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Full text of "Beauty and the beast"

STRONG'S NEW NURSERY TiiI.ES, 



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.ENGRAVED & PUBLISHED BY T. W. STRUNG 9S NASSAU ST. N. Y. 



C031IC NURSERY TALES: 

A merchant once lost all his ships 
In many stormy ocean trips, 

And he had daughters three — 
But only one who did her duty, 
And she was call'd the Little Beauty, 

So beautiful was she ! 

This Merchant went abroad one day, 
And through the forest took his way, 

And wander'd on till night ; 
When lo ! unto his great surprise, 
There stood before his gazing eyes 

A palace passing bright. 

He enter'd at the gorgeous gate, 
Just as a traveller did of late, 

At Windsor, where our Queen 
Resides — that is, when she is there, 
And not in Scotland, or elsewhere, 

In Hyde Park, or the Green. 



The Lord of this most princely place 
Had something like a monkey's face, 

And feet like lion's claws ; 
As this strange looking Lord drew near, 
The Merchant's heart beat quick with fear, 

And surely it had cause! 

This Lord said to the Merchant, " Slave ! 
Your head, instead of mine, I'll have, 

And mine I'll give to thee ! 
But stay — you have a daughter famed, 
The Little Beauty she is named, 

Go, bid her call on me. 

" But mind you, Sir, before you stir, 
If she don't come, I'll go to her — 

And then your head shall fall 
From your two shoulders, sure as fate, 
And you shall have, instead, my pate, 

Or else have — none at all ! 

The strange Lord added with a smile, 

" I'll make it worth your daughter's while, 

As bride, my home to grace ; 
Happy and grand shall be her lot, 
For I've a kind heart, though I've got — 

A precious ugly face !" 



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Then quickly home the Merchant went, 
And Little Beauty did consent 

To wed this noble monkey; 
To save her father she complied, 
And as she had no horse to ride, 

She set out on a donkey. 

" On ! on ! go on ! my donkey dear!" 
Cried Beauty, between joy and fear, 

And gallopp'd through the wood ; 
She bounded over brier and brake, 
Till — all for her dear father's sake — 

She at the Palace stood, 

The Lord came forth and much admired, 
Young Beauty, all in white attired, 

And patted her fair cheek ; 
And when he said, " Love come this way," 
The Donkey ansvver'd with a bray, 

For Beauty could not speak. 

When she recovered her sweet voice, 
It made the monkey-man rejoice, 

So soft and sweet was it! 
But, beauteous maid, (said he) pray stop, 
Before you talk, and drink a drop, 

And likewise eat a bit." 



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The little Beauty straight did take 
A thumping piece of plummy cake, 

And then a glass of sherry ; 
The monkey-man then did the same — 
But he drank more than our young dame, 

And made himself quite merry. 

And then this wonderful man-monkey 
Went out of doors to see the donkey, 

Straying through the trees ; 
But soon he came in-doors again, 
And play'd sweet music — such a strain 

As did young Beauty please. 

He did not play Rory O'More, 

For that tune was not known of yore, 

Nor did he play Jim Crow ; 
The tune was not God Save the Queen — 
What could this charming tune have been ?- 

I really do not know! 

To charm her next he did not fail 
By reading out a fairy-tale 

Of some enchanted bower ; 
Then was young Beauty pleased indeed, 
To see a learned monkey read, 

And drink wine, for an hour ! 



He play'd on the piano-forte, 
And then he did the Lady court, 

Just like a gentle-man! 
" Beauty ! (said he) upon my life, 
You must to-morrow be my wife. 

And love me — if you can." 

Rather than he should grieve, she said, 
(So tender-hearted was the maid) 

She would become his bride ; 
On which the monkey jump'd for joy, 
And to his chaplain said, " My boy, 

Let Hymen's knot be tied !" 

A Fairy came and changed him, then, 
Into the handsomest of men, 

As he before had been ; 
Young Beauty, then, she did address 
And said she should be a princess, 

As grand as any queen ! 

"You loved him for himself (said he) 
When he a monkey seem'd to be, 

Although he was a prince ; 
A vile Enchanter changed his shape 
Into the figure of an ape, 

About a twelve-months since. 



" And he could not his shape recover, 
Till he became some lady's lover, 

And she loved him as-ain." — 
The Prince exclaim'd, "Love, thou art mine! 
And this fair palace shall be thine, 

With all it's broad domain!" 

The merchnt on the wedding-day, 
Did go and give that Bride away 

The Prince was glad to take ; 
And did not she wear fine array ! 
And did not they rare music play ! 

O yes — and no mistake ! 

They made the Palace all day long 
Resound with many a dance and song, 

Then lit it up at night ; 
But they with candles were contented, 
Because the gas was not invented, 

Yet they were very bright! 

But I almost forgot to say, 

That ere the Prince was changed, that day, 

Into his proper shape, 
His heart was filPd with such delight, 
That he got almost tipsey — quite ! — 

With strong juice of the grape ! 




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The Prince's servants, too, were glad, 
And in their hall rare pastimes had, 

And wore apparel fine ; 
A funny clown, in white and red, 
Sang merry songs upon his head, 

And drank a glass of wine ! 

And Little Beauty's donkey pranced 
For joy — and all the peasants danced 

At their good Prince's treat ; 
And of his Burgundy did drink so! 
And ate nice things ! — oh, I should think so ! 

All spicy things, and sweet ! 

But people cannot, though they're clever, 
Eat and drink and dance for ever — 

Nor are such things required; 
And so these people, great and small — 
Just like the people at Vaux-hall — 

Left off when they tired. 

1 can account no further give 
How long these merry folks did live, 

For really I don't know ; 
But they're all buried now, no doubt, 
And Little Beauty died about 

Five hundred years ago. 



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