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Full text of "The Beacon Hill collection : inspired by the early designers & craftsmen of the eighteenth century who created & made furniture of lasting beauty in keeping with the graceful living of the times"

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BEACON HILL COLLECTION 



As Shown in Beacon Hill Galleries 

BARKER BROS. 

DECORATOR SHOP, SECOND FLOOR 



Seventh Street^ Flower &^ Figueroa^ Los Angeles 



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(e>i/) BEACON HlLl. 
(3) MT.VERNOK-(C) COTTON HIH 



BEACON ST. 

1 WtH.-Prescofi 

2 Jiarnson ^ya^/ Otis 

3 David Sears 

4 John Thillipe 

5 "BeHjaminJiamer 

6 Dr. John Joy 

7 John J{(tncoe}(_ 

8 £taf r J/ou«« 

BELKNAP ST. 

1 Ahalifion Church 

2 Wm. Lancaster 

BOWDOIN SCi- 

1 Samuel 'Par}{7Kan 

2 %evere Tlouse 

3 Christopher Qore 

4 Trfer Chaniler 

5 (?4ar/«s "BulfiHch 

CAMBRIDGE ST. 

Z Jiarrisan (iraij Otis 

3 Uksi Church 

4 Joseph Coolidge 

CHARJ-ES BT. 

1 Church 

2 Abner Tiouse 

CHESTNUT ST. 

1 Liytcoln & S-toddard 

2 "BtniamiH Jog 

3 "Kichavd €■ Dcrhij 

4 Jeremiah tioi'dner 

5 Jlepzihah Swan 

6 Charles Taine 



MYRTLE ST. 
1 Wmdlomer 

OLIVE ST. 

1 David :HumphretjS 

2 Stephen DUg^ittsonJr. 

3 ^oscj (ti-awi 

4 Tlarritott QKiy Out 

5 Jonathan MatoK 

6 Jo/)*! Cullender 

7 Stephtn 7{i^ginson,h: 

8 Thomas Tcrkjns 

9 Jeremiah Qardner 

PARK ST. 

2 Josiah Quincy 

3 ?«»-Jii .S*. Cft«»-cA 

PINCKNEY ST. 

1 "Pov/der dlome 

2 WaichJIouse 

3 Middleion & (iUpioH 

S. RUSSELL ST. 
1 Joseph "Dition 

TEMPLE ST. 
1 "Bela Clapp 

TRpMONT ST. 
1 Tremon-f Jiotise 
2, Teter Tancuil 

WALNUT ST. 
1 Uriah CoHing 

LOUISBURG SGL- 
1 Jenny iind married 



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The Beacon Hill Collection 




The fireplace in the HARRISON GRAY OTIS HOUSE dining room 

This house was designed by Charles Bulfinch £5? fireplace frame probably carved by Mclntire 

Beautifully restored by the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities 



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BEACON HILL COLLECTION 

inspired by the early Designers ^ Craftsmen 

of the EIGHTEENTH CENTURY who Created (£^ 

m2idQ f/^rn it N re of lasting beauty in keeping 

with the graceful living of the times 




CHARLES BULFINCH, Esq. 
1763-1844 



SIXTH FDITION 



BARKER BROS. 

Seventh St., Flower and Figueroa, Los Angeles, California 




K.O. 4° BEACON STREET, FACING BOSTON COMMON 
Designed by Charles Bulfinch ^ at present the home ot 
The Women's City Club of Boston 




FO RE WO R D 




"r IS with pleasure that we present the Beacon Hill Collec- 
tion, the finished product of a New Englaml school ot skilled 
craftsmen who have served their apprenticeship in the 
tradition ot an older day. 

Beacon Hill of the Georgian period represented the utmost in 
simple, dignified and gracious living, and many homes are lived 
in today by descendants of those illustrious citizens whose names 
are prominently listed on the pages of American history. 

The Beacon Hill Collection was inspired by the beautifully 
designed furniture found in these homes. Many of the pieces are 
exact copies of originals, some taken from carefully measured 
drawings of genuine antiques, while others interpret the spirit of 
these master styles in the light of modern requirements. 

We welcome the opportunity of bringing you this collection 
from which you may select a single piece at a time if you desire 
or any number of pieces according to your individual taste and 
requirements. 

You have the assurance that furniture of such excellent tradi- 
tion has withstood the test of time without change of style. It 
is a heritage which is our pleasure to carry on, believing that fur- 
niture when made by Master Craftsmen and of lasting beavity 
leads to a finer and happier liv'ing. 



J^s ^?7ge/es, Qalifoimia 



BARKER BROS. 



2049997 




ONE oj the MANY CHARMING HOUSES on BEACON HILL 

Designed by Charles Bulfinch i£ once owned i£ lived in 

bv the actor Edwin Booth 



The Heritage 0/ BEACON HILL 




foii MORE than two centuries Beacon Hill, a residential section in Boston, 
has typified a certain rest and balance in the fine art of simple and dig- 
nified living. The name originated in the days ot the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony when early settlers founti a high hill, inland a little from 
Boston Harbor, and planted a beacon there. They called the place Beacon Hill. 
Beacon Hill is known tar and wide to-day — a place ot high distinction. It is a 
symbol that stands for enlightenment, toward which the eyes of culture turn, 
reminiscent of the past and hopeful of the future. 

A place becomes famous by the important people who live there. Previous 
to the settlement of Beacon Hill in i6jo, a first citizen in Boston was one 
Blackstone. Blackstone invited Governor Winthrop's colony to leave the low 
land of Charlestown and share his hill and his good water in what is now known 
as Spring Lane. His generous offer was too freely accepted, and his numerous 
neighbors infringed on his privacy, to avoid them he moved away in the general 
direction of Providence. But he left an indelible mark. Part of his farm still 
remains free anci open — Boston Common. 

Other marks made by other important people abound. The Hancock House, 
Georgian Colonial, dominating Beacon Hill, was built by Thomas Hancock, 
but his famous nephew John, as Governor of Massachusetts and first signer of 
the Declaration of Independence, marked it for his own. It was John, citizen of 
Boston and wealthy merchant, who caused to be planted the eight huge English 
elms that line Beacon Street inside the Common. Prior to the year 1790 do- 
mestic architecture fortunately followed closely the teachings of those master 
architects, Robert and James Adam of England. However, from the period 1790 
to 1 8 18 many buildings of architectural merit were the result of designs by 
Charles Bulfinch, himself a resident of Beacon Hill, and the first profes- 
sional architect in New England. Number 40 Beacon Street, now the Women's 
City Club, is attributed to him, but the Harrison Gray Otis houses, one on Mt. 
Vernon and the other on Cambridge Street, are unquestionably his. The latter 
is open to the public as a museum and is the home of the Society for the Preser- 
vation of New England Antiquities. Here the hospitable Otis provided daily 
ten gallons of punch, set out on the beautiful stair landing to be drunk by his 
fellow citizens, or failing this, to be allowed to evaporate. 



Bulfinch was also our earliest native architect of public buildings, and is best 
known for his part in designing the National Capitol in Washington, and for 
the design of the beautiful State Houses of Massachusetts and Maine. 

Other marks were made by other important people on Beacon Hill. There 
was John Singleton Copley, our great pioneer portrait painter and extensive 
land owner. It is believed that Elihu Yale, of university fame, was born here. 
Louisa Alcott lived during her creative years in Louisburg Square. Jenny Lind, 
the Swedish nightingale, was married on Beacon Hill. A parade ot illustrious 
people too numerous to mention gave romance and glamour to the Hill, long 
after the Beacon had passed into history. 

It is the artist craftsmen who evolved the furniture, the furnishings, the in- 
timate things associated with the great, and to these we turn with our home- 
making longings. It has been said that Furniture History in the United States 
begins with the Englishmen who first settled here. Trained woodworkers were 
soon numbered among them. The evolution ot cabinetmaking in America is too 
lengthy to trace here, but undoubtedly much of the original furniture in the 
early Beacon Hill settlement was of local character. On the other hand, close 
contact with the Mother Country, England, for reasons of kinship and commerce, 
accounted for much of the furnishings during Colonial days. Styles and 
other luxuries often arrived in America within a year of their appearance in 
London. The residents of Beacon Hill accumulated wealth rapidly, and it was 
natural that they should gratify their taste for fine furniture and decorations 
by purchases from abroad. In fact, many homes literally became storehouses 
for treasures gathered from all parts of the world and brought to Boston, in 
some cases, by the owners' own ships. Also coastwise shipping brought many 
pieces of furniture from well-known cabinet shops located in other colonies. The 
local cabinetmaker contributed his share to Beacon Hill, but it was not until 
after the Revolution, with England in disfavor, that the struggling American 
craftsman really came into his own. He had served a long apprenticeship. 

The Federal period in the United States was the dawn of a golden era in 
American furniture. Wherever there was furniture of merit it found its way to 
Beacon Hill; but during this particular period it would seem from examples ex- 
tant that the chief contributing shops were located mostly in Boston and vicinity, 
Salem, Newburyport, and Portsmouth. There was John Seymour and Son ot 
Creek Square, Boston, responsible for the unusually delicate and attractive tam- 
bour writing desks, of which several styles were made. These desks are outstand- 
ing today in point of design and workmanship. Across the Charles River in 
Charlestown we have the workshops of Jacob Forster and Benjamin Frothing- 
ham. In 1803 Forster advertised the sale of 1400 field and high maple bedposts. 
He must have had a shop of considerable size. Major Frothingham, member ot 
Washington's stat^' during the Revolutionary War, enjoyed the patronage ot 
President and Lady Washington. Labels have been found on his furniture with 
the initials of the engraver N. H. Sc. P., doubtless those of Nathaniel Hurd, one 



of the first Colonial engravers. There was SamuelMcIntire of Salem, foremost 
New England carver, and Abner Toppan of Newburyport, cabinetmaker. The 
work of these and other prominent craftsmen, such as Wm. Savery of Phila- 
delphia, Townsend and Goddard of Rhotle Island, and Duncan Phyfeof New 
York, is still to be found on Beacon Hill. 

There exists in most of us a more or less indefinable desire to know more about 
the articles which filled the household needs of our forefathers. This has been 
fully realized by the First National Bank of Boston, for in one of a series of 
illustrations of the work of early New England craftsmen they selected a furni- 
ture maker's workroom. This picture, through their courtesy, is shown on the 
cover of this book. 

The search for the antique in furniture is an absorbing occupation which waxes 
and wanes as time and money are available. Antiques are not primarily ot value 
simply because they are old. Even the values given by age are not of years only, 
but are due to the living character which years have afforded them. Furniture 
that has been lived with acquires an aura which is not by any means imaginary. 
On the other hand, the good example newly made carries with it all the value 
due to tradition, and what it lacks of long human association is frequently 
offset by a qualified adaptation to the present. The maker of good furniture is 
both artist and craftsman; he is the repository of good tradition, and he has the 
skill to preserve and continue it. So that often you will find a new chair beside 
an old one, each of the same class and kind, the new only a younger brother of 
the old. And you may find both occupied by the descendants ot the original 
aristocracy ot Beacon Hill. 







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Beacon Hill Collection 

^lece .'\urri^t'r 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^'^^^ 



A MARK 6/ CRAFTSMANSHIP 

The real need for a finer type of reproduction which reflects 

the spirit of early craftsmanship was the inspiration which 

prompted the Beacon Hill Collectiofi. * Many ot the pieces 

illustrated are faithjidh reproduced from originals owned by 

prominent families, not only from Beacon Hill, but elsewhere 

in Boston and New England. We gratefully acknowledge the 

interest and assistance rendered by those who have loaned 

rare £5? priceless family heirlooms for reproduction purposes. 

We also respect the wishes of those who prefer to remain 

anonymous in contributing material which appears 

in the following pages, ^f Every effort has been 

made to reproduce the original piece with 

absolute accuracy of detail including 

hardware and the soft, mellow, 

OLD finishes of the origixal 



EACH PIECE FROM THE BEACON HILL COLLECTION- 
CARRIES THE ABOVE MARK OF AUTHENTICITY 

THE NAME BEACON HILL COLLECTION IS REGISTERED IN THE U. S. PAT. OFF. 




SOCIAL GRACE h/rhelAVlSC, ROOM 

(syociability &^ '7?epartee 

with a background o£ grace/'u//y designed Georgian furniture 

having the spirit & mclloiv teeling ot 

an older day 



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No. 13 BIRCHALL — Sheraton Console, from English design of the period 1795. Mahogany, inlaid with burl maple, satinwood, 
and rosewood — L 36, D 13H, H 32. 



12 




No. 17 ELLIOT -Hepplewhite Card Table, from American design of the period 1785. Philadelphia origin. Mahogany, inlaid 
with satinwood, pivoted leg — L 34, D 17, H 30. 



13 




No. 20 DOROTHEA HENRY — Chippendale Mahogany Card Table, from American design of the period 1770, Philadelphia 
origin. Pivoted legs — L33J2, D 17, H 28J2. 



14 




No. 1004 STEPHENS — Regency Card Table, from English design ot' the period 1800. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood 
lines; swivel top — L 36, D 18, H 30. 




No. 711 EDGEWOOD — Regency Sofa Table, from English design of the period 1820. Mahogany, crossbanded with 
rosewood, two drawers simulated on reverse side. Drawers and panels mounted with brass beading L 34)^2, 
D 26, H 28, leaves down; L 56'^ leaves up. 



16 




No. 22 MONTAGUE — Sheraton Sofa Table, from English design of the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood, two 
drawers simulated on reverse side — L 36, D 25}^, H 27, leaves down; L 57, leaves up. 



17 




No. 797 BUSWhLL — Hepplewhite Pembroke Table, from English design of the period 1780. Mahogany, inlaid with 
satinwood lines, one drawer; swirl mahogany top — L i7>^, D 29, H Tjyi. 



18 




No. 190 SANDLEIGH — Hepplewhite Pembroke Table, tVom English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, inlaid with 
tulipwood — L 29, D lo}-^, H 28, leaves down; D 38 i-^, leaves up. 

No. 243 ROGERS — Regency Love Seat, from English design of the period 1815. Front rail 54" 











No. 49 PARHAM — Hepplewhite Drop-Leaf Pembroke Table, troni English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, with 
figured mahogany top and drawer-front, inlaid with tulipwood — L I7>i, D 20, H 27, leaves down; L 29"^, leaves up. 



20 




No. 385 STANIFORD — Hepplewhite Pembroke Table, from English design of the period 1785- Figured mahogany top 
and drawer-front, crossbanded with mahogany — Lja^^, D 18, H 28, leaves down; D 36, leaves up. 



21 




No. 194 AMES — Sheraton Drum Table, from English design of the period 1790. Mahogany, with tooled leather top. Two 
drawers — Dia. 36, H 29. 

No. 7?o KIRKLAND — Hepplewhite Wing Chair, from English design of the period 178";. Tufted back — W 28, S.D 22, 
H 42>4. 



12 




No. 427 MONROE — Regency Drum Table, from English design of the period 1810. Mahogany, with tooled leather top, 

two drawers — Dia. 3a, H 28'-2. 
No. 240 RAWSON — Sheraton Arm Chair, from English design of the period 1700. Spring seat. Color leather optional. 



23 




No. 270 GERALD — Hepplewhite Mahogany Upholstered Arm Chair, from EngHsh design of the period 1775. Spring seat- 
W 23, S.D. 20, H 37. 



24 




No. 36 DALTON — Queen Anne Wing Chair, from English design of the period 1740. 



25 



No. 768 MINOT — Chippendale Two-Tier Revolving Book Table, from English design ot" the period 1770; copper tray 

insert at top with removable wood cover — Dia. 23, H 53. 
No. 728 LOWELL — Hepplewhite Wing Chair, from English design of the period 1780 — W 29, S.D 21, H 45. 



26 




No. 361 DUITON — Sheraton Mahogany Wing Chair, from English design of the period 1790. Spring back and spring seat - 
\V26, S.D 2i,H40. 




No. 740 COLBY 

H 45- 



■ Sheraton Wing Chair. Buttoned barrel back. Also available with channel back — W 291^, S.D. 24, 



28 




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No. 767 SHEFFIELD — Sheraton Drum Table, from English design of the period 1800. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood 
lines and gold tooled leather top. Two drawers and lift sides enclosing two wells — Dia. 36, H 29K. 



29 




No. 737 CRABTREE — Hepplewhite Wing Chair, from English design of the period 1785. Tufted back — W 30, S.D 24, 
H 30. 

No. 1003 COOPER — F"or description of table see page 48. 



30 




No. 729 NEWTON — Chippendale Wing Chair, from American design of the period 1770, New England origin — W 27, 
S.D 19K, H 40. 



31 




No. 7^1 LONGWOOD - English type overstufFed Side Chair. Tutted spring back and seat - W 28, S.D. zij^, H 34- 
No. 647 DUNMORE — For description of chest see page 85. 



32 




No. 734 PRESCOTT — English Type Club Chair — W 29, S.D iiyi, H 34. 

No. ^87 BURNSDALE — Sheraton Mahogany Library Steps, from English design of the period 1800. Cupboard section 

under second step. All steps tooled leather, color optional ^ L 16, D 29, H 27. 
No. 84 APPLEGATE — For description of desk see page 99. 

33 






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No. 777 BENNINGTON — Chippendale Mahogany Pembroke Table from English design of the period 1780 — L 29^^, 
D 183^, H 28, leaves down; D 39, leaves up. 

No. 744 PEMBERTON — English Type Overstuffed Arm Chair with buttoned back — \V 28, S.D 21, H 31. 



34 







No. 736 PUTNAM — English Type Overstuffed Arm Chair, square tapered legs — W 29, S.D 24, H J2. 
No. 417 ROCKWELL — For description of table see page 65. 



35 




No. 176 BAMFORD — Regency Table, tVom English design of the period 18 10. Mahogany, with ebonized turnings and brass 
gallery; one long drawer — L 27, D 15}^, H 25. 

No. 244 GARDNER — English Type Overstuffed Arm Chair. 



36 




No. 363 JOYCE — English Type Overstuffed Arm Chair, with buttoned back. Square tapered legs — W 28, S.D 22, H 34. 



37 




No. 235 KINGSLEY — Chippendale Mahogany Arm Chair, from EngHsh design of the period 1770. Buttoned back and seat 
optional. Available tufted. 



38 





No. 42 WELLt.SLL\' — Chippendale Arm Chair, with tufted back and seat, from English design of the period 1760. 



39 




No. 304 CHATHAM — Regency Mahogany Arm Chair, from Enghsh design of the period 18 10. Painted frame if desired. 

No. 13 BIRCHALL — Sheraton Console, from English design of the period 1795. Mahogany, inlaid with burl maple, satinwood, 
and rosewood — L 36, D 13^21 H 32. 



40 




No. 739 NORFOLK — Regency Mahogany Arm Chair, from Enghsh design of the period 1820 — W 
No. 387 BURNSDALE — For description see page 2J. 



S.D 23, H 33. 



41 





No. 40 EMERY — Chippendale Wing Chair, upholstered in leather with buttoned back and buttoned seat, from English design 
of the period 1 770. 



42 




No. 434 FORBES — English Type Overstuffed Arm Chair, channel back, inside tufted arms — VV 29, S.D 22, H 31. 



43 




No. 623 CONRAD — Sheraton Nest of Tables, from English design of the period 1790. Mahogany inlaid with satinwood. 
Outside table tooled leather top, banded with satinwood; inside tables all mahogany tops — L 21, D 13K, H 27. 

No. 389 TROWBRIDGE — Sheraton Wing Chair. Buttoned barrel back — W 26, S.D 20, H 41. 



44 




No. 750 MADISON — Hepplewhite Wing Chair, from English design of the period 1785. Tufted back and seat — W 25, 
S.D 20, H 221/2. 

No. 766 OXFORD — Chippendale Mahogany Table, from EngHsh design of the period 1770 — L 27K, D 20, H 27. 



45 




No. 598 DAWSON — Adam Mahogany Oval-Back Arm Chair, from English design of the period 1785 — W 24, S.D 20, H 37. 



46 




No. 597 BURBANK — Hepplewhite Upholstered Arm Chair, from English design of the period 1785 — W 22, S.D 17, H 37. 



47 



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No. 1003 COOPER — Chippendale Mahogany Two-Tier Dumb Waiter, from Enghsh design of the period 1760. Bottom tray — 

Dia. 23><, H 33. 
No. 294 SUTTON — English Type Overstuffed .-^rm Chair with tufted back and arms. 




No. 46 PLYMOUTH — Chippendale Arm Chair, from English design of the period 1760. 



49 




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No. 253 BURGESS — Regency Table, from English design of the period 1810. Mahogany, inlaid with tulipwood — L 24, 
D 17, H 281^. 



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No. 375 LANSFORD — Regency Table, from English design of the period 1810. Mahogany, with ebonized turnings, and brass 
gallery; one long drawer — L 27, D I53'2, H 29. 



51 




No. 254 CODMAN — Sheraton Spider-Leg Table, from English design of the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid with English 
ash — L 29, D 1 2, H 27} 2, leaves down; D t,2 leaves up. 

No. 55 CROSSLEY — For description of Sofa see page 66. 



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No. 454 EDWARDS — Hepplewhite I'able, from English design ot the period 1785. Mahogany, with figured mahogany top 
cross-banded with mahogany. One drawer — L -9,' 2, D 21 J 2, H 283-2. 

No. 472 BARNARD — Lawson Tvpe Sofa, with Greek-key arm. Front rail 75". 



S3 




No. 682 EVANS — Mahogany Spider-Leg Table, from American origin of the period 1760 — L lo, D ^^H, H 24, leaves 
down; L 46, leaves up. 



54 




No. 453 GRANADA — Adam Tabic, from English design of the period 1785. Top of quartered figured mahogany, cross- 
banded with mahogany; one drawer — L 29, D 10, H 18. 



55 




No. 651 ABERDEEN — Chippendale Mahogany Coffee Table, adapted from butler's tray. English design of the period 1770. 
L3g, D27K, H 19. 




.__^ 



No. 288 BEDFORD — Chippendale Coffee Table, adapted from English design of the period 1760. Mahogany, with tooled 
leather top — L 34, D 21, H i6J^. 



57 




No. 367 RADDISON — Chippendale Nest of Tables, adapted from English design of the period 1770. Mahogany, with tooled 
leather top — Dia. 27, H i8>2. 



58 




No. 267 CHILTON — Regency Coffee Table, adapted trom English design of the period 1810. Mahogany, with tooled leather 
top. Two small drawers — L 2oM> D 2634) H 18. 

No. 243 ROGERS — Regency Love Seat, from English design of the period 1815. Front rail 54". 



59 





No. 380 GLEASON — Regency Coffee Table, adapted from English design of the period 18 10, for use as a Hobby table. Ma- 
hogany, with tooled leather top. Contains two drawers, and center display section, glass with brass grille — L 36, 
D 19K, H 19. 



60 




No. 469 OWENS — Regency Cotfee Table, adapted from English design ot the period 18 10. Mahogany, with gold-tooled leather 
top — L36, D ii8'2^ H I7>2. 



61 




No. 644 RALSTON — Hepplewhite Coffee Table, adapted from English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, with insert 
of gold tooled leather — Dia. 36, H iS'i. 

No. 498 JEROME — English Type Overstuffed Sofa, kidnev shape, with square tapered legs. Tufted back and seat — L ;% 
S.D 20, H 29. 



62 




No. 605 FRANKLIN — English Type Overstuffed Love Seat — L 52, S.D 22, H 29. 

No. 255 BRIMMER — For description of table see page 67. 

No. 387 BURNSDALE — For description of library steps see page 23- 



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No. 776 ADUINGTOX — English Type Overstuffed Love Seat. Tutted back and seat — L 50, S.D 21, H n^^yi. 

No. 773 WENDELL — Coffee Table adapted from Chinese Chippendale design. Lacquered mahogany, color optional. 
."Mso available in mahogany finish — L 44, D 2j, H l8J^. 



64 




No. 738 CHOATE — English Type Overstuffed Small Sofa — L 58, S.D 24, H 32. 

No. 417 ROCKWELL — Regency Mahogany Canterbury Table, from English design of the period 1815. Figured ma- 
hogany top; one long drawer — L 17, D 26, H 26. 



65 




No. 55 CROSSLEY — Chippendale Sofa, from American design of the period 1770, New England origin. Mahogany, hand 
cnrved frame. Front rail 72 . 



66 



r 




No. 255 BRIMMER — Regency Coffee Table, adapted from English design of the period 1810. Mahogany, with gold tooled 
leather top — L4I, D 19, H 22. 

No. 490 PEARSALL — English Type Overstuffed Sofa, with turned legs — L 79, S.D 23, H 30. 



67 




No. 274 FIELDING — English Style of Overstufted Sofa, three-section cushion seat. Front rail 80". 

No. 774 CRAWFORD — Hepplewhite Mahogany Hunt Table, from English design of the period 1790 — L 54, D 27, 
H 23, leaves down; D 37, leaves up. 



68 




No. 204 FANEUIL — Sheraton Mahogany Sofa, from Enghsh design of' the period 1795. Front rail 79". 



69 




No. 784 ACRES — English Type Overstuffed Sota, kidney shape. Tutted back and seat. Front rail 84". 



70 




No. 752 FAYETTE — English Tvpe Overstuffed Sofa, three down pillows, and three down seat cushions — L 87, S.D 22, 
H31. 



71 




No. 789 MOUNTFORT — Chippendale Sofa, from English design of the period 1760. Front rail 7J" 



72 




No. 790 NEWHALL — Regency Sofa, from English design of tiie period 1820 — L 71, S.D 22, H _5j;>^ 



73 




No. 317 DOUGLAS — Regency Card Table, from English design of the period i8ao. Black and gold decoration, tooled leather 
top, two drawers. Also available in mahogany — L 31^^, D 31K, H 29. 

No. 69 WALLACE — Hepplewhite Upholstered Arm and Side Chair, from English design of the period 1785. Mahogany frame. 



74 



No. 749 VALENTINE — Regency Upholstered Side Chair, from English design of the period 1810. Tufted back — 
W 20, S.D 16, H 35K- 

No. 788 SUFFOLK — Sheraton Mahogany Game Table, from English design of the period 1785. Gold tooled leather top 
for cards, reversible for chess or checkers. Top removable revealing gold tooled leather well for backgammon 
- L r-'A, D 26, H joj^. 

75 




No. 589 NEWMARKET — Sheraton Handkerchief Table, from EngHsh design of the period 1790. Inside top of tooled leather 
for cards; one reversible drawer, tooled leather, arranged for backgammon or chess — L 21, D 21, H 28. 



76 




No. 589 NEWMARKET — Illustrating table on opposite page opened — Top 30 x 30. 

No. 440 CLAYMORE — Regency Side Chair, trom English design of the period 18 15. Mahogany, with brass rosettes. 



77 




No. 286 LEVERETT — Regency Commode, Irom English design ot the period 1810. Mahogany, inlaid with tulipwood and 
ebony lines; mirror backs in end sections — ^ L 46, D I4M. H 36' 2. 



78 




No. 6i BURNHAM — Sheraton Commode, from English design ot the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood. Cup- 
boards contain sliding silver trays tor use as a dining room piece — L 50)^2, D 23, H 36. 



19 




No. 458 BELGRAVE — Regency Commode, from English design of the period 18 10. Mahogany, with brass grille — L 35K, 
Di6,H34H. 



80 




No. 260 JACKSON — Hepplewhite Commode, from English design of" the period 1785. Mahogany, inlaid with tulipwood, 
brass wire grille. Two drawers — L 34, D 15, H 37. 



81 




•'♦:♦-*-; 






\ 




No. 763 NOTTINGHAM — Regency Commode, from English design ot" the period 1810. Mahogany and thuya; ebonized 
column and feet. Brass grille — L J!iJ^, D 16K, H t,2^. 



82 




No. Ii8 HASTINGS — Chippendale Mahogany Chest of Drawers, serpentine front, from Enghsh design of the period 1770- 
L28, D18, H31. 






No. 765 SHAWMUT — Queen Anne Chest, from F.nglish design ot the period 1715. Mahogany, with Australian maple 
drawer fronts. Gold tooled leather writing or service slide — L 25^,4, D 15, H 28. 



84 




No. 647 DUNMORE — Chippendale Mahogany Bachelor's Chest, from English desian of the period 1-60. Five drawers 
— L 26>2, D 13, H 29M. 



85 




iiV-£- v.<t,£i 



No. 6io SUMNER — Chippendale Mahogany Chest of Drawers, serpentine front, from English design of the period 1770. 
Four drawers and gold tooled leather writing or service slide — L 43}i, D 21M, H 36. 



86 




No. 621 DWINELL — Hepplewhite Bow-Front Chest ot Drawers, from English design ot the period 1785. Mahogany, inlaid 
with satinwood. Gold tooled leather writing or service slide — L 38, D 20, H 34>2. 



87 




No. 596 CORNWALL — Hepplewhite Mahogany Breakfront Commode, from English design of the period 1785 — L 38, 
D 13 --2, H 30. 



88 







No. 68 1 HOLLINGSWORTH — Regency Mahogany Commode, from English design of the period i8o". Three drawers, two 
cupboards and center portion with brass grille — L 48, D 14, H 34. 




No. 679 ROLF — Hepplewhite Commode, from English design of the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid with rosewood. One 
drawer, three sliding trays. Suitable size for dining room use — L 41,?^, D l8 5^, H 34. 



90 




No. 759 DEVON — Hepplewhite Commode, from English design of the period i7!S5. Mahogany, with two gold tooled 
leather writing or service slides. Ten drawers — L 503^, D 20, H 35K. 



91 




No. 404 BEAUPORT — Chippendale Pedestal Writing Desk, from English design ot' the period 1770. Mahogany, with tooled 
leather top. File drawer under top drawer in left-hand pedestal — L 54, D 30, H 303^. 

No. 466 FARRELL— Chippendale Mahogany Side Chair from English design of the period 1760. 



92 




No. 68 BUCKINGHAM — Sheraton Writing Desk, kidney shaped, from English design of the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid 
with rosewood, tooled leather top; file drawer lower right — L 49,^2, D 23, H 30. 

No. 69 WALLACE — Hepplewhite, Mahogany .Arm Chair from English design of the period 1785. 



93 




No. 64V NORTHCLIKFE— Chippendale Mahogany Pedestal Writing Desk, from English design of the period 1770. Gold 
tooled leather top; file drawer lower right — L 48, D 27, H 29,' 2. 



94 




No. 633 KILBY — Hepplewhite Mahogany Table Desk, from English design of the period 178s. Gold tooled leather top; six 
drawers — L 55, D 2q, H 30V2. 

No. 474 BRIGGS — Hepplewhite Mahogany Upholstered Arm Chair, from English design of the period 1785. Color of leather 
optional — VV 24, S.D 20, H 23- 



95 




No. 770 FESSENDEN - Chippendale Pedestal Writing Desk, from English design of the period 1770. Mahogany, with 
gold tooled leather top. Two cupboards and three drawers on reverse side — L 60, D 33, H 2914. 



q6 




No. 3o8 MANCHESTER — Chippendale Pedestal Writing Desk, from English design of the period 1770. Chinese lacquer 
decoration with tooled leather top, color optional. File drawer lower right — L n4, D 30, H 30^. 

No. 75 HOLBECK — Chippendale Mahogany Ladder-Back .Arm Chair, from English design of the period 1770. 



97 




No. 723 SAVORY — Sheraton Table Desk, from English design of the period 1800. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood 
p.nd ebony. Gold tooled leather top; four drawers — L 48, D 28, H joi^. 




No. 
No. 



84 APPLEGATE — Sheraton Tambour Writing Desk, from American design of the period 1790. Attributed to John 
Seymour and Son, Boston. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood — L 37, D i8t2, H 34}^. 

597 BURBANK — Hepplewhite Arm Chair, tor description see page 47. 



99 




No. 74 ANDOVER — Chippendale Mahogany Block-front Secretary, from American design of the period 1770, Rhode Island 

School. Desk can be had separately — L 36, D 19H. H 84. 
No. 75 HOLBECK — Chippendale Mahogany Ladder-back Arm Chair, from English design of the period 1770. 




No. 76 HINGHAM — Chippendale Mahogany Secretary, from English design of the period 1765. Desk interior similar to piece 
on opposite page; desk can be had separately — • L 36, D 18, H 86. 




No. 298 GATESWELL — Sheraton Tambour Secretary, from American design of the period 1790, New England origin. Ma- 
hogany, inlaid with satinwood — L 37, D 18^, H 78. 



102 




No. 781 VERNDALE — Regency Mahogany Shelves, from English design of the period 1810 — L 1,4, D 11, H 25. 

No. 780 MIDDLESEX — Regency Mahogany Commode with butler's drawer, from English design of the period 1810 
-L 36, D 18^, H 37. 



103 



No. 459 VAUGHAN — Regency China Cabinet or Bookcase, from English design of the period 1810. Mahogany, with painted 
interior, color optional — L 30, D 1 1, H 85. 



104 




No. 762 KENSINGTON — Regency Mahogany China Cabinet or Bookcase, from English design of the period 1820- 
L SI, D IS, H 91. 



105 




No. 85 BERKELEY — Hepplewhite Bookcase, from English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, inlaid wirh English ash 
L ,^6, D I o, H 46. 



id6 




No. 151 COMPTON — Regency Bookcase, from English design of the period 1810. Mahoaany, with tooled leather writing 
slide, and brass grille doors — L 30I-2, D 1 1, H 57. 



107 




No. 449 JOHNSBURY — Sheraton Mahogany Bookcase, from English design of the period 1790. Two drawers — L 22j^, 
D 10, H 45K. 



108 




HOSPITALITY REIGNS /;/ the DINING ROOM 

<?/(a^ friends o/^wine ^ good 'iooA 

with the charm of a GEORGIAN DINING TABLE promote 
A FLOW OF WIT, A FEAST OF REASON 
<£? A HAPPY GUEST 




No. 86 DEANSGATE — Chippendale Mahogany Breakfront Bookcase or China Cabinet with butler's drawer, from English 
design of the period 1770 — L 56, D 17, H 78. 




No. 658 ALGONQUIN — Hepplewhite Breakfront Bookcase with butler's drawer, from English design of the period 1785. 
Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood — L 68, D 18, H 91. 
This piece also available without the scroll top — H SaK. 




No. 769 HOLDEN — Hepplewhite Mahogany Breakfront Bookcase with butler's drawer, from English design of the period 
1785 — L 82, D 19^, H.86. 



iia 




No. 261 HAVILAND — Hepplewhite Mahogany Breakfront Bookcase with butler's drawer, from Enalish design of the 
period 1785 — L 76, D 151^, H 85. 



"3 




No. 379 BEACHAM — Regency Wing-front Bookcase or China Cabinet, from English design ot the period 1815. Mahogany, 
with black and gold decorations, painted interior — L65, D 14, H 82. 



114 




No. 91 WARWICK — Hepplewhite Breakfront Bookcase or China Cabinet, from English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, 
with old blue painted interior, paint color optional — L 48, D 14, H 80. 



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No. 636L WALTHAM — Chippendale Mahogany Bookcase with butler's drawer, from English design of the period 1770. 
Decorated in black and gold or red and gold Chinese lacquer, with interior of jade green; color optional — L 6< 
D i7>^, H 87. ^ f i> 



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No. 757 WESTBOURNE — Hepplewhite China Cabinet, from English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, with two 
gold tooled leather writing or service slides — L 5oJ-^, D 20, H 85. 



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I20 




No. 93 STAMFORD — Chippendale Corner Cabinet, from American design of the period 1775. New England origin. Mahogany 
with painted interior any color desired. Also available with paned glass door — L 30, D 15, H 78. 




I .t: ^ -2 'C -£ CO _ 3-;> u n 

/'. o I :- Cj .i -^ ^^ s I I _: 




No. 722 CLIFTON — Hepplewliite Breakt'ront Commode, from English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, inlaid 
with satinwood. Service slide has insert of tooled leather — L 71, D 21, H 37. 



123 



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No. 754 HANOVER — Chippendale Mahogany Breakfront Commode from English design of the period 1790. Center 
top is hinged to rest on slides. Two lower drawers are single ones simulating two. Left-hand cupboard contains 
partitioned bottle drawer — L 72, D 21 J^, H 363^. 



125 




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126 




No. 431 RUMFURD — Regency Mahogany Commode, from English design of the period 1810. End sections have hand-made 
brass grilles trimmed with brass rosettes — L 68, D 19, H 36. 



127 




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128 




No. 99 SOUTHMEAD — Hepplewhite Sideboard, from American design of the period 1785. Connecticut origin. Mahogany, 
inlaid with satinwood, ebony and holly lines, and marquetry — L 70, D 23, H 38. 

Portrait of Samuel Alleyne Otis, Father of Harrison Gray Otis, both Beacon Hill. 



129 







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130 




No. 655 LARCHMONT -- Hepplewhite Serpentine-Front Sideboard, from English design ot the period 178.-. Mahogany, inlaid 
with satinwood lines and marquetry. Drawer fronts and doors crossbanded with rosewood. Two lone drawers and 
two compartments — L 70, D 25, H 36' 4. 



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132 




No. 104 MARLBORO — Hepplewhite Console, or Serving Table, from English design of the period 1780. Mahogany, hand- 
carving; one long silver drawer — L 72, D i63^, H 36. 



133 





Upper left 

No. 358 BLAISDELL — Regency Mahogany Side Chair, from Enghsh design of the period 1815. Tufted spring seat. 

Upper right 

No. 1017 GIBBES — Duncan Phyfe Mahogany Side Chair, from American design of the period 181 5. New York origin. 

Lower left and right 

No. 359 DRAPER — Regency Arm and Side Chair, from English design of the period 1810. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood. 

134 




No. 69 WALLACE — Hepplewhite Upholstered Arm and Side Chair, from English design ot the period 1785. Mahogany frame. 
No. 71 KENWOOD — Hepplewhite Mahogany Arm and Side Chair, from English design of the period 1785. 



135 




Upper left and right 

No. 64 HALSEY — Chippendale Mahogany Arm and Side Chair, from American design of the period 1770. 

Lower right 

No. 419 SAWi'ER — Hepplewhite Mahogany Side Chair, from American design of the period 1785. 



136 





Upper left 

No. 238 ANDREWS — Regency Mahogany Arm Chair, from English design of the period 18 10. 

Lower left 

No. 440 CLAYMORE — Regency Side Chair, trom English design ot the period 1815. Mahogany with brass rosette. 

Lower right 

No. 439 BRAEMORE — Regency Mahogany Upholstered Side Chair, from English design of the period 1815. 

137 




-:1 




No. 775 BRADFORD — Chippendale Mahogany Serving Table, from English design of the period 1780. Serving slide 
with gold tooled leather top, color optional — L .^8, D 20, H :^3K. 



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No. 114 COLTON — Hepplewhite Serving Table, from English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, with ebony lines; three 
serving slides with tooled leather tops — L 36, D i8>^, H 32. 



139 




No. 272 BRISTOL — Regency Serving Table, from English design of the period 1810. Mahogany, inlaid with panels of satin- 
wood on the legs and outside uprights — L48, D24, H41. 



140 






Xk. " 



BED ROOMS 





BEAUTY & COMFORT in the BEDROOM 

graceful (^eo7'gian C^urnitiire 

in the bedroom, built with the double motive oi beauty & comfort, 
gives an atmosphere o/'restful charm 

©■ QUIET LUXURY 



"8? 




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No. 771 STRATHMORE — Hepplewhite Bed, from English design of the period 1800. Mahogany, with ebony lines. 

Headboard panel is removable for upholstering. 3'V' and 4'6". Headboard 40, Footboard I2>^. 
No. 77;; COLBOURNE — Sheraton Table, from English design on the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood, 

ebonized lines; wood gallery — L 22, D i8>^, H 28. 
No. 779 PE.'\BOI)Y — Sheraton Book Basket, from English design of the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood; 

ivory knobs — L 20, D 8, H 14. 

142 




tMb^ffiBKi^.^u... ^ . . 



J 



No. 134 SEELER — Sheraton Chest of Drawers, from American design of the period 1790. Philadelphia origin. Mahogany, 
inlaid with satinwood, ivory escutcheons — L 43, D 22, H 35. 



143 




No. 185 RADCLIFFE — Sheraton Dressing Table, from English design of the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood. 

One shallow, and one deep drawer on either side in upper case. Top pulls forward for additional space — L 34, D 19, 

H57- 
No. 128 PAXTON — Hepplewhite Mahogany Stool, from English design of the period 1785. D ii, H 18. 

144 








No. 184 SELDON — Sheraton High Ghest, from EngHsh design of" the period 1790. Mahogany, inlaid with satinwood; ivory 
escutcheons. Four similar drawers and one deep blanket drawer. Toilet slide center — L 35, D 19/2, H 49. 

No. 359 DRAPER — For description, see page 134. 



U5 




No. 758 LEEDS — Hepplewhite Serpentine-Front Chest of Drawers, t'rom English design of the period 1785. Mahogany, 
inlaid with satinwood and rosewood lines; ivory escutcheons. Illustration shows two butted together to form 
a double chest — Each piece L 4a, D 23, H .55. 



146 




No. 760 SHREWSBURY — Hepplewhite Serpentine-Front High Chest, from Enghsh design ot the period 1785, Ma- 
hogany, inlaid with satinwood and rosewood lines; ivory escutcheons — L 40, D 21, H 49. 



147 



"% 




No. lyt/ McKEAN — Regency Bed, adapted from Enulish design ot the period iSio. Mahogany, tretted portion black and 
gold, or mahogany if preferred, j'j" and 46". Headboard 40, Footboard 28. 



148 




No. 123 MACOMBER — Hepplewhite Mahogany Bow-Front Chest of Drawers, inlaid with burl maple and ebony lines, from 
English design of the period 1785. Toilet slide; reproduction Battersea enamel hardware — L 39, D 22, H 34^- 

No. )6 KINROSS — Sheraton Mirror, from English design of the period 1800. Antiqued gold leaf, with eglomise panel — 
frame 35 x 23, mirror 27 x i^yi. 



149 




No. 127 GLENCOE — Hepplewhite Mahogany Powder Table, serpentine front, from English design of the period 1785. Ivory 
pulls and paterae — L 27, D 17, H 54. 

No. 128 PAXTON — Hepplewhite Mahogany Stool, from English design of the period 1785. Dia. 21, H 18. 



150 




No. Ill MAYFAIR — Hepplewhite High Chest of Drawers, from English design of the period 1785. Mahogany and burl maple. 
Five drawers — L 37' 2, D 21, H 48'2. 



151 



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No. 125 BAXTER — Hepplewhite Mahogany Carved Field Bed, from American design of the period 1790, Philadelphia origin. 
Can be had without canopy frame. 3' 3" and 4' 6". Posts 67". 



152 



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No. 164 MILLER — Sheraton Mahogany Field Bed, from American design of the period 1795, Salem, Massachusetts, origin. 
Original once owned by General Miller of the War of 1 8 1 2, is still in possession of a descendant. Can be had without 
canopy frame. 3' 3" and 4' 6". Posts 68". 



153 








No. 503 BRADBURY — Regenc\%Mahogany Bed, adapted from English design of the period 18 15. j'j" and 4'6". Headboard 
42, Footboard 25. 

No. 504 BRADBURY — Regency Table, from English design of the period 1815. Mahogany, trimmed with ivory pulls. Three 
Drawers — L 16K, D l6>2, H 29. 



'54 




No. 500 BRADBURY — Regency Chest of Drawers, from English design of the period 1 8 1 5. Mahogany, trimmed with synthetic 
ivory ring pulls — L 44, D l^yi, H 38. 

No. 505 BRADBURY — Regency Mirror, from Continental design of the period 18 10. Bone white and lavender, gilt decoration. 
Also available in mahogany — Frame 41 x 23, Mirror 29^2 x lyH- 



155 




n 



No. 502 BRADBURY — Regency Dressing Table, from English design of the period 18 10. Mahogany, trimmed with iyorv pulls. 
Five drawers — L 43>^, D 19, H 29. 

No. 50b BRADBURY — Regency Oval Gilt Mirror, from English design of the period 1815. Frame 32 x 24, Mirror 29 x 21. 



156 




No. 501 BRADBURY — Regency Chiffonier, from English design of the period 1815. Mahogany, trimmed with synthetic 
ivory ring pulls. Three drawers, two sliding trays — L 36, D 19, H 49. 



157 




i 



No. 625 PORTSMOUTH — Sheraton Bed, from American design of the period 1800, New Hampshire School. Mahoeanv, 
inlaid with fancy lines — 3'3" and 4'6". Headboard 41, Footboard 26. 

No. 625 PORTSMOUTH — Hepplewhite Table, from American design of the period 1800, New Hampshire School. Mahogany, 
inlaid with rosewood — L i7>i, D 17J-2, H 28 ^i. 

158 




No, 628 CONNECTICUT — Hepplewhite Serpentine - Front Chest of Drawers, from American design of the period 1790. 
Mahogany, inlaid with holly lines. Connecticut origin — L 42, D 22, H 36. 



159 



'¥ ^'"' 




No. 764 NEEDHAM — Chippendale Table, from English design of the period 1-80. Tambour front enclosing cupboard; 
bottom section with tooled leather top pulls forward. Mahogany, inlaid with holly — L 20, D 18^2, H ji. 

No. 771 STRATHMORE — Hepplewhite Bed, from English design of the period 1800. Mahogany with ebony lines. 
Headboard panel is removable for upholstering — 3'j" and 4'6". Headboard 40, Footboard I2>2. 



160 




No. 628 CONNECTICUT — Hepplewhite Serpentine-Front High Chest, from American design of the period 1790. Mahogany, 
inlaid with holly lines. Five drawers — L 37, D 21, H 48. 



161 



t 




No. 151 BERKSHIRE — Hepplewhite Mahogany Four-Post Bed, from American design of the period 178?. Philadelphia 
origin — 3' 3" and 4' 6". Posts 65". 

No. 75 HOLBECK — Chippendale Mahogany Ladder-Back Side Chair, from English design of the period 1770. 



162 




No. 153 BARRETT — Chippendale Mahogany Chest of Drawers, from American design of the period 1770 — L42, D 20, H 361^. 



163 




No. 163 DAVIDSON — Hepplewhite Powder Table, in black and gold Chinese lacquer, peach colored interior, from English 
design ot the period 1785. Also available in mahogany as No. 142 Davenport — L 36, D 17, H 3lH- 

No. 128 PAXTON — For description ot stool, see page 150. 



T64 




No. 152 BARDWELL — Chippendale Mahogany Block-Front Chest-on-Chest, from American design of the period 1770. Eight 
drawers — L 34 ' 2 , D 1 8 J^, H 62. 

No. 75 HOLBECK — Chippendale Mahogany Arm Chair, from English design of the period 1770. 



165 




No. 667 GROSVENOR-Hepplewhite Mahogany Four-Post Bed with Canopy, from English design of the period 1785. 4' 6', 
No. 439 BRAEMORE — For description of chair see page 137. 



166 




No. 720 WIMPOLE- Chippendale Mahogany Double Chest of Drawers, adapted from American design of the period 



720 — L 61, D 21, H j6. 



167 



w 




No. 753 HANCOCK — Chippendale Mahogany Highboy, from American design of the period l7~o. Connecticut origin 
- L iS'A, D 20, H 79. 



168 




No. 732 ARLINGTON - Chippendale Mahogany Chest-on-Chest, from American design of the period 1780 -L ^g 

JU 20i4, H 65. r , OV. 



169 




No. 665 WHEELOCK — Queen Anne Mahogany High Chest, from American design of the period 1760, Salem type. Con- 
tains six drawers — L 36, D io}4, H ^SJ/i. 

No. 75 HOLBECK — Chippendale Mahogany Side Chair, from English design of the period 1770. 



^iTtv 




No. 664 DEVEREAUX — (jueen Anne Mahogany Chest of Drawers, troni American design ot the period 1760. Salem tvpe • 
L42, D2i,H37. 



171 




No. 666 DEVEREAUX — Queen Anne Mahogany Chest-on-Chest, from American design of the period 1760, Salem type. 
Contains eleven drawers — L 35,' 2, D 19, H SSyi. 



172 



The BEACON HILL COLLECTION 

as shown in the galleries of B. Altman tV Company of New York City 
and Barker Bros, of Los Angeles, California 




B. ALTMAN & CO., NEW YORK 



173 




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174 




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175 




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w 
z 

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Z 



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pa 



176 




OS 

o 

1—4 
< 

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CD 

2 

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pa 
Pi 
14 
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177 




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178 



MINIATURES ^////^ BEACON HILL COLLECTION 

Being un Accoun r of how Master Craftsmen with meticulous care reproduced 

in perfect scale various pieces of the Beaco)! Hill 

Collection shown in this hook 



AS the Beacon Hill Colltction has grown, so has its 
/A national interest, and the craftsmen who make 
±. jL. the full-sized Beacon Hill furniture have made 
these tiny reproductions in order that they may he 
used as a traveling exhihit and give pleasure to as many 
people as possible. 

They have heen shown from coast to coast wherever 
the Beacon Hill Collection is exhibited. 

In all of us there is more or less the heart of a child, 
and one's first reaction in seeing these intriguing minia- 
tures is very similar to a child's delight in seeing for the 
first time a new toy. 

On examining further, one is conscious of the ex- 



treme artistry ami craftsmanship shown in these tiny 
reproductions. 

F.ach was maile from exact reduced measured draw- 
ings. Veneers, fabrics, and decorations were selected 
of the same wood and materials as their counterparts. 

The same hands made the fireplace frames and 
decorative objects, all of necessity with special carving 
knives and tools. The diminutive hardware could be 
worked only under a magnifying glass. Imagine inlays 
reduced to a hair line and fitting casters on a table leg 
the size of a match! 

Neither word nor picture can reveal the charm and 
infinite detail of these miniatures. They must be seen. 




mi. 




'79 




i8o 




I8I 



LITTLE STORIES of GREAT DESIGNERS 




T 



"^HF, purpose of these short articles, "Little Stories of 
Great Designers," is to present in the briefest possible 
form high lights of the various furniture styles which 
were developed during the Georgian Period. 

Much fine material has been written about furniture since 
the beginning of the twentieth century, but unfortunately 
there are the usual inaccurate statements, plenty of supposi- 
tion, and some guesswork, particularlv in the earlier books. 
Writers were frequentlv biased. Research had not progressed 
to a point where thev could always write a clear story. As a 
result there is considerable confusion in the mind of both the 
student and the casual reader. Few writers traced the de- 
velopment of furniture design beyond its origin. For in- 
stance, Chippendale furniture was Chippendale, and that's 
all there was to it. Many a reader has been forever preju- 
diced because his intelligence told him that all the so-called 
Chippendale "antiques" could never have been made by 
one man in a small workshop. They apply the same reason- 
ing to the work of other great cabinetmaker-designers. 

The historv ot furniture is a lifetime study, and the follow- 
ing pages contain woefully few words with which to paint a 
complete picture ot such a broad subject. Nevertheless, the 
reader may find something ot interest, a clarifying pomt or 
two at least, which will make the writing of these articles 
well worth while. 



182 



THOMAS C H J IMM^: N D A L E 

hifiiiencc 1740-1775 




Interlacing scrolls and Ingh-cresle.i 
top rail 




"^ NGLAND has produced many 
great cabinetmakers, but 
Thomas Chippendale is un- 
doubtedly the most celebrated. 

F"rom obscure records it would 
seem that Chippendale was born in 
the early eighteenth century. He 
died in 1779 at a ripe old age. While 
little is known about his early lite, bv 
the middle of the eighteenth century, 
at least, Chippendale was definitely 
established as London's most fash- 
ionable cabinetmaker. 

It was from his cabinet shop at No. 
60 St. Martin's Lane that he pub- 
lished in 1754 the first edition of "The 
Gentleman and Cabinet Maker's 
Director." It was largely due to this 
book of furniture designs, a glorified 
catalog of its day, that his name has 
long stood for the characteristics 
found in furniture of the period in 
which he worked. 

The book, with its subsequent edi- 
tions in 1759 and 1762, gives evidence 
of a distinguished clientele appar- 
ently obtained by years of satisfac- 
tory service. We are permitted just 
one revealing glimpse within the 
walls of Chippendale's workshop, 
and that as a result of a fire in the 
year 1775. 

An old inventory lists the chests ot 
twenty-two workmen, which would 
certainly indicate a large establish- 
ment for those days. 



To many it is a mystery how much 
antique furniture can lie attributed 
to Chippendale. It simply means that 
the name of Chippendale has come to 
predominate over all the other cab- 
inetworkers of his time. 

By "Chippendale" furniture, there- 
fore, we mean merely furniture de- 
signed and produced in the style that 
was popular during the periotl of 
Chippendale's career. All the good 
cabinetmakers of London and else- 
where in England were occupied in 
making furniture of similar styles. 
Many of these cabinet shops made 
every bit as excellent furniture as 
Chippendale. It is, therefore, a fal- 
lacy to attribute the finest to Chip- 
pendale's workshop, at the same time 
relegating all inferior examples to 
makers unknown. The best plan is 
to think of "Chippendale" more as 
a definite style, or fashion, if you 
will, and the whole period as the 
Chippendale "School" rather than 
as an individual or an individual 
workshop. 

On the other hand, Thomas Chip- 
pendale was a really noted designer 
who contributed a wealth of material 
to the furniture which so justly bears 
his name. He successfully adapted 
French, Chinese, and Gothic motives 
to give the nation a different type of 
Anglicized furniture. The predom- 
inating wood was the newly imported 
mahogany, highly polished, and en- 
riched with exquisite carving. Inlay 
had not yet come into vogue. Char- 
acteristics of Chippendale design — 
the cabriole leg with various termi- 
nations, such as the claw-and-ball; 
tripod tables with fretted galleries or 
pie-crust tops; chairs with ladder 
backs or interlacing scrolls, all with 
high-crested top rails; frequent use 



of the serpentine curve; and above 
all, masterly execution of leafage, 
ribbon, scroll, and interlacing strap 
carving. 

In America the ChippendaleSchool 
was represented by such worthy 
cabinetmakers as William Savery, 
Jonathan (lostelowe, Thomas 
Tufts, and Henjamin Randolph, all 




(Cabriole leg, leujage carved ii'ith ciaw and 
hall foot 



of Philadelphia, Goddard and 
Townsend of Newport, and Major 
Benjamin Frothingham of Charles- 
town, Mass. 

They were able craftsmen all, and 
in no sense copyists of a style created 
abroad. 

In these capable hands the pre- 
vailing fashions of the Mother 
Country were modified and moulded 
with distinction into a Colonial 
School of Chippendale of which we, 
their descendants, are justly proud. 




Scroll top pediment, flame finial 



183 



St 

JL ti- 



ROBERT 



V If ^HE purjjose of these little 
stories of great designers ot 
the (jcorgian Period is to por- 
tray in a few words salient points 
which influence furniture design. 
First, we establish a definite style as 
"Chippendale" within date limits of 
1740-1775, which is roughlv the 
known years of popularity accorded 
to the ideas of one master craftsman 
and his contemporaries. 

Quite a different story is that of 
Robert and James Adam, important 
architects and furniture designers. 
Their influence on style, based on 
popularity, extended from about the 
year 1760 until practically the end of 
the eighteenth century. It is immedi- 
ately evident that this period not 
only includes the date of the Chip- 
pendale School, but also overlaps all 
the great cabinetmakers of the late 
eighteenth century, causing confu- 
sion to most minds. The ideas de- 
veloped by these talented men were 
diametrically opposed to the style ot 
Chippendale, and, furthermore, were 
being established at the same time. 
How can one account for that? It 
is really very simple — the Adam 
Brothers, having no shop of their 
own, let their work out to any cabinet 
shop capable of executing their de- 
signs. Thus Chippendale not only 
worked for the Adams, but actually 
helped them in creating a type of 
furniture distinctly different from 
that known by the name of Chippen- 
dale. 

Now for the Adam Brothers and 
what thev stood for. Educated men, 
these, cultured and trained to head a 
large organization which not only 
dominated the architectural trend of 



JAMES 

Influence 1760- 1795 




the late eighteenth century, but 
whose influence is still with us today. 
Thev were exponents of classic forms 
in furniture and architecture due to 
extensive travel in Italy and abroad, 
and styled, it not originated, a tre- 
mendous new trend in taste. The 
Adams were primarily architects, but 
at the same time were the cleverest 
welders of materials from furniture, 
carpets, and furnishings, to complete 
architectural interiors. England has 
produced none greater. 

Furniture intluenced by these fa- 
mous brothers should really be di- 



ADAM 



vidcd into two distinct groups. The 
first, or earlier style, followed the 
prevailing taste for mahogany, except 
the form was more delicate than that 
of the Chippendale School. They gave 
l-.ngland a more up-to-date rendering 
based on classic embellishments. The 
second group consists of a further 
development influenced by Italian 
and French classic design, and a 
departure from mahogany made 
possible by the importation of rare- 
wood veneers. A 30-year period be- 
ginning in the seventies is frequently 
called the Age of Satinwood. 

The Adams were exponents of 
acanthus and foliated detail, swags, 
testoons, urns, anthemion, and pat- 
erae. They were past masters in the 
use of fine detail such as beads, flutes, 
and dentil work. They drew largely 
on animal and mythological subjects, 
rams' heads, lions' heads, and sphinx 
being carved in realistic manner. 
Their later designs, frequently exe- 
cuted in satinwood, were ornamented 
with marquetry and painted decora- 
tion. They were particularly fortu- 
nate to have the services of such 
artists as Pergolesi, Zucchi, and 
Anjelica Kauffmann, who painted 
the exquisite panels lending so much 
character to this furniture. 

In America prior to the year 1790 
there were few, if any, professional 
architects, so that our Colonial archi- 
tecture is greatly indebted to the 
teachings of the Adam Brothers. A 
New Englander, one Samuel Mc- 
Intire of Salem, Massachusetts, was 
outstanding in his interpretation of 
the Adam stvle as applied to both 
furniture and architectural treat- 
ments. 




Rosette and flute carvingy drapery swags with ribbon 
184 



GEORGE HEPPLEWHITE 

Influence 1760- 1786 




Shield back carved with shea] of wheal and 
pendant husks 



T 



"^HERE is a dismaying lack 
of actual knowledge about 
George Hepplewhite whom 
we regard as designer and craftsman 
extraordinary. He was apprenticed 
at the Gillows furniture factory in 
Lancaster, date unknown, and even- 
tually opened a business of his own 
in London. Even this date is obscure, 
but it is certain that he was influ- 
encing the craft in the early sixties. 
The date of his death is placed as 
1786. It was the posthumous publi- 
cation of his "Cabinet-Maker and 
Upholsterer's Guide" which helps us 
trace the history of this firm, and 
at the same time elevate the Hepple- 
white combine above the names of 
his contemporaries such as Sheraton, 
Gillow, and others. Owing to the 
early death of George Hepplewhite, 
furniture by his name should be di- 
vided in three classes: 

I. George Hepplewhite proper, 
1760-1786 

1. A. Hepplewhite & Co., 1786 
onwards 

3. The Hepplewhite School as 
followers of the "Guide" de- 
signs 1 7 87- 1 800 

We are chiefly concerned in listing 
the accomplishments of the man 
himself, reviewing his aims and am- 
bitions, which have contributed so 
much to the woodworking craft. The 
Hepplewhite style was founded on 
lightness and delicacy, and is transi- 



tional in character. That is, it began 
with the public taste for carved 
mahogany and eventuatctl in the 
various processes of inlaying and 
decoration. Our designer was first of 
all a chairmaker par excellence. His 
work was so beautifully conceived 
and executed that it is rare intleed to 
come across a poorly designed Hep- 
plewhite chair. Like Chippendale, he 
was influenced by the French taste, 
but it is easy to distinguish the differ- 
ence in contemporary design. Hepple- 
white models range from three to five 
inches lower, and tend to the curvi- 
linear in outline of back and arm. 
Later on Hepplewhite's regard for 
French design was responsible for 
an Anglicized Lmiis X\' and XVI, 




French canted Joot, tudanced skirl 

often referred to as French Hepple- 
white. Hepplewhite is undoubtedly 
best known for his many interpreta- 
tions of the shield-back chair, which 
brings up the old argument as to 
whether he or one of the Adam 
Brothers was responsible for the de- 
sign. Little matter, because the de- 
velopment lay in the capable hands 
of Hepplewhite. If the Adams did 
originate the idea, it was the master 
who adapted the designs to practical 
use of cabinetmakers. Such delicate 
curves cannot be worked out on a 
draughting board. They are the 
product ot understanding and highly 

185 



skilled hand labor. Distinguishing 
marks of the Hepplewhite shield- 
back chair are the gracefully carved 
sheaf of wheat and the "Prince of 
Wales" feathers. Equally beautiful 
is his rendering of the oval-back chair. 

Hepplewhite undoubtedly had 
much to do with the tievelopment of 
the sideboard. To him is also credited 
the development of the tambour and 
secretaire drawer. Hepplewhite's rep- 
utation fortunately does not hinge 
on the success of his large pieces, but 
rather on beautiful small, delicate 
tables, commodes, and the like. 
Many a delightful bit of the period 
in which he lived can probably be 
traced to the influence of this master 
craftsman. 

Upon the death of George Hepple- 
white the business was continued by 
his wife Alice, under the name of 
A. Hepplewhite and Company, a 
commercial success, and the name of 
Hepplewhite percolated to the ut- 
most corners of the British Isles and 
to America. 

The acceptance of the Hepplewhite 
style in America prompted many 
interesting innovations which were 
purely local in character. The designs 
of the great master were adapted for 
home consumption with success and 
distinction to our native cabinet- 
makers. 




Fluted leg with stopbeads, spade foot 



THOMAS SHERATON 

Influence lygo-iSod 



T 



■^HOMAS SHERAIXA', the 
last of" the eighteenth century 
cabinetmaker-designers, was a 
native of Stockton-on-Tees in the 
north of Enghxnd. Born in 1750 or 
175 1, he migrated to London (1780- 
1790) to seek fame and fortune in the 
metropolis. He could hardly have 
selected a more unt(jrtunate time for 
his venture. There was not onl\' the 




Brnkefi top rail 

recent loss ot the .American Colonies, 
but the French Revolution and the 
fight against the .Aristocrats were 
turning the world upside down. 
People of wealth and social position 
in England were none too sure of 
their own future and for a time were 
neither fashion minded nor interested 
in new furniture styles. How was 
Sheraton to cope with this situation, 
having no capital and no workshop 
with which to seek the patronage of 
influential clients? His idea appar- 
ently, perhaps born of desperation, 
was to create a reputation by writing 
books and by his teachings. From 
the financial side failure was inevit- 
able from the very start. 

Sheraton was undoubtedly a 
trained cabinetmaker at one time in 
his career, but there is no evidence 
that he made furniture himself after 
his arrival in London. Like the Adam 
Brothers he may have actually taken 
orders for furniture of his own design 
to be made by others under his per- 
sonal supervision. For the purpose of 
our discussion, however, Sheraton 
was a furniture designer and a teacher 
of drawing. A man of divided ener- 
gies, he spent his time in designing 
furniture, teaching pupils perspec- 
tive drawing, and preaching on street 
corners the doctrines of the Narrow 



Baptists. To these accomplishments 
he added writings on religious sub- 
jects. He was apparently a rather 
objectionable person, inclined to the 
severest criticism of his predecessors 
and his contemporaries. All were out 
of step with Sheraton, and he railed 
against evervbodv, living in povertv 
and without friends. Lender the cir- 
cumstances it is indeed strange that 
his name has come to mean so much 
to late eighteenth century furniture 
design. His successes, based on in- 
direct influence with the trade, were 
due to his various publications which 
were in considerable demand with 
cabinetmakers and which contained 
much valuable material. Whether he 
plagiarized the designs of Hepple- 
white, Gibbons, Shearer, and others 
is a matter of debate, but he was 
the first to co-ordinate the designs 
which have ever since been known bv 
his name. Compared with Hepple- 
white, and the two periods overlap, 
Sheraton may be said to have ex- 
pressed the greater amount of flair 
and originality. In the first edition of 
his "Cabinetmaker's and Uphol- 
sterer's Drawing-Book," published in 
1791, he appealed to the public taste 
with a collection of new designs for 
chair backs. These chairs differed 
from the shield back of Hepplewhite 
by being square back, with the back 
legs extended to meet the top rail. 
Some of the popularity of these chairs 
may have been due to improved con- 
struction and cheaper costs in pro- 
duction. Sheraton's style and repu- 
tation as a designer must rest on the 
"Drawing-Book" of which there were 
three editions, the last in 1802. His 
general taste was delicate, slender 
motives, vertical lines, and long, 
sweeping curves. Chairs and case 
pieces were supported by narrow- 
tapering or slender turned legs. He 
advocated the use of solid satinwood 
in chairs, and his use of rare wood 
inlays throughout his designs adds 
much to the charm of a delicate and 
pleasing style. 

In spite of all the adversity which 
followed this man through the sixteen 
years of his London residence, his 
writings were in real demand. The 
"Drawing-Book" found its way into 

186 



shops all over England where the 
designs were worked out at the 
bench with sufficient variation to 
meet the taste of the countryside,- 
thus accounting for the large out- 
put of furniture which we know as 
"Sheraton." 

Sheraton's "Cabinet Dictionary" 
was published in 1803, at a time 
when he was either converted to the 
English Empire Style or trying to 
meet the further demand for some- 
thing new. It added little or nothing 
to his prestige. .Another book pro- 
jected in 1806 was never released in 
complete form owing to his death in 
October of the same year. 

Sheraton designs met with almost 
immediate approval in the L'nited 
States, and the fertile seeds of his 
teachings fell on productive ground. 




Turned and reeded Fluted leg iiti,i ■ - - , 
/eg rosette and acanthus 

leaf carving 

Exquisite pieces in this style were 
produced by such well-known cabi- 
netmakers as John Sevmour of 
Boston, William Hook, Salem, Mas- 
sachusetts, Abner Toppan of New- 
buryport, and many others. 



ENGLISH REG K N C Y 

T/iis pniod 1 800-1 830 is frequently referred to by collectors as ''Late Georgia)" 



T 



y If ^HE Regency Style which de- 
veloped in England at the 
beginning of the nineteenth 
century was a neo-classic revival, a 
turning away from the over-elaborate 
architectural forms of the Adam 




Brass gallery, turned Tiirtieii leg wirl: spiral 
leg with castor carving 



Brothers and their followers. The 
urge was tor simplicity and the elimi- 
nation of unnecessary ornament; the 
inspiration Greek and Roman an- 
tiquities. 

The new thought was sponsored by 
such men as Sir John Soane, who 
built the Bank of England, Henry 
Holland, architect to the Prince of 
Wales, and John Nash who at Hol- 
land's death took over the rebuilding 
ot Carlton House. Nash also laid out 
Trafalgar Square, Regent's Park, and 
was the architect of Buckingham 
Palace. The name of Thomas Hope is 
especiallyprominent as anearlyadvo- 
cate of the Regency style in archi- 
tecture, furniture, and decorations, 
together with Sheraton and George 
Smith, designers. 

In 181 1 when George became 
Prince Regent, the prevailing style 
(late Georgian), firmly established by 
this time, was named Regency, a 
period which began before he was the 



Regent and lasted until his death in 
iXjo, which includes the ten years of 
his life as King George IV'. 

During the first ten years English 
Regency went along step by step with 
French Directoire (a revolt against 
the overdecoration of Louis X\'I de- 
sign), but during the Twenty Years' 
War which followed with no love lost 
between the two nations, Regency in 
England developed along its own par- 
ticular lines. 

Regency furniture is so closely 
allied to the interior architecture of 
the Period that it is necessary to 
study the one for a better under- 
standing of the other. Gone were the 
heavy paneling and mantelpieces of 
the Georgian period, as well as over- 
doors and broken arch pediments. In 
their place was a classic interior. In 
contrast we would probably call it 
"streamlined" today. Ornament was 
restricted and even severe, with an 
absence of carving. Cornices, pilas- 
ters, and mouldings were greatly sim- 
plified. Plastered walls which ex- 
tended from floor to cornice were 
either painted or hung with wall- 
paper. Marble mantels were the 
vogue. Furniture to be effective 
against an almost austere back- 
ground had to be distinctive and lean 
more or less to the spectacular. Re- 
gency furniture does just that. There 
is a certain amount of simplicity of 
design, and considerable charm to be 
found in the handling of new mo- 
tives, but when all is said and done 
this style of furniture is rather so- 
phisticated. This very sophistication 
was what appealed to the intelli- 
gentsia of the time and no doubt 
accounts for the rev'ival of interest 
felt in England and in our own coun- 
try today. 

The designers of this Greco-Roman 
style were intrigued with the recent 
excavations at Pompeii which served 
as models for chairs and tripod 
candlestands. Sofas were designed 
like Roman beds. Bookcases and 
china cabinets followed the archi- 
tecture of old temples or were orna- 
mented with ormolu representing 
griffins and classic heads. There was 
a strong architectural flavor to prac- 
tically all furniture at the beginning 

187 



of the century, partly due to the 
sponsors who were trained architects, 
and also becau.se the furniture was 
mainly inspired by antiquities. 

During the Regency Period there 
were undoubtedly thousands of cabi- 
net shops in and about London, and 
many exquisite pieces of furniture 
were made by these craftsmen. The 
selection of woods ami veneers, for 
the greater part, was faultless, the 
construction excellent. Small tables 
of all kinds were extremely popular. 
These were frequently made of rose- 
wood, satinwood, and tulipwood, 
inlaid with brass or ebony lines and 
ornamented with brass mounts and 
brass galleries. Dining tables reached 
the point of furthest development 
from the viewpoint of comfort. I'or 
the first time the pedestal table was 
made in sections to accommodate 
larger gatherings. There were deli- 
cately turned chairs with cane seats, 
frequently decorated in black and 
gold. Others had the Trafalgar or 
scimitar front leg (in-curved), a grace- 
ful innovation which came with Re- 




' ' ' .' ;..'.t. ,.; .■■;.:/.,;<.'.•,..•.' tied isith ribbon 
— Duncan Phyje 

gency. There were brackets, foot 
stools, work tables, commodes, and 
writing desks made in really large 
quantities. Many have survived to 
be greatly admired today. 

In the United States Duncan 
Phyfe was the greatest advocate of 
Regency design. His finest work 
belongs to the period 18 10 onw-ards. 
He achieved a type of American Re- 
gency with beauty of line and a dis- 
tinction unmatched by any other 
-American cabinetmaker of his time. 









INDEX ^» 
















Numerical 








No. 


Page 




No. 


Page 




A^. 


Page 




13 


12 


Birchall Console 


103 


132 


Eeighton Dining 


260 


81 


Jackson Commode 


13 


40 


Birchall Console 






Table 


261 


113 


Haviland Breakfront 


16 


149 


Kinross Mirror 


104 


133 


Marlboro Console 






Bookcase 


17 


13 


Elliot Card Table 


106 


122 


Crosby Dining Table 


267 


59 


Chilton Coffee 


20 


14 


Dorothea Henrv 


114 


139 


Colton Serving Table 






Table 






Table 


118 


83 


Hastings Chest of 


270 


24 


Gerald Arm Chair 


22 


17 


Montague Table 






Drawers 


272 


140 


Bristol Serving Table 


36 


25 


Dalton Wing Chair 


121 


151 


Mayfair High Chest 


274 


68 


Fielding Sofa 


40 


42 


Emery W ing Chair 


123 


149 


Macomber Chest of 


286 


78 


Leverett Commode 


42 


39 


Wellesley Arm Chair 






Drawers 


288 


57 


Bedford Coffee Table 


46 


49 


Plymouth Arm Chair 


125 


152 


Baxter Bed 


294 


48 


Sutton Arm Chair 


49 


20 


Parham Table 


127 


150 


Glencoe Powder 


298 


102 


Gateswell Secretary 


55 


52 


Crossley Sofa 






Table 


304 


40 


Chatham Arm Chair 


55 


66 


Crossley Sofa 


128 


144 


Paxton Dressing 


308 


97 


Manchester Writing 


61 


79 


Burnham Commode 






Stool 






Desk 


64 


124 


Halsey Arm Chair 


128 


15U 


Paxton Dressing 


317 


74 


Douglas Card Table 


64 


124 


Halsey Side Chair 






Stool 


358 


134 


Blaisdell Side Chair 


64 


136 


Halsey Arm Chair 


128 


164 


Paxton Dressing 


359 


128 


Draper Arm Chair 


64 


136 


Halsey Side Chair 






Stool 


359 


128 


Draper Side Chair 


68 


93 


Buckingham Writ- 


134 


143 


Seeler Chest of 


359 


134 


Draper Arm Chair 






ing Desk 






Drawers 


359 


134 


Draper Side Chair 


69 


74 


Wallace Chairs 


151 


162 


Berkshire Bed 


359 


145 


Draper Side Chair 


69 


93 


Wallace Arm Chair 


152 


165 


Bardwell Chest-on- 


361 


27 


Dutton Wing Chair 


69 


135 


Wallace Arm Chair 






Chest 


363 


37 


Joyce Arm Chair 


69 


135 


Wallace Side Chair 


153 


163 


Barrett Chest of 


367 


58 


Raddison Nest of 


71 


132 


Kenwood Arm Chair 






Drawers 






Tables 


71 


132 


Kenwood Side Chair 


163 


164 


Davidson Powder 


375 


51 


Lansford Table 


71 


135 


Kenwood Arm Chair 






Table 


379 


114 


Beacham Bookcase 


71 


135 


Kenwood Side Chair 


164 


153 


Miller Bed 


380 


60 


Gleason Coffee Table 


74 


100 


Andover Secretary 


176 


36 


Bamford Table 


385 


21 


Staniford Table 


75 


97 


Holbeck Arm Chair 


184 


145 


Seldon High Chest 


387 


33 


Burnsdale Library 


75 


100 


Holbeck Arm Chair 


185 


144 


Radcliffe Dressing 






Steps 


75 


162 


Holbeck Side Chair 






Table 


387 


41 


Burnsdale Library 


75 


165 


Holbeck Arm Chair 


190 


19 


Sandleigh Table 






Steps 


76 


101 


Hingham Secretary 


194 


22 


Ames Table 


387 


63 


Burnsdale Library 


84 


33 


Applegate Desk 


199 


148 


McKean Bed 






Steps 


84 


99 


Applegate Desk 


204 


69 


Faneuil Sofa 


389 


44 


Trowbridge Wing 


85 


106 


Berkeley Bookcase 


235 


38 


Kingsley Arm Chair 






Chair 


86 


110 


Deansgate Break- 


238 


137 


Andrews Arm Chair 


404 


92 


Beauport Writing 






front Bookcase 


240 


23 


Rawson Arm Chair 






Desk 


91 


115 


Warwick Breakfront 


243 


19 


Rogers Love Seat 


417 


35 


Rockwell Table 






Bookcase 


243 


59 


Rogers Love Seat 


417 


65 


Rockwell Table 


93 


121 


Stamford Corner 


244 


36 


Gardner Arm Chair 


419 


130 


Sawyer Side Chair 






Cabinet 


251 


107 


Compton Bookcase 


419 


136 


Sawyer Side Chair 


96 


120 


Chestershire Dining 


253 


50 


Burgess Table 


427 


23 


Monroe Table 






Table 


254 


52 


Codman Table 


431 


127 


Rumford Commode 


98 


118 


Clayton Dining 


255 


63 


Brimmer Coffee 


434 


43 


Forbes Arm Chair 






Table 






Table 


439 


137 


Braemore Side Chair 


99 


129 


Southmead Side- 


255 


67 


Brimmer Coffee 


439 


166 


Braemore Side Chair 






board 






Table 


440 


77 


Claymore Side Chair 











INDEX 


















Numerical 








A'o. 


I'age 




No. 


Page 




No. 


Page 




440 


137 


Claymore Side Chair 


636L 117 


Waltham Bookcase 


752 


71 


Fayette Sofa 


449 


108 


Johnsbury Boolccase 


644 


62 


Ralston Coffee Table 


753 


168 


Hancock 1 ligh])oy 


451 


126 


Lester Dining Table 


647 


32 


Dunmorc Chest 


754 


125 


Hanover Breakfront 


453 


55 


Granada Table 


647 


85 


Dunmore Chest 






Commode 


454 


53 


Edwards Table 


649 


94 


Northcliffe Writing 


757 


119 


Westbourne Cabinet 


458 


80 


Belgrave Commode 






Desk 


758 


146 


Leeds Chest of 


459 


104 


Vaiighan China 


651 


56 


Aberdeen Coffee 






Drawers 






Cabinet 






Table 


759 


91 


Devon Commode 


459 


126 


Vaughan China 
Cabinet 


653 


130 


Conning Dining 
Table 


760 


147 


Shrewsbury High 
Chest 


466 


92 


Farrell Side Chair 


655 


131 


Larchmont Side- 


762 


105 


Kensington Cabinet 


469 


61 


Owens Coffee Table 






board 


763 


82 


Nottingham Com- 


472 


53 


Barnard Sofa 


658 


111 


Algonquin Bookcase 






mode 


474 


95 


Briggs Arm Chair 


664 


171 


Devereaux Chest of 


764 


160 


Needham Table 


490 


67 


Pearsall Sofa 






Drawers 


765 


84 


Shawmut Chest 


498 


62 


Jerome Sofa 


665 


170 


Wheelock High 


766 


45 


Oxford Table 


500 


155 


Bradbury Chest of 






Chest 


767 


29 


Sheffield Table 






Drawers 


666 


172 


Devereaux Chest- 


768 


26 


Minot Revolving 


501 


157 


Bradbury Chiffonier 






on-Chest 






Table 


502 


156 


Bradbury Dressing 


667 


166 


Grosvenor Bed 


769 


112 


Holden Breakfront 






Table 


679 


90 


Rolf Commode 






Bookcase 


503 


154 


Bradbury Bed 


681 


89 


Hollingsworth Com- 


770 


96 


Fessenden Desk 


504 


154 


Bradbury Table 






mode 


771 


142 


Strathmore Bed 


505 


155 


Bradbury Mirror 


682 


54 


Evans Table 


771 


160 


Strathmore Bed 


506 


156 


Bradbury Mirror 


720 


167 


Wimpole Chest of 


772 


124 


Buckminster Dining 


589 


76 


Newmarket Table 






Drawers 






Table 


589 


77 


Newmarket Table 


721 


16 


Edgewood Table 


773 


64 


Wendell Coffee Table 


596 


88 


Cornwall Commode 


722 


123 


Clifton Commode 


774 


68 


Crawford Table 


597 


47 


Burbank Arm Chair 


723 


98 


Savory Desk 


775 


138 


Bradford Serving 


597 


99 


Burbank Arm Chair 


725 


116 


Eldredge Dining 






Table 


598 


46 


Dawson Arm Chair 






Table 


776 


64 


Addington Love Seat 


605 


63 


Franklin Love Seat 


728 


26 


Lowell N\'ing Chair 


777 


34 


Bennington Table 


620 


86 


Sumner Chest of 


729 


31 


Newton Wing Chair 


778 


142 


Colbourne Table 






Drawers 


730 


22 


Kirkland Wing Chair 


779 


142 


Pea body Book 


621 


87 


Dwinell Chest of 


731 


32 


Longwood Side Chair 






Basket 






Drawers 


732 


169 


Arlington Chest-on- 


780 


103 


Middlesex Commode 


623 


44 


Conrad Nest of 






Chest 


781 


103 


Verndale Shelves 






Tables 


734 


33 


Prescott Club Chair 


784 


70 


Acres Sofa 


625 


158 


Portsmouth Bed 


736 


35 


Putnam Arm Chair 


788 


75 


Suffolk Game Table 


625 


158 


Portsmouth Table 


737 


30 


Crabtree Wing Chair 


789 


72 


Mountfort Sofa 


627 


128 


Gregory Dining 


738 


65 


Choate Sofa 


790 


73 


Newhall Sofa 






Table 


739 


41 


Norfolk Arm Chair 


797 


18 


Buswell Table 


628 


159 


Connecticut Chest of 


740 


28 


Colby Wing Chair 


1003 


30 


Cooper Dumb Waiter 






Drawers 


744 


34 


Pemberton Arm 


1003 


48 


Cooper DumbW alter 


628 


161 


Connecticut High 






Chair 


1004 


15 


Stephens Card Table 






Chest 


749 


75 


Valentine Side Chair 


1017 


134 


Gibbes Side Chair 


633 


95 


Kilby Desk 


750 


45 


Madison Wing Chair 









189 



INDEX m 

Alphabetical 



No. Page 

651 56 



784 
776 
658 
194 

74 

2.VS 

84 

84 



176 
152 

472 
153 

125 
379 
404 

288 

458 

777 

85 

151 

13 

13 

358 

503 

500 

501 
502 

505 
506 

504 

775 

439 
439 
474 

255 



70 

64 

111 

22 
100 
137 

99 



732 169 



36 
165 

53 
163 

152 

114 

92 

57 

80 

34 

106 

162 

12 

40 

134 

154 

155 

157 
156 

155 
156 
154 
138 

137 

166 

95 

63 



255 67 



Aberdeen Coffee 

Table 
Acres Sofa 
Adtiington Love Seat 
Algonquin Bookcase 
Ames Table 
Andover Secretary 
Andrews Arm Chair 
Applegate Desk 
Applegate Writing 

Desk 
Arlington Chest-on- 

Chest 

Bamford Table 
Bardwell Chest-on- 

Chest 
Barnard Sofa 
Barrett Chest of 

Drawers 
Baxter Bed 
Beacham Bookcase 
Beauport Writing 

Desk 
Bedforci Coffee Table 
Belgrave Commode 
Bennington Table 
Berkeley Bookcase 
Berkshire Bed 
Birchall Console 
Birchall Console 
Blaisdell Side Chair 
Bradbury Bed 
Bradbury Chest of 

Drawers 
Bradbury Chiffonier 
Bradbury Dressing 

Table ' 
Bradbury Mirror 
Bradbury Mirror 
Bradbury Table 
Bradford Serving 

Table 
Braemore Side Chair 
Braemore Side Chair 
Briggs Arm Chair 
Brimmer Coffee 

Table 
Brimmer Coffee 

Table 



304 


40 


96 


120 


267 


59 


738 


65 


440 


77 


440 


137 


98 


118 


722 


123 


254 


52 


778 


142 


740 


28 


114 


139 


251 


107 


628 


159 



No. Page No. Page 

in 140 Bristol ServingTable 163 164 
68 93 Buckingham Writ- 598 46 

ing Desk 86 110 

772 124 liuckminster Dining 

Table 664 171 

597 47 Burbank Arm Chair 
597 99 Burbank Arm Chair 666 172 
253 50 Burgess Table 

61 79 Burnham Commode 759 91 
387 ?,i Burnsdale Library 20 14 

Steps 

387 41 Burnsdale Library 317 74 

Steps 359 128 

387 63 Burnsdale Library 359 128 

Steps 359 134 

797 18 Buswell Table 359 134 

359 145 
Chatham Arm Chair 647 32 
Chestershire Dining 647 85 
Table ^ ! 361 27 

Chilton Coffee Table 621 87 
Choate Sofa 
Claymore Side Chair 
Claymore Side Chair 721 16 
Clavton Dining 454 53 

Table 725 116 

Clifton Commode 
Codman Table 17 13 

Colbourne Table i 40 42 

Colby Wing Chair 682 54 

Colton ServingTable 
Compton Bookcase 
Connecticut Chest of 
Drawers 
628 161 Connecticut High 

Chest 
653 130 Conning Dining 

Table 
623 44 Conrad Nest of 
Tables 
Cooper Dumb Waiter 
Cooper Dumb Waiter 
Cornwall Commode 
Crabtree Wing Chair 
Crawford Table 
Crosby Dining Table 
Crossley Sofa 
Crossley Sofa 

36 IS Dalton Wing Chair ' 667 166 



1003 


30 


1003 


48 


596 


88 


737 


30 


774 


68 


106 


122 


55 


52 


55 


66 



204 


69 


466 


92 


752 


71 


770 


96 


274 


68 


434 


43 


605 


63 


244 


36 


298 


102 


270 


24 


1017 


134 


380 


60 


127 


150 


453 


55 


627 


128 



Davidson Table 
Dawson Arm Chair 
Deansgate Break- 
front liookcase 
Devereaux Chest of 

Drawers 
Devereux Chest-on- 

Chest 
Devon Commode 
Dorothea Henry 

Table 
Douglas Card Table 
Draper Arm Chair 
Draper Side Chair 
Draper Arm Chair 
Draper Side Chair 
Draper Side Chair 
Dunmore Chest 
Dunmore Chest 
Dutton Wing Chair 
Dwinell Chest of 
Drawers 

F.dgewood Table 
Edwards Table 
Eldredge Dining 

Table 
Elliot Card Table 
Emery Wing Chair 
Evans Table 

Faneuil Sofa 
Farrell Side Chair 
Fayette Sofa 
Fessenden Desk 
Fielding Sofa 
Forbes Arm Chair 
Franklin Love Seat 

Gardner Arm Chair 
Gateswell Secretary 
Gerald Arm Chair 
Gibbes Side Chair 
Gleason Coffee Table 
Glencoe Powder 

Table 
Granada Table 
Gregory Dining 

Table 
Grosvenor Bed 



190 











INDEX 
















Alphabetical 








No. 


P"X>' 




No. 


Pa^e 




No. 


Pa^e 




64 


124 


Halsey Arm Chair 


30S 


97 


Manchester Desk 


679 


90 


Rolf Commode 


64 


124 


Halsey Side Chair 


104 


133 


Marlboro Console 


431 


127 


Rumford Commode j 


64 


136 


Haisey Arm Chair 


121 


151 


Mayfair High Chest 








64 


136 


Halsey Side Chair 


199 


148 


Mckean Bed 


190 


19 


Sandleigh Table 


753 


168 


Hancock Highboy 


780 


103 


Middlesex Commode 


723 


98 


Savory Desk 


754 


125 


Hanover Breakfront 


164 


153 


Miller Bed 


419 


130 


Sawyer Siile Chair 






Commode 


768 


26 


Minot Revolving 


419 


136 


Sawyer Side Chair 


118 


83 


Hastings Chest of 






Table 


134 


143 


Seeler Chest ot 






Drawers 


427 


23 


Monroe Table 






Drawers 


261 


113 


Haviland Breakfront 


22 


17 


Montague Table 


184 


145 


Seldon High Chest 






Bookcase 


789 


72 


Mountfort Sofa 


765 


84 


Shawmut Chest 


76 


101 


Hingham Secretary 








767 


29 


Sheffield Table 


75 


97 


Holbeck Arm Chair 


764 


160 


Needham Table 


760 


147 


Shrewsbury High 


75 


100 


Holbeck Arm Chair 


790 


73 


Newhall Sofa 






Chest 


75 


162 


Holbeck Side Chair 


589 


76 


Newmarket Table 


99 


129 


Southmead Side- 


75 


165 


Holbeck Arm Chair 


589 


77 


Newmarket Table 






board 


769 


112 


Holden Breakfront 


729 


31 


Newton Wing Chair 


93 


121 


Stamford Corner 






Bookcase 


739 


41 


Norfolk Arm Chair 






Cabinet 


681 


89 


HoUingsworth Com- 


649 


94 


Northclifte Desk 


385 


21 


Staniford Table 






mode 


763 


82 


Nottingham Com- 
mode 


1004 
771 


15 
142 


Stephens Card Table 
Strathmore Bed 


260 


81 


Jackson Commode 








771 


160 


Strathmore Bed 


4')8 


62 


Jerome Sofa 


469 


61 


Owens Coffee Table 


788 


75 


Suffolk Game Table 


449 


108 


Johnsbury Bookcase 


766 


45 


Oxford Table 


620 


86 


Sumner Chest of 


363 


37 


Joyce Arm Chair 












Drawers 








49 


20 


Path am Table 


294 


48 


Sutton Arm Chair 


762 


105 


Kensington Cabinet 


128 


144 


Paxton Dressing 








71 


132 


Kenwood Arm Chair 






Stool 


389 


44 


Trowbridge Wing 


71 


132 


Kenwood Side Chair 


128 


150 


Paxton Stool 






Chair 


71 


135 


Kenwood Arm Chair 


128 


164 


Paxton Stool 








71 


135 


Kenwood Side Chair 


779 


142 


Peabody Book 


749 


75 


X'alentine Side Chair 


633 


95 


Kilby Desk 






Basket 


459 


104 


\'aughan China 


235 


38 


Kingsley Arm Chair 


490 


67 


Pearsall Sofa 






Cabinet 


16 


149 


Kinross Mirror 


744 


34 


Pemberton Arm 


459 


126 


\'aiighan China 


730 


22 


Kirkland Wing Chair 






Chair 






Cabinet 








46 


49 


Plymouth Arm Chair 


781 


103 


\"erndale Shelves 


375 


51 


Lansford Table 


625 


158 


Portsmouth Bed 








655 


131 


Larchmont Side- 


625 


158 


Portsmouth Table 


69 


74 


Wallace Chairs 






board 


734 


7,7< 


Prescott Club Chair 


69 


93 


Wallace Arm Chair 


758 


146 


Leeds Chest of 
Drawers 


736 


35 


Putnam Arm Chair 


69 
69 


135 
135 


^^'allace Arm Chair 
Wallace Side Chair 


103 


132 


Leighton Dining 


185 


144 


Kadcliffe Dressing 


636L 117 


Waltham Bookcase 






fable 






Table 


91 


115 


Warwick Breakfront 


451 


126 


Lester Dining Table 


367 


58 


Raddison Nest of 






Bookcase 


286 


78 


Leverett Commode 






Tables 


42 


39 


Wellesiev Arm Chair 


731 


32 


Longwood Side Chair 


644 


62 


Ralston Coffee Table 


773 


64 


Wendell'Table 


728 


26 


Lowell Wing Chair 


240 


23 


Rawson Arm Chair 


757 


119 


Westbourne Cabinet 








417 


35 


Rockwell Table 


665 


170 


Wheelock High 


123 


149 


Macomber Chest of 


417 


65 


Rockwell Table 






Chest 






Drawers 


243 


19 


Rogers Love Seat 


720 


167 


Wimpole Chest of 


75(1 


45 


Madison Wing Chair 


243 


59 


Rogers Love Seat 






Drawers 



Designed &• Printed 

under the direction of Edgar B. Sherrill 

at the 

UNIVERSITY PRESS 

CAM BRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 









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BEACON ST. 

2 TtarrisoH (irey Otis 

3 "David Sears 

4 Jofcw ThilUp* 

5 3«H/<(iniH 3/om«r 

6 Dr. John Joy 

7 Jofcn JIa-ncoek, 

8 $f atr ^oiwf 

BELKNAP ST. 

1 ^bo/tf iott Church 

2 Wm. Lancaster 

BOWDOIN SO.. 

1 Samuel'Peir\wan 

2 Kfvere Tlouse 

3 Christopher Qore 

4 Tf<f r CljandUy 

5 (^ftar/rc Bulfinch 

CAMBRIDGE ST. 

1 Tark»>an Market 

2 "Jimrriton Qreif Otit 

3 West Church 

4 Joseph CooUdge 

CHARLES 6T. 
1 Church 
Z Abnerltouse 

CHESTNUT ST. 

1 Lincoln & Stoddard 

2 "Btnjamin Joy 

3 Hichavd €■ Derbtf 

4 Jeremiah (iafdner 

5 Jicpzibah Swan 

6 Charlts Taine 



MYRTLE ST. 

1 Wmdiomer 

OLIVE ST. 

1 T)avidJ{uniphreifS 

2 Stephen'J{igjinson,Ir. 

3 Moics (Irani 

4 "Jiarriton Qtaif Otis 

5 Jonaiha^ Mmok 

6 John Callender 

7 Stephen Dligginsonjr. 

8 Thomas Tcrfons 

9 Jeremiah (iardner 

PARK ST. 

1 Thomas Amorg 

2 Josiah Qtiincy 

3 Tark Si. Church 

PINCKNEY ST. 

1 Toivder Oiouse 

2 WaichJiouse 

3 Middleion & (iUpion 

S- RUSSELL ST. 
1 Joseph "Ditton 

TEMPLE ST. 
1 "Bela Clapp 

TREMONT ST. 
1 Tremottt Jlouse 
1 Teicr Taneuil 

WALNUT ST. 
1 Uriah CoHing 

LOUISBURG SCL. 
1 Jennij Und married 






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