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Full text of "Battlefield, 1993"

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/battlefield199380univ 



JUN 14 1994 

OFFICE Of otfiii )f snjotfirs 




I ifpMarye's 
L/liv Heights 

MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
1993 BATTLEFIELD 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 




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Student 




Wayne Blankenship and Jennifer 
LaWatsch 




On sunny days, the front steps of 
Trinkle are preferable to the quiet 
stale study rooms. 



Spring Breakers Steve Craig, Kyle Ryan. Jeremy Cline and Adam Fike 



J8» Candid s 




Candids '19 



Student Life 

1 



I 



'W»» 



In The Beginning 



As we closed the book on summer of 1 992, a few hundred freshmen reached 
the MWC campus. Suddenly, the Georgian garden of learning they once 
visited was rapidly becoming a second home. 

The weekend of August 21, the brick paths were congested with mini-vans, 
large boxes, and tearful parents. Moving days were sunny and warm, and filled 
with more than furniture and good-byes. 

A host of activities were planned to ease the arrival of the new students. 
The traditional Freshman Olympics offered an active opportunity to make new 
acquaintances. The Great Hall and the Underground drew crowds with their 
video dance parties. And, of course, residential students were treated to ice- 
breakers at the first of many hall meetings. 

As always. Ball Circle was the center (literally!) of attention. 
Fredericksburg's merchants spread out their own welcome mats under the 
shade of large tents teeming with freebies and advertisements. A few days 
later, a horseshoe of tables enticed students to join the various organizations 
and teams on campus. Virtually every officially recognized club displayed 
some information or paraphernalia; there were also demonstrations and educa- 
tional videos. 

As returning students arrived, several of MWC's traditions were continued. 
Sunday evening, students were invited to Brompton for a tour of President 
Anderson's home and a light reception on the lawn. First-time students re- 
turned to Dodd Auditorium to sign the Honor Pledge at the ceremonial Honor 
Convocation. 

This hectic weekend was concluded by Monday morning, the day that 
initiated the routine of classes, studying and more classes. 



"5^ 




-v" >*■_■- 



Each year, student involvement beings with club 
carnival, where organizations recruit new members. 



20* Orientation 






Al iIr- licsliiiiaii ( )l\ iiipiLS. u hero 
tliiiii;s iiol a liillc pcrMHial. it was easy 
Id gel lo know people. 




New stiidenls were introduced lo loni: 
line^ and bis: hills al ihc bookstore. 

Willard Hall welcomed .students with 
banners . . . and much appreciated air- 
conditioned rooms. 



m 



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SiKcJent Life 



OrieiiTciTioii • 21 



Are You Politically Right? 
Wrong? or Left (Out)? 



The phrase "pohtically correct" at first seemed to signify an abstract ideal to which we 
all should aspire. Lately, though, it has become a stigma applied generally to overzealous 
activists most people deem offensive. Yet, regardless of how you view the "P.C." 
argument, we have all learned something: you cannot glide through life in ignorance; 
you must be at least aware of the world around you. This year, the MWC campus 
offered many opportunities for students to become more socially informed. 

In late September, students at the college were called on to defend their reputations at 
a public hearing in the City Council chambers. Fredericksburg residents had filed 
numerous complaints about students disrupting their community; accusations included 
vandalism, littering, noise pollution, drinking offenses, unlawful residence and parking 
violations. Organized by the Legislative Action Committee, a group of students attended 
an open forum on campus the day before the meeting to prepare their statements. Sur- 
prisingly, City Council members appeared willing to cooperate; perhaps this was in 
response to the obvious student involvement. 

The subject that turned probably more heads during these months than any other was 
racism. In reaction to the controversial ethnic studies class. Associate Professor of 
Philosophy Craig Vasey organized a faculty forum to discuss the definition of "racism" 
and race relations on our campus. Students and faculty were gathered two months later 
for a similar discussion. On November 18, a standing-room-only/capacity crowd of 
students attended a rally to demonstrate their opposition to racial intolerance. 

Students and faculty observed Banned Book Week — so named by the American 
Booksellers Foundation for Free Speech — between September 26 and October 3. The 
goal of these activities was to alert people to this dangerous infringement upon freedom; 
the idea was spread that censorship is more harmful than any book. At last count. 29 
"banned" books are currently used in classes at MWC. 

The MWC Sexual Assault Committee, in conjunction with peer educators and the 
Women's Resource Center, sponsored Sexual Assault Awareness Month in October. 
Events included a candlelight vigil and circulation of petitions to show support for a bill 
against sexual assault. 

One of the most controversial issues in our country today — one that consistently raises 
eyebrows — is homosexuality. On April 1, more than 1,300 members of the college 
community demonstrated their concern at a forum entitled "Homosexuality, Morality and 
Equality." It was such a popular topic that the crowd — too large to squeeze into the 
Great Hall — was moved to Dodd Auditorium. Religion professor David Cain moderated 
the discussion between Steve Stageberg, from the economics department, and geography 
professor Donald Rallis. Stageberg and Rallis offered their views on the perspectives of 
Christians and homosexuals, respectively. Their speeches were followed by a spirited 
question and answer period, during which both men fielded some difficult questions. 

The homosexuality forum was very carefully publicized as a forum for discussion, not 
a debate. A similar format was employed by the Women's Issues Group in the fall to 
examine the controversy over abortion. Although the vocal leaders of both the pro-life 
and pro-choice groups on campus were present, it remained a peaceful, open-minded 
situation. The more realistic goal of discussions such as these is to help students to 
become socially informed, not necessarily "politically correct." 



Students of all races participated in the Novem- 
ber rally to demonstrate their stand against racial 
hatred. 






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)„ -front o^ U«.Ha-«- 



]^^o^ed and Vu>le«c^ 





22* Awareness 



CciliR Kiickcr, AssdciaiL- Diictini lor 
Sludciil Acli\ ilics. s|ic;iks (iiii ;il llic lalls 
;i!Ji;iinsl racial inlDlcrance. 




Students and facults nicmhcrs \()lunteercd 
to read passages Irnm their favorite 
baned" books during the bookstore's 
Banned Book Week. 

At the forum on homosexuality, associate 
professor of economics Steve Stageherg 
(right) responds to a student's question 
after his exchange with assistant professor 
of geography Donald Rallis. 



Student L.ife 



Awareness • 23 



I 



The Legislative Action Committee orga- 
nized several registration drives to encoiir 
age students to vote. 



Hundreds of students and Fredericksburg 
residents read President George Bush's lips 
when his campaign for re-election stopped 
here on September 4. 




President-elect Bill Clinton was spotted in 
Culpeper en route from Charlottesville to the 
capital on an historic bus trip to celebrate his 
inauguration. 



24* Election 












Sara Gram, leader ot the campus pro-lile 
group. proudK showed her support for 
Bush's re-election. 




Student Life 



^James 



As part of te celebration of 
Black History Month, the 
Virginia State University 
Dance Troupe performed 
"My Name Is African- 
American." 




Tom DeLuca's September 
presentation had students 
entranced. 



What do feminists, environmentalists, poets and hyp- 
notists have in common? Absolutely nothing— until they 
each came to MWC this year. 

Author Susan Faludi led the parade of big names with 
her lecture and book signing on September 6. Faludi's 
career in investigative journalism has led her to the New 
York Times' best-seller list, and in 1991 was recognized 
with the Pulitzer Prize. Her latest work- Backlash: The 
Undeclared War Against American Women — asserts that 
the images of women distorted by the media and govern- 
ment have created a cultural backlash against women. She 
dismisses theories of the "biological clock" and "man 
shortage" as inventions of society, and urges her readers to 
question these deceitful authorities. 

Another powerful voice for feminine rights, Naomi 
Wolf, spoke on March 22 about her 1991 best-seller The 
Beauty Myth: How Images of Beauty Are Used Against 
Women. In the same vein as Faludi and their "third wave 
feminist" following, she asks women to defy the stereo- 
types of the past. In contrast to Faludi's theory, however, 
The Beauty Myth suggests that the cultural backlash vis- 
ible today is a response to women's increasingly successful 
positions in society. 




26 • Guests &Perforniers 




& Faces 



The hiL'lili'jlii (.1 W.iiiicii . Ill .lory 
Miiiiili \^;^^ ail appearance by Naomi 
W till, win ISC bcsl-scllcr '/'/;<• Beauty 
\l\ih iliscLisscs slcrcou [)cs and 
successes of women ni socicly. 



Not all of this year's speakers were so 
political. In February, the college hosted 
Us Distinguished Visitor in Residence of 
the "Near. Stephen Schneider, whose lec- 
ture nn The Global Warming Debate" 
taught students and faculty a great deal 
about the greenhouse effect. As a re- 
search scientist, Schneider is lobbying 
for greater governmental awareness of 
environmental issues. 

.All of MWC's guests were not so 
gravely serious, though. Early in Sep- 
tember, twice-running College Enter- 
tainer of the Year Tom DeLucadisplayed 
his hypnotic talents to a full house in 
Dodd. .A similarly large audience crowded 
into Dodd to hearcomedianWalli Collins 
in February. Collins, best known for his 
appearances on MTV, tickled the audi- 
ence with commentary' about childhood 
and college life. 

Student Life 



Guests <& Pe /formers • 27 



I 



Dean Dinning, of Toad the Wet Sprocket 



Although the Toad show was virtually 
unpublicized. tickets sold out in a matter of 
hours. 










The sultry Tori Amos 



Toads & Blossoms? 




Kicking oil ihc CDiiccrt year was an unlorijcltahic appearance In I on Amos on 
Scpleniher 16. It all bcsjan so innocently — Amos seated graeelully at the piano, in 
front ot a lew hundred hushed college students in a respectable, consersative town. 
It was really a dignified .scene, until the crashing chords and seductive lyrics slowly 
eroded all modesty. Even her fiery red hair was no indication ot the show's over- 
whelming intensity — any earthquakes certainly were not little in a subtle mixture 
of ballads and pounding rock rhythms, Amos explored themes ol religion, sexuality 
and innocence with more emotion than your average wedding day. Her brief 
concert still stands as one of the year's best. 

Just a few days later, the D.C. sound of Drivin" "N Cryin" swelled through the 
Great Hall. Opened by the Voodoo Pistons, this show was a great testimonv to the 
popularity of southern rock. 

Certainly the most well-known group that played was Toad the Wet Sprocket, 
whose November 7 show was one of the most popular events of the year. The 
band — Dean Dinning, Todd Nichols, Randy Guss and Glen Phiilip.s — was on tour 
to promote their third album, fear. Singable tracks such as "Walk on the Ocean" 
and "All I Want" helped to launch Toad from alternative anonymity to MTV 
mainstream virtually overnight. The story of the Gin Blossoms — the opening act 
for the Toad show — is very similar. The Tempe, .Arizona, nati\ es had alread\ been 
together for five years when the single "Hey Jealousy" from The New Miserable 
Experience album instantly became their first success. 

There was a dramatic shift in tone w ith the performance by the Brand New- 
Heavies in late October. The Heavies — Simon Bartholomew , Andrew Levy and 
Jan Kincaid — are a former high school group from England whose current album. 
Heavy Rhyme Experience Vol. 1 , spawned the single "People Get Ready." 

w hich w as used in the mo\ ie Juice. Their sound is an inimitable 

blend of dance, rap, R&B and jazz. No matter what you call it, 

though, it was a foot-stomping show, ri\aled 
Earth Day spectacular. 

On April 21, two relatively 
bands— Pond and Poster Chil- 
prepared the Great Hail's 



anxious audience for 
the main event: 
The Screaming 
Trees. Although 
rain had forced the 
show indoors, the Trees 
played a full set for some 
\ cry appreciative fans. 

Of course, these weren't the 
of the year. The Performing .\rtist 
brought some icons from the classi- 
scene to the campus, including the 
Stockholm .Arts Trio, Igor Kipnis. the 
String Quartet, and the Annapolis Brass 
MWC's Visitine .Artists in Music. 



Coficerts • 29 







onlv bv the 



unknown 
drcn — 



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only concerts 
Series 
cal music 

Cavani 



The curtain rose on the 1992-1993 theater season with 
the production of William Hoffman's As Is. Under the 
direction of Tari Stage, the Department of Dramatic Arts 
and Dance presented a very timely play that proved to be a 
learning experience for all involved. As Is deals with 
classical dramatic themes—life, love and death-in a con- 
temporary context. It is the story of a character named Rich 
Farrell, a homosexual who struggles to continue living with 
the AIDS virus. The audience and is allowed to casually 
observe the sometimes humorous but always emotional 
consequences as Rick discloses the news of his disease to 
his family, his friends, even his former lover, Saul, who is 
an ironic source of love and support. In preparation for their 
emotionally demanding roles, the cast went out to meet the 
Rich Farrells of the world. Members talked with homo- 
sexuals and AIDS patients, volunteered for the 1992 
AIDSwalk fundraiser, and visited the AIDS memorial quilt 
displayed in Washington— a monument to those who have 
died from AIDS. 

The spring production by the Dramatic Arts and Dance 
students, The Boys Next Door, also handled some thought- 
provocative issues. This play, written by Tom Griffin, 
revolves around four mentally challenged men who share 
an apartment. The daily experiences of Norman, Arnold, 
Barry and Lucien were expected to reveal the weaknesses 
in others. Like As Is, Boys 
explores serious social ques- 
tions in four lead actors, along 
with director Greg Stull, were 
educated for their roles by 
working with the mentally dis- 
advantaged in our area. 



Nicki Bottom and Puck 
(Anna Martin and 
Mara Klein) 




In the spring, the Performing 
Arts Club revived 
Shakespear's A Midsummer 
Night's Dream, bringing life 
and laughter to the amphi- 
theater. 




30 • Theater 



All The Campus Is A Stage 

The final curtain call ofthc year actually loqiiircd luicuilain ;ii all. In ihc sprint;, nicnihLis ot ihc Perlorniing Arts Club staged 
William Shakespeare's A Miil.\iiiniiicr Nit^hl's Drcciiii in ihc hisloiicallN appropiialc ampliiilicakT More than 50 students, led 
by peer director Jason Bryan, contrihutcd lo ihis pKiducimn. w inch had aiuhcnccs langhiiiij imi Icuul ihrough five performances. 




AS 
IS 



The (.('nlciiiiikiiixc cast of As l\ 




]VI.\RY)^ASHINGTON COIJ.tC,E 



Theater •SI 



Student Life 



I 




Amy Mumpower 
Marilyn and Elvis. . . who did you think 




Donna Douglas. Edward Rollins. Mar}' Scarborough. Wayne Campbell. 

Knsten Maestri and Leo Rollins Student Life 

Hcilloween's • 33 



I 



Celebration of Diversity 

"Differences Enrich Us All" 



The early spring sun warmed the bricks of Campus Walk to welcome 
the third annual Maiy Washington College Multicultural Fair. More than 50 
vendors, merchants, entertainers and educators Uned the path, which quickly 
swelled with students, faculty and Fredericksburg residents. The day was a 
shining success. 

Hispanic. Asian. Scottish, Irish. Jewish, Native American, African 
American. . . no matter who you are, you could find the common denomina- 
tor on April 3. 1993. Coordinated by the Multicultural Center, the fair is 
intended to celebrate racial, ethnic and cultural diversity among peoples. 
This year's theme, "Differences Enrich Us All," also implies that a lot can be 
learned from the differences between us. The puipose of the fair is to show- 
case these varieties for everyone to experience. 

It was a virtual playground of the senses: brightly decorated tables 
overflowing with merchandise, literature and art; the roaming song of bag- 
pipes; frequent assemblies in front of Lee and Trinkle Halls, as spectators 
cheered singers, dancers, and musicians; the peculiai" aroma of cunied goat, 
egg rolls and funnel cake; the peipetual beckon of the megaphone, announc- 
ing events not to be missed. The whirlwind of activity endured for seven full 
hours. 

Among the participants in this year's fair were several of the campus's 
student-run groups, including the Asian Students Association. Hispanic 
Students Association, Black Student Association, Women of Color and 
Brothers of New Direction. Members of the faculty were also involved; Dr. 
David Cain and retired professor George Van Sant scunied about with mega- 
phones, alerting people to upcoming events. The MWC Show Choir and the 
Voices of Praise were also among the day's performers. 

The slate of entertainers was likewise diverse. Guest musicians 
included Flory Jagoda (a Jewish guitarist), Russ Maclin (spiritual music) and 
the Army Blues/Jazz Ensemble. There were demonstrations of Ecuadorian, 
Native American, and Irish folk dances, as well as Calypso dancers, and 
Egyptian belly dancer and ensembles such as ODADAA! and the Good Time 
Clogaers. 








These agricultural impersonators were among the man}' who 
contributed to the fair-either performing or managing displays 



34 • Multcultural Fair 



his lirilliciiitl} cnloicd ChiiicsL' dragon 
divu allcnliiHi as il \\ca\L\l lhioui;h ihc 
Liouds. 




Food >Pl;.. _ _:'.;\ersal language, a^ 
Musical performers represented man\ Information tables such as this one diverse aromas escaped from tents that 

comers of the world. spread the \\ ord about diversit}'. lined Ball circle. 



pfwtos by M'itle M'ood'zi'anf 



Student Life 



MultLulrui-cil Fnir • 3^ 




36 • Fall & Spring Formols 




Fall & Spriiig Fonuuls '37 



Student Life 

1 



II 



The People You See at MWC 



photos 6y \Mil<^ Woodward 



Devon Williams and Lori Rose were two of the 
many happy faces at the senior class's 193rd night. 



After early morning thunderstorms. 
Devil-Goat Day festivities were moved to 
the Underground. SAE crew member 
Brian Hollingsworth grooves along the 
sidelines to the Black Sheep. 




Religious diversity is a great part of 
Campus life as students search for a place 
of worship. 1700 miles later, Steve Craig, 
Adam Fike, Jeremy Cline, and Kyle Ryan 
stood at the gates of Graceland, the home 
of Elvis Aaron Presley for twenty years 
before faking his death in 1977. 
Note the ties. 




pkoto 6y 1{ed iVest 



38 • Candids 



The lawn in front of Randolph hosted 
many games of stickball. Freshman 
Gary Young's swings for the \vo{ of 
Mason. 



Dan Corbin. Dan 01i\er and friends 
improvise Willard's own golf eoin'se. 
using a tennis bail for the back nine, 

photo bij ■Lilccti iNffJ, 




If. just once, he had left a hat--brimside up--on the 
sidewalk, he would have made a fortune. 



Caiidids • 39 



Student Life 



1 



Kelly Helmstiitler, Devon Williams and Grilling up some fun at the Mason/ 
Lori Rose at 1 93rd Night Randolph Unconcious Party 




Melissa Grady, making some friends at 193rd Night 



40 • Parties 



WcsIl'N Slicphcul. pix'scnl ;i1 1'^mi.I 
Niiihl ti) make sure no one had loo 
much tun 




Swinging deals at Monle Carlo Night 







Commuter parking signs like this one--once an 
endangered species— sprouted up all around the 
campus this year. y/j^^ ^^ .^ai^^ .^ 'oodwanf 



A rare spring snow blanketed the campus after 
spring break. 

Vfioto By 'Eikm ^{effern 












42 • Campus 





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Enormous Ball Hall overlooks an uiumuiII} 
desolate Ball Circle on a rain\ al'icrndon. 

plwtiK 61/ ■Citeen ■McfJiTn 



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A sunn\ da\ at the beach between 
Mason and Randolph. 



photo 6if 'Mi/ie 'Woodward 



On Campus 



Student Life 



Ccuupiis • 43 



Virginia Clarke, Scott Lester, Jenni- Rachel Keene and Brion Daly, after a hard 
fer Gavin and Kim Gossett day at the library 





44 •Candids 



mmmmmmm 





Suidcnts always u>c ihcir lime wiscls 
in Tnnkle. 





Built in 1920. the Fredericksburg 

train station is critical to many 

students as a junction between 

school and home. 






46 * Around Town 



plwtof hi 'MUe 'W'ooihi'anf 




Cards and Cones . downtown on William 
St. is popular not only for great ice cream. 
but cheap birthday presents as well. 



Student Life 



Ai'ouncI T(n\ji • 47 



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50*Dorms 




52*Donns 




DorDis* ^3 




54*Do7'ins 




Dorms* ^5 




56*Dorms 




Dorms* 57 




MARSHALL HALL 



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58*Dor7ns 




Dorms* 59 




60* Dorms 




Dorms* 61 




62» Dorms 




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Dorms* 63 




SOUTH HALL 

64*Dorjns 






Dorms* 65 




66*Donns 




Do//ns' 67 




Class 
of 1993 



Rachel T. Abrajano 
International Affairs 
French 



'Itlwastk 



Donna K. Adams 
Psychology 

Marna M. Albanese 
International Affairs 

Amy S. Alderman 
Geography 




Cristopher L. Alexandrow 
Psychology 

Leigh E. Allcut 
French 

Jennifer M. Almy 
Mathematics 



Paul Sargent, Eric Stohr, Jay Radshaw, 

and Pat Fines, members of the men's 

rugby club, were champions when it 

came to bonding and inebriating the 

spirit. 



Katie D. Anderson 
French 

Sara K. Anderson 
International Affairs 



T/'wto bij ■Mike ■Wooihuard 



Mary WAsmNGTON 



70 • Seniors 




Mary Washington 



Look Mom, We've }»ot our own brew now. 
Mike Weil and Meredith Wehniann 
# ,ffl proudly display their contributions to 
^'^ lOOth ni^ht. 




( ". AnstcN' 
In-lisii 



k.iilii-i iiK- II, Asliln' 



'I'lh'to Ini Milic 'l\'oodu'ard 



\1kIi,ic1 a, ANpiiUls 
|-.ll\ IK lllllH.-Ill.ll 

l-.ailh Science 

Gabiicllc A. Ayrcs 
Psychology 

SlKiion \I. Hasjiiclt 
Biology 



.Stacc\ K. Bailey 
Bh\sics 

LoLiis Baksa. Jr. 
Business .Aeiminislration 

Lcia .1. Baldwin 
Histnrs' 



Stephanie D. Bamberger 
Business Administration 



Seniors • 71 



Harold C. Bame 
English 



'Can p believe this! 



Julia C. Banon 
International Affairs 

Ferdinand T. Basilio 
Biology 

William A. Basye 
Buisness Administration 



Elizabeth J. Bauer 
Economics 

Felicia M. Baxter 
Biology 

Jonathan J. Beam 
Psychology 



Paige L. Beaman 
Psychology 

Shannon L. Beasley 
Psychology and Religion 




Roger Viadero dares to question the 

actions of his classmates. Everyone was 

wild this night ... no exceptions. 



Mary WAsmNGTON 



72 • Seniors 




("Iiciyl A. BcnncU 
( hi Id Dexclopincnl 

Ciciicsa W . HcuiiL'tt 

iMlL'llsh 



Matt Bolen, Rick Downer, Jason Magi, 

and Warren Fischi gather for their last 

photo opportunity before drinking 

themselves into obhyion. 



■riwU'ln, Mikf Wihulwurd 



M;iil;i .1. h(.-imcll 
lnli.-in;ili( )ii;il ,\t lairs 

Kirsicii A. I-)rii\lrn 
Business .Adniiin si i aln ui 

Kaicn ^ . Hcrry 
Business .Ailnunisiial i< in 



Katrina R. Berry 
P>usiness .Atiminisiration 

.Aiiunula I.. Belz 
Biology 

Krisiina M. Bielak 

\:n\ udnniental 

I^arlh Seience 



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'Can't we all just get along! 



911 




.Ierr\ W . Biankenship. Jr. 
Biology 



Seniors • 73 



Mary Jane Bohlen 
Studio Art 



Janelle A. Bolden 
Biology 




Lori F. Bolyard 
Psychology 

Michael S. Boros 

Business 

Adiministration 



Michael S. Bott 
Geography 

Elizabeth R. Bowen 
Sociology 

Elizabeth A. Bowker 
Psychology 







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Seton Motley and Jennifer White 

share a private moment . . . with all of 

MWC! Surprise, guys. 



Scott B. Bradbury 
Psychology 

Dana M. Bradley 
Art History 



Tfioto by ■Milie 'Jl 'ood'u'urd 



Mary Washington 




74 • Seniors 



Mary Washington 



John T. enjoys a triumphant moment 

with Christy E^Ievsky on one arm 

and Kristen Adier on the other. 




I'.ail 1',. lii.islci 
l-.iiylish 

liiii M. Brick 
l-n-lish 



'I'hi't^i Ini Amu \UU 



Ani\ M. Bridges 
Psychology 

Miugarct A. Biitlycs 
\ Iistoiy 

Sally M. Brockscn 
Political Science 



Kimherh R. Brooke 
English 

Ingcr L. Brow n 
Historic Preserxation 

Kimherly A. Brown 
Psychology 



Shaaron E. Brown 
Biology 



Christine R. Bucher 
Chemistry 







• • '. - 
• • • 1 • 


.V. ' 




Tammy L. Buhite 
Mathematics 

Karin A. Bulova 
Economics 

Jill C. Bunch 
Mathematics 




Amy R. Burris 

Mathematics 

Susan D. Cabaniss 
English 

Jason A. Caddell 
English 



John Anstey and Andrew Salp, along with 

2000 others who made it out to see him 

speal^, listen attentively to President Bush 

campaigning his way through 

Fredericksburg. 



Alison D. Cannington 
Psychology 

James W. Cantrall 
hiternational Affairs 



'Pfwto bif Mike 'Woodwurd 



Mary WASfflNGTON 




76 • Seniors 




Mary Washington 



.Slis;iii M. C '.iiImmi 
I I is( UK- I'l csci \ iilion 

Jciiiii k'l I . ( ,111 ( ill 
SiikIki .An 



V 


m" 


^51 


9 


S 


Op 


Hlfi ^^wiRt 


v^^l 





y\re ikthany Zecher, Nikki 

Dunnivan, and vStacey Mclnereney in 

this position hecause they want to he, 

or hecause lOOth ni^ht has gotten the 

best of them? 




■Iluno bij MiKe 'H'ooilwarit 



I r.iL \ ,\ C'arlcr 
iiK'i iKil i( iii.il AITaiis 



I .aui ;i A. ( '.\\ alliiii 
l:JLisincss AdiiiinisUalion 

Keith K. (incclo 
hn<ilish 



Willuiin ("civlli. Ill 
Pnlilical SciL-iiLC 

kobcrt C. C'crulli) 
History 

M.mlia F. Chapman 
Chemistry 



Lisa D. Chinn 
Psychology 



Seniors • 77 



Peter G. Chirico 
Geography 

Selena S. Chon 
History 



Christine H. Cizek 
Psychology 

Hunter R. Clark 
Political Science 

David L. Clayton 

Economics 

English 



Karen J. Clendenin 
Psychology 

Jennifer D. Cochran 
Business Administration 

Amy K. Cole 
Historic Preservation 



Michelle M. Collette 
Historic Preservation 

Russell J. Collin 
Buisness Administration 




Brian Sullivan and Melanie Haynie 

show that it is possible to kiss and 

laugh at the same time. 



'Mota 1)1/ iMil^e i I 'oodWiird 



Mary WAsmNGTON 



78 • Seniors 



Mary Washington 




N;mcy I.. C 'oliiinliui 
I'.Lc UK Mines 



Pete Chirico lets loose, or so it 
seems, at the Brass Rail. 



'Pfioto bii :ltfiii'i ii-u'imjf 



Sharon H. Conuay 
Enylisli 

Saiali C. C'ookc 
Hnglish 

I. \ ilia A. C"()rdcs 

History 

Classics 



Stcplicii I'. C'()\ crt 

SpaniNh 

Gcojjiapiiy 

Sarah H. Cox 
Hnglish 

A I an da M. Crawford 
Geography 



Jane M. Crisler 
Flishuic Preservation 

Tisha L. Custis 
Psychology 

Emily M. Cyr 
English 



Seniors • 79 



Cathleen L. D'Araujo 
Political Science 

Anthony G. Dallman 
Physics 



Diane R. Dansby 
Psychology 

Eric M. Dawson 
Philosophy 

Jerri S. DeHart 
Sociology 



Michelle Deline 
English 

Jon-Eric Dentz 
Political Science 

Amy E. Poe Derrickson 
Biology 




Paul Sargent roots through cheese at a 

local grocery store. What does this 

say about Paul's social life? 



Christopher R. Derrickson 
Biology 

Allyson M. Dieck 
Special 



Tlwto by 'Mike l-l'oodiiiard' 



Mary Washington 




80 • Seniors 



Mary Washington 



Melissa (Jrady explains the art 

and form of drinking to Rob 

Tewels. 




I.i^;i K. Diggs 
•AincrKiiii Suidics 

l^niiili-i I .. I )iii,iin() 
Music 



1 1 ' 1 1 > A - I ) 1 1 1 1 n a I- 
SiikIk. All 

linan M.I ^onagliy 
I'liliiical Science 

Rebecca I .. I )()is< 111 
I lislury 



Ji)hn J. 1 )i)\ le 
Spanish 

Anne P. Dressler 
HcdiKimics 

\\ iliiani R. Diiscoll 
Economics 



Jo Beth Di-> er 
Business Administration 



Seniors • 8J 



Amy K. Duchemin 
French 



Ann Lee Dulevitz 
Historic Preservation 

Kelly S. Duncan 
Psychology 

Mary T. Duncan 
Classics 



Kristina M. Dunn 
History 

Cindy A. Dunnavant 
Economics 

Necole A. Dunnivan 
Economics 




Debbie Newell and Nikki Dunnivan 
pose for a a shot at 100th night. 



Timothy K. Dwyer 
English 

Cristy D. Eglevsky 
Business Administration 



Tfwto bij ■MHq: •tl'ooihi'ard ' 



Mary Washington 



82 • Seniors 



Kani I . l-,|lis 
Husincss AdiiiiiiiNir.iiKin 

;ni I,. l:l)swi)illi 
'sN'chology 




Ellen M. Fink 
Biology 



Seniors • 83 



Emily L. Firkin 
Business Administration 



WaiTen R. Fischi 
Economics 



Jonathan K. Fish 
International Affairs 

John B. Fisher 
History 



Julia E. Fisher 
Business Administration 

Lorilyn M. Fitzgerald 
Psychology 

Blythe A. Fitzharris 

Psychology 




Erin Stephens, standing with 

Shannon Beasley and Angie 

Parker, shows off her 100th night 

trophy ... the blue beast. 



Chriselda N. Fleming 
Psychology 

Michael P. Flynn 
Political Science 



Tfioto 5y 'Milie ■TVoodu'iinf 



Mary Washington 



84 • Settlors 




Mary Washington 



Kristen Adier, Julie Barron, Leigh 

Allcut, and Christy Eglevsky crowd 

together during 1 00th night. 




Eugenia S. Freed 
Enylisli 

Carl B. Frye, Jr. 

I-5 LI SI I less Xilininislralion 



■riuHi> t'l/MitYlWhhlu'iirit 



C'hrisline lullm 
Fs\eh()l()g;)' 

Cassia K. Funk 
Business Administration 

Fli/abelh A. F'usel< 
Biology' 



Neil J. Gallagher. Jr. 
Eeonomics 

Christie L. Gardner 
Inlernatidnal Atlairs 

lohn R. Garman 
Physics 




Heather W. Gebbia 
History 



Seniors • 8^ 



James E. Gibson 
Business Administration 



K. Hope Glass 
English 

Kimberley D. Glenn 
Philosophy 




Christopher Glover 
Historic Preservation 

Man-isa L. Goldsmith 
Political Science 

Charlene E. Gomes 
English 



Kim Glenn reacts to the fact that 
graduation is 193 days away. 



Laura S. Graham 
History 

Christopher N. Granger 
History 



Tfwto bif Anne Stitt 



Mary Washington 



86 • Seniors 



Mary Washington 




Julia H. Grassier 
Hi(.)k)gy 

Jennifer S. Greene 
tinylish 



Amy Mumpower explains the 
mysteries of life to Mike Haller. 



TlwtL' bijMikc-\\\\',t-u'ard 



Harriet W. Greenlee 
Religion 

Mary V. Greyer 
Business Adniinislralion 

Allison K. Griffin 
Biology 



Michael S. Gueiriero 
History 

Alan F. Hall 
English 

Whitney E. Hall 
Historic Preservation 



Now wait a minute! 



Michael A. Haller 
Business Administration 



Seniors • 87 



For St. Patricks Day celebrators, 
inebriation has already set in.. 



Sarah R. Hartman 
Environmental Earth 
Science 
Religion 



Tracey D. Hartnett 
English 

William E. Harvie, Jr. 
Political Science 

Andrea D. Hatch 
History 



Lisa M. Hatchett 
Business Administration 

Jennifer L. Hawkins 
Political Science 

Melanie L. Haynie 
Mathematics 



Suzanne M. Head 
Psychology 

Tara K. Heaney 
American Studies 

Kelley T. Helmstutler 
Art History 



Mary Washington 




88 • Seniors 



Student Association President Devon Williams 

and Legislatinve Action Comniitee Chairperson 

Heathei- Jacobs talk with oilici' licdcncksbuiL: 

residents after a ('it\ Council meetina 



■riioto bij ■Miljc '\\'ooduiaT((\ 




Hii/al-)ciii C. Hensley 
Biology 

Caiolyn C. Hcrndon 
Geography 

Valeric L. Hibtiard 
Computer Science 

Mar\ A. Highl 
Business Administration 



James P. Hilbcrt 
History 

Jennifer M. Hileman 

American Studies 

Tracy Y. Hilts 
Business Administration 



Robert M. Himmel 
F-'hilosophy 

Kristin B.Hodes 

Philosophy 

Classics 

Sandra Hoehne 
Classics/Italian 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 89 



Allison Hight and Adam Owings 
share a hug at 100th Night. 

iTIioto by 'Mike 'Woodzvardl 



Wendy A. Hoffman 
Compter Science 



Julie A. Holland 
Studio Art 

Rachel A. Holland 
Economics 

Jacqueline S. Horsley 
English 



Krista M. Houser 
Mathematics 

Lisa K. Howard 
Anthropology 

Ami A. Hunt 
Chemistry 



Patrick L. Hurlbert 
Business Administration 

Regina M. Hutchinson 
English 

Talia J. Inbar 
Spanish 



Mary Washington 




90 • Seniors 



Si^^iiis iiniiDuiKctI one nl iho lasi schhm tlass parlies 

and the new Iniir hccr iiia\iinuiii. Scvcrai ■^lulKlcllts 

tool the new pohe\ dainpeied the evenings atlendanee. 



3Y.0B. 

-AV-TEEN/AnE 
BEV. 

FfeCfy/lPEC 



t^ ~ No Glass 




!/'/n>fi) /)!/ :'\/iXy '/I i>i>i/zi'iirr/' 



C'hi IS l\. laci ills 
I l:sl(>iv 



Amy C. Jarvis 

English 

Bernard J. Johnson 
Business Administration 

Elizabeth B. Johnson 
Enslish 



Kimberl_\' J. Johnson 
Political Science 

Laura E. Johnson 
Biology 

Chemistry 

Paula L. Johnson 
Business Administration 



Sherricc L. Johnson 
Business Administration 

Heather L. Johnston 
Chemistry 

Christina L. Jones 
Dance 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 91 



Keith Park and Wan'en Fischi put a good 
spell on the photographer at Holloweens. 



\¥iwto by 'Mkje 'Woodward \ 



Joyce A. Jones 
Biology 



Clifford A. Jordan 
Geography 

Christina L. Joubran 
English 

April M. Jurgins 
Political Science 



Laura J. Karhan 
History 

Laura A. Kasley 
Environmental Earth 
Science 

Katherine L. Keeling 
Biology 



Royce B. Kemp 
Environmental Earth 
Science 
Geography 

Jennifer L. Keller 
Psychology 

Robert H. Kelly 
Business Administration 



Mary WASfflNGTON 



■ 


■ 




■ 


^H 


^^H 


^^^ ^3r-,.*«|/Y'^«^^K 


^^^H 


H 


^pi 


\^ . ^/^Bk*^ '1 "^j| 


^H 


H 


1^ 


'>^ ' li 


^B 


^^n 


t* 




■ 


1 


\ 




19 




92 • Seniors 




Clair iVIcNiil!\. Lciiih Allciii. and Monte Montjiomcry 
lake ad\anlai;c ul one ul llic last |)li()l() oiioruinilics. 



\'JiuHc> bij Mil^c ■HWhiu'iini 



Komaync M. Kclcha 
l*sych(3logy 

Laura A. King 
Psychology 

Jennifer L. Kisllcr 
Biology 

Janice L. Kneessi 
Reiiiiion 



Krisla J. Korel/ski 
I n le rn al i on a I A (Tai rs 

Lesley E. Krush 
Mathematics 

Timothy F. Landis 
.American Studies 



Gui-hera L. Lang 

Chemistry 

Math 

Bradford G. Lanspery 
Political Science 

E\ans A. Laroche. Ill 
Enalish 



Mary Wasbowgton 



Seniors • 93 



Best friends Kelly Helmstutler, 

Deveon Williams and Lori Rose 

celebrate their friendship and 

their last days as Seniors 

at 193rd Night. 



Tfwto bij •MilyC 'Woodijigrd 



Amy K. Larsen 
English 

Kirsten D. Larson 
Psychology 

Sara E. Larson 
Psychology 



Teresa L. Lecky 
Mathematics 

Peter B. Lee 

Business Administration 

Soo M. Lee 
International Affairs 
Business Administration 



Jennifer R. Lentz 
Economics 



Joshua E. Lontz 
Geography 

Robert C. Lunger 
Drama 



Mary WASfflNGTON 




94 • Seniors 




TiniDiliy I i. Madcicn 
Hislory 

Kimbcrly G. Madison 

Malhcmalics 

C'()iii|iuicr' Science 



Jason R. Magi 
Business Adminislralion 

I:li/ahelli A. Magnus 

Iinv ironmenlal 

Harth Science 

Brendan M. Mahoney 
Music 



Robert W. Major. II 
Geography 

Da\id M. Maloney 
Business .Adnnnisiralion 

Meghan E. Maloney 
Historic Preservation 



Jennifer H. Males 
Physics 

Denise D. Mangini 
Spanish 

Janice L. Marker 
Mathematics 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 95 



Janet E. Marshall 
English 

Lovelene M. Martin 

Economics 

Business Administration 



Lindsay A. Mast 
Computer Science 

Sandra L. McCaffity 
Classics 

Martin C. McConagha 

Economics 

Business Administration 



Lance C. McDonald 
Geography 

John R. McDonald, Jr. 

Religion 

Psychology 

Maura A. McGee 
International Affairs 



Stacy L. Mclnerney 
Psychology 

Shane K. Mclntyre 
Computer Science 



Jessamy M. McKay 
Psychology 



Mary Washington 




96 • Seniors 




StMiioi' Mai! Mcjia spends some 
lime in ihc (ioolnek pool. 



Tlwlo bif >\n Spcijcr 



Shannon K. McKcnna 
Historic Preservation 

Martha A. McMullen 
English 

Virginia C. McNully 
Psychology 



Matthew E. Mejia 
Geography 

Angela M. Melia 
Biology 

Melissa L. Miles 
Biology 



Karen B. Mtllcr 
American Studies 

Karen E. Miller 
English 

Christine D. Milner 
Mathematics 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 97 



Monte P. Montgomery, Jr. 
History 



Kimberley E. Moore 
Biology 



Jennifer C. Moravek 
History 

Kirsti E. Morin 
History 

Mary E. Motley 
Anthropology 



Eileen M. Mueller 
Geography 

Kathleen M. Mulvaney 
Historic Preservation 

Amy R. Mumpower 
Economics 



Mary WASfflNGTON 




98 • Seniors 




/Mlisdii L. Muidock 
1 llsloiy 

I V'l ix'iicc .1 . M iirpliy 
business Aciiiiinislral ion 



KiNsial M. Myers 
CompiilLT Science 



|-5iiibaia CJ. Nelson 
Iiiiijlish 

Cheryl M. Nelson 
Bnylish 

Grela M. Nelson 
Biology 



Laura L. Newberry 
Anlliropology 

C. Diane Neweonib 

Hnglish 

Business Adminislralion 

Deborah M. Newell 

Amei'ican Studies 



Amy B. New land 
Business A d m i n i s i i\i t i o n 

Mark A. Newman 

F'oliiica] Science 

Michael J. Newman 
Political Science 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 99 



Rebecca T. Nichols 

French 

Enghsh 

Ronald J. Noonan 
International Affairs 



Sheni L. O" Bryan 
Chemistry 

Bernard J. O'Donnell, Jr. 
English 

Ngozi M. A. Obi 
Biology 



Sara E. Ohlidal 
Geography 

Katherine M. Opiela 
Political Science 

Virginia A. Orme 
Psychology 



Jay R. Ostrander 
Business Administration 

Nancy E. Overbey 
Psychology 

Theresa R. Overstreet 
Biology 



Mary Washington 




100 • Seniors 




The African Dance Troupe 
perlormcd m Dodd AudiU)riuin. 



'Photo bii'fhonuL' fiirf.: 



Adam S. Owings 
Hnglish 

Keilh B. Park 
Business Administration 

Lori A. I-'ariish 
Psychology 



Jane C. Partridge 
Sociology 

Maritcs D. Pasco 
liilcniational Affairs 

Rcbckah K. PaUiirana 
1 rcnch 



Mariana C. Patton 
English 

Roberta M. Pa>ne 
Geography 

Kimberly T. Pearson 
Classics 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 101 



Tern Keim and John Richmond discuss 
the meaning of Ufc on Marye's Heights. 



Rebecca L. Perry 
English 



Tamara L. Pfile 
Psychology 

Barbara J. Pike 

French 

Geogi^aphy 

Andrea L. Pleszkoch 
EngUsh 



Mehssa A. Pollard 
Business Administration 

Caroline T. Porter 
English 

Christopher S. Powell 
Physics 



James C. Powell 
Geography 

Kimberly T. Price 
Business Administration 

Cynthia L. Pritchett 
History 



Mary Washington 




702 • Seniors 



Sliidents throw snow bails, and each other 

as Fredericksburg gets hit with eiglit inches 

of snow the weeiv alter spring break. 




'I'fuHo bij 'J\lm Slof;cr 



Melissa A. PuUin 
Psychology 



Joliii Cj. Putciio 
Psychology 

Robert W. Pulerio 
Political Science 

John .1. Radshau. Ill 
International .Aliaiis 



Nicole A. Rager 
Historic Prcser\ation 

Leslie A. Rakes 
Psychology 

Wendy L. Ralph 
American Studies 



Alisa D. Ramirez 
Geography 

Andrew R. Ramsey 
International Affairs 

Janice E. Randovv 
Geography 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 103 



Deena L. Rannazzisi 
American Studies 

Marianne Redmond 
Psychology 



Tamalyn R. Reed 
Economics 

Ayvonne V. Reese 
Spanish 

Timothy A. Rice 
Geography 



Shannon M. Richard 
Chemistry 

John C. Richmond 
PoHtical Science 
Geography 

Jennifer A. Riordan 

Mathematics 

Physics 



Elizabeth K. Rickmon 
Political Science 

Todd M. Ritter 
Political Science 

Lisa C. Roark 
Political Science 



Mary Washington 



Civil War re-enactors march 

in downtown 

Fredericksburg. 




104 • Seniors 




Cliciyl I koluTts 
I lisiory 



1 licrcsa M. Kohci'ls 
Business /\Lliiiinisiiati()ii 

Kara D. F^ockwcll 
History 

Lori A. Rose 
Art History 



ID 


u 


J 


ircd A. Rosenquisl 

En\ironmcntal 

Earth Science 


m 


1 




C\nthis Rush 
History 

Ai\ son J. Saimeca 
PoUlical Science 


; ;'.• 


't 




Paul D. Sargent 
History 






Lisa M. Schaub 
Business Administration 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 105 



Monica L. Schmalhofer 
Geography 



Robert A. Schmitt 
Business Administration 

Christina M. Schrag 
History 

Susan K. Schurman 
International Affairs 
Spanish 



KelHe J. Scott 
History 

Kimberly A. Seate 
Biology 

J. Kent Seeker 
Business Administration 



Jennifer N. Self 
Business Administration 

Tracy L. Sexton 
International Affairs 

Susan M. Shackelford 
Business Administration 



Mary Washington 




106 • Seniors 



Ihe construction ot the newest 
dorm next to Alvey forced 
a detour off campus walk. 




.leiinikT I'. Slicllicld 
/\i I I I IX lory 

I)c)iio|;is A. ShcMon 
Ainci icaii Sliu lies 



Kristin Fv. Shoaf 
Spanish 

Su/.anne E. Sierra 
American SlLidies 

Robert M. Sihier, .Jr. 
English 



A/niv T. Singh 
Art History 

TilTani D. Sisk 
Economics 

Robert A. Skinner 
Business Administration 



Richard R. Slagle 
Business Administration 

Charles T. Smith, III 
Business Administration 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 107 



Jody M. Smith 
History 



Karen L. Smith 
Environmental Earth 
Science 

Shannon L. Smith 
Psychology 

Tara R. Smith 
Enalish 



Arthur L. Speyer, III 
Political Science 

Sarah S. Stack 
History 

Timothy J. Staehling, Jr. 
Geography 



Tari K. Stage 

Drama 

Religion 

Kate E. Stainer 
International Affairs 

Lori A. Stephens 
American Studies 



Mary Washington 




108 • Seniors 



Ann carter Lee Hall proudly 

displays several nations flags as a 

symbol of MWCs goal of diversity.] 




Hrin (). Slovens 
Hnylisli 

L.aLii'cii Fi. Slrawbridgc 
Sociology 



Stasia /\. Slicil 
History 

Jenifer L. Sludt 
Hislory 

Jean B. Sudlow 
American Studies 



Brian M. Sullivan 
Psychology 

Catherine L. Swain 
Biology 

Carol A. Swindell 
History 



Niloufar Tavassoli 
Mathematics 

Dodd H. Terry 
History 



Mary Washington 



Seniors • 109 



Robert B. Tewels, Jr. 
American Studies 



Jennifer M. Thomas 
Chemistry 

Michelle L. Thomas 
Political Science 

Laura K. Thomson 
Anthropology 



Julia L. Tillar 
Biology 

Bridgette J. Timko 
Business Administration 

Courtney E. Tolman 
English 



Opal M. Tomalewski 
Biology 

Jeffrey D. Torrence 
Drama 

Richard E. Treger, II 
Business Administration 



Mary Washington 




110 • Seniors 



Some students gather on 
campus walk on a nice fall day. 




IJk'ii \1 . I riiskowski 

Geoyiapliy 

Environmental 

Earth Science 

Brcnda C". 'I\icker 
Music 



Uerek K. Tucker 
Biology 

.Iciiniri.r P. Turney 
I'l ilnical Science 

.laincs C". I 'ndeiw ood 

J-Jusiucss ,\dmi nisli ;il k in 



Marian M. Uz/alino 
International Affairs 

Lisa .\. \ an CJuiider 
Biology 

Denise L. Vernon 

English 

Art History 



Rcnce L. Vitale 
Business Administration 

Patricia L. W ashington 
Enclish 



Mary Washington 



Se f liars • 111 



Alyssa R. Watkins 
Biology 



Elizabeth N. Watson 
Dance 

Richard P. Watson 
French 

Colette Y. Webb 
Business Administration 



Amy R. Weddle 
Psychology 

Meredith M. Wehmann 
Psychology 

Michael W. Weil 
Geography 



Tama N. Welch 
Psychology 

Lindsey C. Weller 
Biology 

Jennifer White 
Business Administration 



Mary Washington 




112 • Seniors 



The Sunshine Laundry, accross 

Sunken Road, was purchased for 

demoHtion and erection of a 

new pari^ing h)t. 




T;iiinn\ .1, W'liite 
l',l.i|..;'y 

1 Ic.iIIk-i a. WicksliOMi 
AiiK'i K an Si I idles 



\' Ink \\ like 
I -.n -11x11 

Angela M. Willi.iins 
I Jaiicc 

Da\ 1.1 \l. W illiaiiis 
Business Atlii II 111 si I ai II 111 



I)e\nn ,\. Will lams 
Piililieal Scienec 

.lenniler L. \\ i lliams 
Inlernalional Affairs 

Jennifer I .. Williams 
PsN eholog)^ 



Jdhn I. Will lams. Jr. 
BLisiness Atlminisdation 

Meyan I.. Williams 
Business A dm mi miration 



Mary Washington 



Seniors 'US 



Stephen M. Williams 
Geography 




'AH work and no play 



Angela Y. Wilhs 
Business Administration 

Matthew S. Wilson 
Computer Science 
Math 

Rodney D. Wilson 
Historic Preservation 



Eric M. Winter 

History 

Amy D. Wisnosky 
Sociology 

Kirstin L. Wolverton 
International Affairs 
German 



Kirsti Morin slaves away her last 

year at MWC. Student teaching 

was very difficult but also very 

enjoyable for this aspiring young 

teacher. 



Jennifer L. Woodard 
Biology 

Michelle A. Woodward 
Business Administration 




Tfioto bij 'Kim Stot^r 



Mary WAsmNGTON 



1 14 • Seniors 



Mary Washington 



Stacey Mclnerney and Debbie 
Newell share a drink, a photo 
opportunity, and lOOth night. 




l-^cl")L'cc;i S. WooclwDilli 
Sociology 

Amy I,. Wray 
I lisioiic Picsci\'alii)n 



'I'hoto btj 'Kim Slokf 



I fralliL-i L. Yacck 
Scicioloyy 

Ryan A. Younsj 
Business Adminislialion 

Tonya J. Youny 
Gciinan 



Trac\ J. Young 

Business .Xtimini strati on 

Ps_\ clioloy\ 

Belhan\ Zecher 
History 

Jennifer L. Zierden 

PsN'ehoiogy 



:^eniors • 115 



CLUBS 




Anthropology 
Club 




The Anthropology Club was an organization that aimed at expanding the learning 
experience beyond the classroom and to spread an interest in anthropological activities. Our 
activities included field trips to museums to view exhibits of anthropological interest, the 
acquisition of guest speakers in this field who shared with us their work and experiences, trips 
to ethnic restaurants, and annual anthropological theme parties. Future plans included working 
in Old Town Fredericksburg at various archaeological sites and graduate panels for students to 
talk with people who have graduated with Anthropology degrees. The majority of the members 
were Anthropology majors, but EVERYONE with even a slight interest in anthropology was 
more than welcome to join. 

Written by Kristi Noel 

118" Clubs 



Asian Student 



by Ira Wisnumurti 



Association 



A club created a lew years a^o, ihe .Asian Siuelciii .Assoc i.iiion dcAotcd iiscll lo 
introducing Mar\- Washington ("ollege students to various aspects ol /\sia as a continent and 
a conglomerate of cultures, ways ol' lile, ideologies, and socioeconomic backgrounds. As the 
number of its members (Asians as well as non-Asians) gradualh' expanded, ihc ( lub 
continued its pursuit in uniting people from various ethnic backgrounds with the s(jle 
interest of broadening people's views and knowledge about Asia, covering the extensive 
geographical area, covering the Far East (Japan, Korea, C'hina, Vietnam, etc.). South .Asia 
(India, Pakistan, etc.) as well as Middle Eastern countries, fhe club engaged itself in 
activities of all sorts. Two years ago, the club arranged a trip to Washington, D.C. to see a 
pla\': "Shogun." Various guest speakers sponsored b\' the club have come to the college. 
For example, last year, a diplomat from the Indonesian Embassx' in Washington, D.C;. came 
to speak about various aspects of Indonesia and its bilateral relations with the United Stales 
and early in the Fall semester this year, Professor Kawaguchi from the A Ichi Prefecture 
University in Nagoya, Japan, came to speak about a possible student exchange program. 
The club also organized various picnics and dinners (such as a (^linese buffet and an Indian 
dinner in Richmond), as well as cultural events such as a trip to the Smithsonian to see a 
Japanese Art exhibit and a Korean Dance and Music Recital, fhe club c'\ en organized ski 
trips, such as a trip to North Carolina, two years ago. Upcoming events for the Fall Semester 
include the possibility of forming a self-defense class open for all interested students and 
more active involvement in community sei"vices. The club is slowly expanding and intends 
to organize more activities for the coming year. Everyone's welcome to join! 




iMWC 



Clubs -119 



Clubs 



Aubade 

By Mike Woodward & Liz Hockmuth 



Liz Hockmuth, Queen of the Aubade, led the Mary Washington Review ot Arts and Literature for 
her third year. Leading a band of renegade caffeine loving elitist critical dilettante, Liz plans to 
continue her reign next year and is hoping to avoid decapitation at the end of her reign. Above 
all else, the Aubade prides itself on its flyers and its sense of humor. 




J 20 • Clubs 



B attlef ield 



h\ Mike Woodward 



'V\]c I^.alllcricld isdfdicalcd 
to capUliiilL' llic c\ ciils of 
the \L'ai. Iliis Near I'aiil 
Saiijciu IcL'ls he can dcfi- 
niicl\' !jcl the book out on 
time. NOT. The Ballle- 
lield edilois aie also iiieill- 
heroldie l^joaid oll^ihhea- 
lioiis. and hence ha\ e a say 
in all [Xiblicalions on cam- 
pus. 



.Adam I'lkc. i-'aul .Sariicnt 
and Anno SliU argue over 
co\ er art tor the '93 book. 
Paul won. 




C/uhs '121 



Clubs 



Bio Club 



By 

Michelle Hollett 



The Biology Club was an organization open to both majors and non-majors, 
for the purpose of promoting an interest in biology. The members were active 
fund-raisers. This year's projects included sponsoring a Saturday car wash, 
making and selling refrigerator magnets, and selling pumpkins for Halloween. The 
club planned to use the money it raised to take trips to places of interest to its 
members such as the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, the National Zoo in 
D.C., and the Aquarium in Baltimore. The club also showed biology-related films, 
had an annual picnic, and hoped to sponsor guest speakers. 




122 • Clubs 



BSA 

CKwrrM 




The purpose of the Black 
Student Association is to 
serve as a support mecha- 
nism. While its primary goal 
is the unilicalion of the Black 
siudent population, the asso- 
ciation also serves as an in- 
lormation resource center 
which promotes and 
enhances Black cul- 
ture, while facilitating 
communication and 
understanding within 
the membership con- 
cerning Black issues. 
This year, the BSA 
sponsored the Black 
Alumni Reception, the 
annual Semi-formal 
dance, events during 
Black History month, 
served as a co-sponsor 
with other organiza- 
tions for various 
events, and assisted 
the Admissions office 
concerning the reten- 
tion and recruitment 
of Black students. 

Bv Tomaudrie 

udd 



Clubs • 723 



Cllbs 



Bullet 

The Mary Washington Bullet is the college's weekly student newspaper. With a staff of 
approximately 40 writers, editors, photoghaphers as well as advertising managers and 
deigners, the Bullet covered MWC news, features, sports and entertainment. This year, we 
also covered community events which affected Mary Washington Students as well as show 
the Bullet to Fredericksburg 



residents by distributing it at the 
Rappahanock Regional Library, 
Giant and Food Lion. 

This year, the Bullet added 
"Award Winning" to our mast- 
head because we were 
recognized as a Gold Medalist in 
the Columbia Scholastic Press 
Association for being in the top 
fifteenth of student newspapers 
nationwide. 

The seniors, juniors, sopho- 
mores, and freshmen averaged 
80 hours each week writing 
stories, making phone calls and 
doing lay-out. Thanks to all 
these people for helping to get 
the news to the Mary 
Washington community every 
week. 



Sunday Night at the 
Bullet Office was a mad 
dash rush to make the 
deadline, and have a 
little fun to boot. 




J24 • Clubs 



The Campus Christian Community was a Christian interdenominational 
campus community vvliich supporled and challenged individuals as they 
sought to grow in their relationship wilh God. Programs locused on lellowship 
with God, spiritual nurture, lellowship with friends, Bible study, and services. 
Weekly programs included Table Talk, Faithlul Friends: a community Bible 
study. Fireside Chat and Frivolous Friday. Table Talk included dinner and a 
program on issues concerning life as a student. Faithful Friends was a chance 
to be a part of an honest discussion about God, faith and life, while Fireside 
Chat was a time to listen, share with other students, and discuss topics ranging 
from campus concern to social, political or religious issues. Frivolous Friday 
was a time to get together with friends to relax, have a mocktail, or watch a 
movie. The Campus Christian (x)mmunity was an open community welcoming 



all religious backgrounds 



rr I Courtnev Ouillen 




iNWC 



Clubs • 125 



Clubs 



Citizens of 



By 
Carlos Louis Gomez 



the World 

The Citizens ot the World Club at Mary Washington was an organization that promoted an 
awareness and appreciation of cultural diversity. Our activities were directed towards the education 
and exposure ot the college community to new and enriching experiences. We assisted international 
students and sought to provide an atmosphere where their thoughts and concerns could be expressed. 
Our members came from all over the world. They included students, faculty, and community 
members. 

Anyone who was interested in planning, organizing, decorating, fundraising, or socializing 
was welcome to join and participate in the Citizens of the World Club. We met every other Wednesday 
in Lee Hall to plan activities or discuss topics of interest. Dues of five dollars were collected from our 
new members and went towards our activities. 

The best way to experience a new culture is through its music, food, language, history and 
art. We were an organization which explored these possibilities. Activities included participating in 
the Multicultural Fair, trips to Washington for food and entertainment, designing and selling T-shirts, 
and celebrating the holiday season and the graduation of seniors. 




126 • Clubs 




C.O.A.R. 



By 



Diane Ne\vcomb 



COAR's mission states that "COAR is a diverse group of students serving the community's needs 
through an active exchange of service and learning, while continually striving to find solutions to 
problems that challenge the community." To carry out this mission. COAR worked with approx- 
imately 50 agencies in the Fredricksburg area to match college \olunteers with opportunities in the 
community. In addition to these positions, a COAR Council consisted of 20 student who ran their 
own programs and staffed the office during the week. COAR programs included Elderly. Mentally/ 
Physically Challenged. Kid's Recreation. Adult Literacy. English as a second Language. Fredricksburg 
Community Youth Theater Group, and REACH tutoring. 

Founded in 1990. COAR has involved 15% of the student population each year, and 
accumulated approximately 1 3.000 volunteer hours over the past two years. As COAR continues to 
grow, we hope to make a difference in the Fredericksburg community and the world around us. 



iNIWC 



CI lib s '127 



Clubs 



CSA 



By 

Krista Houser 



The Catholic Student Association enabled students to take one step closer to God. Through many 
activities we continued on our journey through Christ growing in love with every step. 

Through the CSA students could discover what Catholicism is all about. Retreats, Bible study. 
Fellowship and mass enabled us to learn how to see the true meaning of Christianity. 

Volunteer opportunities were abundant. Weekly visits to the Hope House and nursing homes 
allowed students to reach out to the community. Different service projects such as CROP walk. 
Harvest of Hope, Habitat for Humanity, Catholic Worker House, Experience in Mexico, and Haiti 
Outreach taught us to reach out to other communities and go where we were needed. Pax Christi 
organized the students for many of these trips. 

The CSA was a place were students could put into action what they believed. Through our 
organization, students could live the gospel instead of just reading it. 




128 • Clubs 




n 

o 





CD 
CD 



Executive 



iNIWC 



Chihs •129 



Clubs 



Fencing Club 

We were the Mary Washington College Fencing Club. Our club was affiliated with the United 
States Fencing Association (USFA), and was part of the Virginia division. Our purpose was to teach 
and promote the sport of fencing. This year the USFA granted us two tournaments. The first, a 
director's clinic and novice 



tournament, took place 
over the weekend of 
October 17. The second, a 
divisional open, was 
scheduled for the weekend 
of January 16. We met 
every Thursday and 
Sunday nights at 7 p.m. in 
the Underground. 

By 

Emily Weed 





^"1 




130 • Clubs 




The German Club was busy during the 1992-93 academic year involving its members in various 
"German" activities. We started the year off with a cookout featuring German Bratwurst and Potato 
Salad. We also planned day trips to Washington for German American Day and to Richmond for 
Oktoberfest. Other activities planned throughout the year included a Spring-time Easter egg coloring 
fest. pretzle baking tests, and two fundraisers where the club sold pretzles and St. Nikolaus stockings 
before Christmas break. "Stammtisch," the German conversation hour was held every Thursday 
evening in the German House; German movies with English subtitles often followed "Stammtisch". 
The club also invited children from the community to trick-or-treat at the German house and 
sponsored a Thanksgiving dinner for the German professors. The club was not only open to students 
taking German courses at the college, but to anyone interested in the German language, history and 



culture. 



By 

Tonya Young 




Club 



iMWC 



Clulrs • 131 



Clubs 



GLBSA 



By 

Jay Vanover 



The Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Student Association was dedicated to providing an open and 
positive atmosphere for gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and their heterosexual supporters. The group also 
worked towards educating the college community and general public about homosexuality and 
bisexuality, and the situation of homosexuals and bisexuals. The GLBSA sponsored bisexual, gay and 
lesbian awareness days (B-GLAD), published the Homophobia Report, and co-sponsored many 
events on and off campus. 
They also held weekly meet- 
ings and offered a confiden- 
tial support group for people 
questioning their sexuality. 
GLBSA membership was 
open to anyone, regardless of 
their sexual orientation, who 
supported gay, lesbian, and 
bisexual rights and the equal- 
ity of all people. 




132 • Clubs 




ti^^^tr^V^ 



HELLO 

GOODBYE 

PEACE 



niiw 



. i 



Hillel was an organization for Jewish students to meet other Jewish 
students and for non-Jews who were interested in learning about the 
Jewish rehgion and culture. Hillel had social events such as conoeing 
trips and dances with Hillel chapters from other uni\'ersities. as well as 
services and religious programs. 



By 

Jennifer Brow n 



Clubs • 133 



Hillel 



Cffibs 



By 

Verna Baragiola 



Hispanic 

Student 

Association 

The main purpose of the Hispanic Student Association was to provide support for Hispanics and 
instill a sense of community for Hispanics attending MWC. The club also aimed to increase pride and 
culture awareness among Hispanics by studying the diverse culture of other members. 

The most important event was the celebration of Hispanic week in the beginning of October. 
Some activities included speakers, entertainers, a picnic, and a dance where some of the most popular 
Spanish dances were taught to the public. 

The HS A participated in the annual Multicultural Fair by providing a booth with Hispanic crafts 
and pinatas for the kids. Some members of the club attended a conference in the spring. The HSA 
cosponsored many activities with other clubs and Multicultural Center. Of course the HSA also had 
many parties where Hispanic music was heard and traditional foods were eaten. 




134 • Clubs 




gr^v" :■-- 



'/I m 





The Historic Preservation Club siroxe to 
promote awareness and interest in historic- 
preservation. The club sponsored many ac- 
tivities throughout the year, the most popu- 
lar of which was the Ghostwalk. our Hal- 
loween tour of Fredericksburg's haunted 
sights. Our members participated in trips to 
historic sights, attended cultural events and 
speeches, and xolunteered with local preser- 
\ation organizations. Through these efforts, 
we hoped to spark a life long interest in the 
preser\ation of our cultural heritage, an is- 
sue of importance to us all. 

B\- Whitnex- Hall 



T^ ^.Club 

Preservation 



|M\VC 



C/uhs • 135 



Clubs 



Honor 
Council 



By John Anstey 

The Honor Council was a judicial body de- 
signed to try specific cases brought to it re- 
garding possible violations of the Honor Code. 
These violations of the Honor Code included 
lying, cheating, and stealing in all of their 
various forms. In addition to presiding over Honor trials, the Council also sponsored an annual 
awareness week to educate students about the Honor System and its organization. 

The Honor Council consisted of a president and sixteen other members, four of whom were 
elected from each class. For the 1992-93 academic year, the members of the Honor Council were 
seniors Michelle Byrum, Keith Can-oil, Stephen Covert and Brian Sullivan; juniors Dave Austin, 
Matt Ernst, Mike Powell and Tara Squires; sophomores Sooki Danosky, Courtney Jones, Aaron 
Straight and Kim Switzer; and freshmen Keia Brown, Brian Hollingsworth, Aaron Smith, and 
Courtney . 




1 36 • Clubs 



Intervarsity 




The Intervarsity Christian Fellowship was an organization of believers who sought to learn 
more about the Lord Jesus Christ. The goals of Intervarsity were to strengthen those who were already 
Christians in their walk vv'ith Jesus and to help those who had the desire to know more about him. 

We preserve those goals through fellowship meetings on Friday nights, small group Bible 
studies and prayer meetings. For large groups we had speakers from different churches and ministries 
come to share on specific topics of interest. Our small groups helped us to dig deeper into God"s word 
and to learn more about God himself and how lo live ihe Christian life. Also our \\eekl_\ prayer 
meetings were for the puipose of praying for our world, our campus and our individual li\es. 

We welcomed anyone who had an interest in being a part of out fellowship as we continued to 
proclaim that Jesus Christ is Lord! 



i.\n\'c 



Clubs • 137 



Cffibs 



By Jennifer Malos 



Jolly Co. 

Jolly Co. is an alcohol alternatives club which promoted playing games without the use of or need for 
alcohol. We played historical strategy games, such as Axis and Allies, Diplomacy, Supremacy, and 
Stratego; and we played role-playing games such as Dungeons and Dragons, Marvel Superheroes, 
Battletech, Rifts, Cthulu, andTorg. which allow you to become another person or thing for the duration 
of the game in order to solve a mystery and complete a quest. Every year we sponsor a trip to the 
Maryland Renaissance Festival so anyone interested can experience the medieval times and a little 
live-action role-playing while they are having fun eating, drinking, shopping, and watching the shows. 
Jolly Co. also helped the French House with its annual fundraiser, Monte Carlo Night, by providing 
training for the dealers and extra dealers from the club. In keeping with our love for games, we 
sponsored an Axis and Allies tournament for the whole campus to participate in and win prizes. We 
even taught anyone willing to learn the games. This was especially true of Bridge Night. Once a week, 
interested members came together to learn how to play the card game. Bridge. The Saturday that exams 
ended in May was one of our favorite times of year. That was when Stafford High School had its after 
prom party which ran from midnight until 4:30 a.m. Jolly Co. provided dealers and the equipment to 
run the casino area of the party where the students won (or lost) chips which they used to buy chances 
at winning prizes such as a car, a computer, a CD player, and other great stuff. 




138 • Clubs 




The Judicial Review Board was a group of 12 elected members and one elected Chairman. The 
purpose of the board was to review violations of the visitation policy, property damage, fire drill 
procedures, improper use of fire equipment, and improper conduct. In addition, the board heard 
appeals from Community Standards trials. Each case was handled on a personal basis after the 
accused student pleaded guilty or elected to have a trial. Sanctions were given accordingly if the 
student was found guilty. Elections for the Judicial Re\iew Board were held each semester. 

I 1 1 /^ -t /^^ -t flk I ' By Trac>- Young 

ReviewBoard 



iMWC 



CI lib s '139 



Clubs 



Performing 



The Performing Arts Club was designed to stimulate interest and 
participation in the performing arts. It was open to everyone who 
liked to preform, whether they were a major or not. PAC presented 
scenes around campus, worked with the 4-H on their "Share the 
Fun" activity, sold concessions for all of the main stage perfor- 
mances, and sponsored workshops on performing for the campus 
and the community. 






By Erika Malos 



Arts 




140 • Clubs 




The editors slaved night and da\' over the Polemic , and. ihiUik God, it seemed Hke \T)U 
appreciated it. We pubHshed four issues on the topics of feminism, racism, pop culture and 
sex. With the help of our large staff, we navigated a desktop publishing program for the first 
time. Highlights for this year included Amy's habit of erasing Nathan's pages, getting our 
page dimensions wrong for three straight issues, and the first Polemic part}-. We look 
fonvard to that point in the future when the onl\- theme left for the Polemic \vill be 
"Bell\-button Lint". Thanks to our dilligent staff, our adxisor, and all those who wrote for and 
read the Polemic. 



iNIWC 



C/uhs -141 



Cffibs 



Pre-Law Society 

By Elizabeth Payne 

The Pre-Law society is an organization for students interested in the study of law. The meetings 
provided information on applying to law schools, taking the LSAT's. and examining the many 
different fields of law. 




142 • Clubs 




Ask ^ 
no 
questions 

We did: 
Tori 
Amos . •» 

(Pete 
Mealy 
Drivin' N' 
Cry in' 
(Voodoo 
Piston), The 
Brand New 
Heavies (The 
Pharcyde), Toad 
the Wet Sprocket 
(Gin Blossoms) 
Screaming Trees 
(Poster Children, 
Pond 

The plastic birthda\ 
cake ballerina dove 
into a vat of orange 
Jello as she inhaled 
toxic fumes of melting 
G. I. Joes, we all agree 

We also did: Dave 
Matthews Band, Tom 
DeLuca, Burma Jam (Jettison 
Charlie, Damn Near Red, 



KASI] 
;unks (Damn 
Near Red, Elephant 
Bo\), Walli Collins, Toshi 
Reagon (Jud\- Gorman), GoodGuys 
Tunji, Punkaholics), Black Sheep, 
Phantom Rockers (RASH). 

We all danced because we knew our father was inside. 
Free James Brown. 



iNlWC 



CI I lbs • 143 



Clubs 



Senate Board 




144 • Clubs 




H 



f 



(\1 



>crtr> 



"Take iiolhiiiy but 

pictiiics. Leave 

_^^^^ ^^ ^^ _^ iiolhinLi bill Ibot- 

'"t ^iM ' 'IrSui^B prints. Kill nothing 

hnl lime."" 'I'hese 

are I he word.s 

f . ^^^^ ^\M"-^r- Vf ''yi^^MHi^^^A whieh are printed 

on the baek of the 
Trek l-shiiis this 
year ( LJ^J2- 1993). 
and the_\ aiv also 
the wortls lo which 
the club adheres. 
Ti'ekClub isanoiii- 
doors elub which 
was established 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ three years ago to 

withanoppoiitinity 
to e.xpericnee and 
appiveiale all that 
nature has to 
oiler. In its shoil 
time ot" e.xistenee, 
elub membership 
has elimbeel lo ap- 
|")ro.\inialel\ 100 
students oi' all le\- 
els ot" skill and ex- 
perience. Fellow 
Trekkers ha\e en- 
jo \ed aeli\ itics 
such as hiking. ca\- 
ing. white water 
ratting, canoeing 

and camping. Self-confidence, cooperation and ""bonding"" is stressed every year when club 
members do a ropes course. Another yearly popular acti\ity is the paint gun war. New acti\ities 
planned for this year and next year include night hikes, hiking w ilh homeless kids, and hang 
elidin;:. 



. '^ 



"^/ 



->La 



( 



'^ 



njR 




Trek Club 



B\ Dana Glenn 



iNfWC 



C/uhs • 145 



Clubs 



WMWC 




The never heard voices of Donna Silver and Jamie Wasseman. 



AMWMWC540 



College radio. Open-minded and free-spirited. 

The way it should be. For you. 

Exceed the recommended dosage. 

WMWC rocks the world. 



146 • Clubs 




The Young Democrats made a comeback from a defunct group to one of over 100 members. Their 
main emphasis was to campaign on campus and help with local campaign events. They provided 
campaign information, participated in on campus debates, went to see the presidential debate in 
Richmond and to see Bill Clinton in person, pamphleted local Fredericksburg neighborhoods, 
organized a march down William Street, manned the polls on election day. drove people to the area 

polls, manned the phones at Andy Fox's headquarters, 
and were part of w hat the Free Lance Star called, "the 
realignmentofiVIars Washington College. "In the spring 
they focused on the gubenatorial election. They were a 
^ ^ \ibrant and young group bent v>x\ democratic ideals. 

Democrats 



orgamzeu a marcn uown vvuiiam oiieei. ma 

Youne 



B\" Heather Mullins 



Clubs • 147 



Clubs 



Underclass 



«to 



*.- 



A Midsummer 
Night's Dream was i li 
performed in the 
amphitheater 
behind Trinkle 
Hall. The 
performance 
brought new life 
to the all but 
abandoned 
theater. 

Tfwto by 'JQmStokieT 
Rachel Abrams 
Amy Acker 
Etta Agan 
Alexa Ainsworth 
Krystina Albus 
Timothy Allison 
Carmen Altorelli 
Rebecca Anders 
James Anderson 
Susan Anderson 
Susan Andes 
Allison Andrews 
Kate Andrews 
Kristin Antisavage 
Matthew Armbruster 
Heidi Ashton 
Nancy Austen 
Kathleen Austin 
Vincent Aversa 
Juanita Avila 




150 • Underclass 



A scruffy Eric "Snuffy" Axelson ponders the 
good life liere at MWC. 




Snuny Axelson 

Jiilic liakcr 

I'atiiciii P.alcsda 

Jciiiiilci Iriall 

Vercna Barauiola 



Catherine FSarber 

Kerri Barile 

Kell\ Barnes 

Deborah Barrel! 

Aheia Barlol 

Daw n Baugher 

Susanne Beck 

Michelle Bedarcl 

Elizabeth Bennett 

Ehzabeth Berman 

Cynthia Bernard 

Sara Bickford 

Stacy Birkenstock 

Dana Birkholz 

Linda Black 



Underclass • 151 



Halloweens 
brought strange 
bedfellows 
together in the 
Great Hall. Here 
Bush (Amy LesHe), 
Clinton (Elizabeth 
Payne) and Perot 
(Susan Taylor) 
spot a photo op. 

(Photo Sy Anne Stitt 
Lisa Blackley 
Heather Blake 
Amanda Blauvelt 
Elizabeth Booker 
Yolanda Booker 
Amanda Boshears 
James Bosley 
Derek Bottcher 
Ginni Bounds 
Stephanie Bowman 
Sharon Boxley 
Katie Braddock 
William Brantley 
Suzanna Braverman 
Sarah Brewer 
Daniel Brooks 
Deborah Brown 
Jennifer Brown 
Kiea Brown 
Michelle Brown 




J 52 • Underclass 



Hadrian Mendo/za and Bill Monahan 
explorinj^ their alternatives. 




F^arbaia Broylcs 

Andrew Bruiil 

Traccy Bubh 

Tanccsha Buck 



Bonnie Bullock 

Mclanic Burger 

Michelle Burgess 

Hduard Burke 

Rose Burnley 

Emily Campbell 

Christopher Caputo 

Lanise Cardwell 

David Carey 

Meg Carey 

Steve Carhart 

Lisa Carlson 

Siohhan Carlton 

Michael Carney 

Colleen Carpenter 

Natalie Carpenter 



Underclass • 153 



Photographer 
Brian 

HoUingsworth 
sneaks up on 
Amanda Tappan 
on the steps 
outside of 
Randolph Hall. 



Joseph Cassady 
Jill Chamberlin 
Lisa Chastain 
Kong Chhour 
Mary Beth Childress 
Kenneth Chitty 
Alethea Christon 
Christopher Clark 
Peter Clark 
Samuel Clark 
Travis Clements 
Jeremy Cline 
Renee Cline 
Debra Coffee 
Wendy Coling 
Thomas Collier 
James Collins 
Carohne Columbia 
Roy Conley 
Jennifer Cooper 




154 • Underclass 



Lisa Hlackley lounges leisurely outside 
her dorm Virginia "I he Vault" Hall. 




Harb;ir;i C'opp 

Lara Corcdraii 

.111! Cordiicr 

James Conlonc 



Ross Cornell 

liniily C'ostello 

Mall C"()\ inL;lon 

Ste\ e Craig 

Jenniter Craiiclall 

Andrew Crislip 

Valerie Crites 

Eric Cronin 

Kevin Crosby 

Kyle Crosby 

Carrie Crowder 

Tiffan\ Crowder 

Heather Cunningham 

Jeanne Curran 

Emih Curtis 

Tad Czvzewski 



Underclass • 7.55 



Bald 



is beautiful. 

Vfioto by 'Brian :Hoffinjjszwrtli 

Jennifer Dalmas 
Sara Daly 
Regina Damon 
Eric Daniels 
Gary Daniels 
Sooki Danosky 
Keitha Dattilo 
Judith Davidow 
Kimberly Davis 
Caroline Dearborn 
Jeffrey DeBellis 
Jeffrey DeSanto 
Hendrik deVoest 
Stacy Dewalt 
JJ Dickens 
Tracey Dickerson 
Noelle Dienert 
Tracy Dillion 
John DiMeglio 
Betsy Divers 




756 • Underclass 



It^. 



Claudette Gamache shares 
lunch with a new friend. 

'Pfwlo bifMHyCn'ooduhird 




KalhlcL-ii Doolcy 

ViiLiini;! Dorc 

Anne Maria Ddlil'Iuv 

C'lllls \){)\c 



Frances Dose 

Kristen Ui)udy 

Melissa Dowell 

Joanna Dri\er 

Pnscilla I)u 

LaLua DutTey 

Mark Dntly 

Nick Duncan 

Kcil\ Dunn 

Kaililccn Dunslan 

Kathleen Durham 

Jennifer D\'snn 

Kristen Eberly 

Karen Edmison 

Beth Edwards 

Laura Edwards 



Underclass • 157 



studying and 
sunbathing at 
the same time 
may or may 
not improve 
your grades, 
but it will get 
you a good tan. 

'Pfwto By M/j; Woodward 

Colleen Egan 
Shelley Ekermeyer 
Cynthia Elliott 
Dana Embrey 
Susanna Engvall 
William Erb 
Cassandra Essig 
Anna Estep 
Martha Estes 
AUyson Eubank 
Lydia Evans 
Jeffrey Everett 
Naomi Fagan 
Alicia Faggart 
Elizabeth Fair 
Joseph Farrell 
Jeanette Feeley 
Cheryl Fenner 
Heidi Ferrell 
Chris Ferry 




158 • Underclass 



Suzanne Beck nervously narrates 
her Spanish 202 paper. 




Andrea Field 

.'\d;iiii l-'ike 

C'ara llaiia^an 

Jeanne I'liekineer 



Jeanne IIomI 

Kryslal Fogg 

Jenn\ F'oll/ 

Melanie l-oole 

Kare\ Ford 

Kathleen i-ord 

Ben Fonishell 

George Fors\lhe 

Sandra Foulkcs 

Rebecca Fox 

Lynn Frampton 

Kimherly France 

Laura Francois 

Jason Friedman 

AndreaFrome 

Meredith Frye 



Uiiderckiss • 159 



"Wer'e Feeling 
Just Vine!" 
Amy Faulkner, 
Nicole Pagano 
and Emily and 
Ellen Simpson 
bunch together 
for Holloweens. 

'Photo 'By Anne Stitt 

Donald Gallitz 
Claudette Gamache 
Sarah Garcia 
Jenny Gardner 
Kathleen Gibby 
Priscilla Gibson 
Craig Gill 
Jennifer Gilligan 
Melissa Gillilan 
Nicole Girvin 
Kristen Gleason 
Dana Glenn 
Kate Glennon 
Kate Golden 
Melanie Goolsby 
Kerri Gordon 
Kimberly Gossett 
Edward Gramling 
Naomi Gray 
Kristen Green 




160 • Underclass 



Alittleoffthetop." 
MWC's Riij^hy team cleans 
up for a match. 

i'lioio'Jiii:hiiim lif^c 




Williiiin Ciivcnuooil 

Jill Ciiciiory 

Krislcii C jncscrl 

Aiiiv fjnilo 



Jennilcr Groves 

Chris Grusscndorf 

Amanda Guyrc 

Shelby Hadhcld 

Jennifer Hairfield 

Brenna Hall 

ShandnaHall 

Susannah Hall 

Kathleen Hallowes 

Ann Halter 

Rohyn Harper 

Anne Hairell 

Amanda Harris 

Angela Harris 

Christine Harrison 

Geoffre\- Hart 



UuclercUiss • 161 



Brian 

Hollingsworth 

capturingthe 

shavedheads 

ofPha 

Stoneman, 

Chris Wright 

andMike 

Taylor. 

'PfuHo 'By iMi/(e 'Woochuard 

Karen Harwell 
Damien Haussling 
Christine Hayes 
Christopher Hayes 
Lawana Hayes 
Mary Hazlewood 
Eileen Heffern 
Michael Heinze 
Lydia Hellrich 
Gina Hernandez 
Deborah Herron 
Julie Heselden 
Jonathan Hickman 
Heidi Hildebrand 
Candice Hill 
Shelby Hill 
Tiffany Hill 
Jason Hillin 
Jonathan Hinrichs 




162 • Underclass 



"I thought this was the drag show!?" 
Bill Monohan and Hadrian Mendoza 
were the queens of Holloween's. 

■I'liolo 'JUf :lnnf Siiti 




Amy llolxiil 

Lisa Hockci 

IX'bbic Hodges 

Dcrck HdlTman 



Michelle Hollell 

Michelle Holley 

Brian Holliiigsworth 

Holly Hollonion 

Michele Holtiiiann 

Molly Hollon 

Stephanie Hooper 

Robert Hoover 

Jane Hope 

Anissa Hopkins 

Emilie Hopkins 

Alfred Horn 

Moll_\ Home 

Stephanie Howard 

Jennifer Howell 

Emilv Howell 



Underclass • 163 



The LAC's pledge 
to vote sign 
collected 
hundreds of 
signatures of 
students for 
November 1992's 
Presidential 
Election. 

Eliza Huber 
Maura Imparato 
Christopher Irving 
Eureka Jackson 
Sharon Jackson 
Wendy James 
Tiffany Jeffries 
Kristin Johnson 
Jodi Jones 
Deborah Johnson 
Heather Johnson 
Tia Johnson 
Courtney Jones 
Paula Jones 
Rebecca Jones 
Alan Jones 
Debrea Jordan 
Chrissy Kahrl 
Sarah Kanney 
Ann Kaplan 




li fj^'o^-t T^^y^ 



r,T' 



^H' 



7 



^ y- ..%'^^ '"* ' 




164 • Underclass 



Ted Keim makes a pliij» for hair loss as he 
portrays Hair Club President Sy Sperhn^. 



Maureen Kcany 

Katie Keariis 

Aron Keeshury 

Colleen Kelleher 




Underclass • 165 



Warm Spring days ^_ \^l^ 



find students 
outdoors. These 
girls in Ball Circle 
study while 

achieving the fe 

beginnings of a tan. 

Tfioto 'By •JVdkic 'li'oodward 



Deanna Knorpp 
Deborah Knowlton 
Kimberly Kobasa 
Jennifer Koch 
Christina Kopacz 
Jeffrey Kramer 
Barry Kraus 
JuUe Kraus 
Tricia Kube 
Jo Anna Kuehle 
Michelle Kurdonik 
Michelle Labbe 
Lynnett LaLonde 
Linh Lam 
Kelly Lambert 
Stephen Landis 
Sandra LaRoclic 
Jennifer Lawatsch 
Christopher Lazzuri 
Wyland Leadbetter 




766 • Underclass 




.^. 



Have You Seen My Keys? 

Auhadc Editor Liz Hockmiith leaves 
her keys behind to be ioiind by 
photographer Brian HoHinj^sworth. 



Corey Leans 

.-\iii_\ liclli Lcasurc 

Miclielle Legg 

Rehecca LeJcunc 



Annie Lellinger 

Amy Leslie 

Slaee> Levy 

Anne Lewis 

James Roberl Lewis 

Anna Liiulahl 

Jenniler Liplrap 

Susan Little 

John Loloyan 

Christine Lourens 

Stacy Lucas 

Nl Luu 

Maureen L>nch 

Sean Lynch 

Stephanie MacDonald 

Rachel Machacek 



Underclass • 767 



FLASHBACK! Tim Lutero models 
the revolving 60's TY-DYE trend. 



Morgen Macintosh 
Jennifer Mackie 
Jill Magnani 
David Mahoney 



Julian Malcolm 
Karen Mallan 
Erika Malos 
Karen Manion 
Julie Margolis 
Michael Margolis 
Kathryn Marley 
David Marquardt 
Heather Marsden 
Anna Martin 
Julie Mason 
Kara Lee Matala 
Jessica Matthews 
Robert McAllister 
Kenneth McAndrew 
Tara McAvoy 




168 • Underclass 



l^onj4 "nt'^ for Hoat Dante 1 ickets 
n Woodard ( anipiis (enter left some 
out in the eold. I he annual event has 
a capacity of less than 400 students. 




Nancy McClaiii 

.Id I rev McCliirkcn 

I'.cili \k( niincll 

Mvliiula Mc( niiiiL'll 



Jill McDaiiicI 

Kern McDonald 

Erin McGintce 

Jcnnilci' NlcKa) 

Shcri McKcnncy 

W. Scdtl McKnight 

Bill McLean 

Janci McMillan 

Leah McNeil 

Jenniler McNure 

Juhi Mehta 

Belh Mel I 

Timnth} Mcnningcr 

Nikki Meyers 

Brook Michalik 

Susan MiJko 



Underclass « 169 



And the Winner Is... 



Rachel Mills 

Amy Minter 

Marty Mitchell 

Timothy Molino 



Richard Moncrief 
Gregory Monner 
Deborah Moore 
Joseph Moorman 
Matthew Niorin 
Samantha Moiris 
Genevieve Morrow 
Christa Moscovis 
Brian Moyer 
J. GaiTett Moyer 
Brian Miilford 
Heather Mullins 
Jennifer Mullins 
Alexander Murphy 
Andy Musk 
Heather Nadeau 




7 70 • Underclass 



Passengers of the best costume at Holloweens, 
Donna Douj^Ias, Ed Rollins, Mary Scarborouj^h, 
Wayne Campbell, Kristen Maestri and Leo Rollins 
rode their bus in a conga line through the night. 



Karen Ncstlcrodo 
Bridget Ncwcomb 
Bic Ni:Li\eii 




Larissa Nojek 

Eric Nolan 

Katharine Now ell 

Hrika Nussen 

Audre\ O'Brien 

BridLiel O'Connell 

Michelle O'Dea 

Jennifer O'Ddniiell 

Deirdre O'Learv 

Laura O'Neill 

Charles Ochocki 

Chi-HnOh 

Daniel Oliver 

Laurel Oliver 

Meliisa Oliver 

Ste\ e Ondrej 



Underclass •171 



Snow JMan 
Gets Makeover 



Rick Oppedisano 
Karen Orr 
Karen Orzechowski 
Joanna Osborne 



Anita Overcash 
Todd Paleic 
Kimberley Pandolfi 
Gene Papetti 
Nicholas Paradis 
Barbara Parrett 
Amy Parrish 
Kathryn Parsons 
Allison Pascinto 
Alethea Patillo 
Heidi Patterson 
Elizabeth Payne 
Ann Perry 
Carlyle Perry 
Erica Peterson 
Deborah Petz 




172 • Underclass 



*■: The snow didn't stop students from heading 

outdoors. Snowpeople popped up all over 
> campus. 

'J'hoto 'JUj ■Lilccn ■.Hcljeni 



Saiulia IVv/illo 

Sk'phanic Phillips 

Kiisim I'ikc 

Jainic l'://()i"ni) 




Underclass • 173 



The flags that fly over Lee Hall represent 
the cultural diversity that the college seeks 
to obtain with each new year. 



Ann Rasmussen 
Eric Reid 
Nicole Reid 
Tory Rendon 



Mary Reveley 
Audra Reyman 
Victoria Rheinstrom 
Jennifer Rice 
Kari Ann Rice 
James Richmond 
Ronald Riley 
Amy Rincian 
Heather Ringer 
Michael Riordan 
Noah Ristau 
Emily Roberts 
Cynthia Robertson 
Merilee Robinson 
Dawn Rock 
Neil Roed 




174 • Underclass 



Flags Flown Proudly 




J;ict|Licl\ II kdiiiaiK) 
James Ross 

JcnMiIci Rndair 
lOniaiuliic Kiulil 



Alan Riisso 

Michelle Russo 

Bi\an Ryals 

K\ le Ryan 

Aiulrew Salp 

Jason Saiiuiels 

Stacy Sanders 

Morgan Sanders 

Sarah San do 

William Sanford 

Daniele Santilio 

Scott Sarlini 

Mary Scarborough 

Anneiiese Scherring 

Richard Schettier 

Mar\ Schools 



Underclass • 17:) 



Debbie Schools 
Kelly Schrock 
Tom Schroeder 
Heather Scott 
Kira Scott 
Rebecca Seabolt 
Amy Seitz 
Vanessa Sekinger 
Kenneth Self 
Misty Serig 
Leslie Sexton 
Sheila Shadmand 
Leslie Shamblin 
Stephen Sharpe 
Jennifer Shaver 
Tanya Shelton 

Michelle Sherfey 
Nicki Sherman 
Stacey Shiftlett 
Renee Shoemaker 




Chandler's Ellipse 



TfuHo 'By 'MiKc 'll'ood'u'ard 
176 • Underclass 




Ryan Shrivcr 

Hcalhcr Sliiii:arcl 

Jdliii Shuiiuniii 

Jonnilcr Sluinialc 

Jdliii Sidchiillom 

Uonna Silver 

Rchccca Silverman 

Karen Simnis 

Zaeh Skelding 

Kelly Skinner 

Jane! Skipwilh 

Emilie Slechla 

Terri Small 

Adam Smilh 

Lauren Smith 

Melissa Smith 

Quigley Smith 

Siacey Smith 

Kaiherine South 

Jov Sowcll 



A class meets in front of Chandler Hall. 
The ellipse is an architectural magnet to 
gatherings of people. 

Unclerc/ass • 7 77 



Keeping Up To Date! 

M. ^D M. -Photo 'Sy'Mih 'Woodivard 



Roy Speckhardt 
Amy Spellerberg 
Christopher Spencer 
Heather Spring 
Cristina StachHng 
MeUssa Stailings 
Natasha Stancill 
Matthew Steele 
Peter Steinberg 
Brigette Steiniger 
Lori Stevens 
Niivi Stevenson 
Chris Stewart 
Kirsten Stewart 
Laura Stewart 
Lesley Stewart 
Maureen Stinger 
Shelley Stinnett 
Philip Stoneman 
Monica Stovenz 




/ Vi? . T Ttt^^i-^I 



It's hard to know exactly whats j^oinj» on 
all the time. The post-it hoards around 
campus hke this one were usually swollen 
with flyers. 




Sarah Strom 

l)ar\l Sliihbs 

Kristcn Stiklchakcr 

I )a\ III Sliirucoi) 



Mir\al Suloman 

Nolan Sullins 

.Mar> Swccl 

Slcphcn Suclt 

KinibL'rly Suil/.cr 

Jennifer Sycks 

Alan S\ heslre 

Carol S/le/ak 

Rebecca Taber 

Susan Tanigawa 

Mark Tan is 

Susan Taylor 

Kristi Terry 

Amy Thomas 

Amy Thomas 

HaiT\ Thomas 



T rnrlr^i-r-l,,. 



Theresa Thomas 
Anthony Thompson 
Maureen Thompson 
Tanya Thrasher 
Landis Tiffany 
Newton Tiffany 
Julie Tillman 
Marc Todd 
April Tofanelli 
Robert Tompkins 
Emily Trexler 
Mary Trocchia 
Elizabeth Tua 
Amy Tubbs 
Angela Tweedy 
Amanda Tyler 

Susannah Uehlinger 
Kirstan Ulrich 
Amy Umberger 
Karen Valenta 




o 



on Campus Walk 



'Fhoto 'By 'Mike ']\'oodioard 



180 • Underclass 




Brooke Vallaslcr 

Hiiaii Valk'nl 

Aiii\ \an Dillcn 

Lisa VanliouiLjoiulicii 

Nicole Vance 

Sliciry 

Vaiil.aiuliiii;haiii 

Karcv Vasco 

Kcllcv Vauijhan 

l.ianc Vcscll 

Sonja Visscr 

Kathleen Vunck 

Nathan Wade 

Pait;e Watiner 

Tricia W'aklrop 

Tracy Walker 

Kelley Walsh 

Sharon W'anipler 

Christine Warden 

Hannah Warren 

Jamie Wasscrman 



VisitorsthetheMulticulturalFair saw 
perfomiancesofOklahomaoncanipuswalk. 

Underclass • 181 



Mary Washington's Angelas 



Amy Watkins 
Nicola Weaver 
Emily Weed 
Stephanie Weidel 
Courtney Weise 
Diana Welty 
John Westerlund 
Christina Wheatley 
Jill Whelan 
Lowell Whitney 
Tiffany Whitt 
Lidie Whittier 
Renee Wicks 
Shenie Wiener 
Danielle Wilbur 
Sarah Wilkes 
Lori Wilkinson 
LeAnne Williams 
Stacey Williams 
Came Williamson 
Rhonda Winn 
Jodi Winship 
Amy Wood 
Kimberly Wood 




182 • Underclass 



Jen Hawkins, Melissa 

Grady and Courtney 

Tolmar robed in white 

anj»elic j»arb for 

Halloween's. 

ffuHo 'Bij 'Mil\C 'W'ootizthird 




Carey Youngs 

Noclle Zeiner 

Robert Zombron 



Underclass • 183 



rts 



i.v r"^: 



fe 






and 



Junior Brian McRoberts was 
one of MWC's top releivers. 




i-K^^P- 






Junior third 
Baseman Jeff 
Tidwell was 
named All- 
Conference for 
the third straight 
year. 





IS SB] ISS!!! 






^^ ^^>j '•'i 




FRONT ROW: Bill Brantley, Adam Wargo, Casey Russell, Adam Brecher, Kevin Howie, Tim Molino, Darrell Snyder. 
Chris Wright, Richie Treger SECOND ROW: Steve Blankenship, Brian Lillis, Doug Sheldon, Jay Glover, Brain Stigall, 
Devin Robinson, Scott Stanton. Don Purcell, Head Coach Tom Sheridan BACK ROW: Jeff Tidwell, Joe Del Buono, 
Kevin Cooke, Brian McRoberts, Alan Hall, Jeff DeSanto, Tim Rice, Brian Abel, Tim Madden, Mark Matthews. 



'ports 
[ MWC 



186 • Sports 



^v 



The Ace of the Eagle pitching staff, junior Mark 
Matthews went 6-2 en route to All-Rcuion honors. 



C <S 




St. Mary's 


6 


1 


<')l(l Dominion 


■s 


1 1 


Scianlon 


11 


1 


Scranlon 


3 


4 


Si. Mary's 


14 


-) 


Bridycvvalcr 


1 1 


T 


VMI 


S 


1 


(iuilford 


4 


^ 


York (PA) 


y 


1 


York (PA) 


X 





Salisbury 


s 


1 


E. Mennonilc 


2.3 


X 


Galiaudct 


IS 





Gallaudct 


23 


1 


Shenandoah 


y 


-) 


CalhoHc 


s 


1 


Cathohc 


\5 


1 


Randolph-Macon 


4 


1 


Hampden-S\dnc\ 


10 


1 1 


St. Mary's 


7 


6 


York (PA) 


6 


1 


Bridgewatcr 


7 


5 


N.C. Wesleyan 


10 


12 




^B^^iWI 







* C'cntcrficklci' Don Pui'ccll fin- 
ished his cai'ccr as .\l\\('"s 
cadci" in homers and RBI. 
while becoming MW'C's first 
All-American in 1 99 1 . Purcell 
'^i3/i ^'^^^ ^1''^' Eagles lo three straight 
NCAA Division III 
Tournaments. 



.^' 



.H 



Sports •187 



ports 

MWC 



Mens 




asketball 

Lead by coach Tom Davies, the Eagles 
reached the Semi-finals of the CAC 
Tournament for the third consecutive year. 




Center Steve Posey led MWC in rebound- 
ing for the third straight year and is on 
pace to become the eighth Eagle in history 
to score 1,000 points. 



FRONT ROW: Mike Johnson, Kerwin 

Miller, Dave Carey, Richie Treger, Jeremy 

White, Billy Hallock, Neal Hutchko 



'ports 
i MWC 



188 • Sports 



/V 



s<>" 



.<^ 



e. 



^ o^^ 



o\ 



Christopher 












Newport 


.S9 


85 ' 


Frostbiirg State 


91 


'^1 


VA Wesleyan 


55 


88 


York (PA) 


77 


90 


Shenandoah 


107 


98 


Catholic 


87 


9.^ 


Lynchburg 


55 


86 


St. Mary's 


66 


62 


St. Mary's 


77 


68 


Marynioiinl 


77 


93 


Hanipdcn-Sydney 


51 


87 


Clallaudel 


70 


81 


Washington & Lee 


S5 


83 


Shenandoaii 


94 


lOh 


W. Mary hind 


76 


83 


Goucher 


49 


70 


Apprentice 


78 


67 


Apprentice 


63 


65 


Marymount 


88 


89 


Cathohc 


63 


65 


GaHaudet 


74 


56 


Yoriv(PA) 


78 


81 


Goucher 


79 


62 


St. Mary's 


56 


55 


N.C. Wesleyan 


71 


74 


Cathohc 


74 


76 




Jcrcin_\ While \\^\\[\ the (.IcIciKlcrs looking 
to dish olT lo an open Icaminalc. 



BACK ROW: Corey Hamni. Elgin Holston. 
Matt Seward. Scott Pate. Neil Gallagher.Ste\e 
Posey. David Winningham. Colin Whitehouse. 
Student Assistant Coach Peter Lee. 



I 




Sports • /<S9 



ports 
^]^\c 



and 



1/ 



Chris Paige, a three-year starter, sports a 
3.8 grade-point average in a triplemajor of 
Mathematics. Computer Science and 
ReHgion. 



FRONT ROW: 

Jay Wilson. 

Chris Paige. 

Angie Parker. 

Corinne May, 

BACK ROW: 

Robin Coates, 

Jeanette Alexander, 

Jennifer Bushman, 

Chris Gleisner, 

Bridget Rooney. 

Stefanie Teter 





'ports 

i MWC 



^OMENS 

asketball 



190 • Sports 




Head Coach Connie 
Callahan led MWC to 
its second-hesi win-loss 
tola! HI I'.a'jlc hisioiA. 



-N 






Corinne May led MWC in scoring ( 16 points/game 
en route to Second-Team All-CAC honors. 



Methodist 


l(^ 


70 


FeiTum 


71 


>1 


W. Maryland 


(^2 


66 


Notre Dame 


97 


55 


Salisbury 


81 


78 


St. Mary's 


60 


36 


Ciiristopher 


61 


70 


Newport 






Ferruin 


49 


52 


Mary moil lit 


72 


S6 


Gallaudet 


71 


69 


Gouctier 


70 


36 


N.C. Wesleyan 


63 


53 


Frostburg State 


30 


60 


York (PA) 


66 


S4 


Catholic 


72 


53 


St. Miiry's 


78 


42 


Mar\niount 


88 


85 


Gallaudel 


73 


52 


Bridgewater 


64 


54 


Goueher 


64 


63 


Shenandoah 


71 


49 


Cathohc 


78 


57 


^'ork (PA) 


83 


69 


St. Mary's 


77 


32 


York (PA) 


93 


70 


Marymount 


79 


103 



Sports •191 



ports 
MWC 



atmosphere of the 1992-1993 season. The cheerleading 
advisor was Leslie Cornish. 





MEN'S & WOMEN'S' 



192 • Sports 



FRONT ROW: Crayton Simmons, Da\c Janes, 
Randy Dye, Murray Chesno, Pete Steinberg, Craig 
Moyer, Nick Duncan; BACK ROW: Mark 
Sheppard, Keith Steury, Mike Ovvings, Mike Hein/e, 
Chris Koehier, Eric Pritchett, Jon Gales. Head Coach 
Stan Soper 




FRONT ROW — Allison Coleman. Harriet 
Greenlee. Emily Howell. Karen Dickinson, Alicia 
Faggart: BACK ROW — Etta Agan. Lesley Krush, 
Stacy Sanders. Chrissy Kauten. Jen Dyson 



k 






» • 




^ 








t. 


•v' 


''V^. 


s. ■ 




•■ ^^ 


K 


v 


i\3 








All-Conference senior Lesley Krush hcl[X'd 
MWC to a CAC title, while later hjossi lin- 
ing in the track and field season (she fin- 
ished second in the NCAADi\ision 111 
1.300 meters in Ma_\ 1993 en route to All- 
Amei'ican honors) 



Spo?rs • 193 



ports 
MWC 



and 1 and 



Eagles set up the attack against 
Dickinson en route to one of their nine 
victories in best-ever 9-4 season, 
which culminated in appearance in 
Capital Athletic Conference Tourna- 
ment finals. 



Head Coach Dana Hall was named 
Capital Athletic Conference Coach of 
the Year for the second straight sea- 
son, and led MWC to an ECAC Tour- 
nament berth. 





^ a 



FRONT ROW: 

Candice Malone, 
Chriswsie Avery, 
Deanna Knorpp. 
Greta Nelson. April 
Moshos. Leslie 
Ptashinski. Kill 
Cornell, SECOND 
ROW: Amy Mann, 
Tracey King, Katie 
Burke, Elize Huber, 
Meredith lerley, 
Tricia Kube, Suzy 
Chenault, Kristen 

Szala, Diane BACK ROW: Head Coach Dana Soper. Michelle O'Hanlon. Carin Gsellman. Sam 

Wickstrom Forshey, Stephanie Lowe. Christian Dodd. Bridget Rooney, Grace Massey, Jen 

Metcalf, Nancy Wilson. 






.4/H^^Mijd^- 



1 ports 
kMWC 



J94 • Sports 




/V 



.o^ 



Johns Hopkins 






(ioucher 






Wesley 






W'oosicr 






(icllysburg 






Koanokc 






York 






Randolph Macon 






lrosllnir<j S. 






Catholic 






l.ynchhui'i; 






Bridgcwatcr 






Washington C. 






Swccl Briar 






East Mennoniic 






Salisbury Slate 






Catholic 






Goiicher 






Hart wick 








CclchratinL! with IcacliiiL; scorer 
Chrissic A\cia ( Icll ). Candice 
Malone. a junior All-Contcfcnce 
defender from Reslon. \A. uas 
selected among a large contingent 
for Academic All-American Honors. 
Malone has a 3.6 overall GPA in her 
double major. History and Business. 

April Moshos. a junior 
from Fairfa.x. VA was 
chosen a third team 
All-American field 
hoeke_\ midllekler. 
Moshos w as naiiiecl 
the Capital Athletic 
Conference Player of 
the Year and a first- 
team All-Region 
selection, helping the 
Eagles to a second 
straieht CAC title. 



Sports • 195 



ports 
MWC 



and 



lacrosse 



0^ 



FRONT ROW: Coby 

Frye, Rick Downer 

SECOND ROW: 

Alan Russo, Steve 

Sharpe, Art Eccleston, 

Steve Fahrenkrog, Derek 

Hoffman, Nick Hamner, 

Eric Amtsberg, Chris 

Bergin, Head Coach Kurt 

Glaeser; THIRD ROW: 

Jon Hinrichs, John 

Martinelli, Aaron Reed, 

Andy Tuomey, Cecil 

Powell, Mike Palmer, 

Bryan Eckle, Chris Trice, 

Kevin Mack, Scott Kapin 




BACK ROW: Chris Williams, Ed 

Mendes, Chris Johann, John Millett, 

Bill McLean, Steve Terpak, Marc 

McCrudden, Kurt Bratten. 



I ports 
i MWC 



Chris Johann added stability 
and scoring punch to the 
midfield. 



196 • Sports 



Nick Hamner paced ihe 
Eagles ill as.sisls(22) 



Shenandoah 


.M 





Stockton State 


17 


() 


VA Wesleyan 


IS 


'; 


Upsala 


i.'^ 


4 


Lynchburg 


X 


16 


Maiymount 


1,^ 


7 


Plymouth St. 


10 


y 


Wesley 


10 


1 


Randolph-Macon 


7 


l.S 


Goucher 


16 


X 


Hampdeii-Sydney 


'■) 


1.^ 


Dickinson 


14 


y 


St. Mary's 


M 


\5 




/o/ 



<>" 



,<?^ 



Harassing goal- 
keepers was a 
speciall) lot' Ircsh- 
nian attack Bill 

McLean, who set a 

=? school recoid w ilh 
44 Lioals. 



% . Fiery Chris Bergin was one 
^ of MWC"s top all-around 
players in the midfield. 



Sports •197 



ports 
.VIWC 



and 



/ 



I acrossel 



Amy Halter draws a crowd 
but maintains possession. 



FRONT ROWTricia 

Kube, Candice Malone, 

Lisa Van Guilder, Ashley 

Young, Rebecca Manners, 

Je^n Wassif; SECOND 

ROW: TaraMcAvoy, 

Audrey O'Brien, Eliza 

Ruber, Cheryl Cole, Tara 

Hollin, RonnaWinn, 

Mindy Voguit; BACK 

ROW: Amy Jones, Amy 

Halter, Heather Hallowes, 

Katie Marley, Genevieve 

Chaney, Kim Pandolfi, 

Head Coach Dana Hall 



I ports 
k MWC 








198 • Sports 







Wasliiiigloii C. 


1.^ 


1 


liiiilijowatcr 


7 


S 


Iroslbiiiii Si. 


5 


10 


St. Mary's 


22 


6 


\V Maiylaiul 


14 


U. 


Kiiwan 


7 


11 


Sued 1)1 lai 


16 


6 


Raiuldlph-.NlacDii 


12 


X 


Washington & Lcc 


5 


7 


Joliiis Hopkins 


S 


9 


Roanoke 


10 


l.s 


Lynchhurg 


'J 


1 1 


Salisbnry 


6 


S 



Fop scoi'Cf I:li/a I liil")cr 

^oals) laces oil in 
tVonl of the new la- 
cfosse/lield 
hoeke} piess box. 



Offensive 
scoring threats 
Chen 1 Cole 

(Icfl) and 
Heather 
Flallowes 
coinhined tor 
43 goals in 
"93. 



Sports -7 99 



ports 
MWC 




''Hey... did you know 
that Mary Washing- 
ton earned the Re- 
gion VII overall point 
title and finished 
fourth at nationals? 
Or... was I not sup- 
posed to talk?" 



Hazelwild Farm 
allows riders an 

opportunity to t 71 >, ? 

train year-round. ■;^ IK ^ / '. ^ 







^■^em 



I ports 
LMWC 



200 • Sports 




Chnsliiic l-ulliii. a scnim- lioni 
Wcslon. C'T on the MWC" Riding 
Team, won the 1992-93 Scholar- 
Athlete Award. She is considered 
the U)p oxeiall rider \n the past 
decade of MWC's highly successful 
riding program by her coach Caiol 
Berry. As a ficshnian. hulliii fin 
ished second al NalioiiaK im the 
Cartier Cup leani in liiicniicd/dic 
Fences. She won die hi!jlil_\ coni- 
petitixe Open l-'cnccs Divisiofi al 
the 1993 Region 7 Championships 
for the second straight season agtcr 
winning in the Inlcrniccliciic Fences 
as a sophomore. She finished as a 
runner-up in the cnerall intli\idual 
point standings for the region as a 
senior and she [Xiced MW'C to the 
team High-Point Championshif^ in 
Region 7 this past year. As a W\ - 
chology Major. 1-ulhn recei\ed a 
major GPA of 3.67. She was also 
on the MWC Athletic Honor Roll 
in six of the prexious se\en semes- 
ters. 



An Hagle compelitor 
awaits the upcoming 
e\ent. 






Sports • 201 



ports 
MWC 



A. 



o. 



Ip^ \ 



o. 



O ^^, 



Rowan 


1 





Bentley 

Randolph-Macon 

Methodist 


2 
1 



1 


2 


VA Wesleyan 
Goucher 




3 


2 



Christopher 

Newport 
Marymount 
Longwood 




8 

1 






2 


St. Mary's 
Catholic 


3 
3 




1 


Gallaudet 


14 





York 


5 





Johns Hopkins 
Roanoke 


1 





1 


Shenandoah 


3 





Catholic 


5 





St. Mary's 
VA Wesleyan 
Randolph-Macon 


1 

2 

2 





1 




Midfielder Ted Keim blasts 
one from the top of the box. 



Goalkeeper Ryan Wilvert was named 

Second-Team All-CAC, helping to 

anchor a strong MWC defense. The 

Eagles won a third state title in five 

seasons. 







^1 



^ «^- 



'4 



I ports 
i MWC 



202 • Sports 




occer 

MEN'S 



Dodd Terry, a senior from Middlelovvn. 
NJ, won the 1992-93 Scholar-Alhlele 
Award in soecer. DiiiinL! his tour \ar- 
sity seasons, he started all 81 games for 
MWC's men's soccer team which won 
60 and lost just 15 with 6 ties. As a 
freshman and sophomore. Terry partici- 
pated in two NCAA Division 111 Soccer 
Tournaments and was a member of two 
Capital Athletic Conference and Vir- 
ginia Intercollegiate Soccer Association 
championship teams. Terry was a His- 
tory Major with a 3.8 (major) GPA. He 
was on the MWC Athletic Honor Roll 
in all seven previous semesters. 



FRONT ROW: (kis Cannona- 
Ernst. .Jason Law ivncc. Chris 
Caputo. dodd Terry. Matt St. 




Sports • 203 



rry 
Murph\. Ted Keim. Rich 
Link(Miis. Samm_\ Clark. R_\'an 
Wiheil. Jeff Kramer. Sean Forde. 
_' Jakob Kramer. Casimir Yasutis. 
John Lee Head Coach Rox Gor- 
don. NOT PICTURED: Doug 
Jester. Asst Coaches Mike Webb, 
Chris Farrell. 



ports 
MWC 






Dickinson 


2 





VA Wesleyan 
Emory 
Salem State 


4 
1 



2 
1 
1 


William & Mary 
Trenton State 






5 
1 


Catholic 


3 





Marymount 
Goucher 


1 
13 






George Washington 





6 


Washington & Lee 


3 





Johns Hopkins 
NC Wesleyan 
Methodist 


6 


3 




2 

1 


Randolph-Macon 
St. Mary's 
Roanoke 


3 
3 






1 


Marymount 
Catholic 


5 
7 




1 


NC Wesleyan 
Wooster 


1 

1 






Denison 


1 





Mass-Dartmouth 





1 



and 



Senior fullback Jenn Almy was a steady force in the back line. 




oo 



and 




occer 



Virginia College Division Coach of the Year Kurt Glaeser 
led his team to an NCAA Tournainent semifinal appear- 
ance. MWC. which also won a second straight CAC title, 
held the first-ever national-championship event ever on 
the MWC campus when three other semifinalists joined 
the Eagles at The Battleground. 




I ports 
i MWC 



204 • Sports 








Senior .All-Rcyion 
toiward Ashley 
^oLiiiL' had more 
Lips ihan dow lis in 
her hrilhanl career, 
finishini: as 
MW'C's second 
all -lime scorer. 







FRONT ROW: Laura Duffey. Mary Knight. Heather Kincaid. Alissa NhiLMum. \ictoria 
Rheinstrom. Karen Grese. Naomi Fagan. SECOND ROW: Kim Williams. Kelley Walsh. 
Mary Beth Leightley. Michelle Labbe. Amy Wihert. Sandy Garrett. Beck Miller. Kelly 
Thelen. May Gulick. BACK ROW: Head Coach Kurt Glaeser. Jenn Almy . Bev Hoover. 

Kirstan Ulrich. Jennifer Cochran. Julie Mason. Ashle\ Young. Stefanie Teter. Carey 

Sports '205 



Sports 



Shortstop Tasha Stancill hit over .300 
as a freshman for the 18-11 Eagles. 



Like teammate Tasha Thomas, Kerri 
Endler was an All-CAC pitcher. 

The Capital Athletic Conference Player 
of the Year for the second straight year, 
Tasha Thomas pitched MWC to a third 
consecutive CAC championship. 




FRONT ROW Tracy 

Phillips, Jackie Davis, Jay 

Wilson, Kerri Endler, Pam 

Williams, Janel Skipwith, 

Kim James BACK ^ 

ROW:Darlene Forst, Carin 

Gsellman, Tasha Thomas, 

Amy Umberger, Jen 

Cleary, Mel Haynie. Tasha 

Stancill, Erin McGintee. 

I ports 
i MWC 




nmmmmmmm 



206 • Sports 




oftbal. 






//. 



Icnuin 


4 




Methodist 


7 




Soiithaiiiplon 


7 




Rowan 







Mclhodisl 


5 




NC- Wcsleyan 
NC Wcslcyan 


2 
2 




iiiulijcualcr 


1 




BrulL'cualcr 


4 




v.. Mciiiionilc 


2 




H. Mcnnonitc 


6 




Ramapo 
Kcan(NJ) 


2 
3 




Muhlenberg 


3 




William Patcrson 







Virginia 





10 


Virginia 







Gallaudet 


3 




Gallaudet 


1 




Longwood 


3 




Longwood 







York (PA) 
Catholic 


S 
7 




Salisbury State 
Salisbury State 


3 

2 




Ramapo 
Penn State 


3 
5 




-Behrend 






Penn State 


2 


10 


-Behrend 






Penn State 


1 


2 


-Behrend 







Outfielder Jay Wilson 
was the team's top hitter 
and a standout dcfensixe 
player. 



^ / 



and 



Sports •207 



ports 
[ MWC 



Junior Amanda 

Clair was the 

CAC Champion 

in the 100 Breast ^ 

Stroke. 




Swimming 

1'°'^'^ 208 . Sports ^ 



Shannon Hutcherson contrib- 
uted to four All American relay 
teams and became MWC's first 
ever individual national cham- 
pion. She accepted CAC plaque 
from MWC Associate Athletic 
Director Roy Gordon. 



Q 



'H; 



O. 



// 



% 



/>. 



r> 



'o. 




Gouchcr 


1 17 


S7 


121 


75 


Catholic 


y2 


113 


153 


53 


Washinelon 


82 


120 






& Lcc 










Richmond 


10(1 


lOS 


';7 


I2X 


St. Mary's 


IK) 


73 


1 16 


66 


U of the 


59 


29 


57 


31 


South 











The CAC champion Eagle 
men and women took the 
victory stand for the third 
> JjlH straight year at Goohick Pool 







* - 



t^lk^A 



FRONT ROW Barak Carter. Matt Mejia. Jill Trussell. Ali Murdock. Larissa Noyek. Nancy 
McClain. Karen Edmison. Alison Cerul. Megan Carter. Heidi Heise. Sarah Hertz. Amanda Clair, 
Josh Lontz. Adam Owings. Bobby Kelly. Lee Lewis SECOND ROW Brian Mulford. Fred 
Nelson. Mike Weil. Carrie Lewis. Merilee Robinson. Sarah King. Shannon Hutcherson. Whitby 
Joyner. Konrad Heller. Coach Paul Richards BACK ROW Stewart Gill. Kevin Ahearn. Dave 
Carillo. Cordis Carter. Elize Barcus. Amanda Dresser. Kim Britt. Liz Darcy. Scott Wagner. Kent 
Seeker. Al Wolstenholme. 



Sports • 209 



ports 
MWC 



Sophomore Bridget Rooney, also a field hockey and 
basketball performer, was one of MWC's top throwers. 



Senior Tammy Buhite was a six-time ; 
All-American jumper who finished 
her career as one of the most-deco- 
rated athletes in Eagle history. 




FRONT ROW Assistant Coach Dan Grimes, HaiTiet Greenlee, Christine Redmon, Tonya Thrasher, Jan Randow, 
Heather Wickstrom, Adeen Hill, Renee Shoemaker, Tammy Buhite; SECOND ROW Assistant Coach Carl Braun, 
Allison Coleman, Etta Agan, Rebecca Silverman, Karen Dickinson, Emily Howell, Bridget Rooney, Bonnie Bul- 
lock, Alicia Faggart, Meloney Wallace; BACK ROW Stephanie Lowe, Lisa Vanbourgondien, Jen Dyson, Lesley 
Krush, Becky Peny, Stacy Sanders, Chrissy Kauten, Amy Tubbs, Head Coach Stan Soper 

210 • Sports 



'ports 
\ MWC 




Spriiiicr Ri)b Hoover dclciKlctl his CAC pole xauli chanipioiiship. 

Senior Jono Crowe repealed as Capital Athletic Conlerence 
high Jiinip and Javelin champion, leading the liaglcs to a 
first-ever CAC Men's Track and Field Chaniinonship. 








HWC 




FRONT ROW Nick Duncan. Jason Lawrence. Mike Heinze. Chris Kochler. Mark Tanis. Jeff 
Willoughby, Mike Britton. Craig Mover. Jono Crowe. Murray Chesno. Head Coach Stan Soper: 
SECOND ROW Assistant Coach Dan Grimes. Jeff Hood. Rob Hoover. Dave Janes. Mark Sheppard. 
Fred Draper. Bill Scott, Darren Bach. Jon Gates: BACK ROW Assistant Coach Carl Braun. Matt 
Baroody. John Richard. Chris Richardson. Keith Steup.. Pete Steinberg. Mike Dmochowski 

Sports '111 



ports 
MWC 



4^; 



A 



•^o^°< 



% 



Guilford 


8 


1 


^ 


E. Mennonite 


7 


2 




Christopher 7 

Newport 
VA Intercollegiate 


2 

1st Place 




Tennis Assoc. 


Tourn 






Lynchburg 
Washington 


8 
1 


1 
8 




&Lee 








VA Wesleyan 
VMI 


8 

2 


1 

5 




Catholic 


7 


2 




Apprentice 
School 


8 


1 




Liberty 4 

Hampden- 3 

Sydney 

CAC Championship 

Randolf-Macon 9 


5 
6 

1st Place 











J 




A team leader and four-year starter, Matt Bolen 
was a three-time All-CAC player who finished 
with a career singles mark of 47-27. 



FRONT ROW: Head 
Coach Roy Gordon, Chop 
Goodman, Steve Dykes, 
Matt Bolen, Eric Geshekter, 
Walter Adcock BACK 
ROW: Steve Paskiewicz, 
Garrentt Moyer, John Neal. 
Matt Strickler, Pat Catullo. 




I ports 
\ MWC 



212 • Sports 



Men s Tennis 



Three-time AII-C'ACjiinioiC iaiivll MoNcrucni 
13-4 at singles aiul teaniecl w ilh Mall Sliickler 
for a 14-1 mark at //3 cloiihlcs. 



N. 



\ ■ ^ Eric Geshekter (pictured) teametl with senior 
Matt Bolen for a 13-4 season at //I doubles. 
including CAC and stale championships. 




.Seniors .Mall .SirickK 
60- 1 1 career singles 
record) and Chip 
Goodman (60- I6i were 
both ihree-lime .All- 
Con lei ence players who 
helped MWC compile a 
39-18 reconl in iheir 
our-\ ear careers. 



Sports •213 



'ports 
kMWC 



(14-3 Tennis 

\ / Leslie Roland chases down the lob. 







"The Ohio Connection" of Kate South (left) 
and starters Beth Todd, Trish Whitefield and 
All-American LesHe Roland 




ft ^ 



i *v:r:^ 



r 



Junior Pia Holm joined Leslie 

Roland as doubles All-Ameri- 

cans for an Eagle team which 

went 14-3 and advanced to the 

NCAA semifinals for the 

seventh time in the last 12 

seasons. 

FRONT ROW: Leslie Roland , 
Pia Holm, Kate South, Kathleen f 
Harter BACK ROW: Trish i 
Whitefield, Anna Jackson, Head 
Coach Ed Hegmann. Beth Todd, 
Laura Graham. 




Sports 
MWC 



214 • Sports 



Scllci' .la_\ Wilson was luiniccl 
l-iisi-lcaiiiAII-CAC'loiihcsec- 
dikI sirai'jht \cai'. 




Sports • 215 



Faculty" 



WMMPVI 



w^«» 




David Ambuel 

Classics, Philosophy & Religion 

Rosemary Barra 
Biology 




Michael Bass 
Enviommental Science 
& Geology 



Keith Bell 
Drama 



Topher Bill 
Psychology 



ABEL 



218 • Faculty 



Robert Boughncr 

Classics, i'hilosphy & Keligion 



Marshall Howcn 
Cicosjraphy 




219 • Faciiltx 



( 





% 



Manning Collier 
Mathematics 

Tim Crippen 

Sociology & Anthropology 

Stephen Czarsty 
Business Administration 

Tom Davies 
Physical Education 

Daniel Dervin 

English, Linguistics & Speech 

Betty Durrer 
Mathematics 



^mii 




220 • Faculty 



W'W^ 



Lew Fickcll, Jr. 
Political Science 

Jane Galeuood 
WritinL' Center 

Kurl Glaeser 
Physical Education 




ini Clochring 
Classics. Philosphy lV Religion 

Roy Gordon 
P\hsical Education 



llf^M^'lflf 



221 • Faculty 



Steve Griffin 
Art 

Dana Hall-Soper 
Physical Education 

Susan Hanna 

English, Linguistics & Speech 




Bill Hanson 

Sociology & Anthropology 

Ed Hegmann 
Physical Education 

Carter Hudgins 
Historic Preservation 



222 • Faculty 




223 • Faculty 




224 • Faculty 



■ 


ft 


■ 


■ 


1 


1 ^' 


>^'m 


1 


1^ 


m^ 

^«% 


(1 


I': 

I 


__i. 


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1 


1^^^ 





HuhMcConncIl 
luu iKinniciital Science 
& Geology 

Susan Miller 
Motlcin ii)iciL;n LaiiL'iiaijcs 

Bniun Morton III 
Hisionc I'rcscr\ation 

Joe Nicholas 
Geography 

Janet Nicodemus 
Biology 

Denis NiNsiin-Sabat 

I'-.'.Jlolo.jV 





22,"^ • Feu 1(1 1\- 




226 • Faculty 






,\:uirca l'unl\ 

Mdilcni loK'iL'ii I ,aiiL:iiai:c.s 



Di.iKilil R.illi^ 



(ici)t;ia|")y 



MiHlcrn I'oroimi Laneuaszcs 





Raman Singh 

English. Linguistics & Speech 

Harry Skinner 
usinesN Administration 




; f/Jt J Paul Slayton. Jr. 



Education 



227 • Faculty' 



Constance Smith 

English, Linguistics & Speech 



Roy Smith 
Psychology 

Stan Soper 
Physciai Education 

Stephen Stageberg 
Economics 

Gary Stanton 
Historic Preservation 






228 • Faculty^ 







Arthur Tracy 
Hi stop.' 

Brenda \'ogeI 
Education 



229 • FaculTx 




Dick Warner 
History 

SteveWatkins 
English, Linguistics 
and Speech 

Fred Whitman 
Business Adminstration 

Werner Wieland 
Biology 

Paul Zisman 
Education 



ZISMAN 



230 • Faculty 




\\ illiaiii AinlciMiii 
I'rcsklcnl 

Jcnnitcr Blair 
Admissions 

Vicki Campbell 

Ai.lministrali\c Assl 

ti) President 

Gloria Day 

Exec Sec 

Business and F-i nance 

Keith Hairsion 
Director ol I'pvsard Bound 

Deborah Harbcr 
Asst Dean tor Financial Aid 



Admiuistratic^n • 231 



11 r,i}\ 



\\ 



&' 



John MacDonald 

Director of Campus Recreation 

Frank Mason 

Asst VP for Business and Finance 

Venitta McCall 

Director, James Farmer Scholars 




Ray Merchent 
Executive Vice President 

Lucy Olson 
Executive Secretary 

Carol Parkinson 

Senior Secretary, English, Linguistics 

and Speech 



MrffflD 



232 • Administration 








\\'illi;iin k;iy l^opc 

Assi VI' tor Planiiinij. 

Asscsmcnl and liislilKni Research 

CccJricRuckcr 

Associate Director of 

Student Activities 

Jet'fcrey Smith 

Couscler. Cooridinalor 

I'puard F-5()iiml 

Lori Turner 

Adiiii 111 strati \e Assistant 
Studeiii Activities 

W'ihna Tynes 

Academic Coardinator. 

Upward Bound 

Da\ id White 
Asst Dean ol Admissions 



233 • AclmitiistrciTioii 



V^ ^^ These are some of the images seeii 

^ 




234 • CLOSING 



It MWC during the 1992-1993 school year... 




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&j 



2J5 • CLOSING 




236 • CLOSING 




237 • CLOSING 





by 
Jeremy Cline 

and 
Adam Fike 




We set out to write a column about a Legend that never lived. 
We wanted somebody from this school, from its past, to show how 
silly all this school stuff really is, and to prove that there is no reason 
for us to take the real world seriously after all. 

(At first we wanted a real legend, but there just isn't room in our 
busy lives for research, so we decided to make one up. (The person 
also had to be a guy, because we don't understand girls)) 

The goal here is to protest something. This may be our last 
chance to fly in the face of established ideas, so we might as well take 
advantage of it. 

Our idea came from Eddie The Eagle, a master of not possibly 
being able to win. Where are our Eddies? 
Who is out there fighting for our right to 
believe that no matter what we try, there 
is a chance that we may not suck. 

In 1968 or 69 there was a mass rally 
in Washington to levitate the pentagon in 
the name of peace and love. Around that 
same time almost the entire campus 
walked to D.C., just to dance naked in the 
reflecting pool. We dig this silliness; Right 
On! 

Sit-ins, and Freedom Rides in the 
sixties changed the world and let the 
college world rise up and stretch its 
muscles in the name of Right. Ok, maybe 
the chance to impact history is not as 
clear as it once was, but there is no reason 
we can't stretch a little. So it was our 
choice to act in the name of students 
everywhere and to create a character 
brave enough to carry our most powerful 
weapon - absurdity. 

Once on the TV show Night Court, 
Harry Stone quit his job as a judge with 
the sole purpose in life to place a Groucho 
fake nose and glasses on the Statue of 
Liberty. This is what we are looking for. 
We want an act both futile and random. 

But, you know we got it pretty good 
here. Sure, this 24-7 thing is a bitch, and 
the administration doesn't seem to listen 



238 • CLOSING 



or care, but for God's 
sake, the biggest issue 
to hit this campus in 
the last two sears is 
whether commuters 
should park on Col- 
lege Heights, "lea, we 
have to study all the 
time, but all those 
who haven't drank at 
least twice a week this 
semester stand up. 
(And ciuestion what 
the hell you are doing 
with your lives) Pa- 
pers are hard to write 
and tests are hard, but 

compared to the rest of the world we sure could do worse. 'I'his leaves 
little to fight about. 

After all, our biggest foe is fear. The real world is scar\-. We 
have a short lease left on our childhood, and four years to figure out 
what to do with it. What comes after this;' Morlgagcs:' Kids.' fobs' 
Baldness? 

To tell the truth, we just couldn't think of anxlhing. Spra\- 
paint is expensive, and nudity is quite IrankK' passe'. Its no wonder 
that our Eddie The Eagle followed a pretty normal path. 

He was sitting peacefully and enjoying his commencement exer- 
cises, the last moments of his college life. Speakers droned on and he 
began to think back on the past four or five \ears of his life. 

Moving into the dorm a nervous freshman, barfing on campus 
walk, staying up all night stud\'ing for an exam, skipping classes, fig- 
uring out that he couldn't skip class, having his first serious girlfriend, 
being broke, taking on the responsibility of renting his o\\ n house, 
blacking out, failing a class, acing an exam. It seemed like so much 
living had been packed into these past four years. He had experienced 
quite a bit in college, and at some point had become an adult. It had 
snuck up and surprised him. In a lot of \va\s that pissed him olf. 

So he stood up. A few people turned as he began to walk down 
the center aisle away from the podium. He stopped for a moment and 
thought about Bill Anderson. He smiled at him and waved. Bill waxed 
back. He didn't seem to xvant to be there either. "Want to come with 
me Bill ?" he asked. "Where are you going ?" asked Bill. "1 don't 
know," Eddie said. "I've already been there," Bill answered. 

More and more people began to notice him as he strode away. 
He threw off his hat. He didn't need it. His took off his gown. The 
diploma didn't mean much to him. He had learned what he could 
and forgotten the rest. Besides, the most important thing was being 
there. The paper had nothing to do with that. 

Shirt, pants, in fact all of his clothes followed (Nakedness might 
be passe', but it sure is fun). The troubling part was what would come 
next. There was really nothing betxveen him and real life. He knew it 
would change him. He liked the who he was and he didn't want to 
change. Ever\one was ignoring him now, and were lining up to get 
on with their lives. The\' might be able to take him alive, he decided, 
but they weren't going to take him boring. 

239 • CLOSING 



•.^^\Vi 




This Postcard 
spotted on a do 
Alvey, We here^ 
BATTLEFIELD \ 
this about sums it 
for Life on Marye 
Heights! 



The 1993 Battlefield apologizes for its tardi- 
ness and promises the 1994 Battlefield will be 
out the first-second week back in the Fall. 

1994 EDITOR Mike Woodward 






■ ,li ■■•,f7,"5 









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