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Full text of "Beck"

. 1 

B I 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 
Brigham Young University-Idaho 



http://archive.org/details/beck02maryannbeck 



I 




PROPERTY OF: 
DAVID O. McKAY LIBRARY 

BYU-IDAHO 
REXBURG ID 83460-0405 



DAVID O. MCKAY LIBRARY 



3 1404 00904 1036 



From Mary Ann Beck, Family Genealogist 

I have taken upon myself the pleasure and project of being the 
genealogist for my family. I have done research for my immediate 
family, my sister Rowena, and my first cousins. I have spent hours 
reading and searching newspapers and making phone calls to search 
out the information. Because of my disability, I then had a couple of 
friends do the typing for me. (It's hard for me to type.) They have 
typed the information from the various family lines onto a disc which 
I then sent to the International Genealogical Index in the Family 
History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, so that it will be preserved 
for generations and available on the internet. 

I researched all my mother and dad's first cousins, as much as I 
could find. I did their temple work. The majority were not members 
of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but some needed 
only to have some of their ordinance work finished. 

None of my cousins seemed to have an interest in doing genealogy 
work or hadn't the time to do it. I remembered what a teacher of 
mine, John L. Smith, told me years earlier in 1960 about doing 
genealogy work for the dead instead of spending money on flowers 
for the graves. I took his advice to heart and became interested in 
Genealogy. I guess that became one of my hobbies, along with read- 
ing, especially the daily newspapers, and doing needlepoint when I 
can find the time. 



iLtUL^Q^^ 1 ^- jys^ 



Mary Ann Beck 
1442 W 1000 South 
Rexburg, ID 83440 

Occupation: Telemarketer for the Jefferson Star, in Rigby, Idaho. 

Church: Stake Librarian and various other callings including presently being Visiting Teaching 
Leader 

Things of Interest: 

Since we last met, I took a wild flower class on August 5, 1989. I enjoyed the Wild 
Flower Field Trip to Teton Canyon Camp Ground which is on pass Driggs. We parked the cars 
and hiked up the South Teton Creek for three miles to the fork in the trail. One trail continues to 
Alaska Basin and Jenny Lake. 

We however, took the other turning and hiking the trail to the Devil's Staircase, a 
distance of 2.7 miles. I hiked a total of eight miles. The challenge came when I started climbing 
the Devil's Staircase. Climbing the mountain was steep and the footing was unsure; gravel and 
rocks were my enemies. If I took one step at time I could make it and I finally did. The higher 
we went the steeper it was. For me to reach the top of the mountain I had to stop and rest quite 
often. The teacher, Lorentz Pearson, lent me a hand, which was very helpful the last mile which 
seemed to never end. He helped me and guided me until I reach the top. It was a breath taking 
view of the valley. I felt I was on top of the world. I had conquered The Devil's Staircase. This 
to you, may not seem too impressive, but for me looking down from the 8,000 foot height I felt I 
had conquered something very tremendous. It gave me the confidence I need, to conquer, with 
God's help, the things that come my way. 

The Staircase was covered with Columbine, Green Gentian, Flax, Snow bush, Owl 
Clover and Louise wort. There was another quarter mile across Alpine Meadow to Little Lake. 
It was a beautiful lake of clear running water. I drank of the water and it tasted really good. The 
lake was formed from the melting snow. There were many lovely wild flowers there also 
growing all over the place. I liked walking though the beautiful flower garden. It was a lovely 
day. 

The big challenge was yet to come. I had to get over the mountain and back down. It 
was more tricky going down because your feet would not stop when you wanted them to stop. 
Thanks to the help of Brother Pearson again. I made it down the mountain safely. All of this 
was an enjoyable experience for a summer day. 

After this experience I felt so confident that I took another excursion hunting for 
mushrooms. We drove through Heise and on around through the back roads to Moody and on 
north some. We stopped now and then to find the mushrooms. We built a fire and fried some in 
butter and onions. They are delicious that way. It was a beautiful warm day. It was another fun 
and enjoyable accomplishment. 



My Personal History 

The life history of MARY ANN BECK 



BEGIN AT THE BEGINNING 

[, Man Ann Beck, was born of goodly parents in Rexburg, Idaho, on October 14, 1940, in 
the Sutherland Hospital. Dr. Sutherland delivered me by Cesarean section. For my angle 
mother, I was her first child. She had me when she was 39 years old. She had my sister Amelia 
at the age of 43. My parents were Otto G. Beck and Anna Marie (Mary) Weber. 

Uncle Henry Larsen and Aunt Amelia tells the story of the day I was born. They were 
quite interested when I was born as they didn't have any of their own children. They waited all 
day for my arrival. In the early evening Uncle Henry took a cow to the neighbors to sell. When 
he came back, my father had called to say that Mary Ann had arrived to her earthly home at 7:00 
p.m. My sister, Rowena, told me how Uncle Bill had made a bet with my father for a sack of 
potatoes that I would be a boy. Dad wanted a boy to carry on his name. But when my father saw 
me he was happy. He rejoiced over my safe arrival. He loved me and was happy to have another 
daughter. He gave me the nickname of Butch. He called me that all his life. I was his baby-girl. 
Father liked my blue eyes, blond hair and fair skin. Mother, was happy that I had arrived safely 
too. 

My birth was during the potatoes harvest. It was a cold, snowy day. Winter came early 
that year. It was the first snow. Dad was working out in the potato fields, so Rowena took 
Mother to the hospital. The weather was so bad that the potatoes froze in the ground. They did 
not get them out nor did they get the sugar beets out. This made my parents very humble. Arlo 
Frost told me that he worked with my father and was in the field with him the day of my birth. 

They named me after my mother and Aunt Anna, who had passed away when she was 
young about 19 years old. My Dad gave me the nickname of Butch. He had always wanted a son 
to carry on his name. When I was an infant, they fed me on the bottle. I learned to walk and 
eventually I got my first tooth. 

Something different about our family is that Father married sisters. His first wife was 
Molla. They had one child, Rowena. Molla passed away of a heart attack in September of 1938. 
At that time Rowena was 14 years old. About six months later Dad married Molla's sister Mary. 
And then I was born to Mary and Otto. This makes Rowena my half-sister and also my first 
cousin. 

About three years later Amelia was born. She is my full sister. She was born three 
months premature, on June 13, 1943, and passed away that same day. 

About the time I was old enough to sit in a highchair, my parents noticed that 1 was using 
mostly my left hand. It seemed my right hand had a birth defect. When I was about 12, after 
having several seizures, they took me to the doctor to be checked. The Doctor took an x-ray. It 
showed a scar on the left side of my brain. That meant I had a stroke during birth. The stroke 
damaged my right side. My right hand has only 50% use. My right leg is shorter. It slurred my 
speech some, and it is still hard to enunciating some words. 

My father always enjoyed the good things of life. He advised me to attend church and yet 
a good education. My mother remembered that I was shy and had my feeling hurt very easil) 



MY CHILDHOOD 

According to my family, I had an outgoing personality but as I grew, I soon became very 
shy and self conscious of my handicap. People would look and stare, which made me feel, they 
were talking behind my back. 

Many things happened to me when I was younger some were good and some not so good. 
I remember going on day -type outings with my Grandparents Weber to places like Lava Hot 
Springs and Green Canyon during the summers. 

When they took out my tonsils at the age of four, I remembered my Grandparent Weber 
being there waiting for me when I returned home. I enjoyed seeing them. This really made me 
happy. 

As a youth I was a tomboy. I liked going fishing with my father. I enjoyed helping him 
grease the pickup and other farm machinery. My father and I loved being together. We would 
also go to the movies about every week as a Daddy Daughter Date. This was the big highlight of 
the week for me. Dad liked cowboy shows but my mother did not care for them. So she stayed 
home. An interesting thing about my family is that my Mother, Father and I were all born in 
October. 

My father told me a story about when I was very young, how mother enjoyed playing with 
me by biting my fingers. So he would tell me to bit her back. 

We lived on a farm situated about one mile southwest of Rexburg, Idaho. I played house 
by myself and pretended to be the mother of a large family. I also, played with my cat and dog 
pretending that they were my children. Sometimes my cousin, Konra would come and play. We 
would make mud pies and pretended to be bakers. 

As for childhood diseases, I had the measles and chicken pox. 

Franklin D. Roosevelt was the 32nd President of the United States at the time of my birth. 
We were at war with Germany, World War II, which started in 1939. As I was born a year after 
the war started, I can remember my parents having and using the food and gas ration stamps. 

I remember that my sister, Rowena, worked in Salt Lake City, Utah. She would come 
home some weekends by train or bus. When she came by bus, they would let her off at the 
corner and I would run to the corner and walk back with her. I was always happy to see her 
again. 

SCHOOL DAYS 

When I began going to school it, was sad at first, then it became more fun, and enjoyable. 
The first grade is the year I will remember most. Being an only child, I did not want to leave my 
parents. I had not been around any other children except Sunday School and Primary. That was 
not enough to prepare me for school as the children teased me because of my handicap. 

Being very shy, I did not like this new situation. I started the first grade two different 
years. The first time, I was still five. When the teacher slapped a naughty child, it scared me. 
My mother had to really talk me into starting again the second year. She told me how great 
school really was and enrolled me anyway. 

The first day of school my teacher, Mrs. Hudson, gave me a seat across from a little girl 
who poked fun and teased until I was crying. That was the beginning of my mother going to 
school with me, which continued for weeks. Then one morning my mother drove me to school, 
told me she was going home, that I was to go to school alone. She then drove off, and left me 



standing there. So, I walked into the class room and sat on my little chair in the reading circle. 1 
remember my teacher's face. This really surprised her! With that all behind me I continued 
attending grade school and learning to love it. 

I started school at Washington School, in Rexburg at age five. Then restarted again in 
1948 and continued this time. I was changed to the Adams Elementary School for my fourth and 
fifth grade, I then returned to Washington for the sixth through eighth grade. I remember being 
afraid to start school and shy of the teacher and other students. As time progressed I overcame 
these feeling and learned to like school. Learning was something I soon began to love and was 
happy to be there. However, I still remember the little girl that teased and make fun of me 
because of my handicap. She was very ignorant toward me. 

When I was in the fourth grade, I had an operation on my right foot so I would walk 
straighter. As I remember, my foot hurt for about three months. They had a cast on my leg all 
the way to my hip for three months, then to my knee for an additional six months. It was hard 
learning to walk again. It felt weird. 

I remember participating in a school play during the fifth grade. I was one that helped 
dump the tea into the bay during the reproduction Boston Tea Party. The class I liked best was 
Health. The least favorite subject was arithmetic. I never understood it and had to have a tutor 
help me. My report cards would usually show that I was a cooperative and pleasant person. My 
favorite games at school were jacks and jump rope. My first grade teacher was Mrs. Hobson and 
my Aunt Amelia. Aunt Amelia was really my tutor. She helped me get through the fourth, fifth 
and sixth grades. She was a great teacher. 

In the sixth grade I liked my Art class the best. I had a good friend that help me in art. 
His name was Karen Keppner. Mr. Robert Pedersen and Victor Anderson are teachers I 
remember. I was a "C" student. I participated in Physical Education and Softball. One time Mr. 
Pedersen took the class outside to play ball. He played right with us. We were surprise but 
enjoyed him. Once we were going to give him a surprise party, however; he walked in right 
when we were preparing for it. So it was not a very good surprise. 



GROWING UP DURING TEENAGE YEARS 

I attended Madison High School in Rexburg, Idaho from 1955 to 1959. I remember Mr. 
Teuscher, and I especially remember Mrs. Bigler because of her greetings. She was the English 
teacher. She always had a big smile for everyone as they came to class. My report cards 
indicated I was a well behaved and a good student. I participated in softball. I graduated May 
1959. 

During these years, I learned to drive the truck and tractor for my Dad while he was 
putting up the hay. Driving was a skill that I have been glad I learned. I used it repeatedly. 

The Twist and Rock 'n Roll were the popular dances then. Elvis Presley was the big hit 
rock 'n roll singer and actor. My favorite song was, Love Me Tender by Pat Boone. My favorite 
movies were, Where the Boys Are and Summer Place . I had some conflict with my mother 
during these years as I thought I knew more than she did. My father died during my teenage 
years in December 1955. 

I graduated from Madison High School in 1959. 



COLLEGE YEARS 

I started college by taking a typing class the summer after high school. I enjoyed college 
very much. My goal for attending college was that I would become a well-rounded person in 
every phase of life. I hope that I am a kind and understanding person with a likeable personality. 

One of the classes I enjoyed was Child Development. I think it is one of the best classes a 
girl could take. The nursery was good and a fun thing to have and to observe. I graduated from 
Ricks College with an Associates degree in General Education. 

One of my hopes and admirations was to get a job in a bank or business office. Another 
dream was to find the right man and get married. 

I was unable to finish college because of limited ability. I attended Ricks College off and 
on for several years-from 1959 to 1973. I studied various subjects. I really bloomed and 
developed mentally, physically and spiritually. Before I started college, I wanted to be a nurse or 
teacher. But found that college was difficult. I had to work very hard to get a degree. I did 
however, receive an Associates Degree in 1970. I continued taking classes as they interested me. 

Some of the classes I took were Office Education, Family Living, Communications and 
Journalism. I sang in the Choir and received award for being a good member. I worked on the 
Scroll, the college newspaper, for a year. And I worked on the Rixida Year Book for another 
year and received an award for my work there. I also joined the International Students Club. 

I lived at home with my mother while attending college and learned patience and long 
suffering. My social life consisted of going to the dances. Besides my Associates degree in 
1970, 1 received a one year certificate in 1962 in General Education. 

My mother said that when I went to College I started to bloom like a flower. My College 
life was the best experience I could have ever had. 

On August 5, 1989, in one of my college classes, I enjoyed a Wild Flower Field Trip to 
Teton Canyon Camp Ground. It is on past Driggs. We parked the cars and hiked up the South 
Teton Creek for three miles to the fork in the trail. One trail continues on to Alaska Basin and 
Jenny Lake. 

We however, took the other turning and hiking the trail to the Devil's Staircase, a 
distance of 2.7 miles. I hiked a total of eight miles. The challenge came when I started climbing 
the Devil's Staircase. Climbing the mountain was steep and the footing was unsure; gravel and 
rocks were my enemies. If I took one step at a time I could make it and I finally did. The higher 
we went the steeper it was. For me to reach the top of the mountain I had to stop and rest quite 
often. The teacher Lorentz Pearson was very helpful the last mile which seemed like eternity. 
He helped me and guided me until I reached the top. It was a breath taking view of the valley. I 
felt I was on top of the world. I had conquered The Devil's Staircase. Looking down from the 
8,000 foot height I had confidence enough to conquer anything with God's help. I could conquer 
anything that might come my way. 

There was another quarter mile across Alpine Meadow to Little Lake. It was a beautiful 
lake of clear running water. I drank of the water and it tasted really good. The lake was formed 
from the melting snow. There were many lovely wild flowers up there all over the place. I liked 
walking through the beautiful flower garden. It was a lovely day. 

The big challenge was yet to come. I had to get over the mountain and back down. It was 
more tricky going down because your feet would not stop when you wanted them to stop. 



Thanks to the help of Brother Pearson again, I made it down the-mountain safely. All of this was 
a very good experience for me. 

The flowers were in full bloom. I'll name some of them. They were Cow Parsnip, Water 
Hemlock, Monkshood, Bedstraw, two species of Geranium, Willow Herb (or fire weed), Lupine, 
low Larkspur, tall Larkspur, three or four species of Indian Paint Brush, two or three species of 
Cinquefoil, at least four species of Henbane Daisy, at least five species of Asters, little Mountain 
Sunflower, two species of Arnica, two or three species of Agoseria, one of Hieracium, Mountain 
Bluebell, Harebell (or Bluebell of Scotland), Forget-me-nots, and Coreopsis. 

Also for the mountain lovers, there were shrubs, bushes, and trees for each to enjoy like 
Black Twinberry, Red Twinberry, Sarvis Berry, Englemen Spruce, Alpine Fir, Fake Hemlock 
(Douglas Fir), Quaking Aspen, Willows, Dogwood, and Green Mountain Ash. 

On the Staircase at the top of the mountain were Columbine, Green Gentian, Flax, Snow 
bush, Owl Clover and Lousewort. 

On September 14, 1 went hunting for mushrooms with Lorentz Pearson's College class. 
We drove through Heise to South Moody and on north of Moody. We found some mushroom 
and I got to take some home to eat. We also built a fire and fried some in butter and onions. 
They are delicious that way. It was a beautiful warm day. It was a fun day and I enjoyed myself. 

From my college experience, I believe I learned to like and meet people better. That is 
important because that is what life is made of most. I learned how to be more gracious. I enjoy 
being with people. I feel I accomplished a neat thing because I took the challenge and conquered 
it— I graduated from Ricks College. 

MY FAMILY 

My father was Otto G. Beck, the son of Johann Beck and Wilhcelmine Weber. He was 
the fourth child, and the third son in a family often children. He was born October 19, 1 893, in 
Germany. Some special qualities I remember about my father while growing up was that he was 
a good, hardworking honest man who went to church. He dealt fairly in his business. He was a 
loving and good father to his family. Nobody had a better father than I. He was a farmer all his 
life. He passed away on December 24, 1955. He died of a cerebral hemorrhage or stroke at the 
age of 62. I was 1 5 years old at the time. 

My mother was Anna Marie (Mary) Weber, the daughter of Gottlieb Weber and Anna 
Marie Grassmick. (This is not the same Weber as Grandma Weber Beck.) She was the third 
child and the second daughter in a family often children. She was a twin. Her twin sister died a 
month later. She was born October 12, 1901 in Russia. My parents were married on March 22, 
1939. Some of the special qualities I remember about my mother are that she was a good, 
hardworking, honest person. She was loving and special to me. She had lots of faith and hopes 
for me. One of her biggest concerns, in leaving this world, was leaving me on my own. My 
mother passed away on December 26, from a heart attack, at the age of 72. She was a widow for 
1 8 years. She was very dedicated to me, and saw that I was taken very good care of until her 
death. Her dream was to see me married to a good man and have a family. She worried about 
me because of my handicap. The best thing my parents did for me was to help me get my 
education. 

I remember my sister, Amelia, was born at home. It was during the summer. Dad and 
Aunt Amelia were putting on my shoes. Each had a separate foot. Mother was in the other 



room. I remember the other man, who was the doctor, being there. --Mother had a very hard 
delivery and had to stay in bed, so Aunt Amelia stayed several days to help. 

I remember Rowena came home for the weekends. She almost always brought me 
something special. She was an outgoing and smart sister. She married Eric D. Bresee on 
October 19, 1946. They had two sons, Charles E. Bresee and Gary Beck Bresee. 

My father's brothers and sisters were Christian, Rosalie, Fred, Otto (my father), Bill, Elsa, 
Albert, Bob, John and Minnie. My mother's brothers and sisters were Alex, Molla, Mary (my 
mother), Katharine, Katie, Anna, Gottlieb, Amelia, Bill and Mada. 

My favorite aunt was Aunt Amelia. She was a school teacher who did not have any 
children of her own. She helped me with my school work. She was a good kind person and 
teacher. She was also a peacemaker. Another favorite was Aunt Mada. She was a good lady. 
Aunt Katie was also a favorite. Freeda and Mollie also were good ladies in their own way. 

My mother's parents, Webers, lived about a mile from us. We could visit them often. 
They lived in town and were always happy to see me. Mother and I would take Grandma to town 
every Saturday. They had a player piano which I enjoyed playing. Grandma would give me 
pennies and Grandpa said he was going to give me his car when I grew up. 

Grandpa Gottlieb Weber passed away on August 7, 1957, in Rexburg, of a heart attack. 
Grandma Anna Marie Weber passed away on December 29, 1954 in Rexburg from a stroke. 
Grandpa Johann Beck passed away on July 27, 1939 in Rexburg of old age and Grandma 
Wilhcelmine Weber Beck passed away on December 25, 1930 in Rexburg also of old age. They 
were from Germany and Russia. 

I will tell you a brief story about Grandpa Weber and his brother Alex. They escaped 
from the Russian army and came to America. They were in starving conditions over there. 
Grandpa, worked for a period of time and saved money enough to send for Grandma and their 
five children. She left her mother behind in Russia never to see her again on this earth. 
Grandpa's parents were dead when he left. He was one of the younger children. They had more 
than five children, we think. All the records were destroyed because of the wars between 
Germany and Russia. Grandma and the children were on the ship many days. My mother told 
me about how the ship captain gave the children some peanuts. This was their first American 
food. They left Europe in 1906 and arrived in America sometime in 1907. They settled in 
Lincoln, Nebraska for a time. Then came to Sugar City, Idaho for sugar beet work. This was 
hard work. They then moved to Rexburg, Burton, Idaho, where they bought a farm and started 
farming. My mother and Uncle Alex said that some of both sides of the family starved to death 
in Russia because there was no food. 

My grandparents, Becks, through the influence of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints, came to the United State of America in 1901 . It took the family six weeks to cross 
the ocean. After about a year in the United States they joined the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. From New York they came directly to Rexburg, Idaho and started farming. 
They lived their lives out and died there. My dad, Otto, was baptized on August 2, 1906, with 
his family. 

REMEMBRANCES OF HOME LIFE 

My sister, Rowena, was 15-years older than I. So, I was raised mostly as an only child. I 
always knew my parents loved me. My parents showed their love by caring and sharing- 



unconditional love. I spent most of my time with them, even through my youth. My parents 
instilled the values of honesty, truth, and hard work. They taught me the gospel of Jesus Christ 
and to be true to the faith. My mother was always home when I needed her and Dad was not far 
away -maybe just out in the fields. They taught me not to hate, to forgive and forget and not to 
hold a grudge. 

I always enjoyed decorating the graves on Memorial Day with my parents. Other fun 
times were watching television and reading. It was always an exciting time in the spring when 
the baby animals were being born. My mother taught me to pray at her knee. I first learned the 
Lord's prayer. 

I can remember we had the tradition of taking fishing trips during the summer. My 
parents would help me celebrate my birthday almost every year by giving me a birthday party. 
They would invite all my friends. One thing I remember about each birthday was that I felt I was 
getting older. 

We always had Thanksgiving with my aunts and uncles. At Christmas time Rowena 
would always come home until after she got married. We would all go over to Aunt Mada's and 
Uncle Burton's because they had a big beautiful home. We would generally go there for 
Christmas and New Years too. I remember having a big special dinner and having a joyful time. 

I enjoyed having animals around. When I was about ten years old, we had rabbits. Dad 
would butcher them to eat. We also had dogs and cats. They were my favorite pets. I remember 
that they were my best friends. 

Sometimes we went on vacations to Yellowstone National Park and Lava Hot Springs. 
On these vacations we camped in a tent although sometimes we would stay in a motel. Some of 
the special memories I have of these times were watching Old Faithful blow. That was great! I 
also liked watching Dad catch fish. He would do some fishing and then get a load of wood for 
our winter heat supply. We would do both on the same trip. 

One time Mother and I took a special trip to Yellowstone National Park with Rowena and 
her family, Gary, and Charles. 

I was born and raised in the same home all my life. It was a stucco home that Dad and his 
cousin, Bill Foell, built about 1935-1936. 1 am still living in it today. 

I grew up in Rexburg, Idaho, home of Ricks College. In later years, I was able to work at 
the college. The population of Rexburg in 1980 was 10,000. It is within 100 miles of 
Yellowstone National Park. 

WORKING YEARS 

The very first job for which I was paid was driving tractor and truck for my Father in the 
hay fields. He paid me about $1 .50 per hour or bought my school clothes. In high school I 
worked in the cafeteria for a year. This mainly paid for my meals. I enjoyed working best for my 
Dad because it was outside and I was helping my Father. I felt that he needed me too. 

I worked at Ricks College part-time as a custodian before receiving my degree. I also 
worked at the College in the Registrars Office part-time, for seven years. 

I did telemarketing work for the Standard Journal for the Classify Ads Department. In 
September 1995, 1 started working for the Jefferson Star newspaper in Rigby doing telemarketing 
also. 



BEGINNING ANEW ■* 

I was given my name and blessing shortly after my birth in 1941 in the Rexburg 3rd 
Ward. I was baptized December 4, 1948, in the old Rexburg Tabernacle. 

I received my Patriarchal blessing on June 13, 1956, from Peter J. Ricks, in Rexburg, 
Idaho. This blessing has guided my life. It promised me the gift of leadership and admonished 
me to call upon the Lord in times of disappointment and sorrow. Some counsel contained in that 
blessing that I would like to share with my posterity is to stay with good companions and people, 
and to stay with the Saints. 

In April of 1975 I went to the Idaho Falls Temple and received my endowments. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY 

I participated in Primary from 1948 to 1951 . I remember a favorite teacher, Mrs. 
Henrietta Klingler. I was semi-active in Primary. When I was about ten years old, I had the 
chicken pox or measles and I was sent home from Primary. My teacher later called my mother to 
find out what was wrong. She told how she and the class members missed my not being there. 
So when I got better, I went back to Primary and never missed it again except for illnesses. That 
was the beginning of going to church and staying active. My Primary teacher took a special 
interest in me and that is why I became active in the LDS Church. 

I remember John L. Smith. He was a favorite Sunday School teacher. He was a very 
spiritual teacher. One thing he told us was that for Memorial Day, it would be better for the dead 
if we would do their genealogy work rather than by putting flowers on their graves. 

At church I developed some good friendships. I always enjoyed when missionaries would 
return from their missions and give their report. I remembered one missionary telling us to live a 
good life and followed Christ's example so we could inherit the celestial kingdom. They always 
seem so spiritual when they first return from their missions. I appreciated their messages. 

I have given talks, taught a few classes and bore my testimony of the Church. These have 
helped me learn to express myself better. At first, I felt very humble and shy about participating 
but later I would have a good feeling and was glad I had done it. I have learned to have faith, 
hope and never give up. My parents taught me that if I would go to church, and be good, that I 
would have an active and good life. 

In MIA I received six individual awards and I earned my Golden Gleaner Award as a 
young woman. I fulfilled the following requirements. I had a strong desire to become a Golden 
Gleaner. The award in and of itself was not as important to me as actually doing the work for the 
different areas of development. 

I thank my Heavenly Father that I was born of goodly parents who were members of His 
church. I am grateful that I was born and raised in the gospel. I have followed the rules that 
were set forth in the application to earn this award. The ones I chose to do are as follows: 

Spiritual area - 

2. I taught a Primary class from July 1958 to 1961 . 
5 . I did research on five ancestors of my mothers. 

Executive area - 

1 . I was a council officer in the Rexburg Third Ward from November 1 960 to 

1961. 



4. I was a council officer on the Rexburg Stake-Board from November 1959 

to 1960. 
7. I was chairman of four firesides. They were held March 18, April 29, 

June, and July 17, 1962. 
Cultural area - 

1 . I gave two talks, one in Sunday School June 1 960 and one in Mutual in 
November 1961. 

4. I read and wrote reports on important articles in the Improvement Era for 
the year of 1961. 

5. I was in the Road show in August 1959. 

6. I was in the Road show in August 1960. 

7. I was in the Ricks College Ward May 1961 . 
Creative area - 

2. I helped edit the Rexburg Third Ward's news bulletin for three months, 
Dec. 1961, Jan. and Feb. 1962. 

8 . Canned during August and September of 1 96 1 . 

9. I created menus and served meals to my family for one week in November 
1961. 

10. I earned the Silver Gleaner award 1959. 

I did this in good faith, I thank my Heavenly Father for my membership in His church and 
for the high standards that are set for me. Through these activities my knowledge and 
understanding of the gospel have been broadened, and my testimony has grown. My first 
church job was as a Primary teacher. I was twelve or thirteen years old when the bishop of the 
Third Ward called me to this position. 

I enjoyed going to Relief Society in the College Wards. That is where I gained my 
testimony and love for Relief Society. I learned that Relief Society is the Lord's place for the 
sisters of the church. I was also the Sunday School Secretary of the College First Ward during 
one summer. 

I have enjoyed working in the Church. I have been the Young Special Interest Leader, 
Primary Teacher, Visiting Teacher, Sunday School, Relief Society Secretary and Message 
Leader. These all helped me grow in developing my leadership ability, meeting people and 
gaining a testimony. 

I started attending the Single Adult Activities and Dances when the organized it in 1 974- 
75. I lived in the Rexburg 3rd Ward for 39 years. When they divided the ward on September 7, 
1 980, 1 became a member of the Rexburg 19th Ward. I have been a Visiting Teacher in the 3rd 
Ward for more than four years. In 1989 through 1996 I was the Stake Librarian, the first and 
only Stake position I've held so far. At present I am the Visiting Teacher Message Leader again. 

Something I have enjoyed doing is genealogy work. I have compiled the histories of my 
mother's, Webers, side of the family. I have also completed the temple work for my ancestors. 

SPIRITUAL GROWTH 

In 1959, President McKay stated every person is a missionary. And he said that more 
temples were being built now than ever before. I contribute to Christ's work by doing my part in 
the Gospel, by fulfilling my callings in my Ward and Stake to the best of my ability. 



I had an interesting opportunity to preach the gospel when the Teton flood happened. 
There were lots of nonmembers that came to help clean up, etc. Those that worked or had any 
connection with me, I gave a Book of Mormon to them before they left. I was surprise to learn 
that they thought Mormons had more than one wife. That was all they knew about the Mormons 
and all they wanted to talk about. 

Special counsel given to us by Church leaders include, stay close to Gospel and Church, 
stand in Holy Places and pick good companions. 

During my lifetime there has been some prophesies fulfilled concerning the Last Days. 
One of these was when the Lord revealed that the Negro could hold the priesthood. I feel this 
was a good thing because they are good people too and should have this blessing. 

TETON DAM FLOOD 

Mary Ann Beck was living by herself at the time of the flood. She was 36 years old at 
this time. She lived at Route 4, Rexburg, Idaho, and was living there during the flood. 

Mary Ann was a business woman and worked at Washington Grade School. She owned 
her home, farm and business before the flood. She supported the construction of the Teton Dam 
because she felt that the people and farmers in the valley needed flood control and extra water. 
She felt that water had been short for years. 

Mary Ann was in West Yellowstone with some girlfriends the weekend the Teton Dam 
broke. She couldn't believe her ears when she heard that the dam had broken-she seemed to be 
in a daze. Mary Ann was unable to save any of her household or personal belongings before the 
water hit as the phones and communications were out. She felt it was a miraculous thing that she 
was away during the flood. She stayed at the Three Bears Motel in West Yellowstone until June 
7, 1977, then upon arriving home she found a town of destruction. 

The evening of June 4, was the last time Mary Ann was to travel the Sugar City overpass 
on her way to West Yellowstone. Anita, Carol and Connie were with her. At the time the Teton 
Dam broke they were at Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park. They over heard comments 
about a dam breaking but never once figured it could be their Teton Dam. After returning to 
their motel they heard more rumors and comments about it breaking. When Anita went for some 
ice, she learned it was the Teton Dam and wanted the television turned on. So the four young 
ladies sat on the edge of their beds watching the water flooding Rexburg. She was petrified, 
shocked, and wondered whether her eyes were playing tricks. The whole town of Rexburg was 
underwater. Homes were floating down Main Street of Rexburg. She even saw her aunt's home 
floating down the road. We heard on television that the State of Idaho had called the National 
Guard out for emergency action. That was when two of the girls, Anita and Connie, decide to 
leave for home as soon as possible. Carol and Mary Ann decided to wait until daybreak to 
return. 

Before Anita and Connie left for Rexburg, they all knelt for prayer. They were up there 
for a Special Interest activity. Ron Bird, the Priesthood representative, gave the prayer. When he 
finished, Mary Ann had a clam feeling come over her and felt she did not need to panic about 
getting home. There was peace in her heart she had told her relatives that she would be gone for 
the weekend. The other girls left not knowing what the roads were like, they went on faith. 

Mary Ann spent two restless nights in West Yellowstone thinking about home and 
relatives. The next day on Sunday she went to Church but, "my heart wasn't there; it was in 

10 



Rexburg thinking of my home, if it was gone and about the two girls that had left the night 
before, and whether they had made it there or not." The Bishop's sister, Sister Knight was in 
West Yellowstone and offered to take Mary Ann home. They started out Monday afternoon. 
They had to go through Felt, Idaho. The road conditions in Teton were terrible, bridges were 
washed out, lumber was scattered in fields, tractors were turned over, cattle were dead and the 
crops were under water. 

When they arrived at Rexburg, it looked as if a natural disaster had hit. The place was 
covered with mud and debris all over. Traffic could only go one direction and only on certain 
roads. The National Guard was picking up dead animals from off Main Street and other 
surrounding areas. All the stores were boarded up with signs reading, Out of Business. People 
wearing fishing boots, were cleaning up other businesses. Ricks College was like an invasion of 
helicopters. They were flying and landing on the hill like flies. The college campus was a 
lifesaver for the valley. 

Mary Ann's home, a mile and half west out of town, was the best sight as it was standing 
in one piece. She was nervous trying to get out of the car and into the house. In fact she could 
hardly get the key to open the door for fear of what she would face. Good fortune, the top floor 
was dry. Her car was still there and it started. The electricity and water were off for three days. 
There was five and a half feet of water in her basement. People seemed to be in a daze. It was 
terrible— the condition of Rexburg and her home. Rexburg was truly a national disaster. Mary 
Ann was really relieved that she was spared from more damage than she did. She was grateful 
and thanked God for His goodness and mercy. 

Some of the major damage she suffered was that the pump was gone, the stairway to the 
basement was gone and about forty acres of the farm had to be leveled. Logs and other debris 
were all over the farmland. Mary Ann was blessed in that her home was still there, and her 
personal and cherished belongings were not lost with the flood. 

Soil Conservation hired some boys and men to help clean up. They took the logs and 
debris off the farmland. The HUD came in and slopped out the basement because it had a dirt 
floor. They built a new stairway. It was hard to manage with no electricity and no water. 
Volunteers from the Latter-day Saints also helped in cleaning up the debris. Buckets and mops 
were received from HUD to sanitize the basement. Both HUD and BOR helped and did a fine 
job. 

There were a few bad incidents that did happen— like the one that was in the newspaper, 
of two brothers that filed false flood claim amounts and got sent to prison. 

Mary Ann felt that the flood was a manmade disaster but that BOR didn't intentionally 
want the dam to break. She felt that some of their engineers made some misjudgments in their 
work. It really was not divine intervention or punishment. She would like to see the dam rebuilt. 
People of Teton, Rexburg, and Wilford need the dam for water, irrigation purposes, and flood 
control. 

Because of the flood Rexburg became a brand new town and was soon enough smelling 
sweet as a rose. People, in general, were better off than they were before. Through the 
experience of the flood people discovered that their families are the most important thing. Cars, 
property, everything worldly, can be gone— swept away— in matter of minutes and can be 
replaced. But families and children are eternal if you are prepared. Things like this tend to make 
people humble. 

11 



MEMORIES 

It happens every time I sit in the public library in front of the picture window. Memories 
flow back to my mind of happy times when I was a child growing up. I would go over to my 
Aunt Mada's and Uncle Burton's home and play with three of my cousins, Konra, Billy and Bob. 
Their home was a large and beautiful wood frame home. My Uncle at one time owned Montana 
and Idaho Lumber Company which was on First North and Center Street. Their home was the 
envy of the neighborhood. All the neighborhood children would congregate there. That is where 
the Weber family on my mother side would get together for the Thanksgiving, Christmas and 
New Years holidays. On Saturdays I would get to go there to visit and play with cousins. 

My Grandparents would take their weekly bath there. This was done because my Aunt 
Mada was the only daughter that lived in town and had indoor plumbing inside her home. After 
a few years my Grandparents moved to town and built a home next door to Aunt Mada and Uncle 
Burton. It was a little white frame home made of wood. They both lived out their lives there. 
Their home is still standing. It is the only home left in that block. All the others have been sold 
for commercial businesses, due to the commercial zoning laws. 

Aunt Mada's home was torn down after the Teton Dam flood. The floor destroyed 
everything. The flood was in 1976. All that was left standing was two evergreen trees and the 
brick border around the property. 

Also, while visiting Grandmother on Saturdays, I loved to play her player piano. I always 
looked forward to playing it. I thought I was really smart. I could play. Grandma had a lot of 
piano rolls to play. Her favorite was the song. My Country Tis of Thee and America . When I 
would leave to go home, she would always say, "Put America back on the roller" that way it 
would be always ready for her to play. 

Another memory was that I would walk to Grandma and Grandpa Weber's home 
sometimes for lunch when I was attending Adams Elementary School. I remember after 
Grandmother passed away, Grandpa moved in with Aunt Mada's family because he had 
Parkinson Disease and couldn't stay home by himself. Aunt Mada had a swing on the front porch 
of her home. And Grandpa would sit and rock for hours. That was his favorite thing to do. lean 
still see him, in my mind, swinging back and forth, back and forth, back and forth watching the 
traffic pass by. 

Whenever I drive by the old gray rock home on my way to Hibbard which is about two 
miles west of Rexburg, I think of my Grandparent Weber. It sits nestled near the canal on the 
north of the road. As a child I could hear the rushing waters as it ran down the stream, through 
the culverts and over the rocks on it way to irrigate the thirsty farm fields. They had beautiful 
Flocks, Irises and a beautiful Snowball tree. I loved going over there in the Spring and Summer 
times to pick the flower for Decoration Day. It was a tradition to go to the different cemeteries to 
decorate the graves. All of my family— both the Weber and Beck grandparents are there in the 
Rexburg Cemetery as well as a lot of aunts, uncles and cousins. I feel that is where I got my 
interest in genealogy. 

On Saturdays my mother and I would take Grandma and take her to town to do her 
Saturday shopping. She would always spoil me and give me some of her change, two to five 
pennies, whatever she had. I really liked that and looked forward to her gift. 

They raised chickens, geese and white sheep. We always had a goose dinner for the 
holidays. My parent and Grandparents would butcher the beef or pork and make liverwurst out 

12 



of it. They used a receipt from the old country. Some of it I liked and some I did not. But it was 
a tradition that they did every winter. This was something I didn't enjoy very much. They moved 
from the farm to Rexburg in the early 1950s. 

I remember in the Spring my parents and I would go out to pick the asparagus around the 
farm near the canals. That was one of the signs of spring. I remember one spring, when I was a 
little older, I went with Dad to pick the asparagus. On this particular day, I managed to fall in the 
water. The ditch banks were very uneven probably causing me to lose my balance. If I 
remember correctly, I fell in more than once. 

I enjoyed going with my mother for that special walk until I finally was old enough to 
pick the asparagus myself. It became my job then. I still look forward every May to pick the 
asparagus. I enjoy walking through the fields. I feel blessed to have lived all these years in the 
same location, growing up doing these activities— learning from my parents. Picking asparagus 
was one of my highlights of spring. 

I also remember when I was about ten or eleven, I decided I could pay my folks telephone 
bill. I had gone with them many time and had seen them pay the bill with a check. So I took one 
of my mother's checks and while she was into the grocery store, I went into the telephone office 
and gave the clerk this check that I had signed. She took it. In thinking about this I am really 
surprised that she would even take it. However, when I told my mother what I had done, she was 
really shocked and tried to explain to me that I did not have an account— that I could not just go 
write a check. She then took me back into the telephone office and paid the bill. 



MY OBITUARY 

We usually say all our nice things about people only after they are dead. And we rarely 
say nice things about ourselves, at least not in an obvious way. 

As I am doing my own "advance obituary" I am going to try take enough nerve to 
verbalize all that is good, decent and lovable about myself. If I were to die at this point, this is 
how would I would summarize my life and person. 

Mary Ann knew she was a Child of God and that God loved her very much. She was 
very humble and prayerful in her life. She tried to stay close to God and her religion. 

Because of Mary Ann's handicap and after her parents passed away people had 
reservations about her being able to take care of her own business affairs. She has done very well 
in this regard. 

The second thing was the schooling she took advantage of. "In all thy getting, get 
understanding," taken from the scriptures. Mary Ann never gave up trying to reach her goals. 
When she was down, she came bouncing back, and would try again, and kept on trying. She was 
a good listener especially for her friends and relatives. She is a warm and very good-hearted 
person who would do anything to help. 

Here lies Mary Ann Beck who was a very warm understanding person who was a good 
listener and a very just person. 



13 







HISTORICAL LINKAGE - ,/ 

1940 - Mary Ann was born on October 14, 1940, at 7:00 p.m., in the-Merefeeff^temesari 
Hospital, in Rexburg, Idaho. During that same year the following events took place. 

In that year also the Mormon Battalion Monument was dedicated in San Diego, CA. 

U.S. population was 131,669,175. Average life expectancy was 64 years /49 in 1900 

The Jack Benny Show , Fibber McGee and Molly . The Shadow , and Gangbusters 

were popular radio shows. 

Carson McCullers' The Heart is a Lonely Hunter was published. 

Mae West and W.C. Fields starred in My Little Chickadee . 

For Whom the Bell Tolls by Earnest Hemingway was published. 

Hattie McDaniel was the first African- American woman to win an Oscar, for the best 

supporting actress in Gone With the Wind . 

John Steinbeck was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for Grapes of Wrath, Carl Sandburg for 

Abraham Lincoln: The War Years . 

U.S. foreign policy shifted from neutrality to non belligerency. 

President Roosevelt submitted $8,400,000,000 budget, including $1,800,000,000 for 

national defense, 50,000 airplanes a year. 

AFL and CIO pledged support to the national defense program. 

Many of Europe's greatest scientists fled to the U.S. 

Smith Act required registration of all aliens. 

Congress created Selective Service System, requiring men of 21 to 27 to register. 

U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Act setting up the nations first peace 

time military draft in history. 

George Washington Carver Foundation for Agricultural Research was established at 

Tuskegee Institute in honor of Carver, a former slave. 

The 40-hour week, provided by Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 went into effect. 

The Alien Registration Act was passed, requiring registration and fingerprinting. 

July 4~ American Negro Exposition was held in Chicago in celebration of the 

Emancipation Proclamation. 

Thomas Wolfs You Can't Go Home Again was published, posthumously. 

Cartoon character Bugs Bunny was created by Tex Avery. 

U.S. embargoed export of scrap iron and steel to Japan. 

Radiation Laboratory was established at MIT for radar experimentation. 

Vladimir Zworykin and James Hillier invented the electron microscope. 

President Roosevelt suggested lending arms to Great Britain (lend-lease). 

George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart wrote George Washington Slept Here . 

Raymond Chandler's Farewell, My Lovely was published. 

By September isolationist groups were increasing across the country; Charles A. 

Lindbergh joined the America Firsters. 

Congress established the Fish and Wildlife Service to develop and administer a 

program of wildlife conservation. 

Cornelius Warmerdam set a pole-vault record of 15 feet. Two years later he set a 

new record of 1 5 feet, 7 3/4 inches. 



14 



Cincinnati Reds won over the Detroit Tigers 4-3. The Red's first World Series win 
in 21 years. 

The Willy Corporation introduced the high-clearance 4-wheel drive Jeep. 
The Gallup poll reported weekly movie attendance at 54,000,000. 
Oscars went to James Stewart for best actor, in The Philadelphia Story , to Ginger 
Rogers for best actress, in Kitty Foyle , and to Rebecca as best film. 
Franklin D. Roosevelt was reelected as President, Henry A. Wallace elected as Vice- 
President, on the Democratic ticket, the first presidential third term in U.S. history. 



1948 - In December 1948 Mary Ann was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints at the Rexburg Tabernacle. That same year the Church announced that Ricks 
College in Rexburg, Idaho, would become a four-year college in the 1949-50 school year. 

• Production, employment and national income were high; strikes, higher wages and 

prices resulted in an inflation spiral. 

Mohandas Gandhi was shot fatally by a Hindu Fanatic in New Delhi. 

The world's largest telescope, with a 200-inch mirror, was installed at Mt. Palomar, 

California. 

Miles Davis's combo pioneered cool jazz. 

Secretary of Interior Krug urged voluntary conservation to meet the oil shortage. 

Norman Mailer's The Naked and the Dead was published. 

David Smith created his abstract sculpture, The Royal Bird . 

The U.S. accepted membership in the World Health Organization. 

Displaced Persons Act authorized admission of 205,000 Europeans in the next two 

years; the first shipload arrived in October. 

James Gould Cozzens' Guard of Honor was published and won the Pulitzer Prize. 

The Housing Act authorized Federal loans for private construction of lowcost homes. 

James Faulkner's Intruder in the Dust was published. 

The UN Loan Act authorized a $65,000,000 loan for the UN building in New York. 

Agnes DeMille staged the ballet Fall River Legend with Nora Kaye and music by 

Morton Gould. 

Bardeen, Brattain and Shockley invented the transistor. 

Eero Saarinen designed the 630-foot Gateway Arch in Saint Louis. 

Peter Goldmark developed the LP (Long Playing) phonograph record. 

The City and the Pillar by Gore Vidal was published. 

Vitamin B-12 was isolated from liver, to be used in treatment of pernicious anemia. 

Maxwell Anderson's Anne of the Thousand Days was published. 

Norbert Wiener's Cybernetics was published, establishing cybernetics as the science 

of control and communication in organisms and machines; provided theoretical 

background for developing computers. 

The US Air Force began Project Blue Book for investigation reports of flying saucers 

Idlewild International Airport in New York was dedicated by President Truman; it 

was the largest commercial airport in the world. 

The U.S. assisted in the airlift of food and supplies to West Berlin, blockaded by the 

Soviets. 



15 






Eddie Arcaro was the first jockey to win the Kentucky Derby 4 times. 

The School of American Ballet became the New York City Ballet; Lincoln Kirstein 

was its director. 

Irwin Shaw's The Young Lions was published. 

Stan Musical of the St. Louis Cardinals was a third-time winner of the Most 

Valuable Player Award. 

Madame Chiang Kai-shek arrived in Washington to seek aid against Chinese 

Communist. 

President Truman issued an executive order forbidding segregation in the armed 

services. 

Laurence Oliver won an Oscar for his role in Hamlet . 

Harry S. Truman was reelected as President and Senator Alben W. Barkley of 

Kentucky was elected Vice-President, on the Democratic ticket. 



1955 - In August 1955 Mary Ann started Madison High School. In that year David O. McKay 
was President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In January-February he took a 
trip covering more than 45,000 miles to the missions of the South Pacific, selected a site for the 
New Zealand Temple and discussed plans for the building of a church college in New Zealand. 
In August- September The Tabernacle Choir made a major concert tour of Europe. On September 
1 1 the Swiss Temple, near Bern was dedicated by President McKay. And in December they 
announced that students at BYU would be organized into campus wards and stakes. 

• The Census Bureau reported that the population of the U.S. rose 2.8 million in 1954, 

largest yearly rise on record. 

U.S. began a program of economic aid to South Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. 

Dr. Martin Luther King rose to national prominence for his advocation of passive 

resistance to segregation in public places. 

Marian Anderson became the first African- American to sing at the Metropolitan 

Opera. 

Why Johnny Can't Read by Rudolph Flesch was published. 

Family of Man , photography exhibit opened at the Museum of Modern Art in New 

York. 

Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof was published. 

The National Hurricane Center was established in Miami, Florida after hurricanes 

devastate the East coast. 

Lawrence Welk began his weekly TV musical show. 

An effective oral polio vaccine was developed by Albert Sabin. 

Arthur Mitchell was the first African- American to dance with a major company 

(New York City Ballet). 

The American Shakespeare Festival opened in Stratford, Connecticut. 

Jim Henson created the first of the Muppets—Kermit the Frog. 

Gregory Pincus developed an effective birth control pill. 

Radio waves coming from Jupiter were detected by Bernard Burke and Kenneth 

Franklin. 

The U.S. Air Force Academy opened. 



16 



Rock 'n' Roll music was condemned as immoral. 

The Supreme Court held that racial segregation in public parks, playgrounds, and 

golf courses was unconstitutional. 

The Interstate Commerce Commission ordered an end to racial segregation on 

busses, trains, and in waiting rooms. 

A $3.25 million foreign aid bill was passed by Congress. 

AFL-CIO merger took place; George Meany was its new president. 

Auntie Mame by Patrick Dennis was published. 

The minimum wage was increased from 75 cents to $1 per hour by Congress. 

Thomas Merton's No Man is an Island was published. 

The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Willis Lamb for work on the hydrogen 

spectrum and P. Kusch for measuring the magnetic moment of the electron; The 

Prize in Chemistry went to Vincent de Vigneaud for synthesizing a hormone. 

Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita was published. 

School desegregation was to begin at once by order of the Supreme Court. 

Heavy rains in northern California and Oregon caused 74 deaths and $150 million in 

damage. 

The White House Conference on Education endorsed a program of federal aid for 

education. 

African- American Rosa Parks' refusal to give up her seat at the front of a bus in 

Montgomery, Alabama, caused her arrest and lead to a bus boycott that ended a year 

later after the city complied with the Supreme Court ruling that segregation on buses 

was unconstitutional. 
1959 - In May 1959 Mary Ann graduated from Madison High School, Rexburg, Idaho. In 
November the Tabernacle Choir received a Grammy award for its recording of the "Battle Hymn 
of the Republic." 

• Alaska became the 49th state-the largest, with the smallest population 

• Hawaii became the 50th state. 

• Radar contact with the planet Venus was reported by an MIT research group. 

• The St. Lawrence Seaway, the world's largest inland waterway, was opened, 
dedicated by President Eisenhower and Queen Elizabeth. 

• A radio-optical-telescope tracking statio for monitoring space vehicles was 
demonstrated by GE. 

• Carl Sandburg addressed the members of Congress on the sesquicentennial of 
Abraham Lincoln's birth; in 1939 Sandburg was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his 
Lincoln biography. 

• International Atomic Energy Agency was formed to explore peaceful atomic energy. 

• A reflection telescope with a 120-inch mirror was installed by the Lick Observatory 
in California. 

• Rogers and Hammerstein's The Sound of Music starred Mary Martin. 

• NASA selected the first candidates for space travel to be called astronauts. 

• Raisin in the Sun , by Lorraine Hansberry, was the first drama by an African- 
American woman to be produced on Broadway. 

• A nationwide steel strike lasted for 116 days, the longest in U.S. history. 



17 



The National Radio Astronomy Observatory in West Virginia announced a program 

of monitoring radio signals possibly from "intelligent beings" on other plants. 

The Barbie doll was introduced. 

Monkeys Abel and Baker returned safely from a space flight to an altitude of 300 

miles. 

The Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, was completed in NY. 

Lady Chatterlev's Lover , by D. H. Lawrence, was published after a 30-year obscenity 

ban. 

The first television pictures of Earth were returned from Explorer VI. 

Soviet Premier Khrushchev arrived in Washington for talks with President 

Eisenhower and a tour of some American cities. 

Congress passed a housing bill authorizing $1,000,000,000 expenditure, including 

$650,000,000 for slum clearance. 

Pioneer IV, launched from Cape Canaveral passes the Moon the next day and went 

into orbit around the Sun. . 

The discovery of a new radiation belt around the earth was reported by the National 

Aeronautics and Space Administration. 

Severo Ochoa and Arthur Kornberg were awarded The Nobel Prize in Physiology or 

Medicine for synthesizing RNA and DNA. 

Berry Gordy, Jr., founded Motown Records ; he recorded "Soul" groups of the 

Sixties. 

Vanguard II, the first space weather station, returned photographs of Earth's cloud 

cover. 

The National Academy of Science and the Russian equivalent agreed to hold forums 

for exchange of information between their scientists. 

Film actress Linda Darnell, a Cherokee Indian, raised money on behalf of children 

for the Kidney Disease Foundation. 






1962 - Mary Ann started Ricks College in Rexburg, Idaho, the summer of 1959 and graduated 
in 1 962 with a one year certificate. In March the age was lowered from 20 to 19 for young men 
to be eligible for missions. On December 3, of that year the first Spanish-speaking stake was 
organized, headquartered in Mexico City. 

A plan was submitted to Congress for the building of neighborhood fallout shelters. 

Lt. Col. John Glenn was the first American to complete an earth orbit on February 

20, 1962, aboard the Friendship 7 space capsule in one hour and 37 minutes. 

The U.S. and Soviet Union approved a two-year cultural exchange agreement. 

The Labor Department set minimum wages for migratory Mexican workers. 

The U.S. and Soviet Union agreed to take part in a global weather watch. 

Congress established a federal matching grant program to help in the developing 

educational television broadcasting facilities. 

Pop painter Andy Warhol painted Green Coca-Cola Bottles and Marilyn Monroe . 

Rt. Rev. John Melville Burgess was the first U.S. African- American bishop of the 

Protestant Episcopal Church in a mostly white diocese in Massachusetts. 






18 



1970 



Rachel Carson's Silent Spring , which will arouse interest in controlling 

environmental pollution, was published. 

The Philadelphia Warriors' Wilt Chamberlain was the first basketball player to score 

100 points in a game. 

Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana was published. 

The Century 21 Exposition of the World's Fair opened in Seattle. 

The Supreme Court ruled against the reading of prayers in New York City schools. 

American air, naval, and land units were ordered to move toward Southeast Asia 

following reports of a major Communist military victory in Laos. 

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey was published. 

African- American James H. Meredith enrolled at the University of Mississippi 

accompanied by U.S. Marshals. 

Ranger 4 Lunar Probe strikes the Moon; M. Scott Carpenter completed three orbits 

aboard Aurora 7. 

TV programs from the U.S. to Europe were relayed by Telstar 1 . 

Catch 22 by Joseph Heller was published. 

John Steinbeck won the Nobel Prize in Literature. 

Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was published. 

President Kennedy ordered a blockade of Cuba because of a Soviet missile buildup 

on the island. Premier Khrushchev agreed to withdraw the weapons in return for an 

American pledge not to invade Cuba. 

Pledges were signed at the White House by some 100 unions to end discriminatory 

practices in organized labor. 

President Kennedy forbad discrimination in federal housing. 

Katherine Anne Porter's Ship of Fools was published. 

Johnny Carson became the host of the Tonight Show. 

Cuba agrees to released Bay of Pigs invasion prisoners in trade for $62,000,000 in 

food and medical supplies. 

The New York Yankees won 4-3 against the San Francisco Giants in the World 

Series. 

Former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt died at 78. 

1 1 1 prominent citizens of Atlanta, Georgia, were killed in an airline disaster. 

Jackie Robinson was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. 

The U.S. traded Soviet spy Rudolph Abel, for captured U-2 pilot Gary Powers. 

Arnold Palmer was voted Player of the Year by the Professional Golf Association. 

Bob Dylan became known for his song Blowin' in The Wind . 

Mary Ann graduated from Ricks College with an Associates Degree in Education. 
Population of the U.S. passed the 204,000,000 mark. 

Paris peace talks continued and public concern to end the Vietnam War increased. 
The trial of the Chicago Seven, with unprecedented contempt-of-court displayed, 
resulted in some not-guilty decisions and 5 -year sentences for Rennie Davis, David 
Dellinger, Tom Hayden, Abbie Hoffman, and Jerry Rubin. 



19 



26-year-old Joe Frazier, former Olympic champion, won the heavyweight title, 

defeating Jimmy Ellis in five rounds. 

Antiwar protestors at Kent State University in Ohio were fired on by National Guard 

troops; four students are killed, 10 wounded. 

Robert Altaian, directed the film, M*A*S*H . later it became an extremely popular 

TV series. 

Erich Segal's Love Story was published. 

448 universities were either on strike or closed by student protest against the 

Vietnam War. 

The 1856 British Guiana one-cent stamp, the world's most valuable, was auctioned in 

New York for $280,000. 

Earnest Hemingway's Islands in the Stream was posthumously published. 

The Doonesburv Gomic strip by Garry Trudeau began to appear in newspapers. 

U.S. troops were sent to Cambodia to destroy North Vietnamese outposts. 

Amtrak was created by Congress. 

April 22 was designated Earth Day by environmentalists. 

Former Gov. Wallace of Alabama urged Southern governors to defy the 

government's order to integrate. 

The first two women generals in the U.S. were named by President Nixon. 

Mae West returned to the screen in the film Mvra Breckenridge . 

Irwin Shaw's Rich Man, Poor Man was published. 

Physician David Reuben's Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex But 

Were Afraid to Ask was published. 

Linus Pauling claimed the large doses of Vitamin C may help prevent the common 

cold and flu. 

Erik H. Erikson received the Pulitzer Prize for his work, Gandhis' Truth . 

Women across the nation marched in celebration of the 50 years of suffrage which 

demanded equal rights under the constitution. 

The National Air Quality Control Act called for a reduction in automobile pollution 

by 90%. Congress established the EPA. 

Hospital care costs reached an average of $81 per day. 

President Nixon, in radio address, appealed to "the great silent majority of my fellow 

Americans" for support against antiwar demonstrations in the streets. 

A copy of the second draft of the U.S. Constitution sold for $160,000. 

A report showed the Sesame Street helps develop preschool skills. 

For the first time in its 102 years the University of California charged tuition. 

Rock star Janis Joplin died of a heroin overdose in Los Angeles; Jimi Hendrix died 

of sleeping pill overdoses in London. 

Nimbus Four, a research weather satellite, was launched. 

Diane Crump was the first woman jockey in the Kentucky Derby. 

Massachusetts initiated no-fault auto insurance; California initiated no-fault divorce. 



20 




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LIFE HISTORY OF DOROTHEA STIEFEL WEBER 

Dorothea Stiefel, my Great Grandmother, was born 30 March 1823 in Niedern- 
dorf, Jagstheim, Wuerrttemberg, Germany, to Christian Stiefel and Eva Dorothea 
Morath. She was the fourth child in a family of six children. 

She married Ludwig Weber on 3 May 1846. To this union was born eight 
children, my Grandmother, Wilhelmine Weber, being the youngest child and born 
on 21 May 1864, at Glashofen, Jagstheim, Wuerrttemberg, Germany. 

On 28 September 1888, her husbsnd, Ludwig Weber, died, which brought great 
sorrow into her life. A few years later she was converted to the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and was baptized on 4 June 1891 by Jacob 
Miller and confirmed the same day by Jacob Miller. After joining the Church 
and learning more about this new religion, she had a great desire to immigrate 
to the United States to be near the headquarters of the Saints and also to be 
able to do the necessary Temple Ordinances for her kindred dead. 

The decision to leave her children, grandchildren, home, and friends could 
not have been an easy one to make. Her faith must have been strong to give her 
the courage to make this final decision. She left Germany 12 August 1893 for 
Liverpool, England where she sailed for the United States 19 August 1»93 as a 
passenger on the ship "S.S. Alaska." 

When she arrived in New York she went directly to Rexburg, Idaho where she 
lived in the Second L.D.S. Ward until 1901 when she moved to the Salem Ward. 

As soon as possible after getting settled in her new home, she started to 
make arrangements to go to the Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah where she was 
sealed for time and all eternity to her beloved husband, Ludwig Weber, on 20 Dec- 
ember 1893. She also did Temple work for many others of her deceased relatives. 

Her daughter, Rosine Dorothea Weber Foell left Germany 30 April 1894 with 
her two children (William Charles, born 1885, and Lena, born 19 July 1886) and 
joined her mother in Rexburg, Idaho in the Second Ward. 

My Grandparents, Wilhelmine Weber h Johann Beck and four of their children, 
(my Mother, Rosalie Karoline (Rosa), Johann Friedrich, Otto Gottlieb, k Wilhelm 
Gottlieb) left Germany 18 July 1902 to come to America. This must have been an 
exciting time for my Great Grandmother ton, as she anticipated being able to see 
and be with her daughter, son-in-law, and grandchildren again after so many years 
of being separated. 

Great Grandmother lived only about eight months after the arrival of her 
youngest daughter. Sho passed away 29 March 1903 and was buried in the Rexburg 
Cemetery. 

Compiled and Written by Her Great Grandson 
Ralph W. Kauer -- March 28, 1982 



LIFE HISTORY OF JOHANN BECK 

My Grandfather, Johann Beck, was born January' 24 , i860 at Hausen, 
Wurttenberg, Germany, the son of Johann Andreas Beck and Katharina Regina 
Qffenhaeuser. He was the youngest child in a family of four boys and 
three girls. 

As a young boy he was raised and went to school in Hausen. Here the 
family were members of the Lutheran Church, where they went for their 
religious training. His Father died when he was only 13 years old. Some- 
time later, while still a young man, he started working as a freighter. 
While traveling from town to town, he often stopped in Glashofen, where 
he met a special young lady by the name of Wilhelmine Weber. 

They were married December 24, 1889 in Hall, Wurttenberg, Germany. 
They became the parents of ten children, seven boys and three girls. Three 
of these children, Elsa Margarete, Albert, and Johann Robert died in infan- 
cy in Germany. 

Grandpa's Mother-in-law, Dorothea Stiefel Weber, and one of his sis- 
ter-in-laws, Rosine Dorothea Weber Foell, had joined the Latter Day Saint 
Church and gone to America. Grandpa and his family had become acquainted 
with some of the IDS Missionaries, one of which was Conrad Walz from Rex- 
burg, Idaho. No doubt from the urging of the Missionaries and the letters 
from his Mother-in-law and sister-in-law, they made up their minds to come 
to America also. As I understand, at this time their son, Christian, was 
serving in the German Army and wasn't able to leave with the family. 

They left Germany on July 18, 1902 with four of their children, Rosa- 
lie Karoline (Rosa), who was my Mother, Johann Friedrich, Otto Gottleib, 
and Wilhelm Gottleib, heading for America. 

After about six weeks on the ocean they arrived in America. They 
'"Came directly to Rexburg, . Idaho where they spent some time with Grandma's 
Mother. Then they moved to a home west of where the old Third Ward Church 
used to be. 

Grandpa found work wherever he could. He worked on the Rexburg Canal 
and on the railroad. He acquired ten acres of land that is located across 
the road north and east of the" present Rexburg Stake Center and they built 
a log house on it. 

Within a short time they acquired a 20 acre farm, on the east side 
of the Swensen farm, located one and a half miles straight east of the 
Burton Church. It was here that they built a new four room house. 



i 

l 



He homes teaded another 80 acres of ground on the Rexburg Bench. It 
was on these farms, through hard work, that he was able to' raise and care 
for the needs of his family. 

After arriving in Rexburg another two children were born to their 
family, a son, John Fredrick and a daughter, Minna (Minnie). 

Grandma and three of their children had been baptized members of the 
latter Day Saint Church several years before. Now Grandpa was baptized 
a member on August 4, 1913 . 

Grandpa and Grandma were sealed as husband and wife in the Salt Lake 
Temple October 1, 1919- At the same time they had six of their children 
sealed to them, the three who had died in infancy in Germany, William, 
John Fredrick, and Minna (Minnie). 

When I was a small boy I remember going with our family for many 
visits to Grandpa and Grandma's. 

Grandpa was already over sixty years old and always used a cane when 
he walked. Mother told me he had hurt his leg as a younger man and it 
didn't heal right but left him lame the rest of his life. 

By this time he had pretty well retired from the hard farm work. 
Each day you would still find him out taking care of his chickens, pigs, 
feeding the cows, and doing odd jobs around the yard. He was very metic- 
ulous about keeping his chicken coop, runs, etc clean for his chickens and 
the other animals. 

I always enjoyed being around at chore time when they milked the cows 
as they would take the milk, pour it into the separator, and then let me 
help turn the separator. The cream would go into the cream can and we 
would take the skim milk out to the pigs. It was no wonder that Grandpa's 
pigs were always so big and fat. 

It was a very sad time for Grandpa when Grandma passed away December 
25i 1930. His family all rallied around him but I'm sure it couldn't be 
the same for him. 

For the last year or so of his life he went to live with his daughtter, 
Minnie, in Rexburg. It was here that he passed away July 2?, 1939 at the 
age of 79. Funeral services were held in the Third Ward Church. He was 
buried in the Rexburg Cemetery beside his wife. 

Written March 22, 1984, by his Grandson, 

Ralph W . Kauer 



BECK FUNERAL SERVICES HELD 
RESIDENT HERE FOR PAST 35 YEARS 
SERVICES HELD IN THIRD WARD CHAPEL 
Funeral services were conducted Saturday In the 
Third Ward LDS Chapel for John Beck, 79, resident of 
this community for the past 35 years, who died at the 
home of his daughter, Mrs. Alonzo Hinckley, of ailments 
incident to old age. Bishop Edward Powell officiated 
at the services and internment was in the Rexburg 
Cemetery under the direction of the Beneficial Mor- 
tuary. Mr. Beck was born January 24, i860 at 
Wurttenberg, Germany. He came to the United States as 
a convert to the LDS faith in 1902 and moved to Rexburg 
where he has resided since. He was engaged in farming 
until a few years ago when his health forced him to 
retire. His wife preceeded him in death eight years 
ago. He is survived by three sons and one daughter, 
William Beck of Menan, Otto Beck, John Beck, and Mrs. 
Hinckley all of Rexburg. 

Rexburg Standard - August 3, 1939 




i 
4 



LIFE HISTORY OF WILHELMINE WEBER BECK 

My Grandmother, Wilhelmine Weber Beck, was born May 21, 1864 at Glas- 
hofen, Wurttenberg, Germany, the daughter of Ludwig Weber and Dorothea 
Stiefel Weber. She was the youngest child in a family of four boys and 

four girls. 

She attended grade school and spent her early childhood at Glashofen, 
where she and her family were members of the Lutheran Church. The family 
owned a small farm out in the country. Her Father was ill for many years 
so her early youth was spent in helping her parents. She used to tell 
about how they would go into the nearby woods to cut hay for their animals. 
Her Father, Ludwig Weber, passed away September 28, 1888. 

In her early years she met Johann Beck, who was a freighter, who often 
came to Glashofen. She was married to Johann Beck December 24, 1889. They 
became the parents of ten children, seven boys and three girls. Three of 
these children, Elsa Margarete, Albert, and Johann Robert died in infancy 

in Germany. 

Her Mother, Dorothea Stiefel Weber, joined the Latter Day Saint Church 
June 4, 1891 and two years later on August 12, 1893 migrated to America 
and settled in Rexburg, Idaho. Her sister, Rosine Dorothea Weber Foell 
left Germany April 30, 189^ with her two children, William Charles and 
lena, and joined her Mother in Rexburg. 

The fact that her Mother and sister were already in America perhaps 
was one of the incentives that started my Grandparents thinking of coming 
to America. The LDS Missionaries were also encouraging them to go to 
America. Conrad Walz was one of these Missionaries and proved to be a real 
friend to them after they arrived in Burton. 

On July 18, 1902 they left Germany for America with four of their 
children, Rosalie Karoline (Rosa), my Mother, Johann Friedrich, Otto Gott- 
leib, and Wilhelm Gottleib. Their oldest son, Christian, never did come 

to America. 

Upon arriving in America, they came directly to Rexburg, Idaho. They 
spent some time with her Mother and then moved to just west of the old Third 

Ward Church. 

They acquired ten acres of land that is located across the road north 
and east of the present Rexburg Stake Center, and built a log house on it. 
Later they built a home on a 20 acre farm in Burton that is located about 
a mile and a half straight east of the Burton Church. It was here my Grand- 



mother spent the remainder of her life. After arriving in America their 
son John Fredrick and a daughter Minna (Minnie) were born. 

Shortly after arriving in Burton, she and three of her children, 
Rosa, Otto, and Bill were baptized members of the Latter Day Saints Church 
on August 2, 1906. 

On October 1, 1919 i when her son William was married in the Salt Lake 
Temple to Rosa Rottweiler, Grandpa and Grandma Beck were sealed as husband 
and wife in the Salt Lake Temple on the same day. They also had six of 
their children sealed to them. The three who had died in infancy in Germany 
and William, John Fredrick, and Minnie. 

My earliest memories of my Grandmother was when my folks would take 
us kids there to visit. One of the great fascinations to me was Grandma's 
pie cupboard that hung on the wall in the kitchen. 1 don't remember of 
there ever being a time when there weren't pies in that cupboard. No one 
was ever at her home very long before she was serving them a piece of pie, 
cake, cookies, or just a drink. 

One of our favorite days to visit Grandma was on Easter. She always 
made little Easter Nests of green twigs and filled with Easter Grass. 
She would fill these with colored Easter Eggs, chocolate bunnies, marsh- 
mallow chicks, and a toy bunny or chicken. 

As I grew older I enjoyed being with Grandma as she was always very 
interesting to talk to. She seemed to take a special interest in each 
one of us and we always knew she loved us. 

They had a basement in their home that was always filled to capacity 
in the fall with their fruit and vegetables from their garden. She also 
had two or three barrels that she used to. make her apple cider or wine 
from her various kinds of berries. Some of the old timers of our Ward 
used to tell us that they always liked to go Ward Teaching to her home 
last because then they were sure she would always have a glass of wine 
and some goodies for them. 

Grandma always kept a neat, clean, yard with beautiful flowers that 
she enjoyed sharing with her friends. She was often found visiting the 
elderly or ill, always thinking to take them a pie, cake, loaf of bread, 
or something to brighten their day. 

She was a Relief Society Visiting Teacher in the Burton Ward for 
many years and always enjoyed taking part in her Relief Society meetings. 

For the last few years of her life she was afflicted with Sugar Dia- 
betes. She passed away December 25, 1930 at hor home in Burton. Funeral 



Services were held Monday, December 29th at the Burton Church. Sh 
buried that day in the Rexburg Cemetery near her Mother and Sister. 



e was 



Written March 20, 1984 by her Grandson, 

Ralph W. Kauer 



MRS. MINNIE BECK PASSES AWAY 

Impressive funeral services were held Monday 
December 29 t at the Burton Church for Mrs. Minnie 
Beck. Mrs. Beck was one of the early pioneers of 
this valley, coming here from Germany. She leaves 
a husband and a large family of grown boys and girls 
to mourn her passing. Speakers at the funeral were: 
Sterling Nelson, James Blake, Bishop Conrad Walz, 
and Bishop James R. Smith. The opening prayer was 
offered by Mr. Rottweeler and the benediction by 
Wm. Beattie. Internment was in the Rexburg Cemetery 
under the direction of Vern J . Keller of the Beneficial 
Mortuary Co. 

Rexburg Journal - Jan 2,1931 






CHRISTIAN BECK 



Christian Beck was born December 21, 1881. He was the 
oldest of a family of ten children. Grandpa Beck adopted him. 
He was Grandma Legitimay's son. He stayed in Germany where he 
was born, grew-up and died in Hall, Wurttenberg, Germany. He was 
a baker. He died February 14, 1920. 

His temple work has been done. He was baptized July 14, 
1920, endowed on December 20, 1921, and was sealed to his parents 
on— Oefeetee-r— 3-7 — 3r^3r9 In Liu 



Dear patron: 



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L^4 



Please list the; ch^dlChristian, born 21 Dec. 1881, on a 
separate | sheet with the mothe j|^jdy,%b©cause he was born illegitimate , 
and Johann Beck;isi;his' step^faM transcript of his Temple 

Index card with name Christian We per .I jS'ji;^ 

Note also 1 the red underlined discrepancies on the datas. 
Christian^ sealing date on your) sheei/ '3 °ct»1919, could not be located 




Christian i;could be {"sealed ;;tb'' her^and^'td' his step-father • \ 



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INDEX CARD TO /W(AA/U : ^W ; TEMPLE RECORDS 

No fo 3 V Bpok \2) - P Page , / f7 



Name in full W EM% - ?AaJU 



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When born 




Where born /^A^/, IaMjUA/^ ; 






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When died 
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.To 
Parents 







X 

JOHNANN FRIEDREICH BECK 

Johnann Friedreich Beck was born October 6, 1891 at Hall, 
Wurttenberg, Germany. The son of Johnann Beck and Wilhelmine 
Weber Beck. He was the third child of a family of ten children. 
At the early age of eleven, in the year 1902, Johnann emigrated 
with his family to the to the United State of America. 

His grandmother, Dorothea Stiefel Weber; his aunt, Rosine 
Dorothea Weber Foell; and her two children, had come to the 
United States of America prior to that time and were living in 
Rexburg, Idaho. Upon arriving in America the Beck family went 
directly to Rexburg to be with them. 

Father John Beck built a log cabin on ten acres of land 
north of Rexburg. It still stands today. They lived there about 
a year. Then they moved to a farm south west of Rexburg and 
lived in the Burton Ward. They built a home and that is where 
Fred spent his childhood days growing up with his family. 

Fred went to Marietta and Cedar Point public schools. When 
Fred was a teenager he left home, never to return. All ties with 
the family were cut. Some say he went to fight with the Germans 
in World War I . No records were ever found in the US Army 
records. Others say he went to Montana. Wherever? no one has 
heard from him. 

My father, Otto, told of how the two of them had to sleep in 
the same bed. Father also told of feelings between Fred and 
their dad. Anyway no one has any record of where he went or what 
he did . H4-s- t e m pi e w o rk hac not boon -deae — a-s of Jan uaxy— 2-Q-, 

Note: I just found out today that Ralph Kauer, did Uncle Johnann Friedreich Beck's temple 

work. On December 11, 1998 he did his Baptism, April 16, 1999 the initiatory work and 
on May 4, 1999 his endowments were done in the Idaho Falls Temple. 
Sealed to parents on: 



*r2+s 



LIFE HISTORY OF ROSALIE KAROLINE (ROSA) BECK KAUER 



My Mother, Rosalie Karoline (Rosa) Beck, daughter of Johann Beck and 
Wilhelmine Weber Beck, was born March 25, 1890 at Hall, Wurttenberg, Germ- 
any. She was the oldest daughter and the second child of a family of ten ' 




Her "Grandmother , Dorothea Stiefel Webeitf, had joined the Latter Hay™ 
Saint Church and about two years later sailed for America on August \?. , 1893. 
She made her home in Rexburg, Idaho. Mother's Aunt, Rosine Dorothea Weber 
Foell, with her two children, William Charles and Lena, had left Germany on 
April 30 » 189^ and were living with Mother's Grandmother Weber In Rexburg. 
I understand that some of her Uncles and their families on the Beck side 
had come to the United States prior to this time and settled in or around 
the state of Ohio. 

Mother's family received letters from her Grandmother Weber in America 
encouraging them to come to this new country where they could start a new 
life and enjoy the new freedoms she had found. I have been told that her 
Grandmother may have even financed their trip over. 

At the early age of twelve, Mother emigrated with her jvarents and three 
brothers, Fred, Otto, and William, to the United States. Her oldest brother, 
Christian, remained in Germany as he was serving in the German Army. On 
July 18, 1902 they left their home, relatives, and friends in Germany and 
started on their journey to America. 

Upon arriving in America they came directly to Rexburg, Idaho. They 
spent some time with her Grandmother and then the family moved to the south 
west of Rexburg into a home on the farm owned by the Cook Family. While 
living here my Mother attended school in a green frame schoolhoune that was 
on the north side of Main Street near 1st West in Rexburg. 

The following year the family moved to a ten acre farm south west of 
Rexburg where her Father had built a log house for them. 

Later they built a home on a 20 acre farm in the Burton Ward that is 
located about a mile and a half straight east of the Burton Church. It 
was here that Mother spent her early youth. She attended school in the 
Marietta School House in Burton and everyone tells us what a good studont 
she was. She especially" excelled in Arithmetic, but was at the top of her 
class in all her studies. She was always active at parties and on programs. 
She was very good at reciting poetry and loved to sing. She was very ambit- 
ious and spent several summers thinning and hoeing sugar beets around Salem 
and Parker. One summer on the 4th of July she and a group of her friends 




W a mi:j}<\: .• .*•.»■.■ ..i ; - . ■■•.■i:<-u i ' : :.±*iiS-',!ii£L*LL\;M 



a* float in the ;,pai§flj| ^fligl^feujp^Jaiif Jtjif^ptory^isj told>tnat she was 

? 4 'M ".-^^thelflife v 'of the crowd and created a lot of fun for all. 

j.. ,';i:A At the time the Beck Family left Germany they belonged to the Lutheran 
v ■■■'. ;,._•:, . Church.. After moving to the Burton Ward they were converted to the Church 
^..V^ i .of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and Mother was baptized on August 2, 
1906 as were her Mother and two brothers, Otto and William. 

About this time in her life she spent a lot of time working for other 
people in their homes. It was while working at the Charles Woodmansee home 
that she became interested in Ernest Ferdinand (Fred) Kauer, whom she later 
married in St, Anthony, Idaho on March 28, 1910. They were married by 
John Donaldson and a reception was held for them at the Beck home in Burton. 



.. -\< She and Dad made their first home on the ^0 acre farm that he owned 
in Burton. He was also* homesteading on 80 acres of dry farm on the Rexburg 



. » 



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'.Bench so they built a one room log house on it and lived there part of the 
time as was required by law to prove up on their dry farm. They made their 
permanent home on the farm in Burton. To this couple were born eleven 
children; Fred James, Ernest (who died when only two weeks old), Richard 
(who died at the age of twelve years), Mary Vilate, Ralph William, Grace B., 
John Douglas, Opal B. (who died when 10 days old), Lorin B., Thelma B. (who 
v "?: ' died when two years old), and Vera B. 

In telling us children of the "old country", she said she remembered 

:•;>?" Vs.:/;:/. 

when the Mormon Missionaries came to see them and stayed over night at 

their home. The next day and for a week afterward the other children 

v*v-.r! ' . '.';■ 
•. threw things at them and called them "Little Mormons". Bishop Conrad Walz 

ftftfGfcJ " . .1.: '' 

was one of these missionaries and was a real friend to the family here in 

5-1 :•?*. . ■ ' 

the Burton Ward. She also remembered her parents taking the family to the 

oi... }■• .«j 

Museum in Germany the spring before they came to the United States. Here 

they saw the old torture blocks, and beheading blocks with the blood stains 

still on them. Ihey also went up to historic "Hangman's Hill", which was 

absolutely bare on top as there had been so much blood there that not even 

* grass could grow. 

Throughout her life, Mother) was very faithful to her religion. She 

spent a good deal of time at Relief Society and teaching Primary. She was 

sustained as President of the Primary in the Burton Ward on July 1, 1928 

and ae\ apart by Bishop Conrad Walz. She was assisted by Margaret Burns 

as first Counoilor, Maud Hall as Seoond Councilor, and Georgia Jensen as 

Secretary. She served in this capacity until she was released October 12, 

1930 •. She used to take the sleigh and team to Primary in the winter and 



- • 



-2- 

■i 



always picked up all the children along her way. They tell us she always 
had a full load and she would tuck the smaller ones under a blanket and 
often there would hardly be room for all that wanted to go with her. She 
is remembered by these youngsters as always having a cookie or a treat of 
some kind for them at Primary. 

She was a very good mother and wife, helping out wherever she could. 
Throughout her life she did all the family washing on the washboard, never 
knowing the convenience of a washing machine. The water was all pumped 
with the old hand pump that stood to the north of the house. Then it had 
to be carried to the house in a bucket where it was heated on the old 
cookstove in a tea kettle, copper boiler, or the reservoir on the end of 
the stove. Even though she had a large family to care for she always kept 
her house spotless and her children clean and well dressed. She often 
helped in' the fields thinning beets and hauling hay or whatever she could 
do. , 

.. _, In. spite of all this work she always had time to help her neighbors 
^^>*|ajj^te>ught.-nany new babies into this world for them before the doc tor ; 4 „ 
arrived. She gave freely of the things she had and often visited the poor 
and sick with food and to help where needed. It might be said that she 
inherited this characteristic from her mother, who was also known for her 
hospitality and kindness to others. 

One year a group of her friends and neighbors decided to have a sur- 
prise party for her on her birthday. They brought a lunch with them and 
she was "REALLY SURPRISED" when the large group arrived. Later in the 
evening she brought out all kinds of cookies, homemade candy, and even a 
freezer of ice cream and a cake to serve to them. Seemed they could never 



get ahead of her, but everyone had a grand evening. 

Her life is quite well portrayed by the following tribute that was 
written to her by Mildred Jensen Johnson, a neighbors daughter. 

TO A NEIGHBOR 

Her life has been a period of unselfish denial for others. She is a 
typical farm wife who, besides caring for her own family is the neighbor- 
hood nurse. She is the Mother of eleven children. Two of them lived long 
enough to receive names and then silently took their flight to the unknown 
world. t Two more had the privilege of staying in the home for sometime and 
then death in the form of typhoid fever and convulsions silently claimed 
them for her own. Through it all she remained calm and said it was for 
the best even when her heart was crying in agony for those who had gone 



-3- 



ahead. Cheerfully she worked, that her husband and children might not b< 
discouraged with life. 

Sometimes in the stillness of midnight a worried neighbor comes fori 
her assistance and in the breaking of another day she lays la' 'new born bal 
in the tired mother's arms, sees that they are comfortable and departs 
with a cheering word and a kind smile. Then she patiently goes each dayj 
bathes the baby, and cares for it's mother until the woman is able to do, 
her own work. :;; * ,f: 

When silent death comes to a neighbor's home she comes to soothe thi 
stricken parents or children. It is she who keeps a silent vigil through 
the night- -keeping a fire and turning the conversation to pleasant thingi 
It is she who thinks to carry to the cemetery pretty flowers for her own< 
relatives and others graves. 

When sickness comes to the community she appears at the time of grei 
est needs. If there is a quarrantine case she keeps in touch with the 
family by telephone. Her name is recorded as a teacher and willing Presi 
ident of the Primary. 

At this time she is quite weak and sick probably caused from her 
strenuous life of activity, but she is cheerful as ever, thinking not of| 
herself but of those near her. 

She is indeed, an ideal for all women to pattern after! 



Mother died at the early age of 42 years, on June 5, 1932 at the ol< 
Beck Home in Burton. -, 

She was loved and held in high esteem by her friends as shown by th< 
large crowd which attended her funeral. The Church was "filled to over- 



flowing and some of her friends were unable to get into 'tne' Church at f al3. 
This was in 'spite W'one^'of^the Severest rain storms Imowrf^^his%oinmii| 
ity. It seemed like even the Heavens were crying with us. '1 remember wl 
how the funeral procession had to stop on the way to the Church as the r4 
came down so hard they could not see to drive. During the funeral the 
storm cleared and the sun was shining as she was buried in the Burton 1 " 
Cemetery, along with four of her children. ' f - ' ' V n ^-' : 

* ■ 

.. <>:i ' . . •=•• raft feVV , L{ r M-" 

' Compiled and written in 1955*"by her sonj 

Ralph W>I^uer ]f ^ ; - ; ^ 
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-4- 



' r " LIFE HISTORY OF ERNEST FERDINAND KAUER 

My father; Ernest Ferdinand Kauer, or Fred, as he was known to his friends, 

was born June .3 i 1878 in Durrenroth, Bern, Switzerland, the second son of Johannes 

Kauer and Anna Elisabeth Anliker. He had two brothers, Johannes (John or Jack) and 

Erail,' and two sisters, Freda and Pauline. He also had a half sister and a half 

brother from his father's former marriage. His half brother, Ernest Johannes, died 
1 
in infancy and his half sister, Eliza, came to the United States and later married 

I 

Ole Gothe of Salt lake City, Utah. 

) ' V 

While dad was very young, only two or three years of age, his parents learned 
) 

of the Latter Day Saints Church and were baptized. They soon moved to the Mission 
) 

Home to care for the Missionaries. They lived there for about five years. While 

I 

there it was decided that the family should go to America, where they could be 
\ 
nearer their Church and the Temples. As money was very scarce, the parents decided 

k to send the children to America with returning LDS Missionaries as the children 

could travel for half fare that way. John was sent first, then Eliza. At the 

tender age of about seven years, my father was sent to America with Missionaries, 
V 
leaving his parents and family. He sailed on August 29 • 1885 from Liverpool, 

] * " 
England on the S.S. Wisconsin with his destination listed as Salt Lake City, Utah. 

When he arrived in Utah, he went to a place called Pleasant Green, now Magna, and 

was met by a Mr.& Mrs. John Hurst, with whom he lived for the next four or five 

years until the rest of, his family were able to come to America in 1889 . While 

.living with the Hurst Family he went by the name of Freddie Hurst. They taught 

.him to speak English and he had no reason to use his Swiss language anymore. He 

.was accepted as a member of the Hurst Family so much that when his parents came 

.from Switzerland, it was hard to accept them as his parents as he did not know 

I 

fc them anymore. It was very difficult for him to communicate with his parents as 

P 

fc they could not understand any English and he had almost forgotten the Swiss language, 

P 

~He often told us of his life with the Hursts, and how he used to herd sheep and do 

^ other odd jobs for them. Even though he had to work hard while living there, he 

W 

^ always appreciated what they did for him. 

^ It was while living in Pleasant Green that dad started his schooling. He also 

^attended school in Logan, Utah and finished his schooling at the Marietta School 

Win Burton, Idaho. 

I After leaving Pleasant Green the family moved to Salt Lake City and then to 

k Logan, Utah. It was while living in Logan that dad's parents were able to go 

^through the Temple for their own Endowments and have their children sealed to them 

Lfor time and all eternity. Dad was baptized into the LDS Church on January 3, 1893. 



> 



After living here for about two years, the family decided to move to Rexburg, Idaho, 
bo dad, with his father and two brothers made the trip. to Rexburg in a covered 
wagon. Grandpa hired a negro, by the name of Enoch Able, to drive his team and 
wagon to move the few things they had accumulated. In payment for the trip, Grand- 
pa gave Mr. Able a cow that Uncle Jack had earned while living in Logan. They 
arrived in Rexburg June 1, 1893» Dad's mother and sisters came about two weeks 
later by train as far as Market Lake, now Roberts. 

It was while the family was living at the Henry Flamm place north of the Sugar 
City Cemetery that dad had the misfortune to break his leg. He was about 1? or 18 
years old at this time and some of the boys were out in the corral roping horses. 
One of the horses hit the fence and knocked a pole into dad's leg, breaking it. 
His parents tried bathing it in sagebrush tea for about 8 or 10 days but it did 
no good and he was really suffering with it. His mother sent his brother Emil for 
a Doctor and he brought back a Dr. Rivers, who set the leg. As soon as the doctor 
finished, dad seemed to relax and was able to sleep. The leg healed alright except 
for the fact that it was set crooked and always bowed in a little after that. 

Soon after this, dad went to work for A.M. Carter in Burton. As I remember, 
dad told me that he was to be paid $15.00 a month. During the summer they would 
cut wild hay in the meadow, then pitch it onto a wagon, pull into the end of the big 
barn, where he would pitch the hay into the loft of the barn. He worked for Mr. 
Carter all one summer. When they went to settle up in the fall of the year, Mr. 
Carter told dad that he didn't have any money to pay him but would give him a colt 
for his summer wages. He took the colt home with him. A short time laterGrandpa 
wanted to pay his tithing but had no money. He gave dad's colt to the Bishop in 
payment of his tithing. This was rather upsetting to dad. 

He later went to Yellowstone Park to work with his brother John, taking care 
of a herd of cattle. Here they furnished the milk and veal for the Yellowstone 
Hotel. They also took a wood contract for supplying, cutting, and cording the 
wood for the Hotel. For about three summers he also drove the stage in Yellowstone 
lark. He hauled freight in and out of Yellowstone Fark with a team and wagon. He 
used to tell his family stories about his experiences while hunting and' fishing : 
there . 

Coming back to Rexburg, he purchased *K) acres of land in Burton from a Mr. 
Bunnell for $700,00 and also homesteaded 80 acres of dry farm land on the Rexburg 
Bench. . '• : ' : ' 

On March 28, 1910 he was married to Rosalie Karoline (Rosa) Beck in St. Anthony, 
Idaho by John Donaldsen. A wedding reception for them was held at the Beck home 
in Burton. From there, he took his bride and moved to their farm in Burton. They 
built a one room house on their dry farm and lived there part of the time as the 



o_ 



law said they must live there six months out of the year to prove up on the land. 
Their first three sons were born at the Beck home in Burton. Fred James was bom 
November *f, 1910, Ernest was born May 11, 1912, and Richard was born August 18, 
1913. Ernest died when only two weeks old. Next -a daughter, Mary Vilate, was 
born to them November 20, 1915; followed by Ralph William born January 12, 1918; 
Grace B. born February 20, 1920; John Douglas born April 12, 1922; Opal B. born 
December 5, 1923 died when she was ten days old; Lorin B. born December 16, 192^; 
Thelma B. born May **, 1927 died at two years of age; and Vera B. born April 10, 
1930 ; who were all born on the farm in Burton. 

Dad did all his farm work with horses and was always a hard worker. After 
the crops were planted on the wet farm, he would take the horses and wagon and go 
up and stay on the dry farm for a week at a time, getting the crops in and things 
taken care of there. They hauled all their water from down by Erickson's for use 
on the dry farm. This water was hauled in a big steel tank on a horse drawn wagon. 
He would drive his four head of horses across the ditch and with the wagon in the 
water, he would put one foot on the wheel and the other on the bridge and would 
dip water from the stream into the opening on the top of the tank with a bucket 

1 

that had a long dipper-like wooden handle. 

While dad was away on the dry farm the summer that Richard was about 10 or 11 
years old, Richard decided to play with matches out by the hay stack, and had the 
misfortune to set it on fire. The neighbors all came to help put out the fire but 
it completely burned the hay stack and barn. They managed to save part of the^ . 
'chicken coop, part of the grainery," and the derrick. These stlll^fcarry marks- of 
the fire. The following summer dad and Ed Davis (Pauline's first husband) bui^l 
a new log barn that is still standing. Richard died at the age of 12 years of 
Typhoid Fever. 

Dad used to run about 50 to 75 head of cattle out in the lava's every year 
for pasture. We would take them out early in the spring and leave them until fall. 
It was always a joy to dad to be able to ride a horse out there with one of us boys 
and check over the cattle. It was a very common thing to see rattlesnakes in the 
lava's at that time. 

In 1927 came the real thrill for our family of owning our first car. * It was 
a new Chevrolet Coupe with two seats and two doors and we were really proud of it. 

On February 9i 1928 his mother died at her home in Rexburg and was buried in 
the Burton Cemetery. ' J v.: •;•„.. 

Dad had a great love for hunting and fishing which he has passed on to his 
sons. He often kept the family in meat, such as ducks, pheasants y r and fish. He 
also killed one of the first Antelope ever shot in the Burton area. ;; He and mother 
often took us children and went on fishing trips with relatives and friends. About 



"5f .:, 



-3- 



once or twice a year he would make a trip by team and wagon with some of his neigh- 
bors to get out timber for farm buildings and corral poles. 

He often went on rabbit drives with us boys that were held in the Lava's west 
of Piano. This was rather exciting as thousands of rabbits were driven from all 
directions into a net fence corral, to be killed. The farmers used this method 
to keep the rabbits from destroying their crops. 

Dad was always ready and willing to help a friend and often loaned money Lo 
his neighbors and friends. At the time of his death there were still several notes 
that people owed him that were left unpaid. 

Quite a tragedy in dad's life was when my mother died, June 5. 1932. He never 
seemed to be well after that but his grief seemed to drive him on to work even harder 
than usual. The winter after she died was called an "open winter" and he plowed in 
the field every month with a hand plow and team with him walking behind it. He 
managed to keep the family togetHer, but seemed to sort of pine away after losing 
mother. He was always a loving father and husband and a good provider. 

After going to several doctors in Rexburg and getting no relief from the 
terrible suffering, he was taken to the LDS Hospital in Idaho Falls where Dr. Cline 
took care of him. When the doctors decided they could do no more for him he was 
moved to his sister Freda's home where he passed away May 16, 193^ a ^ the a S e of 
almost 56, leaving four sons and three daughters. He was buried in the Burton 
Cemetery next to his beloved wife and their four children who precoeded him in 
death. 

Compiled and written by his son, Ralph W. Kauer in 1955 



a.. 



Written by Mary Ann beck a Daughter 

HISTORY OF OTTO GOTTLIEB B£CK 

Otto Beck, son of Johann Beck and his wife Wilhelmine, was 
born October 19, 1893 at Hall, V,\jrtemberg, Germany, He was the 
fourth child of a family of ten. At the early ag-e of eight years, 
in 1901, he emigrated with his family to the U.S. Landing in 
New York, they saw the statue of Liberty. Some of his uncles and 
tholr families had come to the U.S. prior to this tirre and had 
settled in and around the state of Ohio. Being in search of a 
place where they could build their home and find future happiness, 
the Becks moved on west until they arrived in Rexburg, Idaho. 

Here they lived for a year in the Rexburg Third Ward on the 
farm now owned by Eva Cook. While living here Otto attended school 
in the green frame school house near where the high scho:>l now 
stands. 

The following year the family moved to a farm south west of 
Rexburg and later to the old Beck home in the Burton Ward, now known 
as the Seventh Ward. Otto's father had purchased this farm and 
had built a house on it and it was here that Otto spent his youth 
until he was married. He attended school at Cedar Toint. Otto 
enjoyed Arithematic most of all. He went to the Seventh grade. 
Then he was a sheep herder for 2 or 3 years. Then he was a dry 
and wet farmer with his family. Otto and Bill, a brother, went 
to the timber to get logs for fence posts. Otto enjoyed being 
in the timber where it was peaceful and quiet, he loved to be 
close to nature. He like hunting, fishing, dancing, and going 
to the shows and Church. 

He worked for the Rexburg Lumber Co. for a few suTurers. He 
was very ambitious, many summers he worked at thinning and hoeing 
sugar beets, milking cows, and building fence. Otto and his ti**i<e C- 
Bill jfeft built the home Otto lived in until he died. His wife 
Mary and daughter still live in the house on the farm that he 
built. 

At the time the Beck family left Germany they belonged to 
the lutheran Church, After moving to the Burton Ward they were 
converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Lattor-Day saints. 
Otto was baptized on. August 2, 1906 as were bother his parents, 
one sister and two brothers, / 



2 

Otto was married when he was about 30 years ol<^ . Pie 
met Holla Weber at a dance at K^M^^^^m^^4^^^f'i^ho. 
They got married in December 26, 1923. Otto and his wife moved 
to a 40 or 80 acre farm which he was renting from Richard Smith. 
That is where their only child was born, a daughter named R.owena . 
They were neighbors of Holla's parents the Gottlieb Weber family. 
Her sister Mary helped to care for the baby when it ca^e. They 
lived over there for about 10 years. During this time Holla became 
interested in the L.D.S. Churhh and became a member. She had a 
strong testimony and she and her husband and daughter went to the 
Logan Temple to be sealed for time and eternity. She was a Relief 
Society teacher for many years and started on geneological work. 

Then the Becks divided the land and Otto got the 10 acres 
from his parents farm south west of the city. He and his family 
moved there into a log cabin house. During this time his wife 
Molla became ill with a bad heart. Her sisters, Mary and Meda came 
and helped her with the house work and other things 

Otto build a home next to the log cabin, it took about two 
years to complete. They moved in to it. Molla lived in the new 
home about a year befor she died in 1938 of a bad heart. 

In 1939, March 22, Otto married a second wife. She was Molla 1 s 
sister Mary. To-* this union was born two children. Mary Ann 
Oct. 14, 1940 and AaS\i* June. 13, 1943. Mary was converted to 
the Church on September 6, 1941. 

Otto farmed about 110 acres. Otto was an Elder and in 1952 
became a high priest. He was also a director on the Rexburg Canal 
for about five years. He had his picture in the Rexburg paper for 
being one of the outstanding farmers that believed in building 
up his land. 

He was a hearty person and tried to help every person along 
his path. On December 22, 1955 he had a Stroke and on Dec, 24 he 
died at the age of 62, 

On June 6, 1956 Mary and Mary Ann had the Sealing Ordinance 
done for time and all eternity in the Idaho Falls , Temple. 

Otto was preceded in death by his first wife and daughter 
Amelia who died at birth, parents, all his brothers and sisters 
except his brother John Beck and sister Minnie Hinckley. 



Memories of Uncle Otto Beck as recalled by his nephew, 

Ross Beck Hinckley 



Uncle Otto was about the kindest and most generous man I 
have known. He had a good sense of humor and a very contagious 
laugh. He had a gruff voice that may have frightened those who 
didn't know him, but he was very gentle. He was like a second 
dad to me and always treated me like I was his son. 

About the first thing I can remember about Uncle Otto was 
the 1935 black Chevrolet car he owned. It had dented fenders, 
but other than that it was a really good car. 

We would go on many fishing trips in it to Warm River and 
Island Park. He had a trailer that he would put behind it and in 
the fall and we would go into Island Park and cut and load fire 
wood into the trailer. We enjoyed many fishing trips, my dad 
(Lon) , brother (Kay), and myself. When my brother Carl got old 
enough we would take him to. 

There was a really good fishing hole up by Last Chance, near 
a railroad bridge. Although it was illegal, we would put snag 
hooks on our lines and we would really catch the fish. 

Uncle Otto loved candy so we would always stop at Jack's 
Store near Warm River and get a supply of candy and pop. Uncle 
Otto was the one who introduced me to Pepsi. 

At one time Otto chewed tobacco, but realizing it wasn't a 
good thing to do, he substituted bitter sweet licorice for the 
tobacco. He would keep it in a little cigar box in the garage. 
One day he offered me some; I really didn't like it, but I told 
him it was good. 

I remember a lesson he tried to teach us once about drinking 
wine. He offered Kay and me some one day to see what we would 
do. We both took a sip and I thought it was really terrible 
stuff. It sort of burned all the way down and as I jumped around 
he laughed and told me to remember how uncomfortable I was if I 
was tempted to ever try it again. 

He was a very hard worker and was always busy. He raised 
mink and fox, cattle, cows, horses, and always had ducks and 
geese around. He loved animals and would go to the livestock 
auctions and buy animals no one else wanted. He'd then fatten 



Otto 
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them up and would make nice looking animals out of them. He also 
would buy old horses to have slaughtered to feed to his mink and 
fox. 

Many times he would get too attached to them and couldn't do 
away with them. Once he bought such a horse, a white one. He 
told us we could have it if we would take care of him. We had so 
much fun that summer with the horse. I can't remember his name. 
But, by fall the novelty of caring for him wore off and so my dad 
had Uncle Otto come and get the horse. We were sad to see it go, 
but the deal was that we would take care of it and we didn't so 
we had to pay the price . 

Kay and I would work for Otto. We would grind the meat to 
feed to the mink and fox and also feed them. We also would help 
during the grain and hay season. I remember that Mary Ann would 
drive the tractor that pulled the hay wagon and we would have to 
tell her to slow down, as she liked to go too fast. 

The going wage for a man was one dollar per hour and 
seventy-five cents for boys. Uncle Otto told us that we worked 
like men and were worth the one dollar per hour. Many times he 
would just reach into his pocket and give us whatever he had as 
he said, "Boys always need to have some money to spend." 

He loved watermelon and so all during the summer we would be 
treated to watermelon. 

In the early 1950' s, Otto bought a one ton Dodge army truck. 
He loved that truck and built a nice grain bend on it . 

I also remember the 194 9 green two-door Ford car that he 
bought. He was so proud of it. When he bought the 1949, I was 
the lucky recipient of the 1935 Chevy. Kay got a calf. I really 
didn't have the money to pay for the car so he said he would take 
the calf back for payment so Kay and I could be co-owners of the 
car. 

In the early 1950 ' s Otto's health started going down hill 
and he had to have surgery. We did he's chores for him. He 
never could do his work alone from then on so Kay and I helped 
out. Aunt Mary rented the farm out to a Japanese fellow so Otto 
didn't have to worry about the farm anymore. 

He had a nice Ford tractor and he ran into the ditch once 
and he laughingly said, "Whoa, whoa (he was use to horses) , but 
the tractor didn't stop." 



Otto 
Page 2 



He had an Oliver wire-tie baler and he" would cinch the wire 
so tight that the bales were really big and heavy. We always 
wondered why he did that . 

We enjoyed visiting back and forth and if we didn't go see 
him when he thought we should he'd come over and say, "Don't you 
believe in visiting your relative?" 

In the spring of 1955 he bought a blue Ford car. He really 
was proud of it, but only got to enjoy it for about seven months; 
before he passed away. 

I loved Uncle Otto. He was really quite a special person in 
my life. 



Otto 
Page 






LIFE HISTORY OF OTTO GOTTLIEB BECK 

Otto Gottlieb Beck was born October 19, 1893 at Hall, Wurttenberg, 
Germany, the son of Johann Beck and Wilhelmine Weber Beck. He was the 4th 
child of a family of ten children. At the early age of nine, in "the year 
1902, he emigrated with his family, to the United States. His Grandmother, 
Dorothea Stiefel Weber, his Aunt, Rosine Dorothea Weber Foell and her two 
children, had come to the United ' States prior to that time and were living 
in Rexburg, Idaho. Upon arriving in America the Beck family came directly 
to Rexburg where they could be with 'some of their family and old friends 

from Germany. 

They spent some time with his Grandmother Weber and then they moved 
to a home west of where' the old Third Ward Church used to be. 

They next moved to a log house that his Father had built on a ten acre 
plot that he had acquired that was about a mile south west of Rexburg. 

A year or so later they moved to a farm southwest of Rexburg and in 
the Burton Ward. Otto's Father had purchased this farm and built a home 
on it. It was on this farm that Otto spent his childhood days. 

That fall Otto went to the Marietta School in Burton. The next fall 
he went with his brothers to the Cedar Point Public School, and it was there 
that he completed his schooling. From the time that he completed his school- 
ing until he was married he worked with his brothers, sisters, and parents 
on the farm and on a small dry farm that they had purchased. 

At the time the Beck Family left Germany they belonged to the Luthern 
Church, but were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 
not long after moving into the Burton Ward, and Otto was baptized on August 4,^ 
^ 1906 along with his Mother, one sister, and one brother. 

On Sef£5S«r^ 36, 1923 he was united in marriage to Molly Weber. To this 
marriage was born a daughter, Rowena. Otto and Molly made their first home 
on the ten acres where they lived in the log house his Father had built. 
Then they rented the Richard Smith farm and moved there for a number of years 
During this time they purchased a sixty acre farm. Later they moved back to 
the ten acres where they built a new home. On September 18, 1938 Molly pass- 
ed away. This added mora problems and sorrows to Otto's life. 

On. March 22, 1939 he was united in marriage to Mary Weber, his present 
wife, and to this marriage was born * daughter^ Mary Ann, c+xj*. A47i4Ac*J-^ 

Throughout his life Otto took an interest in Mother Earth and he liked 



to till the soil and care for his crops as they matured from seeding to 
harvest. He always had an interest in livestock and always managed to 
have a number of cattle about his farm. He was not afraid of hard work 
and spent most of his time out with his cattle or working the land. He 
enjoyed visiting with his neighbors and was often seen along the road or 
on the farm talking to and discussing problems with his friends. He took 
a big interest in the Rexburg Irrigation Company and represented the comp- 
any as a Director for a number of terms. He always had an interest in the 
Church and especially during the last ten years or so and has given freely 
of his time for his Priesthood activities. He was ordained a High Priest 
on January 4, 1952 by Thomas A. Archibald. He has been a Ward Teacher 
for a number of years and for the last two years has been a Ward Teacher 
Supervisor . 

It should be said that Otto had two of the finest parents that ever 
lived, and he often spoke of them to his family and friends. His Mother 
had a heart of gold and was always to be found at the home of the sick 
with a helping hand and a basket of cookies, pies, or something fitting 
the occasion. She was loved by all that knew her because of her hospit- 
ality and kindness to others. Otto had many of these same characteristics 
and therefore enjoyed life and helped others to do the same. 

Otto believed in being diligent and was always busy. He had complet- 
ed his morning chores and was busy in the yard when he became ill. He was 
taken to the hospital by his wife and friends where he died December 24, 

1955. 

Because of his faithfulness he has been blessed with much of this 
world and I'm sure that he will find a just reward in his Father's Kingdom, 
He is survived by his loving wife, Mary, and two sweet daughters, Rowena 
and Mary Ann, also two grandchildren, a brother John, and a sister, Minnie, 



Written and given at his funeral by his nephew, 

Ralph W. Kauer 



LIFE HISTORY OF WILHELM GOTTLIEB BECK 

Wilhelm Gottlieb Beck, or Bill as he was later known by his friends, 
was born December 7, 1895 at Hall, Wurttenberg, Germany, the son of Johann 
Beck and Wilhelmine Weber Beck. He was the fourth son and the fifth child 
of a family of ten children, seven boys and three girls. At the early age 
of six, in the year 1902, he emigrated with his family, to the United States. 
His Grandmother, Dorothea Stiefel Weber, his Aunt Rosine Dorothea Weber 
Foell and her two children, had come to the United States prior to that time 
and were living in Rexburg, Idaho., Upon arriving in America the Beck family 
came directly to Rexburg where they could be with some of their family and 
old friends from Germany. 

They spent some time with his Grandmother Weber and then they moved 
to a home west of where the old Third Ward Church used to be. 

They next moved to a log house that his Father had built on a ten acre 
plot that he had acquired that was about a mile south west of Rexburg. 

A year or so later they moved to a farm southwest of Rexburg and in 
the Burton Ward. Bill's Father had purchased this farm and built a home 
on it. It was on this farm that Bill spent his childhood days. 

That fall he began his schooling by going to the Burton School. The 
next fall he went to the Cedar Point Public School, and it was there that 
he completed his schooling. From the time that he completed his schooling 
until he was called into the army he worked with his brothers, sisters, and 
parents on the home farm and on a small dry farm that they had purchased. 

In July 1917 he was called into the service of his country as a soldier 
in the United States Army, this was during the first World War. At the 
close of the war in 1918 and with an honorable discharge he returned home. 

On October 1, 1919 he was united in marriage to Rosa Rottweiller. 
To this happy marriage was born a family of six children, two boys and 
four girls. The first two children, a girl and a boy died at birth. Bill 
and Rosa made their first home on a small farm just south of Rexburg. About 
five years later they moved to Camas Creek where they purchased a cattle 
ranch. This ranch lies about nine miles southeast of Dubois and is still 
owned by Bill and his family. In 1932 they purchased a farm in Hamer, Idaho 
and made their home there for the next three years. During the summer of 
1936 they purchased their farm here in Menan, but before they had moved into 
their new home, Rosa died, February 3, 1937- This added many more problems 
and sorrows to the many that Bill already had, but with hard work and a lot 



rTSi 



t. 



of good managing he was able to give his children the necessary care and 
requirements of life for the next few years. 

On March 5» 19^0 he was again united in marriage to Lucy Sellers, 
his present wife, who had five children, three girls and two boys from 
a former marriage. This was a large family, but with love and kindness 
in the home much happiness has been found. 

It should be said that Bill had two of the finest parents that ever 
lived, and he often spoke of them to his family and friends. His Mother 
had a heart of gold and was always to be found at the home of the sick 
with a helping hand and a basket of cookies, pies, or something fitting 
the occasion. She was loved by all that knew her because of her hospit- 
ality and kindness to others. 

At the time the Beck Family left Germany they belonged to the Luthern 
Church but were converted and baptized into the Church Of Jesus Christ 
of latter Day Saints not long after arriving in the Burton Ward. From 
that time to the present they have always been active in Church work. 
While living on his ranch at Camas, even though it was nine miles from 
Dubois, Bill was active in the Church and for a number of years was in 
the Bishopric of that Ward. 

After coming to Menan he became interested in the Cooperative program 
and was a great backer, and builder in helping organize and build to it's 
present standing the Menan Co-op. He has served two three year terms as 
a director within the Menan Co-op, being in that position at the time of 
his death. 

He had a great interest in cattle and always had a small herd on his 
ranch or farm. He believed in being diligent and was always busy. Because 
of his faithfulness he has been blessed with much of this world and I'm 
sure that he will find a just reward in his Father's Kingdom. 

He died April 13, 19^8 and is survived by his loving wife, Lucy, and 
the following children, Lois, Clyde, LaRue, and Joy, five stepchildren, 
three grandchildren, two brothers, Otto and John, and one sister, Minnie. 

Written and given at his funeral by his nephew, 

Ralph W. Kauer 






ROSA ROTTWEILER 



Rosa was born January 13, 1901, in Baigheim, Nordlingen, 
Germany, to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Rottweiler. She came to this 
country when she was one year old. She moved with her family to 
Salt Lake City where they lived for two years. After leaving 
Salt Lake they came to Salem, Idaho. They lived there for 14 
years . 

Rosa married William Beck of Dubois, Idaho, where they made 
their home. 

At the age of 36, Rosa passed away in the Idaho Falls 
hospital on Feb 3, 193 7, with pneumonia and heart trouble. 
Interment was made in the Cedar Butte Cemetery. 

Survivors include -j ade husband, William Beck, four children, 
Lois Norma, Clyde R. , Larue and Joy; her father, Fred Rottweiler 
of Menan; and the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. William 
Clark of Menan; Mrs. Con Jensen of Spencer; Paul and Carl of 
Menan and John of Hamer . 

She had been ill for the last 24 days in the hospital. 



*4 




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Tj^^teJ^ £V k^ hJthC 



ROSA ROTTWEILER RECK 

THE LIFE OF ROSA ROTTWEILER PECK WAS SHORT, RUT SHE HAS A LOVEABLE HARD WORKING 
LADY, HER AND RILLS LIFE ON THE RANCH AT DUBOIS WAS HARD WORK RUT THTIP LOVF TOR 
EACH OTHER WAS WONDERFUL (THEY WORKED TOGETHER) HAYING IN TUF SUMMER AND MILKING 
COWS AND SKINNING MANY RAEBITS IN THE WINTER. 

THE SUMMER AFTER LA RUE WAS BORN IN JANUARY LA RUE BECAME VERY ILL RUNNING A 
VERY RICH FEVER ROSIE BROUGHT l!ER TO IDAHO FALLS TO THE HOSPITAL, SHE WAS IN THE 
HOSPITAL FAR DAYS VEPY ILL, WHEN SHE WAS ABLE TO LEAVE THE HOSPITAL ROSIE CAME 
AND STAYED AT OUR HOME IN MENAN FOR A FEW DAYS AND OflE MORNING AS ROSIE WAS BATHING 
LA RUE SHE DISCOVERED A WOOD TICK BURIED IN HFR HAIR ON THE BACK OF HER HEAD SO 
THEY DECIDED THAT SHE HAD HAD TICK FEVER. 

WHEN ROSIE AND BILLS CHILDREN WERE SMALL BILL WAS PRESIDENT OF THE LDS BRANCH 
IN DUBOIS, IDAHO. 

MANY GOOD TIMES WERE HAD ON THE BECK RANCH AS WE WOULD DRIVE THERE AND STAY 
OVER THE WEEK END HELP WITH THE CHORES AND FISH IN THE CREEK. ROSIE 1 S COOKING WAS 
OUT OF THIS WORLD HER BREAD MAKING FAR WHICH SUE LEARNED FROf 1 HER MOTHER PIES, 
CAKES AND HOME MADE ICE CREAM. ROSIE WAS A HARD WORKING LADY, HER HO ?1 F AND CHILDREN 
WERE ALSO CLEAN. 

ROSIE AND BILL OWNED A RANCH IN HAMER AND WOULD LIVE THERE DURING THE SCHOOL 
TERM SO THEIR CHILDREN COULD ATTEND SCHOOL AND CHURCH. 

THE THREE ROTTWEILER. BOYS PAUL, JACK ?. CARL WORKED FOR BECKS FAR A. NUMBER OF 
SUMMERS IN TUF HAY. SO THEY HAD CLOSE RELATIONSHIP WITH THEIR SISTER ROSA. 

WORDS CAN NOT EXPRESS HOW WE FELT AT THE PASSING OF SISTER ROSIE AS THEY HAD 
BOUGHT A NICE FARM IN MENAN THAT WINTER, ROSIE WAS STAYING IN DUBOIS WITH THE 
CHILDREN SO THEY COULD ATTEND SCHOOL AND COME SPRING THEY WOULD BE MOVING TO MENAN 
TO LIVE. SO WF HAD PLANNED ON BEING TOGETHER VISITTNG AND RAISING OUR CHILDREN. 

SO MY TRIBUTE TO ROSA BECK THAT WE LOST A LOVEABLE. KIND AND HONEST, HARD WORK- 
ING SISTER. 

EDNA ROTTWEILER (SISTER IN-LAW) 



* '1 »••_'_' l ' 1 1 X ■ • 1 . I n > 1 L . . J I 




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— EbSA-4f NSE" ,.(.SI-STE 



p i^iLiMBiEIiX^ SHE CAMF TO TUF U S.A. 

WITH UELUEIIPX^ QvFD IN SA'iTTAKE CITY, UTAH FAR A FEW 

Y £ AKS V'Hr tUJDU!X^JaSLimF.D,IO J5 ALf.M , IDAHO. 



SHE STARTrD^SUQQUIIUSAlxE M)--! Kjnr*™~zm iM SAI FM El Ff-TNTARY SCUOOI 
HAD MANY FREINDS THEN*~4tf^VVRBWHFft^ ["AST or nUROIS I'MFPF 



CUT.' 



ATTENDED SCHOOL THERE, MOVED BACK TO SALEM WHERE SHE MEET WILLIAM HECK. BILL AS 
HE WAS CALLED COURTED FOR SOMETIME. THAN HE WAS CALLED INTO THE SERVICE. 

DURING THAT TIME SHE WORKED DOING GENERAL HOUSE WORK FOR ANY ONE WHO NEEDED 
HELP, SHE WAS VERY NEAT AND CLEAN AND WAS ALWAYS IN DEMAND. 

BILL RETURNED FROM THE SERVICE AND THEY WERE MARRIED. THEY LIVED IN BURTON 
2 CHILDREN 1 YEAR APART WAS BORN AND THEY LOST BOTH A BOY * GIRL THEY LIVED A 
FEW HOURS AFTER BIRTH. THEY FARMED A SMALL ACREAGE. LATER THEY PURCHASED A FARM 
EAST OF DUBOIS WHERE THEY RAISED CATTLE, HAY & GRAIN. MILKED COWS SEPERATED THE 
MILK AND SOLD THE CREAM. 

ROSA WORKED VERY HARD DURING HER MARRIED LIFE WITH FOUR MORE CHILDREN SHE 
WORKED LIKE A MAN. BESIDE HER HOUSE HOLD DUTIES SHE WORKED BESIDE THE MEM IN THE 
HAY FIELD, GOT MEALS FOR THEM. AFTER THE DAYS WORK WAS DONE THE COWS NEEDED' TO BE 
MILKED AND CALVES FED, SHE WAS READY FOR BED. 

WHILE THERE THEY DECEIDED TO MOVE INTO DUBOIS FAR THE WINTER SO THE CHILDREN 
COULD GO TO SCHOOL THERE IS WHEN SHE GOT PNEUMONIA AND WENT TO THE HOSPITAL. 
ALONG WITH A BAD HEART. SHE COULDN'T MAKE IT SHE PASSED AWAY FEBRUARY 4, 1937 
BURIED FEBRUARY 7, 1937 IN ANNIS LITTLE BUTTE CEMETRY. THUS LEAVING BILL AND FOUR 
CHILDREN LOIS, CLYDE, LA RUE AND JOY. JOY BEING 6 MONTHS OLD. SHE NEVER GOT TO 
MOVE INTO THE NEW HOME THEY PURCHASED IN MENAN WHERE THEY PLANNED TO SETTLE DOWN. 



LILLIE CLARK - (SISTER^ 



ON JUNE 17, 1932 ROSA CAME [)P TO MY PLACE IN KILGORE. WIT!! A HUNCH SOMETHING 
WAS WRONG. SO WHEN SHE GOT THERE SURE ENOUGH I WAS SICK. BERNICE WAS ON HER WAV. 
I HAD EVERY THING ALL READY TO PLAY DOCTOR. CON WASN'T HOME SO ROSA SAID I'LL ^0 
TO DUBOIS FAR THE DOCTOR AND CON COULD BRING ME DOWN TO HER PLACE WHERE SHE LI^FD 
ON THE CREEK. ROSA . GOT THE DOCTOR AND WE HOT THERE IN TIME. THE DOCTOR WAS SO 
SCARED. ROSA DROVE SO FAST SHE COULD HARDLY DO ANY THING FROM SHAKING SO HARD 
BUT EVERY THING TURNED OUT OK THANKS TO ROSA AND ALSO HER GOOD CARE SHE HAVE f <E. 
ROSA WAS ALWAYS DOING GOOD THINGS FOR EVERYBODY I NEVER HEARD HER COMPLAIN. SHE 
WORKED HARD ALWAYS GOOD TO HER FAMILY. 

SHE ENJOYED GOING TO DUBOIS TO CHURCH AND WE OFTEN CAME DOWN TO HER PLACE 
GOING WITH THEM TO SPEND THE DAY. SHE WAS A GOOD COOK AND HOUSEKEEPER. SHE LIKED 
HAVING A GOOD TIME. THE LAST DANCE SHE WENT TO SHE HAD A PAD COLD AND GOT 
PNEUMONIA WENT TO THE HOSPITAL AND THERE SHE DIED. IT WAS WINTER AND IT WAS COLD. 
I WENT DOWN TO THE HOSPITAL AND STAYED WIT!! HER WHILE BILL WENT HOME TO CHECK ON 
THE CATTLE. WHEN BILL COME BACK ONE DAY FIE WENT DOWN TO THE TELEPHONE TO CALL 
SOMEONE TO COME AND STAY WITH ROSA ONE NIGHT WHILE HE GOT A GOOD NIGHT'S REST. 
WHEN HE COME BACK TO HER ROOM SHE DIED, PEACEFULLY. 

JACK AND MAUDE TOOK THE CHILDREN UNTIL SCHOOL WAS OUT. 

ELSA JENSEN (SISTER) 



ROSA ROTTWEILER WAS HORN JANUARY 13, 1901 IN GERMANY, SUE CAMF TO TIIF U.S.A. 
WITH HER PARENTS WHEN SHE WAS A YEAR OLD. LIVED IN SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH EAR A FEW 
YEARS WHEN HEP. PARENTS MOVED TO SALEM, IDAHO. 

SHE STARTED SCHOOL IN SALEM AND LATER TO SUGAR SALEM EI.F'TMTAPY SCHOOL. SHE 

UAH MAMV rnrTMHC TUTU lim nnm-Hlr- Tflrtl/ llf-i n t\r\\l r>«n r-r./~-r rsr- rMlr>rt»^ . <t.r-r>r- ^ , , r- 






LIFE HISTORY OF JOHN FREDRICK BECK 



John Fredrick Beck, or Jack, as he was known to his friends, was born 
August 14, Ik, 1903 at Rexburg, Idaho. He was the son of Johann Beck and 
Wilhelmine Weber Beck. He was the seventh son and the ninth child of a 
family of ten children. His parents and older brothers and sister had 
left Germany and come to the United States in search of a new home and a 
place to find future happiness. They arrived in Rexburg, Idaho in August 
1902 and lived there for about a year. They then moved to a farm south- 
west of Rexburg, in the Burton Ward, and this was Jack's home throughout 
his entire life. 

He attended the Cedar Point elementary school and completed three 
years of schooling at the Ricks Academy. 

From his boyhood on he worked with his Father, Mother, brothers, and 
sisters on this home farm and also on a small dry farm his Father owned. 
He always had a great love for horses and enjoyed working with them and 
caring for them. 

When he was about 18 years of age, as most boys do, he and a friend 
decided to find employment away from home. They found work on a construc- 
tion job and spent the summer living in Shelley. 

In July 19^2, at the age of 38 years, he was inducted into the serv- 
ice of his Country to serve in World War II. On August 13» 19^-2, he re- 
ported to Fort Douglas, Utah and then to various other camps before being 
sent to the Asiatic-Pacific Theatre. 

Upon receiving an honorable discharge from the Service, he took a job 
with the railroad at Pocatello. About 19^5 he went to Portland, Oregon 
and worked in the shipyards . He also spent a number of summers in Montana 
working in the mines. A few years later he went back to Montana during 
the summers and worked for some ranchers there. He was very particular 
about the way he stacked hay and everyone wanted him to stack for them as 
he did such a neat job. 

This characteristic of neatness was seen in all Jack undertook to do. 
His home and yard was always kept in excellent condition. As you visited 
him you would always notice that tools and equipment and everything was 
kept in its place and ready for use. 

J.ack lived a quiet life, he loved his home, and loved being in it. 
He spent many hours reading and working in his home and about his yards. 

He was well thought of by all of his neighbors as he was never too 
busy to lend a helping hand with chores or wherever he might be needed. 



Many times he went the extra mile in repairing fences, cleaning ditches, 
and doing the things that farm neighbors jointly do. He was never known 
to speak unkindly of anyone. 

Jack was an Elder in the Latter Day Saint Church and though he didn ' t 
attend services in his later years I personally feel that he lived a good 
life of high ideals as I'm sure those that knew him best would agree. 

He had "been in ill health for the last four or five years, but was 
able to continue to live on at his own home. He was very independent 
and insisted on doing things for himself. Last April he suffered a partial 
stroke and his sister, Minnie Hinckley, moved him to her home to stay. 
Here she cared for him and nursed him back to health, so that during the 
summer he was able to go back home once in a while and walk over the fields 
he loved so much. 

I would like to pay a special tribute at this time to Aunt Minnie 
for the way she has watched over Uncle Jack, not only since his illness, 
but throughout their lives. She has always kept in touch with him while 
he was away and kept a close check on him while he was at home to see that 
he was all right and if he needed anything. It was a common sight to see 
her car parked at Uncle Jack's and know that she was there visiting him. 

He passed away February 7i 1961, at the age of 5? years. He was 
proceeded in death by his parents, six brothers, and two sisters. He ic 
survived by his sister, Minnie Hinckley, and a number of other close rel- 
atives. 

Written and given at his funeral by his nephew, 

Ralph W. Kauer 



mJt 



LIFE HISTORY OF MINNIE BECK HINCKLEY 

Grandmother was "born at the family home in Burton on April 11, 1906. 
She was born so near midnight she could have been born on the 12th. She 
was delivered by a midwife, Conrad Walz's mother. She was the youngest of 
ten children, born to John Beck and Wilhelmina Weber who were German imigr- 
ants. 

They were converted to the Gospel by Conrad Walz, who was serving a 
mission in Germany for the Church and they then came to America. 

Grandmother and her brother Jack were born in America while the other 
eight children were born in Germany. 

When Grandmother was four years old, her sister, Rosa, got married. 
She got a beautiful new dress and long white stockings and her Aunt Dora 
gave her a pair of blue garters to wear. It was an exciting time for a 
little girl. 

She went to school in 1913 at Cedar Point. Her teacher's name was 
Miss Larson, who she dearly loved. She was a good speller and could recite 
well. 

She attended Cedar Point for eight years. She would walk two and a 
half miles through the fields. In the winter, the drifts were so deep. 
Very seldom did the children ever get a ride, but when they did they rode 
in a buggy or on horse back. When it was very cold, Marion Taylor Spaulding, 
who lived along the way to school, would help Grandmother carry her books. 
She liked Marion. 

She then attended school for three years at Ricks Academy, now known 
as Ricks College. She lived with her Aunt Dora while she attended the 
Academy and would go home to Burton on the weekends. 

Upon finishing school, she worked in a seed house in Rexburg for two 
years and then in St. Anthony at a seed house for one year. 

She soon met a young man named Alonzo (Lon) Hinckley and they went to- 
gether for several years. Grandmother's Mother was in very poor health 
having diabetes and Grandmother took care of her for quite some time. She 
and Lon had to keep postponing their marriage because of this so they were 
engaged to be married for awhile. 

Her Mother passed away on Christmas Day in 1930- On January 12, 1931 
she and. Lon were married. Soon after their marriage they moved to Salt 
Lake City, where Lon attended Barber School. While living there Grandmother 
did housework for Bishop Lamont of the Hawthorne Ward. They became very 
home sick after a few months and came home to Rexburg. They lived in a 



little house belonging to Grandmother's parents at 317 South 4th West. While 
living in Rexburg four children, Phyllis, Jean, Ross and Kay were born to 
this union. In 1944 they sold their home and moved back to Burton to the 
old home place. They worked together on the farm and enjoyed life there. 
Soon after moving back to Burton their last son, Carl, was born. 

In 1947 Grandmother and Grandfather bought a 70 acre farm along the 
Rexburg foothills and began to construct a new home. This was a family 
project with Grandfather doing most of the work himself. The home was 
completed in 1953 and the family moved in Thanksgiving Day and this has 
been her home every since. 

In 1962 a flood came due to an early spring run off and it was a real 
struggle trying to keep the water from reaching the main floor of their 
home. Grandmother froze her leg and it caused an ulcerated vein, which 
gave her much pain and problems the rest of her life. 

In I968 while working in the potato harvest, Grandmother contracted a 
very bad bronchial infection which developed into asthsma and caused much 
misery and discomfort to her with many stays in the hospital. 

Grandfather Hinckley passed away unexpectedly on November 2, 1970. 
This was a great loss for her as they were very close. 

As the year 197^ came, Grandmother began to lose her vision and it 
was discovered that she had cataracts on both eyes. It was in Hflarch that 
same year that she made an appointment and went to the Idaho Falls Temple 
and took out her endowments. Her son-in-law, Merrill did the work for 
Grandfather and they were sealed on this day. This made her very happy. 

On October 9. 197^ she entered the Idaho Falls Hospital and had sur- 
gery on her left eye. Things didn't go as ,well as expected and she lost 
the sight of this eye. The right eye became steadily worse and at the time 
of her death she was planning a second operation on the right eye. 

As December 1975 came Grandmother began to have very serious problems 
with her lungs and spent 16 days off and on in the hospital. On Christmas 
Day she re-entered the hospital and was there at the time of her passing on 
January 7, 1976. 

She enjoyed going to Church and loved Relief Society. She taught Prim- 
ary and was a Visiting Teacher for many years. When she could no longer 
attend Ghurch it made her very sad. Grandmother was a very warm person. 
She was always interested in what her family, grandchildren, and friends 
were doing. She was a good wife, mother, sister-in-law, daughter-in-law, 



-2 



l*NWI!*l»fc*»**^f**>-^;M»^»^**«v»J 



and Grandmother. She loved people and always was doing things for others. 
Her life was one of industry being always a hard worker. She took pride in 
her yard, garden, and home and was an immaculate housekeeper. No one could 
have asked for a better neighbor and friend. She loved to visit with people 
and particularly enjoyed going to wedding receptions. 

Grandmother did a lot of fancy hand work and was known for the beautiful 
tatting she did. She was generous and one of the dearest and sweetest women I 
have ever known. 

We will miss her, but our loss — will be heaven's gain. 

She leaves five children, 15 grandchildren, and one great grandson. 



This history was written by her daughter-in-law, 

Nancy P. Hinckley 
Read at Aunt Minnie's funeral by her grand daughter, 

Susan Hinckley Cook 



-3- 



CARL ALONZO HINCKLEY 



Written by Mary Ann Beck 

cl /? i -e c jL 

Carl Alonzo Hinckley was born May 13, 1905, in Hibbard, 
Idaho, to Ira Natherial and Emma Luella Keppner Hinckley. Lon 
(short for Alonzo) was one of a family of eleven brother and 
sisters. He attended school in Hibbard. He was a carpenter and 
farmer. He married Minnie Beck Hinckley. 

Minnie and Lon kept postponing their marriage because of her 
mothers illness so they had a long engagement . 

On January 12, 1931, she and Lon were married. Soon after 
their marriage they moved to Salt Lake City, where Lon attended a 
barber school. They became very home sick after a few months 
that they came back home to Rexburg . 

They lived in a little house belonging to Minnie's father, 
John Beck. It was located at 317 South 4th West. While living 
in Rexburg four children, Phyllis, Jean, Ross and Kay, were born 
to the union. 

In 1944, they sold their home and moved out to the country 
in the Burton area to the old Beck home place . They worked 
together on the farm and enjoyed life there. Soon after moving 
back to Burton their last son, Carl, was born. 

In 1947, Minnie and Lon bought a 70 acre farm along the 
Rexburg foothills and began to construct a new home. This was a 
family project with Lon doing most of the work himself. The home 
was completed in 1953 and the family moved in on Thanksgiving 
Day. They have lived there ever since. 

In 1962, a flood came due to an early spring run off and it 
was a real struggle trying to keep the water from reaching the 
main floor of their home. 

As the year 1974 came, Minnie began to lose her vision and 
it was discovered that she had cataracts on both eyes . It was in 
March that same year that she made an appointment and went to the 
Idaho Falls Temple and took out her endowments on March 20, 1974. 
Her son-in-law, Merrill Pincock did the work Lon and they were 
sealed on the same day in the Idaho Falls Temple. Minnie was 
sealed to her parents on October 1, 1919, in the Salt Lake 
Temple. Minnie had been baptized July 3, 1914. 

Uncle Lon died November 2, 1970, in Rexburg, Idaho, of a 
bleeding ulcer and was buried in the Burton Cemetery. Uncle Lon 
was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints as an eight year old child on August 3, 1913. His 
ordinance work was all done in the Idaho Falls Temple. He was 
endowed and sealed to his wife March 20, 1974. He was later 
sealed to his parents December 20, 1989. 

I remember Uncle Lon being my Dad's fishing buddy. The last 
summer my Dad (Otto) was alive Uncle Lon, Carl, Dad and myself 
went to Henry's Lake in Island Park on a fishing trip. I had 
never see such beautiful, large trout. I will always cherish the 
memory of that summer with my Dad and Uncle Lon. 






Saratov 

CapaTOB . 

A city approximately 400 years old and oddly shaped (25 miles long 
and 3 miles wide), Saratov has a fascinating history with the Germans. 
Saratov began as a frontier post in the 1500s. 

Germans were brought to the Volga region by Catherine the Great 
in the 1770s. She needed them to stabilize the area against the many attacks 
by foreigners and make the land productive. Actually, she wanted the 
Germans to take the brunt of most of the attacks so her Russians wouldn't 

i suffer any more. Interesting choice of people for her to make the scapegoat, 

|. since she was German herself. 

jp The terms they got were fairly reasonable. They could settle where 

% they wanted and worship how they wanted. They would not be taxed for 

a- 

%. 30 years, would receive interest-free loans for tools and equipment for 10 
^ years, - and would be guaranteed no military conscription. Thirty-thousand 
^X came. to the Volga region/ and other groups went to other regions, like 
(ry Ukraine and" the Crimea. "By 1900, 300,000 were in 100 German settlements 
^with Saratov as the center. They were proficient, prolific, productive 

farmers. '•:':'■ V" '. ". 

% \ At the time of World "War I, there were two million Germans on the 

'Volga. Lenin established the German. Autonomous Soviet Republic after the 
f Revolution. .Saratov became the largest city on the Volga River and 
£- exported grain and food. • 

t When Stalin formed collective farms in 1927, the Germans refused, 

[:'•. which historically was their, right. Pointing out the law to Stalin only made 
things worse. They were taxed more than the value of their property, so 
they departed throughout the 1930s. Those who did not leave voluntarily 
were deported. Police vans abducted whole families in the middle of the 
night. They resettled in the forests of northern Russia, back to Europe and 
to America. 

Though the Germans proved themselves resilient, they couldn't 



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. mpped^nsoutfaan^fe^ia mayb^ 
freed if 4 the local governor, carries 

- but his promise to pay a $300,000 \ 
ransom^ Worldwide Television 
Ne\vs*repqrted Saturday. 

Gov, DnritikAkyatskov of Russia's 
SaraW region-said that if the ran- 
som Is taid, he might expel the 
Mormon mission from his region, the 
Rrjtish-based agency reported. 

\Mr\r-mnr\ T*lis«31onJlT^eS "AW*' 



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Kussia. 

! ' B^#^* feSftjffi^sionaries were ab- 
L i U ^?i? Sa r§to* about 450 miles souS- 
• f;/ S^ 0SC0 ^ *&&& for $300,000 ran- 
i^fffi f0U l 4 »^^ church never paid 
b (X jhe ransom, but the missionaries were freed 
^ang>P men^ar^^d^d j a te r convicted. 



survive Hitler. After Germany turned on Russia, Russia turned on Saratov. 
The German ASSR was banned. The German language was banned. 
Germans were banned and by cattle cars joined their families in exile in 
northern Russia, Siberia, Kazakstan, and other regions. 

Meanwhile, Saratov participated in the Great Patriotic War (World 
War II). Because the plants in this city, especially the jet aircraft plant, 
supplied Volgograd, then Stalingrad, in the Battle of Stalingrad, it was 
bombed heavily, and one million people were killed. A war monument 
appears high on the highest hill in tribute to the soldiers of that war. 

Nevertheless, the German problem continued. At the time of 
Gorbachev, more than 100,000 Germans were fleeing the country, mostly 
to western Germany, which didn't mind immigrants who already spoke their 
language. Other cities, such as Ulyanovsk, accepted the Germans because 
they would help restore the farms in disrepair. Unfortunately, some ethnic 
problems will exist among some of the citizens of Saratov. 

Saratov was a closed city until 1990. With a population of one 
million, it has much to boast of. Because of a direct pipeline to Moscow, 
Saratov has natural gas. Yuri Gargarin, the first Russian cosmonaut, was 
born here. A bust of him is displayed in the town square. The other bust 
in the town square is the man who first invented the light bulb (though our 
Edison did make ..many improvements). , :V ^ / ^au ■ ,..;. 

^l7^Saratov"also:has'the J best-art ■ museum^ outside of -Moscow and St. 
Petersburg. It is loaded with the art of Levitan (of'Plyos) and other popular 
Russian artists. : :Even the building itself is beautifully designed and deserves 
some attention/;'^' '-';-- ;- : , _ ' v -; -^i'-'-F^ : - 



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HISTORY OF GOTTLIEB AND ANNA MARIE WEBER 



Gottlieb Weber and Anna Marie Grassmick were born in Balzer, 
Russia. Gottlieb was born to Johanes Jacob and Katherina Speck 
on March 13, 1876. Anna Marie was born to Bill Grassmick and 
Elizabeth Hymbuck (or Heimbuch) on March 12, 1874. 

The Webers, Grassmicks and other ancestors migrated from 
Germany into this section of Balzer Saratov, Russia, which was 
newly opened for settlement. They were a religious group of 
German Lutheran . 

When they first came to this section of Russia they lived in 
dug outs in the side of the mountains. 

The German Colony of Balzer (Goloi-Karagish or Balzer, 
German Republic of Volga, Russia) lies in the Valley of the Volga 
about eight miles from the river's bank. The valley slopes down 
from the north and Balzer is on the right side or "Mountain Side" 
and about 60 miles below the city of Saratov. 

The village was not very large. Each family owned a small 
section of land. On this land they were allowed one cow, a pig, 
some chickens, ducks and geese. Ducks and geese were very 
important to the people as they supplied the families with enough 
feathers for bedding. The down quilts were light and warm. Each 
member of the family slept in a feather bed. 

All families were required by the local authorities to raise 
a vegetable garden. This would give them fresh vegetables in the 
summer time. And they could store potatoes, cabbage and other 
produce in a ground cellar, for winter use. Meat was never 
plentiful. They also had to have fruit trees. Apples and pears 
were the most popular. The fruit could be dried and would not 
turn dark . 

The village, in which they lived, was surrounded by forest. 
Each family was issued a permit allowing them to herd their cow, 
ducks and geese at the edge of the forest to graze. This permit 
also allowed them to carry enough wood home each day for the 
fireplace. Wood was the only fuel they knew and the fireplace 
was the only heat in the home . 

Their homes were all built on the same order, long barrack- 
like structures made of brick and mortar. Each house had a large 
living kitchen with a brick fireplace covering one entire wall of 
the kitchen. A brick oven was built into the fireplace. Meals 
for the day were prepared in the morning, put into the oven and 
baked all day. It was this long slow baking that made everything 
taste so good, especially the whole wheat bread and the custard 
pudding . 



There was a bedroom next to the kitchen which was 
partitioned into smaller sections with heavy linen curtains 
reaching from ceiling to floor. 

There was also a storeroom where grain, flour, cured meat, 
butter and eggs were stored. Other things the family owned were 
also locked up in the room so they wouldn't be stolen. 

In 1914 a revolution took place and a lot of this group 
starved to death. This is when Anna Marie's Grandma Grassmick 
died. 



The Webers came from a family of tall, big-boned, hard- 
working people. Johanes Jacob Weber, had blond hair and blue 
eyes while their mother, Katherina Speck, had very red hair and 
green eyes. Katherina died when Gottlieb was young (maybe about 
seven) . Johanes never did remarry. This left the oldest girl 
responsible for the household chores. Gottlieb often felt sorry 
for her. There were one girl and four boys in the family. 

The Grassmicks were smaller people, not much over five feet 
tall. They had dark brown hair and grey eyes. Anna Marie never 
spoke of her father as he died when she was very young perhaps 
three years old. That left her mother with two boys and two 
girls to raise. Anna Margaretha was the older girl and Anna 
Marie was the younger girl. The older brother, David, died of 
Black Fever as young man, he had studied for the ministry, he was 
married and left three young children that his mother then 
raised. The younger brother also died of Black Fever when he was 
fifteen. He had been studying to be a brick mason. 

Being without a man in the house put a lot of hardship on 
the widow Elizabeth and her two girls. One of the girls 
responsibility was to carry the water from the well that supplied 
the village with pure drinking water. The girls each carried two 
buckets. They were only six and eight years old and the well was 
located just beyond the Weber home. The Webers had a big dog 
that would bark and chase them. This frightened the girls making 
them cry and run as fast as possible and worry about spilling the 
water. When the Weber boys realized this they called the dog 
back and tied him up. The girls must have been very grateful for 
this act of kindness, as in later years the two girls married the 
two brothers . 

Young boys and girls were hired out at the age of twelve, 
and by the time they were fourteen they were expected to do full 
days work just like men- -from sunrise until sunset. 

Gottlieb and his brother, Alexander, went to work in a 
Cleaning and Dying factory. They were lucky to get work, as 



their uncle owned the factory. It was here they helped dye the 
yarn with which they made overalls. 

Anna Marie also worked in the dye factory. Her sister, Anna 
Margaretha went to work for a landowner who lived at the edge of 
the village. The landowner let her go home to visit her mother 
on Sunday. The dye factory was also closed on Sunday, so the 
young folks could go to church with their families. This is 
where these young folks would meet and get better acquainted with 
each other. 

At the age of seventeen Gottlieb was drafted into the 
Russian Army to serve his country for four years . Alexander was 
twenty-one when he was also drafted. This was a blessing in 
disguise for Alexander as it got him out of the dye factory. 
Alexander was a sick man, his skin and the whites of his eyes 
were yellow and he couldn't eat. The fumes from the dye was 
poisoning his body. They were drafted in 1894 and released in 
1897. 

Gottlieb and Marie were married February 9, 1895 in Russia 
at the age of 19 and 21. Marie was two years older than 
Gottlieb. Alexander and Margaretha also married. Alexander 
went back to the factory to work. 

When the Webers immigrated into Germany, the country was so 
poor that the Russian ruler let them work in Russia. Gottlieb 
worked in Russia during the summers and moved back to Germany in 
the falls. He was a carpenter and farmer. While he worked in 
Russia, the Weber family lived with Anna Marie's mother, 
Elizabeth Grassmick. 

To the union of Gottlieb and Marie, ten children were born. 
Six of whom were born in Europe and four were born in the United 
States of America. Alex was born on January 10, 1897; Molla was 
born on July 19, 1898; Mary and Katharine were twins and were 
born on October 12, 1901; Kate was born on May 1, 1904; Anna was 
born on May 31, 190 6; Gottlieb on August 19 1908; Amelia on July 
13, 1910; Bill on February 1, 1912; and Mada was born on July 18, 
1915. 

It didn't take long before Alexander was sick again and 
knew he could not work in the dye factory much longer. These 
were a sad and unhappy people . There was no future for them and 
even less for their children. It was the children they were most 
concerned about . 

Things were never good for the German people in Russia. The 
Russian people had always resented the Germans that settled in 
that part of the country. Schools were few and far between, they 
were even being burnt down. There were many adults that had 
never attended one day of school . They could neither read nor 



write. Very little was being shipped into the village, and 
nothing was being sent out. 

Everyone who was able, was moving to America. America was a 
land of freedom with opportunities, resources, and lots of land 
for the people to live or settle. It was inconceivable to the 
mind. 

It was Margaretha who never gave up scheming of how to get 
to America. The problem was- -there was no money. 

Through the grapevine they hear about a captain who shipped 
purebred cattle to America. He also had room for a few 
passengers, for considerably less money than it would cost to go 
first-class. So they sold every thing they had to raise the 
money and started their journey to America- -Alexander , Margaretha 
and three children, in November 1902. 

They left Saratov to set out on the first leg of their 
journey to America. They traveled by train to the coast of the 
Baltic Sea. On the coast of Poland Port they boarded a boat and 
sailed through the Keil Canal. From there they sailed across to 
the English Port of Hull. Then they traveled across England to 
Liverpool by train. They were taken from there by a motor boat 
some distance out to sea and put on a large ship and sailed 
between what is now North Ireland and England from America. They 
landed at St. John, Canada, then traveled by train to St. Paul, 
Minnesota. Then they arrived at Lincoln on January 17, 1903. 

Everything was fine for a while; however, there was a few 
things the passengers had not anticipated. One was that the 
cattle had priority over the passengers. They were not prepared 
for the cold, the food was poor and there was not enough of it. 
They sailed twenty-eight days before landing in America. When 
the people got off the ship they were dirty, sick, and starving. 

Gottlieb came to the United States of America later about 
1906, to join his brother. He worked on the Burlington Railroad 
in Nebraska for a year. He earned enough money and sent for his 
family to come. They joined him April 18, 1907. They settled in 
Lincoln, Nebraska. Everything was new for them in America and 
lots of adjustments were made. 

After Grandmother Grassmick's two daughters and their 
families left for America she continued to take care of her three 
grandchildren- -the children of her oldest son, David, who had 
passed away. She died over there. 

Gottlieb and Marie's daughter, Mary, remembers the Volga 
River where they played in the water. It was always clean and 
clear and not very deep. They also washed their clothes in the 
river. When she was about five years old she helped her Mother 



in the factory. Her Mother spun yarn on a spinning wheel and 
made different fabrics and Mary helped by rolling the yarn into 
balls . 

Mary was six when she and her parents came to America. She 
remembers the trip as being long and hard. Everyone seemed to be 
sea sick and her Mother had a small baby. They did; however, 
have good food to eat on the crossing. The Captain also gave 
them peanuts which was their first encounter with American food. 

While in Lincoln, Nebraska, the family was caught in a big 
flood. It was necessary for Gottlieb to carry the family to the 
roof of a near-by house where they stayed a long time before 
being rescued and taken by boat to a dry house. 

After living in Nebraska for about two years, they moved out 
west and settled north of Rexburg, Idaho. Later they moved to 
the Burton area west of Rexburg. They moved to work in the sugar 
beets. Alexander and his family stayed in Lincoln, Nebraska to 
work on the railroad. 

Gottlieb lived in Burton for about 35 years. He was a 
farmer and a stockman. He worked between 4 to 8 acres. During 
that time all the family except Gottlieb and their son Alex had 
scarlet fever. Their daughter Mary said they were all on their 
backs for two to three weeks. They were quarantined for a month. 
Gottlieb killed a beef and fed it to the family in the form of 
soup. That helped them regain their health and strength. After 
that they moved to a home just west of Rexburg. 

Then in 1918, Gottlieb's brother, Alexander, decided to 
apply for a railroad pass- -one he had earned. He took his oldest 
son Alex and came to visit his brother, Gottlieb and family, out 
west in Idaho. This was fine with the rest of the family, until 
they returned from their vacation and calmly announced that they 
both had fallen in love with the farms, mountains, people, the 
way of life out west and wanted to live there. 

His wife Anna Margaretha, wasn't too anxious to make the 
move, but Alexander had his way. They sold all their belongings 
and moved to Rexburg. He started to farm in Burton, then moved 
to Thorton, Idaho and farmed there until 1931. They bought a 
three room home in Lorenzo and lived there and had a few chickens 
and one cow. Their children, all lived around the area close by. 
They loved this little home and all the people around them. 

Alexander became a mail carrier for the Postal Service. He 
did that until he retired. 

Gottlieb was President and Director for the Rexburg 
Irrigation Canal Company. Gottlieb and Marie were hardworking, 



good people. They were very conscious of their family's needs. 
Gottlieb enjoyed doing business. 

The Weber family was Lutheran. Anna Marie became interested 
in the LDS Church some but never joined. 

They could not read or write much English. Marie would only 
make an "X" on contracts and such while Gottlieb would scribble 
his name. Mary Ann remembers her grandmother, Marie, taking her 
ABC book and trying to learn the alphabet in her late seventies. 

Marie Grassmick Weber passed away December 29, 1954 at the 
age of 80 in Rexburg, Idaho. Gottlieb Weber passed away August 
7, 1£|5 7, at the age of 81 in Rexburg, Idaho. They had been 
married 59 years. Brother Alexander died June 28, 1949 in Sacred 
Heart Hospital in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Sister Margaretha passed 
away first when she was only sixty-two years old. 

They all lived to see their dreams come true. Their 
families were safe in America. They wanted their children to 
live in freedom and become good Americans. 



Memories of Grandpa and Grandma Weber by Mary Ann Beck. 

My mother, Mary and I would take Grandma Marie Weber to town 
every Saturday. I remember Grandma would give me five cents, in 
pennies to spend at the fair or on whatever. I remember we would 
never miss a Saturday of going to town. This was a very special 
time for the three of us. Even after Grandma passed away and 
moved into town, Saturdays were still special for Mom and me. 

Grandma had a player piano that I loved to play. It used 
rolls to create the music after a lot a pumping from me. 
Grandma's favorite song was America . When I would finished 
playing the piano Grandma would always check to make sure I had 
left the roll of America on the piano ready to be played again. 

Grandpa and Grandma always had a beautiful yard with 
raspberries and flowers. In August the Flocks would bloom with 
lovely colors of purple and white. 

Early in the year 193 0, my grandparents purchased a farm 
with a home on it. It was about two miles west of Rexburg . It 
was by the canal . I remember that they would warn me to stay 
away from the canal and never go near it . 

Grandpa was not a religious man. Grandma would have joined 
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints along with their 
daughters if it had not been for him. She was converted and 
believed the gospel was true. She even bought the LDS garments 
to wear. My mother said that she wanted to be baptized. It was 
sad to me that Grandpa was not interested in the gospel . 

I felt that my Grandparents were interested in me mainly 
because of my disability. I know they were concerned for me. 

Grandma lived to be 80. She had high blood pressure but 
died she from a stroke. Grandpa lived to be 81. He had 
Parkinson disease but died of a heart attack. 

Grandma and Grandpa were both buried in the United States of 
America. A land they were very grateful to have lived in. They 
were very happy that they came to this land of opportunity- -a 
rich heritage for their children. 

Written by Mary Ann Beck a grand-daughter. 



'■Zr 



HISTORY OF ALEXANDER WEBER 

Written by Mary Ann Beck, a niece. 

Alexander Weber was born January 10, 1897, in Balzer, 
Sarat## Russia. He was the oldest son in the family of ten 
children. His parents were Gottlieb Weber and Anna Marie 
Grasmick. Six of the children were born in Russia. Alex was a 
veteran serving in World War I . Uncle Alex was a farmer and 
drove the bus for the School District until he retired. He died 
on April 16, 1971, from a heart attack at the age of 74 at his 
home in Rexburg . 

Alex's parents immigrated from Germany into Russia to work 
the land. Because of poor conditions in Germany and Russia his 
father Gottlieb and his Uncle Alex, immigrated to America and 
worked, on the railroad in Nebraska. When they had earned enough 
money-jflel/ sent it back to Russia to bring their families to 
America. Alex and his sister Molla enjoyed the boat trip, 
especially visiting with the people on the boat . Alex could not 
speak English, but he learned quickly. 

After arriving in the United Stated of America they settled 
first in Lincoln, Nebraska. Then they came to the Rexburg, Idaho 
area, Gottlieb settled in the community of Burton and Alex 
settled in Lorenzo. 

Alexander married Freda Christensen on November 9, 1927. 
They had four girls, Bernice (Shirley), Thelma (Kington), Rayola 
(Fisher) , and Shirleen (Chandler) . 

Freda Christensen Weber was born 1904 and died February 9, 
1980. Freda was a homemaker all her life. They moved to town 
(Rexburg) from the farm in Burton about 1965. They moved into a 
good, religious neighborhood- -a church going people that fellow 
shipped Alex into the LDS Church. They loved him right in. 
Freda prayed for and worked with Uncle Alex until he was ready 
for baptism. That was one of her happiest moments. Alexander 
was baptized on May 4, 1968 and a year lat*fe/f he received his 
endowments and was sealed to Freda in the Idaho Falls temple on 
June 10, 1969. Freda was born into the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. Alex was sealed to his parents on April 5, 
1973 . 










FREEDA F. CHRISTENSEN WEBER 



Freeda C. Weber was born September 14, 1904 at Hyde Park, 
Utah. She died February 9, 1980 at the age of 75, at a Salt Lake 
City hospital following surgery on Saturday. 

Freeda is the daughter of Martin and Fredrikka Jensen 
Christenseru f When_ sjhe was a small child, the family moved from 
Hyde Park^vEb Grantj.l!-- The sixth child of a family of nine, she 
attended schools at Grant and Midway. She worked in Salt Lake 
City. ^hU^€> 

She was married to Alexander Weber at Pocatello, Idaho, on 
November 9 1927. The marriage was later solemnized in the Idaho 
Falls LDS Temple. 

Freeda was a member of the LDS Church and served as a 
Primary teacher. She and her husband farmed in Burton until they 
retired and moved to Rexburg in 1967. He died in 1971. 

Survivors include four daughters, Mrs. Fred (Bernice) 
Shirley of Rigby, Mrs. Norman (Thelma) Kington of Rexburg, Rayloa 
Fisher of Bountiful, Utah and Mrs. Berdett (Shirleen) Chandler of 
Stockton, California; one brother, Orin E. Christensen of Salt 
Lake City, Utah; 13 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. 




J fa t**' 

; (U%f "" "~ 

($-/yrl^6^LL<L' HISTORY OF MO^LA WEBER BECK 

Written by Mary Ann Beck, a niece. 

/{_,MolL* W. Beck, daughter of Anna Maire Grasmick and Gottlieb 
Weber, was born July 19, 1898, in Balzer, Saratov Russia. She 
was the oldest daughter of ten children, six of whom were born in 
Europe near the borders of Germany and Russia which was called 
the Great Republic of Russia. 

/folia's parents immigrated into Germany after she was born. 
The country was so poor, the Russian ruler let those that wanted, 
work in Russia. Gottlieb worked in Russia during the summer 
months and moved back to Germany in the fall. They apparently 
lived near the border of the two countries. He was a carpenter 
and a farmer. While he was gone Anna Maire and children lived 
with Mollis grandmother- -Anna Maire ' s mother. Molla loved her 
grandmother very much and loved being with her. 

AMolla's sister, Mary, said they played in the water and 
washed their clothes in a Russian river named, Volga. When Molla 
was seven or eight, she helped her mother work in the factory. 
She helped her mother spin yarn on a spinning wheel and to make 
different fabrics. Molla helped by rolling the yarn into balls. 

Because of the poor conditions in Germany her Dad, Gottlieb., 
immigrated to America and worked on the railroad in Nebraska. 
When he had earned enough money, he sent for his family. 

The family came by boat and settled in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 
1907. Molla was nine years old when they came to America. Molla 
and her brother, Alex, enjoyed the trip by boat and especially 
enjoyed visiting with the people on the boat with them. 
Everything was new to them in America. Molla could not speak nor 
understand English but she learned quickly. 

While in Lincoln, Nebraska, the family was caught in a big 
flood. It was necessary for her Dad to carry the children to the 
rooftop of a nearby house where they had to stay a long time 
before being rescued and taken by boat to safety. 

After living in Nebraska for about two years, they came west 
and settled north of Rexburg, and later moved to the Burton area, 
west and south of Rexburg. They came to work in the sugar beet 
fields. Her parents were hardworking, good, people. Molla 
worked in a seed house in St . Anthony and Rexburg with her 
sisters; Mary, Kate, Anna and Amelia for several years. She 
also worked as a nurse's aid for the Weber family doctor, Dr. 
Walker, for about two or three years. 



/^Molla 
Page 1 



She met Otto Beck at a dance which was held at the Burton 
Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They 
were married December 26, 1923. Molla and Otto moved to a 40 or 
80 acre farm which Otto was renting from Richard Smith. Their • 
baby was born while living on this farm. She. was born on March 
27, 1925. They named their only daughter, Rowena . 

During this time Molla became interested in the LDS church 
and became the first member of the Gottlieb Weber family that 
join the church. She developed a strong testimony of the Gospel. 
/^J4olla, Otto, and Rowena went to the Logan Utah Temple* and on June 
5, 1929, they received their endowments and were sealed as an 
eternal family. This was a two or three day trip by car from 
Rexburg. But/^Molla felt it was so important she was willing to 
sacrifice to have it completed. 

r^Iolla enjoyed being activity in the LDS Church. She was a 
Relief Society teacher for many years and sang in the Ward choir. 
/\>Iolla also got started doing genealogical work and enjoyed that 
work . 

Otto's parents divided their land. He inherited ten acres 
and moved his family onto the land. They lived in an old log 
cabin until he built a new home beside the log cabin. During 
this time Molla took ill with heart trouble. Molla lived in her 
new home for one year. On Sept. 18, 193 8, she died of congestive 
heart failure. She was survived by her husband, Otto, and one 
daughter, Rowena. 

In later years there were two grandsons , Charles and Gary 
Bresee, and f ive7\grandchildren; Kelly and Amy, and Eric, Jamiee 
and Katie. *F="£etf?f 



A^Molla 
Page 2 



ANNA MARIE (MARY) WEBER BECK 



Mary W. Beck, daughter of Anna Marie Grassmick and Gottlieb 
Weber, was born October 12, 1901 in Balzer, S-aratpj/, Russia. She 
was a twin and either the third or forth of ten children, six of 
whom were born in Europe near the border of Germany and Russia. 

Mary's parents immigrated into Germany after she was born. 
The country was poor so the Russian ruler let them work in 
Russia. Her father worked there in the summer and moved back to 
Germany in the fall. They seemed to have lived near the border 
of the two countries. Her father was a carpenter and farmer'. 
While he was gone her mother and the children lived with her 
Grandmother (on her Mother's side) . She loved her Grandmother 
very much and loved to be with her. 

Mary was six years old when her family came to America on a 
boat so she doesn't remember much of her early life. However, 
she does remember a river called the Volga river where they 
played in the water. It was always clean and clear and not very 
deep. They also washed their clothes in the river. When she was 
about five years old she helped her Mother in a factory. Her 
Mother spun yarn on a spinning wheel and made different fabrics 
and Mary helped by rolling the yarn into balls. 

Because of the poor conditions in Germany her Father 
immigrated to America and worked on the railroad in Nebraska to 
make enough money to send for the family to come. Mary was six 
when they came to the United States by boat and they settled in 
Lincoln, Nebraska in 1907. The trip over was a long and a hard 
one. Everyone seemed to be sea sick and her Mother had a small 
baby. They did, however, have good food to eat on the boat. The 
Captain also gave them peanuts which was their first encounter 
with American food. 

Everything was new to her in America and it was a big 
adjustment to make. She was very shy of people. She could not 
speak nor understand English, but with help she learned the 
English language fast. 

While in Lincoln, Nebraska, the family was caught in a big 
flood. It was necessary for her Father to carry the children to 
the roof of a nearby house where they had to stay a long time 
before being rescued and taken by boat to a dry house. 

After living in Nebraska for about two years they came West 
and settled north of Rexburg and they later moved to Burton. 
They came for the sugar beet labor. Her parents were hardworking 
good people, very conscious of their children's needs. 



Mary worked in a seed house in St . Anthony and Rexburg with 
her sisters Molla, Kate, Anna, and Amelia for many years before 
she got married. She also, milked cows for 20 years, first by 
hand and later with the milking machine, but she enjoyed it. 

Mary was the next to the last in the family to get married. 
She and her sister Mada stayed at home to help their parents on 
the farm and with their business. 

She met Otto Beck at a dance at the Burton Ward which is out 
west of Rexburg. They were married on March 22, 193 9 in Rigby, 
Idaho. For her engagement she received a wrist watch and mirror 
set from him. He was a widower and had a daughter, Rowena, who 
Mary helped raise for five years until she was eighteen years 
old. Otto had been married to Mary's sister Molla, previously. 
So Mary helped raised her niece. 

To their union two lovely daughters were born- -Mary Ann 
Beck, October 14, 1940 and Amelia Beck, June 13, 1943. Amelia 
died at birth. Otto died on December 24, 1955. Mary had their 
marriage solemnized in the Idaho Falls Temple in June of 1956 by 
being sealed to her husband. 

Mary was baptized into the LDS church on September 6, 1941. 
She was active as a Relief Society teacher, enjoyed doing temple 
work and attended the temple regularly. Her greatest desire was 
to become a nurse or teacher. But, because she didn't have the 
opportunity to do so, she has encouraged her daughter to get all 
the education she can. She enjoyed raising chickens and geese 
and a small garden. 

Tribute to Mary by Leona Archibald. 

I am grateful to Mary Ann for the confidence she has shown 
in me by asking me to read the life sketch of her mother, that 
she has written, and I want to thank her for this opportunity. 

I am very appreciative of her friendship. My acquaintance 
with Mary Ann dates back to about 1964 to 1966, when I was Stake 
Gleaner Leader, and she was one of our faithful Gleaner girls, 
who always came smilingly to our Firesides, and to our many 
social activities. 

I have great respect for all of the Weber family. Brother 
Alex, a brother to Sister Mary Beck, and his good wife lived in 
our 2nd Ward. We had the privilege of going to the Temple with 
them for the first time. We also went with them on a sealing 
mission to the Temple. 

Bill and his family have been our good neighbors for many 
years . 



All of the Weber family are respectable, conscientious, 
ambitious, honorable and fine Christian people. 

I should also like to pay a tribute to Sister Beck. This 
good woman as I knew her was a quiet, -unassuming, hardworking, 
thrifty and a woman of great faith. 

She appreciated very much, my putting her name on the prayer 
list, during these last two years, while she has not been in good 
health. She often requested Mary Ann's name be put 'on, also. 

Mary Ann said she was reluctant about going to the doctor 
until absolutely necessary. She loved her family, friends, and 
neighbors, and seemed to see the good in people. She was 
conscious of the welfare of those who were near and dear to her. 
Their problems seemed to be a source of great concern to her. 

She wanted the best in life for Mary Ann. I especially 
noticed this in connection with our M.M. Gleaner program. She 
encouraged Mary Ann to attend our Firesides, of which we had 98 
in two years on Sunday evening after church. I don't think Mary 
Ann missed one of them, if so, she was very ill. 

Her mother saw to it that she had transportation to our 
meeting place for all of our fun activities, summer and winter. 
Mary Ann has been attending church meetings in a College Branch. 
Her mother was desirous of her always. being there. 

Especially was she anxious for her to take all the classes 
possible at Ricks College and to take advantage of every fine 
opportunity offered by our School. 

Mary Ann, herself, is ambitious, and willing to work, at the 
school, to keep herself financially, in order to accomplish all 
she can, to be independent and to get an education. As she 
stated, her mother had so little chance for education, so she 
wanted Mary Ann to get all she possibly could. Her mother was 
anxious for her to have all the best opportunities and clean, 
good times that are available to our young people. 

There was such a close relationship between Mary and her 
daughter, Mary Ann, especially after her husband's death. You 
always saw them together. They lived for each other's welfare, 
well being, and happiness. 

They enjoyed doing Genealogy work together. Mary Ann, 
especially has a great interest in this. They have spent 
countless hours working on Family group sheets and trying to get 
all the information available about their family. Although this 
has been enjoyable for them, it has been a difficult and 
challenging task. They have had the spirit of Elijah in this 
regard. 



Sister Mary loved to go to the Temple. She did the Temple 
work for her deceased parents, sisters and several cousins. 

These dear ones and her husband will meet her with open arms 
and gratitude for her devotion to them. 

She attended Relief Society, Sacrament Meetings, and Sunday 
School. She loved her church. 

■ 

During the last two years, she has had a bad blood disorder, 
and a heart condition. Mary Ann, has helped her and cared for 
her, giving her medication, doing all that was possibly in her 
power, even to her last breath, for which I am sure she will be 
blessed. 

Her mother was devoted to her, also and was patient, humble, 
and long suffering. These words from a poet seem to describe 
her . 

Whatever the year may bring of joy or pain 

May I remember to sing, and not complain. 

The days are dealt impartially with sum and rain, 

Let me accept my share and not complain. 

And the world go mad with greed of gain, 

Let me retain, my faith, and not complain. 

Today is a very special day in the life history of this dear 
woman. We may call it her Graduation or Commencement Day. 

She has passed the examination or tests of earth life. That 
of hard work, cares, sorrows, of hopes realized, of dreams that 
have or have not come true. She has met the tests of joys and 
heartache, of health and sickness, of suffering and intense pain. 
Tests of soul sick burdens, and disappointments, loneliness. The 
tests of parting from loved ones, and tried and true friends and 
of living in widowhood for eighteen years. These tests and tasks 
have proved her worth. 

So on this Commencement Day she passes on with "A" grades to 
a higher school of learning, to a rich reward, and to a happier 
life. 

A candidate for the highest degree of glory, in the 
Celestial Kingdom where God and Christ dwell. 

There is sorrow here at her leaving this sphere of action, 
but a great reunion and rejoicing with her loved ones in the 
spirit world where she will be busy teaching the gospel she loved 
so much to those who are waiting and anxious to hear it. 

Mary Ann, you have great courage and faith and a strong 
testimony of the Gospel. You will meet the challenge bravely. 



You will never be alone as you pray and live .close to your Father 
in Heaven. You have a knowledge of the hereafter and know that 
your mother will never be very far away. 

May your friends and relatives rally round you and may our 
Heavenly Father bless and comfort you and Rowena - the sisters 
and brother and all the nephews and nieces who mourn this day. 

She was proceeded in death by her husband and daughter, 
parents, three sisters and two brothers. She is survived by her 
daughter, Mary Ann, a niece, Rowena, three sisters, Kate Larsen, 
Amelia Larsen, Mada Smead and one brother, Bill Weber. 

In conclusion a poem by Edgar A Guest. 

Who does his task from day to day, 
and meets whatever comes his way, 
Believing God has willed it so. 
Has found real greatness here below. 

For great or small, there's but one test, 
Tis that each man shall do his best, 
Who works with all the strength he can. 
Shall never die in debt to. man." 

Mary's twin sister, Katharina Weber, was born October 12, 
1901, and died January 1902. / 

Written and complied by " h & £ daughter, Mary Ann Beck. 




KATIE , DAUGHTER OF GOTTLIEB WEBER AND MARIE GRASMICK 

Written by Mary Ann Beck, a niece. 

Katie was born May 1, 1904, J^ % , Russia . She was the fifth 
child in a family of ten children. Katie was three years old 
when she came to the United States. Katie learned at a tender 
age to work, like doing field work, milking, feeding, etc. She 
was a proper lady and was always in a dress. I don't think I 
ever saw her in slacks. 

She liked going to the dances and having a good time. That 
is where she met Arthur Nephi Larsen and they were married on 
February 16, 1927. They had one son and named him N. Marvin. He 
was born May 7, 1933. Aunt Katie learned about the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was baptized on October 3, 
1936. 

My sister Rowena, said she was creative and would make 
flowers out of wax. She was a spotless house keeper, very clean. 
When she was in her late fifties or early sixties she took a 
sewing class from the Madison County Agent and learned to make 
her own clothes which she was very proud of wearing. 

During that time in the 1960s she decided to take in some of 
the cultural activities of Ricks College. She went with me as 
her husband, Nephi, would not attend with her. She really did 
enjoyed attending them, however. She was a devoted wife, mother 
and grandmother. She was always there to help her son, Marvin, 
and her five grandchildren, Dennis, Art, Adam, Camillc*. and 
Natalie . 

Aunt Katie was an avid gardener, she especially like growing 
flowers. She had a green thumb. I remember being in her home 
and seeing plants all around. She had a beautiful Christmas 
Cactus which bloomed and bloomed it's heart out. Aunt Katie was 
a very shy person. Her best friends, besides her husband, were 
her sisters. I remember her calling my mother, Mary, once or 
twice a day to just talk. Katie, also worked in the seed house 
picking peas with her sisters before she got married. 

Aunt Katie was a blunt person. She told facts, whether you 
liked to hear them or not. That was the reason I liked talking 
to her. She would never beat around the bush on any subject. 
She faced reality. She died July 15, 1988, in Rexburg, Idaho. 
Katie was endowed on January 11, 1990. She was sealed to her 
parents on February 1, 1990 in the Idaho Falls Temple. Katie and 
Nephi were sealed June 3, 1994, in the Idaho Falls Temple. 






Uncle Nephi was born on November 13, 1896, in Redmond, 
Sevier, Utah. He was born under the covenant (BIC) . He was 
Baptized August 6, 1904. He was a farmer and died on August 5, 
1964 in Rexburg, Idaho. He was endowed September 17, 1976. And 
was sealed to his wife June 3, 1994. 



. -*- 

;., Written by Mary Ann Beck a niece 

h 

-JUL** " 

UuL 

"LIFE HISTORY OF ANNA WEBER" 

Anna Weber, daughter of Anna Marie Grassniick and Gottlieb 
Weber, was born May 31, 1906 in Balzer, Saratov, Russia. She was 
the sixth of ten children, six of whom were born in Europe, the 
border of Germany, Russia called the General Republic of Russia. 

Anna's parents immigrated into Germany after she was born. 
Her father was a carpenter and a farmer. While he was gone, her 
mother. and the other children lived with her Grandmother, on her 
mother's side. Anna was three months old when her family came to 
America. Because of the poor conditions in Germany, her father 
immigrated to America and worked on the railroad in Nebraska. 
They settled in Lincoln, Nebraska in 1907. The trip was long and 
hard and Anna came close to death on the boat. While in Lincoln, 
the family was caught in a large flood. It was necessary for the 
father to carry the children to the roof of a nearby house where 
they had to stay a long time before being rescued and taken by 
boat to a dry house. 

After living in Nebraska for about two years, they came west 
and settled north of Rexburg where they lived for two years and 
later moved to Burton. They came for the sugar beet labor. Her 
parents were hardworking, good people and very conscious of their 
children's needs. Anna attented school in Rexburg and Burton and 
graduated from Madision High School and went a year to Ricks 
College. 

Anna liked crocheting and needle work of all kinds. She was 
the only crocheter in the Weber family. She was the only black- 
headed daughter of the Weber family. Anna had an appendectomy 
and the doctor left some infection in her, so for a year, she was 
not well. On August 1, 1925, she died at the age of nineteen. 



"LIFE HISTORY OF GOTTLIEB, -WERER. jUB" 

Gottlieb v^er Jr., the seventh child, was born in Lincoln, 
Nebraska on August 19, 1908. After he was born, the family came 
West and settled north of Rexburg and lived there for about two 
years. Here is where he drowned in a ditch after having his first 
birthday- on August 19, 1909. Gottlieb Weber Jr. was also the son 
of tioitiieb •> Weber and Anna Marie Grassmick. 



£X^<k CUL~tf 2<-j JJq cr 



^lVl^ 



TRIBUTE TO AMELIA LARSEN- 



The first memory I have of Aunt Amelia was June 13, 1943. I 
was three years old and my younger sister was being born at home. 
I remember it was in the morning. My Dad and Aunt Amelia were 
dressing me. Dad was putting on one stocking and shoe, while 
Aunt Amelia was putting on the other stocking and shoe. The baby 
was coming early and Aunt Amelia was there to help. Mother named 
the baby Amelia after, my Aunt Amelia. 

I don't know why that stands out in my mind but it does. 
When my mother or her sisters were ill Aunt Amelia was always 
there to help. When I was one year old my mother had an 
operation and Aunt Amelia and Uncle Henry took care of me I can 
bearly remember it. But Aunt Amelia said I cried and cried so 
hard it gave her a headache . 

When I stared school I was shy and a slow learner. Aunt 
Amelia was my tutor in elementary school. She taught first grade 
and would often say about me: "Mary Ann is my extra student." 

I had an operation in the fifth grade and I remember Aunt 
Amelia coming to Idaho Falls and spending the day with me. She 
would braid my hair and do everything ' a mother would do to lift 
my spirits. 

After my Mother and Dad passed away Aunt Amelia and Uncle 
Henry became my second parents. I had to report in once a week, 
usually on Sunday. If I skipped a week I would get a phone call 
from Uncle Henry asking why I had not been over to see them 
during the past week. When I had a problem, I could go to them, 
and I could let my hair down. 

Aunt Amelia was a very proper person and wanted things done 
right. Mother was always proud of her. I think I realized how 
important an education was when she earned her Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Education. Amelia said that if she ever went 
back to school she would major in English. 

Aunt Amelia always appreciated it when I put her and Uncle 
Henry's names on the prayer list for the sick in the temple. 
Amelia married Neil Henry Larsen, March 31, 1931, in Rigby, 
Idaho. Amelia was baptized in the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints on October 3, 1936. She received her 
endowments on July 23, 1974, and was sealed to her husband, Neil 
Henry Larsen, the same day in the Idaho Falls Temple. Amelia was 
sealed to her parents in March 1979, in the Idaho Falls Temple. 
She died May 3 / , 1987. She and her husband had no children. 



&or». fujy 13, /c //o 
In ^Hi/^^i,^ 



UNCLE HENRY 



Services for Neils Henry Larsen, 79, a life-long area 
farmer, died Sunday, January 26, 1987, at Valley Care Nursing 
Home of causes incident to age, will be held 1 p.m. Wednesday, 
January 28, in the Flamm Funeral Home chapel. 

Burial will be at the Rexburg Cemetery. 

Friends may call Wednesday at Flamm Funeral Home from 11:30 
a.m. until services start. 

He was born June 2, 1907, in Independence/rthe son of Louis 
and Marie Louise Larsen. He was a life-long farmer until the 
time of his retirement. He married Amelia Weber Larsen, March 
31, 1931, and the marriage was later solemnized in the Idaho 
Falls LDS Temple. He was a member of the Rexburg L$S 19th Ward 
and a high priest at the time of his death. 

He is survived by his wife and proceeded in death by his 
parents, five brothers and two sisters. 



p~ Compiled by a niece, Mary Ann Beck 




UH -/*LT^4 •+ I J0, 







J/flJ^^^x^ WILLIAM GOTTLIEB WEBER - 

Written by Mary Ann Beck, a niece. 

William Gottlieb Weber was born February 1 1912, in Burton, 
Idaho. He was the son of Gottlieb and Anna Marie Grasmick Weber. 
He was the ninth child in a family of 10 children. He attended 
schools at Burton. 

He married Mollie Bratsman on November 18, 193 0, in Rigby, 
Idaho. The had two girls: Dawnella, who was born on March 3, 1931 
and Kaylene M. , who was born on June 30, 1955, and died in June 
1961. 

He was a farmer until he retired in 1976. 

He was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. He enjoyed 
fishing and visiting with fiends, children and grandchildren. 

William (Bill) died on Wednesday, October 3, 1979. He had been fishing at the Blackfoot Reservoir, 
Bingham County, Idaho. He had a heart attack while unloading the fish from his boat. His body was taken to the 
Soda Springs, Idaho, mortuary first, due of an Idaho law, before being taken to the Flamm Funeral Home in 
Rexburg. His wife, Mollie, died on January 13, 1988, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

William Gottlieb Weber work was done in the Idaho Falls 
Temple. Baptized April 16, 1981, endowed on April 28, 1981, sealed 
to his parents April 28, 1981. He was sealed to his wife, Mollie 
Bratsman, on June 3, 1994. 



V^ 



Mollie Bratsman Weber was born on September 3, 1912, at 
Lincoln, Lancaster, Nebraska to Phillip Bratsman and Mollie Walker. 
She died on January 13, 1988 in the Idaho Falls nursing home after 
a period of declining health. She was buried in the Rexburg 
Cemetery. Her work was done in the Idaho Falls temple. Baptized 
January 11, 1990, endowed February 1, 1990, and sealed to parents 
on February 1, 1990. Mollie was sealed to her husband, William, 
June 3, 1994, in the Idaho Falls Temple. 






LIFE SKETCH OF MADA W. SMEAD 



Mada, sometimes called " Madasha " by her nieces and 
nephews, because of their German descent, but most known by her 
family and grandchildren as " Gram " , was born on July 18, 1915 
on the family farm in Burton to Gottlieb and Mary Weber. Her 
parents migrated from Germany Republic Volga, Russia to the 
United States to start a new life for themselves, because of the 
hardships that Germany was having. She is the youngest of ten 
children, three brothers and six sisters. Alexander being the 
oldest, followed by Molly, Mary, and twin sister Katharina, 
Katie, Anna, Gottlieb Jr., Amelia, and William were their names. 

Grandma did all things that a farm girl would do in her 
young years. She would have to herd the cows, and being small and 
tiny, she would climb onto her horse called " Peggy" and off they 
would go herding the cows to a pasture down by Ralph Kauer ■ s 
place. She was always afraid on the way back because the horse 
"Peggy" knew the way home and would just take off heading for the 
barn, and grandma would close her eyes and hang on for dear life. 
As she grew older she decided that farming wasn't going to be her 
way of life. 

She attended grade school in Burton and continued on to 
Madison High School in which she graduated in 193 3. Grandma and 
her best friend Pearl Burger would always go dancing on the 
weekends at a place called Riverside, in Lorenzo. Even though she 
had fun as a youth, education was an important part of her life. 



She attended Ricks College in 19 3 7 and graduated with a degree in 
business. She had a special talent for shorthand and had won 
several contests because of her speed and accuracy. 

Mada worked several years for a Law office, (Tom Smith) 
in Rexburg. Then she thought she would look at the political side 
of life in which she moved to Boise and worked for a legislator. 
When he was not elected again she moved back to Rexburg and 
worked at the Montana Idaho Lumber Company as a secretary. Here 
is where she met her future husband to be William Burton Smead. 
Not knowing for sure what would come about with this gentleman 
she decided to move to Salt Lake City, Utah in 194 3 in which she 
held a job at Fort Douglas during World War II. 

Burton Smead decided that he could not live without 
Mada and would go down to Salt Lake every weekend to see her. As 
there love and relationship grew, they were soon married Sept. 4, 
1943 in Salt Lake City in which she moved back to Rexburg again 
to live the rest of her life. 

Burton worked with his families business, the Montana 
Idaho Lumber Company and Mada once again did secretarial work 
there to help along. They lived in a apartment above what is 
called Porters Book Store now in Rexburg. As they were living 
there their first child Konra was born, July 20th 1944. Burton 
being fiC years older than Mada didn't know what to expect of a 
new child. They thought that something was wrong with her because 
she drooled so much not knowing that some babies did that. 
However, she grow up to be just fine. They decided to move closer 
to the saw mill, so they a found a place in which to settle. Soon 



came along their second child a son, William Henry Smead born 
June 28th, 1946. Since the family had grown, Burton and Mada 
built their first home in 1948 on Center Street across from where 
the Library is now. Burton was a engineer and had designed the 
home for them. Konra and William ( or better known as Billy) 
spent most of their childhood there and have many fond memories 
of this place. She enjoyed cooking such things as Dumplings, 
Sauerkraut, and German Pancakes. Mada would always have big 
Thanksgiving dinners for her family where some of her sisters 
would get together in the morning and start cooking all day. Mada 
was always a very emaculent housekeeper and when her brother-in- 
law, Nephi would come for Thanksgiving she would make him clean 
the chandlers, because he was the only one that was tall enough 
to reach them. 

Burton and Mada enjoyed traveling to the coast on 
business trips. They would often go to Tennessee and other places 
also. They'd take Konra and Billy with them, but hire a nanny to 
help watch them, so they could enjoy the evenings together. 
Winter was a special time of year and a trip was always made to 
Sun Valley to enjoy the winter scenery. 

Much to their surprise, seven years later grandma was 
pregnant with their third child. Her now being 3 7 and grandpa 
being 63, she was not quit sure about this. However, Robert 
Burton Smead (also known as Bobby) was born on July 22, 1953. As 
the years went on they had moved to several homes around town. 
Grandpa and Grandma were very good to their three child, by 
giving them things they always wanted. They also were good to the 



community, and helped donated in building the Ricks College foot 
ball field. With Konra and Billy already grown up and moved out, 
Mada and Burton would take Bob to Salt Lake and stay at the Hotel 
Utah, and they enjoyed going to temple square. 

Grandma went to work at Madison Memorial Hospital in 1970, 
where she was the first ward clerk they had. She would always 
keep everything in order, and some of the employees didn't know 
who was giveing the order the doctors or Mada, however when ever 
she was off or gone they were always be glad to have her back to 
straighten the paper work out. Then, during Bob's senior year of 
1971 Burton passed away at the age of 80. Due to some business 
dealings the sawmill was having problems and Mada was force to 
sell her home. Bob and her purchased a trailer home and lived in 
Village Green Trailer Park together for two years. It was Bob's 
job to help vacuum and clean the house while grandma continued 
working at the hospital. 

There are many stories to tell about grandma at the 
hospital, but an employee recalls one when they were practicing a 
drill on code blue, they ask her to announce the code. Instead of 
going over the paging system she ran up down the halls yelling 
code blue. Grandma always seem to get the job done even if it 
was not in her hospital. Kathy, Billy's wife was expecting their 
first child while living in Montana and grandma went to stay with 
them thinking, the baby would be born soon. A week had gone by 
and still no baby and Mada sensed something was wrong. She made 
Kathy call the doctor and have a nonstress test done and sure 
enough the baby was in trouble. She told the doctor that a C- 



section was needed to be done right away. There she was giving 
everyone orders and they all seem to listen. 

Gram loved all her grandchildren with all her heart. 
She would often take them out on a day and treat them to 
McDonald's, then go to the store and buy what ever candy they 
wanted. If she was baby sitting the grandkids you could always be 
sure she would have everything in tip top shape and they loved 
every minute of her time. 

Mada joined the LDS church in July 26,1975. S-he— fcfeon- 
- laLfcti had Bui Lun sealed Lu her in 197 9. I r <^v r Yrt^a'u^^iCjycj 

Then in 1988 grandma had a stroke, causing her to have 
to retire from the Madison Memorial Hospital. But she was a 
strong lady and continued living by herself. 

With the good sense that grandma had she always knew if 
there was a problem, rather it be helping with the grandchildren, 
or helping when someone who was sick or coming to her childrens 
home with a big bag of groceries, or making sure that her 
daughter and daughters in law also had a Mothers Day gift. She 
always remembered everyones birthday and gave a small gift to 
each one. If she things were no being dealt with right, she would 
let you know, but she always put in a way that never seemed to 
hurt anyones feelings. 

Up until the last year grandma was not able to take 
care of herself and moved into the Rexburg Nursing Home. We were 
all looking forward to taking her out to Ralph and Konra ' s for 
Thanksgiving. She loved the holidays and would always stand right 
by the counter while Ralph carved the turkey to get the tail. If 



she only know that no one wanted it anyway but her. But she fell 
and broke her hip a week before and ending up having surgery 
followed by stroke which eventually took her life. 

Gram will truly be missed this Christmas holiday for 
she always made it a special time. All the years she would give 
each family a big box filled with everything from paper towels, 
toilet paper, Avon shampoo, dish towels, and etc. and with some 
unknown cologne or perfume that we thought we would never wear, 
but always did. 

Mada Madasha Gram or what ever she was called was 



the best mother and grandma of all. 



\Ajsuc j btcr 






>n_ 










WILLIAM BURTON SMEAD 

Written by Mary Ann Beck, a niece. 

William Burton Smead was born May 26, 1891, at Dillon, 
Montana, to William Henry Smead and Antoinette Carmichael . He 
came from a family of two. He had one older sister. William 
Burton Smead met his wife Mada when she was working as a 
secretary for the Montana/Idaho Lumber Company. Not knowing for 
sure about this gentleman she decided to move to Salt Lake City, 
Utah, to work in 1943. She obtained a job at Fort Douglas during 
World War II. 

Burton Smead decided that he could not live without Mada and 
would go down to Salt Lake every weekend to see her. As there 
love and relationship grew, they were soon married September 4, 
1943, in Salt Lake City. They moved back to Rexburg to live the 
rest of their lives. 

Burton had served in World War I . He had attended the 
University of Montana and received a Engineering degree but 
decided to work with his family's business, the Montana/Idaho 
Lumber Company. Mada once again did secretarial work there to 
help along. They lived in an apartment above what is now Porters 
Book Store in Rexburg. 

This is where they were living when their first child, 
Konra, was born on July 20, 1944. Burton being 24 years older 
than Mada didn't know what to expect of a baby. They thought 
that something was wrong with her because she drooled so much not 
knowing that some babies just do. However, she grew up to be 
just fine. 

They decided to move closer to the saw mill, so they found a 
place in which to settle. Soon come along their second child a 
son, William Henry Smead born June 28, 1946. Since the family 
had grown, Burton and Mada built their first home in 1948 on 
Center Street across from where the Library is now. Burton was a 
engineer and had designed the home for them. Konra and William 
(or better known as Billy) spent most of their childhood there 
and have many fond memories of this place. 

Burton and Mada enjoyed traveling to the coast on business 
trips. They would often go to Tennessee and other places. They 
would take Konra and Billy with them, but hire a nanny to help 
watch them, so they could enjoy the evenings together. Winter 
was a special time of year and a trip was always made to Sun 
Valley to enjoy the winter scenery. 

Much to their surprise, seven years later Mada got pregnant 
with their third child. She was now 37 years old and Burton was 

Burton 
Page 1 



63, they were not quit sure about this. However, Robert Burton 
Smead (also know as Bobby) was born on July 22, 1953. 

As the years went on they had moved to several homes around 
town. Burton and Mada were very good to their three children, by 
giving them things they always wanted. 

They were good to the Rexburg community. They helped donate 
towards the Ricks College football field and library. 

With Konra and Billy already grown up and moved out, Mada 
and Burton would take Bob to Salt Lake and stay at the Hotel 
Utah. They enjoyed going to temple square. To this date h^-^ 
temple work has not been done . , ' / 

Uncle Burton Smead died June 4, 1971;7\Salt Lake City of old 
age. He was buried in the Rexburg Cemetery. 



The first memory of Uncle Burton was him tipping his hat 
whenever he greeted anyone. He was a gentleman and very 
hospitable. Uncle Burton became a father at the age of 53 years 
and loved every minute of it . 

In 194 6 Rowena got married. My Aunt Mada gave her a shower 
in her home. They told a teenage cousin to get lost. So Carl, 
Konra and I went with him for a walk down to the mill. We toured 
office and yard area. As we were walking out of one room, this 
cousin let everyone out but me, then locked the door. So I could 
not go with them. I cried and Uncle Burton came and let me out. 
I had to walk to my Aunt Madams home all by myself. It was a 
block away and I was about §^^ years old. 

Burton was good to my Grandparents, the Gottlieb Webers . 
They looked forward every Saturday to go to the beautiful white 
home on the corner of North First Center to take their weekly 
bath. Because the country had no modern water works. 

In the late 40s and early 50s Grandpa built a home next to 
Aunt Mada and Uncle Burton. At Christmas time I remember we 
would get a fruit basket with candy and nuts from them. It came 
from California or Arizona. Konra, Bill and I would play 
together in summer. We would ride our bikes over to Aunt Amelia 
and Uncle Henry. Aunt Mada and Uncle Burton would travel to Salt 
Lake City to visit his parents graves on Memorial Day each year. 

Because there was no nursing home convenient, Burton and 
Mada took in Grandpa Weber. Grandma Weber had passed away in 
December 1954. He was lonely and his health was going down hill. 
He passed away two years later in their home in August 1957. 

Burton 
Page 2 



Alexander and Anna Margaretha Grassmick Weber 

Alexander Weber and Anna Marie Grassmick were born in 
Balzer, Russia. Alexander was born to Johanes Jacob and 
Katherina Speck on December 17, 1871. Anna Margaretha was born 
to Bill Grassmick and Elizabeth Hymbuck (or Heimbuch) on January 
17, 1870. 

The Webers, Grassmick and other ancestors migrated from 
Germany into this section of Balzer Saratov, Russia which was 
newly opened to these people. They were a religious group of 
German Lutherans . 

The German Colony of Balzer (Goloi-Karamish or Balzer German 
Republic of Volga, Russia) lies in the valley of the Volga river 
about eight miles from the river bank. The valley slopes down 
from the north and Balzer is on the right side or mountain side 
and about 60 miles below the city of Saratov. This is where 
Alexander and Margaretha were born. 

When th<*se people first settled this section of country, 
they lived in dugouts in the side of the mountain, until they 
were able to build homes. 

The village wasn't very large, each family owned a small 
section of land. On this land they were allowed one cow, a pig, 
some chickens, ducks and geese. According to Margaretha ducks 
and geese were very important to the people as they supplied the 
families with enough feathers for bedding. The down quilts were 
light and warm. Each member of the family slept in a feather 
bed. 

All families were required by the local authorities to raise 
a vegetable garden. This would give them fresh vegetables in the 
summer time. Potatoes, cabbage and other produce would be stored 
in a ground cellar, for winter use. Meat was never plentiful. 
They also had to have fruit trees. Apples and pears were the 
most popular. The fruit could be dried and would not turn dark. 

The village in which they lived was surrounded by forest. 
This timber was later cut for the lumber industry. Each family 
was issued a permit allowing them to herd their cow, ducks and 
geese at the edge of the forest to graze. This permit also 
allowed them to carry enough wood home each day for the 
fireplace. Wood was the only fuel they knew and the fireplace 
was the only heating unit in the home. 



Weber 
Page 1 



Their homes were all built on the same order, long barrack- 
like structures made of brick and mortar. Each house had a large 
live-in kitchen with a brick fireplace covering one entire wall 
of the kitchen. A brick oven was built into the fireplace. 
Meals for the day were prepared in the morning, put into the oven 
and baked all day. It was this long slow baking that made 
everything taste so good, especially the whole wheat bread and 
the custard pudding. 

There was a bedroom next to the kitchen which was 
partitioned into smaller sections by heavy linen curtains 
reaching from ceiling to floor. 

There was also a storeroom where grain, flour, cured meat, 
butter, eggs were kept. Other things the family owned were also 
locked up in there so they would not be stolen. 

These people took great pride in their church. Their life 
in Balzer was hard, working from sunrise to sunset for a very 
meager wage . 

The Webers came from a family of tall, big-boned, hard- 
working people. Johanes Jacob Weber had blond hair and blue 
eyes, while his wife, Katherina Speck, had very red hair and 
green eyes. Katherina died when Alexander was about twelve years 
old. Johanes, never did remarry this left the oldest girl in the 
family the household chores to do. There was one girl and four 
boys in the family. 

During an uprising in the year of 1914 a revolution took 
place and a lot of this group starved to death. This is when 
they figure Margaretha's grandmother died. 

The Grassmicks were small people, not much over five feet 
tall. They had dark brown hair and grey eyes. Margaretha, never 
spoke of her father, Bill Grassmick, as he died when she was very 
young. That left her mother, Elizabeth Hymbuck, with two boys 
and two girls to raise. Margaretha was the older of the girls. 
Anna Marie was the younger daughter. The older brother, David, 
died when he was a young man of Black Fever. He left three 
children for his mother to raise. The other brother died at the 
age of fifteen also of Black Fever. 

Being without a man in the house put a lot of responsibility 
on the widow Grassmick and her two girls. It was the girls who 
carried the water home from the well that supplied the village 
with pure drinking water. The girls each carried two buckets. 
They were only six and eight years old and the well was located 
just beyond the Weber home. The Webers had a big dog that would 
run after and bark at the girls. The girls would walk fast 
spilling much of the water as they were very frightened and would 

Weber 
Page 2 



cry. When the Weber boys noticed this they called the dog back 
and tied him up. These sisters must have been very grateful for 
this act of kindness, because years later the two girls married 
the two brothers . 

Young boys and girls hired out at the age of twelve, and by 
the time they were fourteen years old they were expected to do a 
full days work just like the men- -from sunrise until sundown. 

Alexander went to work in a dye factory; he was lucky, as 
his uncle owned the factory. Margaretha went to work for a 
landowner who lived at the edge of the village. The landowner 
let her go home and visit her mother on Sunday. The dye factory 
also closed on Sunday, so the young folks would go to church with 
their families. This is where they would meet and got better 
acquainted with each other. 

By the time Alexander was twenty years old he was a sick 
man. His skin and the whites of his eyes were yellow and he 
couldn't eat. The fumes from the dye with which he worked, were 
poisoning his body. 

In 1894 at the age of twenty-one Alexander was drafted into 
the Russian Army to serve his country for four years. This was a 
blessing in disguise as it got him out of the dye factory. 
Russia was not at war with any other nation at the time. He was 
released in 1897. Alexander and Margaretha had been promised to 
marry each other upon his return. 

At twenty years old Margaretha was a full time employee for 
the landowner. She could not go home and visit her mother on 
Sunday any more, only two or three times a year was she able to 
return home. She was allowed to contribute some of her wages to 
her mother. 

The rest she used to buy herself a chest and make herself a 
wardrobe. It was considered rather elaborate, and she was very 
proud of what she had accomplished. Then she decided to buy 
another chest. This she filled with yards of silk, linen, and 
cashmere material as well as lace, thread, ribbon, yarn, and 
needles; all the things she needed to sew with. Then she waited 
for Alexander Weber to come home. He was release in 1987. When 
he called on her she saw a handsome healthy man and they were 
married in October 1897. 

Alexander went back to the cleaning and dying factory- -dying 
yarn from which overalls were made. Margaretha stayed home to 
take care of the home and family she would have. 

Things were never good for the German people in Russia. The 
Russian people always resented the Germans that settled in this 

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Page 3 



part of the country. Schools were few and far between, some were 
even burned down. There were many adults that had never attended 
one day of school. They could neither read nor write. Very 
little was being shipped into the village, and nothing was being 
sent out . 

It wasn't long before Alexander was sick again and knew that 
he would not be able to work in the dye factory much longer. 
These people were a sad and unhappy people. There was no future 
for them and even less for their children. They were concerned 
about their children the most. 

Everyone who was able, was moving to America. America was a 
land of freedom with opportunities, resources, and lots of land 
for people to live on. It was inconceivable to the mind. 

It was Margaretha who never stopped scheming as to how they 
could get to America. Alexander was too sick to care; and 
furthermore, they had no money. 

It was through the grapevine that they hear about a captain 
who shipped purebred cattle to America. He also had room for a 
few passengers, for considerably less money than it would cost 
them to go as first-class passengers, so Margaretha made up her 
mind it would be now or never. She had to raise money in a 
hurry. So with Alexander's consent, she sold her beautiful 
chests and everything in them. This wasn't hard to do because 
things were so scare in the village at that time. The people 
paid her a handsome price for the material and all the contents 
of the chest. This made the trip possible without having to 
borrow money. So, they rolled all their belongings into two 
bundles and started their journey to America- -Alexander, 
Margaretha, and three children, Mollie, Anna Katherina and Alex. 

In November 1902, they left Saratov on the first leg of 
their journey to America. They first traveled by train to the 
coast of the Baltic Sea. On the coast of Poland at a Polish Port 
they boarded a boat and sailed through the Keil Canal . During 
this part of the journey they experienced something that really 
upset Margaretha. There was a bridge across this large canal and 
she thought that the boat would hit the bridge. But in the nick 
of time, through a series of signals from the captain of the 
boat, the bridge swung away and the boat passed safely through. 
It was certainly a new experience for them. From there they 
sailed across to the English Port of Hull. They then traveled 
across England to Liverpool by train. They were taken from there 
by a motorboat some distance out to sea and put on the ship. 
From there they sailed out between what is now Northern Ireland 
and England. 



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Everything was fine for a while; however, there was a few 
things the passengers had not anticipated. That of the cattle 
having priority over the passengers. Nor were they prepared for 
the cold, the food was poor and there was not enough of it. They 
sailed twenty-eight days before landing in America. When the 
people got off the ship they were dirty, sick, and starving. 

They landed at St. John, Canada, stayed there three days, 
traveled by train to St. Paul, Minnesota, then to Omaha, and then 
to Lincoln, Nebraska with some money they still had left. 

There, some friends met them and took them into their home. 
Alexander soon found a few day's work for the Burlington 
Railroad. It wasn't a steady job, but he was able to rent a 
house and buy food. He built a table and benches from the lumber 
he carried home from the railroad. They slept on the floor. 
This didn't bother them because it was heaven compared to the 
cattle boat. 

One of the children passed away during this time and 
Margaretha became discouraged, lonely and homesick, so she would 
walk to the nearby store, something she enjoyed doing, to get her 
mind off things and forget . There at the store were boxes and 
boxes of pretty shoes, ladies shoes, rows and rows of them. 
There were men work clothes, ladies dresses already made, and all 
kinds of ribbon, lace, and buttons. There were groceries on the 
shelves. Things she had never seen before or heard of. The 
butcher shop had so much meat that they never ran short, and they 
trimmed the meat from the bones and threw the bones out for the 
dogs . 

On her way to the store a young boy run after her and called 
her names. This was embarrassing and humiliating, so one day she 
turned and slapped the boy's face. The boy ran home screaming to 
his mother. 

When Margaretha arrived home she told a neighbor what she 
had done. The neighbor informed her that this was against the 
law in the United States. One could not strike another child. 
He said due to the fact that she had been in the United States 
for only a short time and wasn't even a citizen, she could be 
arrested and even deported. 

She then went home, pulled down the blinds, locked both 
doors and waited for the police to come. She also made up her 
mind that she would leave her husband and children behind as they 
had done nothing wrong. She would calmly go with the police, go 
aboard the ship, then jump overboard and drown herself. They 
would not take her back to Russia alive. 



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Page 5 



When she heard the knock on the door and opened it and saw 
her husband instead of the police she went into hysterics. 

It was during these hours of mental anguish that she almost 
lost her mind. The matter was looked into and it was decided the 
youngster needed a spanking long before Mother slapped him. 

The lay-offs at the railroad became more frequent. 
Alexander no sooner got the grocer and the back rent paid up to 
date than he would be laid off again. He worked in the coal 
yard, material yard and even as a baggage man. All in all, he 
worked for this company about fifteen years. 

While he was in Lincoln, Nebraska he applied for his first 
citizenship papers. 

Alexander received an offer from a farmer in Colorado to 
sharecrop. He accepted this offer, moved to Olathe, Colorado, 
and started to farm. The farm was good, there was plenty of food 
and plenty of work. Margaretha would go out into the fields to 
help also. Their three children: Mollie, Alex, and Katherine 
were all under five years of age. Within a few months their 
twins were born. They named them John and Marie. 

It was then that Margaretha took ill. Her high blood 
pressure was high, the altitude was too high for her and the 
doctor advised her to move to a lower altitude and warmer 
climate. Also one of the twins, John, needed a great deal of 
medical attention. It would take them one day just to drive to 
the nearest doctor. So, they decided to move back to Lincoln, 



Nebraska 



With the money they had saved from the farm they invested in 
some real estate at 225 ' C Street in Lincoln. This was the 
first home they had ever owned. It was a four room frame house 
with a large screened back porch that was used for a summer 
kitchen. It also had a large front porch. This is where all the 
friends and neighbors, from the Old Country, would come and visit 
about their friends and relatives they had left behind. Many 
times things got quite emotional. It became a sobbing social 
sometimes all because of the love they had for their loved ones. 
They missed them and wished that they could be here with them. 

Many of their people couldn't to read or write so it was 
only when someone came to the United State that they would 
receive word from their families. Their yard was big, with room 
for all of our friends. The whole family loved this place and 
took great pride in it . 

The railroad was also happy to have Alexander come back to 
work because they needed him because he could speak five 

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Page 6 



different languages: German, Polish, Russian, Italian, Romanian, 

as well as very bad English. They hired him as a foreman over a 

section crew. The hours were long and the work was hard, but he 
felt quite important . 

Alexander applied for a railroad pass of which he had 
earned. He wanted to visit his brother, Gottlieb Weber, who 
lived somewhere in Idaho. Idaho was someplace out West. He took 
his oldest son, Alex, with him. Everything was fine until when 
they returned and calmly announced that they both had fallen in 
love with the farms, mountains, people and that they wanted to 
live there. 

Margaretha wasn't too anxious to make the move, but 
Alexander succeeded in persuading her. They sold all their 
belongings and moved to Rexburg, Idaho. 

They started farming in the Burton area near Rexburg. They 
stayed there a number of years then moved to the Thorton area and 
continued to farm until the fall of 1931. They then bought a 
three room home in the town site of Lorenzo and lived there with 
a few chickens and one cow. Their children lived close by. They 
loved this little home too, and all the people around them. 
Alexander continued to work as a farm laborer until Margaretha 
died in January 1933. She was a great cook, anyone that tasted 
her bread had a real treat . 

Alexander spent some of the happiest years of his life as a 
mail carrier for the Post Office department of the Union Pacific 
Railroad in Lorenzo, Idaho. Alexander carried the mail to the 
train everyday, something he took great pride in. One day he 
threw the mail sack across his back and started to cross US 
Highway 191 to reach the train but was nearly hit by a car. 
Everyone was concerned about him nearly being hit but his reply 
was "Don't you know the mail must go through." He carried the 
mail until he retired. 

Alexander was a neat in his appearance and took pride in his 
home and yard. He was especially good with horses. It has been 
told of one time when the Lorenzo bridge was to be built. The 
steel and parts for the bridge were shipped on the railroad. 
This had to be unloaded During the night and as it turned out 
there was a blizzard which drifted the road closed. They got a 
sleigh and a team of horses to pull this load out. The horses 
could not get the load started, so Alexander went over and took 
the horses by the bridles, spoke to them and lead them through 
the drifts with the load; he just seemed to know what to do. 



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Page 7 



To the union of Alexander and Margaretha, ten children were 
born. The first was a boy, who was born and died in Russia. The 
second and third were twins, Mollie and Anna Katherina. Number 
four was Alex; five was Catherine; six and sever were twins, 
Marie and John. Number eight was Helen. She died when she was 
two years old. Number nine was a little girl also named Helen. 
She died when she was four months old. And number ten was 
Amelia . 

Margaretha passed away before Alexander. She died January 
13, 1933, in Lorenzo, Idaho. She was sixty-two years old. 
Alexander never married again after Margaretha passed away. He 
died June 28, 1948, in Idaho Falls. But they both lived to see 
their dream come true, that of having their family safe in 
America . 









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Page 8 



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Minnie Ann Schmidt 

And how do you spell that? 

The last name? 

Urn huh 

Schmidt 

And your address 

Ity address is 2605 Lawrence St., Eugene 97405 

And when is your birthday? 

My birthday is January 30th 

What year 

1910 if you are talking about the first year. 

Okay, explain and tell of Dora Felt, your grandmother and John Beck and 
Wilhemina Beck your aunt and uncle, building the family cabin in Rexburg. 

Well I will tell what I have been told.. Before I was born John Beck and 
his wife Wilhemina Beck came from Germany with Wilhelmina's sister also, 
Dora Fell, and Dora Fell brought her mother with her Dorthea Fell. At 
that time my mother was 3 years old and she had a brother, Will Schmidt, 
Willy, oh excuse me, Willy Fell, and I think he was about I'ld say he was 
about 5 years older than my mother, that's a guess. There was also a 
sister, her name was, Rosa and she stayed in the east or perhaps went 
back from Ohio, this this we don't know, but they landed of course in 
New York from Germany 'and from there they went to Ohio and Rosie didn't 
want to come, leave New York and for some reason or another she might 
have had work there in New York that she knew about and any way she went 
back to New York, or perhaps stayed in the beginning. This we do not know. 
But, so I have never met Rosie, Willy I knew as I grew up. 

Now the log cabin was built by John Beck, I'm presuming that because he 
was the only man, in the, in the people, among the people that came uh 
on this trip, and uh what I have heard, what I have been told by my Sister 
Dorothy is that the uh, they hauled logs for a log cabin on a, in a, well 
they were hauled from Moody Creek which is about 15 miles from Rexburg. 
And ah these logs were notched, they were not nailed together, they were 
simply put together with some kind of ah well, there was some kind of 
plaster in between the logs to keep the cold and rain out. But it was 
built without nails; it was a large two room, a kitchen and living room 
was all in one, then a very large bedroom which was divided when we lived 
there in two and ah of course, ah, well by the time I was born it was 1910, 
well this homestead, now the only date I have is perhaps 19 - 1980 but I 
also have information from 1983 perhaps that was when everything was 
settled and they moved into the cabin. Oh excuse me 1883, yes 1883, 
we're in 1900 's now and of course they lived there, ah well, the rest 
of my, almost the rest of my mothers life and of course, four children 
of us were born all there in the log cabin and I lived there for 9 years 
and then we moved in town where Grandma lived, Dora Fell had a house, had 
purchased a house in Rexburg and lived in the house and at that time that 
we moved to town, Willy Fell, now he was my uncle, he was my mother's 
brother. And he was a stone mason and he did beautiful work chipping out 
stones and I remember watching him chip those stones, he would take a lot 
of time in making a perfect design and making them alike, all, all the 



and he built the stone house and when it was built was when we moved in 
to the lower floor and then there was an upper floor where a family lived 
and he lived with Grandma Dora Fell in the older house, which was on the 
same lot, it was a large lot, I'll tell you more about that later. 

Now Willy at one time lived at the log house, not exactly with us because 
he built on another wing or another large room which was later used for wood 
and storage. But at the time that, after he built it he lived there for 
quite a while at the log house but in his own apartment. So to say, now 
Willy helped build another house much later for Otto Beck who was a son of 
John Beck and Wilhelmina Beck and this house was built in about 1935, 1936 
and the first occupants of that house was uh, An&llia Weber Beck of course 
and Otto Beck and they had a daughter, one daughter by the name of Rowena 
who is^/iow living in New York. But Rowena was born in ah, on March 27, 1925, 
Now AmSllia Beck lived just a few years, she died in 1938 of a heart attack. 
After a while Otto Beck married another Weber girl and her name was Mary, 
oh, Mary Beck or Mary Weber and she is the mother of Maryann Beck and by 
the way at the present time and I am talking now in 1985 and Mary has lived 
there quire a while, much later after Otto died Maryann has lived there 
ever since and is living there at the present time. 

Well now, let's go back to the log cabin, I haven't mentioned yet that 
this homestead was probably abouxllSO acres. Now-Dora -Fe^R— strkhoff-some 
o f this,_ lafld, all but 10 acres as a matter of fact, and the two-occupants 
af^4JTat^4va-s-t^WL^teiner and George Steiner who was a eous-ing of John 
Stainers and they_ Tjved, there , when I lived in the log cabin, for those 
9 years. Of course we- lived in the log cabin and moved away once and 
lived in St. Anthony and then came back and lived in the log cabin. And 
then we went another time, we lived in ah, on Gary's farm, it was out near 
the rocky mountains and we lived there for a year and then came back again. 

Well let's go back to the children that Lena and George had and George 
Clink was Lena's husband and I think I mentioned that they met at a church 
and were married and ah, when my mother was 18. Now I was the first born, 
January 30, 1910 and my name is Minnie Ann Schmidt now, was Minnie Ann Clink 
then, when I went to get a license by the way, or a birth certificate 
I should say, to go to Alaska, this is much later here in Oregon. I sent 
for a birth certificate and found out I had no name at all, so, no ah 
first name so I simply adopted Minnie, but my real name is Wilhelmina 
and I was named after Wilhelmina Beck. I was born in 1910, my sister was 
the first born - did I mention her, my sister was the first born and she 
was born in 19, ah 19, ah 06 and she was born on July the 29th and 3% 
years later I was born in 1910. The next child was another girl - 3^ 
years later my sister and she was named Eva Magdalene Clink, she was 
born on July 29th, 1913. That made 3 girls. I might say that all this 
time, or a good part of this time, my dad, George Clink worked for the 
railroad, worked on the section. When he moved on the Gary ranch of course, 
he did farming, and when he, when he, we moved to St. Anthony, I think he 
worked in the Sugar Factory, but I'm not sure of that, he did work for a 
while in Sugar City. Let's go back to the children now after Eva, ah 
there was one boy born, and this was about a little, a year and 3 months 
later, in September, 27th of September 1914, George Lewis Clink, my 
brother was born. And I have to tell you this, I haven't told you yet 
Maryanne, uhm my grandmother always was present when we were born and 
in those days we were all actually born in the log cabin and there was 
a midwife, her name was Mrs. Robinson, that's all I know of her, but I 



have just a faint recollection of seeing her when my brother was born so 
I'm telling this now. Well my sister and I were a little bit older and 
so when all this being born was taking place why Grandma sent my sister, 
my older sister and I out to the Beck ranch for the excuse of borrowing 
a couple of tools, now I don't think these tools were needed at all but 
they wanted to get rid of us while the baby was born and so we walked out 
to the Beck ranch and oh how many, how many miles is it out to the ranch 
there, to the Beck ranch? 

Two or three. 

Two or three at least two or three, it seemed like a long ways. So it was 
a long ways out to get this, I believe it was a hammer and some chisel 
or something, it was something simple, cause we carried it easily and that 
was what we borrowed for not really borrowing at all but to get rid of 
us while the baby was born. Well then we had to walk all the way back 
again so you know, that took a few hours and then some. When we got back, 
we no more than got in the house, and Dad came out and he says, halleluhah, 
oh, I got a boy, I've got a boy, I've got a boy and he was so happy to at 
last have one boy and with a family of already 3 girls, the one, the thing 
he wanted most of all was one more, on boy. And that was the last of the 
Clink children that were born of Lena and George Clink. NOW. 

What is your name? 

My name is George, my nickname is Chuck, was Chuck Clink and I was born 
in Rexburg in 19, September 27, 1914, in the log house right next to 
where Maryann lives today. And ah, I remember the log house because, 
quite well, but we ah, I was real young another thing I remember was our 
root cellar out beside the log house. And we used to keep sauerkraut in 
it caust, and I can still remember how it smell ed when I went down into 
this root cellar and we had eggs put up in the water glass, we'd kill 
all the chickens, I can remember in the fall of the year before the 
hard freezes and we would store these stone crocks full of eggs with 
water, ah in water glass so they would keep for the winter. And then 
we had oh beets and turnips and some dried vegetables that we kept down 
in this root cellar with lots of potatoes, and speaking of potatoes we 
would, we 'Id eat potatoes three times a day, breakfast, lunch and dinner, 
day after day. Then another thing I remember about Rexburg, is how cold 
it was in the winter - ah, it'd get down to 40 below and we would, when we 
would go to town into church, to church, why we' Id ride in the sleigh and 
we would cover up with a great big bear rug going into, into Rexburg. 
My dad helped build the Mormon church, what street is that on, Maryanne 
do you remember? 

Third South, Third South. 

On Third South street, my father helped build that church, that was back 
in 1916, 17. Then another one of my memories of Rexburg is right after 
World War I, that the parade they had, coming on the main street, I was 
in front of Pexton's and Jensen's grocery store when the parade went by. 
And there's where I, in Rexburg is where I saw my first airplane. We 
were shopping in some store and somebody yelled airplane and everybody 
in town or in the store ran out in the streets and looked up at this 
airplane. That was the first one I had ever seen. 

See my sister, ah, ur both my sisters went to school in Rexburg, what 
was the name of that school now. 



Washington. 

At Washington school. I didn't go to school there cause I left there 
when I was five. We moved from there to ah let's see, Eugene, Oregon. 
Then we came out on the train, my father left from Rexburg with a, come 
out from there to ah Sutherlin, Oregon, he came by horse and buggy, 
he had a regular old covered wagon, it took him almost, ah, well, between 
three and four weeks to come from Rexburg to Sutherlin, Oregon where he 
got a job working in the woods. And we lived down in Sutherlin that 
summer, we all lived in a tent. And then from Sutherland, we moved to 
ah let's see, we moved to Eugene and stayed here for just about a month 
and then from Eugene we moved to Oregon City where we lived in little, 
well it was a place called Kanema, up on the hill above Oregon City. 
And that's where I went to my first grade, grade of school. Let's see 
then from Oregon City we moved to Salem where I went to school for 3 
years and that's where I got my first job selling papers on the corner 
of the Ladd and Bush bank on that Main Street and Commercial in Salem, 
used to make 20<t a night, thought I was really rich. 

What do you do now? 

And now, well let's see that's a long, a long gap in between there 
you want me to 

mention? 

Now after all these years I am retired to making salad in the salad 
factory we had down to Emerald Fruit and we put up salads for the 
University of Oregon and the different grade schools and high schools 
and we ship salads to'Corvallis and Roseburg and that keeps me pretty busy. 

What's the name of your business? 

And the name of it is Maryellen's Salad Mix which is named after my wife. 
She started making little salads with, made out of cabbage and carrots 
and red cabbage. We put her name on it - called it Maryellen's Salad 
Mix. But now we do, we put up cole slaw and make carrot sticks and 
tossed salads and brockets called flowerets just a number of different 
fancy articles for salad bars. 

You were number one at one time? 

At one time we were the only salad kitchen in Eugene and now there's 3 

located here and there are 2 more that come into town out of port! and so 

we have lots, lots and lots of competition. But we still do all the 
business we want to. 

Minnie do you want to continue on from last night. 

Well I was thinking of some things that George mentioned about the root 
sellar and I want to say something about that. I remember the root cellar 
too and the sauerkraut and eggs in water glass and, oh many things, carrots 
for I, he made mention the carrots, I didn't remember the turnips, but I 
remember the carrots and turnips and things like that. Well anyway, I 
have something else to remember to think about, and perhaps I think more 
of the root cellar for something to climb over and it was right back of 
the log cabin and one day, well I knew these sheep were coming in, the 
sheep herders were bringing in their sheep. This was beet time, beet 
harvesting and I don't think I mentioned that the 10 acres that is there 
at the present time, well that's the same ten acres that we lived on too 
and the crop was sugar beets and when sugar beet, ah harvesting came ah, 



time came, we all went to work. Oh I, of course I tried to help but I 
didn't do very much, but I remembered throwing some sugar beets on a pile 
and the men would come and gather the piles of sugar beets and take them 
to the, Sugar City, well anyway, after the beets were harvested they left 
the greens, the tops in the field and as soon as that was done there was 
all those sheep herders around to bring their sheep in to eat those nice 
fresh beet tops. Well, so this particular day that they, the first time 
they came in I saw them bring all these sheep in, hundreds of them, just 
literally hundreds of them, plus their wagon, their covered wagon that 
these men slept in at night. So what I did, I ran up on the fruit, on 
the root cellar, on the top of the cellar because they were coming in 
in droves, the sheep. Well, they just simply parted and went around me 
and I thought it was lots of fun. To see sheep all around me going to 
the, just as fast as they could go to the beet fields to get those nice 
beet leaves and ah, it was just fun that was all. Then the sheep 
stayed there for three days until all the beets tops were eaten. An oh, 
the sheepherders were always friendly with us kids and they' Id talk with us 
and I believe they had a couple of dogs too, to round up those sheep and 
bring them back out. Well any way after three days the sheep had been 
wandered all through the 10 acres and ate all the tops of the beets and 
then it was time for them to go home, but whenever I went outside I was 
on the root cellar watching the sheep and then I knew that I wouldn't 
be run over by sheep. 

Well so much for that. I want to say something more about, Aunt, well 
really my great Aunt Wilhelmina Beck, she was such a kindly person and 
of course her husband John Beck was too, but I remember so many times 
when they came to town', or perhaps she came alone, drove the horse and 
buggy and always stopped because she went by our house. But when she 
stopped she always had something to bring us. Maybe it was a time when 
our cow was dry and she' Id bring us some milk. And then other times, 
oh any time was a time for bringing butter because they had a butter churn 
and made butter and we didn't have those things and it was so good to 
get butter. And then she had things in her vegetable garden perhaps 
that we didn't have. We had mostly potatoes and cauliflower. Oh we 
grew raspberries and things like that but Aunt Beck, she had everything 
in her garden and she was forever bringing us nice things. Another 
thing that I enjoyed about Aunt Beck, whenever we kids went out there and 
we were there every now and then, perhaps it was a Sunday afternoon, there 
were always goodies on the table for us to eat and she was kindly and 
thoughtful and very generous, always doing things. 

Now I want to say something else about my Grandmother Dora Fell that I 
don't believe I mentioned earlier. I just now thought of it. She's a 
person who was always doing things for us too. And with four children 
there was always something to be done. Well now, my sister Dorothy 
and I were in school, the other two children in the family, Eva and George 
were younger and not in school yet, and we were in Rexburg. But when I 
would go to Grandma's house what do you think she would be doing. She'd 
be sitting in her rocker with a bible on her knee opened up, or a book of 
Martin Luther, she had volumns of Martin Luther's books - which was in 
German, and the bible she had was also in German script. She would be 
reading, no matter what, she would be reading something like that, 
something like these books, and at the same time she would be knitting 
for my sister and for me, knitting stockings of wool, knitting a petti- 
coat of wool. Idaho was cold as George said, it was cold country, snow, 
we had snow drifts that were 6 feet night, we had snow that would reach 



the top of the fence posts and freeze. It was cold. I went to school 
many times at 30 below zero and as George said it got down to 40 some- 
times too. Well she always knit us each, every winter we had a new 
petticoat of a deep red wool yarn and it was nice, it was beautifully 
made. Also there were the mittons and a cap for our head. Now that 
was a lot of knitting, becuase there were two of us and we got the whole 
outfit every winter, and so, and they added up after awhile, we would have 
two of three petticoats and we' Id have several pairs of long stockings 
of wool. So when I think of Grandma I think of her doing that or I 
would think of her raspberry patch when I would help her pick raspberries 
sometimes, or I would help her with the potatoes when we lived in town. 

Well, I might mention again about the Beck's and their homestead. It was 
a beautiful green field, but mostly they had potatoes. And they grew 
potatoes and when potatoe harvesting came all the boys were around and 
the girls too, to help stack the potatoes and get them ready in piles to 
be piled in the wagons and oh, from there I guess they went to the barn 
to be sacked or went to the market, I am not sure from there, I only 
remember the potatoe patch. So potatoe harvesting time was a good 
time when all the kids got together. Then I want to tell you about some 
of the other buildings on their place. They had a large barn and milk 
cows, and oh, milk cows, and milk cows, and milk cows, and when milking 
time came, all the men, all the boys were out there milking and sometimes 
the girls too. I could never manage it, I could never get the milk, 
so I guess I just wasn't old enough. 

Well, but at, they hact horses of course, too, and then there was the 
smoke house, now that smoke house was very important because late in the 
fall before the heavy snow was on, they butchered a pig or two, they 
always let us know when they had them butchered. And they then they put 
the hames in the, well the smoke house was what creates the hams, but they 
became very t very good at smoking hams, and there was always some ham 
for everybody, we always had a little bit of some of that good smoked 
meat. And because they were generous, not only with us but with all 
their family and all their relatives and their friends. Well the Beck 
farm was something to remember and I might mention that it was about 
160 acres plus, they had 160 acres on the dry farm, now the dry farm 
was up on the hill, the hill seemed like a great hill when I was young, 
when I was small, because it took me a long time to walk, it took me 
a long time to walk up the hill, when I was small, when I was young. 
But of course the dry farm was a lot farther out on the hill, and it 
was a 160 acres and it was managed, incidently by Otto Beck and Otto 
Beck was the father of you Maryann. And Otto Beck of course we knew him 
and he was, he was always farming and helping his dad because he was 
one of the older boys in the family, but thd dry farm, oh ah I'll mention 
another thing about the dry farm, I remember my dad going up there too and 
one time they were trying to find ah, well water and if there was one 
thing dad could do that was kind of different from what, well just a little 
bit different from the ordinary, he would take a witching stick and witch 
for water, and my Dad was so good at it the one time they had him come up 
there on the dry farm and I remember that because I was there and Dad, 
Dad witched for the water and they get and this was where the well was 
dug and they just had to have additional water and this was why they 
were trying to get another well on the dry farm. And the dry farm was 
called the dry farm because there was no other irrigation except any well 
water that they might have and then the well water was usually for drinking 
really it wasn't used for irrigation was it. 



Well the rain of course, but there wasn't too much rain in Rexburg, see 
this was why it was called the dry farm. It wasn't like Oregon, Maryann . 
we have rain in Oregon but the dry farm was dry. And so, and where it 
wasn't farmed I might mention that on the lower part of the dry farm it 
was sage brush. But there were the loveliest violets, do you happen 
to remember the violets that grew. Wild violets that grew in the, near 
the sage brush, kind of in the shade of the sage brush. And oh incidently 
I have another story to tell you. And then I think I will quit for 
tonight. When we lived in town, George was about five, well he was 
about five years old then and he was always admiring the boy scouts 
and I guess there was some near, some boy scouts living near us, at 
least I remember one of them and somehow or another he got friendly with 
some of these boy scouts and they were going on a trip and they were 
going up in the dry farm country by the way and so why that kid, that 
George, that little brother of mine, he connived with them and wanted 
to know if they could come along and just for fun they says, oh sure 
you can come along, and so he followed the boy scouts, up there that 
day and stayed all day and worried my mother half to death because she 
didn't know where he was and when he came back home in the evening he 
was so happy because he had quite an excursion with the boy scouts and 
that was when he was only five years old. But that was George. Well 
George has changed much from that time, but I will say this, he is 
still friendly, everybody loves George my brother. Good Night. 



What is your name? 

My name is Dorothy Barker, my maiden name was Clink, Dorothy Clink. 

When were you born. 

July the 23rd, 1906. 

Could you tell us the fun times, you had on Easter, and Christmas in 
Wilhelmina and John Beck's home. 

We always looked forward to our Easters and Christmases at the John 
Beck home. Aunt Minnie was a wonderful person and she worked for days 
cooking and sewing and planning for the big celebration she would have. 
Usually all her children and sometimes even neighbor children were in. 
She was ^/ery generous and would make up gifts of food and clothing for 
all of us. Usually we would have for Christmas, we would have some type 
of clothing and always a basket full of oranges and bananas and other 
fruits which we didn't usually have. We were always looking forward 
to our time at Christmas because they were such wonderful days. Easter 
was another time we were real grateful to have. She would make nests 
in the hay stacks and straw stacks and in these nests she would fill 
with boiled eggs, of colored eggs and little goodies or oranges, perhaps 
a banana or two and some little gift. And we would have to hunt the 
nests that had our name. And we would have a great scramble hunting 
for them, and often she had them hidden so well that she would have to 
show us where she had hid them. We had a great time at Easter time, 
because she would usually have the dinner with all the food, there was 
always fried chicken, she was great on making cakes and pies, all the 
goodies that everybody loved. Aunt Minnie was a wonderful cook. 



8 

Out at Aunt Beck's place it was the first home that was out there, it 
was a two room, two story house, with an attic. They built on a little 
addition, a little addition that was used as a kitchen and bedroom. 
The kitchen was a long kitchen with homemade, a homemade table with two 
benches in back and one in front and the children always had to sit 
on the back benches. These was always pleasant memories because there 
was always a great deal more food at this setting than we would have 
at home. 

One of the things that Aunt' Beck did that always amused me, in the 
Springtime when the jam and jellies were low, she would make sandwiches 
of jello and give to us kids. We always remarked that it was so stiff 
that we couldn't seem to spread it on our bread. But we liked the 
flavor and we liked the color because she always had red jello, we liked 
that. One of the things that, that the men looked forward to, Willy Beck 
was a good carpenter and he built a bath house to the pattern of the 
oriental bath house. And it was made all of wood, a wooden tub, of 
wooden floors, all wery waterproof and somehow or another there was 
fires built underneath to get the water hot and to keep the bath house 
hot. And he was the only one in that area that had that type of a 
bath house, it was patterned to the Japanese bath houses that were in the 
neighborhood, so it was a wery important thing. 

Another think I failed to mention was our Christmas parties. Aunt Beck 
took us children all to the Christmas parties at the church. This was 
a church in the center of town. I don't recall just where it was 
located, but it was always a tremendous gathering and a huge Christmas 
tree, a real Christmas tree, and on each branch there was gifts and 
spangles tied on each branch. There would be an auctioneer that would 
cut off each branch and sell it. These branches were given to the children, 
And I remember Aunt Beck would always buy each one of us children one of 
those branches, with a gift and possibly an ornament or two and it would 
be a long branch which was just a joy to all of us. We really were 
delighted to go to these Christmas parties. And there would be, Minnie 
Beck always attended these parties with us, and so we found this was 
something we always looked forward to. 

I'ld like to go back to the log house and tell a little bit more about 
the log house. The roof was constructed of heavy timbers and soil placed 
on the roof, really sod, and this was there for years, we used this roof 
for many things, we would dry apples, peas, berries and even beans. We 
would dry up on the roof because the sun was real warm up there, and 
my mother would cover it with cheese cloth holding it down with rocks, 
holding the cheese cloth down with rock, but it would only take two or 
three days for the beans and the peas and the apples to dry up on this 
roof. The house itself when it was first built was lined with a material 
they called factory in those days, Now I don't know, it was a material 
similar to a very thin muslin and the whole interior was covered with this 
material and tacked down about e^Qry 6 to 8 inches, then they went over 
it with a brushing of what they called a lime coating. It flaked off 
but it was yery , very white and it wouldn't flake off until it would 
be on this factory material for about a year. So eyery year this was 
a job, they would brush off this loose material and coat it again with 
this filling. Now this wasn't a yery healthful thing and these days 
they would condem it but at that time it was many of the log houses had 
such an interior. 



Another thing that was amusing there, we had a pump out at the back 
door and every winter this pump would freeze upt, it would be so frozen 
that there would be ice all over the top and we would have to get a boiler 
full of hot water and pour over the pump in order to get it to go the 
next morning. Another think that happened, the chickens, we would have 
to put little heaters in the chicken coops to keep the chickens from 
freezing in the winter time. Our heating, the way we had the log house 
was of course with coal and we would have a little building in back, a 
little shed that would hold coal. And also we burned willows, these 
willows were brought by team from the banks of the snake river. My 
father would go down in the summer time and get these willows and haul 
them up on what they call a hay rack and these willows were stacked out 
in back of the log house. And this is what we used for heating in the 
winter time. Between that and coal we kept warm in these 40 below zero 
winters that we had. We also had a smoke house in back just on the other 
side of the cellar, and in the fall it was my job to keep that smoke 
house going. We would use chips that were provided by the wood chopping 
of the willow to burn in the smoke house and this was something that 
lasted for a couple of months, just to keep it a smoking and I always 
had to keep the, a certain amount of chips in this smoke house to keep 
it asmoking. This was a very important thing. 

I would like to say a little something about the school, we went to 
the Washington school. We children, 3 of us . It was a rock building 
and there was also a wooden building nearby which was the first school 
that was built in Rexburg. This first school that was built, it was a 
two story builing, my mother Lena went to school there in all her years 
of 8th grade, through all her 8 years. I attended school for two years 
in that building. They tell me that now that building is taken down, 
but any way I went to. school in the same building for two years that my 
mother went to school in, and some of her chums, some of her friends 
that she went to school with were my teachers, which was always interesting 
Uhm, my mother was sick a great deal when I was young and I had to stay 
out of school many days. And I would write my own excuses for not going 
to school, they knew that on the days my mother was sick, that I would 
have to stay home and take care of the children, three of them that were 
younger than myself. So I was able to write my own excuses. But I did 
my studying and I was always an A and B student in spite of all that. 

During the summer and fall, I worked around in the neighborhood. I 
picked up potatoes in the fall, I hoed sugar beets with Willy Beck and 
I even shocked hay and tried to shock grain but that was a little too 
heavy for me. I found that shocking hay was a little too much, but I 
did work in the beet patch quite a little, topped beets. I was the 
only girl that topped beets for many days, but I got to where, that I 
made pretty good money and to me those few cents were great for school. 

My delight was my Uncle Bill, Billy Fell. At one time he owned a theatre, 
it was the Star Theatre and that was a great delight to us children 
because he would let my cousin Minnie Beck and our neighborhood children, 
which was Johnny Heinz and Will Heinz, he would let us in free, anytime 
we wanted to go to the theatre, so we thought that was real great to have 
an Uncle that would let us go to the theatre. And at that time, the 
theatre fare was a nickel but to not have to spend a nickel to go to the 
theatre was really a great thing. And he used to give me a great many 
little books and literature on the theatre and the stars. And one of the 



10 

books that he gave me that was the fast moving little contraption, for 
Charlie Chaplin was very popular at that time and he was always getting 
all the Charlie Chaplin pictures that were in the setting at that parti- 
cular time. But to say that my Uncle Billy had a theatre and would 
allow us to go in without spending any money was a great thing for us 
to look forward to. This theatre was located on Main street, I couldn't 
say exactly just where but approximately just off College Avenue on 
Main street in that neighborhood. At that time they had a piano player 
and a piano and this was the way they entertained theatre patrons while 
they were waiting and also during particular times of emotion. This 
piano was a great thing for us because before the theatre was playing, and 
after, usually before, he would allow me to go in and play on the piano 
and would give me music so that I could continue learning. My mother 
gave me organ lessons for quite a few years by furnishing eggs at 15<t 
a dozen and each lesson would cost one dozen eggs. So he encouraged 
me to practice on a piano. After he sold the theatre this piano was moved 
to my grandmothers place and there of course I used the piano a lot 
and we children always had a good time in playing the piano and marching 
and singing. He had the piano at my grandmothers home for quite a few 
years . 

I just want to mention that after we moved out of the log house, the 
Clink family, Willy Beck married a girl from Salem, which was a community 
about 15 or 20 miles from Rexburg and he married a girl, Rosie Rootweiler, 
and they moved into the log house after we moved out. They really redid 
the log house, they lined it with some type of plywood, now it wasn't 
plywood in those days, but it was something on that order and painted 
it and they really remodeled it beautifully because Rosie Rootweiler 
was real artistic and she made a beautiful room from the log house. 
The kitchen, there was. only two rooms, one real large room and one smaller 
room which was the bedroom. But they lived in that for^quite a few ^ 
years and after they moved out, Otto Beck married Moll^r, married Molly 
Weber and he lived in the log house. And he was the last one that lived 
in this log house and as I learned it is now used as a 

grainery 

grainery, at this particular date which is 1985. 

In conclusion the log cabin that is, it is an art attraction. Area 
artists paint the log cabin in their art class. And then we have 
visitors from Sun City, Arizona that come up and take art and paint 
it as a subject in their art class. 



OTTO BECK i£Z/ 

by Mary Ann Beck . "^ *^2-c', 



My father, Otto Beck, was born October 19, 1893 at Hall, Wuettemberg, Germany, the son of Johann Beck 
Wilhelmine Weber Beck. In 1902, at the age of nine, he emigrated with his family to the United States afte: 
family became members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Germany. They arrived at 
Island in New York and then traveled directly to Rexburg, where they could be with some of their family 
old friends from Germany. 

Otto attended Marietta School in Burton and the Cedar Point Public School, finishing seventh grade before g 
into the family business of herding sheep and farming. With his father, Otto homesteaded 160 acres of dry : 
on the Rexburg bench. 

Otto married Amalia (Molla) Weber, Dec. 23, 1923. They had one daughter, Rowena. After his first wife pa 
away, Otto married Mary Weber on March 22, 1939. They had two daughters, Mary Ann Beck (myself), 
Amelia who passed away at birth. 

My cousin, Ross, remembered Otto Beck as "one of the kindest and most generous of men. He had a good s 
of humor and a very contagious laugh. He had a gruff voice that may have frightened those who didn't k 
him, but he was very gentle. He was like a second dad." He treated cousins Ross, Kay and Carl like sons. 

Otto had a 1935 black Chevrolet. Though it had dented fenders, it was a really good car. He would put a tr 
on behind it and take cousins Ross and Kay with him to Island Park to cut and load firewood. When little cc 
Carl was old enough, they would all go fishing at Warm River and Island Park. They had a favorite fishing 
near a railroad bridge by Last Chance. They were good fishing buddies and always had a good catch. 

The fishing trips always involved a treat of watermelon, and, since Otto loved candy, they would stop at Ja 
Store near Warm River and get a supply of candy and pop. At one time, Otto chewed tobacco, but realizii 

> 

wasn't a good thing to do, he substituted bittersweet licorice for the tobacco. He would keep it in a little c 



box in the garage. One day he offerd Ross some. Ross really didn't like it, but politely told him it was good. Otto 
also taught the boys not to use alcohol by giving them a taste of wine which they thought was really terrible stuff. 
It burned all the way down and Otto laughed as they jumped around in discomfort. He told them to remember 
how uncomfortable it was if they were ever tempted to try it again. 

Otto Beck was a hard worker and always kept busy. He raised mink, foxes, cattle, and horses and always had 
ducks and geese around. He loved animals and would buy animals no one else wanted at livestock auctions. He 
would then fatten them up and make nice-looking animals out of them. He also bought old horses and had them 
slaughtered for meat for his mink and foxes. In the early 1950's he stopped raising mink and foxes because it 
wasn't economically worthwhile and he concentrated on cattle. 

Otto worked and farmed with horses until he finally got a nice Ford tractor in the 1950's. One time he drove it 
into a ditch and he laughingly said "Whoa, whoa!" but it didn't stop. During the haying season, cousins Ross 
and Kay were Otto's hired help. Although I was only eight or nine, I would drive the tractor that pulled the hay 
wagon. The boys would have to tell me to slow down since I liked to drive too fast. 



My dad passed away from a stroke on December 24, 1955. At the time of his death, he held the office of high 

LOS 
priest in the church. 



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ftowena A. Beck was born on March 27, 1925 to Otto Beck and Amolla 
Weber Beck at my home in Rexburg, Idaho. We lived on a 40 acre farm. We were 
neighbors to my maternal grandparents, Gottlieb and Mary Weber. I was their first 
grandchild. We continued living on that farm until 1933. 

Then we moved about a mile away on the ten acres that Grandfather Beck had 
given to my father, Otto. These ten acres had been homesteaded by father's Aunt Dora 
Foell. We lived in the log cabin for two years while father built our new house. 

After developing a testimony my mother joined the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter Day Saints and the family became active members. Father became an Elder in the 
church and was desirous of having an eternal family. Dad took the family to the Logan 
Temple in Logan, Utah on June 5, 1929 to be sealed for all time and eternity. I remember 
being dressed in a white dress and stockings. I was four years old at the time. This was a 
two or three day trip by car back then. I was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints in April of 1933 shortly after by eighth birthday. 

I remember one winter right through Christmas time my father had pneumonia. 
That was when pneumonia was a serious disease and lots of people died with it. Our 
neighbor, Weldon Steiner, fed and milked the cows for us until my father was able to 
work again. It was a very cold winter and the water pump had to be thawed out before 
water could be pumped. 

Father would tell of his experiences when he and his brothers, Bill and Fred Beck 
and Fred Kauer would stay up on the dry farm during the summer and throughout the 
harvest of both the wheat and hay. They would also do the plowing and planted the 
winter wheat for the next season. They seemed to enjoy this adventure especially riding 
the horses, hurting deer and antelope and cutting timber for our winter supply of wood. 
They would haul the wood back to the irrigated farm where the family lived. Nobody 
lived on the dry farm in the winter because it was too cold and desolate. Father also told 
of the time when a mountain lion walked right across their sleeping bags while they were 
sleeping. They woke up in time to see the mountain lion walking away. 

I went to Washington and Adams Elementary Schools in the fourth, fifth and sixth 
grades. I could memorize and enjoyed reciting poetry and acting in class skits. One 
February the teacher had a skit about George Washington and how he always told the 
truth and about Betsy Ross and how she made the first American Flag. On stage I was to 
make a five pointed star by folding paper a certain way but I made a mistake and it turned 
out to be a six pointed star instead. Everyone laughed to my embarrassment. 

I remember begging my parents to give me a bicycle for my birthday. Finally for 
my twelfth birthday I received a bicycle. I was the happiest girl in town. I was in my 
glory as I rode my bike taking the cows down to the pasture. The pasture was on the 
sixty acres farm which was two miles from our house. I did this each morning and would 
bring them back each night during the spring, summer and fall. Other times I enjoyed 
riding over to Grandmother Weber's house and all around on the country roads. I was 
the first of my friends to have a bicycle and as a result became very popular until they got 
their bicycles. 

My mother's health started failing and continued to do so until she died in 1938 
from a heart attack. Shortly thereafter my father remarried, this time to my mother's 
sister, Mary. They were married on March 22, 1939. To this union my little sister, Mary 



Ann was born on October 14, 1940. So now I had a little sister -- a half sister and a 
cousin all at the same time - strange huh? I was 15 years old at the time. 

I graduated from Madison High School in 1943. This was during World War II 
and many of the boys were joining the armed forces and some of the girls went to work in 
Salt Lake City so I did too. I lived with Aunt Mada until September and then I moved to 
a room on First Avenue and lived with Iris Jenson, a friend from Rexburg. We later 
moved into an apartment with Rachael Olsen. I worked for the Security Insurance 
Company for three years. 

I met Eric Bresee in Salt Lake City at a United State Organization (USO) dance. 
He was stationed at Keams Air Force Base. He had been to India and was waiting to be 
transferred to Tinnian. When Japan surrendered and the War was over they stationed him 
in Mississippi instead. Shortly thereafter he was released from the Air Force. Eric went 
back to New York and started at Clarkson College. I joined with Eric in Potsdam while 
he was there at college. We were married at his parent's home in October 1946. We 
lived in a converted army barracks on the other side of the Racquets River along with all 
the other families of ex-servicemen. 2.5"^ 

Our first son Charles was born on SeptembeBl947 in Potsdam, St. Lawrence 
County, New York. After Eric graduated from college he went to work for the U.S. 
Geological Survey in Ellenville, Ulster County, New York. Our second son, Gary, was 
born in Ellenville, on October 5, 1950. Eric was actually away with the Army Reserve 
while I was in the hospital having Gary. The Inactive Reserve Unit was called to go to 
Korea about then; however, Eric was in the Active Unit he didn't have to go. 

When Eric was transferred to Alaska with his work I spent a month or so with my 
family in Rexburg before joining him. For a year and a half we lived in Palmer, Alaska, 
which is about 50 miles north of Anchorage. Eric traveled all oyer Alaska either by car, 
plane or train. His job was to measure the different stream flows. We did travel to a 
couple of places with the family such as Chitna and Valdez. While fishing at Chitna Eric 
was caught some twelve salmon and we were able to take them all home. 

We moved back to the states and lived in South Charleston and then to St. Albans, 
West Virginia. Charles and Gary went to Hansford Elementary School, Albans Junior 
High School and St. Albans High School. Charles graduated from St. Albans High 
School in 1967. 

The family moved to Albany, New York in 1967. Gary attended and graduated 
from Colonie Central High School 1968. He went on to attend Paul Smith's College until 
both boys joined the service. Charles joined the Marines and was deployed to Vietnam 
while Gary joined the Air Force. He was assigned to Lowry Air Force Base in Colorado 
for armament systems training on completion of basic training at Lackland Air Force 
Base in Texas. He managed to stay state-side the entire time. After Charles return from 
Vietnam he found work at the Rail Road and Gary went on to college and became an 
Engineer. 

Charles E. Bresee married Linda Darlene Mattice on October 9, 1971 or 72, in 
Coxsackie, New York. Their children are Kelly and Amy. Gary was married to Roxanne 
Elizabeth LaPlante on October 12, 1974 in Plattsburgh, New York. Their children are 
Eric Insoo, Jamee and Katie. 

We have done some traveling during our lives including: California, Arroba, 
Antia, Cancun, Singapore, Bali, Korea, Hawaii and Florida. 



It was while living in Albany that I discovered that I really enjoyed and had a 
talent for arranging flowers. I joined the Garden Club and took many horticulture classes 
to help develop my skills. I spent many hours making different floral arrangements and 
won lots of Blue Ribbons and Trophies for my outstanding work. I have made dry floral 
arrangements which are enclosed within glass-covered frames for the wall and plastic 
covered brooches for ladies to wear. Mary Ann has a couple of these in her possessions. 

During the winter months I did latch-hook rugs, pillows or whatever. I made 
pillows and Christmas stockings for my children and Mary Ann with their names worked 
into them. I also gave a pillow to Mary Ann that says, "Be It Ever So Humble There Is 
No Place Like Home." 

I enjoyed reading and learning about the different things of the world such as 
birds and flowers. I love the beauties of the earth and especially the beautiful sunset that 
are seen in the Rexburg area. 

Rowena suffered a stroke on March 9, 2004 shortly before her birthday in her 
home in Albany, New York. This left her quite dependant and moved to an assisted 
living home in Saratoga Springs, New York so she could be closer to her son. 



Minnie Anni Schmidt 

And how do you spell that? 

The last name? 

Um huh 

Schmidt 

And your address 

My address is 2605 Lawrence St., Eugene 97405 

And when is your birthday? 

My birthday is January 30th 

What year 

1910 if you are talking about the first year. 

Okay, explain and tell of Dora Felt, your grandmother and John Beck and 
Wilhemina Beck your aunt and uncle, building the family cabin in Rexburg. 

Well I will tell what I have been told. Before I was born John Beck and 
his wife Wilhemina Beck came from Germany with Wilhelmina's sister also, 
Dora Fell, and Dora Fell brought her mother with her Dorthea Fell. At 
that time my mother was 3 years old and she had a brother, Will Schmidt, 
Willy, oh excuse me, Willy Fell, and I think he was about I'ld say he was 
about 5 years older than my mother, that's a guess. There was also a 
sister, her name was, Rosa and she stayed in the east or perhaps went 
back from Ohio, this this we don't know, but they landed of course in 
New York from Germany and from there they went to Ohio and Rosie didn't 
want to come, leave New York and for some reason or another she might 
have had work there in New York that she knew about and any way she went 
back to New York, or perhaps stayed in the beginning. This we do not know. 
But, so I have never met Rosie, Willy I knew as I grew up. 

Now the log cabin was built by John Beck, I'm presuming that because he 
was the only man, in the, in the people, among the people that came uh 
on this trip, and uh what I have heard, what I have been told by my Sister 
Dorothy is that the uh, they hauled logs for a log cabin on a, in a, well 
they were hauled from Moody Creek which is about 15 miles from Rexburg. 
And ah these logs were notched, they were not nailed together, they were 
simply put together with some kind of ah well, there was some kind of 
plaster in between the logs to keep the cold and rain out. But it was 
built without nails; it was a large two room, a kitchen and living room 
was all in one, then a very large bedroom which was divided when we lived 
there in two and ah of course, ah, well by the time I was born it was 1910, 
well this homestead, now the only date I have is perhaps 19 - 1980 but I 
also have information from 1983 perhaps that was when everything was 
settled and they moved into the cabin. Oh excuse me 1883, yes 1883, 
we're in 1900's now and of course they lived there, ah well, the rest 
of my, almost the rest of my mothers life and of course, four children 
of us were born all there in the log cabin and I lived there for 9 years 
and then we moved in town where Grandma lived, Dora Fell had a house, had 
purchased a house in Rexburg and lived in the house and at that time that 
we moved to town, Willy Fell, now he was my uncle, he was my mother's 
brother. And he was a stone mason and he did beautiful work chipping out 
stones and I remember watching him chip those stones, he would take a lot 
of time in making a perfect design and making them alike, all, all the 



And he built the stone house and when it was built was when we moved in to the lower 
floor and then there was an upper floor where a family lived and he lived with Grandma 
Dora Foell in the older house, which was on the same lot, it was a large lot, I"ll tell you 
more about that later. 

In 193 5, Willy and his cousin Otto Beck built an stucco house next to the old log cabin 
where Otto, Molla and his family lived. There marriage date was, December 23, 1923. 
Mary Ann Beck is presently living in this home. Otto Beck married Mary Weber after the 
death of his first wife, Molla Weber. Rowena was born to Otto and Molla on March 27, 
1925. Molla lived just a few years, she died in 1938, of a heart attack. Then Otto married 
another Weber girl named Mary on March 22, 1939. Mary and Molla were sisters. He had 
two more daughters, Mary Ann and Amelia. Mary Ann was born October 14, 1940 then 
Amelia was born three years later on June 13, 1943. In the Fremont County Clerks Office, 
St. Anthony, Idaho, where they keep the Land Record. Dora Foell bought 10 acres from 
Thomas E. Ricks, the founder of Rexburg and who Ricks College is named after. This is 
the same piece of land that original old log cabin was built on and the same that Mary Ann 
Beck still lives on. She has since sold off five acres. The address there is 1442 West 1000 
South, Rexburg, Idaho 83440. Which is now in Madison County. (This paragraph was up 
dated by Mary Ann Beck after researching Land Records.) 

Well, let's go back to the children that Lena and George had and George Clink was Lena's 
husband and I think I mentioned that they met at a church and were married when my 
mother was 18. Now I was the first born, January 20, 1910 and my name is Minnie Ann 
Schmidt now, was Minnie Ann Clink then, when I went to get a license by the way, or a 
birth certificate I should say, to go to Alaska, this is much later here in Oregon. I sent for a 
birth certificate and found out I had no name at all, so, no ah first name so I simply adopted 
Minnie, but my real name is Wilhelmina and I was named after Wilhelmina Beck. I was 
born in 1910, my sister was the first born - did I mention her, my sister was the first born 
and she was born in 1906, on July 29, and three and one-half later I was born in 1910. The 
next child was another girl, who they name Eva Magdalene Clink, she was born on July 29, 
1913. That made three girls. I might say that all this time, or a good part of this time, my 
Dad, George Clink worked for the railroad, work on the section. When he moved on the 
Gary ranch of course, he did farming, and when we moved to St. Anthony, I think he 
worked in the Sugar Factory, but I'm not sure of that, he did work for a while in Sugar 
City. Let's go back to the children now after Eva, there was a boy born. A little over a 
year later, on September 27, 1914, George Lewis Clink, was born. And I have to tell you 
this, I haven't told you yet, my Grandmother always was present when we were born and a 
midwife, her name was Mrs. Robinson, that's all I know of her, but I 



have just a faint recollection of seeing her when my brother was born so 
I'm telling this now. Well my sister and I were a little bit older and 
so when all this being born was taking place why Grandma sent my sister, 
my older sister and I out to the Beck ranch for the excuse of borrowing 
a couple of tools, now I don't think these tools were needed at all but 
they wanted to get rid of us while the baby was born and so we walked out 
to the Beck ranch and oh how many, how many miles is it out to the ranch 
there, to the Beck ranch? 

Two or three. 

Two or three at least two or three, it seemed like a long ways. So it was 
a long ways out to get this, I believe it was a hammer and some chisel 
or something, it was something simple, cause we carried it easily and that 
was what we borrowed for not really borrowing at all but to get rid of 
us while the baby was born. Well then we had to walk all the way back 
again so you know, that took a few hours and then some. When we got back, 
we no more than got in the house, and Dad came out and he says, halleluhah, 
oh, I got a boy, I've got a boy, I've got a boy and he was so happy to at 
last have one boy and with a family of already 3 girls, the one, the thing 
he wanted most of all was one more, on boy. And that was the last of the 
Clink, children that were born of Lena and George Clink. NOVi. 

What is your name? 

My name is George, my nickname is Chuck, was Chuck Clink and I was born 
in Rexburg in 19, September 27, 1914, in the log house right next to 
where Maryann lives today. And ah, I remember the log house because, 
quite well, but we ah, I was real young another thing I remember was our 
root cellar out beside the log house. And we used to keep sauerkraut in 
it caust, and I can still remember how it smell ed when I went down into 
this root cellar and we had eggs put up in the water glass, we'd kill 
all the chickens, I can remember in the fall of the year before the 
hard freezes and we would store these stone crocks full of eggs with 
water, ah in water glass so they would keep for the winter. And then 
we had oh beets and turnips and some dried vegetables that we kept down 
in this root cellar with lots of potatoes, and speaking of potatoes we 
would, we' Id eat potatoes three times a day, breakfast, lunch and dinner, 
day after day. Then another thing I remember about Rexburg, is how cold 
it was in the winter - ah, it'd get down to 40 below and we would, when we 
would go to town into church, to church, why we'ld ride in the sleigh and 
we would cover up with a great big bear rug going into, into Rexburg. 
My <Jad helped build the Mormon church, what street is that on, Maryanne 
do you remember? ; 

Third South, Third South. 

On Third South street, my father helped build that church, that was back 
in 1916, 17. Then another one of my memories* of Rexburg is right after 
World War I, that the parade they had, coming on the main street, I was 
in front of Pexton's and Jensen's grocery store when the parade went by. 
And there's where I, in Rexburg is where I saw my first airplane. We 
were shopping in some store and somebody yelled airplane and everybody 
in town or in the store ran out in the streets and looked up at this 
airplane. That was the first one I had ever seen. 

See my sister, ah, ur both my sisters went to school in Rexburg, what 
was the name of that school now. 



Washington. 

At Washington school. I didn't go to school there cause I left there 
when I was five. We moved from there to ah let's see, Eugene, Oregon. 
Then we came out on the train, my father left from Rexburg with a, come 
out from there to ah Sutherlin, Oregon, he came by horse and buggy, 
he had a regular old covered wagon, it took him almost, ah, well, between 
three and four weeks to come from Rexburg to Sutherlin, Oregon where he 
got a job working in the woods. And we lived down in Sutherlin that 
summer, we all lived in a tent. And then from Sutherland, we moved to 
ah let's see, we moved to Eugene and stayed here for just about a month 
and then from Eugene we moved to Oregon City where we lived in little, 
well it was a place called Kanema, up on the hill above Oregon City. 
And that's where I went to my first grade, grade of school. Let's see 
then from Oregon City we moved to Salem where I went to school for 3 
years and that's where I got my first job selling papers on the corner 
of the Ladd and Bush bank on that Main Street and Commercial in Salem, 
used to make 20<t a night, thought I was really rich. 

What do you do now? 

And now, well let's see that's a long, a long gap in between there 
you want me to 

mention? 

Now after all these years I am retired to making salad in the salad 
factory we had down to Emerald Fruit and we put up salads for the 
University of Oregon and the different grade schools and high schools 
and we ship salads to Corvallis and Roseburg and that keeps me pretty busy. 

What's the name of your business? 

And the name of it is Maryellen's Salad Mix which is named after my wife. 
She started making little salads with, made out of cabbage and carrots 
and red cabbage. We put her name on it - called it Maryellen's Salad 
Mix. But now we do, we put up cole slaw and make carrot sticks and 
tossed salads and brockets called flowerets just a number of different 
fancy articles for salad bars. 

You were number one at one time? 

At one time we were the only salad kitchen in Eugene and now there's 3 
located here and there are 2 more that come into town out of portland so 
we have lots, lots and lots of competition. But we still do all the 
business we want to. 

Minnie do you want to continue on from last night. 

Well I was thinking of some things that George mentioned about the root 
sellar and I want to say something about that. I remember the root cellar 
too and the sauerkraut and eggs in water glass and, oh many things, carrots 
for I, he made mention the carrots, I didn't remember the turnips, but I 
remember the carrots and turnips and things like that. Well anyway, I 
have something else to remember to think about, and perhaps I think more 
of the root cellar for something to climb over and it was right back of 
the log cabin and one day, well I knew these sheep were coming in, the 
sheep herders were bringing in their sheep. This was beet time, beet 
harvesting and I don't think I mentioned that the 10 acres that is there 
at the present time, well that's the same ten acres that we lived on too 
and the crop was sugar beets and when sugar beet, ah harvesting came ah, 



time came, we all went to work. Oh I, of course I -tried to help but I 
didn't do very much, but I remembered throwing some sugar beets on a pile 
and the men would come and gather the piles of sugar beets and take them 
to the, Sugar City, well anyway, after the beets were harvested they left 
the greens, the tops in the field and as soon as that was done there was 
all those sheep herders around to bring their sheep in to eat those nice 
fresh beet tops. Well, so this particular day that they, the first time 
they came in I saw them bring all these sheep in, hundreds of them, just 
literally hundreds of them, plus their wagon, their covered wagon that 
these men slept in at night. So what I did, I ran up on the fruit, on 
the root cellar, on the top of the cellar because they were coming in 
in droves, the sheep. Well, they just simply parted and went around me 
and I thought it was lots of fun. To see sheep all around me going to 
the, just as fast as they could go to the beet fields to get those nice 
beet leaves and ah, it was just fun that was all. Then the sheep 
stayed there for three days until all the beets tops were eaten. An oh, 
the sheepherders were always friendly with us kids and they' Id talk with us 
and I believe they had a couple of dogs too, to round up those sheep and 
bring them back out. Well any way after three days the sheep had been 
wandered all through the 10 acres and ate all the tops of the beets and 
then it was time for them to go home, but whenever I went outside I was 
on the root cellar watching the sheep and then I knew that I wouldn't 
be run over by sheep. 

Well so much for that. I want to say something more about, Aunt, well 
really my great Aunt Wilhelmina Beck, she was such a kindly person and 
of course her husband John Beck was too, but I remember so many times 
when they came to town, or perhaps she came alone, drove the horse and 
buggy and always stopped because she went by our house. But when she 
stopped she always had something to bring us. Maybe it was a time when 
our cow was dry and she 'Id bring us some milk. And then other times, 
oh any time was a time for bringing butter because they had a butter churn 
and made butter and we didn't have those things and it was so good to 
get butter. And then she had things in her vegetable garden perhaps 
that we didn't have. We had mostly potatoes and cauliflower. Oh we 
grew raspberries and things like that but Aunt Beck, she had everything 
in her garden and she was forever bringing us nice things. Another 
thing that I enjoyed about Aunt Beck, whenever we kids went out there and 
we were there every now and then, perhaps it was a Sunday afternoon, there 
were always goodies on the table for us to eat and she was kindly and 
thoughtful and very generous, always doing things. 

Now I want to say something else about my Grandmother Dora Fell that I 
don't believe I mentioned earlier. I just now thought of it. She's a 
person who was always doing things for us too. And with four children 
there was always something to be done. Well now, my sister Dorothy 
and I were in school, the other two children in the family, Eva and George 
were younger and not in school yet, and we were in Rexburg. But when I 
would go to Grandma's house what do you think she would be doing. She'd 
be sitting in her rocker with a bible on her knee opened up, or a book of 
Martin Luther, she had volumns of Martin Luther's books - which was in 
German, and the bible she had was also in German script. She would be 
reading, no matter what, she would be reading something like that, 
something like these books, andTat the same time she would be knitting 
for my sister and for me, knitting stockings of wool, knitting a petti- 
coat of wool. Idaho was cold as George said, it was cold country, snow, 
we had snow drifts that were 6 feet night, we had snow that would reach 



the top of the fence posts and freeze. It was cold. I went to school 
many times at 30 below zero and as George said it got down to 40 some- 
times too. Well she always knit us each, every winter we had a new 
petticoat of a deep red wool yarn and it was nice, it was beautifully 
made. Also there were the mittons and a cap for our head. Now that 
was a lot of knitting, becuase there were two of us and we got the whole 
outfit every winter, and so, and they added up after awhile, we would have 
two of three petticoats and we 'Id have several pairs of long stockings 
of wool. So when I think of Grandma I think of her doing that or I 
would think of her raspberry patch when I would help her pick raspberries 
sometimes, or I would help her with the potatoes when we lived in town. 

Well, I might mention again about the Beck's and their homestead. It was 
a beautiful green field, but mostly they had potatoes. And they grew 
potatoes and when potatoe harvesting came all the boys were around and 
the girls too, to help stack the potatoes and get them ready in piles to 
be piled in the wagons and oh, from there I guess they went to the barn 
to be sacked or went to the market, I am not sure from there, I only 
remember the potatoe patch. So potatoe harvesting time was a good 
time when all the kids got together. Then I want to tell you about some 
of the other buildings on their place. They had a large barn and milk 
cows, and oh, milk cows, and milk cows, and milk cows, and when milking 
time came, all the men, all the boys were out there milking and sometimes 
the girls too. I could never manage it, I could never get the milk, 
so I guess I just wasn't old enough. 

Well, but at, they had horses of course, too, and then there was the 
smoke house, now that smoke house was very important because late in the 
fall before the heavy snow was on, they butchered a pig or two, they 
always let us know when they had them butchered. And they then they put 
the hames in the, well the smoke house was what creates the hams, but they 
became very, very good at smoking hams, and there was always some ham 
for everybody, we always had a little bit of some of that good smoked 
meat. And because they were generous, not only with us but with all 
their family and all their relatives and their friends. Well the Beck 
farm was something to remember and I might mention that it was about 
160 acres plus, they had 160 acres on the dry farm, now the dry farm 
was up on the hill, the hill seemed like a great hill when I was young, 
when I was small, because it took me a long time to walk, it took me 
a long time to walk up the hill, when I was small, when I was young. 
But of course the dry farm was a lot farther out on the hill, and it 
was a 160 acres and it was managed, incidently by Otto Beck and Otto 
Beck was the father of you Maryann'.^ And Otto Beck of course we knew him 
and he was, he was always farming and helping his dad because he was 
one of the older boys in the family, but thd dry farm, oh ah I'll mention 
another thing about the dry farm, I remember my dad going up there too and 
one time they were trying to find ah, well water and if there was one 
thing dad could do that was kind of different from what, well just a little 
bit different from the ordinary, he would take a witching stick and witch 
for water, and my Dad was so good at it the one time they had him come up 
there on the dry farm and I remember that because I was there and Dad, 
Dad witched for the water and they get and this was where the well was 
dug and they. just had to have additional water and this was why they 
were trying to get another well on the dry farm. And the dry farm was 
called the dry farm because there was no other irrigation except any well 
water that they might have and then the well water was usually for drinking 
really it wasn't used for irrigation was it. 



Well the rain of course, but there wasn't too much rain in Rexburg, see 
this was why it was called the dry farm. It wasn't like Oregon, Maryann . 
we have rain in Oregon but the dry farm was dry. And so, and where it 
wasn't farmed I might mention that on the lower part of the dry farm it 
was sage brush. But there were the loveliest violets, do you happen 
to remember the violets that grew. Wild violets that grew in the, near 
the sage brush, kind of in the shade of the sage brush. And oh incidently 
I have another story to tell you. And then I think I will quit for 
tonight. When we lived in town, George was about five, well he was 
about five years old then and he was always admiring the boy scouts 
and I guess there was some near, some boy scouts living near us, at 
least I remember one of them and somehow or another he got friendly with 
some of these boy scouts and they were going on a trip and they were 
going up in the dry farm country by the way and so why that kid, that 
George, that little brother of mine, he connived with them and wanted 
to know if they could come along and just for fun they says, oh sure 
you can come along, and so he followed the boy scouts, up there that 
day and stayed all day and worried my mother half to death because she 
didn't know where he was and when he came back home in the evening he 
was so happy because he had quite an excursion with the boy scouts and 
that was when he was only five years old. But that was George. Well 
George has changed much from that time, but I will say this, he is 
still friendly, everybody loves George my brother. Good Night. 



What is your name? 

My name is Dorothy Barker, my maiden name was Clink, Dorothy Clink. 

When were you born. 

July the 23rd, 1906. 

Could you tell us the fun times, you had on Easter, and Christmas in 
Wilhelmina and John Beck's home. 

We always looked forward to our Easters and Christmases at the John 
Beck home. Aunt Minnie was a wonderful person and she worked for days 
cooking and sewing and planning for the big celebration she would have. 
Usually all her children and sometimes even neighbor children were in. 
She was wery generous and would make up gifts of food and clothing for 
all of us. Usually we would have for Christmas, we would have some type 
of clothing and always a basket full of oranges and bananas and other 
fruits which we didn't usually have. We were always looking forward 
to our time at Christmas because they were such wonderful days. Easter 
was another time we were real grateful to have. She would make nests 
in the hay stacks and straw stacks and in these nests she would fill 
with boiled eggs, of colored eggs and little goodies or oranges, perhaps 
a banana or two and some little gift. And we would have to hunt the 
nests that had our name. And we would have a great scramble hunting 
for them, and often she had them hidden so well that she would have to 
show us where she had hid them. We had a great time at Easter time, 
because she would usually have the dinner with all the food, there was 
always fried chicken, she was great on making cakes and pies, all the 
goodies that everybody loved. Aunt Minnie was a wonderful cook. 



8 

Out at Aunt Beck's place it was the first home that was out there, it 
was a two room, two story house, with an attic. They built on a little 
addition, a little addition that was used as a kitchen and bedroom. 
The kitchen was a long kitchen with homemade, a homemade table with two 
benches in back and one in front and the children always had to sit 
on the back benches. These was always pleasant memories because there 
was always a great deal more food at this setting than we would have 
at home. 

One of the things that Aunt Beck did that always amused me, in the 
Springtime when the jam and jellies were low, she would make sandwiches 
of jello and give to us kids. We always remarked that it was so stiff 
that we couldn't seem to spread it on our bread. But we liked the 
flavor and we liked the color because she always had red jello, we liked 
that. One of the things that, that the men looked forward to, Willy Beck 
was a good carpenter and he built a bath house to the pattern of the 
oriental bath house. And it was made all of wood, a wooden tub, of 
wooden floors, all very waterproof and somehow or another there was 
fires built underneath to get the water hot and to keep the bath house 
hot. And he was the only one in that area that had that type of a 
bath house, it was patterned to the Japanese bath houses that were in the 
neighborhood, so it was a very important thing. 

Another think I failed to mention was our Christmas parties. Aunt Beck 
took us children all to the Christmas parties at the church. This was 
a church in the center of town. I don't recall just where it was 
located, but it was always a tremendous gathering and a huge Christmas 
tree, a real Christmas tree, and on each branch there was gifts and 
spangles tied on each branch. There would be an auctioneer that would 
cut off each branch and sell it. These branches were given to the children 
And I remember Aunt Beck would always buy each one of us children one of 
those branches, with a gift and possibly an ornament or two and it would 
be a long branch which was just a joy to all of us. We really were 
delighted to go to these Christmas parties. And there would be, Minnie 
Beck always attended these parties with us, and so we found this was 
something we always looked forward to. 

I'ld like to go back to the log house and tell a little bit more about 
the log house. The roof was constructed of heavy timbers and soil placed 
on the roof, really sod, and this was there for years, we used this roof 
for many things, we would dry apples, peas, berries and even beans. We 
would dry up on the roof because the sun was real warm up there, and 
my mother would cover it with cheese cloth holding it down with rocks, 
holding the cheese cloth down with rock, but it would only take two or 
three days for the beans and the peas and the apples to dry up on this 
roof. The house itself when it was first built was lined with a material 
they called factory in those days, Now I don't know, it was a material 
similar to a very thin muslin and the whole interior was covered with this 
material and tacked down about every 6 to 8 inches, then they went over 
it with a brushing of what they called a lime coating. It flaked off 
but it was very, very white and it wouldn't flake off until it would 
be on this factory material for about a year. So every year this was 
a job, they would brush off this loose material and coat it again with 
this filling. Now this wasn't a very healthful thing and these days 
they would condem it but at that time it was many of the log houses had 
such an interior. 



Another thing that was amusing there, we had a pump out at the back 
..door and every winter this pump would freeze jjpt, it would be so frozen 
that there would be ice all over the top and we would have to get a boiler 
full of hot water and pour over the pump in order to get it to go the 
next morning. Another think that happened, the chickens, we would have 
to put little heaters in the chicken coops to keep the chickens from 
freezing in the winter time. Our heating, the way we had the log house 
was of course with coal and we would have a little building in back, a 
little shed that would hold coal. And also we burned willows, these 
willows were brought by team from the banks of the snake river. My 
father would go down in the summer time and get these willows and haul 
them up on what they call a hay rack and these willows were stacked out 
in b&cY, of trie A 09 house. hvA this is Wnat \«e \3seo for neatino, in the 
winter time. Between that and coal we kept warm in these 40 below zero 
winters that we had. We also had a smoke house in back just on the other 
side of the cellar, and in the fall it was my job to keep that smoke 
house going. We would use chips that were provided by the wood chopping 
of the willow to burn in the smoke house and this was something that 
lasted for a couple of months, just to keep it a smoking and I always 
had to keep the, a certain amount of chips in this smoke house to keep 
it asmoking. This was a very important thing. 

I would like to say a little something about the school, we went to 
the Washington school. We children, 3 of us. It was a rock building 
and there was also a wooden building nearby which was the first school 
that was built in Rexburg. This first school that was built, it was a 
two story bulling, my mother Lena went to school there in all her years 
of 8th grade, through all her 8 years. I attended school for two years 
in that building. They tell me that now that building is taken down, 
but any way I went to school in the same building for two years that my 
mother went to school in, and some of her chums, some of her friends 
that she went to school with were my teachers, which was always interesting 
Uhm, my mother was sick a great deal when I was young and I had to stay 
out of school many days. And I would write my own excuses for not going 
to school, they knew that on the days my mother was sick, that I would 
have to stay home and take care of the children, three of them that were 
younger than myself. So I was able to write my own excuses. But I did 
my studying and I was always an A and B student in spite of all that. 

During the summer and fall, I worked around in the neighborhood. I 
picked up potatoes in the fall, I hoed sugar beets with Willy Beck and 
I even shocked hay and tried to shock grain but that was a little too 
heavy for me. I found that shocking hay was a little too much, but I 
did work in the beet patch quite a little, topped beets. I was the 
only girl that topped beets for many days, but I got to where, that I 
made pretty good money and to me those few cents were great for school. 

My delight was my Uncle Bill, Billy Fell. At one time he owned a theatre, 
it was the Star Theatre and that was a great delight to us children 
because he would let my cousin Minnie Beck and our neighborhood children, 
which was Johnny Heinz and Will Heinz, he would let us in free, anytime 
we wanted to go to the theatre, so we thought that was real great to have 
an Uncle that would let us go to the theatre. And at that time, the 
theatre fare was a nickel but to not have to spend a nickel to go to the 
theatre was really a great thing. And he used to give me a great many 
little books and literature on the theatre and the stars. And one of the 



10 

books that he gave me that was the fast moving little contraption, for 
Charlie Chaplin was very popular at that time and he was always getting 
all the Charlie Chaplin pictures that were in the setting at that parti- 
cular time. But to say that my Uncle Billy had a theatre and would 
allow us to go in without spending any money was a great thing for us 
to look forward to. This theatre was located on Main street, I couldn't 
say exactly just where but approximately just off College Avenue on 
Main street in that neighborhood. At that time they had a piano player 
and a piano and this was the way they entertained theatre patrons while 
they were waiting and also during particular times of emotion. This 
piano was a great thing for us because before the theatre was playing, and 
after, usually before, he would allow me to go in and play on the piano 
and would give me music so that I could continue learning. My mother 
gave me organ lessons for quite a few years by furnishing eggs at 15<t 
a dozen and each lesson would cost one dozen eggs. So he encouraged 
me to practice on a piano. After he sold the theatre this piano was moved 
to my grandmothers place and there of course I used the piano a lot 
and we children always had a good time in playing the piano and marching 
and singing. He had the piano at my grandmothers home for quite a few 
years. 

I just want to mention that after we moved out of the log house, the 
Clink family, Willy Beck married a girl from Salem, which was a community 
about 15 or 20 miles from Rexburg and he married a girl, Rosie Rootweiler, 
and they moved into the log house after we moved out. They really redid 
the log house, they lined it with some type of plywood, now it wasn't 
plywood in those days, but it was something on that order and painted 
it and they really remodeled it beautifully because Rosie Rootweiler 
was real artistic and she made a beautiful room from the log house. 
The kitchen, there was only two rooms, one real large room and one smaller 
room which was the bedroom. But they lived in that for quite a few 
years and after they moved out, Otto Beck married Molly, married Molly 
Weber and he lived in the log house. And he was the last one that lived 
in this log house and as I learned it is now used as a 

grainery 

grainery, at this particular date which is 1985. 

In conclusion the log cabin that is, it is an art attraction. Area 
artists paint the log cabin in their art class. And then we have 
visitors from Sun City, Arizona that come up and take art and paint 
it as a subject in their art class. 



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Balzer 

Russian village where 
Alexander and Annie Weber were born 




Some history and personal observation 

of Balzer 
in -July/ 2000 



Why did our German ancestors decide 
to leave Germany and go to Russia? 



Holy Roman Empire - The First Reich 

Germany prior to 1871 - Confederation of German States 

The widely accepted notion during the 20th century of a strong German national tradition, quite ironically, only existed as 
goal or vision for hundreds of years. A strong national cultural tradition did exist for hundreds of years, but not a political 
one. Germany attained unification under centralized rule much later than most other European countries. The powerful 
German dynasties of the middle ages never succeeded in establishing a German nation-state because they were bound by 
the legacy of the traditions of the Holy Roman Empire. Underneath the umbrella tradition of the empire, a multiplicity of 
small states operated under the autonomy and sovereignty of local and regional nobles. In the late 18th century it has been 
reported that as many as 314 states and 1475 estates comprised Germany, making it look like a patchwork quilt. Centuries 
of religious struggle contributed to this fragmentation. 

Religious strife dominated central Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries. The Reformation (1521) resulted in 
prolonged and bloody warfare that was largely carried out on German soil. The Thirty Years' War (1618-1648) was the 
culmination of this devastating period. Large portions of Germany were decimated with an estimated 30% of the 
population being killed. In the Palatinate, one source estimated only 50,000 people surviving out of a population of one 
million. The horrors of the Thirty Years' War lived on in popular memory as those of no other war in Europe until the 20th 
century. 



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German Unification 1871 - The Second Reich 

Under the auspices of Prussia, its largest state, Germany was united into a federal system in 1871. The resulting 
combination consisted of 22 states and the 3 former city-states or urban republics of Hamburg, Bremen and Lubeck. 
Kaiser Wilhelm served as the first emperor of the unified Germany which was referred to as the Second Reich. This 
structure lasted until 1918 when Germany lost extensive portions of territories to France, Poland, Belgium, Denmark and 
Czechoslovakia. Hitler's period of rule beginning in the 1930's marked the Third Reich. The devastation of WWII resulted 
in the further loss of territory including the provinces of Silesia, Pomerania, East Prussia and part of Brandenburg to 
Poland and the Soviet Union. Germany was also split into Eastern and Western republics following the close of the war. 



German Emigration to the United States 

The religious strife that dominated central Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries provided a backdrop for the first 
wave of German emigration to the United States. It came largely from the states of Baden, Wurttemburg, Bavaria, Hesse, 
and from the Munster and Mainz regions. In the early 1 8th century, they were joined by inhabitants of S wabia and the 
Palatinate. The mass emigration by the Palatines in 1709 was especially significant. The flow of Germans to the United 
States slowed in the mid 1700's and was virtually suspended during the French & Indian War (Seven Year's War) from 
1756 to 1763. 

The bulk of German emigration in the latter half of the 1 8th century turned toward European countries, especially Russia 
from 1763 to 1767. As a result of Catherine the Great's Manifesto, nearly 30,000 Germans emigrated to the Volga Region 
of Russia before the German princes could stop the exodus. Budineen Castle was a gathering point for many of the 
emigrant families, as well as a place where many couples were married before departing. Many of the descendants of these 
immigrants in turn began emigrating to the United States 110 years later and continued until about 1920. They came to be 
known as "Germans From Russia". 

The second wave of emigration to America was much larger. After a 25 year lull that occurred during 1789-1815 due 
largely to revolution and wars, emigration started to accelerate again in the 1820s and 1830s. The wave crested in the late 
1840s and early 1850s with 1854 being the peak year. Many of the emigrants were now coming out of the Northern 
German States as well during this time period. The Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin had a particularly large 

http://www.teleport.eom/-herbf/ggr.htm#German 
Genealogical Resources 



k outflow during this period. During the 1860s the exodus contracted dramatically due to Dotn the American Civil War and 
^the Wars of German Unification. 

The third and final wave began in the 1870s and crested in the 1880s. The newly industrialized Germany had become a 
prosperous nation by the mid 1 890s and emigration slowed to a trickle again. Emigration levels in the latter half of the 
1890s returned to levels seen in the 1830s. Emigration in the first two decades of the 20th century included many Germans 
displaced from eastern European countries, especially Volga Germans from Russia. 

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Volga Germans 

Germans From Russia 



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Thousands of German nationals emigrated to Russia between 1763 and 1767 during the rule of Catherine the Great. There 
they pursued the oprxirtunity of freedom, local self government and better economic conditions as promised in her 
Manifesto. They were settled in villages on the Russian Steppe along the Volga river and thus came to be known as Volga 
Germans. One of the largest settlements along the Volga River was the Village of Baker . 

The causes of this emigration can be traced back more than 200 years. The Reformation (152 1) had divided the German 
people and resulted in prolonged and bloody warfare that was largely carried out on German soil. The Thirty Years' War 
(1618-1648) was the culmination of this devastating period which left the population in a state of great poverty. Many 
conflicts continued in the early 1700's, especially in Southwestern Germany. 

The most disastrous war of the 18th century was the Seven Years War (1756-1763), which served to be the final trigger of 
the Volga German Migration. This war occurred at the same time as the French and Indian War in the United States. 
French troops again decimated Southwestern Germany and left the population ravaged. Despite the war induced poverty, 
the princes continued to extract heavily from their peasants. Enforced labor service and required military duty were also 
major factors. Particularly in Hesse, where subjects were frequently hired out as mercenary soldiers. Hessian troops were 
again hired out just a few years after the Volga migration, this time to England to fight against the colonists during the 
American Revolution. 

It should be noted that the prerequisite for a massive movement of this size is also dependent on the opportunities afforded 
in the destination country. Russia offered nearly unrestricted opportunities to the emigrants as a result of readily available 
land for purchase, exemption from military service, freedom from most taxation, self administration, religious freedom and 
loans to aid their initial settlements . 

The migration to the Volga Region started as a trickle in 1763-1765 in response to Catherine The Great's invitation. As 
their subjects began to exit in a flood by 1767, the German princes acted decisively to put a stop to the emigration. This 
sudden cessation left thousands of hopeful German emigrants stranded, with some not even able to return to their home 
villages. Many believe there would have been several thousand more Germans in the original Volga colonies had it not 
been for the rulers decisive move to prohibit the out migration. As it was, it is estimated that 25,000 to 30,000 Germans 
were able to emigrate to Russia. 

The emigrants were of all ages, but were predominantly comprised of young families. Many couples were married just 
prior to leaving for Russia. They came from many different areas or states in Germany. One state with particularly large 
representation was Hesse-Darmstadt. The count of Isenburg was more tolerant of the recruiters than many other rulers and 
consequently many of his subjects emigrated. Budingen Castle , where he resided, was the place where several hundred 
young couples were married before departing. The Budingen marriage records often list the home villages and the parents 
of the emigrants. 

The trip for the emigres was a long and arduous one. First they had to travel overland to the port city of Lubeck on the 
northeastern coast of Germany. There they would gather until sufficient numbers could be grouped together for the long 
trip by sailing ship to the Russian port city of St. Petersburg. Then the route was another long stretch overland to the 
southeast, through the Russian interior, to the city of Saratov. From this point they were dispersed out to their villages of 
destination This was the primary route for early emigres, however some Germans made the complete trip by land. 

The Volga colonies became quite prosperous after suffering through the difficulties of the first few years. From the 
original 104 settlements, a thriving community of 192 towns and villages eventually developed on both sides of the Volga 
river in the Russian provinces of Saratov and Samara. Settlements located on the west side of the river were referred to as 
being on the Bergseite or hilly side. Settlements located on the east side of the river were referred to as being on the 
Wiesenseite or meadow side. 



Village of Balzer 

Volga (Russian) Germans 



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Village History 

Germans from Baden, Hesse, Rhineland, Palatinate, Wtirttemburg and Switzerland emigrated to Russia between 
1765 and 1767. They settled along the west side (Bergseite) of the Volga River, forming the Village of Balzer. 
The village grew to be one of the largest of the Volga German settlements and became the commercial center for 
the colonies on the west side. Balzer was also the Kanton for several other adjacent villages. 

In his book The Emigration from Germany to Russia in the Years 1763-1862, Dr. Karl Stumpp indicates that in 
1768 there were 90 original families comprised of approximately 377 individuals. From this small beginning the 
village grew dramatically over the next 150 years. It is estimated that there were still over 1 1,000 residents of 
Balzer in the early 1900's, even after the heavy emigration to the United States and other countries which had 
been in process since 1875. 

A large percentage of original Balzer residents came from Hesse-Darmstadt. Many came from the Budingen 
area and were subjects of the count of Isenburg. Other villages in Hesse were Alt Wiedermus, Diebach, 
Dudelsheim, Lorbach, Offenbach, and Rohrbach. Although few Balzer residents were married at Buding en 
Castle , several hundred Volga Germans were married there before leaving for Russia. Transcripts of the 
Budingen marriage records in German have been obtained. A translated copy of these records may be printed in 
a future special edition of the Balzer Village Newsletter. 

The summer 1 997 issue of the Balzer Village Newsletter contained a reprint of a several page history of Balzer and emigrating families. A brief 
synopsis of this article on Balzer History is included here, but see the details on newsletter back issues below. The picture at the top right is the 
Balzer Church, built 1 849- 1 85 1 . To view a larger image of the Church (155K) . 






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Outer wall approaching Budingen Castle 



Castle Tower inside the inner wall. 



Balzer History 

"Goloi-Karamisch" in Russian - 

&HiHJliliilJHjljl^^ 

The Village of Balzer was named after its first Burgermeister (mayor), Balzer Barthuly from Essen, Germany. He was 
among the first nine Balzer families to arrive on 28 August 1765. These initial settlers survived the first winter by living in 
dugouts in the hillside. Successive groups of colonists arrived over the next two years, with the last group arriving on 1 8 
August 1767. By this time, the colony was composed of 377 persons, 198 men and 179 women. 

The colony was located in the Volga River valley about eight miles from the river bank and about sixty miles south of the 
Russian provincial city of Saratov. The tract of land allotted to the village by the Russian government was comprised of 
18,000 acres, excluding the forest, town lots, gardens and threshing floors. This amount of land was not sufficient to 
sustain Balzer completely as a farming community, which led it to become an industrial city developing much business and 
commerce, especially with other Volga German colonies. 

The initial group of settlers developed a prosperous colony. It soon grew to include 238 horses, 150 cows and 2 swine. 
Approximately 670 acres of prairie were put under cultivation near the southern end of the village. 

The dominant church in the colony was Evangelical Reformed, with Lutheran being the other major denomination. The 
church in the image on the home page was built in 1849-1851 and was actually the third church built. It was constructed 
from hand formed bricks, while the first two were constructed of logs in 1777 and 1 821 . Of the original 90 families, 60 
belonged to the Reformed Church and 30 to the Lutheran Church. 



■■©* 



The village was laid out with the main street running North and South, eventually extending to two miles as the village 
grew. The church, schoolhouse and market were on this main street. All the other streets ran east and west, forming 
squares with the alleys that ran north and south. 

Balzer was the commercial center for colonies on the west side. Numerous flour and grist mills were built, with some of 
the early ones powered by wind. Other important industries were dye and tanning. Altogether there were about 30 
tanneries that handled about 10,000 hides per year. The textile industry was probably the most prominent, with thousands 
of hand looms in the homes. It has been estimated that over 5 million meters of textiles (Sarpinka) were shipped to both 
domestic and foreign markets. 

When the "Russianizing" process began in 1 874 the colonists sent an exploration party to America to explore emigration 
possibilities. Emigration started in earnest in 1875 as young men objecting to the compulsory military duty began to 
depart. Another contingent left in 1876. Many of these early departing colonists settled in the towns of Friend and Sutton, 
Nebraska. As emigration picked up, many settled in other parts of the United States and also in Winnipeg, Canada. But 
Lincoln, Nebraska ended up being the most prominent destination by far, with more than 200 Balzer families documented 
living there by the early 1900's. 

Summer 1997 Back Issue 

Historical Review of Balzerer from 1938. The following chapters of this article are included in the newsletter: 1) The 
Migration from Germany to Russia 2) The Location of Balzer 3) The Church and the Schools 4) Ministers of the Gospel 
in Balzer 5) Commercial Standing of Balzer 6) The Emigration to America. 

Ordering Information: 

To order the full text version of this article from the newsletter contact: 

Wayne Bonner 
15619 Ogram Ave. 
Gardena, CA 90249-4445 



Why did our Grandparents, 
Gottlieb and Anna Marie Weber 
and Great Uncle and Aunt, 
Alexander and Anna Margaretha Weber 

decide to leave Russia 
and come to the US? 



By the late 1800's, the population of German colonists had multiplied to many hundred thousand people. When the 
"Russianizing" process began in 1874 the colonists began to explore emigration possibilities. Emigration started in earnest 
in 1875 as young men objecting to the compulsory military duty began to depart. Emigration accelerated in the following 
years with many Volga Germans settling in Nebraska, the Dakotas and other parts of the United States and also in 
Winnipeg, Canada. But Lincoln, Nebraska ended up being the most prominent destination by far, with hundreds of Volga 

German families documented living there by the early 1900's. 

Emigration to the United States, and other countries, was effectively ended by the Russian Revolution in 1917. In the 
ensuing years the Volga Germans endured increasing privations and suffered persecution from the Russian government 
and citizens. This period reached a climax during World War II when many Volga Germans were rounded up and forcibly 
transported from their villages to Siberia and other desolate locations following Hitler's invasion of Russian territory. 



Germans From Russia Societies 

American Historical Society of Germans From Russia 

Germans From Russia Historical Society 

Federation of East European Famil y History Societies 



hitp:/Afvww.teleport.com/-herb(M5lgahim#Volga 
Germans 



http://www.teleport.eom/-herbl/balzhisl.hIm#Hislory ol 
the Balzer Colony 




Photograph of Alexander Weber in the Russian army. Alexander is the man standing 
on the right. There is some indication that the man in the middle may be his 
commanding officer who was a German serving professionally in the Russian army. 






Why did Alexander and Annie Weber 
decide to leave Russia and come to 
the US? 



^By the late 1800's, the population of German colonists had multiplied to many hundred thousand people. When the 

''Russianizing" process began in 1874 the colonists began to explore emigration possibilities. Emigration started in earnest 
Fin 1875 as young men objecting to the compulsory military duty began to depart. Emigration accelerated in the following 
^years with many Volga Germans settling in Nebraska, the Dakotas and other parts of the United States and also in 
Winnipeg, Canada. But Lincoln, Nebraska ended up being the most prominent destination by far, with hundreds of Volga 

German families documented living there by the early 1900's. 

^Emigration to the United States, and other countries, was effectively ended by the Russian Revolution in 1917. In the 
ensuing years the Volga Germans endured increasing privations and suffered persecution from the Russian government 
*and citizens. This period reached a climax during World War II when many Volga Germans were rounded up and forcibly 
'transported from their villages to Siberia and other desolate locations following Hitler's invasion of ) 



Russian territory. 



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l&ermans From Russia Societies 

American Historical Society of Germans From Russia 
^Germans From Russia Historical Society 
federation of East European Family History Societies 



http://www.leleport.eom/-herbf/volga.hlm#Volga 
Germans 



http://www.teleport.eom/-herbf/balzhist.htm#History of 
the Balzer Colony 



Jack Weber was a German by heritage, but his German ancestory came by way 
of Balzer, Russia. In the 1760's, his ancestors left the small village of 
Rohrbach in Germany which is near the present town of Budingin ^^ 
town is not too far from Frankfurt, a well known city in Germany, Because 
oHhe economic and political siuation in Germany, Anna Margaret Weber the 
widow of Casper Weber, took her two sons and a daughter and accepted the 
invitation or the Czarina of Russia to Immigrate ■* ■£ t £ f £ r ^ £ n 
Russia along the Volga Rive r. The promises were made by the Czarina 
Russia who was born in Germany and had been married to the Russian Czar. 
Due to political instability, the Russian Czar was removed and she became 
the Russian Czarina. She understood Germans and knew that they were hard 
workers, good farmers, and very productive. However, she did not under- 
stand how hard the area would be to settle and what a hardship she was 
actually expecting from these German settlers. She made promises that 
they would not have to serve in the Russian army forever and that they 
would receive free land (about 160 acres per person). For the first 
thirty years they would not have to pay taxes. They would receive free 
transportation to the area and loans if they wanted to begin their work. 
They put into each colony only people of the same religion. For the Weber 
widow, to remain in Germany meant that her sons would be forced by the 
prince of Germany to serve as mercenaries in a war in which they had no 
concern. Most of the money would go to the prince and almost nothing to 
the boys. Anna and her boys made the decision to leave. 

lc took them a full year to travel to the Volga region. They crossed 
by boat to Lennigrad (St. Petersburg). Next they traveled across land and 
eventually down the Volga River to Saratov in the Volga region. The land 
was arid, having an annual rainfall of about fourteen inches. This was 
a great contrast to the area in Germany from which they had come which had 
an annual rainfall of about forty inches and was green with plenty of 



water. In Russia, they had to learn to plant their wheat in the fall so the 
moisture would accumulate with the snows. They were actually at about the 
latitude of Canada. It was a harsh, tough experience for these Germans. 
Tfie Weber widow was assigned to settle in Balzer, about forty miles south 
of Saratov and eight to ten miles from the Volga River. 

For the next one hundred and thirty years, the ancestors of Jack Weber 
struggled and became successful. They learned to grow the Turkish winter 
wheat which made excellent bread. It proved to be a good quality wheat and 
eventually was brought to America and provided the basis of most of the 
wheat that was grown here in the United States. They prospered and built 
a neat village. The Reformed Lutheran Church was the focus of their reli- 
gious life. Each person had so much space for orchards and livestock. They 
maintained a storage program for their wheat by storing about one-third of 
their grain each year. When the drought years came, no one starved. 

After about one hundred years, the Russians changed their minds and 
demanded that the young men serve in the army. Jack's father, Alexander, 
served four years in the Russian army to fulfill this military obligation. 
His mother did not have to serve in the army, but she worked very hard 
during the time that her husband was in the army. In fact, it was she 
who saved the money that made it possible for them to immigrate to the 
United States. 

While Alexander served in the Russian army, he traveled in the Polish 
area and obtained an idea of the railroad system which permitted him to 
understand how they could leave. When they heard that a ship from England 
was leaving with pure-bred cattle and that a few passengers could go at a 

lower fare, they jumped at the chance. They sold their belongings and left 
for America with their children. It was a trip of some 8,000 miles and one 
of sadness as one of the twins died on the way across the ocean. 

The family arrived in Lincoln, Nebraska where many of the Volga Germans 
had immigrated. It was a tough life in the beginning because they could not 
speak English. At the same time, they were not financially well off. They 
worked as laborers and eventually the railroad provided most of the support 
for-these German immigrants which helped them establish themselves in this 
new land. In Russia, they had isolated themselves into German colonies and 
had not learned the Russian language or interacted with the Russians any more 
than they needed. In America, however, they embraced this new land with much 
more enthusiasm. They saw the great freedom that was present and the oppor- 
tunity to educate their children. They loved this new land. 

Alexander and Anna had other children while they lived in Lincoln, 
Nebraska, but they also wanted to be farmers and have their own land. There 
came an opportunity to work in the sugarbeet industry in Colorado. The. 
Germans had had experience with sugarbeets in Russia and were very hard work- 
ers. They moved to the western slopes of Colorado to a town of Olathe 
where they worked on a farm raising sugarbeets. They had hoped to obtain 

some land. 

It was here in Olathe, Colorado that Jack and his twin sister, Marie, 
were born on October 13, 1905. His official name was John Weber in memory 
of his ancestors. For Alexander and Anna, the birth of the twins was both 
a joy and a sadness. John was born with a cleft palate. In 1905, the 
knowledge of a cleft palate was not too well known and it was frightening to 
realize the disfiguration that had occurred at this birth. The medical 
doctor or midwife that delivered the child was not very skilled. He did 
not even record this birth. In later years, Jack had some trouble establish- 
ing that he was even born in America, but with the help of his sister, Molly, 
he~was able to obtain that verification. 



Visit to Saratov and Balzer by Darrell, Carolyn and Trent Weber 

The following is a journal record that I kept during our visit to the Volga region 
during July, 2000. 

Arriving in Saratov 

In Moscow, there are five airports and one of the challenges is to get to the right 
airport. With a little luck we found the right airport and we got on the airplane. 

It was about eight-thirty pm when we arrived in Saratov. It was very dark. 
White nights are not in existence in this part of Russia. It is much lower, so we had to 
deal with the darkness. It was a little more difficult. They took us through an opening, 
and then we walked over to the side. Then they turned on the lights, and we went back 
in and got our suitcases. It was little confusing, but we found ours. While we waited, a 
man began to talk to us about taxi. Eventually, I was able to get a message across. I 
told him Hotel Volga, and he recognized the hotel. For seventy rubles, which is about 
three dollars, he said that he would take us there. He was an older fellow and a really 
nice taxi driver. He took us to the Hotel Volga; and brought us in the back side of the 
hotel. We entered in the back door of the hotel. The Hotel Volga is a big hotel. I 
shouldn't say monstrous, but it is large. There are four or five floors. It is old, and not 
very modern. Still, it was a nice place and the price was right. It was about twenty-five 
dollars a night, which is unbelievable in many ways. We are going to be paying a 
hundred and fifty dollars in Moscow when we get there. The hotel is on a street that is 
no longer travelled by cars. As it turned out, it took a long time to get checked in. 
There were some people ahead of us. It seemed like it took forever. We had to show 
them passports and communicate with them. Eventually, we got in and settled down. 
Originally, we had wanted a room where three people could sleep. She said that they 
have a double, double which logically sounded like two bedrooms, but it wasn't. So, 
Trent was in a single room, and we were in double, double room. It amounts to having 
a living room with a bedroom. We managed to spend the night. It is the fourteenth of 
July. We settled in, relaxed and fell asleep. We knew that breakfast was served about 
eight o'clock. It was about seven when I woke up and I went in to take a bath. I turned 
on the hot water; and instead of hot water coming out, the air was sucking in. This 
happens obviously when the water below you is pulling down, and all you are getting 
is air. That was a little bit different, so no bath this morning. Eventually, later in the 
day, the pressure built back up. In the evening, there was pressure, and the next day, it 
was okay to take a bath in the morning. We thought that we were going to have a 
double room with a bed for Trent to sleep with us, so that all three of us could be 
together. However, a double double as they would call it is a room with two single 
beds and then a large room like a living room. We got another room for Trent which 
was a single with a bed and a bathroom. It was not quite what we had planned, but 
when you can't talk Russian, and your communication is not clear. You end up with 
something different. Still, like I say the cost was very minimum. So, we were not 
complaining. We got up and with the hotel comes breakfast. We went down and sat 
down at this table. As we went down, we noticed that there was a gambling area. 
Gambling is an important business in town, I guess. At least in the hotel there is a 
gambling place. We went in and sat down. The waitress came with a plate that had 
sausage, some cheese, some butter, and some sliced cucumbers. They also brought 
some bread. We thought, "Well, that is about what we have been having." It was not 
exactly what we consider breakfast. Then he brought in some rice and a hamburger 



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patty. It was almost like meatloaf, so we thought okay. We ate that, and that was our 
breakfast. With a little luck, we will find a driver that can take us to Balzer and we will 
see the village where my Grandfather was born. 
Visiting Balzer 

Next we had the problem of trying to find a taxi to take us to Balzer to see the 
village that my family came from. We went out to try to find taxis. At first, we didn't 
have very much luck. The taxi man didn't know any English at all. He thought that I 
was German, and he called over a German fellow who apparently knew some German. 
He soon realized that I didn't know German either, so that didn't work. Eventually,we 
were able to talk about the town. I did have the Russian spelling of the town called 
Balzer ( Golgi Karamsysch or Krasnoarmeysk). He figured out where the town was 
and said that was okay. Then we tried to determine what the cost would be for the 
whole day. I tried to tell them from ten o'clock till five o'clock would be seven hours. 
Of course, they had to pay for their gas. He said fifteen hundred rubles. That sounds 
like a huge amount of money but it was about fifty dollars. It wasn't too bad. Anyway, 
we agreed to it. We got in and off we went. Turns out this fellow was a little bit of a 
joker. His wife, I don't know why she was there, but she happened to be there with 
her son. They joked about their son and asked us if we had a son. We told them we 
had five sons and one daughter, and they were just amazed. Most Russian families 
have one child. At the most, two children. It is a much different world. As we began to 
drive through Saratov, it was obvious that it is a commercial area. There is quite a 
number of businesses. Saratov has a million people. Historically, it has some 
interesting aspects. In World War II, the German army that tried to take over Russia 
did come to Saratov and fight. He said that a hundred seventy-seven thousand men 
were killed in this battle around Saratov. In America, there was only three hundred 
thousand men killed in the whole war. In just the Saratov area, there was a hundred 
seventy-seven thousand Russian men killed. So, you have to realize that this was a 
bloody battle ground. Because of the concern of the German army coming in, the 
Russians shipped all the Volga Germans out. They shipped them to Siberia or Tashkent 
or some of these areas that were a long distance from the Volga area. They were never 
really officially allowed to come back even though they owned houses and lands. They 
were never given back their own property. They were forgiven for something they 
never did about fifteen years later by Khustchev but we were never given their 
property back. A lot of them immigrated to Germany. About a million of them, in fact. 
It is estimated that there is still apparently about a million of them scattered about 
Russia. Some of them are trying to get to Germany. This is a historical part of war. 

As we left Saratov, the country itself was full of trees. Very green trees lined all 
of the streets and it added coolness to the area. Actually, it was quite a pleasant town 
even though there is a million people. It didn't look like it was that big of a city. It 
looked more like they had a huge main street that was a mile or so long. They had lots 
of stores otherwise, but it never gave you the impression that it would be bigger than 
Salt Lake City. It certainly is nothing like that. There is no skyscrapers. There were 
small buildings. Maybe six or seven stories high would be the highest ones. Any rate, 
it was a pleasant city as we left. One had the feeling that it was fairly peaceful. Around 
Saratov, they have what they call the steppes. I don't quite why they call them the 
steppes. It isn't flat land. It is rolling land. You look on the horizon in all directions and 
you see no mountains. It is a great contrast to our Rocky Mountain area. It is an area 
that is very flat, endless. They used to talk about the endless steppes. It is a large area 
and has aa lot of space. As we began to pull out of the city, we began to see the 



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Downtown Balzer main buildings 



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agriculture that was present. They have huge fields of wheat. Five or six hundred 
acres, I would imagine in a single field. There were fields of sunflowers. Obviously, 
they were growing sunflower seeds to extract the oil. I didn't see a lot of hay. There 
was a grass material that I didn't see very commonly. There were oats, and sometimes 
we would see potatoes, but not a huge number of potatoes. It was mainly wheat. It 
was a large wheat producing area. I had this feeling that this was a rich area. The soil 
looked really good. It was a dark and black soil. One could realize that good 
agriculture production could occur from this area. Even so, they tended to plant winter 
wheat. They would plant the wheat in the fall. Then the snows would come and 
provide the moisture. They would harvest the wheat by July, maybe even June. 
Several of the fields had grain that was almost ready to be harvested. They have also 
planted a lot of trees. Along the roadside, they had planted trees on both sides, almost 
like a wind break. I don't know if that helps in the winter time with the snow 
movement across the highways. Next to the highway they would plant say a swath of 
wheat, fifty or hundred feet wide. Then they would have three rows of trees and then 
large fields behind the trees. Anyway, as I rode along in this taxi with this fellow, my 
mind went back to my grandfather and grandmother who lived in this area. I realized 
they came from a good agricultural area. They came from an area that was much more 
moist then I expected. I expected it to be very dry, maybe like we are in Utah. By this 
time in July, things are all brown, but everything was still very green here. In some 
places, there was some food industry, apples particularly, but wheat was the main crop. 
Wheat, oats, barley, I guess, and corn and also sunflowers. It took us almost an hour to 
reach the town of Balzer. The driver was a little scary. He pushed his taxi faster than I 
think it should have been pushed and he would crowd up behind a car. He would try 
to get around trucks. It is not what I would call safe driving, but on the other hand, he 
seemed to handle it alright. We didn't have any disasters. When we got to Balzer, we 
drove around a little bit. He went to some city building. I didn't know what the 
building was, but inside the building, he began to talk to these people. I showed him 
the map of old Balzer, and I had marked my ancestors home lots. This must have been 
like a historical place where they kept city records. Any rate, as they began to talk to 
these people, a woman went over to a drawer and pulled out some little sheets there. 
There was probably about a hundred fifty names. 

She said, "These are Webers." I was appalled that there would be that many 
names of Webers. I think this was a historical aspect. They would say some of them 
have gone to Brazil. Some have gone to America, and some back to Germany. Then I 
had them look up Grasmicks. There wasn't so many of those. Another of our names is 
Spath. There were just a couple of Spath families. There was some record of this area. 
I got down four or five names of people who apparently were still living and could be 
contacted if I can. 

We wanted to visit the house lots. I was trying to tell them we could visit the 
lots if we could just find out the streets, then we could find out if these lots still exist and 
if there is a house on it. The problem is that the streets are all in russian and no german 
street names exit. The next place we went to was the police station. The police station 
were not too helpful. We had trouble trying to get more information from them. The 
police woman was not too helpful. As it turns out, the next place we went to was the 
museum. It was a museum for the city. That woman was real anxious to make money 
for the museum She said it would takes ten rubles to open up the museum which I 
gave her. She did have a section there on the Volga Germans. She had the map of 
Balzer just like the map I had. In fact, my map was better than her's. But it did was 



Balzer, Russia, July, 2000 




Nice brick building in Balzer. 



Brick house in Balzer 




Funeral procession in Balzer 



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Balzer, Russia, July, 2000 




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The village of Anton from a distance 



Anton lying in the little valley. 



give us orientation. It helped us out quite a bit to know we were in the right area. 
Then I asked if I could take pictures. She said that I could take pictures. I took some 
pictures. Balzer was quite a weaving city. They made very fine scarfs or head 
coverings as they call it. Very fine weaving. Two of my relatives had dye factories 
where they would dye cloth for the weaving. It was interesting. She then wanted 
money from me for taking pictures. I gave her another ten rubles. It was not the end 
of the world but she was anxious to keep the museum supported. 

Then my driver friend with great vigor said, "No, no. Let's keep going." Next 
we went to another police station. These people worked really hard trying to figure 
out the names of the street. Then we went to another building. Eventually, we went to 
a county building. There we had success. They was able to give some of the German 
main streets the Russian names so we could know what we were doing. Then about 
this time we went around and started photographing some of these houses which were 
my ancestors. Most of the time You could identify the German houses because they 
quite often tended to be wooden and they had wooden shutters. Usually above the 
shutters, they had some decorativeness to them. You could almost always peg a 
German house with the shutters and the trim that was a round the windows. Again, 
these are hundred year old houses, but a wooden house can last a hundred years with 
out too much trouble. We drove quite a number of places and photographed these. 
Then we went to this one place, and while we were waiting, we looked down the road. 
Here came a truck with a bunch of people walking behind it. Trent said it was a funeral. 
I don't know it was funeral. Apparently, in Brazil, they did funerals like this too. As it 
came by, here was the casket on the back end of the truck. Here were all the relatives 
walking. They were not crying or sobbing particularly. They were just sober faced. 
They even had a bus behind that with the older women in it. I think that bus would 
also carry the people that couldn't walk. They were walking through the cemetery. 
One time we thought of going through the cemetery, but we realized that it may be 
difficult. A hundred to hundred fifty year old cemetery would be very difficult to 
recognize, and a lot of the headstones now are in Russian names. That was the 
problem. The street names we had were in German, but now they are all Russian 
names. That was a major challenge to convert these German names into Russian 
names so you could find where you where going. Then we went to get something to 
eat. Our taxi guy again found a place. We went in and sat down. We ordered potatoes, 
beef, and cucumbers. We had a juice to go with it, some apple juice and also some fanta 
orange. The meat was breaded and was really quite good. We had bread too, to eat 
with it. It was a nice meal and not too expensive. After the dinner, we went around 
and took some more pictures of where we were at, a number of areas. Again my 
thoughts went back to my Grandfather and Grandmother, and how they had lived in 
these houses. He had worked in the dye factories. He had gone to the Russian army 
for four years. During that time, my grandmother had made things for her hope chest, 
Money wise it was a very nice hope chest. She accumulated quite a number of things 
over the four years while he was in the army. He, of course, accumulated money too. 
Then when he came back, he worked in this dye factory. However,the dye was 
obviously damaging to his liver. He started to get yellow in color. She was afraid he 
was going to die which could have been true. She said lets go to America. About this 
time, the Russian politics were becoming oppressive. They wanted them to pay more 
taxes. Of course, the men had to go in the army like my Grandfather did. They 
i couldn't have their own German schools any more. They had to learn Russian. They 
were regulated more and more by the Russian people. They were expected to learn 



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Volga river about 10 miles from Balzer 






Villages on both sides of the Volga river 




Trent, a 4th generation Volga German 



Darrell, a 3rd generation Volga German 




Carolyn and Darrell at the Volga river 



Volga river from a distance 



Russian. Previous to this time, they had only maintained their German language. 
Many of the Germans were leaving. In fact, I think that a million of them left to Brazil, 
Argentina, or the United States. Any rate she heard about a ship that was going to ship 
pure bred cattle to America. They had room for a few humans to go along. It was 
cheap, so she sold her hope chest. They got on this boat and went to America. It turns 
out that the cattle were treated better than the humans. One of their kids got sick and 
died on the way over. It was a tough experience, but she wanted so much to come to 
America. She was so happy when she got here. He got a job on the railroad in 
Nebraska. From there, they eventually moved to Idaho from Nebraska. They worked 
the beet fields for a while. My father was born in Olathe, Colorado where they were 
living on a beet farm while working the sugar beets. One can't help but think of your 
relatives when you see where they were raised. You have to admit that the community 
they were in was probably very tight, and a likable community. One where people 
interacted well, and it was probably a pleasant environment. 
Seeing the Volga 

After Balzer, I asked if we could go and see the Volga. We headed to see the 
Volga. On the way, we passed through a village called Anton. As it turns out, it's a 
pretty little village kind of nestled in the bottom of valley with hills on both sides. 

Anton was fairly close to Balzer. I am sure they interacted with Balzer. When 
the boys would need a wife, they would go to these neighbor villages to try and find a 
good woman to marry. Any way, the road was dirt and muddy. Obviously things 
have not changed much. My Grandmother and Grandfather left in 1900. That is over a 
hundred years ago, but I would guess this village of Anton hasn't changed much in the 
last hundred years. Any rate, there were a lot of people along the road. The road was 
the place that they would walk. It was quite picturesque. I took a few picture of Anton. 
Then we went up over the hills far enough that would could see the Volga. The Volga 
is quite a long river. I can't remember but I think it is the second longest river in 
Europe. There are many stories about the Volga. There are indications that even 
Saratov was a viking outpost years ago. The vikings would leave Norway and come 
across a couple of rivers and lakes. Then they would come down the Volga to get 
coffee and other material from the Turkey and other areas. They have a long history. 
There is the song about the Volga boat men that would be pulling the barges up the 
river by manual labor. A very tough task. When we were in the art museum in the 
Hermitage in St. Petersburg, I saw a picture of the Volga boat men pulling a barge. It 
required maybe twenty of them pulling this barge against the current. It was obviously 
very hard work. Anyway, the Volga now is dammed somewhat, so it maybe bigger in 
size than when my ancestors came to the Volga region, but many of them did come on 
boats. I don't know if my ancestors came by boat or by wagon. They apparently came 
by boat always, but the easier way would be to come by the boat, come down the 
Volga river rather than wagons. They were further from the Volga than I realized. I 
would say that they were ten miles from the Volga river. I thought they were close 
enough to see the Volga all the time, but apparently that was a misconception. Even so, 
the Volga was impressive. We could see on our side (West side) there was just one little 
village area, but across it there were many little villages. The East side tended to be 
more of the Catholic villages side from the Volga Germans. They have a lot of villages 
on that side. Even now it looked quite heavily populated. We could see lots of houses 
across the river. Later on our guide said there was a railroad bridge that crosses the 
Volga. There is another way that people could cross the river now. I don't know if 
there is a ferry or if there is a boat bridge that people can drive across. Certainly in the 



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the village of Moor from a distance 



Closer view of Moor 



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A home in Moor 




A home in Moor 



A house in Moor 



their time, there would have to be a boat crossing, a ferry type of crossing 

Near Anton, there was a huge apple orchard. It looked like they had quite a 
crop. We then came back to Anton, went back to Balzer. We took some pictures of 
Balzer from a distance. It was interesting to see the plants around Balzer. Many of the 
plants that we have in our country are also there. There was the globe mallow which is 
a common weed. Red root was another weed that was present. There are wild daisies 
just like we have. I thought I saw larkspur, but I wasn't sure. Many of the plants were 
the same. In fact, it could be that the Volga Germans brought plants like the 
tumbleweed and some of these other weeds with the wheat they brought with them It 
was the Turkish hard wheat which turns out to be a very good bread wheat They 
brought the wheat over and began to be grow it m North and South Dakota and 
Nebraska. Just before we left that area, the taxi guy turned and said, "Take a picture " 
The sign was like saying "come again. We are happy you visited at Balzer (actually the 
russian name not Balzer). Any way, we went passed Balzer down to the village of 
Moor. A fellow that I am associated with keeping the records for Balzer, some of his 
families came from Moor. So, I went down there to take some pictures for him One of 
things that were obvious was that Moor hasn't changed all that much. It is still a small 
village. The roads where not paved. In fact, there were quite a few mud holes that you 
had to be very careful that you didn't get stuck. We did stop and there were some kids 
on a motorcycle and some kids in a car. Out taxi driver joked with them about 
something, I don't know what he was joking about. Again, it was a nice little area, and 
we took some photographs there. From Moor, we turned and headed back to Saratov. 
On the way, there was one more village we stopped at. It was Beideck. It was a larger 
village and I don't have relatives or anything from there but it was on the way to 
Saratov. J 

We came back to Saratov. The cost was about fifteen hundred rubles or about 
fifty dollars. This guy worked his heart out for us trying to make contacts and it was 
well worth the money. It was kind of a melancholy day for me to see my ancestors and 
to reflect on a little bit the regions that they came from. Back in Saratov, we went out 
see the city. The street that we live on is the main shopping street for the town. It is a 
big area. We did some shopping up and down the street. We didn't buy much, but we 
shopped around. Then we went and got a burger at Burger Royal. It is kind of a 
Russian version of something like Burger King. The burgers didn't taste like 
hamburgers but they were still pretty good. We did get a milkshake and that was 
pretty good stuff. After that, we returned back, spent the evening, and rested again for 
the night. b 

The next morning, which was Wednesday the fifteenth of July, we got up. We 
had a good nights sleep. This time we had a bath okay. We went down and had 
breakfast. This time they had noodles, like the stroganoff dish, for breakfast. Again, 
we had our sausage, cucumbers, bread, and butter. First I tried to get him to give us 
water, but I had no luck on that. He wanted to give us carbonated water, and its really 
hard to explain to them in a language which you don't speak that you don't want 
carbonation in your water. Any rate, we then went out shopping. It turns out that this 
was quite fun. We had a good time shopping. I actually bought twenty-one of the dolls 
where they are one inside the other, the wooden dolls. It was unbelievable that some 
of them would cost two dollar and seventy-five cents. I wonder how they can ever 
make them for that price and still make money, but they must do. We then bought 
some things, a blanket for one of our children. We also bought some nice white shirts 
for other uses. It was pleasant. Wt bought a cracker box and a little music box. Trent 



Saratov, Russia, July, 2000 



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The steppes of Russia near Saratov 



The fields near Balzer 




Fish market in Saratov, Russia 



Fruit market in Saratov, Russia 




Cheese display in Saratov, Russia 



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almost found some shoes that were good quality shoes, but they weren't big enough so 
we were unlucky on that. Carolyn was looking for shoes but she was unlucky too. 
Anyway, we did quite a bit of shopping. 
Headed for Moscow 

Before you know it, it was almost two o'clock. We came back and packed up 
and got ready to come to the airport. As we left, I paid my bill. We came out and 
waited for the taxi, and no taxi there. I went back in and the man called the taxi. A few 
minutes later she came to us, and asked us something. I couldn't communicate with 
her. I thought maybe she wanted me to pay more money, but later she came back 
again. Eventually, it came through that we explained to her that we were going to 
Moscow, and we wanted to go to the airport, and we needed a taxi. She was helping us 
and when the taxi came, she talked to him a bit. That was nice of her. It's amazing that 
in this time that we have been here we probably haven't talked to anyone that can 
speak English. It has always been by sign language, by writing something down, by 
trying to pantamine what you want done. Still, at the same time, it is amazing how 
much we have accomplished, and certainly, hasn't been too big of a handicap. Again, 
we got a taxi that brought us here for about seventy rubles which was about three 
dollars to go to airport. The airport is pretty isolated. We were a little nervous. There 
was only the three of us and two other people waiting for this airplane. I hope that it 
does come. It is suppose to come at four-twenty, and it is almost a quarter to four. You 
think there would be more of crowd here if people were going to Moscow. Any rate, 
we will fly back to Moscow. We are down to just two or three days left before we 
return. Sunday, Monday, and then we return on Tuesday. We waited for the air 
meeting to be checked in, and finally, they made a lot of people check in. We went over 
to the bags and took our bags. We had picked up our bags in the middle of night 
before. It finally got up to our turn and they put all of our bags on a big scale. Then 
she wrote on there nineteen kilograms overweight. They told me that I had to go pay 
a fee. She didn't tell me. She just pointed to another place, so we had to guess that was 
what she was doing. I had to stop and think. It is probably dollars for that extra 
weight. Flying from Moscow to Saratov, we had to pay one fee, and now all of a 
sudden we were paying the penalty. We went back with the little sign, and then we 
went through the gate checks. Then we went into a room and waited. Some guy came 
and talked to us in English. The plane had been sitting there when we arrived. It was 
an American plane. They took us to this airplane. It is an older model with three 
engines in the rear, one in the tail, and one on each side. We got on the airplane and 
there was no boarding passes. There were no seat assignments, so we just picked out a 
seat and sat down. As we got in the air, one of the things that impressed me as I looked 
out the window was the vastness of this region. Often when you go to the midwest, 
you look out the window and see this agricultural land stretching endlessly. That is the 
feeling that I had here. These steppes were like the center part of the United States. 
Endless agricultural fields. In this case, the rain provided the water. Although, some of 
the Volga has been devoted for irrigation further down as it gets close to the Caspian 
Sea. Any rate, this was an impressive site. One has to reflect that this is probably the 
bread basket of Russia. Soon they gave us a meal. It is a pre-made meal. They have 
some liverwurst in little cans that you open up and smear that onto a roll. There is also 
a roll that you can put jam on. There was some juice. It was not the best meal, but it 
was food. We arrived in good shape to Moscow. 























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DECLARATION OF INTENTION 



:«■ 



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'Madleon County, 



.Court 



& 



Gottlieb 17atifr, 



of 



Ninth Judioial DiBtriot 



occupation °&rpe"ter and fanner 

description is: Color white- complexion llght 



-aged. 



•38- 



. years, 



weight 



175- 



. do declare on oath that my personal 
IIL height _L feet _L inches, 



: pounds, color of hair jg own ' 



1, color of eyes 



hlue — 



other visible ^distinctive marks a °»all mole on ohin- 



I was born in Saratoff, goaa la.— §_.--_«_^ 

on the 13th 



day of 



Maroh- 



_ anno Domini 



at geacbnrg. Madison Jouiity. Idaho , - 



I 876 ,V 

I . . 



1\ <n C 



$ O * $ 

I now fes^dej 



I emigrated to the United States of America from Saratoff . Russia. 

on the vessel , ^reslau.- 

foreign residence was . Saratoff, Russia,- 



■A i_i ... .. 



ffim%o)m%mnptdmmt i .i — to '. -■- -tu i r i ii 

: Saratoff. Rui 



uNMW^auf, 



q>iiMlk|i< 



^\ : ^ 



las 




It is my bona fide intention to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign 

prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, and particularly to "iohoia8.II, anperor of *" 

all the Pusoias, 



IZZZ-, of whom I am now a subject : 
------ ^ ^ ^ 

, on or about the lat ^y 




I arrived at the port of Baltimore 

State of Maryland , . 

of .J^l°hi"7."-""---"ZZ.-anr\o Domini i_2£°_; I am not an anarchist : I am not a 
polygamist nor a believer in the practice of polygamy; and it is my intention in good faith 
to become a citizen of the United States of America and to permanently reside therein: 
So" help mb God. 



$3z4*i 



■ TVn *va.i*i 






IT. I . /J.^1 T ^-HmmtmA 



rt 

'■^•^yBaat tfaf.n in. 



p||ft Immiga&drtoi** UuilU. Stmtm , 



ami mrri—d in Ifcl D*u 

^ 



If/ 



^Z r1&/^r^ 










Stmtk. I mm not m dUlxUmr in or oppa 
u organiam* f mr nmnt . / am n«< » polvfnmit 
intention U Umm* . t^^STCn* U*£}tm 
partioHlarlm f -Orf gf ^ / < —?5f ~£ ^ i 
to mid* pmrwmmtfy in IV. PMferf aiam. 

li/hlh. I mm mtlo to Jj>»ajj tfci <K/UU U 
JW Mfc. // ^»« r«yW ((.tuuuullj a LI 

Hj ./ fl/^dam of j 

thit P 4tUUn, Mllltt. 

r««lh. / k*»* N4>( Ktrotoftro maA* pctitiot 





Subscribed and sworn to before me this '' 



\ 



[SEAL] 



, anno Domirh- 191*1 , 



Tn 



fFj, £ 



s -.,, a 




«**!«!■ 



cinincni %t unnraL-rea enTiuuujxjiTioa mimsis 



Cwnctw. 



IMMIGRATION SERVICE 

saioner. 



1. cu 



^><F«r M» «f allMi trrivlnc 1* U*IU4 httii after Jm M, 1906, T« b* bntd ImibwIIbMt prior to pitW»» r tfa»»>wil tnt l n «J 

; M; i : Serial No,72Q/P-l ... 

. f ;>. i. , a a & DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 

;■■:■/£.•'.. 



>, Baltlnm-. T Ud.. gabrn&ry 6. 1919. 



A 

, u -" 



&&*:.. 



Tent is to certify tint the foflowing-nained alien anired at the port indicated, on. tba data and in the 

:^^3iKLUor^aaorib*d balow, rix: i "-. 



Name of alien: Oottlla* Wabaar. 
Mu^'X^Ul Portofentnr: Baltiaora, Ud. 

^Bl^- ;.^'Data;6f arriVal: isprirlfl, 1907. 



i^^^S^^^ilfe^^u' Horth 



i»£iwfe:^.«>.io-' : 




'/Z???7/ 



Jttoohod W«o «ul Hud, a sort o^ tAI> p«o > 
m« •jPooaft aiU <k« «)7Wa»£* <V tKo tun Borift/tnt > 



fl«Urotim tflnUntlon and CmrUAoato of Jr 
Vara nCuu »r Own.— 11 BMm mm a 




r*< mfmi mmti pttUUnmr tUnf duly i 
tentonu lint/; <«va< tko oeUd petition U tignt 
information mnd UUof, and that mm to tk— max. 



1: 




/;,;. ,[ Immmdiamlfm^omUn/UuaaXotfiUUgnispatU 
'.,'/ ;. : ■; tntUUd notUian U mad* arnHniieuilw-mn— tn* - 

'i'i ; ' -' 1J ■ i ■ •** *^4 y w ■ ■ »» «■• <* » T iwwyj f »wi ^ »V»itiui 

.fry ■■■:'■'.■:, ■<■<:?■:.■: 

^mz&Wt '■ ■-&■■■ 

*.vi:-,2fioj.!i,vs^v l -:-■ ... > c 7 : 

caaaJ>emiMil3f-J- 




11/21/1997 LDS FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 



on oath that my personal 

, heighu£feet JL inches. 

^cotorqfeyes -d^^e^ v ; , 



i "u i 






SI 



■y,l 



.3 .:-'>{«".!'' ■ SaiE -• 



jSpSBj: . n^rnpsjlsaflSiSs? 



1, anno Domini i ?/((?'. I now reside 



I emigrated 1 to the 
on thejvessel 



h States of America from . 



foreign residence was 








; ray test 




:y to any foreign 



itiiaoinyihona fide intention to renounce forever ail allegiance and 
prince, potentate,, state, or sovereignty, and particularly to 

£l£/s ififii O^ J^-*^^^^., of whom I am now a subject; 

. in the 




ta2=^=C-r 




_, on or about 



the^/ 



^^~ 



~*ar 



i arrived atJhe.port of 

Stated 

of 



• ; ,^nnn Domini V3&JL I am not an anarchist: I am not a 
?»tygamtet^a^leyerinithe-pfac^ and it is my intention in good iaith 



toDb^n^atcitizenrofy.thetUnlted Slates of America and to permaneotly reside 
SO HELP MB GOD. 

"*"r.'{Y «•"►'* 



. . ..«.,.k».-4. 



^ 



n 



<s>* 



*N*- 



^"■■- 



, • t> - f V 



SlfttOfci oi _»*; 



>.M,t if Subscribed 











*fi 






KH*.^f 



&£ 



Oak of m 






Be 



11/21/1997 12:36 LDS FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 



LIFE OF ERIC D. BRESEE 



On 18 June 1922 I arrived at the home of my parents, Benjamin Willard and Isabella 
Allison Hampton, approximately 1 mile south of Gouverneur, New York, on a 39 acre 
farm. Both my parents were former school teachers. Dad had attended Syracuse 
University for a period and Mother had her Teacher's Certificate. At the time I arrived, 
Dad worked at my Grandfather Hampton's marble quarry during the day and with 
mother's help ran the farm with 500 plus hens, always a milk cow, a pig at times and the 
usual number of cats and dogs. My brother Willard Edward, named after Grandfather 
Bresee, was born 18 August 1915 and died in 1988. George, the tiny premature baby, 
was born in 1916, and died shortly after birth. My brother William Hampton, named as 
many Hampton's were, was born 27 February and (as of April 1997) is living in 
Birmington, New York. My coming in 1922 completed the family. 

In 193 1 William had a double mastoid operation, making it highly desirable that he be in 
a warm climate for the next winter or so. Consequently, in the fall of 1932 we obtained a 
1925 Cadillac from Uncle William Hately Hampton in Utica and proceeded to St. 
Petersburg, Florida, returning in the spring of 1933. 

The time from 1933 to 1940 was spent growing up, school, caddying at the Gouverneur 
Country Club ($0.25 for 9 holes), working at home, and helping next door on a farm. 

In 1935 or 1936 both Garfield and Pearl Weatherup died within six months. My parents, 
being good friends, became legal guardians of the daughter, Norma (about 1 year older 
than me) and son, Robert, who was slightly younger than my brother, Willard. Norma 
lived with us until she graduated from high school and married. Robert stayed with us 
and other relatives until he graduated from Gouverneur High and went on to the Naval 
Academy. Norma lived until 70+ and, as of 1997, Bob lived in California. 

The fall of 1936 I entered high school, played football, had small parts in a couple plays, 
competed in a math contest, and spoke at a competitive oratorical contest. A couple of 
months prior to graduation, in 1940, 1 got sick with rheumatic fever which postponed my 
graduation plans. I went back to high school in the fall and also took a Machine Shop 
Defense Course in the evening. In the spring I got a job in Utica at Savage Arms as a 
profile operator, making 50 caliber machine guns. Most of the machine guns went to 
Russia as part of the lend/lease. 

I quit Savage the fall of 942 and entered Clarkson College and enrolled in Engineering. 
At the same time I enlisted in the Army Reserve. As planned, I left college after the first 
term and waited for the Army to call. I was inducted at Niagara Falls and, since I had 
enlisted, I was given a second interview and assigned to Miami Beach for Basic Training 
in the Army Air Corps. Aircraft Engine school in Coral Gables, Florida came next and 
then on to Tinker Field, Oklahoma (outside of Oklahoma City) where the 97 th Repair 
Squadron was formed. From there it was port of embarkation at Newport News, Virginia 



and the ocean liner for the trip around the Cape to Bombay, India. We crossed India by 
train to set up a base about 70 miles north of Calcutta. 

A construction unit built the concrete runways and the usual support buildings. The B29s 
arrived with x (for experimental) still on the nose. Not one plane made the trip from 
Oklahoma to India without stopping for repairs. Engines lasted from 20 to 80 hours in 
operation and, since most missions averaged 15 to 20 hours in length, the safety factor 
was near zero. A change in the engine rocker arms a couple of months later corrected, or 
a least extended, the engine's life. All missions were to South East Asia and Japan, via 
China. 

At the time the 29 Bomber Command was to move to Timian, a few who had good 
reason were permitted state-side leave for 45 days (I talked fast). Going home we flew 
from our base to Accra, Africa in a DC3, then to Belm, Brazil and up the coast to Miami 
in a B24; then home by train for 45 days. 

I reported for duty at Kearns (outside Salt Lake City, Utah) after the 45 days at home, to 
wait my transfer back to my unit in Timian. Three major events took place during my 
stay at Kearns, Utah. 1. I met the love of my life, Rowena, later my wife. 2. The bomb 
was dropped. 3. The war ended. After Kearns I spent a short stay in Gulfport, 
Mississippi at a P.T. Boat base and was discharged at Rome Air Corps based. 

After a couple of months I reentered Clarkson College and four major incidents took 
place during my stay. 1 . Rowena and I were married between semesters in 1946. 2. 
Charles was born in 1947. 3. One summer I attended R.O.T.C. Summer camp and 
worked for the Burton Smead Lumber Company in Rexburg, Idaho, and 4. I received my 
degree in Mechanical Engineering and a Reserve Commission as a Second Lieutenant in 
the Corp of Engineers. 

After graduation in 1949 I began working for the U.S.G.S. in Ellenville, New York, 
where Gary was born in 1950. I received orders for active duty. However, since I was in 
an active reserve unit, the orders were cancelled. In 1951 we transferred to Palmer, 
Alaska, via Rexburg, Idaho, where Rowena stayed. I went on to Seattle, booked the car's 
boat passage to Valdez and I continued on by plane to Palmer. Rowena and the boys 
came after I rented a new house, with option to buy. Before our car arrived, I spent 
approximately 75 percent of my time in Alaska in the field. A few of my experiences 
noted here may be of interest. 

The Palmer sub office covered the area of Northern Alaska, including Kodiac. We 
traveled by truck, chartered small planes, chartered small boats or took the scenic train 
between Anchorage and Fairbanks, plus hiking to each measuring site - sometime by 
snowshoes. There was considerable wild life, including Alaska brown bear, beaver, 
salmon and trappers living in the bush. To get to the station on Kodiac it necessitated a 
small float-plane and an hour hike (more or less) to the site. Years ago a volcano 
destroyed all the trees on the Island, leaving grass to grow three to four foot high which 
concealed any brown bear traveling to and from their fishing spots. My loud, but off-key 



singing gave the bears a warning and, unless they had cubs, they would usually retreat. 
Also at that site I was never without my Remington 30-06. In another area, near Valdez, 
I chased a brown bear with a truck at 35 miles an hour for a short distance, so I would not 
like to try to outrun a bear. 

On one trip to Valdez, while waiting for a storm to subside, the hotel burned, a tire blew 
out (20 degrees) and, when we got in the mountains, the truck quit (the temperature was 
55 degrees below zero). Since several cars had been held up by the storm, we all left 
Valdez about the same time so we had no problem catching a ride to a road commission 
work station. They found the problem the next day and I got home without further 
problems. 

The transfer to Charleston, West Virginia, happened in the fall of 1952. Indications of a 
medical problem occurred in Alaska, but the M.S. surfaced big time in West Virginia. 
After taking all my leave built up in Alaska, and some borrowed leave from the 
Government, I got back to work on a part time basis until I could handle an eight hour 
day. Rowena put up with a miserable, hard-to-get-along-with individual. While working 
for the state of West Virginia, in 1961 I was "Acting District Engineer" for several 
months after the District Engineer, W.L. Doll, died. So when the U.S.G.S. changed from 
a District Engineer, covering only surface water, to a District Chief, covering surface 
water, ground water, and quality water, my job as Assistant District Engineer could not 
be converted to Assistant Chief since the appointed Chief was also a surface water man. 
Consequently, I transferred to Albany, New York in 1967 where I stayed until I retired in 
Jan 1980. 

After retirement, I continued work at the office on a part time basis for a year or so. I 
built a sun room on the house, did a little traveling-including Florida, California, Arroba, 
Antia, Cancun. Singapore, Bali, Korea, and Hawaii. 

In 1986 the idea of buying and selling houses surfaced, which I actively pursued for 
several years. The first house was purchased at an auction in Canajoharie, New York 
(midway between Utica and Schenectady). Within a year, seven other houses were 
purchased and six have been sold as of 25 September 1995. 



PROPERTY OF: 
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BYU-IDAHO 
REXBURG ID 83460-0405 



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