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Full text of "Battlefield, 2002"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/battlefield200289univ 




2002 BATTLEFIELD 

'Mary Wt75/init]tt"'ii CoilcLje 

1S.01 College 'Avenue 
'Trecierickshw-g, \"A 22401 



Opening it 1 



2001-2002 







2 -IT Opening 




2002 'Battiefieid 

'^likiV in Chief 
Ryan E. Burleigh 

'Pfiotoaraph y 'Zditcr 
Dana M. Boehmcke 

Stxtion ■Zditivs 

Brooke Carter 

Lauren Elezko 

Kelly Koniowsky 

Mary Rothlisberger 

Megan Rouse 

Rebecca Sellers 

Kendra Stolzenbach 

'P/itirLitjrnp/it-r.s 

K.atie Delaney 

Amy Hawthorne 

Aaron Kota 

Andrea Lovelette 

Asha Merzada 

Tyler Vose 

Alana West 



Opening J' 




embodies a perspective; a new way of 
looking at the world and its ever-changing 
elements. It attempts to capture the essence 
of our college community and its place in a 
nation that both harbors and protects us. 
'Elevations allow people to have a better 
view - to see beyond the obvious and 
discover the unknown. 'Elevations can 
describe an endless airay of tangible and 

non-tangible ideas efevatecf 

't'JiO'lig'H'tS, efevatecf'K'I^OWLE'DgE, 
cfevated'f'R'U'f'US, efevatecf VIEWS, 
efevatedEXTEC'f'A'f'lOI^S, efevatecf 
'ROLES, efevated'TT^rE'jfSirr, efevatecf 
'P'R'1'DE....an efevatecf worCcfthat offers endless opportunities to keep rising. The more 
challenging the task, the more elevated we become with success. Too often we consume 
ourselves with the self-gratification of a job well-done, failing to recognize the beauty and 
fresh perspectives that accompany any accomplishment. It's the experiences that matter, and 
the insight we gain as a result, efevatincj our minds to lead better lives and encouraging others 
to do the same. 



4 IT Openinc 



r ■ 




-'■tiiiient litc 



M ^^ 








Opening li 



CEievation 




6 -IT opening 



T^fie Worfcf'Arouncfll! 



Discovering the history and beauty of the 
area, students broadened their horizons 

and made iuStiUQ 
impressions m the sun-ounding 

community. The proximity of 

Fredericksburg to big cities, mountain 

skyhnes and even sandy shores left 

endless possibilities for activity and 

exploration. Local events welcomed 

students into their realms, while campus 

events often encouraged community 

involvement, as well. 




rl4f) 




Students filled the downtown shops and local restaurants, 

and gave new II JC to the historic town. 

In return, the battlefields and other historic grounds 

added character to the city and offered students 

the opportunity to leam and eXVeHenCe more outside 

the campus boundaries. 

COAR and many of the religious organizations on campus 

worked directly with the outside community, 
StTlVl71Cj for the same goals and experiencing success 

together. Sporting events, music concerts 

and festivals also remained popular events that continued 

to draw in the outside COTntnUnitlf. 



Openinc 



Hevation 




(! 8 IT Opening 



t1t6 Community Tlmong Vis 



Multitudes of flower beds and 

blossoming trees dCCOTdtcd the 

campus in the early spring. Grassy 

lawns filled with pick-up games of 

ultimate frisbee or football, while 

spectators lingered in the sun. Shadows 

both hid and reVealeU markmgs 

from the year's events. 



1 


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Soon, the ever-changing grounds would undergo more modifications to accomodate the 

CjTOWlJlCj community. These plans included the constmction of a new tennis center to the 

Battlefield Athletic Complex, a new fitness center at the opposite end of campus and the 

rennovation of Combs Hall. 



Students met the changes with OVCH 

771171(2 S. They knew most of the rennovations 

and additions existed for their own benefit. Other 

changes also required 

some fomi of adjustment, like class registration 

handled on-line, a new entry system for all 

residence halls and modifications to 

academic department requirements. While not all 

of the CiXUHCjCS worked easily into students' 

routines, over time the adjustments proved 

neccessai7 and well worth the small burden. 




Dening -i-i 9 



Elevation 




10 it Opening 



T'ke Tersonaiities T'dat T>efine lis 



2 ! 




Activities and social events helped add SVlTlt to the overall 

atmosphere and gave students something to look forward to 

when the weekend arrived. Places around campus provided 

entCTtUhWient ox group gatherings throughout the 

week as well, including movie nights in the dining halls, 

festivals such as Apple Fest and Devil Goat Day in the 

afternoons and musical pcrfonnances in the Underground or 

Great Hall at night. 



The spirit rock added a new activity to the list of events, 

as students painted and repainted greetings and messages to one another 

throughout the year. 

The campus also hosted Til TTlilli^r favorites, like the Lip Sync 

competition and the infamous battle for the title of Mr. MWC. 

Such events always drew crowds and gave students a break from the 

monotony of class schedules. 





Belonging to a sports team or setting aside 
time each day for friends also helped 

students maintain healthy, active lifestyles. 
Students needed to remain focused on 
academic courses, but could never be 

comvfetefy fiom^i/ without a 

balance of work and social time in their 
lives. 



Opening i': M 



"Elevation 




12 it Opening 



'Aff'tHat T.xists Witfiin 1h 










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More than earning a degree or making new 

friends or maintaining an active social life, 

college existed to help students d\SCOVCT 

the tmth within themselves and to choose a 

desired direction in life. 



The paths students crossed influenced their lives in one way or 

another, but ultimately the discovery 

and rewards oiSelj-deHnition existed within 

themselves. 

Time alone and time with others allowed room for retlection. 

A college atmosphere allowed room for dwCTSitXj and 

new ideas. Students expressed themselves freely 

and flushed out their tme feelings. 





Never before had students suiTOunded 

themseh es with so many different people. For 

those moments, the real world penetrated the 

campus's boundaries and intlucnced the lives of 

all those who kept 

oven minds. 



OJ)i 



Opening J.T 13 



Elevation 




14 it Opening | 



"ffie Experiences Ttiat ^fevate lis 



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1 Opening it 15 




16 Organizations 




STUDENT LIFE 



JLlCVUtCU spirits filled the campus in late August, as students aiTived rested and 
ready to begin a new year. Activities and social lives took precedence for many as they 
caught up with old friends, hit the fields to begin another season of athletics or made 
plans for various club and organizational events. Students" busy schedules soon added, ' 
an elevated ?>Qn?,Q of responsibility to their lives. For most, this neiCjnteUed 
stress levels, but also offered increasing fulfillment to their college years. Fall brought 
excitement to the campus with Homecoming and the unveiling of the Spirit Rock. 
Students instantly TOSe to the occasion and used the Spirit Rock as a daily message 
board throughout the year. The tragic events of September 1 1 th united the campus in 
a whirlwind of emotions, from grief and sorrow to compassion and hope, as groups of 
students used teamwork to uOOSt spirits and provide all of the help possible to a 
shaken nation. Winter and spring brought just as many changes, as well as the comfort 
of familiar events. As wamith crept over the campus grounds, the Multicultural Fair 
and Devil Goat Day made their annual appearances and students prepared to head off 
to exotic locations for a relaxing spring break. Those who found themselves at home, 
still used the week-long break as a chance to escape the daily rituals of academic life 
and up lift their spirits. After returning from sun and fun, exams brought added 



tension and stress all too soon. When books and pens finally disappeared from desk- 
tops and students slowly disappeared from the grounds for the summer, a beautiful 
graduation day dawned and culminated a year full of events and life memories. 



Divider 



^-^M 1 1 i\ 



Balloons tlew high. Students past and present gathered to catch up on old times and plan the 
day's events. School spirit rose to new levels and an abundance of smiles and excitement defmed the 
atmosphere. Homecoming 2002 had aiTi\ed. The vseekend's events drew in alumni from all over the 
country and also involved the local community in the non-stop festivities. Cun'ent students and fac- 
ulty looked forward to the e\ents. gi\ ing them an excuse to escape books and stress for a few days. 

The homecoming parade made its debut and instantly became a favorite among all attendees. 
It also helped attract a very diverse group of both college and community members to the activities. 
Everyone from local ser\'ice organizations to campus clubs and athletic teams decorated floats with 
different themes. With the recent tragic e\ents of September llth. patriotism surfaced in themes 
throughout the parade and gave many an extra incentive to march on. A panel of city council members 
judged the dozen or so entries and awarded monetary prizes for first, second and third prizes. No 
matter the degree of participation, those who attended the parade left with heightened spirits and the 
motivation to caiTV those spirits throughout the rest of the weekend. The spirit committee remained 
satisfied with the turn-out for the parade and hoped it would become an annual tradition in the years 
ahead. 



\( 




decs ihcir hcsi to impress bolh the 
crowd.md the judges. The team per- 
formed durmg the parade and pau.sed 
for a moment before the judges, giv- 
ing their best shot to land the $2.'i0 
first place pri/.e. 



\Incn II. ill hc-in tllc parade lull of 
ciicrg\ P.irlicipants in the parade not 
only competed for prize money, but 
also did their best to encourage spirit 
among bystanders. 



Student Life | 



^^^^^^^Qmembers of the cross 
couiili\ Icam hang out before the 
parade. Many athletic teams could 
not participate in the event, due to 
practices or games scheduled on the 
same day 




kids from the lo- 
cal community ride along with the 
parade in a trolley car. Parade par- 
ticipants included member.^ from 
both inside and outside the college's 
boundaries. 



Homecoming 19 




jmA'Fm^oo^miWE 



J I "^ 



Activity swamicd on Bail Circle. Tlie competitive spirit in tlie volleyball games grew more intense, as shrieks and shouts 
of encouragment reverberated from the pie-eating contest. Homecoming had officially kicked-off and students aiTived at the 
annual picnic ready to celebrate. The aroma of hotdogs grilling in the sun drew many students, while others showed up for the 
activities and a chance to unwind from a day full of classes. Students also had the oppoitunity to paint their very own spirit rock, 
a smaller version of the newest addition to campus. 

For many, the picnic marked the beginning of an exciting weekend. Many had plans to attend the parade and hoped to 
catch as many of the athletic games as possible. The fireworks returned again this year as well, bigger and better than ever. Giant 
introduced a concert before the event, adding music to the festivities. The fireworks themselves cost the SGA and Honor Council 
an extra SI, 000 and the organizations anticipated more than 2,000 additional spectators at the event. School spirit reached new 
levels throughout the weekend and gave many hope that the excitement would continue to grow year after year. 



20 Student Life [ 



ihc pixigicsMon of ihc the pie-eating 
competition and feel their stomachs 
turn with each bite. The competition 
only worked for those with strong 
stomachs, evident in who made it 
through the entire event without any 
coming hack up the wrong way. 



Brian Asman does his 

hcsi lo chew and swallow as fast as 
he can. The pie-eating contest be- 
came a favorite among students, with 
almost as many competitors as spec- 
tators. 




.Indent concen- 
ir.iics on painting a spirit rock to 
commemorate the year's homecom- 
ing events. The Student Government 
Association introduced a larger spirit 
rock as a permanent fixture on the 
campus at the beginning of Spirit 
Week, hoping the idea would encour- 
age school spirit all year long. 



CLosmg ovr^mE 



Relaxing tunes drew students to the southside of campus. After only a few sets from local bands, the steps of both 
Mason and Randolph overflowed with students. The grassy area between the two residence halls held even more students, 
sprawled on blankets and gathered in groups to enjoy the music. Fredstock always drew a crowd, both because of the local 
talent and the open atmosphere of the concert. It also gave college bands an opportunity to collect an even larger fan 
following and perform new songs for a supportive audience. 

Younger bands opened the event and gained exposure from their performances. Popular bands like XKJ and 
Saline kept the crowd rocking as sunset slowly drew an even larger audience. Folded Under, perhaps the oldest and most 
popular campus band, closed the night with familiar lyrics and favorite tunes. By the end of the last song, the crowd had 
more than doubled in size and Giant Productions, who sponsored and organized the show, seemed more than pleased with 
the outcome. Students slowly lingered and walked aimlessly back to their domi rooms, reluctant to leave the soothing 
atmosphere for the reality of textbooks and syllabi. 




I Giant members lake time 
111 eiijoy themselves at the coneerl. 
The organization set up the event and 
made sure everything ran smoothly, 
even holding trivia and other silly 
games between sets. 



LMUimiJJJJJJIsniden.shanPoul 
on Ihc steps ol Mason and enjoy the 
music. Residents of both Mason and 
Randolph could experience the mu- 
sic oulside at ihe concert, or from the 
comfort of their dorm rooms. 



Student Life 




mammmmmm 



.ludcm lakes lull 
advantage of the free food while ink- 
ing with Class Council meiiiheis 
Free food, including chicken and bis- 
cuits, gave students an excuse to skip 
Seacobeck for the night and spend a 
little more time lingering on the law n 
with friends. 



24 Student Life 




^ 



^ 1 . >' 



^cxm' imo 



\Y^ 



. -x 



hriBic 



Late afternoon music energized students as they walked to and from classes 
on an unusually warm October day. Rocktoberfest offered music, food and good times 
to students who had the chance to relax in the wami sun and many took advantage of all 
the c\ ent had to offer. Bands played music and even handed out free cds to students 
who hung around long enough. Students crowded campus walk and enjoyed yet an- 
other opportunity to escape the stress of daily class rituals. 

Class Council scheduled the talent and handled the organization for the free 
event. Students could hear the music from all areas of campus. Even if class schedul- 
ing kept them from Ball Circle where the e\ ent took place, many could still take advan- 
tage of some of the aspects and stop 
in to grab a soda before heading to 
an evening class. 

Rocktoberfest arrived at 
just the right time, with everyone 
needing a break from their daily 
schedules. It helped refresh students 
and put their minds to ease, as sum- 
mer days had long faded away and 
the realities of another school year 
finally arrived. 

Faculty and staff members 
also enjoyed the e\ent and often 
needed a break just as much as the 
students. Rocktoberfest offered the 

relaxing atmosphere and gave everyone a chance to sit down and breathe. Although the 
event only lasted a span of two hours, students hung around Ball Circle long after the 
band packed away their instruments and the tables full of food emptied. It put students 
in the mood to socialize and just forget their wonies for the evening and perhaps take 
the time to reflect. It put them in the mood to enjoy college life for a while, and get 
serious about studying another day. 




Rocktoberfest 




cmgmAC 

Ci 




As the last days of fall brought bitter w inter winds and a solemn atmosphere to the eampus eommunity. students grew restless for the semester 
to end. Foitunately, Giant Produetions antieipated this lull in activity and came to the rescue with a music conceit that livened the student body. 
Dispatch, formally known as One Fell Swoop, rocked the Great Hall with music that reflected the influences of rock, reggae and funk. Howie 
Day opened for the band, and many students found his original beats a refreshing change from mainstream radio tunes. Dispatch also im- 
pressed students, showing off a variety of vocal and instrumental skills. The band played a mixture of both familiar and new songs, with an 
array of covers in the set as well. The student response overwhelmed Giant staff members, with high-ticket sales beginning the night and 
extreme energy lasting through the duration of the last song. Many students left the concert, still flushed and chattering about the night. Others 
wiped sweat from their foreheads, happily exhausted from a night full of dancing and singing. The artists further pleased loyal fans by hanging 
around well into the late hours of the night, signing autographs and talking candidly about college life and their band scene. 



26 



Student Life 



Singing famiGarfyrics, a memSeroftHspatcfi intrigues the crow£ 
The band held a large fan following on campus, with ticket 
sales topping recent records and hitting the highest mark 
since Wyclef Jean performed in 1999. 



icnds wailin line 
hcloic ihc chiklti Many students 
cagL-i i\ anlicipalcd the night, evident 
in the high ticket sale.s and level of 
enthusiasm in the air. Giant staff 
members reported ticket sales of over 
70(1 





I Hinvie Day fo- 
cuses on an intense part in the song 
while the crowd remains in awe of 
his varied talents. Day. a 2 1 -year old 
singer/songwriter from Bangor. 
Maine, impressed students with the 
acoustic sounds that landed him his 
lirst big record deal with Epic 
Records earlier in the year. 



Dispatch 




ERVICE 



Creative costumes, popular lyrics and original, choreographed moves char- 
acterized this year's lip sync competition. From start to finish, performers kept the 
crowd entertained and left judges with a very difficult decision before them. Two 
groups of performers even used the same artist for their act. Students and faculty 
received a blast from the past as Michael Jackson's lyrics inspired the moves for 
both groups, and e\en led one of the groups to a first place finish and a prize of 
S400. 



♦Dan Dupras, Bobby Bergin, Sarah Domenech and Julie D' Andrilli com- 
prised this talented /7ra/ p/ace group and ignited energy throughout the 
crowd, unmet by any of the other competitors. ♦Freshmen Matt Rogers 
and Matt Hoover took home a second place finish and a prize of S300 
with a comedic imitation of NS'VT^C's, "It's Gonna Be Me." ♦The "Jack- 
son 4," otherwise known as Sue Lowe, Stacy Haessler, Julie Kolakowski 
and Katy Bell, landed a third place finish and a prize of $200 for the 
second Michael Jackson medley of the night. ♦Mark Sturm, Anne Grosz 
and Elizabeth McDowell took horns foiirih place and $ 1 00 for their cre- 
ative rendition of "Copa Cabana." 



Apart from the contestants prizes, the Lip Synch competition brought in 
S400 in profit, all of which Class Council donated to the Crisis Relief Fund for 
September 11 ''i victims. 




I performers enjoy their ^^^^^^^^^ performers take the 

time iiuhe .spotlight. Music and per- stage one last time. Talented perfor- 

formances varied throughout the mances made the judges' decisions 

night and kept students entertained. even more difficult. 



28 



Student Life 





lecca Griffith shows 
Ml r Ik'i- djiiLiiiL' skills. .Students cho- 
iviigraphed moves that the audience 
would both easily recognize and en- 
joy. The most popular choices 
brought back memories from the 
past, including many SO's tunes. 



I a performer adds drama 
to the singing and dancing skit. 
Klahorate costumes often caught the 
audience's eye. but only made a dif- 
ference if the performers had talent 
and skilled dance moves to back up 
the slitter 





^^^^^^^^K^^jj^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 






















Irom the 
skilled ra 
crowd. T 
members 
les of M 
new twis 


^^Qi^g two perlormers 
Mnning team sho« ofT their 
oves before an impressed 
he group consisted of four 
that brought back the lyr- 
chael Jackson and added 
s to familiar tunes. 



Lip Sync 29 



^PEMIfNI^TY MEETS ,_ . 



Audience response and creativity defined the winner for the 3™ annual Mr. MWC 
Contest, although many admitted having difficulty picking a favorite. The event, sponsored by 
the College Republicans and Circle K. featured twelve men representing various residence halls 
across campus. The contestants displayed their creativity in divisions similar to a beauty pag- 
eant, including an introduction division, a sportswear division and a talent competition. Once a 
panel of judges narrowed the field to three finalists, audience response and creativity played a 
role in the selection process. Mr. Madison. Ken Jones, landed the title of Mr. MWC 2001, with 
Mr. Marshall, Matt Kapuscinksi, coming in as first runner up, and Mr Virginia coming in as 
second runner up. Ken Jones received S200 for his new title and a crown and scepter to signify 

his position. Part of the profits from ticket sales 
for the night's event went to the Rappahannock 
Council on Domestic Violence, recognizing Octo- 
ber as Domestic Violence Awareness Month. 

The popularity and student involvement 
suiTOunding the Mr. MWC competition indicated 
it had gained ground in becoming an annual event 
on campus. Students enjoyed the humor and crazy 
antics of the competitors and often chose the 
competition as a favorite above other Spirit 
Week events. No one ever knew what might come out of the contestants' mouths and most 
of what they said encouraged laughter from the audience. Often the wording of the ques- 
tions could only evoke humorous thoughts and phrases, as well. 

No matter who won the title, all of the men did their part to raise spirits and 
encourage participation in Spirit Week events. As one of many activities planned through- 
out the week, the Mr. MWC competition showed growing numbers of attendees and higher 
levels of excitement with each passing year. Many hoped this marked the beginning of 
rising school spirit throughout the years to come. 



1 


HH 


showing off his 


moves, a per- 


^^^^^B.^BuV^^^^^^I 


former competes 
in the talent 


^^■l^/^^^H 


competition. 


^^^^^^V^> ~ ^^^^^^H 


Competitors had 
the chance to do 


^^^^"-fl^H 


whatever they 


^^^^K < '. i ' ' '"^^^^^H 


wanted for this 
portion of the 
show. 


|Hl^yJ^|^| 


E 



Student Life 





-omcitant shows 
noves to impress the 
crowd Competitors Icnew that audi- 
ence response played a large role in 
their success and often held nothing 
buck as they strived for the title. 




unlesianl Impcs thai 
aflccDon will help him take o\er the 
title. As Mr. MWC. the winner did 
not hold any specific duties, although 
room for the creation of responsibili- 
ties existed and .several speculated 
this would be a change made as the 
competition grew more popular. 



31 



gog^f^^f^ft^i' 



^m 






Newly planted flowers appeared all over campus. The fountain ran clear with freshly treated water. Students 
cleaned their rooms and dirty mounds of laundry suddenly disappeared. Passerbys might wonder what the activity 
meant. The college community knew what would soon take place. Parents' Weekend remained one of the few events 
that inspired such activity and attention. Administrators and faculty knew the parents as one of the most important 
sources of revenue for the college, and thus wanted nothing less than their approval. Students knew their parents as 
the only people who still cared whether or not they made their bed or if they had clean underwear at their disposal. 

Apart from the improvements. Parents' Weekend also encouraged the planning of a multitude of activities for 
students and their parents to take part in, both on campus and in the local community. Sporting events and picnics 
invited parents to attend. The college bookstore and many local restaurants ran specials for parents and students. In 
the short span of a weekend, families could enjoy quality time together in a variety of ways. When the time came for 
parents to pack up and head home, students knew life would return to normal all too soon. Piles of laundry once again 
mounted and the food at Seacobeck quickly regained its cardboard flavor. Home had returned. 




;illcnded the college and Parents' 
Weekend gave family members the 
chance to spend plenty of quality 
time with each. 



32 



Student Life 




Parents' Wknd 







The culmination of events tiiat occuiTed in the morning hours of September 1 1'" forever changed the hearts and minds of an entire nation. On 
that tragic Tuesday morning, students and faculty members spread the inconceivable news that ten'orist attacks had claimed the lives of thousands of 
innocent Americans on American soil, destroying parts of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Those who quickly found the closest television 
set watched the towers of the World Trade Center completely crumble and witnessed footage of people jumping from windows of the massive 
buildings. The tragedy ignited such a strong mi.xturc of emotions within evei"yone and students would forever remember the exact moment they heard 
the news. Disbelief and silence set in over the campus. Overwhelmed students gathered for prayer at noon, joining hands and holding each other in 
Ball Circle. Four hours later, hundreds of students and faculty members gathered in silence in Dodd Auditorium, once more praying for the lives lost 
and a nation still overcome with horror. That same night, more than a thousand students, faculty and community members held a candlelight vigil in 
Ball Circle. 

In the days that followed, students stood in inconceivably long lines, patiently waiting to give blood. Flags flew from dorm windows and car 
antennas. "United We Stand" became the theme for the entire nation and students upheld the mission for healing and recovery, making every effort to 
offer support to anyone who needed it. United efforts drew students together and helped them heal, as they attempted to make sense of the life-altering 
event. New levels of patriotism characterized the college community and produced the strength necessary to move on. Life slowly returned to normal, 
but with a Miorc cautious approach to the unfamiliar. The scars ran deep, and students knew a part of their lives had changed forever. 




Lenditig a yfamC.. 

CQ^f^raised over 

$3,000 for the 

September 1 1 ^^ fund 

and Firefighters' 

Disaster Relief 

Fund. They also 

held a food drive to 

replenish the local 

food banks' 
dwindling supplies. 

iHe Association of 
'SgsidenceJfaCk 

collected canned 

food goods to 

donate to the area 

food banks. 

iKeJittiletic 

(Department collected 

money at sporting 

events to donate to 

the American Red 

Cross. 

<Psi VpsiCbn raised 
almost $4,000 for 
the American Red 

Cross by holding a 
party at George 
Street and selling 

tickets for S 1 each. 






residents of 
M.iisliall Hail prepare lor the home- 
coming parade to begm. Students 
adorned costumes from famous 
American landmarl^s, including the 
Statue of Liberty and the Washing- 
ton Monument. 




EW LEVELS 



Many students found themselves surprised to encounter a large addition to the campus grounds while walking to class in late 
September Delivery men worked diligently to carefully place an enormous rock by the campus center, while curious students stood 
nearby. Members of the SGA and a few other select students knew of the rock's purpose and arrival, but most didn't know the details 
surrounding the ""Spirit Rock" until its un\ciling on October l^t. The ceremony, led by President Anderson, helped initiate spirit for the 
upcoming homecoming activities and gave students their first chance to paint a unique message on the rock. 

Throughout the year, students used the rock to announce activities taking place around campus, ignite spirit for sports teams, 
wish friends a happy birthday and even to say goodbye to a dear friend. When Dr Topher Bill, a well-liked and highly respected member 
of the psychology department passed away this past year, students painted the rock in his memory. Many students felt the rock added I 
positivity to the campus and helped boost school spirit, while others felt it invited trouble. Regardless of individual feelings toward the : 
new campus addition, the Spirit Rock maintained a strong presence and gained a recognized place among students and faculty. 




litile study lime in between classes. 
Many students used the rock for 
studying and often found it more ac- 
cessible than crowded benches. 



36 Student Life 







L^ 



rale the Spiril Ruck with paim at the 
unveiMng ceremony. In addition to 
adding creativity to the new Spirit 
Rock, studenl.s received their own 
mini-spirit rock.s to personalize and 
take home with them. 




I President Anderson 
prepares to cut the ribbon at the un- 
veiMng ceremony. After an explana- 
tion of the rock's origin and purpo.se, 
SGA president Kristy Bartle invited 
eveyone to make their mark on the 
Spirit Rack with a personal message. 



student opens 
a new can of paint to decorate the 
Spirit Rock. The SGA provided stu- 
dents with free paint and paint- 
brushes at the unveihna event. 



Spirit Rock 3' 



students capture j 
Iriend and prepare to cover her in 
eggs and flour. Juniors had to attempt 
to make it from class to class with- 
out friends noticing their presence. 



^Wi# 



i 




Ijuniors compare rings 
and admire their newly earned jew- 
elry. Not all students bought rings, 
but those who chose to purchase them 
could do so through the school or on 
their own. 



38 student Life 





The time finally amved for juniors. After two years of joming in on tiie 
prani^s of Junior Ring Week, the class suddenly found themselves the victims of the 
annual tradition. Luckily, the maintenance crew had grown wiser and drained the 
fountain this year, no longer allowing it to function as a dunking pool. The President's 
office sent out yet another letter warning students to keep their pranks to light-hearted 
fun and not to take the week too seriously. After witnessing students bound to light 
poles or duct-taped and bornbarded with raw eggs and rotten milk, many wondered if 
the warning had fallen on deaf ears. 

The annual event lasted the entirety of a week and didn't end until the night 
of .lunior Ring Dance, when juniors received their rings and celebrated another mile- 
stone in their college years. Juniors dreaded the week and often prepared themselves 
for the worst. Embarrassing pictures 



of juniors suddenly appeared plas- 
tered to trees and bulletin boards all 
over campus. Some juniors awoke 
to find a closet full of shoes that only 
fit their left feet. A few girls even 
returned home to find all of the 
phones, hairdryers and cosmetic 
products removed from their houses. 
The all too familiar sight of 
students running frantically across 
campus, dodging fellow athletes or 
upper-class friends, always caused 
passersby to stop and witness the entertaining event, especially if the pursuer caught 
the junior. Safety existed nowhere for these unfortimate few. Some students took the 
good times and jest a little too far, but when all the week's events had drawn to a 
close, most looked back on the week with many fun memories and a feeling of ac- 
complishment. They, too, had survived. 




39 




RIES 



As the end of Junior Ring Week fmally arrived, juniors needed time to them- 
selves to relax and celebrate. Junior Ring Dance provided the opportunity for the 
class to do lUst that and students eagerly made plans for the big event. Amid the 
frenzy of Junior Ring Week pranks, many students made dinner reservations, bought 
dresses, rented tuxes and tried to decide who would hold the pre -parties and who 
would throw the after parties. The night marked many things for juniors. They had 
survived the torture of Junior Ring Week, made it through almost three years of col- 
lege and fmally received their long-anticipated rings. Juniors felt they had made their 
mark. 

The dance, held in the Great Hall, involved a night full of music and fun. 
Students arrived at varying times throughout the night, but instantly joined in on the 
activities. For once, juniors had the floor to themselves. They took full advantage of 
the familiar crowd and danced the night away Both the Great Hall and the Campus 
Center played music for the students. Juniors filled the building, lingering and chat- 
ting in the stairwells and hallways during pauses from dancing. As the night drew to 
a close, students" energy levels remained high and most left the dance with plans to 
continue their celebrating elsewhere. The night marked many important times for the 
class and students seemed intent on making memories that would last a lifetime. 




^Ig^^^^.Ashlcy H, 



and .Amy Hciwlliorne enjoy time on the a break from daneing to eateh up v. ilh 
danee floor. friends. 



40 Student Life 





students enjoy each 
lUhcr's comp.niy and impress by- 
slandcis with unique dance moves. 
Many students chose not to take dates 
to the event, knowing enough fiiends 
would keep them occupied through- 
out the m>iht. 



dressed up v\ilh sonicv\hcrc to go. 
Groups of juniors met at different 
houses to celebrate and enjoy time 
together before the long-anticipated 
niaht. 





^^Ei&f'' ^..^Pl 


^^9 








jjj^^H 










1 i- ^Rh 


Cm 






1 . I^H 


I^H 




■^ffl^^^^^^^R^^^^ juniors siriL' 


alon;: with lauuliar tunes. Students 


^^^^1 


had the opportunity to enjoy upbeat, 
modern music on the upper level of 


fnn iiil^^l 


^^^^^^^^^ 


the Great Hall, or enjoy slower, more 


Ifc... s 


^^^1 


mellow jazz tunes on the lower level. 


iS^.^^ifl 


IB 







41 




MAxma 




RENCE 



As they stretched their legs for a good cause, participants in the annual Fredericksburg AIDS Walk made their way down campus walk. The 
three-mile walk included part of the campus and extended throughout the downtown area. Volunteers stood along the path, handing out water to 
anyone who needed it and offering words of encouragement. Participants included many students, faculty and local community members. "I've 
done this for the past two years. It allows me to support all of those who struggle with the disease," Will Gunther. a student participant, said. 

Another event recognizing the importance of AIDS awareness included the display of various AIDS quilt panels on campus. To honor 
World AIDS day, held each year on December 1 ^^ the NAMES Project displayed panels made in memory of individuals or groups who lost their 
lives to the disease. The project brought 1 92 panels of the existing 44,000 to campus and displayed them in the Great Hall, and then later in DuPont. 
Members of Pride Reflecting Individuals of Sexual Minority (PRISM) and the HIV/AIDS Education Committee handled the entire event, from the 
ceremony to the displays, and felt the display effectively touched many students. 



Student Life 



Signing in at the event, a student participant registers for the walk. 
The annual AIDS Walk invited everyone to participate and attracted 
many students for the good cause. The three-mile course had signs 
lining its entirety, stating facts and statistics about AIDS and the 
HIV virus. 



^^^^^^^^^ siLidem participants 
ciinploiL-oiiL- sirelchnfthc ualk with 
ease The gloomy weather failed to 
dampen anyone's spirits as they sup- 
ported the memories of those who 
lost the fight and the hoped for tho.sc 
still fishini;. 





IB 



.tudcnt lake 



time to read personal messages on 
each of the panels on display in the 
Great Hall. The 192 panels that re- 
iriained on display for a week had an 
impact on all who paused to view 
them. 



Awareness 43 



J^09\4^ 




While on-campus housing grew more and more scarce each year, the college still 
izuaranteed all freshmen and sophomores a place to live. Juniors and seniors who wished to 
remain on campus had to enter a lottery, with no promises for housing. Freshmen occupied the 
majority of domi rooms on campus and visitors could easily identify first-year residence halls 
from upper-class residence halls. First-year halls had the reputation of having more actne 
atmospheres and many more sleepless nights. Upper-class residence halls often kept the noise 
level to a calming decible and preferred going out for activities rather than staying in the 
building. 

Residence halls offered students the chance to create communities of friends. Resi- 
dent assistants held regular meetings for students and encouraged both interaction and coop- 
eration among everyone. Individual residence 
halls also held dances and other activities for 
students to get involved in throughout the 
year. 

Most importantly however, living on 
campus gave students a place to call their own. 
a place to maintain their identity amid a flood 
of changes. More than a place to study and 
sleep, domi rooms drew crowds of students 
for late night pizza parties or afternoon 
lounges in front of a television. They inspired 
crazy antics and memory-making moments. They encouraged communal living and the learn- 
ing experiences that accompanied the challenge. Donn rooms held reflections of forming tirst 
friendships and cramming for final exams. Best friends lived only eight feet away and if ever 
a wave of loneliness hit. someone could spare a second and lend an understanding ear. The 
support system that residence halls offered remained crucial to first-year students as they 
struggled to balance new lives on their own and create a place for themselves among the 
college community. Other students benefitted from the network as well, but had learned from 
experience and did not depend so heavily on the comforts dorm life held. 



CeCeirating a SirtHday, 

students gather in a 
dorm room for cake 
and good times. 
Dorm rooms offered 
the perfect place for 
groups of students 
to gather and have a 
great time without 
having to sacrifice 
privacy or leave the 
building. 





44 



Student Life 





siutiL-m ji- 
tcmpis to drink j-. much milk as he 
Lun m an hour Man\ tried to prove 
the popular belief wrong thai "it is 
impossible to drink a gallon of milk 
in one hour," but always failed. 







student takes a 
break from studying to relax with 
friends. Dorms remained popular 
places for students to do the major- 
ity of their work, despite the multi- 
tude of distractions. 



Dorm Life 45 



!mw^. 




The familiar sights, sounds and smells of the annual Multicultural Fair attracted swarms of people to 
campus. Vendors sold jewlery. clothing and other items along campus walk, while musical performers from every 
imaginable genre displayed their talent in open areas. Ball Circle filled with tantalizing aromas as vendors sold 
food dishes from varying ethnic backgrounds. The event attracted the second highest number of people to the 
campus, falling short only to graduation. Newspaper and television coverage helped encourage the local commu- 
nity to participate, while students needed no extra incentive to show up and enjoy the multitude of activities. The 
event aimed to broaden people's minds and introduce new cultural influences into their lives, and many felt those 
responsible for the event went above and beyond this mission. 

The Multicultural Center on campus helped organize and coordinate the large event. Overall, it benefitted 
eveiyone who took part in the activities, including introducing new people to outside community organizations and 
exposing students to outside influences. The cultural diversity of the college remained relatively low in comparison 
to other state-supported colleges and universities in the state, but the numbers continued to steadily rise. Programs 
like the Multicultural Fair helped these numbers to improve and created a more open, interactive community among 
students and faculty members. Cultural awareness remained an important priority for the college, especially con- 
sidering the recent events of September 1 1 th and the issues that surround an ever-changing world. 



difficult decision of deciding whauo lakes in the variety of music thai liie 



eat. Multicultural food offered dis- 
tinct tastes and often introduced new 
flavors to tasters' mouths. 



lair had to offer. Everything from 
opera to tribal Indian music and rock 
and reggae added life to the festivi- 
ties and attracted diverse crowds of 
listeners. 



i^ 




46 



Student Life 



I 



'iinfl 


ISii isfl 


■ ,-;^-->ff»jK,IUltWl 

^tt II 


■■ nS 


■1 III 


II II 


- >•' - "- - - ■ - ■" 


■1 III 


MM MM 


v iV-- W 


■■ ■■'■ 


■■ ■■ 




1 iin ; li 1 
r 1 im ' ii 1 


nil .!i 


■a.flH^ 


liiii ii 




Hi; iv;» 



Mudents dance 
(Ml vlaije u)ih pertormers. People 
altending the fair enjoyed the inter- 
active atmosphere of the activities. 




I local community 

libers cil .ill jtios and backgrounds 

1 iiid something they enjoy at the fair. 

W ith so much to offer, no one had a 

liilficult time finding something that 

^ .lught their eye. 



47 




%!m(pmg r^Rjw^p-^ 




An old tradition once again found its place in campus life with the reintroduction of the May Court and the Grand Monte 
Carlo Ball. The May Court held significant importance m the social life of students in the 1940's and 1950's and continued 
throughout the years, until interest faded and the college retired the crown in the late 1960's. This year, Sean Cammereats led the 
campaign to have the court reinstated in the campus's schedule of events. Students submitted nominations for a May Queen and 
the college's first King of the court. Those nominated had to write essays on a specific topic and then a board chose from the 
nominees. The board selected winners based upon academics, community service, club and activity involvement and essay 
quality. Marcy Weatherly Mon-is. May Queen in 1950, returned and attended the Grand Monte Carlo Ball to crown the first May 
Queen in 34 years and the college's first ever King. She, as well as many others, expressed strong wishes to have this tradition 
reinstated for future generations of students to enjoy. ; 



48 Student Life | 



former May 
QuL-cn. Marc\ Wealherly Morris, sits 
with her husband ac the dance. The 
night's highlights included the 
ning of the new May Queen and 
King hy the 19,^0 graduate. 

indents enjoy the 
aciiMties at the dance and brush up 
on their gambling skills at the same 
time. The dance attracted students 
from all backgrounds, all eager to 
restore an important tradition to stu- 
dent life. 




tudent takes time 
out Irom the dance floor to try her 
luck at gambling. The dance offered 
a night of fun and activity for stu- 
dents, as well as the opportunity to 
take part in a very special tradition 
brought back to life. 



rrt 




A IT ALL 



As bitter winter winds slowly gave way to the damp chili of spring rains, many students failed to notice the change in the 
atmosphere. Their minds focused elsewhere, with visions of tropical beaches and pina coladas drawing them closer to the equator. Spring 
break airived and left no room for tasks that didn't involve sun. fun and relaxation. Popular student destinations included Cancun, the 
Bahamas and Panama City. Florida, among many others. Unfortunately for many spring breakers, this year didn't offer much sun, as 
tropical destinations experienced a cold front during the fust full week in March. Students who only packed bathing suits and tank tops, 
found themselves shivering in their hotel rooms until the clouds finally diminished and the sun made an appearance toward the end of the 
week. Cold weather couldn't stop the good times, however, with the night life inviting late nights of bar hopping and dancing and the days 
offering plenty of oppoitunitics for ad\ enture. As the week ended, students slowly made their way back to campus, tanned and exhausted 
and hardly ready to focus on anything remotely academic. Classes started back as always, however, and students found themselves 
struggling to get back into their daily routines. Ica\ ing the wild times behind them and setting their sights on the end of the year. 




^^^^^^^^3 ^cnior Mike 
Sandridgc lakes time out of an event- 
ful nigtit to entertain friends. Photos 
often gave friends interesting pieces 
of incriminating evidence to hold 
over each other's heads for hfc. 



und 



,-\nann.i Bciisusan dance on a tahic 
in the Bahamas. Most spring break- 
ers stuck by the motto. "What hap- 
pens on spring break, stays on spring 
break!" 



)me To The tjanaiuab 

)riiv4breaktravel.com 
!v dfscovcrcard.com 



50 



Student Life 




■SiSP 




iiior spring breakers 
gather on a dock on South Padre Is- 
land, Texas. "Booze cruises" re- 
ned popular adventures for stu- 
dents everywhere and offered the 
opportunity for fun on the water. 




students 

make the most of their time in the Ba- 
hamas. Students traveled to differ- 
ent islands in the Bahamas, but found 
n hard to go somewhere without see- 
m<j a familiar face from home. 



students spend time to- 
gelticr forgetting about life back at 
school and focusing instead on the 
Bahama atmosphere. The Bahamas 
ottered a special trip for students that 
mcluded a cruise to the islands with 
a few nights stay. 



Spring Break 51 



I two students attempt to 
keep the ball off the ground in a 
friendly game of volleyball. Games 
and activities kept students active at 
the picnics and cookouts, with plenty 
of time for socializing as well. 




I Professor Whitman 
takes his grandchildren for a spin 
around the lake at the business de- 
partment picnic. Many professors 
brought their families to the events, 
allowing students to view their men- 
tors in a completely different light. 



52 



Student Life 




V\M^(FPIM 






■><^ 



"■^iat^v, 



After endless hours of tcnn paper revisions and study sessions, the end of the year 
still seemed light years away for many students. They felt their eyes cross as they attempted 
to make sense of another impossible case sUidy. Computers had helped them through the 
early morning hours, but students felt they needed human contact. Solitude and stress o\'er- 
v\'helmed many and just when it seemed their brain cells had gnen out. the academic depart- 
ments stepped in to help. Ironically, the very source of the majority of this stress also turned 
into one of the biggest reliefs for students. Professors knew course loads often became 
unbearable for students and as the end of the year approached, they made plans and prepara- 
tions to reward students" hard work. 

Many academic departments held picnics or cookouts. and nearly all held an awards 
banquet. Some departments chose a 
professor's home as the cite for a cook- 
out, while others rented out area locations 
for the event. The business department 
held a cookout at Clore Brothers River 
Outfitters. It gave students the opportu- 
nity to enjoy volleyball, canoeing and 
other activities by the water in an open 
atmosphere far from classroom bound- 
aries. Department activities allowed both 
students and professors to interact in a 
different atmosphere and get to know each 
other on new levels. 

Award ceremonies and banquets 
also gave students relief from textbook stress. Held at area restaurants or choice campus 
locales, these events gave fonnal recognition to those students who went above and beyond 
the average requirements and made an impact on the department as a whole. Although the 
banquets typically had a more formal atmosphere than the cookouts and picnics, they all 
rewarded students in some way for another year successfully completed and helped break 
students in to the relaxation and fun that the summer offered. 




Picnics 53 




^-^^-^^^/^Mi^lONS 



The day dawned bright and clear. Families and friends filled Ball Circle and an empty stage occupied one end of the 
grounds, a clear nidication of the events to come. For hundreds of students, it marked one of the most important days of their 
lives. Graduatioii defined an abundance of accomplishments. Hard work and tireless dedication had carried them to that 
point, and now the time had arrived to celebrate their achievements and cairy their knowledge out into the world. Many 
questioned whether or not they felt ready. Others could hardly wait to step out into the working world and test their abilities. 
All felt a mixture of exhilaration and apprehension as they pondered what their futures might hold. 



54 Student Life | 



(Discussing tie ceremony, two members of the Eagle Pipe Band prepare 
to take part in the big event. The band took part in the procession, 
dividing the students and faculty from the Board of Visitors, the speak- 
ers and President Anderson. Their music inspired a festive spirit and 
added variety to the familiar sounds of "Pomp and Circumstance." 




iilia Dean Hii 
ogni^cs Trai> BraiiJl with {\v 
Colgate W. Darden. Jr. Award. Tiv 
award honored the student with th 
highest cumulative grade point avL-i 
aae in the class. 




IM(P^R!ESSIO^S contmued... 



The week preceding graduation iiad tcept tiie seniors busy with preparations and last-minute celebrations with friends. Many took part 
in "Dead Week" and traveled to Myrtle Beach. South Carolina, for good tirnes and warm weather. Students rented hotel rooms and houses, 
some of the houses holding close to 40 people. The laid-back atmosphere offered the perfect opportunity to make even more lasting memories 
and reminisce back on all the great times seniors had shared together. Most of the beach-bound students returned mid-week to take part in Grad 
Ball. Catered food and all-night dancing kept seniors entertained and kept their minds distracted from the life-altering event that rapidly 
approached. Convocation followed the next night and families and friends aiTived in town from all comers of the nation. The excitement 
continued to build amid dinner reservations and late-night parties. Seniors knew the next morning marked a milestone, but they remained 
detemiined to make the most of their last hours as an undergraduate. 



56 Student Life ] 




vvii students make 
their way doun college walk durins! 
the processional. iVIost barely re- 
membered the walk to their seats, 
only the unbearable anticipation be- 
Tore they received their diplomas 




I Dusty Bower rec- 
ognizes his very vocal cheering sec- 
tion. Many students had inultiple 
family members and friends in the 
audience, who had supported them 
every step of the w ay. 



/: 




vn 




The line-up began bright and early on Saturday morning, with students 
meeting in front of Jefferson Hail and creating a flurry of activity. Students chat- 
tered nervously and helped each other put together the cap and gown ensembles. 
When "Pomp and Circumstance" blared from the loudspeakers across cainpus. a 
sudden hush fell over the seniors as they comprehended the reality that awaited 
them. Smiling faces and camera flashes lined campus walk and the crowd across 
Ball Circle stood to honor the soon-to-be graduates. When all the seniors stood in 
front of their seats, the ceremony began. A speech from Senator .lohn H. Chichester 
gave students wise advice about the future. Honors and acknowledgements fol- 
lowed and when it seemed students could no 
longer differentiate between the sun and over- 
active nerves as the source of the sweat trick- 
ling down their back. President Anderson 
asked the students to rise. One by one, the 
seniors traveled the familiar path across the 
stage many had taken before them. After the\ 
received their diplomas, a few short words of 
congratulations held them in their seats a feu 
minutes longer and then the real celebrating 
began. Hats tiew high, cheers en'upted from 
the crowd and the graduates experienced a rush of emotions that marked a once- 
in-a-lifetime moment. Ball Circle quickly emptied and families and friends headed 
to celebrations all over the town. The vacant chairs and quiet grounds held few 
remnants of the morning's events. Another year ending meant another class leav- 
ing and although the maintenance crew quickly erased all traces of the important 
day, graduates knew they had an abundance of both memories and knowledge that 







''^l^ 


giving words of ■wis- 
dom. Senator John H. 
Chichiester addresses 
the class during the 
ceremony. The sena- 
tor also received an 
honorary degree 
from President 
Anderson. 






I 


^H^H 




could never be erased. 




58 



Student Life 




cnncth Jones ;ind 
jL'iiniler Waters lead Ihe class In sing- 
ing the National Anthem. Jones also 
sang the Alma Mater after the gradu- 
ates received their diplomas. 




Life, Cedric Rucker, helps Evan 
Carlson with his cap and gown. With 
various cords and pins, students 
found the ensembles more difficult 
to manage than they looked. 



Graduation 



59 




60 Sports I 





JLlCVCltCd adrenaline levels pulsed through the air. The tension QYCW stronger 
and the anticipation crept into the crowd. The Eagles stood their ground, determined 
to bring home another victory to the season s ClCCUlfYlUmtiUa wins. With fine- 
tuned skill, unyielding dedication and aggressive teamwork, the men s and women's 
varsity teams remained at the top of their divisions. With one of the youngest rosters 
in the schools history, the women's soccer team fought their way into the second 
round of the NCAA tournament. Both the men's and women's swimming teams brought 
home CAC Championship titles, the 12th straight title for the women's team. The 
field hockey team TOSC to the occasion and advanced to the NCAA Tournament Re- 
gional Semifinals. Senior field hockey player and All American, Jess Morris, broke 
every school record this year in single game, season and career scoring. She also 
appeared in a December issue of Sports Illustrated as a "Face In The Crowd." The 
women's tennis team boasted both the CAC Player of the Year, senior Steffanie Slaugh- 
ter, and the CAC Rookie of the Year, Karii Schneider. The men's lacrosse team ended 
with their most successful season ever, and the women's lacrosse team reached new 
CliiltUuCS in the NCAA Final Four tournament, with seniors Beth Curran, Briana 
Gervat, Giselle Guarino and Laura Walden missing their graduation to lead the team. 







CVdtCU strength and mind power helped the Eagles overcome their opponents 
and TUISB the standards for all who came in contact with their force. Strong 
recruiting systems and endless hours of practices, strategy building and teamwork 
assured the teams that successes would follow year after year. 



61 



■> STATS 



women thii - 
w. maryland invita'c-i 



,5 nips 

n first, men first 



"As the young men's team came together, good things started to happen. 
They won the CAC championship because they ran with pride and deter- 
mination. The women's squad was perhaps the most talented in school 
history. They totally dominated the conterence championships, setting a 
record-best score for a CAC championship. 1 am verv proud." 
- Coach Stan Soper - 







1 Giving his all, freshman Scott Broddus looks to pass the other learns 
runners. Such bursts of energy to pass opponents helped runners finish on lop 
in a race. 2 Starting the race, the girl's squad struggles for position. The 
strength of the team led them to win the CAC chanipumship. 3 Leading the 
pack, sophomores Ryan Bayne and Jason Hough push ihcmselves to the fin- 
ish Hne. This constani motivation helped the men clench the CAC champion- 
ship title. 









62 



Sports 



CROSS COUNTRY 



> 



^ we were a close team, 
which made for a lot of fun. 



hKI\ CU^^NtiUJi 




«4- " ^^^mmi 



■**Sl(fc| 





team roster 




Rvan Bavne 


Jake Rod 


Liz Lake 


Scott Broaddus 


Brian Walsli 


Laura Marafino 


Nate Brooks 


Dustin ^udowitch 


Maggie Marriot 


Jeremy Driver 


Stacv Broadbent 


Erin McLaughlin 


Clint Enos 


Erin Connellj' 


Kathleen Toone 


Jason Hough 


Jessica Edberg 


Lisa Vitollo 


Graeme Joeck 


Dana Folta 


Christ\' Walsh 


Travis Jones 


Rebecca Griffith 




Matt Kirk 


Liz Hackenburg 




Todd Kronenberg 


Caitlin Kinkead 





[cross Country 63 



^ STATS 



alley 



"I am very proud of the 2001 field hockey team and their accomplishment 
3-1 in improving both individuallv and coUectivellv. The reward for their hard 

0-" 

5 work and dedication was an NCAA National Tournament bid and finishing 



I--. 

2-0 
0-2 
2-1 
2-0 
5-1 
2-3 
3-1 
5-0 
3-2 
3-0 
3-0 
0-1 
8-0 
0-1 



eighth in the nation." 
- Coach Dana Hall - 



> 



> 



the team got along 
really well -- we had 
alot of fun this year. 



64 Sports 



^- f ^ * 


i"fP" 




• »v. 


J 


1^1 


■ ^ 


^y ., .-r ^ '^l^ 


^^^^^^^^IF^ A^ ^ a»«/W"*'» 




^KFY 


jiVLl 








tean 


7 roster 




2 


Meredith MacDonald 


15 


Brandv Nelson 


3 


Chrissy Soper 


16 


Claire Van Til 


4 


Emil}' Falvey 


n 


Kammeron Findlev 


5 


Jessica Von Bargen 


18 


Sarah Sebring 


6 


Jessica Morris 


19 


Lindsev Startt 


" 


Adrienne Tromblev 


20 


Meghan McMahon 


8 


Abbv Porter 


21 


Shannon Nobile 





Am\- Smith 


22 


Lisa Cavanaugh 


1(J 


Christine BaUance 


25 


Kara Neviaclcas 


11 


Emily Nagel 


26 


Andi Sasin 


12 


Tricia Marino 


27 


Shelle\' Sabo 


13 


Rebecca Kuehn 


33 


Melissa Kirchner 


14 


Lissa FertTUSon 







lijid^ai^i&ik^:^:;;^ 




reaking away from the defender, senior Jessica Mor- 
ris moves the hall up the field. In addition to being named 
first team All American, Morris was also CAC Player of the 
Year for 200 1 . 2 Chasing her opponent, freshman 

Amanda Mulhern defends her goal. On a young team, 
Mulhem was one of ten freshmen this year. - 3 Hoping to 
get there before the other team, sophomore Chrissy Soper 
rushes to the baU. Soper recieved first team All Region hon- 
ors this season. 



I Field Hockey 65 



■> STATS 



Maryville 
Villa Julie 
HC Wesleyan 
Frostburg State 
St. Mary's of MD 
Roanoke 



Galludet 
York College 
Greensboro 
Catholic 



•lewport 



Goucher [CAC] 
St. Mary's of MD [CAC] 
Salisbury [CAC] 
Gettysburg [NCAA] 
Richard Stockton [NCAA] 



3-1 
5-0 
3-2 
1-0 
1-0 
2-4 
2-0 
1-0 
2-3 
8-0 
4-0 
2-3 
1-0 
0-3 
2-3 
5-1 
2-0 
3-0 
4-2 
3-0 
0-3 



"The season's goal was to plav for the CAC championship and 

reach the NCAA Division 111 National Tournament. Our growth 

and development this season and a new defense structure 

helped us win the CAC title in penalty kicks over Salisbury." 

- Coach Roy Gordon - 




" 1 Positioning his body so as to defend the ball from the other team, junior 
Justin Harcum plans to make a pass. The Eagles advanced to the NCAA 
tournament for the first time in four years this season. ■ 2 Turning the ball 
around, sophomore Roberto Morales hopes to get a shot on goal. The Eagles 
outscored their opponents 52-23 in 2001. 3 Moving the ball up the field, 
junior Mike Nissim-Sabat looks towards ihc goal. Nissim-Sabat was the 
team's leading scorer with nine goals. 




66 



Sports 



MENS SOCCER 



■> 




there was a sense of 

brotherhood 

among the guys. 

Z^-lCH KiLDtK 



f 




team roster 



Liam Garland 
Matt Hcimcrlc 



Ruberto Morak-s 



im Btnabdallal 



Ryan Geib 
Mact I-ockard 
Jamie Scully 
Ryan Kish 
Jason Hansell 
Caleb BiUmeier 
Adrian Burke 
Leigh Murray 
Juson Harcum 
Zach Kaldcr 
David Scraighuff 



I Mens Soccer 



;' 6it\i^ - 


~ ^— ^ 


Wilmington 


2-2 


Gailuadet 


14-0 


W. Maryland 


2-1 


Villa Julie 


4-0 


Lynchburg 


o-'- 


St Mary's 


3-: 


Salisbury 


1-0 


Goucher 


2-0 


Eastern 


3-1 


Dickinson 


2-0 


Randolph-Macon 


4-0 


York 


3-0 


A'varymount 


6-0 


Catholic 


3-0 


Johns Hopkins 


0-0 


Goucher [CAC] 


5-0 


York [CAC] 


4-1 


Salisbury [CAC] 


2-1 


Gwynedd Mercy [NCAA] 


1-0 


Scranton [NCAA] 


0-1 



"We did prettv well, especially considering that we had such a voung 

team — eighteen out of the twentv-three players were freshmen or 

sophomores. \\"e even beat Salisbury — a team of mostly seniors on their 

own field — and got a bid to nationals. We always played well, despite 

injuries and other adversit)'." 

- Coach Kurt Glaeser - 




1 Looking to bcal hor upponciil, senior Bridget White hustles to tlic 
ball. The Eagles finished the regular season with an eight game winnini: 
streak. 2 Charging down the field, senior Kathy Wainwright look 
toward the goal. Midfielder Wainwright was a first team AILCAC pick i 
200 1 . 3 Scanning for an open player, sophomore Joeann Walker paiist 
to pass the ball. Walker led the league this season with nine assists. 



68 



Sports 



women's soccer 



■> 




I 
• I 

team unity was j 

the key to our SUCCeSS. 

K ICHEL I ACCAllO I 



4 



I 



i^^c 








team roster 




(1 


Amanda Thomas 




11 


kara Riggio 


00 


Marv Elizabeth F 


alco 


12 


Lauren Eisold 


1 


Jill Palmeiri 




13 


Elise Fasick 


-) 


Betsv Pitti 




14 


Kathy Wainwright 


3 


Katce Armstrong 




16 


Rebecca Vaccaro 


4 


Hannah Slotnick 




17 


Bridget XX'hite 


5 


(acqui I.oesch 




18 


Jen Condon 


6 


Jessica Hewitt 




19 


loeann Walker 


8 


Alvssa Ehret 




21 


Rachelle Chretien 





Kathr\n Amirpashaie 


T-> 


Meghan Salo 


111 


Rachel N'accaro 




23 


Kelly Quinlan 



Women's Soccer 



69 




"■'1 Flying through the air. junior Jen O'Leary prepares lo do a Hip 
after being tossed by her fellow teammates. This stunt, commonly called 
a basket toss, was often performed among college cheerleading squads. 
" 2 Pumping up the crowd, three members of the MWC Cheerleading 
.squad encourage the players. The constant encouragement the squad 
offered kept the teams in better spirits, even through discouraging games. 
3 Shouting with school spirit, fre.shman Kristin Guagenti cheers on 
her classmates at a basketball game. Cheerleaders cheered at home games 
for both the auy's and airl's teams. 



70 



CHEERLEADTNG 




ATHOUC 



I J -f • ^ 



3ALLAUDET 
JMIVEfiSlTY 



we learned a lot and 

improved as a 

squad. '^' 



KELn^M'4KnN 



^ 




team roster 

Sarah Amos 
Christina Burkert 
Sarah Gorden 
Kristin Guagenti 
Dee Milliard 
Laura HoUman 
Tiffianne Hudnall 
Jennifer Jenkins 
Leah Marie Timberlake 
Constantin Langa 
Kelly Martin 



Ann Moulis 
Jessie Naff 
Kathy Owen 
Jen O'Leary 
Sallv Poole 
Aaron Prowell 
Marv Kate Sheridan 
Mickey Tingler 
Jill Uhrovic 
Kiki Williams 



Cheerleading 



71 



■> STATS 



Lnriscenaom 

Emory and Henry 

V/ashington 

Goucher 

Methodist 

Salisbury 

Western Maryland 

Marymount 

York 

Catholic 

St. Mary's of MD 

Villa Julie 

Gallaudet 

Salisbury 

Goucher 

York 

Marymount 

Washington & Lee 

St. Mary's of MD 

Villa Julie 

Catholic 

Gallaudet 

CAC 



«U-64 

90-94 

79-63 

56-64 

67-72 

65-53 

63-70 

58-63 

63-73 

63-81 

80-75 

103-80 

99-52 

77-72 

75-84 

71-95 

61-73 

53-61 

32-73 

70-62 

4 7-70 

82-65 



"Although the record was only 10-16, we were competitive in all games, 
led at half-time against a Division I opponent, and learned what was 
necessary to succeed. The men's basketball program is in a transition 

phase and should not onh' be measured by wins and losses, but also by 

what the players learned within the program. " 
- Coach Rod Wood - 




Sports 



1 Making a pass, Erik Rodriguez attempts to com- 
plete a strategic play. Players had to stay alert throughout 
the game, knowing when to alter plays and when to fol- 
low through as planned. 2 Aiming at the basket, sopho- 
more Erik Rodriguez prepares to take a shot. Shooting 
required a great deal of coordination. 3 Outstretching 
his arms. Cris Hairston defends the basket. Effective body 
positioning helped players with defensive skills. 



J^ 



men's basketball 




i've never played | 
with a better ffroup 

of guys. 



.\L-ITT LEKiXGIE 



f 




team roster 



14 
20 



Dan Dupras 
Brett Lively 
Evan Fowler 
Alex Concepcion 
Billv Wilkerson 
John Kidwell 
Justin McCuen 
William Doggett 



30 
32 
34 
40 
42 
44 
52 



Cris Hairston 
Rvan Kenna 
Graham Stephen 
Erik Rodriguez 
Matt Levangie 
Delonte VC'aller 
Dan Heselbarth 



M. Basketball 



^ STATS 



6S-51 



"Mary Washington's women's basketball is an up and coming team. We 

learned a new system under a new coach. The team had a strong work 

ethic and a 'never say die' atdtude. These attributes help add to the 

winning tradition." 

- Becky Timmins - 



MD 



57-37 



> 



we bonded as team- 
mates, pushed each 

other through hard 
times, and celebrated 

our victories. 



ADRIENNE B.4RNES 



I 



^ 




WdMEN'S BASKETBALL 



74 Sports I 



team roster 



Doroth)' Propst 
|en Maxwell 
:vristin Sorrell 
)o Ann Parker 
Adrienne Barnes 
CaitJin Wilkinson 




1 Looking for a teammate to pass to. senior Louise 
Winstead aims to bring the ball into play. Winstead was 
of only three seniors on the team this year. ~'2 
Charging down the court, junior Jen Maxwell hopes to 
shoot a basket. The womens' basketball team experi- 
enced its first season under Coach Becky Timmins this 
year. "^'3 Taking a fall. Eagles work to defeat the op- 
posing team. With nine freshman and sophomores, this 
year's team was a young one. 



W. Basketball 



75 



^ STATS 



- -' 114-83 
, jj-j;, v«c:mn 142-63 
123-74, Women 119-77 
-2S-^.7. 125-60 

omen 106-87 



?n first 



> 



we came' together 

as a team when It 
mattered most, CAC 

championships. 



R\:42\ MCGONIGLE 




76 ' Sports 



SWIMMING 



Scott Baker 
Brvan Bearv 
Brian Bradley 
Stephen Coughlin 
Scan Donohue 

V Hess 
Brent fvintzer 
]ason Lancaster 
Andre Lapar 
Ryan McGonigle 
Matt McLaren 
Tim Mo 
lx\ie Schulke 




team roster 

Justin Snvder 
Kent Swats 
James Thomas 
Joy Bailev 
[essica Bielecki 
Jamie Bucher 
Lisa-Marie C^arlson 
Susie Duke 
Jennifer Graboyes 
Tamara Jones 
Amanda Kohne 
Maggie Lancaster 
Ashlev McCoy 



Emily McHenrv 
Meghan Newcomer 
Jennifer Parks 
Eimilv Perkins 
Ashley Randlett 
Karin Riesenfeld 
Lauren Schmidt 
Priscilla Tomescu 
Beth Wagner 
Kade Wamsley 
Emily Williams 
Jen Wilson 




Warming up with Ills team prior to a meet, Justin 
yder prepares lor an upcoming race. Snyder's suc- 
■sstul season earned iiim an All-American title, as well 
recognition as the CAC Swimmer of the Year. 2 
rmning proudly. Coach Matt Kinney awards the first 
ace medal to Mary Washington swimmers as the win- 
iig IM relay team at the CAC Championships. 3 
nrking on perfecting his stroke, Kent Swats practices 
the Goolrick Natatorium. The swim team traveled 
Florida over winter break for practices in warmer 
tiather 



Swimming 



77 



^ STATS 







9-0 






11-2 


- -'i 


port 


7-C 

5-fc 
14-3 
4-3 
6-10 




te 


11-12 




dh) 


8-0 
4-3 


•-J '^' ' 




17-0 
17-2 


=■ h 




9-6 


Salisbury (dh) 


J 


8-4 
1-1 
5-1 
3-1 
9-7 
8-5 
2-12 


Sridgewater 




3-4 



"This year's baseball team is one of the hardest working groups of 

people I have ever been around. They have outstanding character and 

huge hearts. We are currently 24-7 and ranked nationally and hope to 

continue this success through the rest of the season." 

- Coach Thomas Sheridan - 



> 



> 



we're a hardworking 

bunch, let's go!! 



M4RCLOG-4N 




BASEBALL 



"8 Sports 



team roster 



Lee Rubin 

Chase \'ogler 
Reed Shabman 
Rob Boese 
Jason Sullivan 
Corey Templeman 

lay Quintana 

im XX'ilkie 
Stefan Schoen 
Marc Hernandez 
Brad W'ilJiams 
Brandon Orsinger 
Ryan Grue 
Drew Robertson 
Adam Mvchak 




1 Aiming lor the mitt. Andrew Larson hopes for a 
strike. Good pitches were crucial to keeping an 
opponent's score low. - 2 Keeping his eye on the balk 
Ryan Ulrich prepares to bunt. 3 Hunching over, 
Nkitt Lemire looks to keep the hall in the infield. In 
addition to keeping an eye on balls, intlelders had to 
he aware of their opponents' base positions at all times. 



79 



^ STATS 



of MD (CAC) 



9-10 

9-8 

9-1C 

r - 

17-1 

12-3 

8-7 

15-2 

8-9 

15-8 

9-8 

6-5 



"We've had a turnaround from last season. We are still inconsistent of- 
fensively, but when we put it together we surprise ourselves. Team defense 
and goal tending ranks among the best in Division III - that's been a 
pleasant surprise. Our athleticism in the midfield keeps us in games." 
- Coach Kurt Glaeser - 



> 



> 



we were a yOUng team, 
but when we 
executed plays, 
the results were good. 



BRIAN L^4Ua-4TE 




MEN'S LACROSSE- 



80 Sports I 




team roster 

Will Gunther 
Jeb Boland 
David Justen 
Chris Doddridge 
Ryan Mason 
Ryan Brown 
Paul Schutzman 
Tony Ridpath 
Randv Fulk 
Mark Malone 
oe Boulier 
Mike D'Eredita 
Matt Wiles 
Andrew Tremaglio 
Michael Emswiller 



Brian Fuller 
Brian Laudate 
Cliris Burton 
Jamie Stoddard 
Mike MaHn 
lohn Madtes 
Janiie Test 
Ryan Zdanowicz 
Colin Dunphy 
Jonathan Flores 
Catesbv Beck 
Ned DarreU 
Drew Carnvright 
Drew Heston 




•'■"'•^^'Ti^^^P^ 




L'lound ball. Such gains in possesion often led lo scor- 
ing. 2 Staying open, junior Jeb Boland anticipates a 
|\iss. Such good positioning helped with the team's suc- 
i CS-. this season. 3 Waiting for the whistle to blow, 
Mark Malone crouches in a face-off. Face-offs started 
L.ich half in a game. 



^ 



M. Lacrosse 



81 



/ 6iHiO> 


^m ^m ^m 


■jacon 


8-5 




5-6 


Catholic 


16-8 


Washington & Lee 


14-3 


Lynchburg 


11-5 


Goucher 


13-9 


- ■ ■ . ' N J 


5-15 




19-2 




18-6 




12-4 




11-7 


Sc. ,viary of MD 


11-12 



"We enjoyed receiving the opportunity to play for our third straight 

bid to the NCAA Tournament. We'd like to repeat the success of 

our Final four Finish last year. It was exciting to rank amongst the 

top 10 in the country for most of the season." 
- Coach Dana Hall - 




~ 1 Cradling, sophomore Jessica Goon looks to pass tiie ball around 
her defender. Teamwork helped the ladies be at the top of the CAC 
conference this season. 2 Heading down the field, junior Pani 
Kramer hopes for a goal. Kramer led the team in assists this season. 
^ 3 Using her defensive stance, junior Giselle Guarino tries to keep 
her opponent from scoring. The Eagles outscored other teams during 
the regular season 139-81. 



82 



Sports 



women's ucrosse^ 




we improved a lot and became a 

cohesive unit. 

they are a great 

group of girls.j 

MEUSSA BLOCK 








team roster 






1 


Tncia Marino 


14 


Pam Kramer 




3 


Laura Vialden 


15 


Andi Sasin 




4 


Jessica Goon 


16 


Beth Schminke 




5 


Britt Gottlieb 


17 


Kara Bower 




6 


Ivim Becraft 


19 


Briana Gervat 




7 


Giselle Guanno 


20 


Katie MacKinnon 




8 


Lynne Corey 


22 


Leslie Leffke 




9 


Erica Larsen 


23 


Paige Bennett 




10 


Michelle Aubee 


24 


AUison Broglie 




11 


P^milv Nagel 


25 


Kami McNinch 




12 


Melissa Block 


27 


Beth Curran 




13 


Kate Clute 










1 W. Lacrosse 


83 



^STATS 



Maryland 
Maryland 
Richmond 
Goucher 
Sweet Briar 
Mary Washington 



jfth 

second 
third 
fourth 
first 
fifth 
first 



> ' 



. > 

I 
I 

this was one of the 

best years of MWC dding. 

we had a very talented 
team who also happened to 

be tons of fbn. 

JbXA.it±AltS 




rtdtng 



84 Sports I 




team roster 



Gigi Beier 
Christina Bkuch 
Shannon Brennan 
Anna Craft 
Cassandra Crousc 
Jessica D'AJessandro 
Charice Frazier 
enna Hayes 
)ackie Ketterman 
Matthew Lowe 



Icsica ManL;;un 
Jordan Mathias 
Lynsi Montgomery 
Sarah Pech 
Michelle PowlH 
Kasey Quakenbush 
Rachael Reynolds 
Calicoe Richir 
Erica Rozek 
Stephanie Twining 



1 : 


^I 


11 } 


f 




1 MVVC Riders line up U) wail lo be pinned, or 
receive ribbons. Judges awarded ribbons on a point 
basis up to sixth place. 2 In the midst of the com- 
petition, horse and rider work as a team. One of the 
mam parts of riding remained making complex moves 
look easy. 3 A rider in a Hat class at a home show 
prepares to warm up. Both flat and jumping clas,ses 
took great concentration and skill from horse and rider. 



^ 



Riding 



85 



1 > STATS 



" I would say that this season has been a turning point in the history of 
the team. We have the largest and most competitive men's team in our 
short four year history. Our women's team made the top 20 in the na- 
tional rankings for the first time ever and we are still very voung. We only 
lose 2 men and 3 women to i2;raduation. Our teams are stronger than 

thev have ever been, and things are only looking up from here." 
- Coach Brad Holdren - 



> 



I 



we Sa.CririCe a lot for each other, crew is noto- 
riously grueling — 5:00 am practices, bleeding 
hands, burning legs — but not a single person 
on mwc crew looks in retfOSpeCt with regret 
of what they gave up, but forward with excite- 
ment with what they can achieve. 
ChLlD HHRRISC 



getting up at 5lUU am and training and rowing 

with such a dedicated and hardworking 

group of girls has been amazing, few people are 
willing to make the Commitment and sacri- 
fices required to be part of this team, but 

we know how rewarding this experience is. 

COLUiEN KILPH 



ROWING 




86 Sports 



' f^ ' "^ftfHpWBMWnB^^^^Bjt 


; '* '* 1*^^^ Px'tI W 7|>^ 






•:^^/2l 


»!( 


««mill ^■- i ■ ^v 9] 1 



Angela Barker 
Maura Bishop 
Anne Buboltz 
Keri Campbell 
Rebecca Capelle 
Lauren Carter 
Amanda Cristoph 
Amanda Cox 
Elizabeth Cuilen 
Marisa Day 
Katie Dolph 
Kate Domitz 
Maggie Dyer 
Cum Flautt 
Nikki Foltz 
Christina Galilean 



team roster 

Kristin Gordon 
Erika Gottschalk 
Holly Harrell 
Amanda Harrigan 
Channing King 
Sarah McCarthy 
Elaine McDonald 
Katherine McQueen 
Maria Moore 
Meghan Oven 
Margaret Parke 
Sarah Preston 
Colleen Ralph 
Kate Stacy 
Kimberly Tilghman 
Rebecca Turnbul! 
Meaan Yuenser 



Mario Alfaro 
Kevin Casey 
James Connell 
Ben Cubbage 
Stephen Dudley 
Jeremy Glus 
Chris Graham 
Jeffrey Harris 
Chad Herring 
David Hye 
Benjamin Kowalik 
Patrick Loth 
Michael Mallon 
Paul Michanczyk 
Eli Newcomb 
Kevin O'Connor 
Tim 01i\er 




1 Lifting vvitti all their might, the men\ creu team 
cariies their boat to the water. The team enjoyed a 
spring break trip to Clemson. South CaroHna, to train. 

2 Members of the women's team collect life pre- 
servers for their teammates. Because the team prac- 
ticed on water, all of the proper safety precautions \ 
taken. 3 Working as a team, the women prepare to 
carry their boat. Boats usually consisted of three row- 
ers and a co.xswain to give commands. 



Rowing 



87 



SOFTBALL 




The Softball program at Mary Washington College has improved its win 

total in each of the past three seasons. With a roster that includes several 

top returnees and a positive, team-oriented attitude, 

the Eagles will look to fly to the top of the CAC 

standings in 2003, and return to the 

NCAA Tournament, 

- MWC Eagles Online - 



\K 



team roster 


Erin Keenan 


Crystal Zorich 


Julia Gloukhoff 


Nicole Casebolt 


Erin Bundrick 


Emil\' Ruby 


Bevin Gekosky 


Beth Gibson 


Jen Rice 


Kelly Keenan 


Jeanette Moses 


Marci Knight 


Lisa Chillemi 


Stephanie Bolte 


Lisa Collettd 


Kimberly Boelte 



1 Anticipating the hit from the batter, sophomore 
Be\in Gekosky stands crouched in her position. 
Gekosky found herself named to the 2002 All-CAC 
team, an honor for all of her talent and hard work 
throuizhout the season. 




Sports 




1 Concentrating on the serve, setter Lauren Eigel 
decides on her best strategy. The Eagles made it to the 
CAC Championship game in Ihc 2001 season. 



The 2001 season saw a veteran Eagle team that lost 

two plavers to graduation start strong and finish 
strong. AIW'C opened the season with victories over 

Villa Julie College and Lynchburg College, before 
splitting four matches at the always-tough Gettysburg 
College Tournament. After over two weeks of inac- 
tivity- following the tragic events of September 1 1, the 
Eagles returned to win three of four home matches, 
including CAC wins over St. Mary's College and York 

College of PA. After tough conference losses at 

Gallaudet and Goucher, the Eagles rewarded Coach 

Conway with her 300th career victory in a 3-1 win 

over Marymount Universit}- in a league contest. 

- MWC Eagles OnUne - 



/N 




team roster 

Xichole Bulls 
|ackie Durr 
Lauren Eigel 
Kristin Schaible 
Lindsay Christie 
Stacey Standish 
Lindsav Ollice 
Monica Bintz 
Beth Marker 
Melissa Cortina 
Rachel \X iUemin 
Kathv Gochenour 
Sarah Libbv 



VOLLEYBALL 



SballA/ball 



89 



y 


:>iMicj 




\ 




i -6 


7 


- jr 


5-2 
6-1 
2-4 
6-1 
6-1 
4-3 
7-0 
7-0 
6-1 


c 


:!on 


6-1 


L-. ....,^,,- ,.,, 


J 


6-1 


Catholic 




4-0 


Salisbury 




6-1 


Washington 




2-5 



"The guys have worked really hard and we've had a great season. 

We have our highest national ranking ever at #10, but we feel Uke 

we can be even better. We are looking forward to the NCAA's and 

an opportunitv to make the final eight teams in the country." 

- Coach Todd Helbling - 




1 Crouching, junior Kevin Loden anticipates the ball. The Eagles 
won their third straight CAC championship in 2002. " 2 Leaning 
forward, freshman Tim Ryan attempts to with the point. Rya 
named CAC Rookie of the Year in 2002. 3 Following through, sopho- 
more Dan Uyar looks to see if his opponent will return his serve, t 
ace occured when a server gained a point because the other player nc\ 
touched the ball. 



90 



Sports 



men's tennis 



-^ 



this year was a big Step up for the team... 

we finished ranked 10th in the nation, we will 

return next year just as hungry 
with the same leadership and 
discipline necessary to Dling 
home a championship title. 




K-rrE HATHAWAY 



<■ 



; •#? fir«»«i 



. il'»««lilI--^~s*-i;|:i-j:^ir^y^£^-~#-fc-- 



I ll«C4Aait«i 




team roster 








Jeff Cockayne 


Tim Ryan 






Nate Hathaway 


Conor Smith 






Matt Hoover 


Erik Thorell 






Kevin Loden 


Dan Uyar 






Nhat Nguyen 


Steve Wenzel 






Matt Rodgers 


Tripp W'liite 








|Men' 


; Tennis 


91 



■> STATS 







0-9 


:;th 




9-0 


Svvarthrriore 


7-2 


Franklin 


a Marshall 


7-2 


\ ' . 


:: Lee 


1-8 
8-1 


Jo. ... ,,- 


,-.,..ris 


7-2 


Hollins 




9-0 


Kenyon 




0-9 


Loyola 




0-6 


Carnegie 


Mellon 


9-0 


C: " 


' ' J 


7-2 


: 




3-6 


f,;, _, 


, , = con 


9-0 



"As a voung and inexperienced team working to replace four se- 
niors, there have been lots of ups and downs during the season... 

there has been much improvement and a lot of growing up and 

growing together ... the journey has been educational, enjoyable, 

and successful ... and the future looks promising." 
- Coach Cindy Vanderberg - 




1 Lunging forward, junior Sarah Sachen ensures the ball lands in 
her opponent's court. Players scored points when their opponent failed 
to return the ball. " 2 Returning a serve, freshman Nellie Hauff 
focuses on getting the ball over the net. The team took a trip to Hilton 
Head, S.C. over spring break. 3 Pnor to the start of a match, the 
ladies cheer as their teammates are introduced. Although athletes 
played individually or in pairs, team praise encouraged players and 
enhanced unitv. 



Sports 



women's tennis^ 



this i know — i 

tennis rocks. 



COURTNEY WICKER 




Kirsten Agee 
Nancy Clark 
Kim Colwell 
Nellie Hauff 
Lindsay McMahon 
Brandy Nelson 



Mai Ngu\'en 
Sarah Sachen 
Karlie Schneider 
Steffany Slaughter 
Courtney Wicker 
Kadiryn Zelenak 



93 



\ 


y. 


>iMi5 


9-10 






- n 


9-8 
9-10 






:er 


12-5 
10-3 

0- , 

15-2 
8-9 




yiT.OUf: 




15-8 



The women's and men's track and field teams had another outstand- 
ing season, once again capturing the CAC titles. This extends the 
men's streak to 3 years in a row, while the women have captured 

every CAC Track & Field title held (9). I believe our success is due 

to the efforts of our people, not only during the season, but in the 

off-season as well. Our team is proud to represent MWC, and we 

hope to continue our success in 2003! 
- Coach Stan Soper - 
I 



> 



track is mOTC than run- 
ning, it's a place to 

meet good friends, lose 
your worries and 
have a great time. 



UNDS.^' SMITH 



TRACK & FIELD 




94 sports 




j.xKd Bankos 
Ryan Ba\ ne 
Adam Benabdallah 
Bobby Bergin 
Scott Broaddus 
Nate Brooks 
\drian Burke 
Peter Diamond 
lustin DonneUv 
kremv Driver 
( .( ilin DwTcr 
Clint Enos 
Erich Heckel 
|ason Hough 
Travis |ones 
Matt Kjrk 



team roster 

Erik Kochert 
Todd Kronenberg 
.\hke Xewbold 
C] Richardson 
Jake Rod 
Lucas Salzman 
John Slawinski 
Franz Wesner 
Alex West 
Kevin Wallace 
joey Wilson 
Dusrin Yudovvitch 
David Zaweski 
Erin Connellv 
Emily Edelman 
Stacie Evans 
Dana Folta 



Christina Francis 
Erin Haile 
Sarah Kut 
Liz Lake 
Nicole Maier 
Cindv McElveen 
Amanda Nelson 
Bridget Ralph 
Lindsay Smith 
Melissa Smith 
Christina Sullivan 
|ane Thies 
Kathleen Toone 
Rachel L ngerer 
Alana West 
Kim Woods 




1 Pushing herself, Rachel Lingerer runs the steeple- 
L liase. The steeplechase consisted of a footrace of 3,000 
iiieters that included hurdles and water jumps. ~ 2 
Running a relay. Alex West hands the baton to Adam 
iicnabdallah. Changing batons smoothly was key to the 
.success of a relay team. " 3 Extending himself. Erik 
Kochert aims to gain distance in the long jump. Kochert 
took first in the event at the Battlefield Relays. 



^ 



Track & Field 



95 



^ STATS 



36-10 



Georgetown 25-15 

Radford 12-34 

University of Virginia 14-27 

Longwood 

Ed and Sandy Lee Cup 



'In the spring, we won the Washington Irish St. Patrick's Day Tourna- 
ment then lost to Yale to finish second in the Washington Cherry 

Blossom Tournament. We went 6-4 in the fall to finish third in Vir- 
ginia and hope to build on that success in the upcoming seasons." 
- Prof. Warner - 



> 



> 



we tuned our skills and 

achieved goals we 

had set for the season. 

MATT SIL-W 




MENS RUGBY 



96 Sports "I 




Lonnie Adams 
Chris Amrod 
Andv Bennett 
Kevin Blake 
Kevin Bradlev 
Mike Briscoe 
lames Browne 
Steve Busch 
Matt Clark 
Ed Dickerson 
Nate Dovle 
Rvan Findlev 
|eff Frankston 
Will Freaklv 



team roster 

Peter Geres 
jodv Greene 
llossein Hamed 
Darren Hendricks 
Dennis Jensen 
Ben Johnson 
line Jones 
Marc Jones 
Dan Leckburg 
Dan Lee 
Tonv Lunger 
Mark Malone 
Jim McKinnon 
Nate Myers 



^Alex Naden 
John Paxton 
Gavin Pickenpaugh 
Adam Schwartz 
Matt Shaw 
Andv Smith 
Earl Smith 
Matt Wellner 
Dane Whitworth 
Adam Wilkinson 
Andrew Woodard 



N^" 




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1 S.iphomiire Mark Malone rushev lo pick up a 
tiropped ball before his opponents. A goal scored was 
called a "try" and could be followed by a conversion. 

2 Being held up by his teammates. "B" catches the 
li.ill following a line out. Line outs were the actions 
I lull put the hall into play. 3 Falling to the ground, 
iLinior Andrew Bennett clenches the ball to keep the 
oiher team from stealing it. Such falls and hits were 
I haractcristic of rugby, a game played without padding. 



Men's Rugby 



97 



i ' 


'5iMi: 


> 

0-47 


1 ^ r; ;-^ ^ r ; 


:v£.- 


37-0 


[ vcu 




7-5 
0-20 
first 
35-25 




:ssom 


second 



"We've had a great season and I consider us one of nation's premier 
Division II women's rugby teams. We won the MARFU College 
Women's Division II championship, and won our bracket in the Savan- 
nah St. Patrick's Day tournament. Playing Division I teams helped our 

plav tremendously, enhancing the support team members gave each 

other." 
- Coach Bill Lucas - 



> 



> 



we always had fun - 

it didn't matter whether 
we won or lost. 

LYDLA FROM' 




womens' rugby 



98 Sports I 






team roster 


Kat Aversano 


Liz ISjng 


Rebecca Schram 


Ginny Bach 


Alex Lambert 


Gillian Sciacca 


Ari Bensusan 


Emma Law 


]essica Shaver 


Kara Brockman 


Kristin Machado 


Anna Merrv- Welcome 


Kllen Brooker 


Whit MarshaU 


Laura Shea 


Sarah Davis 


Katie Miller 


Tempe Smith 


Sarah Domenech 


Jen Mozolic 


Victoria Stauffenberg 


f'nn Donegan 


Karstena Munzmg 


Claudia Thomas 


Stephanie Eyes 


Stephanie Pllumm 


Diana Torres 


1 ,\xiia Frost 


Erin Prmtv 


Emilv Zechman 


lanilv Grogg 


Ashley Racine 


Marie Zezula 


\niv Hewat 


Lauren Roan 




Susie Hobbs 


Bridiret Robinson 










Locking arms, ihc v\i)incn\ luiihs icani forms a 
scrum. Scrums helped players gain possession of the ball. 
2 Charging down the field. Jen Mozolac seeks to 
allude her opponents. Quick footwork to get around 
opponents proved key for the offense. "3 Hanging 
onto the ball. Amy Hewat tries to not be tackled. Dan- 
ger surfaced In many tackles, as players did not wear pads. 



W. Rugby 



99 



r r 



^teven when youVe played the game of 

you'll remember, you'll forget the plays, the 
your teammates. 




hard work & togethemess. 



because it's such a tough atmosphere.. .tO Will week 

you don't always win, and yOU gOtta 



100 Sports 



your life, it's the feeling of teamwork that 
shots and tlie SCOfCS, but you'll never forget 




they go hand-in-hand, you need the hard work 
in and week out. you need togetherness because 

hang; tough tOgethet. 



TOXl' DUNGY 



Teamwork 101 





^ 




Sports 1U3 



ALL - AMERICANS 




/1\ 



swimming is a big part of my life, and the team at mary 

Washington made me appreciate swimming that much more, coach 

kinney has an incredible program and he inspired me m so 

many ways -- i would not have gotten this far without his support, i 

have had the Opportunity to be part of an amazing team, 

but still excel individually, swimming taught me to never give up 

and that hard work gets you far. 

ndakohne 



erik koche rt 



what i enjoy about track and field is that the sport 
offers both team and individual aspects of competi- 
tion, as a member of a track team, you have a role in 
which you are expected to SCOre pointS. in this way, the 
team relies on your Contribution, but track also offers 

the opportunity to compete agalnst yoursclf and 
for yourself. 





104 Sports I 



J 




jessica morris 



Justin snyder Christine ballance 



\|/ 



bobby berg jrPf 



i high jump tor the fact that it's you against the 

bar. the simple competitiveness of the individual, to n 

there is HO gtcatcr challenge. 




ALL - AMERICANS 



All Americans 105 




106 Organizations 




ORGANIZATIONS 



Jl^lCVCltCd expectations of college life left many students desiring a busier sched- 
ule or perhaps even an outlet to express creative ideas. Other students wanted to be- 
long to a group, one that helped them meet new people and serve the community at the 
same time. Luckily, a club or organization existed for everyone's desires and needs, 
and if a student couldn't find one that suited them properly, the option existed to create 
such a club. The Office of Student Activities and Community Services worked hard 
throughout the year, coordinating the operations of college-recognized organizations, 
CflnClflClTl(j programs of diversity throughout the campus community and offer- 
ing positions of leadership. From Class Council and the Student Government Associa- 
tion to C.O.A.R. and campus publications, the Office of Student Activities and Com- 
munity Services had a hand in most of the events that occuned on and around campus. 
Students who found themselves involved in various clubs and events gathered fulfill- 
ment and valuable experiences from their roles. Leadership positions gave sUidents 
VlCTCdSlllXj responsibilities and often looked favorable in the eyes of future em- 
ployers. Community sei-vice or religious organizations offered the opportunity for 
students to continue devoted lifestyles in the midst of a campus environment. No 
matter what the mission of the club or activity, each group existed solely on the stu- 



dent-run operations. Students planned the budgets, organized the events and strongly 
upheld the reputafion of the college at conferences, social events and in the local com- 
munity. The overwhelming presence of campus clubs and organizations reflected the 
strength and UVlltttnCj character of the student body. 



107 



Mad Mary UUimateFrisbee 



During a break in the game, team mem- 
bers, from left: junior Matt Lange, jun- 
ior Cory Adis. sophomore Justin 
Zimmerman, senior Brevin Balfrey- 
Boyd. sophomore Justin Gaines, and se- 
nior John Ramira discuss the next plav- 
Players quicl^ly learned that teamwork 
prevailed as one of the most important 
aspects of a successful game. 




Floats, Flicks, and Pulls 



Enthusiasm for ultimate frisbee increa.sed .signitlcantly during tlie past se\'eral years. Now a club sport played at 
many colleges and universities throughout the country, ultimate frisbee has obtained a place at Mary Washington as well. The 
men"s team gained popularity and boasted a strong group of both veteran and rookie players. During the fall season, the team's 
record ended as 11-3, including a big tournament win at Shippensburg University. The spring season included such competi- 
tors as Duke, Clemson. and Princeton. The team practiced three times a week at Kenmore Park and occasionally moved to 
Ball Circle when conditions allowed. 

The actual sport of ultimate frisbee originated in the late 1960"s but has only existed at MWC for a few years. 
Considered an easy sport to pick up, frisbee caught on quickly as a stationary game of "throw and catch." Only with dedica- 
tion did players gain skill in the team-playing part of the sport. One especially unique aspect of ultimate frisbee distinguishes 
the sport as more than a simple game. The players moved all over the field, holding the responsibility of calling foul and line 
faults themselves, not with any official. This made good sportsmanship very important to the sport, as well as established a 
sense of spirit, central to the plays of the game. The Mad Mary team realized the importance of this in winning and playing 
well together. "I've never seen a sport where there is such a mutual respect for the team you're on, the team you're playing, 
and the sport itself. It's a unique combination, and ultimate really has the ability to bring together a bunch of pretty random 
guys that would probably never hang out together and let them interact as a team," senior Chris Hunt said. 

The team combined both effort and humor to their everyday play. Throughout the season, costumes and themed 
tournaments came up such as the Fall Formal Tournament where players adorned formal wear while out on the field. Players 
also wore an occasional Spiderman costume or Braveheart attire just for the fun of it. More often than not. song-like cheers 
arose from the teams, another unique part of the sport. To inform fellow classmates and others about games and tournaments, 
the team took advantage of the Spirit Rock to encourage support from the rest of the school during weekend games. The team 
members took the sport seriously and realized the experience itself mattered most. "I get high off of ultimate," sophomore 
Eric Home said, a feeling shared by the entire team. 




108 Organizations 




cymit-m.i.''^^ 


s;. .,«**'': 




'.;»'^': 


W 




Looking for a tejinmate to make a pass, 
liimor Cory Adis uses his skill to battle a 
member of the opposing team. Although ul- 
11 mate frishee remained a non-contact sport 
much in\o]\ement occurred between the 
leams over possession of the disc. 




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Aftera running catch of the frishee. junior 
Patrick Cassino looks to to a teammate 
downfield. Played with seven players on the 
tield, ultimate frishee required players to 
pivot on their feet and pass instead of run- 
ning the disc down the field. 



Organizations 



109 



- During a lull in the rapids, a group of Trek 
Club members pose for a picmre. The annual 
white water trip took place over fall break 
and was, for some, the highlight of the first 
semester. 



Pausing to aim for his target junior Stuart 
Gottlieb enjoys the paint ball trip. Members 
of the Trek Club were able to participate in a 
variety of different adventure trips during 
both the fall and spring semsters. 



110 Organizations 





w»^: 






A Sense of Adventure 

Undoubtedly one of the most extreme clubs on campus, the Trek Club constantly 
outdid itself always looking for a more adventurous activity to participate in each month. 
Giving all students an opportunity to get involved with the trips, officers worked together 
to plan many different types of activities to appeal to all student tastes. Whatever trip 
students chose to participate in. they were guaranteed to have fun and often push them- 
selves beyond their normal limits. 

The main goal of the club was to keep students acti\ e and to pro\ ide a vvav for 
students to release tension and try out activities, normally not available on a regular basis. 

The fall semester included such events as paintball. a weekend of camping and 
hiking, a ropes course, and the white water rafting trip over fall break. The spring semester 
included a skiing trip to Pennsylvania, horseback riding, hang gliding, splunking (a type of 
caving in confined places), and the annual sky diving trip after classes ended the first week 
in May. Members paid dues at the beginning of the year and in return, received a half off 
discount on all trips that they chose to participate in. Nonmembers were also welcomed to 
involve themselves at any time throughout the year. "Not only is the Trek Club a great way 
to meet new people, but it also has really diverse activities for everyone. ..the list is endless 
if you like the outdoors, ""said sophomore Rebecca Tumbull. 



Trek Club 




During the officer training at Camp Hem- 
lock, junior Marc St. Pierre prepares for the 
zip wire. This was just one of the events that 
officers and club members participated in 
throught the year. 



I Organizations 



111 



A Dorm Essential 



At first glance, most students imagined that residence halls existed as individual buildings without any structure 
or organization. The exact opposite was the case for the residence halls around this campus. The Association of Residence 
Halls or ARH functioned as the body that united all the buildings together 

ARH acted as a bridge between students and administration concerning living situations all over campus. Each 
dorm had a representative with cabinent members that oversaw the halls. They brought concerns from the students living 
in the different halls to the attention of the Office of Residence Life and Housing. For example. ARH kept the halls 
prepared with things they needed; everything from microwaves to toilet paper. 

As well as serving as a more administrative service, the group also focused on involving students in campus 
activities. ARH sponsored events like Mr MWC. powder puff football, Marshall Hall's "Grill on the Hill," and South 
Hall's "Southside Luau." 

"ARH really is the backbone of all of the halls, we make sure that everything is running smoothly so everyone is 
happy." said sophomore and ARH hall representative Dave Hunsberger. 

ARH not only stayed involved in on-campus activites. but also participated in larger conferences that involved 
other residence life organizations from around the state and region. These conferences allowed groups to exchange ideas 
as well as get to know other students. The conference attendees also particpated in a carnival as well as a formal dance, 
including fun with the students' hard work. 

The events and leadership training allowed the ARH to build a better sense of community for students in each 
indi\ idual dorm and all across campus. 



1^ 




- The ARH delegation poses for a group pic- 
ture while attending a fall state conference. 
The group worked together to promote cam- 
pus activites that in\olved a diverse group 
of students. 



112 



Organizations 




Association of Residence Halls 




During part of their down iimc at a con- 
vention, sophomores Rebecca Turnhull and 
Wynne Patick compete in a game of bungee 
tug. One of tlie elements of team building 
was for the members to have fun as well as 
leam leadership qualities. 



Working together to finish a poster, junior 
Meagan Lindsay and ARH advisor Dawn 
Fike look up from their work for a picture. 
Discussion and idea sharing with groups from 
other schools was an important part of ARH 
planning. 



Organizations 113 



True Expressions and Form 




During the fall dance concert members of 
PAC use the full length of the stage in Dodd 
for their performance. Choreography was one 
of the essential elements of the show. 



Performing Arts Club..., 



Since the loss of the dunce major at MWC several years ago, the Performing Arts Club allowed 
students to continue to express their love of dance in their free time. Completely student-run, the club held 
auditions each semester for their main performance, which took place in Dodd toward the end of the 
semester. For that performance, student choreographers selected dancers from the audition and rehearsed 
once a week until the show. Choreographers held responsibility for teaching the dancers the choreogra- 
phy, costuming, and lighting design. 

This year the main show, Eugenius, ran twice during the weekend of November 10-11. Featuring 
twelve different pieces, the show consisted of performances to a variety of different musical genres and 
artists. Examples ranged from Beck, to Metallica, to Kid Rock, and Jill Smith. This was the culminating 
event of the semester for the members of the club, after weekly practices and a great deal of hard work. 
Other students and members of the local community shared enjoyment and entertainment in the talents of 
the dancers and performers. 

PAC also held an open floor show each semester. This year both the fall and spring open floor 
performances took place in Lee Hall Ballrooin. This performance showcased not only student choreogra- 
phers and dancers, but also students enrolled in Beginning Jazz and Intro to Modern Dance classes. The 
open floor show took place just before the main show and served as a display of "works in progress." In 
the spring semester, the open floor performance was held on March 21 and the Dodd performance was 
held April 13-14. 

Dancers that didn't perform in either show found themselves still welcome as part of the club. 
PAC members also taught ballet, modern, jazz, and conditioning classes each week, as well as other types 
of dance instruction like hip-hop, lyrical, or Latin dancing. 

PAC functioned as a club that allowed students who loved to dance, the chance to improve and 
display their talents in semester programs. It was also a way for dancers to improve and to learn new 
methods of dancint;. 




114 Organizations 




After finishing a piece, juniors Sarah 
Sadaghatfar and Jessica Brandes sit and watch 
the next group perform. The open floor show 
was a good way for dance students as well as 
PAC members to display their talents in a more 
informal manner. 



Alone on stage, the dancer becomes very 
involved in the music. Along with the chore- 
ography that was involved, part of the 
performance's uniqueness derived from stu- 
dent emotion and expression. 





Dancing did not exist as [lie onl\ element 
of the performance, distinct lighting patterns, 
background design, and the choice of music 
were all significant. Combined, these all 
helped the dancers pull off an ama/ing show. 



Organizations 1 1 5 



College Republicans I 



Several members ol the 
College Repuhlieans pose 
for a group pielurc; IVoiii 
left to right: freshiii.n 
Colin Swink. sophomoii 
executive director Mik> 
Hagan. sophomore cIik i 
delegate Josh Morris, j 1 1 n 
ior 1st vice HeatherBishop, 
senior chairman M.jii 
Hoell, and sophomoie 
sccrelarv Heather Kellev. 




■ 

; On The Campaign Trail 



The mission of the College Republicans involved members directly in the political process 
and this year was no exception. Following last years Republican win in the White House, members 
were anxious to continue their involvement with the party. 

One of the biggest fundraisers and activities for the club this year was the Mr. MWC com- 
petition. Planned by club member and junior Heather Bishop, the third year of the show was another 
large sucess. Part of the proceeds from the show went to the Rappahanock Council for Domestic 
Violence. October, the month of the competition, was Domestic Violence Awareness month. Circle 
K also helped the College Republicans with the activites of the night. 

The members also participated in the November elections in Virginia. In the weeks leading 
up to the elections, the College Republicans co-hosted two debates of local candidates with the 
College Democrats. The debates were for both the 28th and 88th Virginia House of Delegates. 
These debates provided an opportunity for both students and members of the voting community to 
listen to the candidates' opinions on several key campaign issues. 

The night before the election members went around to local voting places to put up signs for 
the candidates from the Republican party. This process lasted well into the morning, having some 
club members out until 4 a.m. making sure everything was ready for voters. Also, during Election 
Day, members sat at the polls to hand out sample ballots and campaign literature to the voters. 

In the spring semester, one of the largest events was the Issues Conference held at Mary 
Baldwin. The club submitted a positions paper on the subject of missile defense. "This has been a 
great year for Mary Washington College Republicans. This year's Mr. MWC contest was the best 
ever, and we would like to thank everyone involved. While it was a disappointment to lose the 
Governor's and Lt. Governor's position in this year's election, it was a great comfort to see local 
candiates win, and we would like to wish Delagates Cole and Howell good luck in their terms," said 
senior and Chairman Matt Hoell. 




116 



Organizations | 





After the Mr. MWC show, junior Heather 
Bishop, who planned the evening, gathers 
with the 12 men representing each residence 
hall. This night was largest fundraiser for the 
College Repuhlicans. 



After finding out that he won. Mr. Madison 
and senior Ken Jones is congratulated by other 
contestants. Judges scored contestants in 
evening wear, sports wear, a talent section, and 
a question and answer segment. 



Organizations 



117 



^yj}?!?.?-!?.?.! 



Singing and dancing along senior Eric Haas, 
senior Kelly Krieger, and sunior Diana Daly 
work together to give another enjoyable perfor- 
mance. The Symfonics worked hard perform- 
ing without any musical accompaniment. 




Hitting AU The Riglit Notes 



There i.s no .shortage of musical talent at Mary Washington with the many different 
types of musical groups, the Symfonics just one example of unique musical skills. The 
Symphonies set themselves apart from every other group because they don't use any musical 
instruments. The 1 8 members of the campus's co-ed a cappella group, continued to peiform 
and increase their fan following. 

This year, one of the most exciting events for the group was the release of their 
second CD. "Can't Get Enough." during Parents Weekend. This CD included many of the 
songs that the group had been singing for a while and as well as a few new songs. The entire 
play list for the Symfonics included very diverse songs from popular musicians today. Ex- 
amples encompassed songs from such various and diverse musicians as Ouster, the Dixie 
Chicks. Barry White, and Ben Folds Five. 

The Symphonies had several on-campus events this year, including a fall show in 
the Great Hall that also featured music from three other school A Cappella groups. In the 
spring, the group's main event involved a spring invitational in the Underground, including 
the John Hopkins Allnighters and the JMU Bluestones. The group also visited other schools 
as well throughout the year so their musical talents could be shared at the dift'erent schools. 

The strong perfonnances that the group put on resulted from endless work over 
several months. While the singing was taken very seriously, everything was completed with 
a sense of humor. Costume accessories, signs, and skits made up for the lack of instruments 
and added humor, leaving the group to provide percussion using just their voices. 

The group improved and continued to make progress in the music. Overall, they 
haven't been around for a substantial length of time, but they have been quickly increasing 
their fan base and involving more people into their shows every time they perform. 



Organizations | 




Sdphtimore Dave Zedonck adds facial ex- 
pressions to his solo to empathize the song, 
most of the members had one or two songs in 
which thev were featured as soloists. 



During one of his solos. Junior Matt Sevon 
iincentrates to get just the notes he is look- 
ig lor. The group practiced several times a 

cck m order In perfect (heir sound. 




Performing an their ongoing Symfonics 
cheerleaders skit, seniors Jane Atticks, Joel 
Nelson, and Liz King humor the crowd be- 
tween songs. This skit was a spoof of the Sat- 
urday Night Live cheerleaders and made the 
crowd laugh every time. 



Organizations 



119 



Keeping The Past Alive__ 

Fredericksburg has called itself. "The Most Historic City." and MWC has held a strong 
reputation for its Historic Preservation program, so the members of the Historical Preservation club 
never had to worry about something to do. This club, comprised mainly of members of the major, 
stayed very involved in both on and off campus activities. 

In the fall semester, the club sponsored several events in the city. The most widely known 
of these was the annual Ghost Walk. This walking tour of some of the historical sites in Fredericksburg 
occurred around Halloween. Members and other volunteers took groups around on guided tours. 
Other students could be found in historical costume reenacting famous ghost stories and scaring the 
visitors. 

Over Parents Weekend, the club sponsored free van tours of the downtown area's historical 
sites. This gave parents, as well as students, the opportunity to learn more about the city beyond the 
campus gate. The club also attended the National Trust Conference in the fall which took place in 
Providence, Rhode Island. Speakers and presentations throughout the week focused on hot topics in 
preservation. 

The biggest event of the spring semester was the Victorian Ball which took place on Febru- 
ary 24th in Lee Ballroom. The theme of the ball. Moonlight and Magnolias, came from a Mort 
Kunstler painting. The authentic event had decorations that gave the feel of a real ball including 
things like trees and several different attendees dressed in formal, period dress. Since every detail 
proved important to making it seem like an actual Victorian ball, dance lessons were given by a 
"dance mistress," a re-enacter well-versed in appropriate dance steps. This gave students the chance 
to dance to period music as their Victorian counterparts would have. "We spent a lot of time plan- 
nine the decorations to make the ballroom really tit with the theme," said sophomore Kristi Harpst. 



Showing off their dancing and outfits, se- 
nior Christina Wample and her partner are 
admired by another dancer. The Ball ended 
as an overwhelming success for the club as 
well as the people who attended. 

120 Organizations 




Historical Preservation Club 




While sitting out and watching the other 
dancers, this participant shows off her period 
dress. The degree of unique and authentic 
clothing varied from person to person, uilh 
nn>st tuninii into the theme. 



A group of dancers participate m a period 
dance during the hall. The morning of the 
event, people took advantage of free dance 
lessons in preparation for the night. 



Organizations 121 



Invoice 



The third and newest a cappella group on campus created an all male vocal 
organization they called Invoice. Invoice started in the spring of 2001 through the 
collaborative efforts of sophomore Kevin Boyd, senior Ken Jones and junior John 
Daubert. The three held auditions during the same semester and added six new mem- 
bers to their new organization. 

The group, still unnamed at the time, chose "Invoice" as their name in the 
beginning of the following fall semester. Invoice began to advertise for more auditions 
shortly after and eventually welcomed three more members. The guys began rehears- 
ing a set of songs and, after one more audition, finally felt they had a solid foundation 
on which they could build. With a total of eleven members, all but one senior knew 
they would return the following year, developing a fan following and establishing a 
good reputation. 

The group quickly established a repertoire consisting of a wide range of mu- 
sical styles, including many popular songs. A few examples included. You 're a God by 
Vertical Horizon, Jessie's Girl by Rick Springfield, and Shape of My Heart by the 
Backstreet Boys. The group members arranged some of their own music, borrowed 
music from other musical groups, and purchased some of it from the CASA (Contem- 
porary A Cappella Society of America) archives. 

During the spring semester. Invoice participated in several shows both on and 
off campus. This included both a winter and a spring show with Bellacappella, a show 
at the Thurmcn Brisben homeless shelter in mid-April, and a show with the JMU a 
cappella group, "Low Key," in Harrisonburg. The group started to plan ahead for next 
year, already scheduling a show during Parents Weekend. "I think the group came 
together really well over the last two semesters. We've dedicated ourselves to perform- 
ing our music well but we remain relaxed enough to have fun with each other at re- 
hearsal and during our shows. Our goal is to have our audiences leave feeling like they 
have been really entertained. I'm excited about our future, and 1 think this group can 
really go far," said President and sophomore Kevin Boyd. 




Members practice in a .stairwell, hoping lo 
achieve a unique sound. The group also sang 
around the dorms, al the fountain, and other 
places around campus, developing recogni- 
tion as an organization. 



During a soundcheck, freshman Ned 
Darrell practices one of his solo parts. The 
group members had the opportunity to per-| 
form a variety of songs from different musi- 




The group poses for a picture after their 
pertormancc al The Treblcmakers Winter 
Concert. The group performed well at one 
of their first opportunities to sing in front of 
an audience. 



Organizations | 



No Treble Making Music 




llACappella members show iheir spini 
by walking in the Homecoming parade. The 
group stayed involved in activities all over 
campus, apart from their musical perfor- 



The filtecn members olthe group perliinii 
dunng their February show. This event gave 
people the chance to come out and hear the 
group's talents developed throughout the 
year. 



I The Other single gender a cappella group, BellACappella, 

has existed as ail-girls organization on campus for a little over a year 
They have had several opportunities to perform around campus as 
well as with groups from other schools around the state. 

Along with the other a cappella groups. BellACappella chose 
to focus its musical selections on mainly contemporary music, in- 
cluding songs froin artists like the Indigo Girls, Extreme, and Boys 
11 Men. The group managed to maintain a unique sound through the 
voices of its members and distinguished itself amid the other musi- 
cal organizations on campus. 

Most of the groups performances took place during on-cam- 
pus events. This year they performed for Parents Weekend and sang 
the national anthem at different sporting events, including soccer 
and basketball games. During the spring semester the group held 
two concerts with Invoice, one in Pollard and the other during "Spring 
Fling," in Monroe. 

"The biggest project for the spring semester was our Smg- 
ing Valentines program, in which students could hire the group to 
serenade their friend or sweetheart." said sophomore Carolyn 
Huckabay. The group had several songs for students to choose from 
as well as several different locations that they would sing around 
campus on Valentine's Day. Despite the fact that it was the first 
fund-raiser of its kind, the positive response from reflected in the 
serenades witnessed all day long. 




BellACappella 



I Organizations 123 



College Democrats \ 



A group of student democrats take time to pose 
with Mark Warner during a governor's rally in 
October. Warner went on to win the governor- 
ship a month later. 



Several members of the College Democrats 
seize the opportunity to coverse with Lieu- 
tenant Governor Tim Kaine. The students at- 
tended the JJ dinner in Richmond and met 
many state political leaders at this annual 
event. 



124 Organizations! 





The officers, sophomore treasurer Will 
Andrews, senior president Brandon 
Robinson, and senior secretary Sara 
Camacho-Felix. pose for a picture after one 
of their meetings. The bi-weekly meetings 
allowed the group to plan future events and 
share opinions on current political events. 



During a meeting, senior Brandon Robinson 
presides over the group. The meetings allowed 
the members to voice their opinions in a sup- 
portive atmosphere. 



Part of the Process 



The College Democrats worked hard throughout the year to sta\- 
involved in the political events that occurred on local, state and national 
levels. This year evolved into an especially busy time for the students due 
to the opportunity they had to actively participate in the election cam- 
paign on the state level. 

During the fall semester, the College Democrats decided to spon- 
sor an annual Virginia Young Democrats Convention and competed for 
the bid to be the sponsor school. The students won the bid and the con- 
vention was held in April at a local hotel in Fredericksburg. It featured 
several guest speakers and democrats from around the state. The club 
spent numerous hours throughout the year getting leady for the big e\ ent 
and saw all of their hard work pay off when the event ended as a success. 

Another inajor activity for the group involved state election cam- 
paigns. Every weekend, members campaigned in local neighborhoods, 
distributing flyers and explaining the democratic ticket to voters. In Oc- 
tober, Fredericksburg hosted a Mark Warner rally that the group also at- 
tended. 

The College Democrats found Election Day one of their busiest 
days as an organization inember. "We got up at 3 am and finished putting 
up signs for the candidates, worked the polls, called people to urge them 
to vote, and did last minute campaigning and arranging of rides to the 
polls," said freshman Stefanie Beierschmitt. Later that night, members 
attended the victory party for the winning democratic candidates in Rich- 
mond. They also traveled to Richmond again in January for the inaugura- 
tion ceremony. Aside from these campaign activities, the group worked 
to plan social e\ents for members and initiate interest all over campus. 




I Organizations 



Lending a Helping Hand 




During the Homecoming parade, COAR 
members proudly carry a banner decorated 
with one of the club's mottos. "Service is 
nothing but love in work clothes" reflected 
COAR's dedication to improving the quality 
of life for the local and global community. 



C.O.A.R 



As one of the largest overall organizations on campus. Community Outreach and Re- 
sources (or COAR) involved one in four MWC students in its programs throughout the year. 
COAR sponsored numerous service programs in many different areas, so students could choose 
among volunteer activities that really interested them. With the direction of a small staff, the 
otherwise entirely volunteer-run organization had a large impact that reached beyond the scope 
of the campus grounds and throughout the surrounding community. 

With over 20 different student coordinated service areas and projects, COAR worked to 
stay actively involved in the community. Council members each had their own service area 
which students could sign up to join. These ranged from animal affairs to elderly programs and 
everything in between. These projects usually required a minimum of one hour a week volunteer 
time by students. There were also several special event opportunities throughout the year if 
students were looking for a one time commitment. "I volunteered at an elementary school with 
the ESL program and I really enjoyed helping and getting to know the third-grader that I was 
assigned. 1 think I'll definitely continue helping out there while I'm here." said sophomore Sarah 
Winnan. 

One of the biggest events for COAR this year was the first annual Make-A-Difference 
Day. Held on October 20th all over campus, the event involved a multitude of local children 
from diverse backgrounds. Throughout the day, over 75 children individually teamed up with a 
college volunteer and performed simple service projects in various buildings around campus. 
After completing a project, each child received a loop to link to a growing chain outside Lee Hall. 
This provided a visual sign of the effort the kids put into the day and their projects. By the end of 
the day, volunteers had accumulated over 750 service hours on a variety of projects. 

In addition to weekly volunteer programs, COAR also sponsored three break trips in 
which students could participate. Instead of going to the beach for spring break or lounging at 
home during fall break, small groups of students chose to travel to cities along the East Coast, 
spending their time volunteering through nationwide service organizations. 




126 Organizations | 




Two students dress up as penquins as part 
of their alternative spring break trip to Bos- 
ion. Massachusetts. COAR sponsored one fall 
break tnp and two spring break trips during 
the school year 




COAR director Lea Ziobro keeps every- 
thing in order during Make-A-Difference Day. 
The new event on campus required long h(nirs 
ot planning for both the director and the stu- 
dent \olunteers. 




A crowd gathers in front of Lee Hall at the 
close of the first annual Make-A-Difference 
Day. Local children and COAR volunteers 
held on to the "chain of good deeds," com- 
prised of construction paper loops that the 
children earned through service projects 
throughout the day. 



I Organizations 



Setting the Standard 



"The purpose of the Student Government Association (SG A) shall 
be to work for a better college community through the development and 
strengthening of individual responsibility and citizenship. The SGA shall 
share with the faculty and the administration the obligation of respecting 
and promoting the tradition, standards and objectives of the college and 
instilling the principles of self-government and democracy in every stu- 
dent." This mission statement describes in broad terms the extensive re- 
sponsibilities that SGA members had in various campus activities. 

Members of different campus organizations such as Senate, Ju- 
dicial Review Board, Honor Council, Academic Affairs Action Commit- 
tee, Legislative Action Committee, and Association of Residence Halls 
comprised the SGA. An executive cabinet served as the governing body 
for the group and included representatives, usually presidents, from these 
organizations. This enabled everyone to take part in the structuring of 
SGA activities and incorporate each group's goals and interests through- 
out the planning process. 

Most events on campus used the SGA for assistance in soine shape 
or fonn. From Homecoming events to music concerts, SGA worked with 
other organizations to build a sense of community on campus and involve 
as many students as possible. The group worked together to continue 
traditions already in place as well as start new ones such as the spirit rock. 

In addition to giving students many activities to fill their free 
tmie, the organization also worked with the administration on serious is- 
sues that they hoped would improve the school in many different areas. 
This input also extended to issues off campus that had the potential to 
affect students. Such a broad scope gave SGA members, especially the 
Legislative Action Committee, the opportunity to get involved in larger 
political issues beyond MWC. 




- The Senate po.ses for a picture before tak- 
ing part in the first Homecoming parade. The 
week-long string of spirit-boosting act]\iiics 
made Homecoming a memorable event, u iih 
the Senate actins us the overseer for all ol 




Organizations I 



student Government Association 



While lobbying, past LAC chair John 
Lydon. member Kristen Bamum, and current 
chair John Messinger stand with a delegate. 
Contacts with people in power positions was 
one of the advantages to being a member of 
the LAC. 




Cabinenl members Kelly Heroman. 
Rebecca Cole. Kathy White, and Knsty Bartle 
take a break during an ice cream social at 
Friendly's, Cohesion between members 
pro\ed Itself as one of the most important el- 
f SGA leadership. 



The Senate and Executive Cabinenl pose 
for a picture during their fall cookout. This 
e\ ent allowed members to sociahze with each 
other in a different atmosphere and gave them 
all the opportunity to discuss upcoming 
events as well. 



I Organizations 1_29 



Music To Our Ears 



Throughout the year, many events took place on cam- 
pus that involved music of some kind, in most of those cases 
Giant staff members were behind it. From the several large 
names in music that visited the campus to the promotion of 
local bands. Giant worked hard to expose students to diverse 
musical sounds. 

One of the main duties of Giant staff involved find- 
ing musical acts to perform on campus for the student bod\. 
Giant helped bring several nationally known musicians ami 
bands to Fredericksburg each year. This year became no ex- 
ception, with the concerts of 2 Skinnee J"s, Howie Day, Dis- 
patch. John Mayer and The Roots, just to name a few. The 
benefits for club members often included meeting the musi- 
cal talent. For many, it provided more than adequate compen- 
sation for the long hours and hard work put into preparing for. 
maintaining and cleaning up after the shows. Often, club 
members even had to help the bands set up their equipment 
and get them acquainted with the surroundings. 

Even more frequently. Giant iriembers helped with 
smaller campus musical shows. These ranged from 
Rocktoberfest to Devil Goat Day to lip syncs and often open 
mic nights in the Underground. Responsibilities ranged from 
setting up stages and equipment to operating soundboards to 
making sure bystanders refrained from stepping on cords. 

While much of Giant's work took place behind the 
scenes, they remained a valuable group at the school. Stu- 
dents used music as a stress reliever and frequent concerts 
offered welcome work breaks and chances to socialize for nu- 
merous students. 



- Giant staff members operate the sound 
boards during the '"Cause and Effect" show. 
System Sound Trio and XKJ performed at this 
event in April. 



- A staff member snags a close seat dunng 
Howie Day's performance at a show in the 
Great Hall. The artist shared a concert with 
Dispatch earlier in the year. During shows 
with high attendance, staff members found 
themselves busy trying to keep things orga- 
nized and running smoothly. 




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130 Organization 



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During Rockloberfest- luo members watch 
a musical perlormance in front of Lee Hall. 
One of ihe benefits of Giant membership in- 
cluded attending all of the shows that came 
to campus. 



A group of Giant members stand to the side 
of the stage during Fredstock. Watching the 
equipment during and between shows existed 
as just one of the many responsibilities of 
members. 



Organizations 131 



SEA&AAAA 



Several members of the MAA and their spon- 
sors take a group photo after tmishing a game 
of bowling. Aside from academic purposes, the 
group met several times during the year to take 
a break and socialize. 




{Working For The Future 



Several clubs on campus existed within majors and provided students with the oppor- 
tunity to join in on social events around campus, while at the same time enhancing their under- 
standing and experiences in their field of study. Two of these, the Mathematical Association of 
America and the Student Educator's Association, involved many students across campus in 
learning activities and provided opportunities for both fun and service. 

The SEA existed as a subset of the education department, and remained a very popular 
organization for students looking to go into secondary or elementary education. The SEA held 
regular meetings, usually in workshop-style organization and with workshop activities. Guest 
speaker often came to talk to students about specific issues in education. Examples from this 
year included lectures and discussions on special education and managing the classroom. Other 
meetings brought panels of student teachers back to the college to share their experiences and 
answer any questions students might have. 

One project the SEA found themselves involved in this year brought to light the im- 
portant relationship between students and student teachers. SEA members painted pots for the 
student teachers and filled them with classroom supplies as a way of congratulating them on 
their accomplishments as a teacher. 



.1 




1 32 Organizations 




An SEA member works intently on pamt- 
ing a pot for a student teacher. Members 
worked hard to encourage other students in 
their discipline and offered support through 
acti\ ities and ser\'ice. 




The M AA found sponsorship from the math department and 
used its resources to promote an interest in mathematics. The 
organization did this by providing activities, field trips and 
seminars to math majors and those interested in becoming ma- 
jors. Aside from just academic related activities, the members 
also held social events, including bowling, going to the mov- 
ies and throwing two parties at the end of each semester. 
Another important aspect of the group "s activities included a dedica- 
tion to service. Meinbers made holiday gift boxes for local needy chil- 
dren and sponsored a children's table at the Multicultural Fair in the spring. 
They also sponsored a talk given by Dr. Jeff Edmunds, the math 
department "s newest professor and provide brain teaser contests for the 
majors. 

Ten active members made up the majority of the clubs membership. 
However, with a higher number of active par- 
ticipants joining and with more activities entic- 
ing students to gain membership, the club hoped 
for an e\en biuizer future turnout. 



SEA&MAA 



Posing for a group shot, the MAA takes a 
break from a regular meeting. With new 
activies added to the group's agenda, the or- 
ganization planned on attracting a higher 
membership in future \ears. 



I Organizations 133 



Alumni Relations 



Most students did not even think about the importance of continuing relationships between alumni and the college. 
Ambassadors, a group of students who did keep this relationship in mind, helped the alumni office with various related 
activities throughout the year. These responsibilities represented a wide range of activities from Homecoming events to 
Reunions to fundraisers and more. 

The college held a long history of strong relationships with many of its former students. The ambassadors 
existed as one of many important channels through which the college received funds and promoted activities at the college 
and in the local community. As members of the Ambassadors, students volunteered their time for activities with the 
alumni department. These activities included Welcome Week, regional and chapter alumni events, a Homecoming hot- 
dog stand, the Fredericksburg Forum, Survival Kit deliveries and Reunion Weekend. 

Reunion Weekend took place at the end of May and allowed class membeis from all different decades to return 
to the college and participate in activities with their old classmates. It also allowed returning alumni to take campus tours 
to view the new changes taking place and attend events and speakers that gave new insight into future plans for the 
college. In order for this event to run smoothly, ambassadors and other volunteer students donated long hours to plan the 
event and help out with all types of activities. The alumni also enjoyed seeing cuirent students amid the activities and 
eagerly asked questions about student life and the various aspects of the younger generation's college experiences. Many 
alumni appeared very interested in the changes that had taken place since they graduated. 

One of the many benefits of being an ambassador included the connections that existed with alumni, other 
students, faculty and members of the community. Ambassadors found themselves widening their scope of knowledge 
concerning the college and also increasing their number of acquaintances around campus. After graduation, many ambas- 
sadors had formed lasting ties with various alumni and members of the community which sometimes led to job opportu- 
nities. Most importantly, however, ambassadors provided a link between cunent students and alumni, keeping lines of 
communication open and working for the common goal of instilling the importance of the college in everyone's lives. 








- As part of the Fredericksburg Alumni 
Qiapter caster egg tiunt, Tracy Brandt works 
at a face painting station. Many of ttie group's 
responsibilities involved helping out with 
alumni events. 




134 Organizations 



College Ambassadors 





Ambassadors help the local alumni group 
put together exam survival kits for students. 
Alumni and ambassadors offered the care 
packages to parents, who could choose to 
send their son or daughter extra snacks and 
goodies during stressful times in the year. 



" During a "new student welcome" activity. 
Ambassadors Elizabeth Ashley-Newman, 
Rachel Sederquest, Meredith Newman. Julie 
Reed, Jen Nisoff and Mary Kate Sheridan 
hand out free frisbees. This opportunity gave 
the group the chance to let students know 
about the organization's goals and how it 
worked throughout the year, possibly creat- 
ing more interest with younger students. 



I Organizations 135 



Giving The Grand Tour 



Doing her best to help, a Washing- 
ton Guide answers a tour group's 
questions before starting the actual 
walking tour of campus. Guides had 
to be very knowledgable about all 
aspects of the school, in addition to 
being comfortable speaking in front 
of groups of people. 



Led by senior Washington Guide, Ariana 
Bensusan, a tour begins on the Lee Hall pa- 
tio. The guides worked closely with the ad- 
missions office to offer the best and broadest 
perceptions of campus for visitors. 




136 Organizations! 




Gathering at the end of the year picniL'. the 
Admissions Office staff takes time out to en- 
joy each other's company and relax. Many 
admissions stalThad graduated in recent years 
and still lelt at home in the campus surround- 



.Washington Guides 



One did not find it uncommon to run into a campus tour on the way to class or perhaps in Seacobeck. cluttering the 
already endless lines near the food. Most students did not give the mass of prospectives and parents a second thought, not to 
mention the amount of work involved in the touring process. The Washington Guides, however, saw these tours in a different 
light. These tours represented responsibility and quick thinking, hours of studying the schoors history and even more time 
keeping up to date on the latest changes around campus. These tours represented a very important job. 

The highly selective interview process and extensive training program for Washington Guides ensured that all of 
the chosen students remained well prepared to represent the school on tours. Not only did guides shadow a set number of 
tours during their training process, but they also studied books that contained statistics and relevant information about the 
college. 

As a guide, students found themselves assigned to three to four mandatory tours a semester, and more could be 
added when the student wished. Each tour required the guide to show at least one academic building and one residence hall. 
Throughout the year, many guides hosted students overnight or allowed the students to follow them around for a day, observ- 
ing the normal rituals of a college student. Another responsibility for guides involved phoning or emailing accepted stu- 
dents, looking to congratulate them and to answer any questions that they might have. "The most difficult part of being a 
guide is giving a tour on one of those days where everything is going wrong. Sometimes it's hard to smile and be positive for 
complete strangers when all you want to do is crawl back into bed. You get through it. though, and 1 think it's worth it," 
senior Carly Reid said. 

In order to stay on top of current events around campus, guides met once a month and usually had a speaker who 
gave more information about various aspects of campus life. In the spring, Washington Guides hosted Preview Day, where 
those students accepted under honors admission come to an all day event of tours, question and answer panels by students, 
lunch, and information sessions. At the end of the year, the Guides had a picnic at which students could earn awards for the 
amount of points they had earned. Points accumulated through meetings attended, tours given, phone calls made, sttidents 
hosted and other responsibilites required of Guides. Overall, the Washington Guides played an important role in drawing 
bright students to campus and representing the school in its best light. 



Organizations 



137 



Brothers of A New Direction: 



Relaxing and enjoying the show students 
waleh the BOND and WOC sponsored Step 
show, "Feel The Beat." The event took place in 
Dodd Autotoiium and drew in viewers from both 
the campus and the local community. 




I Spreading Diversity 



Brothers of A New Direction. BOND, formed a personal and community 
service group for men of color and other members on campus. The group met weekly 
to discuss issues and to plan for events that they participated in throughout the year. 
The group set goals for themselves, aiming to provide an environment for support, 
political as well as personal expression, pride and a sense of community. 

This year, BOND sponsored the 12th annual Step Show, one of the largest 
events BOND helped to organize. Held in early February, the show required many 
hours of planning by BOND with the help of the show's co-sponsor. Women of Color. 
Four local high schools, a local church step team and a fraternity from Virginia Tech 
participated in the event. An after-party held in the Underground ended the night for 
the participants as well as spectators. 

The group participated in many other activities that allowed them to build a 
sense of community among each other. The member appreciation dinner, held during 
the spring semester, illustrated the importance of membership to all. Examples of other 
activities the members participated in included basketball tournaments, poetry and mu- 
sical performances and the sponsorship and organization of a badminton tournament. 
The group also invited guest speakers to attend member meetings, including a former 
BOND president at the college who found a career practicing entertainment law. BOND 
Week, celebrated during the week of April first thru fifth, included nightly events to 
raise awareness about important issues the organization felt needed more attention. 

As part of the service aspect of BOND, members traveled as a group every 
Friday afternoon to volunteer at the Boys and Girls Club. This allowed members to 
build relationships within the community and better understand the meaning behind 
the issues for which BOND stood. 



138 



Organizations 




Feeling their own rhythm, a group from 
North Stafford High School performs dur- 
ing the "Step Show." This event marked the 
12th annual Step Show and ended as one of 
the most successful in the ciilleize's history. 



Master of Ceremonies, Hasse'l Mom.son 
announces the next performance. Six groups 
competed in the event, ranging in age, back- 
ground and experience. 



I Organizations 



ISC 



Keeping things Together 




A group of Class Council members pose for 
a picture during Rocktoberfest. This was just 
one of the many activities that the group 
helped plan and run. 



Class Council 



Class Council knew where the fun began, and it usually began at an event they had worked hard to plan. 
From early in the year, elected members of each class met to coordinate and plan most of the social and traditional 
events across campus. Class Council made most of the Homecoming events possible, sponsored dances and festivals 
in the fall and spring and brought Devil Goat Day back to campus, promising good times despite the rain that drove 
the activities indoors. Various officers held different responsibilities for each event. For example, freshmen repre- 
sentatives coordinated the Devil Goat Day events by themselves, while other classes worked on various projects both 
alone and as a team effort. Typically, members of each class worked on their own class-specific events and then 
worked as a whole for larger events. Junior Class Council members coordinated the events of Junior Ring Week, 
while senior members played a role in the planning of events such as 100th Night, marking the final 100 days until 
graduation. 

Class Council functioned as a seperate entity fi-om the Student Government Association, although many 
often confused the two. Class Council's main role in the campus community focused on providing affordable social 
activities for the student body as a whole. Most of the events the group organized allowed students in for free, or 
perhaps charged a reasonable price for tickets to events like dances. The group met weekly to make sure students 
remained content in the social settings around campus and always had an outlet to enjoy college life. 

Overall, the group represented the life of the campus and made day-to-day routines more tolerable. Whether 
handing out free food and sponsoring bands during Rocktoberfest, or dishing out pizza slices and playing games on 
Devil Goat Day, they always left smiles on students faces and offered relaxation at crucial times. Both effective 
leaders and strong students, the members of Class Council often went above and beyond their duties to make campus 
a better place overall. 




140 



Organizations 




Two Class Council members man the grill 
during the Homecoming picnic. The group 
otien mvolved themselves in activities that 
proMded entertauiment around campus. 



Making it a late night. Class Council mem- 
bers take time to rest after a long night. Many 
students failed to realize the extent of the 
members' involvement in the activities they 
continued to enjoy year after year. 





Smiling for the camera. Class Council mem- 
bers gather during Fall Formal to make sure 
everything continues to run according to plan. 
Members not only organized, set-up and ran 
the event; they also spent long hours cleaning 
up the aftermath. 



Organizations 



141 



Campus Ministries 



A group of students gather in the CCC tor 
a Christian unity event. During these events, 
members of the different Christian organi- 
zations gathered for fellowship. This was just 
one of the many events throughout the year 
that brought the different ministries together 




Sophomores Nathan Bevil and Kevin Boyd 
take a moment for retlection during a prayer 
and song session. Students enjoyed the fel- 
lowship of others during weekly ministry 
events. 



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142 Organizations! 



Keeping the Faith 




The goal of each of the different campus ministries involved working together 
to promote a common sense of beliefs and to give students an environment in which 
they felt comfortable to share those beliefs with others. Often these ministries provided 
a support group and sometimes answers for students, especially freshmen, who faced 
difficult times in their lives. Many ministries available on and near campus, opened 
their doors willingly for students, while others were created specifically for the college's 
student body. Some of the ministries created specifically for the college community 
included the Baptist Student Union, Hillel, the Catholic Student Association, the Fel- 
lowship of Christian Athletes, InterVarsity, the Canterbury Club, the islamic Student 
Association, and the Campus Christian Community. 

Students involved in any one of these organizations participated in a wide vari- 
ety of activities throughout the year. Not only did the ministries provide a place for 
smdents to practice and share their beliefs, but they also sponsored activities to help 
students grow as a group. Home-cooked meals and speakers on a variety of topics 
became a weekly event at both the CSA and CCC. Weekend retreats and trips also gave 
students the opportunity to be open about their beliefs and added a nice break to the 
semester. An example included the Orthadox Christian Fellowship retreat to Westview 
on the James. This year, for the first time InterVarsity sponsored a semi-formal dance in 
Lee Ballroom as an expansion of their regular weekly large group meetings. 

In addition to having plently of worship and social events for students, the 
organizations also involved themselves in campus-wide events as they co-sponsored 
events with Honor Council and SGA. Service also existed as another important aspect 
of the groups' goals, involving students in weekly community activities at nursing homes, 
shelters, and nearby neighborhoods. Whatever religious affiliation students most iden- 
tified with, a group existed that welcomed them and offered many opportunities for 
growth and support throughout the academic year. 




Before leaving the CSA wiriler retreat, 
sophomores EHzaheth Ferguson, Kristi Harpst 
and Beth Fleming take a picture in the snow. 
Wecl<end retreats allowed students to build 
their faith as well as friendships. 



I Organizations 143 




144 Seniors 





JZ-l€V(2t€U hopes and expectations pushed seniors into their final year as they looked 
into the future. In less than twelve months, the community they called home for four 
years would no longer exist as their home. Seniors attempted to make the most of their 
remaining time at Mary Washington, bonding together as a group and creating new 
memories to carry with them after they graduated. The beginning of the year brought 
many changes, with GMATs. LSATs and MCATs taking VTeCeaenCC for many. 
For others, formatting and refomiatting resumes became a daily activity. Career ser- 
vices helped many students, offering alumni contacts and holding job fairs both fall 
and spring semesters. Those who planned to directly enter the work force knew the 
economy did not allow much room for entry level positions, and those that did exist 
drew tough competition from across the nation. Seniors realized that their fuftires 
relied on nothing but hard work and persistance. While womes about the ftiUire loomed 
ever-presently in the backs of seniors' minds, they still managed to YlSBxo the occa- 
sion and have the time of their lives. They added enthusiasm to sporting events and 
music concerts, partied harder than ever on homecoming and gave exams their best 
effort, knowing these last moments would mean the most all too soon. Finally, seniors 




had their chance to tomient the juniors during Junior Ring Week, and took ftiU advan- 
tage of the privilege. Spring break and spring fomial offered more "last chances," 
while 1 00th Night and Grad Ball gave seniors a brand new way to celebrate their time 
in college. When graduation day dawned, a clear sky duOVC, they all knew their 
time had arrived. Ready or not, a new phase of their life awaited and they finally 
realized their own responsibility to make the most of it. 



145 








.'*'"■■ 


u i 


w 




' i 


1 



Jennifer Abraham 

Psychology 
Toms River. NJ 



Megan Adams 

Historic Preservatior 
No. Stonington, CT 



Faranak Aghdasi 

International Affairs 
Fairfax, VA 



Jamie Aliearn 

Psychology 
Olney, MD 



Benjamin Amos Dana Angell 

Business Administration/Religion History 

Moorestown, NJ Midlothian, V 



Cabriela Arellano 

Biology 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Michael Arndt 

American Studies 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Jane Atticks 

Anthropology 
Madison, CT 



Tracie Aver 

Political Science 
Bellingham, MA 



Jamie Babos 

Music 



Virginia Bach 

Mathematics 
Floral Park, NY 



Andrea Baker 

Psychology 
Virginia Beach, VA 



Jason Baker 

Biology 
Yorktown, VA 



Thaddeus Baker 

History 
Culpeper, VA 



Brigid Baldwin 

Business Administration 
Great Falls, VA 



146 IT Seniors 




Nathan Ballentine 

English 
Williamsburg. VA 



Christina Barber 

History/Education 
BurtonsviUe, MD 



Jessica Barg 

Sociology 
Stafford. VA 



Kristy Bartle 

Busine.ss Administraiion 
Richmond. V.A 



Brendan Bayer 

Economics 
Rochester, NY 



Biology 
Manassas, VA 



Psychology 
MiUis, MA 



Geography 
Virginia Beach, VA 



East Greenwich, RI 



History 
Cranford, NJ 



ine Berry 

Biology 
Bedford, NH 



Alyssa Best 

English 
Chester, VA 



Monica Bintz 

Biology/Pre-Med 
Rochester. NY 



Stacey Bittner 

Economics 
Montclair. VA 



William Blackford 

Business Administration 
Rockville Centre. NY 



Ilissa Blackman 

Political Science 
Oak Hill, VA 



Seniors XT 147 




Annette Blankenship 

Spanish Italian Studies 
Fairfax, VA 



Christopher Blasku 

Business Administration 
West Islip. NY 



Christina Blauch 

Psycliology 
Bethesda, MD 



Patrick Blumer 

English 

Ellicott City, MD 



Virginia Beach, VA 



New Hyde Park, NY 



Robert Boese 

Business Administrati( 
West Windsor, NJ 



Nicholas Bogna 

Theater 
Richmond. VA 



James Boland 

Political Scienc( 
Vienna. VA 



Jamie Bolgcr 

Psychology 
Frederieksbur". VA 



Tracey Bonita 

Political Scienc( 
Chester. NY 



Sarah Boone 

Sociology 
Norfolk. VA 



Melissa Borgcrding 

English 
Baltimore, MD 



Jasmine Bowling 

Biology 

Fori Washington, MD 



Tracey Brandt 

Biology 
Lebanon, NJ 



Shannon Brennan 

History 

Silver Spring, MD 



148 IT Seniors 




April Brice 

Business Administration 
Spotsylvania. V'A 



Daniel Brown 

Psychology 
Lyme. CT 



Abigail Browne 

Psychology 
Springfield VA 



Daniel Bruechert 

Historic Preser\'ation 
Grosse Pointe, MI 



Anne Bryc< 

English 
Burke, VA 



International Affai 
West Point, VA 



Virginia Beach, VA 



Ryan Burleigh 

Business Administrati( 
Concord. VA 



Bonnie Burlingha 

English 



Michael Burnett 

Mathematics 
Matamoras, PA 



Sarah Bushman 

Business Administrati( 
McLean, VA 



Sarah Byrne 

Psychology 
Virginia Beach, VA 



Corey Byrnes 

Computer Science 
Franklin, MA 



Rachel Cain 

English 
Pottstov\'n, PA 



Marc Calamito 

Business Administration/Biology 
Medford, NJ 



Seniors XT 149 




Hilary Callahan 

Business Administration 
Wobum, MA 



Sara Camacho-Felix 

International Affairs 
Houston. TX 



Stephen Camell 

Political Science 
Spring Lake, NJ 



Sean Cammaerts 

Religion 
Ashburn. VA 



Geography 
Springfield. VA 



Evan Carlson 

Economics 
Basking Ridge. NJ 



Sharon Carroll 

Business Admini; 



Jayme Cart 

Psychology 
Fairfax, VA 



Kevin Casey 

Environmental Sci 
West Chester, PA 



Christopher Chaleunrath 

Business Administration 



Christina Chandler 

English 
Burke. VA 



Scott Chapma 

Business Admi 
Sorinsfield Vf 



Ivy Chen 

Studio Art 
San Diego. CA 



Lisa Chillemi 

Education 
Manassas, VA 



Frances Chua 

Psychology 
Centreville, VA 



Jennifer Cicotello 

Computer Science 
Warrenton, VA 



150 IT Seniors | 




Angela Cline 

International Affairs 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Elizabeth Colletti 

History 
Richboro. PA 



Jessica Ceilings 

Biology/Business Administration 
Richmond. VA 



Elisabeth Collins 

German 
Alexandria, \'A 



-...,s,<,phy 
Culpeper, VA 



Matthew Conley 

Geology 
Pennington, NJ 



Kathenne Corneille 

Psychology 
Queens, NY 



ntal Science 
ille.NJ 



Andrew Culver 

Cultural Anthropolog 
Fredericksburg. VA 



Sarah Crow 

Studio Art 
Chester. VA 



Daniel Cullinan 

Spanish 
Arlington, VA 



Richard Culver 

Biology 

West Haven, CT 



Michelle Cunningham 

Business Administration/Spanish 
Culpeper, VA 



Elizabeth Curran 

Psychology/Classics 
Moorestown, NJ 



Seniors it 151 







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Tiffany Curry 

Theatre 
Richmond VA 




Sally Dalton 

Studio Art 
Chesapeake, VA 




Kimberly Daly 

Geology 
Nutley, NJ 


Kristine Daniels ] 

Englisli/Education 1 
Middlesex, NJ 




Jamie Darcy 

Mathematics 
Westfield, N.T 

Jennifer DeSer 

Biology 
Goldens Bridge 




NY 


Sarali Davis 

Biology 
Bon Air, VA 

Jennifer Deather 

Spanish 

King George. VA 


Jge 


.Amy Dawson 




iVIaren De Groot 

Classics/Philosophy 
Arlington. VA 

Rebecca Dix 

Art History 
Yorktown. VA 


Herndoii. VA 

Laura Dill 

Biology 
Portland. CT 




152 


Jennifer Dixon 

Biology 
Virginia Beach, 


VA 


Amanda D'Luhy 

Art History/ Antliropology 
Spring Lake, NJ 


Dave Dodrill 

Biology 
Twin Bridges. 


MT 


Michael Doll, Jr. 

History 
Springfield, VA 

J 


it Seniors 


1 















t^^ r. 




Sean Doss 

Business Administration 
Rocky Mount, VA 



Jeremy Driver 

Business Administration 
Harrisonburg, VA 



Thomas Duffy 

International Relations 
Rosvvell. GA 



Business Administration 
Danville, VA 



Terry Edwards 

Mathematics 
Norfolk. VA 



Ruth Engelhard 

Spanish 
Jamestown, RI 



Faith Erikson 

International Affa 
Cumberland, RI 



Caroline Evans 

International Affairs 
McLean, VA 



Andrew Everton 

History /Music 
Richmond, VA 



Cortney Fantasid 

Sociology 
Spotsylvania, VA 



Kena Fauntleroy 

Computer Science 
Hampton, VA 



Seniors it 153 




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Michael Fei 

Mathematics 
Richmond, VA 



Jennifer Feldman 

Historic Pi'csenation 
Northampton, PA 



Tiffany Fesler 

Mathematics 
Lynchburg. VA 



Erin Ficoi 

Psychology 
Mechanicsville. VA 



Kammeron Findley 

Biology 
Springfield, VA 



Lauren Finn 

Anthropology/Classics 
Charlottesville, VA 



Wendy Flora 

Theatre 
Shawnee, OK 



History 
Arlington, VA 



Heather Flory 

Psychology 
Bridgewater, VA 



Dana Folta 

History 
Chesterfield, VA 



Kimberly Foste 

Business Adniini 
Salem, VA 



Kristen Fowler 

Psychology 
Richmond, VA 



Taria Francois 

Business Administration 
Arlington, VA 



David Frazier 

Computer Science 
Gap. PA 



Valerie Frey 

Psychology 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Daniel Frisbie 

Political Science 
Woodbridge, VA 



154 i-T Seniors 




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Elizabeth Ganiboa 

Biology 
Fairfax. VA 



Ryan Garner 

Business Administration 
X'irginia Beach. VA 



Kathy Gochenour 

Spanish 
Edinburg, VA 



Kristy Gasser 

English 
Winchester. VA 



Carston Goebels 

Computer Scienci 
Winsen, Germanv 



Tarisa Griffith 

Historic Preservi 
Cincinnati, OH 



Randy Griffith-Perham 

Religion 
Norwood, MA 



Ashleigh Grondin 

Psychology/Art History 
E. Sandwich, MA 



Amanda Gutheridge 

Geography 
Falls Church. VA 



Eric Haas 

Biology 
Wynnewood, PA 



Curt Haase 

Psychology 
Seaford, NY 



Nessim Hadiii 

Chemistry 
Arlington. VA 



Seniors i-T 155 









Stacey Haessler 

Business Administratio 
East Hampton, NY 



Valerie Hairfleld 

Sociology/Education 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Kate Haley 

Art Histoiy 
Pembroke. NH 



Ryan Hamm 

Spanish/ Journalism 
Midlothian, VA 



English 

West Caldwell, NJ 



International Affa 
Oceanside, NY 



Biology/Env 
Fairfax, VA 



Mathematics 
Buena Vista, VA 



Jennifer Han 

Political Scienc 
Scottsdale, AZ 



Scott Havell(a 

Sociology 
Brewster, NY 



Kristina Hayden 

Classics/Education 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Jenna Hayes 

Biology 
Garden City, NY 



Elizabetli Heidig 

Historic Preservation 
Ellicott City. MD 



156 IT Seniors | 




Adrienne Henck 

Psychology 
Richmond VA 



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Jennifer Hendrick 

Sociolog3'/Education 
Richmond. VA 



Virginia Henley 

Psychology 
Richmond \A 



Mcaghan Herbert 

Biology 
Leeshuru. VA 



Kelly Heroman 

International Affairs 
Washington, D.C. 



Marianne Hii 

Studio Art 



Cynthia Herrmann 



David Hodge 

Computer Sci 



Martha Heuser 

Historic Preservati 
Collincswood, NJ 



Laura Hicks 

Psychology 
New Kent, VA 

Matthew Hoffman 

History/Computer Sc 
Louisville. KY 



Nancy Hollenbach 

Computer Science/Theatre 
Alexandria, VA 



Julie Hollenbeck 

History 
OTallon, !L 



Karen Hoogland 

History/Political Science 
Ridgewood NJ 



Clare Horn 

Biology 
Fallston, VA 



Seniors it 157 




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Jennifer Hossli 

Psychology/English 
South Hill. VA 



Karen Hottle 

Geography 
Front Royal. VA 



Amy Hovdestad 

Anthropology 
Mt. Kisco. NY 



Cary Howell 

American Stiidit 
Herndon, VA 



Biology 
Richmond, VA 



Matthew Hughart 

Economics 



Spotsylvania, VA 



Janet Inman 

Biology 
Charlottesville, VA 



Biology/Musi 
Stafford, VA 



Preeti Jahagirda 

Psychology 
Dallas, TX 



Sociology 
Harrisonburg, VA 



History 

Rockville Centre, NY 



Anne Jernigan 

Psychology 
Mechanicsville, VA 



James Johnson 

Business Administration 
Milford, CT 



Jennifer Johnson 

Psychology 
Alexandria, VA 



Nicholas Johnson 

Political Science 
Woodbridge, VA 



158 it Seniors 




Jamai Jones 

International Affairs 
Arlington, VA 



Kenneth Jones 

Business Administration/Music 
Burke, VA 



LaQuia Jones 

Business \dministration 
Springfield. VA 



Marcellus Jones 

History 
Midlothian. VA 



Mechelle Jones 

Psychology 
Sterling, VA 



Travis Jones 

Business Adm 
Midlothian, Vj 



Sara Joyce 

Business Adm 
Roanoke, VA 



Biology 
Hamden, CT 



Aikaterini Karakehagia 

International Affairs/Political Scien 



Rachel Karluk 

Psychology 
Richmond, VA 



Business Administration/Ec 
Brooklyn, NY 



Erin Keefe 

Biology 
Braintree, MA 



Laura Kelaher 

Biology 

Stony Brook. NY 



Micliael Kelmelis 

Psychology 
Vienna, VA 



Eric Kelsey 

Business Administration 
Midlothian. VA 



Seniors IT 15*: 





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Ryan Kenna 

Business Administration 
Springfield VA 



Jennifer Kesner 

Psychology 
Woodbridge, VA 



John Kidwell 

Political Science 
Herndon. VA 



Ryan Klllarney 

Biology 

East Rockavvay. NY 



Channing King 

Biology/Environmental Sc 
Springfield, VA 



Elizabeth King 

EconoiTiics/Geography 
Vienna, VA 



Melissa Klein 

Business Adminii 
Huntington, NY 



Matthe "'" " 

English 
Columbia, MD 



Erik Kochert 

Chemistry 
Carlisle, PA 



Julie Kolakowski 

Geography 
Syracuse, NY 



Eileen Kollins 

Environmental Science 
Springfield VA 



Mary Kovaleski 

English/Education 
Litiz, PA 



Kristina Kuhns 

Computer Science 
Eldersburg, MD 



160 it Seniors 




Chennel Lafate 


Candice Landes 


Andre Lapar 


Emma Law 


Biology 


Business Administration 


Business .'Administration 


Environmental Science 


Lake Ridge. VA 


Waynesboro. VA 


Glen Cove, NY 


Staunton. VA 




Adam Lawler 


Heidi Lawrence 


Jennifer Lax 


Anh Le 


Psychology 


English 


Psychology/Linguistics 


Computer Science 


East Hampton, NY 


Warrenton, VA 


Wallingford, PA 


Tustin, CA 


Daniel Leckburg 


Jennifer Lee 


Sunnv Lee 


Mattliew Levangie 


Political Science 


Business Administration 


Biology 


History 


Sparta, NJ 


Clifton, VA 


Richmond, VA 


Scituate, MA 




Brooke-Marie Lewis 


Suzanne Lewis 


Kevin Libbv 


Cynthia Lillo 


Biology/Environmental Science 


Mathematics/Computer Science 


Psychology 


Art/Business Administration 


Alexandria, VA 


Alexandria, VA 


Woodbridge, VA 


Alexandria, VA 



Seniors IT 161 




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Meianie Linn 

Business Administration 

Manliasset, NY 



Kristy LiPuma 

Psychology 
Oakton, VA 



Jennifer Locltlear 

Geograpliy 
Annapolis. MD 



Katie Long 

Biology 
Pittsburg, PA 



Business Administration 
Huntington, NY 



CaiLu 

Psychology 



Sarali Lucas 

English 
Springfield, VA 



Jennifer Lukas 

Education/Music 
Fairfax, VA 



Kathleen Lynch 

Environmental Sc 
Alexandria, VA 



Meghan Lyons 

Sociology 



Meredith MacDo 

Music 
Amherst. NH 



Katie Man! 

Business Administration 
Chesaoeake. VA 



Anna Marltham 

Business Administration 
Blacksburg, VA 



Christopher Marlcy 

English 
Wynnewood. PA 



LaToya Marshall 

Business Administration 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Meaghan Marshall 

French/International Affairs 
Burke, VA 



162 it Seniors 






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Stacey Marsland 

Historic Preservation 
Newark, DE 



Stephanie Marsnick 

Geograpliy 
Montville, NJ 



Lori Marstiller 

Political Science 
Herndon. VA 



Ryan Mason 

Business Administration 
Gaitliersbura, MD 



Ryan iVIay 

Linguistics/Psychology 
Bridgeton, NJ 



Lynda McAuliffe 
Studio Art/Classii 
New Britain, CT 



Gordon McCallum 
Business Administration 
Alexandria, VA 



Erin McCarty 

Geology/Geograpliy 

Delaplane,VA 



Jonatlian McCone, III 
Psychology 
Alexandria, VA 



Virginia Beach, VA 



Jennifer McLaughlin 

Biology 
Centreville, VA 



Lynne McMullen 

Geography 
Burke, VA 



Esmeralda Medina 

Spanish 
Mexico 



Christina Meluzio 

Psychology 
Chesterfield. VA 



I Seniors IT 163 





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Stephanie Meriiam 

Psychology 
Mason Neck, VA 



Andrew Mertz 

Biology 

Fort Vallev. VA 



John Messinger 

Political Science 
Fairfax. VA 



Brianna Michalosky 

Biology 
Mechanicsville. VA 



Audrie Mille 
Studio Art 



Jennifer Miller 

Theatre 
Warrenton, VA 



. ...lothy Mine 

Business Admi 
Vienna, VA 



Art History/Histori 
Scotts Valley, CA 



Geography 
Richmond. ' 



English 
Chesapeake. VA 



Gregory Moore 

Economics 
Manassas. V.''l 



Jennifer Moore 

Computer Science 
Bellerose Village, NY 



Meghan Moran 

Anthropology 
Richmond, VA 



Jennifer Moss 

Theatre 
Stafford, VA 



164 XT Seniors 




Dusty Murafsky 

Chemistry 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Jeanette Murphy 

International Affairs 
Havmarket. VA 



Kathleen Murphy 

Psychology /Education 
Fairfax. VA 



Joel Nelson 

Biology 
Valparaiso, IN 



Jennifer Newman 

Political Science 
Montclair. VA 



Kelly Noesner 

Psychology 
Fairfax, VA 



Carolyn Murray 

English 
Wilmington, DE 





Daniel Musson 

Historic Preservation 
N.Ridgeville, OH 

Jennifer Nash 

Business Administration/Spanish 
Richmond, VA 


Lisa Myers 

Business Administration 
McGaheysville, VA 

Rebecca Naumann 

Linguistics/Child Developmen 
Roanoke, VA 


Peggy Myricit 

Spanish/Education 
Chester, VA 

Justin Neale 

t Business Administration 
Haymarket, VA 


Ryan Napolitano 

Business Administration 
Cheshire, CT 

Elizabeth Neidig 

Historic Preservation 
Ellicott, MD 











April Norman 

Historic Preservation 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Seniors IT 16S 






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Susan Oaks 

Studio Art 
Fredericksburg, VA 


Jennifer Occhiuzzi 

English 

North Haledon, NJ 


Steplianie Oclis 

Business Administration/Psychology 
Springfield, VA 


Margaret Oliver | 

English 

Berkeley Heights, NJ 




Oluwatoyin Olukemi 

Alexandria, VA 


Karen Orwoll 

Sociology 
Williamsburg, VA 


Lara Ostrowski 

Business Administration 
Yorktown, VA 


Katlierine Packard 

English 
Burke, VA 


Brian Paice 

English 
Glastonbury, CT 


Andrew Painter 

Political Science 
Alexandria, VA 


Jessica Palmieri 

Italian/Art History 
Fredericksburg, VA 


Shavaris Parham 

Biology 
Dinwiddle, VA 


Julie Patterson 

Business Administration 
Stafford, VA 


Tricia Pavlik 

Psychology/Education 
Warrenton. VA 


Josepli Payne 

Chemistry 
Charlottesville, VA 


Sarah Pech 

Biology 
Columbia, MD. 


166 it Seniors | 










Jessica Pellegrino 


Carrie Pencels 


Mathematics 


Psychology 


Tnmc Ri^^ei" ^T 


Reston, VA 



Megan Petruzzi 

Computer Science 
Vienna, VA 



Holly Petty 

Theatre 
Eltham, VA 





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Richard Pifer, Jr. 

Business Administratic 


n/Economi 


Tricia Pifko 

cs Music 






Kevin Piper 

English/Philosophy 
Virginia Beach, VA 

Jason Price 

Historical Preservation 
Petersburg, VA 


Courtney Por 


ter 

nistration/S 


ociology 


Winchester, VA 

Hilary Potts 

International Affairs 
Alexandria, VA 




Trumbull, CT 
Michelle Powell 


Fredericksburg 

Erin Printy 

Biology 
Staunton, VA 


,VA 


Richmond, VA 

























Margaret Prior 

Business Administration/French 
Burke, VA 



Stephanie Purcell 

Psychology 
Mechanicsville, VA 



Valerie Quartararo 

Psychology 
Malveme, NY 



Amanda Rafsky 

American Studies 
Fairfield, CT 



Seniors -IT 167 




Colleen Ralph 

Psychology 
Silver Spring. MD 



Arnulf John Ramira 

Biology 
Herndon, VA 



Andre Randolph 

Business Administration 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Thomas Ratliff 

Political Science 
Princeton, N.I 



Fredericksburg, VA 



Conor Regan 

Political Science 



Carly Reid 

Business Adn 
Burke, VA 



Kate Richards 

History 

Matthews County, VA 



Christina Richer 

Business Adminis 
Richmond, VA 



Brandon Robinson 

Political Science 
Chester, VA 



Meghan Roden 

Biology 
Mechanicsvillc, VA 



Scarlet Rose 

Biology/Music 
Bealeton. VA 



Rebecca Ross 

Historic Preser\'ation 
Columbia. MD 



Penny Rowley 

Business Administration 
Spotsylvania, VA 



Emily Ruby 

Business Administration 
Chesapeake, VA 



168 -LT Seniors 





Mitzi Saffos 

American Studies 
Spotsyhania. VA 






Kristin schaible 

Biology 
Winchester, VA 

Christina Scliwartz 

Religion 
Ashland, VA 



Reed Shabman 

Biology 
Blacksburg. VA 




Kellyanne Salmon 

Psychology 
Pembroke. MA 




Michael Salpeter 

Psychology 
Fairfax Station. \A 



Kristen Scheerle 

Economics/Political Scien 
Fredericksburg, VA 

Gretchen Schwemer 

Religion 
Staunton, VA 



Sara Schwind 

Business Administratii 
Gordonsville, VA 



Michael Shaffer 

Art History 
Norfolk, VA 



Elizabeth Shaver 

Geography/German 
Williamsburg. VA 



Olan Schultz 

Business Adminii 
Collegeville, PA 



Gregory Sdeo 

Political Science 



Matthen Sheridan 

Business Administration 
Garden City. NY 



Seniors XT 169 




James Shevlin 

History 

New York, NY 



Julie Short 

Sociology 
Baltimore. MD 



Veronica Shultz 

Religion 
Aptos. CA 



Elizabeth Skorackvi 

Classics/Philosophy 
Mechanicsville, VA 



Steffanie Slaughte 

Business Administr 
Wincliester, VA 



Amanda Smith 

Biology 
Manassas, VA 



Business Administratit 
Herndon, VA 



Karia Sr 

English 
Greenbelt, MD 



Charlottesville, VA 



Woodbridge, VA 



' landa Snyder 

. oychology 
Hollis Center, ME 



Valerie Soldatow 

Biology 
Minneapolis, MN 



Ted Southard 

Computer Science 
Montpelier Station. VA 



John Spacelv 

History/Political Science 
Portsmouth, VA 



Margaret Spacek 

Psychology 
PortsiTiouth, VA 



Quinn Spadola 

Chemistry /Physics 
Culpeper, VA 



170 it Seniors 




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Amanda Sparks 


Rekesha Spellman 


James Spencer 


Peter Squire 


Psychology 


International Affairs 


Studio Art 


Computer Science 


Fredericksburg, VA 


Chesapeake, VA 


Oak Hill, VA 


Fairfax, VA 


Allison Stagg 


Katrina Stechler 


Shannon Stolat 


Byrony Stuart 


Art History 


Biology 


English/Theatre 


Psychology 


Huntington, NY 


Eastchester, NY 


Alexandria, VA 


Manassas, VA 


Peter Style 


Driss Taleb 


Michelle Tartaiio 


David Taylor 


Economics 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


History 


Sayville, NY 


Fredericksburg, VA 


Howell, NJ 


Salisbury, MD 





Lauren Taylor 

Classics/Psychology 
Burke, VA 



Joshua Tebay 

Political Science 
Chadds Ford, PA 



T. Clay Templeton 

Computer Science 
Norfolk, VA 



Helena Tenenholtz 

Business Administration 
Spotsylvania, VA 



Seniors iT 1 / 1 




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Brandy Thomas 

Theatre 
Appomattox. VA 



Kathryn Thompson 

Theatre 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Kevin Thompson 

Journalism/Public Affairs 
Vircinia Beach, VA 



Ryan Thompson 

Psychology 
Chesapeake, VA 



Michael Thornfon 

Psychology 
Winchester, VA 



Peter Tramonte 

International Affai 
Kings Park, NY 



Linh Tran 

Business Administration 
Richmond, VA 



Psychology 
Fairfield, CT 



Jessica Treston 

Education/Spanish 
Chesterfield. VA 



Laurel Trueworthy 

Sociology 
Arlington, VA 



Biology 
Amherst, VA 



Meghan Twokuc.r 

Business Administratii 
Sp, 



Caitlin Ulmer 

Political Science 
Olney, MD 



Rebecca Vaccaro 

English 
Alexandria, VA 



Lindsay Vogler 

Geography 
Centreville, VA 



Tyler Vose 

American Studies/Political Science 
Philipsburg, MT 



1 /2 it Seniors 





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Mary Beth Walker 

Sociology 
Grottoes, VA 




Bart Walkins 

History 'Political Science 
N. Attleboro, MA 



Jessica Wallace 

Psychology 
Jacksonville. FL 



English/?- _. . 

Mt. Jackson, VA 



Christina Wample 

Geology/Historic Preservation 
Newark, DE 



Katlierine Webe 

Geography 
Blacksburg, VA 



Amina Wells 

Business Adm 



Sarah Wentz 

English 
Lynchburg, VA 



Sarah Wesley 

Psychology 
Alexandria, VA 



Kris Wheeler 

Classics/Psychology 
Lynchburg, VA 



.41exis White 

Education'Psychology 
Toms River, NJ 



Bridget White 

Business Administration 
Columbia, MD 



I Senio~iT 1/3 




Chase White 

Business Administration 
Scituate. M-\ 



Jocelyn White 

Business Administration 
Troutville, VA 



Kyle Whiteley 

Computer Science 
Potomac, MD 



Christina Wiles 

Historic Preservation 
Mechanicsville, VA 



East Greenwich, RI 



Lori Wilmoth 

Historic Preservation 



Daryl Williams 

Biology 
Fredericksburg, VA 

Amy Wilson 

Psychology 
Shepherdstown, WV 



Psychology 
Clinton, MD 



English 
Springfield, VA 



International Al 

Haymarket, VA 

Katrina Wilson 

Business Administrati( 
Harrisburg, PA 



Margaret Winslow 

Art Histoid 
Newburg, PA 



Joshua Withers 

Business Administration 
Virginia Beach. VA 



Kristin Wnek 

Historic Preservation 
Orange, CT 



Cara Wolfe 

English 
Richmond, VA 



174 ilSeniors 




Andrea Woods 

Anthropology/Italian 
Bow, NH 



Victoria Worlvman 

Physics 
Vienna, VA 



Heatlier Wright 

Psycliology 
Millsboro. DE 



Lauren Wyatt 

Historic Preservation 
Richmond, VA 

Dawn Zbell 

Chemistry 
Mechanicsville. VA 



LinYu 

Business Administration/Psychology 



Elizabeth Zirkle 

Psychology 
Fredericksburg. VA 



Lisa Zaritsky 

Biology 
Gainesville, FL 



David Zaweski 

Business Administrati( 
Huntington, NY 



Garry Judy 

Psychology 
Easton, MD 



Jessica Rose 

Sociology 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Charlotte Hendricks 

Chemistry/Education 
Sandston, VA 



Mary Jancaitis 

Sociology 
Oak Hill. VA 



Seniors it 175 



S'E^IO^ ~ At the top.... an(f stiff rising. 
(Best offuc^ CfcLss of 20021 



you we never -mCC forget, Hie Cessoi 




176 Seniors 



Cove u'iff never die. 




^Seniors 177 




178 People | 




PEOPLE 



^l^VC2t£a expectations led students into another event-filled year. Many began 
the year full of energy and new goals they promised to attain. Fall semester held all the 
fun it always delivered, with Homecoming. Fall Fonnal. music fests and much more. 
This year proved a little different from years past, however. The tragic events of Sep- 
tember 1 1* stopped the lives of many students for a few long, emotional days and gave 
all a new outlook on and respect for life. Flags flown from dorm windows, embla- 
zoned across bumpers and t-shirts and sewn onto knapsacks and backpacks became 
familiar sights. Prayer meetings and a candlelight vigil helped students honor the 
victims and come to terms with the truth of the horrible acts of terrorism. For the first 
time in perhaps their entire lives, students knew what tme VdtTlOtlSTYl felt like. 
As the year progressed, students fell back into their customary routines, carrying out 
their day-to-day activities, but valuing their time a little more. Dispatch brought music 
to the Great Hall, and students crowded in to hear the popular band perform. As fall 
turned to winter, exams took first priority and left a quiet hush on the normally bus- 
tling grounds. Students only dreamt of the warmm unu reiaxation 

spring break soon brought. As groups traveled to the Bahamas. Cancun and other 




tropical locations, a cold front moved through the areas, placing an initial damper on 
the week long stretch of sun, fun and partying. After spring break, the annual 
Multicultural Fair, Junior Ring Week and Spring Formal helped llVBTl up the calen- 
dar of events before exams aiTived again. This time, the promise of summer rays kept 
students motivated and led them to the end of another successful year. 



Divider 



179 



'Acfams-'Bcwen 



Lonnie Adams 

Mohammad Afzal 

Lynn Aiani 

Sobia Akhtar 

Nadia Alfred 

Maria Ali 

Kathryn Allen 



Kelly Allen 

Sara Allison 

Shannon Allmendinger 

Mark Altman 

Jessica Amato 

Kathryn Amirpashaie 

Sara Amiss 



Vitto Amnalhvong 

Sara Amos 

Christopher Amrod 

Catherine Anderson 

Jillian Anderson 

Kathryn Anderson 

Rachel Andrews 

Allison Anolik 

Daniel Archibald 

Janet Ardrey 

Autumn Arrowood 

Heather Atkinson 

Elizabeth Austin 

Johanna Austin 



Elizabeth Avruch 
Elizabeth Ayers 
Sara Bailey 
Lauren Balkus 
Alicia Banister 
Jared Bankos 
Angela Barker 

Chelsey Barnes 

Clinton Barnes 

Nell Barnes 

Eric Barton 

Jessica Beavers 

Catherine Beazer 

Kimberly Becraft 



Caitlin Behrens 

Kristen Behrens 

Stefanie Beierschmin 

Adam Bellacicco 

Emily Benke 

Todd Bennett 

Lauren Benzing 

Lauren Benzoni 

Kimberly Bickert 

Tina Bigdcli 

Samantha Bird 

Tenezeah Bishop 

Abemathy Bland 

Kelly Blosser 

Oregon,' Blough 

Jessica Bolt 

Alexander Bond 

Daniel Bouchard 

James Boucher 

Iman Boukadoum 

Maiy Bowen 




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People 



'Bowen-Ciifford 




Nathan Bowen 
Kara Bower 
Daniel Bowers 
Beth Bowman 
Patricia Boyce 
Jonathan Bradshaw 
Christine Brady 



Meredith Branco 
Sara Brecht 
Erin Brezsnyak 
Lindsay Briggs 
Carlisle Brigham 
Stephanie Bma 
Stacy Broadbent 

Scott Broaddus 
Allison Broglie 
Catherine Brouilli 
Andrew Brown 
Christine Brown 
John Brown 
Randall Brown 



Ryan Brown 
Courtney Brucato 
Jaime Bucher 
Daniel Buckley 
Erin Bundrick 
Alison Burgess 
Christina Burkert 



Paul Bumian 
Christopher Burton 
David Buschenfeldt 
Leah Bush 
Joel Byron 
Shemirel Caballero 
Joanna Cahall 



Bradley Caldwell 
Crystal Canady 
Rachel Cannon 
Sarah Cannon 
Rebecca Capelle 
Corinne Carey 
Christine Carlisle 



Margaret Carroll 
Kimberly Carter 
Drew Cartwright 
Matthew Casciano 
Nicole Casebolt 
Siobhan Casey 
Timothy Castillo 

Emily Cella 
Caroline Chafin 
Monica Chan 
Matthew Christensen 
Lindsey Christie 
Clinton Christopher 
Bernard Chung 



Doreen Ciavarelli 
Cristina Clapp 
Matthew Clark 
Scott Clarke 
Jennifer Clawson 
Heather Claycomb 
Kaitlyn Clifford 



People 



Coc^ayne-'Dcmarcst 



William CockLiync 

Chnstopher CotTman 

Adam Cohen 

Lauren Collier 

Lindsey Collier 

Erin Colligan 

Alcisha Collinson-Strcng 



Elizabeth Colvui 

Carisa Compton 

Jennifer Condon 

Erin Connelly 

Dana Conrad 

Brian Coombs 

John Cooper 




Todd Cooper 


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Lynne Corey 


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Jameson Cowan 


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Patricia Coyle 


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Jeremy Crist 


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Elizabeth Crump 


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Elizabeth Cullen 

Lisa Cummings 

Jennifer Curtis 

Stephanie Curtis 

Matthew Curvin 

Edward Cyran 

Shani Daniels 

Edward Darrell 

Maureen Daulong 

Ryan Davis 

Ashley Davitt 

Joseph DeNardi 

Tara DcNicolas 

Evangeline Dcaton 



Nina Deboeck 

Andrew Deci 

Alexander Defee 

Kathleen Delaney 

Lauren DelesDemier 

Jennifer Delia 

William Demarest 



0^0 







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I 182 People 



'Demko-'Tlores 





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Heather Demko 
Kelly Dennison 
Kathenne Derhain 
Tamara Dense 
Christine Diau 
Diana Dicicco 
Laura Doaanieri 



Kate Domitz 
Sean Donohue 
Sylvia Dove 
Elizabeth Dowling 
Lauren Drennen 
Brett Druger 
Kasev Dmniheller 



Stephen Dudley 
Susan Duke 
Maureen Dundon 
Andrew Durham 
Jacqueline Dun- 
Amanda Echols 
Jessica Echols 



Kristen Edwards 
Emily Eike 
Renee Eldridge 
Sarah Ellison 
Seth Ellison 
Lauren Emig 
Michael Emswiler 

Brandon Estevez 
Russell Evans 
Christine Faivor-Ryon 
Crystal Famey 
Daniel Featherly 
Jessica Fellnieth 
Kelly Ferttuson 



Dana Ferreira 
Laura Fink 
Amy Fish 
P. Curry Flautt 
Alina Fleury 
Jay Florence 
Jonathan Flores 



People 



18? 



'Tlorio-i^ottschafk 



Aubry Furrow 

Wesley Gade 

Amy Gallinagh 

Deirdre Garalian 

Aiyana Garcia 

Charlene Garcia 

Lena Gamer 



Jason Gelatka 

Stephanie Genimatas 

Ann Gcrow 

Elena Gianulis 

Melissa Gibbs 

Elizabeth Gibson 

Alexandra Gi 



Colleen Gleason 

Sara Gliddcn 

Jeremy Glus 

Colin Gold 

JelTrev Golden 

Jennifer Golladay 

Erie Gomes 



Alexander Gomez 

Camiela Gomez 

Jillian Good 

Meghan Good 

Molly Gordon 

Britt Gottlieb 

Erika Gottschalk 



184 People 



T'fie Soutkside 



"Here we are now going to the Southside, pick up my friends..." 
Moby's words rang true. The action took place in Southside. True, not a single 
place offered delicious food. The library remained all the way across cainpus 
and often made students wonder if studying could wait one more night. And. 
the hike to the gym often proved a work-out in itself But, with grassy areas for 
relaxation right outside your door, fresh air always prevailed as a nice alterna- 
tive to inhaling the stench of old gym equipment and body odor To work those 
calf muscles, runners, walkers and other athletes benefited froin the long walk 
up Marshall Hill. Students never found a shortage of frisbees to toss around 
and flag football gaines throughout the lawns left students watching their heads 
to avoid spiraling footballs thrown in their direction. The basketball court, 
complete with spotlights, emerged as home to numerous games of street ball at 
all hours of the night. The Southside had more to offer than fields and courts, 
howc\cr 




The mlamous hill to Marshall Hall 


jave slu- 


dents a challenge each morning as (he 


V walked 


to class. 





Jaclyn Florio 

Caitlin Flynn 

Sebastian Forgues 

Sara Foughner 

Courtny Fout 

Nicole Fowler 

Jillian Fox 


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Jennifer Franklin 

William Freakley 

Vlatthew Freedman 

Erica Frisbie 

Bradford Frost 

Lydia Frost 

Mary Fulco 





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outside Jefferson 
2 duiins their free 



"The Southside has all of the history on campus," Dana Allen said. 
More residence halls on this end of campus translated into more people and 
more activities. Academic buildings like Trinkle Hall provided a place for the 
studious students or the last-minute crammers to study 24 hours a day/7 days a 
week. English and foreign language majors looked forward to the following 
year when the reopening of Combs Hall would allow close proximity to classes 
\\ ithout making the trek to the other end of campus. The possibility of food 
offered in Combs Hall, as well, left all students happily awaiting this new addi- 
tion to the Southside. Just a few strides away, George Washington Hall showed 
relatively new movies for the low cost of only one dollar International flavor 
flowed through Framar Hall, housing both foreign exchange students and other 
students interested in international living. Westmoreland. Jefferson, Bushnell, 
South, Framar, Marshall, Russell. Randolph and Mason Halls - nine residence 
halls total, each with their own unique personality, offered the most diversity 
this campus had to offer 

- Laurie Phillips 




Kathenne Gould 
Christopher Graham 
Daniel Grantham 
Sonya Graves 
Mark Graybeal 
Laura Greehan 
Katie Green 



Jamie Greenwood 
Melissa Grimsley 
Lori Gnsham 
Knsten Guagenti 
Lydia Haas 
Kristin Habeck 
G\vene\ e\ e Habersat 



James Hairtleld 
Nicole Hale 
Carol Haley 
Kaitlynn Hall 
Cheree Hammond 
Ashley Hancher 
Laura Hanks 



Connor Hanmgan 
Jason Hansel! 
Brian Harris 
Jeffrey Harris 
A\a Harrison 
Sandra Hart 
.Amanda Hartman 



Robert Hartzog 
Blake Hathaway 
Nathanael Hathaway 
Joseph Hatheway 
Margaret Hauff 
Pamela Hauke 
Da\ id Hayes 



James Heckman 
Sarah Heffner 
Elizabeth Helfrich 
Shannon Hemstreet 
Jacqueline Henderson 
Christine Hendrix 
Marv Henlev 



People 



lienley-'Xctidaf 



Meara Henley 

Margaret Henry 

Katherine Henshaw 

Jessica Hensle 

Drew Heston 

James Hibbs 

Jamie Hici<s 



Stetson Hill 

Channel Hilliard 

Raymond Hillyard 

Brittany Hillyer 

Catherine Hinckley 

Christopher Hincs 

John HoUida 



Laura Hollman 

Jeffrey Holmes 

Julia Homstad 

Phillip Hooper 

Matthew Hoover 

Michael Hoovler 

Michael Housman 



Amy Howell 

Inigo Howlett 

Rlionda Howlett 

Brian Hrusovsky 

Ashley Huff 

Hunter Hughes 

Andrew Hummel 



Sarah Hydi 

Matthew Hypes 

James Ingalls 

Elizabeth Ingrassia 

Alice Irvin 

Candace Jackman 

Melissa Jackson 



Mary Jalfec 
Jennifer Jenkins 
Katherine Jensen 
Graeme Jocck 
Carlina Johnson 
Jennifer Johnson 
Lesley Johnson 



Shaun Jurgcns 
David Justen 
Ryan Kailath 
Zachary Kalder 
Jeffrey Kane 
David Kang 
Zachary Kator 



Bridget Kavanaugh 

Kelly Keenan 

Peter Kelley 

Debra Kelly 

John Kelly 

Kimberly Kelly 

Kimberly Kendal 




Melissa Johnson 


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Phillip Johnson 


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Christopher Johnston 


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Katie Johnston 


^^Pt^ " VI 




Christopher Jones 


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Marylouise Jones 




Timothy Jordan 








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186 People 



'Kennexj-'McClai}] 




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Sara Kenney 
Juliet Kcrkani 
Jcnniier Kern 
Anna Khandrucva 
Mane Kilroy 
Na- Young Kuii 
Sarah King 

Cassandra Kling 
Marci Kniglit 
Daniel Knorr 
Lisa Koemer 
Kristin Koseielny 
Kiniberly Kosciw 
Anne Kringen 



Todd Kronenbcrg 
Sara Kut 

Eli/aheth Laclede 
Sarah LalTerty 
Brandon Lamb 
Margaret Lancaster 
Julia Landis 



Byron Lecth 
Leslie Leffke 
Melina Lenser 
Matthew Lockard 
Allison Lockwood 
Ashley Long 
Jeffrey Longo 




Katrina Maclnnes 
Alexandra MacLean 
Kristin Machado 
Leslie Machado 
John Madtes 
Michael Mallon 
Laura Marafmo 



Melissa Marchese 
James Marker 
Jennifer Vlarland 
Mark Martens 
Jonathan Martin 
Kelly Martin 
Knsii Martin 



Kathryn Martland 
Lauren Mascarenhas 
Christopher Mashbuni 
Ashley Matthews 
Justin Maurer 
Benjamin Maxwell 
Jacqueline McClain 



People 



'McClure-O'Loughlin 



Sydney McClurc 

Joshua McComas 

Justin McCuen 

Kara McCulloch 

Danielle McDonnell 

Elizabeth McDowell 

Alex McGeorge 



Ryan McGonigle 

Elissa McKay 

Michelle McKenzie 

Matthew McLaren 

Donna McLaughlm 

Katherine McQueen 

Joseph Mole 



Neil Mendieta 

Steven Merenda 

Allison Merkey 

Jonathan Metcalf 

Abbey Meyrick 

Sara Michener 

Elissa Milanowski 



Dana Miles 

Helen Miller 

Katie Miller 

Jane MinerK 

Adrione Mitchell 

Jessica Mitchell 

Jocelyn Mitchell 

Joseph Mitchell 

Elizabeth Monk 

Caitlin Moore 

Erin Moore 

William Moore 

Timothy Morrell 

Rebecca Morrison 



Jeanette Moses 

Kevin Mulhall 

Lisa Muller 

Mallhew Muller 

Meredith Mullin 

Martha Mundy 

Merideth Munoz 



Carolyn Myers 
Jessica Naff 
Emily Nagel 
Brian Napier 
Tyler Nations 
Amanda Nelson 
Sarah Nelson 



Sara Neman 
Eli Newcomb 
Patricia Newman 
John New^son 
Melissa Ng 
Loan Nguyen 
Thuy Nguyen 

Jessica Noble 

Katie Noesncr 

Katrina Noffsinger 

Matthew Nutaitis 

Cari O'Connor 

Kevin O'Connor 

Christina O'Loughlin 



188 People 




# % €l ^^. 




Ocfegaard-'Tiice 




Laura Odegaard 
Sara OITutt 
Harrison Okin 
Timothy Oliver 
Lindsay Ollice 
Christine Olsen 
Nathan Otis 



Mariani Ouhamoii 
Meghan Oven 
Matthew Paci 
Joseph Packer 
Steven Palmer 
Jill Palmieri 
Adam Panza 



Erica Paredes 
Dawn Paris 
Margaret Parke 
Ste\ en Parker 
Jennifer Parks 
Michelle Passar 
Amanda Passmore 



K-ristin Passuth 
Kristen Payne 
Amanda Payton 
Joseph Payton 
Pamela Peach 
Elizabeth Pendleton 
Rachel Pennington 



Sarah Pennock 
Benjamin Perez 
Lewis Perez 
Kevin Perry 
Jason Peterson 
Kira Petru2zi 
Leah Peyton 

Kathryn Pickett 
Richard Pitaniello 
Elizabeth Pitti 
Kimberly Pinman 
Maria Pomfrey 
Sally Poole 
Landon Porter 



Molly Porter 
Jeremy Potter 
Erin Price 
Jessica Prince 
Jennifer Pudeiko 
Thomas Puppi 
Michael Quadrozzi 

Evan Qualtrough 
Gregory Quinion 
Kelly Quinlan 
Sherry Ramos 
Jeanette Rasnack 
Erin Ratliff 
Alexandria Ray 



Brandon Redden 
Alden Reed 
Matthew Reed 
Stacy Reffner 
Katherine Reynolds 
Ian Rhoad 
Jennifer Rice 



People 



'Ri'a''-5fei'iiiuT 



Tiffany Rice 

Christopher Richardson 

Kathleen Ridgely 

Kara Riggio 

Rebecca Riley 

John Ring 

Amy Rixniann 



Lauren Roan 

Anrwane Rohbms 

John Robertson 

Whitney Robie 

Jacob Rod 

Geoffrey Rogal la 

Christopher Rogers 




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Matthew Rogers 




Deborah Roh 


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Eric Rose 


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Jennifer Rov 


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Lee Rubui 


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Allison Ruby 


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Stuart Rucker 
Adam Russell 
Timothy Ryan 
Stephen Ryerson 
Rebecca Sager 
Divya Sahay 
Marilvnn Sarc 



Noelle Sanis 
Katie Satterwhiic 
Stefanie Sayko 
Lauren Schmidt 
Karli Schneider 
Rebecca Scholz 
Lauren Schottenfeld 



Carolyn Schranck 

Kyle Schulke 

Anna Schurman 

Adam Schwartz 

David Schwemer 

Aysha Scotl 

Alison Seager 



Philip Seidman 

Rachel Selle 

Margaret Senk 

Sara Shalowitz 

Rebecca Shames 

Morgan Shanks 

Laura Shea 



Brandi Sias 
Matthew Sileo 
Katherine Siler 
Derek Simpkins 
Amanda Suns 
Jacqueline Singer 
Jessica Skinner 



190 People 




Stephanie Shepherd 


^^■^^H 


Whitney Sheppard 


^^^HH^^I 


Daniel Shemian 


^^^H«^^H 


Valerie Shennaii 


^^Kj ^^H 


Rebecca Shertenlieb 


^Bk---^ JH 


Andrew Slim 


Stephanie Showman 


Ie^I 



Si^ovfiy-Vei 




Virginia Soenksen 
Danielle Samers 
Min Son 
Yuliui Song 
Knsten Sorrell 
Slielli Spence 
Valene Sprague 



Chelsea St. Clair 
Charmayne Staloff 
Nicholas Stanton 
Victoria StautTenberg 
Danielle Steele 
Kelly Steitler 
James Stoddard 



Timothy Stoner 
Cara Stout 
Jennifer Stovall 
David Straightiff 
Jordan Stroh 
Karen Sugahara 
Christina Suett 



Colin Swink 
Stephanie Tanko 
Maribel Tapia 
Emily Taylor 
Robert Taylor 
Emily Tetalman 
Jane Thies 



Milimo Thindwa 
Amanda Thomas 
Claudia Thomas 
Hannah Thomas 
Kniiberly Thomason 
KelK Thomson 
Erik Thorcll 



Amy Thornton 
Katherine Thurston 
Kelly Timmemian 
Kathryn Tomlinson 
Diana Torres 
Claire Traub 
Brandi Tuttle 



Stephanie Twining 
Jessica Ulmer 
Ryan Ulrich 
Tammi VanDeWeert 
Danah VanReuth 
Joshua Vermculen 
Courtney Vernon 



People 



\ 'ersacc-Yorzinski 




Delonte Waller 

Kathenne Wamsley 

Yuan- Yuan Wang 

Krista Waple 

Patrick Warchol 

Kathryn Watts 

Cara Wedding 

Richard Weinliold 

Amber Welch 

Matthew Wei ler 

Franz-Jose Wesner 

Eric Wester 

Matthew Westfall 

Abigail White 



Edward White 

Terry White 

John Whitworth 

Courtney Wicker 

James Wilkie 

Rachel Willemin 

Christopher Williams 

Marquita Williams 

Jasmine Wilson 

Christina Wimmel 

Ryan Wind 

Elizabeth Wingard 

Clinton Wivell 

Sara L. Wood 



Sarah M. Wood 

Emily Woodall 
Kimberly Woods 

Margaret Wynn 
Julia Yolles 

Katherine 'V'oon 
Sharon Yorzinski 



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Elizabeth ^'oung 

Stephanie "^'oung 

Marie Zezula 

Kacy Zuchow ski 

Cassandra de Andrade 



T'ime Witfi 



192 People 




'A[\nTs-'Bonazza 







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Todd Aberts 
Joanna Adams 
Seblewonge Agegnehu 
Osasumwen Airhiavbere 
Erin Albnght 
Mario Alfaro 
Vanessa Ali 



Aha\ a Allen 
Corinne Allen 
Justin Allen 
Kelly Allsbrook 
Jessica Amis 
Alison Anderson 
Davni Anderson 



Dawn Anderson 
Katharine Anderson 
Jeremiah Appleton 
Denise Arce 
Meghan Archibald 
Matthew Arnold 
Kathleen Arrmgton 



Michael Arrington 
Kaye Aswegan 
Dorothy Atienza 
Donna Atkins 
Michelle Auhee 
Allan Aumento 
Katherine A\ ersano 

Elizabeth Bacz 
Christopher Bailey 
Joy Bailey 
Lisa Baker 
Brian Barbre 
Kathryn Barbuto 
Jason Barker 



Cathenne Barthelemy 
Elizabeth Bass 
R\ an Bayne 
Lindsay Beaton 
Lauren Bednarczyk 
Elizabeth Beebe 
Jennifer Beier 



Adam Benabdallah 
Lauren Bencre 
Paige Bennett 
Christina Berben 
Shannon Berck 
Anne Be\ erly 
Lindsay Biddinaer 



Caleb BiUmeier 
Kevin Bird 
Ashlie Biscoe 
Alison Bishop 
Maura Bishop 
Victona Blackmond 
Aliceson Blackstone 



Kevin Blake 
Kate Blakeney 
Sally Bockh 
Ryan Bodenstein 
Misako Bohim 
Angela Bohon 
Cara Bonazza 



People 193 



'3l> nsiero-'Buns 



Michael Bonsiero 

Timothy Boon 

Thomas Borak 

Brian Bomschein 

Lauren Bosv\'ell 

Allison Bourget 

Andrew Bowman 

Kevin Boyd 

Erin Boyer 

Anne Braband 

Emily Brackbill 

Brian Bradley 

Michelle Bradley 

Emilv Brandon 



Kathanne Bridgers 
Knsten Bridges 
Amelia Bristow 
Felicia Brock 
Kara Brockman 
Jaclyn Brondyk 
Ellen Brooker 




t Ji. t 



1. 1 -L 






Shawn Brown 

TitTany Brownley 

Cassandra Bryan 

Elizabeth Buckingham 

Natalie Buckingham 

Kevin Buffardi 

April Bulls 



Andrew Burge 

Chloe Burgess 

Claire Burke 

Caillin Burmeister 

Catherine Butler 

Mechelle Butler 

Rvan Buns 



I 




194 



Call-Colwcl 



> 




Campus Life 




Lisa Call 
Alena Callaghan 
Theresa Callaghan 
Erin Campbell 
Heidi Carlson 
Carrie Carman 
Kristv Carr 



R\ an Carter 
Amanda Carter-Roth 
Elizabeth Carter-Roth 
Michael Casey 
Daphne Cashion 
Elaine Cassarino 
Sara Castner 



Bertha Castro 
Lisa Cavanaugh 
Erik Cecere 
Maria Cedeno 
Christina Chan 
Amanda Chaves 
Alexandra Chehab 



Daniel Chiles 
Jeffrey Christianson 
Emil Christofakis 
Amanda Christoph 
Ashley Chung 
Noah Cincinnati 
Adam Clark 

Mary Clark 
Adam Clarkson 
Wendy Claypoole 
Sara Clemons 
Katie Clerico 
James Click 
Sean Clore 



Susan Clough 
Katherine Clous 
Katherine Clute 
Ann-Courtn Coates 
Frances Coffey 
Kate Cola 
Kimberlv Colwell 



People 195 



Compfier-'Du iipli y 



Melinda Compiler 

Brian Connolly 

Ellen Cook 

Paul Cook 

Casey Cooper 

Christina Cooper 

Janet Cooper 

Rachel Copen 

Alicia Cornell 

Clare Cote 

Ryan Coughter 

Chelsey Coulter 

Amanda Cox 

Amher Cox 



Brandon Cox 

Amy Creech 

Matthew Cribbs 

Floyd Crisp 

Charlotte Crouch 

Elisabeth Cunard 

Nikki Cunningham 



^JLJL 



Rebecca Cume 


■^^^H 


Brent Czaplicki 


Iff^^^^S 


Jessica D'Alessandro 


Btt f^H 


Michael D'Eredita 


Ma^'M 


Christopher Dalton 




Russell Danes 


^^^^IPS^^I 


Catherine Daniel 


^^^H 



Amanda Davis 

Amanda Davis 

William Davis 

Gabrielle Davoy 

Andrew Dawson 

Marisa Day 

Kristen Dayton 



Lauren DeAngelis 

Susan Deedrick 

Kathcrine Demchak 

Stacy Demkowicz 

Keith Dennee 

Aaron Dent 

Matthew Desjardins 



Erin Dexter 


^^^^ 


Edward Dickerson 


^^^^^^^^H 


John Dickerson 


^^Hni^^^l 


Laura Dickinson 


^HRx^l^^^H 


Patrick Dierkes 


mt ^^^H 


Emily Dilger 


W^ "^^^^1 


3ara Dillard-Ruben 


WL-^^M 




Barbara Dimas 
Christopher Dimotsis 
Joseph Dmytriw 
Christopher Doddridge 
William Doggett 
Daniel Dolewski 
Lindsey Donahue 



Clare Downey 

Brian Doyle 

Christopher Dryer 

Joanna Duggan 

Abbie Duke 

Meredith Dunham 

Colin Dunphy 



196 People 




'Durhin-'Flctcliei 



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Students meet at tlie fountain between classes. The foun- 
tain remained a popular gathering place at all hours of the 
day and gave students a break Irani academic stresses. 



Qn T'fie Center Of It M 

Nothing compared to being in the center of everything. The center of 
campus housed great residence halls such as Ball, Custis, Madison, Virginia 
and Willard Halls. Obvious benefits to living in the center of campus included 
getting up five minutes before class and still making it through the door on 
time. Anytime a student felt hungry, food lingered just a short walk away. If a 
student desired relaxation. Ball Circle and the fountain provided great places to 
stretch out in the sun and rest. The residence halls in the center of campus had 
a reputation as the nicer living quarters on campus. This claim perhaps existed 
due to the fact that they housed mostly females. Ball Hall and Virginia Hall 
exclusively housed females, making the center of campus even more lacking in 
males than the rest of campus. However, the many females in the center of 
campus always found plently of male company nearby, playing frisbee or rugby 
111 Ball Circle. Most females prefen^ed to watch a shirts vs. skins game above 
all else. The center of campus had the best of both worlds, as a visit to a friend 
on either side of campus remained only a short walk away. Once students grew 
accustomed to living in the center of it all, they found it hard to imagine living 
anywhere else on campus. 




Michelle Durbm 
Susan Dun'Ctt 
Colin Dvvyer 
Maggie Dwyer 
Catherine Easterling 
Courtney Eaves 
.lason Echols 



Kelly Eckstein 
Summer Edell 
Elizabeth Edwards 
Jacob Edwards 
Jacklyn Egan 
Alyssa Ehret 
Lauren Emel 



Lauren Lisold 
Laviien Elezko 
Christopher Ellington 
Caroline Ellis 
Britton Elmore 
Elizabeth Elzer 
Clinton Enos 



hrm Enzweiler 
Stephanie Eyes 
Bethany Ezell 
Emily Falvey 
.Icnnifer Farr 
Iinn Fawley 
Laura Fazzaro 



Kristen Fellows 
Bradley Ferdinand 
Sebastian Ferdinand 
Elizabeth Ferguson 
Elizabeth Ferguson 
Lara Ferraiolo 
Rohvn Fielder 



Sutton Fielder 
Nathan Figueroa 
Erin Fish 
Jenna Fisher 
Michael Fisher 
David Fitzpatrick 
Dawn Fletcher 



People 



'Tlorio-Grosz 




Christina Francis 
Peter Fravel 
Charice Frazier 
Carol French 
Julie Fretind 
Taryn Friend 
Jonathan Fuhrken 



Bruin Fuller 

John Fumer 

Megan Gallagher 

Suzanne Gallagher 

Christina Galligan 

Carey Garber 

Grant Garber 



Maria Garcia 

William Garland 

Christopher Gamcarz 

Julie Gamett 

Jeremy Gaudreau 

Teresa Geary 

Sarah Geddis 




Bevin Gekosky 

Mohammad Gerdvisheh 

Peter Geres 

Kimberley Geyer 

Peter Gibson 

GeraldineGicquel 

Roger Giese 

Melissa Glennie 

Katrina Glynn 

Maureen Godfrey 

Ryan Goff 

Krystin Gokey 

Laura Goldschmidt 

Faith Goodacre 



Michelle Goode 
Jessica Goon 
Lauren Goor 
Sarah Gordon 
Anne Goska 
Peyton Gouldin 
Darrcll Graf 



Jessica Granda 

Candace Grane 

Joy Grantland 

Laura Grasso 

Amy Gray 

Jill Graziano 

Alison Green 



Kaycee Green 

Shawn Gremminger 

Jaspreet Grewal 

Scott Gribble 

Laura Griffiths 

April Gross 

Anne Grosz 







198 People 



Grusseudorf-'Hitghes 




JtiLl.J.i.1. 



Andrew Grussendorf 
Sarah Gunsten 
Mark Guthrie 
Priya Gyani 
Arthur Habel 
Erin Haile 
Sam Hall 



John Halliday 
Camilla Ham 
Adam Hamilton 
Kathleen Hamilton 
Brittany Hammelman 
Kristen Hammer 
Anneke Hancock 



Mika Harada 
Elizabeth Harker 
Ashley Harkins 
Thomas Harman 
TIffaney Harman 
Kristina Harpst 
Hollv Harrell 



Sabrina Hatch 
Layne Havens 
Rebecca Headley 
Ashley Heimall 
MicheleHeimiller 
Hamotte Hemzen 
Laura Henderson 



Darren Hendricks 
Shalini Henry 
Terrell Henry 
Stephanie Henson 
Joseph Herbert 
Marc Hernandez 
Eric Herring 



Daniel Heselbarth 
Jessica Hewitt 
Katherine Higdon 
Richard Biggins 
Cassandra Hill 
Enn Hill 
Kristen Hill 



Patrick Hiltz 
Erin Hirsch 
Allison Hobart 
Julia Hoffman 
Sean Hogan 
Kathryn Hohman 
Kisha Holland 




Jason Hough 
Meghan Housley 
Jennifer Howard 
Meghan Howard 
Carolyn Huckabay 
Tiffianne Hudnall 
Carolvn Huahes 



People 



Q^ugdes-'Kocfac^ 



Karen Hughes 

Kerri Hundley 

David Hunsberger 

Elizabeth Huntley 

Rita Hurley 

Erin Hutchison 

Lindsey Hutchison 

Hojun Hwang 

Caroline Hyatt 

Amanda lantosca 

Mar>' Idone 

Natalie Ingold 

Maggie Irhy 

Krystal lr\ in 



Emily Jackson 

Sarah Jackson 

Amanda Jacobs 

Om Jahagirdar 

Brian Janelsins 

Kendall Jennings 

Kelly Jensen 

Timothy Jensen 
Lindsay Jett 
Kevin Johnson 
Mary Johnson 
Ricky Johnson 
Ten Johnson 
Anthony Jones 

Ashley Jones 

Brian Jones 

Eric Jones 

John Jones 

Pamela Jones 

Rebecca Jones 

Sherica Jones 



Rebecca Julian 

Matthew Kapuscinski 

David Kardian 

Samuel Kaye 

Katrina Keitt 

Caitlin Kcll 

Elizabeth Keller 



Rachel Keller 

Heather Kelley 

Kelly Kennedy 

Stacy Kennedy 

William Kenney 

Kiara Kerwm 

Wendy Kilby 

Andrew Kimball 
Emily Kimmitt 
Kelly Kinahan 
Jennifer King 
Leah King 
Matthew King 
Lisa Kingsley 

Caitlin Kinkead 
Brent Kintzer 
Matthew Kirk 
Ryan Kish 
Abby Kistler 
Rachel Knowles 
Paul Kodack 



200 People 




JljLjI. 




'Kofodziei-Mattson 




Benjamin Kolodziej 
Omn Konheim 
Kelly Koniowsky 
Marjorie Komides 
Kristen Kosinski 
Danylo Kosovych 
hlizabeth Krause 



Michael Kuehler 
[iiiiK Kuppler 
Timothy Ru/muk 
Michael LaMonica 
Kenneth Lackey 
Kathryn Lacy 
Dons Landers 



Cynthia Landesberg 
Brian Laudate 
Deanna Lavcry 
Christopher Leadem 
Byong Lee 
Daniel Lee 
Katharine Leesman 



Lauren Legard 
Amy Lester 
Laura Lewis 
James Liao 
Margaret Lindsay 
Christy Lindsey 
Shana Lipford 



Jana Lipski 
Phillip Littrell 



Kimberlv Lowden 



Johanna Lunglhofer 
Lauren MacAtce 
Alexia MacClain 
Catherine MacKinnon 
Jonathan Macone 
Jesse Mahle 
Hien Mai 



Lauren Maiocco 
William Malcolm 
Alec Mallmann 
Mark Malone 
Lisa Maloncy 
Laura Manganiello 
Keith Manion 

Lrica Mank 
l-indsay Manning 
LoriAnn Marcsca 
Elizabeth Margeton 
Patricia Marino 
Kristin Marion 
Xkiruaret Marriott 



Adam Marshall 
Lauren Martella 
Meghan Mascelli 
Elyzabeth Massucci 
Kristen Matlick 
Grant Matthews 
Marv Mattson 



People 201 



lAauro-'Moran 



Stephen Mauro 

Kari Mayercsik 

Rebecca Mayhugh 

Ann Mazes 

Margaret Mazzola 

Andrew McAfee 

Ryan McAules 



Dennis McCarthy 

Nichole McCarthy 

Sarah McCartli\ 

Ahce McClain 

Bryce McClamroch 

Lindsey McClintock 

Suzanne McCloskey 



Matthew McConnell 

Brian McCormick 

Robert McCraw 

Austin McCullough 

Alexis McCullough-Tinker 

Elaine McDonald 

Emilv McDonald 



Heather McDonald 

Samantha McDonald 

Charles McGee 

Amanda McGuire 

Emily McHenry 

Matthew McKay 

Megan McKenney 



James McKinnon 

Erin McLaughlm 

Jade McLaurin 

Laura McMahon 

Lindsay McMahon 

Meghan McMahon 

Sara McManus 



Laina McMiilioii 

Almeda McMullen 

Thomas McNinch 

Elizabeth Meeks 

Melissa Melton 

Anna Merrey-Welcome 

Asha Merzazada 

Catherine Messa 

Katherine Messick 

Paul Michanczyk 

Anna Milefsky 

Amanda Miller 

Catherine Miller 

Justina Miller 



Anna Mills 
Neoma Mills 
Sandia Mills 
Jeffrey Mitchell 
Lauren Moir 
Victor Mondino 
Lynsi Montgomery- 
Karen Moonan 
Heather Moore 
Kristina Moore 
Maria Moore 
Michael Moore 
Roberto Morales 
Audrey Moran 



202 People 



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Could a small detail like 
which hand someone wrote 
with alter a student's college 
experience? Maybe not 
dramatically, but subtle 
differences emerged between 
right and left-handed students. 
For instance, almost all of the 
desks in the classrooms had 
designs that accomodated 
right-handed students. The 
school did provide a few left- 
handed desks, but not all 
pro\ed satisfactory. "It's nice 
that the school provides us 
left-handers with those left- 
handed desks, but they are so 
big and awkward and weird- 
looking. It's almost as if they 
tried to point us out and make 
us feel like we are different 
than right-handers. And for 
that reason I never sit in 
them." sophomore Evan 
Steinberg said. Students like 
Steinberg had to tough it out. 
looking awkward in the desks 
designed for right-handers. 
The left-handed desks in 
classrooms always seemed to 
be the ones that got in most 
people's way and that no one 
wanted to sit in. However, 
many left-handers felt glad 
that they had an alternative. 
These students did not seem to 
mind looking out of place in 
the left-handed desks, as long 
as it meant they had a little 
extra comfort during those 
long classes. 



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A left-handed student sticks 
out in his larae. lett-handed desk. 















Gai7 Morgan 
Vanessa Morgenthaler 
Janet Morlarity 
Joshua Morris 
Kendra Morton 



Talia Mosconi 
Sarah Moser 
Miranda Mosley 
[Catherine Mott 
Allison Mowery 



Amanda Mulhem 
Karstcna Munzing 
Bridget Murphy 
Dana Murphy 
William Murray 



Allyson Myers 
.lared Myers 
Rachel Myers 
Melissa Naeger 
Emily Nagel 



John Nagy 
Lynn Nashom 
Michael Newbold 
Nancy Nguyen 
Mansoor Niaz 



Christine Nickels 
Melissa Nilsson 
Gwendolyn Nixon 
Daniel Noel 
Sarah Notter 



Lisa Nuedling 
Katherine Nunley 
Elizabeth O'Leary 
Kelli O'Quimi 
James Oare 



Rissa Obcemea 
Kristin Ochsenreiter 
James Ohisson 
Andrew Oko 
Jamie Oliver 



Brendan Orsinger 
Courtney Oser 
Mary Osing 
Catherine Otey 
Nick Paaonis 



People 



■Tainter-'ReiiTii 



Kalie Painter 
Alexis Pappas 
Jo Ann Parker 
Sarah Parr 
Megan Parr\ 
Joseph Parsons 
Craig Patterson 

John Paxion 

Anthony Pedersen 

Christin Perdue 

Shaina Pereira 

Bryce Perry 

Jennifer Perry 

Brenton Peterson 



Catherine Peterson 

Edwin Peterson 

Brian Peyton 

My-Phuong Pham 

Phong Pham 

Thien-Huon Pham 

Apnl Philhps 

Gillian PhiHips 
Laurie Phillips 
Sandra Phillips 
Amanda Picard 
Tricia Piccinino 
Amanda Pierson 
Salimah Pinnohamed 



Kristy Plourde 

Michael Plummer 

Erin Polk 

Timotheus Pope 

Travis Pope 

Alethea Porfiris 

Justine Poslusznv 



Crystal Potter 

Stephanie Potter 

Amy Prible 

Ellen Prince 

Heather Pritchett 

Dorothy Propst 

Andrew Puddester 



Andrea Purdy 

Michael Pusey 

Kevin Pushee 

Laura Quijano 

Jason Quintana 

Adam Rackliffe 

Charles Rainbolt 



Bridget Ralph 

Steven Ramos 

Patrick Ramsay 

Enc Ramseur 
Brandi Rapalee 
Robert Reading 

Brian Reaaan 



Audrey Reale 
Amber Rector 
Bryan Reddan 
Trisha Reeves 
Tobias Reifsnyder 
Colleen Reilly 
Michael Reilly 



204 People 



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1 1^.1. 4 






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Aaron Reynolds 
Rachael Reynolds 
Valerie Richard 
David Rickey 
Robin Riffe 
Lindsey Riley 
Patrice Riley 

Kn!,tin Ripley 
Ethan Ripperger 
William Roark 
Emily Rohhins 
Piper Roberts 
Sean Rodgers 
Erik Rodriguez 



Elizabeth Rogers 
Archer Rose 
Erica Rozek 
Erin Ryan 
Mary Sallgren 
Andrew Salmon 
Ali Samantar 



Enka Sandberg 
Marie Santana-Gem 
Jacob Sapp 
Andrea Sasin 
Ryan Scales 
Cnsta Scaturro 
Shauna Schaeffer 

Kyle Schatz 
Grace Schauer 
John Schimppa 
Kelly Schmidt 
Stefan Schoen 
Scott Schultz 
jcnnilvn Schuster 



Gillian Sciacca 
Auhry Scott 
Erica Scon 
James Scott 
Sarah Sebring 
Suzanne Segur 
Rebecca Sellers 



Nicole Semerano 
Lauren Seney 
Mark Shabman 
Jessica Shafer 
Michael Shane 
Michael Shapard 
Jessica Sha\er 



Sage Shaw- 
Timothy Shea 
Michael Shelton 
Patrick Shepherd 
Mary Shendan 
Randy Shirtet 
Amy Shioji 



Roxanne Shircliff 
Amanda Shively 
Lisa Shroyer 
James Shugart 
Emily Shuman 
Amy Shumate 
Christina Shutt 



People 



Siegaf-Stai-n 



Judith Siegal 

Kristin Simmers 

Sliannon Simmons 

James Simms 

Jessica Simon 

Erilca Simpson 

Matthew Simpson 

Jeffrey Sinclair 

Ehzabeth Sjoberg 

Kristen Skove 

Noelle Slager 

John Slawinski 

Hannah Siotnick 

Catherme Smith 



Kassandra Smitli 
Katherine Smith 
Lindsay Smith 
Megan Smith 
Portsia Smith 
Rachel Smith 
Sarah Smith 



Tempe Smith 
Katrina Smoot 
Kristen Snider 
Samual Snyder 
Arnold Solomon-Astudillo 
Leslie Soo 
Christina Soper 

Keri Soqui 

Michael Sorgen 

Laine Spadola 

Erik Spahr 

Brooke Sparks 

Lori Sparks 

Elizabeth Spotsvvood 



Timothy Spiirr 
Tyler St. Clair 
Kathryn Stacy 
Donald Stader 
Stacey Standish 
Katherine Stangler 
Lindsey Startt 




^H| iE^ ^^ ^V liP ^Jy 




'A "Wiafit On 



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206 



5 ft" in6e ra - Tw iiw 



I 




A.ll-±^ 




E\an Steinberg 
Paul Stepanick 
Graham Stephen 
Melissa Stephens 
Anthony Ste\enson 
Kimberly Steuart 
Sara Stokes 



Phillip Sto\all 
Jason Stover 
Stuart Strange 
William Stribling 
Jeremiah Sturgill 
Andrew Stumi 
Christina Sullivan 



Jason Sullivan 
Bree Sureras 
Kent Swats 
Carolyn Sweterlitsch 
Amanda Swilley 
Matthew Su itzer 
Mirtha Tapia 

Adam Tash 
Erik Taylor 
Cory Templeman 
Melanie Tenney 
Kathenne Temey 
Elizabeth Terrell 
Darien Thall 



Christine Thing 
James Thomas 
Charles Thornton 
Elizabeth Tidd 
Kimberly Tilghman 
Pnscilla Tomescu 
Riehard Tomlinson 



Carolyn Townsend 
Elizabeth Trimble 
Adrienne Trombley 
Kassie Tucker 
Christina Turkelson 
Melissa Turner 
Chelsei Twigg 



People 207 



^leSeffior-Yudowitch 



Christopher Uebelhor 

Jill Uhrovic 

Daniel Uyar 

Rachel Vaccaro 

Katherine Valentine 

Hook Van 

Nicole Vasil 



Sameer Vaswani 

Dominique Vega 

Kathy Vi 

Sherrie Villaronga 
Valerie Villegas 

Alexandra Vizzier 




Kelly Walsh 

Mary Warder 

Michael Warner 

Jennifer Warren 

Renee Watson 

Erin Waugh 

Mary Webster 

Erin Weiniert 

Daniel Weinbaum 

Paul Weishar 

Kristen Wenger 

Emily Werner 

Krystle Westhafcr 

Brian \\ hitc 



Callie White 

Holly White 

Kelii White 

Emily Whyte 

Gretchen Wietmarschen 

Manhew Wiles 

William Wilkerson 



Jade Willard 
Elizabeth Williams 
Emily Williams 
Ariana Wilson 
Joseph Wilson 
Lauren Wilson 
Thomas Wilson 



Bonnie Winstead 

Abigail Woglom 

Marjone Wold 

Erin Wood 

Andrew Woodard 

Carly Woods 

Sarah Worden 

David Wright 

Kingsley Wright 

Amal Yesuf 

Jonathan Yonce 

Lea Yowell 

Peter Yu 

Dustin Yudow'itch 



208 People 



Chase Vogler 


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Michael Voyack 


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Jessica Waggener 


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Bianca Wakefield 


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Joeann Walker 


m^ ' V 


Lavton Walker 


B^ M 


Victoria Walker 


Ht^ fl 


Kevin Wallace 


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Jason Zamhanini 
Andrea Zhcll 
Kathry'o Zclcnak 
Justin Zimmerman 
Richard Zinky 
Jennifer Zoebelein 
Guzel duChateau 




: Living 



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When it came to living on tiie Northside. people generally had mixed feelings about 
their living situations. It all depended on what students looked for in a residence hall, and what 
activities students involved themselves in on campus. Some students actually felt a sense of 
pride when it came to living on the Northside. "Remember the last time the South tangled with 
the North. We kicked their tails from here to the sea," junior Peter Diamond said. "It"s like 
living in the Playboy Mansion. You've got the gym, the pool, the basketball courts, the library 
and Jepson and the fountain. The only thing missing is the bunnies," junior Bryan Petrak said. 
A somewhat more realistic view came from freshman. Krista Waples, of Alvey Hall. "It's great 
being right next to the gym. It's not hard to pull yourself away from studying or relaxing to go 
workout because it's right there. You don't have to make that long walk across campus." 
Living on the Northside did not present a dreamland to everyone, though. "Let me put it this 
way. Next year I'll be a sophomore, and I'm moving off campus," freshman Chris Hines said 
of his feelings toward the Northside. This side of campus did not evoke strong feelings of 
elation or the blatant need for escape for everyone, however. Some students siinply remained 
neutral on the subject. "It feels farther away from the residential community of the school. 
Other than that, it's ok, I guess. We're more exposed to the highway. The good thing is we 
don't have to walk up a hill to go to class," sophomore, Joey Dmytriw, of New Hall said. For 
the most part, the consensus remained that living on the North had its upsides and downsides, 
different for everyone who found themselves hving there. 

- Kim Stewart 



> 



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People 209 



'AfiimourcfteLf-'Bland 



Rola Abiniourchcd 

Christopher Ackerman 

Danielle Adams 

Cory Adis 

Katrina Adkins 

Jennifer Agee 

Kirsten Agee 



Carole Ahmed 

Donna Akers 

Ercan Akkus 

Dana Allen 

Aaron Altscher 

Sarah Amiek 

Jennifer Ammann 



Linda Amponsah 

Melissa Andersen 

William Andrews 

Katina Antlion\ 

Katherine Armstrong 

Danick Arsenault 

Moses Asamoah 



Brian Asnian 

Virginia Atkinson 

Marianne Ayers 

Emily Azukas 

Jesse Baco 



Adrianne Banictt 

Sean BaskerMllc 

Jennifer Balson 

Kelin Baxley 

Bryan Beary 

Nieole Beatry 

Arthnr Bcau\ ais 



Edward Beck 
Jason Beeman 
Mary Beliveau 
Diana Bendixen 
Maribeth Bendl 
Harlan Bennett 
Allison Benton 



Robert Bergin 

Michael Bemal 

Nicolas Bemasconi 

Jennifer Berry 

Amanda Beverly 

Nathan Bevil 

Maria Bibbs 



Jessica Bielecki 

Jad Bishara 

Amy Bishop 

Robert Bishop 

Danell Bjomson 

Ashley Bland 

Lindsay Bland 




Brandon Bailey 
Kevin Bair 


A^^pHI 


Daniel Bairlev 


^^^H 


Meghan Baker 




Scott Baker 


Hl^i^SI^^^I 


Franklin Barba 


E^^^H 


Luke Barlev 


■l^^H 


Adrienne Barnes 




Teresa Barnes 


m!M 



210 People 



'Bfate-Casteffo 




Andrew Blate 
Kinibeiiy Blizzard 
Melissa Block 
Meghan Blodgclt 
Lynnette Blosser 
Stephanie Boczar 
Kiniherly Boelte 



James Boland 
Josefina Boliek 
Stephanie Bolte 
Stephanie Booll 
Jodi Borden 
Anne Bonng 
Ke\ in Bouffard 



Angela Boukourakis 
Emily Bowers 
Alice Bowling 
Brian Bowman 
Terry Boyd 
Chadwick Bradford 
Ke\ in Bradley 



Lori Bradley 
John Bradshaw 
Jessica Brandes 
Sarah Breeding 
Stephen Bridges 
Jayme Bristow 
Jessica Broderick 

Brendan Brody 
Amanda Brown 
Erin Brown 
Gene Brown 
Jessica Brown 
Robert Brown 
Stephanie Brown 

Tawny Browne 
Zaehary Browne 
Nina Bruno 
Shannon Bryant 
Anne Buboltz 
Robert Buchanan 
Courtney Buck 

Leslie Buckley 
Shannan Bunzey 
Sarah Burchell 
Lauren Burgess 
Steven Busch 
David Buswell 
Megan Cain 



Jay Callahan 
Robert Cambridge 
Meredith Camp 
Keri Campbell 
John Canery 
Kristin Cantwcll 
Ryan Capizzi 



Alex Capshaw-Taylor 
Isabel Cardwell 
Lauren Carter 
Lucy Casciano 
Carolyn Cason 
Patricia Castelar 
Laura Castello 



People 



Cedres-'DiUi 



Charlene Cedres 

Kerry Cerillo 

James Cessaro 

Erica Chapman 

Courtney Childe 

John Chiles 

Leila Choudhury 

Hannah Chowning 
Rachelle Chretien 
Ainy Cipolla 
Erica Civitarese 
Nancy Clark 
Purcell Clark 
Mary Clarke 



Meredith Clarke 

Charles Clarkson 

Laura Clifton 

Lawton Clites 

Joshua Cloudt 

Christy Cockrill 
Carrie Collins 



Kimberly Collins 
Melanie Collins 
Cheryl Collis 
Lisa Colomb 
Sarah Colona 
Hazel Colson 
Marsha Coinan 

Rebecca Comninaki 

Alexis Concepcion 

James Connell 

Patricia Conner 

Diana Conty 

Luna Cook 

Portia Cooper 



Michael Corcoran 

Michelle Corey 

Rheina Comuet 

Daniel Correa 

Scott Coston 

Stephen Coughlin 

Anna Craft 



Brian Crist 
Jennifer Crites 
Regina Cronin 
Evelyn Cropp 
Alyssa Crouch 
Cassandra Crouse 
Scott Crovvell 




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Benjamm Cubbage 

Daniel Curran 

John Cyrus 

Juliana D'Andrilli 

Diana Daly 

John Daubert 

Patricia Daugherty 


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Marit Da\ ies 
Enca Davis 
Jason Davis 
Jill E. Davis 

Jill M. Davis 
Mark Davis 

Michael Day 


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212 People 



'Dayton-'Terrefl 





.^JELdki m. .t^Blft 




Maria Dayton 
Abbey Delk 
Trea Demarest 
Clare Denk 
Carole Derepentigny 
Carolyn Derr 
Andrea Devenins 



Kathleen Diaeonl 
Peter Diamond 
Margaret Dickerson 
Carla Dieorpo 
John Disque 
Diana Dittmann 
Sarah Domenech 



Justin Donnelly 
Adrian Donovan 
Christina Donovan 
Patricia Dooley 
Abigail Dougherty 
Daniel Douglass 
Theresa Downey 



Rebecca Doyal 
Nathan Doyle 
Anna Drago 
Paul Drake 
Raya Drew 
Sean DriscoU 
Michael Drummond 

Joy Dubbs 
Margaret Duffett 
Barbara Dunlap 
Amanda Dunn 
Maggie Dyer 
Emily Eaton 
Lori Eaton 

James Eberhardt 
Laurel Eby 
Lisa Eceard 
Elizabeth Eddy 
Emily Edelman 
Tamera Ehrhart 
Diana Elawar 



Erica Ell 
Megan Ellenson 
Alison Elliott 
Cesar Eloisa 
Kimberly Embrey 
Robin Epperson 
Marael Ernst 



Maxwell Erskine 
Francisco Escobar 
Alonda Etheridge 
Janine Evans 
Stacie Evans 
Kerri Ewing 
Alden Fahy 

Stephanie Falleur 
Nancy Fallon 
Maureen Farmer 
Kristin Farrell 
Elise Fasick 
Jamie Fatek 
Anitela Ferrell 



People 



Tiqueroa-Goloqorsky 



^akina T'fiemsefves 

Tart OfT'fie Scene... 



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David Figueroa 

Angela Filnieck 

Ryan Findley 

Bryan Fischer 

Fagin Fisher 

Anthony Fleming 

Elizabeth Fleming 

Sandra Flernmmg 

Lauren Fletcher 

William Floyd 

Amy Flynn 

Angela Foelber 

Renee Foltz 

Elizabeth Ford 



Andrea Fossum 
Stephanie Foster 
Matthew Francis 
Jeffrey Frankston 
Megan Frascella 
Adrienne Freed 
Bryan Fryzel 

Randall Fulk 
Elise FuUerton 
Kathryn Furst 
Robert Gaines 
Sarah Gamon 
Matthew Garber 
Kathryn Gamer 




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Lindsey Gleason 

Julia Gloukhoff 

Daniel Glynn 

Kathryn Godbum 

Paige Golden 

Pauline Goldsmith 

Keith Gologorsky 



214 People 




Gomez-1-ianiy 



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Juliette Gomez 
Catherine Gooch 
Timothy Gottgetreu 
Stuart Gonlicb 
Katherine Graap 
Jennifer Grahoyes 
Robert GraeetTo 



Lyndsay Graham 
Robert Grassi 
Cathryn Greaser 
Geoffrey Greene 
Joseph Greene 
Lynn Greenlaw 
Rebecca Griffith 



EHzabeth Griffiths 
Emily Grogg 
Diane Gro\e 
Matthew Guderian 
Elizabeth Guinn 
Dereje Gultineh 
Daniel Guplill 



Nathan Hadley 
Michael Hagan 
Cindy Haggerty-Home 
Cris Hairston 
Retha-Lyn Haislop 
Robert Hale 
Jov Halev 



Lydia Haley 
Brian Hall 
Bronson Hall 
Hossein Hanied 
Tracy Hamm 
Jennifer Hammond 
Tiffany Hanback 

Matthew Hanley 
Robert Hanna 
Justin Harciim 
John Hardin 
Joseph Harding 
Ryan Hardmg 
LaShaun Hardy 



People 



l-larityw-'l-litssain 



Donna Harlow 

Ashley Harrington 

Ernest Harris 

Nicole Harris 

Michael Hartsock 

Elaine Harvey 

Aliza Haslev 



Angela Haughney 

Jennifer Havens 

Amy Hawthorne 

Heather Hayden 

John Hayden 

Allison Hays 

Leah Hays 



Jason Healey 

Dena Heath 

Erich Heckel 

Kristine Heffner 

Margaret Heflin 

Matthew Heimerle 

Katie Helldoerfer 



Jennifer Hcllicr 

Katie Henderson 

Jennifer Henley 

Casey Henry 

Laura Hensley 

Lindsay Herl 

Charles Hess 



Cynthia Hess 

Amy Hewat 

Ruth Hicks 

Joanne Higginbotham 

Ashley Hildebrandt 

Emily Hill 

Christopher Hillers 

Laura Hillmann 

Rebecca Hinckley 

La'Lita Hines 

Meredith Hite 

Kendra Hitz 

Susan Hobbs 

Ramona Hodgkms 



Noah HotTman 

Anthony Hogan 

Elizabeth Holland 

David Hollinger 

Joseph Holloway 

Tara Holt 

Rebecca Holzworth 



Laura Honaker 
Ashley Home 
Eric Home 
Jeffrey Howard 
Rachel Howard 
Arthur Howland 
Barbara Howlui 



Margaret Hughart 

Katherine Hughes 

Margaret Hummel 

Sarah Hunt 

Cynthia Hurd 

Jillian Hurst 

Catherine Hussain 



People 




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David Hye 
Nicole larrobino 
Janet llagan 
April Ingram 
Jessica Isaacs 
Tammy Jacobs 
Alexander Jacobsen 



Douglas Javins 
Ryan Jeffries 
Michael Jenlcins 
Ins Jimenez-Castro 
Erui Johansen 
Bradley Johnson 
C hristopher Johnson 

James Johnson 
Kelly Johnston 
Heather Jones 
Heather Jones 
Jennifer Jones 
Megan Jones 
Thomas Jordan 



Fernando Juarez 
Carolyn Junkins 
Dana Karlovich 
Linette Kasper 
Robyn Kaye 
Rachel Keith 
hhzabcth Keller 



Katherine Keller 
Adam Kelly 
Mary Kelly 
Caitlin Kendall 
Alisa Kennedy 
Jacklyn Kettemian 
Andrea Kilkenny 



Patrick Killingswc 
Janna Kincaid 
Rachel King 
Rebecca King 
Melissa Kirchner 
Melanie Kissell 
Jennifer Klaus 



Elizabeth Klingaman 
Tessa Knouff 
Amber Knowles 
John Koblinsky 
Michael Koehl 
Rachel Kocther 
Chastity Kolb 



Aaron Kota 
Benjamin Kowalik 
Michael Kozicki 
Christi Kramer 
Pamela Kramer 
Allison Krebs 
Shan Krua 



Robin Kjuthers 
Jenelle Kubicsko 
Albert Kugel 
Jessica Kwerel 
Manuela Kwiatkowski 
Parthena Kydes 
Cynthia Kyff 



People 



La'Mont-'Mafoche 



Katherine LaMont 

Megan Lake 

Jason Lancaster 

Theresa Lancaster 

Taryn Lane 

Matthew Lang 

Constantin Langa 



Matthew Lange 

Michael Lange 

Denise Lanier 

Cindy Laprade 

Nicole Laiicr 

Matthew Lawsun 

Ronald Lawson 

Aaron Layman 

Jennifer Leggette 

Robin Leightner 

Robert Leonard 

Debra Leopold 

Theodore Lewis 

Sarah Libbv 



Christian Lincoln 

Meagan Lindsay 

Anthony Lipscomb 

Tia Little 

Brett Lively 

Dana Lloyd 

ICimberly Lockett 

Kevin Lodcn 

Elizabeth Long 

Rachel Long 

Julia Lookabill 

Carolann Lotsey 

Andrea Lovelette 

David Lovins 



James Lowe 

Kristina Lux 

Meredith Lydon 

Cristine Lynch 

Chnstopher MacDonald 

Shannon MacMichael 

Aura Macatuno 



Ryan Maccubbin 

Connie Maetzold 

Jenny Mahlqvist 

Christopher Mahon-Stetson 

Shauna Mahony 

Nicole Maier 

Tracy Maloche 



218 People 



T'fie Life of t fie (Resicfent Assistant 

Standing in the long line at tiie Eagle's Nest, she checked her watch. 6:56. She realized that 
she had just four minutes to grab her dinner, run back to the hall, grab the duty keys, and start 
her first round. Welcome to the life of a Resident Assistant. At first glance, a RA doesn't 
seem much different than any other student living on campus. They attended class, com- 
plained about the food at Seacobeck. and had roomates and suitemates. Other students even 
occasionally spotted them at off-campus parties (when they did not have duty responsibili- 
ties that weekend, of course). But, big differences did exist between RA's and residents. 
"When you're a resident you only have to worry about yourself When you have the job of a 
RA, you have to woiTy about how your actions will effect the other 30 people on the hall," 
Erin Merrill, a second year RA said. Especially in the freshman dorms, RA's found them- 
selves excluded from the rest of the hall. "You can't be part of the gang," junior Stu Gottlieb 




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said. Instead of belonging to the gang. RAs iiad to write work orders, give out information, 
hold programs that had little to no attendance, and of course, the dreaded enforcing of the 
rules. "I love trying to enforce rules on late rounds. You"re in your snowman pajama pants. 
They are all drunk. ..Lifetime friendships are made," Meghan Mascelli. a RA from Randolph 
Hall, said. Any Resident Assistant who had to write an incident report at two in the morning, 
or had to testify in front of the Judicial Review Board, thought they deserved a writing or 
speaking intensive credit for the job. The clock read 10:00 pm. Even though Friday nights 
offered fun and partying for most, the dutiful RA stayed in her dorm room completing home- 
work. Her turn for weekend duty had airived. No big deal - she had a term paper due on 
Monday, anyway. Time to do a round and she could only hope the 4th floor remained quiet 
for once. With the paper due, she did not have time to write an incident report, as well. She 
crossed her fingers and grabbed her keys. ..she knew she would return in about ten minutes. 

- Stephanie Booth 




Jaime Malone 
Nicliolas Mancini 
Emily Manges 
Jesica Mangun 
Kristen Mangus 
Kendall Manion 
Emmett Mann 



Mark Manzano 
Lee Mareck 
Ryan Markey 
Brran Marks 
Tiffany Marsh 
Nathan Marshall 
Carrie Marston 

.Adrienne Martin 
Andrea Martin 
Louise Martin 
Tina Mason 
Nina Mathews 
.lordan Mathias 
Patnek Mauney 

Jennifer Maxwell 
Reheeca Maykrantz 
Sara Mazzuchi 
Cansa McAllister 
Erin McCalla 
Mary McCartin 
Melanie MeComas 



Ashley McCoy 
Colleen McDonnell 
Ellen McDougal 
Cynthia McElveen 
Brenna McGaha 
Jennifer McGee 
Robert McKee 



Elizabeth McLaughlin 
Minda McMahon 
Jennifer McMillan 
Sarah McPherson 
Christine Meadors 
Erin Medlyn 
Ernest Meier 



Kristin Menz 
Brent Mercer 
Michael Men-ill 
Corinne Meyerhoff 
Nidia Meza 
Matthew Michaels 
Ashley Michaud 



People 219 



'Mick-'l^owa^ 



Alison Mick 

Heather Mielc 

Aaron Miller 

Eric Miller 

Jaime Miller 

Rebecca Miller 

Elizabeth Mills 

Garth Mills 

Jessica Milner 

Carrie Minnick 

Jeffrey Mitchell 

Melanie Mizelle 

Erin Moffetl 

Kiniberlee Mohle 



Corinne Mohler 

Johany Mojica 

Meredith Moneymaker 

Patrick Monk 

Cheryl Monroe 

Ingrid Moody 

Kathleen Moore 

Anne Moredoek 

Angela Moreland 

Leslie Morgan 

Francisco Monn 

Jeri Mork 

Sarah Moms 

Timothy Morris 

Mark Morrow 

Sabrina Morton 

Emily Mosley 

Ann Moulis 

Magdalena Mrowiec 

Lindsey Much 

Meera Muraai 



Matthew Murphy 

Rebecca Murray 

Nicole Musselman 

Nathan Myers 

Thomas Myrick 

Alexander Naden 

Gina Nardi 



Joshua Neff 
Matthew Neff 
Brandy Nelson 
Rebecca Nelson 
Pamilla Nemelh 
Amber Nettles 
Kara Ne\ iackas 



Tiffany Newell 
Cassandra Newman 
Lindsey Newman 
Mai Nguyen 
Nhat Nguyen 
Tinh Nguyen 
Sara Nicolai 



Ian Nicoll 

Katharine Nikkari 

Lauren Nininger 

Michael Nissim-Sabat 

Shannon Nobile 

Nicole Nolker 

Karolina Nowak 



220 People 







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Kellie Nowak 
Jennifer O'Leary 
Anne Ogu 
Young Oh 
Michael Ohisson 
Kristin Orstead 
Caroline Otto 



Kathanne Owen 
Brett Ozanich 
Sahrena Pagani 
Deborah Paige 
Allison Parker 
Casey Parker 
Gillian Pan- 



James Parrish 
Nan Patrick 
Troy Patrick 
Katherine Patterson 
WilHam Pattie 
Jessica Patton 
Kimherly Pelkey 



Lamarr Peppers 
Chnstopher Perdikoyhs 
(jreg Peterson 
Jennifer Peterson 
Christina Petty 
Heidi Phelps 
Gavin Pickcnpaugh 

Lisa Pickett 
James Pierce 
Jocelyn Pitts 
Sarah Pins 
Joshua Pizzaro 
Jennifer Plant 
Titus Pope 

Laura Poppert 
Rohyn Porter 
Sheila Porter 
Lauren Possanza 
Tracy Poteat 
Jeffrey Powers 
Christina Pratt 



Martha Presson 
Sarah Preston 
Thaddeaus Price 
Jessica Pritt 
Melissa Prussia 
Lauryn Pullan 
Kasey Quackenbush 

Ryan Quinn 
Sara Rainbolt 
Jennifer Rainey 
Mary Ramsey 
Ashley Randlen 
Amanda Ransone 
Jessica Ratcliffe 



Alicia Raus 
Ten'ence Reddinger 
Raeschel Reed 
Kristina Reese 
Matthew- Revelle 
Thomas Reynolds 
Jennifer Rice 



People 221 



'Riclwrdson-Slwnahan 



Scott Richardson 

Calicoe Richir 

Sara Richmond 

Anthony Ridpath 

Karin Riesenfeld 

Katherine Robbins 

Andrew Robertson 

Bndget Robinson 

Adam Robison 

Camien Robles 

Jerry Rogers 

Stacy Rogers 

Mary Rohr 

Virginia Rohr 



Cameron Rohrkemper 

Tracy Roks\ aag 

Virginia Rollmg 

Rebecca Romaneski 

Camion Rooke 

Amelia Rose 

Sarah Rose-Jensen 



Michael Roth 

Megan Rouse 
Elena Rousseau 

Carla Rowley 
Ethan Roy 

Emily Ruesch 
Virginia Russell 



Lucas Salzman 
Marena Samson 
Noah Sanders 
Jason Sandlin 
Norberto Santiago 
Shaun Sargent 
Michael Schad 



Andrew Schacffer 

Heidi Schenkcl 

Anna Schmeiser 

Vicki Schmidt 

Elizabeth Schminke 

Mary Schmotzer 

Julie Schocnwetter 



Kimberly ScholTstall 

Rebecca Schram 

Emilie Schuiz 

Paul Schutzman 

Carla Scott 

Matthew Scott 

James Scully 

Maxwell Seaman 

Heather Seaver 

Sarah Sedaghatfar 

Garett Seeba 

Catherine Seeley 

Matthew Sevon 

Kellie Shanahan 




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People 



Sliarkexf-Street 




Alexandra Sharkey 
Michael Shannan 
Deborah Shear 
Allyson Sheffield 
Kathryn Shepley 
Catherine Shiflet 
Lillian Shirlev 



Brandon Shoop 
Abigail Short 
Stefanie Siemon 
Laura SiKerman 
Robert Simpson 
Elizabeth Sims 
Akash Sinha 



Alexis Slack 
Dana Slepsky 
Sharon Sliwa 
Stephanie Slough 
Crystal Small 
Kmiherly Smart 
Am\' Smith 



Barbara Smith 
Conor Smith 
Larl Smith 
Jack Smith 
Jason Smith 
Kelly Smith 
Kendra Smith 



Manin Smith 
Melissa Smith 
Michael Smith 
Scott Smith 
Matthew Smothers 
Lucie Snead 
Marv Snedeker 



John Sncllinger 
Christopher Snellings 
Jessica Snowberger 
Loma Solomon 
Andrea Soltess 
Michael Spencer 
Nicole Springers 

Allison St. Cyr 
Marc St. Pierre 
Mary Stanley 
Vickie Stanley 
Lisa Starling 
Julie Stavitski 
Christopher Steele 



Michael Steele 
Heidi Steiniger 
Nicole Stenger 
Kathleen Stephens 
Jay Stewart 
Ann Stipicevic 
Sharon Stoeckel 

Kendra Stolzenbach 
Lori Stone 
Mary Stone 
Suzanne Strand 
Ryan Strange 
Michael Strazie 
Virginia Street 



People 



Stric^fand-Van 



T'ime T'o 

Spare... 



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Christopher Strickland 

Ryane Studivant 

Mark Sturm 

Tamara Sullivan 

Viktor Sulzynsky 

Abigail Sutton 

Christine Swain 



Erin Swain 

Megan Swearingen 

Lizbeth Sydnor 

Jennifer Tallman 

Jessica Tapp 

Gregory Tavomiina 

Maevc Taylor 

Jonathan Tellekanip 

Robert Test 

Matthew Thomas 

Stephanie Thomas 

Aisha Thompson 

Ernest Thompson 

David Thome 



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Amanda Tinder 

Karen Tinklepaugh 

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Marisabel Torres 

Caroline Townsend 

Sean Townsend 

Kathleen Tripodi 

Rachel Trowbridge 

Mark Tuben 

Rebecca Tunihull 



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Victoria Valdes-Dapena 
Julie Valeyko 
Lauren Valle 




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224 People 



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Pauline Vam-Jacohc 
Hector Veicz 
Meredith Wadsvvorth 
Elizabeth Wagner 
ICatherine Wainwrighl 
De\ in Wais 
Bridaette Walker 



Lmdsey Wallace 
Christina Walsh 
Gabriel Walters 
Kristen Walthall 
Carol Ward 
Monica Wame 



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Connne Warrener 
Lynne Weber 
Carly Wedge 
Jessica Wells 
Matthew Welz 
Steven Wenzel 
Alana West 



Alexander West 
David West 
Christa Whaling 
Irene Whaling 
Alicia Wheeler 
K.risten Wheeler 
Brvan White 



Curtis White 
Kathleen White 
Matthew White 
I'aul Whuley 
Jcnniler Wiley 
1 rika W'llliclmsson 
Bradley Williams 

Erin Williains 
Laura Williams 
Morgan Wilson 
Stephanie Wilson 
Zachary Wineburg 
Charles Winfield 
Ashley Winfree 



People 



Winfree-Zotter 



Noelle Winfree 

Sarah Wintrey 

Deanna Wingerter 

Sarah Winnan 

Pamela Witthoeflft 

Ste\cn Woodhull 

Jennifer Worcester 



Mary Worrell 

Jonathan Worthey 

Andrew Wright 

Ehzabeth Wright 

Jennifer Wroblewslci 

Martha Yarboro 

Reaina Yolanao 



Deanna Yost 

Justin Young 

Megan Yuenger 

Juha Zahn 

Sanjana Zaman 

Ryan Zdanowicz 

Emily Zechman 





m^3^A. 




T^rev CromwefC: 
Magician 




Trey Cromwell had a unique brand of magic that he performed everywhere from Las 
Vegas, Nevada, to right here, on Mary Washington's campus. Cromwell, however, 
thought of himself not only as a peiformer. but also as a scholar of the art of magic. 
Cromwell made his start in magic at a young age when he joined a magic club in school. 
He felt that this club showed him the path his life seemed destined to travel. After 
joining the club. Trey Cromwell studied magic on his own time and performed when- 
ever he got the chance. Trey graduated two times from Jeff McBride's Master Class of Magic. After moving to 'Fredericksburg 
in 1998. Trey met Mike Taggert and joined Les Jongleurs. From that point on. Trey continued to amaze audiences with the 
troupe as he travelled with the other magicians across the country. Trey also performed his magic at other events and locations, 
including The North Carolina Renaissance Faire. Eventually, he landed a part as a featured stage perfomier for First Night 
Fredericksburg. Trey also involved himself in magic on campus as the magic consultant for the production of Shakespeare's, 
"As You Like It." With a unique style and technical chops that remained the best around. Cromwell entertained his audiences 
with feats of magic and daring that many had never seen before and seemed certain they would never see again. 



226 People 



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232 Academics 




ACADEMICS 



JLlCVCltCU thoughts produced innovative ideas. Combining such thoughts led to 
refreshing discoveries and challenging debates. The academic disciplines in which 
students enrolled had a reputation for such results. Ranking among the top colleges 
and universities in national studies and well-respected journals, the disciplines allowed 
students io QTOW in knowledge through hands-on experiences, interactive discus- 
sions, and in-depth research. For many, class schedules held a medley of interests, 
including classes fulfilling core course requirements, those filling campus-wide re- 
quirements such as race & gender and speaking intensive, and a few electives courses 
thrown in for enjoyment. Some students even CXC€ll€(X beyond traditional class- 
room learning, working at an internship and receiving credit for their hard work. No 
matter what their schedule, students felt the strain of attempting to balance classes, 
outside studying and extracurricular activities. Some handled the challenge with ease, 
while others suffered through last minute cramming sessions or pulled the infamous 
college "all-nighter." Once students finally got the hang of maintaining a new sched- 
ule, they pushed themselves to new flClQiXtS. achieving more and making lasting 
relationships with other students in their majors. Professors became mentors as well 
as teachers and alumni and other community members offered direction for future 



career plans. Academic departments held close relationships among the members, and 
students often found themselves turning to professors for advice, to have a good laugh 
or even to enjoy a cookout at a professor's home. No matter what a student's academic 
or social need, each found their own niche in an academic department of choice and 
developed relationships that both gave the key to a promising future and forever net- 
worked the student to an abundance of valuable resources. 



233 



Bookbags lay neatly next to desks. Fresh notebooks lay perfectly centered, a pen at their sides. Nervous chatter filled the 
room as the students awaited the professors grand entrance. As freshmen, the first class attended proved to be the introduction to the 
entire academic experience. 

Aside from attending classes during the first week of school, freshmen were also introduced to their first drop/add period. 
This consisted of getting up at five o'clock in the morning to sit outside of George Washington Hall and await the battle for available 
classes. Those at the front of the line had the best chance of getting the classes they needed. 

After the rush of the first week was over, freshmen started to get into the rythm of college life, going to classes, getting used 
to a greater amount of reading, and having a day in between to do homework. As most freshmen took intro level classes to begin 
fulfilling the schools requirements, most had pretty diverse schedules. 

Through the necessity of taking so many different types of classes, students began to gain a sense of what kind of subjects 
interested them the most. Even some of those who came to the school thinking they knew what they wanted to do, soon realized the 
endless possiblities in front of them and reconsidered their previous choices. 

As freshmen grew accustomed to the day-to-day rituals of college life and started exploring their options for the future, they 
sucessfully started their assention to the top. 




~ A Group Event. Eager to hlend in wiih 
a crowd forming between classes, fresh- 
men join to watch a performance by an a 
capella group outside of Monroe Hall. 
Social events allowed freshmen to feel 
more comfortable in their new surround- 
ings and provided entertainment between 
classes. 



Ground Floor. Jumping at the chance 
to reach their destination quickly, a group 
of freshmen hurry to the get on the el- 
c\'ator. As freshmen learned the ropes 
of both the academic and social organi- 
zations on campus, they became more 
confident in their roles as their ride to the 
top began. 




Academics 233 



"I really enjoyed my American History classes. Professor Caldwell was always funny and connected the class to current 
events, which helped make it interesting," freshman Lena Garner said. Freshmen and sophomore's first experiences with college 
course work involved introductory level classes. Students increased their cultural awareness with classes such as anthropology and 
geography. Explorations into other religions and various foreign languages expanded global knowledge. Business and computer 
science courses helped increase understanding about today's technical world. Athletic classes such as basketball or tennis gave 
students a chance to exercise their bodies, while introductory mathematics courses exercised their minds. These introductory classes 
guided students in their choices about majors and allowed them to discover new interests. "I took Macro Economics and 1 thought 
that I wasn't going to like it. but my professor made it lots of fun. He really got excited about the material." freshman Jen Lott said. 

Introductory classes also benefited upperclassmen who had chosen a major but still wanted to explore other fields. Juniors 
and seniors took introductory courses to balance out their more challenging upper level classes. "I took ceramics because I heard it 
was interesting and very involved. I like that we mix around clays and glazes here in the studio." senior Cynthia Latze said. 

The pursuit of a liberal arts degree required students to try out many different disciplines and departments within the college 
community. "I had Professor Hudgins for History and it was very engaging. He did more than stand there and lecture; he involved 
the class in what he was teaching." freshman Sara Brecht said. The opportunity to take a variety of classes allowed students to get to 
know more of the faculty and to meet new people. As students raised themselves to the challenge of obtaining a degree, the well 
rounded knowledge gained from introductory classes provided them with a valuable asset. 



Serving Up Weekly 
Exercise. Athletes in an in- 
troductory level volleyball 
class practice their skills. 
Beginning level gym classes 
gave students the opportu- 
nity to learn the rules to new 
sports. Students practiced 
sports such as volleyball, bas- 
ketball, swimming and tennis. 
For those who preferred 
dancing, ballet, jazz, and 
modern dance classes allowed 
ihem to displav their creativit\'. 




236 




Ma>.be I Should JuSt Pxck 
C Again. Carefully choosing his 
test answer, freshman Om 
Jahagirdar fills in his answer 
sheet. One of the first hurdles 
that underclassmen overcame in- 
cluded learning how to take col- 
lege tests. Students adjusted to 
less frequent tests that counted 
for a large portion of their grade. 

Carefully Cultivating Cre- 
ativity. In Ceramics, senior Mary 
Kovaleski and sophomore Emily 
McHenry clean up their materials. 
Introductory art classes taught stu- 
dents basic techniques on a vari- 
ety of media. Other beginning level 
classes that required both creativ- 
ii>' and talent included music and 
theater classes. 



237 



Sunbathing or studying? 

Stretched out in the sunUght, a 
student catches up on her read- 
ing while simultaneously enjoy- 
ing the weather. When warmer 
weather approached more and 
more students could be found 
moving their study sessions 
from the shelter of the indoors 
to the freedom offered outside. 




"I like to study in the laundry room where it is quiet," freshman Elizabeth Ayers reported. Students all found their favorite 
places to study by searching for the perfect place with all the right conditions. While many required quiet to get work done, many also 
found background noise a necessity. For these folks who liked the extra sounds, studying in the room with the TV or music playing 
was a widely accepted study practice, as well as going to the Underground or Eagles Nest, and in nice weather outside in the sun with 
friends. Those who liked the quiet, found sanctuary inside the walls of Simpson library, as well as in study rooms and from time to 
time their own rooms. 

As with every new environment, new ways of negotiating remained necessary. Freshman took the time to develop effective 
study habits that fit their schedule and still proved effective in maintaining high GPAs. From highlighting to flash cards to dry erase 
boards, numerous methods of study were attempted before the perfect system finally appeared. As students continued through their 
four years at school these methods were put to the test as classes became progressively more and more challenging and professors less 
and less relaxed about the quality of work students put forth. 

"[ typically do iny studying at night right before I go to bed." sophomore Marcy Webster said. Practices such as this one 
allowed students to feel that the material they learned would remain fresh in their minds by the morning, in time for tests, quizzes and 
just being prepared for class. 




238 Academics 






Branching out with success. 

Trying out a new place to study, a 
student sits propped in a tree, book 
in iiand. Along with conventional 
places to study students often 
sought out the more unusual rang- 
ing from trees, to the top of the 
spirit rock, to taking a seat around 
the fountain. 



Two heads are better than 
one. Both leaning over notes, 
two students collaborate in their 
efforts to study. Studying with a 
friend or a group from class 
proved to be a popular practice 
among many as more views on a 
subject are often a benefit while 
studying. 






,»«*« 






Rmm infy} E:>^)meme 



Once they established themselves as independent individuals, sophomores and juniors found their place in the college commu- 
nity. These students felt more at ease with balancing both work and play. Individuals no longer felt far away from where they belonged, 
as they learned to call their domis and apartments home. Students mastered the art of writing ten page papers in one sitting, and knew 
which readings to skim and which assignments to spend lots of time perfecting. Now that they had fiilly adjusted to college course work, 
the elevated amount of homework no longer seemed so daunting a task to complete. Students knew how to structure their study time 
according to their syllabi, which prevailed as a huge accomplishment in the four-year progression. 

Another aspect of college life that second and third year students enjoyed included having a well-defined circle of friends. 
Many students left best friends and close relatives at home when they embarked on their journey to college. Living in dorms and having 
classes in a variety of disciplines allowed new friendships to form. After a few years in college, students had new groups of people with 
whom they could share their joys, sorrows and leisure time. 

The main focus of life for sophomores and juniors remained becommg involved in their majors and defining their plans for the 
future. Students narrowed their fields of study and planned which classes they needed to take to graduate. Involved individuals also 
explored a variety of clubs to attempt leadership positions and learn how to work with others. These skills prepared students for the 
future while allowing them to meet new people and try different activities. In addition, sophomores and juniors knew that these years 
could remain the last time that they could have fun without the full amount of responsibility that graduation brought. This knowledge 
motivated sUidents to make the most out of both their social and academic opportunities as they rose in the experience of adulthood. 

A quick chat between classes. 

Strolling down a walkway after class, two 
juniors discuss the events of their day. As 
students spent more time on campus and 
became familiar with one another, com- 
pany to walk with from one point to an- 
other was never hard to find. 

Going Up. Patiently wating to reach 
their destination, a group of sophomores 
and juniors ride their way to the top. 
While in school, sophmores and juniors 
gained valuable knowledge that prepared 
them for the next step in life. 




24U 




r Elevation 241 



Speedy Registration Period. Reading 
course numbers off previously tal<en 
notes, a student experiments with online 
registration. As the first year in which 
this advancement had been offered, stu- 
dents hoped that signing up for classes 
would take less time, and courses neces- 
sary for majors and college requierments 
would become more accessable. 




The ever dreaded question. "What's your major?", heard from parents, past teachers, fellow students, and random shoppers 
waiting in the grocery line who just happened to notice an MWC key chain hanging out of an unsuspecting student's pocket - this 
question turned a normally collected and confident student into a sweating, stammering fool. Make no mistake, the utterance of those 
three little words, can bring swells of panic upon a student almost instantaniously, if he or she has yet to declare. 

Students usually decide on majors at some point during their sophomore year, although a few wait as long as their junior 
year, and some are con\ inced that they are sure as freshman. It is not at all an luicommon circumstance to meet a student who has 
changed majors quite a few times during their four years at school. 

The question of what to major in can be looked at from one of two ways. The first path students follow is to name a goal or 
profession they would like to someday achieve and pick a major that will set them on their way to doing so. Or, many students 
choose a major based on their current interests and then hope to someday stumble across u profession where these skills will be 
useful. In either case, the question of what to major in, can be a stressful one for many students. 




242 Academics 



The Selection Process. Glancing 
down at the 2002 course listing, Chrissy 
n attempts to single out the classes 
necessary to make her schedule of choice 
for the up coming semester To fulfill 
major requirements, students rushed to 
pick up the listings when printed and 
slrived to be the first to sign up for their 
much needed classes. 




I Academics 243 



Dare to Prepare 



After completing general requirements, students advanced into upper le\'el classes. These classes met major requirements and 
allowed students to define their future career goals. After taking a sample of upper level classes, students could determine whether or not 
they made the best choice of a major. Once one settled on a major, he or she could decide what type of job to pursue. Students could 
select a concentration to further their study in a particular area for their career. Concentrations also allowed majors to explore other 
aspects of interest to obtain a well-rounded education. 

The challenge in obtaining upper level classes rested in registration difficulties. Force-adding classes became a necessity for 
students who u ished to enter popular classes. As students earned more credits, registration became easier and they could take more 
classes that they needed. Once they gained entry into their classes, students enjoyed learning more in depth about specific subjects. "My 
favorite class is Sociology and Anthropology of Food because we eat and talk about food! How great is that?"" junior Jen Baston said. 

Having upper level classes invoked fun. but it also included an increased amount of work. "It really depended on the particular 
class and professor, but generally 1 think the work load in upper level classes is heavier."" sophomore Ashlie Biscoe said. Upper level 
classes involved less testing along with more papers and research projects. Seminar classes included more presentations, forcing stu- 
dents to increase their public speaking skills. Students taking several tipper le\ el classes faced the difficult task of balancing a stressful 
work load with their extracurricular activities and personal lives. Although this volume of assignments proved challenging, students in 
upper level classes strived to leam advanced material that would prove beneficial for their future endeavors. 

May I Help Voii With That? In a busi- 
ness senior seminar. Chris Blasko and 
Aaron McKoy receive assistance from Dr. 
deGraff. Senior seminars focused on in- 
depth case studies and problem solving 
sl^ills necessary to compete in the job 
market. Seminars prepared students to 
enter their first job with knowledge and 
confidence. 















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244 Academics | 




Together. Evervone Achieves More. 

Before their education class, Maryann 
iilsenpeter and Kara O'Connor discuss 
upcoming assignments. As students 
struggled through their upper level 
courses, it became essential to form 
friendships with classmates. These 
friends studied together for tests and re- 
laxed with each other after stressful as- 
Mgnments ended. 



Professor of Power. During a lecture 
in his Fashion History course. Professor 
Kevin McCluskey emphasizes a point. 
Fashion History studied fashion from the 
ancient Greeks to the mid-twentieth cen- 
tury. This course proved popular for both 
students who wanted to explore careers 
in die fashion indu.stry or who simply held 
an interest in chanemE! fashion trends. 



245 




Presenting with Power. 

his senior seminar on Policy and 
Strategy, Jeremy Driver explains a 
case study on Toyota in India. In- 
formal presentations helped stu- 
dents feel comfortable about talk- 
ing in front of their peers. 



246 Academics 




r 




Two areas of expertise that the academic curricukiin emphasized included writing and speai^ing si<iils. These two areas remained 
vital to success in the real v\orld, as future employees must know how to make presentations at important meetings and write succinct 
reports for company deadlines. 

One of the greatest challenges that iiidi\ iduals face remained the fear of speaking in front of groups. "I hate talking in front of 
people. Everyone watches you and you thmk they are just waiting for you to mess up to make fun of you, but they really aren't." junior 
Anna Drago said. Speakers had to endure two speaking intensive classes and a variety of presentations and group discussions that 
required oratory skills. Students who needed practice to overcome their fears utilized the speaking center. The speaking center provided 
students w ith coaching tips and the opportunity to videotape a speech so one could re\ ieu his or her weaknesses in private. Regardless 
of the method of practice chosen, students had to leam how to get ready for their speeches ahead of time. "'Most times I prepare my 
speech ahead of time and after it is written. I practice it by myself, then with a group of people, either with friends or at the speech center."" 
junior K.im Blizzard said. 

"I finally learned what a thesis statement is. and 1 feel more confident in my abilities to write a well organized and coherent 
paper,"" sophomore Gretchen Wietmarschen said. Writers had to perfect their abilities over the four required writing intensive courses. 
The writing center offered peer editing to identify grammar problems and content issues within given assignments. Students had to 
rewrite drafts of papers as they learned different styles for varying types of papers. Whether writing eloquent papers or giving well- 
prepared speeches, students learned the value of hard work and practice. 

A Peek into the Minds of 
Men. Performing his one man 
act entitled "Crimes Against Na- 
ture," psychology professor, 
(Christopher Kilmartin, delights 
audiences. Professor Kilmartin's 
play provided insight into the 
male psyche. Students ben- 
efited from viewing presenta- 
tions given by skilled speakers 
as they practiced their own as- 
signments. 




Academics 247 



Top Floor 



College life required all individuals to fill a variety of roles. Their primary role required them to act as students. They 
learned time management skills as they had to balance heavy course loads. They adjusted their st^dy habits to meet the demands of 
challenging classes. Choosing a major became the most important decision they made as students. Students found their place in their 
academic departments as they worked closely with fellow majors and dedicated faculty members. Students progressed through 
introductory classes to more advanced courses, including labs, seminars and research oriented classes. These classes provided 
students with the knowledge and skills necessary to execute their career goals. 

Another role students acquired became that of an independent individual. For most students, the college setting allowed them 
to make choices they could not make in high school. It also increased their levels of responsibility. Students also learned the rewards 
and consequences that accompany living on their own. including cleaning, cooking, laundry and paying bills. Individuals who moved 
off campus learned about running a household. Learning to balance one's finances became essential for all individuals for their 
personal lives. 

The final role individuals faced involved making lasting relationships. Students dated romantic partners they could choose to 
marry. Friendships with roommates, classmates, faculty and fellow members of organizations filled students with pleasure and 
allowed them to make contacts they planned to keep throughout their adult lives. "As a senior. I enjoyed feeling closer than ever with 
tny friends because I know that we have a limited time together." Jenna Hayes said. These roles of student, independent individual and 
friend allowed seniors to grow as they learned about adult life and prepared to leave college and make their dreams come true. 

Emerging with Success. Chatting 
away, seniors Steffanie Slaughter, Carly 
Reid, Lynne McMullen and Margaret Prior 
leave an elevator. For three years, seniors 
elevated their potential as they faced chal- 
lenges with schoolvvork, social problems, 
and the responsibility of making impor- 
tant life decisions. Seniors prepared 
themselves to leave school and estabHsh 
themselves in the real world. 

Hands on Art. Individual works of 
art demonstrate what hard work and 
practice can accomplish. Seniors Sally 
Dalton, Marianne Mines, Ivy Chen and 
Debbie Yarrington exhibited their work 
at duPont Gallery to fulfill their studio 
art degree requirements. Students and 
members of the community had the op- 
portunity to admire their work and pur- 
chase selected pieces. 




248 




I Academics 249 





While helping one student deal with a helplessly knotted shoelace, another runs up to ask for assistence in making his playdough 
sculpture look more like the dog he invisioncd, while still yet another stands off to the side hopping up and down impatiently waiting for 
a comment of approval on her newest work of art. So goes a day in the life of any elementary school student teacher. 

Student teaching exemplified just one example of the many internships available to students to aid them on their transition out 
of school. Not only did interning provide much needed experience in a particular field of work, it also greatly inhanced a student's 
chances of getting a job after graduation. 

The proximity of the college to both the nation's capital. Washington D.C.. and the state's captial, Richmond, provided many 
students with numerous exciting internship possibilities that may not have been made available to them otherwise. Students held intern- 
ships both over the summer months and during the school year in government and associated organizations. Many of the contacts at these 
organizations happened to be alumni from the college, while other employers accepted students based on the college's reputation alone. 
Often, the internships resulted in both sides benefiting, with the students gaining crucial experience and new insights, while the employ- 
ers found fresh ideas and extra assistance around the office or job site. 

Along with providing the experience, the new information gained and sometimes the connections that many students found 
iiTcplacable. internships also provided a change of scenery from the nonnal routine of classes. On rare occasions, students found 
themselves lucky enough to enjoy the added benefit of monetary compensation for their hard work. 



A learning experience. 

Rearranging law books on a 
shelf in the local library's law 
library, junior Jen Wroblewski 
makes sure that the reference 
sources reamain easily acces- 
sible and in their correct order. 
An internship with a local law- 
yer at the Division of Child Sup- 
port Enforcement Agency helped 
Wroblewski gain knowlege in a 
Held she wanted to possibK pur- 
sue litter graduation. 




250 Academics | 





ABC's and 123's. Leaning 
over to examine their designs, se- 
nior Mil<e Malin works with two 
students at a local elementary 
school instilling in the children 
the importance of art. Interning 
offered a chance to gain valuable 
experience in specific fields of 
study, in this case, working with 
children one on one. Many stu- 
dents used internships as step- 
ping stones for their future ca- 
reers. 



251 




Academics 





As they advanced in their academic careers, students had to make critical decisions about their future. Options inckided ending 
their academic life at the undergraduate level and immediately searching for employment. Another possibihty involved going directly to 
graduate school to pursue another degree. Students also considered delaying their graduate work until they could financially and emo- 
tionally handle additional semesters of courses. 

If a student made the decision to attend a graduate program, the next task became selecting which schools to consider for 
application. Career Services guided students through this task as they offered workshops to help with planning. Career Services also 
provided books and advice on graduate schools. Advisors and department chairs gave additional information on programs specific to 
their areas of expertise. Students also faced the challenge of standardized testing. Kaplan offered workshops and practice sessions to 
help test takers prepare. Students could also purchase workbooks to assist them and help to raise their scores. 

The next task applicants faced included filling out the necessary paperwork and visiting the colleges they wanted to attend. 
Students often applied to schools in other states and sometimes had to travel to get a feel for those campuses. Programs that required 
interviews necessitated practicing communication skills before these visits. 

Once students received their acceptance letters, they had to choose a program with the best options at an affordable cost. 
Balancing all of these decisions with a normal semester of work proved challenging, but students could feel at ease knowing that they had 
the future planned. 




Intent to Inform. Speakers provide 
useful tips to interested students about the 
need to prepare for graduate school. Stu- 
dents turned to more experienced indi- 
viduals who already held advanced de- 
grees for advice on how to achieve their 
own academic goals. 



I Academics 



Earnest Ackermann 

Taddesse Adera 

David Ambue! 

Linda Anieen 

Mehdi Aminrazavi 

William Anderson 



Clavio Ascari 
Bulent Atala\ 
Wendy Atvvell-Vasey 
James Baker 
Rosemarry Barra 
Mictiael Bass 



Porler Blakemoru 

Dana Bowen 

Meta Braymcr 

David Cain 

Gardner Campbell 

(nho Campbell 



Ana Chichester 
Bernard Chiricu 
Tracy Citeroni 
Manning Collier 
Deborah Conway 
Carole Corcoran 



William Crawle\ 
Timothy Crippen 
Judith Crissman 
Rita D'Arcangelis 
Jean Dabb 
Frederick Davidson 



Galen DeGraff 
Patricia Dean 
Joseph Dibclla 
Joseph Dreiss 
Betty Durrer 
Stephen Farnsorth 



BK Faunee 

Ciaudine Ferrcll 

Martha Fickeli 

Victor Fingerhui 

Robert Frackelton 

Elizabeth Freund 




254 Academics 




I 1 me Houghtalin 
^' trgared Hubcr 

met Hughes 
IH bra Hydorn 
( liristina Kakava 
\\ iliiam Kemp 



1 Liesa kennedv' 
loelia kilhan 
Christopher Kilmartin 
George King 
Margaret Kia\ton 
liavid Kolar 



l.inusz Koniec/^cny 
iames Lehman 
1 l]/abeth Lewi^ 
I \ nn Lewis 
Kobert Liebau 
Kathr\n Loesser 



Academics 255 



David Lonj^ 

Bruce MacEvven 

Carol Manning 

Christina McBride 

Venitta McCall 

Robert McConnell 



Sammy Merr 
Thomas Moell 
Brown Morti 
Joseph Nichola 
Lorene Nicke 
Vera Niebuh 



Denis Nissim-Sahai 

Patricia Norwood 

Bruce O'Brien 

Deborah O'Dell 

Marjorie Och 

CHnt OlKMi 



Joan Olson 
Judith Parker 
Larry Penwell 
lifer Polack-Wahl 
Wenday Price 
Donald Rallis 



Margaret Ra\ 

John Reynolds 

Mary Rigsb>' 

Cedric Rucker 

Curtis Ryan 

Robert Rvcroti 




AP^C Faculty mevatlng 

Teaching, Coaching, Mentoring ^ ElCVatlng MindS 



Elevating Minds 
Elevating Minds 



256 Academics 



Mara Scalon 
Debra Schleef 
Raymond Scott 
Marie Sheckels 

Thomas Sheridan 
Kcli Slum 




Richard Warner 
Stephen Watkins 
M.irie WeUingto 
Sandra White 
I rud Whitman 
Werner Wieland 



MWC Faculty 



Teaching, Coaching, Mentoring 



Elevating Minds 
Elevating Minds 
Elevating Minds 



I Acadg 



257 




258 Organizations 



TM^JT' 




CLOSING 



Jl^lCVCltCCl thoughts left the campus community reflecting on another year gone by 
and wondering what surprises the next would bring. For some, this ending marlced a 
goal achieved; a milestone in life that would soon fade into the past. For others, this 
concluded the uncertainty of being "the new kids on the block." With experience and 
new knowledge, they finally felt at home on the campus grounds. For the remaining, 
this ending marked just another day and the knowledge that more endings would come. 
For these remaining students, this merely characterized a hurdle in their race for the 
finish line. The college community as a whole endured many difficult times over the 
course of the year, and shared many joys as well. The year remained forever etched in 
the memories of all, due to the tragic events of September 1 1th. It became the type of 
day that eveiyone remembered exactly where they STOOCl or exactly what they did 
when they heard the news. It also became the type of day that forever bonded those 
who shared similar experiences or comforted each other in times of fear and son-ow. 
The community moved on, but never forgot. For many, this delivered a wake-up call 
to protected innocence. It proved that even the strongest force can have vulnerabilities 
and it's never safe to i^r(7W comfortable in power. Apart from September's events, 
the community also suffered the loss of a beloved psychology professor. Dr. Bill. The 




untimely death deeply affected the psychology department's close-knit group of stu- 
dents and professors. Many remembered him as the type of teacher who went beyond 
classroom learning and became a mentor. He cared about his students lives and often 
kept in touch with them years after graduation. The effect of both of these sudden, 
tragic events placed a damper on certain parts of the year for many. However, students 
did the best thing they could do; they HVCu and began to make the most out of 
living. 



Divider 



259 



Ads 



«dSln honor of the graduates of the class of 2002. 
May you find happiness and success in all of your 
[ future ventures and may you 

^ always remember the road back to 

Mary Washington.-^ 



It's hard to believe four years 

of college have passed so quickly. 

We can remember your first day 

of pre-school like it was yesterday. 

We are proud of all your 

achievements and the wonderful 

man you have become. 




FoWow Your ^rea^^^ Always/ 
The S^y U ^he Ut^tft 

Mom, Dad, and Matt 



Congratulations wonderful Quinn 

Rockin' roilin' rocket scientist. 

Kind, considerate, loving, literate. 

Time to touch the sky. 

The world should have more Quinns. 




Only love always 



Matthew, 

We are so very proud of 

you. 

Congratulations! 

Love, 
Dad, Mom, and Meg 



260 



Congratulations 

Ryan Killarney! 

We are very proud of the 

young man you have become! 

Best of luck in whatever lies 

ahead as you leave these 

^^Hallowed Halls!" 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Devon, The RVC & 

The Fla gangs 

Conqratuiations to your friends: 
%ati], 'Xtiti/ 'Bcfi, Shannon, 'Cory, Tfave, 
' JoeCjeff, 'Bifixj, Cfmsc, 'Matt 




Congratulations! We 

are so proud of you, 

"Dana Do." 

You have brought us so 

much love and joy. Hold fast to your 

dreams. 



We love youl 

Mom, Dad, Danielle 

and 

the Whole Family 





TffJE fZJ^^ES y^V\LIo G& 



You have brains in your head. 

You have feet in your shoes. 

You can steer yourself 

and direction you choose. 

You're on your own. And you know what you know. 

And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go... 

You'll be on your way up! 

You'll be seeing great sights! 
You'll join the high fliers 
who soar to high heights. 
You won't lag behind, because you'll have the 

speed. 

You'll pass the whole gang and you'll soon take 

the lead. Wherever you go, you will top all 

the rest. 
And if on your journey there is ever a need. 
Your family will respond with lightening fast 

speed. 

We are like that you know and forever will 

be- 

Your most faithful cheerleaders with love and 

lasting loyalty! 

Love, Dr. Seuss and "Mom" 




Ads 



261 




Sill, 

your light 

always shinszs 

through. 

<l)urround2;d by your 

jr'imdiS or just bszing 

you! 

tiow proud Wsz ar^ of all you do Now 

go your way, staying trusz, 

to your family, friiznds, and you! 



Mom, Dad, Mike, 
Mary Kay, and Tim 





With great feelings of love and 
pride, we congratulate and salute 
you, Susan Marie, on your gradua- 
tion from MWC. 
May your dreams come true and 
may the years ahead bring you all of 
the brightness, sweetness and love 
that you, our 'chocolate-chip 
cookie ", have brought us. 
Love Always, 
Mom and Dad 



It has been pleasing to hear others 

describe you as "one of the good ones", "a 

rare person", and "truly wonderful and 

beautiful". 






We were never surprised because we 

know that YOU ARE A PRECIOUS 

GIFT FROM GOD, SENT TO US TO 

SHARE WITH THE WORLD. 

Love, Your Family 



Kimherfij , 

Let the music move 

you. Let the 

moment take your 

hand. Let it lead you 

onto the dance floor and embrace 

you. Dive off the high board. Ride 

with the top down. Thrive like a 
wild flower. And sing. ..with a voice 
all your own. 
Congratulations! 



With love, 
Mom, Dad, and Karen 




262 



That devilish grin and 
know-it-all attitude 
have gotten you this 
far. May they take 
you the rest of the 

way. 

Congratulations and 

love. 

Mom and Dad 



Conc]ratuiations and best wishes, 

we are very proud of \jou. 
(good Click in in the future, good 
fieaCth and 
hajipiness! 



iMuch Love, 

Mom, 'Dad, 'Donna & 

£i6b\l 





From first grade to 

present, you have made 

our hearts fill with pride. 

Thank you for 

coming into our lives. 

Love, 
Mom and Dad 



Sarah ~ Keep Smiling. 
Your smile makes angels dance. 



Love, Mom & Dad 



'"JML OAKS FROM LrfTLB ACORA/S GROW 



f>ear Michelle? 

/t has teen iv^anv years since ^ou flrs^ recftec/ those words on 
a sfat^t^af school s^age^ vc+ It seeiv^s dk^ vcs+er<;/av +o us* 
Wa+c^fiD^ yoo ^(ossorvi fro!>^ \ha\ happ^ affecytor)a^c chUd in+o the 
teao+rf(i( rn+e((f.^en+ wo^vjan voo are has teen the test/ Than^ yoo 
for ^he Joy ar)<i pleasure yoo have ^Ven os« We are so proud of 
yoo/ 



Z,ov/e always arxi our 

\/ery test wishes 

for yoor future 

happlr)esSi 
Mojv^, i>adi and PJ 





Ads 



263 







Josef>h Barre++ Payne 



r.> 



Lindsay, you are such a special 

person and will always be our 

special daughter. 

Mom and Dad 



Life's a \r}p^ Son. 

eri/oy the nc/e 
and voo never forget 

the way horv^e. 

We're ^roud of you. 

Z.o\/e9 

Mai^^a and &ad 




Born mid winter 
nineteen and eighty, 
You have grown and 

matured, 

Have become quite a 

lady. 

You extend a kind heart 
to all that you meet, 
Your warmth and your 
smile are both hard to beat. 

Good luck for the future, be responsible and 
smart... 



We love you Sweet Peg, 

from the bottom of our 

heart. 




''It's a long and dusty road 

I It's a hot and heavy load 

The people that you meet aren't 

always kind 

Some are bad, some are good 

Some have done the best they 

could 

Some have tried to ease my 

troubled mind." 

Where I'm Bound by Doc Watson 

Love, 
Dad 



264 Ads 




Adam, 

It's been a 

wonderful 4 

years at MWC, 

and an even 
better 22 years. 
Make the most of every opportunity, 
never forget who you are, and never 
compromise your 
morals. Most of 
all, we love you 
very much. 



Love, 
Mom, Dad & Lisa 




Mushy- 

We are so proud of our little sister bear 

and we love you so very much ! 

Love, 

Erik, Beth, and Meghan too! 





You will continue to delight us and fill 

us with pride. 

Loving you always, 

Mom and Dad 




pat, 

you h5Vi3 always marehszd to 

th^ bszat of a diff^r^nt dramniizr. 

Mf^'RCti ON! 

Congratalations on yoar 

graduation! 

WiZ lov^ you! 
?)ad. Mom, Kristin, and Karolyn 










Uxr^t f^/H^^«'//tinVt^'J' ! 



.A^trVM,^ i^lAJ\j /Uv/f l^^[[ 




265 




'Bricfqet, 

You are tridy one of 
the sweetest, kindest, 
and most considerate 
persons we have ever 
known. V^e are 
-proud of adxjour manxj 
accomviishments on and ojj tfie field, 
tfie 'B(B court, in the 
c[assroom, and affijou 

do. 

We love xfou so much. 

(^oodLuckl 

'Mom and 'Dad 




Amanda Harrigan- 

For all the things you are 

Daughter 

Sister 

Friend 

Lover 

Figther 

Student 

Coxswain 

Leader 

Stateswoman 

Writer 

Researcher 

Author 

Singer 

Animal Lover 

Joker 

Policy Analyst 

Dreamer 

And Now Graduate... 

We Love you! 

Mom, Dad, Brendan and Rockie 





Friends you made as a freshman are now friends 

for a lifetime. We are very proud of you and your 

accomplishments. Thank you for always working 

so hard and striving to do your best. We know you 

will succeed in whatever path you choose. 

Congratulations Karen. 



Love, 
Mom and Dad 

P. 5. Our very best wishes to all 
the Ya Yas! 




266 Ads 




Carly. 

Well, you've come full circle. 

Thanks for making our lives 

richer. We know, with your 

strong character, your next 

steps will be as successful as 

your first. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 



From the first day I 

looked into your 

face, I knew how 

special you would 

be. 

Love, Mom 




''Wfiere ska ft we see a 

better daughter or a 

kinder sister, or a truer 

friend?" 

Jane 'Austen 

Love. Mom. Dad. and Cara 





Adam, 

Your wealth of 
experiences have 
prepared you for the 
world. We hope the 
world is ready. 

All our Love, 
Dad, Mom & Kelly 




Congratulations- well deserved! We are 

very proud of all your hard work, 

perseverance, and accomplishments. 

Thanks for being you, Sweetie. Embrace 

your endless possiblites. We're always 

here for you wherever your dreams may 

lead you. 

The future is yours- Soar on Eagles 

Wings. 

God Bless you always. 

Love, Mom and Dad 



"find she is 

going to dance, 

dance hungrg, 

dance -Full, 

dance each cold 

astonishing 

moment, nout 

iiihen she is 

goung and 

again dihen she 

is old. " 
Pinne Lambert 

Love. 
Your Family 
and Friends 




267 




You are ourjirst 

horn, our princess, 

and a masterpiece 

in progress. 

We love you 

dearly, and we are 

so proud of ij OIL 

CongratuCationsl 



Love, 

Mom, T)ad, Julia 

and Qrandpa 





"If a man does not keep 
pace with his compan- 
ions, perhaps it is be- 
cause he hears a different 
drummer; let him step to 

the music he hears, 

however measured, or far 

away." 

H.D. Thoreau 



Congratulations! We're so proud of you! 

Success and happiness 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Mike and Meg (M&M's) 





Dear Erin, 

We are 

extremely proud of 

the tremendous effort 

you have put forward 

during your years at 

MWC. We have 

enjoyed watching you grow in spirit, 

knowledge, and caring for others. We 

wish for your future all the challenges, 
triumphs, and 
happiness you richly 
deserve. 

Love, 
Mom & Dad 






We are proud, not only of your 

academic successes, musical talent and 

athletic achievements, but also for the 

beautiful and caring woman you are. 

Now take your smile and humor and 

courage and knowledge and head off 

for countless new 

adventures! 

With all our love. 
Mom, Dad, Allyssa, John, &. James 



268 




Laura, 
Your hard work has car- 
ried you to this moment: 
a new beginning for what 
will surely be a future 
materpiece. 

We're very proud of you ! 
Mom & Dad 



The great man is he 
who does not lose 
his child's heart... 

and above ail- 
to thine own self 
be true ! 




Love, 
Mom, Dad, Eric 



tAitt viJK nre tovcA. "VKily i\tt 

yOHT Are^ntS (^dmc trnc. 

\/pc 4rc sc very prCHii cif 



^Dve, 'yhotufr Z><tA 





Dear Cathy, 

Congratulations! We are 
very proud of you. Thank 
you for bringing us so much 
happiness. We love you! 

Mama and Daddy 




Rob, 



i^L^^, [ ■; You have given Dad and 
^"^ ^ me many moments of 
joy, pride and fear for 
your survival. Your 
friends and family v\dsh you 
happiness and fulfillment in the future. 
We will alvs^ays cherish memories of a 
loving little boy, and the admirable man 



you have grown to be. 



Love, 
Mom and Dad 




DEAR JULIE. 
I'M SO PROUD OF YOU 

AND YOUR HARD 
WORK. I LOVE YOUR 

COMPASSION AND 

CARING HEART YOU 

ARE DESTINED FOR 

GREAT THINGS, 

EXPECT THE 

EXTRAORDINARY, 

DREAM BIG. YOU 

HAVE THE ABILITY TO 

SOAR WITH THE 

EAGLES, YOU ARE 

WORTHY OF GOD'S 

BEST. DON'T SETTLE 

FOR LESS. 

Love. 
Mom 




269 






She is a rare soul whose spirit gets magically into into the 

hearts of all, leaving behind something more real and 

warmly personal than bodily presence. Her legacy, her 

gift, is her inescapable and eternal essence. Hers is an 

everlasting life through all who come to know her. The 

grace of her spirit will forever pervade the places through 
which she has passed like the heavenly loveliness of an 

angel. 

This is our Jennifer. 
With love always, Mom and Dad 



lloffany lloughlor! 
niii houi lime flic/! 

Just yesterday you were the little girl in 

these photos. What fun and joy you 

have been. Your uncanny athleticism 

started from day one. 

How fun to watch you run circles 

around all the boys in the neighborhood. 

Your fiery competiveness coupled with one of the sharpest minds we know yields 

one terrific personality. Now you are a beautiful young lady ready to take on the 

world. We have been blessed to have you as our daughter. So look out world! 

Look out Price Waterhouse! Here she comes! 



>. ^^^^;. 




m^ 


c% 


t 


i 




Jr^ 




f 




Love, 
Mom & Dad, Steve & Stacey 



270 



Ads 





DEAREST MICHAEL, 

WE ARE ALL SO PROUD OF YOU AND 

ALL THAT YOU HAVE 

ACCOMPLISHED. MAY YOUR LIFE BE 

FILLED WITH LOVE AND HAPPINESS 

AND MAY ALL YOUR DREAMS COME 

TRUE. 

LOVE, 
MOM. DAD, DAVID. & SHARON 



Dear Whitney, 

Your family is so proud 

of your 

accomplishments and the 

young woman you have 

become. You have 
worked very hard to put 
yourself 



through college. 

I pray that happiness 

and love will be yours as 

you start your new 

career. 

Love, Mom 







't)ear Mariannsz, 



Congratulations as you graduatsz from MWC!! you bavjz b(2- 
comsz a young woman of strong Christian faith and of provgrbs 51 
(ZXCizll(zncsz. Wsz rszcogniziz and admiriz \h(z hard work, 
Pizrs(ZVszranc(Z, ch^izrfulnszss and crszativity you haV(Z shown during 
thiZSiZ 4- yszars. your zjzst for lifsz, your s2Xeit(znisznt and curiosity 
continually surprisjz and dizlight us. Our prid^z in you is surpassszd 
only by our lovjz and thankfulns^ss for you. 

LoV(Z you most. Mom & f)ad 



Ads 



271 




A Long Koad: 

Norfolk, Alexandria, 

B'runswick, North 

Yarmouth, 
Fredericksburg. In 
between, Ireland, Bahrain, 
Disney World, England, 
France, Caymen Islands, Turks & Caicos, 
Italy, Belgium, Switzerland, Holland. You 
have traveled a long way sinoe November 
]9&0. There is a lot 
more to look forward 
to as you tackle the 

future. 

Congratulations. We 

love you always! 



Mom & Dad & Jock 





Congratulations Ryan! 

May your blessings 

out-number the shamrocks that 

grow 

And may trouble avoid 

you wherever you go! 

We are very proud of you ! 

All Our Love, 

Mom and Dad 



I9S4 and airizady 

(znvironmizntally 

involvszd. 

I)tay s^ngagszd and hop^ 

that othizrs will follow in 

your footstszps! 

your family lovjzs and 

supports you! 

f)ad. Mom, tlizathszr 





CoUe^vMarCe/llcilph/ 



I null rciiiciiiber 
tlie first liglit 
on the water 
at six. 

1 ivill remember 
the earhj sun, 
my will to win, 
the strength 
in my arms 
and the power 
of the creio. 

I will remember 

how I always reached beyond 

myself 

in everything 1 did. 

And how today 
I still do. 

Author Unknown 




Vfe/Love/Vou/, Colleen/! 

Mcnw cmd/Vad/ 

Je4^Brid^^, and/EwiCUy 



Ads 




on sU yoo have 

accotv>^((jhe</ yo 

far*7he future «y 

voory +0 iv)affe« 

Be(reve io 

Voorje(f anc/ 

^reat +Mfn^5 y/U( 

hat>t>er). We wUi 

a(wavJ be in yoor 

corner. 



Moiv>, ^a;|, 




Y&w begun/ Khoxyh 

a^ o/ Uttiey girl/. 

Now you/ are/ 

graduutiyn^from/ 

college/ ciy^ ciy 

yoxAVug- voowuMv. 

M)e/ are/ proud/ of 

yowl 

Love/, 

Mofn/6r Vady 





There have only been 
treats in watching you 

grow and enjoy your 

academic years. 
Wishing you the very 

best in your future, 

Mom and Dad 





VS» '» 


1 


^ 


m 


tL^ 





X 



\^' 



V 



\L^ 



•f^" 



^4 



t1(3rsz'§ to nszw bszginnings. W^ saw 

your loViZ of teaching b^zgin in 

kindizrgardszn and grow in MWC§ 

tizaehing program, four down and ontz 

to go until your drszam eoniizs trusz! Wsz 

arsz so vszry happy and proud of you. 

you fiVlQ thsz appl(z of our (zyszs. 

liOVsZ, 

Mom fel^ad 



Heather, 
Your college years 

have made you 
stronger and even 
more determined to 
succeed. As you 
continue your 
journey, remember Philippians 
4:6-7 and 13. We are so proud of 
you. God has truly 
blessed our family. 
Always remember 
how much we love 
you! 

Love, Mom, Dad, and 
Hillary 




Ads 



273 




Congratulations Megan.... 
Think left and think right and think low and think 
high. Oh, the THINKS you can think up if only you 

try. (Dr. Seuss) 
We love you and are proud of you every step of the 
way. 



Love, Mom, Dad, 
and Nathan 




^€i 



.C^^ 



\^^- 




You've come a long way baby! 

Congratulations! ! Remember to treasure each moment. 

stay happy and follow all your dreams. We love you. 

Mom, Dad. Aunt Juliann & Simon 



Jessica, 

We are very proud of 

you. You will be a 

wonderful teacher 

May God bless you. 

Love You, 
Mom, Dad, Melissa & AJ 






Amanda, Amanda, 

How the years have flown; 

It has been joyous to our hearts the way 

you have grown; 

You made all the right choices along 

the way; 

Responsible, caring, & loving each & 

every day. 

Now that your education is on the edge 

of reward; 

We are so very happy to see the path 

you continue toward; 
All the best in life, for which you are 

due; 

Always remember how proud we are 

and how much we love you. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 





274 





From Drama Princess to Band Sergeant 

Betty and beyond - you have always been 

a Force To Be Reckoned With. 

Trust yourself, follow the rhyming clues, 

and all good things will come to you. 

Love, 

Mom 




"May you be made strong 
with all the strength that 

comes from God's glorious 
power, and may you be 

prepared to endure every- 
thing with patience." 

Congratulations - 

We Love you 
Pa - Mom - Aifie 



Dear Christopher, 

How quickly time fliesl 

When yon least expect it the 

future is the present. My 

hopes and dreams, and 

unconditional love are with 

you always. 

RS. Your futiu'e is 

something to smile about. 

Love, 

Alom 







JLsI- J~bJ~si 3- Xj 

V/J nv^ 'B© -pvefixd ©i ^©h nt^d 
\^& \©\le y©h ^© V^^y t^hci^l 

X~S>©v^ip 

^©r^^ ^ud^ e3<95^f^9 Cu'6>f&9 ^h^f&9 nt^d VTtll 



Ads 



275 



Gordan 

You have given us so many wonderful 

memories. You deligiited us as a child. 

And make us proud as a young adult. 

Let your dreams inspire you and your 

principles guide you. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 




Blend beauty, intellect, athletics, love of animals, 
joyfulness, compassion, & industriousness. 




Mix for 21 years. Result: the best daughter ever! 
Mom and Dad 




"The first time her laughter 

unfurled its wings in the wind, 

we knew that the world would 

never be the same!" 

You're amazing, babe! 

Love, 

Dad, l^om, and Pat 



Jamie L. Ahearn 









Our love for you and pride in your 

accomplishments at MWC are without 

limit. You have matured and grown in so 

many ways - all through true grit and 

determination. May happiness, your 

friends and sports always be part of your 

hfe. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 



YowCcuxA 

Whatever youJre/ fenced/ with, yow 

ccvn/ha4adley. 

W^uxteA/er y&w'reyfe^lvng^, you/ocu\/ 

cope/. 

Whatever you/ feur, yow caw 

cxynquer, a^lori^ cvif' yowhelieve/ iav 

yourheXf... 

...(M/we/heXleA/e/iAvyou/. 

With love^ and/ heaAAtufut yne4fiorie^, 

Mom/, Vad/ond/Jaredy 



276 



Ads 



Awicfynday 

Yow have^ alwayy heew fuw- lovuogp, 

hut not re<::klei(y 

Kholarly, hut not oh^fe^rHvey- 

Keep the^,€/ viytue^ for cv happy lufe^. 

Wey are/ very proud/ of yow! 

Love/, 
Mom/, Vad/ond/pa^nelo/ 






Quite the 
accomplishment - a de- 
gree in three! 
- So proud of you, Alexis! 

Remember always: 

■Broaden your 

horizons. 

'■"Compete with yourself. 

■■'Walk in a straight line. 



With love, Mom, Ed, and Bryan 



proud/ of yow 
for 22 yeury! 

WLYMTYLA! 

Beyhappy! 

(^uud/O/^r 
SidAAch/ 






Nancy, 

We are grateful to God for blessing us 

with you as our daughter. It has been a 

delight watching you mature into such a 

lovely young lady. 
May the Lord be your guide throughout 
the exciting future that lies before you. 

With deep love and admiration, 
Mom and Dad 



Corey- our special son. 

Our 'job' as your parents is complete; 

our joy as your parents is never ending! 

We admire your spirit and applaude your values. 

Your courage to explore is so well balanced by 

your wisdom to choose!! 

Congratulations! 

With Much Pride and Love!! 
Mom & Dad 




Ads 



277 



Jonathan, 

Congratulations on your graduation from MWC. 

We are very proud of you ! 

Now's your chance to spread your wings and soar! 

Aim high and consider yourself capable of great things! 

We love you. 
Mom, Dad, Lauren and Lady 





Jamie, 

You have been such as inspiration 

and we have enjoyed watching 

you grow over the 

past several years 

into a remarkably ambitious and talented young lady 

We have great hope for your future successes. 

Remember your college years with fondness. 

We love you. 

The McCones 




278 Ads 



Jenrufer, 
You/ truly are/ cv 
gd^ftfrotn/C^od/. Vfe/ 
are/ ^o- ^atefuL to- 
hoA/e/beervhiej^red/ 
wCthyudh/a/lovLyng^ 
doAA^ghter. We/ are/ 
proud/ of aXiyour 
axxxnWpU/^hmeA^y 
andy aychleve^nenty. Mojy aXi 
your dre<Aym^ come/ true/. 



Love/, 

Mofw, 

Vad^and/ 






Dear Curt, 

Congratulations! We are so proud of 

you and your accomplishments. Reach 

for the stars! 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Carolyn, 

Carl, Maureen, Leanne, Charlie 

Cathy, Jamey, James, and Heather 





Stacey, 

From your first day at 

Mrs. Seymour's 

Pre-school to 

graduation from MWC, 

you have made us so 

proud, 
not only for what you have accom- 
plished, but especially for who you 
are. We love you. 

"/ can do all things 

through Him who 

strengthens me."- 

Philippians 4:13 

Congratulations, 

Mom, Dad, & Amy 



M 




i ' 


.^fitt/irM^|ii^ 


M 


f^^A 


C " -||Hrw^^^*!r ^ i 


^Jm 


c- 'iH 


y' -4r ' ^^''^0r^ 


"^^^^^^ILl 


6=0=^ 


^Bl^^^^ 


ii?\ 


^Ml^^^^^L 


fel# 


fjSB'^'^lll^j^P^^ T 


^^-■■^: ^11. i 


,_l^l^g/llg^ 




Con^rafo(afTon5 +0 John t>uH^^ 

Oave Zawer^h Ancfre Lapar arxi 

Oar\ Lecki>urs' Qa^^ of '01/ 

/fere'y a ^oas^ to ^oo<;/ fner^ds ar)<i 

^rca^ (v>eiv>one5 of Ma rye Sfree^ 

ar\(^ MWCr 

We're pfoud of ^ou* 

^ove? 

Morv> and Oa<i 



279 




"Two roads diverged in a wood, 

and I- 

I took the ones less traveled' by, 

And that has made all the 

difference" 

Erin- you've reached another 

summit! 

We couldn't be more proud, Erin! 

With Love, 

Mom and Dad 




Josh, 

Proud of the man you've become and your 

accomphsments achieved. 

Remember "heart" and effort are the key. And PAPA 

DON'T TAKE NO MESS! Love, Dad 




Bart, 

With all you have achieved 

growing from a young boy 

to a man, we're most 

proud that you are a 

wonderful person. 

Congratulations. 

Mom and Dad 




Wisfiing you always 

Lave to surround you, 

Warm memories to cheer you, 

(^ood fonune to waf^ Sefore you and 

liappiness to fill your lie an] 

T)ana, we are so very proud of who you are 

and what you have become ~ a heautijuf, 

loving, caring young woman. 

'Ail Our Love 

Mom, Dad'Sr' "Rich 



Katherine, 

From your first day of school until this, your last 

year, we have watched with pride and a sense of 

wonder at the incredible woman you have become. 

As you take this last step into adulthood we wish 

you a lifetime of love and happiness. 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 





ffleen: 
V/e are so i>rou<i 
of you af)(i yoor 

accot^plUh- 
t^er\^s. You are 
verv 
sf>eclal to (ij ancf we v^lsh 
voo a(( f^e te5+ a? yo^ te^Fn 
your future 
We love you- 



Moivi, i>a<^, Keyfr) 
and Max 




"You've come a long way, 

Ginny!" 

We have watched you grow from 

a giggUng, adorable baby to the 

remarkable, self-assured woman 

you have become. We are so 

proud of you. Congratulations! 

We love you very, very, very 

MUCH! 

Love Always, 

Mom, John, Sue 

Dad, Michael and Ryan 





Amy, 

We have truly been blessed. 

Life with you has been full of surprises and 

amazing delight. 

We are so proud of your accomplishments 

and the woman you have become. 

As you leave these "hallowed halls" of 

MWC and find the way into your future, 

you will neither be leaving your memories 

nor those who you hold dear. 

You will cross paths with many of them 

again. 

Whatever your calling, your contributions 

will be many. 

May you always be healthy and happy. 

Remember, 

we love you just the way you are. 

All our love. 

Mom and Dad 




281 




frcnw 
prey-hcKoxyV until/ they 
dxxy ycrw ^cuiuated/ 
Ki^h/ ^ichoxyl, weywere^ 
alwayy proud/ ofyow 

and/ your cuzcowv- 

plUhmenty. Mcnv, you/ 

are/ ahxyut to^ become/ 

a/ colXe^ ^aduate/ 



and/ we/ cauldn/'t he/ 

prouder. 

C on^atulatixyn^r^! 

Thanks for he^j^yow! 

We/ Love/ You/ Loty! 

Monv£r Vad/ 





The forging of a solid 
education from two 

fine traditions: 
Northern enterprise 

and Southern charm. 

Love, 
Mom and Dad 



It is good to have an end 

to journey toward, but it 

is the journey that 

matters, in the end." 

Congratulations! 

Love, 
Mom, Dad&Tobin 




LoViZ (nod and liv^ ^ach day op^zn to his guidance and yoar 
purpose will b^ r^v^al^d. Continu^z to work hard, tate ^aeh 
day a§ it com^s and always follow yoar dr^zams. May yoar 
fatar^ b^ filled with only th^ b^st. find may 6od wateh ov^r 

yoa always- 
Mom, f)ad, ed & 'Rob 




282 Academics 



Index, 



Ai 



Aberts. Todd 


m 


Asman, Brian 


Abimourched. Rola 


210 


Aswegan, Kaye 


Abraham. Jennifer 


Mh 


Atalay. Buleni 


Ackerman. Chnstopher 


210 


Aiienza, Dorothy 


Ackermann, Earnest 


254 


Atkins, Donna 


Adams. Danielle 


210 


Atkinson. Heather 


Adams, Joanna 


143 


Atkmson, Virginia 


Adams, Lonnie 


97. 180 


Atticks. Jane 


Adams. Megan 


146 


Atwell-Vasey. W'endy 


Adera, Taddesse 


254 


Aubee. Michelle 


Adis. Cory 


lOS. lO^*, 210 


Aumento. Allan 


Adkms, Katrinu 


210 


Austin. Elizabeth 


Afzal, Mohammad 


ISO 


Austin. Johanna 


Agee, Jennifer 


2iO 


Aversano. Kalhenne 


Agee, Kirsten 


■i?. 210 


Avruch, Elizabeth 


Agegnehu. Seblewonge 


1*^3 


Ayer, Tracie 


Aghdasl. Faranak 


[4b 


Ayers. Elizabeth 


Aheam, Jamie 


146 


Ayers, Mananne 


Ahmed. Carole 


210 


Azukas, Emily 


Aiani, Lynn 


ISO 




Airhiavbcre. Osasumwen 


1-^3 




Akers. Donna 


210 




Akhtar. Sobia 


ISO 




Akkus, Ercan 


210 




Albright. Erin 


193 


R 


Alexander Jacobsen 


217 


"r 


Alfaro, Mano 


S7. !43 


I> 


Alfred. Nadia 


180 




Ali. Mana 


180 




All, Vanessa 


\9i 




Allen. Ahava 


m 


Babos Jamn. 


Allen, Connne 


193 


BjLh Ginn\ 


Allen, Dana 


210 


Bach \ir inii 


Allen, Justin 


193 


Bjlo Jesse 


Allen, Kalhrvn 


ISO 


Bjez Ehzabtth 


Allen, Kelly' 


ISO 


Baile\ Brand n 


Allison. Sara 


180 


Baile\ Christ phtr 


Alimendmger, Shannon 


180 


Bailev J \ 


Allsbrook. Kelly 


193 


Baile\ Sara 


Altman, Mark 


180 


Bair KeMH 


Altscher, Aaron 


79.210 


Bairle\ Daniel 


Amato. Jessica 


ISO 


Baker Andrea 


Ambuel. David 


254 


Baker James 


Ameen. Linda 


254 


Baker Ja^-in 


Amick, Sarah 


210 


Baker Lisa 


Aminrazavi, Mehdi 


254 


Baker Meghan 


Amirpashaie. Kathiyn 


69. 180 


Baker Seoit 


Amis, Jessica 


193 


Baker Thaddeus 


Amiss, Sara 


ISO 


Bald\Mn Bri^id 


Ammann, Jennifer 


210 


Balfre) Bosd Bre\in 


Amnathvong, Vitto 


ISO 


Balkus Lauren 


Amos, Benjamin 


146 


Ballanee Christine 


Amos. Sara 


71,180 


Bdllentme Nathan 


Amponsah, Linda 


210 


Banister Alieu 


Amrod. Christopher 


97. 180 


Bankos Jared 


Andersen, Melissa 


210 


Barba Franklin 


Anderson, Alison 


143 


Barber Chnslinj 


Anderson, Catherine 


ISO 


Barbre Bri m 


Anderson, Davin 


193 


Barbuu Kalbr\n 


Anderson, Dawn 


193 


Bar Je il i 


Anderson. Jillian 


180 


Barker \n el i 


Anderson. Katharine 


193 


Barker Jas >n 


Anderson, Katie 


75 


Barle> Luke 


Anderson, President 


37.58 


Barnes Adrienne 


Anderson, William 


254 


Barnes Chtlse\ 


Andrews, Rachel 


180 


Barnes Clint jn 


Andrews. William 


125,210 


Barnes Nell 


Angell, Dana 


146 


Barnes Tere a 


Anolik, Allison 


180 


Bamett Adriannt 


Anthony, Katina 


210 


Bamum kristen 


Appleton, Jeremiah 


193 


Barra Rosemarrv 


Arce. Denise 


193 


Bartheleni\ Caihtrin 


Archibald. Daniel 


ISO 


Bartle knsl\ 


Archibald. Meghan 


193 


Bart n Erie 


Ardrey. Janet 


180 


Ba kerMlle Sl in 


Arellano. Gabnela 


146 


Bass Ehzibelh 


Armstrong, Katherine 


69.210 


Bass Miehael 


Amdt, Michael 


146 


Balson Jenniler 


Arnold, Matthew 


193 


Ba\Ie\ Kelin 


Arrington. Kathleen 


193 


Baver Brendan 


Amnglon. Michael 


193 


Ba\ne R\jn 


Arrowood. Autumn 


ISO 


Bear\ Bryan 


Arsenault, Danick 


210 


Beaton Lindsay 


Asamoah, Moses 


210 


Btattv Nietle 


Ascan, Clavio 


254 


Beau\ais Arthur 


Ashley-Newman, Elizabeth 


135 


Beavers Jessiea 



Beazer. Catherine 
Beck. Calesby 
Beck. Edward 
Becraft. Kimberly 
Bednarczyk, Lauren 
Beebe. Elizabeth 



Beei 



Befumo, David 
Behrens. CaitUn 
Behrens, Knsten 

Beier, Jennifer 
Beierschmitt, Stefanie 
Beliveau. Mary 
Bell. Kathrvn 
Bellacicco. Adam 
Benabdallah. Adam 
Bendixen. Diana 
Bendl. Maribeth 
Benere, Lauren 
Benkc. Emily 
Bennett. Andrew 
Bennell. Harlan 
Bennett. Paige 
Bennett. Todd 
Bensusan, Ariana 
Benton, Allison 



Benzi 






Bcnzoni. Lauren 
Berben. Christina 
Berck. Shannon 
Bergin. Bobby 
Bergin. Jeffrey 
Bergin. Robert 
Bemal. Michael 
Bernascom, Nicola>. 
Bernstein. Aaron 
Berry, Jennifer 
Berry, Katherine 
Best, Aiyssa 
Beverly, Amanda 
Beverly. Anne 
Bevil, Nathan 
Bibbs, Maria 
Bickcrt. Kimberiy 
Biddinger, Lindsay 
Bielecki. Jessica 
Bigdeh.Tina 
Billmeier. Caleb 
Biniz. Monica 
Bird, Kevin 
Bird, Samantha 
Biscoe. Ashlie 
Bishara, J ad 
Bishop. Alison 
Bishop. Amy 
Bishop. Heather 
Bishop, Maura 
Bishop, Robert 
Bishop. Tenezeah 
Billner. Siacey 
Bjonison. Danell 
Blackford, William 
Blackman. Oissa 
Blackmond. Victoria 
Blackstone.Alice.son 
Blake. Kevm 
Blakemore. Porter 
Blakcney. Kale 
Bland, Abemathy 
Bland. Ashley 
Bland, Lindsay 
Blankenship. Annette 
Blasko. Christopher 
Blate. Andrew 
Blauch. Christina 
Blizzard, Kimberly 
Block. Melissa 
Blodgcn, Meghan 
Blosser. Kelly 
Blosser. Lynnetie 
Blough. Gregory 
Blumer, Patrick 



ISO 

85 

193 

125. 180 

210 

28, 147 

ISO 

67.95, 193 

210 

210 

193 



83. 193 

180 

50.99, 136, 147 



85. 148 
211.247 
83,211 



Blumling. Daniel 
Bockh. Sally 
Boczar, Slephanie 
Bodenstein, Ryan 
Boehmckc. Dana 
Boelte. Kimberly 
Boese, Rob 
Bognar. Nicholas 
Bohlin. Misako 
Bohon. Angela 
Boland. James 
Boland. Jeb 



Bolg 



Bolick.Joselma 
Bolt. Jessica 
Bolte. Stephanie 
Bonazza. Cara 
Bond. Alexander 
Boniia.Traccy 
Bonsiere-i. Michai 



Boon. Ti 
Boone, Sarah 
Booth. Stephi 
Borak. Thorn; 
Borden, Jodi 
Borgerding. N 



^ihv 



BUMVCU, 1 


B.itKhara, 


B.iikIktJ 



hem, Bri 



Boukourakis, Angela 



Bowen. Nathan 
Bower. Dusty 



Boyce. Patricia 
Boyd. Kevin 
Boyd. Terry 

Braband, Anne 
Brackbill. Emily 
Bradford. Chadwick 
Bradley. Brian 
Bradley. Kevin 
Bradley. Lon 
Bradley. Michelle 
Bradshaw. John 
Bradshaw, Jonathan 
Brady. Christine 
Branco. Meredith 
Brandes. Jessica 
Brandon. Emily 
Brandt, Traccy 
Braymer. Meia 
Brecht. Sara 
Breeding. Sarah 
Brennan. Shannon 
Brezsnyak. Em 
Brice. April 
Bridgers, Katharine 
Bridges, Kristen 
Bridges, Stephen 
Briggs, Lindsay 
Brigham, Cariisle 
Briscoe. Mike 
Bristow, Amelia 
Bristow. Jayme 
Brna. Stephanie 
Broadbeni, Stacy 
Broaddus. Scott 



181 
115,211 

56, 134. 14 

254 

181.236 

211 

S5. 148 

181 

149 

194 



Index 283 



de 



Brown. Robert 


211 


Capshaw-Taylnr. Alex 


211 


Clerico. Ka((e 


l'J5 


Crisp. Floyd 


Brown, Ryan 


81, 181 


Cardwell. Isabel 


211 


Click. James 


I'M 


Crissman. Judith 


Brown. Shawn 


l')4 


Carey. Corinne 


181 


Clifford. Kaitlyn 


181 


Crist. Brian 


Brown. Stephanie 


211 


Carlisle. Christine 


181 


Clifton. Laura 


212 


Crist. Jeremy 


Browne, Abigail 


14') 


Carlson. Evan 


5'), 1.51) 


Clinc. Angela 


151 


Cristoph. Amanda 


Browne. James 


'17 


Carlson. Heidi 


195 


elites. Lawlon 


212 


Cntes. Jennifer 


Browne. Tawny 


211 


Carlson. Lisa-Maric 


77 


Clore. Sean 


195 


Cronin. Regina 


Browne. Zachary 


211 


Carman. Carrie 


115 


Cloudt, Joshua 


212 


Cropp. Evelyn 


Brownley, Tiffany 


I'M 


Carr. Kristy 


l')5 


Clough, Susan 


l')5 


Crouch. Alyssa 


Brucaio. Courtney 


ISI 


Carroll. Margarel 


181 


Clous, Katherine 


195 


Crouch. Charlotte 


Bruecher. Daniel 


14') 


Carroll. Sharon 


150 


Clute, Katherine 


8-1, 195 


Crouse. Cassandra 


Bruno, Nina 


211 


Carter. Kimberly 


181 


Coates, Ann-Counn 


I'M 


Crow, Sarah 


Bryan, Cassandra 


l')4 


Carter. Lauren 


87,211 


Cockayne, Jeff 


91 


Crovvell, Scott 


Bryant, Shannon 


211 


Carter. Ryan 


^5 


Cockayne, William 


182 


Crumbaugh, Jennifer 


Bryce. Anne 


14') 


Carter-Roth. Amanda 


l'J5 


Cockrill, Christy 


212 


Crump, Elizabeth 


Bubollz, Anne 


87,211 


Caner-Rolh. Elizabeth 


l<)5 


Coffey, Frances 


195 


Cubbage, Benjamin 


Biichakjian, Christian 


7') 


Cartwright, Drew 


81. 181 


Coffman, Chnstopher 


182 


Cullen, Elizabeth 


Buchanan, Robert 


211 


Cartwright. Jayme 


150 


Cohen, Adam 


182 


Cullinan, Daniel 


Bucher, Jaime 


77, 181 


Casciano. Lucy 


211 


Cola, Kate 


195 


Culver, Andrew 


Buck. Courtney 


211 


Casciano. Matthew 


181 


Cole, Rebecca 


129 




Buckingham. Elizabeth 


l')4 


Casebolt. Nicole 


88. 181 


Colletli, Elizabeth 


151 




Buckingham. Natahc 


l<)4 


Casey. Kevin 


87. 1.50 


Colletli, Lisa 


88 




Buckley. Daniel 


181 


Cese>, Michael 


l')5 


Collier, Lauren 


182 




Buckley. Leslie 


211 


Casey, Siohhan 


ISI 


Collier, Lindsey 


182 




Buffa. Luisa 


14') 


Cdshion, Daphne 


l')5 


Collier, Manning 


254 




Buffardi. Kevin 


l')4 


Cason, Caolyn 


211 


Colligan, Erin 


182 


Jl 


Bulls. April 


l')4 


Cassarino, Elaine 


l')5 


Collings, Jessica 


151 


Bh 


Bulls. Nichole 


8') 


Cassino, Pattick 


10') 


Collins, Carrie 


212 


M) 


Bundrick, Erm 


88. 1,81 


Castelar, Patricia 


211 


Collins, Elisabeth 


151 




Bunzey. Shannan 


211 


Castello, Laura 


211 


Collins, Kimberly 


212 




Burchell, Sarah 


211 


Castillo, Timothy 


ISI 


Collins, Melanie 


212 




Burge, Andrew 


I'M 


Castner, Sara 


l')5 


Collinson, Aleisha 


1,82 




Burgess, Alison 


181 


Castro, Bertha 


l'J5 


Collis, Cheryl 


212 




Burgess. Chloe 


I'M 


Cavanaugh, Lisa 


65, 195 


Colomb, Lisa 


212 




Burgess, Lauren 


211 


Cecere, Erik 


195 


Colona, Sarah 


212 


Dabb. Jean 


Burgess. Melanie 


14') 


Cedeno, Maria 


195 


Colson, Hazel 


212 


D'Alessandro. Jessie 


Burke, Adrian 
Burke. Claire 


(i7, ').•;. 14') 
l')4 


Cedres, Charlene 
Cella, Emily 


212 
ISI 


Colvin, Elizabeth 
Colwell. Kimberiy 


182 
9.1. 195 


Dalton, Christopher 
Dalton. Sally 
Daly, Diana 
Daly, Kimberly 
DAndrilli. Juliana 


Burken.Chrisiina 


71. 181 


Cerillo, Kerry 


212 


Coman, Marsha 


212 


Burleigh, Ryan 


I4'l 


Cessaro. James 


212 


Comninaki, Rebecca 


212 


Burlingham, Bonnie 


I4'l 


Chal'in, Caroline 


181 


Compher, Melinda 


196 


Burman. Paul 


181 


Chaleunrath, Chnstopher 


1.5(1 


Compton, Carisa 


182 




Burmeister, CaJllin 


I'M 


Chan, Christina 


l')5 


Complon, Corinne 


151 


DanL^l CaXrine 


Burnett, Michael 


14') 


Chan, Monica 


181 


Concepcion, Alex 


7.1.212 


D is Kr St 


Burton. Christopher 


,81. 181 


Chandler, Chnslina 


L50 


Condon, Jennifer 


69. 182 


D 1 Sh "^ 


Busch. Steven 
Buschenfeldl. David 


')7. 2 1 1 
ISI 


Chapman, Erica 
Chapman, Scott 


212 

150 


Conley, Matthew 
Connell, James 


151 

87.212 


D'Arcangelis. Rita 
Darcy. Jamie 
Darrell, Edward 


Bush. Leah 


181 


Chaves, Amanda 


l')5 


Connelly, Erin 


63.95.182 


Bushman, Sarah 
Buswell, David 

Butler, Catherine 
Butler. Mechelle 
Butts, Ryan 
Byer. Amber 


14') 
211 
l')4 
l')4 
l<)4 
75 


Chehab, Alexandra 
Chen, Ivy 
Chichester. Ana 
Childe. Courtney 
Chiles. Daniel 
Chiles, John 


195 

1.50. 24S 

2.54 

212 

l')5 

79.212 


Conner, Patricia 
Connolly, Brian 
Conrad, Dana 
Conty. Diana 
Conway. Deborah 
Cook. Ellen 


212 
196 
182 
212 
254 
196 


Darrell, Ned 
Daubert. John 
Daugherty. Patricia 
Daulong, Maureen 
Davidson. Frederick 
Davies. Marii 
Davis, Amanda 


Byrne. Sarah 
Byrnes. Corey 


14') 
141) 


Chillemi, Lisa 
Chinco. Bernard 


88. 1.50 
254 


Cook. Luna 
Cook. Paul 


212 
196 


Byron. Joel 


181 


Choudhury, Leila 


212 


Coombs. Brian 


182 


Davis' Ja'^^on 






Chowning, Hannah 




Cooper, Casey 


196 


Davis, Jill 


<G 




Chretien, Rachelle 
Chrissy Soper 


b9, 2 1 2 
05 


Cooper, Christina 
Cooper, Janet 


l')6 
196 


Davis. Mark 
Davis, Ryan 






Christensen. Matthew 


181 


Cooper, John 


182 


Davis, Sarah 


Caballero. Shemircl 
Cahall. Joanna 
Cain, David 
Cain, Megan 
Cam. Rachel 
Calamito, Marc 
Caldwell, Bradley 
Call. Lisa 


181 
181 
2.'>4 


Chnstianson. Jeffrey 
Christie. Lindsey 
Christofakis. Emil 
Christoph. Amanda 
Christopher. Clinton 


195 

8'). 181 
195 
19,5 


Cooper, Portia 
Cooper, Todd 
Copen, Rachel 
Corcoran, Carole 
Corcoran, Michael 


182 
196 
254 
212 


Davis. William 
Daviit, Ashley 
Davoy. Gabnelle 
Dawson, Amy 
Dawson. Andrew 


181 


Chua. Frances 
Chung. Ashley 
Chung. Bernard 


150 
195 
181 


Corey, Lynne 
Corey, Michelle 
Comeille, Katherine 


83. 182 

212 

151 


Day. Marisa 
Day. Michael 
Dayton. Krislcn 




Ciavarelli. Doreen 


181 


Cornell, Alicia 


196 


Dayton. Maria 
De Andrade. Cassand 
De. Maren Groot 
Dean. Patricia 
DeAngelis, Lauren 
Deatherage. Jennifer 
Deaton. Evangeline 
Deboeck. Nina 
Deci. Andrew 
Deedrick. Susan 
Defee. Alexander 
DeGraff. Galen 
Delaney. Kathleen 
DelesDemier, Lauren 
Delia. Jennifer 
Delk, Abbey 
Demarest. Trea 
Demarest. William 


Callaghan, Alcna 
Callaghan, Theresa 
Callahan, Hilary 
Callahan. Jay 
Camacho-Felix, Sara 
Cambridge, Robert 
Cameli, Stephen 
Cammaens, Sean 
Camp, Brian 
Camp. Meredith 
Campbell, Enn 
Campbell, Gardner 
Campbell, Keri 
Campbell, Otho 
Canady, Crystal 
Canery, John 
Cannon, Rachel 


1').^ 
\ti 
1%) 
211 
I2.S. 1.51) 

48. 1.5(1 

1.5() 

211 

l')5 

254 

87.211 

181 
211 
1.81 


Cicotello. Jennifer 
Cincinnati. Noah 
Cipolla. Amy 
Citeroni. Tracy 
Civitarese, Erica 
Clapp. Crisiina 
Clark. Adam 
Clark, Mary 
Clark, Matt 
Clark. Matdiew 
Clark. Nancy 
Clark. Purccll 
Clarke. Mary 
Clarke. Meredith 
Clarke. Scott 
Clarkson. Adam 
Clarkson. Charles 


1.50 

195 

212 

2.54 

212 

ISI 

195 

195 

97 

181 

9.1.212 

212 

212 

212 

181 

195 


Cornell, Brent 
Comuet, Rheina 
Correa. Daniel 
Cortina, Melissa 
Coston, Scott 
Cole. Clare 
Coughlin. Stephen 
Coughter. Ryan 
Coulter, Chelsey 
Covilz, Janna 
Cowan. Jameson 
Cox. Amanda 
Cox, Amber 
Cox, Brandon 
Coyle, Dana 
Coyle, Patricia 
Craft, Anna 


151 

212 

212 

196 

77.212 

l')6 

196 

151 

182 

87. l')6 

l')6 

196 

182 
85.212 


Cantwell, Kristin 
Capelle, Rebecca 
Capizzi, Ryan 


211 

87. 181 
211 


Clawson. Jennifer 
Claycomb. Heather 
Claypoole. Wendy 
demons. Sara 


181 
181 
195 
195 


Crawley, William 
Creech, Amy 
Cribbs, Matthew 
Crippen, Timothy 


2.54 
196 
196 
254 


Demchak. Katherine 
Demko. Heather 
Demkowicz. Stacy 


284 Index 


1 













Index. 



DeNardi, Joseph 


182 






" T"* 




Fowler. Nicole 


DeNicolas. Tara 


182 


Durbin, Michelle 


197 


it 




Fox. Jilhan 


Denk, Clare 


21.1 


Durham, Andrew 


183 


t 




Frabcll, Emily 


Dennee. Keith 


1% 


Durr, Jacqueline 


89, 183 






Frackelton. Robert 


Dennison, Kelly 


1S,1 


Durrer, Betty 


254 


Fahy. Alden 


213 


Francis. Chrrstina 


Dent, Aaron 


l')6 


Durrett, Susan 


197 


Faivor-Ryon. Christine 


183 


Francis. Matlhew 


D'Eredila, Michael 


SI. 1% 


Dwyer. Colin 


95, 197 


Falleur. Stephanie 


213 


Francois, T.uia 


Derepentigny. Carole 


213 


Dyer. Maggie 


87, 197,213 


Fallon, Nancy 


213 


Franklin, Jennifer 


Derham. Katherine 


183 






Falvey. Emily 


64.65. 197 


Frankston. Jeffrey 


Derr. Carolyn 


213 






Fantaski, Cortney 


153 


Frascella, Megan 


DeSerio, Jennifer 


152 






Farmer. Maureen 


213 


Fravel, Peter 


Desjardins. Matthew 


1% 






Famey. Crystal 


183 


Frazier, Charice 


Deuse. Tamara 


183 






Famsonh. Stephen 


254 


Fra/ier, David 


Devening. Andrea 


213 






Farr. Jennifer 


197 


Freakley, William 


Dexter. Erin 


1% 






Farrell. Kristin 


213 


Freed, Adrienne 


Diacont. Kathleen 


213 


F 




Fasick. Elise 


6<l, 2 1 3 


Freednian, Malthcu 


Diamond. Peter 


05.213 


T7^ 




Fatek. Jamie 


213 


French, Carol 


Diau, Christine 


183 


H- 




Faunce. BK 


254 


Frcund, Eli/aheth 


Dibella, Joseph 


2,54 


— ,' 




Fauntleroy. Kena 


153 


Freund, Julie 


Dicicco, Diana 


183 






Fawley. Erin 


197 


Frey, Valeric 


Dickerson. Edward 


97. 1% 






Fazzaro. Laura 


75, 197 


Friend, Taryn 


Dickerson. John 


1% 






Featherly. Daniel 


183 


Fnsbie, Daniel 


Dickerson. Margaret 


213 






Fei. Michael 


1,54 


Frisbie, Erica 


Dickinson. Laura 


1% 






Feldman. Jennifer 


154 


Frost, Bradford 


Dicorpo. Carla 


213 






Fellmeth. Jessica 


183 


Frost. Lydia 


Dierkes. Patrick 


1% 


Earlv. PaU-icia 


153 


Fellows. ICristen 


197 


Fiy/el, Bryan 


Dilger, Emily 


1% 


Easlerling.Calherinc 


197 


Ferdinand. Bradley 


197 


Fuhrken. Jon.ilhan 


Dill, Laura 


152 


Eastham. Matthew 


153 


Ferdinand. Sebastian 


197 


Fiilc.i. Mary 


Dillard-Ruben. Barbara 


1% 


Eaton. Emily 


213 


Ferguson. Elizabeth 


143. 197 


Fulk, R.iiidall 


Dimas. Barbara 


1% 


Eaton. Lori 


213 


Ferguson. Kelly 


183 


Fuller, Brian 


Dimotsis. Christopher 


1^6 


Eaves. Courtney 


197 


Ferguson, Lissa 


65 


Fuller, Stephen 


Disque, John 


213 


Eberhardl. James 


213 


Ferraiolo. Lara 


197 


Fullerton, Elise 


Ditlmann, Diana 


213 


Eby. Laurel 


213 


Ferreira. Dana 


183 


Furner, John 


Dix, Rebecca 


152 


Eccard. Lisa 


213 


Ferrell. Angela 


213 


Furrow, Aubry 


Dixon, Jennifer 


152 


Echols. Amanda 


183 


Fenell. Claudine 


2,54 


Furs!, Kathryn 


D'Luhy, Amanda 


152 


Echols. Jason 


197 


Fesler. Tiffany 


154 




Dmytriw, Joseph 


1% 


Echols, Jessica 


183 


Fickett. Martha 


254 




Doddridge. Christopher 


81, 1% 


Eckstein, Kelly 


197 


Ficor. Erin 


154 




Dodrill. Dave 


1 52, 252 


Edbcrg, Jessica 


63 


Fielder. Robyn 


197 




Doganieri, Laura 


183 


Eddy, Elizabeth 


213 


Fielder. Sutton 


197 


l/~^ 


Doggett, William 


73, 1% 


Edeil. Summer 


197 


Figueroa. David 


214 


fe 


Dolewski. Daniel 


1% 


Edclman, Emily 


95,213 


Figueroa, Nathan 


197 


Vj 


Doll. Michael. Jr 


152 


Edwards. Elizabeth 


197 


Fike. Dawn 


113 




Dolph, Katie 


87 


Edwards, Jacob 


197 


Filmeck. Angela 


214 


Gable. Erie 


Domenech. Sarah 


28,99,213 


Edwards, Krislen 


183 


Findley. Kammeron 


65, l,'i4 


Gade. Wesley 


Domitz. Kate 


87, 183 


Edwards, Monika 


153 


Findley, Ryan 


97,214 


Games. James 


Donahue, Lindsey 


1% 


Edwards, Terry 


153 


Fingerhut, Victor 


254 


Gaines. Justin 


Donegan. Erin 


99 


Egan, Jacklyn 


197 


Fink, Laura 


183 


Gaines. Robert 


Donnelly, Justin 


95,213 


Ehret, Alyssa 


69. 197 


Finn. Lauren 


1,54 


Gallagher. Megan 


Donohue. Sean 


77, 183 


Ehrhart, Tamera 


213 


Fischer. Bryan 


214 


Gallagher. Suzanne 


Donovan. Adrian 


213 


Eigel, Lauren 


89, 197 


Fish, Amy 


183 


Gallahan. Constance 


Donovan, Christina 


213 


Eike, Emily 


183 


Fish, Erin 


197 


Galligan. Christina 


Dooley, Patricia 


213 


Eisold. Lauren 


69. 197 


Fisher, Fagin 


214 


Gallik. Stephen 


Doss, Sean 


153 


Elawar. Diana 


213 


Fisher, Jenna 


197 


Galhnagh. Amy 


Dougherty, Abigail 


213 


Eldridge. Renee 


183 


Fisher, Michael 


197 


Gamhoa. Eli/ahcth 


Douglass, Daniel 


213 


Elezko. Lauren 


197 


Fitzpatrick, David 


197 


Gami'n. Sarah 


Dove, Sylvia 


183 


Eh/abelh, Mary Fulco 


69 


Flau'lt, Curry 


87 


Garahan. Deirdre 


Dowling. Elizabeth 


1.83 


Ell, Erica 


213 


Fleming, Anthony 


214 


Garher, Carey 


Downey. Clare 


196 


Ellcnson, Megan 


213 


Fleming, Beth 


143 


Garber. Grant 


Downey, Theresa 


213 


Ellington. Christopher 


197 


Fleming, Elizabeth 


214 


Garher. Matthew 


Doyal. Rebecca 


213 


Elhou. Alison 


213 


Flemming, Sandra 


214 


Gari-'ia, Aiyana 


Doyle, Brian 


196 


Ellis, Caroline 


197 


Fletcher. Dawn 


197 


Garcia, Ch.irlene 


Doyle, Nathan 


97.213 


Ellison, Sarah 


183 


Fletcher. Lauren 


214 


Garcia, Maria 


Drago, Anna 


213.247 


Elmore, Britton 


197 


Fleury. Alina 


183 


Garland. Liam 


Drake, Paul 


213 


Eloisa, Cesar 


213 


Flora, Wendy 


154 


Garland. William 


Dreiss, Joseph 


2,54 


Elsenpeler, Maryann 


245 


Florence. Jay 


IS3 


Garnion. Carol 


Drennen, Lauren 


183 


Elzer, Elizabeth 


197 


Florence. Robert 


154 


Garncarz. Christopher 


Drew, Raya 


213 


Embrey, Kimberly 


213 


Flores. Jonathan 


81, 183 


Garner. Becky 


Dnscoll. Sean 


213 


Eniig, Lauren 


183 


Florio. Emily 


198 


Garner. Kathryn 


Driver. Jeremy 


63.95. 153.2 


46 Emswiler, Michael 


81. 183 


Florio. Jaclyn 


184 


Garner. Lena 


Drtjger. Brett 


183 


Engelhard, Ruth 


153 


Flory. Heather 


1.54 


Garner. Ryan 


Dnimheller, Kasey 


183 


Enos, Clinton 


63.95.197 


Flowers. Jill 


198 


Garneii. Julie 


Drummond. Michael 


79.213 


Enzweiler, Erin 


197 


Floyd. William 


214 


Gary. Barbara 


Dryer. Christopher 


196 


Epperson, Robin 


213 


Flynn, Amy 


214 


Gasser, Krisly 


Dubbs. Joy 


213 


Enkson, Faith 




Rynn. Caitlin 


184 


Gaudreau, Jeremy 


DuChaleau. Gu/el 


209 


Ernst, Margel 


213 


Foelber. Angela 


214 


Caydish.Alyson 


Dudley. Sarah 


153 


Erskine, Maxwell 


213 


Folta. Dana 


63,95. 154 


Gazzoli. Allison-Leigh 


Dudley, Stephen 


S7. 183 


E,scobar, Francisco 


213 


Follz. Devon 


198 


Geary, Teresa 


Duffett, Margaret 


213 


Estevez. Brandon 


183 


Foltz. Nikki 


87 


Geddts, Sarah 


Duffy. Thomas 


153 


Etheridge. Alonda 


213 


Foltz, Renee 


214 


Geib. Ryan 


Duggan, Joanna 


196 


Evans. Caroline 


153 


Ford. Elizabeth 


214 


Geiger. Erin 


Duke, Abbie 


196 


Evans. Janine 


213 


Forgues, Sebastian 


184 


Gckoskv. Bevin 


Duke, Susan 


77, 183 


Evans. Russell 


183 


possum, Andrea 


214 


Gelatka. Jason 


Dundon, Maureen 


183 


Evans. Stacie 


95.213 


Foster, Kimberly 


154 


Gcnimalas. Stephanie 


Dunham, Meredith 


196 


Everton. Andrew 


153 


Foster, Margaret 


198 


Gcrher. Emily 


Dunlap. Barbara 


213 


Ewing. Kerri 


213 


Foster. Stephanie 


214 


Gerdvisheh. Mohammad 


Dunn, Allison 


153 


Eyes. Stephanie 


99. 1 97 


Foughner. Sara 


184 


Geres. Peter 


Dunn, Amanda 


213 


Ezell. Bethany 


197 


Fout. Courtny 


184 


Germanos. Dora 


Dunn, Andrew 


153 






Fowler. Casey 


198 


Gerow. Ann 


Dunphy. Colin 


81, 196 






Fowler. Evan 


73. 198 


Gerval, Briana 


Dupras. Dan 


28, 73 






Fowler. Kristen 


1.54 


Geyer. Kimbcrley 



Index 285 



StLl * \" 



Gianulis. Elenu 
Gibbs. Melissa 
Gibson, Elizabeih 
Gibson. Peler 
Gicquei. Geraldinc 
Giese. Roger 
Gilbert, Jennifer 
Gillespie. Cannen 
Gilman, Alexandra 
Glaeser, Kurt 
Glassgow, Kira 
Gleason. Colleen 
Gleason, Lindsey 
Glennie, Melissa 
Glidden. Sara 
Gloukhoff. Julia 
Glus, Jeremy 
Glynn. Daniel 
Glynn, Katnna 
Gochenour. Kathy 
Godbum, Kathryn 
Godfrey. Maureen 
Goebels. Carston 
Goehring, James 
GofF, Ryan 
Gokey. Krystm 
Gold, Colin 
Golden, Jeffrey 
Golden, Paige 
Goldschmtdt, Laura 
Goldsmith. Pauline 
Golladay, Jennifer 
Gologorsky. Keilh 
Gomes. Eric 
Gomez. AJexander 
Gomez. Carmela 
Gomez. Juliette 
Gooch, Cathenne 
Gocd.Jillian 
Good, Meshan 
Goodacrc. Faiih 
Goode. Michelle 

Goor. Lauren 
Gorden. Sarah 
Gordon, Krislin 
Gordon. Molly 
Gordon, Roy 
Gordon, Sarah 
Goska, Anne 
Gotlgetreu. Timoihy 
Gottlieb. Bntt 
Golttieb, Siuan 
Goitschalk. Enka 
Goui;h, Siephen 
GouFd, Katherme 
Gouldin, Peyton 
Graap. Katherine 
Graboyes, Jennifer 
Graceffo, Robert 
Graeber. Erin 
Graf. Dane II 
Graham. Chnslophcr 
Graham. Lyndsay 
Granda. Jessica 
Grane. Candace 
Granlham. Daniel 
Grant! and. Joy 
Grassi, Robert 
Grasso, Laura 
Gratz, Roy 
Graves, Sonya 
Gray, Amy 
GraybeaJ. Mark 
Graziano.Jill 
Greaser, Cathn. n 
Greehan, Laura 
Green, Alison 
Green. Katie 
Green, Kaycee 
Greene, Geoffrey 
Greene, Jody 
Greene, Joseph 
Greenlaw. Lynn 
Greenlaw, Steven 
Greenwood, Jamie 
Gregory Moore 
Gremminger. Shawn 
Grewal. Jaspreel 
Gribble. Scott 
Griffin. Siephen 
GnfTith. Rebecca 



Griffilh. Tarisa 



Griffith- Perham, Randy 


IS-'i 


Hardin. John 


215 


Herrmann. Cynthia 


157 


Griffiths. Elizabeth 


21-^ 


Harding. James 


255 


Heselbarth. Daniel 


7.1. 199 


Griffiths. Laura 


198 


Harding. Jo.seph 


215 


Hess. Charles 


216 


Grimsley. Melissa 


\i5 


Harding. Ryan 


215 


Hess. Cynthia 


216 


Gnsham. Lori 


185 


Hardy. LaShaun 


215 


Hess. Joey 


77 


Gro^g, Emily 


99. 215 


Harker. Elizabeth 


89, 199 


Heslon. Drew 


81, 186 


Grondin. Ashleigh 


155 


Harkins, Ashley 


199 


Hcuser. Manha 


157 


Gross. April 


198 


Harlow, Donna 


216 


Hewat. Amy 


99. 216 




28. 198 


Harnian, Thomas 


199 


Hewitt. Jessica 


69. 199 


Grove. Diane 


215 


Harman, Tiffancy 


199 


Hibbs. James 


186 


Grue. Ryan 


79 


Harpsl, Knstina 


120, 14,1. 199 


Hicks. Jamie 


186 


Gru.ssendorf. Andrew 


199 


Harrell, Holly 


87. 199 


Hicks. Laura 


157 


Guagenli. Kristen 


185 


Harrigan, Amanda 


87. 156 


Hicks. Rudi 


216 


Guagonti. Kxislin 


70.71 


Harrington, Ashley 


40. 216 


Higdon. Kathenne 


199 


Guarino. Giselle 


82. 8.1 


Harris, Bnan 


185 


Higginbodiam. Joanne 


216 


Guderun. Matthew 


215 


Hams, Diana 


156 


Higgins. Richard 


199 


Guinn, Elizabeth 


215 


Harris, Ernest 


216 


Hildebrandt. Ashley 


216 


Gullineh, Dereje 


215 


Hams, Jeanene 


156 


Hill. Cassandra 


199 


Gunsten, Sarah 


199 


Hams, Jeffrey 


87. 185 


Hill. Emily 


216 


Gunther. Willam 


42.S1. 155 


Hams, Jennifer 


156 


Hill.Enn 


199 


Guptill. Daniel 


215 


Harris, Nicole 


216 


Hill. Kristen 


199 


Gulheridge. Amanda 


155 


Harrison, Ava 


185 


Hill. Stetson 


186 


Guthrie. Mark 


199 


Hart, Sandra 


185 


Hitlers. Christopher 


216 


Gyani. Priya 


199 


Hart, Teresa 


156 


Hilliiu-d. Channel 


186 






Hartland, William. IV 


156 


Hilliard. Dee 


71 






Hartman. Amanda 


185 


Hillniann. L^ura 


216 






Hartsock. Michael 


216 


Hillyard. Raymond 


186 






Hanzog. Robert 


185 


Hillyer. Brittany 


186 






Harvey, Elaine 


216 


Hiltz. Patrick 


199 


- _ 




Hasley. Aliza 


216 


Hinckley. Catherine 


186 


Hr 




Hatch. Sabrina 


199 


Hinckley. Rebecca 


216 


*H 




Hadiaway. Blake 


185 


Hines. Christopher 


186 






Hathaway. Nathanael 


91. 185 


Hines, La'Lita 


216 






Hatheway. Joseph 


185 


Hines. Marianne 


157.248 






Hauff. Margaret 


185 


Hirsch. Erin 


199 


Hjas. Enc 


118. 155 


Hauff. Nellie 


92. 93 


Hite. Meredith 




Haas. Lydia 


185 


Haughney. Angela 


216 


Hilz. Kendra 


216 


Haase, Cun 


155 


Hauke. Pamela 


185 


Hobart. Allison 


199 


Haheck. Krislin 


185 


Havelka. Scott 


156 


Hobbs. Susan 


99.216 


Hahel, Arthur 


199 


Havens. Jennifer 


216 


Hodge. Julie 


255 


Habcr<.al. G\vene\eve 


185 


Havens. Layne 


199 


Hodges. David 


157 


Haukcnhurt!, Liz 


6i 


Hawthorne. Amy 


40. 216 


Hodgkins. Ramona 


216 


Hadiii. Nosim 


155 


Hayden, Heather 


216 


Hix'll. Matthew 


116. 157 


Hadlcy. Nathan 


215 


Hayden, John 


216 


Hoffman. Julia 


199 


Haessier. Slacey 


28. 156 


Hayden, Knstina 


156 


Hoffman. Matthew 


157 


Hagan. Michael 


116.215 


Hayes, David 


185 


Hoffman, Noah 


216 


Haggerty-Home. Cindy 


215 


Hayes, Jenna 


85. 156. 248 


Hogan, Andiony 


216 


Hallc. Erin 


95. 199 


Hayob, Jodine 


255 


Hogan, Sean 


199 


Hairficld, James 


185 


Headley, Rebecca 


199 


Hohman. Katliryn 


199 


Haiifield, Valene 


156 


Healey, Jason 


216 


Holdren, Bradley 


86. 255 


Hairslon. Cris 


72.7.1.215 


Heath, Dena 


216 


Holland, Elizabedi 


216 


Haisk.p, Rclha-Lyn 


215 


Heckel, Erich 


95.216 


Holland, Kisha 


199 


Hale. Nicole 


185 


Heckman, James 


185 


Hollcnbach, Nancy 


157 


Hale. Robert 


215 


Heffner. Krisline 


216 


Hollenbeck, Julie 


157 


Haley. Carol 


185 


Heffner, Sarah 


185 


Hollida,John 


186 


Haley, Joy 


215 


Heffin, Margarel 


216 


Hollinger, David 


216 


Haley. Kate 


156 


Hegman, Edward 


255 


Hollman, Laura 


7 1 . 1 S6 


Haley. Lydia 


215 


Heidig, Elizabeih 


156 


Holloway, Joseph 


216 


Hall. Brian 


215 


Heimall, Ashley 


199 


Holmes. Jeffrey 


1S6 


Hall. Bronson 


215 


Heimede, Matthew 


67.216 


Holmstrom. Lars 


199 


Hall. Dana 


64.82 


Heimiller, Micheic 


199 


Holt. Jessica 


199 


Hall. Kaitlynn 


185 


Heinzen, Hamotte 


199 


Holt, Tara 


216 


Hall. Philip 


255 


Helbling, Todd 


90. 255 


Hollzman. Tyler 


199 


Hall. Sam 


199 


Helfrich, Elizabeih 


185 


Holzapfel. Eric 


199 


Halliday. John 


199 


Helldoerfer, Katie 


216 


Hotzworth. Rebecca 


216 


Ham, Camilla 


199 


Hellier, Jennifer 


216 


Homstad. Julia 


186 


Hamed. Hosscin 


97.215 


Hemstreet, Shannon 


185 


Honaker. Laura 


216 


Hamilton. Adam 


67. 199 


Henck, Adrienne 


157 


Hoogland. Karen 


157 


Hamilton. Kathleen 


199 


Henderson, Jacqueline 


185 


Hooker. Knsten 


199 


Hamm. Ryan 


156 


Henderson, Katie 


216 


Hooper. Phillip 


186 


Hamm. Tracy 


215 


Henderson, L^ura 


199 


Hoover. Matthew 


28.91. 186 


Hanimelnian. Bnttany 
Hammer. KnMen 


199 


Hendrick. Jennifer 


157 


Hoovler. Michael 


186 


199 


Hendricks, Charlotlc 


175 


Hopkins. Erin 


199 


Hammond. Cheree 


185 


Hendricks, Darren 


97. 199 


Horn. Clare 


157 


Hammond. Jennifer 


215 


Hendrix, Chnstine 


185 


Home. Ashley 


216 


Hampton. Sieve 
Hanback. Tiffany 


255 


Henley, Jennifer 


216 


Hornc. Enc 


108.216 


215 


Henley, Virginia 


157 


Home, .Stacy 


199 


Hancher. Ashley 


185 


Henry. Casey 


216 


Hossli Icnnifer 


1,58 


Hancock. .Anneke 


199 


Henry, Margaret 


186 


llolllc, Karen 


158 


Hanks, Laura 


75. 185 


Henry, Shalini 


199 


Hnuch, Lison 


62,63,95, 199 






Henry, Terrell 


199 


Houeht.ilm. Liane 


255 


Hanley, Mallhew 


215 


Henshaw, Kathenne 


186 


Houxlev, Meghan 


199 


Hanna, Robert 


215 


Hensle, Jessica 


186 


HouMii.in. Michael 


186 


Hanna, Stephen 




Hensley, Laura 


216 


HoiJeM.id. Amy 


158 


Hannigan. Connor 


185 


Henson, Stephanie 


199 


Hou ., Id Jeffrey 


216 




156 


Herbert, Joseph 


199 




199 


Hansen. Jason 


67. 185 


Herbert, Meaghan 


157 


IImu.ioI Meghan 


199 


Hansen, Bradley 


255 


Heri, Lindsay 


216 


IImu.11,1 k.ichel 


216 




L56 
199 


Hernandez, Marc 


79. 199 


IfuMll \I11V 


186 


Harada. Mika 


Heroman, Kelly 


129. 157 


Howell. Cary 


158 


Harcuiii Justin 


66 67 215 


Herring, Chad 


87 


Howell. Jessica 


158 



286 



Intdex 



def * 2hi 



Index. 



Howland, Arthur 


216 


Johnson. Carlina 


Hewlett, Inigo 


186 


Johnson, Chnslophe 


Howletl. Rhonda 


186 


Johnson. James 


Howlin, Barbara 


216 


Johnson, Jennifer 


Hrusovsky. Brian 


186 


Johnson, Kevin 


Huber. Margared 


255 


Johnson. Lesley 


Huckabay, Carolyn 


123. 199 


Johnson. Mary 


Hudnall, Tiffianne 


71. 199 


Johnson. Melissa 


Huff. Ashley 


186 


Johnson. Nicholas 


Hughart. Margaret 


216 


Johnson. Phillip 


Hughart. Matthew 


33. 158 


Johnson, Ricky 


Hughes, Carolyn 


199 


Johnson. Ten 


Hughes. Hunter 


186 


Johnston. Chnslopht 


Hughes, Janet 


255 


Johnston. Katie 


Hughes. Karen 


200 


Johnston. Kelly 


Hughes. Kalherine 


216 


Jones, Anthony 


Hummel. Andrew 


1S6 


Jones. Ashley 


Hummel. Margaret 


216 


Jones, Bnjn 


Hundley. Kerri 


200 


Jones. Christopher 


Hunsberger, David 


112. 200 


Jones. Eric 


Hum, Chns 


108 


Jones. HeJiher 


Hunt, Sarah 


216 


Jones. Jamal 


Huntiej. Elizabeth 


200 


Jones. Jennifer 


Hurd. Cynthia 


216 


Jones. John 


Hurley. Rita 


200 


Jones. Ken 


Hurst. JiUian 


216 


Jones, Kenneth 


Huskey. Melissa 


158 


Jones. LaQuia 


Hussain, Catherine 


216 


Jones. Marc 


Hutchison, Erin 


200 


Jones, Marcellus 


Hutchison. Lindsey 


200 


Jones. Marylouise 


Hwang. Hojun 


200 


Jones. Mec'helle 
lones. Me3an 



'I 



lantosca, Amanda 
larrobino, Nicole 
[done, Mary 
Hagan, Janet 
Ingalls, James 
Ingold, Natalie 
Ingram, April 
Jngrassia, Elizabeth 
Inman, Janet 
Irby. Maggie 
Irvin. Alice 
Ir\'in. Kr\'stal 
Isaacs. Jessica 
Isdell, Lara 



Jackman, Candace 
Jackson. Emily 
Jackson, Melissa 
Jackson, Sarah 
Jacobs, Amanda 
Jacobs, Tammy 
Jaffee. Mary 
Jahagirdar. Om 
Jahagirdar. Preeli 
Jancaitis, Mary 
Janelsins, Bnan 
Jantzi. Katie 
Javins, Douglas 
Jeffries. Ryan 
Jenkins, Jennifer 
Jenkins. Michael 
Jennings. Kendall 
Jensen, Dennis 
Jensen. Kalherine 
Jensen. Kelly 
Jensen. Timothy 
Jemigan, Anne 
Jett, Lindsay 
Jimenez-Castro, Iris 
Joeck, Graeme 
Johansen, Erin 
Johnson. Ben 
Johnson. Bradley 



Jones. Pamela 
Jones. Rebecca 
Jones, Shaunte 
Jones, Shenca 
Jones, Tamara 
Jones. Travis 
Jordan. Thomas 
Jordan. Timothy 
Joyce. Sara 
Juarez. Fernando 
Julian. Rebecca 
Junkins, Carolyn 

Justen. David 



* 



Kailath. Ryan 
Kakava. Chnsiina 
K alder. Zachary 
Kaliszewski. Keith 
Kane. Jeffrey 
Kang. David 
Kapuscinski. Matthew 
Karakehagia. Aikutenni 
Kardian. David 
Karlovich. Dana 
Karluk. Rachel 
Karwowski. Chnslophei 
Kaspcr. Linetie 
Kaie, Mary Shendan 
Kaior, Zachary 
Kavanaugh, Bndgel 
Kaye, Robyn 
Kaye, Samuel 
Keefe. Erin 



.Erin 
. Kellv 



Kebher, Laura 
Kell.Cdiilm 
Keller, EliAiheth 
Keller. Katherinc 
Keller. Rachel 
Kelley. Heather 
Kelley. Peter 
Kelly. Adam 
Kelly. Debra 
Kelly. John 
Kelly, Kimberly 
Kelly. Mar> 
Kelmelis. Michael 
Kelse>,ErK 
Kemp, William 
Kendal. Kimberly 
Kendall. Caiilm 
Kenna, Ryan 



Kennedy. Alisa 
Kennedy, Kelly 
Kermedy, Stacy 
Kennedy, Teresa 
Kenney. Sara 
Kenney, William 
Kerkam, Juliet 
Kern. Jennifer 
Kerwin. Kiara 
Kesner. Jenmfer 
Kelterman, JackJyn 
Khandrueva, Anna 
Kidwell. John 
Kilby. Wendy 
Kilkenny. Andrea 
Kiliamey. Ryan 
KiUian. Joelia 
Killingsworth, Paurick 
Kilmartin. Chnstopher 
Kilroy, Mane 
Kim.Na-Young 
Kimball, Andrew 
Kimmitt, Emily 

Kinahan, Kelly 

Kincaid, Janna 

King, Channing 

King. Elizabeth 
King. George 

King. Jennifer 

King, Leah 

King. Mari 

King. Matthew 

King. Rachel 

King, Rebecca 

King, Sarah 

King. Teresa 

Kingsley, Lisa 

Kinkead. Caitlin 

Kinney. Matt 

Kintzer. Brent 

Kirchner, Melissa 

Kirk, Matthew 

Kish. Ryan 

Kissell, Melanie 

Kjstler. Abby 

Klaus. Jennifer 

KJayton, Margaret 

Klein. Mehssa 

Kling. Cassandra 

KJingaman. Elizabeth 

Klingler, Matthew 

Knight, Marci 

Knorr. Daniel 

Knouff. Tessa 

Knowles. Amber 

Knowles. Rachel 

Koblinsky. John 

Kochen. Erik 

Kodack. Paul 

Koehl. Michael 

Koemer. Lisa 

Koether, Rachel 

Kohne. Amanda 

Kolakowski, Julie 

Kolar. David 

Kolb. Chastity 

Kollins. Eileen 



Konie 



Koniowsky, Kelly 
Komides, Marjone 
Koscielny, Kristin 
Kosciw, Kimberiy 
Kosinski, Knsien 
Kosovych. Danylo 
Kota. Aaron 
Kovaleski. Mary 
Kowaiik. Benjamin 
Kozicki, Michael 
Kramer. Chnsii 
Kramer. Pamela 
Krause. Elizabeth 
Krebs. Allison 
Kneger. Kelly 



Knn 



. Ann. 



Kronenberg. Todd 
Krug. Shan 
Kruthers. Robin 



63. 200 

77 

77.200 

65,217 

63. 95. 200 

67.200 

217 

200 



Kubicsko. Jenelle 
Kuchler. Michael 
Kuehn. Rebecca 
Kugel, Albert 

Kuhns. Knslina 
Kuppler. Emily 

Kuzmuk, Timothy 
Kwerel. Jessica 
Kwiaikowski. Manuela 
Kydes. Parthena 
Kyff. Cynthia 



II 



Lackey. Kenneth 
Laclede, Elizabeth 
Lacy. Kalhryn 
Lafate. ChenncI 
Lafferty. Sarah 
Lake. Megan 
Lamb. Brandon 
Lambert. Alex 
LaMonica, Michael 
LaMont. Kathenne 
Lancaster. Jason 
Lancaster, Maggie 
Lancaster. Margaret 
Lancaster. Theresa 
Landers. Doris 
Landes, Candice 
Landesberg. Cynlhia 
Landis. Julia 
Lane, Taryn 
Lang. Matthew 

Lange, Matthew 
Lange. Michael 
Lanier, Denise 
Lapar. Andre 
Laprade. Cindy 
Larsen. Erica 
Larson. Andrew 
Larson. Nicole 
Latze. Cynthia 
Laudate. Bnan 
Lauer. Nicole 
Lavery. Deanna 
Law. Emma 
Lawler. Adam 
Lawrence. Heidi 
Lawson, Andrew 
Law son. Matthew 
Lax. Jennifer 
Laygo, Miguel 
Layman, Aaron 
Le.Anh 

Leadem. Chnstopher 
Leckburg. Daniel 
Lee, Ally son 
Lee, Byong 
Lee. Daniel 
Lee. Jennifer 
Lee. Jung 
Lee, Sunny 
Leesman. Katharine 
Leeth. Byron 
Uffke. Leslie 
Legard, Lauren 
Leggette, Jennifer 



Lehn^ 



Leightner, Robin 
Lemire. Matt 
Lenser. Melina 
Leonard. Robert 
Leopold, Debra 
LePage. Marie 
Lester, Amy 
Levangie. Matthew 
LeVines. Valen 
Lewis. Brooke-Mant 
Lewis. Elizabeth 
Lewis. Laura 

Lewis. Suzanne 



Index 28"; 



Lewis. Theodore 


:i8 


Mareck, Lee 


Liao, James 


201 


Maresca. LoriAnn 


Libby, Kevin 


161 


Margelon. Elizabeth 


Libby. Sarah 


89,218 


Mane. Leah TImberlakc 


Liebau. Robert 


255 


Marino. Patricia 


Lillo. Cynthia 


161 


Marino. Tricia 


Linu.ln, Christian 


218 


Marion. Kristin 


1 inJs.iv Mar^jTOI 


2111 


Marker. James 


iMuK.u.Meagan 


llj 


Markey. Ryan 


LiiidsL-y. Christy 


21)1 


Markham. Anna 


Linn, Melanre 


162 


Marks, Brian 


Lipford, Shana 


201 


Marland, Jennifer 


Lipscomb. Anthony 


218 


Marley. Christopher 


Lipski. Jana 


201 


Mamot. Maggie 


LiPuma. Knsiy 


162 


Marriott. Margaret 


Lillle.Tia 


218 


Marsh, Tiffany 


Littrcll, Phillip 


201 


Marshall. Adam 


Litz. Anne 


201 


Marshall, LaToya 


Lively. Breil 


73,218 


Marshall, Mcaghan 


Lloyd. Dana 


218 


Marshall, Nathan 


Lockard. Matthew 


67, 1,87 


Marshall. Whii 


Locketl, Kimberly 


218 


Marsland, Slacey 


Locklear, Jennifer 


162 


Marsnick, Stephanie 


Lockwood. Allison 


187 


Marstiller, Lori 


Loden. Kevin 


90.91.218 


Marston, Came 


Loesch. Jacqui 


69 


Martclla, Lauren 


Loesser, Kaihryn 


255 


Martens. Mark 


Logan. Marc 


79.201 


Martin, Adnenne 


Lucas. Bill 


98 


Marlin, Andrea 


Lucas, Sarah 


162 


Martin. Jonathan 


Luff. Ryan 


201 


Martin. Kelly 


Lukos, Jennifer 


162 


Martin, Krisii 


Lunger. Tony 


97 


Martin. Louise 


Lunglhofer. Johanna 


201 


Martland. Kalhryn 


Luller. Emily 


187 


Mascarenhas, Lauren 


Lux. Krislina 


218 


Mascelli, Meghan 


Lydon. Meredith 


218 


Mashbum, Christopher 


Lynch. Crisiine 


218 


Mason. Ryan 


1 ynth, Hmily 


187 


Mason. Tina 


l.\ndi. Kathicen 


162 


Massucci. Elyzabeth 


Lynch, Kevin 


187 


Mathews. Nina 


Lyons, Meghan 


162 


Malhias. Jordan 
Mallick, Krislcn 
Matthews. Ashley 
Malthev^s. Grant 


m 




Mattson, Mary 




Mauney, Patrick 


Mabic. Jeffrey 


187 


Maurer. Justin 


MacAfee. Lauren 


201 


Mauro, Stephen 


Macatuno. Aura 


218 


Maxwell. Benjamin 


MacClain. Alexia 


201 


Maxwell, Jennifer 


Maccubbm. Ryan 


218 


May. Ryan 


MacDonald, Christopher 


218 


Mayercsik. Kari 


MacDonald, Meredith 


65. 162 


Mayhugh. Rebecca 


MacEwen. Bruce 


256 


Maykrantz. Rebecca 


Machado. Kristin 


99. 187 


Mazes. Ann 


Machado. Leslie 


187 


Maz/ola. Margaret 


Maclnnes. Katrina 


187 


Mazzuchi, Sara 


MacKinnon. Catherine 


8,3. 201 


McAfee. Andrew 


MacLean, Alexandra 


187 


McAllister. Carisa 


MacMichael. Shannon 


218 


McAuley. Ryan 


Macone. Jonathan 


201 


McAuhffe. Lynda 


Madtes. John 


81, 187 


McBride. Christina 


Maetzold. Connie 


218 


McCall.VenltIa 


Mahle, Jesse 


201 


McCalla. Erin 


Mahlqvist, Jenny 


218 


McCallum. Gordon 


Mahony. Shauna 


218 


McCarthy. Dennis 


Mai, Hten 


201 


McCarthy. Nichole 


Maier. Nicole 


95.218 


McCarthy, Sarah 


Maioceo, Lauren 


201 


McCartin, Mary 


Malcolm. William 


201 


McCiirty. Erin 


Malln, Mike 


81.251 


McClam. Alice 


Mallmann. Alec 


201 


McClain, Jacqueline 


Mallon. Michael 


87. 1,87 


McClamroch, Bryce 


Maloche. Tracy 


218 


McClintock, Lindsey 


Malone. Jamie 


219 


McCloskey. Suzanne 


Malone, Mark 


81,97,201 


McClure, Sydney 


Maloney. Lisa 


201 


McCluskey.' Kevin 


Mancini, Nicholas 


219 


McComas, Joshua 


Manganiello. Laura 


201 


McComas. Melanle 


Manges, Emilv 


219 


McCone. Jonathan, III 


Mangun. Jesica 


85.219 


McConnell, Matthew 


Mangus, Krisien 


219 


McConnell, Robert 


Muni. Katie 


162 


McCormick. Brian 


Manion. Keith 


201 


McCoy. Aaron 


Manion, Kendall 


219 


McCoy. Ashley 


Mank. Erica 


201 


MeCraw. Rohen 


Mann. Emmett 


219 


McCuen. Justin 


Manning, Carol 


256 


McCulloeh. Kara 


Manning. Lindsay 


201 


McCullough, Austin 


Manzano. Mark 


219 


McCullough. Alexis 


Marafl no. Laura 


63. 187 


McDonald, Elaine 


Marchese. Melissa 


187 


McDonald, Emily 


288 Index 


1 





McDonald. Heather 
McDonald, Samantha 
McDonnell, Colleen 
McDonnell. Danielle 
McDougal, Ellen 
McDowell. Elizabeth 
McEathron, Mark 
McElveen, Cindy 
McElveen, Cynthia 
McGaha. Brenna 
McGee, Charles 
McGee. Ellle 
McGee, Jennifer 
McGeorge. Alex 
McGonigle. Ryan 
McGovem.Gina 
McGuire. Amanda 
McHenry. Emily 
McKay. Elissa 
McKay, Matthew 
McKee, Robert 
McKenney. Megan 
McKenzie, Michelle 
McKinnon, James 
McKoy, Aaron 
McLaren. Malt 
McLaren, Matthew 
McLaughlin. Donna 
McLaughlin, Elizabeth 
McLaughlin. Erin 
McLaughlin. Jennifer 
McLaurin. Jade 
McMahon. Laura 
McMahon, Lindsay 
McMahon. Meghan 
McMahon, Minda 
McManus, Sara 
McMillan. Jennifer 
McMillion. Laina 
McMullen, Almeda 
McMullen. Lynne 
McNinch. Kami 
McNinch. Thomas 
McPherson. Sarah 
McQueen, Kaihenne 
Meadors, Christine 
Meagan Lindsay 
Meara Henley 
Medina. Esmeralda 
Medlyn. Erin 
Meeks. Elizabeth 
Meier, Ernest 
Mele. Joseph 
Melton, Melissa 
Meluzio, Christina 
Mendieta, Neil 
Menz, Kristin 
Mercer, Bren! 
Merenda. Steven 
Merkey. Allison 
Merrey -Welcome. Anna 
Merriam. Stephanie 
Merrill. Michael 
Merrill, Sammy 
Merlz. Andrew 
Merzazada, Asha 
Messa, Catherine 
Messick. Katherine 
Messinger. John 
Meicalf. Jonathan 
Meyerhoff. Corinne 
Meyrick, Abbey 
Meza. Nidia 
Michaels, Matthew 
Michalosky. Brianna 
Michanczyk, Paul 
Michaud, Ashley 
Michener, Sara 
Mick. Alison 
Mickelsen. Alicia 
Miele, Heather 
Milanowskj, Elissa 
Milefsky, Anna 



„ Dana 



Mil 
Millei 



Miller. Catheri 
Miller. Eric 
Miller. Helen 
Miller. Jaime 
Miller, Jcnnifei 
Miller. Justina 



Miller, Katie 
Miller, Michael 
Miller, Rebecca 
Mills. Anna 
Mills. Elizabeth 
Mills, Garth 
Mills, Neoma 
Mills, Sandia 
Milner. Jessica 
Miner, Timothy 
Minerly. Jane 
Minnick, Carrie 
Mitchell, Adnone 
Mitchell. Cara 



-, Thnm 
. Erm 



Moi 
Mo' 

Mohle. KImberle 
Mohler. Corinne 
Moir. Lauren 
Mojica. Johany 
Moncrief. Susan 
Mondino, Victor 
Moneymaker. Mi 
Monk. Elizabeth 
Monk, Patrick 
Monroe, Cheryl 
Monroe, Jordan 

Moody. Ingrid 
Moonan. Karei 



Lynsi 



. Caillln 
. Erin 



Moore. Heather 
Moore. Jennifer 
Moore, Kathleen 
Moore. Krislina 



Morg 


nthaler, Vanessa 


203 


Moria 


rity, Janet 


203 


Morin 


, Francisco 


220 


M.irk 


Jeri 


220 


Morn. 


11. Timothy 


77.188 


Mom 


. Jessica 


65, 105 


Morri 


. Joshua 


1 16, 20 


Mom 


.Sarah 


220 


Mom 


. Timothy 


220 


Mom 


on. Hasse'l 


139 


Mom 


on, Rebecca 


188 


Mom 


w. Mark 


220 



Moll, 


satherine 


Mouli 


,Ann 


Mowe 


rv, Allison 


Mozo 


C.Jen 


Mrmi 


ec. Magdale 


Much 


Lmdsev 


Mulh. 


1, Kevin 


Mulhc 


rn. Amanda 


Mulle 


.Lisa 


Mulle 


, Mallhew 


Mulh 


, Meredith 


MuiRl 


. Martha 


Mun,. 


. Merideth 



Murafskv, Dust 



Mu 



.Me. 



Murphy, Bridget 
Murphy. Dana 
Murphy, Jeanelte 
Murphy. Kathleen 
Murphy, Matthew 



Index. 



Murray. CaroI>n 
Murray, Leigh 
Murray. Rebecca 
Murray. William 
Musselman, Nicole 
Musson, Daniel 
Mychak, Adam 
Myers, Allyson 
Myers. Carolyn 
Myers, Jared 
Myers. Lisa 
Myers. Nathan 
Myers. Rachel 
Myrick. Peggy 
Myrick. Thomas 



nn 



Noesner. Kelly 
Noffsinger. Katrin. 
Nolker. Nicole 
Norman. Apnl 
Nonvood. Patricia 
Notter, Sarah 
Nowak, Karolina 
Nowak. Kellie 
Nuedlmg. Lisa 
Nunley. Kathcrme 
Nuiailis. Matthew 



Q) 



Oaks. Susan 
Oare, James 
Obcemea. Ris 



O'Brien. Bruce 
Occhiuz/j. Jennifer 
Och. Marjorie 
Ochs. Stephanie 
Ochsenreiter, Kristin 
O'Connor. Can 
O'Connor. Kara 
O'Connor, Kevin 
Odegaard, Laura 
O'Dell. Deborah 
Offutt, Sara 



Naden. Alexander 


97, ::i) 


Often, Clint 


Nacger. Melissa 


2(1.? 


Ogu,Anne 


Naff. Jessica 


71, I8S 


Oh, Young 


Nagel. Emily 


65.8,1, 188,20, 


Ohlsson, James 


Nagy. John 


21 B 


Ohlsson. Michael 


Napier, Bnan 


188 


Okin, Harrison 


Napolilano. Ryan 


16-5 


Oko, Andrew 


Nardi.Gina 


221) 


O'Leary, Elizabeth 


Nash. Jennifer 


165 


O'Leary, Jennifer 


Nashom. Lynn 


2(1,1 


Oliver, Jamie 


Nations, Tyler 


188 


Oliver. Marg.iret 


Naumann. Rebecca 


165 


Oliver, Timothy 


Neale. Justin 


165 


Ollice. Lindsay 


Neff. Joshua 


220 


OLoughlin. Christ 


Neff. Matthew 


220 


Olsen. Chnslme 


Neidig. Elizabeth 


165 


Olson. Joan 


Nelson, Amanda 


95, 188 


Olukemi. Oluwaloy 


Nelson, Brandy 


65, 93, 220 


0-Quinn, Kelli 


Nelson, Joel 


119, 165 


Orsinger, Brendan 


Nelson, Rebecca 


220 


Orstead, Knstin 


Nelson. Sarah 


188 


Orvioll, K.iren 


Neraati, Sara 


18S 


Oser, Courtney 


Nemeth, Pamilla 


220 


Osmg, Marv 


Nettles, Amber 


220 


Ostrovvski, Lara 


Neviackas, Kara 


65, 220 


Otey, Catherine 


Ncwbold, Michael 


95, 203 


Otis, Nathan 


Newcomb, Eli 


87, 188 


Otto, Caroline 


Newcomer, Meghan 


77 


Ouhamou, Mariani 


Newell. Tiffany 


220 


Oven, Meghan 


Newman. Cassandra 


220 


Owen, Katharine 


Newman. Jennifer 


165 


Ozanich, Brcll 


Newman, Lindsey 


221) 




Newman. Meredith 


135 


^ 


Newman, Patricia 


188 


Newtson, John 


188 


Ng, Melissa 


188 




Nguyen, Loan 


188 


Paci, Matthew 


Nguyen, Mai 


93, 220 


Packard. Katherine 


Nguyen, Nancy 


203 


Packer, Joseph 


Nguyen, Nhat 


91.220 


Pagani, Sabrcna 


Nguyen, Thuy 


188 


Pagonis. Nick 


Nguyen, Tinh 


220 


Paice. Brian 


Niaz, Mansoor 


203 


Paige, Deborah 


Nicholas, Joseph 


256 


Painter. Andrew 


Nickel, Lorene 


256 


Painter. Katie 


Nickels, Christine 


203 


Palmer, Steven 


Nicolai, Sara 


220 


Palmieri. Jessica 


Nicoll, Ian 


220 


Palmieri, Jill 


Niebuhr, Vera 


256 


Panza, Adam 


Nikkari, Katherine 


220 


Pappas, Alexis 


Nilsson, Melissa 


203 


Paredes, VonOeye 


Nininger, Lauren 


220 


Parham. S ha vans 


Nisoff, Jen 


135 


Pans. Dawn 


Nissim-Sabat, Denis 


256 


Parke, Margaret 


Nissim-Sabat, Michael 


220 


Parker. Allison 


Nissim-Sabat, Mike 


66,67 


Parker. Casey 


Nixon, Gwendolyn 


203 


Parker. Jo Ann 


Nobile, Shannon 


65, 220 


Parker. Judith 


Noble, Jessica 


188 


Parker, Steven 


Noel, Daniel 


203 


Parks. Jennifer 


Noesner, Katie 


188 


Parr. Gillian 



Parrish, James 

Parry, Megan 

Parsons. Joseph 

Passar. Michelle 

Pajismore. Amanda 

Passuth, Kristin 

Patick, Wynne 

Patrick. Nan 

Patrick, Troy 

Patterson. Craig 

Patterson. Julie 

Panerson. Kathenne 

Pattie. William 

Patton. Jessica 

Pavlik. Tricia 

Pax ton, John 

Payne. Joseph 

Payne. Kristen 

Pay ton, Amanda 

Payion, Joseph 

Peach. Pamela 

Pech. Sarah 
Pedersen. Anthony 
Pelkey. Kimberly 
Pellegrino, Jessica 
Pencek, Carrie 
Pendleton. Elizabeth 
Pennington, Rachel 
Pennock, Sarah 
Penwell. Larry 
Peppers. Lamarr 
Perdikoylis. Chnsiopl- 
Perdue. Chnstin 
Pereira. Shaina 
Perez. Benjamin 
Perez. Lewis 
Perkins. Emily 
Perry. Bryce 
Perry. Jennifer 
Perry. Kevin 
Peterson. Brenton 
Peterson. Catherine 
Peterson. Edwin 
Peterson. Greg 



Petmzzi. Megan 
Petty. Christina 
Petty, Holly 
Peyton, Brian 
Peyton. Leah 
Pflumm. Stephanie 
Pham, My-Phuong 
Pham, Phong 



Porter, Molly 
Poner, Robyn 
Poner, Sheila 



Pha 



i.Thien-Hui 



Phelps. Heidi 
Phillips. April 
Phillips. Gillian 
Phillips, Laurie 
Phillips. Sandra 
Picard. Amanda 



Pic. 



). Tnci 



Pickenpaugh, Ga\in 
Pickett. Kathry n 
Pickett, Lisa 



Piei 



Pierson. Amanda 
Pifer. Richard. Jr. 
Pimo,Tncia 
Piper, Kevin 
Pirmohamed. Salimah 
Pitaniello. Richard 
Pitti. Betsy 
Pitti. Elizabeth 
Pitiman. Kimberly 
PitLs. Jocelyn 
Pms. Sarah 
Pizzaro. Joshua 
Plant. Jennifer 
Plourde. Kristy 
Plummer. Michael 
Polack-Wahl. Jennifer 
Polk. Erin 
Poole. Sally 
Pope. Timotheus 
Pope, Titus 
Pope, Travis 
Poppen, Laura 
Porfins. Alethea 
Porter, Abby 
Porter. Courtney 
Poner. Landon 



Prall, Chrislinj 


221 


Prcsson, Manha 


221 


Preston, Sarah 


87.221 


Prible, Amy 


204 


Price, Erin 


IS9 


Price, Jason 


167 


Price. Thaddeaus 


221 


Price, Wenday 


256 


Pnnce, Ellen 


204 


Prince, Jessica 


189 


Pnnty, Erin 


99. 167 


Prior, Margaret 


167.248 


Pntchell, Heather 


204 


Pmt. Jessica 


221 


Propsl. Dorothy 


75. 204 


Prowell. Aaron 


71 


Prussia. Melissa 


221 


Puddester. Andrew 


204 


Pudelko. Jennifer 


189 


Pullan. Lauryn 




Puppi. Thomas 


1S9 


Purcell. Stephanie 


167 


Purdy. Andrea 


204 


Pusey. Michael 


204 


Pushee. Kevin 


204 



cP 



Quackenbush, Kasey 
Quadrozzi. Michael 
Quakenbush, Kasey 
Qualtrough, Evan 
Quartararo. Valene 
Ouijano. Laura 
Quinion. Gregory 
Quinlan. Kellv 
Quinn, Ryan 
Quinlana, Jason 
Qumtana. Jay 



i# 



Racine. Ashley 
Rackliffe. Adam 
Rafsky. Amanda 
Rainholl. Sara 
Raiiicy. Jennifer 
Railis. Donald 
Ralph, Bridget 
Ralph. Colleen 
Ramira. Amulf John 
Ramira. John 
Ramos, Sherry 
Ramos. Steven 
Ramsay. Patrick 
Ramseur. Enc 
Ramsey. Mary 
Randlett, Ashley 
Randolph. Andre 
Ransone. Amanda 
Rapalee. Brandi 
Rasnack. Jeanette 
Ralchffe. Jessica 
Ratliff. Enn 
Ratliff, Thomas 
Raus, Alicia 
Ray. Alexandria 
Ray, Margaret 
Reading. Robert 
Reagan. Brian 



index 289 



pq 



ReaJe, Audrey 


204 


Ross, Rebecca 


168 


Schranck, Carolyn 


|i)0 


Siegal, Judith 


206 


Rector. Amber 


204 


Roth, Michael 


222 


Schulke, Kyle 


77, 190 


Siemon, Stefanie 


223 


Reddar. Bryan 


204 


Rothlisberger, Mary 


190 


SchulU, Olan 


169 


Sileo, Matthew 


190 


Redden. Brandon 


m 


Rouse, Megan 


222 


Schultz, Scott 


205 


Silcr, Kalherine 


190 


Reddinger. Terrence 


221 


Rousseau, Elena 


222 


Schulz, Ernilie 


222 


Silverman, Laura 


223 


Reed. Alden 


ISO 


Rowley, Caria 


222 


Schurman, Anna 


190 


Simmers, Krislm 


206 


Reed. Julie 


1,15 


Rowley, Penny 


168 


Schuster, Jennilyn 


205 


Simmons, Shannon 


206 


Reed. Matthew 


18<) 


Roy, Ethan 


222 


Schutzman, Paul 


81,222 


Simms, James 


206 


Reed. Raeschel 


221 


Roy, Jennifer 


190 


Schwartz, Adam 


97, 190 


Simon, Jessica 


206 


Reedy. Melissa 


168 


Rozek, Enca 


85, 205 


Schwartz, Christina 


169 


Simpkins, Derek 


190 


Reese. Kristina 


221 


Rubin, l^e 


79, 190 


Schwemer, David 


190 


Simpson, Erika 


206 


Reeves. Trisha 


204 


Ruby, Allison 


190 


Schwemer, Grelchen 


169 


Simpson, Matthew 


206 


Reffner. Stacy 


IS") 


Ruby, Emily 


88, 168 


Schwind, Sara 


169 


Simpson, Robert 


223 


Regan. Conor 


16S 


Rucker, Cedric 


59, 256 


Sciacca, Gillian 


99, 205 


Sims, Amanda 


190 


Reid. Carly 


137, 168,248 


Rucker, Stuart 


190 


Scott, Aubrv 


205 


Sims, Eh/abelh 


223 


Reifsnyder. Tobias 


2I« 


Ruesch, Emily 


222 


Scott,, As sha 


19(1 


Sinclair, Jeffrey 


206 


Reilly. Colleen 


204 


Russell, Adam 


190 


Scott, CarIa 


222 


Singer, Jacqueline 


190 


Reilly. Michael 


204 


Russell, Virginia 


222 


Scott, Enca 


205 


Sinha, Akash 


223 


Revelle. Matthew 


221 


Ryan, Bonnie 


222 


Scott, James 


205 


Sjoberg, Elizabeth 


206 


Reynolds. Aaron 


20."i 


Ryan, Cunis 


256 


Scott, Matthew 


222 


Skinner, Jessica 


191 


Reynolds. John 


256 


Ryan. Enn 


205 


Scott, Raymond 


257 


Skorackvi, Elizabeth 


170 


Reynolds. Katherine 


189 


Ryan. Timothy 


90,91, 190 


Scully, James 


67, 222 


Skovby, Karen 


191 


Reynolds. Rachael 


85, 205 


Rycrofl. Robert 


256 


Sdeo, Gregory 


169 


Skove, Krislen 


206 


Reynolds. Thomas 


221 


Ryerson, Stephen 


190 


Seager, Alison 


190 


Slack, Alexis 


223 


Rhoad. Ian 


189 






Seaman, Maxwell 


79, 222 


Slager, Noelle 


206 


Rice. Jen 


88 


S^ 




Seaver, Heather 


222 


Slaughter, Steffanie 


93, 170,248 


Rice. Jennifer 


190,221 




Sebring, Sarah 


65, 205 


Slawmski. John 


95, 206 


Rice. Tiffany 


190 


S 




Sedaghatfar, Sarah 


222 


Sledge, Valerie 


191 


Ridi.irJ, V.ilerie 


205 




Sederquest, Rachel 


135 


Sledz, Robert 


191 


RKh.iids, Kale 


168 






Seeba, Garett 


222 


Slepsky, Dana 


223 


RiclKirdson. Chnstophcr 


190 






Seeley, Catherine 


222 


Sliwa, Sh.u-on 


223 


Rlch.irdM.n, CJ 


95 






Segur, Suzanne 


205 


Sloan. Meghan 


191 


Richardson, Scott 


222 


Sabo, Shelley 


65, 222 


Seidman, Philip 


1 sX) 


Slotnick, Hannah 


69, 206 


Richir. Calicoe 


85, 222 


Sdchen, Sarah 


92,93 


Sclle, Rachel 


190 


Slough, Stephanie 


223 


Richmond, Sara 


222 


Sadaghatfar, Sarah 


115 


Sellers, Rebecca 


205 


Slum, Keli 


257 


Rickel. Krista 


168 


Saddler, Rebecca 




Semerano. Nicole 


205 


Small, Costal 


223 


Rickey. David 


205 


Saeed, Sarah 


222 


Seney. Lauren 


205 


Smalley, Bryan 


191 


Ridgely. Kathleen 


190 


Saffos, Milzi 


169 


Senk. Margaret 


ls«l 


Sman, Kimberly 


223 


Ridpath. Anthony 


222 


Sager, Rebecca 


190 


Sevon. Matt 


119 


Smith, Abigail 


191 


Ridpath. Tony 


81 


Sahay, Divya 


190 


Sevon. Matthew 


222 


Smith, Amanda 


170 


Richer. Christina 


168 


Saiazar, Maria 


222 


Shabman, Mark 


205 


Smith, Amy 


65,223 


Ricsenfeld. Kann 


77,222 


Sale, Jennifer 


222 


Shabman, Reed 


79, 169 


Smith, Andy 


97 


Riffe. Robin 


205 


Sallgren, Mary 


205 


Shafer, Jessica 


205 


Smith. Barbara 


223 


Riggio. Kara 


69, 190 


Salmon, Andrew 


205 


Shaffer, Michael 


169 


Smith, Catherine 


206 


Rigsby. Mary 


256 


Salmon, Kellyanne 


169 


Shalowitz, Sara 


190 


Smith, Conor 


91,223 


Riley. Lindsey 


205 


Salo, Meghan 


69 


Shames, Rebecca 


190 


Smith, Constance 


257 


Riley. Patrice 


205 


Salotti, Marc 


67, 222 


Shanahan, Kellie 




Smith, Earl 


97. 223 


Riley. Rebecca 


190 


Salpeter, Michael 


169 


Shane, Michael 


205 


Smith, Emily 


191 


Ring, John 


190 


Salzman, Lucas 


95, 222 


Shanks, Morgan 


190 


Smith, Jack 


223 


Ripley. Knstin 


205 


Samantar, Ali 


205 


Shapard, Michael 


205 


Smith, James 


191 


Ripperger. Ethan 


205 


Samson, Marena 


222 


Sharkey, Alexandra 


223 


Smith. Jason 


170.223 


Rixmann. Amy 


190 


San, Wendy 


169 


Sharman, Michael 


223 


Smith, Karla 


170 


Roan, L.iurcn' 


99, 1911 


Sandberg, Erika 


205 


Shaver, Elizabedl 


169 


Smith, Kassandra 


206 


Roark, William 


205 


Sanders, Noah 




Shaver, Jessica 


99, 205 


Smith, Katherine 


206 


Robbins, Anlwane 


190 


Sandlin,Ja.son 


222 


Shaw, Matt 


97 


Smith, Kelly 


223 


Robbins, Ijiiily 


205 


Sandridge, Mike 


50 


Shaw, Sage 


205 


Smith, Kendra 


223 


Robbins, Kalhcnnc 


222 


Santana-Germond, Marie 


205 


Shea, Laura 


99, 190 


Smith, Lindsay 


95. 206 


Rohuris, Pi|scr 


205 


Santiago, Norberto 


222 


Shea, Timothy 


79, 205 


Smith, Malcom 


170 


Rnhcrlson, Andrew 


222 


Sapp, Jacob 


205 


Shear, Deborah 


223 


Smith, Martin 


223 


Robertson. Drew 


79 


Sare, Marilynn 


190 


Sheckels, Marie 


257 


Smith, Megan 


206 


Robertson. John 


190 


Sargent, Shaun 


222 


Sheffield, AUyson 


223 


Smith, Melissa 


95. 223 


Robie. Whitney 


190 


Sams, Noelle 


190 


Shelton, Michael 


205 


SmiUi, Michael 


223 


Robinson. Brandon 


125, 168 


Sasin, Andi 


65, 83 


Shenning, Kristin 


169 


Smidi, Ponsia 


206 


Robinson. Bridget 


99.222 


Sasin, Andrea 


205 


Shepherd, Patrick 


205 


SmiUi, Rachel 


206 


Robison. Adam 


222 


Satterwhite, Katie 


19(1 


Shepherd, Stephanie 


11)11 


Smith, Roy 


257 


Robles. Carmen 


222 


Sayko, Stefanie 


190 


Shepley, Kathryn 


223 


Smith, Samantha 


191 


Rod. Jacob 


63,95, 190 


Scales, Ryan 


205 


Sheppard, Whitney 


190 


Smith, Sarah 


191,206 


Roden. Meghan 


168 


Scalon, Mara 


257 


Sheridan, Mary 


205 


Smidi, Scott 


223 


Rodgers. Matt 


91 


Scaturro, Crista 


205 


Sheridan, Matthew 


169 


Smith, Tempe 


99, 206 


Rodgers. Sean 


205 


Schad, Michael 


222 


Sheridan, Thomas 


78, 257 


Smith, Terri 


191 


Rodriguez, Erik 


72, 73, 205 


Schaeffer, Andrew 


222 


Sherman, Daniel 


190 


Smith-Rumph, Ella 


170 


Rogalla, Geoffrey 


190 


Schueffer, Shauna 


205 


Sherman, Valerie 


190 


Smoot, Katrina 


206 


Rogers, Christopher 


190 


Schaible, Knstin 


89, 169 


Shenenlieb, Rebecca 


190 


Smothers, Matthew 


223 


Rogers. Elizabeth 


205 


Schatz, Kyle 


205 


Shevlin, James 


170 


Smucker, Eric 


191 


Rogers. Jerry 


222 


Schauer, Grace 


205 


ShiOet, Catherine 


223 


Snead, Lucie 


223 


Rogers, Matthew 


28, 190 


Scheerle, Kristen 


169 


Shillet, Randy 


205 


Snedeker, Mary 


223 


Rogers, Stacy 


222 


Schenkel, Heidi 


222 


Shin, Andrew 


67, 190 


Snellinger, John 


223 


R,.h, Deborah 


190 


Schirrippa, John 


205 


Shioji, Amy 


2fl5 


Snellings. Chnstophcr 


223 


Rohr, Mar\ 




Schleef, Debra 


257 


Shirclitf, Roxanne 


205 


Snider, Kristen 


206 


Ruhr, Virginia 


222 


Schmeiser, Anna 


222 


Shirley, Lillian 


223 


Snowberger, Jessica 


223 


Rohrkcmper, Cameron 


222 


Schmidt, Kelly 


205 


Shively, Amanda 


205 


Snyder, Amanda 


170 


Roksvaag, Tracy 


222 


Schmidt, Lauren 


77, 190 


Shoop, Brandon 


223 


Snyder, Jessica 


191 


Rolling, Virginia 


222 


Schmidt, Vicki 


222 


Short, Abigail 


223 


Snyder, Justin 


77. 105 


Romaneski, Rebecca 


222 


Schminke, Elizabeth 


83, 222 


Short, Julie 


170 


Snyder, Samual 


206 


Ronald Lawson 


218 


Schmot/er, Mar\ 




Showman, Stephanie 


190 


Soenksen, Virginia 


191 


Rooke, Camion 


222 


Schneider, Karli 


93, 1911 


Shroyer, Lisa 


205 


Soldatow, Valerie 


170 


Rose, Amelia 


222 


Schoen. Stefan 


79, 205 


Shugart, James 


205 


Solomon, Loma 


223 


Rose, Archer 


205 


Schoenwetler, Julie 




Shultz, Veronica 


170 


Solomon-Astudillo, Amo 


d 206 


Rose, Eric 


190 


Schoffstall, Kiniberlv 




Shuman, Emily 


205 


Soltess, Andrea 


223 


Rose, Jessica 


175 


Scholz, Rebecca 


190 


Shumate, Amy 


205 


Somers, Danielle 


191 


Rose, Scarlet 


168 


Schottenfeld, Lauren 


190 


Shutt, Christina 


205 


Son, Min 


191 


Rose-Jensen, Sarah 


222 


Schram, Rebecca 


99, 222 


Sias, Brandt 


190 


Song, Yuhui 


191 



290 



* def <> «! 



\'\\^ "^ \'Z 



—Index. 



Soper. Chnstina 
Soper. Stanley 
Soqui, Keri 
Sorgen. Michael 
Soirell, Kristen 
Southard. Ted 
Spacek, John 
Spacek, Margaret 
Spadola. Lame 
Spadola, Quinn 
Spahr. Erik 
Sparks. Amanda 
Sparks, Brooke 
Sparks, Lon 
Spellman, Rekesha 
Spence.Shelli 
Spencer, James 
Sf>encer. Michael 
Spots wood, Elizabeth 
Sprague, Valene 
Sprmgers. Nicole 
SpuiT, Timothy 
Squire. Peter 
St. Clair, Chelsea 
St. Clair. Tyler 
St. Cyr, Allison 
St. Pierre. Marc 
Stacy. Kathryn 
Slader, Donald 
Stagberg, Stephen 
Stagg. Allison 
Staloff. Charmayne 
Standi sh. Stacey 
Slangier, Katherine 
Stanley. Mary 
Stanley, Vickie 
Stanton, Gary 
Stanton, Nicholas 
Starling, Lisa 
Startt, Lindsey 
Slauffenberg, Victoria 
Stavitski, Julie 
Stechler. Katiina 
Steckler. Debra 
Steele. Christopher 
Steele. Danielle 
Steele. Michael 
Sternberg, Evan 
Sleiniger, Heidi 
Steitler, Kelly 
Stenger, Nicole 
Stepanick. Paul 
Stephen, Graham 
Stephens. Kathleen 
Stephens, Melissa 
Stevenson, Anthony 
Stewart. Jay 
Stewart, Kimberly 
Stipicevic, Ann 
Stoddard. James 
Stoeckel. Sharon 
Stokes, Sara 
Slolat. Shannon 
Slolzenbach. Kendra 
Stone. Lon 
Stone. Mary 
Stoner. Timothy 
Stout, Cara 
Stovall, Jennifer 
Stovall, Phillip 
Stover, Jason 
Straightiff, David 
Strand. Suzanne 
Strange, Ryan 
Strange. Stuart 
Strazie. Michael 
Street. Virginia 
Stnbling, William 
Strickland, Christopher 
Stroh, Jordan 
Strohl, Leroy 
Stuart. Byrony 
Studivant, Ryane 
Sturgill, Jeremiah 
Sturm. Andrew 
Sturm, Mark 
Style, Peter 
Sugahara, Karen 
Sullivan. Christina 
Sullivan. Jason 
Sullivan. Tamara 



Sulzynsky. Vikloi 



Sureru 


S.Br. 


ee 


Sucion 


. Abi 


aall 


Swain, 


Chri 


issy 


Swain, 


Chnslme 


Swmn, 


Enn 




Swals, 
Swcan 


Ken 


1. Megan 


SweverliL<.cl 


1. Ca^ol^ 


Swell, 


Chn 


slina 


Swille 


V, An 


unda 


Swink 


,Col 


in 


Swilze 


r, M^ 


Hlhew 


Sydno 


r. Lizhelh 



T. 



Taleb, Dnss 
Tallman, Jennifer 
Tanko, Slcphanie 
Tapia. Manbel 
Tapia, Mirtha 

Tanalio, Miehelle 
Tash, Adam 
Tavormina, Gregory 
Taylor. David 
Taylor. Emily 
Taylor, Erik 
Taylor, Lauren 
Taylor. Maeve 
Taylor. Roben 
Tebay, Joshua 
Tellekamp, Jonathan 
Temple, John 
Templeman. Cory 
Templclon. T Clay 
Tencnhollz. Helena 



Teni 



■. Me: 



Tesl, Jamie 
Test, Robert 
Tetalman. Emily 
Thall. Danen 
Thies. Jane 
Thindwa. Milimo 
Thing. Christine 
Thomas. Amanda 
Thomas. Brandy 
Thomas. Claudia 
Thomas. Hannah 



„ James 
„ Malthe' 



Thomason. Kimberly 


191 


Thompson. Aisha 


224 


Thompson. Ernest 


224 


Thompson, Kathryn 


172 


Thompson. Kevin 


172 


Thompson. Ryan 


172 


Thomson. Kelly 


|i31 


Thorelt, Erik 


Ql, 191 


Thome. David 


224 


Thomlon, Amy 


191 


Thornton. Charles 


207 


Thornton, Michael 


172 


Thorpe, Mandy 


224 


Thurston. Katherine 


191 


Tidd. Elizabedi 


207 


Tilghman. Kimberly 


87. 207 


Timmel. Laura 


224 


Timmerman. Kelly 


191 


Timmins. Becky 


74.75 


Timpano. Chnslina 


224 


Tinder, Amanda 


224 


Tingler. Mickey 


71 


Tinklepaugh. Karen 


224 


Tisinger. Diana 


224 


Tomescu. Priseilla 


77. 207 


Tomlinson. Kathryn 


191 


Tomlinson. Richard 


207 


Toone, Kathleen 


63. 95. 22- 


Torres. Diana 


99. 191 


Torres. Marisabel 


224 


Townsend, Caroline 


224 


Townsend. Carolyn 


207 


Townsend. Sean 


224 


Tracy, Arthur 


257 


Tramontc. Peter 


172 



Tran. Linh 


172 


Walker. Mary Beth 


173 


Traub. Claire 


191 


Walker. Rebecca 


192 


Tremaglio. Andrew 


SI, 172 


Walker. Ryan 


192 


Treston, Jessica 


172 


Walker. Victoria 


208 


Trimble. Elizabeth 


207 


Walkins. Ban 


173 


Tnpodi. Kathleen 


224 


Wallace. Jessica 


173 


Trombley. Adrienne 


65, 207 


Wallace. Julianna 


173 


Trowbndge, Rachel 


224 


Wallace. Kevin 


95. 208 


Tnieworlhy. Laurel 


172 


Wallace. Lindsey 


225 


Tuben. Mark 


224 


Wallace. Nene 


173 


Tucker. Carrie 


172 


Waller. Delonle 


73. 192 


Tucker. Kassie 


207 


Wallinger, Caroline 


173 


Turkelson. Chnstina 


207 


Walsh, Bnan 


63 


TumbuU. Rebecca 


87, 111, 11.1,2 


24 Walsh. Chnstina 


63. 225 


Turner, Melissa 


2117 


Walsh. Kelly 


208 


Tuttle. Brandi 


191 


Walsh, Sean 


173 


Twigg, Chelsei 


207 


Walters. Gabriel 


225 


Twining, Stephanie 


85, 191 


Walthall. Kristen 


225 


Twomey, Meghan 


172 


Wample. Chnstina 


120, 173 






Wamsley, Kathenne 


192 


UU 




Wamsley. Katie 


77 




Wang. Yuan- Yuan 


192 






Waple, KriSta 


192 






Warchol. Patnck 


192 


Uebelhor. Christopher 


20H 


Ward. Carol 


225 


Uhrovic.Jill 


71.208 


Warder. Mary 


208 


Ulmer, Caitlin 


172 


Wame. Monica 


225 


Ulmer, Jessica 


191 


Warner. Michael 


208 


Ulnch, Ryan 


79. 191 


Warner, Richard 


257 


Ungerer. Rachel 


95. 224 


Warren. Jennifer 


208 


Usener. Heather 


224 


Warren. Tiffany 


225 


Uyar, Dan 


90.91 


Warrener. Corinne 


225 


Uyar. Daniel 


208 


Waters, Jennifer 
Watkins, Stephen 


59 


V 

V 




Watson. Renee 


208 




Watts. Kathryn 


192 






Waugh, Enn 


208 






Weber. Kathenne 


173 






Weber. Lynnc 


225 


Vaccaro. Rachel 


69. 208 


Webster. Marcy 


238 


Vaccaro. Rebecca 


69. 172 


Webster. Mary 


208 


Valdes-Dapena. Viclona 


224 


Wedding. Cara 


192 


Valentine. Katherine 


208 


Wedge. Carly 


225 


Valeyko. Julie 


224 


Weimert. Enn 


208 


Valle. Lauren 


224 


Weinbaum. Daniel 


208 


Valluzzo. Katya 


224 


Weinhold. Richard 


192 


VanHook, Stephanie 


208 


Weishar. Paul 


208 


Van Til. Claire 


65 


Welch. Amber 


192 


Van, Sovany 


224 


Weller. Matthew 


192 


Vander. Cynthia Berg 


257 


Wellington. Marie 


257 


Vanderberg, Cindy 


92 


Wellner. Matt 


97 


VanDeWeert, Tammi 


191 


Wells. Amina 


173 


VanReuth. Danah 


191 


Wells, Jessica 


225 


Vam-Jacobe. Pauline 


225 


Welz, Matthew 


225 


Vasey, Craig 


257 


Wenger, Knsten 


208 


Vasil. Nicole 


208 


Wentz. Sarah 


173 


Vaswani. Sameer 


208 


Wenzel. Steve 


91 


Vega. Dominique 


208 


Wenzel. Steven 


225 


Velez. Hector 


225 


Werner. Emily 


208 


Vemieulen. Joshua 


191 


Wesley, Sarah 


173 


Vernon. Courtney 


192 


Wesner, Franz-Jose 


95. 192 


Versace. David 


192 


West. Alana 


95. 225 


Vi. Kathy 


208 


West. Alex 


95 


Villaronga, Shenie 


208 


West. Alexander 


225 


Villegas. Valene 


208 


West. David 


225 


Vitolo. Lisa 


63. 192 


Wester. Eric 


192 


Vizzier. Alexandra 


208 


Westfall. Matthew 


192 


Vogler. Chase 


79. 208 


Westhafer, Krystle 


208 


Vogler, Lindsay 


172 


Withers. Joshua 


174 


Von. Jessica Bargen 


65 


Witthoefft. Pamela 


226 


Vose. Tyler 


172 


Wivell, Clinton 


192 


Voth. David 


192 


Wnek, Knstin 


174 


Voyack. Michael 


208 







^ 



Wadsworth. Meredith 
Waggener. Jessica 
Wagner. Elizabeth 
Wainwright, Katherine 
Wais. Devin 
Wakefield. Apnl 
Wakefield. Bianca 
Walden. Laura 
Waldrop, Larry 
Walker. Bndgerte 
Walker, Joeann 
Walker. Layton 



291 



Woglom, Abigail 
Wold. Marjonc 
Wolfe. Cara 
Wood, Erin 
Wood. Rodrick 
Wood, Sara 
Wood, Sarah 
Woodall. Emily 
Woodard. Andrew 
Woodhull. Sicvcn 
Woodie, Sara 
Woods, Andrea 
Woods, Carly 
Woods, Kimbcrly 
Woodwell, Grant 
Worcesler, Jennifer 
Worden, Sarah 
Workman, Victoria 
Worrell. Mary 
Worthey, Jonathan 
Wright. Andrew 
Wright, David 
Wright, Elizabeth 
Wright. Heather 
Wnghl. Kingsley 
WriL-hl, Rohbic 



Wu 



W 



Yarboro. Martha 


226 


Yarringlon. Debbie 


248 


Yesuf, Amal 


208 


Yolango, Regina 


226 


Yolles. Julia 


192 


Yonce. Jonathan 


208 


Yoon, Katherine 


192 


Yorzinski, Sharon 


192 


Yost, Deanna 


226 


Youns. Elizabeth 


192 


Young. Justin 


226 


Young, Stephanie 


192 


Yowell, Lea 


208 


Yu, Un 


175 


Yu, Peter 


208 


Yudin, Mary 


257 


Yudowilch, Dustin 


63. 95. 208 


Yuenger, Megan 


87. 226 






Zahn. Julia 


226 


Zaidman. Marsha 


257 


Zaman, Sanjana 
Zambanini, Jason 


226 
209 


Zarilsky. Lisa 
Zaweski. David 


175 
95. ] 75 


Zbell. Andrea 


209 


Zbell. Dawn 


175 


Zdanowicz. Ryan 
Zechman. Emily 


81,226 
99. 226 


Zedonek, David 


119.226 


Zelenak. Kathryn 
Zezula. Marie 


9,1. 209 
99. 192 


Ziegler. Daniel 
Zimmerman. Justin 


226 

108. 209 


Zinky, Riehard 


2(19 


Zirkle, Elizabedi 


175 


Zoebelein, Jennifer 


209 


Zorich, Crystal 
Zotten Linda 


88 
226 


Zuehmvski. Kacy 


192 



292 



Index. 




Index 293 



lOplI 



aotes '• coiophoa < editors' notes ■^" colophun * editors" notes * eoiophon * editor's no 



CoCojjfi 



on 



The 2002 Battlefield Volume 89 is printed by Taylor Publishing Company, 1550 Mockingbird Lane, Dallas, TX 
25235. 

The Battlefield has a press run of 2400 copies with 296 pages of 80# matte stock. Students completed pages on a 
Mac with Pagemaker 6.5 and Photoshop 6.5. Students also scanned photographs with a HP Scanjet 7400c flat bed/slide 
scanner. 

Students created original text for each of the pages, with all copy set in Times New Roman in 10 pt and all captions 
in Times New Roman in 8 pt. Headlines varied from section to section. 

The staff sold senior ads to parents, with an eighth of a page costing $50, a quarter of a page costing $75 and a half 
page costing $150. All parents received notification of this opportunity through fall mailmgs. 

The Battlefield photography staff took all candid photographs for this publication, unless otherwise marked. Can- 
did Color Photography took the senior portraits, with Kurt Araujo handling all arrangements and contact with the staff. 
Candid Color Photography, 11010 Bacon Race Road, Woodbridge, VA 22192. Phone: (703) 590-0187 / Fax: (703) 590- 
8221. 

Copies of the Battlefield are free to students at the time of release. Funding comes from comprehensive fees and 
ad sales. 

Qncjuiries regarding tfiejJuSfication can 9e directed to: 

'BatttefieCd office 

Seacoiieck Q^aCC, 'Room 107 

1301 Coffege %ve. 

TredericksSurg, VA 22401 

Thone: (540) 654-1132 

year^ook&mwc.edu. 



each other's sentences... "That 



fh^ 'Dana 'M. 'Boehmcke Thotoqraplnj 'Zditor «d> 

This has been one of the most eventful years out my four at MWC. The events of September 1 l^h have put things in perspective with 
regards to what is important. "What ifs?" and "could have," "should have," "would have" are eliminated when such a poignant reminder as 9-11 
tells us to live everyday to the fullest. 

There are so many 1 want to thank, for making my time at MWC the fullest it could be... no regrets... 
First off ..Kat - four years as roommates and we are STILL not sick of each other We definitely can tinisl 
guy .. .whose name starts with a W. . .CLIFF!" And even when we are talk- 
ing about the complete wrong thing we still know what's going on... "1 
think there was Rufus in that drink." We've been through a ton, waiting for 
the 3 bangs on the wall from Graeme, haunted silverware at Sammy T 's, 
wombat caves, California boyz, too many guys named Mike, walks to the 
"health food store", Tuesdays at J.Brian's, one too many theme parties, sum- 
mer parties, vacations in the Bahamas, crazy parents, crazy siblings, 
Snicole...damn girl why didn't you graduate with us? 1 feel like I have 
known you forever Charlotte Street treated us well even if there were na- 
ked ex-boyfriends streaking, strangers telling me they live in your room, 
that mysterious milky way blob on your mirror, stalkers in the shower, fresh- 
man girls ripping off our blinds and Craver as our 5th roommate. Thank 
you for always being there for me! 1 hope the new Charlotte girls have just 
as much fun as we did. 
Katrina...l am very glad that we have become friends. Who knew that by living across the hall from each other in Marshall that we'd be 
roommates for the next 2 years? Thank you for always listening and cooking great food. Chase, I don't even know where to start. I can't even 
remember the boy I disliked so much freshman year This has been an amazing 2 years and I know we have so many more to look forward to. 
Thank you for being patient and understanding with me when I am crazy. Finally, Ryan... You are the best! We have had a fantasdc 2 years on 
staff together After all the crisis' this year, this book is one beautiful thing. 





294 '■ Colophon | 



oiopiion ■^ editors notes ^ coiophoa * eduors aoic^ • cuiupiiOii • cu-rtc 



.Editors' Notes. 



r^ 



'Ryan 'Z. 'Bwieiqfi 'Zditor-'ln-Chicf 



-^ 



iST^ 



As I sit here and reflect back on four amazing years. 1 liave a liard time believing it's all over. So many memories and so many great 
times run through my mind. Although three years on the staff has tried my patience, deprived me of many hours of sleep and demanded long 
hours of tedious work, my book is nearly done and the time draws nearer for me to leave everything behind. Law school awaits and Pm off to 
more hard work and late night hours! To my staff - thanks for hanging in there 
through so many ups and downs this year. Everything that could go wrong, did. but 
you girls hung in there until the end. Good luck next year! Kelly and Kendra - you 
two will produce an amazing book next year. I have confidence in you! To the 
Adams St. girls (and Steff) - what would I have done without you? Past and present 

- you all loved me and listened to me through it all - you girls are irreplaceable! I'll 
miss you! To Bri - you are the love of my life. Through those 3 am "nights" you 
kept me company, bringing me hot chocolate and neck massages. You even tackled 
the never-ending task of placing all of those id photos. I could never thank you 
enough for everything you've done for me. All my love forever, baby! Morn, Dad 

- no law school yearbook... I promise! You two are the most amazing parents in the 
world. Through the stress and the tears, you always understood and offered all of 
your support. Thanks for loving me always, even when 1 know it hasn't been easy! 
Dana (aka"D") - If I had to name the best thing that came out of this entire experi- 
ence, it would be your friendship. The hard work always seemed more bearable 
with you there. The yearbook room seemed to be our home there for a while! New 
Orleans and Manahattan held so many fun memories for me. Always remember - if 
you need a shopping partner. I'm only a few states away! Please keep in touch! To 
everyone else (Tami. Kurt. Ellen. Barry. George) - thank you for all of your advice, 
support and help. I couldn't have done it without you! Please know that if any of 
you every need anything at all. I'm always only a phone call away! 






'Yyicr L. Vosc 'ThoToqraphcr <*d^ 

These are my two brothers. Jacob and Nicholas Vose. They mean more to me than anything in this 
world. They live in Philipsburg. Montana, and I don't get the chance to see them as much as I 
should. When I found out that I could select any photo to put in the MWC yearbook, I thought long 
and hard about choosing an artistic photo or a photo with more meaning. I chose the latter. It is 
funny, because this photo was taken in the summer of 2000 and if you could only see this photo in 
color you can see the yellowish overcast that engulphs the photo... that is because the forest fires 
that year were out of control and it affected everything, including the color of this photo. When 
this photo was taken. Jacob was 7 years old and Nick was 5. As I write this (April 22. 2002) Nick 
just turned 7 years old on March 29 and Jacob will turn 9 on May 25. I think about you guys 
everyday and I can't wait to spend more time with you in the future. Also there are some people in 
my life whom I love very much and don't get the chance to tell them as much as I would like: 
Mom. Dad.Yalonda. Gwen. Justaz. Nan and Grandad, Grandpa Busst, Grandma Vose, Randi and 

Rico Barkell, Shayla, Trevor, M. Merker, K. Wallace, Stina, Emily, Nicole and all of my other family and friends around the country and the 

world. Thanks. Long live Canada! 

rb^ 'Alana West ■Tlwtograpfier °^ 

Thanks to my friends who made this year a lot of fun. "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than 
by the ones you did." "You belong among the wildflowers.... You belong on a boat out a sea.,.. Sail away. Kill off the hours.... You belong 
somewhere you feel free." -Tom Petty 




Edtrs' Notes 



Ending. 




The 2002 Battlefield is dedicated to the memory of Dr. J. Christopher "Topher" Bill, 
beloved psychology professor, mentor and friend to all who knew him. 

His legacy lives on through the lives he touched and 
the college will forever remain a better place because of his presence. 

'Dr. J. Christopher "Tojiher" 'Biff 
September 30, 1044 - T)eeember 3, 2001. 



296 Ending