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Full text of "Battlefield, 1998"

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Since the construction of the 
college gated in 1 90S for the State 
Normal Teacher's College, many 
changes hare occurred. Once such 
change is the charging of tuition. Until 
1928, tuition was free for all state 
residents who planned to teach. 19-1-1 
brought about major changes, as the 
state legislature passed laws changing 
the school's curriculum to liberal arts. 
The school's name became Mary 
Washington College of the University of 
Virginia, a place where females could 
receive a strong education. It wasn 't 
until 1970 that Mary Washington 
College broke its ties with the University 
of Virginia and became coed. The 
academic year of 1970-1971 found 22 
male students attending classes at 
AIWC, with 1 male living on campus, 



on the second floor of Hamlet Hoiue. In 
1965, there were 1, 768 students enrolled 
at AIWC. This year there 

are over 5,700. 

Until 1968, May Day was the 
big event of the school year. Like other 
school's Homecoming celebrations, par- 
ents and alumni would travel to MWC 
for the celebration. Preparation for the 
May event began as early as February, 
including allotment of the limited num- 
ber of tickets. Every class worked hard 
to make sure that the day's events went 
smoothly. 

Today MWC no longer cel- 
ebrates May Day, we instead have a 
Homecoming event that serves to unite 
the student body and bring the 
alumni together. 



Left to right: looking over town 
in 1926: May Pole Dance in 
1929: hanging out at the gym 
in Monroe in 1957. 




2 Opening 




One ot the biggest festivities was May Day. The queen was elected by the student body. Her court was usually girls that had 
been nominated for queen. It was held in the Open Air Theater. Being May Queen was quite an honor. 

-Lela Deere Darter 1928 





HinU to the Helpledd 

HOW TO BE A POPULAR FRESHMAN 



a. When first you board the train Fredericksburg bound, rush up to the old girl) as if they were long-lost friends, 

b. Throughout the journey impress upon them the popularity that was yours during High School. 

c. On arriving at College find fault with your room, roommates, food, rules, school regime in general. 

d. In classes answer every question whether or not you have any idea as to the subject matter. 

e. In dancing at night be sure to demonstrate your home-town talent. 

f In class meetings and general assmeblies it is necessary to make yourself very conspicuous by loud 

talking and giggling, 

g. You should by this time be quite well known to the student body and are known as the "Popular Freshman. " 

-Battlefield 1927 



Gateways 3 



ATTENTION OF THE STUDENTS: 

•AT J. boys or men who wish to call on student*) must register with the maid 
on the first floor of Virginia Hall. Before the visit is an approve? one. 

•Reminding: Every student is required to entertain in her own parlors, 
though she u< permittee) to stroll on the campus Sunday afternoon. 

• "Dates " may go to the Tea Room on Saturday evening only. 

• There is to be no parking in front of Betty Lewui Hall. The administration 
has notified both the night watchman and Officer McG bee to thu* effect. 

•All dates leave the hill at 10:00 RM. Boys or men who bring students to the 
college after that hour are expected to leave at once . 

• On your return to the college by automobile, come into your building 
instead of sitting out in the automobile . 

-Mrs. C. L. Bushnell, Dean of Women 




Left to right: a Fredericksburg taxi from 1927: the Swim 
Club from 1959: playing cards while monitoring the phone 
booth in 1957: studying in Trinkle Library in 1952: having 
tea on the porch of Secobec in 1959. 




(( Opening 






Before Seacobeck, everyone ate in FrancLi Willard Hall. 
Everyone ate at the dame time. Meals were served family 
style with eight girL to a table. Mrs. Bushnell would say 
"seated" when every girl was at her place. Every girl wore 
her best to the evening meal. No gym clothes or casual 
clothes were allowed in the dining room. 

-LeLa Deere Darter 1928 



Gateways $ 



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While some thing** change, 
some things stay the same- Junior 
Ring Week hasn 't changed too much. 
Even in the 50'd pranks were pulled 
that resolved around the fountain. 
W 7 hile it has changed shape in 
location and scale over the years, its 
legacy continues with juniors 
swimming in it every March. 

Many residence hall 
regulation*!, one in particular, have 
disappeared. The hated regulato/y 



hells no longer ring to wake students 
up, send them to meals, usher them 
in and out of class, tell them when to 
study, or when it is time for the lights 
to go out. Another big change i s that 
men are now allowed in the residence 
halls. 

Places to study have also 
changed over the 
years. Due to the 
lights out restrictions, 
students used to hide 



in closets and bathrooms with towels 
covering the cracks to prevent light 
from leaking out in order to get in that 
late night cramming before a test. 

There u no doubt that the 
future will bring many new traditions 
and habits to the student body. 




Left to right: being thrown into the fountain in 

1957; studying in the hath tub after tights out in 

1957; ready for a format in 1957; preparing for the 

Junior Ring Dance in 1957 



() Opening 



Dancer uded to be a major form of entertainment on campus. The German Club was the oldest dance club on ca, 
They held formal danced in the Hall of Mirrors. Each lady had a dance card and all of the men had to dance with 
Mr<). Budhnell, the Dean of Women, to make dure that they hadn 't been drinking. 





We 've tried to preserve for you reader*), 

In the few paged we have here, 
Glimpded of the happiest hourd 

We've had together thid year. 
In doing thid we 're comparing 

In a very dmall way 
The modt memorable hoard of Washington d Life 

With thode we Live today. 
The padt td predent, 

The predent, padt- 
That'd the idea we're giving you here, 

For human nature id much tlie dame, 
No matter what the year. 

Battlefield Theme - 1952 




Gateways f 



Student Lik 




8 Student Life 




Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Students enjoy music from a jukebox in the 
College Shop restaurant in Lee Hall, 1948; Residents attend a Coke party in their 
dorm in 1961; Students wait in long lines in from of George Washinton Hall. 
They hoped to get all their classes, as they registered for the 1955 fall semester; A 
couple dances the night away at the Winter Wonderland Dance held in the Lee 
Hall ballroom in 1961. Above: The 1927 May Queen is Crowned while her court 
sits respectfully. 



Gateways 9 



Pihat did you do k$t wmmtf 

5ummerieadereh\p 

Even- summer approximately twenty students are selected to the summer 
Leadership Program at MWC. These students spend twelve hours a -week 
working for the organization they represent. This summer students 
represented such organizations as Class Council, Honor Council, Yearbook, 
Women of Color, and Giant. By staying at MWC, members of these clubs 
are able to help their organization get an early 
start with planning tor the upcoming year. The 
members of Summer Leadership are also 
responsible for organizing Leadership Weekend, 
as well as helping with Preview, 
Graduation week activites, Reunion Weekend, 
and Freshman Orientation. 




Clockwise from center: Corey Sell and Beth 
-Moss go camping in Ball Circle, Matt Kauppi in 
the Big Basin Redwood State Park, Supapan 
Kanti climbs the ropes course, Mandy Grandle 
cleans her room in Willard Hall, Steve Charnoff 
and Jenny Moss take a ride in Baltimore, Blaine 
Ashworth goes in for the kill at Putt-Putt. 



JO Stutiani Life 



Summer Trips 




Megan Sheils and 
Sherri Pothier take a 
dip in front of the 
Louvre, Pans. 



Katie Sullivan takes a ride 
in Uukwaluudhi, 
Namibia. 



Amanda Newman and 
Besty Kiger at Luna 
Park Carnival in 
Montpellier, France. 



Gateways f f 



The School Year deqlne with a f3ang 

What do Bio Ritmo, Rocktoberfest, the drive-in movie, the 
Real Deal game show, and the banned book burning have 
in common? They were some of the first bring-in-the-new- 
year activities this fall at MWC. First year students moved 
in on August 20th and began the annual orientation 
programs. These students enjoyed the 80's dance and MWC 
Grinds. Capping off the week was the Real Deal Crazy Game 
Show in which they had the chance to compete for prizes. 
On September 10, Class Council sponsered the drive-in 
movie in Ball Circle. A movie screen which covered the entire 
entrance of Virginia hall enticed students to bring out 
couches, blankets, lawn chairs, and popcorn. They enjoyed 
a warm autumn night while watching the free double 
feature ET and Dirty Dancing. The beginning of October 
brought the traditional event of Rocktoberfest. All classes 
joined in the festivities on October 2nd. Kentucky Fried 
Chicken catered the campus-wide party, and the band 
Picasso Jones entertained the crowd. Whatever the occasion 
was, MWC students took a break from studying or working 
to join in the autumn fun. 



Below: A freshman plays a round in the Real Deal Crazy Game 
Show during Orientation Week. Far Below: A family strolls 
down campus walk as they visit MWC for Family Weekend. 





f2 



Student Life 



Photo By:Joe Pilln 



lockwise from top left: Students relax in Ball Circle as they watch the drive-in movies; Bio 
,itmo jams in front of Lee Hall; Burn baby, burn- Disco Inferno?, no it's an old-fashioned book 
urning at MWC. Replicas of banned books were burned after professors read excerpts from 
lem to students, who crowded in front of Lee Hall to watch the sparks fly; Students feast on 
Drn and chicken at the annual Rocktoberfest Concert. 




Photo By: Kevin Mac Liuku 



Gateways fQ 



Below: Students and alumni gather at the rugby field. This year's 
Homecoming caused much controversy when it was announced that the tailgating 
would be moved from behind the soccer field to the rugby field. There was a high 
turnout on both of the fields. Right: Soaring Eagle. The Eagle mascot can be 
found at MWC sporting events raising the spirit of the crowds and providing many 
laughs. 



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Look at those buff bodies. Brian Whittear, John Langan, Burt Burroughs, 
and Eric Bursch take a break from the tailgating to watch some of the soccer 
game. Students were often found splitting their time between the rugby field 
and the soccer game. 




rv 



Student Life 




CoHiintj flow 

MWC Begins a Hew Homecoming 
Tradition 

A warm Saturday October afternoon found students 
celebrating Homecoming '97. Students and alumni 
celebrated the annual Homecoming game at the Battlefield, 
but under new pretenses. Differing from years past, the 
tailgating festivities were held on the rugby field rather than 
the Battlefield parking lot. Breaking the tradition brought 
much controversy to the MWC campus as students were 
outraged at the decision. After the debate died down, 
Homecoming was still an event enjoyed by all. Students 
and alumni came early to find a good spot on the rugby field. 
As the day progressed more students walked down College 
Avenue to Hanover Street to join in the festivities. But the 
party didn't stay at the rugby field. Many students and 
alumni worked their way over to the bleachers to watch 
MWC's men's soccer team battle York College. At the end of 
a long, hard game Mary Washington was victorious, winning 
with a score of 2-0. 




Hurry up and take the picture. Some fans find time to take a quick picture. 
Homecoming has always been an event where people have the chance to get 
reacquainted with old friends. 



Gateway & f $ 



1fou Can 't Take 
It Uitk Mm 



Audience members 
were invited into a home 
where fireworks explosions 
were common and the 
inhabitants were anything 
but normal when You Can't 
Take it With You was 
produced in Kline Theater 
this fall. This crazy house 
was filled with a clumsy 
ballet dancer (Sarah Lyon), a 
tax-evading grandfather who 
went to commencement 
addresses as a hobby (Paul 
Dunford), and a cook that 
couldn't fix a real meal to 
save her life (Sara Crawford 
Nash). It was easy to see why 
Alice Sycamore, played by 
Kate Garvey, didn't want to 
introduce her parents and the 
rest of the family to her new 
love, Tommy Kirby (Brandon 
J. Carr) and his wealthy 
stuck-up parents (Joseph 



McMann and Susan 
Ingebretsen). Other 

characters that made this an 
evening to remember 
included Ed(Steven 

Townsley) who was married 
to Essie, the ballet dancer. 
Complete with Russian 
accents, Boris Kolenkhov 
(Mykal Kvenberg) and his 
friend Olga (Natalie Joy 
Johnson) added a bit more 
mayhem to the mix. Other 
cast members included Jim 
Criss as Mr. Depinna, Eric 
Tolbert as Henderson, 
Steven Townsley as Ed, 
Andrew Ward as Danny, and 
Jennifer Louis Being as Gay 
Wellington. As with all good 
stories, love of course wins 
out in the end and the Kirbys 
come to appreciate the 
Sycamore's special brand 
of wackiness. 



fG 



Student Life 




Ed, played by Steven 
Townsley, works on a piece of 
music for his wife. Despite 
galant efforts, it never is 
quite right. 




Mr. Depinna explains the explosion in the 
basement fireworks factory that led to his 
bandages. At the last minute the theater 
department had to change the explosion 
effects from sparklers to electric lights due 
to a decision made by the fire marshal. 




Martin Vanderhoff, played by 
Paul Dunford, was an 
observant character who 
frequently gave advice and 
engineered a clever scheme to 
evade the IRS. 





Harris, Johnson and 
Kvenberg have a 
stimulating conversation 
about Russian politics. 



Penelope and Paul 
Sycamore played by Kate 
Garvey and Michael 
Harris comfort each other 
after a long day. 



Gateways f "J 



Autum has arrived, and she 1 
never looked better. This bsi 
to nature costume was one| 
the more original at the dan: 



Sailor makes waves 
on the dance floor. 




o hy: Kevin Mac hut 



There were many 
portrayals of movie 
characters at the dance. 

The Evil step mother, 
Jennifer Goldman, is in 
a good mood tonight. 
Maybe she finally got rid 
of Snow White... 



18 



Student Life 




chel Silbaugh, Jennifer 
5th, Lillian Pitts, Daniela 
ley, and Kara Davis pose for 
iend. 




Face art work was 
popular this year at 
Halloweens. Catherine 
Cogut was decorated 
with a great flower. 



Beth Whitty, Chris 
Cavanaugh, and Katie 
Sullivan with large group 
of friends have a 
Halloween bash at their 
house. There were some 
interesting and creative 
costumes in attendance. 



Who's that behind the maek? 



ass Council's annual Halloweens 
ent was filled with many 
teresting characters this year. 
ime popular rented costumes were 
e witch from Snow White, 
•incess Leia, flappers, and cows 
aced the dance floor. Many people 
ade their own costumes or showed 
eir true colors by painting their 
ces. As students entered the 
reat Hall they were judged by 
sdric Rucker, Lori Turner, and 



Dean Chirico for best costumes and 
originality in individual and group 
categories. The judges had a hard 
time choosing the winners, 
considering all of the costumes 
reflected the imagination and 
creativity of MWC students. One of 
the awards went to five girls dressed 
as five different Princess Leias from 
the Star Wars Trilogy. As usual 
Halloweens was a well attended and 
successful event. 



Gateways f 9 




Jason Fanning and his friend 
horse around a little at the Kick- 
off. Many seniors had a lot of fun 
at the event. 



Pbot„ h: A'nra ,(/,;,• Lu.it 



fam Hick- OH 

A little different than the yaet. 



This year instead of 
having the usual 198th 
night, as has been the 
tradition, the Senior Class 
Council hosted a new kind 
of party. Unlike the 
alcohol filled celebration 
of the past, this event was 
alcohol free. Although 
some decided that this 
was reason enough not to 
attend, the large number 
of seniors who did show up 
had a really good time. 
There were a lot of gift 
certificates and other 



items given away at the 
door and the Wood 
Company catered the 
event with a variety of 
h'oerdurves, snacks, and 
sodas. Guster was the 
main entertainment for 
the evening. The band 
put on a great 

performance that was 
enjoyed by all. The event 
was a success and the 
start of a new tradition. 
It's definitely something 
for next year's seniors to 
look forward to! 




20 



Student Life 




The band Guster put on a 
great performance that 
kept everyone entertained. 
Many present were 
already Guster fans, and 
many more became fans 
that night. 














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Jay Kirby and Kevin 
Adkins have a 

conversation with fellow 
seniors over a coke. 




Class council president 
Clint McCarthy, Dr. 
Chirico, and senior class 
vice-president David 
Modzeleski discuss their 
kick-off presentation at 
the begining of the event. 

Class council officers 
Kara Davis, Jessica 
Moore, Daniela Kelley 
check in seniors at this 
year's Senior Kick-Off. 



tbotc In,: Kevin Mac Uut 



Gateways 2 1 



h h pi 

Symfonics and Show Choir bring 
Broadway to MWC 



For two evenings in October, the Symfonics and Show 
Choir groups entertained the MWC campus. The two 
musical groups joined forces to present two free concerts 
filled with music ranging from Broadway musicals to 
current popular hits. 

Show Choir wowed the audience with their song and 
dance routines, which included medleys from popular 
shows such as Grease and Rent. Their singing was 
further enhanced by the ballet dancing of Andy DeFiesta 
and Denise Policastro. 

During the Show Choir's costume changes, Symfonics 
took the stage for a change in pace. The MWC acapella 
group sang familiar songs such as Dreams by The 
Cranberries and Ants Marching by the Dave Matthews 
Band. This self-directed group thoroughly impressed the 
audience with their precision and talent. 



The gang is all here. Show Choir members Jon Young, Nate Pipk 
Andy DeFiesta, Marc Williams, Mike Milstead, Mike Henrickson, an 
Corey Sell, show how it is done down on the farm. 





Left: Born to hand-jive baby. Show Choir members, Denise Policastro an 
Andy DeFiesta perform the hand-jive during the Grease medley. This duo als 
wowed the crowd with their dancing. Above: Dave Matthews or Nate Pipke 

Symfonics member Nate Pipke performs a rendition of The Dave Matthews Band 
Ants Marching. 



22 



Student Life 




Sing for your supper. Symfonics member 
Stephanie Pencek performs one of the solos. 
Symfonics is a student-directed group and 
the only acapella group on campus. 




>ove: "We're not going to pay rent!" Show Choir members Lindsey Slaughter,Rachel 
lbaugh,Corey Sell, and Marc Williams perform to Jonathon Larsen's Rent. 



Above: Beauty School Drop-out. Show Choir 
members Marc Williams, Stephanie Pencek 
and Mike Milstead surround Lindsey 
Slaughter during the Grease medley. 



Gateways 23 



fdl fomd 



A night of dancing. 



This year Mary 

Washington students 
dressed up as they attended 
the Fall Formal, put on by 
Class Council. The Great 
Hall was transformed into 
a celestial sky with sun and 
moon decorations 

abounding. The DJ mixed 
popular music to a filled 
dance floor. When people 
were tired of dancing they 
could take a break and grab 
some food and punch. As 
one exited the Great Hall 



sounds of jazz music poured 
out of the Eagle's Nest. The 
live jazz band attracted an 
even greater crowd, filling the 
room. Students had fun as 
they attempted to swing 
dance. Luckily no one was 
injured by the flailing arms 
and legs of the dancers. 



Left to right: Jason 
Vickers, Shannon Maguire, 
Jenny Moss, and Steve 
Charnoff 




2f 



Student Life 



The jazz band play 
up in the Eagle's Ne 





A couple dances to the jazz 
music in the Eagle's Nest. 



Dr. Chirico and his wife talk 
with Cedric Rucker. Fall 
Formal was a chance for 
Faculty to get dressed up 
and have a good time too. 



Gateways 2S 



Ckwtmat Clxeeh 

Inspecting Carol 



This winter the 
faculty, students, and 
community were 

entertained by the very 
amusing performance of 
Inspecting Carol . This play 
touched the heart of the 
audience as the characters 
on stage shared their plight 
with the audience. The 
characters are trying to 
save their failing acting 
company from bankruptcy 
through a National 
Endowment of the Arts 
grant. The company had 
only one way to get their 
grant, to prove that they 
were strong and creative 
actors to an NE A Reviewer. 



The company mistakenly 
believes that an actor, who 
is seeking employment 
with them, is the NEA 
reviewer. They take him in 
regardless of his poor 
acting skills. Believing that 
he is the reviewer the 
company follows all of his 
suggestions on how to 
"improve" their 

performance . It is at this 
time that the real NEA 
reviewer arrives to critique 
the play. In this funny 
twist of fate, the NEA 
reviewer loves the 
haphazaradly perfomed 
play because of the changes 
made by the new arrival. 



Robert Murigaza, Chicago 
Townsley, Tiffany D. Hayzeltt, 
Matthew Fitzpatrick, and 
Brandon J. Carr perform their 
version of "A Christmas Carol." 





26 



Student Life 




Jod bless us, everyone!" 
ies out Brandon Carr. The 
ist attempts to put on their 
sst for the foundation 
ispector. 



Natalie Joy Johnson 
and Paul Dunford 
interrogate Brandon 
J. Carr in an attempt 
to discover if his 
character is the 
inspector that will 
help them reearn 
their grant money 



Gateways 2 T 



ti 



eW 



Giant Productions brings the 
bast to MWC 

The Indigo Girls, Pat McGee, Bio Ritmo, Violent 
Femmes, Stanley Jordan, and Run DMC are just 
a few of the musical groups that Giant 
Productions have brought to MWC in the past 
year. The members of Giant aimed to please 
students and did their best to bring the most 
popular and entertaining musicians to campus. 
Giant booked a wide variety of acts including 
current music, swing, and jazz musicians, such 
as Stanley Jordan. Students were treated to 
music from the eighties when Run-DMC played 
in the Great Hall. However, some might consider 
the Indigo Girls concert the best of the year, while 
others think Pat McGee was the best. The Indigo 
Girls concert in October was one of the most 
popular; students slept out on Campus walk for 
both tickets and seats in Dodd. Giant has always 
provided great entertainment at a great price. 




"I am ready for my close-up Mr. DeMille!" Fans at the Run- 
DMC concert were energized by the group's music and danced the 
whole night. 



Guitarist Stanley Jordan entertains the crowd in Dodd. 




28 



Huddled masses. Students line campus walk waiting to be let in' 
Dodd Auditorium for the Indigo Girls Concert. 



Student Life 




The Indigo Girls Concert is considered by some to be the best of the year. Campus walk was lined 
with students waiting to buy tickets, as well as later on waiting to get into Dodd to find the best 
possible seat. The duo sang old and new songs, thoroughly entertaining the crowd. 



Gateways 2 9 



timtei* Carnival 

C\aee Council Gets Rid of the 
Winter Blues 

Students often complain that the months of January 
and February can sometimes be slow at Mary 
Washington, but this year that changed. Class Council, 
with the help of Campus Recreation, held the first 
annual Winter Carnival on the last weekend of January. 
The main event at the carnival was the Human Foosball 
Tournament. Students created teams to compete 
against each other in the Great Hall. The first place 
team received a $600 cash prize. As the day wore on 
teams became fiercely competitive. 

In the morning Campus Recreation hosted several 
different races, including a relay race as well as a road 
race. Later in the afternoon, students entered a 
wheelbarrow race, that took them from the back 
entrance of the Great Hall to the fountain. Inside the 
Great Hall, students enjoyed free pizza and soda. The 
Health Center gave out free information and the campus 
radio station gave away free CDs. 



Nice legs! Another competitor takes their best shot at scorin 
a goal. 





*'■£. 



\M1 *l 



Photo by: Kerri Pakura 




Push, baby, push!! These two athletes show off just how good they are in the difficult wheel barrow race. 



Photo by: Kerri Paku 



30 Student Life 




Keep your eye on the ball. 

Senior, Ryan Forbrich, shows 
off his soccer skills in the 
human foosball tournament. 



On your marks...One of the teams 
in the wheelbarrow race prepares to 
go. This race provided many laughs 
for the spectators 



oto by: Kerri Pakih 

ome on, just a little faster! Maylian Pac 
id Nate Coles aim at getting the best score 
r the race. This event involved much 
'operation between the two teammates. 



Just try to get by 

me! The goalie in 
this game moves 
forward to try and 
prevent the ball 
from getting past. 



Photo by: Kerri Paka 



Gateways 3 f 



Oh please let me win! A group of seniors anxiously wait while the winning numbers are announced. 




AllpbotM by: Peyton Dm; 



Seniors Have the Beet of doth Worlds 

Following in the tradition of 100th Night, Class Council sponsored Senior Countdown 
on February 3,1996, marking the last 100 days left at Mary Washington. Seniors 
came out to enjoy pizza and soda as they reminisced with old friends. The night was 
hosted by the senior class president, Clint McCarthy, vice-President, Dave Modzeleski, 
secretary/treasurer, Larissa Lipani, and publicity chair, Jenine Zimmers. These four 
presented exceptional senior awards to many deserving students and raffled off several 
pieces of electronic equipment and gift certificates donated by local merchants. Senior 
Countdown was seen by many as a great lead into 100th Night. The following night 
seniors journeyed downtown to Spanky's to partake in 100th Night the way it has 
always been celebrated — with good friends, good music, and good alcohol. When it 
was announced that 100th Night would no longer be sponsored on campus by Mary 
Washington there was much dismay and anger. However, seniors received the best 
of both worlds. They were able to attend an alcohol-free night on campus sponsored 
by Class Council, and were also able to celebrate the traditional 100th night at 
Spanky's. 




32 



Student Life 



You put your left foot in... A group of 
enthusiastic seniors dance to the music. Seniors 
enjoyed good food, good music, and good times. 




ck a ticket, any ticket! Senior Class Vice- 
esident, Dave Modzeleski, holds the bag with 
. the raffle tickets. The holder of the winning 
imber won one of many great prizes. Each 
nior who attended Kick-off automatically 
ceived a raffle ticket. 



Gateways ($($ 



£pww# ffceafe 



Every year many students leave their worries 
behind to enjoy the week long vacation of spring 
break. Students relax by traveling to various 
places; many students go to Florida to spend 
time at sunny beaches, while others go to New 
England to hit the ski slopes or hike in the 
mountains. This year, in addition to these usual 
destinations, students went to Miami to work 
with the Habitat for Humanity of Greater 
Miami. The MWC C.O.R.E. office offered this 
unique break opportunity to the campus 
community, as part of a national collegiate 
challenge posed by Habitat. Students worked 
along side with MWC faculty advisors, Bob 
Franklin and Andre Clanton, to build houses 
for low income families. 






Left page, top : Shoshana Goldberg, Stephanie Hand, Karen Whalen, and Andrea 
Chermela analyze the demons inside of their car engine at South of the Border, 
SC; bottom, Peyton Davis and senior friends party at Daytona Beach, FL. This 
page, clockwise from top: 14 students show off their building abilities in Miami; 
Aaron Davis enjoys the scenery of Arcadia National Park in Maine; Students work 
on the roof of a house; Lars Thestrup and Mike Paolino show off their new studly 
nipple rings. 



Gateways 3v) 



February found many organizations at MWC working hard 
to celebrate black history month. Women of Color (WOO 
and Black men Of a New Direction (BOND), two student 
organizations at MWC, put on the 8th annual Step Show. 
Step teams from many colleges, including VCU and JMU, 
traveled to Dodd Auditorium to compete. This was the 
second year of the new show format. These organizations 
changed the format to reach out to the community, inviting 
high schools to showcase their talents. BOND and WOC 
look forward to an even more exciting show next year; 
MWC'S newly created step team will compete in this show. 
The Gospel Extravaganza was another event that 
helped to make Black History Month a success. Voices of 
Praise, a student choir at MWC, sponsored this event in 
Dodd Auditorium, on February 22nd. In addition to Voices 
of Praise, three community groups sang gospel and hymnal 
music at the event. The choir is currently directed by Andre 
Clanton and Clifton Davis; it is a non-denominational and 
non-ethnic student organization, open to all. 




Top right: A community group sings a gospel song. Right: One of the competing 
step team members concentrates on her moves. Above: Three teammates perform 
for a crowded house. 




36 



Student Life 




Clockwise from top left: Robert Sharp sings along with the other members 
of Voices of Praise; Carrie Smith performs jazz songs at the Masquerade 
Ball. This was a new fund-raising event put on by Women of Color; Masks 
were given out to all who attended; A local high school student performs at 
the Step Show. 



Gateutacjs 3 1 



fyaiok ^m# tyztk 



An MWC Tradition 



This year, as always, Junior Ring Week was filled with 
excitement. Students pulled pranks on juniors from 
March 30th to April 4th. Juniors had fun at special "safe 
activities" that Class Council put on through out the 
week. The Seymores Band kicked off the week when they 
performed in the Underground with Class Council 
providing free subs. On Tuesday, Ball Circle transformed 
into a drive-in movie theater. Students from all classes 
enjoyed two movies, the Goonies and Top Gun. Later in 
the week, juniors formed teams, trying to win cash prizes 
in a scavenger hunt. The pranks ended Friday afternoon; 
many juniors breathed a sigh of relief that ring ceremony 
had finally come. The week ended with the Ring Dance, 
held in The Great Hall. 





Photograph By: Joe Piltman 

Clockwise from above: Students posted embarrassing fliers of juniors throughout campus; Walter Parra helps Stephanie Smith achieve the East 
Bunny look by adorning her with shaving cream, eggs, and Easter grass; Paul Storer takes a tour of Campus Walk; Members of the Physical Pla 
staff cut down one victim's underwear; A banner tells Julie Wessinger where she can find her shoes, Lee Hall; The Lochness Monster emerges fro 
the fountain. 



38 



Student Life 




Gateways 3 9 



Ceremony 

On Friday, April 3, 1998 the 
Junior Class recieved their school rings 
in Dodd Auditorium . This is an exciting 
landmark in the lives of juniors for two 
reasons; they have survived Junior Ring 
Week and their senior year is just 
around the corner. Mary Washington 
has a very high participation rate in ring 
ordering, one of the highest in the 
country. 

In addition to the excitement of 
ring presentations, many students wait 
anxiously to see if they will be selected 
for Mortar Board. The National Honor 
Society recognizes seniors for 
outstanding achievements in 
scholarship, leadership, and service. At 
the ceremony twenty-two juniors were 
tapped into the society. These juniors 
look forward to a year filled with service 
projects. 

Right: Mike Canty and friends show off their rings. 
Below (left to right): Dr. Anderson hands out a ring; 
Dr. Stageberg offers his 'pearls of wisdom'; Students 
try to stay patient while they wait to recieve their 
rings. 





40 Student Life 




Clockwise from top left: Students get used to their new rings; Junior 
Ring Week pranks are returned to students by President Anderson; 
Sarah Petty and her mom show off their matching Mary 
Washington rings; Students open their boxes, happy to get their 
rings after the long wait. 




Gateways £f f 



A Boat Cru'\ee 



As always, spring formal was a major success. 
Members of Class Council organized this event; 
it began with a bus ride which took students 
from GW Circle to the waiting Odyssey 3, in 
Washington D.C. Students filled the two hour 
long boat ride with dancing, eating, and 
drinking, for those who were legal of course. 
The spacious ship provided two different dj's 
for dancing, tables for resting, and outdoor 
walk ways for catching a breathe of fresh air. 





Both pages clockwise from top left: A couple takes a rest from the dance floor; 
Meredith Leson and John Greven look at the passing shoreline; This party goer 
struts his stuff on the dance floor; Asheley Pond and date board the cruise; Dave 
Smith and Keri Mannebach walk across the dance floor; Two couples enjoy the 
fresh air; Nate Coles, Beth LaMantia, James Santos, and Kerry Flynn dance 
the night away together. 




<t2 



Student Life 




U Photos By: Chru Cam 


naugh 












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H»uHi CuHuud fm 

A celebration of diversity 



Mary Washington College hosted the 8th annual Multicultural 
Fair on Saturday April 18th. The fair featured musical 
entertainment, food and craft vendors, as well as a variety of 
children's activities. The fair ran from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on 
Campus Walk, Ball Circle, and in Dodd Auditorium. Many of 
the performances depicted this year's theme, "Embrace the 
Wonders of Cultural Diversity." Elegbra Folklore Society, a 
popular West African dance company from Richmond Virginia 
entertained many people with dances accompanied by music of 
the gourd and drum. The dance company used authentic slave 
narratives and stories to express aspects of Africa's culture and 
customs. The Society dressed in colorful and traditional clothing 
as they educated the audience about Africa's global contributions. 
The Tai Yim Kung Fu Lion Dancers, an Asian dance group also 
thrilled audiences with their traditional costumes and dances. 
Other performers included Kikuyuki Dancers, a Japanese 
classical dance group, the Estampa Espanola Dancers, the MWC 
Martial Arts club, the MWC Bagpipe Band, MWC's Voices of 
Praise, and the MWC Jazz Band. The event, with an estimated 
attendance of over 3500 people, was a success with both students 
and the community. 






Clockwise from top middle: Campus walk is filled with anxious 
visitors; The Kikuyuki Dancers perform an ancient dance; the 
Estampa Espanola dancers perform a traditional dance from 
their culture; Erin Brown performs on the bag pipes; Pitter 
Patter, the clown, was a popular addition to the fair; 
Facepainting was enjoyed by many at the Multi Cultural Fair. 



Airy; Kevin Mac Liutk, 



Gateways 4^v) 



A knock out 

Despite rainy weather Class Council presented another successful 
Devil Goat Day. The event was held on April 23rd in the Great Hall. 
The Ernies, a small band, provided live music for devils and goats 
alike. Devil Goat Day has been a tradition at Mary Washington for 
decades; the seniors and sophomores team up against the juniors 
and freshman in interclass competitions. In the past, classes were 
cancelled to allow for a full day of competition; however, now the 
event is only held in the afternoon so that students will not miss 
precious class instruction. The event has now become a carnival of 
games, free food, and live music to help students relax and have fun 
with their friends. Some students wore oversized boxing gloves as 
they battled it out in the inflatable ring. Others attempted to wrestle 
each other to the ground in huge sumo wrestling suits. Between 
competitions students enjoyed cotton candy, pizza, popcorn and cokes. 




?6 



Student Life 





Clockwise from middle: Two friends 
go at each other in the jousting ring; 
Meredith Price waits for someone 
with good aim to 'dunk' her; Student 
suits up to joust; Sumo Wrestling 
requires concentration and balance; 
Friend or foe? These two decide that 
jousting is the only way to settle the 
matter; Amy Leachtenauer lends a 
hand at the cotton candy machine; 
Students enjoying the free food at 
Devil Goat Day. 



Gateways if 'J 



The final fling, as put on by Class Council, was a major 
success. Grad Ball was even more memorable this year 
because it was held in the ballroom, the first dance to 
occur there in many years. Shoo-shoo, one of the many 
singers with the swing band, crooned songs to soon to be 
graduates. The music was filled with variety, as the 
swing band played jazzy tunes in the Ballroom and a DJ 
spun songs in the Underground. As students moved from 
the Ballroom down toward the Underground, they could 
take a break from dancing and enjoy food. The night 
was a great way to see friends as students one last time, 
enjoy the good Fredericksburg weather, and take one last 
look over campus from the balcony. 



« 




■■ -**^ 




Student Life 





Clockwise from far page top: Shoo- 
Shoo, a great swing singer leads the 
congo line as Danielle Matuch and Jen 
Belote follow; Amanda Newman and 
Patrick enjoy a slow song; A couple 
enjoys the dj's music in the 
Underground; Renee Adler and 
Danny enjoy the view from the Lee 
Ballroom balcony; Famous Grad Ball 
decorations, glasses and flowers; Ed 
Egee and date take a twirl on the 
dance floor; Seniors pose for one last 
picture. 



Gateways 4^9 



A New Beginning 

Commencement exercises for the 1998 senior 
class began around 9:30 in Ball Circle on 
Saturday, May 16. Graduation was a day 
filled with bright sunshine, pictures, and 
speeches. Hildy Parks Cohen, the graduation 
speaker, shared words of wisdom with the 
graduates. President Anderson gave what 
was probably the most memorable speech, "ya 
da ya da ya da." Many awards were given to 
both members of the faculty and graduates 
during commencement. Emeritus status was 
awarded to Professor Glover, Professor 
Hansen, and Professor Muick. The Colgate 
W. Darden, Jr. Award went to, Tiffany 
Hayzlett, the student with the highest GPA. 
By 1:00, Ball Circle was filled with over 800 
graduates possessing BA, BS, and BLS 
degrees. The ceremony concluded with the 
faculty followed by the graduates, exiting the 
circle for one last procession down campus 
walk. 





Top Right: Had:- Parks Cohen, the graduation speaker, gives the commencement speech to the soon to be graduates. During the ceremony she 
recieved an nonary "doctor of humane letters" degree for her service to the college and to higher education. Above: Matt Kauppi, a computer science j 
major, shakes President Anderson's hand as he recieves his diploma. 



SO 



Student Life 




Clockwise from top left: Seniors use commencement programs to fan themselves because of the intense heat; The Eagle Pipe Band ends the 
Taduation procession down campus walk, playing Celtic music; Seniors clap for award recipients, who are announced at graduation; Provost Hall 
resents Tiffany-Amber Hazlett with the Colgate W. Darden Jr. award. 



Gateways $ f 



Ike ifeto %h l^etfiew 



The school year was filled with many exciting events, 
including the completion of Jepson Science Center 
and the presentation of the Presidential Medal of 
Freedom to Dr. Farmer'. Mary Washington hosted a 
reception in his honor on May 3, 1998 in the Great 
Hall. Students, faculty, and the local community 
came to celebrate with Dr. Farmer, enjoying food and 
five music. On Wednesday April 15, a different type 
of celebration was held, the ribbon cutting ceremony 
for the Jepson Science Center. Alice and Robert 
Jepson, who donated $2 million towards construction, 
came to cut the ribbon. Mrs. Jepson is a 1964 
graduate of Mary Washington College. The four- 
story, 72,000 square-foot facility has been under 
construction since March 1996, and will be open for 
fall 1998 classes. The new fountain in front of the 
building will probably become the most tempting 
swimming location on campus due to the difficulty of 
swimming around the new globe scheduled to be 
installed in the Palmieri Plaza fountain. 




Photo By: hill &i™» 



Top right: Dr Farmer wears his Medal of Freedom. Middle right: A live 
band performs at the celebration. Bottom right: The new science center, 
finished at last. Above: People enjoy the variety of delicous foods at the 
celebration honoring Dr. Farmer. 




Photo By: Peyton D, 



52 



Student Life 




Photo By: Peyton DavU 

Top middle: President and Mrs. Clinton present Dr. Farmer with 
the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the White House East Room 
on January 15. Above: The Mary Washington Eagle Bagpipe Band 
leads the procession to the Jepson ribbon cutting ceremony. Left: 
Mrs. Jepson, along with President Anderson cut the ribbon at the 
science cente's opening ceremony. 



: to By: Peyton Da 



Gateways ^>3 



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Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Student* wait for convocation to begin, 1961; Freshman, 
wearing their beanies, review their noted on the benches in Monroe Hall, 1955; Students cany 
their dirty cloths to the laundry room, 1948; Students load their luggage onto the bud preparing 
for the trip home at winter break, 1955 Above: Students participate in the traditional graduation 
activities, carrying the Daisy Chain to Ball Circle, 1932. 



Gateways $ ~[ 



Rebecca D. Abramson 

Psychology 
Kevin M. Ad kins 

Studio Art & Religion 
Renee Lore Adler 

Business Administration & Economics 
Sandra S. Alexander 

Psychology 



Kirsten S. Angle 

Sociology & Business Administration 
Carolyn Ohner Tippie Antonich 

History 
Angela Kaye Apel 

English 
Melissa Armistead 

Sociology 



Laura J. Babb 

Biology 
Jennifer E. Bahler 

Psychology 
Wendy D. Balazik 

Political Science 
Sara M. Baldwin 

Math 



Kimberly S. Barber 

International Affairs 
Molly Barber 

Lori A. Barnes 

Psychology 
Caralyea M. Barranco 

Historic Preservation 



Tara Barto 

Jessica S. Bartlett 
Political Science 

Heidi Darling Bass 
English 

Tina Beahm 
Biology 



Elizabeth B. Bean 

Psychology 
Pauline Leigh Beauchamp 

Psychology 
Clara Elizabeth Bell 

Sociology 
Jennifer L. Belote 

Chemistry 




OO People — Seniors 




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LtspJ 






Hilary Ann Bendix 

English 
Kara K. Bennis 

Political Science 
Darien S. Berkowitz 

Economics 
Rebecca Thomas Berry 

English 



Jeremy T. Blain 

Political Science 
Kimberly A. Bohle 

Political Science 
Kimberly Boots 

Business Administration 
Trevor D. Bopp 

Psychology 



Sheri L. Bourne 

History 
Genevieve M. Bovee 

International Affairs 
Yvonne Bowler 

English 
Dabney C. Boye 

Psychology 



Sarah E. Boyer 

Math 
Zenobia L. Bragg 

Biology 
Alison B. Breland 

Psychology 
Jenni Alice Brock 

Environmental Science 



Courtney Royce Brooks 

Music 
Lori E. Brooks 

English 
Eric M. Brown 

History 
Marissa Buono 



Amy Burns 

Erik D. Bursch 

Geography 
Brian Douglas Burton 

English 
Mary V. Bush 

Geography 



Gateways £9 



Andrew B. Buxbaum 

American Studies 
Mara L. Buzzell 

Biology 
Ailie Byers 

History 
Kevin E. Byrne 

Business Administration 



Mark P. Cancellieri 

English 
Frank C. Carr 

Studio Art 
Jennifer M. Carter 

Religion 
Michelle A. Casey 

Math 



Jeanie Cassidy 

American Studies 
Lauren Q. Chadwick 

English 
Dealon S. Chapin 

Historic Preservation 
Megan E. Chiasson 

Psychology 



Meredith L. Christiansen 

Business Administration 
Alison Chlebus 

Michelle Katherine Ciarlo 

English 
Nina G. Clamosa 

Biology 



Sara C. Coggins 

Economics 
Catherine A. Cogut 

Chemistry 
Kelly Ann Coleman 

English 
Rachel L. Collins 

Sociology 



Debra L. Conner 

German 
Manuel J. Contreras 

Business Administration 
Eli Cook 

Philosophy 
Susan Cooper 




352j*j|# .« 




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60 Peop/e — Seniors 




Jessica S. Cornwell 

Economics 
Kyle Kenneth Courtney 

History 
James L. Creegan 

Political Science 
Toby Croll 

English History 



Julie A. Crowder 

Religion & Studio Art 
Alison Jan Crumling 

Biology & Psychology 
Beth Ann Csizmadia 

Business Administration 
Robert Cushing 



Erin E. D'Amore 

Sociology & Spanish 
Rene a S. Danco 

History 
Marne E. Dantone 

Geography 
Anne E. Daugherty 

English & Political Science 



Richard S. DeRose, Jr. 

Business Administration 
Timothy J. Deyesu 

Geography 
Aryn Elizabeth Diggle 

Business Administration 
Jennifer A. Dodson 

History 



Christine M. Dombroski 

English 
Tracy E. Doney 

Chemistry 
Michael R. Donohue 

Business Administration 
Michael D'Ostilio 



Emily L. Doughty 

Art History 
Emily Ann Douglas 

Political Science 
Elizabeth L. Drennan 

Sociology 
Nicole C. Dumas 

Psychology & German 



Gateways fo f 



Amber L. Dunleavy 

English 
Wesley I. Dunn 

Geography 
Bonnie Joann Dye 

Political Science & Religion 
Sheila M. Elledge 



Kara Elizabeth Eller 

English 
Kirstein K. Erickson 

Erika L. Evans 

Historic Preservation 
Jennifer Lynn Evans 

Biology 



Jason M. Fanning 

Computer Science 
Lara Michelle Fedorov 

English & Sociology 
Megan Leigh Feeley 

History 
Melissa M. Finke 

American Studies & History 



Catherine Kay Fisher 

History 
Lucas M. Flickinger 

Historic Preservation 
John Ryan Forbrich 

Business Administration 
LaRose Anne Fore 

English 



Kathleen Foster 

Susan Lynn Foster 

Psychology 
Amy Lou Friant 

Environmental Science & Geology 
Jason D. Fusaro 

Business Administration 



Matthew P. Galeone 

Psychology & English 
Kelly E. Garner 

Biology 
Brian J. Gebhardt 

English 
Jennifer D. Gentry 

English 



o2 Peopfe — Seniar& 





Rakhi Gera 

Erika Jeanne Giaimo 

Speech & International Affairs 
Cecelia Gibson 

Historic Preservation 
Erin Golden 



Nicole M. Gonyo 

English 
Sara Katherine Goode 

Political Science 
Katie A. Gottsch 

Biology 
Emily C. Grant 

Historic Preservation 



Jessica Alise Green 



Kia Greenfield 

Psychology 
John P. Greven 

Biology 
Roman Angelo Guerra 

Business Administration & Economics 



Keith Guralchuk 

English 
Christina P. Harakal 

English 
Julie A. Harrison 

English 
Allison P. Hatton 

Psychology 



Tiffany D. Hayzlett 

Theater 
Amy C. Helberg 

Psychology 
Susan Herbert 

English 
Daniel P. Hess 

History 



Wesley H. Heuvel 

History 
Victoria E. Higgins 

Sociology 
Natalie L. Holbrook 

Sociology 
Susan E. Hopper 

Biology & Geography 



Gateways &3 



Peter Hua 

Phyllis W. Huntzinger 

Psychology 
Caitlin M. Jenkins 

Art History 
Jeffrey Glen Jennings 

English 



Heather M. Jones 

Sociology 
Suzanna Louise Jones 

History 
Joshua D. Jordan 

Sociology 
Andrea Helene Justice 

German 



Matthew N. Kauppi 

Computer Science 
Mark A. Kelaher 

Business Administration 
Ryan R. Keller 

Geography 
Kishan Ramesh Khona 

Business Administration 



Elizabeth A. Kiger 

Business Administration 
Alexis Kingham 

Biology 
James Alexander Kirby 

Historic Preservation 
Kimberly Klosek 



Stacy D. Knight 

Political Science 
Christine E. Koster 

History 
Jennifer C. Koster 

Economics 
Jeffrey J. Kostrzewsky 

Math 



Edward J. Kriete 

Business Administration 
Brian Chris Kubin 

Business Administration & German 
Jaime Kwiatkowski 

Studio Art 
Aron Dale Laney 

Environmental Science 



6 T Peopfe — Seniors 





Kristin Louise Lantz 

International Affairs 
Beverly E. Laprade 

Business Administration 
Allison J. Leahy 

Biology 
Carmen M. Ledford 

Biology 



Sara E. Leedom 

English 
Selamawit Legesse 

Environmental Science 
Tristan Leiter 

Psychology 
Richard A. Leson 

Art History 



Ashley M. Lewis 

French 
Jennie Y. Lin 

Biology 
Matthew W. LoFiego 

History 
John W. Long, Jr 

Business Administration 



Stacey Look 

Miriam Shine Lu 

Historic Preservation & Art History 
Brian G. Lusk 

Math Physics 
Meredith L. Lyons 

Business Administration 



Ryan A. MacMichael 

Computer Science 
Jennifer L. Macomber 

Historic Preservation 
Betsy M. Maldonado 

Psychology 
Tara A. Mallon 

Business Administration 



Aaron I. Mandel 

Sociology 
Steven Joseph Mangano 

Business Administration 
Lina Marunas 

History & Historic Preservation 
Dianne Michelle Matthews 

Political Science 



Gateways &v) 



Kari Lynn McCarley 

Psychology 
Tara McGintee 

Biology 
Caitlin M. McGurk 

Art History 
David P. McKim 

Studio Art 



Robert P. McKinstry 

Biology 
Brian M. McMurray 

Psychology 
Sarah Ann Meinhart 

Math 
Natalie S. Meredith 

German 



Shelly Lynne Miller 

Environmental Science 
Leslie Lane Mills 

Political Science 
Marliese N. Millson 

English 
Justin A. Mink 

Political Science 



David S. Modzeleski 

International Affairs & Spanish 
Jayme S. Morris 

Business Administration 
Nathan R. Morrow 

Computer Science 
Tricia Moseley 

American Studies 



Katherine Elizabeth Moss 

History 
Anne M. Mullins 

English 
Patrick M. Murphy 

Computer Science 
Elizabeth G. Murray 

Business Administration 



Andrea Christine Myers 

Spanish 
Kirk L. Myers 

Business Administration 
Melissa Rachelle Myers 

English 
Rebecca H. Myers 

Chemistry 



6 6 Peop/e — Seniors 



" MM* 

am ■&! * 





Amanda L. Newman 

French & International Affairs 
Stephen M. O'Connell 

Geography 
Robyn L. Oliver 

Biology 
Anna Elizabeth Olver 

Psychology 
Shannon O'Neill 



Kristal Otto 

Sociology 
Michael Charles Paolino 

Political Science & 

Business Administration 
Dennis Parker 

Business Administration & Economics 



Mary Jeanette Parker 

Business Administration & 
Economics 
Lindsey Marie Parrish 

Psychology Biology 
Kristen Marcelle Patton 

Sociology 
Heather Payne 



Carrie Pearson 

Psychology 
Jennifer L. Perry 

Theater 
Benjamin P. Phelps 

Business Administration 
Joseph E. Pittman 

Business Administration 



Joselle R. Poblete 

Business Administration & Spanish 
Sharon R. Poblete 

Business Administration & Sociology 
Anitra Taylor Pool 

English 
Frank N. Porcelli 

Computer Science 



Michael B. Prensky 

Business Administration 
Kimberly A. Rainbow 

Environmental Science 
Andrea B. Randall 

American Studies 
Amanda K. Reeve 

Psychology 



Gateways () "J 



Christina Reinhart 

Philip J. Reiss 

Geography 
Laura E. Reynolds 

Sociology 
Carl Alexander Reynoso 

Sociology 



Joanna Lee Riedel 

Art History & Studio Art 
Michelle B. Rivers 

Studio Art 
Erin Elizabeth Rodman 

English 
William J. Rusch 

Psychology 



Holly R. Sanford 

Business Administration 
Karina Alexa Santiago 

Sociology 
Jennifer Lynn Sauerbrunn 

International Affairs & Geography 
Jennifer E. Saunders 

Environmental Science 



John Schmauch 

Edward T. Schreiner 

Environmental Science & Geography 
Jennifer R. Schwartz 

English 
Robert Michael Scoggins, Jr. 

Studio Art &Political Science 



Ashley Elizabeth Seekford 

Biology 
Heather Settle 

Emily C. Shanaberger 

Speech 
Kathleen Shea 



Ronelle A. Shields 

English 
Lanny Ray Shortridge 

Political Science 
Elizabeth A. Siciliano 

Psychology 
Heather Lynn Siderius 

Biology 




DO Peopfe — Seniors 




Shelly L. Singley 

English 
Erin E. Smith 

Psychology & English 
Felicity D. Smith 

Geography 
Julia L. Smith 

Business Administration 



Rebecca L. Smith 

Music 
Trina Smith 

Psychology 
Adrien Michon Snedeker 

Business Administration 
Rachel Levine Sola 

History 



Maureen A. Southard 

History 
Deborah Dow Stick 

Biology 
Jennifer Elizabeth Stocks 

Spanish 
Lindsay A. Stover 

English 



Neda Charlotte Stuckey 

English & Geography 
Wendy E. Sulc 

Psychology 
Catherine M. Sullivan 

Sociology 
Theresa A. Tempesta 

History 



Helen M. Thomas 

Historic Preservation 
Robert J. Thormeyer 

History 
Yori Tondrowski 

English 
Michelle C. Turner 

Biology 



Laura Diane Vagts 

Sociology 
Anne D. Valentine 

Sociology 
Virginia M. Vaughn 

Business Administration 
Amy E. Wachenfeld 

Psychology 



Gateways () 9 



Kristen B. Walsh 

Psychology 
Elizabeth L. Wampler 

English 
Jeanmarie R. Ward 

Economics & Political Science 
Jennifer Weakley 

History 



Kimberly Dawn Weber 

Biology 
Susan Weiss 

History 
Anne N. Wenthe 

Business Administration 
Bradley A. White, II 

Environmental Science 




Matthew Peyton White 

Economics 
Morgan A. White 

Political Science 
Anne M. Whitehall 

Geography 
Elizabeth M. Will 

Historic Preservation 



Heather M. Williams 

Psychology 
Laura Kathryn Williams 

Sociology 
Marc A. Williams 

Theater 
Shawna Williams 



Emily Meredith Winn 
International Affairs 

Kathleen M. Wojciaczyk 
Psychology 

James Womer 

Andrew W Wylie 
History 



Jena A. Yoder 

Psychology 
Mary K. Yost 

Biology 
Jenine Mary Zimmers 

English 
Kerri Jones 
Biology I Education 








1 










I ' 1 










( People — Seniors 



Far Left: Frank Carr is shocked 
to find out that there is NO 
drinking on campus at MWCH! 
Near Left:Joe Pittman is trying 
to dazzle another unsuspecting 
women with his dance/ 
cheerleading skills. 



Who says that MWC 

Seniors 

don't have spirit? 




n Grevin, Brian Gephart, Darcy Miller, Mike D'Ostillo, Lacey Ecksbeth, Matt Kauppi, Chris Cavanaugh, and 
ends are all decked out for the Fall Formal. 



Gateways "J f 




W /J very once in awhile we all 
m^ experience setbacks in our 
■ m lives. Some take longer to 
recover from; some take little or no 
time at all. In President Anderson's 
case, his setback was permanent. In 
late September of 1996, the president 
suffered a brain aneurism. After 
being rushed to the hospital, doctors 
estimated President Anderson had 
only fifteen minutes left to live. Dr. 
Anderson suffered the attack in 
Richmond, where he was fortunate 
to have access to the most advanced 
equipment and leading neurologists. 

Dr. Anderson spent several 
weeks in the hospital struggling with 
the realization that he could be 
paralyzed for life. The doctors did 
not have an optimistic outlook about 
the president's recovery. He recalled 
thinking of The Little Engine That 
Could in order to keep his spirits up 
in spite of the doctor's prognosis. 
One day, while still in the hospital, 
President Anderson raised one of his 
legs. From that moment on, he 
realized his struggle was going to be 
"90% determination." 

He returned to Brompton on 
November 10, 1996, where he 
received a warm homecoming. 
Intensive physical therapy kept the 
president busy upon his return. The 
following May, the president 
accomplished his goal of walking 
with the Class of 1997 as part of the 
graduation ceremony. The senior 
class stood clapping as Dr. Anderson 
slowly made his way to the stage. 
Touched by the support he had 
received for so long, he knew he was 
the luckiest person on Earth. 

Resuming his duties as 
president in July, Dr. Anderson 
immediately began to personally 



direct his plans for a new program 
called 'Team MWC The president 
thought of this idea while in the 
hospital because he wanted to show 
his appreciation for everyone 
associated with the college. A visible 
sign of this morale boosting program 
were the 'Team MWC baseball hats. 
Other exciting plans initiated by the 
president include a globe for the 



LEAST 2 

WILL BE 
IN THE 
B 



IT 

TUOENTS 
LE TO FIT 



fountain, a parking garage, and the 
new science building which has been 
named Jepson Hall. 

The globe, made of aluminum 
and fiber glass, will stand several feet 
tall and will be placed in the center 
of the fountain. One might wonder, 
will there be any room left for 
students'? The fountain will now be 
called Richard P. Palmieri Plaza, in 
memory of the geography professor 
who passed away in the fall of 1997. 
In addition to this, Mary Washington 
College Stafford campus will also 
display a globe, designed to unite the 
two campuses together. 

The proposed parking garage 
will have recreational facilities above 
it, complete with the latest stair 
masters, treadmills, and other sports 
conditioning equipment. Dr. 
Anderson is also considering options 
for putting pool tables and air 



-Shannon Maguir 

hockey tables in a game room. 

The new science building i 
almost fully constructed. It boasts 
greenhouse on the top floor and a nei 
fountain in front. Concerned for th 
tradition of Junior Ring Weel 
President Anderson inquired to th 
architects about the holding capacit 
of the fountain. He was relieved t 
discover that it can indeed hold c 
least twenty-five people. Presides 
Anderson is confident that thes 
additions to the college wii 
strengthen the school's sense c 
community. 

As Dr. Anderson enters hi 
15th year as president of Mar 
Washington College, he feels hi 
greatest accomplishment has bee 
improving the academic standard 
to enhance MWC's reputation as ora 
of the best colleges in Virginia. 

Fond memories have fille 
these 15 years, most of which invoh 
pranks by the students on both hii 
and the pranksters fellow peers. Th 
students are as important to D\ 
Anderson as his own children, eve 
when they sometimes wander aroun 
inebriated in his rose garden. TH 
president has witnessed move-in, 
fountain dunkings, ring donningi 
and graduation tears. Between hit 
and his dog, Sunny, they have see 
more soccer games, tenni 
tournaments, and track meets tha 
many of the coaches here. Throug 
these and other experiences, he ha 
learned that 90% of accomplish^ 
anything is determination. Perhap 
the other 10% is being able to shat 
it with those you love.. 



(2. Peop/e 



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#; 



JONATHAN B. ABELSON 
KEITH ACKERMAN 
FLORA E.ADAMS 
LINDA M. ALCULUMBRE 
MARYALESSANDRI 
ALLISON G. ALEXANDER 
ANN FRANTES ALTZIO 

JENNIFER M. AMRHEIN 
RUTH AMUNDSON 
STEFAN C. ANDERSEN 
RYAN M. ANDERSON 
KERRY L. ANDRES 
KENNETH R . ANDREWS 
MELISSA A . ANGERSON 

K\REN L. APPLEGATE 
KATHRYN M . ARAMBULA 
JAMES L. ARCHY 
SARAKARDESTANI 
DANIEL A. ARLAS 
JEANLNE A . ARNAUT 
BENJAMIN H. ARRLNGTON 

JOSEPH W. ARRLNGTON 
WILLLAM D . ARRLNGTON 
LARAL.ASHBY 
LESLIE ASHTON 
EDWARD A. AUGUSTYN 
ELIZABETH M. AVERY-JONES 
JESSICA AVGOLAUS 

JONATHAN D. AVTLA 
VICTORIA AVTLA 
LISA N. AYMOND 
LARA L. BAADTE 
-MATTHEW H . BAECKER 
CHRISTIAN J. BAGLEY 
JENNIFER L. BAINES 

JAIMEE L. BAKER 
ALLISON L . BAKER 
MELISSA V. BALL 
MELISSA J . BALLANCE 
ROBLN L. BARGERSTOCK 
ROBYN BARNARD 
LINDSAY BARNARD 

JOY M. BARNES 
SHANICE R . BARNETT 
EIMAN S. BASSAM 
ANDREW C. BAUMERT 
SALLY BEAN 
MARIA BECKER 
ROBERT J. BELCHER 

ANNETTE BELL 
JESSE R. BENTON 
INGRID L. BERGMANN 
WHITNEY E . BERMAN 
PAMELA BERRY 
ETHAN D. BETTEN 
TERESA A. BETTIS 

JOANNA B. BIBLE 
FRANCISCA A. BIRAGO 
SONYA BLACK 
PETER BLAKE 
MICHAEL W . BLAKE 
HOLLY A. BLANTON 
SHANNON W . BLEVINS 

MARISAA.BODNAR 
JEANINE M . BOEKE 
SARAH L. BONG 
DAVID M. BOOTH 
JENNIFER BOOTH 
REBECCA A BOOTH 
DEBRA LYN N BOUSLOG 




m Paopfe 




REBEKAH L . BOWEN 
JENNIFER C. BOWLING 
ROXANNE R . BOYCE 
GEOFFREY BRADLEY 
MOLLY E. BRADSHAW 
ROBERT K BRAIDWOOD 
CHRISTOPHER BRANTLEY 

JESSICA D . BRASWELL 
EBONY BRAXTON 
JILL GORE BREEDEN 
THERESA BRENNER 
SARAH E. BRICK 
ROGER L. BRIGHT 
STEVE O. BRINCKHAUS 

DOMINIQUE N. BROCK 
MATTHEW A . BROOKINS 
JENNIFER L BROOKS 
ERIN E. BROOME 
JEREMY F. BROWN 
MELINDA K BROWN 
GEORGINA L. BRUER 

COURTNEY R BRUSHWOOD 
EMILY E. BUCHANAN 
KATHRYN G . BUCHANAN 
JENNIFER C. BUFFALO 
GEORGE H. BUNCH 
SEAN W BURKE 
KARIN E. BURKE 

EDWARD A. BURRIER 
MICHELLE D. BURRUSS 
IYSHA V.BURT 
MICHAEL R . BYSTROWSKI 
SARA B. BYWATERS 
NATALIE A . CAHILL 
KEVIN CAIN 

HEATHER L . CALIHAN 
JUSTIN M. CAMARDA 
THERESA C . CAMPBELL 
KIMBERLY DG CANNON 
MICHAEL P . CANTY 
VANESSA A. CARIDI 
ELIZABETH J. CARLL 

SABRINA CARLSON 
LOISARLENE CARPENTER 
JILL ANN CARROLL 
ADRIAN E. CARROLL 
MICHELLE L. CARSON 
ANNEMARIE CARULLO 
CAROLYN CASON 

CHRISTINE E. CAVANAUGH 
CAROL L. CHACE 
STEPHEN CHARNOFF 
WILMAJCHATMAN 
ELISABETH CHAVES 
CHRISTOPHER CHAYKA 
LISA CHIMINIELLO 

ILAN CHIPRUT 
WINIFRED E. CHISHOLM 
CHAE W CHO 
SEO-YUN CHOI 
ALMA E. CISNEROS 
JASON D. CLARK 
JEAN M. CLARK 

HEATHER CLENDENTN 
VICKIE L CLINEHENS 
MARY COFFEY 
ANDREA G COGBURN 
RICHARD A . COLADARCI 
AMY K. COLBY 
SHEILA COLEMAN 



Gateways 7 S 



SUSAN COLEMAN' 
NATHAN L. COLES 
KYLE F. COLIN 
ANDREW K. COLLINS 
JOYACONOSCENTI 
AMY CONWAY 
KENDRA C CONWAY 

MATTHEW E . COOK 
ABIGAIL C . CORDELL 
VIRGINIA C. COVINGTON 
JENNIFER L. COX 
CHRISTOPHER CRABBE 
COURTNEY A. CRABILL 
PENNY LEE CRABTREE 

AMANDA E. CRADDOCK 
LLNDA M CRLM 
LINDSAY R . CROUCH 
GLNAM. CUMBO 
CAROL CURLEY 
KELLY K CWIAK 
MARY E. DALY 

EDWARD W. DAXGERFIELD, III 
TERESA ANNE DARK 
JACQUELLXE M. DARNELL 
TERENCE DAVENPORT 
TIMOTHY DAVIDOVTCH 
THOMAS S. DAVIES 
AARON M. DAVIS 

JOANNA P. DAVIS 
KELLY DAMS 
TLNA MARI E DECARBO 
TYANNE L. DECKER 
GEOFFREY N. DEFILIPPI 
JOANNA M. DEFRANGE 
MATTHEW F . DEGNAN 

ANN E. DEMICHELE 
HANS DEMPSEY 
HEATHER L DEMPSEY 
ASHLEY A. DENEGRE 
HOLLY C. DENNISON 
MICHAEL A . DEPDNTO 
MICHELLE D. DERR 

GENA M. DESANTIS 
WILLIAM DETLEFSEN 
JESSICA DICAPUA 
MICHELLE A. DICKENS 
HEIDI A. DICKSON 
ARIC W. DIETRICH 
JACQUELLXE A. DONALDSON 

KEVIN T. DONOVAN 
MALCOLM K DOUGLAS, III 
WARREN L DUFFLE, JR. 
BRANDY DURBIN 
MARY S. DURRANCE 
JEREMY N. DUVAL 
DAMON P. DWYER 

KELLY A. DWYER 
ELIZABETH A. EAGLES 
-JULIE C. EASTER 
ALICEN EATROFF 
CHERYL D. EDWARDS 
NANCY M. EDWARDS 
JENIFER A . EGGLESTON 

ADAM D. EIDSON 
PETER K. EISEN 
AMANDA E. ELLERBE 
ANNE B. ELLIOTT 
CHERYLL M . ELLIOTT 
CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT 
KATY L. ELMORE 



76 Peopfe 




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KATHYANN EMBREY 
ELLEN C. ERMANOVICS 
HASSAN A ESSALIH 
SUSANNE M . EYMER 
JOSEPH M. FACCIO 
BRENNA J. FACH 
JACQUELINE I. FALKOWSKI 

JOHN P. FARRELL 
KURT N. FELDMANN 
DAVID FERGUSON 
REBECCA A FERN ALLD 
JAMES G FICE 
JENNIFER K. FIEGL 
JENNIFER L. FIELDS 

LARRY L FILLIAN, JR. 
CHRISTOPHER FINES 
KRISTEN N . FISHER 
LARRY B. FLETCHER 
CHARLES A . FLOYD 
JENNIFER A. FLYNN 
KERRY E. FLYNN 

ALAN R. FOLLETT 
AMY FORD 

RACHEL C. FORTANASCE 
KATIE S. FORTHOFER 
AMY FOSTER 
SUZANNE FOXWORTH 
AMY J FRANKLIN 

LARRY W FRANKLIN JR. 
MELISSA J . FRANSON 
JOHN FRIDAY 
ANDREW FRIEDBERG 
DANIEL M. FRYE 
MOLLY E FURLONG 
JACOB K. GALBA-BRIGHT 

KELLEY GALLAGHER 
MICHELLE B GALUSHA 
KATARINA A GAMAGE 
JENNIFER H GAMBARDELLA 
LORA GARCIA 
BRUCE O GARDNER 
CYNTHIA D . GARDNER 

PATRICIA H GARNETT 
MARY K GARRAHAN 
KATHARINE M. GARVEY 
HANNAH M. GATLING 
COURTNEY GELARDI 
GORDON D. GEORGEJII 
BENITAGHURA 

ERIC R. GINS 
MATTHEW C . GIOBBI 
STEPHANIE M. GLAD 
RICHARD W . GLEASON 
KATRINA R . GLYNN 
AMANDA E. GOEBEL 
SHOSHANA M. GOLDBERG 

MIRIAM A. GOLDSTEIN 
MEREDITH L. GOMPF 
LEAH GORDON 
JEFFREY M . GRAHAM 
NANCY GRANDBOUCHE 
JAMES T. GRANT 
KATRINA A. GRANT 

ALFRED S. GRAY 
JESSICA E . GRAY 
HARRIET R . GREENAN 
BRENDA LEE GREENE 
REBECCA A. GREENE 
SARA E. GREENE 
JAMES B. GREENING 



Gateways "J f 



HEATHER M GREGORY 
JOHN T. GRIFFIN 
JOSEPH N. GRUBB 
ERIC G. GRYNAYISKI 
CHRISTLXE M. GUEDRI 
VICTORIA GUNNETT 
ERIC P. GUYTON 

BRETT E HAAS 
DANIEL C. HALLAM 
JOHN' T HALLETT 
ALMEE M. HALPHEN 
DAXA L. HAMEL 
BRYAN HAMLET 
TODD K HAMLIN 

KRISTLNA F. HANNTNG 
LAUREN E. HARIG 
ALLYSON L HARKEY 
MONICA K HARKEY 
AMY L. HARPEL 
AUTUMN HARRINGTON 
STEPHANIE HARRIS 

JAY T HARTEY 
ROBERT A. HAR\"EY 
JENNIFER B HASH 
DANA J. HATA 
TODD E. HEALEY 
BRADLEY HEDRICK 
PEGGY MILLS HEFLIN 

ELIZABETH J. HELLEXSCHMIDT 
SUSAN W. HELLER 
MICHAEL T . HENRICKSON 
KRISTOFFER B. HEXRIKSSON 
RAYMOND E . HENRY 
CHRISTrNE L. HENRY 
CHERYL D. HENY 

SARA N HERBERT 
CLAUDLA E . HERZOG 
ANNE C. HILL 
ATNDREA M . HILL 
DELISA MN HLNDS 
LAWRENCE HLNKLE. JR 
TANL4HA R. HINTON 

TIMOTHY R . HINTON 
CHRISTOPHER HITZELBERGER 
SCOTT HOBBS 
KURT L. HOCKADAY 
TANYA R HOERER 
TARA K HOGAN 
CORY S. HOLDING 

SETH A. HOLLINGER 
MICHAEL P . HOLMES 
COURTNEY D. HOPE 
RACHEL HOPKINS 
BRADLEY E . HOPPER 
TARA D. HOTTLE 
ELIZABETH M. HOWARD 

l A HOWARD 

PAMELA AN N HOWARD 
BONNIE C HOWELL 
STACEYJ HUFF 
JENNIFERE HUGHES 
MICHAEL B HUGHES 
EVAN W HUNSBERGER 

JOSHUA HURLEY 
NATHAN P. HURTO 
CAROLA.IANNUCC] 

NATALIE E. II. 
STEPHEN V . INGULLI 
EM RE Y. IZAT 
JAMES S JACKSON 



78 Peopfe 






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CAKA P. JAMES 
KRISTLAN J. JAMIESON 
SARAJARRETT 
REBECCA A. JENNI 
DIANE C. JENNINGS 
TRACY M. JEWELL 
SOFIA V. JOHANSSON 

IAN R. JOHNSON 
ABY M. JOHNSON 
SUSAN M. JOHNSON 
FAYE D. JOHNSON 
SUZANNE B . JOHNSON 
MICHAEL D . JOHNSON 
CYNTHIA A . JOHNSTON 

KIMBERLY K. JONES 
DESHAY D. JONES 
ANTHONY D . JONES 
DIONNE L JONES 
ROBERT M. JONES 
TIFFANY D . JORDAN 
ANNA E.JORDAN 

JENNY JORDAN 
PAUL J. JUNOD 
NANCY B KAMENSKI 
DANIEL KANE 
SUPAPAN K . KANTI 
GERASMINA M. KAROUSOS 
PEGGY J. KASUN 

MAURA B. KAUFMANN 
RYAN S. KAYE 
DANIEL P. KEARON 
KEVIN J. KELHART 
MAUREEN E . KELHART 
CHANDRA L . KENNETT 
CHRISTOPHER KENNEY 

RYAN R. KEOHANE 
MAHAN J. KICK 
ADRIENNE L. KIELDSING 
AARON L. KIELDSING 
RICHARD M . KIMBLE 
KEVIN A. KINCAID 
KERRYN S. KING 

SHARON B. KIPLE 
HOPE KLAGGES 
DARIAN T. KLARE 
KRISTINA KNOWLTON 
ALISON M. KOELMEL 
MICHAEL J . KOMSSI 
MATTHEW J . KONICKI 

ANGELA M. KOPACK 
STEVEN E. KOVALIK 
JOHN E. KRAFT 
KATHRYN W . KRUKIEL 
SHELIA M KUHSTOSS 
ANDREW P. KULLMAN 
JANINE A. KUTY 

BROOKS D. L'ALLIER 

HEATHER D . LABELLE-SPILLMAN 
JAIMI A. LACARIA 
STEPHEN M . LAMANNA 
MARY E. LAMANTIA 
KATHERINE F. LAMB 
ELISA G. LAMBERT 

PATRICIA LAMBERT 
JENNIFER M. LANDIS 
CARISSA LANGILLE 
VANESSA L LANHAM 
DENISE H LANSING 
LAWRENCE C. 
LANZILLOTTA 



Gateways 79 



GWEN LEE B LEE 
MICHAEL B. LEE 
WENDY LEMING 
HEATHER A . LEN 
ANGELA J. LENGYEL 
STEPHANIE M. LEO 
JANET M LESON 

DERMALNE A. LEWIS 
RANDY LEE LEWIS 
BRL\N J. LIBBY 
BENJAMIN M. LICCLARDI 
CARRIE LILLY 
NARA M. LIM 
SARAH G. UNDEMAN 

EMILY A. LLNDTVEIT 
AMANDA K. LLNEBERGER 
MARGARET T LLNKH 
KEYLN D. LINTON 
BRANDEN A . LOCKE 
LUCLA F. LONDERO 
KELLY B. LONG 

JENNIFER A LONG 
TLNA M. LORAH 
EMTLY J. LOUGHRY 
DAVID J. LOVE 
ERIKA M. LOWREY 
ELISA C. LUCTNI 
MARY J. LUNDIE 

KATHLEEN LYDON 
CHRISTLN'A M. LYERLY 
MATTHEW D . MACDONALD 
KATHLEEN MADSEN 
SHANNON M . MAGUIRE 
LISAMANDRY 
JENNIFER L MANGUS 

KRISTAW'. MANN 
NITHYA M. MANI 
MATTHEW' MANN 
KERI L. MANNEBACH 
JEREMY W. MARCH 
-JENNIFER E. MARDULA 
ROBERT M. MARIGZA 

CHARLES F . MARKLEY 
VALERIE A MARSHALL 
ALISON J. MARTEN 
ROBERT B. MARTIN 
CHRISTOPHER MARTIN 
CRYSTAL MATTHEWS 
REGINA A MATTINGLY 

REBECCAN.MAUS 
MARGARET A. MCCABE 
MATTHEW A MCC AMBRIDGE 
TRAVIS I. MCCOY 
BENJAMIN L. MCDAVID 
MARY MEGA N MCDONALD 
JOSHUA E MCDONALD 

HEATHER MCEACHEN 
JENNY L. MCGRAINER 
WESLEY H. MCINTYRE 
DEBORAH L . MCINTYRE 
DENNIELLE M MCHNNON 
BRENDAN A MCLEAN 
AMANDA D. MCLENNAN 

STEVEN B. MCPHERSON 
JULIE A. MCPHTLOMY 
TIMOTHY MCQUOED 
HELEN L. MEACHAM 
SHELLY ANNE MEARES 
SALLY L MECKLE 
ANDREW H. MEFFERD 



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KRISTEN S . MERCER 
ERIKA T. MEREDITH 
EMILY C. MERIWETHER 
DONALD K. MICHAEL 
MARSHA MICHAELS 
JARED A. MILLER 
DARCEY B. MILLER 

PATRICIA F. MILLER 
ALISTAIR J. MILLER 
CATHERINE MILLS 
DANIEL T MITCHELL 
MELISSA L MITCHELL 
CARLA MITCHELL 
MONIQUE E . MITCHELL 

MARGARET MITCHELL 
THERESA A MODELSKI 
SETH B MOHS 
MARTIN MOLLOY 
SARA MONAGHAN 
DIANE SMITH MONK 
CECELIA L . MONROE 

BRIAN R MONROE 
SANDRA MOORE 
KATHLEEN MOORE 
MARGARITA G. MORALES 
CHRISTINA M. MOREHEAD 
LINDSEY A . MORGAN 
LORIE MORIN 

LD7 MORKEN 

LEAH E. MORRIS 

JENNIFER A. MOSS 

MELISSA A . MUELLER 

HOWIE A. MUHLSTEIN 

ERIN MURPHY 

O. ALEXANDER MURPHY 

MATTHEW E . MURRAY 
ANDREA NAGY 
NOVA C. NAMERDY 
JUDITH NAPIER 
MARTHA H. NEALE 
TRACY L. NEBLETT 
BENJAMIN C. NEHRLING 

JESSICA L . NEILS 
LANCE M. NELSON 
DIANA L. NEMCHICK 
NHU-TRANG T NGUYEN 
GREGORY H . NIENOW 
AMIRA NIKOLAS 
CAROLINA G. NIKOLIC 

JONATHAN T NINO 
RACHAEL M . NOONKESTER 
THOMAS L NORBET 
HEATHER NORRIS 
ELIZABETH B. O'BRIAN 
THOMAS O'BRIEN 
SARAH E. O'CONNOR 

KATEAO'KONSKI 
JASON T O'NEAL 
KIMBERLYA. ODELL 
SAMUEL OGLESBY 
JANET E. OLDIS 
HOLLY C. OLSON 
JOHN J. ONDA 

JEFFREY S ONZE 
DANIEL A. OPIELA 
PATRICK L . ORRISON 
ROBYN M. OSL 
SEAN M OTTO 
CALLIE E. OWEN 
ANDREW L. OWENS 



Gate 



8f 



SARAH PACK 
MAYLLAN PAK 
KERRI PAKURAR 
VALERIE A PALMER 
ALEXANDER L. PANEK 
HAE-JTNA.PARK 
JOSHUA D. PARKER 

TEAL E. PAKMELEE 
NICOLE A. PATTOX 
CYNTfflA C . PAZ 
GLXA L. PEACO 
STEPHANIE PEARSON 
ALYSSAA. PECORINO 
STEPHANIE M. PENCEK 

MATTHEW B . PENDER 
KEVIN M PERRY 
PHOEBE PERRY 
KRISTEN M . PETERS 
SARAH K PETTY 
YTRGLNTA X PHEMISTER 
BETTIXA J . PHIFER 

JENNY A PHILLIPS 
NGUYEN PHUNG 
LUKASZ P. PLXKOWSKI 
NATHAN E. PIPKE 
CHRISTINE L PITTMAN 
AMY J. PITTS 
CHRISTINA M. PLEVA 

ANDREW A PLEVA 
LORI B. POLXDEXTER 
DEXISE M. POLICASTRO 
DA\TD AXDREW POORE 
MARK A. PRESTON 
DOXNA PRICE 
HELEX J. PRICE 

MEREDITH A. PRICE 
JEAXXTNE M. PROTHERO 
MATTHEW H PRUITT 
PETERAPUGLISI 
TRACIE PULLEY 
JULLAXA RAKOWSKI 
LISA RALPH 

XICOLE RAMER 
COURTNEY M. RAXXELLS 
ANGELA RARY 
DAVID M. RASHLEIGH 
MOLLY A. RATZ 
KRISTEN RAY 
MASOX P. REASER 

SHAROX T. REAVIS 
MICHAEL J . RECTOR 
DEXISE REGEIMBAL 
WHITXEYA.REID 
LAURA-CLAY K. REILLY 
DAVID J. RESETAR 
JESSIKA D . REUTER 

LEIGH G. REVELEY 
: YES 
□FERN.REYES 
DANIEL J. REYNOLDS 
ELIZABETH M. REYNOLDS 
AMY RHODES 
JAMES U. RHODES 

JESSICA A. RHODES 
USA M RICH 
KELLY RICHARDS 
8HELLIEE REDDER 

JOHN VV .RID'. 
OWEN B. RILEY 
REBECCA A. RINK 






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LORI GORDON ROACH 
PRESTON W . ROBINSON 
BRIANA.ROINESTAD 
MARIA ROJAS 
CYNTHIA M . ROLLO 
BETHANN ROMPH 
CATHERINE A. ROQUES 

WILLIAM H ROSS 
ANTHONY R ROSS 
JAMES B. ROSSI, JR. 
ANDREW S. ROTHSCHILD 
JENNIFER C. ROTRAMEL 
MANDY C ROUDABUSH 
MICHAEL P . ROWE 

CHRISTOPHER ROY 
EMILY S. RUDGE 
DENNIS L. RUDNICK 
MARC A. RUGGIERO 
HECTOR R RUIZ 
HEATHER L . RUMNEY 
LAURA RUSSELL 

CYNTHIA A. RYON 
KANE SABANDITH 
REBECCA E . SABATOS 
JAMIE SALERNO 
ANN MARIE SALEWSKI 
KATRINA Y SAMUELS 
CHARLES D SANDS III 

JENNIFER L. SANNER 
MATTHEW W . SANTMYER 
KARYN I SATTERFIELD 
TODD M. SAVAGE 
CATHERINE A. SCAROLA 
DWAYNE L. SCHEID 
ERIN R. SCHILLER 

SAMANTHA L. SCHMUCKER 
KATHLEEN F. SCHOEN 
JODI JANELLE SCHOPFEL 
CHRISTOPHER SCHUSTER 
RENEE ALICE SCIUTO 
KIMBERLYA. SCOTT 
KRISTIN L . SCOTT 

DEBRA S. SCRUGGS 
SARAH M. SCYBERT 
W. TRAVIS SEALE 
COREY R. SELL 
ANDREA L. SELLERS 
JILL M. SENECHAL 
AIMEE L. SEWARD 

W.STEPHEN SHAW JR. 
ANDREW P SHEA 
JENNIFER R. SHEAFE 
MELYSSA SHEERAN 
TRISHA M SHEFFIELD 
JEFFREY W . SHELDON 
TROY JAME S SHELTON 

KORY B. SHELTON 
CLAYTON W . SHERMAN 
YUKIKO SHIMIZU 
ANDREA L. SHIPP 
KAYTE L SHRD7ER 
LESLIE A SILBERMANN 
CHRISTINE SIMPSON 

MICHAEL SISSON 
CHRISTIAN D. SMITH 
COURTNEY L. SMITH 
DAVID R. SMITH 
EMILY A. SMITH 
JULIE SMITH 
MARTHA L. SMITH 



Gate 



83 



MONICA M SMITH 
STEPHANIE M. S*UTH 
JOHN C. SNELLGROVE 
ROBERT E. SNOWHITE 
NICHOLAUS SORRENTEsO 
CHRISTEVE M SOTZING 
MARIAMA D . SOU ARE 

SUMMER E. SPEIDELL 
JULIE A. SPESSARD 
LATONYA D . SPr\"EY 
MONICA R. SPRADLIN 
CANDICE J . ST. ONGE 
FAITH A. STACK 
SUSAN E. STALEY 

CANDACE J STANDLEY 
KRISSAN L . STANLEY 
CHRISTY L STANZIONE 
AMY L. STAPLES 
ANDREA M. STARACE 
ANDREW A. STARINSKY 
TONI M. STARLIPER 

ROBERT E STEELE 
JASON A STELTENPOHL 
CAROLINE J. STENDER 
NANCY I. STEVENS 
SUSAN E. STEVENS 
NOELLE A. STEsCHCOMB 
CHARITY STOHLER 

CATHERINE E. STOLLAK 
PAUL G. STORER 
BRIAN M. STRAIGHT 
JENNIFER STRTNGFELLOW 
SHAUNDON L STUCKER 
ANDREW J SUMMERS 
CRAIG SWANSON 

THOMAS R. SWIGART 
JESSICA SWISSLER 
S-\SOIA A SZEBEHELYICOYNER 
MAKI TAKAHASHI 
DANALTALLEY 
LEE A TATE 
CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR 

DAWNITA TAYLOR 
JOHN P. THIBODEAU 
SARA A. THOMAS 
SAMANTHA J. THOMASON 
MICHELE L . THOMASON 
SARA P. THOMPSON 
VIRGINIA THULL 

CATHERINE A TICHACEK 
CHERYL L. TIMM 
ERIC K. TOLBERT 
JOSEPH A. TOMPKINS 
KARIE E. TRAUB 
ERIN E. TRAYLOR 
JAMES M. TREZZA 

MICHAEL A. TRIVETT 
HI EN T. TRUONG 
JAMES S TSANTES 
THEODORE E. TSCHAN 
STI lAR] MARK TURKELSON 
•JESSICA TURNER 
MARSIE K. Ti;RNER 

abigail d . turpyn 
william m . twilde 
carrie tyson 
jason d van horn 
joshua w. vandyck 

k.vaklas 
pauline e varn 



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MARY L. VAUGHAN 
AMBER D VENNING 
GABRIEL VENTURI 
TRACY VERRALL 
JESSICA M . VEST 
SCOTT A. VIILU 
KRISTIN M . VINCENT 

GERRIT J. VISSCHER 
CLARA J. VOON 
SHEREE D. WADDY 
CLAIRE M. WAGNER 
ANTONIAWALCHESTER 
KATHERINE WALKER 
KATHERINE A. WALLACE 

LOUISE WALLACE 
HEATHER A. WALSH 
SARAH WASKO 
CHRISTINA C. WATERS 
MARY B. WATSON 
KATE A. WATSON 
JUSTIN B. WEBB 

KEITH WEBBER 
DAVID G. WEBSTER 
S. KATHLEEN WEBSTER 
JASON W. WENRICH 
JULIE A. WESSINGER 
KENNETH L . WESTNEDGE 
JENNIFER WEYFORTH 

BRIDGET M . WHALAN 
KAREN L. WHALEN 
LANDON D. WHALEY 
CYNTHIA L WHEELER 
STEPHANIE A. WHICHARD 
DANIELLE E. WHICHARD 
MARY E WHITE 

MATTHEW B . WHITE 
QUOTARISHA D. WHITE 
ELIZABETH M. WHITTY 
CHRISTINE M. WIEGAND 
MEREDITH S. WILCOX 
JENNIFER M WILKINS 
REBECCA A . WILLIAMS 

CARRIE E. WILLIAMS 
SHARON Y. WILLIAMS 
GARY A. WILLIS 
TAMMIE WILLIS 
CHRISTINA M WILLS 
SHERRI L WITHROW 
ANNE C. WITT 

MEREDITH L. WOLFE 
JON E WOLFF 
PATRICK L . WOLFREY 
JAMIE L WOODARD 
NICOLE L. WOODFORD 
KELLY R. WOODLING 
HEATHER E . WOODY 

RISTO J. WORTHINGTON 
HOLLIE E. WRITTENBERRY 
IAN D. WYATT 
MARYJANE WYSOCKI 
KRISTAA.YANDER 
COLETTE E . YANKOUPE 
JULIE O. YONTZ 

JUNG-HYUN L. YOON 
HEATHER YOUNG 
RANDALL A . YOUNG 
NATHANIEL G. ZALESKI 
WHITNEY R . ZISKAL 
DARAA.ZITMAN 
KAREN D. ZIZZI 



Gate 



8S 



JULIE A. ACKERMAN 
MARIE-FRANCO ADAMS 
RAYMOND AGEE 
MELAXTE A. ALEXANDER 
WTLLLAM K. ALEXANDER 
CARA ALLISON 
JENNIFER ALTADONNA 

KTMBERLYALVIS 
KATHRYNAMEY 
JENNIFER R AMORE 
KERRY R. ANCOWITZ 
SARA ANDERS EN 
SARAH E ANDERSON 
STEPHANIE R ANDRES 

MARGARET M. APPLEBAUM 
MICHAEL E. ARBOGAST 
MONICA ARIAS 
KATHERINE ARNOLD 
CLAUDE ARTHUR III 
JOELASHWORTH 
ERTN P. ASKEW 

KATIE C. AUSTIN 
KAREN L BAER 
MARCUS W. BAGGETT 
MICHAEL A BAIER 
WILLLAM R . BAIN 
ELLYN S. BANNISTER 
REBECCA BARKER 

STEPHANIE BARNHOUSE 
SARABAROKAS 
EMERY BASK3N 
JULIA C BATTEY 
KATHLEEN BELL 
MATHEW BELL 
NICOLE BENDERSKY 

ADAM L. BERENBAK 
MARA R. BERKOWITZ 
KRISTEN N. BERTINT 
PENNY A. BEVERAGE 
JOSEPH BLAEUER 
WILLIAM M. BLAMEY 
COLLEEN BLUE 

JOSEPH BOCIAN 
MARGOT BOGERT 
■JESSICA BONANNO 
NICHOLAS BONDURANT 
CHRISTOPH ER BOON 
AMY BOSSERMAN 
LISA K BOWEN 

ANDREA BOWLER 
KELLY KAY BOWLING 
DANNA BOWMAN 
PATRICIA G BRANHAM 
JOHN BRAUER 
CYNTHIA BROCK 
KEITH R BROCKMAN 

AELITA BROLIS 
DENISE BROOKS 
ERIN BROWN 
GEORGE 0. BROWN 

STEPHANIE L. BROWN 
STEPHANIE BROWN 
KAILA BROWN-HILL 

KRISTIN BUCK 
CHRISTINA L BUCKLAND 
JENNIFER M. BUDD 
ERICA BURGE 
JENNIFER BURGER 
MARY BURKE 
ELIZABETH A BURTON 




86 



e o 




MARIAH BUTLER 
BENJAMIN C BYRNES 
ANGELA CAMPBELL 
BREANNA CAREY 
WENDELA CARLSON 
KRISTA M. CARMAN 
SHANNON CARNEMOLLA 

BRIAN M. CARPENTER 
COLIN CARRIER 
HATTIE E. CARROLL 
HEATHER CARTER 
HEATHER E . CARTER 
PATTIE E CARTER 
ERIN CASEY 

REBECCA E CASTO 
KEVIN CATARINO 
TERESA CATOE 
RYAN CAYA 
JESSICA CEBULA 
CHRISTINA C. CHARBA 
SARAH CHARDO 

SARAH CHASE 
DAVID R. CHAVES 
TRY U CHEATHAM 
MOLLY CHEATUM 
STEPHANIE CHECKOVICH 
ANDREA CHERMELA 
KIMBERLY EVE CHILDS 

MOON-KYO CHONG 
MICHAEL CHRISTIANSEN 
STACEY S. CHRISTOPHER 
JULIA M CIARLO 
CRISTIN CINI 
BRENDAN W CLAFLIN 
KATHLEEN CLARE 

ALLISON B . CLARK 
CARRIE A CLARK 
MICHAEL CLARK 
CLARENCE H. CLAY 
SUNNY M CLEMONS 
SARAH CLOUTIER 
DEBORAH L COCKRELL 

SCOTT H COCKRELL 
ANGELA COCKRILL 
KELLY COFFEY 
MARLO L. COLES 
JASMINE COMMERCE 
JAY C. CONNER 
JUSTIN M. CONROY 

ROBERT COOK 
WENDI E COOK 
MELINDA J . COOKE 
JAMES COOPE 
RONNETTE E. COOPER 
ZACHARY COPELAND 
DEREK M. CORYELL 

STEPHEN COSTANZO 
MARY COUGHLIN 
LAUREN E. CRENSHAW 
MELISSA A . CRITELLI 
HILLARY L CROSSMAN 
SARAH CROWN 
DANIEL N CULLINAN 

JAMIE CURRIE 
PETER CURRINGTON 
KARI K CWIAK 
KATHARINE DARGIS 
CHANDRA DASGUPTA 
MELISSA DAUGHERTY 
CATHERINE DAVEY 



Gats- 87 



RICHARD DAVIDSON 
AMY E. DAMS 
JENNIFER DAMS 
KARA DAMS 
KRISTIN DE GRAFF 
AMANDA M. DEAN 
JANDZS ML DEATON 

VERENA P. DECKERT 
JEFFREY DEHART 
HARRY L DELL 
ERIN DEMPSEY 
SHARON X. DENMARK 
JASON DICKSON 
PAGE G. DDZTRICH 

MONICA DIONNE 
SARAH DIXON 
JAMES M DLUGASCH 
THANH DO 
ERTX E. DOMANGUE 
STEPHEN DONAHOE 
KENNETH DORITY 

RACHAEL DORSEY 
JANTNE M. DOUGLAS 
SHEILA DOVE 
JAIME M. DOWDY 
EVERETT DRY 
LIZA DUBE 
HOLLY DUD ASH 

PAUL DUNFORD 
STEPHEN L . DUNN 
KEMN F. DUNNTLL 
NANCY M EDWARDS 
PATRICIA W. EDWARDS 
JILL ELLIS 
SHANNON L . ELLIS 

JANET EMERY 
CRAIG A EMMERTON 
KELLY ENGEL 
ERK N. ENRIGHT 
CHAD M. ERENHOUSE 
SUNSHINE EVANS 
MELISSA FALLEN 

MANDI Q FARRELL 
SHANNON L FARRELL 
YVONNE FEBO 
JANAYE FELDER 
MARYELLEN FERRO 
DENISE FINES 
■JENNIFER FINK 

MARGA FISCHEL 
DAMD A FISCHER 
LAUREN J FISHER 
LOGAN FITZGERALD 
MICHAEL B FITZGERALD 
MATTHEW J . FITZPATRICK 
LIXDSEY FLAHERTY 

CHERYL FLETCHER 

DAWN R. FLETCHER 
REBECCA FLYNN 
JESSICA FOLKERTS 
ANTHONY D FOSTER 
KATHERINEAFOX 
CHAKEA FRANCIS 

MICHAEL R 
GRETA FRANK Li 
TERESA L. FRA 
DUSTIN FRIED 
KATHERINE M 
AARON GAGNON 
CASEY M. GALLANT 



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EMILY M. GARBEE 
CHRISTOPH ER GARNER 
ANNIKA L GARVEY 
MARGARET GARWOOD 
ELIZABETH GEIGER 
JOHN M. GENDRON 
KELLY GEORGE 

BRIAN D GIBSON 
JOHN GILREATH 
DEBORAH F . GLICK 
GABRIEL GOLDSTEIN 
JOHN GOMEZ 
PETER J. GONYO 
DEAROSA GOODFELLOW 

DANIEL GOODWIN 
DHEERAJ K . GOSWAMI 
BETHANY GOTTSCHALL 
SUZANNE GRABLE 
ERIKA E. GRACE 
ANDREA GRAHAM 
MARY GRAHAM 

JOSHUA GRAVIS 
JASON GREEN 
VIRGINIA L GREEN 
JESSICA L . GREENE 
MARK GREENLEAF 
GREGORY GREVEN 
LEIGH GROSS 

SCOTT GROSSMAN 
DANIEL M. GUARRIELLO 
NICHOLE LYN GUBITOSI 
MELANIE GUEDENET 
NATHANIEL P HAAS 
ROBERT HALE JR 
JULIE B. HALLMAN 

LAURA HAMILTON 
BRANDY HAN 
SOO IM HAN 
STEPHANIE HAND 
DIANNA HANSEN 
SHARYN HANSEN 
JESSICA HARDYMAN 

KEITH E. HARMISON 
EMILEE HARREN 
ARQUAY HARRIS 
MICHAEL HARRIS 
SANDRA HART 
JAMES HARWARD 
HEATHER L . HARWELL 

GREG H HATA 
KATHRIN HAVRILLA 
MICHAEL HAWKES 
CRAIG E. HAWKINS 
KAREN A. HAWKRIDGE 
MELANIE HAYES 
SUZANNE HAYES 

AMANDA HELLER 
HEATHER HEMSTREET 
ROBERT HENNEBERG 
MATTHEW W HENRY 
JESSICA HENSLEY 
JACQUELIN E HERR 
ANNETTE HIBBERT 

SARAH HINMAN 
KEVIN HJELM 
CARAHOAR 
KEVIN HOCKMUTH 
JOAN HOLCOMB 
CHASITY HOLIFIELD 
MATTHEW N . HOLLERIETH 



Gate- 89 



MICHELLE L. HOLLOWELL 
TERAA.HOLTSLAG 
ZACHARY HOLTZMAN 
ERIKA. J. HORSTMEYER 
JOY HOUCK 
JULIE HOLTS 
AMELIA F. HUBE 

JULIA A. HUE Y 
ELISE HUGHES-SEGROYES 
JENNIFER HUNT 
KATHERLNE A HUNT 
SHANNON HUTCHINSON 
LAURA A INDZERIS 
APRIL LNSLEY 

AAMTNA IQBAL 
JESSICA D . JACKSON 
KERI JACKSON 
SUSANNAH JACKSON 
MATTHEW JAHNGEN 
MICHAEL J JANIK 
JENNIFER JARVT3 

CHRISTINE JEFFREY 
ALTREZAJLAN 
JENNIFER JOHNSON 
NATALIE JOHNSON 
SARA JOHNSON 
BETHANY JOHNSTON 
BRENDA JOHNSTON 

SHANNON H . JONES 
AMANDA JORDAN 
ROBERT KALMTN 
LYDA KANE 
MARYANN KANE 
ELIZABETH KEANEY 
FAITH KEENEY 

CYNTHIA M KEITH 
DANIELA KELLEY 
PATRICIA KELLEY 
BRADFORD M. KELLY 
MICHELLE KELLY 
BROOKE A KEMP 
CARA M. KENNEY 

KATHARINE R. KERR 
MICHELLE P. KEY 
VICTORIA L KEYSER 
MEGAN KXNNEAR 
SARAKLATKO 
JORDAN L. KLEIMAN 
JOHANNA KLELN 

AMY KLEPPLNGER 
ERIC M. KNOTT 
SUNG KO 

KATHRYN KOLOGY 
LESLIE KOPCHINSKI 
JONATHAN KOPP 
COURTNEY KOWALCHICK 

JOSEF A. KOZA 
GEORGE KRAMER 
VANESSA F KREMPA 
KEVIN R. KRISOWATY 
JOSEPH KUTSCHMAN 
JILL KWASNEY 
STACEY M. LADD 

MICHELLE J. LAMBIASI 
JERMAINE J. LANK 
CHRISTIE LANG 
JOHN A. LANGAN 
LAURA A LANGLEY 
PATRICK LANGLEY 
AMY LANKFORD 



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MERISSA LANTZ 
NICOLE M LAPP 
MARY F. LARKIN 
DENNY M. LAU 
JAMES LAY 
KERRY LAYNE 
DZANH LE-SI 

RUSSELL LEDERHOUSE 
KARI A. LEE 
TIMOTHY LEE 
YOO KYUNG LEE 
KATIE LENGYEL 
JOLIE A LESTER 
STEPHANIE LESTER 

ERIK C. LEVY 
RACHEL J. LEVY 
JOY LILLARD 
COLLEEN P LILLY 
GREGORY C . LINCOLN 
NATASHA E LINN 
BRIAN LINSNER 

CLAIRE K. LISTER 
CATHERINE M. LITTLEHALE 
LINDSAY LLOYD 
RYAN M. LYNCH 
KELSEY L LYND 
SARAH LYON 
KEVIN R. MAC LUSKIE 

VICTORIA MACK 
JESSICA MADDOX 
JOSHUA MADDOX 
BRENDAN MADIGAN 
JOHN MAHONEY 
KHURRAM MALIK 
JASON MANDEVILLE 

RYAN MANGELS 
DENISE MANSHEIM 
CHRISTY D MANSPILE 
RODRIGO M MANZANO 
EMILIE M. MARCHESE 
AMANTE MARINAS 
MATTHEW F . MARINO 

KIMBERLY E. MARLEY 
MELONY J. MARSHALL 
GREGORY MARTIN 
TIMOTHY MARTIN 
HEATHER MARTINSEN 
BRIAN J. MARTONIK 
CHRISTEN M MASANIELLO 

CLAUDIA P MATAMALA 
NICOLE MATTHEWS 
KAREN MAUSER 
DIANA M MAY 
KIMBERLY MAY 
LORIE SAL E MC NULTY 
SARAH MCCALL 

JOSEPH JO HN MCCALLISTER 
PATRICIA MCCLINTOCK 
ROBERT MCCRONE 
MICHELLE MCCRYSTAL 
CATHERINE MCDONOUGH 
ROBERT MCDOWALL 
SHEILA MCDUFF 

SARAH E. MCELROY 
MATTHEW MCFARLANE 
SARAH K. MCGRADY 
MEGAN A MCILLWAIN 
ELIZABETH A. MCKEEBY 
TASHA C MCKELVEY 
MICHAEL C . MCKENNA 



Gate- 9/ 



MEGAN MCKEOWN 
VIRGINIA MCKTNNEY 
LORI MCLAUGHLIN 
SAMUEL A. MCLEAREN 
DUNCAN B. MCLELLAN 
CARIN MCMORAN 
LLNDSEY M MCSHERRY 

MARGARET MEDHURST 
LORA M. MEDLYN 
HEATHER MEESE 
JESSICA L MELLINGTON 
EUPHROSYN E A MENTIS 
STEPHANIE MERIWETHER 
PATRICLA. M. MERRILL 

KATHERINE MERTEN 
MEGAN L. MESLER 
ELIZABETH M MESSER 
BRUCE MILLER 
NEVA K. MIMNAUGH 
JAMES MIRABELLO 
KATHERINE MITCHELL 

YURISSA :\HTCHELL 
JEFFREY L MITCHELL JR 
ASHLEY E. MODELL 
JANELLE E MOELLER 
SUCHI MOHANTY 
BRITNEY MONGOLD 
JAMES MONTEPARE 

ELIZABETH MONTGOMERY 
.MARGARET M. MOORE 
MEGHAN W MOORE 
SUSAN MOORE 
KELLY MORGAN 
MATTHEW MORGAN 
SAMUEL MORRISON 

KERI MOTTO 
LLOYD MOYER 
DANA M MULLENS 
ELALVE MURRAY 
JENNIFER K. MURRAY 
JENNIFER S. MYERS 
KIMBERLY MYERS 

MEREDITH MYERS 
ANGELA NAGGLES 
JACQUELIN E NANCE 
RAECHELLE NARVAEZ 
JAMES NEASE, JR. 
ANDREW R. NEIBURG 
JAY NELSON 

SARAH E. NEWMAN 
KAREN NG 
LLNDA H NGUYEN 
CAROLINE A. NICHOLS 
LAUREN C. NICHOLS 
JENNIFER NILES 
MEGAN NOEL 

THOMAS NOLAND 
DEVON NOON 
JOHN W NORD, JR. 
SARAH NORFLEET 
CARISSANORMAN 
CHRISTOPH EB NOWELL 
PETER NUNNALLY 

DANIEL M 

janice ouara 
slsan oak:-; 
henry b. odom 
samantha ( i 

ANTHONY P. '.. 
JAMILYN C ORRISO 




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KIMIKO OSAWA 
JOHN A. OSTERMAN 
KATHLEEN E. OTTERSTEN 
LAUREN S OVIATT 
JAMES PADGETT 
JULIE PALMER-HOFFMAN 
KATHERINE PANEK 

STEPHANIE PAPAEFTHEMIOU 
LAURA N. PAPPALARDI 
CHAN PARK 
KATE PARKER 
KIMBERLY PARKER 
JESSICA PARRISH 
ELIZABETH C PARSONS 

JOSHUA PATERNI 
TIFFANY PATRICK 
CRYSTAL A PATTERSON 
CRYSTAL PAYNE 
JAMES PEACEMAKER 
JOSHUA B PEINE 
JOEY B. PENDERGRAST 

MICHAEL S . PERKINS 
ASHLEY PERRIN 
ELLEN S PERRY 
LINDSAY M PESCUMA 
DAHLIA H PETERSON 
SHARON O. PHANG 
LEAH PHILLIPS 

JAMES C. PIATT, JR. 
MARIKA PICKETT 
LILLIAN PITTS 
JEROME L. PODORSKI 
BRADLEY POOLE 
SHERRI POTHIER 
NATHANIEL POWERS 

TIMOTHY POWERS 
JOSHUA B PRENETA 
ELANA PRESSMAN 
BENJAMIN T. PRESTON 
MICHAEL J . PRrVETT 
HEATHER PROFFITT 
KRISTIN PUMA 

LAURA M. QUINN 
RYAN QUINN 
SUSAN C. QUINN 
SCOTT RACER 
IAN R. RAMCHERAN 
NICOLE RAMEY 
JOHN P RAPAGLIA 

RYANRAPP 
DANIEL RATLIFF 
CHARLES A . RAU 
JAMES REAGAN 
DAVYD M REAMS 
PHILIP REICHERS 
KRISTINE REID 

MARY J. REIERSON 
JENNIFER A. REPASS 
PAUL RESNICK 
TIFFANI A REYNOLDS 
MARC RHATIGAN 
MARY D. RICH 
BEVERLEY RICHARDS 

DANIELLE RICHARDSON 
ERIC W RICHKO 
WILLIAM RIEHL 
JOHN N. RILEY 
LAUREN RIZZI 
KATHERINE ROBIE 
TRINA ROBINSON 






Gate- 93 



JOHN R. ROCK 
EMILYA. ROHWER 
HEATHER K ROME 
KATHRYX ROMERO 
MATTHEW D . ROSONE 
EVA ROSS 
ANDREA ROSSI 

MEGHAN ROSWELL 
YMTTE E. RUIZ 
JESSE A. RUZICKA 
BRJAN C SABATELLI 
ANNNURIE E. SACK 
MITZI HAL L SAFFOS 
ANTOHNY SAITTA 

ERANDI SALGADO 
MISHA SANBORN 
ANNE SAUNDERS 
BRIAN A. SAVAGE 
SHANNON SA\VDY 
MCTORU A SCARBOROUGH 
KELLI SCHAEFFER 

BRTAN SCHAFFTER 
ALEXANDER B. SCHEIN 
NATHAN D. SCHEPKER 
EHREN SCHLMMEL 
IRENE SCHLNKEL 
JYOTI SCHLESLNGER 
ANDREA K SCHMIDT 

ELIZABETH SCHMIDT 
JOHN SCHMIDT 
MELISSA V . SCHMIDT 
ALEXANDER SCHNEIDER 
ADAM C SCHULTZ 
LEE SCOTT 
TANYA SCRUGGS 

CAROLLNE SEAWELL 
RAMLN SEDDIQ 
DONALD P SELF JR 
LAURA SENNER 
AMNA SHAMIM 
JENNIFER A. SHANE 
ERIN SHANK 

ROBERT SHARP 
ANDREA L. SHAW 
BRIAN SHERWOOD 
JAMES E SHEVLIN 
MEGAN C SHILLING 
AARON SHRIBER 
STEPHANIE SIEKIERKA 

RACHEL J. SILBAUGH 
MICHAEL SIMMONS 
BRANDEN R SIMPSON 
MELANIE SIROIS 
LISA SKAGGS 
JOSHUA SLATER 
LINDSEY K . SLAUGHTER 

I.EDJESKI 
V.. SLUSS 
CHRISTY SMITH 
DAVID W. SMITH 
ELLEN A. SMITH 
SARAH A. SMITH 
TERRY D. SMITH 

JONATHAN - 
ROBERT SOB I 
RICHARD M 
SOUTHWORTH 
MARC A SPEED 
DDCIE F SPORE 
KIRSTEN ST CLAIR 



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SARAH STACY 
TERESA E. STARRS 
TERESA A. STAZZONE 
JILL STECHER 
WANDA STEMPIN 
JEREMIAH P. STODDARD 

AMY E. STOLL 

LISA STONE 

ANDREA L STONEBURNER 

GREGORY STRASBAUGH 

JENNIFER L. STRINGFELLOW 
LAMNGEUNE SUBKANHA 
JESSICA SULLINS 

BETHANY SULLIVAN 
MARGARET SUMMERS 
ERIN C. SUTHERLAND 
BRIAN A SWEET 
SUSAN E. SWOGGER 
MELISSA SYLVESTER 
OLrVIA SYNNOTT 

SHANNA EV E TAKACS 
ALI TARQUINO 
SCOTT TAYLOR 
DELBERT TERRILL 
ALISON THOMAS 
LISA MARI E THOMAS 
MARY THOMAS 

LAURIE THOMPSON 
DAVID TILMAN 
STACEY LE E TIMMONS 
SARAH C TINSLEY 
SHANITATISABY 
BRIAN TOPPING 
STEVE E TOWNSLEY 

DANIEL P TRAAS 
FLORINDATREJO 
ELIZABETH C. TUCKER 
KIMBERLY G TUPPER 
KELLY R TURCIC 
BRIAN TURNER 
AMBER C. TUSSING 

KELLY L. UNDERWOOD 
LAINA UPTON 
KAREN VAILLANT 
ANDREA VALITUTTO 
JASON C. VICKERS 
KRISTEN VORISEK 
KELLY J. WAGNER 

TAMARA J. WALKER 
ROBERT WALL 
KRISTIN WALLACE 
WHITNEY WALLACE 
LORI M. WALSH 
CRISTY L. WALTER 
JOCELYN A . WALTON 

KRISTIN J . WARD 
NATASHA WARD 
ABIGAIL WARREN 
ANDREA M. WATERSTON 
KRISTIN R . WEAVER 
TARA C. WEBSTER 
YOFI D. WEINBERG 

MEGAN E WEIRETER 
JONATHAN WEST 
LANCE WESTERLUND 
CHRISTOPH ER WESTFALL 
BETH WHEELER 
GEOFFREY WHITE 
LISBETH WHITE 



Gate 



95 



LORI A. WHITE 
RACHEL WHITE 
JARRETT WHITLOW 
JEAXXETTE M WHITMIRE 
BEAU WHITNEY 
SHAROX E WILCOX 
ROBLX WILD 

EMLLY C. WELKLNSON 
ADRLAN' WILLLAMS 
DAXIELLE WILLLAMS 
JEXXIFER WILLIAMS 
KALELA A WILLLAMS 
SARAH WILLLAMS 
CHRISTOPH ER WILUAMSOX 

COL"RTNEY WILLENGER 
EMILY WILSON 
KERRY K WILSON 
MEREDITH WILSON 
JASOX WLXEIELD 
LISTA WLNGER-EGER 
KRISTIN WITTERS 

SUSAN WOLF 
iLARY E WOODIE 
GARY WOODWARD 
SARAH WORKMAN 
KATHERIXE E. WRIGHT 
AXDREA D WRIGLEY 
VALERIE WUNDER 

BRYAN YAWBERG 
PEI-SZE YEAP 
JOXATHAX YOUNG 
EVAN YOUXGER 
PETER ZACHARLASEN 
DEBORAH K ZAGOREN 
RYAN P ZAVITZ 

AXGELAZOSEL 
SARA B ZUK 
KEVIX M ACOTTO 
XATHAXR ADAMS 
STEPHANIE E ADAMS 
ALEXAXDER M ADDISON 
MOXICA M. AGUDELO 

CRISTLXAL AIKEN 
XATALIE ALEXANDER 
ANTOXIO J ALMAGUER 
SUN M AN 

ELLEN K ANDERSON 
NICOLE LANGARELLA 
JANETTE ANTINORI 

SHERILASBEIL 
CANDICE J ASHTON 
JEXXIFER R AUERBACH 
JAMIE AUGUSTYN 
ELSIE L BAKER 
NANCY E BALLEK 
STOCKTOX D BANFIELD 

MELISSA S. BANZILE 
<GBARHIGHT 
CHRISTINA M BARNES 
MICHAEL A BARRETT 
ANTOl TES 

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ASHLEY P. BE 
ROBERT B BE' 
ETHAN Z BEDELj 
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NICOLE R. BELL 
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TRACY E. BELV1N 
JEREMY L BENJAMIN- YOUNG 
AMY BENSON 
WILLIAM BENSTEN 
KAREN R BERGERON 
RACHEL BERK 
JONATHAN BERNHARDT 

REBECCA A BESANCON 
DAVID E BESSOM 
TASHFEEN F BHIMDI 
SARAH T BIGELOW 
BENJAMIN J BISHOP 
MEGHAN C BISHOP 
HOLLY J BLACKMAN 

ANNA N BLACKWELL 
KATHARINE C. BLATCHFORD 
DESIREE C BLATCHLEY 
LAURYN E. BLEVINS 
TERRANCE G BLOUNT II 
LISA C BOLAND 
JOY M BOLOGNESI 

TY N BOWERS 
AMY M BRADY 
DAVID J BRADY 
PAULINA E BRAJER 
JOSHUA BRANCH 
THEODOR E BRATRUD 
PAUL R BRATTEN 

NOELLE C BRAUN 
ADAM B BRAY 
KATHERINE M BREESE 
MICHELLE L BREIDENSTEIN 
JAMIE M BRISSEY 
ALLYSON C BRISTOR 
DAVID M BRISTOW 

KELLIABRITTAIN 
ROSETTA L BROCK 
SARAH C BROMLEY 
COURTNEY L BROOKS 
STEPHEN BROOKS 
ALEXANDER M BROOKS-BARR 
ALLISON E BROWN 

AMY C BROWN 
MEGAN BROWN 
STEPHEN B BROWN 
WILLIAM R BROWN 
JESSICA R BRUCE 
DANIEL C BRUECHERT 
KATHARINE C BRYDGES 

JOHN P BUCHANAN, JR. 
JENNIFER L BUCKELS 
REBECCA F BULAS 
KEDRON A BULLOCK 
BRANAN G BURDE 
DOMINIQUE A BURGER 
SHANNON M BURKE 

CANDACE J BUSH 
JIN S. BYUN 
CODY J CAMBLIN 
STEPHEN A . CAMELI 
SARITA CAPUTO-NIMBARK 
JENNIFER L CARDELLO 
DARREN M CARLSON 

BRANDON J CARR 
MICHELLE A CARR 
BROOKE L. CARRIER 
COLBY L. CARRIER 
COLLEEN E CARROLL 
JENNIFER S. CARROLL 
MICHAEL K CASSARINO 



Gate- 97 



MICHAEL C CASSETTA 
MEGAN' N CASTXER 
MELISSA G CASTXER 
ERLX C CAULFIELD 
CRYSTAL L CAVE 
TARA LYXX CEBRLAN 
SALLEY S. CHAX 

JAMES D CHAXEY 
HEATHER M CHASE 
PATRICUL CHASE 
SHAHLACHOHAX 
ERTXX CHOROYICH 
WITT JAM J CHRISTLAN 
MICHELLE CLARK 

JESSICA M . CLEMEXTS 
LORI CLEMOXS 
MATTHEW A CLISZIS 
SEAX M. CLORE 
GLXA E CLOUGH 
BRAXDIE D COATES 
JASOX G COBB 

JESSICA A COLIE 
ALEYLA COLWELL 
ERLX B COXXOR 
AMANDA L COOXEY 
JENNIE C COOPER 
MELISSA K COOPER 
DAXIEL COTE 

MELISSA A COTE 
JEREMYACOTHERX 
JAMIE L COULTER 
SARAH L CRABTREE 
TOLER F CROSS 
JOHX A DAXGERFIELD 
JOXATHAX H DAXIELS 

ALICE S DAVTDSOX 
SUZAXXE V DAVIDSOX 
PHHJPADAVIS 
RICHARD T DAVIS 
REBECCA E DAVISON 
NLATTHEW T DAWSON 
ADAM T DECK 

ANDREW DEFIESTA 
REBECA M DELGADO 
BRIAN" M DEMOSS 
SARAH DERIGGI 
RUSTYADESAXTIS 
TIZIAXO DEVESCOVI 
CARLA M DICORPO 

SCOTT F DIXEEX 
LAURA C DIXGLEDIXE 
SHANNON R DIPEPPE 
MICHAEL C DISALVO 

CHRISTINA H DOMINGUEZ 
PATRICIA DOXACHY 
KEVIN J DOXAHUE 

JAIME A DOXARUMA 
JAMES E DORMAN 
EMILY C DO' 
SARAH C DOWNEY 
ALEXIS J DOYLE 
PETER J U' 

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JOHN D EAST 
VIRGINIA LEEEATON 
MICHAELA EGGER 
ROBERT EIDSON 
MATTHEW S . ELKIN 

LEANNE ELLIOTT 
AMANDA ELWELL 
JASON R ENGELHARDT 
CHRISTOPH ER ENINGER 
MINA N ENNIN 
JASON ESGUERRA 
BREYN E EVANS 

MEGAN L EVANS 
VIRGINIA L EVANS 
BRENDAN EYGABROAT 
MATTHEW J FACCENDA 
BARRY FADELY 
SHANE D FARIS 
JEFFREY W FARTHING 

SARAH N FAUERBACH 
D. MCLEAN FAVRE 
MARZENA M FERCZ 
AMY L FIFE 

KAMMERON E FINDLEY 
CARRIE L FINGERET 
OLrVIAAFINNEGAN 

ROBERT I FLORENCE 
CHRISTOPH ER FONTANA 
CATHERINE Y FORD 
DEBORAH FORD 
ERIN P FORREST 
DAVID G FOSTER 
DANIELLE M FOURRE 

HANS P. FOY 
JENNIFER L FOY 
JACQUELIN E MFRANK 
TRLXY J FRANKE 
WAYNE H FRANKLIN, JR. 
DAMON N FREEMAN 
JENNAAFRYE 

THERESA M FURLONG 
LINDSEY M FURMAN 
ANDREW D GALE 
BRIDGET GALLIGAN 
VICTORIA H GALLOWAY 
CHRISTOPH ER GALLUP 
VALERIE P GARDNER 

TAMARA S GARVEY 
BRIDGET A GEIMAN 
ALLISON A GERBER 
REBECCA L GIBBONS 
JAVIER A. GIBERT 
KATHERINE E GILL 
BETHANY J GILLAN 

MARY M GILMORE 
SARDI GJOLLMA 
MELANIE R GLADDEN 
LAUREN K GLAETTLI 
AMBER L GLOVER 
BETHANY J GOBEILLE 
MARC A GORMAN 

FLORENCE J GOSS 
ALLYSON C GOULD 
CYRUS G GRADY 
VIRGINIA L GRAHAM 
ERIN M GREENBAUM 
KIMBERLY FAYGRIFFITH 
CHANNING L. GRIGGS 



Gate- 99 



JILLIAX L . GRIGGS 
DLANE GRIMM 
ASHLEY R GROESBECK 
ALBERT GUERRATY 
ANN T. GLTLL 
MACON G GURLEY 
MICHAEL D GUTZLER 

HONG SUON G HA 
NESSIM G HADIJI 
KELLY M HAHN 
LIZA K HATNES 
RACHEL L H\LL 
BRANDIE X HAMBSCH 
ALLISON P HAMILTON 

JILL E HAMLIN 
GLNA MI HAN 
JESSE E HANSON 
DONALD E HARDEN EI 
JESSICA T HARDIE 
CARRIE HARDIN 
SARA HARNEY 

JAMIE L HARPER 
DENISE A HARRINGTON 
JESSDZ HARRIS 
MICHAEL HARRIS 
REBECCA C HARVEY 
RYAN R HASKLNS 
YARA A HASSAN 

STEPHEN M HASTINGS 
ARIEL C HATFIELD 
KARYN HAVAS 
ERICA AE HAWKINS 
NATHAN' T HAYES 
CLIFFORD R HAZELTON 
JAYME E HAZZARD 

MARY A HEDLESTON 
TERESA A HEFLIN 
PAUL HENDERSON 
KERI A HENLEY 
ANGIE J. HEPNER 
CYNTHIA M HERRMANN 
KATHERINE A HERZOG 

ERIN L HESLEP 
TRAVIS CS HESTER 
KATHERINE M. HIGGINS 
LEIGH R HIGHTOWER 
STEPHEN G HINCHLIFFE 
RAY W HLNKLE 
REBECCA E HIRSCHMAN 

BENJAMIN C HITE 
JONATHAN P. HODGMAN 
JON-BRADL EY HODGSON 
JEFFREY A HOFFMAN 
LAUREN J HOHLER 
KATHERINE A HOLLAND 
GILLIAN L HOLLAR 

VLHOLLENBACH 
JILL M HOLLENBECK 
CAMERON D HOLMES 
EDWARD PHOLOWNIA 
BRYAN M HOLT 
JOHN DAV1 D HOLZ» 
JAMES M HOOKER 

•JULIE A HORWITZ 
WCHELBQHOSS 

REBECCA LHO 
BETH A HOVDESTAU 
TAMARAE HOWARD 
JESSICAAHOWE 
GARY R HOWELL 




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HELEN M HULEY 
CHARLES T HUM PH 
LINWOOD W HUMPHRIES III 
MATTHEW R HUNSINGER 
LAURA HUNTER 
PAUL HUTTON 
MICHAEL C HYATT 

IRENE P ISBERTO 
RACHEL M rVES 
ANDREW M rVIE 
JOSEPH R IVY 
ANNE E JACENICH 
ANGELA L JACOBINI 
JULIE R JAGEMAN 

CAROLINE L JARVIS 
TERESA M JOERGER 
BRYAN JOHNSON 
JESSICA L . JOHNSON 
STEVEN R JOHNSON 
ANNIE B JOHNSTON 
JAMES R JOHNSTON, JR. 

CLAUDIA K JONES 
LAQUIA JONES 
NICOLE L JONES 
TIMOTHY P . JONES 
VICTOR Q JURY 
SARAS KAFKA 
ANDREW KAISER 

KOONJ KAPOOR 
ALKATERIN I EKARAKEHAGIA 
DANA M KARLOVICH 
JENNIFER E KEELING 
CORY R. KEGERISE 
JORDYAKEITH 
MARIE KEITH 

VANESSA G KELLER 
KIMBERLY A KELLEY 
KRISTEN KELLOCK 
DAVID A KELLY 
MICHAEL V KELMELIS 
SETH P KENNARD 
DAWN KENNEDY 

BERNICE J KENNEY 
STEVEN A KTLINSKI 
REGINA S KIM 
LESIA KINDRAT-PRATT 
BRIE A KING 
WILLIAM C KING 
ZEBULUN KIPP 

PAMELA KIRBY 
MELISSA E KITTRELL 
ASHLEY E KNAPP 
BENJAMIN D KOHLER 
EILEEN J KOLLINS 
KIMBERLY S. KOLLMANN 
JENNIE L KORNIOTES 

SARAH J KOVACS 
KAROLAKOZAK 
KELLI L KRAMER 
JONATHAN E KRAUT 
REBECCA E KUEHN 
LAUREN E LAITALA 
DONNA L LAMARQUE 

CHRISTINA M. LAMBERT 
KEVIN R LAMPINEN 
ANN T LANE 
NICOLE M LANGSTON 
ADAM C. LARSON 
KATHLEEN K LASKEY 
RYAN M LAU 



Gate 



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AMY E LEACHTEXAUER 
KEVIALEATY 
BARRET R LEIPERTZ 
CATHERIXE E LEMATRE 
M\RGARET LEXX 
NATHANIEL A LEONHARD 
CAROLYN M LESKOWITZ 

JAMES W. LEWIS 
JENNIFER L LEWIS 
ROCHELLE LIGHTNER 
JONATHAN LIKOWSKJ 
CYXTHLAALLLLO 
DAVID J LIOLA 
CHRISTLNA A LIVESAY 

CAROLINE LOH 
NATALIE E LONERGAN 
TAMA LOURLDO 
JESSICA E LOW 
JESSICA AR LOWE 
FLAYIUS LUNGOCIA 
COURTNEY S LUPTON 

ANDREA E LUTE RAN 

JOHN F LYDON 

KIRA E MAAS 

ANN M MACCOXNACHIE 

KELLEY L MACNEIL 

KATHERLNE D MACPHAIL 

JENNIFER A MADDERN 

\TCTORIA A MAHALEY 
JEXXY M MAHER 
ORRLN K MARCELLA 
ROGER ri MARCY 
CATHERINE A MARGETON 
MADELYN M MARINO 
JAMES D MARKER 

BRIAN' D MARSH 
NATHAN M MARSHALL 
ADAM C MARTIN 
KAREN MARTIN 
MICHAEL G MARTIN 
MICHELLE B MASLANKA 
AHMED M MASOOD 

WAYNE R MATA 
LINDSAY MATSON 
MELISSA L MATTHIESSEX 
JONATHAN R MATTSON 
DANIELLE A MATUCH 
APRIL M MAXWELL 
SANDRA MAYES 

MEGHAN D MCAULIFFE 
GORDON D MCCALLUM 
KATE E MCCARN 
TROY C MCCLELLAND 
KIMBERLY D MCCORMICK 
ERIN L MCCROCKLIN 
ADELE MCDONALD 

JENNIFER MCDONALD 
JILL L MCDONALD 
KARA ("Mr DONALD 
KEMB1 GHEE 

KATH.' INN- 

REBECCA L 
NICOLE J MCINTYRE 

RILEY RMCISAAC 
HEATHER L Mr K; 
TAMARA MCKLVEh. . 
ALYSIA D MCLAIN 
JOSEPH B MCMAHON 
KASEY E MCNATT 
KARA E MCSWAIN 















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ADAM J MEARS 
JOSEPH P MEHALKO 
SARAHAMEHARG 
COLLEEN S MENTZ 
AMANDA R MERCER 
MICHAEL S MERKER 

JENNIFER M MESKA 
DANIEL P MESSIER 
ALEXIS M MICKOWSKI 
ERIN M. MILES 
AUDREY MILLER 
LEE C MILLER 
LINDSAY T MILLER 

ANGELA J MILLS 
AMANDA E MINOR 
JENNIFER L MOCARSKI 
BRIAN C MOCK 
JESSICA A MOORE 
KIMBERLY S MOORE 
KENDRA E MORAN 

TRAVIS R MORGAN 
ANNE G. MORIARTY 
KATHERINE A MORRISON 
KRISTIN R MORTON 
CHRISTOPH ER MOSCHELLA 
MATTHEW P MOSPAN 
MELANIE B MOUSSEAU 

ADAM C MOYERS 
VANESSA E MUHLENFELD 
ALISA M MUNDELL 
KATHLEEN E MURPHY 
KELLY J MURPHY 
ERIN K MURRAY 
KIMBERLY A MYCKO 

SARA NASH 
BARRY F. NEFF 
ELIZABETH NEIDIG 
BRANDY L NELSON 
JEREMIAH L NELSON 
KATHERINE A NELSON 
SHANNON K NELSON 

LISAANENNINGER 
KRISTIN A NEVIACKAS 
KAMILLE M NEWETT 
KATHERINE S NICHOLS 
SARAANICOLAI 
SUZANNE NISSIM-SABAT 
KYLE C. NOVAK 

TINA K. NOVITSKI 
KRISTIN E NUEDLING 
SHAUN D O'BRIEN 
CORINNE L O'CONNOR 
SEAN M O'NEIL 
JENNIFER L O'ROURKE 
JOHN S ODOM 

VICKIE L OGDEN 
ELIZABETH A ONEILL 
JENNIFER R OSBORNE 
JESSICA E OSL 
DERREK J OSTRZYZEK 
SEAN O OTTEN 
ERIN OVEREND 

MARY L OWENS 
KATHRYN J PACELLA 
YANIRA PAEZ 
MARSHALL E PAGE 
ALISON D PAGNANI 
KACY M PAIDE 
ALISSA R PAK 



Gate 



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DEMETRA PAPAEFTHIMIOU 
YOO-JLN PARK 
MICHAEL E PARKER 
SARAH A PARKER 
DOMINIQUE PASTRE 
EMILY A PATTERSON 
JESSICA E PATTON 

STEPHEN" M PATURYNSKI 
QUENTLN A PEARSON III 
BENJAMIN L PECK 
MELISSA A PELLETIER 
LINA L PENALOSA 
VIVIAN M PEREZ-LICEAGA 
BENJAMIN S PERLMAN 

THO^LAS J PERONE 
KAREN M PERREAULT 
JOSEPH M PETRICK 
ERLN M PICKENS 
DrVYAPLLLAI 
DAVID B. PITTMAN 
JOSHUA T PITTS 

NLARTHA E POLLARD 
ASHELEY W POND 
ABIGAIL PORTER 
KIMBERLY S PRICE 
MONICA L PRICE 
DANIEL H. PRIEST 
CATHERINE E PRUDOM 

CARLAQLTST 
ALEXANDRA C RACANELLI 
KATHARINE RADFORD 
WENDY J RAMIREZ 
LINCOLN S RAMSEY 
SARAH G RANSONE 
BRENDA READER 

NATASHA S REDDINGER 
ROBIN M REEDY 
LAURA J REIGLE 
ELIZABETH REIL 
ROBBIE J REUTZEL 
JOHN-ADRI AN REYES 
■JENNIFER M RICE 

ALICIA A RICH 
SARAH E RICHARDSON 
TIMOTHY J RILEY 
JESSICA A RITCHIE 
MATTHEW S ROBERTS 
MARK H RODEFFER III 
MARIA C RODRIGUEZ 

JACOB C ROGERS 
JESSICA D ROKE 
SHANE M ROLAND 
ALLISON L ROONEY 
Jl "LIE K ROPER 
MELISSA M ROSEGRANT 
SUSAN L ROSENKRANZ 

ALISON B ROSS 
RACHELEROSS 

CATHERINE A. ROTHAUG 
JESSICA EROWE 
JASON D ROY 
REBECCA K ROYAL 
GRAHAM L RUCKMAN 

CATHERINE W SAIFER 
AMARI SAINT 
MICHAEL SALPETER 
WENDY J SAN 
ALISON E. SANCHEZ 
ELIZABETH C SANDS 
MICHAEL J SANTAY 




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MELANIEASAPP 
ZACHARY O SARGENT 
AMY N SATTERWHITE 
CHARLES O SAYERS 
MIRIAM R SCARR 
JOY N SCHEER 
BRYCE M SCHEIBEL 

JUSTIN H SCHEIER 
SOLSON SCHERMAN 
JULIE K SCHEXNAYDER 
DAVID E SCHLESINGER 
SARAH E SCHMOYER 
LEA SCHON 
EDWARD W SCOPIN 

CARLY M SCOTT 
CAROLYN N SCOTT 
ERICA L SCOTT 
WENDY E SCOTT 
SARAH R SEALE 
ERICA L G C SELDEN 
MICHAEL J SELLERS 

MATTHEW SELWYN 
FALVASHA B SHAFIQ 
ELIZABETH K SHAVER 
MATTHEW SHAW 
ELIZABETH A SHELDON 
ANJULI SHERIN 
GRAHAM T SHUMWAY 

CAROLINE N SIMPSON 
SARAH CAT HERSKEATE 
KELLY L SLOCUM 
KAREN L SLOTSKY 
STEPHANIE SMALDORE 
AMY H SMITH 
DAVID A. SMITH 

ELIZABETH A SMITH 
ERIN K SMITH 
JAMIE M SMITH 
JASON L SMITH 
KELLI K SMITH 
KYLIE D SMITH 
LAUREN R SMITH 

RYAN P SMITH 
SHANE J SMITH 
TRACY D SMITH 
MALCOLM E SMITH III 
AMBER SONES 
GABRIELLE M. SORRENTTNO 
JESSICA SOULE 

QUINN SPADOLA 
RICHARD C SPEAKMAN 
JAMES M SPENCER 
LAUREN M SPENCER 
ADAM D SPISAK 
KARA M SPRINGER 
STEVEN M SPURRY 

PETER N SQUIRE 
MARTINE N ST GERMAIN 
KATRINA L ST PIERRE 
LAURA S STAFFORD 
SUZANNE H STEARNS 
HILARY E STEBBINS 
JOHN W STEELE 

JUSTIN STEINBERG 
NICOLE M STEINMETZ 
STEPHENIE A STERBLING 
ASHLEY L STING 
PAUL A STODDARD 
CHRISTINE M STOEHR 
GREGORY H STONER 



Gate- 



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PETER W STOUGHTON 
MANDI R STO\*ER 
BRLANASTOZEK 
MAUREEN C STYKA 
PETER M STYLE 
ANDREW E SUDDARTH 
ABIGAIL E SUGRUE 

LEAH M SULLIVAN 
MARGARET H. SULLIVAN 
ELIZABETH C SUMMERS 
EMILY W SUTLIFF 
KATHERLNE M SUTPHIN 
JEREMLAH L SUTTON 
BRIAN J SWEENEY 

ANGELA M SWEIGART 
ALMEE E SWISHER 
RACHEL B SYKES 
MILTON SYKES JR. 
JANE E SZCZESLAK 
LTNDSEY M TABER 
LLNDSEY P TAGGART 

CORIE D TARBET 
AUDREA L TARVER 
LUKE B TATE 
FASDXA N TEFERA 
ASHLEY P TENNENT 
REBEKAH L TERREY 
ASHLEY L THOMPSON 

JONATHAN D THOMPSON 
TIFFANY K THOMPSON 
LORI M TISCH 
CHRISTOPH ER TODD 
PAULTOMICH 
TUND TRAN 
JAMES M TRIPLETT 

SARAH R TROVATO- WHITE 
NICOLE L. TUCKER 
JEAN F TURNER 
YVETTE M UHALDE 
MICHELLE J UITTO 
STACY-ANN VADALA 
CLAIRE H VAN TIL 

NATHALIE YANDENHEWGENBE 
MELISSA S VANZILE 
KENNETH D VARGA 
CHRISTOPH ER VTBERT 
PATRICIA VICKERY 
CARLA M VILLAR 
NICOLLE L VILLERS 

RONALD N. VOGEL 
MARY P VON DER HEIDE 
MAUREEN L VOSKAMP 
RONALD K VOSS 
BRANDY WACHTER 
BRANT L WALDRON 
SCOTT P WALKER 

NEN'E D WALLACE 
ALLISON R WALLIN 
KIMBERLY L WALTERS 
ANDREW M WARD 
JENNIFER L. WARD 
JONATHAN D WARD 
KIMBERLY D WARD 

KARA L WASH! 
TRACEYS. WASH I.- 
ELIZABETH CWA - :. 
BETHE.WATSO:. 
MONNIE E W.Y. 
VESLA WEAVER 
LYNNE ANN WEBER 



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COURTNEY WEBSTER 
JEREMY P WEILAND 
KATHRYNLWELLER 
STACY C WELLER 
CHRISTY F WELLS 
CRAIG J WERSCHING 
SALLY M WERTH 

SARAH E WHAREN 
CARA C WHEATLEY 
MELISSA A WHEATLEY 
KRISTIN A WHEELER 
MEGAN C WHEELER 
HEATHER J WHITE 
KIMBERLY P WHITE 

GEOFFREY J WIEDENMAYER 
MEAGAN L WIENTJES 
RACHEL E WILDER 
DARYL W WILLIAMS 
JONATHAN R WILLIAMS 
NATASHA S WILLIAMS 
SARAH T WILLIAMS 

AMY L WILSON 
DEANNA M WINGERTER 
WILLIAM D WINKLER 
CHRISTOPH ER WINSLOW 
BENJAMIN L WISEMAN 
DEBORAH A WOMER 
TIFFANY P WOOTEN 

RACHEL E WORLEY 
ELIZABETH R. WORTH 
MARK WC WRIGHT 
MATTHEW WRIGHT 
KATHLEEN D YAMASHITA 
KIMBERLY YATES 
CHRISTINE M YERG 

LAURA L YORK 
DAVID M YOST 
SEAN-MICH AELYOUNG 
MELISSA RYUNKER 
KATARZYNA A ZEBRAK 
SARAH E ZELENAK 
XUDZHAO 

RACHEL M ZOBERMAN 
JESSICA J ZUIDEMA 
JENNIFER C ZUNKA 
JOSHUA D ZUSMER 
JONATHAN W ZWICKE 



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Tamara Hinton 



If the old adage is true that 
"experience is the best teacher" then 
students at Mary Washington 
College are receiving some of the 
best education possible; this is true 
for students who have taken Dr. 
James Farmer's civil rights history 
class. His personal narratives of his 
experience in the Civil Rights 
Movement is incomparable to any 
history texts. His class is so popular 
among students that it requires the 
use of a waiting list. Even then, both 
students and professors linger 
outside the door to hear Farmer's 
engrossing and provocative stories 
about his glory days as a civil rights 
leader. After always being in the 
shadow of other civil rights leaders, 
such as Martin Luther King, Jr., Roy 
Wilkins, and Whitney Young, this 
time the spotlight shines solely and 
completely on Farmer and his often 
unrecognized accomplishments. 

Dr. Farmer was born in 1920 
to James and Pearl Farmer. He was 
raised among the academic elite of 
black America in Marshall, Texas. 
His father was a preacher and 
professor of religion. Young Farmer 
grew up not only as a "PK" 
(preacher's kid), but also as a faculty 
brat at various Southern black 
colleges. At the age of 18, the 
precocious Farmer graduated Wiley 
College in Texas. He continued his 
education at Howard University, 
graduating in 1941 with a theology 
degree. Everyone, including his 
father, thought he would become a 
minister, but Farmer had loftier 
ambitions. Inspired or perhaps 
driven by a childhood experience 
when he his mother could not 
purchase Cokes at a drugstore 
because they were black, Farmer 



wanted to end segregation. It goes 
without saying that this challenging 
task began slowly First, Farmer 
became an organizer for a 
pacifist group called Fellowship of 
Reconciliation. This launched an 
idea for Farmer and in 1942 he 
founded the Congress of Racial 
Equality (CORE). Through CORE, 
Farmer began leading nonviolent 
protests against segregation. In may 
1942, Farmer organized the first 
civil rights sit-in in American history 
at a Chicago doughnut shop called 
the Jack Spratt Coffee House. 

In 1961, Farmer organized 
the Freedom Ride, which was a bus 
trip through the deep South, 
designed to desegregate interstate 
buses and terminals. Farmer and 
twelve other Freedom Riders rode 
through Virginia, the Carolinas, 
Alabama, and Mississippi. They 
were eventually arrested in 
Mississippi for violating segregation 
laws and sentenced to sixty days in 
prison. Yet, they succeeded in 
rallying public opinion and dragging 
the reluctant Kennedy 

administration in to the civil rights 
movement. 

Also, during the 1960's, Dr. 
Farmer began a five-year turn as 
CORE's National Director. He 
headed the Center for Community 
Action Education which was a 
private agency established to 
develop and implement a national 
literacy program. In 1968, both 
Liberals and Republicans nominated 
him to run for Brooklyn's twelfth 
Congressional District. He lost the 
race to Shirley Chisholm, the first 
black congresswoman, but won the 
attention of Richard Nixon. In 1969, 
Nixon named Farmer assistant 



secretary of Health, Education, andi 
Welfare.. However, after twenty-two 
months Farmer resigned due to his 
frustrations with the 

Administration. During the 1970s, 
he continues to devote his energy 
and talent toward the fight for 
equality, mostly in the labor 
movement. Yet, it was during this 
time that he retreated from the 
public view to care for his wife and 
help raise their two daughters. Six 
years after his memoirs titled, Lay 
Bare the Heart, he began teaching 
a civil rights history class at Mary 
Washington College. 

Although, the Freedom Ride 
appeared to be Farmer's bright spot 
in American history, it was really 
just a stepping stone for what 
awaited him a couple of decades 
later. Farmer's shining moment 
finally occurred in January 1998 
when President Clinton presented 
him with America's highest civilian 
award, the Presidential Medal oi 
Freedom, in recognition of his 
distinguished life of service and 
honor. This event occurred as a 
response to a fervent campaign by 
Farmer's many admirers. 

Today at 78, one might assert 
that Dr. James Farmer's life is 
complete. He has finally gained the 
recognition of his work toward civil 
rights -recognition that he so badly 
deserved. He continues to fight foi 
better race relations; however, now 
he takes this fight to the classroom 
and instills in young people the 
importance of respecting a| 
individuals. He is no longer fearful 
of his people forgetting him because 
a simple medal, just a token of his 
enduring legacy, preserves his place 
in history. 



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fl^ervatten i 

L-R; W. Brown Morton III 
Wendy Price, Gary Stanton, Joh' 
Pearce, Douglas Stanford 



Science 



L-R; Marsha Zaidman, Ernest 
Ackerman, Jason Fanning, John 
Reynolds, David Hunter, Peter 
Hua 





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Back Row L-R; Manning Collier, 
Steven Lipscomb, Janusz 
Konieczny, Patricia Dean, Betty 
Durrer, Suzanne, Sumner, Marie, 
Sheckels Front Row L-R; Larry 
Lehman, Yuan-Jen Chiang, 
Debra Hydorn 



frdmcaitton 



ack Row L-R; Sandra White, 
aul Zisman, Wendy Atwell- 
asey, George Meadows 
ront Row L-R; Brenda Vogel, 
enitta McCall 





foglteh 



Back Row L-R; Richard 
Hansen, Jayne Harding, B.K. 
Faunce, Donald Glover, Steve 
Watkins Middle Row L-R; 
Carol Manning, Robin Gurin, 
Ellen Chafee, Carmen 
Gillespie, Gardner Campbell 
Front Row R-L; Mary Rigsby, 
Constance Smith, William 
Kemp, Terry Kennedy, Tadesse 
Adera 




Back Row (L-R): Carole Corcoran, Christine 
McBride, David Kolar, Steve Hampton. 
Christopher Kilmartin, Thomas Moeller. 
Deborah Steckler, Roy Smith, Bruce D. 
MacEwen. Front Row (L-R): Wendy Sula 
Jennifer Holzinger, Nicole Dumas, Amy 
Wachenfeld, Chrisopher Bill. 



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Back Row (L-R): Stephen Fuller, 
Rosemary Barra, Mary Pinschmidt, 
Janet Hughes, Lynn Lewis, Stephen 
Gallick, Joella Killian.Front Row (L-R): 
Werner Wieland, Linda Ameen, Deborah 
O'Dell, Stephen Gough, Kathryn Loesser- 
Casey 




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(L-R): Diane Hatch, Mehdi Aminrazavi, 
Liane Houghtalin, Debra Nails, Jim 
Goehring, David Ambuel, David Cain. 



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Art and Art 



Back Row (L-R): Marjorie Och, David 
Reuckert, Paul Muick, Steve Griffin, 
Jean Ann Dabb. Front Row (L-R): 
Lorene Nickel, Joe Dreiss, Joseph 
DiBella. 





Modern H&rt&m 

Back Row (L-R): Susan Miller, Marie 
Wellington, Clavio Ascari, Dr. Lewis, 
Leonard Koos, Ana Chichester, Sammy 
Merrill. Front Row (L-R) Dr. Burrell, Vera 
Niebuhr, Dr. Yudin, Joanna Reynolds. 



,-R): Gerry Wehrli, Martha Fickett, 
'atricia Norwood, David Long, Courtney 
rooks, Bernard LeMoine, James Baker. 




American f fa&es 



Back Row (L-R): Tracy Anthor, Porter 
Blakemore, Otho Campbell, Bruce O'Brien, 
Front Row (L-R) Allison Poska, Claudine 
Ferrell, Roger Bourdon, Richard Warner. 




Back Row (L-R): Marshall Bowen, Stephen 
Hanna, Donald Rallis. Front Row (L-R): 
Dawn Bowen, Erin Fouberg. 




(L-R): Robert Rycroft, Steve Greenlaw, 
Steve Stageberg. Not Pictured: Brad 
Hansen and Margaret Ray 



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Top Left: Dr. Baker explains a piece of music at the 
orchestra concert in Dodd Audiotrium. Top Right: Dr. 
Bowen gives a short speech at Junior Ring Ceremony. 
Bottom Left: Cedric Rucker waits to begin a speech in 
Dodd Auditorium. 



People Having Em Wttk frf end> 




Clockwise from far top left: 
Friends relax in Ball Circle; 
Two students bring "man's 
best friend" to the fountain; 
Residents of Madison Hall 
play chess in Ball Circle; 
Two Eagles cheer for the 
women's basketball team; 
Jaimee Baker finds out 
what good friends Virginia 
Hall residents can be, 
during Junior Ring Week; 
Students play volleyball in 
Jefferson Quad; David 
Sands shows a friend his 




Residence Life 




120 Residence Life 




Opposite page, clockwise from top left: Students play card in the Lee Hall ballroom, 1961; A 
student moves down the bowling alley located in Mason Hall, 1961; UppercLudmen decorate 
the Ball Hall Chr'uttmeu) tree, 1955; Students enjoy the outdoor swimming pool on campus, 
1961. Above: When a male caller was in the lobby of Ball Hall, the residents would rush to the 
staircase to get a good look at him, 1959. 



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Mason 



Right: Natalie Vandenheiligenburg and Erin Greenbaum enjoy the warm weather relaxing 
on the steps of Mason Hall. Below: Freshman Residence Hall, Mason, is one of the larger 
halls on campus. 




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Above: Levi Kipp visits with Jayme Hazzard while she sits desk duty in 
Mason Hall. Right: Patricia Vickery and Tracy Belvin proudly display 
their well-decorated door. 




I 2.2. Residence Life 



Randolph 




Top: Randolph Residence Hall is a freshman dorm that is a twin to Mason Hall. 
Above: Kate Blatchford and John Lydon take a break from work to chat in the lobby. 
Left: Mitzi Morales takes advantage of a few extra minutes while waiting for her laundry. 



Gateoiays f 23 



Bushnell 



Students take time out of their busy 
schedules to enjoy the warm weather 
playing volleyball with friends. The 
field in front of Bushnell is often the 
site of many pickup games throughout 
the spring. 



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I 2 t Re&icfenct Life 




Far right: Lori Tisch, Becky 
Royal, and Karen Slotsky 
ham it up for the camera. 
Near right: Danielle 
Matuch studies and 
happily checks students 
into Bushnell Hall. 



Virginia 





Students who get to live in Virginia Hall their 
freshman year are at the middle of it all. 
These freshmen often spend their extra time 
lounging outside talking, studying, relaxing, 
and watching the constant activity that 
surrounds their dorm. 



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A I v e y 



All photos by: Joe Pittman 

Clockwise from top left: All 




freshman dorm Alvey Hall; 
Upperclassmen dorm New Hall; 
Student enjoying the warm spring 
weather; RA Caritta Lee chatting 
with a resident; A student soaking 
up the rays in front of Alvey. 



/ 2 6 Residence Life 



N e w 








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Mercer 



Claire Bowling and a friend spend a relaxing afternoon in their room in Mercer 
Hall; Kirk watching TV in his room; A resident studying Political Science; Mercer 
Hall, an upperclassmen coed dorm, is conveniently located behind the campus center. 



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Photo by: Joe Pittman 



I 2o Residence Life 



Madison 




Photo by: Jennifer Fink 

Madison Hall houses upperclassmen and the service learning floor; Jesse 
Coope playing Sega, while he should be studying; Angela Kopack and Molly 
Ratz cheerfully pose for the camera; Jim Agnew entertains campus walk 
with his guitar. 



oto by: Jennifer Fink 



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Ball 



Students spent an 
enjoyable and relaxing 
evening at Ball Hall's 
annual Valentine's Day 
dance. Some students 
went with dates, but 
many opted to go stag 
and had just as much fun 
hanging out with 
friends. 





f\jQ Residence Life 



Custis 



Clockwise from left: Residents of Custis enjoy hanging 
out together as they watch television and read magazines; 
Rim Marley, Aelita Brolis, and Annie Wise, give each other 
a group hug; Paul Edgerton, Kim Marley, Aelita Brolis, 
and Paul Barsotti enjoy the muddy conditions that are 
infamous to Ball Circle. 




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Westmoreland 




Clockwise from top: Westmoreland Hall is a centrally located 
upperclassmen dorm; Octoberfest is always a highlight of the 
fall activities held in the dorm. A group of friends enjoy a get 
together in a room; James Tsantes, Christian James, Justin Mink, 
James Creegan, Chris Lanzillotta, and Jesse Benton enjoy a 
drink. 



I\j2 Residence Life 



Jefferson 




Pt/eta by: Cbru Camaattgh 



Clockwise from Top: Jefferson Hall hosted their annual 
Winterfest dance. Shannon Maguire, Kelly Dwyer, Dave 
Smith, Keri Mannebach, Chris Cavanaugh, Shannon Blevins, 
and Erin Higgins pose for a snapshot; Jefferson residents, 
Stephanie Hand, Nancy Edwards, Andrea Chermela, and 
Sarah Chisholm, venture out of their room to cut a rug on the 
dance floor; Michelle Kelly and Maylian Pak dance through 
the hall towards the dancefloor; Jefferson Hall is an 
upperclassman hall that sits behind a busy quad. The quad 
is constantly filled with avid sportsfans, of course we had to 
ask them to move in order to take this picture. 



t: Cbrii Oimnattgb 



Gateways f33 



Westmoreland, Foreign Language Hall: Becky Giusti 
takes a break from studying to say hello . 




Left: A resident is engrossed in conversation. Bekvv 
Carissa Langille is hard at work. 




Special Interest Floors 





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Madison, Service Learning Floor. Above: Brenda 
Johnston works on a paper. Upper Right: George 
and Theresa spend some quality time together. 
Lower Right: Melissa Daugherty reviews class 
notes at her desk. 




/UT Residence Life 



Framar 




Clockwise from top left: 
Framar houses upperclass 
students who are interestc 
in International Affairs ; J 
Houck and Josef Koza spe: 
the afternoon studying; 
Jessica attempts to find 
some distracting 
entertainment while 
lounging in the main lobbj 
Caroline Nichols , presidei 
of the house, takes a momi 
out of her busy schedule tc 
leaf through a magazine. 



South 



K 



Left: South Hall, the only all male residence hall 
on campus, offers upperclassmen a unique living 
experience. Bottom Left: Michael Blake, an RA 
in the building, struggles to keep his eyes open. 
Bottom Right: Michael Rowe plans out his week. 




Gateways f3S 



Marshall 



Clockwise from top left: 
Marshall started a new trend 
of hosting dances with the sold 
-out Autumn Affair. Once the 
hall reached maximum 
capacity people formed 
pyramids to reach the balcony 
in attempt to get in; Two 
students kicked back and 
enjoyed the jammin' tunes in 
the lobby; Looking down the 
infamous hill at Marshall 
Hall: Young Fredericksburg 
denizens, a.k.a. trick-or- 
treaters, filled their jack 
o'lanterns with candy while 
they looked in awe at the 
decorations in the halls and 
the costumes worn by the 
residents. 




Pholo By.Kirri Pa 



Russell 




Despite all of the damage done to Russell during 
the hall's first ever Sundance, students had a blast. 
Clockwise from top left: Alex Schneider 
demonstrates his snappy dance moves; On the more 
sultry side a couple swings to the melodious D.J.; 
A view of Russell looking up the hill on a crisp fall 
day. It's pictures like these that capture the 
moments and make me wish I was on that walkway 



Photo By-Joe P'dtman 



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Photo By: Jen Fink 



Midnight in the Jungle 



Imagine it is midnight in 
the Brazilian jungle. A 
hyena cackles in the 
distance and a lion roars its 
deadly reply. Shadows of 
leopards slowly creep past, 
accompanied by scratches on 
the Aztecan roof overhead. 
How long will it be until 
morning, and more 

importantly, how long will it be 
until you hear the bark of the 
St. Bernard signaling the 
rescue and drink of his life- 
giving scotch? 

Minus the alcohol and the 
jungle conditions, this was a 
reality for first year student 
Jennifer Meska and sophomore 
Geoff Bradley last Novemeber. 
While on a hiking trip with 
their hall mates in Sky 
Meadows National Park, the 
two students wandered away 
from their group while 
exploring a stream beside the 
trail. After telling the rest of 
the group they would catch up, 
Jennifer and Geoff followed the 
stream for awhile, thinking the 
two paths would eventually 
connect. Hours later, after 



trying to rejoin their group, the 
two students realized they 
would have to find shelter for 
the night. Coming upon a 
picnic table, the two tipped it 
over to form a shelter. They 
also found a blanket and tarp 
and settled in for a long 
evening. Jennifer admitted 
that her biggest fear 
throughout the night was the 
animals that scratched on the 
table and made noises from the 
trees. When asked what his 
biggest fear was during the 
trip, Geoff responded that he 
was not very afraid because the 
two had plenty of food and 
water to last them for awhile. 
When morning came, 
Jennifer and Geoff decided to 
double back on the trail they 
had followed to the shelter. 
Several hours and ten miles 
later, the two were ecstatic to 
find the welcome center and 
their parents waiting for them. 
Their parents had 

immediately driven to the park 
when they recieved the 
ranger's phone call about their 
missing children. 



By Shannon Maguire 

Jennifer and Geoff 
arrived safely on campus the 
day after their adventure, 
much to the relief of their 
friends and hall mates. Then 
they heard their group's 
account of what they did while 
waiting with the ranger until 
dark for the duo. Apparently^ 
the group did not notice 
Jennifer and Geoff had been 
separated from the group until 
waiting in the parking lot for 
them after the hike. The group 
headed back to Mary 
Washington when it became 
dark and they knew that the 
ranger would take care of the 
situation. 

College is said to equip 
oneself with three things: 
knowledge, ideas, and open 
minds. Some people learn 
beyond what the classroom 
teaches. "We learned that we 
are presented with challenges, 
most of which are unexpected,' 
reflected Geoff. It is those who 
meet these challenges who 
succeed, even if they have tc 
fight leopards in the Brazilian 
jungle. 



I \JO Residence Life 



Clockwise from top: Unsuspecting hikers 
preparing for what they think will be "just another 
hike." Goeff posed with some natural (?!) resourses 
that can be found in the woods. Jennifer on the 
wide open trail with the scenic valley in the 
background. Jennifer resting on a boulder. 




Gateways /39 



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mo ciubs 







Opposite page, clockwise from top Left: The Midnight Feast club hosts a meeting, 1914; The 
Angels club gathers in the ampitheater, 1914; The Mike club broadcasts a program, 1948; 
The MWC All-Girl band marches in downtown Fredericksburg, 1955. Above: Students perform 
Alice In Wonderland. 1913. 



Gateways / if f 




Front Row (l-r): Darren Carlson (Secretary), Kristin Witters (Treasurer), Clint McCarthy (President), 
Jesse Coope (Vice-President), Jenna Frye. Second Row: Caroline Nichols, Demetra Papaefthimiou, 
Jessica Moore, Rachel Sola, Michelle McCrystal, Heather Carter, Karen Hawkridge. 

AtieCiATipH pT 




Whitney Wallace, Andy Waterston, Janet Oldis, Jenny Phillips, and Amanda Goebel are 
"all dolled up", ready to enjoy Winterfest in Jefferson Hall. This is one of the many events 
that ARH helps sponsor. 



The Association of Residence Halls, a.k.a. 
ARH, is the little recognized organization 
behind most of the activities that the student 
body attends. These activities, including 
Winterfest and the Valentine's Day Ball, are 
presented by the hall councils of each residence 
hall. The ARH is designed to allow time for 
the president of every hall council to come 
together and share ideas that they may bring 
back to their buildings. Many of the events 
that the students attend are paid for by or with 
the help of the ARH. In order to receive this 
money, each residence hall is required to 
perform some sort of community service. This 
year, the ARH reviewed and revamped their 
organization's constitution. Many thanks to 
the ARH and their contributions to the campus 
community. 



f£f2 Cfubs 



Executive Cabinet represents 

many different organizations on 

campus. They include: 

Beth Moss - Judicial Review Board Chair 

Mandy Grandle - Honor Council President 

Josh Bacigalupi - Academic Affairs Chair 

Sarah Gilbert - Legislative Affairs Chair 

Clint McCarthy - ARH President 

Brooks LAllier - Commuting Student Pres. 

Matt Galeone - SGA President 

Erika Giaimo - SGA Vice-President 

Alison Chlebus - Executive Coordinator 

Larissa Lipani - Press Secretary 

Lindsey Morgan - Secretary 

Abigail Mitchell - Treasurer 



The Executive Cabinet consists of twelve members, 
representing the student body on all matters of joint 
concern between the Administration of the College and 
the student body. The Executive Cabinet is the highest 
SGA body on campus. All members, excluding the 
Secretary, the Executive Coordinator, the Treasurer, 
and the Press Secretary, are elected by the student body 
and are voting members of the Cabinet. The above 
mentioned positions are appointed, non-voting members 
of the Cabinet. Each member of the Executive Cabinet 
has a full voice at all meetings. The purpose of SGA is 
to "work for a better College community through the 
development and strengthening of individual 
responsibility and citizenship." Mary Washington's SGA 
is extremely active and positively affects the campus 
community by respecting and promoting MWC 
traditions and standards, and instilling the principles 
of self-government and democracy in every student. 




V 



Photo by: Peyton Dm 

Front Row (l-r): Mandy Grandle, Beth Moss, Alison Chlebus, Erika Giaimo. Back Row: 
Josh Bacigalupi, Matt Galeone, Sarah Gilbert, Clint McCarthy. Not Pictured: Brooks 
L'Allier, Larissa Lipani, Lindsey Morgan, and Abigail Mitchell. 

KZCMTWft 



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Front Row (l-r): Erin Rodman, Daniela Kelley, Amanda Goebel, Sharon Wilcox, Lindsey Morgan. 
Second Row: Tara Barto, Kim Odell, Katherine Moss, Jason Fanning. Third Row: Mariah Butler, Julie 
McPhilomy, Jamie Coulter, Kelly Underwood, Kim Bohle, Cory Kegerise. Fourth Row: Jessica Bartlett, 
Katie Gill, Jennifer Moss, Michelle Kelly, Jason Roy, Melissa Schmidt (Not Pictured: Georgina Bruer). 



The Judicial Review Board, a.k.a. JRB, underwent 
complete restructuring this year. Changes varied 
from the elimination of Peer Judicial Boards to 
increasing class representation to five 
representatives, rather than three, for each class. 
Thus far, the changes have resulted in a more 
effective system. Beth Moss, the chairperson of 
JRB, played a very important part in the changes. 
Her input, experience, and determination during 
the last months of the 1997 Spring Semester, as 
well as during Summer Leadership, enabled her 
to develop a judicial system that is more organized, 
more time-efficient and more consistent than ever 
before. A new face was present at the 1997 Honor 
Convocation, Beth Moss spoke on behalf of JRB for 
the first time at this event. Kim Odell and Amanda 
Goebel worked hard, fulfilling two newly created 
positions of vice-chairperson and hearing 
coordinator, respectively. Hopefully, these changes 
will benefit the MWC community, not only now, but 
> the future, and will continue to improve with 
time. 




Having a relaxing break, Lindsey Morgan, Julie 
McPhilomy and Jason Fanning enjoy a few laughs and 
some great food with other JRB members before exams 
began. 



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This fall, Mary Washington 
Honor Council worked at 
continuing campus education 
on the Honor System and 
making necessary changes to 
the Honor Constitution. To 
meet those goals the members 
of the council wrote a mission 
statement that briefly sumed 
up their main agenda. They are 
currently working on 
amendments that clarify the 
process by which a student is 
officially accused of an honor 
offense. 



In continuing with their 
campus-wide education on the 
Honor System they held honor 
training sessions for first year 
students, residential life staff, 
and BLS students. Some of 
their main events for fall 
semester included Honor 
Awareness Week, Apple Fest, 
and the Swing Dance (co- 
sponsored by Giant 
Productions). The council 
hopes to continue to have more 
fun events for the entire 
community to enjoy. 



Council members Dave Sands, Ed Egee, and 
Suzy Hayes take time out during the hectic 
Honor Awareness Week 



H 



H r\ 




Front Row(l-r): Jennie Jarvis, Mandy Grandle, Kristin Ruhl, Melissa Rizzo. Second Row: 
Polly Beauchamp, Mike Canty, Ed Egee, Seth Kennard, Suzy Hayes. Third Row: Maureen 
Southard, Josh Bacigalupi, David Sands, Jim Reagan, Cody Camblin, Jessica Ritchie. 



Gateways J^fS 




Photo by; Jot PUtman 

Members: Roger Marcy, Colleen Marino, Matt Marino, Jess Rowe, JenAmore, Emily Patterson, Katherine 
Hunt, Natalie Lonergan, Heather Chase, Cam Holmes, Kate Weller, Chandra Kennett, Janet Emery, 
Jana Riggle, Elizabeth Hellenschmidt, Whitney Berman, Jessika Reuter, Sabrina Carlsen, Cory Kegerise, 
Greg Stoner, Brian Mock, Amanda Cooney, Mike Harris, Andrea Chermela, Alysia McLain, Zac Sargent, 
Lori demons, Kristin Ward, Amy Smith, Riley Mclsaac, Alison Koelmel, Kasy McNatt, Amy Brady, 
Debbie Womer, Kim Ward, Julie Walker, Kathleen Lilly, Sheila Elledge, Heather Proffitt, Stephanie Hams, 
Dan Bruechert, Renee Sciuto, LeeAnn Weikert, Emily Wilson, Emily Patton, Beu Byrnes, Alison Martin, 
Katharine Kerr, Courtney Harhai, Michael Sisson, Jessica Neils, Kate Foster, Jeff Farthing, Trang Nguyen, 
Holly Hanney, Helen Thomas, Tina Lorah, Amanda Ellerbe, Matt Jondrow, Bob Hale, Vicki Avila. 



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Jenny Burger and guide recreate a historical moment 
on the steps of the Presbyterian Church during Ghost 
Walk. 



The Mary Washington College Historic 
Preservation Club is one of the schools 
largest organizations. The club is open to 
all students regardless of their major. Each 
year the members try to uphold certain 
traditions. One such tradition is Ghost Walk. 
Every year the members of the club 
volunteer to dress up and recreate certain 
historical events for the people in the 
Fredericksburg community. 

Another event is entitled "Friday 
Frolics". On a Friday or Saturday 
preservation professors take interested 
students to historic homes, monuments, or 
landscapes. During the first semester the 
club traveled to western Pennsylvania to see 
Falling Water, one of Frank Lloyd Wrights 
architectural masterpieces. More trips are 
planned for the future and all those who are 
interested are welcome. 



fV6 Uu6s 



Club 




Club Officers (l-r): First Row; Co-President: Jenny Evans, Co-President: Kate McPeek, Publicity Chair: 
Elizabeth Avery-Jones. Second Row; Historian: Amy Stoll, Trip Coordinator: Andrea Chermela, 
Treasurer: Matt Cook, Publicity Chair: Melanie Alexander (not pictured: Trip Coordinator: Rob Gushing). 




Club Members Stephanie Hand, Andrea Chermela, 
Nancy Edwards and Jesse Coope taking a break after 
a long hike in the Shenandoah Valley 



The Trek Club is an organization which is 
open to all Mary Washington students. The 
club is designed to allow members to 
experience nature in new and exciting ways. 
Trips include everything from horseback 
riding to skiing. Members can be extremely 
active and participate in every trip or select 
the ones that appeal the most to their sense 
of adventure. Officers of the club took 
advantage of winter and planned ski trips 
on Monday nights during the second 
semester. Every year the club tries to plan 
one big trip. In the past it has included sky 
diving and white water rafting. This spring 
the club took members white water rafting. 
Everyone managed to stay relatively dry 
and officers are pretty sure that no one 
was left in the river. 



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Right: Starting 
the evening off on 
the right foot (or 
knee) two 

dedicated 
students decide to 
settle their 

disputes in a 
civilized manner. 
Far right: Natural 
Highs member, 
Sandy Tenneyson, 
is not advocating 
peace, she is 
merely excepting 
bids from 

members of the 
student body. 



Why Ask Why? Drink Bud Dry?! Not on this evening. Friday- 
Night Dry, an event sponsored by the MWC Natural Highs Peer 
Educators, is a completely dry event. This group of students dedicate 
their time to educating their peers about the dangers of alcohol and 
drug abuse. Natural Highs advocates students to have fun without 
using any substance-induced highs. At Friday Night Dry, there were 
too many of these "highs" to count. Students could Jello-wrestle their 
friends in a baby pool in front of Randolph or they could take a blast 
into the past at the Sock Hop in the gym, sponsored by the MWC 
Softball team. Some students took Jello-shots (I promise, they were 
nonalcoholic and it was not the same Jello used in wrestling). While 
some students were getting messy doing interesting things with Jello, 
others were throwing pies at Residence Life Staff members Ray Tuttle, 
Page Babcock, and Matt Gardzina. So what was the point of going to 
each event? Well, "dollars" were given out at each event and were 
used at the huge auction at the end of the night. When students 
walked away from the auction with prizes, including a five disc CD 
player, Busch Gardens tickets, and countless gift certificates, they 
couldn't believe the entire evening was free of cost. Many area 
businesses worked together with members of the residence halls to 
make the evening a major success. 

Above: 




Karen Martin is 
learning how a breath-a - 
lizer works, just in case. If 
she's not careful, she may 
blow her brains out!!! 

Right: John Mahoney shows 
his moves at Framar's 
Gothic Drag dance. 




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Out With The Old '97-'98 Officers... 
pictured left to right: 
Secretary- Angie Apel 
Vice-President/Treasurer- Jennifer Stocks 
Publicity Chair- Michael D'Ostilio 
President- Shelley Singley 
Historian- Chrissy McKee 



AticciA-npH 



The Student Education Association has been 
extremely active this year on and off of the Mary 
Washington Campus. There have been many 
workshops held for and sponsored by the members 
of SEA. Workshops on the creation of effective 
bulletin boards, resume building, multiple 
intelligence , managing money, and Reading Across 
America - Celebrating Dr. Suess's birthday, just to 
name a few. The SEA has also been very active with 
the Spotsylvania High School's chapter of FEA, 
Future Educators of America, particularly assisting 
with fund-raisers. The main focus this year in the 
SEA was to get an active chapter started again. 




This year there was a focus on both elementary and 
secondary education. Many times, the students 
seeking licensure in secondary education can be 
overlooked. The SEA, headed by Shelley Singley has 
been very active in both the SVEA, the Student 
Virginia Education Association, as well as the NEA, 
the National Education Association. The SEA officers 
attended the SVEA conference in Roanoke during the 
fall, and the newly elected officers will travel to 
Williamsburg in the Fall of 1998. The final activity 
that all members of the SEA worked on was the 
Annual Student Teacher Reception, which was held 
on April 23, 1998. 



In With New '98-'99 Officers. 
Pictured Left to Right 
Secretary- Amanda Goebel 
President-Emily Buchanan 
Publicity Chair-Kathryn Murphy 
Vice-President/ Treaurer- Megan Miloser 
Not pictured: Historian- Jenny Phillips 



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Photo By: KcrrLPaku 

Front Row (l-r): Alicen Eatroff, Jessica Avgolaus. Second Row: Darcey Miller, Sara 
Leedom, Melissa Cooper, and Amanda Cooney. Not pictured: Chevronne Bray, Lydie 
Kane, Heather Clendenin, Allison Clark, Travis Morgan, Ellen-Ashton Smith, Tasha 
White, and Melanie Lenihan. 



Mary Washington's Chapter of National Organization 
for Women works towards advocating women's rights. 
A main focus at this point in time is to adapt NOW 
to fit the campus community's needs, as far as 
feminism is concerned. NOW recognizes many 
different degrees of feminism. The organization has 
not only been active on the MWC campus, but has 
been venturing out to other events. These events 
allow other colleges and groups with similar goals to 
exchange ideas, listen to different perspectives on 
issues, and hopefully, expand current knowledge so 
that it may be shared on the Mary Washington 
campus. NOW has attended such events as the JMU 
panel for eco-feminism and the Young Feminist 
Summit. As for their involvement on campus, NOW 
is crucial to the planning of many of the Women's 
History Month's events, as well as, the Variety Show. 
Their slogan says it all: NOW is NOW!!! 



MWC's Chapter of the 

National Organization 

for Women 

Slogan: NOW is NOW!!! 

Membership: 20 active 
members 

Membership includes both 
men and women. 

Advisor: Carole Corcoran 

Associate Professor of 

Psychology 



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Photo By: Ktrril 

Front Row (l-r): Amanda Minor, Hilary Bendix, Angela Naggles, and LaToya Bease. Second Row: Andre 
Clanton, Latoya Clay, Rachel Collins, and Greta Franklin. Back Row: Mina Ennin, Kristel Blauvelt, 
Arquay Harris, Deanna Toema, Fasika Tefera, and Chevronne Bray. 



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Women of Color is a support group to women 
of color on the campus of Mary Washington 
College. This organization holds both fun and 
serious discussions on issues that affect women 
of color. These issues address concerns in the 
campus community, the Fredericksburg 
community, the United States, and the world. 
WOC has also sponsored many events around 
campus this year. The Masquerade Ball in 
January and the Step Show in February are 
both courtesy of WOC. This organization also 
cosponsored the Latin American Ballet 
Company that recently performed at Mary 
Washington College. Women of Color is an 
organization open to anybody, no matter what 
your race or gender may be. This is evident 
through their motto, stated at the conclusion 
of every meeting: "I am a beautiful woman of 
color (or a supporter of a woman of color) and I 
have something to offer the world that no one 
else does." 



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At the 2nd annual fashion show members pose for a picture. 
Top row: John R., Nene W., John G, Dominique B.. Second 
row: Virginia G, Mariama S., Jackie, Claudia. Front row: 
Tasha W., Francisca B., Mina A., Flor T.. 



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Members 

Marisa Bodner 

Meredith Christiansen 

Michael Donahue 

Roman Guerra 

Joseph Kutschman 

Kai Lamb 

Meredith Lyons 

Lisa Murray 

Kirk Myers 

Mike Paolino 

Dennis Parker 

Brian Pederson 

Joselle Poblete 

Sharon Poblete 

Holly Sanford 

Alex Scarpone-Lennon 

Laurie White 



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Front Row (1-r) : Josell Poblete, Meredith Lyons; Back Row (1-r) 
Lisa Murray, Meredith Christiansen, and Sharon Poblete 



The SAM Club (Society for 
Advancement of Management) is 
the most active business club on 
campus. It is also a well-known 
club to the business world. The 
club's goals are exposing 
members to different areas of 
business, helping them decide 
upon a major/field, and giving 
them the opportunity to learn 
about different managerial skills. 
The club invites local business 
people to give speeches. Often, 
these local business people help 



MWC students learn the latest 
styles styles of business practices 
and theories by giving tours of 
theis business facilities. A few 
activities that the club sponsors 
are job-hunting seminars, tours of 
Hartwood Winery and Bowmans, 
GMAT information sessions. The 
club also hosted a prestigious 
presentation with Judd 
Honacker, Vice-President of 
Commercial Development in 
Silver Incorporated. 



Mission Statement: Through the interaction of students, faculty, and 
practicing managers, to assist in communicating the practice of professional 
management. 



fS2 Cfutt 



The Biology Club at Mary Washington College 
is concerned primarily with providing fun and relaxing 
activities for biology majors. Their favorite pastime 
each semester is the Rappahanock River Clean-up. The 
clean-up provides a chance for students and faculty to 
give something back to the community, while getting 
away from the stresses of the rigorous biology 
curriculum. 

Students have the opportunity to get to know 
their professors and their families every semester at 
the Biology Club picnics. Alum Springs Park is the 
scenic location of the picnics — a great place to barbecue 
and eat the great food prepared by the students and 
faculty (another bonus). 

Biology Club officers Kerri Jones, Kate McPeek, 
Dana Halsey, Kelly Cwiak, Carmen Ledford, and Mary 
Kate Yost worked hard this year to bring these and other 
activities, such as Senior Toast, to the biology majors 
at Mary Washington College. 

Membership is open to any student who is a 
biology major at Mary Washington College. Look for 
information in the new Jepson Science Building! 



TOP TEN REASONS TO BE A 

BIOLOGY MAJOR AT MARY 

WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

10. Peeing in a cup every 30 
minutes is a class requirement. 
9. Eating in a lab, better yet, 
eating what you make in lab. 
8. Madagascar Hissing 
Cockroaches, not your every day 
pet. 

7. Technologically advanced, 
dependable computer pod. 
6. Three words: "What's that 
smell?!" 

5. The best dang professors on 
campus. 

4. The only building that provides 
couches for napping. 
3. Studying dead animals, or 
animal parts, late at night. 
2. Four to Six hour lab = One credit 
AND THE NUMBER ONE 
REASON TO BE A BIOLOGY 
MAJOR... 
Just can't get enough of that Fly- 
Nap 






Seated left to right are the Biology Club Officers : Kerri Jones - President, 
Kelly Cwiak - Treasure, Mary Kate Yost - Newsletter, Dana Halsey - Secretary, 
Kate McPeek - Vice-President, and Carmen Ledford - Publicity. 



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Members (l-r): Front row: Natasha Ward, Stephanie Papaefthimiou, Meg Weireter; Back 
Row: Andrew Mefferd, Jeremiah Stoddard 



The Polemic, a Mary Washington 
student-run journal of opinion on 
current environmental, political, and 
social issues, publishes four issues per 
year. It accepts literary and art works 
by students and faculty of Mary 
Washington College, as well as residents 
of Fredericksburg. In addition to 
stories, poems, and photos, the Polemic 
conducts interviews with various 
interests groups on campus. The group 
interviewed the Underground Writers, 
a group of students who get together and 
critique each other's work. The Polemic 
relies on the students of the college to 
submit articles and poems for 
publication. 




The Underground Writers caught doing what they do best: 
reading.writing, and discussing literature. 



f5V Cfafu 




Photo by: Kevin Mac Luskk 

Members (l-r): First Row: Kevin Mac Luskie, Joe Pittman, Jeremy Brown; Second 
Row: Jen Fink, Kerri Pakurrar, Courtney Kowalchick, Jamie Harper; Third 
Row: Whitney Wallace, Amanda Goebel, Andrea Chermela, Stephanie Hand, 
Chris Cavanaugh 



sfrnvenzi 





Photo by: Kaiia Mac UukU 

After Amanda Goebel suggested that her picture (and her inflated ego) 
should appear on every page of the yearbook, the staff decides to pitch her 
and her idea into the fountain. 



This year the Mary Washington College 
yearbook staff has worked very hard to 
make its' presence known again. Last 
year, after two years with no yearbook, 
the staff managed to get one published. 
This year the editors, Stephanie Hand and 
Chris Cavanaugh , and the rest of the staff 
are trying to keep the Battlefield going 
strong. The yearbook is one of the things 
that the student body will have to 
constantly remind them of their college 
years. In addition to photographing the 
shining moments of our sports and clubs, 
the book also captures the fun-loving 
spirit of the students. Anyone can help 
out regardless of experience and it is also 
a great way to get your friends 
embarrasing pictures into the yearbook. 



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Freshmen Class 
Officers are pictured 
right from front to back. 
They are Jen Amore - 
President, Jessica 
Rowe- Vice-President, 
Cait Cooper - Secretary/ 
Treasure, and Jessica 
Moore -Publicity Chair. 
These officers are 
responsible for many of 
the activities that Mary 
Washington College 
students enjoy 
throughout the year. 
The freshmen class 
officers were responsible 
for planning Devil-Goat 
Day on April 23, 1998. 
This carnival-like event 
included Sumo- 
Wrestling, Bouncy 
Boxing, and the Human 
Joust. The Class 
Council worked with 
Giant to provide the 
musical entertainment 
at the day's events. 




Class Council 
Executive Officers 

President: David Modzeleski 
Vice-President: Catherine Scarola 
Secretary/Treasurer: Jennifer Moss 
Publicity Chair: Daniela Kelley 




Pictured right are the Sophomore Class Officers. 
Left to right they are Rachel Silbaugh - Vice- 
President, Jaime Dowdy - Secretary/Treasurer, 
Kara Davis - President, and Daniela Kelley - 
Publicity Chair. The Class of 2000 had two 
successful events this year, Rocktoberfest and 
Fall Formal. Rocktoberfest was October 2, 1997 
in front of Lee Hall. The festivities included a 
band provided by Giant and food from Kentucky 
Fried Chicken. On November 15, 1998 the theme 
of Sun, Moon, and Stars prevailed at the Fall 
Formal. A DJ and a Jazz band provided 
entertainment for the evening. 




Photo Ai// Karl Pain 



fSG c/u6& 



The executive board is responsible for the 
general administration of Class Council 
and its officers. It is also in charge of 
election procedures each year. In addition, 
it implements Winter Carnival and the 
Spring Formal Boat Cruise. Both of these 
Spring semester events were very 
successful and were well-appreciated by 
the College community. 




Pictured below and seated left to right are Shannon Maguire - 
Publicity Chair, Cathy Scarola - President, Jennifer Moss - Secretary/ 
Treasurer, and Travis McCoy - Vice-President. These are the Junior 
Class Council Representatives. They are responsible for Halloweens 
and Junior Ring Week. Halloweens is Class Council's biggest event 
of the Fall Semester. This dance provides students with an 
opportunity to make their wildest dreams come true as they slip into 
their favorite costumes, compete for cash prizes, and let loose on the 
dance floor. Junior Ring Week is a week of fun filled activities which 
allows Juniors to kick back and enjoy a band in the Underground, 
Drive-in movies, Ring Rehearsal followed by a pizza party, and a 
Scavenger Hunt. The Week's events come to a close with the 
presentation of Class Rings, the tapping of new Mortar Board 
Members, and finally the Junior Ring Dance. 




CCAAHCM 





Senior Class Council pictured left, seated left to right are 
Larissa Lipani - Secretary/Treasurer, David Modzeleski - 
Vice-President, Clinton McCarthy - President, and Jenine 
Zimmers - Publicity Chair. The Senior Class Council 
organized a new tradition, Senior Kick-Off, taking the place 
of 198th night, as well as, planning Senior Countdown in 
place of 100th night. Both nights included raffles of prizes 
from local merchants including Spank^s and Best Buy. The 
Seniors are also responsible for planning the exciting events 
of Grad Ball, Senior Convocation, and Graduation. These 
are important events that every senior enjoys and will 
remember for a lifetime. 



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Members (1-r): Erin Brown, President; Natasha Ward, Treasurer; Katie Arnold, Publicity Chair 

Before the Russian Department 
leaves Mary Washington College, 
the Russian Club officers decided 
to have one more year of activities. 
The schedule was flexible, meeting 
at various times throughout the 
year. Their many activities 
included a trip to Lillwood 
Museum in Washington D.C., 
attending a performance of "Uncle 
Vanya", watching Russian 
television programs such Sesame 
Street, etc. Members are 
interested in learning about 
Russian culture and ways of life 



Sophomore Natasha Ward enjoying some 
ice cream with her authentic Russian 
treat. 




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GOALS 

The German Club envisions itself as a 
community of speakers working to: 
improve their language skills, promote 
awareness of the culture they represent, 
and provide the college campus with a 
real-world link to Germany. It 
accomplishes these goals through its 
language coodinator and members who 
have traveled or had contact with the 
country and its people. They seek to 
encourage an understanding between 
foreign cultures through interaction by 
way of Stammtisch and other regular 
events. By hosting such events, they aim 
at involving students in cultural activities 
that they might not otherwise experience. 



The German club prides itself on hosting a 
variety of special events and occasions aimed at 
increasing campus and community awareness of 
German culture. In addition to their weekly 
meetings, they help with the planning, 
organizing, and hosting of Oktoberfest in 
Westmoreland Hall. Members (and those of you 
who just happen to speak German fluently) are 
welcome to attend a conversation hour. However, 
if you are interested in learning to speak another 
language, the club offers a conversation hour 
aimed at beginners. Remember when you had to 
take a language to fulfill your language 
requirements? Well fortunately the club offers a 
tutoring service for all those in desperate need 
of help. In addition to all of these generous acts, 
members do a few things for themselves. The 
group travels into Washington D.C. to attend 
German movies and enjoy food at German 
restaurants. 



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First Row: Henry B. Odom IV, Natalie Meredith, Erin Brown, Relt Puschmann. Second 
Row: Amy Sobeck; Third row: Kevin Cain, Jessica Lerch, Alex Szebehely, Jen Carter, Ellen 
Kamolz. 



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Photo by: Peyton Dwu 

Gathered after a Senate meeting the group is all smiles upon completion ofbusiness. The members 
of Senate represent the student body and are responsible for establishing and monitoring a 
suggestion box and posting the Senate minutes in the residence halls. 



The MWC Senate is a very important part 
of the college community. The members take 
an active interest in the students and their 
problems. The Senate Board is comprised of 
the Committee Co-chairs that address the 
problems brought to their attention. 
Members of Senate are responsible for 
bringing the concerns students may have to 
the attention of a particular committee and 
it is then their responsibility to take action. 
Many of their efforts can be seen already on 
campus. So far they have managed to extend 
library hours and get continuous visitation 
in the dorms. For the future a motion has 
been made to have condoms available in 
vending machines. Any concerns students 
may have about safety are also brought to 
the attention of the Senate. It was proposed 
that lights be put in at the basketball court 
next to Bushnell. Due to the participation 
of many dedicated students the Senate can 
take credit for many beneficial 
accomplishments. 




Senate Board Members (L-R): First row: Shannon Hutchinson, 
Lindsay Morgan, Chelle Kelly, Chrissy Harakal, Cheryll Elliott. 
Middle Row: Becca Greene, Anne Dougherty, Maylion Pak, 
Kristin Degraff Kara Bennis; Back: Sara Leedom, Wes Heuvel, 
Mike Canty, Erika Giamo. Not pictured: Chris Hitzelberger, 
Larissa Lipani, Kelly Cwiak, Claire Bowling, Blaine Ashworth, 
Lara Federov 



fbO Cfubi 







Front Row (L-R): Francisco, Birago, Melissa Papendick, Kelly Dwyer, Sara O'Connor. Middle 
Row: Kara Eller, Aaron Mandel, Kristin Lantz, Courtney Rannwlls, Bettie Bell, Shannon 
Macguire, Dow Stick. Back Row: Mike Canty, Jennifer Bahler, Tasha White, Amy Sobeck, Natalie 
Holbrook, Tricia Mosely, Clifton Davis. Not Pictured: Geoff Younger, Tamara Hinton, Brian 
Straight, Jessica Turner, Ann Marie Sack, Jill Ellis, Beth Ann Romph, Ginger Vaughan. 



Existing Programs 
Hunger and Homelessness 

Kid's recreation 

Elderly 

Mentally and Physically Challenged 

Tutoring 

Alternative Spring Break 

Into the Streets 

COAR WELCOMES ALL NEW 
IDEAS! 



Coar is a program that is open to the entire 
Mary Washington College Community. 
There are numerous community service 
projects an individual or group can 
participate in. To become involved all that 
one has to do is stop by the office and speak 
to a COAR council member. These are the 
people responsible for managing COAR 
programs. Their job is to develop and 
implement programs and make sure that 
they run smoothly. The mission of COAR 
is to provide opportunities for members to 
develop important skills which can be used 
in the future while giving them a sense of 
fulfillment. Members will walk away from 
the experience with leadership and 
management skills as well as the ability to 
work with diverse groups of people. 



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J M i> I C I A J 




Elephant Boy, courtesy of Judicial Review Board and Giant Productions, performs for Judicial Week in the underground. Even the band 
was having fun, as evident by the expression of the lead singer. 

For the first time in Mary Washington history, the Judicial Review Board presented Judicial Week 
to the college campus. This week, which took place from February 23-27, 1998, was a huge success. 
JRB's aim for the week was to get their name out and inform the students of the revised Judicial 
System here at MWC. Changes included the elimination of Peer Judicial Boards, and the creation of 
the Office of Judicial Affairs. Students now have the option to attend a hearing by their peers 
through the Judicial Review Board or to be heard by an Assistant Director of Residence Life. The 
week was a successful one because of the help of numerous organizations on campus including the 
Office of Judicial Affairs, Giant Productions, and SGA. On Monday, there were free bagels, courtesy 
of Einstein's Bagels, and free 32 oz. cups in the campus center. Although this event was scheduled to 
last until 2:00 in the afternoon, it ended early when quantities ran out at noon. On Tuesday, there 
were guest speakers in the Great Hall. The speakers were Bob Franklin, Assistant Director of 
Residence Life and graduate of Mary Washington College, and Sherri and Todd Williams, alumni of 
MWC, who spoke of a death on the campus due to alcohol. On Wednesday, Giant Productions presented 
Elephant Boy in the Underground to a large crowd. The free raffle, including such prizes as a CD 
player and gift certificates to The Outback, was announced at the concert. On Thursday, free candy 
was distributed in the Eagles' Nest to anyone who would take it. For a first time event, the week 
went very well. Be on the lookout for even better activities next year! 



f62 Cfube 







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While the band took a break, many 
students took the opportunity to 
mingle. Some took advantage of the 
free snacks, while others left the 
Underground to take a breath of fresh 
air. A variety of students attended 
Wednesday night's Judicial Week 
event. 



The Judicial Review Board's 
Judicial Week attracted a wide 
range of students and faculty. 
Pictured left, Officer Wilson 
enjoys the music. BLS students 
even came and supported the 
group named "Elephant Boy". 
JRB members, shown at the 
bottom of the picture, observe 
the great turnout in 
anticipation for another 
successful event. 





Judicial Review Board President Beth 
Moss announces the winning ticket for 
the CD player, while Jenny Moss and 
Julie McPhilomy, Judicial Week Co- 
Chairs look on. The free raffle tickets 
were distributed at every event during 
the week; any student could win, but 
needed to be present to claim their 
prize. 



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First Row (L-R): Kristin Boody, B.T. Beasgie, Pastor Daphne, Joshua Gravis, Melisa Daugherty. 
Back row (L-R): Jenny Evans, Kim Weber, Helen L. Meachan, Sonya Shifflett, Kristin Page, Tara Hogan, 
and Michelle Ayers. 



The Campus Christian Community is 
a loving and supportive environment 
that welcomes diversity while seeking 
to live and understand what Jesus has 
asked of us. They invite people to grow 
spiritually and emotionally through 
fellowship, mission, service, worship, 
and fun. The CCC offers many 
opportunities to the college community 
including weekly table talk dinner 
discussions, bible studies, and Holy 
Communion services. In addition the 
CCC sponsors Coffeehouses, retreats, 
community service projects, and a 
mission trip to Nicaragua in the 
summer of 1998! The CCC house is also 
a fun place to relax and hang out. 




The Campus Christian Community started out the new school year with an 
opening picnic in August. Friends came together to eat, sing, and enjoy a 
beautiful summer day. 



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Front Row (L-R): Jennie Jarvis, Heather Hemstreet, Jen Stocks, Margot Freer, Emily Ballister, 
Tricia Merrill, Bethany Gotschall, Lisa Stone, Libby Drennan, Andy Myers, Nancy Kraus, Kerry 
Layne, Chrissy Koster. Back Row (L-R): Matt Murray, Bruce Leaman, Dave Chaves, Jim Womer, 
Bart Irwin, Nathan Morrow, Mike Blake. These students enjoyed a summer in Rockbridge Virginia 
learning to become small group leaders. 

InterVarsity Christian Fellowship consists of about 150 
students. They are dedicated to spreading the gospel of Jesus 
Christ and promoting spiritual growth on campus. Weekly 
activities include small group Bible studies in every dorm, 
prayer meetings, and a large group chapter meeting every 
Friday night. Other activities have included fundraisers for 
student mission trips, such as boys versus girls penny wars. 
A service auction was also held to earn money, one of the most 
popular services was a toilet cleaning so supurb that "one 
could eat soup out of the basin." Service projects for the year 
included working with the homeless in Washington D.C. 
and dorm wide "trash" ministries where the InterVarsity 
members helped take out dorm members trash. The supreme 
jesture of goodwill is their help during freshman move-in when 
things can get a little hectic. 




Mike Merker, Matt Selwyn, and Karen Baer join together 
after a Friday night meeting. The group members 
commonly hang out together after the meetings, enjoying 
activities such as ice skating, bowling, or going to a movie. 



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M A K A i- 




Photo by: KerriPaku 

Members (not all pictured): Anne Witt, Nedra Stuckey, Bonnie Dye (president), Lisa Brundage, Kelela 
Williams,Genevieve Bovee (secretary I treasurer), Meg Weireter, Monica Price, Vanessa Krempa, Rachel 
Levy (vice president), Heather Clendenin 



The Mary Washington College Virginia National 
Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League 
(NARAL) works to promote the Pro-Choice cause. 
This year the members have attended many 
conferences and rallies in the surrounding areas. 
On January 28 members attended the VA 
NARAL event, Pro-Choice Lobby Day in 
Richmond. This event was held after the 
anniversary of the Roe v. Wade court case. 
Participants in the conference lobbied our state 
legislators to vote Pro-Choice. In addition to 
these conferences the club provided a clinic in 
self-defense as well as training sessions. NARAL 
also collaborated with the Young Democrats on 
several election campaigns. Work included 
attending a rally in Fredericksburg and working 
the poles on election day. In the future the club 
hopes to help open a clinic in the Fredericksburg 



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Members Anne Witt, Sara Leedom, Lisa Brundage, Karey David, 
and Megan Park take a time out from the NOW counter Rally to 
the Promise Keepers to smile for the camera. 



T66 c/u6s 




Photo by: Kerri Pakurar 

Front Row (l-r): Hilary Crossman, Anne Witt, Renee Serena, Monica Agudelo. Second 
Row: Mark Rodeffer, Jennifer Holf. Third Row: Erin Heslep, Meg Weireter. Back Row: 
Erik Tolbert. 



During the fall 1997 semester the MWC Young 
Democrats were very busy with the races for 
Governor, Lt. Governor, and Attorney General. 
They worked with the Fredericksburg 
Democratic Committee to hold a rally for the 
three Democratic candidates for state office, 
Don Beyer, L.F. Payne, and Bill Dolan. 
Members also participated in two literature 
drops in the neighborhoods adjacent to 
campus. For fun they attended a pig roast at 
Mark Warner's home in King George, a social 
hosted by the Spotsylvania Democratic 
Women's caucus. Together with NABAL and 
NOW they held a pro-choice benefit concert 
and rally. In April, they sent some of their 
budding members to the State Young 
Democrats convention in Bichmond. 




Some Young Democrats on the campaign trail with candidate Mark 
Warner. 



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Club member Shanita Tasiby has some fun during 
one of the meetings. 



The Voices of Praise Gospel 
Choir was founded in 1990 by 
Sherri Combs, under the 
direction of The Multicultural 
Center at Mary Washington 
College. Mrs. Phyllis Nelson of 
Fredericksburg was the 
director at that time. Today 
the choir is under the direction 
of Clifton Davis with musician 
Kevin Mickie. The advisors 
are Mr. Andrew Clanton and 
Mrs. Ruth White. Their 
mission is to minister to people 
through song about the lord 
and savior Jesus Christ. 



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First Row fl-r): Jennifer Osborne, Dominiquue Brock, Yvette Uhalde, Katie Laskey. Second 
Row: Erica Hawke, Rosetta Brock, Tiffany Wooten, Shanita Tisaby, Brian Sweet David 
Booth. Third Row: Laquia Jones, Sara Baldwin; Back: Andre Clanton. 



f68 Cfabs 



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ront Row (1-r): Steve Donahoe, Debbie Womer, Donna LaMarque, Jessica Hensley, Kristin 
srtini, and Jennifer Burger. Second Row (1-r): Nikki Matthews, Kerri Flynn, Lindsay Miller, 
rin Heslep, Kristen Ray, Jennifer Hoffman, Elana Pressman, and Michelle Hossainkhail. Third 
3w (1-r): Aimee Halphen, Allison Alexander, Megan Miloser, Jen Hughes, Manuel Contreras, 
itzi Morales, Jennifer Reyes, Cynthia Helmann, and Noelle Stinchcomb. These are the members 
ho help make Circle K great! 



Circle K is an international 
collegiate service organization. 
It has three components: 
service, fellowship, and 
leadership. The club focuses 
on service as it offers 
opportunities for fellowship 
and leadership. The 

organization tries to serve the 
Fredericksburg community in 
a variety of ways. Members 
have painted canons, built 
homes with Habitat for 
Humanity, walked dogs for the 
SPCA, visited with residents 
at the nursing home, and 
walked to raise money for 
AIDS and MS organizations. 
Each year the club sponsors 
the American Red Cross Blood 
Drive on campus. Circle K 
serves to help others, while 
also trying to narrow the gap 
between the student body and 
the citizens of Fredericksburg. 




Members of Circle K gather together to help celebrate fellow member Katie Members Debbie Womer, Michele Hossainkhail, Mitzi 
Gotlsch's birthday. Movates, Michele Alvarez, and Kristen Bertini prepare 

dinner at the Thurman Brisben Homeless Shelter. 



Gateways / 6 9 









Headed by co-captains 
Tara Mallon and Jenny Moss, 
this year's dance team started 
practicing in October with a 
strong squad of experienced and 
talented girls. For a month, they 
reworked and perfected an old 
favorite routine, Mortal Kombat. 
Their first performance came in 
December at both the men and 
women's basketball home 
opener. 

They started out the 
second semester with an idea to 
choreograph a routine to "Men in 
Black". The team cooperated as 
a whole, combining moves and 
formations to create their longest 
and most challenging routine 
ever. All of their hard work, 
dedication, and extra practices 
paid off in February with another 
doubleheader halftime 

performance. 

The crowd's response was 
so positive that instead of ending 
their season early, they added an 
additional performance. The 
Performing Arts Club invited the 
dance team to join them at their 
informal concert held in Lee Hall 
Ballroom in March. This 
opportunity gave the Dance 
Team a perfect ending to a 
successful season. 




Kneeling : Peyton Davis. Second Row (1-r) : Kim Tupper, Tara Mallon, Kim Mycko, Meliss 
Yunker. Third Row (1-r) : Jenny Moss, Becky Royal. 




Preparing for a performance, pictured left to right are: Melissa Yunker, Kim Tupper, 
Tara Mallon, Kim Mycko, Becky Royal, Jenny Moss, and Peyton Davis. 



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Lounging (1-r): Jenna Frye, Alex Beguin, Jessica Low, Kim Griffith, Ernie Yermoli. Middle Row: 
Laura Varlas, David Liola, Amanda Elwell, Pam Kirby, Mike Arbogast, Kevin Dunnill, Breyn 
Evans, Katie Fry, Nancy Stevens, Heather Clendenin, Amira Nikolas, Meredith Wilcox, Jenny 
Auerbach, Sara Thomas, Kacey Kology. Back Row: Brandon Goldstein (Co-chair), Steve Charnoff 
(Co-chair), Danielle Williams, Steve O'Connell; Not Pictured: Meghan Hoffman. 




Giant staff members, Breyn Evans, Jessica Low, Steve O'Connell, Kevin 
Dunnill, Michael Arbogast, and Kim Griffith, setting up equipment in 
the Eagles Nest for a show featuring the local band Don't Panic. 



The Student Activities 
Entertainment (SAE) 
committee, responsible for 
bringing bands, comedians, 
and lectures to campus, was 
nicknamed "Giant 

Productions" years ago 
because everything they did 
was just that: a giant 
production. During the '97- 
'98 school year, the hard- 
working volunteers on Giant 
brought such acts as Run- 
DMC, the Indigo Girls, the 
Violent Femmes, and the Pat 
McGee Band. Giant also 
brought free shows back to 
the Eagle's Nest in the spring 
of 1998, giving numerous on- 
campus and local bands a 
chance to play fortheMWC 
community. 

In addition to their 
own shows, Giant also co- 
sponsors numerous events 
with a multitude of campus 
organizations, such as the 
Multi-Cultural Center, 
Honor Council, Black 
Student Association, and the 
Judicial Review Board. Class 
Council in particular relies 
heavily on help from Giant, 
both financially and for 
advice on how to successfully 
put on large events. 






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The Mary Washington College newspaper, The Bullet, is published weekly. Pictures, articles, cartoons, and 
police beats, discuss both recent and upcoming events. The paper is distributed almost every Thursday during 
the school year. Regardless of who you are, there is usually something in The Bullet that appeals to you. 
Anyone can become a staff member. If you are on the staff it is more than likely that you are enrolled in 
Journalism 380, a one credit practicum course. You can do what you love while receiving credit! You are 
probably familiar with many issues that the newspaper covered this year: President Anderson's recovery, the 
first SGA elections, the second SGA election, condoms in the vending machines, and changes in senior traditions.j 
The staff attends National College Media conventions once or twice a year to expand their range of knowledge.' 
This is a student run organization that needs student's help to continue going strong. 




Above: Erin Rodman, Thomas Thormeyer, and Jenine Zimmers hanging out together outside 
of the office. Left: Anne Mullins (News Editor) leaps tall buildings in a single bound while 
in Chicago. 




Pictured (from left to right) in San Fransisco are Bullet members Jenine Zimmer, 
Anne Mullins, Erin Rodman, Angela Zosel, Bethany Johnston, and Lindsay Reisinger 
are preparing to jump ship to avoid incarceration at Alcatraz after failing to meet a 
deadline. 



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The Aubade staff takes time out to pose for a picture. Well, we are not really sure that 
they are " Taking time out." They were like that when we got their to take the picture. 

A Vis A i> t 



Just a flower poem really 

green thought 

imagination train 

I'm screaming my way out 

of my skin 

and tears make me choke 

on this house 

on the phone 

in the street 

walking quick 

ready like tulips drooping 

they get ready and in their 

redness 

look away one second 

look back 

they're down 

I'm down like that 

next season comes 

we get up again 

gather up roots and dirt 

and roots and pebbles and 

lint and trash 

and damn remembrances 

looking glass cobalt blue 

distortion through a 

looking glass 

in this preparation for peace 

of mind 

I've foiled again 

by Sarah McCall 



The Aubade, Mary Washington College's 
review of art and literature, is put out once a 
year. The staff works hard collecting 
submissions, making selections, creating 
layouts to showcase student talent at the 
finish of the year. 

The 1997-1998 staff was small, though 
they came together with determination and 
desire to continue circulation and 
appreciation of art: written, handmade, 
thought, or other- . They captured this 
through students' contributions. 

Members of the Aubade staff had fun 
as they worked at a fast pace to produce the 
magazine. Working on a literature and art 
review entails patience, time, and a critical 
eye, though most staffers would agree that 
the effort required is rewarding. Members 
of the Aubade take pride in saying, " We did 
that!" 

Because their group is small, they 
always need more voices in their production. 
They encourage everyone to submit 
contributions or join the staff. 



Gateways f 7 3 



The MWC Ambassadors had a very exciting 
year, in part due to a large increase in 
membership. These students are very 
enthusiastic about volunteering their time 
to help the College. The Organization was 
formed 3 ago years; however, many people 
still do not know who the Ambassadors are 
or what they do. Luckily, thanks to the 
students' commitment and enthusiasm, 
that is finally beginning to change. This 
year's MWC Ambassadors exemplified their 
commitment to the College through a 
multitude of Alumni Association and 
College Advancement activities which 
included: Survival Kit Deliveries, Alumni 
Chapter Events, Family Weekend, 
Distinguished Graduate in Residence, 
MWC Annual Phonathon Fund, Fall 
Homecoming, and Reunion Weekend. The 
mission of the MWC Ambassadors is to 
foster appreciation for a lasting 
commitment to Mary Washington College. 
The Ambassadors work for this goal through 
programs and activities that enhance the 
culture of philanthropy provide service to 
the College, and strengthen links between 
students, alumni, the College and the 
community. 






A few of the Mary Washington College Ambassadors take time out from their busy 
schedule to pose for a picture.. 



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Carly Scott shows off her artistic skills as she face paints a cat onto one of the 
children at the Fredricksburg Alumni Chapter Easter Egg Hunt. 



A feast fit for an Ambassador!! Jen Hunt, Amy Brady and Kim 
Mycko enjoy a good meal at the Ambassador Workshop. 



Members of the MWC Ambassadors include: Mariel Alculumbre, Kate Amey, Darien Berkowitz, Mara Berkowitz, Katharine Blatchford, Amy 
Brady, Amy Brown, Julia Ciarlo, Jessica Clements, Gina Cumbo, Jamie Currie, Jamie Deaton, Kristin DeGraff, Jeremy Duval, Anne Elliott, Amy 
Franklin, Theresa Furlong, Erika Giamo, Ashley Groesbeck, Hong-Anh Ha, Ellen Harris, Karyn Havas, Keri Henley, Sarah Herbert, Jackie Herr, 
Erin Heslep, Jennifer Hunt, Shannon Hutchinson, Cory Kegerise, Brooke Kemp, Regina Kim, Alexis Kingham, Angela Lengyel, Jessica Maddox, 
Karen Martin, Adele McDonald, Elizabeth McWhirt, Angela Mills, Elizabeth Montgomery, Jayme Morris, Melanie Mousseau, Kim Mycko, Corinne 
O'Conner, John Onda, Sean Otto, Yanira Paez, Kate Parker, Erin Pickens, Laura Reilly, Liz Sands, Carly Scott, Casey Selden, Erin Shank, Betsy 
Shaver, Katie Shea, Lisa Simpson, Sarah Stacy, Hilary Stebbins, Lora Wagner, Loris Walsh, Beth Waters, Julie Wessinger, Cara Wheatley, Tasha 
White, Sharon Wilcox, Meredith Wilson, Kristin Witters, Mary Woodie. 



174 Cfa6s 



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Giving tours is not the only activity for Guides, they also play!! Ed Egee, Jill Ellis, 
and Courtney Rannells enjoy an evening with the Guides during an ice skating social. 



Members of the Washington Guides 
volunteer their time and services to 
conduct tours and host prospective 
students for both day and night visits. 
Guides are selected based on an 
application and interview; they then 
receive training from admission counselors 
and other guides. Guides also have the 
opportunity to visit high schools, serve on 
student panels, and attend college night 
programs. All guides participate in the 
Showcase Program; showcase is a chance 
for Mary Washington College to show 
honors admission students all that the 
college has to offer. This year over 600 
visitors attended the showcase, which the 
college community put on for two days! All 
guides served as either a tour guide or a 
student escort for the event. Throughout 
the year, there are general meetings, 
newsletters, and several socials for guides, 
including the end-of-year picnic. 



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Front Row: Tamera Hinton, Krisin DeGraff, Karen Applegate, Jill Ellis. 2nd Row: Heather 
E. Carter, Lisa Murray, Casey Gallant, Beth LaMantia, Chris Hitzelberger. 3rd Row: 
Katie Higgins, Julie Smith, Jessica Clements, Whitney Wallace, Annika Garvey. 4th 
Row: Ebony Braxton, Julie McPhilomy Sarah Hinman. 5th Row: Becky Sabatos, Kristin 
Witters, Claire Rotramel, Renee Scuito, Jason Roy. 6th Row: Leah Gordon, Peter Hua, 
Seth Kennard, Alyssa Pecorino. 7th Row: Emily Wilkinson, Kelly Wagner, Olivia Synnott, 
Madelyn Marine. 8th Row: Carissa Langille, Katherine McGinn, Ed Egee. 9th Row: 
Shannon Hutchinson, Cory Kegerise. 



Not Pictured: Robyn Alizzeo, Joy Barnes, 
Jennifer Belote, Darien Berkowitz, Mara 
Berkowitz, Jeremy Blain, Dabney Boye, Eric 
Brown, Mariah Butler, Kevin Cain, Cody 
Camblin, Mike Canty, Heather A. Carter, Steve 
Charnoff, Matt Cliszis, Amanda Craddock, 
Lindsay Crouch, Mike D'Ostilio, Marne 
Dantone, Aaron Davis, Kara Davis, Erin 
Dempsey, Tim Deyesu, Karen DiMaira, Emily 
Doughty, Nicole Dumas, Kelley Gallagher, Sarah 
Geiger, Erika Giamo, Steve Hatch, Jess Hensly, 
Brad Hopper, Natalie Johnson, Supapan Kanti, 
Alexis Kingham, Stacey Ladd, Caritta Lee, Cat 
LeMaire, Angela Lengyel, Larissa Lipani, Lisa 
Mueller, Denee Lonce, Lina Marunas, Kim May, 
Rob McKinstry, Sara Monaghan, Jayme Morris, 
Sarah Petty, Nate Pipke, Lillian Pitts, Denise 
Policastro, Kristin Puma, Courtney Rannells, 
Andrew Rothschild, Dennis Rudnick, Ann Marie 
Sack, Ann Marie Salewski, Corey Sell, Rachel 
Silbaugh, Leslie St.Denis, Hilary Stebbins, Paul 
Storer, Hien Truong, Chris Van Horn, Claire 
Wagner, Jacelyn Walton, Jason Wenrich, 
Meredith Wilcox, Marc Williams, Heather 
Woody, Collett Yankape, Jenine Zimmers. 



Gateways f IS 









Organized in 1934, the 
Mary Washington College 
Dance Company enriched 
the lives of students and 
members of the 
Fredericksburg community 
through choreography and 
performance. The 
Performing arts Club is 
continuing the creative 
tradition. During their first 
year in existence, they 
performed on and off 
campus, including four solo 
performances and a few 
additional ones in 
conjunction with events and 
other clubs. 



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The array of performances at the Performing Arts Show was impressive. See! Even people i 
suits can cut it loose! 




Students in the Performing Arts Club can present pieces as a group 
or individually. Right: Students exhibit flexibility, strength, and 
creativity. Above: Dominique Pastre shows off her style and grace in 
this picturesque position. 




f7b Clubi 



Costumes for these performances ranged from every day wear to camouflage. Below: 
Students create a sculpture using only their bodies and their creative minds. The 
positions are expressive, but would not mean the same without the facial expressions. 
Left: David Booth laughs as he sends his partner, Karen Ng, into a top spin. The 
performers practiced for many hours to perfect such acrobatic skills. 




Above: students please the crowd with a partner-like dance. The girls have left 
a lot of trust for their male counterparts. Left:, Joshua Gravis, David Booth, 
Kenneth Dority and Jason Fanning strut their stuff in this interesting formation. 



Gateways fTT 



Isn't it the fc'O's? Have 
Don Johrson, Bruce 
Sprinj&tein and 
friends come back for 
one last groove? Oris 
it some Mary 
Washington College 
students having fun 
on their own at an 
80's theme party? 
Pictured right, Don 
(aka Chuck), Bruce 
'aka Brauerl, and 
friends (aka Duv, 
Jimmy, Angry and 
Baecker) pose for a 
snapshot before 
bustin' a move to 
Michael Jackson's 
"Beat it". 




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Is this 

Fredericksburg, 
Virginia? Has 
Mary Washington 
College opened a 
branch in Greece? 
Are college 

students too poor to 
do their laundry 
and must resort to 
wearing sheets? Or 
is it Toga night? 
Who says we don't 
have a Greek 
system at Mary 
Wash? Pictured 
left, students take 
time out from 
discussing the 
classics to pose for 
the camera. 




178 Clubs 





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Left: The Mary 
Washington College 
Field Hockey Team are 
posed on a rock during 
a beautiful sunset in 
Palm Springs, 

California. Front row 
left to right are Megan 
Kinnear, Heather 
Carter, and Lillian 
Pitts. Back row left to 
right are their 
California coach, Robin 
Wild, Erin Broome and 
Charlotte Cockrell. 
They are taking time 
out of their busy 
training to relax and 
take in the wonderous 
scenery. 





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iddle Picture: While camping in the woods, Mary Washington students take time out 
doing tent set-up to capture the Kodak moment. Above: Heather Carter, Kristin 
ard and Sarah Dixon smile angelically , answering "What money?" to Tom's proposition, 
howme the Money." 



Although student 
organizations on Mary 
Washington's Campus are 
very active and well-known, 
not every student joins a 
clubs and participates in 
their activities. Many 
students simply like to hang 
out with friends, some 
through theme parties. 
Sometimes you can revisit 
the 50's or the 80's, go to 
Hawaii, or travel back to 
ancient Greece all in one 
night. Many students go 
camping together, while 
others socialize with 
celebrities, like Tom Cruise 
as they watch movies all 
night long. Still others 
travel to new places with 
teammates or friends just to 
enjoy a change of scenery. 



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Front (1-ri: Dave Carboni, Shannon Slawter, Mitzi Morales, Rachel Hopkins, Tamara Hinton, Anna 
Eriksson. Back (1-r): Angela Lengyel, Timothy Lee, Robert Rycroft (Advisor), Gabe Venturi, Brian 
Whitacre, Michael Warren, Michael Franco. 



Omicron Delta Epsilon is the international 
economics honor society. It is one of the largest 
academic honor societies in the world. In order 
to receive membership in this society, students 
must have completed at least 12 credits in 
Economics, with a 3.25 GPA in economics and a 
3.0 GPA overall.. The members for the 1997-1998 
academic year were Brian Whitacre, James 
Tsantes, Shannon Slawter, Renee Adler , Tamara 
Hinton, Michael Cirami, and Gabe Venturi. 
Robert Rycroft is the academic advisor. The 
following students were inducted on April 9, 
1998: Jenni Brock, David Carboni, Anna 
Erikkson, Michael France, Christopher 
Hitzelberger, Rachel Hopkins, Timothy Lee, 
Angela Lengyel, Margarita Morales, Kristen 
Ruehl, Christopher Taylor, Michael Warren, and 
Ian Wyatt. Society activities for the 1997-1998 
year included bringing an economic speaker to 
campus. In honor of Women's History Month, 
Omicron Delta Epsilon, with the economics Club, 
sponsored a discussion by Dr. Ranjini Thaver of 
Stetson University on Race, Gender, and Societal 
inequalities. 



Purpose 

To promote greater interest in and 
understanding of economics 

Requirement 

3.25 economics average and an 
overall average of 3.0 



Advisor 
Professor Rycroft 



1 80 Ctahe 




Left to Right: Tara Barto, PeterHug, Lisa Murray, Jill Fultz. 



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Purpose 

To encourage learning and to 

recognize high scholastic 

achievenment. 

Requirement 

3.25 average and 60 semester 
hours 

Advisor 

Professor Rosemary Barra 



Alpha Phi Sigma National 
Scholastic Honorary society came 
into existence in February of 1930. 
At Mary Washington College, 
members are encouraged to help the 
community with service projects in 
addition to succeeding academically. 
This year, members of Alpha Phi 
Sigma donated their time to work 
on many projects; members helped 
those in need by raising over five 
hundred dollars for groceries for the 
Hope House and they cooked dinner 
at the Thurman Brisman homeless 
shelter. 



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Below: Beth Lamantia, Jenny Phillips, Janet Oldis, Andy Waterston, Tony 
Orlando, Whitney Wallace, and Amanda Goebel help Jenny celebrate her 
21st birthday. Many students celebrate by going out to dinner or surprising 
their peers with "dorm-cooked" food. These students visited the ever-popular 
Carlos O'Kelly's before returning home for some chocolate cake. 



Pictured below Q-r): Tony Orlando, Joey Harris and Brian Yawberg 
sport their khakis, their jean shirts and some stylish ties. Wow! 
What a good looking group of guys! 




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Above O-rKCaritta Lee, Meredith Price, Ethan Bedell, Hien 
Truong, Steve Charnoff, Laura Reilly, Cory Kegerise, Maylian 
Pak, Kristin Witters, Kim Odell, Jenny Moss, Lindsey Morgan, 
and Julie McPhilomy have dinner at Carlos O'Kelly's to celebrate 
Kim's 21st. Right O-rj: Rebecca Williams, Russell Scott, Jenny 
Phillips, Georgina Bruer, and Cheryl Mayers huddle for a picture 
at a get-to-gether in an off-campus apartment. 




1 u2 Clubs, 



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Front Row (1-r): Fiance Chair, Renee Adler, Secretary, Chris Cavanaugh, Franny Birago, Shannon Blevins. Back Row: James Tsantes, 
Julie Garner, Kelly Dwyer, Tasha White, Sam Clayton, Vice-Chair, Jacob Galba-Bright. 

The Finance Committee is responsible for allocating money from the school comprehensive fee to the many 
clubs and organizations at MWC. Every March, the committee holds budget hearings, to approve budgets 
for every club that requests money. Throughout the year, clubs come to the committee on Sunday nights to 
make requests. The money from these requests is used: to bring speakers to campus, to attend conferences, 
and to hold special events on campus. The ten elected members of this committee help to ensure that money 
is spent appropriately and on things that interest students. 



Gateways / S3 



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F/rsi i?oti) (l-r): Morgan Baker, Ben Holt, Scott Cockrell, Megan Wheeler. Second Row: 
Becky Flynn, Adrienne Kieldsing, Monica Harkey, Kristy Buck, Dr. Bulent Atalay 
(Advisor). Third Row: Shane Smith, Justin Conroy, Cressida Shogren, Erzsebet Szasz; 
Back Row: Paul Barsotti, Aaron Kieldsing, Sam Clayton. Missing: Tara Hogan, 
Christen Brownlee, David Bullock, Jill Reilly, Matt Jondrow, Nancy Krauss, Davis 
Lee, Elmer Sharp, Brian Lusk. 



The Mary Washington College 
Chapter of the Society for Physics 
Students has a multitude of 
functions: it raises funds for extra- 
curricular department projects, it 
helps sponsor guest lectures. SPS 
also organizes and sponsors field 
trips, including annual tours of the 
Physics Department at Princeton 
University, and the nuclear reactor 
at the University of Virginia. For the 
wealth of its activities, it has earned 
the Best Chapter Award from the 
National Organization of SPS four 
times since its formation in 1977. 



Purpose 

To recognize individual 
excellence in scholarship, 
leadership, and service 

Requirements 

Juniors and Seniors who have 
good academic standing, co- 
curricular involvement, and 
community service that is above 
average 



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The Nu Xi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi is an 
international education honor society 
founded on the ideals of scholarship, 
leadership and service. In order to be 
admitted to the society at Mary Washington 
College, its members must possess at least 
sixty semester hours, hold a G.P.A. of 3.0 or 
above, and be seeking a collegiate 
professional license. The society strives to 
promote the welfare of children and the 
quality education through its participation 
in community service and by honoring 
outstanding educators. 



Josh Bacigalupi enjoys some cake 
after a strenuous meeting. 




Front Row (1-r): (Officers) Kathy Fisher, Josh Bacigalupi, Leigh Siegel, Jill Fultz, Niki 
Gonyo, Dr. Sandy White (Advisor). Second Row: Krista Mann, Mel Myers, Cynthia 
Wheeler, Kathryn Murphy, Andrea Starace, Rachael Noonkester, Andrea Justice, 
Marliese Millson, Sarah Boyer, Tim Deyesu. Third Row: Nadene Hall, Lois Cigavic, 
Theresa Pugh, Rebecca Smith, Claudia Dursa, Danielle Minthorne, Denise Peloquin, 
Heidi Buchanan, Corey Sel, Christina Stallings. Back Row: Amanda Clift, Kerri Jones 
Andrea Myers, Nova Namerdy Margaret Foley, Heather Walsh, Meredith Gompf, Jaimee 
Baker, Sarah Meinhart. 



Gateways fSS 



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Opposite page, clockwise from top left: The womens field hockey team posci for their team 
picture, 1929; The All-Girl Band prepare* for a performance inBall Circle, 1 '948; The archery 
team takes aim, 1939; Students play volleyball, check out the uniforms, 1957. Above: The 
MWC Tennis team lines up at the net on the tennis court in front of Monroe and Willard 
Halls, 1913. 



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Craig Gillan 
Men's Soccer 


Felicity Smith 
Women's Soccer 




Chris Rice Megan Reese 

Men's Swim Team Women's Swim Team 



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Kim Myers 
Women's Swim Team 



Mariah Butler 
Women's Swim Team 




Lindsay Stover Yurrisa Mitchell 

Women's Basketball Women's Track & Field 



Gateways f 3*) 



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This year found both cross country teams taking top places at many races. The 
women had an exceptionally strong season, winning not only their Conference, the Capital 
Athletic Conference, but also the Mason Dixon Conference meet. The Eagles faced many 
challenges this season, one of the biggest being their inexperience; this season marked 
the beginning of college races for most members of the team. One of the first major tests 
for the team came at the Virginia State Division II/III Championship Meet. The women 
took 2nd place, with just one point separating them from a complete victory. Senior 
Caitlin McGurk led the women's team with her second place finish (19:19). 

At the CAC Meet, the Eagles were able to beat their arch-rival Salisbury State 
to win the Conference. Freshman Jaime Donaruma remembered the sweet victory, "Going 
against Salisbury State was tough. We all had to pull together to stay in a pack. Working 
together helped us mentally to run our best that day." This team truly did run their best 
as they set a conference record for having the most runners named to the All-Conference 
Team. Jaime Donaruma, Caitlin McGurk, Julie Rakowski, Erin Murray, Teresa Joerger, 
Beth Goodall, Kristin Neviackas, Marga Fischel, and Leah Sullivan were named to this 
prestigious team. Jaime Donaruma was named CAC Rookie of the Year after her 2nd 
place finish. The men also performed well at the CAC's, taking 4th place. Jason Van 
Horn led the Eagles with a 3rd place finish. Van Horn, along with Jim Dlugasch, Brien 
Roberts, and John Rock were named to the CAC All-Conference Team. 

The next meet, Regionals, found Donaruma leading the women's team to 3rd 
place. Her time of 19:31 took 7th place, earning All-Region Honors. The men's team was 
led by Jason Van Horn who took 7th place with a time of 27:09. Donaruma finished her 
season in Boston, where she took 133rd place at the NCAA National Championship. 
These young teams are looking forward to an even better season next year with the 
experience that they have gained from this one. 

-Chris Cavanaugh 





Above: Couch Stan Soper and 
■Jamie Donaruma at the Mason- 
Dixon meet. Right: MWC's Cross 
Country team, Front Row (l-r): 
Teresa Joerger, Caitlin McGurk, 
Tara Hottle. Middle Row (l-r): 
Megan Tansey, Kristin Neviackas, 
Julie Rakowski, Jaime Donaruma, 
Erin Murray. Buck Row (l-r): 
Coach Stan Soper, Leah Sullivun, 
Courtney Lupton, Dunielle Matuch, 
Murga Fischel, Kristin Vorisek. 




I'bala by: Knrrn Ptarlnuii 



J 90 Sports 



a t"K e 9»ena|s 




Scoreboard 

Wo. Men 
9/13 University of Virginia 8th 10th 

9/20 George Mason 7th 7th 

9/27 Dickenson College Inv. 

10/11 Va. State Champions. 2nd 4th 

10/18 Allentown 8th 20th 

10/25 Mason Dixon Inv. 1st N/A 

11/9 CAC Championships 1st 2nd 

11/15 NCAA South Regional 3rd 9th 

11/22 NCAA Nationals 



MWC Men's Team, Front Row (l-r): Khurram 
Malik, John Rock, Jim Dlugasch, Steve 
LaManna. Back Row (l-r): Coach Stan Soper, 
John Kopp, Jason Van Horn, Brien Roberts, 
Ethan Bedell. 



Gateways f*)f 



M en S $6** C V 



The 1997 season proved to be a successful year for the men's soccer 
team as they advanced to the NCAA National Semifinals for the first time 
ever. A winning regular season enable the Eagles to be tied with Greensboro 
College for first place in the South Region with a 13-2-1 record. Their play 
continued to be strong as they kicked their way to the Capital Athletic 
Conference Championship. The Eagles downed Salisbury State University 
2-0 to win the CAC crown for the seventh consecutive year. Senior Craig 
Gillan was named the CAC player of the year and Second Team All- American. 
Jason Fusaro, Jordi Kleiman, Jeremy Corazzini, and Dan Guarriello also 
were also named to the CAC team. 

After the CAC victory the Eagles were invited to the NCAA South 
Regional Tournment held in Greensboro, North Carolina. They competed 
against Emory University and Virginia Wesleyan College. Winning both of 
those games they moved on to the Quarter Final Round against California 
Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks California. The team returned home 
after their win to prepare for the NCAA Semifinals that was held on our 
home field. Unfortunately, the Eagles weren't able to defeat Wheaton IL 
College falling 2-1. This ended the most successful season in MWC men's 
soccer history. 

John Likowski flies higher 
than the eagle as he kicks 
the ball past the enemy. 




Scoreboard 




Opponent 


Score 


Emory 


2-1 


Va. Wesleyan 


3-1 


Greensboro 


2-1 


Gaucher 


4-0 


Catholic 


7-0 


Salisbury State 


2-0 


Va. Wesleyan 


0-1 


Greensboro 


2-1 


Longwood 


1-1 


Fredonia 


2-1 


Frostburg 


1-1 


Randolph-Macon 


2-1 


York 


3-0 


Gallaudet 


6-0 


Salisbury State 


2-0 


Catholic 


2-1 


Cal Lutheran 


2-1 


Wheaton IL 


1-2 




I ! ____ — — — 

PhtO by: Peyton Dam 

The mens' soccer team poses for the camera after winning the CAC championship. Front Row 
to R): Dan Guarrielo, Brian Turner, Jason Green, J.T Nino, Jay Hartey, Jordi Kleiman, I 
Burrier. Second Row: Kevin Byrne, Kevin Linton, Brad Hopper, Randy Scott, Brad Kelly, Cra 
Gillan, Jeremy Corazzini, Ryan Forbrich. Third Row: Alex Addison, John Buchanan, Tot 
Essalih, Kelly Coffey, Jason Fusaro, Brenden Madigan, Ben Phelps, Brian Sweeney, John Ea. 



f92 Sports 









* <#' :*h{ 








I— ••',...,,-' __J 



Senior Ben Phelps goes for the goal as team captain,Craig Gillan, 
looks on. 



Ph„t„ by: Kern Pakurar Photo by: Kevin Mac L„.,k 





Left: Brian Turner skillfully evades his opponent at the Homecoming game. 
Above: Senior Jason Fusaro grimaces while taking a hit for the team. 



Gate(Aatj& /93 



Wean's Setter 



Winning their third consecutive Capital Athletic Conference 
title, Mary Washington's women's soccer team exceeded new heights 
this year. Seven players were named first team All-CAC honors. 
The team finished the season ranked fifth in the nation and boasts 
a 18-2-2 record. This team record was the longest unbeaten streak 
in school history. Goalkeeper Anne Wenthe was an outstanding 
leader for the team this year as well as freshmen Ellen Anderson 
and Laura Stafford. Anderson, who scored 14 goals this season, 
was named league rookie of the year. Anderson credits her success 
to the strength of the team, " Our chemistry was excellent. We did 
a lot of activities off the field. The captains were both great leaders 
and role-models, that helped us be a cohesive group on the field." 
Senior Felicity Smith received the honor of First team Ail-American. 
The Eagles hosted the Southern Regional Tournament. The team 
was boosted by the support of the crowd who packed the stands 
and braved the rain. The team performed well, breezing by Emory 
University from Georgia and Trinity University from Texas. These 
two victories advanced the team to the NCAA Quarterfinals, which 
were also held at Mary Washington College. The Eagles started 
the game against University of California San Diego with tenacious 
play, scoring the first goal. Unfortunately, UC-San Diego scored 
two quick goals to win the game. The loss may have marked the 
end of their season, but it will live on in the record books as a 
successful season; one in which the Eagles were able to achieve 
the highest national ranking in their history. 




PhatO h: Jot Pittn 






^ 



< 




Photo ky:Kar 

Back row: Ellen Anderson, Felicity Smith, Kristen Mercer, Colby Carrier, Laura Stafford, 
■Jaime Kwiatkowski, Sarah Anderson . Front row: Sara Zelenak, Adrien Snedeker, 
Stephanie Whichward, Sarah Downey, Martine St. Germain, Leah Phillips, Johanna 
Klein, Jill Stecher. 



*o ■ 






{ ±e~ 



Vh,.l,.h:.L:el'itlma 



f9V Sports 




559** 



Photo by: Joe Pittman 

Clockwise from top left: Sara Zelenak turns the ball around in an attempt to go for the 
goal; Anne Wenthe heads for the ball; Running down the field, freshman Laura 
Stafford runs swiftly past the opponent; Scrambling for the ball, Kristen Mercer fights 
off her opponent. 



Gateways f*)S 



TieW Hettey 



Mary Washington Field Hockey had an 11-10 win/loss ratio overall for 
the season and 5-3 in the Capitol Athletic Conference. The players also scored 
144 points for the season while their opponents scored only 93 against the 
team. 

Senior Angie Saulsbury finished her final season with a number of 
honors. She was named Academic All- American, the first Mary Washington 
player to receive the honor three times, First Team All-Capital Athletic 
Conference, 1997 Division III South NFHCA All-Star, and 1997 NFHCA 
(South) First Team All- American. 

Erin Broome was named to the 1997 NFHCA Regional (South) Second 
Team All American. Players Natalie Simpson and Heather Carter were also 
named Academic All -Americans. In addition, Heather Carter was also named 
to 1997 All-CAC. 



Back row: Flora Adams, Stephanie Lowe - Assistant Coach, Brandy Nelson, Robyn Wilde, Katie Nelson, 
Liz Worth, Amy Smith, Leigh Gross, Natalie Simpson, Aimee Seward, Coach Dana Hall. Middle Row: 
Megan Shilling, Rebecca Kuehn, Abbie Porter, Erin Broome, Heather Carter, Kate Morrison, Christine 
■Jeffrey, Ellen Ashton Smith, Lillian Pitts. Front Row: Amy Leachtenauer, Kammeron Findley, Claire 
Van Til, Kathleen Keenan, Angie Saulsbury, Megan Kinnear, Katie Lengyel, Molly Cheatum. 





Photo by: Kama Pearlma 



f9b Sports 






Scoreboard 


MWC 


Opposing Team 


1 


Washington MD 2 





SUNY-Cortland 2 


1 


Roanoke 2 


4 


Bridgewater 


2 


Lebanon Valley 4 


7 


Sweet Briar 


3 


Goucher 





York PA 2 


4 


St. Mary's 


5 


Johns Hopkins 2 


2 


Catholic 1 


1 


Eastern Mennonite 6 


1 


Frostburg St. 





Salisbury State 1 


3 


Lynchburg 2 





Gettysburg 2 


4 


Randolph-Macon 3 





Messiah 2 


8 


St. Mary's 


3 


York PA 2 





Salisbury State 3 




Top: MWC goalie, Heather 
Carter, comes out for the 
save. Erin Broome runs in 
for support. Left: Ellen 
Ashton Smith makes her 
move and pushes her way 
down field. 



Gateways f*)T 



We^<V$ v elUyb*ll 



The MWC Eagles volleyball team, led by coach Dee 

Conway, had a successful and impressive season, finishing 

with a 22-12 record. The team remained undefeated at 

home, winning hard matches against Johns Hopkins, 

Randolph Macon, and Christopher Newport University. 

Katie Conway, All-CAC player and the only senior on the 

team, lent her skills and experience to the juniors and 

sophomores. The Eagles' key players this season were 

sophomore Lisa Skaggs, an all conference player, and 

juniors Katie Forthofer and Katie Wallace. Forthofer set 

the level of play for the season with her 267 kills and a 

team best of 89 solo blocks, and Wallace achieved an 

impressive 300 kills and 207 digs. Skaggs contributed, 

57 service aces and 85 solo blocks, to the team's outstanding play. The 

concerted effort of the experienced and determined players led them to a 6-1 

record in regular season Capitol Athletic Conference matches, putting MWC 

at the top of the CAC conference for the first time since 1993. 





Team photo Q-r): Stephanie Adams, Katie Wallace, 
Bethany Gobielle, Deanna Heckman, Teresa 
Heflin, Lisa Skaggs, Katie Forthofer, Chrissy 
Stoehr, Tammy Hinton, Hilary Clark, Beth Pollard, 
and Kristel Blauvelt. 



t98 Sporfs 






^k jfl 


1 ^ i 

/I 


1 — 



C-Heevl ending 





Daring, tough, and looking good. Mary Washington 
Cheerleaders work hard to get their fans pumped up and 
to make their teams feel at home, no matter who's court 
they're on! 

Squad Captain Stephanie Smith made this comment 
about the squad's performance this season, "We really set 
the pace in the conference this season. We were the only 
full co-ed squad in the CAC and because of this we were 
able to make huge improvements over last year's squad 
and show the rest of the CAC what cheerleading is all 
about!" 

With a great season behind them, the Eagles are 
looking good as they head off to NCAA camp this summer 
in Myrtle Beach, S.C. ,where they'll watch and learn from 
the best squads in the country in preparation for next 
season. With camp ahead and the talent they already 
possess, the eagles look to be the best squad MWC has 
ever seen and to continue setting the pace for CAC 
Cheerleading! -Joe Pittman 



Gateways /99 



iWUt»c Trainers 

At twelve o'clock the training room is relatively 
empty. The washer and dryer in the far corner are silent, 
the room looks abandoned. Bright fluorescent lights, and 
the open blinds on the window serve to seemingly increase 
the size of the room. Voices can be heard laughing and 
talking in the walled off, left-hand, corner of the room. 
Thin wooden barriers extending from the back and left 
walls serve to create a make-shift office for Mary 
Washington's two athletic trainers. At this time one is 
reading a magazine and the other is wolfing down the 
remains of a sandwich from subway, setting it down only 
long enough to munch on some Lay's Baked Potato Chips. 
In about two hours there won't be enough time to do 
everything, so they take advantage of the sluggishness to 
prepare themselves for the pre-practice rush. The younger 
of the two trainers crumples up the paper remains of what 
once contained a foot long sub and pulls out a book on 
sports medicine and without seeming to look at it, he opens 
the book to the middle and begins reading. The older 
trainer has since set down his magazine and is now 
working the mouse and keyboard to the one computer in 
the room. 

From this computer he can pull up lists and 
statistics of the cases that they have treated through the 
previous months, and even individual cases. He could 
pull up Jennifer Foi's case and look to see what treatments 
have been used on her postoperative knee injury. The 
man behind the computer is Robert Liebau, Athletic 
Trainer for the Varsity sports teams of Mary Washington 
College for twelve years. The man perusing through a 
sports training book is Dave Neulanze, a recent addition 
to the Athletic Training office. More accurately, he is the 
only staff addition to the office since its inception twelve 
years ago. 

Athletic Training has been recognized by the 
American Medical Association as an officially sanctioned 
approach to caring for sports injuries. In order for Bob 
and Dave to call themselves athletic trainers they have 
to hold a four year degree, and pass a test administered 
by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA). 

The four major areas of injuries treated by the 
Athletic Trainers Office include overuse injuries, 
tendonitis, acute injuries, and sprains. The majority, 
99.48%, of injuries treated by the office are those coming 
from the various athletic programs, with baseball being 
the highest percentage, with 13.18%, but a small amount 
of the injuries are athletes outside the Mary Washington 
Athletic Program; these are other students referred to the 
trainers office by the campus Health Center. The trainers 
are multifaceted; they do injury prevention, evaluation, 
treatment, rehabilitation of injuries, and education. 

200 Sports 




On the injury prevention facet of Dave an 
Bob's profession they talk with students, that com 
to see them, about what they can do to prevent th 
reoccurrence of an old injury and how to keep an 
new injuries from creeping up. While the treatmen 
and rehabilitation part of training might be the mos 
visible it is not necessarily the most important. Wit! 
education, injury prevention, and prope 
rehabilitation, Bob and Dave can cut down on th 
number of people that end up in the office fo 
treatment. Any decrease in the flow of student 
would be helpful, especially considering that betwee 
August and March, this school year, the trainers hav 
seen over 2,600 cases for a total of 1,257 hours < 
treatment. 

For every person that walks in the door ft 
treatment there are at least two injuries that nee] 
to be addressed, the psychological and th 
physiological. An example of this would be Jennift 
Foi, when she injured the ligaments in her knee h< 
senior year of high school she knew she require 
surgery. By the time that she began playing for Mai 
Washington her knee was almost healed, but sh 
noticed that in her ' 




playing she is taking more care when moving on the 
field. She said that she is more careful in how much 
pressure she puts on it, and almost always aware of 
her knee when she plays. If her mind had recuperated 
at the same time as her knee, she would have more 
trust in it, be able to put it through more, while at the 
same time keeping in mind certain things that would 
prevent injuring it again. As Bob puts it, "they need to 
maximize the psychological to maximize the 
physiological," in other words train the mind so that it 
can allow the injury to heal properly - work the person 
up through an ever more demanding series of goals - so 
that when the physical injury is healed the mind 
recognizes it as healed and can push it safely. This type 
of training allows the injury to heal and keeps the mind 
from developing blocks. 

Sometimes students are injured and try to hide 
their injuries; according to Bob these are the most 
difficult to treat. Often times they are first string 
athletes who are afraid that if they need extended 
treatment or time off from their sport, they will lose 
their position on the team. These people are highly 
competitive and don't want to stop for anything, 
including an injury, and they don't want to go to someone 
who may have to tell them they may need to stop playing 
for a while. They don't often see this type of person in 
the trainers office because unlike a Division I school 
there are no athletic scholarships riding on a student's 
athletic performance. For the most part, the students 
of Mary Washington are good about seeking help if they 
are injured. ~ Jeremy Brown 



Photo., By: Kerri Pok 







Gateways 20 f 



Men's VsketMl 



The Mary Washington Men's Basketball team continued to build upon their 
success from last season. Coach Rod Wood kept his players focused in the preseason by 
covering the windows in the doors which also kept his strategies a secret. Well, whatever 
they did worked because the 24 combined wins over the last two years is the most at 
the school since the 1987-88 and 88-89 season which earned 26 victories. Coach Wood 
commented on his teams performance by saying, "We did better than anyone expected. 
We will probably do better next year. We'll get better in each succesive season. It was 
definately a building season." 

Junior forward George Bunch had a very impressive season. In January he was 
among the nation's leading scorers, averaging 20.6 points per game. During the game 
against Salisbury State University Bunch scored his 1,000th career point. One of the 
highlights of the season was an alley-oop dunk from David Love to Bunch, which provided 
a spark to the team. 

Freshman forward Mike Fitzgerald, MWC'S "three point specialist", had a 
monumental season. Along with Bunch, Fitzgerald was often the focal point of the 
Eagle offense. Averagingl6 points a game, comprised mainly of three pointers, he was 
among the leading scorers of the team. 

Burt Burroughs, David Love, and Erik Bursch also contributed to their team by 
sinking more than a few baskets themselves. The Eagles ended this challenging season 
with a 9-16 record overall and a 4-10 record in the Capital Athletic Conference. 





^ AJ^ 



w 



^ %■,]£:. \ ^* V# * '/flp| 



n(VV ftf/U 



* ■> • 




Front Row: Branan Burde, Burt Burroughs, Mike Fitzgerald, Toler Cross, Mike Prensky, John Langan, Dave Love. 
Second Row: Coach Rod Wood, Charlie Sayers, John Steele, George Bunch, Eric Bursch, Stockon Banfield, Joe Faccio, 
Craig Emmerton, Paul Stoddard, Casey Selden. 



202 Sports 




Photo by: K 



UNI 




Photo by: KerriPakarar 

op: Eric Bursch looks for a teammate to pass the ball as he avoids the opponent, 
op right: Junior George Bunch breaks away from the opponent and successfully 
impletes a layup. Above: Craig Emmerton attemps a two point shot during an 
iportant game. 





Scoreboard 


MWC 


Opponent 


53 


Campbell University 84 


73 


Apprentice School 58 


74 


Westerm Maryland 85 


89 


Marymount University 101 


64 


St. Mary's 75 


58 


Gettysburg College 75 


76 


Shenandoah 80 


56 


Washington College 83 


81 


Apprentice School 73 


54 


Catholic University 61 


75 


Gallaudet University 61 


59 


Gaucher College 86 


93 


Salisbury State 88 


95 


Shenandoah 82 


68 


Marymount 77 


85 


York College 70 


76 


Catholic 83 


79 


Villa Julie College 58 


72 


St. Mary's 87 


73 


Gallaudet 47 


71 


Salisbury St. 82 


86 


Frostburg St. 83 


59 


Gaucher 89 


54 


York College 80 


62 


Marymount 64 






Gafefoays 203 



Wren's VsfatMl 



With a Capital Athletic Conference record of 10-4 and an overall record of 21-8, 
the Mary Washington College Women's teamed proved that even though they had only 
five returning players they could still pack a punch. They advanced through the CAC 
tournament and made it to second round in the NCAA play-offs. According to Sophomore 
Erika Grace "I think that we did better than anyone expected a team of mostly 
underclassmen to do. We will probably do better next year after we have team of more 
seasoned players." No doubt about it, this year's class of talented freshman helped to 
push the team through the Conference. 

The team established a new school record for racking up twenty-one wins in a 
season. Contributing to the wins were top scorers Lindsay Stover, Erin Caulfield, Andrea 
Sellers, Erika Grace, and Bernice Kinney. 

With their winning season the women's team attracted a crowd comparable to 
their male counterparts. Senior Lindsay Stover led the team in points, 483, and rebounds, 
243. Lindsay Stover was named to the CAC first team and was also Kodak Women's All- 
American Basketball Team finalist. Junior guard Andrea Sellers and first year forward 
Erin Caulfield received Second Team Conference honors. Head Coach Connie Gallahan 
took home the title of CAC Coach of the Year for her efforts in leading the team through 
its successful season. 

-Jamie Harper 






Top: Bernice Kinney fights for the ball. Left: Erika Grace plans hi 
next move. Above: Lindsay Stover concentrates on a foul shot. 



Photo by: Kci 



20V Sports 






Scoreboard 




MWC 


Opponent 


82 


Averret College 


59 (home) 


69 


Shenandoah 


58 (home) 


87 


Va. Wesleyan 


85 (away) 


84 


NC Wesleyan 


61 (home) 


63 


Marymount 


57 (away) 


46 


St. Mary's 


58 (home) 


55 


Rowan Univ. 


88 (home) 


82 


Christopher Newport 59(h) 


73 


Catholic Univ. 


54 (away) 


67 


Gallaudet U 


72 (home) 


77 


Gaucher College 38 (home) 


88 


Methodist 


72 (home) 


100 


Salisbury State 91 (away) 


82 


Marymount Univ. 67 (home) 


61 


York College 


55 (home) 


73 


Catholic 


47 (home) 


77 


St. Mary's 


63 (away) 


89 


Lincoln U. 


66 (home) 


96 


Gallaudet 


104 (away) 


81 


Salisbury 


80 (home) 


74 


Frostburg St. 


65 (away) 


60 


Gaucher 


38 (away) 


55 


Bridgewater 


75 (away) 


63 


York College 


66 (away) 


66 


Catholic 


44 (home) 


83 


Gallaudet 


74 (home) 


50 


St. Mary's 


77 (away) 


56 


St. Mary's 


43 (away) 




Front Row: Sarah Seale, Erin Caulfield, Bernice Kenney, Christina Yerg , Andrea Sellers, Sumer Speidell, Erika Grace. Second Row: 
Lindsay Stover, Helen Huley, Jill Hollenbeck, Jessica Sullins, Kim Price, Denise Harrington. 



Gateways 2 OS 



Men 5 $tvi*n Tc**n 

The MWC Eagle's Men's Swim Team had another great season with a spectacular 
close. The Eagles ended the season with a 6-3 record, boasting some tough wins over 
traditional rival schools like Catholic University and St. Mary's College. The team was 
coached by Matthew Kinney, who was named Coach of the Year for his outstanding 
leadership. One of the leading members of the team was Chris Rice, a senior, who was 
awarded the title Swimmer of the Year in the Capital Athletic Conference (CAC). The 
team went to Florida over winter break for some intense training and had a blast while 
practicing daily. Chris Rice commented "we trained a lot while we were in Florida, but it 
was a lot of fun and it built up team spirit." The team also made a trip to Franklin and 
Marshall College for an invitational meet, and finished sixth out of eleven teams. An 
incredible amount of team spirit, dedication, and skill led the Eagles to a successful 
finish for the season in the CAC meets, allowing MWC to take the title for the third 
consecutive year. After the finish of the regular season, Chris Rice qualified to compete 
in the NCAA conference held on March 19-21. In all, the season was a success and made 
MWC proud of it athletes. 

~ Vanessa Krempa 




Above team photo, front row: Mark Greenleaf, Josh Slater, Cody Camblin, Ben Preston. Middle row: Arte Dietrich, Jeff 
Dehart, Nate Zaleski, Todd Hutzler, Mike Salpeter, Eric Richko. Back row: Sean Young, Karl Anderson, Matt 
Anderson, Tim Riley, Chris Rice. 








206 Sports 




« jm~ 




j 


3 


. . . • 


• 


* * , % 


■ 


™'tiifii7* "i ' % i$j* 




^■i ^n^i 




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BHj 





Wjo/^ /-v.- .Aw Pitlmai 

: Chris Rice catches his breath after a race. Above: Chris Rice competes in 
butterfly. Right: Todd Hutzler mentally perpares himself before a race. 



Meet Results 

Salisbury State University 

Win 146-54 

Catholic University 

Win 144-63 

University of Richmond 

Loss 88-145 

Goucher College 

Win 143-73 

Johns Hopkins University 

Loss 72-128 
St.Mary's College ofMD 

Win 111-79 

Marymount University 

Win 106-53 

Franklin and Marshall College 

Win 125-79 

Gettysburg College 

Loss 44-171 

Washington and Lee University 

Win 103-94 

CAC Championships 

Win 3rd consecutive title 



*A> 




Photo by: Joe Pi 



Gateways 20T 



\Nt *net\\ %yv**to Tea*n 

This year the MWC Eagles Swim Team had another great 
season; they showed their school spirit and brought the season to a 
spectacular close. They finished the regular season with a fantas- 
tic 6-3 record, having beaten many rival schools in regular season 
meets. The team was headed by Coach Matthew Kinney who was 
awarded the prestigious title of Coach of the Year for his excellent 
leadership of the team. They also bonded and boosted their morale 
outside of meets and practices by having a spaghetti dinner and 
making spirit posters for the CAC conferences. Jessica Green said 
"the team had a lot of team spirit this year, and our outside activi- 
ties were more fun. We had a Christmas in February and ex- 
changed funny gifts and decorated the pool with lights." The team 
was asked to the Franklin and Marshall Invitational, and placed 
fourth out of twelve teams. The Eagle women also swam in the 
Capital Athletic Conference and won the crown for MWC for the 
eighth consecutive season. Sophomore Mariah Butler commented, 
"This season was very successful based in part on a strong fresh- 
man class. Overall, everyone swam faster and pulled together to 
cheer the team on." After the CAC conference Megan Reese, 
Mariah Butler, and Kim Myer went on to compete in the NCAA 
Division III Nationals over Spring Break. A mixture of pride, 
spirit, determination, and skill brought the Eagles the successful 
season they deserved. -Cindy Brock 





Above team photo, front row: Megan Reese, Karyn Havas, Kim Myers, Lindsay Lloyd, Dani\ 
Whichard, Chavis Armstrong. Second row: Natalie Longernan, Lindsey Taggart, Aa 
McDonald, Carolyn Scott, Mariah Butler, Carly Scott. Third row: Jill Kwasney, Caroline Stem 
Dianna Hansen, Melissa Timberlake, Liz Keaney, Jenn Maher. 



208 Sports 




Meet Results 

Salisbury State University 

Win 138-73 

Catholic University 

Win 114-91 

University of Richmond 

Loss 91-134 

Goucher College 

Win 114-73 

Johns Hopkins University 

Loss 87-112 
St. Mary's College ofMD 

Win 116-86 
Marymount University 

Win 108-72 

Frankilin and Marshall 

Win 126-74 

Gettysburg College 

Loss 72-135 
Washington and Lee 

Win 138-60 

CAC Championships 

Win 8th consecutive title 



Top: The team poses for a picture. Left: The swimmers getting ready for a race. Above: 
The crowd supports the team during a home meet. 



Gateways 20*) 



V*eMI 



The Mary Washington College baseball team 
ended the season on a high-note by taking the 
Capital Athletic Conference Championship and 
avenging their earlier loss to York College. This 
was the icing on the cake for a season that included 
twenty-six wins, and only three conference losses. 
The conference championship win was fueled by a 
strong pitching performance by BJ Belcher and 
homeruns from Adam Natysin, Aaron Vradenburgh, 
Tad St. Clair, Eric Guyton, and Chris Kenney. The 
final score against York College was 10-2. At the 
end of the season the Eagles beat Methodist College 
to clinch a spot at Regionals; however, this young 
team was on the bubble, and advanced to the 
Mideast Regionals. Normally MWC is part of the 
South Region but because they were on the bubble, 
they played in the Mideast Region, strengthening 
the competition in a weaker region. This marked 
the sixth appearance of the Eagles at Regionals in 
the past eight years. In the first game, the Eagles 
lost to Wooster 8-2. In the second game the Eagles 
emerged victorious, downing Hope 11-10. Ryan 
Kaye attributed the win to, "some upper and 
middle-classmen who stepped up with big plays. 
Sophomore 3rd basemen 
Jay Monetpare had the 
game winning hit." The 
season ended with a 
disappointing loss to 
Anderson College. By the 
end of the season the 
Eagles had achieved many 
honors. Eric Guyton, 
Adam Natysin, Chris 
Kenney, Aaron 

Vradenburgh, and Kevin 
Losty were named All 
Conference. The team 
looks forward to an even 
more successful season 
next year as it looses only 
two seniors. The team will 
look to returning All- 
Region Players, Eric 
Guyton and Adam Natysin 
for leadership. 

-Chris Cavanaugh 




^MAtt l VVMOI IIIVUl wm - 



AT BAT BALL STRIKE OUT H/E 



I 2 3 A 5 6 7 8 9 10 RUNS HITS ERRORS 



GUEST 
EAGLES 




210 Sports 



Front Row (1-r ): John Rapaglia, Matt Hooker, Tad St. Clair, Ross Brown, Aaron Vradenburgh, Tony Saitta, Bn 
Poole, Brian Sabatelli, Jay Johnston, Ryan Kaye. Middle Row: Coach Tom Sheridan, Matt White, Michs 
Parker, B.J. Belcher, Dan Arias, Kevin Losty, Jeff Sheldon, Adam Natysin, Eric Guyton, Chris Kenney. Ba 
Row: Mike Santay, Ben Perlman, Brendan Eygabroat, Billy Humphries, Steve Hastings, Jay Montepare, Chi 
Crabbe, Jeff Onze, Eric Dorman. 



Left: Matt White waits for the pitch. Below Left: Brian Sabatelli takes a swing. Below Right: Brad Poole sprints to home base. 




Left: Kevin Losty is on the mound. Above: Jeff Sheldon pitches a fast ball. 



Gateways 2 f f 



t6ftb*ll 



The 1998 Women's Softball team, despite a slightly disappointing regular 
season record , still made it to the Capital Athletic Conference 
Tournament. The Eagle's played over thirty-five games in their regular 
season, including a round-robin tournament hosted by MWC; the team 
also took to the road, traveling as far as Orlando, Florida for competition. 
Many of the players on this team used this competition to improve their 
personal records. The team approached their '98 season with 
anticipation; the recently renovated Battleground softball facility 
provided a quality place for games and daily practices. Many of their 
star team members from the 1997 season would be returning. Among 
these were All-State player Sara Goode, who held the team's high batting 
average (.379), runs scored (22), and a multitude of other impressive 
records. Also returning was veteran player Janet Oldis, a versatile player 
who has qualified for All-Conference, playing two different positions. 
When asked about the season, co-captain Janet Oldis said, "We were a 
young team and spent the first part of the season trying to get to know 
each other and learning to work well together and ended on a strong 
note." Also contributing greatly to the teams success was head coach 
Dee Conway, who has been teaching and coaching at MWC for eleven 
years. She is a very effective coach who is especially good at developing 
the individual strengths of the players; she is well liked by the ladies on 
the team. She has led the Eagles to four CAC crowns, and to the NCAA 
Division III tournament. The Women's Softball team also did well in the 
classroom during their season maintaining one of the highest overall 
GPAs of any of the MWC sports teams. In general, the team had a great 
season, had a lot of fun, and made MWC proud. 

-Cindy Broc& 





Above:Melyssa Sheeran 
prepares to catch the 
opponent's ball. 



Bottom row (1-r): Melyssa Sheeran, Melanie Gladden, Beth Messe 
Ashley Beck Stephanie Barnhouse. Top row (1-r): Deborah Zagorii 
Kate Morrison, Janet Oldis, Krissy Kellock, Andy Waterstoi 
Jennifer Adams. 



2f2 Sports 






Scoreboard 




March 




3rd 


Longwood College 


....0-8, 4-6 


5th 


Franklin and Marshall 


...5-4, 1-3 


6-15 


FL Rebel Games 




9th 


William Peterson 


....0-8 


9th 


Ithaca College 


2-7 


10th 


UW-Lacrosse 


....0-13 


10th 


Stimpson College 


....0-11 


11th 


Heidelberg College. 


....0-8 


11th 


Anderson College 


0-1 


24th 


Virginia Wesleyan 


...6-5, 5-2 


25th 


York College of PA 


...7-2,6-5 


28th 


MWC Tourney 




28th 


Bridgewater. 


...2-6 


28th 


College ofNJ. 


...4-11 


28th 


CNU. 


....5-7 


28th 


College ofNJ. 


...1-5 


April 






1st 


Galludet University. 


....6-5,11-0 


3rd 


Catholic University. 


12-3, 11-0 


10th 


Salisbury State U. 


..2-15, 0-7 


15th 


NC Wesleyan Collaege... 


...1-4, 2-3 


18th 


Lynchburg College 


..0-7, 2-11 


22nd 


Christopher Newport..... 


..0-3, 2-11 


25th 


CAC Conference at Salisbury State 



Left: The team huddles to congratulate each 
other on another successful game. 



Left: Coach Dee Conway supports Andrea Waterson after a 
fabulous play. Above: Janet Oldis takes second base. 



Gateways 2 f3 



Men's t*cress e 



The men's team ended the season with a 
close, 11-10 match against St. Mary's College 
of Maryland in the Capital Athletic 
Conference Tournament. The effort was led 
by Senior Attacker Stuart Sears, with a team 
high of three goals. Risto Worthington and 
Ed Scopin each added two goals to the mix 
and were followed by Ryan Lynch, Erik Viilu 
and Matt Rosone who each gave a goal to 
the team effort. It was an exciting match 
with the two teams trading goals 
throughout. At the end of the season 
Worthington accumulated a season long 
team high of 39 points, powering 24 goals 
and 15 assists. Sears was next in the pack 
with 19 goals and 14 assists. And Derrek 
Ostrzyzek ended the season with 101 saves 
over ten games. -Jeremy Brown 



Scoreboard 


MWCvs. 


Opp. 


Virginia Wesleyan 


7-16 


Catholic University 


17-3 


Randolph-Macon 


7-9 


Marymount 


7-13 


Shenandoah 


8-7 


Salisbury State 


3-25 


Washington and Lee 


5-21 


Goucher 


9-7 


Villa Julie 


11-13 


Colorado College 


9-18 


Hampden-Sydney 


7-18 


St. Mary's 


10-11 




2 I t Sports 




mt Row (1-r): Brian Marsh, Grif Barhight, Chris Lanzillotta, Marc Rhatigan, Aaron Shriber, Matt Rosone, Ristro Worthington, Adam 
rson, Rob Reutzel. Middle Row: Head Coach Kurt Glaeser, Andy Suddarth, Joshua Paterni, Stuart Sears, Erik Viilu, John Schmauch, Ed 
lownia, JB Hodgson, Erik Gins, Assistant Coach Brennan. Back Row: Chris Vibert, Derek Ostrzyzek, Jacob Norrgard, Justin Camarda, 
rrit Visscher, Jeremy Benjamin- Young, Ryan Lynch, Ed Scopin, Ted Bratrud. 



Gateways 2 fS 



\Ne ^ en's L<*cre$s e 



This Mary Washington team ended their Conference 
hopes this season in the semi-finals with an 8-6 loss to 
Goucher College. But, this says nothing of the strong 
performances from the team all season long, achieving 
an overall record of 7-7 and a 3-2 record in the Capital 
Athletic Conference. The scoring effort against Goucher 
was led by Diane Grimm with two goals, and followed 
by Lauren Nichols, Melissa Ballance, Whitney Ziskal, 
and Jenny Fox each with one goal. Other outstanding 
performances came from netminder Jen Williams, who 
had twelve saves. During the season Sara Anderson 
was able to accumulate 28 goals with 25 assists; she 
was named to the All-Region Team. Jen Williams 
topped the team with 106 saves over seven games. 
Melissa Ballance, a captain, was named Ail-American 
as a defender. Ballance led the team in goals this year, 
with thirty, and she picked up eleven assists. She was 
also named to the All-Conference Team along with fellow 
teammates Sara Anderson and Aimee Seward. 

-Jeremy Brown 





Front Row (1-r): Melissa Ballance, Aimee Seward, Alexis Kingham, Whitney Ziskal. Middle Row: Coach Dai 
Hall, Sara Andersen, Melanie Hayes, Diane Grimm, Courtney Gelardi, Alexandra Racanelli, Kathryn Weller, Jenni» 
Foy, Lauren Nichols, Alison Hamilton. Back Row: Jennifer Williams, Susan Rodenkranz, Bridget Geiman, Tii 
Novitski, Kelli Brittain, Karen Slotsky, Janet Emery, Thank Do, Allyson Briston, Beth Schmidt. 



2 1 6 Sports 




Clockwise from left: Melissa Ballance is about to take the ball and run; Alexis Kingham runs from the opposition; 
Sara Anderson moves the ball down the field. 







1 

/ 


' 


i 


/ w 

^ J '"S3 


5 




fe. 


• 

H 






V 


"..■ - 


\ 1 


:^m) 


4/ .['■'' <■''■■ 


1 


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1* 






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. . .._. - ■ 1 



Scoreboard 




MWCvs.Opp 


Longwood 


13-7 


Montclair State 


23-4 


Roanoke 


12-13 


Marymount 


17-3 


Lynchburg 


11-9 


Washington & Lee 7-13 


Goucher 


12-13 


New Jersey Coll. 


7-16 


Randolph-Macon 


11-12 


Kean 


15-9 


Rowan 


12-14 


Salisbury 


11-9 


St. Mary's 


9-8 


Goucher 


6-8 



Gateways 2 ft 



M 



en $ Tennis 



The Mary Washington College Men's team ended their season 
by placing second in the Capital Athletic Conference 
Tournament held at Salisbury State University. Jay Nelson 
rose from number four in the rankings to number two in the 
singles championship. The team swept second through fourth 
singles in the tournament with smart play from Nelson, David 
Bristow, and Jason Vickers. The team took second place only 
after a 6-1 defeat Salisbury State handed to them. At the 
conclusion of the tournament Tim Martin was named 
Conference Player of the Year. 

~ Jeremey Brown 









Scoreboard Mwc 


vs. Opp. 






Virginia Military Institute 


2-5 


Washington and Lee 


2-5 


Hampden-Sydney 


4-3 


Methodist College 


2-5 


Goucher 


4-3 


Bethany 


7-0 


Kenyan College 


1-6 


Christopher Newport 


3-4 


Gettysburg 


3-4 


Vassar 


3-4 


Catholic University 


6-1 


St. Mary's 


4-3 


Bluefield 


7-0 


Mount St. Mary's 


4-3 






Virginia Wesleyan 


5-2 


Salisbury 


1-6 







218 Sports 



Clockwise from left: Jason Vickers takes a half-volley; Team photo: Chris moves to hit an approach shot; Tim 
Martin hits a groundstroke. 




Gateways 2 f*) 



V/e^eri's Tennis 

The Mary Washington Women's Tennis team 
completed another successful season as shown by 
their top seed at the Capital Athletic Conference 
Championship. Salisbury State hosted this 
tournament, where the Eagles worked hard to 
maintain their top positions for the duration of the 
tournament. They swept all nine flights on their way 
to the CAC Tournament win. Individually they swept 
positions from first through fifth singles with wins 
from, Leo Schon, Jyoti Schlesinger, Sarah Chase, 
Leah Morris, and Kelly Gallagher. On the doubles 
side, Chase and Morris emerged victorious at first 
doubles, while Schlesinger and Schon won second 
doubles. Kelly Gallagher and Emily Sutliff completed 
the sweep, downing their opponents at third doubles. 
The team ended regular season play with a 3-0 
Conference Record and an overall record of 10-7. Lea 
Schon advanced to the NCAA National Tournament, 
hosted by Washington and Lee University. Schon lost 
in the 1st round to the #2 seed from Skidmore College. 
Morris and Chase also advanced to the National 
Tournament, for doubles. The duo won there first 
match before loosing to Skidmore College in the 
second round. With the top six players returning next 
season, this team will be looking to fly to new heights. 




220 Sports 




$cerebe*r<J 


MWC vs. Opp. 


Methodist College 


8-1 


Kenyon College 


2-7 


UNC- Wilmington 


2-7 


Emory University 


2-7 


Howard University 


9-0 


Washington and Lee 


0-9 


Colgate University 


7-2 


Salisbury State 


9-0 


Washington College 


9-0 


Georgetown 


2-5 


Mount St. Mary's 


7-2 


Sweet Briar College 


9-0 




Clockwise from top left opposite 
page: Ann Taylor takes a serve; 
Kirsten Erickson hits from the 
baseline; Team Photo (L-R) front 
row: Leah Morris, Jyoti 
Schlesinger, Emily Sutliff, Lea 
Schon. Back Row: Emily, Kelly 
Gallagher, Coach Hegmann, 
Sarah Chase, Ann Taylor; Sarah 
Chase takes a volley; Watch out, 
Leah Morris is approaching the 
net. 



Gateways 22 f 



Men's Tr**K *nj Tie|J 

Finishing second in the Capital Athletic Conference by a mere margin 
of two points, the track and field team was one to be reckoned with. 
The team had successful indoor and outdoor seasons, competing in 
eight regular season meets. 

Coach Stan Soper's young middle distance and distance runners 
were dominant in the CAC. At the championship meet, 1997 800 meter 
champion, Brien Roberts captured the win again with a time of 1:58.8. 
Derek Coryell crushed a strong field in the 1500 meter run. New 
addition Jason Van Horn earned the Rookie of the Year award after 
winning both the 3000 meter steeplechase and the 5000 meter run. In 
the 1600 meter relay Coryell, Roberts, Mike Merker, and Justin Scheier 
beat rival Salisbury for the win in a breathtaking sprint to the finish. 

The jumping squad, led by coach Skeeter Jackson, had a banner 
year and jumped beyond their ability at the CAC championship. 
Already famous for overcoming injuries, senior co-captain and Scholar 
Athlete Award winner, Derek Amos cleared 6'6" in the high jump despite 
a sprained ankle. Multi-talented Jon Snelson jumped to a second 
place finish in the triple jump, and third in the long jump. 

Also led by coach Jackson, the sprinters were young and few in 
number. Snelson contributed with a second place finish in the 110 
hurdles. Freshman Terrance Blount gave promise to the young team, 
including a win in the 55 meter dash at the Dickinson Invitational. 
Due to injury, Terrance was unable to score points at the CAC meet. 

The weight team, coached by Nick Nickols, included only two 
members, juniors Tom Swigart and Mike Privett. Despite this lack of 
depth, the two unleashed their abilities all year. At the CAC meet, 
Swigart who dominated the shot put and hammer throw threw for 
first and second respectively. Privett beat the field in the discuss with 
a monster throw of 149' and took third in the javelin. 

With the last race concluded, the last weight thrown, and the 
last bar cleared; the track is silent once again. To a member of this 
track and field team, however, the sounds are still heard. The pep 
talks, the starting guns, the cheers, and head coach Stan Soper's speech 
at the conclusion of the CAC meet. "Don't hang your heads. This was 
the best meet I've ever seen. You guys ran your hearts out!" 

-Matt Kauppi 

Top Right: 

Push harder! 

The track team 

was plagued by 

stuck buses. 

Middle Right: 

Brien Roberts 

beats the 

competition in 

the 800 meter. 




Alt Phohu By: Ch 




Front Row (\-ry. Team Captains, Derek Amos, Mike D'Ostilio, Tom Swigart. Middle Row (1-r): Marty Martonik, Matt Kauppi, Alex Addison, Andy Ivi 
Terrence Blount. Back Row 0-rt: Assistant Coach Nichols, Assistant Coach Jackson, Justin Scheier, Jonathan Snelson, Mike Merker, Mike Privetj 
Greg Griven, John Greven, John Rack, Jason Van Horn, Jim Dlugasch, Jon Thompson, Brien Roberts, Derek Coryell, Head Coach Soper, Rob McCroO 



222 Sports. 



[ike D'Ostilio waits for the sound of the gun to start the 400 Meter race. Jas , on Van Horn checks his watch durin S the steeplechase 

making sure that his time will take first. 




Far Left: Derek Amos take first place in the high jump at 
CAC's. Above: Seniors get together for one last laugh. Derek 
Amos, John Greven, Mike D'Ostilio, and Matt Kauppi hold 
Katy Sullivan. 



Gateways 2.2.3 



Wren's TY*cK *nj Ti«W-^C C+«Mp$ 

The Eagles had another successful season, packed with fast races, long jumps, and far throws. New school 

records were set all season long by these talented athletes. 

The indoor season was filled with strong performances at 

the Franklin and Marshall Meet and a first place team finish 

at the Swarthniore Invitational Meet. The indoor season 

ended with a second place finish at the Mason-Dixon 

Conference Meet. Katrin Banks was the first athlete of the 

season to break a school record, with a throw of 37'9.5" in 

the 201b. weight throw. 

The tone of the outdoor season was set by the team's 
first place finish at the Roanoke Invitational Meet. The 
distance runners ran strong, taking the first five places in 
the 3,000 meter run; Jaime Donaruma won the race with a 
time of 11:16.42. MWC hosted the next meet, The 
Battleground Relays. Many fans came out in support of 
the Eagles and watched as two more school records fell. 
Katrin Banks set a new record with her hammer throw of 
124'3". Yurissa Mitchell broke the MWC record in the triple 
jump, qualifying for the NCAA Nationals with a jump of 
39'5". The next weekend the Eagles competed at the Duke 
Invitational Meet. Most of the Eagle athletes competed in 
the developmental sections in the morning, and watched in 
the afternoon as many of their heros, Olympians, raced. The 
next weekend, the Eagles traveled to Lynchburg; where, 
Trina Smith broke the school record in the 200 meter at 
26.01 seconds. Katrin Banks broke another school record, 
this time in the shotput, with a throw of 39'1". Yurissa 
Mitchell was named Athlete of the Meet due to her many 
strong performances. 

The season ended with the Eagles winning the Capital 
Athletic Conference Championship Meet; although, this was 
no surprise because the Eagles have never lost a CAC. Kim 
Alvis was named athlete of the year; she had first place 
finishes in the 400m, long jump, and 400 meter relay, with 
a second place finish in the triple jump and a third place 
finish in the high jump. The great depth of the team, as 
shown by many strong performances, helped the Eagles 
emerge victorious again as they continue to fly around the 
track and through the air. -Chris Cavanaugh 

This page clockwise from top: Team 
Captain Katy Sullivan edges out her 
opponent in the mile relay; Meredith 
Leson and Teresa Joerger head for top 
finishes in the 5000m; Yurissa Mitchell's 
long jump. At the Battlefield Meet she 
broke the school record with a jump of 
39'5", qualifiying for the Division 3 
Nationals. Far page: bottom left, Kim 
Alvis competes in the high jump. Her 
strong perfomance in this and four other 
events earned her the CAC Athlete of the 
Year award. Bottom right, CAC Coach of 
the year, Soper works the field. 




22? Sports 



Photo By: Chris Cavanaugh 



Photo By:Chris Cavanaugh 



slow: Front row (1-r): Team Captains, Katy Sullivan, Jennifer Fields, Katrin Banks. Middle row: Christina Charba, Meredith Leson, Teresa 
erger, Chris Cavanaugh, Jaimie Donaruma, Erin Murray, Jamie Smith, Susanne Eymer. Back row: Assistant Coach Nichols, Danielle 
atuch, Assistant Coach Jackson, Kristin Neviackas, Jessica Johnson, Kim Alvis, Marga Fischel, Natalie Alexander, Trina Smith, Michelle 
;lly, Yurissa Mitchell, Beth Whitty, Jill McDonald, Kristine Reid, Head Coach Soper. Missing (Sunny Cleamons, Brittney Mongold). 




to By: Chris Cavanaugh 



Gataoiacfs 22S 



M 



en 



\ "R^by 



Men's Rugby started the fall season slow, but eventually 
warmed to the occasion. They earned a second place seed in the Ed 
Lee Cup, where they downed William & Mary only to lose to James 
Madison University. 

What stands out most about the season is the high level of 
player's commitment. While the beginning of the season proved 
disappointing, teammates pulled together: changing the team for 
the better, electing new officers, intensifying their conditioning 
program and renewing their commitment to do what it takes to 
win. Look for this team to make a triumphant return to form in the 
'98 seasons. 



Right: .Man- 
Washington team 
huddle. Bottom 
right: fun in Ball 
Circle. 
Bottom left: 
pushing past 
opposing team. 













■*+ 



22G Sports 




\Ne** en's T^g by 



The women's rugby team had a rough season. To start with 
they had a really young squad, then many of their games were 
canceled due to inclement weather. This resulted in a 2-2 season 
with a second place finish at the Sorenson Cup, and a ninth place 
finish at the University of Virginia Invitational. What their record 
doesn't show is that the MWC team was the only team in their 
conference to score on the UVA team. 

The season may also start a little rough next semester, as 
the team is graduating six seniors. However, Marci Sumner is 
optimistic on the teams chances, "Our new officers have a lot of 
ideas on how to improve the team, and increase team spirit. I'm 
really looking forward to next season, I think with some experience 
we'll do well." The team is likely to get that experience with a 
calender filled with games. 





Top center: An MWC 
player makes the mid 
air catch. Above: The 
two teams huddle. Left: 
A Mary Washington 
player out manuevers 
the opposing team. 



Gateways 22T 



Tenting ^\nb 



According to James Schoonmaker, President of the Mary Washington 
College Fencing Club, "This year has been something of a Renaisance for 
the club. We gained three coaches and hosted a tournament, The Mary 
Washington College Pheonix Tournament. We picked this name because 
as a club we are literally rising from our own ashes this year." This 
statement was then backed up by Diane Fergusan, co-chair of the Virginia 
Division of the USFA, "Mary Washington is definitely back on the map in 
Virginia Fencing." 

In addition to hosting the Tournament as their big fund raiser for 
the year the club was also able to sponsor several fencers in their 
tournament. They are hoping to send even more fencers to a non-electric 
tournament in the spring. As part of the their growth the club was able to 
purchase electric equipment so that they could send fencers to tournaments. 

~ Jeremy Brown 



Top: Line of fencers awaiting instructions from coach Norm 
Hecht (not pictured). Right: President James Schoonmaker 
and Vice-President Becky Flynn battle for supremacy. 




Phil,' by: Ktrri Pain 



228 Sports 




M *rt»*l Axis c l*b 



The martial arts club, like in previous years, learned a variety of 
martial arts styles from all over the world. Among the styles were Bando, 
Wu Chun Su Kung Fu, Shotokan, and Tae Kwon Do. The instructors were a 
combination of both current and former students. 

Sophomore Jenny Burger said, "It was a fun way to stay in shape." 
Sophomore Stephanie Brown was not only a member of the club, but also 
taught Tae Kwon Do with Matt Hunsinger. She agreed with Jenny and 
added that this year the club was going through a lot of changes and that 
they were looking forward to building the club up more next year. She also 
said she liked the club because "I got to train while in college and meet a lot 
of people." 

The Northern Virginia native went on to say that she enjoyed, "Showing 
people that they can do these things, its not that difficult if you practice and 
have a little dedication." One of the other good things about the club was 
that it got together outside of the instructional setting "to have fun and goof 
off" according to Stephanie. 

-Jeremy Brown 




■ 1 H 



Upper left: Wu Shu kungfu instructor John Wilson concentrates while 
executing a form. Above: Stephanie Brown and Matt Hunsinger practice 
grappling. Left: The club s kung fu practitioners practice their forms. 



*li*»«*» H... 



Gateways 22*) 



~fliJin$ Te*tn *n<l fie E^e^frian C\nb I 



The MWC Eagles Riding team, led by coach and 
trainer Becky Dye, had another successful season in 
the 97-98 school year. The discipline and spirit 
displayed by the team contributed greatly to their 
success in the shows. A precision sport like horseback 
riding requires skill, concentration, and devotion, 
traits that all of the riders on this year's team 
displayed. The riding team placed in the top five out 
of fourteen at the end of the season, and ten of their 
riders made it to Regionals. Four members qualified 
to participate in Zones, just one step below Nationals. 
The National competition took place on the weekend 
of April 11th. The Equestrian Club is made up of 
many of the same members as the riding team, some 
of whom have their own horses boarded at Bradford 
Stables, the home base of MWC's Riding team. 



Riding Team photo (1-r ): Front row: Valerie Wunder, Kim Klosek. 
2nd row: Sheila Elledge, Jackie Falkowski, Teresa Bettis, Jenna 
Cassidy. 3rd Row: Elizabeth McKeeby, Branden Locke, Morgan 
White. 4th row: Amy Ryder, Lauren Rizzi, Melissa Finke, Ellyn 
Bannister. Not shown: Robyn Allizeo, Joanna Moore, Joanna 
Riedel, Katie Breese.. 




Sept. 28th- College of William and Mary. 6th 

Oct. 5th- University of Richmond 7th 

12th- University of Maryland 6th 

Nov. 2nd- Goucher College 4th 

22nd- Randolph Macon 10th 

Feb. 15th- MWC show at Bradford Stables.. .4th 
April 4th- Regionals at Sweetbriar. 5th 




Photos- Left: Jenna Cassidy and Sheila Elledge at Bradford Stables. 
Above: Ellyn Bannister, Lauren Rizzi, Valerie Wunder, and Liz McKeeby 
having a good time. 



230 Sports 



M\VC M£ n \ an«j \A/e^en \ Cyeiv Tea** 



Front Row (1-r): Anne B., Ben B., PatriciaV., Sara 
H., Stacey L. Second Row: Jayme H., Alysia M., 
Patty D., Mandi S., Asheley P., Jessica J., Kelly 
H. Third Row: Mary D., Michelle C, Renea D., 
Tara H., Jason E., Brian S., Claire R., Mike D., 
Erin D., Keith B., Gary W. Back Row: Maura K, 
Heather C, Scott C, Travis H., Sean O., Mike B., 
Joe P., Paul B., Peter S., Julie H.P 




Gateways 23 f 






The Terrapins worked hard for their many successes 
during the '98 season. They began training in the Fall Semester 
for a season that officially started in January. During the season 
they competed against both club and varsity teams. 

Their hard work paid off when the team sent a number of 
people to nationals in April; they competed against teams from 
University of Michigan, Stanford, University of California at 
Berkeley, and William and Mary. Competition at nationals 
included figures and routines, which are done with music. Nicole 
Mathews placed 13th in the Individual and Joy Conoscenti also 
turned in a stellar performance. The team looks forward to next 
season, where they hope to build upon the success of this season. 



Right: Kelly Morgan, Maylian Pak, and Joy Conoscenti. Bottom: Elana Pressman, M. 
Gaby Dyke, amd Kristin Buck do an egg beater. 





232 Sports 




Left, team photo: front to back - Nicki Mathews, Kedron Bullock, Ellen Perry, Kristy Buck, 
Sarah Fauerbach, Kelly Morgan, Maylian Pak, Tiffany Patrick, and Coach Amy Simonsen. 
Not pictured: Gaby Pyk, Joy Conoscenti, Elana Pressman; Above (1-r): Tiffany Patrick, 
Sarah Faurbach, and Ellen Perry; Top Right: Ellen Perry, Sarah Faurbach, and Tiffany 
Patrick do a ballet leg. 



Gateways 233 




Tired of spending your 
money on banking fees? 

You could save $200 a year by using 
a credit union instead of a bank*. 

Virginia Credit Union is owned by its members, not outside stockholders. As a member, you 
usually have fewer fees, pay less for loans and earn more on your savings than you would 
elsewhere. You'll enjoy unlimited free checking and get more personal attention. We've even 
got a branch and ATM on campus. It's your credit union. Why go anywhere else? 



/ Worldwide account access through 
ATMS <& other automated services 



/ Lifetime membership 

(just keep your accounts active and 
in good standing) 



NCUA 



LT/t3Ts -VIRGINIA 

I .*:Vi'i CREDIT UNION, INC. 

MWC students, employees and their 
families are eligible to join. 

* 1997 Credit Union Fees Survey Report, Credit Union National Association, Inc. 



Experience the credit union difference. 

Stop by the MWC branch or call 654-1 002 

Member Services 1 -800-285-6609 or804-323-6800 
www.vacu.org 



BJ's Wholesale Club 

ONE DAY SHOPPING PASS 



TO ACTIVATE BRING THIS 
pass; TO MEMBERSHIP DESK 





VAWt-VM ■?.;:-.- 



jkJ rm guesli. fWias* a listed wnol«o!e orites PIUS 
, fiiA, Disaver = Card, or MmlerCofO wiry. No diecxi. 



Fredericksburg, VA 

3985 Plank Rd.,(Rte.3 West) 
Located one mile west of the 
Spotsylvania Mali Route 95, 
Exit 1 30 at the intersection of 
Plank Rd. & Heatherstone Rd. 

Mon-Sat 9:00 am - 9:00 pm 
Sunday 10:00 am - 6:00 pm 



Original watercolors 
Dried & silk arrangements 
Wreaths 



Herbs & gifts 



Parsley, Pots and Posies 

612 Caroline Street 

Fredericksburg, VA 22401 

540/899-2036 



Artist-in-Residence 
Owner. Becky A. Toney 




Open Daily 
10-5 



23V Sports 



Virginia Credit Union 

"Students Serving MWC and the Community" 




Virginia Credit Union (VACU) is here 
on campus making banking easier for 
you! At Virginia Credit Union's non- 
cash branch in the Woodard Campus 
Center, you can apply for services, 
balance your accounts, ask account 
questions and more. At the ATM mem- 
bers can get cash, make deposits by cash 
or check, transfer between accounts, and 
even make loan payments. 

Hard work and commitment from the 
branch staff has paid off. VACU has 
obtained the support of over 41 % of the 
MWC student body and of many college 
employees. This is an impressive under- 
taking since the campus branch has only 
been open for two years ! 




Top Row (L-R): Matt Cook, Brian Kubin, Brian Graziano, James Tsantes, Joe Thompkins. 
Bottom Row(L-R): Sarah Geiger, Shannon Blevins, Julie Garner. 

Nobody knows how to serve the MWC comminity better than its students! 

Virginia Credit Union is represented by branch employees and an advisory 

board who work together to provide quality services and valuable educational 

opportunities. 

Virginia Credit Union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. 



Membership Benefits 

Free unlimited checking 

Free ATM transactions at 
VACU ATMs 

Low rate credit cards 
and loans 

Convenience of a branch 
and ATM on campus 

Worldwide account 
access through automated 
and other services 

Lifetime membership 



for av\P*^ c \ 

ere* y &ar - 



***** >£tei **>' 



^Virginia 



Credit Union 




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236 Sports 




Gateways 23T 



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The staff enjoys a meal outside of the office. Front Row (l-r): Courtney Kowalchick, Kerri Pakurar, Andrea Chermela, Amanda Goebel, Steph 
Hand. Back Row (l-r): Kevin MacLuskie, Jen Fink, Joe Pittman, Chris Cavanaugh. 



238 Sports 



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As I write this letter I realize that yes, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. I am about to finish the 
very last spread, in this so appropriately named Battlefield. Did the founding editors realize what a struggle it 
would be to put out a yearbook? They must have because it is so hard to sum up a year in the life of Mary 
Washington College in just 240 pages. When Steph and I took this position we knew it would be tough, but we 
had no idea what we were in for. Fall semester was rocky to say the least due to many contractual changes that 
included a new publishing company, a new photo developing company, a new photography company, and a new 
computer with a mind of its own. After our trip to Chicago, for a yearbook convention, Steph and I realized that 



we , like the Blues Brothers, "Were 
Mission was to save the yearbook, 
the year before. Remembering the 
look back on what is probably the 
lives. This accomplishment would 
help of our staff and a few great 
shared a special mission with 
Chicago without having any 
Steph and I in the realization that 
A.M. Both you and Amanda gave 
always coming through at 
spreads. Your perseverance is the 
clubs represented in this 
senior environmentals . I'll never 
that you, Joe and Peyton had 
environmentals. The three of you 
was often hard to choose which 
computer savior. I do not know 
your endless help. You truly stuck 
pictures. What could be more 
the middle of the summer? 
patience with your tedious task, 
spreads happen, even taking 




on A Mission From God." Our 
that Kelly Engel had resurrected 
237 pages that are before this, I 
biggest accomplishment of our 
not have been possible without the 
section editors. Amanda- you 
Steph and I, surviving our trip to 
cabbies kill us. Andrea-You join 
the best captions are made after 1 
new meaning to the word awesome, 
deadlines, often with extra 
reason why we have so many more 
yearbook. Kerri- you saved the 
forget that day when you told us 
talked and wanted to take the 
gave us so many great pictures, it 
ones to use in the book. Kevin-the 
where we would have been without 
it out to the end to finish the I.D. 
exciting than the yearbook office in 
Courtney-thank you for all your 
Jen-you did a great job making 
pictures yourself. Jeremy- Can I 



have just one more fry? I think we'll remember you best for fitting the most copy in a spread ever. Our staff- 
you guys helped out in so many ways. There are many other people to thank for their contributions to this 
colossal project. Thank you Cedric for all of your help, especially with obtaining the I.D. pictures. Lori Turner, 
thanks for putting up with all of our film processing headaches. To everyone at Computer Network Services, 
thank-you for your work on the student I.D. pictures. One last thank-you, to everyone who helped with articles 
and contributed pictures. 

Beth and Katy, my housemates, thanks for listening to countless 
hours of yearbook jargon, from someone who was "possessed" 
by the yearbook around deadlines. Dad- thank you for always 
being there, answering the phone at 3:00 a.m. during a deadline 
to convince me that I really shouldn't rip all my hair out. Thank- 
you for listening and helping me put problems in perspective, it 
is only just a book. Matt, how many times did I call you to come 
down to the office and bring a picture or your I.D. so that I could 
eat, thanks for always coming. Thank-you for understanding 
and supporting me when I was a complete stress ball. Finally, 
thanxs to my friends for putting up with countless yearbook 
comments. 



Andrea-thanks for never loosing your 
enthusiasm and for coming down and rescuing 
me on those late nights when I have nothing 
to say. Shoshana-thank-you for helping me 
keep a sense of humor about the book. Mom 
and Dad- thanks for all your great yearbook 
ideas. 



Tig sin 



Gateways 23*) 



2 V Sports