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Full text of "The Bear"

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NINETEEN SIXTY SIX 



BEAR 



Centennial Edition 



Shaw University 



Raleigh, North Carolina 



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FOREWORD 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

4 IMPRESSIONS 
18 ADMINISTRATION 
32 WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 

AND UNIVERSITIES 
36 THE CORONATION 
42 CENTENNIAL FOUNDER'S DAY 
46 CENTENNIAL HOMECOMING 
50 FACULTY 
58 CLASSES 
120 ORGANIZATIONS 
136 GREEKS 
151 ATHLETICS 
174 QUEENS 
188 HERE AND THERE 
198 THE '66 BEAR STAFF 
200 SHAW UNIVERSITY - IT'S HISTORY 
AND REBIRTH 



'66 Bear Staff 



Editor 
Jose Goodson 



In the 1966 Bear, campus life is portrayed can- 
didly, picturing the college student and his activities 
honestly and without reservations. Approaching the 
book impressionistically, we have tried to create an 
atmosphere typical of Shaw University as the 100- 
year old institution of higher learning enters its sec- 
ond century . , . always remembering how essential 
each intimate detail is in the make-up of the whole. 
Therefore, this Centennial Edition is dedicated to a 
unique life, that of the college student. 



Co-Edilor 
Joyce Cooke 

Associate Editors 

Berlina Patterson 

Harry Oldham 

Business Manager 
Kerniit Britt 

Advertising Managers 
Tyrone Morgan 
Sherry Everett 



Sul>scn/>liiins & Circulation 

Manager 

Richard Martin 

Photographers 
Ivan Donovan 

Sheila Ray 
Curtis Gilbert 

Artist 
Hcnrv Moore 



Adviser 
John A. Hollev 



WE HONOR THEE . . 





Everv member of the Shaw family can truthfuUv say 
that Mr. Gil-Smythe deserves to be honored. He has 
brought much enlightenment and entertainment to the 
University in the area of music. 



Many teachers gain the respect of their stu- 
dents, but there are few who, by their accom- 
plishments and their devotion instill a bit of awe 
in those whom they teach. 

We pay homage to these four dedicated per- 
sons who represent a total of almost a century 
and a half of service to Shaw University. 



Because of his contributions to the field of athlet- 
ics. Coach Lytle deserves tribute. A game, in any 
sport, would not be complete without his presence. 
le is director of athletics and head baseball i 




presence. a 




Mrs. Ernestine P. Hamhn has rendered 
many years of service in the Registrars 
Office. Students always depend on her to 
help them through Registration. 



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College is more than a place; it is a type of existence. It 
is a life that places great challenges before the student, 
supplies the means to overcome them, and helps to make 
him an individual. In individualism there is promise of a 
stronger united strength. 










Between these pages you will find many 
images of what Shaw means to each of its 
students 




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Olivia Hardy expounds with words of oration at the caronation as Sir William Smalls 
awaits his moment. 








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Staff members Mesdames Louise Lewis and Emestive P. Hamlin ex- 
change views here with T.V. personality J. D. Lewis at a faculty affair. 





Eastern Airlines recruitment representatives interviews senior, Donna 
Archer. 



Art Bridges recites lines in one of Chestyn 
Everett's speech class. 




Rachael Williams pauses between touch- 
downs at one of the Bear's football games. 



10 



On the block - Sharon O'Neal. 




The faculty "Punch Set" 
— Mr.and Mrs. David Maves 
and Clyde Appleton, all 
membersoftheShaw faculty, 
get service at the annual 
Freshman reception from 
Mrs. Imogene Long. 





Arthur Kindred listens to words 
of romance (foreground) from 
Vera Allen at the May Day fes- 
tivities. 




Leonard Building 



12 



4 




Robert's Science Hall 




University of Minnesota visiting students enjoy a mo- 
ment of relaxation during a visit on tlie Shaw U, 
campus. 




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Shaw students admire the work of the Fitzgibbons' 
(James & Margaret) in the opening art exhibits in the 
Fine Arts Festival Exhibitions in Tyler Hall Library. 



Alumnus Eric Harding returns to the campus scene for 
an exchange of "What's happening" with senior Jesse 
Edmonds. 





The crowd gathered for the Centennial Homecoming 
clash against St. Augustine's College at ancient Chavis 
Park. 



Lady Brenda Bullock and her escort. Sir William Moses, 
at the Royal Ball, following the annual Caronation. 



Art Bridges gets "upended" here in the Bears first 
loss of the '65 football season against Virginia State. 



"DISA 'AN DATA 













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Administration of a college is the system of 
supporting, educating and counseling the stu- 
dents under its tutelage. The demands upon the 
administration are greater than those upon the 
student ... yet both are engaged in the same 
purpose - education. While it is the duty of the 
student to find and unlock the door to the fu- 
ture, it is the duty of the administration to help 
that student find the key. 




Harold T. Graves 
Summit. N.J. 

C. Melvin Creecy. Jr. 
Rich Square, N.C. 

Mrs. Mary Duke Semans 
Durham. N.C. 

J. Melville Broughlon. Jr. 
Raleigh, N.C. 

R. Smart Dickson 
Charlotte, N.C. 

William H. Jones 
Raleigh. N.C. 

J. Jasper Freeman 
Norfolk. Va. 

E. Theodore Jones 
Valley Forge, Pa. 

John N. Coffey 
Raleigh. N.C. 

John R. Lark ins 
Raleigh. N.C. 

Rufus Hairslon 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 

John W. Winters 
Raleigh, N.C. 

Howard L. Mitchell 
Gatesville, N.C. 

E. L. Spivey 
Raleigh, N.C. 

William H. Rhoades 
Valley Forge, Pa. 

Paul H. Johnson 
Raleigh. N.C. 

Jonathan Daniels 
Raleigh. N,C. 

Mrs. Ellen S. Alston 
Raleigh, N.C. 

Warren Carr 
Winston-Salem, N.C 

J. W. Goodloe 
Durham. N.C. 

Dr. John W. White 
Ashcville, N.C. 

Chauncy R. Edwards 
Fayetteville, N.C. 

John W. Davis 
New York. N.V. 

Terry Sanford 
Fayetteville. N.C. 



ASA T. SPAULDING: CHAIRMAN 
THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OF 



President of an $85 million firm which is the 
largest Negro-owned insurance company in 
the world, director of a leading national chain 
store, friend and personal emissary for the 
U.S. presidents and Tar Heel governors — that 
is the story of Asa T. Spauldmg. who began 
life 62 years ago as a poor farm boy in Co- 
lumbus County. 

Spaulding. now chief executiye of North 
Carolina Mutual Life of Durham, recently re- 
ceived another of his numerous high honors, 
and one he prizes at or near the top. He be- 
came president of the trustees of Shaw Uni- 
versitv of Raleigh. 

Asa Spaulding is particularly proud, be- 
cause this honor stems from an interest very 
close to his heart — education. 

It was Spaulding's intensely earnest desire 
for an education that caused him to leave his 
father's farm deep in the low country of Colum- 
bus, and go to Durham. He'd had in his 16 
years, only a few years of four-month annual 
schooling, but this was enough to alert his un- 
usually perceptive mind to the fact that suc- 
cess would be forever elusive without 
'learning", as education was called. And he 
meant to be successful. 

That he has attained his goals to the fullest 
and then some, is proof again that '"the Amer- 
ican dream" need not be only a dream. He 
surely is in the forefront of those who have 
made it a reality. 




Asa T Spaulding, 
Chairman, Board of Trustees 




Reception honoring Mrs. Viola G. Turner on her retirement from North 
Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company on December 31. 1965 — giv- 
en at the home of President and Mrs. A. T. Spaulding. Shown are: 



Mrs. Margaret Shearin (SEATED). Mr. and Mrs, E. C, Turner, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Spauldmg. 




The 




President James E. Cheek - the name and the man are 
both symbols of dynamic to Shaw University as it em- 
barlcs on a bold new program and its second century of 
service to the education of American youth. 

Those who know him personally can attest to the fact 
that here is a man dedicated to the task of developing 
and enriching the future of Shaw University. Under his 
administration, the Board of Trustees adopted the Uni- 
versity's new educational program and has endorsed a 
five million dollar Centennial Development Fund Cam- 
paign to rebuild the college's entire physical plant. 



President's Day Varies . 




A family man 




Planning the future 





Delivenng Fall Convocation Address 





Dr. King V. Cheek, acting Dean of the Col- 
lege, with his secretary, Mrs. Mildred H. 
Hooker. A familiar figure around the Shaw 
campus. Dr. Cheek received his A.B. from 
Bates College, and his M.A. and J.D. de- 
grees from the University of Chicago. 



Academic and 
Administrative Problems 
Are Their Domain 



Mrs. Roberta F. Lightner is the Admm- 
istrative Assistant to the President. A pro- 
duct of North Carolina College at Durham, 
Mrs. Lightner has served under three 
different administrations at Shaw. 




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Lenoir H, Cook now serves the Uni- 
versity as Director of Special Services, a 
newly created post in the administrative 
structure since September, 1965. A grad- 
uate of Darmouth College and Columbia 
University, Dean Cook as he is called, 
formerly held the post of acting Dean of 
the College. 



Financial Business 

and 
Student Accounts 



Financial matters are handled by the Uni- 
versity's Business Manager, J. Vernon Par- 
ham, here with his secretary, Mrs. M. An- 
nette L€wis. 





Are 

Handled 
By the 



Student accounts are handled by Mrs. Annie 
M. Hinton. University cashier, and Mrs. 
Justine Milliard, accounts receivable clerk. 
Mamie Frye, a student worker, checks over 
an account here. 



Business Office 



Mrs. Elizabeth Jiles. accountant, and Joe 
Lamer Gibbs. bookkeeper, keep tabs on the 
University's expenditures. 







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Testing and 
Student Affairs 



Mrs. Velma C. Clarke joined ihe Shaw Administrative staff this year as Director of 
Testing, a key post in the University's new academic program, the "Shaw Plan of 
Education. She is a graduate of Fisk University, where she received both the bache- 
lor's and master's degrees. 





Dean of Students, Thomas E. Kee, discusses a financial assis- 
tance application with his secretary. Miss Lillie Mae Dunn. A 
Shaw alumnus, Kee was formerly an instructor in foreign lan- 
guages. As an undergrad, he was one of Shaw's most out- 
standing athletes. He earned the M.A. degree at Columbia 
University. 



Public Relations 
and Development 



Another Shaw alumnus, Clifford C. Coles, holds the 
post of Director of Development and Public Relations. 
Here he and his secretary, Mrs. Louise W. Lewis, go 
over the files of some 4,000 graduates. Coles received 
the M.S.W. degree from Columbia University. 



Publicity and Publications 
are their Province 



The University's "news arm" is John Holley, director 
of the Shaw News Bureau and adviser to student pub- 
lications. He received his training at North Carolina 
College at Durham and the State University of Iowa. 




Admissions and 
Records 




Mrs. Martha Wheeler, a former Mathematics instructor, is the 
University's Registrar, who handles admissions and registra- 
tion. Here she confers with her secretary, Mrs. Gloria 
Cumbo. 




are 
Handled By 



Mrs. Ernestine P, Hamlin gels assistance from Ophelia Miles 
as she goes through the students records' ihdex. In the fore- 
ground is Minnie Langley, another student worker in the 
Registrar's Office. 



the Registrar's 
Office 



Mrs. Annie Hooker looks through Ihe roladex file for Fannie 
Wilder's (extreme left) record, while Mrs. Jennie Brown an- 
swers a question for Cathel Scott. This is onlv a sampling of 
the heavy traffic which flows by Ihe busy Registrar's Office 
daily. 




These People 

Render a Vital Service 

to the College 




Mrs. Laura Kaye is the lady who connects Shaw 
with the rest of the world- 




4 




The Secretarial Pool headed by Mrs. Nannie Inhorden is responsible for the major part of 
the mimeographed material used here at Shaw. Assisting her are Miss Rena Blyther, Miss La- 
Verne Hicks and Miss Ruby Fredericks. 




Mrs. Elnora Kee is the manager of the bookstore. In this scene she helps 
students. Veronica Di.xon and Joyce Cooke make purchases. Her assis- 
tant Doris Henry helps Amur Patterson select books for her classes. 



A newcomer to the Shaw family. Mrs. Imogene Long, serves as 
Secretary to the President. 



28 



The Associate Dean of 
Students, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Cofield, is a friend to all 
Shaw students. Pat Dow- 
ell, a freshman, enlists 
her aid in getting adjust- 
ed to college life. 





Mrs. Gertrude Jones 





Mrs. Priscilla Hunt 



Mrs. Arcelia Thomas 




Mrs. Harriett Jones 



Personnel Staffs Direct and Correct 



Auxilliary Services Perform Vital Functions 
in tlie University's day-to-day operations 




Mr. Taylor (left) goes about his day-to-day chores as manager of the Campus Inn, the "hub- 
bub" of many campus going-ons. 





Nurse Flowers lakes care of iils and aches of our students. 



Paul Diggs. an alumnus, is the University's Director of 
Inventory He handles distribution of supplies and 
equipment. 



30 




First-year students look over the vast catalogue of film m the library which will he used on the auto- 
mated learning machines installed this year. 



31 



WHO'S 

WHO in 

AMERICAN COLLEGES 

AND UNIVERSITIES 



Members of Who's Who Among Student's in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities are selected on the basis 
of scholarship, leadership, participation in extra-curric- 
ular activities, and promise of future success. Fourteen 
Shaw students, eight seniors and six juniors, were 
chosen, the number being determined by the enroll- 
ment at Shaw University. 




SHAW 



32 




FRONT ROH': Sheila Ray, Minnie Mitchell. Joyce RoUe. Eva Grandy. BACK ROW Daniel Burrell. 
Sandna Williams. Robert Christian, Vera Allen, Kermit Britt, Annie Abbott, Collie Coleman. Robbie 
Debnam. Sterline McNair. 



-LEBRITIES 



Although each person has distinguished quah- 
ties of personahty, it is only occasionally that one 
encounters a possessor of that extra spark of 
character. If that character is to be successful, 
however, it must be founded on sincerity; for 
sincerity is the infaUible yardstick of the public. 
A Shaw-lebrity. then, must be composed of three 
factors — that which he sincerely is, that which he 
sincerely wants to be, and that which he is to 
others. 



33 




Robbie Debnam and Danial Burrell discuss "business" dunng their 
leisure time. 





Collie Coleman and Sandria Williams lind that Shaw is a historical institution. 

34 




Wilton Smith rushes to class. 




Minnie Mitchell and Shelia Ray tr>s to 
see who can write the most letters. 





Joyce Rolle. Roben Christian and 
Eva Grandy share a joke. 




Vera Alien asks .Axthur Bunch to take her to Chips Kermit Bnlt prepares to take an af- 

for a hamburger. temoon spin. 



Annie Abbot and Sterling McNair exchange ideas dbv>ut lu- 
ture plans. 



35 




Majestic looking George Spauld- 
ing's entrance signified tlie opening of 
the annual Coronation ceremonies 
this year. A royal affair under the di- 
rection of Chestyn Everett, the Coro- 
nation had a lasting impression on all 
who witnessed it. 



THE SHA W 



36 




"In our hearts we build a shrine for thee 
We hail Thee, the Queen of Shaw U . . . 



Grace. Charm, talent, personality 
and beauty all personify the 
quahfications of the reigning Queen at 
Shaw University this year. 



CORONATION 



37 





The Coronation was full of Royalty. Here with Vera Regina are Miss 
Virginia Union and Miss North Carolina College. 



Lord William escorts Lady Addic of Sigma during the Royal Procession. 





Lady Andre of Delta was escorted by Lord Joseph 



Lady Lightner of Administrahon and Lord Cheek 
of Administration add dignity to the Coronation. 
Behind them are Lord Spann and Lady Dubner. 



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Her Royal Highness 

VERA REGINA 




The Evening's first dance. 



The Coronation 
and Ball 




Campus Favorites. Connie and Bill pause for a moment at the Coronation Ball. 



And the Growd danced i 






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The Duchess of Thespia, (Sallye Toiien) and the Duke of Shackleford. 




CENTENNIAL 




. . . And Alumni Return 

English Prof. Madelyn Watson is flanked here by James T, Bright (' ) of Rich- 
mond. Va- and Attorney Raines (' ) of NYC, 




FO UNDER 'S DA Y 



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HOMECOMING 




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FESTIVITIES 



47 





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Miss Freshman, attractive Barbara Venable from Woodbui^. New Jersey. 
and her attendants Patricia Pevton and Iris Bea. 





Miss Junior, attractive Barbara Bullock of Apex. North Carolina with Sally Totten and 
Brenda Bullock as attendants. 



48 




Miss Homecomins and other celebnties. 




Miss Homecoming 

Lovely Shelia Ray of Tarboro, N.C. and Art Bridges, Football Co. Capt. 








The Shaw drill team under direction of Robert 
"Bob" White. 




A gathering of "Shaw-Lebnties" 



49 




If our faculty pretended they knew all 
the answers, they would become bores and 
pedants. However, when they admit they 
only know some of the answers, and that 
students must also engage in the search for 
truth, they become scholars and friends. 

If teachers gave all the answers, many 
needed and enjoyable hours in the library 
or science laboratory would not become a 
part of our college experience. For the 
search for truth sometimes centers in a lab 
where many hours of work may contribute 
only one minute piece of information. 
Sometimes it is in the library where books 
must be studied for new insights. But what- 
ever the source, and whatever the know- 
ledge, it passes from teacher to student and 
from this generation to the next. . . . 

















Our Faculty Is Not Divine 

An attempt to praise the Faculty as a group is possible 
but also quite unrealistic. To praise them as individuals is 
impossible for us (the members of the yearbook stalT, 
which is limited lot), but it is the only vaUd way. 

If each reader would praise or commend the instructors 
and administrators they know, our task here in presenting 
them to you is complete. 




Dr Ram 




Bhatnager lectures to a sociology class here. 




Charles Robson 

History - Political Science 

B.S.: M.A. 



Mrs. Vivian Sansom 
Physical Education 
A.S.; M.Ed. 





Dr. Rani Bhatnager 

Sociology 

B.S,; M.A : MS,; Ph.D. 



Ekanem Itaekanem 
International Studies 
B.S.; M.A.: B.L. 



Mrs, Nurry Johnson 

Business 

A.B.: M.A. in L.S. 



Dr. King Cheek 
Economics — Business 
A.B.; M.A.; J.D. 





Nancy Kendall 
English 
B.A.; MA. 



Dr. Mallappa Amravati 
International Studies 
B.A.; MA: Ph.D. 



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Dr, Walter Gustafson 

English 

A.B.. M.A.: Ph.D. 





James E. Lvtle 
Physical Education 
A.B.: M.A. 



Shaw U. faculty members. Mrs. Dale Collins and Clyde Appleton. exchange views with artist 
James McMillan, whose works were on exhibit at the Shaw art gallery. 



Mr. Camp conducts an experiment in one of his advanced Chemistry classes. 




Mrs. Katherine Young Shepard 

Education 

A.B.; M.A. 




54 



Mrs. Ura Jones 


Cleon Thompson 


Education 


Biologv 


A.B.; M.A. 


B.S.; M.S. 



Hogar Nicholas, an assistant professor of foreign languages, engages in conversation with the Svlvan- 
ders at a faculty' affair. 






Dr. Shirley Tove 

Biolo2\- 

B.S.; M.S.; Ph.D. 



Leung Wang Lau 

Physics 

B.S.: M.S. 



Norman Camp 

Chemistrv 

B.S.; M.N.S.; M.S. 



Dr. Suzanne Purnnglon 

Chemistr\- 

A.B.; A.M ; Ph.D. 






Naman M. McMillan 

Education 

B.S.- M.A., Ph.D. 



Mrs. Elizabeth Cohcid 

Education 

B.S.. M.A. 



Harry Gil-smythe 

Music 

A.B.; Mus. M. 



Lenoir H. Cook 
Foreign Languages 
A.B.; M.A. 




Mrs. Carolyn Sylvander 
Music — English 
B.S.; M.S. 





Chestyn Everett, an assistant professor of speech and drama, "drive's home" a point in conversation 
with J.D. Lewis, a well-known local T-V. personality. Looking on is George Spaulding, a Shaw junior. 




l)r .IcMis Faruis 

History 

B.S.L.; Sc. S,D.; LL.D, 



Rev, John Fleming 

Humanities 

A,B,, B.D.. S.T.M. 



Thomas E. Kee 
Foreign Languages 
A.B.; MA. 



Paul Kiane 
Mathematics 
B.S.; MS. 




Mrs. Celesline Cheek, the president's wife, entertains faculty members, Mrs. Vivi- 
an Sansom and Mrs. Ura H. Jones here at one of the faculty affairs. 



Stefan Sylvander 

Music 

B.S.; MM. 



Mrs. Frances Dubner 
Speech and Drama 
A.B : MA 





Dr. MargLiente Adams 

Education 

A B.; MA.: Ed D 




Charles Mebane 

Biologv 

B.S.; M.S. 



Dr. Amalia Farias 
Foreign Language 
B.S.: Ph.D.; Ed.D. 



The three necessary elements for 
a complete education are the learn- 
ing of facts, self-knowledge and the 
practical application of both of these 
to real life. It involves discovery, 
amplification and improvement of 
potentialities. It calls for forebear- 
ance and the acceptance of the sci- 
ences of life. 

Above all. it demands that the 
student think, for only then can an 
education have perspective. 



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First-year studenL'. Anita Childs o( Philadelphia, Pa,, and Wilbur 
Turner of Palerson, N.J, gel experience on new equipment in the 
labs. 




President Charles Gray 

Vice President James Hargrove 

Secretary Jacqueline Lewis 

Treasurer Ruby Seabrook 



61 




Annie Gwendolyn Abbott 

Ruffin, N.C. 

English 

Laurie Alston 
Kingstree, S,C, 
Elementary Education 




Walter Agers 
Winston-Salem. N.C. 
Sociology 



Donna Delores Archer 
Winton. N.C. 
Elementary Education 




Dorothy Atkinson 
Macclesfield. N.C. 
Business Administration 



Johnny Lane Atkinson 
Goldsboro. N.C. 
Physical Education 



62 



Fjiink Bernard Belk, J 
StalesviIIe. N.C. 
Socioloo> 





Jean Mane Britt 
Seaboard. N.C. 
Sociology 



Millard Fillmore Boone. Ill 
Seaboard. N.C. 
Religion 

Barbara Ann Brown 
Athens. Georgia 
Sociology 



Nancy Carol Brown 
Draper. N.C. 
Business Education 



William Edward Brown 
Newark, NJ. 
Sociology 



63 




Nellie Womble Burton 
Bear Creek. N.C. 
Elementary, Education 



Anthony H- Carpenter 
Washington, DC. 
Biology 



Delphine Bryant 
Windsor. N.C. 
Elementary. Education 

Samuel Caldwell. Jr. 
Morgantown, N.C. 
Sociology 




Barbara R. Chavis 
Raleigh, N C. 
Elementary Education 



James M. Clay 
Raleigh. N.C, 
Elementary Education 



64 



Clarence W. Coleman 
BrooklvTi, N.V. 
Mathematics 



Joyce Racquel Cooke 
Raleigh. N.C. 
English 





Collie Coleman 
Baily. N.C. 
English 

Mary Alberta Couch 
Chapel Hill. N.C. 
Sociolog\' 



Edith Delores Cox 


Geraldine Dav 


Clinton, N.C. 


Latta. S.C. 


Elementarv Education 


Biologv' 



65 



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Pauline Davis 
Buckingham, Va. 
Business Education 



Ella Glendora Gentry Diggs 
Blanch. N.C. 
Elementary Education 




Anne Mane Dickens 
Baltimore. Md. 
Mathematics 



Mary Lena Diggs 
Chuckatuck, Va. 
Mathematics 



Edward Cecil Dolby 
Raleigh. N.C. 
Sociology 



Mary EHzabeth Dotson 
Preston. Md. 
Elementary Education 



66 



-. 



Veronica Dixon 
Burlington, N.C. 
Business Education 



Arthur Duren 
Englewood. N.J. 
Elementan Education 




Jesse Edmonds. Jr 
North Hills. Pa. 
Sociolog) 



Sherr\ Mae Everett 
Pittsburg. Pa. 
Education 



67 



Candis Ferrell 
Paterson. N.J. 
English 




Marva Anderson Fisher 
Merritt. N.C. 
Enghsh 



William Hicks Fredenck 
Mt. Olive, N.C. 
Biology 



Willie French 
Piltsboro. N.C. 
Physical Education 



68 



^ t t - 'it'-i ' ^a --^^ 



Mamie Ora Fne 
Pinehursi. N.C. 
Elemenlan Education 




WaUace C. Gray, Jr. 


James Ellioil Hargrove 


Hemstead, N.Y. 


Soulh Port N.C. 


Biology 


Elementary Education 



69 




Marion Beatrice High 
Knightdale, N.C. 
Elementary Education 



Pecolia Elaine Hinton 
Raleigh, N.C. 
Elementary Education 



Joyce Mae Hmton 
Raleigh. N.C, 
English 



I 




Shirley Ann Hinton 
Raleigh, N.C 
Chemi.stry 



Julia Pearl Borne 
Wadesboro, N.C. 
Elementary Education 



70 



James Howard, Jr. 
Raleigh. N.C, 
Physical Education 



Van Frances Ivey 
Rocky Mount, N.C. 
History 





Mary Evelyn Jackson 
Harlem, Ga. 
Elementary Education 



Constance Lauvelia Johnson 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Education 



71 



Blanche A. Jones 
Aulander, N.C 
English 




Paul James Joyner 
LaGrange. N.C. 
Business Administration 



Shirley Lee Kearney 
Raleigh. N.C. 
Elementary Education 



72 



Billy B. King 
Chester, S.C 
Phvsicai Education 



Bennie Lee Lake 
Asheville. N.C. 
Phvsicai Education 




Pamela Ann Lacewell 
Raleigh, N.C. 
Elemenlap, Education 

Kalherine Lamb 
Corapeake. N.C. 
English 



Eunice Beverly Latta 
Raleigh, N.C. 
Sociology 



Maijorie .Mills Lee 
Baltimore. Md. 
Music 



73 



Jacqueline Lewis 

Whitakers. N,C. 
English 




Gloria Dean Lloyd 
Robersonville, N.C. 
Elementary Education 



Mildred Ann McCoy 
Raleigh, N.C. 
Elementary Education 



Thomas T. McGimpsey 
Oxford. N.C, 
Chemistry 



Gene Autry McNeil 
Angier. N.C. 
Music 



74 



fra Milchell 
New York. N.Y. 
Physical Education 



Ethel Marie Moore 

Baltimore. Md. 
Business Education 




Tyrone Morgan 


Lunetia Irene Mosley 


Bailey. N.C. 


Waynesboro. Va. 


Sociology 


Physical Education 



75 



Shirley Moss 
Bridgeport. Conn. 
Biology 

Haywood Moye, Jr. 
Raleigh. N.C. 
Physical Education 




Joseph Outland 
Monrovia Liberia 
Business 

Andre Owens 
Morganton, N.C. 
Elementary Education 



Rochelle Peebles 
Zebulon. N.C. 
Biology 



Anna Peterson 
Philadelphia. Pa. 
Business 



76 




Pearl Quarles 
Washington. D.C. 
English 



Shelia Ray 


Deidra Robinson 


Tarboro. N.C. 


Easley, S.C. 


Sociology 


Physical Education 



77 



Joyce Rolle 
Miami. Florida 
Elementary Education 

Chnstine Ruflin 
Providence. N.C. 
Sociology 





Ruby Seabrook 
Charleston, S.C. 
Business Education 

Lawrence Shackleford 
Wake Forest. N.C, 
Sociology 



lizabeth Singlelary 


Patti Spence 


aleigh, N.C, 


Holly Srprngs, N.C 


lemenlary Education 


English 



78 




Selma Spicer 
Goldsboro. N.C. 
Elementan Education 

Bishop Siallin^ 
Edenlon. N.C. 
Physical Education 



Betty Stanley 
Shallotte, N.C. 
Physical Education 

Wa\Tie Sulphin 
South Boston. V'a. 
Sociology 




Versia Thomas 
Hampton. Virginia 
Mathematics 



Marion Tucker 
Holly Springs 
Home Economics 



79 



Anna Walker 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Sociology 



Robert White 
Raleigh. N.C. 
Physical Education 





Nathan Walton 
Elizabeth City. N.C. 
Physical Education 



Clinton Whitfield 
Panama City. Fla. 
Physical Education 



Bernard Wilder 
Raleigh, N.C. 
Elementary Education 



Fannie Wilder 
Franklinton, N.C. 
Business Education 



80 




Nathaniel Woods 


James Wilson 


Ashville, N.C. 


Apex, N.C 


Physical Education 


Elementarv Education 



81 




•1C _ " _ ^ ^ ^ 

b^- - ' A:« 

JUNIORS ''^V^mi^'^% 

President Dan Burrell 

Vice President WiUiam Moses 

Secretary Shirley Haskins 

Treasurer Brenda Bullock 




Rufus Allen 





Ernest Alston 



Delores Barrett 





Jean Beal 



84 




Addie Bass 



Doretha BilLie 




Arthur Bridges 



Marian Brodie 





Betrv Brvson 



Janice Brown 



Barbara Bullock 




Daniel Burrell 



James B. Cheek 





Demeterias Daniels 



86 




Robert Christian 



Mary Davis 




Joyce Smith Dixon 



Constance Evans 





Grace Edwards 



Charles Freeman 




Horace Graham 



Joseph Guess 




Shirley HasJdns 



Robert Hassell 




John Holland 



Delores Jenkins 





Nellie Jenkins 



Dons Jones 




Eleanor Jones 




Carolyn King 




Norman Joyner 



Demetris Kirksey 





Viola Logan 



90 




Frances LUes 



William Love 




William L. Moses 



Mary Murphy 





Shirley McClain 



91 




McAnhur Mitchell 



Doretha McCoy 




Berlina Patter: 



William Pollard 




Willie Ramey 



India Rose 




^ 



I 
I 




Hazel Russell 






Robert Russell 



Juanita Saunders 




Geraldine Salmond 



James Savage 





Nancv L. Simue! 



93 




Armon Scon 



Louis Smith 




George Spaulding 



Matlie Tillman 





Saliie Totten 



Mary G. Upperman 



94 




Arletha Vann 




Connie and Bill in one of those cher- 
ished momenls. 



Even in the Campus Inn Mr. Camp is planning 
"Chem problems" for us!! 



The last remnants of of Convention Hall come 
down! 




Eva Grandy confers here with Dr. De about one of the many 
experiements now underway in an active Science Lab. 





SOPHOMORES 



President William Jones 

Vice President Fred Long 

Secretary Frances Wilson 

Treasurer Joseph Acqul 



Joseph Acqui 
Helen Adams 



Spencer Baldwin 
Randolph Bazemore 




Johnny Boykins 
Beverly Brogden 
Thomas Brown 



Patnck Bryant 
Betty Bugg 
Florine Burch 



98 



Frank Byers 



Daisy Bynum 






Deiores Caple 




WiUiam Cooper 




Vernon Course) 




Brenda Cooke 


Dorothy Coleman 




Mable Davis 


^^ «^-S 


Major Davis 






frSW 


Ivan Donovan 


f M 




§ 'Jm 


Freddie Edmonds 


Jc9 


Thomas Edwards i 


^L^>W 









99 



Julia Ellison 
Harold Flowers 



Lynwood Foster 
Robert Foust 




Alphonso Gaskins 
Ned Gibbs 
Curtis Gilbert 



Jimmy Gilchrist 
Curtis Gill 
Senatra Gooding 



100 






Susan Gordon 



Karen Gore 



Lawrence Griffin 
William Hargrove 



John Johnson 
Sarah Johnson 
Joyce Jones 



Willie Jones 
Arthur Kindred 
Edward Ladson 




101 



Tyrone Laval 
Betly Langley 



Minnie Langley 
Gerald Latta 




Sandra Long 
Sharon Lucas 
Patricia Majin 



Eloise Maxwell 
Emily McDougald 
Rene Mclver 



102 



Ophelia Mile 



Patricia Neal 



Samuel Quinn 
Walter Rav 
Harold Reid 



Tom Reynolds 
Clara Richardson 
Fred Roberts 




103 




Elaine Ross 
Nathan Saziru 
Calhel Scoll 



Lela Silas 



Harold Smalls 



Carolyn Smiley 



^■|^a ,,^n* ^ 


^^F^-^ 







Valarie Snell 
Cassie Stanley 



Adelle Stokes 
Geraldine Turner 




Betty Wall 
Brenda Ward 



104 



Claude West 
Harold White 
Carolyn Williams 



Walter WiUiams 
Betty Wilson 
Bruce Winston 



Price Woodard 
Fannie Woo ten 



Rowena Zanders 
Ida Alexander 




105 




w^m 


Joann Avery 


K'-W 


Macon Battle 


t'-r 


Laura Bullock 


J 






Miriam Dargan 
Joletha Gaskill 


It" 


Thayne Goodman 


i^ 


Delilah Johnson 


^^H. ^-"h^ ' 




^^■L*.^/ 


Carolyn Jones 





Marilyn Joyner 
Rosaphine McCarroH 



Gloria Miles 
Leona Moore 



# 



106 



Iris Morrow 



Delores Riddick 



Annie Sherine 



Isabella Singletary 
Dorothy Singleton 
Dwisht Stanford 



Carol Stokes 
Barbara West 



Rosa Wiggins 
Lucius Williams 



Nancy Williams 




107 



Tupper Hall, Freshmen Men"; 




A "spanking, brand new Frosh 




President • ■ ■ 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer • • ■ 



• • Barbara Brown 
Haywood Shearin 

■ ■ ■ Anita Childs 
Merriette Chance 



Franklin Arnold 
Delons Artis 
Carol Avery 
Elsie Avery 




Carol Adams 
Annette Allen 
Emanuel Allen 
Cheryl Alston 
Sandra Alston 



Jeanette Barnes 
Jeanette Baines 
Jenifer Baker 



Victoria Baldwin 
Mildred Barks 



Harriet Barton 



Melvin Barnes 



Marvin Barton 
Ins Bea 



Clyde Bess 



Daisvbell Brown 
Janet Bowson 
Iwanda Brewer 
Janet Brown 
Micheal Brown 




Ralph Blakely 
Larry Blakeney 



James Bostic 
Madlyn Branch 
Donald Bunt 
Barbara Brown 



I 



no 



Warren Brown 
William Brown 
Earlene B\rd 
Maurice Bundv 
Madie Bunting 



Lydia Butler 
Estelle Bvnum 
Jarris B\Tium 



Edwin Caye 
^'^° C°°P" Manetia Chance 





Alphonso Cameron 
Genise Carroll 
Edwards Cassidv 



Claude Cooper 

Gregory Cottman .Ajiila Childs 



Conley Crawford 
Wesley Crenshaw 
William Crowdor 






Claude Crudup 
Sandra Crump 
Bemadelte Davis 
Everett Davies 




Giona Davis 
Harold Dunn 
Lucy Dawson 
Debra Dunn 
Jeanette Deloatche 



111 



Thurman Draughn 
ZuIIie Earl 
Betty Edwards 
Neliie Edwards 




Gerald Denings 
Mary Dennings 
Blonnie Dennis 
Veda Dodson 
Palncia Doweil 



Souvania Elleby 
Lillian Elliott 
Bernard English 



Phyllis Felton 
Doris Fenner 



Jeanette Ferrell 



Ernest Fernandez 



Meekie Floyd 
Alice Flouronory 



Harold Gilliam 
Robert Gleaton 
Veronica Gooding 
Peggy Goodman 
Eula Graddy 




Benny Ford 
Frager Foster 
Gladys Fowler 



William Foxwell 
William Freeman 
Vera Fulton 
Willie Gerald 



U2 



Delores Graham 
Rue Graham 
Lula Green 
Lindsey Grice 
Carl Griffin 




Wa\Tie Griffin 
Beny Hairston 
Robert Hall 
Louis Hames 



£££^ 



Edmond Hamilton 
Edward Hamilton 
Oh\"ia Hardv 



Patsy Harvin Norma Harris 

Benjamm Harrison 



Willard Hawkins 

Francine Hayman Lorene Hartsoe 





Wilham Hildebrand 
\£.^H Brenda HiU 

Consuela Hill 



Juanita Hill 
Ronald Honon 
James Howerton 
Wilbert Huff 



Fannie Hughes 
William Hunter 
Kaiherine Iceson 
Brenda Jackson 
Janice Jackson 



113 



Edith Jennings 
Harriet Jennings 
Charlie Johnson 
Gloria Johnson 




Shirley James 
William James 
William E. James 
Garry Jenkins 
Lila Jenkins 



Claudia Jones 
Deidra Jones 
Edna Jones 



Travis Jones 
Frank Kaham 



Harold Joyner 



Brenda Kornegay 



Wilson Lacy 
Andrew Lamb 



Beasley Mclvey 
Leon McKinley 
Fred McNair 
Barbara McQueen 
Frenzola Mickie 




Laura Long 
Cheryl McClain 
Barbara McCuUough 



Edward McDaniels 
Dorothy McDowell 
Geraldine McFadden 
William McFadder 



114 



IJ 



Elviba Miles 
Beverly Millner 
Fannie Mitchell 
Natlie Mitchell 
Ella Mitchner 




Henry Moore 
Grace Moore 
Patricia Moore 
Ronnie Moore 







Samuel Moore 
William Moore 



Brenda Moultrie 



Linda Paden 



Manon Peebles 
Gloria Peoples 



Lorelta Perry 
Mary Peterson 



Elizabeth Peyton 






Betty Nicholson 
Sharon O'Neal 






Cynthia Pack 




Patricia Peyton 
Lenora Phillips 
Penelope Poe 
Cecile Ponson 



Robert Pretty 
WiUiam Price 
Arthur Puren 
Eamell Purrington 
Barbara Ragland 



115 





Charles Ramey 
Beverly Reynolds 
Ruth Rice 
Cathem Richardson 
Carolyn Ricks 



Mahalia Roberts 
Alice Rufiin 
Glona Sanders 
Vermel Salley 



Haywood Shearwin 
Rachel Short 
Haryl Sills 



Brenda Simmons 
Douglas Simms 



Frank Smith 




Kenneth Skinner 



Harold Smith 
Marv Smith 



ik 




Norman Smith 
PhyUis Smith 
Geraldine Snellings 




Novell Sowell 
Kenneth Sparrow 
Shirley Speight 
Pamela Springer 




^^ 5^L 





Geraldina Spurill 
Lillie Squires 
Rebecca Stalworth 
Kay Stanley 
Gallah Stephan 




M%9& 



116 



Patricia Storer 
Elnora Slukes 
Hazel Suggs 
William Sutphin 
James Taylor 



William Teal 
Shirlev TTiomas 
William Thomas 
Charles Thompson 



Barbara Venerable Wilben Turner 

Sidney Twiggs 



Carlolia Ward 
Constance Watson 





Robert Thomes 
John Timmons 
Hebert Turner 



Dons Vance 



Jesse Wheeler 
Joseph UTiitaker 
Joseph D. UTiiiaker 



Raymond Whitakers 
Marcma White 
AzJene Williams 
Edward Williams 



&M& 



Man Williams 
Othera Williams 
Rufus Williams 
William Williams 
Earl Wilson 



117 




Margie Wilson 
Commeleta Windoi 
Wallina Woodard 
George Woodford 
Junius Woodson 



Debonair and suave is the word. Gents!! 
So says Ivan Donovan and Freddie Ed- 
monds. 




■,mi^: 




Mrs. Johnson's typing class gets 
instructions on the use of the new 
equipment . 




President Cheek discusses the college's plans for re-development with student leaders. 




OKCVHIS 
ORGAKII 




aiDME 

kmns 



The true scholar is one who 
accomphshed more that his as- 
signed work. He seeics to go be- 
yond ... to extra-curricular ac- 
tivities. Organizations offer this 
opportunity. 

In participating in activities, 
the student learns to broaden 
his outlook and respect the 
rights of others; to form, ar- 
range, and state his own opin- 
ions; and more important, to 
work cooperatively with his fel- 
low students. He places himself 
on a scale with others and at- 
tempts to improve himself If he 
succeeds, the advantages are 
doubled — he advances the 
cause of the organization, and 
places confidence in his own 
ability. 



SHA W-LEBRITIES 










'The My Man Club'' 

. . . Varsity Lettermen 






The Shaw Cheerleaders 



jfife- ^k_i^ 



T^fiSt^ 




te 




,3P* 



-'^''^&^>^ 



?^iv^^-vir^-^ 



Patricia Peyton. Demeierias Daniels. Carol Adams. Claire D- Robinson. Lvdia Butler. Shern- Everen. 
Rene Mclver. 



Hey. hey. Maroon and White, you look so good to me! Heh. hev! 





N.A.A.C.P. 



N.A.AC, p. - Robert Davis. Annie Williams, Larry Alston, Delphine 
Bryant, James Hargrove, Thelma Ruffin, Sliirley Moss, Frances Liles, Eve- 
lyn Jackson. Luther Coppedge, Vema Johnson. 



S.N.E.A 



S.N.E.A. SEATED: Brenda Barton, Larry Alston. Nancina Dulin. Tyrone Laval. Lena Diggs. James 
Hargrove. STANDING — Irene Baldwin. Verna Johnson. Evelyn Jackson. Authur Duren, Annie Wil- 
liams. Mamie Frye. Delphme Bryant, Edith Cox. 




STUDENT COUNCIL 




Student Council officials gather around Student Council Prexy Collie Coleman to plan and outline stu- 
dent government activities for the school year. 




Prexy Coleman goes over student government 
proceedings with Joyce RoUe, Pearl Quarles and 
Racheal Williams. 



Vice President Bill Pollard plans Student Council so- 
cial calendar with. Penelope Powe, William Moses. 
Juanita Saunders. George Spaulding and Jannifer Baker, 




"VJwwawsMSKswHsmaa'is;; 




Foreign Students Association 




Men's Personnel Council 

Men's personal Council officials Ivan Donovan and William Moses listen to the problem of 
George Spaulding. 



^^^^1 


1 






1 

t 

1 


li^ r^^*»r-*r 


-^V3L^ 


Business 


1 

! 

Baptist Student Union 


1 
^ 

ii 




i t i>' 




"Campus News 

that's 
Fit to Print" 



Joseph Goodson. Dan Burress, Mary Murphy, Editor, Eichard Martin, and Berhna Patterson. 



the 



Shaw Journal Staff 




Joseph Goodson, Geraldine Turner, Daniel Burell, Dementrias Daniels, Mary Murphy, Richard Mar- 
tin. Berlina Patterson, Jeanette Jackson, William Moses. William Pollard, and Candis Ferell. 



^^^^''"'■'■^^^-''■'-"^^^-"^^•-"*'" 



The Shaw Chorale Society 





The Chorale Society is a student group composed of 
more than seventy students. Members of the chorale are 
from the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, New 
York. New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Georgia. 
The group is under- the direction of Harry GU-Smythe. 



Charles Johnson. Shirley Gray. Edilh Cox. Selma Spicer and Jessie 
Edmonds. 



131 




DANCE 
GROUP 



Western Style 





Dance Ballerina 




Shawettes' Drill Team 



Physical Educ 



ation Club 




The Shaw Players 



m 



'Tiger At The Gates" 





Paris bestows his affections on Helen, whom he has bought to Troy 
away from her husband Menelos. Cassandra. Paris' witty sister watches. 



Andromache and Hector in one of their tender, emotional moments. 




Helen of Troy offers her hand in welcoming Ulysses a.< he ar- 
rives in Troy to claim Helen. 



rm.vtmuBBSSBSXBXBUKilih 



"All the World's 

A Stage . . 



Under the direction of Chestyn Everett, 
the Shaw Players cast the school's first 
major dramatic presentation. Gi- 
raudoux's "Tiger At the Gates" 




135 




v^ 




Greek organizations are societies designed for the so- 
cial and scholastic benefit of its members, and is founded 
upon the bond of brotherhood. 

The evolvement of fraternities and sororities has been 
gradual. In early stages. Greeks formed their alliances se- 



cretly, since the schools banned any such group. Today, 
most colleges endorse the organizations, and the fraterni- 
ties, in return, have given allegiance to the schools. The 
Greek organizations have become part of the backbone 
of school spirit. 



ALPHA PHI ALPHA 




KNEELING - Willie Ramey. Dan Burrell. and Robert RusseU. STANDING - Cecil Dolby. Charles 
Spellman, John King, Horace Graham, James Savage. James Howard and Kermit Britl. 



Brother Charles "Concrete" Gray caught in a mo- 
ment of deep pondering in his dorm "pad." 





Brother James Savage on his way to class. So what 
else is new. huh? 



"'•^'•'•'vwvua^saBvasasBwayii;'. 



ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA 



I'l; I' t . I > Ilia ■ I lui II III !■ ' I ii 




SEATED - Joyce Cooke. Lena Diggs, Minnie Mitchell. Robbie Debnam. Brenda Ward and Ma 
Fisher. STANDING - Eva Grandy. Ethel Moore. Eugenia Hinton and Arnese Rayford. 





Sorors Eugenia Hinton, know as "Jazzy from 
the Windy City." and Eva Grandy tipping 
around the campus. 



139 



Miss Alpha Kappa Alpha, lovely Lena Diggs. 



- KAPPA ALPHA PSI FRATERNITY - 




Bobby Height 




Bill Pollard 



r 




Al Gaskins 




BiU McCullough 



rns^ 




Bob Hassell 




Claude West 





Counter Clockwise: William Pollard, William McCulloch. Bobby Height. Jose Goodson, James Wilson, 
Robert Hassell. Oaude West, and Alphonso Gaskins. Centered in the Kappa diamond is Prof. 
Gil-Smythe. chapter adviser. 




Brother Sam Caldwell in one of his most classic poses. 



NeophMes Gaskins. West and McCulloch entertain the crowds during probate 
week. 




f^ 






Brother Pollard getting in 
his favorite course." Cam- 
pus Gnllology." 







Brother Preston Peace and his 
"charm," Alice Flomoy. dur- 
ing the homecoming float 
building activities. 




Omega Psi Phi 




Franklin Cheek, Clarence Coleman, Fred Long, Larry Shackleford, Bill King. Charles Johnson, 
Freddie Polhill, Roscoe Johnson and Frank Belk. 




The Que's Freddie Polhill 




Que "Dogs" on the move. 




Relaxing with Ira. 



DELTA SIGMA THETA 




Barbara and Brenda Bullock, Alberta Pace. Vera Allen, Juanita Saunders, Mildred Mc- 
Coy, Donna .Archer, and Joyce Rolle, 




"Hanging clolhes" on the Delta Line. 



ZETA PHI BETA 




Vema Johnson, Frances LUes, Shirley Smith, Shirley Moss. Pearl Quarks, Candis Ferrrell, Martha 
Jackson, Sarah Johnson, Doretha Billie. Josephine Walker, Geraldine Turner, Eleanor Jones, Betty 
Bryson, Helen Horton, Addie Bynum. 



PHI 

BETA 

SIGMA 




Robert Jones, William Brown, William Frederick, Collie Coleman. 



144 



SIGMA GAMMA RHO 




Blanche Jones. Fannie Wilder. Don's Dupree. Gloria Lloyd. Margie Powell. 



Greek Probation 




\ 




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F- 


^ 




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WSk 


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1 


1 




1 


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1 


■ 


■ II 


II 


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Zeta "Kittens" 



Charles Freeman 



145 





Crescent Club and Sweetheart. 




§ B^AfmJ^^ 




Pan Hellenic Council 



$10 Million Rebuilding Project Set at Shaw 

Campus to Expand to Meet 



By SIDNEY STAPLETON 
Times Staff Writer 

President James E. Cheek of Shaw University has an- 
nounced the school will institute an entirely new curriculum 
in September more in line with the needs of the stu- 
dents it admits. 

Cheek said the new curriculum is the result of more 
than two years of study by the administration and faculty 
at the Shaw in an attempt to enable the school to offer its 
students the best possible education. 

"We have such a wide diversity of ability among the 



students we admit," Cheek said, "that we must correspond- 
ingly diversify our teaching to enable the faster student to 
go ahead with his education while giving the slower student 
the additional time and instruction he needs." 

Under the new program, some students may need as 
much as five years to complete their degree requirements 
while others may secure their degrees in the normal four 
years, or in some cases, even less. 

Shaw will also shift from its present semester system 
to a "term system" under which it will operate on a full- 
time basis the year-round. The school year will be divided 
into four quarters and the student who needs to do more 
work can attend in the summer. 




The future new campus at Shaw University will include (1) library, (2) and (3) classrooms buUdings, (4) student lounge and 
cafeteria, (5) and (6) new residence halls, (7) fine arts building, (8) auditorium and chapel, (9) music building, (10) univer- 
sity church, and (11) the administration building now under construction. Other buildings are existing structures which will be 
remodeled. 



Varied Needs 



Under the plan, there will no longer be the accustomed 
freshman, sophomore, junior and senior designations for 
students. They will be divided into upper and lower levels 
with periodic examinations determining when the student 
should be moved up. 

Cheek said extensive tests administered when the stu-* 
dent enters will determine which program he will enter. 

While the administration drew upon recommendations 
from other educational institutions for its new program, 
it is basically their own idea and a somewhat revolutionary 
concept. 

The curriculum will also include the use of automated 
teaching machines and the addition of an audio-language 
laboratory. 

The 32-year-old Cheek has already broken a number of 
precedents at the Baptist institution since he was made its 
president in December of 1%3. 

At the time Cheek took over, the school was faced 
with a $280,000 deficit and seemed on the verge of closing. 
However, Cheek put on a high-powered fund-raising drive 
among the alumni and friends of the institution and the debt 
was paid in full in six months. 

Cheek also completely revamped the school's administra- 
tion and faculty, hiring four new department heads, tight- 
ening up the lines of responsibility and authority and em- 
ploying some 15 new teachers. He said an additional six 
professors will be added this year. 

Recently the school sold part of its West campus 
to the city for street development and used the proceeds 
from the sale to begin construction on a new $130,000 
administration building which is about half complete. 

The new building will ultimately stand in the center 
cf a new $10 million campus which Cheek hopes to see 
rise on the site in the next five to seven yea^. 

Most of the existing buildings will be demolished in 
phases to make way for the new structures. Only the 
present natural sciences building, the chapel, the freshman 
dormitory, and the gymnasium will be left. 

Cheek said the campus will be divided into four seg- 
ments with each area devoted to a specific function. 
There will be areas for residence halls, teaching, fine arts, 
and a multi-purpose area centered around the existing 
chapel building. 

First on the list to be constructed is a nine-story 
women's domitory with a cafeteria and student lounge to 
follow. Construction on this building is slated to begin be- 
fore the end of this calendar year with the cafeteria and 
lounge following early in 1966. 

A new men's dormitory will be added as enrollment 
necessitates. 

In time a six-story natural sciences building and 

library will be constructed and the present natural sciences 

building will be remodeled and enlarged for new liberal 

arts classroom space. 

The third phase of the building program will include 




President James E. Cheek of Shaw University emphasizes 
the need for teaching a diversified curriculum to correspond 
with the wide variety of ability among the students admitted. 

a fine arts center, a building for music and drama, and a 
combmation chapel and auditorium. 

Later the school hopes to acquire a three block tract 
to the east to develop new recreational areas. Present 
recreational facilities will be absorbed by the new build- 
ings. 

The Baptist school was founded in 1865 and recently 
celebrated its centennial anniversary. It is thus the oldest 
Negro co-educational institution in the nation and has about 
900 students enrolled. 

Cheek himself is a native of Greensboro and Roanoke 
Rapids, Va. He spent seven years in theological seminaries 
and one year as a teacher at a Negro college in Richmond, 
Va., before coming to Shaw. 



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n. 



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Sports and athletics involve a formula com- 
bining perseverance, thought and skill. In an 
athletic contest, the players should have more 
than the ability to compete well. It is imperative 
that they learn the arts of teamwork and sports- 
manship. They have to accept discouraging de- 
feats on the same plane as exhilarating victories, 
and be able to temper their emotions to both. 



^ 



S 



\J 









Len Pinkney 
Bears' Punter 





Action at the line of scrimmage hero against Winston-Sala 




Haywood Move 



Jimmy 
Howard 














Bill Jones 





Nat Walton, QB. fakes a handoff to Billy King after tossing a short one to Art Bridges. Louis Smith 
blocks into the line. 



FRONT ROW: Woods. Howell. Peace. French. Walton. King. Howard. 
Move, 1. Edmonds. Pinknev, and H. Edmonds. SECOND ROW: 
Cheek. Smith. Gaskins, J. Jones. Bridges, Russell. Coursey, Scott, Long, 



Gill and Gaskings. THIRD ROW: Bolds, Grice Woodson, W. Brown, 
W. Jones, F. Smith, M. Brown, Hunter, Guv, Hinnant Williams. 
Simms, and Griffith, 




ipr-.Sitaissw»»lsS.-..j,^iyiiv^ !•■. ,--- * .•'./M-^?^;.--: ■,;:>-'<s^^M^r„f^' ■^^■Z::-^'.^^^^^ 



Bill King (45) on the move 
against Virginia Slate. 



Season's Record 

Football Scores 



Shaw 
Shaw 
Shaw 
Shaw 
Shaw 
Shaw 
Shaw 
Shaw 
Shaw 



University 16 

University 39 

University 12 

University 

University 22 

University 12 

University 20 

University 28 

University 21 




Va. Union 
Fayetteville St. 
Va. State 
Elizabeth City St. 
J. C. Smith Univ. 
N.C. College 
Hampton Institute 
Winston Salem St 
St. Augustine's 




Art Bridges is upended here 
after making one of his specta- 
cular catches against Virginia 
State. 




Jim Howell 











i^^l 







Willie Jones gets away here on the Trojans at Petersburg. 



156 



"Mac" Mitchell turns the comer for yardage against Smith's 
Golden Bulls. 



JLA-iL^ 









Henry Edmonds 



Bob Russell 



Bear "Fresh" 
KNEELING - Leo- 
nard Guy. Lenzie 
Grice. Bill Brown. 
Mike Brown, and 
Doug Simms. 

STANDING - Ar- 
mond Scott. Don 
Williams, Junius 
Woodson. Carl 

Griffith. Wilham 
Hunter, Chalmbers 
Hinnant. and Frank 
Smith. 








158 



Cumulative Football Statistics — '65 Season 



Passing 



All. 



Walton 
French 
King 
Grice 

Totals 



om^ 


). Inl 


Yds 


TD 


Conv. 




67 


65 


17 


905 


9 


3 


Mitchell 


4 





1 


56 


1 





Jones 


1 





1 











Long 


1 

















Walton 
Howard 


73 


68 


19 


961 


10 


3 


French 
Woodson 



Inlerceplion Returns 
No. 





Yds. 


TDs 


Avg. 


2 


35 


1 


17.5 


4 


62 


1 


15.5 


1 


60 





60.0 


2 


20 





1 0.0 


1 


51 





51.0 


2 


12 





6.0 


1 


20 





20.0 



Receiving 



Totals 



13 



260 



20.0 





No. 


Yds. 


Ave. TDs 




Conv. 




Move 




13 


26f 


20.2 


6 


1 


Punting: 


Bridges 




18 


220 


12.2 


? 


2 


Jones 


King 




15 


205 


13.7 


1 





Moye 


French 




12 


183 


15.3 








Pickney 


Jones 




8 


70 


8.8 










Long 




2 


21 


10.5 


1 





Totals 


Totals 




68 


961 


14.1 


10 


3 


Punt Returns 


Rushing 














Wahon 


Carries 


Gained 


Lost 


Total 


TDs Conv 


Avg. 


French 


King 


109 


All 


30 


442 7 


3 


4.1 


Jones 


Long 


46 


224 


14 


210 





4.6 




French 


72 
24 


266 
150 


78 
19 


188 2 





2 6 


Totals 


Jones 


131 1 





5.5 




Walton 


60 


238 


196 


42 2 


1 


0.7 




P. Gaskins 


4 


7 


6 


1 





0.3 




Mitchell 


10 


29 


1 


28 





2.8 




Simms 


4 


7 


2 


5 





1.2 




Grice 

A. Gaskins 

Gnffith 


3 
1 

1 


5 




6 

4 


-1 

-4 







-0.3 
0.0 
-4.0 


Wahon 
King 



Totals 



334 1400 350 1044 22 



Scoring 



King 

Moye 

Walton 

Bridges 

French 

Jones 

Long 

Mitchell 

Totals 



Total Offense 



Walton 

King 

French 

Long 

Jones 

Mitchell 

Grice 

Simms 

P. Gaskins 

A. Gaskins 

Griffith 

Totals 



TDs 



1-Pt. 



6 

3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 

25 



2 -Pi. 

6 











3.1 



Total 

60 

38 
20 
16 
12 
12 
6 
6 

170 



Plays 



lushing 


y Passing 


Total 


227 


42 


905 


947 


110 


442 





442 


76 


188 


56 


244 


46 


210 





210 


24 


131 





131 


10 


28 





28 


4 


-1 





-1 


4 


5 





5 


4 


1 





1 


1 











1 


-4 





-4 


507 


1044 


961 


2005 



So. 


Yds. 


Avg. 


34 


1194 


35.1 


7 


221 


31.6 


5 


115 


23.0 



46 



1530 



15 



228 



15.2 



Jones 

Moye 

Long 

Mitchell 

Bridges 

Totals 



Shaw Opp. 



37 672 



18.2 



Team Statislics 



33.3 



No. Yds. 


Avg. 


TD 


5 86 


17.2 


1 


5 60 


8.8 





5 82 


15.7 






ickoff Returns 








No. 


Yds. 


Avg. 


TDs 


14 


291 


20.8 





7 


147 


21.0 





7 


104 


14.9 





3 


46 


15.3 





3 


44 


14.7 





1 


16 


16.0 





1 


13 


13.0 





1 


11 


11.0 






170 Points scored 211 

58 First Downs, Riishing 71 

37 First Downs, Passing 43 

13 First Downs, Penalty 10 

108 Total First Downs 124 

1400 Gained Rushmg 1451 

356 Lost Rushmg 251 

1044 Net Gained Rushing 1200 

173 Passes Attempted 189 

68 Passes Completed 92 

961 Yards Passing 1332 

39.3 Completion Pet. 49 

46 No. of Punts 36 

1530 Yards Punting 1110 

33.3 Punt Average 30.8 

66 Penalties Against 77 

623 Yards Penalized 774 

14 Fumbles 27 

9 Fumbles Lost 19 

13 Interceptions 19 

25 X-Points Att. 30 

13 X-Points Made 19 

Field Goals 1 




CIAA Baseball Chaimvs admire their plaque 
along with T.V. Sports personalities. J. D. Lewis 

nnrt Mirk Pc»nH (1 




^^^ 



Baseball 



Coach Randolph discusses various p.Iches here with the Bruins' "Rookie (irps," twirlers Bazemore 
Love and the ambidextrous Johnson. 





Wilson 



Second sacker whirls toward first to complete a double play. Backing him up 
is shortstop Bill Jones. 



Bears Win Second CIAA Baseball Title 



'64 Results 



1964 BASEBALL SCORES 



Batting Averages 



Norfolk Slate 
Hampton Institute 
Howard University 
A. & T. College 
Delaware State 
Fayetteville Slate 
Maryland Slate 




Opp. 
5 
2, 4 
1. 4 
6, 9 
4, 9 
8, 5 
4, 11 

















W 


L 














Record: 9 and 4 




Totals for 13 Games 










CIAA Champions 




NAME G AB 


R 


H 


2b. 


3b. 


HR 


RB 


B. 


Avg. 


Mayo Weaver 


13 


44 


15 


17 


4 


1 


3 


7 


.386 


Willie French 


13 


52 


17 


20 


3 


2 


1 


15 


.385 


Fred Long 


13 


54 


20 


20 


5 


1 





12 


.370 


Nathan Walton 


13 


57 


18 


21 


4 


1 





19 


.368 


James Wilson 


13 


56 


23 


17 


2 




3 


19 


.303 


Bobby Height 


13 


41 


24 


17 


1 


3 


2 


17 


.414 


Bill Jones 


13 


47 


13 


7 


3 






3 


.149 


Ira Mitchell 


12 


41 


7 


10 


2 






6 


.244 


Jimmy Howard 


11 


31 


5 


7 


1 






5 


.226 


Others 


14 


33 


6 


3 


2 






3 




Team Totals 


13 


484 


148 


142 


27 


8 


9 


110 


.295 


Opponents 


13 


472 


72 


101 


15 


5 


5 


58 


.259 



Pitching 



PITCHING 
















W - L 


I.p 


H. 


R. 


ER 


E.R.A. 


Nathan Walton 


6 


- 1 


42 2/3 


23 


14 


9 1.98 


William Love 


2 


- 


15 2/3 


14 


8 


6 2.80 


Ray Gadsden 


1 


- 1 


13 1/3 






4.00 


Randy Bazemore 





- 


10 2/3 






675 


Bernard Wilder 





- 2 


15 1/3 






3.75 


Alvin West 








10 






8.00 


Johnny Johnson 








2 2/3 






0.00 




Pitcher Bernard Wilder 



The CIAA's MVP 
Catcher - Pitcher Nathan Walton 






Hustling Willie French 




Shortstop Bill Jones 




Track Team 



I I 

I 



^[ 




Versatile Len Pinknev 



.:5t^ 



Half-miler Mulligan 




•B^-«^ 




The Bears' spnnt relay quartet - Pinknev. Byers, Deck and Gnffin. 



Season's Record 



1 




m "M^i^^^^l 




SHAW 


75 


VIRGINIA STATE 


74 


SHAW 


90 


LIVINGSTONE 


75 


j SHAW 


105 


FAYETTEVILLE 


86 


SHAW 


98 


VIRGINIA UNION 


105 


f SHAW 


88 


NORTH CAR, COLL. 


lOI 


SHAW 


101 


LIVINGSTONE 


105 


SHAW 


73 


JOHNSON C. SMITH 


81 


SHAW 


93 


FAYETTEVILLE STATE 


91 


SHAW 


84 


ST. AUGUSTINE 


73 


SHAW 


78 


ELIZ. CITY STATE 


no 


SHAW 


54 


A&T COLLEGE 


75 


SHAW 


92 


ST. AUGUSTINE 


102 


SHAW 


70 


ELIZ. CITY STATE 


106 


SHAW 


69 


JOHNSON C. SMITH 


93 


SHAW 


92 


VIRGINIA STATE 


125 


SHAW 


44 


A&T COLLEGE 


66 


SHAW 


68 


VIRGINIA UNION 


70 


SHAW 


64 


NORTH CAR. COLL 


90 





The cage "giants" battle in this dash between the Bears and 
the Falcons. 







FRONT ROW: Greg Allen, Norman Joyner, Ira Mitchell. Rufus Wil 
liams. and Bennie Lake. BACK ROW: George Renwick, Edward Ham 



ilton. Ray Whitakers. WiUiam James, Robert Williams, Ivan Dono^ 
Eddie Lane. Edmond Hamilton, Richard White, and Bobby Heigh^ 




Co-Captains Ira Mitchell and Norm Joyner in pre-game pose 
with regulars "Foots" WiUiams, Ivan Donovan, Bobby Height 
and Bennie Lake. 




Augustine's. 


IHMi 












^^B 












^^^^^^^^i- 












^^^^I^H^ 










^B 


























^^^■^ 
















^^Hi^^Hfe:- 















"Foots" Williams takes the rebound here against the Falcons. 




Head Coach Bill Soann with senior backcourt aces. Height, Mitchell and 
Lake. 



168 




Shaw fans get in on the action 




Robert "Foots" Williams 





Ivan Donavan 




Bennie Lake 



170 



Bobby Height 




17! 




SG Prexy Collie Coleman makes presentations to seniors in their finale at Spaulding Gymnasn 




George Renwick 




172 



Eddie Lane 



^^^^^^^^^Pit^ -.'j^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


^^H 


Cm! 






) ^S^iH^H 


^ ^iV^fl 


AiflnH 



The Hamilton twins, Edmond and Edward. 



Leading Scorers 




Rufus Williams 



PLA YER 



FIELD GOALS FREE THROWS POINTS 
SCORED SCORED TOTAL 

ATTEMPTED ATTEMPTED GAME AVG. 



MITCHELL, IRA 


158 


331 


57 


86 


373 


21.9 


JOYNER, NORMAN 


110 


244 


31 


64 


251 


13.9 


DONOVAN. IVAN 


84 


160 


55 


102 


223 


12.4 


LAKE, BENNIE 


100 


226 


24 


48 


224 


12.4 


WILLIAMS, ROBERT 


67 


129 


25 


60 


159 


10.0 



A tense and critical moment during the '66 season. 




173 



"In our hearts we build a shrine for 
thee . . . 

We hail the Queens of Shaw U. . . ." 



Grace, charm, talent, personahty 
and beauty are the qualifications of a 
successful queen as well as a successful 
human being. Here at SHAW UNI- 
VERSITY, we are blessed with a bevy 
of lovely young ladies with the forego- 
ing qualities for being our queens. In 
looking around our campus, we often 
wonder, as we view the many 'lovely 
lassies who were by-passed because of 
campus traditions, why there could not 
be at least "a dozen Queens" for each 
organization. 

This section is devoted entirely to 
our reigning and charming queens. We 
will also remember their serenity dur- 
ing the Coronation, homecoming fes- 
tivities, the Greek balls and many oth- 
er festive affairs of their domain here 
at dear ole SHAW U. 




The lovely Queen Vera Regina (Miss Shaw U.) flanked on either side by her charming 
attendants. Lady Joyce (left) and Lady Shirley. 




From one Queen to another - Queen Vera receives royal attention from 
the former Miss Shaw U. 



Lady Shirley Moss 



Miss Shaw University is officially crowned by President James E. Cheek. 




Lady Joyce Rolle 




Miss Shaw U. (caught in an unposed moment) gets in some study 
time during a busy year for her. 




Willie French gets special attention from the campuses' First Lady, 



177 




Miss Omega Psi Phi 
Dana Tibbs 







^MBtt^^_^ 






{ 


^K^ ^^i^ 1 


1 


iss Kappa Alpha Psi 




^^HK^' ^ 




Cassie Stanley 






■""^^ 








^ 


- 


i 


■ 


Ji 



Miss Alpha Phi Alpha 
Robbie Debnam 




Miss Phi Beta Sigma 
Addle Bass 




Miss Shaw Hall 
Sandra Long 





\ 



Miss Freshman 
Barbara Veneable 



Miss Estey Hall 
Janifer Baker 



Miss Sophomore 
Geraldine Turner 




Miss Senior 
Rachel Williams 




Miss Junior 
Brenda Bullock 




Miss Football 
Janice Brown 




Miss Physical Education 
Betty Stanley 





^ 



Miss Track 
Pecolia Hinton 




Miss Basketball 
Brenda Ward 





Miss Baseball 
Connie Johnson 



\ 



V 



^?S?'4 



Miss Cheerleader 
Sherry Everett 




\ 



Miss International 
Hawa Lyons 



Miss Social Science 
Chris Ruffin 



184 




Miss S.C.A. 
Shirley Grant 





MISS HOMECOMING 
Shelia Ray 



Miss S.N.E.A. 
Nancina Dulin 



185 



-'UN 





^^^ 




. ■■■■■ 


1 








1 



'-♦ 







Varsity Queens 
Rachel Williams, Betty Stanley. Connie Johnson and Janice Brown. 




C, C. SpaulUin^ Gymnasiun 



Performances Like this 




made him the 
'Most Valuable 









College is more than a place; it is a type of existence. It is a life 
that places great challenges before a student, supplies the means 
to overcome them, and helps to make him an individual. In indi- 
vidualism there is promise of a stronger, united strength. 

College life is constructed on four cornerstones — scholarship, 
social life, self-knowledge, and school spirit. If these cornerstones 
are to support the college, they must be placed upon a firm founda- 
tion — quality of the individual student. 




Hey Bennie, unhand my collar! 



Even he spends a moment "on the block!' 




■ ■ ^C'^r'-ri-rvr-v 







The "two Eddies", Lane and Walker, whoop it up here during homecoming week. 



In his Columbia Blue! 




Look Mom, he went to Mass this Sunday, 



190 



Shirley's sportmg her "Sat, morn, togs" 




A Visit From the 
Tupper Relatives 

The campus was visited by relatives 
of its founder, the late Dr. Henry 
Martin Tupper. Mrs. Arthur Pfalzer, 
a great grand-daughter of the late Dr. 
Tupper. and her husband. Arthur Jr.. 
and two sons, Eric and Fritz, stopped 
off in Raleigh to view many familiar 
sites on their return trip home to 
Granville. Ohio. 




Clifford Coles hosts the Founder's relatives during their summer visit to the campus. 




Mr. 



Pfalzer, along his two sons, shoots movies of campus scenes. q. 




Ivan's World 



What's up, Wayne? 




Don't take that "line," Genese! 




''Hodge-Podge 



99 



m^ 








f 



Definitely "pressed." man! 



192 



Strolling to class, girls? 





The Crowds gather 





194 




Special Counsel to the President of the U.S.. Hobart Taylor. Jr., on a 
visit to the campus, converses with Dr. Spaulding and President Cheek. 



Minneapolis Symphony conductor, Stanislaw Skrowaczewski. auto- 
graphing program after the Orchestra's concert launchmg the Centennial 
Festival of the Arts. 




196 




SHAW ALUMNI RETURN 
For Special Occasions 



President Cheek makes meritorious presentation here to Dr. John W. 
White, alumnus and former chairman of the Board of Trustees. 




Alumnus McPhail returns for University spring affair, 
chats here with the Sylvanders. Stefan and Carolyn 
(LEFT), and Lenoir H. Cook (RIGHTi. director of 
special services. 



Alumni John W. White. E. B. Turner, and Chancy R. Edwards 
here for the observance of Founder's Day. 





THE '66 BEAR STAFF 



The Editorial Board 





'66 Bear Editor Jose Goodson 




Associate Editors Harry Oldham and Berlina Patterson 



Co-Editor Joyce Cooke 





H 



Chief Editorial Aide, Connie Johnson shares Layout ideas with staffers Harold Smiih and 
George Woodford. 





Typing chores done bv Marian Brodie and Sharon Lucas get attention 
from Business Manager Kermit Britl and Associate Editor Harry Oldham. 



Staffers Mary Peterson. Natalie Mitchell and Brenda Kornegay discuss 
photo selections for '66 Bear. 




Yearbook ideas are shared here by Wilson Lacy, artist Henry Moore and 
photographer Ivan Donovan. 



Chief Aide Connie Johnson goes over portrait page suggestions with 
staffers Shirley Moss and Candis Ferrell. 






Managing Editor Richard Martin stresses a point with Sherry Everett and Joyce Cooke. 



SHAW UNIVERSITY 

Its History and Rebirth 



In 1965, Shaw University completed a full century of 
educational activity premised upon the principle that reli- 
gion and learning go hand in hand and that character 
grows with understanding, (knowledge) 

The story of these one hundred years is studded with 
turbulence, wars, depressions and with radical changes in 
educational policy and practice. In a larger sense, it is 
also the story of that curious American phenomenon 
called Negro education, now considered anachronistic by 
informed observers. 

No brief account can ever hope to capture completely 
the sense of drama nor reveal truly the skeins of continu- 
ity connecting that long ago begmning, with the college 
as it exists today. But perhaps something of the pathos 
may be conveyed with the statement that upon witness of 
the disorder prevalent here a scant three years ago, even 
the most impartial observer would not have failed to 
predict utter collapse for this embattled college. But this 
prediction could not have been more wrong, for it would 
have reckoned the tireless efforts of dedicated men and 
women to keep ahve a worthy enterprise. 



Now Shaw enters her second century of service. The 
future could not be more bright, the opportunities more 
numerous, nor the achievement of true excellence nearer 
her grasp. For the predominantly Negro, private liberal 
arts church-related college, Shaw University now points 
the way to the future. 

It began on October 10, 1865. A white New Englander, 
Henry Martin Tupper, recently discharged Union Army 
Chaplain, arrived in Raleigh at the behest of the Ameri- 
can Baptist Home Mission Society to help feed, clothe 
and educate the newly freed slaves. The first two man- 
dates were relatively easily accompUshed. But it would be 
diflicult to imagine a more inauspicious time for the 
founding of a college. 

It was the closing weeks of the great fratricidal. Civil 
War. Busy Hcking its own wounds, the impoverished 
ante bellum South had neither the resources nor the in- 
clination to educate its former bondsmen. Into this vacu- 
um stepped the Northern based American Baptist Home 
Mission Society and other church related agencies, giving 
impetus to the establishment of many church related col- 




A scene of the early Campus showing Shaw Hall. 



200 



leges across the southland. This was a development in 
which Shaw shared; but. there, the similarity ends. 

On that lirst day. Tapper was advised to "Catch the 
tirst train gomg back North" by a fellow clergyman. But 
Tupper was not to be put off. From his diary note on De- 
cember 1. 1865, a month hence, the entry that he had vis- 
ited six families, held a prayer meeting and "heard my 
theological class", the college takes its date of origin. 
Onlv Julv 5, 1866, the Raleigh Institute was formed, en- 



1^ 




Dr. Henry Martin Tupper. . . . Founder and 
first President. 



Ignoring the current vogue of considering women suit- 
able only for housework, another educational heresy was 
committed with the establishment in 1872 of a "Female 
Department". Despite heavy criticism of housing both 
men and women on the same campus, Tupper persisted 
in appealing for funds with which to build a women's 
residence. In 1874 a women's residence was erected bear- 
ing the name of its largest contributor, Jacob Estey. So 
successful was the Women's Department, that in 1893, a 
Missionary Training Department was added for women 
also. 

Tupper succeeded in surrounding himself with capable 
and distinguished assistants. Evenly divided between 
white and Negro teachers, the Shaw faculty were dedicat- 
ed, missionary spirited men and women whose academic 
preparation was good but whose salaries enabled them 
only to live in a shabby state of respectibility. In the ear- 
ly decades, teachers like McKee. Hayward, Charlotte 
Murray, Brawley, Pegues and later, Payne, Cook, Gil- 
Smythe and others, all gave unstintingly of themselves. 
They will be long remembered. 

Student life was rigorous but not unpleasant. Emphasis 
was placed on Christian character building. This was sup- 
ported by daily chapel attendance and evening prayer 
service plus a two hour course in Bible. There were liter- 
ary societies, debate groups and various cultural pro- 
grams, sometimes open to the public. The only rehef in 
this otherwise stringent regiment was organized intercolle- 
giate sports such as baseball and football. Socializing was 
permitted although dancing was not. Still, any thought of 
student docihty must be dispelled when on January 2, 



rolling seventy-five students for training as ministers and 
teachers. In 1870, the name was changed to Shaw Col- 
legiate Institute, and construction begun on Shaw Hall, 
named for the largest contributor. Hlijah Shaw. With the 
issuance of a charter Ln 1875, the name became Shaw 
University, and in 1878, six students were graduated 
three with the Bachelor of Arts degree and three with the 
Bachelor of Science degree. 

From the outset, the fledgling school was in direct 
conflict with contemporary educational thought which 
held that Negroes were incapable of significant educa- 
tional achievement. Disdamful of such thinking, Shaw 
offered high school level courses in carpentry, furniture- 
making and bricklaying in addition to college level de- 
gree programs in Theology, Law and Pharmacy. In 1881, 
Shaw instituted a four year medical training program, 
which was the first in this country and which remains the 
pattern of medical education even today. 




Charles Francis Meserve . . . expanded voca- 
tional offerings and closed the professional 
schools . . . 



201 




UPPER LEFT - Estey Hall - Girl's dormitory, built in 1875. VPPER 
RIGHT - Meserve Hall the President's residence. LOWER - Shaw 
Hall — the oldest building on the campus of the 100-year old institu- 
tion, built entirely with student labor in 1871. 



1914 they revolted over the suspension of J. D. Bean, a 
student who had gotten married against regulations. 
Threatened with dishonorable dismissal if they did not 
return to class, many decided to leave rather than submit. 
Henry Martin Tupper died on November 12, 1893 and 
was laid to rest on the campus. His headstone reads, "He 



counted not his life dear unto himself that he might lift 
Godward his brother," By sheer force of his determina- 
tion and resolve, he had estabUshed a viable institution 
of learning against the most acute odds. He had provided 
ample demonstration of the Negro's educability and his 
desire to lead a useful, productive life. In heartfelt grat- 
itude to him, whenever the University Choir traveled 
north on tour they stopped in Philadelphia to visit and 
sing in the nursing home where his widow had gone to 
live out her years. 



202 



The Shaw University of yesterday is linked with the in- 
stitution of today by an elite procession of only seven 
chief executive officers. Each brought to that high office 
the weight of his own personality, his philosophy of edu- 




pleading rising costs and diminishing finances. A more 
serious blow to the graduates of these schools (404 physi- 
cians, 124 pharmacists and 54 lawyers) would be hard to 
imagine. 

Serving from January 1920-1^31, Joseph Leishman 
Peacock decided not to compete with the burgeoning 
state secondary school program. He phased out Shaw's 
high school curriculum, reduced the industrial offerings 
and concentrated increasingly on upgrading the collegiate 
level courses. 

To the aristocratic William Stuart Nelson, the first Ne- 
gro president, 1931-1935, fell the awesome task of culti- 
vating new financial support from the Negro community 
and alumni. His task can best be appreciated when it is 
recalled that this period coincides with the beginning of 
the great depression. 

Building upon the legacy of his predecessor, the en- 
thusiatic Robert Prentiss Daniel, set in motion a building 
renovation program. He strengthened the academic pro- 
gram and achieved an "A" rating from the earlier "B" 
awarded in 1933 by the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools. 

WilUam R. Strassner served creditably from 1951-1962. 
However, the latter part of his administration represents 
a time of growing discontent and disenchantment. Shaw's 
rank in academia suffered. Her physical plant had fallen 



William Stuait Nelson 
gro President. 



the first Ne- 




Joseph L. Peacock . . . phased out the 
High school curriculum and upgraded 
collegiate level courses. 



cation and influence. The result was often contrasting 
changes in educational pohcies and practices. A brief 
view of each incumbent's administration is instructive. 

Charles Francis Meserve was a warm admirer of Book- 
er T. Washington. As the president from 1894-1919, Mes- 
erve expanded the vocational offerings and in 1914 
closed the professional schools. Law and Medicine, 




Robert P. Daniel ... set in motion a 
building renovation program and strength- 
ened the academic programs. 



into pitiable condition. She was encumbered with heavy 
indebtness. Closure was imminent. The situation seemed 
beyond reclamation. Strassner resigned in 1962. 

From August 1962 to November 1963, interim presi- 
dent Nelson H. Harris presided. A stalwart of some thirty 
years' service and, some say, a by-passed candidate for 
president in 1951, Harris ushered Shaw into the closing 
years of her first century. 

In December of 1963 the Board of Trustees passed the 
presidential reins to James E. Cheek, age 31, dynamic, 



203 



hard-driving and the first alumnus to be so honored. Com- 
parable to Tupper in vision and force of personahty. 
Cheek's administration has been characterized by a bold, 
innovative educational and physical redevelopment pro- 
gram. So impressive have been his accomphshments. that 
Shaw's future as a modern urban center of learning and 
culture is virtually assured for generations to come. 





Dr. James E. Shepherd . . . Shaw alumnus 
and founder of North Carolina College at 
Durham. 



Charles R. Frazer ... an alumnus, class of 
1900 and former Dean of the College. Dr. 
Frazer, who has authored several books and 
now resides in East St. Louis. 111. 



This is a very brief abstract of Shaw alumnus. Dr. Ben- 
jamin Quarles' "Shaw University: A Centennial Survey." 
A noted historian. Dr. Quarles is chairman of the Depart- 
ment of History at Morgan State College, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 




This IS an architect's model of the Shaw campus as it will look once the redevelopment is completed in 
1970. 



204 



A uto graphs 




Colas (Charles Johnson), 
Bastienna (Marjorie Lee), 
and Baslien (Robert 

Hassell). 



THE CENTENNIAL 

FESTIVAL 

OF THE ARTS 



As a major feature of the celebration of its one 
hundredth anniversary, Shaw University presented 
the Centennial Festival of the Arts, the first such 
promotion of its kind in the school's history. The 
Festival featured artists of distinction from the 
worlds of music, drama, literature and art. 

Through this Festival, the University brought 
to new recognition the concept that valid artistic 
experiences are central to the enhancement of the 
human condition — without them, life would be- 
conie narrow and meaningless. 

The festival provided significant cultural ex- 
posure not only for the college community, but for 
the community at large. 



Scenes from "Bastien and Bastienna" 




Charles Johnson in his role 
as Colas. 




Erroll Gamer 





Goeffrey Holder is the center of attention here after 
his one-man show on the Festival program. 



intermission and small talk 




Rolf Bjoerling signs autographs following his Festival 
pearance. 



ap- 



■^ 



^ 





nw^^OT 



A scene from ""Fumed Oak ' 



MORE ON THE PLA YERS 





Hystena sets in from a scene in "Riders To The Sea" 



Franklin Check in "Lay This Body Down" 




Brooklyn's Daryl Sills and PilLsburyh's Don Brent. 



"Butch" Hamilton and Valerie Snell 





Help yourself Carolyn! 



I think you're spoiling her. George! 







Exchanging Ideas 
with Students from 
Kalamazoo College 




:.»*{r*- 



f^ 




213 



THE IN A UGURAL - CENTENNIAL 




CONVOCATION 



On Saturday afternoon, April 16, Dr. James Edward 
Cheek was inaugurated as seventh president of Shaw 
University. Nearly 1,500 gathered in Raleigh Memorial 
Auditorium as the academic processional of some 400 
representatives of colleges and universities, learned soci- 
eties and organizations, and representatives from bus- 
sinesses, government, civic, and religious organizations, 
donned in academic regalia, filed into the auditorium. 

WiUiams' Academic Procession, played by North Caro- 
lina College's band, set a mood of ceremony and majesty. 
Three honorary degrees were confirmed and the Uni- 
versity's Charter and Seal were transferred to Dr. Cheek 
by Dr. Asa T. Spaulding, Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees. The Centennial-Inaugural address was delivered 
by Dr. Earl J. McGrath, executive officer of the Institute 
of Higher Education, Teachers CoUege, Columbia Uni- 
versity, and the Inaugural response was delivered by 
President Cheek. 






"HIT s'l --- -"-J : ^■^^iBl'" '«Si- 




a».<^aLt -J^ 




SHAW PRESIDENTS - Dr. William Smart Nelson. Dr. Robert P. Daniel. Dr 
William R. Strassner. and Dr. James E, Cheek. 



217 



The President's Family 





Recipients of the Shaw Honorary Degree 




Billy King and Coach Lee Roysler. 



'66 Athletic Banquet 



Star Nate Walton receives '66 Golden Helmet Award. 





Queen Vedii jnd her court 

Lady Laura (L) and Lady Connie (R). 



Penna. Coed 
'66 May Queen 




Lovely Veda Dodson 






101st CONVOCATION 

for the Conferring 
of Degrees 



223 



A utographs 



1 




Pro Christo Et Humanitate