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Full text of "The church bells of the county and city of Lincoln : their founders, inscriptions, traditions, and peculiar uses, with a brief history of church bells in Loncolnshire, chiefly from original and contemporaneous records"

THE CHURCH BELLS 



OF THE 



COUNTY AND CITY OF LINCOLN: 

Their Founders, Inscriptions, Traditions, and 
Peculiar Uses ; 

' WITH A BRIEF 

HISTORY OF CHURCH ^ELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE: 

Chiefly from Original and Contemporaneous Records. 

BY THOMAS NORTH, F.S.A., 

Hon. Member and Hon. Secretary of the Leicestershire Architectural 'and 

Arch.^ological Society. Hon. Member of the Derbyshire 

Arch^ological Society, &c., &c. 

with illustrations. 

LEICESTER: 
PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR BY SAMUEL CLARKE. 

1882. 



Printed by Samuel Clarke. 5, Gal'owtree Gate. Leicester. 



cc 



WS TO 

5^ THE RIGHT 

^ REVEREND CHRISTOPHER WORDSWORTH, D.D., F.S.A., 
^ LORD BISHOP OF LINCOLN, 

-^ THIS VOLUME, DESCRIPTIVE OF THE CHURCH BELLS IN THE 

LARGER PORTION OF HIS DIOCESE, 
IS, BY HIS LORDSHIPS SPECIAL PERMISSION, 

MOST RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 
BY HIS OBEDIENT AND FAITHFUL SERVANT, 

THE AUTHOR. 



731889 



2IO Copies printed, viz. : — 

200 Copies for Subscribers. 
10 Copies for Presentation. 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 
(For the Royal Library, Windsor Castle.) 



The Right Honourable the EARL 
BROWNLOW, Lord Lieutenant of 
Lincolnshire. 



The Right Reverend the LORD 
BISHOP OF LINCOLN, D.D., F.S.A. 



NATHANIEL CLAYTON, Esq., 
High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, (1881). 

His Grace the DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE, K.G., Devonshire House, Piccadilly. 
The Right Honourable the EARL OF YARBOROUGH, Brocklesby Park. 

Ulceby. 
The Very Reverend the LORD ALWYNE COMPTON, M7A., the Deanery, 

Worcester. 

Sir Charles H. J. Anderson, Bart., Lea, Gainsborough. 

Sir John Dugdale Astley, Bart., Elsham Hall, Brigg. 

Sir William E. Welby-Gregory, Bart.. M.P., Denton Hall, Grantham. 

Sir William H. Salt, Bart., Maplewell, Loughborough. 

The Honourable Edward Stanhope, M.P., 3, West Eaton Place, S.W. 

The Right Reverend the Bishop of Nottingham, D.D,, Leasingham Rectory. 
Sleaford. 

The Venerable Archdeacon Maltby, M.A., Farndon Vicarage, Newark. 

The Venerable Archdeacon Thicknesse, M.iV., Prebendal House, Peter- 
borough. 

The Library of the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. 

The Stock Library, Lincoln. 

The Society of Antiquaries of London. 

The Library of the Corporation of the City of London, Guildhall. 



VI 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



The Librarj' of Science and Art Department, South Kensington, S.W. 

The Bodleian Library, Oxford. 

The Library of Queen's College, Oxford. 

The Library of Magdalen College, Oxford. 

The Lincoln Diocesan Architectural Society. 

The Leicestershire Architectural and Archoeological Society. 

The Bedfordshire Architectural and Archa2ological Society. 

The Worcester Diocesan Architectural and Archaeological Society. 

The Architectural Society of the Archdeaconries of Northampton and Oakham. 

The Liverpool Free Public Library. 

The Free Public Library, University College, Nottingham. 



Adcock, Captain, North Lodge, Melton- 

Mowbray. 
Alington, the Rev. Chas. A., Muckton 

Rector)', Louth. 
Amcotts, Weston Cracroft, Esq., Hackthorn 

Hall, Lincoln. 
Amherst, W. Amherst Tyssen, Esq., M.P., 

F.S.A., Didlington Hall, Norfolk. 
Andrews, the Rev. S. W., M.A., Claxby 

Rector)-, Market Rasen. 

Bailey, J. E., Esq., F.S.A., Egerton Villa, 

Stretford, Manchester. 
Baker, Charles, Esq., i8. Friar Lane, 

Leicester. 
Barber, PL, Esq., Bangor, North Wales. 
Baxter, the Rev. Thomas P. N., R.D., 

Hawerby Rector>', Great Grimsby. 
Beedham, B. H., Esq., Ashfield House, 

near Kimbolton. 
Bellairs, Major, The Newarke, Leicester. 
Binns, R. W., Esq., F.S.A., Worcester. 
Blenkin, the Rev. Canon, The Vicarage, 

Boston. 
Brooke, Thomas, Esq., F.S.A., Armitage 

Bridge, Huddersfield. 
Burton, John Francis, Esq., Eastgate, 

Lincoln. 



Carpenter, Alfred, Esq., M.D., Croydon, 

Surrey. 
Chambers, the Rev. W. F., M.A., North 

Kelsey Vicarage, Brigg. 
Clarence, Mr. Justice, Coaxdon, Axmin- 

ster. 
Clarke, the Rev. Canon J. Erskine, M.A., 

6, Altenburg Gardens, Clapham Common, 

S.W. 
Clephan, Edwin, Esq., Southfields, Lei- 
cester. 
Constable, J. Goulton, Esq., Walcot, Brigg, 
Cooke, the Rev. Canon, M.A., F.S.A., the 

Hill House, Wimbledon, Surrey. 
Cooper, the Rev. Wm., M.A., R.D., Rippin- 

gale Rectory, Bourn. 
Cooper, Thomas, Esq., Mossley House, 

Congleton, Cheshire. 
Cracroft, the Rev. R. W., M.A., Harrington 

Vicarage, Spilsby. 
Cripps, Wilfred J., Esq., M.A., F.S.A., 

Cirencester. 
Crofts, the Rev. Charles D., M.A., Cay- 

thorpe Rectory, Grantham. 
Cross, the Rev. Canon, M.A., Appleby 

Vicarage, Brigg. 
Cruickshank, the Rev. Edward R., M.A., 

S. Augustine's Vicarage, South Hackney. 



Subscribers. 



Vll 



Day, William Rawson, Esq., 2, Hill Side, 

Bengeo, Hertford. 
Dickson, Thomas, Esq., General Register 

House, Edinburgh. 
Donisthorpe, Alfred Russell, Esq., Knighton 

House, Leicester. 
Downing, William, Esq., 74, New Street, 

Birmingham. 
Dunkin, E. H. W., Esq., 14, Kidbrook Park 

Road, Blackheath, S.E. 

Edmond, George, Esq., Spring Vale, Niton, 

Isle of Wight. 
Edmonds, J. R., Esq., Charnwood House, 

Sileby, Loughborough. 
Edmonds, Temple, Esq., 39, Jackson Street, 

North Shields. 
Edwards, Samuel, Esq., Lewisham, Kent. 
Ellacombe, the Rev. H. T., M.A., F.S.A., 

Clyst S. George, Topsham, Devon. 
Elwes, Dudley George Gary, Esq., F.S.A., 

5, The Crescent, Bedford. 
Elwes, Valentine Dudley Henry Carey, 

Esq., F.S.A., Billing Hall, Northampton- 
shire. 
Evans, John, Esq., D.C.L., LL.D., F.R.S., 

F.S.A., 65, Old Bailey, E.G. 

Fawssett, the Rev. R., M.A., Smeeton 

Westerby, Leicester. 
Fenwicke, the Rev. G. C, B.A., Blaston 

Manor, Uppingham. 
Ffytche, Lewis, Esq., F.S.A., Thorpe Hall, 

Elkington, Louth. 
Field, the Rev. Thomas, B.D., Bigby 

Rectory, Brigg. 
Fisher, Edward, Esq., Blackmore Hall, 

Sidmouth. 
Fisher, Saml. T., Esq , i. Queen Victoria 

Street, London, E.G. 



Fitz-Herbert, the Rev. Reginald IL C, 
M.A., Somersal Herbert, Derby. 

Foster, Richard, Esq., Lanwithan, Lost- 
withiel. 

Foster, William Edward, Esq., F.S.A., 
Aldershot. 

Fowler, the Rev. J. T., M.A., M.R.C.S., 
F.S.A., Vice-Principal of Bishop Hat- 
field's Hall, Durham. 

Fox, Francis F., Esq., 72, Pembroke Road, 
Clifton, Bristol. 

Freeth, George, Esq., Duporth, Saint 
Austell, Cornwall. 

Garfit, Thomas, Esq., Kenwick Hall, 

Louth. 
Garvey, Henry S., Esq., 11, Clarence 

Terrace, Great Grimsby. 
Gill, Miss, 19, Princess Street, Leicester. 
Gill, Miss Alice J., 19, Princess Street, 

Leicester. 
Gillett, the Rev. E. A., M.A., Woolsthorpe 

Rectory, Grantham. 
Grayling, Francis, Esq., Sittingbourne, 

Kent. 
Griffiths, the Rev. John, M.A., Belton 

Rectory, Grantham. 
Grimsey, B. P., Esq., Stoke Lodge, 

Ipswich. 

Hacket, Miss, Langdale Lodge, Adkins 
Road, Clapham Park, Surrey. 

Hanbury, the Rev. Thomas, M.A., Church 
Langton Rectory, Market Harborough. 

Harris, Joseph, Esq. (the late), Westcotes, 
near Leicester (2 copies). 

Harting, J. Vincent, Esq., F.S.A., 24, Lin- 
coln Inn Fields, London, W.C. 

Harvey, the Rev. G. T., M.A., Vicars' 
Court, Lincoln. 



Vlll 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



Haworth, Jesse, Esq., Fair Lea, Bowden, 

Cheshire. 
Hebb, Wm., Esq., SoHcitor, Ross, Here- 
fordshire. 
Hervey, George H. W., Esq., The Old 

Place. Sleaford. 
Hilton, James, Esq., 60, Montague Square, 

London. 
Hodgson, the Rev. S. E., M.A., Scawby 

Vicarage, Brigg. 
Hodgson, the Rev. J. F., M.A., Witton-on- 

Wear Vicarage, Darlington. 
Holdich, the Rev. T. P., M.A.. Linwood 

Rectory, Market Rasen. 
Holmes, Gervas, Esq., M.A., Redenhall 

Bellfoundry, Harleston, Norfolk (2 copies). 
Hope, Robert Charles, Esq., Albion Crescent 

Villa, Scarborough. 
Howorth, Henrj' Hoyle, Esq., F.S.A., Derby 

House, Eccles, Manchester. 
Hewlett, W. E., Esq., F.S.A., Kirton-in- 

Lindsey. 
Hudson, the Rev. John Clare, M.A., Thorn- 
ton Vicarage, Homcastle. 
Hutton, the Rev. Prebendary H. W., Vicars' 

Court, Lincoln. 

Ingram, Thomas, Esq., Hawthornfield, 
Wigston Magna, Leicester. 

James, Francis, Esq., F.S.A., 190, Crom- 
well road, London, S.W. 

Kirk, Herbert, Esq., Sleaford. 
Knowles, the Rev. C, M.A., Winteringham 
Rector}', Brigg. 

Langton, Mr. Robert, Albert Chambers, 

Manchester. 
Latham, William, Esq., Melton Mowbray. 



Lewis, the Rev. Samuel Savage, M.A.,F.S.A., 
Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. 

Linley, F. F., Esq., 11, Lea Road, Gains- 
borough. 

Luck, Richard, Esq., Plas Llanfair, Llan- 
fairfechan, North Wales. 

Maclean, the Rev. Canon, M.A., the 
Vicarage, Caistor, Lincolnshire. 

Massingberd, the Rev. W. O., M.A., Ormsby 
Rectory, Alford, Lincolnshire. 

Mears, John, Esq., 47, Burgate, Canter- 
bury, Kent. 

Mellor, John W., Esq., M.P., 68, S. George's 
Square, London, S.W. 

Moore, Colonel Charles Thomas John, 
F.S.A., Frampton Hall, Boston. 

Moore, the Rev. Canon, M.A., F.S.A., 
Spalding. 

Moore, the Misses, the Cedars, Evington, 
Leicester. 

Morley, Frederick Richard, Esq., Stonesby 
House, De Montfort Square, Leicester. 

Nesbitt, C. M., Esq., Louth. 

Niblett, J. D.Thomas, Esq., F.S.A., Hares- 
field Court, Stonehouse, Gloucestershire. 

Nichols, Mrs., Holmwood Park, Dorking. 

Nicholson, James Gamson, Esq., London 
Road Station, Manchester. 

Oakey, John, jun., Esq. (the late), West- 
minster Bridge Road, London, S.E. 

Owen, the Rev. T. M. N., M.A., F.G.H.S., 
Rhodes Vicarage, Manchester. 

Paget, Thomas Tertius, Esq., M.P., Hum- 

berstone, Leicester. 
Peake, Henry, Esq., Sleaford. 
Peake, Henry Arthur, Esq., Sleaford (2 

copies). 



Subscribers. 



IX 



Pearce, William, Esq., Solihull, Warwick 

shire. 
Perry- H err ick, Mrs., Beaumanor Park, 

Loughborough. 
Phillips, Joseph, Esq., Stamford. 
Poole, Henry Davis, Esq., Sherborne House, 

Hoddesdon, Herts. 
Potts, Messrs. W. and Sons, Guildford 

Street, Leeds. 

Ramsey, R. W. F., Esq., 27, Greendyke 

Street, Glasgow. 
Raven, the Rev. J. J., D.D., School House, 

Great Yarmouth. 
Reynardson, the Rev. John Birch, M.A., 

Careby Rectory, Stamford. 
Ridgway, E., Esq., Huyton, Liverpool. 
Robinson, Thomas, W. U., Esq., F.S.A., 

Houghton-le-Spring, Durham. 
Roundell. Charles S., Esq., M.P., 16, 

Curzon Street, May Fair, London. 
Rowe, R. Reynolds, Esq., F.S.A., Park 

House, Cambridge. 
Royce, the Rev. David, M.A., Nether Swell 

Vicarage, Stow-on-Wold. 

Seely, Mrs., Brooke House, Isle of Wight. 

Shuttleworth, Alfred, Esq., Minster Yard, 
Lincoln. 

Sibthorp, H. A. M.Waldo, Esq., 57, Chester 
Square, London, S.W. 

Sibthorp, Coningsby, Esq., Canwick Hall, 
Lincoln. 

Sidebotham, Joseph, Esq., F.R.A.S., F.S.A., 
Bowdon, Cheshire. 

Solly, Edward, Esq., F.R.S., F.S.A., Cam- 
den House, Sutton, Surrey. 

Stahlschmidt, J. C. L., Esq., Master of the 
Worshipful Company of Founders, Fren- 
shaw House, Fontenay Road, Balham. 



Stainbank, Robert, Esq., Spring Lodge, 
Lawrie Park, Sydenham. 

Stephenson, Mill, Esq., Molescroft Cottage, 
Beverley, East Yorkshire. 

Stretton, Miss, Danes' Hill House, Lei- 
cester. 

Sutton, the Rev. Canon, M.A., West Tofts 
Rectory, Mundford, Norfolk. 

Swithinbank, George Edwin, Esq., M.D., 
Ormleigh, Anerley Park, Surrey. 

Taylor, Messrs. John, and Co., Bell- 
foundry, Loughborough. 
Tilley, the Rev. H. T., M.A., Moseley, 

Birmingham. 
Timmins, Samuel, Esq., F.S.A., Elvetham 

Lodge, Birmingham. 
Tinkler, the Rev. John, M.A., Arkengarth- 

Dale Vicarage, near Richmond, Yorkshire. 
Tomline, George, Esq., F.S.A., Riby Grove, 

Great Grimsby. 
Tyssen, John Robert Daniel, Esq., F.S.A. , 

9, Lower Rock Gardens, Brighton (3 

copies). 
Tyssen, Amherst Daniel, Esq., D.C.L., 40, 

Chancery Lane, London, W.C. 
Tyssen, the Rev. Ridley Daniel, M.A., the 

Rectory, South Hackney, 

UssHER, Richard, Esq., 10, Augusta 
Gardens, Folkestone, Kent. 

Walford, E., Esq., M.A., 17, Church Row, 

Hampstead, London. 
Walker, J. L., Esq., 6, Albany Court-yard, 

London, W. 
Warner, Robert, Esq., The Crescent 

Foundry, Cripplegate, London, E.G. 
Wartnaby, Mrs. (the late), Market Har- 

borough. 



Chuych Bells of Lincolnshire. 



Waterton, Edmund, Esq., F.S.A., Deeping 

Waterton Hall, Market Deeping. 
Webster, Mrs., Raven Holt, Scalford, 

Melton Mowbray. 
Welby, the Rev. G. E., M.A., R.D., Barrow- 

by Rectory, Grantham. 
Whitelegge, the Rev. Canon, M.A., Farns- 

field Vicarage, Southwell, Notts. 
Wild, the Rev. J., M.A., Tetney Vicarage, 

Great Grimsby. 
Willan, the Rev. W. W., M.A., Ventnor 

Vicarage, Isle of Wight. 
Williams, J. H., Esq., Stoneygate, Leicester. 
Williamson, Mr. James, 290, High Street, 

Lincoln (2 copies). 



Wilson, the Rev. Edward S., M.A., Winter- 
ton Rectory, Brigg. 

Winn, Mr. Henry, FuUetby, Horncastle. 

Wood, R. H., Esq., F.S.A., Penrhos Hou.se, 
Rugby. 

Wood, Willoughby, Esq., Hollyhurst, Bur- 
ton-on-Trent. 

Wood, James, Esq., Louth. 

Wordsworth, the Rev. Canon, M.A., i, 
Keble Terrace, Oxford. 

Wright, the Rev. T. B., M.A., Broughton 
Rectory, Brigg. 

Young, Thomas Arthur, Esq., K.S.G., 
Kingerby Manor, Market Rasen. 




PREFACE. 



Having already, in a Paper read at the Lincoln (1880) 
Congress of the Royal Archaeological Institute, explained 
the circumstances under which the labour of collecting 
material for the following pages was commenced, I need 
not repeat them here. 

It is, however, due to the Rev. J. T. Fowler, F.S.A., to 
again say that without the inducement held out to me 
by him, in the placing at my disposal his valuable 
collection of notes, sketches and casts, I should, probably, 
not have attempted a work involving so much labour, and 
calling for so much patience and perseverance. 

During the prosecution of my enquiries I had no 
reason to regret my decision to do my best to complete 
what Mr. Fowler began, and so to place on record as 
full an account as possible of the Campanology of Lincoln- 
shire, the interest of which is becoming every year less, as 
the ancient bells gradually, from various causes, disappear. 

For I have received from very many of the clergy and 
laity of the County information often obtained with much 
difficulty, and, I may add from all to whom I applied — 
where nothing more was, or could be given, — uniform 
courtesy. 



xii Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 

My thanks are due, and are heartily tendered to the 
Rev. j. T. Fowler, F.S.A., and to Mr. Jerram for placing 
their collections, illustrative of the Lincolnshire Bells, at 
my disposal; to J. J. Creswell, Esq., and again to the 
Rev. J. T. Fowler, F.S.A., and through him to some 
unknown friends, for very careful and exact drawings of 
many Bellfounders' stamps to illustrate this volume ; to 
J. R. Daniel Tyssen, Esq., F.S.A., W. Amherst Tyssen 
Amherst, Esq., M.P., F.S.A., and to LI. Jewitt, Esq., F.S.A., 
for the use of wood blocks ; to the Dean and Chapter 
of Lincoln for permission to make extracts from their 
muniments, and to the Rev. Canon Wickenden for very 
courteously and efficiently making searches for me, and for 
directing and superintending the transcriber employed ; to 
W. P. W. Phillimore, Esq., for help most kindly given in 
the Public Record Office, London, (where Mr. Vincent 
rendered me careful and valuable professional services) ; 
to the Rev. W. G. Dimock Fletcher, for (as on former 
occasions) kindly searching, and making extracts, for me in 
the Bodleian Library, Oxford ; to Mr. Justin Simpson for 
giving much time amongst, and making extracts from, the 
Records belonging to the different Parishes, and to the 
Municipality, of Stamford; and to the Rev. Reginald H. 
C. Fitz-Herbert, W. H. Jones, Esq., and other gentlemen, 
who made long journies, and spent many hours amongst 
dusty and musty Parish Papers, preserved in Church chests, 
in searching — sometimes with the most meagre result to 
cheer them — for information about the bells hanging over 
their heads. 



Preface. 



Xlll 



And, whilst I append to this Preface a list of the ladies 
and gentlemen to whom I am specially indebted, and to 
whom I here specially offer my thanks, for Rubbings or 
Casts taken from the bells of the parishes placed opposite 
to their names, I beg all others who have aided me in a 
variety of ways, by procuring measurements of their bells, 
sending me notes on their " Uses," hunting up Traditions, 
searching the Registers and other Records of their parishes, 
&c., &c., to accept my best thanks for their valuable 
assistance so freely and ungrudgingly given. 



Alington, Rev. A. M. 
Alington, Rev. C. A., R.D. 

Alington, Rev, R. P. . . 
Andrews, Rev. C. R. 
Andrews, Rev. W. 
Armstrong, H. W., Esq. 



Ranby. 

Burwell, Cawthorpe Little, Louth S. 
Michael, Muckton. 

Swinhope. 

Hough-on-the-Hill. 

Carlton Scroop, Normanton. 

Covenham (S. Bartholomew and S. Mary), 
Grainsby, Holton-le-Clay, Marsh Chapel, 
Scartho, Thoresby North, Waith. 



Baldock, Rev. W. H. . . 
Barker, Rev. Thomas 
Bashforth, Rev. F. 
Baxter, Rev. T. P. N., R.D, 
Baylay, Rev. C. F. R. . . 
Beale, Mr. J. 
Bell, Rev. J. ; Kirk, Herbert, Esq. ; and 
Snow, Rev. Benjamin 



Carlton-le-Moorland, Stapleford. 

Moorhouses, Revesby, Wilksby. 

Minting. 

Hawerby. 

Kirkby-on-Bain. 

Grantham. 

Anwick, Asgarby, Aslackby, Aswarby, 
Aunsby, Blankney, Bloxholm, Braceby, 
Branston, Brauncewell, Burton Pedwar- 
dine, Cranwell, Dembleby, Digby, Dor- 
rington, Evedon, Ewerby, Fillingham, 
Haceby, Hagnaby, Hale Magna, Hecking- 
ton, Helpringham, Howell, Kirkby-Lay- 



XIV 



CJiiircli Bells of Lincolnshire. 



Bell, Rev. ]., Sec— Continued. 



Bengough, Rev. E. S. . . 
Benson, Rev. Percy G. 
Benwell, Rev. H. 
Bigland, Rev. J. E. 
Binder. Rev. W. J. 
Bosanquet, Rev. E. S. 
Browne, Rev. H. A. 
Buddicom, Rev. R. J. 
Bury. Rev. T. W. 



thorpe, Kyme (North and South), Mether- 
ingham, Potterhan worth, Quarrington, 
Rauceby.Rowston.Ruskington.Sapperton, 
Scredington, Sleaford, Spanby, Swaby, 
Svvaton, Tattershall, Willoughby Silk. 

Hemingby. 

New Bolingbroke. 

Langtonby-Horncastle. 

Wickenby. 

Leadenham. 

Hareby. 

Newton-by-Toft, Toft-next-Newton. 

Morton-by-Gainsborough. 

Aisthorpe. 



Calverley, Rev. H. C. 
Campbell, Rev. Thomas . 
Child, Rev. C. 
Clements, Rev. E. M. 
Cochrane, Rev. W. Rupert 
Cole, Rev. R. E. . . 
Cooper. Rev. W., R.D. 
Cracroft. Rev. R. W. 
Cresswell, J. J., Esq. . . 



Crofts, Rev. C. D. 
Cumming, Rev. S. 
Curtis, Mr. (Lincoln) 



Deedes. Rev. Canon, R.D. 
Disbrowe, Rev. Canon H. S. 
Dundas, Hon. and Rev. Canon C. 
Dunning, Rev. \V. H. 



Bassingham. 

Brothertoft. 

Ashby-de-la-Launde. 

Syston. 

Langton-by-Partney. 

Doddington. 

Rippingale. 

Brinkhill. 

Aswardby, Beesby, Driby, Farforth, Han- 
nay, Haugh, Maltby-le-Marsh, Manby, 
Oxcombe. Rigsby, Ruckland, Sausthorpe, 
Steeping Great, Sutton-le-Marsh, Well, 
Worlabye near Louth. 

Caythorpe. 

Carlton Castle, Carlton Parva. 

Boultham, Bracebridge, Branston, Greet- 
well, Heighington, Lincoln (Guild Hall, 
S.Martin, S.Michael, S. Nicolas, S. Paul, 
S. Peter in Eastgate, S. Peter-at-Gowts, 
and S. Andrew), Sudbrooke, Willingham 
Cherry. 

Heydour. 

Benington. 

Epw^orth. 
Mumby Chapel. 



Preface. 



XV 



Earle, Rev. L. H. 
Elsee, H. J., Esq. .. 

Faulkner, Rev. W. E. 
Fawssett, H. F., Esq. 

Fernie, Rev. John 

Ferrall, Rev. C. W. 

Fitz-Herbert, Rev. Reginald H. C. 



Foster, Rev. James 



Foster, Rev. H. K. 
Fowler, Rev. J. T., F.S.A. 



Conisholme. 

Anderby and Ingoldmells. 

Wainfleet (S. Mary). 

Baumber, Edlington, Gautby, Sturton 
Magna, Waddingworth, Wragby. 

Wellingore. 

Langtoft. 

Blyborough, East Ferry, Gainsborough 
(Holy Trinity), Kirton-in-Lindsey, Knaith, 
Messingham, Northorpe, Pilham, Red- 
bourne, Wildsworth,Willough ton, Wrawby. 

Alford, Authorpe, Belleau, Bilsby, Gayton- 
le-Marsh, Markby, Reston (North and 
South), Saleby, Strubby, Thoresby (South) , 
Tothill, Trusthorpe, Willoughby, Withern. 

Dowsby. 

Alkborough, Althorpe, Alvingham, Amcotts, 
Ancaster, Appleby, Ashby-cum-Fenby, 
Barkston, Barnoldby-le-Beck, Barrow-on- 
Humber, Barrowby, Barton-on-Humber, 
Belton (Isle of Axholme), Bigby, Bin- 
brook, Blyton, Bonby, Bottesford, 
Brattleby, Brigsley, Broughton, Burton- 
by-Lincoln, Burton Gate, Burton-on- 
Stather, Cadney-cum-Howsham, Carlton 
North, Carlton South, Cockerington 
North, Cockerington South, Crowle, 
Croxton, Denton, Dunholme, Elsham, 
Faldingworth, Ferriby South, Fisker- 
ton, Flixborough, Friesthorp, Froding- 
ham, Gainsborough, Glentworth, Gonerby 
Great, Goxhill, Grainthorpe, Graying- 
ham, Grimoldby, Grimsby Great, Gun- 
ness, Habrough, Hackthorne, Halton 
East, Halton West, Harlaxton, Hatcliffe, 
Haxey, Heapham, Hibaldstow, Holton-le- 
Moor, Honington, Horkstow, Immingham, 
Keelby, Kelby, Kelsey South, Kettlethorpe, 
Killingholme, Kingerby, Kirkbycum- 



V 



XVI 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



Fowler, Rev. J. T., F.S.A. — CoutiuueJ. 



Fowler, James. Esq. 



Freeth, Rev. Dr. 
Frith, Rev. W. A. 



Osgodby, Kirkby East, Kirmington, Laugh- 
ton, Lea, Limber Magna, Lincoln 
Cathedral, Lincoln (S. Botolph, S. Mark, 
S. Mary-le-Wigford, and S. Swithin), 
Londonthorpe, Luddington, Mablethorpe 
(S. Mary), Manthorpe, Manton, Marston, 
Marton, Melton Ross, Nettleham, 
Nettleton, Newton-on-Trent, Normanby- 
near-Spital, Normanby-on-the-Wolds, 
Norton Bishop's, Owersby North, Owmby, 
Owston, Rand, Rasen (Middle and 
West), Reepham, Riby, Roxby-cum- 
Risby, Saltfleetby (All Saints, S. Clement, 
and S. Peter), Saxby (All Saints), Saxilby, 
Scampton, Scothorne, Scotter, Scotton, 
Searby, Sedgebrooke, Skidbrook, Snarford, 
Snitterby, Somercotes North, Spridlington, 
Springthorpe, Stallingborough, Stickford, 
Swallow, Tetney, Thoresway, Thorganby, 
Thornton Curtis, Thornton-le-Moor, Tork- 
sey, Ulceby, Upton, Usselby, Wadingham, 
Waltham, Washingborough, Welby, Wei- 
ton, Whitton, Willingham-by-Stow, Wils- 
ford, Winteringham, Winterton, Wootton, 
Worlabye. 

Bratoft, Burgh, Candlesby, Claxby (S. An- 
drew), Cumberworth, Elkington North, 
Farlsthorpe, Fulstow, Gayton-le-Wold, 
Grimsby Little, Gunby (S. Peter), Har- 
rington, Irbyin-the-Marsh, Keddington, 
Kelstern, Ludborough, Ludford Magna, 
Lusby, Orby, Ormsby Nun, Scremby, 
Skegness, Skendleby, Somercotes South , 
Steeping Little, Stewton, Thorpe (S. Peter), 
Toynton (S. Peter), Utterby, Welton-le - 
Wold, Winthorpe, Wyham. 

Fotherby, Yarburgh. 

Welby. 



Garstin, Rev. A. 



Ropsley. 



Preface. 



xvii 



Gerrish, W., Esq. . . 
Gilbert, Miss Amy 
Gillett, Rev. E. A. 
Goodacre, Rev. F. W. , 

Greenside, Rev. J. D. 
Greenwood, Rev. H. J. 
Gurnhill, Rev. James 



Wainfleet School. 

Hogsthorpe, Mumby. 

Woolsthorpe. 

Eagle, Norton Disney, Scarle North, 

Swinderby. 
Donington. 
Beelsby. 
Stockwith East. 



Hackford, Mr. E. C... 
(per Rev. F. Besant.) 
Hall, Rev. Charles 
Hanson, Rev. W. H. . . 
Hayes, Rev. J. 
Hensley, Rev. C. 
Hodgson, Rev. S. E. 
Holdich, Rev. T. P. . . 
Holmes, Rev. Joseph 
Hudson, Rev. J. Clare 

Jackson, Rev. J. Russell 
Jackson, Rev. C. B. 
Jarvis, Rev. C. E. 
Jerram, Mr. 



Jones, W. H., Esq. 



Skirbeck. 

Dunston, Kirkby Green, Scopwick. 

Kirmond-le-Mire, Stanton-le-Vale. 

Navenby. 

Cabourn. 

Scawby. 

Linwood. 

Swineshead. 

Martin, Thornton. 

Moulton Seas' End. 

Wold Newton. 

Hatton. 

Baston, Bicker, Bolingbroke, Boston, 
Butterwick, Clixby, Cowbit, Croft, Croy- 
land, Dawsmere, Deeping (S. James), 
Deeping Fen, Fleet, Fosdyke, Gedney, 
Gedney Hill, Gosberton, Hacconby, Hol- 
beach (All Saints and S. John), Holbeach 
Hurn, Holbeach Fen (Mission), Huttoft, 
Miningsby, Moulton, Moulton Chapel, 
Pinchbeck East, Quadring, Saxby, Skir- 
beck, Spalding, Stainton-by-Langworth, 
Surfleet, Sutterton, Sutton Long, Sutton 
(S. Nicolas, S. James, S. Matthew), Tydd 
(S. Mary), Wainfleet (All Saints), Welton- 
le-Marsh, Wigtoft, Wrangle, Wyberton. 

Barholm, Bassingthorpe, Bitchfield, Booth- 
by Pagnell, Bourn, Braceborough, Burton 
Goggles, Bytham Castle, Careby, Carlby, 



XVlll 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



Jones, W. H., Esq. — Continued. 



Jones, Rev. W. P. 
Jones, Rev. J. G. 



Colsteru-orth, Corby, Deeping Market, 
Deeping West, Gunby, Irnham, Ponton 
Great, Skillington, Stainby, Stamford (All 
Saints, S. George, S. John Baptist, S. 
Mary, S. Michael, Roman Catholic 
Chapel, Cemetery Chapel), Swayfield, 
Swinstead, Tallington, Thurlby, (near 
Bourn), Uffington, Whaplode Drove, 
Witham North, Witham-on-the-Hill. 

Clee, Cleethorpes. 

Somerby, near Brigg. 



Keightley, Rev. G. J. 
Kirk, Herbert, Esq. 

[see Messrs. Bell, Kirk, and Snow.] 



Dunsby. 



Lane, Rev. G. P. 
Lawrence, Rev. Percival 
Lewin, Rev. Samuel . . 
Llewellyn, Rev. P. 
Lloyd, Rev. C. A. 
Lodge, Rev. Canon S. 
Loft, Rev. James E. W. 
Lutt, Rev. E. K. . . 
Lynde, Rev. T. G. 

Mackay, Rev. S. M. . . 
Mackdonald, Rev. Grant W. 
Mackean, Rev. W. S. . . 
Maclean, Rev. Canon 
Mantell, Very Rev. Dean 
Mason, Rev. W. W. 
Massingberd, Rev. W. O. 
Melville, Rev. F. A. L. 
Moore, Rev. Canon, R.D. 

Moore, Rev. H. Dodwell, R.D. 
Morgan, Rev. John 
Mossman, Rev. T. W. 
Mowbray, Rev. J. H. AL De 



Stowe. 

Walesby. 

Tealby. 

Lincoln (S. Mary Magdalen). 

Goltho. 

Scrivelsby. 

Healing. 

Harmston. 

Harpswell, Hemswell. 

Langton-by-Wragby. 

Holbeach Marsh. 

Buslingthorpe. 

Kelsey North. 

Gretford, Wilsthorpe. 

Leverton. 

Ormsby South. 

Welbourn. 

Spalding (S. John Baptist, S. Peter, and 

S. Paul). 
Honington. 
Humberstone. 

Torrington (East and West). 
Barnetby-le-Wold, Caistor, Claxby. 



Preface. 



XIX 



Nash, Rev. W. 

Nelson, Rev. Canon 

Nottingham, Right Reverend Bishop of 

Overton, Rev. Canon . . 

Peacock, Rev. J. 
Peacock, Rev. W. G. 
Penny, Rev. J. 
Potter, Rev. C. A. . . 

Priestley, Mr. Joseph... 

QUARRINGTON, Rcv. E. F. 

Quirk. Rev. J. F. . . 
Rabbetts, Rev. J. D. . . 
Raven, Rev. J. J., D.D. 



Rawnsley, A. E., Esq. (the late) 



Reynardson, Rev. J. B. 
Reynolds, Rev. J. J., R.D. 
Robinson, Rev. G. A. 

Sammons, Rev. R. T. . . 
Scrivenor, Rev. A. 
Sharp, Rev. J. P. 
Sharp, Rev. W. . . 
Shelley, Rev. J. B. 
Sladen, Rev. Ed. . . 
Smith, Rev. Francis . . 
Snow, Rev. Benjamin, 

[see Messrs. Bell, Kirk, and Snow.] 



Somerby. 

Lincoln (S. Peter-at-Arches). 

Leasingham. 

Legbourne. 

Fulbeck. 

Ulceby-cum-Fordington. 

Cuxwold. 

Asgardby, Bucknall, Hagworthingham, 

Thimbleby, Wispington, Woodhall. 
Haltham-on-Bain, Roughton. 

Stroxton. 
Grasby. 

Stoke (North and South), Witham South, 
Wyvill. 

Addlethorpe, Algarkirk, Boston, Fishtoft, 
Frampton, Frieston, Horkestow, Kirton- 
in-Holland, Ponton Little, Sibsey, Weston 
(S. Mary), Whaplode. 

Ashby-by-Partney, Benniworth, Donington- 
on-Bain, Friskney, Halton Holgate, 
Haugham, Hundleby.Keal (EastandWest), 
Partney, Raithby-by-Louth, Raithby-b)-- 
Spilsby, Spilsby, Stenigot, Tathwell, 
Toynton (All Saints), Withcall. 

Holywell. 

Hykeham South. 

Irby-on-Humber, 

Wroot. 

Horncastle. 

Edenham. 

Mareham-le-Fen. 

Theddlethorpe (S. Helen). 

Theddlethorpe (All Saints). 

Moorby. 



XX 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



Southwell, Rev. H. G. 
Stanley, Rev. Richard . . 
Stockdale, Rev. Walter 
Streathfeild, Rev. G. S. 
Sutton, Rev. F. H. 
Swallow, Rev. H.J. 

Sweeting, Rev. W. D. 

Taylor, Rev. T. W. V. 
Taylor, Messrs. . . 
Turner, Rev. W. V. . . 
Tweed, Rev. H. E. 
Tyrrell, Rev. Walter . . 



Rothwell. 

Apley, Barlings. 

Morton. 

Louth (Holy Trinity). 

Brant Broughton. 

Biscathorpe, Burgh-on-Bain, Leake, Six- 
hills, Willingham North. 

Bardney, Barkwith (East and West), Holton- 
le-Beckering, Lissington, Stixwold. 

Sixhills. 

Carlton Magna. 

Bardney. 

Coleby. 

Asterby, Calkwell, Goulceby, Hainton, 
Stainton Market. 



Usher, Rev. W. N. 
Ussher, Richard, Esq. 



Cammeringham, Coates, Saxilby(S. Andrew), 
Stow, Sturton-by-Stow. 

Allington (East and West), Beckingham, 
Bennington Long, Boothby Graffoe, Clay- 
pole, Doddington Dry, Eagle, Fenton, 
Hougham, Norton Disney, Potterhan- 
worth, Scarle North, Skellingthorpe, 
Snelland, Stragglethorpe, Swinderby, 
Thorpe-on-the-Hill, Thurlby near Newark, 
Waddington, Westborough. 



Walker, Rev. E. R. . . 
Wallace, Rev. J. D. C. 
Walter, Rev. J. C. 
Ward, Rev. J. 
Warner and Sons, Messrs. 
Warren, Rev. C. . . 
Watkins, Rev. G. E. . . 



Watney, Rev. James 
Westbrooke, Rev. W. F. W. 
Wheat, Rev. C. G. 
White, Rev. D.J. 



Billinghay. 

Ravendale East. 

Kirkstead, Langton (S. Andrew). 

Stickney. 

Brigg, Coates North. 

Aylesby, Bradley, New Clee, Laceby. 

Billingborough, Coates Great, Folkingham, 

Newton, Osbournby, Pickworth, Threck- 

ingham, Walcot. 
Canwick. 
Corringham. 
Martin, Timberland. 
West Butterwick. 



Preface. 



XXI 



Wilkinson, Rev. C. A. 
Willan, Rev. F. M. 
Wilson, Rev. P. S. 
Wilson, Rev. A. C. 
Windle, Rev. Allen 
Winn, Mr. Henry 



Wood, James, Esq. 
Worsley, Rev. P. R. 
Wright, Rev. Canon 
Wylde, Rev. Robert 



Llanfairfechan. 

North Wales. 



Willingham South. 

Aubourn. 

Horbling. 

Nocton. 

Rasen Market. 

Ashby Puerorum, Ashby West, Belshford, 
Enderby Bag, Fulletby, Greetham, Ham- 
meringham, Salmonby, Somersby, Tetford, 
Toynton Low, Winceby. 

Louth. 

Stubton. 

Coningsby. 

Enderby Mavis. 

T. N. 




CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Church Bells (with special reference to those in Lincolnshire) . 1-40 

The Church Bells of Lincolnshire .... 41-49 

The Lincolnshire Bellfounders (IllnstvaUd) . . . 50-67 

Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells (Illustrated) . . 68-146 

Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells . . . 147-262 

Latin Inscriptions on Lincolnshire Bells (with Translations) . 263-274 

A Table of Diameters of Bells with the approximate weights . 275 

The Inscriptions on the Church Bells of Lincolnshire with the 
Diameter at the mouth of each Bell, from which its 
approximate weight may be ascertained. To which are 
added Extracts, where procurable, from the Commissioners' 
Returns temp. Ed. VI., and from Parochial and other 
Records, together with Local Traditions, Notices of 
Donors, &c., &c. ...... 277-764 

Index ........ 767 



CHURCH BELLS, 



BELLS do not appear to have been introduced into 
the Christian Church until the fifth century. Prior 
to that date the Early Christians, so soon as they were able 
to meet publicly without fear, used, like the Jews of old,* 
trumpets as a summons to prayer and praise. S. Ephrem 
{circa a.d. 370) further mentions the Signum — a clapper or 
tablet — as the call then used to Holy Communion. f The 
earliest Christian writer who refers to bells is thought to be 
Saint Jerome, who in the Regula Monachorum {circa a.d. 422) 
mentions their use as a call to matins, &c.J Paulinus, 
bishop of Nola, in Campania (a.d. 400), has been generally 
credited with their invention, § but inasmuch as there is 
extant an epistle from him to Severus, in which he minutely 
describes his church, but makes no mention of either tower 
or bells, we must consider he was ignorant, at least at that 



* Bingham's Antiq., Bk. viii., c. 7. 
f Paycenesi xliii. The late Rev. Mac- | QuoieAhy Rocca, De Campanis. Opera, 

kenzie E. C. Walcott, F.S.A., to whom I Romse, 1719. Vol. i. p. 156. 
was indebted for this reference, so in- § Dupin's Eccl. Hist. Ninth Cent., 

terpreted the " sign." p. 166. 

B 



2 Church Bells. 

time, of their use,* From this tradition, however, we have 
the mediaeval Latin name, Nola, for a small hand-bell, and 
Campana for the larger bell hanging in the church tower or 
turret. Church Bells are also called Signa in mediaeval 
documents. 

It is not proposed — as being foreign to this work — to 
attempt a description of the Nola or Tintinnabulum, as the 
early portable hand-bell was called. Several of these, of 
great antiquity, are still extant in Ireland, North Wales, 
and Scotland. Some of them are very elaborately orna- 
mented, and are accompanied by covers of exquisite work- 
manship. They are frequently formed of a sheet of metal 
hammered into shape, and rivetted at the side. There does 
not appear to be any clue as to the precise original use of 
these curious bells, which in many instances were, until 
recently, held in high reverence, and even in superstitious 
dread, by the ignorant peasantry. Some antiquaries think 
they are relics of the early founders of Christianity in these 
Islands, and have been, as such, carefully preserved in 
Religious Houses founded at the time by the saints them- 
selves. f 



* The Bell, by Rev. Alfred Gatty, p. 13. by my venerable friend The Rev. H. T. 

The Rev. H. T. EUacombe in his Bells of Ellacombe, F.S.A. In the year 1833 Dr. 

the Chunh, p. 33S, gives an engraving of an Petrie read before the Royal Irish Academy 

ancient bell "supposed to have been in- an Essay on the Ancient Consecrated Bells 

vented or adopted by Paulinus, circa 420, of Ireland. This Essay has never been 

for church purposes." published, but interesting extracts are 

f Avery full and profusely illustrated given in Stokes Life of George Petrie, LL.D., 

account of these bells will be found in TJie pp. 277-280. 
Bells of the Church, a Tome lately put forth 



Church Bells. 3 

Pope Sabinian (a.d. 604) having ordered the hours to be 
sounded on the bells,* is thought by others to have intro- 
duced the use of the CampancB or Signa, as the large bells 
were called, into churches. He, however, more probably 
found bells in partial use, and recognizing their beauty and 
value, encouraged their general adoption, as it is soon after 
his time that we read of their use in this country. They 
are mentioned in the Ordo Romanus about that date, as 
being used to announce Tierce, Mass, and Processions, and 
S. Owen in the life of S. Eloy [circa a.d. 650) speaks of the 
Campmia.'\ 

Legend tells of S. Columba hearing the midnight bell 
which called the brethren to matins in his church in lona, 
and of his hurrying thither with feeble steps, and there 
dying before the altar, on June the gth, a.d. 597. It is, 
however, nearly a century later before we meet with an 
authentic record of the church bell as being in use in 
this country. Bede mentions the existence of one at 
Streanseshalch (Whitby) in the year 680, which was used to 
awake, and to call the nuns to prayer. J The second excerp- 
tion of Egbert, issued about the year 750, commands every 
priest, at the proper hours, to sound the bells of his church, 
and then to go through the sacred ofihces of God. In the 
year 816 the Canons of Wulfred gave directions as to the 
sounding of the Signinn in every church upon the death of 
a bishop. § In the tenth century we trace the existence of 



» Walcott's Sac. Arch., p. 96. % Eccl. Hist., Book iv., c. xxiv. (Gidley's 

f Walcott's Sac. Arch. p. 66. Translation). 

§ Johnson's English Canons, Part i., p. 306. 



4 Church Bells. 

bells in one of the illuminations in S. i^thelwold's Bene- 
dictional, a gorgeous manuscript, certainly executed before 
the close of that century : an open campanile appears in 
which are suspended four bells.* 

The building of churches, and the founding of bells, were 
much encouraged at that time by a decree which provided 
that a Thane's rank might be obtained by a Saxon churl or 
franklin if he were rich enough to possess about five hundred 
acres of land, and had a church with a bell tower on his 
estate. t About that time too, if we may trust Ingulph, we 
find a ring of bells at Croyland Abbey in this county, which 
will be more particularly described hereafter. From 
Ingulph's remarks we may infer that single bells, if not 
rings, were then well known in this country. Neither were 
the abbots of Croyland the only ecclesiastics of that period 
whose names are handed down to us as founders of bells. 
S. Dunstan, "the chief of monks," an expert worker in 
metals, cast a bell, which for many ages after his death 
hung in Canterbury Cathedral ; two bells cast under his 
direction were at Abingdon, where also were other two the 
work of its founder S. ^thelwold.J In the year a.d. 1035 
King Canute gave two bells, amongst other rich gifts, to 
Winchester Cathedral, and in the same century gifts of 
pairs of bells were made to Southwell and to Beverley, as 
well as to Stow S. Mary in this county. S. Dunstan also 
drew up Rules for the ringing of the Bells, as did Lanfranc, 



» Archaologia, xxiv., plate 32. % Rock's Church of oiir Fathers, iii, 

f Chnxion 5 Early English Church, p. 230. Part 2, p. 57. 



Church Bells. 5 

Archbishop of Canterbury.* It will thus be seen that bells 
were well known to the Anglo-Saxon Church ; and our 
word bell is said to be derived from the Saxon bellan, to 
roar or bellow, so Chaucer "as loud as belleth wind in 
hell."f So too there is every reason for believing that at 
the Norman Conquest the art of bellfounding was well 
understood, and carried to great perfection in this country : 
the law of Curfew could not have been carried into effect if 
bells had not then been in general use. The grand old 
Norman — if not Saxon — towers of our churches (witness 
Brigstock and Brixworth in Northamptonshire) clearly 
point to the large and heavy bells which they were built to 
contain. 

The first Englishman who followed bellfounding as a 
trade at present known by name, was Roger de Ropeforde 
of Paignton, who, in 1284, was employed to make four bells 
for the north tower of Exeter Cathedral, J and about the 
same time Michael de Lichfield, bellfounder, was plying 



* See these Rules in Church Bells of gave in kind : — " Metal for the bell. They 

Somerset, pp. 113 and 114. answer for 180 pounds of brass received 

f The Rev. J. T. Fowler on Bells and as gifts, as in pots, platters, basons, lavers, 

Bellringing. kettles, brass mortars, and mill-pots. Also 

+ Ellacombe's Bells of Exeter Cathedral, for 425 pounds received from one old bell, 
p 3. See also Notes and Queries, 5th s. iii., Also, for 40 pounds of brass, received by 
p. 77, for an interesting account of the purchase. Also, for 896 pounds of copper 
casting of a bell in the same year (1284). received by purchase. Also, for 320 
An endorsement on the parchment upon pounds of tin received by purchase, 
which this account is written shows not " Sum 1861 pounds, of which there has 
only the constituent parts of the bell-metal, been melted in making the new bell 1781 
but also proves the fact that those who pounds; and there are 8t pounds remain- 
could not subscribe to the cost in money, ing over." 



6 Church Bells. 

his craft in that city.* It is doubtful whether Fergus of 
Boston — circa iioo — who will be mentioned hereafter, cast 
large bells. 

In the thirteenth century we meet with constant mention 
of bells as of things not in the least extraordinary or rare : 
indeed Matthew Paris writes as if, at least, every church of 
note, possessed one bell or more if and in what are supposed 
to be the earliest complete lists of the necessary furniture 
of an English Parish Church contained in the decrees of 
Walter Grey, Archbishop of York, 1216-1255, and of 
Robert Winchelsey, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1293-1313, 
are found — in the former — " campanse magnae cum chordis 
suis," and— in the latter — " magnae campanae campanilis & 
cordae ad easdem."J 

In the middle ages, when roads were bad, and locomo- 
tion difficult, bells were frequently cast within the precincts 
of Religious Houses, and in churchyards, the clergy or 
monks standing round, reciting prayers and chanting 
psalms. An instance of this occurred at S. Albans in the 
early part of the fourteenth century when the great bell 
called '' Amphibalus," being broken, was recast in the hall 
of the sacristy. § During excavations in the churchyard of 
Scalford, Leicestershire, some years ago, indications of the 
former existence of a furnace for the casting of the church 
bells there were discovered, and a mass of bell-metal was 



* Hewitt's Handbook of Lichfield % Peacock's Chuirh Furniture, p. 177-9. 

Cathedral. § Lloyd's Altars of S. Albans Abbey, 

f Bohn's Ed., vol. iii. p. 51. p. 45. 



ChurcJi Bells. 7 

found, which had clearly been in a state of fusion on the 
spot ; and a similar discovery was made a few years 
ago in the churchyard of Empingham, Rutland. Until 
quite recently the bellfounders occasionally acted in the 
same manner. " Great Tom " of Lincoln was cast in the 
minster yard in 1610; and the great bell of Canterbury 
was cast in the cathedral yard in 1762.* We also find 
instances (at Kirby Malzeard, Yorkshire, and Haddenham, 
in the Isle of Ely,) where a furnace was erected, and bells 
recast within the walls of the church itself.f The founders, 
too, sometimes itinerated with the implements of their craft 
to a central spot, where they set up their furnace, and did 
what business they could with the neighbourhood around. 
This was done at Winterton, in this county, by Daniel 
Hedderly, of Bawtry, in 1734; and by Henry Penn, of 
Peterborough, at Horncastle in 1717 ; Henry Bagley 
(formerly of Chacombe, Northamptonshire), then of Witney, 
Oxon, also says, in an advertisement issued in 1732, that 
he would if desired " cast any Ring or Rings of Bells in 
the town [to which] they belong." 

It may be well to state here that the composition of 
bell-metal may be roughly said to be one portion of tin to 
three of copper. The popular belief that silver entered into 
the composition of the metal of our ancient bells, and that 
it is to its presence they are indebted for the beauty and 
purity of their tone is a great error. It was a custom to 



* Bells and, Bellringing, by Rev. J. T. f Bells of the Church, p. 2S7. Notes and 

Fowler, F.S.A. Quevies, 5th, s. ii. 147. 



8 Church Bells. 

cast a few coins into the furnace, but silver in any appreci- 
able quantity would tend to injure, and not to improve, the 
tone. Age, no doubt, which changes the colour and 
roughens the surface of a bell, also improves in some 
manner — it has been suggested that it is by a very gradual 
process of oxidation — the character of its tone. 

After the bell was cast, and was made ready for its high 
and airy chamber, it was set apart for its future use by a 
solemn ceremonial, and by the recitation of an Office which 
has been variously termed the Benediction, the Consecration, 
and the Baptism of the Bell. The use of this Office, if not 
coeval with the introduction of the church bell, is certainly 
of great antiquity. " It appears from a Pontifical preserved 
in the British Museum (Cottonian MS. Vespasian D. i.p. i2y) 
that the service commenced with the recital of the Litany, 
and that whilst the choir sang the antiphon Asperges me, 
the psalm Miserere and psalm 145, with the five following 
psalms, and the antiphon In civitate Domini dare sonant, the 
bell about to be blessed was washed with holy water, wiped 
with a towel, and anointed by the bishop with the holy 
oil."* The Pontifical of Egbert, Archbishop of York, and 
other early Office books, have similar Services. 

The De Benedictione Signi vel CampancE of the more 
modern Roman Pontifical enjoins the same ceremonies 
interspersed with prayers, psalms, and antiphons. The 
bell is washed by the bishop with water, into which salt has 



* Church Bells of Norfolk, p. 17. 



Church Bells. g 

previously been cast ; it is then dried by his attendants with 
clean linen ; the bishop next dips the thumb of his right 
hand in the holy oil for the sick, and makes the sign of the 
cross on the top of the bell, he then anoints the bell again 
both with the holy oil for the sick and with chrism, saying 
the words : — 

' ' Saudi + ficetur, et conse + cretur, Domine signum istud : in nomine 
Pa + tris et Fi + ^^h ^i Spirittls + Sancti : in honorem Sancti N . Pax 
tibi.'" 

after which the inside of the bell is censed.* 

This Office bore a close resemblance to that of Holy 
Baptism, both in the ceremonial used, and in the giving of 
a name to the bell. That was probably the reason why 
Charlemagne issued, in the year 789, an express injunction 
against the baptism of bells. Learned liturgical writers of 
the Roman Church maintain that the baptism of bells was 
not in ancient times, and is not now, as used by them, such 
as confers remission of sins — Southey quaintly observes 
"the original sin of a bell would be a flaw in the metal^ or 
a defect in the tone, neither of which the priest undertakes 
to remove" — but the bells are thereby set apart from all 
secular uses, and blessed or consecrated ; and the hope is 
that (in accordance with the prayers offered) by their sound 
the powers of demons may be restrained, and the sources 



♦ See a full copy of this service from the Pontifical (Antwerp, 1627) in Bells of the 

Church, p. 83. 
C 



^ 



lO 



Church Bells. 



of storm, tempest, and contagion, kept away.* Whilst 
this no doubt is quite true, it must, nevertheless, be evident 
that the ceremony did frequently, in mediaeval times, 
surpass that of a benediction, and, by an addition of other 
ceremonies to those enjoined in the Pontificals just quoted, 
bore so close a resemblance to baptism, as to present, at 
least to the eyes of the vulgar, a too close and irreverent 
resemblance to that Holy Sacrament. Le Sueur, an old 
French writer, shows this to have been the case. He says 
" that the imposition of the name, the godfathers and god- 
mothers, the aspersion with holy-water, the unction, and 
the solemn consecration in the names of the Father, Son, 
and Holy Ghost, exceed in ceremonial splendour what is 
common at baptism, in order to make the blessing of bells 
more highly regarded by the people. Real baptism," he 
remarks, "may be administered by all kinds of persons, 
and the rite is simple, but in what is done to the bells there 
is much pomp. The service is long, the ceremonies are 
numerous, the sponsors are persons of quality, and the 
most considerable priest in the place, or even a bishop or 
archbishop officiates. "f That this was the case in England, 



• Lawrence Beyerlink, Canon of Ant- to a bell, not as if it were a living thing, 

werp, &c., &c., in his "Select Sermons of but just as names are given to gates, har- 

various Subjects" (Cologne 1627) says: — hours, and fortifications, or rather it should 

" Hence the custom of sponsors is free not so much be said that a name is given 

from all impiety, although the Roman to it, as that it is consecrated in honour of 

Pontifical orders no such thing. For why some saint whose name afterwards con- 

cannot special persons be appointed to tinues with it." Quoted in Bells of the 

have care of the bell and contribute to its Church, p. 93. 

expenses A name is given f Quoted by Gatty, The Bell, p. 22. 



Church Bells. ii 

as well as in France, we learn from a curious entry made 
by the churchwardens of S. Lawrence, Reading, in their 
Accounts for the year 1499 : — 

s. d. 
" Itm. payed for haloweng of the grete bell namyd Harry vj. viij. 
And mem. that Sir Willm. Symys, Richard Clech 
andmaistres Smyth beynggodfaders andgodmoder 
at the consecracyon of the same bell, and beryng 
all o^ costs to the suffrygan."* 

This custom of blessing bells before raising them to their 
place in the church tower points to the origin of bell 
inscriptions ; the earliest inscriptions being simply the name 
of the saint placed upon the bell when it was cast, and 
ratified at its consecration. f There is a singular proof of 
this in an unique inscription on a bell at Crostwight, 
Norfolk :— 

ASLAK JOH'ES JOH'EM ME NOI'AVIT 

John Aslak being clearly the godfather at the benediction 
or baptism of the bell.J 

It may here be worth noting that by a Commission from 
William, Bishop of Lincoln, dated the 21st of April, 1501, 
his suffragan, "Thomas Bishop Achaden," was empowered 
to consecrate moveable and fixed altars, bells, &c., &c., in 



• Notes and Queries, 3rd s. vii. p. 90. tion : indeed some ancient bells have no 

f It does not follow that the name inscription at all. 
given was always indicated in the inscrip- % Church Bells of Norfolk, p. 17. 



12 Church Bells. 

the Archdeaconries of Lincoln, Stow, Leicester, and 
Huntingdon.* 

When the mediaeval form of benediction was done away 
with in this country at the Reformation, English church- 
men, unfortunately, were not furnished with any form of 
dedication to supply its place. Consequently, the people 
in getting rid of the superstitious rite of their fathers, 
substituted, upon the advent of a new bell, or ring of bells, t 
indecorous conviviality similar to that which is described 
by White of Selborne, who tells us that when new bells 
were brought to his parish in 1735, the event was celebrated 
by fixing the treble bottom upwards, and filling it with 
punch. It is a matter for thankfulness that this profane 
" christening " is becoming a thing of the past, and that the 
church is again receiving bells within her towers with a 
dedication service, sanctioned and used by her bishops, 
which is joyous and reverent in tone, and calculated to give 
all, clergy and people, a fitting impression of the uses to 
which the Bells of the Church are intended to be put. 
After such a dedication they can scarcely be used, as they 
frequently have been in times past, upon most improper 
occasions — occasions when things had been enacted com- 
pletely opposed to the honour of God, and utterly alien to 
the teaching of the church, whose fast and festival the bells 
are to mark, and whose summons to prayer and praise they 
are day by day to sound. 

♦ Harl. MSS. 7048, p. 499. 
+ A bell is spoken of by ringers in the called "a ring;" a performance upon 
feminine gender ; a set of bells is properly them " a peal." 



Church Bells. 13 

It is now time to turn to the bell itself, and to see what 
it has to say in elucidation of its past history. To do this 
we must ascend to the bell chamber in the church tower, or 
to the bell turret on the roof. This is not always, by any 
means, an easy, pleasant, or even a safe, thing to do. 
Some of the stone staircases in our church towers are so 
much worn that only a scant and precarious foothold is left, 
and some of the long ladders by which the bells are reached 
are almost perpendicular, and, occasionally, so decaying 
with age, as to render a climb up them a proceeding 
requiring great care and some nerve. The floor of the 
bell chamber, too, is occasionally found rotten and covered 
with filth. Once up, however, the difficulty or danger 
attending the ascent is forgotten ; the ancient bells, so often 
heard, never, perhaps, before seen, are looked upon with 
reverence, almost with awe. We think of the many 
changes which have taken place in all around — many of 
which they have noted with their solemn tolls or their 
joyous peals — since they were first placed there. Our 
reverie, however, is broken by the cold wind rushing through 
the louvre boards in the windows, so we hasten to complete 
our work — take our "rubbing" or our "squeeze," give one 
hasty glance through the openings at the grand peeps of 
the surrounding country, so well obtained in our elevated 
position, and then descend with greater ease, and with 
much less trepidation, than we ascended. 

The earliest bells do not generally tell us anything as to 
the date when, or the locality in which, they were cast. 
They usually bear nothing more than the names of the 



14 Church Bells. 

saints in whose honour they were dedicated. Upon the 
tenor, or largest, bell was frequently placed the name of the 
patron saint of the church ; upon the smaller ones, perhaps, 
the namics of the saints whose altars were formerly in the 
church below, or who were the patrons of ancient Guilds or 
Confraternities in the parish.* We shall see that the 
ancient bells at Croyland Abbey bore names ; and from 
an ancient Roll at Ely we learn that when they cast four 
new bells for the Cathedral in the year 1346-7 they gave 
them the names of Jesus, John, Mary, and Walsyngham.f 
Bells of this class (though not necessarily of this early 
date) are found in this county. We may mention now 

at Hacconby : 

at South Somercotes : 

at Ingoldsby : 

at Aswarby : 

at Branston. 



* Inscriptions are usually placed upon of the bell; on old bells they are some- 
the haunch, or, as some call it the shoulder, times found nearer the canons, 
f Church Bells of Cambridgeshire, p. 6. 



Church Bells. 15 

A few early dated English bells have, however, been 
discovered. One (supposed to be the oldest dated bell in 
the kingdom) is at S. Chad's Church, Claughton, Lanca- 
shire, and is dated 1296, thus: — ^o 

+ ANNO DNI • M • CC • NONO • AI . 

the letter V being reversed. 

At Cold Ashby, Northamptonshire, there hangs an 
interesting bell dated 13 17; and in this county two richly 
ornamented bells, dated 1423, are at South Somercotes, 
and another pair, cast eight years later, are still in existence 
at Somerby, near Brigg. 

These early inscriptions are usually in stately Gothic 
capital letters, and in Latin — the language of the mediaeval 
church. 

We soon meet with a slight extension of the inscriptions 
such as — to quote Lincolnshire examples : — 

at Claxby S. Mary : 



at Laceby, and 
at Whitton. 



1 6 Church Bells. 

Bells cast in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries though 
undated, have generally founders' marks, initial crosses, and 
other means of recognition by which they can be classified, 
and, in many cases, assigned to their respective dates and 
foundries. These trade marks, taken by themselves, are, 
however, by no means infallible guides as to the date of 
the bell upon which they are found ; for as foundries often 
went on for generations, and even for centuries, so the 
marks and stamps were, no doubt, handed down from one 
founder to another, and so were used for a long period. 
They also not unfrequently passed from one foundry to 
another. 

On bells of this date, and on to the period of the 
Reformation, we frequently find the invocation ^^ Ora pro 
nobis " added to the name of the saint, thus : — 

as at Enderby Bag, and 

+ mpa^ii^M ^M.'MmmJ. m'MM.mM :iPM<&> 

as at Laughton. 

These invocations were taken from the Litany ; and 
many of the other inscriptions found on ancient bells in 
this and other counties doubtless owe their origin to the 
various Offices of the mediaeval church. Very many have, 
in whole or in part, the angelic salutation : — 

AVE MARIA GRACIA PLENA DOMINVS TECVM 



Church Bells. 



17 



and many have, as will be seen hereafter, inscriptions in 
rhyming verse, often of a precatory character. 

Occasionally we find figures of the Blessed Virgin and 
Child, of men and of angels on bells of this date. Examples 
of such are found in Leicestershire and Northamptonshire. 
Figures of the Virgin and Child are upon bells at Haxey 
and Wellingore in this county. 

English inscriptions, though rare as early as the four- 
teenth and fifteenth centuries, were sometimes used. At 
Long Sutton, near Odiham, Hants, and at East Dean, near 
Chichester, are bells inscribed : — 

at Gainford, Durham, is another with : — 

.-MMMO^ miM-^^'M. (^\^m:m :Ei<D@©^:Ei <b^ 



that is, Help Mary quoth, or saith, Roger of Kirkby, who 
was vicar 1401 — 1412.* On the 3rd bell at S. Chad's 
Lichfield is 

+ <d-^:ei jhMJi^'K miM-:^% mim-v^'mmm mj^ 

On Lincolnshire Bells are several good examples as — not 
to mention all — at Alkborough, where we find : — 

* Sottanstall's Campanologia. 
D 



1 8 Church Bells. 

at Laccby : — 

and (though somewhat later) at Semperingham : — 

The founder's name, too, occasionally appears, as at 
Bicker, North Elkington, Sutterton, and Scawby ; and the 
donor's as at Dunsby, Saltfleetby S. Clement, and at 
Somerby near Brigg, all in this county. 

At the date of which we are now speaking there was no 
such thing known as change-ringing : and, indeed it would 
seem that neither ringing " rounds " nor chiming in " tune " 
were possible in the great majority of our churches. In the 
Returns of the Commissioners for taking lists of the orna- 
ments of the churches in the Hundred of Framland, 
Leicestershire, in 6 Edward VI . certain churches are 
mentioned as possessing " bells of a corde " or " bells of one 
ryng,^^ meaning, I suppose, that the notes of these bells 
were in musical sequence, and Stow, in describing S. 
Bartholomew's Church in Smithfield, says, "in the bell 
tower sixe Belles in a tune.'" In the existing Returns from 
Lincolnshire parishes, Claxby S. Mary and Harrington are 
each described as possessing " ij bells of one Reinge." 
The other churches are noted, simply, as possessing a 
certain number of bells, unfit, apparently, for musical 
chiming or ringing, but quite adequate to the custom of the 
time. That custom, probably, was in ordinary churches to 



Church Bells. 



19 



have in addition to its own, or parish, bell, a bell for the 
Angeliis, and one for each of the several altars which were 
usually found there dedicated to different saints, and which 
was sounded when mass was about being said at its 
particular altar. At Ludlow in addition to the fore bell, 
second bell, third bell, second tenor, and great bell, they 
possessed "our Lady belle," "First mass-bell." and "the 
gild belle."* Even now one bell is all that is required by 
the Rubric and (as now followed) by the Canons to be 
provided, of necessity, in churches at the charge of the 
parish. There is, however, no doubt that all the bells, 
notwithstanding their being unfitted for musical ringing or 
chiming, were used for Divine Service on Sundays. We 
find the Bell-master at Loughborough, Leicestershire, in 
the time of Edward VL or earlier, was obliged "to help to 
reng to sarvys if ned be." The custom in larger churches 
where the canonical hours were kept will be referred to 
hereafter. Towards the close of the sixteenth century care 
was sometimes taken when bells were recast to have them 
" in tune." An instance of this occurred at Loughborough, 
Leicestershire, in 1586, when the churchwardens paid four- 
teenpence "to John Wever for his tow dayes chardges 
when he went to Nottingham for them that came to prove 
the tune of ye bells :" and an earlier instance appears to 
be pointed to by the churchwardens of S. Mary-at-Hill, 
who, in the year 15 10, paid eightpence for " wyne and pers" 
consumed by four men and " the clarks of Seynt Anthonys " 

• Ludlow Cliurchviiardcns' Accounts published by Camden Society. 



20 Church Bells. 

who went to " see whey' Smythes bell wer Tewnabill or 
not." 

The decay of Gothic art, however, followed by the 
Reformation, introduced many changes in connection with 
bells, as it did with other "ornaments" of the church. 
The stately Gothic capital, and the quaint small " black 
letter," gradually gave place to clumsy Roman letters for 
the inscriptions. The beautiful initial cross, also, gradually 
disappeared. Figures of saint or angel were discarded. 
English, although it did not supplant Latin, gained a full 
share of use on the bells. Ancient Inscriptions were some- 
times erased, and the old forms were dropped, at first to 
give place to mottos of a reverent character, which soon, 
however, drifted, in many instances, into doggrel rhyme — 
stupid, frivolous, and thoroughly out of place, or into a 
bare list of names of vicar and churchwardens. Dates, in 
Arabic numerals, now appear on every bell ; and founders' 
names abound. Specimens of all these will be found on 
the Bells of this county hereinafter described. 

Sometimes eighteenth century bells bear the names of 
their donors, or commemorate some event of national 
interest, but bell inscriptions (with some praiseworthy 
exceptions) after the middle of the seventeenth century 
afford little interest. With the revival of Gothic art, and a 
clearer perception of the fitness of things, it is pleasant to 
note that our new church bells are frequently cast with in- 
scriptions and devices befitting their position and their use. 

Very little can be told about the large bells of the 
Religious Houses in Lincolnshire before their Dissolution : 



Church Bells. 



21 



a diligent search through the " Ministers^ Accounts,'^ 
'^ Suppression Papers,'' and other manuscripts in the PubHc 
Record Office has only yielded a very brief valuation of 
the lead and bells of nineteen Houses out of the large 
number formerly existing in the county. The following 
short entries are from the ' ' Comput. Johnis ff reman A rmigii 
Receptoris,'' dated 31st and 32nd Henry VHI. : — 

Bourn ; in plumbo cxxj" x*" in campanis xliij" xiij*" 

in tot' clxv" iij"". 
Valdye : in plumbo clxv" in campnis xxxvij" vij**' 

in toto ccij" vij"^'. 

[A bell from hence is traditionally believed to have gone 

to Edenham, and to have been recast into the tenor bell 

there.] 
NocTON : in plumbo Ixix" in campanis xxxiij" xv"' 

in tot' cij" xv**'. 
Swineshead: in plumbo ccxxxiiij" in campanis xxxix" iiij"^' 

ij stepynge leads and ij latten pannes xx'^' 

in tot' cclxxiiij" iij"^'. 

XX 

TuPHOLME : in plumbo iiij j" in campanis xxxij" xij''' vj'' 

in tot' cxiij" xij*^' vj"*. 
Grenefeld : in plumbo cxxix" in campanis vj" xviij"' 

in toto cxxxv" xviij'''. 
. . . bye: in plumbo cxxvij" x"" in campanis xxvj" vj''' vj'' 

in tot' cliij" xvj*^' vj"*. 
Hagnaby : in plumbo Ixxviij" in campanis xxxj" v'" vj" 

in toto cix" v"*' vj**. 
Louth Park: in plumbo clxiiij" in campanis xxxiiij" xiij' 

XX 

in tot' ciiij xviij" xiij"*'. 

[The MS. Chronicle of Louth Park has only the following 

references to the bells : — 



22 ChiircJi Bells. 

Mcclxxxix. Facta est magna campana de Parco Lude. 
Mcccvi. Facta est parva campana collocionis cim- 

bolum [?] 
Mcccx. Facta est nova celebrata in campan'.] 

Stainfield : in plumbo clxv'' in campanis xxij" xiij"*' vj" 

XX 

in toto ciiij vij'' xiij"' vj''. 
Wello : in plumbo clxv" in campanis xxxvij" xvj*" 

in tot' ccij" xvj'''. 
Humberstone: in plumbo xl" x'" in campanis xvj'' iiij'^' 

in tot' Ivj" xiiij'". 

c 
Newsome : in plumbo iiij xj'4n campanis xlj'' viij'" 

c 

in tot' iiij lij'' viij'''. 

XX 

Eltham : in plumbo iiij iiij'' in campanis vij^xvij"" vj"* 

XX 

in tot' iiij xj" xvij"" vj''. 
Thornholme : in plumbo clx" in campanis xxiij" iij'" vj** 

XX 

in tot' ciiij iij" iij''' vj". 
Gokewell : in plumbo Ixvij" x*" in campanis x" vj"" 

in toto Ixix" x"' vj" [?] 
Torksey: in plumbo xlviij'' in campanis xvij'' xv**' vj"* 

in tot' Ixv'' xv^' vj"*. 
Newboo: in plumbo cxlij" x*" in campanis xviij" vij"" 

in toto clxx" xvij*". 
Newsted juxta Stamford: in plumbo vij" x'" in campanis cviij 

in toto xij" xviij*^'.* 

The sale of the bells and lead was generally expressly 



Ministers' Accounts, 31, 32 Hen. VIII., No. 254, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells. 



23 



excepted from that of the supellex, or general furniture : 
such was the case in a document, dated 25th April, 1543, 
authorizing the sale of the supellex of the Prior and Convent 
of Spalding:* the value of the bells there is not now forth- 
coming. 

In the second year of Edward the Sixth's reign a Com- 
mission was issued to enquire into the quantity and value 
of church furniture and ornaments throughout England, and 
to forbid their sale or misappropriation. The following is 
a copy of the Certificate under that Commission for the 
greater portion of Lincolnshire. It is dated the loth of 
April, 1549, and addressed to the Lords of the Privy 
Council : — 

The certificat of p'ate Jewells Belles &c. in Lyincolshire 
X""° Ap'lis 1549. 

Plesyth yt yower grace wyth the Reste of the Kynges maiestye 
most horable councell to be aduertyssed that accordyng to yower 
letteres to vs addressyd wee haue taken parfyte and trewe Invytores 
of all chalyces Jewelles playtes and belles wythin evyre churche 
and chappell in the countye of lyncoln, excepte the wappentak of 
kirkton in hoUand wyche was allottyd to Thomas hollande Blayse 
holland and John Bolles esquyers of whose pcedyngs hytherto wee 
haue not harde. The nombre of wyche chalyces arre vj'lxxxviijth 
Crosses viij pyxes xxvij paxes v Crewettes ij Crysmatores viij 
Sensers vj Kandylstyckes ij Baysens j one bolle and a d5'she of 
Sylver. Create Belles mVij^liij Sanctus belles iiij^lxxv after the 
computacyon of v*" to the hundrethe as yt doythe appere more 
playnely and p'tyculerly in the sayd sevyrall Invytories delyverd to 

* Quoted in Nichols' Account of the Spalding Gentlemen's Soc. (17S4), p. 17. 



24 Church Bells. 

the sevyrall custos Rotulor' wythin the sayde countye therto be 
Safely kepte to the kynges maiestye plesure and yoweres be therein 
further knowne and lykewyse delyverd to the wardens parson or 
curate of evyre paryshe churche the counterpayre of the sayde 
Sevyrall Invytores wyth lyke charge as was conteynyde in yower 
sayde letteres thus comyttynge yower grace wyth the Reste of the 
Kynges maiestye most honorable councell to the tuyscyon (?) of 
the ever lyvyng god, wrytten at lyncoln the x' day of apryll 1549. 

Md that over and besydes this ower sytyfycate the' is delyveryd 
in to the handes of Rychard goodryk esquyer of london Seven 
hundrethe and fyve vncys of playte of churche goodes of lowthe 
in the sayd countye of lyncoln to the Intent to purchasse certayne 
landes to be Imployed for the Rylyfe of the pore people and other 
necessaries as more playnely apperythe in the Invytorye of the 
same towne lefte in the custody of the custos Rotulor' 

Thomas hennege John hennege 

ffrances ayscoughe Rychard Desney 

John copledyke Richard Ogle 

Rychard bollyes • Willfn Thorold 

John Tourny Richard paynell 
George Sayntpoll 

Willm Aramely [ ? ] 

[Endorsed:] To the right honorable the lorde Protector hys grace and 
other lordes of the kinge Mat'" most honorable pryvey counsale.* 

This Commission failing to complete its object ; about 
four years afterwards — in 1552 — another was issued which 
carried out its purpose more effectually. Under this 
Commission enquiry was made, upon oath, as to any loss 
which had accrued, by the removal or misappropriation of 

• Exch. Q. R., A P. R. Office. 



Church Bells. 25 

church goods, to the different churches, since the Inventories 
of 1549 were made. A new appraised Hst was drawn up, 
and the goods therein mentioned were committed to the 
safe keeping of the Churchwardens and Curate of the 
parish. A few of these Inventories, dated igth August, 
6 Edward VI., for parishes in the Deaneries of Hill, Nos. 
I and 2, in this county, are preserved amongst the Land 
Revenue Records in the Public Record Office, and will be 
quoted from hereafter when the bells in those parishes are 
described. At the bottom of each Inventory is a statement 
like the following, which is from the Inventory for Ashby 
Puerorum : — 

The seid Edmudde Thewe & Wittm Thewe churche Wardens & 
p'sent's sayes vppon ther othes that ther is nothyng dym5mysshed 
sence the last Inventory that was made & taken by the Justices & 
the bysshope. 

M"* that all the churche goodes is comytted to the sayfe keipyng 
of the seid p'sent's savyng one challice one Vestement one 
coope one surplysse w'^'' is comytted to the Curate for s'vyng of 
the churche. 

ffrancs ayscough 
Edward Dymok 
Wyttm Monson. 

Again, in January 1553, a third Commission was issued, 
under which the Commissioners had power and authority 
to '' collect and bring together all and singuler redye money 
plate and Juelles certyfyed by our Commyssioners aforesaid 
[i.e. under the previous Commission] to remayne in any 
church, chapell, Guild, Brothered, Fraternitye or company 



26 Church Bells. 

in any shire Countye or place within this our Realme of 
Englond." This Commission, which is a long one, directed 
one or two chalices to be left out of the confiscated plate 
for use in every cathedral or collegiate church, and one 
chalice for every small parish church or chapel where 
chalices were remaining. It next provided for the sale or 
distribution of the other "ornaments and ymplements" of 
the churches, and with regard to the bells directed : — 

And also to sell or cause to be sold to our use by weight all parcells 
or peces of metall except the metall of greatt bell, saunse bells, in 
every of the said churches or chapells.* 

This order as to the bells has generally been understood to 
direct the sale of all the large bells with the exception of 
the largest, or tenor, in each ring. What was meant, I 
think, was not the confiscation of all excepting one bell, but 
that all broken bells — "peces of metall" — and bells, other 
than the parish church bells proper, were to be sold, and 
the proceeds remitted to the king's exchequer : this view is 
borne out by the fact, abundantly proved, that the church 
bells were not sold, and also by the express injunction 
charged later in this same Commission upon all Deans, 
Provosts, Churchwardens, Ministers, and parishioners of 
the said churches and chapels : — 

That they and everye of them do safely kepe unspoiled, unembesiled 
and unsold all suche bells as do remayne in everye of the said 
Churches and chapells and the same to conserve untill our pleasur 
be therein further knowne. 

* Seventh Report of the Deputy-Keeper of the Public Records, p. 312. 



CJiurch Bells. 27 

When the clean sweep intended under this Commission 
was effected, an Indented Inventory of the few goods left 
behind in each parish was drawn up, and a duplicate copy 
left with the Vicar and Churchwardens. Some of these 
Indented Inventories relating to Lincolnshire are still extant 
in the Public Record Office, and will be quoted hereafter ; 
they relate to parishes chiefly in the Deaneries of Boling- 
broke. Isle of Axholme, Corringham, Gartree, Grimsby Nos. 
I and 2, Horncastle, Manlake, and Walshcroft. A copy of 
one of them will explain all the others : the one selected 
related to the Church of S. Botolph, Boston, a church 
formerly very rich in plate, jewels and vestments : — 

This Indenture made the xxvj day of may in the seventh yere of the 
reigne of our sou'aign lord kyng Edward the sixt by the grace of 
god of England Fraunce & Irelond Kynge defendur of the Faith 
& in erth of the Church of England & also of Ireland the sup'me 
head Between Robt. Cobbes maior of the Borough of Boston in 
the Countie of Lincoln George Saintpoll Thomas Browne and 
Richard Ogle Esquiers & John Tuxholme marchunt Comission' 
assigned by the Kynges highnes Comission ffor thorder & sale of 
the church goodes w''4n the seid Borough on thone ptie and Marten 
Bradley of Boston Marchant of the staple at Calice Wittm 
Wesenghin of Boston aforesaid Botcher & Xrofer Nesse of the 
same Cordyn'wanow Wardens of the seid churche of Boston of 
thother ptie Wittenesith that the seid Comissioners by vertue of 
the seid Comission have assigned & delyv'ed the day & yere of this 
psent to the seid churche warde3'ns one chalice sylver gilte w**" a 
paten Weying xxiiij ounces for the furniture of y" comunion ther 
& fyve great belles in the steple ther w*'' one sanctus bell valew to 
the some of one hundredth marks savely & surely by them to be 
kept to the kinges ma"'' use untill his highnes pleasure be further 



28 Church Bells. 

knowen in that behalf whiche chalice & belles the seid church 
wardeyns cuvenat for them ther executors & administrators by 
these ^sentes savely to kepe the same to the use aforeseid in 
wyttenes whereof to these ^sentes & Indentures to thone f)te of 
thes psentes remeynyng w*'' the seid churche wardeyns the seid 
comissioners have sett ther seales and to thother pte of the same 
remayning w"" the seid Comissioners the seid churche wardeyns 
have sett ther seales the day & yer above seid 

By me Marten Bradley 

f) me Wiftm Wesham 

X X 

Xrtfer Nesse.* 

That the quantity of bell-metal that came into the hands 
of the king was very large there can be no doubt ; and that 
much of it was purchased for sale abroad is shown by a 
memorial, still preserved, addressed to the King's Council 
by Thomas Egerton. In it he desires to have from the 
king " all the bell metall that his Highenesse nowe hathe 
in the realme at the price of xx^ everie hunderith waighte" 
to be delivered at some port or ports in readiness to be 
shipped, together with passport, and the king's licence, and 
the same to be dealt with at the convenience and pleasure 
of the petitioner. He further asks for six years for payment 
after the receipt of the last, or else to be bound for pay- 
ment after the receipt of any part for its value and no more ; 
and so on, from time to time. As an alternative he offers 
to pay a third within three years after receipt, and after 
another three years another third part, and the remaining 

Exch. Q. R. -iy Ch. Goods, Lines., P. R. Off. 



Church Bells. 29 

third after other three years, or else the whole at six years' 
end as beforesaid. He further agrees to be bound within, 
or at the end of the six years, to bring into his majesty's 
mint as much fine gold and silver from beyond the seas, to 
be coined after the standard, as amount to the value of the 
bell metal received. He provides for reduction if the 
standard of money be hereafter lowered ; and finally he 
thinks that no person can offer more without being a loser.* 
Upon the death of Edward VI. the sale and the removal 
of bell-metal in Lincolnshire were not completed. A docu- 
ment, dated in the second year of Queen Mary, throws 
some light upon the subject. It is an indenture, made on 
the 26th of July, 1554, between John Bellowe of Newstede, 
in the County of Lincoln, Esquire, one of the Queen's 
Surveyors, of the one part, and Henry Hoblethorne of 
London, Knight, and John Whyte of London, Grocer, 
of the other part. It witnesses that the said "Harrye" 
Hoblethorne and John Whyte have received at the delivery 
of the said John Bellowe by force of a warrant, dated the 
25th of April, in the first year of Queen Mary [1554], from 
Sir William Pollett [Paulet], K.G., Marquis of Winchester 
and Lord Treasurer of England, and "Davye" Brocke, 
Knight, Lord Chief Baron of the Queen's Exchequer, the 
number of seventeen thousand one hundred and twenty-one 
pounds of bell-metal remaining at the town of Kingston- 



* Land Revenue Records. Church Goods Grace's support of his petition to the 

W P- R- Off- There is also a Memorial Council : also articles " towching the re- 

from the same Thomas Egerton to the quest of Thomas Egerton." 
Duke of Northumberland, desiring his 



30 Church Bells, 

upon-Hull, "in the wayehouse there," and also " xxxj m^ 
nyne hondrethe therequerters & one & twentye poundes of 
bell mettalle which Remayned at Grett Grymsbye in the 
County of Lyncolne:" all which in the whole amount to 
forty-nine thousand one hundred and fourteen pounds (sic). 
The charges for weighing and otherwise defrayed by the 
said Sir Henry Hoblethorne and John Whyte amounts to 
£j. 6s. 8d., as appears by a bill of parcels annexed to this 
Indenture. 

This document is a copy of the original Indenture signed 
by"Jn'' bellowe," as appears from this memorandum at 
the bottom : — 

Mr. Bellowe, I have sent yow here the copye of the Indentuer 
verbatum {sic) & is wrytten with my owne hande the xij day of 
Febrery In 1555 

Y- Jn°. Whyt Aid.* 

Though not now annexed there is extant a copy of the 
" Bill of Parcels," so far as relates to the "xxxj""' ix'' iijqrt 
xxi lib. w* " of bell-metal which remained at Great Grimsby. 
The metal — some of which appears to have been stowed in 
barrels — consisted of sixty-one lots, the weight of each lot 
being given. Unfortunately no clue is afforded as to the 
parishes from which the metal came. The document is 
endorsed "Lincolnshire: for all the belles there delyvered 



Endorsed '• Belloo for Bells in Coin Lincolne." Land Revenue Records. Church Goods 

■*!' P. R. Off. 



Church Bells. 31 

to Mr. White alderman; " and it also has this memorandum 
at the bottom : — 

Mr. bellow : y'^ is y^ Coppye of y^ ptyculor wayght of W" townerows 
boke of y" bells Red & wayed onlye At grymsby &c. 
Yo" Jn" Whyt.* 

It appears from these documents that John Bellow was 
the Queen's Surveyor, whose duty it was to see to the 
weight of the metal handed over to the purchasers, who, in 
the case of the Lincolnshire contribution, were Henry 
Hoblethorn of London, knight, and John Whyte of London, 
grocer, who was also an alderman of the city ; the former 
was, probably, a surety for the fulfilment of the contract 
by the latter — the real purchaser — for I find another docu- 
ment in which under the head of " Com Licoln " is : — 

Bellys 
ml a 

The Bellys of the] xxxj ix* iij qrt &] to be answeryd by M' Whyte 

hole circuyte i xxj" weyght J of London the yonger Aldermanf 

This also shows that only the metal mentioned in the 
Indenture just abstracted as then remaining at Great 
Grimsby was from Lincolnshire ; the other portion then 
remaining at Kingston-upon-Hull being probably collected 
from parishes in Yorkshire. 

That the bells were collected at different places in the 
county, and afterwards sent to Grimsby as the general 



* Land, Revenue Records. Church Goods W P- ^- Off- t Land Revenue Records. 
Church Goods *V P. R. Off. 



32 Church Bells. 

depot, is shown from a very fragmentary memorandum 
preserved amongst the Cottonian Manuscripts in the 
British Museum,* which, as illustrating our subject, is worth 
transcribing: : — 



Bell mettall deliu'd p W"" Townerowe 

Henry Hoblethorne knight & John White M'chaunt . . . 
the XX day of July a° rr Marie secundo. 

m c ■_ 

First at Thornton xvj belles wayinge xiij iij di di qt' . . . 

_ c __ 

viij belles wayed ix'= v" , one oy' wayed viij di one other . . 

_ __ m c , _ m c 

vj'= di vij" one other iij j di xxiij" one other ij iij di 

one other wayed viij" iij qt' vij" one other x" iij qt' xxij" 

one other xvij" j qt' one oth' xvij" j qt' ix" 

Itm at Boston ix belles waying vj" iij qt' v''wherof 

one wayed j° xvij^'one other j" xxj" one oth' iij qt' xxvj'' 

one other j'' j qt' ix" one oth' xviij" one oth' xxix" one 

other j" di xxvj" 

Itm at Lowth vj belles waying v" j" wherof one 

wayed j" vj" one other j'= xxv'' one other j" xvij" one 

other j'= j qt' iiij" one other iij" one other j qt' ij" 

Two years later the sound of the stolen bells is still in 
the air. On the 14th of May 1556, Robert Goche, Esq., 
Receiver of the County of Lincoln, wrote from his house at 
Chillwell to Mr. Earners, Mr. Mildmay and Mr. Wiseman, 
the Commissioners for Lead and Bells. The letter begins 
with a reference to the " newe weight and the olde of such 
leadd as was waied by warrinte from my L. North at 
Grymesbie," and mentions a book, then missing, which 

* Tiberius, E., 3, p. 67. 



Church Bells. 33 

ought to be produced by John Barton ; after which a com- 
plaint is made against Mr. Bellow, the Surveyor (to whom 
reference has been already made) in these words : — 

For thaccompte of the belles I lefte with you therof the viewe the 
more playnes therof Barton canne enforme you declaringe vnto 
me that Mr. Bellowe hath takin awaie more belles then didd appeare 
in his accompte when I was there consideringe there were many 
smalle belles brokin in peces w"*" Mr. Bellowe hadd awaie as well as 
the hoole belles so that the hoole some of belles wille falle out by 
weight w'" cannot appeare in nombre by reason of the brokin 
belles 

A not very clear statement of a supposed wrong ! 

Notwithstanding the Commissions issued in the reign of 
Edward VI., and the measures taken to prevent it, the 
occasional robbery of churches still went on. Queen 
Elizabeth, soon after her accession, tried to stop the 
mischief by issuing a Proclamation, in which it was said : — 

That some patrons of churches and others who were possessed of 
impropriations, had prevailed with the parson & parishioners to 
take or throw down the bells of churches or chapels & the lead of 
the same, & to convert the same to their private gain, by which 
ensued not only the spoil of the said churches but even a slanderous 
desolation of the houses of prayer. 

Therefore it was commanded : — 

That no manner of person should from thenceforth take away any 
bells or lead off any church or chapel under pain of imprisonment 
during Her Majesty's pleasure, & such further fine for the contempt 
as shall be thought meet.* 

* Quoted in Heylyns Hist, of Reformation, n. p. 339. 



34 CJiurch Bells. 

It will be seen by the Certificate of Plate, Jewels, Bells, 
&€., in Lincolnshire, dated the loth of April, 1549, already 
quoted [see p. 23], that there were then in the churches 
and chapels of the county, exclusive of the Wapentake of 
Kirton, in Holland, 1753 great bells and 475 Sanctus bells : 
if we add to that number the moderate addition of 47 of 
the former and 10 of the latter for that Wapentake, we find 
in the parish churches and chapels of Lincolnshire at the 
time of the Reformation 1800 great bells and 485 Sanctus 
bells. 

Notwithstanding the increase made since in many rings 
for the purpose of change-ringing there are now only about 
100 more large bells than there were three hundred and 
thirty years ago ; and — as might be expected — the Priests' 
bells, which are the present successors of the Sanctus bells, 
have very much decreased in number, there being now about 
70 only against 485 at the date to which we have referred. 
A reference to existing Inventories of Church Goods in the 
Lincolnshire churches in the time of Edward VI. shows 
that (with only one exception) no church, however small, 
had then less than two "great bells," whereas there are 
now about two hundred old parish churches in the county 
with only one bell, and that, in many cases, a miserable 
ting-tang* — and as in other counties so in this, compara- 
tively few ancient bells are left. At what time, and for 



* Things might have been even worse if Charing in the Dell lies in a hole 

the old Kentish proverb formerly current It has but one bell, and that it stole. 

at Charing, near Ashford, be true : — Charing has now a good ring of six bells. 



Church Bells. 



35 



, what purpose those ancient bells were sacrificed, are 
questions which naturally suggest themselves. 

By the Indented Inventories of the seventh year of King 
Edward the Sixth the church bells therein named were 
given into the charge of the parson and churchwardens for 
use in the churches respectively named. We must therefore 
look to those church officers, and to the action of the 
parishioners generally for some intimation as to the way in 
which they discharged their trust. No doubt during the 
changes and uncertainties in church teaching and ritual in 
the reigns of Edward VI. and Queen Mary some church 
bells were sacrificed by foolish people like the parishioners 
of Skidbrooke in this county, who being, as they subse- 
quently confessed, " moved by universal talk, and by 
persons openly preaching against bells and other laudable 
ceremonies of the church, affirming the use of them to be 
superstitious and abominable," sold two of their bells for /^20, 
which sum they expended upon repairing the church, and 
scouring out the haven then choked up with sand. Possibly 
also a few were seized by private persons, and sold for their 
own benefit ; but it was, I think, the parsimony or poverty 
of churchmen in after years — in the seventeenth, eighteenth, 
and even in the present century, that induced the sale of 
so many bells from the smaller village churches in this 
county. 

Many examples might be quoted : it will suffice to say 
that Beelsby, where was a fine ring of bells early in this 
century, has now only one small bell ; two bells at Cadney 
were sold in the last century to pay for repairs at the 



36 CJiurch Bells. 

church ; the same thing happened at Fosdyke, where one 
bell represents an older ring of five ; Fulletby, Howell, 
South Reston, Skegness, Strubby, Sturton Magna, Low 
Toynton and other churches all lost bells under similar 
circumstances : Thimbleby lost a ring of six bells to pay 
for exchanging an ancient gothic church for a so-called 
classic and unsightly structure ; and, lastly, we must 
mention the needless sacrifice of the ring of the six Lady 
bells formerly in the grand central tower of the Cathedral 
church of Lincoln. Some Lincolnshire bells were damaged 
by the fall of church towers, never recast, and so lost : 
Conisholme, Fulstow, Lusby, and possibly other parishes, 
lost their rings of bells in that way. 

At a moderate computation a number of bells approach- 
ing four hundred — irrespective of the Sanctus or Priests' 
Bells — must have been lost to the Lincolnshire Churches 
since the death of Edward the Sixth. 

Two other causes operated to lessen, if not the number 
of bells, certainly the number of ancient ones, and to 
necessitate the substitution of modern ones in their places. 
Ordinary and (in some, not all, cases) unavoidable wear and 
tear is the cause of the gradual loss of a goodly number of 
our ancient bells. When we remember the nature of the 
metal of which bells are made — how easily it may be 
cracked, and how reckless and ignorant, as a body, have 
been the ringers, into whose charge the bells have frequently 
been entirely left, we can well believe that many of our 
ancient bells have from time to time succumbed to their 
almost inevitable fate. They were cracked, and so obliged 



CJiiirch Bells. yj 

to be recast to fit them again for their work. In this way, 
undoubtedly, many of them disappeared, to be replaced by 
more modern ones. 

The introduction, however, of change ringing in the 
seventeenth century produced a still greater havoc amonfy 
our ancient church bells. Early in that century ringing 
increased in popularity. The churchwardens of Lough- 
borough, Leicestershire, charge in 1616: — 

" It. spent in giveing entertainment to the gentlemen 

strangers when they came to ringe ... ... xjs."* 

Fabian Stedman, a printer, resident in Cambridge, is said 
to have reduced change ringing to an art.f He published 
his ^^Tintinnalogia'' in 1668. Previously to the seventeenth 
century the ringing in use, where anything of the kind was 
attempted, was " rounds " or — as a slight advance upon 
that — at most "call changes," that is, the bells were rung 
"in one particular position for a great many pulls consecu- 
tively, and changed at some accustomed signal to a variation 
called by a fugleman or chalked on the belfry wall. "J These 
must, in most cases, have been sorry performances, the bells 
not being " tunable " and so unfit for the purpose. " With 
change ringing proper the case" — to quote Mr. Ellacombe — 
"is very different: here a change is made at each stroke; 
the bells being never sounded twice in the same order ; and 



* Thirty years before this date we are Regis. See Mackerell's History of Lynn 
told that "certain Lusty young Fellows i?^^;s (1738), p. 229. 

began to set up Ringing again " at Lynn f Church Dells of Cambridgeshire, p. 37. 

I Bells of the Church, p. 32. 



38 Church Bells. 

this is continued till the end of the peal, when the bells are 
brought ^ home' to their regular places. This end is only to 
be attained by each bell being made to follow a certain 
course, and to change places with the other bells by the 
evolution of certain rules or ^methods.'' To manage his bell 
properly in this respect, and guide it up and down the maze, 
making it strike now before, and now after, this or that other 
bell, not only requires much practice and study, but a cool 
head and close attention ; and this necessity justifies the 
remark that ringing requires a mental as well as a bodily 
effort."* 

To meet this new art of ringing, important changes in 
the bells were necessitated. The old rings consisted, 
usually, of few bells and heavy ones, dignity and grandeur 
of tone being then the chief thing sought. To ring the 
"changes," introduced by Stedman and his disciples, a 
larger number of bells was required. This want could be 
met in two ways, either by adding new trebles to the 
existing heavy rings, which was the best, but the most 
expensive way, or by recasting, say, four heavy bells into 
six or eight light ones, and so increasing the number without 
buying more metal. This was the least expensive, and, 
therefore the most popular plan. By this means a great 
number of our ancient bells disappeared from the larger 
town churches. It ceases, therefore, to be a matter of 
surprise that it is chiefly in small rural churches, with few 
bells, where the temptation to change-ringing could not 

» Bells of the Chitreh, p. 33. 



Church Bells. 39 

exist, that we chiefly expect, and usually find, ancient bells. 

The English have been for many generations enthusiastic 
admirers of the melody produced by a ring of bells. Whilst 
other nations — the Russians and Chinese for example- 
possess far heavier bells, and make much more noise by a 
rude irregular clanging, we have long been accomplished 
ringers, and our joyous peals — our "rounds " and number- 
less " changes " have in no slight degree added to the 
cheerful temperament of " merrie England." Indeed so 
popular did the art of ringing become after the invention 
of " changes " that England became known as the " ringing 
Island." 

Ringing does not appear, however, to have been in all 
cases acceptable, for when the bells of S. Stephen's Chapel 
at Westminster were rung "men fabuled," says Stow, "that 
their ringing soured all the drink in the town." 

Lincolnshire was not behind in this national taste. "This 
shire" says Fuller "carryes away the Bell for round-ringing 
from all in England, though other places surpasse it for 
changes, more pleasant from the variety thereof; seeing it 
may be demonstrated that twelve Bells will afford more 
changes than there have been hours since the creation."* 

Peal-boards, however, in many of the ringing chambers 
testify that change-ringing was not neglected in Lincoln- 
shire, and in the Cathedral itself we find a company of 
Ringers of our Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln at the 
commencement of the seventeenth century. 



» Worthies, fo. ed. Lincolnshire, p. 152. 



40 Church Bells. 

The love of bells is still universal in this country. We 
need not be surprised at this for "these patriarchs in their 
tower hold constant converse with man, but they are not of 
him ; they call him to his duties, they vibrate to his woes 
and joys, his perils and victories, but they are at once 
sympathetic and passionless ; chiming at his will, but 
hanging far above him, ringing out the old generation, and 
ringing in the new, with a mechanical almost oppressive 
regularity, and an iron constancy which often makes them, 
and their grey towers, the most revered and ancient things 
in a large city."* In past ages the bells were supposed to 
be able to reciprocate this affection, and to ring of their 
own accord upon special occasions : as when Becket was 
murdered the bells of Canterbury rung without being 
touched : and as when Grostete the great bishop of Lincoln 
died in 1254, music, it was said, was heard in the air, and 
the bells of distant churches tolled of their own accord, so 
when Hugh, the boy-martyr of Lincoln was buried, it was 
said that 

A' the bells o' merrie Lincoln 

Without men's hands were rung ; 
And a' the books o' merrie Lincoln 

Were read without men's tongue ; 
And ne'er was such a burial 

Sin' Adam's days begun. 

* Haweis : Music and Morals, p. 421. 



THE CHURCH 
BELLS OF LINCOLNSHIRE, 



THERE are now in Lincolnshire 2034 Church Bells. 
That number includes 72 Priests' and other small 
ones. The 1962 large bells, hanging in no less than 683'; 
churches, are thus distributed : — ( Ih'J^^*^^-*^ f-^*^ rj. •"•i 1 

" Great Tom " and the four Quarter-bells at 

Lincoln 5 

I Ring of 10 bells 10 

18 Rings of 8 bells 144 

46 Rings of 6 bells 276 

68 Rings of 5 bells 340 

48 Rings of 4 bells 192 

203 Rings of 3 bells 609 

51 Rings of 2 bells 102 

Single bells 248 

Carillon bells at Boston 36 



1962 



42 The Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 

To the 2034 Church Bells must be added, as worthy of 
notice, the bell at Wainfleet School, and the curious and 
ancient one hanging at the Town Hall, Lincoln, making a 
total of 2036 bells to describe. 

Of these 2036 bells the fair proportion of 353, or about 
17I- per cent., may be said to have been cast before the year 
1600. This is a larger proportion of ancient bells than is 
found either in Leicestershire or Northamptonshire ; the 
former county having only about 14I per cent., and the 
latter about 10^ per cent., of such bells remaining. 

There are complete rings of ancient bells still hanging 
at thirty churches in this county : namely rings of four bells 
at Branston, and Hacconby; of three bells at Barnetby-le- 
Wold, Boothby Graffore, Bratoft, South Elkington, Holton- 
le-Clay, Horkstow, Immingham, Kirkby-cum-Osgodby, 
Lavington, Limber Magna, Manby, Ruskington, Saus- 
thorpe, Scampton, Somerby near Brigg, South Somercotes, 
Tallington, Theddlethorpe S. Helen, Waith, and North 
Witham ; and rings of two bells at West Allington, 
Canwick, Dunsby, Harpswell, Maltby-le-Marsh, Rowston, 
Saltfleetby S. Peter, and at Toynton S. Peter. About a 
score of the Churches now only possessing single bells have 
preserved ancient ones. 

The Dedications and Legends of the 353 ancient bells 
may be thus classified : — 

One (Linwood 2nd) is inscribed with what is meant 
for 



The Church Bells of Lincolnshire . 43 

Five are dedicated in the Holy Name of Jesus thus : — 
J.'M^M'WS (Hacconby 4th). 
'M'WX'W^ XMW ^i^% (Honington 2nd), 
i^t na^amtiis (Walesby ist) 

(Burwell 2nd). 

mi^^M (Immingham 3rd.) 

Thirteen in that of the Blessed Trinity : namely one 
(Swinstead 4th) inscribed : — 

one (Barnetby-le-Wold 3rd) : — 

another (Kirkby-cum-Osgodby 3rd) : — 

another, a double dedication (Killingholme 4th) : — 

and nine (Burgh 5th, Hammeringham 2nd, Haxey 6th, 
Kirkby East 2nd, Lincoln S. Mark's single, Maltby-le- 
Marsh ist, Ruskington 3rd, Somerby 3rd, and Little 
Steeping 3rd). 



44 The Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 

Seventy-two of these ancient bells are dedicated to, 
bear inscriptions relating to, or addressed to, the Blessed 
Virgin Mary in these forms : — 

I. rni 

2. XHaria 

6. %.-M>M._ X^Elaria 

1. jj^fatbs^t X3^ana 

2. jEit ^yh.a\t %'MM. XiEl;tn:x 

I. "yiTotor X^Elaria 

1. Tlin amore ^ca Xllana 
9. „^6e Xllana 

10. J^bt X^Elaria gratia plena 

2. ,^b£ [XHaria] gratia pkita ^IDominus t«um 

1. ^,tt£ antilla ^XDomini 

2. X^^'i''^ mater gratie 

1. X^Elaria X^^to ^J^zx est nomtit meum 

2. ^Bitt tampana pie rausa sit fatta X^Elarie 

3. ^Bict pro laabe pie resonat tampana X^Elarie 
I. X3Q,aria "^irgo assumpta est in tclum 

I. \L irgo eoionata but nos ab rcgna beata 

I. ^nra pubiea pia miseris miserere Xllaria 

8. ^ta X^aria era pro nobis 

I. .CElarg of ^afoarbbg of bs Ijabe mertg 

7. j©um rcisa pulsata munbi X^Elana bocata 
!• !I?ios tb prole pia bnbitat " \/ irgo X3Q.aria 

I. (Theddiethorpe S. Helen's ist) is unintelligible. 

72 

Nineteen bells are dedicated to the Archangel Gabriel, 

and six to the Archangel Michael, one is dedicated to 



The Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 45 

S. Anne the mother of the B. V. Mary, five to S. Andrew, 
one to S. Anthony, three to S. Augustine, one to S. Barbara, 
one to S. Benedict, two to S. Botolph, one to S. Clement, 
one to S. Cuthbert, one to S. Denis, two to S. Edmund, 
four to S. George, three to the Holy Innocents, three to 
S. James, fifteen to S. John (one being specially designated 
the Evangelist and two the Baptist), twelve to S. Katharine 
(a popular dedication), one to S. Laurence, one to S. 
Leonard, one to S. Luke, one to S. Mark, five to S. 
Margaret, four to S. Martin (on one of which the bell 
is described as " Sci Martini Epi"), three to S. Mary 
Magdalene (on two of which she is styled simply 
"Magdalene"), one to S. Matthew, four to S. Nicolas, 
one to S. Paul, fourteen to S. Peter, (one of which, the 2nd 
bell at Claxby S. Mary, has an unusual form of inscription), 
one to S. Thomas, one to S. Wilfrid, and three to All 
Saints, not including two bells— Canwick ist, and Killing- 
holme 4th — which have double dedications. 

Eleven ancient bells in Lincolnshire are inscribed : — 

M'li J?iomcn ^omiui ^tueirlctum 

and eight bear : — 

©"tlorum ^\t plateat libi xt^ sonus iste 

Two (Corby 4th and South Willingham 2nd, the latter not 
quite complete) have the text : — 

3Eu no£ ilju ^^ amz gettu flectat' alcsim tcrslriu i infrovu 



46 Tlie Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 

and two others (Fleet 5th and Irby-on-the-Humber 2nd) 
have the prayer : — 

The third bell at Thornton Curtis bears the beautiful and, 
I believe, unique inscription : — 

and the single bell at Bracebridge quotes the last verse in 
the Psalter : — 

Many of these 353 ancient bells bear English inscriptions : 
three have been already referred to, namely Alkborough 
2nd : — 

m.^ ^M-Mm miM-M.^ m^p^^m 

Laceby ist : — 

and Semperingham ist: — 



Tlie Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 47 

No less than twenty others are inscribed : — 

all of which (excepting East Barkwith ist and Lavington 
3rd) are dated. 

The 4th at Moulton has : — ■ 

The 2nd at Newton, near Folkingham, says : — 
On the single bell at Northope is the aspiration : — 

On three bells, all dated, is the loyal prayer : — 

On five, also all dated : — 

and on two (Lincoln Cathedral tenor, and Ruskington ist) 
we have the prayers for Church and Queen combined : — 

On two other of these old bells, both dated, we are exhorted 
to 



48 The Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 

and on another (Hacconby ist) to 

On the 2nd bell at North Witham we have the encouraging 
aphorism : — 

:^ci>^:^ -^Mi^:^ -mmtwi^. ^w^[^M^::^ 

on the tenor at Winteringham (the bell with the previous 
portion of the motto is now lost) : — 

and the tenor at Silk Willoughby (apparently a late 
sixteenth century bell) calls upon all to 

On a large number (eighteen) of these ancient bells still 
remaining in Lincolnshire there is no inscription beyond the 
letter ;© repeated several times (probably for Sanchis) with 
an intervening cross. 

On other eighteen bells there are founders' stamps only. 

On nine there are portions of the alphabet. 

On two (Grasby ist and Saltfleetby S. Clement 2nd) 
appear the donors' names only. Donors' names appear on 
other bells, but not alone. 

Upon six bells the date only (or the date and initials 
only) is given. 



The Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



49 



Upon four interesting bells the founders' names form the 
inscriptions. 

On three others (South Ormsby 3rd, Pilham single, and 
Saxilby 3rd) are initials only. 

And on other three (Stamford S. John Baptist ist and 
4th and Little Steeping ist) appear the names of Parson, 
Churchwardens, or Benefactors. 

Of the remaining ten ancient bells three (West Allington 
1st, and the Priests' bells at Tallington and North Witham) 
are devoid of inscription or stamp of any kind : five 
(Bitchfield 2nd, South Ormsby 5th, Rowston ist, Sedgebrook 
3rd, and Syston 3rd) have imperfect inscriptions, and one 
is the highly curious bell hanging at the Town Hall, 
Lincoln. 

The earliest dated bells in Lincolnshire are the fine pair 
at South Somercotes, cast in 1423. 




H 



THE LINCOLNSHIRE 
BELLFOUNDERS. 



THE earliest casting of bells in Lincolnshire at present 
known to us occurred at 



BOSTON 

late in the eleventh century. After the great fire at 
Croyland Abbey in the year logi we read of 

Fergus the Coppersmith of Botolph's Town present- 
ing two small bells to that Abbey, which the monks placed 
within a. ''humble belfry" which they had erected as a 
substitute for the tower which had fallen down.* There is 
no evidence to show that Fergus cast large bells. 

Four hundred years later we find two other founders at 
Boston. 

John Red and Leonard Pynchbeck, about whom I know 
nothing beyond their names as given in the Accounts of 
the Churchwardens of Leverton in this county thus : — 

* Ingulgph's Cliron. Bohn's Ed. p. 208. 



The Lincolnshire Bellfounders. 51 

1503. Itm payd to John Red bellgedar of boston for 

schotyng of a bell iij//. vj5. viiji. 

1506. Itm payd to lenard pynchbec of boston in 
payrt payment for hour belle gyddynge 
[yetting i.e. casting] vij7z. ix5. 

There is neither documentary notice nor tradition to 
guide us to the site of any bellfoundry in Boston.* We 
know indeed that as early as 1489, f and until quite recently, 
there was a Lane called Bell Lane, but it was, as a friend 
writes to me, " such a mere angiportus through a little mass 
of houses under the Stump that I think if you saw the spot 
you would feel that the name originated in some tavern 
rather than in a foundry." 



STAMFORD. 

The first Stamford bell-founder at present known is 

Tobias (or Tobie) Norris, who took up his freedom 
on the 4th of June, 1607. ^^ was one of the '' Capital 
Constables" in that year, and again in 162 1-2, and warden 



* Although a diligent search extending the goodes of the Crafte of ffounders of 

over several days has been made in the London at Cristmas in the yere of our 

Will Office, Somerset House, and in the Lord 1497" is " Item a grete maser har- 

District Probate Registry at Lincoln, nessed with Silver gilte of the gifte of 

neither the wills of these two founders, John Pynchbeck." Annals of Founders' 

nor those of Wilkinson of Lincoln, George Company, p. 44. 
Lee or Richard Sanders can be found. It f Thompson's Boston, p. 129. 

may be noted that in an " Inventory of 



52 



The Lincolnshire Bellfounders. 



of S. George's church in 1613-14. His name also occurs 
in connection with charities belonging to S. George's parish 
in 1609. He died on the 2nd of November 1626, and was 
buried in the north aisle of S. George's Church, Stamford, 
where a small brass thus records the fact : — 

HERE LIETH THE BO 
DY OF TOBIE I^ORRIS 
BELFOVM : WHO DEC 
EA : THE Z OF ^O 1626 

and the Register of the parish says : — 

1626 Tobye Norris Bell-founder was buryed the 
iiij daye of November 

His earliest bell in Lincolnshire appears to be the 3rd of 
the ring at Sutton S. James, dated 1603, and his latest the 
2nd at Moulton, dated 1626. He did not always place his 
name as founder upon the bells from his foundry, but he 
used the several initial crosses figs, i, 2, and 3, and for 





The Lincolnshire Bellfoiinders. 



53 




intervening stops, figs. 4, 5, and 6. Upon bells cast by him 
at Gosberton (3rd), Pinchbeck East (3rd), and Stamford 

S. Mary (7th), he placed the Royal 
Arms — of James I. on the two first 
mentioned bells and of Charles I. 
on the other — similar in style to the 
stamp (fig. 114) used occasionally 
by the Nottingham founders, and 
given further on. Another 

ToBYAS NoRRis, also a bell- 
founder (probably a son of the 
above Tobias), took up his freedom on 
the 4th of June, 1628, and we find his 
name as *' Toby Norris of Staunford 
bellfounder" mentioned in a document 
relating to the church estate in 1638. 
He apparently occupied a subordinate 
position in the foundry. 

Thomas Norris — who, upon the 
death of Tobias the elder, suc- 
ceeded to the business — took up 
his freedom as a bellfounder on the 
31st of December, 1625. He was 
warden of S. George's Church 
from 1630 to 1632, spelling his 
name as Norys and Norris. He 
was constable for the parish of 
S. George 9 and 10 Car. I. ; elected 
a "capital burgess" (that is, a 





54 



The Lincolnshire Bellfounders. 



member of the body corporate) on the 25th of September, 
1638 ; Chamberlain in 1641-2 ; and Com-burgess (or, as 
would now be said, Alderman) on the 27th of January, 
1652-3. He was also one of the "Conduit Masters" for 
several years. While he sat in the Council Chamber it is 
recorded of him that he was upon several occasions fined 
ij« vj*^ for non-attendance at meetings. In 1656-7 he served 
the office of chief magistrate as "Alderman" — the title of 
"Mayor" was not then adopted at Stamford — for his native 
town.* Besides being a member of the borough senate, 
Thomas Norris was also a useful parochial officer of S. 
George's parish, filling several offices of trust and con- 
sideration. At a meeting of the Hall, held on the loth of 
May, 1663, it being agreed that the sum of ;/^200 should be 
borrowed towards defraying the expenses of a new Charter 
from the King, Thomas Norris was one of the sureties. 

His career in the Corporate Chamber was not always a 
pleasant one, for we find that at a Common Hall held on 
the 13th July, 1665, "Thomas Norris and Robert Whatton 
two of y® Aldermen " had notice " to appeare at y« next hall, 
and in the interim shall doe and p'forme their duty as is 
injoyned on y'' rest of y^ Aldermen, or others to be chosen 
in their place." The duty alluded to as being shirked, 
consisted in carrying out a previous order made by the 



• During his tenure of office his ap- the Corporation records of Wm. Saunders, 

prentice William Saunders "because he It may be worth noting that at a meeting 

hath served seven years apprenticeship in of the Council held 25th April, 1664, the 

this Corporation is freely admitted to scott Fee for taking up the Freedom of Stamford 

and lott." No further mention is found in by a bellfounder was fixed at £1^. 



The Lincolnshire Bellfounders. 55 

Hall, that in consequence of the plague raging very severely 
at Peterborough and adjacent places, a strict watch was to 
be kept day and night to prevent any person entering 
Stamford without a pass : and in order to see that the guard 
did their duty, one of the first company (Aldermen) was to 
be with the guard, one every night in his turn. 

From some cause, not recorded in the municipal books, 
Thomas Norris appears, some years later, to have taken 
umbrage, for at a meeting of the Hall, held on the 2gth of 
August, 1678, the following letter from him, resigning his 
seat, was read by the Mayor : — 

M' Mayor 

I have not of late received soe much content and satisfaction 

in my residence in Stamford as formerly, so am resolved to retire 

myselfe amongst other my relations in y^ countrey, soe y* I shall not 

bee capacitated to doe y^ Corporacon any further service, and am 

desirous to resigne up my office of Alderman, and my requests are 

y' you will bee pleased to accquaint y^ rest of y" brethren therew*", 

and accept of this my resignation, and although I cannot bee 

ffurther serviceable to y' Corporacon, yet I shall alwaise pray for 

y^ p'spitye thereof, & am, 

Yo' most humble serv', 

Thomas Norris. 

Stamford Aug. y^ 6, 1678. 

The resignation was accepted, but to what place Thomas 
Norris retired is unknown : perhaps to Barrowden in 
Rutland, where, as the Registers show, a family of his 
name was living from 1610 to 1699.* 

♦ Edith the wife of Thomas Norris George, Stamford) was buried 28th July, 
(according to the parish registers of S. 1673. 



^6 The Lincolnshire BcUfoiinders. 

Although there are many single bells in Lincolnshire 
cast by Thomas Norris, there is only one complete ring 
from his foundry — that of Algarkirk, cast in 1662. His 
bells date from 1628 at Burton Goggles (ist) and other 
churches, to 1674 at Croyland (ist). A bell of his hangs 
at Fakenham, Norfolk, dated 1678, the year when, accord- 
ing to the above letter, he resolved to leave Stamford. He 
used the same stamps as his predecessor, placing the Royal 
Arms on one bell only in this county — the 4th at Holbeach. 
His son and successor 

Tobias Norris (who occasionally placed his own name 
upon bells during his father's life time as at Belleau (3rd) 
Haltham-on-Bain (ist and 2nd) and other places) was 
baptized at S. George's Ghurch, Stamford, on the 25th of 
April, 1634. He was Overseer of the Highways in 1660-7, 
of the Poor 1678-9, and Ghurchwarden in 1685-6; his name 
also occurs in connection with parish charities in 1693. 
He was buried, as appears by the register of S. George's 
parish, on the 19th of January 1698-9. His bells in this 
county, of which there is no complete ring, range in date 
from 1664 at Haltham-on-Bain (ist and 2nd) to 1695 at 
Alford (5th), but he continued casting until his death. He 
occasionally used figs, i and 2, as initial crosses, and in 
two cases — Enderby Mavis ist, and Tattershall 4th and 
5th — a rude S. Andrew's cross, but frequently placed his 
name, as founder, without any cross or stamp. 

The favourite inscriptions of the Norris family were 
" Mvlti vocati pavci electi " — " Cvm voco ad ecclesiam 
venite" — " Omnia fiant ad gloriam Dei" — and, occasionally, 



TJie Lmcolnshire Bellfounders. 57 

on the tenor bell, as at Deeping S. James and at Swayfield, 
" Non sono animabvs mortvorvm sed avribus viventivm," 
which, as has been said, was perhaps "a fling" at the old 
faith. 

Mr. Justin Simpson of Stamford, to whom I am indebted 
for much of the above information respecting the Stamford 
bellfounders, tells me that there is, unfortunately, no known 
record pointing out the precise site of the foundry, but that 
it is generally believed to have been in the vicinity of the 
present Gas Works, or of Mr. Blashfield'sTerra-cotta Works. 

Alexander Rigby appears to have been connected — 
perhaps as foreman — with the Stamford foundry for some 
years before the death of Tobias Norris in 1698-g, for at 
Great Billing in Northamptonshire the ist bell there, cast 
by him, is dated as early as 1684. There are only four 
bells by Rigby, or as he sometimes spelt his name "Rigbe" 
in Lincolnshire, but those are sufhcient to show that he 
carried on the foundry for a few years — until his own death 
— after the decease of the last Norris. Rigby's bells extend 
from 1704 at Deeping S. James (ist) and Swinestead (2nd) 
to 1707 at Kirkby Laythorpe (2nd and 3rd) : upon the last 
mentioned bell he placed the initial cross fig. 3, used, as we 
have seen (see p. 52) by the Norris family. He died at 
Stamford in the year 1708, and was buried at S. Martin's 
as appears from the Register : — 

1708 Alexander Rigby, bellfounder, bur. Oct% 29. 

He is referred to, in a not very complimentary manner, on 
the treble bell at Badgworth, Gloucestershire : — 



^8 The Lincolnshire Bellfoiindcvs. 

Badgworth ringers they were mad 
Because Rigbe made me bad ; 
But Abel Rudhall you may see 
Hath made me better than Rigbe. 

At his death the Stamford foundry was closed. 



LINCOLN. 

That there was a Foundry at work here as early as 1641 
is evident from the Churchwardens' Accounts of S. Mary's 
Barton-on-Humber for that year, in which is a minute 
record of the cost of taking a bell, drawn by six horses and 
two oxen, and attended by four men, to Lincoln for the 
purpose of being recast, but the name of the founder is not 
preserved.* A few years later — in 1676 — 

" Humphrey Wilkinson of Lincoln Bellfounder" en- 
tered into an engagement to cast the 3rd bell of Kirton- 
in-Lindsey, the Bond for the due performance of which is 
still extant. In 1689 the same founder was casting the new 
" Cutlers' Bell," by order of Robert Breilsforth, the Master 
of the Cutlers' Company in Sheffield. It is somewhat 
curious that his bells do not appear in Lincolnshire 
churches until the year 1695, when he sent the Priest's bell 
to Winthorpe : from that date until 17 18, the date of the 
1st bell at S. Peter-at-Gowts, Lincoln, recently recast, he 
sent a few bells to different churches in this county ; in all 



* Mr. R. Brown, jun., F.S.A., of Barton, without being able to discover any docu- 
very kindly made a diligent search for me ment giving this founder's name, 
amongst the parochial muniments, but 



The Lincolnshire Bellfoiinders. 59 

cases however — excepting Ingoldmells and Middle Rasen 
where are two — only single bells of his are hanging, showing 
that his business was a small one. He used a good bold 
trade mark, fig. 7, 




7 

which he appears to have copied from that used by 
Quernbie and Oldfield a century earlier. 

BRIGG. 

The Parish Register of Scotter records that the second 
bell there was new cast by " one 



6o TJie Lincolnshire Bcllfounders. , 

Richard Sanders of Brigg " on the 3rd of May, 1673. 
Unfortunately all the old Parish Records of Wrawby, of 
which parish Brigg was until recently a hamlet, were 
destroyed by fire some years ago ; so nothing can be learned 
from them as to Sanders, who was, probably, not a regular 
bellfounder, but simply a blacksmith. ]rriL^ <u x^Ur^ 

BARROW-ON-HUMBER 

AND 

BARTON-ON-HUMBER. 

In the latter half of the seventeenth century there lived at 
Foulby, a hamlet in the parish of Wragby, near Pontefract, 
in Yorkshire, a carpenter named Henry Harrison, who had 
two sons, John and James, the former born in the year 
1693, and the latter in 1697. About the last-named date 
the father moved with his family to Barrow-on-Humber, in 
this county, where he was parish clerk for thirty-one years. 
He died in June, 1728, leaving his two sons, John and 
James Harrison, in business as carpenters at Barrow. 
They were ingenious men, and set to work attempting to 
construct an instrument for determining the longitude at 
sea, for which a large reward (^20,000) was then offered by 
the Government. The instrument was, after several trials 
and improvements, completed, as is generally supposed, by 
John Harrison the elder brother, but the popular impression 
in their own neighbourhood was that James was the greater 
genius of the two, and that from his conception the time- 
keeper was modelled and completed, but that being the 



Elizabel 
2nd wi 



B 
E 



Barron 



PEDIGREE OF THE HARRISON FAMILY. 
BELLFOUNDERS. 



^ John Harrison (" Longitude Harrison") = Elizabeth . 
born 1693, bap. at Wragby, Yorks: ist wife. 

31 March 1693, ob, 1776. 



of Hatfield, =x= Susannah Hodgson = . 



Harrison an 

East Indian. 

3rd wife. 



rrison. bom 1761 : 
s house. Brook St., 
an 1S42, aged 80. 



T of I 



1 2 Nov. 1732, ^ Ann Newton of Barrow 

dead in 17S4. bur. at Barrow, as wido 

of H.H.. ig July, 1784, 



I 

John Harrison, 

Bap, 17 Dec. 1763 : 

Died 20 Aug. 1784 

s. p. described id 

Barrow Reg. as Bellfounder. 

son of H. Harrison. 



James Harrison, Bellfounder = 

of Barrow and Barton died at 

Hull in the year 1835. 



Henry Harrison, 



William Harrison, 
Bellfounder : after- 
wards lived and died 
at Liverpool.' 



Francis Harrisoi 
bur. at Barrow 
4 Feb. 1778. 



[This PediRree is from the late Mr. Heseldine's. MS, 
Collection corrected and augmented from the Parish 
Registers of Wragby. Yorkshire, and of Barrow-on- 
Humber, and from a Pedigree drawn up in 1856 by 
Canon Machell. then Vicar of Barrow.] 



r 



The Lincolnshire Bellfounders, 6i 

most careless and easy of the two in disposition and habits, 
he allowed his brother to take the instrument up to London, 
where, as was anticipated by their neighbours, he introduced 
it as his own sole invention, and obtained the full credit for 
it himself. However that may have been it is certain that 
John Harrison obtained all the renown, and, after much 
trouble, the promised reward ; and that the only share 
James, or his family, received was the free grant to them of 
the house in which they resided at Barrow.* John Harrison 
died at his house in Red Lion Square, London, on the 24th 
of March, 1776, aged 83 years, and was buried in a vault 
on the north side of Hampstead Church. f His brother 

James Harrison of Barrow erected the sun-dial still 
standing in Barrow churchyard and inscribed "James 
Harrison fecit 1732," and he was also a bellhanger about 
that date, as is shown by his name on several bellframes. 
He had two sons, Henry and James. 

When the bellfoundry at Barrow was opened I cannot 
say, but that it was during the life-time of this James 
Harrison is evident from a letter addressed by him to the 



» This house was " on the left-handside in the Latitude of Barrow 53 degrees 

as you enter Barrow, and which, having 18 minutes; also of difference that 

been sold by the family, is now the pro- should & will be betwixt y'' Long 

perty of Mr. Smith Brewer." — Lindsay Ob- pendillom & y^ Sun if y^ Clock go 

server, 15th June, 1854. true 

f The Rev. J. E. Cross, Vicar of John Harrison." 

Appleby, possesses a clock made by John Mr. Cross, who observes that Harrison 

Harrison : at the back of the case is has here got his latitude wrong, also pos- 

pasted: — sesses a portrait of him " Pub. as the Act 

" A Table of the Sun rising & setting directs i Aug. 176S." 



62 The Lincolnshire Bellfounders. 

Dean and Chapter of Lincoln, dated the 15th of July, 1763, 
wherein (offering his services to repair the Lady-bells) he 
describes himself as " Bellfounder at Barrow near Barton." 
At that time, or immediately after, his son Henry was 
working with him, as is shown by an entry in the Parish 
Register at Hibaldstow, in this county, from which we learn 
that the great bell there was recast at Barrow " by James 
Harrison and Henry his son, July 6, 1764." This bell 
bears the stamp No. 8 on Plate I. The same stamp is 
upon the 3rd bell at Wootton also dated 1764. James 
Harrison died in 1766, being buried at Barrow on the 24th 
of November in that year. The foundry then passed into 
the hands of his eldest son 

Henry Harrison (the name of his other son — James — 
does not appear in connection with it). Henry Harrison 
was born on the 2nd November, 1732, and married Ann 
Newton of Barrow on the loth of September, 1758. From 
documents still extant at Welton we find he cast the bells 
of that church in the year 1770, in which year he also cast 
the ring at Willoughby and the 3rd bell at Sibsey. His 
name appears on bells at West Keal cast in 1772, and at 
Redbourne cast in 1774. Four years prior to the last- 
mentioned date he had opened a foundry at Barton, having 
cast the Addlethorpe ring of six bells there in the year 1770, 
as their inscriptions testify. The date of Henry Harrison's 
death is unknown, but that event occurred prior to 1784, 
for on the 15th of July in that year Ann the widow of H. 
Harrison was buried at Barrow. Henry Harrison left five 
sons — John (baptized the 17th of December, 1763, died the 



Plate I. to fobce- p . 62. 



^^ 



:'A\\\ 



toil I OW^^ 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Thomas EeU A Son. PhotoUth.. 
40. KiBP- Street. Coveat Garden 



The Lincolnshire Bellfoiinders. 63 

20th of August, 1784, s. p.), James (his successor), Henry 
(who went to America), William (to be mentioned pre- 
sently), and Francis (who died young, being buried the 4th 
of February, 1778). Although the name of 

William Harrison of Barton appears as Founder upon 
bells at Burgh and at Six Hills : his connection with the 
craft was brief: he left Barton, and lived and died at 
Liverpool. The foundry, upon the death of their father, 
passed into the hands of his second son 

James Harrison, who much extended the business. His 
name appears upon bells cast at Barrow (Saxilby 4th and 
Wootton 1st) in 1788 and 1789, but the foundry at Barton 
quickly, in his hands, superseded the original one at Barrow, 
which was on a very small scale. The Barrow foundry 
stood on Piking Green, near to Barrow Hall, the seat of 
G. C. Uppleby, Esq. : no part of it now remains. His 
Barton bells still hanging in this county, and numbering 
between seventy and eighty, date from 1789 (Claxby S. 
Mary ist) to the year 1833 (Caistor 2nd and 3rd). Upon 
them is generally found his name, but upon the 3rd bell at 
Market Rasen), dated 1795, is the stamp fig. 10 on Plate I. 
He used several border ornaments between the words of 
the inscriptions, of which figs, g and ga on Plate I. are 
specimens. 

In 1816, in 1818, and again in 1828, James Harrison 
wrote very long letters to the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln 
(and which are now amongst the Cathedral Records) 
respecting the then contemplated recasting of the bells. 

His business as a founder extended beyond his native 



64 The Lincolnshire Bellfounders. 

county. Major George Anderson, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, 
having, in 1831, left ;f500 to provide a large clock-bell for 
the church of S. Nicolas in that town, Harrison was 
selected as the founder. He cast the bell (now called 
"The Major" from the donor) in the month of November, 
1833, at the foundry of Sir R. S. Hawks and Co., of Gates- 
head. It is a large bell weighing 8021 lbs., five feet in 
height, and six feet nine inches in diameter at its mouth. 
When cast it gave so much satisfaction that upon its 
arrival at Newcastle, being turned upside down, Harrison 
— so runs the story — was placed in it, and so taken round 
the town. This admiration must have been excited by its 
appearance only, for Harrison having tried the experiment 
of mixing brass with bell-metal produced a very indifferent 
bell indeed. The tenor of the old ring, which is not nearly , 
so large, can, it is said, be heard at twice the distance. 
Local historians tell of the large number of persons that 
could stand in their clock bell, and that whilst in the porch 
of S. Nicolas, awaiting its rise to the belfry, a shoemaker 
made the greater part of a shoe in it, even as, in 1793, 
when the spire of Chester-le-Street was rebuilt, a not less 
ambitious son of Crispin made, or mended, a pair of shoes 
on the topmost stone ; taking care, however, to do his work 
before his seat was raised to its intended eminence ; a pre- 
caution not always disclosed to his audience by the teller of 
the story. 

James Harrison had a great reputation amongst his own 
townspeople, strengthened, no doubt, by his connection by 
descent with the inventors of the time-keeper, and many of 



Tlie Lincolnshire Bellfounders. 65 

his characteristics are still preserved by the old people of 
Barton. They say he was a sober and industrious man of 
small education, very lax in his religious opinions, and 
eccentric in his habits. He formed no acquaintances, his 
mind being so absorbed in his craft that his talk was always 
of the casting, tuning and ringing of bells. He is said to 
have made no money by his trade, spending a long time in 
making his calculations before casting a bell, which if not 
proving exactly to his mind when cast he would break up 
and commence again. His calculations were — so it is said 
— chiefly made in a bed which he had fixed up in his 
foundry : there he would remain for several days (food being 
taken to him) until his mental calculations (he seldom used 
figures) were completed to his satisfaction, when jumping 
up with the exclamation " I have got it, I have got it," 
would proceed to put his plans into execution. He cast 
his bells in cellars several feet below the road level, and old 
people say that he cast them in the dead of the night 
because any sound, such as the braying of an ass, or the 
crowing of a cock, would be communicated to the bell as 
the metal set ! Indeed both he and his grandfather of the 
same name were suspected of dabbling in the mysteries of 
astrology before making important castings. An old gentle- 
man, now living, once asked the son of this James Harrison 
then (1866) living at Hull whether his father or grandfather 
consulted the stars or had any practice of that kind before 
the operation of casting ? He answered indefinitely, but 
added "/ don't believe in astrology. It's all nought. I 
believe in astronomy though." 

K 



66 The Lincolnshire Bcllfoiindcrs. 

The point in his trade upon which James Harrison laid 
the greatest stress, and the correctness of which he laboured 
all his life to prove, was that all bells had not only much 
more metal in them than was necessary, but that their tone 
would be considerably improved by a less lavish, but a 
proper, use of it. Writing, in 182 1, to the churchwardens 
of Appleby, who were then thinking of having their bells 
recast, he gives an estimate 

"to form a new and complete peal of six harmonious bells, to be 
cast with all the advantages of modern improvements (the results 
of upwards of twenty years pertinacious researches and experi- 
ments) whereby the metal is so disposed of as to produce a perfect 
concordance throughout all the parts of the bells, and consequently 
affords the softest and sweetest tones, at the same time that the 
more extended range or greater freedom of the vibrations occasion- 
ing more flowing sounds, they are heai'd further than the generality 
of bells with a minimum weight of metal." 

The bells of Epworth — six in number, cast without canons, 
which he always knocked off old bells when he had the 
opportunity — may be quoted as a ring cast by Harrison on 
his own principle : they are very wide and thin at the 
mouth, but they are pronounced by competent judges to be 
far inferior to the ring of the same number at Haxey, which 
were cast on the old plan. In 183 1 he published a Treatise 
on the Proportions of the Constituents of Bells, &c., also an 
Introduction to the same, with a verbose title of about thirty 
lines in length.* 



* Hull : Printed by William Stephenson, Bowlalley Lane. 1831. 



The Lincolnshire Bellfounders. 67 

Upon the death of James Harrison, which took place at 
Hull while he was visiting his son there, in the year 1835, 
the foundry at Barton was closed and the premises sold. 

The Barton foundry stood on the west side of the Brigg 
Road, near to the Market Place : it was purchased, upon 
the death of Harrison, by Mr. Jervis Watson, a wheel- 
wright, who took down the foundry, and erected a house 
and wheelwright's shop on the site : some of the cellars in 
which Harrison cast his bells still remain under the modern 
premises. 

James Harrison had, as just mentioned, a son also 
named James, who resided in Porter Street, Hull. He was 
a clock and watch maker : he died, at an advanced age, a 
few years ago.* 



GRANTHAM. 

The name of 

J. T. Barston appears upon two bells — Digby ist, dated 
1822, and Silk Willoughby ist, dated 1825 — but he was an 
ironmonger, and not a bellfounder. 



Mr. R. Chapman of Barton has taken much trouble to supply me with many facts 
connected with the Harrisons. 




OTHER FOUNDERS 



OF 



LINCOLNSHIRE BELLS 



IN addition to the Bells already enumerated as cast by 
the Lincolnshire Founders, there are, of course, a 
goodly number in the County by other Founders, known 
and unknown, ancient and modern. 

The ancient bells first claim attention, and then notes 
upon the founders of a more recent date will follow. 

William ffounder. The stamps figs, ii and 12 on 
Plate II. are found upon the 2nd bell at Grimoldy, 
the 3rd at Partney, and the single bell at Skegness, where, 
however, the cross is of a larger size (fig. 14). 

Again, the shield fig. 11 is on the 3rd bell at South 
Ormsby in company with a stamp 
which is, to me, undecypherable : it 
is also on the ist bell at Sutton-le- 
Marsh (where the inscription is in 
irregular black letter with very small 
capitals, unlike those on the other bells 
with this stamp), in conjunction with 
the shield fig. 13, and the initial cross 
18 fig. 18 here engraved. 




Plate 11. to face p. 68. 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 69 

It occurs once more on the 4th bell at South Ormsby 
with the initial cross fig. 15 on Plate II. 

The cross fig. 12 is also on the 3rd bell at Osbournby 
with the handsome cross fig. 16 on the same Plate. 

The initial cross fig. 15 also occurs on two other bells 
(Tallington 3rd and Wrawby 2nd) accompanied in both 
instances by another cross fig. 17 also engraved on the 
same Plate. 

These stamps (figs. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17) were 
possibly used by William Underbill, alias William ffounder, 
a mediaeval craftsman, whose trade marks are well-known 
to campanists. It appears probable that some of these 
stamps — for instance figs. 15 and 17 — were in the hands of 
a founder in Kent, from whom they passed into those of a 
founder or founders at Reading. Upon the Tallington bell 
(as upon bells elsewhere) are the initials I. S. with a coin 
between them : those letters may be the initials of John 
Saunders, who was casting bells at Reading between the 
years 1539 and 1559.* 

Robert Merston. In four churches near together — 
North Cockerington 2nd, Maltby-le-Marsh ist and 2nd, 
Skendleby 3rd, and Little Steeping 3rd — are bells bearing 
the founder's seal-like stamp fig. 19 on the next page. Of 
Robert Merston nothing at present is known. He probably 
was an itinerant founder, who setting up his furnace at, or 
in the neighbourhood of, Alford, cast bells for any churches 



See Tyssen's Church Bells of Sussex and North's Church Bells of Northants, 

pp. 67-8. 



70 



Other Founders of LincolnsJiire Bells. 




19 



in that locality requiring a bell- 
founder's skill. Until the year 
1875, when they were recast, there 
were two of his bells hanging at 
Trusthorpe, another village in the 
neighbourhood of Alford. His 
inscriptions are in black letter, 
with capitals, both of a poor 
character. 




Symon de Hazfelde. The small Sanctus bell at Sutter- 
ton bears the name of this founder with the initial cross 

fig. 20. The only _^ ^^^^.^ ^ .^ 

other bell by the 

same founder known 

to me is the ist at 

Stanwick, North- 
amptonshire, bearing 

a similar inscription 
to, and in the same form of Gothic 
capital letters as, this Lincolnshire 21 

bell, but in that instance preceded by the singular cross 
fig. 21. here engraved. 

John Potter. The 3rd bell at West Halton has the 
inscription : — 



20 







Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



71 




the initial cross and intervening stop being figs. 22 and 23, 

both which are also on 
the 4th bell at Killing- 
holme by the same 
founder : a bell bearing 
his name, and the same 
inscription as that on 
the West Halton bell is 
at Holy Trinity, York. 
22 23 Although I have not met 

with any certain guide as to the locality of John Potter's 
foundry, it was probably at Norwich, for " Thomas 
Potter, Brazyer," who was also a Bellfounder, was 
admitted to the freedom of that City in the year 1404. 
The tenor bell at S. John Sepulchre, Norwich, was cast by 
him.* 

In connection with the probability of John Potter being 

a Norwich founder it is a matter of interest that the Patron 

of the benefice of West Halton is the Bishop of Norwich. 

Johannes Sleyht cast the single bell at North Elkington 

upon which he fixed his name preceded by the cross fig. 

24 : a fleur-de-lys being the intervening 

stop. I found a bell by this founder, with 

the same cross and stop, at Glapthorne, 

Northamptonshire, where he spells his 

name " Sleyt : " another of his bells for- 

24 merly hung at Owston in Leicestershire. f 




* Church Bells of Noyfolk, p. 25-6. \ North's Church Bells of Northants, p. 58. 



72 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



He used a small neat gothic capital letter for the inscription 

of his name. 

ViLELMVs DvDDELAi. The single bell at Well bears an 
inscription showing it to have been cast by a 
founder named William Dudley. The inscrip- 
tion — in small pretty gothic 
capitals — is preceded by the 
elegant little cross fig. 25 ; 
^5 the words are divided by the 

equally well formed fleur-de-lys fig. 26. 
This is the first bell by this founder (about 
whom nothing is known at present) that 
has been recorded. 

John. There is a curious little Sanctus bell at Bicker 
inscribed : — 





that is, "John cast me." It has no initial cross or other 
stamp. It is quite probable, judging from the form of 
letters used, that this bell was cast by Master John, a 
founder of bells at Lynn, Norfolk, in 1299. He is de- 
scribed in a Tallage Roll of that year as " Mag'r Joh'nes 
fundator campanar'."* 

Early London Founders (Supposed). The shield fig. 
27 occurs thrice on the ist bell at Covenham S. Mary. 
The same shield in company with another shield fig. 29 
and the beautiful cross fig. 28 — all engraved on the annexed 
Plate III — is upon bells at Cowbit (2nd), South Elkington 



* Church Bells of Norfolk, p. 22. 



Plate III. to face p. 72. 




4 


J/ 



31 



STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE- 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 73 

(all 3), Frieston (4th), Harpswell (ist and 2nd), Scotton 
(2nd), Thorpe S. Peter (istand 2nd), Thurlby near Newark 
(ist), and Welton-le-Wolds (ist and 2nd). 

The short ejaculatory prayers on the cross fig. 28 are 
frequently found on mediaeval ecclesiastical work : a varia- 
tion of them occurs on the brass of William Browne and 
his wife in All Saints' Church, Stamford : over his head on 
a scroll are the words "X me spede " (Christ me speed), 
and over her's a similar scroll, with the prayer " Dere 
lady help at nede." 

The cross, fig. 28, occurs again in company with fig. 2)2)i 
and the Royal Arms ensigned with a crown fig. 30 (both on 
the annexed Plate) on bells at Alvingham (2nd and 3rd), 
Croyland (5th), Grainthorpe (ist and 2nd), and North 
Thoresby (3rd). The same shield with fig. 33 only is also 
on the 2nd bell at Tealby. 

With regard to this stamp of the shield of the Royal 
Arms it may be observed that the date of the foundry 
originally using it must have been subsequently to the 
commencement of the fifteenth century when Henry IV., 
in 1406 according to Willement {Royal Heraldry p. 32), or 
Henry V., in 1413, according to Boutell (p. 296) substituted 
three fleurs-de-lys in the ist and 4th quarters of his coat 
for a semee of fleurs-de-lys previously borne. 

The same shield without the crown (fig. 32 on Plate III.) 
is upon the 3rd bell at Kettlethorpe, and the 2nd at 
Torksey, in company with the cross fig. 28 and the stamp 
fig. 33, both referred to above. 

In connection with these stamps we find the initial cross 

L 



74 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

fig. 31 on the annexed Plate, which is alone on the 2nd and 
3rd bells at Great Ponton, on the ist and 2nd bells at 
Bratoft in company with the two shields figs. 27 and 29; on 
the ist at Nettleton with the stamps figs. 32 and ^^ ; and 
on the ist bell at Torksey with fig. 32, which is there placed 
between the letters I U D, perhaps the initials of the 
founder. He used a fine bold black letter with crowned 
capitals on some of his bells, on others a rather smaller 
black letter : drawings of the first set, from the pencil of 
the Rev. J. T. Fowler, F.S.A., as they appear on the 2nd 
bell at Thorpe S. Peter, are given on Plate IV. 

The little initial cross fig. 34, here engraved, is only on 
:^::^:::^— -^-— — — one bcll in Lincolnshire — the school bell 
at Wainfleet All Saints. This, and the 
seven stamps just referred to, being found 
in all parts of the country, are supposed, 
from that circumstance, to have belonged 
originally to a London founder. That 
Z^^^^^i^i^^l^^^^^^^^^^^ London founders were employed to cast 
34 bells for Lincolnshire we know (if we may 

trust his Chronicle in this matter) from Ingulph, who tells 
that Abbot John Lytlington caused "five fine and choice 
bells to be cast in London " for Croyland Abbey in the 
year 1465. 

It is worth noting that the beautiful cross fig. 28 was 
subsequently in the hands of the Leicester founders.* 

Ancient Unknown Founders. The 2nd bell at Salt- 

* See Church Bells of Northants, p. 64. 




Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 75 

fleetby S. Peter was cast by a founder whose stamps figs. 
35 and 38 on annexed Plate No. V. have not at present 
been found elsewhere : the first — a trade mark consisting of 
a shield bearing the letter W, over which is a tun, and 
above the shield a plain cross terminating in a cross pattee 
having a bell hanging from its sinister arm — is used in the 
place of an initial cross : the stop between the words is a 
kind of five-leaved rose. 

The elaborate stamps figs. 37 and 39 occur as initial 
cross and stop upon two bells only in this county — the 3rd 
at Immingham and the 3rd at Whitton : upon the former 
the Holy Name is ensigned by the running pattern fig. 36, 
which is used to represent a crown. These are fine 
mediaeval bells, tall and thick. 

The 2nd bell at Normanby-by-Spital has the initials 
K 3E — probably those of the founder — and the date 1571, 
but no stamp or trade mark of any kind. 

The cross fig. 40, see Plate No. VI., is upon two ancient 
bells in this county — the ist at Ingoldsby and the single 
one at Keddington. 

The stamp there figured No. 42 is repeated eleven times 
in lieu of inscription on the 3rd bell at Sausthorpe ; and 
upon the ist at Market Stainton it is given seven times 
alternately with the letter X^ — the initial of the name of 
the Blessed Virgin. 

The inscription, in coarse gothic capitals, on the single 
bell at Enderby Bag, and on the 2nd bell at Laceby, are 
preceded by the initial cross fig. 41. As the church at 
Enderby is known to have been built by Albini de Enderby 



76 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

who died in 1407, the bell there was probably cast about 
the year 1400. 

On the 4th bell at Springthorpe are the four stops figs. 
43, 44, 45, and 50— two being the letter S. The stop fig. 
45 is also on the 2nd bell at Laceby in company with the 
initial cross fig. 41, to which reference has just been made. 

There are five interesting bells all with inscriptions in 
the same gothic letters, and all bearing the same initial 
cross fig. 47, namely, Heapham ist, Saltfleetby S. Clement 
2nd and 3rd, and Scampton ist and 2nd : they all (excepting 
Saltfleetby 3rd, where the stop is simply composed of three 
dots) bear a fleur-de-lys, fig. 48, as a stop between each 
word, and the inscriptions on the Heapham bell, and on 
the 2nd at Scampton, are terminated by the trade mark 
fig. 46. 

The curious "Ave Maria" bell at Hatcliffe has the 
initial cross fig. 51 and the singular stop fig. 53 (see Plate 
VII.) between the first six letters of the inscription : these 
stamps are not found elsewhere in the county. 

The little cross fig. 52 which is found once in this county 
only — on the single bell at S. Mary Magdalene, Lincoln — 
is valuable as enabling us to fix an approximate date to the 
bell. Two bells with the same cross still hang in North- 
amptonshire : on one of them — the Priest's bell at Harring- 
worth — is the inscription : — 

which indicates that the bell was the gift of Philip de 



Plates IK VII to fa^e p ■ 76. 




LETTERS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Tliomas Eell * Son. HiotoHtb., 
•4'J, K:iio- Sti'eel, Covent Garden 



Plate V to follow PL IV. 








< 




i::^ ^ Z 



36 



liililli 








3£^ (t 

J7 



STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Thojnai? E=IL cv Sou . Fhotolith.. 
40.E2i£- Street, Co^entGarden. 



Plate VI to follow PI K 







" 50 



Ilioiuas E^eii Sc Son. PhotoUth. 
STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 40. Ei3P-Sti-eet.0<j™rit Garden. 



Plate. VII. to follow PL. VI. 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. ^A^^^^^%%°^^^^lt 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



77 



Repingdon, Bishop of Lincoln, 1405-1420: that inscription 
enables us to give a definite date to that bell, and so an 
approximate date to any ancient bell on which the same 
initial cross occurs. 




60 



The initial cross fig. 60 here 



engraved, which is upon two modern 
bells at Gayton-le-Marsh (2nd and 
3rd), and upon a rather older bell at 
Tealby (3rd) with inscriptions in 
Roman capitals, is similar in form 
to a cross found upon some much 
more ancient bells in Northampton- 
shire. 

On the 3rd bell at Swinderby 
occurs the initial cross fig. 58 on 
Plate VII. ; and on the single bell at Rigsby (where the 
inscription is in black letter without capitals) is the cross 
fig. 56. 

The two ancient bells at Sausthorpe (ist and 2nd), with 
inscriptions in Gothic capitals, bear the initial cross fig. 54, 
and the 2nd at Grayingham the one fig. 57. 

There are two bells at Mumby (2nd and 3rd), with 
inscriptions in black letter with crowned capitals, preceded 
by the cross fig. 59, and followed by the cross fig. 15 (see 
p. 69) and the shield fig. 55. These stamps are found upon 
bells in Cambridgeshire. " I take" (says Dr. Raven in his 
Church Bells of Cambridgeshire) "the moon and the stars on 
the shield to indicate worker in silver and other metals." 
The bells of this founder are well cast. 



78 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

The ist bell at Bonby has the shield fig. 65 on Plate 
VIII. in company with the initial cross fig. 64, which cross 
is also on the 2nd bell at Rothwell, and on the 2nd and 3rd 
at Horkstow where the intervening stop is the elegant S like 
fig. 67. The shield (fig. 65) is found in Yorkshire and 
Durham : at Kirkby Fleetham in the former county the 
name Richard Pette is placed on the crown of the bell, 
and may possibly be that of the founder.* 

Upon the 3rd bell at Covenham S. Bartholomew, and 
upon the 2nd at Fiskerton are the stamps (no inscriptions) 
figs. 62, 61, and 69; and on the single bell at Sturton 
Magna are two of them only — figs. 62 and 6g. On the first 
bell at North Somercotes is (in addition to figs. 61 and 6g) 
the stamp fig. 63, and on the 2nd at Rand — both ^^ Ave 
Maria " bells — is the fig. 69 only, where the letters are as 
shown in figs. 70 and 71 and yia. 

The spread eagle (fig. 69) is found on bells in Dorset, 
Somerset, and Wilts. 

There are nine old bells, in churches near to each other, 
bearing the initial cross fig. 66, viz., Bratoft 3rd, North 
Cockerington ist, Hundleby ist, Orby 3rd, Wispington 3rd, 
South Ormsby 5th, Theddlethorpe S. Helen 2nd and 3rd, 
and Enderby Wood single ; the first five also have the 
founder's trade mark fig. 68, bearing, apparently, his 
initials, rather rudely cut. Of him nothing is at present 
known : the finding of his bells near together leads to the 
inference that he was an itinerant founder, who, setting up 

* Gent. Mag. September, 1865. 



Plate, VIII . to face p. 78. 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Thomas Kell & Son. Photninh. 
40. King; Street, f o\-eiit Gorclec. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



n 



his furnace in a central spot, did what business he could in 
the neighbourhood, and so the expense and trouble of sending 
bells a long distance to a foundry, in days when roads were 
sometimes well nigh impassable, were avoided. The in- 
scriptions are in small black letter of a poor character, with 
capitals. 

There are eleven bells from the same foundry in which 
are included some of the most interesting, as certainly the 
most ornate, specimens of the bellfounder's art in Lincoln- 
shire. Two are the early dated ones at South Somercotes 
(2nd and 3rd) cast in the year 1423. Both these bear 
inscriptions in the fine gothic capitals which are engraved 
on the opposite Plates IX., X., XL, and XI L* 

These inscriptions are preceded by the beautiful decorated 






75 



76 



77 



* The moulds and casts of these letters 
and stamps, and of the letters engraved on 
Plate XIII., were made by J. R. Daniel- 
Tyssen, Esq., F.S.A., which casts were 
engraved by the late Mr. Orlando Jewilt- 



for W. A. Tyssen- Amherst, Esq., F.S.A., 
M.P., of Didlington Hall, Norfolk, by 
whose courteous permission they appear 
in this volume. 



8o 



Other Foimders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



^ 



78 



gothic cross fig. 75 here engraved, the words on the first of 
the two bells being separated by the fleur-de-lys 
fig. 76 and by the pretty stop fig. 77 on the pre- 
ceding page ; those on the other bell by the fleur- 
de-lys only : at the end of the inscription on each 
bell is scratched the trade mark fig. 78 here 
engraved, one-fourth the size of original. 
The same initial cross fig. 75, and the fleur-de-lys fig. 76, 
are upon the 2nd bell at Toynton S. Peter, where the 
inscription is in the same grand capitals. 

The same initial cross is also upon the 3rd bell at 
Hainton, and upon the two bells at Somersby, where, how- 
ever, a small black letter is used for the inscriptions, but 
with capitals from the ornate set used at South Somercotes. 
Another pair of singularly interesting bells cast by the 
same founder eight years after those at South Somercotes 
still remain at Somerby near Brigg — the ist and 3rd. They 
each have a double inscription — one giving the name of the 
donor, the other the dedication of the bell. The first 
inscription on each bell is preceded by the stop fig, 78^, 
which is fig. yj shortened one half, and so showing 
two roses only, and terminated by the trade mark 
fig. 78 as on the South Somercotes 
bells. The second inscription on 
each bell is preceded by the initial 
cross fig. 79 here engraved. The 
78^ gothic letters of these inscriptions are 
of a smaller character than those at South 79 

Somercotes, as is shown by the engravings of them as given 





Plates IX.^XIII. to face p. 80. 












STAMP AND LETTERS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Plate X. to follow Plate IX. 









CI 



LETTERS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Plate XL to follow Plate X. 















LETTERS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Plate XI I. to follow Plate XL 





•I 







•^ 



LETTERS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Plate XIII . to follow Plate XII. 



















X3 






STAMPS AND LETTERS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 8i 

on Plate XII I., the initial letters being, however, of the 
larger and more ornate kind, as is shown by the specimen 
word MARIE fig. 74a, on Plate XII . An inscription with 
the same letters (fig. 74a) is upon the 2nd bell at Hammer- 
ingham preceded by the cross fig. 75. 

Again there are two other curious bells from this foundry 
— Beesby 3rd and Gunby S. Peter 2nd. The inscriptions, 
which in both cases are in the small gothic capitals all of 
one size shown on Plate XIII., are preceded by the initial 
cross fig. 79. 

These two bells are, I think, a few years later in date 
than the other nine bells just described, for the founder not 
only does not use his ornate large initial capitals, but has 
broken them up, and uses scraps of them as intervening 
stops : thus we have on these two bells, in addition to the 
fleur-de-lys fig. 76, the nondescript from the letter T, the 
mitred head from the letter O, the lion from the letter 
C, the mask from the letter V, and a sprig of trefoil from 
the letter L of the fine capitals used at South Somercotes 
and engraved on Plates IX. — XII. With this description 
it is unnecessary to engrave these stops. 

These eleven bells, all from the same foundry, are 
undoubtedly, with reference especially to their known dates 
and their ornamentation, the most interesting group yet 
illustrated in England. 

The initial cross fig. 79 (just mentioned), or a cross 
exactly the same in form, occurs upon the single bell at 
Goulceby, and upon the 2nd at Gunby S. Nicolas. The 



M 



82 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

lettering — gothic capitals — is, however, different from that 
at Beesby and Somerby. 

In addition to the old bells already mentioned there are 
many others to which reference will be made in the notes 
upon the founders of the more modern bells, to whom we 
must now give attention. 



CHESTERFIELD, DERBYSHIRE. 

" Ralph Hethcote Belfounder " — the son of Ralph 
Heathcote, brazier, of Chesterfield, whose will is dated in 
1502 — released, in 1524, to his son George Hethcote, certain 
lands, and died in the following year, when an inventory of 
his goods was taken. 

George Heathcote, another son of Ralph, whose will 
is dated in 1502, was also a bellfounder. His will is dated 
on the 4th of August, 1558 (after which date he soon died) 
and in it he bequeaths his dwelling in Saltergate-head, 
Chesterfield, and other property, to his wife Margaret, and 
then says: — "I give and bequethe to Raffe Hethcott my 
Sonne and Heyre all my Lands and allso I bequethe to the 
same Raffe my sonne all my moldes and Towles all Brass 
and Bell metell and all other thinges in my workhowse 
apperteyning to my Occupation." 

There are four bells in Lincolnshire — West Barkwith 
2nd, Belleau ist, Bishop's Norton 2nd, and Wadingham 
2nd — which bear the curious shield fig. 80 on the annexed 
Plate XIV., which Mr. Jewitt (to whom I am indebted for 



Plat& XIV. to fcbc& p. 82 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Thomas KeU cS: Son. Photolitb.. 
■M.Kuag- Street, Cavaat Garden 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 83 

these notes on the Chesterfield foundry*) thinks may be 
assigned to this George Heathcote. These four bells in 
addition to the shield fig. 80 have the stamps figs. 81 and 
82 ; and the Belleau and Wadingham bells have also the 
cross fig. 83, which also occurs by itself on the ist bell at 
Asterby. 

The stamps figs. 81 and 82 are also on the ist bell at 
Scothorne in company with the capital letter D (fig. 84) 
used as a stamp, and found on the 5th bell at Matlock, in 
Derbyshire. This Scothorne bell was therefore from the 
same foundry as the* four just mentioned. The same curious 
stamp (fig. 84) is also on the 5th bell at Appleby with the 
shield fig. 89 (see p. 87) bearing the initials of Thomas 
Bett of Leicester : from what foundry this bell came is 
uncertain. 

It will be noticed that a distinctive feature in the stamps \ 
figs. 80 and 84 is the '' fylfot," or cross cramponee. The ; 
fylfot, or swaslika as it was there called, was used as a i 
symbol by the votaries of Buddha six hundred years i 
before Christ. Centuries afterwards it was known in 
Scandinavia : and is supposed to have had some mystical 
signification in mediaeval English heraldry and ecclesi- 
astical art : it is found on the earliest known English 
monumental brass — that of Sir John D'Aubernon (a.d. 
1277) at Stoke D'Aubernon, Surrey — and on rather 
later brasses at S. Leigh's, Essex, and at Kemsing in 
Kent. 

* Reliquary, xvi. p. 141-6. 



84 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



GLOUCESTER. 

This was the centre of the Bellfounder's art at an early 
period. John of Gloucester flourished early in the fourteenth 
century ; Sandre of Gloucester and others followed. The 
Rudhalls worked a foundry here with great success from the 
end of the seventeenth century till about the year 1831, 
when it passed into the hands of the Whitechapel founders. 
Abraham Rudhall supplied the ring of four bells at 
Heighington and three bells at Washingborough — upon all 
of which is his stamp (fig. 85) here given — in the year 1713 : 
and the ring of eight to S. Peter at Arches, Lincoln, in the 
year 1728. 






HERTFORD. 

John Briant, bellfounder of Hertford, supplied several 
bells to Lincolnshire churches. They date from 1793 at 
Claypole (3rd) to 1805 at Moulton (5th). He was born at 
Exning in Suffolk. He commenced business as a bell- 
founder by casting the ring of eight bells at S. Andrew's, 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 85 

Hertford, and his fame as a good founder soon procured 
him a large connection. In December, 1827, Mr. Briant 
(being then out of business) was consulted by Mr. Betham, 
Surveyor to the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln, as to the 
crack then discovered in " Great Tom :" to Mr. Betham's 
questions Mr. Briant returned very full and practical replies, 
strongly recommending the employment of a London 
founder as having a proper furnace for so large a casting. 
Owing to pecuniary difficulties he ended his days in the 
Spencer Almshouses, S. Albans, where he died on the 27th 
of February, 1829, being then in the 8ist year of his age. 
He was buried in All Saints' churchyard, Hertford. 

Upon several of Briant's bells in this county the name of 
John Cabourn is associated with his own as joint 
founder. Cabourn was a whitesmith, a church bellhanger, 
and a good change-ringer, but he was not a bellfounder. 
He began business in his early days with sixteen shillings 
gleaned in Christmas boxes. He died "after severe and 
painful affliction which he suffered with patience and 
fortitude " at Sutterton, in this county, on the 6th of April, 
1 8 13, aged 63 years, leaving behind him property of the 
value of ;^20,ooo.* He was buried at Sutterton, where his 
grave is marked by a plain headstone which records that 
with much assiduity he " carefully improved his talents," 
that in him were united " the skilful artist and scientific 
mechanic," and that he was "celebrated and admired for 
his professional excellence as a church bellhanger." 

• Gent. Mag. Ixxxiv. p. loo. 



86 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



LEICESTER. 

Johannes de Stafford, whose name is mentioned as a 
bellfounder in the Fabric Roll of York Minster* under the 
date of 1371, was probably the same as the man of that 
name who was Mayor of Leicester in 1366, and again in 
1370, and whose name appears as founder upon the tenor 
bell of the ring of All Saints', Leicester. He also cast (as 
we know from the initial cross, and the form of letters used) 
several other bells still hanging in Leicestershire. In this 

county his name appears up- 
on the tenor bell at Scawby, 
with his initial cross, stop, and 
letters here engraved (figs. 
86, 87 and 88) the size of the 
originals. The same are also 
upon the 2nd bell at West 
Allington, and the single 
bell at Dry Doddington, 
both of which are therefore 
fourteenth century bells, and may be assigned to him. 






88 



* Surtees Soc. Vol. 35. p. 9. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



87 



The first recorded bellfounder at Leicester is William 
Millers, who died in 1506: to him succeeded Thomas 
Newcombe {pb. 1520) who was succeeded by 

Thomas Bett, Mayor of Leicester in 1529, and who 
died in 1538. Whether he was the founder of the 5th bell 
at Appleby, bearing an imperfect stamp with his initials 

fig. 89, is very uncertain. He was 
succeeded by his son-in-law, 

Robert Newcombe, Mayor of 

Leicester in 1550. He used the 

stamps figs. 90 and 91. The fol- 

V -^/-^ ^ f lowing bells in Lincolnshire may 

be assigned to him : the 2nd and 
3rd at Barholm, the ist at Careby, 
the 1st at Semperingham, the 3rd 
at Syston, and the ist at Tailing- 
ton. Robert Newcombe had three 





91 

sons, Thomas, Robert, and Edward, who all became 
founders. 



88 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 




including fig. 



(i) Thomas Newcombe, his eldest 
son, used a founder's mark bearing his 
initials (most probably also used by his 
predecessor of the same name) fig. 92, 
and with it also the cross given above 
fig. go. These stamps are found upon 
the 2nd bell at Haceby. 

This Thomas Newcombe and his 

predecessors used many other stamps 

found on the 3rd bell at Aslackby in 





94 

company with the initial cross fig. 94, and on the 2nd at 
Bitchfield with fig. gi ; figs. 95 and 97 on the 5th bell at 
Swinderby ; and fig. 96 on the ist bell at Bitchfield, and on 
the 4th at Swinstead ; all which bells may be assigned to 
those founders, as may also the 2nd bell at Normanton, 
which has its inscription in large ornate gothic capitals 
like the 4th at Swinstead, but without an initial cross. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 89 

This Thomas Newcombe died in 1580-1. 




95 




96 



(2) Robert Newcombe 
another son of Robert placed 
his name and his stamps upon 
several bells in Leicestershire. 

(3) Edward Newcombe, a 
third son of Robert, was most 
probably the founder of the 
2nd bell at Gretford, dated 
1593, upon which he placed 
the stamp fig. 90 engraved 
on page 87. 

This Edward Newcombe 
had three sons, Robert, Thomas, and William connected 
with the foundry, the last-mentioned of whom — William — 
cast in partnership with Henry Oldfield of Nottingham, 

N 




97 



go Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

Great Tom of Lincoln in the Minster- Yard in the year 
1610. Soon after that date the foundry of the Newcombes 
appears to have merged into, or to have been eclipsed by 
that of the Watts family. 

Several of that family, of whom we have no documentary 
notice, were casting bells in the sixteenth century. " Hew 
Watts " placed his name upon the ist bell at South 
Luffenham, Rutland, in 1563; "William Wates" cast bells 
now hanging at Clifton, Bedfordshire, in 1590, but 

Francis Watts appears with certainty as a Leicester 
bellfounder in 1564 when he bought some bell wheels from 
the church of S. Peter then being taken down. He died in 
the year 1600, his Will being proved in that year. These 
early members of the Watts family used letters and stamps 
previously used by the Brazyers, founders at Norwich ; it is 
therefore highly probable that the immediate predecessor of 
one of them had been employed at Norwich, and leaving 
during the temporary closing of the foundry there upon the 
death of Richard Brasyer in 15 13, found his way to Lei- 
cester, bringing some of the old bell gear with him, and 
opened a foundry there. Francis Watts occasionally joined 
in partnership with the Newcombes in casting bells : thus 
they jointly cast the tenor bell of Loughborough, Leicester- 
shire, in 1585, and to such a partnership we may ascribe 
the 1st and 4th bells at S. John Baptist, Stamford, cast in 
1561 upon which appears the stamp fig. 98 which we 
know to have belonged to the Newcombes, and fig. 99, with 
the ornate letters to be referred to presently all of which 
were constantly used by the Wattses : also on the curious 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



91 



2nd bell at North Witham we have the Watts stamp fig, gg 
in conjunction with the Newcombes' stamps figs, gi and 
go given on page 87. 





98 



99 




100 



Both Francis Watts and his son and successor Hugh 
Watts also used the stamp fig. 100 which is found in 



92 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



company with their more usual stamp fig. gg on the 3rd 
bell at Helpringham, dated 1600, where the inscription is 
in the ornate gothic capitals, specimens of which are here 
engraved. 





lOI 



Francis Watts was succeeded in the foundry by his 



son 



Hugh Watts, who soon obtained a very high reputation 
as a founder : his bells are still very numerous in Leicester- 
shire, and are all extremely good in tone. He continued 
to use the stamp fig. gg upon most of his bells, but only 
upon comparatively rare occasions did he use the ornate 
gothic capitals of his father fig. loi above, substituting 
sometimes a somewhat plainer gothic letter fig. 102, but 
more generally a rather clumsy Roman capital. He 
extended the inscription round the bell, filling up the spaces 
between the words in most cases with an ornamental acorn 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



93 




102 



band fig. 103. Harlaxton 3rd bell is the only specimen of 



•r-T 




103 

his founding in this county. It is one of his " Nazarenes," 
so called by his contemporaries from the frequency with 
which he used the inscription given thereon. 

Hugh Watts died in 1643 : portions of his bell gear fell 



94 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells, 

into the hands of the Nottingham founders : his letters are 
upon the 2nd bell at Blyton, but his stamp (fig. gg) and 
band ornament never appear after his death. 

The Leicester foundry was closed, and no founder 
appeared again there until Thomas Clay commenced 
business about the opening of the eighteenth century. He 
sent no remaining bells into this county. After a second 
interval 

Edward Arnold opened a foundry at Leicester in or 
about the year 1784. He had worked with, and succeeded, 
Joseph Eayre, at S. Neots. He sent nine bells into this 
county — no complete ring — dating from 1787 at Croyland 
(4th) to I7g7 at Stamford S. George (3rd). 

Messrs. Taylor. During part of the time that Edward 
Arnold carried on the Leicester foundry, he also continued 
his business at S. Neots, into which he received, as an 
apprentice, Robert Taylor, who towards the close of the 
eighteenth century succeeded to the foundry there, which 
at that time was carried on in a lofty brick building situate 
in the Priory, and built in the form of a bell. The business 
was carried on there by Robert Taylor, then by Robert 
Taylor and Sons, until the year 182 1, when they removed 
to Oxford. In 1825 the late Mr. John Taylor, one of the 
above firm, went to Buckland Brewer, near Bideford, 
Devon, to cast bells there, and after casting several rings 
and odd bells in Devon, Cornwall, &c., returned to Oxford 
in 1835. In i83g or 1840 he and his son came to Lough- 
borough, Leicestershire, to cast the bells there, and finding 
the town well situated for business took up their residence 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 95 

in that place. Since that time Mr. John Taylor has died, 
leaving his son, the present Mr. John William Taylor, the 
head of the now justly celebrated Leicestershire foundry. 
The Oxford foundry, which had been chiefly under the 
.superintendence of Mr. William Taylor, brother of the 
above-mentioned Mr. John Taylor, was closed upon his 
decease, which occurred in 1854. 

The Messrs. Taylor have supplied a large number of 
bells to Lincolnshire from all their foundries. As their 
names appear upon them a list in detail is rendered 
unnecessary.* 

KETTERING. 

The Parish Registers of Kettering show that several 
families of Eayre, Ayre, or Aire were living there in the 
latter part of the seventeenth, and early in the eighteenth 
centuries. 

John Eayre was Constable in 1662. He and Thomas 
Eayre (probably his brother) signed the Kettering Vestry 
Book in 1714, and the latter also signed, with others, the 
order in the same book, and in the same year, for recasting 
the ancient church bells. The new bells were cast by 
Richard Sanders of Bromsgrove, from which we may infer 
that the Kettering foundry was not then opened. The 
Eayres were clockmakers, and as such Thomas Eayre's 



♦ For a full account of the ancient Leicester Bellfounders, with copies of their Wills, 
&c., &c., see Church Bells of Leicestershire, p. 37-74. 



g6 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

name appears upon the 4th bell then cast as " T. Eayre 
Horo." 

" Thomas Ayre senr." was buried 15 April 1716. I gather 
from the Register that he was the Thomas Eayre the clock- 
maker just mentioned, and that he had two sons " Thomas 
son of Thomas Eayre and Anne his wife [who] was born 
26 Aug. i6gi and baptized 21 Jany. 171 1 " and " Mr. Josh. 
Eayre an adult person baptized Oct. 26, 1731." This 
Joseph Eayre subsequently, as we shall see, opened a 
foundry at S. Neots. 

Thomas and John Eayre. It would appear that very 
shortly after the death of Thomas Eayre the elder, his son 
Thomas Eayre, in partnership with (as I suppose) his uncle 
John Eayre, opened a bell-foundry at Kettering, for the 
2nd bell at Cranford S. John, Northamptonshire, is inscribed 
" Thomas et Johannes Eayre de Kettering fecerunt," and 
is dated "Oct. 1717," and other bells in that county, all 
dated 17 18, were from their foundry. I do not know the 
date of the death of John Eayre, — who sent no bells into 
Lincolnshire — but I find no bells bearing his name of a 
later date than 17 18, and the Kettering foundry appears 
soon after that to have passed into the sole management of 

Thomas Eayre who also continued the business of a 
clockmaker. 

It was of this Thomas Eayre that the Rev. J. Ludlam* 
subsequently wrote : — " I saw a great deal of the art of bell- 



* Of Trinity College, Cambridge. He graduated in 1748-9, and was Chaplain of 

Horningsey 1757-1765. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 97 

founding in the time of the late Mr. Thomas Eayre of 
Kettering, a man who had a true taste for it, and spared no 
expense to make improvements. Much of tone depends on 
minute circumstances in the shape, and Mr. Eayre had 
crooks or forms cut in thin boards, carefully taken from the 
inside and outside of all the good bells he could find . . . "* 
Thomas Eayre died on one of the last days of the year 
1757. He was buried in Kettering Church, most probably 
in the south aisle of the chancel and in the same grave as 
his wife Susannah who had died three years previously, but 
no inscription records his sepulture. The entry of his 
burial in the parish register is : — 

1758. Mr. Thomas Eayre Buried January y^ 3'*. 

From his will, dated the 24th of September 1757, we 
learn that he had then four children : three daughters, Ann, 
Sarah, and Frances to each of whom he left a legacy of £^0 
and one son, Thomas, who was his sole executor. f This 

Thomas Eayre (2nd) (who, according to the parish 
registers, married Eliz : Marshall on the nth Oct. 1748) 
was associated with his father in the foundry and carried 
it on for a few years after his father's death. Mr. Ludlam 
says he was " a good bellfounder" and that " he cast a dish 
bell of 5 or 5 cwt. for the church clock of Boston, Lincoln- 
shire, the tone of which was very deep and wild." 

According to a tradition current at Earl's Barton, 



* Brewster's Encyclopedia, Article Horology. 
f This Will is in the District Probate Registry at Northampton. 

O 



gS Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

Northamptonshire, this Thomas Eayre was employed — 
as the present inscription testifies — to recast the tenor bell 
of that ring in 1761 : he is said to have become bankrupt at 
that time, and not to have had enough metal to make the 
bell the weight it ought to have been. He employed his 
nephew Edward Arnold, afterwards of S. Neots and Lei- 
cester, to complete the job. 

About that time the Kettering foundry was closed. 
Although the bells cast at Kettering were very numerous 
comparatively few are in this county : Wigtoft having 
the only complete ring supplied by Thomas Eayre. They 
are generally well cast and good in tone. His bells in 
Lincolnshire range in date from 1730 at Anwick (2nd) to 
1761 at Folkingham (3rd) and Stamford S. George (ist). 
Thomas Eayre's favourite inscriptions were " Omnia fiant 
ad gloriam Dei" — " Gloria Deo soli " — " Gloria Patri Filio 
et Spiritui Sancto" and " I H S. Nazarenus Rex Judeorum 
Fili Dei miserere mei." He generally also placed the date 
and his name as founder (omitted however, on Anwick 2nd 
and Gretford ist bells) and used a liberal supply of Croslets 
jitchy to fill up vacant spaces. 

The street in Kettering now called Wadcroft was 
formerly known as " Bell-Founder's Lane." It is so named 
in old maps of the town. A few yards down this street, on 
the left hand entering from the High Street, is a blank wall: 
about mid-way along this wall may be traced in the pave- 
ment the edge stones about what was once the mouth of 
a well now filled up. This was known as "The Foundry 
Well," and the wall (to which is still fastened the iron hook 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 99 

which once held up the wooden covering of the well when 
open) was no doubt the exterior wall of the Kettering 
foundry. In Gold Street is the Grammar School : a short 
distance above which — standing a little back from the 
street, and partially hidden by a modern building — is an 
old fashioned house of a fair size : this was Thomas Eayre's 
private residence.* 

LOUVAINE. 

A. L. J. Van Aerschodt supplied the tenor bell of the ring 
of eight bells, and the thirty-six carillon bells to Boston in 
the year 1867. The readers of Mr. Haweis' Music and 
Morals, and of his numerous contributions to bell literature, 
will know that Peter van den Gheyn was a bellfounder at 
Louvaine in 1562. From him descended Matthias van den 
Gheyn (born 1721) "the greatest organist and carilloneur 
Belgium has ever produced." He died, aged 64, in 1785, 
leaving a numerous family. The present Louvaine bell- 
founders, Andre Louis van Aerschodt and Severin van 
Aerschodt, are the sons of Anne Maximiliane, his grand- 
daughter. Mr. Haweis says that these gentlemen cast all 
the best bells that are made in Belgium, and that " certainly 
the younger brother, Severin, retains much of the artistic 
feeling and genuine pride in his bells so distinctive of the 
old founders." It further appears, from Mr. Haweis' 



I am obliged to the Rector of Kettering (the Rev. Canon Lindsay) for extracts from the 
Parish Records, and to Mr. W. H. Jones for notes on the site of the foundry. 



100 Otliev Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

remarks, that Boston was unfortunate in the choice between 
the two brothers : however that may be, it is generally 
allowed that Boston is not fortunate in the bells composing 
the carillon. Mr. Haweis explains the matter in a letter to 
the Times newspaper, written in November, 1878, by stating 
"that the drawings and plan for the Boston bells were 
made by Severin van Aerschodt ; but the bells were cast by 
his brother, Andre Louis, who, on the authority of Mr. 
Denyn, the greatest living carillioneur, * is a distinctly 
inferior maker.' M. Severin van Aerschodt rubs his hands 
anent these bells. He once said to me laughing, ' My 
brother had my designs, but he could not cast my bells.' " 

NORWICH. 

From the fourteenth to the eighteenth century Norwich, 
with slight breaks, had its bellfounders. 

John Brend, after being settled in Norwich some years, 
became a freeman of that city in 1573. He sent four bells 
in Lincolnshire, namely, Fleet 5th and Toynton All Saints' 
2nd in 1572, Healing 4th in 1573, and Benniworth 2nd in 
1577. He used Arabic numerals for his dates, and large 
uncouth Roman capitals for the few inscriptions he used, of 
which his Lincolnshire bells give specimens. His initials, 
L B., which he usually placed upon his bells, are linked 
together in a quaint manner. He died in 1582. 

R. G. There are four other bells (two — Irby-on-Humber 
2nd and Langton-by-Horncastle single, dated 1579, Brace- 
bridge single dated 1583, and Baumber 2nd dated 1585) 




Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. loi 

bearing these initials, which, from the similarity of lettering 
and form of inscriptions, appear to have 
come from the same foundry, but the 
owner of the initials is at present unknown. 
The Baumber and Bracebridge bells bear 
the initial cross fig. 104. Upon the death 
of John Brend, as just mentioned, in 
104 1582, the foundry was carried on by his 

son ^A' P ■-*>■•-- 

William Brend, who used, amongst other forms of 
letters, a small black letter without capitals. To him I 
attribute a few bells in this county, viz. : Quadring 3rd and 
4th dated 1619, Quarrington ist dated 1624, Raithby-by- 
Spilsby 3rd cast in 1620, Toynton All Saints' 3rd in 16 15, 
and Frodingham 2nd — with a capital initial letter — in 1624. 
He died in 1634, leaving his bell-metal in equal portions 
between his wife Alice, and their son, John Brend, and 
leaving the latter all his bell gear. John Brend carried on 
the foundry, and there is no record of his mother, Alice 
Brend, being in any way connected with it, but there is a 
bell (the 2nd) at Raithby-by-Louth, dated 1636, with an 
inscription in the gothic smalls (with initial capitals, how- 
ever, in this case) used by William Brend, and ending with 
the initials I A B, which most probably mean 

John and Alice Brend, the mother being very likely 
associated with her son for at least a time until their joint 
bell-metal was converted into money. John Brend died in 
1658. 

No other existing bells in Lincolnshire came from 



102 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

the Norwich foundry, which was closed about the year 
I753-* 

NOTTINGHAM. 

There are a large number of bells in Lincolnshire from the 
Nottingham foundries. Those foundries will, I think, 
whenever the history of the Church Bells of Nottingham- 
shire is written, be shown to have been amongst the largest 
and most important in the kingdom. It would be stepping 
beyond the boundaries of this volume to attempt the 
placing upon record more than the shortest possible account 
of such of the Nottingham founders as are at present 
known to us, to aid in identifying their bells, and to assist 
in tracing the founders of some of the more ancient bells 
now remaining in Lincolnshire churches. 

At present we have no very early mention of a 
Nottingham bellfounder. "William Brasiere de Notyng- 
ham," who was admitted to the freedom of the city of 
Norwich in 1376, may have been (as it has been suggested) 
identical with William de Norwyco, who cast some bells in 
Norfolk about that date: "a few years residence in 
Norwich would have entitled him to call himself William 
de Norwyco. "f A hundred years later — in 1488 — we meet 
with 

Richard Mellour, Alderman of Nottingham and "Bel- 
yetter." Deeds are preserved in the Free Library, 



For an account of the Brends see Church Bells of Norfolk, p. 34-42. 
f Church Bells of Norfolk, p. 25. 



w 



PEDIGREE OF THE QUARNBIE AND MELLOUR FAMILIES. 



i (of Mellour). Arg.. three blackbirds, 



Thomas Quarnbie. =j= 



Richard Mellour, otherwise Meller or Mellei 
of Nottingham and bellfounder. Mayor in 
1506. Died before 1509. 



Agnes, dau. of ; survived he 

husband, and founded the Free School i 
Nottingham in 1513. 



Nicholas Quarnbie, 
of Nottingham and 
husband. Probably 
died without issue. 



dau. and heir =^ Robert Mellour, Alderman of Thomas Mellour, 

Nottingham and bellfounder. Alderman of Nott- 

Sheriff 1511. Mayor 1521. ingham. Sheriff 

Benefactor to the Free School. 1509- Mayor 15 14, 

ist husband. Will dated 16 1515 and 1529. 

July, 1525; died in that year. Will dated 16 Aug. 



Humphrey Quarnbie, Alderman of NotI 
{and bellfounder? ) Sheriff 1534. Mayc 
1549. ^555. 1562, M.P. for Nottinghai 
and 1562. 



..e,o^ 



Nottingham, bellfounder. 



Une, marr. at St. Mary's, 
Nottingham, 27 Sept., 1574, 
to Peter Lowth. 



Elizabeth, dau. and eventual 
coheir., bapt. at St. Mary's, 
Nottingham. 19 Sept., T563; 
marr. there 26 Nov.. 158S, to 
John Kyme. of Nottingham. 
Gent ; bur. there i May, 1626. 



Mary, dau. and eventual 
coheir, bapt. at St. Marys, 
Nottingham. 13 May, 1571 ; 
marr.thereto"' "' ' 
of Aspley Wc 
Notts., Gent. 



Robert. 
St. Mary's 



Humphrie 

bapt. 
St, Marj''s 

Nottinghan 



Margerie, 

St. Mary's, 
Nottingham, 



r 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 103 

Nottingham, from which we learn that " Rico Mellour 
de Notyngham Belyetter" was living in 1488. He was 
Mayor of Nottingham in 1499, and again in 1506. He 
died, probably, about the year 1508, as there is a Deed 
extant to which " Dame Agnes Mellers, widowe, executrix 
of the testament of Richard Mellers, late of Notyngham, 
belfounder," was a party : it is dated xviij October 
xxiiij Henry vii.* Richard Mellour was succeeded by his 
son 

Robert Mellour, also Alderman of Nottingham and 
Bellfounder : he was, probably, the founder of an early ring 
of Bells, predecessors of those at present at Louth in 
this county, which ring, we shall see, was cast in 15 10, and 
also of a bell mentioned in the Accounts of the Church- 
wardens of Wigtoft, as being cast by a Nottingham founder, 
in the year 1525. His Will, a copy of which is now before 
me, is dated the i6th of July 1525, and he died shortly 
after its execution. 

It will be seen from the annexed Pedigree, for which I 
am much indebted to Captain A. E. Lawson Lowe, F.S.A., 
that Robert Mellour's widow, Juliana, was married, secondly, 
to Nicolas Quarnbie, and that his only daughter and heiress, 
Elizabeth, became the wife of Humphrey Quarnbie, Alder- 
man, and sometime Member of Parliament for Nottingham. 
Whether this Humphrey was a bellfounder is not quite 
certain : he probably was. It is evident from Robert 
Mellour's Will that his foundry must have passed with his 

* Reliquayy xiii. 8i. 



104 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

other property to his daughter and heiress Elizabeth, who 
was this Humphrey's wife, and their son, Robert Quernbie, 
was, as we shall see, undoubtedly a bellfounder. This 
Robert was not born until some few years after his grand- 
father, Robert Mellour's death, and it is not likely that the 
foundry would be suffered to remain idle. Thomas Mellour, 
the younger brother of Robert, (see pedigree), may have 
been a bellfounder, and possibly continued the business 
after his brother's death, but it is rather improbable, for 
this Thomas left two sons, William and Fabyan, neither of 
whom seem to have been bellfounders. It is most likely 
that the foundry passed by marriage from the Mellours to 
the Quernbies or Quarnbies. 

Robert Quernbie, however, the son of Humphrey 
Quernbie, and grandson of Robert Mellour, is the only one 
of the name we know, with certainty, at present, as a bell- 
founder. He was married in January 1567-8. He had six 
children, — two boys and four girls — : the two boys died 
young, and so, having no one of his own family to succeed 
to the foundry, he appears, some time prior to 1593, to have 
taken Henry Oldfield into his business, for their joint 
names 

Robert Quernbie and Henry Oldfield are upon two 
bells still hanging in this county — the tenor at Lincoln 
Cathedral, and the 3rd bell at Ruskington, both dated 
1593- ^^ know that in the same year they also cast 
four of the " Lady Bells" formerly hanging in the central 
tower of Lincoln Cathedral. On the two existing bells is 
the stamp fig. 105, on the annexed Plate XV., bearing the 



Plate XV to fact p. I04. 




107 



STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



rhcnias Keil .t Sen, Photnlith. 
40 Tuti p- Stxeet.CoveatGaxaEa. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 105 

joint names of the founders. In addition to this stamp 
the Lincoln bell bears the initial cross fig. 106, and the 
stamp fig. 108 : this last mentioned stamp (fig. 108) is also 
on the Ruskington bell in company with the rose-like stamp 
fig. 107. These three stamps will be again referred to 
presently. 

I do not know when Robert Quernbie died, but at his 
death the foundry was carried on by Henry Oldfield, 

Whether the Oldfields were an old Nottingham family 
or whether one of the name settled there about the middle 
of the sixteenth century is uncertain : judging from 
certain bell stamps and letters used by the Oldfields, 
but which " were certainly made originally for some fifteenth 
century foundry, probably at York, as they have only been 
found with their earliest trade marks in Yorkshire, Durham, 
and Northumberland," it would appear that the latter was 
the case.* 

The first of the name, as a bellfounder, I have met 
with is 

Thomas " Owefeld," who cast the Sanctus bell for the 
church of Melton-Mowbray, Leicestershire, in 1553 : but 
the record does not say he was of Nottingham. f 



• See Mr. Fowler's Notes in Yorhs. and Northamptonshire, and that one at 

Arch. Journal, n. 65, and see also Church least of his stamps — the Virgin and Child 

Bells of Somerset, p. 118, for an engraving —is found on a bell at Wellingore in this 

of an ornate letter afterwards in Oldfield's county, which was most probably cast by 

hands. It may be worthy of notice, in the Nottingham founders, 
connection with this idea, that bells by f North's Church Bells of Leicestershire, 

John of York are existing in Leicestershire p. 247. 

P 



io6 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

Henry Oldfield of Nottingham is said to have been 
living in 1558. There are five undated bells bearing a 
stamp ensigned with a crown fig. 109 on Plate XVI., which 
clearly belonged to that family. They are the ist bell at 
Mareham-le-Fen, the 4th at Stow, the 3rd and 4th at 
Walcott, and the 2nd at Silk Willoughby. In company with 
this stamp, fig. log, occurs the cross fig. iii on the bells just 
mentioned at Stow, Walcott (4th), and Silk Willoughby: 
also on the Stow bell is found the " Royal Head" fig. 112, 
on the 4th at Walcott the two "Royal Heads" figs, no 
and 112, and on the Silk Willoughby the former of those 
two only. These stamps will be presently referred to again. 
The forms of the inscriptions on these five bells accord 
with what we should expect to find at the transition period 
in which this Henry Oldfield lived : they may be safely 
assigned to him as their founder. 

On the Sessions Roll of the town of Nottingham for the 
seventeenth year of Elizabeth's reign (1574-5) ^.re two 
presentments of this Henry Oldfield, which are by no 
means creditable to him and his family. They serve our 
present purpose, for they give the locality of the Nottingham 
foundry at that time. He is described as " Henrye Olde- 
fellde bellfounder ov' the Longe Row." This, or the back 
part of it, became afterwards known as Bellfounder's Yard, 
and there the foundry continued until its extinction at the 
commencement of the present century. 

The date of the death of this Henry Oldfield is at 
present unknown. 

Henry Oldfield (2nd), who is assumed to have been 



Plate XVI. to face p. io6. 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



107 



the son of the last-named Henry, is the bellfounder who 
became partner with Robert Quernbie, and of whose bells, 
dated 1593, at Lincoln and Ruskington, mention has already 
been made. There are other bells in Lincolnshire, dated 
prior to 1600, which clearly were cast by him both before 
and after his connection with Robert Quernbie. Among 
these may be mentioned Hacconby 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, dated 
1596 ; Kirkby-cum-Osgodby ist and 2nd, dated 1598 ; 
Limber Magna ist, 2nd, and 3rd, dated 1595 ; Partney 
2nd, dated in the same year ; Scampton 3rd, the earliest of 
his dated bells — 1582 ; Washingborough 3rd, 4th, and 5th, 
dated 1589 ; these all bear a similar stamp to the one used 
by the first Henry Oldfield, but without the ensigned crown : 
it is engraved fig. 113 on Plate XVI. The inscriptions on 

all these bells are preceded by the 
initial cross fig. 116. This stamp (fig. 
113), and similar ones, with the same 
initial cross, we shall find were used 
by all the Oldfields. 

Other bells cast by Henry Oldfield 
prior to 1600 also bear the initial cross 
fig. Ill on Plate XVI., in company 
with his distinctive stamp fig. 113 ; 
such are Boothby Pagnell 3rd, dated 
1594; Branston ist and 2nd, dated 1595; and Moulton 
4th, dated 1588. 

Again, on the 2nd bell at Fenton, dated 1596, is the 
initial cross fig. 117 (over) with the distinctive stamp fig. 113, 
which stamp is without any initial cross upon the 2nd bell 




116 



io8 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



at Heydour, dated 1587. The initial cross itself (fig. 116) 
is alone upon the 4th bell at Branston, 
dated 1595, the ist at Hale Magna, dated 
1589 ; the ist at Newton, near Folking- 
ham, and the 3rd at Swaton, both dated 
1596. 

This Henry Oldfield occasionally 
placed the Royal Arms on his bells : the 
stamp fig. 114 on Plate XVII. is upon 
the 5th bell at Barton-on-Humber, dated 1598 ; the 3rd at 
Boothby Pagnell, dated 1594 ; the ist at Kirkby-cum- 
Osgodby, dated 1598 ; and the 3rd at Limber Magna, dated 
1595. For bands, and to fill up the spaces between the 
words of his inscriptions Henry Oldfield used occasionally 
the grotesque pattern fig. 118 here engraved, and the 





graceful one fig. 115 on the Plate XVII.: the former is 
found at Barton-on-Humber S. Peter (5th), Corby (4th), 
Ewerby (2nd), Hale Magna (ist), Kirkby-cum-Osgodby 



Plates XVII and XVlIIto face p. Io8 . 












11=; 



STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Thomas Kell & Son . Photolith. 
40. King- Street, Covent Garden. 



Plate mil tofoUam PiXVII. 




i22 



Thomas Eell & Son, Pliotahth. 
STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 40. Sag- Str*et, C<'rent Garden. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. log 

(ist), Scampton (3rd), and at Lavington (tenor) : the latter 
is on bells at Aswarby (3rd), Heydour (2nd), Northope 
(single), Pilham (single) ; and also, with the other band 
fig. 118, on the tenor at Lavington. 

We will now leave, for the present, the course of the 
Nottingham foundry at the date we have chosen as the line 
between what we call the ancient bells and the modern 
— A.D. 1600 — and see whether the information we already 
possess will help us in assigning a few more of the ancient 
bells still remaining in this county to their founders. 

Although the ancient bells have not usually either date 
or founder's name to enable us to say definitely by which 
particular man they were cast, the founder's stamps very 
frequently enable us to assign them to distinct foundries, 
and, allowing a broad margin, to approximate dates. These 
remarks apply to the Nottingham foundry or foundries 
carried on by the Mellours, Quernbies, and Oldfields, prior 
to the year 1600. By learning what stamps those founders 
placed upon their bells in the sixteenth century we may 
fairly assign — there being no contradictory circumstances — 
earlier bells bearing the same stamp, or stamps found in 
company with them, to the same foundry. 

On the 3rd bell at Scampton, dated 1582, is, as we have 
seen (p. 107), the initial cross fig. 116 in company with the 
stamp fig. 113, which latter is well known to have been used 
by Henry Oldfield of Nottingham, whose initials it contains. 
Now in addition to the large number of comparatively 
modern bells (about fifty) bearing this cross, fig. 116, there 
are several more ancient ones, bearing the same cross. 



no Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

generally, like the modern one, on a square block, but 
sometimes on a lozenge. These bells, which may therefore 
fairly be assigned to the ancient Nottingham foundry, are 
at Alkborough (2nd), Asgarby (4th), Aylesby (3rd), North 
Carlton (2nd), Enderby Mavis (3rd), Hagworthingham (5th), 
Holton-le-Clay (2nd), Kirkby-cum-Osgodby (3rd), Lavington 
(tenor), South Willingham (2nd), and Wragby (4th and 
5th). 

All these, with the exception of the bells at Alkborough, 
Hagworthingham, and Lavington, also bear the shield fig. 
iig on Plate XV III., accompanied, on the Aylesby bell, 
with the initial cross fig. 120. 

This shield (fig. 119) which bears the trade mark of a 
I founder whose initials were R. C. is interesting to us here 
because it can be traced back for about five hundred years. 
It is found upon the curious little bell hanging on the top 
of the Guildhall, Lincoln, which bell was cast in the 
Mayoralty of William Belle — a.d. 1371. 

This shield being thus fairly assigned to a Nottingham 
founder, the following ancient bells — in addition to those 
already mentioned — upon which it appears may also be 
said to have been cast at that foundry : Althorpe ist and 
2nd, Boothby Graffoe ist and 3rd, Claxby 2nd, Frodingham 
3rd, (with fig. 122, and a Royal Head fig. no on Plate XVI.) 
Honington 2nd, Reepham single, Waith ist and 2nd, Win- 
thorpe 2nd, and Yarborough 2nd, all with the initial cross 
fig. 120; and South Carlton single, Hackthorne single, 
Halton East 2nd, Manby 2nd and 3rd, Scopwick 3rd, and 
Tetford 3rd all with the initial cross fig. 121. In order to 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



Ill 




123 



dispose of the cross fig. 121 it may be here noted that it 
occurs by itself on the ist bell at Manby, and on the 2nd 
at Saxilby. Upon the ist bell at Boothby Graffoe the 
shield, fig. 119, is alone. Again it is on the ist bell at 
Boothby Pagnell and on the single bell 
at Swarby accompanied in both cases 
by the cross fig. 123, which cross is also 
on the 1st bell at Canwick, the ist at 
Rowston, and the ist at Wispington. 

Again this shield, fig. 119, is on the 
3rd bell at Deeping S. James in com- 
pany with the early stamp fig. 124, 
which is found upon several ancient bells in Leicester- 
shire and Northamptonshire. If 
we may, from this connection at 
Deeping S. James, assign this 
stamp (fig. 124) to an early 
Nottingham founder, then the 
following other bells bearing it 
may fairly be presumed to have 
come from the foundry there : — 
it will be noticed that most of 
them hang in churches on the 
western side of the county, and 
so near to Nottinghamshire — : Aswarby ist, Asterby 3rd, 
Bassingthorpe ist, Branston 3rd, Bytham Castle ist, Carlby 
single, Fenton ist, Hale Magna 3rd, Holton-le-Clay 3rd, 
Immingham 2nd, Lavington ist and 2nd, Norton Disney 
2nd, Semperingham 2nd, Stickford single, Stickney 3rd, 




124 



112 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



Tallington 2nd, Waddington 4th and Welbourne 2nd. 
Nearly all these bear very simple inscriptions — only the 
name of a saint, and two of them stamps only — thus in- 
dicating their antiquity. On three of them — Bassing- 
thorpe 1st, Lavington ist and Stickney 3rd — is also the 
crown fig. 125 (found with the same stamp in Northampton- 




125 

shire) accompanied at Lavington with a fleur-de-lys very 
similar, but not exactly like fig. 76 on page 79, and with 
the stamp fig. 126 here engraved which is also on the 2nd 
bell at Immingham just mentioned. This last mentioned 
stamp (fig. 126) is found in Leicestershire, as in this county, 
in company with fig. 124. We may, perhaps, approximately, 
date this stamp (fig. 124) by reference to the Will of Alice, 
wife of Anketel de Mallorby, proved on the 26th Oct. 141 2, 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



113 



by which she bequeathed ;^io. to the fabric of the Campa- 
nile of the church of Castle Bytham.* Supposing the 




tower to be then building, it is very probable that the ist 
bell upon which is the stamp now under notice, would be 
cast about the same time. Lastly the shield fig. iig is also 
on the 3rd bell at West Rasen in company with fig. no, 
the ist at Tealby, and the 3rd at Waith, with figs, no and 
III, and on the 3rd at Wilsford with fig. iii only, for 
engravings of which see Plate XVI., all which stamps will 
be referred to again presently. 

In attempting to trace the birthplace of a few more of 
the ancient bells still remaining in this county, we will look 
at another early bell known to have been cast by the 
Nottingham founders. 

The 3rd bell at Ruskington, dated 1593, which bears the 
trade mark of Robert Quernbie and Henry Oldfield of 
Nottingham (see p. 104) also bears two stamps which are 
here engraved, and which are found on a large number of 



* Reg. 0/ Philip of Repingdon quoted in Hist, of Castle Bytliam. p. 60. 

Q 



114 



OtJier Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 




bells in Lincolnshire — figs. 107 and 127 : the latter appears 

in two forms, the one here given, 
which is the more ancient form, 
and another from a coarser form- 
ed stamp (fig. 108 on Plate XV.) 
which is evidently a later pro- 
duction : it is this ruder form 
which is upon the Ruskington 
bell. 

These stamps — Rose and 
loy (See Plate XV.) Shield, figs. 107 and 127, — are 
upon ancient bells at Alkborough (ist.), Barrowby (5th), 

Burton Goggles (3rd), Caistor (5th), 
Gonerby Great (3rd), Gunby S. Peter 
(3rd), Haxey (4th and 6th), Killing- 
holme (3rd), Laughton (2nd), Lud- 
dington (3rd), Bishop's Norton (ist), 
Sedgebrook (2nd and 3rd), Skid- 
brook (3rd), Thornton Curtis (3rd, 
dated 1592), Witham North (ist), 
and on twelve other bells which will 
be referred to presently as " Bells of 
.^ .©. " 

Again these two stamps, figs. 107 and 127, are accom- 
panied by the cross fig. 128 on Plate XIX., on the 4th bell 
at Corby, the 4th at Hacconby, and on the grand bell at 
S. Mark's, Lincoln, dated 1585, upon which are also the 
stamps figs. 129 and 132. 

At Haxey they occur, on the 5th bell, with the figure of 




Plate XIX. to face' p. Il4^ . 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Thomas Sell it Son. PhotoHtii 
40. Kino" Street. Covent Gaxden 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



115 




134 



the Virgin and Child fig. 133 here 
engraved, which is found in com- 
pany with the same stamps upon 
the 4th bell at Stanion in Nor- 
thamptonshire. At Northope they 
occur on the single bell with the 
initial cross fig. 130 on Plate XIX., 
only found once in this county. 
At Saltfleetby S. Peter, the ist 
bell has them in company with the 
cross fig. 134 here engraved, and 
which is not found elsewhere in 
Lincolnshire. Again these stamps 
figs. 107 and 127 occur on the 2nd 
bell at East Kirkby, and on the 
single bell at Pilham, in company 
with the shield fig. 131 on Plate 
XIX., which is also, with other 
^^T^ stamps, on the 5th bell at 
Burgh, dated 1589, and on the 
2nd at Snelland, dated 1647, 
the latter bearing as will be 
seen, the trade mark of Augus- 
tine Bowler. 

Once more these stamps — 
the Rose and Shield — are found 
with the initial cross fig. 106 — 
which it will be remembered is 
on Quernbie andOldfield's bell 



ii6 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



at Lincoln Cathedral (see p. 105) — on the ist bell at Nor- 
manby-on-the-Wold. There are twenty bells in this county 
bearing the same initial cross, in several cases accompanied 
by the Oldfields' marks: all these, which need not be par- 
ticularized, were cast at Nottingham. 

The Rose (fig. 107) is alone upon modern bells at Blyton 

(ist), Goxhill (2nd), Laughton (3rd), and Normanton (3rd). 

The shield (fig. 127) is alone on the 4th bell at Belton, 

the 3rd at Boothby Graffoe, the Priest's at Hale Magna, 

the 3rd at North Witham, and the 3rd at Yarborough. 

The more modern form of this shield (fig. 108 on Plate XV.) 
occurs with the Rose (fig. 107) on South Cockerington 3rd 
(with fig. 170), Hagworthingham 6th, Lincoln tenor (with fig. 
105) , Lincoln S. Botolph's Priest's, on the ist and 3rd at Rus- 
kington, and on the 3rd at Saxilby with Oldfield's initial cross. 
Another known bell of the Nottingham foundry prior to 
1600 is the 3rd bell at Boothby Pagnell, dated 1594, which 
in addition to Henry Oldfield's stamp (fig. 113) also bears 
the initial cross fig. iii (see Plate XVI.), which is found on 
about seventeen bells in this county. 

Again another bell from Nottingham — Ruskington 2nd — 
dated in the same year as the one at Boothby Pagnell 
(1594) bears a very similar initial cross 
fig. 135, which is also found elsewhere. 
Several of the bells with the cross fig. 
Ill also bear other stamps (figs. 119 
and 109) known to have belonged to 
the Nottingham founders. These crosses 
(figs. Ill and 135) are found in other 




135 



Plate XX. to face p. iij. 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 117 

parts of the kingdom frequently in company with stamps 
known to campanists as 

Royal Heads. These " Royal Heads" are supposed to 
have originally belonged to London founders, and have 
been assigned, from peculiarities of treatment, to Edward 
I. and Queen Eleanor, Edward HI. and Queen Phillippa, 
Henry VI., Margaret of Anjou, and her son Prince Edward. 
Those assigned to Edward HI. and Queen Phillippa (figs, 
no and 112 on Plate XVI.) are the only two found in 
Lincolnshire : they occur upon several bells in addition to 
those mentioned on p. 106, and it should be observed that 
so late as 1787 one (fig. no) occurs on the ist bell at 
Wellingore, cast in that year by George Hedderly of 
Nottingham. 

In company with the Royal Heads at Edlington (3rd), 
Marton (ist), Wellingore (3rd), and Haltham-on-Bain (3rd), 
is the shield fig. 137 on Plate XX), which is also on bells at 
Barnetby-le-Wold (2nd), Burton-by-Lincoln (single). Bur- 
well (2nd), Edlington (2nd), Grimoldby (3rd), Immingham 
(ist), Kelsey South (3rd), Linwood (2nd and 3rd), and 
Roxby-cum-Risby (3rd). At Wellingore there is in addition 
another stamp of the Virgin and Child, fig. 136 engraved 
on Plate XX. This stamp is found upon the 2nd bell at 
Wanlip, Leicestershire, cast by John of York, who supplied 
several bells to Leicestershire churches, and his name is 
also found in Northamptonshire. We can arrive at the 
approximate date of the shield fig. 137 from the date — 1500 
— which is said to have been on a bell upon which it 
formerly appeared at Grasby, recast in 1873. A similar 



Ii8 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



shield fig. 139 is found on the 2nd bell at Belton and on the 
2nd at Scothorne. The initials are most probably those of 
Henry Oldfield, the letters and cross at Scothorne being 
precisely similar to those on Wragby 3rd bell, which has 
his ordinary stamp fig. 113 (see Plate XVI.). 

It should be noticed that of the inscriptions on the 
sixteen bells with these shields figs. 137 and 139, four 
commence with IN NOMINE, &c., and seven with the 
Holy Name of IHS: the same remark applies to similar 
bells in Leicestershire. 

Again as before stated (see p. 107) on the 2nd bell at 
Fenton, dated 1596 occurs — with the Oldfields' stamp fig. 
113 — the initial cross fig. 117 reproduced on Plate XX. , 
which is a well known Nottingham stamp : it is also found 
upon ancient bells at Friesthorpe (3rd), Holton-le-Becker- 
ing (ist on a lozenge shaped block), Laceby (ist), and 
Manton (single) : on the latter bell it is accompanied with 
a kind of mason's mark fig. 138. It (fig. 117) is also on 
several modern, and dated, bells. 

Bells of " S S." There are a number of bells in 
Lincolnshire with no inscription beyond the letter M re- 
peated in company with some founder's 
stamps. The meaning of this letter S 
is uncertain. It probably means Sanctiis, 
not the Tersanctus, for the number varies, 
two being found on many bells, three on 
some, and four on others. In all cases 
140 the cross fig. 140 here engraved is repeated 

with the letter .©. This will be found to be the case on 




Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 119 

Bassingthorpe 3rd, Brigsley 2nd, Legbourn 2nd, Quarring- 
ton 2nd, and on the ist and 2nd bells at Raithby-by-Spilsby: 
more frequently, however, this cross and the letter ^ are 
accompanied by the Rose and Shield (see figs. 107 and 
127 on p. 114), one being usually placed over the other, 
as on the ist bell at Barnoldby-le-Beck, the 2nd at 
Boothby Graffoe, the single bell at Bucknall, the ist at 
Covenham S. Bartholomew, the ist at Faldingworth, the 
2nd at Friesthorpe, the ist at Great Gonerby, the ist at 
Grayingham, the 4th at Harlaxton, the ist at Hemswell, the 
4th at Leasingham, the 3rd at Normanby near Spital, and on 
the 3rd at S. John Baptist, Stamford: on Dunsby 2nd, fig. 
107, and on Toynton S. Peter ist, fig. 127 are omitted. 

All these are pre-Reformation bells, and none of them 
are dated, but as we know that figs. 107 and 127 belonged 
to the Nottingham founders (see p. 113), we have no 
hesitation in assigning these '*^ ^" bells to them. The 
letter ^ as used on these bells will be found fig. 178 on 
Plate No. XXV t. 

Tudor Badgcs. There is another cluster of bells, seven 
in number, in near proximity to each other, upon each of 
which occur some of the stamps figs. 141 — 145 drawn on 
Plate XXI. These seven bells are Barnetby-le-Wold 3rd, 
with figs. 142, 143, and 144; Burton-on-Stather ist, Elsham 
2nd, the Priest's at East Halton, Horkstow ist, and 
Somerby near Brigg 2nd, with figs. 141, 142, 144, and 145 ; 
and South Ferriby 3rd with figs. 142, 143, 144, and 145. 
Upon the bells at Elsham, East Halton, and Somerby 
there is no inscription whatever, on the other four bells the 



120 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



the stamps are associated with scraps of the black letter 
alphabet oddly mixed up, in two cases, of capitals and 
" smalls," as is shown by fig. 146, which is a reduced copy 
of the full inscription on the bell at Burton-on-Stather. 
The Horkstow bell is dated 1578, and so gives, (what is 
no doubt), the approximate date of the series. 

There are two other bells of this date upon which the 

same mixed jumble of letters appear — Riby 3rd and 

'T*' Wrawby ist — the latter dated 1581 : upon neither of these, 

however, occur the Tudor Badges, but each bears the initial 





'^-r-fu 



147 

cross fig. 147, and the latter in addition the shield fig-i^A^ 
148, both here engraved, (/tyvn^ rf^OU^^ CriCcY- CA^ttJUiXi^ i4.*rt^,4^ 

Tudor Badges were in the hands of Henry Oldfield of 
Nottingham, as we know from certain bells of his in 
Leicestershire.* I suspect he was the founder of these 
Lincolnshire bells : which suspicion is strengthened by 
finding on the 3rd bell at Gunby S. Peter, in company with 



» See 4th bell at Kegworth and the 3rd at Muston in Church Bells of Leicestershire. 



Plcit^XXl. to fa CO p. 120. 




Tiiomas jieii c!c Son. Hiotolith.. 
STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 4C,Ei^g-Su-eet,CovmtGaraea. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 121 

the Rose and Shield figs. 107 and 127 (which undoubtedly 
belonged to the Nottingham founders) a series of capital 
gothic letters of the same character as those on the bells 
with the Tudor Badges, and, like them, clumsily placed, 
some of them, upside down. 

" Trinitate " Bells. Again there are eight other bells 
in Lincolnshire, all from the same foundry, which may be 
so designated from the inscription they bear : — 

~^tt CTampana ^atra PRtat ^rimtate ^tata. 

These eight bells are Burgh 5th, Haxey 6th, East Kirkby 
2nd, Laughton 3rd, Lincoln S. Mark's single, Metheringham 
5th, Ruskington 3rd, and Spilsby 6th, Other bells have 
the same inscription, but they do not belong to this set. 
Although these eight bells all bear the same inscription it 
is not always in the same order, for whilst the capital letters 
are each from separate stamps, the small letters of each 
word are from a single block, and so although the order of 
the words could be, and was altered, the same spelling was 
necessarily always preserved. These bells, and similar 
ones in other counties, have, since Mr. Fowler called 
attention to them,* created some interest among bell 
students because of the uncertainty of their founder ; 
because, by them, the passing on of bell stamps from one 
founder to another for three hundred years can be traced ; 
and, thirdly, because certain initials K Ja) which appear 
upon some of them, and upon other bells of the same date 

• In Yorks. Arch. Journal, vol. ii. 6i. 



122 Other Founders of Lincolnsliire Bells. 

and from the same foundry, have hitherto baffled enquiries 
as to their owner. 

Taking these points in their order, although it was 
suspected that these Lincolnshire examples, and some 
others like them, were from the Nottingham foundry, it was 
reserved for the 3rd bell at Ruskington, dated 1593, to 
declare the fact with certainty ; that bell bears, as we have 
already seen, fig. 105 (see p. 104) used by Quernbie and 
Oldfield, who in the same year cast the tenor bell of 
S. Hugh's ring, and four "Lady Bells" for Lincoln 
Cathedral."* Mr. Fowler says " These letter-stamps were 
certainly made originally for some fifteenth century founder, 
probably at York, as they have only been found with their 
earliest trade marks in Yorkshire, Durham, and North- 
umberland. It seems likely that a Nottingham founder, 
possibly an ancestor, or, at least, a predecessor, of the 
Oldfields, who cast so many bells in Nottinghamshire and 
Lincolnshire before and after 1600, had become possessed 
of the original stamps, or copies of them made by casting." 
However that may have been the letters are found on a bell 
at Sedgefield, Durham, cast circa 1450 ; we then find them, 
to quote only dated bells, at S. Mark's, Lincoln, on a bell 
(removed from S. Benedict's) dated 1585, at Burgh in 1589, 
at Ruskington, as just mentioned, with the founders' names, 
in 1593, at Laughton in 1607, and lastly on the 6th bell at 



* Since writing the above I have seen which he also shows the founder must 
Mr. Fowler's additional notes on these have been Henry Oldfield. 
bells [Yorks. Arch. Journal, ii. 193), in 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



123 



Spilsby, cast by Daniel and Thomas Hedderly, in 1744: 
thus showing that the same stamps and letters were used 

by a succession of 
founders for three 
centuries. 

With regard to the 
initials 'M Js) — figs. 
149 and 150 here en- 
^ graved — which are 
found on the Burgh 
bell just mentioned, 
and on the 2nd bell 
at Ewerby, the 2nd 
at South Hykeham, 
the 3rd at Lavington, 
and the 4th at Corby, 
it should be observed 
that the first initial is 
the letter 'M. from the 
word ^cc, and the 
second is the letter (ST 
? (reversed to do duty 
"" as a ^) from the 
word (iTampuua of the 
Trinitate inscriptions, 
thus showing, as 
already stated, that 
these capitals were 
separate stamps. That these two letters are not the initials 




124 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

of the master founder we now know ; that they occur too 
often to be those of a donor or benefactor is quite evident, 
neither can they, for the same reason, represent the name 
of Vicar or any other official of the place in which they are 
found. The most probable supposition is that they are the 
initials of a foreman, or of some one connected with the 
foundry, who thus, in a modest way, wished to hand down 
a memorial of his share in the work of casting some of the 
finest bells in the county. This supposition is well nigh 
proved to be correct by a reference to the pedigree of the 
Quernbie and Mellour families opposite page 125, where we 
find that Robert Quernbie, the partner of Henry Oldfield 
in the casting of the Ruskington bell, married Frances, the 
daughter of Henry Dand : what more probable than that 
Henry Dand was connected with the foundry, and so placed 
his initials — using for that purpose two of Oldfield's 
elaborate capitals — upon such of the bells as were cast 
specially under his superintendence ?* 

Two of these ornate capitals, ^ and [K, are used as 
initial letters to the inscriptions on the ist and 2nd bells at 
Scotter, dated 1692 ; and the letter ^ from the same set, 
with stamps from the Nottingham foundry, is on the single 
bell at Pilham. 

There are a few more late sixteenth century stamps 
which were in the hands of the Nottingham founders. 



* Since writing the above my supposi- and Harry Danne, bellfounders, of Not- 
tion has been strengthened by the finding tingham, in the books of Shrewsbury 
that mention is made of Harry Oldfield Abbey Church, in 1591. 



PI a tes XXII nndXXUL to face p 125 



'^Wt 




Xliomsis Keli .t Son, fuotolitu., 
STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 40, Eng- street. CoventGardea. 



PI ate XXIII. to follow PI XXII 




STAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Thomas Zell & Son Photolitii 
40. KLco- Street, Coveat Garden. 



• 



PEDIGREE (PARTLY REQUIRING CONFIRMATION) OF THE 
OLDFIELD FAMILY. 



Henry Oidfield. living 1558 
buried as "the elder" at 
S. Marys Nottingham 2 
July 1590. [but query the 



-Owefeld' living 1553. 



28 Ap. 1599 ; had 7 children. 



Mary, dau. of Rich. Spencer of 
Congleton. Cheshire, istwifei had 



George, [assumed son by =p 
and wife] buried 
S. Mary's Nottm. 
July 1680. 



Eliz. Green, 
marr. S. Mary's 
Nottm. 26 Aug, 



Mary. bap. at 

S. Mary's Nottm, 

5 Ap. 1584: died 

young. 



Richard Robert P. 

[assumed son] [assumed son] [assumed son] 

cast a bell at cast a bell cast bells at 

Everton. Hunts, at Shillingtoa. Metheringham, 



S, Mary's 

Nottm - 

2 May 1624. 



rhos. Gretton, 
of Nottm. 
Gent marr. 



Eliz. bap, =i 


= Rich. Hodgkin, 


Henry. 


John, 


George. 


= Mary 


Alice =f 




Gent. Alderman 




bap, at 




dau. of 








S- Mary's 


S, Marys 




John 


and twin 


13 Jany 1627-8 




Noltm. 


Nottm, 


Nottm, 


Flam stead 


with 


1666 and 1673. 


13 Dec. 1629: 


to Jan, .631-! 


II July .660 






30 Sep. 1675. 




died young. 


died young. 


s, p. 


Derbys, 
Gent. 
Marr. 

15 Dec. 
1659 


bap. 
S- Mary 

Nottm. 
10 Jan. 
1631-2 
bur. 

there 
8 Aug. 
1677. 



George, bap. S. Mary's Nottm. 
8 Nov. 1671. bur, there 14 Sep. 1741. 
carried on bis grandfather's business 



s and I dau. died young. 



George, bap, S. Mary's Nottm. 
27 Feb. 1716-7. bur. there 
21 Mar. 1747-8. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 125 

On the 5th bell at Winteringham is the Tudor Rose fig. 
152 on Plate XXII., in company with "The Eagle and 
Child," fig. 151, and the Fleur-de-lys 154 which is a 
Nottingham stamp. The Eagle and Child is also upon the 
3rd bell at Marsh Chapel, dated 1584, and upon the 4th at 
Ulceby, dated 1583, upon both of which is also the Tudor 
Rose ensigned with a crown fig. 153, which is also on the 
tenor bell at Lavington — a Nottingham bell. Ulceby has, 
in addition the fleur-de-lys fig. 154 as at Winteringham, 
also the stamp fig. 155 found in Lincolnshire only on this 
bell. The fleur-de-lys, fig. 154, is also on the 3rd bell at 
Silk Willoughby, and the comparatively modern bells (2nd, 
3rd, and 4th) at Irnham, all undoubtedly Nottingham bells. 

Without positively asserting that these inferences lead, 
in every case, to the correct foundry, it may be said, until 
the contrary is shown, that the ancient bells in Lincoln- 
shire bearing the founders' stamps figs. T05 to 155 both 
inclusive, were supplied to their several churches by 
Nottingham founders. 

From the year 1600 till the year of his death, 1620, 
Henry Oldfield (2nd) continued sending many bells into 
Lincolnshire : Ropsley ist, being the last supplied by him 
in 1620. He did not place his name upon his bells, but 
they are readily distinguished by the presence of one or 
more of his distinctive stamps already described. He was, 
as will be seen by reference to the annexed Pedigree, 
married twice, having at least five children by his first wife, 
and seven by the second : the baptisms of two only of these 
have yet been found in the Registers of S. Mary's, 



126 Otlicv Founders of LincolnsJiire Bells. 

Nottingham, but I find a bell at Everton, Huntingdonshire, 
cast by Richard Holdfield in the year 1611; Robert Old- 
field (according to the Churchwardens' Accounts preserved 
there) cast a bell for Shillington, Bedfordshire, in 1638, he 
being, apparently, at that time established at Hertford ; 
and on the 4th bell at Metheringham in this county, cast in 
1620, bearing an inscription in the Nottingham letters, is 
the usual Nottingham initial cross fig. 116 with the shield- 
like stamp fig. 156 on Plate XXI 1 1., bearing the letters 
P. H. perhaps the initials of Philip Ploldfield : the same 
stamp is also upon the 2nd bell at Burton-on-Stather, dated 
1622 ; the 3rd and 5th at Metheringham, dated 1620; and 
the 2nd at Rauceby, dated 162 1. It is very probable that 
Richard, Robert and P. Oldfield were sons of Henry, but 
there is no proof forthcoming at present. -^'^'^--'■- ''••" 

Upon the death of Henry Oldfield, in 1620, the foundry 
passed into the hands of his son 

George Oldfield the register of whose baptism has 
not been found, but who is assumed to have been one of the 
second family. He sent a goodly number of bells into 
Lincolnshire dating from 1620 at Frampton (5th) and other 
places, to 1674 at Barrow-on-Humber (4th). He very rarely 
placed his name on his bells : it appears on the ist bell at 
S. Nicolas, Leicester, cast in 1656 ; and as rarely his 
initials, which, however, are upon the 6th bell at Appleby 
in this county, one on either side of the Nottingham stamp 
fig. 116 (p. 107). He more generally used either the stamp 
fig. 159 here engraved, which occurs only once in this 
county — on the 5th bell at Great Ponton, dated 1667 — 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



127 



or the one fig. 157 on the annexed Plate XXIII. , which is 

found on very many bells. 
It will be observed that the 
stamp fig. 159 is his father's 
old one, with the first initial 
H (of which the head and 
tail appear) altered to G. 
He soon gave up the use of 
the old initial cross fig. 116, 
which had been used for so 
many years by the Notting- 
ham founders, but which. 




159 



doubtless, became to be considered out of fashion : it does 
not appear in Lincolnshire after the year 1636, when he 
placed it upon the 2nd bell at Welby. 

There is a bell at Messingham (3rd) upon which is the 
stamp fig. 158. This bell does not bear any of the usual 
Nottingham stamps, but the letters used in the inscription 
show it to have been cast by George Oldfield. 

George Oldfield, who died in 1680, married, in 1622, 
Elizabeth Green, by whom he had a numerous family (see 
Pedigree) — three sons, Henry, John, and George, and four 
daughters. Henry and John died young ; George lived 
longer, was married, and was associated with his father in 
the foundry, but died, without issue, in 1660 — in his father's 
lifetime. Alice, the fourth daughter and twin with John, 
was married, in 1663, to one Hugh Oldfield. Who he was 
is not known : George Oldfield the younger, who, as just 
stated, died in 1660, left by his Will, dated the 4th of July 



128 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

in that year, and proved in the Prerogative Court of York, 
five shillings to this Hugh Oldfield, but does not describe 
him as a kinsman. Who carried on the foundry for some 
years after the death of George Oldfield in 1680 is uncertain : 
perhaps William Noone, who will be mentioned presently. 
Hugh Oldfield died in 1672, and Alice his widow in 1677, 
leaving an only son 

George Oldfield (2nd), who was baptized in 1671, and 
who eventually succeeded to his grandfather's business. 
He died in 1741, and a headstone, with the following 
inscription, yet marks his grave on the north side of the 
churchyard of S. Mary's, Nottingham, not far from the 
vestry door : 

Here 

lieth interred the Body of 

George Oldfield 

Bellfounder. Who died 

the 1 1"" day of September 

In the year of our Lord 1741 

Aged 72. 

Also near this Place lieth y' 

Body of Elizabeth the Wife 

of y^ said George Oldfield 

She died in April, 1736, 

in the 41"' year of her Age. 

I do not think this George Oldfield did much in the 
business of the foundry, which appears, before his death, to 
have passed into the hands of the Hedderlys. The later 
Oldfields used several floral band ornaments between the 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



129 



words of their inscriptions : a specimen is here given 



fig. 160. 




160 

Daniel Hedderly, living in 1722, described as of 
Bawtry in the county of Yorl<:, in an Agreement dated in 
1733,* and 

Daniel and John Hedderly — whether father and son, 
or brothers is uncertain — described in another Agreement, 
dated 1732, as both of the borough of Derby, bellfounders,t 
sent many bells into Lincolnshire. Daniel Hedderly's 
bells — upon which he frequently placed his initials 
instead of his name — date from 1723 at Haxey (3rd) and 
Leadenham (2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th), to 1759 at Digby (3rd) ; 
John Hedderly's name is only on two bells at Carlton-le- 
Moorland (ist and 2nd) dated 1733, and on one at Louth 
(4th) dated 1726, where are other bells cast at the same 
time by Daniel Hedderly, thus showing them to be in 
partnership. It appears that upon the death of John 



• Mr. Tyssen's MS. Col. 



f Reliquary xiii. 225. 



130 Otlicr Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

Hedderly, Thomas Hedderly became associated with 
Daniel in the foundry, for the ring of six bells at Spilsby 
were cast in 1744 by 

Daniel and Thomas Hedderly as the inscription on 
the 5th bell testifies. 

When the Hedderlys settled at Nottingham I cannot 
tell, for no one of the nearly eighty bells in this county 
upon which Daniel Hedderly's name or initials appear 
is the locality of his foundry given. That it was before 
the year 1744 is evident from the 6th bell at Spilsby cast 
in that year, which bears the ancient " Trinitate " inscription 
in the handsome gothic letters already described (see p. 123) 
as belonging to the Nottingham founders. 

Thomas Hedderly, who placed his name upon bells 
during the lifetime of Daniel, sent a few bells to Lincoln- 
shire, dating from 1743 at Donington (4th) to the date of 
his death which occurred about the year 1778 ; he left four 
sons, Thomas, who died in 1785 ; George, who emigrated 
to America about the year 1800; John and Samuel. The 
two first named were bellfounders ; and John, who was also 
described as a bellfounder, became afterwards a frame- 
smith. 

Thomas Hedderly (2nd) supplied a few bells to Lin- 
colnshire dated in 1782 ; and 

George Hedderly sent a bell to Wellingore in 1787, 
and two to South Witham in 1785. 

The Hedderlys became possessed of several ornate 
stamps belonging to their predecessors. On the 4th bell at 
Spilsby are two such — one a crown, and the other a shield- 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 131 

like stamp with three bells ; and on the 3rd at Welby, cast 
by Thomas Hedderly in 1744, are three elaborate stamps, 
namely, a bird trussing a rabbit on a crest wreath, a bell on 
an oblong stamp, and a double equilateral triangle in a 
circle. They generally used coarse Roman letters for their 
inscriptions, but occasionally as at Appleby (3rd) Daniel 
Hedderly used a fine gothic capital similar to that on 
mediaeval bells in Yorkshire ; and, as at Spilsby, the equally 
fine gothic black letter and ornate capitals of the earlier 
Nottingham founders. They occupied, as a foundry, the 
premises previously occupied by their predecessors, the 
Oldfields, on the Long Row. It was a tiled building at the 
top of Bellfounder's Yard, and, having been sold by the 
Hedderly family about the year 1850, is now converted into 
a slaughterhouse. 

There was another bellfounder at Nottingham about 
whom little is known, 

William Noone, who cast the 5th bell of S. Martin's, 
Leicester, in 1700. According to the Parish Register of 
S. Mary's, Nottingham, " M"" William Noone [was] bur. 
Aug^* the 17^^ 1732." He may have been employed by the 
Oldfields to carry on the foundry after the death of George 
Oldfield in 1680, and during the minority of his grandson 
George, and so have transacted business in his own name. 

According to Deering {Hist, of Nottm. Sect. v. 94) there 
were two bellfoundries in the town of Nottingham in 1641, 
but only one (which would be Hedderly's) when he wrote 
his work in 1745. 

Upon the emigration of George Hedderly to America 



132 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

about the year 1800, the Nottingham foundry, after being 
in existence for several centuries, was closed. 



PETERBOROUGH. 

Henry Penn commenced business here during the last 
days of the Stamford foundry. He supplied some very fair 
bells to this and the neighbouring counties. His bells hang 
in twenty-six Lincolnshire churches and date from the year 
1708 — he was casting bells several years earlier — when he 
sent a treble to Kirkby Laythorpe, to the year 1729, when 
he supplied a whole ring to Bourn. 

Although the site of the Peterborough foundry cannot be 
fixed by reference to any legal document hitherto discovered, 
there is little doubt about its having been situated on the 
east side of Broad Bridge Street. Several cottages formerly 
stood there belonging to the family of Shepheard, some 
member or members of which married into that of Penn, 
one of which latter family was Henry Penn the bellfounder. 
In course of time the old property consisting of the 
cottages — then called "Rotten Row" — passed from the 
Shepheards into the possession of a Mr. De-la-Rue, an 
extensive merchant in Peterborough, who pulled down the 
cottages, and built a large mansion on the site, which now 
remains, and is occupied by Dr. Waller. 

At the back of these cottages, and in the recollection of 
persons now living, there were the remains of certain pits 
which were supposed to have been "tan-pits," but which 
were more probably connected with the work of the foundry. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 133 

At the rear of this property there was — it was filled up 
about ten years ago — a canal known as '* Bell Dyke." It 
was fed probably from a spring then called "Tom Lock." 
It was of sufficient size to carry large boats into the river 
with which it communicated. Its name leads to the 
inference that this canal was constructed by Henry Penn 
for the purpose of more readily conveying his bells by 
water carriage. There is a popular belief (an erroneous 
one) in Peterborough, that the name originated from " Tom 
of Lincoln" being conveyed from Peterborough to that city. 

The estates of the Penn and Shepheard families were all 
copyhold of the Manor of Peterborough. The late Mr. 
James Cattel, the Deputy Steward of the Manor (who very 
kindly searched the Court Rolls for me), said that whilst he 
had no doubt that the site just indicated was that of the 
foundry, the one fact to establish it, namely, the entry of 
Henry Penn as the occupier, he had not been able to find. 

Henry Penn cast some good bells, but not pleasing the 
people of S. Ives for whom he cast a ring, they instituted a 
lawsuit against him. The case was tried at the Hunting- 
donshire Assizes, held at S. Ives, in 1729, and the verdict 
given in favour of Penn. After the trial, as he was mount- 
ing his horse in the Inn-yard at S. Ives, to return to 
Peterborough, he fell down and died from the effects of 
over-excitement. 

S. NEOTS AND DOWNHAM MARKET. 

Joseph Eayre, the son of Thomas Eayre of Kettering (see 
p. 96), opened a foundry here probably soon after his 



134 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

baptism at Kettering as " an adult person " in the year 
1 73 1, for he sent a ring of bells to Chatteris, Cambridge- 
shire, in 1735, and on the ist November, 1736, his marriage 
is thus noted in the Kettering register : — 

Mr. Joseph Eayre of S. Neots and Mrs. Sarah Soame of Kettering. 

He sent a few bells to Lincolnshire dating from 1762, when 
he supplied the present ring of six to S. Michael's, Stam- 
ford, to 1770, when he sent bells to Holbeach and Sutton 
S. Nicolas. 

For his foundry he erected a lofty brick building in the 
form of a bell in the Priory. After his death the business 
at S. Neots was held jointly for a short time by his late 
foreman Thomas Osborn, and his cousin Edward Arnold. 
After they dissolved partnership 

Edward Arnold held the foundry at S. Neots, sending 
however only one bell from thence into Lincolnshire — 
Langtoft 3rd in 1772. In 1784 he opened his foundry at 
Leicester (see p. 94), still however keeping on the S. Neots 
foundry, at least for a short time. 

Thomas Osborn, after dissolving partnership with 
Edward Arnold, set up for himself at Downham Market, 
from which place he supplied bells now hanging in twenty- 
six churches in this county. They date from 1783 at 
Ewerby (3rd) to 1801 at Horncastle (4th) and Spalding (ist 
and 6th). About the latter date he took into partnership 
his grandson William Dobson : their joint names as founders 
occur on the ring of five at Gedney Hill cast in 1804, on 
the ring at Billinghay cast in 1805, and on the tenor bell at 



V-J't*^-^ 



«CH 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 135 

Sutton S. Nicolas cast in 1806. In that year Thomas 
Osborn died, after which event the foundry was carried on 
by that 

William Dobson who sent a few bells into this county 
dating from 1824 at Swaton (ist) to 1831, when he supplied 
the whole ring at VVitham-on-the-Hill, and completed the 
ring of eight at Great Grimsby. In 1829 he was a 
candidate for the honour of recasting "Great Tom" of _ 
Lincoln. His tender and his letter to the Dean of Lincoln ^ ^ ^ ^ 

(the latter an amusing composition) are extant, and will be ^ 
referred to hereafter in the description of the Cathedral '^/>Af> 

bells. Although he had a large connection he was not ^m^-i ...-^<Ud 

prosperous in business. In 1833 his foundry passed into .^ *4xi-tr 

the hands of Mr. Thomas Mears of London,* and he 
himself died at the Charter-house, London (of which he 
had been made a brother), on the nth July, 1842, in the 
sixty-third year of his age. 



YORK. 

There was a bellfoundry here at an early date. The 
Bellfounder's window, to the memory of Richard Tunnoc, 
is an interesting feature in the Cathedral. He was a Bell- 
founder, and M.P. for the city in 1327. 

Bells cast by John of York, are found in the Midland 
Counties. 



• See a good account of the Downham foundry in L'Estrange's Church BeUs of Norfolk, 

p. 48-9, 



/^3 < 



136 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

James Smith of York, living in 1660, was, I suppose, the 
founder of the 3rd bell at Crowle, dated 1656 ; it bears the 
stamps figs. 161, 163, and 166 on Plate XXIV., which stamps, 
Mr. Fowler informs me are also found at York: the first bears 
his initials I S, the second has been supposed to have been 
the stamp of William Carter, a London founder, who died 
early in the seventeenth century, with whom, it is possible, 
James Smith served his apprenticeship ; the third, impaled, 
stamp, points to the joint business of bellfounder and 
brazier. James Smith whose name is upon the 5th bell 
of Ripon Cathedral, dated 1663, was succeeded by his 
son 

Samuel Smith of York who died in 1709 ; and he by 
his son 

Samuel Smith (2nd) who was Sheriff of York in 1723, 
and died in 173 1 : they both sent bells into Lincolnshire, 
which date from 1686, at Thornton Curtis (2nd), to 1725 
at Killingholme (ist and 2nd). The last-named Samuel 
Smith lived in Micklegate, York, and had his foundry on 
Toft Green.* Both father and son placed their stamp fig. 
168 on Plate XXIV., upon their bells, with which stamp 
occasionally occur (though not in this county) figs. 161 and 
166, mentioned above. 

At the time the Smiths were living at York another 
foundry was worked there in the hands of the Seller family. 

There are a large number of bells in this county — chiefly 
in the northern part — dating from 1662 at Saxby All Saints' 

* Reliquary, xiv. 103. 



Plates UIV^XXVIL tofacep.IsS. 




168 



STAMPS OM BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



40. KruH' Stt-eet.Coveut Garden. 



Plata IXK to follow PI XXIV 






172, 




5 



SIAMPS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 



Thomas £ell * Son, Photolith- 
4n "RtTipr- Street. CovEHtGaxdea.' 



PlaU XXVI. to follow Pl.XXV 




_ ii.ijii;is Jieii i Suu. PiiGtoIiti^. 

LETTERS ON BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE 40.Kiug- Sn^et.Ccveat Garden 



I 



Plate XXVII. to follow Pl.IXVI. 




LETTERS ON BELLS IN UNCOLNSHIRE 



.'^unias Jieli * Son. ±-iiotolitK 
40, Eup- Sb-eet, Covent Garden. 



Other Foimders of Lincolnshire Bells. 137 

(2nd) to 1687, the date of the 3rd bell at Owmby which 
I attribute to 

WiLLiAM Sellars or Seller Coppersmith and Bell- 
founder of York.* They bear the initial crosses figs. 162, 
165, and, rarely, 164; and occasionally, for a stop, fig. 
167, with a band ornament of rose flowers and leaves. 
Upon the 7th bell at Hagworthingham is the stamp fig. 
169, on Plate XXV., in company with the initial cross 
fig. 162. 

The favourite inscriptions of this founder, who, however, 
frequently placed nothing beyond his initials with stamps 
and date upon his bells, were " Santitas Domino," " Memento 
Mori," " God with us," and " SoH Deo Gloria." His bells 
from 1662 to 1682 have the initials W. S. only ; from 1683 
to 1687 those initials are accompanied by two others — H. W. 
These last initials may be those of a foreman or of an 
apprentice. It is unnecessary to enumerate this founder's 
bells now remaining in Lincolnshire, as they all bear either 
his initials, or are readily distinguished by one or more of 
his stamps just pointed out. He appears to have been 
succeeded by his son [?] 

Edward Seller, who was sheriff of the city in 1703, 
and died about the year 1724: he sent two bells into 
Lincolnshire — the 3rd at Althorpe in 1714, and the 6th at 



* Of this Founder I know nothing be- shire centenarian (born at Ripon, i6 Nov. 

yond what is furnished in The Universal 1654, died at Leeds, Dec. 1768), who 

Museum and Gentleman and Lady's Polite at the age of fourteen was apprenticed to 

Magazine for 1763, in which is a communi- "Mr. W™. Sellars of York, copper-smith 

cation relative to Robert Oglebie a York- and bell-founder." 

T 



138 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

Barrow-on-Humber, dated 1713 : he was succeeded by his 
son also named 

Edward Seller (2nd), who only supplied the 2nd bell 
at Dunholme to Lincolnshire in 1730. He also was Sheriff 
of the city in 1731, and died about the year 1764; they 
both placed their names upon their bells 

E Seller 
E bor 

cut on a stamp about 2h inches long. 

The York foundry appears next in the hands of 
George Dalton, who, in an advertisement in the York 
Courant for the 6th of March, 1764, describes himself as of 
Lendal Street, York, where he had a commodious foundry 
and good water carriage for the Ouse and the Humber to 
the sea. Two bells at Worlabye (ist and 3rd) are from his 
foundry. He repeated his name 

G 

DALTON 

YORK 

within scroll-work frequently on the crown of his bells. 

WATH-UPON-DEARNE, YORKSHIRE. 

Thomas Hilton of Wath was casting bells there in the 
year 1774. A few years later — in 1785 — 

Walker and Hilton sent four bells to Messingham in 
this county, and in 1794 they supplied the single bell to 
S. Paul's Church, Lincoln. 



Otlier Founders of Lincohishire Bells. 139 

Their smaller bells at Messingham are described by 
Mr. Fowler as being particularly narrow in crown and 
waist. 

Augustine Bowler was paid 39s, yd. by the church- 
wardens of Kirton-in-Lindsey for casting their " little bell " 
in the year 1629. Whether he was a son or other relative 
of Richard Bowler, a founder who had his head-quarters at 
Colchester, and was casting bells from 1583 to 1603, I 
cannot say. There are four bells in this county — Baumber 
1st, dated 1638; Cockerington South 3rd, dated 1626; 
Hibaldstow 2nd, cast in 1635 ; and Snelland 2nd, in 1647 — • 
which bear the founder's stamp fig. 170 on Plate XXV., 
which may fairly be assigned to this Augustine Bowler ; 
indeed his name, as he no doubt intended, can be pretty 
clearly made out on his trade mark. Again there are four 
other bells of about the same date, and with inscriptions in 
the same letters, with the initials A. B., but without the 
stamp, which were, no doubt, cast by this founder, namely, 
Grayingham 3rd, 1640 ; Saxilby 3rd (this is uncertain) ; 
Wildsworth single, 1632 ; and Haugh single, cast in 1638. 
Upon the last-named is the pretty band ornament fig. 171 
on Plate XXV. Two of these eight bells (South Cocker- 
ington 3rd and Snelland 2nd) also bear stamps which were 
in the hands of the Nottingham founders, which may show 
some connection of Bowler with that foundry. 

George Lee was casting bells for Lincolnshire churches 
early in the seventeenth century. 

In 1613 he cast the present 2nd bell at Wellingore, 
which bears his name in rather ornate mediaeval gothic 



140 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



capitals placed on the bell in a clumsy manner — many 
letters being transposed thus : — 

The neat little initial cross fig. 172 is drawn on Plate 
XXV. The churchwardens of Kirton-in-Lindsey employed 
him in 1615, and made this entry in their accounts : — 

" It' layd out to Mr. Lee the belfounder xP. 

The 3rd bell at Market Stainton, the 2nd at Thorpe on 
the Hill, and the 3rd at South Willingham maybe assigned 
to this founder whose habitat is not known, but whose con- 
nection, in some way, with the Nottingham founders is 




173 
shown by the use of the band ornament fig. 115 (on Plate 
XVII.) on his bell at Wellingore. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 141 

The 3rd bell at Honington tells us that it was made by 
T. G. in 1673 : who he was I do not know : he used as a 
stamp a plain cross on a shield. 

The seventh bell in S. Hugh's steeple, Lincoln Cathedral, 
cast in 1606, bears fig. 173 as an initial cross : I do not 
know the founder. Neither do I know the name of the 
founder of two other comparatively modern bells — the 
Priest's bell at Binbrook S, Mary, and the single one at 
Croxby — which bear his initials thus 

R. ^ B. 
W. 

BIRMINGHAM. 

Wm. Blews and Sons have supplied only two bells to 
Lincolnshire churches: they hang at S. Martin's and S. 
Andrew's, Lincoln. 

James Barwell sent the small bell at S. Saviour's 
Chapel-of-Ease, Little Gonerby, in i< 



EAST DEREHAM, NORFOLK. 

Joseph Mallows, who was casting bells as early as 1750, 
had his foundry here. His bells are in three churches in 
this county — Bennington, Fleet, and Wainfleet S. Mary, 
dated 1758, 1759, and 1760. 

HULL. 

The single bell at Waddingworth was supplied by 



142 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

T. Johnson of Hull, in 1832, who was probably only a 
whitesmith. 



ROTHERHAM. 

Joseph Ludlam of Rotherham, who was an ironmonger, 
whitesmith, and bellhanger, had for his shop an old dilapi- 
dated building near to the Grammar School, Rotherham, 
all long since removed. His name appears in the Accounts 
of the Feoffees of the Common Lands of Rotherham, 
1733 — 1759. Although he cast a few bells, including one 
only in this county — the 4th at Thornton Curtis — bell- 
founding was, apparently, quite an exceptional stroke of 
business. He is not mentioned amongst the multitudes of 
interments in the church, but there is no doubt that he died, 
and was buried, at Rotherham.* 

SHEFFIELD. 

Naylor, Vickers, and Co. supplied three of their cast-steel 
bells to Burton Gate in 1865. 

MODERN LONDON FOUNDERS. 

The Whitechapel Foundry. There are many bells in 
Lincolnshire from this foundry. 

Robert jNIot held it from 1578 (and probably a few years 

* Ex infer, the late Mr. Guest, F.S.A., the historian of Rotherham. 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 143 

earlier) to about the year 1608, when he died. From him 
the foundry passed through several hands until, in the 
year 1701, 

Richard Phelps became its head. He sent three of 
the present bells to S. Botolph's, Lincoln, in 1723. At his 
death, in 1738, he left all his bell gear to his foreman 

Thomas Lester, who built the present foundry : he sent 
only one bell into this county, the 3rd at Barrow-on- 
Humber, dated 1749. He took Thomas Pack into partner- 
ship about the year 1752. 

Lester and Pack's bells hang in ten churches in Lin- 
colnshire, dating from 1757, at Coningsby and South 
Ormsby, to 1766, the date of the tenor at Fleet. 

About the year 1769 the name of William Chapman, 
Lester's nephew, appears in the firm as 

Lester, Pack, and Chapman, of "The Three bells, 
Whitechapel, London." Upon the death of Thomas Lester 
in that year (1769) William Chapman was, in conformity 
with his uncle's will, taken into partnership with Pack, and 
so the firm became 

Pack and Chapman, who sent bells into Lincolnshire 
now hanging at Bicker and Grantham. Pack died in 1781 : 
soon after which W^illiam Mears joined Chapman, and in 
his family the foundry continued for many years. 

Thomas Mears and Son supplied several bells to 
Lincolnshire (including complete rings at Hogsthorpe and 
Kirton in Holland) dating from 1806 at Fleet to 1810 at 
Langtoft. 

Thomas Mears [Jun.] supplied many bells hanging in 



144 Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 

twenty-five Lincolnshire churches dating from 1792 at 
Welton-le-Marsh to 1843 at Sutton S. Matthew. 

Charles and George Mears sent bells from 1845 
(Belton, Isle of Axholme 4th) till 1857 ^^ Tattershall (3rd). 

George Mears and Co. supplied a few bells to Lincoln- 
shire churches the last dated being the ring of six at Nocton 
dated 1865 : soon after which date the foundry passed into 
the hands of the present sole proprietor. 

Robert Stainbank whose name is upon the three bells 
at North Willingham dated 1868. Mr. Stainbank, however, 
retains the name of Mears in the firm (Mr. George Mears, 
his former partner, after being out of business some years, 
died at Landport, Portsmouth, 12 August, 1873, aged fifty- 
three) and he under the style of 

Mears and Stainbank has sent several bells (including 
a ring of six to S. Peter at Gowts, Lincoln) dating from 
i856 at Skillington (ist) to 1877 at Croft (6th). 

The Crescent Foundry, Cripplegate. There are many 
bells in Lincolnshire from this foundry, dating from 1854, 
the Priest's at Irby-on-Humber, to 1874 at Brigg (ist and 
2nd) . 

John Warner was in business in the year 1763, as a 
Bell and Brass Founder, at a house known as the Three 
Bells and a Star, in Wood Street, Cheapside, London. He 
had a brother named Tomson Warner, who, after serving 
his apprenticeship as an ironmonger at Ampthill in Bedford- 
shire, came to London and joined his brother John in 
business. Sometime between the years 1763 and 1782 
they removed to Fore Street, Cripplegate, near to their old 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 145 

premises, and also close by the site of the present foundry. 
In the latter year the brothers dissolved partnership, 
Tomson remaining in Fore Street and John going to Fleet 
Street, where he carried on business as a Bellfounder under 
the name of John Warner and Sons, He sometimes placed 
his own name on bells — as at Strood, Kent, in 1788, and 
sometimes that of his firm, as at S. Stephen's, Norwich, in 
1796, and at Colby, Norfolk, in 1802. The bell at Cripple- 14^" 
gate church was also cast by him. From Tomson Warner 
(whose eldest son was named John after his uncle) the 
business has descended to his grandson, Mr. Robert 
Warner, F.R.H.S., who under the style of 

John Warner and Sons is the present proprietor. Prior 
to 1850 the bells cast by Messrs. Warner were in sand, and 
did not exceed 18 inches in diameter, but in that year, 
being established in the present premises, Mr. Warner 
commenced casting large bells in loam. The foundry 
stands on ground said to have been occupied by the Jews, 
and given — upon their banishment in the twelfth century — 
to the Dean of S. Paul's — hence Jewin Street and Jewin 
Crescent. The trade mark of the foundry (adopted, I 
suppose, from the name of the last-mentioned locality) 
is a bell within a crescent. A handsome band encircles 
some of the more recent bells cast here, upon which 
also appear some appropriate inscriptions, in fine gothic 
letters.* 



* I am indebted to Mr. S. B. Gosliu for the above notes on the early histor}- of this 

foundry. 

V 



146 



Other Founders of Lincolnshire Bells. 



The Brixton Foundry. Mr. T. C. Lewis, of this new 
foundry, supplied the ring of eight bells to the church of 
S. Paul, Spalding, which church was consecrated on the 
27th of October, 1880. 




A performer playing a Carillon of five Bells, from a MS. said to be of the ninth century. 



PECULIAR USES 



OF THE 



LINCOLNSHIRE BELLS 



THE only direction as to the use of a Church Bell in 
the Rubrics of the Book of Common Prayer is in 
that relating to Daily Service : — 

" And the Curate that ministereth in every Parish-Church or 
Chapel, being at home, and not being otherwise reasonably 
hindered, shall say the same in the Parish-Church or Chapel where 
he ministereth, and shall cause a Bell to be tolled thereunto a 
convenient time before he begin, that the people may come to hear 
God's Word, and to pray with him." 

The Canons give a few more directions : 

The 15th, which directs ^^ Litany to be read on Wednesdays 
and Fridays,'" orders, that warning be " given to the people 
by tolling of a bell." 

The 67th Canon entitled '■'■Ministers to visit the Sick" 
says : — 



148 Peculiar Uses of the LincolnsJiive Bells. 

" And, when any is passing out of this life, a bell shall be tolled, 
and the Minister shall not then slack to do his last duty. And after 
the party's death, if it so fall out, there shall be rung no more than 
one short peal, and one other before the burial, and one other after 
the burial." 

So much for their use. 

The 88th Canon directs churchwardens not to allow the 
superstitious use of bells upon " Holydays or Eves abrogated 
by the Book of Common Prayer, nor at any other times 
without good cause to be allowed by the Minister of the 
place, and by themselves." And the 1 1 ith Canon is directed 
against such as shall..." by untimely ringing of bells. ..hinder 
the Minister or Preacher." 

Ringing for Divine Service. Although one bell is all 
that is really essential for carrying out such of these direc- 
tions as are now usually followed, it is generally only 
poverty or some other difficulty, which hinders the erection 
in our modern churches of a number of bells, with which to 
ring those peals, in which almost all English churchmen 
delight. And so it was in more ancient times. It will be 
seen that in Lincolnshire several of the larger churches had 
four bells in the reign of Edward VI., and that whilst many 
had not more than three, scarcely any were satisfied with 
less than two. 

In churches where the Canonical Hours were kept the 
bells, or some of them, would be ringing very frequently. 
The Canons made in King Edgar's time (a.d. 960) provided 
"that the hours be timely notified by ringing [the bells] 
and that every priest then look out his tide-song in the 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 149 

church {i.e. attend his Canonical Hours), and that prayers 
be there diligently made in the fear of God and intercession 
for all people :"* thus '' the ringing of these Canonical 
hours let the world know the time, by day and by night ; 
and in those larger churches where such a custom was 
followed, the several bells, as well as the different ways in 
which they were rung for the purpose, told the precise 
service which was then about to be chanted. "f The bells 
of parish churches were frequently rung by the Deacons. 
" Now one bell shall be rung, now two, now three, now all 
the bells in the steeple, by the which diversity of ringing 
men may the better know when it is festum simplex, or 
festum duplex, or festum principale."J That was the case 
at Holy Trinity, Coventry, in the year 1462, § and at the 
parish church of Ludlow in 1551, when the churchwardens 
paid twelvepence to " the dekyns for rynginge of day 
belle. "II " Bishop Oldham (of Exeter) in his Statutes, 
151 1, directs how the Annualarii (or Chantry Priests) were* 
to sound or toll a certain number of times with one bell 
then a full tolling of all the bells, at the Canonical Hours, 
after the accustomed manner ; at the close of which, the 
service was to begin. "^ An interesting illustration of this 



• Johnson's English Canons, Part i. p. || Churchwardens' Accounts of Ludlow 

428. (Camden Soc.) p. 47. 

t Dr. Rock's Church of our Fathers, in. ^ The Cathedral Bells of Exeter, p. 13, 

part 2, p. 143. The Canonical Hours were Prime 6 a.m., 

X Becon iii. 534, quoted by Mr. Wal- Tierce, Mass, at 9 a.m., Sext at Noon, 

cott, Parish Churches before the Reformation, Nones at 3 p.m., Vespers at 6 p.m., Com- 

p. 8. pline at 9 p.m., Matins and Lauds in the 

§ Bells of the Church, p. 276. early hours between midnight and Prime. 



150 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnsliire Bells. 

custom is found upon the Font of the Parish Church of 
Belton in this county, which bears, upon its eight sides, the 
various officers of the church represented in rude sculpture : 
one of these is the campanarius, who, attired in his camise, 
is chiming two bells. At the ordination of the ostiarius the 
bell ropes were placed in his hands as well as the keys of 
the church. In our smaller parish churches, too, those 
bells appropriated to the side altars in chantry chapels, or 
belonging to Guilds and Fraternities, would very frequently 
be sounding.* On Sundays and high-days all the bells 
appear to have been ruQg for Matins and Evensong — the 
two services which all were expected to attend : and so the 
custom has continued to the present time. The Bell-master 
of Loughborough, Leicestershire, in the time of Edward 
VL, was "to help to reng to sarvys if ned be." Hooper, 
in his Injunctions, dated 1551, whilst forbidding ringing at 
unseasonable times, adds " but before services, as well 
morning as at even, to warn people by as many peals or 
ringings as they think good." 

The mode of ringing, or of chiming, for Divine Service 
varies somewhat in different parishes. 

In Lincolnshire the general use is for the bells to be 
chimed, followed by the ringing of the tenor as a Sermon- 
bell ; after which, in many parishes, a few strokes are given 
upon the Priest's bell where one exists, or upon the treble 

* At Ludlow, in addition to the fore- tioned), "First-Mass-Bell," and " the gild 

bell, second bell, third, second-tenor, and belle," all apparently bells of moderate 

great bell, they possessed " Our Lady size. See Ludlow Churchwardens' Accounts 

belle" ("our Lady Chauncelle " is men- published by Camden Society. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 151 

bell, as a summons to the clergyman. This, however, is 
varied in some parishes. 

At Broughton a full peal is rung ; after a pause the bells 
are lowered ; the Sermon-bell is then rung until the time 
for Divine Service arrives. 

At Lincoln S. Peter-at-Gowts, for morning service, some 
well practised " touches " are rung for twenty-five minutes ; 
then the tenor is rung as the Sermon-bell : the bells are left 
standing till evening, when they are again rung for service. 

At Belton, Isle of Axholme, three peals are rung between 
9.30 and 10.15 a.m., and between 5.30 and 6.15 p.m. for the 
first half of the next fifteen minutes the bells are chimed, 
followed by the ringing of the 4th bell as a Sermon-bell : so 
at Skirbeck and Springthorpe ringing generally precedes 
the chiming for both services on Sunda}^ ; at Stow ringing 
follows the chiming ; and at Horncastle there is ringing 
before Morning Service, but before Evening Service the 
bells are not raised. 

The bells are also always rung, instead of chimed, for 
Divine Service at Burgh, and occasionally they are so rung 
at Butterwick, Elsham, Frieston, Leake, Skirbeck, and 
Thornton Curtis. Sometimes, as at Coleby, the bells are 
chimed for Matins, but rung for Evensong. At Fleet they 
are rung on two Sundays in the month. 

At Friesthorpe each of the three bells is tolled separately 
twelve times, then all are chimed, after which the third 
is tolled alone : a similar plan is followed at Ashby-de- 
la-Launde, Carlton-le-Moorland, Claypole, Folkingham, 
Lavington and Welton. 



152 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

At Gedney Hill the ist bell is tolled for five minutes ; 
then the ist and 3rd bells are chimed for five minutes; 
then all five are chimed for five minutes (fifteen minutes in 
all) , At Lea the treble is rung for fifteen minutes before 
chiming commences, which is begun by tolling each bell 
in succession a few strokes, followed by the chiming of all 
four together for ten minutes : that is succeeded by the 
ringing of the tenor as the Sermon-bell. 

At Fleet the tenor is first rung for fifteen minutes ; then — 
excepting on the Sundays when the bells are rung — all are 
chimed for fifteen minutes followed by a few strokes on the 
treble alone : a similar custom is followed at Bourn, 
Grantham and Halton Holgate. 

At South Cockerington the tenor is tolled for five minutes 
half an hour before service : after a pause of ten minutes 
the 1st and 2nd bells are chimed for five minutes ; after 
another pause all three are chimed for five minutes, followed 
by a few strokes (for two minutes) on the treble bell. 

At Willoughby the tenor is rung for a short time an hour 
before service, and called the Sermon-bell : all the bells are 
chimed for twenty minutes for service, after which the tenor 
" rings in" for five minutes. 

At Sutton-le-Marsh the tenor is tolled three times for 
five minutes each time, with an interval of five minutes 
between each tolling : then all are chimed for ten minutes 
followed by the Priest's bell for a few minutes. 

At Croyland and at Morton the bells are chimed with 
the tenor " rung in." 

At Bonby, after chiming for fifteen minutes, the tenor is 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 153 

sounded for two minutes, followed by three strokes on the 
treble. 

At Caistor the 3rd bell (of six) is rung for ten minutes 
after the chiming for twenty minutes. 

At East Kirkby (where are two bells) the larger is 
sounded for ten minutes ; then the smaller for five minutes, 
excepting on Christmas and Easter days, when both are 
chimed together for ten minutes followed by the treble alone 
for five minutes. 

At Navenby the treble is first rung for fifteen minutes 
followed by chiming for ten minutes : then the tenor is 
rung for five minutes as a Sermon-bell. 

At North Owersby the ringing of the large bell com- 
mences three quarters of an hour (and rings for fifteen 
minutes) before service time : then no more ringing until 
about five minutes before the commencement of Divine 
Service, when the Priest's bell is sounded. 

At Irnham, where there are four bells, the custom is to 
chime the ist, 2nd, and 3rd: then raise the tenor: then 
again to chime the ist, 2nd, and 3rd, after which the tenor 
is lowered as a Sermon-bell. 

At Kirkby Laythorpe they first chime the ist and 2nd 
bells, and afterwards all three. 

At Sleaford each bell is chimed seriatim twice round : 
then all are chimed together : the tenor is next tolled fol- 
lowed by chiming again, at the end of which the 2nd bell 
is rung up, and then lowered at the time for commencing 
Divine Service. 

At Theddlethorpe S. Helen a bell is rung for five 
w 



154 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

minutes an hour before service commences : followed after 
a time, by chiming in the ordinary manner, with the treble 
alone at the close. 

At Louth the eight bells are raised for the 10.30 Morning 
Service, and rung from g till 10 o'clock, after which the 3rd, 
4th, and 5th bells are chimed till 10.20: the tenor is then 
raised and rung for five minutes, after lowering which the 
treble is raised and rung for five minutes, being ** settled" 
at 10,30. For the Afternoon Service the eight bells are 
chimed, after which the treble is raised and rung for five 
min'utes. For Evening Service the eight bells are again 
chimed for twenty minutes, followed by the ringing of the 
tenor for five minutes, and then by the ringing of the treble 
for the same length of time. 

Ringing before Divine Service has long been the custom 
at Louth: at a Vestry, held on the 20th April, 1781 : — 

It was ordered and agreed that the Ringers do attend at the Church 
every Sunday in the morning and evening ; in the morning at 10 
o'clock, and in the evening at 3 o'clock, and ring a peal on the bells 
half-an-hour, and then chyme in the bells, for which they are to be 
allowed four pounds in the year to begin on Sunday next. 

In 1792 it was agreed that the Ringers should continue 
the ringing in the morning, but the bells were to be only 
chimed in the afternoon.* 

At Saxilby it is the custom to strike the day of the 
month upon one of the bells immediately before the com- 
mencement of Divine Service. 

* Vestry Book. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 155 

On the Great Festivals the call to Divine Service is 
rung instead of chimed at Fleet, Holbeach All Saints, 
S. Botolph's, Lincoln, and Marsh Chapel ; at Winterton 
the bells on those days are rung not only for Matins and 
Evensong, but also for the early celebration of the Holy 
Communion ; and at Lea on those days a peal is rung 
before the usual chiming. 

These examples show the diversity of usage in different 
parishes : no doubt ancient customs have, in very many 
cases, been departed from ; for though the Parish Clerks 
were, like that ofhcer at Barrow-on-Humber in 1713, ex- 
pected to " tole a bell and ring a little according to the 
custom of the place,"* their respect for precedent was, 
doubtless, in many cases not so strong as that shown by the 
present Clerk at Thornton-le-Moor: there are in the Church 
there two bells, but it has always been the custom to ring 
only the small bell for service on Sundays " the large bell 
being," as the clerk observes, " reserved as a death-bell :" 
and though the small bell is now cracked, he still persists in 
ringing that, and that only, for Divine Service. 

Early Sunday Peals. With the introduction of the 
'* new sarvis " (as the Book of Common Prayer was called) 
in the time of Edward VI., the singing of the Canonical 
Hours — with the exception of Matins and Evensong — was 
dropped. The only traces of them we now have in the use 
of our church bells, excepting the ringing or chiming for 
Morning and Evening Prayer, are in the ringing of the 

* His " Duties " in MS. 



156 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

"first and second peals" on Sunday Mornings, at seven 
and eight, or eight and nine o'clock, in very many parishes. 
In Pre-Reformation times Matins was said in all parish 
churches before breakfast, as a preparation for mass. The 
" first peal " was the call to Matins, the " second peal" to 
tierce and mass.* It is a curious proof how tenacious 
custom is in having continued the ringing of these bells for 
over three hundred years after the purposes they served 
were abrogated, and when few even think of, or enquire as to, 
the meaning of their sound. For these " peals " (which 
are rung in many Lincolnshire parishes) the smaller bells 
are generally used. 

The mode of ringing varies : — 

At Market Deeping the ist bell is rung at 7 a.m.; the 
2nd and 3rd bells at g a.m. 

At Market Rasen the 2nd bell is tolled at 8 a.m. ; the 
2nd and 3d at g a.m. 

At Langtoft a single bell is rung at 8 a.m. ; two or more 
are chimed at g a.m. 

At Gedney the ist is rung at 7 a.m. ; the ist and 2nd 
chimed at 8 a.m. 

At Bourn the 2nd is rung at 8 a.m.; the 3rd and 4th at 
g a.m. 

At Caistor the 3rd bell is rung at 8 a.m. and again at g 
a.m. ; and at Coningsby and Stickney a single bell is rung 
at the same hours. 

• Sir Thomas More said " Some of us so longe fasting, as on the Sonday to com 
laye men think it a payne ones a weeke to and heare out theyr inntins."— Rock, iii. 
ryse so soon fro sleepe, and some to tarye part 2, pp. 5, 143, 146. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. i^y 

At Swineshead the 2nd bell is tolled at 8 a.m. ; and the 
5th and 6th at g a.m. 

At Westborough the ist bell is rung at 7 a.m., the 2nd 
at 8 a.m. ; and at Corringham, formerly, a bell was rung at 
those hours. 

At Branston the ist is rung at 8 a.m. ; the 2nd at g.30 
a.m. 

At Aswardby the ist is rung at 8 a.m. ; the 2nd at 9 a.m. 

At Halton Holgate the ist is rung at 7.30 a.m. ; the ist 
and 2nd at 8 a.m. 

At Redbourne a single bell is rung at 8 a.m., and again 
at 9 a.m. 

At Bennington the ist is rung at 8 a.m., and again at 
10 a.m. 

At Sleaford formerly the ist bell was rung at 7, and 
again at 8 a.m., but there being now an Early Celebration 
the 1st bell summons to that at 7.45 ; and the ist and 2nd, 
which are chimed at 8.45 a.m., are considered a summons 
to Sunday School, which commences at 9.30 a.m. 

At South Kelsey the tenor is sounded at 8 a.m., and 
again at 9 a.m. 

At Fleet the treble is rung at 8 a.m., after which forty 
strokes are given on the tenor: the ist and 2nd bells are 
chimed at 9 a.m. ; and at Billinghay the same ringing (but 
without the strokes on the tenor) takes place. 

At Doddington the single bell is rung at 8.30, and again 
at 9.30 a.m. 

At Heckington a single bell is rung at 7 a.m., and again 
— called the Matins' bell — at 9 a.m. 



158 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

At Morton when there is a Celebration of the Holy 
Communion the ist bell is rung at 8 a.m., the 3rd and 4th 
are chimed at 8.30, and the 3rd, 4th, and 5th at g a.m. 
When no Celebration the ist is rung at 8 a.m., and the 3rd 
and 4th are chimed at 9. The day of the month is given 
on the tenor bell every Sunday morning. 

The two Early Peals have, in very many parishes, 
merged into one: thus one bell is sounded at 7 a.m. at 
Halton West (2nd), North Kelsey, Navenby, Owston — 
where it was, until recently, also rung at 8 a.m. — Pinch- 
beck East (3rd), Spalding (3rd), Wellingore (ist), and 
Waddington ; one bell is rung at Aslackby at 7.30 a.m., 
but eight o'clock is the more usual time : at that hour one 
bell is chimed or rung at 



Allington, Althorpe, Appleby, Aylesby, Barholm, Barrow-on-Hum- 
ber, Bassingthorpe, Belton near Grantham, Bennington Long, 
Bitchfield, Blyborough, Blyton, Boothby Graffoe, Broughton Brant, 
Butterwick, Burton-on-Stather, Burton Goggles, Carlton Scroop, 
Claypole, Colsterworth, Cranwell, Denton, Deeping S. James, 
Eagle, Edenham, Ewerby, Fishtoft, Frieston, Frampton, Fulbeck, 
Gedney Hill, Gosberton, Grayingham, Haceby, Hemswell, Honing- 
ton, Keddington, Kirkby Laythorpe, Kirton-in-Lindsey, Lacey, 
Lavington, Leake, Leasingham,Leverton, Morton-by-Gainsborough, 
Newton-on-Trent, Newton, Normanton, Orby, Owmby, Potter- 
hanworth, Ponton Great, Ruskington, Scotter, Scopwick, Stock- 
with East, Stragglethorpe, Stubton, Swinderby, Tallington, Tetney 
(the Priest's), Thorpe-on-the-Hill, Washingborough, Welbourn, 
Willoughby-by-Stow, Willoughby Silk, Winterton, and formerly, 
but not now, at Coleby, Hibaldstow, Tydd S. Mary, and 
Winteringham. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 159 

In these parishes the treble or one other of the smaller 
bells is used, but the tenor is used at Amcotts, Caythorpe, 
Claxby, Goxhill, Ludborough and Ulceby ; at Lincoln, S. 
Peter-at-Arches the 5th bell is used, and at Harlaxton the 
2nd is rung at 8 o'clock, succeeded by a short chiming of 
the 1st and 2nd. At Sibsey the ist, 2nd, and 3rd bells are 
chimed at 8 a.m. excepting when Holy Communion is to 
be administered, when the chiming is at 7 a.m. and again at 
9 a.m. At Sutterton the day of the month is tolled 
every Sunday morning at 8 a.m. At Weston S. Mary the 
three bells are chimed at 8 a.m. At Horncastle the ist and 
2nd ; or the 3rd and 4th are chimed at 9 a.m. At the same 
hour a single bell — the treble or one of the smaller bells — 
is rung at Addlethorpe (where formerly the ist bell was rung 
at 8, and the 2nd and 3rd at 9 a.m.) , Billingborough, Binbrook, 
Broughton, Helpringham, Hemingby, Hundleby, Spilsby, 
North Scarle, Thornton Curtis, Witham-on-the-Hill, and 
formerly at Utterby. At Croyland, where the custom for- 
merly was to ring the 1st bell at 7 a.m., the 1st and 2nd 
bells are now chimed at 9 a.m., and the same custom is 
followed at Hale Magna. At Mumby the Priest's bell is 
rung at 8 a.m. At Haxey the tenor is rung at 7 a.m. and 
again at 8 a.m. and is called the Sermon-bell : at Fiskerton 
the tenor, which is rung at 8 a.m., is also called the Sermon- 
bell "because it is rung whenever there is to be a sermon 
during the day : " at Laughton also the 8 a.m. bell is called 
the Sermon-bell. At Belton, Isle of Axholme, the treble is 
rung at 8 a.m. after which 5, 6, 7, and 8 strokes are given 
upon the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th bells respectively. At' 



i6o Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

Aisthorpe all five bells are rung or else chimed according to 
the number of ringers present at 8 a.m. At Baston the ist 
and 2nd bells are chimed at 8 a.m. : and at Donington 
the same bells are chimed at 9 a.m. At Barkeston the ist 
bell is rung at 8.30 a.m. At Burton-by-Lincoln and at 
Ingoldsby a bell is rung at 8 a.m. after which the day of the 
month is tolled. At Bicker the same occurs after the ring- 
ing of a bell at 7 a.m. in summer and 8 a.m. in winter. 
At Castle Bytham the ist and 2nd bells are chimed at g 
a.m. : the two bells meaning, says the clerk, two services. 
At Limber the bells are chimed at 8 a.m. At Moulton 
three bells are chimed at 8 a.m., and at Long Sutton the 
same number of bells at 9 a.m. At Rippingale the 3rd and 
4th bells are chimed at 9 a.m. At Revesby the single bell 
is sounded at 8 a.m. "to enable the parishioners to set 
their clocks right for the day." At Hogsthorpe the custom 
was, until recently, to ring one bell at 8 a.m. ; again at 
9 a.m. ; and again at 10 a.m. (traditionally said to have 
been originally so rung for Matins, Litany, and Holy Com- 
munion respectively) at which time the morning service 
then began : there are no early peals now. At Burgh the 
1st and 2nd bells are chimed at 8 a.m., after which the 
tenor is raised, the whole taking five minutes. 

These Early Peals are now frequently considered as 
notices of services which are to follow later on in the day : 
indeed in some parishes they are distinctly so used, for 
example : — 

At Scothorne the ist bell is rung at 8 a.m., after which 
the day of the month is tolled on the 2nd bell, and when 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. i6i 

morning service is to be said the 2nd is rung at 9 a.m. At 
Welton the 2nd bell is rung at 8.30 a.m. when there is to 
be morning service ; at 12.30 when afternoon service. At 
Westborough the 1st is rung at 7 and the 2nd at 8 a.m. 
when there is to be morning service ; the ist at 11, and the 
2nd at noon, when only afternoon service. At Dunsby a 
bell is rung at 8, and again at 9 a.m. when morning service 
is to follow. At Doddington Dry the single bell is rung at 
7, and again at 8 a.m., when Matins and Evensong are to 
be said; at 11 a.m. and again at noon when only Evensong. 
At Carlton-le-Moorland, Northorpe, Swarby, Torksey and 
Walcott, a bell is rung at 8 a.m. when there is to be morn- 
ing service : at noon when only Evensong, the tenor being 
used at Walcott. At Wootton the 2nd bell is rung at 8 a.m. 
excepting when there is to be only evening service when 
it is rung in the afternoon. At Corby the ist bell is sounded 
at 8, and the ist and 2nd at 10 a.m., when Matins are to be 
said, the same at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., when only Evensong. 
At Irby-on-Humber a bell is rung at 8 a.m., "to let the 
people know of morning service " and again at 10 a.m. "to 
tell of afternoon service." At Irnham the ist and 2nd 
bells are rung at 10 a.m. when only morning service : the 
same at 2 p.m. when afternoon service : at North Witham 
the same bells are rung at 8 a.m. when there is to be morn- 
ing service, at noon when only Evensong. At Bonby, 
Cotes Magna, and Nettleton, the tenor bell is rung at 
8 a.m., and a bell is rung at Cammeringham at 9 a.m. 
only when there is to be morning service. 

At Stamford there is much early ringing : at All Saints' 

X 



i62 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

the custom is between 7 and 8 a.m. to chime three bells, 
then toll the tenor : a quarter of an hour after which the 
3rd and 4th, then the 4th and 5th bells are chimed, followed 
by another tolling of the tenor. At S. George's between 
8 and g a.m. they first chime the ist and 2nd, then the 2nd 
and 3rd bells, followed by a tolling of the tenor. At S. John 
Baptist's the ist, 2nd, and 3rd bells are chimed at 7.30 
a.m. : at 8.30 the tenor is tolled for early Celebration. At 
S. Mary's between 8 and g a.m. the 3rd and 4th, then the 
5th and 6th bells are chimed, followed by a tolling of the 
tenor. At S. Michael's two bells are chimed at 8 a.m. 

The Sermon Bell. In the "Rites of Durham" is this 
reference to the Sermon-bell : — " Every Sounday in the 
yere there was a sermon preached in the Galleley at after- 
noone, from one of the clocke till iij ; and at xij of the 
clocke the great bell of the Galleley was toulled every 
sounedaie iij quarters of an houre, and during the fourth 
quarter till one of the clock, that all the people of the towne 
might have warnyng to come and here the word of Gode 
preched."* The Royal Injunctions of 1547 ordered a bell 
in convenient time to be rung or knolled before the sermon. 
When Hugh Latimer visited Melton Mowbray, Leicester- 
shire, and preached in the church there, that custom was 
followed ; for the churchwardens charge in their accounts : — 

" 1553 October. Itm. payd to John Hynmane and to 
Robert Bagworth for rynginge of y" great bell for 
master latimore sarmon iji." 

* Suftces Soc. p. 22- 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 163 

The Sermon bell was sometimes rung during the Litany 
to give notice to the people that the sermon was coming 
on ;* and one of the duties of the Bell-ringer at Exeter 
Cathedral, in 1670, was "to toll y*" Sermon Bell every 
Sunday after the second lesson of the Quire Service in y® 
morning when there is a sermon. "f The Puritans were so 
often ready to go to Sermon, but not to Prayers, that the 
bishops tried to check the unseemly practice of going into 
church after Prayers were said, by directing attention to it 
in their Visitation Articles, and Wren (1640) directed with 
regard to the Sermon-bell "That the same ringing of bells 
should be observed at all times whether there was a Sermon 
or not. "J 

The ringing of this bell after the chiming, when a sermon 
is to be preached, though not universal, is very general in 
Lincolnshire : the tenor bell is so used at 

Addlethorpe, Allington, Ancaster, Appleby, Ashby Puerorum, 
Ashby-cum-Fenby, Ashby-de-la-Launde, Ashby West, Aswarby, 
Aubourn, Barholm, Barkstone, Bassingthorpe, Belton (Isle of 
Axholme), Belton near Grantham, Binbrook, Bitchfield, Bloxholm, 
Blyton, Boothby Graffoe, Boothby Pagnell, Boston, Bottesford, 
Branston, Carlton-le-Moorland, Carlton Scroop, Caythorpe, Claxby, 
Coleby, Coningsby, Crowle, Deeping Market, Denton, Digby, 
Donington-on-Bain, Dunston, Elsham, Elkington South, Epworth, 
Evedon, Ewerby, Folkingham, Foston, Fulbeck, Fulletby, Goxhill, 
Grayingham, Gunby S. Nicolas, Hale Magna, Halton West, Har- 
laxton, Heckington, Helpringham, Heydour, Hibaldstow, Horn- 



• See Lathbury's Hist, of Book of Com. f Bells of Exeter Cathednil, p. S3. 

Prayer, 2nd Ed. p. 83. + Lathbury, p. 175-6. 



164 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

castle, Irnham, Kelsey South, Kirkby-cum-Osgodby, Kirkby Under- 
wood, Kirton-in-Lindsey, Lavington, Lincoln S. Botolph and S. 
Peter-at-Arches, Linwood, Ludborough, Navenby, Newton, Nor- 
manton, Norton Disney, Ormsby South, Owston, Partney, Pinch- 
beck East, Ponton Great, Potterhanworth, Rasen Market, Rasen 
Middle, Raithby-by-Louth, Redbourne, Scarle North, Scredington, 
Sibsey, Skellingthorpe, Skidbrook, Skirbeck, Spilsby, Springthorpe, 
Stainby, Stamford All Saints, S. George, S. John Baptist, and 
S. Michael ; Stow, Stroxton, Surfleet, Swaton, Swinderby, Tal- 
lington, Tattershall, Thornton Curtis, Thorpe-on-the-Hill, Ulceby, 
Utterby, Waddington, Walcot, Wainfleet S. Mary, Washing- 
borough, Welbourn, Wellingore, Welton, Westborough, Winter- 
ingham, Winterton, and Wragby. 

The treble bell is rung as a Sermon-bell after the chiming 
at Aunsby ("because less trouble than the tenor,") 
Baumber, Benington, Broughton, Burgh, Burton Goggles, 
Honington, Langton-by- Wragby, Rippingale, South Somer- 
cotes, and North Witham. 

At Leverton the ringing of the ist is called the Sermon- 
bell, though the tenor is rung just preceding. 

At Butterwick, Fishtoft, Frieston, and Leake the tenor 
is rung as the Sermon-bell fifteen minutes before the 
service. 

At Leasingham and Scotton the 2nd bell is rung as the 
Sermon-bell after the chiming. 

At Harpswell and at Hemswell a bell is rung as the 
clergyman enters the churchyard, but whether intended as 
a Sermon or a Priest's bell is uncertain. 

At Haxey the tenor bell rung at 7 a.m. and again at 
8 a.m., and at Fiskerton the same bell rung at 8 a.m. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 165 

are called the Sermon-bells : the early bell (8 a.m.) at 
Laughton is also called the Sermon-bell. 

At Bourn, Claypole, Grantham and Skendleby the tenor 
is rung as a Sermon-bell before the ringing or chiming. 

At Laceby — where the tenor was formerly rung — they 
now ring the Priest's bell as the Sermon-bell : so at Tetney 
the Priest's bell is rung as a Sermon-bell after chiming and 
ringing of the treble. 

Occasionally the inscription on the tenor bell refers to 
its use as a Sermon-bell : thus at Ancaster : — 

I will sounde and resounde unto thy people O Lord 
With my sweet voyce to call them to thy word. 

In Northamptonshire we find : — 

I ring to sermon with a lusty home 

That all may come and none may stay at home. 

Sunday Mid-day Peals. It is customary in many 
parishes to ring at the close of the Morning Service in a 
similar manner to that described under Early Peals : thus 
the ist and 2nd bells are so rung at Brant Broughton, Hale 
Magna, Harlaxton, and, until recently, at All Saints and 
S. John Baptist, Stamford. 

At Bourn the 2nd is rung at the close of Morning 
Service, and the 3rd and 4th bells at 2 p.m. 

The treble bell only is rung at Aslackby, Barholm, 
Bennington Long, Edenham, Holbeach All Saints, Lang- 
toft, Lavington, Leasingham, Leverton, Scothorne, Stubton, 
Thornton-le-Moor, and Toynton All Saints. 



1 66 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

The tenor is so rung at Caythorpe : and the 2nd at 
Barkstone and at Sleaford. 

At Aswarby and at Thorpe-on-the-Hill the treble bell is 
rung at i p.m. 

At Horncastle the ist and 2nd, or the 3rd and 4th, are 
rung at 2 p.m. 

As the Early Peals are frequently considered signals for 
the Morning Service, so these mid-day ringings are some- 
times now used as warnings that Evensong will be said : 
they are only used when such will be the case at Burton 
Goggles, Thimbleby, and Wellingore, at which places the 
treble is rung : at Cotes Magna the tenor is rung. 

At Cammeringham, at Dunsby, and at Harpswell, when 
there is no Morning Service the bell is rung at noon to 
announce Evensong : the same custom is followed at 
Morton, where, after ringing the treble at noon, the day of 
the month is tolled on the tenor. 

At South Kelsey the tenor is rung at the conclusion of 
Morning Service, and again at 5 p.m., when Evening 
Service is to be said. 

At Heckington a bell is rung at 4 p.m. : and at Scopwick 
and at Willoughby the tenor is sounded at the same time, 
which is locally said to be "meant as a warning to the 
ringers to remember Evening Service:" at Swineshead 
the 2nd bell is tolled at 4 p.m., and the 5th and 6th at 5 
p.m. 

At Gedney Hill a bell is always rung at the end of every 
service on Sunday and week-day alike ; and at Louth, until 
recently, the 3rd bell was rung after both Morning and 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 167 

Evening Service on Sunday, and was called the " Leaving- 
off bell." 

At Wainfleet S. Mary it is the custom to ring a peal 
after Morning Service. 

At Hogsthorpe it was, until recently, the custom to ring 
a bell at noon, again at i p.m., and again at 2 p.m., half- 
an-hour after which the service began. 

It was formerly the custom at Croyland to ring the ist 
bell at 12.30, and to chime two bells at 4 p.m., but both are 
now discontinued. 

The bell at the close of the Morning Service is, in some 
places, known as 

"The Pudding Bell" being supposed to be rung in 
order to give the cook warning that Service is over, and so 
dinner may be prepared : others, as already said, think that 
the ringing at the close of one Service was, and is, meant 
as the signal that another will follow ; others, again, that 
the custom originated in the habits of neglect on the part 
of the clergy in the country districts ; who being frequently 
non-resident, and holding Services at irregular times were, 
in consequence, obliged to give warning thereof: but it is 
more probable that the custom is the survival of the 

Knolling of the Aves mentioned in the Injunctions of 
1538 as being sounded after the Service, and at certain 
other times, and as having been brought in and begun by 
the pretence of the Bishop of Rome's pardon, and it was 
ordered that they be thenceforth left and omitted. Shaxton, 
Bishop of Sarum, in that year, said " That the bell called 
the Pardon or Ave Bell which of longe tyme hathe been 



1 68 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

used to be tolled three tymes after and before Divine 
Service be not hereafter, in any part of my diocese, any 
more toUyd." 

In some places the Aves' bell was tolled thrice every day. 
That was the case at Cropedy, Oxfordshire, as we know 
from a benefaction to the Bells made by Master Roger 
Lupton, vicar of that parish, by Indenture dated 26 August, 
1512. He gave certain money to the churchwardens upon 
condition that they should amongst other things, "toll 
dayly the Avees bell at sex of the clok in the mornyng, 
at xij of the clok at noone, and at foure of the clok at 
afternoone."* 

The saying of the Aves was between the tolling : among 
the articles of enquiry in 1547 was one whether the knoll- 
ing at the Aves be used ? 

The ringing or tolling of a bell or bells before the 
chiming or ringing commences for Divine Service at Ashby- 
de-la-Launde, Bourn, Carlton-le-Moorland, Claypole, Cock- 
erington South, Fleet, Folkingham, Friesthorpe, Gedney 
Hill, Grantham, Halton Holgate, Lea, Navenby, Owersby 
North, Sleaford, Theddlethorpe S. Helen, and Welton may 
be, and probably is — as well as the ringing at the close of the 
Service — a continuance of the custom of knolling the Aves. 

Sacrament-bell. At Stamford All Saints', S. George's 
and S. Michael's the treble bell is rung, after the chiming 
for Morning Service, instead of the tenor (Sermon-bell) 
when there is to be a mid-day Celebration and no sermon : 

• Historical Notices of Cropredy, by Rev. D. Royce, p. 43. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 169 

and at S. Mary's in the same town on a similar occasion 
the 3rd and 4th are first chimed, then the 4th, 5th, and 6th 
followed by the ringing of the 2nd instead of the usual 
Sermon-bell. At Fulbeck the 5th bell is rung at the close 
of the chiming on like occasions. 

At S. Botolph's, Lincoln (where all the bells are chimed 
for early Celebrations), the "ting-tang" is used as a Sacra- 
ment-bell. It is always sounded for five minutes before the 
hour (when the other bells have ceased) at 8 a.m. on Sunday 
mornings. It is also rung when there is a mid-day Celebra- 
tion (which is on the ist Sunday in the month) after Matins, 
at which service the sermon is preached. The Celebration 
is then proceeded with without any break for sermon, and 
so invalids and others, wishing to do so, can attend the 
Holy Communion Service only. 

At Holbeach All Saints it is the custom to ring a bell 
at the end of the Litan}^ and at Spalding parish church 
the 4th bell is tolled at the same time, and again for a few 
minutes when the Celebration is over. At S. Peter-in- 
Eastgate, Lincoln, and at Winterton, the ist bell is rung 
at the close of the sermon when a Celebration follows. 

This useful custom is referred to in Bishop Hooper's 
Injunctions (1551) in these words: — 

" . . • . and in case there be any pause between the Morning 
Prayer and the Communion, then to advertise and signify unto the 
people of the ministration of the Holy Sacrament, to toll one bell, 
such as the parish shall think most meet and convenient." 

It was, until recently, the custom at Horncastle to ring 

Y 



170 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

the 5th bell at six o'clock on the evening preceding the day 
on which the Holy Communion was to be Celebrated. 

The Passing-Bell. Besides the use of bells for calling 
to Divine Service the Canons enjoin the tolling of the 
" Passing-bell." The custom of notifying, by this means, 
the passing of a soul out of this life, is almost, if not quite, 
as ancient, in this country, as the use of bells by the church. 
Bede mentions " the well known sound of the bell by which 
they [the Nuns of Hackness] were wont to be aroused or 
assembled to prayers when any one of them was called forth 
from this world," as being heard in the year 680.* 

Durand, who wrote about the end of the twelfth century, 
says : " when any one is dying bells must be tolled that the 
people may put up their prayers, twice for a woman and 
thrice for a man ; if for a clergyman as many times as he 
had orders. "t The Passing-bell was, of course, then rung 
at all hours of the night, as well as by day. This custom 
is referred to in an entry in the accounts of the Church- 
wardens of Peterborough for the year 1572 : — 

" Itiri to Scarlet (the sexton) beyng a poore olde man and 
rysyng oft in the nyghte to tolle the bell for sicke 
persons the wether beynge grevous, and in con- 
sideration of his good service towards a gowne to 
kepe hym warme viiJ5." 

After the Reformation the custom of ringing the Passing- 
bell in the ancient way was continued. Even Bucer, who was 
no lover of bells, allowed of ringing " to pray for the sick." 

* Bede, Book iv. c. xxiii. f Brand's Pop. Ant. u. 129. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 171 

Bishop Hooper in his Injunctions, issued in 1551, says : 

" Item. That from henceforth there be no knells or forthfares 
rung for the death of any man ; but in case they that be sick and 
in danger, or any of their friends will demand to have the bell toll 
whiles the sick is in extremes to admonish people of their danger, 
and by that means to solicitate the hearers to pray for the sick 
person, they may use it." 

The Passing-bell is enjoined by the royal Injunctions of 
1559, and the Advertisements, issued in the year 1564, show 
that it was still usual to ring or toll the Passing-bell whilst 
the person was believed to be dying, but not yet dead : 
" That where anye Christian bodie be passing that the bell 
be tolled, and that the curate be specially called for to 
comforte the sicke person." The bell was ordered to be 
used by Grindal in 1570, "to move the people to pray for 
the sick person."* In 1588 the custom is referred to in the 
Records of the Corporation of Boston in this county 
thus : — 

" Every person that shall have the great bell rung for him in their 
extremity of sickness to pay 4" to the church, over and beside the 
usual fee due to the clock-keeper." 

The Bishops, in after years, enquired in their Articles 
whether the Passing-bell was so tolled. Bishop Cosin in 
his Visitation Articles for the Diocese of Durham in 1662, 
enquires : — 

• Lathbury, p. 86. 



172 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

"And, when any person is passing out of this world doth he [parish 
clerk or sexton] upon notice given him thereof, go and toll a bell, 
as hath been accustomed, that the neighbours may thereby be 
warned to recommend the dying person to the grace and favour of 
God?"* 

In 1624 D'Ewes mentions the bell tolling for a person 
whom he visited, and who lived some hours afterwards. 
The Puritans used the Passing-bell, as Fuller shows in his 
account of John Rainolds, one of the Puritan advocates of 
the Hampton Court Conference: he says: " The morrow 
after, death seazing upon all parts of his body, he expressed 
by signes that he would have the passing-bell tole for 
him."t 

Amongst the fees belonging to the Bell-ringer of Exeter 
Cathedral in 1670 were : 

" For tolling the bell for every sick person is. 

For every childe 6i."J 

The custom was continued to recent times. Nelson in 
his Meditations for the Holy Time of Lent, speaking of a good 
christian says: — "If his sense hold out so long he can 
hear his Passing-bell without disturbance. "§ At Barrow- 



* Cosin's Works (Lib. Ang. Cath. The- Catherine, sister of Lady Jane Grey, who 

ology), Vol. IV. p. 517. died a prisoner in the Tower of London, in 

-f Lathbury, p. 151-2. 1567; Sir Owen Opton, Constable of the 

:|: Bells of Exeter Cathedral, p. 32. Tower, perceiving her drawing towards 

§ Bells of the Church, p. 273, where the her end, said to Mr. Bokeham, 'Were it 

following instance is given from Brayley's not best to send to the church that the bell 

History of the Tow^^r, p. 460. " We have a may be rung?' and she herself hearing 

remarkable mention of this custom in the him, said, ' Good, Sir Owen, be it so,' and 

narrative of the last moments of the Lady immediately died." 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 173 

on-Humber in this county amongst the Clerk's fees in 1713 
we find : — 

" For every passing bell four pence and for every soul bell four 
pence." 

the former being rung according to ancient practice, the 
latter after death, as a Death-knell. At Melton Mowbray, 
Leicestershire, the custom was first departed from in the 
case of Mr. Crane, who died about 1738. He " was the 
first person in Melton," says Nichols, "for whom the bell 
tolled after death, till when the custom was for it to pass 
before, agreeably to the primitive institution." Wheatley 
speaks of the Passing-bell as being generally disused in 
1755.* The late Mrs. Law, who died in 1874, aged about 
94 years, not only remembered the Passing-bell being rung in 
the ancient manner at King's Cliffe, Northamptonshire, but 
she used to relate that upon one occasion it was tolled for 
a lady who did not then die as was expected, but recovered 
her health. The inscriptions on some of the tenor bells in 
this county refer to their use for the Passing-bell : for ex- 
ample, at Addlethorpe : — 

Remember Death. 
At Claypole : — 

All men that heare my mournful! sound 
Repent before you lye in ground. 

At Fishtoft :— 

Vitam metior mortem ploro. 

» Rat. III. of Book of Com. Prayer, p. 427. 



174 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 



At Frampton : — 



My roring sound doth warning give 
That men cannot heare allwaies live. 

At West Keal :— 

To speak a parting Soul is giv'n to me 

Be trimm'd thy Lamp as if I toll'd for Thee. 

At Owmby : — 

When you die aloud I cry. 

And occasionally — as at Deeping S. James — an inscription 
is used which refers to the modern custom in contrast to 
the ancient : — 

Non sono animabus mortuorum sed auribus viventium. 

The bell now used for the Passing-bell (or more properly 
the Death-knell) is usually the tenor, but this is sometimes, 
as we shall see, changed in the case of children, when a 
smaller bell is occasionally rung. At the close, or the com- 
mencement, or at both, of the Passing-bell it has long been 
the custom to indicate the sex of the person departing, or 
departed, by certain strokes or tolls of the bell. These 
have generally been three for a male (in honour of the 
Holy Trinity), and two for a female (in honour of our 
Saviour born of a woman), on the tenor bell, as at Aisthorpe, 
Bicker, Bratoft, Carlton Castle, Dowsby, Harlaxton, Hey- 
dour. Ponton Little, Quadring, Rippingale and Straggle- 
thorpe. These are given before and after the knell at 
Aubourn, Caythorpe, Claxby, and Mumby. Sometimes, as 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 175 

at Claypole, Middle Rasen, and Stow-S.-Mary these tolls 
are given on all the bells. At Scothorn the tenor is first 
tolled, then rung up, then, after a pause, lowered, after 
which each bell is tolled three times for a male, twice for a 
female. At North Kelsey three strokes are given on each 
bell for a male, two for a female, after which the tenor is 
raised and rung for about twenty minutes followed for a 
few minutes by a " minute bell " first on the tenor, then on 
the treble bell. Three tolls for a man, two for a woman, 
and one for a child are given at Alkborough, Beelsby, and 
Donington-on-Bain (before and after) : at Luddington these 
tolls are given on each of the three bells, and at Long 
Sutton these tolls are given on the 4th, 5th, and tenor bells, 
after which the 5th is rung for ten minutes. At Morton-by- 
Gainsborough the bell is tolled in triplets for a man, in 
couples for a woman, and in single strokes for a child for 
about ten minutes in each case. At Welton these three 
tolls for a male and two for a female are given on the 4th, 
5th, and 6th bells, and at Winteringham and at Winterton 
on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th bells. 

The most usual form of distinction of sex, however, in 
this county is thrice three tolls for a male and thrice two 
for a female : such is the custom at : 

Ancaster, Aslackby, Aswarby, Aunsby, Bardney, Bennington Long, 
Belton-by-Grantham, Billinghay, Bitchfield, Bloxholme, Boothby 
Graffoe, Bottesford, Branston, Brinkhill, Burgh, Burton-by-Lincoln, 
Burton Goggles, Burton Pedwardine, Caistor, Carlton Scroop, 
Coleby, Cranwell, Groyland, Denton, Digby, Doddington Dry, 
Donington, Dorrington, Dunholme, Dunsby, Dunston, Edenham, 



176 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

Evedon, Ewerby, Fiskerton, Folkingham, Foston, Gainsborough, 
Grantham, Gunby S. Nicolas, Hacconby, Haceby, Hale Magna, 
Harmston, Harpswell, Heapham, Helpringham, Hemswell, Irnham, 
Irby All Saints, Kelsey South, Kirkby-cum-Osgodby, Kirkby Lay- 
thorpe, Kirkby Underwood, Kyme South, Langton-by-Wragby, 
Leasingham, Limber Magna, Lincoln S. Martin, S. Mary-le- 
Wigford, S. Paul, S. Peter-at-Arches and S. Peter-at-Gowts, at 
Londonthorpe, Mareham-le-Fen, Navenby, Newton, Nocton, Nor- 
manton, Norton Disney, Osbournby, Owersby North, Ponton 
Great, Potterhanworth, Reston South, Saltfleetby S. Clement, 
Scredington, Scopwick, Scarle North, Skellingthorpe, Skendleby, 
Stainby, Stockwith East, Stroxton, Stubton, Swinstead, Tallington, 
Tattershall, Tetney, Thorpe-on-the-Hill, Thornton-le-Moor, Torksey, 
Upton, Waddington, Washingborough, Westborough, Willingham- 
by-Stow, Willingham South, and Witham North. 

The same number of tolls, — thrice three for a male, 
thrice two for a female, — are given both before and after 
the knell at 

Allington East and West, Ashby-de-la-Launde, Ashby West, 
Barholm, Barkston, Bassingthorpe, Baston, Billingborough, Boothby 
Pagnell, Bourn, Careby, Colsterworth, Coningsby, Corby, Deeping 
Market, Deeping S. James, Elkington South, Fulbeck, Honington, 
Lavington, Orby, Swinderby, Ulceby, Welbourn, Welby, Wel- 
lingore, Willoughby, and at Yarburgh, 

At Blyborough, Hawerby, and Morton, these distinctive 
tolls are given only at the commencement of the knell. At 
Gainsborough the 6th bell is rung for the knell, but the 
distinctive tolls are given on the tenor. At Hawerby the 
smaller of the two bells is used. At Lincoln, S. Peter-at- 
Arches, and S. Peter-at-Gowts, the custom is to toll the tenor 
for ten minutes, and then ring it for five minutes. At 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 177 

Dorrington the Passing-bell is never rung before 8 a.m. nor 
after 6 p.m. At Branston and at Heapham the age of the 
deceased is tolled after the knell. At the following places 
the bell is rung a short time only for children : — Billing- 
borough, Doddington Dry, Hale Magna, Kirkby-cum- 
Osgodby, Morton, Owersby North, Thornton-le-Moor, and 
Westborough : and at Bardney, Bourn, Deeping Market, 
Deeping S. James, Edenham, Tallington, and Willoughby, 
the death of a child is indicated by ringing the treble or 
one of the other small bells instead of the tenor. At 
Heckington the ringing is commenced by nine tolls in 
succession, followed by thrice three tolls for a male : or 
by six tolls in succession, followed by thrice two tolls 
for a female. At Louth, where these distinctive tolls 
2, X d> ^^^ 3x2 are used, the use of the 5th bell is 
included in the burial fee, and so is generally rung for the 
working classes : for the use of the 7th bell a fee of ■^s. 6d. 
is charged, and is generally rung for the tradespeople : and 
for the tenor the fee is 55., and its use is chiefly confined to 
the nobility and gentry. At Croyland the treble bell is 
rung for infants, the 3rd for children, and the tenor for 
adults. At Tattershall upon the death of any church 
officer the tenor is rung as a minute bell for an hour. 

These nine tolls for a man are sometimes called 
"tellers," audit has been suggested that the old saying 

Nine tailors make a man 

is a corruption of a saying arising from the thrice three 
tolls or " tellers " at the close of the passing-bell, 
z 



178 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

Nine tellen mark a man. 
In addition to these modes of indicating the sex and 
age of the deceased, there are very many more in use in 
Lincolnshire. Some of them have, no doubt, been long in 
use, others are, probably, corruptions of older customs 
through the ignorance or negligence of parish clerks or 
sextons. A record of these, though, perhaps, tedious, 
may well be preserved as the collecting of them has 
involved some trouble. 

At Owston thrice three tolls are given for a man on 
four bells, beginning with the 6th, ending with the 3rd ; 
the same for a boy under ten, but commencing with the 
3rd and ending with the 6th. For a woman seven tolls 
are given, commencing with the 6th and ending with the 
3rd bell, and the same number for a girl beginning with 
the 3rd and ending with the 6th bell. These tollings are 
both before and after the knell, which is rung on the 
tenor for adults, on the 5th bell for children. 

At Tydd S. Mary, where thrice three tolls are given for 
a male, four single strokes and then three are given for a 
female, the tenor being used for adults, the treble for 
children. The same custom is followed at Moulton for a 
man or a woman, but for a child they give three tolls and 
then two. 

Thrice three tolls for a man, thrice two for a woman and 
three single strokes for a child are given at Addlethorpe, 
Authorpe, Barrow-on-Humber, Brant Broughton, Burton- 
on-Stather (at beginning and end), Cockerington South, 
Crowle, Elsham, Holywell, Keal East (after which the age 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. lyg 

is tolled), Messingham (at beginning and end), Somercotes 
South, Theddlethorpe S. Helen, Tothill, Walton-le-Wold, 
Withern, and at Goxhill, where the tenor is tolled a little at 
the commencement, then the indicating tolls are given, after 
which the tenor is again tolled, followed by the indicating 
tolls on all the bells. 

At Saltfleetby S. Peter, thrice three tolls are given for a 
man, thrice two for a woman, and twice two for a child 
before the knell. 

Thrice three tolls are given for a male and twice three 
for a female at Castle Bytham (before and after the knell), 
Skegness and Timberland. 

At Doddington thrice three tolls are given for a male and 
twice two for a female, and the same for a man and a woman 
at Blyton, where, however, a child is indicated by one stroke. 

At Ruskington and Silk Willoughby the death of a man 
is indicated by thrice three tolls, that of a woman by thrice 
two, that of a boy by twice three, and that of a girl by 
twice two : the same custom is followed at Sleaford and 
Swarby, at which two places, however, the tolls are given 
both before and after the knell, and the age of the deceased 
is tolled at the end. 

At Belleau, Hatcliffe, Irby-on-Humber, Raithby-by- 
Louth and Searby thrice three tolls are given for a man, 
twice three for a woman, and three single ones for a child : 
the same custom is followed at Alford, excepting that for a 
child one toll is given on each bell. 

At Carlton-le-Moorland, Gosberton, Lincoln S. Botolph, 
and Weston S. Mary the indicating tolls are thrice three 



i8o Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

for a man, twice three for a boy, thrice two for a woman 
and twice two for a girL 

At Althorpe they give nine strokes on the 3rd bell for a 
man, seven strokes on the 2nd bell for a woman, and five 
on the first bell for a child. 

Nine tolls are given for males and seven for females at 
Alvingham (where the knell is rung half-an-hour for adults, 
a quarter of an hour for children), Barkwith East, Cocker- 
ington North (rung as at Alvingham), Grimoldby, Hogs- 
thorpe, Lacey, Ludborough, Pinchbeck East (where the 
tenor is used for adults, the 2nd bell for children), Thoresby 
North, and Theddingthorpe All Saints, where the tolls are 
given both before and after the knell. 

At Belton, Isle of Axholme (where the 2nd bell is used 
for children), Benniworth, Gedney Hill, and Scotter, nine 
tolls are given for a man, seven for a woman, and five 
for a child : at Waltham and Wootton the same number 
are given for a man and a woman, but four are the num- 
ber for a boy, three for a girl, at the latter place before the 
knell : at Horkstow the same for a man and woman, but 
three for a boy and five for a girl : and at Thornton 
Curtis, where the same tolls indicate a man and a woman, 
three tolls are given for a child, and at that place all the 
tolls are given upon each bell, after which, the age of the 
deceased is tolled on the tenor. 

At Bigby and Bonby seven tolls are given for a man, 
five for a woman, and three for a child, at the former place 
both before and after the knell. 

At Frampton and Sutterton the custom is to give three 



Pecidiav Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. i8i 

tolls four times for a man, three times for a woman, twice 
for a child in teens, and three single tolls for a young child. 
The same custom is followed at Wainfleet S. Mary, except- 
ing that twice three tolls serve for all children. 

At Holbeach All Saints, thrice three tolls are given for 
a man, three tolls and then four tolls for a woman, three 
and two for a boy, and twice two for a girl both before and 
after the knell. 

At Haxey five tolls are given for a male, three for a 
female, on the tenor for adults, the 5th bell for children. 

At Scotton nine strokes are given for a male, namely 
three on tenor, three on treble, then three on tenor again : 
for a female the same number but beginning and ending 
with the treble bell. 

At West Halton both before and after the knell, four 
tolls are given on each bell for a man, three for a woman, 
and two for a child, commencing in each case with the 
treble bell. 

At Corringham four tolls are given for a male, three for 
a female before, and twice four for a male, twice three for a 
female after the knell. 

At Great Grimsby four tolls are given for a male, three 
for a female before tolling the 7th bell. 

At Hibaldstow they give four tolls on the tenor for a 
male, three on each bell for a female. 

At Skirbeck and Swineshead the indicating tolls are 
rather precise: they are three times four for a married man, 
twice four for a single man, and four single strokes for a 
male child : thrice three for a married woman, twice three 



i82 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

for a single woman, and three single tolls for a female 
child. The same custom is followed at Boston with the 
exception of seven tolls, instead of four times two, for 
bachelors. 

The notification at Northorpe is given in couples thus : 
six couple of tolls for a man, five for a woman, four for a 
boy, and three for a girl. 

At Caenby five times four tolls are given for a man, four 
times four for a woman, and three times four for children 
under twelve years of age. 

At Epworth at the commencement of the knell one 
stroke is given on the ist bell, two on the 2nd, three on the 
3rd, four on the 4th, five on the fifth, then twelve tolls on 
the tenor for a man, nine for a woman : the same for 
children, excepting the use of the 4th bell instead of the 
tenor. 

At Butterwick, Fishtoft, Frieston, Leake, and Stickney, 
they give thrice four tolls for a man, twice four for a 
boy, thrice three for a woman, and twice three for a 
girl. 

At Kirton-in-Lindsey six tolls are given for a man, five 
for a woman, four for a boy, and three for a girl. In case 
of an Inquest the bell is not rung until after the enquiry is 
over. 

At Mumby Chapel they give four times three tolls for a 
male, and three times three for a female : the same custom 
is followed at Leverton, where it is according to ancient 
use, as is shown by an entry in the Constables' Accounts 
for the year 1692 : — 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 183 

" In ringing the passing-bell it has been time out of mind customary 
for a man that dies to toll 12 tolls. For a woman g tolls. They 
are accounted man or woman at the age of 16 or 18 years. For 
younger persons, a male 7 tolls ; a female 6 tolls."* 

At Algarkirk, Kirton-in-Holland, Mablethorpe S. Mary, 
and Wyberton, it is the custom to toll twelve strokes for a 
man, nine for a woman, three for a child : at Benington and 
Laughton the same number for a man and a woman, but 
seven for a boy and six for a girl at the former place, and 
six for a child of either sex at the latter. 

At Broughton they give twelve tolls for a man, eight for 
a woman, and six for a child, after which the tenor is tolled 
half-an-hour for an adult, and a quarter of an hour for a 
child. 

Four strokes for a male and three for a female are the 
indicating tolls at Cuxwold and at Keddington. 

At Fulstow (where the bell is tolled longer for old people 
than for the young) they give three times four tolls for a 
male, and four times three for a female. 

At Bolingbroke, Hareby, and Sibsey — at the last-named 
place a few tolls are first given as if to call attention, and 
the distinctive tolls are given both before and after the 
knell — the custom is thrice four tolls for a man, thrice three 
for a woman, and thrice two for a child : which is slightly 
altered to twice three for a child at Enderby Mavis and at 
Kettlethorpe. 



Thompson's Boston, p. 574. 



184 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

At Heminby they give thrice three tolls for a male, four 
threes for a female. 

At Marsh Chapel thrice three tolls are given for a man, 
twice three for a male under 16 ; thrice two for a woman, 
twice two for a female under 16 ; and at Spalding the same 
custom is followed with the age of the deceased tolled 
after the bell is lowered. 

At Market Rasen they give thrice three tolls for a man, 
twice three and one for a boy, twice three and two for a 
woman, and twice three for a girl. 

At East Kirkby four times three tolls are given for a 
man, thrice three for a woman, twice three for a boy, and 
three single strokes for a girl. 

At Hundleby, Partney, Spilsby, Toynton All Saints and 
Toynton S. Peter, they give four times three tolls for a man, 
thrice three for a woman, twice three for a child both before 
and after the knell. 

At Fleet the tenor is tolled at minute intervals for ten 
minutes, then rung for three minutes, followed for thrice 
three tolls for a man, thrice two for a woman, or three single 
strokes for a child on the 5th bell. 

At all the churches in Stamford, since about the year 
1872, the ringing of the Passing-bell has been discontinued, 
the only notification of death being thrice three tolls for a 
male, thrice two for a female, twice over, on the tenor 
bell for adults, on the treble for children, with a short pause 
between each set of strokes. 

At Horncastle nine tolls are given for a male, six for a 
female before the knell, excepting for an inhabitant living 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 185 

west of the river Bain, when the tolls are given after the 
knell : for a child the bell is not raised, only tolled : on the 
death of the Sovereign, Bishop of Lincoln, Vicar of the 
parish, or any officer of the church, the bell is tolled an 
hour, minute time, and on those occasions is always com- 
menced at 3, 6, 9, or 12 o'clock, those being the only hours 
at which the minute bell is commenced. 

At Appleby two strokes are given on the 3rd, 4th, and 
5th, and four on the 6th bell for a male ; two strokes 
on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th, and three on the 6th bell for 
a woman ; and two strokes on the 4th, 5th, and 6th bells 
for a child. 

At South Ferriby the custom is to give thrice three tolls 
for an adult and thrice two for a child irrespective of sex. 

At Baumber, Cotes Magna, Fotherby, Fulletby (where 
the bell is rung twenty minutes for an adult, fifteen minutes 
for a youth, and ten minutes for an infant), Harrington, 
Langton-by-Partney, Legbourn, Manton, Nettleton, Rand, 
Ravendale East, Roxby-cum-Risby, Tathwell, Walcot (where 
the treble is rung for children), Wickenby, Witham-on-the- 
Hill (treble for children), Wold Newton, Woolsthorpe 
(where the bell is tolled for half-an-hour with an interval of 
half-a-minute between each toll), and Wragby (where, how- 
ever, there is some recollection of distinctive tolls being 
used), the bell is rung without any indicating tolls for age 
or sex, either at the commencement, or the end of the knell. 

It is customary in Lincolnshire not to ring the Passing- 
bell after sunset: this is specially the case at Castle Carlton, 
Torrington, Gedney Hill, and other places. 

2 A 



1 86 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

At Thornton-le-Moor the larger bell of the two is only 
used as the Passing-bell : not for Divine Service. 

Death Knell. In addition to the Passing-bell, the 
Canon enjoins that "after the party's death, if it so fall 
out, there shall be rung no more than one short peal." 
Durand mentions this custom, and in the Book of Cere- 
monies (1539) we are told that " Bells are ordained to give 
knowledge of our Christian brother or sister departed this 
world, that both we may call to remembrance our own 
mortality, and also be moved with charity to pray for them 
so departed." After the Reformation it is referred to in 
some of the Articles of Enquiry issued by the bishops in 
such words as these...." or to ring a knell presently after 
the departure, that notice may be taken by all to give God 
thanks for that party's deliverance out of this vale of 
misery."* The Puritans in 1562, desired "that no peal 
after death of any person be above the space of one hour." 
Wheatley writes of " the short peal " after the party's death 
as being generally rung in 1755, but the custom has now 
fallen entirely into disuse, A trace of it may however be 
traced at Fleet, S. Peter-at-Arches, and S. Peter-at-Gowts, 
Lincoln, Scothorn, and other places where the so called 
passing-bell is first tolled then rung: so at Epworth, Owston, 
Long-Sutton, &c., the distinctive tolls are first given after 
which the bell is rung. At Stow S. Mary it was formerly 
the custom to toll for twenty minutes, then ring for twenty 
minutes, and afterwards toll for twenty minutes again. The 

• Vide Walcott's Ed. of Canons, iS-c, p. 94. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 187 

Death-knell of the Canon is, I think, referred to under the 
name of 

Soul Bell in the list of the ^^ Clark's fees and wages'' 
for Barrow-on-Humber, in 1713, thus: — 

" And for every passing-bell four pence and for every soul-bell four 
pence." 

the passing-bell mentioned being then rung according to 
primitive practice, and the Soul-bell " presently after the 
departure : " the Burial peal is mentioned as distinct from 
this. Sometimes the Passing-bell was called the Soul-bell : 
thus Bishop Hall says : "We call them Soul-bells because 
they signify the departing of the soul, not because they 
help the passage of the soul." 

Burial Peals. The Canon mentions "and one other 
(peal) before the burial, and one after the burial." 

This sounding of bells at funerals was an ancient custom, 
and had been carried to great excess ; indeed, so early as 
1339 Bishop Grandisson, of Exeter, found it desirable to 
check the long ringings on such occasions, on the grounds 
that "they do no good to the departed, are an annoyance 
to the living, and injurious to the fabrick and the bells."* 
The Puritans in 1562 desired that no peal of bells at the 
interment be above half-an-hour. Sometimes Burial Peals 
were provided for by Will : thus, John Woodford of Barsby, 
Leicestershire, in his Will dated 13th February, 1543, said 
" Also I will that they shall ring att my Burriall and to have 
for their Labour \]d. a peece." [Notes and Queries, 6 s. i. 

* Bells of Exeter Cathedral, p. 7. 



1 88 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

p. 94.] Latimer speaks of "ringing of bells," and Whitgift, 
sometime Dean of Lincoln, of "the threefold peal" at 
Funerals. We find traces of this custom constantly in 
Churchwardens' Accounts. For instance in those of S. 
John Baptist, Stamford, for the year 1587-8, there is 

lead forthe for mettle to mending the belles at mistres 

backhows biriall \]d. 

1604-5. Itiii pd to John Pearson for mending the bel- 

ropes when mistris loveday was buryed \]d. 

1633-4. It' for ringing at y" buriall of M' Reynolds 00 . 01 . 06 

The custom of chiming or ringing at funerals is now 
becoming obsolete : it, however, still lingers in this county. 

At Dunsby and Hawerby the bells are chimed at funerals, 
and such is occasionally the case by special request at 
Edenham, Hale Magna, Heckington, and Sibsey : at 
Epworth and Thornton Curtis the bells are chimed at the 
funeral of church officials. 

At Long Bennington the bells were chimed at Thomas 
Slack's funeral in 1861, and at West AUington on the 
occasion of Thomas Scott's funeral in 1874.* 

At Scothorn an aged woman, a native of Yorkshire, who 
died about the year i860, requested that the bells might be 
chimed at her funeral, which was done : it is the only 
remembered instance in that parish : so at Cotes Magna 
the bells were rung at the funeral of Ann Phillipson on the 
2nd of July, 1872 : she was aged 75, and had been a long 

* In Gent. Mag. lxii. 963, is an account of the funeral of Mary Foster, at Folkingham, 
in the year 1792 : she made many whimsical requests connected with it: the bells were 
chimed. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. i8g 

sufferer: she desired that "the beautiful bells which had so 
often cheered her in life might ring her to rest in her last 
home." 

At South Kelsey the clerk, now (1879) aged 89 years, 
only remembers one instance of chiming at a funeral : it 
was at that of Ann Johnson, who was buried on the 19th of 
November, 1848, aged 96 years : she specially requested 
that she might "be chimed to church as old people were 
when she was a girl." Her wish has been thus put into 
verse : — 

Chime me to Church, and let no doleful knell 
Be tolled from that old steeple grey ; 
The melody of pealing bells shall swell 
Around me on my funeral day. 

Ninety long years of glowing Summer light, 
And Winters with their pinching cold, 
Like a long day have past, and now the night 
Steals on me — I am very old. 

I've heard the merry bells peal brisk and clear, 
For wedding and for festal day : 
I've heard the dull bell tolling sad and drear, 
For flowers that died in early May. 

The mellow leaves are falling from the trees, 
Golden and brown, by soft winds borne : 
After life's strife there comes the hope of ease ; 
Its coming should not make us mourn. 

Low in the west slow dips the setting sun 
Behind a solemn purple cloud : 
Mourn not for loss of him : his course is run. 
Rest comes with evening's misty shroud. 



I go Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

The clouds have shd down to the distant sea, 
Beyond the darkly shadowed wold ; 
High in the deepening blue, o'er tower and tree, 
One lonely star hangs clear and cold. 

The night wind, wandering round that moss-grown tower, 
Sings in the belfry a lone song. 
Lulling to sleep the dew-steeped closing flower, — 
And sleep will come to me ere long. 

I shall not wake to any earthly morn ; 
My long day's work comes to a close ; 
Humbly, I trust, life's struggles I have borne ; 
And now I wait for sweet repose. 

Chime me to Church, and let the cheerful peal 
Make homely music in the air ; 
No cause for sorrow, I but gently steal 
Away into a dawn more fair. 

Chime me to Church, to sleep near its grey wall, 
Lulled by the evening song to rest. 
Till summoned by the white-robed angel's call 
To the bright morning of the blest.* 

Though not now followed the custom of chiming at 
Funerals is remembered at Althorpe, Corringham, Owston, 
Gunby S. Nicolas, Tetney, and Stainby : at the two last- 
named places the custom was to toll a single bell until the 
procession appeared in sight, then to chime. At S. John 
Baptist, Stamford, the present (1879) parish clerk remembers 
when it was the custom at a funeral to toll the ist, 2nd, 

* By permission, from Autumn Leaves by S. CoUinson, 2nd Ed. p. 107. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. igi 

3rd, and 4th bells singly, then chime all together, and after- 
wards toll the tenor. The ringing or chiming to funerals 
seems to be referred to in the inscription on the 3rd bell at 
Brant Broughton : — 

Beg ye of God your soul to save 
Before we call you to the grave. 

Simple tolling before the funeral is now the prevalent 
custom : at Croyland the tenor is rung : at South Somer- 
cotes the day of the month is given after the tolling : at 
Tetney the 2nd bell is used for children, the tenor for 
adults : at Swineshead, and probably in other places, the 
tenor is tolled when a corpse is carried through the parish 
for interment beyond. Amongst the Fees due to the Parish 
Clerk of Barrow-on-Humber in 1713 was: — 

" If the friends of any deceased person desire to have the great bell 
rung a Little before the Corpse is brought to the Church the Clark 
for his ringing the said Bell shall have one shilling." i*- 

The "one peal after" the funeral is now of rare oc- 
currence excepting in the case of ringers or other church 
officials. 

At Bardney, however, and at Lea a dumb peal is rung 
occasionally after a funeral : at Haxey the same thing 
occurs at intervals during the day of the funeral of church 
officials, and occasionally of other parishioners by particular 
desire : at Navenby the bells are also occasionally rung in 
the evening after a funeral : at S. Peter-at-Gowts, Lincoln, a 

* MS. preserved in Church Chest. 



1 92 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

peal is rung for an hour without any pause, with the bells 
muffled on one side after the funeral of a ringer, or of a 
member of the congregation, as a mark of respect. 

A muffled peal is not uncommonly rung on the day of 
the funeral of a ringer or other church officer, as at Addle- 
thorpe. Long Bennington, Butterwick, Caythorpe, Fishtoft, 
Frieston, Harlaxton, Heckington, Hogsthorpe, Horncastle, 
Leake, East Pinchbeck, Market Rasen, Searby, Skirbeck, 
and at Swineshead. 

At Boston a dumb peal is rung at the burial of a ringer, 
concluding with an open peal : at Spalding, a dumb peal 
is rung on the Sunday evening after the funeral of any 
church official. 

At Louth a dumb peal is not only rung at the funeral of a 
ringer or other church officer, but a similar peal is rung in the 
evening. The custom of ringing dumb peals there appears 
to have been a common one formerly, for at a Vestry held 
on the 26th of April, 1821, it was ordered: — 

" That two guineas be deducted from the salary of the Ringers for 
every dumb peal which they hereafter ring without the express 
authority of the Vicar and Churchwardens."* 

The ancient custom is echoed at Weston-S.-Mary, where 
the bell is tolled before the interment, and rung for ten 
minutes at the close of the Office : and at Barnoldby-le- 
Beck, East Barkwith, Baston, Owston, and Walcot, where 
the tenor is tolled after as well as before the interment. 

* Vestry Book. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 193 

The use of the tenor as a funeral bell is occasionally 
referred to in the inscription, as at Kirton-in-Holland : — 

May all whom I shall summon to the grave 
The Blessing of a well spent Life Receive 



and at Saxilby:- 



I to the church the Living call 
And to the grave do summon all. 



The inscription on the tenor at Horbling apparently 
refers to the ringing after the funeral : — 

Defunctos ploro, vivos voco, funera daudo. 

In many parishes the tenor is tolled for a few minutes 
about half-an-hour, or an hour, before the funeral, to give 
warning to the " bearers," and the neighbours : it is called 
the 

Invitation Bell. This bell is (amongst other places) 
tolled at Aslackby, Barholme, Benington, Boothby Graffoe, 
Boothby Pagnell, Branston, Carlton Scroop, Castle Bytham, 
Caistor, Corby, Folkingham, South Kelsey, Lavington, 
Leasingham, Normanton, Osbournby, Ruskington, Scotton, 
Wellingore, Winterton, and South Witham. 

In addition to the ringing after Death and at the Funeral, 
it was the custom, as is well-known, in pre-Reformation 
times to keep, in some cases, the "month's mind" or 
monthly commemoration of the dead, and in many others 
the 

Obit, annual, or year-mind, that is, the anniversary of 
the death of a person, on which day the bells were rung, 

2 B 



194 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

and Masses were said for the dead, for which provision had 
been made by the deceased person, or by his friends. In- 
stances are numerous enough : it will suffice to quote one 
or two connected with Boston : — William Goodyng — a 
brother of all the Guilds in that town — left twenty shillings 
for an obituary service, " all the bells were to be rung, and 
20^^ paid therefor." Gilbert Alilaunde, the founder of the 
Guild of Corpus Christi at Boston, who died in 1354, had 
his annual obit on the Vigil of S. George, when twenty 
pence was to be paid " for the ringing of all the bells."* 

The Churchwardens of Leverton, in their Accounts, 
have some entries relating to obits : — 

1515. Itm payd for y'^ nobbyt of Water bussche to y' 

preste & clarks & all [ale] & bred V5. 

15 16. Itm payd for the ferment of water bussche & hys 
wyfe to prestys & clarks & ryngyng & bred & all 

& chesse vs. 

Although such Services have long since ceased, it is 
rather curious to note that 

Commemorative Peals are not unknown : at Harlaxton 
a full peal is rung yearly from 3.15 to 4 o'clock in the after- 
noon, on the nth of January, in memory of Nicholas 
Harby, who was a ringer and singer in Harlaxton Church. 
He was buried there on the nth of January, 1826, aged 84 
years : he left £2^, the interest to be divided equally among 
the ringers after the peal on the anniversary of his burial, 
which is annually done. 

* Pishey Thompson's Boston, p. 124. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 195 

At Holbeach two such commemorative peals are rung : 
the one, a dumb peal in memory of Mr. J. Barker, is rung 
at 3 p.m. on the first Sunday after Christmas day ; the 
other, also a dumb peal, is rung at the same hour on the 
last day of the year in memory of Mrs. Harrison lately 
(1879) deceased : there is no endowment in either case. 

A commemorative bell of a different character was 
formerly rung once a year at Welton : a man named Gilbey, 
who lost his way at night but was guided home by the 
sound of the Welton bells, left one shilling annually to have 
a bell rung every year on the anniversary of that event. 
The ringing of the bell ceased about the year 1820. 

The Sanctus Bell. In the Inventories of church goods 
taken in the reign of Edward VI, where the bells are 
enumerated, a "sanctus bell," a " sauntes bell," or a 
" lytyll bell in the stepull," is generally mentioned. It was 
sometimes hung (in order that it might be heard by those 
outside, as well as by those within the church) in a little 
bellcote on the gable of the chancel roof between that 
portion of the church and the nave, or more usually in a 
convenient position in the belfry — not unfrequently in a 
window — so that the rope came down into the church 
within easy access to the server at the altar. When the 
priest said the Sanctus in the Office of the Mass three 
strokes were given on this bell (hence its name) so that all 
— the sick man in his chamber, as well as the worshipper in 
the church — could join in the holy song of adoration. A 
goodly number of successors of the Sanctus bell are in the 
bell-chambers of the Lincolnshire churches, in the "Priest's 



1 96 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

bell" or "ting-tang" usually rung immediately before the 
service begins. These are, in many cases, modern, being 
probably recasts of the ancient Sanctus-bells. There are, 
however, several of those ancient bells still remaining in 
this county : namely at Bicker, Ingoldmells, East Halton, 
Sutterton, and, with very little doubt, at Algarkirk, Hac- 
conby. Hale Magna, Tallington, and North Witham. There 
are many Priests' bells in other churches without inscrip- 
tions : it is highly probable that some of those also may be 
of pre-Reformation date. 

The Sanctus-bell may have been used upon other 
occasions than the one just mentioned. Dr. Rock was of 
opinion that in many parish churches the practice followed 
at Durham (see p. 162) was the rule, and that some kind of 
instruction was given every Sunday in the afternoon. To 
warn the parish of the sermon time a bell or bells would 
be rung, perhaps at 12 or i o'clock. The first ringing would 
be on the Signa or large bells ; the last quarter of an hour 
ringing was, perhaps, on the smaller, or Sanctus-bell.* 
Hence probably the origin of the modern use of 

The Priest's Bell or Ting-tang which is so often 
sounded immediately before the commencement of Divine 
service. I have only found one bell mentioned as used as a 
Priest's bell in pre-Reformation times. At Ware, in 
Hertfordshire, there was (in 6 Edward VI.) "one lyttle belle 
to calle for y^ priste, clarke, or sexton when they arre absent. "f 



• See Notes and Queries, Vol. xi. p. 150 f Cnssan's Church Goods in Hertfordshire, 

(1855). p. 123. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. igy 

This use is called in many parishes "ringing in," and is 
referred to in Hudibras : — 

" Hypocrisy, that thriving'st calling, 
The only saint's bell that rings all in." 

This bell is also sometimes called 

The 'Tantony-bell or Saint Anthony bell. The small 
bell in the central tower of Lichfield Cathedral is so called, 
and the churchwardens of Lamport, Northamptonshire, 
charged on the 22nd March, 1747, ninepence for " a 
Tantony-bell rope." The Priest's bell at Weedon Bee in 
that county was formerly called " Tantony," and at Great 
Oakley in the same county it is known as " Tintanny." 
The churchwardens of Leverton in this county charge one 
penny in 1528 for "a littill sanct' antony bell" — a hand- 
bell. The name is evidently derived from the emblem of 
S. Anthony — a small bell attached to his tau-staff, or sus- 
pended from the neck of his accompanying pig. Amongst 
the specimens of heraldry in the windows of stained glass 
in Stanford Church, Northamptonshire, is a shield orna- 
mented with the garter, and displaying a Tau-cross with a 
bell appended. The bell is inscribed SAN • ANTHON.* 

Again the Sanctus-bell was occasionally called 



* The late Rev. Abner W. Brown, in bidden to allow them to wander through 

his History and A)itiqiuties 0/ Bells, says the the streets of Paris, a special exception 

small bells fastened round the necks of was made in favour of the Monks of S. 

cattle in Northamptonshire were called by Anthony, whose pigs were still to be at 

old -people tanthony bells. In the year 1131, large so long as each animal had a bell 

when the owners of all swine were for- round its neck. 



igS Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

The Anthem-bell, as in the Inventory of Church Goods 
belonging to Oldham, Lancashire, in 1552.* 

As just indicated the Priests' bells are usually sounded 
for a few minutes before the commencement of Divine 
Service to call the clergy, but the one at S. Botolph's, 
Lincoln, is used as a " Sacrament-bell ;" those at Burgh 
and Ingoldmells are not now used ; neither is that at North 
Witham, which is now without a rope. Those at Mumby 
and Tetney are rung as " Early-bells" on Sunday morning 
at 8 a.m., that at Laceby is called " the Pancake-bell," and 
that at Alford "the Minute-bell." 

The Sacring-bell. This was a small hand-bell also 
used in the Office of the Mass to warn people that the 
Elevation was about to take place. 

It would appear that in mediaeval times one (or more) of 
the large bells was sometimes sounded at the Elevation. 
In Peckham's Constitutions at Lambeth, 1281, we read: — 

" Let the bells be tolled at the Elevation of the Body of Christ [in the 
Eucharist] that the people who have not leisure daily to be present 
at Mass, may, wherever they are, in houses, or fields, bow their knees, 
in order to the having the indulgences granted by many bishops. "f 

And again another order was : — 

" The parishioners shall not irreverently incline at the Elevation of 
the Body of Christ, but adore with all devotion and reverence : 
wherefore let them be first warned by ringing the little bell, and at 
the Elevation let the great bell be thrice knolled."^ 

* Cheeihani Soc. cvii. p. 43. 
f Johnson s English Canons, Part 11. 273. Mr. Walcott in Parish Churches before the 
% De Quivil : Wilkins i. 132, quoted by Reformation, p. 7. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 199 

A small bell, however, was more usually rung : it is 
frequently mentioned in Edwardian Inventories of Church 
Goods as hanging '' in the hie chauncell :" at S. Matthew's, 
Friday Street, London, it hung " at the quyer door." 
Amongst the plate formerly belonging to Boston Church, 
and sold by the Mayor and Burgesses in the reign of 
Edward VI., was "a Sylver belle" weighing eighteen ounces 
— doubtless a Sacring-bell : and Sacring-bells are mentioned 
in the sixth year of that King's reign as then remaining in 
the churches of Harrington, Brinkhill, and Claxby, in this 
county : possibly they were also found in other churches 
whose Inventories are not now forthcoming, and also may 
be classed under the name of small bells or of handbells. 

Sometimes a number of small bells affixed to a wheel, 
which was pulled by a cord, were used to give warning of 
the Elevation. Eighteen such small bells are said to have 
hung in the church of Brokenborough, Wilts,* and if I 
mistake not, a similar arrangement was in use at Achurch 
in Northamptonshire, where we find " viij lyttell Belles in a 
chyme hangynge on a wele" mentioned in the Inventory of 
Church Goods belonging to that parish in 1552.! 

This bell was occasionally called 

The Agnus-bell, as at Hemswell in this county, from 
its being rung at the elevation of the chalice at the close of 
the Canon, followed immediately by the singing of the 
" Agnus:' 

Cranmer, in his Visitation Articles (1549), condemned 

» Bells of the Church, p. 107. f Church Bells of Northanis, p. 139. 



200 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 



the use of " ringing or sacrying Bells " in the time of Com- 
munion. He classed it among the customs kept up by 
those ministers who " Counterfeited the Popish Mass ; " 
and Ridley soon after his appointment to the Bishoprick 
of London, issued Injunctions (1550) for that diocese in 
which he forbad the "ringing of the Sacrying Bell." In- 
deed the necessity for its use passed away when the 
Reformed Liturgy, or Order of the Holy Communion, 
was commanded to be used in English in 1549. 

An interesting example (as Mr. Peacock believes) of a 




194 

bronze Sacring-bell ''was found, in the month of August, 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 201 

1870, in the parish church of Bottesford near Brigg in this 
county. It was discovered walled up in a putlog hole in 
the western wall of the south aisle almost immediately over 
the half pillar which separates the aisle wall from that of 
the nave. It is worth remarking that the tongue of this 
bell is not suspended in the modern fashion from a loop 
cast in the head, but by a piece of iron, apparently an old 
nail which is bent so as to pass through two holes pierced 
on either side of the handle."* By the kind permission of 
the Society of Antiquaries I am able to give an en- 
graving of this curious little bell, showing it two-thirds the 
size of the original. 

Hand-bells. In many of the Inventories of Church 
Goods from the Lincolnshire parishes in the reign of 
Edward VI., one or more " handbells " are noted. These 
small bells were used in a variety of ways in pre-Reformation 
times. They were used in processions on Rogation days. 
In Inventories we often meet, as at Addington, Surrey, with 
"a Procession bell."t The Injunctions of Archbishop 
Grindal, in 1571, whilst directing "perambulation to be 
used by the people for viewing the bounds of their parish 
in the days of the Rogation, commonly called Cross-week 
or Gang-days," prohibit the wearing of the surplice by the 
minister, or the carrying of banners or hand-bells. The 
bell master of Loughborough, Leicestershire, would use 
one when he went according to his "dooty" every Friday 
about the town to bid all to pray for all christian 

* Proceedings of Soc. Antiq. 2nd S. v. 24. f Proceedings Sac. Antiq. 2nd S. v. 29. 

2 C 



202 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

souls.* At the obit of William Reede, merchant, of Boston, 
the bellman and the Sacristan of the Guild were to receive 
fourpence for making the circuit of the town, proclaiming 
at each station: — ''Ye shall pray for the souls of William 
Reede of Boston, and Alice, Margaret, and Anne that were 
his wives, and brothers and sisters in Corpus Christi Guild." 
So, too, at the obit of Richard Benynton and Joan, his 
wife, of Boston, the bellman exhorted the people to pray 
for all christian souls, and to say an Ave and a Pater noster 
for charity's sake.f 

The Hand-bell was rung in the procession when the 
Eucharist was borne to the house of the sick or the dying, 
in order that all, according to the then teaching of the 
church, might be warned of its approach, and pay reverence 
to it. The bell so used was sometimes called 

The Houselling-bell, as at Great Gonerby in this 
county. J 

Among the church ornaments to be provided by the 
parishioners in the fourteenth century was " a bell to carry 
before the Body of Christ in the Visitation of the Sick."§ 

At the burial of the dead the hand-bell was also used to 
clear the way, and to call for a prayer for the deceased. It 
was called 

The Corse-bell or Lych-bell, and is frequently met 
with in Church Inventories under those names. The 



* See Church Bells of Leicestershire, p. I Peacock's Church Furniture, p. 86. 

229. § Lyndwood, 252, quoted by Mr. Wal- 

f Pishey Thompson's Boston, pp. 123, cott in Parish Churches before the Reformation, 
124, and 127. p. 19. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 203 

custom of ringing a small hand-bell before the corpse is still 
(or was until recently) observed in the parish of Llanfair 
Dyffryn Clwyd in Wales:* and at Oxford also when a 
member of the University is buried. Indeed the hand-bell 
was used in a variety of ways in the mediaeval church. 

Canon Moore of Spalding has in his possession a small 
bell, five inches and a half in diameter, which was probably 
one of these ecclesiastical hand-bells. For an inscription 
it has the initials of " the superscription of His accusation," 
and the date thus : — 

with a fleur-de-lys between the letters, as shown by the stop. 
The local tradition is that it " belonged to a moated house 
in the neighbourhood." By means not now known it had 
fallen into the hands of the Town-cryer of Whaplode, from 
whom Canon Moore rescued it. 

The Curfew. The origin of the Curfew is well-known. 
It was heard in Normandy at an early date, and its use was 
enforced throughout this country — where it appears to have 
been partially instituted by King Alfred — by William the 
Conqueror. When it sounded at eight o'clock every 
evening, all persons were ordered to extinguish fire and 
candle, hence its name — coiivre-feu. Although its sound, 
and its use, were only enforced during the reigns of William 
the Conqueror and William Rufus — the law of Curfew was 
abolished by Henry I. in iioo — the custom of ringing the 

* Archaologia Cambrensis, 4th S. 11. 273. 



204 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

bell still prevails in many parishes in this country. Its 
continuance is to be attributed to a religious, and not to a 
civil, purpose. The evening " Hail Mary" was ordered by 
Pope John XXII. (1316-34), to be said at the sound of a 
bell called the " Angeliis,'' and it is probable the Curfew was 
continued as a warning to all to say an Ave to the Blessed 
Virgin before retiring to rest. "Thrice every day at 
Evening the bells are rung that every one may kneel and 
repeat the Angel's salutation to the Blessed Virgin."* 
Dr. Rock says : "If this Curfew did not give pious 
individuals the earliest thought of saying an ^ Ave' at night- 
fall, the ringing of the bell was in itself so seasonable that 
it was looked upon, and employed, as a happy incident for 
calling upon the people, whether in town or country — 
throughout the land in fact — to say their greetings to the 
Virgin at sun-down. f" 

Previous to the Reformation (as we gather from Hooper's 
Injunctions in 1551) the ringing of the " Curfaye " in some 
places was accompanied by, or replaced by, the ringing of 
all the bells in the steeple. 

Although since the Reformation the custom of ringing 
the Curfew, or last Angelus, has gradually, been waning, 
still the practice lingers in a few Lincolnshire parishes 
— about twenty — where it has no doubt been continuously 
followed since its first institution. It is generally still rung 
at eight o'clock, though in some cases this is varied. It is 
rung at that hour at Blankney, Deeping S. James (3rd bell), 

* Polyd. Vergil lib. vi. c. 12. f Chunk of our Fathers, iii. p. 337. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 205 

after which the day of the month is tolled on the tenor, 
Long Sutton (2nd), Market Rasen (4th), after which the day 
of the month is given on the 5th, Swineshead (5th), followed 
by the day of the month on the 6th : also at Gedney (3rd 
bell) it is rung on every evening excepting Saturday : at 
Harlaxton (2nd bell) on every evening excepting Saturday 
and Sunday, after which the day of the month is tolled : at 
Caistor (3rd bell) every evening excepting Sunday. At 
Holbeach the treble is rung at 8 o'clock, after which eight 
knolls are given on the 3rd bell, on every evening excepting 
Saturday when the Curfew is rung at 7 o'clock followed by 
seven knolls on the 3rd bell : the knolls being, I suppose, 
to indicate the hour. At Spalding the 3rd bell is rung at 
8 p.m. from 29th September to the 25th March : and at 
Heckington the Curfew is rung at 8 p.m. from Lady Day 
to Michaelmas, and at 7 p.m. from Michaelmas to Lady 
Day, after which the day of the month is tolled. 

At Louth it is rung (3rd bell) at 8 p.m. excepting on 
Saturday evenings, and from Christmas Day to Plough 
Monday, when it is rung at 7 p.m. ; the day of the month 
is tolled at the end. 

At Bourn the Curfew is rung at 8 p.m. excepting on 
Saturday, and during Harvest, when it is rung at 7 p.m. 
and so acts as a Gleaning-bell. 

At Horncastle the ist bell is rung as the Curfew at 
8 p.m. from Monday to Friday inclusive, and at 7 p.m. on 
Saturday, commencing on Plough Monday, continuing until 
Lady Day, old style, inclusive ; commencing again on 
Michaelmas Day, old style, and continuing until the Vigil 



2o6 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

of S. Thomas the Apostle inclusive, followed by the tolling 
of the day of the month. On all ** red letter days" the 
Curfew is not rung. 

At Sleaford the 3rd bell is rung from Monday to Friday 
inclusive at 8 p.m. On Saturday evening, and on the eve 
of any day on which any special service will be held, as 
Christmas Day, Ascension Day, Bishop's Visitation, &c., 
it is rung at 7 p.m. 

At Grantham the ist bell is rung as the Curfew at 
8 p.m., followed by the day of the month tolled on the 2nd 
bell, excepting on the Vigils or Eves of Holy days named 
in the Church Calendar when the Curfew is not rung. 

At S. Mary's, Stamford, the Common bell (7th) is rung 
every evening, Sundays excepted, at 8 o'clock, after which 
the day of the month is tolled. The payment for ringing 
this bell having always been made by the Corporation, 
there is no mention of it in the Churchwardens' Accounts, 
but it is thus referred to in those of the Mayor and 
Chamberlain : — 

1709. p*^ to Henry Smith his yeares sallary for ringing 
the 4 & 8 o'clock Bell at St. Marys & at the halls 

& sessions & i'/- for Oyle 02 . 01 . 00 

p'' to M' Shipley for the 8 a clock bell rope &c. ... 00 . 04 . 06 

The same payments are found in subsequent years until 

1825, since which year the Curfew only has been rung.* 

The Curfew is rung at 7 p.m. at Haxey from Michaelmas 

to Shrove Tuesday : and at the same hour at Potterhan- 

* Extracted for me by Mr. Justin Simpson. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells, 207 

worth (ist bell) from Michaelmas to Lady Day, but being 
an endowed bell by a person who had lost his way and re- 
gained it by the sound of a bell ringing there, this ringing 
at Potterhanworth may possibly not be, although it more 
probably is, a survival of the ancient Curfew. 

The Curfew was rung at Boston, with the day of the 
month at the close, until the year 1846, but "no funds 
now:" so too at East Pinchbeck it was rung "until the 
abolition of Church rates ;" it was also rung until recently 
at Coningsby, Croyland, Donington, Great Grimsby, and 
at Tattershall, with the day of the month tolled at the 
close. At Stow it was formerly rung during the winter 
quarter, and the clerk paid by an endowment left by some 
one who found his way (after losing it) by the sound of the 
bells there. 

Until about the year 1874 the 5th bell was rung as the 
Curfew at All Saints, Stamford, at g p.m. It is thus 
referred to in the Parish Book : — 

1607 April 6. Agreed upon by the whole pys the day and yeare 
below written that a bell shall ringe dayly the whole year at 
ix o'clocke at night and 4 in the morninge the ringer to have 
for his service xiij=* iiij** by the yeare. 

1634 April 6. It is agreed y' Cobby have 10 groats more added to 
his former allowance for hereafter ringing y^ bell on Sunday 
night . . . 

The payments for this was afterwards made by the Corpora- 
tion. We find that at a Common Hall, held on the gth 
October, 165 1, it was ordered : — 



2o8 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

That frauncis Cole shall have six shillings and eight pence a yeare 
allowed him forth of the towne stocke for his paines in ringinge of 
the bell in All saints parish at the howers of fifive o'clocke in the 
morninge & nyne at night the same to be paid him by the Chamber- 
laine for the tyme beinge. 

This order was confirmed by the Corporation on the 26th 
of October, 1669. 

The Accounts of the Mayor and Chamberlain have one 
or two references to this ringing at All Saints : — 

1709 p" to Geo. Woolley his yeares sallary for ringing 
the 5 & 9 a clock bell at All Saints due at St. 
Thomas 1708 ...^ 00 . 06 . 08 

The same payment appears in the Municipal Accounts 
until the year 1834. 

At S. Michael's Stamford the Curfew was, until quite 
recently, rung at 7 p.m. : the following entry in the 
Municipal Records probably refers to it : — 

1655 April 17. Allowed to John Shepheard ffor looking 

to the clocke & ringing the bell yearely o . 20 . o* 

Amongst the duties " of the Parish Clark of Barrow 
[upon Humber] as recorded in the Town's Book 1713 " is 

Item he is to ring a Bell for the ringing of the Corphew beginning 
at St. Andrew's Eve and Ending at Candlemas. f 



1 am much indebted to Mr. Justin Simpson for making these extracts from the original 

Manuscripts, 
f MS. preserved in Church Chest. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 209 

In some parishes, as we have seen, the continuance of the 
Curfew was sought to be secured by an endowment, pro- 
vided by persons, who in times when the roads were badly 
defined, and crossed an open unenclosed country, lost their 
way in the gloom of evening, or in the darkness of winter 
early nights, but were enabled to find their village homes 
by its welcome sound. Apparently with reference to this 
end it is sometimes only rung during the winter months. 

The ringing of the Curfew was, for a long period, the 
signal for the closing of all taverns and ale-houses. In 1291 
no wine was to be drawn after it had rung ; and although, 
until the reign of Henry VII., ale was sold without any 
restriction, still all public-houses had to be closed at the 
tolling of Curfew.* It would appear to have been fre- 
quently, perhaps on that account, rung at nine o'clock in 
the larger towns : that was the hour formerly at All Saints, 
Stamford, Stamford Baron, and at Northampton All Saints, 
and is now the time at Towcester, Northamptonshire. So 
it is, and has been for many years, at S. Martin's, Leicester, 
where it was referred to in the following stringent bye-law 
passed 22 February, 25th Elizabeth. " Item, that the 
keeper of any ale-house that suffers any townsman to 
remain in his house after the Curfew bell hath rung (without 
lawful cause) shall forfeit i2d. to be paid presently, or else 
to remaining in ward that night. "f 

The ringing at nine o'clock in the evening of Bow bell 
in London was also, in 1469, the signal for the closing of 



• See Palmer's Pcrlustration of Great Yarmouth, i. 30 and 85. f Nichols. 

2 D 



210 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

shops. From that circumstance the Curfew in the country 
was sometimes called " Bow-bell."* 

The Early Morning Bell. The origin of the ringing 
of the Morning-bell arose from an extension of the practice 
of saying an Ave to the Virgin at nightfall. In 1399 Arch- 
bishop Arundel issued a mandate commanding that at early 
dawn one " Our Father" and hve " Hail Marys " should be 
said.f As a reminder to all of this duty the Angelus was 
rung. This bell was often called "Gabriel" after the 
Angel of the Annunciation. The 3rd bell at Branston, the 
2nd at Holton-le-Clay and the 3rd at Waith are so called : 
the 2nd at Gunby S. Peter and the 3rd at South Somercotes 
are inscribed : — 

:m~^fsiijh^%^ MMM)m(B mi^':^'^^ ■yz-<D<gr€):Ei 

others again — Althorpe ist, Baumber 2nd, Mavis Enderby 
3rd, Manby 2nd, Scopwick 3rd, and Somersby ist — say: — 

X3E1I^^3E :iB^ mmjh^B J^M-l^m(B ^ilC^P^^lSl 

and others bear an inscription indicative of their purpose 
gfrsonet Ijct tcUs bulctssimn bo^ gabricUs 



• It was so at S. Martin's, Leicester, lished in 1616, the largest bell of a ring 

see Church Bells of Leicestershire, p. 115; of five was called " the tenor or bow-bell." 

and at Blakesley, Northamptonshire, see Ibid, p. 67. 

Notes and Queries, 6th S. 11. 264. It should f Walcott's Sac. Arch. Rock's Church 

however be noted that in a Sermon pub- of our Fathers. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 211 

as at Belton (4th), Haxey (4th), Killingholme (3rd), and 
Sedgebrooke (2nd). 

These bells were, doubtless, rung as the Angelus, and 
some of the Ave Maria bells too (of which there are 
several still remaining in this county) were, probably, used 
for the same purpose. 

The Early Morning-bell is still rung at Gedney (3rd bell) 
at 5 o'clock in the summer : at 6 o'clock in the winter. 
At Bourn, Crowle, Deeping S. James (3rd), Market Deep- 
ing (5th), Epworth, Heckington, Market Rasen (4th), 
Sleaford (ist, used to be rung at 5 a.m.), Long Sutton (2nd), 
and Witham-on-the-Hill (4th), the morning-bell is rung at 
six o'clock : the day of the month is tolled at Sleaford after 
the ringing. 

At Rippingale the ist bell is rung at 7 a.m. from the 5th of 
April to the nth of October : at 8 o'clock during the winter : 
at Folkingham the treble is rung daily at 8 a.m. : at Belton 
the 3rd bell is rung at 6 a.m. from Candlemas to Michaelmas. 

At Spalding the 3rd bell had previous to 1803 been rung 
from time immemorial as the Morning Angelus at six 
o'clock. In that year the following resolution was passed 
by the Vestry : — 

" 1803. As it is the sense of this meeting that the Bell usually rung 
every morning at six of the clock from 29"" sepf to 28"" 
march would be of more service if rung at 7 o'clock it is 
hereby agreed that the ringing of the Bell be at 7 o'clock 
instead of the afore mentioned hour of six."*^ 



Vestry Book. 



212 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

This alteration of the hour did not last long : the bell has 
been again rung at the old hour for more than half a century 
past from the 25th of March to the 29th of September. 

At Burgh the 6th bell is rung at 5 a.m. from the nth 
October to the nth November : at 6 o'clock from the latter 
date to the 21st February: and again at 5 a.m. from that 
date to the 21st of March, after which the day of the month 
is tolled. 

Until recently a bell was rung at 5 a.m. at Croyland 
(until 1874), Grantham, and at East Pinchbeck (2nd) " until 
the abolition of church rates." At Bostoj:i, too, the ist bell 
was rung at that hour until 1846 when it was given up " for 
want of funds : " a reference to it is made in an Order 
made by the Corporation in 1554 : — 

"That 13^ & 4^^ be given to the persons to ring the morning and 
evening bell." 

At Donington, Great Grimsby (until 1840), Horncastle 
(ist), S. Mary-le-Wigford, Lincoln, and S. Michael's, 
Stamford, a bell was formerly rung at 6 a.m. : and at 
S. Benedict's, Lincoln, it was rung at that hour in the 
summer, at 7 o'clock in the winter. 

At S. Peter-at-Arches, Lincoln, a bell was formerly rung 
at 7 a.m. : at Harlaxton and Carlton-le-Moorland (in sum- 
mer) at 4 a.m. : at Tattershall at 8 a.m. : and at Swines- 
head at 5 a.m. in summer, at 6 o'clock in the winter. 

At Tydd S. Mary an early morning bell used to be rung 
" to call men and carts to work:" and at Louth the 3rd 
bell was, sixty years ago, rung at 5 a.m. and was called the 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 213 

" getting up bell : " subsequently, until about the year 1868, 
it was rung at 8.30 a.m. 

At Coningsby an early bell was formerly rung, and there 
was a house given rent free to the man who acted as ringer: 
the house has long since fallen down, and the land upon 
which it stood has been added to the churchyard. 

At Stamford as we have already noted under the ringing 
of the Curfew (see pp. 208 and 206), the morning bell was 
rung at All Saints' at five o'clock, and at S. Mary's at four 
o'clock : the payment for the ringing at the latter church 
was regularly made until the year 1825, when the ringing 
of the morning bell there ceased. 

At Barton-on-Humber, writes Mr. Ball, the Jury ap- 
pointed a man to call up the townspeople between 3 and 5 
o'clock in the morning, and also to ring a bell at 5 a.m. 
from Michaelmas to Lady-day.* 

This ringing of the Early Morning-bell has long been 
used (as confessedly in past days at Tydd S. Mary and at 
Louth) as simply a call to daily work : indeed the inscrip- 
tion on the 1st bell at Horncastle says that : — 

LECTUM FUGE DISCUTE SOMNUM, 

and so on the 3rd at Friskney : — 

LABOREM SIGNO ET REQUIEM. 

Other Daily Bells. A mid-day Angelus was rung in 
France in the fifteenth century. Although that custom 

* Ball's Barton, Part ii. p. 4. 



214 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

appears to have been followed in some places in England 
(as at Cropedy in Oxfordshire, where the Ave-bell was rung 
daily at noon as well as in the morning and evening (see 
p. i68), the practice does not appear to have been at all 
general in this county. In some parishes, however, a 
mid-day bell is rung. Such is the case in a very few in 
Lincolnshire. 

At three places in the Isle of Axholme — Epworth, Crowle, 
and Belton — a bell is rung (Sundays excepted) at 6 a.m. ; 
at noon, and again at 6 o'clock in the evening : at the latter 
place — Belton — it (the 3rd bell) is rung at noon only from 
Michaelmas to Candlemas. 

At Rippingale and at Folkingham, in addition to the 
ringing of the treble bell early in the morning, it is rung at 
one o'clock p.m., at the latter place now (1880) by a woman 
named Armstrong, who has charge of the clock and keeps 
the keys of the Church, the Yard, and the Belfry. 

At Market Deeping the 5th bell is rung at 6 a.m., and 
again at 6 p.m. in the summer, at 8 o'clock in the winter. 

In the absence of all evidence to the contrary, the use of 
these mid-day bells in this and other counties may be 
attributed to a secular origin — the giving warning to 
agricultural labourers and others of the time — rather than 
to a religious one. 

In several parishes a bell is rung for Morning and 
Evening Prayer daily : of such I have made no note. 

The Pancake-bell. In addition to the occasional 
confession of sin to the priest, it was considered, in mediaeval 
times, that the week preceding Lent was specially an appro- 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 215 

priate time for all to perform that duty. It was hence 
called Shrove-tide, and the Tuesday in it called Shrove, 
Shrive, or Confession-Tuesday — shrive being an old Saxon 
word for confession. The confession was made in the 
church, where the priest sat in an open chair, or stall, to 
hear the confessions of his people, to award them such 
penance as he thought good for them, or to give them 
absolution. In order that all might be reminded of this 
duty, and be informed that the priest was ready to receive 
them, a bell was rung calling them to the church. This 
was the origin of the ringing of the bell on Shrove-Tuesday. 

But another custom was followed in those times when 
Lent was more strictly observed than now as a time of 
abstinence from flesh meat. On Shrove-Tuesday, we are 
told by a writer in Notes and Queries, the housewives, in 
order to use up all the grease, lard, dripping, &c., made 
pancakes, and the apprentices, and others about the house 
were summoned to the meal by the ringing of a bell, which 
was naturally called ''the Pancake-bell."* 

The ringing of the Shrive-bell, now called the Pancake- 
bell, is still continued in a goodly number of Lincolnshire 
parishes on Shrove-Tuesday. 

It is rung at 11 o'clock in the following places : — 

Aslackby (2nd bell), Bassingthorpe, Belton, Isle of Axholme (ist), 
Long Bennington (ist), Billingborough (4th), Blyborough (for five 
minutes), Bourn (ist), Branston (3rd), Burton Goggles (ist bell), 
Caistor (4th), Carlton-le-Moorland (2nd), Claypole (3rd), Coleby, 

* Notes and Queries, 3rd S. vi. 404. 



2i6 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

Colsterworth (ist), Corby (3rd), Crowle (ist), Market Deeping (4th), 
Digby (ist), Norton Disney (ist), Doddington, Doddington Dry, 
Donington (2nd), Dunsby (ist), Epworth (3rd), Grayingham, 
Haceby, Hale Magna (largest sound bell), Haxey (tenor), Helpring- 
hani, Hemswell, Heckington (tenor), Holbeach (7th bell for fifteen 
minutes), Ingoldsby (2nd), Kirton-in-HoIland (5th), Kirton-in- 
Lindsey, Kirkby Laythorpe, Laughton, Lavington, Osbournby 
(2nd), Owston (tenor), Ruskington (3rd), Scotter, Scotton (2nd), 
Sleaford, Stragglethorpe (2nd), Swinstead, Swinderby (tenor), 
Tattershall, Thorpe S. Peter, Upton, Washingborough (ist), and 
Wragby. 

At Harlaxton the 3rd bell is rung at the same hour : that 
bell being used, it is said, " because Shrove-Tuesday falls 
on the 3rd day of the week." At Horbling and at Sco- 
thorne (ist) the Pancake-bell is also rung at that time, when 
the children turn out of school, and have a holiday. 

The Pancake-bell is rung at 10 a.m. at Burgh (tenor 
bell for an hour), Croyland (4th bell) and at Spalding (2nd 
bell) : at Coningsby the 5th bell is rung at 10.30; at Surfleet 
a bell is rung at 10.45 5 ^^ Leasingham, the tenor, at 11.30, 
and at North Scarle the treble is rung at 11. 15. 

The Pancake-bell is rung at noon (12 o'clock) at 
Bardney (3rd bell), Brant Broughton, Dowsby, Owmby, 
and Waddington (ist bell) : also at Market Rasen, where 
two bells (5th and 6th) are rung : that is the case at 
Blakesley and at Oundle, Northamptonshire, where the 
two bells are supposed to say " Pan on ! " 

At Grantham the tenor is rung for half-an-hour com- 
mencing at 9 a.m. The bells were formerly allowed to be 
jangled by the people, and much damage was done, as is 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 217 

shown by an order passed by the Corporation in 1646, which 
directed that whereas an innumerable concourse of old and 
young were wont to enter the church on Shrove-Tuesday, 
ascend to the roofs and olliers, jangle the bells, and break 
the chime wires, the belfry door was to be kept locked, and 
such misdemeanors prevented in future.* 

At Stamford it is the custom at All Saints' to raise and 
fall separately the 5th, 4th, and 3rd, or other three bells, 
commencing at eleven o'clock : at S. George's, S. Mary's, 
and S. Michael's each bell is raised and lowered, one after 
the other. 

At Horncastle the 3rd bell is rung at ten o'clock : until 
comparatively recent times the shops were closed when the 
Pancake-bell began, and the day was kept a close holiday. 

The custom of ringing the Shrive or Pancake-bell is 
gradually dying out, as is shown by the number of parishes 
in which it is remembered, though not now followed : 
amongst them may be mentioned : — 

Addlethorpe, Alford, Althorpe, Ancaster, Belton, Benington, Benni- 
worth, Billinghay, Burton-by- Lincoln, Caythorpe (until quite 
recently), South Cockerington, Corringham, Denton, Dunholm, 
Gedney Hill (discontinued in 1830), Hemingby (rung 50 years ago), 
Hibaldstow, Honington (rung 50 years ago), Kelsey North, Kirkby- 
cum-Osgodby, S. Botolph's, Lincoln (rung 40 years ago), Louth 
(rung 45 years ago), Ludborough, Mareham-on-the-Hill, Nocton, 
Partney (rung until 1873), Quadring, Middle Rasen, Rippingale, 
Scredington, Sibsey, Stainby, Stickney, Sutterton (discontinued 



* Street's Notes on Grantham, pp. 80, 81. allowed in Northamptonshire, see Church 
The practice of jangling the bells was Bells of Northamptonshire, p. 147. 

2 E 



2i8 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

about 1845), Tetney, Thornton-le-Moor (treble at noon), Thorpe- 
on-the-HiU, Tydd S. Mary, High Toynton, Ulceby, Welby (dis- 
continued thirty years ago), Welton (until 1876), and Westborough 
(until 1876). 

At Nettleton and at Stow (where it was formerly rung) 
the children left the schools for a holiday at the sound of 
the Pancake-bell. 

At Weston S. Mary it used to be rung at intervals all 
day, until forty years ago when it was discontinued. 

Shrove-Tuesday has long been considered a holiday by 
the young people, jangling the church bells was not un- 
common ; and cock-fighting, cock-throwing, and football 
were, until recently, usual amusements. 

At Appleby the Pancake-bell was rung at 11 o'clock 
until about the year 1865. The farm servants left off 
work for the day to eat pancakes and to play at football. 
Football ceased about the year 1845 when a lad's leg 
was broken in the game. Although the bell is not now 
rung, the school children have a half-holiday according 
to old usage. 

At Winterton also the ist bell was rung as the Pancake- 
bell at II o'clock until about the year i86g. Apprentices 
were let off work when the bell sounded, and played at 
football in the afternoon : the ringers got their pancakes, 
and then rang a peal. 

In some parishes, as at Navenby and Wellingore, this 
bell was formerly rung by the oldest apprentice in the 
parish : the apprentices used to consider Shrove-Tuesday a 
day specially licensed for rough and boisterous amusements. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 219 

Years ago, writes a correspondent in Notes and Queries, 
Shrove-Tuesday was in South Lincolnshire the day for 
beginning the battledoor and shuttlecock and whipping-top 
season.* 

At Laceby the Priest's bell is called " Pancake-bell." 
Shakespeare, in AWs well that ends well, speaks of a 
pancake as fit for Shrove-Tuesday, and Taylor the Water 
Poet (1630) mentions the Pancake-bell as being then rung 
on that day : so too in Poor Robin's Almanack, 1684, we 
read : — 

But hark I hear the Pancake-bell 
And fritters make a gallant smell. 

Advent Ringing. At Market Rasen a peal is rung 
early in the morning of the first Sunday in Advent. It 
is customary in Lincolnshire to practice ringing during 
the weeks in Advent, and to ring much during the Christmas 
season : such is the case at 

Addlethorpe, West Ashby, Barkstone, Benniworth, Benington, 
Binbrooke, Bicker, Branston, Carlton Scroop, North Coates, South 
Cockerington, Coleby, Cotes Magna, Donington, South Elkington, 
Folkingham, Fotherby, Frampton, Gedney Hill (for a month on 
each side of Christmas), Goxhill (twice a week from 5th November 
to Lent), Great Grimsby (for the month before Christmas), 
Harlaxton, Healing (as at Goxhill), Hogsthorpe (from 5th 
November to Christmas), Irby-on-Humber, Kirton-in-Holland, 
Lavington (twice a week from 5th November to Christmas), Lea, 
Legbourne, Leverton, Ludborough, Moulton, Newton, Normanton, 
South Ormsby, East Pinchbeck, Middle Rasen, Scothorne, Scremby, 

* 5th S. XII. 155. 



220 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

Searby, Skellingtlaorpe, Skendleby, Swineshead, Tattershall (from 
5th November to New Year's Day), Tetney (a peal for an hour 
every evening, Sundays excepted, during Advent), Theddlethorpe 
All Saints, North Thoresby, Timberland, South Willingham (every 
night for six weeks before Christmas), and at Willoughby (from 
5th November to New Year's Day). 

At Claxby they ring once in the first week in Advent, 
twice in the second, thrice in the third, and four times in 
the fourth or last week. 

At South Kelsey the bells are rung two evenings in the 
week from Kelsey Feast (old Martinmas) till Christmas ; 
and at Epworth peals are rung from 7 to 8 p.m. on the 
Saturday night next following Martinmas day, and then on 
every Thursday and Saturday evening until the Saturday 
night before "Fastens Eve" {i.e. Shrove-Tuesday). It 
is thought probable that the Thursday night's ringing 
originated in the idea that Thursday being Epworth market 
day, and there being formerly much water between that 
place and Doncaster, it would be useful to guide any one 
back to Epworth who might lose his way on returning to 
Doncaster : it is further said that the ringing arose from the 
fact of a traveller being lost on the moors and finding his 
way to Epworth church by the sound of the bells. 

The Churchwardens' Accounts at Corringham show that 
the bells there were formerly rung from the 5th November, 
to the 14th of February, and that the ringers were allowed 
three pounds of candles, and ten shillings worth of beer. 

Christmas Peals are rung in very many parishes on the 
Eve of the Festival : such is the case at Barkston, Billing- 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 221 

borough, Corby, Donington, Great Grimsby, Halton- 
Holgate, South Kelsey, East Keal, Osbournby, Rippingale, 
Spilsby, and Welton. 

The ringing at midnight is an old custom : at Ruardean, 
Gloucester, there is a benefaction to the ringers of 55. a 
year under a Deed of the Rev. Anthony Sterry, Vicar of 
Lidney, dated in the fortieth year of Elizabeth, " for ringing 
a peal on Christmas-eve about mid-night for two hours in 
commemoration of the Nativity."* This midnight ringing 
is heard at (amongst other places) Springthorpe in this 
county. 

Merry peals are rung on Christmas morning at five 
o'clock at South Kelsey: an hour later (6 a.m.) peals are 
rung at South Cockerington, Edenham (and again in the 
afternoon), Holbeach All Saints, Scothorne, Swineshead, 
Thornton Curtis, and at Westborough. 

At an early hour, or during the day, peals are rung at 

Belton near Grantham, Bonby, Branston, Broughton, Crowle, 
Denton, Market Deeping, Donington, Dorrington, Ewerby, 
Folkingham, Fulbeck, Gunby S. Peter, Harlaxton, Heckington, 
Helpringham, Heydour, Horncastle, Irby-on-Humber, Laceby, 
Lavington, Lincoln (S. Botolph's, S. Peter-at-Arches, and S. Peter- 
at-Gowts), Linwood, Louth, Luddington, Navenby, Newton, South 
Ormsby, East Pinchbeck, Market Rasen, Middle Rasen, Saxby All 
Saints, Sibsey, Skellingthorpe, Skirbeck, South Somercotes, 
Spalding, Stainby, S. Mar^-'s, Stamford, Swinderby, Waddington, 
Wyberton, and doubtless many other places. 



Edwards' Old English Customs, p. 6. 



222 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

At Ashby-de-la-Launde the bells are not only rung at 
8 a.m., but also for Divine Service. 

At Amcotts a peal is rung at 8 a.m. instead of the usual 
single bell. 

At Caistor the bells are rung for some days before the 
Festival. 

At Stow they are rung early on Christmas morning, and 
also on every day during the following week, finishing on 
New Year's Eve. This is an ancient practice, as is 
apparent from the direction of S. Dunstan, made in the 
tenth century in his Rule for the Reformation of Monas- 
teries, that " at mass, nocturns, and vespers from the Feast 
of Innocents to the Circumcision all the bells should be 
rung as was the custom in England." 

At Lea a peal is rung before chiming for service : and at 
Sleaford the bells are rung at lo a.m., 4 p.m., and again 
after Evening Service on Christmas Day. 

Peals were formerly rung, but not now, at Althorpe and 
at Alvingham : the churchwardens of Kirton-in-Lindsey 
refer to the custom in their accounts for 1640 : — 

" It' given to the Ringers at Christenmasse day at morne xijd." 

Easter Day. Peals are heard in many parishes on 
this Great Festival. 

At Mavis Enderby the bells are rung at break of day. 

At Addlethorpe, Barkston, Belton near Grantham, 
Broughton, North Coates, Denton, Edenham, Gunby S. 
Nicolas, Harlaxton, Heydour, Holbeach All Saints, Lincoln 
(S. Botolph, S. Peter-at- Arches, and S. Peter-at-Gowts), 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 223 

Linwood, Louth, Navenby, Market Rasen, Skellingthorpe, 
Skirbeck, Stainby, Swinderby, Swineshead, Thornton Curtis, 
and at Waddington the bells are rung joyously early in the 
morning : that is also the case at South Cockerington, where 
the bells are also rung before and after each Service. 

So, too, on other Festivals the bells are sometimes rung: — 

The Epiphany : Peals are rung at Swineshead, 

Ascension Day : Peals are rung at North Coates and 
at Heydour. 

Whitsunday Peals are rung early in the morning at 
Harlaxton, Lincoln (S. Peter-at-Arches, and S. Peter-at- 
Gowts), Linwood, Louth, Navenby, and Skellingthorpe. 

Trinity Sunday. The bells of S. Peter-at-Arches and 
S. Peter-at-Gowts, Lincoln, are rung from seven to eight 
o'clock in the morning, 

Lenten Ringing. At Broughton they chime (not ring 
as usual) the bells for Divine Service on Ash-Wednesday. 

At Gedney Hill, during Advent and Lent, the 2nd bell 
only is used for week-day Services : and at S. Botolph's, 
Lincoln, the bells are only chimed, not rung, during the 
same seasons. 

At Barrow-on-Humber it was one of the duties of the 
Parish Clerk in 17 13 : — 

" Item He is to ring a Bell every working day from monday the first 
whole week in Lent, until Easter, except such days as there is 
prayers in the church."* 



MSS. preserved in Church Chest. 



224 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

That "Duty" is more clearly expressed in an old Survey 
or " Terrar " of that parish thus : — 

"The Clarke Receiveth from every Cottager at Easter three pence 
and from every Husbandman for every Plough Land eight pence, 
and for Ringing the Day Bell and Night Bell in Harvest two pecks 
of wheat, being also obliged to ring at Nine a Clock and four a Clock all 
the time of Lent/'*' 

I suppose we are to understand that this ringing of a bell 
at the hours of Matins and Evensong was to take place 
every day, although no Service was said, excepting on 
Litany and Holy days, when Divine Service would really 
be said, and that rather later in the morning. A similar 
custom was formerly in vogue at Cottingham, Northampton- 
shire, where a bell was rung daily at ii a.m. during Lent, 
for doing which the clerk collected eggs at Easter. 

Good Friday Use. At Winterton one bell only is 
used in Holy Week, and the tenor tolled for Services on 
Good Friday. 

At Scawby one bell only is rung on Thursday, Friday, 
and Saturday in Holy Week. 

At S. Botolph's, Lincoln, the tenor bell is rung at 8.0, 
g.o, and 10.30 in the morning. For the three hours Service 
(12.0 to 3.0 p.m.) the tenor is muffled on one side, and in 
addition to being rung for Service, six strokes are given 
each quarter of an hour, and at 3 o'clock it is rung for five 
minutes. The tenor is the only bell used from that time 
until Easter morning. 

* MSS. preserved in Church Chest. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 225 

At Broughton the bells are chimed, instead of being 
rung, for Divine Service. 

At S. Peter-at-Arches, Lincoln, the tenor bell only is 
used for the Services on Good Friday. 

At Horncastle the tenor is first tolled, then rung, for 
Divine Service on this day, after which the 2nd bell is rung 
as on Sundays. 

At Aisthorpe the tenor bell is tolled at 3 p.m. and at 
Caistor a muffled peal is rung at that hour. 

Saints' Days' Echoes. The curious custom of ringing 
a bell as a reminder of Services no longer said, which was 
formerly followed, during Lent, at Barrow-on-Humber 
(see p. 224) finds almost a duplicate at Messingham, 
where on Saints' Days, when there is no service said, 
a bell is rung for half-an-hour at eleven o'clock in the 
morning. 

S. James' Day. The churchwardens of Kirton-in-Lindsey 
(1610-1623) and of other places formerly made entries of 
payments for ringing on this day, which may have been a 
compliment to the name of the reigning sovereign — James 
the First. 

S. Andrew's Day too was announced in the same way 
at Kirton-in-Lindsey in 1658 — that is during the common- 
wealth. A bell is now rung on this day at Bozeat in 
Northamptonshire, and is called 'Tandrew, or S. Andrew's 
bell, and is there supposed to have, in times past, had some 
connection with the celebration of the day as the anni- 
versary of the Patron Saint of the lacemakers. A similar 
reason may have caused the ringing at Kirton-in-Lindsey, 

2 F 



226 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

or it may have been a survival of a custom of ringing on 
the anniversary of the Patron Saint of Scotland introduced 
after the union of the English and Scotch crowns. 

The Gowrie Conspiracy. The bells of Kirton-in- 
Lindsey were also rung in the reign of James I., on the 
5th of August : which day was formerly kept in England as 
a holiday to commemorate the escape of that monarch 
(when ruling over Scotland alone) from death at the hands 
of the Earl of Gowrie and his brother Alexander Ruthven 
on that day in the year 1600. 

New Year's Eve. The bells are rung on New Year's 
Eve at — amongst other places — Barkston, Halton Holgate, 
East Keal, Linwood, Osbournby, Saxby All Saints, Spilsby, 
and Welton. 

New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. The old year 
is rung out, and the new rung in, at Ancaster, Ashby-de-la- 
Launde, Billingborough, Carlton Scroop, North Coates, 
Cotes Magna, Corby, Edenham, South Elkington, Healing, 
Heckington, Lea, Lincoln (S. Peter-at-Gowts), Normanton, 
Owston, Middle Rasen, Sleaford, Spalding, Stamford (All 
Saints and S. Mary), Stow, and at Winterton : also at 
Holbeach All Saints, where at midnight the bells are 
"fired" three times three. 

At Aisthorpe and at Mareham-le-Fen they toll the old 
year out and ring the new year in. 

At S. Botolph's, Lincoln, they ring a half-muffled peal 
for midnight service, and an open peal whilst the Te Deum is 
sung at twelve o'clock. 

At Market Rasen they ring with partly muffled bells on 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 227 

New Year's Eve ; at midnight they toll twelve tolls ; then 
welcome the new year with an open peal. 

At Stainby and Waltham the old year is rung out with 
a muffled peal, and the new year rung in with an open one. 

At Caistor, Fulbeck, Heydour, Irby-on-Humber, East 
Pinchbeck, Scothorne, Sibsey, South Somercotes, and 
Thornton Curtis, the new year is rung in with a peal. 

At Donington a peal is rung on New Year's Eve and 
again on New Year's Day. 

At South Kelsey they ring on new year's eve, and 
again at 5 o'clock on new year's morning. 

Formerly, when the ringers could be paid, the bells were 
rung on new year's eve and morning at Althorpe, and 
when the bells could be rung at Great Grimsby ; so too, at 
Kirton-in-Lindsey, the bells were rung on new year's morn- 
ing upwards of two centuries ago, as is shown by the 
following extract from the accounts of the Churchwardens 
there for the year 1632 : — 

Item to the ringers of new yeare day morninge xiji. 

Hallowmas or All Hallows' Ringing. There was 
formerly much ringing on the Vigil of All Saints, the bells 
being kept going all through the night. 

The Accounts of the Churchwardens of Leverton have 
some entries relating to that custom : — 

1524. Itm payd to Wyllya' Josson Carpentar for helpj-ng 

of y« bellfray agayns halomese vd. 

1526. Paid to Rodlay y^ wryght for me'dyng of y« bells 

agayns halomes iiiji. 



228 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

Henry the Eighth suppressed this ringing through the 
night on the Vigil of All Saints by an order addressed to 
Cranmer: — "Forasmuch" said that document, "as that 
Vigil is abused as other Vigils were, our pleasure is, as 
you require, that the said Vigil shall be abolished, as 
the others be, and there shall be no watching nor ringing, 
but as be commonly used upon other holidays at night." 

The custom was revived at Leverton in the reign of 
Queen Mary as the Churchwardens' charges show : — 

1556. It' p"^ for the full contentation of the ryngeres vpon 

alhallow nyght xixd. ob. 

All Saints' Eve being, I suppose, meant. 

The day after All Saints was known as 

All Souls' Day, a comparatively modern festival of 
the Roman Church, founded on the doctrine of Purgatory, 
and styled the Commemoration of the Faithful Departed. 
It was sometimes called 

SouLEMAS Day,* and there was again much ringing on its 
Vigil. The Services of the day being for the benefit of all 
christian souls, a general collection appears to have been 
made from all the people — from the living for the benefit of 
the dead — either in the church or through the parish, to 
pay for the night-long ringing of the bells. Thus at Holy 
Trinity, Coventry, in 1462, it was the duty of the first 
Deacon to "go on all halowe day at evyn among y* pepyll 
in y^ northe syd off y^ Churche and gedyer money off them 

* Paston Letters, iii. 170; iv. 238. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 229 

for y^ ringars y* ryng for all crystyn sols :" and in like 
manner the second Deacon was to collect "in y* sowthe 
syde off y" churche."* " The watching and ringing of 
bells all the night upon Alhallow day at night " was for- 
bidden in 1546 as it was the warning for All Souls' day, but 
the practice was revived in Queen Mary's time. 

We find a reference to this ringing, and to the collection 
from the people in the Accounts of the Churchwardens of 
Leverton : — 

1557- It' P** for the full paymet of the ryngeres vpon 
psalmes nyght over & besyds towe & twentye penes 
gatheryd of the paryshyoners xiiiji. 

** Psalmes " is an attempt at Somas or Soulmas. The 
ringing continued all through the night until the morning of 
All Souls, when the Morrow-mass was sung. 

S. Hugh's Day. The bells of several parishes in 
Lincolnshire were formerly rung on this day. 

In the Churchwardens' Accounts of Market Deeping is 
found : — 

1588. P** for bread & drinke on S' Hughes daye & the 

two days followynge xvjrf. 

and several small payments about the bells. 
Those of Kirton-in-Lindsey give : — 

1580. Itm aganste san hew day for warke to the belles ... iJ5. 



• Quoted by Mr. EUacombe in Bells of the Church, p. 276-7. 



230 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

The same entry occurs in the following year. A few years 
later we have : — 

4 

1597. Itm vpon sante hue daye viiji. 

So those at Leverton : — 

1580. Imp'mis p" to Thoms Skottyll for one day worke 

aboute the bells before St. hewe day viiji. 

1585. Itm p'' for bread & ale to y« ringers on St. hewe day xiiji. 

1586. Itm p"* to the rynggers on St. hewe day xijd. 

[Similar payments in 1589, 1590, 1595, 1597.] 

1598. Itm p'' to viij ringgers on St. hughes day iiijs. 

In later years the ringers were regaled with " bread, drinck 
& cheeze:" for the "drinck" a strike of " mawlt " was 
brewed : — 

1602. It' p'' for a strik niawlt for the Ringers against St. 

Hughe day ijs. iiij^. 

It' p"* for thre pecke of Wheat & one of Rye then 

& grindinge them ijs. viij^. 

It' for Thre stone of Beif & white bread that day 

expended vJ5. 

It' p'' for greise & Candle then vij^. 

The Accounts of the Churchwardens of S. John Baptist, 
Stamford, say : — 

1589-90. Itm to the Ringers upon St. hewes day for bread 

& drynck for them xij^. 

1595-6. Itm gyven to y^ Ringers on sanct hewyghes day xijd. 

Itm for Candle on St. hewyhe nyght iji. 

These ringings were not, however, in honour of S. Hugh, 
but in honour of the Accession of Queen Elizabeth which 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 231 

took place upon S. Hugh's day — and which saint's day, in 
accordance with ancient custom, was frequently quoted as 
a date instead of the day and the month — 17th November, 
1558: so the Churchwardens of Leverton, in 1594, instead 
of saying, as usual, S. Hugh's day, give the date thus : — 

1594. Itm expended on the Ringgers the xvij day of 

November xix^. 

those of S. John Baptist, Stamford, say : — 

1601-2. On the crownation day for 2 belrops iiji. 

and those of Market Deeping : — 

1587. Itin p*" to y^ ringers on the Coronation daye iijs. v]d. 

The anniversary of the Accession of Queen Elizabeth 
was first publicly celebrated about the year 1570,* and 
became known as the 

Queen's Day : it is so called in the Parish Book of All 
Saints, Stamford : — 

" 1 59 1. Ap. 5. It is accorded that hereafter for the ringers 
one the Queene's daye the allowance shall be 
but vs." 

and in the Accounts of the Churchwardens of Market 
Deeping to which reference has already been made, where the 
ringing is sometimes said to have taken place on S. Hugh's 
day, sometimes on the Coronation day, and sometimes on 

• See Nicolas' Chvonology of History, p. i68. 



232 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

the Queen's day, all meaning that it was in honour of the 
Queen's Accession : — 

1592. Itm to nine men to ringe on y^ Queene's daye iv5. vj^. 

1593. Itm for bread & ale grese & candle on y^ Queene's 

daye ijs. viiji. 

The celebration of the day was long kept in many 
places, by the lighting of bonfires and ringing of bells : 
indeed in London, where the bells began to ring about 3 
a.m., the day was more or less one of violent political and 
religious excitement until the Accession of George the First, 
The ringers at Bowden-Magna, Leicestershire, still receive 
one shilling annually, left to them by Richard Kestin, under 
his Will dated the 7th of August, 1674, "for their pains in 
ringing on the 17th day of November for ever, in thankful 
remembrance of restoring the Gospel, and removing Popish 
Idolatry, and bringing in Queen Elizabeth."* 

Dedication Peals are rung at Aubourn, Branston, 
Caythorpe, Hale Magna, Haxey, Heydour, East Pinch- 
beck, Rippingale, Skellingthorpe, and at other places. 

At Sibsey a peal is rung on the morning of the first 
Monday in August, commonly called "Sibsey Feast Day." 
As the church is dedicated to S. Margaret, whose festival 
day is the 20th of July, it seems likely that on the occasion 
of the alteration of style, in 1752, the parishioners kept 
their ancient festival on the date in the new style that 
corresponded with the 20th of July in the old style. The 

* See Charity Commissioners' Report, 1837, p. 223. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 233 

Sunday following this date would be the principal religious 
celebration or festival, and the next day, Monday, the 
principal secular festival day, upon which the bells were rung. 

Baptism Peal. At Searby a peal is rung for ten 
minutes after the Sacrament of Holy Baptism has been 
administered ; and at Fulbeck the 4th bell is rung prior to 
the Service in which the Ministration takes place. 

Confirmation Peals are rung at Donington and 
doubtless in many other places when that Holy Rite is 
administered. 

Banns Peal, that is a peal after Divine Service on 
Sunday morning when the Banns of an intended marriage 
are first "put up," is rung at Aisthorpe, Ancaster, Ashby- 
de-la-Launde, Barkston, Barnoldby-le-Beck, Bassingthorpe, 
Bottesford (sometimes), Carlton Scroop, Claypole, Claxby, 
Denton, Eveden, Fulbeck, Heapham, Irby-on-Humber, 
Kirkby Laythorpe, Kirkby Underwood, Legbourne, Nor- 
manton, Norton Disney, Middle Rasen, Redbourne, Ropsley, 
Rothwell, Scotter, Skellingthorpe, Springthorpe, Thorpe-on- 
the-Hill, Welby, North Witham, South Willingham, and 
at Yarburgh. 

The same custom is followed at Bonby, when desired. 
At South Kelsey the peal is rung in the evening ; at Sway- 
field the customary fee (2s. bd.) for entering the Banns is 
appropriated by the clerk for his services in the belfry ; at 
Laceby the peal is given if the parties concerned are 
" popular people." 

The single bells are sounded at Beelsby, Caenby, 
Torrington East and Torrington West. 

2 G 



234 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

A Peal is rung after the third publication at Asterby 
("when money is forthcoming"), Cotes Magna, Heydour, 
Saxby (occasionally), Scotton, and at Upton ; after the 
first and third times of publication at Long Bennington, 
Ingoldsby, Lavington, and at Westborough ; and after 
each publication at Alvingham, North Cockerington, 
Elsham, and at Searby. 

The ringing of these Banns Peals is remembered at 
Alkborough, AUington East and West (where they are 
still occasionally rung), Appleby (only recently given up), 
Branston, Carlton-le-Moorland, Corringham, Fotherby, 
Honington, Kirkby-cum-Osgodby, Lea, Leasingham, Net- 
tleton. North Owersby, Owston, Thornton-le-Moor, Thorn- 
ton Curtis, and at Ulceby, where the peal was rung in 
the afternoon of the third, and sometimes of the second 
day of publication. 

At North Kelsey, where a peal was formerly rung on 
Sunday after the publication of Banns, the bells are now 
always rung on the Monday. 

At Barnoldby-le-Beck, Lea, and other places the ringing 
was, and is, called giving the couple their "spurring" or 
" sporrings," from the old Danish the " sporge " or asking ; 
at Denton, Swayfield, and North Witham, the ringing is 
called " spurs." 

There is another custom followed at Claxby and other 
parishes in that neighbourhood in connection with the 
publication of Banns : after the third asking the clerk says 
" God speed them well ; " until recently the custom was 
followed at Springthorpe ; in a neighbouring parish to that, 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 235 

where it still lingers, the Vicar published his own banns, I 
whereupon the clerk turned round and said "Godspeed ' 
you well Sir ! "*. 

Wedding Peals are, of course, usual in almost every 
parish in the county : even in some of those which possess 
only one bell an attempt is made on such occasions to be 
hilarious: at Stroxton, where, until recently, there was only 
a single bell, it was customary on the occasion of a wedding 
for three men to beat a kind of peal on the bell with ham- 
mers which was called "Three-bell-peal." It is said to 
have been last done there on the occasion of the marriage, 
in the year 1814, of a man only lately deceased. The old 
bell still bears the marks of that performance. 

At Addlethorpe a peal is always rung immediately after 
the wedding of a ringer ; at Hawerby the two bells are 
chimed after a wedding ; and at Searby the bells are rung 
for ten minutes. 

At Donington, and doubtless at other places, it is 
customary to ring the bells before and after Divine Service 
on the first Sunday after the return of the newly married 
couple, and of their attendance at Church. 

The 5th bell at Spalding is called 

The Wedding-Bell, because it is used to call the 
Priest to the church as soon as the wedding party arrives. 

The Wedding-peal is referred to on several bells in 
Lincolnshire : for example on Hogsthorpe 2nd bell we 
read : — 

* Notes and Queries, 5th S. xii. 125, 518. 



236 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

When Female Virtue weds with manly worth 
We catch the rapture and we spread it forth. 

and on the 5th at Brant Broughton : — 

In Wedlock's band all ye who join 

With hands your hearts unite, 
So shall our Tuneful! Tongues combine 

To laud the nuptial rite. 

The Bride's Peal. In days when "wedding trips" were 
unusual, if not almost unknown, amongst the villagers of 
Lincolnshire, it was, in some parishes, customary to ring a peal 
on the morning after the wedding ; that custom has nearly 
died out, but at Kirkby-cum-Osgodby, and at Mumby it was 
recently the custom to ring early on that morning to call 
up the bride and bridegroom ; such is now the case, on rare 
occasions, at Scotter ; at Fotherby, too, a peal used to be 
rung at seven o'clock on that morning called " Ringing 
them up." At Hogsthorpe the bells are generally rung the 
day after a wedding, and such a compliment h^s. been 
known at Thornton-le-Moor. i^Ml^e^J^. 

May-Day Peals were rung at All Saints', Stamford, in 
1707, as the Churchwardens' Accounts show: — 

1707. Expended on the Ringers on May Day 050 

and it is worth noting that on the second ladder leading to 
the bells "at Castle Bytham are cut the words : — 

THIS o WARE 
THE o MAY 1660 
POVL 



y 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 237 

Dole Meadow Bell. A bell so called was formerly 
rung annually at Carlton-le-Moorland to summon the people 
to the church gates to bid for the yearly occupation of a 
meadow, containing about three and a half acres of land, 
left by a benefactor to the poor of the parish, to be let at 
the ringing of a bell. The bidding now goes on at the 
school. A similar occurrence known as 

The Letting of the Lanes formerly took place in the 
church porch at Winterton on May Day, for which a peal 
used to be rung : when the letting of the lanes ceased in 
the church porch, the bells were still jangled by anyone who 
liked, but since the ropes of the bells have been brought 
down to the floor, and the tower arch opened, that bad 
practice has ceased. 

The Apprentice Bell. At Waddington the tenor bell 
is rung for a few minutes when an apprentice is out of his 
time. 

Fair and Market Peals. At Epworth peals are rung 
for an hour on the first Wednesday after May Day intro- 
ductory to Epworth Fair on the following day ; and at 
Louth it was, for many years, the custom to ring on the 
evening before November Fair-day. 

At Scotton the bells are rung on Tuesday evenings from 
seven to eight o'clock from November to the end of the 
year, "to guide the people coming from Gainsborough 
market across Scotton Common." 

At Kirton-in-Lindsey a bell, sometimes called the 
Market-bell, but more generally known as the ''Winter 
Ringing," was, for many years previous to the Inclosure in 



238 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

1801, and is still, rung at seven o'clock in the evening 
during the months of November, December, and January, 
on Tuesday to guide travellers from Gainsborough market, 
on Thursday from Brigg market, and on Saturday from 
Kirton market. This continued until 1858, when, upon the 
appointment of a new Vicar, the night ringing was changed 
to Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, to suit his convenience. 
Those nights, of course, meant nothing. With some 
difficulty the Vicar was brought to see why other nights 
had originally been chosen, and Tuesday, Thursday, 
and Saturday night ringing was restored, and still con- 
tinues. 

The Mayors of Boston and Grantham are generally 
welcomed by a merry peal on the day of their election. 

Election Peals, though now happily seldom heard, are 
of respectable antiquity. The Churchwardens of Kirton- 
in-Lindsey charge in their Accounts : — 

1625. It. to Ringers when the knyghts of the shire were 

chosen xiji. 

Birthday Peals are rung at Belton on the birthdays of 
the Earl and Countess Brownlow : at Langton-by-Partney 
the bells are rung on the Rector's birthday : a similar com- 
pliment was paid to the Rector of Great Ponton (the Rev. 
Canon Brooks) on the 31st of October, 1879, he having 
then attained his ninetieth year. 

Call Bells. There is a small modern bell at Fleet so 
called ; it is used to call the ringers together. The 4th 
bell at Welton is so used, and a single bell sounded for five 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 239 

minutes before each Service at Gainsborough is known by 
the name of the Call Bell. 

The Oven Bell. The Mill and the Oven of the Lord 
of the Manor were formerly found in very many parishes : 
to them the tenants of the Manor were expected to resort 
to grind their corn and to bake their bread. In some 
parishes a bell was rung, called the Oven bell, to give warn- 
ing that the Manor Oven was heated and ready for use. 
There is now only one trace of this custom in Lincolnshire: 
at Welton there is a tradition of the Oven bell having been 
rung there in past times : at Cranwell (as at Melton 
Mowbray, Leicestershire) notice was given by a man 
parading the streets and blowing a horn.(y{ |)J^;,,ylQl^ Jyft'^i^-^ 

Storm or Tempest Peals. As is well known the sound 
of church bells was formerly supposed not only to drive 
away or restrain the power of evil spirits, but also to 
ward off thunder and to calm storms and tempests. It 
is said that there was a special endowment to old S. Paul's 
" for ringing the hallowed belle in great tempestes and 
lighteninges ; "* and that whenever it thundered and 
lightened it was customary at Malmesbury Abbey to ring 
S. Adhelm's bell.f 

Wynkyn de Worde in the Golden Legend wrote of the 
power of bells to cause the " feinds and wicked spirytes " 
to be abashed and flee "and cease of the movynge of 
tempeste." 

Whitgift refers to this belief in his Defence^ wherein he 

* Church Bells of Winchester, p. 7. f English Folk Lore, p. 263. 



240 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

writes of bells as a sign of evil when they were rung " to 
stay storms and tempests," but were then a sign of good 
being rung " to sermons and other godly actions." * 

Latimer too remarked upon this supposed power in the 
sound of Bells in one of his Sermons preached in Lincoln- 
shire in 1553:— 

" Ye know, when there was a storm or a fearful weather, then we rang 
the holy bells : they were they that must make all things well : they 
must di'ive away the devil ! But, I tell you, if the holy bells would 
serve against the devil, or that he might be put away through their 
sound, no doubt we would soon banish him out of all England. 
For I think if all the bells in England should be rung together at a 
certain hour, I think there would be almost no place but some bells 
might be heard there : and so the devil should have no abiding 
place in England, if ringing of bells would serve : but it is not that 
will serve against the devil. "f 

The custom is referred to in the ancient Accounts of the 
Churchwardens of Spalding : — 

1519. Itm p** for ryngyng when the Tempest was iiji. 

There is an inscription of a much later date (1705) on 
the 3rd bell at Lois Weedon, Northamptonshire, which 
appears to point to this belief: — 

Defunctos ploro : ccelvm reddoque serenvm. 

Call for Easter Dues. The 2nd bell at Horncastle 
is tolled immediately after morning service on Easter 

* Parker Society, n. 68. f Sermons of Bishop Latimer (Parker Society), p. 498. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 241 

Monday and on Easter Tuesday, to give notice of the 
Collection of Easter Dues. 

School-Bell. The 3rd bell at Horncastle is rung every 
morning at 8.45 to call the scholars of the Grammar- 
school to their duties. The inscription on the 2nd bell 
at Fishtoft points to its use as a School Bell. .^ 

The Restoration of Charles the Second is com- 
memorated by merry peals at Benington, Swineshead, and 
occasionally, at Louth. 

Ringing on that day is known formerly to have been 
the custom at Althorpe, Corringham, Haxey (where the 
anniversary was called "Oak-apple Day"), Horncastle, 
Owston, and at Sutterton, where the Churchwardens' 
Accounts have entries of payments to the ringers on the 
29th of May for many years. So, too, at S. Mary's, 
Stamford, the Churchwardens charged in 

1709. P'' Richard Hambleton for ale for the Ringers on 

y* 29 May 00 06 00 

and at All Saints', Stamford : — 

1712. May 29 paid to the Ringers on King Charles 

Restauration 00 05 00 

Harvest Bell. In some parishes it was formerly the 
custom to ring a bell early in the morning, during the 
Harvest season, to call the reapers to their work. Such 
was the case at Barrow-on-Humber as we learn from a 
manuscript copy of the ^^ Office and Duty of the Parish Clark'^ 
there, dated 17 13 : — 
2 h 



242 Peculiar Uses of the LincolnsJiire Bells. 

Item He is to ring a Bell every working day morning at Break of 
the day and Continue the ringing thereof until All Saints and also 
to ring a Bell every evening about the sunseting until harvist be 
fully ended ; which Bells are to begin to ring from the begining of 
harvist. 

From an old Survey or "Terrar" preserved among the 
Church papers we further learn : — 

" The Clarke Receiveth from every Cottager at Easter three pence 
and from every Husbandman for every Plough Land Eight pence, 
and for Ringing the Day Bell and Night Bell in Harvest two pecks 
of wheat ..." 

The Gleaning-bell. In many parishes a Gleaning- 
bell is rung during harvest in the morning, and sometimes 
both in the morning and at evening, giving warning when 
gleaning may commence, and when it must close for the 
day. This is done in order that all — old and feeble, as well 
as young and active — may have a fair start. Such a bell 
is rung at eight o'clock in the morning, and again at six 
o'clock in the evening, at Bassingham, Castle Bytham, 
Coleby, Colsterworth, Corby, Foston, Horbling, Langtoft, 
Swinstead, and Wilsford. 

At Morton and at Rippingale the bell is rung at 8 a.m. 
and at 5 p.m. ; at Bourne it is rung at 8 a.m. and at 7 p.m. ; 
at Billingborough and at Folkingham a bell is rung at six 
o'clock in the evening ; at Market Deeping at seven o'clock 
in the morning ; at Hacconby, Norton Disney, and at 
Navenby, the Gleaning-bell is rung, at the last-named place 
the school-bell being used. 

The Gleaning-bell is remembered, but not now rung, at 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 243 

Aslackby, Baston, Burton Goggles, Carlton-le-Moorland, 
Croyland, Gunby S. Nicolas, Hale Magna, Helpringham, 
Heckington, Honington, Leasingham, Quadring, Saxby All 
Saints, Scredington, Stainby, Swaton, Welby, Wellingore, 
South Witham, and at West Deeping; at the last-named 
place the gleaners paid twopence each ; when they declined 
to pay the ringing ceased. 

At Louth there was formerly a bell rung in connection 
with 

The " Gatherums," a piece of ground so called in the 
neighbourhood of Aswell, which in former times was cul- 
tivated for the benefit of the poor: when the " pescods " 
were ripe a church bell was rung which gave warning to the 
poor that the time had arrived when they might gather 
them: hence (it is said) gather' em or ^^ gatherum.'' The 
church books had the following, and similar, entries re- 
lating to that custom : — 

1556. Item for Knyllyng the bell in harvest for gatheringe 

of the pescods iiijrf.* 

Boon-days' Ringing. In the same church books of 
Louth is the following entry : — 

1589. To y^ keper of y' clock & chymes for y* service & 
for ringeng of y' day bell & for ringeng of y' cur- 
feu & for ringeng at y'' boundays & in peas tyme & 
for kepeng cleane of y^ leades for iij of y" first 
quarters xxxJ5. \]d. 

" Notitice Luda, 215. 



244 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

The "boundays" or boondays were the days on which 
occupiers of land having horses and carts were bound to 
give work gratis, for the pubUc good, towards the repair of 
the roads. 

On Mumping Day, as S. Thomas' day is called there, 
and in many other places, the tenor bell was, until the year 
1877, rung at Wragby to summon the poor to receive a dole 
of bread and meat provided by the Churchwardens. 

The Execution Bell : in some places a bell was 
formerly tolled as the criminal passed on his way to be 
hanged, calling on the people to pray for one passing from 
life : such a bell was tolled at S. Helen's, Worcester, S. 
Sepulchre's, London, and formerly at Spalding Priory in 
this county. "The Turris " there was built in 1230: a 
hundred years later the Prior, Walter Halton, erected a 
lofty tower over that building wherein hung a large bell 
which was tolled at executions, and on other solemn 
occasions.* 

Haxey Hood and The King of the Boggans. At 
Haxey there is an annual festival called " Haxey Hood " 
held on the 6th of January or on the following Monday if 
that day fall on a Sunday. It is said to have originated 
when the Mowbray family possessed a castle in the adjoin- 
ing parish of Owston, the site of which is still traceable 



* Minutes of Spalding Gentlemen's Society, after that. The last execution took place 

III. no. Canon Moore writes to me, "The in the Market Place in 1742, and the man 

power of ' Pit and Gallows ' was taken was hung in irons on a gibbet about one 

away at the Dissolution, but I find by the mile out of the town. I recollect the 

Parish Register felons were executed here gibbet standing." 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 245 

near to the church. The tradition is that they also had a 
country house in a part of Haxey parish still known by the 
name of " the Park," and that on one Epiphany Lady 
Mowbray was going to church from the Park, when a 
sudden gust of wind carried off her hood which was chased 
across the country by a party of rustics, who at length 
captured and restored it to her Ladyship. She appears to 
have been so much amused with the incident that she 
instituted an annual observance of the event upon the hill 
where it had occurred. It is also said that she left six and 
a half acres of land as a reward to the thirteen men who 
were to conduct the affair. No record, however, can now 
be found of the bequest, nor can the land be traced. 

The festival, as now observed, is of a rather disreputable 
character, and has of late years lost much of its popularity. 
It is now observed as follows : — 

On the sixth of January at about 2 p.m. twelve men 
called ''Boggans" dressed in scarlet jackets, headed by 
another also in a scarlet jacket but further decorated with 
rags and ribbons, and who is called "King of the Boggans," 
march up the village to the base of an ancient cross near 
the church. The King of the Boggans bears "The Hood" 
which is a roll of leather about two feet long, and as thick 
as a man's arm. The King is then hoisted up on to the 
top of the ancient stone, and there, in a rigmarole speech 
invites the mob to follow him to the top of the hill, and 
enjoy the sport of chasing the hood. Away they all go. 
The King of the Bpggans takes his stand on the appointed 
spot, and the twelve Boggans are posted at intervals, five or 



246 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

six hundred yards away. The King then throws up the 
Hood, which is caught by one of the mob, who makes off 
with it at the top of his speed across the country : he throws 
it on ahead of him, it is caught by another and so on, the 
Boggans all the time intercepting, if possible, the Hood, 
and when a Boggan gets hold of it he quietly and un- 
molested carries it back to the King, who throws it again 
amongst the people. This continues until the approach of 
darkness when the festival for that day is ended. The next 
day the Boggans and their King go round soliciting con- 
tributions which they spend in drink. There is a general 
holiday in the parish on " Hood Day," and the inhabitants 
are visited by their relatives and friends from all parts of 
the country. The ringers ring at intervals during the day, 
but without special payment.* 

Racing Peals were formerly rung — it is sad to say — 
in honour of favourite horses or dogs winning races : 
although a thing of the past, such ringing is remembered 
at Winterton, and doubtless at other places. 

Fire-bell. A special bell is sometimes rung as an 
alarm in case of fire : the treble is so rung at Barkston, 
Hale Magna, and at Thornton-le-Moor, the 3rd at Walton, 
and one of the bells at Wragby. 

The 1st and 2nd bells are rung at Caythorpe. At 
Lincoln (S. Peter-at-Arches) the " Ting-tang" is commonly 
called the Fire-bell ; and at Horncastle that small bell is 



Saunders (Vol. ii. 214) gives an account of this festival, which is altered in its 
observance since he wrote. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 247 

rung " as an alarm bell, day or night, in case of Fire 
or other great calamity." 

In case of Fire the treble and the tenor are rung at 
Caistor, Market Rasen, Swineshead, and at Louth : at the 
latter place in accordance with a resolution of the Vestry 
passed on the 17th of November, 1800: — 

That in case of any further alarm of Fire two Bells shall be rung 
instead of one.* 

At Sutterton the Priest's bell and the tenor are rung 
together. At Swaton they jangle the bells in case of fire. 
The bells at Stamford were formerly sounded in the same 
way : on the occasion of a fire there, on the 2nd October, 
1803, "A strange ringing of bells gave the alarm, and the 
drums of the third Lincoln Militia beat to arms."f Bishop 
Hall refers to the custom when he says " so when we would 
signify that the town is on fire we ring confusedly. "{ 

At Sleaford a small bell (14 inches in diameter, without 
inscription or date) hangs in a canopied niche on the west 
front of the south aisle of the church : this bell which may 
possibly have formerly belonged to a chapel of one of the 
Guilds, is now known as the Fire-bell. The chain and 
wire from this bell are carried over pulleys, and the end is 
padlocked to the external wall of the church : the Local 
Board of Health has given instructions (1879) that the bell 
and its fittings are to be put into good order, and so it is 
presumed that it will be again used in case of fire. 

• Vestry Book. f Stamford Mercury, 7th October, 1803. % Occasional Meditations, lxxx. 



248 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

Gunpowder Plot. The discovery of this Plot is still 
commemorated by the ringing of merry peals at Benington, 
Branston, Claypole, Elsham, Heydour, Springthorpe, 
Swineshead, and at Wragby. The bells are clashed or 
" fired " at Caythorpe, Walcot, and at Halton-Holgate, 
where they call it "shooting the bells;" also at Great 
Ponton and at Rippingale, at both of which places the 
people call it '' shooting old Guy." 

Peals on this day are remembered, but not now rung, at 
Althorpe, Carlton-le-Moorland, Corby (where they used to 
"shoot" the bells), Corringham, Horncastle, Osbournby, 
Owston, and at Weston S. Mary. 

At Sibsey the Churchwardens' Accounts for i6gg have : — 

Given the Ringers on 5'^ Nov' o . 10 . o 

The same item occurs frequently until recent times, the 
amount given varying from 10s. to 5s., and there was some- 
times a supper. 

At Sutterton the ringers had a dinner and drink : — 

1803. Nov. 5. Paid Ringers dinner & drink £2 .12.0 

and so for many subsequent years. 

Gunpowder Plot, discovered in 1605, was ordered by 
Parliament, in 1606, to be observed. We have an early 
mention of the commemoration in the Accounts of the 
Churchwardens of S. John Baptist, Stamford : — 

1608-9. Itm paid for Rynging the V'' of November vji. 



Pecidiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 249 

This payment is continued even during the Commonwealth, 
for instance : — 

1652-3. given to y^ Ringers for ringing on Nov. 5th 0.1.4 

In the Book of the Churchwardens of S. Mary's, Stam- 
ford, is the following order respecting the ringing on this 
day : — 

Ap. 24, 1701. Memorandum that the Churchwardens is onely to 
give six shilHngs for Ringing on the fifth of November. 

and that payment appears in subsequent years. 

We find in the Churchwardens' Accounts of Kirton-in- 
Lindsey the following early entry : — 

1623. It' for ringinge the fift day of November xijrf. 

and so in subsequent years. 

And at Leverton the Churchwardens charge : — 

1610. Itm pd for bread & drinke for the ringners the fifte 

of November iJ5. \]d. 

This Anniversary is referred to on two bells in this 
County in very different terms : the 2nd bell at Owmby, 
dated 1687, exclaims : — 

Let vs remember the 5 of November. 

Whilst the ist at Witham-on-the-Hill is very strong in 
the opposite direction : — 

Twas not to prosper pride or hate 
Wilham Augustus Johnson gave me ; 
But peace and joy to celebrate, 
And call to prayer to heav'n to save ye : 

2 I 



250 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

Then keep the terms and e'er remember 
May 29th ye must not ring : 
Nor yet the 5''' of each November 
Nor on the crowning of a King. 

This day was formerly observed at Lincoln by a Bull 
baiting which commenced at 11 o'clock in the morning: 
the bull-ring was on the Castle hill. 

The Market-bell, which was formerly heard in many 
market towns has only one representative in Lincolnshire. 

At Sleaford there is a small bell (thirteen and a half 
inches in diameter, without inscription or date) hanging 
in the south light of the lowest west spire light of the 
church : it is known as 

The Butter-bell. There is a traditional recollection 
of it having been rung at 12 o'clock on the morning of 
market day, about sixty years ago, to announce to the 
Sleaford people that the sale of butter was about to com- 
mence : the inhabitants had then the privilege of securing 
all they required before purchasers from a distance were 
allowed to buy. 

This little bell had been lost sight of for many years 
previous to the bells being examined for the purposes of 
this volume. A new rope was then supplied to it by two of 
my kind correspondents, and the Vicar's son now (1879) 
rings it from 12 o'clock to 12.15 every market day in 
imitation of the ancient use. It was first rung by him on 
the 14th of April, 1879, its unaccustomed sound causing a 
crowd to assemble, and to offer many conjectures as to its 
source, and the cause and object of the ringing. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 251 

C. Knight has some amusing remarks on the Market- 
belL He says : — "Is that rung now? I fear not. There 
was something deeply impressive in that belL It spoke 
loudly of the majesty of the law, which then aspired to 
regulate some domestic, as well as all foreign, commerce. 
The stalls were duly set ; the butchers had hung up their 
joints ; the farmer's wife had spread her fowls and her 
butter upon a white cloth ; onions and apples stood 
temptingly on the pavement side, but not an atom could be 

sold till the market bell had rung It was unlawful 

even to handle a goose till the bell said * You may bargain.' 
There was a board exhibited which told of heavy penalties 
if early housewives were disobedient to the mandate of 
that bell, and dared to chaffer before other housewives were 
awake."* 

At Louth there was a bell on the summit of the 
Guildhall, which formerly stood in the Market Place, and 
which may have been used as a Market-bell, or as a 
Common belLf 

At Stamford the signal for the commencement of the 
Corn Market was, in the reign of Edward the Fourth, the 
ringing of the Undernone or Undern bell. J The Town 
Book, belonging to the Corporation, has the following Order 
passed in 1478-g : — 



* Once upon a Time, p. 480. 
f NotiticB LudcS: p. 204. often used in the thirteenth and fourteenth 

X Sir H. Nicolas, in his Chronology of centuries for the third hour of the day, or 
History (p. 195), says, "Undern, a word 9 a.m." 



252 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

" It is ordeyned that no person opyn ther sack or set ther corn to sale 
afore the hour of ten of the bell or els the undernone bell be 
rongyn."* 

This bell, or a successor, became known subsequently 
as the Market-bell. The Records of the Corporation con- 
tain the following Resolution passed in the year 1777 : — 

Resolved that the Market-Bell be given to the Parish to be recast 
in order to be added as an additional bell to the Quarters in the 
church. 

This bell may have hung at the old Market House 
pulled down about the year 1822. 

The statutes against forestalling, &c., being repealed in 7th 
and 8th Victoria, the Market-bell lost its use and its power. 

Forestalling was provided against at Barton-on-Humber 
by a law which prohibited "any person purchasing for 
resale at a profit goods brought into the haven, until after 
the expiration of three days from the bellman's announcing 
the arrival of the cargo ; during these three days the in- 
habitants had the opportunity of buying the goods at the 
wholesale price. "f Measures were also taken at Great 
Grimsby to prevent forestalling.^ 

The Mote or Common Bell. A bell was ordered 
by Edward the Confessor to be sounded in cases of danger 
to convene the people. This was the same as the alarm 
bell which we read as being rung by order of John to sum- 
mon the citizens of London when he wished to involve 



Peck's Desiderata Cuyiosa, Lib. vi. p. 36, Tom. i. f Ball's Barton, Part 11. 3. 
\ See Architectural Socs. Reports and Papers, xiv. 212. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 253 

them in certain illegal acts during the absence of Richard I. 
(1193) in the Holy-land. Indeed the use of a bell as a 
summons to public meeting, or as an alarm in cases of 
danger, appears to have been very general. A bell for such 
a purpose was used at Newcastle-on-Tyne where it was 
called the " Common Bell." Nottingham too, had its 
"Common Bell" in 1315, and at S. Chad's, Stafford, was a 
" grette bell which is accustomed to call the parishioners to 
geather to all things pertening to the towne of Stafforde." 

The 7th bell at S. Mary's, Stamford, is the " Common 
Bell " of that municipality. It was tolled to call the mem- 
bers of the Hall together to attend Mr. Alderman to church 
from the reign of Elizabeth down to recent times. It is 
frequently referred to in the Municipal Records. Thus : — 

" 1 6 14. April 24. At this hall the comon bell was toled to the order 
to call the townsmen togeather that they there might be p'suaded 
to adventure some money according to the Counselles letters into 
Virginia, but beinge not thought fitt by the greater p'te of the 
Company there assembled to adventure of any man's p'vate purse 
nothinge was done." 

It was subsequently determined that "iij"' be laid downe" 
from the town stock " and adventured in the lotterye for 
Virginia." 

" 1622 Oct. 9. At this hall it is further agreed uppon by the said 
assembly that uppon all occasions M^ Alderman hath [to come] to 
the comon hall the treable bell of St. Maries church shall be tolled 
to the ende both the Companies, as well the Comburgesses as the 
Capitall burgesses, may come to M' Alderman & attende on him to 
& from the hall for the glory & wor^ of the towne." 



254 Pecidiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

It would appear that the "Common Bell" was, at that 
time, cracked or not useable, and so the treble was used 
in its stead, for on 

" Jany. 2. 1624-5 it was agreed uppon by the Alderman, Comburgesses 
and Capitall burgesses .... that five pounds shall be given freely 
out of the towne stocke for and towards the castinge of the Coiiion 
bell beinge now in the steeple of St. Maries in Stamford aforesaid 
(p'vided alhvayes nev' the lesse that it be made tuneable to the 
other five bells m the steeple) and that there be an acte made and 
confirmed accordinge to lawe by the advise of the towne to make 
it appeare that the said bell belongeth to the said towne and not to 
the p'ish. And also that there shall be a subscription made about 
the said bell to import the same to belong to the towne,"* 

The bell thus referred to is the present Common Bell 
— the 7th of the ring : in addition to the pious prayer 
" jesvs spede vs," and the name of the founder " Tobie 
Norris cast me 1626," it bears the inscription, in refer- 
ence to its use : — 

Which seems to mean : — 

/ am myself worn out \_ov bruised] while serving for the men of Stamford. 

In the Mayor and Chamberlains' Accounts are found 
occasional references to this bell, such as : — 

1736. To Edw. Lyon for mending the Corporation Bell 

St. Mary's Church 00 . 06 . 00 



m 



Kindly extracted for me by Mr. Justin Simpson. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 255 

1789. Edw. Arnold Bellfounder for hanging the Cor- 
poration Bell 6 . 6 . o 

This bell is still tolled for a quarter of an hour at Quarter 
Sessions to summon the jury and others. 

An ancient Mote-bell hangs in a wooden frame, protected 
from the weather, on the top of the roof of the Guildhall, 
Lincoln. It is twenty and a half inches in diameter, has a 
rope and wheel, and is a very interesting bell, because its 
inscription not only tells of its use, but also gives its date 
thus : — 

:m.M^mi :F[cD:Ei©- m~w^m. Mm%w<Bw^ 

u 



This inscription shows that the bell (cast in the time of 
William Beele, Mayor — that is in 1371) was rung at the 
opening, and again at the close of the court : the first 
portion reads literally (according to a reading kindly given 
to me by the Rev. J. T, Fowler) : — 

When any good man hears the hell let him open the hag, and know ye the 
hall to he clear when it re-rings. 

The Court being a law Court, the reference is to the bag in 



256 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

which those interested in the case or cases being about to 
be tried carried their papers in the same way still common 
with lawyers. Caxton, in the second edition of his trans- 
lation of The Game and Playe of the Chesse (1480), refers to 
these bags in an interpolation of his own in the chapter 
descriptive of the third pawn, called a notary, or ''advocate 
publique," thus: — "I suppose that in alle Cristendom are 
not so many pletars, attorneys and men of the lawe as ben 
in Engelond onely, for yf they were nombered alle that 
longe to the Courtes of the Chaunserye, Kynge's Bench, 
Comyn place, Cheker, ressayt and helle, and the bagge 
berars of the same, it should amount to a grete multitude . ." 
The inscription on this curious little bell has been freely 
rendered into English verse thus : — 

When first a good man hears the bell 

Let him his bag with speed untie ; 
When next it rings, he'll know full well 

The Hall is cleared, and homeward hie. 

or 

Let the honest burgher who hears me ring 

Produce his bag and untie the string ; 
And when the clapper again is heard 

Be sure the Court is about to be cleared. 

It is now only rung to give warning of a meeting of the 
Council. In smaller places a church bell was frequently, 
and is still sometimes, used (as we shall see presently) to 
summon to a Town or Parish meeting. 

The Vestry Bell. A bell (the treble or one of the 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 257 

small bells of the ring), as a summons to attend a Vestry, 
is still rung at 

Addlethorpe, West Allington, Althorpe, Alvingham, Ancaster, 
Appleby, Asterby, Bardney, Barnoldby-le-Beck, Baston (for both 
Vestry and Town meetings), Belton near Grantham, Bicker, 
BilHnghay, Blyton, BoHngbrooke, Bonby, Branston, Bratoft, 
Broughton, Butterwick, Burgh, Caenby, Carlton Scroop, Coleby, 
Corby, West Deeping, Digby, Doddington Dry, Donington, Dun- 
holme, Dunsby, South Elkington, Ewerby, South Ferriby,Frampton, 
Friesthorpe, Frieston, Gosberton, Gretford, Gunby S. Nicolas, 
Hareby, Harlaxton, Hale Magna, Heckington, Hogsthorpe, Horn- 
castle, Ingoldsby, Irby-on-Humber, Laceby, Laughton, Langtoft, 
Leake, Lincoln (S. Botolph and S. Peter-at-Gowts), Ludborough, 
Mareham-le-Fen, Mareham-on-the-Hill, Minting, Moulton, Mumby, 
Nettleton, Normanton, Orby, Osbournby, Owmby (for Vestry and 
Town Meetings), East Pinchbeck, Potterhan worth, Quadring, 
Middle Rasen, Rippingale, Saltfleetby S. Clement, Scotton, Searby, 
Skellingthorpe, Skirbeck, Spilsby, Springthorpe, Stainby, Stickney, 
East Stockwith, Stow (formerly for Town also), Stragglethorpe, 
Surfleet, Swinderby, Thornton-le-Moor, Thorpe-on-the-Hill, Tim- 
berland. High Toynton, Walcot, Westborough, Whaplode, Silk 
Willoughby, South Willingham, Winteringham, and at Wyberton. 

A larger bell is rung at 

Aslackby (tenor), Benington (5th), Caistor (3rd), Caythorpe (7th), 
Coningsby (4th), Elsham (tenor), Evedon (tenor), Fulbeck (4th), 
Grantham (6th), West Halton (tenor for Town and Vestry meet- 
ings), Hundleby (tenor), Leasingham (3rd), Leverton (3rd), Lin- 
coln, S. Peter-at-Arches (5th), Market Rasen (5th), Ruskington 
(tenor), Sibsey (4th), Sleaford (7th), Swineshead (7th), Waltham 
(tenor), and at Washingborough (5th). 

At Epworth two or three bells are chimed : at Gedney 
2 K 



258 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

the treble bell is rung for important parish meetings, the 
School bell for minor meetings ; and at Wacldington a bell 
is rung twice for parish meetings. 

At Folkingham the 3rd bell should be rung, but the ofhce 
of bellringer being performed by a woman (Mrs. Armstrong), 
she is allowed to ring the treble as being lighter. 

At Louth the 3rd bell is tolled thirty tolls, thrice, a 
quarter of an hour before the time for a Vestry meeting. 

There is an express order for the ringing of a summons 
to the Vestry meeting in the Parish Books of All Saints', 
Stamford : — 

" 1652. April the ig. It is ordered by the parishioners that noe 
succeedinge Churchwards shall disburst above 10s. for any repaires 
to the leades or windows or Bells but they shall cause a bell to be 
tolled and give warninge that the parishioners may meete together 
to agree about the said worke."* 

The ringing of the Vestry bell is remembered at Boston, 
Corringham, Hibaldstow, and at Weston S. Mary. 

Dykes and Drains Jury-bell. At Claypole the 3rd bell 
is rung annually in November to summon the Parish Jury 
to view the Dykes, Drains, &c., &c. : and at Epworth, a 
bell is rung at Eleven o'clock in the morning of the last 
Monday in October to summon "the Isle of Axholme 
Common Drainage Meeting." 

The Bull-running Bell. Bull Running took place 
at Stamford from time immemorial annually on the 13th of 
November. On the morning of that day the " Common 

* Kindly extracted for me by Mr. Justin Simpson. 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 259 

Bell " there was tolled at a quarter before eleven o'clock to 
give warning for the thoroughfares to be cleared of infirm 
persons and children. At eleven o'clock the bull was 
turned into a street, and then the sport began, the great 
object being to " bridge the bull," that is, by main force to 
tumble him over the bridge which spans the Welland into 
the river beneath. This annual Bull-running was con- 
tinued, notwithstanding many unsuccessful attempts made 
to stop it, until the year 1840, when it (and so the ringing of 
the Common-Bell on that occasion) was finally given up.* 
Fuller tells that Lincoln was noted as producing superior 
dogs for Bull baiting, which was a very popular sport at 
Great Grimsby and elsewhere. 

Loyal Peals. Upon all occasions calling for an 
expression of loyalty such as the anniversaries of the 
Queen's birthday, accession, and coronation, the bells are 
rung in many parishes. It has long been our custom to 
express our loyalty by merry peals. In past times, when we 
were unhappily frequently at war with our neighbours, and 
when our victories by land or by sea called forth bursts of 
patriotic thankfulness and exultation from Englishmen, 
their feelings found expression in no way more strongly 
than in the joyous and jubilant ringing of our glorious and 
spirit-stirring bells. Churchwardens' accounts teem with 
payments for such, especially during the first few years of 
the present century. 



• See a very amusing account of the attempts to put down the Stamford Bull-running 
in Chambers' Book of Days, ii. 575. 



26o Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

No doubt Church Bells have been in past years rung 
upon other and most improper occasions. Happily they 
are now looked upon as part of the ornaments, or requisite 
furniture, of a church, and set apart with it to be used for 
holy and sacred purposes, and upon occasions, when by 
their exhilarating sounds, they can . add to the joyous 
thankfulness and innocent pleasure of all within reach of 
their sound. Of their occasional perverted use within the 
memory of many living, it will be well not to speak further, 
but rather to rejoice that a better feeling, and better 
customs, now prevail. 

In my former Books on Church Bells I have closed this 
portion of the Work with a few words on the necessity of 
keeping the bells and their surroundings in good repair and 
in decent order ; and on the best mode of restoring the 
ringers to their proper position amongst the officers of the 
church. I am glad to know that with regard to the ringers 
a great improvement has taken place during the past few 
years. The establishment of Ringers' Guilds in many 
counties — Lincolnshire being one — presided over by the 
clergy, has much improved the moral standard of the 
ringers, whilst the presence of many a parson, rope in 
hand, in the ringing chamber, has equally improved the 
tone in the belfry. 

It may be well to repeat that " the ringers' chamber, and 
the access to it, ought to be made as easy and comfortable 
as possible, and it should be furnished with proper light, 
and with coat and hat pegs. The windows ought to be 
glazed, for the tower, without this precaution, is a bitter 



Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 261 

place for men who have been engaged in an exercise which 
has kept them warm for an hour or two ; and the little 
light-holes by which the circular staircase to the belfry is 
lighted may well be closed with a piece of glass."* 

Mr. Haweis has in one of his Books some remarks on 
the bells themselves,, from which a hint or two may well be 
taken. He says that every belfry should have a care-taker, 
called by him "the Bellstoker," who "should keep every 
rivet in its place ; the wheels and beams should all be 
varnished or painted regularly. I have visited many belfries 
at home and abroad, but never have I seen a bit of paint 
or varnish in one yet. The shutters should be kept from 
swinging, with their flanges sloping downwards, so as to 
keep the wet from driving in, whilst allowing the sound to 

float freely out and down upon the town : An 

eye for the belfry is a thing to be cultivated. The belfry 
should look like a fine engine-room in a first-rate factory. 
It should be a pleasure as well as an instructive lesson to 
go into it. When all was in motion everything should be 
so neatly fitted and thoroughly oiled that we should hear 
no sound save only the melodious booming of the bells 
themselves. At present, when the bells are rung, the belfry 
appears to go into several violent convulsions, correspond- 
ing, too often, to the efforts of the poor ringers below. At 
last the wheel is induced to move enough for the clapper to 
hit the bell an indefinite kind of bang — an arduous opera- 
tion which may or may not be repeated in some kind of 

* Bells and Belfries, by the Rev. G. A. Poole, R.D. 



262 Peculiar Uses of the Lincolnshire Bells. 

rhythm according as the ringer may or may not succeed in 
hitting it off with the eccentric machinery above . . . ."* 

The example of the Churchwardens of Barrow-on- 
Humber in 1713 may well be followed: the Parish Clerk 
at that time was told 

" He must be Carefull that no Boys or Idle persons Jangle the Bells 
or abuse the Church or the Windows ; he is to grease or oil the 
Bells, and to keep them in good order ; and if they be defected in 
any thing he shall let the Church Wardens know that they may 
be mended in convenient time." He was also to continue in the 
"Bellhouse" all the time of ringing and to be earful that nothing 
there suffered abuse or damage. If any person wilfully or care- 
lessly overturned a bell the Clerk might demand of him one shilling 
for the offence which if he refused to pay the Clerk might sue for it 
in the Court, and be, by the parishioners, " indamnified therein. "t 



• Music and Morals, 460. 
t " The Office and Duty of the Parish Clerk of Barrow ;" a MS. preserved in the Church 

Chest there. 




Ancient Bell-tile found at Repton, Derbyshire. 



LATIN INSCRIPTIONS 

ON 

CHURCH BELLS IN LINCOLNSHIRE. 

[With Translations.*] 



ANTONIVS MONET VT CAMPANA BENE SONET. 

[ Anthony advises that the bell may sound well. ] 

AVE MARIA. 
[ Hail Mary. ] 

AVE MARIA GRACIA PLENA. 

[ Hail Mary, full of Grace. ] 

BEATVS EST POPVLVS QVI EXAVDIT CLANGOREM. 

[ Happy is the people that hears the sound. ] 

BEATVS VIR QVI NON ABUT. 

[Blessed is the man who hath not gone.-- (Ps. i. i).] 

CAMPANA SANCTE TRINITATIS ET OMNIVM SANCTORVM. 

[ The Bell of the Holy Trinity and All Saints. ] 

• For these I am indebted to the kindness of a friend. 



264 Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 

CAMPANA AVDITE VOCO VOS AD SACRA VENITE. 
[Hear the Bell : I call you : Come to Sacred things [i.e. to Church).] 

CATERINA PIA PROTEGAS NOS A NECE DVRA. 
[ O Kind Catharine ! Protect us from cruel death. ] 

CELORVM XTE PLACEAT TIBI REX SONVS ISTE. 

[ Christ the King of Heaven, may this sound he pleasing to Thee. ] 

CONCORDIA SIT VOBISCVM. 

[ Concord be with you. ] 

CVM SONO SI NON VIS VENIRE 
NVNQVAM AD PRECES CVPIES IRE. 

[ // you he unwilling to come when I call 
To prayers you'll not wish to go at all. ] 

CVM VOCO AD TEMPLUM VENITE. 

[ When I call come to Church. ] 

CVM VOCO VENITE. 

[ Come w'hen I call. ] 

DEFUNCTOS PLANGO VIVOS MONEO. 

[ / mourn the dead, I warn the living. ] 

DEFUNCTOS PLORO VIVOS VOCO FUNERA CLAUDO. 

[ / weep for the dead ; I call the living : I close funerals. ] 

DIES DIEI ERUCTAT VERBUM. 

[ Day unto day uttereth speech.] 

DVLCIS SI[S]TO MELIS VOCOR CAMPANA GABRIELIS. 

[ / am of sweet sound ; I am called the hell of Gabriel. ] 

DVM SPIRAS SPERA. 

[ While thou hreathest, hope ! ] 



Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 265 

ECCE ANCILLA DOMINI. 

[Behold the Jiandmaid of the Lord. ] 

EGO SVM VOX CLAMANTIS. 

[ / am the voice of one crying. ] 

ET CLAMOR AD CCELOS. 

[ And sound to heaven. ] 

ET NOMEN DICTI GERO SCI BNDICTI. 

[And I bear the name of him called S. Benedict. ] 

EXEAT E BVSTO AVSPICE CHRISTO. 

[ May he go forth from the tomb, Christ being his Helper. ] 

FIDELES VOCO AD DOMVM DEI. 

[ / call the faithful to the House of God. ] 

FILI DEI VIVI MISERERE NOBIS. 

[ Son of the Living God, have mercy on us. ] 

FLOREAT ECCLESIA ANGLICANA. 

[ May the English Church flourish. ] 

FRANCISCVS SOVTH EQVES AVRATVS IN DEI 
HONOREM ME FIERI CVRAVIT. 

[ Sir Francis South, Knight, procured me to be made for the honour of God. ] 

GABRIELIS EGO CANA VOBIS ORE IVCVNDO NVNC. 

[ I Gabriel now sing to you ivith pleasant voice. ] 

GEORGIVS CAMPANA VOS SONAT DULCITER BENE. 

[ George. The bell sounds you sweetly well. ] 

GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO 

and 

GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO. 

[ Glory to God in the highest. ] 
2 L 



266 Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 

GLORIA PATRI ET FILIO SPIRITUI SANCTO. 

[ Glory he to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost. ] 

GLORIA SOLI DEO. 

[ Glory to God alone. ] 

GRATA SIT ARGUTA RESONANS CAMPANULA VOCE. 

[ May the little bell be pleasant, sounding with clear tone. ] 

HARMONIA NOSTRA EGO SVM SECVNDVS CONCORDIA 
VOS ESTOTE MILLI [PforNVLLI] SECVNDI. 
[ In our harmony I am second ; in concord be ye second to none. ] 

HEC CAMPANA PIE CAVSA SIT FACTA MARIE. 

[ May this bell be piously made for the sake of Mary. ] 

HEC CAMPANA SACRA FIAT TRINITATE BEATA. 

[ Be this bell sacred to the Holy Trinity. ] 

HEC PRO LAVDE PIE RESONAT CAMPANA MARIE. 

[ This bell piously resounds for the praise of Mary. ] 

HOC NOMEN IHESVS EST AMOR MEVS. 

[ This Name Jesus is my love. ] 

HONORI DEI ET HVIVSCE VSVI H.E SUNT CAMPANiE. 
[ These hells are for the honour of God and the use of this [Church or Parish).'] 

HVIVS SANCTI PETRI. 

There are several similar inscriptions. 
[ Saint Peter's bell. ] 

IHC CAMPANA BEATE MARIE. 

[ Jesxis. The hell of Blessed Mary. ] 

IH'8 NAZARENVS REX IVDEORVM FILI DEI MISERERE 

MEL 

[ Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews, Son of God have mercy on me. ] 



Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 267 

IN AMORE SCA MARIA (sic). 
[ In love of S. Mary. ] 

IN DEI GLORIAM IN ECCLESI^E COMMODUM. 

[ To the glovy of God and the good of the Church. ] 

IN HON : DEI OPT : MAX I ET COMM : R : T : LOWE IN 
INS : MADER : OL : ECCL : ANG : FID : PRE[S]B :et 

CAP : 1852. 

[ In honour of Almighty God and in memory of R. T. Lowe, formerly a faithful 
priest and chaplain of the English Chicrch in the Island of Madeira. ] 

IN HONORE SCE ANDRAE. 

And several similar inscriptions. 
[ In honour of S. Andrew. ] 

IN MVLTIS ANNIS RESONET CAMPANA lOHANNIS. 

[ For many years may John's hell resound. ] 

IN NOIE IHS MARIA. 

[ In the name of Jesus. Mary. ] 

IN NOE IHU XPI OME_G_ENU_ FLECTAT CELESTIU 
TERSTRIU T INFRORU. 

[ In the Name of Jesus Christ every knee shall bow, of things in heaven, in earth, 

and under the earth. ] 

INTACTVM SILEO PERCVTE DVLCE CANO. 

[ Untouched I am a silent thing 
But strike me and I sweetly ring. ] 

IN TEMPLO VENERARE DEVM HEN I PENN NOS FVDIT 

CORNVCASTRI. 

[ Worship God in His Temple. Hen. Penn founded us at Horncastle.] 



268 Latin Inscriptions on Cliurcli Bells. 

INTONAT DE CELIS VOX CAMPANA (sic) MICHAELIS. 
[ The voice of MichaeVs bell resounds fvom heaven. ] 

ION BAPTIST CAMPANA MANEAT HEC VNDIQVI (sic) 

SANA. 
[ John Baptist. May this hell remain sound all round. ] 

ISTA CAMPANA SANCTI lOHANNIS EWANGELISTI. 

[ Tliis is the bell of S. Jolin the Evangelist. ] 

LABOREM SIGNO ET REQVIEM. 

[ / give the signal for labour and for rest. ] 

LAVDATE ILLVM CYMBALIS SONORIS. 

[ Praise Him on the loud cymbals. ] 

LAVDO DEVM CONGREGO CLERVM PLEBEM VOCO 
FVNERA PLANGO. 

[I praise God, I gather the clergy, I call the people, I mourn the dead (funerals).] 

LAVDO DEVM VERVM. 

[ / praise the true God. ] 

LAVS DEO. 

[ Praise to God. ] 

LECTUM FUGE DISCUTE SOMNUM. 

[ Flee thy bed, banish sleep. ] 

MAGISTRO ET DISCIPVLIS SONO. 

[ / sound for master and scholars. ] 

MARIA MATER DEI EST NOMEN MEVM. 

[ Mary Mother of God is my name. ] 

MARIA MATER GRACIE. 

[ Mary Mother of Grace. ] 



Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 269 

MARIA VIRGO ASSUMPTA EST IN CELUM. 

[ The Vivgin Mavy is taken into heaven. ] 

ME AVDITO VOS CREDITE DEVM CELITVS CONVOCARE 

SANCTOS AD ADORANDVM ILLVM IPSVM SOLVM. 
[ Hear thou me. Believe that God calls the saints fvom heaven to adore Himself 

alone. ] 

ME VOCE FRACTA MALE CONCINENTEM PROPRIO 
SUMTU LIQUEFIERI ET DENUO CONFLARI VOLUIT 
^LFREDUS SHUTTLEWORTH A.S. MDCCCLXXX° 
VIGILATE ET ORATE NESCITIS ENIM QUANDO 
TEMPUS SIT. 
\_ Alfred Shuttleworth had me melted tip and cast again at his own expense 

when I ivas cracked in tone and out of tune A. S. 1880. Watch and pray for 

ye know not when the time may be. ] 

ME PROPRIO SUMTU DENUO CONFLARI FECIT 
NATHANIEL CLAYTON A.S. MDCCCLXXX° VENIT 
HORA ET NUNC EST QUANDO MORTUI AUDIENT 
VOCEM FILII DEI. 

[ Nathaniel Clayton had me cast again at his own expense A . S. 18S0. The hour 
Cometh and now is when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God. ] 

MELODIAM ORDIOR. 

[ / begin the melody. ] 

ME RESONARE IVBET PIETAS MORS GRATA VOLVPTAS. 

[ Piety, death, welcome pleastire, (each) bids me resound. ] 

MEMENTO MORI. 

[ Remember death. ] 

MEROREM MESTIS LETIS SIC LETA SONABO. 

[ Sadly to the sad, to the joyons Joyful, will I sound. ] 



270 Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 

MISSI DE CELIS HEO NOME GABRIELIS. 

[ I have the name of Gabriel {who was) sent from heaven.] 

MORTUOS PLANGO MORTUOS VIVENTES MONEO. 
[ / mourn the dead, I warn the living dead {i.e. in trespasses and sins). ] 

MVLTI VOCATI PAVCI ELECTI. 

[ Many called, few chosen. ] 

MVSICAM DOCET AMOR. 

\_Love teaches music] 

NOME MARTINI PRESULIS DANT PAROCHIANI. 

[ The parishioners give the name of Martin the Bishop. ] 

NOME PETRI FERO QUI CLAUIGER EXTAT IN EVO. 

[ / hear the name of Peter who remains the hearer of the keys for ever. ] 

NOMEN SANCTORUM GERIT HEC CAMPANA 
PUERORUM. 

[ This hell hears the name of the Holy Innocents. (Lit. Boys).] 

NOMEN MAGDALENE CAMPANA GERET MELODIE. 

[ This hell shall hear the melodious name of Magdalene. ] 

NON CLAMOR SED AMOR CANTAT IN AVRE DEI. 

[ Love's voice not noise sings in the ear of God. ] 

NON SONO ANNIMABVS MORTVORVM SED AVRIBVS 

VIVENTIVM. '\lli^^'->^ JfJ^ ^ ■ 

[ / sound not for the souls of the dead, hut for the ears of the living. ] 

NON VOX SED VOTVM NON MVSICA CORDVLA SED COR. 

[ Not the sound hut the vow : not the musical string hut the heart. ] 

NOS CV PROLE PIA BNDICAT VIRGO MARIA. 

[ May the Virgin Mary hless us with pious offspring. ,] 



Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 271 

NOS SUMUS CONSTRUCTI AD LAUDEM DOMINI. 

[ We are cast to the glory of God. ] 

NOX NOCTI INDICAT SCIENTIAM. 

[ Night unto night showeth knowledge. ] 

O DEVS ABSQVE PARE FAC NOS TIBI DVLCE SONARE. 

[ God without an equal, make us to sound sweetly to Thee. ] 

OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEL 

\_Let all he done to the glory of God. ] 

OMNIBVS SONO PLACERE. 

[ / sound to please all. ] 

OMNIS SPIRITVS LAVDET DOMINVM. 

\^Let all breath praise the Lord. ] 

PAX AVDIENTIBVS ME. 

[ Peace to them that hear me. ] 

PERCUTE DULCE CANO. 

[ Strike me, I sweetly sing. ] 

PER GENTEM TRUSTHORPE SIT PETRVS SONANS IN 

TRVSTHORPE. 

[ Through the Trusthorpe folk may Peter be well sotcnding in Trusthorpe. ] 

PERSONET HEC CELIS DULCISSIMA VOX GABRIELIS. 

[ May this most sweet sound of Gabriel sound through the heavens. ] 

PLEBEM VOCO CONGREGO CLERUM. 

[ I call the people ; I collect the clergy. ] 

PRINCIPIO FINE SONAN[S?] SONVS HIC SIT CATERINE. 
[ May this sound of Catharine be sounding in the beginning (and) in the end 

(i.e. always ?). ] 



272 Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 

POST BELLVM VIGINTI ANNORVM RAT^ PACIS INTER 
ANNA ANGLORVM REGINA ET LVDOVIC 14 FRAN- 
CORVM REGE ANNO PRIMO SALVTIS VERO 1713. 

[/« the fiyst year of the peace made between Anne Qtieen of England and 
Lewis XIV. King of France after a 20 years war, but in the year of our 
salvation 1713.] , 

PRyESIDIO SEMPER TE CELEBRAI [ 5/c but query for CELE- 

BRITER] SONO. 

[ Thou being ever my Guard I sound fauiously (?).] 

PURA PUDICA PIA MISERIS MISERERE MARIA. 

[ O pure, chaste, kind Mary ! have mercy on the miserable. ] 

SACRA TRINITATE FIAT HEC CAMPANA BEATA. 

[ Be this bell sacred to the Holy Trinity. ] 

SANCTE GABRIEL ORA PRO NOBIS. 

And several similar inscriptions. 

[ Holy Gabriel pray for us. ] 

SANCTE PARENS MEA VIS MEA SOLA POTENTIA 

ADESTO. 

[ Holy Parent, my strength, my sole power, be Thou present {i.e. to help me). ] 

SANCTI VENITE OMNES. 

[ come, all ye holy. ] 

SANTITAS DOMINO. 
[ Holiness to the Lord. ] 

SCE (sic) TRINITAS VNVS DEVS. 

[ Holy Trinity One God. ] 

SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM. 

[ Blessed be the Name of the Lord. ] 



Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 273 

SPIRITUS SANCTUS A PATRE ET FILIO PROCEDENS 

SUAVITER SONANS AD SALUTEM ANNO DOMINI 1835. 
[ The Holy Ghost pyoceeding from the Father and the Son ; stveetly sounding to 

Salvation A. D. 1835.] 

STANFORDIENSIBVS INSERVIENS IPSA CONTEROR. 

[ / am myself worn out K'hile serving for the men of Stamford. ] 

STATUTUM EST SEMEL OMNIBVS MORI. 

[ It is appointed unto all men once to die. ] 

SVM ROSA PVLSATA MVNDI MARIA VOCATA. 

[ / being rung am called Mary the Rose of the world. ] 

SVPPLICEM DEVS AVDIT. 

[ God hears the suppliant. ] 

SVRGE AGE. 

[ Arise and come. ] 

SVSCITO VOCE PIOS TV lESV DIRIGE MENTES. 

[7 arouse the pious with my voice ; Thou, Jesus, direct their minds. '\ 

TEMPLA PETAS SVPPLEX ET VENERARE DEVM. 

[ Seek the temples as a suppliant and worship God. ] 

THO PER SONO PVLSATVS MARIA DEBET VOCITATVS. 

[ So on bell : query the meaning ? ] 

TINNITUS RAPIDOS SCINTILLANS SPARGO PER AURAS. 

[ I sparkling scatter through the air the rapid sounds. ] 

TVB^ SIC SONITV DOMINI CONDVCO COHORTES. 

[ So by the sound of a trvimpet I conduct the hosts of the Lord. ] 

UT MUNDUS SIC NOS NUNC LyETITIAM NUNC DOLOREM. 

\_As the world, so we, now joy, now grief. '\ 

VT TVBA SIC SONITV DOMINI CONDVCO COHORTES. 

[ Astmik a trumpet so by (my) sound I conduct the hosts of the Lord.] 
2 M 



274 Latin Inscriptions on Church Bells. 

VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO. 

[ come let us sing unto the Lord. ] 

VIRGO CORONATA DVC NOS AD REGNA BEATA. 

[ crowned Virgin, lead us to the blessed realms. ] 

VITAM METIOR MORTEM PLORO. 

[ / measure life : I bewail death. ] 

VIVANT REX ET REGINA GVIL : ET MARIA. 

[ Long live the King and Queen William and Mary.] 

VIVOS VOCO FESTA DECORO DEFUNCTOS PLORO. , 

[ / call the living, I grace festivals, I bewail the dead. ] 

VOCE MEA LAVDO DOMINVM PRO PESTE FVGATA HIC 
^GRIS ANIMIS, CHRISTE, MEDERE PRECOR. 

[ With my voice I praise the Lord for pestilence banished, I pray Thee here, O 
Christ, to heal sick souls. ] 

VOCO VENI PRECARE. 

[ / call. Come to pray. ] 

VOX AVGVSTINE SONET IN AVRE DEI. 

[Let the voice of Augustine sound in the ear of God. ] 

VOX MEA EST DULCIS MEA SCINTILLANS VULTUS. 

[ Sweet is my voice and bright my face. ] 




Average Weight of Bells. 



275 



List of the Average Weight of Bells cast by 
Messrs. Taylor and Co., of Loughborough, Leicestershire. 
The diameter being known, a reference to this list will 
give the approximate weight of any bell. 



DIAMETER. 


WEIGHT. 


DIAMETER. 


WEIGHT. 


Inches. 


Cwts. Qrs. 


/i5. 


Inches. 


Cwts. Qrs. 


Ihs. 


12 


I 


20 


37 


9 





13 


2 


6 


38 


10 





14 


2 


20 


39 


II 





15 


3 


16 


40 


12 





16 


I 





41 


13 





17 


I I 





42 


14 





18 


I 2 





43 


15 





19 


I 3 





44 


16 





20 


2 





45 


17 





21 


2 I 





46 


18 





22 


2 2 





47 


19 





23 


2 3 





48 


20 





24 


3 





49 


21 I 





25 


3. 2- 





50 


22 2 





26 


4 





51 


24 





27 


4 2 





52 


25 2 





28 


4 3 





53 


27 





29 


5 





54 


28 2 





30 


5 2 





55 


30 





31 


6 





56 


31 2 





32 


6 I 





57 


33 2 





33 


6 2 





58 


36 





34 


7 





59 


39 





. 35 


7 2 





60 


42 





36 


8 I 













From an Illuminated MS. of the Psalms [fourteenth century) in the King's Library, 
British Museum ; marked 20, B. xi. 



THE INSCRIPTIONS 

ON THE 

CHURCH BELLS OF LINCOLNSHIRE, 

With the Diameter at the mouth of each Bell, from which 
its approximate weight may be ascertained (see page 275) . 
To which are added Extracts, where procurable, from the 
Commissioners' Returns temp. Edward VI., and from 
Parochial and other Records, together with Local Tra- 
ditions, Notices of Donors, &c., &c. 

Note. — The numbers between [ ] refer to the drawings or woodcuts on the 
Plates, or to those worked in with the letterpress. It being impossible to reproduce 
here the various forms of medicsval Gothic letters found on the ancient bells, one 
form of letter is used to indicate where Gothic capitals are found [ J^ ^IB ^ ] > 
and one form where small Gothic or ^^ black letter''' is found [a b c]. For the 
various forms of Roman letters found on modern bells one form [ABC] will suffice. 

Errors of spelling, misplacement of letters, &>€., S'C, in the following Inscrip- 
tions, are copied literally from the Bells. They are therefore Founders' blunders 
and not Printers' mistakes. 

A reference to the pages given after the name of each Parish in the Index will 
supply, in most instances, information as to the Uses of the Church Bells therein. 

A similar reference to the pages given after the name of each Foundry or 
Founder will furnish some particulars respecting it or him. 



278 The Inscriptions on the 

/•• ADDLETHORPE. 

S. Nicolas. 6 Bells. 

1. H HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1770. 

( Diam. 30^ in.) 

2, 3, 4. 1770- 

(Diams. 331, 35^, 37^ in.) 

5. DAVID BRIGGS C. W. 1770. 

( Diam. 39! in. ) 

6. REMEMBER DEATH 1770. 

( Diam. 41J in. ) 

The present bells were cast from the metal of three ancient ones in 
1770. 

The Churchwardens made the following charges in their Accounts : — 

1542. Itm payde for a horse skyne for bell stryngs iJ5. ]d. 

1552. Receuyd of y° sayd John [Curtas] for on hand bell xn]d. 

1580. It' geven to y' men of mumbye chappelle for 

carrynge of y^ lytle belle to Lincolne xij^. 

It' p"* for my charges to wenflite iiij tymes going 

for y' clappers js.* 

1. . AISTHORPE. 

S. Peter. 5 Bells. 

i_5. J. TAYLOR & CO., BELLFOUNDERS, LOUGH- 
BOROUGH. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH 1867. 
( Diams. 29^, 30^, 32I 341, 37^ in., Key A. ) 

Prior to 1867 there was one bell only inscribed : — 
God save His chvrch 1667. 

• Oldfield's Wainfleet, p. no. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 279 



3- ALFORD. 

S. Wilfrid. 5 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I, 2, 3, 4. [ + 3 ] TOBIE MORRIS CA8T ME 1676. 
T8 TWELL PIG. 

( Diams. 28, 2g\, 31, 36 in. ) 

5. [ + I] JOHN TISON WILLIAM QICKINSON C W JOSEF 

NORTH GENT. TOBY NORRIS MADE ME 1695. 

( Diam. 39^ in. ) 

Priesfs 5f// ;—[ Called "Minute Bell."] 

Blank. 

( Diam. 17 in. ) 

For Stamps see p. 52. 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that " a handbell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, still remained.* 
On the frame of the 4th bell is : — 

W lACKSON HVNG MEE 1772. 



^. ALGARKIRK. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 5 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1,2,4,5. [+2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1662. 

3. [ + 2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1662 W FEILDING 

W TAYLER. 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 

For Stamp see p. 52. 

There is now no approach to the bell chamber : the only means of 
reaching the bells is by getting on the Chancel roof, climbing from 

• Peacock's CIi. Fur. p. 29. 



28o TJie Inscriptions on the 

thence on to the Nave roof, and then crawling through a latticed 
window, which is too small to admit an adult. 

The bells are now never rung : they were raised for a few minutes 
when the Prince of Wales came of age, but have not been rung 
since. 



/T ALKBOROUGH. 

S. John Baptist. 3 Bells, 

0000 

( Diam. 33 in. : coins on sound-bow.) 

2. [+116] %mM-w ■ :h(d:ei : ~WJ^ : m^€>:j^iiM ; 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

3. TVB^ : SIC : soNiTV : domini : condvco 

COHORTES : 1701 : JOHN : SCARBOROVGH : 

CHURCH r .Q 1 

WARDEN L ° '^^-J 

( Diam. 40^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. pages 114 and 107, and Plate XXIV. 

The ist bell has four impressions of small coins on the sound-bow: 
the letters of the inscription are very small. 

The inscription on the 2nd bell is a rare and interesting example of 
an early one in English. " Gart make" is the old English of fecerunt 
fieyi, gart being the preterite of gare, to cause. 

The allusion to a trumpet in the inscription on the 3rd is not un- 
commonly met with, and has reference to the silver trumpets of the 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 281 

Levites. So Archdeacon Wordsworth in his beautiful Sunday Hymn 

in the " Holy Year " : — 

" To holy convocations 
The silver trumpet calls." 
Rocca compares Trumpets and Bells at some length in his treatise 

De Campanis. [J. T. F, ] 

In 1553 there were " iij greatt belles, one sanctus bell."* 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that " Itm a Sakeringe bell and 

one hand bell " which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, 

were " broken in peces by the aboue named churchwardes in anno 

i565-"t 

(^ ALLINGTON EAST. 

S. Andrew. 2 Bells. 

1. Blank. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

2. [ + 106 ] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH. 

[ □ 157- ] 
( Diam. 20 in. ] 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XXIII. 



^ ALLINGTON WEST. 

Holy Trinity. 2 Bells. 

1. Blank. 

( Diam. 20-|- in. slightly cracked. ) 

2. [ + 86 ] miM-^M^M^ • PEIM^W^:^ ■ m'MM^<^'^^' 

( Diam. 23I- in. ) 

For Stamp see page 86. 

The ist bell, judging from its long form, is an ancient one. 

• Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line, /s P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 36. 
2 N 



282 The Inscriptions on the 



^ ALTHORPE. 
S. Oswald. 3 Bells. 

1. [ij 119+ 120] ^3Elissi ^£ ^dis ^to ^mome ©abrielis. 

( Diam. 36 in. : no canons. ) 

2. [;[j 119 + 120] ^omc XH'irtmi; ^rcsuUs ^ant ^arotl^mni. 

( Diam. 39 in. ; no canons. ) 

3. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1714 ^^q HEATON^ 

WILL: BURN ) CHURCH E Seller 
JO. PARKINSON j WARDENS Ebor 

( Diam. 42 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XVIII. 

The ist bell was probably used for the Angelus (see p. 210) ; the 2nd 
is of the same type, and both are probably coeval with the Perpendicular 
tower, erected by Sir John Neville, in the reign of Edward IV. 

In 1553 there were here, according to the Indented Inventory of 
goods received by the Parson and Churchwardens for use in the church, 
" j greyt bell one Santus bell."* 

This I cannot reconcile with the present existence of two bells which 
are almost certainly of an earlier date than the Inventory. ' ■^'^ '^ 

ALVINGHAM. 

S. Adelwold. 3 Bells. 

1. THO. WARMOTH 1726 JOHN BROOKES C.W. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

2. [ + 28 ] ^J^om^n X3^HgbitInte ©"ampana ©txzi XMl«Iobi£ [ U 3° 

D 33-1 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

* Exch. Q. R. Chuvch Goods Line. s% P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 283 

3. [ + 28 ] Hit ;i?iamni: ^crmmt ^citcMctum [ U 3° ° 33- 1 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 



/^. AMCOTTS. 

S. Mark. 3 Bells. 

I, 2. Blank. 

( Weights 3 cwt. i qr. 26 lbs,, 4 cwt. 2 qrs. 18 lbs. ) 
3. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1853. 
( Weight 4 cwt. 3 qrs. 10 lbs. ) 

The ancient Chapel (dedicated to S. Thomas of Canterbury), which 
fell down in 1850, had only one bell, which, most probably, went to the 
foundry when the present three bells were given to the new church by 
the late Mr. J. B. Fairell. 

// ANCASTER. 

S. Martin. 5 Bells. 

1. J. TAYLOR & Co. FOUNDERS, LOUGHBOROUGH 1881. 

2. 1607 [ D 113. ] 

3. mg roartng£ sofanii£ bot^ ioiirninge gck tbat mm cannot l^cau altoags Inbe 

1602 [ n 113. ] 

4. all men tl^at \tnxt mg ntobrufbll sobnb repent before gob ige in grobub 

1602 [ D 113. ] 

5. J^ bjiU sobnbe anb resobnbe bnto tl^g people lorb bjitlj mg sbcrt bonce 

to rail i\im ia tljg foovb (&M \ Jf.§ '. 1602 [ n 113.] 
[ All have had their canons cut off. ] 

For Stamp see Plate XVI. 

Prior to 1881 there were four bells only. Early in that year a new 
treble (weighing 7 cwt.) was given to the church by the Rev. J. P. 



284 TJie Inscriptions on the 

Maud, the Vicar ; at the same time the whole ring was rehung in a new 
oaken frame. 



ANDERBY. 

S. Andrew, i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I. JOHN TAYLOR & SON BELLFOUNDERS LOUGH- 
BOROUGH 1856. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 



Priesrs Bell :■ 



+ S^aglar 1856. 
( Diam. 12^ in. ) 



/3 ANWICK. 

S. Edith. 3 Bells. 

1. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1654 W THOMPSON J SQVIRE 

WARDENS [ D 157. ] 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. GRATA SIT ARGUTA RESONANS CAMPANULA VOCE : 

ANNO : DOM : 1730 -> 

( Diam. 29^- in. ) 

3. WILL GLADWm WARDED 1656 [ d 157. ] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII. 

The 2nd bell was from the Kettering foundry. 



/f- APLEY. 

The Mortuary Chapel here has a modern small bell without Inscrip- 
tion or date. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 285 

" The bell which now is placed over the West end of the building 
formerly hung in a tree."* 



APPLEBY. 

S. Bartholomew. 6 Bells. 

I, 2. C. & G. HEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1853 

GLORIA PATRI ET FILIO SPIRITUl SANCTO. 

( Diams. 28, 30 in. ) 

:is)^:Ei 1741. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

4. DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST VS IN 1739. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

5. [ □ 84 ] sea mn; ria ops [ U SQ- 1 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

6. ^jhCB^pw 1^^ W€) ©©:© mwi MJ.^:m^ 

-jvi [ + 116] m 1628. 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XIV. and pages 87 and 107. 

The 5th bell has the fylfot (see p. 83) in a letter D instead of an 
initial cross. The shield has been partly obliterated previous to the 
casting of the bell ; it is, however, found entire on bells at Braithwell 
in Yorkshire and at Monyash, Derbyshire. O p s is a mistake for o p n 
— ova pro nobis. The letters and cross on the 6th are like those on the 
2nd at Alkborough, and the initials are those of Henry Oldfield of 
Nottingham. 

There is extant the " specification of the Plan and Sections for the 
new Bell-frame for the Parish Church of Appleby, June 12, 1821. 
James Harrison." 

* Saunders' Hist, of Lincolnshire, Vol. ii. p. 64. 



286 TJic Inscriptions on the 

Also an estimate from the same James Harrison in three forms : 
ist to recast the four old bells, and to add metal to augment to six bells 
for ;^255 los. 2nd to supply two new bells, and rehang the whole for 
;^i6o 2s. 3rd to rehang the old bells with no addition to the ring for 

Judging from the present bells the last estimate was the one chosen, 
the new bells not being added until the year 1853. 

There is a tradition here that the Appleby folk stole (!) the tenor bell 
from the adjoining parish of Broughton. 

ASGARBY. 

S. Andrew. 4 Bells. 

1. WILL^i HOWETT C" WARDEN 1796 : T. Osborn Down- 

ham Norfolk Founder. 

( Diam. 2']\ in. ) 

2. W^i HOWETT C : WARDEN T. Osborn Fecit 1796. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1630. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

4. [+116] Xn ^onorc @"t£ J5_nbriK [U^^Q-] 

(Diam. 35.^ in.) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plate XVIII. 

Prior to 1630 there were two bells — in addition to the present tenor — 
inscribed : — 

1. In Honore Sci Johannis. 

2. In Honore Sci Jacobi.* 

ASGARDBY. 

5. Swithin. I Bell. 



I. Blank. 



( Diam. 14 in. 



• Hay!. MSS. 6829, p. 295. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 287 

In 1553 there were here " ij gret belles & a sanctus bell."* These, 
probably, disappeared when the ancient church was demolished. 

A. ASHBY-CUM-FENBY. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. VOCO VENI PRECARE JOHN WHALLEY GARDEN 

1725 [ n 168. ] 

( Diam. 29 in. ; height 22 in. ) 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO. JOHN WHALLEY 

CHVRCH r .Q T 

WARDEN '^^^ t □ 168. ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ; height 24 in. ) 

3. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO. 1699 JOHN WHALEY 

CHVRCH r ^ ,^Q T 
WARDEN L ° i&«- J 

( Diam. 36 in. ; height 28 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIV. 

In 1553 there were here " iij grete belles. "f 



' ASHBY-BY-PARTNEY. 

S. Helen. i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I. [+1] EDWARD READE C W T N [MADE] MEE 
i6gi. 

( Diam. 23^ in. ) 

Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 
( Diam. lo-J in. ) 

For Stamp see p. 52. 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, -5^. P. R. Off. f Augm. Office Misc. 507. 



288 The Inscriptions on the 

ASHBY-DE-LA-LAUNDE. 

S. Hybald. 5 Bells. 

I, 2, 3, 4. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FOUNDER 1834. 

( Diams. 27, 29, 30, 32^ in. ) 
5. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FOUNDER 1834. 

THE PEAL OF 5 BELLS OF WHICH THIS IS THE 
TENOR WAS PRESENTED TO THE CHURCH OF ST. 
HYBALD OF ASHBY-DE-LA-LAUNDE BY CLIFFORD 
KING, ESQUIRE, LORD OF THE MANOR &c. &c. 
J. W. KING A.M. VICAR JOSEPH CLARKE CHURCH- 
WARDEN. 

I SWEETLY TOLLING MEN DO CALL 
TO TASTE OF MEATES WHICH FEEDE THE SOULE. 
[ Arms of ij Donor. ] 
( Diam. 35 in. ) 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that the handbells formerly 
belonging to this church were " stolle at the same tyme" that is " in 
queue maries tyme."* 

Prior to 1834 there were two bells only. 

The arms on the present Tenor are : — Sable on a chevron engrailed 
argent 3 escallops of the first. Motto : — VirtiUi Forttina Cedit. 

There is a tradition which is, however, untrue, that the bells here 
came down from London in company with " Great Tom" of Lincoln — 
that bell came on a carriage by itself. 

The Rev. J. W. King (see 5th bell) — who was instituted as Vicar in 
1822 — he rebuilt the chancel and nave of the church, — died gth May, 
1875, and was buried in the chancel of this church. 

* Peacock's Chur. Fur. p. 30. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 289 



ASHBY PUERORUM. 

S. Andrew. 2 Bells. 

I and 2. Blank. 

(Diams. 21, 22 in. ) 

In 1552 " Assebye puerorum in the parties of Lindesey" possessed 
•' It' ij greate bells one Sanctus bell & ij handebells " which were 
valued at 51s.* 



2 2 ASHBY WEST. 

All Saints. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. LESTER AND PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1759. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1850. REV. W. M. 

PIERCE INCUMBENT ABR^^. SHARP CHURCH- 
WARDEN. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. LESTER AND PACK LONDON FECIT. VOCO AD 

TEMPLUM 1759. 

(Diam. 35 in. ) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 
( Diam. 14^^ in. ) 

The three ancient bells here were inscribed : — 

1. Sit nomen Domini benedictum. 

2. Intonat e celis vox campana Michaelis. 

3. Sum rosa pulsata mundi Maria vocata.f 



• Land Revenue Records. Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. f Harl. MS. 6829, p. 342. 

2 O 



290 TJie Inscriptions on the 

The second bell, cast with the others in 1759, fell whilst a peal was 
being rung, and was so much damaged that it had to be recast in 1850. 
On the frame of the Tenor bell is the date 1673. 

1 j, ASLACKBY. 

S. James. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + 2 ] OMMIA [05] FIANT [05] AD [05] 

GLORIAM [ n 5] DEI [05] 1633 [ d 5 ] T 
[ D 5 ] GROVES [ D 5 ] R [05] MAYFEILD. 
( Diam. 30 in. ] 

2. [ + 2 ] lOHN QVIMSEY ISAY CHARES CW TOBIE 

MORRIS CAST ME 1683. 

( Diam. 33^^ in. ) 

3- [ + 94?] :E)©CD • • MJS. EK • • • [U93-] 

( Diam. 35 in. apparently an imperfect casting. ) 
Pviesfs Bell : — 
1 — • [ + 2 ] Omnia '. fiant ! ad '. glorl\m ! Dei 1611. 

(Diam. i2| in. : unhung and cracked.) 

For Stamps see pages 52, 53, and 88. 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that "ij handbells" which were 
here in Queen Mary's reign had been "sold vnto wm Callis A°. iij Eliza- 
beth by the abousaid churchwardens wch is defacid."* 

ASTERBY. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 83 ] ^m%. ^^iE^i^, 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 
2. 1824. 

( Diam. 26i in. ) 

» Peacock's Ch. Fuy. p. 31. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 291 

3. sea maria [\J 124. ] 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XIV. and page iii. 

In 1552 there were here " iij bells in y^ stepyll j sanct' bell."* Two 
of those bells still remain. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported " or candelstickes crwetes hand- 
bells and a sacring bell — we had non sens the dethe of King Edward. "t 

I r ASWARBY. 

S. Denis. 3 Bells. 

1. sec bionisii [ IJ 124. ] 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

2. [ + I ] GOD SAVE THE KING THOMAS NORRIS MADE 

ME i66[?]8. 

( Diam. 32I- in. ) 

3- [ + 111] TMMM'w^ :©:^ €)Tz-m:H. M^iB:mM. 

-^Mm T25ff3E <sr:e [□113-] 

( Diam. 34^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 11 1 and 52 and Plate XVI. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that they had "broken the 
start" [a straight handle] off "one hand bell" which belonged to this 
church in Queen Mary's time, and had sold it " to Johnne Chamberlaine 
and he haith made a morter thereof." They further said: — " Itiii one 
sacringe bell broken in peces and sold likewise. "t 

ASWARDBY. 

S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. [+-116] js{:^m:m:^ ©©:© 1619. 

( Diam. 20 in. ) 



* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 33. 

File 79, P. R. Off. + lb. pp. 33, 34. 



292 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamp see page 107. 

In 1552, when an Inventory of the Church Goods belonging to 
" Aserbye in the parties of Lindse," and their valuation, were taken, 
the following entries were made : — 

Itm ij bells and a litill bell xxvjs. viijW. 

Itm ij handbells xijr/.* 



AUBOURN. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1—3. G. MEARS & CO. FOUNDERS LONDON 1852. 
(Diams. 31, 33, 36 in. ) 

This is a modern church consecrated in 1852; in the old church 
hung a bell inscribed : — 

ihc ne mi on ni 

Many enquiries were made for an explanatory reading : read backwards 

it is : — 

in nomine IHC. 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that " Itiii j handbell one 
sacring bell," which had belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, 
were " broken and defaced in the fyrst yeare of queue Elizabethe by 

Mr. mearsc."t 

?<■ AUNSBY. 

S. Thomas a Becket. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 2 ] T. DOBS C. W. TOBIAS NORRIS CAST ME 1684. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. 3l sfocctin toling men bo call to taste on meats t^at feebs i\]t soolc 1612 

[ a 113- ] 

( Diam. 35 m. ) 

• Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 35. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 293 



3. [ + I ] GOD SAVE THE KING 1669. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For stamps see page 52 and Plate XVI. 



\\ AUTHORPE. 

S. Margaret. i Bell. 



I. 



MEARS LONDON. 



The present church was built in 1848, when the above bell was 
provided. 

AYLESBY. 

S. Lawrence. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1610. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2- [+117?] m:(B^ MM-^^t 'MJ.s m-MJ^^^mM 

1610. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3- 'M'WJ-'WM ^M:sh<^mj- [ + 120 + 116] )p:e.^:i513C: 

[U "9-] 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 

( Diam. 15 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 108, Plate XVIII., and page 107. 

Many of the letters on the 2nd bell are upside down. The two 
crosses on the 3rd are (which is unusual) in the centre of the inscription. 

In 1553 Aylesby (as now) possessed " iij greatt belles, one sanctus 
bell."* 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507. 



294 -^^^^ Inscriptions on the 



BARDNEY. 

S. Lawrenxe. 4 Bells. 

1. X SOLI DEO GLORIA 1644 T T W K CHVRCH- 

WARDMES. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. [ + 165] W. S 1670. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

.3. [+162] ^autitas :E)onirao X^El ^3El W ^ 1663 ^0[^ M 
( Diam. 37 in. ; cracked. ) 

4. [ + 116] 31::^:^^^^.^ i^M cD"^m M:i^M:m:m. 
1615. 

mm :a :Ei 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. and page 107. The Stamp on the ist 
bell is a rude S. Andrew's cross. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that '' ij hand belles . . . w"" 
other mettell of papistry," which belonged to the church in Queen 
Mary's time, had been "sold to robt fowler and he saythe th they by 
defacid."* 



V BARHOLM. 

S. Martin. 3 Bells. 

^ —. I. Blank. 

( Diam. 24 in. ; a piece broken out. ) 

2. [ + 90 ] jhjBrm^':^M^M [ □ gi- 1 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 
» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 37. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 295 

3. [ + 90 ] m^M-:m.(M^j^.& [ □ 91- ] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 87. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " Itm sacringe bell wee had 
none . . . Itm handbelles we had none" in Queen Mary's time.>^ 

There is an impression that the ist bell here came from the dis- 
mantled church at Stow about the year 1780; but it appears that 
although a bell was brought from Stow, and placed (not hung) in 
Barholm Church, it was subsequently removed, and, owing to a dispute, 
was broken in pieces during removal. 



J 3 BARKSTON. 

S. Nicolas, 3 Bells. 

I, 2. T. MEARS FECIT LONDON 1821. 

( Diams. 28, 30 in. ) 
3. [ + 106 ] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH [ a 113. ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XVI. 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that " ij hande belles broken 

one sacring bell" which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's 

time " were defaced about three yeres past and sold at 

Christems Iast."t 



^,U BARKWITH EAST. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

( Diam. 27! in. : cracked. ) 
* Peacock's Ch. Fuf. p. 38. f lb. p. 39. 



.4 



296 The Inscriptions on the 

( Diam. 3if in. ) 
3. DANIEL HEDDERLY DEO GLORIA 1738. 

( Diam. 33I in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

A. W. 0071. 

( Diam. 11 in. ) 

BARKWITH WEST. 

All Saints. 2 Bells. 

1. [ + 165 ] \V S 1670 [ D 167. ] 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 

2. [ IJ 80 D 81 D 82. ] 

( Diam. 29I in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV. and XIV. 

There is a tradition that there were formerly three bells here. 



BARLINGS. 

S. Edward. i Bell. 

One small modern Bell without Inscription or date, probably hung 
when the church was rebuilt in or about the year 1807. 



BARNETBY-LE-WOLD. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 111] p:iM-M^M-yiis.mM. 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 297 

2. [ D 144 ] ebr^a [ d 142 ] [ □ 143 ] xbhiis [ □ 143. ] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XVI., XXL, and XX. 

The I St and 3rd bells are uniform in character, the letters being small 
gothic capitals found elsewhere with the same founder's stamps. 



BARNOLDBY-LE-BECK. 

S. Helen. 3 Bells. 

[ a 107 ] 

I- [ + 140 ] .e [ + 140 ] ^" [ + 140 ] ^ 
[ U 127 ] 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. [ + I ] lESVS BE OVR SPEED 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. [ + I ] IHESVS BE OVR SPED 1608. 

(Diam. 36 in. : all have lost their canons. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV., pages 118, 114, and 52. 

The frame of the bells here appears to be original : it is very like 
that at Pittington near Durham, figured in the Rev. J. T. Fowler's Bells 
in the City and Neighbourhood of Durham, p. 3, but straight sided. 

In 1553 "Barnaldby" possessed " iij greatt belles j sanctus bell."* 

^9 BARROW-ON-HUMBER. 

Holy Trinity. 6 Bells. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

* Augm. Offia Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 
2 P 



298 The Inscriptions on the 

2. T. WHITBEE MINISTER R. YONGE C. MARRIS 1638 

[ a 157- ] 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

3. ROBERT KIRK VICAR THO^ CAVIL & ROBT ROCK- 

LIFFE CHURCHWARDENS 1749. THOMAS LESTER 
OF LONDON FECIT. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

4. [ + 116] FUSOR G F VICARIVS GARDIAM 1674 J GOOD- 

HAN [ n 157 ] W HARESON WARDENSD. 
( Diam. 39^ in. ) 

5. JOHN BROC;k:RVM ESQVIER GEORGE GATES MIN- 

NESTER 1636 [ D 157. ] 

( Diam. 42 in. ) 

6. OMNIBUS SONO PLACERE 1713. 

THOS SCRIVENER CHURCH E. Seller 

EDV^. GLENTWORTH WARDENS Ebor. 
( Diam. 46^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIII., and page 107. 

Prior to 171 3 there were only five bells. 

The ist bell is a poor casting full of bubbles : all save this have had 
the canons cut off. The founder has made a strange business of the 
inscription on the 4th; " guardiam " doubtless ought to be guardiani. 
This bell has a crack excised from the sound-bow. The 5th has a 
gothic K inserted among the other letters. The 6th has a rich crown 
ornament often used by the founder — E. Seller of York. Considering 
that these bells are all of different dates, and by two or three different 
founders, and that two or three of them appear to be defective, for the 
Tenor is not the same thickness all the way round, it is remarkable that 
this ring has long enjoyed the reputation of being the best in North 
Lincolnshire. It probably owes much to its situation near the banks 
of the Humber. [ J. T. F. ] 

The Rev. T. Whitbie (see 2nd bell) died in 1658: The Rev. Geo. 
Otes (see 5th bell) in 1637; and the Rev. Robert Kirk (see 3rd bell) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 299 

was buried 25th May, 1755. The Parish Registers give no information 
as to John Brockrum, Esq., whose name is on the 5th bell. 



/^ BARROWBY. 

All Saints. * 5 Bells. 

1. THO. HEDDERLY FOUNDER NOTT. 1774. GLORY BE 

TO GOD ON HIGH. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH MARKE JENKINSON 1712. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. THO. HEDDERY FOUNDER 1774 JOHN DORR 

CHURCHWARDEN. 

( Diam. 33I in. ) 

4. GLOREY BE TO GOD AND HIGH. JOHN DORR 

CHURCHWARDEN THO. HEDDERLY FOUNDER 
NOTT'^i 1774. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

5- r rj 127 1 ^^^^orum xU plaaat libi r£¥ sonus isle. 
( Diam. 39 in. : all canons cut off. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. and page 114. 

Prior to 1774 there were four bells only: the present tenor was then 
the 3rd and the then 2nd was inscribed : — 

In multis annis resonet campana Johannis.* 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that "two hand belles" which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time had been "sold to 
Thomas Clarke the yonger sens michaelmas past and he haith broken 
them in peces."t 

* Harl, MSS. 6829, p. 306. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 41. 



300 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

BARTON-ON-HUMBER. 

S. Peter. 6 Bells. 

I. ^^s'^s ;i3©- mi'w .e:]p©-er:E) 1666. 

( Diam. 27J in. ) 

2. DANIEL HEDDERLY FOVNDER 1741. 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

3. GEORGE ADAMSON WILLIAM BYGOTT C. W. 1741. 

( Diam, 3i|- in. ) 

4. jE sfatdlg loling nwn bo tall to taste oit meats t^nt fefbs lIjE soble [ d 113.] 

( Diam. 3 if in. ) 

5. GOD SAVE OVR CHVRCH 1598 [ a 113 ] [ U ^H ] 

( Diam. 34! in. ; crown ornament d 118. ) 
^. HENRY NELTHORPE AND WILLIAM GILDAS 
CHVRCH WARDENS 1743. 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XVI., XVII., and pa^^e 108. 

The 5th and 6th have had the canons cut off. The inscriptions on 
the ist and a portion of that on the 6th are in archaic letters. 

Formerly a bell was rung here at eight o'clock in the evening during 
the winter months for the guidance of travellers. The tradition is that 
an old lady being accidentally benighted on the wolds she was directed in 
her course by the sound of a bell — probably the curfew — ringing at 
S. Peter's Church ; to show her gratitude she gave a piece of land to 
the parish clerk on condition that he should ring one of the church 
bells from seven to eight o'clock every evening, except Sundays, com- 
mencing the day of the carrying the first load of barley in every year. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 301 

until Shrove-Tuesday next ensuing inclusive. In a Terrier of 1730 it is 
stated that "the clerk holds 13 acres & 3 stongs of arable land lying 
dispersed in the several fields of Barton " for ringing one of the bells of 
S. Peter's, called "the Barley Bell," at the time just mentioned. At 
the Inclosure the clerk's allotment is put at 7 acres 2 roods 16 perches. 
The custom of ringing the bell, however, ceased about the year i860. 

ift BARTON-ON-HUMBER. 

S. Mary. 4 Bells. 

1. GEORG KIDSON THOMAS FERRIS WARDENS 1666 

[ a 157- ] 

( Diam. 351 in. ) 

2. ntg roaring sobnbe boilj fciurutng gebe tl^al men cannot \fa.xz albags Igbe 

[ a II3-] 

C W P w 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

3. ALL GLORY BEE TO GOD ON HIGH 1666 [ d 157.] 

( Diam. 41! in. ) 

4. ALL MEN THAT HEARE MY MOURNFVLL SOVND 

REPENT BEFORE YOV LYE IN GROVND 1666 

[ D 157- ] 

( Diam, 46 in. ; all have canons cut off. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIII. and XVI. 

The following account relating to the expenses attending the recasting 

of the 2nd bell here in 1641, gives a good idea of the difficulties and 

expenses of travelling at that period : — 

s. d. 
Bestowed of a workman which came to see the 

riven bell i . o 

In charges of the bell-founder when we agreed for 

the second bell casting, at two several meetings ... 3-6 

To John Addamson and Jasper Greene, for helping 

down the riven bell i . o 



302 TJie Inscriptions on the 

s. d. 
To other poor labourers, for helping down the bell i . o 

For a man and horse going to Lincoln to get the 
articles sealed — Bond concerning the agreement 

for the 2nd Bell casting 4 , 6 

To Jasper Greene and his son, for making a waine 

fitt to carry the bell to Lincoln for their day's work 2 . o 

To M' Chapman for making 2 waine felfs for the 

bell to lye in 8 

To charges for the bell carrying to Lincoln : — 
For four men's dinners at Brigg on Monday 16"' of 

November 2 . o 

For 2 pecks of provender and hay at Brigg for 6 

horses and 2 oxen 

At Redburn that night for 4 men's suppers 

For three pecks of oats that night 

For hay there for the horses and oxen 

For our 4 breakfasts on Tuesday morning 

For three pecks of oats for the horses that morning 

For one bottle of hay and 2 bands 

For unwaining the bell at Lincoln 

For our suppers that night at Lincoln 

For 3 pecks of provender that night 

For hay that night 

For 3 pecks of provender on Wednesday morning 

For hay that day 

For our dinners and suppers that day 

Bestowed on the workmen when the bell was casting 

For 3 pecks of provender and hay that night 

For provender on Tuesday morning and hay that 

day 

For help to pull the bell out of the pit 

For help to waine the bell 

For our suppers at Spittle that night 

For 3 pecks of provender that night and hay 



2 


. 


I 


. 6 


2 


. 


2 


. 


I 


. 6 




6 




8 


2 


. 


I 


. 6 


2 


. 


I 


. 6 


2 


. 


4 


. 


I , 


. 


3 


. 6 


3 ■ 


. 6 


I , 


, 




6 


2 . 


, 


3 • 


, 6 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



303 



5. d. 

For our dinners that day 2 . o 

For provender at noon and hay for the cattle i • 9 

For our suppers that night 2 . o 

For 3 pecks of provender and hay that night 3-6 

For our breakfasts on Satterday morning 2 . o 

For 3 pecks of provender i . 6 

For one bottle of hay 3 

For 2 new shoes for Edward Thompson's horse ... 8 

For 3 pair of new traces i . o 

For our expenses in drink all the said days 3-4 

For the bell casting at 155. per hundred weighing 

1200 and odd weight g . 4 . o 

For 3 stone of his mettall more than the old "at 

145. per stone 2 . 2 . o 

For the bellfounder's meat at Edward Browne's ... 18.0 

For getting the new bell upp into the steeple, 

bestowed of workmen i . 6 

For li lb, of swine's grease for the tackles, to get 

her upp 6 

To Richard Page for his waine and his oxen going 

with the bell to Lincoln 10 . o 

Given to his man i . o 

For 2 men we hired in our roomes the week we 

went to Lincoln with the Bell 6.0* 



L^Z 



BASSINGHAM. 



S. Michael. 
I — 4. Blank. 



5 Bells. 



(Diam. 27, 30, 33, 35 in.) 



Ball's Hist, of Barton, Part 11. p. 9. 



304 T^^^ Inscriptions on the 

5. WILLIAM ROLLISON AND JOHN MARFLEET CHURCH- 
WARDENS 1770. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

In 1565-6 the Churchwardens reported: — " Itni that the said church- 
wardens haith broken the handbelles" (that is, those belonging to the 
church in Queen Mary's reign) "in peces as yt here appearethe."* 



i-'- BASSINGTHORPE. 

S. Thomas of Canterbury. 4 Bells. 

1. [ ij 124 D 125 a 125 ] 

( Diam. 26:^ in. ) 

2. [ + I. ] HEMRY TOMLIMSO^ C W 1694. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

3. [ + 140 ] ^ [ + 140 ] ^ [ U 127. ] 

( Diam. 31^^ in. ) 

4. [ + 3 ] MVLTI VOCATI PAVCI ELECTI 1619. 

( Diam. 33I in. ) 

For Stamps see pages iii, 112, 52, 118 and 114. 



U^. BASTON. 
S. John. 5 Bells. 

1. GEORGE TAYLOR JOHN SPINKES WARDENS 1705. 

( Diam. 22 in. ) 

2. [ + I ] WILLIAM MORTOM THOMAS MORTOM 1694. 

( Diam. 23 in. ) 

J 3. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1705. 

( Diam. 24^ in. : cracked in the crown. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 41. 



A k 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire . 305 

4. RICHARD PARKINSON CHURCHWARDEN -^ EDWD 
ARNOLD LEICESTER FECIT 1797. 
( Diam. 29 in. ) 

1693. — ^ 

( Diam. 35 in. ; cracked. ) 

For Stamps see page 52. 

The following initials &c. are cut on the frames of the ist and 2nd 
bells :— 

S B. R W. C. W. 1680. W N. T N. G T. T H. J W. R W. 1693. 

These bells and the belfry have been much neglected in past times : 
there is now a wish to remedy this when funds can be raised. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " a handbell," which had 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been " broken in 
paces & sold to thoiiis leivicke vpon sondaie last i565[6] " and that "one 
sacring bell [and] two clappers " . . . " wee know not what is become of 
theim nor what was done w* theim nor whoe had theim or made theim 
awaie and that we will depose vpon a book,"* 

There is a tradition — not an uncommon one in other places — that 
the Langtoft bells and those belonging to this parish being cast at the 
same time were exchanged by the founder, and so missent — the Baston 
bells to Langtoft, and the Langtoft bells here. 



BAUMBER. 

S. SwiTHiN. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. GLORIA SOLI DEO A B 1638. [ TJ 170. ] 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

2. [ + 104 ] HABEO NOMEN GABRIELIS DE CELIS 15S5. 

R. G. ' / 

( Diam. 38^ in. : cracked. ] 

* Peacock's CJi. Fur. p. 43. 
2 Q 



3o6 The Inscriptions on the 

3. CUM VOCO AD TEMPLUM VEMITE 1637 [ d 4. ] 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 
PriesVs Bell :— 

Blank. 

( Diam. i2f in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXV. and pages loi and 53. 

In 1553 " Bambre " possessed " iiij gret bells and a Sanctus bell."* 



^ BECKINGHAM. 

All Saints. 6 Bells. 

1. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1829. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. •:•• BY SUBSCRIPTION THOS. OSBORN FECIT 

THE REVD RICHD HACKET RECTOR 1790: ... 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. : : • REVD RiCH'^ HACKET RECTOR ROBERT JOHN- 

SON CH WARDEN T. OSBORN FECIT 1790. 
( Diam. 32 in. ) 

4. [ + 106 ] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1632. 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

5. REV. ROBERT MOODY RECTOR 1 RICHARD JOHNSON 

CHURCHWARDEN 1829. 

(Diam. 35^ in. ) 

6. ALL GLORY BEE TO GOD ON HIGH 1668. 

[ a 157 ] 

( Diam. 39^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XXIII. 



Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



307 



S. Andrew. 
I. i8ig. 



BEELSBY. 



(Diam. 26 in. ) 



4ir. 



I Bell. 



In 1553 " Beylsbeye " possessed " iij greatt belles j sanctus bell."* 
There is a tradition that there were once several bells here which 
were sold at the commencement of the present century to the parish 
of Great Coates in this county, when they were recast by James 
Harrison. [ See under Coates Magna. ] This tradition is confirmed 
by the entry in the Edwardian Inventory just quoted. 



S. Andrew. 

1. Blank. 

2. [ + 2 ] 



BEESBY. 



( Diam. 21 in. ) 
TOBIE MORRIS CA2T ME 1676 
( Diam. 22 in. ) 



3 Bells. 



[ D 76 ] 

[ + 79 □ ] 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 



[ D 76] 
[ □ ] 



For Stamps see pages 52, 79, and 80: the other stamps (unnumbered) 
are described on p. 81. 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Beeson " reported that they had no 
handbell " sence King Edwardes tyme but a handbell wch wee borowed 
in queue Maries tyme of the church of Salebie to whome wee re- 
deliuerid it againe A° pmo Elizabth."t 



Augm. Ojfice Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 44. 



^o8 TJie Inscriptions on the 



BELLEAU. 

S. John. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 83 D 82 U 80 D 81. ] 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. 1823. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

3- 3E :Bj^m:K:©-:Ei j. :m(B^m [ + 1 ] ^(d:3i@- 

( Diam, 31J in. ) 
For Stamps see Plate XIV. and p. 52. 



^(^ BELSHFORD. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. [ + 164] GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH W S H W 1683. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIV. 

In 1553 " Belchworth " possessed "three great bells one Sanctus 
bell."* 



BELTON NEAR Grantham. 
SS. Peter and Paul. 5 Bells. 

1. ADELAIDE COMES BROWNLOW 1872 MEARS & STAIN- 

BANK LONDON. 

( Diam. 27 in. : weight 4 cwt. 2 qrs. 11 lbs. ) 

2. [ u 139 ] J-'M^ ^^M:m.%M. 

( Diam. 27 in. : rim cut off. ) 
* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 309 

3. [ + 106 ] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1606 [ n 113. ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

4. [ U 127 ] pcrsonct ^cc tdb bultissimu fao« gabrielb. 

(Diam. 35 in. ) 

5. ADELBERT COMES BROWNLOW 1872 MEARS & STAIN- 

BANK LONDON. 

( Diam. 38^ in. : weight 10 cwt. i qr. 13 lbs. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XX., XV., and XVI. and p. 114. 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that " diurse other popishe 
peltrie was stoln out of o' church thre or iiij" year ago by whome wee 
knowe not."* The handbells and sacring bell probably then disappeared, 
as they are not mentioned in the Inventory of church goods destroyed. 

There was formerly a Priest's bell, which, being cracked, was taken 
down, recast, and hung at the School. 

On the bell frame is : — 

HH ^^76 

Sir Adelbert Wellington Brownlow-Cust, 3rd Earl Brownlow (see 
tenor bell), married Lady Adelaide Talbot, youngest daughter of Henry 
John, i8th Earl of Shrewsbury (see treble bell). There were only three 
bells prior to 1872, when the Earl and Countess Brownlow gave the 
two new bells, and rehung the whole ring. 

On the font is a figure of a " campanarius " chiming 2 bells (see 
p. 150). 

^^ BELTON (ISLE OF AXHOLME). 

All Saints. 4 Bells. 

I. JOHN SHAW C.W : 1748. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

• Peacock's Cli. Fur. p. 48. 



310 TJic Inscriptions on the 

2. FEARE GOD HOWOVR THE KIMG 1663 [ d 157.] 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

3. mjj roaring e sounbc botlj foaming gcbe that mm cannot Ijcarc ulfaags Igb 

1663 [ D 157.] 

(Diam. 35 in.) 

4. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1845. 

( Diam. 41 in. ; weight 11 cwt. 2 qrs. 23 lbs. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles."* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " Itm ij handbells and one 
sacringe bell " which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time had 
been " defacid . . . this yere by the churchwardens. "t 

The tenor bell was previously inscribed : — 

Jn° Morris C.W. 1748. 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

There was also " one other small bell, with frame, one foot two inches 
in Diameter, with this Inscription Ric. Taylor Ro. Robinson Ch. 
\\'ardens 1709. "X Both these bells being cracked they were sent to the 
founder in 1845. 



w-' BENINGTON. 

All Saints. 6 Bells. 

1. G. BRABBINS & M BLAKE CH WA. JOSEPH MALLOWS 

FECIT 1759. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. JOSEPH MALLOWS DEREHAM IN NORFOLK 1759. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 



* Exch. Q. R. Chunk Goods Line, -/j | Extracted by the Rev. R. Walker, 

P. R. Off. Rector, from "A True Note and Terrier 

-(- Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 46. taken and renewed ^rd Nov. 1826. ' 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 311 

3. [ + I ] TOBY NORRIS CAST ALL FIVE IN 1686. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

4. THE HILLS & VALES & TOWNS ALL ROUND SHALL 

ECHO WITH A PLEASANT SOUND 1759. 
( Diam. 32 in. ) 

5. HENRY PENN MADE ME 1725. 

( Diam. 34I in. ) 

6. TO CHURCH THE HOUSE OF GOD : COME ALL I 

CRY : TO PRAISE HIS NAME TO ALL ETERNITY 

1759- 
( Diam. 39^ in. ; all have been quartered and have lost their canons. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

It is evident from the inscription on the present 3rd bell that prior to 
1759 there were only five bells. Marrat sa5^s of them " six very musical 
bells, being the best in this neighbourhood." 



4 BENNINGTON LONG. 

All Saints. 4 Bells. 

1. EDWARD GVY VICAR JOHN KINING CHVRCH- 

WARDENS 1736 G. O. 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

2. AMBROSE KINNING CHURCHWARDEN THOMAS 

HEDDERLY FOUNDER 1764. 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. % sfacdlg loliitg men iro tall to imiz axx meats tijat feeb tlje soule 1630. 

Sa; ^ P i markns [ □ 157. ] 
( Diam. 35^ in. ) 

4. J. HARRISON FOUNDER REV. M. E. WELBY VICAR. 

JOHN WHITAKER CHURCHWARDEN 1827. 
(Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII. 



312 The Inscriptions on the 

!^''' BENNIWORTH. 

S. Julian. 3 Bells. 

1, 3. J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 

- 1S75. 

( Diam. 24^, 28^ in. ) 

2. ANNO DOMINI 1577. 

( Diam. 2^^ in.) 

Although at some time previous to 1875 there were three bells, one 
had at that time disappeared, and toother being cracked (it was dated 
1675) it was sent to be recast and a new bell purchased to replace the 
missing one. 

There is a tradition that the bells here came from the old church at 
Sotby, and that those originally belonging to Benniworth went to South 
Willingham ; but the present bells at South Willingham could never 
have hung in this tower, they being much too large. 

There is also a tradition that a benighted fisherman, who had lost 
his way, was led, by the sound of the church bell here, to shelter, and 
that to show his gratitude he left a few acres of land in the parish of 
Toynton S. Peter to the Parson. The land is still there belonging to 
the Rector of Benniworth, and a record of it appears in an old Terrier 
dated early in the 17th century. Another version (preferred by the 
people) is that he left the land for the poor of Benniworth, and a string 
of eels for the Parson ! 



/ / BICKER. 

S. SwiTHiN. 6 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. T. OSBORN FECIT RAIS'D BY SUBSCRIPTION W. 

MORLEY CH. WARDEN 1784. 

2. Pack & Chapman of London Fecit 1780 Raised By Sub- 

scription. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 313 

3. [ + 106 ] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1636. 

4. William Morley & Brace^ Green Church Wardens. Pack 

& Chapman of London Fecit 1780. 

5. PERCUTE DULCE CANO T. OSBORN FECIT 1785 

W. MORLEY CH I WARDEN. 

6. W. BYDALL W GRAIM [ + 2 ] THOMAS NORRIS 

MADE ME 1 66 1. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

For Stamps see Plate XV. and page 52. 

The Priest's bell is an interesting example of an ancient Sanctus 
bell with the name of the founder in English : — J oh : me : yeyt : that is, 
John cast me. 

5^6 BIGBY. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I, 2. W S [ + 165 ] 1680 [ D 167. ] 

3. [ + 2 ] GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH i6og. 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. and page 52. 

There is a very uncomplimentary notice of these bells in a descrip- 
tion of Bigby church in the Gentleman's Magazine, Vol. Lxix., page 377, 
(1799). It is as follows : — 

There are three bells in the steeple ; but, surel}', the jarring dis- 
sonance of ill-accordmg sounds never " grated harsher musick " 
than they ; and to this it is most probably owing that they exist at 
all, else frequent use must long ere this time have levelled their 
mouldering timber with the dust. 

These timbers are probably (says Mr. Fowler, who ascended this 
tower in 1865), coeval with the bells of 1680 at least, and are now in no 
better condition. 
2 R 



314 T^i^ Inscriptions on the 



3 BILLINGBOROUGH. 
S. Andrew. 5 Bells. 

I. CAMPANAM : AUDITE : VOCO ; VOS : AD \ SACRA : 

VENITE : 1717. 

( Diam. 27I- in. ) 

■2. NON : CLAMOR ; SED \ AMOR ; CANTAT ; IN \ AURE 

: DEI : 1717. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. SANCTE : PARENS \ MEA : VIS \ MEA : SOLA : 

POTENTIA : ADESTO \ HEN. PENN. FVSO. 
( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

4. PR.ESIDIO ; SEMPER : TE : CELEBRAI \ SONO ; 

JOSEPH BARTON CH : W. 1717. f--^^, 
( Diam. 33 in. ) 

5. VIVOS : VOCO : festa : decoro : defunctos = 

PLORO : ROB. KELHAM VICAR. 
( Diam. 37 in. ) 

The inscription on the 4th bell is apparently wrong somehow. 

In 1565-6 the Churchwardens reported that " a sanctus bell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mar^''s time, had been "sold to 
Roberte Buckeberie," and that " ij handbelles " then remained " wch 
we halve to make awaie and breake afore Easter nexte."* 

The Rev. Robert Kellam (see 5th bell), who was Vicar of Billing- 
borough, Threckingham, and Walcot for 50 years, died in 1752, aged 
75 years. 

Ir BILLINGHAY. 

5. INIicHAEL. 3 Bells. 

I. OSBORN AND DOBSON FOUNDERS 1805. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 49. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



315 



2. OSBORN AND DOBSON FOUNDERS DOWNHAM 

NORFOLK 1805. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

3. REVD W-^r BROADBELT CURATE, ANTHONY RADFORD 

CHURCHWDN 1805. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

On the west beam of the beilframe is incised I C 1733 

S. G. 





^ BILSBY. 


Holy Trinity. 




I. Blank. 


( Diam. 27 in. ) 



I Bell. 



BINBROOK. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I, 2. 1803. 

( Diams: 32^; 35 in.) 
3. LUKE BLAND CHURCHWARDEN 1803. JAMES 
HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER. 
( Diam, 39 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

R A B 

W 

( Diam. 13 in. ) 

In 1553 there were at " Bynbroke Marye " " iij gret belles j santus 
bell."* 

The small Priest's bell, which came from the ruined church of ' 
S. Gabriel, now lies in the vault below this church. 



• Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



3i6 The Inscriptions on the 



; ■ BINBROOK. 

The ancient church of S. Gabriel formerly standing in this parish, 
but now demolished, possessed, in 1553, " iij" gret belles j sanctus bell." 
What became of the great bells cannot now be told : the small one was 
taken to the parish church of S. Mary, where it now lies in the vault. 
[See Binbrook S. Mary above.] 

6> BISCATHORPE. 

S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 16 in. ) 

This bell was new when the church was rebuilt about the year 1850. 



BITCHFIELD. 

S. Mary IMagdalen. 3 Bells. 

I- [ + 96 ] ^mtcti ©abrlel ©ra ^ro ^obis 

( Diam. 3if in. ) 

2. [ + 93 n 91 ] :oici)x3Ei@r:im (^j^mi:f^M-:m..M. 

( Diam. 35I in. ) 
3. [ + 2 ] YiOVl [05] CLAMOR [05] SED [05] AMOR 
[ D 5 ] CAMTAT [ D 5 ] m AVRE [05] DEI 1619. 
( Diam. 36! in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 8g, 88, 87, 52, and 53. The inscription on the 
2nd bell is incomplete. 

In 1565-6 the Churchwardens reported that " a sacring bell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold by them 
after being broken in pieces and defaced.* 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 48. 



CJmrch Bells of Lincolnshire. 317 

The Churchwardens' Accounts contain many entries for new ropes 
and trifling repairs : also : — 

1750. for a new Boldrick for the Little Bell o . i , o 

1753. Octr y' 8 Paid for help & spent when the second 

Bell was hung o . i . 8 



\> 



BLANKNEY. 

S. Oswald. 5 Bells. 

I — 3. T. Mears of London Fecit i8ig. 

(Diams. 28^, 31, 33 in. ) 

4, 5. T. Mears of London Fecit i8ig Rev° Edward Chaplin 

Rector James Greenham Churchwarden. 
( Diams. 34, 37^ in. ) 

A small field was left to the parish by a lady who, having lost her 
way on Lincoln Heath regained it by the guidance afforded by the 
sound of one of the Blankney bells, on condition that the bell should 
be rung every evening at 8 o'clock.* 

' ^ BLOXHOLM. 

5. Mary the Virgin. 2 Bells. 

I, 2. Blank. 

(Diams. 21, 24 in. ) 



^ 



i BLYBOROUGH. 

S. Alkmond. I Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1796. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

• Bishop Trollope on Lincoln Heath md its Historical Associations. 



3i8 TJie Inscriptions on the 

Priesrs Bell ;— 

Blank. 

( Diam. ii^ in. ) 

A chest full of loose papers belonging to the parish, kindly examined 
for me by the Rev. Reginald H. C. Fitz-Herbert, yields the following 
entries respecting the above bell cast in 1796 : — 

. £• s. d. 

1796. To Harrison for casting the Bell 16 . 18 . 3 

To Rob' Lidgit for Carrying and fetching the 

Bell I . II . 6 

Borrowing W" Child's Cart for the Bell o . 5.0 

Spent on Ace* of Bell o. 10.8 

1827. Oct. Bell frame repairing o . 15 . o 

1831. Nov. Bell ropes o . 6.0 

1835. Feb. 17. 4 Winders Tellis work for the Bell 

Chaimber i . 10 . o 

The Priest's bell is not now used in any way : neither has it a wheel. 

BLYTON. 

S. Martin. 3 Bells. 

1. ^jeloram %it plaaat tibi xtx soims hit 1607. [ n 107. ] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

2. IH'2 NAZARENVS REX IVDEORVM 1672 [ d 157. ] 

( Diam. 36 in. ; canons broken. ) 

3. DANIEL HEDDERLY OAST ME WILL : DUCKLE : JOHN 

CHAPMAN C : W : 1727. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. a.nd XXIII. , and for the word "Celorum" 
on the ist bell see fig. 174 on Plate XXVI. 

In 1553 there were " iij great belles one santus bell."* 

* Exch. Q. R. Chwch Goods Line. -5^ P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 319 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a sacringe bell " which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time had been "defacid," and 
that " one handbell" then remained,- 



7 'J BOLINGBROKE. 
SS. Peter and Paul. i Bell. 

I. tE sbeetig toling men ba tall to fiistc oir meats tijat fccbs tijc soole [ □ 113 ] 
1604. 
A8. AP. TC. lA. C.W. 12. TO. W.W 
( Diam. 42 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XVI. 

In 1553 there were here " iij [ ? ] great belles one sanctus bell."t 



BOLINGBROKE NEW. 

S. Peter. . i Bell. 

This modern church — built in 1854 — -has only one bell, " utterly 
unworthy " — says the vicar " of being a Church Bell." 



-; -^ BONBY. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 64 ] ^auxta mum ora pro nofais [ U 65- ] 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. DANIEL HEDDERLY 1724. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

3. WILLIAM SMITH. SOLI DEO GLOREA. 1720. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 52. f Exch. Q. R. Chuvch Goods, -5^4, P. R. Off. 



320 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see Plate VIII. 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Bomnbie " reported that "one 
sacring bell," which had belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, 
still remained.* 

BOOTHBY GRAFFOE. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 119 ] Tlin bonorc ^d ^wipetli. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. [ + 140 ] .e [ + 140 ] [ + 140 ] [ ° \l]\ ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. ^jelorum nit plaxeal libi xtx sonus iste 

[U 127.] 
( Diam. 34 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XVIII. , page 118, Plate XV. and p. 114. 



BOOTHBY PAGNELL. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 123] MM-:m.^w-'% »^:m:E)m©"©" [u"9-] 

( Diam. 26f in. ) 
2. [ + 2 ] OMKIA [05] YlAVii: [05] AD [ a 5 ] GLORIAM 
[ D 5] DEI [ D 5] 1606 [05-] 
( Diam. 29I in.) 

3- [ + III ] j-'M^M'WM :i3©- <i)"yr:Bi ^:^^^m 1594 

[ D 114] [ D 113.] 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

For Stamps see page III, Plate XVIII, pages 52 and 53 and P/^if^ 
XVI. and XVII. 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 53. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 321 

In 1565-6 the Churchwardens reported that "a hand bell and a 
sacring bell," which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had 
been " broken and sold to a brazier at Grantha' faire Anno dni 1563."* 



-7^^ BOSTON. 

S. BoTOLPH. ' 8 Bells and 36 Carillon Bells. 

1,2. H. INGRAM, G. BYRON W. BOWSFIELD C"- 

WARDENS:- 1785 T. OSBORN FECIT;: 

( Diams. 32, 33^ in. ) 

3- 1772. 

( Diam. 34f in. ) 

4. JOHN GAMBLE EDWARD BELL JOHN JESSOP 

CHURCHWARDENS 1710. 
( Diam. 36:^ in. ) 

5. ALL GLORY BEE TO GOD ON HIGH [ n 157 ] 1657, 

( Diam. 38! in. : canons broken off.) 

6. ROBT WILBY : MAYOR THO^ HARDWICK : SAM^l 

OBBINSON & JNO SCRIMSHER : C W« JNo CAL- 
THROP : VICAR JNO LINTON : LECTURER THO^ 
EAYRE PYROTECHNVS, DE, KETTERING, FECIT 

1758. 

( Diam. 41! in. : no canons. ) 

7. John Calthrop Vicar; Thomas Cheyney John Lowe John Betts 

Church Wardens 1772. 

( Diam. 45^ in. : no canons. ) 

8. 1867. 

G. B. BLENKIN, M.A. VICAR. W. GEE, J. E. RID- 
LINGTON, R. M. DINGWALL, CHURCHWARDENS. 
BLESSED IS THE PEOPLE THAT KNOUW THE 
JOUFUL SOUND. 

» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 53. 
2 S 



322 The Inscriptions on the 

ME FUDIT 
A. L. J. VANAERSCHODT MAJOR, SUCCESSOR 
A. L. VANDENGHEYN LOVANII MDCCCLXVII. 

( Diam. 50^ in. : weight 28 cwt. i qr. i] lbs. ) 

Carillon Bells: — 

I to 29. A. L. J. VANAERSCHODT MAJOR SUCCESSOR A. L. VANDENGHEYN 
ME FUDIT 1867. 

30. THIS IS NONE OTHER BUT THE HOUSE OF GOD, AND THIS IS THE GATE 

OF HEAVEN A. L. J. VANAERSCHODT [ &c., as on prcvious bells. ] 

31. LET THINE EYES BE OPEN AND LET THINE EARS BE ATTENTIVE UNTO 

THE PRAYER THAT IS MADE IN THIS PLACE. A. L. J. VANAERSCHODT 
[&C.] 

32. HOLY HOLY HOLY LORD GOD OF HOSTS HEAVEN AND EARTH ARE FULL 

OF THE MAJESTY OF THY GLORY. A. L. J. VANAERSCHODT [ &C. ] 

33. O ALL YE WORKS OF THE LORD, BLESS YE THE LORD, PRAISE HIM AND 

MAGNIFY HIM FOR EVER. A. L. J. VANAERSCHODT [ &C. ] 

34. GLORY BE TO GOD IN THE HIGHEST, AND ON EARTH PEACE, GOOD WILL 

TOWARDS MEN. A. L. J. VANAERSCHODT [ &C. ] 

35. THESE CHIMES WERE ERECTED BY PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION, COMMENCED 

BY W. SIMONDS, ESQ., MAYOR, A.D. 1865, FINISHED 1867. A. L. J. 
VANAERSCHODT [ &C. ] 

36. G. B. BLENKIN, M.A. VICAR, WILLIAM GEE, J. E. RIDLINGTON, R.M. 

DINGWALL, CHURCHWARDENS. E. THIRTLE, ORGANIST, E. C. HACK- 
FORD, VERGER. A. L. J. VANAERSCHODT [ &C. ] 

( For Diams., weights, &c. see further on. ) 

That there were several bells here in the fourteenth century is 
evident from provisions made for their being rung at the obits of 
certain members of the Religious Guilds then existing in the town. 

It would appear that there was a recasting of the church bells — or 
some of them — towards the close of that century, for at an annual obit 
of Frederick Tilney (he entered the Guild of Corpus Christi between 
1356 and 1360) and Margery his wife, on the Feast of S. Petronilla, 
when 2od. should have been expended, according to the prescribed form. 



CJiiirch Bells of Lincolnshire. 323 

for ringing the bells, the following entry was made "per indenture for 
ringing, 4"*, because there was at that time only the bell in the steeple." >^ 

This church was, in pre-Reformation times, rich in church plate and 
other ornaments. In a list of " Plate Lackinge and solde by the 
Mayer and buriesses of boston " in 1552 is, what was most probably, a 
sacring bell, thus described: — " Itm a sylver belle xviij ounces. "t In 
that year there were " fyve great belles in the steple there and one 
Sanctus belle valued to the somme of one hundred marks safely and 
surely to be kept to the kynge's majestic use, until his highnes' plesure 
be further knowen." 

By an Indenture, dated the 26th of May in the following year, those 
bellst and a chalice were placed by the Commissioners for Church 
Goods in the hands of the Churchwardens (see p. 27). 

There is no mention in this document of the large clock bell which 
is known to have existed here forty years later. It probably was con- 
sidered the property of the Corporation, and so escaped being 
catalogued by the Commissioners. The Corporation Records refer to 
this bell under the date 1598, when it was proposed to sell the clock 
bell and devote the proceeds to the repair of the other bells, but the 
motion was negatived. Stukeley describes it as having been a "pro- 
digious clock bell which could be heard six or seven miles round, with 
many old verses round it."§ 

In 1626 the bells were repaired, as is shown by the Corporation 
Records. 

Prior to 1709 a sixth bell had been added to the ring, for in that year 
a faculty was obtained to recast the " immense old bell hanging in the 
tower, which is of little use and imperfect sound and publishing the 
holy hours imperfectly, and of the metal of the said bell to make three 
smaller ones. Two of these to be added to the six now in the tower, 
and the third bell to be for the clock to strike upon, and to tell the hour 



* Thompson's Boston, pp. 124, 125. + The turret for the Sanctus bell still 

f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 219. exists at the east end of the nave. 

§ Stukeley's Itin. (Ed. 1714), Vol. i. p. 29. 



324 TJie Inscriptions on the 

to the people loudly and clearly, and to place the same on the lantern 
or highest part of the tower, and suspend the same for the better and 
more audibly hearing of the sound thereof." The second bell of the 
six being then cracked was also recast, and the eight bells were first 
chimed in the steeple on the 17th December, 17 10. 

The large clock bell, so directed to be melted and recast, weighed 
above 4000 lbs. The new clock bell substituted for it weighed only 
533 lbs. This latter bell is said to have been cracked in 1754; con- 
sequently, a few years later — in 1758 — a new clock bell was directed to be 
made, the weight of which was not to exceed 1000 lbs.* This new bell 
(as is shown by the Vestry Books, which contain a number of resolu- 
tions passed relating to it) was cast by Thomas Eayre of Kettering. 
It was in B Flat, and was inscribed : — 

THO^ BROTHERTON, LUKE PLUMER AND CHA^ GRAVES C. W^ : I759. 
WE HAVE NO NOTE OF TIME BUT FROM ITS LOSS. 

There were, as companions to it, two bells for " Quarter Jacks " of very 
rough make, probably cast in the town, and only inscribed with the 
date 1777. They were made partly from the Market bell which the 
Corporation gave to the parish in that year, " in order to be added as 
an additional bell to the Quarters in the Church." The old figures — a 
man and a woman — which struck the quarters — the " Quarter Jacks" — 
were sold in 1S53. 

In 1758 the sixth bell was recast, and the others put into order by 
Thomas Eayre of Kettering ; and, as the inscriptions on the bells show, 
others were recast as necessity arose. In 1853 the whole were rehung 
at a cost of ;^85.t 

Before recording the last great work in connection with the bells the 
chimes claim a brief notice. 

Jean Ingelow in a poem called The High Tide on the Coast of Lincoln- 
shire in 1 57 1, relates how the bells in the grand old tower of this church 
rang out the alarm called The Brides of Endevhy : — 

* Thompson's Boston, p. 189. f lb. p. 190. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 325 

Play uppe, play uppe, O Boston bells ! 
Ply all your changes, all your swells 
Play uppe The Brides of Enderby. 



They sayde, and why should this thing be ? 
What danger lowers by land or sea 
They ring the tune of Enderby ? 

When chimes were first introduced here is not known (for the above 
allusion to them was only a poetic fancy, and not founded on fact) ; 
they are mentioned in the Corporation records in 1614. In 1732 new 
chimes were ordered ; they struck upon the eight bells, but, becoming 
out of order, they ceased to play in 1832.* 

About the year 1865 a movement was set on foot by W. Simonds, 
Esq., the then mayor, for providing a new set of chimes on a large scale. 
Thirty-six carillon bells were ordered from Mons. A. L. J. Van Aerschodt 
of Lovaine. 

At the same time the tenor bell being cracked, it was resolved to 
have it recast by the same founder. The following extract from the 
Vestry Book is explanatory : — 

Boston, August i, 1867. 

The Vicar and Churchwardens having decided that the Tenor Bell, 
which has been for several years seriously cracked, should be 
recast, the same was this day broken up preparatory to being sent 
to Belgium, for that purpose. The weight of the fragments was 
taken by the Inspector of Weights and Measures, and was found 
to be as follows : — twenty hundredweight, two quarters, and twenty 
two pounds (i ton, 'q qr,< 22 lbs.) and on the exterior was the 
following inscription : — 



* See Thompson's Boston, p. igo. 



326 



The Inscriptions on the 



All men that heare my movrnefuU sovnd 

Repent before yov lie in grovnd 1657. 

James Preston, 

Anthony Butler, 

John Letsham, Wardens, 

The contractor for the recasting is Mons. A. L. J. Van Aerschodt, 
Aine, Rue de Namur, Lovaine, Belgium. 

G. B. Blenkin, M.A., Vicar. 

The diameter of this bell was 49^ inches. The treble bell was at the 
same time taken down, and it was sent to Louvaine to secure accuracy 
in the tone of the Carillon Bells and of the new Tenor. 

When the Carillon bells arrived from Belgium they were hung in the 
following manner : — 



Top Tier 


1ST Bay. 


2ND Bay. 


3RD Bay. 


4TH Bay. 


3 Bells 


3 Bells 


3 Bells 


3 Bells 


Second Tier... 


2 Bells 


2 Bells 


2 Bells 


2 Bells 


Third Tier ... 


2 Bells 


2 Bells 


2 Bells 


2 Bells 


Fourth Tier... 


I Bell 


I Bell 


I Bell 


I Bell 


Bottom Tier... 


I Bell 


I Bell 


I Bell 


I Bell 



The tone, diameter, and weight of each bell is as under: — 



No 


Tone. 


Diameter 
of mouth 
in inches 


CWt. 


Weig 
qrs 


ht. 
lbs. 


No. 


Tone. 


Diameter 
of mouth 
in inches 


CWt. 


5\''ei{,'ht. 
qrs. lbs. 


I. 


Eflat 


... 6^ 


.. 





igf 


7- 


A 


... 71 •• 





20i 


2. 


D 


... 7 


.. 





i8i 


8. 


A flat 


... 7i .. 





171 


3- 


D flat 


... 7 


.. 





18 


9- 


G 


... 8i .. 





igi 


4- 


C 


- 7i 


.. 





igi 


10. 


G flat 


... 8i .. 





25^ 


5- 


B 


- 71 


.. 





20:^ 


II. 


F 


... 8^ .. 





21^ 


6. 


Bflat 


■■• 71 


.. 





20f 


12. 


E 


... 8i .. 





2^ 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



327 



No. 


Tone. 


Diameter 
of mouth 
in inches 


cwt. 


Weight, 
qrs. lbs. 


No. 


Tone. 


Diameter 
of mouth 
in inches 


cwt 


Weight, 
qrs. lbs. 


13- 


Eflat . 


.. 9f .. 








261 


26. 


D 


... Hi ■■ 


. 


3 7 


14. 


D 


•• 91 •■ 







2 


27. 


D flat 


... i6i .. 


. 


3 Hi 


15- 


D flat . 


.. loi .. 







10 


28. 


C 


... i6i .. 


. I 


3i 


16. 


C 


.. lof .. 







I2i 


29. 


B 


... i8f .. 


. I 


I 9i 


17- 


B 


.. lof .. 







13 


30- 


B flat 


... i8f .. 


. I 


I 26J 


18. 


Bflat . 


.. Hi .. 







i5i 


31- 


A 


... i9i . 


. I 


I 24 


19. 


A 


.. Hi .. 







19 


32. 


Aflat 


... 21 


. I 


3 17 


20. 


A flat . 


.. Ilf .. 







20 


33- 


G 


... 22 


. 2 


24 


21. 


G 


.. I2i .. 







261 


34- 


G flat 


... 22f . 


. 2 


I i8i 


22. 


Gflat . 


.. I2f .. 







26 


35- 


F 


... 24I .. 


• 3 


2 oj 


23- 


F 


.. I2I .. 







27 


35. 


E 


... 24I .. 


. 2 


3 i2f 


24. 


E 


.. 14 .. 





2 


1 81 




NEW 


TENOR BELL. 




25- 


Eflat . 


.. I4I .. 





3 


li 




E flat 


... 50^ .. 


. 28 


I li 



1.^ 



Four of these beUs only are "maidens:" the lowest is a semitone 
above the treble of the ring of eight large bells. The new Tenor has 
been rather over-flattened by chipping. 

The erection of the new chimes was entrusted to Messrs. Gillett and 
Bland of Croydon, who provided the first of their now well-known 
machines, and Dr. Clark of Finmere House, Oxfordshire, superintended 
the work. The four musical barrels were constructed to play the 
following twenty-eight tunes on the forty-four bells : — 



*Vesper Hymn. 

O Thou that Tellest. — Handel. 

Cujus Animam. — Rossini. 

The Heavens are Telling. 

— Haydn. 

Emperor's Hymn. 

Caller Herrm. — Gow. 
*The Harmonious Blacksmith. 

Most beautiful appear. 

-^Haydn. 



He watching over Israel. 

— Mendelssohn. 

If with all your Hearts. 

— Mendelssohn. 
^Auld Lang Syne. 
*The Last Rose of Summer. 
*Home, Sweet Home. 
*With Verdure Cldid.— Haydn. 
*Haydn's Hymn. 

The Angelas, from " Faust." 



328 



TJie Inscriptions on the 



The Portuguese Hymn. 
The SiciUan Mariner's Hymn. 
Hope told a flattering Tale. 
The Harp that once in Tara's 

Halls. 
Rule Britannia. 
Brides of Enderby. 



See the Conquering Hero 

comes. 
Blue Bells of Scotland. 
Sweet Jenny Jones. 
Irish Melody. 
Love's Young Dream. 
Huntsman's Chorus. 



Those tunes only are now played wdiich are marked with an asterisk. 

It may be mentioned that the frame of the machine (which is of cast 
iron) weighs g cwt. ; the motive power is given by cast iron weights 
weighing 8 cwt. ; the four musical barrels are each pricked with about 
3000 brass pins, one-sixteenth of an inch square. They were arranged 
to play one tune every hour, and a fresh tune every day. The 132 cast 
iron hammer heads for striking the bells weigh 8 cwt. 2 qrs., and the 
w'eight of the whole machine is over three tons. 

The clock strikes on the tenor bell ; and the quarter chimes, which 
are after the Cambridge model, are on bells 35, 36, 37, and 40. Bell 40 
seems too sharp in the quarter changes, but sounds fairly well in peal. 

The total cost of the whole work amounted to about ^1638. 

Having said that Jean Ingelow's mention of the chimes in her poem 
had no foundation in fact, it may be a cause of surprise to find the 
name of the tune she mentions, "The Brides of Enderby," in the list 
for the new chimes. Its presence there is well explained by a gentleman 
writing from Boston in Notes and Queries (6th S. 11. p. 435) : — " Some of 
the most active promoters of the new chimes, after receiving Miss 
Ingelow's answer [saying there was no foundation in fact for her poetic 
fancy], wrote to ' Claribel,' who lived at Louth, and asked her to 
compose a tune to be called ' The Brides of Enderby.' She objected — 
very wisely as I think. A local music-master was next applied to. He 
composed one, but on trial it was fortunately found so florid, and 
otherwise unsuitable to the carillons, that after a short trial it was very 
properly abandoned. If this tune had been adopted, we should have 
been in the peculiar position of that keeper of a museum who showed 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



329 



the sword with which Balaam tried to kill the ass, and when he was 
told Balaam never had a sword, but only wished for one, he replied 
' Well, this is the very sword he wished for.' So we should have been 
obliged to explain to strangers that the tune they heard was not the one 
rung in the great flood, but the very tune which would have been rung 
if the ringers had known it." 

The new bells which at first were considered very satisfactory and 
were highly eulogised, have not sustained their first reputation — 
a more matured criticism now pronounces them to be very unsatis- 
factory. 

Since Messrs. Gillett and Bland erected the chiming machine — they 
were not in any way responsible for the bells — they have much improved 
and simplified their system which has now become very perfect. 

After the above works were completed the old clock bell cast in 1759 
and the "Quarter Jacks" (dated 1777) were sent to Messrs. Mears' 
foundry, Whitechapel, London, to be broken up. The following par- 
ticulars were preserved : — 



Bell. 


Diameter. 


Estimated 
Weight. 


Weight 

Actually 

Ascertained 


ist "Jack " 
2nd "Jack " 
Old Clock Bell 


24 in. 
26 in. 
36^ in. 


cwt. qrs. lbs. 
238 

400 

902 


cwt. qrs. lbs. 

2 3 14 

3 I II 
10 2 22 



The outline of a handbell is chiselled on each of the two middle 
pillars of the north aisle of the church about five feet from the floor. 
Whether the ringers had formerly a seat between these two pillars or 
not is a matter of conjecture. 

Sir Gilbert Scott pointed out, in his Report on the state of the 
church, that the bells were originally rung from the little stone galleries 
which run round the second story of the tower. 
2 T 



330 The Inscriptions on the 

All inscriptions on the walls relating to the bells were cleared away 
thirty years ago, but the ringers have a tradition that a Peal of " Grand- 
sire Triples " was rung at the Declaration of Peace after the Battle of 
Waterloo, and that Boston being the only town in England where a full 
peal was rung on that day, the ringers were in consequence invited to 
London and feted. 

The Rev. John Calthrop, M.A., (see 6th and 7th bells) was elected 
Vicar nth April, 1746. He died in August, 1785, and was buried at 
Gosberton. The present Vicar (see 8th and 36th carillon bell) was 
instituted in 1850.* 



BOSTON. 

S. James. 3 Bells. 

Here are three Bells from the foundry of Messrs. Mears and Stain- 
bank, Whitechapel, London, in 1868: — 

cwt. qr. lb. 

1. Weight 2.1.8 Diam. 2if in. note A. 

2. „ 2.3.8 ,, 23i in. ,, G. 

3. „ 3 . I . II ,, 2S\ in, „ F. 



BOSTON. 

The Chapel of Ease in the High Street erected in 1820, and the 
Chapel at Hill-Dike opened in 1857, have each a small modern bell. 



• For a portion of the above information some of it (as he informs me) through the 
about the Boston bells I am much indebted intelligent assistance of Mr. Hackford, 
to the Rev. J. J. Raven, D.D., who obtained verger of the church. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 331 



BOTTESFORD. 

Holy Trinity. 3 Bells. 

1. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1765. THE 

REVD EDW» BRISTOW VICER W" SOWASBY & 
THOs CAMBELL CH. WARDENS. 

2. B. JOHNSON. W. PLOMER CH. WARDENS 1712. 

3. GOD SAVE QVEEN ANN cSw^wIrDENS ^7- 

[O7.] 

For Stamp see page 59. 

In 1553 there were at " Botteswort' " " iij Gret belles and on sanctus 
belle."* 

An interesting specimen of a Sacring bell was found in this church 
in August, 1870 (see p. 200). 

The Rev. Edward Bristow signs the Register for the last time in 
1768. 



7.^ BOULTHAM. 
S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 14 in. ) 



BOURN. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. WILLIAM DOD VICAR MDCCXXVIIII SURGE AGE. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. LAUDO ; DEUM ; VERUM :.: :•; MDCCXXVIIII. 

( Diam. 31J in. ) 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Lines. s% P. R. Off. 



332 TJie Inscriptions on the 

3. ■:•: ET : CLAMOR AD : CCELOS ; HENRICVS ; PENN : 

FVSOR : 1729. 

( Diam. 32|- in. ) 

4. UT : MUNDUS \ SIC : NOS : NUNC : L^TITIAM : 

NUNC : DOLOREM : 1729. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

5. PLEBEM : VOCO ; CONGREGO : CLERUM : HENRICUS 

: PENN : FUSOR ; 1729. 

( Diam. 38I in. ) 

6. DEFUNCTOS ; PLANGO : VIVOS ; MONEO ; JOHN 

HARDWICKE : LYON : FALKNER : JAMES ; LEY : 
CHURCHWARDENS 1729. 

( Diam. 42! in. ; all bells turned. ) 
Pyiest's Bell :— 

1635- 
(Diam. 18I in. ) 

On the wheel of the 3rd bell is : — 

These bells rehung in July 1852. 

The Priest's bell was cast by Norris of Stamford ; it has a wheel, 
stay, and slide, like the large bells. 



BRACEBOROUGH. 

S. Margaret. 3 Bells. 

1. JOHN TAYLOR FOUNDER LOUGHBOIIOUGH : 1845. 

(Diam. 31I in. f ^ . 

2. J : TAYLOR FOUNDER LOUGHBOROUGH 1845. 

(Diam. 35 in.) n^. 

3. REV^'D GEORGE ROGERS RECTOR : JAMES FRANCIS 

CHURCHWARDEN 1845. J : TAYLOR FOUNDER 
LOUGHBOROUGH. ) 

(Diam. 38^ in. : Key G. ) 

Prior to 1845 there were only two bells. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. ^^'^ 



- BRACEBRIDGE. 

All Saints. i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I. [ + 104 ] OMNIS • : • SPIRITVS • : • LAVDET • I • DOMINVM 
1583 R.G. 

(Diam. 26f in. ) 
Pyiesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 
( Diam. 12 in. : not used. ) 

For Stamp see page loi. 

'^^": BRACEBY. 
S. Margaret. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 



^^ BRADLEY. 

S. George. ' , i Bell, 

I. S . W 

W 

1833 
( Diam. 16 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles and one Sanctus bell."* 
The ancient cage for these three bells still remains, but sometime 
prior to 1833, two bells had disappeared : the remaining bell was 
cracked by three men endeavouring to imitate a peal upon it with three 
hammers on the occasion of the wedding of a farmer named Nicholson. 
It was then melted down and recast by a blacksmith of Waltham (a 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



334 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

neighbouring village) named Sanauel White, who placed upon it his 
own initials, and that of his dwelling place. 



BRANDON. 

This Chapel-of-Ease to Hough-on-the-Hill, built in 1872, has one 
small bell. 

BRANSTON. 

All Saints. 4 Bells. 

1. [+111] ©(D5D ^Msw^ €)"33"m (^^^:m.^ 

1595 [ ° "3-] 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. [ + 111] ©<i):E) ^M-~w^ M^M m'M'w^MmM. 

1595 [ n 113- ] 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

3- ©M-l^^^J-^J^ [Ui^4-] 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

4. [ + 116] 'WM^M'w^ :©er <b^:bi M^^:mm 

1595- 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XVI., and pages iii and 107. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "two hand belles" and 
"a sac'ing bell" which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time 
had been sold " sdns the last visitacon."* 



BRATOFT. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I- [ + 31 U27] j^undt ^ftolai (Bxu ^ro ^Mobis [ U 29- ] 

( Diam. 26-|^ in. ) 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 56. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 335 

2- [ + 31 U27] ^anttc ^otolfe ©ra ^ro ^obis [ U 29- ] 

( Diani. 30 in. ) 

3- [ + 66 ] ^antta pixt ©ra pr© n(Dfai^ [ U 68. ] 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 
( Diam. lof in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates III. and VIII. 



^ BRATTLEBY. 

S. CuTHBERT. 3 Bells. 

1. [+120] m.MMJ[LM. [UII9-] 

2. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH. 

3. [ + 120 u 119 ] :BLM.wMMM:mM. 

For Stamps see Plate XVIII. 



BRAUNCEWELL. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I- [07-] 

( Diam. 14^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page 59. 

BRIGG. 

S. Mary. 8 Bells. 

I. 2. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1878. 
( I. Diam. 24! in. weight 4 cwt. o qr. 8 lb. note A. 
2. ,, 25 in. ,, 4 ,, o ,, 8 ,, ,, G sharp.) 



336 The Inscriptions on the 

3—7. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1875. 
(3. Diam. 26^ in. : weight 4 cwt. o qr. 21 lbs. note F sharp. 
4, „ 271 in. ,, 4 „ I ,, 21 „ ,, E. 
5- .. 29 in. „ 4 ,, 3 ,, 21 ,, ,, D. 

6. „ 301 in. ,, 5 ,, 2 ,, I ,, „ C sharp. 

7. ,, 33 in. „ 6 ,, 2 ,, 9 „ „ B.) 

8. FOR THE HONOUR OF GOD AND USE OF THIS 
CHURCH THESE BELLS WERE ERECTED A.D. 
1875. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON. 
( Diam. 36 in. : weight 8 cwt. 2 qrs. 7 lbs. : note A. ) 

Prior to 1876 there was one bell only. 

Six bells of the present ring of eight arrived here from the London 
foundry on the 22nd February, 1876, and were received "with great 
rejoicing. A procession was formed at the Railway Station, the Church 
choir taking the lead, followed by the band of the ist Lincolnshire 
Light Horse in full dress uniform ; next came the clergy, churchwardens, 
and gentry, of Brigg and neighbourhood ; then the carriage containing 
the bells drawn by twelve highly caparisoned horses, the bells also, and 
carriage, being decorated ; next came the school children of the town 
including those of the workhouse. The procession paraded the town, 
and the inhabitants were highly pleased. The bells were received at 
the church tower by the clergy and choir in surplices, and with prayer 
and praise solemnly dedicated to the service of Almighty God, after 
which the vicar — The Rev. W. J. Wylie — addressed a crowd of 
spectators. He hoped the bells would answer the purpose for which 
they were intended, calling the people together to worship God in His 
house, and that the people would accept the invitation the bells gave 
them. The bells having been hung by Mr. H. Boswell were ready the 
first week in Lent, but that being a season in which the church wishes 
her bells to be silent, they were not formally opened until Tuesday 
in Easter week. On that day an early peal was rung inviting the 
parishioners to an 8 o'clock Celebration of the Holy Communion. At 
10.30 a company of Ringers from S. Peter's parish church, Sheffield, 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. ^2>7 

rang a touch before Divine Service at 11.30. In the afternoon the 
Sheffield ringers rang touches. In the evening another service was 
held when an appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. Dr. Gatty, 
Vicar of Ecclesfield.* 

On nth October, 1878, the present ist and 2nd bells were added, 
making a ring of eight. 

The old single bell was sold for £^. 85, iid. 

The six new bells cast in 1875 cost £2,^'i- 3s. 6i. 

The two new ones cast in 1878 cost ;^io8. igs. o^. 



BRIGSLEY. 

S. Helen. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 165 ] IF GOD BE WITH VS HO CAN BE 1674 W S. 

2. [ + 140 ] ^ [ + 140. ] ^ •— (§ 

3. [ + 162 ] mimtniQ X^Elori ~YMM J^.:m. 1682. 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. and page 118. 
In 1553 there were at " Beygsley " " iij grete belles j santus bell."t 

The omission of the ist letter of the relative pronoun on the ist bell 
is in accordance with the local pronunciation. The same error occurs 
on a bell at Newton-on-Trent : it is also found on gravestones. 

The 2nd bell is cracked, and the belfry is in too dangerous a state to 
allow of the diameters being taken. 



J BRINKHILL. 

S. Philip. ' i Bell. 



I. Blank. 



( Diam. 12 in. ) 



* From Church Bells Newspaper, 29th April, 1876. f Avgm. Office. M isc. ^o-j, P. R. Off. 

2 V 



338 The Inscriptions on the 

In 1552, when an Inventory of the Church Goods belonging to 
" Brinkeill in the parties of Linsie " was drawn up with their values, 
the following entries were made relating to the bells : — 

Itm ij bells in the stepill iiij/^. vjs. viij^. 

Itm one sacre bell ij^. 

ItiTi one sanctus bell iiJ5. iiij^.* 



.1 BROCKLESBY. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

Here is a small bell from the foundry of Messrs. Taylor of Lough- 
borough. 

^U BROTHERTOFT. 
_ ? / I Bell. 

There is a single modern small bell in a turret. 



BROUGHTON. 

S. Mary. 5 Bells. 

1. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1867. 

( Diam. 27!- in. ; weight 4 cwt. 2 qrs. 26 lbs. ) 

2. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1867. THIS 

PEAL OF 5 BELLS ERECTED BY SUBSCRIPTION 
1867. 

( Diam. 29 in. ; weight 5 cwt. 2 qrs. 3 lbs. ) 

3. CAST BY JOHN W^ARNER & SONS LONDON 1867. 

THOMAS BOOTH WRIGHT RECTOR. 

JAMES CAMPBELL | churchwardens 1867. 
GEORGE MARSHALL j 

( Diam. 30 in. ; weight 5 cwt. 3 qrs. 10 lbs. ) 

* Land Revenue Records, Church Goods, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 339 

4. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1867. 

CUM VOCO AD TEMPLUM VENITE W.S. 1669 RE- 
CAST 1867. 

( Diam. 33 in. ; weight 7 cwt. o qr. 7 lbs. ) 

5. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1867. _ 

IN • MULTIS • ANNIS • RESONET • CAMPANA • IOHTs. 
( Diam. 36 in. ; weight 8 cwt. i qr. 7 lbs, note A ^ sharp. ) 

In 1553 there were here " ij gret belles one saunct bell."* 

In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that " a hand bell and a litell 
brass bell," which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had 
been sold.f 

Prior to 1867 there were, as in 1553, two bells only — the inscriptions 
on which are preserved on the 4th and 5th bells of the present ring — 
the ist was cracked. 

There is a tradition current at Appleby that the people there stole 
the tenor bell now hanging in their church from their neighbours here. 
There was, however, clearly no loss of a bell between 1553 and 1867 ; 
so the character of the Appleby folk for honesty need no longer be 
impugned ! 



/; 



BROUGHTON BRANT. 

S. Helen. 6 Bells. 

1. IF YOU HAVE A JUDICIOUS EAR YOU'LL OWN MY 

VOICE IS SWEET AND CLEAR. 

2. T. OSBORN FECIT DOWNHAM NORFOLK 1792 ;:• 

3. BEG YE OF GOD YOUR SOUL TO SAVE BEFORE W^E 

CALL YOU TO THE GRAVE. T. OSBORN FOUNDER 

1792 : 

4. OUR VOICES SHALL WITH JOYFUL SOUND MAKE 

HILLS AND VALLEYS ECHO ROUND i 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. ^\, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 55. 



340 TJie Inscriptions on the 

5. IN WEDLOCK'S BAND ALL YE WHO JOIN WITH 

HANDS YOUR HEARTS UNITE SO SHALL OUR 
TUNEFULL TONGUES COMBINE TO LAUD THE 
NUPTUAL RITE . . . T. OSBORN FECIT 1792 ::• 

6. JAMES ANDREW MILNE RECTOR JOHN AULSBROOK 

CHURCHWARDEN. T. OSBORN FOUNDER DOWN- 
HAM 1792. 

\_ A nd incised : — ] 
^r ^ / SIR RICHD SUTTON BAR^' PATRON. 

• ^'^fihjU'^ (Weight 15 cwt.) lyy^y^^rtidUA^ 

The Rev. James Andrew Mihie, LL.D. (see 6th bell), of Christ 
Church College, Cambridge, who was Rector of Shelton, Notts, as well 
as of Brant Broughton, died, at Newark-on-Trent, on the 25th of 
February, 1814, in the 82nd year of his age. He was buried in his 
family vault in Newark Church on the 7th of March, 

Sir Richard Sutton, Bart. (6th bell), was born 31st July, 1733 ; M.P. 
and Under Secretary of State, 1766 — 1772; created a baronet 25th 
September, 1772 ; died 1802. 



^v, BROXHOLME. 

All Saints. ' '' i Bell. 

The single bell here is in so difficult a position for inspection that 
I am reluctantly obliged to say " inaccessible." 



BUCKNALL. 

S. Margaret. i Bell. 

[D 107] 
I. .^ [ + 140] ^ [ + 140] .S [+ HO] .^ [+140.] 
[U127] 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. and pages 114 and 118. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 341 

In 1553 Bucknall possessed " one greate belle & one sanct' bell."* 
The whole framework is in a very rotten condition ; on one of the 
beams is carved the date 1666. There is a tradition in the village that 
there were formerly two bells, one of which (probably the Sanctus bell 
of 1553) was sold by a former churchwarden. 

BURGH. 

S. Peter. ' 6 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. JOHN DAWSON CHURCHWARDEN GAVE THIS BELL 

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND FOR THE USE OF 
HIS CHURCH. O COME LET US SING UNTO THE 
LORD. J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGH- 
BOROUGH 1868. 

( Diam. 33^- in. ) 

2. WE PRAISE THEE O GOD. JOHN TAYLOR & CO. 

FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1868. 
( Diam. 35^ in. ) 

3. WILLIAM HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1820. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

4. IE sfajttlg tolrng mtrc ba call to taste on meats tljat feebs l^e sobk 1 6 1 6 [ n 113.] 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

5. Mnctn ^rhtUate ;Fltat ^ee ©"ampana p©eata 1589 [U 131. ] 

JJ^^:m M-^PEl^ IM M 149 and 150. ] 

[ 4- ii6 ] -M^ [ + ii6 ] :g>M--Y':m [ + ns ] :H<i)m 
[ + 116] mM-MWJ-'M© [ + 116] (d:r [ + 116] 
w:Bi3E^ [ + 116] :]B^jhM 

( Diam. 44I in. ) 



* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



342 The Inscriptions on the 

6. [ + ii6 ] jhMM-^a^M (b:^ jcD:Bija :m<Byh:m:m:m 

^2tr^(D ^M-TT-J^ ^O&iJ^ PSEJ2: ^CD 

^W^'M^J^M. 1616 [ D 113.] 

( Diam. 48 in. ) 
Priesfs Bell on roof of Tower : — 

JESUS BE OUR SPEEDE 1663. 
( Diam. igf in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XVI . and XIX. : pages 123 and 107. 

Prior to 1868 there were only five bells : in that year the then treble 
bell which had no inscription (and was said to have been brought from 
Wainfleet All Saints), was recast, and a new treble given, so making the 
present ring of six. 

John Kyme (see 5th bell, which is one of the most elaborately or- 
namented in the county) was probably a member of the ancient family 
of Kyme of Lincolnshire. In 1554 John Kyme Gentleman (perhaps 
the father of the man whose name is on the bell) died seized of lands 
in Wainfleet S. Mary and Friskney. 

For some account of the H olden family see Oldfield's Wainfleet, page 
96. John Holden, the donor of the tenor bell, appears to have also 
given " a very richly carved " pulpit to the church, which was inscribed 
" 1623 John Houlden.'"" 

A piece of land in this parish, called Bell-string Acre, was left (at 
what time is not known) by the captain of a vessel to provide a silken 
rope wherewith to ring the tenor bell ; he having lost his reckoning off 
this coast on a dark night, and being warned of his dangerous proximity 
to the shore, by the sound of that bell ringing the Curfew. The land 
is now worth £^. a year, and the money goes to the ringers' fund. 



* Saunders' Hist. Lines, n. p. 129. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 343 

The Bell frame is inscribed : — 
Edw'' Doughty Blacksmith 1820 W. Shaw S. Greenfield Workmen 



BURGH-ON-BAIN. 

S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. LOVE GOD FOR EVER 1637. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

Jo', BURRINGHAM. 

S. John Baptist. i Bell. 

This modern church, built in 1857, has only one small bell. 

/ Ot BURTON-BY-LINCOLN. 

S. Vincent. 1 Bell. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 
For Stamp see Plate XX. 

/y" BURTON GOGGLES. 

S. Thomas of Canterbury. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 2 ] OMMIA FIAMT AD GLORIAM DEI. TH0MA8 

MORRIS CAST ME 1628. 

( Diam. 30J in. ) 

2. [ + 2 ] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1660. 

(Diam. 33^ in.) 



344 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

3- [+107] sM-^M^m^M- miM.^^%M. m^M^ 

[U 127] 
( Diam. 36^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 52, Plate XV., and page 114. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " Itm ij handbelles," 
which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been "broken 
and solde to Johnne nixe and Thomas AH'aine of the same Toune Ano 
1565;" and that "one sacring bell — willfn Eland had and hong it by 
his horse eare a long tyme but nowe yt is broken."* 



BURTON GATE. 

S. Helen. 3 Bells, 

1. PATENT NO 4238 NAYLOR VICKERS & Co SHEFFIELD, 

1865. CAST STEEL. 

2. (The same, No. 4230.) 

3. (The same, No. 4242.) 

' ' BURTON PEDWARDINE. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. J. TAYLOR & CO. LOUGHBOROUGH 1870. 

( Diam. 16^ in. ) 

Prior to 1801, when the steeple fell, there were three bells, which 
are said to have been inscribed thus : — 

1. Cum voco ad ecclesiam venite 1604. 

2. W. Eden C. W. T. N. cast me 1591. [ ? 1671 ] 

3. M. Collingwood. Tobie Norris cast me 1671. 

» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 50. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 345 

There is a tradition that the 2nd and 3rd of these bells were removed 
to Scredington in 1802, but an inspection of the bells now there does 
not confirm this rumour. 



; 5 , BURTON-ON-STATHER. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

I. [ D 141 D 142 D 144 ] b t ;i3 it b I [ D 145 ] ^ © f 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. %^M'w^ P©©" €)~yr:Bi M:^m:m^ 1622 [U156. ] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

1612. 

(Diam. 35* in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXI. and XXIII., and page 52. 
See fig. 146, Plate XXL, for the inscription on the treble. 
In 1553 " Burton on y' hyll " possessed " iij greyt belles, one Sanctes 
bell."* 

For a story about these bells see under Luddington. 

BURWELL. 
S. Michael. ^ I 2 Bells. 

I. [ + 165 ] GOD WITH VS W S H W 1683. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

X2^^ [UI37-] _^ 

( Diam. 36 in. ; a piece chipped off the rim. ) ^ 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV. and XX. 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. s\ P. R. Off. 
2 W 



34^ 



TJie Inscriptions on the 



/or 



BUSLINGTHORPE. 



I Bell. 



Blank. 



Diam. i6 in. ) 



BUTTERWICK. 



S. Andrew. 



5 Bells. 



1. JOHN LINTON VICAR 1714. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. HENRY PENN MADE ME AND ALL MY FELOWES 

1714. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 
25. SIMON BOWIS EDWARD TVRNER CHVRCH WARDENS 
1714. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

4. Blank. 

( Diam. 36 in. ; turned. ) 

5. PETER PACKHARNIS WILLIAM MANFOLD TRVSTEES 

1714. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

What is believed to be the ancient Sanctus bell of this church now 
hangs at the Red Lion Hotel, Boston. It has a narrow crown, is much 
spread out towards the rim, is devoid of inscription and ornamentation 
of any kind, and in lieu of canons has a kind of shank. It is painted a 
dull red colour, and is used weekly to call the farmers to their ordinary. 
Cannot the churchmen of Butterwick provide the Inn with a new bell, 
and restore this ancient one to their parish church ? 

This ring is in G, the 3rd bell sharpened and the 4th flattened by 
chipping. The bells are rough cast, and some of the lettering nearly 
illegible. In the ringing chamber is scrawled the following, with much 
more to the same effect : — 



Chui'cli Bells of Lincolnshire. 347 

All You that hath A mind to learn to ring 
Must to the old Ringer Admission money bring 



Each coult must, sirs, just three and sixpence pay 
When our accounts are past for truth 
And you are styled then a College Youth. 
So now, my lads, admission money bring 
And we will learn you presently to Ring. 

The Rev. John Linton was inducted Vicar in 1712; he died 6th 
January, 1773, aged 88. I presume the "Trustees" named on the 
tenor bell were those of Anthony Pinchbeck's School Charity. 



BUTTERWICK WEST. 

S. Mary. i Bell. 

I. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1841. 

The Priest's bell at Owston was given to this church when it was 
erected in 1841 ; the above is doubtless a recast of it. 



BYTHAM CASTLE. 

S. James. a 3 Bells. 

I. [ij 124] see pixt ora pro nobis. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2- [ + 3 ] CVM : : voco : : ad : : ecclesiam : : 
VENITE : : 1618. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 
3. [ + 4] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1664. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages iii, 52, and 53. 



348 The Inscriptions on the 

Alice, the wife of Anketel de Mallorby, by her will, proved on the 
26th October, 1412, bequeathed £10 to the fabric of the campanile 
here.* The ist bell was probably cast about that time. 

In 1565 — 6 the churchwardens reported that " Itm two handbelles," 
which had belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold 
to " wittm Craine by the said churche wardens in Ano predi' wch he 
haith made a brasen morter of."t 



BYTHAM PARVA. 0^ 

S. Medardus. 3 Bells. 

1. THE REV WILLIAM TENNANT CURATE. JOHN 

ORMOND, CHURCHWARDEN 1831. 
( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. REVD W^r TENNANT, MINISTER, JOHN ORMOND 

CHURCHWARDEN 1832. 

( Diam. 27f in. ) 

3. [ + 2] MOM : CLAMOR : SED : AMOR : CAMTAT : IM : 

AVRE : DEI : R W : H S 1612. 
( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbells . . . one 
sacringe bell," which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time 
were " broken and defaced anno dni 1565. "X 

The present bells have been newly hung, the tower and spire lights 
carefully wired, and the whole place is decent and clean. 



• Hist, of Bythani Castle, p. 60; quoting f Peacock's Ch. Fiiy. p. 59. 

the Reg. of Bishop Philip of RepingJon. + lb. p. 51. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 349 



CABOURN. 

S. Nicolas. i Bell, 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 20 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " ij great belles j sanctus bell."* 



CADNEY-CUM-HOWSHAM. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1851. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

There were formerly three bells, but late in the last century two were 
sold for the repairs of the church, the one left being cracked. This 
was a much larger bell than the present one. 



CAENBY. 

S. Nicolas. '''^ i Bell. 



Hi' 



I. R. B. C. 

N« 8 
( Diam. 15 in. ) 

The initials of the maker on this modern bell are accidently those of 
the present Rector. 

CAISTOR. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 6 Bells. 

I. J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1871. 

( Diam. ^1^ in. ) 

* Aitgm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



350 The Inscriptions on the 

2, 3. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1833. 

( Diams. 31^, 32^ in. ) 
4. 7661 ^ 13^ BntbraTSJ Ijcrulj^f 'W^ <D W ir^XslEl 
clu£m£X2El [ + 162. ] 

(Diam. 34I in.) 

5. [ ° \% ] MM-yum w^ :^©' WM^ 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 
6. GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO 1712 [d 168.] 

(Diam. 42^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV. and A'7., and page 114. 

Prior to 1871 there were only five bells. 

The 2nd and 3rd bells, which were cast without canons, were given 
by Mr. Martin Munday, who died 25th March, 1832, aged 84 years. 
The Inscription on his tomb records the gift in these words: — "Such 
was his veneration for the Church of England he bequeathed by his 
Will two additional Bells to the Belfry of this Church for the use benefit 
and amusement of the Inhabitants of the Town of Caistor for ever." 

It will be observed that the inscription on the 4th bell is reversed in 
consequence of the letters having been impressed the wrong way on the 
mould — that is, the right way for reading. There is doubtless another 
initial letter before the word " Church," but it is concealed. 



/,r CALCEBY. 

When the church here was pulled down in 1757 two bells were taken 
to the mother church of South Ormsby. [ See under Ormsby South. ] 



\{ 



f CALKWELL. 



S. Peter. i Bell. 

The single bell here is a modern one, about eighteen inches in 
diameter. 



Chmxh Bells of Lincolnshire. 351 

/h CAMMERINGHAM. 

S. Michael. i Bell. 

I. 1765 

(Diam. 17 in. ) 

/ 1 C CANDLESBY. 

S. Benedict. 3'Bells. 

1, 2. Blank. 

( Diams. 24, 28^^ in. ) 
3. REMEMBER DEATH 1704 [ O 7. ] 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page 59. 

/^ ' CAN WICK. 

All Saints. 2 Bells. 

I- [+123] M-yr^ miM:MJ^M. : ^MM.mj.M. 

[ A nd lower doivn : — ] 

[+123] mmvmxwmi : 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. mart 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

For Stamp see page iii. 



CAREBY. 

S. Stephen. 2 Bells. 

I- [ + 90] M-:mmiiBia/jE{^:m.% 

( Diam. 25:^ in. ) 



352 The Inscriptions on the 

2. Blank. 

( Diam. 28f in. ) 

For Stamp see page 87. 

The date 1693 is cut on the bell-frame. 



I- CARLBY. 

S. Stephen. " i Bell. 

I. [ ij 124 ] sm ma ri n: 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page iii. 

r\ CARLTON CASTLE. 

Holy Cross. i Bell. 



I. Blank. 



(Diam. 12 in. ) 



CARLTON MAGNA. 

S. John Baptist. 5 Bells. 

I — 5. ^ : HD • Joban^ ^orster 

in mem : 

lie 

^am"^ 'MotsUx 1874 

JRrcb^' ^Ktgmait ^Elector 
J^o^it ^aglor anJ) Cfo. ZFloimbcrs Jlcoug^boroug^ 1874. 

( I. Diam. 28 in. weight 4 cwt. 2 qrs. 15 lbs. 

2. ,, 30 in. 

3. „ 32i in. 

4. ,, 36 in. 
5- .. 37 in. 



5 


>' 


I 


, 24 


5 


) ) 


3 


. 14 


7 


)i 


2 


' 4 





,, 


2 


. 15 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 353 

Prior to 1874 (when Major Forster, who is Lord of the Manor, gave 
the present ring) there were 3 bells only inscribed : — 

1. Barabas Simpson Vicar George Aveldale William Winter 

Church Wardens i6gg [ O 7. ] 

( Weight 2 cwt. 3 qrs. o lbs. ) 

2. [ D 49 a 49 D 49 ] A D I [ D 49 ] 1678. 

( Weight 3 cwt. 2 qrs. 6 lbs. ) 

3. John Innet Vic. Edward Taylor senior Ch : Warden 171 7. 

( Weight 5 cwt. o qrs. 8 lbs. ) 



CARLTON PARVA. 

S. Edith. . i Bell. 

I. SL FOSTER D^' DT 1836. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON 
FOUNDER. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

Mr. Samuel Foster, the donor of the bell, was the brother of the 
Rev. Stewart Foster the then Rector. By profession a solicitor, he 
was the owner of the Advowson of the Living, and of considerable 
estates hereabout. 

/'^■y CARLTON-LE-MOORLAND. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

1. JOHN HEDDRLY OO MADE ME 1733 OOOOO 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. JOHN HEDDERLY MADE ME 1733. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1848. WILLIAM 

KNIGHT HAYWARD CHURCHWARDEN. 

( Diam. 32! in. ) 
2 X 



354 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

CARLTON SCROOP. 

S. Nicolas. 3 Bells. 

1. [+ 117] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1613 [ d 113.] 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. g t r g : £ 

( Diam, 30 in. ) 

3. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1822. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 108 and Plate XVI. 



3 Bells. 



CARLTON NORTH. 



1. [+ 164] GOD WITH VS W S 1682. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

2. [+1161J119] 3[n ^onor£ ^e X^ada. 

(Diam. 35 in. ) 

3. + GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1609. 

( Diam. 36^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV., page 107 and Plate XVIII. 
The frame here is set in the steeple diagonally. 



CARLTON SOUTH. 

S. Andrew. (?) i Bell. 

I. [ + 121 D 119] a(jc mnria griuia plena. 

For Stamps see Plate XVIII. 

The cage here is constructed for three bells. The church was ex- 
tensively repaired in 181 2 ; perhaps two bells were then sold. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 355 



• ^ ' 



CARRINGTON. 

S. Paul. (?) i Bell. 

This church, built in 1816, has one small bell. 



CAWTHORPE LITTLE. 

S. Helen. i Bell. 

The ancient Bell here was recast in the year i860, when the church 
was rebuilt. The present small bell is 14 inches in diameter. 



CAYTHORPE. 

S. Vincent. 8 Bells. 

1. :. TINNITUS RAPIDOS SCINTILLANS SPARGO PER 

AURAS 1759 •:• THE GIFT OF W^^i WILSON. 
( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. NOS SUMUS CONSTRUCTI AD LAUDEM DOMINI 1759. 

THE GIFT OF WILLIAM WILSON. 
( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI :• THE GIFT OF 

WILLIAM WILSON : A : D : 1744. 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

4. THE : GIFT : OF : THO : POCHIN : ESQ^^ : 1744. 

(Diam. 33 in.; Inscription incised.) 

5. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI •:• A •:• D--- 1744. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

6. RICH. SEAMOR THO PICKWORTH WARDEMS [ a 157] 

1656. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

7. all mux t^at ^eare wjr mornfull souni> rcptnt btfort gon Ijje iit groinii) 1639. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 



356 The Inscriptions on the 

8. GOD PRESERVE ALL OUR BENEFACTORS RICHARD 
METHERINGHAM & JOHN BUTTLER : CHURCH- 
WARDENS •!• A : D •: 1744 •: • 

( Diam. 41 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIII. 

Nothing is known of the liberal benefactor mentioned on the three 
first bells. The Rev. C. D. Crofts, the present Rector, writes : — 
" Neither monuments, registers, nor the memory of the oldest inhabitant, 
show any trace of his existence, status, or even of the name of Wilson ; 
so we must hope that if unknown to posterity, he may reap the blessing 
inscribed on Bell No. 8." 

Thomas Pochin ( see 4th Bell) was the patron of the living. He was 
the son of Thomas Pochin, Esq., of Barkby, Leicestershire ; born 
15th April, 1685, married (ist) Charlotte, daughter of Sir Edwd. Hussey, 
Bart., of Welbourne, Lincolnshire, and (2nd) Mary, daughter and 
heiress of Thomas Trollope, Esq., of Bourne, Lincolnshire ; he was 
High Sheriff of Leicestershire in 1714; died 30th August, 1751, and 
was buried at Barkby on the 5th of the following month — September. 



/ "^ CHAPEL HILL (near Swineshead). 

This Chapel-of-Ease, built in 1826, has one small bell. 

^\ CLAXBY. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

1. Rev Richard Dixon Vicar Mr James Young (E^uvcJ^biiritEit 
James Harrison of Barton founder 1789. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

2. [ + 120 13J 119 ] ^omc ^drt ^cra (^m ©"lantgcr ^stat 

( Diam. 33-! in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 357 

3. [ + 111] -MWTw^ ^^J- miM-^M%:mj- [u^ig-i 

( Diam, 34^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XVIII. and XVI. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles one Sanctus belles."* 

The present 2nd and 3rd are two of the bells mentioned as then 
existing ; the inscription on the former has not, I believe, been met 
with elsewhere. 

The Rev. Richard Dixon, LL.B. (see ist bell), who was instituted to 
the Rectories of Claxby and Normanton in 1794, died in March, i8ig, 
and was buried here. 

^^^' CLAXBY S. ANDREW. 
S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

In 1552 the Inventory of Church Goods from this parish com- 
prised : — 

Imp'mis ij bells of one Reinge \]li. 

Itin one sanctus bell w* ij hand bells & a sacring bell ... vjs.f 

/'^ CLAYPOLE. 

S. Peter. 5 Bells. 

1. RAISED BY SUBSCRIPTION : J : BRIANT & : J I 

CABOURN HERTFORD FECERUNT 1795. 
( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1633. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 



* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 
f Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. 



358 TJie Inscriptions on the 

3. PATMAN BRIGGS & W^i GRIMSHAW C : WARDENS 

JOHN BRIANT HERTFORD FECIT ANNO DOM 

1793- 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

4. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1630. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

5. ALL MEN THAT HEARE MY MOVRNFVLL SOVND 

REPENT BEFORE YOV LYE IN GROVND 1633. 
( Diam. 33 in. ) 

The 2nd, 4th, and 5th bells were from the Nottingham foundry. 



lOxP CLEE. 

Holy Trinity and S. Mary the Virgin. 3 Bells. 

I, 2. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1793. 

( Diams. 36, 39^ in. ) 
3. REVD SAMUEL STOCKTON VICAR GEORGE PARKER 
CHURCHWARDEN 1793. JAMES HARRISON BAR- 
TON FOUNDER. 

( Diam. 44 in. ) 

In 1553 Clee possessed " iij belles one santus bell."* 
The bells having been recast in 1793, the following Rules were 
placed on a board in the belfry : — 

Orders to be kept by y^ ringers in y* town of Clee, in y* County of 
Lincoln, from the 27 day of Nov. 1793 with y" consent of y^ Rev. 
J. Stockdale, vicar, Rich'' Rawson Churchwarden. 

Any person y' shall ring a bell with his hat upon his head shall 
forfeit and pay G"* to y" use of y" ringers. 

Any person y' shall ring a bell with his spurs on shall pay 6*^ to 
y' use [ &c. ] 

• Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 359 

Any person y' shall ring a bell, and break a stay, shall make it 
good and forfeit 6'^ for y^ use [ &c. ] 

Any person y' shall pull a bell of her stay and cannot set her on 
again shall forfeit 6** for the use [ &c. ] 

Any person leaving y° rope on y^ floor to forfeit 2'^ [ &c. ] 

Any person or persons who shall swear or lay wagers, etc., in y* 
ringing room shall forfeit for every offence 3'' to the use [ &c. ] 

Any person who shall read any of these orders with his hat 
upon his head shall pay 6'' to the use [ &c. ] 

Clee printed by George Parker, in y' yeare 1793. 



CLEE NEW. 

S. John the Evangelist. i Bell. 

I. J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1879. 
( Diam. 24 in. ; weight 3 cwt. i qr. note G. ) 

This new church was consecrated on 12th June, 1879. 



' CLEETHORPES. 

S. Peter. i Bell. 

I. REMEMBER DEATH 1701 [ O 7. ] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 59. 

This chapel was consecrated in 1866; the bell is a second-hand one 
from Strubby Church, near Alford. [ See under Strubby. ] 



jU- CLIXBY. 

? I Bell. 

I. Blank. 



360 The Inscriptions on the 



COATES. 
S. Edith. 2 Bells. 

1. Blank. 

2. R S R T 1704 [07-] 

For Stamps see page 59. 

These bells are quite small ones, and one is cracked. 



li^^ COATES GREAT. 

S. Nicolas. ' '' 4 Bells. 

I, 2, 3. 1807. 

( Diams. 26, 28, 31 m.) 

4. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER 1807. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

In 1553 " Gret Cootes" possessed " iij gret belles."* 
It appears that these, or some of them, subsequently disappeared, 
for the ancient bells of Beelsby (said to have been a very fine ring) were 
sold to the churchwardens here, and recast into the present bells — which 
are light ones without canons — in the year 1807. 

On the bell-frame — which appears to have been reconstructed — is 
inscribed : — 

— Robinson Curat — Edward Gilliat Churchwarden 1739. 
James Harrison of Mid' Raison Bell-Hanger. 

COATES LITTLE. 

5. Michael. i Bell. 

In 1553 " Lytell cotes" possessed " ij gret belles, "f which are now 
represented by a single small bell so placed as to be almost inaccessible ; 
it is reported to be without inscription. 

• Ausm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. f Church Goods, Misc. Book, 507, Aug. Office. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



361 



COATES NORTH. 



S. Nicholas. 



I, 2, 3. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & 
1864. 

[ Royal xj A rms. ] 
Patent. 
( I. Diam. 26 in. ; weight 4 cwt. o qr. i lb, 
2. „ 27^ in. ; ,, 4 ,, I ,, II ,, 

3- >. 30 in.; „ 5 M I „ 13 " 



3 Bells, 
SONS LONDON 



note F. 
,, E flat. 
„ Diflat.) 



In 1553 there were in the church of " North Cottys " " iij gret belles 
j santus bell."* 

In 1604 these three bells were recast at the Nottingham foundry, 
and inscribed : — 

1. My roaring sound doth warning give 
That men cannot here always live 1604. 

2. I sweetly toling men do call 

To taste on meats that feeds the soul 1604. 

3. All ye that hear my mournful sounde 
Repent before you lie in grounde 1604. 

At the close of the last century these three bells remained, but 
subsequently one of them disappeared. It is presumed that it was 
sold to pay for repairs to the church ; and one of the two remaining 
ones was cracked when they were sent to the founder in 1864. The 
present three bells weigh 12 lbs. less than the former two. 

The Rev. T. R. Matthews, the present Rector, has written the 
following melody in three notes for North Coates bells, which he 
permits me to print here : — 



Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



2 Y 



362 



The Inscriptions on the 



VILLAGE VESPERS. 

(8.7, 8.7, 7.7.) 

" Thyough the day Thy Love has spared us.'" 

T. R. Matthews. 




fe^=^ 



rail. 



-— ^s-^y 



^- 



^zig^z^ig^ -^- 



:^: 



^ c^-SpH-^i^p? 



t'= ^' "t^ 



f^ ' C? Sh- 



rz 



ZS3S1 



3i 



:s=z=^^^: 



rr-r. '^,-- . <: ? "^" . tr:::^ 



-^ 



£21 



.i^^. 



(^ ^2 fZi.\ gg 



:P2: 



-^-i- 



COCKERINGTON NORTH. 



S. Mary. 



1. [ + 66 U 68 ] ^cE X^aria ©rn ^to ^obis. 

( Diam. i^\ in. ) 

2. ^donun Sanctorum gcrit bcc (D'ampana pucrorum [O 19. ] 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

3. [ + 116] FEARE GOD 1634. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 



3 Bells. 



For Stamps see Plate VI II., and pages 70 and 107. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. _ 363 



W 



COCKERINGTON SOUTH. 

S. Leonard. 3 Bells. 

1. GERVASE SCROPE ESS. THO WILLKINSON VIC. 1726. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

2. ADRIN BIRCH DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST ME IN 1726. 

( Diam. 36^^ in. ) 

3. ^E^YME ^RYE^H ^HE ^RVETH [\j 108 ] 1266 

[U 170-] 

I [ n 107 ] S 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XXV. 

The Rev. Thomas Wilkinson (ist bell) first signs the Register nth 
March, 1721 ; he was buried here 22nd May, 1741.* 

Cockerington had long been the seat of the Scropes when Sir Adrian 
Scrope died here in 1623 ; from him descended Gervase Scrope, Esq., 
whose name is on the ist bell ; he was Lord of the Manor at the time, 
and his descendants still possess it.f 

Adrian Birch gentleman, who was probably a benefactor to the 2nd 
bell, was buried here 21st September, 1738.1 

The figures in the date on the 3rd bell are evidently misplaced for 
1626; the inscription is in post-mediseval Gothic and Roman letters 
mixed. 



:, / COLD HANWORTH. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

This bell being in a most awkward little tower, and also being said 
to be dangerous for access, I am reluctantly obliged to note it as 
inaccessible. 

* Par. Reg. f See a Pedigree of the family in Blore's Rutland. % Par. Reg. 



364 The Inscriptions on the 



COLEBY. 

All Saints. 5 Bells. 

1. THE LORD TO PRAISE MY VOICE I RAISE. T. 

OSBORNE FOUNDER DOWNHAM MARKET. 
( Diam. 29 in, ) 

2. PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

3. SING YE MERRILY UNTO GOD. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

4. LONG LIVE KING GEORGE III. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

5. WHEN YE DO HEAR MY VOICE ABROAD COME YE 

TO CHURCH AND SERVE THE LORD. JOHN 
LANSDALE CHURCHWARDEN 1798. 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

COLSTERWORTH. 

S. John. 4 Bells. 

1. [ + 2] TOBIAS MORRIS CAST ME 1684. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. [ + 2 ] GOD SAVE THE KING R HARDEL I WHITEL 

TOBIE MORRIS CA8T ME 1674. 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH i860. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

4. [+2] GOD SAVE THE KIMG TOBIAS MORRIS CAST 

ME 1684. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

The 3rd bell was previously inscribed : — 

Non clamor sed amor cantat in aure Dei 1613. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 365 



/r/ CONINGSBY. 

S. Michael. 6 Bells. 



a 



1. J. BURCHAM C. WARDEN J. BRIANT & J. CABOURN 

HERTFORD FECERUNT 1801. ^ 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

2, 3. The RevI^ Jn^ Dyer Rector Ge^ Martin & Sam^^ Bailey Cu^^ / 2- 

Wardens 1757 Lester & Pack of London Fecit. 
( Diam. 2g{r, 32 in. ; both cracked. ) 

4. [+116] jhW'(B:iEi :j^cB^jhm<B:m^ m ~w^ 1614. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

5. [+116] :!b:^-w^msm <^jhM^mmo:^'m. m -yM 

1614. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

6. [+116] ^<B:m ^M-'WM m^^. y^%:m^^ 1616. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 107. .■-/' -•' TvAvt '^> ' -t ; r ^^c/-^/ .^.-^^^^^^^^ -V 
The Indented Inventory of Church Goods deHvered to the parson ■^''*'^i''^*'^ ^ 

and churchwardens of " Conysbe " in 1553, is unfortunately defective as 

regards the bells ; it says : — 

Santus bell [blank] great bell.* 

The Rev. John Dyer (see 2nd and 3rd bell), who was the author of 
*' TA^ Ruins of Rome," ''The Fleece," &c., was buried here on the 15th 
December, 1757, aged 56. 

CONISHOLME. 

S. Peter. i Bell. 

Tradition asserts that there were formerly good bells here, which 
were sold when the old tower fell. The present bell is a small one, 
without inscription or date. 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



366 TJie Inscriptions on the 



CORBY. 

S. John. 4 Bells. 

1. [ + 3] MEROREM [005] MESTIS [005] LETIS 

[005] SIC [DOS] LETA [005] SOMABO 1618. 
( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. [ + 2 ] VIOVL CLAMOR SED AMOR CAMTAT IM AVRE DEI 

1629. 

( Diam. 33 in. ; 4 coins on rim. ) 

3. 3E sbcctb toling mciv bo tall to tastt oir mtnh tljat fwbs tlje soole [ d 113 ] 

1604. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

4. [ + 128 ] jEit nof [ D 118 ] ibu «pi: omc muS [ D 118 ] flcdiit [ □ 118 ] 

cclcstiu icrstriu t infroru [ □ 107] ^ [ n 127] Jt2) [ n □ 149 
and 150] 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 53, Plates XVI., and XIX., page 108, 
Plate XV., and pages 114 and 123. 

The inscription on the 4th bell is In nomme Jhesu Christi onine genu 
ficctatur celestitim terrestium et inferorum. 

On the bellframe are these initials : — 

tt:rk:lh:cw: 1670 : 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " the handbelles" which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time had been " sold to 
Roberte dente of Grauntham."* 



CORBY. 

At the Roman Catholic Chapel here there is one small bell cast by 
Messrs. Taylor and Co. of Loughborough. 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 6i. 



Chiiych Bells of Lincolnshire. 367 

CORRINGHAM. 

S. Lawrence. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. JOHN WELLS JAMES WIGELSWORTH C.W. 1744. 

( Diam. 34^ in. ) 

2. ALL GLORY BEE TO GOD ON HIGH 1660 [ n 157.] 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

3. JOHN WARNER & SONS CRESCENT FOUNDRY LONDON 

1857- 

[ Royal Tj A rms. ] 

Patent. 

A nd incised on waist : — 

THIS BELL RECAST 1857 BENJAMIN LAMB \ ^ \\r 

JOHN COOK ) ^•^^- 13 

( Diam. 40-^ in. ; cracked and piece broken out. ) 

Priest's Bell:— ^ ^^^ ^^1.^ ^ A^t A^ 

Blank. I -r / , !r /J ' 

( Diam. 13^ m-) // ^ ^ ^ ., >- "^^ / /n 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII . l^cc. ^^/u^c^y /*''/'f 

In 1553 there were here " iij grat belles one sanctus bell."* ^^ /o^.^-^ Jm^ 2i.f^^ 
In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a handbell and a sacring 
bell," w^hich belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, still 
remained " in o'' pish churche," but that " Itm one other handbell " was 
"lost in the plague tyme," that. is during the great Plague of 1563. t. 

These bells are now in a sad condition, and can scarcely be used. 
An estimate has been obtained for putting them in order, which it is 
hoped may be acted upon ; about ;^i7o is required. 

There is a tradition current here that many years ago a gentleman 
being lost on the then unenclosed moor, sometimes called Corringham 
Scroggs, and again finding his whereabouts by the sound of the church 
bells then ringing in the evening, he left ten shillings yearly to the 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. s% P- R- Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 6i. 



368 The Inscriptions on the 

ringers to pay them for ringing during the winter months, and so to 
save others from being lost. In support of the truth of this tradition 
it may be mentioned that the bells were formerly rung from the 5th 
November to 14th February, for which ringing the churchwardens 
allowed 3 lbs. of candles and 105. to pay for four lots of beer at the 
public-house, viz., on 5th November, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, 
and 2gth May. Nothing is now known about the traditional bequest. 



COVENHAM S. BARTHOLOMEW. 

S. Bartholomew. 3 Bells. 

I- [^ J27] [+ HO] ^ [+ 140] .^ 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1632. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. [ D 61 62 D 69 O 62 □ 61 O 62 D 69 62. ] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV., pages 114 and 118, and Plate VIII. 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Cownham Bartholomewe " reported 
that the " handbelles," which had belonged to the church in Queen 
Mary's time, were " brockin and defacid in a 1566."*^ 

COVENHAM S. MARY. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I- [U27U27U27-] 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. J. HARRISON FOUNDER THO BRAY CHURCHWARDEN 

1822. 

(Diam. 33 in. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 63. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 369 



3. JOHN SIKES C.W. 1726. 

( Diam. 33 in. ; all canons cut off. ) 

For Stamp see Plate III. 



COWBIT. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

1. JOSEPH EAYRE FECIT 1769. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. ■ySSJoJe ,^«gnstini: 3"onet jUin J^wxt ^ei [ IJ 27 n 28 17 29I j/^ 

( Diam. 29^ in. ; cracked ; canons gone. ) 

3. EDWD ARNOLD LEICESTER FECIT 1788. 

( Diam. 33!- in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 

The 1st and 3rd bells were previously inscribed : — 

I. Sancta Katerina Ora Pro Nobis. 
3. Thomas Norris made mee 1663. 

The W for V on the 2nd bell is not uncommon. 

All the present wheels are broken ; no rope to 2nd ; all very dirty ; \ 
timbers shakey. 



CRANWELL. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. SR. JOHN THORALD DONOR 1752. 

( Diam. 21 in. ) 

Early in the sixteenth century the manor of Cranwell passed into 
the possession of the ancient family of Thorold. Sir John Thorold, the 
8th Baronet, who was born in 1703, and resided chiefly at the old Hall 
here, was the donor of the above bell. He died in 1775. 
2 Z 



370 Tlic Inscriptions on the 



CREETON. 

S. Peter. 2 Bells. 

The framework is in too unsound a condition to allow of an inspec- 
tion of the bells, which are believed to be comparatively modern. 



' :. ■ CROFT. 

All Saints. 6 Bells. 

1. LESTER AND PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1762 GEORGE 

SMITH AND JOHN LEEMAN C Ws. 

2. JOHN WILLIAMSON JOHN ALLETT C Ws. H.P. 1716. 

3. IN CHRIST AND HIS CHURCH H.P. 1716. 

4. HENRY PENN FOUNDER 1716. 

5. HE THAT HATH EARS TO HEAR LET HIM HEAR 

H. P. 1716. 

6. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON. GLORY 

TO GOD IN THE HIGHEST ON EARTH PEACE 
GOODWILL TOWARDS MEN, 1877. 

REHUNG BY J. R. JERRAM. 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

The previous tenor was inscribed : — 

Prepare to die. Samuel Walker Vicar H.P. 1716. 

The Parish Books show among the " Dues & Duties belonginge and 
appertaininge unto the office of the Clarkes of Croft Anno Dni 1626 ": — 

Item for the passinge bell ringeinge for evry Inhabitant &c. that 
are deceased foure pence. 

The Sexton's wages, at the same period comprised, amongst other 
dues : — 

For Ringing the Bell at 8 and 4 01 • 00 • 00* 

» Oldfield's Wainflect, p. 140-141. 



Cliiirch Bells of LincolnsJiire. 371 

On a Tablet in this church was formerly : — 

All buildings are but monuments for death 
All clothes but winding sheets for my last knell, 
All dainties fattening for the worms beneath, 
All curious musick but a passing bell. 
Thus death is nobly waited on, for why ? 
All things we have is but death's livery. 



ji^^ CROWLE. 

S. Oswald. 3 Bells. 

1. 3: sbc«t(n toliug men bo tall U taste on meats l^at feebs tlje soble 1663 

[ D 157 ] Is. tr. lur. to. barbens marmabitke tooke mmistcr. 

2. w : D c : J J : s 1593. 

3. ME RESONARE IVBET PIETAS MORS GRATA 

VOLVPTAS 1656 A-S WARDENS J- M. R 0. 

[ n 161 ^ 163 \j 166. ] 

For Stamps see Plates XX 1 1 1., and XXIV. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greatt bells and one sanctus bell."* 
All the present bells have lost their canons. The Rev. M. Cooke 
(ist bell) not being mentioned in the Registers was probably a tem- 
porary curate. 



CROXBY. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. R ^ B 

W. 
( Diam. g in. ) 

» Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Lines. s\ P. R. Off. 





/i: 


CROXTON 


S. John. 






I. 




1822. 



372 The Inscy'iptions on the 

In 1553 " Croxbye " possessed " iiij gret belles & one sanctus bell."* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "a handbell" which belonged 

to this church in Queen Mary's time was broken at Christenms last and 

sold," and that "and that the late jpson had .... ye sacringe bell" 

but what he did with it they could " not tell certainlie."t 



I Bell. 



In 1566 the Churchwardens reported that " a sacringe bell," which 
had belonged to this church in Queen Mary's reign, was " defacid A° 
pmo Elizabth by the said churchwardens."! 



CROYLAND. 

SS. GUTHLAC AND BARTHOLOMEW. 5 BeLLS. 

1. [ + 2 ] THOMAS NORRIS MADE ME 1654. 

{ Diam. 30 in. ; no canons. ) 

2, 3. EDWR ARNOLD LEICESTER FECIT 1788. W^i HICK- 

LING W-M COOKE CHURCHWARDENS O O 
( Diams. 33, 34 in. ) 
4. REVD MOORE SCIEBO RECTOR -^ WILLIAM COOKE 
AND CHARLES ASHBY CHURCHWARDENS E 
ARNOLD LEICESTER n- -r FECIT 1797 n- 
( Diam. 38^ in. ) 
5- %n X^Elultts ,^mus ^Sifsonet tampans 3Eol^mtins [ U 3<^ ° 33 
D 28.] 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 



* Aiigm. Office Misc. Book 507, Church f Peacock's Cli. Fur. p. 65. 

Goods, P. R. Off. + lb. p. 65. 



y 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 373 

For Stamps see page 52, and Plate III. 

The early history of the Bells of Croyland Abbey — of which the 
present parish church is a portion — is familiar to most lovers of Church 
Bells, inasmuch as it records the first known ring of bells in England. 

Turketyl, the sixth abbot (a.d. 946 — 975), cast a great bell for the 
Abbey, naming it Guthlac. Egelric, his nephew and successor (a.d. 
975 — 984), added six more bells, namely, two large ones which he 
named Bartholomew and Betelm, two middle ones named Turketyl and 
Tatwyn, and two lesser ones named Pega and Bega. When these 
seven bells were rung (says the chronicler Ingulph, whose statements, 
for our present purpose, are accepted as correct) " an exquisite harmony 
was produced thereby, nor was there such a peal of bells in those days 
in all England."* " They resounded with melody " (says Dr. Stukeley) 
"through the extended plains of Holland; whence the proverb 'as 
sweet as Croyland bells.' "f The sound of Guthlac was even better 
than music, for "the ringing of Guthlac at Croyland, according to 
Fuller, was a remedy for the headache."! 

These bells hung in the central tower until the year logi, when a fire 
broke out in the belfry, and Ingulph, the chronicler of the Abbey, and 
its then abbot, running to the church door, and attempting to get in, 
had a narrow escape of being killed by the " melted brass " of the bells 
which poured down ; the tower fell, and the bells and belfries were 
consumed. 

After this great fire, when the monks set to work to rebuild their 
church, they erected " an humble belfry and placed therein" — says the 
chronicler — "two small bells which Fergus the coppersmith of Saint 
Botolph's town [Boston] had lately presented to us, there to remain 
until years of greater prosperity, when we propose by the Lord's 
assistance to make alterations in all these matters for the better." 

In 1091 Senian de Lek was appointed Keeper of the Church. 



* Ingulph's Chronicle and Continuations (Bohn's Ed.), p. 107. 
f De Croylandia Memorabilia, Gresley's | Gatty's Ecclesiastical Bell, Papers of 

Ed. p. 13. Ass. Arch. Societies, iii. p. 258. 



374 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

Amongst other duties he was to ring all the notices in the church both 
in the night and in the daytime, with a few exceptions, when the duty 
was performed by the monks, 

Ingulph, who was elected Abbot in 1075, replaced the books, vest- 
ments, bells, and other requisites before his death, which took place in 
1109. 

About the year 1171 the church, with its outbuildings and most of 
its furniture, was agam destroyed by fire, but was quickly restored by 
Abbot Edward, who then ruled the house. Whether the bells suffered 
is not told. 

Abbot Ralph Merske (1253-1281) erected a Campanile or detached 
building, at the East end of the church which was known as the 
" outward belfry ;" * and John de Asheby, abbot, who died in 1392, 
gave, or else recast, "the large bells hanging in the outward belfry. "f 
So at that time the abbey possessed two rings of bells. 

In 1405 there were " four sweetly sounding bells" hanging " in the 
tower beyond the choir "^ — that is, as it is generally understood, the 
central tower : they were repaired in that year by Abbot Thomas 
Overton. 

In the time of John Lytlyngton (Abbot 1427- 1469) the great bells in 
the outer steeple or belfry were recast " in order that they might be 
brought to a state of more perfect harmony," in which the monks were 
assisted by John Leycester, a brother of the monastery, who, in 1463, 
"induced by pious considerations . . . , contributed 40 marks" towards 
the good work. 

What became of the bells of the outer steeple at the Dissolution is 
not now known : at Moulton there is a tradition that the church bells there 
came originally from Croyland Abbey. A similar tradition is current at 
East Pmchbeck, the bells being said to have been sent there because 
there was no other tower in the neighbourhood large enough for them. 



* Gough's Hist. Croyland {1782), p. 5j. "caused the great bells of the Convent 
f So says Dugdale and Gough, but in to be recast," without specifying which 
Ingulph's Chronicle we are told that he ring. 



y Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 375 

In 1465 the Abbot, John Lytlyngton, "in order that nothing might 
remain undone which is considered to tend to the increase of the praise 
of God, caused five fine and choice bells to be cast at London, and 
substituted for the three old ones [one gone since 1405] here [ that is in 
the central tower ] to send forth their sweet sounds with their har- 
monious chimes. The cost of these, together with the expense of the 
carriage thereof to Croyland by land and water, amounting in all to a 
sum of one hundred and sixty pounds, was defrayed entirely by himself. 
These bells (continues the chronicler) while still lying below upon the 
ground before they were hung, were solemnly consecrated by Nicholas, 
the venerable lord bishop of Elphin, who was at this time suffragan of 
the reverend father in Christ, John, lord bishop of Lincoln. They were 
inscribed from the smallest to the greatest with the names in especial 
of the patron saints in whose honour they were most devoutly 
dedicated : the names being Guthlac, Bartholomew, Michael, Mary, 
and Trinity." The chronicler goes on to relate that a great beam, 
which was being raised in the greater bell tower, which had been newly 
built in the Western part of the church, in which it was intended 
that the bells just mentioned should be hung, fell down, doing much 
damage and jeopardising the lives of the workmen, all of whom, how- 
ever, escaped.* 

Two of the five "fine and choice bells" hung here by Abbot John 
Lytlyngton in 1465 most probably remained in the church until after 
1783, for Gough in his History of Croyland Abbey, published in that year, 
mentions the inscriptions on the bells : — 

1. In multis annis resonet Campana Johannis. 

2. Sum Rosa pulsata mundi Maria vocata. 

3. Haec Campana beatas Trinitati sacra. f 

The first, dedicated to S. John, was cast subsequently to Abbot 



• Ingulph's Chron. and Contin. (Bohn's Ed.), pp. 197-203, 208, 215, 233, 273, 35S, 432, 

441, 442. 
f See also Harl. MSS. 6829, p. 240, where the same inscriptions are given. 



376 The Inscriptions on the 

Lytlyngton's time, but those numbered 2 and 3 (Gough evidently did 
not care to record the modern bells) would be those mentioned by 
the chronicler as dedicated to " Mary" and " Trinity." 
/^ From that time to the present the bells tell their own history : two of 
the ancient bells mentioned by Gough have been recast. 

Hearing that there were many old Papers in the Parish Chest here, 
Mr. W. H. Jones of Uppingham very kindly went to inspect them on 
my behalf. He writes, " I was sadly disappointed with the Parish 
Chest. I was three hours or more rummaging amongst Poors' Accounts, 
Settlements, Indentures, &c., &c. ; the few scraps of Churchwardens' 
Accounts were simply rags, the rest reduced literally to dust, in which 
I was half smothered." 

From the chaos thus described the following references to the bells 
were gathered : — 

1690. It. pd. to M' Brickells for Hanging the Bell 18 . 10 . o 

It. given to the Ringers November y' 5"" 1690 ... 00 . 11 . 08 
It. given to the workmen when they was Hang- 
ing the Bells 00 . 01 . 00 

1 69 1. It. paid Wm. Bridgins for a bawdrick for the 

great Bell 00 . 01 . 06 

1693. ^^^y 10. It. pd. to Step. Williamson for Beare 
y' y' Ringers had y'^ day of Reioycing against ye 

ffrench 00 . 09 . 04 

1694. It. pd. Tho. Darby for makin y" Letell bell a 
baudrick 00 . 01 . 06 

1742. [ Payments to Ringers on 5"^ Nov' and 25''' 

Dec^ 
1748. June 3. for taking the litel bell out of the frame 0.3. 6 
1763. [ From a loose bill ] one new weell for y^ forth 

bell 2.7.0 

one new Weell for y" third Bell 2. 7. o 

1802. Oct II. Paid M'' Redman for ale for the 

Ringers of the peace o. 5. o 

^"^' U^^ Wyi. J^rtf,/ uA 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 377 

The Rev. Moor Scribo (whose name is mis-spelt on the 4th bell) 
was a native of Gedney, Lincolnshire. He was entered of Sidney- 
Sussex College, Cambridge; B.A. there in 1745; and in 1747 was 
appointed Curate of Quorndon and Woodhouse, Leicestershire. In 
1767 he was presented to the Rectory of Croyland, and died there on 
the 13th of July, 1808, aged 85 years. 

^;^ CULVERTHORPE. 

In 1566 the churchwarden of the ancient chapel of S. Bartholomew, 
"Thorpe in P'rochie de Heyther," reported that " one sacringe bell " 
belonging to that church in Queen Mary's time had been " broken in 
paces and sold."* 

//7 CUMBERWORTH. 



s. 


Helen. 


3 Bells. 


I. 


Blank. 

(Diam. 11 in. ) 




2. 


J. TAYLOR & CO LOUGHBOROUGH 1870. 
( Diam. 2if in. ) 




3- 


J. TAYLOR & CO LOUGHBOROUGH 1873. 
(Diam. 24 in. ) 






The ist bell was doubtless intended for a Priest's bell. 


One of the 



larger bells is said to have been formerly inscribed : — 

lESV MERCI. 

HP CUXWOLD. 

S. Nicolas. i Bell. 

I. 1822. 

( Diam. 17^ in. ) 

In 1553 " Cokeswold " possessed " tow gret belles. "f 

» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 151. f Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 

3 A 



378 TJie Inscriptions on- the 

m DALBY. 



I Bell. 



In 1862 the ancient church here was taken down and the present 
church erected. 

Some years previously the single bell, being cracked, was recast, and 
made somewhat heavier as the following extracts from the Church- 
wardens' Account show: — 

1849. Paid Barratt for bell ;^6 . 18 . 2 

John Thorne for hanging i . 6 



' - DALDERBY. 

The ancient church here, dedicated to S. Martin, has long been lost, 
though traces of its foundations are visible. 

In 1553 there were " iij great bells j sanctus bell" hanging in its 
steeple.* 

' '^' DAWSMERE. 

Christ Church. i Bell. 

1. J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1872. 

( Diam. 15 in. ) 

- /It DEEPING S. JAMES. 
S. James. 5 Bells. 

I. J : COVLSON : AND : T : MEASVRE : CH : W : ALEX : 
RIGBY : MADE \ ME : 1704 ; 
( Diam. 34 in. ) 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 379 

2. [ + 2 ] NON : CLAMOR ; SED : AMOR ; CANTAT ; IN : 

AVRE : DEI 1608. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

3. [ + 124 ] %tz lawk [ U 119- ] 

( Diam. 42 in. ) 

4. [ + 2 ] MOM SOMO AMMIMABVS MORTVORVM SED 

AVRIBVS VIVEMTIVM 1624 TOBIE M0RRI8 CAST 
ME. 

( Diam. 43^ in. ) 

5. [+1] %^M~W^ [04] ^^m^^^^ [04] ffl.©- 

[ □ 4 ] :^<B:i^ [04] M<B^l<B MSMM^mi-- 

M-iB'WM mi<B:^m^<B:^^^i [ □ □ 4 1 

TOBIE MORRIS FECIT 1623. 
( Diam. 48 in. ; all canons gone. ) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and iii, Plate XVIII. and page 53. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that "one cross clothe and 
two hand belles," which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, 
had been " sold by the said churchwardens anno 1562 for the somme of 
xx** and the mouney bestowed vpon shewes and geven to a poore child 
wth in the pishe defaced;" and that " a sacring bell," which they had 
borrowed of "tighee [the churchwarden] in quene Maries tyme,".had 
been defaced " as we are able to depose."* 



//o DEEPING FEN. 

S. Nicolas. ' i Bell. 

This modern church possesses one bell cast in the year 1846. 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 69. 



380 The Inscriptions on the 

DEEPING MARKET. 

S. GuTHLAC. 6 Bells. 

1. CUM VOCO VENITE O JOSEPH EAYRE S^ NEOTS 

HUNTINGDONSHIRE FECIT 1766. 
( Diam. 30I in. ) 

2. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI 1766. 

( Diam. ^2^ in. ) 

3. EGO SUM VOX CLAMANTIS JOSEPH EAYRE S^ NEOTS 

FECIT 1766. O O 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

4. IN DEI GLORIAM IN ECCLESI^ COMMODUM M 

JOSEPH EAYRE FECIT S'^ NEOTS HUNTINGDON- 
SHIRE 1766. 

( Diam. 36^ in. ) 

5. LA\YRENCE MAYDWELL RECTER JOHN MAWBY 

JOHN BOYALL CHURCHWARDENS 1766 O O 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

6. LAURENCE MAYDWELL RECTER JOHN MAWBY 

JOHN BOYALL CHURCHWARDENS O O JOSEPH 
EAYRE ST NEOTS FECIT NO^' 15 1766. 
( Diam. 44^ in. : the coins are Farthings of George II.) 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that a "hand bell" which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, was sold in A° dni 1563, 
and that another " hand bell " was also sold in the same year " and put 
to pfane vse."* 

The ancient Churchwardens' Accounts, commencing in 1570, are 
very interesting : the following extracts relate to the bells : — 

1587. Deepinge Gutlac. 

Itm p" to y^ ringers on the Coronation days iijs. vj^. 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 68. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 381 

1588. Parochia S" Gutlachi de M'kett Deepinge 

P"* for bread & drinke on S' Hughes daye & the 

two days followynge xvji. 

P"* for ij pinnes for y' bell bauldricke \]d. 

P" for I lb of grease for y' belles iiiji. 

P"* for y° great bell baldricke mendinge viiji. 

1591. P" for bread and drinke & greese on S' Hugh's daye xvi. 
P'' to Rowland Harrison for mendinge y' bell clapper xiji. 

1592. Itm to nine men to ringe on y* Queenes daye iv5. v]d. 

Itm for bread & drinke & greese xvi. 

Itm for hanginge of y^ great bell & y" fore bell ... vjs. viiji. 

Itm for keyes & iron for y' belles xiji. 

1593. Itinforbread&alegrese&candleony^Queene'sdaye ijs. viiji. 
Itm to Wilkinson for y' greate bell staye viiji.* 

In 1637 a difference having arisen between the then Rector of Market 
Deeping — the Rev. Paul Prestland — and his parishioners concerning 
the new framing and casting of the bells and other rights of the church, 
and he being then sickly and "not willing to follow suits " petitioned 
Archbishop Laud to have the matter referred to Montague Lord 
Willoughby " and other eminent gentlemen next adjoining." The 
Archbishop passed the matter on to Sir John Lambe (Dean of 
Arches) in order to obtain an account of the petitioner, but how the 
dispute was settled is not recorded. f 

The Rev. Laurence Maydwell (see 5th and 6th bells) was Rector 
here for thirty-six years: he died 14th March, 1788. 

^^-^ DEEPING WEST. 

S. Michael or S. Andrew ( ? ). 5 Bells. 

I, 3. WILLIAM DOBSON, FOUNDER, DOWNHAM NOR- 
FOLK 1829. 

( Diams. 28^, 32 in. ) 

* For these extracts I am much indebted to the Rector — the Rev. David Robertson, R.D. 
f State Papers Dom. Ser. Car. i. Vol. 383, No. 44. 



382 The Inscriptions on the 

2. [ + I ] TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 1673. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

4. MYHILL ADDY CHURCHWARDEN IN THE YEAR OF 

OUR LORD 1829. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

5. EDWARD ARNOLD LEICESTER FECIT 1787. EDW^ 

ROSE CHURCHWARDEN -t- +- 
( Diam. 38 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens of "West Deping " reported with 
regard to " Monuments of Superstition " belonging to the church in 
Queen Mary's time : — 

Itm two handbelles wth a latten cross and a paire of sensers one 
hallie water stock wt a candlestick wt one pix of Copper and gilte — 
solde to leonard Stubbes by the said churchwardens anno Dni 1560 
wch the said churchwardens boughte againe of the saide leonard 
Stubbes wch was melted and cast towardes the mendinge of a 
broken bell.* 
Prior to 1829 there were four bells only. 

A stained glass window was inserted in the tower in the year 1865, 
to the memory of Mr. Myhill Addy, whose name is on the 4th bell. 
' The 3rd bell is unhung (1879), but the bells and belfry are well 
1 cared for. 

/7 ^ DEMBLEBY. 
S. Lucia. 2 Bells. 

I, 2. J. WARNER & SONS LONDON 1867. 

In 1566 the churchwarden reported that " a handbell and a paire of 
sensers wth a crismatorie" which belonged to this church in Queen 
Mary's time had been " sold to John Pollard of the said pishe A" 1565 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 70. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 383 

by Thomas Tailor churchwarden, whether he hath defaced it I knowe 
not but moste certainly at my retorne he shall deface it."* 

Prior to the erection of the present church in 1867 there was only 
one bell at the ancient church and it was cracked: it weighed 174 
lbs. Marrat describing it in 1834 writes: — "Here is only one bell 
which hangs upon two posts on the outside of the flat roof [of the 
nave], and is rung by means of a lever and a rope tied to the longer 
end, the rope goes through the roof into the church, and when the bell 
is ringing it very naturally reminds a spectator on the outside of the 
action of pumping. "f 



/ DENTON. 

S. Andrew. 6 Bells. 

1. RECAST IN THE YEAR 1839 RICHARD BURGIN 

CHURCHWARDEN THOMAS MEARS, FOUNDER, 
LONDON. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. Wm. WELBY & Wm. GREGORY WILLIAMS ESQ^s 

BENFRs CAST NEW IN 1782. THO^ HEDDERLY OF 
NOTTINGHAM FECIT. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

3. FOUR OF US WAS RECAST AGAIN TO SING BY 

FRIENDS TO COUNTRY CHURCH & KING THOs 
HEDDERLY OF NOTTINGHAM FECIT 1782 O O 
(Diam. 33 in.) 

4. 5. Wm. WELBY & Wm. GREGORY WILLIAMS ESQ^s 

BENEFACTORS RECAST IN 1782 THO^ HEDDERLY 
NOTTINGHAM FECIT. 

(Diams. 35, 38 in.) 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 66. f Marrat's Hist. Lines, iii. p. 164. 



384 



The Inscriptions on the 



6. ALL YE THAT HEAR MY MOURNFULL SOUND 
REPENT BEFORE YOU ARE LAY'D IN GROUND 
THOs HEDDERLY OF NOTTINGHAM FECIT O O 
( Diam. 43 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported " Itm as for . . . handbelles . . . 
we had none in quene maries tyme so far forthe as we can learne nor 
yet sacring beU."* 

Prior to 1782 there were four bells only. These bells, according to a 
memorandum in Thomas Hedderly's note book, weighed and measured 
on the 31st January, 1782, as under: — 

lbs. 
o 431^ in. wide 2I bare thick 31:^ high. 

12 39 " '1 ^8 )J M 20 ,, 

3 352" >) >5 2g^ ,, ,, 20 ,, 

3 334 " " 24 ,, ,, 24 )> 

When the new bells were cast the following were the weights and 
measurements : — 

H. Q, lbs. 



Bare ^ note too sharp. 



Too thin upwards. f 

This new ring was opened on the 27th October, 1782 ; the bells were 
rehung in 1855. 

William W'elby, Esq., who died in 1657, purchased the manor of 
Denton. His grandson — William W'elby, Esq., the benefactor to the 





H. 


Q- 


Tenor. 


14 


. 


3- 


9 


2 


2. 


8 


. 


Treble. 


6 


I 



e. 


5 


3 


24 


3oi 


in. 


wide 


2\ thi 


2. 


6 





23 


3H 






o3 


3- 


6 


2 


22 


33 






2f „ 


4- 


7 


2 


5 


35 






2| „ 


5- 


9 


I 


12 


38 






2| „ 


6. 


12 


3 


10 


43 






2| „ 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 67. 
f I am indebted to Mr. W. P. W. Phillimore for these extracts from the founder's note 

book. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 385 

bells — was High Sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1746, and Colonel of the 
South Lincolnshire Militia; he married Catherine, daughter of James 
Cholmeley, Esq., of Easton, and died in 1792. 

DIGBY. 

S. Thomas a Becket. 3 Bells. 

1. BARSTON GRANTHAM 1822. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. WILL. MEDCALFE WARDEN [ d 157] 1656. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. WILLIAM WEBB C W 1759 DANIET HEDDERLY 

FOVNDER. 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII. 

DODDINGTON. 

S. Peter. i Bell, 

I. CHARLES M. G. JARVIS RECTOR 1851. JOHN NESBITT 
CHURCHWARDEN PRAISE THE NAME OF THE 
LORD FOR HIS NAME ONLY IS EXCELLENT AND 
HIS PRAISE ABOVE HEAVEN AND EARTH. C. & 
G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON. 
( Diam. 22 in. ) 

The former bell was badly cracked when it was sent to the foundry. 
The Rev. Charles M. G. Jarvis was instituted as Rector in 1837; he 
resigned the living in 1861, and died at Torquay, where he was also 
buried, in 1863. 

//,^ DODDINGTON DRY. 

S. James. i Bell. 

I. [ + 86] MM.:^mWW^ : J-M-(^<^^~W'^ 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 
3 B 



386 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamp see page 86. 

Doddington Dry paid half the cost of the recasting of the Bells of 
the mother church of Westborough in 1752, as appears from the follow- 
ing entries in the Churchwardens' Accounts : — 

1752. Charges at Newark about the Bell and for the 

Article 4 . 8 

For carrying the bells to Nottingham — half 5-3 

For fetching the bells home — half 10.6 

P'' half of Mr. Hederleys the Bellfounder's bill ... 31 . 17 . 4 

For Bell ropes— half 11 . o 

1754. For half the bell ropes 6.0 

■^ DONINGTON. 

S. Mary and The Holy Rood. 5 Bells. 

1. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1743. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1820. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. RICHARD BOWLES AND THOMAS TENEY CHURCH- 

WARDENS 1776. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

4. JOHN WARD AND Wm. TOOLEY CHVRCHWARDEMS. 

Th° Hedderly 

1743. 
Founder 

( Diam, 36 in. ; out of order. ) 

5. SUSCITO VOCE PIOS TU lESU DIGERE MENTES 

JOHN FLINDERS JOHN WATERHOUSE C. W. 1747. 
( Diam. 43 in. ; out of order. ) 

On the bell-frame is : — 

HENRY BROWNING THOMAS COLINGWOD 

CHVRCH WADENS 1695. lOHN BROWN WORKMAN. 

Digeve on the 5th bell is a blunder for Dirige. 



Churcli Bells of Lincolnshire. 387 

"C'. DONINGTON-ON-BAIN. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

1. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1796. 

( Diam. 24^ in. ) 

2. James Harrison Founder 1796. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

3. James Harrison Founder Barton 1796. 

( Diam. 29^^ in. ) 

In 1553 " Donnyngtone " in Gartree Wapentake possessed " iij gret 
bells & a santus bell."* 



.^., DORRINGTON. 
S. James. ^ " 3 Bells. 

1. [ + I ] TOBIE NORRIS CAST VS ALL THREE 1692. 

( Diam. 32^- in.) 

2. [ + I ] THOMAS BVRNNET THOMAS HANSON 1692. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

3. [ + I ] JOHN TODKILL GENT ROBERT STANDISH 

GENT 1692. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 52. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " i j Handbelles," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, " were broke and sold to 
Leondard lawcock of Lincoln. "f 

There was formerly a chapel here, called Shefford Chapel, standing 
on the Chapel Hill, half-a-mile south-east of the parish church : it was 
taken down in 1698, and its materials used in repairing the church. It 
had a single bell, dated 1643, which long continued to hang in a wooden 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R, Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 73. 



/ 



388 The Inscriptions on the 

frame in the village, and to be rung for service in the church on account 
of the distance of the latter from the village. Bishop Trollope*^ says it 
was eventually taken down and removed to the church. 



/p- DOWSBY. 
S. Andrew. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. Blank. 

(Diam. 32 in. ) 

2. GEORGE WELLS CHURCHWARDEN 1775. 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

3. OMNIA : FIANT : AD : GLORIAM : DEI \ i6o8 

WILLIAM : RIGDEM ; MILES. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 
Priesrs Bell :— 

1827. 

( Diam. 12 in. ; not used. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbells," which be- 
longed to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold " to a metle 
man."t 

William Rigden (see 3rd Bell) possessed, and lived at, the Hall here. 



jiPf DRIBY. 

S. Michael. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 



DUNHOLME. 

S. Chad. 3 Bells. 

I. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1629. 

( Diam. 32 in. ; cracked and useless.) 

» Trollope's Skaford, p. 232. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 71. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 389 

2. RICH. COOPER VICAR ROB. SQUIRE ^^^^^^N 

E. Seller j^^q GLORIA 1730. 
Ebor. -^ 

( Diam. 34 in. ; broken and useless. ) 

3. X« no£ ifea %p. oms gcitu fledat 1628. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

The second bell has a crown ornament consisting of the founder's 
name alternating with bells. 



jr DUNSBY. 

All Saints. 2 Bells. 

(Diam. 26 in. ) 
2. ^ [+140] ^ [UI27.] 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 118 and 114. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " the handbelles," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, were "broken in peces 
and sold to a brasier of lincoln in an°. 3° Elizabeth regine " and that 
** one sacringe bell " had been " broken and defaced."* 

The surname of Jackling (see 2nd bell) is not uncommon in Lincoln- 
shire : it is also known in Cambridgeshire (see Raven's Cainbridgeshire 
Bells, page 26). 

DUNSTON. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. JAMES HARRISON BARTON, 1819. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 



/(> 



^ Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 72. 



390 The Inscriptions on the 

2. [+116] -^-MmB-^^ :©©■ €)Tr:Ei ^:^m:mm 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 
3. all mm tljat ^eate ntg mornfuU sobnir Kpnit before Qon Igc in grounb 1633. 

( Diam. 38 in.) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plate XVI. 
The I St bell was previously inscribed : — 

Celorum Christe placeat tibi Rex sonus iste.* 



/r EAGLE. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. JESUS BE OVR SPEED 1727. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. JOHN COTTAM C.W. DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST ME 
1727. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 
-' 3. DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST US 1727. 



//- 



( Diam. 30^ in. ; a large piece out of lip. ) 



^(JQ EAST FERRY. 

S. Mary. ^ i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. i2i in. ) 

This bell is only used for Divine Service ; passing, funeral, and 
marriage ringing for the inhabitants of East Ferry is at the Parish 
Church, Scotton. 



Harl. MSS. 68^9, p. 337. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 391 



EASTVILLE. 

? ' I Bell. 

This church, built in 1840, has only one small bell. 



/^2, EDENHAM. 
S. Michael. 5 Bells. 

1. THOMAS MEARS FECIT 1S32. 

( Diam. 32 in.) 

2, 3. RECAST 1807. GEORGE PARKER CHURCHWARDEN 

T. MEARS & SON FECIT. 

( Diams. 34, 36 in. ) 

4. JOHN BACON ROBT ALLEN CHURCHWARDENS 

HENRY PENN MADE ME 1721. 
( Diam. 39 in. ) 

5. THOMAS DONCOMBE RECTOR 1636. THOMAS NORRIS 

MADE ME. 

( Diam. 42 in. ) 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that "the lytle sackering bell" 
belonging to the church in Queen Mary's time was " defaced and mad 
away when sire Thomas Sharpeney being Minister John Goodall and 
Simond Tebbe churche masters a" p'mo Elizabeth."* 

The bells here having been long out of order were rehung in 1S74 with 
entirely new fittings by Messrs. Taylor and Son, of Loughborough, at 
the joint expense of Lady Willoughby de Eresby and the parishioners. 

The present tenor is traditionally said to have been made from the 
metal of a former bell brought from the neighbouring Abbey of 
Valle-Dei, which formerly stood in Grimsthorpe Park. 



Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 75. 



392 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

EDLINGTON. 

S. Helen. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. 1824. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. 3EKH ^M^Mmm^ :iP^WM^ Luis?.] 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

3. J-iKm mmm ^iPM-'wJhm [01120110^137-] 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

T L T F C W 1670. 
( Diam. 11^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XX. and XVI. 

In 1553 there were here " iij bells in the steple w* a sanct' bell."* 
Two of those bells still remain. 

UCj ELKINGTON NORTH. 

S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. [ + 24 ] j(B'MM-im:M.^^ [ □ * ] ^jit©-^:]^?^ 

( Diam. igi in. ; * a fleur-de-lys. ) 
For Stamp see page 71. 

- ELKINGTON SOUTH. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I. j^aiutij ^Eiatcvinn ©ra ^ro ^obis [ U 27 n 28 ij 29. ] 

( Diam. 32^, in. ) 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 393 

2. Mri ;^omen ^omhti ;©£ttcbictum [ U 29 n 28 ij 27. ] 

( Diam. 36-1 in. ) 

3. Tlinlonai CTalis "^iZE^os ^Tampana X3Elix^adis [ U 29 n 28 ij 27. ] 

( Diam. 391 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 

These bells form an interesting and uniform set ; the capital letters 
on the 3rd bell are crowned. 



ELSHAM. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. SOLI DEO GLORIA W. S. [ n 167] 1664. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. [ a 141 D 142 D 144 D 145. ] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1636. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXI V. and XXI. 



• ENDERBY BAG. 

S. Margaret. i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I. [ + 41] MmM- : miM:M^M.:m.mmM- ^^.m. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 
( Diam. 13 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate VI. 

In 1552, when the Inventory of Church Goods belonging to this 

3 c 



394 The Inscriptions on the 

parish was drawn up, the following entries were made as to the bells 
and their value : — 

Itm ij grete bells vj7?. iijs. iiijrf. 

Itm one sanctus bell V5. 

Itm ij hand bells xx^.* 

The present bell is one of the two bells then hanging. It is probably 
coeval with the erection of the church and tower by Albini de Enderby, 
who died in the year 1407. His memorial brass is still in the church. 



ENDERBY MAVIS. 

S. Michael. 3 Bells. 

1. ABRAHAM FREESTON RECTOR TOBIE NORRIS CAST 

ME 1688. 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 

2. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1819. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. [ + 116] X3^issi ^1; ©fdis ^co ^omtn ©abriclis [U^^Q-] 

( Diam. 32! in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plate XVIII. 
In 1553 there were here " iij great belles one Sanctus bell."t 
The Rev. Abraham Freeston (see ist bell) was instituted as Rector 
in 1685 ; he was buried at West Keal on 24th August, 1727. 



/"^^ ENDERBY WOOD. 

S. Benedict. ' i Bell. 

I. [ + 66] ^ancta .GElaria. 

( Diam. 25^ in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate VIII. 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, f Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. s\ 

File 78, P. R. Off. P. R. Off. 



Church, Bells of Lincolnshire. 395 

^^-^• EPWORTH. 

5. Andrew. 6 Bells. 

1, 3, 5. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON-UPON-HUMBER 

FOUNDER 1813. 

( Diams. 36, 41, 48 in. ) 

2, 4. 1813. 

( Diams. 39, 43 in. ) 

6. REVD CALEY ILLINGWORTH DD. ARCHDEACON OF 

STOW RECTOR. JOHN SAMPSON AND BELTON 
BUTTRICK CHURCHWARDENS JAMES HARRISON 
OF BARTON FOUNDER 1813. 
( Diam. 54 in. : note C, all without canons ; very wide and thin. ) 

In 1553 there were " iiij gret Belles j santus bell " belonging to 
Epworth.* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a handbell " belonging to 
the church in Queen Mary's time had been sold.f 

The present bells were hung in 1814 having been previously weighed, 
it is said, on a sycamore tree growing near the belfry door : the record 
of the weights is lost. The Epworth people are proud of their tenor 
bell, and say " no other bell nearer than the one in York Cathedral 
which rings out the tenor C." But competent critics say that owing to 
their great thinness of metal, the bells here are not to be compared with 
the neighbouring ring at Haxey, which are cast on the old plan. 

The Rev. Cayley lUingworth, D.D., F.S.A. ; Archdeacon of Stow, 
Rector of this parish (see 6th bell), was also Rector of Scampton (of 
which parish he wrote a Topographical Account) and Vicar of Stainton. 
He died at Scampton on the 28th August, 1823, in the 65th year of his 
age.t 



• Exch. Q. R. Chiivch Goods Line. -5^3, X See a short Memoir of him in 

P. R. Off. Gent. Mag. Vol. xciii. Part 2 (1823), p. 

f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 76. 279. 



39^ The Inscriptions on the 

EVEDON. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

1. WE PRASE THE O GOD 1745. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. I ACKNOWLEDG THE TO BE THE LORD 1745. 

( Diam : 29 in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1745. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

These Bells were cast by Hedderly of Nottingham. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "one hand bell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, was " sold to a brasier 
. ... in anno pmo Elizabethe." * 

"U-x EWERBY. 

S. Andrew. 4 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I. HENRY PENN FVSORE 1710. 

( Diam. 38 in, ) 

2. i+ 11^] jL-M^M-^r^ [D118] :©©-[Dii8] <i)'yr:Ei 
[ □ 118] H:i§>m:mm {-m ^ ^ ^ ^\9 and 150.] 

( Diam. 39^ in. ) 
3. JOHN BULLIMAN \\-^i TINDALE C^WARDENS 
T. OSBORN DOWNHAM NORFOLK FECIT 

1783. 

( Diam. 44! in. ) 

4. [ + 116^ M-j^jh yhMsw:m^ M:m.:m :iP^^M-%M^ 

:©©■ 'w:m.'m^ ©cd:id M.jhW^MS.M'M. 1616 

( Diam. 47 in. ) 
» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 77. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 397 

Pricsfs Bell :— 

Blank (?) 

For Stamps see pages 107, 108, and 123, and Plate XVI. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij hand belles " which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time had been sold to one 
Cuthbert a pewterere of lincoln in the begynig of lent."* 

^^3 FALDINGWORTH. 

All Saints. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell, 

I- [°J27] [+HO] ^ [+140] S [+140] ^ 

( Diam. 31!^ in. ) 

2. C. & G. HEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1854. 

( Diam. 33-^ in. ) 

3. I.e. T. H. R. B. JESVIH BE MY SPEED. W. OSBORN 

C.W. 1733. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 
( Diam. 15 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. and pages 114 and 118. 
The 2nd bell was previously inscribed : — 

Jesvs be my spede 1591. 



U FARFORTH. 
S. Peter. i Bell. 



I. Blank. 



( Diam. 14 in. ) 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 80. 



398 



The Inscriptions on the 



S. Andrew. 
I. Blank. 



FARLSTHORPE. 



( Diam. i5f in. ) 



FENTON, 



All Saints. 



I Bell. 



3 Bells. 



1. MSW^ miMSMl^M- [U124. ] 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. [+ 117] JHESVS BE OVR SPEDE 1596. 

[ a 113] 
( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. all men \\'id Ijcare mg mornfbll sobnir repent before gob Ige in grobnb 1627. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages iii and 108, and Plate XVI.; and for the 
curious letter A, with a crozier annexed, on the ist bell, see fig. 179, 
Plate XXV L 

There is a tradition that there were formerly four bells. 



FERRIBY SOUTH. 



S. Nicolas. 



1. [ + 165] W. S. 1676 [ D 167.] 

( Diam. 22i in. ) 

2. DANIEL • PiEDDERLY • FOUNDER • 1741. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

3. [ n 142 D 144 D 145 D 143 ] 1) C f t 

( Diam. 25 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV and XXI. 



3 Bells. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 399 

There is a tradition in the village that in former times there was a 
very fine ring of bells here but that they were stolen and carried across 
the Humber into Yorkshire. 
I The present bells want rehanging. 

-2^/^ FILLINGHAM. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. J. HARRISON FOUNDER. CHRISTOPHER WALKER 
CHURCHWARDEN 1817. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " i j handbells," which be- 
longed to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been "sold, thone of 
theim to willm' moris and thother to wittm drewrie who hathe defacid 
them."* 



t^ FIRSBY. 

S. Andrew. 2 Bells. 

-I. Blank and cracked. 
2. JOHN WHITE C. W. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH 1731. 

V FISHTOFT. 

S. GuTHLAc. 5 Bells. 

1. MELODIAM ORDIOR HENRY PENN FUSORE 1713. 

( Diam. 281 in. ) 

2. MAGISTRO ET DISCIPVLIS SONO 1713. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 82. 



400 The Inscriptions on the 

3. DANIEL HEDDERLY FOVNDER HENRY MOBERRY 

C. W. 1731. 

(Diam. 33 in.) 

4. FIDELES VOCO AD DOMVM DEI WILL : BATES. C.W, 

1713- 

( Diam. 34^^ in. ) 

5. VITAM METIOR MORTEM PLORO. M« POWELL 

RECTOR 1713. 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

A similar ring hangs at Friskney. 
The Rev. John Powell was rector from 171 1 to 1717. 
Three bells only are chimed for Divine Service : no peal has been 
rung for several years owing to the insecure state of the bell-frames. 



t/; FISKERTON. 

S. Clement. 3 Bells. 

1. [+1620167] lESVS BE OVR SPEED W. S. H. W. 

1683. 

( Diam. 26 in. ] 

2. [ D 62 n 69 D 62 D 61 D 62 n 69 n 62 D 61 D 69. ] 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. mi : -^i-KM-jh ■ :BiM-^7h^:Bi :ipm.:bi : 1618. 

( Diam, 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV., and VIII. 

The following entry in the Churchwardens' Book most probably 
points to the sale of the ancient Sanctus bell: — 

April 22. 1805 

Rec" for an old bell £2 . 18 . o 

The name of William Rajaier (see 3rd bell) is not found in the 
Register. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 401 



^A'^ FLEET. 

S. Mary Magdalene. 6 Bells and a Call Bell. 

I, 2. The Rev^ James Ashley Rector John Ashfield Wm. Smith 
Church Wardens. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 
1806. John Cabourne Bell Hanger. 
( Diams. 30, 31 in. ) 

3. JOSEPH MALLOWS OF EAST DEREHAM IN NORFOLK 

1758. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

4. The Rev^ James Ashley Rector John Ashfield Wm. Smith 

Ch. Wardens Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 
1806. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

5. AMMO DOMIMI 1572 FILI DEI VIVI MISERERE NOBIS 

I B. 
( Diam. 38 in. ; very rude letters ; canons off. ) 

6. W^^ Dennes & W-^i Winkley Ch. Wardens Lester & Pack of 

London Fecit 1766. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 
Call Bell:— 

J. R. JERRAM & D. OLIVER CHURCHWARDENS 1876 
MEARS & CO. LONDON. 

Prior to 1758 there were four bells only: in that year the present 
3rd was added as a treble, and the present 5th bought second hand of 
Joseph Mallows of East Dereham as a 3rd, thus making a ring of five 
which in 1798 were inscribed : — 



( The present 3rd. ) 

Ihesus be our spede 1598. 

( The present 5th. ) 

( The present 6th. ) 

Thomas Norris made me 1652. 



3 D 



402 TJie Inscriptions on the 

This last mentioned bell was exchanged for the present ist and 2nd 
bells in 1806, to inake a ring of six. The bells are hung in two tiers, the 
steeple being only 11 feet 6 inches square. The bells and belfry are in 
excellent order. There is a chiming apparatus by Mr. J. R. Jerram, 
who also rehung the tenor bell in 1874. 

There is a peal board dated loth June, 1878, 

The Rev. James Ashley (see ist, 2nd, and 4th bells) died in 1806. 



\(^ FLIXBOROUGH. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. 1624. 

In 1553 there were, in the ancient church here, " iij gret belles."* 
In the Gentleman'' s Magazine for October, 1786, is a notice, with a 
Plate, of a singular detached campanile then standing by the old 
church. It was a light frame- work of wood, supporting a little roof, 
under which hung the bell with a wheel. It was to the south of the 
church, and attached to it were the parish stocks. 



FOLKINGHAM. 

S. Andrew. 5 Bells. 

I, 2. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1847. 

( Diams. 30^, 32^ in. ) 

3. SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM LAUDATE ILEUM 

CYMBALIS SONORIS THO« EAYRE FECIT 1761. 
(Diam. 34-^ in. ) 

4. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON. 

THOs MITCHELL 



, _, _,_ , CHURCHWARDENS 1847. 
JOHN EASTLAND ' ^' 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. s% P. R. Off. 



Cliurch Bells of Lincolnshire. 403 

5. [ + 2 ] GOD SAVE THE KING S. TOWEL TOBIE 
NORRIS CAST ME 1676. 

( Diam. 39^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij hand belles " belong- 
ing to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been "sold to Edward 
ffoste."* 



FOSDYKE. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. BENEIDCT WADINGHAM WILLIAM HVNT 1630. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

Belonging to the ancient church here were five bells : four were sold 
to help to defray the expences attending a new building erected about 
the year I756,t which, in its turn, gave place to the present church in 
the year 1870. 

K^ FOSTON. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. FEARE YE THE LORD [ n 157] 1658. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. 1827. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. JOHN KNIGHT C : W^ARDEN AUGi' 18 : 1821 TAYLOR 

&- SON FOUNDERS 5^ NEOTS & OXFORD. 
( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII. 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 8i. f Saunder's Hist. Line. Vol. i. p. 352. 



404 The Inscriptions on the 

FOTHERBY. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

1. % sfacdln loUng mcir bo cull to taste oit meats tljnt feebs tlje soole 1608 

[ □ 113- ] 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. XHii ronring sobnb botlj iMarnmgc gibe tijat men cannot Ijere alfaags Ijibc 

[ D 113 ] 1608. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3- ,^11 men that Ijeare mjr jnobrnfbll sobnb repent before jiob Ine in grobnb 

1608 [a 113. ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XVI. 

FRAMPTON. 

SS. Mary and Michael. 5 Bells. 

I. REVNDJ : WAITE VICAR J : & T : TUNNARD C. W^ 
J : BRIANT & J CABOURN HERTFORD FECERUNT 

1801. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

3- j'MM'w^ :©E. <i)'^:Bi M^^:Eji^ 1620. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

4- M-jhjh mjh(BM^ .^:m:^ w<^ ^m:m 1620. 

( Diam. 38^ in. ) 

5. [+116] mp^ ^^o:mjLM^ ^€)^:m:iD :mm>wM. 
^m^M-^i:mxM^ ©jrw:^ WMMm mMM 

jhjrw^ 1620. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 405 

For Stamp see page 107. 

On the bell-frame is the date 1670. 

The Rev. John Wayet, whose name is attempted on the treble bell, 
held the living only temporarily for a short time. He was Vicar of 
Pinchbeck for many years, but died and was buried at Boston in 1841. 



FRIESTHORP. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 165] W S 1676. 

( Diam. 2'2f in. ) 

[ D 107] 

2. [ + 140 ] ^ [ + 140 ] ^ 
[ U 127] 

( Diam. 25^ in. ) 

3. [ + 117] M.~w^ miM:^%M. 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 
For Stamps see Plates XXIV. and XV., and pages 118 and 108. 



i-ir FRIESTON. 

S. James. 5 Bells. 

I. [ + I ] GOD SAVE THE KING 1669. 

(Diam. 33 in.) 

2. [+116] ^:m.m:^^i wi^<BmiM^M %^-Mm. 

'MMMi 1614. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

3. [ + I ] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1662. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

4. j©«m ^osa ^alsitj X3^«"i5i X3Q,aria "yTocata [ U 29 □ 28 ij 27 ] 

( Diam. 42 in. ; crowned capitals. ) 



l^ 



4o6 TJie Inscriptions on the 

5. [ + I ] THOMAS NORRIS MADE ME 1640. 
( Diam. 47 in. ; cracked, ) 

For Stamps, see pages 52 and 107, and Plate III. 

This is rather a fine ring in D., but not in good tune. 

The canons of the treble have been cut away : the 2nd has been 
over-sharpened and much injured by chipping: the 4th, which is a very 
beautiful bell, has been flattened by the same process ; the tenor has 
been a very fine bell, but there is a crack of 40 years' standing in the 
shoulder; the lip is covered with coins. [ J- J. R. ] 

With reference to the Rose as an emblem of the Blessed Virgin 
(see 4th bell) an ancient writer remarks : — " The Image of our Lady is 
painted with a Child on the left arm in token that she is mother of God, 
and with a Lily or else with a Rose in her right hand, in token that she 
is maiden without end, and a flower of all women. {Dives and Pauper 

I495-) 

The brothers Pishye, donors of the 2nd bell, were most probably 

descendants of Herbert Peche, who held the manor of Frieston in the 

year 1272. The name of Pysshe occurs on a list of persons here, 

assessed to a subsidy granted to Queen Elizabeth, in 1597. The 

family remained in Frieston until 1749, when the name became extinct 

by the marriage of Bridget Pishey with John Thompson.* 



FRISKNEY. 

All Saints. 5 Bells. 

1. MELODIAM • ORDIOR • HENRICVS • PENN • FVSORE 

1719. 

( Diam. 26-| in. ) 

2. MAGISTRO • ET • DISCIPVLIS • 1719. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

* Pishey Thompson's Hist, of Boston, p. 519. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 407 

3. LABOREM • SIGNO • ET • REQVIEM • 1719. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

4. FIDELES i VOCO ; AD : DOMUM : DEI ! ADLARD : 

CVTCHBERT : CHVRCHWARDEN 1719. 
(Diam. 33 in. ) 

5. VITAM METIOR MOTEM PLORO 1719. 

( Diam. 36^ in. ; " viotcm ''for inovtem, ) 

A similar ring hangs at Fishtoft, with the word " sono " in the second 
bell's inscription, which is omitted here. 

Mr. Adlard Cuthbert was buried 22nd June, 1753, aged 69 years. 



FRITHVILLE. 

? I Bell. 

This church, erected in 1821, has one small bell. 



FRODINGHAM. 

S. Laurence. 3 Bells. 

I- [ + 116] WM^M~WM p©©" mi^^. m^^:m 1614. 

2. ^rags£ i\t lorir 1624. 

3. [ + 120 ] ©"t [ D no] ;i?),omctt ^y^xdi ©no Mti ^nMdi 

[ D 122 ij 119. ] 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plates XVIII. and XVI. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greyt belles."* Judging from the 
present ancient tenor bell, which is a very fine one, the old three bells 
had probably continuous inscriptions, of which it carries the conclusion. 

FULBECK. 

S. Nicolas. 6 Bells. 

I. VENITE EXULTEMUS FRANCIS FANE DONOR 1743. 

• Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line, /j, P. R. Off. 



4o8 The Inscriptions on the 

2. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE ME IN 1742 ROBERT 

CAPP C.W. 

3. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1743. 

4. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE US ALL IN 1743. 

5. FRANSIS FANE ESQ. EDWARD FANE RECTOR. 

6. SOLI DEO GLORIA DANIEL HEDDERLY FOUNDER 

1743- 

Francis Fane, Esq., Lord of the Manor of Fulbeck, benefactor to 
these bells, was the son of Francis Fane, Esq., by Dorothy his wife, 
daughter of Sir Henry Heron, and great grandson of Sir Francis Fane, 
K.B., of Fulbeck (third son of the first Earl of Westmoreland). He 
was baptized on the 3rd of April, 1696; married first a daughter of 
Edward Paine, Esq., of Hough in this county, and second, Jane, 
daughter of Sir Richard Cust, Bart. ; he died on the igth October, 1758. 



FULLETBY. 

S. Andrew. 2 Bells. 

I, 2. J. WARNER AND SONS LONDON 1857. 
( Diams. 11^, 14^, in.) 

In 1553, when an Inventory of the Church Goods here was taken, 
the bells and their value were thus described : — 

It' iij bells & alytlebell vi]li* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a sacringe bell," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, still remained. f 

There are said subsequently to have been five bells : and that three 
of those were sold in the early part of the last century, towards defray- 
ing the cost of extensive repairs to the fabric. The large bell then sold 
is traditionally believed to be in the belfry at Tetford, three miles from 

• Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 81. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 409 

hence. In 1799, the tower needing repair, the churchwardens pulled it 
down level with the nave, throwing over the top a pitched roof covered 
with tiles ; the remaining two old bells were then sold, and a small ting- 
tang hanging in a wooden cupola substituted. That small bell, which 
was cracked about thirty years ago, did duty until 1857, when all that 
remained of the old tower was taken down, the church rebuilt, and the 
present two bells suspended in a stone bell turret. 



7 : ? FULSTOW. 

S. Lawrence. i Bell. 

I. [+117] GOD SAVE OVR KING [ D 113] 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 108 and Plate XVI. 
In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles & one santus bell."* 
Subsequently the ancient church here is said to have had a ring of 
eight bells and a Priest's bell. When the tower fell many years ago 
seven of them are believed to have been sold to Clee church where, 
however, they have only three, and most probably never had a larger 
number (see p. 358). The Priest's bell continued to hang imder a small 
wooden cote at the West end of the South aisle until the church was 
repaired in 1869, when it was taken to the school where it now hangs. 
Tt is 12 inches in diameter, without inscription, date, or stamp, and is 
cracked. 



^a^ GAINSBOROUGH. 

All Saints. 8 Bells. 

I, 2, 3, 4. 7. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1764. 
( Diams. 30, 30! , 33, 35, 43^ in. ) 



* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



3 E 



4IO TJie Inscriptions on the 

5. IN WEDLOCK'S BANDS ALL YE WHO JOIN WITH 

HANDS YOUR HEARTS UNITE; SO SHALL OUR 
TUNEFUL TONGUES COMBINE TO LAUD THE 
NUPTIAL RITE. 

( Diam. 37^ in. ) 

6. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1856. THIS 

BELL WAS RECAST 1856. 

WILLIAM STANWELL | rHTIRCHWARDFN^ 

JOHN FERRIS MARSHALL ) CHURCHWARDENS. 

( Diam. 39!- in. ) 
8. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT O O O O 

JOSEPH HORNBY & JOHN COATS CHURCHWARDENS 

1764. 

( Diam. 48 in. ) 

In 1553 there were " v [ ? ] gret belles and on' sanctus bell."* 
Prior to 1764 there were five bells only as is evident from the follow- 
ing memorandum as to an ancient charge upon certain lands for the 
providing of ropes : — 

August 25''' 1690. Mem. There is ffoure bell ropes found by the 

farms in East Stockwith viz : John Luddington senior his farm the 

Great bell rope ; Nicholas Booteflower his farm the fourth and third 

bell ; John Luddington jun' the second bell ; and is to be found by 

these three farms for ever. 

Witness, 

Tho" Elley, Saxton. 

A "Terrar" (apparently of a rather later date) also mentions this 
matter as follows : — 

Three bell ropes are found by the heirs of Stanhope for their lands 
in Stockwith ; the second and third bell ropes from a farm now or 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. ^\, P. R. Off. The original is much faded. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 411 

late in the occupation of William Stow ; the fifth bell-rope from a 
farm late Reeder (supposed farm situate at Ravenfleet). John 
Luddington's estate at Stockwith finds a rope for the fourth bell. 

Whether, says Stark (Hist, of Gainsborough, 2nd Ed. 1843, pp. 387-8), 
these ropes were found by the several estates from ancient custom or 
grant does not now appear ; neither is it now certain exactly which 
farms are liable. In consequence no claim has been made for many 
years. 

The Churchwardens' Accounts for 1856 give the following particulars 

as to the recasting of the 6th bell : — 

s. d. 

1856. Octr. 25. Frt [freight] of bell to & from London 0.17.8 

Nov. 21. New Bell £j6 .8.7 less allowed for 

old metal ^62 . 13 . 6 13 . 15 . o 

There are two Peal Boards in the Belfry: the ist dated 24th May, 
1768 ; the 2nd, dated i January, 1848, records the ringing of "the First 
Peal of Kent Treble Bob Major ever Rang in the County of Lincoln 
comprising 5088 changes in the Time of 3 Hours & 20 minutes." 



GAINSBOROUGH. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

This parish was formed in 1843 ; there is one small modern bell. 



n.xo GAUTBY. 

All Saints. ' i Bell. 

I. Blank (?) 

( Diam. 15 in. ) 

In 1553 " Gawdebe " possessed " too greatt bells."* 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



412 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

No ladder to be had to reach the present single bell, which is believed 
to have no Inscription. 

^ ' GAYTON-LE-MARSH. 
S. George. 3 Bells. 

1. 1823 0000 

( Diam. 12 in. ) 

2. [ + 60] GOD SVVE HIS CHVRCH. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. [ + 60] GOD WITH VS AMEN ANNO DOM 1674 O 

(Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 77. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "a sacringe bell," which 
belonged to this church in the time of Queen Mary, " was given to the 
pson of Tottill A° pmo Elizabth and what he did wth it wee know not."* 

Although the first of the present bells was evidently from its size 
intended for the Priest's bell, it is chimed with the others, and not used 
for any other purpose. It was cast by Harrison, without canons, and 
the canons of the other two bells are cut off. 



-. 3 / GAYTON-LE-WOLD. 

S. Peter. i Bell. 



Blank. 



( Diam. 10 in. ) 



't'^-^ GEDNEY. 

S. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I. INTACTUM SILEO PERCUTE DULCE CANO. T. 
OSBORN DOWNHAM FECIT 1794. 
( Diam. 31 in. ) 

♦ Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 84. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 413 

2,4. •:: THO^ OSBORN FOUNDER 1794. 

( Diams. 34, 39 in. ) 
3. OUR VOICES SHALL IN CONCERT RING : IN HONOUR 
BOTH TO GOD AND KING. 
T. OSBORN DOWNHAM FOUNDER 1794. 
( Diam. 35 in. ) 
5. REV» THOS WILLSON VICAR MICH^ ATHEW GEORGE 
OLDHAM CH WARDEN : T. OSBORN FECIT 1794 : ... 
( Diam. 45 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens of •' Gedney ffen end" reported that 
"one sacringe bell," which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's 
time, had been "defaced and broken."* 

The Rev. Thomas Willson — see 5th bell — (who was also Vicar of 
Soham and Whaddon, Cambridgeshire), was instituted to the Vicarage 
of Gedney in 1794 : he died in 1796 or early in 1797. 

Here is a Peal Board dated 1800. 



Z'^ GEDNEY HILL. 
Holy Trinity. 5 Bells. 

1. LET US LIFT UP OUR VOICE WITH JOY •: 1804 :• 

(Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBORHOOD •: 1804 I- 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. GIVE NO OFFENCE TO THE CHURCH. OSBORN AND 

DOBSON FOUNDKs 1804. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

4. OSBORN AND DOBSON FOUNDERS DOWNHAM NOR- 

FOLK 1804. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 84. 



414 The Inscriptions on the 

5. WILLIAM HORNER CHURCHWARDEN A ^ D ONE 
THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND FOUR. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

Prior to 1804 there were three bells only: a Minute Book in the 
custody of the Charity Trustees gives the following particulars : — 

Five new bells were hung in the steeple of this chapel in the year 
of our Lord 1805, which were cast at Downham in the County of 
Norfolk by M' Osborn & Dobson, Bell Founders: all of them 
weighing, Cwts. 31, qrs. o, lbs. 21 : W" Horner, churchwarden: 
cost £14^2 . 19 . 3 J. This sum is exclusive of the weight of the 
three old bells, which were recast.* 



GLENTHAM. 

S. Peter. 4 Bells. 

1. J. JOHNSON W. BARNARD CHVRCHWARDENS 1687. 

2. LABOVR OVERCOMETH ALL THINGS 1687. 

3. LET GLENTHAM EVER BE HAPPY 1687. 

^1 ^4. PROSPERITY TO THE CHVRCH OF ENGLAND AS IN 

LAW ESTABLISHED 1687. 

(All canons gone ; tenor cracked. ) 



1 i> GLENTWORTH. 

S. Michael. 2 Bells. 

1. [ + 165 ] GOD WITH VS 1675 W. S. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

2. THOMAS BILLAM CH : WARDEN 1777. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 



» Kindly extracted for me by the Vicar, the Rev. George Clark. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 415 

For Stamp see Plate XXIV. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a hand bell," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had "gone we cannot 
tell howe the same yeare [ 1565 ]."* 

There are cages for three bells : there is a tradition that the missing 
one was taken to some other church. A Sanctus bell formerly hung in 
the west belfry window, as is shown by certain marks on the shaft of 
the window. 

The church books give the following entries kindly extracted by 
the Rev. J. Sanderson : — 

1777. By fetching weights to weigh the old bells and s. d. 

carriage back o . 5 . o 

By John Harrison his bill for recasting and hang- 
ing bells 10 . 7 . 9 

n%^ GOLTHO. 

S. George (?). i Bell. 

This chapel, which is a mile from any house, now possesses one 
small bell, which was hung above the west gable about the year 1844, 
a short time previously to the marriage of the daughter of one of the 
principal parishioners. Prior to that time there was no bell. ^ 

^3/ GONERBY GREAT. 

S. Sebastian. ' 3 Bells. 

+ 140 

1. [ + 140 + 140 D 107 xj 127. ] 

2. MICHAEL KELLHAM : C : W : THOMAS HEDDERLY 

FOUNDER : NOTTM 1765. 



r n 127 ] ^^toJ^"i« *t« plaaat tibi xtx so:ras isle. 



Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 85. 



41 6 TJie Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see page ii8, Plate XV., and page 114. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "one howshnge bell one 
sacring bell ij handbelles," which belonged to this church in Queen 
Mary's time, had been "broken in peces and sold vnto Roberte Sandes 
of Gunwerbie Smythe sens the last visitacon."* 

-, GONERBY LITTLE. 

Here are two Chapels-of-ease — " The School Chapel," opened in 
1863, and " S. Saviour's Chapel," opened in 1880 — each possessing one 
small bell; that at S. Saviour's being supplied by Mr. James Barwell 
of Birmingham. 

GOSBERTON. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 5 Bells. 

I. [ + 3 ] TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 1683. 

(Diam. 34I in.) 

2. [+116] j_-M^M~w^ :©©■ <ByF:Ei ^:ig>©-©-:E) 

1618. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

3- [ + 3 ] OP^MMM- M^M-MW M^M ©:^€)^ 

TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 1624. 
■ [ Royal A rms \j of James I. ] 
( Diam. 39 in. ) 

4. WILLIAM DOBSON FOUNDER DOWNHAM NORFOLK 

IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1828. 
( Diam. 42f in. ) 

5. J. G. CALTHROP • W. DODD CH : WARDENS. T. 

OSBORN FECIT 1787. 

( Diam. 48 in. ) 

* Peacock's CIi. Fur. p. 86. 



CJiurch Bells of Lincolnsliire. 417 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 107. 

" The families of Calthorp and Dodd [see 5th bell] have resided in 
this parish for a very long time. Prior to 50 Edward III. we find 
Thomas Dod mentioned in an inquisition taken in that year."* 

Mr. J. G. Calthrop, mentioned on the tenor bell, died 4th March, 
1815, aged 65. 



GOULCEBY. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I- [ + 79] M-'w'M. miM-:^% [+79] -MM. -i'^ 
© m -^ <^ :e_^ 

( Diam. 26 in. ; cracked. ) 

For Stamp see page 80. 

In 1553 " Gawlsbye " possessed " iij gret bells & a sanctus bell."t 



O/^, GOXHILL. 

All Saints. 4 Bells. 

1. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1715 [ d 168. ] 

( Diam. 3 if in. ) 

2. [a 107] iglorg b ia gob en Ijiglj 1624. 

(Diam. 33f in.) 

3. GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO 1715 ^''bui":' Warftns 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

4. FEARE GOD HONOVR THE KING 1666 [ n 157. ] 

( Diam. 40^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV., XV., and XXIII . 



* Marrat's Hist. Line. Vol. i. p. 206. 
f Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 

3 F 



41 8 The Inscriptions on the 

GRAINSBY. 

S. Nicolas. 3 Bells. 

1. C. & G. MEARS, FOUNDERS, LONDON 1854. 

(Weight 2 cwt. 3 qrs. 27 lbs. ) 

2. DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST ME 1733. 

3. lESVS BE MY SPEED. 

In 1553 there were here " iij Gret belles one sanctus bel."* 
There is a tradition that the bells now at Waith once hung in this 
church, and that during some repairs going on in both churches, and 
with the bells, at the same time, the latter were changed. But inas- 
much as all the Waith bells are ancient, and one is dedicated to S. 
Martin, the titular saint of that church, the evidence they give contra- 
dicts the tradition. 

For a story about these bells see under Hawerby. 



7 k : GRAINTHORPE. 

S. Clement. 3 Bells. 

I- jEit X3Elxiltis ^^rntis ^esonet ©"ampfuna lEo^aimis [ ij 28 a 30 d 33.] 

2. 3[it gjoirat ,!>)£ ^tX\% ^0¥ CTampana X^Elit^adis [ U 28 a 30 d 33.] 

3. MY ROREING SOUND DOTH WARNING GIVE THAT 

MEN ON EARTH SHALL NOT ALWAYS LIVE 1761. 
W^I WILSON JOHN CLAYTON CHURCHWARDENS 
THOMAS HEDDERLY FOUNDER NOTTM. 

For Stamps see Plate III. 

These are fine heavy bells; the ist and 2nd are noble specimens of 
their class : all three have had the canons cut off. 



Aiigm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 419 

GRANTHAM. 

S. WuLFRAM. 10 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. PACK AND CHAPMAN LONDON FECIT 1775. 

( Diam. 34J in. ; Thickness at Rim 3 in. ) 

2. IF YOU HAVE A JUDICIOUS EAR YOU'LL OWN MY 

VOICE IS SWEET AND CLEAR. PACK AND CHAP 
MAN LONDON 1775. 

( Diam. 36J in. thickness 2^^ in. ) 

3. PACK AND CHAPMAN LONDON FECIT 1775. 

( Diam. 38^ in. ; thickness 2\^ in. ) 

4. GLORIA DEO SOLI. GLORIA PATRI FILIO & SPIRITUI 

SANCTO THO : EAYRE KETTERING FECIT. 
( Diam. 39^ in. : thickness 2 \% in. ) 

5. CCELORUM CHRISTE PLACEAT TIBI REX SONUS 

ISTE. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI T. E. 1752. 
( Diam. 41 in. ; thickness 2 yv i-"^* ) 

6. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI. GLORIA PATRI 

FILIO & SPIRITUI SANCTO. T. EAYRE FECIT 

1752. 

(Diam. 43^ in.; thickness 2\% in.) 

7. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI CCELORUM CHRISTE 

PLACEAT TIBI REX SONUS ISTE. T. EAYRE 
FECIT 1752. 

(Diam. 46 in. ; thickness 2\% in. ) 

8. IN DEI GLORIAM IN ECCLESI^ COMMODUM. GLORIA 

PATRI FILIO & SPIRITUI SANCTO. ANNO DOM. 

1752. 

( Diam. 49 in. ; thickness 2\^ in. ) 

9. YE RINGERS ALL WHO PRIZE YOUR HEALTH AND 

HAPPINESS BE MERRY SOBER WISE AND YOU'LL 
THE SAME POSSESS. RECAST IN 1775 RICHi^ 
EASON VICAR. JNO. CALCROFT & JNo HARDY 



420 The Inscriptions on the 

CHURCHWARDENS. PACK & CHAPMAN OF LON- 
DON FECIT. 

( Diam. 57 in. ; thickness 3^^^ in. ) 
10. T. MEARS OF LONDON FECIT. REV^ WILLIAM 
POTCHETT VICAR JOHN BROOKS ROB^' STORR 
CHURCHWARDENS 1818. 

(Diam. 59^ in. ; thickness 3^^ in.) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

[+2] THE GIFT OF MIS ANN HVRST OF BARABY 
DOCKTER HVRST WIDOW TO THE CHVRCH OF 
GRANTHAM 1674, 

( Diam. 20^ in. ; thickness i^^g in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1640 the bells — then five in number — were rehung, and the chimes 
were repaired and made to go " perfect and true."* 

In 1652 the steeple was much injured by lightning. Mention is made 
of it in the Records of the Corporation, where it is also notified that 
" Lord Rosse gives a bell at Belvoir towards a sixth bell, the Sancte 
bell in the steeple given and added to it to make a complete sixth bell, 
sutable and tunable with the other five, so as the Town be at no charge 
Jan. 13, 1652-3." 

Sir William Ellys, Bart., who died in 1728 gave £2^ to cast the 5th bell. 

In 1752 four bells were recast and their frames repaired: two of these 

bells were inscribed (and the inscriptions were preserved on the new 

bells) :— 

Coelorum Christe placeat tibi Rex sonus iste, 

and the ring was then augmented to eight bells. The chimes were 
also put into good order. Fifty-three contributors gave a total of 
;^5i6 OS. 2d., towards the expenses, the Duke of Rutland heading the 
list with £^2 los.t 

Change ringing was at that time practised in Grantham : there is a 
Peal Board announcing the ringing of a complete Peal consisting of 

* Street's Notes on Grantham, p. 79. f Tumor's Grantham, p. 7. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 421 

5040 changes of Grandsire Triples on the 22nd of April, 1764, " being 
Easter Sunday." 

The following " Ancient Belfrey Articles " were then in force : — 

He that in Ringing takes delight 

And to this place draws near 
These Articles set in his sight 

Must keep if he Rings here. 

The first he must observe with care 

Who comes within the door 
Must if he chance to curse or swear 

Pay Sixpence to the poor. 

And whoso'er a noise does make 

Or idle story tells 
Must Sixpence to the Ringers take 

For melting of the Bells. 

If any like to smoke or drink 

They must not do so here 
Good reason why — ^just let them think 

This is God's House of Prayer. 

Young men that come to see and try 

And do not Ringing use 
Must Six Pence give the company 

And that shall them excuse. 

He that his hat on's head does keep 

Within this sacred place 
Must pay his Six Pence ere he sleep ; 

Or turn out with disgrace. 

If any one with spurs to's heels 

Rings here at any time 
He must for breaking articles 

Pay Six Pence for his crime. 



422 The Inscriptions on the 

If any overthrow a Bell 

As that by chance he may 
Because he minds not Ringing well 

He must his Six Pence pay. 

Or if a noble minded man 

Comes here to Ring a Bell 
A Shilling is the Sexton's fee 

Who keeps the church so well. 

If any should our Parson sneer 

Or Wardens' rules deride 
It is a rule of old most clear 

That such sha'n't here abide. 

The Sabbath-day we wish to keep 

And come to church to pray 
The man who breaks this ancient rule 

Shall never share our pay. 

And when the bells are down and ceased 

It should be said or sung 
May God preserve the Church and King 

And guide us safely home. 

Twenty-two years later— in 1775 — the bells were again put into good 
order, the then ist, 7th, and 8th were recast, and two new ones added, 
making a noble ring of ten bells — the only one of that number in the 
County of Lincoln. The entire cost was £2)'&S ^S^- 3^-) towards which 
(there were 107 contributors) the Duke of Rutland gave ^100.* 

Change-ringing went on with unabated enthusiasm. There are Peal 
Boards extant dated 20th June, 1S14 ; 12th January, 1844 ; gth 
November, i860; 24th December, i860; 4th February, 1861. At the 
foot of the last-dated Tablet are the lines : — 

* Tumor's Grantliam, p. 20. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 423 

These Sabbath Bells shall still arise 
And sound their notes to yonder skies 

The living to worship God they'll call 
And to the grave they'll summon all. 

The Grantham people are justly proud of their bells. "Nothing 
can be sweeter" (writes the Rev. B. Street) "than the sound of the 
Grantham bells when heard from the High Dyke road, whence the steeple 
itself cannot be seen, but where the ear is reminded of its vicinity ; for 
their many voiced peal fills the hollow valley till it overflows with sound 
which sweeps over the hills and across the table land beyond ; or 
following the wind and the channel of the river, spends itself among 
the villages Lincolnwards."* 

The chimes too have long been favourites. The old chimes played : — 

Easter Hymn. Sicilian Mariners. 

Ye Banks and Braes. Home, Sweet Home. 

Hanover. 

They are said to have been " tuneful and cheerful;" and, as Bow Bells 
boast to have charmed Whittington back to his apprenticeship in 
London ; so Grantham chimes, heard unexpectedly, and for the first 
time, decided a wavering boy to become an apprentice in Grantham, 
where he has since grown old.f 

In 1 81 8 the tenor was again recast ; it was inscribed : — 

In wedlock's bands all ye who join 
With hands your hearts unite 
So shall our tuneful tongues combine 
To laud the nuptual rite. 

Recast in 1775 Richard Eason Vicar, John Calcraft and 
John Hardy Churchwardens. Pack and Chapman, 
London, fecit. 

• Street's Notes on Grantham, p. 78. f lb. p. 78. 



424 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

And in 1876 Messrs. Gillett and Bland of Croydon were employed to 
erect a new and large clock, St. Mary's of Cambridge chimes, for 
striking the quarters on the 4th, 5th, 6th, and gth bells, and to 
thoroughly restore the old chiming machine. They replaced the five 
old tunes on the barrels, and added three new ones, namely, " Life let 
us cherish," " O rest in the Lord," and (for use on the anniversaries of 
the Queen's Birthday, Accession, &c., &c.,) "God save the Queen." 
The chimes play everj^ three hours, da}^ and night, namely, at three, 
six, nine, and twelve o'clock. 

There are some rules for the guidance of the ringers, drawn up in 1872. 

The Rev. R. Easton (see gth bell) died in the year 1817, when he 
was succeeded, as vicar, by the Rev. William Potchett (see loth bell) 
who held the living until 1856, when he resigned it in favour of the 
Rev. G. Maddison. Mr. Potchett died 13th November, 1859, aged 
eighty-five years. 

Mrs. Ann Hurst, the donor of the Priest's bell, was the widow of 
the Rev. Thomas Hurst, D.D., Rector of Barrowby, from which living 
he was ejected during the troublous times of the Civil War. He was a 
great benefactor to the town of Grantham.* 

GRANTHAM. 

The Roman Catholic Chapel, dedicated to S. Mary, has a "large 
fine-toned bell" which was hung in May, 1834, and "rung for the first 
time on Sunday the i8th day of that month (Whitsunday) to announce 
the celebration of mass."t 

GRASBY. 

All Saints. 4 Bells. 

I. J. TAYLOR & CO FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1873. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

• See Street's Notes on Grantham, pp. 155, 162. f Saunders, Vol. 11. p. 306. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 425 

2. [ + 165 ] 1669 I : G I : M w : s [ D 167. ] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. IN MEMORY OF ELIZABETH TENNYSON DIED 1865 

PS. 103 : 8 VERSE J. TAYLOR & CO FOUNDERS 
LOUGHBOROUGH 1819. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

4. IN MEMORY OF HENRY SELLWOOD DIED 1867 

MICAH 6 CHAP. 8 VERSE. J. TAYLOR & CO 
FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1869. 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. 

The ist bell was previously inscribed : — 

Thomas Sprote gafe me 1500 [ \J 137. ] 

Elizabeth Tennyson (see 3rd bell) was mother of the late vicar — the 
Rev. Charles Turner ; — and of Alfred Tennyson, Esq., Poet Laureate, 
Patron of the Living. 

Henry Sellwood (see 4th bell) was father of Mrs. Charles Turner, 
and of Mrs. Alfred Tennyson. 

Prior to 1869 there were two bells only. There was formerly a 
Sanctus bell but it has not been heard of for thirty years : it is said to 
have been exchanged about that time for some new bell ropes. 



"' ' GRAYINGHAM. 

S. Radegund. 3 Bells. 

1. ["^[l]] M [+HO-] M [+ 140.] 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

2. [ + 57 ] %SW-M- : mM-mi^fPM-^MM. : mM-:ih<^m'% ■■ 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

3. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1640 A. B. 

(Diam. 34^ in. ) 

3 G 



426 



Tlie Inscriptions on the 



For Stamps see Plate XV., pages 114 and 118, and Plate VII., and for 
drawings of letters and intervening stop on the 2nd bell see figs. 180 to 
184 inclusive, on Plates XXVI. and XXVII. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greatt bells j sanctus bell."* 

The 2nd bell has an inscription in letters which I have not met with 
elsewhere. The substitution of W for V is not uncommon, particularly 
in the south. The V in the word " ovr" on the 3rd bell has a small R 
inside It reversed. [ J. T. F. ] / %^l^ e - p^*f^ f^^J^^ 

The bells were rehung in 1868. , ,^j^^,,^^u#»v 4Liu 



All Saints. 
I. Blank. 



GREETHAM. 



( Diam. 18 in. ) 



I Bell. 



When the Inventory of Church Goods belonging to this parish was 
taken on 19th August, 6 Ed. VI. (1552) the bells and their value were 
given thus : — 

It' iij bells in the steple injli. 

It' ij handebells xiji.f 



All Saints. 
I. Blank. 



c> GREETWELL. 



( Diam. 21^ in. ) 



I Bell. 



S. Martin. 



t<D GRETFORD. 



4 Bells. 



I. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI ANNO DOM. 1732. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 



* Excli. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. ^^, f Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, 

P. R. Off. File 78, P. R. Oflf. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 427 

2. [ 4- 90 ] :^^iMJL^^ m'M:^ jh<B:m.^^ 1593. 

( Diam. 28^ in. ) 

3. EDWD ARNOLD LEICESTER, FECIT 1787. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

4. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI. EAYRE KETTERING 

FECIT ANNO DOM. 1732. 

(Diam. 33I in.) 

For Stamp see page 87. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that "one sacringe bell," 
which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been " stolen 
awaie," and that they had then no handbells.* 

There is room for a fifth bell which is now lacking. 

GRIMOLDBY. 

5. Edith. 3 Bells. 

1. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

2. [ + 12 ] ^um ^osa ^ulsata X3El"«'^i ^atmna "^Fotata [ U ^i- ] 

(Diam. 351 in.) 
3- [U137] StVL xamm [ n ajleur-de-leys.] 

( Diam. 38I in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates II. and XX. 

The capital letters on the 2nd bell are crowned, so is the letter S on 
the 3rd bell. The canons have been cut off the 2nd and 3rd, and the 
ist cast without any. The present 2nd was formerly the treble, but the 
then 3rd being cracked, James Harrison cast a new treble instead. The 
cage (writes Mr. Fowler who visited these bells) is original, but enclosed 
in an outer and slighter arrangement of straight pieces, the whole rest- 
ing on large timber brackets, and destitute of flooring, as are most of 
the cages hereabout. 



Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 91. 



428 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

• GRIMSBY GREAT. 
S. James. 8 Bells. 

1. CELORUM CHRISTE PLACEAT TIBI REX SONUS ISTE 

( Diam. 30-| in. ) 

2. J. V. SHELLEY ESQ. M.P. : R. H. GRONOW ESQ : H. 

W. HOBHOUSE ESQ. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

3. THE RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD YARBOROUGH. 

RICH" THOROLD ESQ. 1830. 
( Diam. 32 in. ) 

4. CHAS. WOOD ESQ., M.P. I CAPT^ GEORGE HARRIS 

R.N : c.B : M.P : 1830. 

( Diam. 331 in. ) 

5. GEORGE FIESCHI HENEAGE, ESQ : COLONEL CHALO- 

NER BISSE CHALLONER. THIS PEAL OF SIX 
BELLS WAS CAST BY WILLIAM DOBSON, DOWN- 
HAM, NORFOLK, 1830. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

6. B. HARRISON ESQ. MAYOR; W^i BANCROFT, JAs CHAP- 

MAN, CHAMBERLAINS, GEO. BABB, ESQ. TOWN 

CLERK. 1830. 

( Diam. 38^ in. ) 

7. GEO. WHITLAM, W^i MARSHALL, GEO. WARBURTON, 

ROBT JOYS, W^i BENNETT, FRANCIS EPWORTH. 

1830. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

8. LAUDO DEUM, CONGREGO CLERUM, PLEBEM VOCO, 

FUNERA PLANGO, G. OLIVER, MINISTER; JNO 
LUSBY, WM SMITH, CHURCHWARDns 1830. 
( Diam. 48 in. ) 

In 1553 " greatt grymsby S. James" possessed '/' iiij greatt belles j 
sanctus bell."* 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 429 

That probably continued the number until the year 1830, when [see 
5th bell] a ring of six was cast, at a cost of ^385 raised by voluntary 
contributions, which was speedily augmented to eight as tlie following 
receipt signed by the founder testifies: — \ 

Received July ist 183 1 of Mr. John Skelton the sum of Ninety 

Pounds for two additional Bells, Hangings, and Frames to increase 

the Peal of Six Bells in the Parish Church of Great Grimsby to 

Eight. 

;^90 .0.0 Will ! Dobson. 

The bells were rehung in 1857 ; soon after which date the tower 
being considered unsafe all ringing was given up : a chiming apparatus 
has been fixed, since which, two of the bells have unfortunately been 
cracked. 

i > ^^ GRIMSBY GREAT. 

The ancient church of S. Mary, which was pulled down in 1585, 
contained, in 1553, " iiij greatt belles one sanctus bell."* 



GRIMSBY GREAT. 

S. Barnabas. i Bell. 

This iron church, erected in 1874, has one small bell. 



:j < GRIMSBY GREAT. 

S. Andrew. i Bell 

X. VOCE MEA LAUDO DOMINUM PRO PESTE FUGATA : 
HIC .EGRIS ANIMIS, CHRISTE, MEDERE PRECOR 
D.D. CHR : EP. LINC. 1871. 
(Diam. 26 in. ) 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



1^ 



430 The Inscriptions on the 

This bell was given to this new church (consecrated 29th September, 
1870) by the present Bishop of Lincoln, as a thankoffering to Al- 
mighty God for his goodness in enabling the parochial clergy then 
resident in the town (the Revs. R. Ainslie, W. Maples, J. P. Young, 
and G. C. Hilbers) to labour faithfully and zealously among their flocks 
during the then recent severe visitation of small pox, and for preserving 
their lives in the peril to w^hich they were exposed. Cases of small pox 
had appeared before, but in January, 1871, it spread until it was 
estimated there were about one thousand cases of different degrees of 
virulence in the town during that year. Before it finally disappeared 
the number of deaths (including some in New Clee) arising from it was 
said to have been over two hundred. 



^^ GRIMSBY LITTLE. 

S. Edith. i Bell. 



I. 1850. 



( Diam. 17 in. ) 



^, GUNBY. 

S. Nicolas. j 3 Bells. 

I. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON GEORGE OS- 
BORNE RECTOR. AD. 1853 GLORIA IN EXCELSIS. 
( Diam. 20^ in. ) 

2. [ + 79 ] j:m \ 'w^ : :i^j^X3Ei : <b:e{ \ -w^ \ 

( Diam. 22J in. ) 
3. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON. RENEWED 
A.D. 1853 LAUS DEO. 

( Diam. 24^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page 80. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 431 

?>^ GUNBY S. PETER. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. Blank. 

( Diam. 22f in. ) 

2. [ + 79 D a ] m.H'Jhmj.M [ □ ] ^jE^CD [ □ ] 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 
Pviesrs Bell :— 

W R . 
X c ^^"^ 

( Diam. 11 in. ; letters incised. ) 

For Stamps see pages 80 and 79, Plate XV., and page 114 ; the other 
stamps (unnumbered) are described on page 81. 

In 1566 the churchwardens, referring to "monuments of Super- 
stition " belonging to this church in Queen Mary's time, reported 
" handbells . . . wee had non .... a sacringe bell defacid A° pirio 
Elizabth."* 

i^^GUNNESS [or Gunhouse]. 
— ? I Bell. 

I. 1662. 

( Diam. 15 in. ) 



I ij HABROUGH. 

S. Margaret. 3 Bells. 

I, 2. 1825. 

( Diams. 26, 28^ in. ) 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 92. 



432 The Inscriptions on the 

3. W. MABLETHORP CHURCH WARDEN 1825 J. HARRI- 
SON FOUNDER. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens, referring to goods belonging to the 
church in Queen Mary's time, reported : — 

Itni o'' handbels .... wth a sacringe bell and the rest appartain- 
ing to the popishe service sold and defacid iiij°' yeare agoo."* 

; . HACCONBY. 

S. Andrew, 4 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [+116] :fi©".^:isi©" m<B:j^ m:m:i^ :k©-©-)p©- 

-M^M JhMSW^ 1596 [Diis] 

2. [+116] ©©:© mm:w:js^ ^^:m (^~^M.:mM. 

1596 [ n 113.] 

3. [ + 116] ©(d:id ^MsyF:E^ -MUM m-M'w:^^'M 

1596 [ D 113.] 

4- XMMMl^M [ + 128 u 127 n 107. ] 

( Diam. 35 in. ; turned. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 

(Diam. 16 in.; unhung; on the sill of the bell-chamber window; 

apparently ancient.) 

For Stamps see page 107, Plates XVI. and XIX., page 114 and Plate 
XV. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " two hand belles," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been " broken in 
peces and sold to Johnne chamberlaine," and that " one sacringe bell 
wch Thomas Carter had and he haith made a horse bell therof to hange 
at a horses eare." 

» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 93. f lb. p. 95. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 433 

HACEBY. 

— ? 2 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. THOMAS NORRIS CAST ME 1628. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

2. [ + 90] ^ :mM-^:^M-:EiM. [U92. ] 

( Diam, 28^ in. ) 
Priest's Bell (lying on the floor of Tower ; clapper gone ; canons damaged.) 

Blank. 
( Diam. 9^ in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 87 and 88. 



HACKTHORNE. 
S. Michael. i Bell. 

I. [ + 121 ] ora : groitoHs • facate • tbrnonbc [ U ^^Q- ] — '" - -^ 

( Diam. 30 in. ; cracked. ) 

For Stamps see Flate XVIII. 



li g: HAGNABY. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. 1781. 

( Diam. 15 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " ij great belles j sants bell."* 



" '^ HAGWORTHINGHAM. 
Holy Trinity. 8 Bells. 

I. 1824. 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 

• Exch. Q. R. Church Goods. Lific. s\, P. R. Off. 
3 H 



434 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

2, 3. JOHN BRIANT & J. CABOURN, HERTFORD, FECIT 

1802, 

( Diams. 27^, 28 in. ) 

4. J. WINGATE C : W : THREE BELLS ADDED BY SUB- 

SCRIPTION. JOHN BRIANT & J. CABOURN HERT- 
FORD FECIT 1802. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

5. [ + 116] MTWm miM^M^M- 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

6. ;H.£ar-e ©oJ> [ □ 107 ] 1627 [ jj 108. ] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

7. [ -f 162 ] ^rinitat^ Matrix 'MM ©"ampana ;©cala M. ^. M i686 

[U169. ] . ^ 

( Diam. 37 m. ) 

8. JAMES HARRISON, FOUNDER, BARTON 1824. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107, and Plates XV., XXIV. and XXV. 
In 1552 the bells then belonging to Hagworthingham were thus 
entered and valued in an Inventory of Church Goods then taken : — 

Itm iij bells vli* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " hand bells . . . wth such 
like trifles" belonging to this church in Queen Mary's time were defaced 
in the 2nd year of Elizabeth's reign ; and that " a sacringe bell " had 
been " sold to one Storie of Connisbie brasier " in the same year.f 



^^1 HAINTON. 
S. Mary. "l 3 Bells. 

1. Blank. 

(Diam. 29^ in. ) 

2. JESVS BE OVR SPEED W S. H W 1688. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 



» Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 95. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 435 

3- [ + 75 ] ^n^omen ^andonim ^txd ^ec ^ampana ^mrornm. 

( Diam. 33I in. ) 

For Stamp see page 79. 



^^ HALE MAGNA. 
S. John Baptist. 4 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [+116] J.^m.^M~WM [a 118] q:^ [nii8] 

(B^^.^ [D118] ^:]^^©-:iD [nii8] 1589. 
( Diam. 34 in. ) 

2. 4. GLORY TO GOD OM HIGH 1652 [ n 157. ] , 

( Diams. 37, 45 in. ; tenor broken ; not used. ) — /- ^ 

3. sandx Uonarbi [ u 124. ] 

( Diam. 41 in. ) 
Pries fs Bell : — 

[U 127.] 
( Diam. i5|- in. ; cracked, and not used. ) ' ^\ 

For Stamps see pages 107 and 108, Plate XXIII., and pages iii and 
114. 

These bells are very difficult of access ; the tenor and priest's bell 
have no ropes, and very few of the parishioners know that they have 
more than three bells. On the frame of the 3rd bell is (in capital letters) 

William Hutchinson & J. Creasey Churchwardens Dec 12. 1810. 

Large portions of the lip of the tenor bell are broken off, and lie in the 
Vestry. The Priest's bell hangs close by the south window of the 
tower. It is most probably the ancient Sanctus bell. 

"^'^ ^ HALTHAM-ON-BAIN. 

S. Benedict. 3 Bells. 

1,2. ^(E):©!,^^ :iii€)mm3^-^ mM-^m miM 

1664. 

( Diams. 27, 29 in. ) 



436 The Inscriptions on the 

3- [+^?>5^ 'KJ^W [niio] miM.^%M. [□112] 
mM.P^^M-:ihM- [ U 137- ] 
( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 116, and Plates XVI. and XX, 



-^^1 '■ H ALTON EAST. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + 162 ] ^it ^omm ^Eiubixtum '^^M^M^ 1678. 

( Diam. 32-|- in. ) 

2. [ + 121 ] sum : rosa : pulsata : rnunbi : maria : feotata [ IJ 119. ] 

( Diam. 34^ in. ) 

3. [+116] ^<i):iD MMT^ia. 'MJM <^T6i'^m<ir:Bi 

1613. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

Priest's Bell : — 

[ D 141 D 142 D 144 D 145 D 142 D 144 D I45. ] 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV. and XVIII., page 107, and Plate XXI. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a hand bell," belonging 
to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been defaced, and "putt to 
pfayne vse," and also that "a litle bell called a sacre bell" had been 
sold to " Edward both wch is defaced in y' first yere of y^ reigne of o' 
quene that now ys."* 

The Priest's bell, which has upon it a series of Tudor Badges, 

formerly hung in the north window or aperture of the top-stage of the 

tower. It was found several years ago unhung in the bell-chamber, 

' and brought into the chancel ; it is now lying in the north aisle. It 

' should not be lost. 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 98. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 437 

-" HALTON HOLGATE. 

S. Andrew. 6 Bells and a Priest's Bell, 

1, 3. J. TAYLOR & CO BELLFOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 

1867. 

( Diams. 27, 29!- in. ) 

2. HENRY : PENN : MADE : ME : AND : ALL : FELLOWS 

: 1717- 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

4. ROBERT : HARBY : WILLIAM I MAWER : JOHN : 

CLARKE : JOHN ! INGOLMELS •:• 
( Diam. 32^^ in. ) 

5. LEONARD : WHITLEY : JOHN : WHARF : CHVRCH- 

WARDENS i 1717. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

6. REV. WM BRACKENBURY RECTOR JOHN WRAY C^ 

WARDEN THO« OSBORN DOWNHAM NORFOLK 
FOUNDER 1791 ::• 

( Diam. 42^ in.) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 

In 1553 there were at " Haltone " " iiij gret bells in the steeple."* 
Holies says that at Haulton Holgate " In Fenestra Occident' ad 
dextram Campanilis 

Orate pro pulsat' Campanar. qui fecerunt Fenestram."t 

The Rev. Wm. Brackenbury (see 6th bell) of Jesus College, Cam- 
bridge, B.A. 1777, M.A. 1784, was presented to the Rectory of this 
parish in 1779, and to the Vicarage of Humbleby in 1793 ; he died 26th 
August, 1824, aged 70 years. 



* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods. Line. Parcel 35^, P. R. Off. f Harl. MSS. 6829, p. 217. 



43 S The Inscriptions on the 



HALTON WEST. 

S. Etheldreda. 3 Bells. 

1. VENITE EXULTEMUS DOMINO 1710 [ n 168. ] 

( Diam. 26f in. ) 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1710 [d 168.] 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 
3- [ + 22 ] %-M(^ [ a 23 ] mM-mi^MSMM. [ □ 23 ] 

:iB^MJm^ [ a 23 ] miM:M%m [ □ 23 ] jd)- 

'MM.:m.^M^^ [ □ 23 ] -^ow-w-^^M [ ° 23 ] 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. and page 71. 

In 1553 there were here " iij great belles one sanctus bell."* Of 
these only one now remains — the 3rd. 

tE ^ <Sr^ the symbol of the Holy Name l^'M.M'WM seems to 
have been sometimes used in bell-inscriptions in the same way as at 
the beginning of charms or spells. John Potter was probably a 
Norwich founder (see p. 71) and this is a matter of interest in con- 
nection with the fact that the Bishop of Norwich is Patron of the 
benefice [J. T. F. ]. There is a local Tradition that this bell 
"originally belonged to Norwich Priory." 



^ 75 HAMMERINGHAM. 

All Saints. i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I- [ + 75] WnXMXmM-WM. MM-^^mJ^ -MJLMm 

( Diam. 22 in. ) 
• Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Lvtc. /g. P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 439 

Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. ^3 

( Diam. 11 in. cracked and useless. ) 

For Stamp see page 79. 

When the Inventory of Church Goods belonging to " Hamryngham" 
was made on the 19th of August, 6 Ed. VI. (1552) the bells and their 
value were thus entered : — 

Inp'i ij Bells liiJ5. iiiji. 

It' one sanctus bell \-s. 

It' ij handbells xvj^. 



S. Andrew. 
I- 1754- 



SS. Peter and Paul. 
I. Blank. 



HANNAY. 



( Diam. 16 in. ) 



HAREBY. 



( Diam. 15 in. ) 



I Bell. 



I Bell. 



In 1553 the ancient church of Hareby (the present is a modern one) 
possessed " ij great belles j sanctes bell."* 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " a hand bell and a pece 
of a hand bell " belonging to this church in Queen Mary's time had 
been "sold by the whole pishe to Sr Roberte Mynnett f)Sonne ther " 
which he had exchanged for a brasen mortar; and that "a sacringe 
bell" had been " made awaie and defaced in a" 2 Elizabeth. "t 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. -5^, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 99. 



440 The Inscriptions on the 

^'1 (> HARLAXTON. 
SS. Mary and Peter. 5 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. THE GIFT OF GEO: DE EIGNE GREGORY ESQ« LORD 

OF THE MANOR OF HARLAXTON 1820. 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. % sfocftig toling mm bo call ta taste ott meats tl^at fabs i\t soole 1604. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

3. IH'8 NAZARENVS REX IVDEORVM FILI DEI MISE- 

RERE MEI 1635 [U99-] 

( Diam. 31^ in.) 

4. [ D 107 ] [ + 140 ] ^ [ + 140 ] ^ [ + 140 + 140 ] H 

[U 127.] 
(Diam. 341 in.) 

5. + TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS S^ NEOTS : 1820 + 

ROB'i' COX JUNR & NICHOLAS HEARBY C. WARD- 
ENS 0000 

( Diam. 38 in. ; key G. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 
tcj Blank. 

f (Diam. 14 in. ; cracked.) 

For Stamps see page 91, Plate XV. and pages 118 and 114. 
In 1566 the churchwardens reported that they had neither " hand 
belles " nor " sacring belles " " in quene maries tyme."* 

Prior to 1820 there were only 4 bells : the tenor was then inscribed : — 

All men that hear my mournful sound 
repent before you lie in ground 1639. 

The Manor of Harlaxton came into the possession of George 
Gregory, Esq., upon his marriage with Mrs. Anne Orton (described in 
the Parish Registers as " Lady of the Manor of Harlaxton ") on the 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 99. 



Church Bells of Lincolnsliire. 441 

8th September, 1738. Their first child, George De Ligne, the donor of 
the treble bell here, was born on the ist of May, 1740, and baptized on 
the 4th of the same month. He succeeded to the estates upon the 
death of his father in 1758, died 24th August, 1822, aged 82 years, and 
was buried in the chancel of Harlaxton Church,* 

There is a small grass close in this parish called the Bell close. The 
Parish Clerk for the time being occupies it for ringing the Curfew at 
8 p.m. Formerly a bell was also rung at 4 a.m. but that has been dis- 
continued because it is said to have disturbed some of the parishioners 
earlier than was agreeable to them. \ 



HARMSTON. 

All Saints. 8 Bells, 

I, 2. GIFT OF SAMUEL THOROLD ESQUIRE 1799 THOMAS 

OSBORN FOUNDER DOWNHAM NORFOLK. 

( Diams. 27, 28 in ; both out of order. ) 

3. SING YE MERRILY UNTO GOD. OSBORN FOUNDER 

1798. 

( Diam : 29 in. ) 

4. PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD OSBORN 

FOUNDER 1798. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

5. 6. GIFT OF SAMUEL THOROLD ESQUIRE T. OSBORN 

FECIT 1798. 

(Diams. 31, 33, in.) 

7. LET US LIFT UP OUR VOICE WITH JOY. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

8. CLARK TOYNBEE CHURCHWARDEN 1798. OSBORN 

FOUNDER DOWNHAM NORFOLK. 
( Diam. 39 in. ) 

* Harlaxton Par. Reg. 

■ 3 I 



442 The Inscriptions on the 

Samuel Thorold, Esq., (the youngest son of Sir John Thorold, eighth 
Baronet,) Lord of the Manor of Harmston, and benefactor to these 
bells, was born 29th December, 1749, died — in consequence of injuries 
received the preceding day by being overturned in his carriage — 19th 
January, 1820, and was buried in this church on the 26th of the same 
month. His eldest daughter and heiress Ann Eliza (baptized here on 
26th June, 1772) married, on the 6th July, 1797, Benjamin Hart, Esq., 
" son of the Rev. Joseph Hart minister of the Gospel in Jewin St. 
Chapel London." He assumed the name of Thorold, and the present 
possessor of Harmston — Benjamin Hart Thorold, Esq. — is his son.* 



HARPSWELL. 

S. Chad. 2 Bells. 

1. ^aiutc .^irbvta (Dra ^ro ^oMs [ U 27 ° 28 ij 29. ] 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

2. ^Hutta K^ittrina ©ra ^ro ^oMs [ U 27 a 28 ij 29. ] 

(Diam. 35 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 



ar-jL, HARRINGTON. 

/ 

S. Mary. 4 Bells. 

1. JOSEPH WILSON CH. W. 1732. 

( Diam. 12J in. ) 

2, 3. 1814. 

( Diams. 21, 22 in. ) 
4. T. MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1814. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 



* Harmston Par. Reg. and gravestone in Church ; also see Gent. Mag. Vol. lxvi. p. 445, 

and Vol. xc. p. 187. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 443 

In 1552, when the Inventory of Church Goods belonging to this 
parish was taken, the following entry was made respecting the bells and 
their value : — 

It' ij bells of one raygn one sanctus bell ij hand bells 

& ij litle sacryng bells xxxiiis, iiiji.* 

'7^>- HATCLIFFE. 
S. Mary. i Bell. 

!• [ + 51] M. [DSS] IML [ass] )A [°53] ^El [ □ 53 ] 

J^ [ a 53 ] :^%Jf5^ 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate VII. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret bells. "f Of those one only now 
remains. It is a curious Ave Maria bell. The W (intended for a V) 
and the E, are misplaced as shown in the printing. The initial cross, 
stop, and letters, are peculiar, the latter are very boldly formed gothic 
capitals. 

^-^'^ HATTON. 

S. Stephen or S. Barnabas. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 16 in. ) 

The Parish books give the following information : — 

1733- P'' for ale when the Bell was took down 00.00.06 

1736. Spickes and Stapels for the Bels o. 2.3 

Pad for the new Bel wheel & fastening the frames 

and mending the other wheel i. o. o 

for the man's meat and my Labouer o. 1. 6 

1 820. Dec. 16. Paid for the Bell 4 • 4 . o 

[ This is no doubt the present bell. ] 



* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. f Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Ofi'. 



444 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

It is traditionally believed that there were four bells here which 
were sold to defray, in part, the cost of repairs and alterations at the 
church in 1769. There is no record of this in the Church Books, but 
the above entries tend to corroborate the tradition, and in rebuilding the 
church, in 1871, the foundations of a tower were discovered. With 
regard to the sale of the old bells, there is a saying here (not uncommon 
in other places) : — 

The poor Hatton people 
Sold the bells to build up the Steeple, 

but, it is believed, no steeple was built. 



ir HAUGH. 

S. Leonard. 1 Bell. 

I. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1638. 

A B 
( Diam. 14 in. ) 



HAUGHAM. 

All Saints. 2 Bells. 

I, 2. THOMAS MEARS BELLFOUNDER LONDON 1839. 

( Diams. 25 ; 27^ in. ) 



;: HAWERBY. 

S. Margaret. 2 Bells. 



1. W. S. 1666. 

2. Blank. 



( Diam. 20 in. ) 
( Diam. 20^ in. ) 



Church Bells of Lmcolnshire. 445 

The Indented Inventory of Church Goods here in 1553 is unfortu- 
nately indistinct in the part referring to the bells: — ". . . gret belles 
j santus bell."* 

The bells of North Thoresby and of Grainsby (two adjacent villages, 
with three bells each) are supposed to ask each other " Who ring 
best?" "Who ring best?" and Hawerby bells to reply "We do," 
" We do." 



.'. - HAXEY. 

5. Nicolas. 6 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. WILLIAM DARRAND & GERVAS KILHAM CHURCH- 

WARDENS 1815. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

2. GLORY TO GOD ON HIGH 1653 [ a ^57- ] 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

3. D HEDDERLY FOVNDER. lO HOOLE VIC : R. 

TAYLER RIC BROWN C. W. 1723. ,^-0 & 

( Diam. 37 in. ; cracked. ) 

4- r n 127 1 P"^°"^^ ^'^^ "^'^^ buidssima box gabrielis. 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

5- r ^ j27l ^^lortim xU plaaat tibi xtx soitus isle [ a 133. ] 

( Diam. 44 in. ) 

6. r r^ 127 ] ^^' ^ampnua ^atra ^iat ^rinitate ^cata. 

( Diam. 49 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Daniel Hedderly 1733. 

For Stamps see Plates XXIII . and XV., and pages 114 and 115. 
In 1553 there were " v gret belles one santus bell."t" 



Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. OS. f Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line, /j, P. R. Off. 



446 The Inscriptions on the 

The 4th of the present bells was probably used for the Angehis (see 
p. 211). The 5th has a figure of the Blessed Virgin with tlic Infant 
Jesus (see p. 115). The 6th has curiously ornamented capitals. These 
three are from the same foundry, but they are all different in the letter- 
ing. They may be coeval with the tower, which is Perpendicular in 
style. These bells are celebrated for their excellency of tone and for 
the distance at which they can be heard. 

The Rev. Joseph Hoole became Vicar of Haxey in 1712 ; he resigned 
the living in 1736, when he was collated to the Rectory of S. Ann's, 
Manchester. 

Here are a set of chimes which play every three hours ; the following 
are the tunes : — 

I. Life let us cherish. 

II. A March — "They marched through the town with their 
banners so gay." 
III. Keble's Evening Hymn. 

These tunes were arranged about eighteen years ago, when the chimes 
were renewed. 

The following Ringers' Rules are suspended in the belfry : — 

All you that here intend to ring 

Mind well before you do begin 

If you ring in Great Coat, Spurs or Hat 

Sixpence you pay stright down for that 

If you break Stay or quarrel breed 

Twelve pence you pay right down with Speed 

If you be Fair and do no Wrong 

Then unto us you shall belong. 

Mr. John Knowlson ] Churchwardens 
Mr. John Curtis \ in y* year 1785.. 

Jas. Morris, Script. 

There is an estate belonging to the church, of which the vicar and 
churchwardens are trustees, from that source the ringers receive : — 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 447 

5 at ;^2 . 18 . o each per ann £ii\. . 10 . o 

I at ;^3 . 3 . o for tenor bell 3. 3.0 

Curfew bell per ann 2 . 10 . o 

Sexton for chimes 4. 4.0 

The ancient Churchwardens' Accounts were unfortunately destroyed 

as worthless some years ago. The only book in existence commences 

in 1815. From it the vicar — the Rev. John Johnstone — has kindly 

made the following extracts: — "Jv, , -^^y "^ f^ ; ^a 

s. d. 

1815. Oct. 4. Allowances on taking up Great Bell ... 7.6 
Dec. 23. To B. Templeton & J. Tinker i yrs 

Chiming Wages 2.16.0 

Dec. 27. Ringing on King's birthday i.o 

1816. Jan. 5. Going to the canal for the new bell 10 . 6 

Carriage of the same from Barton 10 . 6 

Jan. 8. Attendance 3 days when fixing Bell 7 . 6 

^-^ HEALING. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 4 Bells. 

1. [ + 165 ] THE GIFT OF CHAMPION DYMOCK 1685. 

( Diam. 25-I in. ) 

2. [ + 165 ] THE GIFT OF SVR FRA LAWLEY A FRA 

COVENTRY ES 1685. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

3. JESVS BE OVR SPEED 1633. 

( Diam. 3of in. ) 

4. ANNO DOMINI 1573. 

I B 

(Diam. 35I in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles."* 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



448 The Inscriptions on the 

The donor of the ist bell, in 1685, was Sir Charles Dymock, Knight, 
who was Champion at the Coronation of King James the Second in 
that year. What connection he had, if any, with this parish I cannot 
learn. He died about the year 1688, but the precise date is unknown. 
The Parish Register of Scrivelsby — the seat of the Dymock family — is 
imperfect from 1657 to 1722, four leaves being crumpled up, and the 
writing obliterated, apparently, by the action of heat. A subsequent 
Rector did his best to remedy the defect by collecting the various 
entries relating to the Dymock family, and transcribing them on a piece 
of paper which he pasted on the cover of the Register : he headed his 
collection thus : — 

Below is what I can find in the Register for Scrivelsby relating to 
the H'''" Family of Dymoks. 

He, however, gives no entry of the burial of the donor of the Healing 
bell ; neither do the memorial stones at Scrivelsby give the information 
as to date, although the spot of his sepulture is recorded in the following 
inscription on a plate on the floor of the church on the south side of the 
altar-table : — 

Under this stone lyes Sir Cha. Dymoke K' 

Who was Champion at the Coronation of 

King James H. on his left hand lyes 

The Lady Dymoke, next her the Honourable 

Lewis Dymoke their youngest son, next 

To him lyes Captain Dymoke the eldest 

Son of Sir Charles who died in France 

Next to him M" Dymoke daughter 

of Sir Charles & at the head of Sir Charles lyes 

M''' Eliz. Dymoke the youngest 

daughter of Sir Charles Dymoke. 

Sir Francis Lawley (see 2nd bell) was the son of Sir Thomas 
Lawley, first Baronet, by Anne his wife, the daughter of John Manning, 
Esq., of Hackney, Middlesex. He died in October, i6g6. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 449 

Francis Coventry, Esq. (who was a joint donor with Sir Francis 
Lawley of the 2nd bell) was buried here : he died on the 26th August, 
1687, as is testified by a large slab on the floor of the church. In the 
Parish Register he is described as the grandson of " Domin' Coventrye 
fuit Gustos Sigilli Mag: Regno Caroli Martyris Beatee Memoriae. " 

The Rector writes : — From some place or other the following note 
has been obtained : — 

The smallest bell sold by the Parishioners was given by one of the 
Alcock family. 

It would thus appear that there were five bells here formerly, or 
perhaps the " smallest bell" was the Sanctus.* 



HEAPHAM. 

All Saints. 2 Bells. 

I- [ + 47] M'm.mi :ei(d MM- [□48] ^^-^jh &M. 
mM- [ □ 48 ] x3Ei-^:m :e)3e l □ 48 j p^m^ :^% 

M. [ □ 48 ] ^& ^M- mM. [ c 46 ] 
( Diam. 24J in. ) 
2. [ + 165] SOLI [D167] DEO [0167] GLORIA [0167] 
I R [ D 167] W : S. 1663. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates VI., and XXIV. 

The Indented Inventory of Ghurch Goods belonging to this parish 
in 1553, is unfortunately, as regards the bells, undecipherable. t 

These small bells are chimed by means of levers instead of wheels. 
The letters and stamps on the ist are very small, and are like those on 
the ist and 2nd bells at Scampton. 

* I am much obliged to the Rectors of above information, and for the extracts 
Healing and Scrivelsby for much of the from the Parish Registers, 
f Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. aV, P. R. Off. 

3 K 



450 The Inscriptions on the 



yf' HECKINGTON. 

S. Andrew. 8 Bells. 

1. THIS TREBLE BELL THE GIFT OF EDWARD GOD- 

SON NOVEMBER 1880. MEARS & STAINBANK, 
FOUNDERS, LONDON. 

{ Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. THIS 2><D BELL THE GIFT OF EDWARD GODSON 

NOVEMBER 1880 MEARS & STAINBANK, FOUND- 
ERS, LONDON. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

3. M^ W1LLLA.M Taylor Churchwarden HECKINGTON 1773. 

( Diam. 33I in. ) 

4. ©OD SAVE MIS CHVRCH [ n 157 ] 1651. 

( Diam. 35I in. ) 

5. 8. CAST BY JOHN WARNER AND SONS LONDON 1859. 

[ Royal xj A. rms. ] 

PATENT. 

( Diams 38 ; 48^- in. ) 

6. WILLIAM TAYELER LOVES RU/lGmG SO WELL 5 

POV>lD OF METAL HEE GAVE TO THE BELL 

[ D 157] 1633. 

( Diam. 40^ in. ) 

7. T. MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1824. THE REV. HENRY 

BRESTOWE BENSON VICAR WILLIAM GODSON 
THOMAS ALMOND SEN^ CHURCHWARDENS. 
( Diam. 45+ in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII. 

The 5th, 7th and 8th bells were previously inscribed : — 

5. Glory to God on high by powers heavenly to all eternity 1651. \j 

7. Let peace and charity unite Christs family in perfect harmony 
1651. 

8. All men that heare my movrnfvl sovnd repent before yov lye in 
grovnd. Ex dono Gvlielmi Taylor ferrariae ij 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 451 

Marrat* says the shields on the former 5th and 8th bells bore 
" 3 Crescents 2 and i ; " more probably 3 horse-shoes. 

The friend who visited this belfry for me writes :— " Many a dispute 
and wager has taken place in the village with regard to the figure on the 
6th bell, between the words ' well ' and ' pound.' Tradition says 40, 
and the sexton, who accompanied me, said I need not trouble to copy 
it as he knew it was 40 ; but he was at a loss to make out that number 
when I showed him the rubbing." The explanation is that the arable 
numeral 5 is of the form not uncommon at that time when its shape was 
not as defined as at present : it is merely a curved line, very like that 
used by the French now : and the inscription records that William 
Tayler gave, not five pounds weight of metal, as the villagers would 
read it, but, £^. worth of metal, which at that time would be a substantial 
contribution to the cost of the bell. 

Mr. Edward Godson, the kind donor of the two new treble bells to 
make up a ring of eight, is a member of an old and valued family in 
Heckington, where he and his ancestors have been landowners for 
many years. Mr. William Godson, whose name is on the 7th bell, was 
his uncle, and " William Tayeler " who loved ringing so well that he 
gave ;^5. worth of metal to the 6th bell, was his great great uncle on his 
mother's side. The new bells were dedicated by the Bishop Suffragan 
of Nottingham, on Tuesday, the ist March, 1881, after the old bells had 
been rehung by the Committee of the Heckington Flower Show from 
funds which had accumulated in their hands. 

On the walls of the belfry is a great number of names, initials, and 
dates cut in the stone : probably those of ringers : they date from 1677. 

'M^" HEIGHINGTON. 

— ? 4 Bells. 

I. PROSPERITY TO THIS TOWN [ □ 85 ] 1713. 

( Diam. 22f in. ) 

* Hist. Line. in. p. 222. 



452 The Inscriptions on the 

2. PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD [ n 85 ] 1713. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE THE CHURCH AND QUEEN [ n 85 ] 1713. 

( Diam. 25^ in. ) 

4. TIMOTHY PIKE BENEFACTOR [ d 85 ] 1713. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ; all without canons. ) 

For Stamp see page 84. 

As to Timothy Pike see under Washingborough. 



1^0 HEI.PRINGHAM. 

S. Andrew. 5 Bells. 

1. JOHN SPRINGTHORPE C.W DANIEL HEDDERLY 

POVND 1758. 

( Diam. 32! in. ) 

2. ALL GLORY BE TO GOD ON HIGH 1707. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

3- [ + 100 ] )^m.^3E^-® wM^ :^(Dm:E>^ 1600. 

[ U 99 U 99 U 99 U 99- ] 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

4. CUM VOCO VENITE ii-.-JOHN HILL CHURCHWARDEN 

THO^ OSBORN FECIT 1794. 

( Diam. 41^ in. ) 

5- J^Il men; t^at ^eart mg monrfall sounir repent before gon Ige in ground 1627. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 91. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "one sacring bell," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold and 
defaced.* 



Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. loi. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 453 

According to Bishop TroUope's Sleaford (p. 403) the 4th bell was 
previously inscribed : — 

Anthony Newlove Rector. William Barnes Vicar. 
Omnia fiant ad gloriam eccl. [?] 1608. 

The Parish Registers keep on record the following : — 

1610. 24 June being midsummer day the greate bell fell down as 
the people were ringing, & brake through the high bell 
chamber & strucke thorow the stone floor into the ground 3 
quarters of a yard : which was throwe one of her yudyrons 
breaking and had no hurt at all to her.* 

The bells were rehung in 1878 by Mr. Rogers of Boston, 



HEMINGBY. 

S. Margaret. 3 Bells. 

I, 2, 3. Lester & Pack of London Fecit 1764. 
(Diams. 29, 31, 33 in.) 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret bells. "f 

There is a tradition that a larger church than the present formerly 
stood here, in which were six bells. 



HEMSWELL. 

All Saints. 2 Bells. 

1. ["^M]] M [+140] -^ [+140] ^ [+140.] 

(Diam. 33 in. ) 

2. [ 4- 162 ] ^antti 'yjfnxrtz (Dmncs 1675 ^iZtZ" j© 

( Diam. 34I in. ) 



* Bishop TroUope's Sleaford, p. 399. 
f Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



454 ^^'^ Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see Plate XV., pages 114 and 118, and Plate XXIV. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reporting as to the " monuments of 
superstition " belonging to this church in Queen Mary's time, said: — 
Itm . . . one sanctus bell one agnus bell gone owtt off the fore sayd 
churche no man knoweth how ano dome a thousand five hundrethe 
three schore & foure." 

" Itm ij hande belles solid to Robertt aestroppe one of the sayd 
Churche wardens to make a mortar off & they be deffaced the same 
yere by the condecent off the holle pis."* 

X^3 HEYDOUR. 

S. Michael. 5 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I. 3I: summon nil bji Icnbin0 sounbc : to Ijeare t^e faorb siim to toufonnb^ 
[ a 113- ] 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2,3- 'KM^M'w^ :©©■ m'w:^^ ^x^©":©©" 1587 

[ D 113 n 115. ] 

( Diams. 36, 39 in. ) 
4. jE sfaectln toling men bo tall to taste on meats lljat fetbs i\}t soolc 1609 
[ D 11'^ XJ see below, ] 

( Diam. 42 in. ) 

5. mij.i^'MM ':j^'w^^'w smMMM <d:h wmm 

M:mmiy^M:J^ 'X^'W.S^'W 1609 [xjseebeloti;.] 
( Diam. 45 in. ) 
Priest's Bell :— 

Blank. 

( Diam. 14 in. ) 
» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 103. 



Churcli Bells of Lincolnshire. 455 

For Stamps see Plates XVI. and XVII. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a sacringe bell," belonging 
to this church in Queen Mary's time had been defaced and sold.* 

John Bussey of Heydour, who was born about 1533, and who died 
in 1593, was the representative of a junior branch of the house of 
Bussey of Hougham, a family of great distinction, whose pedigree is 
proved by record evidence almost to the era of the Norman Conquest. f 
Leland relates that "one Bussey coming of a younger brother of the 
house of Busseys of Hougham, dwelleth in an old place at Haider that 
he and his parents hath of a fee farm of the Church of Lincoln. "t 
This " old place " is supposed to have stood near the church, in a field 
on the west of the village, where — some years ago — foundations and 
traces of buildings were traceable. § Sir Edmund Bussey, Knight, 
whose name is on the ist bell, dated 1612, was the son of the John 
Bussey just mentioned; he was born at Heydour 15th March, 1562. 
His arms [argent] 3 bars [sable] are given on the bell. He married 
Frances, daughter of ... . and died on the loth June, 161 6. 

Miles Bussey — the son of Sir Edmund Bussey — whose name is on 
the 5th bell, was born at Heydour in August 1590 (or 1592). 

In 1 610 he, as son and heir of Sir Edmund Bussy, joined with his 
father and Frances his mother, in conveying certain lands in Culver- 
thorpe. His arms (impaling, I presume, those of his wife, if he were 
married so early) are upon the 4th and 5th bells dated i6og, viz. : — 
[argent] 3 bars [sable] with a crescent for difference, impaling [ . . . ] 
fretty [...]. There is no entry of his burial in the Heydour Parish 
Registers, which, however, record nothing between the years 1650 and 
1663.11 

All the bells have lost their canons; the dates 1664 and 1825 are 
upon the bell-frames. 



» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 96. || Heydour Par. Reg., extracts from 

f lb. p. 96 (note). which were kindly made for me by the 

X Itiii. I. 29. Rev. Canon Deedes. Bishop Trollope's 

§ Saunders' Hist. Line. 11. p. 290. Skaford, pp. 354, 379-80. 



456 The Inscriptions on the 

There are some excellent rules for the guidance of the ringers, drawn 
up by, and with the consent of, the Vicar and Churchwardens. 

^ ^' HIBALDSTOW. 

S. HiBALD. 3 Bells. 

1. GLORIA DEO J. TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS LOUGH- 

BOROUGH 1848. 

2. FEARE GOD 1615 [or 1635] [ U 170 ] B. S. 

3. BEATUS VIR QUI NON ABUT [ n 8 ] WILL^ SHARP 

C : WARDEN 1764. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXV. and /. 

In 1553 there were here " iij grete belles, one Santus bell."'^ 
The Parish Register contains the following entry referring to the 
present tenor, with its incomplete inscription from the first Psalm : — 

The Great Bell of this Parish was recast at Barrow by James 
Harrison and Henry his son June the 25''' Old Stile, or, according 
to this Stile, July the 6'*" 1764. 

The tower has recently fallen. Now (1880) the bells are hung in a 
little lean-to at the west end of the church ; the ropes have been fastened 
to the bell clappers, and then passed through holes cut in the west wall, 
so as to be pulled from inside the church — an arrangement likely to 
crack the bells. 

HOGSTHORPE. 

S. Mary. 6 Bells. 

I. In sweetest sounds let each its note Reveal mine shall be 

FIRST to lead the Dulcet PEAL : T : Mears & Son of 

London Fecit 1808. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

» Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. ^3, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 457 

2. When Female Virtue weds with manly worth we catch the 

RAPTURE AND WE SPREAD IT FORTH : T. MeARS & SoN OF 

London Fecit 1808. 

(Diam. 29 in. ) 

3. Should Battle rage and sanguine foes contend we hail the 

Victor when he's Britain's friend. T. Mears & Son of 
London Fecit 1808. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

4. Here let us Pause and now with one accord salute the 

CHURCH TRIUMPHANT IN THE LoRD : T. MeARS & SoN OF 

London Fecit 1808. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

5. May George long Reign who now the sceptre sways and 

British Valor ever rule the seas. T. Mears & Son of 
London Fecit 1808. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

6. George Hogarth Minister. Richard Reggall John Ullyett 

Churchwardens all you that hear my mournfull sound 

REPENT before YOU LYE IN GROUND T. MeARS & SoN OF 

London Fecit 1808. 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

Prior to 1808 there were four bells only: those were then recast and 
two new ones added : the inscription on the old tenor was evidently- 
preserved on the new one. 

The Rev. George Hogarth (of S. John's College Cambridge, B.A., 
1777; M.A. 1780) was presented to the Vicarages of Mumby and 
Hogsthorpe in 1776 ; he died in the year 1824, aged 84 years.* 



* Gent. Mag. Vol. xciv. p. 574. 
3 L 



458 The Inscriptions on the 



7> HOLBEACH. 

All Saints. 8 Bells. 

1. GOD SAVE OUR CHURCH THE BELLS IN THIS 

STEEPLE LIKEWISE ALL THE SUBSCRIBING 
GOOD PEOPLE. CAPT EDWARD NORTHON. 

JAMES BENSON CURATE. 

JOHN W^ATSON \ 

WM STUKELEY [ ESQ«s 

JOHN KEY ) 

SAML TYRER ) _^ ,,rAOT^T7XTc 

E- JARVIS f ™- WARDENS 1770. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. Blank. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

3. Thomas Mears & Son of London Fecit 1807. 

(Diam. 33 in. ) 

4. [ + I ] IOWA HOBSOM RICHARD DARBY CHVRCH 

WARDEPIS 1648 [ D 6. Royal jj Arms, n 6. ] 
( Diam. 33 in. ; one canon off H. O. on the crown. ) 

5. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI -i- JOSEPH EAYRE 

FECIT 1770 ^- 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

6. EDM« JARVIS CHURCHWARDEN 1770 ^ -^ JOSEPH 

EAYRE FECIT. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

7. RECAST AND MADE NEW BY THE CONTRIBUTION 

OF JAs BENSON CURATE W^' STUKELEY EDW^ 
NORTHORN JO^ W^ATSON AND SEV^ OTHERS 
1770 EDMD JARVIS CHURCH WARDEN -^ +- 
( Diam. 41 in. ) 

8. [ + I ] lOHN HOBSON RICHARD DARBY CH WA 1648 

[ Royal \j Arms. ] 

( Diam. 45^ in. ; turned, no canons, Note E flat. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



459 



For Stamps see pages 52 and 53. 

In 1453 "W" Knot of Lyn Epi and Henry Nele of Holbech gave 
the Saint's bell."* A more recent bell-cot now exists, dated 1629, but 
it contains no small bell. 

In 1547 the following were sold by the churchwardens : — 

If to W"" Callow the younger on lytyll bell vj^. 

It' to Antony Heydon on other lytyll bell vji. 

It' for on bell xviij//. ijs.f 

There are chimes here : their history and capabilities are told on a 
brass plate attached to their frames, thus : — 



W" Stukeley Esq : Cap* EdA^ 


r'^ Northon 


J St 


Ladies of London. 




2" 


Riggadoon. 


1 — , w 

■% 


3' 


Oswald's Air. 


g w 
73 g ^ 


4- 


Lovely Nancy. 




3th 


Lady Chatham's Jigg. 


gth 


Seely's Garott [ ? ]. , j/- 


-^ '- 

w U G 

1-1 1h ^H 


7*" 


Three Gen'^ Healths. 




gth 


A Minuet by Norris. 


W u '^ 


9'" 


113 Psalm. 





Captain Edward Northon, whose name appears on two of the bells, 
died on 23rd April, 1797, aged sixty years. This is a fine ring of bells 
in perfect tune, but not in good order. 



Stukeley's Itinerarium (Ed. 1724), Vol. i. p. 20. 



t lb. (Ed. 1724), Vol. I. p. rg. 



460 The Inscriptions on the 



HOLBEACH. 
S. John. i Bell. 

This is a small bell hanging in a turret. It was cast in 1840. 

(Diam. 18 in. ) 



HOLBEACH. 

S. Matthew. i Bell. 

This church, consecrated in 1869, has a small bell, about ten inches 
in diameter, hanging in a turret over the chancel arch. 



HOLBEACH MARSH. 

S. Mark. i Bell. 

I. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1868. 

( Diam. 22 in. ) 



HOLBEACH HURN. 

S. Luke. i Bell. 

I. J. TAYLOR & CO LOUGHBOROUGH 1870. 

( Diam. 22 in. ) 



J' / HOLBEACH FEN MISSION CHAPEL. 

— ? I Bell. 

I. MEARS & CO LONDON J. R. JERRAM 1875. 
(Diam. gi in. ; weight 18 lbs. ) 

3' HOLBEACH CLOUGH MISSION CHAPEL. 

Here is one small bell. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 461 

HOLLAND FEN. 

S. John Baptist. i Bell. 

This church, consecrated in 1867, has one small modern bell. 

HOLLAND NEW. 

Here is a licensed schoolroom with a small modern bell in a gable. 

HOLTON-LE-BECKERING. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I. [+117] M-~w^ -. piiM.:mjLM. 

(Diam. 33 in. ) 
2. GOD SAVE THE KING 1660 [ n 157. ] 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

( Diam. 42 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 108 and Plate XX III. 

The mould of the initial cross on the ist bell is lozenge shaped, 
not square as the later examples. 

The Vicar's name on the 3rd bell was Baxter, as is seen in the 
Parish Register. 

3 (J b HOLTON-LE-CLAY. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 111] -MWTWM :©©• miM-MJi^M- [TJ119.] 3[ 

( Diam. 25^ in. ; cracked. ) 



462 The Inscriptions on the 

2. [ + 116 ] -MWKW^ Mm% ^MJ^^^JMJh%^ 

[ U "9- ] 

( Diam. 28J in. ) 

^3. [ + 124] ^aitc irt c]j it. 

(Diam. 31:^ in. ; not used : intended for Sancti petri. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XVI. and pages 107 and iii. 

In 1553 there were here " iij great belles one Sanctus bell."* Those 
three ancient bells fortunately still remain. The ist and 2nd were from 
the same foundry: the letters on the 3rd are misplaced, the inscription 
is meant for Sancti petri. 

f . HOLTON-LE-MOOR. 
— ? 2 Bells. 

I, 2. C. & G. HEARS FOUNDERS LONDON. HOLTON 
NEAR CAISTOR 1848. 

( Diams. 18, 20 in. ) 

Prior to 1848, when the church was rebuilt, there was only a single 
bell ; it bore the name of the donor which was Bestoe, and a seven- 
teenth century date, but, unfortunately, a rubbing then taken by the 
Rector cannot now be found. The full name is probably supplied by 
the following entry in the Caistor Parish Register : — 

1654. Nicholaus Bestoe Armig : de Howton in le Moor Parochia 
de Castre, in Capella de Howton. 

That single bell was recast, and a second added as above. 

HOLYWELL. 

S. Mary. 2 Bells. 

I. BE CONSTANT IN PRAYRE TO GOD 1628. 

( Diam. 25^ in. ) 

• Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 463 

2. Blank. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbelles . . . wt 
one sacringe bell," which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, 
had been broken in pieces, defaced, and sold,* 

jj^ HONINGTON. 
S. Wilfrid. 3 Bells. 

1. [+106] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1631. 

( Diam, 30^ in. ) 

2. [+120U119] -^'yFJ.-^M IlMW ^^J- 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH xj T. G. MADE ME 1673 U 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XVIII., and as to that on the 3rd 
bell see page 141. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbells," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold and 
defaced. t 

In 1818 " great abuses having taken place by injuring the bells of 
the church," the parishioners in vestry assembled very properly 
appointed six bell-ringers on condition that they attended to ring the 
bells at the times appointed for church services ; and on that condition 
only were they to be allowed "to partake of the emoluments arising 
from marriages, &c.| 

C!) HORBLING. 

S. Andrew. 5 Bells. 

I. TEMPLA PETAS SUPPLEX ET VENERARE DEUM 1719. 

(Diam. 29 in. ) 

» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. io6. f lb. p. 107. I Church Booh of the Parish. 



464 The Inscriptions on the 

2. REV. J. LODDINGTON VICAR T. KENSINGTON C.W. 

REV. J. SINGLAR CURATE. J. BRIANT & JOHN 
CABOURN HERTFORD FECERUNT 1801. 
( Diam. 30} in. ) 

3. NON CLAMOR SED AMOR CANTAT IN AURE DEI. 

JOH. CROSSBY THO. THIMBLEBY. 
( Diam. 31^^ in. ) 

4. CAMPANAM AUDITE VOCO VOS AD SACRA VENITE 

1719. 

( Diam. 35^ in. ) 

5. DEFVNCTOS PLORO VIVOS VOCO FVNERA CLAVDO. 

EDWi> BROWN ESQ^ HEN. PENN FUSORE 1712. 
( Diam. 38! in. ) 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " two handbelles," 
which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been broken 
in pieces and sold.* 

The Rev. Joseph Lodington (see 2nd bell) who was also Vicar of 
Oundle, Northants, died in 1806. 

Edward Brown, Esq., whose name is on the 5th bell, was a con- 
siderable benefactor to the church and the poor here. He died in 1761 
aged 85. Thomas Thimbleby (3rd bell) also left a small benefaction to 
the poor of Horbling. He died in 1727. 



7/f HORKSTOW. 

S. Maurice. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ D 141 D 142 n 144 D 145] m 1 k 8751. 

( Diam. 25 in. ) 

2. [ + 64 ] J^\it [ □ 67 ] ©racia [ □ 67 ] ;g>kita. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 



• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. io8. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 465 

3- [ + 64 ] MJit [ □ 67 ] ©mia [ □ 67 ] ^hxi-a [ □ 67 ] X^ominus 
[ □ 67 ] ^EJccum. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 

( Diam. 11 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXI. and VIII., and for the capital letter A on 
the 3rd bell see fig. 191, Plate XXVII . 

The ist bell has Tudor Badges and three letters of the alphabet with 
the date 1578 reversed. 

The 2nd and 3rd have elegantly executed inscriptions ; the capital 
letter A is ensigned with a crown. 

The same cross and letters are found on the ist bell at Bonby. 

The Priest's bell is not used. On the bell-frame are the letters MT 
RT 1614. 



HORNCASTLE. 

S. Mary. 6 Bells and 2 Small Bells. 

1. LECTVM : FVGE : DISCVTE I SOMNVM : G. s : J. w : 

H. PENN : FVSOR : 1717. 

( Diam. 33^^ in. ) 

2. IN TEMPLO VENERARE DEVM HEN PENN NOS FVDIT 

: CORNVCASTRI. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

3. SVPPLICEM DEVS AVDIT DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST 

ME 1727. 

(Diam. 36!- in. ; many impressions of coins. ) 

4. THO. OSBORN FECIT DOWNHAM NORFOLK 1801. 

THO. BRYAN AND D. BROWN CHURCHWARDENS. 
( Diam. 37^ in. ) 

5. DVM : SPIRAS : SPERA : H. PENN : FVSOR : 1717 THO 

: ET : SAM : hamerton : .editivi. 

( Diam. 41 in. ) 
3 M 



466 The Inscriptions on the 

6. EXEAT : E : BVSTO : AVSPICE : CHRISTO. THO : 
LODINGTON LL.D. VIC : H. P : 1717. 

( Diam. 46^- in. ) 
Fire Bell. Blank. 

( Diam. 16^ in. ) 
Small Bell. Inaccessible. 

The 4th bell was previously inscribed: — 

Fac : et : spe : Henri : Penn : Fvsor : Peterbvrgensis. 

The small bell, which is now rung as an alarm bell day or night in case 
of fire or other great calamity, was, until recently, used as the Priest's 
bell : it has no wheel. 

The second small bell, which is attached to the exterior of the small 
timber spire which crowns the tower, has no clapper. Prior to the 
restoration of the church, in 1859-61, the clock struck the hours on this 
bell, which has a very peculiar shrill sound, and could be heard much 
further off than the tenor bell upon which the clock now strikes. The 
quarters are struck upon the ist and 5th bells. 

The Rev. Thomas Lodington, LL.D. (see 6th bell), who was Vicar 
of Horncastle for forty-five years, was buried here the 25th of March, 
1724. 

3! 3 HORNCASTLE. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

This chapel-of-ease, opened in 1848, has one bell then provided, 
which hangs in a high open gable. 

HORSINGTON. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

In 1553 there were here " Itm ij gret bells."* There is now only a 
single one which was brought from the ancient church to the present 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



467 



new building erected about twenty years ago. The bell is evidently an 
ancient one (about 15 inches in diameter) with an inscription upon it, 
but as it hangs about thirty feet above the belfry floor, without any 
ladder or stairs by which to get to it, I am reluctantly obliged to say 
inaccessible. 



All Saints. 



HOUGH-ON-THE-HILL. 



5 Bells. 



I. 

2. 
3- 
4- 
5- 



[ + 2 ] ED PAYNE ESQVIRE. W. WALKER. J. MORRIS 

1683. 
[ + 2 ] TOBIE NORRIS CAST ALL WEE 1683. 
[ + 2 ] W. READE. S. FOLKERD. 1683. 
[ + 2 ] R. POOLE MIN. R. BEE GENT 1683. 
[ + 2 ] WHEN YOV HEARE THIS MOVRNFVLL SOVND 

PREPARE YOVRSELVES FOR UNDERGROVND 1683. 



For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbells" which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time had been " sold since the 
last visit, being defaced," and that "a sacringe bell" had been "sold 
to Austen Earle to put about a calues neck."* 

Prior to 1683 there were three bells, which were inscribed : — 

1. Sea Helena ora pro nobis. 

2. Protege prece pia quos Cqrnuoco sea Maria. 

3. Celorum xpe placeat tibi Rex sonus iste.f 



U 



(J«^ •*-•-«• tr 



All Saints. 



HOUGHAM. 



4 Bells. 



I. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1694. 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 105. 



t Had. MSS. 6S29, p. 319- 



468 The Inscriptions on the 

2. 3: sincetlg to ling men bo tall to taste on meats lljat fetirs t^e soole 1607. 

[ n 113- ] 
( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. [ + 117] M-MM @M(B:mrw^ pb©"©" ^cd ©<d:id 

[ a 113- ] 
( Diam. 34^^ in. ) 
4. [+106] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH OVR KIMG AMD 
REALME AMD SEMD VS PEACE IM CHRIST 
AMEM 1618. 

[ a 113] 
( Diam. 38 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XVI. page 108, and Plate XV. 



S(l HOWELL. 

S. Oswald. i Bell. 

I. EDWARD BROOKES 1827. 

( Diam. 17^- in. ) 

There were formerly 2 bells in the double bell turret : one was sold 
towards repairing the church.* The present bell, before it was recast 
in 1827, is said to have been inscribed : — 

Tobie Norris cast me 1666. 



V HOWSHAM-CUM-CADNEY. 

Here is a modern chapel-of-ease with one small bell. 

* Sketches of Sleaford (1825). 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 469 



HUMBERSTONE. 

S. Peter. i Bell. 

I. JOHN BEE CHURCHWARDEN 1819. JAMES HARRISON 
OF BARTON FOUNDER. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " ij gret belles."* 

The clock strikes on the present good sized bell. There is a tradition 
at Irby-on-Humber that one of the present bells there came from this 
parish church. That is probably true seeing there were two bells here 
in the sixteenth century, and one of them is now wanting. 

HUMBY GREAT. 

This chapel built originally in 1682, and recently restored, has one 
small bell, 14 inches in diameter, without inscription. 

^r^ f HUNDLEBY. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + 66 ] Met :]^«tre (Btn :]P»ro X^^obts [ U 68. ] 

( Diam, 30 in. ) 

2. [ + 2 ] GOD SAVE THE KING TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 

1675- 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON, 1819. 

( Diam. 36^ in. ) 
Priest's Bell ;— 

Blank. 
(Diam. 13^ in. ) 

• Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



470 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see Plate VIII. and page 52. 

^^ 1553 there were here " iij belles in the steple w'*" the Sanctiis 
bell."* 

In 1818, the tenor bell being cracked, it was agreed at a vestry held 
on the 1 2th of November in that year "that the Bell should be taken 
down and recast and other things done in the church, according to 
Archdeacon Goddard's monition ; . . . . and that the churchwarden 
write to Mr. Harrison, or some other founder, concerning the Bell 
emediatel}'." 

There was then living in Hundleby a tinker named James Rose, 
who was generally known by the name of "Ingenuity Rose:" he 
undertook to repair the bell for ten pounds, and so save the trouble 
of sending it out of the parish : the Vestry Book records the agreement 
thus : — 

Hundleby Feb. 18. i8ig. 
At a Vestry held in the Parish Church this Day, it is agreed upon 
by the undersigned that James Rose doth agree to undertake to 
repair the Bell that is crack'd & to make her perfect, and stand 
ringing as perfect as when she was new, and the said James Rose 
doth agree to take Tenn Pounds for the said repairing of the said 
Bell — and if he does not make her perfect and to stand ringing to 
the said parishes satisfaction the said Ja^ Rose doth agree to have 
nothing for his doing her. 

James Rose made a fire in the churchyard, and after sawing a piece 
out of the bell, he tried to run some new metal into the crack : it is 
needless to say that his " Ingenuity " failed him : he got no payment for 
his labour, and the bell had to be sent to the founder at Barton as its 
present inscription testifies. f 



* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods. Line. ^\. P. R. Off. 
+ For the extracts from Vestry Book I am indebted to the Rev. C. G. Ridley, Vicar of 

the parish. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 471 

HUTTOFT. 
S. Margaret. 3 Bells. 

1,2. THOMAS MEARS & SON OF LONDON FECIT 1809. 

3. REV. GEORGE HOGARTH MINISTER KING QUEEN- 
BOROUGH C.W. THOMAS MEARS & SON OF 
LONDON FECIT 1809. 

31 '- HYKEHAM NORTH. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

This church was built in 1858, and its single bell is no older. 



^\if HYKEHAM SOUTH. 

S. Michael. 2 Bells. 

1. DAN HEDLY 1758. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. [+116] -^mM~WM :^^ €)lFm M^fPm^ 

:6i Jg) [ □ D 149 and 150] 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 107 and 123. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbelles," belonging 
to this church in Queen Mary's time had been sold and defaced.* 



3-11 IMMINGHAM. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

I- [ + 137 ] M^ "TT©- XaElJ^ :^% M. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 141. 



472 The Inscriptions on the 

2. [ ij 124 n 126] stii mariit. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

3- [ + 37] :m^(Bm [039] ^iiQ>miis,^m^ [039] 
[ □ 36] 
j.-M'MM~w^ [°39] :e:^^^ [039] M^mim:m. 

[ D 39 ] X^E."^-© 

( Diam. 42 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XX., pages iii and 113, and Plate V.; and for 
a specimen of the letters on the 3rd bell see fig. 175, Plate XXVI. 

These are three very interesting bells. The 3rd bell is probably 
coeval with the tower, and is a fine tall and thick one, a characteristic 
example of the mediaeval form. William of Wykeham left by Will a 
pair of beads with the inscription iljs xst amor im«s, and the same inscrip- 
tion is upon the exterior wall of the north aisle of S. Mary's Church, 
Stratford, Suffolk, supposed to have been built in the fifteenth century 
by the Mors family. 

'Si^ INGHAM. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

Inaccessible. 



3"^' INGOLDMELLS. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 4 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. 3E©-^ -yFM i^m myF:m m^mm:^^ 1705 [07. ] 

(Diam. 31^ in.) 

3. [O7] 1705. JOHN BARNS CHURCHWARDEN BEING 

THEN ALIVE CAUSED VS TO BE CAST IN 1705. 
( Diam. 36^ in. ) 

4. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1761. 

( Diam. 42^ in. ; cracked. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 473 

Priest's Bell :— 

r □ 76] 

[ + 79 □ 78^ ] ^-TTX^Cl [ D ] mCD^JSL [ n ] ^-\rjh^ 

[ D 76] 
[ D 76] 

( Diam. ig in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 59, 79, and 80 — the other Stamps (unnum- 
bered) are described on page 81. 

The Priest's bell is now unhung and lies on the floor of the room 
below the bell-chamber. The canons are broken off, and holes have 
been bored through the crown, by means of which the bell was hung. 
It has a clapper, and apparently, is not cracked : there is therefore no 
reason why this interesting ancient Sanctus bell should not be rehung. 
It is one of the curious set of bells described on page 81, as remaining 
at Beesby, and Gunby S. Peter, and has, for intervening stops the same 
scraps of ornate letters as appear upon them. 

I have obtained a rubbing of the inscription on this bell with con- 
siderable difficulty, and after much delay, hence the omission of any 
mention of it when describing similar bells on page 81. 



Zip INGOLDSBY. 

S. Bartholomew. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 40] ^(B(M(B^. M:m<^:^mM- 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1799. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. EDWARD WORSDALL JUNIOR CHURCHWARDEN 

THOMAS HEDDERLY FOUNDER 1765. 
( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate VI. 
3 N 



474 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

1,^^ IRBY-IN-THE-MARSH. 

All Saints. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + I ] 1691. 

( Diam. 22^ in. ) 

2. -WM^MIlFM :©©" €)'T^m ^^^J^^ 1618. 

(Diam. 27^ in. ) 

3. 1828. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 
Pyiesfs Bell :— 

K 

W [ + 116] O 1629. 

( Diam. iij in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 107. 

The 3rd bell was previously inscribed : — 

God save his chvrch 1610. 



1>3 ■ IRBY-UPON-HUMBER. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + 162 ] ^antitas domino "T^E" M 1664. 

( Diam. 34! in. ) 

2. FILI DIAIAI : MISERERE NOBIS ANNO DOMINI 1579 

R G. 

( Diam. 35 in. ; 12 coins on sound-bow. ) 

3. THOMAS BORMAN CHURCHWARDEN 1768. 

( Diam. 40^^ in. ; all have had their canons cut off. ) 
Pries fs Bell : — 

J. WARNER & SONS LONDON 1854. 
( Diam. 13^ in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIV. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 475 

In 1553 " Rebye " in Bradley Haverstoe Wapentake, which perhaps 

means this parish, there were " iij gret belles j sanctus bell."* 

The commencement of the inscription on the 2nd bell is intended 

for FILI DEI VIVI. 

E G 

On the belfry ladder are the initials and date 1737. 

I P 

There is a tradition that the tenor bell was brought from the church 

at Humberstone, which is probably true (see p. 469). 

3-3/ IRNHAM. 
S. Andrew. 4 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + I ] GOD SAVE THE KING 1670. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

2. [4- 116] . j^ Ti^T% mtn lljat Ijcare mg mornfull sobub rtptnt hdaxt 

gou lg£ in grounb 1620 [ n 154. ] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. [ 4- 116] % sfeutlg toling mm bo tall ia ivi$k an meats t^at ffcbs tlje 

sofale 1620 [ D 154. ] 

(Diam. 35+ in.) 

4. [+116] ,Oi)'^ ronringe sounbe bot^ foaruhtg gi6e i\p.i men cannot 

\tmt alinags Ig&c 1620 [ a 154. ] 

( Diam. 38^ in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 

( Diam. 13! in. ) 
For Stamps see pages 52 and 107, and Plate XXII. 

KEAL EAST. 

5. Helen. 5 Bells. 

I. [ 4- I ] GOD SAVE THE KING 1670 B. H. STINGES. 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

• Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



4/6 The Inscriptions on the 

2. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1633. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

3. Thomas Scott Churchwarden 1773. 

( Diam, 32^^ in. ) 

4. JOSEPH WILSON JOHN GILDON C : W 1731 DANIEL 

HEDDERLY FOVNDER. 

( Diam. 35^ in. ; coins on rim. ) 

5. JOHN SCOTT HUTCHINGS CHURCHWARDEN THO^ 

OSBORN DOWNHAM FECIT 1790 ;:•.. 
(Diam. 43 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1553 " Est Kell " possessed " iiij°' great bells j sanctus bell."* 

The 2nd bell was from the Stamford foundry, and the 3rd from that 
at Barrow. 

The bells here have twice during this century had a narrow escape 
from destruction. Between twenty and thirty years ago the tower fell 
in ; it had given premonitory warnings of giving way, and steps were 
being taken to examine it and make it safe, but before anything could 
be done it crumbled together, and one morning a heap of rubbish only 
marked the spot where the tower had stood up to the previous evening. 
On this occasion the bells fell together ; they kept their places in their 
frame, and all sank vertically and uniformly, and no harm was done to 
them. Later, in the autumn of 1877, ^^^ ^^w tower, in which the old 
bells had been replaced, was struck by lightning. The west wall of the 
tower in its upper part, was torn away, and the bell-chamber was laid 
open to the outer air while the roof was hanging down towards — but 
not so far as — the frame, for want of the support of the western wall. 
A few trifling items of damage were done to the woodwork by the 
stones that the lightning violently displaced, but, substantially, the bells 
received no harm at all. 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line, j^, P. R. Off. 



ChurcJi Bells of Lincolnshire. 477 



^ 3 " KEAL WEST. 

S. Helen. 5 Bells. 

1. Henry Harrison of Barrow. Founder. 1772. 

( Diam. 31J in. ) 

2. Cast at Barrow 1772. 

(Diam. 331 in.) 

3. RICHD CLARK CHURCHWARDEN T. OSBORN DOWN- 

HAM NORFOLK FECIT 1790 ;:::• 
( Diam. 36J in. ) 

4. Richard Parkinder Church-warden 1772. 

( Diam. 37^ in. ) 

5. To speak a parting Soul is giv'n to me 

Be trimm'd thy Lamp as if I toll'd for Thee. 
( Diam. 41^^ in. ) 

In 1553 "West Keyll " possessed " ij belles in the Steple and a 
Sant' bell."* 

On Sunday, the i8th of September, 1881, the tower of this church 
fell with a tremendous crash : at the time of going to press with this 
sheet the bells lie amongst the ruins, and nothing can at present be 
learned as to their state beyond the fact that the canons of one bell are 

broken. iM'-^^\;'-- 

•J I • ' . 

^ "^" KEDDINGTON. 

S. Margaret. i Bell. 

I- [ + 40 ] Mi'w:^^ ffl. [ + 40 ] m:mm.m^® [ + 40 ] 

( Diam. 22^ in. ) 
For Stamp see Plait VI. 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line, -i^, P. R. Off. 



478 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

33' KEELBY. 
S. Bartholomew. 3 Bells. 

1. GOD SAVE KING JAME 1688. 

( Diam. 28^ in. ) 

2. 1628. 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

3. PRAYSE YE THE LORDE 1604 W. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) . 

All have had the canons cut off. 



KELBY. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. THQs HEDDERLY OF NOTTINGHAM FECIT 1782, 

A Cornucopia is represented on this, as on some other of this 
founder's bells. 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Kelbie in the Pishe of Haydor " 
reported that " a sacring bell" which belonged to the church in Queen 
Mary's time had been sold that year to Giles Harrie and defaced, and 
that " ij hand bells" were defaced and sold to Godfrey Jenkinson 
" yesterdaie beinge the vij of this instant Aprill."* 



KELSEY NORTH. 

S. Nicolas. [ ? ] 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 162 ] ©ob bjii^ bs :Ei:R :Ei"^^f i^s^m 1662. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. x^B.M'WM :bm (B^:m. mi^:ej^:^ i62e. 

( Diam. 331 in. ) 
* Peacock's Ch. Fur. pp. 109, no. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 479 

( Diam. 37I- in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIV. The 2nd and 3rd bells were from the 
Nottingham Foundry. 

The Sanctus bell formerly hanging here, which is without inscription 
or mark of any kind, has been removed to the School. 



^3g' KELSEY SOUTH. 
S. Mary. * 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 116] j.'MM'w^ :©:^ €)"T^'m M^jaM:i^ 1620. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 
2. ROBERT COX CHURCHWARDEN 1768. 

( Diam.. 35^^ in. ) 

3- [U137] ilm :iiici)f:E WMTF miM:m.%M- 

0000 

( Diam. -3)7^ i^^- ! 4 coins on sound-bow. ) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plate XX. 

In 1553 " Kelsey Mary " possessed " iij gret belles & one sanctus bell."*- 
The following rhyme is current in this neighbourhood : nothing is 
known as to its supposed origin : — 

Owersby parish 
Wicked people 
Sold their bells to Kelsey 
To build a steeple. 

C>"i^ KELSEY SOUTH. 

S. Nicolas. 

This church, which formerly stood within the still used burial ground, 
possessed, in the year 1553, " iij gi'et belles & one santus bell."t 

• Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. f lb. 507, P. R. Off. 



480 The Inscriptions on the 



KELSTERN. 

S. Faith. 3 Bells. 

I. [+117] -M.^m-M-^M^%^m'WM MiB'^m'M 

:m.M-'\^'K^ 1607. 

[ D 113 ] [ Arms of xj Donor. ] 
( Diam. 26^ in. ) 

2. [ + 117] ~VM-M^:^ "\m-:e: wmm'm. pse::]^!^^ 
-^m'TF:m^ M:mM> ojh:mi^ 1607. 

[ D 113 ] [ Arms of XJ Donor. ] 
( Diam. 29 in. ) 

m(B^:m~w^<B mmMO'MWMM 1607. 

[0113] \_A rms of ij Donor. ] 
( Diam. 34 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 108 and Plates XVI. 

Sir Francis South of Kelstern (the donor of these bells) was knighted 
(previously to the coronation of King James I.) at Whitehall, 23rd July, 
1603. He was High Sheriff of the county on the occasion of the visit 
of that monarch to Lincoln, on 27th March, 1617, and assisted, as such, 
in conducting the king to his lodging at S. Catharine's House.* He 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Meeres, of Auburn, Knight. 
His arms, as given on the bells, were [argent] two bars [gules]. Crest : 
A lion rampant [gules] ducally gorged [or] holding in the dexter paw a 



* Civitas Lincolnia, p. 74. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 481 

mullet pierced [argent]. He was buried at Kelstern on the 2gth of 
July, 1632. 



nlj.\ KETSBY [cum South Ormsby]. 

The ancient church of S. Margaret formerly stood here ; no vestige 
now remains. 

In 1552, when the Inventory of Church Goods at " Kettisby in the 
parties of Lyndesey" was made, the bells and their values were thus 
entered : — 

Inp'm iij bells in the steple x\]li. 

Itm one littill bell vjs. viijc/. 

Itin two handbells viiji.* 



Ijb KETTLETHORPE. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

1. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH. DARWENT STOW JOHN 

SHAW WARDENS 1710. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. lESVS BE OVR SPEEDE CHARLES HALL RECTOR^ 

1710 ROBERT COALE. 

(Diam. 31 in.; cracked.) 

3. [ + 28 ] ^xi ^omcn Domini ^encbittum [ □ 33 U 32- ] 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 

The ist and 2nd bells, which are much ornamented, were from the 
Nottingham foundry. 

The Rev. Charles Hall (see 2nd bell) died in 1728. 



* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. 

3 o 



-i^i 



482 The Inscriptions on ihe 



(^ -^ KILLINGHOLME. 
S. Denys. 4 Bells. 

1. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1725 [ d 168 ] 

( Diam. 30I- in. ) 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1725 [ d 168 ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. r n 127 1 P"'S°"^^ ^"^^ "^'^ bukissimu Uov- gubriclis. 

( Diam. 34I in. ) 

4. [ + 22 ] mM^mi:jpj^'MM- [ □ 23 ] MM-M^mM 
[ D 23 ] wMJ.'M^mj^m^^ [ □ 23] M.m [ ° 23 ] 
mmiMM^^^i [ ° 23 ] ^M.'M<^m(B'M-'^^m. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and pages 114 and 71. 
The inscription on the 4th is indistinct ; the cross, stop and letters, 
are like those used by John Potter at West Halton. 



1,-^ KINGERBY. 

S. Peter. i Bell and a Priest's Bell, 

I. [ + 165] GOD WITH VS WS 1678 [ d 167 ] 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

W S 1678. 

( Diam. 12 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. 

In 1553 there were here " ij gret belles j santus bell."* 



* Aiigm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Ofif. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 483 

5 Y ^^ KIRKBY-CUM-OSGODBY. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + 116] mm:m> MM-'w:^. 'M%m m:m'W^<^i^ 

1598 [ D 113.] 

[ Royal xj Arms. ] 
( Diam. ^1^ in. ) 

2. [ + 116] wMMM-w^ :jbm ©-yrm M:^M:is>M 

1598 [ D 113] 

[ Royal xj Arms. ] 
( Diam. 34^ in. ) 

3. [+116] ^:t ^onow ^« ^rinitHtis [U^iQ-l 

( Diam. 38^ in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 

( Diam. 14^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107, and Plates XVI. and XVIII. 

In 1553 " Kyrkebye " in Walshcroft Wapentake possessed " iij grete 
bells one sanctus bell."* 

The 3rd bell has the same cross as the other two but on an earlier 
formed stamp. 

^If : KIRKBY EAST. 

S. Nicolas. 2 Bells. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 
[ D 107 ] 
2. Ufeiet ^ampana ^atra [ U ^S^ 1 !©eata 5i[3nnitat-e JSKvsi. 
[U127] 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

» Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



484 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see page 59, Plates XV. and XIX. and page 114. 
In 1553 there were here " iij great belles, one sanctus bell."* 
The Churchwardens' Account Book has the following entry under 
the year 1822 : — 

Bells taking down and hanging over again with new frames the old 
being very dangerous. Mr, Thimbleby agreed with Parishioners 
to do it for £10 last 25 March. 

At that time the bells were hung in the lower chamber of the tower 
instead of the upper as before. 

The 3rd bell (the largest) formerly here is remembered as being 
cracked and standing on the church floor about the year 1812: after 
some years — there is no mention of it in a Terrier made in 1823 — it was 
broken up and the metal sold : there being no record of what became 
of the proceeds, and the traditions about it being of a very hazy 
description it may be well not to chronicle them here. 



KIRKBY GREEN. 

Holy Cross. i Bell. 

I. 169D. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

Church built in 1849. 



3 /a' KIRKBY LAYTHORPE. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. HENRY PENN MADE MEE 170J. 

( Diam. 27!- in. ) 

2. ALEXANDER RIGBY MADE ME 1707. 

( Diam : 29 in. ) 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. 5^, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 485 

3. [ + 3 ] ALEXANDER RIGBY MADE ME 1707 JOHN : 

WILLOWBY. 

( Diam. 32I- in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 



,?A-' KIRKBY UNDERWOOD. 

S. Mary and All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. 3- [ + I- ] 'M m<^:^j-^M.^ m 'v^ % '^mjmm. 

( Diams. 24, 30 in. ) 
2. William Brittain Church Warden 1774. 

( Diam. 26 in.) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " as for handbelles sacring 
bell we had none in quene maries daies."* 



l^'i^ KIRKBY-ON-BAIN. 

S. Mary. i Bell. 

I. F RENOLDS C WARDEN J BRIANT HERTFORD 

FECIT 1803. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

In 1553 " Kyrkbye super Bayn " possessed " iij gret bells & a santus 
bell."t 

KIRKSTEAD. 

S.Leonard ( ? ), i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 12 in. ) 

» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. iii. 
f Land Revenue Records, Church Goods, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



486 The Inscriptions on the 

This chapel is a donative. In 1720 it was in the hands of Mr Daniel 
Disney who, being a Presbyterian, appointed a minister of his own to 
perform service, paid him a stipend, and " settled certain lands upon 
five trustees, the profits of which were to be applied to the maintenance 
of a Presbyterian minister at this place. This gift he afterwards con- 
firmed by his Will in 1732, and in addition bequeathed to the trustees 
the use of the chapel and chapel ground for the same purpose. Several 
appointments of ministers were made in accordance with Mr. Disney's 
Will, but in 1794 the then owner of the manor appointed a clergyman 
of the Church of England paying him the stipend. The Presbyterian 
Trustees recovered possession of the estate, but not of the chapel, by 
an action of ejectment tried at Lincoln Assizes in 1812, part of the 
evidence (it is said) to show that it had been the Parish Church, and 
therefore belonged to the Church of England, was that an old man 
remembered when a bell used to be rung as it hung in an oak 
tree hard by the church. What became of that bell is not known. 
Probably the church was for some time without a bell, for when it was 
re-roofed, in 1849, a bell turret was, for the first time, erected, and the 
present bell, which looks a modern one, is also no doubt of that date. 



KIRMINGTON. 

S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. WILLIAM HALL CHURCHWARDEN 1803. 

The Frame is of a curious and clumsy construction, with two arches 
one above the other. 



KIRMOND-LE-MIRE. 

S. Martin. i Bell. 



I. Blank. 



( Diam. 12 in. 



• Saunders' Hist. Line. Vol. 11. p. 79. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 487 

Three bells were removed in 1697 from the ancient church of this 
Parish to Wragby, by Sir Edmund Turnor. 

^r^ KIRTON-IN-HOLLAND. 

S. Mary or SS. Peter and Paul. 8 Bells. 

1. In Sweetest sounds let each its Note Reveal Mine shall 

BE FIRST TO LEAD THE DULCET PeAL. T. MeARS & SON OF 

London Fecit 1807. 

( Diam. 2(^h in. ) 

2. When Female Virtue Weds With Manly Worth We catch 

the Rapture and we spread it Forth. T. Mears & Son 
of London Fecit 1807. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. Should Battles rage and sanguine foes contend We hail the 

Victor When he's Brittains friend. T. Mears & Son of 
London fecit 1807. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

4. Here let us pause & now with one accord salute the Church 

Triumphant in the Lord. T. Mears & Son of London 
FECIT 1807. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

5. May George long reign who now the sceptre sways and 

British Valour ever rule the Seas. T. Mears & Son 
of London fecit 1807. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

6. May Peace return to bless Brittannias shore and faction 

fall to raise her head no More. T. Mears & Son of 
London fecit 1807. 

(Diam. 38 in, ) 

7. Mankind alas like us are often found A tinkling Cymball 

BUT AN empty SOUND. T. MeARS & SoN OF LoNDON FeCIT 

1807. 

(Diam. /[o\ in. ) 



488 The Inscriptions on the 

8. May all whom i shall summon to the grave The Blessing of 

A WELL SPENT LiFE RECEIVE. ThE ReV° FrANCIS SwAN 

Vicar Joseph Dodds William Palethorp Church Wardens 
John Cabourn Hanger Thomas Mears & Son of London 
Fecit 1807. 

( Diara. 45^ in. ) 

Prior to 1807 there was "a noble ring of five large bells."* The 
Rev. F. Swan (see 8th bell) who was of Magdalen College, Oxford ; 
M.A., 1810; was presented to the Vicarage of this parish by the 
Mercers' Company in 1785, and to the Rectory of Winteringham, by 
the Earl of Scarborough, in 1808; he was also a Prebendary of Lincoln 
(collated in 1825) ; he died on the 23rd of February, 1845, in the g2nd 
year of his age. 

Here are Peal Boards dated 185 1 and 1856. 



1h KIRTON-IN-LINDSEY. 

5. Andrew. 6 Bells. 

1—5. 1798. 

( Diams. 31, 32I 35, 36^, 39 m. ) 

6. REV. JOHN GRAY MINISTER : WILLIAM BECK & 

THOMAS DRY ©"Ijurt^ '^^tfarbms 1798. THIS PEAL 
OF BELLS CAST BY JAMES HARRISON OF 
BARTON. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

The Churchwardens' Accounts here give some curious information 
about the bells : — 

Mcccccxxxv 

Itfn for hawefe a hyde of wytlether vj^. 



* Stukeley's liinerarium, p. 30. 



Ciiurch Bells of Lincolnshire. 489 

lira payd to roger codder for iij bautres making*... vj^. 

Itm payd to Jalyfyld for tak3^g vp of gret bell xijrf. 

It' payd fFor whet leder' to the bell baudre ji. 

[1546] 

ffor a belle as we gott off the vessetery iiiji. 

[1549 circa ] 

It' payd ffor grese to the byells ]d. 

It' payd for hempe ijs. 

It' payd for y^ maken vij^f. 

It' payd to John halefield for bell claper ix5. 

Itm paide for hemppe to the bell stryngs xvj^. 

ye makyng of y* same m]d. 

Itm paid for mendyng of the bell yoke and y" wj'clls xvj^. 

Itm paid for makyng of a belle batrey and mending viijd'. 

In 1553 when an Indented Inventory of the Church Goods belonging 
to this church was drawn up there were " iij greyt belles one sanctus 
bell."t 

The extracts from the Churchwardens' Accounts are continued : — 

1570. Itm thoms flesher a great bell clapp' 

1573. Jan. y'^ 6. paid to berye for bells mendinge vijs. vj^. 

Jan ye 6. 1573 Elizabethe 16° agred thorns berye 
to tack charge off the bells yerlye at viiJ5 & the 
town shepe to Rapaie all as his dutyes he must 
fiind strings, greas & all other charges wood Iron 
. . . and the workmanshipe excepted, 

Itm for rope to the lytell bell 

ItiTi for iij bell Rope to the chewrche iiJ5. vj^. 

1575. for three bel Ropes iiJ5. vi]d. 



' The bauderick was the leather gear in the previous entry was for use in making 

with its appurtenances attached to the the baudericks. 

upper part of the clapper, by which it was f Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. ^% 

suspended ; the half hide of whitleather P. R. Off. 

3 P 



490 The Inscriptioris on the 

To Thomas fare for mendyng the byls iijs. 

To Thomas Whatson for makeyng tharne* geare 

to the beyles xxi. 

To Thomas berye for mendynge the beyles xxiji. 

To wyllam dowsson for nales & makeyng thrne 

geare the beyles xs. 

for a stone of thyrne to the bel claper xviiji. 

for whetlether to the beyl streynges & bawetrese 

meyndeyng iiij^. 

1577. Itm paid to denis for iij bell stringes and ij cloke 

stringes vs. vj^. 

1580. Itm for a pennieworth of sope for the belles ']d. 

Itiri aganste San hew day for warke to the belles... ijs. 

1581. Itm for mendinge the belles aganste San hew day viijrf. 

1596. It' layd out for the bels mendinge iijs. iiij^. 

laid out for a bell rope xx^. 

laid out for a bell bawtrye xx^. 

layd out for Whytlether to mende the bell baw- 

tryes wyth ni]d. 

layd out for a punde of grease for y^ bells iiiji. 

1597. Itin vpon sante hue daye \\i\d. 

[ Many items for repairs to the bells ] 

1600. Itm layde forthe for the beell at lyncolne whn it 

was cayst iiijs, iiij^. 

1610. It' to M' Sawer for gettinge the little bell casten at 

lincolne xxxijs. \]d. 

Imprimis for a bautrie xxji. 

It' charges for ringing of Sainte James day xiiiji. 

161 3. It' for ringinge at vsuall times for oure Kinge and 

for mending of y^ bels vjs. 

1615, It' layd out to M' Lee the Belfounder xls. 



Iron. 



CJiurch Bells of Lincolnshire. 491 

In 1616 an entry of the weights of the three bells was made as follows: — 

The lytell bell weithe vj hundred and a half and izdi. The second 
bell weithe vij hundred and one li. The great bell weithe xiij 
hundred vj stone \li and half. 

1622. It' for ringinge of Saint James day ixi. 

1623. It' for two poundes of goose grease for the clocke 

and the bels x.v]d. 

It' for mendinge the bell bautries ijs. 

It' for ringinge charges for ringinge the xxiiij day 

of March v]d. 

[ The King's Accession. ] 

It' to the smyth for mendinge of the bels of S' 

J ames even xxi. 

It' charges for ringeinge of S' James Day xviij^. 

It' for ringinge the fifte of August viiji. 

It' for ringinge the fift day of November xiji. 

1625. It' to Ringers when the Knyghts of the shire were 

chosen xiji. 

1629. Item to Augustine Bowler for castinge the little 
bell and for charges belonginge to her xxxixs. ']d. 

1630. It' ou' chargis at Lincoln about the bell is. 

It' to Marmaduk hayer for feching her at glent- 

worthe iiij^. 

It' for hinging her iiJ5. 

Item bestowed of the ringers in Ayle for Joye of 

the younge Prince xij J. 

Item to Christopher Newham for hangeinge the 

greate bell and for nailes xviiji. 

1632. Item to Thomas Blaw when he was hyred to ring 

the bell viij^. 

Item to Thomas Blaw for ringing the bell xiijs. n\]d. 

Item to Thomas Blaw for mending the bautries ... iJ5. 
Item to the ringers of new yeare day morninge ... xijrf. 




492 The Inscriptions on the 

Item to the ringers the fift day of November ijs. 

Item to John Horsfall of Scotter the xxx day of 

March for three bell roapes xiJ5. vji. 

1638. Imp'imis for rynginge of the Crownation day the 

xxvij'*" of March ijs. 

1640. It' given to the Ringers at Christenmasse day at 

morne xijd. 

1658. It' to the Ringers on Saint Andrews day o . i . o 

The tenor bell requiring recasting Humphrey Wilkinson, bellfounder 
of Lincoln, was employed to recast it in 1676. A Bond for ^100 was 
given on the 14th November, 1676, by him with George Gilby of 
Lincoln, yeoman, as his surety to "James Dalbye gen. & John Richard- 
son mercer of Kirton in Lindsey" for the due performance of the 
contract. The condition of the Bond was thus stated : — 

The Condicon of this p'sent obligacon is such that whereas the 
above bounden Humphrey Wilkinson hath artickled w"" the above 
named James Dalby and John Richardson churchwardens of the 
f)ish of Kirton in Lindsey which artickles iointly sealed beareth 
date the sixth day of this instant September for and concerning the 
sufficient casting of the third Bell of Kirton aforesaid and other 
things theare in conteined if therefore the said Humphrey Wilkinson 
doe truely & sufficiently observe and keepe the artickles afore- 
mentioned and every thing there in conteined that then this p'sent 
obligacon to be voide or else to be and remaine in full power 
Sealed and delivered in the Humphrey Wilkinson 

presence of George Gilbye 

William Curtis 

Hervey Emanson. 

The Churchwardens' Accounts have references to this contract : — 

1676. Nov 5. Paid to the Ringers for the Pouder plott 

day o . 2 . 6 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 493 

November the 5''' Paid by order of the neighbours 

when we Artickled w"" the Bell founder 0.4.2 

Nov' 14 in charges att Lincoln when I tooke bonde 

of the Bellfounder for performance of Artickles ... 0.2.6 

for the Bond draweing 0.0.6* 

The ancient number of three bells was augmented to six in 1798, 
when the present bells were cast by James Harrison of Barton-on- 
Humber. They were rung by the Barton ringers for the first time on 
the ist day of September in that year. 

The Rev. John Gray, whose name is on the tenor bell, was Vicar of 
Hibaldstow, and "minister" or curate of Kirton. He died 6th July, 
1806, aged 55 years, and was buried in Grayingham churchyard, where 
a flat stone marks the place of his sepulture. 



^n 



KNAITH. 

S. Mary (?) i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. i2f in. ) 

This small bell, which (like many others in the county) is most 
difficult of access from the outside only by means of a long ladder, is 
covered with rust, and entirely devoid of inscription or stamp of any 
kind. 

KYME SOUTH. 

S. Mary the Virgin. i Bell. 

One small modern bell 17 inches in diameter. 



* The extracts were made by Edward Fowler, F.S.A., to whom I am indebted 
Peacock, Esq., F.S.A., for the Rev. J. T. for them. 



494 The Inscriptions on the 



I KYME NORTH. 

S. Luke. i Bell. 

One small modern bell in a turret. 



3^n LACEBY. 

S. Margaret. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + 117] miM^M'W^ : (BM ; MMrmf-M.:m:]^'iB-w 

[ O O O O O O Six coins on sound bow. ] 
( Diam. 34 in. ) 

2. [ + 41 ] nMmM. [ □ 45 ] ^,^x3a:]^,^:iFi,^ [ □ 45 ] 

:h3[^ [ □ 45 1 ix?i :fei€):Ei<i)m©" [ □ 45 ] 

MM.'Mi^WJ- [ ° 45 ] ,^'lM:@^l£i:.e^3::ii^l 

( Diam. 38I- in. ) 
3. SOLI DEO GLORIA PAX HOMINIBVS 1712 [ d 168.] 

( Diam. 40^^ in. ) 

Priesfs Bell : — 

[ a 97] 
( Diam. 17^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 108, and Plates VI. and XXIV. 

In 1553 there were here " iij great belles & one Sanctus bell."* 

Two of those ancient bells still remain. 

The inscription on the ist is in rather small gothic capital letters 
which, with the same cross, are upon the single bell at Manton. 

Of S. Mary of Hawardby — or Hawerby, as the place is now called — a 
village not far from Laceby, nothing is now known. As the Images 



Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 495 

of Mary of Walsingham,* and Dervel Gadarnf had wide reputations — 
the former in England, the latter in North Wales — so, doubtless, there 
were, in pre- Reformation times, many others whose reputations were 
local — confined to the immediate neighbourhood in which they stood. 
As is well known, a figure or painted representation of the Patron Saint of 
the church was very generally set up therein ; thus, to quote Lincolnshire 
examples, at Belton, in the Isle of Axholme (All Saints) there was " an 
Idol of all halowes ; " at Corby (S. John the Evangelist) there was an 
" Image of St. Johnne Evang , . ; " at Edenham there were " the images 
of Saint Michael being patron of the churche ; " at Folkingham an 
" Image called St. Andrewe vppon the wch the parish church of ffolk- 
inghm drewe his name;" and at Gayton-le-Marsh was "a picture of 
St. George" the patron of that church. It is equally well known that 
other Images in addition to that of the Patron Saint were also placed 
in churches : thus at Bassingham, dedicated to S. Michael we find a 
figure of "peter; " at Bonby it is recorded that in addition to the usual 
figures of SS. Mary and John from the rood-loft, other " such like Idols " 
were burned ;t so at Hawerby, where the church is dedicated to S. 
Margaret, there was, without doubt, a much esteemed figure of the 
B. V. Mary, the only memorial of which is preserved on this bell at 
Laceby. 

* Edward IV. undertook a pilgrimage was the image from the offerings of the 
to our Lady of Walsingham to avert a pilgrims, that the parson and the parish- 
great calamity which was supposed to be ioners offered a bribe of £4,0 to the Com- 
foretold by extraordinary appearances in missioner-General of the diocese to induce 
the air. See Dugdale's Monasticon (Ed. him to allow the image to remain. It was, 
1817, Vol. II. p. 104). however, sent to London, and was con- 

f There was {temp. Henry VIII.) a sumed in the same fire in Smithfield with 

famous wooden image of Dervel Gadarn an unfortunate friar named Forrest, who 

in the church of Llandderfel in Edeyrnion, was burnt on the 30th May, 1538, for 

Merionethshire, to which people came in denying the King's supremacy.— /irr/;. Ca;«- 

great numbers, and from great distances, brensis, April, 1874, p. 152. 
with offerings of every kind — " somme with % Peacock's Ch. Fuv. pp. 45, 61, 74, 80, 

Kyne, other with oxen or horsis, & the 83, 41, 53. 
teste withe money." Indeed so profitable 



4g6 The Inscriptions on the 

The inscription on the 2nd bell (like the single bell at Bag Enderby) 
is in well executed bold gothic letters. 



3 - LANGRICK VILLE. 

— ? I Bell. 

This modern church, erected in 1818, has one small bell. 



J ,i LANGTOFT. 

S. Michael. ' 5 Bells. 

1,2. [ + 2 ] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1662. 
( Diams. 31, 34^ in. ; both turned. ) 

3. JOHN SPINNEL CHURCHWARDEN EDWARD ARNOLD 

FECIT 1772 -H ^- 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

4. Rev^ John Mossop Rector John Gee Churchwarden 1810. 

T. Mears & Son of London Fecit. 
(Diam. 381 in. ) 

5. T. Mears of London Fecit 1825. 

( Diam. 42^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbells," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold and 
defaced.* 

The Rev. John Mossop (4th bell) of Queen's College, Oxford ; M.A. 
1799 ; appears to have done occasional duty here in 1779 when he was 
Curate of Dunsby. He became Vicar of Baston in 1781 and of this 
parish in 1801, being then also Curate of Deeping S. James. He 
appears to have held that curacy and the Living of Baston until his 
death in 1834. He was buried at Deeping S. James. By his Will he 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. m. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 497 

left lands in Baston, Langtoft, and Deeping S. James for the benefit 
of poor widows in those parishes.* 

See under Baston for a tradition as to these bells. 

^^"^'LANGTON [by Horncastle]. 

S. Margaret. i Bell. 

I. ANNO DOMINI 1579 R.G. 

In 1553 Langton in Gartree Wapentake possessed " iij gret bells & a 
sanctus bell."t 

^ ^ LANGTON S. ANDREW. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 12 in. ) . . 

A modern bell ; the church was erected in 1847. 

^^^ LANGTON-BY-PARTNEY. 

5. Peter. 6 Bells. 

1, 3, 4, 5. CAST BY T. MEARS LONDON 1825. 

( Diams. 28, 32, 34, 36 in. ) 

2. WE WERE GIVEN BY JOHN STEPHEN LANGTON 

LORD OF THIS FREE WARREN. CAST BY T. 
MEARS LONDON 1825. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

6. ARE YOU PREPARED FOR ME TO CALL YOU. CAST 

BY T. MEARS LONDON 1825. 
( Diam. 38 in. ) 

* See Gent. Mag. Vol. iii. N. S. (1835), f ^^"^ Revenue Records. Bundle 1392, 

p. 103. File 79, P. R. Off. 

3 Q 



498 The Inscriptions on the 

In 1552, when the Inventory of Church Goods belonging to "Lanton 
juxta .ptnay " was made, the bells and their value were entered thus : — 

It' iij bells and one litle belle 'idi* 

John Stephen Langton, Esq., the donor of the present bells — 
descended from a long line of ancestors said to have been settled here 
for 800 years — was the son of George Langton by his wife Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thomas Main waring, Esq. He died in the year 1833, aged 
37 years. He gave (writes the Rector of the Parish) a ring of the 
sweetest bells in Lincolnshire to one of the ugliest churches in 
Christendom. t 



LANGTON-BY-WRAGBY. 

S. Giles. 4 Bells. 

I, 2, 3. 1822. 

( Diams. 27^, 28^, 31 in. ) 
4. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1822. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

Inside the large bell is inscribed : — 

These bells were hung Dec 21. 1822 T Bartholomew Church- 
warden J. Pinon Clerk. 

LAUGHTON. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I. REV^^ RICHARD ATKINSON A : B : CURATE JOHN 
WRIGHT CHURCHWARDEN 1841. 
( Diam. 34 in. ) 



• Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, f See a Pedigree of this family in Hill's 

File 78, P. R. Off. Langton, &c., p. 18. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 499 

[ D 107 ] (Bm:M^M mm:m<^wj- m^MMm^ 

( Diam. 37^ in. ) 
3. [ n 107 ] ^fc tampans jg'atra ^iat ^rhutate ^eala 1607 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. and page 114. 

In 1553 there were here " iij great bells j sanctus bell."* 

In 1565 the churchwardens reported that "one handbell" did "yet 
remayne," and that the " sacring bell," with other things, were "made 
awaie but the aboue named churchwarde can not learne how thei were 
gon."t 

The Priest's bell (probably the old Sanctus bell recast) was removed 
to the chapel-of-ease at Wildsworth, when it was built there in 1838. 
(See under Wildsworth.) 

The bell- frames were thoroughly repaired in 1877. The ist bell was 
cast by Harrison. 

LAVINGTON or LENTON. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. [ ij 124 a 126 D 125 n 76. ] 

( Diam. 28f in. ) 

2. [IJ124] ^uius gd ibmunbi. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. [ + 116] %^M'^^ ps^ <2>"T^:Ei m:^^:j^m 

I'M. ^ 149 and 150 ] [ D 153 ] [ ©" fieur-de-lys ^ ] 
Band ornament [ d 118 D 115.] 
( Diam. 34 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages iii, 113, 112, 79, 107, 123, Plate XXII., page 
108, and Plate XVII. 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. /^, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 112. 



500 The Inscriptions on the 

In 1565-6 the chiircliwardens reported that " one sacringe bell," 
which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's days, had passed into 
the hands of " M' Edmond Haselwood of Handbie graung," who " had 
and vsed [it] in his house (as he said) to call worck folke to dinner."* 

The bells have recently been rehung in new frames. 



LEA. 
S. Helen. 4 Bells. 

1. Jo^n ^aglor anb ^on of Ji^tougliborottgb 1853 + !Ii^ot wi^to us. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. Joljn ^aglor anb ^on founbcrs J^iougljiborouglj 1853 + ©lorji to ©ob. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

3- John 'II3ngIor anb ^on founbcrs J^ongbltotroug^ + on eartlj pcare. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

4- Jo^n ^aglor anb ^on fonnbers J^ongljborouglj mbmliii. 

jEn Ijon : ^ei : <^^i : X3Cla,¥ : 
ft tomm : ^Ei : ^ : JlfobjE in %vis : 
XHabrr : ol : ©"tcl : ,^ng : fib : pwb : 
ct . cap . 1852. 
( Diam. 32 in. ; key C. ) 

In 1553 there were here " iij grat belles. "t 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbelles," borrowed 
of John Hodgson, " late bayle of Lea in the tyme of Quene Marie," had 
been returned to him at the death of the Queen; and that "one 
sacringe bell," which the parish had borrowed of William Theaker at 
the same time, had also been returned to him.j 

The three " great bells " hanging here in the reign of Edward VI. 
probably remained until the commencement of the present century. 
At that time three bells were taken down, the tenor is said to have been 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 114. | Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. 5^, P. R. Off. 
X Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 113. 



Church Bells of Lincolnsliire. 501 

sold to the parish of Willingham, a village about three miles from 
hence, and the two smaller ones cast into four light bells by Harrison 
of Barton-on-Humber. These four bells constituted the ring until the 
year 1853, when they were recast into the present ring by the Lough- 
borough founders* [see under Willingham-by-Stow], under circum- 
stances recorded thus on a brass plate over the door of the belfry : — 

To the praise and glory of God 
The four bells in this tower were recast into a heavier peal, and 
humbly offered to Almighty God in this church and parish of Lea 
A.D. 1853 by the congregation in Madeira of the Rev. Richard 
Thomas Lowe M.A. in thankfulness for his ministry and in recog- 
nition of the service rendered by him to the church at large as 
chaplain in Madeira from A.D. 1832 to A.D. 1852. 

Mr. Lowe continued to act as chaplain at Madeira, during three months 
every year, for many years ; he was eventually drowned on his way out, 
the vessel and all on board being lost. 



si LEADENHAM. 

S. SwiTHiN. 6 Bells. 



C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1855. 



VENITE EXVLREMVS. 
Blank. 

DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST VS ALL IN 1723. 

ERA. MEYMOT T CARTER C W 1723. 

RECAST A.D. 1S68 

REVD OFFLEY SMITH M.A. VICAR 

JOSEPH MORLEY ROBERT HARVEY CHURCHWARDENS 

MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON. 

Prior to 1855 (when the treble was added) there were only five bells. 

* Ex. infor. Sir Charles Anderson, Bart. 



502 The Inscriptions on the 



^'1 3 LEAKE. 

Mary. - 6 Bells. 

J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1878. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 
THE CHVRCHIS PRAIS I SOVND ALL WAYS 1751 
THOs HEDDERLY FOUNDER. 
( Diam. 30+ in. ) 
[ + I ] RICHARD FYNN JOHN CLAY W BAWTREE 
BENEFACTORS TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 1682. 
( Diam. 32-| in. ) 
GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH SKYNER BAILY VIC. ROB 
FRAMCIS WARDED 1750. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 
[06] THOMAS NORRIS MADE ME 1642. 

( Diam. 37^ in. ) 

[+2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE ME 1655 TB W T. 

( Diam. 41 in.) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 53. 
Prior to 1S78 there were only five bells. 
The Register has the following : — 

Memorandum that the ist and 2nd Bells in Leake were purchased 

in the year of our Lord God 1682 by voluntary subscription as 

follows : — 

£. s. d. 

Richard Fynn & Richard his son 7.0.0 

Henry Conington 5.0.0 

Jacob Conington 5.0.0 

John Clay 5.0.0 

W" Lawson 8 . o . o 

Abram Lawson 5.0.0 

John Boultall of Cambridge 3 . o . o 

William Bawtree 3 . o . o 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 503 

The sum contributed was just £6^. though some of the Benefactors 
are forgotten, the register being burned September 8th, 1700. The 
above are fairly and faithfully recorded by me 

Jacob Conington 

Vicar of Leake.* 

The Rev. Skyner Bailey was instituted as Vicar in 1729, and held 
the living until 1764. 

Tradition asserts that a bell belonging to Leake was lost in the Fen 
near Eastville during its transit from the foundry to the church. A 
dyke in Eastville is still known as Bellwater Drain. 



LEAKE. 

Christ Church. i Bell. 

The small bell here, which does not weigh i cwt., was supplied by a 
tradesman at Hull. 

LEASINGHAM. 

S. Andrew. 4 Bells. 

1. [+116] -^-M^MT^M ;]©©■ ©"^^m M^^^:m 

1617. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. [ + ii6] ^(d:id MMsyr^ WM^ K3E:m© 1617. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. [ + 116] ©(DD© SMSW^ MJ-M <STK'yrm<sr-Bi 

I6I7. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

4- [^\%] -H [+140] S [ + 140.] 

( Diam. 42 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107, Plate XV., and pages 114 and iiS. 



• Kindly extracted by the Rev. H. J. Swallow. 



504 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 



LEGBOURNE. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1863. 

[ Royal Xj Anns. ] 

PATENT, 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

2. ^ [ + 140] ^ [ + 140] -S [ + 140-] 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH 1706 [ O 7. ] 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 118 and 59. 

LEGSBY. 

S. Thomas. i Bell. 

There being no ladder within a reasonable distance I have not been 
able to get this small bell — a mere ting-tang and most probably devoid 
of inscription — examined. Many years ago there was this local rhyme: — 

A little ting-tang in a little steeple, 

or 
A thack church and a wooden steeple, 
A drunken parson and wicked people. 



LEVERTON. 

S. Helen. 4 Bells. 

1. [ + 2] THOMAS • NORRIS • MADE • ME • AND • THE • 

REST • OF • MY • FELLOWES • AS • YOV ■ MAY • 

SE • 1635. 

( Diam, 30:^ in. ) 

2. JOHN FAWCETT CHURCHWARDEN 1819. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



505 



3. EL • READING • RI • MOANKE • RI • LAWES • JO • 

GREENE 1635. 

( Diam. 34^ in. ) 

4. [ + 2 ] W • CLAY • AL • MVCKBODIE • CH • WA • 1635 • 

F • BOWMAN • E • PINCHBECK • RECTORS. 
( Diam. 37! in. ) 

For Stamps see page 52. 

The Churchwardens' Accounts here are unusually well preserved. 
The following extracts refer to the bells : — 



1492. 



1495- 



1498. 



1503- 



n p'imo sol' Joh'i Clark p emend vni' bell coler ... ji. 

t' sol' Thoe Silam p fact' viij° I'i hempe ij^. 

t' sol' Walt' Wytnese p trussyng of y^ bells v]d. 

t' sol' Edm° Hopkynson p emen' campan' ]d. 

tm sol' p le Carage magne campane iJ5. iiiji. 

tiri sol' f) le trossyng dse campane iJ5. m]d. 

tm sol' Willmo wryght de Bennyngton p le hengyng 

if y^ grette belle \]s. 

tm for a ston hempe to y^ bellstryng vd. 

t' for makyng of y'' same hempe m.]d. 

tin payd for belstrynges \d. 

trn payd to y^ Smyt of leke for hyngyng of y" bells w]d. 

tin payd for makyng clen of y* bell hows lofte ]d.^ 

tin payd to Wittm Wryth for y^ bell welys xiiij^. 

tin payd for bellstryng \]d. oh. 

tin payd to John Clarke for makyng of a bawdre* 

o y' bell ]d. 

tin payd to Wyllm Wryth for makyng of y' bell 

wellst xij^. 

tin for makyng of a coller to y' lyttyll bell ]d. 

tin in expencys at boston whan y*" bell was schott x\d. 

tin payd for a bell clapper dressyng at boston iJ5. 



• Bauderick. 

3 R 



f Wheels. 



t Cast. 



5o6 The Inscriptions on the 

Itiii payd to John Dalbe for bavdree makyng to y" 

bells vji. 

Itm payd for a handbell makyng at boston viji. 

Itni payd to Rici messur whan y" bells was last 

hungyn vjd. 

Itm payd for y^ Sancte bell stryng iji. 

Itni payd for a hand bell makyng at boston vji. 

Itm payd to y^ plummar for makyng of y' Sant' 

bell vj^. 

Itm payd to John Red bellgedar* of boston for 

schotyng of a bell iij/j. vJ5. viiji/. 

Itm in expencys at y' samtyme v^. 

1506. Itm payd for tackytts to the bell wells ijd. 

Itm payd to John Walcar for makyng of y^ sam 

bell well iiij^. 

Itm payd for makyng of a bolder to y^ bell qwell... }d. 

Itm payd for makyng of ij bell stryngs iji. 

Itm payd for a stryng to the Sants bell ob. 

15 1 2. Itin Resseuyd of Rici' messur for ye hold bell 

clapers xixd. 

Expencys. 

In the forst payd in Ernyst whan wye fest hour 

bells to make iiij^. 

Itni in expencys the sam day at boston viiji. 

Itiii in expencys a noder day at boston whan Mast' 

pson was ther viiji. 

Itiri in expencys thayt day hour bells war schotte iiJ5. viiji. 

Itm payd for strykyng of the bylls iijd. 

Itiii payd for pawp ob. 

Itiii in expencys whan wye fette the bells fro boston viiji. 

Itm in expencys at boston for John Aclyf & John 

harthro iiij<^. 

* Bellyeter, i.e., bellfounder. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 507 

I Itin payd to lenard pynchbec of boston in payrt of 

payment for hour bells gyddynge* v\]li. ixs, 

Itm payd for iiij bolders to hour bells iiJ5. iiiji^. 

Itm payd for ij baddryks to ye bells vn]d. 

lira in expencys in bred & alle whan y^ bells wer 

weyd \n]d. 

Itm payd to the Smyth of Bennyngton xxi. 

Itm payd for ij oblygacyon wrytyng in boston xji. 

Itm to John hauthro for hyngyng of the bells... xxvJ5. viiji. 

Itm payd the last pay for hour bells vij//. \s. \\\.]d. 

Itm payd to harry Est gate for clymyng to y^ sante 

bell id. 

Itm payd for iij Kayys makyng & mendyng y^ start 

of y* sante bell ix^. 

15 15. Itin payd for clement y^ wryth whan I fet hym to 

se hour bells i]d. 

Itin payd for Clement y° wryth denarf & for 

arewarde v]d. 

Itiii payd to John Wallcar for a day wyrkyng abwt 

ys bell wells vj^. 

1516. Itin payd for the terment of Water bussche & hys 
wyfe to prestys & clarks & ryngyng & bred & all 

& chesse V5. 

1517. Itm payd for a ston hempe to make bell stryngs wyth ixi. 

Itm payd for makyng of y'' sam hempe \d. 

Itin payd for the santus bell makyng iJ5. 

1520. Itin sol' pro linia ad puam campanam vocat sanct' 

bell pulsand ]d.ob. 

1524. Itm Recevyd of John hopkynson for y' bequeth of 

Wyllya hopkyson hys ffader to the bells xij^. 

Itm payd to Wylla Josson carpentar for helpyng of 

y* bellfray agayns halomese \d. 



* Yetting, i.e., casting. f The wright's dinner. 



5o8 The Inscriptions on the 

Itm payd to the Smyth for ij sacrye bell clapersse i]d. 

Itin payd for a ston & a halfe of hempe for bell 

stryngs & for makyng of y' same xvd.ob. 

1526. payd to nycholas y' smyth for a wyndyng of yryn 

to y*" sec'nd bell whele ij^. 

payd in expens whan wyllyam Josson carpenter 

helpyd the bell fraym iij^. 

payd to thomas Walkar for fellyng & hewyng of 

iiji. 

paid to gylbert dayle of boston for tymber xxxs. viij^. 

paid to laurens belman of boston for tymber ixs. 

paid in expn at bryng of y* said tymber jd. 

paid to wyllyam Josson for helpyng to chewes y^ 

said tymber & helpyng of y^ bells y'njd. 

paid for drawyng of y" tymber ov' y* bargn y' was 

bought of laurens bellman vji. 

paid in expen att cartyng of the tymber at boston iiijo^. 

paid for a ston of hempe & makyng of y^ same in 

bellstryngs xd. 

paid for hyngyng vp of y' santt' bell stryng jd. 

paid to Rodlay ye wryght for me'dyng of y^ bells 

agayns halomes [Hallowmas] iiiji. 

1528. Itiii for the obbit of Walt' busche & Margar Walt' 
& Agnes for breed x\id. for aile xijd. for a ston of 

chese ixd for dirige iji. for Ryngyng iji. [&c.] 

Itm for a bolte of yryn & ij haspis & ij forloks 

for y^ sec'nd bell iji. 

paid for a new bawdryke to y*" littyll bell to John 

busche seni' ijd. 

paid to John busche y^ eld for a bawdrycke to the 

secund bell ijd. 

paid for a littill sanct antony bell* id. 

* See p. 197. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 509 

153 1. Rec. of Ric. Sylame for y* Rent of grafte crofte 

with y* makyng of y^ bell strynges iiijs. 

It' paid to Nicolas y^ smyth for y^ sanctus bell & 

helpyng of it agan iJ5. iiijW. 

It' paid to Stephen Wodows for chaungyng of y" 

sanct' bell X5. \d. 

It' to hug Sleforth for ij tymes hengyngof y*" sanct' 

bell xvj^. 

Under this date the following memorandum is entered, from which 
it appears that the price of three acres of land had been expended upon 
the bells, instead of (as intended by the testator) in the purchase of 
a cope : — 

Also for reformacon of last wylle of wait' bowsche latt of leu'ton 
wyllyd yn ys last will iij acr land to be solid to by a cope wt and 
the f)hysconars*^ at that tyme dyde sell foresayd iij acr land and 
mayd thei bells there wt wytche was agans good conshans.f 

1533. It' to Rye' smyt for makyng of y* bell clapper \]d. 

It' for V quarters hempe for bell strygs xi. 

It' for makyng y'^ saym hympe vd. 

1537. ffyrst payd to William lyme y' he layd out to the 

smyght for medyng of the lytyll bell ij^. 

Itin payd vnto Johne busche that he layd forthe 

to the smyght for the Santt' bell iiijoi. 

Itm payd to Robertt Jordan carpynter wan we fest 

the bell frame w* hym for erts [ earnest ] xviiJ5.iiijrf. 

Itm payd to the same Robertt Jordan Carpynter 
wan he had done hys bargane xb. 



* Parishioners. to in the text. The bells had been in- 

f The obits of Walter Bussche and his creased in number twenty years previously, 

wife were commemorated in this church. as may be inferred from the entries of 

He probably was the benefactor referred payments. 



5 TO Tlie Inscriptions on the 

Itm payd for the brekefast wan the bell frame and 

the bells rassed at Wyberds xxiji. 

Itni payd to William Wytton for makyng clene of 

the bell layft iiiji. 

Itm payd to the clarke for Ryngyng for John grene 

wyffe ij^. 

1538. Itm payd to davyt the wryght for helpyng of the 

bells and thayr wells for wags ijs. iiijd. 

Itin payd for hemppe for stryngs to y" bells x^. 

Itm payd for makyng of y' same to Rye' by- 
land vd. 

Itm payd for hale whan we war abowt the bells 

and wan we fest y^ wryght to bord ij^. 

Itm payd for bording of y^ wryght xiiiji. 

Itm payd for drynke wan we payd hym jd. 

Itm payd to John busche for on daye wt davyd a 

bowt the bells for wages and bord iiiji. 

1543. fFyrst payd to Wyllam grestcroft y^ eldther of leeke 

for helpyng of the bell fraye xjs. 

Itm payd for hym and his compeny whan he come 

to seytt att John benetts in drynk vji. 

Itm payd for bred and drynke whan he [the smith] 
was a bowtte the bells and whan he mayd a nende 
off them att John benetts to the ryngers for to se 

how y''' went iiiji. 

Itm payd for iij bell tonges n}d. 

Itm payd for wytt ladder medyng off the bauderethe 

of the bells iiij^. 

1546. It' for a lether whonge to yMyttle bell iijJ. 

It' to pedd' for trussyng y^said bell vjd. 

It' to M' sleford for hyngyng vp y' said bell xiji. 

1556. It' p'' for mendynge the belles vpon alhallow 

nyght vjd. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 511 

It' p*" for the full contentation of the ryngeres vpon 
alhallow nyght* xixoi. 

1557. It' pd for the full paymet of the ryngeres vpon 
psalmes nyghtf over & besyds towe & twentye 

penes gatheryd of the paryshyoners xiiijf/. 

1558. It' pd to John Randawle for shottynge the for bell 
clapper xijt^. 

1580. Impmis pd to Thorns Skottyll for one daye worke 

aboute the bells before St hewe day viiji. 

1581. Itm rec. of henrye hopkynson for the bequeste of 
Richarde Slowe for Belstryngs xx^. 

1583. Itin pd to John Randoll Smythe for mackynge y' 

goginge for y'' second bell [&c.] iijs. 

1585. Itm pd for bread & ale to y^ ringers on S' hewe day xiiji. 

1586. Itm pd to the rynggers on St. hewe day xiji. 

1589. Itm pd to y' Ringgers of S' hughe day iJ5. 

1590. Itm pd to ij Ringers of S' hughe dale iiij^- 

Itiii for Bread & drinke the same daie iJ5. 

Itm for candle & grece on S hughe day \\i]d. 

Itm pd to the Smith ifor Iron worke for the second 

Bell called St. Peter iiJ5. iiij^^. 

Itm pd to Jo. Wilson for Trussinge her vp iJ5. 

1594. Itm expended on the Ringgers the xvij day of 
Novemberl xixr/. 

1595. Itm pd to the ringgers on St huge day xijJ. 

Itm pd on St hughe day for Bread drinke & candle xiij^. 

1597. Itm for sope against St hughe day n]d. 

Itm for Bread on SMiughes even iij(/. 

1598. Itm pd for Bread & drinke on S' hugh's day ijs. iij^. 



• At this time bells were tolled during f Psalmes— soul mas (see p. 229). 

the whole night of All Hallows, and con- % S- Hugh's Day, the day of Queen 

tinued on the morrow on All Souls' Day Elizabeth's accession, 
(see p. 227-8). 



512 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

Itni pd to viij ringgers on St hughes day iiijs, 

Itin for candle id. 

1599. Itm pd to John Wilson for a newe bushe for the 

great bell & mendinge fallts about thoth' bells ... \]d. 

Itm pd for bread drinck & cheeze for y^ ring" on 

St Hugh day V5. 

1600. Itm pd to Anthon}^ harte for a strick of mawlt 
brewed against St Hewgh day for ringers then ... iiJ5. m]d. 

1601. Itm pd for a strike mawlt for the Ringers against 

St Hughes day ijs. viij^. 

Itm pd for two peckes of wheat and rye and for 

grindinge it iJ5. 

Itm pd for grease & candle then \\]d. 

1602. [Malt, wheat & rj^e against S. Hugh's day] 

It' pd for Thre stone of Beif & white bread that 
day expended \]s. 

1610. Itm pd for bread & drinke for the ringher the 

fifte of November iJ5. \]d. 

1612. Pdfor Aile breade Cake & cheese on Ringinge day viijs. \]d.* 

The names of the churchwardens on the 4th bell have been read as 
one name " W. Clay alias IMuckbodie," the first being a supposed 
refined alias of the second; but under the date 1635 in the Register is 
this entry : — 

Willyam Clay 



,, , ,. , Churchwardens. 
Alexander Muckboddie ) 

The appearance of the names of two Rectors on the same bell is 
explained by the fact that Leverton had formerly two distinct rectories, 
which were called the boreal and the austral medieties. The tithes of 
the parish were equally divided between the two rectors, and each of 



• For the above extracts I am much and to the Rev. W. W. Mason, Rector of 
indebted to the Rev. J. T. Fowler, F.S.A., Leverton. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 513 

them possessed a separate rectory house, both of which stood within a 
small enclosed space on the south eastern side of the churchyard. This 
arrangement was in force until the two medieties were consolidated by 
an Act of Parliament passed in 1800.* 

Francis Bowman was Rector of the south mediety and Edmund 
Pinchbeck that of the north mediety. f 

Formerly there was no floor between the ringers below and the bells 
above, and on one occasion, it is said, a clapper broke away from a 
bell, whilst ringing was going on, and killed a ringer below. 



^7 "-" LIMBER MAGNA. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 116] ©(d:© mm.~w^ 'M%m mMy^isimM. 

1595 [ n 113- ] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. [ + 116] -f_mMTrM PB©- (D'yrm ^)^©":E)ef 1595 

[ n 113] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. [ + 116] ©(d:e) mmtw^ (D"T^:Ei (^~Tr^^:m^m 

1595 [ a 113] 

[ n 114] 
( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plates XVI. and XVII. 

These are three uniform and well preserved bells by Henry Oldfield 
of Nottingham, with the inscriptions in his fine large gothic letters. 
The 3rd has the Royal Arms of Queen Elizabeth. They are chimed 
by levers instead of wheels. 



* Thompson's Boston, p. 557. f lb. p. 55S. 

3 s 



514 T^^i^ Inscriptions on the 



■\ LINCOLN GUILDHALL. 

:m,^jQEi :H(Dm@r m^mi Mm%m<^^^ 



( Diam, 2oi- in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XVIII. 

Though not belonging to a church this is too curious a bell to be 
omitted in an account of the campanology of the county. It is probably 
the most interesting ancient Mote bell existing in the kingdom. 

Mercatorial Guilds were in existence in Lincoln, as in other large 
towns, before the Norman Conquest, and enjoyed special privileges. 

By a charter of Richard I., dated in 1195, the citizens were to have, 
once a w^eek, a Burgwardmote, or meeting of the Burg-wardens, that 
is, in modern idiom, a Common Council. 

By a charter of King John, signed 23rd April, 1200, the citizens were 
allowed to elect two provosts, instead of one as previously, to take the 
chief management of the city, and to be removable at the will of the 
Common Council. It was early in the thirteenth century, perhaps in 
the reign of King John, that the supremacy of the civil power, formerly 
enjoyed by the pvepositiis or provost, was transferred to another individual 
designated in mediaeval Latinity Majoy Civitatis, and in the vernacular 
speech, the Mayor of the city. At what time, and in what manner, this 
important dignit}'^ was first conferred on the chief citizen is not perhaps 
ascertainable, as there is no mention of such person in any of the pre- 
ceding records : nor is it shown whether or not these early Mayors were 
possessed of the same magisterial power as was vested in their sue- 



Church Bells of Lmcolnshire. 515 

cessors. On the Pipe Rolls, in the year 1210, it is stated that the 
citizens of Lincoln owed the exchequer ;^ioo that they might have 
Adam for their Mayor so long as he pleased the King. However, before 
the middle of the thirteenth century several citizens had enjoyed the 
dignity of Major Civitatis, and had held a rank above that of the ancient 
Provosts, who, about that period, are mentioned by the name of 
Bailiffs. The citizens were several times deprived of their Mayor, 
specially in 1290, when the King instead of a Major Civitatis appointed 
a Custos Civitatis, who undertook the farming of the city, and all its 
revenues arising from tolls, rents, &c., then fallen into the King's hands : 
nor was it till the end of the century that the office was restored. At 
the close of the year 1300 the King came to Lincoln, where he stayed 
for some time, for the purpose of holding a Parliament, and the citizens, 
it appears, while he was their guest, besought him to restore them their 
Mayor and to confirm their charters, which he did. 

By a charter of Edward IIL, given 7th October, 1327, " a Burgman- 
mote was to be held once a week in the Guild Hall, on the monday, by 
the Mayor & Bailiffs, and all pleas of the aforesaid city were there to 
be held & impleaded before them without interference from the officers 
of the King, except in pleas of transgressions, conventions, & contract 
made in the King's Hospice," &c., &c.* 

The Mayor of Lincoln was firmly on his seat when the present 
Guildhall bell (the inscription on which probably refers to the hearing 
of these " pleas ") was provided in the year 1371. (See p. 255.) 



o7 LINCOLN CATHEDRAL. 

The earliest date in connection with the bells of Lincoln Cathedral 
is mentioned by Stukeley,t who states that a gift of two was made by 
Robert de Chesney, the fourth Bishop of the Diocese (1148 — 1167), and 
the builder of the ancient Bishop's Palace ; but as I find no authority 



* Civitas Lincolinia, pp. 71-6. f Itincrarium, p. 92. 



5i6 The Inscriptions on the 

for this statement, it will be well to consider Geoffry Plantagenet, the 
natural son of King Henry II,, who held the temporalities of the See, 
but was never consecrated its Bishop, as the first recorded donor of 
bells to the Cathedral Church of Lincoln. He gave (a.d. 1173 — 1182) 
to the Cathedral, amongst other ornaments, a pair of large and sonorous 
bells. Giraldus Cambrensis says: — - 

Ipse quoque ornatus ecclesiae suae plurimum propriis donariis 
amplificavit. Cui et inter cetera quoque campanas duas grandes, 
egregias atque sonoras devota largitione donavit.* 

This pair of bells hung in one of the western towers, the lower parts 
of which were erected about the year 1140. What bells the Cathedral 
possessed prior to Geoffry Plantagenet's gift, and whether his bells were 
the predecessors of the ring in S. Hugh's steeple, or of " Great Tom," 
which originally hung in the North-western Tower, cannot now be 
determined. 

Two more bells, as we shall see presently, were placed in the Central, 
Broad, or Rood Tower, wheii that magnificent structure was raised by 
Bishop John D'Alderby (1307-11). 

These four ancient bells were, as I take it, the precursors of those 
for w'hich Lincoln was so long famous, namely, " Great Tom," originally 
placed in the North-w-estern Tower; the ring in the South-western 
Tower, usuall}^ called S. Hugh's Steeple ; and the fine ring of six 
Lady Bells, which, until the present century, graced the Central, Broad, 
or Rood Tower. In attempting to give an account of these bells it will 
be well to do so in the three divisions just indicated, commencing with 
those which no longer exist— the Lady Bells. 

The Lady Bells. 

In the year 1307 John D'Alderby, consecrated Bishop of Lincoln 
seven years previously, issued letters of indulgence, in which, after 



* Giraldus Cambrensis [Opera, Vol. vii. Ed. John de Schalby {lb. p. 198) has the 
P- 37)' ^'^^'^ 5. Rcmigii, Master of Rolls' same passage. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. ^ly 

setting forth the duty of paying special reverence to the Blessed Virgin, 
he desired the faithful to assist in raising the central tower of the 
Cathedral to her honour. This was done in so sumptuous a manner 
that the magnificent structure is pronounced not only the highest, but 
the finest, central tower in England. The appeal of the Bishop was 
made at a time when the reverence paid to the Virgin had reached its 
meridian in this country — when England was called " Our Lady's 
Dower" as Ireland the "Island of Saints" — it is therefore not sur- 
prising that means were at once forthcoming which enabled him to 
prosecute the work so rapidly that four years afterwards — in 131 1 — we 
read of the executors of Gilbert D'Eivill, formerly a treasurer of the 
church, being condemned in the cost of two ropes for the bells then 
lately hung in the new tower. The Chapter Act Book has the following 
entry : — 

Memorandum quod die Sabbati proxime post Festum Sanctorum 
Fabiani et Sebastiani [i.e. Saturday 23 Jan. 131 1] Decano et ceteris 
canonicis residentibus more solito in capitulo congregatis condemp- 
nati fuerunt executores testamenti Domini Gilberti Deivill quondam 
Thesauraril, ecclesiae Lincoln in duabus cordis campanarum tunc 
noviter in medio campanili suspensarum. 

The two bells, thus provided with ropes, were the precursors of the 
ring of the six Lady Bells which gave the name of Lady-Bell-Steeple 
to the new tower. 

When the number of bells was increased from two to six, and 
whether the increase was gradual (which, as will be shown, is most 
probable), or made at one time, cannot now be said. When the Muni- 
ments belonging to the Dean and Chapter are arranged and made 
consultable, which useful work is now being gradually carried out by 
Canon Wickenden, some light will doubtless be thrown upon their 
history. At present the Computus for the year 1593, when four of these 
bells were cast, is missing, and though the Chapter Acts for 1633 and 
1737 are accessible, they give no information about the other two bells 
cast in those years. 



5i8 The Inscriptions on the 

In 1834, when these bells were taken down for removal to London, 
they were found to be inscribed as under : — 

1. Jesus be our speed 1633. 

2. Soli Deo Gloria in excelsis. Daniel Hedderly Founder 1737. 

3. Cum voce sonora Thomam Campana laudet 1593. 

4. Sum Rosa pulsata mundi Katerina vocata 1593. 

5. In multis annis resonat Campana Johannis 1593. 

6. Sum Rosa pulsata mundi Maria vocata 1593. 

The four largest bells bore the founder's mark fig. 105, Plate XV., 
showing them to have been cast by Robert Quernbie and Henry Oldfield 
(see p. 104) who, doubtless, reproduced the inscriptions found on the 
old bells then recast. The tenor note is said to have been one note 
above that of the present tenor of the ring of eight in S. Hugh's steeple 
which was cast in the same year. The gross weight of the six bells, 
taken at the time by Mr. Betham, Surveyor to the Chapter, was 68 cwt. 
2 qrs. 4 lbs. 

Sir Charles H. J. Anderson writes : — "The Lady Bells were fixed in 
a row on the floor of the belfry, and are shown in the section plate of 
"Wild's Lincoln Cathedral. The ropes of the four largest of the Lady 
Bells went down to the piers of the great tower below, where the rings, 
to which they were fixed, still remain. [ This tends to show that the 
number was increased from two to four, and afterwards to six.] The 
singing boys used to ring them for service, two for common days, four 
on the eves of Saints' days, on Saturday evenings and on Sundays. On 
Lady-day the singing boys used to go up into the belfry, tie strings to 
the clappers of the Lady-bells, and chime them as below. I used, as a 
boy, to be at Lincoln at that time of the year, and I well remember the 
charming melody of those bells both when rung out and chimed. I 
have since imagined, and am more and more convinced, that the 
chiming on Lady-day was the Ave Maria: — 



r r ^ '^ ^ I r r r r^rt 



=^=n 



The Peal. Ave Ma-ri-a o - ra pro no -bis. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 519 

They used to repeat this for an hour, and finish with the six bells in 
succession." * 

The 3rd of the Lady Bells was rung at 6 a.m. in summer, at 7 a.m. 
in winter, after which the day of the month was tolled. 

The largest Lady Bell was rung on Shrove Tuesday, at noon, as 
" the Pancake Bell." 

This largest bell also used to be tolled forty times at the shutting of 
the church doors every night, after which the searchers of the church 
partook of bread and beer provided for them under the watching- 
chamber — a chamber of timber formerly in the North- East transept. 
They then walked round and searched the church. 

It would appear that these bells required rehanging in the eighteenth 
century, for there are two letters from Bellfounders preserved amongst 
the Muniments of the Dean and Chapter: one, dated the 15th of July, 
1763, from James Harrison, of Barrow, offering his services to repair 
the six bells in the " Lady Steeple of the Minster," and another with a 
similar offer, dated the 8th of July, 1772, from Samuel Turner, of 
Whitechapel, London. There is also a third letter preserved, dated the 
nth of January, 1785, recommending Edward Arnold, of Leicester, as 
a good man for the work. 

"Great Tom" having become cracked in 1827, it was, in 1834, 
determined to have him recast larger, and to add two new Quarter-bells. 
To effect this it was (taking advantage of the fact of the 2nd Lady Bell 
being also slightly cracked, and the whole ring requiring rehanging) 
unfortunately resolved to give up the fine and interesting ring of six 
Lady Bells to provide the metal required, but for which purpose it is 
now universally acknowledged they ought not to have been sacrificed. 
They were taken to the wharf of Messrs. Sharp, on their way to the 
London founder, on the 23rd of June, 1834,! and so were for ever lost 
to the church from which their melody had issued for so many years, 
and the Cathedral also lost the distinction of being the only one in the 



• The Ecclesiologist XXVI. iji, and Pocket f Stamford Mo'cury Newspaper, 27th 

Guide to Lincoln, 92-4. June, 1834. 



520 The Inscriptions on the 

kingdom possessed of two rings of bells. This was done to have a 
great bell that could not be rung, and Quarter-bells which were not 
required. When the bells reached London, and were examined by 
Mr. Mears, the founder, he described them as being " very fine bells, 
ver}' thick for their size, and consequently rich in tone." They were 
not a heavy ring, the tenor weighing from eighteen to twenty hundred- 
weight : the slight crack in the shoulder of the 2nd did not extend far, 
nor did it affect the tone.* 

Great Tom and the Quarter-Bells. 

Great Tom : — 

SPIRITUS SANCTUS A PATRE ET FILIO PROCEDENS 
SUAVITER SONANS AD SALUTEM ANNO DOMINI 
1835 MARTII 25 REGNI GULIELMI QUARTI BRIT- 
ANNIARUM 5°. 

(And round the sound-bow : — ) 
GEORGIUS GORDON DD DECANUS RICARDUS PRETY- 
MAN MA PRECENTOR GEORGIUS THOMAS PRETY- 
MAN B.C.L. CANCELLARIUS THOMAS MANNERS 
SUTTON MA SUBDECANUS ET MAGISTER FAB- 
RICE. 

THOMAS MEARS LONDINI FECIT. 
( Diam. 6 ft. io| in. ; weight 5 tons 8 cwt. ; key A. ) 

The Quarter-Bells : — t 

I. NOX NOCTI INDICAT SCIENTIAM MARY SEELY ME 

FECIT FIERI ANNO DOMINI MDCCCLXXX. 

(Diam. 35! in. ; weight 11 cwt. o qr. 10 lbs. ; note C sharp.) 



» I am indebted to Sir Charles H. J. f The Inscriptions on the ist and 2nd 

Anderson, Bart., for much of the informa- of the Quarter-bells were suggested by the 

tion (from his own personal recoUec- writer of this Volume ; those on the 3rd 

tions) here given respecting the "Lady and 4th were from the pen of the Very 

Bells. " Rev. the Dean of Lincoln. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 521 

2. DIES DIEI ERUCTAT VERBUM NATHANIEL CLAY- 

TON ME FECIT FIERI ANNO DOMINI MDCCCLXXX. 
(Diam. 37! in. ; weight 12 cwt. 3 qrs, 14 lbs. ; note B. ) 

3. ME • PROPRIO • SUMTU • DENUO • CONFLARI • FECIT • 

NATHANIEL CLAYTON A. S. MDCCCLXXX". 
VENIT • HORA • ET • NUNC • EST • QUANDO • MORTUI • 
AUDIENT • VOCEM • FILII • DEI. 
(Diam. 39^ in. ; weight 13 cwt. o qr. 14 lbs. ; note A. ) 

4. ME • VOCE • FRACTA • MALE • CONCINENTEM • PROPRIO • 

SUMTU • LIQUEFIERI • ET • DENUO • CONFLARI • 
VOLUIT • AELFREDUS SHUTTLEWORTH A. S. 
MDCCCLXXX". 
VIGILATE • ET • ORATE • NESCITIS • ENIM • QUANDO • 
TEMPUS • SIT. 
(Diam. 51^ in. ; weight 27 cwt. 2 qrs. 7 lbs. ; note E. ) 

There are several traditions as to the origin of " Tom of Lincoln." 
A curious and highly improbable local one is current in the neighbour- 
hood of the Premonstratensian Abbey of Beauchief, Derbyshire, that 
the great bell of that House, given to it by Prior Robert de Ednessouter, 
was surreptitiously taken away at midnight to Lincoln — the horses' 
shoes being reversed to avoid detection — and there became the veritable 
Tom of Lincoln.* 

The Car-dyke, a Roman work commencing on the Nene about half a 
mile from Peterborough, and terminating in the parish of Washing- 
borough near Lincoln, where it formerly communicated with the 
Witham, was once a wide and deep catch-water canal ; it is also 
occasionally called the Bell-Dyke from a tradition that the original 
" Great Tom " was floated on a raft or boat on this canal to its destina- 
tion all the way from Peterborough, it being sometimes added that the 
bell was a present from the Abbot of Peterborough to the Cathedral of 

* Historical Memorials of Beauchief Ahhcy, the Gent. Mag. (lxxvii. (1S07) p. looS) to 
by S. O. Addy, p. 38. I suppose this is the effect that Great Tom was carried 
the same tradition as that mentioned in away from a chapel near Sheffield. 

3 T 



522 The hiscriptions on the 

Lincoln, and sometimes that it was forcibly taken from his Minster.* 
This tradition probably arose from the fact (mentioned in my Chuvch 
Bells of Northamptonshire) of Henry Penn, the Peterborough Bellfounder, 
in the early years of the eighteenth century, having apparently con- 
structed a canal known as " Bell Dyke " from the back of his foundry, 
of a sufficient size to carry large boats into the river with which it com- 
municated. From his foundry many bells — perhaps including the 6th of 
the Cathedral ring, cast by him in 1717, — were floated down this Car-dyke 
into Lincolnshire, and so the name " Bell-Dyke," originally given to the 
connecting canal between his foundry and the river, would, in time, be 
given to the larger and older work more generally known as Car-dyke. 

There is yet another local tradition : Before the Reformation (so goes 
the story at Markby, in this county) one of the largest bells in the 
kingdom swung in the tower of the Priory there, and at the Dissolution 
it was purloined by John Longlands, the then Bishop of the Diocese, 
and removed to his Cathedral, where it now bears the name of Great 
Tom of Lincoln. 

So, too, as to the name of this great bell there are diverse opinions. 
Stukeley says : — "There are many bells [belonging to the Cathedral] 
particularly one remarkably large call'd Tom of Lincoln, which takes 
up a whole steeple to itself, probably consecrated to that great 
champion of the church [that "Saint Traitor" as Fuller calls him] 
St. Thomas of Canterbury. "t Others think that Great Tom is a 
corruption of Grand Ton, or adopted from the name of the bell of 
Christ Church, Oxford.! 

Setting aside these traditions, it may safely be asserted that for 
several centuries Lincoln Cathedral has possessed a large single bell, 
but whether it originated or not in one of those large and sonorous 
bells given to the Cathedral, as we have seen, by Geoffry Plantagenet 
between the years 1173, and 1183, has yet to be demonstrated; and as 
to the name it possibly arose from the supposed assimilation, by the 



* See Bishop Trollope's Sleaford, p. 65. | Mr. Walcott's Memorials of Lincoln 

f Itinerarium (Ed. 1724), i. 86. and the Cathedral, p. 28. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 523 

vulgar, of the boom of the bell, when sounded, to the short name by 
which it has so long been known. 

Although there is little doubt as to the fact, there is no documentary 
evidence known to me to prove the existence of a " Great Tom " before 
the reign of Elizabeth. A Broadside about him, dated " Lincoln, June, 
1836," and printed by " Edward Bell Drury, Printer, Stonebow, 
Lincoln," contains the following passage, " The period when the first 
Great Bell was placed in Lincoln Cathedral is not known. A large 
Bell was recast there very early in the fourteenth century, and remained 
until the beginning of the seventeenth century when it was recast," 
&c., &c., but as the writer gives no authority for his statement, it cannot 
be accepted as historically correct. 

The first recorded reference to " Great Tom " at present found amongst 
the Muniments of the Dean and Chapter, occurs in a Computus headed 
"Conc'neingy^greate Bell," dated "xxx die Januarii anno Dni i6io[-ii]." 
From it we learn that " Henricus OUdfield de Nottingham et Robertus 
Nevinson [Newcombe] de Leyster Bellfounders," had recast the old bell 
which weighed 7,807 pounds " at 112 to the C," which shows the weight 
to have been 78 cwt. 7 lbs., or 8743 pounds, a fact missed by Browne 
Willis, and all writers on this bell, who give the weight as 7807 pounds 
only. This casting was made in a temporary furnace erected in the 
Minster yard nearly opposite the residence of the sub-dean. 

The new bell was larger than its predecessor : it weighed 8838 
pounds and a half — that is 88 cwt. 38^ lbs., or 9894^ lbs. — "which at 
the rate of xd. the pownd for the surplusse above the weight of the old 
bell amounteth to xlvij//. xixs. & ijrf., and so they demanded in all for 
workmanshipp and mettal added an cxlvijV?. xix5. iji., and did leave 
their covenant and bond for warrant of the said bell for 2 yeares and a 
day after the said xxvij'^ of January in the hands of me the said 
Thomas Stirropp" [Chapter-clerk]. The bell was " cast and hung upp 
and upon Sonday the xxvij of this month [January 161 1 ] ronge owte 
and all safe and well." * This bell was inscribed : — 

* Compnttis Vol. 1604 — 1640, MSS. Lincoln Minster. 



524 The Inscriptions on the 

Spiritvs Sanctvs a Patre et Filio procedens svaviter sonans ad 
salvtem anno Domini 1610 Decembris 3 Regni Jacobi Anglie 8° et 
Scotie 44°. 

[and round the rim) 
Lavrentivs Stanton Decanvs Rogervs Parker Precentor et Magister 
Fabricie Georgivs Eland Cancellarivs et Magister Fabricie Ricardvs 
Clayton Archidiaconvs Lincoln. 

The diameter at its mouth was 6 feet 3^ inches: weight 4 tons, 8 cwt. 
I qr. 10^ lbs. ; key B. It was, writes Sir Charles Anderson, beautifully 
finished with lace work [as a band ornament], and of a peculiarly 
beautiful shape and tone. 

It will be observed that whilst the joint founder with Henry Oldfield 
is usually said to have been William Newcombe, the Record just quoted 
says Robert Newcombe. I think both statements are correct. Edward 
Newcombe, who was at that time the head of the Leicester foundry, 
was then an old man, and so, no doubt, left much of the business in the 
hands of his three sons Robert, Thomas, and William.* Now, whilst 
it was quite natural that the agreement should be made with Robert, 
the eldest son, as representing his father, there was nothing improbable 
in the actual work in the Minster Yard at Lincoln being carried out 
under the direction of William Newcombe his younger brother. 

We learn from an entry, dated 21 Sep. 1611, in the Book of Acts in the 
Chapter Library headed "Contributions to the great bell " that ;^5o. 
towards the cost of recasting was agreed to be paid by the Dean and 
the Archdeacon — the latter, no doubt, then keeping his greater residence 
and so representing the Chapter — that there were " other sums " (dona- 
tions I suppose) " agreed to be paid by other people," and the rest was 
to be raised by the Receiver and Bailiff of the church, who "shall collect 
& gather of every tenant iJ5. \]d. in the pound, and that also they doe 
collect & gather of every Prebendary xiji. in the pound of every Pre- 
bendarie according to the valuation of their Prebends in the Kinge's 



See Church Bells of Leicestershire, p. 54. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 525 

books. And that my Lord Bishop's letters may be obtained for that 
purpose, and that also the Dean and Chapter's letters be written to that 
purpose. And that the Bishop and his Chancellor may be moved for 
some commutation money, and to procure the Ministers in all places to 
move their Parishioners making Wills to contribute to the same. And 
if nothing be given in the Wills to convent the ministers for their 
negligence." 

No doubt these means soon raised the requisite amount. 

" Great Tom," which then hung in the North- Western tower, was 
one of the sights and sounds of Lincoln. " As loud as Tom of Lincoln " 
became a proverb ; and as "men fabled," according to Stow, that the 
ringing of the bells of S. Stephen's Chapel at Westminster, " soured all 
the drink in the town," so the tolling of Tom of Lincoln was said to 
turn the milk sour for several miles round the Cathedral, Fuller says 
of him, "Tom of Lincoln may be called the Stentor (fifty lesser 
bells may be made out of him) of all in this county."* Evelyn, who 
visited Lincoln in 1654, rnentions " the greate bell or Tom as they call 
it."t Southey, who ascended the tower to see him, writes " At first it 
disappointed me, but the disappointment wore off, and we became satis- 
fied that it was as great a thing as it was said to be — a tall man might 
stand in it upright. "| "It was guaged " says Browne Willis in his 
Survey "by Mr. Pontjoy, and will hold 424 gallons of ale measure . . . 
" its compass is seven yards and a half and two inches. "§ 

The clock struck upon the " Great Tom " of 1610. It was tolled as 
the Passing-bell for those dying in the Minster Close, and for people of 
high position, after which thrice three strokes were given for a male 
and thrice two for a female. It was also tolled on Whitsunday, and 
when the Judges arrived at the Assizes, but it being found that the 
swinging of so heavy a weight shook the tower more then was con- 
sidered safe, it was decided, in 1802, that it should not be tolled in 
future : a writer in the Stamford Mercury newspaper of the 6th of August 



• Worthies, fo. Ed. Lincolnshire, p. 152. J Quoted by Saunders' Hist. Line. 1. 17; 

f Diary (Bray's Ed. 1871), p. 238. § Survey of Cathedrals, ni. 33. 



526 The Inscriptions on the 

in that year says : — " Great Tom o' Lincoln is to be rung no more ! 
The full swing of four tons and a half is found to injure the tower where 
he hangs. He has therefore been chained and rivetted down ; so that 
instead of the full mouthful he has been used to send forth, he is 
enjoined in future merely to wag his tongue."* 

Early in the present century the unsatisfactory state of the bells 
pressed itself upon the notice of the Dean and Chapter; and an im- 
pression being afloat that some steps would be taken to remedy the 
defects, induced James Harrison, Bellfounder, of Barton, to address a 
letter, dated the 15th of October, 1806, to the Dean and Chapter, 
containing a wordy exposition of his theories. Again, twelve years 
afterwards — on the 7th of November, 1818 — the same man wrote: — 

" A report having lately reached me purporting that all the Minster 
Bells, except Great Tom, are to be recast to form a grand Peal of 
Ten, and that it is also wished that Great Tom should be rung & 
consequently that it is become very desirable to have its Tower 
firmly secured for this purpose," &c., &c. 

He proceeded to recommend that the new ring of ten bells should be 
hung in the Broad Tower with Great Tom in the centre ! and pro- 
pounded his theory for believing that such an arrangement would in no 
wise interfere with the stability of the structure. An estimate " of the 
expense of recasting the two old peals of bells, namely, the peal of 
eight and the peal of six now in the Cathedral into a very capital and 
grand peal of ten harmonious bells," accompanied the letter. He 
promised that the new bells should " be formed with all the advantages 
of modern improvements and discoveries, viz., the metal to be arranged 
according to mathematical calculation for affording the loudest, gravest, 
and most lasting sounds that can be produced with given weights, and, 
in consequence, the most lively and free tones," and that the new bells 
should be turned "into perfect tune." Without giving the details, 



* There is a tradition that on the occa- by twenty-four women ; the Lady-bells and 
sion of some victory "Great Tom " was rung S. Hugh's bells being rung at the same time. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 527 

which are long, it may be mentioned that he judged the weight of the 
old metal to be about seven tons, which he valued at ;^i68. a ton, and so 
worth £ii'j6. The same metal recast into new bells he estimated at 
;^224. a ton, and so would cost ;^i568, — the difference between which 
two sums — /^392. — would be the actual cost in money of the transforma- 
tion of the two rings into one : to that sum he added £2^']. lOs. — for 
new frames, &c., &c. — making the total of his estimate £6^g. los. The 
weight of his proposed tenor was to be 32 cwt., its diameter about 5J ft., 
its key C sharp. The proposed ring, he asserted, would " exceed in 
grandeur and flow of sound any other peal in England whatever, though 
there are some of much greater weight. It would also," he added, 
" exceed in the sweetness of the tones, and it would be heard to a 
greater distance." 

The Dean and Chapter, fortunately, did not accept his proposals. 

In 1827, to add to the perplexities of the Cathedral authorities, 
" Great Tom " became perceptibly cracked near the rim in consequence 
of some mismanagement in the striking of the clock-hammer. 

On the 31st of December in that year Mr. Edward Betham, the 
Surveyor to the Dean and Chapter, addressed a series of queries to 
Mr. John Briant of Hertford, who for many years had been a well- 
known bellfounder, but who, at that time being nearly eighty 3'ears of 
age, had declined that part of his business, as to the cause of the 
accident, and the best course to pursue. The queries (to put them very 
briefly) were : — 

1. Could such an accident occur by the accidental or intentional 
pressure by any person upon the bell at the time the clock was 
striking ? 

2. Will any further injury be occasioned by allowing the clock 
to strike and the bell to be tolled with the clapper as hereto- 
fore ? 

3. Whether any temporary improvement in the tone would be 
obtained by cutting a piece out of the bell as far, or a little 
beyond, the present crack ? 



528 The Inscriptions on the 

4. Relates to the proposed striking of the clock upon the tenor of 
S. Hugh's ring. 

5. What would be the probable expense of recasting " this 
stupendous bell " . . . . and would it be more readily done at 
Lincoln or in London ? 

To these queries Mr. Briant replied, on the 2nd of January, 1828, that 

1. The fracture was not occasioned by either of the causes named. 
[In a later paragraph he gives his opinion that the fracture which 
apparently extended seven inches upwards from the extremity of 
the skirt really extended much further than was perceptible to 
the eye, and had been occasioned in the first instance " by the 
Line of the momentum of the Clock Hammer being in too per- 

■ pendicular a direction with the Bell and striking on a thinner 
part than the extreme thickness of the sound-bow, instead of 
having its impetus inclined to a more horizontal position." 
"Most likely," he adds, "that part of the fracture above the 
sound-bow was done before it extended to the skirt, at which time 
[ i. e. fifty years previously, when the hammer struck on the part 
of the bell now cracked, but was then removed to the opposite 
side of the bell] the tone was very little injured." 

2. By continuing the striking of the clock, or the tolling with the 
clapper, the fracture would probably extend. 

3. The cutting out of a piece would not produce any sensible im- 
provement in the tone, would be attended with great trouble and 
expense, and would be eventually abortive. 

4. He offered same advice. 

5. He promised to write again under this head which he did in a 
long letter, dated the 8th of January, 1828, strongly recommend- 
ing that, in case the bell was recast, the work should be done in 
London, chiefly because there, and there only, was a furnace of 
sufficient capacity for so large a work, and suggested that Mr. 
Mears should examine the position of the bell in order to arrive 
at an idea of the cost. He wrote of the old bell (that of 1610) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 529 

as " the most superior Great Bell in England," and he estimated 
the cost of recasting at from ^200. to ^240., which in a sub- 
sequent letter he corrected to ^165. 

This new disaster to the Cathedral bells caused several letters of 
advice and suggestion, and proposals from bellfounders, to be sent to 
the Dean and Chapter. Amongst the Cathedral Muniments are pre- 
served letters written at this time (January, 1828) by Sir J. H. Thorold 
and the Rectors of Downham and Croyland ; Charles Vellam, Robert 
Hepworth, Robert Boston, George Sanderson, and John Potts, all 
made their suggestions as to the repair of the bell. William Dobson, 
bellfounder, of Downham, Norfolk, sent proposals (7th January, 1828) 
for effecting the same object, enclosing a number of testimonials, 
amongst which is a letter from Sir Robert Smirke, R.A., dated 21st 
September, 1825, and a curious one on bells and bellringing from Dr. 
Samuel Parr, dated the 22nd January 1816.* James Harrison (not 
daunted by the failure of his former proposals), wrote (2nd February, 
1828) " The misfortune announced in the newspapers of the renouned 
Tom of Lincoln having got broken occasioned the present address. 

I shall be extremely happy to receive " He enclosed 

a new estimate amounting to ;^23i. Thomas Mears, of London, sent a 
brief estimate (4th February, 1828) for recasting the two rings into a 
new ring of ten musical bells for £2(^6. On the 4th of March, 1828, the 
original crack was extended, and two additional ones made, by striking 
the bell with the clapper: soon after which William Dobson wrote 
again, and in his letter (dated i6th August, 1828) engaged to remove 
the great bell and replace it with a new one for ;^2oo. — with certain 
stipulations as to the overplus or deficiency of metal. In the following 
year (3rd July, 1829) Dobson had an interview with the Dean, when 
the idea of augmenting the weight of "Great Tom" and placing him 
in the central tower was discussed, but the Dean felt a difficulty in 
deciding upon the extent of such augmentation. This led Dobson 



* That letter I have printed in The Antiquary. Vol. in p. 157. 

3 V 



530 The Inscriptions on the 

shortly afterwards — 27th July, 1829 — to address a letter to the Dean 
which is sufficiently amusing to quote : — 

Downham, Norfolk, July 27"* 1829. 

To the Very Rev'' Geo : Gordon D.D. 
Dean of Lincoln. 

Rev". Sir, 

During the conversation I had the honor of holding with you 
on the 3rd Ins* you seem'd to approve of the idea of augmenting 
the weight of the Great Bell but felt a difficulty in deciding upon 
the extent of such augmentation. As you entertain the design of 
placing the new Bell in the Centre Tower, I beg leave to suggest 
that the Bell ought to be made to correspond with the splendor 
and magnificence of the Building (the Tower), which unquestion- 
ably is the finest in the whole kingdom. Altho' Humility is a great 
virtue, there is a possibility of carrying it too far and I think that the 
most fastidious would acquit you of presumption were you to in- 
troduce a Bell weighing something more than the mighty Tom of 
Oxford, which is computed to weigh 7 tons, 15 cwt. ; a spirit of 
emulation is laudable and praiseworthy, and indeed to such a spirit 
is the grand and stately Cathedral of Lincoln indebted for its vast 
magnificence. I have often thought that the dignity of this great 
Empire was compromised by those who had the management of 
St. Paul's ; had my spirit presided, not even the Kremlin itself 
should have outdone me. The commanding situation of the 
Building is admirably calculated for the display of such a Bell, it 
would be heard many miles around (if St. Paul's could be heard at 
Windsor, may we not presume that Tom's notes will reach the 
Turrets of Belvoir ?) and the clock which was evidently too power- 
ful for the old Bell, will, I am confident, be sufficiently so for a new 
one on the scale I have suggested. 

The weight of the present Bell is computed by some to be 4 tons, 
8 cwts., and by others 4 tons, 14 cwts., we may adopt the inter- 
mediate weight, and call it 4 tons, 11 cwts., and the Ladies' Bells 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 531 

(sic) may probably weigh 2 tons, 16 cwts., together about 7 tons, 7 
cwts. So that about 10 cwts. of metal in addition will produce a 
Bell heavier than any other in the Kingdom. Herewith you have 
my offer for carrying the plan into effect, which I have made more 
with a view to the acquirement of Fame than fortune, and if I be 
honored with the execution of the business, no expense on my part 
shall be spared to render it perfect and compleat. In the event of 
your having the larger Bell, a new Frame and Hangings will be 
required which, under my superintendence and direction, might be 
furnished by your own Carpenter, I therefore have not included 
them in my proposals. Begging that when the question is brought 
forward, my humble pretensions may meet your favourable con- 
sideration 

I have the honour to remain, 

Rev** Sir Your very respectful, 

and obedient Servant, 

Will. Dobson. 

Dobson's proposal was to take down " Great Tom " and the six Lady 
Bells, convey them to his foundry, and recast them with about 10 cwt. 
of new metal into one bell, and hang it for ;^35o. 

Early in the following year — 1830 — the Precentor broached another 
idea, which was that two quarter-bells should be provided, and that, in 
order to save the expense of new metal for them, "four small Bells 
from the peal of eight [in S. Hugh's steeple], which have been a long 
time useless," should be sacrificed for the purpose. In order to meet 
this proposal (which would have left the Cathedral with a ring of four 
bells only in addition to the suggested new " Great Tom ") Dobson sent 
in another, and corrected, estimate, dated the loth of March, 1830, 
undertaking to cast the then Great Tom and the six Lady-bells into one 
great bell, and to cast " four of the small bells of the Peal of eight into 
two new Bells for the Quarter Chimes," for the sum of ;^385. 

One reads the Dean's reply to this proposal with a sigh of relief: 
he put the whole matter off indefinitely. 



532 The Inscriptions on the 

Notwithstanding Mr. Briant's warning that the cutting out of a piece 
of the bell " would not produce any sensible improvement in the tone, 
would be attended with great trouble and expense, and would be 
eventually abortive," the Dean and Chapter in the following year 
resolved to try that method of preventing the extension of the cracks, 
and of improving the tone. In June, 1831, Mr. Thomas Bishop of 
Birmingham (who had previously been in correspondence with the 
Dean) was employed to attempt a remedy of the defect, in doing which, 
during the driving of a wedge to trace the flaw, a large piece of the rim 
broke off, soon after which a further portion was taken off by a white- 
smith of Lincoln named Poole. Mr. Edward Betham, the Surveyor, in 
a letter to Lord John Thynne, dated the i8th of June, 183 1, enclosed 
the following : — 



An Account of the Metal taken off the Rim or Skirt of Tom o' 
Lincoln in June 183 1, during the attempt by M' Tho' Bishop of 
Birmingham, and afterwards by Poole of Lincoln, to remedy 
the defect occasioned by the cracks, the first of which was 
discovered in Decern' 1827, which was extended and two addi- 
tional ones made, by striking the Bell with the Clapper, 4th 
March, 1828. 



Marks upon the respective pieces. 

>ABRICE •.• .-. •.• .-. •.• .-. •.• .-. RI| 

]CHARDj 

iS .•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.-.•.•. -.-l , 

iCLAi I I 

iTON •.•.-.•.•.•.•.• ARCHIDIAQ^ 



i:ONVS| g;| 

ILINCOLi; o 

R. .'.-.'.-.'.-.'.-.•.'.',' .^^ 



Total taken off under M' Bishop's direction 



cwt. 


qrs. 


lbs. 




2 


133 




I 


Ih 




I 


6i 




I 


H 




3 


5 




I 


6 




2 


3f 


) > 


I 


7i 


3 


1 


23* 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 533 

).-. •.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•••.•.•.•.•.•. LAVRENTIVSi 3 ,, 6 

jSTANTON .•.•.-.•.•.• DECANVS .•.•.•.•.•.-.•.[ 

ROGERVS ..•.-.•.•. •.• PARKERI j ^ ^ ^ 

iPREj „ „ 3 



These were separated from the Bell in one piece and] 

in attempting to break it into 2 parts, for convenience [5 3 25 

of removal, it became separated into 4 pieces as above) 

Without any Inscription ,, ,, 6^ 



Total taken off by Pool after Bishop left 6 ,, 3^ 



Taken offunder M'Bishop'sdirections,8pieces, weighing 3 i 23I 
,, by Pool 5 pieces 6 ,, 3^ 



Total taken off 13 pieces 9 i 27 



All of which are deposited in the closet upon the Staircase which 
leads out of the upper North Transept. 

June 17''' 1831. (Signed) Edw" Betham. 



It being generally believed that when "Great Tom" of 1610 was 
cast in the Minster- Yard, many of the inhabitants of Lincoln threw in 
silver tankards, spoons and other valuables, it is of interest to place on 
record the following : — 

Birmingham, Dec. 8, 183 1. 
Rev" Sir 

Agreeable to my promise I have at last succeeded in getting a 
piece of the great Bell assay'd and feel a pleasure of informing you 
the component parts, it consists of 3 metals only, vizt. Copper, Tin 
and Silver. 



534 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

The original quantity of each was to 

looo lbs, weight 700 lbs. Copper. 
299 ,, Tin. 
I ,, Silver. 



1000 



The trial of the piece gives the following answer to 1000 lbs. 

700 lbs. Copper. 
280 lbs. Tin. 
I lb. Silver. 
19 lbs. loss, Dirt. 



I Remain Rev'' Sir, 

Your obliged & obt. Servant, 
Tho'. Bishop. 

This shows a very small percentage indeed of silver. 

The great Bell after this remained dumb, with the exception of the 
clock striking upon it, until the year 1834, when the question of re- 
casting was again discussed. On the ist of January in that year the 
following important Order was entered in the Order Book on Fabric 
A ccount : — 

1834. Jan. I'' Ordered, with the consent and approbation of the 
Precentor & Chancellor that M' Thomas Mears, Bell 
Founder of Whitechapel, London, be employed to recast 
the Great Bell &c &c and directed to send a Plan, Estimate, 
and Contract for the same. 

T. Manners Sutton. 

The result of this order was the receipt of the following estimate 
from Mr. Thomas Mears : — 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 535 

March 27"" 1834. 

Estimate by M' Tho' Mears for recasting Great Tom o' Lincoln 
and the six Lady Bells into one large and two Quarter Bells : 

Cwt. 

Weight of the present Tom supposed to be about 88 

,, Six Lady Bells ,, 53 



141 
Old Copper Balls, Weather Cock and Vane formerly upon the 
two leaden spires at the west end about 3 



144 



Cwt. 

A new Tom 100 

Cwt. 

First Quarter Bell 14 1 

Second Quarter Bell 30 J ^^ 



New Bells 144 



Recasting the old metal at 375. 4^. Per Cwt ;^268 . 16 . o 

Carriage to & from London 40 . 0.0 

Taking down & rehanging the new Bells with two| 

new Stocks for the Quarter Bells J 



Mr. Mears 358 . 16 . o 

Contingent expenses in alterations that may be re- 
quired to strengthen the Timbers under the Bells, 
and making the opening at the trap door a little)- ei 
larger to admit the large Bell and restoring the 
same &c / 

410 . 0.0 



536 The Inscriptions on the 

Should there be more metal in the old Bells &c. than is above 
mentioned the addition will go into the new Bells. 

If the carriage and getting down & up the present and the new 
Bells should cost less than is above stated, such reduction will be 
taken off. 

To the Rev** The Sub-dean 
&c. &c. 

Lincoln. 

Soon after the receipt of this estimate an Order appears in The Order 
Book on Fabric Account (dated the 8th April 1834) signed by the Dean and 
Sub-dean " that the present state and condition of the Broad Tower 
should be ascertained from the best authority, that in the event of an 
order being given for the recasting of the great bell it might be known 
how far it would be advisable that it should be hung there." Mr. Blore 
was thought the fittest person, but his fees being considered high, Mr. 
James Savage, of Essex Street, Strand, was desired to examine the 
Tower, and send in a Report. In that Report (dated the i6th of May, 
1834) Mr. Savage said (to quote the first two paragraphs only) : — 

In pursuance of your directions I have carefully examined the 
Broad Tower of your Cathedral with a view to ascertain its suffi- 
ciency to receive the large bell for occasional tolling and for the 
clock hammer to strike upon, together with two smaller bells for 
the Quarters to strike upon. 

The weight of the large bell being Five Tons or a little more, 
and of the small bells together about two Tons, I have no hesitation 
in stating my entire conviction that the Tower is of ample 
strength for the purpose. 

Being satisfied with this Report, the Dean and Chapter resolved at 
once to employ Mr. Thomas Mears to destroy the six Lady Bells, and 
from their metal and that of the cracked " Great Tom " to produce a 
new large bell and two Quarter-Bells. The following was Mr. Mears' 
Acfreement : — 



Church Bells of Lincohishire . 537 

Memorandum June 6"" 1834. The undersigned Thomas Mears of 
Whitechapel in the County of Middlesex, Bell Founder, hath this 
day agreed with the Right Worshipfull the Dean and Chapter of 
the Cathedral Church of Lincoln, as follows, that is to say, 

First. To break into pieces in the chamber where it now hangs 
the large Bell called " Great Tom o' Lincoln," so that the 
same may be safely and carefully conveyed through such 
openings as there now are in the several Floors through 
which the pieces will have to pass down to the Floor imme- 
diately over the stone groined cieling, and from that Floor 
to be conveyed through the arched aperture in the south 
wall of the Tower to the Floor of the church. 

Second. To take down the six Bells now in the Rood or Broad 
Tower of the Cathedral, and if any of them are too large to 
pass through the present openings in the several Floors, 
then to break such, in the Bell Chamber, into parts suffi- 
ciently small to pass through such openings down to the 
floor of the church, and, the Dean and Chapter finding 
proper Planks to preserve the said Floor from injury, to 
remove the metal to the outside of the church. 

Third. To convey the said Metal, as also the part now in store, 
together with the old Copper, also in store, to the Bell 
Foundry at Whitechapel. 

Fourth. To recast the above Metals, together with such additional 
new Metal as may be required, into three musical and proper 
tuneable Bells of the following dimensions and weights, at 
the least, that is to say. 

One large Bell to be called " Great Tom o' Lincoln," of 
the diameter of six Feet and ten Inches at the mouth or 
skirt, measured from outer edge to outer edge ; and of the 
thickness of five Inches and five eights of an Inch, or there- 
abouts, at the sound-bow, and in all other parts of such 
thickness, lengths and breadths, as the above mentioned 
3 w 



538 The Inscriptions on the 

diameter and thickness require a full toned and properly 
proportioned Bell, of such size, to be : with proper Cannons 
and Crown Staple. The said Bell to be in the key of A, or 
as near thereto as a casting of such magnitude and weight 
can be expected to arrive at, such weight to be not less than 
five tons, and one quarter of a Ton. 

One Quarter Bell to weigh not less than fourteen hundred 
weight, and of such dimensions as shall make its tone to be 
an octave above the large Bell. 

One other Quarter Bell to weigh not less than thirty one 
hundred weight, and of such proportions as will produce a 
tone that will be in accordance with the large bell and the 
first Quarter Bell, so that the three Bells sound in the pro- 
portions of one, four, eight. 

Fifth. To recast the old Metals before mentioned at the price or 
sum of thirty seven shillings and four pence per hundred 
weight ; and to be allowed for such new metal as may be 
required after the rate of six Pounds ten shillings and eight 
pence per hundred weight. 

Sixth. To convey the said Bells to Lincoln and into the Bell 
chamber of the said Broad Towner, and hang the same with 
proper Stocks and Gudgeons in the Bell Frame now there ; 
any alteration or strengthening of the said Frame, or of the 
Floor upon which it rests, as also the securing of the 
Timbers of the Roof from which the Blocks and Tackles 
(to be provided by the said Thomas Mears) by which the 
Bells are to be drawn up from the Floor of the church, will 
be suspended ; and the enlarging, if necessary, of the 
openings through which the said Bells will have to pass, to 
be done and executed at the expence of the said Dean and 
Chapter — The alteration, if any, required to the present 
clapper of the Great Bell to make it suitable to the new 
large Bell to be done by the said Thomas Mears — To attach 
a quarter wheel or some other suitable apparatus to the large 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 539 

Bell as will admit of its being tolled (not rung) when 
required. 

The Dean and Chapter to provide such Planks as may be 
necessary to carry the wheels of the Truck or Carriage, upon 
which the large Bell will be conveyed from London, along 
the Floor of the church to prevent injury to the same. 

The said Thomas Mears to be allowed the sum of Ninety 
pounds for taking down the old Bells, conveying the same to 
the Foundry at Whitechapel, taking the new Bells to Lincoln, 
and hanging the same in the appointed place in the said 
Rood Tower, over and above the charge for recasting the old 
metals, and for the additional metal. But if the expenses 
attendant on such removal of the old metal and the new 
Bells should be less than the said sum of Ninety Pounds, 
then for such less sum as the same shall amount to. 

To put on the Bells such Inscriptions as the Dean and 
Chapter may hereafter direct. 

I do hereby agree to the several conditions of the pre- 
ceding Memorandum of Agreement, and engage to have the 
new Bells at Lincoln on or before the 25'^ day of March 
next, and to proceed with the hanging thereof without delay 
if permitted to do so by the said Dean and Chapter, and 
also to insure the said Bells from any defects for one year 
from the date of the hanging of the same, if they be not 
improperly used, or wilfully injured by any one during that 
period. Witness my hand, the said Sixth day of June, One 
thousand eight hundred and thirty four. 

Tho' Mears. 
Witness 

Edw" Betham. 

The demolition of the "Great Tom" of 1610 took place after Morning 
Service on Wednesday, the i8th of June, 1834, the clapper being 
employed as a battering-ram, until by repeated blows the mass was 
broken into seven or eight pieces. 



540 The Inscriptions on the 

The actual casting of the present " Great Tom " took place on the 
15th of November, 1834, as the following interesting memorandum, 
preserved amongst the Cathedral Muniments, fully details : — 

Whitechapel Bellfoundry 

London. Saturday, November 15"' 1834. 

The recasting of Great Tom o' Lincoln was effected this day : at 
32 minutes after 10 o'clock A.M. the opening of the aperture in the 
Furnace through which the metal was to pass into the mould was 
commenced, at 36 and ^ minutes the first appearance of the metal 
was exhibited and commenced running into the two channels which 
conveyed it to the mould, and in 16 minutes all that was required 
for the Bell had run out, and in 4 minutes more the whole of the 
surplus metal had run out into the reservoirs prepared for it. The 
metal was considered by all present who understood it, as in the most 
perfect state of fusion possible, and there is every prospect of the 
Bell proving to be a good one. N.B. The date upon the Bell is 
March 25, 1835, by which day it is intended that it shall be in the 
Cathedral at Lincoln. 

Joseph Swan, Surgeon 6 Tavistock Square. 

Thomas Winn, Alderman of Lincoln. 

James Schooling, 13 Artillery Place, Finsbury. 

Edw** Betham, Surveyor to the Dean & Chapter of Lincoln. 

Cha*" Hildyard. 

Cha* Jepson Betham, of Xst's Hospital, London. 

"Great Tom," although not ready for hanging quite so soon as 
agreed, left the Whitechapel Foundry for Lincoln on Monday, the 6th 
of April, 1S35. It was placed on a timber carriage, with three pieces 
of timber laid from the front to the rear bolster, and securely bolted 
down ; the bell was closely covered, and attracted little or no notice on 
the way. The carriage was drawn by eight horses, and attended by a 
proper staff of men, the survivor of whom is Mr. John Mears, a son 
of the founder, who is now living at Canterbury, and who has favoured 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 541 

me with these particulars of the journey. They stopped — " night or 
day as it fell out," the journey being divided into stages, and the 
foreman " having an eye to stable-room " — at the following places, 
namely, Hoddesdon, Buntingford, Caxton, Stilton, Bourn, and Sleaford, 
arriving at Lincoln on the following Monday, the 13th of April, when 
the bell was received by a procession consisting of the military, public 
schools, companies of ringers, and bands of music, and having been 
conducted to the Cathedral, was drawn by manual strength to the centre 
of the building, whence it was raised a few days afterwards to its new 
position in the Broad Tower. 

The two new Quarter-bells did not travel to Lincoln with " Great 
Tom," but were sent — it is believed — by sea to Boston, and carried 
from thence to Lincoln. They were simply inscribed with the name of 
the founder : — 

Thomas Mears of London, founder, 1835, 

and were respectively 40 and 51 inches in diameter. They were hung 
in the same tower (the Central one) as " Great Tom." The hours were 
struck on Great Tom by a hammer, the head of which weighed 140 lbs., 
and although the new Quarter-bells had clappers, and were hung for 
ringing, they were only used for sounding the quarters — 1-2 at a quarter 
past the hour, the same repeated at half-past, and so on. 

These bells in the Central Tower remained as they were placed in 
1835, until the year 1880, when the number of Quarter-bells was 
increased by the addition of the present ist and 2nd, presented, as their 
inscriptions show, the one by Mr. Nathaniel Clayton, the senior member 
of the well-known firm of Messrs. Clayton and Shuttleworth, of the 
Stamp-end Works, and High Sheriff (1881) of the county ; the other by 
Mrs. Seely, the wife of Mr. Charles Seely, Member of Parliament for 
the City of Lincoln, of which he is a native. When these new bells 
were hung, on Tuesday, the 17th of August, 1880, with the intention of 
using them, and the two old bells, for the well-known " Cambridge 
Quarters," it was found that the latter were not in sufficiently correct 
tune for the purpose, so they were removed and recast, as their present 



542 The Inscriptions on the 

inscriptions show, at the cost of Mr. Nathaniel Clayton, and of his 
son-in-law, Mr. Alfred Shuttleworth. All being completed (including a 
new clock) they were formally opened at mid-day on Saturday, the nth 
of December, 1880. After Matins had been sung in the choir, the Dean, 
accompanied by the Residentiary Canons, the Priest- Vicars, and other 
officials of the Cathedral, the donors of the new bells, and many friends, 
ascended to the clock chamber, which occupies the lower story of the 
Broad Tower. After the Dean had recited some prayers, and delivered 
an appropriate address, the clock and chimes were set going by Mr. 
Clayton, and for the first time, at a quarter-past twelve, the tones of the 
new bells floated melodiously over the city, and were eagerly caught by 
many a listening ear below. 

The new clock of the Cathedral has a very respectable ancestry as 
to antiquity. In 1324 Thomas of Louth, Treasurer of Lincoln, gave 
to the church a horologium or clock, which was unanimously accepted by 
the Chapter.* The clock now superseded was made by Thwaites in 
1775, and subsequently improved by Vulliamy, the best maker of large 
clocks at that time. The new clock has been constructed by Messrs. 
Potts and Sons, of Leeds, whose reputation as clockmakers is very 
high. The work was carefully superintended by Sir Edmund Beckett, 
Bart., the highest living authority on all horological matters. The total 
weight of the new clock is about four tons. The striking apparatus, 
under the more powerful hammer of which " Great Tom " gives out a 
far grander tone than he has ever done before, needs daily winding, 
which occupies about twenty minutes ; the clock itself is wound up 
weekly, the process occupying about the same time. The clock bears 
the following inscription : — 

Quod bene vortat Deus Optimus Maximus, Consiliis Edmundi 
Beckett Baronetti LL.D., Opera Gul. Potts et Filiorum, civium 
Leodiensium, sumptibus Decani et Capituli, novum in turri positum 
est Horologium A.D. MDCCCLXXX. 



» Sir Charles Anderson's Guide, p. 94. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 543 

Although the Broad Tower was, as already shown, surveyed before 
hanging the great bell and the two Quarter-bells there in 1835, and 
was declared perfectly safe, it was soon feared that the ordinary tolling 
of so large a bell shook the tower sufficiently to do mischief to the 
fabric, so now, and for some time past, the bell has not even been 
chimed, but the clapper is swung by a man, and so caused to strike the 
side of the bell- 
On the Great Festivals, and at the Assizes, when the Judge attends 
Divine Service, the Sermon-bell is sounded on " Great Tom." 

On the death, and on the day of the funeral of any member of the 
Royal Family, the Bishop, Dean, or other member of the Cathedral 
Chapter, also for a citizen, when leave is obtained from the Dean and 
Canon in residence (fee two guineas), the bell is sounded by striking 
with a muffled hammer. This Passing-bell is sounded ordinarily for 
fifteen minutes with quarter-minute strokes, but for Royalty and the 
higher dignitaries — viz.. Bishop, Dean, and Canons Residentiaries — it 
is sounded for half-an-hour, with half-minute strokes. At the close of 
the knell thrice three tolls are given for a male, thrice two for a female. 
On Good Friday " Great Tom " is sounded a quarter of an hour for 
the Morning Service, and no other bells are used. 

S. Hugh's Steeple [South-west Tower]. 

I. THOMAS MEARS OF LONDON FOUNDER 1834. TREBLE 
OF 8. LINCOLN CATHEDRAL HUGH STEEPLE 1834. 
GEO. GORDON DD. DEAN. RI. PRETYMAN A.M. 
PRECENTOR. GEO. THO^ PRETYMAN B.C.L. CHAN- 
CELLOR. T. MANNERS SUTTON A.M. SUBDEAN. 
( Diam. 32 in. ) 

2—5. R. WILLIS DEAN. 10. KNIGHTON SUBDEAN. 
10. MANDEVILLE CHANCELLOR. 10. INETT* 
CHANTOR 1702. ' 

( Diams. 32, 33, 34^, 37^ in. ) 

• The 4th has Ivctt for Inett. 



544 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

6. HENRY PENN FVSORE 1717. 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 
7- [ + 173 ] ^«m ^osit ;]^ulsat;i XiElonbi X^Elnna "yZ"ocata 1606. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

8. [ + 106 ] GOD • SAVE • THE • CHVRCH • OVR • 

QVEENE • AND • REALME • AND • SEND • VS • 

PEACE • IN • CHRIST • AMEN • 1593 [ u 108. ] 

[O 105.] 

( Diam. 46^ in.) 

For Stamps see page 140 and Plate XV. 

When and how the ring in this tower was formed cannot now be 
stated. No ancient Inventory of the Bells of Lincoln Cathedral has 
yet been discovered, and the Books of the Chapter Acts give no informa- 
tion at the dates when the several bells were cast. I incline to think 
that an increase in number took place in 1702, when four out of the 
present eight were cast. The then treble was probably of the same 
date. That bell being broken late in the last century, and the whole 
ring requiring rehanging, the bells here had not in consequence been 
rung for forty years, when, in 1834, the treble having been recast, and 
the whole ring rehung with new wheels, &c., a peal was rung on the 
eight bells on the Feast of the Annunciation (25th of March) in that 
year. It was then found that the tenor bell (which had been shortened 
at its mouth) was a little below F in its key, and weighed only 
17 cwt. o qr. 7 lbs., which was 2 cwt. o qr. 25 lbs. less than the tenor of 
S. Peter-at-Arches, although S. Hugh's bells altogether exceeded those 
of S. Peter-at-Arches in weight by 6 cwt. iqr. 12 lbs., the former 
weighing 87 cwt. i qr. 7 lbs., and the latter 80 cwt. 3 qrs. 23 lbs.* 

Of the two old bells the seventh has an inscription in fine large 
ribbon gothic letters, with ornamental capitals (of which specimen 
drawings are given as figs. 185 and 186 on Plate XXVII.), preceded by 
an elegantly formed initial cross of four fleurs-de-lys. 

* From a memorandum in the handwriting of the late Mr. Betham, long Surveyor to 

the Dean and Chapter. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 545 

The tenor bell has the cross and first word, and each succeeding 
word, on a single stamp. It is of the same date, and bears the same 
founders' medallion stamp (fig. 105), as the four oldest of the Lady-bells, 
which formerly hung in the Central Tower. 

Formerly (before the destruction of the Lady-bells) the 5th and 8th 
of this ring were the Quarters to old " Great Tom," and were sounded 
by wires from one tower to the other. 

The Uses of S. Hugh's bells are as follows : — 

On Sunday the 5th bell is rung for an Early Celebration of the Holy 
Communion at 8.30 a.m. 

For Morning Prayer the whole are rung for fifteen minutes, then, 
after a short pause, they are rung again for seven minutes, followed by 
the ringing of the tenor alone — excepting on the Great Festivals, when 
Great Tom is sounded — as a Sermon-bell. 

In the afternoon the 5th bell is rung for five minutes before three 
o'clock to announce a Sermon in the nave ; after the conclusion of 
which sermon the whole of the bells are chimed, from 3.45 till 4 o'clock, 
for the choral Evensong in the choir, at which service there is no 
sermon. 

Daily the 5th bell is rung at 6 a.m. from Lady Day to Michaelmas, 
and at 7 a.m. from Michaelmas to Lady Day for " Chapel Prayers," 
which, however, the Priest- Vicars do not now say. The day of the 
month is tolled at the end of the ringing. At 9 a.m. the 5th and 6th 
bells are rung ; at 9.30, and again at 9.45, the same bells are again rung 
(excepting on Saints' Days, when the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th are rung) 
for Matins. The same ringing occurs again in the afternoon at 3 o'clock 
and at 3.30 and 3.45 for Evensong. These ringings at 9 a.m. and at 
3 p.m. are probably echoes of the Canonical Hours. 

The 5th bell is rung daily at 8 o'clock in the evening, after which the 
day of the month is tolled. 

On the evening of the funeral of the Bishop, Dean, or any Resi- 
dentiary Canon, a dumb peal is rung. 

Peals are rung on Christmas and Easter Eves and Days ; on the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin (the Cathedral being dedicated 

3 X 



54^ 7"^^^ Inscriptions on the 

to her) ; on the Queen's Accession, Birthday, and Coronation ; in 
honour of the Bishop during the weeks of Ordination ; and quarterly to 
welcome each of the Residentiary Canons at the commencement of 
their respective residences. 

Formerly the bells were rung on the anniversaries of the Restoration 
and the Discovery of the Gunpowder Plot. 

The Cathedral Bell-Ringers. 

A Society of Ringers was formed here on the i8th of October, 1612, 
with Robert Sandie, the Scrivener, as its first Master, "for ever here- 
after for the Ringing of S. Hugh's Bells and Our Lady's Bells," for the 
encouragement of which Dean Parker and the Chapter granted, on the 
20th of September, 16 14, a yearly annuity of forty shillings. 

" The Ordinances of the Society of Ringers of S. Hugh of Lincoln," 
dated i8th October, 1612, are preserved amongst the Muniments of 
the Cathedral. They are illuminated on five folios of vellum, and are 
accompanied, at the end, by a schedule of the ringers' names, illumi- 
nated in a similar manner. It is unnecessary to give a copy of the 
Ordinances in full but an abstract may be acceptable to those now 
interested in Ringers' Guilds and similar Societies for the encourage- 
ment of Ringing and of Ringers : — 

1. Forfeit for non-attendance i2d. 

2. Sunday after S. Luke the Feast of the Society : married men 
to bring wives and pay \6d.: unmarried men 8d. : forfeit for 
non-attendance 25. half for master, half for company. 

3. Election of Master for year to be made after Dinner and he to 
have custody of common stock and documents, and to appoint 
two of the company as Wardens to summon the members, who 
are to receive a yearly fee of los. to be paid quarterly out 
of common stock for their expenses in running up and down, 
together wdth free commons on the feast-day. Past Masters or 
Associates not Eligible as Wardens. 

4. Forfeit for disobedience to Master 25. td. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 547 

5. No one (not being a Past Master) to refuse office of Warden 
under penalty of 13s. ^d. ; nor be liable to reappointment 
against his will. 

6. The Wardens to sweep and clean the Chapel or hall of the 
Company, the Steeple of the bells, and the Steeple wherein 
the Company used to ring: also to oil the bells &c., at the 
order of the Master : to lay up the chime hammers before they 
ring and lay them down after, and forfeit 6d. on every default : 
same forfeit for neglecting to summon the members. 

7. All of the Company to behave modestly and well at all times, 
and to accept the place assigned by the Master or his deputy 
under penalty of 25. 6d. : not to revile one another under 
penalty of 2S. 6d., 35. 6d., and 65. 8i., for ist, 2nd, and 3rd 
offence, the last followed by total dismissal. 

8. The Master on the Sunday after Feast-day, in the ringers' 
chapel or hall, between i and 3 in the afternoon to give his 
account for year of office. 

9. The Master upon account-day after his election to choose 12 
associates out of the company to assist him in any difficulty 
that may arise. 

10. The ringer appointed by the Master to each bell, not to refuse 
under penalty of 6d. for each offence, not to give his "string or 
strings " to a stranger during a peal without the leave of the 
Master, nor disorder a peal by talking or other noise under 
penalty of i2d. : connivance in a stranger's ringing without 
consent of Master fined /[d. : ringing with others to the pre- 
judice of this company fined 20s. for every offence. 

11. Master to choose a Past-Master to act as his deputy when 
away or out of town. 

12. No deputy to be sent by any member without permission 
under penalty of \d. 

13. The Company to attend the funeral of any member and to 
ring one or two peals at least in his honour under penalty of 
i2d., and if the member be too poor to leave anything, the 



548 TJie Inscriptions on the 

Master to disburse 25. 6i. out of the Common Stock, and at 
the next meeting of the Company shall fill up vacancy. 

14. That the 405. fee allowed by the Dean and Chapter be appro- 
priated always by the Master to the forming of a fund not to 
be touched except on death of a member, and then in rateable 
proportion to go to widow and children : and if a member have 
no wife or child his portion may be bequeathed by Will, and if 
not bequeathed his portion to be appropriated by Master with 
consent of his 12 Associates for the good of the Company. 
The payment of the Clark's fee and the Wardens' fees and 
oil and lights when not otherwise met, may be paid out of this 
fund. 

15. Assistance to sick members to be given by Master and 
Associates. 

16. If any member detain from the Master sums received for ring- 
ing, he is to be fined 205. for each offence. 

17. Secrets of the Company not to be betrayed under fine of i2d. 

18. Master to choose 3 members, in addition to the Wardens, to 
help him to " take up " the clappers, these three to be taken in 
succession from all the company. Any refusing to be fined 
i2d. 

19. Any one taking a stranger, without permission of Master, into 
steeple to forfeit 4^. also doorkeeper ^d. 

20. Every member keeping the Company waiting in the steeple for 
a quarter of an hour after time summoned to forfeit i2d. (the 
great bell in S* Hugh's steeple being tolled before the watch 
have " strooken the saide quarter") except by permission of 
Master. 

21. The " Musitions " who attend on Feast Day to have 25. 6d. and 
their dinners to be paid from the common stock. 

22. The Master may make loans to members to the extent of half 
the common stock, taking security for repayment to him six 
days before the Sunday next after Feast Day, when he has 
to render up his account. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



549 



23. The Master and some other principal person to examine the 
S. Hugh's bells before every peal is rung to be sure of their 
safety, under penalty of 2s. 6d. for each neglect. 

24. Master to recover fines at law if necessary. 

25. Law expenses allowed to Master. 

26. Master not to make breach of present ordinances when so 
prosecuting a member of the Company. 

27. Master to keep ordinances and pay his own fines on his 
Account-day. 

28. Master not to commence a suit without consent of majority of 
the twelve associates. 

29. Recitation of members' names, and their formal assent to 
Ordinances. 

The List of Members which accompanies the Ordinances contains 
many names which are also found in a black letter list on the wall of 
the chamber below S. Hugh's Tower. The heading of that list is : — 

%\i names of i\t Company of |lhtgers of our 
§kss£b Wxt^m pam of Itintohu. 

Beneath this the wall is marked to represent ashlar work, and, as it 
were, on each stone, is the name and date of a Master, as follows : — 



Robert Sandie M' 


1614 


John Hellarye ,, 


1615 


Henrye Blackborne ,, 


1616 


Edward Whipp ,, 


1617 


at the King's coming to 


Lincolne 


Henrye Yorke ,, 


1618 


John Wattson ,, 


1619 


John Danye ,, 


1620 


Thomas Stanley ,, 


1621 


William Laminge ,, 


1622 


John Bincks „ 


1623 


John Walker ,, 


1624 



550 



The Inscriptions on the 



Richard 


Haukesworth M' 


1625 




Thomas 


Betney ,, 


1626 




John To 


vvl . . ,, 


1627 




Thomas 


Bannister ,, 


1628 




Thomas Brewer ,, 


1629 




. . . Beryone [?] ,, 


1630 




Robert 


• • • >) 


1631 




James Yorke ,, 


1633 




Thomas 


Stanley ,, 


1634 




WiUiam Burhean [?] ,, 


1635 




^hen follow names in columns : — 






Peeter Drake M' 


John Davill W'den 


Xpoffer Archer 


Thomas Nixx 


William Crofts 




Thomas Wingreen 


Edward Whittington 


Thomas Johnson 




John Richardson 


Henrye Harrinson 


Henrye Mace 




Originall Bartram 


Amer Stafford 


George Kettle 




Anthony Varley 


Richard Lincolne Clark 


Robert Kilne 




John Peachye 


1634 


Richard Wayd'son 


Henrye Raw 


Hastings Markby 


William Frod'gwell 


Robert Michel 


William James 


William Burham 




John Harris 


Luke Benson W'den 


Robert Fowler 




P . . • Haslewood 


Edward Bust 


John Lilly 




Richard Yorke 


John Benson 


Humfrey Thornto' 


Rowland Todd 


Richard Jameson 


John Downing 




.... Ewerby 


John Askew 


Walter Holmes 







These last appear to be the names of the members of the Company 
m 1634. 

There is also a circle ornamented with scroll work in yellow, green, 
and black, with the eight bells suspended on it properly graduated as to 
size. Within this are written in modern letters : — 



The Names of the Company of Ringers of our Blessed Virgin 
Mary of Lincoln 1714 George Holms Organ'' & M' of this Comp' 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 551 

1714 Rob. Conston M' 171 1. M' Geo. Hall M' 1715 John Ryall M' 
1708. M' W" Mackinder M' 17 15 Dan' Hunton, John Goodall, 
James Mitchil, Walter Dawson, Luke Trotter. 

The title " M'' " being prefixed to some of the names is an indication 
that Ringing was practised at that time in Lincoln as a gentleman's 
recreation. 

The following are also in this place surrounded by a plain border : — 

The Names of the Company of ringers of our Blessed Virgin Mary 
of Lincoln 1722 

John Read enter'd Master 1721 

John Ryall Master 1717 

John Hunton Master 1716 

James Mitchil Master 1717 

John Trawley Master 1718, 19 & 20 

Luke Trotter f M' Will" Mackinder ) 

John Ward 1 Master 1725 j 

Henry Singleton 

Joseph Smith 

Robert Hatfeild 

Francis Bristow 

John Dawson 

John Brown 

James Wise 

Thomas Ball 

Henry Miller 

Samuel Merreweather 

Edward Hunton 

Joseph Fisher.* 

The Members of this Society — like the present ringers — were not 
members of the Cathedral staff, but extraneous to it. There are, how- 

* These Lists were copied by the Rev. J. T. Fowler, F.S.A., and are given here from his 

collections. 



552 The Inscriptions on the 

ever, and have long been, four, so-called, "Patent-ringers," namely the 
two Vergers, the Bellows- blower and the Porter. They now hold no 
Patents but are appointed by the Dean and Chapter. There was some 
little difference in the year i6o5 as to with whom the nomination rested, 
the sub-dean claiming it jure officii, as he was keeping the greater resi- 
dence at the time of the vacancy, and nominating a servant of his, 
named John Toms, whom he instantly required to be admitted. The 
matter was discussed and the Chapter agreed to accept his nomination.* 
Probably these four ringers were originally appointed for the four 
largest Lady-Bells whose ropes as we have seen (p. 518) came down to 
the piers of the great tower below, where the rings to which they were 
fixed still remain. These four " Patent-bell-ringers in company with 
every other member of the Cathedral body, down to the youngest 
chorister, assembled in the Chapter-House on the occasion of the third 
triennial Visitation of the Bishop of Lincoln, which commenced in the 
Cathedral on the 21st of October, 1879. Beginning with the inferior 
orders, and going through the entire body, each member was summoned 
to stand forward, and make any presentment that he might have to the 
Bishop, after which he was told to retire. This process was, I suppose, 
being " praeconized " by the Chancellor of the Diocese. 



'^7 LINCOLN. 

S. BoTOLPH. 5 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1, 3. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1846. 

( Diams 26 ; 27^ in. ) 

2. R. PHELPS FECIT 1723. 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 
4. RICHARD PHELPS MADE ME 1723. 

( Diam. 30! in. ) 

» " Admissio ad offic' pulsatoris," Book of Acts 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 553 

5. R. PHELPS ME FECIT 1723 FUNDATO' NOSTRO' CAN- 
AMUS LAUDES DEUS PROPITIE' ILLIS. 
(Diam. 331 in.) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

[U 108] tEXMI [ □ 107] 1632. 

( Diam. 16 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. 

The ancient church of S. Botolph was long in ruins. 

There is a tradition that previous to 1723 there were no bells, and 
that the present Priest's Bell was lent to the church by Lord Monson 
of Burton Hall, where it had done duty as a Dinner Bell. The initials 
upon it may have favoured this idea. When the bells were put into 
good order in 1846 it was proposed to use this small bell for notices for 
Vestry meetings, but it was not used in any way ; indeed it had never 
been heard within living memory until the present Vicar had a clapper 
inserted, and now uses it as a Sacrament Bell. 

A Book belonging to the Parish gives the weight and cost of a ring 
of 5 Bells cast for this church in 1723, by Richard Phelps, of London: — 

Oct 13. 1723 The Peel of Bells weighed 23 cwt. 

5 Bells ^128 . 16 . o 

5 Pr. of Brasses & 5 Clappers ... 6 . 10 . o 

Cart Hire & Wharfage 15 . o 



^136 



The same Book gives the following account of the Bells in 1845: — 

Feb : 3'" 1845 

There is in this Tower a Peal of Five Bells and a Ting Tang of 
the dimensions hereunder written, viz. : — 

3 Y 



554 



The Inscriptions on the 



Ft. 


In. 


In. 


2 


I 


2 bare 


2 


2i 


2 


2 


3* 


2t'b 


2 


6f 


2i 


2 


94 


2i 


I 


4 


I 



Diameter at Thick at 
the mouth. Sound Bow. 

cwt. qr. lbs. 
Treble Bell of the Peal (cracked) 3.0.7 
Second (cannons gone, hangs by the crown 

Third (cracked) 4 . o . 14 

Fourth 

Tenor 

Ting Tang 

This Peal was cast by Rich'' Phelps of London 1723. The Treble 
Bell is hung in a raised frame upon & 3 ft. 4|- in. higher than the 
general frame. The 3''* Bell is out of & set upon the Frame, its 
brasses are gone. 

The Bells being at that time much out of repair, the parishioners 
obtained from Messrs. C. and G. Mears of London, two estimates — one 
for recasting the two cracked bells, rehanging the whole ring, and 
making it complete for ringing ; and the other for casting an entirel}' 
new ring. This last estimate amounted to (less ;^ioo to be allowed for 
the old bells) £gd> 10s. ; the former, which was the one selected, 
amounted to ^57 8s. 4^. 

A further entry in the same Parish Book gives the cost, &c., of the 
two new bells — the present ist and 3rd — obtained under that estimate : — 

On the 26"" Sept. 1846 Two New Bells were put up in the Tower 
of the Church of S' Botolph Lincoln, in place of the Treble Bell 
& 3"* Bell, which were cracked. 



Mess" Mears' Account. 








1846 cwt. qrs. lbs. 








Sep. 26 A Bell 3 . 2 . 25 








k do. 4 . I . 15 










£■ 


s. 


d 






8 . . 12 at ;^6 . 6 . 


51 


. I 


. 6 






[ Carried forward 


51 


I 


• 6] 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 555 

£. s. d. 
[ Brought forward 51 .1.6] 

2 new clappers exchanged 18 . o 

4 new stocks & 3 new wheels [ &c ] rehanging Bells 

as per estimate 35 • o . o 

86 . 19 . 6 
Extya. 

Man's time repairing Frame & rehanging small Bell 2 . 8.0 

^89 . 7 . 6 
Credit. cwt. qr. lbs. 

By two old Bells 4 . o . 14 

3 • o • 7 

7 . o . 21 
Deduct iron staples & dirt 7 

7 . o . 14 at ;^3 . 19 . 4 
per cwt. 
£28 . 5.3 

Overcharge in man's time i . 14 . o 

29 . 19 . 3 

£59 - 8 . 3* 



LINCOLN. 

S. Mark. i Bell. 

°Q T ^«cra ^rinitatc ;F[iat 'M.tt ^ampana ^©tata 1585 
I. I ~r 120 J 

r -, [ D 129 D 132.] 

[UI27] 

( Diam. 35I m. ) 



* For these extracts I am much indebted to the Rev. A. C. Ramsay, the Vicar of the 

parish. 



556 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XIX., and page 114. 

This is a fine large bell very profusely ornamented. The inscription 
is in the same letters as several others of the same type (see p. 121) 
and between the words is a scroll work of renaissance character. In 
addition to the cross, rose, and shield, there is, all round the bell, under 
the inscription, an elegant border forming a kind of fringe similar to 
that found on bells of this date from the Nottingham foundry. Near to 
the date there are a fleur-de-lys and a winged beast (apparently a griffin) 
on a crest wreath. 

This bell formerly hung at the church of S. Benedict in this city, to 
which church it is traditionally believed to have been given by the 
Barber Surgeons. When at S. Benedict's it used to be known by the 
name of " Old Kate," and was rung at 6 a.m. and at 7 p.m. all the year 
round. Old men say that (giving over work at seven in the evening) 
they used to listen for the welcome tones of " Old Kate." It was rung 
for many years by John Middlebrook, the parish clerk, who lived in a 
little lean-to tenement attached to the north side of the tower. On his 
death in December, 1804, his wife succeeded him as parish clerk (her 
name was Mary Middlebrook ; she was buried, as the Parish Register 
shows, on the 7th November, 1822, being aged 72 years) ; and the story 
goes that the old lady consulted her convenience and her duty at once 
by bringing the bell-rope through the belfry door to her bedside, and 
pulled " Old Kate " whilst she lay in bed. Afterwards old men, then 
boys, used to sleep in the widow's tenement (she being past her work), 
and they did the same, pulling the bell between them, " kneeling on the 
bed," and then lying down to sleep again. For this the Corporation 
paid 65. 8^. a year down to 1837. 

There was a fancy that " Old Kate " took its name from the name of 
the aged sextoness ; but, as just mentioned, the Parish Register shows 
her name was Mary. More probably a previous bell at S. Benedict's 
was dedicated (as many bells were) in honour of S. Katharine, and that 
when the bell was recast in 1585, and an inscription placed upon it 
more in accordance with the reformed faith, the old name clung to the 
new bell, and it continued to be known, as in times past, as " Old Kate." 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 557 

LINCOLN. 

S. Martin. i Bell. 

I. WILLIAM BLEWS AND SONS FOUNDERS BIRMING- 
HAM 1874. 

( Diam, 4of in. ) 

The present church is a new one consecrated in 1873. The previous 
church had one bell inscribed : — 

[ -f 165 J 1665 W S \J [see below. ] 

It was of a type common in Lincolnshire, but it bore these arms (which 
I have been unable to identify) on a shield : — cheeky, a fess vair, 
impaling a chevron between three swans. 

This seventeenth century bell being cracked it was sold. Sir Charles 
Anderson of Lea being the purchaser. The new bell was the gift of 
the Vicar — the Rev. John Foy — who generously offered the parish a 
ring of bells, which offer was — as it is now thought — foolishly declined. 
The old proverb is sometimes true : — 

" He who will not when he may. 
When he wills he shall have nay." 



LINCOLN. 

S. Mary-le-Wigford. 4 Bells. 

1. % sbc£tlg loling nt£n bo tall io taste on meats t^at fecbs t^e soble 1636 

[ D 157.] 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1636. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. [+116] %^M'WM ps^ €)"^:bi ^:e>^^<srj© 

1616. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 



558 The Inscriptions on the 

4. [ + 116] ©(d:ii> ^m--w^ 'M'^^ rn'M'^^M^'M 
1616. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIII. and page 107. 

The Priest's bell formerly hanging here is now used at S. Faith's 
School. It is without inscription, about 12 inches in diameter, and had 
been lying in the tower unhung for some time before its removal. 



LINCOLN. 

S. Mary Magdalene. i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I- [ + 52] MmM- mi:^iLM. miM.m:mM.:^m:m^ 

( Diam. 18 in. ; height 15 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 
( Diam. 10^ in. ; height 8 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate VII. 

LINCOLN. 

S. Michael. i Bell. 

\ This modern church possesses one small bell, about 14 inches in 
diameter, which is difficult of access, 

LINCOLN. 

S. Nicolas with S. John, Newport. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 14 in. ) 

A modern bell; church erected in 1840. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 559 



y. LINCOLN. 

S. Paul. i Bell. 

1. HILTON & WALKER 1794. 

( Diam. iS in. ) 

The ancient church of S. Paul, which suffered much during the 
Civil Wars, was replaced by a very poor oblong room about the year 
1787. It was, I presume, for that church that the above bell was 
provided ; it now hangs in the much worthier building which has 
succeeded to the very poor one, to which reference has just been made. 



LINCOLN. 

S. Benedict. 

The fine bell formerly hanging in this disused church has been 
removed to S. Mark's Church, Lincoln, which see. 



LINCOLN. 

S. Peter-at-Arches. 8 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1—3, 5—8. THE GIFT OF THE CITY OF LINCOLN 1728. 

( Diams. 29!, 30^, 32^, 371, 39, 43, 48^ in. ) 
4. THE GIFT OF THE CITY OF LINCOLN. ABR. RVDHAL 
OF GLOCESTER CAST VS ALL 1728. 
( Diam. 34I in. : key E flat. ) 
Priesfs Bell (commonly called the Fire Bell): — 

Blank. 
( Diam. 13J in. ) 

On the bellframe is inscribed : — 

JOHN WETHERALL MAYOR 1729 FRANCIS BUTCHER 
BELLHANGER. 



560 The Inscriptions on the 

The Corporation Records supply the following particulars as to the 
cost of these bells : — 

1729. Payment of £^ yearly by the Corporation to the Ringers. 

Gave at first ringing of Bells o . 10 . o 

For wood used about Bellframe 0.12.0 

For carrying old Bells to Torksey o . 15 , o 

To Abraham Hayward for land carriage of the 

Bells & his journey 20. 8.2 

For Ropes i. 6.8 

To John Holland for the Bell Frames 25 . 9.0 

Given him in earnest & spent when bargained 

with him o.io.o 

To John Morley for carriage of Bells by water... 10 . 0.0 

To M' Butcher for making bellframes 57 . 11 . o 

Spent when bargained with him o. 2.6 

To M' Rudhall for the Bells 381 . 16 . o 

There was formerly a set of chimes here. 



LINCOLN. 

S. Peter-in-Eastgate. i Bell. 

Here is a small bell (20 inches in diameter) cast by Messrs. Taylor 
of Loughborough in the year 1875. 

The S. Peter and S. Margaret Parish Magazine for June, 1875, gives 
the following paragraph : — 

"Ever since the new church was built [in 1870] those who lived 
within sound of the bell have complained of its unpleasant tone. This 
grew worse and worse, until, at last, a crack appeared in the bell, and 
necessitated its removal. When taken down it was found to weigh 
3 cwt. 14 lbs., and it bore the following inscription : — 

+ ,^b£ : X3^nrie : @^rad : ^letta : ^omiita : M : (^ic-) 
It was sent to Messrs. John Taylor and Co., bellfounders, Lough- 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



561 



borough, to be recast, and was returned us with a very pleasant tone, 
and now weighs 3 cwt. i qr. 22 lbs. The whole expense of recasting, 
£i'\. 85. 8i., has been generously defrayed by the Ven. Edward Trollope, 
Archdeacon of Stow. The old bell had done its work in three churches, 
having been brought to the former church of S. Peter-in-Eastgate from 
the church of S. Margaret-in-the-Close." 



LINCOLN. 



S. Margaret. 



The bell from the church formerly standing in this parish was 
removed to S. Peter-in-Eastgate, which see. 



LINCOLN, 



S. Peter-at-Gowts. 



6 Bells. 



1—6. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1872. 



Weights. 


cwt. 


qr. 


lbs 


I. 


3 


2 





2. 


4 





19 


3- 


5 





6 


4- 


5 


2 


26 


5- 


6 


2 


9 


Tenor. 


8 





3 




33 





7 



Prior to the casting of the present ring there were only 3 bells here 
which were inscribed : — 

1. James Cockell Edmvnd Brockellhvrst Chvrchwardens 1718 

[O 7. ] 

2. Jesvs be ovr speed 4- W P 1639 A B [ U 170. ] 

3. [ n no D 112 ] See [ d no ] Petre [ n 112 U 137 ] IHS. 

3 z 



562 The Inscriptions on the 

^^' LINCOLN. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. W. BLEWS & SONS BIRMINGHAM 1878. 

( Diam. 23 in. ) 

LINCOLN. 

S. SwiTHiN. I Bell. 

I. REV. GEORGE S. DICKSON PERPETUAL CURATE. 
W. A. NICHOLSON. J. S. WILKINSON CHURCH- 
WARDENS 1851. 
( Cast by C. & G. Mears : Weight 4 cwt. o qr. 21 lbs.) 

This bell was cast from an older one. 



LINWOOD. 

S. Cornelius. 3 Bells. 

I. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1863. 

[ Royal xj A vnis ] 

PATENT. 

( Diam. 32 in.) 

2. [U137] TM :iii(D mi% :^^ ©::© wm 

( Diam. 34+ in. ) 

3- [U137] MM.'M^ WJ^ ^IM. m^E M. 

(Diam, 39^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XX. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles & one santus bell,"* Two of 
those still remain. The last four letters on the 2nd bell are probably 

• Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 563 

meant for DEVS ; the inscriptions on this type of bell are often 
ungrammatical. The letters on the 3rd bell, which has lost its canons, 
are small. 



LISSINGTON. 

S. John. i Bell. 



I. 1705. 



( Diam. 20 in. ) 



,: LONDONTHORPE. 
S. John. 3 Bells. 

I. [+116] j.'M^^'WM PS©- m~w:^ m:^mm:m 

1609 [ D 113. ] 

2. T. MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1820. 

3. [ + 116] .,^11 men tljat Ijeare mg momfull sounb xtpxA before gou Ijjc 

itt grounb 1609 [a 113.] 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plate XVI. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that a " handbell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been "sold to o' 
vicar that now is who hathe made a morter of it."* 



LOUTH. 

S. James. 8 Bells. 

1. FITZWILLIAM WHIGHT ROBART TATHWELL 1726 O O 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

2. CHARES LOOSTE UIC DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST US 

ALL IN 1726. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fuy. p. 114. 



564 The Inscriptions on the 

3. JOHN PAGGIT THO: FAULKNER C F O T T 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

4. DYMOOI YOUNO C.W. lOHANES HEDDERLY O O 1726. 

(Diam. 39I in. ) 

5. ACCORDING TO OUR SOUND LET HEDDERLY'S FAME 

SERROUND 1726. 

( Diam. 41 in. ) 

6. Blank. 

(Diam. 44I in.) 

7. R. WHARF, R. ARLIS, J. BALLITT, N. SHAW 1746. 

( Diam. 47 in. ) 

8. REV. WOLLEY JOLLAND VICAR, JOHN JACKSON & 

THOMAS BOGG CHURCHWARDENS 1818. JAMES 
HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON. 
( Diam. 54 in. ) 

If the rather disjointed entries in the copies preserved of an ancient 
Record, now no longer extant, are understood, there were, in the 
fifteenth century, three bells hanging in the tower of this church then 
recently erected. During the first decade of the next century the spire 
or " Broach" was added, and the three bells were recast by a founder 
at Nottingham, whose name, unfortunately, is not preserved. These 
three bells are thus described in the Record to which reference has just 
been made : — 

Memorandum the weight of the three bells in Louth. 

Item the i'' the least bell called John, weynge 

[weighing] 13' . i"^ 

Item the middle bell weigheth i^Y except 9 pounds 15'= . 47"'' 
Item the great Bell called Stella Maris weigheth 

18"= except 12 lbs 17' . 44""* 

The least bell clapper weigheth a Quarter of C 

& 12 pounds 40""^ 

The middle Bell Clapper a qr. of C & 16 lbs 44'''^ 

The great Bell Clapper i C & 6 lbs 62"" 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 565 

j^d yt ye 2 j^g^ Bells weighed heavier than y' 3 old Bells in 
Mettle, which Bell getter had in money £j .8.0, which was 
borrowed of Trinity Hutch, as appears by accompts there. 

P"* for making 3 new Bells to of Nottingham 

Bell getter 

Paid for 3 Indentures making betwixt this Town and the 

said Bell getter 4'* 

Paid W" Forster riding to the said Bell getter to 
Nottingham to see the Bells casting his expences 4'* 

Paid Thos. Wright and Robert Burnett carrying 
two of the s** Bells to Bracebridge beside Lincoln 6' , S"* 

It. Carrying the i^' Bell to Bracebridge 8*^ 

Riding to Nottingham for the s"* Bells by 6 days ... 4-4 

It, Carrying s** 3 Bells from Bracebridge to Louth 

2 Load 9 . 4 

Making 3 Bell Clappers 14 . o 

P** to . . Hardy for carrying the Rope from Salt- 

flet Haven to Louth 6"* 

The new spire approaching completion, the ring appears to have 
been augmented by the addition of three new bells : judging from the 
weights of the clappers these were a new treble, dedicated to the 
Blessed Trinity, the " 5th bell," and a new tenor dedicated to S. James. 
These are all referred to in the following entries : — 

To Oliver Whitaker Serv' to the Bellfounder 

Nottingham o . 40' . o" 

It. p** to y" s^ Oliver in full payment and pay- 
ments in any condition which belongs to his s** 
master as appears by a Indenture and Obligation 

wch he broke and cancelled 3. o .20" 

Also p** . . Palmer taking diverse Suits at London 
of Bellfounder at Nottingham for because he 
would not deliver 3 new Bells 0.19'. o 



566 The Inscriptions on the 

p" in expences to them that carried 2 new Bells 

from Nottingham to Louth S** 

It. p'' John Spencer for an obligation making ... 4^ 

p** to the Bell founder of Nottingham part of a 

more sum for casting Trinity Bell 6'. 8** 

p'^ Robt. Goldsmith riding to Nottingham for 

Trinity Bell 20" 

Memorandum that John White, priest, gave to 

the buying of Trinity Bell in gold 6'. S"* 

And also the said John gave 3 silver spoons to 

the same Bell, sold to Richard Lofte 8 . 6 

Also rec** of diverse men of their good will to the 

said Trinity Bell 54' . 5"* 

Trinity Bell Clapper v/eighs 3 qr. of L & 31 lb. 
5''' New Bell Clapper weighs 70 lbs. 
James Bell Clapper weighs 121 lbs. 

Memorandum : That John Quark of Boston, Smith, warrants 
the 2 Bell Clappers of his costs & charges at any time, if 
need be, during 7 years after. 

p"* Robt. Johnson of Boston, smith, for mending 
Trinity Bell Clapper . . . Bell Clapper & y" 2°" 

Bell Clapper . . . . with other charges g^ . 4" 

Also in expences to him and caiTiage of s** 

Clappers from Boston to Louth 3*'. 4'' 

Also p'' said Robt. for Iron & making the 5*'' Bell 

Clapper 17'. o 

Memorandum that every pound of iron and workman- 
ship cost 3** a lb which is accompted for and y^ s** clapper 
weighs 3 score lbs & 6 lbs. 

The bells were hung, the spire finished, and the weathercock placed 
upon it, in the year 15 15, upon which occasion the bells rang out a 
merry peal : — 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 567 

Mem" y^ 15 Sunday after Holy Trinity this year (15 15) the 
weather cock was set upon the Broach of Holy Rood Eve after 
there being Will. Aylsby parish priest with many of his Brethren 
priests there present hallowing the s" Weathercock, & the Stone 
that it stands upon, & so conveyed upon the s'' Broach. And then 
the s"* priests singing Te Dcum Laudamus with organs ; and then the 
Kirk-wardens garred Ring all y' Bells, and caused all the people 
there being to have Bread and Ale. And all to the loving of God, 
our Lad}'^, & All Saints. 

A further memorandum records : — 

And the Weathercock was set upon the Broach of holy Rood Even, 
and hallowed with many priests there present, and all the Ringing, 
and also much people there and all to the pleasure of God. Amen.* 

The following entries in the old Parish Books are preserved in 

Notitici; Ltidis : — 

1527-8. To Harry Doyne for j bell strynge ix^. 

1553. Item paid for a sakring bell iiij^. 

1556, Item for knjdlyng the bell in harvest for gather- 

inge of the pescodsf iiijV. 

1570. Fade to xxvj [?] Ringers that day that the Lord 

President came to towne xiiiJ5. ix^. 

Paid to the Ringers when the Lords came to the 

Towne viJ5. . 

1635. Paid ffor ringing the Lord of Lindsey to towne xiv5. vj^. 



* See Avchaologia, x. 85-92. I have also missing [see Notiti^e LiuLv, p. 138], and it 

been favoured by James Wood, Esq., of is evident that the copies or extracts pre- 

Louth, with extracts, made by a different served contain many clerical errors. The 

hand, from a copy of the original MS. above account of the ancient bells is the 

The MS. Book itself, which contained an result of a collation of the two sets of 

account of the " Edifices and Buildings of extracts just referred to, and, I believe, it 

the Church and Steeple of Louth," from conveys the facts, 
about the year 1500 to 1518, has long been f See p. 243. 



568 The Inscriptions on the 

1662, To the ringers when the Queene came in xxiij'" 

May vs. 

To the ringers when Sir Edward Lake came to 

the Visitation xs. vji.* 

The 5th bell was recast in 161 6 when the weight was ig cwt. 

In 1640 the ringing chamber and clock were renewed: and about 
the same time a new frame for the bells was provided, for which Robert 
Parnell was to have ;^ioo. 

The Great Bell which was recast in 1654, was, unfortunately, again 
cracked in December, 1722. t 

According to a terrier taken on the loth June, 1724, there were then 
six bells and a Saints' bell hanging in the steeple. t 

Two years later (in 1726) the whole ring was recast by Daniel 
Hedderly of Nottingham, and, most probably, at that time augmented 
to eight bells, the Saints' bell being sent to the foundry as a contribu- 
tion to the extra metal required. 

In the Churchwardens' Accounts now existing there is a credit for 
" Bell-money " (annually amounting to from £^. to £6.) in almost every 
year from 1758 to 1784 when it is entered for the last time. It would 
appear, that the wardens received the ringing fees, and paid the ringers 
their salaries out of the churchwardens' fund. 

The Parish Vestry Books contain many entries relating to the bells. 
The following are abstracts of some of the Resolutions passed : — 

1762. Dec. 10. That after Easter 1763 the Ringers shall not 
receive any salary for Ringing till Easter week annually. 

1763. Feb. 15. That;^ii — be paid to Mr. John Sewell so soon as 
he shall put the church clock into sufficient and useful re- 
pair : and that he be allowed £1 — per annum for keeping 
the same in repair for the space of eleven years to come. 

» Notitice Ltida (1834), p. 47-53. "Nicholas Shaw, His Book, Louth, Aug. 

f These facts are obtained from a MS., 14, 1760." 
X Notitia Luda, p. 159. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 569 

1781. Aug. 28. That Bartholomew Howlett shall have a salary of 
£6 .5.0 for one year, for which he shall take care of the 
church clock & chimes, & keep the same in proper order and 
condition. 

1784. Oct 12. That it is absolutely necessary to have the Bells 
belonging to this church new hung, and the churchwardens 
are hereby impowered to seek out some proper person for 
the doing thereof. 

1785. June 2. It is agreed between the churchwardens for the time 
being and John Caborn of Sutterton, Bell Hanger, that the 
said John Caborn shall rehang the Bells agreeable to an 
estimate this day delivered for the sum of £^0 .13.6; the 
whole to be compleated for the above sum, the church- 
wardens first putting the frame whereon the Bells hang in 
proper and compleat condition to the good liking of the said 
John Caborn. The said John Caborn does not desire to be 
paid till the churchwardens and Parishioners are satisfied 
that his work is well done. 

1788. March 27. That from this day Mr. Howlett's Salary for 
attending the chymes cease and be void. 

In October, 1798, the Great Bell was cracked when the bells were 
being rung "to commemorate Admiral Nelson's glorious victor}'." It 
remained in that state until 1818: at which date the extracts from the 
Vestry Book are resumed : — 

1818. Mar. 24. That the churchwardens employ some proper 
person to examine the Bell Frame and report upon the state 
of the Bells and the propriety of removing the ringing 
chamber floor, recasting the Great Bell, and rehanging the 
Peal of Bells, that such report be forthwith made and sub- 
mitted to a meeting of the charge- bearers and that the Vicar 
and Churchwardens take care that the Bells be not rung out 
until the same be pronounced free from danger. 
4. A 



570 The Inscriptions on the 

1818. April 3. The Report of Mess" James Harrison, James 
Copeland, John Espin, John Jackson, & Thomas Bogg (as 
underwritten), having been read is highly approved and they 
are requested to accept the thanks of this meeting for the 
very able manner in which the same is drawn up, & the 
judicious measures thereby suggested for remedying the 
several defects, & making the improvements therein pointed 
out, which are to be carried into execution. 

It was resolved that plans, &c., be at once made out by Mr. James 
Harrison, and an opinion expressed that the tenor bell should be at 
once recast by him. 

As the report referred to gives a detailed account of the state of the 
bells, bell chamber, &c., at that time, it is here given in extenso : — 

We the undersigned having examined the timber of the Bell- 
frames, the floor beams, and the supporters of the framing, do 
find them in an exceedingly decayed state. The sills whereon the 
supporters rest being in such a dilapidated condition that one half 
of them at least have lost their foundations, and the bond sills 
in the wall on which the beam ends ought to rest, together with the 
ends of those beams, are, on the west side, so far gone to decay 
that they appear to have scarcely any other support than what 
arises from the collateral pressure occasioned by being jammed 
between the walls of the steeple as the beams and frame have 
settled on losing their supports. One of the principal beams also 
is rotten quite through, and broken in such a manner that the 
strength of a man is sufficient to bring it down : in a word they are 
so bad as not easily to be imagined by any person who does not 
closely examine them. 

It also appears that the bells want rehanging exceedingly : the 
gudgeons being worn very flat, and the brasses worn wide, they 
make a violent jolting when rung, certainly to the detriment of the 
frame and steeple. The principle, likewise, on which they have 
been hung, is far from the best, and has caused the bells to give a 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 571 

much greater swing, and, at the same time, has rendered them more 
unguidable in ringing, than if they had been hung in a more 
judicious manner. 

It is Hkewise our opinion that to make the bells complete as a 
peal, and at the same time suitable for the clock to strike upon, the 
great bell must be recast, since the sound is not only weak, 
and somewhat dismal, but is also quite out of tune with the 
other bells. 

As the bell-frame is now fixed entirely below the windows, 
which causes the sound of the bells to be thrown too much up- 
wards, and consequently much of it to fly quite over the town, 
whereby the clock, at least the quarters, are heard better at a con- 
siderable distance than in the town itself; we therefore think it 
extremely proper that the bell-frames be raised higher in the 
steeple, so as to hang more near the centres of the windows from 
whence the sounds issue. This will not only make the clock be 
heard better, but will render the sounds more uniform when the 
bells are rung, by affording a much greater and more equal facility 
to the sound of each bell escaping through the windows. 

Such an alteration would likewise admit of the present ringing 
chamber being taken away, as the bells, in such cases, would best 
be rung above the vaulted arch. 

As to any advantage which the bells may have over the steeple 
by being hung higher, the difference will certainly be very trivial. 
The Bellhanger pledges his credit that the bellframe can be so 
contrived, and the bells hung so different, as to affect the steeple 
considerably less than is possible in their present manner of hang- 
ing, even though all things were in good order. Indeed it is not so 
much the swag of the bells (though this may be greatly reduced) 
as the injudiciousness of the framing, that has damaged the steeple. 
Lastly, that the steeple may be restored to its primitive strength, 
it is recommended by us to place ties of oak timber close above the 
vaulted arch, to reach from side to side, with suitable anchors 
through the walls, which will hold them as effectually together, and 



572 The Inscriptions on the 

consequently render them as strong, as if they had never been 

separated. 

Jno. Jackson. 

Louth, 3 April, 1818. Jno. Espin. 

The recommendations contained in this Report were carried out. 
The tenor bell was recast in the same year, and in the year 1820, Mr. 
James Harrison was further employed to rehang the whole ring, his 
estimate for which was ;^8o. 

Having put their bells into good order the parishioners very properly 
wished to have them well rung, so 

1820. Sep. 22. It was resolved that an efficient body of Ringers 

be obtained from the parishioners, and that a proper person 

be employed to instruct them. 
1829. Septr. 14. Amongst expences allowed: — Ringers including 

King's Birthday, Coronation-day and Winter Louth Fair 

Day ;i^i2 .0.0. 

The bells were again rehung and put into good order in 1872, and a 
chiming apparatus was at the same time put up : the cost of these im- 
provements was met by public subscriptions chiefly collected by James 
Wood, Esq., of Louth, to whom I am much indebted for the extracts 
from the Vestry Books given above, and for much of the other informa- 
tion here given about the bells. 

There is a tradition that a man lost his way on the Common to the 
north of Louth on the evening preceding Louth November Fair, and 
was enabled to make his way to the town by the sound of the bells then 
ringing. It is said that he left a sum of money for the ringers to ring 
on the anniversary of that evening, but if there was any endowment it 
has now disappeared. It is certain that for many years the bells were 
always rung on that evening, but whether in accordance with ancient 
custom, or because of the provision referred to, cannot now be said. 

The Rev. WoUey Jolland (see tenor bell), a native of Louth, was 
inducted as Vicar in 1780. He was also Vicar of Tetney. He died 
at Louth on the i6th of August, 1831, and was buried at Yarborough. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 573 

See an account of him, and of the curious Hermitage he built at Louth, 
in the Gent. Mag. Vol. ci. Part 2 (1831), pp. 375-6. 



LOUTH. 
S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

The ancient parish church of Louth, dedicated to S. Mary, being a 
considerable distance from the town, gradually fell into decay after the 
erection of the new church of S. James. It possessed three bells, as 
appears from the following extract from an ancient account : — 

The accompts of Robert Spencer of such money as the said Robert 
receyved as well for the three bells of St. Mare churche as for 
certeyn other things receyved by him as hereafter followeth : — 
First Reed, by hym for the said three bells in 
St. Mare churche 2^£ iis. yd.* 



LOUTH. 

S. Michael. i Bell. 

This is a small modern bell about 16 inches in diameter. Church 
erected in 1863. 

;^ LOUTH. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I. FR. GARTHSIDE RECTOR JAMES BOYES C.W. 1725. 

The above bell (a second-hand one) was hung in the first church 
built in Holy Trinity District in 1834, and was brought from thence to 
the present church erected in the year 1866. 



Notitite Luda (1834), p. 164. 



574 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

LUDBOROUGH. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 165] \V S 1666. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. THO. TRAUES CHURCH WARDEN 1708. 

[07-] 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1724 JOHN TRAFFS 

THO. ASTERBE church r ^ ^^^^^ 

WARDENS '- -■ 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. and page 59. 

The Parish Register has the following entry relating to a previous 
bell :— 

The Great Bell of Ludborough was cast Ano Domi 1667 and cost 
14 lb. 8' 3'' y^ casting. 

LUDDINGTON. 

S. Oswald. 3 Bells. 

I, 2. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1855. 

( Diams. 31, 32^ in. ) 

3. rrTTo^n ^dorum xk plaaat tibi xtx sonus iste. 
L U 7 J 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. and page 114. 

In 1553 there were " iij gret belles one sauntus bell."* 

When the church was rebuilt two only of those bells were left. One 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. s\, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 



575 



of them which was sent to the foundry when the present ist and 2nd 
were cast, bore the inscription : — 

SCE OSWOLDE ORA PRO NOBIS 

in the form of letters shown in figs. 195, 196, and 197, here engraved. 

There is a saying that the Burton bells used to call across the Trent 
to Luddington — "Who ring best? Who ring best?" to which Lud- 
dington replied — " We two, we two," 




The 3rd is one of a type common in Lincolnshire. 
The Luddington folk used to be called 

Luddington poor people 

With a stone church and a wooden steeple, 

but they now rejoice in a stone spire. 



4-K^ 



LUDFORD MAGNA. 



S. Mary. i Bell. 

There is one small modern bell in a turret, and inaccessible. 



3tj 



576 The Inscriptions on the 



LUSBY. 

S. Peter. i Bell. 

There is here a modern bell, about 24 inches in diameter, which is 

an old bell recast about 30 years ago. 

In 1553 there were here " ij great bells j santes bell."* 

It is said that three bells remained until the church tower fell in the 

last century, when two were sold to pay for repairs. 

MABLETHORPE S. MARY. 



S. Mary. 


5 Bells. 


I. Blank. 




( Diam : 26 in. ) 




2. 1825. 




( Diam. 29 in. ) 




-3- 1724- 




( Diam. 29 in. ; broken. ) 




4. EDWARD WHITE : ROBERT BRAUSEBY 


: CHURCH 


WARDENS 1724. 




( Diam. 32 in. ) 




-5. ELI HENNEAGE : RECTOR \ HEN \ PENN : 


FOUNDER 


: 1724- 




Jv/" -•-. (Diam. 37 in. cracked ; all canons cut off.) 




6f( MALTBY-LE-MARSH. 




All Saints. 


2 Bells. 



1. ^linitatc ^acra ^rat \}tt (Sfampana ^eata [ O 19. ] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. nomtn j^anttoxm gcrit ^cc ^ampana pullormn [O 19. ] 

(Diam. 33^ in.) 

♦ Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. A. P- R- Off- 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 577 

For Stamp see page 70. 

The frame shows that there were formerly three bells here : nothing 
is now known of the third. 

The inscription on the 2nd bell is, so far as is known at present, 
unique : pnerorum, the word used on other bells dedicated to the Holy 
Innocents would not have suited the verse, so the versifier hit upon the 
happy thought of pullorum — " The Holy Chicks." 

6*J MANBY. 

S. Mary. / 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 121 ] ^«m ^asm ^nlsnta X^Eltmbi X^arm "^otata. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

2. [+121] X^issi l^t ©"db ;Biako ;i?lom«tt ©abriflis [ U "9- 1 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

3. [ + 121 ] Mnm ^osa ^ulsata X^un^i X^aria "^ocata [U ^iQ-l 

(Diam. 42 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XVIII. 

These are fine uniform bells, probably coeval with the Decorated 
Tower. The inscriptions on the ist and 3rd are alike, but the letter S 
on the ist is the short, that on the 3rd is the long form. 

L\Q- MANTHORPE. 

S. John. i Bell. 

I. C. & G. HEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1848. 



MANTON. 

S. HiBALD. I Bell. 

I. [+117] MTW^ ': miM-M^M^ ■. mMM-m-^M- 

[ □ 138.] 

( Diam. 24 in. ; slightly cracked. ) 

4 B 



578 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see page 108 and Plate XX., and for specimens of the 
letters see figs. 176 and 177 on Plate XXVI. 

In 1553 " Mawunton " possessed " ij gret belles one santus bell."* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that a " tickynge belle," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been defaced and 
sold.f 

The single remaining bell has its inscription in the same letters as 
those upon the curious ist bell at Laceby. On the waist is a mark in 
the form of an arrow head, which was scratched on the mould. 



MAREHAM-LE-FEN. 

S. Helen. 3 Bells. 

1. %MM miMSMMJ^ [Diog.] 

(Diam. 33^ in. ) 

2. 1819. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

3. tEu no£ il^u xpi om£ g«nu flectat tckstiu Ifrstriu 't infroru 1627. 

( Diam. 41 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XVI. 

The inscription on the 3rd bell here is like that on the 4th at Corby. 
Here is a chiming apparatus erected (when the church was restored) 
in 1873. 

/i^' MAREHAM-ON-THE-HILL. 

All Saints. * i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 



Exck. Q. R. Church Goods Line. ^\, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 116. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 579 



:. . MARKBY. 

S. Peter. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 20 in. ) 

The present small thatched church is probably a fragment of the 
Priory of Austin Canons which stood here. Indeed there is a tradition 
that the small bell now hanging was the Refectory bell of the Priory, 
and further that John Longlands, Bishop of Lincoln, at the time of the 
Dissolution, purloined one of the largest bells in the kingdom which 
then hung in the tower of Markby Priory, and removed it to Lincoln, 
where it became known as Great Tom. 

It appears that there were three bells here in 1556 : in a letter from 
Robert Goche, Receiver of the County of Lincoln, dated the 14th of 
May in that year, and addressed to the Commissioners for lead and 
bells, he says : — 

I send you also the obligacon w"^ was taken of the parisshoners of 
Markbie for thre belles delivered to them by warraunte from my 
L. Riche.* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a handbell " which be- 
longed to this church in Queen Mary's time was still in their hands, but 
" wch thei have to break afore maii iiij."t 



l^\Z 



MARSH CHAPEL. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE ME 1742. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 



Land Revenue Records, Church Goods, Line. W. P- R' Off- t Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 117. 



580 The Inscriptions 07t the 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1699 [ n 168. ] 

MATTH^VS ADDISON 



GVARDIANI. 
THOMAS FARROE 

( Diam. 39J in. ) 

3. ^M.^ -MM-^M ^M:WM [ d 151] 1584 [ a 153. ] 

( Diam. 42^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV., and XX H. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greatt belles j sanctus bell."* None of 
those now remain : the present 3rd is a rare instance of a late named 
bell. 

^'^ MARSTON. 
S. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I, 2, 3. 1822. 

4. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1822. 

5. JOHN MORLEY CHURCHWARDEN 1822 JAMES HARRI- 

SON FOUNDER BARTON. 



MARTIN. 

S. Michael. i Bell. 

I. 1771. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

In 1553 " Merton " in Gartree Wapentake possessed " ij great 

bells."t 

MARTIN [with Timberland]. 
Holy Trinity. No Bell. 

This new chapel has at present (1879) no bell : the school bell is used. 



♦ Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 
-f- Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 581 



H ^^: MARTON. 

S. Margaret. / 3 Bells. 

I- [U137] %'MM mm'M- miM-^im^imwM. 

[ n 112. ] 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 
2. [+106] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1637. 

(Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. [ + 116] wM^M'WM ps@r m^^im m^^';]^^ 

[ n 113- ] 

(Diam. 34!- in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XX., XVI., and XV., and page 107. 
See under Stow for a rhyme on these bells. 



MELTON ROSS. 

The Ascension. i Bell. 

The small bell here is without inscription or date. 



MESSINGHAM. 
Holy Trinity. 5 Bells. 

I, 2. 1785. 

( Diams. 27, 30J in. ) 

3, 4. WALKER & HILTON 1785. 

(Diams. 32, 34 in.) 

5. GLORIE BE TO GOD ON HIGH [ D 158] 1630. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles one sanctus bell."* 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. s\, P. R. Off. 



582 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

The smaller of the present bells are particularly narrow in crown 
and waist. The 4th has had a crack in the sound-bow excised. 

The old Clerk here tells the following story : — A traveller passing 
through Messingham on a Sunday, a long, long time ago, noticed three 
men sitting on a stile in the churchyard and saying " Come to Church 
Thompson ! Come to Church Brown !" and so on. Surprised at this, 
the traveller asked them what it meant : and was told that having no 
bells this was how they called folks to church. The traveller remarking 
that it was a pity so fine a church should have no bells, asked the men 
if they could make three for the church, promising to pay for them 
himself. This they undertook to do. They were a tinker, a carpenter, 
and a shoemaker respectively. When next viator came round he found 
the three men ringing three bells, which said, "Ting, Tong, Pfuff" — 
being made respectively of tin, wood, and leather. 

There is in the possession of the Vicar of Messingham a MS. Book 
headed Some Account of Messingham, drawn tip hy the desire of the Rev. 
Archdeacon Bayley, D.D., Vicar, by J. Mackinnon, M.A., Curate, 1825. In 
this book, writing of the church, the author says : — " It once possessed 
a spire, the only one in the neighbourhood .... This, many 3'ears 
ago, owing to the dilapidated state of the tower, was, as also the tower, 
obliged to be taken down ; the tower only was rebuilt. The three large 
bells which hung in the old tower were changed for five smaller ones, 
and these hung in the new tower," The same writer gives an account 
of the rapid method adopted by the parishioners to bring down the 
spire: — "The parishioners one Sunday (thinking that the spire would 
fall when they might happen to be in church during Divine Service) 
assembled together, tied all the waggon ropes they could procure in the 
village to it, and with a long pull, a strong pull, and a pull altogether, 
brought it down. Amongst the number of hands who assisted on this 
occasion was an old woman upwards of eighty years of age, who died 
the next day." 

There is a tradition that some time after the removal of the spire the 
west side of the tower fell down in the time of barley harvest, but the 
bells stood firm in their frames, and being safely taken down were sent 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 583 

to Rotherham and "run down" into five. It will, however, be seen 
that the tenor bell was not cast at the time referred to — that is in 1785. 
It is said that prior to the restoration of the church in 18 18 there 
was a small bell in the porch called a " Tink-tank." 

METHERINGHAM. 

S. Wilfrid. 5 Bells. 

1. THIS BELL RAISED BY SUBSCRIPTION REV^ J. CASE, 

VICAR 1830. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. GOD SAVE SIH CHVRCH 1620. 

( Diam. 28^ in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE THE KIMG 1620 [xj 156.] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

4. [ + 116] jL^Myrm :©©"©■ m^:^ .©:f»©-©-:© 1620. 

[U 156.] 
( Diam. 32 in, ) 
5- I&iu ^ampatta ^atra ^iat ^rinilak p©cata 1620. 

[ tJ 156. ] 
( Diam. 35I in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIII., and page 107. 

The Rev. J. Case (see ist bell) was instituted as Vicar in 1825. 

MIDVILLE. 

— ? I Bell. 

This church, erected in 1819, possesses one small bell. 

MININGSBY. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

The single small bell here is without inscription or date. 

In 1553 "Mynygsby" possessed "ij great bells, on[e] s[anctus bell]."* 

• Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. 3^, P. R. Off. 



584 The Inscriptions on the 



MINTING. 
S. Andrew. i Bell. 

This is a small modern bell, about 15 inches in diameter, hanging in 
a turret, which is a poor representative of the " ij bells in ye stepyll & 
j sanct' bell" which hung here in 1553.* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbelles . . . [and] a 
sacringe bell," which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, 
were " brokne and sold A° primo Elizabeth. "f 



MOORBY. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 1866. 

When the church was rebuilt in 1866 the old bell, being cracked, 
was recast as above. 



i> MOORHOUSES [with Revesby]. 

? I Bell. 

This chapel-of-ease, built in 1875, has one small steel bell. 



MORTON. 

S. John. 5 Bells. 

1. VOX MEA EST DULCIS MEA SCINTILLANS VULTUS 

THOs EAYRE : • • DE KETTERING : FECIT :• 1755 ^ 
( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. THE REVD SAMUEL HOPKINSON, VICAR, JOHN LAM- 

BERT CHURCHWARDEN 1816. 
( Diam. 35 in. ) 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 118. 



CJiurcli Bells of Lincolnshire. 58=; 

3. STATUTUM EST SEMEL OMNIBUS MORI EDWARD 

FRANKS C.W. JOHN BRIANT HERTFORD FECIT 

1798. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

4. NOS SUMUS CONSTRUCTI AD LAUDEM DOMINI :- 

GLORIA PATRI FILIO & SPIRITUI SANCTO O 

1755 o 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

5. CUM SONO SI NON VIS VENIRE, NUNQUAM AD 

PRECES CUPIES IRE :• -h JOHN SYMPSON, 
CHURCH WARDEN I 1755. THO^ EAYRE FECIT : 
( Diam. 45 in. ) 

The Rev. Samuel Hopkinson (see 2nd bell) was presented to the 
Rectories of Morton and Hacconby in the year 1795. 



MORTON-BY-GAINSBOROUGH. 

S. Paul. i Bell. 

I. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1846. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

in , MOULTON. 

All Saints. ' 5 Bells. 

1. EGO SUM VOX CLAMANTIS JOSEPH EAYRE ST NEOTS 

FECIT. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

2. [ + 2 ] MOM CLAMOR SED AMOR CAMTAT IM AVRE 

DEI. TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 

( Diam. 34 in. ; turned. ) 

3. T. OSBORN FECIT 1785. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

4 c 



586 The Inscriptions on the 

4. [+111] ©cd:e) ^:fp^^'jB yiM 'v^^m 

MM.'WWM mM(Bm.M.^ MJ^MM 1588 

(Diam. 41 in. ; turned. ) 
5. REVND MAURICE JOHNSON D.D. VICAR VENITE CUM 
VOCO. JOHN BRIANT & JOHN CABOURN HERT- 
FORD FECERUNT 1805. R. THORP & R. KING C.W. 

( Diam. 46 in. ; note E. ) 

For Stamps see page 52 and Plate XVI. 

The Rev. Maurice Johnson, D.D. (5th bell), died 25th May, 1834 [?], 
aged 78 ; he was Vicar of Moulton for fifty-three years. 

There is a tradition (without any foundation in fact) that the bells 
here came originally from Croyland Abbey. 

The steeple being accidently set on fire in 1785, the 3rd bell was 
destroyed or damaged, hence the present one dated in that j^ear. 

The present ring is in excellent tune and good order, but, owing to a 
bad arrangement for the ringers, ringing is well-nigh impossible. 

/^r'^ , MOULTON CHAPEL. 

— ? ' I Bell. 

A small bell, cast in 1722, hangs in a turret in the centre of this 
octagonal chapel. 

Ij^X MOULTON SEAS END. 

— ? "^ I Bell. 
Here is a small bell, 12 inches in diameter, placed in the turret in 



MUCKTON. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

The present bell was given to the church about the year 1820. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 587 

MUMBY. 

S. Peter. 4 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1820. 

( Diam. 41 in. ) 

2. [ + 59 ] M'li ^omtn ^amini ^tiwbktum [ U 55 + i5- ] 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

3- [ + 59 ] 3E« XsEluItis .^itnis ^tsouet ^ampaita Jo^annis [ + 15 

U55-] 

( Diam. 47 in. ) 

j:^^ :i^(bwm m%~w^ mMMJm miMSM 

'MiXW^^ DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE ME IN 1737 
WILLIAM NELCY C.W. 

( Diam. 47 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 

For Stamps see Plates VII. and //. 



MUMBY CHAPEL. 

S. Leonard. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 13 in ; out of order. ) \ 



NAVENBY. 

S. Peter. 6 Bells. 

I. THE LORD TO PRAISE MY VOICE I'LL RAISE T. 
OSBORN FECIT 1797. 

( Diam. 29I in. ) 



588 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

2. PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD THO^ OSBORN 

FOUNDER 1797. 

(Diam. 31! in. ) 

3. LONG LIVE KING GEORGE THE THIRD. T. OSBORN 

FECIT 1797. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

4. GIVE NO OFFENCE TO THE CHURCH T. OSBORN 

FECIT 1797. 

( Diam. 34 1 in.) 

5. OUR VOICES SHALL WITH JOYFULL SOUND MAKE 

HILL AND VALLEYS ECHO ROUND THO^ OSBORN 
FECIT 1797. 

( Diam. 37I- in. ; cracked. ) 

6. REVD DEARING JONES RECTOR CHA^ SINGLETON 

CH. WARDEN GAVE ONE HUNDRED POUNDS 
TOWARDS CASTING THESE SIX BELLS. 
( Diam. 41^^ in. ) 

Prior to 1797 there were three bells inscribed : — 

I. Richard Dorwean gave me to the church of Naueby 1589. 
'^ 2. In nomine Jesu Maria. 

3. See Edmunde ora pro nobis.* 

The Rev. Dearing Jones (6th bell) of Christ College, B.A. 1740, 
M.A. 1744, was rector of this parish as early as 1753 ; he was also vicar 
of S. Andrew's, Cambridge. He died 12th November, 1803, in his 84th 
year ; he was buried in the chancel. His tombstone is there, but not 
actually over his grave, it (the stone) being removed when the church 
was restored. 

Charles Singleton, the benefactor to the bells (6th bell), was a land- 
owner here ; he died 8th December, 1816, aged 79. His tombstone lies 
on the chancel floor, but was only placed there in 1876, when, at the 
restoration of the church, the site of his grave was reincluded within 
the walls of the church. 

* Harl. MSS. 68^9, p. 334. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 589 



NETTLEHAM. 

All Saints. 6 Bells. 

1. J. PROCTER C.W. 1740. SAML DRAKE VICAR. THE 

RINGERS GIFT & OTHERS D H FOUNDER. 

2. VENITE EXULTEMUS. 

3. HENRY ROGERS C.W. SAMl DRAKE MINISTER. 

4. DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST US ALL IN 1724. 

5. Blank. 

6. JOHN ASTROPP & HENRY ROGERS C.W. SOLI DEO 

GLORIA 1724. 

h':^ NETTLETON. 

S. John Baptist. 3 Bells. 

I- [ + 31 ] ^aitd£ lEatoh <^xn )g>ro ^oMs [ U 32 □33-] 

( Diam. 33^^ in. ) 

2. [ + ii6] -f.'M^M'WM :©©• m^^i M:fp^:j^ 1614. 

( Diam. 35I in. ) 
3. [ + 162 ] jgantitHS ;iDomtncr 1673 'V^ M 

( Diam. 39^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III., page 107, and Plate XXIV. 
The present bells have been recently rehung. 



NEWTON. 

S. BoTOLPH. 3 Bells. 

I. [+116] ^M-:m'^^j^%M ©•©€) mM-^MM- 
'M'w:m.m 1596. 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 



590 The Inscriptions on the 

2. [+116] :iri©":Ei^ j^:m:m :m:^^:m ©€>:© 

[ a 113- ] 

( Diam. 35^ in. ) 

3. THOMAS NORRIS MADE ME 1641. 

( Diam. 39^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plate XVI. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "two handbelles," belong- 
ing to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold to "Johnne 
Carr who haith broken them," and that " one sacringe bell " had been 
" broken in peces and made awaie."* 

NEWTON-BY-TOFT. 

S. Michael. i Bell. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greatt Belles j sanctus Bell."t 

There is now one bell only, and there being no ladder in the parish 

long enough to reach it, I must be content to quote the description 

kindly supplied to me by the Rector : — 

/ "It is a good bell of fine full tone, and can be heard two miles off. 
It hung for 150 years or more in the gabled belfry of the old 
church ; and when this (the church) was rebuilt, in i860, it was 
suspended in an open stone Campanile. There is no inscription — 
the maker's name only, which I cannot call to mind." 



NEWTON-ON-TRENT. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I. JOHN BROWNE GAVE XXL HARDOLPH COTTON 
GAVE XL 1664 [ G 157. ] 

(Diam. 31 in. ) 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 118. f Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 591 

2. [+164] GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH W S H W 1683. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

3. [ + 164] IF GOD BE WITH VS HO CAN BE AGAINST 

VS W S H W 1682. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXI 11, and XXIV. 

The gifts to the ist bell were ;^20. and ^10. 

The omission of the first letter in the relative pronoun on the 3rd 
bell is in accordance with the local pronunciation. 

The same error is found on tombstones [ J. T. F. ] See also the ist 
bell at Brigsley. 



NOCTON. 

All Saints. 6 Bells. 

1. BLESSING. HEARS & CO FOUNDERS LONDON 1865. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. HONOUR. MEARS & CO. FOUNDERS LONDON 1865. 

( Diam. 27 in, ) 

3. GLORY. MEARS & CO FOUNDERS LONDON 1865. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

4. POWER. MEARS & CO FOUNDERS LONDON 1865. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 
5 BE UNTO HIM THAT SITTETH ON THE THRONE. 
MEARS & CO FOUNDERS LONDON 1865. 
( Diam. 33I in. ) 
6. AND UNTO THE LAMB FOR EVER AND EVER. MEARS 
& CO. FOUNDERS LONDON 1865. THESE BELLS 
WERE THE GIFT OF SARAH ALBINIA LOUISA 
COUNTESS OF RIPON TO NOCTON CHURCH OF 
ALL SAINTS. REBUILT A.D. 1863 GEORGE GILBERT 
SCOTT R.A. ARCHT 

( Diam. 35^ in. ) 



592 The Inscriptions on the 

The ancient church here had only one bell. The present church was 
erected by the late Countess of Ripon, the donor of the present ring. 
She died on the gth April, 1867, 



k '■' NORMANBY NEAR SPITAL. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

1. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE VS IN 1747. 

2. ©" J ANNO DOMINI 1571. 

[ D 107] 

3. ^ [ + 140] m> [ + 140] ^ [ + 140] ^ [ + 140] 

[U 127] 

For Stamps see Plate XV., and pages 114 and 118. 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Normanbie jux" Ownbie " reported 
that " a paire of handbells," which belonged to this church in Queen 
Mary's time, had been sold.* 



NORMANBY-ON-THE-WOLDS. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. [+ 106] GOD f°5°^] SAVE OVR •:• CHVRCH •:• 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. GOD SAVE THE CHURCH 1629. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

3. 1828. 

(Diam. 35 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles j santus bell."t 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 119. f Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 593 



/j : NORMANTON. 

S. Nicolas. 3 Bells. 

I. ELIZOBETH PANE ETHEL PANE DONER 1743. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. miM.^:sBM-jhm:i^^ 

(Diam. 32 in. ) 
3. [ + 107] GOD •:• SAVE •:• HIS •:• CHVRCH •:• OUR 
• :• QUEEME •:• AMD •:• REALME •:• AMD •:• 
SEMD ■:• VS •:• PEACE •:• IVL •:• CHRIST •:• 
AMEN. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XV. 

Nothing is known (beyond their liberality) of the two ladies men- 
tioned on the ist bell. Their names are not found in the Parish 
Registers. 

The inscription on the 2nd bell is in fine ornate gothic capitals like 
those on the 4th bell at Swinstead. 



l^(^, NORTHORPE. 

S. John. i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

1703. 
( Diam. i2f in.) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XIX. and page 114. 
4 D 



594 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

In 1553 the church of Northorpe possessed " ij gret belles & one 
sanctus bell."* 

The date of the present larger bell is probably about 1600 [ J. T. F. ] 
It has the band ornament fig. 115 [Plate XVII.) between the words. 



NORTON BISHOP'S. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

2. [ D 82 D 81 u 80 ] M<^M. miM^MXM. CDDBl,^ 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

3. MICHAEL WIGELSWORTH WILL SPAVIN CHVRCH 

WARDENS HENRY PENN MADE ME 1708. 
( Diam. 39^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV., page 114, and Plate XIV. 

l/oi - NORTON DISNEY. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. [+106] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1631. 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 

2. [u 124] miMSMMM- yrXMm<B M^MM'W.mi':JPW-M^ 

( Diam. 29^^ in. ) 

3. [ + 106] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1606 [ a 113. ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV., page m, and Plate XVI. 



» Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. rS, P- ^ Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 595 

ORBY. 

All Saints. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I, 2. [ + I ] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1663. 

( Diams. 301, 33 in. ) 
3. [ + 66 ij 68 ] ^a X^arm (Bm ^ro ;i?^obis. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

1610. 
( Diam. 13^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 52, and Plate VIII. 

'---^ORMSBY NUN. 
S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 19 in. ) 

ORMSBY SOUTH. 

S. Leonard. 5 Bells. 

1. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1757. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

2. LESTER & PACK OF LONDON FECIT 1757 J. SMITH 

RECTOR. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

3- % [+59?] -M [UII-] 

( Diam. 27!- in. ) 

4- [+15] j^Htitta X^argarda (Bra ^rc ^Il^oWs LU"-] 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 
5. [ + 66 ] ^onrah j^oito srcta more mea. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 



596 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see Plates VII., II., and VIII. 

In 1552 when the Inventory of Church Goods belonging to " Southe 
Ormsby in the parties of Lyndsay " was drawn up the following entries 
relating to the bells and their value were made :— 

It' iij bells xvj7i. 

It' one lytel bell X5. 

It' ij handbells ijs.* 

The inscription on the 5th bell is illegible as taken both by rubbings 
and squeezes : it is given above as literally as possible, but is clearly 
wrong. 

There is a tradition here that the two largest bells came from Calceby 
in 1757, when the church there was pulled down: it is more probable 
that the two bells from that place were then sent to the foundry, and 
are now represented by the present ist and 2nd here cast in that year, 
and that the three ancient bells are those referred to in the Edwardian 
Inventory. In the ringing chamber is a small board with the names of 
the first five ringers thus : — 

Samuel Webster 
Richard Hobson 
Francis Ealand 
George Baston 
Samuel Burges 
The first set on the 5 bells 
1758. 

On the bell-frame is cut : — 

John Smith Rec* Will™ Eland Church^""" James Harrison of Mid' 
Raison Bell-hanger 1757. 

The Rev. John Smith (see 2nd bell) was Rector for twenty-six years, 
and died on the 30th October, 1778. His tombstone is in the churchyard. 

* Lanil Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 597 

4->- OSBOURNBY. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

1. DANIEL HEDDERLA 1Z55. 

( Diam. 29^- in. ) 

2. JESVS BE OVR SPEED 1634. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 
3- [ + 12] ^nm ^osa ^ulsata X^Elonbi ]Biaterma "J^otala [ + 16. ] 

( Diam. 36^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate II. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "the handbelles," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been " sold to The 
Bell and Wittm Pell and thei have made brase morters wt the'."* 

In the belfry is the following : — 

Take Notice 

Belfry Rule. 

This is a Belfry that is free 

For all that sivil be 

And if you please to ring 

Or chime it is a very pleasant thing 

Their is no music playd or sung 

Like Bells when their well rung 

Then ring your bell well if you can 

Silence is for every man. 

If here you swear or ring in hat, 

Sixpence you pay, beware of that ; 

And if a bell you overthrow 

Two pence you pay before you go. 



* Peacock's CIi. Fur. p. 120. 



598 The Inscriptions on the 



OWERSBY NORTH. 

S. Martin. i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I. RICHARD DONGWORTH VICAR EDWARD HEWSON 
THO RABY CHVRCH WARDENS HENRY PENN 
MADE ME 1708. 

( Diam. 371- in. ) 

Priest's Bell: — 

1713- 

[ D 168] [ D 168] 

( Diam. 18^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret bells & one sanctus bell."* 

There is a rhyme current in this neighbourhood for which I find no 

foundation beyond the fact disclosed by this Indented Inventory that 

two great bells are now wanting : — 

Owersby parish 
Wicked people 
Sold their bells to Kelsey 
To build a steeple. 

The Rev. Richard Dongworth was inducted in 1698. There is no 
entry of his burial in the Register, but he appears to have died in the 
winter of 1711-12. 



OWMBY. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 162] GOD SAVE THE KING W S H W 1687. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

• Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 599 

2. [+162] LET VS REMEMBER THE 5 OF NOVEMBER 

W S H W 1687. 

( Diam. 25 in. ) 

3. [ + 162 ] WHEN YOV DIE ALOVD I CRY W S H W 1687. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Ownedbie " reported that "two 
handbelles " which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time had 
been sold since the last visitation.* 



OWSTON. 

5. Martin. 6 Bells. 

1,2. FRANCES SANDARS GAVE THIS BELL A.D. 1847 TO 
HER PARISH CHURCH. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS 
LONDON 1847. 

( Diams. 25, 30 in. ) 
3,5. THE REV. W. STONEHOUSE M.A. VICAR JOSEPH 
COOPER CHURCH WARDEN 1822. T. MEARS OF 
LONDON FECIT. 

[ Diams. 32, 36 in. ] 
4. FRANCES SANDERS GAVE THIS BELL A.D. 1847 TO 
HER PARISH CHURCH. C. &. G. MEARS FOUND- 
ERS LONDON. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

6. ALL MEN THAT HEARE MY MVRNFVLL SOWND RE- 

PENT BEFORE YOV LY IN GROVND 1662 [ d 157. ] 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIII. 

In 1553 there were here "iiij greyt belles and Santus be]l."t 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 120. f Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. s\, P. R. Off. 



6oo The Inscriptions on the 

Until the year 1847 there were still four bells and a small Priest's bell, 
which latter hung outside the steeple, and was probably the Sanctus 
bell mentioned in the Edwardian Inventory just quoted. 

On the stock of the 4th bell is : — 

W. Raynor 

church E + Lee 
warden 

1854. 

The Rev. W. B. Stonehouse, subsequently Archdeacon of Stow, 
was instituted as Vicar of Owston in January, 1821 ; he died iSth 
December, 1862, and was buried here. 

His sister-in-law, Miss Frances Sandars, the donor of the ist, 2nd, 
and 4th bells, died at Owston on the 27th December, 1868. 

It is related of Archdeacon Stonehouse that he used to say to Miss 
Sandars, " I always pray for you, Fanny, when I hear those bells." 

Both Archdeacon Stonehouse and Miss Sandars left considerable 
sums of money for the benefit of the church, organ, schools, poor, choir, 
ringers, &c., of this parish. 

OXCOMBE. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 12 in. ) 

In 1552 this church possessed " Itm ij bells one lytle bell ij handbells 
& one pare of sencers," which were valued at " xls."* 

PANTON. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

Here is one small bell in a dilapidated brick cote : it is believed to 
be without either inscription or date. 



Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, Church Goods, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 60 1 



PARTNEY. 

S. Nicolas. " 3 Bells. 

I. HENRY PENN FVSORE PETERBOROVGH 1712. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. [ + 116] %'M^M'w^ :©^ ©"T^:m ^^m^j^ 

1595 [ D 113- ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 
[ D II ] [ D II] [ D II ] 
3- [ + 12] Mxam ^osa ^JPuIsala X^Elunbi ^Biattrhta "^otata 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107, and Plates XVI. and //. 



w PICKWORTH. 

S. Andrew. 2 Bells. 

1. GOD SAVE THE CHURCH [ n 113.] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. mxidt anbrea oia pro nobs 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XVI. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " one handbell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been " broken and 
defaced anno dni 1565."* 

There is a space for a third bell. 

PILHAM. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

(Diam. 29 in. : pattern round n 115.) 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 123. 
4 E 



6o2 



The Inscriptions on the 



For Stamps see Plate XV., page 114, and Plates XIX. and A'K//. 

In 1553 the ancient church here contained " iij gret belles one santus 
bell."* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " one sacring bell and ij hand- 
bells, "which belonged to the churchin Queen Mary's time, "remaynith."t 

There has been no parish clerk here for some time ; the bell is never 
used, not even for Divine Service. It has the elegant band ornament 
of oak leaves and acorns (fig. 115). 

The single letter ^E^ is that figured No. 149, on page 123. 



PINCHBECK EAST. 



S. Mary, 



5 Bells. 



[+3] GOD SAVE THE KING A LAWSOM TOBIE 
MORRIS CAST ME 1677. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 
[ + I ] GOD SAVE THE KING W CLOVES TOBIE 
MORRIS CAST ME 1677. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 
[+2] MOM [ D n 04] VOX SED [ n n 04] VOTVM 
[004] MOM [ D D 04] MVSICA [a d d 4] 
CORDVLA [0004] SED [04] COR [04] 1624. 
TOBIE NORRIS ME FECIT 
[ Royal A rms xj of James I. ] 
( Diam. 41 in. ) 
[+ I] CARIS HOLYDAY THOMAS ELLIN C.W. THOMAS 
ANSILL 1619. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

[ + I ] GOD SAVE THE KING J WIMBERLIE B WIM- 
BERLIE M MICHILL [ + + i ] W SHARP J OL- 
FIEILD T BISSEL TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 1677. 
( Diam. 48 in. All without canons. ) 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. 5^3, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 123. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 603 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 53. 

There was another bell here — a small one — which being cracked 
was taken down, recast, and given to the new district church of S. 
Bartholomew. 

The Rev. Michael Mitchell, whose name is on the tenor bell, was 
Vicar of the parish: he died on loth October, 1714, aged 76 years. 
The John Wimberlie and Bevile Wimberlie on that bell were, I believe, 
father and son, descended from Wm. Wymberley, who was of South 
Witham early in the sixteenth century.* 

The following leaflet was, some time ago, printed and circulated in 
the neighbourhood : — 

The following various items for work done at the Church of Pinch- 
beck, and for other services, was recently discovered among the 
parochial records of that place, where it now remains. It appears 
that objections had been made to the Account, which, however, 
were overcome by the rh3miing powers of the village carpenter, 
who ultimately obtained payment : — 

Dec. 2oth, 1769. 

Oil for little and great Bell £. s. d. 

T'other three went very well o . i . o 

To eating and drinking at the Bell 

For Ringing Christmas in so well o . 12 . 6 

Paid for lean-toos, posts and planks 
Over the grounds of neighbour Franks 

Drunkards pulled up in their pranks o . 8.0 

Item, cutting and contriving. 

Four pence nails, and sixpence driving o . o . 10 

Lain a plank in Cuckoo Lane 
Cuckolds never can complain. 
They may go to Church and back again o. 2. o 



See a Pedigree of this family in the Genealogist, Vol. iv. p. 6. 



6o4 The Inscriptions on the 

For a new pulpit, oak the wood 

As parson Townshend said it should 5 . 5 

To going to Pepper and to Gall 
For cash to do the work withall 
They the pulpit did, and preach, and all o , i 



£(> 



When such hot and bitter folks, 

Pay me for my deals and oaks 

I know no more than Joney Noakes. 

Thos. Stiles. 

There is a tradition that the bells from Croyland Abbey were trans- 
ferred to this church, there being no other tower in the neighbourhood 
large enough for them. 

^^^ PINCHBECK WEST. 

S. Bartholomew. 2 Bells. 

This modern church, erected in 1849, has two small bells — one pro- 
vided for the church when it was built, and the other was the priest's 
bell at East Pinchbeck. This latter bell was cast by Tobie Norris in 
1633, and, being cracked, was recast before it was hung as the second 
bell here. 



" ^ PONTON GREAT. 

Holy Cross. 5 Bells. 

I- [+116] j.-M^M'^'M :©©■ <B~w:^ M:j^mmM>m 

160I. [ D 113 ] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 
2- [ + 31 ] .©ancta ^Katerba (Dra ^xa ^obis 

(Diam. 33 in.) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 605 

3- [ + 31 ] Sii ^omen Domini [iSenebictum. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

4. 3E sfacttig toling men bo tul to tasl£ on meats i\rd feebs l^e soule 1632 

[ a 157- ] 

( Diam. 39^^ in. ) 

5. T. ASKEW. J. ASKEW WARDENS 1667 GOD SAVE THE 

KING [ a 159.] 

( Diam. 43^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107, Plates XVL, III., and XXIII., and page 
127. 

The tower of this Church was completed in 1519 by Anthony Ellys, 
a merchant of the Staple of Calais, who, having made his fortune by 
honest industry and transmitted a portion of his gains to his wife in 
gold enclosed in a cask labelled " Calais sand," bought lands at Basing- 
thorpe, and Swineshead, as well as at Great Ponton, where he built a 
house for himself close to the church, and then erected this fine tower 
(with the concurrence of his wife), as a thankofFering to God. After his 
death he was buried beneath an altar tomb in the north eastern comer 
of the chapel adjoining the chancel of this church.* The motto (carved 
by order of the founder) " Thynke and Thanke God of all," appears on 
the north and south faces of the tower, in which he would undoubtedly 
hang a ring of bells ; of that ring we may safely infer the present 2nd 
and 3rd bells to have been a portion. 

/ 

PONTON LITTLE. 

S. GuTHLAC. I Bell. 

I. 1694. 

( Diam. 20 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Paunton P'a" reported that "one 
handebell," which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had 

• Reports and Papers of Ass. Arch. Societies, xiii. p. i6. 



6o6 The Inscriptions on the 

been " broken in peces," and that "one sacringe bell and one handbell " 
had been "stolen forthe of or churche by theves that robbed o' said 
churche."* 

Over the bellcot is " An° D 1657." 



POTTERHANWORTH. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

I. [+16] :mcrj^m©" ©€):id i6i6. 

( Diam : 26 in. ) 

2. DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST ME IN 1736. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

3. ^aglor ^ Maw Jltoitgljborouglj 1858. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 107. 

The proceeds of a cottage and a few acres of land have long been 
given for the ringing of the ist bell at seven o'clock in the evening from 
Michaelmas to Lady-day. The endowment is said to have been pro- 
vided by a person, who being lost on Lincoln Heath, was guided to his 
home by the sound of one of the Potterhanworth bells then being rung. 



QUADRING. 

S. Margaret. 4 Bells. 

1. [-f 2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1638. 

[ ^ D Bird ] lA u Dolphin ] [Ad Thistle ] 
( Diam. 33I- in. ) 

2. JOHN LUDD GEORGE CROW CHURCHWARDENS T. 

OSBORN FECIT 1788. 

( Diam. 34^ in. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 122. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 607 

3. %\\ mnto biri i6ig. 

( Diam. 35 in. No canons. ) 

4. tE« noe i^u it'pi 1619. 

( Diam. 39J in. No canons. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

The bells here were previously inscribed : — 

1. See Martine ora pro nobis. 

2. Sea Maria. 

3. God blesse the Holy church. 

4. Virgo coronato due nos ad regna beata.* 

Thomas Norris seldom used the curious stamps on the ist bell: they 
are upon the 4th bell at Aldwincle All Saints, Northamptonshire. 

^'^ QUARRINGTON. 

5. BoTOLPH. 2 Bells. 

1. rob lomliiTSon foil toplanb 1624. 

( Diam. 25 in. ) 

2. [ + 140 ] ^ [ + 140 ] >© 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 118. 

^'^ < RAITHBY-BY-LOUTH. 

S. Peter. 2 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1830. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. ©ob ^ab T^\t :Mntg 1636. %j^:^ 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 



Harl. MSS. 6829, p. 227. 



6o8 The Inscriptions on the 

Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 

( Diam. 14 in. ) 
In 1553 " Rythbye " possessed " iij greate bells and one saunce bell."*^ 



RAITHBY-BY-SPILSBY. 

Holy Trinity. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 140] ^ ^ [ + 140.] 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

2. [+140] ^ [+140] ^ [+140] ^ 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. gob sabc ijis cl^r&c^ i6zo. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 118. 

RANBY. 

S. German. 3 Bells. 

1—3. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1840. 
( Diams. 30-^, 32, 34 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret bells & a sanctus bell.f 
These bells were, under now unknown circumstances, lost to the 
church, for prior to 1839, when the tower was rebuilt, there was only 
one small bell ; the present ring was then substituted for it by the 
patron. 

RAND. 

S. Oswald. 2 Bells. 

I. JESUS BE OUR SPEED [ O 7. ] 

{ Diam. 26^ in. ) 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line, -/j, f Land Revenue Recot'ds, Bundle 1392, 

P. R. Off. File 79, P. R. Off. 



ChurcJi Bells of Lincolnshire. 6og 

2. M-TF^ [ □ 69 ] XIl.^:i3iJ,^ [ □ 69 ] ^:^M-^%M. 
[ D 69 ] :^Jh^^ElM- [ □ 69. ] 
( Diam. 31 J in. ) 

For Stamps see page 59 and Plate VIIL, and for specimens of the 
letters on the 2nd bell see figs. 192 and 193 on Plate XXVII. , where, 
however, the letter P is reversed. 

It is said that a third bell, being cracked, was sold for ;^30., and the 
proceeds employed towards the cost of rebuilding a portion of the 
church in 1836. 

^7 RASEN MARKET. 

S. Thomas Apostle. 6 Bells. 

1. 6. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1862. 

[ Royal xj Anns. ] 

Patent. 

( Diams. 25 ; 37 in. ) 

2. 1808 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 

3. J 4 H [ D 10.] 

1795 
( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

4. GLORIA DEO IN EXCELCIS 1734. 

( Diam. 29-|- in. ) 

5. DANIEL HEDDERLY FOUNDER. 

(Diam. 33 in.) 

For Stamp see Plate I. 

In 1553 " Estereason " possessed " iij great belles j sanctus bell."'* 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Market Reason " reported " or 

* Written in body of Inventory "Est- "East Rasen otherwise Market Rasen." — 
reson."— ^«^/H. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. Gent. Mag. for 1789, p. 2S2. 

4 F 



6 10 The Inscriptions on the 

handbell," which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, 
"was gone out of or church (as or vicar saith) by a madd woman 
a yeare ago."* 

There is a Peal Board dated loth August, 1878. 



RASEN MIDDLE. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

1. 1699 [07] 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. SOLI DEO GLORIA 1721. RIC : BENNETT THO : 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE QVEEN ANN 1707 [QT.^ 

( Diam. 31^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 59, and Plate XXIV. 

In 1553 " Mydell Rayssen " possessed " iij grete belles & one Santus 
bell."t 

-^ -- RASEN MIDDLE DRAX. 

In 1553 " Myddl Rayson Rackes " possessed "iij gret belles & one 
sanctus bell."! 

The church of S. Paul (in which those bells hung), generally known 
as "the Low Church," was taken down about the year 1861, and its 
bells (three in number) sold. 

J RASEN WEST. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I. PRAYSE YE THE LORDE 1591 N B J C. 

* Peacock's Ch. Fuy. p. 124. f Aiigm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. + lb. 507. P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 6ii 

2. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH J BEECH R CHATTERTON 

WARDENS 1710. 
3- [ U "9] ^ca X^iitiii [° 110] ©ra [d ho] ^xa [XJ 119^ ^obis 

For Stamps see Plates XVIII. and A^F/. 

In 1553 " West reason " possessed " iij gret belles j Sauntus bell."* 

In 1556 the churchwardens reported that " ij hand bells," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, were broken and sold.f 

From time immemorial a small piece of land had been in the hands 
of the parish authorities here called " Ding-Dong piece," and at the 
enclosure an acre and a half was conveyed to the Rector and Church- 
wardens in accordance with the original grant, on condition that one of 
the church bells should be rung every night during the winter m.onths. 
The name of the donor is unknown. 

^yU RAUCEBY. 

S. Peter. 4 Bells. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

2. %mM'WM P©©" (D'W:Bi M^^'M^ 1621 [U156.] 

( Diam. 34-I- in. ) 

3. [+2] lOH^ PATTISOM lOHM FLETCHER CW TOBIAS 

MORRIS CAST ME 1684. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

4. THO SPENCER : VIC : JOSEPH : WILLKINSON : 

WILL : THVRLBY : HC WARDEN : HENRY ! 
PENN : FOVNDER 1723. 

( Diam. 42 in. A large piece broken off rim. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIII. and page 52. 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur p. 125. 



^1% 



6i2 The Inscriptions on the 

The Rev. Thomas Spencer (see 4th bell) was instituted in 1710: he 
died or vacated in 1729. 



RAVENDALE EAST. 

S. Martin. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " ij gret bells."* Their present poor repre- 
sentative belonged to the old church, which was rebuilt in 1857. 



RAVENDALE WEST. 

The ancient church here, which has long been in ruins, possessed, 
in 1553, " ij greyt belles." t 



REDBOURNE. 

5. Andrew. 6 Bells. 

1, 5. Blank. 

( Diams. 26|-, 34^ in. ) 

2, 4. 1774. 

( Diams. 27^, 3oi in. ) 

3, HENRY HARRISON OF BARROW BELLFOUNDER 1774. 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

6. THIS PEAL OF BELLS WAS RECAST AT THE EX- 

PENCE OF THE REVD ROB^' CARTER ESQ'' 1774. 
( Diam. 36^ in. ) 

In 1553 there were " iij greatt belles & j sanctus bell."t 

The 5th and 6th bells of the present ring are without canons. 



* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. \ Exch. Q. R. Church GooJs. Line. 5*3 

t lb. 507, P. R. Off. P. R. Off. 



Churcli Bells of Lincolnshire. 613 

The Rev. Robert Carter — who died and was buried here — was styled 
"Esquire" because he was the chief landowner in the parish. In the 
memorial introduction to Grosart's Edition of Christopher Harvey's 
Poems'^ (p. 29) we read, " In 1653 he was appointed a trustee .... 
by the designation of Christopher Harvey Esquire, it having been not 
then unusual to designate well-born clergymen as ' Esquire,' as witness 
the burial entry of George Herbert." 



REEPHAM. 

SS. Peter and Paul. i Bell. 

I. [+ 120] ti.S cmo^ indT utdbn^O [U119. ] 

For Stamps see Plate XVIII. 

This is an instance of misplacement of letters on the mould (which 
cannot be shewn in type), by some one who did not remember the 
reversing of letters in the casting. 



RESTON NORTH. 

S. Edith. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a sacring bell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's reign, had passed into, the 
hands of " S' Rob dyon" the late vicar, but what had become of it 
they did not know.f 

. , RESTON SOUTH. 

S. Edith. 4-/^6 i Bell. 

I. 1772. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

• For private circulation, 1874. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 126. 



6i4 The Inscriptions on the 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a sacring bell," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, was "broken and defacid 
anno pino Elizabth."* 

The ancient church here had three bells : there is no record of what 
became of them. 



REVESBY. 

S. Lawrence. i Bell. 

I. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1813. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

There are frames here for four bells. 



RIBY. 
S. Edmund. 3 Bells. 

1. JHESVS BE OVR SPEDE 1607. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. THIS PEAL REPAIRED 1811. THE BISHOP GAVE 50 

POUNDS. 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

3- [ + 147 ] cD<iC <sr:©j^ ^gt£s ^m<a 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 120. 

All these bells have had the canons cut off. The Bishop referred to 
on the 2nd bell was the Right Rev. George Pretyman Tomline, Bishop 
of Lincoln (1787- 1820). Bishop Pretyman succeeded to the name and 
large property of Marmaduke Tomline, Esq., who died at Riby Grove, 
on the 22nd June, 1803. See under Tetney for an anecdote relating to 
him and a church bell. 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 127. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 615 

^ RIGSBY. 
S. James. i Bell. 

I. [ + 56 ] a u c m (I r i a 

( Diam. 13 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate VII. 

^, RIPPINGALE. 

S. Andrew. 5 Bells. 

1. 4. 1830. 

( Diams. 32, 39 in. ) 

2. W-^i DOBSON FOUNDER 1830. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

3. LONG LIVE WILLIAM THE FOURTH. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 
5. W'^i DOBSON DOWNHAM NORFOLK FOUNDER 1830. 

( Diam. 43 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a Htell bell," which be- 
longed to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been " sold to Johnne 
Tounesend of haconbie tincker anno 1560 " and was broken ; that "two 
handbelles " had been sold and broken in pieces; and that " a litle bell" 
yet remained.* 

Prior to 1830 there were three bells only, which are described in a 
memorandum belonging to the Parish, dated 3rd July, 1822, thus :-^ 

Three Bells with their frames in Belfry of Tower. 

The i^* or least Bell being 3 feet in diameter with the Inscription 

Samuel Orr. 

The 2°'^ Bell 3 ft. 3 in.; Diam' with the Inscription Thomas Bacon 

in 1620. 

The 3'''* Bell 3 ft. 6 in. Diameter with the Inscription Thomas 

Norris made me in 1672. 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. pp. 127, 129. 



6i6 The Inscriptions on the 

In 1830 those three bells were sent to the founder, and the present ring 
of five substituted. That was done by means of a legacy of ^200 left for 
the purpose by Mr. Richard Casswell. Mr. Casswell was a native of 
Rippingale, but had removed to the adjoining parish of Morton, where 
he was in business as a maltster. He was an amateur musician and 
artist: he played the violin in the church choir when at Morton, and 
painted several pictures of sacred subjects on the walls of Rippingale 
and other neighbouring churches. He died at Morton in 1829, at the 
age of 82 years, and was buried at Rippingale on the i6th of August in 
that year. 

In the Churchwardens' Account Book the following entries occur 
relative to the new bells and Mr. Casswell's legacy : — 

1830. Dec. 7. Paid M' Westby of Surfleet in part 

for the Bellframes 51 . 10 . o 

1 83 1. Dec. 1 6. Paid M' Westby in full for hanging the 

Bells 50 . o . o 

1 83 1. Dec. 16. Paid M' Wilkinson (the Attorney) for 

Legacy duty on the Bells 16 . 4 . 11* 



RISBY. 

In the ancient church here dedicated to S. Bartholomew, but now 
destroyed, there were, in 1553, " ij greatt bells. "f 



A 



RISEHOLM. 
S. Mary. i Bell. 



This new church has one small modern bell. 



• Communicated by the Rev. W. + Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. -^3 

Cooper, R.D. P. R. OlBf. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 617 



^7 ROPSLEY. 

S. Peter. 2 Bells. 

1. % sbfctlg toling nun bo call io tast£ on meats lljat ittbB i\t soble 

[ n 113 ] 1620. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. [ + 2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1664. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XVI. and page 52. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbells" and "one 
sacringe bell," which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's reign, 
had been sold.* 



ROTHWELL. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I. [+ 116] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1613 [d 113.] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 
-2. [+64] Mtt tEoIjics <g)r;T "^xa ^obis. 
( Diam. 34^ in. ; cracked. ) 

( Diam. 37^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plates XVI. and VIII. 

In 1553 Rothwell possessed " iij greatt belles & j sanctus bell."'t 
Of those the present 2nd is the only one remaining. The inscription on 
the 3rd is a sorry attempt to reproduce the ancient one, which was : — 

Sum Rosa Pulsata Mundi Maria Vocata. 



» Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 130. f Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 

4 G 



6i8 The Inscriptions on the 



ROUGHTON. 

S. Mary. i Bell. 

I. 1694. 

( Diam. 20 in. ) 

In 1553 " Roughtone" possessed " iij gret bells & a sanctus bell."* 



r ROWSTON. 

S. Clement. 2 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [+ 123] ^ • • • <i) :]^ :m 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

( Diam. 20 in. ) 
PriesVs Bell :— 

Blank. 
( Diam. 12 in. ) 

For Stamp see page iii. 
I The two bells are of the same date : very difficult of access, and very 
dirty. The dedication of the ist is not deciphered, but the letters are 
the same as those on the ist bell at Wispington. O P N stands for 
Ora Pro Nobis. 

The Priest's Bell (very much cracked) is unhung and on the floor of 
the tower. 

ROXBY-CUM-RISBY. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I. VENITE EXULTEMUS DOMINO 1709 [a 168.] 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

• Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 619 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1709 [ n 168.] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV. and XX., and for a specimen of the 
letters on the 3rd bell see figure igo, Plate XXVII. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greyt bells one santus bell."* 



RUCKLAND. 

S. Olave. I Bell. 



I. Blank. 



( Diam. 12 in. ) 



RUSKINGTON. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

I. [+106] GOD •:• SAVE •:• THE •:• CHVRCH •:• OVR 

•:• QVEEME •:• AMD •:. REALME [ U 108. ] 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

2. [ + 135 ] WMM :©^ mij- ^:jp^:m> ©:© a 33^1^" 

W.M 1594 [or 1574] [ D 113.] 

( Diam. 38i in. ) . 

3. dTampaira ^acra ^mt '^ximtnit ^eata ^a 1593 [U^oS d 107 ^ 

O 105. ] 

(Diam. 42 in. ; cracked.) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. page 116, and Plate XVI. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbells" which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had gone " wee knowe 
not howe.f 

• Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. -5^, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 130. 



620 The Inscriptions on the 

When the spire fell in 1618 tradition affirms that the bells were cast 
over the churchyard wall into a contiguous brook. 

The tenor is of the same date, and bears some of the same stamps 
as the tenor of the ring of eight at Lincoln Cathedral : the same circular 
stamp with the founders' names was also upon some of the Lady Bells 
formerly hanging there. This fine bell is unfortunately obliged to be 
recast, it being cracked. 



SALEBY. 
S. Margaret. 2 Bells. 

1,2. MEARS FOUNDER LONDON. 

( Diams. 18, 20 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "a brasier had in exchange 
one handbell" which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time.* 

The present bells were cast about thirty years ago. According to a 
note made by the late Vicar of the parish— the Rev. Felix Laurent — on 
28th March, 1856, f an ancient bell formerly here bore the inscription: — 

;]^^i:li{jpbs ©rag X^El mtxt itxii. 

Here are evidently some errors : perhaps the M is a mistake and the 
inscription "me refecit," or, more probably, the true reading was "me 
fieri fecit." 



SALMONBY. 

S. Margaret. i Bell. 

I. 1842. 

( Diam. 23 in. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fuv. p. 131. -f- Communicated to me by the Rev. J. J. Raven, D.D. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 621 

In 1552, when an Inventory of the Church Goods belonging to this 
parish was taken, the following entries were made descriptive of the 
bells and their value : — 

Inp'mis twoo belles in the steple & one Sanctus bell 

up^sed to xb. 

It' ij handebells & one pyxe xxiiji.* 

^qi> SALTFLEETBY ALL SAINTS. 

All Saints. 5 Bells. 

1,2,3,4. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1799. 

5. REV. GEORGE STEPHENSON RECTOR : REV. RICH- 
ARD KILVINGTON CURATE JAMES HARRISON OF 
BARTON FOUNDER LARGEY GACE HODGSON & 
BENJAMIN CURTIS ^^rdj liZS^arhns i799- 

On bell-frame is :— L G H + Chu*^ Warden 1799. 

-^--- SALTFLEETBY S. CLEMENT. 

S. Clement. 3 Bells. 

1. DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST ME IN 1727. 

(Diam. 22^ in. ) 

2. [ + 47 ] ^^mMjElWM [ □ 48 ] %(B'MM-l^:m.^M 

[048] :e)©- [048] :K€):Bi^'^©wcD:m- [048] 

(Diam. 24^ in. ) 

3- [ + 47 ] -M^m \ ^M^m:^M:m.M. \ :iPjM. \ 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 
* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. 



622 The Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see Plate VI. 

These are very light bells. The canons have been cut off the 2nd 
and 3rd, the inscriptions on which are in beautiful small gothic capitals 
like those on others bearing the same cross and stop. 



SALTFLEETBY S. PETER [Ancient]. 
S. Peter. 2 Bells. 

jV-^'i- [ + 134U127] x^ [0107] M-^iay^MlS^ [0107] 

( Diam. 31 in. ; cracked. ) 

2. [ D 35 ] :ji>y^MM. [ n 38 ] ^i^-^JO^^mM. [ □ 38 ] 

:^%M. [ a 38 ] mx^'XBij.M [ □ 38 ] mji-- 
mi^:bim.:^m. [ □ 38 j miMSM^M. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 115, and 114, Plates XV. and V. 

The above two bells still hang in the tower of the ancient church, 
which stands in the parish churchyard, and serves as a cemetery 
chapel. There was a small Priest's bell which is removed to the new 
parish church, consecrated on 31st July, 1878. 

These two inscriptions are both quite peculiar in character. The ist 
has the well known rose and shield so often found together (p. 114) but 
the cross and letters are quite different from what are usually associated 
with them. The letters are foliated in a somewhat coarse fashion, as is 
also the cross. The 2nd has no initial cross but in its place a trade 
mark which I have not met with elsewhere. The letters are good bold 
plain gothic capitals. The legend [ which is also upon a bell at 
Breaston, Derbyshire, probably cast by John of Stafford ] is nearly 
the same as that surrounding the seal of St. Mary's Abbey, at York : 
Virgo pudica, &c. [ J. T. F. ] 

There is a tradition, unsupported by any evidence, that the bells here 
were taken from some neighbouring church. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 623 

t 

The second bell was cracked by a too enthusiastic farm servant, 
who, on the occasion of his master's marriage, thought to help the 
ringing by using a blacksmith's hammer on the bells. 

SALTFLEETBY S. PETER [New]. 
S, Peter. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

{ Diam. 12 in. ) 

This small bell was the Priest's bell at the ancient church of 
S. Peter. 



SAPPERTON. 

S. Nicolas. i Bell. 



I. 1825. 



( Diam. 25 in. ) 



SAUSTHORPE. 
S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

I- [ + 54] 'M.mm^ MSMmjyhMM. :j^<BmjLMM- 

( Diam. 23+ in. ) 

2. [ + 54 ] M-'^tM. miMSM^ m:mj^m%M. '^'MM:mM. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 
3. [ a 42 D 42 D 42 D 42 D 42 □ 42 n 42 n 42 D 42 D 42 D 42 ] 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates VII . and VI. 

In 1552 the bells belonging to this church were thus entered and 
valued in an Inventory of Church Goods then taken : — 

It' iij small Bells wyth a littyll bell & ij handbells iiij"* 
• Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. 



iv> 



624 The Inscriptions on the 

The three small bells still remain, but the little, or sanctus, bell 
has gone. 

SAXBY ALL SAINTS. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. XM^M'WM :©©- <DTr:Bi M:iP^^yB 1612. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. [ + 165 ] SOLI DEO GLORIA R : I. T : H. W : S. 1662. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

3. [ + 165] 1681 W S. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV., and for specimens of the letters on the 
I St bell see figs. 187 and 188 on Plate XXVII . 



SAXBY [with Firsby]. 
S. Helen. i Bell. 

Here is a small bell without inscription or date. 



f Y SAXILBY. 

S. BoTOLPH. 4 Bells. 

1. R WOOD SEND EDGOOD HELP CW W COSIN T 

HIRD D H FOV 175. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. [ + 121 ] ^£3 ;B0tnIpljMS S'xi ;iIlomen ^ni ^©nbktum. 

( Diam. 37^ in. ) 

3. [D 107 +116] M- [U108] ^ 

( Diam. 39 in. ; cracked. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 625 

4. REV. MR JEPSON VICAR I TO THE CHURCH THE 

LIVING CALL AND TO THE GRAVE DO SUMMON 

ALL 

HENRY WOODWARD ) ^, , ^, ^ 
GERVAS WOODEND J ^^"'^^^ ^^'^''''^ 

JAMES HARRISON OF BARROW FOUNDER 1788. 
( Diam. 44J in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XVIII. and XV., and page 107. 

The first reading of the inscription on the ist bell (which is much 

smaller than the others, but is treated as one of the ring) naturally is 

" R Wood sended good help," that is to the expense of casting the bell. 

I hope I am not robbing him of his due if I suggest the correct reading 

to be 

R. Woodend, Ed. Godhelp, C.W. 

for Gervase Woodend was churchwarden here in 1788, and the name of 
Godhelp is found in the Parish Register. 

The initials D.|if. are those of Daniel Hedderly the founder. 

For a local rhyme about these bells see under Stow. 

The Rev. George Jepson was probably a non-resident vicar: he 
signed the Register occasionally between 1777 and 1785 : he probably 
held the living until 1789, when the Rev. Thomas Rees signs, and 
continues to do so for some time. 

^^4' SAXILBY. 

5. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. J. TAYLOR & Co. FOUNDERS 1879. 

( Diam. 14 in. ) 

Sci SCAMBLESBY. 

S. Martin. • i Bell. 

In 1553 there were here " j sanct' bell ij great bells " which are now 
poorly represented by a small bell, in a turret, about twelve inches 
in diameter. 
4 H 



626 The Inscriptions on the 



i«y SCAMPTON. 

S. John Baptist. ■ 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 47 ] M^mi mCD^J^ [ n 48 ] ^iBJh [ □ 48 ] 

SMMM^ [ a 48] mi^Wi:^% [ ° 48] miMSM^M. 

[ D 48 ] -^<^mM.mM- [ a 48. ] 

2. [ + 47 ] 3e<b:i^ [ □ 48 ] :i3,^:^ m-^^w [ a 48 1 

or,^x3a:]g>,^:ifi,^ [ □ 48 ] miM.:i^^Mm [ □ 48 1 
:Bi@-€r [ □ 48] "yr:i^^3£ ^^~wj- [ □ 48] .©.^:iii,^ 
[ □ 46] 

3. [ + 116] -KM^^-wM :©©■ mi^:^ m^^'m^ 

[a 113] 1582. 

[Crown ornament n ii8. ] 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate VI. page 107, Plate XVI. and page 108. 

The ist and 2nd bells are uniform in character; the letters are small, 
and in the word undique the d and q are inverted and i substituted for e 
so that the word looks like unqkidui. These inscriptions are given, but 
incorrectly, in the '■'■History of Scampton'" by the late Archdeacon 
Illingworth [J. T. F. ]. A similar bell hangs at Heapham (the ist). 

^^^ SCARLE NORTH. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

[ D 113 ] 1616. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

2. lESUS BE MY SPEED 1733. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. SOLY DEO GLORIA 1727. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 108 and Plate XVI. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 627 



i: u J SCARTHO. 

S. Giles. 2 Bells. 

1. [+106] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1634. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. HENRY PENN FUSORE 1715. 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XV. 

In 1553 there were here " ij great bells one sanctus bell."* 
There is a tradition that one bell was sold from hence, in 1810, pre- 
served in the following rhyme : — 

Poor Scartho people 

Sold their bell to repair the steeple. 

If this be true it was probably the old sanctus bell that was then sold, 
and so the people here robbed their belfry much less than many of their 
neighbours, whose large bells have disappeared. 



ri^ SCAWBY. 

S. Hybald. 3 Bells. 

1. 1628. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. DANIEL HEQDERLY MADE ME IN 1741. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

WM^ iiLm'MM-^:i^m'^ [ : 87 j :mm [ : 87 ] 
3. [ + 85 ] '^-mM-'M'^e.m'M^m^ [ ; 87 ] 

miM-^^M. is{mmiLw [ ; 87 ] x^ei©" 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 
For Stamps see page 86. 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



brA^ 



628 The Inscriptions on the 

In 1553 " Scalbye " possessed " iij greatt bells j sanctus bell."* One 
of those bells (the present 3rd) still remains. 



SCOPWICK. 

Holy Cross. i 3 Bells. 

1. 0071 [O7. ] 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER WILLIAM SEWELL 

CHURCHWARDEN. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

3. X^^ssns ^t ©"dis ^Biabia ^omcn ©abmlis [ + 121 ^ 119.] 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 59 and Plate XV III. 

The date on the ist bell is reversed, and the inscription on the 3rd is 
blundered. 



'-; '^'^ SCOTHORNE. 

S. German. 3 Bells. 

I. [ D 81 a 84 D 81 a 82. ] 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

2. [ + 111U139] w-Mm miM-:Bij!LM- 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 
3. [ + 162 ] ^Immto X^Elori ~^M& Ml^^ 1683. 
( Diam, 39 in. ; cracked. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XIV., XVI., XX., and XXIV. 
A small bell — perhaps the ancient sanctus bell — which was found 
some years ago in the ringing chamber, was hung in the porch of the 

* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line, /j, P. R, Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 629 

school in the year 1853; it has no inscription, and is 12 inches in 
diameter. 

There is an ancient Account Book belonging to the parish, but the 
entries relating to the bells are very meagre :— 

1591. Itm to Rob' Chapman Thomas Downing for a bell 

spoke xx^. 

Itm to John Richardson for a peece of wood 

toward the bell yoke viiji. 

Itm for bell Irons vJ5. viiji. 

A small headstone in the churchyard here has the following — now 
mostly illegible : — 

Alas poor John 
Is dead and gone 
Who often toU'd the Bell 
And with a spade 
Dug many a grave 
And said Amen full well. 
1739- 

In Scothorn Parish Register, under the year 1739, is the following 
entry and note, doubtless referring to " poor John " : — 

John Blackburn was buried Jan^ g"* 1739-40. He had serv'd the 
office of Parish Clerk near 50 years & had been a decent & faithful 
servant to nine preceeding Vicars at this Parish Church. In 
Gratitude to the Memory of him this short account is given by the 
present Vicar. 

V. Drake. 

Exoriantur usq. qui ornent hanc Ecclesiam.* 



Kindly communicated by the present Vicar. 



630 The Inscriptions on the 



j-)3 SCOTTER. 

S. Peter. 4 Bells. 

1692. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 
( Diam. 32 in. ) 

( Diam. 35 in.) 
4. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER. HENRY 
JOHN WOLLASTON M.A. RECTOR. WILLIAM 
FOSTER & THOMAS MOULDS CHURCHWARDENS 

1832. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

The first three bells were cast at Nottingham. 

In 1553 there were " ij great belles j sanc'^ bell."* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "one handbell," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, " was taken out of or 
church three yeare agoo ... by whome wee know not."t 

The ring was subsequently increased to three bells. 

From the following entry in the Parish Register we learn that one 
of the bells was recast in 1673 • — 

Memorandum that the second Bell was new cast by one Richard 
Sanders of Brig May the third 1673, and was hung up in the steeple 
of Scotter on Saturday June 8"" 1673. 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. 5^, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 133. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 631 

A few years later another bell being damaged, it was determined to 
cast the three old bells into four new ones. The Parish Register has the 
following entry : — 

Memorandum 
That June the 21'* 1692 the great Bell was by W" Markham 
carelessly Riven by violently striking her with a great Hamer on y^ 
wedding day of W" Parr and Sarah Moody, the tongue of the sayd 
Bell being then defective & sent by Joseph Webster y^ church- 
warden to Gainsburrough. 

And the Churchwardens' Book gives the following particulars entered 
subsequently (between the years 1705 and 1706) : — 

Memorandum 
That at Lady day 1693 Scotter 3 old Bells were cast into 4 new 
Bells and weigh as follows : — 

Old Bells weighed 

c q'ter pound 

The old Tenure weighed 11 : 01 : 02 

The old second Bell weighed 07 : 03 : 00 

The old first or treble Bell 06 : 02 : 00 



The old Bells weighed in tot 25 : 03 : 00 



The foure new bells weighs as follow 

c q'ters pounds 

The new Tenure weighs 09 : 03 : 12 

The new third Bell weighs 07 : 03 : 00 

The new second Bell weighs 06 : 01 : 08 

The new Treble weighs 04 : 02 : 00 



The 4 new bells weighs in Tot. 28 : 01 : 20 



The 4 new Bells now weigh c q'ters li 

more than the 3 old Bells 

did weigh by 2 : 02 : 20 

Account of them Taken p me 

Robt Belton. 



632 The Inscriptions on the 

The tenor bell was recast again in 1832 as the Vestry Book tells, 
and as the inscription on the bell itself testifies. The Churchwardens' 
Accounts charge : — 

1832. Nov. Carrying Old Bell to Barton £1 .1.0 

Fetching New Bell from Barton i . i . o 

Bell-ropes 1.5.0 

Gave to Ringers o . 5 . o 

In 1880 the bells were rehung in a new frame (not recast as stated in 
the church books) by Messrs. Taylor at the cost of ;^io2 12s.* 

The first letters of the inscriptions on the ist and 2nd bells are of 
the kind engraved on p. 123, figs. 149, and 150, the other letters are 
smaller gothic. 

The following lines are painted, in red and black letters, on the south 
wall of the Tower over the belfry door : — 

Yow ringers All 
who heare doe fall 
And doe cast over 
a bell doe for feit 
to the Clarke theirfore 
A Groute I doe yow 
tell & if yow 
thinck it be to 
little & beare 
A valliant minde 
ymore yow give 
vnto him then 
yow prove to him 
more kinde. 



* I am much indebted to the Rev. ing on my behalf a chest full of dis- 
Reginald H. C. Fitz-Herbert for (with arranged Papers fur the information given 
the Rector's kind permission) search- above. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 633 

These are (says The Rev. J. T. Fowler, who copied them some years 
ago) the earHest ringers' rhymes I have met with. 

The Rev. Henry John Wollaston (4th Bell), was of Sidney College, 
Cambridge; B.A., 1792; M.A. 1795; was sometime Rector of Paston, 
Northants. He was collated to Scotter in 1803, died 27th October, 
1833, aged 63 years, and was buried here. 



j-/^ SCOTTON. 

S. Genewys. 3 Bells. 

.1. JESVS BE MY SPEED 1748. 

(Diam. 34 in ; cracked.) 

2. [ ij 27 + 28 ij 29 ] jEn X^Elallb ,^mtis ^esomt (iTampana JiDbrntnis 

( Diam. 38I in. ) 

3. JESVS BE OVR SPEED. MAY 2. 1623. 

R : IF AC 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greatt belles j santus bell."* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " one handbell," belonging 
to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been broken in pieces. t 

The only ancient bell remaining — the 2nd — is of a very common 
type, especially in the south of England. The capital letters are 
crowned. 

There is a tradition that the treble bell was cracked on the occasion 
of a three days' ringing in honour of the only visit ever paid to the 
parish by Sir John Frederick, a former Lord of the Manor. He was 
on his way from his house at Burwood Park, Surrey, to take the 
command of the 3rd Surrey Regiment of Militia, then quartered at 
Hull, during the Peninsular War. 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. ^\, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 135. 

4 I 



634 ^^'^ Inscriptions on the 



S I 'i SCRAFIELD [cum Hammeringham]. 

The ancient church of S. Michael, of which no traces now remain, 
possessed in 1552 " ij Bells," which were valued at " xls."* 



J7^ SCREDINGTON. 
S. Andrew. 2 Bells. 

1. [ + 106] GOD SAVE OVR QVEEl^E 1601 [ n 113. ] 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

2. R. ATTEWELL 1672. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XVI. 

The rent of six acres of land goes to the parish clerk, part of whose 
duty it is to ring the bells. 



^^^'' SCREMBY. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 4 Bells. 

1. lESVS BE OVR SPEED 1740. 

( Diam. 2if in. ) 

2. WILLIAM YOVNGER C : W. 1739. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

3. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE VS ALL IN 1740. 

( Diam. 25^ in. ) 

4. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE VS ALL 1740. 

(Diam. 27f in. ) 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 635 

S//^ SCRIVELSBY. 

S. Benedict. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 8 in. ) 

In 1553 "Scrylbye," in Gartree Wapentake, possessed " ij bellis in 
the steple and a sanct' bell,"* which are now represented by, probably, 
the smallest church bell in the county, which is thus amusingly 
referred to by the Rector, who, I hope, will forgive me for quoting his 
description : — 

" ' Story ? God bless you ! I have none to tell, Sir ! ' about the Bells 
of Scrivelsby. We have only one, and that one something bigger 
than a sheep bell — not quite so good as the dinner bell of one's 
house. This one bell does duty for everything. It rings us into 
church ; it tolls us to our grave ; and it attempts to make a lively 
sound to cheer us at our matrimonial ventures ... It is about as 
unpretending a bell as any in the county, and if it could smile it 
doubtless would do so now to think of any one caring to know any- 
thing about it." 



j-; L SEARBY. 

S. Nicolas. 5 Bells. 

1. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1865. 

A nd incised on waist : — 

TE DEUM LAUDAMUS. 

(Diam. 2i|- in. ) 

2. 1811. 

( Diam. 23 in. ) 



* Land Revenue Recoyds, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



636 The Inscriptions on the 

3. CAST BY JOHN WARNER 8c SONS LONDON 1865. 

A nd incised on waist : — 

GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

4. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1856. 

( Diam. 25^ in. ) 

5. [+116] GOD 8AVE HIS CHVRCH 1609. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ; note E flat. ) 

For Stamp see page 107. 

When the ancient church here was allowed to go to ruin, and the 
chancel was bricked up at the west end so as to be available for Divine 
Service, the then bells were fixed in a frame in the churchyard. 

Prior to the year 1865 there were only three bells : the present 4th 
(the gift — in the year 1856 — of the late Rev. Wm. Wright, who was 
born in the adjoining parish of Somerby) was then the 2nd. The 
present ring was completed in 1865, by the gift to the church of the 
ist and 3rd by the present Vicar — the Rev. T, J. M. Townsend — who 
is a great lover of bells and bellringing. 



^ ' SEDGEBROOKE. 

S. Laurence. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH 1724. 

2. r T-f ^ 27 1 pfi^so"'^^ k^^ ^«Ji3 bukissimm bo« gabrielis 



X ^. I ^°7J Inscription evased. 

y( ^ [U 127] ^ 



Priest's Bell : — 



Blank. 



For Stamps see Plate XV. and page 114. 

The inscription on the 3rd bell was erased on the mould apparently 
by the finger while it was soft, and so previous to the casting of the 
bell : there are traces of letters like those on the 2nd bell. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 637 

SEMPERINGHAM. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 90] :©^ [ + 90] :m.<B^ [ + 90] €):iii^pgi 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. mvitit gabriel ora pro nobis [ u 124. ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. THO ESSINGTON C W 1719. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 87 and iii. The letter U (ist bell) is inverted. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a handbell," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold and 
defaced.* 

^^TT SIBSEY. 

5. Margaret. 8 Bells. 

1. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1815. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2, 7. Blank. 

( Diams. 31, 42 in. ) 

3. HENRY HARRISON FOUNDER 1770. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

4, 5. J. BRIANT AND J. CABOURN HERTFORD FECIT 

1801 WM POCKINGTON C. W. 

[ Diams. 37^, 38 in. ] 

6. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER 1822 THO. MAWER C.W. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 136. 



638 The Inscriptions on the 

8. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON UPON HUMBER 
FOUNDER 1815. 

( Diam. 48 in. ) 

In 1553 " Sybseye" possessed " iij gret belles & a santus bell."* 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that the "handbels and sacryng 
bels," belonging to this church in Queen Mary's time, had gone " we 
know not how."t 

The Parish Register for 1659 has an entry of the burial of T. 
Symond, "belman." 

The ancient Churchwardens' Accounts have one or two notices of 
the bells : — 

1698. Paid for help at the church when the bells were 

mended o . 2.0 

Paid for Bell-ropes i . o . o 

1699. Given to the Ringers on 5"" Nov' o . 10 . o 

Prior to 1770 there were five bells only. At a Vestry meeting held 
on the 15th February in that year, it was resolved that all the five bells 
should be recast by Henry Harrison of Barrow : accordingly, on the 
same day, the following agreement was drawn up : — 

Memorandum. A contract made the 15"' day of Feb. A.D. 1770 
between Henry Harrison of Barrow in the county of Lincoln Bell- 
founder on the one part, and Thomas Gilbert Churchwarden of 
Sibsey in the county aforesaid on the other. The aforesaid Henry 
Harrison on his part has covenanted and agreed to recast the Bells 
and to give them a full true and tunable sound at the rate of 245. 
per cwt. and also that he shall provide new wheels, irons, brasses, 
and all other necessary materials (except the great frame) for the 
sum of ;^28 — and that he will take them at Hull and deliver them 
again when recast, and that he will completely hang the same at 



* Exch. Q. R. Chiivch Goods, Line, /j, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fiir. p. 137. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 639 

his own proper charge. And provided the said Bells return heavier 
when recast than before, for every pound heavier the parish is to 
pay to the said Henry Harrison after the rate of ^6 per cwt., to the 
weight of two hundred; but if they shall exceed two hundred, for 
every pound so exceeding the parish shall pay after the rate of £'^ 
per cwt. But if the said Bells shall prove deficient of their old 
weight, for every lb. wanting he the said Henry Harrison shall pay 
to the parish aforesaid nine pence for every such lb. wanting, to the 
weight of two hundred, but if they be deficient above two hundreds, 
for every lb. so deficient he shall pay eighteenpence. 

And that the said Henry Harrison shall deliver the Bells aforesaid 
within 3 months after their arrival there ; and likewise that the 
said Henry Harrison shall make good all damages that the said 
Bells may sustain for the space of a year and a day after they are 
completely hung. 

Also Thomas Gilbert on the other part doth agree for himself and 
for his successors the churchwardens of Sibsey aforesaid, in behalf 
of the parish, that he or they shall pay or cause to be paid at 3 
payments, namely one half of the sum upon completion of hanging 
the bells, the other half at two equal payments, one payment at the 
expiration of one year, and the other at the expiration of two 
years. 

It was further agreed that the churchwardens aforesaid shall 
deliver the Bells at Hull and bring them back again from thence 
at the expense of the parish. 

In witness thereof we have hereunto set our hands the day and 

year before written. 

Henry Harrison. 

Witnessed by Thomas Gilbert. 

Richard Plant Jr. 

From an entry, made on the 24th September, 1770, we learn that the 
contract was concluded : the bells were completed and hung by Henry 
Harrison, and the following record of their weights entered in the 
Vestry Book : — 



640 The Inscriptions on the 

I St weighed 6 cwt. o qr. 13 lbs. 

2nd ,, 3 " 3 ». H " 

3rd ,, 7 ,, 2 ,, 10 „ 

4 >. 8 ,, 2 ,, 20 ,, 

5 ». 10 ,, 2 ,, i6i,, 

On the 5th .September in the following year (1771) we find a resolu- 
tion " that our Churchwarden Mr. Henry Baxter should agree with 
proper workmen to make us a set of new Bellframes of the Heart of 
Oak." This is curious as being only a year after the new bells had 
been hung. 

The ring was increased by " a new Treble Bell to complete the 
number of six" in accordance with a resolution of the majority — for 
the vote was not unanimous — of a Vestry held on the 8th April, 1773. 

At that time there was much change ringing here, as is testified by a 
peal board still remaining, dated loth March, 1776. 

On 24th February, 1814, a Vestry Meeting was summoned " to 
consult about augmenting the number of Church Bells," and it was 
agreed that a new treble bell and a new tenor bell should be procured 
to complete a ring of eight ; and that Mr. James Harrison should be 
employed to cast and hang them. These bells, which arrived in 1816, 
cost with the rehanging of the whole ring, about ;^300, which was 
raised by private subscription amongst the ringers and their friends. 
These were so enthusiastic that the idea was entertained of having two 
more bells to make a grand ring of ten, but the death of Mr. Miller, an 
influential ringer, caused it to be given up. The Sibsey people are still 
great ringers: no less than seven members of one family — the Messrs. 
Mawer — are amongst the best; Mr. Mawer, Sen., has been (1879) 
ringing for nearly sixty years, and Mr. Clapham, now at the age of 
eighty-four, for even a longer period.* 

There is a tradition amongst the inhabitants of Stickford that the 



« I am much indebted to the Rev. F. Bezant, the Vicar of Sibsey, for the above 

extracts. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 641 

Sibsey people have their bells ; that once upon a time the Stickford 
bells were sent away for repair, dropped carelessly in the water or dyke 
by the way side and lost ; that some time afterwards they were dis- 
covered, taken up out of the mud, and hung in Sibsey church tower. 
There is no evidence whatever in support of such an act of dishonesty. 

/"^-^ SIX HILLS. 
All Saints. 4 Bells. 

1. MEARS & STAINBANK FOUNDERS LONDON 1869. 

( Diam. ig in.; not used. ) 

2. + '%\x ^onor (Dm ^mtdrm 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

(Diam. 33 in.) 
4. RECAST AT BARTON 1821, JAMES HARRISON 

FOUNDER. 

(Diam. 37 in. ) 

The bells are so difficult of access that I am unable to give the 
initial crosses on the 2nd and 3rd. 

Owing to an unfortunate dispute, the details relating to which need 
not be detailed or commented on here, the ancient tower of this church 
was demolished a few years ago, and the bells stowed away in a barn, 
and in danger, (it was feared,) of being lost to the parish. "To this 
loss, however, the Rev. Charles A. Wilkinson (the then Vicar) could 
not conscientiously consent, and noble efforts were immediately made 
by him to secure the re-erection of the tower, and rehanging of the 
bells, in which he would certainly have succeeded by the aid of 
numerous sympathizing friends in the diocese, and beyond it, Avhen, 
through the interposition of a mutual friend, all further action on his 
part was rendered unnecessary by a guarantee from that friend for the 
erection of the tower without any extraneous aid."* 

* Report of Lincoln Diocesan Arch. Soc. for 1875. 
4 K 



642 The Inscriptions on the 

The bells are so awkwardly fixed in this new tower that their in- 
scriptions can with great difficulty be approached. Those as given 
above are the best readings that can be obtained. 

The first bell was probably intended for a Priest's bell : there is a 
still smaller bell — only about 4 inches in diameter — fixed with the others 
by the late Vicar, and used by him, chiefly, to attract the notice of the 
sexton when the time for service had arrived. 



5 SKEGNESS. 

S. Clement. i Bell. 

I. [ + 14 ] 'J^viltiB M'lsia XllfiUs "^otor ^ampana ^i\t\-at\x& 

( Diam. 4of in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate II. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " one sacring bell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been broken and 
defaced.* 

" Two other bells formerly hung in the tower. The tradition respect- 
ing the loss of one of them is altogether legendary ; the account given of 
the fate of the other is probably correct ; viz. : that being cracked it 
was taken down by the churchwardens and sold, and the produce of it 
expended at a convivial meeting. "f 

That was bad, but worse was said of Dunkeld : — 

"Was there e'er sic a parish — a parish — a parish, 
Was there e'er sic a parish as little Dunkell, 
Where they sticket the minister, hanged the precentor 
Dang down the steeple, and drunk the bell." 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 137. f Oldfield's Wainjieet, p. 251. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 643 



^2^ SKEGNESS. 

The new church of S. Clement has at present only a very small 
bell. 



SKELLINGTHORPE. 
S. Lawrence. 5 Bells. 

1—4. + J. TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 

1855- 

( Diams. 28, 29, 30, 31 in. ) 
5. JOHN TAYLOR & SON FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

Mr. Ussher, who kindly visited these bells for me, says "the cleanest 
and best appointed belfry I have ever been in." 

There are some excellent modern Belfry Rules hanging up. 

The Ringers have a bequest of £1. per annum from the late 
Mr. Henry Stone. 

r,~, SKENDLEBY. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I, 2. J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 

1877. 

( Diams. 27, 30J in. ) 
3. [O19] ^ttm ro^H pul^ata nuntbi catrna ttotata. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 
( Diam. 13 in.) 

For Stamp see page 70. 

The previous ist and 2nd bells, recast in 1877, are said not to have 



644 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

been ancient. A singular feature in tlie inscription on the tenor is the 
use of the capital S throughout. The late Sir Gilbert G. Scott made a 
curious mistake as to the inscription on this bell in his Report on the 
state of this church. He wrote : " The inscription upon the tenor bell 
is interesting, and seems to show that this belonged to one of the 
churches of Mumby : it is as follows :— Sum rosa pulsata Mumbi 
caterina vocata." 



3 SKIDBROOK [with Saltfleet]. 

S. BoTOLPH. 3 Bells. 

1. GOD SAVE THE KING LE HW 1630. 

2. lESVS BE MY SPEEDS RH TT CH. W. 1675. 

3. [ □ 107 ] mm:m^ mM- <^mm:m. ^j. 

[U 127.] 

For Stamps see Plate XV. and page 114. 

The churchwardens and parishioners of Skidbrook having, in 1552, 
sold two of their church bells, were a few years afterwards (in the reign 
of Philip and Mary) called upon to replace them. This led to the 
presentation of a Petition to the King and Queen and the Council by 
Henry Day and Christopher Scupholme, parishioners of " Skydbroke 
cum Saltflethaven," in the county of Lincoln, for themselves, and in 
the name of the inhabitants and parishioners. In which Petition they 
set forth that they (moved by universal talk, and by persons openly 
preaching against bells and " other lawdable cerimonies " of the church, 
affirming them to be superstitious and abominable), by common consent, 
about the 20th of May, 6 Edward VI., sold two bells then in the parish 
church for ;^2o ; which amount, with other money thereto added, they 
employed in repairing the church of Skidbrook, then sore decayed, and 
also in scouring and making "of one haven called Saltflethaven then 
also beinge sore decayed ruinous and in effect warpt upe so w* sande 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 645 

that the ffreishe waiteres was not able to have the full course to the See, 
ne shippes or bootes have eny passage into and ffrome the said haven 
whiche is nowe Right well amended." The Petitioners go on to say 
that "the said orators" were then called by Privy Seal that present 
term before William Barneres, Thomas Myldway, and John Wyseman, 
Esqrs., their Majesties' Commissioners, to pay the said ;^2o received for 
the bells — which were sold by consent of the whole of the parishioners 
— and also that the orators and the rest of the parishioners were 
compelled by the Bishop's injunctions to buy back the same bells or 
others as good at their own costs, they therefore prayed to be discharged 
from that payment, or else they would be driven to forsake the parish, 
for they were poor, and not able to bear the said charges. 

The prayer of this Petition was granted, for there is an Order of 
Council, addressed to the three Commissioners, for the discharge of the 
parishioners without troubling them any further in the matter of the 
two bells, upon proof shown of the truth of their statements.* 

Saltfleet Church was, centuries ago, washed away by the sea. There 
is an improbable story to the effect that some of its bells have been 
found at low water mark. This may be an exaggeration of another 
story that about sixty years ago a fisherman drew up a large bell-clapper 
in the meshes of his net. 



f^^^' SKILLINGTON. 

S. James. 5 Bells. 

I. MEARS & STAINBANK, FOUNDERS LONDON. 

TO THE MEMORY OF 

CHARLES HUDSON 

1866. 

( Diam. 27J in. ) 

• Land Revenue Records, Church Goods, Line, Bundle 1392, File 81 (2 Papers), P. R. Off. 



646 The Inscriptions on the 

2. G. MEARS & CO FOUNDERS LONDON. 

PRESENTED 
TO THE CHURCH OF SKILLINGTON 

BY 

THE REV. CHARLES HUDSON, VICAR 

1864. 

(Diam. 28^ in, ) 

3, 4, 5. G. MEARS & CO., FOUNDERS, LONDON, 1864. 

(Diams. 30, 3if, 34 in.) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "one sacring bell & one 
hand bell," which belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had 
been sold.* 

Prior to 1864 there were only three bells, which, when sent to the 
foundry, were found to weigh 21 cwt. i qr. 14 lbs. These were 
recast in that year, and a fourth (the present 2nd) presented by the 
Rev. Charles Hudson, who also caused the frames to be arranged for 
five bells in case of some day being able to add a fifth to the ring, 
which he much desired. After his disastrous death on the Matterhorn, 
in 1865, his parishioners and friends subscribed for and added the 
present treble bell in memoriam. 

The weights of the present bells are 

I St. 4 cwt. o qrs. 4 lbs. 3rd. 4 cwt. 3 qrs. 24 lbs. 

2nd. 4 ,, I ,, o „ 4th. 5 ,, 3 ,, o „ 

5th. 6 cwt. 3 qrs. 25 lbs. 

SKIRBECK. 

S. Nicolas. 5 Bells. 

I. VOX MEA EST DULCIS MEA SCINTILLANS VULTUS : 
THOs EAYRE CAMPANARIUS 1759. 
( Diam. 31 in. ) 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 138. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 647 

2. ALEXANDER SAMSON VIC : ROBERT BOWCOCK C.W. 

D.H. FOVNDER 1731. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. [ + 2] J. REYNOLDS B LE W SMITH 1684. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

4. Blank. 

( Diam. 39 in. : canons off. ) 

5. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON. EDWARD 

HARRISON CHURCHWARDEN 1820. 
( Diam. 44 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

The Rev. Alexander Sampson (2nd bell) came into residence in 1720 ; 
he died 28th February, 1735, aged 47 years, and was buried in the 
Church here. 



^3/ SKIRBECK. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I. GOD SAVE OVR KIINGE 1638. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

This small bell, which is placed at the extreme top of the western 
gable, and was only to be reached by long ladders, has a rather curious 
tradition attaching to it. It is said to have been given by King Charles 
the First to the Town Hall at Derby. 

Unfortunately the Derby Town Records were destroyed when the 
Town Hall there was consumed by fire in 1841, so there is no docu- 
mentary proof of the truth of the tradition, which may have originated 
only from the loyal inscription found on the bell. However that may 
be it is well known that the builders of the new hall contracted to have 
all the old material. Hence the bell fell into their hands, and was sold 
by them to the builders of Skirbeck Church, which church was con- 
secrated in the year 1848. 



648 The Inscriptions on the 



5^^ SKIRBECK QUARTER. 

The Licensed School here has one small bell presented by Mr. 
Stainbank, bellfounder, London. 



SLEAFORD. 

S. Denis. 8 Bells and 2 small Bells. 

1. THE LORD TO PRAISE MY VOICE I'LL RAISE. T. 

OSBORN 1796. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

2. NO OFFENCE TO THE CHURCH T. OSBORN 1796. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3. PEACE AND GOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD ; • T. OSBORN 

FOUNDER 1796. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

4. GOD SAVE KING GEORGE THE THIRD T. OSBORN 

FECIT 1796. 

(Diam. 35! in.) 

5. THE REVD EDWARD WATERSON VICAR 1796 t osborn 

DOWNHAM NORFOLK FOUNDER. 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

6. WILL^i KIRTON AND GEO ROBINSON CHURCH 

WARDENS ; THO OSBORN DOWNHAM NORFOLK 
FECIT 1796. 

( Diam. 39^ in.) 

7. THESE EIGHT BELLS WERE CAST IN THE YEAR OF 

OUR LORD 1796 :• T. OSBORN FECIT :: • 
( Diam. 43 in. ) 

8. I TO THE CHURCH THE LIVING CALL AND TO THE 

GRAVE DO SUMMON ALL. tho^ osborn founder 

DOWNHAM NORFOLK 1 796. 

( Diam. 49 in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 649 

Fire Bell: (which hangs in a canopied niche in west front of south aisle.) 

Blank. 

( Diam. 14 in. ) 

Butter Bell: (which hangs in south light of the lowest spire window.) 

Blank. 
( Diam. 13^ in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Sleford Nova " reported that 
" sacring belles" . . . . " wt suche other trumperie," belonging to the 
church in Queen Mary's time, " were burned in the markett place of 
newe sleforthe the xxj''' daye of October A° secundo Elizabeth."* 

Prior to 1796 there were six bells only: one of which bore no in- 
scription : the others were thus lettered : — 

1. A. R. Founder. Thomas Seller Vicar. 
T. Harriman & W. S. Ch. W. 1707. 

2. Ihesus be our speede 1600. 

3. Prayes ye the Lorde 1600. 

4. God save the church our Queen and Realme and send us 

peace through Christ Amen 1600. 

5. This town subscribed to have me here thro' him whose name 

below I bear. 

George Arnett. 

There were also chimes, connected with the works of the clock, 
which played at four, nine, and twelve o'clock every day.f 

The Parish Book, which contains several agreements as to the 
repairs of the chimes in 1728, 1746, &c., records that it was agreed at 
a meeting held on the loth March, 1796, "certain proposals be taken 
into consideration on Thursday next respecting the repairs to be done 
to the Bells." On the day indicated — that is 24th March, 1796— the 
Vestry agreed that 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 138. f Dr. Yerburgh's Notes in MS. 

4 L 



650 The Inscriptions on the 

the present 6 bells being part burst and untuneable be recast and 
made into eight of the present weight, and that the churchwardens 
do procure a faculty for the same . . . and also that Mr; Osborn 
be agreed with to recast the bells . . . 

Again at a Vestry held a few days later — 6 April, 1796 

It was agreed that the present bells be recast into eight and that the 
tenor be cast in the Key of E according to proposals delivered on 
this day by Thomas Osborn of Downham in Norfolk and that the 
churchwardens do contract with the said T. Osborn.* 

The Registers contain several notices of the ringing of the Passing 
bell for different members of the Royal Family : e.g. Prince of Wales, 
four hours in 1751 : George II., twelve hours in 1760: Funeral of 
Princess Charlotte of Wales in 18 17; death of Queen Charlotte one 
hour in 1818 ; death of George III., from one o'clock in the day till one 
o'clock in the night on 30th January, 1820; death of Queen Caroline 
one hour, on 8th August, i82i.t 

The small bell known as the Butter bell had been long forgotten 
until the bells were examined for this work : respecting it see p. 250. 
Also as to Fire bell see p. 247. 

Mr. Waterson (see 5th bell) was instituted as Vicar in 1781, and in 
1 79 1 resigned in order to be appointed Rector of Quarrington, after 
which, and in the same year, he seems to have been reappointed to the 
Vicarage of Sleaford, in which living he was succeeded by Dr. Yerburgh 
in 1809. He resigned Quarrington in 1797. 

i'l>k SNARFORD. 

S. Lawrence. i Bell. 

I. 1619. 

* These extracts were kindly made for indebted for much of the other informa- 
me by Herbert Kirk, Esq., to whom I am tion about these bells, 
f Bishop Trollope's Sleaford, p. 146. 



Chitrch Bells of Lincolnshire. 651 

This bell has a hole in the crown. It is hung on a well-made 
half- wheel. [J. T. F.] 

., SNELLAND. 

All Saints. 2 Bells. 

1. HEARS & CO. FOUNDERS LONDON 1863. 

( Diam. 22 in. ) 

2. [ X 131 ? D 107 ] 1647 [ D 170. ] 

( Diam. 23 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XIX., XV., and XXV. 



;jc SNITTERBY. 

S. Nicolas. i Bell. 

I. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1864. 

[ Royal xj Arms. ] 

PATENT. 

( Diam. 28|- in. ) 



vi'37 SOMERBY NEAR Brigg. 
S. Margaret. 3 Bells. 

I. [D77] "mMm m<^^^M.M m~wm^:m^:Bi^ 

[ D 78] 

[ + 79] M^(M :^ MM-^w:!^^ )9>i©- :Ei©-- 

(Diam. 22 in. ; height 19 in. ) 
"2. [ D 141 D 142 D 141 D 142 D 144 D 145. ] 

( Diam. 24 in. ; height 20 in. ; unhung. ) 



652 The Inscriptions on the 

^ m [078] 

[ + 79 ] WMJJ^'M-WMJm^ mj^m^M-M. lS{%MJm 

I ( Diam. 27 in. ; height 21 in. ; unhung.) 

For Stamps see pages 79 and 80 and Plate XXL, and for the letters 
used on the ist and 3rd bells see Plate XIII., and fig. 74^ on Plate XII. 

The P on the ist bell stands for Pro, which word is found in full in 
the same inscription at Somersby. 

Sir Thomas Cumberworth, the donor of ist and 3rd bells, was the 
son and heir of Robert de Cumberworth of Somerby and Stayne-in-the- 
Marsh. He served as High Sheriff in 1415 and 1431, and represented 
his county in the Parliaments of 1420, 142 1, and 1424. These bells 
were probably intended for the Chapel of the Holy Trinity in this 
church, which chapel the same Sir Thomas Cumberworth provided 
with a rich supply of furniture, the Inventory of which is printed in 
Mr. Peacock's English Church Furniture (pp. 181 — 185.) The chapel is 
there called " the Trinitie Chappell in Som'by Kirk," and the things 
are given " to the Worship of the holy Trinitie, of o' Ladie Virgine and 
Mother Saint Marie all the holy Saintes of Heaven for my saule and 
my wife Dame Katherine and for all Christiane saules and speciallie for 
those saules that god wald most speciallie I did for the yeare of o'' Lord 
1440." 

The bells were given in 143 1. Sir Thomas Cumberworth's Will, 
(for which I am indebted to Mr. Peacock's Book just referred to) dated 
1450, is sufficiently curious to warrant its production here : — 

In the name of Gode, and to his loveyng. Amen. I Thomas 
Cumbyrworth, knyght, the xv day of Feberyer, the yere of our 
lorde M^CCCC and L in clere mynde and hele of body blyssyd 
be Gode, ordan my last wyll on this wise folowyng : — Furst, I gyff 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 653 

my sawle to Godd, my lorde and my redemptur, and my wreched 
body to be beryd in a chitte with owte any kiste in the north yle of 
the parych kyrke of Somersby be my wyfe, and I wyll my body ly 
still, my mowth opyn, untile xxiiij ourys, and after laid on bere 
withowtyn any thyng ther upon to cover it bot a sheit and a blak 
cloth with a white crose of cloth of gold : bot I will my kyste be 
made and stande by and at my bereall gifF it to hym that fiUis my 
grave : also I gif my blissid Lord God for my mortuary there I am 
bered my best hors. 

The 2nd and 3rd bells are unhung, and, sad to say, were covered 
with coal and other things when rubbings of the inscriptions were 
kindly taken for me by the Rector. 



Sli^ SOMERBY. 

S. Mary. i Bell. 

I. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1856. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " a sacring bell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, was " solde to a puterer 
of Lincoln at Grantha' faire this year " by the churchwardens. 



^6& SOMERBY NEW. 

S. Anne's School Chapel, opened 5th November, 1878, has one small 
new bell. 



SOMERSBY. 

S. Margaret. 2 Bells. 

I. [+75] X3Elist ^M>t telis ^a to ^omcit ©abrielis. 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 



654 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

2- [ + 75 ] ^cc )g>ro ;i2ia«bc ^xt ^csonat Ofampaua XsElaiic. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 79. 

In 1552, when the Inventory of Church Goods was taken, the bells 
here were thus entered and valued : — 

Inp'm two bells p'ce \\\]li. 

Itm one littill bell & two hand bells vs.* 

These two fine old bells happily still remain. 

The bell-frames and the floor of the bell-chamber are rotten and in 
a dangerous state. There is no means of reaching the bells but by 
hired ladders, indeed the approach to them is a matter of great difficulty 
and some danger. 

^^■^ ' SOMERCOTES NORTH. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [069] M^-w^ [ □ 61 ] miM.:B.jiLM- [□63] 

2. [+1] ^M^^'WM :©©• m^M M:ip^^:m 

i6i5. 
3. GOD SAVE OVR KING 1603. 

Priest's Bell ;— 

Blank. 

For Stamps see Plate VIII . and page 52. 

^ SOMERCOTES SOUTH. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells. 

( Diam. 33 in. ; * as to cross see below. ) 
» Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. 





















^ 



=3S 

»v be 



o 

CO 



3 
o 

CO 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 655 

2. [ + 75] "^TiiXgrcDm [ a 76 ] :E^©-g^m"y^^ [ □ 76] 

j^° :is)^(Dm [ □ 77 ] <sr<sr€r^ [ □ 77 ] ^^ 

o 

[ D 76 ] JXM. [ □ 77 ] '^^MJ.Jh'M^ [ a 77 ] 

M^iM-^m.:^% [ □ 77 ] 'M [ □ 76 ] x^ao y:i5i 

[ D 78] 

( Diam. 39^ in. ; height 26 in. ; thickness at sound-bow 2I in. ) 

3- [ + 75 ] :m'WJ^^iLM [ □ 76 ] <gr3E^€) [ □ 76 ] 

XlEl©-:ii:3E^ [ □ 76 ] <Sr,^X3Ei:]^J3L [ □ 76 ] 
^MM- ■^CDCrom [ □ 76 ] @f,.^:B:El3:©'J^3c^ 

[ □ 76 ] M^ :m>'f(B mi mmmm ^^ ij3e 

[ D 78. ] 

( Diam. 43 in. ; height 31 in. ; thickness at sound-bow 3J in. ) 



For Stamps see pages 79 and 80, and for letters used on the 2nd and 
3rd bells see Plates IX.— XI I. 

These are most interesting mediaeval bells, exceedingly rich in tone. 
The cross and letters on the ist are quite plain, the former too much 
worn to engrave. The 2nd and 3rd are noble early dated bells. The 
letters are beautifully ornamented gothic capitals, some of which are 
found upon other bells in the county (see p. 79). They contain human 
and grotesque figures, natural representations of leaves, &c. The cross, 
too, is very elegant, being composed of crumpled foliage such as is used 
in Decorated work. The fleurs-de-lys used as stops are very good, 
whilst the additional stop used on the 2nd bell is well worthy of remark. 
They both have the kind of mason's or merchant's mark (fig. 78), which 
is also found on the corresponding bells at Somerby. These bells are 
probably coeval with the tower. The two names on the 2nd bell are 
probably those of church officials, or benefactors to the bells : Moigne 
Moyne, or Mone, is an old Lincolnshire name. [See under Wigtoft 
(Churchwardens' Accounts in a.d. 153 i).] 



656 The Inscriptions on the 



^0 



SOTBY. 

S. Peter. i Bell. 

Tradition says there were formerly three bells here which were lost 
to the church when the tower was destro3^ed — which is probably true — 
and that one of them now hangs at Benniworth — which is probably not 
true. The present single bell is, writes the Rector, " a miserable little 
modern affair adapted for a town crier or a muffin hawker." 

-^ SPALDING. 

SS. Mary and Nicolas. 6 Bells. 

1. THOMAS OSBORN FECIT DOWNHAM NORFOLK 

1801 : : . : • 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. [ + 2 ] OMMIA FIAMT AD ©LORIAM DEI THOMAS 

MORRIS CAST ME 1629 W SMEATH B BVRTOM CH 
WA. 

( Diam. 30 in. ; turned. ) 

3. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI GLORIA DEO SOLI 

•:• ANNO DOM •:• 1733. 
( Diam. 33 in. ) 

4. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI •:• ■ \ • GLORIA 

PATRI FILIO ET SPIRITUI SANCTO • ; • A : D : 
1744 . : . 

(Diam. 35 in.) 

5. [ + I ] JAMES WILSBY JOHN HOMAM CH WA 1648. 

( Diam. 38^ in. ; turned. ) 

6. THOMAS OSBORN FECIT 1801. MAURICE JOHNSON 

DD. MINISTER THO^ MAPLES W^i LAW CHURCH- 
WARDENS. 

( Diam. 44 in. ; note F. ) 

For Stamps see page 52. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 657 

The bells here are mentioned early in the fourteenth century, when 
a quarrel existed between the inhabitants and the prior and convent, 
the latter complaining of the annoyance caused to them by the ringing 
by the former of the bells of their parish church at unreasonable hours. 
The Prior and Convent appealed to the King, and the inhabitants to 
the Pope. 

The dispute lasted for several years, and was eventually referred to 
"the R' Rev"* Father in Christ our Lord, the Lord Henry de Beaufort 
the Bishop of Lincoln," who cited both parties to appear before him at 
Buckden, and took upon him the determination of the controversy on 
the 28th June, 1401.* 

In the Rev. Maurice Johnson's MS. History of Spalding are bound 
up three folio leaves containing entries apparently copied from the 
original accounts of the churchwardens of the parish : the following 
refer to the bells : — 

15 19. p*" to W" Carter Belrynger & Keeper of y^ Kirke 

for his yer' stypent viijs. iiiji, 

Itm p"* for ryngyng when the Tempest was n]d. 

Prior to 1801 there were five bells only. On the loth August in that 
year, as recorded in the Vestry Book, 

A Vestry meeting was held to consider the propriety of having a 
new treble bell and the tenor Bell recast. Churchwardens to write 
to M' Osborne, Bell Founder of Downham, inviting him to come 
to ascertain the full tone or note of the said Bells, and finally to 
agree for the above order. 

Maurice Johnson 
(and ten others). 

The Rev. H. T. Ellacombe's chiming apparatus is attached to the 
bells. 



Vide Antiquities of Spalding, by T. Cammack, and Minutes of the Spalding Gentlemeti's 

Society, Vol. iv. p. 120. 

4 M 



658 The Inscriptions on the 

The 1st bell is called the Call Bell, rung just before the commence- 
ment of Service. 

The 2nd is called the Pancake Bell, rung on Shrove Tuesday. 

The 3rd is called the Curfew Bell, and is so used. 

The 4th is called the Sacrament Bell, rung before the commence- 
ment of the Communion Office. 

The 5th is called the Wedding Bell, used to summon the Priest to a 
wedding. 

The 6th is called the Dead Bell, used as the Passing and Funeral Bell. 

The Rev. Maurice Johnson, D.D. (see tenor bell) was Incumbent from 
1782 to 1825, when he resigned. He died 25th May, 1834, aged 78 years. 

In the early part of this century the widow of the sexton, continuing 
his duties, used to ring the six o'clock morning bell. She was also a 
washerwoman. Being engaged in the latter occupation at a clergyman's 
house with other women, she left the tub to ring the bell. One of her 
companions putting a white sheet around her, followed her, and in the 
dark stood on the bench in the south porch, and on the old woman 
coming out of the church, and while she was locking the door, set up a 
dreadful moan, thinking to frighten the old lady, but she quickly drew 
the huge key from the lock, and rushed at the figure with the exclama- 
tion, " Be ye 'live or dead here's a go at yer," and nearly slew the 
would-be ghost. 

Here are peal boards dated 1804 and 1870. A Society of change 
ringers has been recently formed. The bells are in excellent condition.* 

^H^ SPALDING. 

S. John Baptist. 2 Bells. 

I. MARY ANN DAUGHTER OF REV» WALTER MAURICE 
JOHNSON 

SI' LUKE VII. VER. V. A.D. 1875. 
( Diam. 21 in. : note A flat. ) 

• For much of the above information I am indebted to the Rev. Canon Moore, F.S.A., 

the Vicar of Spalding. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 659 

2. SAINT JOHN BAPTIST 

S^' MATTHEW III. VER. III. A.D. 1875. 
( Diam. 27 in. ; weight 4 cwt. o qr. 11 lbs. ; note E flat. Both cast by- 
John Warner and Sons, London. ) 

Miss Mary Ann Johnson (ist bell), the daughter of the Rev. Walter 
Maurice Johnson, formerly Vicar of Weston S. Mary, built the church, 
endowed it with ;^35o a year, built a vicarage house, and an excellent 
schoolroom ; and was, in other ways, a great benefactress to Spalding. 



P^L SPALDING. 

S. Peter. i Bell. 

The single bell at this chapel-of-ease is the one exhibited by the 
founders, Messrs. Mears of London, at the Great Exhibition of 1851. 



^j^^ SPALDING. 



■ 



S. Paul. ^ Bells. 

( Diam. 25^ in. ) 

2. {see^helow^ (MMSM-CB^M '■ X^€)(D:bi©" I <l)1at:El : 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

: 'M 

( Diam. 29J in. ) 

4. [ see xj below ] ^m(B:^M^:^ '■ <B^JCM : :^%^M(b:jp 

( Diam. 32^^ in.) 



66o The Inscriptions on the 

5. [ sec -t- heiow ] MMjLmm : 'IPM-'^fiJh : cDxg::Ei : 

( Diam. 35I in. ) 
( Diam. 37 in. ) 

( Diam. 40:^ in. ) 

( Diam. 43I in. : weight 14 cwt. 2 qrs. : note F rather sharp. ) 

This ring of bells, from the foundry of Messrs. T. C. Lewis and Co., 
of Shepherd's Lane, Brixton, is, as the inscription on the 3rd tells us, 
the gift of the munificent foundress of the church. Miss Charlotte 
Charinton. The first stone of the church was laid on the i8th of 
November, 1877. Miss Charinton has not only given the site, built 
the church, and endowed it with ;^35o. a year, but has also erected 
a vicarage house and schools. 

The arms on the 2nd bell are Argent an engrailed chevron Sable 
between three moor-cocks proper {Moore) ; impaling Gules on a bend Or, 
three leopard's faces vert {Stephenson of Suineshead). 

Those on the 4th bell are Gules two Lions passant guardant Or ; 
on a chief Azure the Holy Virgin and child sitting crowned and bearing 
a sceptre of the second {see of Lincoln) : impaling Argent 3 bells azure 
2 and I. {Wordsworth). 

The 5th bell has a representation of a sword, the emblem of S. Paul 
the patron saint of the church, before the inscription. 

The bells are in very substantial cast iron cradles. 

SPANBY. 

S. Nicolas. • i Bell. 

1. 1821. 

( Diam. 13 in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 66 1 

^ SPILSBY. 

S. James. 6 Bells. 

1. I PRAIS THE O GOD 1744. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. WE ACKNOWLEDG THE TO BE THE LORD. 

( Diam. 28^ in. ) 

3. THE GLAS DOTH RVN THE GLOBE DOTH GO AWAK 

FROM SIN WHY SLEEP YOU SO 1744. 
( Diam. 29 in. ) 

4. [ D a see below ] 1744. 

( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

5. DANIEL AND THOMAS HEDDERLY FOUNDERS 1744 

[ D a see below. ] 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

6. ^cc ^ampann ^Hcra ^iai ^nnitaU ^eata 1744. 

lOHN LANE C.W. 
( Diam. 43 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " iiij great belles j santus bell."'^^ 
That continued the number until 1744, as we learn from the following 
entry in the Parish Register : — 

1744. Dec. 10. The first peal was rung on our 6 new Bells to-day. 
We had 4 bells before. 

The Stamps on the 4th and 5th bells are a crown and shield bearing 
three bells. 

The capitals on the tenor bell are those described on page 122. 

/T^ SPITAL [cum Hemswell]. 
The chapel-of-ease here has one small modern bell. 

« Exch. Q. R. Church Goods. Line. -j^. P. R. Off. 



662 The Inscriptions on the 

I 
SPITTLEGATE near Grantham. 

S. John. i Bell. 

The first sermon was preached in this modern church by the first 
Vicar on 7th February, 1842 : there is one small bell. 

,,rv SPRIDLINGTON. 

S. Hilary. i Bell. 

I. J. HARRISON FECIT WILLIAM MORRIS CHURCH- 
WARDEN 1802. 

( No canons. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " one handbell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been " sold and 
defacid."* 

b^^ SPRINGTHORPE. 

SS. George and Lawrence. 4 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1,2,3. J. TAYLOR & CO FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 

1865. 
( Weights : ist, 7 cwt. 3 qrs. o Ibs; : 2nd, 8 cwt. i qr. 24 lbs. : 3rd, 

9 cwt. 3 qrs. 10 lbs. ) 

4- ^^(b:bi^xw^ [ a 44] <S^M-m^:^M.MM. [ a 43] 

■^©^ [ □ 43 ] MOMM-W [ a 45 ] :my^M^ 

mj.m^:^ [ D 45 ] :^^M^^ [ a 50. ] 

( Weight : 9 cwt. 2 qrs. o lbs. ] 
Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 142. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 663 

For Stamps see Plate VI. 

In 1553 there were " iij gret belles & one santus bell."* 

Three "gret belles" continued the number until 1865, when two of 
the old bells (weighing respectively 6 cwt. o qr. 11 lbs., and 6 cwt. 3 qrs. 
o lbs.) were sent to the founder and three new ones as shown above 
hung in their stead. They were first tried on the evening of the ist 
December, 1865. 

The stops on the ancient bell are unusual. UOS is a mistake for 
VOX. 

" In the chancel are suspended a maiden's funeral wreath and gloves 
cut out of white paper, such as are yet not uncommonly displayed in 
some parts of England, but very rarely in Lincolnshire. It is reported 
that the girl thus commemorated here was killed through the unwary 
manner in which she pulled one of the bell ropes, whence she was 
dashed against the belfry floor above. "f 



^JTZ/, STAINBY. 
S. Peter. ' 4 Bells. 

1. J : TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 
HAS QUATUOR CAMPANAS I : II I III : IV I SIGNATAS 

DEDERUNT GEORGIUS OSBORNE A.M. RECTOR 
ET FRANCESCA UXOR EJUS A : D : 1865. 
( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

2. + J : TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS 1865 + 

II. LAUS DEO. 
( Diam. 33! in. ) 

3. TAYLOR & CO. LOUGHBOROUGH 1865 

III. SURGE AGE. 
( Diam. 36 in. ) 



• Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. s\, f Associated Architectural Societies' Re- 

P. R. Off. ports and Papers, 1865-6, p, 238. 



664 The Inscriptions on the 

4. IV. MORTUOS PLANGO MORTUOS VIVENTES MONEO 

J : TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 
1865. 

( Diam. 40^ in. ; key G. ) 

The Rev. George Osborne, Prebendary of Lincoln and Rural Dean, 
who was Rector here for 45 years, completely restored this church at 
his own cost. He died 3rd July, 1871, and was buried in the church- 
yard. 

^"' " STAINFIELD. 

5. Andrew. (?) i Bell. 

Here is a small bell without inscription, probably hung when the 
church was rebuilt in 171 1. 

^^ STAINTON-BY-LANGWORTH. 

S. John Baptist. i Bell. 

I- [ + 111] j.'M^M'WM PS©" €)"yr:Ei M^mi^^ 

[ a 113- ] 
For Stamp see Plate XVI. 



^J I STAINTON-LE-VALE. 

S. Andrew. I i Bell. 

I. 1622. 

(Diam. iSiin. ) 

In 1553 there were here " ij gret belles j santus bell."* 
Those two larger bells — if not all three — were subsequently recast. 
One remains here, another, with the date in the same figures as the 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 665 

above, and 16J inches in diameter, was — it is said — removed to the 
Hall, and the third went to Ranby Hall. There is no record of the 
circumstances under which they were moved. 

STAINTON MARKET. 
S. Michael. 3 Bells. 

1. [+42] XiEl [ + 42] ^l [ + 42] mi [ + 42] mi [ + 42] 

XH [ + 42 ] X^ [ + 42 ] x^ 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

2. TV lESV DIRRIGE MENTES SVSCITO VOCE PIOS 

CHRISTOPHER BLAKISTON 1712. 
( Diam. 26 in. ) 

3. [ + 172 ] %'M^M'm.M :©^ <i)"w;:Bi M^^:m:^ 1610. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates VI. and XXV. 

In 1553 " Markett Staynton" possessed " iij bells in y^ stepyll & j 
sanct' bell."* One only of those ancient bells now remains (the ist) 
bearing a gothic letter mi seven times repeated with a circular stop 
between each. The letter may be used as the initial of the name of 
S. Michael, the titular saint of the church, but more probably it is in- 
tended for the Blessed Virgin Mary. Such a mode of decoration was 
not uncommon in mediaeval times. The Guild of the B. V. Mary of 
Boston possessed "a vestymet of blew worsted wt this Ire M 
crowyned.t " 

The 2nd bell was from the Nottingham foundry. 

ik^' STALLINGBOROUGH. 

SS. Peter and Paul. i Bell. 

I. DANIEL HEDDERLY FOUNDER EDWARD COMINS 
C. W. 1744. 

( Diam. 38 in. : canons gone. ) 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 208. 

4 N 



666 The Inscriptions on the 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Stallingbrok " reported that of 
church goods belonging to the church in Queen Mary's time " a pix 
and a crismatorie " were " sold and defacid and melted to make a bell 
bouldr the sayd fyrst yeare" of Elizabeth's reign, and " handbels and a 
sacring bell " had been " put awaie an meltid to the casting of bell 
bathers the said fyrst yeare."* 



j-f, STAMFORD. 

All Saints. 6 Bells. 

1. BOUGHTON HODGES & THOMAS HAYNES CHURCH- 

WARDENS R. TAYLOR ST NEOTS FECIT 1808. 
( Diam. 32 in. ) 

2. 4. Blank. 

[ Diams. 32!, 36 in. ] 

3. BOUGHTON HODGES & THOMAS HAYNES CHURCH- 

WARDENS ROBT TAYLOR S^ NEOTS FECIT 1808. 
( Diam. 35 in. ) 

5. BOUGHTON HODGES & THOMAS HAYNES CHURCH- 

WARDENS. 

( Diam. 39^ in. ) 

6. BOUGHTON HODGES & THOMAS HAYNES CHURCH- 

WARDENS ROBT TAYLOR FECIT 1808. 
( Diam. 44 in. ; note F sharp. ) 

In 1727 there were five bells only, and a Sancte bell: the five bells 
were inscribed : — 

1. Haec nova campana Margaretta est nominata. 

2. Nomen Magdalene campana sonat melodic. 

3. In multis annis resonet campana Johannis. 



Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 144. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 667 

4. IHS. Nazarethae Rex Judeorum Fill Dei miserere mei. Cor- 
nelius Edis and Thomas Lenton Churchwardens 1725. 

5. God save the King Tobias Norris cast me 1674. 

Having regard to the inscriptions on the ist and 3rd of these 
ancient bells, Peck guesses they were given by John Brown and 
Margaret his wife who were buried at the east end of the north aisle. 

Subsequently the 3rd bell of this old ring was recast ; being 
inscribed : — 

3. Laudate Dominum cymbalis sonoris. Thomas Eayre pyro- 
technus de Kettering fecit 1759. 

The old bells were recast and a new one added in 1808, at the cost 
of ;^230. The Priest's bell probably disappeared at that time.* 
On the wall of the belfry is the following : — 

All you that do pretend to Ring 
You under take a Dangerous thing 
If that a bell you overthrow 
Two Pence must pay Before you go 

1694. 

The Churchwardens' Books have many entries relating to the bells. 
The following are extracted : — t 

1588-9. paid to Tho. Orpin for chimes iJ5. 5^. 

1701. Dec. 13. To y^ Ringers at y^ p'clamation of 
Queene Anne 00 . 03 . 06 

1702. April 23. The Coronation day expended on y^ 

Ringers 00 . 06 . 06 

Nov. 5. To y^ Ringers 3. 6 

[Many entries for Ringing on Thanksgiving Days, 

for Victories, &c.] 



* See Peck, Harrod, and Burton, 
t For the following extracts I am much indebted to Mr. Justin Simpson. 



668 The Inscriptions on the 

1705. Gave Geo. Woolley for tolling the bell to call the 
parishioners together about burying the woman 

that was executed i . o 

Paid M' Watts for the new Clock as p. acquittance 10 . o. o 

1 7 10. Paid John Brown for new hanging the Bells as p. 

Bill 10 . 12 . o 

Paid . . . the money expended on ringers when 

the bells were rehung o. 7.0 

1716. May 28. Paid for ringing on King George 

landing o . 10 . o 

Ocf 20. to George Redmile for Ringing on King 

George's Coronation 2 . 6 

1716-17. Jan. 21. Paid to Tho. Spinks for ringing for 

y' King coming home to London 2 . 6 

April 23. paid John Kittell for Ringing on Queen 

Anne's coronation 4 . 6 

[Much ringing on Royal and Loyal occasions.] 

1725. Disbursements of Cornelius Edis churchwarden for y^ Re- 
pairs of the 4"' bell : — 

Aug. 17. Paid for help getting y' Bell down & 

for drink 4. 6 

To Tealby for his pulleys 2 . o 

23. For help weighing the Bell & for drink 2 . 6 
Expended with M' Eayre when he came 

to take y^ Bell 4. o 

Sep. 6. Paid for help loading the Bell & drink 5 . o 
14. My Partnor (Thomas Lenton) going to 
Kettering to Deliver the Bell ; horse & 

self 8. o 

22. At the Assessment making 2. 6 

To M' Well for writing the same 2 . 6 

Oct. 4. To M' Snow for making y^ article 6. 8 

Paid for Letters to and from Kettering 6 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 669 

[1726.] Feb. 28. My Partner going to Kettering to see 

after y^ Bell horse & self 8. o 

Paid to M"^ Eay re as p. receipt g. 9.6 

Paid To y^ Ringers when the bell was 

hung 5. o 

Paid to John Smith for a horse to carry 
M' Eayrs Brother home he being lamed 

by y^ Bell 3. o 

[Other payments connected with the recasting] 
Total disbursements ;^i5 . 17 . 8. 

Much ringing and many payments for the same. The following 
Orders relating to the rmging of the bells were made in 1715 : — 

1715. 28 April. Itm ordered that noe more than one shilling per 
bell be at any tyme hereafter allowed upon any 
occasion for ringing within the said parish. 
6 Dec. It is ordered that neither the Clerk nor Sexton 
permitt any persons to ring without the consent of 
the Minister & Churchwardens or two of them 
upon any occasion whatever under penalty of each 
offending two shillings & six pence to be deducted 
out of their sallary for each offence. 



STAMFORD. 

S. George. 4 Bells. 

1. VOX MEA EST DULCIS MEA SCINTILLANS VULTUS 

: • : • • INTACTUM SILEO PERCUTE DULCE 
CANO, 

•: THOS : EAYRE, FECIT, 1761. 
(Diam. 26J in. ) 

2. R. A. KNOWLES RECT^ -^ THO HUCKERBY & JO^ 

STEVENSON CHURCHWARDENS 1777 -> 
( Diam. 26f in. ) 



670 The Inscriptions on the 

3. REVD MR HUNT RECTOR EDWd LINCOLN SPENCE 

MAIN C.W. ARNOLD FECIT 1797. 
( Diam. 2(^\ in. ) 

4. [ + I ] E D WEBSTER RO LIGHTFOOTE C W 1697. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 52. 

Harrod says that in 1785 the inscription on the 3rd bell was 

Die beatus ante obitum nemo. 

In the will of William Bruges, dated 26th February, 1449, is a 
bequest to this church : — 

Item I bequethe to the said chirch a little handbell of sylver, of 
the gretnesse of a sacryng bell. 

The Rev. Richard Arthur Knowles (see 2nd bell) was presented to 
the living by the Earl of Exeter in 1755 : he was succeeded by the 
Rev. Samuel Hunt (see 3rd bell). 



^^b"^ STAMFORD. C 

S. John Baptist. 4 Bells. 

I. :mj-^:mM-:m.:m [ □ 98 j m'mm^^:^^^:^ [ □ 98 j 
^M:M^(B:m. [ □ 98 1 M-:m.:]^<B 1561 [ u 99. i 

( Diam. 26|- in. ) 

2. R : TAYLOR ST NEOTS • FECIT • 1814 O EDWD CLIP- 

SHAM • & EDWD ASKEW • C : W. 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

[ D 107 ] 

3. [ + 140 ] [ + 140 ] [ + 140 ] [ + 140. ] 
[ U 127] 

( Diam. 3if in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 671 



4- m€):©^m^ [ □ 98 ] x3^j©:E)CE>^:ni@. [ □ 98 1 
w<Bi^m [ □ 98 ] jh(B^M-:mM-%^ [ □ 98 ] 

1561 [ a 98 ij 99. ] 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

For Stamps see page 91, Plates XV., and pages 118 and 114. 

The ist and 4th bells are amongst the few in Lincolnshire from the 
Leicester founder, and have the inscriptions in the ornate letters figs. 
loi (see p. 92). The 2nd bell was previously dated 1561, and there was 
formerly a Priest's bell inscribed : — 

CVM VOCO VENITE 1605. 

Peck, referring to an old parish book, in which the fourth and middle 
bells were often mentioned, concludes that there were once five bells 
belonging to this church.* 

The Church Books supply the following entries relating to the bells : — 

1587-8. lead forth for mending the gret bell staye ijd. 

lead forth for mending the bell ropes to Jeames 

blyethe iij^. 

lead forth for mending the bawdrick of the 

sekond bell iiiji. 

lead forth for a rope for littell bell Yijd. 

lead forth for mettel to mending the belles at 

mistres backhow's biriallf ijd. 

1588-9. pead to thomas timmins for making iij ball- 

drickes and mending our forth belles iJ5. xd. 

1589-90. Itm payd to Richard Goodlad ... for dressing 

of all the bells the fyrst day of July iiijs. 

• Aniiquurian Annals of Stamford, Lib. xiv. 35. 
f The Parish Register under date of Backhus whoUing drap.," whose own 
i8th February, 1586-7, records the burial burial is entered on the 5th November, 
of " Johan Backhus y^ wiffe of John 1590. 



672 The Inscriptions on the 

Itfn to the Ringers upon S' hewes day for bread 

& dry nek for them xij^. 

1595-6. Itm gyven to y' Ringers on sanct hewyghes day xij^. 

Itfn for candle on S' hewyhe nyght i]d. 

Itm for a rope for the lytle bell viiji. 

1601-2. On the crownation day for 2 belrops iiji. 

It' candels and grese iji. 

1604-5. It™ P" to the Ringers the fyrst day of August 

1603 xijf/. 

Itm p** to John Pearson for mending the bel- 

ropes when mistris loveday was buryed '\]d. 

Itin bestowed upon the Ringers the xxiiij*" day 

of March xiiij^. 

Itm payd to Sheffeld and Jo. Storye for taking 
up the great bell from the place wher it was 
fallen down into the frame ij . vjW. 

1605-6. Itm paid for liftinge upp the second bell into y' 

frame i]d. 

Itfn paid to Tobye Norrysh for our bell castinge xvijs, 
Itfn paid to y' Ringers the 24 of Marche i]d. 

1606-7. Itfn paid to the Ringers of St. James daye \]d. 

1608-9. Itfn paid for Rynging the V"" of November... v]d. 

1609-10. Itfn paid for Two Bell Ropes against St. James 

daye iiJ5. 

Itfn paid for Ringers uppon our Ladyes even ... v]d. 

1610-11. [Ringing on Coronation day and ^^^ Nov'] 

1613-14. Item payd to browning for a bel clapper vjs. viiji. 

Item payd for bread and drinke for the Ringers 

upon the Kinges daye xij^. 

1614-15. P'^to the ringers when the King cam a prograce i]d. 

1615- 16. P'' to the ringers on St. James day 0.0.6 

[ Baldricks and Bell ropes. ] 

1622-3. given on St. James daye to Ringers v]d. 

given to Ringers for Joye at the princes returne viijrf. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 673 

1624-5. given to the Ringers for Ringing at Kings 

p'clamation xij^. 

Itm given to the ringers on the Coronation day is. o 

1627-8. It' for two iron baldrocks iiij5. 

It' for lether for two baldrocks vji. 

1628-9. It' to ringers when the Bishop came to the 

towne v^. 

[ Ringing on 5th Nov. and King's Coronation. ] 

1632-3. It' given to y'' Bishop of Lincolne at y" Bull in 

wine 0.03. o 

It' given to y" Ringers y^ same daye o . 01 . o 

1633-4. It' given to y^ ringers at y^ Kings coming 00 . 03 . 00 

It' to Goodman Browning for 2 staples for y' 

Saint bell 00 . 00 . 06 

It' to ys Ringers at y* Kings coming back 00 . 01 . 02 

1635-6. It for ringing w° y« King came throu y^ towne* 00 . 02 . 00 
It for ringing on y* fift of Novemb' calld y" 
poud' Treason 00 . 01 .00 

1643-4. It' to the Ringers for Ringing for my Lord of 

Exeterf o. i. o 

It' flfor Beare to the ringers one the 5"" of Novr. 

to Symon Stroude o. o. 6 

[ The same in succeeding years. ] 
It' to Gyles Nelson for the same o. 1.6 

1652-3. given to y' Ringers for ringing on Nove 5"" o. 1.4 



* The three entries here quoted refer f David Cecil succeeded his uncle 

to the three visits of Charles I. as King to William (the second Earl) as Earl of 

Stamford. The Records of the Munici- Exeter in 1640: he died iSth April, 1643, 

pality contain divers orders as to the pro- at Exeter House, in the Strand, London, 

cedure to be observed. They also show and was buried in the family vault in S. 

that the ringers frequently received gra- Martin's, Stamford Baron, so there is no 

tuities from noblemen and gentlemen for doubt this payment was for ringing at his 

ringing on the occasion of their being funeral, 
made " free of this Corporacon." 

4 o 



674 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

This Book ends in the year 1676, but there are no further entries of 
interest relating to the Bells. 

The marriage of Richard Snowdon, the parson in 1561, (see ist bell,) 
is thus entered in the Parish Register : — 

1602 (3). TheseaventeenthdayeofJanuaryie,beingSunday, Richard 
Snowsden, Clerk, & Margaret Cunyngton Spinster wear 
marry ed. 

He shortly afterwards died of the plague, which was then raging with 
great virulence in Stamford. The Parish Register records his burial : — 

1604. Richard Snowden, Clarke, buryed June iij. 

By his will, dated 20th May, and proved 27th December, 1604, he gave 
his lands, messuage, houses, and tenements, after the decease of his 
wife, for the benefit of seven poor widows of Stamford of three score 
years of age. An Hospital bearing his name is now in existence in 
Scotgate, Stamford, which has been augmented by other benefactors 
since his decease. 

" Robert Meddowes [see 4th bell] Mercer," says the Corporation 
Records, took up his freedom 30th September, 1576, "he proffei-inge 
iiij" the rest of his ffyne xx^ was forgyven him in consideracon y* he was 
p''tis in this towne." The Register of the Parish says : — 

1622. Robert Meadows gent, buryed Aug. i. 

The Municipal Records have many entries relating to Toby Loveday 
[see 4th bell], not altogether to his credit. The Parish Register records 
in the list of burials : — 

1625. Toby Loveday gent. August 12.* 



* For the extracts from the Parochial indebted to Mr. Justyn Simpson, of 
Records and Parish Register I am much Stamford. 



CJiurch Bells of Lincolnshire. 675 



^ ^^ STAMFORD. 

S. Mary. 8 Bells. 

1. :Bi} '^W^t^i XSElajror l^fi" ^mJtlj M-wimi :Bakcr €:;'^ 

T^tTarhns. ^zvitt to all tljc "V^S^orlir ^^os (EEleavs of 
;i2£onlio« 'JE{ttxi 1802. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. ^^o3 Xl^e:irs of ;MiOubott ^■.tit ^t "J^S^tsi ^Mlanor '^33''" 

j^miti^ ,^utljoitg ^alicr dTljiialj "^^ZtiTarbens 1802 ^ot m 
^J^kiTorir nor in ^oitgue ^ut in bccb- anb in Initlj. 
( Diam. 31 in. ) 

3. SVM ROSA PVLSATA MVMDA MARIA VOCATA 
TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 1625. 

( Diam. 33 in. ; coins on rim. ) 

4. HENRY : PENN MADE I ME 1727 \ : \ lOHN \ SEATON : MAYOR 

; EDWARD : PEAKE : MATTHEW : NEWARK : CHURCHWARDENS : • : 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

5. [ + 2 ] OMMIA FIAMT AD GLORIAM DEI TOBIE 

M0RRI8 CAST ME 1625. 

(Diam. 35i in. ) 

6. Exalted to this Station at the request and Expence of a 

FEW Private Gentlemen R West Mayor Tho* Mears. of 
London Fecit 1802 Peace & Love be multiply'' 
( Diam. 38f in.) 

7- [ + 1 ] iL^M'^M [04] ^:e>©:E)©- [04] ~WM 
[ □ 4] MmM:Mis{(^:^:miL [04] @':i?i.s3e:3^^ 

TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 1626. 

[ On ivaist Royal xj Arms of Chavles I. ] 

( Diam. 41 in. ) 



676 The Inscriptions on the 

8. [ + I ] jF[©^,^:Ei©^ ©(d:e) :m©:i?icDv:Ei wm^ 

^LTMm 3EPB [06] T^TB <^M.^:mmM.:ih% 

1638. 

( Diam. 46 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 53. 

Prior to 1802 there Avere only six bells: the two bells added in that 
year were hung on the 3rd of June. 

The present 3rd probably preserves the inscription on an older bell. 
The 4th and 6th were previously inscribed : — 

4. Non verbo sed voce resonabo Domini laudem. 
6. Celorum Christe placeat tibi Rex sonus iste. 

The inscription on the 7th has been oddly blundered by some of the 
local historians. 

There was a Priest's bell here inscribed : — 

SANCTA MARIA, 

which was evidently the ancient Sanctus bell recast (with the ancient 
inscription) by Norris in the seventeenth century. Having been re- 
moved from its place, and handed down from one churchwarden to 
another, it was, in 1854, repaired at the expense of the parish, and 
presented to the Cemetery Chapel, where it now hangs. This is shown 
by the following extract from the Vestry Book of the church : — 

Thursday 5 Oct' 1854. 

Resolved : That a Bell of the weight of about 48 lbs. in- 
scribed " Sancta Maria" which has not been in use for many 
years and is not likely to be again required for the use of the 
church be presented to the Stamford Burial Board for the 
purpose of being placed in the Tower of the new Cemetery. 

This is considered the mother church of the town and one of its 
bells has been for many years the " Common Bell " of the Municipality, 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 677 

(see p. 253.) The Hall Books contain a few references to the bells and 
chimes : — 

1638. Aug 28. Ordered that the churchwardens of ev'y pish shall 
collect in theire se'rall parishes of the inhabitants for their 
contribusons towards the new castinge of S* Maries great 
bell. 

1683. Mar. 27. Agreed upon y* the chamberlaine for y^ time being 
shall pay y^ sume of twenty shillings yearly out of y^ towne 
stocke towards y" chymes in S* Mary's Church in Stamford. 

1728. Aug. 29. Ordered that the chamberlain of the Corporation 
do pay . . . the sume of Ten pounds towards the charges of 
new casting the second bell [ present 4th ] in the church of 
the said Parish of S' Mary. 

In 1741 the Corporation paid £^13 lis., to Boniface Bywater for 
repairing the chimes, and in 1770 agreed to pay Joseph Eayre ;^40. for 
new chimes he " to take to his own use the old chime materials." 

Again, in 1801, it was ordered that Edward Arnold of Leicester be 
employed to repair the chimes " to the good liking & approbation of the 
Mayor (R' West Esq.) & Mr. Alderman Tatam." Twenty years later 
(in 1821) the chimes were again out of order, but "this hall considering 
them of utility to the public " it was ordered " that the chamberlain be 
authorized to pay the expense of repairing them, & that in future the 
chimes be repaired & regulated at the expense of this Corporation." 
This generous resolution was rescinded in the days of " Reform," for, 
in answer to a petition from the churchwardens requesting the Corpora- 
tion to clean and repair the chimes, it was resolved at a Hall held 29th 
Aug. 1833, "that no part of the funds of this Corporation be applied 
for such purpose." 

The Corporation now again pays expenses connected with the clock 
and chimes, they are compounded for by a payment of ;^io a year, the 
clock keeper to make all repairs at his own expense. The chimes play 
at 3, 6, g, and 12 o'clock day and night : the following are the tunes, as 
inscribed on a brass plate on the frame : — 



678 The Inscriptions on the 

108 Psalm. Lodging on the ground. 

General Toast. God save the King. 

Tight Little Island. Highland Laddie. 

Gramnocree Molly. 145 Psalm. 

The clock has a brass plate inscribed : — 

The gift of the Hon"^'^ Chads Cecil & the Hon""^ Charls Bertie 
members of Parliament for y" Corporation performed by Boniface 
Bywater Stamford Jany. y^ 20. 1709. 

The Account Books of the chamberlains of the Corporation supply 
a few entries relating to the Bells such as : — 

lyog. P'' to Henry Smith his yeares sallary for ringing 
the 4 & 8 o'clock Bell at St. Marys & at the halls 

& sessions & 15. for oyle 02 . 01 .00 

P** Richard Lane for drink for the Ringers on the 

surrender of Ghent 00 . 06 . 00 

[ Similar payments on 29th May, Queen's birth- 
day, when Bishop of Lincoln was at Stamford, 
Victory in October last (capture of Lisle ?) ] 

1710. [ Ringing on taking "Mono," anniversary of "the 
defence of Gibraltar," St. George's day, " on 
forcing y^ ffrench lines," taking of Douay.] 

1712. To the Ringers on surrender of Dundirke 00 . 07 . 06 

(Ringing on Queen's birthday, Coronation day, 
8 March \_i.e. Accession day,] 29 May.) 

1 714. P'^ Bryan Harrison for Ringers on King's procla- 
mation day 00 . 06 . 00 

P'' Widow Moats to the Ringers when y* King 

landed 00 . 09 . 00 

[ and similar payments. ] 

1728. To Matthew Newark Churchwarden of St. Mary's 
pish towards the new casting the 2°'' [present 4th] 
hell in St. Mary's Church according to an order 
01 the Hall 10 . 00 . 00 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 679 

1736. To Edw'^ Lyon for mending the Corporation Bell 

in St. Mary's Church 00 . 06 . 00 

[ Many payments in different years to Ringers, 
Chimes, and repairs connected with the bells. ] 

1771. To Joseph Eayre Bellfounder for the new chimes 

at St. Mary's by order of the Hall 40.00.00 

[ 4 and 8 o'clock bell mentioned in several years.] 

1 789. Edw. Arnold Bellfounder for hanging the Corpora- 
tion bell 6 . 6 . o 

1820. P** the Ringers on the occasion of the King's 

accession to the Throne 10 

P" to the Ringers on the Duke of WeUington 

coming to Stamford i . i . o 

Payments in connection with the bells, and chimes, continue until 
the year 1834. 

An ancient account of " lohis leche Goldsmyth de Stanf ppoiti ecclie 
ad pontem Stanf anno sexto Reg Henr' sexti post conq' [1428]" has 
these references to the bells : — 

In emenand campanis vjs, 

Et sol' p j belropp viijrf. 

Et in corio ept' ad funes campanaru' i]d. 

Et loh'i Rope p j corda capane xj^. 

Et eidm p al' corda x^. 

Et sol' Tho' Basse p j baudryk vj^, 

Et sol' p vno culo ad capanam iiiji.* 

The earliest Churchwardens' Accounts now remaining in the church 
commence in 1633. 

There are various entries in the Accounts from 1649 to 1653 of small 
sums due from the town for repairing the 5th bell and the chimes, 
which the churchwardens do not appear to have recovered. 

• Cotton MS. Vesp. A. 24, f. 36, quoted in Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 179. 



68o The Inscriptions on the 

During the eighteenth century there are payments for ringing on 
royal and loyal occasions. 

In 1789 the bells were rehung and repaired by Edward Arnold of 
Leicester. The accounts say : — 

1789-90. 

June 6. pd Arnol part of his bill 15 . 15 . o 

Ap' 6. pd M" Arnold remainder of his bill for 

repairs of Bells &c 16. 5.6 

In 1802, when the ring was augmented by the addition of two treble 
bells, the actual founder, as is shown by the inscriptions, was Thomas 
Mears of London, but, for some reason, the transaction passed through 
the hands of Edward Arnold, who, perhaps, at that time had given up 
the casting of bells. 

1802. * 

June 30. paid M' Arnold's Bill ;^44 . 6 . 6 on acct of 2 new 
Bells which with £\o paid him by M' Stevenson 
with the parishioners consent is the full amount of 
Arnold's Bill. 

The Mr. Leonard Stevenson here referred to — who was Mayor in 
1808-9 — was a surgeon and apothecary. He advanced the money 
(which was raised subsequently by assessment) on a Note of Hand. 

During the present century there are, as before, numerous charges 
for ringing, including : — 

1820. Ap. I. Ringing for the proclamation of George 

4**" I . I . o 

P"* Ringers a dumb peal on the funeral 

of George 3'^'' i . i . o 

1835. Sep. 4. P'' the Ringers on occasion of the 
Princess Victoria passing thro' the 
town to the Musical festival at York ... 2.0 

1840. Feb. 10. The Ringers Queen's Marriage 12 . o 

May25. Ringers Queen's birthday 12 . o 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 68 1 

1852. Nov. 18. P"* share of ringing a dumb peal on the 
day of the funeral of the Duke of 
Wellington 3 . 10 

1862. Feb. 17. Tolling bell part of 2 days death of 

Prince Consort 2 . 6 

Robert West (see ist bell) was apprentice to Henry Parker, con- 
fectioner, admitted as freeman 28th August, 1778, constable of this 
parish 1778-g, capital burgess or common councillor 29th August, 1782, 
chamberlain 1797-8, an alderman 28th August, 1800, and Mayor 1800-7. 
He died in London 30th March, 1826. 

John Seaton, mercer, (see 4th bell) who commenced his public 
career in the Council Chamber as a capital burgess on 29th August, i68g, 
taking the seat vacated by Samuel Parker, who had resigned on de- 
clining to take the prescribed oath of allegiance to William and Mary, 
was thrice Mayor, viz. : 1704-5; 1717-8 and 1726-7, and was buried at St. 
Michael's Church, on the i6th February, 1 730-1. 

The initials on the tenor bell may be those of John Butcher and 
Thomas Thistlewheat, or perhaps the latter and John Bullock. Those 
families have given useful parochial officers to the parish.* 



^t :/ STAMFORD. 

S. Michael. 6 Bells. 

1. PRAISE THE LORD UPON THE HIGH SOUNDING 

CYMBALS :• 1762 •:;:• 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

2. IT IS APPOINTED FOR ALL ONCE TO DIE •::;• 

JOS : EAYRE SI' NEOTS FECIT 1762 • : • 
( Diam. 30^ in. ) 



* I am again much indebted to Mr. from the Municipal and Parochial Records 
Justin Simpson for making copious extracts relating to these bells. 

4 P 



682 The Inscriptions on the 

3. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI 1762. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

4. HENRY WARD AND JAMES DAVIE CHURCH WARDENS 

:• J : EAYRE ST NEOTS FOUNDER 1762. 
( Diam. 33I in. ) 

5. HENRY WARD AND JAMES DAVIE CHURCH WARDENS 

:• ANNO DOMINI :• 1762. 

( Diam. 36^ in. ) 

6. I TO THE CHURCH THE LIVING CALL AND TO THE 

GRAVE DO SUMMON ALL :• ANNO DOM :• 1762. 
( Diam. 39^ in. ) 

Prior to 1762 there were " four very small bells none of them above 
a hundred years old," which, says Peck, were mounted on the west end 
of the nave in a small tower of wood.* 

The present bells are sadly discordant: "indeed," writes Harrod, 
" the din of S' Michael's bells is so intolerable to those who live in their 
vicinity that they will readily believe there is no devil in his senses but 
will get away as fast as he can as soon as their clamour begins." 

Basil Ferrar, late parish clerk and a celebrated ringer, left ;^2o. to 
the churchwardens, the interest of which was to be applied in keeping 
the bell ropes in repair.f 

irV-^^ STAMFORD. 

The church of S. Paul is now part of the Grammar School. 
The school bell is perfectly plain. There are a few entries in the 
Chamberlains' Accounts referring to it : for instance : — 

1 716-7. P'^ for y' School bell rope 00 . 02 . 00 

1 718-9. John Webdale for ffree school bell rope 00 . 02 . 00 



* Antiquarian Annals of Stamford, Lib. wooden tower as having been taken 
VIII. p. 12. Marrat mentions this small down. 

f Burton's Chronology of Stamford. 



Chmxh Bells of Lincolnshire. 683 



■ STAMFORD. 

Browne's Hospital. i Bell, 

I. CHRISTOPHER COOKSOR B.A. WARDEN CHARLES 
SANDERS A.M. CONFRATER. 
( Diam. 20^ in. ) 

The Rev. Christopher Cookson (not Cooksor as on the bell) was 
Confrater from 1785 to 1808, and Warden from the latter date to 1845. 
The Rev. Charles Sanders was Confrater from 1808 to 1844. 
The clock strikes on the bell which is also used to ring for prayers. 

STAMFORD [Roman Catholic. ] 
Our Lady and S. Augustine. i Bell. 

+ AVE : MARIA : GRATIA : PLENA. 

+ SANCTE : AUGUSTINE : ORA : PRO : NOBIS. 

fU STAMFORD. 

Cemetery Chapel. i Bell. 

I. SANCTA MARIA. 

This was formerly the Priest's bell at S. Mary's Church. It is a 
recast in the seventeenth century by Norris of Stamford of an older 
bell which was most probably the ancient Sanctus bell of that church 
[see p. 676]. 

SU STAPLEFORD. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1691. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

This bell (which was from the Nottingham foundry) cannot be rung^i 
as there is no stay. 



684 The Inscriptions on the 



STEEPING GREAT. 

All Saints. ' i Bell. 



Blank. 



( Diam. 22 in. 



This modern bell replaced, a few years ago, a small cracked one, on 
which was said to be a grotesque head with an illegible inscription 
in old English characters.* 



STEEPING LITTLE. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 106] lOHM HOLLAND GEMT THE TRVTHE FOR 

TO TELL AMD lOHM COXHEAD YOMAM THE 
FOVMDERS OF 

THIS BELL 

1594 
( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

2. J. TAYLOR & CO. LOUGHBOROUGH 1874. 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 
3- ]6?a (STampana ^taa [ □ 19] trinUate ^acra ^at 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XV. and page 70. 

In 1553 there were here " iij belles & a sant' bell in the steple."t 
Of these the ist was soon afterwards recast, the 2nd which is said to 
have been inscribed : — 

Johannis Baptistae Campana, 

remained until 1874, and the 3rd, with the blundered inscription, still 
exists. 

* Oldfield's Wainfleet, p. 267. f Exch. Q. R. Church Goods Line. ^\. P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 685 



SJZ STENIGOT. 

S. Nicholas. i Bell. 

I. 1716 [07-] 

( Diam. 15^^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page 59. 

In 1553 " Staincote," in Gartree Wapentake, possessed " three greate 
bells and one Sanctus bell,"* for which the present small bell is a very 
unworthy substitute. 

STEWTON. 

S. Andrew. i Bell. 

I. 1856. (Diam. 14 in. ) 

STICKFORD. 

S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. [ + 124 ] saittte gaktel a p s 

For Stamp see page iii. 

The imperfect conclusion of the inscription is intended for ora pro 
nobis. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that they had neither " handbels 
nor sacring bell " in Queen Mary's time.f 

See under Sibsey for a tradition as to bells here. 

STICKNEY. 

S. Luke. 4 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I, 2. REVD R. LOXHAM RECTOR J. NORTON C. W. J. BRIANT 

& J. CABOURN HERTFORD FECERUNT 1803. 

( Diams. 32^, 33^ in. ) 

• Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Oif. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 146. 



686 The Inscriptions on the 

3- ^uius set mat^ci [ □ 125 ij 124. ] 

(Diam. 351 in.) 
4. MY ROARINGE SOUNDE DOTH WARNING GIVE THAT 
MEN CANNOT HEARE ALWAYS LYVE 1607 [ n ^S-] 
( Diam. 39 in. ) 
Priesfs Bell: — 

Blank. 

( Diam. 14I in.) 

For Stamps see pages 112 and iii, and Plate XVI. 

In 1553 there were here " iij [?] great bells & one saunce bell."* 
Of those ancient bells one only now remains — the present 3rd — which 
bears the same stamps as those upon the ist bell at Bassingthorpe 
(see p. 304). 

The Rev. Robert Loxham (see ist bell) was of S. John's College, 
Cambridge; B.A. 1779: M.A. 1782; he was Vicar of Hagnaby (pre- 
sented in 1782) as well as Rector of Stickney-cum-Stickford, to which 
livings he was instituted in 1786. He died at Stickford in the year 1828. 



STIXWOLD. 

S. Peter. 2 Bells. 



I Mti ^Klatinx. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 
2. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER FRANCIS GREENFIELD 
CHURCHWARDEN 1829. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here "iij gret bells & a sanctus bell ;"t of those 
the present ist is the only one remaining. The difficulty of reaching it 
prevents a more perfect description. 



* Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. --^4, much faded that the number of bells can- 
P. R. Off. This indented inventory is so not be read with certainty, 
f Lajid Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 687 

^ STOCKWITH EAST. 

S. Peter. . i Bell. 

I. C. & G. HEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1846. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

jT^'^STOKE NORTH AND SOUTH. 

SS. Andrew and Mary. 5 Bells. 

I. EX DONO EDMVNDI TURNOR EQVITIS AVRATI XIIII 
DIE MAY 1670. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 
2,3. [+ 106] GOD SAVE OVR QVEENE 1600 [ a 113.] 

( Diams. 31, 34 in. ) 

4. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH. T. MUSSON J. INGLETON 

T. LINCOLN, V^ARDENS 1710. 
( Diam. 37 in. ) 

5. [ + 106] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH OVR QVEENE AND 

REALME AND SEND VS PEACE IN CHRIST AMEN 
1600. 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XVI. 

Sir Edmund Turner, knight, the donor of the ist bell, married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir John Harrison, and through her became 
possessed of the Manor of Stoke, He was in other ways a benefactor 
to this church and parish. He died 4th April, 1707, in his 88th year, 
and was buried in the church in a handsome tomb erected there by 
himself in his life time.* 

* See Tumor's Grantham, p. 135-145- 



688 The Inscriptions on the 

STOW. 

S. Mary. 5 Bells, 

1. JOHN BROWN CHURCHWARDEN 1770. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. JAMES HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER 1805. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 

3. lESVS BEE OVR SPEED 1663 [ d 157.] 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

4- [niog] mm^ [+111] P£i^mM-mjh [ D 112.] 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 
5. ALL MEN THAT HEAR MY MORNFUL SOUND RE- 
PENT BEFORE YOU LY IN OROUN W & C 1762. 
( Diam. 38I in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIII., and XVI. 

Two great bells were given to the church of Our Lady at Stow, in 
the eleventh century either (for authorities differ) by Alfric, Archbishop 
of York, or by his successor Archbishop Kinsius. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "the handbelles," which 
belonged to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been " broken in 
peces and sold to a tincker ano 1562."* 

There is a rhyme used here comparing the bells with those in some 
neighbouring parishes thus : — 

Marton's cracked pancheons. 

And Torksey egg-shells ; 
Saxilby ding-dongs, 

And Stow- Mary bells. 

In the church chest is preserved a manuscript book written by 
William Swift, once a schoolmaster here: it contains, amongst a variety 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 147. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 689 

of subjects, conundrums, charades, and mathematical puzzles ; also a 
short treatise on bell-ringing entitled 

Campanalogia 

or the Art of Ringing made easy, by Plain 

and methodical Rules and Directions, 

whereby 

The Ingenious Practitioners may obtain 

to the Knowledge of Ringing. 

He was also the writer of the following, which used to hang in a 
frame in the ringing chamber: — 

Articles And Orders To Be Observd By Ringers. 

All 5'ou who hath a mind to Larn to Ring s. d. 

Must to the Sexton Admission money Bring 2 6 

Those Articles observed Strict must be 

Or your expelled this Society 

Two Nights a Week Sirs, you must meet, or pay 

This Forfiture to us without delay o 2 

Or when the Sexton for you tools a Bell 

You must appear, or else this Forfit tell o 2 

And when you come upon this Bellfrey 

If that you Noise or talk, this Forfeit pay o i 

When you Round peals can Ring, you must pay down 

To be a change man Sirs, Just half-a-crown 2 6 

On the first change that you have Learnd to Ring 

One Shilling more must pay Sirs, that's the thing i o 

And every Ringer must spend more or Less, 

As he thinks meet, to wish you good Success o 2 

If you would Learn to prick a peal in score 

Unto those Colledge youths you must pay more i o 

When you know Bob, Hunt, Single, Dodge compleat 

You'll not deny our Colledge youths a Treat 2 6 

4 Q 



690 The Inscriptions on the 

On our Feast day, the Twenty ninth of May, 

Each member must. Sirs, just one shilHng pay i o 

Where our accompts are passed Sirs for Truth 
And you are stiled then a Colledge youth 
New Stewards then are chose, — and, by the by 
If that you do the Stewardship deny 

Your fine must pay — as in the margin see i 6 

Then from your Stewardship one year are free. 
Those Rules peruse well before you enter 
Its a hard task on which you venture. 
When once a member you are freely made 
Those Articles must justly be obey'd. 

So now my Lads, admission money bring 2 6 

And we will Learn you presently to ring. 

John Marshall William Swift 

Master. Notary. 

March the i'' 1770. 

By the side of these Rules were figures to guide the ringers in 
ringing a peal of " Grandsires." 

On another Card is : — 

" We ring the quick to church, the dead to grave 
Good is our use, such usage let us have. 
Who swears or curses, or in chol'ric mood 
Quarrels or strikes, altho' he draw no blood, 
Who wears his hat, or over turns a bell 
Or by unskilful handling mars a peal 
Let him pay six pence for each single crime 
T'will make him cautious 'gainst another time. 
So, when the bells are ceased, then let us sing 
God bless our Holy Church — God save the Queen." 

There are several peal-boards. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 6gi 



^^0 STOWE [with Barholm]. 
S. Michael. 

The ancient chapel here was taken down about the year 1780, and 
its single bell was placed, not hung, in Barholm Church. It was sub- 
sequently removed, and, owing to a dispute, was broken. 



STRAGGLETHORPE. 

S. Michael. 2 Bells. 

1. 1804. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

2. THQs OSBORN DOWNHAM NORFOLK FOUNDER 

1790 : • • 

( Diam. 23 in. ) 

The ist bell is said to have been given to the church by Mr. Mills of 
Beckingham, about fifty years ago : it had been his dinner bell, and 
was standing in the church for seven years before it was hung. 



it^ STROXTON. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. GOD BE OUR SPEED THOMAS HEDDERLY FOUNDER 

1773- 

( Diam. 27! in. ; weight 4 cwt. 2 qrs. ; note D sharp. ) 

2. ALL THINGS COME OF THEE AND OF THINE OWN 

HAVE WE GIVEN THEE A.D. 1879. J. TAYLOR & 
CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH. 

( Diam. 30^ in. ; weight 6 cwt. 26 lbs. ; note C. ) 



6g2 The Inscriptions on the 

3. TO THE GLORY OF GOD, AND FOR THE COMPLETION 
OF THIS MEMORIAL CHURCH A.D. 1879. THY 
BROTHER SHALL RISE AGAIN. J. TAYLOR & CO. 
FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH. 
( Diam. 32^ in. ; weight 7 cwt. i qr. 13 lbs. ; note B. ) 

This church was rebuilt (except the old arcades) in 1874-5, as a 
memorial to the late Rev. P. J. E. Welby, Rector of the parish ; the 
allusion on the third bell is to him, both the new bells (which are 
" maiden " ones ; that is, cast in perfect tune) having been given by his 
relatives. There was only one bell (the present treble) previously. 



3^3 STRUBBY. 

S. Oswald. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 

The ancient tower of this church contained three bells. When the 
tower was taken down some years ago the bells — or at least two of 
them — were sold. One now hangs in the new church of S. Peter, 
Cleethorpes ; what became of the 2nd is not known ; the 3rd was 
probably recast for the church here. 



o^- STUBTON. 

S. Martin. 2 Bells. 

I. [+116] jM.^M'wm :©©■ <b^:bi m^mm:m 

1618 [ n 113. ] 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 
2. GOD SAVE OUR KINGE 1616. 

G. L. 
( Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plate XVI. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 693 

' STURTON MAGNA. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. [ D 62 D 69. ] 

( Diam. 29 in ; cracked. ) 

For Stamps see Plate VIII. 

In the year 1810 three bells belonging to this church were sold. 



,S% ^ STURTON-BY-STOW. 
S. Hugh. i Bell. 

I. J. TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS 1879. 

(Diam. 14 in.) 

This Mission-room was opened on All Saints' Day, 1879. 



SUDBROOKE. 

S. Edward. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 21 in. ) 



,^g^ SURFLEET. 

S. Lawrence. ' 5 Bells. 

1. T. BROWNIN TOBY NORRIS CAST ME [ + i ] JOHN 

SHARPE C.W. 1694. 

2. [ + 2 ] OMMIA [ D 5 ] FIAMT [ D 5 ] AD [05] GLORIAM 

[05] DEI : : E : ward : : p : peder : 1618 : 

3. R CVRTIS toby NORRIS cast ME [ + I ] WILLIAM 

[ D 5 ] WALKER [D5] C [05] W [05] 1625. 



694 The Inscriptions on the 

I : lACKSON : R ; SMITH ; 1607. 
[ + 2 ] EDWARDV2 HEROPl MILES BALMEI. 
5. [ + 2 ] MOM : CLAMOR \ SED : AMOR i CAMTAT \ IVL \ 
AARE : DEI ; lOHM \ LOWES 1608. 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 53. 

The 3rd bell is cracked : all and the belfry are in a very dirty, 
unsatisfactory state ; they are seldom used, as the tower and spire lean 
much, hence the local doggerel : — 

Gosberton church is very high, 
Suvfleet church is all awry, 
Pinchbeck church is in a hole 
And Spalding church is big with foal. 

The seat of the ancient family of Heron was Cressy Hall in this 
parish : they descended from Sir John Heron, Knight, Privy Councellor 
to King Henry VII. Sir Edward Heron, Knight of the Bath (see 4th 
bell), was the son of Sir Edward Heron, Baron of the Exchequer, and 
married Anne, daughter of Sir Henry Brooke, alias Cobham, Knight. 

There is a tradition that on the occasion of the marriage of Mr. 
William Bird to Miss Ann Rose, in October, 1801, a wedding peal was 
rung here by females. This is probably true, for the Register records 
the marriage, on the 29th September, 1801, of W. Bird, widower, and 
Ann Rose, spinster. 



SUTTERBY. 

S. John [Baptist?]. i Bell. 

I. 1802. 

( Diam. 18 in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 695 

SUTTERTON. 

S. Mary the Virgin. 8 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. THE GIFT OF JOHN CABOURN J : BRIANT & J 

CABOURN HARTFORD FECIT AN : DOM : 1797. 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. RAISD BY SUBSCRIPTION THE HONBle & REVNd CH. 

LINDSEY VICAR A CASH & G : HARISON C : W : 
JOHN BRIANT & JOHN CABOURN OF HARTFORD 
FECERUNT AN : DOM : 1797. 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. LEND BERRIDGE DD. VICAR THO« BEALBY THO^ 

WILLSON CH WARDENS BY SUBSCRIPTION T. 
OSBORN FECIT 1784 : : • LET EVERY THING 
THAT HATH BREATH PRAISE THE LORD : • 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

4. lESUS BEE OVR SPEED 1720. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

5. HENRY PENN FOVNDER 1720. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

6. 7. 1720. 

( Diams. 37, 39} in. ) 
8. GEORGE : WALLIS : WILL i PICKWELL : JOHN : 
PEARSON : CHVRCHWARDENS 1720. 
( Diam. 43^ in. ) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

[ + 20 ] M~wPEimM. ': :iD@r i mm.'^'M^m':^^ 

( Diam. 12 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 70. 

The only ancient bell here is the present Priest's bell, which was 
formerly the Sanctus bell ; it hangs over the chancel arch. The ring 



6g6 The Inscriptions on the 

of bells is in excellent order, and the ringers have been noted as good 
ones for many years. Numerous tablets recording the ringing of peals 
hang in the belfry. 

John Cabourn, the donor of the ist bell, was a noted bellhanger; he 
died in 1813 (see p. 85). 

The Hon. and Rev. C. Lindsay (2nd bell) was instituted in 1792 ; 
after a few years he was consecrated Bishop of Kildare. 

The Rev. Leonard Beridge, D.D. (3rd bell), was instituted in 1779 ; 
died 1 79 1, and was buried in Algarkirk Church. 

The Churchwardens' Books contain numerous entries for bell ropes, 
&c., &c., and the following: — 

1 78 1. July 8. Bells finished half the estimate paid to 

John Cabourn 15 . 13 . 5 

1783. May 17. The last half of the money by agree- 
ment for bells repairing ^5 • ^3 • 5 

1801. Paid Ringers: Preliminaries of Peace i . 10 . o 

1803. Nov. 5. Paid Ringers dinner & drinck 2. 12.0 

[ Several similar payments on 5th Nov. ] 

1804. May29. Paid Ringers i. i.o 

[ Similar payment in other years. ] 

1840. Ringers on Birth of Prince of Wales 2 . 10 . o 

1861. Dec. 23. Paid Ringers for a dumb peal upon the 
occasion of H.R.H. Prince Consort's 
funeral 15 . o* 

SUTTON-LE-MARSH. 

S. Clement. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I. [ 4- 18 ij II ] Mmdt ^^oma (Dra ^xa ^liiofais [ U i3- ] 

( Diam. 30^ in. ) 



• I am obliged to the Rev. Adam Clarke Rowley. Vicar of the Parish, for these extracts, 

and for other information. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 697 

2. 1628. 

( Diam. 32f in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE THE KING 1629. 

( Diam. 37I in. ) 

For Stamps see page 68 and Plate II. 

The ist bell (which probably belonged to the previous church) has 
very small capitals to the black letter inscription : the other two bells 
were from the Nottingham foundry. 



^.^ SUTTON LONG. 

5. Mary. ' 6 Bells. 

1—5. 1716. 

( Diams. 28, 29, 30, 31^, 34^ in. ) 

6. HENRICVS PENN PETERBVRGENSIS FVSORE 1716. 

( Diam. 39^ in. ; turned. ) 

Here is a chiming apparatus, by Messrs. Jerram and Blackbourn, 
erected in 1878. The state of the belfry might be much improved. 



^'X5 SUTTON S. NICOLAS [or Lutton]. 
S. Nicolas. 5 Bells. 

I, 2. JOSEPH EAYRE FECIT 1770. JOHN HARRISON 
CHURCHWARDEN. 

( Diams. 23, 24 in. ) 

3. JOHN MARSHALL ADDER CRAPLEY GILBERT RED- 

HEAD 1770. 

( Diam. 25 in. ) 

4. JOHN HARRISON C. W. JOHN MARSHALL ADDER 

CRAPLEY GILBERT REDHEAD 1770. 

( Diam. 26^ in. ) 
4 R 



6g8 The Inscriptions on the 

5. HARVEY BURGESS CHURCHWARDEN OSBORN AND 
DOBSON FOUNDERS DOWNHAM NORFOLK 1806. 
( Diam. 29 in. ) 

These small bells are much out of tune ; some think they would be 
better cast into one large bell. 

^ SUTTON S. EDMUND. 

S. Edmund. i Bell. 

This church, erected about the year 1800, has one bell, which is 
probably of the same date. 

3 r SUTTON S. JAMES. 
S. James. 3 Bells. 

1. WM DOBSON, FOUNDER, DOWNHAM NORFOLK 1824. 

(Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. THOMAS [05] WARDE [ d 5 ] VICAR [05] [ + 2 ] 

MVLTI [05] VOCATI [05] PAVCI [05] ELECTI 

[ ns.] 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. [ + 2 ] CVM [05] VOCO [05] AD [05] ECCLESIAM 

[05] VENITE [ D 5 ] [ + 2 ] RICHARDE [05] 
RENTVN [05] WILLIAM [05] DANYEL 1603. 
( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 53. 



SUTTON S. MATTHEW [or Sutton Bridge]. 
S. Matthew. i Bell and a Priest's Bell. 

I. THOMAS MEARS FOUNDER LONDON 1843. 

( Diam. 41^ in. ) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 6gg 

Priest's Bell : — 

AMERIKA VON STRALSUND 1854. 

The Priest's bell (formerly a ship bell) was brought here from Guy's 
Head. 

SWABY. 

S. Nicolas. i Bell. 

Here is a small modern bell. 

It is said that a bell with " some figures and letters upon it " was 
taken from the church some years ago, and hung at the school ; but 
being cracked, it subsequently went to pieces, and had to be replaced 
by the present modern school bell. 



, ^ SWALLOW. 

Holy Trinity. i Bell. 

I. J. WARNER & SONS FOUNDERS LONDON 1864. 

In 1553 there were here " thre Gret belles & one Sanctus bell,* now 
poorly represented. 



SWARBY. 

S. Mary and All Saints. i Bell. 

I. [+ 123] mjm :^^m^ :m:mL i^i^:mj.mm'y^(M 
[U119] 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

For Stamps see page in, and Plate XVIII. 

On the bearer of the bellframe is cut: — J. C 1756. 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



700 The Inscriptions on the 



SWATON. 

S. Michael. 3 Bells. 

I. REVD JOHN SHINGLAR, VICAR; THQS SMITH church- 
warden W. DOBSON fecit 1824. 
( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. ©cd::© smtw^ Ki:m© ^M^mi^M len. 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3- [ + 116] 3E:m miwj^w:^^ msm^%^ :ei^^<d- 
:mei^ mj^^s^i'^M.^MM^ ^(E>M.:i2i:!SijLM 1596. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 107. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " one handbell," belong- 
ing to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold to a pewterer.* 

The present treble is the ancient tenor recast smaller in 1824, it 
being previously much damaged. The inscription on the 3rd bell — 
with an error in the proper name — is doubtless a copy of that on an 
older bell. 

SWAYFIELD. 

S. Nicolas. 3 Bells. 

1. JOHN HARBIN RECTOR -^ JOHN TODD & SAMUELL 

PRIDGMORE : C. W ^ 1753 O T. EAYRE FECIT. 
( Diam. 28^ in. ) 

2. [ + 2] OM^IA FIAMT AD GLORIAM DEI. 

TOBIE MORRIS CAST ME 1625. 
( Diam. 31 in. ) 

3. [ + 3 ] viovi : soNO : amimabvs : mortvorvm : 

SED : AVREBVS I VIVEMTIVM 1613. 
(Diam. 33^ in.) 

• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 148. 



CJmrch Bells of Lincolnshire. 701 

For Stamps see page 52. 

The Rev. John Harbin (see ist bell) signed the Register as "Curate," 
" Minister," and "Rector," from 1746 to 1762. There is no entry of 
his burial. 



SWINDERBY. 

All Saints. 5 Bells. 

I, 2, 4. J : TAYLOR & CO. FOUNDERS LOUGHBOROUGH 
1879. 

( Diams, 23, 24, 28 in. ) 

3- [ + 58] m :m ©:f[ mi^ 

(Diam. 25 in. ) 

5. [ + 95 ] . . mi^ TM @^:r [ □ 97 ] m 

(Diam. 30 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate VII. and page 8g. 

Prior to 1879 there were three Bells only, namely the present 3rd and 
5th, the then ist and 3rd, and a 2nd inscribed : — 

[ 4- 106 ] God save the chvrch 1605 [a 113 ] R.G. 
( Diam. 27 in. ) 

In that year the then 2nd bell, being cracked, was recast and two new 
bells added : £'j^ towards the cost was given in memory of the late 
Rev. W. C. Kendall, a former Vicar. 



^ 



2 SWINESHEAD. 



S. Mary. '^ 8 Bells. 

1. PERCUTE DULCE CANO. T. OSBORN FECIT W^i ELLIS 

SUBSCRIBER 1794. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. T. OSBORN FOUNDER 1794. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 



702 The Inscriptions on the 

3. CUM VOCO VENITE THO^ OSBORN FECIT 1794. 

( Diam. 32 in, ) 

4. T. OSBORN DOWNHAM, NORFOLK, FECIT 1794. 

( Diam. 33^^ in. ) 

5. IN WEDLOCK'S BANDS ALL YE WHO JOIN WITH 

HANDS YOUR HEARTS UNITE SO SHALL OUR 
TUNEFULL TONGUES COMBINE TO LAUD THE 
NUPTUAL RITE. T. OSBORN FOUNDER 1794. 
( Diam. 36^ in. ) 

6. OUR VOICES SHALL IN CONCERT RING IN HONOUR 

BOTH TO GOD AND KING T. OSBORN FOUNDER 

1794. 

( Diam. 37^ in. ) 

7. THO« OSBORN FECIT DOWNHAM NORFOLK 1794. 

( Diam. 41^ in. ) 

8. ROBT UVEDALE, DD. VICAR, JOSEPH MASON W^ 

BREWSTER CHURCHWARDENS T. OSBORN FECIT 

1794. 

( Diam. 46 in. ) 

Prior to 1794 there were four bells inscribed : — 

1. In multis annis resonet campana Johannis. 

2. God be our speede. 

3. God be our speede. 

4. Ave Maria gracia plena, Dnus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus, 

et benedictus fructus.* 

SWINHOPE. 

S. Helen. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

(Diam. 18 in. ) 

In 1553 there were at " Swynup " " ij Gret belles. "f 
• Harl. MSS. 6829, fo. 224 f Church Goods, Misc. Book, 507, Aiigm. Office, P. R. Off. 



i 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 703 



(, 



5 SWINSTEAD. 

S. Mary. 4 Bells. 

1. [ + 2] OMKIA FIAMT AD GLORIAM DEI. 

THOMAS NORRIS CA8T ME 1628. 
( Diam. 28f in. ) 

2. ALEXANDER : RIGBY : MADE ; ME ; 1704 \ EDWARD 

: SNART : CHVRCH : WARDEN. 
(Diam. 31! in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH W NIXSON WARDEN 1717. 

( Diam. 34^ in. ) 

4- [ + 96] WMKMlLmM.^ 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 8g. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " one handbell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, was " Broken and in the 
handes of Johnne Coy."* 

The 3rd bell was from the Nottingham foundry. The inscription 
(as quoted) on the 4th is in large, bold, ornate gothic letters, like those 
on the 2nd bell at Normanton. 



/, 



$L SYSTON. 

S. Mary the Virgin. 3 Bells. 

1. [+106] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1638 [ n 157.] 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

2. T. Mears of London Fecit 1821. 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 

* Peacock's Cli. Fur. p. 149. 



704 The Inscriptions on the 

3- ^ © ;o er [ □ gi-l 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XV. and XXIII. and page 87. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " the sacringe bell wth the 
handbells," belonging to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been 
sold and defaced.* 

The intention of the four letters on the tenor bell is not apparent : 
possibly TOME for THOME was attempted. The horses of the 
Canterbury Pilgrims appear to have been supplied with small bells 
inscribed with the words " Canipana Thome.'' 



TALLINGTON. 

S. Lawrence. ' 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + 90] J.Q)-MM-:ih^^ [ngi-] 

( Diam. 30^^ in. ) 

2. \_xj 124 ] a be ma ri a 

(Diam. 33iin.) 
3- [+15] ^it )Elomm Domini ^cncbidum [+17] % O M 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 
Priesfs Bell : — 

Blank. 

^"^ ^ — (Diam. I2f in. ; cracked.) 

For Stamp see pages 87 and 1 1 1 and Plate II. 

The small bell — most probably the ancient sanctus bell — hangs in its 
cot at the east end of the nave. It was originally rung by a lever 
projecting from the stock eastward, a chain or rope from which descended 
into the chancel. There is now no means of ringing. There are 
grooves on each side of the interior of the bell-cot, and the bottom 
stone is hollowed out, as though for the working of a larger bell, pro- 
bably the predecessor of the present one. The form of the bell shows 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 149. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 705 

it to be ancient ; holes have been drilled through the shoulder, and a 
staple clumsily inserted, to which the clapper is attached by a S shaped 
iron hook. The old parish clerk, recently deceased, remembered this 
small bell " kicking about the church for some years :" it was replaced 
in its cot by the Rev. White Bates, a former Vicar. 



L ^ TATHWELL. 

S. Vedast. I Bell. 

I. 1790. 



( Diam. 20^ in. ) 



(. 



OQ TATTERSHALL. 

Holy Trinity. 5 Bells. 

1. SOLI : DEO GLORIA : IN : EXCILSIS : 1752 DANIEL : 

HEDDERLY I FOVNDER O 
( Diam. 30^ in.) 

2. THO PECOCK C W : DANIEL HEDDERLY FOVNDER 

1752. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 1857. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 
4,5- [X*] TOBIAS MORRIS CAST MEE 1691. 

( Diams. 38, 40 in. ) 

* The Stamp on the 4th and 5th bells is a rough S. Andrew's cross. 



TEALBY. 

All Saints. " 4 Bells. 

I. [ + 111] -M'w%~w^ [Diio] 'wwwmos{:bij.:j^%j_ 

2. ^omcn Domini ^tncbictum [ a 33 U 30- ] 
4 S 



7o6 The Inscriptions on the 

3. [ + 60] IHESVS BE OVR SPEDE 1596 TA TP IL. 

4. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH THOMAS BEVERLEY 

CHURCHWARDEN 1704. 

For Stamps see Plates XVI., XVIII., and ///., and page 77. 

In 1553 there were here " iiij grete belles one sanctus bell."* Of 
those ancient bells two still remain : the present ist with a somewhat 
unusual dedication, and with a " Royal Head," and the 2nd. The 
other two have been recast. 

TETFORD. 

5. Mary. 3 Bells. 

I. THOMAS SUTTON CHURCHWARDEN 1794. 

( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 
3. [+121] ^antta .C^aria ora )Pro nobis [TJ iig.] 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XVIII. 

In 1552, when the Inventory of Church Goods belonging to this 
parish was drawn up, the following entries describing the bells and their 
value were made : — 

1 1 m i i j b el 1 s X i ij7/ . 

Itm one lytle bell ij handbells one pare of sencers & ij 

candylsty cks xxs. f 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "one handbell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, was "sold and gone.";]: 

The tenor bell from Fulletby is traditionally believed to have been 
sent here (see p. 408), but the present bells compared with the Edwardian 
Inventory does not confirm that idea. 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 
f Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 78, P. R. Off. X Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 151. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. joy 

TETNEY. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. CVM VOCO AD TEMPLVM VENITE 1700. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. BEATVS EST POPVLVS QVI EXAVDIT CLANGOREM 

1700 [ D 168. J^;?*,^, 16irt./c.j 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. T. MEARS OF LONDON FECIT 1823. 

( Diam. 34J in. ) 

Priesfs Bell :— 

Blank. 

( Diam. 8^ in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXIV. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greatt belles j sanctus bell."* 
It is currently reported, and the report is said to be perfectly true, 
that the Priest's bell here was sent out of the parish to adorn a 
" Hermitage," built by Bishop Tomline, at a house of his at Riby, near 
to Grimsby. It was, however, badly packed, and, in the carrier's cart, 
gave tongue in a way which attracted notice. So the good people of 
Tetney, when they missed their bell, had no difficulty in tracing it to 
Riby. There was naturally a hubbub, and the bell was returned. 
Some amusing verses were written at the time on the incident. 

0/5 TEMPLE BRUER. 

S. John Baptist. i Bell. 

Here is a small modern bell placed in the new church erected in 
1874. 

* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



7o8 The Inscriptions on the 

There is a tradition, often repeated, as to the finding in the last 
century of tliree bells of large dimensions in an ancient well to the west 
of the site of the Temple buildings. I have failed to verify the truth of 
the tradition. 



THEDDLETHORPE ALL SAINTS. 

All Saints. 6 Bells. 

1. JOHN SMYTH : CHVRCH WARDEN 1717. 

( Diam. 28^ in. ) 

2. 1825. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE ME IN 1749. 

(Diam. 33 in.) 

4. 5. Blank. 

( Diams. 34, 37 in. ) 

6. HONORi : DEI : ET : HUjuscE : USUI : UM : sunt : 

CAMPAN^ ; HEN : PENN : FVSOR : 1717 a \ 
( Diam. 41 in. ) 

The Churchwardens' Accounts for 1722, and several subsequent 
years, show that the cost of the casting of the ist and the tenor bells in 
17 1 7 was a heavy one upon the parish. The Accounts for that year 
cannot now be found. The following entries in a later Book refer to 
the new 2nd bell, dated 1825 : — 

1826. July 6. Carriage of new Bell to Louth o . 7 . 9 

Bell & materials fetching o . 6 . o 

P** M' Harrison in p* for new Bell 31 . o . o 

For getting Bell into Cart 0.2.6 

Old Bell retUo Louth 0.6.0 



CJiiirch Bells of Lincolnshire. jog 



THEDDLETHORPE S. HELEN. 
S. Helen. 3 Bells. 

1. ^^0 ^u sona ^ulsntus XiElana ;i2)cbct bodtatus. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

2. [ + 66 ] ^aterinH pia protcgus nos J^ lute bura. 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 
^3. [ + 66 ] "yiTirgo coroirata but nos ab rcgiia bcata. 

( Diam. 4o|- in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate VIII. 

The canons of these bells (which have been turned) are gone : the 
inscription on the ist is unintelligible. 

THIMBLEBY. 

S. Margaret. i Bell. 

I. •:• WILLIAM CAREY •:• C :W !• ANNO : DOM 

•:• 1744. 

(Diam. 14! in. ; height 12 J^ in. ) 

In 1744 the fine ancient church of this parish was taken down, and 
an unsightly attempt at a "classic" structure erected in its place. To 
help in defraying the expenses a ring of six bells was sold to some other 
(now unknown) churches in the county. The whole work was effected 
by the William Carey, then churchwarden, whose name is upon the 
present bell — probably a recast of one of the old ring. 

THORESBY NORTH. 

S. Helen. 3 Bells. 

I. REVD SAMUEL YORKE RECTOR REV. MILES MYERS 
CURATE JOHN PARKER ©Ijurtlj TSZ'arkn 1792 JAMES 
HARRISON OF BARTON FOUNDER. 
(Diam. 33I in.) 



710 



The Inscriptions on the 



2. [+ ii6] GOD SAVE OVR KING 1605. 

( Diam. 36]- in, ) 

3. jEit X^ttltis ,^nnis "JBicsoivct (S'ampana 3Eolj''tniUS [ a 28 n 33IJ30._, 

( Diam. ^g^ in.) 

For Stamps see page 107 and Plate III. 

In 1553 there were here "iij gret belles j Santus bell,"* one of which 
still remains. 

"The Rev"* Samuel Yorke A.B. [see ist bell] was inducted to the 
Rectory of North Thoresby by the Rev"* M' Myers on Saturday the 
iS'*" March 1786."! 

For a local saying about these bells see under Hawerby. 



S. Andrew. 
I. Blank. 

Priesfs Bell : — 



THORESBY SOUTH, 



I Bell and a Priest's Bell. 



( Diam. 25 in. ) 

Blank. 
( Diam. i2-|- in. ) 



S. Mary. 
I. Blank. 



THORESWAY. 



( Diam; 12^ in. ) 



I Bell. 



In 1553 " Thorsway" possessed "iij gret belles & one sanctus bell,":]: 
now sadly represented by the present insignificant single ting-tang. 



* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. f Par. Reg. + Aiigm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 711 



THORGANBY. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 14^^ in. ) 

In 1553 there were here, as at Thoresway, " iij great belles & j 
sanctus bell . . "* now unfortunately lost to the church. 



' THORNTON. 

S. Wilfred. i Bell. 

I. 1763. 

( Diam. 17 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret bells. "f 



^1'^ THORNTON CURTIS. 

S. Laurence. 4 Bells. 

1. Blank. 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1686 [ a 168. ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

3- [ ^ !27 ] ® :j^^'wm M-i^Mi^-^^m :^M-im.m 
-MM-m :m(BM WK^% :m>'w.jhm^ 

Mm'X^M^M^ 1592. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 
4. THE PRAISE OF GOD I SING AND TRIUMPH OF THE 
KING THE MARRIAGE lOYES I TELL AND SOUNDS 
THE DEAD MAN'S KNELL. J. LUDLAM ROTHER- 
HAM FOUNDER 1761. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 



* Aiigm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 
f Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off 



712 Tlie Inscriptions on the 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV. and XV. and page 114. 

The very excellent motto on the 3rd bell has not, it is believed, been 
met with elsewhere. 

The Churchwardens' Accounts contain many charges for ringing "at 
gunpoulder treson " — " at new yearmas," &c., &c. ; and there is a 
receipt for ;^i6, dated 12th February, 1762, "in full of all accounts for 
Hanging and recasting of Bells at Thornton, haveing made them an 
abatement of £^ from Contract which was ;^30." This receipt is 
signed by " Row** Winn," the then owner of the advowson, who, 
apparently, took the responsibility of the expense on behalf of the 
parish. He is mentioned in the Churchwardens' Accounts a few years 
previously thus : — 

1754. Pad for Ringin for S' Rowland Winn at lamas ... 00 . 9 . 9* 



THORNTON-LE-FEN. 



This church, built in 1816, has one small bell. 



I Bell. 



THORNTON-LE-MOOR. 

All Saints. 2 Bells. 

4^~- I, 2. 1688. 

( Diams. 18 in. ; ig|- in. ) 

In 1553 " Thornton-in-the-More " possessed " ij greyt belles. "t 
The smaller bell was cracked when ringing for a wedding about fifty 
years ago. Jo \:^.\^^ ' j^Y^ 



Y 



The Rev. G. Noel Storrs very kindly made these extracts for me. 
t Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. yi^ 

THORPE S. PETER. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I- j©it ^omeit Domini ]I3ci«bitfum [ ij 27 + 28 ij 29. ] 

( Diam. 36 in. ) 

2. tEh ^Elultis J^mu ^esomi ^ampana J'o^anms [ u 29 + 28 ij 27. ] 

( Diam. 4o|- in. ) 

3. MEMENTO MORI 1701 [ O 7. ] 

( Diam. 44 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. and page 59. 

The capitals of the inscription on the 2nd bell are crowned. 

There was formerly a Priest's bell here inscribed : — 

When I call come to church 1691.* 

~ ? f^ THORPE-ON-THE-HILL. 

S. Michael [ or all Saints ]. 2 Bells. 

I. JOHN GIBSON & RICHARD FENELAY WARDENS 1851. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. [ + 172] j.M^B''fSiM pB©" <i)Tsi::Ei mip^^:j^ 1612. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

For Stamp see Plate XXV. 

Prior to 1851 there were three bells: one was never used, not having 
had a rope for many years ; it was sold to pay the cost of the casting of 
the present treble in 1851. 

I am not quite certain as to the correctness of the description of the 
2nd bell : the belfry is dark and dangerous. 

* Oldfield's Wainjleet, p. 295. 
4 T 



Uc^ 



714 The Inscriptions on the 

\ 

U '' THRECKINGHAM. 

S. Peter. ' 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1660. 

(Diam. 33 in. ) 

2. [ + I ] GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH 1615. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

3. [ + 2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1660 B.G. 

(Diam. 38 in.) 

For Stamps see page 52. 



THURLBY [near Bourn.] 
S. FiRMiN. 5 Bells. 

1. MVSICAM DOCET AMOR. JOSH. CHALSWORTH VICAR 

THO. TROLLOPE ARMIGER DEDIT DECEM LIBROS 
1714. 

( Diam. 32J in. ; cracked. ) 

2. HARMONIA NOSTRA EGO SUM SECVNDVS CON- 

CORDIA VOS ESTOTE MILLI SECVNDI 1713. 
(Diam. 34^ in. ) 

3. BRYAN BROWNING CHURCHWARDIN EDW^ ARNOLD 

LEICESTER FECIT 1790 O O 
( Diam. 36^ in. ) 

4. POST BELLVM_ VIGINTI ANNORVM RATiE PACTS 

INTER ANNA ANGLORVM REGINA ET LVDOVIC 
14 FRANCORVM REGE ANNO PRIMO SALVTIS 
VERO 1713. 

(Diam. 39 in.; no canons. ) 

5. ME AVDITO VOS CREDITE DEVM CELITVS CON- 

VOCARE SANCTOS AD ADORANDVM ILLVM IPSVM 
SOLVM. W. PRATT R THORP CH WARDENS 1713. 
(Diam. 42 in. ; no canons.) 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 715 

These bells (excepting the 3rd) were from the Nottingham foundry. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " the sacringe bell," 
belonging to the church in Queen Mary's time, had been " broken for 
the reparacons of the church by the plumar," and that " ij handbelles 
& the holie water fatte were melted at the castinge of two belles."* 

Thomas Trollope, Esq., of Thurlby and Bourn, benefactor to the ist 
bell, was the great grandson of William Trollope, Esq., of Thurlby, 
Bourn, and Casewick, the father of Sir Thomas Trollope, the first 
Baronet. Thomas Trollope married Mary, daughter of Sir William 
Craven, and sister of the first Lord Craven. He was also a benefactor 
to Bourn Church : he died in 1736, and his portrait is at Casewick. 

The word MILLI on the 2nd bell is evidently the founder's mistake 
for NVLLI. 

There is a noteworthy ancient railed ladder standing on a stone 
platform, with steps leading from the tower floor to the first chamber. 
The bells are exceedingly dirty, and much require care and attention. 



THURLBY [near Newark]. 
S. German. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 28U27U29] MM.^M.(Bm^ ^M^mm'MM.m 

( Diam. 24^ in. ) 

2. DANIEL HEDDERLY FOVNDER 1733. 

( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

3. GOD SAVE HIS CHVRCH 1630. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 153. 



7i6 Tlie Inscriptions on the 



TIMBERLAND. 

5. Andrew. 6 Bells. 

I, 2, 3, 5. ENOCH HILTON CHURCHWARDEN THO^ 
OSBORN DOWNHAM FECIT 1789. NORFOLK. 

4. IN WEDLOCKS BAND ALL YE WHO JOIN WITH 
HANDS YOUR HEARTS UNITE SO SHALL OUR 
TUNEFULL TONGUES COMBINE TO LAUD THE 
NUPTUAL RITE. ENOCH HILTON CHURCH- 
WARDEN THOS OSBORN DOWNHAM NORFOLK 
FECIT 1789. 

6. OUR VOICES SHALL WITH JOYFULL SOUND MAKE 

HILLS AND VALLEYS ECCHO ROUND. ENOCH 
HILTON CHURCHWARDEN THO^ OSBORN DOWN- 
HAM NORFOLK FOUNDER 1789. 
( Diam. 40 in. ) 

Prior to 1789 there were three bells only. 

There is a tradition that an aged woman, who had lost her way in 
the Fens, recovered it by hearing the sound of the Timberland bells ; 
and that as a thankoffering she left some land, the proceeds of which 
were to be devoted to buying and keeping the bell-ropes in repair. This 
land now realizes £\^ a year, and out of it all church expenses are paid. 

/ 

TOFT-NEXT-NEWTON. 

SS. Peter and Paul. i Bell. 

In 1553 there were, in the ancient church here, " ij Gret Belles."* 
Here is now only a very small bell, without inscription or date, 

provided when the present church was erected early in the present 

century. 

* Angm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. jiy 



TORKSEY. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I- 3E [ U 32 ] !© [+31] T^o« ,^«gasttn£ ^onet iEnanrc ^ei. "^ 
( Diam. 31 in. ; cracked. ) 

2. [ + 28 ] ^antta i2ElargaKta <Dm )g>ra ^oWs [ U 32 □ 33- ] 

( Diam. 33! in. ) 

3. WILLIAM TATTERSAY FRANCIS MAWER C. W. 

D : H : F : 1747. 

( Diam. 38^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 

The initials on the ist bell may be those of the founder. The 
D ! H ! F I on the 3rd stand for those of Daniel Hedderly, Founder. 

For a rhyme in connection with these bells see under Stow S, Mary. 

Under the account of the Bells at S. Peter-at- Arches, Lincoln, will 
be found a charge by the Corporation of Lincoln, when the new bells 
were given to that church, in 1728 : — 

For carrying old Bells to Torksey o . 15 . o 

Whether that entry means that the ancient bells from S. Peter-at- 
Arches now hang here, there is no further evidence to show. 

I '^ -^ TORRINGTON EAST. 

S. Michael and All Angels. i Bell. 

I. Blank (?) 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 



TORRINGTON WEST. 

S. Mary. i Bell. 

I. M^M.:^^ ^(B:m 1609. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 



7i8 The Inscriptions on the 

TOTHILL. 

S. Mary. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

(Diam. 21 in, ) 

In 1556 the churchwardens reported that "a sacring bell and a 
handbell," belonging to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been 
sold and defaced.* 



A . ■ 



TOYNTON ALL SAINTS. 



All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. [ + 2 ] 1666. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

2. ANNO DOMINI 1572. 

I B 
( Diam. 27^ in. ) 

3. thm □ boco a ab lentglbm □ bciritc 1615. 

(Diam. 33 in.) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

In 1553 there were here " iij greate belles and Sanctus belles."! 

TOYNTON S. PETER. 

S. Peter, 2 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I, [+140] m [ + 140D107] ^ [+107.] 
( Diam. 34I in. ; unhung. ) 

* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 153. f Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. 5^. P. R. Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 719 

2. [ + 75 ] 'Mm<^ [ □ 76 ] mM-mi:!^M-^MM. [ □ 76 ] 
^%^ [ □ 76 ] (STj^-^^,^ [ ° 76 ] m%m 

( Diam. 37! in. ) 
Priesrs Bell .•— 

i6gi. 
(Diam. 13! in. ; unhung.) I 

For Stamps see page 118, Plate XV., and page 79 ; and for the letters 
used on the 2nd bell see Plates IX. — XII. 

In 1553 there were here " iij great belles one Santes belle."* 
There is a vague tradition about a bell being stolen from hence when 
the church was once under repair, which receives some confirmation 
from the fact of one of the Edwardian bells being wanting. 



J ^ TOYNTON HIGH. 

S. John. i Bell. 

I. Blank. 

( Diam. 12 in. ) 

, ; -: TOYNTON LOW. 
S. Peter. i Bell 



I. Blank. 



( Diam 10 in. ) 



The ancient church, which was taken down about the year 181 1, had 
a tower and four bells. Three of those, with the lead from the roof, 
were sold, and so paid, it is said, the cost of the present insignificant 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. 3^4, P. R. Off. 



720 The Inscriptions on the 

building. The present bell is not one of the old bells, but one sub- 
stituted for a cracked one since the present church was built. 



TRUSTHORPE. 

S. Peter. 3 Bells. 

I, 2, 3. H. OWEN RECTOR J^o WILLSON W^ BLACK- 
BOND CHURCHWARDENS. CAST BY JOHN 
WARNER & SONS LONDON 1875. 
(Diams. 29, 31, 34 in.) 

The three ancient bells here were inscribed : — 

1. + Sancta Johannes ora pro nobis. 

2. [ O 19 ] Sum roas pulsata mundi Catrina vocata. 

3. [ O 19 ] Per gentem Trusthorpe sit Petrus sonans in Trusthorpe. 

' I' TUPHOLME. 

In a letter from Robert Goche, Receiver of the County, to the 
Commissioners for Lead and Bells, dated 14th May, 1556, occurs the 
passage : — 

I have spokin to my L. Willoughby for the belle remayninge in his 
handes at Tupholme beinge verie smalle ys content to paie for the 
same at your wourshipfull discretions.* 



TYDD S. MARY. 

S. Mary. 5 Bells. 

I. THOS OSBORN DOW^NHAM FECIT 1788. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 



Land Revenue Records, Church Goods, Line, W. P- R- Off. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 721 

2. T. OSBORN FECIT 1788. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. PERCUTE DULCE CANO :••• THO^ OSBORN FECIT 

1788 :•• 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

4. THOs OSBORN DOWNHAM NORFOLK FOUNDER 1788 

: : : • • WILL^ FREEMAN CHURCHWARDEN. 
( Diam. 37 in. ) 

5. CUM VOCO VENITE :•• WILL^ FREEMAN CHURCH- 

WARDEN T. OSBORN FECIT 1788. 
( Diam. 41^ in. ) 

Owing to a dispute with the ringers, who were in the habit of taking 
beer into the ringing chamber, which the Rector very properly would 
not allow, there was no ringing here for some time, and a chiming 
apparatus was fixed by Mr. James Jerram ; but recently the bells have 
been put into good order, a new company of ringers formed, and 
change-ringing practised. 

(//O UFFINGTON. 

S. Michael. 5 Bells. 

I. CAST BY JOHN WARNER & SONS LONDON 1865. 

[ Royal xj Arms. ] 

PATENT. 

( Diam. 30^^ in. ) 
2,3,4. [+2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE ME 1640. 

(Diams. 32I, 34^, 37 in.) 
5. [ -f I ] THOMAS NORRIS MADE ME 1640. 

(Diam. 41 J in. ) 

For Stamps see page 52. 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that "a handbel," belonging 
to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold for the sum of 
4 V 



722 The Inscriptions on the 

xiijrf., and was broken; and that another handbell " remayninge in or 
churche at this pnte tyme " had been " broken and knockt in peces."* 

The ancient bells appear to have been recast when the tower was 
repaired in 1639 ; a new frame was made for six bells in 1865, when the 
treble was recast. 



ULCEBY. 

S. Nicolas. 5 Bells. 

1, 2. EDMVND SMITH VICAR WILLIAM SMITH WILLIAM 
MAVLTBY CHVRCH 

WARDENS ' T^ L J 

( Diams. 29, 31 in. ) 
3. TE DEVM LAVDAMVS E. S. VIC : W. S : W ! M. 

CHVRCH r ro t 

1724 r D 168. 1 

WARDENS ' T^ L J 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

[ D 155 D 154 D 153 D 151. ] 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 
5. % sfacetig tolrng mcit bo tnll to taste ott meats t^at fecbs i\z soolc 
1606 [ n 113. ] 

( Diam. 38 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XXIV., XXII. , and XVI. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that "one sacringe bell," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had gone " we know 
not howe ;" and that " ij handbelles " had been "broken in peces and 
sold to or Vicare."t 

Edmund Smith (ist and 2nd bells) signs the Register as "Curate" 
until the year 1733. There is no entry of his burial. 



• Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 154. t lb. p. 155. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 723 



ULCEBY [with Fordington]. 
All Saints. i Bell. 

The very small bell here is without inscription or date. ' 



UPTON. 

All Saints. 4 Bells. 

1. REV HUGH POINER VICAR 1790 WILLIAM INGHAM 

& GEORGE COOKE dTljurclj SEarbm. 
( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. ANNO DOMINI 1787 R.G. 

( Diam. 281 in. ) 

3. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS LONDON 

J* DICkIoN^^^^ } CHURCHWARDENS 1847. 
( Diam. 32^ in. ; weight 5 cwt. 3 qrs. 16 lbs.) 

4. EX DONO PAROECORVM GEORGIO FOTHERGILL 

VICARIO 1641. 

( Diam. 34:^ in. ; canons gone. ) 

The ist bell was cast by James Harrison. 
In 1553 there were here " iij grete belles j sans bell."* 
The Rev. George Fothergill (see 4th bell) is first mentioned in the 
Register in 1637, and last in 1641. 



USSELBY. 

S. Margaret. i Bell. 

I. 1670. 

( Diam. 12 in. ) 

In 1553 there were here " ij greyt belles. "t 



» Exch. Q. R. Church Goods. Line. ^\, P. R. Off. f Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 



724 ^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

UTTERBY. 

S. Andrew. 3 Bells. 

1. TE DEVM LAVDAMVS 1725 [ a i58. ] 

( Diam. 25 in. ) 

2. GLORIA IN ALTISSIMIS DEO 1725 [ a 168.] 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

3. DANIEL HEDDERLY FOVNDER ROBERT BEAMOVNT 

C.W. 1752. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. 



WADDINGTON. 

S. Michael. 5 Bells. 

1. ED. COVLSON OF WADDINGTON CAVSED MEE FOR 

TO BE RUN. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. [ + 3 ] GOD SAVE OVR QVENE. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. [ + 3 ] IHESVS BE OVR SPEDE. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

4. [U124] mmm %^'MMM ~:^M-:^m%MW^ 

(Diam. 35 in. ) 
5. ALL MEN THAT HEARE MY MVRNEFULL SOVND 
REPENT BEFORE YOV LYE IN GROVND 1658. 

[ ° ^57^^ 

E COLSON W HAMMOND WARDENS. 

( Diam. 40 in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and iii and Plate XXIII. 

The " Ed Covlson "' on the ist bell is the " E Colson " on the tenor. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire . 725 



WADDINGWORTH. 
S. Margaret. i Bell. 

I. T. JOHNSON HULL 1832. 

( Diam. 2ih in. ) 

In 1553 " Waddyngworthe " possessed " ij grett bells."* 



WADINGHAM. 

S. Mary. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

I. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE ME IN 1741. 

( Diam. 31^^ in. ) 

2. [ + 83 D 82 a 81 u 80 D 81 ] Mm:^ ^mwM^ 
€) :g> :m 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

3. REMEMBER DEATH 1713 [ O 7. ] 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 
Priest's Bell: — 

Blank. 

( Diam. i2i^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XIV. and page 59. 

In 1553 " Waddyngham " possessed " iij gret belles and one sanctus 
bell."t One of those bells still remains — the present 2nd — which is of 
a curious, and probably rather late, type. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that they had neither Sacring 
bell nor handbell in Queen Mary's time.t 

WADINGHAM. 

A second church dedicated to S. Peter formerly stood in the same 

* Land Revenue Records, Bundle 1392, File 79, P. R. Off. 
t Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. 3*3, P. R. Off. + Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 156. 



726 The Inscriptions on the 

churchyard as S. Mary's. In 1553 it possessed " ij greyt belles and one 
Santus belle."* 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Waddingha' Sancte Peters " reported 
that " one handbell," which belonged to that church in Queen Mary's 
time, had been sold and broken in pieces, and that "one sacringe bell 
wch honge at a maypole toppe and what is become thereof we know 
not."t 



WAINFLEET ALL SAINTS. 

All Saints. i Bell. 

There is now only one small bell here, placed in 1821. 

In 1 718 the v/ooden spire of this church was removed, and a brick 
tower erected, in which were placed five heavy bells. In 1820 (the 
buildmg having gone rapidly to decay) the old church was taken down, 
and the materials used in the erection of the present edifice on a new 
site. The "five heavy bells" were then, I presume, sold; it is said 
that two went to Wainfleet S. Mary, and one to the church of Burgh 
[see under those churches]. 



WAINFLEET ALL SAINTS. 

Magdalen College School. i Bell. 

I. [ + 34] M.'w^ miM-^i^M. m:m.j^^%M. 

( Diam. 20^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page 74. 

This is most probably the original bell placed here in 1484 by the 
founder of the school, William Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester, and 



Exch. Q. R. Church Goods, Line. -^\, P. R. Off. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 157. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 727 

founder of Magdalen College, Oxford, The date 1796 is on the frame, 
showing it to have been rehung in that year. 



^3^ WAINFLEET S. MARY. 
S. Mary. 6 Bells. 

1. JOHN CHOLMELEY CURATE HENRY JOHN SEELY CH. 

WARDEN MARCH 1855. C. & G. MEARS FOUNDERS 
LONDON. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 

2. JOSEPH MALLOWS OF EAST DEREHAM NORFOLK 

FECIT 1760. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

3. COME TO GOD'S HOUSE TO PRAISE HIS HOLY NAME 

THOSE THAT FORSAKE IT 'TIS A SIN AND A 
SHAME 1760. 

( Diam. 33 in. ) 

4. GOD SAVE HIS CHURCH 1620. 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 

5. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1820. 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

6. VITAM METIOR MORTEM PLORO. C. & G. MEARS 

FOUNDERS LONDON 1855. 
( Diam. 42 in. ) 

In 1566 the churchwardens of " Wauphlett Maries" reported that 
" one hand bell," which belonged to this church, in Queen Mary's time, 
had been sold, and that " a sacringe bell " had also been sold, but 
whether then " defaced or not we do not knowe."* 

Two bells are said to have been brought here from Wainfleet All 
Saints, when the church there was taken down in 1820 ; perhaps the 
5th here represents them. 

* Peacock's Ch. Fiiy. p. 158. 



728 The Inscriptions on the 

The ist and the tenor were previously inscribed : — 

I. Adlard Thorpe and John Clarkson CWs Lester and Pack of 

London fecit 1761. 
6. [ The same and : — ] S. Mary pray for us. To him that rings 

me high and well the tenor note I'l truly tell. 

The invocation to S. Mary on the previous tenor bell was, no doubt, 
a copy of that on the ancient bell which preceded it : Oldfield in his 
History of Wainjleet (p. 76) asks whether such was the case, and adds : 
"or did some of the old leaven of popery remain unpurged in the 
heart of the inditer ? Little did we expect to find the invocation of 
Saints on a bell, cast for the use of a protestant church in the middle 
of the eighteenth century." [ ! ! ] 

On a grey stone near the chancel is the memorial of Adlard Thorpe 
(previous ist and 6th bells) : — 

Under this stone there is a vault and 

therein lyes the Remains of Adlard Thorpe 

Gent, a Sinner and a Ringer, who departed 

this life on the 24"" of January 1770 aged 58 years.* 

The bells were rehung in an iron framework in 1844 when new 
wheels, &c., were also provided. 



WAITH. 

S. Martin. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + 120] M^M- M-^MMM. [U119. ] 

( Diam. 29 in. ) 

2. [ + 120] -MT^J-Tf^ sm% m^M-^w%:ih%[v^^9-] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 
* Oldfield's Wainfleet, p. 75. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 729 

3. [+111] m [U 119] 'M'WW^^ © [Diio] 

( Diam. 35 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XVIII . and XV I. 

In 1553 " Waythe " possessed " iij grete belles."* Those still hang : 
they are a uniform set ; all three have the same letters and shield. On 
the 3rd, after the letter G, is a Royal Head. 

On the frame is : — 

Francis Nettleship C. Wdn. 1737 
J a' Harrison B, 1 hanger. 

For a tradition as to these bells see under Grainsby. 



WALCOT. 

S. Nicolas. 4 Bells. 

1. GOD SAVE THE CHURCH 1601. 

( Diam. 2"]^ in. ) 

2. [ + I ] W. QUINCEY W. SMART C.W. TOBY NORRIS 

CAST ME 1687. 

( Diam. 27 in. ) 

( Diam. 29^ in. ) 
4. [ + III D 112 D no] %'M.M ^IM-^'^M. [Diog. ] 

( Diam. 331 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 52 and Plate XV I. 

The bells are (1879) about being put in better order. On the frame 
of 3rd bell are the initials I. M[eadows] C.W. 1797. 



* Augm. Office Misc. 507, P. R. Off. 
4 W 



730 The Inscriptions on the 



WALCOT-CUM-BILLINGHAY. 

There was formerly a chapel here dedicated to S. Oswald. In a 
turret at the west end hung two bells, which were sold when the chapel 
was taken down late in the last century, and the proceeds given for 
parochial purposes.* 

The present chapel-of-ease, erected in 1852, has one small bell. 



t WALESBY. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. iljc ixnpnmw. 

( Diam. 29! in. ) 

2. [ + 124 ] gta maria. 

( Diam. 31 in. ) 

3. M' Henry Handson dlljurclj mnxhm JAMES HARRISON OF 

BARTON FOUNDER. 

( Diam. 33^ in. ) 

For Stamp see page iii. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles one Santus bell."t 



WALTHAM. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

1. VENITE EXVLTEMVS DOMINO 1698 [ d 168. ] 

( Diam. 32 in. ) 

2. TE DEVM LAVDAMVS 1713 ^^^^- ^^'^^^ chvrch . ^^g^ , 

' -^ JOHN BRADY WARDENS ■- -■ 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 



Sketches of Sleaford. f Church Goods, Misc. Book, 507, Augm. Office. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 731 

3. JAMES HARRISON FOUNDER BARTON 1820. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. 

In 1553 there were here " iij gret belles & one Santus bell."* 



i (^ ! WASHINGBOROUGH. 

5. John. 6 Bells. 

1. TIMOTHY PIKE GENT. BENEFACTOR [ n 85 ] 1713. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. PROSPERITY TO OUR BENEFACTORS [ D 85 ] 1713. 

( Diam. 3o|- in. ) 

3,4. [+116] %M^s'^M :©©• ©"^m M^m:mm 

1589 [ D 113.] 

( Diams. 32, 34 in. ) 

5. [+116] JM^M'WM :©©■ <B^^ ^:^^^:m 

1589 [ D 113.] 

( Diam. 37 in. ) 

6. I TO THE CHURCH THE LIVING CALL AND TO THE 

GRAVE DOE SUMMONS ALL [085] 1713. 
( Diam. 39^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see pages 84 and 107 and Plate XVI. 

Timothy Pike (see ist bell) was also a joint founder of schools in 
this parish. 

There is a tradition here that some of the bells came — or as others 
say were stolen — from S. Swithin's, Lincoln. There is nothing con- 
firmatory of the truth of the tradition in the Parish Books. 



Aiigm. Office Misc. 507. P. R. Off. 



732 The Inscriptions on the 

WELBOURN. 

S. Chad. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

1. [ + 162 ] :g>u« .^bbientibus P^t T^S?^ 1663. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. s« launnti [ U ^24. ] 

( Diam. 34 in. ) 
Cl ^ 3- [ + 162 ] ^aitctitas :E)omiiio ^"^3^ '^SSZ"^ 1663. 

( Diam. 37 in ; cracked. ) 
Pmsfs Bell ;— 

Blank. 
( Diam. 13 in. ; unhung in the church. ) 

For Stamps see Plate XXIV. and page iii. 

The Priest's bell, which is unhung and in the church, has not been 
used within living memory. There is a little external bell-cote at the 
east end of the nave, where the Sanctus bell formerly hung. 

i-i'S WELBY. 

S. Bartholomew. . 3 Bells. 

1. [+2] VLOVi CLAMOR SED AMOR CAPITAT IM AVRE 

DEI THOMAS NORRIS CAST ME 1628. 
( Diam. 30 in. ) 

2. [+116] GOD SAVE THE CHVRCH 1636 [ d 157.] 

( Diam. 32^^ in. ) 

3. DEORVM FILI DEI MISERERE IHS NAZARENUS REX 

THO. HEDDERLY 
'^^ FOVNDER 

[ D n n For a description of these Stamps see p. 131.] 
(Diam. 341 in.) 

For Stamps see pages 52 and 107 and Plate XXIII. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbells," which 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 733 

belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, had been sold, defaced, 
and broken.* 



WELL. 

S. Margaret. i Bell. 

I- [+25] 'wJ.^^'M.mi'WM [026] :E)-yr:ii)^ 

:m^jhM^% [026] js{mm%m- [026] ^im 

( Diam. 19 in. ) 

For Stamp see page 72. 

This interesting little bell with its pretty initial cross is very difficult 
of access. Mr. Cresswell, on his first visit, was assured that the bell 
had neither inscription nor date, but, making a second visit, he, with 
the aid of a ladder, got through a small door in the eastern gable, and 
lantern in hand picked his way through the false roof to the bell in a 
small cupola swarming with bats and dreadfully filthy, at the west end, 
and so secured a very good rubbing. 



U^ 



WELLINGORE. 

All Saints. 3 Bells. 

BY FRIENDS TO COUNTRY CHURCH & KING I WAS 

RECAST AGAIN TO SING 
GEO HEDDERLY FECIT NOTTINGHAM 1787 THO^ 

ALLWOOD CHURCHWARDEN [ a no.] 
( Diam. 31^ in. ) 

[+172] miM^m:m :^^ xasi^ ©©-(Dm© — -^^ 

( Diam. 35 in. ; cracked. ) 
* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 158. 



734 T^^^^ Inscriptions on the 

3. j.'m'm [ □ 136] (B m-:m^~w m. [ □ 112 d ho] 

jgj^:m-<sr^€):BiT2-xii [□136U137.] 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plates XVI., XXV., and XX. 

In the year 1810 the son of Mr. Woolfitt, a farmer then residing at 
Harmston, was ringing the Sermon-bell at this church: he suddenly 
desisted ringing, observing Ihat the bell was so heavy he was quite 
fatigued. He died a few minutes afterwards in the churchyard.* 



WELTON. 

S. Mary. 6 Bells. 



( Diam. 28 in. ) 



I. W S 1770. 

2—5- 1770. 

( Diams. 30, 32, 34, 36 in. ) 
6. WILLIAM STEEPER CHURCHWARDEN 1770. 

( Diam. 39 in. ) 

In 1565-6 the churchwardens reported that " ij hand Belles . . . and 
one sacringe bell," which belonged to this church in Queen Mary's 
time, had been sold.f 

The bells here were cast by Henry Harrison of Barrow. Although 
the Churchwardens' Accounts of that date are not preserved, there are 
sundry receipts and promissory notes in the Church Chest relating to 
the business, from which we learn that the parishioners paid him (at 
periods extending over two years) ;^92 for workmanship and ;^20 15s. 
for " addittional mettle." There is nothing relating to the ancient bells, 
which evidently were melted down at that time. 

* Gent. Mag. Lxxx. (1810) p. 499. f Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. 159. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 735 

WELTON-LE-MARSH. 

S. Martin. i Bell. 

I. THOMAS MEARS LONDON FECIT 1792. 



WELTON-LE-WOLD. 

S. Martin. 3 Bells. 

1. j^anttc ©targie (Drn: ^ro ^obis [ U 29 n 28 ij 27. ] 

(Diam. 31 in. ) 

2. jganttc ^ccolac (Dra 'ypxa >^obis [ U 29 d 28 ij 27. ] 

(Diam. 34 in. ) 

3. DANIEL HEDDERLY CAST ME IN 1728. 

( Diam. 341 in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate III. 

In 1566 the churchwardens reported that " ij handbelles," which 
belonged to this church in Queen Mary's time, still remained in their 
hands not defaced.* 

The ist and 2nd bells are uniform in stamps and letters. 



WESTBOROUGH. 

All Saints. 4 Bells. 

1. THO. HEDDERLY MADE VS ALL GOOD LVCK : 

ATTEND VS ALL 1752. 

(Diam. 27^ in.) 

2. WE WILL SING WITH A CHEARFVLL NIES 1752. 

( Diam. 28 in. ) 



* Peacock's Ch. Fur. p. i6o. 



']},^ The Inscriptions on the 

3. JOHN RIMINGTON WILLIAM PEPPER CHVRCH- 

WARDENS 1752. 

( Diam. 30 in. ) 

4. THE CHVRCH'S PRAIS I SOVND ALL WAYS 1752 

THO HEDDERLY FOUNDER, 
( Diam. 32^ in. ) 

The spire fell, and the bells were so much injured that they were 
obliged to be recast, in 1752 : the expense was shared by the two 
parishes of Westborough and Doddington Dry. The Churchwardens' 
Accounts here have the following entries : — 

1752. Charges at Newark about the bells and for the 

Article o . 4 . 8 

For careying the bells to Nottingham : half o . 5.3 

For fetching the bells home : half o . 10 . 6 

P" half of M' Hederley the Bell founder's bill ... 31 . 17 . 4 

1753. For Bell ropes half o . 11 . o 

For four new Bell ropes o . 12 . 6 

WESTON S. MARY. 

5. Mary. 3 Bells. 

1. [+2] CVM : voco : ad : ecclesiam : vepiite : 

I6I3. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

2. JOSEPH EAYRE S^ NEOTS FECIT 1769 JOHN HUTCH- 

INSON CHURCHWARDEN. 
( Diam. 27 in. ) 

3. • : OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI 1735 • : • THO. 

EAYRE KETTERING FECIT. 
( Diam. 29 in, ) 

For Stamp see page 52. 

The bell-frames were repaired, and the chamber put into good order, 
in 1877. 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 737 



WHAPLODE. 
S. Mary. ^ 5 Bells. 

1. LAVDO : DEVM ; VERVM 1718 HENRICVS PENN 

FVSOR. 

[ Lion Rampant XJ Xj hvice on ivaist. ] 

( Diam. 31 in. ; turned. ) 

2. ^T : CLAMOR \ AD C^LOS 1718. 

( Diam. 33 in. ; turned. ) 

3. + VT : MVNDVS i SIC : NOS I NVNC : LiETITIAM : 

NVNC : DOLOREM : 1718. 

( Diam. 35 in. ; turned. ) 

4. lAC : BOLTON : GVLS : ONE : CWS. PLEBEM : VOCO 

: CONGREGO ; CLERVM 1718. 
( Diam. 38 in. ) 

5. lOH i RVSTAT : VICAR. DEFVNCTOS : PLANGO \ 

VIVOS : MONEO 1718. 

[ Lion Rampant xj Xj twice on ivaist. ] 
( Diam. 42 in. ; turned. ) 

Here is a Peal-board dated 1775. 



' WHAPLODE DROVE. 

S. John Baptist. 3 Bells. 

I. [ + I ] i^rw^i '■ ~w<Bmm : mj^ : m^mjhm^ 

(Diam. 20 in. ) 
.2. [ + 2] OMMIA : FIAMT : AD : GLORIAM : DEI : 1615. 

( Diam. 22 in. ; cracked ; imhung ; stands in nave of church. ) 
3. [+2] THOMAS NORRIS MADE MEE 1656 HC IC. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

For Stamps see page 52. 

The Rev. Canon Moore, F.S.A., of Spalding, has in his possession 

4 X 



738 The Inscriptions on the 

a small handbell which he, some years ago, purchased from the crier's 
hands in this place : see page 203 for a description of it. 

WHITTON. 

S. John Baptist. 3 Bells. 

1. DANIEL HEDDERLY MADE WE IN 1742. 

( Diam. 24 in. ) 

2. JOHN WALKER C.W. 1742. 

( Diam. 25! in. ) 

3- [ + 37 ] miMSM^M^ [ □ 39 ] m.MJm^:m. [ □ 39 1 
:e)©3e [ □ 39 ] ^Mw [ n 39 ] :iii<DX3Ei©-:m 

[ □ 39 ] X3^©-Tg:x?El [ + 37. ] 

( Diam. 30^^ in. ) 

For Stamps see Plate V., and for a specimen of the letters on the 3rd 
bell see fig. 175, Plate XXVI . 

The Rev. J. T. Fowler, F.S.A., who visited these bells, writes : — 

The 3rd bell is said to have been brought from Welton on the other 
side of the Humber, and the tradition is confirmed by the fact that 
there is still at that church a bell precisely similar to this in the 
lettering, &c. This inscription at Whitton presents the peculiarity 
of two crosses close together, where the beginning and end of the 
inscription approach each other. It possesses a peculiar interest 
in the writer's mind as being the first bell inscription to which his 
attention was ever directed. This was on August ist, 1845, when 
he helped his father to make a rubbing of it. 

•) 1 a WICKENBY. 

SS. Peter and Laurence. 3 Bells and a Priest's Bell. 

( Diam. 2if in. ) 



Chiircli Bells of Lincolnshire. 739 

J<DK:iil WMmmiMM (ST.TSr. 1738. 
( Diam. 22f in. ) 

( Diam. 26 in. ) 
Priest's Bell : — 

Blank. 

( Diam. loj in. ) 

The Priest's bell has not been used within living memory. 

" Samuel Batchelor A.B. [see 2nd bell] was inducted into the Rectory 
of Whickenby on the 20*" da}' of August 1737 by the Rev. M' Lily of 
Lin wood, whose patron was M" Alice Roth well of North Collingham 
in the county of Nottingham."* 

"The Rev. M' Batchelor Rector of Whickenby buried May 11 
[a.d. i74i]-"t 

/ ^ 

;'' ■ WIGTOFT. 

SS. Peter and Paul. 5 Bells. 

1. GRATA SIT ARGUTA RESONANS CAMPANULA VOCE 

T. EAYRE FECIT 1750. 

2. OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI 1750 T. EAYRE DE 

KETTERING FECIT -^ 

3. GLORIA PATRI FILIO ET SPIRITUI SANCTO ^ A.D. 

1750 OMNIA FIANT AD GLORIAM DEI, 

4. GLORIA PATRI FILIO ET SPIRITUI SANCTO THO 

EAYRE DE KETTERING FECIT -^ 1750. 

5. GEORGE FERNE VICAR -^ JOHN TURNER & JOHN 

PAKEY CHURCHWARDENS 1750. 
( Diam. 35 in. ) 

* Par. Reg. f lb. 



740 The Inscriptions on the 

There is an iron plate in the bell-chamber, from which we learn that 
the bells were rehung in 1858. The cage is arranged for six bells : it is 
hoped the ring may sometime be made that number. 

The Churchwardens' Accounts of this parish had the following 
entries (amongst others) relating to the bells : — 

1484-6. In the first paide to John Cony for making of 

a newe belle whele o . 4 . 10 

Item in expences done of the same John for his 

dyner 0.0. 3 

Item paid for repacion of irren wark, that is to 
say gogeons, Keye, and what y^ warkman's hire 

to dresse the grete belle o . i . 8 

Item paide for femble [hemp], and for makyng 

that of in bell ropes o. i . 5 

Item paide for neweshotyng [forging] of the 

grete bell claper o . 3 . 3 

Item paide for shoting of the middell bell claper o . i . o 
Item paide to Ric. Michell and to Ranlot Wright 
for mendyng of the tymbwark of all the bells, 

and for their bordyng [food] o . i . 4 

Item paide for and for shotyng of 

an irren bolte to the forbell whele 0.0. 6 

[There were now 3 bells — fore, middle, and great — 
and a Sanctus bell.] 
Item paid for hespes and stapulls to the bells ... o . o . 10 
Item paide for trussyng of the forbell and for 

the sanctus bell [&c. &c.] 0.2. 3 

Item paide to Agnes Grymston for 1 1 lbs. brasse 
of hir boght to the bolsters to all y* belles p' of 

yMbii" o . I . 2i 

Item to John Tynker in arnest for to make the 
bolsters to the bells, and for his comyng hidder 
and for fewell o . i . o 



6 . 


7 


5 • 


8 


o . 


5 


o . 


4 



Church Bells of Lincolnshire. 741 

Item paid for 100 nailes to the bells 0.0. 2 

Item in expenses in hiryng of Thomas Tynkir 
of Gosberkirk [now Gosberton] at 2 tymes for 

the makyng of the said bolsters o . o . 8 

Item paide to John Harby and to Will, his 
broder for 15 days wirkyng upon the bells in 

makyng of the crosse tristles takyng 

by the day they bothe 5** with 4"* more att alle ... o 
Item paide to the saide Thomas Tynkir for 
makyng of 6 bolsters of brasse to all y' belles ... o 
Item paide to John Almonds for a stone femble 

to the bell stryngs [or ropes] o 

Item paide for makyng that of in ropes for the belles o 
Item paide to Edward Smyth of Sutterton for 
makyng of all the claspes of irren and an ere to 
y' for bell [perhaps an " ear " in connection with 
the baldrick] o 

1487-9. It' sol. edwarde Smythe for yryne warke to y^ 

bellys o 

It' sol. loh. herwy for dressyng of the sayd bellys o 
It' sol. Alice brige for the bord of the sayd Joh. 
herwy o 

1500. It' for y^ Clap' of y' grett beyll o 

It' payd for shotyng of y'' sainctys belle o 

1507. Itm payd for heyngyng of y^ second bell o 

1509. It' payd for y^ Grett beyll clappur o 

It' payd fo