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Full text of "Battlefield, 2010"

THE BATTLEFIELD 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witin funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/battlefield201097univ 




University of Mary Washington 

Battlefield Yearbook 2010 
Volume 97 

Students: 

College of Arts and Sciences: 4.000 

College of Graduate and Professional Studies: LOOO 

Faculty & Staff: 400 



1301 College Avenue 
"rksburg, VA 22401 
Frione: (540) 654-1000 
htti- ^www.umw.edu 



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College--The Best Time of Your Life 



Last August, over 900 eager young freshman stepped onto the grounds of UMW with an array of emotions 
and expectations. Many wondered what college would bring: New friends, interesting classes, study abroad 
opportunities, toga parties. ..The list goes on. Despite the nervous persona of many freshmen entering a new 
environment, orientation provided students with fun and engaging opportunities to meet their fellow peers. 
The first week, all students met with their orientation groups, toured the campus, and participated in the 
orientation carnival. Students also became familiar with many community values, including the widely- 
respected Honor Code. The ice cream social hosted by President Judy Hample at Brompton remained a 
favorite among students. In addition, students participated in diversity training, a Glow-Zone Dance party, 
and students pledged to remain true to the honor code during the UMW Honor Convocation. Perhaps the 
wise quotes of the ancients say it all: "College is a fountain of knowledge and students are there to 
drink," "College is the best time of your life." All in all, college remains an exciting adventure incoming 
students happily plunge into. 




Club Carnival 





Boasting over 100 student-led organizations, the 
OSACS-sponsored Club Carnival gives students 
new and old alike the chance to become more 
involved on campus. With opportunities ranging 
from dance and cultural clubs to volunteering to 
intramural sports, it seems there is something to 
fit the interests of all students. As part of NSO 
week. Club Carnival gives upperclassmen the 
chance to recruit and bond with both freshmen 
and fellow upperclassmen who may have missed 
their chance in previous years. Student leaders 
set up posters, trophies, and even performed 
demonstrations to bring in new members. The 
carnival is open to all clubs registered through 
OSACS. While students get the opportunity to 
find fun ways to fill their time, the carnival is 
also inevitably laden with free food, candy, and 
cups to entice students to sign up. Though many 
students only commit to a few clubs following 
the carnival, it is a well-known fact that no 
matter how many clubs you sign up for, the e- 
mails following Club Carnival will continue to 
arrive long past college days. The carnival 
always promises to be one of the most exciting 
NSO week events, bringing the UMW 
community together to show off skills and 
interests. 



By: Anne Elder and Katelynn Monti 

What's a better way to ease the anxieties 
of the first day of class than to enjoy free 
food and engage in relaxing conversation? 
On August 24th, student leaders 
representing many of UMW's clubs came 
out to chat with fellow students and enjoy 
some free barbecue on Ball Circle. The 
event was planned as a way for new 
students to meet leadership and find 
interesting clubs, and while it was 
attended by more upperclassmen than 




freshmen, all attendees enjoyed 
getting to know their classmates and 
fellow leaders. The event was 
sponsored by SGA and OSACS as 
part of Connections Week, and 
provided an informal setting to 
connect the student body with the 
leaders of a wide range of clubs, 
giving them a chance to ask 
questions, discuss clubs, and enjoy a 
hamburger or two on a hot summer 
day. 





Meet the Lead 




Rocktol^rtes 



By: Kelsey Leonard 

On October 2, this year's 
Rocktoberfest welcomed 
We the Kings to Ball 
Circle. The members of 
the up and coming band 
include Travis Clark, lead 
vocalist; Hunter Thomsen, 
ead guitarist; Drew 
Thomsen, bass; and Danny 
Duncan, drums. Travis 
Clark blew the audience 
away with his voice, with 
many students unable to 
keep their feet still as the 
lyrics hit them. Many 
students were up front 
dancing and singing along 
to the music. "Check Yes 
Juliet," one of their most 
popular songs, was played 
as well as many others. 




Along with the band, 
Allman's Bar-B-Que 
provided free food for 
everyone to enjoy. Ball 
Circle was packed with 
students who came out to 
have fun with friends and 
enjoy the free concert and 
food. The annual event was 
co-hosted by Giant and 
Class Council. 
Rocktoberfest was a day to 
remember for UMW 
students thanks to We the 
Kings and hard work from 
Giant and Class Counci 
officers. 



Breast Cancer Awareness 

Ha-Ha's for Ta-Ta's and "Dig Pink" Volleyball Game 








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By: Anne Elder 

Started in 2008, this years second annual 
"Haha's for Tata's" brought laughs to the 
Underground while fundraising for a worthy 
cause. Seniors Brian Keys and Katie Watson 
created this event to "bring the light of comedy 
and hope to breast cancer patients," Watson said. 
The event raised over $300 this year, which was 
matched by breast cancer survivors close to Katie 
Watson. The money raised was donated to the 
Breast Cancer Network of Strength. 

The comedians who brought laughs to the 
stage were senior Katie O'Connor, non-student 
Anthony Coleman, senior Mike Issacson, junior 
Misak Artinian, senior Brian Keys, and 
sophomore Chris Velucci. Watson and Keys 
have passed the torch to Velucci for the coming 
years, "to carry on the tradition of UMW student 
comedy and awareness for a worthy cause," 
Watson said. 

In addition to comical awareness at the 
Underground, the women's volleyball team 
supported breast cancer awareness at their "Dig 
Pink" match in October. This event is held 
annually at college and high school matches, 
raising funds as well as promoting breast health 
education. The UMW team hoped to raise $2000 
during their match against North Carolina 
Wesleyan College. Spectators donated funds and 
wore pink as they cheered the girls on. At the 
end of the night, the girls raised over $ 1 200 for 
the Dig Pink initiative. 






Laughs, Spikes 
Bring Hoi^e J 





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Homeco ming 




Once an Eagle, Always an Eagle 



On the weekend of October 17, Homecoming fever hit the students of UMW. With alumni from 
multiple years visiting the campus for the annual Alumni Tent Party, the students took to the 
Battlegrounds to watch the sports teams face off against fierce rivals while encouraging them with 
"UMW EAGLES" spirit. OSACS sponsored a Homecoming Carnival held indoors this year due to a 
particularly rainy week, but this did not stop the spirit from coming out. Students raced each other 
through obstacle courses, bought t-shirts, received free personalized license plates, cups, and foam 
fingers, played carnival games, including the ever-favorite Twister, and ate scrumptious barbecue in 
front of the Great Hall. Rapper Talib Kweli held a fun-filled concert on Saturday night after the 
games. His personable and entertaining performance packed the seats of Dodd Auditorium, with the 
hit "Get 'Em High" getting the audience up and moving around. While the traditional fireworks were 
canceled due to the stormy weather, students didn't let the rain damper their moods and continued 
with their festivities. The fireworks were rescheduled for a few days later. 







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By: Paulina Kosturos 

What could be better than watching your peers 
dress in wacky costumes, dance badly, and sing to 
their favorite songs on stage? Nothing compares! 
Originally scheduled for Homecoming week, the 
annual Lip Sync competition is a great UMW 
tradition. For this exciting event, participating 
students paid a ten dollar deposit and formed 
teams. Next, they created unique dance routines to 
their favorite songs while lip syncing in front of a 
large audience. The stakes remained high as 
talented acts competed for a cash prize. 
Competitors performed routines to songs ranging 
from "I'll Make a Man out of You" from Mulan, to 
"I'm on a Boat", from Saturday Night Live. 



"I did it because it's really fun, and I like 
getting up in front of a huge group of people 
and doing ridiculous stuff to make them 
laugh," sophomore Mary Cait Nannery said. 

Freshman Julia Pannewitz shared her 
enthusiasm. 

"My floor in Custis did 'I'll Make a Man 
Out of You' from Mulan. It was great, 
considering we came up with the routine the 
night before. My favorite part was that we 
reversed the roles— a girl was Shang and a 
boy was Mulan." 

One thing remains clear: Next year's Lip 
Sync will definitely bring more exciting 
routines and gut-busting entertainment to 
Dodd Auditorium. 



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Trick or treat. 



By: Katelynn Monti 

Known in previous years as 
'Haunted Helpers', this 
year's annual fall festival 
organized and run by 
COAR and its gracious 
volunteers was held on 
October 25th from 1-5 PM 
for children who live in 
the Fredericksburg area. 
This year the event was 
called 'Pumpkin Palooza'. 
Children came to campus 
dressed in their Halloween 
costumes and safely trick- 
or-treated around the 
different dorms at UMW 
that had been decorated by 
students in collaboration 
with the Association of 
Residence Halls. This 
year's award for the best 
decorated dorm went to 



Virginia Hall. Aside from 
getting lots of candy, there 
was also an abundance of 
crafts and games waiting 
for the trick-or-treaters in 
the Great Hall, each 
sponsored by a different 
club. Throughout the day 
around a hundred and 
seventy-five guests came, 
including the Vice 
President of Student 
Affairs Doug Searcy and 
his children. This event is 
one of the many ways 
COAR reaches out to the 
community, and surely one 
of the most loved event for 
children of all ages. 



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By: Anne Elder 

Every Halloween, Class Council brings 
something frightful to the Great Hall and 
this year was no exception. Aiding their 
haunting was DJ Kyle Meagher from the 
band The Beetkeepers, as well as palm 
readings and tarot cards. Participants were 
encouraged to keep the Halloween 
tradition alive by arriving in costume, with 
prizes awarded for the most creative attire. 
Advertised as "the BEST HALLOWEEN 




PARTY ON CAMPUS," it left 
nothing for students to worry about, 
making sure to incorporate some free 
candy into the celebration. Class 
Council continues to spook students 
with their Halloween spirit and fun 
and games to entice even the most 
devilish creature of the night. 





Hallowee 




Mr. UN 




By: Paulina Kosturos 

This year, eighteen sexy men 
representing every corner of 
the campus strutted their stuff 
in the annual Mr. UMW 
Pageant. Hosted by the 
Association of Residence 
Halls, the Mr. UMW Pageant 
contained a multitude of 
surprises, including dancing 
men, a Speedo-wearing 
saxophone player, and even a 
surprise appearance by last 
year's Mr. UMW, Anders 
Coe. Critiqued by a strict 
panel of judges, competitors 
put their abilities to the test. 
In desperate pursuit of the 
coveted Mr. UMW crown, 
contestants astounded the 
crowd with their raging style 
during the formal and 
sporting wear portions of the 
competition. In addition, 
contestants performed a 
riveting group 



dance to a variety of songs 
including "Single Ladies" and 
"Natural Woman", while 
wearing dresses and spandex. 
Competitors also got the 
chance to showcase a unique 
talent. After an intense 
elimination round, the judges 
chose Mr. Mason, Stuart 
Smith; Mr. Custis, Andrew 
Garofolo; and Mr. Bushnell, 
Chris Vellucci as the three 
finalists. As a part of the final 
round of judging, the three 
finalists answered a series of 
questions. After a very 
difficult decision, judges 
crowned Chris Vellucci the 
new Mr. UMW. 
Congratulations to all the 
competitors! 



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By: Anne Elder 

At the end of every semester as students are 
cracking down on studying for finals, the crew 
from Dining Services rides up on their white 
horse with the one thing no poor college student 
can resist— free food. 

Not only do students get the opportunity to 
jump in line for french toast sticks, scrambled 
eggs, and sausage, the event holds two raffles 
throughout the night. Winning a prize in a very 
crowded Seacobeck is often the most coveted 
event of the night. 

While the prizes change each semester, they 
are usually most-wanted items, like Wii, 
RockBand. digital cameras, and iPods. There is 
a chance for 10 students to win, so many students 
linger after polishing the syrup off their plate to 
see if they will be the one to take home a prize. 

If prizes and free food aren't enough, students 
can revel in the fact that the people serving them 
include Dean of Student Life Cedric Rucker, 
Director of Judicial Affairs and Community 
Responsibility Ray Tuttle, and Director of 
Student Activities Joe Mollo. 

The administrators are met by student 
volunteers and employees, who all offer food 
with delight to their peers. 

Midnight breakfast at Seacobeck wraps lines 
around the building longer than any other dining 
event. Students camp outside waiting to be 
allowed in the warm, inviting environment that 
calms them down in the middle of cramming for 
exams. After free food and coffee, the studying 
goes back into full throttle, leaving both minds 
and stomachs full for another semester. 



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By: Anne Elder 

While some students may sleep in on their 
day off in January, many students have 
started to see Martin Luther King Jr. Day 
as an opportunity to reach out to the 
campus as well as the Fredericksburg 
community through volunteer projects, 
performances, and speeches to mark the 
occasion. The activities, co-sponsored by 
OSACS and the James Farmer 
Multicultural Center, bring students 
together to embrace diversity and live up 




to the dream held by Dr. King. This 
year, the celebration entailed 
community service with COAR, with 
many sports teams and clubs 
participating in the service together. 
The week of celebration also 
included speeches in front of the 
James Farmer bust on Campus Walk 
and speaker events where all of the 
Fredericksburg community could 
gather and embrace diversity. 





Martin Luther King Jr. D 




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enlor Countdown 




Remembering the Good Times 



Last January, seniors gussied up, sporting formal dresses and suits, all in 
celebration of Senior Countdown. Hosted by Class Council, Senior Countdown 
marked one hundred days until graduation. Seniors participated in casino night, 
competing for over three thousand dollars in prizes and free trinkets. Senior 
Countdown enabled seniors to win awesome prizes, and share some final memories 
with friends and some wonderful faculty including Dean Rucker and Joe Mollo. The 
event remains the culmination of four years of hard work and dedication at UMW. 
Therefore, Senior Countdown not only marked the final days of college, it was a 
milestone of the obstacles overcome, exams passed, and long all-nighters 
completed. Overall, the night was filled with good friends, games, and memories 
frozen in time. 




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Drag Show 




By: Paulina Kosturos 

Where else are you going to find bearded 
ladies and Lady Gaga impersonators dancing to 
songs such as "Jizz in my Pants" or "Pop"? 
PRISM'S Annual Drag Show, of course! This 
past year, PRISM hosted UMW's annual drag 
show, with the exciting "Under the Sea" theme. 
Hosted by Fritz Reuter, the show thrilled viewers 
with dazzling performances by the boy bands 
"Dictation" and "Penie". In addition, the drag 
show featured spectacular dance numbers by 
"Gady Lala", mermaid-clad men, and various 
others. Dean Rucker, Kevin McCluskey, Mara 
Scanlon, Gary Richards, and Danny Tweedy 
served as judges for the competition. 

Freshman Jeanette Hodge, member of the 
group "Penie," recounts her experience on 
stage, "We loved being on stage and seeing how 
well the crowd responded to us. It was so much 
fun! Shanita started the choreography a couple 
days beforehand. Our wardrobe took a little bit 
more effort though. We borrowed stuff from our 
friends and dads, bought men's boxers and 
dougies (fitted hats) and just went over the top 
with a sharpie marker to make tattoos! We got 
really into it and had such a great time ! " 

While the performers took breaks, the 
audience remained eligible to participate in 
interactive games such as "keep your sea 
cucumber safe," and a drag walk-off. By the end 
of the performances, the judges tallied up the 
scores and dubbed "Dictation" as the winner of 
the competition. Overall, the night proved a great 




i Ne^ Orleans Relief 




Bringing Hope and Support 



While most Mary Washington students spent spring break relaxing after a week of midterms, the brothers 
of Psi Upsilon fraternity traveled down to New Orleans along with members of the Disaster Relief Club to 
lend a hand to communities that were devastated by Hurricane Katrina. They spent their time in the Lower 
Ninth Ward, repairing houses and reaffirming their brother dedication to philanthrop> . The Disaster Relief 
Club was founded to bring aid to areas affected by natural disasters, making New Orleans an ob\ious trip 
after the huiricane. During the week, the team was able to drywall houses and construct irrigation systems 
to control future rain conditions in the area. The Lower Ninth Ward saw the greatest de\astation after 
Hurricane Katrina. drawing in volunteers from all over the country including the dedicated team from 
Mary Washington. 




By: Anne Elder 



On Friday, Feb. 5, the "snowpocalypse" of 2010 
began, as classes were canceled and flurries tainted 
the blistering air. Students took advantage of the 
unexpected sequel to their Winter breaks, having 
snowball fights and sledding down Trench 
"Suicide" Hill. 

Snow continued through the night of the 5th. 
burying Mary Washington under two feet of white 
powder. Residence Life recommended to stay 
indoors to avoid falling trees and slippery 
walkways. The record-breaking blizzard put a 
hamper on the administration for several days, 
causing classes to be canceled the following 
Monday, Feb. 8, with night classes on Tuesday, 
Feb. 9 canceled as well. 



When the skies seemed clear and 
commuters thought it was safe to return to 
our beloved campus, another snow started, 
canceling classes on Wednesday, Feb. 10. 

While the blizzard may have set 
professors back on their syllabi and students 
on their studies, the entire Mary Washington 
community will always remember the two 
weeks when finding cars took hours, driving 
was only possible with four-wheel drive, and 
snowmen and igloos were the newest 
additions to the UMW construction projects. 




photo by: STEPHANIE WATKINS 






photo by: ANNE ELDER 





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photo by: VICKY HUDSPETH 





AltemafTve Spring Break 





A fulfilling way to relax 



While most students head home for spring break or go on vacations, this group of students made it 
their mission to make an impact on people's lives during their spring break and head to Bucknell. 
Florida and Albany. Georgia for a week of service and fun. Sponsored by COAR. the students 
helped build houses while cultivating leadership, teamwork, and organizational skills. While the 
experience may only last a week, students left with a new outlook on life as well as many skills 
developed over the week. Leaving the typical spring break trips behind, these students build 
together as a community, while helping rebuild communities in need. 



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Junior Ring 
Week 




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By: Michelle Esch 

Every year in Mid-March, 
the Juniors band together 
and participate in the 
sacred Junior Ring V\leek 
traditions. Started many 
moons ago when UMW 
was still Mary Washington 
College, the Juniors are 
put through a weel< of 
pranks from the graduating 
Seniors. Pranks include 
saran wrap over private 
toilets, duct-taped doors, 
cars filled with balloons, 
balloons tied onto SUV 
roof racks, shaving cream 
"incidents," and many 
many more. 

The week is not just filled 
with pranking, the Class 
Council brings a wide 
variety of entertainment to 
campus, just for the 
Juniors to enjoy. Starting 
the week with a Scavenc 
Hunt, the Class Council 



awarded prizes to the most 
creative and together 
teams. Mid-week a 
hypnotist was brought into 
GW Hall and proceeded to 
hypnotize over thirteen 
Juniors causing the crowd 
to fall into hysterics at their 
antics. 

The final two days of 
Junior Ring Week are the 
most sough after: the 
Junior Ring Ceremony 
where the Juniors receive 
their class rings and the 
Junior Ring Dance, a night 
filled with dancing and 
music in the Great Hall. 

"Got Pranks?" 



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By: Paulina Kosturos 

This past February, 
members of the Historic 
Preservation Club 
hosted their annual 
Victorian Ball. The ball 
gave students the 
exciting opportunity to 
dress in period clothes 
and listen to live music. 
In the Victorian era, 
people gathered at 
parties to perform 
traditional dances, drink, 
and socialize. The 
Historic Preservation 
Club desired to 
showcase this unique 
world. Students and 
members of the 
Fredericksburg 
community gathered in 
Lee Hall to learn specific 
Victorian dances. 



Participants enjoyed 
eating, chatting with 
friends, and spending an 
evening lost in the 
nineteenth century. 
Around thirty-five 
couples and a handful of 
single people appeared 
in costume and danced 
the night away. Victorian 
Ball Chair, Jessica Stem, 
and many volunteers 
dedicated their time and 
effort to make this 
celebration a reality. 
While the preparations 
proved tedious, the ball 
proved a great success. 
No doubt Victorian era 

lovefs.are.QreRtiy 

anftcipating next year's 






Family 
Weekend 



By: Michelle Esch 

Every year, parents invade the UMW campus 
during Family Weekend. This past year was no 
exception. The weekend of September 25 
through 27 hosted many scheduled events 
including concerts, a 5K run and Civil War 
walking tours. Highlighting the weekend were 
four talks by professors who had books published 
within the last year: Claudia Emerson, Bulent 
Atalay, William B. Crawley Jr.. and Steve 
Watkins. 

Other events included a performance by the 
Eagle Pipe Band which has won awards at the 
Virginia and Ohio Scottish Games and the 
Richmond Highland Games. The campus Civil 
War walking tours were led by the Historic 
Preservation Club. Also, the James Monroe 
Museum hosted its 20th annual Fredericksburg 
Welsh Festival. 

214 registrants representing six different states 
ran in the annual 5K Run. The course traveled 
through the heart of the UMW campus and into 
the surrounding neighborhoods. Matt Gordon 
was the top finisher followed by twins Philip and 
Andrew (student) Kada. The top female finishers 
(all students) included Tara McFarland. Lynette 
Humphries, and Colleen Hopkins. In addition to 
the great time had by the runners lots of shoes 
were collected for the One World Running 
organization which collects shoes and sends them 
to Third World Countries. 




By: Anne Elder 

Elaborate costumes, lively bands and a 
plethora of tasty food started the day for 
the annual Multicultural Fair, an event 
which typically brings around 3,000 to 
4,000 people to campus. Students and the 
Fredericksburg community had the 
opportunity to watch the Latin Dance Club 
and the Eagle Bhangras, along with 
several other entertaining acts. People 
also flocked to the vendors strung along 
Campus Walk, selling tapestries, scarves, 




jewelry, musical instruments, as well 
as much more. The James Farmer 
Multicultural Center and 
Multicultural Student Affairs 
sponsored the fair, collaborating with 
many student clubs to make this year 
another success. Sunshine also made 
a visible appearance at the fair, 
making the soft-serve ice cream an 
even better treat at one of the most 
popular events of the year. 




iP»aci^iagiBnaMi 




Multicultural ?k 




Beak Week 




Bringing Out the Blue, Gray and Eagle Pride' 



UMW wasn't short on school spirit this April, with the SGA sponsored "Beak Week" to bring out 
everyone's Eagle pride. The week started with an outdoor concert and a barbecue and went on to include a 
drive-in movie on Ball Circle, "Drench the Bench", and a grand finale of a barbecue, fireworks, and a concert 
at the Rugby Fields. While rain may have dampened the plans of a bonfire. Beak Week was still seen as a 
success to show off school spirit for a week. There are hopes that the SGA will make this an annual e\ ent 
which has been described as a week similar to Homecoming but without the anticipation of a game at the end 
of the week. Students unified all week long to show their school spirit and dunk a classmate or two in ihc 
process. 

In addition to the various spirit events, the SGA turned Beak Week into a charity event, raising mone\ for 
the Charity Water organization everyday of the week. The proceeds from the donations help gi\ e clean w aier 
to people currently living with only dirty water. By doing this, the SGA showed the UMW community that 
not only do they care about the school, but the world as well. 




"Wine-ing 



By: Anne Elder 

Early Saturday mornings are 
rarely seen by most students 
until spring rolls around, 
when it becomes time to buy 
tickets for the Spring Formal. 
Every year, students 
anxiously wait in line in the 
campus center, hoping to 
purchase one of the coveted 
tickets. This year was no 
exception, with the tradition 
being held at Potomac Point 
Winery in Stafford County. 
Students gathered behind 
George Washington Hall to 
meet the bus on April 16, 
ready to celebrate and have 
fun with friends. The 
evening included an outdoor 
cocktail hour, dinner, 
dancing, the opportunity to 
take a guided tour of the 
winery and a wine tasting. 



Students had access to a cash 
bar and heavy hors d'oeuvres 
throughout the evening and 
were also allowed to explore 
the property and walk 
through the vineyard 
themselves. Spring Formal is 
held annually to celebrate the 
end of the school year and is 
sponsored by Class Council. 
This year. 250 students were 
able to enjoy a night of wine, 
dancing and final goodbyes 
before the end of school, 
deeming the tradition a 
success once again. 





students Helping Honduras 




By: Virginia Osella 



Students Helping Honduras started off the 2009- 
10 year with almost 100 students at their first 
meeting. SHH members hosted their 3rd annual 
poker tournament with $ 1 ,000 in prizes in 
November to raise money for their winter trip. 
About 50 UMW students went on service trips to 
Honduras throughout the school year. The focus 
of the spring semester was to raise money for the 
Education and Empowerment Fund to help more 
than 200 kids stay and succeed in school. Club 
members hosted small events in preparation for 
the 2nd Annual Volleyball Tournament where 
hundreds of students, friends, and family 
watched and participated. The tournament 
consisted of 25 teams and the final two teams, 
the "CCM Sanctifiers" and "Can You Dig It", 
competed for the championship title. The 
champions, "Can You Dig It", received custom 
tournament jerseys. The UMW Chapter raised 
$17,400 for the Education and Empowerment 
Fund while the whole organization raised 
$116,700. 





From Vo 
to Missio 




•^iudeat^ Helping Hf>n 

53 b buy back I 





By: Anne Elder 

Every year when spring is in the air and 
finals loom in the near future, a tradition 
comes along to distract students from their 
worries and focus solely on two things- 
free T-shirts and class competition. The 
Goats, this year the classes of 2010 and 
2012, and the Devils, the classes of 201 1 
and 2013, were all drawn together to Ball 
Circle to jump on moon bounces, climb 
"walls" and play a trickier, inflatable 
version of Twister. However, the fun 
wasn't only inflatable. The event, 




sponsored by Class Council, was also 
home to a live band performance and 
free food-a staple sure to attract any 
student's attention. As always, the 
line to get the coveted Devil-Goat 
Day shirt wrapped well around Ball 
Circle, past Virginia Hall and down 
the hill to Seacobeck, proving the 
temptation of competition and fun in 
the last few weeks of school. 








Devil-Goat 




Dancin' 




Bv: Michelle Esch 



On Thursday May 6, 
UMW's Senior Week 
festivities were quickly 
winding down. The 
almost-graduates gathered 
at the Great Hall for four 
hours of reminiscing and 
dancing fun. With the grey 
and blue decorations, 
fancy dresses, sharp suits, 
and music pumping, the 
seniors danced the night 
away while drinking and 
taking numerous pictures. 

The tradition of Graduation 
Ball started some decades 
ago when the school was 
first founded and the 
tradition has never 
stopped. Students come 
back early from trips to 
Myrtle Beach and other 
such locations in order to 
start the final hour 
countdown to Graduation. 



With all of the side rooms 
open, a bartender off to the 
side for those of age, and 
food available in the Red 
Room, it was hard for 
everyone to go home in 
the wee morning hours. At 
eleven in the evening, the 
traditional UMW Grab Ball 
commemorative glasses 
were brought out by the 
Office of Student Activities 
and Community Service. 
As their final goodbye, the 
seniors crammed 
themselves in to the Great 
Hall and danced for a few 
more hours. Dean Rucker 
and Joe Mollo both took 
many pictures with 
students. 



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By; Anne Elder 

As the class of 2010 proceeded down 
Campus Walk last May, memories 
from years at UMW intertwined with 
the ever-present blue and gray spirit, 
leaving the grads with nostalgia and 
excitement as they spent their last 
few moments together as a class. 
The graduates at the undergraduate 
ceremony were addressed by UMW 
alum Daniel R. Wolfe ('84), who is 
now executive vice president of 
Worldwide Creative Operations for 




Universal Pictures. The night before 
at the graduate ceremony, retired 
Senator John H. Chichester praised 
the graduates for completing their 
master's degrees and encouraging 
their future job searches. Overall, 
UMW graduated 1,201 students last 
spring, including 240 master's 
degrees. Congratulations and good 
luck class of 2010! 








Graduatid 




In memorY of 



Christina %a\a'y>a 



1960-2010 




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November 11, 1987-;une 5, 2010 
You were way too young to leave us, 



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photo courtesy of: PAULINA 




No Pain, No Glory 



One of the many necessities on campus, the fitness center provides an excellent place to 
build muscle, play basketball, or just release some endorphines. Goolrick gym hosts a 
myriad of exorcise machines, provided to assist students in building their upper, lower. 
and/or core body strength. Goolrick hosts various treadmills, jump ropes, and exorcise balls 
for those students wishing to improve their cardio workouts. Aside from exorcise machines, 
the gym maintains various dance studios, a basketball court, and a large indoor swimming 
pool. UMW sports teams such as swim and dive, basketball, volleyball, and the dance team 
utilized these spaces throughout the year. "The gym is awesome because the machines are 
all in the same area. I enjoy going there frequently," freshman Andrew Whitfield said. It's just 
as the old saying goes, "No pain, no glory," And the fitness center continues to make this 
possible! 



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By: Anne Elder 

Since the beginning of the 
school year, construction 
trucks and cranes have taken 
up residence on the north side 
of campus, leaving students 
wondering what new addition 
the administration has in store 
for them. Behind Goolrick 
Hall, hard-working 
construction teams have put 
their time and energy into the 
new Anderson Center, a two- 
story convocation center that 
is expected to seat 3,000 
people for convocation events 
and 2,000 people for sporting 
events. Currently, the largest 
space available on campus is 
Dodd Auditorium, which 
seats 1,300. The center will 
also open new opportunities 
for sporting events and will 
offer an inclement weather 
alternative for scheduled 
events on campus. 




The center will be used not 
only for events, but also for 
volleyball competitions, 
physical education classes. 
and UMW will be able to 
host the NCAA III basketball 
championships, a feat which 
was never possible with the 
Goolrick gymnasium. The 
Board of Visitors named 
Anderson Center after former 
president Bill Anderson, 
whose tenure of 23 years at 
UMW brought substantial 
growth and support to the 
intercollegiate varsity 
program at UMW. The 
center is expected to be open 
in winter 201 1. 





I 



By: Anne Elder 

Nestled safely under the halls of Seacobeck, the 
Office of Student Activities and Community 
Services is always bustling with students and 
community members, looking to get a head start 
on activities or share enthusiasm for events on 
campus. As the sponsor for all clubs on campus, 
OSACS really is the backbone of student life at 
UMW, offering several concerts, comedy acts, 
and fundraisers each month. 

This year, OSACS was highlighted with the 
grand opening of the renovated Underground, 
which allowed a venue for Bingo Nights, "Tin 
Chef" competitions, and Cheap Seats movie 
nights. 

While the office may have been busy with new 
events at the Underground, traditions on campus 
were still successful, such as orientation. 
Homecoming, Devil-Goat Day, Club Carnival, 
Senior Countdown, and the Spring Formal. 
OSACS works hard every year to make sure 
every student has something fun and safe to do 
on the weekends, while offering awesome(and 
usually free!) entertainment for students 
everyday of the week. 



By: Anne Elder 

Anyone who has ever referred to UMW as 
a suitcase school clearly hasn't walked out 
the gates to College Avenue yet. Beyond 
those gates and across the fence there lies 
a world full of bookstores, restaurants and 
the student favorite of coffee shops 
Hyperion, and that's all within a mile of 
campus! Even poor freshmen without cars 
can experience the wonder of downtown 
Fredericksburg, venturing to Capital Ale 
House with all their fellow Eagles for 




Monday's Dollar Burger Night, then 
to Carl's for a much needed sugar 
boost. However, past downtown any 
student can fmd the "secret spot" to 
swim, or the Central Park shopping 
center for the adventuresome with a 
good sense of direction. All in all, 
Fredericksburg has so much to offer 
without even crossing the city limits, 
though students have the ability to 
drive down to Richmond or up to 
Washington, D.C. for a day of fun. 




\r^!r'?v3;i!:(-» ;■,'?; 




jobs on Campus 




Working Hard for the Money 



In addition to classes, clubs and other activities, many UMW students worked jobs on campus to earn some 
extra cash. Jobs enabled students to earn money while contributing to the campus' unique social and economic 
development. Many students found jobs in Dining Services, the library, and the Writing Center. "I love 
working at the library. My supervisors and coworkers are amazing. I don't have a car so it"s very con\enient 
to work on-campus." freshman Rebecca Poole said. In addition, other students sought opportunities working 
backstage events in Dodd Auditorium. "I have to say that working at Dodd is actually very fun. Meeting all 
the cool artists is amazing. There is a common understanding that for them to do well, they need you to work 
your hardest... otherwise the show fails. Basically, working at Dodd is the best job on campus! It sure beats 
filing paperwork in some mundane office," freshman Jeremy Thompson said. Overall. UMW jobs continue to 
provide excellent career opportunities in a friendly, involved environment. 





Living a Life 



By: Anne Elder 

When the UMW Foundation 
purchased the Park & Shop in 
December 2007, students 
couldn't begin to imagine the 
progress that would be made in 
the following two years. Since 
the acquisition of the property, 
"Eagle Landing", a new student 
apartment building, has been 
constructed and is ready for 
students to move into in fall 
2010. The building will house 
624 students in 156 two- 
bedroom apartments, each fully 
equipped with granite 
countertops, stainless steel 
appliances and a ceramic 
cooktop in the kitchen, as well 
as two full baths, one for each 
bedroom. Outside the 
apartments, students can 
venture to the rotunda, rooftop 
terrace, or one of the many 
lounges found within Eagle 
Landing. 



However, the plans for 
development don't stop with 
the apartment building. Just 
next door there is a "multi- 
use" building, with a secure 
parking garage as well as 
shops and restaurants that are 
sure to become favorites for 
students. So far. Eagle 
Village is rumored to become 
home for a coffee shop, a 
Thai restaurant, a smoothie 
shop, a fast-Mexican 
restaurant, and a full service 
restaurant. As students 
anxiously await the amval of 
Eagle Village, progress 
continues to be made over the 
summer, ready to welcome 
students back in the fall. 




Renovations 1 




KOSTUROS 



! PI 



By: Paulina Kosturos 

This past year, Mary Washington 
experienced a series of dramatic building 
renovations with the hope of improving 
campus. Last fall, after months of 
construction, the new Lee Hall was proudly 
unveiled to students. The new building 
houses the bookstore, student services, and 
the Underground, to name a few of its 
attributes. Students especially favor The 
Underground as a hang-out and source of 
entertainment. Aside from serving food. The 
Underground hosted many bands and other 
fun activities like Bingo and Karaoke Nights 
throughout the year. In addition to Lee, the 
academic building of Monroe has recently 
undergone construction. Administrators plan 
to complete and unveil the building by 201 1. 
Next fall, the school plans to shut down 
Randolph, and parts of Mason residence halls 
in the hopes of improving their conditions. 
"I think the renovations are good because 
they will update the buildings. The new Lee 
Hall is convenient because everything is in 
one place. I've never been inside Monroe, but 
I'm sure it will look great!" freshman Lara 
Bellfield said. 

"I haven't seen any of them before but The 
Underground and Lee Hall have improved. 
They are assets to our campus and make 
everything look nice," freshman Katherine 
Sleyman said. 

From a school of small beginnings, Mary 
Washington's expansion and growth remains 
extremely significant, and a source of great 
pride. The school will continue to build, 
overall adding to the beauty and efficiency of 
the campus. 





photo courtesy of: PAULINA KOSTL'ROS 



Ready 



By: Paulina Kosturos 

This year, UMW hosted an array of 
talented musicians ranging from We The 
Kings to Talib Kweli. The various singers 
never failed to excite students and keep 
people dancing into the night hours. Giant 
Productions was responsible for providing 
the fun entertainment. Performers included 
Howie Day. We The Kings, Talib Kweli, 
Gym Class Heroes. Elby Brass, and more. 
A crowd favorite, Gym Class Heroes' 
eclectic fusion of rock and rap kept 
students screaming for more. Allman's 
BBQ catered the We The King's concert as 
a part of Rocktoberfest, giving students 
yet another reason to . 



come out to the show. Talib Kweli 
graced Dodd Auditorium for UMW 
Homecoming, ushering in an 
incredible performance. UMW hosted 
other notable performers in the 
springtime as well. Howie Day, 
famous for his hit song, "Collide" 
drew a considerable crowd for his 
free concert in Ball Circle. The year 
proved a great musical success! 
Furthermore, UMW will continue to 
host many more amazing performers 
in the near future. 



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photo bj/: PAULINA;*:OSTURq§ 



study Abroad 




"If you love your country--LEAVE!" 



Every year, almost 300 UMW students study abroad with either a semester or year-long program. Whether 
they leave to study language, science or history, each student returns with a renewed outlook on life and a 
greater comprehension of the world. Students are given the opportunity to study abroad with one of the many 
UMW exchange programs or any independent program of their choice. Either way. they are exposed not only 
to courses in culture, but also to daily life in their country abroad while living with host families or more 
independently in dorms or apartments. Living abroad encourages students to be immersed in a foreign culture 
while studying and traveling through a world they may not have had the chance to experience before. All 
students are encouraged to study abroad no matter what their major, with programs in Argentina. .Australia, 
the United Kingdom, France, Spain and countless other destinations around the globe. 



"Special thanks to David Young for helping acquire many of the photos on this spread. 




Serving t 



By: Anne Elder 

Every year, 
CO. A. R. (Community 
Outreach and Resources) 
takes the forefront of students 
wanting to serve the 
Fredericksburg community 
and beyond. This year, big 
events for the club included 
"Into da Streetz", the annual 
Haunted Helpers fall festival, 
the annual Gift Box Drive for 
Head Start, VA Cares 
Hygiene Drive, the Charity 
Poker Tournament, the 
Community Egg Hunt and 
Spring Forward Festival, as 
well as co-sponsoring the 
Act! Speak! Build! week, 
which was incorporated into 
Class Council's Beak Week. 




In addition to all these 
projects, C.O.A.R. sent 
groups of students to help in 
communities nationwide, 
going to Albany, GA and 
Bunnell, FL for Alternative 
Spring Break and Exmore, 
VA for Alternative Fall 
Break. With all these 
activities on top of their 
regular service projects aimed 
at helping the community 
environment and reaching out 
to local children, elderly 
people, and animals. Their 
work inspires the student 
body to not only focus on 
academics but also the world 
around UMW. 



tvaraoKe ancl Bltlgo"! 

Nights 




By: Paulina Kosturos 

Every Wednesday and Saturday nights, the 
Underground amassed a following of 
competitive, prize-craving, singing sensations. 
That's right. Bingo and Karaoke night proved 
extremely popular on campus, thrilling students 
with its array of prizes and stardom possibilities. 
Many devout followers of Bingo prided 
themselves on their competitive edge and ability 
to win various exciting prizes."! love bingo, it is 
the highlight of my school week. It's always 
really intense and everyone takes it very 
seriously but ultimately its fun when you win. 
I've won a frisbee and and a DVD," freshman 
Katherine Sleyman said enthusiastically. 

In addition to Bingo Night, Karaoke Night 
enabled students to show off their amazing (or 
lackluster) singing talents in a fun-filled 
environment. 

"Karaoke is alot of fun. Everyone gets into it. 
It was fun to rap it out to Eminem with my girl. 
Katie! Doing karaoke is a tradition and now we 
go off campus to restaurants and do it!" freshman 
Jessica O'connell said. While many people enjoy 
singing in front of an audience, other maintained 
"stage fright". 

"It sounds like fun, but I've never gone, and I 
would probably be too shy to go up there by 
myself," freshman Catherine Carbone confessed. 

Aside from the prizes and competition. Bingo 
and Karaoke succeeded in bringing UMW 
students together, contributing to a close sense of 
community. No doubt. Bingo and Karaoke will 
continue to remain popular in the next semester! 




Cami 



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Fun 
Down 
Under 



By: Anne Elder 

For any student looking for fun ways to 
procrastinate, the re-opening of the 
Underground gave them much to do last 
year. With a cult following for Bingo 
nights, open mic nights, acoustic acts, and 
a very popular "Tin Chef" competition 
(complete with guest stars like Dean 
Rucker), homework was the least of 
anyone's concerns with so much fun to be 
had. The opening also saw a whole new 
food arena on campus, where students 
lined out the door at lunchtime to snack on 
some spirited sandwiches (Anyone for a 



Lee or Virginia this afternoon?). 
Smoothies, a full espresso bar, and a 
plethora of desserts act as perfect 
complements to any meal, or any 
entertainment act. But the fun didn't 
stop with pre-planned activities ! 
Students came to the Underground to 
relax, hang out with friends, and rent 
board games while they munched on 
their treats. The re-opening of the 
Underground left many students 
eager to see what exciting activities 
might happen next year! 



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nhoto bv: ANNE ELDER 



Where you lead, I will follow 



Sponsored by the office of Admissions, the Washington Guides show potential students UMW two times a 
day. five days a week. The tours give high school students and parents alike the chance to ask questions, see 
dorm rooms and watch classes in session before they make their final decision. The guides are seen bra\ ing 
the cold weather and rain to show off the campus they love. They also help Admissions with events 
throughout the year, such as Showcase Days, Destination Days, and the all-time campus favorite. Discovery 
Days. This April, the Office of Admissions hosted the largest Discovery Day ever-with more than 450 
students and 1300 overall guests. Regardless of the group size, guides moved all guests about in a graceful 
manner to show the newly-renovated Lee Hall as well as the construction for the Anderson Center and Eagle 
Village. While they may not get paid, the Washington Guides spread their love of Mary Washington on every 
tour they give, guaranteeing more fresh faces at UMW every year. 




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I By: Eve Patterson and Ashlee Sisson 

The UMW Women's Cross Country team 
I ended their season by running at the NCAA 
I Division III Regionals. The team came in 
1 1th place overall. In the CAC 
I Championship, the team got 2nd place. 

Junior, Sarah Dawes, was awarded the 
I CAC Runner of the Year award after 
finishing first at the CAC Championship 
race. Witek, Sands, Cate, Rainbolt, and 
Pfeiffer were all rewarded honors on the All- 
CAC team and finished in the top 20 in the 
CAC Championship. 

Overall the girls did a great job. 
Congratulations Eagles ! 




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"Spotlight" 

Hayley Sullivan 



Sophomore Hayley Sullivan led the way of the 
Women's Cross Country team to the CAC Regionals. 
Sullivan, a five-time CAC Runner of the Week this season, 
has been UMW's top finished in every race in which she has 
competed in. At the George Mason Invitational, Hayley was 
the first Division III runner to cross the finish line. Great 
Job Hayley! 




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By: Eve Patterson and Ashlee Sisson 

Racing across the finish Une, the UMW 
I Men's Cross Country team ended their 
season by running in the Cross Country 
Championships and NCAA Division III 
Regionals. The team came in 4th overall. The| 
team also captured the CAC Championship 
I and saw five runners finish in the top nine. 

Coach Soper was named 2009 CAC 
Coach of the Year and DeVar was named 
CAC Runner of the Year. Overall, the men's 
team did outstanding, and with many new 
faces on the team, we will continue to see 
victories in the upcoming years for the 
Eagles. 



*,.« 



"Spotlight" 

Frank DeVar 



Frank DeVar, UMW senior, gained Ail-American honors by placing 
16th overall at the 2009 NCAA Division III National Championships. 
DeVar became the first Eagle Men's Cross Country Ali-American 
since UMW Hall of Famer Jon Gates in 1996. 

DeVar also finished second overall in the 8K meet at the 
Southeast Regional Championships. Earlier in the season he lead the 
Eagles to a tie for third place at the Carnegie Mellon Invitational. He 
was also the first collegiate runner across the finish line, great job 
DeVar! Keep up the good work! 



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By: Eve Patterson and Ashlee Sisson 

The Women's Soccer team had another 
successful season, ending with a 12-5-5 
overall record and a 4-2-2 CAC record. The 
team won the CAC title and went on to play 
in the NCAA division 3 Tournament for the 
first time since 2004. There, they lost 3-2 to 
Maryville College from Tennessee. The girls | 
tied 1-1 to York College in the rainy 
Homecoming game, yet they went on to 
defeat Hood 5-1 in the season finale. 

The team had 6 players named to the 
2009 All-CAC team and Coach Hewson was 
named Co-Coach of the Year. The 6 players 
were Olson, Tryon, Strat, Denkler, Brehm, 
and Eyler. Congratulations girls! 




"Spotlight" 

Amy Olson 



Sophomore forward Amy Olson, a second team pick in 2008, is the 
only Mary Washington player with previous All-CAC recognition. 
Olson was also named CAC Women's Soccer Player of the Week the 
week of September 2 1 st after scoring five goals and adding two assists 
in three UMW victories. She started the week off with a goal and an 
assist in a 3-1 victory over rival Christopher Newport. In UMW's first 
CAC clash of the season, Olson scored her first career hat trick in a 
win over Wesley. She finished the week with a goal and an assist in a 
2-0 non-conference win over Averett. Great Job Amy! 




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I By: Eve Patterson and Ashlee Sisson 

The Men's Soccer team finished this 
I year's season with an impressive 12-7-1 
overall record and a 6-1-1 CAC record, 
taking them all the way to the CAC 
Semifinals against York. Unfortunately, they| 
were defeated 4- 1 at the semifinal game, 
I however, that didn't stop them from being 
recognized by the CAC. 

Five players were named to all-CAC 
teams and Coach Gordon was named Co- 
Coach of the Year. Toohey, Rutkowski, 
Gallop, Tutor, and Mensah-Abrampah the 
five that were named to all-CAC. 
Congratulations guys ! ! ! 




"Spotlight" 

Duke Mensah-Abrampah 



Freshman, Duke Mensah-Abrampah, had a great first season 
playing for the Eagles. At the CAC Tournament Duke scored a pair of 
goals to lead the men's soccer team to a 2-1 overtime win over 
Marymount. He was also named Co-Player of the week on November 
2nd. At the beginning of the season Duke scored the game's only goal 
against Stevenson University to take the win of 1-0. 

Duke ended the season with 15 points and the second highest 
shooting percentage on the team. As a freshman, this is a huge 
accomplishment. Congratulations Duke! Can't wait to see what he 
brings to the field next year for the Eagles. 




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By: Eve Patterson and Ashlee Sisson 

The Volleyball team made impressive 
I strides this year to land themselves at the 
CAC Semifinals against Gallaudet 
I University. The team finished this year's 
season with an overall record of 18-1 1 and a 
ICAC record of 7-1. 

Two players, Anne Lutkenhaus and 
Laura Gomez, were awarded CAC honors. 
Also, Coach Dee Conway was named CAC 
Coach of the Year. 

The team was comprised of nine 
underclassmen, meaning the team will 
continue to bring victory to the Eagles for a 
few more years to come. 



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"Spotlight" 

Anne Lutkenhaus 

Senior outside hitter, Anne Lutkenhaus, propelled the team to 
many wins including the win over Marymouth University in the final 
regular season home match of the season. Anne, the only player in 
school history with 1,000 career kills and 1,000 career digs, posted 23 
kills at this game. 

Lutkenhaus was named the CAC Player of the Week on October 
5th after leading the Eagles to three victories that week alone. She 
contributed 13 kills and 16 digs in a victory over York, then followed 
with 19 kills and 15 digs against Gallaudet. Overall, she led the team 
in kills, hitting percentage, and was second in digs. Great Job Anne! 




By: Anne Elder 

The men's and women's rugby teams 
I respectively had yet another impressive 
season, with both teams exciting students and| 
bringing in the Eagle pride with their annual 
I Homecoming games. 

In November, the lady ruggers were 
I ranked 19 by RugbyMag.com Division II 
College Rugby. The Mother's Rugby men's 
team hosted their annual alumni game and 
for the first time this fall competed in both 
Division II and Division III, fielding 3 full 
sides every weekend. Way to go teams ! 





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I By: Eve Patterson and Ashlee Sisson 

Making it all the way to the CAC 
I Championship game, the field hockey team 
had an impressive season. The Eagles took 
on Salisbury in the championship game and 
barely lost with a score of 2-1. The team 
finished with an impressive 12-8-0 overall 
I record and a 4-2-0 CAC record. 

Emma Jones, Heidi Sheehan, Jaci 
Marshall, Nicole Conti, and Florence George 
were all recognized as being on the CAC 
teams. 

Congratulations girls ! 




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"Spotlight" 

Emma Jones 

Junior forward, Emma Jones, scored a goal and added an 
assist to lead the University of Mary Washington field hockey 
team to a 2-1 victory over York College in the CAC semifinals. 
Jones was named to the 2009 All-South Region Team, as 
selected by Longstreth and the National Field Hockey Coaches 
Association as well as the All-CAC team. Throughout the 
season Jones led the field hockey team to win after win. 

Jones led the Eagles in scoring with 15 goals and seven 
assists in 20 games for the Eagles. We look forward to seeing 
Jones back on the field leading the Eagles next year. Congrats! 





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I By: Anne Elder 

This spring, the women's swimming team 
was buzzing with excitement as five women 
traveled to the NCAA Division III National 
Championships. At the competition, junior 
Sarah Crockett, senior Nina Sawyer, junior 
I Adriana Lesuik and sophomore Megan 
DeSmit brought the team to 25th place after 
the first day of competition in Minnesota. 

Before their travels, the team won the 
Capital Athletic Conference Championship 
for the 20th time in the twenty-year history 
of the conference. Awesome job ladies ! 




"Spotlight" 

Nina Michelle Sawyer 

Senior psychology major Nina Sawyer was selected by the CAC 
Directors of Athletics as the CAC's 2010 NCAA Woman of the Year 
program candidate in summer 2010. During her time at UMW, 
Sawyer earned the title as record holder for the 200M individual 
medley and earned All-American honors five times. Her tenure 
includes a total of 27 All-CAC awards, including nine conference 
championships and 18 silver medal fini.shes. In 2007, Sawyer earned 
the honor of CAC Rookie of the Year. During her senior year, she 
served as team captain. Congratulations Nina! 





I By: Anne Elder & Paulina Kosturos 

The men's swimming team made 
I impressive strides this year, finishing their 
season at the NCAA Championships in 
Minnesota. Representing the team were 
junior Stephen Clendenin and freshman Nick 
lEckhoff. 

The men also swept the CAC 
Championship with an 189-point advantage. 
Billy Norfolk gained an NCAA provisional 
time of 51.23 in the 100 yard butterfly race. 
The men's 800 free relay hit an NCAA 
provisional time of 6:55.49. Awesome job 
boys ! 




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"Spotlight" 

Stephen Clendenin and 
Nick Eckhoff 

Stephen and Nick were two of the five UMW Swim 
and Dive team members chosen to attend the NCAA 
Division III National Championships in March. 
Stephen competed in the 400 IM, the 200 butterfly, 
and the 200 backstroke, Nick swam in the 500 
freestyle, the 400 IM, and the 200 backstroke. Nick 
earned 31st place for the 500 freestyle race with a 
time of 4:41.09. 



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By: Anne Elder 

After a 71-48 win against St. Mary's 
I College, the UMW women's basketball team 
tied with Marymount University in the CAC 
regular season standings. At the CAC 
Championship, the #24 ranked UMW team 
fell to #7 Marymount with a final score of 
150-48. 

The Eagles ended their season with a 21-5 
record. They went on to compete in the 
NCAA Division III tournament, where they 
reached the second round before falling to 
the University of Rochester with a final score 
of 6 1 -54. Way to go girls ! 





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I By: Anne Elder & Michelle Esch 

When the men's basketball team 
I overcame York College in overtime in 
February, head coach Roddick Wood 
reached his 200th career win. The men's 
season was also highlighted by an overall 
9-15 record, with a close final loss against 
1st. Mary's College with a final score of 76- 
54. 

Over the course of the season, the 
Eagles found victory against Galludet, 
York, Stevenson, and Shenandoah. Good 
job boys! 



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"Spotlight" 

Brandon Altmann 



Senior center Brandon Altmann was honored once again by the 
CAC, named to the All-Capital Athletic Conference first team. 
During the season, Altmann helped the Eagles gain 19.2 points 
and 10.5 rebounds per game. His legacy remains as the school's 
all-time leading shot blocker. He was also recognized as one of 
ten finalists for the Jostens trophy, an award given to the NCAA 
Division III Basketball Player of the Year. 



Men's Basketball 




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By: Anne Elder & Michelle Esch 



Reaching the quarterfinals of the NCAA 
Division III women's lacrosse tournament, 
I the female Eagles ended their season with a 
14-6 overall record. The quarterfinal game 
I was played against fourth-ranked Franklin 
I and Marshall College, where the Eagles fell 
16-3. 

At the end of the season, sophomores 
Jenny Atmar, Catherine Kennedy, Allie 
Kimmelman, and Ellen Bikowski were 
selected as All-Chesapeake Region selections 
to the 2010 Intercollegiate Women's 
Lacrosse Coaches Association all-region 
teams. 




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I By: Anne Elder & Michelle Esch 

The men's lacrosse team ended their 
season with an overall record of 7-8. They 
I advanced to the C AC tournament, where 
they defeated York 19-9, continuing to the 
CAC semifinals. Competing against #1 
Salisbury in the semifinals, the team fell 18- 

The men had a strong season this year, 
working hard to compete against rivals 
Salisbury, York, and Stevenson. Including 
the CAC tournament, the Eagles ended their 
season with a 8-9 record. Congratulations 
boys! 



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"Spotlight" 

The Entire Team 

"The University of Mary Washington men's lacrosse 
program has been awarded the James "Ace" Adams 
Sportsmanship award by the U.S. Lacrosse Men's 
Division Officials Council. The award is given for 
sportsmanship shown not only by the team but also by 
coaches, fans, and administrators. Head Coach Kurt 
Glaeser was recognized with the award at the US 
Lacrosse convention in January and was named in 
Lacrosse Magazine." — UMW Athletics 



Men's Lacrosse 



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By: Anne Elder 

The women's tennis team hit the nets hard 
I this season, landing as the CAC Tournament 
Champions against Salisbury. They 
continued to the NCAA Tournament, where 
they fell to The College of New Jersey in the 
second round. They finished the year with a 
16-8 record. 

In addition to reaching the two elite 
tournaments, the team also saw Michelle 
Meadows and Meg Lawlor honored as CAC 
Players of the Week respectively, while 
Coach Patrick Catullo earned Coach of the 
Year for the fifth straight season. 





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"Spotlight" 

Courtney Goimarac 

"Mary Washington junior Courtney Goimarac continues a long and 
impressive list of Eagles that were selected by the conference coaches 
as the CAC Women's Tennis Player of the Year when she won the 
award and earned first team singles and doubles recognition to lead 
the 2010 All-CAC Women's Tennis Team. Goimarac, now a three- 
time first-team All-CAC selection in both singles and doubles, brings 
the Player of the Year trophy back to Fredericksburg, Va., for the 
seventh-straight year and the 18th-time in the 21 -year history of CAC 
women's tennis. She is the 14th different Eagle to win the award and 
the sixth UMW player to win the Rookie of the Year (2008) and 
Player of the Year awards during their careers." ~UMW Athletics 




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By: Paulina Kosturos 

The men's tennis team performed admirably 
this season. They won their eleventh CAC 
title, advancing to the NCAA Division III 
National Championship tournament. Senior 
Evan Goff and junior Kaz Murata earned All 
I American honors in doubles at the NCAA 
Championships at Oberlin College. The 
Eagles finished the season with a record of 
13-12. This put them with a ranking of 
eighteen nationally. 




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I By: Anne Elder & Michelle Esch 

The women's softball team ended their 
I season with an 9-26- 1 overall record and 6-6 
in league play. The Eagles advanced to the 
CAC Tournament, where they won against 
Hood 6-2 in the first round and fell to York 
land Stevenson. 

The girls saw four players named to the 
All-CAC team, including sophomore third 
baseman Elizabeth Crowe, senior utility 
player Kim Olinger on the first team and 
sophomore outfielder Amanda Adams and 
senior shortstop Kaitlin Petrella were named 
to the second team. Great job girls! 



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"Spotlight" 

Elizabeth Crowe 

Sophomore Elizabeth Crowe has certainly made a name for herself on 
the field at UMW. She was named to the 2010 National Fastpitch 
Coaches' Association's all-region team in May 2010, after being 
named to the All-CAC team as well. During the season, Crowe hit a 
seventh-inning grand slam against Hood, leading to a 6-2 victory for 
the Eagles. Crowe has led the team in hitting(.412), home runs(8). 
RBI(33), runs scored(24), and bases on balls(16), according to UMW 
Athletics. She has been predicted by Coach Conway to become the 
top pitcher for the Eagles. Good job Elizabeth! 





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The Eagles ended their regular season with a 
record of 26-12, losing to #1 ranked John's 
Hopkins. The Eagles returned to play again 
on May 19 at the NCAA Regional 
Tournament. The UMW baseball team 
I claimed a 6-5 win over York College in the 
first round of the NCAA Division III South 
Regional (in Fayetteville, N.C.) 




"Spotlight" 

Will Wright & 
Eric Rehbein 

Senior Will Wright and junior Eric Rehbein were 
named to the American Baseball Coaches 
Association's all-South Region team. Wright was 
named to the first team as an outfielder and was 
named Capital Athletic Conference Player of the 
Year. Rehbein was named to the third team as a 
utility player, 



By: Paulina Kosturos 



The University of Mary Washington 
equestrian team performed very well this 
season. Four riders went to the zone 
championship show at the regional show, 
hosted by the College of William & Mary. 
I Mary Ryan Richardson won first place in her 
class of novice equitation over fences at the 
Zone Championships on Sunday, moving 
onto the IHSA national show. Thus, 
wrapping up the season. 




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Mary Ryan Richardson 

Junior Mary Ryan Richardson proudly 
claimed the national title in novice 
equitation over fences. The Kentucky 
Horse Park in Lexington, Ky hosted the 
IHSA national show this year. 



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By: Paulina Kosturos 

This season for women's rowing proved quite 
exciting as the ladies finished fifth in heat 
and seventh in the petite qualifier at the 
NCAA Division III Championships. The 
ladies finished with a time of 7:12.88 in its 
I heat. They claimed a seventh in the petite 
qualifier with a time of 7:23.57. The 
women's varsity team finished in fourth place 
in the third level final of the NCAA 
Championships. The team ended with a time 
of7:17.57. 



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By: Paulina Kosturos 

The University of Mary Washington men's 
rowing team began their exciting 2010 spring | 
season at the Occoquan Sprint regatta. 
The men's varsity placed first in their heat 
with a time of 6:42.40. The men's team was 
I victorious at the Knecht Cup in Camden, 
N.J.The men's varsity placed second in the 
Division II/III race with a time of 6:52.19. 
The men's varsity eight came in second in the 
Division II/III grand final. Their time was 
6:23.30. 





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" "Spotlight" 

Coach Richard Wilson 

The University of Mary Washington's Richard 
Wilson serves as the head coach of men's and 
women's varsity rowing. Wilson is a three- 
time champion of the Royal Canadian Henley 
Regatta and co-created a rowing club at 
Niagara University for men and women. 



Men's Rowing 




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By: Anne Elder 

At the Duke University Invitational this year, 
the Eagle women saw Ali McClelland run 
the 100 meters at 13.04 and the 200 meters at 
26.98. Michelle Sutherland ran a season best 
in the 400 hurdles at 1:05.9. Lynette 
Humphries ran the 100 meter hurdles at 
16.00 seconds, and Sarah Dawes ran the 800 
meters at 2:24 (Clint Often). 

Later in the season at the Swarthmore 
Invitational, Nicole Ditto earned second 
place in the triple jump with a 36 feet, five 
inch jump. Sarah Dawes ran the womens 
race in 4:55.1. Awesome job ladies! 






By: Paulina Kosturos 

The University of Mary Washington men's 
track and field won second place at the 2010 
Capital Athletic Conference Championships 
in Salisbury, Md. Senior Matt Cash won the 
800 meters at 1:56.63 and the 1500 meters in 
I a CAC record won first place in the 5000 
meters at 15:37.7. Matt Cash's selection to 
compete in the 2010 NCAA Division III 
Men's Track and Field Championships 
represented the sixth Eagle spring team to 
advance to NCAA Championship 
competition. 




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By: Paulina Kosturos 

What other club at UMW maintains such poise, 
I such grace? Nothing else compares the UMW 
Terrapins team! The Terrapins team utilizes 
synchronized swimming to create breathtaking 
performances. The Terrapins team competed 
against other University club and Varsity teams 
' throughout the year. Their season began in 
September, culminating with Nationals in March. 
While the Terrapins team believes in performing 
to the best of their abilities, the club's competitive 
spirit fails to outweigh their desire to have fun. 
The Terrapins will continue to stand by this belief 
for years to come. 




"Spotlight'- 

Krissy Donahoe 

Krissy Donahoe is the volunteer coach 
of the Terrapins. She graduated from 
Mary Washington in 2002. In addition 
to coaching the Terrapins, she enjoys 
being a stay-at-home mom. 




_ photo courtesy of: CHELSEA MOORE 





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By: Anne Elder 



All of the other sports teams would be 
[nothing if it weren't for this group of spirited 
Eagles. Whether they win or lose, the 
cheerleaders were always there to support 
our teams, bringing spirit not only to the 
I team but also to the crowd. 

This year the team captains were Jenny 
Eikenberg, class of 2010, and Lindsay 
Mollohan, class of 2008. While it may be 
considered a club sport at UMW, the 
cheerleaders provide valuable support for our 
teams, while practicing long hours and 
developing new techniques to bring Eagle 
pride to our stands. 





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Roadley Middle Row: Anne Elder, Rebecca Presor, \=mf\{^mcmfuSrG?^mftG\or\a Yl, Steph 
Martin, Nihhoahh Chltty Back Row: Alyssa Dembrowski, Madeline Cain, Chelsea Lours, Stephen 
Clendenin, Jeffery Duncan, Maura Mays, Matt Wallace 






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Front Row: Vincent Nguyen, Kayla Chadmen, Lucy Kim, Jessie Davis-Le Back Row: Meredith 
McLeod, IVIario Rivadeneira, Jake Argarin, IVIereditli Roane, Ross Kinsman, Max samsky, Madeline 
McDonald, Matt Motley 




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Winston, KiMHHp'Tierra Ragland, Araba Boakye, Shanita Mitchell Third Row: Virginia St. 
Clair, Raelisha^Rtmrer, Paige Arsenault, Jeannette Hodge, Eniya Lufumpa, Brandy Harris Back 
Row: name witheld, Ronald Hudson, Romadon Stovall, Erica O'Brien, Charles Reed Jr. 




ront Row: Alyssa Cli MiBllBlSlBI Berenbaum. Michelle Bon SWHiBegBBit evenlnq. Katey Kerns 
Middle Row: Kelly Caldwell, Ashley Nixon, Krystal Hawkins, Sam Miller, Louisa Dispenzirie 
Back Row: Mike Kappert, Kate Johnson, Austin Bartenstein, Jen Crystle, Amanda Buckner, 
Emmanuel Garcia 




Front Row: Karl Evans, Jen Gerardi, Kaley Huston, Kira Lanewala 

Back Row: Sonia Roschelli, Brad Efford, Stephanie George, Amy Leap, Hannah Hopkins 




HoolbrdipiPPPPIP^Iizabeth Brennan, Katherine Holmberg, Emma Peck, Samantha Miller, 
Jennifer Cutrona, Jessica Evans, Hannah Miller, Eliza Lunde Back Row: Ashley Nixon, Samantha 
Bradshaw, Kara Cutrona, Andrew Luton< Catherine Melissa Fletcher, Jillian-Rose Varnau 




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Front Row: Rosa Herrera, Brittany Azzato, Lindsay Glotzer, Samantlia IVIorris IVIiddle Row: Shellye 
Burrow, Diana Weigel, Erin Dwyer, Tracy Frell<, Vida Austin Back Row: Lauren Bates, Catherine 
O'Doherty, Kasi Hunnicutt, Jenny Davenport, IVIegan Overman, Cliristina Lambert 



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Front Row: Pris 
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' ^^^^ront Row: Sara Monk, Claire McKinney, Mike Issacson, Cliris Goulait, Evelyn Hay 







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Front Row: Sarah Sanders, Hannah Ridenour, Rebecca Pomerantz, Kerry Mitchell Middle Row: 
Jessica Dabul, Katherine Stinson, Erin Glennon, Laura Heemer, Jessica Focht Back Row: Rachel 
Frederick, Victoria Leonard, Ginger Brothers, Drew Radtke, Michelle Cole 



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Lea McLaughlin, Kaitlyn Crotty, Kerry Haddock, Brittany Bray Tliird Row: Gilmore McLean, Andrew 
Smith, Stacy Whitehouse, Caitlin Brady, Leigh Stanfield Back Row: Matthew Baldwin, Alex Morris, 
Travis Bice, Aaron McPherson, David Klein 



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Front Row: J IBgiaiffii^pp^liip n Rigby, Thalia Halpert Rodis, Allis 
Randy Overland, Zaeh'Fifnifein, Fez Casim, Mandi Solomon 




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Front Row: Patrick Shugrue, Kimmi Zane, Michelle Flores, Td1R!19lllplsabel McLoughlin Back Row: 
Colin Manning, Jonathan Putty, Emily Ritchie, Scott Hoffman, Becky Lamm 



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jipront Row: Emilie Begin, Hannah Laughlin, Abbie Rogers, Ha 
Row: Katie McGraw, Hillary Lyons, Diana Scott, Brianna Jone^, . 
Dettmann, Michael Hollister, Evan McLaughlin, Thomas Campell, Brendan Kelly, Nathan Jennings 



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Front Row: Elizabeth Ramsey, Jessica Zeitz, Rebecca Zeitz Back Row: Amelia Toms, Valerie Igal, 
Emiyne Forren 



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Front Row: Leandra Frye, Nti Aninez, Prarthana Gurung, Shirin Afsous Back Row: Morgan Harding, 
Name Witheld, Zein Al-Atrache, Charles Reed Jr. 



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Front Row: Nidi Jesionlln, AFNglffil^Gold, Sarah Payne, Annie Unger, Joe Buonannata Middle Row: 
Samandtha Bradshaw, Ashley Nixon, Samantha Miller, Lindsay Sekel Back Row: Hassan 
Abdelhalim, Brian DeMott, Daniel Kauffman, Ryan Gallasch 



179- 




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ront Row: Casey Mitchell, Taylore Pointdexter, Gina Ayers, Paige Paterno Middle Row: Shannon 
Storey, Abi Chandler, Chelsea Lewis, Emily Goldhammer Back Row: Kyle Lefler, Gina Rhodes, 
Mary Beth Moody, Mariah Kiernan, Anna Smith 



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Front R 
Belley, 
Olivia Scott 



gham, Emily Harris, Joseph Calpin, Joseph Pug 
er, Emily Thomas, Nora Bessey Back Row: Jeremy Lay, William Loring, 



181- 







V V "^ V 



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Front Row: Emily Horin, Alexis Witthoft, Abby Leach, Sarah Erath, Christine Pham, Kayla Bretzin, 
Erin Kohler 

Second Row: Maya Richards, Rachael Flaks, Susan Roberts, Marianne dublnsky, Amanda Manno, 
Kathleen Morgan, Emilia Stern A 

Third Row: Dana Jones, Devon Maresco, Amy Allshouse, Lizzie Brenner, Amanda Parker, RachjjCi 
Underwood, Kathryn Swenson /., y^^ 

Back Row: Gwen Holdgreiwe, Charlotte Rodina, Marina Freckmann, Erin Evans, Jenn \^i£ ri^^r^ 
Elyse Clark, Anne-Elisabeth Halbert 



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" acJ/rc /r r///^i^ ^r^ ^;/^ ^/ a f(ina: roe peopte 
that you "V^ill meet , the actilpities that you mil 
inevitably enjoy, the food and goodies you ypill 
tal(e in, but nothing compares to the lasting 
friendships that ypill alypays carry mth you 
long after you lealpe the bric^ col?ered 
^alkyaysofUi<:MW:' 
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185- 





Hassan Ahdelhalim 
CharlottesvUle. VA 



Hadeel Abu Jamous 
Chester. VA 



Brittany Adams 
Notfolk. VA 



Shama Ahmed 
Alexandria. VA 





Scott Altman 
Manassas, VA 



Justin Anderson 
Oak Hill, VA 



Stephanie Andreucci 
Brandy Station, VA 



Davida Austin 





Joseph Cirenza 
EiirlysvilU: VA 




Saiali C'liaiidlcr 
Rocky Mount. \'.\ 



( iHlllllC\ ( lKI|)lliall 




mBSB^ 








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4 



Mark Ci)inpcl 
Spriiii^fii'ld. VA 



Chelsea Corcoran 
WiiiiLuir. MA 



Kane ( harinelski 
Locust Grove. VA 




.\ ssa Cousincaii 

'Roosevelt. S.I 






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Caitlin Dail 

Frederickshiirii. VA 



Alyssa Davis 
Ripley. TN 



Margaux DeLong 
Ashbiim. VA 



Sarah Denby 
Garden Cit\. NY 




'^^wz^^-^m 




Katherine Despagni 
Cutchogue, NY 



Ruth Dhanaraj 
Vienna, VA 



Samantha DiPaola 
New Providence. NJ 



Ashhe Dofflemyer 
Stafford. VA 




^^ 


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Michael Downey 
Faiifu.x. VA 



Amy Doyel 
Ware Neck. VA 




Kathleen Dray 
Mversville. MD 



Jason Driscoll 
Haxmarket. VA 



Miles Dumville 
Richmond. VA 



Jose Antonio Duque 
Fredericksburg. VA 



'J 



Class of 2010 



il_-__ J 




Bradley Efford 

Spriiiiifiekl. VA 




Jenny Eikcnberg 
Ellicott City. MD 







Bpl ^^gll 




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Chrilsopher Erdwins 
Vienna. VA 



Kclscy Evans 
Pliilailclpliia. PA 




i lOT^ 



Mariana Ferro 
McLean. VA 



Molly Ellis 
Srojjoni. VA 




Andrew E\'erell 
Fdirfa.x. V\ 



Knsicn Lnii 
Dunnsvillc. VA 






Michelle E 
Paiiiiu-rtviili 


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Christina Estop 
f- rcilcritksl'un;. ^ \ 




Nicole Faison 

Mclianic^villc. \ \ 




Nathan i-innc\ 
Blarkslniii;. VA 



Class of 2010 



191^ 




Fre 


Ashley Ford 
dericksburg. VA 


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Angela Francis 
Virginia Beach, VA 



James Gallagher 
Centreville, VA 







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Daliana Gandarillas Sagarnaga 
Alexandria. VA 



James Garman 
Centreville, VA 





Kristin Gauta 
Harbor Twnshp, NJ 



Jennifer Gerardi 
Kings Park, NY 





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Nicole Glover 



Andrew Godburn 




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1 




E\an GotT 
Wiiiwrvillc. NC 



Tashine Gorgonc 
3rist(iM. \'A 



Christopher Gi)Lilail 
Alcxcmdiia. VA 



Miliar) (jra\cs 
Alcxiindria. VA 





Jessica Kilday 
Manassas. VA 




Kelly Landau 
Jackson, Wi' 




Daniel Lockbaum 
Pedricktcnvn, NJ 




Amanda Leich 
Merrick. NY 



Lisa Lenny 
Fredvrickshinx- ^A 







Anne Longerbeam 
Midlothian. VA 



William Loring 
Ircdcricksliuri;. \ A 



Erica Lowe 

Mrsinia Beach. \ A 





illt 



Anne Lutkenhaus 
Richmond, VA 



John Mahan 
Petersburg, VA 



Jillian Maier 
Falls Church, VA 




Louisse Anne Maniscalco 
Rappahannock Academy, VA 



Jacqueline Marshall 
Annapolis, MD 



Kristin Mettem 
Saint James, NY 




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Elizabeth McAulitYe 
Rcislcrstown, MD 



James McCormack 



Erin McCracken 
Arlington, VA 




Jennifer Menge 
Hanover, NH 



Nana Mensah-Abrampah 
Gainesville, VA 




Lauren Malick 
Granite, MD 




Mary Maultsby 
Midlothian. VA 




Brian McGrath 
Manhasset, NY 




Elizabeth Miller 
Faiifax. VA 



Class of 2010 



iU— -J 




Jodi Miller 
Fredericksburg. VA 





Megan Montgomery 
WorreiUoii VA 



Chelsea Moore 
Spriiigflelil. VA 

-FT' 



Da\'id Moore 
Springfield. VA 



Sarah Moriii 
RluKidsvilic. VA 




Jody Nelson 
King George. VA 



Chelsea Newnaiii 
Chesapeake. VA 



Vincent Noori 
Frederii ksliu rg. \ A 



[iriii O Dono\an 
Riilniwnd. \.\ 



Class of 2010 




Tara O'Toole 
Himtingtown, MD 




Raphael Pascale 
Williamsburg. VA 




Sarah Peters 
Charlottesville. VA 





Sarah Payne 
Potomac Falls, VA 




Christine Pham 
Alexandria. VA 




W^., :,■ J^ 




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Randall Overland 




Emma Peck 
Huntington, NY 




David Pierandri 
Ridgefield, CT 




Hye Rim Park 

Fairfax. VA 




Brenda Pennington 
Mechanicsville. VA 




Jessica Pike 
Middleboro. MA 



198 




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Laura Pilati 
Yorktown. VA 



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Colh\ ProtYitt 
Foresr. VA 




Samuel Protich 
Newport News. VA 



Jonathan Putt\ 
Spotsylvcinia. \'A 



Cassandra Ratti 
Dumfries. VA 





Emily Ritchie 
New Market. VA 



Samantha Rizzi 
GambhUs. MD 



Harrison Roberts 
Westfteld. NJ 



Dawn Robey 

Fredericksburg. VA 



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Catherine Roets 

Stajford. VA 



Alexander Rohde 
Hamilton, VA 



Brandi Rollins 
Springfield, VA 



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Kristen Romano 
Shoreham, NY 



Sonia Roschelli 
Christiiinsbiirg, VA 



Renee Rosser 
Richmond, VA 



Michelle Rother 
Vienna, VA 




200 




Rose Schirle 
Chesapeake. \ 'A 




Rebecca Shapiro 
Charlottesville. VA 



Lindsay Sci^ei 
MulUiiuf Park. NJ 





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Lauren S ha tier 
\\arrciit(>ii. \'A 





Charis SiroUy 
Locust Grove. VA 



Sean Slattery 
Blacksburg. VA 



Allison Sleeman 
Sterling, VA 




Sara Speicher 



Monica Spencer 
Fredericksburg, VA 



Ivy Spicer 
Milford, VA 



Katharine Stinson 
Chev\ Chase. MD 



Leigh Taliaferro 
Bowlers Wlmif. VA 



Da\id Thompson 
Woodbridge. VA 



Shenika Thompson 
Fredericksburg. VA 



Bridge Travers 
Foresthills. NY 



Sarah Trimble 
Yorktonn. VA 




Philip Smith 

Madison. VA 




Tim St. Onge 
Bethesda. MD 




Megan Thompson 
Danville. VA 




Class of 2010 




Elinor Tuhy 
Hockessiu. DE 




Tyler VanderMeer 
Virginia Beach. VA 




Lauren Villiva 
Burke. VA 




Justin Weirich 
Harrisonhiirfi. VA 



Allison Urbano 
Cnmslon. RI 



Stephanie Van Buskirk 
Henulon. VA 



Caitlin Vance 
Viri^inia Beach, VA 




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Joy Vandervender 
Richmond. \'A 




Lidia 
Falls 


Var 
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gas-Claros 
'((;•(■/), VA 


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Kyle Wadkins 
Stephens Cin\ VA 



Elisa Walker 

Rockville. MD 



Kathleen Watson 

Ij'rton. V\ 




Alexandra Weller 
Waxncshoro. VA 



Andrew W elsh 
FJIicott Cin. MD 



Paul W hitaker 
Alexandria. \'A 



Class of 2010 



203' 



^ 




Jonathan Wigginton 
Rockville. MD 



Sarah WiUiams 
Colonial Heights, VA 



Alexis Witthoft 
Northport, NY 




Jeremy Wood 
Morrisville, PA 



William Wright 
St. Louis. MO 



Catelin Wrigley 
Egg Harbor Twnshp, NJ 




Brian Young 
Springfield. VA 



Lisa Zanzarella 
Haxmarket. VA 



Jessica Zeitz 
Fredericksburg, VA 




Thomas Wolfe 
Powhatan, VA 




Varin Zimmerman 
Vienna. VA 




I'm oevy- guutefiil tKat I 



neoer waste 



\g to bGcoine soiiiebody else's Image of wKat I sKoulcl be. 



I v\?ork In a business wkere almost eoer)oi^e Is Waiting for tke next big tklng. Sonvetlnves It conves, and 

soiiietlmes It doesn't. But It doesn't niattei- tkat youf dream came true if you spent youi- vokolc life sleeping. So 

qet out tkere and go for It, but don't be caugkt Waiting. R's great to plan for your future. Just don't lloc tkece, 

because veaily notklng eoev kappens In tke future. Wkate>Jec kappeias Ivappens now, so llsJe your life wkere tke 



action Is — now. 



Mrs. Zubatsky's law. One day wken I Was a kid, our kouse caugkt on fire In Milwaukee. A large section of tke 
vOood sklngle roof Was burning as tke fire trucks pulled up. Tke firemen ran Into tke back yard wltk a large 
KosG and began assembling tkelr metal ladders and positioning tkem against tke kouse. Mrs. Zubatsky Was our 
ne\i door nelgkbor and, at tke time, ske Was standing on ker upstairs porck taking In tke laundry-. Ske Watckcd 
anxlousl)' as tke firemen struggled wltk tkelr ladders. Sviddenly ske leaned ov?er tke balcoixy and skouted down 
I to tke professional flreflgkters, "Forget tke ladders! Just point tke kose at tke fire!" Tke firemen, to tkelr credit, 
responded Ininiedlately. Tkey dropped tkelr ladders, pointed tke kose at tke fire and extlngulsked tke blaze In 

about AO seconds. 



I Tkere are two niorals to tkls stor^'. One, neoer assunte tkat just because It's someone's job, tkey know kow to do 
I It. And two, don't let yourself be Intlnxldated by professionals or tkelr uniforms. 



If YOU kaoe a better Idea, if your plan makes niore sense, if you kaoe a olslon, tken put down your laundry* and 
screani a little bit. Tkrow your kat Into tke ring and neoer let professionals or tkelr uniforms present you from 

telling anyone wkere to point tkelr kose. 

If you're going to fall, fall big. If you don't, you're nev^er going to niake a difference. Creativity Is allowing 

I iNoiirself to make mistakes. Art Is knowing wklck ones to keep. Ask yourself one question: If I didn't kaoe to do It 

perfectly, wkat Would I ivy? For many of you, tke biggest obstacle to getting tkere will be a fear tkat you Uaoe 

carried wltk your since cklldkood — tke fear of kunilllatlon, of enibarrossnvent, of ridicule. Tkat Is 8€) stupid! 

Ok ... sorr\'. Bvit really, you ka>Je to stop caring about tkat, wklck brings nxe to Trav?oltas law. 

> My brotker Da*jld and Jun Abrakanis and I Were kaolng pie at Rumpelme)-er's Coffee Skop In New York on tke 

day after our tklrd moole, "Top Secret," opened. Tke reviews Were terrible and It Was bombing at tke box office. 

We Were reall)- gettlixg Into sonxe serious nxoplng and self-flagellation wken Jokn Travolta Walked In. We kiaew 

klm from tke Parantount lot and ke could see rlgkt aWay tkat We Were In a funk We Immediatel)- poured out 

our keart to klnx, explaining tke pain of our kumlllatlng misfortune. 

Fni not sure wkat We Were expecting, but Jokn just smiled and said, "Guys, tke tklng you kaoe to cenvember Is 
' (tkat) nobod)' else Is pa)'lng as ntuck attention to )our failures as )-ou are. You're tke onl)- ones wko are 
obsessed wltk tke bnportance of your own life. To eoer)one else. It's just a blip 011 tke coxlor screen, so just move 



Tklnk of tke World as a big glass of water wltk some salt In IL You kave a ckolce. You can ivy to pick out all 

tke salt or )ou can keep pouring In niore Water so eventuall)' It gets less bitter. As you begin your new joume)-, 

) ou can ivy to remove ever)'tklng tkat you Rnd distasteful In tke WocU, or you can just pour in nvoce Ujve It's 

tke only tklng tkat tke more )ou give aWay, tke more you kave' 

Jerry Zucker O/^^ '"'^ 

Director, Movle Producer (2003) ^V 'O 



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Class of 



2011 





20f 




Nora 



Ellen 
Bcste 



Bethel 



(larrell 
Bethni.inn 



Hanicl 
Biec 



Billini:>.lea 



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Bkiizs; 



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Owen 
Blandford 


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Margaret 
Boatner 


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Matthew 
Blakely 


Jonathan 
Blauvelt 


Dyna 
Blewis 


Amanda 
Boccuti 


Andrew 
Boczar 




\^- 




Amanda 
Hunter 


Rebecca 
Hutchinson 




Aiiiher 
HNatt 




H J ward 
Ihinson 


Mark 
Inszraliani 


lai 
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Ir\ine 




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217- 




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f-- 




Alexander 
Morris 



Sean 
Mounie 



Kevin 
Murphy 




Alanna 
Neal 



Clare 
O'Brien 




Anne 
Moms 







Paul 
Morris 




Andrew- 
Mullen 



Melissa 
Mullinax 







Daniel 
Murdoch 





Ako 
Nagahama 


Mar>' 
Napier 


Kathryn 
Nara 


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l-:iinl> 
Morion 




Erin 
Murph\ 




Jessie 

Nash 




Randolph 
Nicklas 




Matthew 




KcUc> 
Murph\ 




Kate 
Nazworth 




Bradle\ 
Nissen 







Meaghan 
Nucent 



Angela 



OBricn-Blondino 






Hrin 
ONeal 



Tar.i 
O Toolo 



Li race 
Otslaeer 




Ashley 



DBi 



Emily 
Wamplcr 



Borwyn 
Wang 



JoAnn 



Taylor 



Jillian 
Wennberg 




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4 



233^ 



Jane 
Ballard 



Margaret 
Barber 



Carlos 
Barher\ 



Moira Ri 



Williaiii 
Hartcnsicin 



WM^ 



John 
Baskin 



Mitchell 
Bass 



Joel 
Bassam 



Hannah 
Baumsardner 



Riley 
Baver 








Samson 
Belay 



Katherine 
Belfield 



Jessica 
Bell 





Alexandra 
Beraman 



Erin 
BeiT\ 




Kallici ine 
Barlkouiak 




i;ilcn 
3iko\\ski 




Justin 
Bishop 



Cameron 
Bither 



Chrisio|ihc 
Blouiih 




Michael 
Bchrens 




Eiise Lauren William 

Benhase Bennett Bennett 




Lauren 
Birkhoid 




Morgan 
Bohinski 





Liesel 
Bosnar 





Vanessa 
Boosahda 



Caitlin 
Bouluari 




Benjamin 
Bouer 




Robert 
Cowley 



Megan 
D'Aliura 



Erika 
deBroekert 



Kay la 
Dickhute 



□EiO 







Robert 
Crawford 



Elizabeth 
Crowe 



Michael 
D'Amico 



Kelsey 
DeJamette 



Laurel 




LfJ 



Monique 
dela Cruz 




Megan 
DeSmit 





Adji Marietou 
Diop 





Bridget 
DooleN' 



James 
Cruz 




Anna 



Dameron Damewood 




Eugene 
Delano 




William 
Devlin 



Luisa 
Dispenzirie 




Danielle 
Cunetta 




Rebecca 
Davidson 



Kyle 
Dexheimer 




Teresa 
DiTirro 




John 
Dorman 



John 
Cunningham 




Robert 
Davis 




Stephen 
Deltuva 




Nicole 
Ditto 




Edward 
Drummond 




Laura 


Robert 


Dick 


Dickerson 


Mm 


WM 


m 


i 1 




Marianne 
Dubinsky 




Meghan 
Graham 



Sarah 
Graham 



/\le.\andra 
Green 



Sean 
Green 



Janci 
Greider 



Edward 
Greissint: 



Rachel 
Cjrimes 





■BBOP 



Samantha 



Krysta 



Prarthana 



Lauren 



Constance 



Grimslev Guiney-Olsen Guruna 

■01 



Guzinski Guzman-Tacaraya p^^j^jy Halbrooks-Fulks 




Nicholas 
Hall 



Morgan 
Haherson 



Daniel 
Hamilton 



Carlie 
Hampton 



Joanna 
Han 



Laureen 
Hancock 



Rachel 
HanJcian 




BBBO 





Richard 


Shannon 


Riehl 


Riley 


^^^1 


13 


W'^A 


L^ 



Kaitlyn 
Ripley 



Kathryn Derek 

Rizzo Roberts 





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Gina 

Ayers 


Elizabeth Elizabeth Jose 
Backman Badley Baires 


Cleo 
Baker 


Bridget 
Balch 


Briana 
Baldino 


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Ciass^ 


wt 


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Matthew Lassanara Koger 

Boward Bowman Bowman 





t-^^J 




Catherine 
Carbone 



Joseph 
Carleton 



Alexander 
Carlson 



Samuel 
Carmona Caroliis-Hacer 



Carpenter 



Shannon 
Carrican 



IBSiiiEj 




Carroll 



Raven 
Carroll 



Carson 



Elizabeth 
Carter 



Carter 



Kathn.ne 
Carter 



Kalherinc 
Cases 



■QBSEISB 



Muhammad 
Casim 



Catherini 
Cassara 



Ciusta\o 
Castillo 



Patricia 
Casiil 



Tina Ross, inn. i 

Castillo C.ilah.iM 



\ietor 

C.iilcil 




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Jeffrey 
Duncan 


Roben 
Duquette 


Carol 
Dye 


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Matthew 
Eby 



Kelsey 
Eissler 





Ashley 
ElHott 



Christopher 
Emerick 




I— ^ 





Scan 
Heal\ 



Alesia 
Hebb 



I. aura 



C'aso> 



Crortlon 
IIl-iI 



Jainc 
llciii 



Scih 
Holler 




Molly 
Hidges 



Andrew 
Hosan 




Felicia 
Holzgrefe 



BQBH 



Seamus 
Hooban 



Jessica 



Lemuel 



Ronald 



Sara 
Hulvey 



Sarah 
Hundley 




i 




M 





c^ 







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Andrew 
Kasabian 



Thomas 
Kasabian 



Amy 
Kasper 




Nancy 
Kelce 



Wen 

Kelly 



Catherine 
Kennedy 




Matthew 
Kennedx 



Grant 
Kenn\ 



Kendra 
Kem 



Margaret 
Kern 



Kylie 
Kerr 



Prakrit! 
Khanal 



Drema 
Khraibani 



llBHHy 



Taeheon 
Kim 





David 
Klein 


Lawrence 
Knight 


Q 


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Manisha 
Kumar 


Kathleen 
Kutnak 


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Kiranjit 
Kooner 



Kimberly 
Lane 




Joseph 
Lansenberg-Manson 





Kc\ in 
Likins 



Lim 



LiiKlsc\ 



Linchaii 



Ijichloal 



,ic\\cll\ II 



Lockuood 




oii^r 



Derek 
Loe\enstein 




Lauren Meghan 

Olsen Olson 



Riham 
Osman 



Stephanie 
Ospina 



Lindsay 
Owen 



Christina 
Owens 



Ohen 
Owusu-Ansah 





Nicholas 
Ryals 



Shilpa 
Sadarangari 




Susan 




Nathaniel 


Sadick Saint-Preux 


o 




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\^ 




KJ 



Maria 
Salas-Baltuano 



Charlotte 
Sandv 



Elizabeth 
Schenker 




SHBHB 



N1;irk 

Scull 





Cameron 
Thomas 



Chelsea 
Thomas 



Heather 
Thompson 



Keller 
Torrev 



Ryiey 
Trahan 



Jalisa 
Thomas 



Malik 
Thomas 



Phillip 

Thomas 



Brooke 
Thompson 



Claire 
Thompson 





Matthew 



Rachel 
Tippoit 



Miehacl 



mma 



Joelisn Vy 

Iran Tran 



Sarah 



Kc\ in 




M I W^ r^n JM 



James 
Updike 





^^^H^^yl 




Lisa Ames 
Div. of Teach. & Learn. Tech. 



Mehdi Aminrasavi 
Classics. Phil.. Religion 



Karen Anewalt 
Computer Science 



Deena Applebury 
Athletics. Health. P.E. 




Pamela Arnold 
Enterprise Application Sen: 



Virginia Ashley 
Instit. Research & Reporting 



Elaine Asper 
Leadership & Manag. Prog. 



Janet Asper 
Chemisti-y 



Wendy Atwell-Vasey 
Education 





p 




1 




Rosemary Barra 
icadenik^ffairs 



Antonio Ban^enechea 
English, Ling., Comm. 



Kevin Bartram 
Music 



Michael Bass 
Earth & Environ. Sciences 



Mary Becelia 
Career Services 



Facult 




Dawn Bowen 
Geography 



Da\ id Cain 
Classics, Phil., Religion 



Sallie Braxton 
CGPS 



Meta Braymer 
CGPS 



Ashia Brooks 
Univ. Advancement 



Gail Brooi^s 
Computer Infor. Systems 




Jane Cariker 
Univ. Advancement 



Amanda Carter 
Univ. Advancement 



Joanna Catron Patrick CatuUo 

Melchers Home & Studio Athletics. Health. P.E. 



Facult 



289- 



Facult 




~^ mm 




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Courtney Chapman 
James Fanner Mulli. Center 



Raul Chavez-Negrette 
Leadership & Manag. Prog. 



Wei Chen 
Business Administration 



Yuan-Jen Chiang 

Mathematics 



And ChichtstLi 
Modern Foreign Lang. 




Betsy Chinn 
Ojfice of the President 



Tracy Citeroni 
Sociology & Anthropology 



Jan Clarke 
Univ. Advancement 



Manning Collier 
Mathematics 



Deborah Conway 
Athletics, Health, P.E. 




Rosalyn Cooperman 
Poli. Sci. & Intern. Affairs 



Ranny Corbin 
Office of the President 



Leah Cox 
Academic Senices 



William Crawley 
History & Amer. Studies 



Carole Creque 
Business Administration 




Tim Crippcn 
Sociology & Anthropology 



Janet Cropp 
CGPS 



Nicole Crowder 
Chemistn' 



Jean Ann Dabb 
Art & Art Histon- 



Jason Davidson 
Poli. Sci. & Intern. Affairs 



Facult 




Catherine Derecki 
Enterprise App. Services 



Elizabeth Desi 
Financial Aid 



Joe DiBella 
Art & Art Histon' 



Andrew Dolh_\ 
Biolofiical Sciences 



George Farrar 
Univ. Relations & Conun. 



Susan Fernscbncr 
Hislorv & Anwr. Slii(lic\ 



C'laudinc Icrrcll 
Hislorx & Anicr. Studies 



Martha Iickeil 
Music 



Brooke Donaldson 
Modern Foreii;n lumi;. 




Mia l-it/i;erakl 




Eric Gable 
Sociology & Anthropology 



James Gaines 
Modem Foreign Lang. 



Jacqueline Gallagher 
Geography 



Connie Gallahan 
CGPS 







Carole Garmon 
Art & Art Histon- 



Douglas Gately 
Music 



Jane Gatewood 
Writing Center CAS 



Leanna Giancarlo 
Chemistry 



Jim Goehring Glad\ s Gomez 

Clas.sii'^. Phil.. A'(7;i,'/f)/; Lciulcrship & .\lanaii. Prog. 



Roy Gordon Patrick Gosetti-Munayjohn 

Athletics. Health. P.E. Div. of Teach. & Learn. Tech. 



Stephen Gallik 
Biological Sciences 




Kurt Glaeser 
Athletics. Health, P.E. 




Theresa Grana 
Biological Ssciences 




29 



Alan Griffith 
Biological Sciences 



Jiin Groom Surupa Gupta 

Div. of Teach. & Learn. Tech. Poll. Sci. & Intern. Affairs 



Facult 



m 




Cris Hairston 
Admissions 



Dana Hall 
Athletics. Hciiltli. P.E. 



Lynn Hamilton 
CGPS 



Slcxe Hampion 
Ps\rlioloi;y 



Zennia Hancock 

MnJen, rmrivii I.niik 




J. Todd Helbling 
Athletics. Health. P.E. 



Randall Holnisiuik-r 
Matlieiiuttics 



Alison Cjauch Hichci 
.Achnissioiis 



Julie Hodge 
Theatre tt Dance 



Facult 



Douglas Holcombe 
Leader. S: Mamit;. Proi;ram.^ 



c^O'-'^ 




Facult 



w^^^^^wdkM 



Norah Hooper 
Education Progruins 



Carter Hudgins 
Histon' & Amer. Studies 



Rick Hurley 
Office of the President 



Gary Johnson 
Career Sen'ices 





Suzanne Houff 
Education Programs 



Liane Houghtalin 
Classics, Phil.. Religion 



Helen Housley 
Theatre & Dance 



Margaret Ruber 
Sociology & Anthropology 




Donna Hudgins 
UMW Libraraies 



Jane Huffman 
Education Programs 



Shawn Humphrey 
Economics 



David Hunt 
Theatre & Dance 




Jennifer Jakubecy 
Education 




Jason James Rosemary Jesionowski 

Sociology & Anthropology Art & Art Histoiy 







Lori Johnson 
Academic Senres 



Sabrina Johnson 
Human Resources 



Kimberly Johnston 
Admissions 



Christina Kakava 
English, Ling., Comm. 



Facult 




George Kingill 
Physics 



Kimberley Kinsley 
Leadt'isliip & Manag. Prog. 



Ben Kisila 
Earth & Environ. Sciences 



Jeanie Kline 
CGPS 



Lori Kiopp 

Univ. .Xdviuicenienl 








Janusz Konieczny 
Matlwmatics 



Konstanlinos Kuuriikakis Tera Kovancs 

Poli. Sci. & Intern. Affairs Office of tlie President 



Lynn Lewis 
Biological Sciences 




-'WT 




Kevin McCluskey 
■Zheaire^Dance 



George Meadows 
Education 



Christopher Medley 
Residence Life 



Donna Mejia 
Univ. Advancement 



Matt Mejia 
Admissions 



Facult 




Keith Mellinger 

Mathematics 



Torre Meringolo Paul Messplay Margaret Mi Nina Mitchaievsky 

Advan. & Univ. Relations Budfiet & Fi?uiiuial Analysis Business Administration IT & Instit. Research 




Ka\atus Newell 
Education Programs 



Timolh) Newman 
UMW Libraries 



Joseph Nicholas 
Geography 



Lorene Nickel 
Art & Art Histon- 



Denis Nissim-Sahal 
Psychoh^gy 



Facult 



Facult 




Joan ONon 
Sociology & Anthropology 



Patricia Orozco 
Modern Foreign Lang. 



Smita Oxford 
Business Administration 



Judith Parker 

English, Ling.. Comin. 



Carolyn Parsons 
UMW Libraries 




Melina Patterson 
Geography 



Richard Pearce Larry Penwell 

Administration & Finance Business Administration 



Lester Phares 
Business Administration 



Angela Pitts 
Classics. Phil., Religion 




Jennifer Polack 
Computer Science 



J William Poole 
B.O.V. 



Chris Porter 
Residence Life 



Allyson Poska 
History- <& Amer. Studies 



Scott Powers 
Modern Foreign Lang. 



Facult 




Tammy Pratt-Fartro Daniel F'rcsloii C'hiistic Puijli Donna K.uih ( ulin Kallcris 

Education Programs Papers of James Monroe I'lin . Relalions Si C'oiiiiii. I 'luversin AthiiiK iiiinii I ir.'h-Ji. I.iir.' ( n 




Patricia Revere 
B.O.V. 



Patricia Reynolds 
Eiliicarlon Proiirams 



Ciar_\ Richards 
Eniilish, Liui;.. Comm. 



Xa\ iar Richardson 
B.O.V. 



Lynn Ro 
IT Si InstitttalUm Relations 



Joseph Romero 
Cla.\slcs. Phil.. Religion 



Marcel Roller 
.Modern Foreign Lang. 



Maria Riegger 

.Modem I'nrunn Lin'. 




I arhani; Roiihani 
Cieograpliy 



.lcHVe\ Rountree 



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Cedric Rucker Andy Rush Larissa Ruuskanen 

Student Affairs Div. of Teach. & Learn. Tech. Counseling & Psycli. Sen'ices 



Robert Rycroft 
Economics 



Mark Safferstone 
CGPS 




L V 



Jose Sainz 
Modern Foreign Lang. 



Douglas Sanford 
Historic Preservation 



Nana Lou Sauder 
B.O.V. 



Mara Scanlon 
English, Ling., Comm. 



Holly Schiffrin 
Psychology 




Debra Schleef 
Sociology & Anthropology 



Philip Schmehl 
Athletics, Health. P.E. 



Federico Schrass 
Modern Foreign Lang. 



JoAnn Schrass 
Academic Services 



Brett Scofield 
Counseling & Psych. Sen'ices 




Raymond Scott 
Chemistn' 



Sally Scott 
Disability Ser\'ices 



Doug Searcy 
Student Affairs 



Elizabeth Searcy 
Academic Services 



Crystal Sehlke 
Career Senices 




irles Sharpless 
lemistiy 



Marie Sheckels 
Education & Mathematics 



Thomas Sheridan 
Athletics, Health, P.E. 



Vanessa Shurina Ranjit Singh 

University Advancement Poli. Sci. & Intern. Affairs 



Cynthia Snyder 
Alumni Relations 



Carol Ste\'cns 
Academic Services 



Facult 




Marie Somma 
Alumni Relations 



Stan Soper John St. Clair Stephen Slageberg 

Athletics, Health, P.E. Distance & Blended LeurninK Economics 




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Ken Steen 
L'niversity Advancement 



Pelra Sleiiicr 
M.Hlcrn Forei'jn luuc 



C. Maureen Stinger 
B.U.V. 




leRoy Slrohl I 
L^MW Lihraru 



Gregg Stull 
Theatre & Dance 



Jean Stunibaugh 
CA/W Foundation 



Facult 



301- 



Facult 




Raymond Tuttle 
Student Affairs 



Jo Tyler 
Education Programs 



Craig Vasey 
Classics, Phil., Religion 



Brenda Vogel 
Education Programs 



Facult 



Shara Voisard 
Modem Foreign Lang. 



Stephen Watkins Justin Wcbh 

Eni;lish. Lint;.. Coiniu. Enlcrprisc .Xpp. Sfivices 



I, aw rciKC W L'hb 
Ailmissiiiiis 



Inez VVchrli Mane W'cllinyKin 




Zach Whalen Charles Whipkey 

English, Ling.. Comm. Earth & Environ. Sciences 



Pamela White 
B.O.V. 



Khalil 'iazdi l^Mhcr Vook 

IT & Informational Research English. Ling.. Coinin 



Fred Whitman Werner Wieland 

Business .Administration Biological Services 




Tm Uaoina nous 
IqI and loo* 



TtA tiaoi^l^Winti 



Vlliau a^'ai mi l^cfetodlaa 



Toi akoa^n ma winai, 1 (Mc 
Sii^i ma outofiia wHHi 
I'm (lolf^Q, 4-^^^^' ^^"^pH^oU 
^iMtlitmi (^ind ma u^aa 







httk 



^ 



entor 



^Ads 




7 j^ 



Vll imif^ met imiln. an(f i^'voi \^{i\i(ykk 



Vlicyki Ictme ibCafe ma iatt 





I'm o^^ia ^ih(f, ty^ii u^okU, mix dkiamv, 
(^akoi ma nUH. 4«a> ma i^ami 
V.iiniiy\hk ai I 4ail ma 4£a4, 



ooc ao 



^.afl-Hl, 




In: \ikki ki 



S^otfMtfnan 



Gt^ 



aX 



5co 



,\X\ 



Just "One Note" - 

You bring music to our hearts. 

We love you. 

Dad & Mom 




Congratulations, 
'Qraduate 




rS^^^^'/yMC 



''J>^'' 



OAd-T-o\D ^~j . 



//^c/y^ 



Congratulations! 
UUe admire you greatly 

Por uuorking so hard 
to reach this milestone. 


1 


■^ 


ULIe ujish you success 

in all you do. 

KnouLi that uue ujIII 




111 


alujoys be in your life 




ri4r 


as you move 
ifito the next stages. 


1 








a,iitz C iodd 


■B^*^^ 




|y^ 



306 



%atherine, 

Congratulations on all of your 
accomplishments at ZlzMW! 

We are so proud of you and 
Vpis/? you elpery happiness and 
success in the future! 

With all our lolpe, 
^tom, T)ad, <J)itatt and 
Thomas 



To Oor frlnctii A*KLfc^, 

Af<*r foi/r ^lorux/* ^CAr* Af {Jf^\J..you xrt x 
(;i^Al>t)ATf !!1 UWf An CUifAndln^ 
AcKtfc*tiv*tnf . Ut tnou) ^<X/ lola kAVt COnHnOtd 

ii/cceu In ukAfevtr ^ou do And uker&vtr ^01/ ^0.... 

Loofc. Af fodA^ A* ^tf H\fc *fArf of "AnofKer 
Advtnfurt." flnAa^J 'W fCAU^ *Sia OU/V\f "!!', 

...And «0 f rlnceXi, t>AnCe And StlAft ^OUT UA^ 

Hwoi/^K Life, f njo^ tvtr^ i*^ni4e. of If ...birt- 
rtiMtMbtr ijoi/ u)(Xl AluA^i KAVt a pArfntr, US!!! 

Voor Lo\^ln^ f AiMci^ 







Congratulations on your Graduation! 

We are very proud of you both. 

Always keep God 1st in your life. 

Remember Ph. 4:T3 

We love you both. 

Mom & Dad 



^[(}Uppi^{)^(}nmm^a 



Congratulations Giuseppe, 
We are so very proud of you and 
all of your accomplishments while 
attending the University of Mary 
Washington. 

We always knew you were born 
to be a leader. May you make 
your mark wherever you go near 
or far, and may all your dreams 
come true. 

With all of our love and God's 

blessing. 

Proud Mom and Dad, Sarina, 

Sandra, Nonni and the family 





S^ie 



a 



^00^2 





(^'on^rdtiilalions i'rica'.'.l 
']\ '(• are so proiiii of your siirress! 
Dream big, flourish a net shtire 

Tour Qod gitfH talents. 
Tin- beauty of the "Korld awaits 

you! 
Tii^t time to eelebrate your life! 

QootI luei^ on the rest of your 

journey anil 

('nntinue to follo-K your dreams. 

li'here'fer you go. go "irilh all 

your heart. 

J^zo'fe. JiCom and 'Dad . Jason 

and £.il\ 



BD7 



Dani^oad^ 



Danl, 

Coiagrutulatlons on youu 

grxxduatloR! 

Always... 

Do wkat you lov^e 

Follow your dreams, 

Be true to yourself, and 

Lo<>e, kapplness and success 

will follow. 

We are so proud of you! 

Lov?e, Mom, Dad, and Nina. 



Ehlni^oa 




Erm, 

Frmn i/^c daif pii were hrn pu haire kmi^i 

u^ n&Iknf fjuPJ&^ andfiappins^i We are 4& 

fjr&ud &( ai£ pu Ve acc&mpMed. 

Cm^aUikUm^' with t\re(rdm 

Mm, Dad, R&i and Steire 

"18 



%oo Uoo, iJfc ATfc ver^ )Oituti- f o KAve ^ou. TVtU U 

(Kn. AJMAzln^ R>Ht In ^(XW lift. VoO Art A. btAuHfuL 

InfelU^enf , iuttk^, ^<XM0 uoiMAn. Vou CAn Ad\L&vt 

An^Hxcn^, HunnK. ^ou for beln^ OUT doi/^Kfer. 

your ver^ proud pArtnfx 

^\0M A Dftd 




CoA^rAfuUfLoia! LlfHt iUftr ija/ Art. on yoir ua^] f 

A<^^u£vln^ ^our drtAiMt. Voi/ Vunvt )H(ui& iMfc (o proud! 

1 towt you foopUt 




^iy^ays belielDe. 



We are Ipery proud of you. 





Congratulations, ^Com, T)ad , and J^ilipe. 




imlh^iil 







■Mrl^f'iifst -Michflle. 

Tdii liniiiahl jny mid sun shine into your -jSCom and my liyi-s 
yeilh your birth. T'oddling times yvere an udy<enlnre not to he 
missed iind If at thing you groyf through high school and nov 
college into a beautiful . confident and secure young 'nniiian has 
been a pure joy. 

Tou endured a terrible loss three year ago. Vet your great 
smile continues to be your light to the "World and "nill alffays 
lea>e a lasting and positi"t>e impression on myself and our 
family. 

.7f U could giJ'e you anything as you graduate. U yfould gi^c 
you a candle that burns as brightly as the light "within you . the 
light you arc... U Vfould tell you to l^eep it burning, no matter 
Vibat. T>oii't let your light f Helper and fade because of 
eyeryday challenges and concerns. The tforld needs your light . 
Ui'old your candle high! 

\A s your -JsCom once said before, "enjoy your vtiugs but 
please ahTays remember vehere you found your roots as tfell." 

U am so "Yery proud of you'. 

'With loye from 'Dad and Joe - U l^noVt your -JMom is so 
proud of you right uoVf! 









Congrutulations Katie 
You're coniG a long Way baby!! 




We're so proud of you...XOXO, 

Mom, Dad, Jenni and 

Grandma 




j^ 



Kelly, your Mom and I could not be prouder of you for your 
accomplishments at the U. of Mary Washington. You have grown 

and matured and you are on your way to realizing your full 
pot:; : 'ol. Academically just stellar (Phi Beta Kappa), your highly 
acti\ i !"ement in the community (Catholic Campus Ministries) 

and -ivolvement in extra curricular activities such as 

performir: ( IMW (and many other clubs, etc) show you as 

someout ided. Always keep close the friendships, 

relationships u: . : eriences you have gained at the U of Mary 

Washington. This is the time to celebrate. All your hard work 

has paid off with a lasting academic achievement. Your whole 

family is PROUD! Mom, Dad, Grandma, Uncle Donald, Grandpa 

and Nana G and all the rest of the family. With love to remember 

this day! (note picture is a fun moment at Fenway catching a foul 

ball - Living to the Fullest!) 



310 



^inntiSlhnkh 



"The future belongs to those who 
believe in the beauty of their dreams." 



Eleanor Roosevelt 




-Jenny- 

As you begin the next chapter of your life, we 

know you will continue to dream with all the 

passion and love you have shown in all of your 

endeavos. We could not be more proud of the 

outstanding woman you have beome. 

We love you! 

Mom, Dad & Kevin 



VadKdli^^amUat)olan 




YOUR FAMILY IS SO PROUD OF 

YOU! 

WITH LOVE 

CONGRATULATIONS ! 







W^ /\.^T^ GKTtJ.CKGI-y PU.0U1> OP YOU AV^-Ii MJL OF YOUR. /iCjCjOKPL-I^HMeViT^ /IT U^W. M/^Y 

THis^ :g,^ rwe ^r At^r op kuch success iv^ Yout^ cmoSj^ ca^^^^lS. m^ a ^e/^v^iv^^spui, 

LlP^POt^ ?,OrK OP YOU iVi TH^PUrUti.^. WCLOVe YOU /iVi'i> Wl^H YOU Ml TWe" "BC^r /^^ YOU 

K0VeP0t5.W/V^1> IVi YOUft. eii'IiCAVOO^. 

'1>/\1> ^ KOK WlLLCS.^ 



'^1 






l^OU. are stronger than you feel , 
T&U. are smarter than you thin^, 
T&ZI are braver than \wi/ bcHe'\)e, 



TOld'^bard ■s^ori;^ is the foundation of your success 
T01J.'\anibition is the kj:y to your future 
TOZl'Rjicconip/ishn/cnts vpi// be the lessons of ton/or ro^ys students 

T0ZC%Janii/y continues to share your life in ai)iaii;})icnt at the person you halw become 
and stares ypith anticipation at all that you v^ill achielH' C'7f^ 




We are so proud of you!! 

"With -Jll Our j[:o')H' ^Monr ^Dad and £arry 



im 



Kdiii(lM Kn&pl 




Congratulations Catherine. 

Toil are an ama^ng young lady &^ you 

ynill makj a difference in people' s li')>es. 

We are so proud of you. 

With J^oye, 
^Coni, T>ad, &^%risten 



^rf^a^eod 



L<^ve, 1>3Jl, K<MA\, 




To my girl and best frien(Q 

^^^teftons on making it out alive! I cannot believe 
tbat^^H|^^ has gone by so fast with you. Thank you 
for ev^HHfttou have done for me and I am so thankful 
that I (^^i^^IJHB^Y best friend. Even though school is 
over, our patnP||ra^rinitely still cross for years to come. 
Good luck in everY^^.You do, keep your head up and 
always look towards mfe' light side of things. 

love forever, * . 

Michelle 



31^ 



We ^^re verj pre^uJl e^ 
VreiA\ev\cJl(^us:> 

Le^ve, NA<MA\, ^^Jl, 2:eu^, 



T©: ^sYiX^^ ^acabtf, Cliriftic 

C©urti\c^ ^'^©©dburi^, Ca«salT:dra ^atti, 
aftd «y«Ttf'©ri;«-^©it2, 2,006-2,007 ^Iy€^ 

C®i^'grats «v*T'/'©i^'ci We're ©utft 

F©ur tfcar* lias c©tRC afid g®l^« al\d 

\f\iil^ s©tn«- ©/ us rtxh^iti cl©**, ©th.«T« 

have drifbed. JV©th.il^| yfill e®tnf are t© 

©ur titiiC Sf eitt at dMV^, but it i/as a 

jpleasure \rv©i/il\g all ©/ tf©u, arid 1 h^J^ 

i/C v/ill see each, ©ther agail\' il^ the 

^ture. 

^©®d lucJ^virith, if©uT live*. 

lo©ve, 
Michelle Esch 






SO MA>fY NIGHTS, IVE LED AWAKE 
THI^fKING OF THE TIME rr TAKES TO GROW Lffi 



USTENING TO EVERYTHING OUR PARENTS SA'Y 
THEY KNOW WILL BRING US FORTUNE 



I KNOW rVE WATTED FOR THIS FOREVER I KNOW! x 
BUT NOW rrS HERE AND I AM SCARED TO GO OUT ON MY OWN 

^ — , AND I PRAY THAT YOU WELL BE 

WITH ME FOREVER AND EVER RIGHT HERE BY MY SDE 

HOLDING ME CLOSER AND CLOSER 

AND IF WE SEPARATE PLEASE DONT FORGET THE DAYS 

WHEN WE WERE FRIENDS WHEN WE WERE FRIENDS 




WE FLIES BY SO FAST YOU NOTICE YOU FORGE 
THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IN LIFE 

WE MAKE MISrmSSrlm^HOUT OUR TIME 
WE FORGIVE THOSE WHO CAUSE US STRIFE AND HARM US 

l AND NOW FM WISHING WE WERE LITTLE KIDS AGAIN 
ND WE COULD BE AS CAREFREE AS WHEN WE FIRST MET 

\ ..-.^: AND I PRAY THAT YOU WILL BE 
WITH ME TOREVER AND EVER RIGHT HERE BY MY SDE 
^ HOLDING ME CLOSER AND CLOSER 

ND IF WE SEPARATE PLEASE DONT FORGET THE DAYS 
WHEN WE WERE FRIENDS WHEN WE WERE FRIENDS 
HERE WE STAND WTTH OUR FUTURE IN OUR HANDS 
WE'LL DECIDE OUR FATE AND MAKE OUR PLANS 

rrS NOT GOODBYE BUT SEE YOU LATER 
LOOK FORWt^RD to AND PLEASE WtMT TO MEET AGAIN 

' WE'VE MADE WILL BE IN MY HEART DONT FORGET ME 
..^ ILL MISS YOU 

rVE LEARNED SO MUCH BEING WTTH YOU 
I HOPE YOU FEEL THE SAME WAY TOO 

. JGH TIME WILL PASS OUR LOVE WILL LAST" 
A LIFETIME THROUGH AND THROUGH 

AND I PRAY THAT YOU WILL BE 

WITH ME FOREVER AND EVER RIGHT HERE BY MY SDE 

HOLDING ME CLOSER AND CLOSER 

'and if we separate please DONT FORGET THE DAYS 

■^f WE WERE FRIENDS WHEN WE WERE FRIENDS 



**i^mtt»>m^A 



^ special 'r'!H''iAU^C3^ TOUC to the 
'Battlefield Tearbool S^^ff- 

cGife: 'Paulina %osturos. 



%at£^M£zMontT;%el sey J^eonard 



nne c. .. 




'7'brougb the Tear: 'Paulina 



sson, 8^e 



'C^^bs: f§arab ganders 



traits: <J^ic belle 8scb 



zAnd to all others '^bo contributed , 

namely: 



Joe <j)(Coiio &^ es^CS 

**%elly C^ldypell 



^^rian j^lamm 

Tearboo\s c^tafi 



zAlumni Association 



i^ • ■ .■^"T i-*< 






^ MM 

iiaoaitl uf&oU k d&m u}iAiii'^M4ldd U nous. Ltog too'di, ai I am uHitinaiiu in ^p^il, I am OTl 
itifl wo'tbina ^aAc( on <ilf>l^<i ^o<^. 'UWIU, "tf « ki,t aiad&\i. ^oLL'Mi. flLlTI 

vl:Hn«t'T^'o'(:d(4 canno't'iXbfain how m/>e|\ I apb<:2cia't'« aoo. ^oo aami in onc(Tooht|\£ kilar\l, laLTaicH andHinfjk^ ]| 
acccptidi ma o^^«A ai eo-£IC./£IC anif I i&oid n&fiaoi hin moki akafillfol. ^oo aki atnaymaiatahntid ^[__"| 
and I om 4o afai'tlof'tioi* luiotni jpakfoljiiitiam. 'Voina'tili' U nofiaLa, l>oX u^oota\>-i ioikaxilna In 
(.tkidi and itmot.'tdilinitda^ iloMi. Thank aoo ^o*th£ tati nlaifk, i&iyHlna f^ok ma ahintik, and (S"~Tf 

iommonUafina usdiiii kfa^. 1 am io ^appato \lnoiuiiatiii"Baft!l4idd U kina tiffin aooA iaf^iaUi M^ J|' 
iandi and aoo aki a fnklliii aikdl^o'iiiu ui&ol. ^"" ' || 

KdU (^aldwdt.OXli Mooid iaoi kin at a a'daftoLL ^o^"ti« badiikH a«an Witioof aaoktMlliU j^ldoha ^'" m 
fo toiyH ook poa^A- T|\ahfe ao^ 4o n^oii ^o4 hftina oi jpau^Wooal a&ok ^ando&k aHomi [nXhi ioHi o§ il^^Tl 
Ijindina [oittii kialt jalttoki f^ok an ioinf. (^ona'tatola'tlonL on akadoaXinal aJ:— 

^oi yvioHo &,^'ilan ^lamm'.Tlank a&o ko n\oih ainttimin l^ok aifiia akiat adoUitoVhi iTa^^ and ^ok 

klibina m« ^Aom bolllna ma iaH oof. ^oi, Hank tioo ^o^ at!, o^ Hi b'ufo'tiL Hu Uriakl 

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Md. iai.tLfndainl^ notliaitand nioik go^goften,-(f e-Batttcgiefi M^i'.'Witioofi^oo ail. milHu ^SJ 

l^ook ufootd notk li'ii. tlank iioo all io modi Ijok uto'iklna miki niidid and nioik aomblainlna miiin ^^J 

uoo wokkidiii intlki aiak, ok ioLfiilbid utlin ao<> aoold. SoUu lifth ^tf coonti and itdiktalnla kl&ufi. ^^— i 

Thodt? iLoo and aoad loik in aook iotokiL. ^5r- '"'' 

^ookaiakt, ui&kkina onHi^BaithlJiiild LH andtiinSlG, IdokHi }f>aLfiikii a^iaki. iatu ^oi« ^^ Y^'^^h' "'" ^i-J 
cannotiaa I Mill mUitic l&na ifkiuljol daaL and niaiti kljoki a diadlini, iotl will mikt, Uiinaiii Q^ I||| 
kmilina habbiilaiik iniiibiitokiL and miifinaioii u)<>ndik^ol and di<}ikl,ibi(>bli. '^ood loik ioiktionil wlZi 
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TfvU ^ook hoi hin io m<^e|\ mo^tthan i^^i'to i't'a^^ aolnato ioinft, on aamboL. I iaoi inliii'tiiiii. 
Idt) 0^ Mona liikUnii, and ilol> hadm, off o^ m&m iooi Imn fno^iffoti a'tociooito ila'diiil't 
biifo'di, and InfjOhmafion witi mi, ^oA utlul I am «)fh«mcfa a4'ot«^(^f! 44(>m)«o«a, nc>n« o^fhU 
wo^fd! hoae 8ccn boiii^f « utdi&otoo'i aiuii&mi ifa^, Honk tioo all io moil ^o^: aoo't ia'id wo^k! 

#a^ off a^ ao^ ^eoiinathU in the ^off, pfco4« kiib in mindiiafiiu U notix^A l>ook"i:t'iial!a^ U 
ao^U. 'TiJe UJOhTTo ifvow aoti, ao<^^ pee^i onol Ijofo'ii a'(and(ii'dd'iin MhaX an aufiiomitlmi aoo 
had at^'MW, kimindlna aoo o^ aooh alm^a n^atu MHn aoo't daat> o^ utalklna doutn Comp^i 
XOofb ^^^^v\ llki an etMhrta autaa. Vliaii do notliLltatito aioi oi iioo^ Ijiidllank and jDidtviik. 
VDi 4fCaffa aipb^ulafi itl llUm U Imbo^tonffo tiox^, u)i want to iooi't it. Tn4 ^ook luoold h 
mianlnaluL <^ rt'coi^ent^o^ aoo, io lloi onU^WJCand htoi doaominf li^.l 

yvHnldli', "Ho oni dl>i I know ian ioin ^ofhom aomtfif'in^ and koll>m.lttina nia'tla 60 ip^feodli [n 
ttx}o daixi, (OMCh I'ae Liin aoo do on iioikal oaaLloni. ^ook taLLion lif>(ola ama'Xlnal I knouts 
aooti looi ^o^t aia'il^ook wdl na'c'ta^ ufdi UrOO ^o^coe^ and I iantwaitfo Lii luiata^oo aAi o^fcTo 
amomblui. (^ona'totolatlonL on ao^l unddinaiD ni)ctaia'(, 1 knout aoo u*dl In a haotll^ol 
Uldi and 1 utui aoo iiikdoli lajDipiniU Miti Matt. ..^ 

Vaolina', I'm 4o cyciferf aoo'(}i aa'kiid'to h ioSld M[tl mi ni)d'aia'(, aoo'oi ahiada iioutn 
(look i%t&imint and baUion I<i0k'\ii l>ook oAiii makit, mi VabblihThan aoo con oyih [maalni. 
^oo'tyi inn koA a l>[a Mftthti aiah onti.ait diadlinik, I dontknoui uiiat uii mooid'oi doni 
Mi^oot aoo and I zant luaiitto Ui what us i ^omi ob tuitfv niv^ aiah\ 

^oi yiollo'. "Viank aoo l^ok aluiaai hlnatiiM l^ok ok no mattik what mi maa laiyi mikkld oi 
no mat^ik how mana blttokik wi utiki tkaina to ktial ^kom ao^. ^jfook aoldanti iontinoik 
dkiolna ^okai f^okthlk l^ook, mi kialla nooldntdo i^ wHXhoot aoo\ 

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T\telA\-€: The Theme of "Eagle Spirit" was chosen for the ninety-seventh volume of The Battlefield Yearbook by co-Editors in Chief 
Michelle Esch and Anne Elder after OS ACS motto for the year. "Once an Eagle, Always an Eagle." In order to carry the theme throughout the 
book, an eagle of some sort was placed on every page: the small eagle flying by the page numbers, eagle heads in Sports, and an eagle flymg 
on the Clubs pages. The school colors of blue and grey with white accents was also used for the theme, such as on the Student Life pages and 
the People pages. ?utlc£=.\vCV\<J-.- The Battlefield was published by Walsworth Publishing Company. 306 N. Kansas Ave.. Marceline, MO 
64658. Mindy Sayre was our Customer Service Represetative while Brian Flamm was our Yearbook Representative. The press run was 1.200 
copies, each with 320 full-color pages printed with RGB and Greyscale process. CftVef: The cover photograph was designed by co-Editors 
in Chief Michelle Esch and Anne Elder. The photograph used was taken by Matthew Brooks specifically for the cover. Ka-rAw^r-e 3-V\(A 
S^e^VWa-f-e: The book was produced using the Walsworth Yearbooks Online Design program by six staff members using their personal 
computers. Adobe Photoshop was used in order to crop and edit photos. Mv-€f U.S:.-elA\-e\\V£>. Senior Ads were sold to parents at the 
prices of $35 for an eighth of a page. $64 for a quarter page. $125 for a half page and $250 for a full page. Parents received notifications of ad 
sales through the mail. Ads were designed according to parents' specifications or at the discretion of co-Editor in Chief Michelle Esch. 
Tjp'^'J-rB-pV): "Kent" was used for Contents/Dividers/Page Numbers. "Alice" was used for Student Life. "Jasper" was used for Through the 
Year. "Keifer" for Clubs, "Chelsea" for Sports. "Daisy" for Seniors. "Herman" for Yearbook Staff Pages, and "Handwriting" for the names of 
seniors on the Parents' Ads pages. Pl.e>Vc><5-r^pVj : Underclassmen photos were provided by the University ID Center and were cropped and 
placed by co-Editor in Chief Michelle Esch. Faculty photos were also cropped and placed by Esch and were provided by the Office of News 
and Public Information. Senior Portraits were taken by appointment with Candid Color Photography, 1 1010 Bacon Race Rd, Woodbridge. VA 
22192. Seniors were notified of available dates through the mail, email announcements, and fliers placed around campus. The photos were 
then cropped and placed by co-Editor In Chief Anne Elder. Sports photographs were taken by Clint Often. Wr-cU.W<J- ^WA (Ae£=^<JV\: All 
body copy and headlines were written by staff members. Dividers and section layouts were designed by Esch and Elder. The title page, 
opening and closing, as well as the celaphon, were designed by co-Editor in Chief Michelle Esch. 'Ix.S^.Vr-ltuU.e-W: The 2010 Battlefield 
was distributed in the Fall 2010. Books were also mailed to Seniors' permanent addresses that were on file with the Administration. Funding 
for the yearbook was provided by the OSACS Finance Committee and revenue earned from Senior Ads. O^K^'^O^; The Battlefield office 
is located in Seacobeck Hall, room 107, 1301 College Ave, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 or available at battlefieldybk@gmail.com. No portion 
of the yearbook may be reprinted or reproduced in any was without the express written consent of the co-Editors in Chief. 



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Walsworth