris Lorraine Wright 



Jane Dimmitt Zeigler 
Anne Elizabeth Zirpel 




'Westmoreland Hall 



73 





SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 



So good to be back — this time as sophisticated sopho- 
mores . . . Freshmen viewed sympathetically and maybe 
just a bit smugly . . . Renewing acquaintances and meet- 
ing Little Sisters . . . Rehashing the events of the sum- 
mer . . . Door to door for English Lit and Psych books 
. . . Club meetings . . . Term papers . . . Those never-to- 
be-forgotten mid-semesters . . . Mrs. Bushnell, a truly 
wonderful housemother . . . Scrumptious Sunday morn- 
ing breakfasts in Betty Lewis . . Bull (or rather Hen!) 
sessions . . . Feverishly trying to get those argyle socks 
done by Christmas . . . Coffee in the C Shoppe . . . Sat- 



urday night movies on the Hill . . . Struggling with the 
crawl in Swimming Class . . . Second Semester and — 
Well, next time for certain, Dean's List . . . Weekends 
at Annapolis and Virginia . . . Working hard on the 
Benefit . . . Discovering the fun to be had at the Cabin, 
the tennis courts . . . The year rapidly drawing to a 
close . . . Pride in the realization that the halfway mark 
has been reached . . . Anxiety to really get into major 
programs comes the fall . . . Almost Upperclassmen 
now ! 



74 




Officers. Riley, Edgerton, Stuelcken, Norwood, Orkney, Heilmann 



Sophomore Class Officers 



President Patricia Anne Riley Secretary Lena Carol Egerton 

Vice-President Mary Louise Stuelcken Treasurer Ruth Hart Norwood 

Sponsor Miss Mary E. Stephenson 



75 




Betty Ann Adams 

Charlotte Wales Adams 
Emily Clisby Adams 

Lotus Annette Allbee 

Jean Elizabeth Amis 
Gwendolyn Amory 

Peggy Lee Anderson 
Carolyn Arrington 

Marie Carol Attianese 

Emma Loucelle Barnes 

Elizabeth Ann Barton 

Phyllis Elizabeth 
Bennington 

Betty Frances Betts 

Josephine Langhorne Bidgood 

Catherine Anne Birmingham 

Patty Lee Black 



SOPHOMORE 



Selma Doris Black 

Jacqueline Marie Bobbin 
Frances Ann Bold 

Jimmie Rae Bow en 

Barbara Marie Bowman 

Bessie Barbara Bowman 
Shirley Jean Bowman 
Rita Marie Brahs 

Betty Jo Braithwaite 

Suzanne Weitzel Branner 
Elizabeth Harris Brice 

Joan Margaret Britten 




76 



\lary Eleanor Bruce 

Maxine Wiley Bryant 

Diana Gay Buckwalter 
Carolyn May Burkett 

\lthea Wallace Burklin 
Peggy Gray Burton 

Elizabeth Bowers Bush 

Roxanna Marie Byrnes 

Anne Brittian Caffey 

Mary Elizabeth Campbell 
Alice Robertson Carroll 

Frances Jacqueline Carter 

Anne Lee Ceglis 

Betty Westray Chappell 
Susie Charles 

Lila Ward Chichester 




CLASS 




Marjorie B. Clark 

Lucie Carolyn Clarke 
Gale Clinton 

Rebecca Catherine Coates 

Georgelyn Coffelt 

Patricia Ann Collins 

Nancy Carroll Cooper 
Betty May Coyl 

X largaret Hew es Craighill 
Ella Virginia Crim 

Candace Crittenton 

Mary West Crocker 



77 




Eleanor Isabelle Crockett 
Sara Jane Cress 

Nancy Ann Cundey 

Dorothy Elizabeth Cuneo 

Judith Ann Curtin 

Barbara Ann Cushing 
Janye Allen Dance 

Dorothy Allene Davis 

Dorothy Willert Davis 
Edith Cushing Davis 
Jacqueline Davis 

Marguerite Bessie Davis 

Marian Lou Davis 

Mary Rosalie Davis 

Suzanne Manning Davis 

Esther Katherine Dawson 



CLASS 



Evelyn Parrish DeMott 
Martha Joan DeVebre 

Eleanor Enders Dickinson 
Anne Willard Dodson 

Virginia Donald 

Katherine Love Eamshaw 
Peggy Jane Eaton 

Lena Carol Edgerton 

Mary Mapp Edmonds 

Jacqueline Segar Epes 

Mildred Louise Evans 
Jessie Jordon Ewe II 




78 



Bernice Irene Fawthrop 
Mary Pauline Fenn 
Joan Ruth Ferrari 

\ lary Lou Finney 

Mildred Geraldine Foley 
Mary Elaine Foster 

Barbara Anne Fowler 
Betty Lou Fox 

Jo Ellen Freeman 

Selma Ruth Friedman 

Ann North Gaines 

Dorothy Elizabeth 
Garretson 

Gay Brooke Garrett 

Genevra Frances Gaskins 
Nancy Ann Gass 
Wvan Gaw 




OF '5 2 




Garolyn Maurine Gay 
Marilynne Gessford 

Corleta Mary Gibson 

Marjorie Suzanne Gibson 

Betty Ann Gooding 

Marjorie Ann Gortner 
Lorna Gossett 

Alma Elizabeth Green 

Margaret McArthur Green 
Margaret Cecilia Greene 
Carolyn Latimer Grey 
June Wanda Griffin 



79 




Nancy Pricilla Guynn 

Maxine Blanton Haley 
Elizabeth Ann Ham 

Marilyn Ann Handelsman 

Mary Ann Harding 

Anne deBeelen Hart 
Betty Pace Hatch 

Maryanne Heatwole 

Janet Caroline Heilmann 
Betty June Henley 

Norma Audrey Henley 

Frances Irene Hermann 

Florette Clarice Heyman 

Dorothy Frances Hickson 
Harriet Hill Hodges 
Jo Ann Hoehler 



SOPHOMORE 



Betty Lee Holland 

Betty Clarke Holzhu 

Nancy Dorothy Horan 
Janet Anne Houston 

Mary Eleanor Howard 

Nora Lee Hulme 

Elizabeth Cornwallis 
Humphreys 

Jean Ann Huntington 

Sarah Jane Huston 

Susan Daniel Hutcheson 

Katherine Clare Jackson 

Dorothea Sophie Jashow 




Carolyn Dawn Jennings 
Sally Ann Johnson 

Catherine Ann Jones 

Evelyn Darden Jones 

Jacqueline Ann Jones 
Mary Ann Jones 

Mildred Louise Jones 
Susan Borgess Jones 

Frances Smith Kimbark 
Barbara Ann Kimble 
Carol Ellen King 

Shirley Jean King 

Patricia Ellen Knight 

Mildred Frances Kolarik 
Rhoda Kronick 

June Anne Kucher 




CLASS 



^rit 





Rita Jo Lambert 

Carolina Gale Lambright 
Mary Elizabeth Latham 
Patricia Ann Leech 

Margaret Elaine Leftwich 
Joan Madeline LeSage 

Patricia Elizabeth Line 
Molla Dora Litt 

Betty Gene Litton 

Joyce Adelle Long 

Lilly Jeanette Long 
Mary Ann Lutz 




Joan Marie Marscher 
Betsy Lane Martin 

Dorothy Gaines Maynard 
Rosa Maria Mayol 

Margaret Louise McBride 
Martha Ann McClenny 

Betty Andrews McElroy 
Sue Grady McFarland 

Gertrude Stedman McGinnes 
Ursula Ann McGreevy 
Marietta McKnight 

Nancy Wyatt McLeod 

Marjorie Joan Meyer 
Barbara Jane Miller 

Nancy Bailey Miller 
Janet Patricia Mills 



CLASS 



Betsy MacRae Montgomery 
Sally Ann Moore 

Eugenia Helen Moran 
Rita Wanda Morgan 

Marilyn Marie Morris 
Mabel Patricia Moss 
Mary Edwina Moss 

Lelia Adrenne Motley 

Eleanor Agnes Mount 

Nancy Theresa Moxley 

Dorothy Lynelle Murden 
Elaine Frances Nader 




82 



Mary Kathryn Neary 
Anne Carter Nelson 

Zoila Ernestine Nogales 
Betsy Ann Norris 

Ruth Hart Norwood 

Mildred Elizabeth Nowlin 
Ann Hinda O'Dette 
Mary Lee Oliver 

Kathryn Margaret Olson 
Kathryn Marilyn Orem 

Virginia Elizabeth Orkney 
Ann Orwiler 

Karen Ilene Osborne 
Betty Anne Overby 

Inez Williams Palmer 
Mary Ann Pancoast 




OF '5 2 




Nancy Marie Parker 

Alice Madge Parsons 
Patricia Jane Peirce 

Elizabeth Brame Peterson 

Lennie Rae Peterson 

Beatrice Pierce 

Betty Jane Pou 

Madeleine Rousby 
Quesenberry 

Martha Cornell Rand 

Marjorie Lucille Ratcliffe 
Mary Elva Ratcliffe 

Margaret Eugenia Rawls 



83 




Helen Lee Reicl 

Mary Davidson Ribble 
Emily Patterson Rice 

Barbara Jean Richardson 

Helen Elizabeth Riddle 
Patricia Anne Riley 

Ruth Vedder Rivenburgh 
Priscilla Jane Roberts 

Evelyn Irma Roeder 
Nancy Ellen Rogers 

Marjorie Ann Rothenberg 
Sara Leonard Rowlett 

Gisela Elizabeth Ruhroth 
Leah Belle Sachs 

Ajia Louise Sakakini 
Shirlie Lee Savin 



SOPHOMORE 



Althea May Scholl 

Helen Bagley Schroeder 
Jane Rae Scott 

Jane Marie Self 

Margaret Jean Shaw 

Margaret Card Sherman 

Khalida Bessie Showker 
Mary Baxter Sigler 

Barbara .Ann Silvernail 
Grace Ann Simmons 
Mary Claire Sims 

Claire Kendrick Sindlinger 




Avee Anne Smith 

Betty Alice Smith 

Cornelia Gaston Smith 
Lois Elaine Smith 

Mary Annette Sorey 

Phyllis Rose Sparacino 
Carolyn Spencer 

Martha Nan Spry 

Julia Margaret Starkey 
Barbara Ann Staylor 
Sara Ann Stephens 

Elizabeth Corinne Stevens 

Ann Clopton Stone 

Nancy Carolyn Straughan 
Mary Louise Stuelcken 

Nancy Simmons Stump 




CLASS 




Shirley Jane Swarm 
Mary Ann Taylor 

Ruth Ann Taylor 

Martha Jeanne Therrel 

Dorothy Ann Thombury 
Barbara Ann Thurner 
Jessica Tignor 

Mary Byrd Tignor 

Mary Jim Timberlake 

Barbara Joyce Tucker 
Helen Louise Turner 

Ruth O'Mae Underwood 




Jewel Whitaker Upshur 
Shirley Ann Van Epps 

Anne Livesey Van Kirk 
Patricia Lee Vint 

Ann Marie Vredenburg 
Felde Lee Wagner 

Nancy Jane Wagner 

Frances Victoria Wallace 

Virginia Gardner Wallace 
Dorothy Jean Walls 

Diana Hardwick Walter 
Susan Ann Walton 

Mary Alice Ward 

Pauline Ries Wassermann 

Nannette Ruckman Webb 
Phyllis Jean Webb 



CLASS 



Vivian Katherine Wells 

Melita Ethel Whitcomb 
Barbara Mae White 
Becky Jane White 

Catherine Love Whittle 

Eleanor Rogers Wideman 
June Estelle Wilderson 

Charlotte Marie Wilkinson 

Bettie Faison Willard 

Ruth Ethelyn Williams 
Frances Neale Wills 

Nancy Lorraine Willson 




Phoebe Anne Wilson 

Anna Gibson Winsbro 
Diane Ellyse Winters 

Harlene Janet Wolever 

Mary Wong 

Joan Alice Woodbury 
Betty Jo Woodford 

Gene Marie Woolfolk 

Frances Westwood \\ right 
Barbara Jane Wynne 
Janet Boice Young 

Louise Ann Zamoiski 




OF '5 2 



Virginia Hall 



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II 




FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY 



^lch excitement ... So many new faces . . . Please, 
which way is Monroe Hall? . . . The confusing ordeal of 
registration . . . That little book called the Bayonet . . . 
The Kid Party, foolish, but fun . . . Wonderful Big Sis- 
ters . . . The first big dance . . . The recurring task of 
writing themes . . . Biology Lab . . . Fredericksburg 
weather . . . The indispensable P.O. . . . Christmas Pro- 
grams . . . The frightening prospect of College Exams 



. . . Second Semester already . . . Snapshots . . . That 
sight-seeing trip in Washington . . . First term papers 
. . . Easter Holidays . . . Spring at Mary Washington . . . 
Suntans! . . . Signing up for next year's rooms — Shall 
it be Virginia or Betty Lewis ? . . . Inevitable goodbyes — 
Don't forget to write this summer! . . . Eager anticipa- 
tion of return in the Fall — as full-fledged, in-the-know 
Sophs ! 




Officers. Spitzer, Farrow, Bennett, McCoy, Dr. Castle, Imbt 



Freshman Class Officers 



President Dorothy Nell McCoy Secretary Constance Mae Bennett 

Vice-President Nancy Montae Imbt Treasurer Eugenia Louise Farrow 

Sponsor Dr. William Castle 



/*= 



^ 





F R E S H M A 











Patricia Ganelle Abernathy 
Beverly Irvine Adams 

Mary Lewis Adams 
Miriam Agostini 



Anne Marie Berkeley 
Bernice Berkman 

Judith Ann Berry 
Claudia Ann Beswick 



Jean Alcock 

Jane Elizabeth Allen 

Betty Ruth Anderson 
Myra Burr Anderson 

Virginia Lee Arrington 

Margaret Dunlap 
Atkinson 

Ruth Hudson Avery 
Pauline Aiken Bagby 

Martha Virginia Bailes 
Jean Neale Bailey 

Barbara Joan Barnam 
Corinne Cloyes Beecher 



Jacqueline Mae Bender 
Norma Benitez 



Constance Mae Bennett 
Martha Mae Bergenty 



Betty Jean Booker 
Johanna McKenzie Bourne 

Ellen Nora Bourquardez 
Charlotte Mae Bowry 



Joyce Elaine Bradley 
Suzanne Bradley 



Valerie Jean Brady 
Elizabeth Lee Brockley 



Rosalie Marx Brodie 
Barbara Ann Brown 



Betsy Alice Brown 
Carolyn Wyatt Brown 

Jane Hope Brown 
Millicent Judith Brown 

Thalia Jean Brown 
Emily Ruth Brownlee 






















90 



I - ■£ 



AT 



I 












CLASS 



Bernice \ lorgan Bryant 
Barbara Marie Burnett 



Loretta Jean Bumette 

Elizabeth Jeanne 
Burroughs 



Ruth Xaomi Burrows 

Marjorie Slaughter 
Burrus 



Nancy Louise Caldwell 
Jane Elliot Calhoun 



Sandra Esther Chastang 
Jane Alice Chinn 

June Vooght Christian 
Jennie Ciccarello 



Helen Elizabeth Coddington 
Mary Jacqueline Colbert 



Mary Nelson Coleman 
Beatrice Thrasea Coletta 



Betty Joyce Campbell 
Anne Elizabeth Campbell 



Jane Royall Campbell 
Jo Anne Campbell 

Beverly Ann Carmack 
Dixie L. Carver 



Bourdon Irene Casey 
Betty Norvell Casto 



Joan Marie Collins 
Iris Nereida Colon 



Mary Kathryn Cope 
Patricia Ellen Courtright 



Marguerite Henriette Crabites 
Kibler Carlton Crenshaw 



Elizabeth Gordon Crockett 
Geraldine Essie Crowley 



Evelyn Joan Chamblin 
Beverly Bailey Chapman 



Peggy Louise Chapman 

Helen Zulieme 
Chappelear 



Ilena Viae Cruise 
Thyra Ellen Crymes 



Annemarie Jean Curling 
Iris Jacqueline Dagg 









W 















1 « i 




91 














CLASS 












Susan Bradley Dalzell 
Joyce Eileen Davenport 



Betty Davidson 
Mary Geraldine Davies 



Esther Gray Davis 
Nancy Lou Davis 

Ann Truxal DeWitt 
Betsy Anne Dickinson 



Naney Rae Dineen 
Mary Louella Dodge 



Victoria Biggs Donahey 
Ludema Mary Drake 



Nancy Hall Driski 
Jane Byrd Dunn 



Mary Jean Dunning 
Dorothy Durrence 



Barbara Anne Eanes 
Betty Wise East 

Mary Alice Edmonds 

Mildred Elizabeth 
Edwards 



Georgie Day Eley 
Marcia Ann Elliott 



Peggy Jo Ellis 
Mary Carter Ellison 



Naomi Elswick 
Elizabeth Ann Emerson 

Lois Louise Enders 
Gwendolyn Corrine Erb 



Elizabeth Norreys Ervin 
Sal lie Nelson Eubank 



Ruth Kay Eutsler 
Joyce Evans 



Margaret Elaine Evans 
Nancy Louise Fahy 



Tommie June Fairey 
Eugenia Louise Farrow 



Barbara Jean Fasick 
Barbara Ester Faxon 



Nancy Suzanne Ferguson 
Patricia Wordsworth Fernald 

















& 





92 



I 



9 



j 

if 




OF '5 3 











lf> ^ 



Katherine Jackson Fisher 
Aileen Cynthia Fitzgerald 

Doris Charlane Flory 
Joan Dolores Foley 



Mary Ann Fox 
Beverly Banks Fretwell 



Peggy Carolyn Friend 
Nancy Lee Frost 



Patricia Ann Rita Gillen 
Barbara Glaser 

Helen Martine Glass 
Doris Ann Godbey 



Margaret Louise Gooch 
Patricia Ann Good 

Peggie Jean Goode 
Nancy Jean Gordon 



Merle Frances Fulton 
Janet Ann Galloway 

Jerry Lee Garber 
Kathryn Jane Garland 

Norma Ann Gates 
Mary Frances Gaylord 

Elizabeth Ann Geoghegan 
Frances Ann Giannotti 



Anita Whitman Gott 
Janet Louise Graham 

Helen Lavina Grant 
Shirley Ann Grant 

Betty Lou Gray- 
Donna Lee Gray 

Sarah Baker Gray 
Dorothy Julia Green 



Martha Gilbert 
Barbara Wilson Giles 



Cardelle Jean Gilderdale 
Christie Lee Gill 



Mary Stuart Grimaud 
Rachel Mae Gum 



Frances Smith Gunther 
Lois Eileen Gutherie 


















P v, 








93 






















F R E S H M A 



Barbara Mokisette Hamilton 

Aileen Hirschman 
Billie Jean Hamm 

JoAnne Marcia Hoclges 



Sally Hammett 
Nancy Sue Hankins 

Mary Anita Hantzmon 
Patricia Rene Harding 



Nancy Lee Harrill 
Joanne Lee Harris 



Peggy Jane Harrison 
Beverly Arlene Harrell 

Patricia Hart 
Jane Maude Harty 



Marjorie Louise Hassell 
Patricia Hawkins 

Patsy Ann Haymes 
Mary Ann Hellberg 

Dorothy Lenore Hendry 
Nancy Jean Hewett 

Roberta Chapman Heyl 
Margaret Suzanne Hicks 



Anne Zuleime Holland 
Carolyne Vista Hopkins 

Peggy Anne Hopkins 
Patsy Delores Horton 

Nancy Ann Hudes 
Sarah Bet tie Hudgins 

Barbara Sue Huff 
Nancy Elizabeth Huff 

Jane Ann Hughes 
Lou Ann Humphrey 

Joan Sharp Humpton 

Winifred Elizabeth 
Hundemann 

Jaonne Muriel Hunt 
Dorothy Arlene Hunter 

Barbara Lee Hurst 
Nancy Montae Imbt 

Barbara Coleman Ingram 
June Virginia Inscoe 












§ 



94 



/IT 




CLASS 












Florence Elizabeth Irvin 
Gloria Kay Ives 

Elizabeth Lee Jackson 
Nancy Ann Jacobi 



Uarda Billie James 
loan Harding Jefferds 



Jane Elinore Kitchingman 
Marjorie Jean Kodet 

Page Kohn 

Caroline Emily Krauss 



Caroline Cudy LaBarron 
Kathleen Perkins Lackey 



Kathleen Mary Johnson 
Frances Rutherford Jones 



Marguerite Jones 
Mary Barbara Jones 



Gloria Diane Jordan 
Norma Frances Jordan 



Carol Husted Kederick 
Laura Lee Kelly 



Patricia Jane Kelly 
Joan Marie Kerrins 



Joe Ann Ketron 
Douglas Isabel Kingree 



Mary Isabel Kinnett 



Katherine Elizabeth 
King 





Mary Jo Lacy 
Mary Ann Landers 

Helen Constance Larson 
Virginia Lauck 

Alma Jane LeCompte 
Jean Ainslie Leiby 

Emma Jo Levey 
Jean Lee Lewis 

Patricia Waring Lewis 
Doris Ann Lindsey 

Elizabeth Dorothy Livingston 
Kathleen Long 



Nancy Carolyn Loux 
Anne Carruth Loyd 







BR // i 












-IV 






CLASS 


















/>f\-t 



Helen Lyon 



Frances Louise McBride 

Dorothy Nell McCoy 
Virginia Norton McCoy 

Dana Sue McCray 

Margaret Seaman 
McDonald 

Barbara Ann McFarland 
Jessie MacKay 



Marietta McKnight 
Barbara Mack 



Lois Valdex Mackey 

Virginia Helen 
Makarewicz 



Irene Maliaros 

Sarah Hughes Marable 



Betty Ann Marshall 
Cary Randolph Marshall 



Grace Kenney Marshall 
Mary Lou Martin 



Sarah Stone Martin 
Elizabeth Ann Mason 



Elizabeth Cornell Matthes 
Shirley Mae Matzenger 

Anna Loretta Mawhinney 
Barbara Ann Maxwell 

Patricia Ann Maxwell 
Patricia Gay Mayer 



Leah Ray Mears 
Norma Melendez 



Martha Ellen Merchant 
Martha Michaelson 



Bitsy Middleton 
Anne Cochran Miller 



Myrtle Mae Miller 
Ruth Richards Miller 



Mary Ellen Mills 

June Henry Carlton Mitchell 



JoAnne Theresa Moderau 
Mary McAlpine Moore 

LaRita Dawn Moretz 
Joan Lee Morgan 















£& / 









96 











or '5 3 



Mary Elizabeth Morris 
Diane Rives \ lorrison 

Nancy Corr Mosher 
Mary Moskos 



Betty Mothershead 
Caroline Rose Mueller 



Vlarigene Mulligan 
Martha Carol Munn 



Jacqueline Harrison Payne 
Ethel Maxine Peake 

Mary Beaumont Peters 
Bernice Arlene Phelps 



Clara Jeanette Piggott 
Patricia Ann Pitzer 



Rose Plewnick 
Henrietta Joan Pluese 



Marilyn Elizabeth Myatt 
Frances Britt Myrick 



Carol Jane Napier 
Nancv Lindsay Neil 



Miriam Rose Poindexter 
Virginia Mae Poole 



Harriet James Poolos 
Nancv Duval Potts 




Nancy Newhall 

Patricia Ann Oberholtzer 



Barbara Ann Ogletree 
Ellen Noel Parker 



Marajane Parker 
Ruth Ann Parker 



Wilier Dee Parsons 
Beverlv Ruth Patricl- 









Barbara Karen Pritcharc 
Marv Eilen Proffit 



Eugenia Richmond Pugh 
Peggy Joyce Pugh 



June Frances Purdy 
Carol Field Putnam 



Elizabeth Strangman Quicke 
Ana Maria Quinones-Roque 
















97 




FRESHMA 




W"' 


















Mary Jo Racier 

Louclell Nicholas Boyd 
Raitt 



Nell Cobb Ramsey 
Harriet Mae Ramsten 



Virginia Carolyn Rawls 
Betty Anne Ravnor 



Diane Stephanie Read 
Ruth Beverly Reamy 



Betty Kerr Reed 
Jacqueline Heath Reese 



Dorothy Eugenia Reisig 
Doris Ann Renn 



Jean Fay Ruttenbur 
Sandra Ann Sacrey 

Marilyn Yvonne Sadler 
Patsy Joleen Saunders 



Jacquelyn Savers 
Suzanne Schaller 



Bettv Ann Schmitt 



Virginia Montgomer 
Schneblv 



Leslie Lentor Schofield 
Sara Louise Schroder 



Jewell Lockhart Scott 
Betty Clark Sebrell 



Helen Margaret Reynolds 
Ruth Joyce Reynolds 



Suzanne Lucille Seelman 
Ruth Marie Sergeant 



Nancy Jane Richardson 
Eleanor Joyce Riddle 



Flora Carole Risdon 
Jimmv Emeline Rivers 



Joyce Fay Roberts 
Joan Ellen Robinson 



Mattie Lou Shaffer 
Sarah Lee Sharpe 



Barbara Ann Sheiry 
Mary Alberta Shelton 



Betty Eggleston Sheppard 
Carol Aline Sher 








*TL* 










98 




CLASS 











Barbara Frame Shevitz 
Margaret Alice Shields 



Alice Anne Sichler 
Ellen Adair Simkins 



Ann Leighton Simmons 
Edwina Andrea Simon 



Celeste Abercrombie 

Sinkler 
Shirlev Mae Sinnard 



Betty Alice Smith 
Dorothy Lee Smith 



Jo Anne Katherine Smith 
Nancy Rice Smith 

Sophia Arnell Smith 
Claudia Kirkman Snider 



Eleanor Carolyn Spangler 
Nancy Eleanor Speck 



Anna Dorothy Speen 
Carlina Gloria Speir 



E. Joan Stacy 



Charlotte Louise Staples 
Dorothy Ann Stauffer 

Nancy Jeanne Stedman 
Arlvne Elaine Sterba 



Alida Ann Stew art 

N larianne Louise Stivers 



Lynne Stoddard 
Elaine Frances Strawser 



Olivia Stuart 
Anne Lucille Tallev 



Margaret Rose Taylor 
Marilyn Teien 



Helen Muldrow Thacker 
Peggy Ann Thomas 



Katherine Roberta Toe Laer 
Mary Evelyn Tomlin 

Thurley Evalena Travis 
Carol Lysbeth Upman 



Jo Ann Constance Vames 
Carolyn Wood Vance 













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CLASS OF '53 



Elizabeth Mae \ andemark 
I 
Margaret Ann Van Deusen 

Cynthia Louise Van Wirt 
Alice Verburg 



Lois Leota Whiteman 
1 
Nancy Ann Whitney 

Jean Earle Whittenberg 
Betty Louise Whyman 



Janet Ann Vilbranclt 

Irene Theodora 
Voronovsky 



Shirley Frances Widener 
Esther Mae Wilkins 



Dorothy Lucille Wade 
Elizabeth Franklin Walker 



Betty Lou Wilkinson 
Ruth Frances Williams 



Ruby Lee Ward 
Jeanne Claudia Warner 



Barbara Ann Waskey 
Sara Gray Watkins 



Gladys Elaine Wimberh 
Mary Anne Winborne 

Ann Gayle Winston 
Patty Arz Withrow 



Caroline Newbold Watson 
loan Bel in Watson 



Joyce Ann Weimer 
Sarah Frances Welch 



Geraldine Lee Wells 
Anna May Wheeler 

Barbara Anne White 
Mary Ellen Whitehurst 



Sue Carol Workman 
Charlene Alta Wright 

Laureen Ann Wright 
Catherine Louise Wyss 

Elizabeth Ann Yago 
Ann Louise Young 



Elizabeth Leigh Young 
Janet Estelle Young 






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100 




Mary Ball Hall 



FINE ARTS 



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nford, Emil R. Schnellock, Mrs. Pruc Smith Rockwell 



ART 



Blue jeans were hidden under trench coats. 
You had created the world's masterpiece and 
almost treasured your first paint stain. Art 
Appreciation wasn't such a snap, and the 
loveliest trees are in front of Monroe. Christ- 
mas vacation Cezanne was mentioned 
casually. 



The sunset was suddenly exquisite. If only, 
(you thought), I could paint — remembering 
suddenly you could. Remembering, perhaps, 
for a long time Michelangelo, a head by 
Scopas, and men who saw eternity and were 
eternal. 



104 




Officers: Sollows. Newell, Mr. Cecere, Rhodes, Wiate, White. Maynard (Preside 



ART CLUB... The touch of the brush 



Sunlight and shadow . . . form, perspective, 
color, design . . . the desire to be able to catch 
on canvas the fast-deepening hues of a sunset s 
rays on a floating cloud . . . seeing an elderly 
man's worn but finely cut features and feeling 
the urge to sculpt a permanent likeness. 
Spring bursting all over campus and the over- 
whelming longing to create something that 
would be an indelible reminder of that first 
inspirational beauty . . . experiences trans- 
ferred through the imagination into subject 



matter for the most memorable drawings and 
paintings ever seen. An artist copies life and 
yet, in so doing, he is going beyond everyday 
experience in his interpretations of a spiritual 
nature. 

The thrill of creating values and the oppor- 
tunity to develop artistic appreciations belong 
to the Art Club members. Those long hours 
spent in art labs are well compensated for by 
the satisfaction of seeing one's masterpieces 
on exhibition for the first time. 




Levin Houston, III, Eva T. Eppes, Mrs. Vera Ross, Marion K. Chauncey, Ronald W. Faulkner 



MUSIC 



A junior left her room. Someone was play- 
ing — she thought banging — the piano. Fur- 
ther down the hall she heard what could have 
been the best or worst voice at Mary 
Washington. 

At Chapel that day "Pop" Faulkner's 
orchestra played. It was wonderful. There 
were a lot of feet tapping to the "Mary Wash- 
ington Stomp." A lot of talent playing good, 
1950 music. The kind of music our junior 
understood. 

In the late afternoon, the quiet of the li- 
brary was broken, a chair screeched and some 
students hurried to the window caught up by 



the beat of marching music. One girl whis- 
pered, 

"Funny how much of college life is tied up 
with music. Remember the first time we heard 
Mr. Houston? Well, this is really a year of 
progress, he's got a new verse to "Jenny." 
Yes, Mr. Houston's "Jenny" and Mr. Carter's 
Chapel sings. Say, haven't they got a new 
majorette?" 

That night a freshman tried to shut her 
ears to the sounds of Glee Club practice, but 
the warm voices pulled her from her books to 
the window and her thoughts moved beyond 
the dark campus. . . . 




Monroe Hall 



GLEE CLUB... The essence of musical charm 



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108 



OFFICERS 

President Rowena Simpson 

Vice-President Helen Chiles 

Secretary Donna Hankla 

Treasurer Maxine Bryant 











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"Eager voices singing" may be well-applied 
to the members of the Mary Washington Glee 
Club . . . composed of those who have not only 
an ability to sing, but a true interest in music 
. . . sharing together the experience of gaining 
something cultural . . . and having fun doing so. 

Perhaps one of the most outstanding pro- 
grams of the year is that presented by the 
Glee Club: the annual Christmas Carol Pro- 
gram, which has always left a rather 
"inspired" feeling in the audience . . . making 
us love even more the wonderful carols we 
know so well. The Glee Club, however, does 
not limit its activities to the campus only, 
for it is always more than willing to present a 
program for local and state groups, radio pro- 
grams, church and civic organizations, and 
sponsor in-coming concerts given by groups 
from-other schools in Virginia. 

The Glee Club gives a highly pleasurable 
concert itself in the spring, usually made 
up of light, and semi-classical pieces. This 
group, directed by Miss Marion Chauncey, 
surely has the right to pride itself on its con- 
tribution to our campus. 



MEMBERS 

Virginia Arrington, Corinne Beecher, Constance Ben- 
nett, Suzanne Branner, Maxine Bryant, Ruth Bryce, 
Marjorie Burrus, Peggy Burton, Anne Ceglis, Beverly 
Chapman, Frances Chesson, Mary Christie, Rita 
Christie, Georgelyn Coffelt, Shirley Cole, Nancy Davis, 
Marjorie Diener, Ada Dodrill, Dorothy Durrence, 
Kathryn Garland, Mary Gaylord, Nellie Grieve, Donna 
Hankla, Barbara Huff, Billie James, Patricia Knight, 
Martha Lancaster, Helen Larson, Ann Lawson, Carolyn 
Lee. Margaret Leftwich, Patricia Line, Grace Marshall, 
Betty Mason, Charlotte Massey, Nell McCoy, Betsy 
Middleton, Betty Lou Miles, Rosemary Miller, Betty 
Montgomery, Marilyn Morris, Nancy Moxley, Karen 
Osborne, Virginia Poole, Ann Powell, Dorothy Reisig, 
Johanna Ridgely, Jacquelyn Savers, Betty Shuffle- 
barger, Rowena Simpson, Shirley Sinnard, Dorothy 
Stauffer, Nancy Stump, Josephine Summers, Shirley 
Swarm, Margaret Taylor, Mary Trumaine, Ruby 
Ward, Barbara Wynne. 



109 




CHOIR... Happy voices, happy hearts 



OFFICERS 

President Toni Patelos 

Vice-President Betty-Lou Fox 

Secretary Patricia Leech 

Treasurer Helen Foussekis 



MEMBERS 

Abernathy, Arrington, Bobbin, Bowman, Brahs, 
Brown, Chappell, Charles, Chastang, Clark, Connelly, 
Cope, Cross, Crowley, Cundley, Darden, Donahoe, 
Driskill, Eley, Ellis, Fahy, Ferguson, Foussekis, Fox, 
Freeman, Fulton, Gessford, Goldenson, Gordon, Gra- 
vatt, Green, Griffin, Hewlett, Hubbard, Hughes, Jor- 
dan, King, Landes, Latham, Leech, Loux, McLeod, 
Moss, Mott, Munn, Nader, Oliver, Olson, Overly, 
Parsons, Patelos, Peterson, Rees, Reid, Richardson, 
Rivers, Roberts, J.E., Roberts, J. F., Scott, Silvernail, 
Sims, Spencer, Stuelken, Swyers, Taggart, Thornbury, 
Tignor, Turner, Upman, Van Deusen, Vint, Webb, 
Wilkinson, Willson, Wilson. 




110 




st, Patclos, Miles, Weatherly, Mrs. Ross, Chesson, Lyle, Hankla, Delano, Rustad, Hove, Sakakini. Stated: Ward, 
Cole (President), Grieve, Trice 



MU PHI EPSILON 



Music should not mean, but be 



OFFICERS 

President Shirley Cole 

Vice-President Nellie Grieve 

Corresponding Secretary Donna Hankla 

Recording Secretary Bette Hove 

Treasurer Betty Lou Miles 



Inspired and inspiring — these are the girls 
whose world is a world of song — who hear the 
melodies of the falling leaves and of the spring- 
time shadows — music expressing itself through 
a variety of mediums, not always audible but 
always sensed. 

They who not only enrich their own lives 
but possess that happy faculty of being able 
to give pleasure to others . . . Mu Phi Epsilon 
... an integral part of the student life; and an 
honorary achievement for Mary Washington's 
music lovers. 




Strains of martial music drift through the 
dorms . . . chairs scrape the floor . . . there's a 
mad dash down the hall to get the favored 
position on a window ledge. The campus 
comes alive . . . girls seem to appear in every 
door and window. 

What causes this burst of acitivity? What 
else — but the Mary Washington Marching 
Band ! 

In blue and white unison, gold braid spark- 
ling in the sun, they march past the library 
onto the green, there to perform the high-step- 
ping routines that have won for them the 
praise and admiration of all onlookers. 

Yes, we're proud of the band for the awards 
and honors it's won but, more that that, for 
the school spirit and sense of unity it's given 
us . . . with our friends, our band, our Mary 
Washington. 



Drum Major — Marceline Weatherly 



MARY WASHINGTO 



Members of the Band 




112 



BAND PERSONNEL 

Drum Major: Marceline Weatherly. 

Majorettes: Jean Hawkins, Maryanne Heatwole, Cath- 
erine-Rae Capizola, Phyllis Maddox. 

Clarinets: Rosemary Miller, Jean Haw kins. Alice Ponte, 
Maryanne Heatwole, Doris Ann Lindsey, Patricia 
Abernathy, Virginia Lee Pace, Jacqueline Payne, 
Lucy Hunter Smith, Betty Anderson, Cynthia Med- 
ley, Nancy Moxley, Nancy Guynn. 

Trumpets: Bette Hove, Joan Smythe, Carol Bailey, 
Priscilla Martin, Audrey Conkling, Harriette Seely. 

Alto Saxophone^: Sara Jane Cross, Patricia Hart. 

Tenor Saxophones: Barbara Hove, Willie Dee Parsons. 

Trombones: Shirley Cole, Janice Horstman. 

Bass: Margaret Taylor, Peggy Jane Eaton. 

String Bass: Barbara Johnson. 

Alto Clarinet: Mary Irene Dean. 

Bass Clarinet: Irene Keesler 

Flutes: Mary Alberta Shelton, Anne Smith, \ lary Claire 
Sims. 

Baritones: Betty Jean Lyle. Rowena Simpson, Con- 
stance Bennett, Caorlyn Spangler. 

French Horns: Sara Jane Huston, Shirley Sinnard, Lucy 
Ring, Joanne Hodges. 

Bells: Donna Maria Hankla, Constance Kontopanos, 
Karen Morey. 

Percussion: Frances Chesson, Elsie Scott, Emily Adams, 
Carolyn Vance. 




Flagbearers. Miller, A., Miller, J„ Dodrill, Mosher 



A N D ... The Spirit of M.W C. 



Majorettes. Maddox, Hawkins, Weatherly, Capizola, Heatwole 




113 



DANCE ORCHESTRA 



IsAusic for dancing 



The organization on the Hill which has per- 
haps the most widely-recognized appreciation 
is the college dance orchestra. Under Mr. 
Ronald Faulkner's direction this group has 
made trips to various schools in and around 
Virginia, devoting several days each trip to 
performances of the best-loved popular music 
for their appreciative audiences. The mem- 
bers themselves look forward to these per- 
formances, and even rehearsals, with an en- 
thusiasm, which not many of the college 
organizations can contend. Whether the music 
is jazz or sweet you may be assured that the 
orchestra will produce a vibrant and original 



arrangement to entertain you. 

The opening of a new college session inevit- 
ably brings a score of girls, who hope to add 
their talent to this popular organization. It 
is easy to see why this group consists of the 
most outstanding music personalities on cam- 
pus. Each girl does her utmost to make the 
melodies a perfect blending of harmonies, and 
this working together is the source of the at- 
tractive tunes which we enjoy at each ap- 
pearance. 

The orchestra's performances of this year 
add to the list of its musical successes made in 
the past. 




DANCE ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL 

Director Ronald Faulkner Trumpets .... Priscilla Martin, Joan Smythe 

Vocalist Anne Ceglis Bette Hove 

Pianist Betty Jean Lyle Trombones . . . Shirley Cole, Janice Horstman 

Tenor Saxophone Bobby Hove Bass Fiddle Betty Gavett 

Alto Saxophones . Jean Hawkins, Rosemary Miller Percussion Frances Chesson 



114 



SYMPHONETTE 



Music for dreaming 



Whether it be the semi-classical favorites, 
or the heavy "long-hair" music of the three 
B's both are beautifully performed by the col- 
lege Symphonette, which has won tremendous 
popularity and admiration on the Hill. 

A consistent demand for music prior to and 
between acts of plays at the college has given 
the Symphonette many engagements this 
year, and the familiar tones of these melodies 
add an excitement to the evening ... a kind of 
excitement you might feel in some large New 
York theatre. 

The Yuletide spirit found its way into 
everyone's heart just before Christmas when 



this musical group presented selections old and 
new. The organization has been a success out- 
side Mary Washington, too, for invitations 
are numerous from music-lovers, who, al- 
though unaffiliated, enthusiastically appre- 
ciate the concerts of this group. 

Under the direction of Mr. Ronald Faulkner 
each girl in the Symphonette has captured and 
retained the spirit of good music and thereby 
a desire for perfection in performance. Their 
presentations have provided us all with many 
enjoyable moments and with a hope for their 
continued success. 




Violins: Mary Sue Ekeluncl. Concertmaster; Betty 
Mason. Nancy Wagner, Eva Buseman, Ruth Ruder- 
hausen, Priscilla Martin, Floretta Heyman, Jessica 
Tigner. 

Violoncellos: Gloria Kay Ives, Leah Sachs, Dorothy 
Davis. 

Contrabasses: Barbara Ann Johnson, Betty Gavett, 
Betty Lou Fox. 

Flutes: Mary Shelton, Claire Sims. 



SYMPHONETTE PERSONNEL 
Oboe: Atha Patelos 

Clarinets: Rosemary Miller, Patricia Abernathy 
Bassoon: Marceline Weatherly. 
Saxophones. Jean Hawkins, Bobbie Hove. 
Horn: Sara Jane Hustan. 
Trumpets: Bette Hove, Joan Smythe, 
Trombones: Shirley Cole, Janice Horstman. 
Piano: Betty Jean Lyle. 
Percussion. Frances Chesson. 




First row: Doumas, Trice. Second row: Leech, Litt, Edgerton. T7u>tiroii>:Bassett,Gavett, Martin, Overly. Fourth row: Goldman, Mrs. Read 

CONCERT DANCE CLUB 



First row: Branner, Sultz, Harriss, Youngs. 


Second row: Venezio, 


Kirkendall, Spry, Snidow 










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116 




First row: Epps, Greene, Raith. Second roic: Edmonds, Watson, Whitcomb, Ruttenbur. Third row: Williams, Jones, Trosper, King, Kingree 



JUNIOR DANCE CLUB 



A visiting artist demonstrates 




117 




Be/ore the curtain rises 



LIMON DANCE GROUP 



A few preliminaries 




118 




Backstage Histrionics 



GRAND OPERA AT G. W 



The cast relaxes before Act I 





Jack \V. Warf 



Mrs. Mildred B. Sollcnbcrger 



DRAMATIC ARTS 



SPEEC 



It was certainly a different day, the Post 
Office and class seemed different. Eating was 
impossible — no appetite, rolled-up hair, per- 
fectly memorized lines. 

Were the lights right? Musn't forget to tell 
Wallace we have to clean up tomorrow. 

Did that apprentice put her poster in the 
off-campus room 7 I'll bet Mr. Warfield lets 
us out of class early today. Dress rehearsal 
was awful. 

Too much excitement — red, flushed cheeks, 
moist palms, a missing prop — too many good 
lucks. Voices were humming in front of the 
cutain; the whole world trembled behind. 



Sleepy, lonely thoughts made you wonder 
if it was worth getting up that early just to 
turn on a switch. Still there was something 
exciting about the empty halls of G.W. at 
eight o'clock — something so exclusively radio. 

Someone walking behind you had her heart 
in her mouth. She knew enough to throw her 
voice out, to stand back from the microphone, 
but the script would shake just a little. 

A couple of students were already there 
talking in a whisper simply because there was 
no one listening. Everyone was thinking in 
terms of seconds. Eight o'clock in the morning 
became terribly important — it was almost 
time. 



MARY WASHINGTON PLAYERS 

. . . Players at wor\ 



There had been weeks of collecting props, 
painting scenery . . . publicity . . . ticket sell- 
ing. There were superb rehearsals, terrible 
acts . . . wonderful scenes . . . moments of 
triumph . . . hours of despair . . . those differ- 
ent emotions that only show business can 
grasp. 

Scores of girls joined Mary Washington 
Players . . . volunteered help without which 



no play could be produced. They were next 
year's master members . . . future Barrymores 
. . . and the man behind the man behind the 
prop. 

Every member of Players has felt it . . . the 
eternity before the curtain rises, the impact of 
the final lines . . . the yearning to begin 
again. 



Offic 



Newell, Mr. Warfield. Froeler (President), Wilton, Penney 



M* 





Offic. 



Wilton, Mrs. Sollenberger, Chiles, McClerkin, Stess, Thomson, Miles, Stacey 



Ml IKE CLUB... Those who ride the air waves 



OFFICERS 



Station Manager Nancy Stacey 

Program Director Ann McClerkin 

Continuity Catherine Thompson 

Publicity Natalie Wilson 



Production Sarah Miles 

Music Librarian Ruth Stess 

Chief Engineer Martha Carr 

Artist Bureau Helen Chiles 



Station WMWC on the air . . . many are 
listening, or a few, or maybe just this once no 
one. Its thrilling and fun for everyone in the 
studio . . . script writer, engineer, and per- 
former alike. 

Each year Mike Club develops new tech- 
niques for better and more original programs. 
Criticism and comments are welcomed by 
members of the Mike Club whose membership 



in the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System 
has also proved of value in understanding 
radio technicalities. 

Over the air comes music, drama, inter- 
views, news ; behind these things is what every 
Mike Cluber understands . . . planning — 
perfect timing . . . co-operation and skill . . . 
the fascinating realm of what makes radio 
click. 



122 



It was a fantastic hour for a caller, it seemed 
hours before your eight-thirty class. Your 
eyes were suddenly opened wide, you would 
always remember that moment ... a bid to 
Alpha Psi Omega. 

You lay in bed a bit bewildered. You 
smiled and recalled the first happy days in 
Players . . . recited lines, prop lists, scenery 
. . . ah, a master member . . . and now Alpha 
Psi Omega the National Dramatic Fraternity. 

Your thoughts turned to this year particu- 
larly . . . the wonderful success of "The 
Women" . . . taking the show on the road . . . 
how, more than ever before, everyone worked 
together . . . how Alpha Psi and Players had 
united to form the College Theatre instilling 
on campus the spirit of good theatre and 
better plays. 




ALPHA PSI OMEGA 

. . . And those who trod the boards 



Seated first rmv Carr Hardwick, Gregg. Second row: Osborn, Wise, Newell, Garey, Thomson, Jones. Standing: Ritter, Mr. Houston. 
Mr. Walther. Mr. Warfield, Dean Alvey, Dr. Castle, Mr. Carter 




123 




Officers: Mrs. Sollenberger, Leonard, McClerkin (President), Gray, Attianese 



They say you can judge a person, his stand- 
ing, his self-confidence, his experience with 
people, by his voice and by his ability to speak 
well. Being able to put across your ideas in 
a logical, concise, clear manner is an index to 
your personality. ... Pi Sigma Kappa, the 
speech fraternity on campus, encourages de- 
bates, panel discussions, and radio work, all 
aimed at promoting good speech ... its mem- 
bers realize the importance of a good speaking 
voice, an adaptable manner . . . and they 
want to help others and themselves in per- 
fecting their pronunciation and in forming a 
working vocabulary . . . not forgetting the 
need for interesting content and a pleasing 
attitude. 



PI S I G WA A K A P P A . . . Accustomed as we are 



Seated: Baum, Webb, Burrows. Snidow, Chapman, Bowers, Starkey, Mrs. Sollenberger, Shaw, Riley, Miller. Standing: Gillen, Henley, 
Wagner, Milhauser, Olsen, Hopkins, Jones, Ceglis, Bagley, Schroeder, Miles, Chiles 




124 




The stage is set 



A premiere of "The Women" before it goes on the road 



Barter presents Moltere 




SCIENCE AND 



MATHEMATICS 



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Chemistry. Herbert C. Shull, Dr. Earl G. Insley, Helen H. Schultz, Dr. Herbert L. Cov 



CHEMISTRY 

Recalling Chemistry ... a broken test tube 
and first lab partners. Raining and already 
dark after four o'clock lab . . . classmates 
asking you about the atom bomb. 

Being blase when titration was mentioned — 
vaguely aware of feeling like a genius after 
the first unknown checked. Contemplating 
research, lab technician, resolving to pioneer 
forever — wildly dreaming of scientific truth 
. . . never forgetting Chemistry in Chandler. 



MATHEMATICS 
AND PHYSICS 

Your roommate was majoring in English — 
she would never understand. But after all 
didn't a poet tell us about Euclid and wasn't 
there an indefinable thrill in dealing with 
infinite and finite numbers? 

Someone groaned when you mentioned 
physics, but, buildings were built and rivers 
spanned. Somewhere architects and engineers 
were dreaming — you were differently proud of 
a progressive world. 



Mathematics and Physics. Dr. Hobart C. Carter, Dr. Charles H. Frick, Preston G. Burns 







Chandler Hall 




Officers. Booker, Zipf, Clements 



In a world which has so suddenly become 
almost a scientist's world, background and 
specific training in science is one of the fore- 
most goals of many of the young women of 
today . . . and Chi Beta Phi selects as its 
members those who have achieved the highest 
place at Mary Washington in the sciences . . . 
promoting interest by keeping up with scien- 
tific investigation, by means of lectures, hear- 
ing papers prepared by members, and by gen- 
eral discussion. 

The fraternity includes in its yearly plans 
the sponsoring of trips to places of scientific 
interest in this vicinity . . . sponsoring an 
auction and presenting prominent scientists 
as speakers at its monthly programs. 



CHI BETA PHI 



At the heart of the matter 



Seated left: Trimborn, Nickey, Booker, Walker, Bailey. Seated right: Knoell, Mr. Burns, Gillespie. Standing: Dr. Pierce, Zipf, Dr. Pyle 
Clark, Baute, Clements, Miss Schultz, Cottinsham, Mctzger, Dr. Inslcv, Weaver 





3n HUmoru of 

DR. ROY SE.LDEN COOK 

Professor of Chemistry 

Born September 1, 1890 
Died June 18, 1949 



131 




Seated: Dr. Hugo litis, D 



C. Black. Standing: Dr. Alan S. Pierce, Dr. William A. Castle, Dr. Robert W. Pyle 



BIOLOGY 



It seemed a long time since the early fascina- 
tions of Biology . . . the tiny amoeba, a red 
maple leaf, and innumerable phylums. Per- 
haps it was a long time, but to you Biology 
never lost its original interest; in fact a great 
deal had been added. 

A deft hand now adjusted the microscope, 
an adapted mind discerned the slides, lab 
periods seemed increasingly shorter, your pro- 
jects increasingly vital. Biology came to mean 
so much . . . hours on a single cell structure 
... a little despair . . . unparalleled hope ... a 
touch of genius, weeks of perseverance. A 
keener sense of the summation of all life per- 



vaded and remained. You might never forget 
observing one small part of a Biological world, 
and feeling for an instant something of scien- 
tific truth. Perhaps you realized why men like 
Pasteur and Koch had never given up . . . you 
understood in many ways a budding tree and 
a dying flower. Those precious facts, some 
would call cut and dried, were to you wonder- 
ful experiences. 

The science of plant and animal life . . . 
Histology . . . Genetics ... all phases were 
integrated. Biology would retain its wonders, 
as the red maple would its beauty. 



132 



ATTHEW FO 
SCIENCE CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President Mary Lyne Kucera 

Vice-President Barbara Baute 

Recording Secretary Dorothy White 

Corresponding Secretary . . . Constance Metzger 

Treasurer Jane Gregg 

Reporter Bonnie Powell 

Sponsor Dr. William Castle 



TAINE MAURY 

Interrelation of mind and matter 

Remember the day of the initiation ? Having 
to wear old clothes . . . clashing colors and lab 
aprons that dangled around your ankles . . . 
and not being able to wear any make-up! 
Why, you felt like a scientist's guinea pig 
yourself! But that was a single day and to 
compensate for it came many days of pleasure 
and companionship ... on field trips, in the 
laboratories and at monthly club meetings 

Such fun . . . this world of science . . . and 
fascinating, too . . . thinking of what has been 
done in the scientific world and of the pros- 
pects for the future. Whether or not you 
choose a career in one of the sciences, a 
scientific background is sure to be of value in 
everyday life. 



Metzger, Baute, Gregg, Dr. Castle, Kucera, White, Powell 





Seated: Alice Hobhauer, Sara Taylor, Dr. Alice L. Edwards. Standing: Catherine Tur 

Mrs. Mattie L. Sholes 



Doris Reid, Mrs. Hazel Morris, 



HOME ECONOMICS 

AND DIETETICS 



You would always remember silly little 
things about Home Economics, like spending 
an entire period on a buttonhole or planning a 
meal with three thousand calories. But, far 
transcending all the little things were those 
aspects of good living . . . the knack of doing 
things right . . . which would stay with you 
throughout life. Home Economics covered so 
many interesting things that might one day 
be found in better homes. 

China, silver, linens, reproductions . . . your 
own personality was alive and found itself in 
some dream house of tomorrow. You actually 
drew a floor plan . . . pondered over a budget 



. . . and learned after all these years you could 
never wear yellow. You were gradually more 
sensitive to color, more alive to design, saga- 
cious about dieting, leery of imitations. Your 
tastes were suddenly important, your values 
slowly shifted. 

The chemistry of foods . . . selecting ma- 
terials . . . the utility and simplicity of the new 
. . . the warmth and charm of the old. Here 
was a practical study that would never forget 
the principles of sewing circles and homemade 
pies even when it had become an important 
scientific field. 



134 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 



A stitch in time 



We may not make "pies like Mother used 
to make,'' but the Home Economics Club is 
responsible for many behind-the-scenes neces- 
sities for social activities on the Hill. . . . We 
learn not only the cooking-and-sewing side of 
Home life, but gain background and experi- 
ence in home management, which will, we 
hope, make our future hubbies proud . . . 
preparing an effective table, finding the best 
ingredients in a salad, always willing — and 
able — to aid efficiently at any social function 



on campus . . . realizing all the important 
things which make a successful home. . . . 

We're constantly showing forth our intense 
interest in clothes, too, with the Spring Fash- 
ion Show, in which we model clothes we have 
designed. ... At our meetings we hold dis- 
cussions, and have speakers on interior deco- 
ration, the care of children, budgeting, and all 
phases of home economics ... for we know so 
well the value of training which will give us 
the ability to make a home truly a home. 



Officers: Dr. Alice L. Edwards, Frazier, Terrell (President), Gay, Mrs. Reid, Minnick 




135 



ISTORY AND 
THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 




Dr. Carroll H. Quenzel, Dr. Almont Lindsey, Dr. Robert L. Hilldrup, Dr. Henrietta L. Krone 

HISTORY AND SOCIOLOGY 

History is following primitives, warriors, looks to the end of all things, 

the Mediterranean World, English kings, History is in the making — furiously, cau- 

watching civilizations rise and fall, and Em- tiously, extravagantly. The elusive ideal of 

pires vanish. Countries are bought and sold, one world and the glare of an atomic age are 

ideals flourish and die. The past conceives the twin climaxes in a contradictory civilization, 
future. History tells of the beginning and 

L. Clyde Carter, Dr. Oscar H. Darter, Dr. R E. Sumner, Philip J. Allen, Mrs. Frances P. Mooney 




138 




E. Lee Trinkje Library 




International relations — an important 
keystone to world affairs; I.R.C. — an integral 
part of Mary Washington College. Helping 
us to unite college and country to face the 
realities and conflicts of international policies 
and to understand the problems that face the 
world today. 

Politics, a word that arouses mixed feel- 
ings, becomes more than an abstract symbol 
when we are able to contact political systems 
through their chief exponent. At a time when 
governmental practices in all countries are of 
prime concern, we feel it is most important for 
every man and woman to be well-acquainted 
with the facts and fallacies of international 
relations. 



Officers. Mount, Riley (President), Radcliffe, Wrigley 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

CLUB. . . Thinking in terms of one world 

Seated: Scuftert, Zeppenfeldt, Ekelund. Worshan, Gushing, Pate. Frazier, Parrish, Claud. Standing: Henderson. Smith, Seeley, Davis, 
Brown. Erickson, Holladav. Sutherland, Williams. Cuneo 




140 



Pi Gamma Mu. the social science fraternity 
at M.W.C., is a fairly new organization, 
formed to promote interest in, and improve 
scholarship in, the social studies . . . formed to 
inspire social service to humanity ... by a 
truly intelligent approach to the problems of 
our times. . . . 

The group has a radio program over 
WMWC . . . presents a yearly Convocation 
program . . . and attends the inter-chapter 
meetings which are held with other schools in 
Virginia . . . stresses the need for sympathy 
toward others of the world, who hold different 
opinions and abide by different institutions, 
in order to create a better mutual understand- 
ing. 




Officers. Claud, Dr Hilldrup, Fisher (President), Mount, Riley 



PI G A M M A M U . . . And a better world 



First row: DeMiller, Recker, Davidson, Henderson, Davidovich. Second row: Dawideit, Ferguson, Fisher, Harvel. Schoolcraft. Wellboi 
Parrish, Mount, Riley. Third row: Claud, Hewetson, Mrs. Wade. Dr. Hilldrup, Dr. Dodd. Mrs. Quenzel 




141 




Dr. Myrick H. Sublette, Dr. Ja 



Kenneth Roach, Fred E. Miller 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 



Advancements are made in economy, ad- 
vancements that Herbert Spencer and Adam 
Smith never dreamed of. Yet, in all parts of 
the world there remains poverty and drudgery. 
These are the evils which economists of all 
times have striven to eliminate. 

You were acquainted long before with Free 
Enterprise and Capitalism. System were in- 
numerable, and the best system seemed an 
ideal. Purchasing power was a byword of an 



alphabet era, while a great nation grew on 
trusts and corporations. International trade 
reached unequaled heights, and a naive world 
awaited disaster. 

You were a part of the most revolutionary 
and conflicting forces in economic history. 
The realization that every man must have 
bread was no longer just a charitable thought, 
but the ideal on which your nation was built 
and for which it might one day die. 



142 



SIGMA TAU CHI 



A lot to do with the price of eggs 



The business man today finds himself dealing 
more and more with the up-and-coming "busi- 
ness woman," who, he realizes, is becoming 
increasingly important to the field of eco- 
nomics . . . bringing a different outlook to 
ever-present problems . . . and combining her 
ability and intelligence with a new approach. 

Sigma Tau Chi attempts to develop that 
sense of alertness to all phases of national, 
political and business affairs ... to promote 
the interest in and to define the needs of the 
complex maze which business has become . . . 
to stress the importance of attaining a "happy 



combination" of ability, intelligence, efficiency 
and personality, along with the "know-how" 
which makes a person successful in the field. 

The fraternity plans a trip to Washington 
each year, to the Senate or to the Supreme 
Court . . . and presents a Convocation speaker 
— a person dealing with current affairs — who 
may give to all of us a wider perspective of 
economics. . . . The members of Sigma Tau 
Chi keep themselves well-informed of trends 
and changes by discussions at their regular 
meetings. 

And what is vour wish, Madame Executive? 



Officers. Callis, Dr. Dodd, Webb, Pike, Davidson (P 




143 




Seated Dr Eileen K. Dodd, Mary A. Klinesmith Standing Dr. Michael 
Erdelvi, Dr. Charles K. Martin 



Education. Dr. Charles K. Martin, Dr. Edward Alvey. 
Philosophy. Dr. Kurt F. Leidecker 



PSYCHOLOGY 



You had collected the most fantastic con- 
glomeration of words, and tried to pyscho- 
analyze your roommate. But, you were 
strangely bewildered by the complexity of 
the human mind and realized just how close 
you were to something terribly important. 

Human nature was more than whims and 
caprices, it was vital and dynamic — at once 
predictable and unpredictable, at once meas- 
urable and immeasurable. To you, Jung and 
Watson and Freud were not just names, but 
pioneers in a great field that opened almost 
in the shadow of your life and that would go 
on forever. 



PHILOSOPHY 
AND EDUCATION 

It was not just an act of fate that you were 
in a Liberal Arts College carrying sixteen 
semester hours. Thousands of years before, 
great men had brought forth great ideas. They 
had studied the mind and the spirit of man, 
they stood in the light of truth and looked to 
the years to come. 

Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, Rousseau, 
and many others had found their way and 
given it to you. You pondered these men 
whose eyes were fixed on the eternities — you 
took a step closer to them and to your own 
philosophy. 



144 



PHILOSOPHY CLUB 



Anything from Aristotle to Dewey 



Philosophy . . . a term suggestive of the 
ancient sages of Greece and Rome ... of the 
classics and the moderns, from Plato to James. 
The name itself, "love of wisdom," connotes 
great people and greater minds. The fruit of 
the brilliant and erudite is not a thing apart 
from our daily lives — it is reflected in our en- 
vironment and in our own actions . . . the 
theories and ideals of countless great men 
contribute to our own standards of life. 

Philosophy Club teas — at Dr. and Mrs. 



Leidecker's home, where we became aware of 
the mystery and fascination of the Orient. 
The meetings . . . one night a speaker frcm 
Iran explains the Hindu philosophy of life . . . 
another time, a contemporary journalist helps 
us to formulate our own theories. 

Yes, Philosophy is a lot of things . . . not 
only knowledge and ability to pattern one's 
thoughts in a logical sequence, but a deepen- 
ing of sensitivity and a broadening of under- 
standing. 



Members of the Philosophy Club 




145 



LANGUAGE 



AND LITERATURE 



'1 i 



'**$• 



v>*&i 



its- 



it 











ENGLISH 

English was a thousand things 
more than the verb to be. The 
Mermaid Tavern wasn't far 
away, and once you met some- 
one almost like Hotspur. Will- 
iam Blake was strange, and Lord 
Byron was intriguing. The Vic- 
torians were gone forever, ex- 
cept that this generation too 
might be somewhere between 
Matthew Arnold's two worlds. 

English was even more than 
Chaucer's realism and Shelley's 
spirit. It was volumns of new 
and vigorous and wonderful 
characters. It was life itself. 



Dr. George E. Shankle, Dr. Alice S. Brandenburg, Dr. William W. Griffith, Dr. James L. Allison, 
Dr. Arthur L. Volgelback 



Charmenz S. Lenhart, Dr. James H. Croushore, Walter B. Kelly, Benjamin W. Early, Dr. Reginald W. Whidden 




148 




George Washington Hall 




Sommers, Cross, Davis, Gardner, Ward (Editor), Diehl, Dr. Shanklc 



EPAULET 



Something of the printed word 



The main purpose of the Epaulet is to give 
those with creative ability the chance to pub- 
lish their stories, articles, poetry . . . realizing 
that it is important for any embryo writer to 
be able to present her work to others, for their 
approval and opinion, knowing that is the best 
way in which she can know whether her work 



is really good. . . . 

It is important, too, to know what goes into 
the "making-up" of a literary magazine. . . . 
The Epaulet gives experience in all phases of 
magazine work: advertising, printing, selling, 
layouts, copy . . . always searching for new 
ideas. 



Myrick, Winstead, Webb, Bruce, Daughtrey, Walker, Bellamy, Irvin 




150 



SIGMA TAU DELTA... Emphasis on English 



OFFICERS 

President Delia Gene Pate 

Vice-President Billy Jean Mitchell 

Secretary Maribel Sutherland 

Treasurer Virginia Felts 

Reporter Barbara Birkenmeyer 



Literature ... an end and a means ... a 
means to an understanding of cultures and 
civilization as well as of individual authors 
. . .• an end in itself in that it offers a world 
apart from the here and now. a sense of satis- 
faction and pleasure. 

Sigma Tau Delta was organized on the 
campus as an honorary society for English 



majors in order that they might be able to 
meet with those girls having similar interests 
in literary activities. Through the common 
bond of literature members of Sigma Tau 
Delta have developed varied interests, so that 
the society's activities no longer center ex- 
clusively in literature but have branched out 
into such projects as attending the theatre in 
Washington and Richmond. 

Thus, through the fraternity, members have 
been encouraged to take an active interest in 
other cultural pursuits . . . from a background 
study in one of the fine arts, they have de- 
veloped a deeper and more lasting apprecia- 
tion for the others as well. 



Slandw Millar Felts, Bunnell, Parks, Sutherland. Seated: Gardner, Mitchell Dr. Shankle Pate (President), Head, Brett, Myrick. 
Sealed on floor: Swyers, Glass, Bordon, Zeigler, Birkenmeyer, Lightner 




151 




Edwin H. Jones, Dr. Vladimer Brenner, Ivlrs. Mildred M. Boiling, Dr. Josiah H. Combs, Dr. Suzanne C. Engelman, Dr. Milton H. Stansbury 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 



It all began when you first wrote your name 
in a different language — when you smugly 
rattled off some little phrase and glibly ac- 
cented the wrong syllable. It wasn't just 
collegiate, it was fun. You decided to major 
in a foreign language. 



Things took a different turn when you dis- 
covered Goethe, Schiller, Cervantes, or Victor 
Hugo, actually read Russian prose in the 
original. There was so much — magic worlds, 
cultures, lives, spirits — a new and wonderful 
experience. 



Dr. H. Logan Cobb, Dr. Louis J. Cabrera, Mary E. Stephenson, Dr. James F. Mormile, Dr. Clifton B. Mcintosh 




152 



Humanities in a modern world . . . studies 
of classical times . . . the "'glory that was 
Greece and the grandeur that was Rome" 
brought to the attention and appreciation of 
Mary Washington students through the Ath- 
enaeum Club. Slides, discussions, speakers, 
bring into clearer focus those countries and 
civilisations which exist today in archaeolog- 
ical museums. 

For these girls, history does not exist solely 
in the past. Here, in the present everyday 
world, they are aware of the beauties, the ex- 
travagances, of classical culture and of the 
governmental and economic orders that have 
been a basis for many of our existing social 
systems. Past history is present enjoyment, 
past deeds worthy of comparison with present- 
day values. 




Officers: Dr. Voelkel, Mrs. Stewart, Maddox, Saul, Snidow, 
Gillespie (President) 



ATHENAEUM CLUB 



The humanities in a modern world 



First row: Speck, Saul, Bowan. Snidow, Hughes, Davis, Maddox. Second row: Sheally, Fox, Gillespie, Mrs. Stewart 




153 




L'ACCADEMIA ITALIANA 



OFFICERS 

President Nilda Rosa Fernandez 

Secretary Anne Ruggles 

Program Chairman Betty Lou Fox 

Faculty Advisor Dr. James Mormile 



I MEMBRI 

Pat Abernathy, Martha Bergandy, Bernice Bryant, 
Beatrice Coletta, Joyce Evans, Marie Ferrari, Betty 
Lou Fox, Nilda R. Fernandez, Nancy Hudes, Jessie 
Mackay, Edwina Moss, Ernestina Nogales, Helen Reid, 
Anita Rudenhauser, Anne Ruggles, Elizabeth Simuro, 
Jo Ann Smith, Hannah Lou Southwell. 



154 




Officers: Gains, Mitchell, Huber (President,!, Miller, Ob-born 



EL CLUB HISPANO-AMERICANO 



Our own Latin-American Good Neighbor 
policy . . . learning about another land, an- 
other language, another literature and art . . . 
appreciating the customs and the sentiment of 
another people, through moving pictures, dis- 
cussions, lectures . . . and attempting to put 
into practice "Como esta usted?" and "Hablo 
usted Espahol?" . . . 

We want to know more about our hemi- 
spheric neighbors, not only now but as a prep- 
aration for the future . . . realizing the impor- 
tance of building a lasting friendship between 
the Latin-American countries and our own 



. . . learning of the culture of a people who had 
a great civilization before ours was born. . . . 
And we try to increase our knowledge of the 
Spanish language, to familiarize ourselves with 
its expressions, knowing that it is mainly 
through the language and the mode of life 
and the spirit of a distant place. . . . 

And yet we know the importance of realiz- 
ing that a land is not distant any longer, but 
a part of us in this world which grows in- 
creasingly smaller . . . and makes of our 
neighbors true neighbors. 



155 




First row: Moxley, Hunt, Winsbro, Mills 
McClcrkin, Nelson, Walsh. Third row: Spe 



Plewniak, Craig, Gray, Phipps, Swarm, Black. Second row: Overby, Stedman, Roller, 
icer, Dia, Watson, Stevens, Ferrari, Mayol. Fourth row: Kederick, Bowan, Seelman, Huff 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 



Officers: Webb, Gravatt, Cable, Mrs. Boiling. Absent: 
Harpine (President) 




Parlez-vous Francais?" . . . for that is what 
le Cercle Frangais holds as its goal ... to give 
the students in French a chance to listen to 
French and to speak it, in order that they may 
increase their vocabulary and improve their 
grammar . . . feeling that French has always 
been almost an international language . . . 
and one of the foremost cultural languages of 
the world. . . . 

Le Cercle Francais brings to its members 
speakers who are French, or Americans who 
have travelled widely throughout France, and 
know its culture and its people. . . . By means 
of such speakers, through moving pictures, 
they try to capture something of the very 
esprit gaulois which is the French citizen. 



156 




Torrice, Taylor, Ferrara, Dr. Qucnzel, Carter, Frarier, Hairficld, Harper, Anders, Wade 



PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY STAFF 

Librarian Dr. Carrol Quenzel Aquisitions and Serials Librarian, 

Circulation Librarian .... Mrs. Morgan Harper Miss Marguerite Carder 

Reference Librarian .... Mrs. Seawright Wade Catalog Typist Miss Lorene Hairfield 

Cataloguer Miss Carolyn Taylor Order 'Typist Mrs. Felix Torrice 

Head Cataloguer Mr. Richard Anders Circulation Clerk Mrs. Nunra Ferrara 

Catalog Clerk Miss Jane Frazier 



157 



PHYSICAL EDUCATIO 



AND SPORTS 










«te^2* T -* ?r '' 




Standing: Mrs. Claudia M. Read, Russell W. Walther, Josephine \V. Huhbell, Mary F. Gratzer. Seated: Margery E. Arnold, Tannye O. 

Burnett, Mildred P. Stewart 



PHYSICAL AND 

HEALTH EDUCATION 



Some day when all that is left of college 
memories is a few dusty books and fewer 
friends, one thing will remain constant . . . 
you will still be a Devil, or a Goat. There has 
never been a traitor to either cause. Thoughts 
of Devil-Goat rivalry will be an amusing and 
wonderful recollection of the most spirited 
titles at Mary Washington. 

"Phys. Ed." was the same to all whether 
Devil or Goat. White gym suits, wet hair, 
square dancing, and a hundred miles to the 



tennis courts. It was the eternal anathema of 
Hygiene, and the everlasting comedy of fifteen 
lengths of the pool. It was a four-o'clock 
hockey game and Intramural Basketball. 
There was no such thing as an overcut — 
there was no greater fun than A.R.A. 

Everything about "Phys. Ed." was in- 
delible. The weekend at the cabin, the savoir- 
faire of the horsey set, the never seen hole in 
one, and six beautiful credits. 



160 




The Outdoor Pool 




in Taylor (President) 



Officers. Buckwalter, Davis, Woods, Mildred Stewart, Kucera 



ATHLETIC RECREATION ASSOCIATION 



First row: King, Minnick, Lyle. Second row: Meriwither, Trice, Clark, Cottingham. Third row: Gibson. 




162 




First row: West, Bailey, Webb, Gib 



The "plays" the thing 

A.R.A. OFFICERS 

President Nan Taylor 

Vice-President Brooke Woods 

Secretary Diana Buckwalter 

Treasurer Mary Lyne Kucera 

Librarian Barbara Davis 

Advisor Mildred P. Stewart 



There are many activie organizations on 
campus, but few keep members on their toes 
as constantly as A.R.A. . . . the Athletic Rec- 
reation Association. Just an inkling of what 
takes place during the year ... an A.R.A. 
Benefit in the fall (means gaiety fun for all), 
sponsoring Devil-Goat rivalry in the spring 
(flags flying, a marathon, sports ... we even 
sing!) ... A welcoming tea . . . how nice to 
make new acquaintances . . . scheduling of all 
sports events . . . A.R.A. plans way ahead . . . 
and a gret big splurge when Alumnae return 
. . . food and fun and adventure stories from 
our graduates. 

A.R.A. is all for fun and fun for all. 



163 




Officers. Clark, Brauer, Bailey (President), Mr. Walther, Foster 



HOOFPRINTS rmg 



Wilson, Gardner, Miller, Parks, Wills, Vredenburg, Mcintosh, Dickson, Sullivan, Klosterman, Pancoast, Melvin, Burton, Leftwich 




164 



Will you ever forget the day of the fall 
horse show? Breakfast at dawn in the tack 
room at the stables, the undercurrent of ex- 
citement breaking now and then into tense, 
exultant laughter . . . Grooming the horses and 
comparing notes on the relative merits of 
Little Zero and Virginia Boy . . . And then the 
show itself — eager spectators and thrilled par- 
ticipants . . . prancing horses, nervous because 
of the unaccustomed crowds — the lucky, lucky 
winners of the blue ribbons. 

The possum hunt is a thing apart — such 
scrambling when a possum is actually found! 
And remember the girl who climbed the tree 
to push an obstinate possum into the waiting 
bag below? 

Here indeed is the stuff dreams are made of! 
Horsey dreams, perhaps, but those of the girls 
to whom riding is more than an occasional 
pastime . . . the members of Hoofprints Club. 




Initiation of new members 



and on the trail 



Pappas, Walton, G 



Sampson, Zamoiski, Dreifus, Fletcher, Horton 




165 



CAVALRY TROOP 

OFFICERS 

Captain Winifred Horton 

First Lieutenant Joan Katz 

Second Lieutenant Marjorie Burton 

Sponsor Mr. Russell Walther 

Cavalry has stressed military techniques 
less during the past few years, and has opened 
its doors to all those who are interested in rid- 



ing . . . sportsmanship and comradeship being 
the chief goals. . . . 

The Troop has lectures and movies to pro- 
mote an interest in riding and in improving 
horsemanship . . . plans picnics, overnight 
hikes . . . sponsors Gymkhana . . . presents 
exhibition drills . . . representing on campus a 
willingness and ability to give aid and support 
when needed. 



Katz, Walther, Horton, Burton 




166 




Members of the Cavalry 




167 




Officers. Winters, Curtis (President), Wilkinson 



These are the girls who are never daunted 
by that swimming test which must be passed 
before graduation — the girls, in fact, who seem 
to have been born with the extra blessing of a 
pair of water wings ! 

And what fun they have at the Aquacade 
each year! The crowd around the indoor 
pool . . . shimmering reflections on the blue, 
blue water , . . the first splashy greeting! 
Thus, Terrapin members present an evening 
of grace and beauty, as well as fun and slap- 
stick. Diving and swimming ability, yes in- 
deed, but combined with originality and hard 
work to produce the shows that delight all 
onlookers. 



' ERRAPIN CLUB... Aquatic artistry 



Hove, Betty, Hove, Barbara, Capizola, Curtis, Gardner, Davis, Fox, Wilkinson, Winters, Ogden, Burklin, King 

\mmmmmmmmmmmm 




168 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 




Elizabeth Bunnell (Business Manager), Leora Knapp (Editor) 



BATTLEFIELD 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Leora Knapp 

Associate Editor Jane Gardner 

Layout Editor Lois Bellamy 

Photography Editors Pat Riley 

Joan Hewlett 
Copy and Literary Editors . . Patti Head 
Jean Sprower, Virginia Briant, 
Pat Moss, Audrey Miller 

Faculty Editor Betty Gardner 

Senior Editor Rowena Simpson 

Junior Editor Joyce Miller 

Sophomore Editor .... Lila Chichester 
Freshman Editor . . . Joyce Stoutamyer 

Section Editor Eloise Clark 

Typist Anne Zirpel 

Apprentices: Barbara Mack, Leighton Sim- 
mons, Nancy Huff, Peggy McDonald, 
Patti Black, Nancy Gordon 



BUSINESS STAFF 
Business Manager . . Elizabeth Bunnell 
Assistant Business Manager . Kay Venezio 
Advertising Manager, 

Margaret Anne Eanes 

Assistants . . Judy Mack, Gwen Amory 

Publicity Manager . . . Peggy Craighill 

Assistant Kay Showker 

Circulation Manager .... Juanita Pike 

Assistants Barbara Davis 

Phyllis Maddox, Karen Morey, 
Cora Lee Kaufmann, Jean Amos, 
Mary Ann Jones, Charlotte Adams, 
Mildred Kolerick, Drusilla Howson, 
Barbara Bowman, Frances Baker 
Apprentices: Ann Campbell, Page Cohn, 

Christie Gill, Ludema Drake 
Sponsors: Dr. R. W. Whidden, Dr. Carrol 
Quenzel, Mr. Edgar E. Woodward, 
Mr. Julien Binford, Mr. Reynold 
Brooks, Mrs. Margaret Russell 



172 




Maude Levey (Editor), Gaynell Parrish (Business Manager) 



THE BULLET 



Howson, Atwood, Smith, DeMiller, Penney, Belden 




174 




Kelley, Selfe, Crosby. Steele 



It seems to be an almost impossible job . . . 
getting the paper out each week on time, with 
everyone's name properly spelled (sundaes 
are out!), with all the articles in — at the length 
desired by the submitter of same — and with 
explanations of why every story just couldn't 
be on page one. . . . 

You soon realize, however, that not every- 
one understands how great a task it is to pub- 
lish a college newspaper every week . . . sand- 



wiching it in among your exams, term papers, 
and the other extras that always seem to crop 
up at the worst possible time. . . . 

We're proud of the way the Bullet has grown 
during the past few years . . . proud of its in- 
novations . . . and the importance it has gained 
on the campus . . . for tine college newspaper 
has always held a place of respect and a re- 
sponsibility on its campus. 



175 




First row: Redmond, Nickey (President), Dawideit. Second row: Curtis, Fox, Hove. Third row: Carroll, Overley. Fourth row: Trimbom, 
Charlton, Redman, Hankla. Fifth row: Custer, Webb, Plyley. Sixth row: Fisher, Cable, Anderson, Coffman, Mcintosh, Mercer, Ruggles, 

Taylor, Doumas, Gravatt, Leonard 



SENIOR COMMISSIO 



Who saw to it that all the Freshman "Y" 
groups functioned smoothly? Who helped 
shell those hundreds of peanuts for Peanut 
Week and made sure that everyone who signed 
up became someone's shell? Who planned 
socials, picnics, and overnight cabin parties 
for their freshman groups? You guessed it; 
the Senior Commission! 

One of the worthiest tasks for those on the 



commission was to help the freshman become 
acquainted with the functioning of "Y" and 
gradually prepare them for leadership in this 
organization. On another side, not strictly 
educational, these seniors acted as advisors for 
their freshman groups, which made original 
dolls; they staged the Doll Show itself, and 
helped plan the Christmas parties, at which 
time the dolls were given to needy children. 



176 



FRESHMAN COMMISSION 



All was quiet in the glass showcase, but as 
the hands of the clock on the wall moved past 
midnight, every doll there suddenly became 
animated. "Get off my foot!" cried a sailor 
doll to the phlegmatic Dutch lad. 

"Oh, I'm sorry," exclaimed he. "I was just 
wondering what will happen to us now that 
the freshmen have finished us and presented 
us in their doll show. Do you suppose we'll 
stay here long?" 

"Goodness no!" answered the Scotch lassie. 
"We're to be given to some needy children at 



their Christmas parties." 

"What will the Freshman Commission do 
now — make more dolls'?" questioned the twin 
dollies. 

"Ah heerd de gals in mah group say dat 
cley's wukin' on cle Freshman Talent Show and 
helpin' wit dat Religious Emphasis Week in 
de spring," smiled the colored mammy. "De 
Leader tole dem dat dis Commission helps de 
freshman to know 'bout de 'Y'." 

Then, as the clock struck 1 2 ;30, as by magic 
they again became — just dolls. 



First row: Lewis, Putman, Shaffer, Ketron, Crise. Second row: Ramsten, Adams, Berry, Parker, Larson, Sinkler, Allen (President 




177 




Kaufmann (President), Hyans, Whyman, Davis, Plyley, Dawidcit, Hume, Birkenmeyer, Doolittle, Pate, Scott, Whitcomb 



RED CROSS 



OFFICERS 

President Cora Lee Kaufmann 

Vice-President Gracia Plyley 

Secretary Elizabeth Dawideit 

Treasurer . Barbara Birkenmeyer 



Although I'm only a deck of cards, I have 
an interesting story to tell. I'm one of many 
similar decks out in the Marine Hospital at 
Quantico, Virginia. Once a month something 
very special happens around here — a group 
from the M.W.C. Red Cross come to help en- 
tertain the hospitalized marines and sailors. 

Being a deck of cards, I get in on most of the 
excitement. Over a fast-moving game, I hear 
a lot about what the Red Cross at this college 
does. For instance, I didn't know until the 



other night that every student was auto- 
matically a member, or that the group is under 
the jurisdiction of a twelve-girl directing unit. 
I heard one of the girls say that they plan to 
work in the Fredericksburg day nursery and 
the Mary Washington Hospital to help relieve 
over-worked conditions. 

In March, big plans are afoot for a variety 
show to stimulate interest in the annual Red 
Cross drive. Never a dull moment for them — 
or me! 



178 



CAMPUS CHEST 



OFFICERS 

Chairman Margaret Anne Eanes 

Secretary Audrey Miller 

Treasurer Patricia Leech 

Publicity Manager Virginia Briant 



"They Still Need You !" The big poster pic- 
tured convincingly the dire need of a group of 
European teenagers. Beside this was a smaller 
announcement that soon a campaign would 
begin for the T.B., Cancer, and Polio Drives, 
plus the campus Y.W.C.A. 

A group of girls around the bulletin board 
expressed their views on these causes. "Won- 
derful group, this Campus Chest. Helps for- 
eign student groups as well as local service 
organizations," remarked a freshman. "Are 
we having an assembly to open the drive?" 
"Guess so," replied her friend. "Always do — 



with movies. We'll have to watch the chart 
in Chandler Circle to see how the funds 
collect." 

Another freshman wanted to know how the 
campaign was planned, to whom a friendly 
senior explained that each student pledges so 
much to the drive; the money secured is di- 
vided so that World Student Service Fund 
receives half and each of the other four groups 
share equally in the other half. 

"Best of all, though, this covers everything 
but the Red Cross drive!" 



Orient, Eanes, Leech, Miller 




179 




FORMAL DANCE COMMITTEE 



Chairman 

Senior Representatives . 

Sophomore Representative 



Jean Marie Melvin Junior Representatives 



Barbara Frances Ogden 
Barbara Anne Galliher 
. . . Betty May Coyle 



Freshman Representative 



Lois Armine Bellamy 
Barbara Davis 
Phyllis Jean Maddox 
Anne Gale Winston 




Standing: Bowers. Ridgely, Moss (President), Hunter. Smith. Radcliffe. Seated: Woolfolk, Lawson, Haley, Chinn. Sheppard, Sprower, Smith 



ALUMNAE DAUGHTERS 



The poster outside the C-Shoppe read, "Are 
you an A.D. ?" She proudly told herself, "Yes, 
I am — an Alumnae Daughter," and, as she 
stood contemplating the words, she recalled 
all that her mother had told her about M.W.C. : 
the dining hall over in Willard ... no Tri-Unit 
. . . the tiny swimming pool where the Little 
Gym is now . . . building a fire in that small 
wood stove out in the country school where 
she did her practice teaching . . . Devil-Goat 



Days ("My goodness," she realized suddenly, 
"Mother and I are both Goats!"). 

As she hurried on to class, she thought how 
lucky she was to be able to follow the honored 
traditions of her mother's school, to enjoy the 
campus features her mother knew and loved, 
plus all the new additions. "Being a second 
generation M.W.C. er definitely makes my 
college career much more special," she de- 
cided, slipping into class as the bell rang. 



181 




Hardwick, McCoy, Weatherly, Riley 



ONOR COUNCIL 



' 'An Honest man's the noblest work of God. ' ' 
Burns said it, and M.W.C. believes it, from the 
lowliest freshman to the mightiest senior and 
professor ! 

Honor Council : Not a stern body of law en- 
forcement officers always looking for trouble, 
but a group of students, whose duty it is to see 
that justice is administered in case of an in- 
fringement of the Honor Code. Members are 
the four class officers, plus House President 
of the dormitory in which the girl committing 
the offense lives. 



How does every student know about and 
help the Council? New students learn about 
its work during Freshman Orientation, and 
are asked to sign Honor cards stating that they 
understand the Code. Every member of stu- 
dent body helps the Council by making honor 
a vital part of her life, as well as of her class- 
mates. 

Not a social organization, Honor Council 
meets only for cases which are few and far 
between. 



182 




First row: Felts, Hardy, DeMiller. Second row: Stoutameyer, Weaver, Dawideit (President), Miss Foster, Webb. Thi 

Schiller, Ray, Powell, Vance 



INTER-FAITH COUNCIL 



Of the many religious organizations on cam- 
pus, who co-ordinates their activities for the 
mutual benefit? To unite all of them in spirit, 
but not in doctrine, while stressing co-operation 
leading to human welfare and understanding, 
Inter-Faith Council has been set up. 

Composed of two representatives from 
each religious group, this Council sponsored 
the customary sunrise service preceding the 
Thanksgiving holidays, and the evening of 



caroling with the Inter-Racial group. Of great 
interest to everyone present was the Inter- 
denominational meeting featuring a movie and 
discussion of Jewish holidays. 

Although each group has a definite repre- 
sentation on Council, the meetings are always 
open to all students so that everyone may 
know of its unpublicized work and plans as 
well as of the widely-noted undertakings. 




Thornbury, Smith, Clarke, Smith, Moss, Reverend Phillip Roberts, Seuffert, Zeigler (President), Brice, Boswell, Barton 



WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP 

OFFICERS This year was Westminster's fourth anni- 

President Jane Zeigler versary at Mary Washington. And this year 

Vice-President Gerry Boswell like the others we can look back over so many 

Se " etar y ■ • ■ ■ • • • LuCY Smith things that made us better people and better 

Treasurer Anne Smith _. . . „. ... , , . , 

^ „ Christians. We will remember a long time the 

Historian Dorothy 1 hornbury 

informal meetings, inspiring guest speakers 

and get-togethers with the University boys. 
We will always cherish the memory of Christ- 
mas caroling with the Junior Fellowship and 
the party given by the Men's Bible Class. 

Yes, there were so many things in West- 
minster that made us feel closer to God and 
to our fellow men and that we'll keep with us 
all our lives. 



184 




First row: Rogers. Moxley, Felts, Frazier, Stoutameyer (President). Christie, C. Second row: Miss Foster, Bennington, Christie. R. 
Third row: Wilhelm, Hobbs, Youngs, Bell, Frantz. Fourth row: Schroeder, Summers, Greene. Fifth row: Mr. H. M. Burleigh, 

Murden, Underwood 



WESLEY FOUNDATION 

OFFICERS Why are the Churches represented by stu- 

President Joyce Stoutameyer dent groups here on the Hill ? Wesley Founda- 

Vice-Prestdent . Mary Jo Summers tion, for the Methodists, pretty well sums it 

Secreiary ' • • Nancy Stagey U p: To seek to provide for spiritual, moral, and 

Treasurer Beverly "Youngs . , , r , . , , , , , , , 

social needs of the girls; and to help lead them 

to and strengthen them in the faith of Christ ; 

through Sunday School, weekly meetings of 

worship and recreation, inter- and intra-col- 

lege group co-operation, and creative Christian 

living. 



185 




Officers. Metzger (President), Baute, Venezio, Father Widmer, Miss Gratzer, Froeler, Rudolph 



EWMAN CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President Constance Metzger 

Vice-President Constance Froehler 

Secretary Cornelia Rudolph 

Corresponding Secretary Barbara Baute 

Treasurer Catherine Venezio 



Borrowed from a member's letter to a 
friend : 

"Yes, Newman Club was quite busy this 
year. Starting things off right, one of the 



women's groups gave us a supper party, and, 
opening Lenten Season, we again held a Re- 
treat up on the Hill between classes. We had 
our Spring Communion Breakfast on Mother's 
Day, as we do each year. 

"At the huge Christmas party we enter- 
tained students from Georgetown University, 
University of Richmond, University of Vir- 
ginia, and Randolph-Macon. More fun : songs, 
games, food, etc. ! 

"We sponsored the Dean of Canon Law 
from Catholic University in Chapel, too. 

"Surely wish you could have been with us!" 



HILLEL CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President Blanche Schiller 

Vice-President Selma Black 

Secretary Selma Friedman 

Treasurer Mickey Litt 



The time? Study hour (naturally!). The 
place? Any dorm. Topic of conversation? 
"Wonder what's the youngest religious organi- 
zation on the Hill?'" Interesting question, but 
what's the answer? Hillel Club. Yes, organ- 
ized for the benefit of all the Jewish students 
here, it is celebrating it's third birthday this 
year. 

In the course of the discussion, someone 
mentioned that Hillel's art exhibit certainly 



was a huge success, whereupon another of the 
girls, who had just come in, brought up the 
point that the exchange meetings, socials and 
dances at other colleges with their Hillel Clubs 
or fraternities were very much enjoyed. Just 
as lights-out bell rang, a member of the Club 
itself spoke up to declare that what she liked 
best of all was the friendly spirit of co-opera- 
tion both within her club and with other 
denominational groups at M.W.C. 



First row: Glaser, Weinstein, Saks, Kay, Kessler. Second row: Dr. Leidecker, Litt, Schiller, Friedman. Black, Hyans. Third row: Michael- 
son, O'Brian. Shevitz, Hudes, Peake, Milhauser, Heyman, Berkman, Ives, Hirschman 





CANTERBURY CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President Ruth DeMiller 

Vice-President Betty McElroy 

Secretary Louise Davis 

Treasurer Barbara Kelley 



She opened her eyes suddenly as the clock 
sounded demandingly at 6 a.m. "Where are 
you going at this hour?" she queried, still half 
asleep. "Over to Canterbury's weekly Com- 
munion service," came the reply. 

"Have it every week?" she asked, now wide 
awake. Receiving an enthusiastic affirmative, 
she continued, "I'm not an Episcopalian, but 
could I attend some morning?" "Sure," her 
roommate responded. "We'd love to have you 
You know, we meet every Sunday night, too, 
for a devotional and supper, and at Christmas 



time we sell cards and Church calendars. We 
exchange meetings with other Canterbury 
groups in neighboring colleges, too. Our 
visit to the National Cathedral was one I'll 
never forget ! We attended services there, and 
then toured the whole site. 

"Our aim, you see, is to try to promote 
Christianity and a better understanding of 
the Episcopal Church on the campus. Say, 
I've got to leave now, but you come to the 
meeting Sunday and find out for yourself what 
fine times we have together!" 



BAPTIST STUDENT UNIO 



Baptist Student Union. Three little words, 
which together mean the organization for all 
Baptist students on the Hill, and separately, 
the explanation of the work and purpose of 
the whole. 

Baptist: One of the Protestant religious 
groups, represented on campus by the Baptist 
Student Center, under the guidance of Melba 
Long, their secretary of student work. 

Student: An organization of, by, and for 
the students at M.W.C. — not necessarily only 
those of Baptist beliefs, but all students — who 



enjoy privileges such as attending religious 
rallies at home or away, participating in and 
receiving inspiration from the nightly In- 
spirationals at the Center or the annual 
Thanksgiving Sunrise Service, or working 
in neighboring rural and colored churches, to 
mention only a few. 

Union : The linking of the Baptist students 
with the local church and its various activities. 
The Baptist Student Union: Fun, fellowship, 
inspiration, and spiritual growth. 



Seated, first row: Henderson, Webb. Second row: Trice, XlcKnight, Gravatt, Olivci 
Standing: Coffclt, Profitt. Claud, Webb, Huston, Ma 



Long. Woodford. Third roic: Pate, Custer, Rowlett. 
ris, Jones, J., Jones, E. 





Officers. Clements, Booker, Metzger, Hopkins (President 



ALPHA PHI SIGMA 

Two bits of ribbon . . . green and gold . . . 
pinned on her sweater; just two ribbons . . . 
with a wealth of significance : high scholastic 
achievement, now rewarded by a fraternity 
whose members strive continuously to main- 
tain the honors they have won, Alpha Phi 
Sigma. Recognition before the students of her 
scholarly merits ; new, valuable fields of educa- 
tion and culture : lectures by eminent authori- 
ties on world and domestic affairs, or programs 
of a lighter vein, by such prominent persons as 
Miss Esther M. Doyle, monologuist, who 
presented the fraternity's annual convocation 
program; informal meetings at which ideas 
are traded, new friendships formed, enter- 
taining talents exhibited. 

Interest, enthusiasm, scholarship, leader- 
ship . . . Alpha Phi Sigma. 



First row: Marscher, Gravatt, Trice, Litt, King, Hyans, Jones, Gibson, V., Gibson, M., Swyers, Ferguson, Huber, Ferrari, Grieve. Second 

row: Nelson, Lightner, Orkney, Belden, Boswell, McClerkin, Miles, Trimborn, Brauner, DeMiller, Busemann, Weaver. Third row: Rand, 

Tignor, Millar, Birkenmeyer, Sprower, Clark, Osborn, Brown, Recker, Mount,.Cottingham. Fourth row: Gaw, Knight, Parrish, Stuelken, 

Shropshire, Snidow, Weathcrly, Chesson, West, Meriwether. Fifth row: Baute, Eglof, Starkey, Webb. Summers, Zipf, Clark 




CAP AND GOWN 

"Where's my Student Directory? I've got 
to know Ann's box number!'' Her roommate 
unearthed it from beneath a stack of books, 
and handed her the familiar, dog-eared blue 
and white book. "Jimminy, what would I 
do without this thing?" she thought, leafing 
through it's thumb-marked pages. 

"Say, roommate, what did you think of the 
Career Day Assembly? Wasn't that model 
stunning? Just think : she graduated from here 
just two years ago! A senior told me that 
Cap and Gown sponsors programs like this 
every year." A short silence. "Look! Cap 
and Gown published this directory, too!" she 
observed suddenly. "This society surely rates 
tops for school service!" 





■^r-^HL^^^ ttfe 2 


l 

H 


" L 













Sponsors. Dr. Voelkel, Mrs. Russell, Miss Stephenson 



Lyle, Head, Weatherly, Keener, Levey, Miles (President), Met;ger, Sprower, Parks, Cottingham 




Vets practice for a Saturday game 





9 



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i .^2$fr> 









mt.f! 


1 ? 

.•'■*■ 


flflf 




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Seated, first row: John Johnstone, John Snowden, Thomas Sale, Garnett Sullivan, Charles Winberg. Second row: Don Whittle, Elmer 
Morris, Dorsey Sisler, Charles Meadows, William Garner, Fred Saunders. Standing: Thomas Augherton, Dr. Shankle (Sponsor), Ralph 

Franklin, Edward Braden, Charles Ritter 

VETERANS 

Someday there'll be a few legends floating 
around, or a few remember whens. Someone 
will run to an old Battlefield — did boys 
really come to Mary Washington? Was there 
actually a football team here? 

Already they've become a sort of tradition. 
The veterans belong. They drive the flashiest 
cars, whistle the loudest in the halls, and play 
the juke-box's latest tunes. They are seen 
strolling to the Post Office, in and out of the 
C Shoppe, having morning coffee with Dr. 



Shankle. Whether off to basketball practice 
or the library, the Vets are just about the most 
carefree of all M.W.C.'ers. 

Between here and there, Trinkle or Chan- 
dler, they're downright casual in their black 
and white saddles, sport coats, and enviable 
freedom. We no longer stop to stare at these 
"new" students who now take an active part 
in campus activities, and who uphold the 
traditions of our college. 



193 



FORENSIC 



CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President Sarah Anne Miles 

Sponsor Dr. Warren G. Keith 

Advisor Dr. George E. Shankle 



Easter vacation, and everybody went home 
to enjoy a little relaxation — everyone, that is, 
except the girls of the Forensic Club, who 
were busily preparing and carrying out plans 
for the annual Grand National Forensic Tour- 
nament held here in April. 

The members were efficiently taking care of 
registration, assisting with the various con- 
tests, and generally being where they were 
needed; they didn't mind not going away! 
(It wasn't all work, because many types of 
enjoyable recreation had been scheduled, and 
the possibility of meeting old acquaintances 
and forming new friendships was endless !) 

Why sacrifice a holiday for a convention? 
Simple; to learn contest leadership and to 
better understand debating and parliamen- 
tary procedure ! 



Standing: Hewlett. L 



McKnight, Shaw, Knight, Cladakis, Dr. Shankle. Burrows. Sommers, Chapman 



" = ":: : 




194 




Some are in 



A fall Afternoon 



Some are out 




195 




Freshmen swap 
first impressions 



Freshman 

Reception 



You may start out 
as "Miss Brown," 
but the Faculty takes 
it from there 



196 



College is tor adults 



Fun with freshmen 




197 



"V" goes off -campus 
for a Christmas party 



That spirit prevails 





Student Government members play hostess to the college 



Leaders ta\e over 





201 




One dav in Max 



Two big events of 49 



Should old acquaintance 




202 




To the victor . 



'Possums, Potholders and Postmen 



They also serve 




203 




MAY QUEEN... Marceline Lavon Weatherly 



204 




MAID OF HONOR... Helen Hop\ins 



205 




MAY COURT 



Catherine Venezio 
Patricia Lou Head 
Jean Marie Melvin 



Mary Watts Cottingham 

Elizabeth Anne Custer 

Dorothy White 



206 




MAY COURT 



Martha Jane Foster 
Eloise Elizabeth Clark 
Jane Edmund Gregg 



Shirley Joan Hamilton 
Phyllis Jean Maddox 
Jane Byington Millar 



207 







MAY COURT 



Ursala Ann McGreevy 
Corlita Mary Gibson, Trainbearer 
Nancy Dorothy Horan 
Patricia Ann Leech 



Lena Carol Edgerton 

Candace Crittenton 

Marjorie Suzanne Gibson, Trainbearer 

Priscilla Jane Roberts 



208 







MAY COURT 



Nancy Suzanne Ferguson, Flower Girl 
Joan Ellen Robinson 
Beverly Bailey Chapman 
Joan Sharp Humpton 



Mary Alice Edmonds 

Ann Gayle Winston 

Victoria Briggs Donahey 

Dorothy Ellen Stultz, Flower Girl 



ATTLEFIELD GOES TO 



A M.W.C. WEEKEND 



":-.h: 




It all begins in a telephone booth. "Can any- 
one change a dollar?" "Yes, operator, I'm 
calling Charlottesville." But, this is only the 
beginning. Two weeks is a short time to plan 
a party, exchange dances, get your date a 
room and your roommate a date, and persuade 
your family you need a new formal . . . you 
end by borrowing one. 



Suddenly it's the Friday and there's a line 
of men at the Dean's Office. Back in the 
dorms there is a flurry of last minute ironing, 
borrowing, primping, and wheedling Paris 
Perfume from your roommate. The House 
Mother sends word your date is in the parlor. 
One last look in the mirror. . . . 





It's a beautiful afternoon. Couples chat, 
or stroll around campus while committee 
members put some final touches on the 
Tea Dance decorations. Music-lovers 
gather around the piano — will it be bebop 
or Dixie Land jazz? 

The Tea Dance gets under way and 
late-comers check their lipstick while, 
outside, their dates have a cigarette and 
predict football scores. 




"Isn't your date from the Eastern Shore ?" All 
Saturday afternoon you play "who-do-you- 
know" with familiar and unfamiliar faces. 
The Tea Dance is a wonderful success (defi- 
nitely no girl break!). Practically all the 
pieces are slow. The jitterbugs dynasty has 
seen its day, and the additional instrumental 
pieces turn the dance into a concert. This was 
Mary Washington as you dreamed it would be. 



After the dance you gather back in the 
dorm and many an engagement ring or fra- 
ternity pin is foretold. Car pools are devised, 
and you're off to the Stratford or the College 
Shoppe, which is really so different by candle- 
light. A wonderful atmosphere is created, and 
thoughts of books and things become remote. 
After all, tonight is the dance. 




214 



Everyone in the dorm is excited . . . corsages arrive in 
dozens. You're pleased with the way you look . . . 
you're proud of your elate and never bother to explain 
that enigmatic smile he questions, which, of course, 
comes from your knowledge of all the stay-at-homes 
who hover behind the doors and rest on stair rails. 
G.W. is just ahead . . . and becomes now only the Hall 
of Mirrors. 





215 



The dance is crowded and gay. 
But home in the dorms are those 
who also are very much in the 
pattern of the weekend. Some 
linger outside the window and 
pick the best looking boys . . . 
there are bridge games, and in- 
terminable sessions on I.C.C.'s 
. . . others go to the movies. 
They all wait up for the stories 
to come. 





Intermission . . . and then it's al- 
most all over. The walk back is the 
slowest in history. Some are home 
earlier than others, with a thousand 
things to tell about ... a few couples 
linger as long as possible. Its a 
beautiful night in December — you 
wish for a few more minutes, and 
then, goodnight. . . . 




INDEX 



A 

Administration 10 

Alpha Phi Sigma l q 

Alpha Psi Omega 123 

Alumnae Daughters 181 

Art Club 105 

Art Faculty 104 

Athenaeum 153 

Atheletic Recreation Association 162 

B 

Band 112 

Baptist Student Union 189 

Battlefield 172 

Battlefield Goes to a M.W.C. Weekend ... 210 

Biologv Faculty 132 

Bullet". ..." 174 

C 

Campus Chest 179 

Canterbury Club 188 

Cap and Gown 191 

Cavalry Troop 166 

Chemistry Faculty 128 

Choir 110 

Concert Dance Club 116 

Contents 9 

D 

Dance Orchestra 114 

Dedication 6 

Dramatic Arts and Speech Faculty 120 

E 

Economics and Business Faculty 142 

El Club Hispano- Americano 155 

English Faculty 148 

Epaulet 150 

F 

Foreign Language Faculty 152 

Forensic Club 194 

Formal Dance Committee 1 80 

Foreword 8 

Freshmen 90 

Officers 89 

History 88 

G 

Glee Club 108 

H 

Hillel Foundation 187 

Home Economics Club 135 

Home Economics and Dietetics Faculty .... 134 

Honor Council 132 

Hoofprints 164 

I 

Interfaith Council 183 

International Relations Club 140 



J 

Junior Dance Club 117 

Juniors 64 

Officers 63 

History 62 

L 

L'Accademic Italiana 154 

Le Cercle Francais 156 

M 

Mary Washington Players 121 

Mathematics and Physics Faculty 128 

Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club .... 133 

May Queen and Her Court 204 

Mike Club 122 

Mu Phi Epsilon Ill 

N 

Newman Club 1 86 

P 

Philosophy Club 145 

Philosophy and Education Faculty 144 

Pi Gamma Mu 141 

Pi Sigma Kappa 124 

Physical Education and Hygiene Faculty ... 160 

Professional Library Staff 157 

Psychology Faculty 144 

R 

Red Cross 178 

S 

Seniors 26 

Officers 25 

History 24 

Senior Commission 1 76 

Sigma Tau Delta 151 

Sigma Tau Chi 143 

Sophomores 76 

Officers 75 

History 74 

Student Government Association 18 

Student Activities 170 

Symphonette 115 

T 

Terrapin Club 168 

V 

Veterans 193 

W 

Wesley Foundation 185 

Westminster Fellowship 1 84 

Y 

Y.W.C.A 20 



Compliments 



HEfinoon co.. inc. 



424 WILLIAM STREET FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



Wholesale distributors of 

Candy, Tobacco, Light Groceries, etc. 



Relax . . . have a Coke 





RICHMOND COCA COLA BOTTLING 
WORKS, INC. 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Member of the Federal Reserve System 

Farmers and Merchants State Bank 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 



Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Compliments 

JUDSON SMITH 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

1009 CAROLINE STREET 


Say It with Flowers 

at 
P. PETER 

Florist 

707 PRINCESS ANNE STREET 
Telephone 2273 


Compliments 

CROWN JEWELERS 

206 WILLIAM ST. 


BECK CHEVROLET CORPORATION 

FREDERICKSBURG. VA. 
Chevrolet - Oldsmobile - Cadillac 


Welcome! FACULTY and STUDENTS 
JOSEPH H. ULMAN 

"Feminine Fashions" 
Riding Togs - Costume Jewelry 

822 CAROLINE STREET 
FREDERICKSBURG. VIRGINIA 


Compliments 

BRENT'S 

Your Shopping Center 

1019 CAROLINE STREET 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



YOUNG MOTORS, INC. 






Chrysler - Plymouth 






Sales - Service - Parts 






707 WILLIAM STREET 




Compliments of 


FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 








F. 


W. W00LW0RTH 




Compliments 




COMPANY 


MAYFLOWER 






RESTAURANT 







The National Bank of Fredericksburg 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

Security and Service since 1865 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 
MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



J. C PENNEY CO., INC. 

825 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



C o rn p I i in ent s 

»f 

ROBERT B. PAYNE, INC 

Your Favorite Fuel Dealer 
FREDERICKSBURG. VIRGINIA 



SAFEGUARDING YOUR HEALTH 

with 

QUALITY DAIRY PRODUCTS 
FARMERS CREAMERY CO., INC 

Fredericksburg, Va. 



Phone 289 

Hopkins Home Bakery 

PASTRIES SPECIALTY CAKES 

715 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 


ULMAN'S 

Lifetime Jewelry 
903 CAROLINE STREET 


It's 

LEVINSON'S QUALITY SHOP 

For Sophisticated Juniors 

Nationally Advertised 

Coats - Suits - Dresses - Accessories 

Phone 1163 904 CAROLINE STREET 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 


For Those Who Appreciate 
SANITONE DRY CLEANING 
Storage for Furs and Woolens 

SUNSHINE LAUNDRY 

WILLIAM STREET and SUNKEN ROAD 


CHARLES L. READ 

Wholesale Candies 
Phone 1086-W 


VAUGHAN COCKE CARPENTER 
MOTOR CO., Inc. 

Dodge - Plymouth 
Dodge Job-Rated Trucks 

2100 PRINCESS ANNE STREET 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Pitts' Theatres 

PITTS' VICTORIA, FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' COLONIAL, FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' FAUQUIER, WARRENTON, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' FAIRFAX, CULPEPER, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' NEW, CULPEPER, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' MURPHY, FRONT ROYAL, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' PARK, FRONT ROYAL, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' MANASSAS, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' BERRYVILLE, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' EMPORIA, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' ROXY THEATRE, EMPORIA, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' CHADWICK, SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' PALACE, SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' CAVALIER, SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' CARVER THEATRE, SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' TALLY-HO, LEESBURG, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' YORK, WEST POINT, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' MADISON, ORANGE, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' PATRICK HENRY, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' EAST END, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' JEFFERSON, CHARLES TOWN, WEST VIRGINIA 

OPERA HOUSE, CHARLES TOWN, WEST VIRGINIA 

PITTS' CAPITOL THEATRE, LAWRENCEVILLE, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' STATE THEATRE, LAWRENCEVILLE, VIRGINIA 

PITTS' LEE THEATRE, WHITESTONE, VIRGINIA 



_ _ Main Office 

BEN J. T. PITTS FREDERICKSBURG - VIRGINIA 

PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER 

Telephones 275, 569-1 and 1235 



// We Please You 

Tell Others! 

If We Don't 

Tell Us! 

ADAMS NEWSSTAND 

314 WILLIAM ST. 


ROGER CLARKE 

Fire — Life — Automobile 
Insurance 

Surety Bonds 
Law Building Phone 1500 


i Compliments 
of 

SOUTHERN GRILL 


J. Jenkins Sons Co., Inc. 

Manufacturers 
Mary Washington College Rings 

Sold Thru 

ULMAN'S 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

20 W. Redwood Street Baltimore, Md. 

•— 


Two 
SELF SERVICE LAUNDRIES 

in Fredericksburg to Serve You 

1503 PRINCESS ANNE STREET 
620 KENMORE STREET 

9 Pounds of Laundry Done in 40 Minutes 


BOND REXAL DRUGS 

Toilet Articles - Soda Fountain 
Prescriptions Filled Promptly 

CAROLINE and WILLIAM STREETS 

Phone 2200 



Do tke Class of 1950 



Our sincere congratulations . . . and a wish that you will 
return often to renew old friendships — that you will view 
with pleasure the exciting mood changes of dramatic designer 
originals, the distinctive Debutante or Misses Shops . . . 
that you will enjoy the delightfully varied gifts of our 
seventh floor collection . . . and that you continue the 
pleasant practice of meeting your friends for luncheon or 
tea in our Greenbrier Garden. 



JULIUS GARFINCKEL & CO. 

F STREET at FOURTEENTH 

Spring Valley Store, Massachusetts Avenue at 49th 



Sincere good wishes 




to 


Compliments of 


DR. MORGAN L. COMBS 


C. H. MONTGOMERY 


THE FACULTY 


and 


STUDENT BODY 




and the 


COMPANY 


STAFF OF THE BATTLEFIELD 






FREDERICKSBURG VIRGINIA 


WALTER N. CHINNJR. 






College Printing 


yajualitif J^hotoaraphic 


Stationery — Programs — Tickets, etc. 


Service 


COLONIAL PRESS, INC. 


SNAPSHOT FINISHING COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 


M. N. Beales, Mgr. 


STUDIO PORTRAITURE WEDDING COVERAGE 

QoloWf STUDIOS k 


307 William St. Phone 1201 




m. 


We Appreciated All Orders 




From the Girls and Faculty 


Princess Anne Hotel Bldg., Phone 2188 


of MWC 


FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 




JANE TRUSLOW, MGR. 


ELKINS FLOWER SHOP 




613 CAROLINE STREET 



^-omplimenti of 



SYLVANIA CELLOPHANE 




SYLVANIA DIVISION 

AMERICAN VISCOSE CORPORATION 

Manufacturers of cellophane and other cellulose products since 1929 

General Sales Office: 1617 Pennsylvania Blvd., Philadelphia 3, Pa. 

Plant: Fredericksburg, Va. 



Compliments of 




B. GOLDSMITH & SON, INC. 


where moil airli buii men i &ifti 




R. A. KISHPAUGH'S 


Compliments 






STATIONERY 


of 




ROBERT WASHINGTON 


Pretty Writing Paper 


INSURANCE AGENCY 


Portable Typewriters 




Books Novelties 


-x 


Kodaks Films 




Gifts 


BRADFORD BUILDING 


COLLEGE PRINTING 


Phone 1144 Established 1940 


Compliments of 


dana 4 sfeivel £5ox 


WEST END FOUNTAIN SERVICE 


Jewelers and Silversmiths 

Fine Diamonds, Watches and Jewelry 


Phone 22 50 


Fine Sterling and Crystal 


806 Williams Street 


208-210 WILLIAM STREET 
FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 


Fredericksburg, Va. 


/^^B^x 


Compliments of 


There's %\&&7 e cC' Jin your future 


BLANTON MOTOR CO. 

Ford Authorized Sales and Service 


VjS^if 613-21 


Princess Anne St. Phones: 912 - 913 


^'i ^ Alternate 


U. S. Highway No. 1 Phones: 1781-J - 9264 




Fredericksburg, Va. 



For Comfort Combined with Economy 

tEfje iprmcefif* &tme Hotel 

FREDERICKSBURG, IN OLD VIRGINIA 




A traditionally Southern institution lo- 
cated in the center of America's Most 
Historic City. Within walking distance 
of the railroad and bus stations. 



Coffee H>()op 

Good Food Fireproof 

Private Garages 

J. R. Hilldrup 
Manager 



Woodward & Loth r op 

Washington 13. D. C 




6L-6 



a, coA^e^i 



But first to Woodies for the wardrobe 
that gives you an impressive beginning, 

a pleasant stay, a confident air. Choose 
yours on our Young Fourth Floor. 



Compliments of 

THE FASHION PLATE 

1009 PRINCESS ANNE STREET 




902 Caroline Street 



Compliments of 



SHELTON AND TRUSLOW CLEANERS 



FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Compliments 
of 

KAUFMAN JEWELER 

823 CAROLINE STREET 



GOOLRICK'S PHARMACY 

Drugs 
Soda and 
Cosmetics 

901 CAROLINE STREET 



TOTS 'n TEENS SHOP 



from the cradle to high school 



816 CAROLINE STREET 



WHITE and WEEKS 
FURNITURE CORP. 

Complete Home Furnishings 
Radios . . . Electrical Appliances 

"BETTER VALUES FOR LESS MONEY" 
800 Caroline Street Fredericksburg, Va. 



"Automatic Vending At Its Best" 

COLONIAL POPCORN 
AND CANDY CO., INC. 

Pitts' Colonial Theatre Building 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 

Telephones 231-275 or 1576W 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


CONGRATULATIONS 

GRADUATES . . . 

May the picture we take of you at the 
exact moment you receive your di- 
ploma bring back, through the years, 
happy memories of your days spent at 
Mary Washington College. 

ARTHUR CLARKE STUDIOS 

311 WEST GRACE STREET 

\ RICHMOND VIRGINIA 


Compliments of 

COLLEGE INN 

The Favorite Meeting Place 
of MWC 

DINNERS GROCERIES 


Compliments of 

MILLER'S SPECIALTY SHOP 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 



Cong-ra tula tionA 



C. C, Jylnde 

3u\nituxe o/ 3)l3tinctlon Since 1886 



Compliments of 

J. J. NEWBERRY COMPANY 



Compliments of 

CARLEY'S 

215 William Street 
Fredericksburg, Va. 




ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS 



FIREPROOF 



• MORE SERVICE 

• MORE OFTEN 

• TO MORE PLACES 





-|s ^^i vTrlaSgl jfoh^ 



Stratford Jrotel 

Fredericksburg's Finest 



Make the Stratford your headquarters 
ivhen in Fredericksburg 



COURTEOUS SERVICE EXCELLENT CUISINE 



Compliments of 

BELL BROTHERS FURNITURE COMPANY 



Fredericksburg 



Virginia 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

for 

THE "1950" BATTLEFIELD 



Colon na Studios, Inc. 



"On Location" Photographers 



114 PARK ROW NEW YORK 7, NEW YORK 



MEMBER OF 
The College Annual Producers Association of the United States 





PUT 



COLLEGE ANNUALS 

VIEW BOOKS ■ CATALOGS 
ADVERTISING LITERATURE 



mm 



THOMSEN 
• ELLIS • 
HUTTONCO 



J\idemark J\ess 
!M!HIJ 

m 



Ptu+dete. <U the 
1950 BATTLEFIELD 



BALTIMORE 2 



NEW YORK 7 



„;/',; 



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