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Full text of "The beauties of melody; a collection of the most popular airs, duets, glees, &c., of the most esteemned authors, ancient and modern: comprising those of Arne, Handel, Haydn, Mozart ... &c. Also a selection of the best ... Irish melodies; with appropriate words, written expressly for them: the symphonies and accompaniments enitrely new, and composed for this work. Interspersed with many of the beautiful Scotch melodies ... Arranged for the voice, with an accompaniment for the piano-forte, &c. To which is prefixed, observations and instructions on music, particulary vocal and accompaniment"

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TBE 

BEAUTIES OF MELODY; 

A COLLXCTION OF TBS MOST POFULAK 

AIRS, DUETS, GLEES, &c. 

OF THB 

MOST ESTEEMED AUTHORS, ANCIENT AND MODERN: 

COMPRISING 

THOSE OP ARNE, HANDEL, HAYDN, MOZART, WINTER, WEBER, BISHOP,%c. 

ALSO A 
SBI.SCTION or THB SBST AND MOST APPROYBS 

IRISH MELODIES; 

WITH 
APPROPRIATE WORDS, WRITTEN EXPRESSLY FOR THEM i 

THB 

SYMPHONIES AND ACCOMPANIMENTS ENTIRELY NEW, 

AKO COMPOSBD FOR THIS WORK. 
INTERSPERSED WITH MANY OF THB BEAUTIFUL 

SCOTCH MELODIES, 

SINGING AT THB TBBATRBS, CONCXBTS, &C. 

ARRANGED FOR THE VOICE, 

WITH 

AN ACCOMPANIMSNT FOR THB PIANO-FORTE, *< . 



TO WHICB IS PRBFIXBD, 

OBSERVATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS ON MUSIC, PARTICULARLY 

VOCAL AND ACCOMPANIMENT. 



TBB WMOLB COMPILBD, COMPOSED, SBLBCTBD, AND ARRANOBD, BT 

W. H. PLUMSTEAD, 

OF THB THBATRE ROVAL, DRURT-LANB. 



^ ^oIo« 



XaONDON; 



PRtNTBD AND SOLD BT 

DEAN AND MUNDAY, THREADNEEDLE-STREET. 

FRICB 7S. 6d. BOARDS 



tiil 



TO 

JOHN BRAHAM, Esq. 

AS 
THE FIRST SINGER OF THE DAY, 

WHOSE POWERS HAVE STOOD THE TEST OF MANY YEARS. 
AND STILL REMAIN UNRIVALLED, 

AND TO WHOM 

MANY OF THE PIECES IN THE PRESENT COLLECTION 

OWE THEIR POPULARITY, 

THIS WORK 

IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



>y/ a? 



http://www.archive.org/details/beautiesofmelodyOOplumiala 



OBSERVATIONS 



Musia 

PARTICULARLY VOCAL AND ACCOMPANIMENT. 



Music has always ranked high among the Sciences, but has 
attained an eminence in the present day, far above any other^ 
As nations have been civilized, so has music been cultivated. 
Always making a great impression on the feelings, either by rais- 
ing sublime inspirations, or exciting strong and animating 8enr> 
sations, it was used in the early ages, as well for religious, as 
political purposes ; but now it is more subserviant to our domestic 
habits, forming at once a delightful and innocent recreation. Yet 
it is still capable of rousing the energies of the soul, both in 
adoration to the Diety, and in exciting and allaying the most 
varied passions. The one may be exemplified in the works of 
Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and many others: who, for instance, 
can hear the sublime Oratorios of "The Messiah," "The Creation," 
and '* The Requiem," and not feel elevated by the solemn harmo- 
nious sounds, uttered with the most beautiful sentiments? The 
other, our national airs will testify; and, indeed, the original 
melodies of any country, (particularly those of Scotland and 
Ireland), produce the utmost enthusiasm on the hearers; — they 
will either melt the heart to pity and love, or inspire it with the 
noblest sensations. " The spirit-stirring drum, the ear-piercing 
fife," and even "the squeaking bagpipes," are instruments capable- 
of rousing the most supine. Who can behold the march of a 



VI OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 

regiment, and hear its martial rnusic, without feeling his blood 
thrill within him, and all his faculties alive to its invigorating 
sounds ? <i Va O i X A " 

But it is in the domestic circle that music gives the greatest 
plesisure, and where we derive the most advantage from it. It 
connects families, by affording within themselves a charming 
source of amusement for leisure hours, which othenvise, perhaps, 
in the one sex, might be spent in pernicious pursuits : and, were it 
merely on this consideration, music ought to be introduced, for 
whenever social enjoyment can be found at home, it will not be 
sought elsewhere. 

To attain a proficiency in any science, a firm foundation ought 
to be formed ; and as none require it more than music, it is neces- 
sary to understand its principles before we can expect to profit by 
our exertions ; these can only be developed by slow and almost 
imperceptible degrees; for whoever imagines to make a progress 
by a short cut, will find himself miserably deceived ; it is by la- 
bour, patience, and perseverance alone, that we can gain the end ; 
and by attacking the difficulties at the onset, the path, as we 
proceed, becomes clear and pleasant. In no one pursuit does a 
master toil under so many disadvantages, as a teacher of music, 
who is obliged to connive at what he knows can be of no solid 
advantage to his papih Py an injudicious anxiety on the part of 
the scholar's friends to hear a song, when it is understood he is 
receiving instruction, induces him to be impatient, till he is en- 
abled to gratify them; and the time that ought to have been 
devoted to the cultivation of the voice, and improvement in the 
science, is taken up in practising a song, that he may exhibit 
his astonishing powers, when, perhaps, the preparatory rudiments 
have not been learned. Having commenced song singing, the pu- 
pil finds it irksome to return to the *' mere nonsense," as it is 
■ceilled, of do, re; and after possessing a sort of half-and-half 



OBSEJIVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



tU 



smattering', he finds out, at last, he has begun at the wrong end* 
and gives it up in despair. This is an every-day occurrence; 
and we hope to convince our readers that, however tiresome the 
following instructions may be at first, yet, by a steady persever- 
ance, the difficulties will be overcome, and they will reap the \ 
benefit of their exertions. * 

The requisites for singing are, a clear voice, powerful lungs, 
and a good ear. A bad voice may be improved by judicious 
cultivation, and the power of the lungs may be increased by 
practice; but a correct ear is indispensibly necessary. The 
first attempt mast be to ascertain the compass of the natural 
voice, and then to form a clear firm tone within its bounds. 

We reconmiend the following scale, the notes of which lie 
within the compass of most voices, whether male or female ; but 
should it be found too high for some, practice only as far as it 
can be sung with ease. 

Pia. cr >. for. dim. pia. 



1 



w 



"Ty- 
re 



Do 



fa 



sol 



la 




P 



zd: 



si do re 



fa sol. 



i 



m 



22: 



i 



OBSERVATIONS ON Ml'SIC. 




321 



m 



sol 



la 

-e- 



re 



do 



'O 




i 



la 



sol 



fa 



:«a: 



rni 



re 



-e- 

do. 



i 



Jiivi ( '>l<ikirj» I'i 



■nmn v^u;').!,' 



The manner of singing this is, to sound the beginning of each 
note very soft, gradually increasing it to the full power of the 
voice, (without straining it), and then equally decreasing it to 
the same degree of softness on which it was commenced. A 
plentiful supply of breath should be inhaled, and husbanded up, 
that it esjcape by degrees, and sufficient be preserved to finish 
the note firmly. In swelling out the notes, care must be taken 
not to sing too sharp; and in decreasing, not to get too flat. An 
instrument is the best guide, till the voice becomes inured by 
practice to sustain itself. The tone must come from the chest, 
without any impediment from the throat, teeth, or nose; fhough 
•they all assist the tone, by the perfection of their formation, 
jet, by improperly closing the two former, or emitting the sound 
through the latter, a disagreeable sound will be uttered. The 
formation of the mouth is another essential point to be attended 
to, without which the pupil can never give a true utterance to his 
words, besides injuring his tone by obstructing the free emission 
of it from the lungs. In sounding the first syllable, do the 



OBSP.RVATIONS ON MUSIO 



i* 



mouth must be opened in an oval form, and kept in that position 
till it is finished. The next, re, (pronounced ra), the mouth is 
formed lengthwise, and rather open. The next, mi, {me), the 
mouth is nearly closed. The next, fa, {faa), is the most open 
of the whole, the mouth to be as open as possible without 
distorting the countenance. Sol, {sole), is somewhat similar to 
cfo, except that the mouth is formed rounder. La, {lad), is like 
/a, the mouth a little more lengthwise. The last, si, {se), is 
nearly the same as mi. When the mouth is opened for the pro- 
nunciation of any syllable, keep it in that position till the note 
is ended, as the least variation in the form of the mouth will 
^^duce another syllable. * 

When a firm clear tone is established, the pupil may proceed 
to cultivate his voice for the execution of divisions, turns, graces, 
shakes, &c.; all of which, precision and neatness constituting 
their greatest beauty, require indefatigable practice. The fol- 
lowing are to be sung very slow at first, and increased by degrees. / 

— -^- Exercise on Thirds. 




Do re mi rai re do, re &c. fa &c. mi 



fa 



m 



E 



sol la 



m 



g 



Si do re 



OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 




X,' 



y^^^^ 




do 


o - 


si 




la 




so 


1 


fa 






' V 


-^ 




n 








.1. 




■^ 




. w 


















i^<^ 














1 — - 


, , ... 




.._— 






Observe that the accent or stress of the voice is laid on the 
first note of every three. They may sing as above, one syl- 
lable to each note; but when the voice is capable of performing 
them quicker, one syllable to each three need only be used; 
thus, 




Do 



^5^&^ 



re - - &c. 



— Y— *~ 



In the following, the accent is laid oh the flrst and third note, 
but more particularly on the first; though each note must be' 



OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



sung even, the slight stress being to denominate the time, and 
prevent them from being equivocal. 

Exercise in Fourths. 



m 



fc Jjij^SE M ^^ JTT ji 




Do re, &c. re 



mi 



ffi 



i 




^SS 



1 



re 



re do. 



m 



§ 



— e 




L^ 


■ - -^ 


i — :: — j — 


-^— ^— 



xn 



OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



*frr 




^^W%^^ 


re 

f^ 

4 


do 


■#4 i^» '^i jjj«' ■ 

si la 






a 1 1 1 . 1 , 1 - ^ ' A 



J 




-V- 


-f- 


— •- 




■~l" 


"1" 


.. > 


1" 


— #— 


— •— 




^T"" 



























OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



xni 




lY-rr 



f=f=R=F^ 




Hhr it-H=f=P 



P P- 












mi 








re 










d 







' V 


1^ 






1^ 




t 










»!• 




















p 


» 






» 


^ 
































' 






•^ 








_—_ 




» 








LJ 






_ 




^ 



9 4 




^ 



"• — •- 



i 



OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



Exercise in Sixths. 




fa soi la 



. ^^ 



H- P r 



Ifpg& ggg 



i 



SI 



do 



re do. 






i 



dzzzf: 




D:,I r P r 




OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 

Exercise in Sevenths. 



i«r 




• 4 r 



f=— F--^ 



-i — p- 







# F F 




:t r r rr 



i 




frr 



§ 



i 



OBSBRVATIONS ON MUSIC. 




f\ . ■ :■ :•_ 1 '" . m . . . ■". „ 

■'•■'■ "••r r r 






da — """ •""''s j'^r- ,_," ?i I~-_- 



la re do. 



^ 



^ 



« F- 



Exercise in Octaves. 





OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



ȴ1K 



^iir - CQf%^ ^ 




sol 



la 



^V ' — 

• ^* I p! ■ P ■ [- -1 



i 



I r ■ I f= ^ 




m 



^ 



^ 





» - y I r ■ 



si do. 



S 



m 



m 



( 



OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



The shake may next be attempted, which requires the most, 
arduous and constant practice of the whole. It is the quick re- 
petition of two notes, either at the distance of a tone or half- 
tone. There are some who possess a sort of shake naturally ; but 
that which is cultivated is most perfect; the former being merely 
a tremulous motion in the throat, and frequently, only one note 
gutterally uttered. The best method of attaining the shake, is to 
begin very slow, and practice till the voice becomes flexible 
enough to execute the two notes clear and firm without effort; it • 
may then be practised a little quicker; and so On by degrees, till 
perfect. It should be begun soft, gradually swelled, and demi- 
nished again to its original softness. It must be practised on 
every note within the compass of the voice, and ort each of the 
seven syllables. The shake is generally finished with a turn, 
which should be practised wiih it : thus, '"^r^^Ta^fV"^ 




Minor, or Imlf-tone Shake, 






^^^ 




1^3 



( 



OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



XIX 






MaJ. 



Min. Maj. 



Maj. 



Min. 



jhit-7 I I Hl—F ^^ 

sol la SI do re mi 

^^hTti7 I I = i pmr a:^ 



Ma;. Maj. Min. Maj. 



Maj. 



Maj. 




~fll. -^^-*-; - " ^°J 



^J \ II II \ 



mi 



■a 

re 



-e- 

do. 



J^s^l 



^araia 



iJ 



The turn has a pretty effect on a plain note when used judici- 
ously : there are two sorts, the common and the inverted. 



The Common, marked. 



performed. 



P 



lifjf^ 



XX 



OBSRRVATIONS ON MUSIC. 



The best method to acquire the turn, is to practice on every 
syllable, commencing on the lowest note, and ascending to the 
highest, within your compass; beginning very slow, and singing 
every note clear and distinct ; and increase the time by degrees, 
as you find your voice capable of sustaining itself. 




^ LJl P zf^fr EJ = ^-^^-fz^ =| 




_ — F--3-f^ — :: — F s r -p — f — W-- r - i 




fH*- 








-•• 


__JE 


f 


f", 






f- 






■~T~ 




1 




1 




1 




-(■ 




-r " ■ 




r^icr 



^ r i'-F- 



^^ 



lj--:litl 



OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. XXI 

The inverted turn precedes the principal note, by commencing 
a half-tone below it : thus. 

Marked f performed. 



fe z ij M 



There are a variety of exercises for improving the flexibility 
of the voice, which can only be imparted by an experienced 
master, and no written instructions can convey the mode of 
executing them ; but a few general observations may be of service. 
Great attention must be paid to taking breath; for unless a suffi- 
cient quantity is inspired, and kept in reserve, the notes Mill 
become weak and faltering; and, instead of a clear succession of 
notes, a confused jumble of unmeaning sounds will be heard. 
Never take breath in the middle of a word, or where the sense is 
closely connected; but after a comma, or the beginning of a line, 
after a dotted note, or rest, the breath may be taken with propri- 
ety. Every exercise should be sung slow at first, and gradually 
increased, till the voice becomes so inured to the passages, that 
it b impossible to fail. -''"^^^H ' 

''iiic^i t 1 •■ STYLE 

Is next under consideration. To command a good style, the 
pupil must possess sound sense, a just descrimination, and 
an attentive observation of the best singers of the age. It is the 
style of our great singers, that gives them, in a measure, the 
saperiority over the mass of those who remain at a considerable 
distance from them in popularity. Let a person possess ever so 
fine a voice, or ever so brilliant execution, if he has not feeling 
and taste, he will ever remain but in second-rate estimation 
to one who has an indifferent voice, with the power of expressino- 
the various feelings, and entering into all the pathos or energy of 



XXIt" OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 

his subject; — the one sings to the ear, the other, to the heart; — 
the one is a mere organ-pipe ; the other is a soul K^hich enters 
our hearts, and carries us insensibly with it. What has raised 
Mr. Braham to the high pitch of popularity he at present enjoys, 
and leaves him no competitor ? It is not his voice, for there are 
others who possess much sweeter voices: it is his style, his ener- 
gy, his discrimination. The songs which he excels in, are only 
outlines, which, in the hands of others, are mere sounds, pos- 
sessing little to please or admire in them; but, filled up by his 
exquisite taste and judgment, they become finished productions. 
Yet we recommend not a downright imitation of Mr. Braham, 
though there are few who do not imitate him; but a person pos- 
sessing genius may take an example without following it so 
closely, that every one may perceive the resemblance. Imitators 
generally copy the peculiarities, not the excellence, of the original, 
and thereby betray themselves. A man may build a fabric on a 
^certain structure, but may so alter and arrange it, that it may 
pass, without strict examination, for a design of his own. So 
ought a good singer found his style on the best basis, but so cover 
it with judgment, that it may appear the emanatiou of his own 
ius. 

Few instructions can be given on style; it must be the result 
of observation, guided by sound sense, adhering strictly to the 
nature of the melody, and the subject of the words; giving each 
their proper expression, and unaffectedly uttering both, that they 
may be understood and felt. 

While on this part, we shall include a few hints on the use of 
ornament. It has become the fashion to attach to any melody, 
however simple, a number of notes unconnected with it, which 
are called graces; but, in many instances, they may be termed, 
rfij-graces. It is the indiscriminate use of these, that the novice 
ought to avMd. There are many who, possessing flexible voices, 



Xxiii OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 

seek every opportunity of showing oflf, by running through the 
whole scale at almost every other bar, and by disjointing the 
melody and the words, destroy both. Even an apogiatura too 
often introduced, mars the melody; but judiciously put in, adds 
greatly to the effect. When the words and melody allow it, a 
short cadence may be made; but always in character with the 
air. Nothing is more ridiculous than a bravura run in a subject 
requiring pathos and feeling; yet how often do we hear it; and 
sometimes very slovenly executed. There are some who, having 
a few runs at command, use them indiscriminately at every 
part wherever their voices will execute them, and frequently the 
same graces, as they are termed, will be heard half-a-dozen times 
in the course of a song. This shows, at least, a poor imagina- 
tion and a scanty store, when they are applied on every occasion; 
not to mention how they tire the ears of the audience. Another 
fault singers fedl into, is, that of using a favourite note in the 
voice, which, whenever an opportunity occurs, they will hold 
out twice the length the time will admit, and keep one in suspense 
on an unimportant word, such as, and — to — the — for, &c., 
thereby delaying some immediate part of the subject, that one 
has forgot what is was about. The voice should be so practised, 
that they may all become favourite notes; all clear, equal, and 
distinct ; all of the same quality ; blended one with the other, 
like the tones of a fine instrument; all equally under command. 
The weakest part of the voice should be practised most, to make 
it as flexible as the other: at the same time, be careful of strcun* 
ing it by over exertion ; let it be done by degrees ; by a little and 
often; and, with patience and perseverance, you will bring all 
your notes equally good, and under your command. 

We cannot conclude this part better than by giving the follow- 
ing extract, from a work entitled, " The Art of Improving the 

Voice and Ear :— {*' - , 
(!jita lo U'jAi 



XxiT OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 

«* It is an extremely false taste to overload every performance 
with a profusion of ornament. When a piece has intrinsic merit, 
or when a singer has a fine voice, ornament, if profuse, has 
more chance to injure than to add to its eflfect. It is not to be 
denied, however, that ornament, when judiciously placed, is 
indispensable to a singer, and will require great care and practice 
in the acquisition. The following passage from the life of Rossini, 
by Count Stendthall, strongly illustrates the ideas of this great 
master upon the point. 

" ' On Rossini's arrival at Milan, in 1814, when he was in his 
twenty-second year, to compose the " Aureliano in Palmira," he 
became acquainted with Velluti, who was to sing in his opera. 
Velluti, then in the flower of his youth and talents, and one of 
the handsomest men of his time, had no small share of vanity, 
and was fond of displaying and abusing the powers of voice with 
which nature had gifted him. Before Rossini had an opportunity 
of hearing this great singer, he had written a cavatina for the 
character he was to perform. At the first rehearsal, Velluti began 
to sing, and Rossini was struck with admiration. At the second 
rehearsal, Velluti began to show his powers of gracing; Rossini 
found the effect produced just and admirable, and highly ap- 
plauded the performance. At the third, the simplicity of the 
cantilena was entirely lost amidst the profusion of the ornaments. 
At last the great day of the performance arrived. The cavatina 
and the whole character sustained by Velluti, was received with 

rapture : but Rossini scarcely knew what Velluti was singing it 

was no longer the music he had composed ; yet still the song of 
Velluti was full of beauties, and succeeded with the public to 
admiration. The pride of the young composer was not a little 
wounded. This opera fell, and it was the soprano alone who 
had any success. The ardent mind of Rossini at once perceived 
all the advantages that might be taken of such an event. Not 



OBSERVATIOirS ON MUSIC. XXW. 

a single suggestion was lost upon him. It was by a lucky chance, 
we may suppose him to have said to himself, that Velluti disco- 
yered he had a taste of his own ; but who will say that in the 
next theatre for which I compose, I may not find some other 
singer, who, with as great a flexibility of voice, and an equal 
rage for ornament, may so spoil my music, as not only to render, 
it contemptible to myself, but tiresome to the public? The dan- 
ger to which my poor music is exposed, is still more imminent 
when I reflect upon the great number of different schools for song 
that exist in Italy. The theatres are filled with performers, who 
have learned music from some poor provincial professor. This 
mode of singing violin concertos and variations without end, tends 
to destroy not only the talent of the singer, but also to vitiate 
the taste of the public. Every singer will make a point of imi- 
tating Velluti, without calculating upon tlie relative compass o^ 
his voice. We shall see no more simple cantilenas. They would 
appear cold and tasteless. Every thing is about to undergo a 
change, even to the nature of the voice. Once accustomed to 
embellish, to overload the cantilena with high-wrought ornaments, 
and to stifle the works of the composer, they will soon discover 
that they have lost the habit of sustaining the voice and expand- 
ing the tones, and consequently the power of executing largo 
movements. I must therefore lose no time m changing the system 
I have followed hitherto. I am not myself ignorant of singing: 
all the world allows me a talent this way. My embellishments 
shall be in good taste; fori shall at once be able to discover 
where my singers are strong and where defective, and I will write 
nothing for them but what they can execute. My mind is made 
up. I will not leave them room for a single appogiatura. These 
ornaments, this method of charming the ear, shall form an 
integral part of my song, and shall all be written down in my 
^^^^' 4iai*ittj6 tiM i*iiJ 



XXVI. OBSERVATIONS ON Mt/StCi' '^ 

" Such ought to be the practice of all composers : and no young 
singer ought ever to attempt a grace that is not set down for him, 
or which is not pointed out for him by a judicious mastet*. The 
violation of this rule may procure a momentary applause from a 
mixed audience; but it will never ensure a lasting reputation, 
nor lead to establish first-rate excellence in simple execution." 

ACCOMPANIMENT. 

As the voice is the principal, the accompaniment must be sub- 
ordinate to it, whether in full orchestra, or only the piano-forte: 
it is merely to assist and fill up ; therefore it must follow the voice, 
and be subservient to it on all occasions. The great fault of 
accompaniests is, that of playing too loud, and overpowering 
the voice; they make that the most prominent which should b^ 
in the shade, to show to more advantage what is intended to h& 
conspicuous. What a singular effect would a picture have, if the 
artist were to bring his dark colours forward, and leave the light 
in the back ground; and that which he intended as his principal 
figure, was to be enveloped in clouds, or overshadowed with 
trees ? This fault mostly rests with amateurs, who, so that thej;'' 
can hear themselves play, never study the effect of the whote.' 
In an orchestra, every eye should be turned to the leader, and 
the leader must keep his on the singer, and his ears open to all 
around him. Every piano must be observed, and every fotti; 
marked, that the effect may be produced which the author in- 
tended; it is the light and shade which render the whole beauti- 
ful. Many piano-forte accompaniests also fall into this error; 
and frequently to show themselves off, sadly discomfort and 
annoy the singer, by throwing in extraneous ornament. But this 
is a paltry ambition; because there are many opportunities for 
such a display, without overpowering and ruining the simplicity 
that an accompaniment ought to possess. We recollect a laugh- 



OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. XXTU. 

able occurrence which took place at a concert, where both the 
ein((er and the piano-forte player seemed determined to contest 
who should make the most noise and show off. The former 
commenced early to make a grand display of his flexibility of 
voice; and the other, not be outdone, fallowed with a tfemendotts 
run from the top to the bottom of the instrument: the one bel- 
lowed, the other thumped; till the audier.ce expressed their 
approbation, by a loud roar of laughter; and the player and 
singer went to loggerheads, each accusing the other as the cause 
of it. 

A judicious accompaniest will always play in a subdued tone, 
making a distinction wherever it will assist the singer, or add to 
the effect. In fact, a singer .-is entirely iitt^^e hands of the 
accompaniest; he can either make him feel confidence, or distress 
him by not entering into his ideas. There should always be an 
understanding between them; the singer should previously point 
Out where he means to take liberties with the time, which may 
sometimes be done with effect; and where he means to throw in 
a grace or cadence, that the accompaniment may be accommo- 
dated to it. 

The accompaniment of glees should possess the utmost deli- 
cacy ; for their beauty lies in the blending together the voices. 
When there is no regular one written, merely chords should be 
struck sparingly, to keep the voices in tune, and mark the 
change of key where it occurs. 

In accompanying concerted pieces, that is, pieces in several 
parts, the eye and ear must be continually on the alert, and 
strict time adhered to; but should any of the voices fail, or any 
indecision arise, it is the duty of the accompaniest to direct the 
attention of the party, at a loss, by playing a little stronger, 
taking up the passage on the instrument, and marking the time 
in such a manner that it cannot be misunderstood. 



XXVin. OBSERVATIONS ON MUSIC. 

These few hints, it is hoped, may prove useful to young prac- 
titioners; but both experience and practice are necessary to 
attain readiness and ease, whether as a singer or a player. No 
pursuit can be gained without some labour, and many imagine 
that music requires but little; yet there is none, perhaps, that 
needs so much study, perseverance, and experience, and none 
that repays us more in the enjoyment, than this delightful 
iscience. 

W. H. P. 

52, JUDD-STREET, 
BRCNSWICK-SQUARE. 



THE 

BEAUTIES OF MELODY. 

All the blue Bonnets are over the Border. 

A CELEBRATED SCOTCH SONG, SUNG BY MR. BRAHAM. 
fVith Spirit. 




^5 



#• # 



jLZ.T» — ZTj F W 



-}— =^ 



fr 



8ves. 



^^iii^^s 



H 



# -# 



f==^=hT=Mdt=j=t==m 



i 



1 



-+— =h-i — h 



rtna: 



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UJ: 



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i 



i 



6— ^ 



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I 



P 



^— • 



^— ♦ 



March, march, Et-trick and Te - vi - ot dale. Why, my lads 







H-~= — y 



1 J 1 



T-^ 



•g — W 



— h- 




^ — b» — h 



p^^i^ 



■4 — # 
din na ye march, Forward in or - der, March, march. 



3S=5t 



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-♦-¥- 



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Eskdale and Laddles-dale, All the blue bon-nets are 




--{ — ■• — ^^ i^- T - 4 — 



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i 



f — =V 



I'j'^j)! ■ nm 



x)-ver the bor-der. 



Ma-ny a banner spread 




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MZiZpEI 



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flutters above your head, Many a crest that is famous in 



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crnr: 



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sto - ry. 



Mount and make ready then,.Sons of the 






g 



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y— rg 






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fi^f.tfJjTr^ 



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mountain glen, Fight for your king,and the old Scottish border. 




JT? 



& 



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16 



ipix^rrrnff f 



M arch, march, Et-trick. andTe-vi-ot dale, Why, my lads. 



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din-na ye march, Forward in or - der, March, march. 




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p — F--^ 



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Eskdale and Liddles-dale, All the blue bon-nets are 



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17 




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O-ver the bor-der, 




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Come from the hills «rhere your hirsels are grazing,Come from the 



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18 




glen of the buck and the roe, Come to the crag where the 



i 



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Sees 



r, ... t W , 



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r r r y-- 



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s-i—s- 



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beacon is blazing,Come with the buckler, the lance & the bow. 




-• •- — i- — ¥ 




^^ 



H — L 



^* 



■#- •*- 



^^ 



f — =t — ^ 



Trumpets are sounding. 

War steeds are bounding ! 
Stand to your arms, and march in good order ; 

England shall many a day, 

Tell o'er the bloody fray. 
When the blue bonnets came over the border. 
March, march, &c. 



The above wurds sing to the latter part of tJictune of the first verse— riz. " Many 
• bMnoer iipread," &c. 



19 



'N.^<"».^'X, 



When my SouVs Delight. 



k FAVORITE SONG, FROM THE OPERA OF " NINA. 
Lnrghetto. 




^ 



^ 



gg^ 



j^^ i ^nu 



t~z± 



When my soul's delight a - gain vi-sits these sad sorrowing 



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g^^ 



f ^ — ^ 



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eyes. Spring's re-turn shall bless the plain, Flow'rs of 



ry - ■ _„J_. #- _ _J , -:t 


'-^ 1^ i 1 A \ 1 r n ^ . 



Pi». 




sweetest fragrance rise. 



Hark ! bark ! T hear him; 



m 



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3e 



20 



^ijiii. 



& 



■P- 1 - 1 



i 



i 



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ah 


1 


no, I'm 


doom'd to mourn, I'm 


doom'd 


to 

1 1 1 


' V 












■ , • 


■ 




_ 


■n I 


• '• 




■ 


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-- JJJI 


° 


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f 



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— •— # 



mourn. My soul's de - light will ne'er re-turn. My soul's de- 






p 



i 




f — ^ 



2^ 



light will ne'er re-turn. 



^ 



i=i 



Tuneful songster of the grove. 
Know, the voice of him I love, 
Shall inspire thy little throat 
With a softer, sweeter note. 
Hark, &c. 

Echo ! stranger to repose. 
Oft I tire thee with my woes ; 
See him i yet for thee he sighs. 
Echo, yes, for thee he dies. 
Hark, &c. 



* 21 

Turn Amanllis. 

A MADRIGAL FOR THREE VOICES. 



Moderato, 



i 



i 



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I 



Turn, A-ma-ril-Iis, to thy svrain. Turn, A-ina - ril 



•t\}^^\n 



-. — ^=F^ 



Turn, A-ma-ril-lis, to thy swain. Turn, A - ma - ril - lis. 



s 



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pe=l 



o ' 



W-^ 



Turn, A-ma-ril-lis, to thy swain,Turn, A - ma - ril - 



i 



s 



* 



P 



lis, to thy swain,Turn, A-ma - ril - lis, to thy 



iqifzq^ 



i 



^^ 



i 



±Z± 



to thy swain. Turn, A-ma - ril - lis. Turn, A-ma - ril - Gs 



T T] r r 



^^ 



^-P 



li8,Turn,Amar - ril - lis. 



i--C5 



Turn, A - ma-ril - lis. 



^m 



I 



#-e-j-— ♦ 



< • j — ^ 



swain, to thy swain. Thy Damon calls thee back a -gain, Thy 



i 



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-^ 



I 



#--# 



9 — P- 



I h> 



to thy swain. Thy Da-mon calls thee back a - gain. Thy 



^es 



i 



# • r- r I ^ ^ 



to thy swain. Thy Damon calls thee back a - gain. Thy 



ynr 



m 



22 



4 4 J O • 



ti-rUC-^tfJ 



Damon calls thee back a - gain. Here is a pretty, pretty. 



. ^'ri \ iO'^ \ --\UU ^ 



Damon calls thee back a - gain. Here is a pretty, pretty. 



■n'M i rfl 



i 



e^ 



h* ii» 



Da-mon calls thee back a - gain. Here is a pret - ty 



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K—S-t-^ 



i 



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pretty, pretty, pretty arbour by,WhereApol-lo, Where Apol-lo 

N N 



^ii 



S 



m 



am 



pretty, pretty,pretty arbour by. Where A - pol-lo. Where A- 



s: 



o r j J I jE*fj U .J j: 



pret - ty ar - hour by. Where A-pol-lo, Where A 



^ T I r^ i YTT^^^ S 



Where A - pol - lo. Where A - pol - lo can-not, cannot 



^ — ^ 



^ — ^ 



pol - lo. Where A - pol - lo. Where A - pol - lo can-not 



f — f- 



p — ^ 



F^ 



m 



)^ — ^ 



pol-lo Where A - pol - lo. Where A - pol-lo can-not 



p a M 



23 






i 



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V-^ 



spy. Where A-poI - lo can-not spy. Here let's sit, and 



^ 



P=^ 



'M 



O » II P' # 



^ 



spy. Where A-pol - lo can-not spy. Here let's sit, and 



rir 



S I S 



^m 



m 



[^ 



tx:^ 



spy. Where A - pol - lo can-not spy. Here let's sit and 



finu! 



i 



—• 



whilst I play. Sing to my pipe sing to my pipe, sing to my 



wn i jQ-iVfu 



whilst I play. Sing to my pipe, sing to my pipe, sing to my 



i?=F 



i^n i ruun 



whilst I play. Sing to my pipe sing to my pipe, sing to my 



. cjrjjjuJj: 



i 



pipe, sing to my pipe, sing to my pipe a rounde 



m 



i 



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pipe, sing to my pipe, sing to my pipe sing to my pipe a rounde- 



;)••« p. J Tt 



K~~K 



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t 



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1=2 



pipe, sing to my pipe, sing to my pipe a rounde- 



24 



'^m 



i 



I 



i 



I 



lay, sing to my pipe, sing to my pipe, sing to my 



ra:a:FP^g^ 



3C 



lay, sing to my pipe, sing tomy pipe,singto my pipe. 



Sg 



n 



m 



* 



lay, sing to my pipe. 



sing to my pipe. 



^m 



i 



f -4 . 



pipe - - - a round - e - lay 



i 



1 .:•*.•# 



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EGe=e 



±Z^ZI± 



sing to my pipe a round-e - lay. 



Wn) o T St z L 



^m 



BUS 



WTT 



sing to my pipe a round - e - lay. 



Let me Wander not unseen. 

aV¥G BY HISS STEPHENS. 



Siciliano. 



Handel. 




^^^^S^ 



5^rTJ 



murium 



00 r 



s 



Let me 



-F-=h 



25 



^ T ^ Tf F F ^^ 



wan-der not unseen. By hedge-row elms, on hillocks green; 



TT? 



1 



■=V=h 



There 



^ 



i 



^^ 



#— ^ 



mr 



entoii 



^T 



p — p-p 



^ U **- ' [, * I l » ~^C" [, I > 



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the ploughman near at hand. Whistles o'er the furrow'd land, 



a=i= =' 



QJrTTtMTrc 



¥~g 



#— # 



P^ 



rt~f:J]| r - r-tf-'J UX 



There the ploughman near at hand,. Whistles o'er the furrow'd 



.^ 



iffi 



4 4 - d . -P-it 



4 ,^4 4 4 d ^ 



Sym» 



land. And the milk-maid 



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4 P M 



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26 



:f » * # §-m # 



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sing - elh blithe. And the mower whets his scythe, And 



p I .J J J 1 =3=^ 



i 



# — # 




^^ 



me 



p¥^ 



Utf 



k 



e - ve-ry shep-herd tells his tale, Un-der the hawthorn in the 



r m^G figT^ 




grJrtr^ 



Sym. 



f — V — Is 



^m 



tale, Un - der the haw-thorn in the dale. 



=i=p: 



Andante Allegro. 




Or let the merry bells ring round, 



Sm 



^ ^^^ ^ W^^M 



s 




k — k- 

Or let the 



m=t=$: 



p ~:-M p p 



f^-f-^ 



i:zi=J!c=s 



m 



A-F^4^ 



±ziz 



-^ ' ^ 

mer-ry bells ring round. And the jo - cund re - becks 



m 



>-^ 



1X-- 



=^^5Q: 



M 



jjy T i 



sound. 



And the jo - cund re -becks 



^ 




g0T^ i \ um^ m 



youth and ina-ny a maid. 



Dancing 



:) :« , r tf F 



■f= — f- 



3 3.3 




29 






many a youth and nia - 


ny a maid 


, Dancing in 


the 


^ Vtt 








t J.w,. 




i 








A 


1... t; - 






L-j 










che-quer'd shade. 










Dan 


cing. 


dan - 


■ { 








• 








■ it* ■ 


• l.»,. 


i 








f 












tl 




4 










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4 










• 






i 









P^sa 



agjjJ 



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k^— 



• ". ' . 


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... 


cine:, dan- 


cina- 


in 


the 


.. 






















■ 






' Vrt 












ft l.il,. 






a 






■ 






tt 


4 










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L- ♦^ 















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chequer'd shade, 



To manv a vouth and 



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ma-ny a maid 



Dan-cinff in the 



m 



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30 

3 . 3 , 3 3 








Dancing 



n~-^ 




m 



^^WTp '^P P m^ -w^ 



te^ 



F>"r T^:^^7TT"7^ 



iffli 



dan ---._------- cing, dancing 



i 



f 



— ft^-rv-N— fi 




^=^=i 



i& 



E 



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1 



in the chequer'd shade. 
m 



EE 



i 



^m 



WJM. 



P r -'* 



AnJunlinit. 



31 

John Anderson, my Joj John. 



H ^ 



g^^p^d^ 





m 



t 



It-* 



mi 



■ ■ ■ ' 4-\ — ' — I '■'- J — I • L 



i 




m 



^^SJziS!z 



■ ■Lj' ■ — U I ■ L 



^-^ 



■^^ 



e — p-^ 



« — # 



John An-der-son my jo, John, When 



35 



^^ 



SBS 



« -* « 



^ 



i 



^ 



« • 



Na-ture first he - gan. To try her can-ny hand. 



^ 



f :i f-i-r p 



i=3t=* 



t 



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3i= 



i^ 



i=^ 



^ 



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John, Her mas- ter work was man. And you a-mangthem 



'^^rr-H^ 



m 



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ti2 




Sip 



*: 



i 



a* John, ,so trig from top to toe. She prov'd to 



^SP^^, 



^-31 




John Anderson, my jo, John, ye were my first conceit, 
I think nae shame to own, John, I lo'ed ye ear' and late ; 
They say, ye're turning auld, John, and what tho' it be so? 
Ye're ay the same kind man to me, John Anderson, my jo. * 

John Anderson, my jo, John, when we were first acquaint, '^ 
Your locks were like the raven, your bonny brow was brent ; 
Bat now your brow is bald, John, your locks are like the snow. 
Yet blessings on your frosty pow, John Anderson, my jo. 

John Anderson, my jo, John, we clamb the hill thegither. 
And mony a canty day, John, we've had wi' ane anither ; 
liow we maun totter down, John, but hand in hand we'll go. 
And sleep thegither at the foot, John Anderson, my jo. 



^ 



Together let tis range the Fields. * 1 

A FAVORITE DUET SUNQ BY MR. BRAUAM AND MISS STEPHENS. 
Vivace ma non troppo. Dr. Uoyce. 



*fe^ 



BETZI 



Cf f fr^l 



pi| 



IX 



4-4 



4 4- 



ass 



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I 



& 



mmm^ 



SS&& 



I 



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^^^^^. 



jQ-gfi'lf. 



JJ-J- 



^^ 



^ 



» 



#^ 4^ 



To- 



u 



-^ 



.=^_^ 



■.— m ± 



f"Vfrn 



-~j— ^^-T^ 

1^^ 



gether, To-ge-ther, To-ge-ther let us range 



1^ 






•f==f-F- 



Together, 



Together, 



^2 



N— |-N 



L^^tti: 



^E^ 



»» 



M 



£ 



-=l — F-=H 



^_=, ^' 



I 



e=i 



I 



the fields. 



Im-pearl - ed with the 



-^^» 



§ 



nn»: 



^ 



i 



-=1 F-^ 



K 



o-ge-ther let us range the fields. 



^^ 



P~r 



i ^£z^ 



p-r 



^■■,; ■ 



^Sg 



■ 1 r - 1 



^ 



morn - ing dew. 



Or view thee 



^ r'^-^-rrm 



as 



1 r 1 - 



Impearled with the morn - ing dew, 



^! 



si 



^ 



— iZZ: 



-^-r 



-^-^ 



i 



35 






m 



-u — k- 



zsEzze 



1 r 1 



fruits the vine-yard yields. 



«» 



at 



,> f-f /I 



-p-=t— ^ 



f 



\ ^ C^ 



Or the ap - pies clustering 



^^ 



e 



^-!- 



fi? 



i 



s 



«* 



F-^- 



I 



There in close em-bower'd shades, Ina - per-viou» 






O-h 



i 



P^ 



? 



» 



bough, There in close em-bower'd shades, Im - per-vious 



m«i 



P — P 



p — p — p 



■^=-^ 



4—^ 



S^^* 



^ggg ^P«i j[«J ^ 



s 



TSTiy 



«i=p:^i 



-=hH= =V 



to the noon-tide ray. By tink - ling rills 



«« 



tS=M. 



I 



m 



-=\ — F — =^ 



«i 



to the noon-tide ray. 



on ro - sy 



^5 



^ 



-• — 4- 



■u^^ — 



F-=h-f^ 



36 



tz-vi wtw f 



riM 



£pi 



rzK 



We'll love - - - - - the sul-try hours a- 



l ^tp=^ 




beds,: We'll love ----- the sul-try hours a- 



igffig 



p—^-p—p- 



p~p 



t»M 



4-4 



i 



I^H — ^^-f 




way. We'll love 



the sul - try hours a- 



5-«ix^ 



-f-=^ 



^^-=^-f- 



K 



P^Pa,^p 



■^ — F- 



way, 



We'll love 



the 



3i* 



«i 



^ 



F^ 



# P • g »._«__»_A 



l^_j — ^ 



-8» 



=« M-^-p- 



I 



sSi 



-^^-f^- 



^ k. t^ 



way. We'll love - 



the sul-try hours h- 




Kul-try hours a - way, We'll love 



the: 



iSttS: 



^-j ^J_j ^^-) ^ 



^ 1 1 L *jl 



37 



}| 



^ffS-^ 



'M 



■^— F- 



— w 



!»i 



?ay. 



the sul - try hours a - way. 



^It 



«i 



p^ 



«±=5z=±: 



s 



We'll 

i 

■Kr 



tti 



sul -try hours a - way. 



the sul-try hows a - 



^!i 



m 



p — p 



9 P- 



«i: 



P — 4—P—4^ 



Sgm. 



p^M fFS 



tfCm^ ' ^JJj> 



love 



the sul-try hours a - way. 



g^e^gg 




way. We'll lore the sul-try hours a - way. 




^^^m 



W=p 



» 



:«i 



I 



i 



T - ri 



2itd FetV«. 



-prS«. 




-Ji^ihuH-mEiip: 



To- 




iSjizC 



SS^ 



^^ 



T - r - 1 



psi 



38 



fct^ 



^ 



-f^^H^ 



Together, Together, 



^^^^^^m 



gether, To-ge-ther, To-ge-ther let us range 



ei« 



*-r 



«i: 




ge-ther let us range the fields. «i, 



^a 



"»i: 



-^ r 1 



•(=-=1 F- 



^^ 



the fields. 



i-=h 




#-*-# 



Iin-pearl - ed with the 



f 



• r*, 



-8?: 



«i; 



F l-P' 



T-f^^-^ 



|aSE| 



a^M 



i 



1 - r -1- 



k-^ 



Impearled with the morn - ing dew. 



g fe auun^. i =T?^ 



morn - ing dew. 



Or view the 



31$ 



«i: 



■*-=- 






39 



«? 



JSi: 



-F-^ 



^^ 



Or the ap - pies clustering 



^m 



^f w 



f 



1 r 1 



hm k 



fruits the vine-yard yields. 



M^g 



m 



^ 



? 



ta 



-k9» 



i 



«t 



rvT 



^ 



I 



bough. There in close em-bower*d shades, Im - per-vioas 



kpT r * I . i fcrtil-h. 5 P ^^p^ 



? 



There in close em-bo wer'd shades, Im - per-vious 



S! 



? 



^ 



«i: 



y-g 



fepN 



^ 



-^i F— =^- 



-J- to the noontide ray, 



s«. 



By tink-ling 



. fc«i 



m 



P-P 



^^m 



to the noontide ray. By tinkling rills. 






m]T?T7't"ff^ 



40 






i 



«& 



■ 1 ro 



rills. 






-=t-F- 



fe±i^ 



on ro - sy beds. We'll love 



1 



»» 



a if^^ 



pip 



- 1 r 1 



rir - 



^i 



on ro - sy beds. 



We'll lovft .-,^ I 



Im uU^tt 



00 P 



N I Ni 



a^ ^ f ^ I til ' J 



• ^ • # 



i-— g C ^-i >^ N 



^^ra 




the suUtry hours a - way. We'll love 




the sul-try hours a - way. 



We'U 



[^S 



fe 



wm 



■y=i 



£S 



«* 



«i: 



^ 



*^-^^tt 



J 



^ 1 r - 



f 



0-^ F- 



the sul - try hours a - way. 



the 



-»« 



5«iif 






ktM=± 



p^ 



love 



the sul - try hours a- 



^ ¥^i44^H= njnrri 



-5^5 



— ?> r * ^ j 



41 



P-1 -r-^- 



H^-^-^ 



K 



-=V-f^-^ 



sul - try hours a - way. 



By tinkling rills, I 



«» 



'pfg 



I 



ai: 



Jtr^n^ 



^~^T F- 



fct 



ktzb:i^r*ii 



way. 



the sul-try hours away. 



By tinkling 



a! 



i 



C^r fi JD 



«»: 



^^ 



P^ 



a 



— 9^-- 



^ii."'i- 



w^-H4-i \ r ' ' \ '^ 




On ro - sy beds. 



We'll lore 



sl 



m 



«i=to 



-f— =h 



r (» p 



m 



.i^_f^ 



Erf# 



I 



rills. 



On ro - sy beds. We'll love 



m^ iif- ^\ Uf^\W^ 



4-4-^-4- 



t^ sP- f> i fFr rTrf ^ frriP' Ffff 



ir:^ 




i 



a 



ggj^^iHg^z;^ 



i ^ # -i =31 



Vw/ ^-/ 






iJrljjlJWfjJi^ 



^«i 




I§t 



fi 



We'll love - - - the 



*« 






3:zv: 



i^^-W 



i^5s 



z^=P:^^^^^^±t± 



We'll love 



the 







JJ?« 



-d--*^— ^ 






'-^M" 



K^ 



-Trn^- 



!3|33 



■ ■■ — ^ ■ — t—ff ICJ — ^MH — ibU — "H — *■ 



sill - try hours a - way. We'll love - - - the i 



HFSg g^ i T-pf-^ 



i 



:«i: 



-=1— F- 



£fg pffF|n 



-=H^ 



ens? 



Sglcji 



sul-try hours a - way. We'll love 



the 



^ 



^. •v 



43 






«: 




m 



sul-try hours a - way 





j^» 



m 




s — 



-T f=^-^ 



sultry hours a-way. 



^S 






^Sipiipiipi 



«» 



P 



«i: 



By tinkling rills 
h^ 



-F-^^- 



^m 



3EE 



By tinkling 



By tinkling rills 



By tinkling 



^E 



«a=^=^ 



:3z£±ra: 




| P ^P 



PLH 



S 



We'll love 



the 




rills. We'll love - - - the 



3ii5 



«i: 



We'll love 

.As (t 



H=^ 



^ 



is 



cm^^M 



a^ 



-* 



44 






8ul-try hours a-way, the sul-try hours 



«« 



M h- 



1=^ 



«t 



^ # 



b^ I ii*' 



m. 



sul-try hours a-way, the sul-try hours 

Nt 



]E=i=X 



^t 



I 



Uta 



e-^ 



-ev 



■«ft^ 



i^^^^s^^ 



«t±:^ 



I 



44 



way. 



^^ _ '' 



isSig 



PS 



N- - 



g 



igi## 






Wit^ 



aZkm^ 



:* 



I I I I I 



^ tt g tf i£ 



I 



^ 



g %gR^ B 



IBt 



1^- 



^ 



s^ 



-i— Nn 



^^m 



-4^-— 4^- 




^j^ ^^^^ 



:'(() 'iiu 



m^ ^\-rH-r^ 



n 



P 




iwji i'i' 



&enlle Youths ah ! tell me why, '■ | 

i 
SUNO BY MISS STEPHENS IN LOVE IN A VILLAGE. 

Largo. Arne. 






:-p|i|3 




^2 



ilE 



^1 



-W-T- 



fm 




Mfji.j^[ i jj j ;n 

Gentle youth, ah ! tell me why, j 



mi rr -.W^m \ ^ m 



m ^ ^m ^^m 



Still you force me thus to fly; Cease, oh ! cease, to 



S« 



^S 



«i: 



J5^ 



f 



■ftft 



d 




p «^ ffj«fe| 



per - se - vfcie. Speak not what I must not 



EBS frc* r '^^ 



Ig 



8« 



■^ 



/'-N 



s 



»i:i=^ 



f— F- 



hear, Speak not what I must not hear. 



mu 



m 



^ Mfe ^ AH ^^ 



^e 



-*-^^- 



To my heart its ease re - store. Go, and ne - ver 



^«ii 



m 



^^ 



^ 



jg &^farj^rf^^ ^ 



see me more. To my heart its ease re-store. 



aB 



SeI 



• — *—* 



nt 



i 




Go, and ne - ver see me more. Go, and 






^ 






eElEZK 



lil 



•7 



ne - ver see me more. 



3^5 



rir r'rrf iri 



«i: 




^S 



^ 



i 



48 



c Still in Hopes to get the better. \. 

SUNG BY MR. PYNE IN LOVE IN A VILLAGE. y 

Allftih. Arne 



WUi \ i ! ^ ^^^. 



— 't- 



is 



sg^ 



p~^ 



m • 



P-0- 



P~=- 



is; 



F- 




D^ b f ' 



0-^ 



t±^ 



h- h- h 



Jg^SS: 




\Y\fWT~W—^..\ t~^ P ^yTT-f 



f C i r r rtt 



■1^ 



n 




gftf^^ ^^^ 



Still in hopes to get the bet-ter Of my stubborn 



^i^ 



^ 



Nt 



4d 



# r 



E^iPS 



iM 



flarue I try ; Still in hopes to get the bet-ter Of my 



EfcztJ 



^ 



^-:r-|^-^ 



-=^- 



gg 



p^ 



>T- 



fr--^ 



fc3 



c - m r rt! ^ 



stubborn flame I try ; Swear this mo-ment to for-get her. 



t-t: — P- 



m 



b# 



fT^ifc Lpgj 



i^afej^EfeN pi^ 



Ar 


id the next my oath de 


-nj 


r, my oath de - 


ny 


, my oath de- 


' V 




• ■ 






1 






1 


• I. 


9 W 








f 






f 




5 




• ^ 






»■ r-" 




■J 


. ■■" 1" - 






1 ^ 




(* 




LJ 




r"* 



a 



i 



i 



^t 



e:ii: 



Jl* ^ f 



-nn 



Now pre-par'd with 



tfah^-ftj 



1^^ 



f~fmTt ?T-r f r r 



scorn to treat her, Ev'ry charm in thought I brave, Ev'ry 



i ijjrrp"J 



itzz^ 



p 



^ 




50 



I 



i 



c\ 



m — y 



^^ 



* 



charm in thuught I brave ; Then re-laps-ing fly to meet her 



i^^ 



4^_i._ 



^ 




L« ' U t^ U — t;r 



^=i 



And con-fess my-self her slave ; Then re-laps-ing fly to 



CrfrT-fTTTr^ gsp 




I 



*_._-. 




meet her. And con-fesg my -self her slave. And con- 



a. -f f r IW^TT^ M 



i 



— h 




3^S^ 



i=F 



' ^ ^ ' u 



fess my -self her slave. And con-fess my-self her 



slave. 



m. 



^ 



51 






a 



S#g5g 



When Time was enlnnning. 



CAU.COTT. 



^35 



g 



•--# 



P§^ 



M-^p # F 



When time was entwining the gar-land of yearSjWhich to 



fes 



^ 



43^ 



mui 



^ • — • 

When time was entwining the gar-land of years,Which to] 



^55 



^ 



b ^ 4 \ 4 4 t 



When time was entwining the gar-land of years,Which to 



r o.b r - # 



s 



lEi-ip: 



±±z^ 



SI.. SI 



crown my be - lov-ed was giv'n. 



fc^ 



■'s*.« 



P 



« # 



crown my be - Ioy - ed was giv'n. 



i 



3± 



l^^ 



-— ^ 



1 f 



crown my be - lov - ed was giv'n, Thougli some of Ihe 



62 



sul - lied with 



I 






pai 



fe— F-^ 



f"- 



Though some of the leaves might be sui-lied with 



^^ 



^ 



e-~i. 



^ES 



leaves might be sul-lied with tears 



with 



f I b,# ■ . p r 



^ 



-f^— f- 



tears, 



the flow'rs were all 



^ 7\Trm ^ 



¥'^ L C'^- 



tear8> Yet the flow'rs were all gather'd the flow'rs were all 



k^.i. P r. f I f • r rr^ ^^ 



b t l^ U 



jg .' I 



tears. Yet the flow'rs were all gather'd in heav'n. 



±-£rGte 



i 



^ 



^ 



gather'd in heav'n 



in heav'n - - the 



^^ 



gather'd in heav'n, in heav'n 



the 



m 



i 



TT-ff 



ifcii 



^ 



TTTT 



heav'n were all gather'd in heav'n - - the 



od 



fc — —fvi^t^i 



i 



^mmm^^m 



flow'rs were all ga-lher'd in heav'n And long may this 



kx 



h 



4*4/9 



^^t 



y i.,-.#p -lip 



5c:zs 



flow'rs were all ga-ther'd in heav'n. And long may this 



m 



—i 



i 



i 



tktzzt 



— @-~F 



^ 



lf~9 



-F F- 



flow'rs were all ga-tber'd in heav'n. 



i ■^etf- ,w*^ 



Uii* 




gar-land be sweet to the eye. 



kzi 



4^-P^ 



WZl^M^^ 



# — ^ 



'^ ^ ' li 



gar-land be sweet to the eye. 



^ 



^^i 



P_* — e 



H=-^ 



-k^ 



gar-land 



to the eye. May its vtrduro for 



'i 



^^ 



-F-f^ 



#---# 



May its ver - dure for e - ver be 



i 



PE 



-F-H=- 



4L. 



May its ver-dure for e - ver be 



m 



t-~U- ='-H-^ 



e-ver be new 



b« 



54 



new, May its ver - dure for c - ver be new. Young 



frzK 



i 



^» 



n±:z±z±±=lzz 



tzttiztiz:^ 



new. May its ver - dure for e - ver be new. Young 



Efe 



• * It 



^ 



# — P- 



yv 



new. May its ver - dure for e - ver be new. Young 



i 



hFTO 



j5^-^ 



^---^ 



¥=^ 



Love shall en-rich it with ma -ny a sigh j 



^ 



n 



1 1 > • * 



^ 



♦iTT 



Love shall en-rich it with ma-ny a sigh ; And Pi - ty shall 



m£ 



m^ 



b 4 -4 — # 



Love shall en-rich it with n»a-ny a sigh ; And Pi - ty shall 



e— ^ 



© — =- 



-f'-F- 



Young Love 



S 



W=H^ 



•f^— f^- 



nurse it with dew ; 



Young Love shall en - 



s^ 



iiii^ 



nurse it with dew ; 



Young Love shall en- 



55 



i 



-e — ^- 



m 



And Pi - ty shall 



iraE 



A-Z I F~7 tzgfe 



i 



g 



rich it with ma - ny a sigh ', And Pi - ty shall ). 



m^tr t : \T axt t:^m 



rich it with ma - ny a sigh ; And Pi - ty shall 



^ 



t 



# — ^• 



nurse it with dew, shall nurse it, shall nurse it. And 



3 



p\ P P 



f 



nurse it with dew, shall nurse it, shall nurse it. And 



ffi5 



m 



P — P 



nurse it with dew ---------- And 



b.^«.#: 



^ 



i 



s 



Pi - ty shall nurse it with dew. 



^ 



^s 



Pi - ty shall nurse it with dew. 



^r : r i rfirm 



Pi - ty shall nurse it with dew. 



56 



Heroes when with Ghry burning. 



I 



A Tempa di Guvotlu. 



Handel. 






— rqr^ 



ffltt -r ft^ M^ 



;>:, .rf l JJ: 



^ 



f— y— f 



^ 



tt:! 



^ d ^ d 



4-' 



m 



£f^ 



^ 



J 



i 



-&~t 




^ 



:i=* 



t- 



li.'.— — - 


— H«-«)£6 


wb«H with glo - fy 


l>ur« - -mg alt ittekr ' 




i!.l» - 






rli - 






■ 


h 








■ -d 




L J 





.57 



^ 



f^=§f=^ = ^ 



-\— 



toil with plea-sure bear. 



^ 



tt!J:i£la 



^^ 



> .fl » F r—P 



iF ^' J 



^ 



g 



And be-lieve to love re-turning lau-rel 



I 



#~^ 



ijiiig 



wreaths be-neath their care. 






..,:::::. '.i 






_i 




-r ' 


P-f 


P a. 


f}' ■ I 


^ 


r 


~4 




-J — 1 — 




-L- 


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b 






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' 


— i-- 



f^ 







-h-T^I— t: 



t 



Tpfr-...fr.T^,\ 



{ 

i 



^• 



:=r 













He-roes when with glo-ry 


burning all their 


'V 


[^ 




m 








• J. 






9 




■ 


■ 


T 


h 










c 




















■ 



I 



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^f=l 



m 



toil with pleasure bear, And believe to love relurn-ing 



m 



:*- 



^M-J^ 



...r 
e 



w 



-0~ 



58 



si 



* 



to love re-turn-ing lau - rel vreaths 


be-ne 


alli 


their care. 


' V 




■ 


^ 




f 




Li: 




• ''h ■ 


■ 


„ ,. L 










f 






























c 












k 


— 









* v i r Pf. i-p-F^^ 



i 



s 



P=i[ 



^^ 



He-roes 



t #» • ■_ 



feig 



=i? 



^ 



S 



when with glo-ry 


3urn-ing all their 


toil with pleasure 

• 


be 


ar, 


' V 








f 






. 1. 


■ 


- p*. 










h 




1 






_J 


^ 
















i 



iS 



e^ 



^ U ^ 4 ^ 



^ 



4—4 



And be - lieve to love re-turn-ing laa-rel wreaths beneath I heir 



a 



t 



i 



^— F 



TCf i f "^CfltTjgf? ^ 



* 



And be - lieve to love re- 



^^^^^^m 



59 



-Q ' 




— 


















, .. 






/i b < J 
















P 










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(\i * 


' 






























y.y - « 




^ 


1 








4 


a 


• 




i 


i 


4/ 

turnin, 


^ lau-rel wreaths be-iieath their care. 










be- 



^V ■# 



3 



i 



iH-^ 



g 



luTErr] 



^— 1( 



ncath their care. 



And be - lieve to love re-turn-ing 



m 



tofrjrirh^ 



n 



f!\ 



i 



T~y 



I 



fi 



cr — ^ 



m 



lau-rel wreaths, lau-rel wreaths beneath their care. 



r Tj i Fr-r. i 



; ): r f r r J 






I: 



War to 



60 



^^^i^^ 



har-dy deeds in-vites, 

z:e±3: 



War to » 



mm 



FF FPF^ ^ 



^ 



^ ^ 4 ^ a^irg 



3U-^-* 



a < 



har-dy deeds in - vites. Love the danger well requites. Lore the 



^rN^T^ft^' ^ I r r ri tT Tf 




daa-ger weli re-quites. 



Love the 



lg N=# 



3 



:«: 




mEtoa 



^ 



■^— -pr-v--^ri«^-^% jger, War to 



r-r-^ 



±=3t 



61 



g pf£]ffffrn:t t 



H P ^ ^ 



har-dy deed 


s in 


- vites. 


itfp 


P »■ 1 


Lore the | 

f- m. . 8 

^ > 


-yr^d 


J 


y 


^^-^ 









gTj i j ^- c'r ^^ 



dan-ger \reil ro-quite!«, War to har-dy deeds in- vites. 



e 



^ 



U ^ f r ^tl-^ 



e 



^ 



# * # 






Adtiglu, 



I 



ii-'^=# 























Leve 


the 


^v 


• 












. 


..... . ^ 


•.J. 




a 














■ 




f 


h 












A 




d 




hr '" 










4 




i 






1 


rci 




,-- H. 




■— 




4 




■- 






i 







i 



J 



./4 Tempo. 



^ 



^^=^=^ 



^ 



dao - gw well re - quites. 



''V 



^F=F f 



£ 



:£ 



* 



N— 1 — ^ 



16 



i 



l2i:i=3 



-g j I J I — r — rr-T T » j » ^ 9-1^ 



±=tf=±:=i=z!^ 



Z: i-LJ--L zz-z=3lz=j:^=J£ES^EgE 



6-2 



i ^ ^ ^^H ^rrf j^ 



-e — I- 



p 



He-roes 





^ ' HI [JJij j^i J 1 



^} J j u 



Efetft 



when with g!o - ry 


burn-ing all their 


toil with pleasure 


'V 






1 1. ■ 


■ 


I 


h 










' 



s 



rTj 1 



Z3t 



bear. And be-liei 


re i 


love 


re-turn 


-ing 


la 


u re 




wreaths be- 


'V 


., 








• 
















• J* . 




1 










t 


^ 














h 








i 










4 
























■— W 


J 


1 — J 


U .|_ 



s 




^^^ 



neath their care, lau - rel wreaths be-neath their care. 



■IV--C3 



^a 



'^m 



t5i=* 



^ 



Dal Segno. 



63 



.— h^ 



?piniB maasai saiBiL®iDiiiaa^ 



N0.i* 



Harkf I hear the OcearCs whelming Sweep. 

THE WORDS WRm'EN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 
Andantino espresnco. [Air— Low;'« young Dream. 



^^rtf i rf rr^-^ 



t 




fe 



I 




m 



^gp^ X 




^te rfgfcj ; 



-^M^klb 



-^ 



rP ^- > * 



g 



T3G: 



s 



^ 



i 



Hark! I hear the o-cean's whelming sweep. The loud winds 




f^-^- 



TI^rf-jn^^L 



m 



*^- ^ - r 1 



■^— r 



f 



^S 



64 



dd— -r — -^^—^ 




^f frfnmm 



roar, Fare-thee-well, my love, I brave the deep,We meet no 




3t 



rJETivinn 



#- — F-^ 



t 



^— 



izn 



I 



^-^ 



• . ■■ 



^: 



i:.!-__ii3[ 



more. Deep glooms the night a-cross the land and darkly 

cres. f. 



:i± 



-p-^h 



gS 



-^=l-'€- 



^ 



i— 



"i- 



■I ~ — — zj^ L U r 1^4 



#. -^^ 



f — iH 



-=^- 



^H--^- 



;^ 



:e 



N — ;■ 



^ 



^zzfiz 



lours the skies. Coldly blows the wind and cold's the hand that 



^ ^jf!=jr^rhi^^ 



I 



rinf. 



m 



t& 



-H — F — *h 



i ^""J — H-d siJll: 



m 




in mine lies. And the on-Iy lights up - on the strand Are 



iig 






Ei 



m 



p—^ 



mBSi 



I 



-f-^ 



-'^-ih^ 



^^ 



--f^-^- 



4^ — 4-^-4-^ 



those lov'd eye». 




i 



w^ 



■:^ 






^^ 



f 



i 



When my bark across the foamy \mue 

Shall fty frojn thee, — 
When those dear bli»ecyes no longer shine 

Life's light to me,-^' 
This heart thy smiles first taught to glow. 

Will bid emotion ceaise^ 
And I, from ills and griefs below. 

Find one release, 
Wlen these eyes that Tong have wept in woe, 
^ Shall close in peace. 



m 



No.H. 



Could the Voice that I lov'd wake again to this Ear, 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 

[Aia~SAe vt far from the Land. 




n^s 



fe 



t 



^M I f - < ^ 



■-F-^ 



i 



^=Sf 



kk 



■r 1-r- 



Could the 




eis 



^i ^itf ctf I r M [ 



Wr 



fe 



p:^ 



i 



feii: 



i 



F5 



EX 



voice that I lov'd wake a - gain to this ear, AH its 



fet 






^^m 

^^3 



&f 



^^^^^^m 



rap - tu - rous ine - lo - dy breath - iiig 



■^^ 



^3 



^m 



^- t-j 



^=4 



^ 



^1 



■=\ — 



SE 



fEars: 



^A4=^ 



^ 



then might for-get all the sor-rows that here Round this 



mm-i-1-Jim 



: y.h . r r~T 



^ 



m 



±iE 



id^toiisw 



^ 



*S K 



WgM. 



4 4 



de - 80 - late heart are en - wreath - ing. 



I 



^S=f 



^MMb 



t-^ 



r? 



i 



^ 



s 



p^ 



68 







rinf. 



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Could the eyes on vhose light it was rapture to gaze, 
feinJ u Shed on me their Iustrou» splendor. 

Beam again, like the moon on the streamlet, their rays. 
All gloving, yet meltingly tender, — 

Could the lips that were brighter than rosebuds in hue, 
, When the dews of the morning weep o'er them, 
' Melt once more to my own, or be bright to my view. 

As when first my heart learnt to adore them, — 

I again might be blesa'd ; but cold in the tomb 
Lie those charms, with my Julia sleeping ; 

And lonely I wander in silence and gloom, 
To moisten her grave with my weeping. 

The winds whistle over the grass at her head. 
And wild roses around it are springing, 

As still, though the <|ueen of their beauty lies dead. 
To Ihe mem'ry of loveliness clinging. 



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Ye Woods and ye Mountains unknonm 
^n ISlegp. 

COMPOSED BY WILLIAM JACKSON, OF EXBTER. 
Larghetta. 



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Ye woods and ye mountains anknown,6eneath 'whose dark 



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^4<¥e woods and ye mountains unknown. 



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v¥s woods and ye mountains unknown^Beneath whose dark 



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sha-dows I stray. 



To the breast of my 



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Beneath whose dark sha - dows I stray. 



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shadows I stray, be - neath whose dark sha-dows I 



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charmer a - - lone. 



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To the breast of my char-mer a - lone. 



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stray. To the. breast of my char-mer a - lone. 



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sighs, these sighs, these sighs bid sweet E-cho con- 




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These sighs, these sighs bid sweet £-cho con- 



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e - ver he pen-sive - ly leans. By foun-tain on 



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e - ver be pen-sive - ly leans. By foun ■< tain oa 



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e - ver he pen - sive - ly leans. By foun - tain on 



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bill or in grove. 



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hill or in grove, his heart 



will explain what she 



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bill or in grove. 



His heart will explain what she 



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meanSjHis heart will explain what she means,who sings both from 



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means, His heart wifl explain what she means, 



Who 



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means. 



What she means. 



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sorrow from sorrow and love,who sings both from sorrow St. love. 




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sings both from sorrow&lo\v,whQ sings botbfrom sorrow & love. 



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sings both from eorrow&love,who sings both from sorrow & love. 



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More soft than the nightingale's song, O waft the sad 



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sound to her ear. 



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O waft the sad sound to her ear. 



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sound to her ear, O waft the sad sound lo her 



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friend of his bo-som, the friend of his bo-som is 



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The friend the friend of his bo - som is 



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near. Then tell him what years of de - light. Then 



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near. Then tell him what years of de - light. Then 



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telt him what a - get of pain, what a - ges what 




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sight, I feel till I see him a -gain. 



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-\ 



76 



No Flower that Blows. 



SUNG BY MISS STEPHENS, IN SELIMA AND AZOR, 



HJoJerato. 



LiNLKY. 




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like this rose. No flow'r that blows is 



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like is like this rose. Or scat - ters such per- 



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fume, 



or scat-ters such per-fume. 



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No fiow'r that blows is like this like this 




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bloom. No flow'r that blows is like is like this 




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rose, Dear pledge to prove a pa - rent's love, a 



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pleas -ing pleas - ing gift thou art. Come 



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sweetest 


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in my heart, live henceforth in my heart. No flow'r that 

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blows is like is like this rose, " ~ -No flow'r that 



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blows, is like is like this rose. 



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80 







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No. SSi. 






— -<l 




i* ■ ■ 

Helen. 

A BALLAD. 








THE woRi: 


is WWTTEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 
[Am— rA« nueting <J the 






SehehanJn. 


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81 

— ' — — ~— ' - ■ — 
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gal • lop'd in ha&te o'er the gUde« And his 

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steed and his mas - tcr were gai - ly ar - 




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ray'd, And bright was his form. 



And 




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biythe xnaa his air. Id his bat was seen flowing the 




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gift of his fair. In his hat was seen flowing the 



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83 



rituril. 




And tl«lleD Knik'd out from her window that night. 
And he wav'd his gay plumes, when the maid was in nighl, 
Clapping spurs to his steed, swiftly onward he prest. 
In a moment he folded the fair to bis breast. 



And lip meeting lip, there as mutely they clung, 
Their eyes' glowing rapture spoke more than the t«>ng«ie ; 
While her breath panting quickly in sighs only spoke. 
The echoes of rapture his presence awoke. 



^ 



The morning beam'd brightly, the cavalier's steed 
Flew lightly along the dew-spangled mead ; 
But never again came that knight, and no more 
Wears the maiden the smile which that ev'ning she wore. 



She weeps not, bat looks from her lattice all day. 
On the road where the cavalier wended his way ; 
In vain her heart throbs, or her bosom may burn. 
That knight and those blisses will never return. 



*-. 



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64 



^.X.'V-..^. 



Under tJie Greenwood Tree, 



~| Andante. 



±^ 



Dr. Arne. 



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Flauto. 




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Under the greenwood tree.Who loves to lie with ine. 



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And tune his merry note liis mer-ry mer-ry 



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note Un-to the sweet bird's throat? And tune hi«/ 



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mer-ry note Un - to the sweet bird's throat, Com« 



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hither. 



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hi - ther, come hither, come hither, come hither. 



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Here shall he see no e - nc-niy But Win-ter and rough 

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Here shall he see no e-ne-my But 



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greenwood tree, Who loves to lie with me, 



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tune his merry note. Unto the sweet bird's throat ? And 



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tune his nierrv note un - to the sweet bird's throat ' Come 



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hitber,come hither,come hither,come hither come hither,come 



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hitber, come hither. 



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Oh I come to the Tomb, 

THE WORDS WRIT! EN BY MISS MARY LEMAN REDE. 

[Air— -OA/ breathe not his Nanu^^ 



Andante. 




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come to the tomb,where this form Bhail be laid. Where no 



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woes shall mo-lest it, no cold ones ap-braid. And 

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heart that has shed more than mil - lions for you. 



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Gild my tomb with the smile that in life I ador'd. 
Which often has life to my bosom restor'd ; 
But, oh ! let its sunbeam be blended with dew. 
As my last look will be when it lingers on you. 

Then turn to the world, to its shadow or glare. 
And ask, has it got such a friend for you there, — 
So fondly adoring, so ardently true, — 
So madly devoted, as I was to you ? 



Then come to the tomb where these relics recline. 
The spirit has fled, but despise not the shrine. 
And remember that nothing but death could subdue 
The light of that shrine that burn'd only for you. 



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Fair Clora. 



A DUET FOR TWO VOICES. 



Dr. Havdn. 



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As I saw fair Clo ---_-.. la 



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walk a .-_; 


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down, soft-ly down, softly down, soft-ly down, came soft - ly 



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wan - ton snow flew to her breast as lit-tle lit - tie « 



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The wan • ton snow flew to her breast as lit-tle 



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birds in - to their nest. But be-ing o'ercoine with 



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birds in - to their nest. But be-ing o'ercbme with 



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^whiteness there, for grief dissolv'd' for grief dis-solv'd in- * 



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4' ^ 4 i 



'.'., whiteness there, for grief dis-solv'd, for grief dis-solv'd in 




to a tear. Thence fall - ing 



f?t^j?i^g 



gar - ments hem, to deck 



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To deck 



gar-ments hem. 



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her 



froze, froze, froze, in- 



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her froze, froze, froze, in- 







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to a tear. 



The wan - ton snow flew 



a^3 



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P P^p^ p 



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to a tear. 



Tlie wan - ton 



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to ber breast as lit-tle lit-tle birds in - to tbeir nest. 



^ 8 f r 7 ^ 



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snow flew to her breast as little birds in - to their n^st. 



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But be-ing overcome with whiteness there, for grief dis> / 



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But be-ing o'ercome with whiteness there, for grief dis- 



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solv'd for grief dis-solv'd in - to a tear. 



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soU'd, for grief dissolved io - to a tear. 

-•: <u- 



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f^_. 



100 



Green grow the JRcishes, , O ! 

Vivace ma non troppo. 




.wl> "bh;* TcJ ^-rradt tizya^lldw ifJhr 3moj<xd'o X" 



There's 



" ' " I ^*^ — '4 



i^zizzt 









Iff J tt»4yn jJiil'f/ dii-''' •^fmt.-jit'o j^ai-dtt tu'\ 




S — s- 



tnrf.ri^Jr.JI 



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pas-ses O, What sig-ni-fies the life o' man An' 



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101 



Wri^TJJE 






'twere not for the las - ses, O ! Green grow the 



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rash - es, O, Green grow the rash - es O, The 



tizSfc 



f:-- 



W¥ F f^ 



-t Tt 



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^ 



^^ 



— ^ 



•.,;; i.i> ' , »; ;,v 7 10 



^ 



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^-# 



sweetest hours that e'er I spent Were spent amang the 



^M^^m 



^^^^^^1 



^^^ 



,3J& ^WO'il^ Oi-.i.J .vv>AO 

-#~# P ^- 



■ — W 



102 



lasseSfO ! 



-P-^ 



i 




The -warry race may riches chase. 
An' riches still may flee them, O ! 

An' tbo' at last they catch *em fast. 
Their hearts can ne'er enjoy them, O ! 

Chos. Green grow, &c. 

Bargi*e me a canny hour at e'en. 
My arms about my dearie, O ! 

An' warl'y cares an' warl'y men 

May a' gae tapsailteerie, O. ' " "' 

Chos, Green grow, &c. 

For you sae douse ye sneer at this, 
Ye're nought but senseless asses, O ! 

The wisest man the warl' e'er saw. 
He dearly lov'd the lasses, O. 

Cho$. Green grow, &c.*^ — 



4iu«wi U-. 



Auld Nature swears,, the lovely dears' 
Her noblest work she classes, O !. .^ 

Her 'prentice ban' she Iry'd on man,^ 
An' tb«n she made the lasses, O. 

CA(v. Green grow, &c. 



103 



NO. rr* 



^7<r~^ 



>i .^^ni'^iiif odi uiMii O/I 



OA / never more. 

THE wSSDS -WRITTEN BY WILI JAM LEMAN REDE. 



-v^— '; 



fVith Feeling. 
± 



[Air — The Harp that once. 



m\mmm^^^ m 



-»i[:-' 




S^B5 



m 



s itsr^"^ ^ ^ ^ 



''V 



B 



bl) d + 



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ne-Tcr more up-on this heart The sun of joy will glow. 



104 



b . I 'p • > f P w'Zpi 



^ 



-"f~3-W»- 



^m 



fc* 



No more the pitying tear shall start For mine or other's woe. 




■jgK ^ IP* • 'f ^— ' p . -»-,— I . • 



— -The source of smiles and tears is dry. And feel-ing% 







51 1 ^. f —^"=m 



s 



E^==^3 



«: 



p^ 



<8V 



:-TtlH I 



^=f=F=F=5= 



h ex i;- [ I - c 



font is o'er, There's no-thing now can meet my eye <5n 




105 




^^ sf+fntnEm 



The blandishments of life that lit 

My hopes when youth was wild. 
Have vanished ; would they'd lingerVl yet, 

And I was still a child ! 
Oh ! for those happy hours of peace. 

When trifles gave delight, 
Ere Sorrow bid those raptures cease, 

Or Malice brought h€r blight. 



Those joys I never more must know. 

But mem'ry pictures yet 
The blisses that I must forego, 
^ But never can forget. 

~tHope flutters still within Us dm. 

And cools my burning brain ; 
mUn dreams my bosom still will barn,— 
~~- '—UMid echo joy again. 



'iW-ain L> 



i 



fn.'ii yiiii.uU 



106 



O! who has seen the Miller s Wife ? ^'* 

A aLES FOR THREE VOICES. 



. Moderato. 



Rkevb. 



m 



t 



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F-M-- 



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O, who has seen the iniHer's wife ? I, I, I, 



U 



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I, I. 



^EE: 



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and kindled up new strife, and kindled up new strife, 




and kindled up new strife, and kindled up new strife. 



I 



#-#■■#-•# 






s^ 



and kin-died up new strife, and kindled up new strife ; A 



^ 



^ 



Si 



d-r--z: — r — ^ 



shilling from her palm I took Ere on the cross lines I could 



io/ 






I, 1. I, in 



P 



ii * Jl ^ J j-^T r-y 



-F-f^ 



Who has the tanner's daughter seen^ I, I, in 



m 



^ 



look. 



::!z:i:iinit i 



'»s.tH«i* - «iU *a l»il <fHi* cloit-/ 



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i;f III II- 
qaest of her have been, in quest of her have been, . 


■ft 


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quest of her have been, in quest of her have been, 



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quest of her have been, in quest of her have been ; But 



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>ij ^ as the tan-ner was with-in 'twas hard to 'scape him in 



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But as the tanner -was^within^ •'twas hard to 



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im 



# — ^ 



But a3 the tanner was witbin/twas hard to 



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whole skin. But as the tanner was within 'twas hard to 



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'scape him ir 


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i whole sk 


in, 'Twas hard to 'scap 


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'scape him in whole skin, 'Twas hard to 'scape him in 



; ):T Tir rfTT^Tip pi j j 



'scape him in whole skin, 'Twas hard to 'scape him in 



luS 






r H 1 



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whole skin. 






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whole skin. From ev'- ry place con-demn'd to 



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whole ' skin. 



From ev'- ry place cen-demn'd to 



s 



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109 



-f^-^T F- 



-rur. 



These branches form our 




i 



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roam, In ev'ry place we seek a home,These branches form our 
b i K- M ... 1— « X h 



m 



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dff 



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roam. In ev'-ry place we seek a home.These branches form our 



ts± i m 



m 



p — ^ 



m 



Summer roof. By thick grown leaves made weather proof. In 




Summer roof. By thick grown leaves made weather proof. In 



m 



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:f uiu-»' 



Summer roof. By thick grown leaves made weather proof. In 



jtJ*- #■■#— t 



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BZieZK 



shel'tring nooks and l^ollow ways. We cheerly pass our Winter ! 
1 St — I h 1 P N- 




3 



sheVtring nooks and hollow ways. We cheerly pass our Winter 



F~y 



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i_. 



shel'tring nooks and bol-low ways. We cheerly pass our Winter 



110 



^ 



cca [ i rrr- i ^ 



r^ t Tw 



^ U L- 



days. Come cir-cle round the gipsies' fire. Come cir-cle round 



i 



m 



days. 



Come cir-cle round 



m 



-F-=h 



■zziyri 



days. 



' ' ^ ,,r— 



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the gipsies' fire, Come cir-cle round the gipsies' fire. Our songs 




the gipsies' fire. Come cir-cle round the gipsies' fire. Our songs 



m 



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w — w 



gr~g 



Come cir'cle round the gipsies' fire, Our songs 



^s 



a 



y-f-Cteing^ 



— t^— 1_ 



our sto-ries ne - ver tire. Our songs our sto-ries ne - ver 



^ 



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^i^ tiu-m^ 



our sto - ries ne - ver lire. Our songs our stories ne - ver 



$m 



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i 



w~ 



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our sto - ries ne - ver tire. Our songs our stories ne - ver 



Ill 



tire. ne-ver tire. Come stain your cheek with nirt or 



^5p ^ - t fM 



tire. ne - ver tire. 



m 



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5 



tire. ne - ver tire. 



# |.# 



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F=^ 



berry, Come stain your cheek with nut or berry, Come stain your 



i 



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E^ a3 TrT.TtrT^ 



Come stain your cheek with nut or berry,Come slaiii your 



^t: 



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Come stain your 



^u it a ^^ 



w—^ 



WZSL 



k-^ 



cheek with nut or ber-ry. You'll find the gipsies' life is rnerry, 




cheek with nut or berry. You'll find the gipsies' life is merry. 



nrf-f-tf-ftf-H 



fe=K=Br 



check with nut or ber-ry. You'll find the gipsies' life is merry. 



112 




You'll find the gipsies merry, merry, merry. You'll find the gipsies 



,m 




=iE lA^jZ C^g=:faE±|3=jij^ 



You'll find the gipsies merry, merry, merry. You'll find the gipsies 



3E 




? 



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You'll find the gipsies merry, mer-ry, merry, You'll find the gipsies 



lEZIE 



i 



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fcy=i= 



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4 — 4- 



merry, merry, merry, You'll find the gipsies' life is mer-ry. 




i 



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w — tn^- 



S- — Fs — S- 



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#-# 



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^ ^ ~^ . . . . 

merry, merry, merry. You'll find the gip-sies' life is merry. 



315 



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merry, merry, merry, You'll find the gipsies' life is mer-ry. 



^ 



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— ba—k- 



Come stain your cheek with nut oi ber-ry, You'.l di d the gipsies* 



^3F-[-rti 



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Come stain your cheek with nut or ber-ry, Y.- 'II find the gipsies' 



'HP 



E 



Come 



Come • -,,^, 



113 



ii=6^p^iippgp 



ii 



JCI 



k--E=^Kl 



life is merfy. Come stain your cheek with nut and ber - ry 



^P 



life is merry. 



1 



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Come stain your cheek wilh nut or ber - ry, Come stain your 

. ft 



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I 



Come stain your cheek with nut or ber-ry. Come slain your 



BE 



M 



Come stain your 



J T^E^^K^^ ^^Eligp 



cheek with nut or ber-ry. You'll find the gipsies' life is merry. 



III 



WZnj.ZMZZMZ'JfZI 



--b — ^ — ^ 



zreiie 



p—p- 



^— i^ 



^m 



cheek with nut or berry, You'll find the gipsies' life is merry. 



^^^^ m^ 



cheek with nut or ber-ry. You'll find the gipsies' life is merry. 



114 



^m 



-^-»-Mr 



■6*-<- 



i 



^ 



You'll find the gipsies merry, merry, merry. You'll find the gipsies 



gET ^ # 



ezzi: 



^^ 



i 



You'll find the gipsies merry, merry, merry, You'll find the gipsies 



^^ 



irrr:-g-y-y-# 



l= M-t TT T 



g-P-g-g^- 



KZK 



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You'll find the gipsies merry, mer-ry, merry. You'll find the gipsies 



r-rt 




g 



f — ^ — ^ — p — ^—p — ^ 



k — k 



mer-ry, met - ry, mer - ry, You'll find the gip-sies* life is 



^^ ^^^^^^4^U-^ 



mer-ry, mer-ry, mer-ry. You'll find the gip-sies' life is 



1 irz.¥r-y. — ¥ — > . _ : 



y — y~"y ».: # -»— g 



]¥ \¥ }^ \^ ■ j^ 



mer-ry, mer - ry, mer-ry, You'll find the gipsies' life is 



^^ 



mer-ry. 



m0s- 



mer-ry. 



^^ 



mer-ry. 






THE WORDS WRnTEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 
Solemn. _ [Air — Rich and rare were the Gems she wwre. 



S: 



I 



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fcp^ 



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H 1- 



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Deep o'er Al - va's 



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tow - er falls The gloom of night, the an - cient 



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walls Are dark as death ; the sen - try's care 

-U r 1 l-T-H !^— H~^-T^ 0~ 




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na: 



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"O — * 

si - lent all. For death is theie,The last of Al - va's 



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lof - ty line [s laid with - in the con - vent 



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shrine. 

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.--5- 



Alva ! peace is not for thee. 
Thy splendid turrets yonder see. 
Thy wide domains are fair to view ; 
Thou hast no child to give them to ; 
And thou art old, and sorrow here. 
With none to dry thy bitter tear. 

False thou wert in love, and now 
Thou reap'st the guerdon of thy vow j 
Days shall rise, and suns shall glow. 
But pleasure thou wilt never know; 
More wretched than thy meanest slave. 
Thy only hope is in the grave. 



118 



Let us haste to Kelvin Grove, honny Lassie, O ! 

A FAVORITE SCOTCH BALLAD, 
INTRODUCED BY Mb. BRAHAM, IN GUY MANNERING. 




feEE^33BS 



— *-4-4^ 



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t r r r ■■■ 



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Let us haste to Kelvin 




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119 



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grove bon-ny lassie, 0! Through its ma-zes let us rove, 



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bon-ny lassie, O ! Where the rose in all its pridePaints the 

1- 



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35 



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hollow dingle side, Where ihe midnight fairies glide, bonny 



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120 



lassie, 0! We will wander to the mill, bonny lassie,0. To the 




fe- 



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w 



p—p- 



■^ZWZ^-JL. 



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cove beside the rill, bonny lassie,0,Where the glens rebound the 



P ^Tf , 



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call Of the lof-ty water-fall. Thro' the mountain's rocky 



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121 



h -n - ^-M - 



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ball, bon-ny las-sie, O ! Thro' the mountain's rocky ball 



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bon-ny las-sie, O. 




Then we'll up to yonder glade, bonny lassie, O ', 

Where so oft beneath the shade, bonny lassie, O ! 
With the songsters in the grove, we have told our tale of love. 

And have sportive garlands wove, bonny lassie, O ! 

Ah I I soon must bid adieu, bonny lassie ! 

To this fairy scene and you, bonny lassie, O ! 
To the streamlet winding clear, to the fragrant scented bri'r 

E'en to thee of all most dear, bonny lassie, O ! 

For the frowns of fortune lour, bonny lassie, O ! 
On thy lover at this hour, bonny lassie, O ! 

Ere the golden orb of day wake the warblers on the spray, '-'^ t 
From this land I must away, bonny lassie, O ! | I 

And when on a distant shore, bonny lassie, O ! / 

Should I fall midst battle's roar, bonny lassie, O ! ' 

Wilt thou, Julia, when you hear of thy lover on his bier. 
To his mem'ry drop a tear, bonny lassie, O ! 




122 



N0,'F3EI. 



' In Griefs and in Dangers. 

THE WORDS WRITIEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 



[Air— TAe last Rose of Summer. 



■-rrShi-^ 








^ 



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-rv#? 




I N griefs and in dangers. At land and at. 



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123 



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sea. Midst pleasures and strangers. My soul vas 



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with thee. Whilst thou with thy kindred. At peace 



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and at home. Taught thy fan-cy to wan-d«r 



H 



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132: 



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Thy wish - es to roam. 



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Whilst I sufFer'd capture, 

WrongM wounded, oppress'd. 
Thy heart beat with rapture 

To Netherville's breast. 
In my wants and my sorrows, 

I fear'd thou should'st mourn ; 
And my heart was distressed 

Lest thine should be torn. 

The' false friends have decried thee, 

I join not their hate ; 
Tho* the world may deride thee, 

I pity thy fate, 
I know thou hast wrong'd me — 

Will ne'er be my own ; 
But I feel that I love thee, 

And love thee alone ! 



126 



O Loffie O' Buchan. 



A FAVORITE SCOTCH AIR, ARRANGED AS A DUET. 



Grazioso. 



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Sandy has onsen, has gear, and has kye, 

A house and a haddin, and siller forby ; 

But Pd tak' my ain lad vi' his staff in his hand. 

Before I'd hae him vi' his houses and land. 

He said, ' Think na lang, lassie,' &c. 

My daddy looks sulky, my minny looks sour, 
They frown upon Jamie because he is poor ; 
Tho' I like them as weel as a daughter should do. 
They're nae half sae dear to me, Jamie, as you. 
He said, &c. 

I sit on my creepie and spin at my wheel. 
And think on the laddie that likes me sae weel ; 
He had but ae saxpence, he brak' it in twa. 
And he gied me the ha'f o't when he gaed awa'. 
Then haste ye back, Jamie, and bide na' awa*, 
Then haste ye back, Jamie, and bide na'awa'. 
The simmer is coming, cauld winter's awa'. 
And ye'll come and see me in spite o' them a'. 



128 



The Rose had been wasKd. 



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moisture encumber'd the flow'r & weigh'd down its beautiful 



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No. Vrm. 
When the Dave left tfte Ark. 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY MISS M. LEMAN REDE. 



Lmrghetto. 



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source of my plea-sures, from thee. 



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turn to thy breast as the dove to the ark. For the 



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Bui the dove at last fled to the grove's sylvan shade. 

Forsaking the ark j'ou will say ; 
But was it not Nature whose call she obey'd ; 

And how could the flutt'rer stay ? 
I shall yet quit this breast, where each warm virtue springs. 

That to me ev'ry pleasure has giv'n ; 
But, oh ! it will be on eternity's wings— 

I shall fly from your bosom to heav'n. 



138 



I^ist May a hraw Wooer cam' down the lang Glen. 

A FAVOIIITE SCOTCH SONG. 
THE WORDS WRITTEN BY ROBERT BURNS. 
Liteltf. 



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love he did deave me I said there was no-thing I 



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He spak o' the darts in my bonnie black e'en. 

And vow'd for my love he was dying ; 
1 said he mighl die when he liked for Jean. 

The lord forgi'e me for lying, for lying. 

The lord forgi'e me for lying. 

A weel stocked mailin, himsel' for the laird, 
And marriage aff hand were his proffers ; 

I never loot on that I kend it or car'd, 

But thought I might hae waur offers, waur offers. 
But thought I might hae waur offers. 

But what wad ye think ? in a fortnight or less. 
The de'il tak' his taste to gae near her. 

He up the lang loan to my black cousin Bess ; 

Guess ye how, the jad ! I could bear her, could bear 
Guess ye how, the jad ! I could bear her. 

But a' the niest week, as I petted wi' care, 

I gaed to the tryste o' Dalgariiock, 
And wha but my fine fickle lover was there : 

I glowr'd as I'd seen a warlock, a warlock, 

I glowr'd as I'd seen a warlock. 

But owre my left shouther I ga'e him a blink, 
Leest neebours might say I was saucy : 

My wooer he caper'd as he'd been in drink. 
And vow'd I was his dear lassie, dear lassie. 

And vow'd I was his dear lassie. 

I spier'd for my cousin fu' coulhy and sweet. 

If she had recover'd her hearing. 
And how her new shoon fit her auld shachl't feet ; 

But heav'ns ! how he fell a-swearing, a-swearing, 

But, heav'ns ! how he fell a-swearing. 

He begg'd for gude-sake ! I wad be his wife. 

Or else I wad kill him wi' sorrow : 
So e'en to preserve the poor body in life, 

I think I maun wed him to-morrow, to-morrow, 

I think I maun wed him to-morrow. 



her 



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Forgive the Muse tJiat slumbered. 






THE WORDS WRHTEN BY MISS M. LEMAN REDE. 
Allegretto. [Air— /'(( mourn the hopes tfe. 







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Those flowers have been shaded 

fiy cypress boughs from sunny skies. 
Yet still they bloom unfaded, 

Though adverse winds around them rise. 
Though sorrow's tears oft dew them. 

Bright joy shall shake them off to-day. 
As thou, if thou couldst view them 

With smiles would kiss them all away. 



144 



The Banks of the Yarrow. 

A FAVORITE GLEE. 



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night, I'll weep on his dwell - ing so narrow, And 



145 



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148 



No. X. 

All Venice look'd gay at the Bridal, 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY MISS M. LEMAN REDE. 
Allegretto. [Air — Hm Sorrow thy young Days thaded 





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bosom's young i - dol. To breathe to bright Hy-men her 



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light were blend - ed. As they view'd her with looks of 




Vet she was the brightest of any 

Where all beside were bright ; 
She rose 'mid the beautiful many 

A creature of tenderer light ; 
For the softness, almost like sadness. 

That shadow 'd her brow serene. 
Was sweeter than all the gladness. 

That in other eyes were seen. 
The bridegroom and train came lightly. 

Each his hat and plume in hand ; 
And never did bliss beam more brightly 

Than it did in that noble band. 
Now band in band to the altar. 

The young pair advance up the aisle ; 
But her step was seen to falter, 

And her check to lose its smile. 
A terror seem'd o'er her to hover, 
> In sighs quick, and low came her breath. 
When just at the altar her lover 

Caught her cold to his bosom in death. 
Oh ! he gaz'd on his bosom's young idol 

With anguish too wild for a tear. 
And the flowers that were culi'd for her bridal. 

Were silently strewn on hei bier 



151 



Though all may foryet thee, 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY MISS M. LEMAN REDE. 



Allegretto. 



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She remembers thy sighs as they breath'd on her ear. 

In the accents of sorrow and pain ; 
And feels that thy sufF'rings have made thee more deai 

Than any will e'er be again. 
She would have thee once more with the waste of thy voe. 

With feelings of fondness and pride. 
But since that is a thought she must ever forego. 

She would joy to lay down by thy side. 

Then though all may forget thee, who once in the glow 

Of thy fortune press'd round with delight ; 
Though the grave is forgot where they saw thee laid low. 

And bade thee for ever good night. 
That one who for thee could resign ev'ry dream. 

That from youth and ambition arise. 
Will still think on thee here, as her life's dearest beam, 

And her beacon of worlds in the skies. 



155 



* Had J a Cave oh some wild distant Shore. 



A DUET. 



THE WORDS WRirrEN BY ROBERT BURNS 
Andante espressivo. 




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Oh ! had I a cave on some wild dis - tant 



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shore. Where the winds howl to the waves dashing roar. 



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shore. Where the winds howl to the waves' dashing roar. 



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There would I weep my woes, There seek my lost re-pose. 



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There would I weep my woes. There seek my lost re-pose. 



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Till grief my eyes should close. Ne'er to wake more. 



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Till grief my eyes should close. Ne'er to wake more. 



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Falsest of woman kind, canst thou declare. 
All thy fond plighted vows fleeting as air. 

To thy new lover hie. 

Laugh o*er thy perjury. 

Then in thy bosom try 

What peace is there 



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158 



The Lover s Lute. 

THE WORDS WRITIEN BY MISS M. LEJVIAN REDE. 
fruh Expression. [Air— TAe Minstrtl Boy 




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Her lo-ver's lute that so of-ten woke With 




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thrilling tones to hail her. Met Emma's eje uii 



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tun'd and broke. And it turn'd her pale cheek pa - ler. 







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Harp of love ! she soft - ly sigh'd. 




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His heart beats high to war- like pride. Mine on - ly 




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lives to prize thee. 



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Bot yet again, , as ho oft before, 

She heard its notes so tender, 
When her warrior-youth return*d once more, 

His country's best defender. 
And sung — " How well is he repaid. 

Who from toil of war returning. 
Beholds in eyes like thine, sweet maid. 

Love's brightest, warmest welcome burning. * 



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lake, oh ! take those Lips away. 



' "^' A FAVORITE CANZONET. 



IJ Allegro Molto 

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And those eyes the breaks of day. Lights that do mis- 



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breaks of day, the breaks of day. Lights that do mis- 



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lead the morn,Iiights that do mis-lead, mis-lead the morn. 



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lead the morfi,Lights that do mis-lead, mislead the morn. 



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Take, oh ! take those lips a - way. But my kis - ses 
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bring a - gain. Seals of love, seals of love, but 




* But my kis - ses bring a -gain. Seals of love, but 



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Seals of love, but seal'd in vain, in 

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166 



No. xwau 



No more shall I seek in the red Field of Danger. 



THE WORDS WRITTEN BY MISS M. LEMAN REDE. 



With Expression. 



[Air — 'Tis gone and for ever. 



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more shall I seek in the red field of dan ger, The 



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plian-tom of ho - nor the hopes that be-tray ; 1 will 



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roam like a pil - grim, and ask of the stran-ger. The 



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crostand the cnp that vill serve foi the day 



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I how have. I found all my dar-ings re-cprd-ed. And 






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how have my life-wounds and love^ been re- ward -ed. And 




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brighten'd in-gra - ti - tude's dreari-est way. 




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That chosen of all — that best beam of my glory. 

Who promis'd to hght me to heaven's own shrme. 
Has thrown the first blight on the dawn of my story. 

And wilher'd the wreath that she taught me to twine 
Oh I vain was the hope that she kindled so brightly,"^" 
And which rose 'mid the stars that watch'd over me nightly 
She has cast off the chain that but fetter'd her lightly. 
And left all its weight and its cbillness on me. 

No matter ! when years shall have sadden'd her spirits. 

And taught her how false is the flatterer's breath. 
Sad, deserted, declining, she'll think of my merits. 

She'll seek me, perhaps, — she must seek me in death ! 
She will ask- they will tell her, when hope from life parted. 
One heart-burst escap'd, and one burning tear started. 
Then silent and lone, I went forth broken hearted. 
To seek some lone spot that might serve for a grave 



4 



170 



•^ ^ 1 love to oatch thy radiant Smile, 

THE WORDS WRTITEN BY MISS M. LEMAN REDE. 




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ra - diant smile. It speaks of so much sweetness. 



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wear, That bears not pleasure to me ; But most I prize The 




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The rosy hour of dawning light. 

Which dewy gems encluster. 
Boasts not a beam sp warm, so bright. 
As that dear eye's own lustre. 

Like some fleet ray. 

That breaks away 
From clouds of fleecy whiteness. 

The beam that hid 

Beneath thy lid. 
Breaks forth all warmth and brightness. 



173 



Ye Streams that round my Prison creep. 



A FAVORITE SONQ, SUNG PY MISS TOVEY IN TUB REVIVED 
OPERA OF LODOISKA. 

Sempre Piano. — 



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Yb streams that round my pri - son 



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creep, If on your mos - sy bank you see my 



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weep. Oh ! mur - mur 



oh ! mur - mur. 



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this com - mand from me 


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watch - ful day. 



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Ye gales, that love with me to sigh. 
If, in your breezy flight, you see 

My dear Floreski lingering nigh. 
Oh ! whisper this command from me. 

Thy mistress bids thee haste away. 

And shun the broad-ey'd, watchful day. 



176 



4 



We^ who waruTrinff Arabs are. 



A FAVORITE GLEE. 



Allegretto 



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sorrow, laugh at care. We, who wond'ring A - rabs 



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sorrow, laugh at care, We, who wand'ring A -rabs 



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forrow, laugh at care. We, who wand'ring A-rabs 



177 



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are. Fly from sor-row laugh at care, let the ; 






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are. Fly from sor-row laugh at care, let the 



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notes of love re - sound, and the ru-byjjjcup go 



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round. Whilst the gale its fra-grauce brings, and the 



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round. Whilst the gale its fr?^-grance brings, and tlie 



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Sum - mer flow - ret springs, Let the notes of love re - j 



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sound. And the ru - by cup go round, While the gale its 



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sound, And the ru - by cup go round, While the gale its 1 



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fragrance brings, and the Summer flowret springs. We, who 



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fragrance brings, and the Sum-mer flowret springs. We, who 



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179 






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waixd'riug A - rabs are. Fly from sor-row, fly from 



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wand'ring A - rabs are. Fly from sor - row, fly from 
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sor-row, fly from ^ care. 



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doom. If the rose of life shall bloom, Or, be- 



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neath the blightning shade. Droop un - time-ly pine and 



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neath the blightning shade. Droop un - time-ly, pine and 



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neath the blightning shade, Droop un-time-ly, pine and 



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181 



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sorrov , laugh at care. We, who wand'ring A - rabs 



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sorrow, laugh at care. We, who wand'ring A-rabs 



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fly from care, fly from sor-row, fly from care. 



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fly fix)m care, fly from sor-row, fly from care. 



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fly from care, fly from sor-row, fly from care. 



182 



No. XiV* 



On the dark lonely Strand. 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY MISS M. LEMAN REDE. 



With melancholy Feeling. 



[Air — At the mid Hour <tf Night. 




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dark lone-ly strand, which girts tlie tem - pes-tuous wave. 




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^ See a lorn fi - gure stand,Who watches yon lone - ly 



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cave. Tho' night shadows hang o'er her,Wmd8 whistle and- 



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billows boom. And her children de-plore her. She wanders a 

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mid the gloom. She weeps not, she sighs not, but ga - zes 

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sad-ly on his tomb. 



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Oh ! that breast calmly sleeps, 
^' That once was warm as her own, -' ■ 

Ami the loathsome worm creeps 

Thi'ough the heart that was her's alone ; 
And the bright eye is clouded, 
-p^-— -j ^ -Whose beam was her guiding light,^—^.^ 



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And those smiles now are shrouded. 
That made every beam more bright, 
All fleeted, all perished, and left her in darkness and night 



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r| Farewell, Ihou Stream that winding Flows. 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY ROBERT BURNS 
Larghetto. 




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cm - el throes With - in my bo - som swell-ing. 



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dare dis - close my an - guish. 



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Love's veriest wretch, unseen, unknown, 

I fain my griefs would cover ; 
The bursting sigh, th' unweeting groan. 

Betray the hapless lover. 
I know thou doom'st me to despair. 

Nor wilt, nor can'st, relieve me j 
But, oh ! Eliza, hear one pray'r — 

For pity's sake, forgive me ! 

The music of thy voice I heard. 

Nor wish whilst it enslavM me ; 
I saw thine eyes, yet nothing fear'd. 

Till fears no more had sav'd me : 
Th' unwary sailor thus aghast. 

The wheeling torrent viewing. 
Mid circling horrors sinks at last. 

In overwhelming ruin. 



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Blow, bloWf ihou Winter^s Wind. 



A POPULAR SONG, SUNO BT MR. BRAHAM, IN SHAKSPEARE's 



PLAY, OF THG MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR. 



Andante. 



Dr. Arne;; 



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wind. Thou art not so un-kind, thou art not so un- 



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tooth is not so keen, because thou art not seen, Al- 



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the', thy breath Ibe rude. 



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Freeze, freeze thou bitter sky, 
I'hou dost not bite so nigh 

As benefits forgot ; 
Though thou the waters warp, 
Thy sting is not so sharp, 

As friends remembci'd not. 



191 



Tlie Masquerade. 






THE WORDS WRITTEN BY W. LEAIAN REDE. 



Litiely. 



Air — C'est I'Amour. 




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glances, Joy fills her goblet to the brim, Pleasure'j train ad- 




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vances. Lightly the fai - ry footstep steals, Where mus.ic'^ 




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ma-gic straius be-gin. Whilst vi-zors like the lamp con-ceals 




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The rap'rous flame that burns within. Then oh ! seize an 



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hour. All beaming in bliss like this. Whilst bliss is in our 






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power Let's taste the pow'r of bliss. Gai-ljr,.at the masqus- 






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194 



rade Y'outhful bosoms beat. Lightly as the movements 



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made By beauty's bounding feet. 




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Why should age reprove our mirth, 

Or cynics chide our gladness. 
When pleasure's sun has set on earth, 

*Tis time enough for sadnes'. 
Scholars may pore o'er midnight lamp. 

Darkly they gleam to those above. 
Why should their frowns our pleasure's damp ; 

Let them seek lore whilst we seek love. 
For learning sheds no gleam 

To those who read but eyes. 
And Ovid's softest theme 

Is not so soft as sighs. 
Gaily, &c. 



195 



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Whereas the Heart so cold. 

THE WORDS WRiriEN BY MISS M. LEMAN REDE. 
Larghetto. 



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hear thy sto - ry told, Nor feel its pul-ses shakeu. 



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When we hear thy tale Of woe and vir-tue given, We 



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feel thou canst not fail To yet be one in IleaT^u. 

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Then let sighs less deep, 

O'er thy lip come stealing ; 
Be the tear you weep. 

Fraught with balmier healing. 
Mem'ry vainly tries 

To speak to thee of error ; 
Hope beyond the skies. 

Hushes every terror. 
All thy many woes 

To thee were only given. 
To prove, how purely glows 

The flame that mounts- to Heaven. 




198 



With theejair Summer* s Joy appears* 

A FAVORITE SONG, SUNG BY MR. BRAHAM, IN SHAKSPEARS'f 
ILAY OF THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR. 

Andunle. 
8vo 



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With thee fair Summer's joy appears,Oh ! 



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sweet Anne Page ; But thou a • way dread 




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Win-ter's near. Oh ! sweet Anne Page. And 




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all a-round is dark and drear, The leaves look pale and 
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shepherd's"mourn,AII na-ture droops till you re-turn. Oh ! 



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sweet Anne Page. 




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When April's glories shine on me. 

Oh ! sweet Anne JPage ! 
And violets bloom, oh!, none -I see, 

Oh ! sweet Anne Page ! 
But sweets or colors stol'n from thee ; 

Yet though 'tis Winter, thou away. 
Still there thy shadows make it May, 

Oh ! sweet Anne Page ! 



201 



Comin throi' the Rye. 

A. CELEBRATED SCOTCH 80N0, SUNO BY MISS STEPHENS. 



Andante. 
8vo 



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Gin a bo - dy meet a bo - dy Comin thro' the rye. 



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Gin a bo-dy kiss a bo-dy. Need a bo - dy cry. 



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U - ka bo - dy has a bo-dy. Ne'er a ane hae 

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I, But a' the lads they lo'e me weel,- ~A"nd 

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Gin a body meet a body 
Comin frae the well ; 

Gin a body kiss a body, 
Need a body tell. 

Ilka bodv, &c. 



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Gin a body meet a body 

Comin frae the town.. 
Gin a body kiss a body. 

Need a body gloom. 
Ilka Jeimy has her Jocky, 

Ne'er a ane hae I ; 
But a' the lads they lo'e me weel. 

And what the war' am I. 



i 






204 



Allegretto. 
8vo 



Oh ! when in Days that are yet to rise. 

THE WORDS WRIITEN BY MISS M. LEJMAN REDE. 

[Air— T&c Legacy, a 

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moonlit sea. And gaze as now on the star-ry skies, WilJ 






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oilier tVieiuls and ties far stronger. May liap-pi - ly light my 



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steps to fame 



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Oh ! yes 1 know thougli far I sover. 

Without the hope that was once my own. 
Thy heart cannot resign for ever 

The thoughts of bright days too fleetly flown. 
And thou wilt wish where'er I wander, 

That Heaven's kind care my path may keep, 
And shed a tear of pity — fonder 

Than happier days e'er saw thee weep. 

And when my weary exile's o'er. 

And time shall bring the wanderer home. 
To tread again the native shore. 

From which and tliee 'twas death to roam, 
Although forgot by all who may linger, 

As kindnnl or friends, to my cold view, -"^ 

Love, early love, with unerring finger, 

I feel will point me out to you. 



1 



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207 



O this is no my ain Lassie, 

A FAVORITE SCOTCH SONG. 
TllF. WORDS WRITTEN BY ROBERT BURNS 



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Allfsreito. 






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O this is no my ain las-sie. Fair the' the lassie be, O 



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weel ken I my ain las-sie, Kind love is in her e'e. 






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wants to me the witching grace,The kind love that's in her e'e. 

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O this is no my ain lassie. 

Fair though the lassie be, 
Weel ken I my ain lassie. 

Kind love is in her e'e. 
She's bonny, blooming, straight, and tall. 

And lang has had my heart in thrall. 
And aye it charms my very saul. 

The kind love that's in her e'e. 



^~fc^ 



O this is no, &c. 

A thief sae pawky is my Jean, 

To steal a blink by a' unseenj^ 
But gleg as light are lover's e'en. 

When kind love is in the e'e. 



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O this is no, &c. 

It may escape the courtly sparks. 

It may escape the learned clerksi. „ 
But weel the watching lover marks "^"^ 

The kind love that's in her e*e. 



-:±i:5r.ir^i 



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M»*' . mmn ^Mut- I. 



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The Day returns when first we met. ^ /? „ 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY IMns. CORNWELL BARON WILSON. 

ISulyect from VlOTTI. 




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The day re - turps when first we met, 

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seems but now, but now a love 



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dream. The sun which cheer'd me then has 




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beam, The sun which cheer*d me then 



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set. Nor left be - hind one sooth-ing beam. Nor 



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The day returns, — in gayest pride 

Glad Nature hails young Summer's reign ; 

And I must try in smiles to hide 

The grief that rends my heart in twain. , 



1=-- 



The day returns, but still I mourn. 
The hopes that bloom for me no more ; 

The peace that from my breast is torn. 
The joys of youth so quickly o'er ! 

The day returns, — to me in vain. 
It cannot give this bosom rest; 
But only brings redoubled pain, 
Jo know, I can notmore be blest ! 




r- 3— 



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215 




r^- — 



Love in thine Eyes. 



A FAVORITE CANZONET FOR TWO VOICES. 
Allegio. W. Jackson. 



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He in thy snow - y bo - som strays. He makes thy 



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216 



ro - sy lips his care. And walks the ma - zes 



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of thy hair, Love dwells in ev - ry out-ward 



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of thy hair. Love dwells in ev - ry out-ward \ 



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ne - ver, ne-ver, touch'd thy heart. 

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ami grief, 






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deep with -in my glow - ing soul He reigns, and 






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rules with - out con-troul, He rules, he 



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rules with - out con-troul. He niles, he 




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troul, with - out con - troul. 



222 



Oh ! could I bid the Days return. 

THE WORDS WRrn'EN BY MISS MARY LEMAJV REDE. 
Allegretto. [Am— When frtt I nut I li<r. 




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could I bid the days re-turn. That once with joys were 



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glowing. Ere first from Sor-row's e - bon urn. The 

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va-ried light of plea-sures pure and ma - ny. But 

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one to make my pathway bright/Twould be the smile ol 



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meet it while My eyes are clos'd in slum - ber. 




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'Tis ever thus, in vain, we view 

The hope we nourish'd blossom. 
When bright in bloom, and bath'd in dew. 

It fades upon the bosom. 
Oh, Fanny ! thy fond smiles of bliss. 

Thy tears of tender sweetness, 
Beam'd all too bright for me to guess. 
That such would be their fleetness. 
At morn those smiles were mine. 
In light and love unclouded ; 
, At eve that form divine. 

In death was darkly shrouded. 

But, like the sun, in that pure clime. 

Where night is daylight mellow' d. 

Beneath the holy touch of time, — 

Thy loss has long been hallow'd j 

And now beyond the bliss most bright, 

If earth for me has any, 
I prize the pure and calm delight 
Of thinking of my Fanny. 
My vesper star ! my love ! 

My soul to thee was given ; 
Oh ! plead for it above. 
And summon it to Heaven 



226 



NO. aCFSI. 



Tlie Rose that you gave me has wither d away. 

THE WORDS WRIITEN BY MISS MARY LEMAN REDE. 



[Air — Farewell ! but whenever. 




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The rose that you gave me has wither'd a-way. Yet how 



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sweet-ly it breathes in the midst of de - cay, Tho' its 







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blush-es are gone, it is dear-er to me. Than the 



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brightest that blow on their own na-tive tree. I 




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tiea-sure its frag-ments, Tho' some-times a sigh Will 

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scat-tor their sweets as they faint - ly breathe by. For they 



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whis-per that all that is dear and di-vine. Like their 



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fu - gi - tive beauties, but rise to de-cline. 

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That life, like a rainbow, first gives to our view 
-Existence, imbued with each soft tinted hue ; 
Bnt they fade one by one, till the last glow has sank, 
And our hearts become cold, and existence a blank. 
Oh ! long before that may I sink to repose. 
Nor linger to see the last beam o'er me close. 
To be left a lorn mark on the desolate scene. 
That merely points out where the waters have been. ' 

j 

They'll have ebb'd far away, and their bright tide no more : 

Will revisit the vej-dure that fades on the shore ; 

The pale flowers perish, the last of their kind. 

And leave not a wreck of their beauty behind. 

Oh ! no, ere existence has quite lost its spring. 

And my spirit yet rises on hope's bouyant wing. 

May I fade from the sunshine, and leave a fond ray 

To vkit the grave, where I sink to decay. 



230 



If those who live in Shepherd's BowW, 

TIIE WORDS WRITTEN BY THOMSON. 
Allegrftto. 




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If those who live in shepherd's bow'r. Press 




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231 



not the rich and state - ly bed ; The new mown hay and 




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breathing flow'r, A soft - er couch beneath them spread. If 

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those who sit at shepherd's board^Soothe not their taste by 



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232 



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take it with a cheer-fui heart. 



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.. .. rff Ikoge who drain the shepherd's bowJ, 
^ ; ."Np high and sparkling wines can boast j 

'--:^ With wholesome cups they cheer the soul. 
And crown them with the village toast. 
If those who join in shepherd's sport, 
- n. -(Jay dancing on the dasied ground. 

Have not the splendor of a court. 
Yet love adorns the merry round. 



23S 



No. xvmi* 



Breathe not again that dreadful Sound. 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY MISS MARY LEMAN REDB. 



Aff< tuiigo. 



[Air — Whena''er I see those smiling eyet. 



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lip so late - ly fell. Which *^«n my ear with 






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nor - ror heard. It woke likt dy - ing pas - sion's 



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knell! Chase not. the dear de - lu - sive dream, Which now has 



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luU'd my heart so long. Let not thy harp Ibr-sake the 




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theme. In which it breath'd the soul of song. 




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iStill smile, my love, as when the dream 

Of passion woke that sunny ray. 
Which melted like the western beam, 

When daylight fades in dew away ; 
Let my adoring eyes perceive 

The smiles you gave, when love was young ; 
Still let thy playful fancy weave 

The tale on which, entranc'd, I've hung. 

Tell me you love, and let me see 

The truth in thy dissolving glance ; 
Turn, turn, that languid eye to me. 

And let its light my soul entrance ; 
But if that bliss you now refuse. 

And love no more can wake those charms, 
Oh ! take me then, and let me lose 

Existence in thy faithless arms. 



236 



The halmy Odours of the Mom. 

THE BRIDESMAID'S SONG and CHORUS fuom WEBER'S OPERA OF 
Dbr Frieschutz. 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY MISS MARY LEMAN REDE. 

Andcmt'mo. 






g^ife 



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^ L-J i 1 M in ill ^1 Y- < -1 f 1- ■ 



287 



totil y^^ *^® morn al - rea - dy breathe a - long the grove, And 




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on the hill the ro - sy dawn Looks radiant as the 



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blush of love. Balm - y mom and beam - - y 



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238 




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skies. Say, why art thou dear ? Say, why art thou 



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dear. 'Tis that love in El - - la's eyes A- 



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*ris that love. in_ £1 

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wait me fond-ly here, A-wait me fond - ly here. 



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wait me fond-ly here, A-wait me fond - ly here. 

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Ah ! see she rises to my view. 

Like new-bom light from clouds she springs ; 
Did love e'er lie in eyes more blue 1 

Her form but wants an angel's wings. 
Sister seraphs well might steal 

To view her from on high. 
And deem she hid them, to conc« 
*^ She'd wander'd from the sky. 



240 



NU. XIX. 



Oh! Love is just like Gaminq, 
.:r^~jj;*?JHE WORDS wRirniN by mss mary leman rede. 

Allegretto. [Air — To Ladiea' Eyes. 

-3- 9-r-M — a- W — W 



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Oh ? love is just like gam-ing. The world the pack, the 



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241 



world tlie pack, The human mind in - flara-ing, With tort'ring 






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rack, with tort'ring rack, Some hearts, like dice too tru-ly. On 



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cool-y, And won by tricks, and won by tricks, Oh! love is 

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just like gaming, The world the pack, the world the pack, The 



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243 




^^it \-WlM 



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The men, oh ! who will doubt it. 

Are oft the knaves, are oft the knaves ; 
But when we set about it. 

We make them slaves, we make them slaves ; 
But some are so unruly. 

They will he kings, they will be kings. 
And king of clubs too truly, 

And such like things, and such like things. 



The ladies all to Hymen's 

Bright altars crowd, bright altars crowd. 
Some to be queen of diamonds. 

It is allow'd, it is allow'd ; 
But such soon change their billing, 

And call in aids, and call in aids, 
And while their spouses killing. 

Prove queen of spades, prove queen of spade*. 



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Cut those who prize the winning 

Of real bliss, of real bliss. 
Despise such sordid sinning, 

As much amiss, as much amiss, 
And seek those honT)rs solely, . ^iL-J- 

That love imparts, that love imparts 
Ambitious to be wholly 

The queen of heartSf the queen of hearts. 



241 



Waters of Elle. 

THE WORDS FROM GLENARVON, adapted to a FRENCH AIR. 

Affttuoso. 



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Elle, thy lim-pid streams are flow-ing. Smooth and un- 



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trou-bled o'er the flow'ry vale. 



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On • thy green banks once 



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more the wild rose blowing, Greets the young Spring,and 




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246 



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scents the passing gale. Greets the young Spring, and 



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scents the pass-ing gale. 



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Here 't%vas at eve, near yonder tree reposing 

One, still too dear, first breath'd his vows to thee ; 

" Wear this," he cried, his guileful love disclosing, 
" Near to thy heart, in memory of me." 

Love's cherish'd gift, the rose he gave, is faded ; 

Love's blighted flow'r, can never bloom again. 
Weep for thy fault, in heart and mind degraded, 

Weep, if thy tears can wash away the stMn., 



247 



O what ye wha that lo'es me. 

A FAVORITE SCOTCH BONO. 
THE WORDS WRnTEN BY ROBERT BURNS. 



Andante con Eipreuione, 

b N- 



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248 






keep-ing, O sweet is she that lo'es me, As 



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dews of Sum-mer weep-ing. In tears the rose-buds 



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steep-ing, O that's the las - sie o' my heart, My j 



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wo - man kind, And ne'er a ane to peer her. 






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2oO 

If thou shalt meet a lassie 

In grace and beauty charming. 

That e'en thy chosen lassie. 

Ere while thy breast sae warming. 
Had ne'er sic powers alarming, 

O that's the lassie o' my heart, 
My lassie ever dearer ; 

O that's the queen of woman kind 
And ne'er a ane to peer her. 



If thou hadst heard her talking, j 

And thy attention's plighted. 
That ilka body talking. 

But her, by thee is slighted. 

And thou art all delighted, 
O that's the lassie o' my heart. 

My lassie ever dearer ; 
O that's the queen o' woman kind. 

And ne'er a ane to peer her. 



If thou hast met this fair one. 
When frae her thou hast parted. 

If every other fair one, 

But her, thou hast deserted. 
And thou art broken hearted : 

O that's the lassie o' my heart, 
My lassie ever dearer ; 

O that's the queen of woman kind, 
And n<^er a ane to peer her. 



251 



When fore' d from dear Hehe to go. 

THE WORDS FROM SHENTONE'S PASTORALS. 
Andante con Espretsione. [Dr. Arnc 



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forc'd from ccar He - be to go, What an - guish I 



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felt at my heart, And I thought, but it might not be 



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so, She was sor - ry to see me de - part. She cast such a 



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cern, So sweet - ly she bade me a - dieu, 

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thought that she bade me re - turn, I thought that she 



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I thought she might like to retire 

To the grove I had laboured to rear i'^' 

For whatever I heard her admire, 

I hastened and planted it there. ' 

Her voice such a pleasure conveys, 

So much I her accents adore, 

Let her speak, and whatever she says, 

I'm sure still to love her the more. 



And now, ere I haste to the plain. 
Come, shepherds, and talk of her ways ; 
I could lay down my life for the swain, 
That would sing me a song in her praise. 
While he sings, may the maids of the town 
Come flocking, and listen awhile ; 

Nor on him let Hebe once frown; .- — — 

But I cannot allow her to smile. '* 

To see, when my charmer goes by. 
Some Hermit peep out of his cell ; 
How he thinks of his youth with a sigh. 
How fondly he wishes her well. 
On him she may smile if she please, 
'Twill warm the cold bosom of age ; 
But cease, gentle Hebe, oh ! cease, 
Such softness will ruin the sage. 



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I've stole from no flow'rets that grow 
To paint the dear charms I approve ; 
For what can a blossom bestow. 
So sweet, so delightful as love. 
I sing in a rustical way, 
A shepherd, and one of the throng ; 
Yet Hebe approves of my lay ; — 
Go, Poets, and envy my song. 



k 



255 

Jock o* Hazeldean. 

A CELEBRATED SCOTCH BONO, 8UNO BY MISS PATON. 
THE WORDS WRITTEN BY SIR WALTER SCOTT. 



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Why weep ye by the tide, la-dy ? Why weep ye by the 




tide ? I'll wed ye to my youngest son. And ye sail 

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he his bride ; And ye sail be his bride, la - dy, Sae 




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come-ly to be seen; But aye she loot the tears down 



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fa', For Jock o' Ha - zel-dean. 



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Now let this wilful grief be done. 

And dry that cheek so pale. 
Young Frank is chief of Errington, 

And lord of Langley dale. 
His step is first in peaceful ha*, — J—* 

His sword in battle keen ; 
But aye she loot, &c. 

•* O' chain o' gold ye shall not lack. 

Nor braid to bind your hair. 
Nor mettled hound, nor managed hawk. 

Nor pal fry fresh and fair; 
And you, the foremost of them a*, 

Shall ride our forest queen." 
But aye she loot, &c. 

The kirk was deck'd at morning tide. 

The taper glimmer *d fair. 
The priest and bridegroom wait the bride. 

And dame and knight are there. 
They sought her both by bower and ha' 

The lady was not seen : 
She's o'er the border, and awa* 

Wi' Jock o' Hazeldean. 



258 



Tsro. XX. 



Sunshine on thy Pathway. 



THE WORDS WRITIEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 



Andanit 



[AiB — Tho' the last glimpse of Erin, 




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Sunshine on thy pathway, My t - 



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bon-eyed Jane, Wher - e • ver you wan-der O'er 




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rent that wafts thee from me, And soft blow the 
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breez-es When thou'rt on the sea 



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Lightly, dear maiden, 

Thy bosom may prize 
The vows of my breathing. 

The glance of mine eyes. 
T-ightly thy heart may 

Bound gaih and free. 
Whilst mine must, uneasy. 

Ache sadly for thee. 



Yet blessings upon thee. 

My light-footed fair, 
Tho' for me or my fate 

You confess not a care. 
The star that in yonder 

Bright heaven I see. 
Is as lov'd of my soul 

The' it beam not for me. 



261 



No. XXi, 



\-~3U:^fetto. 



Hush'd be Sorrow* s Sigh. 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 

[Aia — Nordh Crthta. 



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Hush'd be Bor-row's sigh to night. Let no tear of 



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grief be start - ing ; Joy a - lone shall lend her light, And 



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bless the mo-ment of our part-ing. To so - li - tude be- 



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queath the sigh. For mem'ry's thrilling thoughts to sleep in,To 



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night we meet, then why, oh ! why. Dim an hour of 



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bliss with weep - ing. Waves will roll beneath us soon, 



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Moms will rise, and we shall greet not; Reserve your tears till 



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eve has flown, And let us weep, love, when we meet not. 






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Come, take the cup ; our only tears 
J Must be the ruby tears of pleasure ; 

J 7 These few last moments are as years, 

We cannot lose in woe the treasure. 
Now let every thought of bliss. 

Here in rich communion meet, love ; 
jEZ^irXir" Perchance we take a last, long kiss; 
^ Oh ! let that dear, last kiss be sweet, love. 

"* Waves will roll, &c. 

Oh ! let our parting hour be such 
T ' Z "7 " "'"". ^ brilliant moment of delight, love. 
That rapture could not add a touch 

Of joy, to make the hour more bright, love; 
That when afar, we dream again 
On pleasure fled, or bliss departed, 
-'T'-'r — i -One ^em shall light the page of pain, 
■Remembrance of the eve we parted. 
Waves shall roll, &c. 



n' 



265 



Some Fairy Spell around me plays, 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY Mks. CORNWELL BARON WILSON. 
Andante Esyreasito. [Scotch Melody, i 



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spell a-round me plays. Whene'er I hear that tone ; 



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To me it speaks of o-ther days, And joys for 



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e - ver flown; The hearts that felt it 




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lips which breath'd that strain of old, Shall ne'er re- 

Jl * 51 — ■ "^"n-HV 





How sweetly at this silent hour. 

It floats upon the wind ; 
Now melody has double power, 

To soothe the pensive mind ; 
And while I hear that well-known strain. 

By minstrel fingers play'd, 
I live o'er happier hours again. 

And present sorrows fade. 

Then, oh ! repeat that soothing lay. 

*Tis like some magic charm 
That's plac'd by Hope in life's bleak way. 

To keep the bosom warm ; 
And as the wand'rer of the night 

Hails morning's welcome beam. 
So memory meets the lovely light. 

That cheer'd life's early dream. 



268 



Jn Infancy our Hopes and Fears. 



Andante. 




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269 



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in-fan-cy our 


lopes and fears were to eac 

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known. And friend - ship in our ri - per years has 



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twin'd our hearts m 


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twin'd our hearts in one. 



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clear him then from this of - fence. Thy love thy 
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(111 - ty prove ; Re-store him with that innocence which 



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first in - spir'd my love 



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first - - in - spir'd my love. 



love. 



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271 



O my Lovers like the red red Rose. 

A CELEBRATED SCOTCH SONG, SONG BY MR. SINCLAIR 
Andamtino. 




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O MY love's like the red red rose that's 




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newly sprung in June, O my love's like the me-lo-die, that's 

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sweetly play'd in tune. As fair art thou, my bonny lass, So 



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deep in love am I, And I will love thee still my dear, till 



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a' the seas gang dry. Till a the seas gang dry, my dear, till 




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273 



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a the seas gang dry, O I will love thee still, my dear, till 



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a' the seas gang dry. 







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Till a' tlie seas gang dry, my dear. 

And the rocks melt with the sun, 
I will love thee still my dear. 

While the sands of life shall run. 
Then fare thee well, my only love, 

O fare thee well awhile. 
And I will come again, my love. 

The' 'twere ten thousand mile. 
Tho' 'twere ten, &c. 



274 



O what a charming Fellow, 

SUNG BY MRS. HUMBY, IN THE AGREEABLE SURPRIZX. 




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mam or dad, Why let them scold and hel - low , For 




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while I live, I'll love my lad. He's such a charming 



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lel - low. The last fair day, on you-der green, The 



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276 



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youth he danc'd so well, O ! So spruce a lad was 




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■'•■ — 1- ■ ■ •-■ -■ s - " ■ 



The fair was over, night was come, 

The lad was somewhat mellow ; 
Says he, " My dear, I'll see you home j" 

I thank'd the charming fellow. 
We trudg'd along, the moon shone bright, 

Says he, " My sweetest Nello, 
I'll kiss you here, by this good light." 

O ! what a charming fellow. 

" You rogue," says I, " you've stopp'd my breathj 

Ye bells ring out my knell, O !" 
Again I'd die so sweet a death, 

With such a charming fellow. 
The last four liues are to be sung to the second part of the tone* 



277 



Smile on, for thy young Day is dawning. 

THE WORDS WRITTEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 
Allegretto. [Ai« — Siitg", ting. 




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world beams for thee in its bright-est of hours ; 




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rap - ture bursts forth, like the sun up - on flow-ers- 



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Bright as the sky is thine eye's brilliant beam-ins^. 



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Light bounds your heart as the roe on the moun-tain 

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Calm flow your thoughts as the Sum-mer lake stream - ing 



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Sparkling in joy, like the spray of the fountain. Smile on, soon 







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time will a - wak - en Thy bo-som from peace to o'er- 



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whelm it in sadness; Thou'lt rise a-Ione and forsaken. To 



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281 



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feel tlie world's tem-pest, its wrath and its madness. 



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Young dreams, like the bright lotos* growing, ' 

Arise from the stream, when the sun kisses ocean, 
Bud in his beams, , whilst the waters are glowing. 

All warm with his smiles in their tremulous motion. 
As the cold eve draws in darkness around it. 

The flow'rs of the earth from the sunbeam must sever, 
The lotos awakes from the bright spell that bound it, 

And vanishes 'neath the dark waters for ever. 
Smile on, for thy young day is dawning. 

Bask while you may in joy's roseate light ; 
Too soon you'll relinquish your morning, 

And sink in the cares of the world's gloomy night. 

"j 

• Aa Egyptian flower, that rises above the stream at sunrise, and sinks at 
sunset. 



282 



Our Thoughts are still at Home. 

FROM WIT<T£r's OPERA OF THE ORACLE, ARRANGED AS 
A DUETT. 
THE WORDS WRITl^N BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 



AlUgretto. 




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cross the boundless wa - ter, The barks of bat - tie 



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ride, They sweep to war and slaughter O'er the deep Mue 



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tide, Yet leave one sigh for home. Yet leave one sigh for 



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'Mid foreign splendor glowing, When far the wand'rer 




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flies, When far the Mand'rer flies. When far the wand'rer 



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''^ "its more humble home, For its more hum-ble home. The 



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^ ^- -its more humble home. For its more humble home. 




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286 




rear that wreath at home, Would rear that wreath at 




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home. The hunter on the mountain, The lo-ver in his 



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bow'r, The fish - er at the fountain. In Summer's twilight 
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hour, Dreams of his na - tive home,dreams oi" his na - live 



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sigh, For dearer smiles at home, For dear-er smiles at 






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mirth, In all our hours of mirth. In all our hours of 




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mirth. Thro' pleasures or dis-tress-es, Wher'er we pace o'er 






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home. Our thoughts are still at home. 






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290 
TSfo, XXMH, 



Tli£ Bark is on the swelling Wove. 

THE WORDS WRirrEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 
Allegretto. [Aip, — St. Senanua nnd the Lady, f 




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on the swelling shore, 'Mid tempests' roar, and torrents* 




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rage, And on the deck the lov-ers stand, To-ge-ther 



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In Italy's bright land of flowers. 

They spent their young and ardent hours. 

An instant ! and their tomb will be 

Beneath the dark, blue sea. 
But the worst horrors death can bring, 
"Will only make them closer cling. 

'Tis past ! the welt'ring waves now clasp 
That fated vessel in their grasp, 
'Mid human misery's piercing cry, 

Their lips gave one fond sigh ; 
And form in form entwin'd, they sleep 
In the blue bosom of the deep. 



/ 



«99 



The Woodman. 

A FAVORITE SONG, COMPOSED BY MR. LIN LEY. 

Moderato. 



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Stay, tra-vel - ler, tar - ry here to-night ; 



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too with - drawn her light, And gone to sleep be-hind a 

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cloud. 'Tis seven long miles a-cross the moor, And should you 






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Kate, Our meal prepare, This stranger shall par-take our 

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best, A cake and rash-er be his fare, With ale that 



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makes the wea-ry blest. Approach the hearth there take a 



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place, And till the hour of rest draws nigh. Of Robin Hood and 



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Che-vy Chase, We'll sing, then to our pal-lets hie. 



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UiJtise you well, 'Tis lit - tie I have got to boast; 



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Yet should you of this cottage tell. Say Hal the woodman. 




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was your host. Say Hal the woodman, was your host. 



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The hardy Sailor braves the Ocean. 

A FAVORITE SONG, SUNG BY MR. BRAHAM, IN THE CASTLE 

OF ANDALUSIA. 
Grazioso. 




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The har-dy sailor braves the o-cean fearless 



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of the roar-ing wind ; Yet his heart with soft e- 

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mp-tion, throbs to leave his love be-hind, throbs, 







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throbs, throbs, throbs. Yet his heart with soft e- 






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* V* mo - tion throbs to leave his love be - hind - - to 



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leave to leave his love be - hind. 






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To dread of foreign foes a stranger,Tho'the youth may 






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dauntless roam, A - Jarra-ing fears paint ev'-ry dan - ger 



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ev'-ry dan-ger in a ri - val left be - hind 






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303 



The Exile's Return. 

THE WORDS WRrrXEN BY MISS A. M. PORTER. 
Eapretsico. 




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woods of green E - rin, sweet, sweet was the breeze That 






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rtis-tled long since thro' your wide-spreading trees. And 



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sweet was the flow of your wa - ters to hear, And 



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precious the ca-bin, the hoiue of my dear. 



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For then thro* your groves, by your waters I walk'd. 
And with Norah of love and of happiness talk'd, 
Willie calm as the moonlight that silver'd your charms. 
My child, softly sleeping, lay press'd in her arms. 



But now that I visit thee Erin again, 
Tho' years have pass'd o*er me, they've pass'd me in vain ; 
Thy woods, and thy lakes, and thy mountains, no more 
Can renew such fond thrills as they kindled before. 

Still green are thy mountains, still green are thy groves. 
Still tranquil the water my sad spirit loves ; 
But dark is my home, and wild, wild its trees wave. 
For my wife and my baby are dust in the grave ! 



306 



O sweet is the Hour. 



t ■ ■■;, 



TII£ WORDS WRnTEN BY D. L, RICHARDSON Esq. 
Affctuoao. ISpanish Melody. 




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iveet is the hour. When low in the west, The 



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Bun gilds the bower, Where fond lovers rest. 

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gor-geous-ly bright, Be-neath the" blue stream, In 
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garments of light De-parts like a dream. Oh ! 



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sweet is the hour. When low in the west, 



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sun gilds the bawer. Where fond lo-vers rest. 



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O sweet and serene the spell that beguiles. 
When Night's sable queen more tenderly smiles : 
The boldest are coy — the wildest are grave — 
The Bftd feel a joy loud mirth never gave ! 
O ! sweet is, &c. 

The spirits of love, to hallow the time, 
From regions above, pour music sublime ; — 
Their harmonies cheer the dull gloom of night, 
Aud wake the sweet tear of voiceless delight. 



309 



The Voice of Love, 

TH£ WORDS WRTITEN BY D. L. RICHARDSON Esq. 



Andante Eipressivo. 

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Oh ! if there is a ma-gic charm in this Jow val-ley 



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drear, To cheer Uie pilgrim's wea-ry way, the darken'd 



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soul to cheer; It is the soothing voice of love that 



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echoes o*er the mind. Like mu - sic on a twilight 



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lake, or bells up-on the wind. 






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Oh ! dull would be the rugged road, and sad the wand'rer's 



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heart. Should that ce - les - tial har-mony from life's dark 



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sphere de-part ; Oh ! how for that far distant land would 



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love, would be the place of rest. 




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Says Plato f why should Man be vain ? 



Moilerato. 



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315 






of a crown. Give health, or ease the brow of care. 






The sceptei'd king, the burthen'd slave. 

The humble, and the haughty, die ; 
The rich, the poor, the base, the brave, 

In dust, without distinction, lie ! 
Go, search the tombs where monarchs rest. 

Who once the greatest titles bore : 
The wealth and glory they possessed. 

And all their honors, are no more. 

So glides the meteor through the sky. 

And spreads along a gilded train ; 
1 But, when its short-liv'd beauties die, 

Dissolves to common air again. 
So 'tis with us, my jovial souls ; — 

Let friendship reign while here we stay ; 
Lets crown our joys with flowing bowls, — 

When Jove us calls, we must away. 



31(J 



Come if you Dare. 



BUNO BY MR. THORNE, IN THE REVIVED OPERA OP ARTHUR 
AND EMMELINE. 



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Triumphant with spoils of our vanquish'd invaders. 



These lines are sung to the second part of the air — " Now they charge,' &e 
and repeated in chorus. 



321 



No. XXl^. 



Whilst thouWt hy my side, 

THE WORDS WRTITEN BY WILLIAM LEMAN REDE. 



Allegretto. 



[Aim — Dear Harp of my Countrtf. 




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If I joy in thy blisses 

When rapture's tide flows. 
If dear are thy kisses. 

More dear are thy woes. 
The ill that hefalls thee. 

May call up a tear ; 
Yet the woe that enthrals thee, 

But makes thee more dear. 

When danger annoys thee, 

I sorrow with you ; 
In the storm that destroys thee, 

I perish, love, too. 
Come want, woe, and sorrow. 

Thy cares I'll divide, 
Nor fear the worst morrow. 

Whilst thou'rf by my side. 



8-25 



Come Love to me. 

THE WORDS WRITIEN BY L. Z. 



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The moon- queen gently sports her ray 

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The Zephyrs kiss, in sportive play. 

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Will droop and die ; — alas ! 
My love for thee aye fresh shall be. 

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I've wander'd, sweet, I've wander'd far. 

To sing my faithful love. 



328 



If o'er the cruel Tyrant Love, 



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341 



INDEX. 



Obserrations on Music •• • • •• •• •• w 

Solfeggio • •• •• >• •• •• •• •• tH 

Exerci8€ on thirds • •• •• •• •• •• ix 

£xercise on fourths •• •• •• •• •• xi 

Exercise on fifths .' • . . . xii 

Major, or whole-tone shake • •• •• •• •• «. •• xTiii 

Minor, or half-tone shake xviii 

The turn • •• xix 

Style xxl 

Accompaniment* •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •* .. xxTt 



AH the b]ue bonnets • 13 

Alva . a i. •• .. 115 

All Venice looked gay at the bridal •• •• f« •• .. 148^ 

Blow, blow, thou winter's wind *'^i't,* '^'i. 188 

Breathe not again that dreadful sound 233 

Could the voice that I loved •• '•'• '»'• 66 

Comin thro' the Rye •• .«'•''»« '"'•'>''_ »« ;.;;•"" ' *• '""»« 201 

Come, if you dare • *'• *.'• '*'" ii .V*'';^'." •.':.. 316 

Come, love, to me ' •• • %'^ i.' «. 325 

Pair Clora •♦ *^; .;•• »• 96 

Forgive the muse that slumbered •• •• 141 

Farewell, thou stream that winding Bows 185 



/ 



342 

Gentle youth, ah! tell me why •• •• •• •••» •• 45 

Green grow the rashes, 01 •• • • •• •• 100 

Heroes, when with glory burning* • •• •• • 56 

Haric! I hear the ocean's 'whelming sweep • • •• •• •• 63 

Helen 80 

Had I a cave •• •• •• 155 

Hushed be sorrow's sigh .... .. .. 261 



In griefs and in dangers • 

I lore to catch thy radiant smile > . 
If those who live in shepherd's bower 
In infancy our hopes and fears • • 
If o'er the cruel yrant Love • • 
John Anderson, my jo, John • • 
Jock o* Hazeldean »* »» *r svr^ 

i/x : •' »• 

Let me wander not unseen • • • • 

Let us haste to Kelvin grove • • »• 

Last May, a braw wooer 

Love in thine eyes • • • • • • • • 



No flower that blows •• •• •• •• '•*• •• •• .. 76 

No more shall I seek in the red field of danger 166 

O! come to the tomb •• •• •• «« • •• 92 

Oh! nevermore .... •• •• vc^ ^^. .. i. .. 103 

Oh! who has seen the miller's wife •• •• v!»'5(fi*5,. *• ^^^ 

O! Logic o' Buchan Hft*^ i?*!»! W5 

On the dark lonely strand ••.•• (•• 182 

Oh ! when in days that are yet to rise • • « • 204 

Oh! this is no my ain lassie ^*» «• «• '« •• •• 207 

Oh! could I bid the days returrf v^''««ta WD gWifn.vf^ •vi SfilS 

01! love is just like gaming - «*^ W' awi.'ifco- rf* .liftr 9M 



843 

Oh ! what ye wha that lo'es me • • • • . . 247 

O ! my luve*s like the red, red rose * -'♦iV "V. 271 

O! what a charming fellow ». .. 274 

y Our thoughts are still at home •• .. .. •i-w* ,, 282 

! sweet is the hour •• ..^'.w V»' .. 306 

am in hopes to get the better .. ,^,i, ,j,,., ^^ •» i»,.,,,^„, 4^ 

Sunshine on thy pathway .^...„. ^^ ,^» ^ ,„^ . 858 

Some fairy spell around me plays 265 

Smile on, for thy young day is dawiiing 277 

ISays Plato, why should man be vain . . .. *'\i'^''lk^"'V. 313 

Turn, Amui-illis 21 

Together let us range the fields 33 

The ix>se had been washed •• • 1S8 

The banks of the Yarrow * . . . . 144 

Though all may forget thee 151 

' The lover's lute 158 

Take, oh! take, those lips away *- 161 

The masquerade »• •• .. .. .. 191 

The day returns when first we met • 210 

The rose that you gave me •• •• •• 226 

The balmy odours of the mom 236 

The bark is on the swelling wave 290 

The woodman 293 

The hardy sailor braves the ocean • . • • 298 

The exile's return 303 

The voice of love 309 

The soldier tired 331 

Under the greenwood tree •• •• •• 84 

When my soul's delight 19 



344 



When time was entwining • • • • • • • • 

When the dove left the ark t • • 

We, who wandering Arabs are •• •• •* 

Where's the heart so cold 

With thee, fair summer's joy appears •• • • 

Waters of Elle • • • • 

When forced from dear Hebe to go "V^ ■'"^» 
Whilst thou 'rt by my side • • • • • •' '*'i»* 



51 

134 
176 
195 
198 
244 
251 
321 



• •■ • • 

Ye woods and ye mountains unknown •• „•,•,,- •* •• 

Ye streams, that round my prison creep .jj^;*^^^-*. •• "• 1^3 



69 



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^ .1. ;j sqil »«< 
FINIS. 



Ci-.'U 



• • - • iiiiiiinuuit ^>iJ i 

'fiAii loliius vb^cil •jiiV 
j)'jiij -loiJifoa oiil' 



Dean U Munday, Printeni, 
■nirpa<liieedlc-rtrcet 



University of California 

SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY 

405 Hiigard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1388 

Return this material to the library 

from which It was lK>rrowed. 



UC SOUTHERN REGONAI. UBRARY FACIUTY 

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