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Full text of "Benevolent institutions. 1910"

LIBRARY 



^nSSACHo^. 




1895 



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13143? 



13143? 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

WM. J. HARRIS, Director 



3/0 



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/o 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS 

1910 







WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1913 



GIFT OF THE 
6overffi3ct ef the Unitd Siatej. 



153031 



r C 



CONTENTS. 






\c 



Introduction 

Previous reports 

Thirteenth Census Report (1910) 

Period covered by the report 

Scope of the report 

Classes of institutions included 

Information furnished 

Special features 

State legislation and supervision 

State boards of charities 

General summaries of statistics of benevolent institu- 
tions 

Institutions, inmates, and finances of institutions 

Comparative summar\', 1910 and 1904 

Distribution of institutions, inmates, and persons re- 
ceived . by class of institution 

Distribution of finances of institutions, by class of 

institution 

Information furnished 

Significance of figures reported 

Statistics for individual classes of institutions 

Class I. — Institutions for the care of children 

Classes of children received 

Methods of management 

Cottage system 

Placement in families 

Comparison OTth report for 1904 



Page. 

11-14 
11 
12 
12 
12 
12 
13 
13 
13 
14 

15-25 
15 
17 

18 

22 
22 
22 
26-57 
2&-33 
26 
26 
27 
30 
30 



Statistics for individual classes of institutions — Contd. 

Class II. — Societies for the protection and care of cliildren 

Information furnished 

Children placed 

Receiving homes 

Class III. — Homes for the care of adults or adults and 
children 

Comparison with report for 1904 

Permanent and temporary homes 

Permanent homes 

Temporary homes 

Sex and age of inmates 

Class IV. — Hospitals and sanitariums 

Classes of institutions included 

Medical and nursing staff 

Patients reported 

Dispensaries 

Treatment of tuberculosis 

Class V. — Dispensaries 

Class VI. — Institutions for the blind and deaf 

Special summaries 

Sex and age of inmates 

Placement of children 

Supervising agencies of institutions 

Finances of institutions 

Comparison with report for 1904 

Institutions under governmental care 



PRINCIPAL TABLES. 



General summary, Ijy divisions and states 16 

Comparative summary, by aivisionsand states, 1910 and 1904. 17 

Institutions, by class of institution 19 

Inmates of institutions, by class of institution 20 

Persons received into institutions, by class of institution 21 

Receipts of institutions, by class of institution 23 

Payments of institutions, by class of institution 24 

Value of property of institutions, by class of institution 25 

Distribution of institutions for the care of cliildren, by 

divisions and states 27 

General summary of institutions for the care of children. ... 28, 29 

Children in institutions for the care of children, 1910and 1904. 31 
Children received into institutions for the care of children, 

classified according to type 32 

Children in institutions for the care of children, classified 

according to agencies through which received 33 

General summary of societies for the protection and care of 

children .• 86, 37 

General summary of homes for the care of adults or adults and 

children 39 

Comparative summary of homes for the care of adults or 

adults and children, 1910 and 1904 40 

Inmates of permanent and temporary homes 41 

Persons received into permanent and temporary homes 42 

Inmates of permanent humos 43 

Persons received into temjxirary homes 45 



General summary of hospitals and sanitariums 

Institutions for the treatment of tuberculosis 

Dispensaries operated by hospitals or independently 

General summary of dispensaries 

General summary of institutions for the blind and deaf 

Persons under care of institutions at close of the year, by sex 

and age 

Persons received into institutions during the year, by sex 

and age 

Children in institutions at close of year, by sex 

Adults in institutions at close of year, by sex 

General summary of child-placing 

Institutions classified according to super\-ising agency 

Inmates of institutions, classified according to supervising 

agency 

Receipts of institutions from public appropriations 

Receipts of histitutions from donations 

Receipts of institutions from care of inmates 

Running expenses of institutions 

Value of land, buildings, and equipment owned by institu- 



tions . 



Value of invested funds owned by institutions. 

Institutions under Federal care 

Institutions under state care 

Institutions under county care 

Institutions under municipal care 



Page. 

34-38 
34 
35 
35 

38-46 
40 
40 
43 
44 
46 
46-50 
46 
46 
47 
47 
47 
50-52 
53-57 
57-84 
57 
65 
68 
72 
72 
80 



Page. 

48,49 
50 
51 
52 

54,55 

58,59 

60,61 

62,63 

64 

66 

68 

70,71 
73 
74 
75 
76 

77 
78 
81 
82 
83 
84 



(3) 



13143? 



CONTENTS. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



Table I. — Institutions for the Care of Children. 



Alabama 86 

Arizona 86 

Arkansas 86 

California 86 

Colorado 90 

Connecticut 90 

Delaware 92 

District of Columbia 92 

Florida 94 

Georgia 94 

Idaho 96 

Illinois 96 

Indiana 100 

Iowa 102 

Kansas 104 

Kentucky 104 

Louisiana 106 

Maine 108 

Maryland 108 

Massachusetts 110 

Michigan 112 

Minnesota 114 

Mississippi 116 

Missouri 116 

Montana 118 



Nebraska 118 

Nevada 118 

New Hampshire 118 

New Jersey 120 

New Mexico 122 

New York 122 

North Carolina 132 

North Dakota 134 

Ohio 134 

Oklahoma 140 

Oregon 140 

Pennsylvania 140 

Rhode Island 148 

South Carolina 148 

South Dakota 148 

Tennessee 148 

Texas 150 

Utah 1.50 

Vermont 152 

Virginia 152 

Washington 154 

West Virginia 154 

Wisconsin 154 

Wyoming 156 



Table II. — Societies for the Protection and Care of 
Children. 



Page. 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
158 
160 
160 
160 

Kentucky 162 

Maine 162 

Maryland 162 

Massachusetts 162 

Michigan 162 

Minnesota 162 

Missouri 164 

Montana 164 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Idalio 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 



Nebraska 164 

New Hampshire 164 

New Jersey 164 

New Mexico 164 

New York 164 

North Carolina 166 

North Dakota 168 

Ohio 168 

Oklahoma 168 

Oregon 168 

Pennsylvania 168 

Rhode Island 170 

South Carolina 170 

South Dakota 170 

Tennessee 170 

Texas 170 

Virginia 172 

Washington 172 

West Virginia 172 

Wisconsin 172 



Table III. 



-Homes for the Care of Adults or Adults and 
Children. 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California. .. 

Colorado 

Connecticut. 
Delaware 



Page. 

174 

174 

174 

174 

178 

178 

180 

District of Columbia ISO 

Florida 182 

Georgia 182 

Idaho 184 

Illinois 184 

Indiana 188 

Iowa 192 

Kansas 192 

Kentucky 194 

Louisiana 196 

Maine 196 

Maryland 198 

Massachusetts 200 

Midiigan 206 

Minnesota 208 

Mississippi 210 

Missouri 210 



Page. 

Montana 212 

Nebraska 212 

New Hampshire 214 

New Jersey 214 

New Mexico 218 

New York 218 

North Carolina 230 

North Dakota 230 

Ohio 232 

Oklahoma 236 

Oregon 236 

Pennsylvania 236 

Rhode Island 246 

South Carolina 248 

South Dakota 248 

Tennessee 248 

Texas 250 

Utah 250 

Vermont 252 

Virginia 252 

Washington 254 

West Virginia 254 

Wisconsin 254 

Wyoming 256 



Table IV. — Hospitals and Sanitariums. 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 
Florida 



Page. 
258 
258 
258 
260 
262 
266 
268 
268 
268 

Georgia 270 

Idaho 270 

Illinois 272 

Indiana 278 

Iowa 282 

Kansas 284 

Kentucky 286 

Louisiana 288 

Maine 288 

Maryland 290 

Massachusetts 292 

Michigan 300 

Minnesota 302 

Mississippi 306 

Missouri 308 



Page, 

Montana 310 

Nebraska 310 

New Hampshire 312 

New Jersey 314 

New Mexico 318 

New York 318 

North Carolina 334 

North Dakota 334 

Ohio 336 

Oklahoma 340 

Oregon 340 

Pennsylvania 342 

Rhode Island 352 

South Carolina 352 

South Dakota 352 

Tennessee 354 

Texas 354 

Utah 356 

Vermont 356 

Virginia 358 

Washington 360 

West Virginia 362 

Wisconsin 362 

Wyoming 364 



CONTENTS. 



Table V. — Dispensaries. 



rage. 
366 
366 
366 
366 
366 
366 
366 
366 
368 
368 
368 
370 
370 
370 
370 
370 
370 
372 

Michigan 372 

Minnesota 374 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Marjland 

Massachusetts 



Page. 

Missouri 374 

Montana 374 

Nebraska 374 

New Jersey 376 

New Mexico 376 

New York 376 

North Carolina 382 

Ohio 384 

Oregon 384 

Pennsylvania 384 

Rhode Island 396 

South Carolina 396 

South Dakota 396 

Tennessee 396 

Texas 396 

Virginia 396 

Washington 396 

West Virginia 398 

Wisconsin 398 



Table VI. — Institutions for the Blind and Deaf. 



Page. 
400 
400 
400 
400 
400 
400 
400 
400 
400 
400 
402 
402 
402 

Kentucky 402 

Louisiana 402 

Maine 402 

Maryland 402 

Massachusetts 402 

Michigan 404 

Minnesota 404 

Mississippi 404 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 



Page. 

Missouri 404 

Montana 404 

Nebraska 404 

New Jersey 494 

New Mexico 406 

New York 406 

North Carolina 408 

North Dakota 408 

Ohio 408 

Oklahoma 408 

Oregon 408 

Pennsylvania 408 

Rhode Island 410 

South Carolina 410 

South Dakota 410 

Tennessee 410 

Texas 410 

Utah 410 

Virginia 410 

West Virginia 410 

Wisconsin 410 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, 

BtJKEAU OF THE CeNSUS, 

Washington, D. C, December 18, WIS. 
Sir: 

I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on the benevolent institutions of the United States. 

This report contains statistics relatmg to institutions for the care of children, societies for the protection and 
care of children, homes for the care of adults or adults and children, hospitals, dispensaries, and institutions for 
the blmd and deaf, showmg the name, location, and supervisory agency of each institution for which data was 
secured and the class of inmates received by each, the movement of institutional population, the number of 
employees, and certam statistics pertainmg to equipment, financial transactions, and property valuations, the 
whole forming a handbook and directory for use m organized or individual philanthropy as complete as it has 
been possible to prepare. 

The report was prepared by Dr. Edwhi M. Bliss, under the supervision of Dr. Joseph A. HUl, expert special 
agent in charge of the special census on institutions and institutional population. The list of institutions included 
in the canvass was prepared by Mr. John Koren of Boston, formerly special agent of the Census Bureau. 
Very respectfully, 




Director of the Census. 



Hon. WiLLi.\.M C. Redfield, 

Secretary of Commerce. (7) 



o 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS 



(9) 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The Report on Benevolent Institutions is one of a 
series of reports, issued by the Bureau of the Census, 
on institutions for the relief and care of the dependent 
and delinquent classes. The other reports of the series 
cover almshouses, penal institutions, and institutions 
for the insane and feeble-minded, while this report in- 
cludes homes of various types for adults or children, 
organizations for the protection and care of children, 
and institutions for the sick or disabled and for the 
blind and deaf. The institutions covered by the other 
reports are mostly public in character, while those cov- 
ered by the present report are chiefly private. In the 
other reports the emphasis is on the inmates, the infor- 
mation furnished corresponding closely to that pro- 
vided in the census reports on population; the present 
report, on the other hand, emphasizes the tjrpe of insti- 
tution, giving in each case its location and describing 
its purpose, the class of inmates received, and its finan- 
cial status, and might thus be designated as a direc- 
tory of benevolent institutions. 

PREVIOUS REPORTS. 

Apparently the first effort to present a survey of the 
charities of the United States was made in connection 
with the Seventh Census taken in 1850. That report 
showed the number of paupers supported wholly or in 
part at pubhc expense within the year preceding, and 
the actual number in institutions on June 1, 1850, 
together with their nativity, and certain other par- 
ticulars. It was felt, however, that as this took no 
notice of those supported or reUeved by individual 
charities, it was not complete, and a special effort was 
made in 1854 to supply the lack. The returns, how- 
ever, were imsatisfactory, and were never presented 
infuU. 

The Eighth Census (1860) confined itself to a report 
on the iimaates of almshouses. 

The Ninth Census (1870) took the same course, on 
the ground that the "framers of the Census law did 
not have it in contemplation that the beneficiaries of 
hospitals, dispensaries, and asylmns distinctly for the 
blind, sick, or insane would be embraced in the 
returns," enforcing this conclusion by a reference to 
the eleemosynary character of educational institu- 
tions, due to their large endowments, which would 
necessitate their inclusion in any complete review of 
benevolences. 

The Tenth Census (1880) recognized the very close 
relations existing between institutions for public and 



private reUef of the poor, but the difficulty connected 
with a similar enumeration of the inmates of the two 
classes of institutions resulted in the decision to limit 
the investigation of private benevolences to institu- 
tions for homeless children. The report in regard to 
these was quite complete, giving the number of 
" Homeless children in almshouses, in families of out- 
door paupers, and in all institutions of a benevolent 
or beneficent character, including orphan asylums, 
homes for children, homes for the aged, friendless, 
etc., also those having no given habitation.'- These 
were also classified according to sex, race, and 
nativity. 

The Eleventh Census (1890) placed the statistics of 
benevolent institutions on the same basis as those for 
almshouses, prisons, etc., and called for, as nearly as 
possible, the same information as to their inmates as for 
the population at large. While the arrangement was 
by classes of institutions, probably as the most con- 
venient way of securing retiu-ns, the results were set 
forth by characteristics of inmates and the institutional 
element practically dropped out of sight, the emphasis 
being upon the inmates. 

The classification of institutions was as foUows: (1) 
Those for children, with an occasional adult element; 
(2) those for adults, with an occasional child element; 
(.3) hospitals and infirmaries; and (4) miscellaneous, 
such as homes for discharged prisoners and for mag- 
dalens, inebriate asj'lums, etc. 

The inmates were classified by sex, age, color, na- 
tivity and race, naturalization, legal residence, liter- 
acy, education, ability to speak English, marital con- 
dition, health (whether in good health, ill, insane, 
blind, deaf-mutes, idiots, crippled), occupations prior 
to admission to institutions, and cause of depend- 
ence. The classification of children in institutions was 
further extended to cover the questions of legitimacy, 
orphanage, abandonment, and institutional births. 
The statistics were arranged in a great variety of 
combinations, so as to make the presentation as com- 
plete as possible. It appeared, however, that the 
replies were by no means satisfactory, and although 
the percentage of error, in the view of the writer of the 
report, was not such as to invalidate conclusions, it was 
large enough to raise a question as to the real value 
of the investigation, in view of the labor and expense 
involved and the degree of coilipleteness attained. 

Under the law governing the Twelfth Census (1900), 
the enumeration of special classes could not be under- 

(11) 



12 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



taken until the census of population, vital statistics, 
agriculture, and manufactures had been completed. 
By that time the permanent Census Bureau had been 
established, with authority to conduct these investi- 
gations, and the reports on paupers, insane, feeble- 
minded, prisoners, and inmates of benevolent institu- 
tions, were made as for the year 1904. All except the 
last were conducted along the same lines that had been 
followed in previous censuses, classifying the inmates 
by age, sex, nativity, race, etc. 

For the report on Benevolent Institutions, however, 
an entirely different plan was adopted. The regular 
census enumerators were not available, the appoint- 
ment of special agents for a large number of small insti- 
tutions would have involved an expense out of pro- 
portion to the value of the results obtained, and it 
was decided to gather the information by correspond- 
ence with the institutions themselves. This method 
made it especially difficult to secure the type of in- 
formation set forth in the reports for the Eleventh 
Census. Comparatively few private institutions keep 
any records of race, nativity, literacy, etc. In many 
cases those in charge, while excellent superintendents, 
matrons, etc., are entirely unfitted for preparing a 
detailed report as to the inmates, and not infrequently 
seem to resent a request for such information. The 
result was that the report became a "Directory of 
Benevolent Institutions," with merely enough of sta- 
tistics to give an idea of the size of each particular 
home or hospital. The items covered included the 
name and location of the institution ; how it was super- 
vised and maintained; the year of establishment; 
its specific object; the number of inmates at the com- 
mencement and close of the year, and the number re- 
ceived during the year; the number of paid employees; 
the amounts received from public funds and from pay 
inmates; and the total annual cost of maintenance. 
In the tables for orphanages and homes there was a 
classification by sex, and the distinction between 
adults and children was recognized, but there was no 
effort to show age periods, so that the term "child" 
covered the period from infancy to majority, and an 
adult might be 18 or 70 years of age. Furthermore, 
the period covered by the financial statement was 
different from that covered by the record of inmates. 

THIRTEENTH CENSUS REPORT (1910). 

Period covered by the report. — The law providing for 
the Thirteenth Census reverted to the original plan 
and made the institutional census contemporaneous 
with the decennial census of population. Accordingly 
the period covered by the present report is the calendar 
year 1910. It appeared, however, in the case of a num- 
ber of institutions, that the fiscal or institutional year 
did not coincide with the calendar year, so that it was 
exceedmgly difficult to secure exact figm-es for the cal- 
endar year. In such cases, reports were accepted for 



the fiscal or institutional year when it closed in the 
early half of 1911, which was found to be sufficiently 
accurate for the pm-poso of the report. 

Scope of the report. — The scope of this report is essen- 
tially the same as that of the report for 1904, and is 
indicated by the classes of mstitutions included and 
the nature of the information furnished in regard to 
them. 

Cldsses of institutions included. — The institutions 
covered by the investigation may be classified under 
the following general heads: 

I. Institutions for the care of children. 

II. Societies for the protection and care of children. 

III. Homes for the care of adults, or adults and children. 

IV. Hospitals and sanitariums. 
V. Dispensaries. 

VI. Institutions for the blind and deaf. 

Certain changes from the report of 1904 should be 
noted. Day nurseries, included then with orphanages 
and children's homes, have been omitted; societies for 
the prevention of ci-uelty to children, children's aid 
societies, and other similar organizations have been 
brought together as a distinct class; dispensaries, 
formerly mcluded with hospitals, have been classed 
by themselves ; and the distinction between permanent 
and temporary homes for adults and children has been 
dropped and both classes have been united under the 
head of homes for the care of adults, or adults and 
children. 

Thii classification, while perhaps the best available, 
is not completely satisfactory. Many mstitutions 
might easily be placed in either of two classes; others 
have developed quite differently from their avowed 
purpose; and stUl others seem to fit into no class. 
There are foundling asylums and children's hospitals 
which might be mcluded imder either Class I or Class 
IV; homes for incurables, convalescents, and the like 
which might be included under either Class III or 
Class IV; societies included under Class II which are 
practically of the same type as institutions included 
under Class I. 

Confusion arises also from the difficulty of deter- 
minmg the line between adults and children; strictly, 
all minors are children, yet to include under Class I a 
rescue home merely because the inmates are under their 
majority is scarcely fitting. Accordingly, in general, 
the principal object of an institution has determined 
the class to which it was assigned. 

iVnother perplexhig problem arose in connection with 
the decision as to what are the distinctive charac- 
teristics of a "benevolent institution." The ordinary 
use of the term is sufficiently clear, even though an 
exact definition that is also inclusive is scarcely pos- 
sible. The report for 1890 made no attempt at defini- 
tion, merely calling attention to some of the incon- 
sistencies in its use. The report for 1904, after stating 
that an mstitution was considered benevolent "if sup- 



INTRODUCTION. 



13 



ported, wholly or in part, by public taxation, private 
endowment, or subscriptions, donations, and other 
forms of gift, for the benefit of the sick, aged, and 
needy," elaborated exceptions to such an mterpreta- 
tion, untn the criteria of admission to the list became 
more or less uidefinite. 

In the preparation of the present report the same 
difficulties were met, and it was deemed best not to 
follow any rigid rule, but to rely upon the best obtam- 
able testimony and to exercise judgment in each indi- 
vidual case. 

In general, it may be stated that the benevolent 
institutions included in this report are those for the 
benefit of the sick, the needy, and the dependent, 
exclusive of those covered by the special reports on 
paupers, the insane, and the feeble-minded. The 
great majority are conducted by private persons or 
corporations both with and without financial assist- 
ance, whether from public authorities or private bene- 
faction. Some are charitable in the sense that inmates 
are cared for free of all charge; others are benevolent 
rather than charitable, in that they provide succor 
and relief for persons who are not destitute, but whose 
means or circumstances are inadequate for the fuU 
provision for their need. In most cases the income, 
from whatever source received, is applied to the pur- 
poses of the institution. 

Information furnished. — The scope of the informa- 
tion furnished in this report has been determined 
largely by the fact that, as in 1904, the correspond- 
ence method of conducting the canvass was adopted. 
It was recognized as impracticable to expect the 
officials in charge of an orphanage, asylum, or hospital 
to undertake to furnish facts not provided in then- own 
records. Consequently only such questions were asked 
as would naturally be readily answered by those officers. 

The classification by sex has been extended to 
include all persons under the care of institutions, 
patients in hospitals or treated in dispensaries, nurses, 
agents, and other employees; and in the statistics for 
hospitals children under 15 years are shown separately. 
The financial reports have been elaborated to include, 
in addition to the items previously presented, the 
receipts from donations, the amount of invested funds, 
and the value of property; and inqunies have been 
made as to the date of incorporation, if incorporated, 
the admission of colored persons, the number of beds 
in hospitals, and the adoption of the cottage plan in 
the conduct of institutions for the care of children. 

Special features. — The most important new feature 
is the presentation of a new phase of activity involv- 
ing the enumeration of a distinct class of benevolent 
organizations. Up to 1904 the care of dependent 
children, of which a census investigation could legiti- 
mately take cognizance, was limited to that exercised 
in homes where they were resident inmates. The 
conception of a family home for each child as the ideal 



solution of the dependent-chUd problem had only 
recently become famihar, and comparatively little 
progress had been made in putting it into practice. 
The report for that year covered a number of chil- 
dren's aid societies, societies for the prevention of 
cruelty to children, and similar organizations, but only 
those which conducted homes with resident inmates. 
The succeeding years, however, witnessed a remarka- 
ble development along these fines. There was a large 
increase in the number of societies specially organized 
for the purpose of finding homes for children; institu- 
tions, orphanages, and homes added this to their hst 
of activities; and juvenile courts, pubhc officers, alms- 
houses, reformatories, and very nearly every kind 
of organization or institution that had deaUngs with 
children shared in the new impulse. In order to 
give to this development recognition in the present 
report, a special classification of "Societies for the 
protection and care of children" was made, and ques- 
tions as to the number placed in families were intro- 
duced into the schedules for institutions for the care 
of children. 

Another important feature of the report is the classi- 
fication of the inmates of institutions according to the 
cause for their admission. In the report for 1904 the 
institutions were described as for orphan, destitute, 
homeless, deUnquent, or other children; for aged, 
infirm, disabled, wayward adults; incurables, epilep- 
tics, etc. In this report the institutions are described 
m the same way, but in addition the number of inmates 
of these difl'erent classes is shown, so that a clearer idea 
of the institution is furnished; and there is a partial 
basis for a study of the conditions indicated by the 
facts. For inmates of institutions for the care of 
children there is a further classification according to 
the agencies through which they enter the institution. 

STATE LEGISLATION AND SUPERVISION. 

An important factor in the development of benevo- 
lent institutions is the changing attitude of the state 
toward all classes of dependents, manifest in the or- 
ganization of systems of supervision of charitable 
institutions, and the enactment of laws governing the 
treatment of dependents, especially children and 
dehnquents. Seldom does a year pass without the 
enactment by some state of elaborate statutes pro- 
viding for the better care of orphans and dependents, 
the establishment of juvenile courts, and the placing 
of all rehef institutions under the general supervision, 
and sometimes the authority, of a state board. One 
result has been a new emphasis upon the close relation 
between the different classes of dependents. In many 
states children are no longer allowed in almshouses, 
but must be provided for in benevolent institutions; 
and juvenile dehnquents, pending fuU trial, are cared 
for in detention homes, classed as benevolent institu- 
tions, and when committed by the courts are, except 



14 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



in cases of serious crime, intrusted to benevolent insti- 
tutions. Furthermore, the poor officers or other au- 
thorities charged with looking after the poor in many 
states are specially instructed to keep in constant 
communication with private institutions, not merely 
that private relief may assist pubUc rehef, but that 
the recipients of rehef may receive attention which 
the pubhc institution could scarcely give. 

State boards of charities. — Probably the most pow- 
erful influence in tills direction has been that exerted 
through the state boards of charities. Under various 
names and with differmg status these exercise a gen- 
eral supervision over the entire field of charity, often 
adding to it that of correction. They are generally 
charged with the duty of immediate inspection of in- 
stitutions with a view to the prevention of abuses and 
the adoption of the best methods, but in the later 
and more elaborate codes they are required to make 
careful study of the entire problem of the care of the 
"wards of the state." Originally their duties were 
simply supervisory and the members gave their serv- 
ices for the public good, although necessary office or 
traveling expenses were paid. Of late it is becoming 
the custom to recognize them as an integral part of 
the state government, and the members are salaried 
and give their entire time to the work. In the latter 
case the board generally has administrative as well as 
supervisory authority and is frequently termed a board 
of control. In many cases, a supervisory board has a 
salaried secretary who acts as an executive officer. 
The following list describes the situation in each state: 

Alabama No state board. Inspector of jails, alms- 
houses, cotton mills, and factories (sala- 
ried). 

Arizona Board of Control, supervisory and adminis- 
trative (salaried). 

Arkansas Board of Trustees for State Charitable Insti- 
tutions, administrative (unsalaried). 

California State Board of Charities and Corrections, 

supervisory (unsalaried). 

Colorado State Board of Charities and Corrections, 

supervisory only (unsalaried). 

Connecticut State Board of Charities, supervisory (un- 
salaried). 

Delaware Ho state board. 

District of Columbia. . .Board of Charities, supervisory (unsalaried). 

Florida Board of Commissioners of State Institu- 
tions, supervisory; 8tat3 executive officers 
(salaried). 

Georgia No state board. 

Idaho No state board. 

Illinois Board of Administration of State Charities 

(salaried). Charities Commission, super- 
visory (unsalaried). 

Indiana State Board of Charities, supervisory (un- 
salaried). 

Iowa Board of Control of State Institutions, ad- 
ministrative and supervisory (salaried). 

Kansas Board of Control of Sta,te Charitable Insti- 
tutions, administrative and supervisory 
(salaried). 

Kentucky State Board of Control of Charitable Insti- 
tutions, administrative and supervisory 
(salaried). 

Louisiana State Board of Charities and Corrections, 

supervisory (unsalaried). 

Maine No state board. 



Maryland Board of State Aid and Charities, supervis- 
ory (unsalaried). 

Massachusetts State Board of Charity, supervisory (un- 
salaried). 

Michigan Board of Corrections and Charities, super- 
visory (unsalaried). 

Minnesota State Board of Control, administrative and 

supervisory (salaried). 

Mississippi No state board. 

Missouri State Board of Charities and Corrections, 

supervisory (unsalaried). 

Montana State Board of Charities and Reform, super- 
visory (unsalaried). 

Nebraska State Board of Charities and Corrections, 

supervisory (unsalaried). 

Nevada No state board. 

New Hampshire State Board of Charities and Corrections, 

supervisory (unsalaried). 

New Jersey Commissioner of Charities and Corrections, 

supervisory (salaried). 

New Mexico No state board . 

New York State Board of Charities, supervisory (un- 
salaried). 

North Carolina Board of Public Charities, supervisory (un- 
salaried). 

North Dakota Board of Control of State Institutions, ad- 
ministrative and supervisory (salaried). 

Ohio Board of State Charities, supervisory (un- 
salaried). Ohio Board of Administration, 
administrative (salaried). 

Oklahoma ^ . State Commissioner of Charities and Cor- 
rections, supervisory (salaried). 

Oregon No state board. 

Peimsylvania Board of Public Charities, supervisory (un- 
salaried). 

Rhode Island Board of State Charities and Corrections, 

administrative and supervisory (unsal- 
aried). 

South Carolina No state board. 

South Dakota State Board of Charities and Corrections, 

administrative and supervisory (salaried). 

Tennessee Board of State Charities, supervisory (un- 
salaried). 

Texas No state board. 

Utah No state board. 

Vermont No state board, except for the insane. 

Virginia Board of Charities and Corrections, super- 
visory (unsalaried). 

Washington State Board of Control, administrative and 

supervisory (salaried). 

West Virginia State Board of Control, administrative and 

supervisory (salaried). 

Wisconsin State Board of Control, administrative and 

supervisory (salaried). 

Wyoming State Board of Charities and Reform, ad- 
ministrative and supervisory (all salaried 
executive officers of the state). 

As will be seen these boards in most cases include 
under their supervision poorhouses and general poor 
rehef, hospitals for the insane, reformatories, and not 
infrequently prisons, as well as what are generally 
regarded as more properly benevolent or charitable 
institutions, and tliis increasingly close interrelation 
of the different branches of their work will have an 
undoubted effect upon the development of distinctly 
charitable or benevolent work. That it has already 
had an influence is certain, though it is not as yet easy 
to de&ie, and any interpretation of the figures for 
county homes for dependents in such states as Ohio 
and Connecticut for rescue homes under the care of 
Sisters of the Good Shepherd and similar organizations 
all over the country, and for boards of guardians in 
Indiana, must take into consideration the increasing 
influence and activities of organized charity. 



GENERAL SUMMARIES. 



15 



GENERAL SUMMARIES OF STATISTICS OF BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS. 



The principal statistics of the benevolent institu- 
tions included in this report are summarized in Tables 

I to 16, inclusive. Tables 1 to 3 give the aggregate 
number of institutions, of inmates at the close of the 
year, and of persons received during the year; and the 
total income, expenditure, and value of property, for 
all classes of institutions; Tables 4 and 5 give a com- 
parative summary of such statistics in this report and 
in that for 1904, as are fairly comparable; Tables 6 to 

II show the number of institutions, of inmates at the 
close of the year, and of persons received during the 
year, in the diflferent classes of institutions ; and Tables 
12 to 16 present the total income, expenditures, and 
value of property of these classes of institutions. 

INSTITUTIONS, INMATES, AND FINANCES OF INSTI- 
TTJTIONS. 

A general summary of the statistics included in this 
report is given in Table 3. The first column of the 
table shows the entire number of institutions given in 
the general tables. Under each succeeding head is a 
column giving the number of institutions reporting 



that particular item, which differs very materially from 
the number in the first column. This is due to the 
exclusion from these columns (1) of all institutions 
which were not in operation during 1910, or on Decem- 
ber 31 of that year, and which consequently furnished 
no statistics, but which, for different reasons, it was 
deemed wise to include in the general tables; and (2) 
of those institutions which for any reason made no re- 
port of the particular item. This latter condition 
seems to have been due in some cases to the absence 
of the necessary records, in others to the fact that the 
item was not pertinent to the institution. Thus, dis- 
pensaries and a number of societies for the protection 
and care of children made no report of inmates at the 
close of the year, but did report the number of persons 
received under their care during the year. In addi- 
tion, the financial reports of a number of institutions 
are included in those from other institutions under 
whose supervision they are operated. This is espe- 
cially true of dispensaries and of some branch hospitals. 
The distribution of these various items by geo- 
graphic divisions is illustrated by the following table: 



Table 1 


PER CENT OF innTED STATES TOTAL: 1910. 


RANK IN 1910. 


DrVISION. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions. 


Inmates 

at close 

of the 

year. 


Persons 

received 

during 

the 

year. 


Receipts 

during 

the year. 


Pay- 
ments 
during 
the 
year. 


Value of 
property 

at close 
of the 
year. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions. 


Inmates 

at close 

of the 

year. 


Persons 

received 

during 

the 

year. 


Receipts 

during 

the year. 


Pay- 
ments 
during 
the 
year. 


Value of 
property 

at close 
of the 
year. 


United States 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 































12.1 
31.3 
19.5 
10.1 
10.7 
3.8 
3.9 
3.3 
5.4 


9.3 
34.8 
22.7 
10.1 
8.2 
3.2 
3.3 
2.2 
6.1 


9.1 
54.6 
15.1 
5.4 
6.0 
1.5 
2.4 
2.0 
3.9 


11.8 
39.0 
22.0 
8.4 
6.7 
2.0 
2.3 
2.5 
5.3 


11.5 
41.2 
18.5 
8.6 
7.2 
2.2 
2.3 
2.9 
5.6 


13.5 
49.5 
14.3 
6.0 
7.9 
1.8 
1.9 
1.7 
3.4 


3 

1 
2 
5 
4 
8 
7 
9 
6 


4 

1 

I 
5 

8 
7 
9 
6 


3 

1 
2 
5 

1 

6 


3 

1 
2 
4 
5 
9 
8 
7 
6 


3 
1 
2 
4 
5 
9 
8 
7 
6 


3 


Middle Atlantic. . 


1 


East North Central 


2 


West North Central . ... 


5 




4 


East South Central . . 


s 


West South Central 


7 


Mountain 


9 


Pacific 


6 







The relation borne by the various items to the 
population in general is illustrated by Table 2, which 
gives the rate per 100,000 of population for both the 
munber of inmates resident in the institutions at the 
close of the year and for the number of persons 
received into the institutions during tho year. 



Table 2 


kate per 100,000 of 
population: 1910. 


DIVISIOK. 


Number of 
inmates 

at close of 
the year. 


Number of 
persons 

received 
during 

the year. 


United States 


448 


5,872 






New England 


586 
743 
612 
358 
261 
156 
153 
348 
601 


7,483 
15 269 


Middle Atlantic 


East North Central 


4,482 


West North Central 


2 493 


South Atlantic 


2,658 


East South Central 


934 


West South Central 


1,482 


Mountain 


4,085 
5,052 


Pacific 





Fiu-ther Ught is shed upon the situation by the fol- 
lowing statement, giving tne distribution of institu- 
tions among the population in the different geographic 
divisions : 



United States One for every 17,007 inhabitants. 

New England One for every 10,019 inhabitants. 

Middle Atlantic One for every 11,409 inhabitants. 

Pacific One for every 14,357 inhabitants. 

Mountain One for every 14,963 inhabitants. 

East North Central One for every 17,299 inhabitants. 

South .^^tIantic One for every 21,098 inhabitants. 

West North Central One for every 21 ,275 inhabitants. 

East South Central One for every 41,478 inhabitants. 

West South Central One for every 41,831 inhabitants. 

The distribution among the population of the cost 
of conducting the benevolent institutions included in 
this report is indicated by the following statement 
showing by geographic divisions the amount expended 
for that purpose per capita of the general population: 



DIVISION. 


Amount. 

per 
capita. 


United States . . . 


SI. 21 






2.35 




1.95 




1.48 




1.21 




1.12 


West North Central 


.82 




.66 


East South Central 


.29 




.29 









16 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

GENERAL SUMMARY, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



DIVTSION OR STATE. 



United States... 

Geographic divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central.. 
West North Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central. . 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District ot Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virgiiua 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



Aggregate 
number 
of benev- 
olent in- 
stitutions 
reported 



5,408 



634 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 



56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 



800 
207 



310 

177 
•325 
136 
107 



123 
103 
159 
18 
17 
50 
72 



23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 



71 
32 

189 



NUMBER OF INMATES 
I.V INSTITUTIONS AT 
CLOSE OF THE 
YEAR.' 



Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting. 



4,420 



565 
,272 
912 
469 
465 
165 
177 
147 
248 



47 
58 
20 
308 
45 



632 
171 
469 



271 
147 

278 
118 
98 



112 
92 

128 
14 
13 
46 
64 



19 
104 
55 
81 
29 
54 
30 
64 
29 



63 
30 

155 



Number 
of in- 
mates 

reported. 



412,274 



38,463 
143,528 
93,582 
41,715 
33,964 
13,191 
13,463 
9,152 
25,216 



3,744 
2,573 
830 
20,989 
3,666 
6,661 



85,489 
16,036 
42,003 



29,687 
11,505 
30,282 
11,199 
10, 909 



8,639 
8,209 
12,018 
1,159 
1,420 
3,212 
7,058 



769 
8,062 
6,481 
6,359 
2,757 
3,466 
2,203 
3,113 

754 



5,840 
4,363 
1,763 
1,225 



1,376 

5,937 

803 

5,348 



957 

727 

221 

5,049 

1,152 

215 

740 

91 



5,269 
3,604 
16,343 



NUMBER OF PERSONS 
RECEIVED INTO IN- 
STITUTIONS DURING 
THE YEAR.' 



Number 
of insti- 
tutions 

reporting. 



588 
1,544 
929 
488 
510 
170 
172 
1.55 
259 



48 
56 
21 
328 
47 



734 

178 
632 



277 
138 
293 
124 
97 



116 
93 

141 
14 
14 
46 
64 



19 
126 
66 
83 
31 
56 
33 
71 
25 



66 
29 
164 



Number of 

persons 

reported. 



5,400,556 



490,390 
2, 949, 407 
818,001 
290,222 
324, 250 
78,556 
130, 205 
107,604 
211,801 



15,604 

8,255 

5,737 

362, 454 

37,940 

60,400 



2,013,854 
186,498 
749,115 



301,350 
49, 473 
273, 6li0 
129,628 
63,944 



79,568 

31,355 

128,180 

3,792 

4,808 

21,294 

21,225 



3,576 
129,299 
87,901 
41,616 
10, 675 
13,5.39 

6,279 
25,003 

6,362 



36,456 
19, 750 
9,794 
12,556 



12,340 
48,563 
3,209 
66,093 



22,994 
2.944 
2,T08 

29,540 
4,619 

37,929 

6,857 

13 



32,965 
57,308 
121,528 



RECEIPTS DURING THE 
YEAR. 



Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting. 



4,281 



558 
1,285 
902 
440 
451 
152 
150 
110 
227 



48 
47 
17 
317 
41 



648 
173 

464 



284 
141 
278 
113 
86 



113 
87 

120 
11 
13 
36 
60 



19 
109 
55 
75 
27 
52 
29 
63 
22 



51 
26 
ISO 



Amount 
reported. 



$118,379,859 



13,958,788 
46, 145, 265 
26,007,752 
9,939,318 
7,970,582 
2,354,675 
2, 720, 156 
2, 942, 457 
6, 280, 866 



944,074 
616,119 
266,887 

8,633,048 
913,684 

2, 684, 976 



28,216,055 
3,261,102 
14, 668, 108 



6,460,073 
3,052,626 
12,258,819 
2,353,269 
1,942,965 



2,756,097 

1,567,600 

2,985,574 

155, 840 

453,554 

630,013 

1,390,634 



149,415 

2,223,367 

1,830,404 

1,378,116 

414,254 

698, 759 

292,252 

810, 184 

173, 831 



999,487 
785,231 
275,183 
294,774 



484,087 

854,117 

210,755 

1,171,197 



374,361 
192,262 

35,880 

1,469,358 

345,948 

219, 067 

286,591 

19,000 



962, 212 

716,339 

4,602,315 



PAYMENTS DURING THE 
TEAR. 



Number 
of in-sti- 
tutions 

reporting. 



562 
1,297 
890 
434 
453 
158 
150 
119 
224 



46 
52 
16 
317 
43 



654 
173 

470 



282 
135 
277 
110 



112 

82 
120 
10 
13 
37 
60 



20 
108 
53 
77 
27 
52 
29 
63 
24 



50 
27 
147 



Amount 
reported. 



Jill, 498, 155 



12,836,444 
45,959,479 
20,570,840 
9,(»I,879 
8,057,084 
2, 439, 602 
2,614,625 
3,197,708 
6, 219, 894 



968, 769 

611,172 

245, 785 

8,058,753 

1,004,077 

2,047,888 



28,445,171 
3,571,404 
13,942,904 



6,360,646 
1,937,607 
7,956,899 
2,255,931 
2,059,757 



2,568,929 

1,590,994 

2,796,030 

141,766 

420, 159 

691,217 

1,392,778 



188,987 

2,280,022 

1,757,550 

1,435,991 

466, 824 

669, 062 

277, 928 

795,783 

185,537 



1,057,994 
769,000 
312,724 
299,884 



425,497 

892,696 

194, 677 

1,101,7.55 



628,221 
258,348 

34,831 

1,518,815 

346, 269 

207,023 

280,284 

23,917 



988,512 

7.35,983 

4,495,399 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF THE YEAR. 



Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting. 



506 
1,161 
798 
400 
410 
148 
135 
119 
194 



41 

47 

15 

293 

33 

77 



585 
149 
427 



252 
117 
252 
103 

74 



101 
81 

102 
10 
13 
38 
55 



43 
26 
125 



Amount 
reported. 



$643, 878, 141 



86,880,642 
318,478,758 
92, 135, 619 
38,900,536 
51,115,306 
11,497,418 
11,927,101 
10,-840,969 
22,095,792 



4,082,169 
3,950,775 
1,470,040 

62,010,787 
3,577,863 

11,795,008 



187,760,531 
13,806,200 
116,912,027 



34,665,751 
9,587,512 

30,470,428 
9,074,523 
8,337,405 



9,045,826 
6,260,436 
13,905,450 
722,786 
1,306,720 
2, 774, 155 
4,885,163 



963, n3 
15,223,085 
18,480,325 
6,72-1,997 
1,48S,578 
2,887,192 
1,563,980 
2,885,778 
894,658 



4,844,278 
4, 135, 674 
1,320,434 
1,197,032 



1,488,700 

5,449,243 

434,586 

4,554,572 

1,733,176 

523,983 

75,200 

5,713,176 

899,338 

462, 083 

1,374,013 

60,000 



3,419,733 
2,389,386 
16,286,673 



' Including children under care of institutions or societies. 



* Including patients treated in dispensaries. 



GENERAL SUMMARIES. 



17 



COMPARATIVE SUMMARY: 1910 AND 1904. 

The diffeiciiccs in j)lan botweeii the present report 
and that for 1904 make it difficult to present a fair 
comparison between the statistics for the two years. 
Day nurseries, reported in 1904, have been dropped from 
the list of institutions co^ ored, while societies for the 
protection and care of children have been added, and 
though the resulting change in the aggregate number 



of institutions is not great, the totals for inmates and, 
to an even greater extent, for persons received during 
the year are considerably increased. The inclusion, 
under the head of inmates at the close of the year, of 
persons not resident in institutions but under their care 
or protection, and the inclusion, under the head of per- 
sons received during the year, of patients treated in 
dispensaries also materially affect those totals. 



COMPAEATIVE SUMMARY, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910 AND 1904. 



Table 4 



DrVISION OR .ST.ITE. 



United States. 



Oeooeaphic divisions: 

New England 

Middle .Atlantic 

East North Central.. 
West North Central- 
South .\tlantic 

East South Central.. 
West South Central.. 

Mountain 

Pacific 



Nfw England: 

Maine 

New Ilampshire. . 

Vermont , 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



MniDLE Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania... 



East North Centkai,: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



■West North Central: 

*' Minnesota 

•' Iowa 

Y Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



SouTU Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

f-Jeorgia 

Florida 



East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

-\Iabama 

Mississippi 



^\ est South Centr.\l: 

-Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming... 

Colorado 

New Me.xico. 

-\rizona 

Utah 

Nevada 



Pacific: 

Washington. 

Oregon 

California 



TOTAL NtnUBER OF 
raSTITUTIONS. 



1910 



5,40S 



654 
1,693 
1,035 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 



56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 



SOO 
207 
6S6 



310 
177 
325 
136 
107 



12S 
103 
159 
18 
17 
50 
72 



23 

137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 



71 
32 

189 



1904 Increase. 



4,207 



548 
1,230 
841 
422 
467 
173 
172 
132 
222 



43 

50 

23 

305 

41 



1,201 



106 
463 
214 
125 
111 
30 
38 
44 
70 



6,i9 


141 


162 


45 


409 


277 


267 


43 


117 


60 


257 


68 


117 


19 


S3 


24 


86 


42 


83 


20 


140 


19 


14 


4 


13 


4 


36 


14 


50 


22 


Ifi 


7 


117 


20 


57 


15 


77 


21 


33 


1 


48 


15 


27 


11 


59 


22 


33 


21 


82 


7 


49 


8 


25 


11 


17 


4 


27 


9 


,56 


5 


13 


6 


76 


18 


23 


3 


7 


4 


6 


2 


.W 


13 


13 


14 


11 


6 


12 


2 


1 




47 


24 


22 


10 


163 


36 



NUMBER OF INMATES AT CLOSE OF THE 
YEAR.' 



1910 



412,274 



1901 



284,362 



38,463 
143,528 
93, 582 
41,715 
33,964 
13,191 
13,463 
9, 152 
25,216 



3,744 
2,573 
830 
20, 989 
3,666 
6,661 



85, 489 
16,036 
42,003 



29,687 
11,505 
30, 282 
11,199 
10,909 



8,639 
8,209 
12,018 
1,169 
1,420 
3,212 
7,058 



769 
8,062 
6,481 
6,369 
2,757 
3,466 
2,203 
3,113 

754 



5,840 
4,363 
1,763 
1,225 



1,375 
5,937 



957 
727 
221 
3,049 
1,152 
215 
740 
91 



5,269 
3,604 
16,343 



26,469 
98,835 
66, 636 
26,410 
23,404 

9,467 
10,095 

5,728 
17,418 



4,015 
1,653 
679 
13,958 
1,873 
4,291 



60,704 

8,043 

30,088 



25, 160 
8,199 

20,090 
5,884 
7,203 



4,013 
4,061 
9,110 
308 
508 
1,993 
6,417 



590 
5,571 
3,962 
6,192 

922 
2, 295 
1,206 
2,231 

445 



4,461 

3,234 

1,169 

603 



1,086 

4,309 

415 

4,285 



1,005 
232 
114 

2,843 
791 
169 
518 
56 



2,133 

1,086 

14, 199 



Increase. 



11,994 
44,693 
27, 046 
15, 305 
10, 560 
3,724 
3,368 
3,424 
7,798 



'271 
920 
161 
7,031 
1,793 
2,370 



24, 783 

7,993 

11,915 



4,527 
3,306 
10, 192 
5,315 
3,706 



4,626 

4,148 

2,908 

851 

912 

1,219 

641 



179 

2,491 

2,529 

167 

1,835 

1,171 

997 

882 

309 



1,379 

1,129 

594 

622 



1,62S 

388 

1,063 



248 
495 
107 
2,206 
361 



NUMBER OF PERSONS RECEIVED DimiNQ 
THE YEAR. 



1910 



5,400,556 



490,390 
2,949,467 
818, 061 
290, 222 
324, 250 
78, 566 
130, 205 
107,604 
211,801 



222 
35 



3, 136 
2,518 
2,144 



15,604 

8,255 

5,737 

362,454 

37, 940 

60,400 



2,013,854 
186,498 
749, 115 



301,350 
49, 473 
273,666 
129, 628 
63,944 



79,568 
31,356 
128, 180 
3,792 
4,808 
21,294 
21,225 



3,576 
129, 299 
87,901 
41,616 
10,675 
13, 539 

6,279 
25,003 

6,362 



36,456 
19, 750 
9,794 
12, 556 



1901 



2,040,372 



12,340 
48,563 
3,209 



22,994 
2,944 
2,708 

29,540 
4,619 

37, 929 

6,857 

13 



32.965 
57,308 
121,528 



281,339 
952, 100 
325, 413 
140, 776 
114,295 
36,240 
62,250 
31,457 
106,502 



7,643 
5,677 
3,275 
212,612 
10, 703 
41,629 



514,438 
247,393 
190,269 



129, 133 
17,976 

123,242 
30,345 
24, 717 



35, 710 

22,770 
58, 201 
2,295 
2,012 
8,123 
11,665 



1,198 

35,889 

37,953 

15, 498 

6,677 

4,926 

1,806 

8,355 

1,993 



14,991 
13, 170 
5,253 
2,826 



3,766 
22,005 

1,315 
25,164 



5,586 
1,557 
1,008 
15,058 
2,308 
2, 295 
3. 036 



14, 152 
37, 622 
54,728 



Increase. 



3, 360, 184 



209,051 

1,997,367 

492,648 

149,446 

209,955 

42,316 

77,956 

76, 147 

105,299 



7,961 

2,678 

2,462 

149,942 

27,237 

18,871 



1,499,416 
2 60, 895 
558,846 



172,217 
31,497 

160,424 
99,283 
39, 227 



43,858 
8,585 

69, 979 
1,497 
2,796 

13,171 
9,560 



2,378 
93,410 

49, 948 
26,118 
3,998 
8,613 
4,473 
16,648 
4,369 



21,465 
6,380 
4,541 
9,730 



8,574 
26, 568 

1,894 
40,929 



17,408 
1,387 
1,700 

14,482 
2,311 

35,634 

3,221 

4 



18,813 
19,686 
66,800 



' Includes, for 1910, cliildren under care of societies for oare of children, and under supervision outside of institutions. 
9531°— 13 2 



• Decrease. 



18 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



The financial items, as is explained on page 22, are 
so different that no attempt is made to present com- 
parative statistics, and Table 4, which gives figures for 
both 1910 and 1904, is thei'efore hmited to the aggre- 
gate number of institutions, the number of inmates 
at the close of the year, and the number of persons 
received during the year. Detailed statistics are 
presented in connection with the different classes of 
institutions. 

Keeping the above-mentioned facts in mind, the 
following table showing by geographic divisions the in- 
crease under the different heads, together with the 
percentage of increase, makes it evident, in regard both 
to the institutions and the number of persons under 
their care, that there has been a marked increase, either 
in the need of the communities or in the faciUties for 
meeting the need. It is certainly contrary to general 
observation that there has been any such increase in 
the need as would be indicated by an increase of 164.6 
per cent in the number of persons received into insti- 
tutions, so that the conclusion seems inevitable that 
the increased facihties for meeting the need are largely 
responsible for the increased number of persons re- 
lieved. 



Table 5 


increase: 1904-1910. 


DIVISION. 


Institutions. 


Inmates at close 
of the year. 


Persons received 
during the year. 




Num- 
ber. 


Per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 
cent. 


Number. 


Per 
cent. 


UuiTED States 


1,201 


28.5 


127,912 


44.9 


3,360,184 


164.6 


Middle Atlantic 


463 
214 
125 
111 
106 
70 
44 
38 
30 


37.6 
25.4 
29.6 
23.8 
19.3 
31.5 
33.3 
22.1 
17.3 


44,693 
27,046 
15,305 
10,560 
11,994 
7,798 
3,424 
3,368 
3,724 


45.2 
40.6 
57.9 
45.1 
45.3 
44.7 
59.1 
33.3 
39.4 


1,997.367 

492,648 

149,446 

209,955 

209,051 

105,299 

76, 147 

77,955 

42,316 


209.8 


East North Central 


151.4 


West North Central 


106.2 


South Atlant ic 


183.7 


New England 


74.3 


Pacific 


98.9 


Moijntain 


242.1 


West South Central 


149.1 


East South Central 


116.8 







DISTRIBUTION OF INSTITUTIONS, INMATES, AND 
PERSONS RECEIVED, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 

The entu-e number of institutions of all classes, in- 
cluding those which for any reason did not furnish 
statistics, but combining hospitals and dispensaries 
under the head of institutions for the care of the sick 
is given in Table 9, while, for purposes of comparison, 
the followmg table shows the number of institutions 
in each class and the per cent which this number 
represents of the total: 



Table 6 

CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 


BENEVOLENT INSTI- 
TUTIONS: 1910. 


Number. 


Per cent 
of total. 


All classes 


5,408 


100.0 








2,492 

1,435 

1,151 

205 

125 


46.1 


Tnatitntions for the care of children 


26.5 




21.3 








2.3 







Table 10, which gives a summary, by classes of 
institutions, of the number of inmates at the close of 
the year, covers only those actually resident in insti- 
tutions at the close of the year, and excludes those 
outside of institutions, though under their care or 
supervision, and patients treated in dispensaries. 

The following table gives the number of inmates 
in the different classes of institutions, together with 
the per cent distribution of the total number: 



Table 7 

CLASS OF INSTITUTIONS. 


INMATES IN 

BENEVOLENT 

INSTITUTIONS AT CLOSE 

OF THE YEAR: 1910. 




Number. 


Per cent 
of total. 




339,571 


100.0 






TTnmp.q for adults, nr adnlt.'i and rhildrp.n 


116,228 

111,514 

96,390 

15,439 


34.2 


Tn'jt.itntinTiR for thp parp nf phildroTi 


.32.8 


Tnqtit.iitions for thp sipt 


28.4 


Tnstitntinns fnr blind and dp.af 


4.6 







Table 11 gives the number of persons received into 
the various classes of institutions during the year as 
resident inmates, excluding patients treated in cUs- 
pensaries and those taken under their care by societies 
for the protection and care of children, or by homes 
for children. The following table gives the num- 
ber of inmates received in each class of institutions, 
together with the per cent distribution of the total 
number received : 



Table 8 

CLASS OF INSTITUTIONS, 


PERSONS RECEIVED IN 
BENEVOLENT INSTI- 
TUTIONS DUEINa THE 
TE.tR: 1910. 




Number. 


Per cent 
of total. 


XU classes 


2,960,538 


100.0 








1,953,309 

918, 752 

85,829 

2,648 


(i6. 




31.0 




2.9 


Tn^tifntinns fnr blind and dpaf 


0.1 







In connection with these tables it should be 
borne in mind that, as will be explained more fully in 
the text accompanying the descriptive tables on hos- 
pitals, page 46, the number both of mmates of hospi- 
tals and of persons received mto them includes a 
large number of persons who can not fairly, e-xcept 
perhaps in an indirect way, be considered as recipients 
of benevolence, beuig pay uunates who meet all regu- 
lar charges for treatment and who do not consiiler 
themselves as under any special obligations to the 
hospital authorities. In a somewhat similar man- 
ner the inmates of institutions for the blind and deaf 
are, for the most part, regarded m the same light 
as pupils m educational mstitutions which are sup- 
ported by the state. Keeping these conditions in 
miml it is noticeable that while the hospitals and 
dispensaries far outnumber the other classes, forming 
46.1 per cent of all the mstitutions reported, and also 
report a considerable majority of the number of per- 
sons received during the year (66.0 per cent of the 



GENERAL SUMMARIES. 



19 



total), in respect to number of inmates at the close of 
the year they have a much lower standing, reporting 
only 28.4 per cent of the total. 

As will bo seen from the descriptive text ui comiec- 
tion with the summary for homes for adults or 
adults and children, page 38, a considerable number 
of adults mcludcd m those tables can scarcely be 
regarded as recipients of benevolent relief or assistance 
in the usual sense of the term, while the children 
hicluded in that class may all legitimately be so 
regarded. It appears, therefore, that notwithstanding 



the comparatively small number of children received 
mto homes for the care of children, it is practically 
certain that children occupy first place, numerically, 
among the classes of persons receiving benevolent 
care. A full presentation of the situation in regard to 
children is given on page 26. 

It should be said that the small number of children 
received into institutions, as compared Avith the 
number of adults received, is due to the large and 
rapid movement of population in hospitals and in 
homes for the temporary care of adults. 



NUMBER OF INSTITUTIONS, BY CLASSES, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 9 


Total 
num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions. 


Insti- 
tu- 
tions 
for 
care 
of 
chil- 
dren. 


Soci- 
eties 

for 
pro- 
tec- 
tion 
and 
care 

of 
chU- 
dren. 


Homes 
for 

adults, 
or 

adults 
and 
chil- 
dren. 


INSTITUTIONS FOR 
CAEE OF THE SICK. 


Insti- 
tu- 
tions 
for 
blind 
and 
deaf. 


DH-ISION OR STATE. 


Total 
num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions. 


Insti- 
tu- 
tions 
for 
care 
of 
chil- 
dren. 


Soci- 
eties 
for 
pro- 
tec- 
tion 
and 
care 
of 
chil- 
dren. 


Homes 

for 
adults, 

or 
adults 
and 
chil- 
dren. 


institutions FOR 
CAEE OF THE SICK. 


Insti- 


DIVISION OK STATE. 


Total. 


Hospi- 
tals 
and 
sani- 
tari- 
ums. 


Dis- 
pen- 

sa- 
ries. 


Total. 


Hospi- 
tals 
and 
sani- 
tari- 
ums. 


Dis- 
pen- 
sa- 
ries. 


tu- 
tions 

for 
blind 
and 
deaf. 


United States 


5.408 


1,151 


205 


1,435 


2,492 


1,918 


574 


125 


South Atlantic: 


23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 

89 
57 
36 
21 

36 
61 
19 
94 

26 
11 

8 
72 
27 
17 
14 

1 

71 
32 

189 


5 
36 
14 
32 

9 
17 
10 
22 

7 

25 
15 
8 
7 

9 
24 

5 
20 

3 
2 
1 
14 
2 
2 
3 
1 

14 

6 

56 


1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
...... 

2 
2 
2 

1 

6 

1 
1 

""2 

1 


9 
31 

26 
27 

5 
10 
14 
26 

6 

31 
17 
11 
2 

8 
19 

4 
24 

4 
1 

1 
9 
1 
2 
3 


8 
63 
29 
36 
18 
34 
12 
31 
17 

29 
20 
12 
10 

16 
16 
6 
41 

17 
6 
6 
46 
22 
13 
7 


5 
43 
16 
29 
16 
31 

9 
27 
17 

25 
16 
11 
10 

15 

12 

6 

37 

16 

6 

6 

45 

19 

12 

7 


3 
20 
13 

7 
2 
3 
3 

4 

4 
4 
1 

1 

4 

....„ 

1 




Geogeaphic DmsioNS: 


654 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 


118 
309 
260 
95 
152 
55 
58 
28 
76 


18 
65 
63 
20 
10 
6 
9 
5 
9 


228 
445 
266 
126 
154 
61 
55 
21 
79 


277 
842 
444 
290 
248 
71 
79 
117 
124 


232 
500 
380 
256 
193 
62 
70 

ni 

114 


45 

342 

64 

34 

55 

9 

9 

6 

10 


13 
32 
22 

16 
14 
10 
9 
5 
4 


Maryland 


5 


New England 

Middle Atlantic 


District of Columbia.. 


2 
I 


East North Central... 
West North Central. . 

South Atlantic 

East South Central... 


West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 


1 
1 
1 
2 


West South Central.. 


Florida 


1 


Mountain 


East South Central: 




Pacific 








3 
3 


New England: 


56 
62 
24 
300 
56 
96 

800 
207 
686 

310 
177 
325 
136 
107 

128 
103 
159 
18 
17 
50 
72 


12 
17 
4 
49 
13 
23 

154 
50 
105 

106 
47 
64 
24 
19 

16 
18 
32 
2 
2 
9 
16 


2 
3 

■■'io' 

1 
2 

28 
12 
25 

16 
33 
5 
3 
6 

7 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 


19 
16 
9 
130 
19 
35 

221 
59 
165 

83 
40 
88 
31 
24 

29 
27 
37 
2 
2 
14 
15 


22 
26 
11 
163 
22 
33 

379 

83 

380 

100 
55 

162 
74 
53 

74 
54 
81 
11 
10 
24 
36 


21 
26 
11 
129 
17 
28 

253 
63 

184 

81 
51 
132 
66 
50 

69 
52 
57 
11 
9 
23 
35 


1 


1 


Alabama 


Maine 






New Hampsh ire 


West South Central: 




Vermont 








Massachusetts 


34 
5 
5 

126 
20 
196 

19 

4 

30 

8 

3 

5 

2 

24 

...... 

1 

1 


8 
1 
3 

18 
3 
11 

5 
2 
6 
4 
5 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Tiniii<!iaTin 


2 


Rhode Island 




2 


Connecticut 


Texas 


3 

1 
1 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 


Mountain: 
Montana 


New Jersey 




Peimsylvania 


Wyoming 


East North Central; 


Colorado 


1 
3 
1 


1 


Ohio 




1 


Indiana 




Illinois 


Utah 


1 


Michigan 




Wisconsin 


Pacific: 


1 
1 
7 


19 
11 
49 


37 
13 

74 


36 
12 
66 


1 
1 
8 




West Noeth Centeal: 




Minnftsota 


Oregon 


1 
3 


Iowa 


Cnlifomia 






North Dakota 

South Dakota 




Kansas 









20 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



NUMBER OF INMATES PRESENT IN INSTITUTIONS AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR 

DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



TRble lO 


Total 
number of 
inmates. 


INSTITUTIONS FOR 
CARE OF CHILDItEN'. 


; HOMES FOR ADULTS, 

OH ADULTS AND 

CHILDREN. 


i HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 

1 


INSTITUTIONS FOR 
BLIND AND DEAF. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Numl)er 
of insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 


Number of 
inmates. 


Number 
1 of insti- 
j tutions 
1 report- 
' ing. 


Number of 
inmates. 


1 

Number 
of iii.sti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 


Number of 
inmates. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 


Number of 
inmates. 


United States 


339,571 


1,077 


111,514 


1,358 


116,228 


1,716 


96,390 


121 


15,439 




Geographic divisions: 

New England 


31,143 
121,061 
74,974 
31, 766 
27,009 
11,496 
12,788 
8,270 
20,464 


110 
291 
248 
93 
139 
50 
53 
24 
69 


9,023 
44,963 
23,597 
7,721 
10, 107 
2,979 
4,136 
2,166 
6,822 


219 
429 
254 
121 
139 
53 
51 
17 
75 


10,357 
35,362 
30,538 
13,092 
9,553 
5,061 
3,781 
1,514 
7,970 


209 

i 469 

347 

223 

165 

51 

59 

98 

95 


10,643 
36,789 
17,797 
9,908 
6,311 
2,206 
3,265 
4,112 
5,359 


13 
32 
21 
16 
13 
8 
9 
6 
4 


1 120 


Middle Atlantic 


3,947 
3,042 
2,045 
1 638 


East North Central . . ... 


West North Central 


South Atlantic. 


East South Central 


l'250 


West South Central. . 


1 606 


MniiTitflin . . . , 


478 




313 






New England: 
Maine 


3,495 
1,915 
827 
16,573 
2,684 
5,649 

77,194 
10, 829 
33,038 

25,472 
8,609 

25,729 
7,257 
7,907 

6,919 
5,673 
9,595 
459 
851 
2,729 
5, .540 

687 
6,829 
4,702 
5,516 
1,318 
3,041 
1,869 
3,008 

639 

4,479 
4,122 
1,670 
1,225 

1,366 
5,364 

777 
5,281 

954 
437 
221 
4,638 
974 
215 
740 
91 

3,454 
2.266 
14,744 


11 

17 
2 
48 
11 
21 

144 
45 
102 

100 
44 

63 
23 
18 

16 
18 
31 
2 
2 
9 
15 

5 
33 
14 
27 

8 
16 
10 
20 

6 

21 
14 

8 
7 

7 
24 

4 
18 

2 
2 
1 
12 
2 
1 
3 
1 

10 
6 

53 


853 
1,125 

113 
4,069 

913 
1,950 

30,247 
3,365 
11,351 

8,479 
2,600 
9,047 
1,868 
1,603 

1,569 

1,667 

2,865 

121 

78 

646 

775 

309 
2,493 
1,063 
1,243 

407 
1,698 
1,270 
1,431 

193 

930 
813 
603 
633 

243 

2,534 

95 

1,264 

224 

57 

13 

1,329 

148 
41 

263 
91 

639 

563 

5,620 


16 
16 

8 
127 
17 
35 

212 

58 
159 

80 
37 
83 
30 
24 

28 
26 
36 
2 
2 
13 
14 

9 
28 
23 
25 

4 
10 
13 
22 

5 

26 
16 
10 

1 

7 
IS 

4 
22 

4 
1 

1 
9 


1,947 
371 
432 

5,070 
788 

1,749 

21,692 
3,806 
9,864 

9,669 
4,097 
9,916 
2,725 
4,131 

2,142 

1,761 

2,978 

148 

548 

945 

3,570 

241 
1,831 

2,528 
3,181 
246 
426 
255 
708 
137 

2, 165 

2,326 

390 

180 

371 
1,279 

305 
1,826 

207 

177 

53 

948 


18 
23 
10 
116 
15 
27 

241 

54 
174 

74 
47 
122 
58 
46 

62 
44 
53 
7 
6 
21 
30 

5 
37 
15 
26 
15 
26 

5 
20 
16 

22 
13 

7 
9 

11 

12 

5 

31 

14 
5 
5 
41 
19 
8 
6 


584 
419 
282 

6,770 
909 

1,679 

22,998 
3,381 
10, 410 

6,550 
1,440 
5,946 
2,114 
1,747 

2,839 
1,884 
3,224 
87 
112 
891 
871 

137 
2,207 
977 
1,018 
473 
550 
141 
602 
206 

923 
500 
371 
412 

371 

1.372 

94 

1,428 

440 
153 
155 
2,171 
792 
174 
227 


1 


111 


Mpw "Hfimpshirft 










Massachusetts . . . 


8 
1 
3 

18 
3 
11 

5 
2 
5 
4 
5 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


664 




74 


Connecticut . . 


271 


Middle Atl.vntic: 

New York 


2,257 




277 




1,413 


E.vsT North Central: 


774 


Indiana ... 


472 


Illinois 


820 




550 




426 




369 




361 




528 




103 


South Dakota 


113 


Nebraska , , 


247 


Kansas 


324 


South Atlantic: 






4 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

2 
3 
3 


298 


District of Columbia 


134 


Virginia 


74 




192 




367 




203 


Georgia 


267 


Florida 


103 


East South Central: 

Kentucky 


461 




483 


Alabama 


306 






Arkansas 


2 
2 
2 
3 

1 
1 


381 




179 


Oklahoma 


283 




763 




83 




SO 








1 

1 


190 




34 











Utah 


2 


129 


1 


121 






Pacific: 


19 
10 
46 


1,445 

704 

6,821 


33 
12 
50 


1,370 

973 

3,016 






Oregon 


1 
3 


26 
287 







GENERAL SUMMARIES. 



21 



NITMBER OF PERSONS RECEIVED INTO INSTITUTIONS DURING THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR 

DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table H 


Total num- 
ber of persons 
received. 


INSTITUTIONS FOR 
CARE OF CHILDREN. 


HOMES FOR ADULTS , OR 
ADULTS AND CBaDREN. 


HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 


1N.ST1TUTI0NS FOR 
BLIND AND DEAF. 


DIVISION OR ST.VTE. 


Number 
of institu- 
tions re- 
porting. 


Number of 
persons 
received. 


Number 
of institu- 
tions re- 
porting. 


Number of 
persons 
received. 


Number 
of institu- 
tions re- 
porting. 


Number of 
persons 
received. 


Number 
of institu- 
tions re- 
porting. 


Number 
of persons 
received. 


United St.ites 


2,960,538 


1,065 


85,829 


1,302 


918,752 


1,829 


1,953,309 


Ill 


2,648 


Geographic division.s: 


314,742 

1,239,399 

622, 246 

212,615 

185,081 

66,477 

79, 297 

67,791 

182,890 


112 

287 
246 
90 
138 
47 
49 
27 
69 


8,066 
36,873 
18,712 
7,681 
3,8,83 
1,456 
2,360 
2,689 
6,309 


198 

420 

244 

116 

132 

63 

60 

18 

71 


82,049 

514,466 

208,430 

23,834 

23,126 

7,035 

2,565 

1,773 

55,475 


226 
491 
368 
239 
183 
55 
69 
101 
107 


224,432 

688,346 

394,687 

180,891 

167, 652 

47,779 

74,141 

63,343 

122,038 


13 
28 
17 
16 
12 
8 
8 

I 


195 


Middle Atlantic 


714 




417 


West North Central 


309 


Soutli Atlantic. . 


421 


East SoiiUi Central 


207 




231 




86 


Pacific . . 


68 






New England: 

Maine 


14,392 

8,255 
5,737 
215,383 
19.363 
51,612 

771, 175 
128,836 
339,388 

245,111 
.37,777 
158,511 
122,393 
58, 454 

60,747 
29,329 
77,706 
3,792 
4,808 
15,514 
20,719 

2,195 
47,569 
58,350 
24,818 
10,023 
11,006 

5,000 
19,768 

6,362 

20,813 
1.5,614 
7,494 
12, .566 

11,751 
23,695 
.3,209 
40,742 

21,058 
2,944 
2,708 

28,340 

3,719 

2, 162 

6,867 

13 

32,325 
.55,311 
95, 224 


12 
17 
2 
48 
11 
22 

143 
43 
101 

102 
45 
58 
24 
17 

16 
17 
29 
1 
2 
9 
16 

5 
36 
14 
27 

8 
14 
10 
21 

4 

20 
13 
8 
6 

6 
21 

4 
18 

3 
2 
1 
13 
2 
2 
3 
1 

11 

5 

53 


2il8 
625 
68 
5,632 
724 
819 

26,465 
5,131 
4,277 

6,996 
1,277 
7,348 
1,951 
1,141 

1,194 

1,182 
3,677 
66 
106 
642 
716 

92 
1,310 
503 
309 
349 
388 
232 
604 

96 

526 
.595 
198 
137 

179 

1,352 

102 

727 

207 
249 

13 
1,724 

74 

83 
226 

13 

1,069 
414 

3, 826 


13 
14 
8 
118 
16 
30 

213 
66 
161 

77 
38 
79 
28 
22 

29 
24 
33 
2 
2 
12 
14 

7 
30 
22 
23 

4 

9 
12 
21 

4 

27 
15 
9 
2 

7 
17 

4 
22 

4 
1 

I 


1,170 

91 

126 

55,861 

902 

23,909 

347,207 
55, 121 
112,138 

150,696 
10,904 
24,872 
2,041 
19,917 

8,386 
892 
10,675 
144 
668 
482 

2,687 

122 

4,978 

8,763 

6,363 

245 

303 

303 

2,003 

45 

4,943 

1,374 

617 

101 

298 

948 

188 

1,131 

173 

43 

12 

1,441 


21 
25 
11 
125 
16 
28 

250 
60 
181 

78 
49 
128 
63 
50 

65 
49 
55 
9 
8 
22 
31 

5 
43 
16 
26 
16 
29 

8 
24 
16 

25 
15 

7 

13 

11 

4 

31 

16 
6 
5 

41 

17 
9 

7 


12,994 
7,539 
5,653 
153,778 
17,724 
26,844 

397,078 
68,631 
222,737 

87,360 
25,606 
126,198 
118,333 
37, MX) 

61,122 
27,209 
63,248 
3,664 
4,116 
14,361 
17,271 

1,981 
41,238 
49,057 
18,121 

9, 406 
10, 251 

4,436 
16,960 

6,212 

16,283 
13,667 
6,611 
12,318 

11,221 

21,275 

2,878 

38,767 

20,669 
2,645 
2,6.S3 

25, 145 
3,627 
2,069 
6,505 


1 


20 














8 
1 
3 

14 
3 
11 

3 
2 
4 
3 
5 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


122 


Rtiode Island . 


13 




40 


Middle Atlantic: 


425 


New Jersey. . 


53 




236 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


70 


Indiana 


90 


Illinois . . . ... 


93 




68 




96 


West North Central: 


45 


Iowa 


46 




106 


North Dakota ... 


19 




18 


Nebraska . . 


29 




46 


Delaware. 






4 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
2 

1 

2 

3 
3 


43 




27 




25 




23 


North Carolina. . . .... 


64 


South Carolina 


29 


Georgia 


201 


Florida 


9 


East South Central: 


61 


Tennes.see 


78 


.Vlabama . 


68 






West South Central: 


2 

1 
2 
3 

1 
1 


53 


Louisiana 


20 


Oklahoma 


41 




117 


Mount.un: 

Montana 


9 


Idaho 


7 






Colorado 


1 


30 




18 












3 


104 


1 


22 






Pacific: 


19 
10 

1 42 

1 


1,365 
41.107 
13.003 


11 

60 


29,891 
13,814 
78,333 








i 

3 


6 




62 







22 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



DISTBIBXITION OF FINANCES OF INSTITUTIONS, BY 
CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 

The schedules sent out to the uistitutions called 
for financial information as follows: (1) Receipts from 
state, county, or municipal appropriations, from 
mvcsted funds, from donations, from care of inmates, 
and from other sources; (2) expenditures for general 
rumiing expenses, and for permanent improvements; 
and (3) value of property at close of year, including 
land, buOdmgs and apparatus, antl invested funds. 

Infonyiation furnished. — From the returns it became 
clear that it would be unpossible to obtain the deshed 
information, at least in detail. Some institutions 
evidently did not keep the necessary financial records, 
others objected to making public their private finances. 
This latter difficulty was overcome in some instances 
by including the figures in the summary tables where 
the identity of the institution was not disclosed and 
not presenting them in the detailed general tables. 
It became apparent also that Mmitations of space for 
the tables necessitated some consolidation. 

Tables 14, 15, and 16, on pages 23, 24, and 25, show, 
by geographic divisions and states, the income, expendi- 
tures, and value of property reported by the different 
classes of institutions, together with the number of 
institutions making a report as to each item. In each 
case the figures cover all the varied sources of uicome, 
the different forms of expenditure, and the different 
classes of property. 

The foUowuig table shows the distribution of the 
tln-ee main financial items among the different classes 
of uistitutions: 



Tahle 13 



CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 



KECEIPTS: 1910. 



All classes 

Hospitals 

Homes far adults, or 

adults and children. . 
IiLstitutions for the care 

of children 

Institutions for blind 

and deaf 

Societies for protection 

and care of children. . 
Dispensaries 



Per 

cent 

of 

total. 



8118, 379, S59 100.0 



66,213,435 

24,203,10" 

19,140,342 

5,650,380 

2,102,892 
1,069,613 



65.9 

20.4 

16.2 

4.8 

1 

0.9 



payments: 1910. 



$111,498,1.55 



61,330,047 

23,720,381 

17,381,486 

5,464,020 

2,009,081 
1,593,140 



rer 
cent 

of 
total. 



100.0 



55.0 

21.3 

15.6 

4.9 

1 

1.4 



VALUE OF 

property: 1910. 



$6-13,878,141 



306,021,539 

158,318,121 

133,931,551 

33, 159, 771 

6, 727, 107 
5,720,052 



Per 
cent 

of 
total. 



100.0 



47.5 

24.6 

20.8 

5.2 

1.0 
0.9 



In similar manner. Table 13 gives the average 
income, expenditures, and value of property for the 
different classes. 

Significance of figures reported. — The fuU significance 
of these figures, of course, depends upon the relative 
importance of the different classes of income, expentli- 
ture, and property, the amount received from pay m- 
mates, from public (federal, state, etc.) appropriations, 
from invested funds, etc., respectively. This is shown 



in subsequent tables, pages 73 to 78, and it is sufficient 
here to call attention to a few items of special signifi- 
cance. The relatively high rank of institutions for 
the bUnd and deaf in the fuiancial items, as compared 
with their rank in number of uistitutions and of in- 
mates, is due cliiefly to the fact that the great majority 
of them are state institutions, then expenditures bemg 
on a scale commensurate with this fact. Hospitals 
share in the same source of mcome, although theii' 
prmcipal source is the amount received from pay m- 
mates. Their property also includes a large amount 
of invested funds or endowments. Among the homes 
for adults and children are the large soldiers' homes 
conducted by the federal and state governments, which 
raise the totals and averages for this class of uistitu- 
tions. On the other hand, as already stated, a consid- 
erable number of dispensaries own no property apart 
from the hospitals under whose auspices they are con- 
ducted, and frequently their mcome and expenditures 
are covered by the hospital statements. A similar 
situation exists in regard to societies for the protection 
and care of children. 



Table 13 



CLASS OF institution. 



All classes 

Institutions for the care of children 

Societies for tlie protection and care of children 

Homes for adults, or adults and children 

Hospitals 

Dispensaries 

Institutions for blind and deaf 



average per institution 
reporting: 1910. 



Receipts. 



$27,652 



19,004 
12, 744 
18,830 
43,446 
5,942 
50,904 



Pay- 
ments. 



$26,008 



17,278 
12,326 
18, 107 
40, 697 
8,341 
49,673 



Value of 
property. 



$106,333 



127,882 
83,051 

146,855 

216,270 
48,068 

312,828 



The items that enter into these financial statistics 
are of wider scope than those included in the report 
for 1904, so that comparison between the two reports 
is difficult. In 1904 the items called for were "Annual 
subsidy from public funds," "Receipts from pay in- 
mates," and "Cost of maintenance." As will be set 
forth in fuller detail m connection with Tables 64-69, 
pages 73-78, these do not appear to correspond with 
the items covered by the present report. It was in- 
tended to cover the item "Cost of mamtenance" by 
the question calling for expenditures for general run- 
ning expenses. As a matter of fact, the average "Cost 
of maintenance" in 1904 was $13,211, while the aver- 
age total expenditui'es in 1910, as above, were $26,008, 
and the average runnmg expenses were $22,220. An 
average increase of $9,011 per institution in sLx years 
seems so unlikely as to render mevitable the con- 
clusion that the elements entermg into the two reports 
were so different as to make comparison impossible. 
The situation is similar in regard to the receipts from 
public funds and from pay inmates. 



GENERAL SUMMARIES. 23 

RECEIPTS OF INSTITUTIONS DURING THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910, 



Table 14 



DIVISION OR STATE. 



United States., 



Total 
income 
reported. 



$118,379,859 



Geogkaphic divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. . 
West North Cenlral. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central.. 
West South Central. . 

Mountain 

Pacific 



13, 95S, 788 
46,145,265 
26,067,752 
9,939,318 
7, 970, 582 
2,354,675 
2, 720, 150 
2,942,457 
6,280,866 



New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire. . 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut , 



Middle .\tlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania. . . 



East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico. 

.\rizona 

Utah , 

Nevada 



Pacific: 

Washlng;ton. 

Oregon 

Calitomia.... 



944,074 
516,119 
266,887 

8,633,048 
913, 684 

2,684,976 



28,216,055 
3,261,102 
14,668,108 



6,460,073 
3,052,626 
12,258,819 
2,353,269 
1,942,965 



2, 756, 097 

1,567,600 

2,985,574 

165.846 

453, 554 

6.30,013 

1,390,634 



149, 415 

2,223,367 

1,8:30,404 

1,378.116 

414,254 

698, 759 

292, 252 

810, 184 

173,831 



999, 487 
7.85,231 
275, 183 
294, 774 



484,087 

854,117 

210,755 

1, 171, 197 



374,361 

192, 262 

35,880 

1,469,358 

345,948 

219,057 

286, 591 

19,000 



962, 212 

716,339 

4,602,315 



IN.STITUTIONS FOR 
CARE OF CUILDREN. 



Num- 
ber of 
institu 
tions 
report- 
ing. 



102 
274 
235 
82 
132 
45 
45 
24 
65 



1.35 
41 

98 



Receipts 
reported. 



819,140,342 



1,324,260 
10,213,100 

3,193,354 
977,349 

1,282,124 
441,856 
429, 812 
312,207 
966,280 



83,211 
99, 936 
IS, 673 
660, 220 
119,024 
353, 196 



5,691,435 

444,816 

4,076,849 



382, 154 
972, 764 
176, 170 
263, 370 



242,230 
2.57,113 
300, 440 



83,640 
83,942 



45,921 
330, 132 
134,973 
209. 344 

43,091 
164, 482 
149, 431 
191,531 

13,219 



186, 362 
79, 370 
66, 577 

109, 747 



61,886 
208, 751 

20,231 
138, 944 



62,067 
39,842 



158,292 

2,600 

7,664 

22, 742 

19,000 



72,929 

45,816 

847.535 



SOCIETIES 

FOR PROTECTION 

AND CARE OF 

CHILDREN. 



Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties 
report- 
ing. 



165 



$2, 102, 892 



Receipts 
reported. 



308,549 

974, 734 

252,015 

178, 599 

138, 193 

9,564 

19, 128 

85,751 

136, 359 



4,465 
1,421 



240,313 
17, 149 
45,201 



635, 592 
101,517 
237,625 



45,088 
39, 458 
99,909 
33, 293 
34, 207 



36, 461 
47, 733 
33, 586 
14, 544 
14, 152 
10,326 
21, 797 



1,158 
21,966 
72,928 
13,938 
8,492 
7,847 
4,665 



,199 



2,848 
6,716 



3,150 



6,132 
9,846 



13,637 
49,300 



1 12,314 
10,500 



31,811 
14,201 
90,347 



HOMES FOB 

ADULTS, OR ADULTS 
.VND CHILDREN. 



Num- 
ber Of 
institu- 
tions 
report- 
ing. 



1,297 



207 
416 
247 
113 
133 
50 
45 
17 



17 
13 
5 
122 
16 
34 



206 
57 
153 



Receipts 
reported. 



824, 203, 197 



3,043,209 

8,090,785 

5,269,006 

2, 289, 926 

2,156,093 

776,651 

587, 506 

406,075 

1,683,946 



450, 761 
119,838 
52, 629 
1,735,989 
206, 750 
477,242 



5,417,330 

813,250 

1,860,205 



1, 559, 283 
673, 678 

1,886. .562 
445,706 
703,777 



326, 162 
301,333 
522, 434 
32, 992 
258, .585 
221,421 
626,999 



39,722 

289,894 

911,393 

655,294 

12, 131 

74,983 

27,518 

124,299 

20,859 



281,665 

387,260 

60,320 

47, 406 



63,954 
106,876 

72, 435 
344,241 



49,576 

31,000 

14.919 

299,312 



223,052 

112,171 

1, 248, 723 



HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 



Num- 
ber of 

institu- 
tions 

report- 
ing. 



1,524 



195 
444 
322 
194 
145 
42 
41 
64 
77 



16 
21 
10 
111 
12 
25 



216 
56 
172 



43 
113 
54 
36 



Receipts 
reported. 



S66,213,435 



8,642,451 

24,725,505 

15,890,287 

5, 667, 254 

3, 946, 431 

794,627 

1,205,427 

1,903,875 

3,437,578 



381,037 
294, 924 
195,585 

5,530,390 
538,580 

1, 701, 935 



15,039,231 
1,836,565 
7,849,709 



3,ftS3,295 
1, 777, 203 
8, 752, 227 
1,474.397 
803, 165 



1,985,310 
846,526 

1,864,073 

59, 490 

121,401 

227, 126 

563, 328 



52,614 
1,526,938 
604, 482 
475, 451 
288,590 
364, 630 
110, 207 
410. 965 
112.554 



408,912 

215,228 

70, 486 

100,001 



191,951 
499, 278 
31,957 
482,241 



201,281 
47,120 
20,961 
900,450 
320,089 
211,393 
202,581 



634,420 

533,039 

2,270,119 



DISPENSABIES. 



Num- 
ber of 
institu- 
tions 
report- 
ing. 



Receipts 
reported. 



$1,069,613 



103, 107 

408, 171 

307,908 

133,479 

56,927 

10, 893 

16, 462 

200 

32, 466 



90,576 
1,181 
10, 550 



313, 124 
17,238 
77,809 



109,395 

29,019 

156, 167 

4,881 

8,446 



11,790 

16, 750 

103,939 



1,000 



INSTITUTIONS FOE 
BLIND AND DEAF. 



Num- 
ber of 
institu- 
tions 
report- 
ing. 



6.734 
4,159 



13,462 



3,000 



822 
31,644 



$5,650,380 




Receipts 
reported. 



537,212 
1,732,970 
1,155,182 
692,711 
390, 814 
321,084 
461, 821 
234, 349 
124,237 



23,800 



385,560 
31,000 
96.852 



1,119,343 
47,716 
565,911 



264, 116 
151,114 
391,130 
218,822 
130,000 



154, 144 
08, 145 

161,102 
48,820 
49,432 
86,500 
94,568 



73.500 
20,000 

115,814 
96,366 
71,284 
37,620 



163,146 
25,750 
80,000 

192,925 



47,800 
25,000 



98,790 
13,759 



50,000 



10,290 
113,947 



' Includes money used for protection of dumb animals. 



24 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

PAYMENTS OF INSTITUTIONS DURING THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 15 



DIVISION OR STATE. 



United States. . 

Geographic divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. 
West North Central. 

South .Atlantic 

East South Central. 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 

New Englakd: 

Maine 

New Hampshii-e 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Miimesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota , 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida , 

East South Central: 

Kentucky , 

Tennessee , 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



Total 
payments 
reported. 



$111,498,155 



12,836,444 
46,959,479 
20,570,840 
9,601,879 
8,057,684 
2, 439, 602 
2,614,625 
3, 197, 708 
6,219,894 



968, 769 
oU,172 

245, 785 
.8,058,753 
1,004,077 
2.047,88s 



28,445,171 
3,571,404 
13,942,904 



6,360,646 
1,937,607 
7,956,899 
2,255,931 
2,059,757 



2,568,929 

1,590,994 

2,796,036 

141,766 

420, 159 

691,217 

1,;«2,778 



188,9.87 

2,280,022 

1, 757, 550 

1,435,991 

466,824 

669,062 

277,928 

795,783 

185.537 



1,057,994 
769,000 
.?12,724 
299, 884 



425,497 

.S92, 696 

194,677 

1.101.7.M 



.528,221 
258,348 
34,831 
1,518,815 
346,269 
207,023 
280, 284 
23,917 



988,512 

735, 983 

4,495,399 



institutions for 
care of children. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



1,006 



105 
276 
230 
82 
134 
48 
45 
23 
63 



135 

41 

100 



49 



Payments 
reported. 



517,381,486 



1,342,732 

8,587,202 

3,051,651 

951,862 

1,281,953 

474, 603 

431,034 

326, 776 

933,673 



95,385 

99,826 

21, 986 

664,541 

119,792 

341,202 



5,761,154 

439,018 

2,387,030 



1,369,356 
363,894 
.870,610 
194,874 
252,917 



243,745 
257,135 
282,360 



10,253 
73,880 
84,489 



44,116 

325,094 
143,318 
197,874 

60,200 
189,424 
138,477 
171, .509 

11,941 



197,183 
88,699 
80,666 

108,055 



50,411 
223,350 I 

21,171 I 
136,102 , 



65,716 
37,440 



160, 198 
2,600 
21,116 
15, 789 
23,917 



62,858 
39,537 
831,278 



societies 

for protection 

and care of 

children. 



Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties 
report- 
ing. 



Payments 
reported. 



$2,009,081 



230,403 

974,582 

235,236 

180, 486 

130,712 

8,414 

20, 586 

84,358 

144,304 



4,334 , 
1,436 I 



171,328 
9,499 
43,806 



641,584 
106,368 
226,630 



35,384 
36, 498 
96,535 
34,982 
31,837 



35,617 
47,186 
32,385 
16,295 
16,714 
9,835 
22, 454 



1,429 
23,270 
63, 9U 
14,572 
8,586 
7,232 
4,665 



7,047 



2,873 
5,541 



2,900 



6, 143 
11,543 



13,640 
48,500 



2 11,718 
10,500 



31,811 
15,871 
96,622 



homes for 

ADtn-TS, OR ADULTS 
AND CHILDHEN. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



208 
421 
251 
113 
133 
52 
45 
17 
70 



17 
14 
5 
122 
16 
34 



209 
57 
155 



Payments 
reported. 



$23,720,381 



2,721,261 

8,018,127 

6,334,902 

2,249,614 

2, 064, 406 

806,611 

590,525 

420, 177 

1,614,758 



426,935 

83,715 

49, 818 

1,514,223 

201,374 

445, 196 



5,019,376 

963, 796 

2,034,955 



1,553,955 
632, .565 

1,927,837 
446,319 
774,226 



313,629 
309, 778 
487,710 
25,295 
236,716 
257,984 
618,502 



39,723 

264,748 

825,312 

649,222 

67, 795 

57,170 

21,913 

120,316 

18,207 



313,635 

388, 493 

57,087 

47,396 



58,996 
151,984 

66, &54 
312,691 



54,417 

39,000 

14,919 

300,841 



11,000 



208,630 

116,877 

1,189,251 



HOSPITALS And 
sanitariums. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



1,507 



192 
449 
311 
186 
144 
42 
41 
68 
74 



15 
23 
9 
107 
13 
25 



220 
55 
174 



75 
39 
110 
50 
37 



10 



Payments 
reported. 



$61,330,047 



7,%0,852 
25,921,582 
10, 436, 202 
5,389,489 
4,113,960 
SU,.541 
1,128,600 
2,095,802 
3.472,022 



417,515 
326, 195 
173,981 

5,294,332 
633,859 

1,114,970 



15,728,357 
1,996,724 
8,196,501 



3,053,410 

732, 943 

4,438,790 

1,348,357 

.862, 702 



1,809,900 
824, 149 

1,740,489 

50. 053 

126,877 

261,031 

570,967 



93, 719 
1,607,469 
617,652 
530,747 
268, 293 
328,419 
112,565 
426, 754 
128,342 



416,496 
190,086 
98, 146 
106,813 



184,044 
471,0.53 
30, .509 
442,994 



331,648 
7.8, 408 
19,912 
954,293 
322, 139 
1.8.5,907 
203,495 



685,213 

548,028 

2,238,781 



DISPENSARIES. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



Payments 
reported 



$1,693,140 



110,017 

852, 781 

339, .'05 

160, 602 

58, 276 

15,130 

23,809 

200 

32,620 



800 



99,120 
1,053 
9,044 



323,404 

17,305 

512,072 



94,785 

25,009 

211,958 

4,118 

3,935 



11,894 
46, 750 
97,544 



1,200 
3,114 



10,000 
13,599 
7,606 
15,076 
1,200 
425 
308 
10,062 



10, 939 
4,191 



20,809 



3,000 



200 



413 

32,207 



INSTITUTIONS FOR 
BLIND AND DEAF. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



Payments 
rejjorted. 



'$5,464,020 



171,179 

1 , 6IJ.5, 205 

1,17;), 044 

069,929 

10^,377 

:!23,303 

1 120.071 

270,39.5 

122,517 



315,209 
38,500 
93.670 



971,296 

48,193 

."«. 716 



2.a, 756 
146,698 
411,169 
227,281 
134.140 



1.54, 144 
105,996 
1M,548 
44,123 
■29,599 
87,267 
9:1.252 



45,842 
99,751 
28, .500 
60,750 
86. .392 



67, 142 
20,000 



119,741 
94,658 
71,284 

37, 620 



' 129,146 

25,500 

70,000 

IW, 425 



62,800 
55,000 



91,565 
U,030 



15, 267 
107,260 



I This amount covers two years for one of the institutions reported. 
3 Includes money used for protection of animals. 



GENERAL SUMMARIES. 



25 



VALUE OF PROPERTY OWXED UY IXSTITUTIONS AT CLOSE OF THE YKAR, liY (I LASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR 

DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 16 



DIVISION OR STATE. 



United States. 



Total value 
reported. 



$643,878,141 



OEOGRApmc divisions: 

Now Encland 86, 886, 642 

Middle .\(lantic 318,478,758 

92, 135, 619 
38,900,536 
51,115.306 
11,497,418 
11,927,101 
10, 840, 969 
22, 095, 792 



East North Central- 
West Norlh Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central . . 
West South Central., 

Mountain 

Pacific 



New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachu.setts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania. . . 



East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



We.st North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Ati.antic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central; 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming... 

Colorado 

New Mexico. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 



PAcmc: 

Washington . 

Oregon 

California 



4.082,169 
3,950,775 
1,470,040 

02, 010, 7S7 
3. 577, 803 

11,795,008 



187,760,531 

13,806,200 

116,912,027 



34,665,751 
9,587,512 

30, 470, 428 
9,074,,52:J 
8.337,405 



9, 045, 826 
6, 260, 436 
13,90.5,4.50 
722, 786 
1,306,720 
2,774,1.55 
4,885.163 



963,713 
15, 223, 085 

18. 480. 325 
6, 727, 997 
1,488, .578 
2,887,192 
1,563,9.80 
2, 885, 778 
894, 658 



4.844,278 
4,135,674 
1,320,434 
1,197,032 



1,488,700 

5, 449, 243 

434, .586 

4, .554. 572 



1,733,176 

523,983 

75,200 

5,713,176 

899, 338 

462, 083 

1,374,013 

60,000 



3.419,733 
2. 3.89, .386 
16.2,86,073 



INSTITUTIONS FOR 
CARE OF CHILDREN. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



91 
251 
217 
73 
118 
43 
39 
23 
57 



129 
36 
86 



Value, 
reported. 



$133,931,551 



10, 977, 958 
77,465,216 
18,961,072 
6,336,245 
9, 669, 589 
2,684,400 
2,332.149 
1,580:633 
3,924,389 



597, 907 
1,189,474 

151,000 
5, 12<1,793 

728, 143 
3,181,641 



32, 295, 447 

2,860,617 

42, .309, 152 



8,785,041 
2, 652, 884 
4,837,392 
1,668,195 
1.017,560 



1.674,2.50 
1,141.999 
2. 668. 502 



75,000 
275, 284 
501.204 



312,600 

2, 587, 490 

1,685,762 

1,756,410 

311,000 

8,88.914 

839, 378 

1,226.717 

01,318 



1,267 



436 
432 
322. 500 
517,032 



340,000 

1,338.399 

94,760 

.5.59,000 



277,000 
63.000 



876, 633 
20,000 
.58, 900 

225, 000 
60,000 



505. 663 

4.50, ,591 

2.968,1.35 



SOCIETIEff 

FOR PROTECTION 

AND CARE OF 

CHILDREN. 



Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties 
report- 
ing. 



Value 
reported. 



S6, 727, 107 



1,939,878 

3, 689, 893 

257, 186 

336, ,570 

162, 100 

1,248 

23,000 

103,550 

213, 682 



175 
4,046 



1,660,951 
77,100 
197,606 



3,150,761 
93, 141 
445, 991 



.50, 952 
36,000 
119,980 
34,000 
16. 254 



83,480 
97,000 
70,000 
26, 790 
56, 000 



4,300 



102,775 



20,600 

35,000 

2.725 

1,000 



1,248 



12,000 
11,000 



18,000 
74,400 



HOMES FOR 

ADULTS, OB ADIT-TS 

AND CHILDREN. 



1.1.50 
10,000 



40,400 
133, 1.50 
40. 132 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



1,238 



194 

390 

238 

108 

126 

54 

44 

19 

65 



16 
12 
5 
117 
14 
30 



53 

148 



Value 
reported. 



$168,318,121 



18, 208, 980 
72, 660, 081 
25,424,710 
9,045,727 
15,831,465 
4,381,014 
3, 162, 630 
2,116,231 
7,497,383 



1, 418, 629 
1,090,511 
235, 091 
12,326,194 
1,024,915 
2, 113, 640 



.50, 103, 260 
3,660.508 
18.896.315 



8,044,765 
3,289,780 
9,314,319 
1,603,363 
3, 172, 493 



1,590.935 

1,345,729 

2,464,639 

167, 963 

829, 700 

801,644 

1,845,217 



254, 170 

1,848,055 

8,997.476 

3.209,190 

138,318 

206.700 

408, 717 

645, 839 

123,000 



1,629.474 

2,373,864 

244,686 

133.000 



273,600 
1.042,902 

289, 886 
1, 646. 242 



240, 431 

93,000 

15,000 

1,747,600 



12,000 
8.200 



1,466,200 

342, 195 

5. 698, 9.88 



HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



Value 
reported. 



1,415 $306,021,639 



181 
420 
284 
187 
132 
41 
40 
67 
63 



107 
8 
21 



207 
52 
161 



60,380,111 

149,644,928 

41,645.965 

19, 167, 616 

22,877,936 

2,696,709 

4,667,722 

6,117,155 

8,923,397 



1' 

9 

37 



1,979,958 
1,666,744 
1,083,949 
38, 305, 467 
1,679,205 
5, 664, 788 



92,798,979 
6,764,064 
49,981,885 



16,142,209 
2, 614, 897 

14,450,117 
4, 750, 472 
3. 688. 270 



,5, 180, 151 
2,844,660 
7,615,168 
223, 033 
222, 835 
1,072,327 
2, 009, 442 



, 3^1,943 

9, 792, 899 

■7,029.787 

'',,696, ,597 

604, 260 

i, 448, 8,53 

■ 212,035 

716, 222 

•6^5,340 



1 ,368, 209 
, ,529, .500 

; .')02,000 
■ ,297.000 



, '425,200 

2,650,942 

30.2.50 

1^61.330 



' 1)78.245 
. 'to. .583 
■ ' ' 60, 200 
•,i,. 152, 793 
' '845, 338 
' . , 391, 183 
; -. '940,813 



1,417,470 
'1,413,450 
6,092,477 



DISPENSARIES. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



10 



Value 
reported. 



$5,720,0.52 



601,270 

2,831,776 

1,397,081 

464, 350 

143,216 

125, 159 

17,000 

60,000 

80,200 



2,259.176 

51,130 

621,470 



440,211 

286,925 

658, 645 

4,300 

7.000 



67,000 
131,000 
16,350 



250,000 



5.000 
82.366 
5,800 
5,200 



40.000 
2.8.50 
2,000 



159 
125,000 



60,000 



INSTITUTION.S FOR 
BLIND AND DEAF. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



Value 
reported. 



4,778,445 
12,286,864 
4.449,605 
3,550,028 
2,431,000 
1,608,8S8 
1.734,700 
863,500 
1,456,741 



85,000 



4,007,112 
68. .500 
617, 833 



7,152,908 

376, 742 

4,757.214 



1,202.5.83 

707.026 

1,089,975 

1,014,193 

435, 828 



4.50,004 
700,048 
1,070,791 
305,000 
124, 186 
375.000 
525.000 



809,500 
761,, 500 
40,000 
100,000 
300,000 



295.000 
125.000 



579,000 
,529,888 
260,000 
260,000 



4.50,000 

.500.000 

7,700 

777,000 



210, .500 
45.000 



375,000 
24,000 



200,000 



.50,000 
1,406.741 



26 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



STATISTICS FOR INDIVIDUAL CLASSES OF INSTITUTIONS. 



The statistics of benevolent institutions are pre- 
sented for ttie different classes of institutions sepa- 
rately in summary and analytical Tables 17 to 49, 
inclusive. 

Tables 17 to 25 give the statistics for institutions 
for the care of children; Tables 26 to 28, those for so- 



cieties for the protection and care of children; Tables 
29 to 36, those for homes for the care of adults, or 
adults and cliildren; Tables 37 to 39, those for hospi- 
tals and sanitariums; Tables 40 to 42, those for dis- 
pensaries; and Tables 43 to 49, those for institutions 
for the blind and deaf. 



Class I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CARE OF CHILDREN. 



The institutions covered by this classification are 
those especially designed for children. They include 
orphanages, children's homes and asylums, receiving 
homes for societies for the protection and care of 
children, detention homes connected with juvenile 
courts, and similar institutions wliich receive children 
as resident inmates, sometimes for a very short period, 
but do not mclude day nurseries or homes open for only 
a part of the year. 

CLASSES OF CHIXDREN RECEIVED. 

The children received are primarily those who are 
destitute and dependent upon the public for support. 
Of late years, however, the state has come to recog- 
nize its responsibility not only for the material welfare 
of its children, but also for their protection from evil 
influences, and in many states under the head of ' ' de- 
pendent or neglected children" are included, not 
merely orphans and children deserted by their parents 
or guardians, and thus without visible means of support, 
but also those who live in xmfit or disreputable surround- 
ings, who are growmg up in the, habit of begging or 
receiving alms, who frequent vicicus places, or who 
in any way give indication of devylcping into unde- 
sirable citizens. Such children, if they actually trans- 
gress the law, are amenable to, the juvenile courts, 
wherever such are established, and may be committed 
to refonnatories, or if the offense is slight, to some 
orphanage or other institution of tl/is class. If there 
is no infraction of the law, the jiivendr "court may stiU 
take cognizance of the case and comMit"the child to 
some benevolent institution, or to the guardianship of 
some person or persons, with a' ppecial" view to its 
being placed in a family home. ' In mariy states offi- 
cers in charge of poor relief are ' instructed to keep 
careful watch for such children, and to see that they 
are provided for in homes for chjil'dren, or in families, 
detention m almshouses, except iii; the case of infants, 
being forbidden in an increasing number of states. 
Children's aid societies, humane societies, societies for 
the prevention of cruelty to children, and similar or- 
ganizations are also vested with rights of guardiansliip 
of dependent children but are expected to direct their 
energies toward the finding of a home for each one 
in some family. Individual action along these lines 
is generally discouraged, and in many states it is illegal 
for any person or any institution to "place" a cliUd 
except by authority of the court, of the state board of 
charities, or of some similar body. 



METHODS OF MANAGEMENT. 

This development in the general purpose of child 
care has residted in the development of different types 
of institutions find of different methods of manage- 
ment. There are still many orphan asylums of the 
old type, but there is an increasing number of state 
detention homes where dependent and delinquent 
children are cared for pending final disposition by the 
juvenile courts; of receiving homes under the conduct 
of home-finding organizations; of state pubUc schools, 
intermecUary between the orphanage and the reforma- 
tory ; and of framing homes and schools of many kinds 
wliich fi'equently are practically educational institu- 
tions. The distinction between these classes is not 
always easily drawn, yet, in general, they stand, as in- 
dicating the different efforts to solve the child problem. 

The general methods of conducting institutions for 
the care of children have developed along three lines 
which deserve special note: The extension of super- 
visory care by institutions over cliildren placed by 
them in family homes or elsewhere; the adoption by 
cliildren's homes of the cottage system; and the 
assumption by some state authority of supervision 
over benevolent institutions. 

The responsibUity of an institution for the well 
being of a child committed to its guardianship does not 
cease with its placement in a famUy home, except in 
case of legal adoption. In all other cases the institvi- 
tion is expected, and in some states is required, to 
keep a careful watch of the concUtions in the family 
where the cliild is placed, with o. view to change, should 
it seem desirable. The result is that to record merely 
the number of children resident in an institution at a 
given time does not give an accurate presentation of its 
work, and a column has been added to the tables 
showing the number outside of the institutions, but 
under theii' care or supervision. 

The introduction of the cottage system in the conduct 
of cliildren's homes is the residt of the conviction that 
the old-time orphanage, with its scores or even hun- 
dreds of uniformed children, was not well adapted to 
the securmg of the best results in individual character. 

The assumption by state authority of supervision 
over benevolent institutions has already had notable 
results in the betterment of conditions in those institu- 
tions, in the preparation of new laws, in the inaugura- 
tion of new methods (including the two already noted), 
and in the emphasis laid on more complete and accurate 



INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CARE OF CHILDREN. 



27 



reports. Wliile ultimately it will doubtless extend to 
all classes of institutions, its chief application has 
lutherto been to those for the care of chUdi'en, and the 
Bureau of the Census is under obligations to the various 
state boards for much of the completeness of the present 
report. 

The information secured by the census canvass in 
regard to the different institutions for the care of 
children included in this report, together with their 
addresses, is shown in detail, by states, on pages 86 
to 157. Table 19 gives the principal statistics by 
states and geograpMc divisions. 

The institutions covered by tliis table are mostly of 
the old type, where orphan or dependent children are 
gathered in a single building under the care of a j)rivate 
association. There are, however, 92 county homes 
(50 in Oliio, 17 in Indiana, and 7 in Connecticut); 18 
state homes, several of these being for the orphans of 
soldiers or sailors; and 5 municipal homes. There are 
also 9 detention homes for dependent and deUnquent 
children under the care of the juvenile courts, and 
a number of receiving homes for societies for the pro- 
tection and care of children (Class II). The cottage 
system has been adopted by 168 homes. 

The total number of homes reported, 1,151, repre- 
sents an increase of 76 over the number reported in 
1904. The following table arranges the states accord- 
ing to the number of institutions reported in 1910: 



Institutions for the C.yre of Children, 
States: 1910. 



Distributed by 



Tabic 17 

STATE. 


Numlwr. 


STATE. 


Number. 


United States 


1,151 


Colorado 


14 






14 
14 


New York 


154 
106 
105 
64 
56 
50 
49 
47 
36 
32 
32 
29 
24 
24 
23 
22 
20 
19 
18 
17 
17 
16 
16 
15 


Washington 


Ohio 




13 






12 


Ulinofi 




10 






9 


New Jersey 


Nebraska 

West Virginia 

Alabama 

Florida 


I 


Tnrfiflna 


g 




7 


Missouri 




7 


Virginia 


Oregon 


Q 






5 


Louisiaua 


Oklahoma 


5 








Cftnnprti^Ht 


Montana 


3 




Utah 


3 


Texas 




2 


Wisconsin 


Idaho 


2 






2 


New HampstiLre 


North Dakota 


2 






2 


Kanqft-tj 


Nevada 


1 






1 


TAnnp.iqpA 











Tlie rank of the states, as shown in this table, is 
determined by varying conditions. The liigh rank of 
New York and Pennsylvania is natural, in view of the 
size and peculiar type of their population; that of 
Oliio is due chiefly to its system of county homes, 
wliicli also figures largely in Indiana and Connecticut. 

The following statement showing the number of 
homes in proportion to the population in the different 
geographic divisions is of interest, especially as intU- 
cating the result of the activities of the charitable 



organizations on the Pacific coast, wliich place that 
division in the lead, above even the New England and 
Middle Atlantic divisions: 

Pacific division One liome to every 55,162 inhabitants. 

New England division One home to every 55,531 inhabitants. 

-Middle .\tlantic division One home to every 62,511 inhabitants. 

East North Centrai division One home to every 70,195 inhabitants. 

South Atlantic division One home to every 80,229 inhabitants. 

Mountain di\ision One home to every 94,054 inhabitants. 

West North Central diiision One home to every 122,504 inhabit ants. 

West South Central division One home to every 151,457 inhabitants. 

East South Central division One home to every 152,907 inhabitants. 

COTTAGE SYSTEM. 

The following table shows, by states, the average 
number of inmates per institution and the number of 
institutions reporting, and the extent to wliich the 
cottage system has been adopted; the states are ar- 
ranged accorchng to the average number of inmates 
per institution. It is noticeable that the extension of 
the cottage system has had a close relation to the em- 
phasis laid by the states on county homes and general 
state supervision. Thus Oliio, with its system of 
county homes, leads in the adoption of the cottage 
system, with New York, Illinois, Pemisylvania, and 
CaUfornia following closely, while Indiana and Con- 
necticut, also with county homes, surpass other states 
of even greater size. 



Table 18 



New York 

Illinois 

South Carolina 

Montana 

Colorado 

Pennsylvania 

California 

North Carolina 

Louisiana 

Minnesota 

Oregon 

Connecticut 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nevada 

Mississippi 

AVisconsin 

Utah 

Massachusetts 

Ohio 

Rhode Island 

Michigan 

Maine 

Alabama 

District of Columbia 

Maryland 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

Georgia 

Nebraska 

Texas 

New Hampshire 

Washington 

Delaware 

North Dakota 

Indiana 

Tennessee 

Vermont 

Kansas 

West Virginia 

Virginia 

Kentucky 

Arizona." 

South Dakota 

Arkansas 

Florida 

Idaho 

Oklahoma 

Wyoming 



INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CABE OF 
CUILDREN: 1910. 



Average 
number of 
inmates per 
institution 
reporting. 



210 
144 
127 
112 
111 
111 
106 
106 
102 
98 
94 
93 
93 
92 
91 
90 



Number of 

institutions 

reporting 

inmates. 



144 
63 
10 

2 
12 
102 
53 
16 
24 
16 

6 
21 
18 
31 

1 

18 

3 

48 

100 

11 

23 

11 

8 

14 

33 

45 

2 

20 
9 
18 
17 
10 
5 
2 
44 
14 
2 
15 
8 
27 
21 
1 
2 

6 
2 
4 

1 



Number of 

Institutions 

reporting 

cottage 

system. 



20 
16 
6 
1 
3 
14 
10 
10 



1 
24 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 



28 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR INSTITUTIONS FOR 



Table 19 



IllVrSION OR STATE. 



United States. 



Geookaphic divisions: 

New Ensland 

Middle Atlantic 

East Nortti Central. . 
We.st North Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central.. 
West South Central.. 

Mountain 

Pacific 



New England; 

Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts... 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania.. 



East Nortu Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South .Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



We.^t South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



Moxjntain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming... 

Colorado 

New Mexico. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 



Pacific: 

Washington . 

Oregon 

California 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 

re- 
port- 
ed. 



1.131 



118 
.■i09 
260 
95 
IS2 
55 
58 
28 
76 



154 
50 
105 



106 
47 
64 
24 
19 



20 



CHILDREN UNDER CARE OF INSTITUTIONS AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR. 



Total 
number 
of chil- 
dren re- 
ported. 



151.441 



14,023 
51,. 31 5 
36,526 
15,912 
12,692 
4,512 
4,741 
2,815 
8.905 



883 
1.742 

116 
7.290 
1.284 
2,708 



33,571 
4,943 
12,801 



12,206 
4,2.30 

ll,f>82 
4.199 
4,203 



3.130 
4,151 
5.030 
461 
628 
1,126 
1,380 



391 
2,917 
1.190 
1 , .121 
1,289 
2,120 
1,529 
1.5.36 

199 



2,291 
933 
655 
633 



243 

3,107 

95 

1,296 



224 
295 

13 
.740 
148 

41 
263 

91 



1,302 
1,265 
6,. 338 



In institutions. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



1.077 



110 
291 
248 
93 
139 
50 
53 
24 



144 

45 
102 



100 
44 
63 
23 
18 



53 



Number of children. 



Total.i 



111,514 



9,023 

44,963 

23,597 

7,721 

10,107 

2,979 

4,136 

2,166 

6.822 



853 
1,125 

113 
4,069 

913 
1,950 



30,247 
3,365 
11,351 



8,479 
2,600 
9,047 
1,868 
1,603 



1,569 

1,667 

2,865 

121 

78 

646 

775 



,309 
2,493 
1,063 
1,243 

407 
1,698 
1,270 
1,431 

193 



9,30 
813 
603 
633 



243 

2,534 

95 

1,264 



224 

57 

13 

1,329 

148 
41 

263 
91 



639 

.563 

5,620 



With sex reported. 



Male. Female. 



59,481 



4,891 
25,251 
13,504 
3,901 
4,347 
1.266 
1,971 
913 
3,437 



450 

565 

95 

2,122 
451 

1.208 



17.065 
1.595 
6,691 



4,463 

1,482 

5,722 

972 

865 



914 
824 
,274 
59 
43 
344 
443 



179 
1,016 
537 
491 
139 
794 
602 
557 
32 



449 
313 
271 
233 



96 

1,290 

50 

535 



26 

9 

623 



112 
44 



402 

235 

2,800 



47,635 



3.891 
19,207 
8.3S8 
3,310 
5,100 
1,592 
1,968 
1,042 
3,137 



403 
534 

18 
,764 
442 
7.'.0 



13.029 
1,579 
4.599 



3,294 

1.055 

2,6,32 

731 

676 



655 

556 

1,373 

62 

35 

302 

327 



60 
1,291 
526 
7,38 
141 
904 
668 
668 
104 



4S1 
409 
332 
370 



122 

1,211 

45 

590 



125 
31 
4 
551 
148 
41 
95 
47 



237 

328 

2,572 



In families and elsewhere. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



45 
113 
133 
56 
47 
16 
9 



Number of children. 



5,000 

6,352 

12,929 

8,191 

2,585 

1.533 

605 

649 

2.083 



30 

617 

3 

3.221 

371 



3,324 
1.578 
1.450 



3,727 
1,636 
2,6.35 
2,331 
2,600 



1,561 
2,484 
2.165 
340 
550 
480 
611 



82 
424 
127 
278 
882 
422 
259 
105 



.361 
120 
52 



573 
' "32 



238 

■iii 



063 
702 
718 



With sex reported. 



Male. Female. 



2,305 

3,812 

6,2.35 

4,265 

983 

707 

543 

301 

1,074 



8 

1 

1,735 

180 

381 



2,064 
911 
837 



1,711 

804 

1,512 

1.373 

835 



892 
1,215 
1,131 
190 
247 
270 
320 



55 
160 

81 

87 
175 
194 
195 

36 



596 
62 
49 



533 

"io' 



221 



367 
259 
448 



16,434 



2,232 
2,430 
4,794 
3,655 
1,082 

826 
62 

348 
1.005 



30 

212 

2 

1,420 

191 

377 



1,260 
652 
518 



1.643 
678 
955 
948 
570 



669 
1.250 
782 
150 
303 
210 
291 



27 
264 

46 
191 
187 
228 

64 

69 
6 



158 
190 



296 
443 
266 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 

re- 
port' 
ing. 



Cmi.DREN RECEIVED PURINO 
THE YE.1R. 



1,065 



112 

287 
246 
90 
1.38 
47 
49 
27 
69 



143 
43 
101 



102 
45 
58 
24 
17 



Number of children. 



, 



Total.i 



85,829 



With sex reported. 



Male. Female 



50,874 



8,066 
35,873 
18,712 
7,581 
3.883 
1,456 
2,360 
2,589 
5.309 



208 
625 
58 
5,632 
724 
819 



26,465 
5,131 
4,277 



6,995 
1.277 
7,348 
1,951 
1,141 



1,194 

1,182 

3,677 

6.5 

106 

642 

715 



92 
1,310 
503 
309 
349 
388 
232 
604 
96 



526 
595 
198 
137 



179 

1,3.52 

102 

727 



207 
249 

13 
1,724 

74 

S3 
226 

13 



1,069 

414 

3,826 



30,487 



3, 553 

24,679 

11.317 

2,856 i 

1,977 

676 

1,345 

1,391 

3,080 



92 
318 

48 

2,341 

346 

408 



19,476 
2,783 
2,420 



4,118 

689 

4,739 

1,137 

634 



503 
492 
1,050 
38 
48 
361 
364 



62 
695 
285 
137 

90 
210 
129 
331 

38 



272 

255 

87 

62 



87 
894 

39 
325 



114 
129 



29 

136 

9 



579 

175 

2.326 



2,670 

10,940 

7,2.38 

2,907 

1,704 

743 

938 

1,198 

2,149 



112 
258 
10 
1.687 
378 
225 



6,989 
2,337 
1,614 



2,759 
549 

2,609 
814 
507 



615 

406 

1,215 

27 

58 

235 

351 



30 
596 
218 
172 

76 
178 
103 
273 

58 



254 
303 
111 

75 



92 
458 

63 
.325 



93 
120 
4 
759 
74 
54 
90 
4 



410 

239 

1,500 



' Includes those whose sex was not reported. 



INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CARE OF CHILDREN, 

THE CARE OF CHILDREN, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



29 



CHILDSEN PLACED 


DURING THE YEAR. 


CHILDREN DISCHARGED DURING THE 


RECEIPTS 


DURING THE 


PAYMENTS DURING THE 


VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 














YEAR. 




YEAR. 




YEAR. 


CLOSE OF THE YEAR. 






Number of children. 




Number of children. 
















Number 








Number 








Niunber 




Numlier 




Number 






o( insti- 
tutions 








of insti- 
tutions 








of insti- 
tutions 


Amount 
reported. 


of insti- 
tutions 


Amount 
reported. 


of insti- 
tutions 


Amoimt 
reported. 


















reporting. 




With sex 


reported. 


reporting. 




With SOX reported. 


reporting. 




reporting. 




retorting. 








Total.' 








Total.' 


































Male. 


Female. 






Male. 


Female. 
















522 


15,072 


7,055 


6,949 


863 


57,300 


35,576 


19,653 


1,004 


$19,140,342 


1 

j 1,006 


$17,381,486 


912 


$133,931,551 


1 


55 


2,358 


1,017 


988 


96 


5,236 


2,8.34 


1,818 


102 


1,324,260 


, 103 


1,342,732 


91 


10,977,9.38 


2 


139 


2,003 


1,292 


1,237 


248 


28,437 


19,213 


9,093 


274 


10,213,100 


1 276 


8,587,202 


251 


77,465,210 


3 


148 


4,030 


2,067 


1,867 


191 


12, 108 


7,646 


3,986 


235 


3,193,354 


230 


3,051,651 


217 


18,961,072 


4 


48 


2,261 


1,109 


1,088 


76 


3,539 


1,611 


1,431 


82 


977,349 


82 


951,862 


73 


6,336,245 


5 


57 


992 


279 


374 


103 


1,777 


791 


738 


132 


1,282.124 


134 


l,2,iil,9.53 


118 


9,669,589 


6 


20 


636 


273 


345 


40 


689 


316 


309 


45 


441,8.56 


48 


474,603 


43 


2,084,400 


7 


16 


338 


93 


121 


39 


1,319 


711 


578 


45 


429,812 


45 


431,034 


39 


2, .332, 149 


8 


7 


420 


211 


209 


13 


815 


510 


305 


24 


312, 207 


23 


326, 776 


23 


1,580,533 


9 


32 


1,434 


714 


720 


57 


3,380 


1,944 


1,395 


65 


966,280 


63 


933,673 


57 


3,924,389 


10 


6 


90 


54 


36 


8 


112 


47 


65 


11 


83,211 


10 


9.5,385 


7 


.597,907 


11 


10 


05 


33 


32 


15 


409 


213 


17:3 


; 12 


99,936 


14 


99, 826 


11 


1,189,474 


12 


1 


15 


15 




2 


28 


16 


12 


2 


IS, r,73 


2 


21,986 


2 


131 000 


13 


20 


1,411 


515 


543" 


40 


3,095 


2,059 


1,167 


47 


650,220 


48 


664^541 


43 


5, 129, 793 


14 


4 


71 


36 


35 


11 


.528 


259 


269 


10 


119,024 


11 


119,792 


9 


728, 143 


15 


H 


706 


364 


342 


20 


464 


240 


132 


20 


3.53,196 


20 


341,202 


19 


3,181,041 


16 


76 


1,413 


723 


644 


135 


21,939 


15, 829 


6,082 


135 


5,091,435 


133 


5,761,154 


12) 


32,295,447 


17 


20 


499 


244 


243 


29 


3,567 


1,636 


1,901 


41 


444,816 


41 


439,018 


36 


2,860,617 


IS 


43 


091 


325 


350 


84 


2,931 


1,748 


1,110 


98 


4,076,849 


100 


2,387,030 


86 


42,309,152 


19 


6S 


1,028 


871 


718 


79 


4,044 


2,236 


1,539 


98 


1,398,896 


97 


1,309,350 


89 


8,785,041 


20 


31 


695 


328 


329 


28 


5BS 


296 


201 


41 


382, 154 


39 


363,894 


38 


2,6.32,884 


21 


28 


808 


401 


407 


48 


5,625 


3,984 


1,631 


01 


972, 764 


58 


870,610 


59 


4,a37,392 


22 


14 


552 


267 


266 


20 


1,175 


748 


343 


19 


176,170 


20 


194,874 


17 


1,068,195 


23 


" 


347 


200 


147 


16 


696 


382 


272 


16 


263,370 


16 


252,917 


14 


1,01 7, .560 


24 


8 


524 


276 


248 


14 


616 


189 


423 


15 


242,230 


16 


243, 743 


13 


1,674,2.56 


23 


7 


733 


330 


339 


14 


476 


142 


127 


16 


2.57,113 


15 


237, 135 


16 


1,141,999 


26 


13 


438 


221 


217 


27 


1,905 


1,021 


631 


26 


300,440 


26 


282,360 


23 


2,668,502 


27 


1 
2 


42 
116 


24 
49 


18 
67 


1 
2 


31 
28 


8 
15 


23 
13 










1 




28 


i 


9,984" 


i 


i6,'2,53" 


i 


7,3^606' 


29 


6 


230 


122 


lOS 


8 


290 


162 


128 


8 


83,640 


8 


73,880 


7 


275, 284 


30 


11 


178 


87 


91 


10 


193 


74 


86 


16 


83,942 


16 


84,489 


13 


501,204 


31 


2 


23 


14 


9 


5 


66 


39 


27 


4 


45,921 


5 


44,116 


4 


312,000 


32 


12 


208 


39 


143 


32 


729 


251 


245 


34 


330, 132 


34 


325,094 


27 


2, 587, 490 


33 


6 


46 


24 


22 


13 


411 


. 239 


172 


13 


134,973 


13 


143.318 


11 


1,685,762 


34 


10 


75 


34 


41 


21 


118 


46 


72 


26 


209,344 


27 


197, ,874 


24 


1,730,410 


33 


8 


361 


72 


63 


5 


57 


25 


28 


7 


43,091 


7 


60,200 


7 


311,000 


36 


8 


113 


58 


55 


9 


99 


43 


56 


16 


104,482 


16 


189, 424 


15 


888,914 


37 


3 


14 


9 


5 


6 


156 


90 


66 


10 


149,431 


10 


138, 477 


8 


839,378 


38 


5 


104 


17 


111 


11 


140 


58 


71 


18 


191,. 531 


17 


171,509 


17 


1,226,717 


39 


3 


48 


12 


20 


1 


1 




1 


4 


13,219 


5 


11,941 


6 


01,318 


40 


11 


534 


223 


293 


17 


278 


155 


123 


19 


186,362 


20 


197, 183 


18 


1,207,436 41 


3 


29 


11 


IS 


11 


2.58 


93 


101 


12 


79,370 


14 


88,699 


12 


577,432 i42 


5 


62 


34 


28 


7 


106 


41 


65 


8 


66,377 


8 


80,666 


7 


322, 500 : 43 


1 


11 


5 





5 


47 


27 


20 


6 


109,747 


6 


108,055 


6 


517,032 


41 


2 


25 


13 


12 


4 


20 


10 


10 


y 


61,.8S6 


7 


50,411 


7 


340,000 


45 


8 


91 


43 


46 


IS 


1,012 


568 


444 


19 


208,751 


20 


223,350 


16 


1,338,399 


46 


1 


10 


5 


5 


4 


56 


28 


28 


4 


20,231 


4 


21,171 


2 


94,750 


47 


5 


212 


30 


58 


13 


231 


105 


96 


15 


1.38,944 


14 


136, 102 


14 


559,000 


48 










1 


99 


49 


50 
62 


y 


62,067 
39, .842 


3 
2 


65,716 
37,440 


3 

1 


277,000 

6:t,ooo 


49 
50 


2' 


i59' 


75' 


S4' 


2 


94 


32 


2 


1 
4 


3 

258 


1 
135 


2 
123 


1 
S 


4 
599 


3 

415 


1 
184 








'' 






51 


ii 


i58,'292 


12 


ieojiii.s" 


ii' 


876,033' 


52 


















1 


2,600 


\ 


2,600 
21,116 


I 


20,000 

58. 900 

223,000 


53 


















2 


7,064 


2 


2 


54 


















3 


20^742 


2 


15,789 
23,917 

62, 858 


3 


55 










1 


19' 


ii' 


3 


I 


19,'000 
72,929 


I 


1 
9 


"eb',000 

503,663 


56 
37 


3 


326 


161 


165 


9 


737 


404 


333 


9 


9 


3 


407 


139 


268 


3 


112 


57 


55 


5 


45,816 


5 


39,537 


5 


4.30,591 


58 


26 


701 


414 


2S7 


45 


2,531 


1,483 


1,007 ! 


51 


847, 535 


49 


831,278 


43 


2,968,133 


59 



30 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



PLACEMENT IN FAMILIES. 

The degree to wliich the method of placement of 
children in famihes has been carried by institutions 
of this class is illustrated by the accompanying table 
giving, by states, the number so placed during the year. 
Detailed statistics as to this phase of work are given 
in Table 57. 

Children Placed in Families by Institutions for the Care 
OF Children: 1910. 



Table 20 

STATE. 


Number. 


STATE. 


Number. 




15,072 




208 






178 


Ohio 


1,62S 
1,413 
1,411 
808 
733 
706 
701 
695 
691 
552 
534 
524 
499 
438 
407 
361 
347 
326 
258 
230 
212 


Idaho 


159 


New York 


South Dakota 


116 




North r^rnlinf^ 


113 


lUinois 




104 




Louisiana 


91 






90 




Virginia 


75 






71 




New Hampshire . . 


65 






62 




Florida. 


48 


Miimesota 


District of Columbia 

North Dakota . 


46 




42 


Missouri 


Tennessee 


29 






25 


West Virginia 


Delaware 


23 






15 






14 






11 


Nebraska 


Oldahonia 


10 






3 









The distribution, by geographic divisions, together 
with the number per 100,000 population, is given in 
the following table: 



Table 21 

cmsioN. 


NUMBER OF CHILDBEN 
IN CARE OF INSTITU- 
TI0N3 FOE CHILDREN : 
1910. 




Total. 


Per 
100,000 
popula- 
tion. 


Middle Atlantic 


51,315 
36, 526 
15,912 
14,023 
12,692 
8,905 
4,741 
4,612 
2,815 


265 


East North Central 


201 




137 


New Enfiland . . 


214 




104 


Pacific 


212 




54 


East South Central . . 


53 




107 







Table 22 shows, by states, the distribution of the 
children reported, including both the inmates of the 
institutions and those under their care in families. 

COMPARISON WITH REPORT FOR 1904. 

Comparison with the report for 1904 is materially 
affected by the inclusion in tliis report, as already 
noted, of the children outside of institutions but still 
under their care, whereas the report for 1904 was 
limited to those resident in the institutions them- 



selves. Thus, of a total of 151,441 children reported 
by these institutions as under their care, 39,927, or 
26.4 per cent, ■were outside of the institutions. A 
comparison of the cliildren resident in institutions 
alone shows an increase over the figures for 1904 of 
19,225. 

Children Under Care of Institutions for the Care op 
Children at Close of the Year: 1910. 



Tahio 22 

STATE. 



United States 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Massachusetts 

California 

Missoiu-i 

New Jersey 

Indiana 

Wisconsin 

Michigan 

Iowa 

Minnesota 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

Connecticut..-. 

Kentucky 

North Carolina 

New Hampshire 

Colorado 

Georgia 

South Carolina 

Virginia 

Kansas 



Number. 



151,441 



33,671 
12,801 
12,206 
11,682 
7,290 
6,338 
5,030 
4,943 
4,236 
4,203 
4,199 
4,151 
3,130 
3,107 
2,917 
2,708 
2,291 
2,120 
1,742 
1,740 
1,536 
1,529 
1,521 
1,386 



Number. 



Washington 

Te.icas 

Rhode Island 

West Virginia 

Oregon 

District of Coltmibia. 

Nebraska 

Termessee 

Maine 

Alabama 

Missis?=ippi 

South Dakota 

North Dakota 

Delaware 

Idaho 

Utah 

Arkansas 

Montana 

Florida 

New Mexico 

Vermont 

Oldahoma 

Nevada 

Arizona 

Wyoming 



1,302 

1,296 

1,289 

1,284 

1,265 

1,190 

1,126 

933 

883 

655 

633 

628 

461 

391 

295 

263 

243 

224 

199 

148 

116 

95 

91 

41 

13 



In this connection it should be remembered that 
the custom of placing cliildren in homes, as already 
stated, is of comparatively recent origin. Massachu- 
setts, New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut had 
led the way, and by 1904 a considerable number of 
states had adopted this method of caring for depend- 
ent cliildren. Either because the work was poorly 
organized, or because it was judged that that class of 
cliildren did not properly come within the scope of 
the report, there was no effort in 1904 to learn the 
number of cliildren so provided for. It becomes there- 
fore impossible to make any complete or exact state- 
ment as to the relative situation in the two years. 
In some states, as in Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, 
and South Dakota, while the total number of chil- 
dren under care of institutions has increased, there 
has been a decrease in the number resident in the 
institutions. This would appear to indicate not so 
much a change in the actual conditions as a change 
in the efficiency of the methods of meetuig those 
conditions. 

That dependency increases witth the population is 
undoubtedly true, but whether or not it increases in 
the same ratio can not be ascertained without more 
careful and thorough study than can be given at this 
time. The next comparative summary presents the 
facts for the different states. 



INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CARE OF CHILDREN. 

INMATES OF INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CARE OF CHILDREN— COMPARATIVE SUMMARY 1910 AND 1904. 



31 



Table 23 


1910 


1904 


DIVISION OB STATE. 


1910 


19M 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Children 
in insti- 
tutions. 


Children 

outside 

under care. 


Total 
under 
care of In- 
stitutions. 


In inst i- 
tutions. 

92,289 


ChUdren 
in iustl- 
tutions. 


Children 

outside 

under care. 


Total 
under 
care of in- 
stitutions. 


In insti- 
tutions. 


United States 


111,514 


39, 927 


151,441 


South Atlantic— Continued. 


1,063 
1,243 

407 
1,698 
1,270 
1,431 

193 

2,979 


127 
278 
882 
422 
259 
105 
6 

1,533 


1,190 
1,521 
1,289 
2,120 
1,529 
1,536 
199 

4,512 






967 
938 


New England 


9,023 


5,000 


14,023 


8,291 


Virginia 






198 
1 247 




853 
1,125 

113 
4,069 

913 
1,950 

44,963 


30 

617 

3 

3,221 

371 

758 

6,352 


883 
1,742 

116 
7,290 
1,284 
2,708 

51,315 


569 
9S1 
181 

3,953 
753 

1,854 

37,923 


North Carolina 












727 




Florida 


119 




East South Centr.m 




Connecticut 


3,143 




Kentuckv 


Mmni-K ATT-AWTir 


930 
813 
603 
633 

4,136 


1,361 
120 
52 


2,291 
933 
655 
633 

4,741 


1 4'^2 






862 
529 


New York 


30,247 
3,365 
11,351 

23,597 


3,324 
1,578 
1,450 

12,929 


33,571 
4,943 
12,801 

36,526 


24,907 

2,598 

10,418 

18,801 

7,670 
2,9.34 
5,245 
1,669 
1,283 

6,208 


Alabama 


New Jersey.. .. 


Mississippi 

WEST South Central 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 


270 




605 






3,390 




243 

2,534 

95 

1,264 

2,166 




243 

3,107 

95 

1,296 

2,815 


177 

1,S99 

253 


Ohio 


8,479 
2,600 
9,047 
1,868 
1,603 

7,721 


3,727 
1,636 
2,635 
2,331 
2,600 

8,191 


12,206 
4,236 

11,682 
4,199 
4,203 

15,912 


673 




Tliinni'^ 


Texas 


32 
649 


1 061 


Michigan 


Mountain.. 






1,376 




Montana . 


West North Central 


224 

57 

13 

1,329 

148 
41 

263 
91 

6,822 




224 
295 

13 

1,740 

148 

41 
263 

91 

8,905 


332 




Idaho. 


238 






1,569 

1,667 

2,865 

121 

78 

646 

775 

10,107 


1,561 
2,484 
2,165 
340 
550 
480 
611 

2,585 


3,130 
4,151 
5,030 
461 
628 
1,126 
1,386 

12,692 


1,220 

1,162 

2,697 

68 

101 

393 

567 

7,863 




Iowa 


Colorado 


411 


650 






106 




Arizona 








Utah 




232 


Nebraska 


Nevada. . 




56 


Ka.T\iif\s. 


Pacific 


2,083 






5 294 




Washington 

Oregon 

Calilornia 






639 
563 

5, 620 


663 
702 
718 


1,302 
1,265 
6,3.38 


359 
255 


Delaware. . ... 


309 
2,493 


82 
424 


391 
2,917 


391 
2,165 




4,680 





In accordance with the modern tendency to regard 
inmates of institutions, or other "wards of the state," 
as individuals, each with distinctive characteristics, 
rather than in the mass, an effort has been made to 
classify the children reported by the institutions into 
certain broad groups. The results have not been 
wholly satisfactory. In many cases the superin- 
tendents or others in charge of the mstitutions evi- 
dently had no exact records, in others there was 
apparent uncertainty as to the class in which the par- 
ticular children should be included. Table 24 presents 
the results so far as it has been possible to interpret 
the schedules. The distmction between orphans and 
half-orphans was made in very few cases, and it was 
found to be impracticable to separate even the found- 



ling.^, so that all these classes are included under one 
head. The children included under the heading "News- 
boys and other working boys or girls" represent for 
the most part the mmates of several newsboys' homes, 
but this classification is incomplete because a number 
of similar institutions are included in Class III (Homes 
for adults, or adults and children) . The majority of 
the children reported as "Defective or mvalids" are 
cripples in homes for such children. Those classed as 
delinciuent, wayward, or truant are reported chiefly 
by the detention homes, 45 per cent of the total for 
this class being reported by an institution in Chicago. 
In the final column are included all children regarding 
whose classification the officers of the institutions 
were in doubt. 



32 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



CHILDREN IN INSTITUTIONS FOR THE OARE OF CHILDREN AT THE CLOSE OF THE YEAR, BY CLASSES, FOR 

DIVISIONS AND STATES; 1910. 



Tuble 34 


Total 
number 

of in- 
stitutions 
reported. 


Total 
number 

of in- 
stitutions 
reporting 
children 
at close 

of the 

year. 






childben in institutions at 


CLOSE OF 


the tear 








DIVISION Oa STATE. 


Total.' 


Orphans, half- 
orphans, and 
foundlings. 


Newsboys or other 

working boys 

and girls. 


Defectives or 
invalids. 


Delinquent, way- 
ward, or truant 
children. 


Other homeless, 
neglected, or indi- 
gent children. 




Number 

of in- 
stitutions 
reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


Number 

of in- 
.^titutions 
reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


Number 

of in- 
stitutions 
reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


Number 

of in- 
stitutions 
reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


Number 

of in- 
stitutions 
reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 




1,151 


1,077 


111,514 


915 


72,925 


30 


1.139 


147 


1.181 


129 


6,120 


561 


27,339 






Oeogkaphic divisions; 

Xow England 


118 
309 
260 
95 
152 
55 
58 
28 
76 


110 
291 
248 
93 
139 
50 
53 
24 
69 


9.023 
44.963 
23.597 
7,721 
10, 107 
2,979 
4,136 
2,166 
6,822 


93 

241 
205 
76 
126 
45 
49 
19 
61 


5,671 
29.275 
13. 197 
5.052 
8.019 
2,502 
3,299 
1,337 
4,573 






9 
38 
35 
21 
14 

3 
14 

5 

8 


172 

574 

251 

52 

37 

7 

40 

11 

37 


11 

36 

35 

11 

10 

1 

5 

4 

16 


168 

1.794 

3.297 

121 

132 

1 

149 

44 

414 


73 
168 
144 
41 
42 
17 
16 
13 
47 


2 956 


Middlo AtUintic 


13 
6 
2 
4 


459 

433 

29 

48 


12,345 
5 560 


!;^ast North Central 


West North Central 


2,066 

1,369 

401 




East South Central 


Vi'est ,Soiith Central 


2 
1 
2 


123 
IS 
29 


499 




374 


Pacific 


1,769 






New England: 


12 
17 
4 
49 
13 
23 

154 
50 
105 

106 
47 
64 
24 
19 

16 
18 
32 
2 
2 
9 
16 

5 
36 
14 
32 

9 
17 
10 
22 

7 

25 
15 
8 
7 

9 
24 

5 
20 

3 
2 
1 
14 
2 
2 
3 
1 

14 


56 


11 

17 
2 
48 
U 
21 

144 
45 
102 

100 
44 
63 
23 
18 

16 
18 
31 
2 
2 
9 
lo 

5 
33 
14 
27 

8 
16 
10 
20 

6 

21 

14 
8 
7 

7 
24 

4 
18 

2 
2 
1 
12 
2 
1 
3 
1 

10 

6 

53 


853 
1,125 

113 
4,069 

913 
1,950 

30.247 
3,365 
11.351 

8,479 
2,600 
9,047 
1,868 
1,603 

1.569 

1.667 

2.865 

121 

78 

646 

775 

309 
2.493 
1.063 
1.243 

407 
1,098 
1,270 
1,431 

193 

930 
813 
603 
633 

213 

2.534 

95 

1.264 

224 

57 

13 

1,339 

148 
41 

263 
91 

639 

563 

5,620 


10 

16 
2 
41 
10 
14 

116 
35 
90 

3/ 
49 
20 
17 

15 

12 

24 

2 

1 

8 

14 

4 
29 
11 
27 

7 
15 
10 
18 

5 

18 
12 

8 

7 

6 
22 

4 
17 

2 
2 
1 
8 
2 
1 
2 
1 

8 

4 

49 


774 
891 
(3 
2,571 
669 
693 

17,886 
2,310 
9,079 

5.481 
1,626 
4,002 
1,043 
1,045 

1,284 
750 

1,901 
112 
53 
423 
529 

214 
1,459 

840 
1,131 

351 
1,582 
1,220 
1,068 

154 

620 
726 
523 
633 

143 

1;933 

94 

1,127 

174 
18 
4 

699 

120 
23 

231 
65 

456 

346 
3,771 






1 
1 


2 
4 


2 
3 


4 
11 


5 
12 

2 
29 

6 
19 

98 
27 
43 

61 
24 

29 
18 
12 

5 
13 
8 
1 
2 
5 
7 

2 
15 

6 
9 


58 


New Hampshire 






219 


\'erniont 






40 


Massachusetts 






5 


53 


5 


125 


1 274 


I^hode Island 






244 








2 

16 
8 
14 

10 
11 

5 

2 

7 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
5 

I 

2 
2 
3 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


108 

334 
49 
191 

196 
24 
12 
13 
6 

17 
3 

10 
3 

1 

U 

1 
5 
3 
4 
7 
2 
3 
9 
1 

1 
3 
3 


1 

17 
5 
14 

11 

8 
6 
3 

6 


28 

1,394 
194 
206 

116 
187 
2.816 
163 
15 

67 


1,121 


Middle Atlantic: 


7 
1 
5 

2 


339 
32 

88 

49 


9,900 
65s 


New Jersey 




1,787 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


2,074 
656 


Indiana 


Illinois 


2 
1 

1 


381 
2 

1 


1 709 


Michigan^. 

Wisconsin 


647 
474 


West North Central: 

Minnesota 


201 




1 
1 


17 
12 


862 




3 


44 


613 


North Dakota 


6 


South Daliota 










24 


Nebraska 










135 


Kansas 






2 


10 


225 


South Atlantic: 

Delaware 






24 


Maryland 






4 
2 


41 

50 


868 


District of Columbia 

\'irginia 


1 


22 


146 
108 








1 


1 




North Carolina 


1 

1 


11 
10 


4 

1 
5 


103 


South CnT"li"a. 


1 
2 


32 

8 


5 


* Jeorgia 


115 




1 


5 




East South Central: 

Kentucky 


1 


1 


10 
4 
3 


285 








39 


Alabama 










77 


Mississippi 












West South Central: 

Arkansas 














2 
10 


75 


Louisiana 


2 


123 


9 


27 


4 


148 


301 


Oldahoma 




Texas 






5 

1 
2 


13 

1 
5 


1 


1 


4 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


133 


Mountain: 

Montana 






49 


Idaho 


1 


18 


2 


11 


5 


Wyoming 


9 


Colorado 






2 


5 


1 


1 


242 








28 


.\rizona 












15 


Utah 




I 




1 


32 




Nevada 








1 

5 

4 

38 


26 


Pacific: 










2 


77 


106 








2 


3 
34 


214 




2 


29 


14 


337 


1.449 







' Includes those not classified. 



Incomplete and unsatisfactory as this table is, it 
marks an advance in the i-ecoguition of llic necessity 



for careful stuily of conditions, and it is hoped that 
future reports will show a much better record. 



INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CARE OF CHILDREN. 



33 



The following table, classifying the children received 
into institutions according to the agencies through 
which they were received, is indicative of tho,ie agencies 
rather than exact in its specification of them. The 
term "Public official" includes municipal, township, 
county, or state officers; the "Agents of institutions" 



are the representatives of the institutions themselves. 
It is manifestly not always easy to distinguish between 
these difl'erent agencies, and the figures given can not 
be considered complete or exact, but they are of m- 
terest, especiallj' those showing the number of children 
brought to institutions by relatives or friends. 



CHILDREN RECEIVED INTO INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CARE OF CHILDREN, CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO AGENCY 
THROUGH WHICH RECEIVED, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 26 


Total 
number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Total 
number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting 
children 
received. 


children received. 




Total. 1 


Classified according to agency through which received. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Public officials. 


Agents of 
institutions. 


Child-placing 
societies. 


Relatives. 


Other agencies. 




Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 

reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 

reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 

reporting. 


Number 

of 
children 
reported. 


United States 


1,151 


1,065 


85,829 


514 


29,756 


164 


7,407 


96 


1,291 


817 


33,712 


202 


10,035 




Geographic divisions: 


lis 

309 
260 
95 
152 
55 
58 
28 
76 


112 

287 
246 
90 
138 
47 
49 
27 
69 


8,066 
35,873 
18,712 
7,581 
3,883 
1,456 
2,360 
2,589 
5, .309 


44 

153 
148 
41 
39 
15 
16 
14 
42 


922 

14,893 

8,196 

1,765 

460 

321 

506 

824 

1,869 


16 

43 

33 

19 

25 

12 

4 

4 

8 


444 
3,825 
1,442 
499 
474 
181 
54 
230 
25S 


9 
35 
18 
9 
13 
2 
2 
1 
7 


116 

262 

601 

111 

97 

4 

15 

9 

76 


87 
236 
155 
75 
109 
34 
42 
20 
59 


5,045 
9,673 
6,394 
4, .507 
2,420 
675 
1,365 
1,149 
2,484 


19 

61 

40 

13 

26 

8 

9 

4 

22 


391 


Middle Atlantic, . . 


6 801 


East North Central 

West Xortli Central 

South Atlantic 

East South Central 

West South Central 


1,084 
699 
293 
66 
281 
42 


Pacific 


378 






New England: 


12 
17 
4 
49 
13 
23 

154 

50 
105 

100 
47 
64 
24 
19 

16 
18 
32 
2 
2 
9 
16 

5 
36 
14 
32 

9 
17 
10 
22 

7 

25 
15 

8 
7 

9 
24 

5 
20 

3 
2 
1 
14 
2 
2 
3 
1 

14 

6 

36 


12 
17 
2 
48 
11 
22 

143 
43 
101 

102 
45 
.is 
24 
17 

16 
17 
29 

1 

2 

9 
16 

S 
35 
14 
27 

8 
14 
10 
21 

4 

20 
13 

8 

6 

6 
21 

4 
18 

3 

2 
1 

13 ! 
2 
2 
3 
1 

1 

5 
53 


208 
025 
58 
.5,632 
724 
819 

26,465 
5,131 
4,277 

6,995 
1,277 
7,348 
1,951 
1,141 

1,194 

1,182 

3,677 

65 

106 

642 

715 

92 
1,310 

503 
309 
349 
388 
232 
604 
96 

526 

695 

. 198 

137 

179 

1,352 

102 

727 

207 
249 

13 
1,724 

74 

83 
226 

13 

1,009 
414 

3,820 


5 
11 

1 
12 

3 
12 

106 
11 
38 

69 
26 
32 
12 
9 

10 
9 
11 

1 


53 
125 
1 
163 
115 
465 

13,167 

1,153 

573 

1,967 
739 

4,444 
558 
488 

405 

328 

705 

3 


2 
2 


9 
12 


1 


1 


8 
15 

2 
40 

8 
14 

117 
35 

84 

57 
19 
44 
20 
15 

12 
16 
24 
1 
2 
6 
14 

3 
27 

9 
23 

6 
12 

9 
16 

4 

13 
8 
7 
6 

5 
18 

4 
15 

2 
2 
1 
8 
2 
2 
3 


139 
453 
57 
3,866 
276 
254 

4,333 
2,987 
2,353 

2,998 
271 

1,627 
897 
601 

766 

704 

1,984 

62 

51 

372 

568 

49 
875 
215 
263 
136 
279 
183 
345 

75 

156 
240 
144 
135 

140 
0,59 
94 
472 

85 
22 
9 

0.53 
71 
83 

226 


1 
2 


6 


New Hampshire 


35 


Vermont 










7 
4 

1 

15 
11 
17 

8 
7 
12 
5 

1 

2 

4 

7 


278 
140 

5 

3,223 
199 
403 

386 
186 
844 
25 

1 

23 
101 
268 


7 


113 


12 


257 


Rhode Island 






1 

9 

8 
18 

3 
1 
7 
4 
3 


2 

76 
70 
116 

36 

1 

310 

246 

8 


4 

27 

4 

30 

19 
5 
7 
5 
4 


93 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 


5 319 




'718 


Pftnnsylyanif^ 


764 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


838 


Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

\f innp<;ntq . . . 


55 
123 
25 
43 


Iowa 

Missouri 


3 
4 


19 
90 


1 
9 


30 
630 


South Dakota 


1 
3 
2 

1 

8 


50 

52 

5 

12 
113 






1 
2 


5 


Nebraska 

Kansas 


4 
6 

2 
10 

7 
4 
1 
6 
2 
6 
2 

8 
4 
3 


182 
142 

9 

167 
191 
6 
5 
26 
15 
23 
IS 

211 

103 

7 


2 


2 


34 


South Atlantic: 
Delaware 


2 

8 


16 
70 


2 
8 
5 
3 


g 


Maryland 


66 


District of Columbia 


97 


Virginia 


3 
2 

3 
3 
4 

1 

7 
3 
2 


11 
208 
39 
34 
54 
3 

153 
20 
8 


1 


8 


21 


West Virginia 










5 




.South Carolina 








Georgia 


2 


3 


3 


59 


Florida 




EastSouth Central: 






4 

2 
2 




Tennessee 






23 


.Mabama . 


1 
1 


2 

2 


37 


Mississippi 


West South Central: 

Arkansas 


2 
10 
2 
2 

2 

2 
1 

7 

1 


6 

484 

2 

14 

79 
00 

4 
605 

3 


2 


33 






Ijouisiana 


1 


2 


6 


107 


Oklahoma 


1 
1 

1 
1 


6 




Texas 






13 


3 

1 


174 
3 


Mountain: 


40 
167 




Idnho 








Wyoming 










Colorado 


2 


23 


1 


9 


3 


39 


New Mexico 




Arizona 














Utah 


















Nevada 


1 

7 

4 

31 


is 

025 

100 

1,144 














Pacific: 

Washington ." 










8 
4 
47 


414 


4 


30 


Oregon 


2 



75 
183 










7 


76 


1,937 


18 









9531°— 13- 



> Includes those not classified. 



34 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Class II.— SOCIETIES FOE THE PROTECTION AND CARE OF CHILDREN. 



The organizations covered oy this classification 
include societies for the prevention of cruelty to chil- 
dren, humane societies, children's aid societies, chil- 
dren's friend societies, and home-finding societies, 
and, in brief, any organizations which receive children 
under their care for the special purpose of finding 
homes for them, and wliich place them in such homes, 
by boarduig, adoption, or indenture. In the strict 
sense of the term, these organizations can scarcely be 
called institutions, yet their woi'k is frequently so 
thoroughly institutional in character, so closely alHed 
to that carried on by many orphanages, homes, etc., 
that to omit them from this report would eliminate 
from it a most important element. It was therefore 
decided to obtam statistics for societies as a separate 
class, but to hmit the number included to those which 
actually receive children under their care. A con- 
siderable number of such societies, especially of 
humane societies, oonfine their efl'orts to the prosecu- 
tion, in the com"ts, of cases of cruelty to children, 
while some are siniply agencies for cliild-protection, 
but are not in any sense responsible for the subsequent 
well-being of the children; aU societies of this char- 
acter are excluded. 

INFORMATION FUBNISHED. 

The facts shown by the tabulation are the number 
of paid and voluntary agents m service, the number 
of receiving or temporary homes under the control 
of the society, the number of f amihes m which cMldren 
were placed during the year, the mmiber of children 
so placed, and the number imder the care of the 
society at the close of the year. In addition to these 
data regarding the organization and work of the 
society, its receipts, expenditures, and property valua- 
tion are shown. The cluldren placed during the year 
are classified according to their location in famihes or 
in institutions, being grouped in each case under the 
same general heads as the cliildren m institutions of 
Class I. Those imder the care of the society at the 
close of the year are classified as in the receiving or 
temporary homes, in families, \vith or without pay- 
ment of board, and m custody elsewhere. 

The receiving or temporary homes \mder the care 
of the societies, together with their inmates, are also 
included in Class I, which fact should be noted in any 
consideration of the figures for the total number of 
children in various classes of institutions. The infor- 
mation obtained in regard to the societies covered, 
together with their local addresses, is presented in 
detail, by states, on pages 158 to 173. Table 28 
summarizes the more important figures. 

From this table it appears that the majority of these 
societies are found m the Middle Atlantic and East 
North Central divisions. Among the states Indiana 
leads with 33, and is followed by New York with 28, 
Pennsylvania with 25, Ohio with 16, New Jersey with 



12, and Massachusetts with 10. Vermont in New 
England, Georgia, Mississippi, and Louisiana in the 
South, and Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming in 
the West, reported no organizations of this ty])e. 

A noticeable featm-e of these societies is the extent 
to which they employ voluntary agencies. Of the 205 
organizations enumerated only 163 reported agents, 
the inference as to the other 4^ being that the regular 
officers of the societies carried on whatever business 
might be necessary in caring for the cMldren. Those 
societies which employed agents reported a total of 
3,135, of whom 977 were paid, and 2,158 served with- 
out compensation. It is noteworthy that voluntary 
service is practically confined to the eastern states 
(including the East North Central division), Missouri 
being the only southern state, and Cahfornia and Colo- 
rado the only western states reporting an appreciable 
amount of voluntary work. Of the paid agents a 
majority are women, while of the volmitary agents 
the overwhelming majority are men. 

As already intimated, there are two quite distinct 
departments of work conducted by these societies: 
protection of children, through the courts, from cruel 
treatment or from evil influences; and provision for 
their care. As this report is necessarily hmited to 
children who come directlj' under the care of the 
societies, those organizations wliich confine their 
acti\'ities to the first-named department are excluded, 
while for those whose work includes both protection 
and home finding only the last-named branch is pre- 
sented in these tables. 

The children cared for are tabulated under two 
heads, ''Children placed during the year" and "Chil- 
dren under care of societies at the close of the year." 
The first head is subdivided so as to show children 
placed during the year in families and in institutions, 
respectively; the second shows the number at the 
close of the year in receiving homes controlled by soci- 
eties, and those under their supervision in families, 
other institutions, or elsewhere. 

In this connection an explanation of the terms used 
in these tables in regard to the placing or care of chil- 
dren will assist in interpreting their significance. A 
child is placed in a family, by assignment by the soci- 
ety, with or without payment of board; by adoption 
into the family; or by indenture. The term "insti- 
tution" is applied to an orphanage, childi-en's home, 
or other home that receives children as inmates; and 
the institution is usually one that is recognized by the 
court or by the state board of charities as providing 
proper care for the child. A child is placed in such an 
institution when it is committed to its care with 
approval of the court or state board of charities, or is 
temporarily intrusted to it by the society, pending 
further disposition. A receiving home under the 
control of the society, and in which children are pro- 
vided for temporarily, is not included under this 
definition. 



SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION AND CARE OF CHILDREN. 



35 



CHILDREN PLACED. 



The following table gives, by states, the total num- 
ber of children placed by the societies with families 
and institutions, respectivelj' : 



Table 26 



United States 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

Indiana 

California 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Iowa 

Maryland 

Washington 

Minnesota 

Oregon 

Wisconsin 

Missouri 

Colorado 

Maine 

District of Columbia. . 

Kansas 

Te.xas 

Virginia 

Connecticut 

Alabama 

Delaware 

Tennessee 

South Dakota 

Idaho 

Rhode Island 

Oklahoma 

North Carolina 

Florida 

New Hampshire 

West Virginia 

Montana 

North Dakota 

New Mexico 

Arkansas 

Nebraska 

South Carolina 



CHILDREN PL.1CED BY SOCIETIES 
FOE THE PROTECTION AND 

CABE OF children; 1910. 



Total. 



25,288 



In fami- 
lies. 



14,019 



2,389 

2,428 

1,329 

9S0 

610 

287 

295 

627 

313 

542 

340 

530 

178 

383 

270 

295 

4 

335 

24 

290 

196 

223 

114 

37 

34 

19 

138 

121 

27 

97 

93 

87 

23 

71 

66 

61 

50 

46 

39 

28 



In insti- 
tutions. 



11,269 



6,177 
678 
155 
347 
286 
489 
477 

26 
339 

15 

205 

6 

291 

38 
142 

98 
364 

22 

296 

4 

86 

21 
119 
165 
136 
123 
1 
4 

95 



From this table it appears that New York placed 
6,177 children (72.1 per cent of the total reported for 
that state) in institutions and only 2,389 (27.9 per 
cent) in families; Massachusetts placed 89.6 per cent 
in families and only 10.4 per cent in institutions; and 
Washington placed all but 6 of 536 children in famiUes, 
while Colorado placed all but 4 out of 368 children in 
institutions. The explanation of this marked differ- 
ence between certain states is found chiefly in the 
type of society that conducts the principal amount of 
child-placing work in the particular state. In general, 
societies originally or primarily protective in their 
character place the majority of childi'en in institu- 
tions, while the children's aid societies, home-finding 
societies, and those of that type place the majority 
of their children in famiUes. Thus, out of the total 
number reported from New York 6,046 were reported 
by 3 societies, the New York and Brooklyn Societies 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and the 
Mohawk and Hudson Humane Society, all three organ- 
izations being primarily protective rather than home 
finding in their character; in Massachusetts almost all 
were reported by children's aid societies and similar 
organizations; while in Colorado, two humane socie- 
ties, and in Washington a children's home society, 
were the only ones reported. 

As in the case of institutions for the care of children 
(Class I), so with these societies the assumption by 



state authority of supervision over benevolent insti- 
tutions has resulted in requiring child-placing and 
home-finding societies to continue their guardianship 
and supervision over children placed by them until it 
is clear that the right home has been found. 

RECEIVING HOMES. 

Another development lias been the establishment 
by a number of societies of receiving homes, where 
cliildren who come under their care, but for whom as 
yet no appropriate family or institution has been found, 
may be temporarily placed, or to wliich they may be 
returned should the experiment of family placing in 
any instance prove a failure. Some home-finding 
societies, instead of establisliing such a home, make 
arrangements with some neighboring orphanage or 
home, but the tendency is to have separate homes for 
the care of these cliildren. 

The following table gives the cUstribution by states, 
of the total number of cliildren reported by such socie- 
ties as under theu* care at the close of the year, accord- 
ing to their location in family homes, receiving homes, 
or elsewhere. Tliis last column covers a great variety 
of arrangements, some of the cliildren included being 
in institutions where they are kept tentatively, some 
in places where they are held on indenture, and some 
being self-supporting, but still under supervision. 



Table 27 

STATE. 


children under care of societies for 
protection and care of children at 
the close of the year: 1910. 


Total. 


In fami- 
lies. 


In receiv- 
ing 
homes. 


Else- 
where. 




32, 776 


20,989 


3,562 


8,081 




Pennsylvania 


7,515 

4,971 

■3,629 

1,918 

1,652 

1,611 

1,260 

1,195 

1,152 

907 

881 

809 

636 

611 

565 

557 

488 

■402 

360 

258 

254 

219 

178 

159 

121 

109 

75 

52 

53 

41 

41 

35 

26 

19 

9 

3 

3 

3 


4,062 

2,734 

2,412 

1,479 

1, 062 

612 

735 

1,088 

1,050 

907 

651 

756 

558 

192 

526 

300 

356 

330 

341 

207 

145 

198 


166 

2,115 

182 

80 


3 2f7 




122 


New Jersey 


1 006 


Illinois 


359 




590 


Michigan 


152 
28.8 
33 
35 


847 




237 


Massachusetts 


74 


Washington 


67 








50 


180 


Maryland 


53 




58 
8 
31 
25 
67 
45 
19 
32 


20 


Rhode Island 


411 




8 


West Virginia 


232 


Ohio 


65 


Wisconsin 


21 


Missouri 


19 
109 






21 




10 
5 


168 


Minnesota 


132 
19 

(=) 
71 
8 


22 




102 


Florida 


m 


(S) 




4 




44 
49 




Iowa 


3 




37 
6 

1 
11 


4 


New Hampshire 




3S 




34 
15 
19 
















9 


Montana 






3 




3 










3 










1 Includes those whose location was not reported. 



2 Not reported. 



A comparison of this table with the preceding one 
makes it evident that the societies of some states con- 
tinue their supervision over cliildren under their care 
longer than do those of other states. 



36 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR SOCIETIES FOR THE 





Table 28 

DIVISION OE STATE. 


Total 
num- 
ber or 
socie- 
ties re- 
ported. 


AGENTS IN SERVICE OF SOCIETIES AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR. 


CHILDREN PL.VCED DURING THE YEAR. 






Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties re- 
port- 
ing 
agents. 

i 


Total 


Paid. 


Voluntary. 


Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Total 
num- 
ber re- 
port- 
ed.' 


With sex 
reported. 


In families. 


In institutions. 




ber of 
agents 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Total.' 


With sex 
reported. 


Total.' 


With sex 
reported. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total.' 


With sex 
reported. 


Total.' 


With sex 
reported. 




Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


1 


United States.. 

Geographic omsioNS: 

Middle England 

Middle Atlantic... 
East North Central. 
West North Central 

South Atlantic 

East South Central. 
West South Central 


205 


163 


3,133 


977 


410 


567 


2,158 


1,874 


274 


198 


25,288 


12,545 


8,606 


14,019 


6,511 


5,424 


11,269 


6,034 


3,182 


2 
3 
4 
5 


18 
OS 
03 
20 
10 
6 
9 
5 
9 

2 
3 


18 
53 
39 
20 
10 
4 
7 
5 
7 


477 
850 
291 
98 
58 
9 
56 
1,145 
151 


77 

513 

143 

78 

58 

7 

55 

20 

26 


20 
179 
67 
46 
19 
6 
46 
14 
13 


57 

334 

76 

32 

39 

1 

9 

6 

13 


400 
337 
148 
20 


333 
214 
87 
18 


67 

113 

61 

2 


18 

63 

63 

20 

10 

4 

S 

5 

7 


2,277 

12,999 

3,385 

1,953 

1,561 

346 

425 

609 

1,733 


1,102 
7,032 
1,504 
954 
808 
264 
113 
140 
628 


1,175 
3,316 
1,454 
999 
666 
82 
147 
133 
634 


1,828 

5,797 

2,115 

1,543 

900 

56 

339 

241 

1,200 


876 
2,561 
1,021 
760 
424 
45 
84 
123 
617 


952 

1,499 

1,006 

78.3 

389 

11 

90 

118 

576 


449 
7,202 
1,270 
410 
661 
290 
86 
368 
533 


226 

4,471 

483 

194 

384 

219 

29 

17 

11 


223 

1,817 

448 

216 

277 

71 

57 

15 

58 


7 
8 
ft 


2 

1 

1,125 

125 


2 

1 

1,106 

113 


12 


n 






New England: 

Maine 


n 


2 
3 


2 
6 


1 
2 


...... 


1 
1 


1 
4 


3' 


1 
1 


2 
3 


357 
81 


204 

28 


153 
53 


335 
23 


193 

7 


142 
16 


22 

58 


11 
21 


11 
37 


12 
18 


New Hampshire.... 


u 

15 
16 

17 


Massachusetts 

Rhode Lsland 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic; 
New York 


10 
1 
2 

28 
12 
25 

16 
33 
5 
3 
6 

7 
2 
5 

1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


10 

1 
2 

27 
12 
14 

16 
10 
5 
2 
6 

7 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
2 

1 
1 


148 

■ 5 

316 

567 
87 
196 

140 
17 
87 
14 
33 

34 
13 
20 
9 
3 
8 
U 

1 
19 
10 
12 

8 


66 
4 
4 

376 
43 

94 

1 34 

1 14 
56 

i " 
25 

18 
! 13 
! 16 

'• 9 

i I 
1 11 

1 1 
19 
10 
12 

S 


13 
4 
2 

131 
18 
30 

27 
8 

19 
1 

12 

U 

14 
2 
1 
3 

8 

1 
3 
5 
3 
2 
2 
2 


53 

245 
25 
64 

7 

6 

37 

13 

13 

6 
2 

2 
5 
3 


82 

1 

312 

191 
44 
102 

106 

3 

31 


18 

1 

311 

169 
33 
12 

65 
2 
16 


64 
...... 

22 
11 
80 

41 
1 
15 


10 

1 
2 

27 
11 

25 

16 
33 
5 
3 
6 

7 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


1,484 
122 
233 

8,566 
1,327 
3,106 

772 
896 
653 
652 
412 

469 
557 
393 

62 
139 

39 
294 

170 
545 
320 
244 
72 
95 
28 


690 
53 
127 

5,695 
584 
753 

179 
448 
320 
327 
230 

220 
271 
212 
35 
63 
14 
139 

82 
305 
208 
105 
48 
44 
16 


794 
69 
106 

2,257 
604 
555 

166 
448 
333 
325 
182 

249 
286 
181 
27 
76 
25 
155 

88 
240 
112 
139 
24 
51 
12 


1,329 
27 
114 

2,389 

980 

2,423 

295 
610 
627 
313 
270 

178 
542 
295 

61 
138 

39 
290 

34 
340 
24 
223 
71 
93 
28 


610 
4 
62 

1,560 
389 
612 

HI 

299 
313 
166 
132 

95 
263 
153 
35 
62 
14 
138 

13 

192 
9 

103 
47 
44 
16 


719 
23 
52 

721 
354 

424 

96 
311 
314 

147 
138 

S3 
279 
142 
26 
76 
25 
152 

21 
148 
15 
120 
24 
49 
12 


155 
95 
119 

6,177 
347 
678 

477 
286 
26 
339 
142 

291 

15 

98 

1 

1 


80 
49 
65 

4,135 
195 
141 

68 
149 

7 
161 
98 

125 

8 
59 

i' 


75 
46 
54 

1,536 
150 
131 

70 
137 

19 
178 

44 

166 

7 

39 

1 


18 
19 

m 


New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 
Ohio 


?) 




?? 




n 




74 


Wisconsin 


8 
16 


4 
15 


4 
1 


?S 


West North Central: 
Minnesota 


w 




?7 


Missouri 


4 


3 


1 


?8 


North Daliota 

South Dakota 


W 








w 








^1 


Kansas 








4 

136 
205 
296 
21 
1 
2 


1 

69 

113 

199 

2 

1 


3 

67 
92 
97 
19 

2 


w 


South Atlantic: 

Delaware 








11 




16 
5 
9 
6 
2 
1 








14 


District of Columbia 








IS 








16 


West \'irgLnia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 








17 


4 ; 4 








IS 


3 


3 








W 














40 


Florida 


1 

2 
2 

2 


1 


1 


1 


1 










1 


87 






87 












t1 


East South Central:. 
























*? 




2 
2 


4 
5 


3 

4 


3 
3 


...... 


i 
1 


\ 




2 
2 


144 
202 


101 
163 


43 
39 


19 

37 


12 

33 


7 
4 


i25 

165 


89 
130 


36 
35 


)1 




14 


Missis,sippi 


tn 


West South Central: 
Arkansas 


1 


1 


41 


41 


40 


1 








1 


46 


22 


24 


46 


22 


24 








<6 
















*7 




2 
6 

1 
1 


2 

4 

1 
1 


4 
11- 

4 
5 


4 
10 

4 
5 


2 

4 

3 
2 


2 
6 

1 
3 








2 
5 

1 

1 


97 
282 

66 
125 


51 
40 

29 
69 


46 

77 

37 
56 


97 
196 

66 
121 


51 
11 

29 
69 


46 
20 

37 
52 








tf! 


Texas 


i 


1 




86 


29 


57 


44 


Mountain: 


W 


Idaho 








4 




4 


51 








5? 




2 

1 


2 

1 


81,132 

4 


4 


7 
2 


""2 


31,125 n,106 


19 


2 
1 


368 
50 


19 
23 


13 

27 


4 
50 


2 
23 


2 
27 


364 


17 


11 


■il 


New Mexico 


M 












55 


Utah 







































56 






































57 


Pacific: 

Washington 


1 
1 
7 


1 
1 

5 


11 
3 


11 
3 
12 


8 
1 
4 


3 
2 

S 






1 

1 
5 


536 
421 
776 


278 
207 
143 


258 
214 
162 


530 
383 
287 


274 
207 
136 


256 
176 
144 


6 
38 
489 


4 


2 


58 






38 

7 IS 1 


59 






12 




















1 



1 Includes tliose whose sex was not reported. 



» Not reported. 



SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION AND CARE OF CHILDREN. 

PROTECTION AND CARE OF CHILDREN, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



37 



CHaDEEN UNDER CARE OF SOCIETIES AT CLOSE Or THE TE.U!. 


RECEIPTS DURING 
THE 1-EAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 
THE YEAH. 


VALUE OP 
PROPERTY 

AT CLOSE 
OF THE YEAR. 




Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties re- 
port- 
ing. 


Total 
number 
reported.' 


With sex 
reported. 


In families. 


In receiving homes. 


Elsewhere. 


Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties re 
port- 
mg. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 

socie- 
ties re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 




Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total.i 


With sex 
reported. 


Total. 


With sex 
reported. 


Total." 


With se.t 
reported. 




Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 




148 


32,776 


15, 038 


12,086 


20,989 


9,665 


8,149 


3,562 


2,141 


1,226 


8,081 


3,016 


2,481 


165 


$2,102,892 


163 


$2,009,081 


81 


$6,727,107 


1 


14 
51 
42 

16 
9 
3 
5 
3 
5 


2,320 

16,115 

5,679 

1,758 

3,770 

102 

70 

233 

2,609 


1,081 
6,759 
3,013 

420 
2,151 

121 
15 

132 
1,346 


1,239 

4,741 

2,611 

512 

1,510 

41 

8 

101 

1,323 


1,029 

9,208 

3,512 

1,590 

2,715 

56 

12 

8 

2,259 


764 

4,138 

1,803 

316 

1,558 

45 

9 

7 

1,026 


865 

2,955 

1,709 

448 

1,157 

11 

2 

1 

1,001 


41 

2,463 

632 

124 

56 


20 

1,541 

371 

76 

21 


21 

797 

201 

48 

35 


660 

4,415 

1,629 

44 

890 

106 

9 

171 

267 


297 

1,077 

835 

28 

572 

76 

5 

91 

35 


353 
988 
639 

16 
318 

30 
4 

SO 

63 


16 

49 

46 

20 

10 

i 

8 

5 

8 


308,549 

974,734 

252,016 

178,599 

138, 193 

9,664 

19, 128 

85,751 

136,359 


16 
49 
43 
20 
10 
4 
8 
5 
8 


230, 403 
974, 582 
235,236 
180, 486 
130,712 
8,414 
20,586 
84,368 
144,304 


14 

26 
14 
10 
7 
1 
2 
4 
3 


1,939,878 

3,689,893 

257, 186 

336,670 

162, 100 

1,248 

23,000 

103,550 

213,682 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


49 
54 
143 


1 

34 

77 


2 
20 
41 


1 
2 


219 
41 


131 
16 


88 
25 


198 
6 


119 
4 


79 
2 








21 
35 


12 
12 


9 
23 


2 
1 


4,465 
1,421 


2 

1 


4,334 
1,436 


1 
2 


175 
4,046 


11 
12 














9 

1 
1 

17 
11 
23 

12 
17 
5 
3 
6 

4 
2 
4 

1 
1 
1 
3 


1,195 
611 
254 

4,971 
3,029 
7,515 

488 
1,200 
1,91S 
1,611 

402 

159 
52 

258 

360 
19 
3 

907 


542 
274 
118 

2,95S 
2,089 
1,712 

238 
661 
1,013 
884 
217 

92 

35 

128 

117 

10 

3S' 


663 
337 
136 

1,903 
1,418 
1,300 

195 
599 
905 
727 
185 

67 
17 
130 
243 
9 
3 
43 


1,088 
192 
145 

2,734 
2,412 
4,062 

356 
735 
1,479 
612 
330 

132 


505 
68 
68 

1,603 
1,447 
1,188 

195 
378 
775 
279 
176 

72 


583 
124 

77 

1,231 
943 

781 

161 
357 
704 
333 
154 

60 


33 

8 


17 
3 


16 
6 


74 

411 
109 

122 
1,006 
3,287 

65 
237 
359 
847 

21 

22 
3 
19 


20 

203 
50 

74 
581 
422 

4 

105 

185 

627 

14 

16 
2 
10 


54 

208 

59 

48 
425 
516 

6 
132 

174 
320 

6 
1 
9 


10 

1 
2 

23 
10 

16 

14 
17 
5 
3 
6 

7 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


240,313 
17, 149 
45,201 

635,592 
101,517 

237,626 

45,088 
39, 468 
99,969 
33,293 
34,207 

36,461 
47,733 
33,586 
14,544 
14, 162 
10,326 
21,797 

1,158 
21,966 
72,928 
13,938 
8,492 
7,847 
4,666 


10 
1 
2 

23 
11 

15 

13 
16 
S 
3 
6 

7 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 

1 

2 

1 
2 

1 

1 

1 


171,328 
9,499 
43,806 

641,584 
106,368 
226,630 

35,384 
36,498 
96,535 
34,982 
31,8.37 

35,017 
47, 186 
32,385 
16, 295 
16,714 
9,835 
22,454 

1,429 
23,270 
63,911 
14,672 
8,686 
7,232 
4,665 


8 
1 

2 

14 
4 

8 

3 
2 
4 
3 

2 

3 
2 
2 
1 
1 


1,660,961 
77, 100 
197,606 

3,150,761 
93,141 
445,991 

50,952 
36,000 
119,980 
34,000 
16,264 

83,480 
97,000 
70,000 
26, 790 
65,000 


14 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

26 
26 
27 

''8 


2,115 
182 
166 

67 
288 

80 
152 

45 

6 
49 
32 
19 
19 


1,381 
58 
102 

39 
178 
53 
78 
23 

4 

33 
17 
12 
10 


684 
49 
64 

28 
110 
27 
74 
22 

1 

10 
15 
7 
9 


207 
341 


101 
105 


106 
236 








29 
10 


3 

907 


"■'38' 


3 
43 




















1 


4,300 


31 

32 
33 
14 














2 

1 

1 
1 
1 


809 

1,652 

505 

557 

3 

75 


498 

1,061 

261 

286 

1 

44 


311 
591 
304 
271 
2 
31 


766 

1,062 

526 

300 


478 
638 
250 
151 


278 
424 
276 
149 








53 

590 

8 

2.32 

3 

4 


20 

423 

1 

124 

1 

3 


33 

167 

7 

108 

2 

1 


2 


102,775 








31 

26 


10 
11 


21 
14 


2 

1 
1 
1 


20,600 

35,000 

2,726 

1,000 


35 
36 
37 
38 
39 


71 


41 


30 














1 


109 


(=) 


(-) 


(=) 


m 


m 


O 


m 


m 








1 


7,199 


1 


7,047 
















41 
42 
43 
44 

45 
46 
47 

48 

49 
50 

61 
52 


1 

2 


^•j{ 


87 
34 


34 

7 


19 

37 


12 
33 


7 
4 








102 
4 


75 
1 


27 
3 


2 
2 


2,848 I 
6,716 


2 
2 


2,873 
5,541 












1 


1,248 








1 


9 


5 


4 














9 


5 


4 


1 


3,150 


1 


2,900 






















2 
2 

1 
1 


26 
35 

3 
52 


9 
1 

1 
31 


2 
21 


11 

1 


9 

r-) 


2 


15 
34 


1 


% 








2 
5 

1 

1 


6,i32 
9,846 

13,637 
49,300 


2 
5 

1 
1 


6,143 
11,543 

13, 040 
48,500 


1 
1 

1 
1 


12,000 
11,000 

18,000 
74,400 








3 


1 


2 


8 


7 


1 


44 


24 20 
































2 
1 


10,600 


2 
1 


< 11,718 
10,500 


1 
1 


1, 150 
10,000 


1 


178 


100 


78 








10 


10 




168 


90 


78 








54 
55 
66 

57 
58 
59 


1 

1 
3 


1,152 
030 
881 


616 
282 
449 


537 
354 
432 

1 


1,060 
558 
061 


553 
251 
221 


497 
307 
197 


35 

68 
50 


27 
31 
19 


8 

27 

6 


67 
20 
ISO 


35 


32 
20 

1 


1 

1 
6 


31,811 
14,201 
90,347 


1 
1 
6 


31,811 
16,871 
96,622 


1 

1 


40,400 
133, 150 
40, 132 



' Includes agents for protection of animals. 



' Includes expenditures for protection of animals. 



38 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Thus New York, -wliicli placed 8,566 children during 
the year, reported only 4,971 as under care at the close 
of the year; but Pennsylvania, which placed 3,106 dur- 
ing the year, reported 7,515 as under care at the close of 
the year. Sunilar contrasts occur elsewhere. The ex- 
planation is probably that in New York the societies 
are prunarily protective rather than home finding in 
their character, while in Pennsylvania the children's 
aid societies are more prominent. 



The same contrast appcai-s in the financial reports. 
Only 1 65 of the 205 societies made any report of their 
finances, and only 81 made any report as to the value 
of property owned. It should, however, be remem- 
bered that as the work of the societies in many cases 
is yet in its infancy, and therefore not fully organized, 
future reports will undoubtedly show considerable 
increase along these lines. 



Class III.— HOMES FOE THE CARE OF ADULTS, OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN. 



The institutions covered by this classification are 
primarily for adidts, and include homes for the jier- 
manent care of the aged, infu'm, or destitute; for the 
temporary shelter of the homeless, the unemployed, 
or wayfarers; for the protection and relief of the un- 
fortunate, wayward, or fallen; and for special classes, 
as convalescents, incurables, epileptics, and others. 
Cliildren are received when they accompany their 
parents or when, for any reason, they can not appro- 
priately be received into the institutions specially for 
the care of cliildren (Class I), particularly in the case 
of self-supporting, delinquent, or wayward minors. 

In the report for 1904 these institutions were in- 
cluded under two separate classifications, (1) "Per- 
manent homes for adults, or adults and cluldren" and 
(2) "Temporary homes for adults and children." In 
the present report, cliiefly because of the fact that 
many institutions seemed to belong sometimes to 
both classes, all are included in one class, although 
the distinction between permanent and temporary 



homes is recognized in sqme of the analytical tables 
which follow. 

In a general way the institutions of tliis class are 
distributed over the country according to the density 
of the population rather than the area. The geo- 
graphic divisions, however, show mdely divei-gent 
ratios between the number of institutions and the 
population. The ratios for the respective divisions 
are as follows: 

\ew England One to every 28,740 inhabitants. 

Middle Atlantic One to every 43,406 inhabitants. 

Pacific One to every 53,067 inhabitants. 

East North Central One to every 68,611 inhabitants. 

South Atlantic One to every 79,187 inhabitants. 

West North Central One to every 93,364 inhabitants 

Mountain One to every 125,405 inhabitants 

East South Central One to every 137,867 inhabitants. 

West South Central One to every 159,719 inhabitants. 

The information secured in regard to the various 
institutions of this class, together with their local ad- 
dresses, is pi'esented by states in the general tables, 
pages 174 to 267. Table 29 summarizes the principal 
statistics by states and geographic di^^sions. 



HOMES FOR ADULTS, OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN. 



39 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR HOMES FOR THE CARE OP ADULTS, OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN, 

BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 39 



mvmoN OR STATE. 



United States.. 

Qeogkaphic divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. 
VVest«S!orlllCentral. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central. 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 



New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire.. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut., 



Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania... 



East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South .Vtlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia. . . 
North Carolina.. 
South Carolina. . 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 



Pacific: 

Washington. 

Oregon 

California.... 



Total 
num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 



228 
445 
366 
126 
154 
61 
55 
21 
79 



19 
16 
9 
130 
19 
35 



221 
59 
165 



INMATES AT CLOSE OF THE YEAH. 



Num- 


Total 


ber 


num- 


of m- 


ber of 


stitu- 


m- 


tions 


mates 


re- 


re- 


port- 


port- 


mg. 


ed. 



219 
429 
254 
121 
139 
53 
51 
17 
75 



16 
16 
S 
127 
17 
35 



212 
58 
159 



116,228 



Adults. 



To- 
tal.' 



1,947 
371 
432 

5,07U 
788 

1,749 



21, ( 
3,806 
9,864 



4,09; 
9,916 
2, 725 
4,131 



2, 14; 

1,761 

2,978 
148 
548 
945 

3,570 



241 

1,831 

2,528 

3,181 

246 

426 

255 

708 

137 



2,165 

2,326 

390 

180 



371 
1,279 

305 
l,f 



207 
177 
53 
948 



129 



8,846 



59,677 



9,373 
28,902 
27, 149 
10, 565 
8,339 
3,584 
2,669 
1,27S 
6,987 



1,947 
371 
224 

4,387 
760 

1,684 



17, 197 
3,467 
8,238 



8,672 
3,852 
8,686 
2,311 
3,628 



1,821 

1,556 

2,275 

99 

548 

911 

3,353 



235 

1,454 

2,235 

3,146 

167 

239 

242 

533 



1,066 

2,146 

192 

180 



213 

1,219 

69 

1,168 



192 

177 

53 

731 



125 



With sex 
reported. 



Male. 



37,849 



5,069 
13,657 
18,761 
7,035 
5,370 
2,610 
1,116 
859 
5,200 



1,795 
144 
129 

1,773 
349 
879 



8,590 
1,760 
3,307 



6,264 
2,665 
5,590 
1,' '^ 
2,746 



1,060 
917 

1,104 
37 
548 
449 

2,920 



85 

516 

1,676 

2,657 

15 

150 

21 

226 

24 



521 

1,802 

142 

145 



66 
402 

16 
632 



87 
177 

44 
429 



Fe- 
male. 



4,160 
14, 806 
7,997 
3,427 
2,954 

974 
1,470 

419 
1,642 



152 
213 
95 
2,484 
411 
805 



8,490 
1,458 
4,858 



2,399 

i,is; 

2,714 
815 



761 

639 

1,068 

62 



462 
435 



150 
923 
559 
489 
152 

89 
221 
307 

64 



545 

344 

50 

35 



147 

734 

53 

536 



105 



9 
302 



Children. 



To- 
tal." 



984 
6,460 
3,389 
1, 527 
1,214 
1,477 
1,112 
236 
983 



With sex 
reported. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



276' 551 

2,581 3,726 

839 l,97ll 

472' 872! 
293 



PERSONS RECEIVED DURING 
THE YEAR. 



384' 

479' 

10 

231! 



718 
1,076 
609 
177 
661 



208 
683 
28 
65 



105 103 

155j 391 

4 4 

12 S3 



4,495 1,979 

339 95 

1,626 507 



997 
245 
1,230 
414 
503 



321 

205 

703 

49 



34 
215 



6 
377 
293 

35 

79 
187 

13 
175 

49 



158 
60 
236 
658 



15 
'2i7 



231 
88 

221 
97 

202 



107 
65 
154 

27 



18 
101 



28 
74 
12 
41 
86 

m 

52 



267 
67 
50 



61 

28 

117 

273 



(') 



2,417 

244 

1,065 



457 
157 
755 
301 
301 



91 
128 
501 

22 



16 
114 



m 

349 
99 
17 
38 
91 
2 

112 
10 



815 
113 
148 



97 

32 

109 

371 



168 



Num 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
jjort- 
iug. 



Total. 1 



1,302 918,75-. 



19S 82,049 
420 514,466 
244 208, 4;S0 
116' 23,834 
132 23,135 
7,035 
2,565 
1,773 
55, 475 



13 
14 
8 
118 
15 
30 



213 
56 
151 



1,170 

91 

126 

55,851 

90: 

23,909 



347,207 
65,121 
112, 138 



With sex 
reported. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



■56,691 140,302 



71,837 

446,041 

144,117 

15.729 

18, 790 

5,404 

766 

733 

53, 274 



746 

45 

60 

47, 164 

491 

23,331 



2S6, 478 
63,963 
105,600 



150, 696 
10,904 
24,872 
2,041 
19, 9r 



8,386 
892 
10,675 
144 
568 
482 

2,687 



122 

4,978 

8,763^ 

6,363 

245 

303 

303' 

2,003 

45, 



4,943 

1,374 

617, 

101 



298 

948 

188 

1,131 



173 

43 

12 

1,441 



9,630 

51,655 

60,852 

7,816 

4,174 

1,436 

1,799 

739 

2,201 



RECEIPTS 

DURING THE 

YEAR. 



PAYMENTS 

DURING THE 

YEAR. 



Num- 
ber 

of in- 

stitu- Amount 

tions reported, 
re- 

jjort- 

Ing. 



Nimi- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



1,297 $24, 203, 197 



382 
46 
66 
;,147 
411 
578 



44,100 
1,017 
6,538 



100,0,85 50.611 
8,124 1,1.85 

7,321 

1,045 
690 



15, 6.H5 

996 

19,227 



4,338 
332 

8,064 

16 

568 

210 

2,201 



3,795 

7,418 

5,843 

109 

147 

42 

1,311 

26 



3,991 

1,026 

323 



56 
413 

27 
270 



59 

43 

10 

536 



3,1 

560 
2, 433 

128 



272 
486 



23 

1,183 

1,345 

520 

136 

156 

261 

531 

19! 



348 
126 

371 



242 
535 
161 
861 



2 
604 



207i 
416, 
247 
113 
133, 

5o: 

45 
17, 
69 



3,043,209 

8, 090, 786 

5,269,006 

2,289,926 

2,156,093 

776, 651 

587,506 

406,075 

1,583,946 



17 
13 
5 

122 
16 

34: 



450, 761 
119, 838 
52, 629 
1, 735, 989 
206, 750 
477, 242 



2061 5,417,330 
571 813, 250 
153 1,860,205, 



80 
35 
79! 
30' 
23 



1,559,283 
673, 678 

1, 886, 662 
445, 706 
703,777 



326, 162 
301, 333 
522, 434 
32,992 
258,585 
321,421 
626,999 



39,722 

289, 894 

911,393 

655, 294 

12, 131 

74,983 

27,518 

124, 299 

20,859 



281,665 

387,260 

60,320 

47,406 



63,954 
106,876 

72, 435 
344,241 



49,576 

31,000 

14,919 

299,312 



11,268 



Amount 
reported. 



1,310*23,720,381 



208 

421 

261 

113 

133 

52 

45 

17 

70 



1 
14 
5 
122 
16 
34 



209 
57 
155 



2,721,261 

8,018,127 

5, 334, 902 

2,249,614 

2,064,406 

806,611 

690,525 

4-20, 177 

1,514,758 



426,935 

83,715 

49, 818 

1,514,223' 

201,374' 

445, 196 



5,019,376' 

963, 796 

2,034,955 



1,553,9651 
632,565 

1,927,837 
446, 319 
774,226 



313,629 
309,778 
487,710 
26,295 
236,716 
25?; 984 
618,502 



39,723 
264,748 
826, 312 
649,222 
67,795 
57, 170 
21,913 
120, 316 
18,207 



313,635 
388,493 
57,087 
47,396 



58,996 
161,984 

66,854 
312,691 



54,417 

39,000 

14,919 

300,841 



11,000 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF 

THE YEAH. 



Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



1,238 



$158,318,121 



194 

390 

238 

108 

126 

64 

44 

19 

65 



16 
12 
6 
117 
14 
30 



189 
53 
148 



.\mount 
reported. 



1.8,208,980 
72,660,081 
25,424,710 
9,045,727 
16,831,465 
4,381,014 
3,162,530 
2,116,231 
7,497,383 



1,418,629 
1,090,511 
236,091 
12,326,194 
1,024,915 
2, 113, 640 



50,103,260 
3,660,506 
18,896,315 



8,044,755 
3,289,780 
9,314,319 
1,603,363 
3,172,493 



1,590,935 

1, 345, 729 

2, 464, 639 

167,963 

829,700 

801,544 

1,845,217 



254, 170 

1,848,055 

8,997,476 

3,209,190 

138, 318 

206, 700 

408,717 

646,839 

123,000 



1,629,474 

2,373,864 

244,686 

133,000 



273,500 
1,042,902 

289.886 
1,546,242 



240,431 

93,000 

15,000 

1,747,600 



12,000 
8,200 



1,445 1,077 

7041 616 

5,821, 5,294 



747 

463 

3,990 



330 

153 
1,159 



126 
18 

87 



226 

70 

365 



1,365 483 
41,107 40,857 
13,003' 11,934 



250 
1,069 



223, 052 

112, 171 

1,248,723 



208,630 

116, 877 

1,189,251 



1,456,200 

342, 196 

5,698,988 



1 Includes those whose sex was not reported. 



' Not reported. 



40 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



COMPARISON WITH REPORT FOR 1904. 

Table 30 gives a comparative summary of the Bta- 
tistics of the institutions in this class, in 1910 and 
1904, the figures for 1904 combining the two classes of 
permanent and temporary homes which are consoli- 
dated in this report. 

Comparative Summary — Homes for the Care or Adults, on 
Adults and Children, 1910 and 1904. 



Table 30 

DIVISION OR STATE. 


NUMBER OF 
INSTITUTIONS. 


NUMBER OF INMATES 

REPORTED AT CLOSE OF 

THE YEAR. 




1910. 


1904. 


In- 
crease. 1 


1910. 


1904. 


Increase.' 


United States 


1,435 


1,202 


233 


116,228 


105,812 


10, 416 






New England. . . 


228 


210 


18 


10,357 


10, 784 


-427 






Maine 

New Hampshire 


19 
16 
9 
130 
19 
35 

445 


20 
16 
9 
120 
13 
32 

378 


-1 

io' 

6 
3 

67 


1,947 
371 
432 

5.070 
788 

1,749 

35,362 


2,946 
44.3 
358 

5,029 
695 

1,413 

28,357 


-999 

. -72 

74 


Massachusetts 

Rhode Mand 

Connecticut 


41 
193 
336 


Middle Atlantic 


7,005 


New York 


221 
59 
165 

266 


200 
49 
129 

207 


21 
10 
36 

59 


21,692 
3,806 
9,864 

30,538 


18, 179 
2,931 
7,247 

30, 592 


3,513 


New Jersey. . . 


875 


Pennsylvania 

East Nokth Central... 


2,617 
-54 


Ohio 


83 
. 40 
88 
31 
24 

126 


68 
27 
64 
26 
22 

102 


15 

13 

24 

5 

2 

24 


9,669 
4.097 
9,916 
2,725 
4,131 

12,092 


11,131 
3,973 
8,691 
2.457 
4,340 

11,837 


-1,462 


Indiana 


124 




1,225 




268 




-209 


West North Central.. 


255 


MlTlTlpsnta , 


29 
27 
37 
2 
2 
14 
15 

154 


18 
24 
36 

? 
9 
11 

130 


11 
3 

1 
-1 

1 
5 

4 

24 


2,142 

1,761 

2,978 

148 

548 

945 

3,570 

9,553 


1,088 

1,629 

2,945 

57 

211 

922 

4,985 

9,363 


1 054 




132 


Missouri 


33 


North Daliota 

South Dalcota 


91 
337 
23 




1,415 


South Atlantic 


190 




9 
31 
26 
27 

5 
10 
14 
26 

6 

61 


7 

30 

24 

27 

4 

8 

7 

16 

7 

47 


2 
1 
2 

i' 

2 

7 
10 

-1 

14 


241 

1,831 

2.528 

3,181 

246 

426 

255 

708 

137 

5,061 


147 
1,501 
2,096 
4,490 

138 

180 
494 
65 

3,310 


94 




330 


District of Columbia. 


432 
1,309 


West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 


108 

174 

75 

214 


Florida 


72 


East South Central . . . 


1.751 


Kentucky 


31 
17 
1! 

2 

.55 


25 
14 
5 
3 

50 


6 
3 

6 

-1 

5 


2,165 

2.326 

390 

180 

3,781 


1.C23 

1,473 

170 

44 

3,080 


542 




853 


Alabama 


220 
136 


West South Central. . 


701 


Arkansas 


8 
19 
4 

24 

21 


7 
17 

2 
24 

19 


1 
2 

■ 
2 


371 
1,279 

305 
1,826 

1,514 


265 

1,161 

31 

1,623 

1,209 


106 


Louisiana... 


118 


Oklahoma 


274 


Texas 


203 


MOUNT-UN 


305 








4 
1 

1 
9 
1 
2 
3 


4 

1 

1 

11 

i" 

1 


1 

1 
2 


207 
177 
53 
948 


151 
121 
48 
853 




Idaho 


56 


Wyoming. . . . 


5 






New Mexico 




Arizona 




11 
25 


11 


Utah 


129 


104 


Nevada 




Pacific 


79 


59 


20 


7,970 


7,280 


690 








19 
11 
49 


9 

8 
42 


10 
3 

7 


1,445 

704 

5,821 


661 

367 

6,252 




Oregon 


337 


California. 


4^11 







•A minus sign {— ) denotes decrease. 

From this table it appears that there has been a 
total increase of 233 institutions' Five states — Colo- 
rado, Florida, Maine, Mississippi, and North Dakota — 



report a decrease in the number of institutions, and 
seven — Idaho, Montana, New Hampshire, Texas, Ver- 
mont, Virgmia, and Wyoming — report the same num- 
ber as in 1904, while Nevada remains the only state 
that has no institution of this class. The largest 
increase reported is in Pennsylvania (36), followed by 
Illinois (24), New York (21)," Ohio (15), Indiana (13), 
Minnesota (11), and Georgia, Massachusetts, New 
Jersey, and Washuigton (10 each). 

The increase m the total number of inmates reported 
at the close of the year is 10,416. Eight states — Ari- 
zona, California, Kansas, Maine, New Hampshire, 
Ohio, Vu-ginia, and Wisconsm — show a decrease. The 
largest increase is reported from New York, followed 
by Pennsylvania, lUmois, and Minnesota. 

The number of inmates at the close of the year and 
the number of persons received during the year per 
100,000 of the total population are shown by geo- 
graphic divisions in the following table: 



Table 31 

INMATES AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR: 1910. 


PERSONS RECEIVED DURING THE TEAR: 
1910. 


Division. 


Number 

per 
100,000 
popvila- 

tion. 


Division. 


Number 

per 
100,000 
popula- 
tion. 


Pacific 


190 
183 
167 
161 


Middle Atlantic 


2 612 




Pacific 


1,323 


East North Central . . 


Now Fnplnnd 


1 252 






1,142 


West North Central . 


101 


West North Central 


205 




78 
60 
57 
43 




189 


East South Central 


East South Central 


83 






67 


West South Central. . . 


West South Central 


29 









It should be borne in mind that the table deals with 
data that are far from homogeneous either as to class 
of institutions covered or type of persons included. 
Among the institutions are federal and state soldiers' 
homes. Masonic and other fraternal homes, homes for 
the aged under the care of Catholic sisters or private 
coi-porations, municipal lodging houses for transients, 
associated charities' shelters, rescue homes for way- 
ward or fallen women, shelters for the unemployed, 
homes for incurables and convalescents, etc. Pri- 
marily, all these institutions are supposed to be de- 
signed for adults, yet a large number of children are 
provitled for, some with their parents, and some tem- 
porarily, because no other suitable homes are open to 
them, while in many cases persons classed as children 
because legally minors are to all intents and purposes 
adults, being mdependent and self-supporting, and 
only temporarily in need of relief. 

PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY HOMES. 

Totals made up of such diverse elements evidently 
can not be regarded as fully satisfactory, yet the dis- 
tinction between the two classes of homes (permanent 
and temporary) is important and is frequently used. 
Tables 32 and 33 give, with what is believed to be sub- 



HOMES FOR ADULTS, OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN. 



41 



stantial accuracy, the situation in this respect, showing 
for each class the number of homes, the number of 
inmates at the close of the year, and the number of 
persons received during the year. Under the head of 
"Permanent homes" are moludcd those whose maui 
purpose is to receive persons who have no prospect of 



ability to care for themselves; under the head of 
"Temporary homes," those which aim simply to supply 
rcUef or shelter for those in immediate or temporary 
need. The distinction between the two is not always 
easily drawn, but the classification is sufficiently accu- 
rate to bring out a general itlea of the conditions. 



INMATES AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR IN PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS, OR 

ADULTS AND CHILDREN, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 32 


all homes. 


permanent homes. 


TEMPORARY HOMES. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Institu- 
tions 
reported. 


Inmates 

at close 

of the year. 


Institu- 
tions 
reported. 


Institu- 
tions re- 
porting 
inmates 
at close of 
the year. 


Inmates reported. 


Institu- 
tions 
reported. 


Institu- 
tions re- 
porting 
mmates 
atcloseof 
the year. 


Inmates reported. 




Total. 


Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Adults. 


Children. 




1,436 


116,228 


808 


782 


78,050 


73,177 


4,873 


627 


576 


38,178 


25,669 


12,509 




Geooraphic divisions: 

New England 


228 
445 
266 
126 
154 
61 

00 

21 
79 


10,357 
35,362 
30,538 
12,092 
9,653 
5,061 
3,781 
1,514 
7,970 


145 
239 
156 
76 
85 
36 
27 
9 
36 


139 
236 
154 
74 
82 
32 
24 
7 
34 


7,178 
19,009 
22,903 
9,521 
6,818 
3,540 
2,396 
732 
6,953 


6,889 
17,911 
22,025 
8,698 
6,598 
2,915 
1,498 
732 
5,911 


289 
1,098 
878 
823 
220 
625 
898 


83 
206 
110 
50 
69 
26 
28 
12 
43 


80 
193 
99 
47 
57 
21 
27 
10 
42 


3,179 
16,353. 
7,635 
2,571 
2,735 
1,521 
1,385 
782 
2,017 


2,484 
10,991 
5,124 
1,867 
1,741 

669 
1,171 

546 
1,076 


696 


Middle Atlantic 


6,362 
2 511 


East North Central 


West North Central 


'704 




994 


Ea^t South Central 


852 


West South Central 


214 


Mountain 


236 


Pacific 


42 


941 






New ENGL.iND: 

Maine 


19 
16 
9 
130 
19 
35 

221 
59 
165 

83 
40 

88 
31 
24 

29 
27 
37 
2 
2 
14 
15 

9 
31 
26 
27 

5 

10 
14 
26 

6 

31 

17 
11 
2 

8 
19 

4 
24 

4 
1 
1 
9 
1 
2 
3 


1,947 
371 
432 

6,070 
788 

1,749 

21,692 
3,806 
9,864 

9,069 
4,097 
9,916 
2,725 
4,131 

2,142 

1,761 

2,978 

148 

548 

945 

3,570 

241 

1,831 

2,528 

3,181 

246 

426 

255 

708 

137 

2,165 

2,326 

390 

180 

371 

1,279 

305 

1,826 

207 
177 
53 
948 


13 
15 
S 
75 
12 
22 

120 
34 
85 

42 
22 
67 
20 
15 

15 

17 

22 

1 

2 

9 

10 

7 

16 

15 

17 

2 

6 

6 

13 

3 

17 

11 

6 

1 

4 
U 
3 
9 

2 

1 
1 
3 
1 

1 


12 
15 

8 
72 
10 
22 

lis 

34 
84 

41 
22 
57 
19 
15 

IS 
17 
21 

I 

8 

10 

7 
16 

'I 

6 

6 

12 

3 

10 

10 

5 

1 

3 

10 
3 
8 

2 
1 
1 
3 


1,905 
361 
432 

2,669 
493 

1,318 

10,891 
2,432 
6,686 

6,846 
3,499 
7,232 
2,078 
3,248 

1,312 

1,495 

1,969 

40 

548 

656 

3,501 

206 

916 

1,930 

2,852 

19 

358 

89 

400 

48 

1,131 

2,036 

194 

180 

212 

866 

260 

1,068 

92 
177 

53 
410 


1,905 
361 
224 

2,634 
493 

1,272 

10,317 
2,379 
5,215 

6,635 
3,370 
6,966 
1,970 
3,084 

1,115 

1,403 

1,638 

40 

548 

654 

3,300 

200 

903 

1,924 

2,852 

19 

203 

89 

354 

48 

694 

1,933 

108 

ISO 

89 
851 

24 
634 

92 
177 

53 
410 




6 
1 
1 

66 
7 

13 

101 
25 
80 

41 
18 
31 
11 
9 

14 
10 
16 

1 


4 

1 


42 
10 


42 
10 




New Hampshire 






Vermont 


208 
35 




Massaeh usetts 


65 
7 
13 

94 
24 
75 

39 
15 
25 
11 
9 

13 
9 

15 
1 


2,401 
295 
431 

10,801 
1,.374 
4,178 

2,823 
698 

2,684 
647 
883 

830 

266 

1,009 

108 


1,753 
267 
412 

6,880 
1,088 
3,023 

2,037 

482 

1,720 

341 

644 

706 

1.53 

637 

59 


648 




28 


Connp/'tir'nt 


46 

574 
53 
471 

211 
129 
266 
108 
164 

197 

92 

331 


19 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 


3,921 
281 




Pensy Ivania 


1,155 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


786 




116 




964 




306 


Wisconsin 


339 


West North Central: 


124 


Iowa 


113 




372 


North Dakota 


49 


South Dakota 






Nebraska 


2 
201 


5 
6 

2 

15 

11 

10 

3 

4 

8 

13 

3 

14 

6 
5 
1 

4 

8 
1 
15 

2 


5 
4 

2 
12 
9 
8 
3 
4 
7 
10 

10 
6 
6 


289 
69 

35 
915 
598 
329 
227 

68 
166 
308 

89 

1,034 
291 
196 


267 
55 

29 
551 
311 
294 
148 

36 
1.53 
179 

40 

372 

213 

84 


32 




14 


SocTH Atlantic: 


6 


Maryland 


13 
6 


364 


District of Columbia 


287 




35 


West Virginia 




79 




155 


32 


South Carolina. 


13 


Georgia 

Florida 


46 


129 
49 


East South Central: 


437 
102 
86 


662 




78 


Alabama 


112 






West South Central: 


123 

15 
226 
634 


4 

8 

1 

14 

2 


159 
413 
55 
768 

115 


124 

368 

45 

634 

100 


35 




46 


Oklahoma 


10 


Te.xas 


124 


Mountain: 

Montana 


15 








Wyoming 



















« 


6 


53$ 


321 


217 








Arizona 












1 
3 










Utah 


129 










2 


129 


125 


4 


Nevada 














Pacific: 

Washington 


19 
11 
49 


1,445 

704 

6,821 


6 
4 

27 


5 
4 

25 


775 

350 

4,828 


753 

331 

4,827 


22 
19 

1 


14 

7 

22 


14 

6 

22 


670 
354 
993 


324 

285 
467 


346 




69 


CalUomia 


626 







42 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



PERSONS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR IN PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS. 
OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN, CLASSIFIED BY SEX, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 33 


TOTAL NUMBER EECEIVED.l 


MALES RECEIVED. 


FEMALES RECEIVED. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


In all homes. 


In 

permanent 

homes. 


In 

temporary 

homes. 


Inallhomes. 


In 

permanent 

homes. 


In 

temporary 

homes. " 


Inallhomes. 


In 

permanent 

homes. 


In 

temporary 
homes. 


United States 


918,752 


27,710 


891,042 


766,691 


19,850 


736,841 


140,302 


7,695 


132, 607 






Geogeaphic divisions; 
New England 


82,049 

514, 466 

208, 430 

23,834 

23, 125 

7,035 

2,565 

1,773 

00, 475 


2,192 
0,167 
7,934 
4,591 
2,585 
1,307 
657 
300 
1,977 


79,857 

608,299 

200, 496 

19,243 

20, 540 

5,728 

1,908 

1,473 

53, 498 


71,837 

446,041 

144,117 

15. 729 

18, 790 

5,404 

760 

733 

53,274 


1,553 
3,674 
6, 023 
3,149 
2, OSO 
1,097 
334 
288 
1,652 


70,284 

442,367 

138, 094 

12,580 

16.710 

4,307 

432 

445 

51,022 


9,630 

51,655 

60,852 

7,816 

4,174 

1,436 

1,799 

739 

2,201 


639 

2,389 

1,857 

1,442 

505 

210 

323 

12 

318 


8,991 
49, 26<i 


Middle Atlantic 


East North Central 


58,995 
6, 374 


West North Central 




3,669 


East South Central 


1,226 




1,476 


Mountain . 


727 




1,883 






New England: 


1,170 

91 

126 

55,851 

902 

23,909 

347,207 
55,121 
112, 138 

150, 096 

10,904 

24,872 

2,041 

19,917 

8,386 
892 
10,675 
144 
568 
482 

2,687 

122 

4,978 

8,763 

6,363 

245 

303 

303 

2,003 

45 

4,943 

1,374 

617 

101 

298 

948 

188 

1,131 

173 

43 

12 

1,441 


576 
72 
99 
923 
127 
395 

4,054 

743 

1,370 

1,693 
1,436 
2,876 
811 
1,118 

705 
424 

1,219 

19 

668 

139 

1,517 

46 

175 

1,089 

748 

32 
180 
116 
170 

30 

310 

847 

63 

81 

84 
210 

46 
317 

37 

43 

12 

208 


594 
19 

27 

54, 928 

775 

23,514 

343, 153 
54,378 
110, 768 

149,003 

9,468 

21,996 

1,230 

18,799 

7,681 
468 

9,456 
125 


746 

45 

60 

47,164 

491 

23,331 

286,478 
53,963 
105,600 

100, 085 

8,124 

15,685 

996 

19,227 

4,338 
332 

8,004 

16 

568 

210 

2,201 

99 

3,795 

7,418 

5,843 

109 

147 

42 

1,311 

26 

3,991 

1,026 

323 

64 

66 
413 

27 
270 

59 

43 

10 

636 


509 
, 45 

60 
542 

59 
278 

2,485 
390 
799 

1,446 
953 

2,048 
618 
958 

418 

254 

457 

16 

668 

97 

1,339 

22 

77 

1,003 

693 


177 


382 
46 
66 
8,147 
411 
578 

44,100 
1,017 
0,538 

50,611 

1,185 

7,321 

1.045 

690 

3,937 
560 

2,433 
128 


7 
27 
39 

381 
68 

117 

1,559 
259 
571 

247 
429 
828 
193 
160 

287 

170 

762 

3 


375 




19 






27 


Massachusetts 


46, 622 

432 

23,053 

283,993 
63,573 
104,801 

98,639 

7,171 

13,637 

378 

18,269 

3,920 

78 

7,607 


7,766 




343 




461 


Middle Atlantic: 


42,541 


New Jersey 


758 




5,967 


East North Central: 


50,364 
756 




Illinois 


6,493 




862 




630 


West North Central: 

Mirinp^nta 


3,650 
390 






1,671 




125 


South Dakota 








343 
1,170 

77 

4,803 

7,674 

5,615 

213 

123 

187 

1,833 

15 

4,627 
527 
554 
20 

214 
738 
142 
814 

136 


113 

862 

77 

3,718 

6, 415 

5.150 

109 


272 
486 

23 

1,183 

1,345 

520 

136 

156 

261 

531 

19 

925 

348 
126 
37 

242 
535 
161 
861 

114 


42 
178 

23 
98 
86 
55 
32 
33 
81 
93 
4 

135 
47 
11 
17 

36 
132 

19 
136 


230 




308 


South Atlantic; 




Maryland 


1,085 




1,259 


Virginia.. 


405 




104 


North Carolina 


147 
35 

77 
26 

181 

800 

52 

64 

48 
78 
27 
181 

37 
43 
10 
198 


123 


South Carolina 


7 
1,234 


180 


Georgia ... . . 


438 




15 


East South Central: 


3,810 
226 
271 


790 




301 


Alabama 


115 


Mississippi 


20 


West South Central: 


8 
336 


206 




403 




142 


Texas 


89 
22 


725 


MOtlNTAIN: 


114 


Idaho . 






Wvoming 






2 

604 


2 
10' 






1,233 


338 


594 


New Mexico 
























Utah 


104 




104 


85 




86 


19 




19 












Pacific: 

Washington 


1,365 
41,107 
13,003 


197 

106 

1,674 


1,168 
41,001 
11,. 329 


483 
40,8.i7 
11,934 


180 

78 

1,394 


303 
40.779 
10,540 


882 

250 

1,069 


17 

28 

273 


SM 




222 


California 


796 







1 Includes those whose sex was not reported. 



iSTumerically and in number of inmates at the close 
of the year, the permanent institutions exceed the 
temporary institutions; in the number of persons 
received during the year, however, the temporary 
homes far outclass the permanent homes. Both 
classes are distributed over the country in about the 



same proportion, the Middle Atlantic division being 
followed by the East North Central, New England, 
South Atlantic, West North Central, Pacific, East and 
West South Central, and Mountain divisions, in the 
order named, which order couicides closely with that 
in the ratio of inmates to total population. 



HOMES FOR ADULTS, OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN. 



43 



As was to be expected, adults outnumbered children — 
73,177 to 4,873 in the permanent homes and 25,669 
to 12,509 in the temporary homes — although it is to be 
remembered that in the temporary homes the great 
majority of the children arc independent minors 
classed as children simply because they are under age. 
Among the adults reported as inmates at the close of 
the year, males greatly outnumbered females, and the 



same is true in regard to those received into institu- 
tions (lining the year. Among the children or minors, 
however, the reverse is true. 



PERMANENT HOMES. 



A more detailed analysis of these figures is made in 
the followmg table, which shows the more important 
types of permanent homes and their inmates: 



INMATES OF PERMANENT HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS, OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN, AT CLOSE OP 
THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 34 


all permanent 

HOMES. 


SOLDIERS' HOMES. 


HOMES OP LITTLE SIS- 
TERS OF THE POOR. 


FRATERNAL HOMES. 


ALL OTHER. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Number of 

inmates at 

close of 

the year. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Number of 

inmates at 

close of 

the year. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Number of 

inmates at 

close of 

the year. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Number of 

inmates at 

close of 

the year. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 

reported. 


Number of 

inmates at 

close of 

the year. 


United States . . 


808 


78,050 


63 


40,200 


42 


8,362 


74 


5,701 


629 


23,787 




Geographic divisions: 


145 
239 
156 
76 
85 
35 
27 
9 
36 


7,178 
19,009. 
22,903 
9,521 
6,818 
3,540 
2,396 
732 
5,953 


7 
9 
10 
12 
8 
5 
3 
4 
5 


3,127 
3,640 
15,619 
6,137 
4,303 
2,221 
592 
541 
4,020 


4 
15 
10 
4 
4 
1 
2 


869 
3.354 
1.742 
647 
686 
220 
392 


7 
20 
12 
9 
6 
6 
7 
3 
4 


265 
1,402 
1,028 
637 
291 
691 
954 
123 
310 


127 
195 
124 
51 
67 
23 
15 
2 
25 


2,917 
10,613 
4,514 
2,100 
1 538 


Middle Atlantic. . 




West North Central. . 


Soutli Atlantic 


East South Central. 


'408 
458 


West South Central 


Mountain 


68 


Pacific 


2 


452 


1 171 






New England: 

Maine 


13 
15 
8 
75 
12 
22 

120 
34 

85 

42 
22 
57 
20 
15 

15 

17 

22 

1 

2 

9 

10 

16 
15 
17 
2 
6 
6 
13 
3 

17 
11 
6 

1 

4 
11 
3 
9 

2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 


1,905 
361 
432 

2,669 
493 

1,318 

10,891 
2,432 

5,686 

6,846 
3,499 
7,232 
2,078 
3.248 

1,312 

1,495 

1,969 

40 

548 

656 

3,501 

206 

916 

1,930 

2,852 

19 

358 

89 

400 

48 

1,131 

2,035 

194 

180 

212 

866 

250 

1,068 

92 
177 

53 
410 


1 

} 

2 

1 
1 

2 
2 
5 

3 
2 
2 
1 
2 

2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 


1,751 

94 

99 

552 

130 

501 

2,051 

849 
740 

4,923 
2,728 
4,200 
1,221 
2,547 

553 
850 
544 
40 
548 
506 
3,096 










12 
12 

6 
70 

9 
18 

102 
28 
65 

33 
18 
46 
16 
11 

10 
14 
16 


154 


New Hampshire 






2 

1 
1 
1 
2 

9 
2 

9 

2 
1 
6 
2 
1 

1 
2 
2 


36 
16 
89 


231 








317 




\ 
1 

2 
6 

4 
1 
3 

1 

1 

2 


510 
200 
159 

1,623 

380 

1,351 

095 
150 
631 
66 
200 

272 


1,518 






124 

841 
121 
440 

415 
131 
319 

108 
55 

48 

84 

315 


534 

6,376 
1 082 


Middle Atlantic: 


New Jersey 






East North Central: 

Ohio 


813 






Illinois 


2,082 
683 
446 

439 




Wiscon.'^in. . . 


West North Central: 




Missouri 


2 


375 


735 


North Dakota 




South Dakota 














Nebraska 






2 

2 


31 

159 


5 
6 

7 
14 
12 
12 
1 
4 
6 
9 
2 

11 
8 
4 


119 










South Atlantic: 








Maryland 


1 
1 
3 


ios 

1,424 
2,496 


i 

1 
1 


290 
200 
130 






523 


District of Columbia 


1 
1 

1 
1 


19 
55 


287 


Virginia 






North Carolina 


1 


145 






159 


54 


South Carolina 






89 




1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
1 




113 
22 

237 

1,726 

78 

180 

SO 
122 


1 


66 


2 


58 


163 
26 


Florida 


East South Central: 

Kentucky . . 


1 


220 


4 
1 

1 


475 
135 

81 


199 
174 


Tennp^.;ep 


















West South Central: 
Arkansas 






1 


129 


2 

8 


3 




2 


392 


Oklahoma 


3 
3 

1 


250 
575 

1 




Texas 


1 

1 
I 
1 
1 


390 

91 
177 

.53 
220 






5 


103 


Mountain: 






Idaho 










Wyoming 














Colorado 






1 
1 


122 


1 


58 










Arizona 














1 




Utah 


















Nevada * 
























5 
4 

27 


775 

350 

4,828 


1 
1 
3 


690 

134 

3,196 






1 
1 
2" 


38 

37 

235 


3 

2 

20 


47 


Oregon ... 






179 




2 


452 


945 







44 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Yvoia this table it appears that of the 808 perma- 
ment homes, 63 are Soldiers' Homes and 74 are fi'a- 
ternal beneficiary homes (Masonic, Odd Fellows, etc.), 
lea\'ing 671 of a general type. Of the general homes, 
42 are conducted by a single central organization, the 
Little Sisters of the Poor. Of the 78,050 inmates of 
these 808 permanent homes, 40,200 are in the Sol- 
diers' Homes, 5,701 in the fraternal homes, and 8,362 
in the homes of the Little Sisters of the Poor, leaving 
23,787, or 30.5 per cent of the total, in all the other 
classes of homes. The average number of inmates 
per institution for all the permanent homes is 97; for 
the Soldiers' Homes, 638; for the fraternal homes, 77; 
for the homes of the Little Sisters of the Poor, 199; 
and for the other homes, 38. 

It is apparent, then, that if homes that are restricted 
in their reception of inmates to certain limited classes 
are eliminated from the number of permanent homes, 
the balance represents a much smaller amount of re- 
lief rendered to adults in general than would appear 
from the totals. This, is especially noticeable in cer- 
tain sections of the country. Thus, by excluding the 
Soldiers' Homes alone, the number of inmates of 
permanent homes in the East North Central division 
is reduced fi'om 22,903 to 7,284, and in the West 
North Central division from 9,521 to 3,384. The same 
situation affects the statistics as to sex. The total 
number of adult males reported as inmates of insti- 
tutions at the close of the year was 59,677. In the 
Soldiers' Homes there were 40,200, of whom 37,583 
were males and 2,617 females (mves or widows of 
veterans). If these figures are deducted from the 
respective totals, there remain 22,094 males and 35,- 
232 females. Viewed from the standpoint of the in- 
stitutions of general character, therefore, the females 
are in the majority, and while strictly correct, it is 
misleading to say that more men than women are per- 
manent recipients of public charity. Another signifi- 
cant fact is that in five states — Mississippi, North 
Dakota, South Dakota, Idaho, and Wyoming-^the 
Soldiers' Homes are the only institutions for adults, 
while in Oldahoma, of four institutions reported, three 
are fi-aternal homes and one a rescue home. 

TEMPORARY HOMES. 

The temporaiy homes may be loosely divided into 
three classes: Shelters for transients, rescue homes for 
the wayward or fallen, and homes for the friendless 
providing rehef for respectable persons ordinarily 



self-supporting but temporarily in need. The first 
class includes municipal lodging houses, Salvation 
Army industrial homes, immigrant homes, and simi- 
lar institutions under the care of associated charities 
or other pliilanthropic societies; the second class in- 
cludes the Florence Crittenton Missions, Houses of 
the Good Shepherd, and similar institutions; and the 
third takes in all that are not represented in the other 
two classes, particularly homes for women out of 
work, homes for working boys and girls, convalescent 
homes, etc. With regard to the homes for working 
people, only those are included which, so far as could 
be learned, are distinctly benevolent in character. 
Witliin the past few years a large number of homes 
have been established by the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Associations and by private corporations wliich 
furnish board to working girls at a lower rate than 
is usual in boarchng houses. As a rule these houses 
are provided rent free and there is no expense for 
general superintendence or for interest on investment, 
and the sums charged the inmates are intended to 
cover no more than the actual cost of running expenses. 
In general these homes have not been included, 
although the mere fact that such a home meets its 
ruiming expenses by receipts from inmates has not 
been regarded as the decisive factor. 

A better view of the work carried on by these dif- 
ferent classes of institutions is obtained from the 
record of the number of persons received during the 
year than fi"om the number of inmates at any particu- 
lar date, and this is set forth in Table 35. 

The reports for municipal shelters, immigrant 
homes, and private shelters for transients were not 
entirely satisfactoi-y and the statistics presented prob- 
ably do not represent accurately the full amount of 
work done by those classes of institutions. In some 
cases officials of municipal shelters refused information 
on the ground that the institutions were really a part 
of the police system rather than conducted for benev- 
olent purposes. The information received from other 
institutions also proved to be somewhat vague. 

There were 15 immigrant homes reported — 1 in 
Maiyland, 4 in Massachusetts, and 10 in New York — 
sheltering in all 45,221 persons. Of the 57 homes or 
shelters included under this head, 36 homes report- 
ing 572,000 persons received during the year were 
under private auspices. The Salvation Army indus- 
trial homes, being under one centi-al organization, are 
shown separately. 



HOMES FOR ADULTS. OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN. 



45 



PERSONS RECEIVED INTO TEMPORARY HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS, OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN, 
DURING THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 35 


ALL TEMPORARY 
HOMES. 


SHELTER HOMES 

(MONICITAL, 

IMMIGRANT, ETC.). 


SALVATION ARMY 
INDUSTRLAL HOMES. 


RESCUE HOMES. ALL OTHER. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Number of 
persons 
received. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Number of 
persons 
received. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Number of 
persons 
received. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 

reported. 


Number of 

persons 

received. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


Number 
of persons 
received. 


United St.^tes . 


627 


891,042 


57 


787,573 


100 


14,239 


230 


20,542 


240 


68,688 




Oeooraphic divisions: 


83 
206 
110 
50 
69 
26 
28 
12 
43 


79,857 

508,299 

200, 496 

19,243 

20,640 

5,728 

1,908 

1,473 

53,498 


12 

26 

8 

3 

5 

1 


70,667 

457,234 

179,951 

12,919 

14,553 

1,629 


13 

31 

18 

10 

6 

5 

1 

5 

11 


2,011 

6,752 

2,023 

1,150 

884 

430 

71 

163 

755 


22 
58 
40 
27 
31 
13 
16 
5 
18 


2,208 

6,104 

4,036 

2,213 

2,237 

827 

936 

700 

1,281 


36 
91 
44 


4,971 
38,209 


Middle ,\tlantic 


East North Central 


11 486 


West North Central 


10 ' ^'ilSi 


South Atlaulie 


27 
7 

11 
2 

12 


2 866 




2,842 


West South Central 


901 








610 


Pacific 


2 


50,620 


842 






New England: 


6 
1 

1 
55 

7 
13 

101 
25 
80 

41 
18 
31 
11 
9 

14 
10 
15 

1 


594 

19 

27 

54,928 

775 

23,514 

343, 153 
54,378 
110,768 

149,003 
9,468 

21,996 
1,2.30 

18,799 

7,681 
468 

9,456 
125 






1 


161 


2 


91 


3 

1 


342 








19 


Vermont 










1 

11 
4 
4 

24 
8 
26 

14 
6 
9 
7 
4 

7 
6 
7 
1 


27 

1,305 

329 

456 

2,899 
617 

2,588 

1,365 
331 

1,035 
886 
419 

641 
274 
806 
Via 






11 


48,243 


6 
2 
4 

12 
8 
11 

8 
4 
3 
2 

1 

3 

2 

3 


795 
426 
029 

3,395 
1,866 
1,491 

735 
364 
520 
284 
120 

310 

47 

718 


27 
1 
i 

49 

6 

36 

15 
6 

18 
2 
3 

3 
2 
4 


4,585 


Rhode Island 


20 




1 

16 
3 

7 

4 
2 
1 


22,424 

303,910 
51,367 
101,957 

142,947 
6,900 
12,104 


5 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 


32, 949 




528 


Pennsylvania 


4 732 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


3,956 




1,873 


Illinois 


8,337 
60 


Michigan 




1 
1 


18,000 
4,700 


260 


Minnesota 


2,030 
147 




Missouri 


1 


7,171 


761 


North Dakota 




South Dakota 


















5 

5 

2 
15 
11 
10 
3 
4 
8 
13 
3 

14 
6 
5 
1 

4 

8 
1 
15 

2 


343 
1,170 

77 

4,803 

7,674 

5,615 

213 

123 

187 

1,833 

15 

4,627 

527 

554 

20 

214 
738 
142 
814 

136 






2 


75 


3 
. 3 

1 
6 
3 
5 
2 
4 
3 
6 
1 

7 
i 
1 

1 

3 

2 

1 

10 

2 


268 
99 

(') 
009 
672 
220 
110 








1 


1,048 


1 


23 


South Atlantic: 

Delaware 


1 

1 
1 


77 
309 
181 






2 

1 
1 


3,553 
5,040 
5,000 


6 
6 
4 


332 




1,781 
395 






1 


103 




North Carolina 






123 
















169 
334 
(■) 

376 

316 

115 

20 

116 
221 
142 
457 

136 


5 
4 
2 

5 


18 


Georgia 


1 


960 


2 


214 


325 


Florida 


15 


East South Central: 

Kentucky 


1 


1,629 


1 
2 
2 


38 
211 
181 


2,584 










2 


258 










A rlrfint:}*.i 










5^ 


98 








1 


71 


446 


Okla.homn. 


















5 


357 


Mountain: 

Montana 


















































6 


1,233 






3 


78 


2 


545 


1 


610 












1 
3 


(■) 
104 














1 


(') 


Utah 






2 


85 


1 


19 












Pacific: 

Washington 


14 

7 

22 


1,168 
41,001 






4 
1 
6 


174 
131 
450 


6 
5 


546 
250 
485 


4 


448 


Oregon 


1 


40, 620 
10,000 






S 394 













1 Not reported. 



46 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



SEX AND AGE OF INMATES. 

When estimates arc reported to the extent to which 
they have been by some of these institutions, it is 
difficult to obtain accurate statistics for sex. As nearly 
as can be ascertained, however, the following repre- 
sents' the situation with substantial accuracy: 



Table 36 

CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 


PERSONS RECEIVED IN HOMES 
FOR ADULTS, OR ADLT,TS 

AND children: 1910. 




Total. 


Male. 


Female. 




891,042 


758,435 


132,607 






Municipal and private slielters and immigrant 


787,573 
14,239 
20,542 
68,688 


714.359 

14,239 

1,110 

28,727 


73,214 








19,432 




39,961 







The classification of minors, even up to 18 or 21 
years of age, as children renders any satisfactory 
age grouping even more difficult than that by sex. 
The total number of cliildren reported as inmates 
of the institutions was 17,382. Of these, 4,873 were 
in permanent homes and 12,509 in temporary homes, 
including 5,954 in rescue homes. Of tliis entire 
number only 1,986 were rejDorted as received with 
parents. There were 2,067 reported as dehnquent, 
leaving 13,294 dependent. In view of the fact that 
a great majority of the females in rescue homes are 
under age and may legitimately be classed as delin- 
quents, it is evident that there has been considerable 
confusion in makmg the distinction between adults 
and children and also between dependent and dehn- 
quent children. 



Class IV.— HOSPITAIS AND SANITARIUMS. 



The institutions included in this class are those 
hospitals and sanitariums wliich may be regarded 
as benevolent institutions in distinction from those 
which are conducted on a distinctively business basis. 

In regard to no other class has it been so difficult 
to decide the principle on which selection should be 
made. Broadly speaking, those hospitals are included 
which are open to persons who need treatment, but who 
for any reason are unable to meet the full cost. This 
has not, however, been the sole basis, for with hospitals, 
as with physicians, there is a great deal of charity which 
is nevertheless not of a type to cause the institutions to 
be classed as benevolent m any such sense as is used 
in this report. The element of self-support through 
income from pay patients has entered into considera- 
tion, but tliishasnotbeen aconclusivetest,fornot infre- 
quently a prosperous hospital with a good balance on 
its ledger is the one to which the poor or needy may 
go with greatest assurance of relief and is popularly 
looked upon as really a benevolent institution. 

CLASSES OF INSTITUTIONS INCLUDED. 

In general tlic following classes of Iiosj)itals and 
sanitariums have been included: (1) Public hospi- 
tals and sanitariums supported and conducted by 
federal, state, county, or municipal authorities, except 
those county hospitals which are connected with 
pauper asylums; (2) hospitals and sanitariums sup- 
ported and conducted by ecclesiastical, missionary, 
or philanthropic organizations; (3) hospitals and 
sanitariums supported by fraternal or beneficiary 
associations; (4) hospitals and sanitariums owned 
and conducted by private corporations, but held 
under the auspices of some ecclesiastical or benevo- 
lent body; and (5) hospitals and sanitariums which 
are owned and conducted by private corporations, but 
wliich receive patients for free or part-pay treatment, 
of their own motion, on contract with public authori- 
ties, or in behalf of some benevolent organization. 



It is of course recognized that with hospitals as 
with educational institutions, the fees charged seldom 
cover the full value of the service rendered. This, 
however, must be taken for granted, and it is believed 
that the Ust as it stands, if not absolutely complete, 
fairly represents the benevolent contribution of that 
class of institutions. 

The mformation obtained concerning the hospitals 
and sanitariums covered by this report is presented 
in detail, together with the local addresses of the 
institutions on pages 268 to 375. Table 38 sum- 
marizes the principal statistics by geographic divisions 
and states. 

MEDICAL AND NURSING STAFF. 

It is noticeable that only 60 per cent of the hospitals 
and sanitariums make any report of resident physi- 
cians. Tliis is due partly to the failure of a large 
number to make any full report and partly to the 
fact that a considerable number, especially of the 
smaller hospitals, have no resident physicians, but are« 
each under the care of a superintendent or head nurse, 
medical supervision being given by physicians who 
were resident in the locality, and who might be and 
sometimes were designated as visiting physicians. 
There were, however, a number of cases in which the 
entire medical fraternity of a town or city were re- 
turned as visiting physicians, so that to give a total 
under that head would be misleading. It will be 
noted that the average number of resident physicians 
for each hospital and sanitarium was nearly 5, while 
according to the report for 1904 the average, if all the 
hospitals made reports, was only 2. 

The number of hospitals maintaining training 
schools for nurses has increased from 867 to 1,118, 
representing the same proportion of the entire num- 
ber of hospitals as in 1904. The average number of 
nurses per hospital or sanitarium, however, has ad- 
vanced from 15 to 20. 



HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 



47 



The number of beds was reported for the first time 
at the census of 1910, so that comparisons with 1904 
can not be made for this item. 

PATIENTS REPORTED. 

It is noticeable that 202 of the hospitals reported 
gave no report of the number of inmates at the close 
of the year. A considerable number of these, espe- 
cially municipal hospitals for contagious diseases, had 
no inmates, but in the great majority of cases the lack 
was evidently duo to a failure to make returns. The 
report for 1904 states that a number of institutions 
failed to report inmates at the close of the year, but 
does not give any figures, so that comparison in this 
respect is scarcely possible. The fact that the num- 
ber of hospitals reporting the number of persons 
treated during the year is much larger than that of 
the hospitals reporting the number of inmates at the 
close of the year is explained partly by the fact that 
even those that had no inmates at a given date treated 
patients at some time during the year, and is also 
partly due to the fact that wliile hospitals usually 
record the mcoming and outgoing patients a current 
daily report is seldom kept. 

The returns for the financial items are the least 
satisfactory of any obtained. Only 79.5 per cent of 
the total number of hospitals and sanitaiiums reported 
gave the amounts received, only 78.6 per cent gave 
expenditures, and only 73.8 per cent gave the 
value of property. Some of the federal Iiospitals did 
not make any separate reports under the different 
heads, and in the case of the army post hospitals it 
was often impracticable to give any valuation to the 
hospital projjerty as distmct from the other property 
of the post. In other cases also hospital property 
seemed to be so mvolved mth other property that a 
separate statement was impracticable. 

The following statement shows the distribution by 
geograpluc divisions of the number of hospitals and 
sanitariums, the number of beds reported, the num- 
ber of inmates at the close of the year, and the number 
of patients treated during the year, the averages per 
hospital also being given for the last tlireo items: 



Table 37 


AVER.^GE PER HOS- 
PITAL OK SANIT.MUUM 
KEPOKTraG: 1910. 


RANK IN 1910 IN— 


DmSION. 


Num- 
ber of 
beds. 


Niun- 
ber 
of pa- 
tients 

at 
close 
of the 
year. 


Num- 
ber 
of pa- 
tients 
treated 
during 
the 
year. 


Num- 
ber of 
hos- 
pitals 
and 
sani- 
tari- 
ums. 


Num- 
ber of 
beds. 


Num- 
ber 
of pa- 
tients 

at 
close 
of the 
year. 


Num- 
ber 
of pa- 
tients 
treated 
during 
the 
year. 


New England 


74 
109 
82 
69 
67 
71 
93 
66 
78 


51 

78 
51 
44 
38 
43 
55 
42 
56 


993 

1.4112 

1.073 

757 

861 

869 

1,257 

627 

1.141 


4 
1 
2 
3 
5 
9 
S 
7 
6 


4 
1 
2 

3 
5 
9 

S 
7 
6 


3 

1 
2 
4 
5 
9 
8 
7 



3 


Middle Atlantic 




East North Central 


2 


West North Central 


4 


South Atlantic 




East South Central . . . 


9 


West South Central 




Mountain 


8 


Pacific 









The ratio between the number of hospitals and 
sanitariums and the population for the respective 
geographic divisions was as follows : 

Mountain One hospital or sanitarium to every 23,725 inhabitants. 

New England One hospital or sanitarium to every 28,244 inhabitants. 

Pacific One hospital or sanitarium to every 36,775 inhabitants. 

Middle Atlantic One hospital or sanitarium to every 38,631 inhabitants. 

West North Central . . One hospital or sanitarium to every 45,461 inhabitants. 
East North Central. . . One hospital or sanitarium to every 48,028 inhabitants. 

South Atlantic One hospital or sanitarium to every 63,186 inhabitants. 

West South Central . - One hospital or sanitarium to every 125,493 inhabitants. 
East South Central. . . One hospital or sanitarium to every 135,644 inhabitants. 

The high rank of the Mountain and Pacific divisions 
is noticeable. 

The number of persons treated per 100,000 of the to- 
tal population, by geographic divisions, was as follows : 



DrVISION. 


Number. 


New England 


6,023 
3,564 
2,911 
2,405 
2,163 
1 554 


Middle Atlantic 


Pacific 




East North Central 


West North Central 


South -Vtlantic 


1,293 


West South Central . . . . 


844 


East South Central 


568 







DISPENSARIES. 

Among the questions asked- of each hospital was one 
as to the operation of a chspensary in connection with 
the hospital. Wlienever the answer was in the afFu-ma- 
tive, special inquny was made to learn (1) whether the 
dispensaiy was practicaUy distinct m its operation 
from the hospital, in which case a separate report was 
called for; (2) whether it was practically the out- 
patient department of the hospital, and so identified 
with it as not to permit of a separate report, in which 
case the number of persons treated in the dispensaiy, 
if given, was put in a footnote; or (3) whether it was 
really only a pharmacy, in wliich case it was onutted 
from the report. In a number of cases it appeared 
that no exact distinction was made by the hospital 
between bed-patients and out-patients. So far as 
possible, especially when the number of persons re- 
ported as inmates at the close of the year exceeded the 
number of beds, special effort, was made to learn the 
exact situation, but not always with satisfactory re- 
sults. In the main, however, the figures in the general 
tables and the accompanying summaries for inmates 
and for persons received during the year refer to bed- 
patients, the out-patients being reported in connection 
with the dispensaries. 

TREATMENT OF TXIBERCULOSIS. 

A most important feature of hospital development 
has been the special attention given to the treatment 
of tuberculosis. Table 39 shows the number of hos- 
pitals and sanitariums and of dispensaries which 
reported special arrangements for such treatment. 
The most noticeable smgle feature is the number of 
dispensaries m Pennsylvania, most of these bebig re- 
cently established state dispensaries. 



48 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR HOSPITALS 



Table 38 



I>r\'ISION OR STATE. 



United States. 



CtEOGRArnic divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. . 
West North Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central.. 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 



New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Coimecticut 



Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania. . 



East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebra.ska 

Kansas 



South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. , 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

TeJcas 



Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico . 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 



Pacific: 

Washington.. 

Or^on 

Calilbmia 



Total 
num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 

re- 
ported. 



1,918 



232 
500 
3S0 
256 
193 
62 
70 
111 
114 



21 
26 
11 
129 
17 
28 



253 
63 
184 



81 
51 
132 
66 
50 



RESIDENT 
PHTSICUNS. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



122 
336 
203 
151 
131 
35 
50 
57 
70 



176 
41 
119 



Num- 
ber of 
physi- 
cians re- 
ported. 



5,339 



512 
1,539 
1,144 
867 
460 
121 
240 
210 
246 



39 
36 
21 
316 
45 
55 



953 
129 

457 



209 
72 
013 
170 
80 



256 
202 
205 

19 
4 

54 
127 



5 
179 
89 
55 
18 
21 
16 
62 
15 



31 

58 

5 

146 



37 
IS 
191 



Train- 
ing 
schools 

for 
niu-ses 

re- 
ported. 



1,118 



142 
324 
229 
148 
120 
36 
34 
31 
64 



NURSES IN SERVICE AT CLOSE 
OF THE YEAR. 



149 
36 
139 



3 

19 i 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



218 
486 
367 
236 
183 
54 
65 
100 
105 



21 
24 
11 
119 
16 
27 



248 
58 
180 



77 
50 
126 
66 
49 



With sex 
reported. 



Total • 
number 
of nurses 
reported.' 



35,617 



4,376 
11,667 
7,633 
4,038 
2,918 
717 
1,097 
1,172 
1,999 



181 

2,630 

399 

584 



6,735 
1,102 
3,830 



1,981 
679 

3,207 
977 
789 



1,117 
799 

1,126 

93 

122 

382 

399 



66 
917 
436 
473 
210 
307 
128 
301 

91 



306 
193 
109 
109 



182 



61 

568 



183 
53 
41 

566 
82 
88 

169 



Male. 



3,581 



534 

249 

1,210 



406 
882 
836 
404 
323 
70 
176 
214 
270 



30 
14 

25 

252 

74 

11 



690 
135 
157 



306 
34 
348 



06 
26 
201 
7 
15 
33 
56 



113 
18 
13'J 



Female. 



3,960 

10, 763 

6,823 

3,634 

2.596 

647 

921 

968 

1,703 



258 
270 
156 
2,378 
325 
573 



6,144 

946 

3.673 



1.700 

645 

2,859 

881 
738 



1,051 
773 
925 
86 
107 
349 
343 



43 
840 
393 
404 
201 
280 

94 
286 

54 



278 
183 
100 
86 



112 

274 

42 

493 



152 
42 
14 

486 
69 
55 

140 



421 

231 

1.051 



Num- 
ber of 
i insti- 
Itutions 
Ireport 
1 uig- 



223 
494 
376 
246 
184 
58 
63 
106 
110 



11 
124 
15 

27 



252 
60 
182 



,S0 
51 
129 
65 
50 



Number 

of beds 

reported. 



155,838 



16,551 

53, 659 

30, 787 

17,012 

12,258 

4.133 

5,859 

7,027 

8,552 



1,094 

810 

449 

10,277 

1,335 

2.586 



31,577 
5,070 
17,012 



9,211 
2,984 
11,702 
3,773 
3,117 



4,522 
3,045 
5,205 
349 
405 
1,609 
1,877 



218 

3,721 
1.888 
1,996 

991 
1,096 

445 
1,326 

577 



2,057 

1,030 

660 

486 



961 
1,763 

302 
2,833 



1,004 
34S 
269 
3.249 
1,193 
474 
600 



2,556 
1,158 
4,838 



PATIENTS AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report 
ing. 



1,716 



469 
347 
223 
165 
51 
59 
98 
95 



18 
23 
10 
116 
15 
27 



241 
64 

174 



74 
47 
122 
68 
46 



Total 
number 

of 
patients 

re- 
ported. 1 



10,643 
36, 789 
17,797 
9,908 
6. 311 
2,206 
3,266 
4,112 
5,359 



684 
419 
282 

0,770 
909 

1,679 



22,998 
3,381 
10,410 



6,650 
1,440 
5,946 
2,114 
1,747 



2,839 

1,884 

3,224 

87 

112 

891 

871 



137 
2,207 
977 
1,018 
473 
560 
141 
602 
206 



923 
500 
371 
412 



371 

1.372 

94 

1,428 



440 
163 
165 
2,171 
792 
174 
227 



1.370 

973 

3.016 



Adults. 



With se.T 
reported. 



Total.' 



8,293 
28.036 
13.899 
6,974 
4,806 
1,448 
1,712 
3,334 
4,447 



447 
361 
226 

5,170 
612 

1,477 



17,715 
2,249 
8,071 



6,746 
1,274 
4,315 
1,675 
989 



Male. Femali 



41,064 



2,107 
943 
2,427 
79 
96 
613 
709 



102 
1,511 I 
715 I 
890 
435 
392 
121 I 
465 I 
185 



655 
331 
229 
233 



329 

410 

17 

956 



323 
146 
148 
1,695 
712 
140 
171 



1.212 

916 

2,319 



239 
179 
94 
2,549 
379 
761 



9,931 
1,239 
4,405 



3,151 
680 

2,137 
697 
536 



982 

497 

,531 

46 

43 

299 

375 



58 
779 
427 
621 
284 
197 

74 
233 
139 



356 
140 
150 
154 



256 

254 
15 

745 



241 
84 

134 
1.123 

617 
99 

124 



791 

562 

1,641 



30,915 



4,201 


4,092 


16,676 


12,259 


7,201 


6,499 


3,773 


2,675 


2.812 


1,941 


800 


648 


1,270 


442 


2,428 


906 


2,994 


1,463 



208 
182 
132 
2,621 
233 
716 



7,683 
1,010 
3,666 



2,577 
594 

2,171 
704 
453 



795 
374 
849 
33 
53 
269 
302 



44 
702 
288 
269 
151 
195 

24 
222 

46 



299 
191 
79 
79 



73 

156 

2 

211 

82 I 
61 
14 
566 
95 
41 
47 



421 
354 

678 



' Including those whose se.x was not reported. 



HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 

AND SANITARIUMS, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



49 



PATIENTS AT CLOSE OF THE 

YEAR— continued. 


PATIENTS TREATED DtniING THB 


TEAR. 


RECEIPTS DimrNG THE 
TEAR. 


PAYMENTS DtlRING THE 
TEAR. 


VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF THE ^TAR. 




Children. 


Number 


Total 


With sex 


reported. 


Number 




Number 




Number 






























of insti- 


number of 






of insti- 


Amoimt 


of insti- 


Amount 


of insti- 


Amount 






Witli sex 


reported. 


tutions 


patients 






tutions 


reported. 


tutions 


reported. 


tutions 


reported. 




Total.' 






reporting. 


reported.! 


Male, 


Female. 


re.porting. 




reporting. 




reporting. 






Male. 


Female. 




12,356 


6,087 


5,679 


1,829 


1.953,309 


982.096 


715.841 


1,524 


J66,213,435 


1,507 


$61,330,047 


1,415 


*306,021,539 


1 


1,538 


753 


724 


226 


224,432 


111,068 


94.991 


195 


8,642.451 


192 


7,960.852 


181 


50,380,111 


2 


6,522 


3.421 


3,068 


491 


688, 346 


348. 710 


273,252 


444 


24,725,505 


449 


25.921,582 


420 


149,544,928 


3 


2,033 


885 


864 


368 


394, 687 


155, 8.S7 


141, 786 


322 


15,800,287 


311 


10,436,202 


284 


41,645.965 


4 


958 


398 


415 


239 


180, 891 


94,699 


64,874 


194 


5,667,254 


186 


5,389,486 


187 


19, 167, 616 


5 


547 


236 


244 


183 


157, 652 


83,604 


52,02:! 


145 


3,946,431 


144 


4,113,960 


132 


22,877,936 


e 


172 


71 


101 


85 


47, 779 


21,410 


19,283 


42 


794, 627 


42 


811,641 


41 


2, 696, 709 


7 


89 


52 


37 


59 


74, 141 


47,303 


14,891 


41 


1,205,427 


41 


1,128,600 


40 


4,667,722 


8 


125 


65 


60 


101 


63,343 


38,290 


20,540 


64 


1.903,875 


68 


2,095.802 


67 


6,117,155 


9 


372 


206 


166 


107 


122,038 


81,125 


34.301 


77 


3.437.57S 


74 


3,472,022 


63 


8,923„397 


10 


65 


31 


34 


21 


12,994 


6,898 


6.068 


16 


381,037 


15 


417,515 


15 


1,979,958 


11 


58 


26 


28 


25 


7,539 


3.688 


3,436 


21 


294,924 


23 


326, 195 


22 


1,666,744 


12 


16 


9 


7 


11 


5,553 


2,922 


2.263 


10 


195,585 


9 


173,9,81 


8 


1,083,949 


13 


1,040 


523 


517 


125 


153,778 


74, 153 


63.580 


111 


5.530,390 


107 


5,294,3.32 


107 


38,305,467 


14 


179 


82 


60 


16 


17, 724 


10.032 


7,617 


12 


538,580 


13 


633.859 


8 


1,679,205 


IS 


180 


82 


80 


28 


26,844 


13.375 


12.027 


25 


1.701.935 


25 


1.114.970 


21 


5,664,788 


16 


4,649 


2,458 


2,183 


250 


397,078 


206. 797 


164.503 


216 


15.039.231 


220 


15.728.357 


207 


92,798,979 


1- 


581 


301 


280 


60 


68.531 


37.723 


27, 596 


56 


1.8.36.565 


55 


1,996,724 


52 


6,764,064 


If 


1,292 


662 


605 


181 


222,737 


104, 190 


81.153 


172 


7. 849, 709 


174 


8,196,501 


161 


49,981,885 


1£ 


676 


337 


329 


78 


87,350 


46,068 


38,003 


76 


3,083,295 


75 


3,053,410 


70 


16,142,209 


2C 


95 


56 


39 


49 


25,506 


13,298 


12,208 


43 


1,777,203 


39 


732,943 


38 


2,614,897 


21 


696 


287 


302 


128 


126. 198 


58,938 


56,524 


113 


8,762,227 


110 


4,438,790 


95 


14,450.117 


25 


344 


121 


110 


63 


118,333 


19,525 


19. 069 


54 


1,474.397 


50 


1.348.367 


49 


4,750,472 


23 


222 


84 


84 


50 


37,300 


18,058 


15.982 


36 


803, 165 


37 


862,702 


32 


3,688,270 


21 


345 


100 


137 


65 


51,122 


24,233 


20,618 


59 


1,985,310 


56 


1,809,900 


56 


5,180,151 


25 


147 


76 


68 


49 


27,209 


10,800 


10,141 


42 


S46. 526 


38 


824, 149 


36 


2,844,660 


2t 


217 


108 


75 


55 


63.248 


38.815 


20.675 


45 


1. 864. 073 


45 


1,740.489 


42 


7,615,168 


2- 


8 


6 


2 


9 


3,564 


1.094 


1,060 


6 


59. 490 


5 


56.053 


6 


223,033 


» 


16 


9 


7 


8 


4,116 


1,385 


1,544 


7 


121.401 


7 


126,877 


7 


222,835 


2S 


147 


73 


74 


22 


14,361 


7,826 


5.981 


11 


227. 126 


12 


261,051 


15 


1,072.327 


3C 


78 


26 


52 


31 


17,271 


10.546 


4,855 


24 


563.328 


23 


570.967 


25 


2,009.442 


3! 


35 


21 


14 


5 


1,981 


1,169 


812 


4 


52,614 


4 


93.719 


4 


391,943 


35 


217 


69 


81 


43 


41,238 


15.528 


14,492 


35 


1.526.9;« 


34 


1,607,469 


30 


9,792.899 


33 


101 


51 


50 


16 


49,057 


.30.681 


14, 455 


12 


604,482 


12 


617.652 


10 


7,029.787 


34 


53 


26 


27 


26 


18,121 


9, 515 


4.986 


22 


475,451 


21 


530. 747 


22 


1,696.597 


3£ 


25 


11 


14 


16 


9,406 


5,736 


3.670 


14 


288,590 


13 


268, 293 


14 


904. 260 


3( 


15 


9 


6 


29 


10,251 


5,005 


4,573 


23 


364, 630 


23 


328.419 


21 


1.448.853 


3- 


20 


12 


8 


8 


4.436 


2,021 


1,483 


6 


110,207 


6 


112.565 


5 


312.0:i5 


S( 


70 


30 


40 


24 


16,950 


8,895 


6,544 


18 


410, %5 


19 


426, 754 


15 


716.222 


3S 


11 


' 


4 


16 


6,212 


5,054 


1,008 


11 


112,554 


12 


128,342 


11 


585,340 


4C 


114 


38 


76 


25 


15,283 


7,517 


6.588 


21 


408, 912 


20 


416,496 


20 


1,368,209 


41 


24 


12 


12 


15 


13,567 


4,396 


4,212 


11 


215.228 


10 


190,086 


10 


529,500 


45 


15 


7 


8 


7 


6,611 


3,308 


2,622 


3 


70.486 


4 


98, 146 


3 


502,000 


43 


19 


14 


5 


8 


12,318 


6.189 


5,861 


7 


100,001 


8 


106.813 


8 


297,000 


44 


42 


25 


17 


13 


11,221 


8.540 


1,435 


9 


191,951 


10 


184. 044 


11 


425,200 


45 


30 


18 


12 


11 


21,275 


12, 725 


7,409 


9 


499, 278 


9 


471.053 


7 


2,550,942 


4f 








4 


2,878 
38,767 


990 


191 
5,856 


3 
20 


31,957 
482,241 


3 
19 


30. 509 
442.994 


2 
20 


30,250 
1,661,330 


J" 


i? 


9 


S 


31 


25,048 


48 


37 


17 


20 


16 


20,669 


12,757 


7,912 


10 


201,281 


10 


331.648 


11 


978,245 


49 


8 


6 


2 


6 


2,645 


1,524 


1,121 


4 


47, 120 


5 


78. 408 


4 


248,683 


50 


7 


3 


4 


5 


2,683 


2,371 


312 


2 


20. 961 


2 


19.912 


2 


60.200 


51 


61 


31 


30 


41 


25,145 


13, 719 


7,613 


25 


900,450 


27 


954.293 


25 


2.652.793 


52 


6 


3 


3 


17 


3.627 


2.436 


491 


12 


320,089 


13 


322. 139 


13 


845. .338 


53 


4 


3 


1 


9 


2,069 


1,691 


378 


6 


211.393 


6 


185.907 


6 


391.183 


54 


2 


2 




7 


6,505 


3,792 


2,713 


5 


202,581 


5 


203,495 


6 


940.813 







5' 
56 


107 


62 


45 


35 


29,891 


19, 474 


10.417 


24 




634,420 


23 


685,213 


17 


1.417,470 


57 


57 


31 


26 


12 


13,814 


8,501 


5.313 


8 


533,0.39 


9 


648.028 


9 


1,413.450 


58 


208 


113 


95 


60 


78,333 


53, 150 


18,471 


45 


2. 270. 119 


42 


2,238.781 


37 


6,092.477 


59 




Qiiaio 


Q < 

























50 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

INSTITUTIONS FOR TREATMENT OF TUBERCULAR PATIENTS: 1910. 



Table 39 


TOTAL. 


HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 


DISPENSABIES. 


DIVISION OE STATE. 


total. 


HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 


DISPENSARIES. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Num- 
ber. 


Number 

of persons 

treated. 


Num- 
ber. 


Number 

of persons 

treated. 


Num- 
ber. 


Number 

of persons 

treated. 


Num- 
ber. 


Number 

of persons 

treated. 


Num- 
ber. 


Number 

of persons 

treated. 


Num- 
ber. 


Number 

of persons 

treated. 


United States 


318 


91, 178 


152 


30,736 


166 


60,442 


South Atlantic— Con. 

District of Columbia 

Virpinia 


2 
6 
1 
5 
2 
4 


828 
729 
156 
369 
78 
891 


1 
3 


465 
210 


1 
3 

1 


363 
519 


New England 


34 


7,640 


27 


4,621 


7 


3,019 






156 


Maine 


1 
2 
1 
21 
4 
5 

178 


230 
73 
141 

5,734 
732 
730 

60,564 


1 
2 
1 
14 
4 
5 

39 


230 
73 
141 

2,715 
732 
730 

12,928 






North Carolina 


5 

1 
2 


369 
17 
105 


New Hampshire 

Vermont . . 








1 

2 








Georgia 


786 


Massachusetts 


7 


3,019 


Florida 




Rhode Island .. . 


East South Central 

Kentucky . . 


7 


1,124 


4 


235 


3 










889 




139 


47,636 




Middle Atijintic . 


4 
2 
1 


1,043 
81 


2 

1 
1 


154 

81 


2 
1 


889 






(') 


New York 


38 

6 

134 

23 


26,765 

697 

33,102 

7,881 


19 

6 
14 

18 


7,432 

697 

4,799 

3,357 


19 


19,333 




New Jersey 


Mississippi 










Pennsylvania 


120 
5 


28,303 
4,524 


We3t South Central 


7 


288 


6 


288 


1 








East North Central 




1 
2 


98 
35 


1 
1 


98 
35 






Ohio 


8 
4 
3 
6 
2 

14 


5,263 
390 
448 

1,386 
394 

3,805 


5 
4 
3 
4 

2 

12 


1,635 
390 
448 
590 
394 

1,996 


3 


3,728 


Louisiana 


1 


(■) 






Illinois 






Texas .. 


4 

22 


155 
3,971 


4 
22 


155 
3,971 






Michigan . . . 


2 


796 


Mountain 






Wj<:ron<:in 






2 


1,809 








West North Central 


























M'fnTip<:ntA 


7 
3 
4 


1,115 

395 
2,295 


6 
3 
3 


662 
395 
939 


1 


453 


Wyoming 












Iowa 




13 
8 
1 


2,376 is 
1,535 ! 8 

60 1 


2,376 

1,535 

60 








1 


1,356 








North Dakota 


Arizona 






South Dakota 














Utah 














































Pacific 


6 


397 M 6 


397 








27 


5,508 


18 


2,943 


9 


2,565 




South Atlantic 












, 










2 
5 


766 
1,691 


1 
5 


86 
1,691 


1 


680 




2 
4 


195 
202 


2 
4 


195' 

202 






Maryland 


California 



















I Not reported. 



Class v.— DISPENSARIES. 



In this class are included those institutions, vari- 
ously termed dispensaries, clinics, or infiimaries, 
where medical or surgical treatment may be obtained 
gratuitously or at a nominal price, but which do not 
receive resident patients. Such institutions are oper- 
ated either independently or in connection with some 
hospital or medical coUege. In the case of those 
connected with hospitals the dispensary, or clinic as 
it is usually termed, is practically the out-patient 
department of the hospital, i. e., the department 
which treats patients who do not occupy beds in the 
hospital. Sometimes these cluiics are so thoroughly 
organized and so distinct from the hospital with 
which they are connected as to be practically separate 
organizations; on the other hand, they are often so 
intimately comiected, not only occupying the same 
building, but served by the same medical and nursing 
staff, that hospital and dispensary are practically one 
institution. 

There are also cases where the dispensary or clinic, 
as it is often called, is little more than a pharmacy, 
where patients can obtain medicines on the order of 
some physician, whether connected with the hospital 
or not. Dispensaries of this type are not included. 

The questions asked covered the number of persons 
on the medical and nursing staff at the close of the 
year, the number of treatments given, the number of 



different persons treated durmg the year, and the 
same financial inquiries as for the other classes of 
institutions covered by the present report. 

The returns, so far at least as statistical presenta- 
tion is concerned, can scarcely be considered as satis- 
factory. Only about one-third of the dispensaries 
made any financial report at all. This is due partly 
to the fact that in the case of many dispensaries 
identified with hospitals, the financial reports for the 
hospitals covered the dispensaries also; a notable 
instance being the case of the Pennsylvania State 
Dispensaries for treatment of tuberculosis, whose 
financial statistics are included in the report of a 
single sanitarium, in the hospital table. In other 
cases the dispensaries seemed to be on such an informal 
basis that records of any kind were very incomplete. 

In reporting the number on the medical staff at the 
close of the year there appears to have been no imif orm 
basis adopted by the dispensaries, one institution 
reporting 245, while in other cases the numbers re- 
ported were 183, 174, 121, 80, etc. The majority of 
these dispensaries were connected with medical col- 
leges, and the students seem to have been registered as 
attendant physicians. 

The greatest difficulty, however, came in connection 
with the effort to distinguish between treatments given 
and persons treated. It was impossible, even with 



DISPENSARIES. 



51 



repeated correspondence, to obtain satisfactory in- 
formation on this point. In many cases but one of 
these two questions was answered — sometimes one, 
sometimes the other — and not infrequently the same 
figures were given in answer to both questions. So 
verj' unsatisfactory was the result that no column 
showing "treatments during the year" has been given 
in the general tables, though such information as the 
schedules furnished has been included in the summary 
table. Table 40 presents, by geographic divisions, the 
total number of persons reported as treated, and the 
total number of treatments given. 

Another difficulty arose from a doubt in some cases 
as to whether the hospitals reporting always made 
the distinction between out-patients and bed-patients. 
Some undoubtedly made tliis distinction, others ap- 
parently did not, but the situation was not sufficiently 
clear to warrant a distinct statement. In the main, 
however, as stated in connection with the summarv 



for hospitals, the figures there given are for bed- 
patients, while those in this table are for out-patients^ 



Table 40 

DIVISIOK. 


Number of 

persons 

treated: 

1910. 


Number of 

treatments 

given during 

the year: 

1910. 


United States 


2,440,018 


6,737,162 




Middle Atlantic 


1,710,068 
195,816 
175,648 
139,169 
77,607 
50,908 
39, 813 
28,911 
22 079 


4,464,823 
585,394 
604,547 
382,599 
389,670 
119,215 
70,538 


East North Central 




Soutli Atlantic 


West Nort h Central 


West South Central 




Pacific 


East South Central 


34,978 







A general summary of the statistics of dispensaries 
as reported is given in Table 42, and Table 41 shows 
by geographic divisions and states the number of 
dispensaries operated by hospitals and those operated 
independently, together with the number of persons 
treated in them. 



DISPENSARIES OPERATED BY HOSPITALS OR INDEPENDENTLY: 1910. 



Table 41 


institutions 
reported. 


persons treated. 


DIVISION OK STATE. 


institutions 
reported. 


PERSONS TREATED. 


D1VI.SI0N OR STATE. 


Total. 


Oper- 
ated 
by 
hos- 
pitals. 


Oper- 
ated 
inde- 
pend- 
ently. 


Total. 


In hos- 
pital dis- 
pensaries. 


In inde- 
pendent 
dispen- 
saries. 


Total. 


Oper- 
ated 

^^ 
hos- 
pitals. 


Oper- 
ated 
inde- 
pend- 
ently. 


Total. 


In hos- 
pital dis- 
pensaries. 


In Inde- 
pendent 
dispen- 
saries. 


United States 


674 


229 


345 


2,440,018 


1,405,448 


1,034,570 


South Atlantic— Con. 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 


13 
7 
2 
3 
3 
4 


8 
1 
1 
2 

i' 


5 
6 
1 
1 
3 
3 


29,551 
16,798 
652 
2,633 
1,279 
6,246 


21,768 

9,968 

496 

1,383 




New England 


45 


17 


28 


175,648 


94,753 


80,895 


7,783 
6,830 


Maine 


1 




1 


1,212 




1,212 




158 


New Hampshire 






1,279 
786 


Vermont 
















4,459 


Massachusetts 


34 

5 

5 

342 


12 
4 
1 

143 


22 
1 
4 

199 


147,071 

18,577 
8,788 

1,710,068 


76,176 
17,577 
1,000 

1,049,406 


70,895 
1,000 

7.788 

660,662 


Florida 




East South Central 

Kentucky 


9 


2 


7 


22,079 


16,779 






5,300 


Middle Atlantic 


4 
4 

1 


1 

i' 


3 

4 


15,643 
4,136 
2,300 


14,479 


1,164 


New York 


126 
20 
196 

64 


66 
12 
65 

19 


60 

8 

131 

45 


1,242,679 

67,662 

409,727 

195,815 


701,147 
38,651 
309,608 

59,176 


541,532 

19,011 

100,119 

136,640 


Alabama 

Mississippi 


""2,'366' 


4,136 


New Jersey 




Pennsylvania 

East North Central 


West South Central 

Arkansas 


9 
1 


3 

1 


6 


50,908 
689 


19,940 
589 


30,968 


Indiana 

Illinois 


4 

30 

8 

3 

34 


1 
8 
3 

14 


3 
22 
5 
3 

20 


11,696 

115,165 

7,235 

5,490 

"7,607 


150 
32,934 
3,279 


11,546 
82, 221 
3,956 
5,490 

34,927 


Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 


4 

4' 

6 


2' 

2 


4 

2" 

4 


24,968 

"'25,' 351" 

39,813 


"'i9,'35i" 
37,713 


24,968 
" "6,066 


Wisconsin 


2,100 




42,680 


Montana 

Idaho 


West North Central 


1 


1 




1,936 


1,936 




Iowa 

Missouri 


2 
24 

i" 


1 
10 

i' 


1 

14 


2,026 
50,474 


"'29;252' 


5,393 

2,028 

21,222 


Wyoming 

Colorado 


i' 

3 

1 


i' 


i" 

3 


""i,'26o' 

900 
35,777 




■■■ 1,266 
900 


North Dakota 

South Dakota 


Arizona 

Utah 


36,777 


Kansas 


1 
1 

55 


25 


i 

1 

30 


5,780 
506 

139,169 


78,925 


5,780 
506 

60,244 


Nevada 

Pacific 


10 


4 


6 


28,911 


6,077 


22,834 


South Atlantic 




Delaware 


3 
20 


2 
10 


1 

10 


1,381 
81,730 


701 
40,150 


680 
41,580 


Washington 

Oregon 


1 
1 

8 


1 
3' 


i' 

6 


640 

1,967 

26,304 


640 


""i,"967 
20,867 




California 


6,437 



52 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR DISPENSARIES, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 42 


Total 
num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber on 
medi- 
cal 
stall at 
close 
of the 
year. 


Num- 
ber of 
nurses 
at close 
of the 
year. 


Number of 
treatments 
given dur- 
ing the 
year. 


PERSONS TREATED 


DURING THE YEAR. 


RECEIPTS DURING 
THE TEAR. 


PATTHENTS DURING 
THE YEAR. 


VALITE or 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF 

THE YEAR. 


DIVISION OB STATE. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Total 
number 
reported.' 


With sex 


reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


1 

Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 




Male. 


Female. 




United States 


574 


7,444 


1,604 


6,737,152 


508 


2,440.018 


946,131 


883.347 


180 


$1,069,613 


191 


$1,593,140 


119 


$5,720,052 






Geographic divisions; 
New England. 


45 
342 
64 
34 
55 
9 
9 
6 
10 


629 

4,365 

1,114 

464 

515 

48 

54 

10 

245 


126 
870 
240 

73 
206 

24 

31 
6 

28 


604,647 
4,464,823 
585.394 
389,070 
382,599 
34,978 
119,215 
70,536 
85,390 


39 
318 
54 
27 
45 
7 
6 
4 
8 


175, 648 
1,710,068 

195,815 
77,607 

139, 169 
22,079 
50,908 
39,813 
28,911 


65, 461 
060,887 
86, 143 
26.511 
44,788 
12,375 
33,809 
1,400 
14, 757 


79,741 
635,411 
58,275 
13,003 
68, 807 
9,704 
17,099 
700 
10,607 


25 

72 

34 

15 

21 

4 

3 

1 

6 


103, 107 

408, 171 

307.908 

133, 479 

56,927 

10,893 

16, 462 

200 

32.466 


28 

73 

36 

17 

22 

5 

3 

1 

6 


110,017 

852,781 

339,805 

160,502 

58,276 

15,130 

23,809 

200 

32,620 


13 

47 
28 
7 
16 
2 
2 
1 
3 


601,270 


Middle Atlantic 


2,831,776 


East North Central 

West North Central 

South Atlantic 


1,397,081 
464,350 
143,216 


East South Central 

West South Central 


125, 159 
17,000 
60,000 


Pacific 


80,200 






New England: 
Maine. . . . 


1 


11 


2 


4,138 


1 


1,212 


625 


587 


1 


800 


1 


800 


1 


500 






Vermont 






1 
























34 
5 
5 

126 
20 
196 

19 

4 

30 

8 
3 

5 

2 

24 


602 
90 
26 

3,119 

190 

1,056 

229 
94 

685 
48 
58 

67 
46 
295 


108 
7 
9 

333 
44 
493 

109 
11 

104 
12 

4 

5 
14 
54 


521,455 
61,652 
17,302 

3,124,784 

180,723 

1,159,316 

113,386 
50,057 

399,624 
14,490 
7,837 

29,747 

10,668 

291,364 


29 
4 
5 

114 
16 

188 

17 
4 

24 
6 
3 

4 

1 

20 


147,071 
18,577 
8,788 

1, 242, 679 
57,662 
409,727 

56,239 

11,696 

115,155 

7,235 

5,490 

18,821 

2,026 

50,474 


59,369 
4,304 
1,163 

484,229 
26.204 
150, 454 

33,135 
9,311 

38,446 
2,366 
2,885 

2S4 

1,000 

21,076 


73,111 
3,892 
2,151 

486,935 
22,429 
126,047 

21,255 
2,385 

28,387 
3,643 
2,605 

373 
1,026 
9,469 


19 
1 
4 

61 
7 
14 

11 
3 

15 
3 
2 

3 

1 
10 


90,576 
1,181 
10,550 

313, 124 
17,238 
77,809 

109,395 
29.019 

156. 167 
4,881 
8,446 

11,790 

16,750 

103,939 


22 
1 

4 

51 
7 
15 

11 
3 

17 
3 
2 

4 

1 
10 


99,120 
1,053 
9.044 

323,404 

17,305 

512,072 

94,785 

25,009 

211,958 

4,118 

3,935 

11,894 
46,750 
97,544 


10 


581,270 






Oonnp^tipiit 


2 

30 
3 
14 

10 
2 

13 
2 

1 

2 
1 

3 


19,500 


Middle Atlantic: 
New York 


2, 259, 176 




61,130 


Ppinn^iylvanin. 


521,470 


East Noeth Central: 
Ohio 


440, 211 


Indiana 


286,925 




668,645 


Michigan 


4,300 




7,000 


West North Central: 


67,000 


Iowa 


131,000 




16,350 


North Dakota... 




South Dakota 


1 

1 
1 

3 
20 
13 

7 
2 
3 
3 
4 






42,000 
13, 471 
2,400 

5,580 

242,994 

54,395 

32,627 

512 

23,001 

576 

22,914 






















Nebraska 


42 
14 

34 
202 
166 
49 
6 
16 
5 
37 


19 

61 

79 

14 

1 

27 

1 

4 


1 

1 

2 
14 

13 
6 
2 
3 
2 
3 


5,780 
506 

1,381 

81.730 

29.551 

16.798 

652 

2.5.33 

1.279 

5,245 


3,855 
296 

625 

21,340 

7,351 

10,478 

270 

1,352 

421 

2,951 


1.925 
210 

756 

33.923 

13.240 

6,173 

382 

1.181 

858 

2,294 


1 


1,000 


1 
1 

1 

7 
4 
5 
1 
1 
1 
2 


1,200 
3,114 

10,000 

13,599 

7,606 

15,076 

1,200 

425 

308 

10,062 


1 


250,000 






South Atlantic: 


1 

4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 


10,000 
12,907 
7,986 
14,089 
1,200 
425 
431 
9,889 


1 
6 
4 
3 


5,000 


Maryland. . . 


82,366 


District of Columbia 

Virginia. . 


5,800 
6,200 


West Virginia 




North Carolina. 


1 
1 
1 


40,000 




2,860 


Georgia 


2,000 






East South Central: 


4 
4 
1 


31 

17 


24 


21,821 
13,157 


4 

2 

1 


15,643 
4,136 
2.300 


9,725 
1.550 
1,100 


5,918 
2,586 
1,200 


2 
2 


6,734 
4,159 


3 
2 


10,939 
4,191 


1 
1 


169 




125,000 


























West South Central: 


1 
4 


4 

38 


10 
11 


1,415 

78. 140 


1 
2 


689 
24,968 


589 
11,569 
















Louisiana 


13,399 


2 


13,462 


2 


20,809 


2 


17,000 






Texas 


4 
1 


12 


10 


39,660 


3 

1 


25,351 
1,936 


21,651 


3,700 


1 


3,000 


1 


3.000 






Mountain: 




" 


Idaho 
























































1 
3 

1 


3 
7 


6" 


2,044 
21,000 
47,492 


1 

1 
1 


1.200 

900 

35, 777 


500 
900 


700 


1 


200 


1 


200 


1 


60,000 






















Utah. 






















Nevada 












. 


















Pacific: 


1 
1 
8 


10 

15 

2-20 


15 

1 

12 


225 
3,670 
81.495 


1 
1 
6 


640 

1,967 

26,304 


450 
1,5.50 
12,757 


190 

417 

10,000 
















1 
4 


822 
31,644 


1 
5 


413 
32,207 






California 


3 


80,200 







I Including those whose sei was not reported. 



INSTITUTIONS FOR THE BLIND AND DEAF. 



53 



Class VI.- INSTITUTIONS FOE THE BLIND AND DEAF, 



In this class aro included those institutions for the 
care, education, and training of blind and deaf persons 
which make special provision for those who are unfitted 
for or unable to meet the expense of purely educa- 
tional institutions, whether boarding or day schools. 
The great majority of these institutions are supported 
and conducted by the different state governments, 
and the remainder are mostly under the auspicies of 
benevolent organizations, private or ecclesiastical. 
Day schools and ordinary boarding schools conducted 
on a distinctly business basis are not included. 

The report for 1904 gave simply the total number of 
persons received into and resident in the institution, 
by sex. As wiU be seen from the following summary, 
this report gives also the number of adults and chil- 
dren, classifying them as "Blind only," "Deaf only," 
and "Blind and deaf," and further noting the dis- 
tinction between the deaf who were able to speak 
and those who were unable to speak. 

Seven states — Arizona, Delaware, Nevada, New 
Hampshire, Vennont, Washington, and Wyoming, 
reported no institutions of tliis class. All these states, 
however, make provision for the training of blind and 



deaf residents of the state in such way as the state 
authorities may judge best. Vermont and New 
Hampshire send most of those for whom they provide 
to private institutions m Massachusetts and Con- 
necticut. The western states named frequently make 
arrangements with state institutions of contiguous 
states. There is probably no one class of persons for 
whose education and training such complete provision 
is made as for the blind and deaf. 

The foUomng tables show the number of institutions 
under state and private management, respectively, 
together with the number of inmates at the close of 
the year, the amount expended during the year, and 
the value of property at the close of the year for each 
class; also the percentage under these heads. It 
should be said that a considerable number of the 
private institutions, includmg some large ones under 
the care of the Roman Catholic ecclesiastical bodies, 
declined to furnish the financial information called 
for. In one case the value of property is included in 
the summary tables, though it is not shown in the 
general tables, where it would be identified with the 
particular institution. 



Table 43 


INSTITUTIONS FOR THE BLIND AND DEAF: 1910. 


DIVISION. 


Number of institutions. 


Inmates at close of the year. 


Payments during the year. 


Value of property at close of the year. 




Total. 


State. 


Private. 


Total. 


State in- 
stitutions 


Private 
institu- 
tions. 


Total. 


state insti- 
tutions. 


Private in- 
stitutions. 


Total. 


State insti- 
tutions. 


Private in- 
stitutions. 


United States 


125 


72 


53 


15,439 


10,658 


4,781 


$5,464,020 


$3,463,937 


$2,000,083 


$33,159,771 


$16,185,086 


$16,974,685 


New England 


13 

32 

22 

16 

14 

10 

9 

5 

4 


3 
6 
14 
14 
10 
9 
8 
5 
3 


10 

26 

8 

2 


1,120 
3,947 
3,042 
2,045 
1,638 
1,250 
1,606 
478 
313 


326 

612 

2,749 

1,928 

1,474 

1,240 

1,569 

478 

2S2 


794 
3,335 
293 
117 
164 
10 
37 

3i 


471,179 
1,605,205 
1,173,044 
669, 929 
408,377 
323,303 
420,071 
270, 395 
122,517 


92,S38 
208, 17S 
1,066,189 
653,591 
308, 626 
321,532 
420, 071 
270, 395 
122,517 


378,341 

1,397,027 

106, 855 

16,338 

99, 751 

1,771 


4,778,445 
12,286,864 
4,449,605 
3,550,028 
2,431,000 
1,608,888 
1, 734, 700 
863, .500 
1,456,741 


240,325 
1,190,497 
4,217,907 
3,209,028 
1,669,500 
1,596,888 
1,734,700 

863,500 
1,456,741 


4,632,120 


MiHrllA Aflnntir-, 


11,096,367 


East North Central 


231,698 


West North Central. 


341,000 




761,500 


East South Central 


12,000 

























A review of this table shows that the institutions 
under private management arc almost entirely in the 
eastern states, chiefly Massachusetts, New York, and 
Illinois, and that they report a large proportion of the 
inmates and finances for those states. One institution 
alone in Massachusetts, the Perkms Institution for the 
Bluid, reported 292 of the 794 inmates, $165,699 of the 
$378,341 expended, and $3,299,627 of the $4,217,907 
reported as the value of property for private institu- 
tions in that state, and the situation is similar in regard 
to some of the institutions in New York City. In the 
West and South almost tlie only private institutions 
are those carried on under the auspices of ecclesias- 
tical bodies. 



Table 44 


INSTrrUTIONS FOB THE BLIND AND DEAF: 1910. 


DIVISION. 


Number of 
institutions. 


Inmates at 
close of 
the year. 


Payments. 


Value of 
property. 




Per 
cent 
state. 


Per 
cent 

pri- 
vate. 


Per 
cent 
state. 


Per 
cent 
pri- 
vate. 


Per 
cent 

state. 


Per 
cent 
pri- 
vate. 


Per- 
cent 

state. 


Per 
cent 

pri- 
vate. 


United States 


57.6 


42.4 


69.0 


31.0 


63.4 


36.6 


48.8 


61.2 




23.1 
18.7 
63.6 
87.5 
71.4 
90.0 
88.9 
100.0 
75.0 


76.9 
81.3 
36.4 
12. 5 

28. 6 

in.o 

11.1 
"25.6' 


29.1 
15.5 
90.4 
94.3 
90.0 
99.2 
97.7 
100.0 
90.1 


70.9 
84.5 
9.6 
5.7 
10.0 
0.8 
2.3 

' '9.'9' 


19.7 
13.0 
90.9 
97. C. 
75. 6 
99.5 
100.0 
, 100.0 
; 100.0 


80.3 
87.0 
9.1 
2.4 
24.4 
0.5 


5.2 
9.7 
94.8 
90.4 
68.7 
99.3 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


94.8 


Middle Atlantic 

East North Central 

West North Central 

South Atlantic 


90.3 
5.2 
9.« 

31.3 


East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain 


0.7 


Pacific 









54 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR INSTITUTIONS 





Table 45 

DIVISION OP. STATE. 


Total 
num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


teachers at close of 

THE IXAB. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing 
in- 
mates 

at 

close 

of 

the 

year. 


INMATES AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR. 




dum- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Number reported. 


All classes. 


Blind only. 


Deaf only. 




To- 
tal. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


To- 
tal.' 


Adults. 


Children. 


To- 
tal. 


Adults. 


Children. 


Able to speak. 




Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fa- 
male. 


To- 
tal.' 


Adults. 


Children. 




Male. 


Fa- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


1 


United States. . 

Geogkaphic divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. 
West North Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central. 
West South Central. 
Mountain.. 


125 


105 


1,801 


544 


1,257 


121 


16,439 


2,917 


2,713 


5,144 


4,462 


4,720 


1,015 


1,115 


1,390 


1,200 


5,782 


849 


691 


2,166 


2,006 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
g 
4 


13 
32 
22 
16 
14 
10 
9 
5 
4 


10 
26 
18 
IS 
12 
7 
8 
5 
4 


172 
478 
326 
242 
197 
135 
138 
79 
35 


23 

108 
102 
91 
66 
53 
56 
29 
16 


149 

370 

223 

151 

131 

82 

82 

50 

19 


13 

32 
21 
16 
13 
8 
9 
6 
4 


1,120 
3,947 
3,042 
2,045 
1, 638 
1,250 
1,606 
478 
313 


180 
608 
705 
400 
295 
176 
390 
95 
68 


178 
712 
664 
366 
246 
149 
375 
63 
61 


425 
1,417 
955 
680 
489 
490 
414 
173 
101 


337 
1,210 
818 
600 
405 
435 
427 
147 
83 


365 
922 
1,036 
566 
698 
446 
429 
142 
117 


75 
193 
263 
127 
130 
68 
95 
31 
33 


93 
349 
161 
143 
116 

86 
119 

24 

25 


102 
200 
336 
156 
237 
163 
107 
54 
35 


95 
180 
276 
139 
216 
129 
108 
33 
24 


616 
2,278 
990 
315 
497 
269 
454 
220 
143 


78 
298 
167 
43 
96 
34 
84 
33 
26 


64 
239 
133 
36 
62 
20 
90 
19 
28 


252 
9t0 
377 

99 
142 

99 
132 

84 

41 


222 
801 
323 
137 
127 
116 
148 
84 
48 


in 


Pacific 




New England: 
Maine .... 


11 


1 


1 


16 


2 


14 


1 


111 


25 


20 


34 


32 












92 


21 


14 


28 


29 


1? 


New Hampshire.. . . 












n 


Vermont 












































14 
I'i 


Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Cormecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 
New York. ... 


8 
1 
3 

IS 
3 
11 

5 
2 
6 
4 
5 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


5 

1 
3 

15 
3 
8 

4 
2 
3 

4 

2 

\ 
2 
2 
2 
2 


101 
13 

42 

285 
24 
169 

78 
48 
75 
65 
59 

48 
40 
61 
12 
13 
25 
43 


12 
1 

8 

61 

6 

41 

18 
16 
22 
21 
25 

16 
16 

23 
5 
4 
9 

18 


89 
12 
34 

224 
18 
128 

60 
32 
53 
44 
34 

32 

24 

38 

7 

9 

16 

25 


8 
1 
3 

18 
3 
11 

5 
2 
5 
4 
5 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


664 
74 
271 

2,257 

277 

1,413 

774 
472 

■ 820 
550 

! 426 

369 
361 
528 
103 
113 
247 
324 


106 


127 


235 
34 
122 

790 

74 

663 

296 
43 
236 
258 
122 

208 
89 

146 
24 
30 
67 

116 


196 
40 
69 

660 
60 
490 

268 

63 

181 

219 

97 

161 

74 
149 
36 
30 
63 
88 


323 


66 


87 


88 


82 


317 
74 
133 

1,238 
100 
940 

249 


34 


31 


142 
34 

48 

495 
39 

406 

86 


110 
40 
43 

400 
33 

368 

80 


16 
17 


49 

418 
50 
140 

102 
190 
234 
56 
124 


31 

389 

93 

230 

108 
186 
169 
18 
83 


42 

384 
109 
429 

274 
161 
292 
192 
117 

91 

139 
136 
23 
37 
69 
80 


9 

124 
23 

46 

11 
28 

56 


6 

143 
72 
134 

13 
37 
70 
12 
29 


14 

64 

2 

134 

139 
43 
65 
72 
17 

63 
30 
22 
2 

7 
17 
25 


13 

53 

12 

115 

111 

53 
35 
63 
15 

38 
26 
20 
6 
9 
14 
27 


23 

193 
16 
89 

40 


19 

150 

J? 

43 


18 




19 


Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 
Ohio. . 


?i 




?? 


Illinois 


295 
207 
239 


70 
1 

46 


51 
1 

38 


89 


81 
96 
66 


?3 


Miphipnn 


?4 




?■; 


West North Central: 
Minnesota 


"fi 


Iowa 


110 
116 
20 
29 
64 
61 


88 
117 
24 
24 
53 
59 


48 
25 
5 
17 
17 
15 


36 
69 
10 
4 
11 
13 


17 
80 


7 
10 


5 


3 
15 


2 
55 


71 


Missouri 


W 


North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska . 


29 

in 


34 
63 
121 


5 
10 
11 


4 

14 
13 


11 

16 

54 


14 
23 
43 


31 


Kansas 


32 


South Atlantic: 


33 




5 
2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
2 

1 

2 
3 
3 
2 

2 
2 
2 
3 

1 
1 


4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

2 
2 
3 

1 

2 
2 

1 

' 

1 
1 


47 
27 
6 
18 
41 
16 
32 
10 

45 
39 
37 

14 

37 

14 

6 

81 

14 

7 


14 

16 
3 
5 

12 

6 
7 
4 

12 

13 

23 

6 

17 
5 
3 

31 

6 
2 


33 
12 
3 
13 

29 

10 

25 

6 

33 

26 
14 
9 

20 
9 
3 

50 

8 
5 


4 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 

I 

2 
3 
3 

2 
2 
2 
3 

1 
1 


298 
134 

74 
192 
367 
203 
267 
103 

461 
483 
306 
(') 

381 
179 
283 
763 

83 
50 


68 
56 


62 
34 


94 
21 
45 
52 

104 

(") 

120 
53 

148 
169 
173 
W 


9i 
23 
29 
34 

92 
(') 
S3 
50 

142 
160 
133 

m 

102 
40 
113 
172 

28 
14 


HI 
10 
29 
52 

275 
80 

105 
36 

107 
229 
110 


14 

4 


24 
6 


31 


42 


86 
124 
10 
15 
44 
70 
108 
40 

167 
102 


19 
62 


10 

28 


25 

21 

7 

4 

10 

(') 

53 

22 

53 

46 


32 

23 

3 

2 

21 

(') 

28 

18 

77 
39 


34 


District ot Columbia 
Virginia 


35 


IS 
16 
SO 
21 
56 
16 

31 
71 
61 


11 

9 
66 
29 
49 
20 

19 
61 
49 


36 
37 
38 
31 


West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 


53 
94 

m 

34 


53 

77 

m 

30 


15 
76 
21 


13 
63 

9 


4 


6 

6 

(») 

13 


40 


Florida 






41 


E A.ST South Central: 
Kentucky 


103 
73 


68 
81 


29 
39 


28 
58 


25 
9 


12 
8 


491 




43 




44 


Mississippi 










(') 

108 

9 

81 

256 

46 
17 






(') 

34 

4 
24 
70 

20 
3 


(») 

36 

4 

39 

69 

19 
6 


45 


West South Central: 
Arkansas 


92 

58 

33 

207 

10 
14 


81 


116 


38 


28 


24 


26 


17 

1 
8 
68 

2 
5 


21 

"io' 

69 

4 
3 


46 


Louisiana 


47 ! 34 


47 


Oklahoma 


38 
209 

10 
9 


99 
175 

35 
13 


46 
267 

28 
10 






26 

68 

13 
4 


21 

61 

8 
3 


W 


Texas . 


57 

4 
2 


91 

3 
1 


ll 


Mountain: 

Mnntftnft 


,50 


Idaho 


51 




5? 




1 
1 


i 
1 


31 

4 


8 
2 


23 

2 


1 

1 


190 
34 


46 
6 


26 
5 


65 
12 


53 
11 


45 
34 


15 
6 


8 
5 


17 
12 


5 
11 


75 


16 


7 


26 


27 


53 


New Mexico 

Arizona 


54 












55 


Utah 


1 


1 


23 


11 


12 


1 


121 


19 


13 


48 


41 


25 


4 




8 


6 


83 


11 


5 


35 


32 


56 


Nevada 


57 


Pacific: 












































.58 




1 
3 


1 

3 


4 
31 


2 
14 


2 
17 


1 
3 


26 
287 






13 
S3 


8 
75 


26 
91 






18 
17 


8 
16 












59 




68 


61 


33 


25 


143 


26 


28 


41 


48 







1 Includes those whose sex and age were not reported. 



2 Not reported. 



INSTITUTIONS FOR THE BLIND AND DEAF. 



55 



FOR BLIND AND DEAF, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



INMATES AT CLOSE OF THE VKAR— pontinued. 


INMATES RECEIVED DURING 
THE YEAR. 


RECEIPTS DURING 
THE YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 
THE YEAR. 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT CLOSE 

OF THE YEAR. 




Deaf only— Continued. 


Both blind and deaf. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Number reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount, 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 




Unable to speak. 


To- 
tal. 


Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 




Total.i 


Adults. 


ChUdren. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 




Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 




4,883 


1,060 


889 


1,603 


1,279 


54 


14 


27 


7 


6 


Ill 


2,648 


1,470 


1,178 


Ill 


$5,650,380 


110 


$.5,464,020 


106 


$33,159,771 


1 


135 
727 
996 
1,163 
441 
534 
719 
115 
53 


26 
114 

278 
230 
90 
74 
209 
30 
9 


19 
110 

261 
1S5 
78 
43 
165 
20 
8 


70 
275 
239 
425 
131 
228 
175 
35 
25 


20 
228 
218 
323 

90 
189 
170 

30 

11 


4 
20 
20 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 


1 
3 

7 


2 
14 
9 
1 


1 

2 

3 

...... 


...... 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 


13 

28 

i 1^ 
16 
12 
8 
8 
5 
4 


195 

714 
417 
309 
421 
207 
231 
86 
68 


105 

383 
239 
174 
228 
123 
134 
41 
43 


90 
331 

178 
136 
193 

.84 
97 
45 
25 


13 

30 

19 

16 

10 

7 

8 

5 

3 


537,212 
1,732,970 
1,155,182 
692,711 
390,814 
321,0,84 
461,821 
234,349 
124,237 


13 
29 
19 
16 
10 
7 
8 
5 
3 


471,179 
1,603, £05 
1,173,044 
66H,!i:9 
40S, 377 
323,303 
420,071 
270,395 
122,517 


13 

27 
17 
15 
11 

7 
8 
5 
3 


4,778,445 
12,286,864 
4,449,605 
3,650,028 
2,431,000 
1,608,888 
1,734,700 
863,500 
1,456,741 


2 
3 
4 
5 








2 

1 


1 




8 






















19 


4 


6 


6 


3 












1 


20 


8 


12 


1 


23,800 


23, ,800 


1 


85,000 


11 












I' 










































n 


20 


5 


7 


4 


4 


4 


1 


2 


1 




8 
1 
3 

14 
3 
11 

3 
2 
4 
3 
5 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


122 
13 
40 

425 
53 
236 

70 
90 
93 
68 
96 

45 
46 
106 
19 
18 
29 
46 


64 
6 
27 

240 
28 
115 

43 
42 
57 
39 
58 

30 
25 
57 
9 
8 
16 
29 


58 
7 
13 

185 
25 
121 

27 
48 
36 
29 
38 

15 
21 
49 
10 
10 
13 
17 


8 
1 
3 

17 
2 
11 

6 
2 
5 
4 
3 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


385,560 
31,000 
96,852 

1,119,343 
47,716 
565,911 

264,116 
151,114 
391,130 
218,822 
130,000 

154,144 
98,145 

161,102 
48,820 
49,432 
86,500 
94,568 


8 
1 
3 

16 
2 
11 

5 
2 
5 
4 
3 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


315,209 
38,500 
93,670 

471,296 
48, 193 
585,716 

253,756 
146,698 
411,109 
227,281 
134,140 

154,144 
105,996 
155,548 
44,123 
29,599 
87,267 
93,252 


8 
1 
3 

16 
1 
10 

4 
2 
4 
4 
3 

2 
2 
4 
1 
2 
2 
2 


4,007,112 

68,500 

617,833 

7,152,908 

376,742 

4,757,214 

1,202,583 

707,026 

1,089,975 

1,014,193 

435,828 

450,004 
700,048 
1,070,791 
305,000 
124,183 
375,000 
525,000 


14 


96 

626 
64 
37 

245 
311 
233 
142 
65 

277 
205 
311 
80 
42 
125 
123 


17 

99 
11 
4 

49 
162 
42 
4 
21 


6 

91 
5 
14 

50 
149 
48 
1 
13 


BO 

229 
33 
13 

70 


13 

207 
15 
6 

76 














9 

4 

7 

6 


2 
...... 

2 


5 
4 
5 

2 


2 




17 

18 


1 


1 
1 


19 
20 


78 
76 
15 

155 
66 

109 
22 
12 
34 
37 


65 
61 
16 

122 
47 
74 
29 
7 
26 
18 












o-i 


9 
5 

1 


4 

1 


4 
3 


1 
1 


1 


23 
24 


55 
81 
15 
7 
37 
35 


47 
47 
14 
16 
28 
33 








ifi 


1 




1 












•'S 
























?0 
























T" 


101 


25 


18 


38 


20 












2 

1 

2 
3 

3 


43 
27 
25 
23 
64 
29 
201 
9 

61 

78 
68 
{') 

53 
20 
41 
117 

9 

7 


23 
15 
12 
13 
27 
13 
120 
5 

37 
42 
44 

30 
10 
25 
69 

5 
3 


20 
12 
13 
10 
37 
16 
81 
4 

24 
36 

24 

23 
10 
16 

48 

4 
4 


2 
2 

1 
1 
1 


41,530 
98,642 
10,000 
60,750 
86,392 


2 
2 
1 

1 
1 


45,842 
99,751 
28,500 
60,750 
86,392 


3 

2 
1 
1 

1 


809,500 
761,500 
40,000 
100,000 
300,000 














?l 


34 
125 
48 
52 
54 
27 

186 
152 
196 
« 

165 
170 
156 
238 

10 
23 






20 
33 
14 

m 
11 

15 

64 
52 
112 

m 

48 
30 

50 

47 

2 

6 


14 
23 
15 

m 

6 
12 

45 
60 

84 
(') 

40 
36 
53 
41 

1 
5 


1 








1 


35 


34 
11 

m 

20 


35 

S 

(') 
17 








36 














1 






1 




?S 






2 

1 

2 
3 
1 

1 

2 
1 
2 
3 

1 

1 


73, ,500 
20,000 

115,814 
96,366 
71,284 
37,620 

' 163,146 
25,750 
80,000 
192,925 

47,800 
25,000 


2 
1 

2 
3 

1 
1 

2 
1 
2 
3 

1 
1 


67,142 
20,000 

119,741 
94,658 
71,284 
37,620 

> 129, 146 

25,500 

70,000 

195,425 

62,800 
65,000 


2 
1 

2 
3 

1 
1 

2 
1 
2 
3 

1 
1 


295,000 
125,000 

579,000 
529,888 
250,000 
250,000 

450,000 

600,000 

7,700 

777,000 

219,600 
45,000 


39 












49 
25 


28 
IS 


1 








1 










42 




























44 


35 
57 
25 
92 

4 

7 


32 

47 
28 
58 

3 
5 


2 


2 








2 
1 
2 
3 

1 
1 










46 














2 




1 




M 


48 












SO 












51 


69 


15 


11 


22 


21 


1 


1 








1 

1 


30 
18 


13 
10 


17 
8 


1 
1 


98,790 
12,759 


1 
1 


91,563 
11,030 


1 

1 


375,000 
24,000 


5'j 








53 






















54 


13 


4 


1 


5 


3 












1 


22 


10 


12 


1 


50,000 


1 


50,000 


1 


200,000 














% 










































57 






















I 
3 


6 
62 


3 3 


1 
2 


10,290 
113,947 


1 
2 


15,257 
107,260 


1 
2 


50,000 
1,406,741 




33 


9 


8 


25 


11 































> Returns for one of the institutions reporting cover two years. 



66 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



The following tables show, by geographic divisions, 
the number and percentage of adults and cMldren 



among the different 
the year: 



classes of inmates at the close of 



Table 46 








SMATES 


OF INSTITUTIONS 


FOR BLIND AND 


DEAF AT CLOSE OF THE 


teae: 


1910. 










.\11 inmates, i 


Blind only. 


Deaf only.! 


Both blind and deaf. 


DmsioN. 


Aggregate. 


Able to speak. 


Unable to speak. 




Total. 


Adults. 


Chil- 
dren. 


Total. 


Adults. 


ChU- 
aren. 


Total. 


Adults. 


ChU- 
dren. 


Total. 


Adults. 


cha- 

dren. 


Total. 


Adults. 


ChU- 
dren. 


Total. 


Adults 


Chfl- 
dren. 


United States. .. 


15, 236 


5,630 


9,606 


4,720 


2,130 


2,590 


10, 543 


3,489 


.7,054 


5,712 


1,540 


4.172 


4,831 


1,949 


2,882 


54 


41 


13 


New England .... 


1,120 
3,947 
3,042 
2,045 
1,435 
1,250 
1,606 
478 
313 


358 
1,320 
1.269 
765 
641 
325 
765 
158 
129 


762 

2,627 

1,773 

1,280 

894 

925 

841 

320 

184 


365 
922 
1,036 
565 
698 
446 
429 
142 
117 


168 
542 
424 
270 
245 
154 
214 
55 
58 


197 
380 
612 
295 
453 
292 
215 
87 
59 


751 

3,005 

1,9S6 

1,478 

816 

803 

1,173 

335 

196 


187 
761 
829 
494 
326 
171 
548 
102 
71 


564 
2,244 
1,157 
984 
490 
632 
625 
233 
125 


616 
2,278 
990 
315 
427 
269 
454 
220 
143 


142 

537 
290 

79 
158 

54 
174 

52 

54 


474 
1,741 
700 
236 
269 
215 
280 
168 
89 


135 
727 
996 
1,163 
389 
534 
719 
115 
53 


45 
224 
639 
416 
168 
117 
374 
50 
17 


90 
503 
457 
748 
221 
417 
345 
65 
36 


4 

20 
20 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 


1? 
16 
1 

3" 

1 


1 


Middle Atlantic 

East North Central 

West North Central. . . 

South Atlantic 

East South Central.... 
Weit South Central.... 
Mountain 


3 















1 Exclusive of one institution in South Atlantic division not reporting age distribution of deaf inmates. 



Table 47 


INMATES OF INSTITUTIONS FOR BLIND AND DEAF 
AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR: 1910.' 




All 

inmates. 


Blind 
only. 


Deaf only. 


DIVISION. 


g 


d 

£ 


2 

3 

S 


i 

t-, 


Total. 


Able to 
speak. 


Unable to 
speak. 




3 

Si 


Is 


si 


Ig 

-a 


a ^ 

3 
S C3 


E3 d 

si 


United States 


37.0 


63.0 


45.1 


54.9 


33.1 


66.9 


27.0 


73.0 


40.3 


59.7 


New England 


32.0 
33.4 
41.7 
37.4 
37.7 
26.0 
47.6 
33.1 
41.2 


68.0 
66.6 
58.3 
62.6 
62.3 
74.0 
52.4 
66.9 
58.8 


46.0 
58.8 
40.9 
47.8 
35.1 
34.6 
49.9 
38.7 
49.6 


54.0 
41.2 
59.1 
62.2 
64.9 
65.5 
60.1 
61.3 
50.4 


24.9 
25.3 
41.7 
33.4 
40.0 
21.3 
46.7 
30.4 
36.2 


75.1 
74.7 
58.3 
66.6 
60.0 
78.7 
53.3 
69.6 
63.8 


23.1 
23.6 
29.3 
25.1 
37.0 
20.1 
38.3 
23.6 
37.8 


76.9 
76.4 
70.7 
74.9 
63.0 
79.9 
61.7 
76.4 
62.2 


33.3 
30.8 
54.1 
35.7 
43.2 
21.9 
62.0 
43.5 
32.1 


66.7 


Middle Atlantic 

East North Central 

West North Central 

South Atlantic ... 


69.2 
45.9 
64.3 
56.8 


East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain 

Paeiflc 


78.1 
48.0 
56.5 
67.9 



1 Percentage not shown for persons both blind and deaf, as base is less than 100. 

From these tables the following general facts ap- 
pear: (1) The number of deaf persons under care and 
training is more than double the number of those who 



are bUnd only; (2) the number of those who are both 
blind and deaf is so small as to be practically negli- 
gible for purposes of percentages or comparison; (3) 
the deaf persons able to speak outnumber those 
unable to speak; (4) the children outnumber the adults, 
forming 63 per cent of the entire number under care, 
54.9 per cent of those who were blind only, and 66.9 
per cent of those who were deaf only, but including 
only 13 of the 54 who were both blind and deaf; and 
(5) of the two classes of deaf persons the children 
number 73 per cent of those able to speak, and 59.7 
per cent of those unable to speak; of the adults, how- 
ever, 27 per cent only were able to speak and 40.3 per 
cent were unable to speak. 

The geographic distribution depends to a consid- 
erable degree upon the emphasis laid on different 
forms of training by the different states. Some states, 
as Indiana, give special attention to the industrial 
training of adults, both blind and deaf, and in those 
states the percentage of adults is naturaUy greater. 



Table 48 






INMATES 


OF INSTITUTIONS FOR BLIND AND DEAF AT CLOSE OF THE TEAK: 1910. 










All 


hunates.' 


Blind only. 


Deaf only.' 


Both blind and deaf. 


DFVISION. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total. 
4,720 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


.^.ggregate. 


Able to speak. 


Unable to speak. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 




Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 




15,236 


8.061 


7,175 


2,405 


2,315 


10,543 


5,678 


4,865 


5,712 


3.015 


2,697 


4,831 


2,663 


2,168 


64 


21 


33 








1,120 
3,947 
3,042 
2,045 
1,435 
1,250 
1,606 
478 
313 


605 

2,025 

1,660 

1,080 

784 

666 

804 

268 

169 


515 
1.922 
1,382 
965 
651 
584 
802 
210 
144 


366 
922 
1,036 
565 
698 
446 
429 
142 
117 


177 
393 
599 
283 
367 
231 
202 
85 
68 


ISS 
529 
437 
282 
331 
215 
227 
57 
49 


751 

3,005 

1,986 

1,478 

816 

803 

1,173 

335 

196 


426 
1,627 
1,051 
797 
459 
435 
600 
182 
101 


326 
1,378 
935 
681 
357 
368 
573 
153 
95 


616 
2,278 
990 
315 
427 
269 
454 
220 
143 


330 
1,238 
534 
142 
238 
133 
216 
117 
67 


286 
1,040 
456 
173 
189 
136 
238 
103 
76 


135 
727 
996 
1,163 
389 
634 
719 
115 
53 


96 
389 
517 
655 
221 
302 
384 
65 
34 


39 
338 
479 
508 
168 
232 
335 
60 
18 


4 
20 
20 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 


2 

5 

10 

...... 

•••■j- 

1 


2 


Middle Atlantic 


15 


East North Central 


10 


West North Central 


2 


South Atlantic . . 


1 




1 


West South Central 


2 






Pacific 













> Exclusive of the figures for one institution in South .Atlantic division not reporting sex distribution of deaf inmates. 



SPECIAL SUMMARIES. 



57 



Table 49 


inmates 


OF INSTITUTIONS FOR BUND AND DEAF AT 

CLOSE OF tear: 1910.1 




All 
inmates. 


Blind 
only. 


Deaf only. 


DIVISION. 


.2 

CO 

a 
1 


.2 
S 




1 

a 

is 


Total. 


Able to 
speak. 


Unable 
to speak. 




"1 


£•2 


|l 


Si 


So 

p 


Si 


United States 


62.9 


47.1 


51.0 


49.0 


53.9 


46.1 


52.8 


47.2 


55.1 


44.9 


New Enfiland . . 


64.0 
51.3 
54. C 
52.8 
64.6 
53.3 
50.1 
56.1 
54.0 


46.0 
48.7 
45.4 
47.2 
45.4 
46.7 
49.9 
43.9 
46.0 


48.5 
42.6 
57.8 
50.1 
52.6 
51. S 
47.1 
59.9 
58.1 


51.5 
57.4 
42.2 
49.9 
47.4 
48.2 
52.9 
40.1 
41.9 


56.7 
54.1 
52.9 
63.9 
56.3 
54.2 
51.2 
64.3 
51.5 


43.3 
45.9 
47.1 
46.1 
43.7 
45.8 
48.8 
45.7 
48.5 


63.6 
64.3 
53.9 
45.1 
55.7 
49.4 
47.6 
53.2 
46.9 


46.4 
45.7 
46.1 
64.9 
44.3 
50. 6 
52.4 
46.8 
53.1 


71.1 
53.5 
61.9 
56.3 
56.8 
56.6 
53.4 
56.5 
64.2 


28.9 


Middle Atlantic 

East North Central 

West North Central 

South Atlantic 

East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain 


46.5 
48.1 
43.7 
43.2 
43.4 
46.6 
43.5 


Pacific 


35.8 







I Percentages not shown for persons both blind and deaf as base is less than 100. 



In goneral, admission to these institutions is limited, 
except under special conditions, to those under 21 
years of age, which accounts to a considerable degree 
for the preponderance of children. The distribution 
by sex of the mmates of institutions for the blind 
and deaf is given in Tables 48 and 49. 

The tables show a notable uniformity. Of the total 
number of inmates 52.9 per cent were males and 47.1 
per cent females; of the blind only, 51 per cent were 
males and 49 per cent females; for the deaf only, the 
corresponding percentages were 53.9 and 46.1, respec- 
tively. Of those who were both bhnd and deaf, how- 
ever, 33 were females and 21 males; but, as already 
stated, the numbers involved are too small to furnish 
the basis for any satisfactory conclusions. The geo- 
graphic distribution follows, ^vith no important excep- 
tion, the general proportions indicated above. 



SPECIAL SUMMARIES. 



Under this heading are presented summaries of cer- 
tain special phases of the statistics of benevolent 
institutions, together with descriptive text and ana- 
lytical tables. Persons imder the care of institutions 
and adults and children in institutions at the close of 
the year, and persons received into institutions during 
the year are presented by classes of institutions and 
sex in Tables 50 to 56; Tables 57 to 59 show the 
statistics of the placement of children in homes and 
institutions; Tables 60 to 63 give the number of in- 
stitutions of the different classes and the inmates 



of these mstitutions grouped according to the char- 
acter of the supervisory agency ; Tables 64 to 72 pre- 
sent the income of institutions during the year under 
the head of public appropriations, donations, and 
receipts from care of inmates; the expenditures dur- 
ing the year for running expenses; the value of land, 
buildings, etc., and of invested funds at the close 
of the year; and Tables 73 to 77 give the number of 
different classes of institutions with the number of 
inmates under federal, state, county, and municipal 
care. 



SEX AND AGE OF INMATES. 



The value of a classification by sex of the persons 
cared for or reUoved by benevolent institutions varies 
considerably according to the character of the different 
classes of institutions. There is, for example, little, if 
any, value in such classification for the imnates of 
hospitals. Except for the purposes of medical inves- 
tigation in regard to certain types of disease, whether 
a general hospital receives more men or women is a 
fact of Uttle significance, and such medical investiga- 
tion belongs to a different department of census work. 
It is of interest, however, to know- whether the majority 
of adults who receive the benefit of general relief are 
men or women, and whether more boys or girls appear 
in the records of the dependent classes. So, also, it 
is of interest to know whether sex is an important 
factor in the constitution of the transient element in 
the population of these institutions. 

The conditions as to sex have been set forth and 
discussed in connection with the summaries of the 
statistics for the different classes of institutions. In 
Tables 50-53 they are summarized for all classes of 



institutions. Table 50 gives statistics for aU persons 
under the care of benevolent institutions at the close 
of the year. Table 51 for persons received into insti- 
tutions during the year, and Tables 52 and 53 for 
children and adults in the institutions at the close of 
the year. 

It should bo noted that Table 50 includes both 
resident inmates of institutions, and those outside of 
institutions but under their care or supervision, wliile 
Tables 52 and 53 are confined to those adults and cliil- 
dren actually resident in institutions, and Table 51 
includes all persons, adults and children, received 
into institutions, except patients treated in dispen- 
saries and cliildren received by societies under their 
general care, aside from those received into receiving 
homes. The sex records for the two classes excluded 
are in the maui incomplete and unsatisfactory; the 
children received into the receiving homes of societies 
for the protection and cure of children are, however, 
already accounted for under the head of institutions 
for the care of children. 



58 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

PERSONS UNDER CARE OF BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR, 



Table 50 



DIVISION OR STATE. 



UmTED States... 

Geographic divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. 
West North Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central. . 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire. . . . 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Vir,c;inia 

North Carolina 

South CaroUna 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentuckv 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

PAcmc: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



ALL INSTITUTIONS. 



Total 
number 
reported. 



5,408 



054 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 



56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 



800 
207 
686 



310 
177 
325 
136 
107 



128 
103 
159 
18 
17 
50 
72 



23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 



71 
32 
189 



Number 

reporting 

persons 

under 

care at 

close of 

the year. 



565 
1,272 
912 
469 
465 
165 
177 
147 
248 



47 
58 
20 
308 
45 



632 
171 
469 



271 
147 
278 
118 



112 
92 

128 
14 
13 
46 
64 



19 
104 
55 
81 
29 
54 
30 
64 
29 



63 
30 
155 



Persons under care at close of the year. 



Total 
number 
reported.* 



Number 

of In- 
stitutions 
rcporling. 



38,463 
143,528 
93,682 
41,715 
33,964 
13,191 
13, 463 
9,152 
25,210 



3,744 
2, 573 
830 
20, 989 
3,660 
6,661 



85,489 
16,036 
42,003 



29,687 
11,505 
30,282 
11,199 
10,909 



8,639 
8,209 
12,018 
1,159 
1,420 
3,212 
7,058 



769 
8,062 
6,481 
0,359 
2,757 
3,460 
2,203 
3,113 

754 



5,840 
4,303 
1,763 
1,225 



1,375 

5,937 

803 

5,348 



957 
727 
221 
5,049 
1, 152 
215 
740 
91 



5, 209 
3,604 
16,343 



With sex reported. 



4,161 



548 
,221 
849 
426 
432 
1.52 
158 
136 
239 



46 
55 
19 
300 
43 
85 



620 
158 
443 



255 
143 
252 
111 
88 



104 
75 

119 
14 
13 
42 
59 



62 
30 

147 



Number of persons. 



Total. 



383, 322 



36,585 
135,240 
86,604 
37,175 
31,176 
12, 467 
11,648 
8,239 
24, 188 



3,672 
2,130 
790 
19,913 
3,471 
6,609 



84,227 
14,908 
36, 105 



28,063 
11,217 
27,736 
10, 526 
9,062 



7,691 
7,022 
10,736 
1,159 
1,420 
3,036 
6,111 



693 
7,285 
6,200 
6,264 
2,097 
3,313 
1,966 
2,819 

539 



5,669 
4,127 
1,636 
1,035 



1,350 

4,889 

701 

4,708 



877 
727 
221 
4,430 
1,078 
185 
630 
91 



5,202 
3,604 
16,382 



Male. 



19, 181 

73,081 

62, 098 

21,344 

16,976 

6,625 

6,250 

4,976 

14, 657 



2,705 
938 
433 
9,740 
1,753 
3,612 



46, 253 
8,114 
18,714 



16,793 
6,669 

16, 952 
5,953 
5,731 



4,355 
3,828 
5,692 
626 
959 
1,584 
4,400 



398 
3,218 
3,984 
4,200 
1,056 
1,629 

948 
1,288 

255 



2,478 

2,725 

876 

546 



707 
2,617 

339 
2,587 



499 
431 
190 
2,544 
738 
102 
428 
44 



3,110 
1,868 
9,679 



Female. 



168, 134 



17,404 
62, 159 
34, 506 
15,831 
14,200 
5,842 
5,398 
3,263 
9,531 



967 
1,192 

357 

10, 173 

1,718 

2,997 



37,974 
6,794 
17,391 



11,270 
4,548 

10,784 
4,673 
3,331 



3,336 
3,194 
6,044 
633 
461 
1,452 
1,711 



295 
4,067 
2,216 
2,064 
1,041 
1,684 
1,018 
1,531 

284 



3,191 

1,402 

760 

489 



643 
2,272 

362 
2,121 



378 
296 

31 
,886 
340 

83 
202 

47 



2,092 
1,736 
5,703 



INSTITUTIONS FOR CARE OF CHILDREN. 



Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



110 
291 
248 
93 
139 
50 
53 
24 
69 



144 
45 
102 



100 
44 
63 
23 
18 



Children under care at close of the 
year. 



Total.' 



151,441 



14,023 
51,315 
36, 520 
15,912 
12, 092 
4,512 
4,741 
2,815 
8,905 



883 

1,742 
116 
7,290 
1,284 
2,708 



33,571 
4,943 
12,801 



12, 206 
4,230 

ll,fiS2 
4, 199 
4,203 



3,130 
4,151 
5,030 
401 
628 
1,126 
1,386 



391 
2,917 
1,190 
1,521 
1,289 
2,120 
1,529 
1,536 

199 



2,291 
933 
665 
633 



243 

3,107 

95 

1,296 



224 
295 

13 

1,740 

148 

41 
203 

91 



1,302 
1,265 
6,338 



With sex reported. 



Male. 



79,706 



7,196 
29,003 
19,739 
8, 106 
5,3.30 
1,973 
2,514 
1,214 
4,511 



450 

573 

96 

3,857 
631 

1,589 



19, 129 
2,506 
7,428 



6,174 
2,286 
7,234 
2,345 
1,700 



1,806 
2,039 
2,405 
249 
290 
614 
763 



234 
1,176 
618 
578 
314 
988 
797 
593 
32 



1,045 

375 
320 
233 



96 

1,823 

50 

545 



99 

106 

9 

844 



112 
44 



769 

494 

3,248 



Female. 



64,069 



6,123 
21,637 
13, 182 
6,905 
6,182 
2,418 
2,030 
1,390 
4,142 



433 

740 

20 

3,184 
633 

1,107 



14,289 
2,231 
5,117 



4,937 
1,733 
3,587 
1,079 
1,246 



1,324 
1,806 
2,165 
212 
338 
512 
618 



87 
1,555 
572 
929 
328 
1,132 
732 
737 
110 



1,246 
467 
335 
370 



122 

1,261 

45 

612 



125 
189 
4 
741 
148 
41 
95 
47 



533 

771 
2,838 



' Includes those whose sex was not reported. 



SEX AND AGE OF INMATES. 

BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION AND SEX, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



59 



SOCIETIES FOR PROTECTION AND 
CARE OF CHILDREN. 


HOMES 


FOR ADULTS, OR .\DULT.S AND 
CHILDREN. 


HOSPITALS ANC 


SANITAEICMS. 


INSTITUTIONS FOB 


BLIND AND DEAF. 






Children under eare 
of the year 


at close 




Inmates at close of the year. 




Inmates at close of the year. 




Inmates at close of the year. 






























Number 




With sex 


reported. 


of insti- 




With sex 


reported. 


Of insti- 




With sex 


reported. 


of insti- 




With sex 


reported. 




eties re- 
porting. 








tutions 
report- 








tutions 
report- 








tutions 
report- 




























Total.' 






ing. 


Total.i 






ing. 


Total.' 






mc. 


Total.' 












Male. 


Female. 






Male. 


Female. 






Male. 


Female. 






Male. 


Female. 




148 


32,776 


15,038 


12,086 


1,358 


116,228 


05,242 


48,210 


1,716 


96,390 


47, 141 


36,594 


121 


15,439 


8,061 


7,175 


1 


14 


2,320 


1,081 


1,239 


219 


10,357 


5,345 


4,711 


209 


10,643 


4,954 


4,816 


13 


1,120 


605 


515 


2 


51 


16,115 


6,759 


4,741 


429 


35,362 


16,238 


18,532 


469 


3(i, 789 


18,996 


15,327 


32 


3,947 


2,025 


1,922 


3 


42 


5,679 


3,013 


2,611 


254 


30,638 


19. 600 


9,968 


347 


17,797 


8,086 


7,363 


21 


3,042 


1,660 


1,382 


4 


16 


1,758 


420 


512 


121 


12,092 


7,507 


4,299 


223 


9. 908 


4,171 


3,090 


16 


2,045 


1,080 


965 


S 


9 


3,770 


2,151 


1,510 


139 


9,563 


5,603 


3,672 


165 


6,311 


3,048 


2,185 


13 


1,638 


784 


651 


6 


3 


162 


121 


41 


53 


5,061 


2,994 


2,050 


51 


2,206 


871 


749 


8 


1,250 


666 


584 


7 


5 


70 


15 


8 


51 


3,781 


1,595 


2,079 


59 


3,205 


1,322 


479 


9 


1,006 


804 


S02 


8 


3 


233 


132 


101 


17 


1,514 


869 


596 


98 


4,112 


2,493 


966 


5 


478 


268 


210 


9 


5 


2,669 


1,346 


1,323 


75 


7,970 


5,431 


2,303 


95 


5,359 


3,200 


1,619 


4 


313 


169 


144 


10 


1 


219 


131 


88 


16 


1,947 


1,795 


152 


IS 


584 


270 


242 


1 


111 


59 


52 


11 


2 


41 


16 


25 


16 

8 

127 


371 

432 

5,070 


144 

234 

1.928 


213 

198 

2,875 


23 

10 

116 


419 

282 

6,770 


205 

103 

3,072 


208 

139 

3,138 










r;i 










13 


9 


1,195 


642 


653 


8 


664 


341 


323 


14 


1 


611 


274 


337 


17 


788 


353 


415 


15 


909 


461 


293 


1 


74 


34 


40 


lo 


1 


254 


118 


136 


35 


1,749 


891 


858 


27 


1,679 


843 


796 


3 


271 


171 


100 


16 


17 


4,971 


2,958 


1,963 


212 


21,692 


10,569 


10,907 


241 


22,998 


12,389 


9,766 


18 


2,257 


1,208 


1,049 


17 


11 


3,629 


2,089 


1,418 


58 


3.806 


1,855 


1,702 


54 


3,381 


1,540 


1,290 


3 


277 


124 


153 


18 


23 


7,515 


1,712 


1,360 


159 


9,864 


3,814 


5,923 


174 


10,410 


5,067 


4,271 


11 


1,413 


693 


720 


19 


12 


48S 


238 


195 


80 


9,669 


6,495 


2,866 


74 


6,550 


3,488 


2,906 


5 


774 


398 


376 


20 


17 


1,260 


661 


599 


37 


4,097 


2,753 


1,344 


47 


1,440 


736 


633 


2 


472 


233 


239 


21 


5 


1,918 


1,013 


905 


83 


9,916 


5,811 


3, 469 


122 


5,946 


2,424 


2,473 


5 


820 


470 


350 


22 


3 


1,611 


884 


727 


30 


2,725 


1,593 


1,116 


58 


2,114 


818 


814 


4 


550 


313 


237 


23 


5 


402 


217 


185 


24 


4,131 


2,948 


1,183 


46 


1,747 


620 


537 


5 


426 


246 


180 


24 


4 


159 


92 


67 


28 


2,i42 


1,167 


852 


62 


2,839 


1,082 


932 


2 


369 


208 


161 


25 


2 


52 


35 


17 


26 


1,761 


982 


767 


44 


1,884 


573 


442 


2 


361 


199 


162 


26 


4 


258 


128 


130 


36 


2,978 


1,258 


1,569 


53 


3,224 


1,639 


924 


4 


528 


262 


266 


27 


1 


360 


117 


243 


2 


148 


64 


84 


7 


87 


52 


35 


2 


103 


44 


59 


28 


1 
1 
3 


19 
3 

907 


10 


9 
3 
43 


2 
13 
14 


548 

945 

3,570 


548 

467 

3,021 




6 
21 
30 


112 
891 
871 


52 
372 
401 


60 
343 
354 


2 
2 
2 


113 
247 
324 


59 
131 
177 


64 
116 
147 


W 


478 
549 


30 


38 


31 










9 
28 


241 

1,8.31 


85 
544 


150 
1,272 


5 
37 


137 

2,207 


79 
848 


58 
783 










3? 


2 


809 


498 


311 


4 


298 


152 


146 


33 


1 


1,652 


1,061 


691 


53 


2,528 


1,750 


658 


15 


977 


478 


338 


2 


134 


77 


57 


34 


2 


565 


261 


304 


25 


3,181 


2,669 


506 


26 


1,018 


647 


296 


1 


74 


45 


29 


35 


1 


557 


286 


271 


4 


246 


56 


190 


15 


473 


295 


165 


1 


192 


105 


87 


36 


1 


3 


1 


2 


10 


426 


236 


180 


26 


550 


206 


201 


1 


367 


198 


169 


37 


1 


75 


44 


31 


13 
22 


255 
708 


21 

278 


223 
419 


5 
20 


141 
002 


86 
263 


32 
262 


1 
2 


203 
267 






38 


154 


113 


?0 


1 


109 






5 


137 


24 


74 


16 


206 


146 


50 


1 


103 


53 


50 


40 










26 


2,165 


788 


1,360 
457 


22 


923 


394 






461 


251 




11 


1 


121 


87 


34 


16 


2,326 


1,809 


13 


500 


152 


203 


3 


483 


242 


241 


42 


2 


41 


34 


7 


10 

1 


390 
180 

371 


192 
145 

127 


198 
35 

244 


7 
9 

11 


371 
412 

371 


157 
168 

281 


87 
84 

90 


3 


306 


173 


133 


43 


1 


9 


6 


4 


2 


381 


198 


183 


4,'i 










18 


1 279 


430 


766 


12 


1,372 
94 


272 


168 


2 


179 


92 


87 


46 


2 


26 


9 


2 


4 


305 


133 


162 


5 


15 


2 


2 


283 


132 


151 


47 


2 


35 


1 


2 


22 


1,826 


905 


907 


31 


1,428 


754 


219 


3 


763 


382 


381 


48 


1 


3 


1 


2 


4 


207 


96 


Ul 


14 


440 


258 


102 


1 


83 


45 


38 


49 


1 


52 


31 


21 


1 


177 


177 




5 


153 


90 


63 


1 


50 


27 


23 


50 










1 
9 


53 
948 


44 
429 


9 

470 


5 
41 


155 

2 171 


137 
1 160 


18 
596 










51 










I 


190 
34 


111 


79 


'i2 


1 


178 


100 


78 










19 


792 


020 


98 


1 


18 


16 


53 


















8 
6 


174 
227 


102 
126 


42 
47 










(^i 










2 


129 


123 


6 


1 


121 


67 


54 


55 


1 
1 


1,152 
636 


615 
282 


537 
354 


19 
10 


1,445 
704 


873 
481 


556 
223 


33 
12 


1,370 
973 


853 
593 


466 
380 










51 


1 


26 


18 


8 


58 


3 


881 


449 


432 


46 


5,821 


4,077 


1,524 


60 


3,016 


1,754 


773 


3 


287 


151 


136 


59 



60 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

PERSONS RECEIVED INTO BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS DURING THE YEAR, 



Table 51 



DIVISION OR STATE. 



United States. 



Geographic divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central.. 
West North Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central.. 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 



New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey . . . . 
Pennsylvania. . 



East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri , 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico., 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 



Pacific: 

Washington. 

Oregon 

California 



all institutions. 



Total 
number 
reported. 



5,408 



654 
1,693 
1,055 
647 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 



56 

62 
24 
360 
56 
96 



SOO 
207 



310 
177 
325 
136 
107 



128 
103 
159 
18 
17 
50 
72 



23 

137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 



71 
32 
189 



Number 
reporting 

persons 
received 

during 
the year. 



Persons received during the year. 



4,307 



549 
1,226 
875 
461 
465 
163 
166 
151 
251 



47 
66 
21 
299 
43 
83 



620 
162 
444 



260 
134 
269 
118 
94 



112 
92 

121 
14 
14 
45 
63 



17 
112 
53 
77 
29 
53 
31 
68 
25 



65 
28 
158 



Total 

number 

reported.! 



Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting. 



2,960,538 



314,742 
1,239,399 
622,246 
212, 615 
185, 081 
66, 477 
79, 297 
67, 791 
182, 890 



14,392 
8, 255 
5,737 
215,383 
19,303 
51,612 



771, 175 
128, 836 
339,388 



245,111 
37,777 
158,511 
122.393 
58, 454 



60, 717 
29,329 
77,706 
3,792 
4,808 
15,514 
20, 719 



2,195 
47, 569 
58,350 
24,818 
10, 023 
11,006 

5,000 
19, 758 

6,362 



20,813 

15,614 

7,494 

12, 556 



11,751 
23,595 
3,209 
40, 742 



21,058 
2,944 
2,708 

28,340 

3,719 

2,152 

6,857 

13 



32,325 
55,341 
95,224 



With sex reported. 



4,116 



621 
1,189 
843 
421 
443 
153 
155 
146 
245 



43 
52 
20 
284 
42 
80 



600 
168 
431 



263 
129 
259 
112 
90 



105 
77 

111 
13 
13 
43 
59 



17 
104 

52 
74 
28 
52 
29 
63 
24 



64 
28 
153 



Number of persons. 



Total. 



2,678,939 



293,944 

1,155,991 

521,614 

189, 190 

162, 693 

49, 159 

67,273 

62, 977 

176,098 



14,318 

7,791 
6,369 
197, 194 
19, 288 
49,984 



728, 768 
126,472 
301,751 



241,714 
36, 143 

145, 909 
42, 654 
55, 194 



64,289 
22, 777 
72,378 
2,382 
3,621 
14,914 
18,849 



2,195 
36, 332 
54,429 
21,198 

9,840 
10,333 

4,068 
IS, 086 

6,212 



19,608 
10,618 
6,645 
12,288 



10,505 

22,454 

1,512 

32,802 



21,058 
2,944 
2,708 

24,226 
3,019 
2,152 
6,857 
13 



32,245 
55,341 
88,512 



Male. 



1,791,131 



186,563 

819,813 

311,560 

113,458 

104,599 

27,613 

49,548 

40, 456 

137, 522 



7,744 
4,051 
3,030 
123, 722 
10,875 
37,141 



512,991 

94, 497 

212,325 



150,314 
22,153 
79,419 
21,697 
37,977 



29,104 
11,649 
47,986 
1,157 
2,009 
8,413 
13, 140 



1,330 
20,041 
38,399 
15, 507 
5,948 
5,389 
2,205 
10,657 
5,123 



11,817 

5,719 
3,762 
6,316 



8,713 
14,042 

1,081 
25,712 



12,935 
1,699 
2,390 

15,233 
2,446 
1,720 
4,023 



20,536 
49,636 
67, 450 



Female. 



887,808 



107, 381 
336,178 
210,054 
75, 732 
58,094 
21,646 
17, 725 
22,522 
38,576 



6,574 
3,740 
2,339 

73,472 
8,413 

12, 843 



215, 777 
30,976 
89, 426 



91,400 
13,990 
66,490 
20,957 
17,217 



25,185 
11,128 
24,372 
1,225 
1,612 
6,501 
5,709 



865 
16, 291 
16,030 
5,691 
3,892 
4,944 
1,863 
7,429 
1,089 



7,791 
4,899 
2,883 
5,973 



1,792 

8,412 

431 

7,090 



8,123 

1,245 
318 

8,993 
673 
432 

2,834 
4 



11,709 

5,805 

21,062 



INSTITUTIONS FOR CAKE OF CHILDREN. 



Children received during the year. 



Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting. 



1,065 



112 

287 
246 
90 
138 
47 
49 
27 
69 



143 
43 
101 



102 
46 
58 
24 

17 



Total. > 



85,829 



8,066 
36,873 
18,712 
7,681 
3,883 
1,456 
2,360 
2,589 
5,309 



208 
625 
58 
5,632 
724 
819 



26, 465 
6,131 
4,277 



6,995 
1,277 
7,348 
1,961 
1,141 



1,194 
1,182 
3,677 
65 
106 
642 
715 



92 
,310 
603 
309 
349 
388 
232 
604 

96 



526 

595 



137 



179 

1,362 

102 

727 



207 

249 

13 

1,724 

74 

83 

226 

13 



1,069 

414 

3,826 



With sex reported. 



Male. 



50,874 



3,553 

24,679 

11,317 

2,856 

1,977 

676 

1,345 

1,391 

3,080 



92 
318 

48 

2,341 

346 

408 



19, 476 
2,783 
2,420 



4,118 

689 

4,739 

1,137 

634 



603 
492 
1,050 
38 
48 
361 
364 



62 
695 
286 
137 

90 
210 
129 
331 

38 



272 
255 

87 
62 



87 



39 
325 



114 
129 



966 



29 
136 



579 

175 

2,326 



Female. 



' Includes those whose sex was not r«ported. 



SEX AND AGE OF INMATES. 

BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION AND SEX, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



61 



HOMES FOB ADDLTS, 


OK ADULTS AND 


CHn-DREN. 


HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 


INSTITUTIONS FOB 


BLIND AND DEAF. 




Number 


Persons received during 


tlie year. 


Number 


Persons 


received during the year. 


Numlier 


Persons received during the year. 






With sex 


reported. 




With sex reported. 




With sex reported. 




o( Insti- 
tutions 








of insti- 
tutions 






of insti- 
tutions 






















reporting. 


Total. 1 


Male. 


Female. 


reporting. 


Total.' 


Male. 


Female. 


reporting. 


Total.' 


Male. 


Female. 




1,302 


918,752 


756,691 


140,302 


1,829 


1,9.53,309 


982,096 


715,841 


Ill 


2,648 


1,470 


1,178 


1 


198 


82,049 


71,S!7 


9,630 


226 


224,432 


111,068 


94,991 


13 


195 


105 


90 


2 


420 


514, 466 


446,041 


51, 655 


491 


688, .346 


348, 710 


273, 2.52 


28 


714 


383 


331 


3 


244 


208,430 


144,117 


60,853 


368 


394, 687 


155, 887 


141, 786 


17 


417 


239 


178 


4 


116 


23,Si4 


15,729 


7,816 


239 


180, 891 


94,699 


64,874 


16 


309 


174 


135 


5 


132 


23, 125 


18,790 


4,174 


183 


157,6.52 


83,604 


52,023 


12 


421 


228 


193 


6 


53 


7,035 


5,404 


1,4.36 


55 


47, 779 


21,410 


19, 283 


8 


207 


123 


84 


7 


50 


2, .565 


766 


1,799 


59 


74,141 


47,303 


14,891 


8 


231 


134 


97 


8 


18 


1,773 


733 


7.39 


101 


63,313 


38,290 


20,540 


5 


86 


41 


45 


9 


71 


55,475 


53,274 


2,201 


107 


122,0.38 


81, 125 


34,201 


4 


68 


43 


25 


10 


13 


1,170 


746 


382 


21 


12,994 


6,898 


6,068 


1 


20 


8 


12 


11 


14 

8 
118 


91 

126 

55,851 


45 

60 

47, 164 


46 

66 

8,147 


25 
11 

125 


7,539 

5,-553 

15.3,778 


3,688 
2,922 
74, 1.53 


3,4.36 

2,263 

63, 580 










12 










13 


8' 


122' 


64' 


58' 


14 


15 


902 


491 


411 


16 


17, 724 


10,032 


7,617 


1 


13 


6 


7 


15 


30 


23,909 


23,331 


578 


28 


26,844 


13,375 


12,027 


3 


40 


27 


13 


16 


213 


347,207 


2,86,478 


44,100 


2.50 


397,078 


206,797 


164,503 


14 


425 


240 


185 


17 


56 


55, 121 


53, 963 


1,017 


60 


68,531 


37,723 


27,596 


3 


53 


28 


25 


18 


151 


112, 138 


105, 600 


6,538 


181 


222, 737 


104, 190 


81, 153 


11 


236 


115 


121 


19 


77 


150,696 


100,085 


50,611 


78 


87,3.50 


46,068 


38,003 


3 


70 


43 


27 


20 


38 


10,904 


8,124 


1,185 


49 


25,506 


13,298 


12,208 


2 


90 


42 


48 


21 


79 


24,872 


15, 685 


7,321 


128 


126, 198 


58,938 


56,524 


4 


93 


57 


36 


22 


28 


2,041 


996 


1,045 


63 


118,3,33 


19,525 


19,069 


3 


68 


39 


29 


23 


22 


19,917 


19,227 


690 


50 


37,300 


18,058 


15,982 


5 


96 


.58 


38 


24 


29 


8,386 


4,338 


3,937 


65 


51,122 


24,233 


20,618 


2 


45 


30 


15 


25 


24 


892 


332 


560 


49 


27,209 


10,800 


10,141 


2 


46 


25 


21 


28 


33 


10,675 


8,064 


2,433 


55 


63,248 


38, 815 


20,675 


4 


106 


57 


49 


27 


2 


144 


16 


128 


9 


3,564 


1,094 


1,060 


2 


19 


9 


10 


2S 


2 


568 


568 




g 


4,116 


1,385 


1,544 


2 
2 


18 
29 


8 
16 


10 
13 


25 


12 


482 


210 


272' 


22 


14,361 


7,826 


51981 


30 


14 


2,687 


2,201 


486 


31 


17,271 


10, .M6 


4,855 


2 


46 


29 


17 


31 


7 
30 


122 
4,978 


99 
3, 795 


23 
1,183 


5 
43 


1,981 
41,2-38 


1,169 
15, 528 


812 
14,492 










32 


4 


43 


2.3 


26 


-33 


22 


8,763 


7,418 


1,345 


16 


49,057 


30,681 


14,4.55 


1 


27 


15 


12 


34 


23 


6,363 


5,843 


520 


26 


18, 121 


9, 515 


4,986 


1 


25 


12 


13 


35 


4 


245 


109 


136 


16 


9,406 


.5,736 


- 3,670 


1 


23 


13 


10 


36 


9 


303 


147 


156 


29 


10,251 


5,005 


4,573 


1 


64 


27 


37 


37 


12 


303 


42 


261 


8 


4,436 


2,021 


1,483 


1 


29 


13 


16 


38 


21 


2,003 


1,311 


531 


24 


16,950 


8,895 


6,544 


2 


201 


120 


81 


39 


4 


45 


26 


19 


16 


6,212 


5,054 


1,008 


1 


9 





4 


40 


27 


4,943 


3,991 


925 


25 


15,283 


7,517 


6,-588 


2 


61 


37 


24 


41 


15 


1,374 


1,026 


348 


15 


13,567 


4,396 


4,212 


3 


78 


42 


36 


42 


9 


617 


323 


126 


7 


6,611 


3,308 


2,622 


3 


68 


44 


24 


43 


2 

7 


101 

298 


64 
56 


37 
242 


8 
13 


12,318 
11,221 


6,189 
8, 540 


5,861 
1,435 










44 


2 


53 


30 


23 


45 


17 


948 


413 


635 


11 


21,275 


12, 725 


7,409 


1 


20 


10 


10 


46 


4 


188 


27 


161 


4 


2,878 


990 


191 


2 


41 


25 


16 


47 


22 


1,131 


270 


861 


31 


38,767 


25,048 


5,856 


3 


117 


69 


48 


48 


4 


173 


59 


114 


16 


20,669 


12, 7-57 


7,912 


1 


9 


5 


4 


49 


1 


43 


43 




6 


2,645 
2,683 
25, 145 
3,627 


1,524 
2,371 
13,719 
2,4-36 


1,121 
312 

7,613 
491 


1 


7 


3 






1 
9 


12 
1,441 


10 
536 


2 

604 


5 
41 
17 


4 


-50 
51 


i' 

1 


30' 

18 


is' 

10 


n' 

8 


52 
53 


3' 


m 


85' 


"io' 


9 
7 


2,069 
6,505 


1,691 
3,792 


378 
2,713 


i' 


22' 


io' 


i2' 


54 
55 
56 

57 


19 
10 


1,365 
41,107 


483 
40,857 


882 
250 


35 
12 


29,891 
13,814 


19,474 
8,501 


10,417 
5,313 










i 


6 


3' 


"3 


58 


42 


13,003 


11,934 


1,069 


60 


78,333 


53,150 


18,471 


3 


62 


40 


22 


59 



62 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

CHILDREN IN BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR, 



Table 62 



DIVISION OR STATE. 



United States . . 

(iEOGRAPHIC divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. . 
West North Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central.. 
West South Central- 
Mountain 

Pacific 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota , 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas , 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia, 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina , 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East Socth Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas , 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Te.xas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 







ALL INSTITUTIONS. 






institutions for 


CARE OF CHILDREN. 








Children 


n institutions at close of 
the year. 




Inmates at close of the year. 


Total 


Number 
reporting 


Number 








Number 
of 




















number 
reported. 


children 
at close of 


reporting 
sex. 




With sex reported. 


institu- 
tions re- 




With SOX 


reported. 




the year. 




Total.' 






porting. 


Total.' 






















Male. 


Female. 






Male. 


Female. 


5,408 


2,621 


2,415 


154,420 


78,418 


69,362 


1,077 


111,614 


59,481 


47,635 


654 


279 


273 


12,348 


6,365 


5,624 


110 


9,023 


4,891 


3,891 


1,69.) 


755 


739 


63,035 


34,211 


28.008 


291 


44,963 


25,251 


19,207 


1,055 


552 


527 


31,424 


16,554 


12,302 


248 


23,597 


13,604 


8,388 


547 


269 


250 


11,610 


5,527 


5,245 


93 


7,721 


3,901 


3,310 


578 


259 


242 


12,818 


6,386 


6,502 


139 


10, 107 


4,347 


5,100 


203 


107 


102 


5,553 


2,211 


3,204 


60 


2,979 


1,266 


1,593 


210 


99 


90 


6,227 


2,917 


3,043 


63 


4,136 


1,971 


1,968 


176 


63 


56 


2,901 


1,195 


1,446 


24 


2,166 


913 


1,043 


292 


138 


136 


8,504 


4,052 


4,088 


69 


6,822 


3.437 


3,137 


56 


20 


20 


984 


515 


469 


11 


853 


460 


403 


62 


33 


33 


1,183 


691 


560 


17 


1,125 


566 


634 


24 


5 


5 


337 


209 


128 


2 


113 


96 


18 


360 


149 


147 


6,256 


3,052 


2,884 


48 


4,069 


2,122 


1,764 


56 


22 


19 


1,202 


574 


551 


11 


913 


451 


443 


96 


60 


49 


2,386 


1,424 


932 


21 


1,950 


1,208 


730 


800 


378 


372 


42,956 


23,673 


18,973 


144 


30,247 


17,065 


13,029 


207 


104 


102 


4,601 


2,123 


2,212 


45 


3,365 


1,595 


1,679 


686 


273 


265 


15,478 


8,415 


6,823 


102 


11,351 


6,591 


4,699 


310 


171 


165 


10,783 


6,366 


4,376 


100 


8.479 


4,463 


3,294 


177 


84 


83 


3,324 


1,847 


1,414 


44 


2,600 


1,482 


1,055 


325 


167 


158 


11,470 


6,519 


3,897 


63 


9,047 


6,722 


2,633 


136 


70 


63 


3,255 


1,526 


1,435 


23 


1,868 


972 


731 


107 


60 


68 


2,592 


1,296 


1,180 


18 


1.603 


865 


676 


128 


66 


61 


2,609 


1,333 


1,045 


16 


1,669 


914 


655 


103 


48 


42 


2,231 


1,087 


842 


18 


1,667 


824 


656 


159 


76 


68 


4,112 


1,699 


2,113 


31 


2,865 


1,274 


1,373 


18 


11 


11 


256 


128 


128 


2 


121 


69 


62 


17 


10 


10 


173 


92 


81 


2 


78 


43 


35 


50 


26 


26 


957 


602 


456 


9 


646 


344 


303 


72 


34 


33 


1,272 


686 


581 


15 


775 


443 


337 


23 


9 


7 


350 


200 


74 


5 


309 


179 


60 


137 


63 


60 


3,278 


1,207 


1,815 


33 


2,493 


1,016 


1,291 


72 


28 


27 


1,501 


683 


698 


14 


1,063 


537 


526 


98 


45 


43 


1,436 


584 


832 


27 


1,243 


491 


738 


34 


21 


19 


622 


254 


241 


8 


407 


139 


141 


63 


26 


26 


2,096 


993 


1,093 


16 


1,698 


794 


904 


38 


13 


13 


1,303 


614 


678 


10 


1,270 


602 


668 


81 


40 


38 


1,879 


769 


903 


20 


1,431 


657 


668 


32 


14 


9 


356 


92 


168 


6 


193 


33 


104 


89 


48 


45 


2,433 


902 


1,514 


21 


930 


449 


481 


67 


31 


30 


1,346 


561 


694 


14 


813 


313 


409 


36 


18 


18 


1,122 


601 


621 


8 


603 


271 


332 


21 


10 


9 


652 


247 


376 


7 


633 


233 


370 


36 


14 


14 


651 


288 


338 


7 


243 


96 


122 


61 


34 


33 


2,698 


1,370 


1,295 


24 


2,534 


1,290 


1,211 


19 


11 


10 


658 


266 


267 


4 


95 


60 


45 


94 


40 


33 


2,320 


993 


1.143 


18 


1,264 


635 


590 


26 


9 


9 


339 


160 


179 


2 


224 


99 


125 


11 


7 


7 


136 


69 


67 


2 


67 


26 


31 


8 


2 


2 


20 


12 


8 


1 


13 


9 


4 


72 


27 


21 


1.725 


719 


802 


12 


1,329 


623 


551 


27 
17 
14 


8 
3 
6 


8 
3 
5 


187 

45 

358 


25 

3 

163 


162 
42 
139 


2 

1 
3 


148 

41 

263 




148 
41 
95 




m 


1 


1 


1 


91 


44 


47 


1 


91 


44 


47 


71 


33 


32 


1,149 


617 


516 


10 


639 


402 


237 


32 


20 


20 


792 


333 


459 


6 


663 


235 


328 


189 


85 


84 


6,563 


3,102 


3,113 


53 


6,620 


2,800 


2,672 



1 Includes those whose sex was not reported. 



SEX AND AGE OF INMATES. 

BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION AND SEX, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



63 



SOCIETIES FOB PROTECTION AND CARE 
OF CHILDREN. 


HOMES FOR ADULTS, OR ADULTS AND 
CHILDREN. 


HOSPITALS ANT 


SANITARIUMS. 


INSTITUTIONS FOR 


BLIND AND DEAF. 




Num- 
ber of 
societies 

re- 
porting. 


ChUdron in receiving homes at 
close of the year. 


Num- 
ber of 
institu- 
tions re- 
porting. 


Children in institutions at close 
of the year. 


Num- 
ber of 
institu- 
tions re- 
porting. 


Children in institutionsat close 
of the year. 


Num- 
ber of 
institu- 
tions re- 
porting. 


Children in institutions at 
close of the year. 




Total.' 


With sex reported. 


Total.' 


With sex 


reported. 


Total.' 


With sex 


reported. 


Total.' 


With sex reported. 




Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 




77 


3,662 


2,141 


1,225 


370 


17,382 


5,565 


10,361 


880 


12,356 


6,087 


5,679 


117 


9,606 


5,144 


4,462 


1 


4 
24 
26 
10 

4 


41 

2,463 

632 

124 

66 


20 

1,541 

371 

76 

21 


21 

797 

261 

48 

35 


31 
110 
70 
45 
38 
26 
23 
4 
23 


984 
6,460 
3,389 
1.527 
1,214 
1,477 
1.112 
236 
983 


276 
2,581 
839 
472 
293 
384 
479 
10 
231 


551 

3,726 
1,971 
872 
718 
1,076 
609 
177 
661 


121 
298 
190 
105 
66 
23 
U 
28 
38 


1,538 

6,522 

2,033 

958 

547 

172 

89 

125 

372 


753 

3,421 

885 

398 

1? 
52 
65 

206 


724 
3.068 
864 
415 
244 
101 
37 
60 
166 


13 
32 

18 
16 
12 
8 
9 
5 
4 


762 

2,627 

1,773 

1,280 

894 

925 

841 

320 

184 


425 
1,417 
955 
680 
489 
490 
414 
173 
101 


337 
1,210 
818 
600 
405 
435 
427 
147 
83 


2 
3 
4 

5 
S 

7 


3 
2 

4 


49 
54 
143 


1 

34 

77 


2 
20 
41 


8 
9 
10 


















8 
16 

2 
70 

6 
19 

155 

37 
106 

46 
20 
71 
30 
23 

34 
17 
22 
5 
5 
11 
11 

3 
19 
6 
12 
9 
4 
1 
9 
3 

10 
8 
2 
3 

1 
3 


65 

68 

16 

1,040 

179 

180 

4,649 

581 

1,292 

676 
95 
696 
344 
222 

345 

147 

217 

8 

16 
147 

78 

35 
217 
101 
53 
23 
15 
20 
70 
11 

114 
24 
15 
19 

42 
30 


31 

26 

9 

523 

82 
82 

2,458 
301 
662 

337 
56 
287 
121 

84 

100 
76 
108 
6 
9 
73 
26 

21 
69 
51 
26 
11 

9 
12 
30 

7 

38 
12 
7 
14 

25 
18 


34 

26 

7 

517 

60 
80 

2,183 
280 
605 

329 
39 
302 
110 

84 

137 
68 
75 
2 
7 
74 
52 

14 

81 

60 

27 

14 

6 

8 

40 

4 

76 
12 
8 
5 

17 
12 


1 


66 


34 


32 




















n 










1 

7 

52 
13 
45 

18 
8 
24 
10 
10 

11 
9 
15 

1 


208 

683 

28 

65 

4,495 

339 

1,626 

997 
245 
1,230 
414 
503 

321 

205 

703 

49 


105 

155 

4 

12 

1,979 
95 
507 

231 
88 

221 
97 

202 

107 
65 

154 
27 


103 

391 

4 

53 

2,417 

244 

1,065 

457 
157 
755 
301 
301 

91 
128 
501 

22 










n 


3 

1 


33 

8 


17 
3 


16 
5 


8 
1 
3 

18 
3 
11 

3 

I 
4 

5 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


431 

74 
191 

1,450 

134 

1.043 

564 
96 
417 
477 
219 

369 
163 

295 
59 
60 
130 
204 


235 
34 
122 

790 

74 

553 

296 
43 
236 
258 
122 

208 
89 

146 
24 
30 
67 

116 


196 
40 
69 

660 
60 
490 

268 
63 
181 
219 
97 

161 
74 

149 
35 
30 
63 
88 


u 

15 


» 
6 
8 

4 
11 

4 
3 

3 
2 
3 

1 
1 


2,115 
182 
166 

67 
288 

80 
152 

45 

5 
49 
32 
19 
19 


1,381 
58 
10? 

39 
178 
53 
78 
23 

4 
33 
17 
12 
10 


684 
49 
64 

28 
110 
27 
74 
22 

1 

16 
15 
7 
9 


17 

18 
19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

25 
26 
27 
28 


3 

6 

1 
7 
6 
3 
2 
5 
2 
9 
3 

15 
6 
5 


34 
215 

6 
377 
293 
35 
79 
187 
'13 
175 
'49 

1,099 
180 
198 


18 
101 

m 

28 
74 
12 
41 
86 

m 

62 

267 
67 
50 


16 
114 

m 

349 
99 
17 
38 
91 
2 

112 
10 

815 
113 
148 












T1 




















4 
2 

1 
1 
1 


188 
44 
74 
86 

196 


94 
21 

45 
52 
104 


94 
23 
29 
34 
92 












34 


2 

1 


31 

25 


10 

11 


21 

14 


35 
36 




















2 

1 

2 
3 
3 


203 
103 

290 
329 
306 


120 
53 

148 
169 
173 


83 
50 

142 
160 
133 




1 


(') 


m 


m 


40 































11 










4 

5 

4 

10 

1 


158 

60 

236 

658 

15 


61 

28 

117 

273 

9 


97 
32 
109 
371 

6 


2 
2 
2 
3 

1 
1 


208 

74 

212 

347 

63 
27 


106 
34 
99 

175 

35 
13 


102 
40 
113 
172 

28 
14 














i 


15 
34 


1 


m 

2 


•17 


7 

5 
3 
1 

12 
4 
2 
1 


17 

37 
8 
7 

61 
6 
4 
2 


9 

17 

3^ 
31 
3 
3 
2 


8 

20 
2 
4 

30 
3 
1 


48 


1 


44 


24 


20 


"fO 










SI 










2 


■217 


(') 


168 


1 
1 


118 
23 


65 
12 


53 
11 




1 


10 


10 




13 












'i4 










1 


4 


1 


3 


1 


89 


48 


41 


"iS 














1 
1 
2 


35 
58 
50 


27 
31 

19 


8 
27 
6 


9 
4 
10 


368 
88 
527 


126 

18 
87 


226 

70 

365 


13 

8 
17 


107 

57 
208 


62 
31 
113 


45 
26 
95 










S7 


1 
3 


26 

158 


18 
83 


8 
75 


58 
59 



' Not reported. 



64 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



ADULTS IN BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION AND SEX, 

FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 63. 



DrVMION OR STATE. 



United States... 

Geographic ditisions: 

Now Enshind 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. 
West North Oentral 

South Atlantic 

East South Central. . 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Mass.ichusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atl.antic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Petmsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Daltota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolma 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

MotraTAiN: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Ari2ona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



ALL institutions. 



Total 
num- 
ber 
report- 
ed. 



Num- 
ber re- 
port- 

ing 
adult 

in- 
mates 

at 
close of 

the 
year. 



5,408 



654 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 



56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 



800 
207 
686 



310 
177 
3?5 
136 
107 



128 
103 
159 

IS 
17 
50 
72 



23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 



71 
32 
189 



2,979 



424 
884 
568 
326 
291 
108 
106 
107 
165 



35 
39 
17 
240 
30 
63 



453 
108 
323 



150 
83 

187 
85 
63 



Num- 
ber re- 
port- 
ingsex. 



2,932 



418 
874 
561 
318 



104 
107 
164 



35 
38 
17 
235 
30 
63 



447 
106 
321 



148 

83 
184 
83 
63 



SO 



Adult iimiates at close of 
the year. 



177,424 



18,024 

58,257 

42,317 

18,304 

13,686 

5,357 

5,146 

4,770 

11,. 563 



2,439 
732 
450 
9,790 
1,372 
3,241 



35,719 
5,859 
16,679 



14,628 
5,502 

13,404 
3,959 
4,824 



3,928 
2,697 
4,935 
222 
697 
1,641 
4,184 



337 

3,075 

3,040 

4,036 

708 

802 

363 

1,052 

273 



1,892 

2,631 

421 

413 



715 
1,734 

157 
2,540 



535 
345 
201 
2,498 
723 
140 
328 



2,289 
1,532 
7,742 



With sex 
reported. 



Male. Female 



103, 648 



9,450 
29,840 
26,607 
11, 20S 
8,4/7 
3,586 
2,776 
3,382 
8,262 



2,059 
323 
223 

4, 428 
728 

1,689 



18,939 
3,049 
7,852 



9,617 
3,535 
7,961 
2,248 
3,406 



2,042 

1,524 

2,751 

103 

620 

812 

3,356 



143 

1,353 

2,159 

3,278 

352 

441 

95 

493 

163 



980 

2,015 

292 

299 



414 

714 

64 

1,584 



338 
275 
178 
1,604 
623 
99 
265 



1,538 
1,025 
5,699 



71,477 



8,430 
27, 777 
15,060 
6,467 
5,141 
1,771 
2,287 
1,388 
3,156 



380 
395 
227 

5,232 
644 

1,552 



16, 462 
2,561 
8,754 



5, 084 
1,967 
6,054 
1,537 
1,418 



1,556 
1,101 
2,034 
119 
77 
784 
796 



194 
1,677 
SSI 
758 
356 
361 
245 
659 
110 



912 
016 
129 
114 



301 

937 

93 

956 



197 
70 
23 
894 
100 
41 
63 



751 
507 



HOMES FOR ADULTS, OR ADULTS 
AND CHILDREN. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
ing. 



1,358 



219 

429 

254 

121 

139 

53 

51 

17 

75 



16 
16 
8 
127 
17 
35 



212 
68 
159 



Adult inmates at close 
of Ihe year. 



Total.' 



98, 846 



9,373 

28,902 

27, 149 

10,665 

8,339 

3,584 

2,669 

1,278 

6,987 



1,947 
371 
224 

4,387 
760 

1,684 



17,197 
3,467 
8,238 



8,672 
3,852 
8,686 
2,311 
3,628 



1,821 

1,556 

2,275 

99 

548 

911 

3,355 



235 

1,454 

2,235 

3,146 

167 

239 

242 

533 

88 



1,066 

2,146 

192 

180 



213 

1,219 

69 

1,168 



192 
177 
53 
731 



125 



1,077 

616 

5,294 



With sex 
reported. 



Male. Female 



59, 677 



5,069 

13,657 

IS, 761 

7,035 

5,370 

2,610 

1,116 

859 

5,200 



1,795 
144 
129 

1,773 
349 
879 



8,590 
1,760 
3,307 



6, 264 
2, 665 
5,590 
1,496 
2,746 



1,060 
917 

1,104 
37 
548 
449 

2,920 



85 

516 

1,676 

2,657 

15 

150 

21 

226 

24 



521 

1,802 

142 

145 



66 
402 

16 
632 



87 
177 

44 
429 



747 

463 

3,990 



37,849 



4,100 
14,806 
7,997 
3,427 
2,954 

974 
1,470 

419 
1,642 



152 
213 
95 
2,484 
411 
805 



8,490 
1,458 
4,858 



2,399 

1, 1.S7 

2,714 

815 

882 



701 

639 

1,068 

62 



462 
435 



150 
923 
559 
4S9 
152 

89 
221 
307 

64 



545 

344 

50 

35 



147 
734 
53 
536 



330 

153 

1,159 



HOSPITALS AND SANITARIUMS. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 
report- 
mg. 



196 
429 
298 
191 
143 
50 
47 
85 
87 



18 
23 
9 
108 
13 
25 



224 
47 
158 



Adult inmates at close 
of the year. 



Total.' 



72,948 



8,293 
28,035 
13, .899 
6,974 
4,806 
1,448 
1,712 
3,334 
4,447 



447 
361 
226 

5,170 
612 

1,477 



17,715 
2,249 
8,071 



5, 746 
1,274 
4,315 
1,575 



2,107 
943 
2,427 
79 
96 
613 
709 



102 
1,511 
715 
890 
435 
392 
121 
455 
185 



655 
331 
229 
233 



329 

410 

17 

956 



323 
145 
148 
1,695 
712 
140 
171 



1,212 

916 

2,319 



With sex 
reported. 



Male. Female. 



4,201 
15.575 
7,201 
3,773 
2,812 
800 
1,270 
2, 42S 
2,994 



239 
179 
94 
2,549 
379 
761 



9,931 
1,239 
4,405 



3,151 
680 

2,137 
697 
536 



982 

497 

1,531 

46 

43 

299 

375 



58 
779 
427 
021 
2S4 
197 

74 
233 
139 



356 
140 
150 
154 



256 

254 

15 

745 



241 
84 

134 
1,129 

617 
99 

124 



791 

562 

1,641 



30,915 



4,092 

12,259 

6, 499 

2,675 

1,941 

648 

442 

906 

1,453 



182 
132 
2,621 
233 
716 



7,583 
1,010 
3,666 



2,577 
594 

2,171 
704 
453 



795 
374 
849 
33 
53 
209 
302 



44 
702 
288 
269 
151 
195 

24 
222 

46 



299 
191 
79 
79 



73 

156 

2 

211 



82 
61 
14 
566 
95 
41 
47 



421 
3.54 

678 



INSTITUTIONS FOR BLIND 
AND DEAF. 



Num- 
ber 
of in- 
sti- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



Adult inmates at 
close of the year. 



Total.' 



5,630 



358 
1,320 
1,269 
765 
541 
325 
765 
158 
129 



807 
143 
370 



210 
376 
403 
73 
207 



198 
233 
44 
53 
117 
120 



110 
90 



106 
171 



171 
154 



173 

105 

71 

416 



32 



With sex 
reported. 



Male. 



2,917 



180 
608 
705 
400 
295 
176 
390 
95 
68 



25 



106 



418 

50 
140 



102 
190 
234 
55 
124 



110 
116 
20 
29 
64 
61 



103 

73 



92 
68 
33 
207 



19 



' Includes those whose sex was not reported. 



SEX AND AGE OF INMATES. 



65 



The lack of exact classification by age and the indefi- 
inite use of the terms "adults" and "cliildren" make 
any general comparison with the population unsatis- 
factory. The foUowuig statement, however, compar- 
ing the sex percentages of the general popidation with 
the percentages for the persons included in the tables 
of the report will be of interest: 



Table 54 



Total poptilation, 1910 

21 years of ace and over 

Under 21 years of age 

Persons imder care of benevolent institutions, 1910, 
Adults in homes for adults, or adults and 

children 

Children in institutions for the care of children 



Per cent 
males. 



63.3 
50.3 



61.2 
55.5 



Per cent 
females. 



48.6 



47.7 
49.7 



43.9 



38. 7 
44.5 



Males to 

100 
females. 



106.0 



110.0 
101.2 



157.6 
124.8 



The dividing lines of age in the two statements are 
not identical. As ah'eady stated, under the head of 
adults are included a considerable number of females 
from IS to 21 years of age and even younger, and prob- 
ably some males under 21. It is not probable, how- 
ever, that the percentages would be materially affected 
were the exact figures available, and the proportions 
shown may be accepted on the whole as fairly correct. 
The figures indicate, therefore, that the number of 
males who for one reason or another are recipients of 
general benevolence is considerably larger than the 
corresponding number of females. 

It is noticeable, however, that this preponderance 
of males is more evident in the figures for persons 
received into institutions during the year than in 
those for persons under their care at the close of the 



year, as is shown by the following statement giving 
the percentages of males and females falling under 
these two heads for the several classes of institutions, 
and also the number of males to every 100 females: 



Table 55 


PERSONS UNDEE CARE 
AT CLOSE OF THE 
YE.A.K; 1910. 


PERSONS RECEIVED 
DURING THE TEAR: 
1910. 


CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 


Per 
cent 
males. 


Per 
cent 
fe- 
males. 


Males 
to 100 

fe- 
males. 

178.1 


Per 
cent 
males. 


Per 

cent 
fe- 
males. 


Males 
to 100 

fe- 
males. 


All classes 


56.1 


43.9 


66.9 


33.1 


201.1 






Institutions for the care of children. . 
Societies for the protection and care 


5r..5 

55.5 

57.5 
06.3 
52.9 


44.5 

14.5 

42.5 
4.3.7 
47.1 


124.4 

124.4 

135.3 
128.8 
112.3 


62.6 


37.4 


168.7 


Homes for adults, or adults and chil- 


84.4 
57.9 
55.6 


15.6 
42.1 
44.4 


539.3 


Hospitals and sanitariums. . 


135.8 


Institutions for the blind and deaf. . 


124.8 



The exceptionally large percentage of males received 
into homes for adults or adults and children is due 
chiefly to the fact that, as stated in a previous section 
of this report, of the transients provided for in munici- 
pal shelters. Salvation Army mdustrial homes and 
similar institutions, the overwhelming majority are 
men. So also the predominance of males iia the figures 
for hospitals is due in large measure to the number of 
soldiers and sailors treated in the marme and post 
hospitals. It is also to be remembered that the pres- 
ence in homes for adults, or adults and children, of a 
large number of pensioned soldiers and sailors helps to 
raise the percentage of males for that class of 
institutions. 

The following table shows, by geographic divisions, 
the percentage of each sex under the various heads: 



Table 56 


PERSONS UNDER 
INSTITUTIONS AT 
THE YEAR: 1910. 


CARE OF 
CLOSE OF 


INMATES OF INSTITUTIONS AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR: 1910. 


PERSONS RECEIVED INTO 

INSTITUTIONS DURINa 

THE YEAR: 1910. 


DIVISION. 


Per cent 
Male. 


Per cent 
female. 


Males 

to 100 

females. 


Adults. 


Children. 


Per cent 
male. 


Per cent 
female. 


Males 

to 100 

females. 




Per cent 
male. 


Per cent 
female. 


Males 

to 100 

females. 


Per cent 
male. 


Per cent 
female. 


Males 

per 100 
females. 




56.1 


43.9 


128.0 


68.4 


40.3 


145.0 


50.8 


44.9 


113.1 


66.9 


33.1 


201.7 








52.4 
54.0 
60.2 
57.4 
54.5 
53.1 
53.7 
60.1 
60.6 


47.6 
46.0 
39.8 
42.6 
45.5 
46.9 
46.3 
39.6 
39.4 


110.2 
117.6 
151.0 
134.8 
119.5 
113.4 
115.8 
152.5 
153.8 


52.4 
51.2 
63.0 
61.2 
61.9 
66.9 
63.9 
70.9 
71.5 


46.8 
47.7 
35.6 
35.3 
37.0 
33.1 
44.4 
29.1 
27.3 


112.1 
107.4 
177.0 
173.3 
164.9 
202.4 
121.3 
243.6 
261.8 


61.5 
64.3 
52.7 
47.6 
42.0 
39.8 
46.8 
41.2 
47.6 


44.7 
44.4 
39.1 
45.2 
50.7 
57.7 
48.9 
49.8 
48.1 


115.2 

122.1 
134.6 
105.4 
82.8 
69.0 
95.9 
82.6 
99.1 


63.5 
70.9 
59.7 
60.0 
64.3 
66.2 
73.7 
64.2 
78.1 


36.5 
29.1 
40.3 
40.0 
35.7 
43.8 
26.3 
35.8 
21.9 


173.7 


Middle Atlantic 


243.9 


East North Central 


148.3 


West North Central 


149.8 


South Atlantic 


180.0 


East South Central . 


128.2 


West South Central 


279.5 




179.6 


Pacific . .... 


356.5 







PLACEMENT OF CHILDREIT. 



As already stated, probably the most important 
feature distinguishing the present report from that for 
1904 is its record of placement of children in homes. 
That work, as conducted by institutions for the care of 
children, and by societies for the protection and care of 
children, is set forth m detail for each class of institu- 
tions in Tables 19 and 28, pages 28 and 36. 

Table 57 gives a general survey of the entire work, 
as conducted by these two classes of organizations. 
9531°— l:? 5 



Institutions which care for adults are omitted, because 
except pei'haps in individual cases they do not engage 
in this line of work. 

It is to be remembered also that the totals given do 
not by any means represent the aggregate number of 
children placed, for no mention is made of the number 
placed by officials or organizations not included in this 
report, as officers of the poqr, almshouses, reforma- 
tories, etc. 



66 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

CHILD-PLACING IN FAMILIES AND INSTITUTIONS DURING THE YEAR, BY DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 57 


NUMBER OF INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND SOCI- 
ETIES DEVOTED 
SPECIFICALLY TO 
THE CAKE OF 
CHILDREN. 


NDMBER OF 

ORGANIZATIONS 

REPORTING. 

CHn.DREN PLACED. 










CHILDREN PLACED DURING THE 


TEAR. 














Aggregate. 








In families 










In institutions.' 


DmSION OR STATE. 


To- 
tal. 


In- 
stitu- 
tions. 


Soci- 
eties. 


To- 
tal. 


In- 
stitu- 
tions. 


Soci- 
eties. 


To- 
tal.' 


With sex 
reported. 


Aggregate. 


By institutions. 


By societies. 


To- 
tal.' 


With sex 
reported. 




Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


To- 
tal.' 


With sex 
reported. 


To- 
tal.' 


With sex 
reported. 


To- 
tal.' 


With sex 
reported. 


Male. 


Fe- 




Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


male. 


United States... 


1,352 


1,151 


201 


720 


522 


198 


40,360 


• i 
19,600 115,555 


29,091 


13,560 


12,373 


15,072 


7,055 


6,949 


14,019 


6,511 


5,424 


11,269 


6,034 


3,182 


Geographic Drvs.: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central? 
West North Central . 

South Atlantic 

East South Central.. 
West South Central. 


136 
374 
323 
115 
162 
59 
66 
33 
84 

14 
20 
4 
59 
14 
25 

182 
62 
130 

122 
SO 
69 
27 
25 

23 
20 
37 
3 
3 
10 
19 

6 
38 
15 
34 
10 
18 
11 
22 

8 

25 
17 
10 

7 

10 

24 

7 

25 

4 

3 

1 
16 
3 
2 

3 

1 

15 

7 

62 


118 
309 
260 
95 
152 
55 
58 
28 
76 

12 
17 
4 
49 
13 
23 

154 
50 
105 

106 
47 
64 
24 
19 

16 
18 
32 
2 
2 
9 
16 

5 
36 
14 
32 

9 
17 
10 
22 

7 

25 
15 

8 
7 

9 
24 
5 

20 

3 
2 
1 
14 
2 
2 
3 
1 

14 

6 
56 


18 
65 
63 
20 
10 
4 
8 
5 
8 

2 
3 

"io 

1 
2 

28 
12 
25 

16 
33 
5 
3 
6 

7 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
...... 

""2 
2 

1 

""2 

5 

1 

1 

"2 

1 


73 
202 
211 
68 
67 
24 
24 
12 
39 

8 
13 

1 
30 

5 
16 

103 
31 
68 

84 
64 
33 
17 
13 

15 
9 

18 
2 
3 
7 

14 

3 
14 

7 
12 
9 
9 

4 
5 
4 

11 

5 

7 

1 

3 
8 
3 
10 

1 
3 
1 
6 

1 


55 
139 
148 
48 
57 
20 
16 
7 
32 

6 
10 

1 
20 

4 
14 

76 
20 
43 

68 
31 
28 
14 
7 

8 
7 

13 
1 
2 
6 

11 

2 

12 
6 

10 
8 
8 
3 
5 
3 

11 
3 
5 
1 

2 

8 
1 
5 

■""2" 

1 
4 


18 

63 

63 

20 

10 

4 

8 

5 

7 

2 
3 

'"io" 
1 

2 

27 
11 
25 

16 
33 
5 
3 
6 

7 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

""'i' 

'i' 
2 

1 

""2 

5 

1 
1 

1 


4,635 

15,602 

7,415 

4,214 

2,553 

982 

763 

1,029 

3,167 

447 
146 
15 
2,895 
193 
939 

9,979 
1,826 
3,797 

2,400 
1,591 
1,461 
1,204 
759 

993 
1,290 
831 
104 
255 
269 
472 

193 
753 
366 
319 
433 
208 
42 
104 
135 

534 

173 

264 

11 

71 
91 
107 
494 

66 

284 

3 

626 

50 


2,119 

8,324 

3,571 

2,063 

1,087 

537 

206 

351 

1,342 

258 

61 

15 

1,205 

89 

491 

6,418 

828 

1,078 

1,050 
776 
721 
594 
430 

496 
601 
433 
69 
112 
136 
226 

96 

344 

232 

139 

120 

102 

25 

17 

12 

223 

112 

197 

5 

35 
45 
56 
70 

29 

144 

1 

154 

23 


2,163 

4,553 

3,321 

2,087 

1,040 

427 

268 

342 

1,354 

189 
85 

"i,'337" 
104 
448 

2,901 
747 
905 

884 
777 
740 
591 
329 

497 
625 
398 
45 
143 
133 
246 

97 

383 

134 

180 

87 

106 

17 

16 

20 

293 

61 

67 

6 

36 
46 
51 
135 

37 

140 

2 

136 

27 


4,186 

8,400 

6,145 

3, 804 

1,892 

692 

677 

661 

2,634 

425 

88 

15 

2,740 

98 

820 

3,802 
1,479 
3,119 

1,923 

1,305 

1.435 

865 

617 

702 
1,275 
733 
103 
254 
269 
468 

57 
548 

70 
298 
432 
206 

42 
104 
135 

534 
48 
99 
11 

71 
91 
107 
408 

66 

280 

3 

262 

50 


1,893 

3,853 

3,088 

1,869 

703 

318 

177 

334 

1,331 

247 

40 

15 

1,125 

40 

426 

2,283 
633 
903 

982 
627 
714 
433 
332 

371 
593 
374 
59 
111 
136 
225 

27 
231 
33 
137 
119 
102 
25 
17 
12 

223 
23 
67 
5 

35 
45 
56 
41 

29 

144 

1 

137 

23 


1,940 

2,736 

2,873 

1,871 

763 

356 

211 

327 

1,296 

178 
48 

■i,'262' 

58 

394 

1,365 
597 
754 

814 
640 
721 
413 
285 

331 
618 
359 
44 
143 
133 
243 

30 
291 

37 
161 

87 
104 
17 
16 
20 

293 

25 

32 

6 

36 
46 
51 

78 

37 

136 

2 

125 

27 


2,358 

2,603 

4,030 

2,261 

992 

636 

338 

420 

1,434 

90 
65 
15 
1,411 
71 
706 

1,413 
499 
091 

1,628 
695 
808 
552 
347 

524 
733 
438 
42 
116 
230 
178 

23 
208 

46 

75 
361 
113 

14 
104 

48 

534 
29 
62 
11 

25 

91 

10 

212 


1,017 

1,292 

2,067 

1,109 

279 

273 

93 

211 

714 

54 
33 
15 

515 
36 

364 

723 
244 
325 

871 
328 
401 
267 
200 

276 
330 
221 
24 
49 
122 
87 

14 

39 
24 
34 

72 
58 
9 
17 
12 

223 

11 

34 

5 

13 

45 

5 

30 


988 

1,237 

1,867 

1,088 

374 

345 

121 

209 

720 

36 
32 


1,828 

5,797 

2,115 

1,543 

900 

56 

339 

241 

1,200 

335 
23 


876 

2,561 

1,021 

760 

424 

45 

84 

123 

617 

193 
7 


952 

1,499 

1,006 

783 

389 

11 

90 

118 

576 

142 
16 


449 

7,202 

1,270 

410 

661 

290 

86 

368 

533 

22 
58 


226 

4,471 

483 

194 

384 

219 

29 

17 

11 

11 
21 


223 

1,817 

448 

216 

277 

71 

57 

15 


Pacific 


58 


New England: 
Maine 


11 


New Hampshire 


37 


Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 


543 
35 
342 

644 
243 
350 

718 
329 
407 
266 
147 

248 

339 

217 

18 

67 

108 

91 

9 
143 
22 
41 
63 
55 

5 
16 
20 

293 
18 
28 
6 

12 

46 
5 
58 


1,329 
27 
114 

2,389 

980 

2,428 

295 
610 
627 
313 
270 

178 
542 
295 

61 
138 

39 
290 

34 
340 
24 
223 
71 
93 
28 


610 
4 
62 

1,560 
389 
612 

111 
299 
313 
166 
132 

95 
263 
153 
35 
62 
14 
138 

13 
192 
9 
103 
47 
44 
16 


719 
23 
52 

721 
354 
424 

96 
311 
314 
147 
138 

83 
279 
142 
26 
76 
25 
152 

21 
148 
15 
120 
24 
49 
12 


155 
95 
119 

6,177 
347 
678 

477 
286 
26 
339 
142 

291 

16 

98 

1 

1 


80 
49 
65 

4,135 
195 
141 

68 

149 

7 

161 

98 

125 

8 

59 

...... 


75 
46 
54 


Middle Atlantic: 


1,636 


New Jersey 


150 


Pennsylvania 

E. North Central: 
Ohio 


131 
70 




137 


Illinois 


19 




178 


Wisconsin 


44 


W. North Central: 
Minnesota 


168 




7 


Missouri 


39 


North Dakota 

South Dakota 


1 


Kansas 


4 

136 

205 

296 

21 

1 
2 


1 

69 

113 

199 

2 

1 


3 


South Atlantic: 


67 




92 


District of Columbia. 


97 
19 


West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 


2 








Florida 


87 


(») 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(•) 


E. South Central: 






19 
37 


i2 

33 


7 
4 


125 
165 


89 
130 


36 


Alabama 


35 






W. South Central: 


46 


22 


24 


















97 
196 

66 
121 


51 
11 

29 
69 


46 
20 

37 
52 








Texas 


86 


29 


67 


Mountain: 




Idaho 


159 

3 

258 


75 

1 

135 


84 

2 

123 


4 




4 






Colorado 


4 

50 


2 

23 


2 

27 


364 


17 


11 


New Mexico 
















Utah 












































































Pacific: 


1 
1 
6 


4 

4 
31 


3 
3 

26 


1 
1 
5 


862 

828 

1,477 


439 
346 
557 


423 

482 
449 


856 
790 
988 


435 
346 
550 


421 
444 
431 


326 
407 
701 


161 
139 
414 


165 
268 
287 


530 
383 
287 


274 
207 
136 


266 
176 
144 


6 
38 
489 


4 

...... 


2 


Oregon 


38 




18 







1 By societies. 



* Includes those whose sex was not reported. 



» Not reported. 



PLACEMENT OF CHILDREN. 



67 



Of the entire number of institutions specifically for 
the care of chUdron, practically aU the societies and 

45.4 per cent of the homes for cliildren are engaged in 
this work. Of the total number of chihh'en placed by 
them 72.1 per cent were placed in families and 27.9 
per cent in institutions, these latter being placed en- 
tirely by the societies for the protection and care of 
children. Of those placed in families, 51.8 per cent 
were placed by institutions for the care of children 
and 48.2 by societies for the protection and care of 
children, the average for the institutions being 29 and 
for the societies 71. 

The statistics in regai'd to the sex of the cliildren 
placed are not fuUy satisfactory, as a number of organi- 
zations (12.9 per cent of the total) made no report on 
this point. Of the children whose sex was reported 
55.8 per cent were boys and 44.2 per cent girls. 
Of those placed by institutions, the boys and girls 
were almost equal; of those placed by societies in 
famihes, 54.6 per cent were boys and 45.4 per cent 
girls; and of those placed by societies m institutions, 

65.5 per cent were boys and 34.5 per cent girls. 

The following comparison of the number of boys 
and girls reported as placed in famihes and in institu- 
tions is of interest as showing the much greater pre- 
ponderance of boys among children jjlaced in institu- 
tions as compared with those placed in families. Were 
it possible it would be interesting to know just the 
type of institutions in which the children were placed. 



Table 58 


CHILDREN placed: 1910. 


DIVISION. 


Aggre- 
gate. 


In families. 


In institutions. 




Total.! 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total.' 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


United States 


40,360 


29,091 


13,566 


12,373 


11,269 


6,034 


3,182 




4,635 
15,602 
7,415 
4,214 
2,5.53 
982 
763 
1,029 
3,167 


4, 186 

8,400 

6,145 

3,804 

1,892 

692 

677 

661 

2,634 


1,893 

3,853 

3,088 

1,869 

703 

318 

177 

334 

1,331 


1,940 

2,736 

2,873 

1,871 

763 

356 

211 

327 

1,296 


449 

7,202 

1,270 

410 

661 

290 

86 

368 

533 


226 

4,471 

483 

194 

384 

219 

29 

17 

11 


223 


Middle Atlantic 


1,817 


East North Central 

West North Central 


448 
216 


East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain 


71 

57 
15 


Pacific 


38 







• Includes those whose sex was not reported. 

The distribution by states of the number of organi- 
zations engaged in this work is given in Table 59, to- 
gether with the number of children placed, and the 
average per organization. 

New York is far in the lead in the number of chil- 
dren placed, owing very largely, as explamed m con- 
nection with Table 26, to the work of tliree large child- 
placing societies. Pennsylvania comes next, followed 
by Massachusetts, Ohio, New Jersey, Indiana, Califor- 
nia, Illinois, Iowa, and Michigan. It is noticeable that 
the largest averages per institution are found in the 
North Pacific states, due to the fact that the principal 
effort in each state is made by an organization which 
has state-wide jurisdiction. 



Table 59 



United States.. 



New York 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Indiana 

Illinois 

California 

New Jersey 

Massachusetts 

Missouri 

Michigan 

Connecticut 

Minnesota 

Kansas 

Maryland 

New Hampshire 

Wisconsin 

Virginia 

Kentucky 

Texas 

Iowa 

North Carolina 

West Virginia 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Alabama 

District of Columbia. 

Nebraska 

Colorado 

Georgia 

Rhode Island 

Teimessee 

Florida 

Oregon 

Soijth Carolina 

"Washington 

.\rkansas 

Delaware 

Idaho 

Oklahoma 

South Dakota 

North Dakota 

Mississippi 

Montana 

New Mexico 

Vermont 

Wyoming 

Arizona 

Nevada 

Utah 



CHILDBEN PLACED : 1910. 



Institu- 
tions re- 
porting. 



103 
84 
68 
64 
33 
31 
31 
30 
18 
17 
16 
16 
14 
14 
13 
13 
12 
11 
10 
9 
9 
9 



Number. 



Total. 



40, 360 



9,979 

2,400 

3,797 

1,591 

1,461 

1,477 

1,826 

2,895 

831 

1,204 

939 

993 

472 

753 

146 

759 

319 

634 

494 

1,290 

208 

433 

91 

447 

264 

366 

269 

626 

104 

193 

173 

135 

828 

42 

862 

71 

193 

284 

107 

255 

104 

11 

66 

50 

15 

3 



Average 
per Insti- 
tution. 



97 
29 

66 
25 
44 

49 
59 
97 
46 
71 
59 
66 
34 
54 
11 
58 
27 
49 
49 

143 
23 
48 
11 
56 
38 
52 
38 

104 
21 
39 
35 
34 

207 
11 

216 
24 
64 
95 
36 
85 
52 
U 
6« 
50 
15 
3 



A fact which should be kept in mind in connection 
with these statistics is that there is a certain amount 
of replacing of children. If the home selected for a 
child does not appear to be the best place for it, the 
society which selected the home is required to remove 
it and find another home. It is probable, however, 
that this has not been done to any great extent, at 
least to such a degree as to affect materially the totals 
or proportions. 

In general it should be said that this class of work 
is by no means thoroughly organized. There are a 
considerable number of organizations whose existence 
as yet is merely formal, and which have not commenced 
active operations. Even in states which, like Indiana, 
have an elaborate system of boards of guardians, 
comparatively few are well established, and some seem 
to have acquired but a limited conception of the work 
they are organized to do. Of those that are in opera- 
tion, many seem to have considerable difficulty in 
realizing the necessity, or even advisability, of keeping 
exact and complete records. It is doubtless due to 
this that so many failed to make any report of sex. 
In a single state, out of 533 {^•hildren reported as placed 
in institutions, the sex was reported for only 69. 



68 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 
SUPERVISING AGENCY OF INSTITUTION. 



Table 60 gives by geographic divisions and states 
the number of the diflferent classes of benevolent in- 
stitutions, classified according to character and super- 



vising agency, and Table 63 classifies in the same 
manner the inmates of such institutions at the close 
of the year. 



NUMBER OF BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS' CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO CHARACTER AND SUPERVISING AGENCY, 

FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 60 


ALL institutions. 1 


institutions fob case 
of che-deen. 


HOMES FOR ADULTS, OR 
ADULTS AND CHILDKEN. 


HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 


INSTITUTIONS FOR BLIND 
AND DEAF. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


% ■ 

SI 


3 


Private. 


i 



% 

115 

9 
9 

75 
8 
4 

2 
4 
3 


Private. 


1 


3 

74 


Private. 


1 



3 

3 
Ph 

375 

55 
SO 
62 
40 
48 
19 
21 
22 
38 


Private. 


I 
125 

13 

32 
22 
16 
14 
10 
9 
5 
4 


3 

3 
Ph 

72 


Private. 






a .2 

il 


1 





S§ 

273 

17 

56 
49 
33 

48 
33 
IS 
5 
14 


If 
281 

36 
87 
46 
27 
31 

9 
17 

8 
20 


i 
1 

25 

1 
12 
6 

"3 
.... 

■ -2 


i 

A 

457 

55 
145 
84 
27 
65 
12 
20 
11 
37 


1^ 

Oh" 

456 

54 
157 
89 
37 
56 
18 
15 
6 
24 


as. 

192 

24 

63 
41 
21 
11 
8 
S 
2 
14 


A 

.a 
S. 

30 

3 
10 
7 
4 
4 

"2 


1 


683 

139 
204 
117 
51 
71 
30 
27 
9 
35 


m 
4 

24 
35 
49 
20 
9 
7 
14 
12 


if 

386 

27 
66 
113 
76 
16 
11 
18 
33 
26 


A 

20 

"9 

5 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


1 


963 

146 
321 
175 
90 
107 
22 
23 
41 
38 


s| 

&<■" 
2 


14 


A 

.a 

1 


1 



United States 


4,629 

591 
1,286 
928 
493 
513 
188 
192 
165 
273 


636 

75 
106 
153 
75 
74 
34 
36 
35 
48 


905 

75 
237 
174 
119 
124 
61 
40 
25 
50 


873 

87 
223 
203 
125 
59 
28 
44 
43 
61 


75 

4 
31 
18 
5 
9 
1 
2 
1 
4 


2,140 

350 

689 

380 

169 

247 

61 

70 

61 

110 


1,151 


1,435 


1,918 


37 


GEOGEAPinc divisions: 

New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central... 
West North Central.. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central 


lis 

309 
260 
95 
152 
55 
58 
28 
76 


228 
445 
266 
126 
154 
61 
55 
21 
79 


8 
11 
12 
13 
12 
5 
5 
4 
4 


232 
500 
380 
256 
193 
62 
70 
111 
114 


3 
6 
14 
14 
10 
9 
8 
5 
3 




in 




7 
3 

1 
1 




10 

4 

1 

3 


West South Central 


1 












Pacific 




1 












New England: 


53 

59 
24 
316 
50 
89 

646 
175 
465 

275 
140 
290 
125 
98 

116 
99 

130 
17 
15 
48 
68 

19 

115 
58 
89 
31 
59 
34 
77 
31 

83 
SI 
33 
21 

34 

57 
• 17 

84 

24 

10 
8 
69 
23 
16 
14 
1 

69 
30 
174 


5 
6 
2 

42 
9 

11 

61 
21 
24 

69 
32 
18 
IS 
16 

17 
14 
12 
4 
6 
12 
10 

1 

13 
10 
9 
5 
7 
7 
12 
10 

9 
12 
8 
5 

8 
7 
3 
18 

6 
3 
5 
10 

4 
3 
3 

1 

15 

4 

29 


5 
6 
1 

38 
7 

18 

114 
23 
100 

53 
24 
66 
16 
15 

31 
23 
31 

\ 
15 
13 

3 

27 
15 
21 

3 
17 
13 
21 

4 

30 
13 
10 
8 

7 
13 

4 
16 

2 
1 

1 
11 
2 
3 
5 


■: 

43 
8 
11 

136 
35 
52 

48 
24 
73 
21 
37 

28 

27 

37 

5 

i 

15 

4 

20 
9 
7 
8 
4 
1 
5 
1 

14 
5 
7 
2 

7 
19 

1 
17 

10 
3 


"3 

.... 

16 
3 
12 

10 
1 
6 

"i 

1 
"4 

'"'7 

1 

"i 

1 

"2 


36 
33 
17 
190 
26 
48 

319 

93 

277 

95 
59 
127 
70 
29 

39 
35 
46 
4 
2 
13 
30 

11 

48 
23 
52 
15 
31 
13 
38 
16 

29 
21 

8 
6 

12 

16 

9 

33 

6 
3 
2 

29 
11 
6 
4 


12 
17 
4 
49 
13 
23 

154 
50 
105 

106 
47 
64 
24 
19 

16 
18 
32 
2 
2 
9 
16 

5 
36 
14 
32 

9 
17 
10 
22 

25 
15 
8 

7 

9 
24 

5 
20 

3 
2 
1 
14 
2 
2 
3 
1 

14 

6 

56 


1 


1 

3 


3 

8 




7 
6 
4 

22 
5 

11 

69 
30 
46 

24 
17 
26 
14 
3 

2 
6 

7 
1 
1 
2 
8 

2 
11 
5 
IS 
5 
5 
5 
11 
4 

6 
5 


19 
16 
9 
130 
19 
35 

221 
59 
165 

83 
40 
88 
31 
24 

29 
27 
37 
2 
2 
14 
IS 

9 
31 
26 
27 

5 

10 
14 
26 

6 

31 

17 
11 
2 

8 
19 

4 
24 

4 
1 
1 
9 
1 
2 
3 


1 
1 
1 
4 
1 

5 
4 
2 

3 
3 
4 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
3 

"2 

3 

2 

.... 

2 

1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
2 

"2 

1 

1 
1 

1 


4 
2 
1 

27 
4 
16 

78 
18 
61 

32 
10 
29 
11 

7 

11 
7 
10 


1 
2 
2 
14 
2 
3 

37 
7 
19 

11 

5 
15 

4 
6 

6 
6 
7 


"2 
.... 

4 

1 
5 

5 
1 

1 

1 

"3 


13 
11 
5 
83 
12 
15 

97 
29 
78 

32 
21 
39 
15 
10 

10 
13 
15 

1 


21 
26 
11 

129 

17 

2S 

253 
63 

184 

81 
51 
132 
66 
50 

69 
52 
57 
11 
9 
23 
36 

5 
43 
16 
29 
16 
31 

9 
27 
17 

25 
16 
11 
10 

15 
12 
6 
37 

16 
6 
6 
45 
19 
12 
7 


2 
5 
1 
37 
6 
4 

50 
15 
15 

13 

9 
9 
13 

8 

12 
9 
7 
1 
2 
5 
4 

1 
8 
5 
6 
4 
4 
3 
9 
8 

6 
7 
4 
2 

5 
4 

1 
11 

3 

1 
4 
6 
3 
3 
2 


"i 
'"3 

13 
2 
9 

10 
7 
14 

1 
3 

15 
9 
8 
4 
1 
6 
6 

1 
4 
2 
3 
2 
5 

""2 

1 

5 

'4 

1 
3 
1 
2 

2 

1 


3 
4 
2 
11 
2 
5 

40 
12 
14 

19 
14 
47 
11 
22 

15 
18 
18 
4 
5 
4 
12 


6 

1 
2 

2 

""2 
.... 

'"'i 


16 
16 

8 
78 

9 
19 

144 
33 
144 

37 
21 
60 
41 
16 

27 
16 
23 
2 
1 
8 
13 

3 
24 

7 
19 

7 
20 

5 
14 

8 

7 
7 
4 
4 

4 
2 
3 
14 

3 
1 
2 

19 
10 
4 
2 


1 


1 










New Hampshire 
























.... 
7 

3 
1 
5 

51 
18 
2 
1 
3 

2 
2 

1 


8 
3 
2 

23 

3 

30 

U 

7 

23 

\ 

5 
7 
13 


18 
4 
3 

53 
15 
19 

17 
5 

10 
6 
8 

7 
3 
11 

1 


1 

6 
\ 

3 


8 
1 
3 

18 
3 
11 

5 
2 
6 
4 
5 

2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


1 
1 








7 












Connecticut. . . . 








a 


Middle Atlantic: 


3 

1 
2 

2 
2 
3 
3 
4 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 




6 

1 




n 


New Jersey 


1 


Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 
Ohio 


9 




1 




1 


Indiana 




Illirnii^; , , , , 


.... 


1 




n 






Wisr'nn'^in , , 


1 






West North Central: 






Iowa 










Missouri 

North Dakota.. 




1 




1 


South Dakota 


"2 

1 


1 
















Nebraska 


2 
3 

3 
11 

4 
4 
4 
2 


""2 


6 
3 

2 
11 
10 
8 
1 
3 
9 
11 
1 

9 
4 
5 


2 


... 


3 

9 

6 
12 
9 
15 
3 
6 
3 
13 
4 

16 
9 
4 
1 

4 
9 
3 
11 

2 










Kansas . 










South Atlantic: 


1 
3 
3 
2 
1 


"3 

1 










Maryland 


".'i 


12 
3 
10 


5 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
2 


2 


5 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

2 
3 
3 
2 

2 

\ 

3 

1 
1 


3 




1 




I 


District of Columbia.. 


\ 


Virginia 


2 
1 

2 
2 
3 

2 

2 

1 
2 
3 

1 
1 










West Virginia 

North Carolizia . . 










1 
1 

"i 

"2 

1 


9 
4 
8 
2 

16 
8 
5 
4 

4 
6 
2 
6 
























Georgia 


2 
1 

3 
1 
3 
2 

1 
12 


1 


1 












Florida 










East South Central: 
Kentucky.. 


1 




6 
2 
3 


1 




















Alabama. . . 










""'i 


1 

4 

5 
3 

8 

I 
2 










West South Central: 


2 
4 
1 

8 


1 
4 




5 
2 

1 
10 

8 
3 


"i 










T.nni<;iftna , 




1 












Texas 


4 
1 




3 












Moxtntain: 

Montana 










Idaho 










Wyoming 


"2 

.... 

1 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 






















Colorado . . 


IS 
6 
4 
2 


1 



4 
1 
1 

1 




7 


4 






3 

1 
2 

1 


6 
1 
2 
2 


13 

5 
3 
1 


1 


1 

1 


1 
1 










New Mexico 










Arizona 






















Utah 




1 


.... 


2 






1 


1 










Nevada 














Pacific: 

Washington 


14 
4 
32 


15 
11 
35 


'"4 


25 
11 

74 


3 


1 
3 
16 


"2 


9 

3 

25 


19 
U 
49 


1 
1 
2 


7 
3 
14 


3 

i 


"2 


2I 


36 
12 
66 


13 
2 
23 


4 

1 


11 
6 
q 




8 
3 
27 
















\ 


1 
2 










California 


2 


11 




1 

















1 Not including dispensaries or societies for the protection and care of children. 



SUPERVISING AGENCY OF INSTITUTION. 



69 



In the report for 1904, there was a general classifica- 
tion of institutions as pubUc, private, and ecclesiasti- 
cal. As stated m that report, "the fh'st group com- 
prised all those du'ectly supervised and maintamed by 
the Federal Government, individual states or civil 
divisions of the latter; the second, all those managed 
by private corporations not subject to the control of 
any general body or organization, though a few estab- 
lishments mamtauied by fraternal orders were in- 
cluded; and the thu-d, all mstitutions directly super- 
vised and supported by religious denominations, 
orders, or groups of churches." 

The present report has adopted the general classifi- 
cation of institutions into public and private, including 
imder the former head institutions operated under 
federal, state, county, and municipal authority, and 
under the latter head, other institutions operated imder 
the laws governing private corporations, associations, 
or individual enterprises. 

The private institutions have been subclassified into 
those mider the supervision of Protestant, Roman 
CathoUc, Jewish, and other private organizations, 
respectively. Under the head of Protestant are in_ 
eluded all mstitutions that are tUstinctively Protestant 
in character, as indicated by their title, description, or 
avowed purpose, whether under the dhect control of 
an ecclesiastical body, or merely affiliated with one. 
Under the head of Roman Catholic are included both 
those institutions wliich are operated directly by the 
Roman Cathohc Church or a rehgious order of that 



church, and those conducted by members of some 
Roman Cathohc order and popularly recognized as 
Roman Cathohc, although not owned by the order. 
Under the head of "Other private institutions" are 
included all private organizations not specifically bo- 
longing under one of the other heads. Among these 
last are the majority of private hospitals, and homes 
and hospitals under the control of fraternal or bene- 
ficiary organizations. 

Dispensaries and societies for the protection and care 
of children have been omitted from this classification. 
In many cases it is difficult to decide whether the so- 
cieties should be regarded as pubUc or private, while 
the majority of the dispensaries are either idenftfied 
•with hospitals already included in the classification or 
are of very vague and uncertain type in this respect. 

The following tables show the per cent distribution, 
according to supervising agency, of the institutions 
and of their inmates: 



Table 61 


PER CENT or UNITED STATES TOTAL: 1910. 


CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 


Public 
institu- 
tions. 


Private institutions. 




Protes- 
tant. 


Roman 
Catholic. 


Jewish. 


other. 


All classes 


13.7 


19.6 


18.9 


1.6 


46.2 




Institutions for the care ot children . 
Homes tor adults, or adults and chil- 


10.0 

5.2 
19.6 
57.6 


23.7 

31.8 
9.1 
1.6 


24.4 

13.4 
20.1 
11.2 


2.2 

2.1 
1.0 


39.7 

47.4 
50.2 
29 6 


Uospitals and sanitariums . 


Institutions for blind and deaf 









Table 62 


PEB CENT OF UNITED STATES TOTAL: 1910. 




All inmates. 


Adults. 


Children. 


CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 


In pub- 
lic in- 
stitu- 
tions. 


In private institutions. 


In pub- 
lie in- 
stitu- 
tions. 


In private institutions. 


In pub- 
lic in- 
stitu- 
tions. 


In private mstitutions. 




Protes- 
tant. 


Roman 
Catho- 
lic. 


Jewish. 


Other. 


Protes- 
tant. 


Roman 
Catho- 
lic. 


Jewish. 


other. 


Protes- 
tant. 


Roman 

CatJio- 

lic. 


Jewish. 


other. 




27.2 


11.6 


30.4 


2.4 


28.4 


37.0 


10.4 


21.8 1.4 


29.5 


15.8 


13.1 


40.7 


3.5 


27.0 




Tn.stitntion<i for the care of children 


11.3 

36.4 
28.1 
68.6 


15.0 
12.3 

S.4 
0.3 


45.0 
24.3 
23.2 
10.0 


4.5 
1 2 
i.7 


24.2 
25.7 
38.6 
21.1 










11.3 

4.2 

31.5 

68.4 


15.1 
11.7 

7.1 
0.2 


45.0 
46.2 
18.6 
8.0 


4.5 
0.4 
1.9 


24.2 
37.6 
40.9 
22.8 


Homes for adults, or adults and children . . . 
Hospitals and sanitariums 


42.1 
27.5 
68.9 


12.4 
8.6 
0.3 


20.5 
24.0 
12.3 


1.4 23.7 
1. 7 38. 2 


Institutions for blind and deaf.. 









A comparison of Tables 61 and 62 shows a marked 
difference in the rank of the different classes of agen- 
cies in respect to the number of institutions and of 
inmates. In total number of institutions "Other" 
private mstitutions lead, followed by Protestant, Ro- 
man Catholic, Public, and Jewish. In total number of 
inmates Roman Catholic institutions lead, followed by 
"Other" Private, PubUc, Protestant, and Jewish. 
The public institutions form only 13.7 per cent of the 
total number, but report 27.2 per cent of the inmates. 



Protestant institutions number 19.6 per cent of the 
total, but report only 11.6 per cent of the inmates; 
while the Roman Catholic institutions number 18.9 
per cent of the total, but report 30.4 per cent of the 
iimiates. Of the total number of adults reported, 37 
per cent are in pubUc institutions, 21.8 per cent in 
Roman Catholic institutions, and 10.4 per cent in 
Protestant institutions; of the children 15.8 per cent 
are in public, 13.1 per cent in Protestant, and 40.7 
per cent in Roman Catholic institutions. 



70 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

INMATES OF BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS ' AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, 



Table 63 



DrVISIOK OB STATE. 



United States 

Geographic divisions: 

New Enijtand 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. 
West North Central. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central. . 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michi'ran 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

* North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georiria 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oreeon , 

California 






4,629 



591 
1,286 
928 
493 
513 
188 
192 
165 
273 



53 
59 
24 
316 
50 
89 



R46 
175 
465 



275 
140 
290 
125 



116 
99 

130 
17 
15 
48 
68 



19 
115 

58 
89 
31 
59 
34 
77 
31 



69 
30 
174 



ALL INMATES OF BENEVOLENT 
INSTITUTIONS." 



328,282 



30,311 
118,829 
73, 109 
29,790 
26,448 
10,910 
11,324 
7,617 
19,924 



3,423 
1,915 
787 
16,013 
2,566 
5,627 



76, 560 
10,278 
31,991 



25,344 
8,538 

24,794 
7,062 
7,371 



6,532! 
4,879 
9,015' 

459! 

851 
2, 598| 
5,456 



687 
6,350 
4,541 
5,441 
1,305 
2,r" 
1,666 
2,931 

629 



4,325 
3,977 
1,543 
1,065 



1,366 
4,432 

7oo; 

4,826 



874 
437 
221 
4,223 
900 
185 
686 
91 



3,403 
2, 
14, 255i 



89,330 



7,716 
18, 260 
2S, 636 
11,485 
7,445 
4,287 
3,5S6 
2,276 
5,639 



In private institntions. 



38, 195 



1,932 
155 
116 

4,168 
596 
749 



12,841 
2,249 
3,170 



9,960 
4,382 
9,442 
2,172 
2,680 



1,941 
2,145 
1,562 
153 
671 
1,160 
3,853 



11 
897 
2,050 
2,590 
331 
567 
290 
525 
184 



949 

2,451 

511 

376 



607 
562 



185 

227 

139 

1,083 

414 

15 

122 

91 



883 

252 

4,5M 



1,814 
12,45(5 
7,281 
4,709 
4,956 
2,157 
1,577 
1,03: 
2,209 



50 
121 
7 
969 
224 
443 



6,391 

683 

5,381 



2,050 
953 

3,077 
544 
657 



1,279 

606 

2,001 

71 

81 

453 

218 



59 
765 
401 
731 
92 
1,057 
925 
778 
148 



874 
364 
451 
468 



208 
675 
121 
573 



23 
13 

451 
71 
87 

312 



374 

271 

1,564 



b1 



99,815 



9,291 
44,911 
17,940 
7,808 
5,025 
2,329 
3,301 
2,490 
6,720 



555 
906 
288 

5,250 
942 

1,350 



32,456 
3,934 
8,521 



6,421 
1,569 
6,443 
2,118 
2,389 



1,946 

1,237 

3,079 

102 

73 

710 

661 



278 

2,463 

775 

540 

444 

160 

43 

279 

43 



1,441 
410 
366; 
112 



196 
2,262 



208 

4,826 

1,654 

110 

385 

24 

249 

107 

282 



93,097 



3,878 
140 
808 



743 

19 

867 



24 



843 



472 
124 



1,418 

241 

60 

175 



107 



1,217 
1,063 
4,440 282 



11,302 
38,37 
17,598 
5,678 
8,63 
2,113 
2,611 
1,707 
5,074 



710 
376 

5,450 
804 

3,076 



20,994 
3,272 
14,111 



6,170 
1,615 
5,966 
2.228 
1,620 



1,356 
891 

2,273 
133 
26 
275 
724 



339 
1,840 
1,315 
1,580 

438 
1,114 

408 
1,349 

254 



1,037 
752 
215 
109 



355 

684 

291 

1,281 



137 

63 

69 

I,16i 

174 
23 
77 



929 

680 

3,465 



CHILDREN IN INSTITDTIONS FOR CAJiE OF 
CHILDREN. 



9,023 
44,963 
23, 597 
7,721 
10, 107 
2,979 
4,136 
2,166 
6,822 



853 
1,125 

113 
4,069 

913 
1,950 



30,247 
3,365 
11,351 



8,479 
2,600 
9,047 
1,868 
1,603 



1,569 

1,667 

2,865 

121 

78 

646 

775 



309 
2,493 
1,063 
1,243 

407 
1,698 
1,270 
1,431 

193 



930 
813 
603 
633 



243 

2,534 

95 

1,264 



224 

57 

13 

1,329 

148 
41 

263 
91 



639 

563 

5,620 



12,577 



866 

1,111; 

8, 136 

1,315 

406 

26 

332 

334 

51 



In private institutions. 



183 
619 



240 

27 

844 



2,989 
780 

3,823 
197 
347 



256 

593 

4 



520 
4,078 
2,790 
2,221 
3,383 
1,614 
995 
145 
1,033 



264 
193 



185 



332 



243 



91 



207 
96 
120 



1,850 

76 

2,152 



678 
492 
1,283 
132 
205 



353 

315 

1,322 






5,061 
25,812 
6,506 
2,846 
2,621 
730 
1,950 
1,195 
3,430 



450 
744 



273 
169 



2,958 
520 



19,805 
1,972 
4,035 



2,744 
397 

1,530 
913 
922 



777 

392 

1,173 

102 



984 

829 

539 

90 



545 
282 
339 

448 



79 
449 

55 
412 



42 



116 
'9i7 



186 
216 



189 
1,453 
400 
143 
181 
80 



62 
3,368 
1,063 



147 
225 



2,872 
56 
440 



595 



468 



147 



132 
43 



234 
170 
264 
112 



1,542 
"329 



734 
110 



145 

329 

2,956 



120 



26,972 



2,514 

10, 594 

5,102 

1,339 

3,550 

559 

739 

492 

2,083 



321 
299 
113 
842 
114 
822 



5,480 
1,234 
3,i 



1,473 
931 

1,943 
626 
129 



183 

367 

366 

19 

19 

97 



120 
620 
309 
601 
226 
634 
220 
760 
60 



151 
335 



85 
423 

40 
191 



66 



369 

234 

1,480 



INMATES OF HOMES FOR ADtJLTS, 
ADULTS AND CHILDREN.' 



Adults. 



98,846 



9,373 

28,902 

27, 1491 

10,5651 

8, .339; 

3,584! 

2,669 

1,278: 

6,987! 



1,947 
371 
224! 

4,387 
760 

1,684 



17,197 
3,467' 
8,238! 



8,672 
3,862 
8,686 
2,311 
3,628, 



1,821; 

1,556 

2,275 

99! 

548 

911! 

3, 355' 



235 

1,464 

2,235 

3,146 

167 

239 

242 

533 



1,066 

2,146 

192 

180 



213 

1,219 

69 

1,; 



192 
177 
63 
731 



1,077 

616 

5,294 



41,607 



2,704 
5,330 
15,464 
6,209 
4,119 
2,221 
1,017 
541 
4,002 



1,751 
94 

99 
630 
130 



3,662 

1,127 

541 



4,923 
2,844 
4,628 
1,221 
1,848 



528 
850 
544 
40 
548 
636 
3,163 



122 
1, 
2,183 



145 

48 
113 
22 



237 

1,726 

78 

180 



80 
188 



91 
177 

53 
220 



690 

134 

3,178 



In private institutions. 



12,216 



1,046 
5,792 
2,193 
693 
995 
406 
403 
286 
402 



35 
27 

7 
573 
122 
282 



3,217 

598 

1,977 

731 
204 
808 
220 
230 



221 
125 
225 



35 
267 
203 
155 
15 
43 
83 
173 
31 



247 
70 



101 

142 
45 
115 



164 
"i22 



69 

35 

308 






20,243 



2,285 

7,778 

4,204 

1,840 

1,318 

596 

856 

190 

1,177 



30 
39 

65 

1,409 

285 

457 



4,502 

865 

2,411 



1,129 
454 

1,637 
636 
449 



695 
376 
646 



223 



89 
506 
262 
270 
125 



66 



396 
200 



10 

677 



1,337 



168 

80 

iio 



190 
134 
853 



874 
150 
59 
108 



23 



67 



582 

23 

269 



108 



3,249 

9,128 

5,138 

1,764 

1,799 

361 

394 

261 

1,349 



131 

188 
53 
1,718 
223 
936 



5,234 

854 

3,040 



1,828 
331 

1,545 
335 

1,101 



467 

205 

811 

59 



59 
163 



111 
461 
284 

638 
27 
61 
111 
181 
35 



160 
25 



22 
213 

24 
136 



21 



237 
■■3 



138 
313 



' Not including dispensaries and societies for the protection and care of children. 



SUPERVISING AGENCY OF INSTITUTION. 

AGE, AND SUPERVISING AGENCY OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



71 



INMATES OF HOMES 
FOE ADULTS, OE ADULTS 

AND CHILDEEN 2— continued. 






rNMATES OF 


HOSPITALS AND SANITAEIUMS.' 




INMATES OF INSTITUTIONS FOE BLIND AND DEAF. 




Children. 


Adults. 


Children. 


.\dult3. 


ChUdren. 




"3 
1 


2 
.1. 

3 

a 
a 


In private 
institutions. 


2 


3 

a 


In private institutions. 


3 



1 

ft 

n 


In private 
institutions. 


"a 



3 

.a . 

si 

3 
P. 

a 


In private 
institutions. 


3 


3 

:Si 

a ^ 

p. 

C3 


In private 
institutions. 




1 
S 


. 

a. a 

as 


.a 
.a 

1 
>-* 





1 

e 

1^ 


a 


i 
*-* 


1 




i 
2 


a . 
a. a 

al 


i 
1 


1 



1 

1 
g 

Ph 
16 


a . 
a. 2 

al 

694 


■s 

1 


i 




1 

2 


22 


a . 
a. a 

al 

823 


i 

is 


1 





17,382 


722 


2,034 


8,027 


62 


6,537 


72,948 


20,083 


6,246 


17,531 


1.223 


27,865 


12,356 


3,889 


882 


2,296 


238 


5,051 


5.630 


3,881 


1,039 


9,606 


6,571 


2,190 


1 


984 
6,460 
3,389 
1,527 
1,214 
1,477 
1,112 
236 
983 


4 

606 

'ii2 


129 

707 
660 
176 
101 
58 
70 


621 

3,812 

1,391 

497 

432 

576 

87 

168 

443 


57 
5 


173 
1,330 
1,338 
742 
681 
843 
955 
68 
407 


8,293 
28,035 
13,899 
6,974 
4,806 
1,448 
1,712 
3,334 
4,447 


3,285 

7,878 

2,048 

1,706 

1,579 

745 

665 

912 

1,275 


115 

1,513 

1,385 

1,474 

395 

60 

109 

582 

613 


1,174 

5,453 

5,113 

2,232 

546 

324 

324 

886 

1,479 


'■464 
358 

45 
113 

21 
115 
107 


3,719 

12,727 

4,995 

1,517 

2,173 

298 

509 

84i 

1,080 


1,538 

6,522 

2,033 

958 

547 

172 

89 

125 

372 


531 

2,726 

2.39 

215 

70 

55 

13 

11 

29 


4 

365 

225 

145 

82 

9 

"24 

28 


150 

904 

539 

313 

78 

53 

48 

51 

16(1 


iis 

83 
6 

17 
3 

14 


853 

2, 412 

947 

279 

300 

52 

14 

39 

155 


358 
1.320 
1.269 
765 
541 
325 
765 
158 
129 


70 
131 
1,152 
718 
447 
316 
762 
158 
127 








288 
577 
47 
37 
90 


762 

2,627 

1,773 

1.280 

894 

925 

841 

320 

184 


256 
478 
1.597 
1,210 
824 
924 
807 
320 
155 








506 

1,609 

31 


•J 


7 
"9 


612 

63 

10 

4 




■■2! 


540 
124 
70 
26 




3 
4 
■i 




44 


6 

7 


3 






34 






8 













.... 


133 




2 








29 






in 

























447 
361 
226 

5,170 
612 

1,477 

17,715 
2,2i9 
8,071 

5,746 
1,274 
4,315 
1,575 
989 

2,107 

943 

2,427 

79 

96 

613 

709 

102 
1,511 
715 
890 
435 
392 
121 
455 
185 

655 
331 
229 
233 

329 

410 

17 

956 

323 
145 
148 
1,695 
712 
140 
171 


6 

55 

17 

2.934 

151 

122 

6,055 

590 

1,233 

1,193 
253 
251 
219 
132 

682 
338 
554 
10 
3 
39 
80 

11 

465 
367 
333 
137 
54 
21 
132 
59 

241 
207 
115 
182 

146 

221 

5 

283 

11 

■■"86 

421 

378 

15 

1 


■"io 

"'165 

747 
(') 
766 

353 
164 
702 
36 
130 

568 
110 
411 
66 
20 
194 
105 


70 
112 

15 
426 
119 
432 

3,427 

744 

1,282 

1,893 
582 

1,846 
327 
465 

480 
310 
717 

^'^67 
275 
383 


329 

58 
77 

72 
"261 
"■25 

■■■45 


371 
184 
194 
1,705 
342 
923 

7,157 

857 

4,713 

2,235 
276 

1,255 
993 
237 

377 
185 
700 
3 
6 
105 
141 

91 

627 
253 
370 
169 
246 
77 
228 
112 

126 

124 

12 

36 

115 
13 
1 

380 

52 
6 

62 
522 
171 

22 

12 


65 
58 
16 
1,040 
179 
180 

4,649 

581 

1,292 

676 
95 
696 
344 
222 

345 

147 

217 

8 

16 
147 

78 

35 
217 
101 
53 
25 
15 
20 
70 
11 

114 
24 
15 
19 

42 
30 






5 
11 

56 
18 
60 

744 
77 
S3 

132 
41 
148 
129 
89 

87 
109 
23 
(») 
6 
28 
62 


93 
3 
19 

13 
■■76 

'"h 


60 
39 
16 
623 
103 
112 

1,460 
243 
709 

290 
10 
3.54 
193 
100 

107 

28 

123 

3 

1 

12 

5 

11 

109 
82 
36 
12 
5 


45 


45 










66 


66 




11 














6 


2 


















11 


208 

683 

28 

65 

4,495 

339 

1,626 

997 
245 
1,230 
414 
503 

321 

205 

703 

49 






208 
401 






























11 


4 

519 

87 

.... 


8? 
6 
41 

306 

9 

392 

181 
82 
198 
119 

80 

92 
49 
26 


57 


139 
22 
12 

734 

75 

521 

303 
6S 

833 
81 
53 

222 
106 
236 
49 


459 
58 
8 

2,081 
258 
387 

134 
33 
38 
13 
21 

106 
3 

48 

■■"7 

51 

■■"42 
12 

""2 
1 


271 
94 

107 
11 
86 
9 
12 

45 

7 

% 

2 

58 

" 

24 

30 
7 
5 
6 
(') 


233 


25 








208 


431 
74 
191 

1,450 

134 

1,043 

564 
96 
417 
477 
219 

369 
163 
295 
59 
60 
130 
204 


116 

74 








316 


14 














15 


12 

2,934 
168 
710 

513 
95 
199 
214 
370 

7 
50 
«0 


2 
'""3 


80 

807 
143 
370 

210 
376 
403 
73 
207 










80 

202 

5 

370 

43 








191 

727 

4 

878 


Iff 


91 

40 




514 
98 




193 
120 
165 

554 
96 
326 
456 
165 

369 
163 
225 
59 
60 
130 
204 


— 


530 
10 




17 
18 
It 


167 
376 
376 
66 
167 










10 




?n 












?i 


■7 


23 




4 


■■21 


60 




31 


22 

?3 


40 






54 






?4 










?■> 


198 
233 
44 
53 
117 
120 


198 
186 
44 
53 
117 
120 


















■>« 




10 




37 




70 






27 






"fl 


























■x* 


34 
215 

6 
377 
293 

35 

79 
187 

13 
175 

49 

1,099 
180 
198 


23 

88 


9 






2 
127 

6 
23 
253 
35 
4 
178 


















3(1 






















31 
























3? 




28 
9 


326 
31 




177 
13 
72 
71 
21 

■■'27 

45 


■■■15 

28 
55 
11 
15 

63 
21 


129 
82 

115 
58 
71 
23 
68 


113 


19 


17 


110 
90 


106 




4 






188 
M 
74 
86 

196 
P) 

203 

103 

290 
329 
306 
P) 

208 

74 

212 

347 

63 
27 


162 




26 






33 




90 




44 


34 


12 
5 
9 
20 
13 












74 
86 
196 

m 

203 
103 

290 
328 
306 
(=) 

208 

40 

212 

347 

63 
27 








35 






75 




106 
171 
P) 
64 


106 
171 
P) 
64 


















36 




9 
13 
31 
11 

33 

2 

23 


















V 












C') 








(») 


3S 






144 

38 

530 
138 
175 


13 

10 
19 
12 
14 


8 
2 

4 

"■5 




36 
9 

44 
5 
3 














39 






















40 


536 
40 


.... 


222 
(') 
102 


21 


63 


3 


171 
154 


171 
145 


















41 


9 








1 








4? 














43 






(') 

173 
105 

416 

20 
23 


(=) 

173 
102 
71 
416 

20 
23 








(=) 












158 
60 
236 
658 

15 






25 




133 
31 
226 
565 

15 


40 
6 

197 
118 


■■iis 


42 
(>) 

^\ 

19 
6 




















45 


••■• 


29 
10 
31 


11 


.... 


14 


^ 


.... 


3 






.... 


34 






Iff 














47 


62 




17 

37 

8 
7 
61 
6 
4 
2 


2 


17 
2 




9 
1 


















48 












































V) 










. 






7 

25 
3 

1 
2 


















51 


217 






168 




49 


265 
32 
43 

158 


. 380 
131 
60 

m 


107 


9 
2 


1 
1 
3 


26 
P) 

8 




72 
11 


72 
11 










118 
23 


lis 

23 




** 


























53 






























54 


4 










4 


32 


32 










89 


89 




** 


































55 


368 

88 

527 


.... 


11 

6 

116 


201 
58 
184 




156 

24 

227 


1,212 

916 

2,319 


175 

82 
1,018 


174 
223 
216 


623 
507 
349 




240 
104 
736 


107 

57 

208 


9 
10 
10 


14 

7 

7 


68 
35 
67 


:::: 


26 

5 

124 


























57 














26 
158 


26 
129 










58 


129 


127 


.... 


2 








29 






fW 













9 Exclusive of those aot classified by age. 



* Not reported. 



72 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



FINANCES OF INSTITUTIONS. 



The general summary of the income, expenditures, 
and value of property of institutions is given in Tables 
12-16 preceding. Tables 64-69 show for each class of 
institutions the amount of income from public appro- 
priations, from donations, and from care of inmates; 
the amount disbursed for running expenses; and the 
value of land, buildings, and equipment owned. 

Under the heading "Public appropriations" are in- 
cluded all funds received from federal, state, county, 
or mimicipal authorities, whether in the form of regular 
appropriations or subsidies or of specific grants. 

Under the heading "Donations" are included per- 
sonal gifts, legacies, pubhc collections, receipts from 
entertainments, appropriations by philanthropic or 
missionary societies, assessments by fraternal or bene- 
ficiary organizations, and other receipts of this type. 

Under the heading "Care of inmates" are included 
all sums paid into the institutions for the care of indi- 
viduals, whether by the individuals themselves, by 
friends, or by organizations. 

Under the heading "Other sources" in the general 
tables are grouped aU receipts not classified by the 
institutions themselves, together with those which it 
was impracticable to include under any one of the other 
three heads — "Public Appropriations," "Donations," 
or "Care of inmates." Income from invested funds 
rentals, interest, proceeds of labor of inmates or sales 
of products, and loans are some of the receipts so 
included. In regard to the last-named, it should be 
stated that wherever the amounts were known, loan 
transactions have been eliminated. Cash balances 
were also eliminated from both receipts and payments, 
wherever it was possible to ascertain the amount of 
such balances. In general, therefore, the term "Other 
sources" was of necessity so elastic as to render it 
inadvisable to present separately the receipts included. 

In dealing with expenditures, it was also found 
difScult to distinguish between "Running expenses" 
and "Permanent improvements." The cost of a new 
building, of an annex to an old one, or of a new piece 
of land could be easily classified, but it became evident, 
from an examination of the schedules received, that in 
a number of cases considerable amounts representing 
costs of improvements had been included under 
"Running expenses." The statistics, therefore, are 
not as exact as could be wished. In many cases the 
total expense only was given, and when further in- 
quiry failed to elicit specific information, it was 
assumed that the entire amount expended was for 
" Running expenses." Because of the resulting incom- 
pleteness of the returns, no special summary for "Per- 
manent improvements" is given. 

With regard to the value of property, certain con- 
ditions must be kept in mind. There is no uniform 
basis for appraisal or estimate of the value of land, 
buildmgs, etc. In a number of cases, a hospital, an 
orphanage, or a home for the aged is only a part of a 
great institution, and to decide what part of the entire 
property should be regarded as belonging to the par- 



ticular benevolent institution under consideration is 
practically impossible. This is true of a considerable 
number of the Roman Catholic homes, and of practi- 
cally all of the United States post hospitals. Another 
factor to be considered is the difference between origi- 
nal cash cost and present market value, some insti- 
tutions apparently giving the original cost, others the 
market value. As far as the requisite data were 
obtamable the valuation given in this report for 
properties belonging to an institution represents the 
equity of the institution in such properties, being the 
total valuation less such obligations as are secured by 
mortagages or deeds of trust pledging the properties 
for the payment of debt obligations. The amounts 
given under "Invested funds" seem to be limited in 
some cases to bonds, stocks, etc. In other cases they 
apparently include the value of investments in real 
estate whose rentals are reckoned as income. 

Another, and possibly even more important, phase 
of the subject is the evident lack of careful accounting 
by the institutions. In many cases the figures given 
on the schedules apparently bore little or no relation 
to the questions asked, and considerable correspond- 
ence was required in order to secure a statement that 
should fairly represent the situation. 

Comparison ivitJi report for 1904- — These conditions, 
combined with apparently different bases of inquiry, 
make any satisfactory comparison with the report for 
1904, as aheadymtimated, difficult and unsatisfactory. 
That report made no reference to receipts from dona- 
tions, to value of property, or to expenditures for per- 
manent improvements. It reported "Annual subsi- 
dies from public funds," but apparently did not include 
.special appropriations under this head, as is done in 
the present report. Income from pay inmates also 
seems to have been limited in the 1904 report to pay- 
ments by inmates, whereas under the corresponding 
head in this report are mcluded, not merely direct 
payments, but receipts for this purpose from relatives 
or friends, benevolent organizations, etc. That there 
is a radical difference in the basis of report is evident 
from a comparison of the averages. According to the 
report for 1904, the total income from pay inmates 
for 4,207 mstitutions was $14,848,508, an average per 
institution of $3,529. Out of 5,408 institutions covered 
by the present report, 2,710 reported their total in- 
come under this head as $30,320,289, an average per 
institution of $11,188. Even assuming that in 1904, 
as in 1910, only haK the total number of institutions 
reported receipts from this source, the average for 
1904 would be $7,057, showing an average gain per 
institution of $4,131, an increase which could scarcely 
be possible if the statistics in the two reports were on 
the same basis. 

The situation is essentially the same in regard to the 
amounts given m the two reports for ' ' Runnmg expen- 
ses" and "Cost of mamtenance," which would seem 
to be comparable. The total amount reported in 
1904 for "Cost of maintenance" was $55,577,633, an 



FINANCES OF INSTITUTIONS. 



73 



average per institution of $13,211; or if tlic same 
allowance be made as in 1910 for institutions not 
reporting (22 per cent), an average of $16,939. In 
the 1910 report tlie total given for running expenses 
is $94,658,836, an average per institution reporting of 
$22,220. That there should have been a gain of $5,281 
in the average cost of maintenance, or running expen- 



ses, for so largo a number of institutions of such dif- 
ferent types, is scarcely possible, and it seems clear, 
as already indicated, page 22, that the terms "Cost 
of mamtenance" and "Running expenses," as used in 
the two reports, are not identical in meaning, and that 
the statistics given under these heads are therefore 
not comparable. 



PUBLIC APPROPRIATIONS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND 

STATES: 1910. 



Table 64 


ALL institutions. 


institutions 

for care of 

children. 


societies for 

protection 

and care of 

CHh-DKEN. 


HOMES FOR 
ADULTS, OR 
ADULTS AND 
CHILDREN. 


HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 


DI3PENSAKIES. 


INSTITUTIONS 

FOE BUND AND 

DEAF. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Total 
num- 
ber. 


Num- 
ber re- 
port- 
ingap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Appropria- 
tions re- 
ported. 


Num- 
ber 
o( in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amovmt 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of so- 
cieties 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
ol in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of In- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount, 
reported. 


United States 


6,408 


1,896 


$37,677,802 


457 


$5,516,694 


95 


S699,413 


312 


88,986,645 


876 


$17,906,058 


61 


8217,992 


93 


84,351,000 


Geogeaphic divisions: 

New England 


654 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 


180 

685 

360 

150 

219 

72 

74 

47 

109 


3,477,083 
15,939,366 
7,361,026 
3,643,691 
2,308,343 
1,198,604 
1,241,897 
812,807 
1,694,986 


25 

147 

119 

28 

44 

13 

24 

9 

50 


171,105 

2,945,086 

1,221,825 

293,029 

171,010 

47,976 

117,880 

160,267 

388,516 


4 

29 
31 
9 
5 
4 
5 
3 
5 


18,608 

462,788 

49,241 

12,971 

73,751 

4,381 

2,247 

30,950 

44,476 


21 
102 
46 

!^ 
15 
17 
8 
25 


789,737 

1,978,087 

2,653,975 

1,360,480 

645,827 

427,514 

265,579 

124,092 

741,354 


115 
360 
144 
64 
99 
31 
17 
22 
24 


2,236,768 

9,473,524 

2,450,366 

1,251,896 

1,009,641 

398,324 

387, 120 

287,805 

410,614 


6 
26 
6 
4 
12 
2 
3 


13,145 
32,340 
32, 187 
91,358 
34,939 
3,823 
7,500 


9 

21 

14 

14 

12 

7 

8 

5 

3 


247,720 




1,047,541 


East North Central 

West North Central 


953,432 
633,957 
373, 175 


East South Central 

WestSouthCentral 


316,586 
461,571 
209,693 




2 


2,700 


107,325 






New England: 


56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 

800 
207 
686 

310 
177 
325 
136 
107 

128 
103 
159 

18 
17 
50 
72 

23 

137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 

89 
67 
36 
21 

36 
61 
19 
94 

26 
11 

8 
72 
27 
17 
14 

1 

71 
32 
189 


31 
23 
3 

67 
16 
40 

361 
68 
256 

120 
83 
85 
42 
30 

32 
30 
21 
5 
5 
10 
47 

6 
81 
25 
32 

8 
18 

9 
28 
12 

28 
24 
11 
9 

11 

38 

4 

21 

12 

6 
2 
12 
9 


497,847 
60,496 
24,825 
2,064,637 
250,470 
578,808 

10,071,204 
1,206,182 
4,661,980 

2,935,084 

1,074,377 

1,856,780 

632,945 

861,840 

723,732 
504,487 
1,048,4.34 
34,569 
301,609 
256,334 
774,526 

12,863 
533,812 
448,696 
581,976 
150,714 
195,365 

58,644 
271,678 

54,595 

391,742 
495, 196 
148,590 
163,076 

285,114 

379,356 

80,562 

496,865 

123,280 
107,493 
17,919 
364,916 
132,294 


7 


15,500 
6,761 


1 


3,500 


5 

I 
7 
3 
3 

46 

6 

50 

5 

14 
16 
5 
6 

3 
4 
6 
2 
2 
3 
11 


383,050 
2i,535 
20,825 

180,066 
34,025 

148,236 

1,416,742 
293,411 
207,934 

825,647 
515,184 
662,354 
182,139 
468,651 

100,250 
165,061 
148,496 
4,705 
256, 189 
120,490 
567,289 


16 
14 

2 
50 

8 
25 

163 
48 
149 

40 
23 

41 
28 
12 

16 
14 
9 
1 
1 
3 
20 

4 

30 
10 
17 

4 
11 

4 
13 

6 

13 

4 
7 

5 
5 


78,047 

30,200 

4,000 

1,726,574 

149,520 

248,427 

5,022,679 

793, 198 

13,657,647 

1,169,381 

147,931 
777,081 
218,773 
137,200 

352,206 

133,903 

671,953 

126 

420 

24,164 

69,124 

1,885 

362, 826 

226,218 

54,576 

77,411 

61,548 

43,051 

155,821 

26,305 

180,838 
86,090 
53,346 
78,050 

89,368 
229,823 


1 


250 


1 


17,500 






















1 
3 
7 

102 

8 

37 

58 
27 
23 
5 
6 

5 

7 
1 


25 
35,300 
113,519 

2,635,824 

19,444 

289,818 

657,335 
222, 550 
168,487 
48,764 
124,689 

100,645 

104,726 

13,680 






4 


11,945 


5 
1 
2 

14 
1 

6 

3 
2 
3 

3 
3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


146,027 




1 
2 

15 
2 
12 

10 

16 

1 

1 

3 

4 

2 
2 


3,625 
11,483 

342, 134 
61,029 
69,625 

18,022 
26,039 

3,420 
460 

1,300 

7,487 
2,347 
2,987 


28,000 




1 

21 
3 
2 

4 
1 
1 


950 

19,740 

4,100 

'8,500 

13,587 
12,000 
6,600 


66,193 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 


634,085 




45,000 




368,456 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


251,112 




150,673 


Illinois 


238,838 




182, 809 








130,000 


West North Central: 


2 

1 

1 


9,000 
3,750 
78,608 


154,144 




94,700 




134,710 




29,738 
















45,000 




2 

13 


26,780 

47,198 










84,900 




1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


150 

978 

500 

70,710 

1,500 

63 






90,765 


South Atlantic: 


1 
6 
1 
3 


10,000 

8,039 

400 

11,500 






21 
5 
4 
2 
3 
2 
5 
2 

5 
1 


71,063 
50,310 
1,560 
13,240 
16,800 
9,997 
5,560 
2,490 

40,476 
4,740 
2,760 


19 
6 
6 


48,746 

19,913 

502,850 


4 
2 

1 

1 
I 


42,638 


District of Columbia 


81,145 
10,000 




60,000 




3 
3 

7 
3 

5 
6 
3 

1 

2 
12 
1 
2 

3 

1 
1 
2 


30,625 
5,596 

32,297 
5,800 

55,850 

305,241 

19.017 

47.406 

30,300 

59,111 

90 

176,078 

26,072 
28,000 
14,919 
64, 741 






86, .392 




















1 


5,000 


2 
1 

2 
3 
1 

1 

3 

1 
2 
3 

1 
1 


73,000 


Florida 






20,000 


East South Central: 






1 
1 


1,192 
2,631 


113,386 




2 
2 


2,198 
2,183 


94,296 


Alabama 


71,284 






37,620 


West South Central: 


1 
18 


1,.800 
60,422 


1 


500 






163,146 




2 


4,500 


25,500 




1 
3 


472 
1,275 


80,000 




5 

2 
2 


65,658 

33,200 
32,263 


7 

6 
1 
1 
4 
8 


67,929 

19,208 

180 

3,000 

134,628 

119,794 


1 


3,000 


192.925 


Mountain: 


44,800 


Idaho 


1 


22,050 






25,000 












3 


74,254 


2 


8,900 






1 
1 


92, :i93 








12,500 






















Utah 


5 

1 

21 
15 
73 


47,905 
19,000 

202,567 

97,496 

1,394,922 


1 
1 

5 

4 

41 


1,550 
19,000 

31,924 

9,799 

346,793 






1 


360 


2 


10,995 






1 


35,000 














Pacific: 


1 
1 
3 


4,870 

4,885 

34.721 


7 
4 
14 


87.461 
28, 2-,2 
625,641 


8 
5 
11 


78*312 

44,5110 

287,742 
















1 
2 


10,000 




2 


2,700 


97.325 







1 Entire state appropriation for tuberculosis work reported imder South Mountain Sanatorium, Mont Alto, Pa. 



74 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

DONATIONS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1310. 



Table G5 


all institutions. 


INSTITUTIONS 

FOR CARE OF 

CHILDREN. 


SOCIETIES 

FOR PROTECTION 

AND CARE OF 

CHILDREN. 


HOMES FOR 
ADULTS, OR 
ADULTS AND 
CHILDREN. 


HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUM.S. 


DISPENSARIES. 


INSTITUTIONS 

FOR BLIND AND 

DEAF. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Total 
num- 
ber. 


Num- 
ber re- 
port- 
ine 
dona- 
tions. 


Donations 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 

report- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of so- 
cieties 
report- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
report- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
report- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
report- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
ol in- 
stitu- 
tions 
report- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


United States 


5,408 


3,088 


$19,697,598 


801 


$4,510,101 


129 


$823,000 


966 


$4,762,385 


1,034 


$9,061,841 


120 


$401,146 


33 


$139,065 


Geographic divisions: 


654 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 


413 
1,046 
589 
274 
322 
111 
108 
65 
160 


2,663,390 

7,907.296 

4,008,123 

1,514.187 

1,164,350 

463,660 

653, 123 

600,492 

822.977 


79 

243 

139 

68 

111 

44 

43 

18 

56 


340, 175 
1,662,881 
944,046 
321,433 
546,804 
242, 726 
188,427 
69,209 
194,400 


14 

46 

23 

17 

9 

2 

7 

4 

7 


108,488 

260,058 

177,418 

114,762 

58,304 

4,076 

11,634 

40, 784 

47,636 


156 
319 
186 

76 
102 

37 

39 
7 

46 


763,782 
1,628,161 
1,070,349 
341,067 
280,203 
112,167 
169,673 
134,406 
256,607 


139 

362 

216 

106 

89 

25 

16 

35 

47 


1,379,696 
4,205,567 
1,683,362 
703, 697 
257,162 
98, 764 
176.001 
356,893 
301,799 


IS 
56 
21 
7 
10 
2 
2 
1 
3 


33,045 

114,535 

187,261 

20,118 

10,098 

5,116 

7,138 

200 

17,635 


7 
20 
6 
2 
1 
1 
1 


38,204 


Middle Atlantic 

East North Central 

West North Central.-.. 
South Atlantic 


36,104 
39,687 
13,220 
6.779 


East South Central 

West South Central.... 


821 
260 


Pacific 


1 


5,000 






Kew England: 

Maine . 


56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 

800 
207 
686 

310 

325 
136 
107 

128 
103 
159 
IS 
17 
50 
72 

23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 

89 
57 
36 
21 

36 
61 
19 
94 

26 
11 

8 
72 
27 
17 
14 

1 

71 
32 
189 


36 
35 
12 
244 
30 
66 

537 
131 
378 

175 
63 
213 

81 
67 

68 
51 
85 
5 
6 
18 
41 

18 
77 
36 
64 
17 
38 
22 
40 
10 

54 
32 
15 
10 

17 
41 
U 
39 

12 
7 
1 

26 
8 
6 
5 


62, 729 
47,590 
35,982 
1,751,002 
164,710 
001.377 

5,368.722 

719,646 

1,818.928 

963.841 
190, 247 
2,177.492 
367.393 
309,150 

241,944 

246,925 

652,640 

14,922 

24,481 

62.611 

370,804 

63,205 
241,555 
106.850 
242, 179 

39.690 
173,651 
109,974 
150,087 

36,669 

179,685 

110,656 

72.653 

100,867 

92,446 
107,497 

38,215 
314.965 

31,408 
41,540 
7,486 
442,179 
31,158 
29,104 
17.617 


9 

8 
2 

42 
8 
10 

122 
37 

84 

41 
13 
57 
16 
12 

11 
14 
23 


25,118 
11,642 
10,536 
227.234 
29,097 
36,648 

896,080 
223,837 
542,964 

353.948 
33,279 

419,398 
46,424 
90,997 

57,115 
1 no. 471 
112,373 


2 
1 


314 
187 


13 
10 
4 
99 
11 
19 

163 
37 
119 

60 
20 
64 
23 
18 

19 
16 
24 


9,432 
13,860 

9,736 

697.402 

70,527 

02,825 

1,063,639 
143,660 
420,852 

259,817 
67,875 

581,590 
72,089 
94.978 

54,874 
44,859 
180,066 


11 

16 
6 

77 
9 

20 

183 
41 

138 

65 
26 
79 
30 
20 

31 
18 
28 
4 
4 
6 
14 

4 

23 

7 

20 

6 

15 

3 

7 

4 

14 
6 
1 
4 

3 

6 
1 
6 

4 
1 
10 
6 
6 
2 


27,315 
21,901 
15.710 

775,559 
62,706 

476,505 

3,146,193 
306,925 
752,449 

254,322 
79,8.33 
952, 968 
212,486 
83,754 

110.644 
65,816 

217,179 
3,823 
2,754 
5,596 

307,785 

20,761 
94.306 
43,668 
37,034 
11,134 
29,289 
1,569 
6,925 
11.876 

71.477 
12,406 
12,600 
2,381 

6,826 

33,167 

229 

136,779 

6,171 

7,111 

7,486 

273,769 

25,458 

24,569 

11,329 


1 


550 






New Hampshire 














Massachusetts 


8 
1 
2 

21 
9 
16 

8 
3 
4 
3 
5 

5 
2 

5 
1 

1 


89,889 
1,726 
16,372 

166,087 
40, 113 

53.858 

15,617 
9,010 
90,936 
30,340 
31,615 

17,287 
33, 779 
24,618 
11,099 
13,422 


13 
1 
3 

38 
6 
12 

9 
1 

2 
2 

2 
1 
3 


22,828 

654 

9,013 

77,028 
6,096 
32,411 

76,385 

250 

101,791 

1,029 

7.. 806 

2,024 
12. «» 
5,094 


6 


38,090 






CnTinpftiC'it , , 


2 

10 
1 
9 

2 


114 


Middle Atlantic: 
New York 


19,695 




15 


Pennsylvania. . 


16,394 


East North Central: 
Ohio 


3,852 








2 

1 


30,809 


Michigan 


5,026 






West North Central: 














2 


13,220 


North Dakota 






1 

' 5 
1 1^ 

6 
26 

8 
23 

6 
14 

9 
17 

3 

18 
12 
8 
6 

i 19 
13 

2 
2 


8,306 
32.954 
10,216 

17,539 

67,971 

8,754 

124,537 

12,027 

96, 178 

95,792 

115,258 

8,748 

52,678 
49,341 
42,321 
98,486 

57,410 
52,966 
15,759 
02,292 

16,200 
7,179 
















7 
9 

8 
24 
17 
17 
3 
8 
8 
15 
2 

20 
12 
5 


23,961 
37,307 

24,885 
67,614 
42,229 
65,281 

6,900 
40,246 

7,648 
23,615 

1,785 

50,614 
47,661 
13.982 












3 

1 

2 


14,567 

20 
10,664 


1 


1,000 






South Atlantic: 








2 
3 

1 


1,000 
6,420 
2,289 
1,200 








1 


5,779 




2 
1 
1 

1 


12,438 
8,429 
7,838 
4,666 


















1 
1 


300 
4,889 






Georgia 








1 


14,250 






East SotiTH Central: 
Kentucky 


2 


5,116 






TpTinfi.'wp.p 


1 

1 


326 
3,750 


1 


821 










Mississippi 










West South Central: 
Arkansas 


1 


1,000 


6 
13 

4 
16 

2 


27,210 
13,976 
17,176 
111,311 

2,300 


2' 


■■"'iiss' 


i' 






250 




2 
4 

1 
1 


5,061 
5,583 

6,737 
27,250 















Mountain; 




'■ 
















WynminfT 
















10 
1 

1 
2 


35,218 

200 

4,535 

5,877 


1 

1 


1,297 
6,600 


4 


131,695 


1 


200 












Arizona 














Utah 






1 


411 










Nevada,, 














Pacific: 


34 

17 
109 


91,859 

55,328 

675.790 


4 
45 


12,320 
13,682 
168.398 


1 

1 
5 


23,990 

1,826 

21,720 


11 

6 
29 


25,311 

19.126 

212,171 


15 
5 

27 


30,238 

19,965 

261,596 












1 


730 
16.905 






California. . 


1 


5,000 







FINANCES OF INSTITUTIONS. 



75 



RECEIPTS FROM CARE OF INMATES DURING THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND 

STATES: 1910. 



Table 66 


all institutions. 


institutions 

for care of 

childeen. 


homes for 

adults, or 

adults and 

children. 


HOSPITALS AND 
.SANITARIUMS. 


DISPENSARIES. 


INSTITUTIONS 

FOR BLIND AND 

DEAF. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Total 
num- 
ber. 


Num- 
ber re- 
port- 
ing re- 
ceipts 
from 
care of 

in- 
mates. 


Receipts 
from care of 
inmates re- 
ported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Ntun- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of m- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
mg. 


Amoimt 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


.\ mount 
reported. 




5,408 


2,710 


$30,320,289 


626 


$1,689,704 


590 


$1,904,043 


1,357 


$26,505,275 


96 


$223,616 


41 


$97,651 




Oeogkaphic divisions: 

New Eugland. 


654 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 


376 
865 
573 
289 
238 
63 
69 
76 
161 


4,086,813 
8,348,939 
7,856,951 
3,311,906 
2,132,317 
325,919 
449, 692 
1,121,450 
2,686,302 


76 

20': 

135 
67 
48 
17 
20 
17 
62 


312,437 

638,509 

* 274,040 

88, 650 

62, 060 

12,714 

13,130 

49,824 

138,340 


94 
190 
120 
65 
52 
17 
17 
6 
39 


232,215 

790,584 

329, 850 

141,184 

84, 185 

21,612 

9,339 

80,515 

214,.5.59 


184 
407 
291 
166 
1.32 
29 
31 
53 
64 


3,479,169 

6,736,611 

7,212,089 

3,063,983 

1,979,091 

291,593 

427,073 

991,111 

2, 324, .555 


15 
44 
22 
8 
3 


26,805 

148,222 

27, 128 

15,122 

2,236 


7 
20 
5 
3 
3 


36, 187 

35,013 

13,844 

2,967 

4,745 


Middle Atlantic 


East North Central 


West North Central 




East South Central 


West South Central 


1 


150 






MnnntAin . . 






Pacific 


3 


3,953 


3 


4,895 




New England: 

Maine 


56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 

800 
207 
686 

310 
177 
325 
136 
107 

128 
103 
159 

18 
17 
50 
72 

23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 

89 
67 
36 
21 

36 
61 
19 
94 

26 
11 

8 
72 
27 
17 
14 

1 

71 
32 
189 


28 
39 
12 
210 
26 
61 

461 
103 
311 

168 
65 
208 

77 
55 

77 
58 
76 
7 
6 
27 
38 

12 
62 
32 
36 
18 
31 
8 
25 
14 

30 

23 

5 

5 

15 

18 

8 

28 

11 
4 
1 
36 
11. 
5 
8 


255,252 
216,002 
114,711 
2,522,082 
176,317 
802, 449 

6,092,088 

583,541 

2,673,310 

1,626,331 

1,580,247 

3,310,109 

826,793 

613,471 

1,117,041 
611,951 
867,227 
51,647 
115,861 
376,315 
171,864 

23,776 
746,912 
246, 919 
339,872 
200, 752 
224, 843 

57,857 
221,643 

69, 743 

160,674 

125,967 

16,629 

23,649 

65, .562 
153,366 

34,577 
206, 188 

145,414 
64, 671 
10,475 

652,110 

139,793 
39, 735 

169,252 


6 
10 

2 
38 

8 
12 

108 
32 
64 

56 
15 
42 
12 
11 

9 

7 
23 


18,180 
38,216 
2,718 
164,555 
14,133 
74, 635 

468,848 
69,738 
109,923 

79,666 
30,203 
117, 186 
23,007 
24,078 

13,237 
6,416 
53,022 


6 
6 
1 

55 
6 

21 

100 
20 
70 

37 
14 
43 
13 
13 

14 

17 

13 

1 


11,711 
12,255 

6,899 
130,517 

7,017 
64,816 

630,678 

46,799 

213,107 

96,299 
26,934 
156, 443 
22, 197 
28,977 

38,722 

26,458 

63,776 

1,079 


15 
23 
9 
101 
11 
26 

196 
47 
164 

66 
36 
111 
48 
30 

53 
34 
32 
6 
6 
14 
21 

4 
32 
10 
21 
14 
22 

5 
15 

9 

16 
8 
2 
3 

8 
5 
3 
15 

8 
4 
1 
22 
10 
4 
4 


219,061 
165,531 
106,094 
2,187,210 
151,654 
649,619 

3,937,143 

475,005 

2,324,463 

1,344,126 

1,524,110 

3,008,475 

775,023 

560,356 

1,064,316 
580,077 
733,716 
50,568 
115,861 
357,548 
161,897 

19,224 
681,245 
191,863 
332, 153 
196,809 
222,1.36 

56,969 
211,685 

67,017 

139,663 

115,270 

14,040 

22,620 

49,618 
146,487 

29, 692 
201,276 

137,965 
64,671 
10,475 

438,667 

138,793 
38,049 

162,491 






1 


6,300 


New Hampshire 


















12 
1 
2 

36 
2 
6 

10 


25,705 
613 
687 

138,996 

741 

8,485 

6,341 


4 

1 
1 

11 
2 

7 


14,095 
3,000 
12 792 


Rhode Island. . . 


Connecticut 


Middle Atlantic: 


16,423 
1 258 


New Jer.se V 






East North Central: 

Ohio 




Indiana 






niinois 


9 
2 
1 

1 


16,875 

3,852 

60 

766 


3 
2 




Michigan 


2 714 


Wisconsm 




West North Central: 
Minnesota 












ML_ uri 


6 


14,346 


2 


2,367 


North Dakota 


South Dakota 














Nebraska 


6 
12 

3 

15 

8 

4 
4 
1 
4 
2 

8 
6 
1 
2 

2 
10 
2 
6 

2 


9,235 
6,740 

2,587 

38,702 

8,914 

3,278 

3,943 

933 

301 

2,321 

1,081 

7,306 

3,965 

415 

1,029 

2,376 
4,847 
3,089 
2,818 

6,926 


6 

4 

5 
13 
11 

7 


8,932 
3,217 

1,965 
26,165 
41,254 

3,158 






1 


600 




1 


10 




South Atlantic: 

Delaware 






Maryland 


1 
1 
1 


200 

753 

1,283 


1 
2 


600 


District of Columbia 


4 145 


Virginia 




West Virginia 






North Carolma 


5 
2 
6 
3 

6 
9 
2 


1,774 

587 

7,637 

1,645 

13,700 
6,732 
1,174 










South Carolma 










Georgia 










Florida 










East South Central: 

Kentucky 










Tennessee 










Alabama 










Mississippi 










West South Central: 

Arkansas 


5 
3 
3 
6 

1 


3,568 
2,031 
1,796 
1,944 

523 










Louisiana 










Oklahoma 










Texas 


1 


150 






Mountain : 

Montana 






Idaho 










Wyommg 


















Colorado 


10 
1 
1 
3 


33,637 
1,000 
1,686 
6,676 


4 


79,806 










New Mexico 










Arizona 














Utah 


1 


186 










Nevada 










Pacific: 

Washington 


37 

18 

106 


536, 894 

368,837 

1,780,671 


8 
3 
41 


12,527 

4,929 

120,884 


9 
6 

24 


21,458 

16,220 

176,881 


20 

7 

37 


602,909 

347,360 

1,474,286 










Oregon 


1 
2 


78 
3,875 


\ 


250 


California 


4,645 





76 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

RUNNING EXPENSES DURING THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table G7 



DIVISION OR STATE. 



United States 

Geogkapiiic duisions: 

New EiiRlanii 

Middle Atlantic 

East No.'th Central. 
West North Central. 

South .\tlantic 

East South Central., 
West South Central. 

Mountain 

Pacific 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Coimecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana . . .-. 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virgmia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East Soijth Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central; 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

Camornia 



ALL institutions. 



Total 
num- 
ber. 



Num- 
ber 

report- 
ing 
e-x- 

penses. 



654 
1,693 
1,055 
647 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 



56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 



800 
207 
686 



310 
177 
325 
136 
107 



128 
103 
159 
18 
17 
50 
72 



23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 



71 
32 
189 



1,286 
882 
433 
455 
154 
149 
116 
223 



45 
52 
17 
321 
42 



647 
170 



277 
137 
272 
111 

85 



113 

85 
117 
10 
13 
36 
59 



19 
108 
63 
78 
28 
52 
29 
64 
24 



49 
27 
147 



Expenses 
reported. 



$94,658,830 



11,035,527 
38,542,089 
18,323.469 
7,958,428 
6,865,252 
1,925,031 
2,304,124 
2, 458, 305 
6,246,6U 



849, 159 
444,046 
249, 337 

7,019,260 
810,362 

1,663,363 



23,912,908 
2,824,843 
11,804,338 



6, 664, 559 
2,771,550 
6,290,940 
2,005,113 
1,591,307 



2,121,815 
1,391,900 
2,406,381 
124, 716 
376, 653 
603,857 
933, 106 



131,808 

1,968,919 

1,360,738 

1,217,866 

412,071 

597, 057 

264, 169 

744,418 

168,206 



776,394 
694, 749 
241, 797 
212,091 



343,273 
799,204 
177,687 
983,960 



333, 191 
142, 778 
31,631 
1,319,292 
193, 132 
160,273 
256, 589 
21,417 



728,269 

544,402 

3,973,940 



Num- 
ber of 
Insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



institutions 
for care of 

CmLDKEN. 



104 
270 
228 
SO 
136 
47 
45 
23 
65 



132 

40 
98 



Amount 
reported. 



Num- 
ber of 
soci- 
eties 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



$14,850,746 



1, 158, 140 

7,284,025 

2,642,784 

808,644 

1,151, 635 

331,676 

359,504 

244, 456 

869, 982 



75, 786 
89,006 
19,038 
666, 637 
116,837 
291,836 



4,851,736 

350, 618 

2,081,771 



1,172,964 
337,-040 
724, 083 
184, 049 
224,658 



178,917 
237, 307 
251,607 



0,797 
57,919 
75,937 



37,425 
289, 680 
130, 763 
174, 748 

43, 113 
162,052 
118,815 
183,884 

11,256 



150, 728 
73,079 
60,260 
47,609 



25,211 
206, 194 

17,171 
111,928 



59, 182 
14,440 



126, 850 

2,000 

0,945 

13,022 

21,417 

64,806 
33, 151 
782,025 



societies for 
protection 

AND care of 
CHILDREN. 



Amount 
reported. 



$1, 869, 745 



226, 154 
946, 919 
217,506 
147, 963 
136,828 
8,414 
20,586 
30, 501 
134,874 



4,159 
1,436 



171,254 

9,306 

39,999 



618,366 
103, 732 
224, 821 



34,999 
32, 773 
86,210 
33,982 
30,642 



35, 629 
40,472 
28,602 
12, 205 
11,087 



20,168 



1,429 
23,270 
63,911 
13, 591 
8,437 
7,232 
4,665 



14,293 



2,873 
5,641 



2,900 



6,143 
11,543 



6,631 
7,652 



11,718 
5,500 



29,811 
14, 4.53 
90, 610 



HOMES FOR 
ADULTS, OR 
ADULTS AND 
CHILDREN. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



1,299 



205 

417 

252 

113 

132 

52 

45 

16 

67 



17 
14 
6 
122 
16 
32 



207 
65 
165 



Amount 
reported. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



$19,956,359 



2,222,307 

7,018,958 

4,394,973 

1,984,950 

1, 572, 795 

649, 206 

512,168 

295, 524 

1,305,478 



403,651 

76,073 

49,016 

, 166, 713 

149, 668 

377, 186 



4, 4&8, 538 

727, 715 

1,822,705 



1,476,330 
.695, 119 

1,269,774 
431,499 
622,251 



272,319 
289,448 
417,682 
22,996 
214, 119 
209,103 
559,283 



30, 791 

241,290 

535,794 

505,311 

61, 795 

44, 990 

20, 797 

116,680 

15,341 



193, 478 

366, 126 

54,812 

35,790 



57,340 
136,906 

64,440 
264,482 



48,207 
30,000 
14,919 
192, 173 



10,226 



181, 702 

98, 716 

1,025,060 



HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 



1,602 



197 

446 

306 

189 

146 

39 

40 

65 

74 



15 

23 

10 

111 

13 

25 



217 
55 
174 



73 

41 
106 
51 
35 



Amount 
reported. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



$51,938,207 



6,932,240 

21,177,667 

9,826,160 

4,33.5,868 

3,602,732 

613, 033 

975, 536 

1,676,477 

2,798,498 



346,463 
277,531 
181,283 
4, 767, 670 
503, 498 
856,796 



12,871,068 
1,584,298 
6,722,291 



2,684,950 
1,668,848 
3,721,713 
1, 145, 510 
005, 146 



1,528,488 
723,020 

1, 476, 666 

47, 392 

116,483 

248, 668 

195, 151 



52, 163 
1,355,944 
538, 784 
500, 140 
250, 776 
311,066 
119,892 
366,650 
107,317 



311,439 
160, 122 
49,900 
91,572 



128,676 
412,295 
29, 933 
404, 032 



172,371 
65,686 
16, 712 
911,034 
174,602 
153,330 
182, 742 



461,950 

387,669 

1,948,879 



DISPENSARIES. 



Amount 
reported. 



Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



$1,432,783 



100,457 

808,002 

277, 349 

119, 747 

66,399 

14,671 

23,809 

200 

32, 149 



800 



89,660 
1,053 
9,044 



286,212 

16, 487 

506,303 



73,312 

23,691 

172,390 

4,118 

3,835 



11,894 
16, 750 



900 
1,314 



10,000 
13,499 

7,237 
14, 076 

1,200 
325 



10,062 



10,780 
3,891 



20,809 
' '3, 666 



200 



413 
31, 736 



INSTITUTIONS 

FOR BLIND AND 

DEAF. 



110 



Amount 
reported. 



$4,610,996 



396,229 
1,306,528 
904, 691 
661,366 
344,863 
308, 031 
412, 521 
211,147 
105,630 



19,300 



267, 42« 
31,000 
98,503 



816, 98S 
43,093 
446,447 



223,014 
114,078 
317, 770 
206, 955 
104, $76 



94,068 
84,843 
143,035 
42,133 
28,167 
87,267 
81,253 



46,330 

84,249 
10,000 
46,760 
71,392 



67,142 
20,000 



109,969 
89,658 
71,284 
37,120 



129,146 
26,000 
70,000 

188,375 



47,800 
25,000 



77,317 
11,030 



60,000 



10,000 
95,63» 



FINANCES OF INSTITUTIONS. 



77 



VALUE OF LAND, BUILDINGS, AND EQUIPMENT AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR 

DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 68 



DmSION OR STATE. 



T;mTED States. . . 

Geooeaphic DmaoNs: 

New England 

Middle .\-tlantic 

East North Central.. 
West North Central. 

South .Atlantic 

East South Central.. 
West South Central . 

Mountain 

Pacific 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire. . . . 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wiscon.sin 

Wist North Central: 

Miimesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

PAcmc: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



ALL INSTITUTIONS. 



Total 
num- 
ber. 



Num- 
ber re- 
port- 
ing 
value 

of 
land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



654 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
578 
203 
210 
176 
292 



56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 



800 
207 
686 



310 
177 
325 
136 
107 



128 
103 
159 
18 
17 
50 
72 



23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 



71 
32 
189 



3,867 



5473,516,349 



504 
1,149 
804 
408 
409 
142 
141 
115 
195 



40 
47 
16 
289 
34 
78 



580 

147 
422 



249 
122 
258 
104 
71 



104 
84 

100 
12 
13 
38 
57 



43 
26 
126 



Value 

reported. 



46,217,563 
230,465,468 
74,058,277 
35,401,373 
37,178,288 
10,044,024 
11,143,071 
10,010,451 
18.397,234 



2,604,533 
2,1.58,704 
1,039,957 
32,198,011 
2,110,378 
6,105,980 



142,081,625 
11,740,452 
76,643,391 



28,022,242 
8,520,946 

24,395,070 
6,219,605 
7,500,414 



8,013,782 
6,115,430 
12,021,424 
543,040 
1,296,720 
2,701,196 
4,709,781 



629,320 
9,328,287 
14,356,006 
4,777,204 
1,366,993 
2,377,336 
1,219,800 
2,303,614 
819,668 



3,803,664 
3,929,742 
1,205,936 
1,104,682 



1,488,700 

4,969,981 

396, 102 

4,288,888 



1,546,176 

487, 9S3 

75,200 

5,372,176 

773, 338 

414,605 

1,280,913 

00,000 



3,183,716 
1,973,316 
13,240,202 



INSTITUTIONS FOR 

CARE OF 

CHILDREN. 



Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



$93,809,714 



94 
2.52 
221 
75 
119 
43 
41 
23 
56 



131 
36 
85 



Amount 
reported. 



Nuffl' 
ber 
of so- 
cieties 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



5,330,266 
53,577,912 
14,375,291 
5,119,824 
6,989,277 
1,856,619 
2,190,500 
1,472,033 
2,897,992 



357,600 
588,841 
92,000 

2,604,845 
336,480 

1,350,500 



23,418,229 
2,208,450 
27,951,233 



0,571,531 
1,959,543 
3,827,244 
1,1.58,413 
858,560 



1,244,219 
1,081,222 
1,948,083 



75,000 
274,500 
496,800 



197, 100 

1,661,378 

1,514,338 

979, S43 

263,000 

068,033 

640,000 

1,004,267 

61,318 



780,687 
428,000 
223,250 
424,682 



340,000 

1,252,500 

90,000 

508,000 



277,000 
63,000 



SOCIETIES FOR 

PROTECTION AND 

CARE OF 

CHILDREN. 



HOMES FOR ADULTS, 

OR ADULTS AND 

CHILDREN. 



J3, 728, 568 



843, 133 
20,000 
58,900 

150,000 
60,000 



484,463 

207,671 

2,205,858 



.\mount 
reported. 



Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



317,518 

2,635,155 

216, 580 

226, 690 

75, 875 



22,000 
102, ,5.50 
132,200 



208,093 

25, oon 

84,250 



2,462,190 
64,000 
108,965 

28,050 
36,000 
107, 530 
31,000 
14,000 



48,000 
57,000 
50,000 
22, 390 
45,000 



4,300 



1,775 



20,600 

35,000 

2,500 

1,000 



15,000 



12,000 
10,000 



18,000 
73,400 



1,222 



1112,378,861 



1,150 
10,000 



191 
385 
233 
109 
125 
50 
47 
17 
65 



40,000 
83,000 
9,200 



15 
13 
6 
115 
14 
28 



188 
52 
145 



Amount 
reported. 



Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



1,434 



7,921,585 
53,445,641 
19, 525, 024 
7,772,833 
9,519,712 
3,880,849 
2,577,200 
2,042,031 
5,687,986 



991,634 
388,000 
234, 600 

4,601,798 
450, 868 

1,254,685 



39,278,980 
2,984,110 
11,182,545 



6,227,177 
2,896,690 
0,475,483 
1,228,085 
2,697,589 



1,20.5,797 

1,224,192 

1,840,0.58 

68, 500 

829, 700 

759,369 

1,845,217 



164,220 

1,040,091 

5, 175, 129 

2, 165, 529 

114,318 

181,500 

218, 800 

349, 125 

111,000 



1, 173, 809 

2,337,354 

242,686 

133,000 



273,500 

714,990 

256, 152 

1,332,558 



228,431 

93,000 

15,000 

1,687,600 



HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 



1232,841,181 



ISO 
419 
295 
193 
131 
40 
41 
05 
64 



12,000 
6,000 



1,310,225 

332, 195 

4,046,566 



110 

8 
23 



206 
51 
102 



70 
41 
103 
51 
30 



DISPENSARIES. 



Amount 
reported. 



Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



30,296,287 

110,466,314 

35,083,293 

18,432,248 

18,024,824 

2,570,508 

4,602,271 

5,495,337 

7,870,098 



1,169,624 
1,181,863 
713,357 
22,836,531 
1,229,450 
3,165,462 



70,454,863 
0,064,020 
33,947,441 



13,714,684 
2,741,687 

12,329,849 
2,797,267 
3,499,806 



4,998,762 
2,952,968 
7,154,742 
222, 150 
222,835 
1,042,327 
l,a38,464 



263,000 

5,794,943 

0, 925, 239 

1,571,092 

854,675 

1,185,303 

260, 000 

663,222 

507,350 



1,274,009 
509, 600 
490,000 
297,000 



425, 200 

2,485,491 

30,250 

1,601,330 



803,245 
213,583 
60,200 
2,430,293 
719,338 
343,765 
924,913 



$4,548,577 



.\mount 
reported. 



287,430 

2,0.58,786 

1,059,152 

432.750 

78, 100 

125, 1,59 

17,000 

00,000 

4.30,200 



500 



1,349,028 
1,300,450 
5,220,620 



269,850 

80 

17,000 



1,738,602 
43, 130 
277,054 



300,800 

180,000 

567,052 

4,300 

7,000 



07,000 
100,000 
15,750 



INSTITUTIONS 

FOR BLIND AND 

DEAF. 



Num 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 



250,000 



5,000 

25, 100 

5,800 

200 



40,000 



159 
125,000 



17,000 



60,000 



430, 200 



Amount 
reported. 



$26,209,448 



2,064,477 
8,281,660 
4,398,937 
3,417,028 
2,490,500 
1,604,888 
1,734,700 
838,500 
1,378,758 



85,000 



1,676,894 
68,500 
234,083 



4,728,765 

376,742 

3,176,153 



1,180,000 

707,026 

1,087,912 

1,000,540 

423,459 



450, OOi 
700,048 
1,012,791 
230,000 
124, 185 
375,000 
525,000 



805,000 
735,500 
40,000 
100,000 
300,000 
100,000 
285,000 
125,000 



575,000 
529,888 
250,000 
250,000 



450,000 

500,000 

7,700 

777,000 



219,500 
45,000 



350,000 
24,000 



200,000 



50,000 
1,328,768 



78 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

INVESTED FUNDS AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES; 1910. 



Table 69 


all institutions. 


institutions for 

CARE OF 

children. 


societies for 
protection and 

CARE OF 
CHILDREN. 


HOMES FOR ADULTS, 

OR ADULTS AND 

CHILDREN. 


HOSPITALS AND 
SANITARIUMS. 


DISPENSARIES. 


INSTITUTIONS 

FOB BLIND AND 

DEAF. 


DrVlalON OB STATE. 


Total 
num- 
ber. 


Num- 
ber re- 
port- 
ing in- 
vested 
funds. 


Invested 

fimds 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reporl«a. 


Num- 
ber of 
socie- 
ties 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


.\mount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


.\mount 
reported. 


United States 


6,408 


1,646 


$174,252,696 


409 


141,950,374 


53 


$3,013,539 


586 


$46,054,197 


519 


$74,231,634 


44 


$1,802,628 


35 


$7,200,323 


Geographic DmsiONs: 

New England 

Middle .\tlantic 

East North Central... 
West North Central.. 

South Atlantic 

East South Central... 


654 
1,693 
1,055 
547 
678 
203 
210 
176 
292 


339 
615 
272 
105 
161 
44 
22 
18 
70 


43,867,759 
87,131,468 
18,154,905 

4,304,946 
14,564,307 

1,213,394 

1,144,340 
637,518 

3,234,058 


59 
143 
70 
25 
58 
22 
8 
2 
22 


5,900,777 

24,376,742 

4,745,985 

1,331,421 

3,409,622 

843,781 

407, 149 

108,500 

826,397 


13 
16 

8 
7 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 


1,622,360 

1,054,738 

40,606 

109,880 

101,225 

1,248 

1,000 

1,000 

81,482 


140 

208 
104 
38 
50 
15 
10 
4 
17 


10,903,529 

19,861,416 

5,866,686 

1,275,694 

6,303,370 

244, 165 

670,740 

74,200 

864,397 


116 

207 

79 

31 

42 

5 

3 

10 

26 


22,413,205 

36,789,805 

7,113,031 

1,273,351 

4,644,474 

120,200 

65,451 

428,818 

1,383,299 


4 
27 
6 
2 
4 


313,920 
1,053,563 

337,929 
31,600 
65,116 


7 
14 
5 
2 

4 

1 


2,713,968 

4,005,204 

50,668 

283,000 

40,500 

4,000 


West South Central.. 












1 

1 


25,000 


Pacific 


1 


500 


77,983 






New England: 

Maine 


56 
62 
24 
360 
56 
96 

800 
207 
686 

310 
177 
325 
136 
107 

128 
103 
159 

18 
17 
50 
72 

23 
137 
72 
98 
34 
63 
38 
81 
32 

89 
57 
36 
21 

36 
61 
19 
94 

26 
11 

8 
72 
27 
17 
14 

1 

71 
32 

189 


24 
37 
9 
193 
21 
55 

328 

74 

213 

84. 

36 

92 

32 

28 

26 
26 
33 
5 
1 
6 
10 

9 
42 
20 
30 

4 
21 
13 
18 

4 

27 
9 

7 
1 


1,505,136 
1,964,456 
540,083 
30,188,743 
2,477,013 
7,192,328 

43,805,809 

2,301,873 

41,023,786 

6,728,628 
1,270,306 
6,457,062 
2,891,918 
806,991 

1,259,844 

581,989 

1,801,026 

333,746 

10,000 

72,959 

245,382 

334,393 

5,472,909 

4,267,369 

2,013,733 

121,585 

514,856 

797,308 

952,164 

89,990 

800,614 

205,932 

114,498 

92,350 


4 
9 
2 

28 
6 

11 

73 
21 
49 

22 
13 
23 
8 
4 

5 
7 
9 


367,807 
635,633 
59,000 

2,545,033 
391,663 

1,901,641 

9,181,996 

821,867 

14,372,879 

2,273,510 
716,641 

1,087,052 
509,782 
159,000 

605,037 
60,777 
760,419 






13 
11 
3 

82 
9 
22 

112 
23 

73 

30 
15 

36 
11 
12 

10 
11 
10 
2 


426,995 
752,511 
40,491 

7,849,396 
674,047 

1,260,089 

11,338,826 

717,821 

7,794,770 

1,817,578 
393,090 

2,805,836 
376,278 
474,904 

380,938 
221,537 
501,581 
99,463 


7 
15 

4 
66 

6 
18 

113 
24 

70 

25 
7 
26 
11 
10 

8 
5 
10 
1 


710,334 

572,266 

440,592 

15,699,818 

1,459,203 

3,530,992 

19,376,127 

720,044 

16,693,634 

2,452,644 

53,650 

2,468,068 

1,990,205 

158,464 

338,389 

228,675 

460,426 

4,883 












2 


4,046 










Vermont 










Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 


8 

1 
2 

8 
3 
6 

3 


1,452,858 
52,100 
113,356 

688,571 

29,141 

337,026 

22,902 


3 


311,420 


6 


2,330,218 


Coiuiecticut 


1 

16 
3 

8 

2 
1 
3 


2,500 

796,147 

13,000 

244,418 

139,411 
106,925 
91,593 


1 
6 


383,760 
2,424,143 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 




Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 
Ohio 


8 
2 


1,581,061 
22,58? 


Indiana 


Illinois 


3 
1 

1 

2 
1 
2 
1 

1 


12,460 
3,000 
2,254 

35,480 
40,000 
20,000 
4,400 
10,000 


1 

1 
1 


2,063 
13,653 
12,369 




Wisponsin 






West North Central; 








Iowa 


1 
1 


31,000 
600 






Missouri. 


1 

1 


58,000 
225,000 


North Dakota 


South Dakota 












1 

3 

18 
4 

'? 

7 
6 

7 


784 
4,404 

115,500 
932,861 
322,857 
839,567 
48,000 
225,881 
552,506 
372,450 


4 
1 

4 
11 
10 

8 
1 
3 
5 
7 
1 

11 
3 
1 


42,175 
30,000 

89,950 

807,964 

3,813,964 

1,043,661 

24,000 

25,200 

189,917 

296,714 

12,000 

205,605 
36,500 
2,000 


1 
6 

2 
8 
4 
9 
2 
10 
1 
3 
3 

3 

1 
1 


30,000 
210,978 

128,943 

3,569,318 

104,548 

125,605 

49,585 
213,530 

52,035 
273,000 

77,990 

88,200 
20,000 
12,000 










Kansas 














Booth Atlantic: 
Delaware 
















2 


101,000 


2 


57,266 


1 

2 


4,600 
26,000 


District of Columbia 


Virginia 






1 


5,000 












North Carolina 


1 


225 












1 


2,850 






Georgia 






1 


10,000 


Florida 












East South Central: 


1 

12- 
5 
4 
1 


502, 749 
149,432 
99, 250 
92,350 










1 


4,000 


Tennessee 














1 


1,248 










Mississippi 










West South Centrm.: 

A rif flnsj^s 
























11 
2 
9 

2 

2 


837,172 
38,484 
268,684 

37,000 
36,000 


3 

1 
4 


351,399 
4,750 
51,000 






6 

1 
4 

1 


420,322 
33,734 
216,684 

12,000 


3 


65,451 
























Texas 


1 


1,000 














Mountain: 


1 

1 


25,000 
35,000 


















1,000 










Wyoming 




















6 

1 
2 
S 


424,000 
26,000 
21,418 
93,100 


\ 1 


33,500 






1 


60,000 


3 
1 
2 
2 


305,500 
26,000 
21,418 
15,900 






1 


25,000 




































Utah 


1 


75,000 






2 


2,200 
























PAcmc: 


12 

6 

52 


256,017 

416,070 

2,561,971 


4 

2 
16 


21,200 
242,920 
562,277 


1 
I 
1 


400 
50, 150 
30,932 


2 
1 

14 


165,975 

10,000 

68.8,422 


6 
2 

19 


68,442 

113,000 

1,201,857 










Oregon 












1 


500 


1 


77,983 





FINANCES OF INSTITUTIONS. 



n 



Table 70 gives by classes of institutions the number 
and per cent distribution of institutions reporting the 
receipt of income from public appropriations, dona- 
tions, and care of inmates; Table 71 gives the amounts 
reported under these heads; and Table 72 gives the 
average per institution of the receipts under these 
heads, of the amounts expended for rumiing expenses, 
and of the value of property m land, buildings, etc. 

Certain general facts call for specific reference, these 
being (1) the large number of institutions receivmg 
public aid and the proportionately still larger amount 
of aid received; (2) the comparatively small amount 
actually received for "Care of inmates" (except by 
hospitals) notwithstanding the considerable precen- 
tage of institutions reporting such income; and (3) 
the large percentage of institutions reportmg the 
receipt of donations, contrasted mth the small per- 



centage of the total income formed by thus class of 
receipts. 



Table TO 


Total 
num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tutions 

re- 
ported. 


IHSTITtJTIONS REPORTINO RECEIP 


IS 








CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 


Public appro- 
priations. 


Donations. 


Care of 
iiunates. 




Num- 
ber. 


Per 
cent 

of 
total. 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 
cent 

of 
total. 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 

cent 

of 

total. 


All institutions 


5,408 


1,896 


35.0 


3,088 


57.1 


2,710 


50.1 






Institutions for the care of chil- 


1,151 

205 

1,435 

1,918 

574 

125 


459 
95 

312 
876 
01 

93 


39.8 
46.3 

21.7 
45.6 
10.6 

74.4 


801 
129 

966 

1,034 

120 

38 


69.6 
62.9 

67.3 
53.9 
20.9 

30.4 


626 


54.3 


Societies for care of children 




Homes for adults, or adults and 


590 

1,357 

96 

41 


41.1 




70.7 




16.7 


Institutions for blind and 
deaf 


32.8 







Table 71 


Total receipts 
reported. 




INCOME DURING 1910 FROM — 




CLASS OF INSTITUTION. 


Public appropriations. 


Donations. 


Care of inmates. 




Amount 
received. 


Per cent of 
total. 


Amount 
received. 


Per cent of 
total. 


Amount 
received. 


Per cent of 
total. 


All classes.. 


$118,379,859 


$37,677,802 


31.8 


$19,697,598 


16.6 


$30,320,289 


25.6 






Tnstifnti'ftTi.q for fho rarfi nf rhiMrftn 


19,140,342 
2,102,892 
24,203,197 
66,213,435 
1,069,613 
5,650,380 


5,516,694 
699, 413 

8,986,645 

17,906,058 

217,992 

4,351,000 


28.8 
33.3 
37.1 
27.0 
20.4 
77.0 


4,510,101 

823,060 

4,762,385 

9,061,841 

401,146 

139,065 


23.6 
39.1 
19.7 
13.7 
37.5 
2.5 


1,589,704 


8.3 






Homes for adults, or adults and children . 


1,904,043 

26,505,275 

223,616 

97,651 


7.9 


Hospitals 


40.0 




20.9 




1.7 







Table 72 


AVERAGE PER 


INSTITUTION reportinq: 1910. 




Receipts from — 


Run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


Value of 
property. 


CLASS OP INSTITUTION. 


Public 
appro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care 
of 
in- 
mates. 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


Invest- 
ed 
funds. 


All institutions 


$19,872 


$6,314 


$11,188 


$22,220 


$122, 295 $105, 500 






Institutions for the care of 

children. 

Societies for care of children 

Homes for adults, or adults and 

children. 
Hospitals 


12,019 

7,362 
28,803 

20,441 
3,574 
46,785 


5,631 

6,380 
4,930 

8,764 
3,343 
3,660 


2,636 

"3,227' 

19,532 
2,329 
2,382 


14,881 

11,542 
15,363 

34,579 

7,581 

41,918 


101,526 

55,650 
91,472 

162,372 

40,253 

244,948 


102,568 

56,859 
77,567 

143, 028 




40,969 


Institutions for blind and 
deaf. 


205, 724 



In general, these facts seem to indicate an increased 
sense, on the part of the state, of its responsibihty for 
the care of those who are sometimes called "wards of 
the state." In the past benevolent institutions have 
been generally regarded as representmg the element 
of personal or private sympathy for mdividual dis- 
tress. There appears to be arismg, however, a reali- 
zation that even where distress does not necessarily 
go so far as pauperism, it involves detriment, if not 
danger, to the welfare of the community, and that 
dependents of all classes may properly come witliin 
the scope of public supervision and control. This has 
already been indicated in connection with the statis- 



tics for the different classes of benevolent institutions, 
but it comes out still more clearly in these tables, 
which show that 35 per cent of the total number of 
institutions are recipients of public aid, as distin- 
guished from private donations; that 31.8 per cent of 
the total income of all institutions is from public 
appropriations, and that the highest average receipts 
per institution from any source are from such appro- 
priations. 

Attention has already been called to the large num- 
ber of institutions for the bHnd and deaf which are 
practically supported by pubUc appropriations, but 
it is noticeable that 46.3 per cent of the societies for 
the protection and care of children, 45.6 per cent of 
the hospitals and sanitariums, and 39.8 per cent of 
the institutions for the care of children receive pubUc 
aid. On the other hand, the donations, which ordi- 
narily are regarded as the expression of the benevo- 
lence of the community, represented only 16.6 per 
cent of the total income of the institutions, figuring 
largely only in the returns for societies for the protec- 
tion and care of children, and for dispensaries. 

The lack of material for comparison in these respects 
with the situation in 1904 makes it impossible to 
speak very positively, but there appears to be suffi- 
cient basis for the behef that the tendency is toward 
the placing of all types of benevolent institutions 
under governmental care, and the gradual elimination 
of private support and thus of private control. 



80 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER GOVERNMENTAL CARE. 



The increase since 1904 in the number oi benevolent 
mstitutions under public, or goveriunental care, and 
the even greater increase in the amounts appropriated 
for their maintenance, is significant of the changing 
attitude on the part of federal, state, county, and 
mimicipal governments toward the dependent classes 
or "wards of the state." 

In 1904 the total number of institutions classed as 
public was 485; in 1910 it was 636, an increase of 151, 
or 31.1 per cent. The total amount reported in 1904 
as amaual subsidies from public funds was $6,089,226 ; 
in 1910 the total pubhc appropriations amounted to 
$37,677,802, an increase of $31,588,576, or 518.8 per 
cent. As abeady stated, page 72, it seems probable 
that some items are included in the present report 
wliich were not included m 1904, but with all due 
allowance for such differences of method, it is eviilent 
that there has been a great advance in the amount of 
aid given to benevolent institutions from pubhc funds. 

Tables 74 to 77 show those under federal, state, 
comity, and municipal care, respectively, with the 
number of inmates at the close of the year classified 
as adults and cliildren, together with the income and 
expenditures during the year and thevalueof property 
at the close of the year, for all institutions under each 
form of governmental contract. 

It will be noticed that there are only two classes of 
histitutions imder federal care — homes for the care of 
adults, or adults and children, and hospitals and 
sanitariums. The former are confuied chiefly to 



homes for soldiers, sailors, and marines; the latter 
include marme, naval, and army post hospitals, and 
certain institutions for the treatment of soldiers and 
sailors who suffer from tuberculosis. 

Institutions under state care include four classes; 
institutions for the care of cliildren, homes for adults, 
or adults and children, hospitals and sanitariums, and 
institutions for the bhnd and deaf. Among the insti- 
tutions for the care of children are a number of sol- 
diers' and saUors' orphans' homes, some state public 
schools, and a few general homes; the homes for adults, 
or adults and cliildren are chiefly soldiers' homes ; and 
the hospitals and sanitariums include a number of in- 
stitutions for the treatment of tuberculosis, and sev- 
eral miners' hospitals, especially in Pennsylvania and 
West Virginia. 

Institutions under county care are chiefly county 
homes for cliildren and institutions for the treatment 
of tuberculosis. 

Institutions under municipal care include detention 
homes for chilch-en, municipal lodging houses, and 
municipal hospitals, the last-named class being chiefly 
for contagious diseases. 

The following table shows the number of federal, 
state, county, and municipal institutions reported, 
with the total number of inmates and the average 
number per institution reported at the close of the 
year; and the expenditures and value of property, 
with the averages under each head per institution 
reporting: 



Table 73 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reported. 


PUBLIC institutions: 1910. 




Inmates reported. 


Paj-ments. 


Value of property. 




Total. 


Average 
per in- 
stitution 
reported. 


Number 
ol insti- 
tutions 

reporting. 


Amount re- 
ported. 


Average 
per insti- 
tution 
reporting. 


Number 
of insti- 
tutions 
reporting. 


Amount re- 
ported. 


Average 
per insti- 
tution 
reporting. 


All PITBLIC INSTITUTIONS 


636 


91,457 


144 


474 


$26,017,772 


$54,890 


421 


$110,018,535 


$261,327 






Federal 


153 

188 
118 
177 


25.830 
40,936 
8.892 
15, 899 


169 

218 

75 

90 


44 
171 
107 
152 


5,000,163 

11,589,047 

1,472.217 

7,956,345 


113,640 
67, 772 
13,759 
52,344 


26 
161 
100 
134 


21,810,546 
39.512,232 
6,048,807 
42, 616, 950 


838, 867 


State 


245, 418 




60,488 


Municipal 


318,261 







The relatively low expenditures and liigh value of 
property of municipal institutions are due largely to 
the fact that the municipal hospitals for contagious 
diseases require a heavy outlay for buildings, etc., 
but as a rule cost comparatively little for rumiing ex- 



penses owing to theu' infrequent use. The inclusion, 
among state institutions, of the majority of the insti- 
tutions for the bUnd and deaf, raises aU the figures in 
that class, wliUe the sokhers' homes, both state and 
federal, are all large mstitutions. 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER GOVERNMENTAL CARE. 81 

INSTITUTIONS UNDER FEDERAL CARE, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 74 


Total 
num- 
ber of 
Fed- 
eral 
insti- 
tu- 
tions. 


INMATES AT CLOSE OF TEAR. 


EECEIPT3 DTTRING 
THE YEAR. 


PAYMENTS 

DURING THE 

YEAR. 


VALUE OP 
PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE or 

THE YEAB. 




Total 
num- 
ber of 
inmates 
at close 
of year. 


Homes for 
adults. 


Hospitals and sanitariums. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
mg. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber of 
insti- 
tu- 
tions 
ra- 
por(>. 
ing. 






Num- 
ber of 
Insti- 
tu- 
tions 

re- 
port> 
ed. 


Number 

of iiunates 

at close 

of year.' 


Num- 
ber of 
Insti- 
tu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Number of patients at 
close of year. 


Amount 
reported. 




Total.i 


Adults. 


Chil- 
dren. 




United States 


153 


25,830 


13 


21,705 


140 


4,125 


3,943 


44 


38 


»4, 794, 413 


44 


$5,000,163 


26 


$21,810,546 






Geographic divisions: 


17 
23 
15 
16 
32 
5 
10 
14 
21 


2,064 

708 

9,734 

3,116 

4,560 

1,681 

387 

651 

2,929 


1 

1 
4 
2 
3 

1 


1,751 
89 
9,521 
2,911 
3,628 
1,606 


16 
22 
11 
14 
29 
4 
10 
14 
20 


313 

619 
213 
205 
932 
75 
387 
651 
730 


313 

481 
213 
198 
895 
75 
387 
651 
730 


7' 

37 


3 

4 

10 
4 
8 
4 
1 
1 
3 


450,646 
106,473 
1,746,041 
648,562 
901,068 
343, 921 
29,282 
104,022 
464,398 


4 
5 

10 
4 

12 
4 
1 
1 
3 


465,923 
410.395 
1,657.380 
619. 040 
914.083 
340. 352 
29.282 
104.022 
459, 686 


4 
1 
6 
4 

7 
2 


1,269,608 


Middle Atlantic 


276,332 




5,613,814 


West North Central 


1,881,882 


Pniith Atlantii^ 


8,881,878 




1,738,572 












1 
1 


600,000 




1 


2,199 


1,648,460 






New England: 

Maine 


2 
2 

1 
9 
3 


1,756 

1 

17 

178 

112 


1 


1,751 


1 
2 
1 
9 
3 


5 

1 

17 

178 

112 


5 

1 

17 

178 

112 




1 


391,838 


1 


37:1,261 


1 


839,603 






















1 












2 


58,808 


2 

1 


58,808 
33,854 


2 
1 


360.000 


Rhode Island 






70,000 


Connecticut 














Middle Atlantic: 


18 
2 
3 

3 
3 
4 
3 
2 

1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
5 

1 
7 
6 
5 


535 

11 

162 

3,562 
1,764 
2,513 
36 
1,859 

3 

1 

74 

10 

326 

27 

2,675 

11 

297 

1,730 

2,404 






18 
2 
2 

2 
2 
3 
3 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
4 

1 
7 
4 
4 


535 
11 
73 

70 
11 
85 
36 
11 

3 

1 
74 
10 
10 
27 
80 

11 
297 
285 
221 


397 
11 

73 

70 
11 
85 
36 
11 

3 

1 
74 
10 

3 
27 
80 

11 
269 
276 
221 


m 


2 


75,976 


2 


75,976 
















Ppnn<*ylvaTii!i 


1 

1 
1 

1 


89 

3,492 
1,753 
2,428 




2 

2 
2 
3 
1 
2 


30,497 

634,084 
301,878 
427, 627 
24,030 
358,422 


3 

2 
2 
3 
1 

2 


334,419 

602, 253 
278, 218 
407,871 
24,030 
345,008 


1 

1 

1 

2 

' 


276,332 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


1,351,562 


Tntliana . ... 


922,000 




1,872,906 








1 


1,848 


\ 2 


1,467,356 


West North Central: 

M1nnp.t!otj\ 




















. 




Missouri 








1 


18,772 


1 


18, 772 
















South Daliota 


1 


316 


7 


2 


181,971 


2 


166,042 


2 


732,700 






K"flnaa.q 


1 


2,595 




1 


447,819 


1 


434,226 


2 


1,149.182 


South Atlantic: 
Delaware 




Marylrtnd 






28 
9 


2 
3 


60,123 
800, 145 


5 
4 


59,713 
813, 570 


2 

3 


244,000 




2 

1 


1,445 
2,183 


8,421,663 






















North Carolina 


2 
2 
4 
5 

1 
2 
2 


16 

21 
37 

44 

16 

1,625 

40 






2 
2 
4 
5 

1 
1 
2 


16 
21 
37 
44 

16 
19 
40 


16 
21 
37 
44 

16 
19 
40 





1 


10,739 


1 


10,739 
























1 
1 

1 
2 
1 


16,215 
13,846 

15,945 

311,230 

16,746 


1 

1 

1 
2 
1 


16,215 
13,846 

15,945 

307,661 

16,746 


1 
1 


16,216 


Florida. .. 






200,000 












1 


1,606 


i ^ 


1,738,572 






Mississippi 










West South Central: 


2 
2 

1 
5 

2 

1 
3 
2 
2 
3 
1 


89 

48 

5 

245 

7 






2 
2 
1 
5 

2 
1 
3 
2 
2 
3 
1 


89 

48 

5 

245 

7 


89 

48 

5 

245 

7 












1 












1 


29,282 


1 


29,282 
















Texas 




















MnntAna 




































1 




Wyoming 


86 
165 
373 

15 






86 
165 
378 

15 


86 
165 
378 

15 












































1 


104,022 


1 


104,022 


1 


600,000 










Utah 




















Nevada 


























PAcmc: 


10 
10 


131 

5 

2,793 






10 

1 
9 


131 

5 
594 


131 

5 

594 




1 


18,605 


1 


18,605 






Oregon 












1 


2,199 




2 


445, 793 


2 


441,081 


1 


1,648,460 







1 All adults. 



* Includes those not classified by age. 



' Not reported. 



9531° 



82 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

INSTITUTIONS UNDER STATE CARE, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 75 


1 

o 
a 

o 

B 

1 


INMATES AT CLOSE OF THE YEAR. 


BECEIPTS 

DURING THE 

YEAR. 


PAYMENTS 

DURDJa THE 

YEAR. 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF 

THE YEAR. 




1 

h 
r 

a 

3 

a 


Institu- 
tions for 
care of 
children. 


Homes for care of 
adults, or adults 
and children. 


Hospitals and 
sanitariums. 


Institutions for blind 
and deaf. 


.s 

1 

1 

3 

1 

o 

S 

a 

3 

z 


o 
£ 

1 

D 

B 

< 


be 

.s 
■e 

1 

en 

1 
1 

1 

O 

1 

a 

3 

z 


1 

1 

o 

a 

< 


3 
1 

1 

3 

1 

s 

a 

3 






o 

is 

a~ 

3 

z; 


it 


3 

II 

Is 
a -2 

3 


Number of in- 
mates at close 
of the year. 


?! 

^ S 

a -2 

3 


Number of pa- 
tients at close 
of the year. 


3 

II 

^ o 

!£ 
a -a 

3 

z. 


Number of in- 
mates at close 
of the year. 


1 




i 

o 


3 

•3 


s 

3 


i 

o 

El 


1 
< 


:3 


i 

6^ 


1 


1 

u 


e 

i 


United State3 


188 

17 
29 
30 
35 
25 
15 
17 
14 
6 


40,936 


18 


4,614 

247 

878 

1,705 

1,142 


51 

4 
8 
7 
11 
5 
4 
5 
4 
3 


19,315 


18,616 


699 


47 

8 
12 
4 
6 
10 
2 
3 
2 


6,349 

1.936 

1,609 

326 

483 

658 

324 

1,111 

2 


4,941 


362 


72 


10,658 


3,881 


6,571 


172 


Sll, 740, 366 


171 


811,689,047 


161 

11 

27 
29 
32 
19 

9 
16 
13 

5 


$39,512,232 


Geogbaphic divisions: 


3,373 
8,187 
10.374 
6,963 
2.415 
2,179 
4.005 
1,355 
2.085 


2 
3 
5 
4 


864 
5,088 
5,594 
3,4101 

383 

615 
1,017 

541 
1,803| 


864 
4.601 
5.594 
3.298 

383 

615 
1,017 

541 
1,803 


'587 

'Hi 


1,816 
1,453 
291 
428 
641 
182 
230 


72 
156 
36 
55 
17 
14 
11 
2 


3 
6 
14 
14 
10 
9 
8 
5 
3 


326 

612 

2,749 

1,928 

1,474 

1,240 

1,569 

478 

282 


70 
131 
1,152 
718 
447 
316 
762 
158 
127 


256 
478 
1,597 
1,210 
824 
924 
807 
320 
156 


16 
30 
29 
34 
21 

9 
16 
12 

5 


1,119,004 

3, 202, 954 

2,516,680 

2. 029, 481 

'589.463 

347, 016 

1,072,772 

484,000 

378,996 


16 
30 
29 
33 
20 

9 
16 
13 

5 


1,118,669 

2,671,216 

2,814,962 

2,093,583 

620, 058 

351,005 

1,010,754 

634, 799 

374,002 


3,274,336 


Middle Atlantic 

East North Central 

West North Central 


8,294.721 
9,787,740 
6,844.329 
2, 269, 789 








1.482,888 


West South Central 

Mountain 


1 
3 


308 
334 


4,075,660 
1,523,633 


Pacific 


1,969,236 


New ENGtAND: 


2 
2 
1 

7 
4 

1 

9 
6 
14 

6 
5 
7 
6 
6 

6 
6 
5 
3 
3 
7 
5 


175 

124 

99 

2,373 

505 

97 

4,174 
1,497 
2,516 

2,834 
1,924 
2,989 
1,992 
635 

1,200 

2,061 

1,031 

143 

345 

996 

1,178 


1 


64 


















1 


111 


45 


66 


2 
2 

1 
7 
4 


32,300 
40,087 
21,621 
866,041 
159,055 


2 
2 

1 
7 
4 


32,297 

40,082 

19,961 

837,233 

189,096 


1 
2 
1 
3 
4 


85,000 


New Hampshire 




94 

99 
64l| 
130, 


94 

99 
541 
130 




1 


30 


30 




132,000 
















20,043 










5 
1 
1 

2 

1 
9 

1 


1,691 
118 
97 

287 

123 

1,199 

48 


1,691 
96 

236 

111 

1,106 

48 


70 
'\ 

61 
12 
93 


1 
1 


141 
74 


25 


116 

74 


2, 468, 793 


Rhode Island 


1 


183 


568,500 






Middle Atlantic: 


1 


178 


3 
4 

1 

2 
2 
2 
1 


1 

3,422 
1,214 

452 

1,431 
1,091 
1,851 
1,221 


2,922 

1,127 

452 

1,431 
1,091 
1,851 
1,221 


500 

87 


3 
1 
2 

2 
2 
3 
3 
4 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


287 
160 
165 

721 
472 
702 
622 
332 

369 
361 
411 
103 
113 
247 
324 


91 
40 

167 
376 
376 
66 
167 

'"igs 

186 
44 
53 
117 
120 


193 
120 
166 

554 
96 
326 
466 
165 

369 
163 
225 
69 
60 
130 
204 


9 
7 
14 

6 
6 
7 
6 
5 

5 
6 
5 
3 
3 
7 
5 


953,443 

597,009 

1,652,502 

760,100 
485,887 
474,473 
477,878 
318,342 

378,879 
467,022 
463, 176 
71,845 
128.046 
259, 812 
260. 701 


9 
7 
14 

6 
6 

7 
6 
6 

4 
6 
6 
3 

3 

7 
6 


924, 415 

609,870 

1,136,930 

817,043 
484,679 
702, 451 
488,407 
322, 482 

391,871 
517,827 
465,976 
59, 867 
102, 273 
295, 037 
260, 732 


8 
7 
12 

6 

6 
7 
6 
5 

4 
6 
6 
2 
3 
7 
5 


3,296,071 




2,636,389 




2 

1 
1 
I 
1 
1 

1 
1 


700 

634 
361 
314 
197 
199 

232 
685 


2,363,261 


East North Central: 
Ohio 


2,805,978 




1,911,576 


Illinois 


.... 


1 
1 

1 

2 
2 
1 


122 
62 
104 

80 

265 

75 


87 
52 
104 

80 

265 

71 


35 

"'4 


2,492,472 




1,796,130 




781,584 


West North Central: 
Minnesota 


1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
3 
2 


528 
850 
646 
40 
232 
569 
656 


528 
850 
544 
40 
232 
536 
668 


.... 


1,357,018 




1, 738. 896 




1,218,434 








456,896 


South Dakota 
















224,185 




1 
1 


127 
198 


23 
88 


1 


63 


12 


51 


818.600 




1,030,400 


South Atlantic: 














5 
1 
»3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
4 

3 
3 

4 
5 

4 
5 
2 
6 

3 
2 
2 
3 
2 


681 
94 
164 
315 
549 
203 
380 
129 

698 
593 
384 
604 

518 
1,384 

283 
1,820 

174 
227 

53 
653 

36 






1 


103 


103 




1 

1 
3 
1 

1 


210 
94 
90 

123 
37 


196 
91 
90 

123 
37 
(=) 


14 
3 


3 


268 


106 


162 


4 


136, 104 


4 


148, 453 


4 


1,111,289 


District of Columbia 












*l 








1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

2 
2 
3 
2 

2 
1 
2 
3 

1 
1 


74 
192 
367 
203 
267 
103 

461 
473 
306 
(=^) 

381 
142 
283 
763 

83 
60 


'"ioe 

171 
64 

171 
145 

"m" 

173 
102 
71 
416 

20 
23 


74 
86 
196 

(=) 
203 
103 

290 
328 
306 

208 

40 

212 

347 

63 
27 


2 
4 
3 
1 
3 
4 


37,000 
132,737 
143,963 
14,000 
98,500 
27, 159 


2 
3 
3 

1 
3 

4 


95,500 
104.726 
138,052 
14,000 
92.142 
27,185 


2 
4 

2 
1 
2 
4 


115,000 














210,000 








1 


145 


145 


.... 


350,000 








15,000 








1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
2 


113 

22 

237 

120 
78 
180 

80 
188 


113 
22 

237 
120 
78 
180 

80 
188 




295,000 


Florida 








2 


4 


4 


.... 


163,600 


East South Central: 
























3 
2 
4 

4 
4 
2 
6 

3 
2 

1 
3 

1 


108, 166 
87,096 
151, 754 

279.835 

292, 134 

80,000 

420,803 

114,278 
56,000 
14.919 

217.044 
12,759 


3 
2 
4 

4 
4 
2 
6 

3 
2 
1 
3 
2 


114,237 
86, 410 
150,358 

227.217 

299.984 

70,000 

413.553 

128,014 
94,000 
14,919 

209.819 
14,130 


3 
2 
4 

4 

4 
2 
6 

3 
2 
1 
3 
2 


602,888 


















310,000 








.... 


2 

1 
2 


324 

57 
1,054 


182 

57 
173 


14 

'"ii 


570,000 


West South Central: 






560,000 








1,980,860 








7,700 




1 

1 


308 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 


749 

91 
177 

53 
220 


749 

91 
177 

63 

220 














1,527,000 


Mountain: 












396,500 














138,000 










*1 








16,000 




1 


243 








1 
1 


190 
34 


72 
11 


118 
23 


687.133 






1 


2 




2 


27,000 


















Utah 


1 

1 

1 
2 
3 


121 
91 

690 

160 

1.235 






















1 


121 


32 


89 


1 
1 


60,000 
19,000 


1 

1 


50.000 
23,917 


1 
1 


200,000 




1 


91 


















60,000 


Pacific: 


1 
1 

1 


690 
134 
979 


690 
134 

979 






































1 
2 


26 
256 


'""i27 


26 
129 


2 
3 


39,190 
339,806 


2 
3 


40.883 
333,119 


2 
3 


166,666 



















1,869,236 





















■ Includes those not classified by age. 

2 Not reported. 

' Does not include Lee Camp Soldiers' Home, Richmond, which, though receiving state appropriation, is registered as a private organization. 

* Not opened until 1911. 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER GOVERNMENTAL CARE. 83 

INSTITUTIONS UNDER COUNTY CARE, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 76 


Total 
num- 
ber 
of 
Coun- 

.'y 

in- 
stitu- 
tions. 


INMATES AT CLOSE OF THE TEAR. 


EECEffTS DURING 
THE YEAR. 


PAYMENTS 

DURING THE 

YEAR. 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF 

THE YEAR. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Total 
number 
of in- 
mates 
atclose 
of the 
year. 


Institution.s 
for care of 
children. 


Homes for adults, or 
adults and children. 


Hospitals and sanitariums. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 






Num- 
ber 
ol in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
mates 

at 
close 
of the 
year. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Number of inmates 
at close of the year. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Number of patients 
at close of tne year. 


Amount 
reported. 




Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total.' 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 




United States 


118 


8,892 


92 


7.513 


2 


87 


87 




24 


1,287 


1,109 


133 


109 


11,305,780 


107 


81,472,217 


100 


$6,048,807 


Geographic du'isions: 


7 
14 
73 
6 
2 
5 
1 
4 
6 


619 

1,121 

6, 492 

248 

19 

185 

24 

46 

138 


7 
5 
70 
4 
1 
1 
1 


619 

194 

6.431 

173 

'""26' 
24 


















6 
13 

70 
6 
2 
4 
1 
3 
4 


116,088 

375, 401 

607,336 

49,523 

S,463 

69.824 

3,450 

39,205 

39, 490 


6 
13 
69 
5 
2 
4 
1 
3 
4 


116,821 

534,651 

622, 940 

40,768 

5.966 

65.294 

3,450 

39.205 

43,122 


6 
11 
66 
5 
2 
4 
1 
3 
2 


350,000 


Middle Atlantic 


1 


68 


68 




8 
3 
2 


859 
61 
75 


769 
41 

72 


90 
10 
3 


1,573.113 


Fiwt North Central. 


3,549.694 












86,000 




1 


19 


19 




19.000 






4 


159 


139 


20 


267,000 


West South Central 










25,000 










4 

3 


46 

87 


11 

77 


'"io" 


73.000 


Pacific 


3 


51 










106.000 


New England; 


7 

6 
5 
3 

52 
17 
1 
1 
2 

1 
3 
1 
1 

1 

1 

4 
1 

1 

1 
3 

1 
1 
4 


619 

783 
194 
144 

2.406 
419 

3,509 

10 

148 

24 

83 

4 

137 

19 

98 
87 

24 

4 
42 

9 

87 
42 


7 

1 
1 
3 

50 
17 
1 


619 

23 
27 
144 

2,355 

419 

3,609 


















6 

6 
4 
3 

51 

16 

1 


116,088 

190.891 
160,490 
24,020 

478,104 
48,632 
37,200 


6 

6 
4 
3 

50 

16 

1 


116,821 

203,345 
307,289 
24,017 

487, 444 
48.576 
41,512 


6 

5 
3 
3 

49 

13 

1 

1 
2 

1 
3 


350,000 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 


1 


68 


63 




4 
4 


692 
167 


667 
102 


25 
65 


868,358 




656.855 












147,900 


East North Central: 
Ohio 










2 


51 


41 


10 

. .. 


3.106,587 












173, 107 




















200.000 












1 


10 


m 


(') 


10.000 




2 

1 

1 
1 
1 


148 

24 

8 

4 

137 










2 

1 
3 
1 
1 

1 
1 

3 
1 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 
2 


43,400 

15,000 
15.843 
13,680 
5,000 

3,663 
1,800 

42,224 
27,600 

3,450 

7,607 
31.598 

4, 522 
19.040 
15,928 


2 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
2 


45,408 

15,000 
7,137 

13,680 
4,951 

3,666 
2,300 

37,694 
27,600 

3,450 

7,607 
31,598 

4,522 
23.000 
15,600 


60,000 


West North Central: 


















28,000 












2 


75 


72 


3 


50,000 
































1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 
2 


8,000 


South Atlantic: 


1 


19 


19 












11,500 




1 

1 


26 












7,500 


East South Central: 










3 
1 


72 
87 


64 

75 


8 
12 


117.000 












150,000 


West South Central: 


1 


24 










25,000 


Mountain: 










1 
3 


4 
42 


4 
7 


"{■'")■■ 


5,000 
















68.000 


Pacific: 


1 


9 






















1 
2 


87 


77 

m 


10 


1 

1 


100.000 




2 


42 










6.000 















1 Includes those not classified by age. 



2 Not reported. 



84 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

INSTITUTIONS UNDER MUNICIPAL CARE, BY CLASS OF INSTITUTION, FOR DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1910. 



Table 77 


Total 
num- 
ber 
of 

Mu- 
nici- 
pal 
insti- 
tu- 
tions. 


INMATES AT CLOSE OP THE YEAR. 


EECEIPTS 

DUBING THE 

TEAE. 


PAYMENTS 

DURING THE 

YEAR. 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF 

THE YEAR. 


DIVISION OR STATE. 


Total 
number 
of in- 
mates 
at close 
of the 
year. 


Institutions 
for care of 
children. 


Homes for adults or adults 
and children. 


Hospitals and sanitariums. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 


Amount 
reported. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ing. 






Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
mates 
at Close 
of the 
year. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Number of inmates 
at close of the year. 


Num- 
ber 
of in- 
stitu- 
tions 
re- 
port- 
ed. 


Number of patients 
at close of the year. 


Amount 
reported. 




Total. 


Adults. 


ChU- 
dren. 


Total.i 


Adults. 


Chil- 
dren. 




United States 


177 


15,899 


5 


445 


8 


1,222 


1,199 


23 


164 


14,232 


10,090 


3,350 


150 


$7,563,485 


152 


17,956,345 


134 


S42,646,950 


Geographic divisions: 


34 
40 
35 
18 
15 
9 
8 
3 
15 


1,733 

8,385 

2,095 

1,647 

663 

393 

237 

259 

487 






3 
1 

1 


93 
691 
349 


89 
672 
349 


4 
19 


31 

38 

34 

18 

9 

9 

8 

2 

15 


1,640 

7,655 

1,746 

1,647 

168 

393 

237 

259 

487 


1,156 

5,175 

1,503 

1,008 

143 

349 

38 

250 

468 


459 

2,480 

194 

150 

16 

21 

2 

9 

19 


29 

35 

31 

15 

15 

8 

5 

3 

9 


1,308,889 

3,499,113 

1,035,757 

814,633 

242,055 

189,054 

83,188 

119,708 

271,088 


30 
38 
30 
14 
16 
8 
5 
3 
8 


1,280,790 
4,184,198 
975,516 
591,529 
235,144 
195,598 
76,813 
116, 754 
300,003 


26 
37 
26 
14 
12 
8 
5 
3 
3 


2,211,897 


Middle Atlantic 


1 


39 


26,883,862 
5,564,561 


West North Central 






4, 647, 839 


South Atlantic 

East South Central 


3 


406 


3 


89 


89 




940,872 
557,500 
















183,600 




1 


(•) 










533,222 












1,123,597 


















New England: 


1 
2 


1 
30 














1 
2 


1 
30 


2i 
















New Hampshire 














6 


1 


24,083 


2 


26,871 


2 


133,300 










■ 








26 
2 
3 

28 
8 
4 

8 
7 
6 
8 
6 

9 
4 

4 


1,572 
97 
33 

7,490 
547 
348 

1,207 
275 
431 
144 
38 

705 
(') 
906 






3 


93 


89 


4 


23 
2 
3 

26 
8 

4 

8 
7 
5 
8 
6 

9 

4 
4 


1,479 
97 
33 

6,760 
547 
348 

1,207 
275 

82 
144 

38 

705 

m 

906 


1,065 
39 

27 

4,755 
366 

54 

1,034 
242 

79 
131 

17 

599 
409 


389 

58 
6 

2,005 
181 
294 

124 
33 
3 
13 

21 

106 

(') 

44 


23 
2 
3 

23 

8 

4 

7 
6 

a 

8 
4 

8 
3 

4 


1,197,919 
34, 194 
52,693 

2,930,745 
305,213 
263,155 

700,451 
114,747 

91,003 
103,636 

25,920 

351,809 

2.776 

460,048 


23 
2 
3 

26 
8 
4 

7 
5 
6 

8 
4 

8 
3 
3 


1,190,599 
34, 194 
29,126 

3,625,239 
318.377 
240,582 

647,030 
104,081 

84,300 
105,816 

34,289 

385,608 

2,776 

203,145 


21 
1 
2 

25 

8 
4 

6 
6 
5 
7 
2 

8 
2 
4 


1,626,597 


Rhode Island 






390,000 
















62,000 


Middle Atlantic. 


1 


39 


1 


691 


672 


19 


23,470,799 




1,669,428 
















1,743,635 


East North Central: 















3,402,088 
















393,405 








1 


349 


349 




212,832 








126,236 
















1,430,000 


West North Central: 














1,203,000 
















14,600 
















3,430,239 


North Dakota 
























































1 


36 














1 


36 


(») 


(') 








































South Atlantic: 














































































3 
1 

1 
1 
3 

6 

1 

5 
3 
1 


226 
22 
16 
2 
269 
117 
11 

258 
135 
(») 


2 


185 


1 


41 


41 












4 

1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 

5 
3 


88,625 
7,539 
14,447 
2,419 
29,455 
87,086 
12,484 

124, 920 
64,134 


4 
1 
1 
1 
3 
5 
1 

5 
• 3 


86.943 
6,979 
8.911 
2,424 
29,445 
91,.S73 
S.569 

132,300 
63,298 


3 
1 

1 
1 
1 
4 

1 

5 
3 


634,550 






1 
1 

1 


22 
16 
2 


22 
14 

1 


" "2" 
1 


10,000 
















15,000 
















20,000 




1 


221 


2 


48 


48 




10,000 






6 
1 

5 
3 
1 


117 

11 

258 
135 

m 


95 
11 

225 
124 


13 

10 
11 

m 


148,222 


Florida 














103,100 


East South Central: 














387,000 
















170,500 












































West South Central: 


2 


(•) 














2 


(') 


m 


(•) 


2 


6,800 


2 


6,800 


2 


11,700 




























































6 


237 














6 


237 


38 


2 


3 


76,388 


3 


70,013 


3 


171,900 


Mountain: 






























































































2 


258 


1 


(») 










1 


258 


249 


9 


2 


113,923 


2 113,903 


2 


522,000 


























































1 


1 














1 


1 


1 




1 


5,785 


1 


2,851 


1 


11,222 


















Pacific: 


3 


53 














3 


53 


44 


9 


3 


43,497 


3 


43,497 


























12 


434 














12 


434 


424 


10 


6 


227,591 


5 


256,506 


3 


1,123,597 



















' Includes those not classified by age. 



" Not reported. 



GENERAL TABLES 



(85) 



86 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



ALABAMA. 

Birmingham: 

St. Edward's Athenpura Orphan Home. 
S131 Berney Ave. (East Lake P. O.). 
Eveegeeen: 

Louise Short Baptist Home 

Mobile: 

Church Home lor Orphans 

204 South Warren St. 
Industrial School for Catholic Orphan 
Boys. 

3" Lafayette St. 
Protestant Orphan Asylum 

859 Dauphin Way. 
St. Mary's Female Orphan Asylum 

357 Conti St. 

StraMERFTELD: 

Alabama Methodist Orphanage 

Talladega: 

Presbyterian Orphans' Home 

ARIZONA. 
Tucson: 

Methodist Industrial School 

1200 East Seventh St. 
St. Joseph's Orphanage 

ARKANSAS. 

Batesville: 

Masonic Orphans' Home 

FoET Smith; 

Orphans' Home 

615 North Nmeteenth St. 
Helena: 

Ophelia Polk Moore Memorial Home... 

St. John's Orphan Asylum 

Levy; 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 

Little Rock: 

Arkansas Methodist Orphanage 

Sixteenth and Elm Sts. 

Children's Home 

416 East Fifth St, 
Monticello; 

Arkansas Baptist Orphans' Home 

Texarkana; 

Baptist Orphans' Home 

CALIFORNIA. 
Alamei>a; 

California Girls' Training Home 

620 Lincoln Ave. 
Anaheim: 

St. Catharine's Orphan Asylum 

215 Palm St. 
Bakeesfield: 

Kern County Children's Shelter 

920 Twentieth St. 
Chdjo: 

California Junior RepubUc 

Fbesno; 

Fresno County Orphanage 

Venture Ave. 
Gaedena: 

MoKinley Industrial Home 

Gileot; 

Odd Fellows' Orphans' Home 

Grass Vallet: 

Grass Valley Orphan .Vsvlum 3 

Church'St. 
Los Angelfs; 

Frances M. De Pauw Industrial School. 
4840 Sunset Boulevard. 

Home of the Guardian Angel 

West Washington St. (R. D. 7, Box 
148). 

Jewish Orphans' Home 

2033 East Fourth St. 

Los .\ngeles Orphan A sylum 

Stephenson and Boyle Aves. 

I Not reported. ^ Boarders, 



Sisters of Charity . 



Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 

Protestant Episcopal Dio- 
cese of Alabama. 
Brothers of the Sacred Heart, 



Private corporation . 
Sisters of Charity . . . 



MethodistEpiscopalChurch, 
South. 

Presbyterian Synod of Ala- 
bama. 



Woman's Home Missionary 

Society, M. E. Church. 
Sisters of St. Joseph 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 
Arkansas. 

Private corporation 

Private association 

Protestant E piscopalChurch , 
Sisters of St. Benedict 

Methodist Episcopal Church 

South. 
Private corporation 

Baptist churches of Arkansas 
Landmark Baptist Church.. 



Private organization. 



Sisters of St. Dominic. 



Private corporation. 



California George Junior 
Republic .Vssociation. 

Private association 



Private corporation 

Rebekah -\ssembly, I. O. 
O. F. of California. 

Sisters of Mercy 



Woman's Home Missionary 

Society, M. E. Church. 
Sisters of Mercy 



Private corporation . 
Sisters of Charity . . . 



. lass of children received. 



Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children from 2 
to 14. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Orphan boys 

Indigent orphan children 

Orphan and neglected girls. 

Needy children 

Orphan children 

Mexican girls 

Orphan and abandoned 
cnildren. 



Masons' destitute orphan 
children. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 
Orphan children 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children under 14.. 

Orphan children 

Orphan children under 13.. 
Orphan children 



Delinquent girls from 9 to 16, 



Orphan and abandoned 
boys, and boarders. 

Orphan and abandoned 
cnildren. 

Delinquent and wayward 
boys. 

Orphan and abandoned 
cnildren. 

Orphan and homeless boys. 

Odd Fellows' and Rebek- 
ahs' orphan children. 

Orphan and abandoned 
cnildren. 

Spanish and Mexican girls. . 

Orphan and abandoned 
cnildren, and boarders. 

Orphan and destitute Jew- 
ish children. 
Orphan girls from 2 to 14. . . 



1903 

1893 

1864 
1838 

18,36 
1838 

ISSl 

1S68 

1906 
1905 



1900 

1892 
(') 
1909 

1899 
1886 

1896 
1907 

1893 



1906 



1898 
1897 



1900 
1895 

1908 
1869 



No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

(') 
No. 

No. 
(') 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

(') 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 



No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 



C) 



(') 



CmLDEEN EECErVED FOR FIEST 
TME IN 1919. 



40 

14 

18 
29 

15 
32 

34 

16 

24 
59 

44 
(') 

15 
(') 

7 

10 

30 

1 

18 

29 

85 

40 

52 

22 
16 



30 
94 

40 
141 



(') 



18 



Through- 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



C) 



(') 



C) 



(■) 



(') 



» Includes report of St. Patrick's Boys' Orphan Asylum and St. Vincent's Girls' Orphan -Asylum, 



GENERAL TABLES. 



87 



THE 


CARE OF CHILDREN 


: 1910. 






































CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 


CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

TEAR. 


CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING TEAR. 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 
TEAR. 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF TEAR. 




■3 

o 


s 

48 

45 

5 
89 

25 

.... 

34 
25 

(') 

17 
(■•) 

10 

(') 
42 

10 
(') 

12 

5 

160 

24 

60 

25 

105 
33 

72 

0) 
25 


■a 

i 

51 
46 
39 

20 
76 

55 

45 

41 

(') 

24 
V) 

9 

(') 

37 

21 
(') 

16 
15 

24 
22 

IS 

22 

67 

5f 
(■) 

34 
314 


Dependent. 


3 
o 

S 
o 


a 

3 

.a 




Total. 


Derived from— 




T3 

a . 

«a 

to a 

|1 

5'" 

75 

48 

44 
89 

46 
63 

89 

70 

26 
(') 

41 
(') 

3 

(') 
20 

31 

(') 

28 
20 

19 


1 

•a 

> 


a 

o 

24 
43 


"3 


•3 


1 


■rf 
O 


"3 

a 


•a 
a 

pt. 


i 

o 

33 

1 

17 
21 

3 

26 


■a 

a 


.2 

a 

Qi 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


P--S: 


Total 
Cinclud 

invested 
funds). 


Land, 
build - 
in?s, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


6 

3 

a 
1 

3 

1 
i-l 


99 

91 

44 
89 

45 

76 

89 
70 

41 
{') 

41 

25 

19 
(■) 
79 

31 
(') 

28 
20 

24 

■ 160 

46 

60 

43 

105 
55 

1?9 

56 
234 

59 
314 


11 
1 

2 
21 

3 


22 
15 

26 


J5,160 

16,015 

4,999 
6,500 

4,000 
7,229 

8,954 

13,520 

4,535 

19,297 

2,350 

800 
(') 
4,939 

23,000 

(') 

8,000 
3,500 

4,012 
12,445 

3,100 
22,305 

6,716 

11,849 
12,837 

< 24,349 

5,300 
20, 020 

6,117 
28,713 


$2,760 


S800 

16,016 

1,572 
3,000 

300 
812 

7,528 

12,294 

4,535 




11,600 


35,000 

17,501 

4,547 
15,000 

3,950 
7,525 

13,623 

13,520 

17,987 
(') 

5,640 

2,500 

800 

5,27| 

23,000 

(') 

10,000 
3,200 

3,974 
12,410 

4,800 
22,305 

7,109 

16,192 
13,716 

27,169 

5,300 
24,023 

12,814 
27,712 


$5,000 

16,326 

4,547 
7,000 

3,500 
5,844 

7,523 

10,520 

3,816 
(■) 

2,640 

2,500 

800 

5,271 

3,000 
(') 

9,000 
2,000 

3,731 
12,410 

4,800 
12,302 

7,109 

12, 192 
12,714 

26,897 

5,000 
24,023 

12,685 
26,712 








1 






2 

C) 
47 


47 


2 


10 


4 


6 


$1,175 

8,000 

450 
1,681 

6,100 

3,000 

14, 171 
3,000 

(') 

20,000 
(') 

1,000 
1,200 

243 

10,003 

4,000 
1,002 

272 

300 

129 
1,000 


$40,000 

52,750 
75,000 

26,000 
12,000 

63,750 

53,000 

22,200 

90,000 
5,000 
5,000 

150,000 

35,000 
(') 

35,000 
20,000 

11,700 

35,000 

12,000 

17,358 

40,000 

80,000 
26,500 

150,000 

22,000 
(>) 

0) 
100,000 


$30,000 

10,250 
75,000 

16,000 
12,000 

27,000 

53,000 

22,200 
(■) 

90,000 
5,000 
5,000 

150,000 

35,000 
(') 

35,000 
20,000 

8,000 

35,000 

12,000 

17,358 

40,000 

80,000 
26,500 

150,000 

20,000 
P) 

100,000 


2 






8415 


3,427 
3,500 

3,700 
6,002 

1,426 

1,226 


3 










3 
51 


3 
2 


3 


4 










5 


3 


10 












6 






3 


2 


1 


35 

9 


17 

8 


18 
1 


7 










5 


3 


2 


8 




' 15 












1 


















3 

(') 

13 
0) 


(') 

3 

(') 

C) 


(■) 

(') 

6 
(') 


(') 


(') 


2 






















1,800 
(') 

(') 

1,445 
8,756 

1,431 

5,630 

1,840 
1,592 

11,500 

10,890 

2,481 
10,053 


19,297 

350 

500 
(') 
2,763 

23,000 

(') 

8,000 
3,500 

1,614 

308 

3,000 

18,400 

155 

1,082 
5,008 

1,09- 

4,600 
450 

1,092 
8,.351 


1 


CO 


(■) 
16 

0) 

59 


(') 


(■) 


0) 


C) 


(■) 


ir- 


9 


7 


200 

(') 
2,176 


300 


2 
3 


(') 


(') 


0) 


(') 


0) 


(') 


(') 


(') 


4 












9 


4 


5 


2 
(') 

2 


(■) 


2 
0) 

2 


t 


(M 


0) 


(') 


(') 


(•) 


(■) 


(') 


(') 


(') 




























i 








5 

7 


(') 




(') 


(') 




m 








580 
2,590 

IOC 
2, 474 

931 

8,234 

900 

•11,757 

700 
8,427 

l,41.'i 
9,7CC 


373 
731 

093 
5,337 

247 

524 
549 




123 
27 
8 

26 

59 
55 

130 

36 
15f 

4S 
309 




2 30 
19 
5 
17 
46 




29 
29 
10 
59 

22 

2 

32 

19 
93 

26 
64 


29 
15 
10 
27 
22 

14 

53 
20 


14 

32 

2 

18 

19 
40 

6 
64 










19 


10 


9 






47 








< 
































( 




















2 

. . . . 


g 

23 
7f 

14 

5 












10 

1 


6 


4 

1 






1 


1 

4 


0) 


1 

0) 


1 












1 












4 




4 


1 















< Includes $9,767 board of academic pupils. 



^ Included in report of Mercy Home. 



88 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



CALIFORNIA— Continued. 



Los Angeles— Continued. 

Maud B. Booth Home 

1511 West Twenty-third St. 
Regini Coeli Orphan Asylum . . . 

GIO North Hill St. 
Victoria Home 

2414 Griflith Ave. 
Working Boys' Club 

2205 South San Pedro. 
Lttton: 

Golden Gate Orphanage 



Mission San Jose: 

St. Mary's Orphanage. 



Oakland: 

Children's Home 

393 Forty-fifth St. 
Fred Finch Orphanage 

3670 Peralta Ave. (Fruitvale). 
Juvenile Detention Home 

413 Nineteenth St. 
Smith 's Cottages 

Fourth and C^^ttage Aves. 
Pasadena: 

Pasadena Children's Training Society . . 

Wilson Ave. and Delmar St. 
Sacramento: 

Home of the Merciful Savior for Invalid 
Children. 

3410 J St. 
Sacramento Children's Home 

2330 Ninth St. 
Sacramento ProtcstantOrphan Asylum. 

Palmetto Heights (R. D. Box 24^). 
Stanford- Lathrop Memorial Home 

SOON St. 
San Anselmo: 

Presbyterian Orphanage and Farm 

Fairfax road. 
San Bernardino: 

Orphans' Home , 

246 Base Line. 
St. Catherine's Orphan Asylum 

512 E St. 
San Diego: 

Children's Home 

Sixteenth iind Ash Sts. 
San Francisco: 

Babies' Aid 

487 Twenty-ninth Ave. 
Bertha Juilly Ilome for Children 

Lomita Park. 
Bovs' and Girls' Home School 

460 Baker St. 
Infants' Shelter 

1025 Shotwell St. 
McKinley Orphanage 

3S41 Nineteenth St. 
Maria Kip Orphanage 

520 Lake St. 
Mount St. Joseph's Infant Orphan Asy- 
lum. 

Silver Ave. 
Mount St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum... 

N and Bay View Sts. 



Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum 

600 Devisadero St. 
San Francisco Nurserj' for Homeless 
Children. 

Lake St. and Fourteenth Ave. 
San Francisco Protestant Orphan 
Asylum. 
Haight St. 

Youth's Directory 

720 Church St. 
San Gabriel: 

San Gabriel Masonic Home 



San Jose: 

Home of Benevolence 

Martha and Eleventh Sts. 
Notre Dame Institute for Orphan Girls 

596 South Second. 



Supervised or conducted by — 



Volunteers of America 

Sisters of the Sacred Heart. . 

Children's Home Society of 

California. 
Private individual 



Salvation Army., 



Sisters of St. Dominic . 



Ladies' Relief Society of 

Oakland. 
Methodist Episcopal Church . 



County of Alameda. 
Pri vat 6 corporat ion . 



Private corporation. , 



Protestant Episcopal Dio- 
cese of Sacramento. 



Private corporation. . 
Private corporation . 



Roman Catholic Diocese of 
Sacramento. 



Presbyterian Church 

County of San Bernardino. 



Sisters of the Immaculate 
Heart of Marj'. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society. 

Private corporation 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 

Sisters of Charity (St. Vin- 
cent de Paul). 

Sisters of Charity (St. Vin- 
cent de Paul). 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan 

Asylum and Home Society 

Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Masonic Grand Lodge of 
California. 



Private corporation 

Sisters of Notre Dame. 



Class of children received. 



Dependent children 

Orphan and abandoned 

girls. 
Homeless, neglected, and 

dependent children. 
Wayward, homeless, and 

friendless boys over 16. 

Orphan, dependent, delin- 
quent, and waj'ward chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected girls , and boarders. 

Dependent, delinquent, and 
homeless children. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Children awaiting action of 
court. 

Homeless girls under 14 



Orphan and deserted chil- 
dren. 



Sick and incurable children 



Orphan and abandoned chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, abandoned, and 
delinquent children. 

Abandoned and homeless 
girls. 



Orphan, abandoned, 
homeless children. 



and 



Orphan, abandoned, and 

other homeless children. 

Orphan girls , 



Needy children.. 



Foundlings and abandoned 
children. 

Orphan children and found- 
lings. 

Dependent and delinquent 
boys. 

Working mothers' children.. 

Orphan and abandoned chil- 
dren. 

Orphan.homeless, and needy 
girls. 

Orphan, abandoned, and 
dependent children. 

Orphan, abandoned, and 
dependent girls, and 
boarders. 

Jewish orphan and aban- 
doned children. 

Orphan, abandoned, and 
homeless children. 



Orphan children 

Homeless boys 

Orphan children of Masons.. 



Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected children. 
Orphan girls 



1906 
1905 
1S91 

1906 

1894 

1894 

1872 
1891 
1909 
1901 

1902 

1907 

1890 
1867 
1900 

1895 

1892 
1885 

1887 

1868 
1898 
1874 
1871 
1897 
1890 
1852 

1852 

1871 
1892 



1898 

1877 
1893 



Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 5 

(0 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 



Yes. 
No. 



0) 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



83 

59 

262 

100 

101 



49 

63 

435 

4 



19 

C) 

58 
16 

30 

30 
13 

38 

46 
33 

163 
78 
17 
30 

250 

148 

42 
24 

33 

318 



Through- 



413 



0) 



0) 



1 Not reported. 

3 Included in report of Children's Home Society of California. 

3 Includes 25 boarders. 



* Included in report of Old Ladies' Home. 
6 Also Chinese. 

* Includes IS boarders. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



89 



CARE OP CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTIOK AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



67 

136 

14 

as 

38 

19 

(') 
115 
(') 

110 

28 
69 



166 
83 

127 

85 

45 

78 
60 






Dependent. 



45 

75 

2 

50 
153 

6134 

13 
46 



(■) 



C) 



29 



21 



(') 



(') 



73 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIE.S 

DURING 

YEAR. 



259 



83 



(') 



C) 



(') 



132 



(') 



(') 



(') 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAH. 



(') 



(■) 



39 

10 

(') 
35 
9 



16 
3 

29 

41 
18 

192 
37 
39 
25 

235 



(■) 



18 



37 



RECEIPT.S DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



38,585 

(') 

2,400 
62,207 

16,962 

(•) 
14,751 
13,000 
25,838 

7,650 

6,865 

(') 
28,232 
5,020 

12, 484 

2,928 
15,066 

12,146 

4,491 
3,442 
35,565 
7,919 
6,738 
13, 160: 
39,634 

9 42,9651 

10 74,763 
15,892 

19, igej 

20,000 

(1!) 

9,475 
6,415 



Derived from — 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



$1,629 
(') 
900 

20,126 

10, 444 

(') 

6,164 
13,000 



650 

860 

(') 
12,336 



2,363 
4,214 

3,097 

3,263 
3,343 
9,861 



3,681 
3,650 
32, 440 

30,867 

8,690 
4,425 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 



$5,579 
(') 

(') 
800 

15,120 

664 

(<) 
800 



4,000 
3,972 



4,720 



101 

746 

1,992 



Other 
sources 



$2,695 

(') 
(') 
700 



5,552 



046 

(') 

5,778 

2,620 

1,810 

448 
404 

2,860 

620 



90 
4,814 
1,242 
661 
2,345 
3,047 

7,972 

26,564 
10, 159 

8,14: 

(') 
(12) 

970 
250 



6, 

5,038 

1,915 

1,885 

1,130 

3,934 



1,308 
3,342 

(') 



864 
U15 



$311 

(') 



16,961 

1,990 

(') 
2,235 



25,838 

3,000 

1,381 

(■) 

5,398 

2,400 

2,539 

16 
9,702 

4,19' 

708 



13, 898 
1,639 
481 
5,280 
3,011 

192 

39,519, 



PAYMENTS DDBINO 
YEAR. 



Total. 



(') 



2,511 
6,000 



$8,491 
(') 
(') 
2,400 

52,207 

16,952 

(*) 
14, 811 
13,000 

(■) 

9,000 

5,981 

(') 
20,945 
6,406 

12,345 

2,600 
14,726 

9,032 

4,461 
3,442 
35,343 
12,334 
6,048 
10,536 
40, 936 

39,081 

54,676 
15,971 

25,968 

19, 500 

13,209 

(') 
9,069 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$6,748 
(') 

m 

2,400 
39, 776 

14,026 

(<) 
14,311 
12,500 
21,629 

8,400 

5,569 

(') 
20,215 
6,406 

11,443 

2,600 
13,696 

8,637 

4,461 
3,442 
35,343 
12,334 
4,849 
13, 706 
35,919 

39,081 

42,950 
12,471 

22, 108 

19,600 

13,209 

8,449 
7,212 



$1,743 
(') 



12, 431 

2,926 

(<) 
500 
500 

(') 

600 
412 

(') 
730 



1,030 
395 



199 
2,830 

5, or 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



11,626 
3,500 

3,860 



$16,000 

(') 

m 



(<) 

90,000 



200,000 

20,000 

10,000 

(') 

74,000 

85,500 

75,000 

6,000 
(') 

38,500 
30,000 



(') 
1,857 



107,623 

31,610 

31,580 

128,000 

263,000 

73,000 

11 179, 752 
50,000 

(■) 

(') 

65,000 

40,445 
150,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$16,000 
(') 



75,000 



15,000 



(') 
40,000 



(') 

20,000 

10,000 

C) 

55,000 
10,500 

75,000 

6,000 
(') 

30,000 

30,000 



13 
14 
16 
16 



160,000 
25,000 
19,888 
26,000 

203,000 

69,000 

73,000 
60,000 

C) 

(') 

05, 000 

10,945 
50,000 



19 
20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 

26 
27 



29 
30 



32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 



40 
41 

42 

43 

44 

45 
48 



' Records destroyed. 

'After Oct. 9, 1910. Previous records destroyed. 

• Exclusive of $83,681.25 from insurance, call subscriptions, etc., after fire. 



1" Includes report of Home for Aged and Infirm Israelites. 

11 Includes invested funds of Home for Aged and Infirm Israelites. 

12 Included in report of Decoto Masonic Home, 



90 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



CALIFORNIA— Continued. 

San Lorenzo; 

Union Orphanage 



Class of children received. 



S.AN Mateo: 

A rmitage Orphanage 

504 Kearney St., San Francisco 
(office). 
San Rafael: 

St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

St. Vincent P. O. 
Santa Barbara: 

St. Vincent's Institute 

De La Vina St. 
Santa Cruz: 

Holv Cross Convent Orphan Asylum. . 
'Mission Hill. 
SODTH Pasadena: 

Home for Friendless Children 

Mission St. and Orange Grove Ave. 
Stockton: 

Children's Home 

1308 Lafayette St. 
Ukuh: 

Albertinum Orphanage 



Vallejo: 

Good Templars' Home for Orphans . 

Watsonville: 

St. Francis' Orphanage 



COLORADO. 
Denver: 

Clifton Training School for Girls 

Eighth and Oneida Sts. (Montclair 
P.O.). 
Colorado Children's Home 

3545 Raleigh St. 
Colorado Christian Home 

4325 West Twenty-ninth Ave. 
Denver Orphans' Home 

Colfax Ave. and Albion St. 
Detention Home 

2844 Downing St. 
E. M. Byer's Home for Boys 

64 West Aiameda Ave. 
Home League Orphanage 

5050 Newton St. 
Lenox Home for Children 

•2949 West Thirty-seventh Ave. 
Regina Coeli Orphanage 

4S'25 Boulevard F. 
St. Clara's Orphanage 

3S01 West Twenty-ninth Ave. 
St. Vincent's Home 

Lowell Boulevard (Highlands Sta.). 
State Home for Children 

2305 South Washington St. 
Pueblo: 

McClelland Orphanage 

106 Lake Ave. 
Sacred Heart Orphanage 

Sprague Ave. 

CONNECTICUT. 

Bridgeport: 

Bridgeport Protestant Orphan Asylum. 
Ellsworth St. and Fairfield Ave. 
Cromwell: 

Swedish Christian Orphanage 



State Building Trades Coun- 
cU. 

Episcopal Church 



Brothers of the Christian 
Schools. 



Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Charity 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society 

Private corporation , 

Dominican Sisters 

Good Templars of California, 
Franciscan Fathers 



City Temple Institutional 
Society. 

Children's Home Society of 
Colorado. 

National Benevolent Associ- 
ation of Christian Church. 

Private corporal ion 



City and County of Denver . 

Private corporation 

Home League of America . . 

City Temple Institutional 

Society. 
Missionary Sisters of the 

Sacred Heart. 
Franciscan Sisters 



Sisters of Charity. 
State of Colorado. , 



Associated Charities of 

Pueblo. 
Franciscan Sisters , 



Private corporation. 



Danburv: 

Children's H ome 

57 Toron Hill Ave. 
East Whs'dsor; 

Hartford County Temporary Home 

Gardnei St. 
Haddam: 

Middlesex County Temporary Home. . 
Main. 
Hartford: 

Hartforrl (Orphan Asylum 

171 Putnam St. 

St. James' Orphan Asvlum 

91 Church St. 

Watkinson Juvenile Asvlum 

1100 Albany Ave. (P. O. Bo.x 335). 



Eastern Swedish Mission 
Association. 



Private corporation. . 
County of Hartford... 
County of Middlesex. 



Private corporation. 

Sisters of Mercy 

Private corporation. 



Orphan and abandoned 
children. 



Orphan, destitute, 
abandoned boys. 



and 



Orphan, dependent, and 
abandoned boys under 14. 

Orphan and abandoned 
children. 

Orphan and dependent girls, 
and boarders. 

Orphan and other needy 
children. 

Orphan or abandoned chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and dependent 
boys from 3 to 10. 

Orphan and abandoned 
children, and boarders. 

Orphan, abandoned, and 
neglected boys. 



Dependent and homeless 
girb. 

Homeless and dependent 

children. 
Orphan children 



Needy children 

Children awaiting action of 

court. 
Orphan boys 



Orphans, and children of 

widowed working parents. 

Dependent children 



Orphan and homeless girls. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and othei homeless 
boys. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 



Destitute children . 
Orphan children . . . 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Waifs, orphan and depend- 
ent children. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren from 4 to 11. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Indigent and dependent 
children. 

Orphan, destitute, and neg- 
lected children. 

Homeless boys over 12 



1909 
1886 

1855 
1858 
1862 
1888 
1885 
1904 
1869 
1869 

1892 

1S92 
1906 
1877 
1903 
1892 
1896 
1892 
1904 
1891 
1882 
1896 

1893 
1903 

1869 



1883 

1829 
1852 
1862 






Yes. 

0) 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

0) 
No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 



(') 



(') 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



0) 



13 



212 

21 
53 
96 

(') 
41 
52 

100 

104 

42 

34 

203 

485 

22 

67 

65 

30 

184 

225 

153 

(') 
110 

10 
12 
8 
66 
27 
61 

21 



Through - 



C) 



C) 



(') 



(') 



(■) 



(') 



« 



« 



{') 



CO 



(') 



(') 



(■) 



1 Not reported. 



* Includes 5 boarders. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



91 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 




i 


a 

19 

(') 

514 

75 
(') 
110 

75 
265 

5 

7 
C) 
(■) 

26 
(') 

53 

73 
225 
148 

(') 
86 

30 

49 

(') 

65 

44 

73 

(') 

31 


<D 

a 
13 

105 

84 

50 

(') 

38 

07 

5 

14 

C) 

(') 

C) 
20 
106 
155 

95 

(') 
89 

23 

18 

(') 

33 

13 

47 
(') 


Dependent. 


'3d 

o 

o 


a 



SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DURING YEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from— 




X 


t3 

a . 

s| 

»> n 

aj 


32 
(') 

314 
72 
51 

125 
24 
83 

103 

161 


V 

X3 

■i 
> 

a 


O 


3 


1 


9 

a 


3 

o 


a 


"cS 

a 

<B 


"a 
o 

(') 
(') 

231 
15 
49 
76 

(') 

(') 
37 
83 

0) 


"3 

a 

(') 
(■) 

231 

45 

(') 

(■) 
14 
83 


6 
a 

a 
(') 

15 
49 
31 

(') 

23 

(■) 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


I!are of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For ^o"' 
„,„ perma- 

S^ Vm- 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 

funds). 


Land, 
bmld- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 
1 

3 
1 


32 
(') 

514 
105 

84 
125 

24 
110 
113 
265 

07 

10 
21 
113 

(') 
26 
42 
73 
106 
228 
225 
243 

(') 
175 

53 
67 
12 

104 
57 

120 

31 


$5,000 
(') 

66,960 
13,971 
11,378 
10,794 
2,643 
10,972 
13,675 
30,590 

11,579 

3,065 
2,835 
18,589 
5,600 
4,167 
5,307 
9,244 
3,200 
14,320 
14,132 
66,254 

(') 
(') 

6,448 

6,641 

1,632 

41,706 

12,974 

26,950 
(■) 
21,796 

' Boarde 


845, 120 
4,628 
7,001 
6,896 

9,648 
7,538 
15, 496 

3,000 
5,000 

66,254 

(■) 
(') 

(') 

41,483 
12,974 

(') 


$5,000 
(') 

189 

4,654 

1,837 

1,188 

326 

238 

642 

1,668 

5,523 

2.621 
2,010 
5,774 






$8,000 
(') 

64,766 
13,822 
11,280 
10,429 
3,804 
10,972 
14,479 
30,832 

12,019 

3,074 
2,936 
18,114 
5,600 
3,981 
6,063 
9,244 
6,644 
12,211 
14,058 
66,254 

0) 

(') 

8,296 

6,077 

1,691 

41,262 

12,974 

26,950 
(') 
22,899 


$6,000 
(■) 

64,766 
11,979 
8,159 
10,429 
3,804 
8,972 
13,219 
30,832 

8,122 

3,074 
2,786 
16,758 
5,600 
3,981 
6,063 
8,303 
5,644 
11,207 
14,058 
41,254 

(') 
(') 

8,248 

6,077 

1,691 

17,689 

10,520 

26,95C 
(■) 

22,89£ 


$2,000 
(') 

1,843 
3,121 

2,000 
1,260 

3,897 

150 
1,356 

941 
1,000 
1,004 

25,000 

(') 

(') 

48 

23,573 
2,454 

(') 


$2,000 
C) 

200,000 

16,000 
50,000 
30,000 
23,000 
20,000 
62,667 
155,000 

60,000 

3,000 
21,000 
73,500 
22,000 
18,000 
10,000 
40,000 
17,000 
225,000 
250,000 
137,133 

(') 
(') 

(') 
8,000 
18,500 
50,000 
25,000 
500,000 

345,000 


$2,000 

(') 

200,000 
16,000 
50,000 
30,000 
3,000 
20,000 
62, 667 

150,000 

60,000 

3,000 
21,000 
40,000 
22,000 
18,000 
10,000 
40,000 
17,000 
225,000 
250,000 
137,133 

(') 
(') 

70,500 

8,000 

10,000 

50,000 

25, OOC 

100, OOC 
(') 
75, OOC 


47 


(') 


(■) 

185 

33 

2 33 


(■) 


15 


(■) 

53 


53 




27 


(') 




$5,168 
1,013 
2,012 
2,710 

1,000 
3,265 
3,378 

6,056 

230 

597 

5,748 


(') 

316,483 
3,676 

528 

2,317 

86 

2,230 

10,048 

214 

228 
4,067 

600 
1,639 

453 

7,982 


48 

49 

50 












5 
2 


2 


5 


51 












52 
















£3 




27 

3 10 

77 

67 

2 

9 

(■) 

(') 






3 
1 


3 

0) 


1 


14 
16 
26 


14 

7 
26 


9 


64 






S£ 




27 


56 

1 


7 
12 

(') 






1 


18 


8 


10 


42 


20 


22 


2 


22 
176 
(') 
16 

(') 
35 


13 

98 
(') 

16 
(') 

20 


9 

78 
(>) 

(') 
15 


3 


















4 


(') 
















5 


(■) 
42 
59 
96 

181 

130 

(') 

(') 
172 

39 

66 

4 




8 
(') 


8 
(') 




6 


6 




500 
3,390 
2,276 
2,500 
8,074 
2,550 


2,028 
1,464 
6,968 
700 
6,246 
3,600 


6 






7 


2 
(') 

(') 
3 


14 
10 
47 
93 
(') 

(') 






38 


25 


13 


8 






9 


















39 

203 

42 

(') 
66 

20 
7 
5 

48 
{') 
27 


16 

203 

28 

(') 
21 

12 
4 
1 
4 
2 

30 

27 


23 

14 

(') 
45 

8 
3 
4 
3 

18 
(■) 


10 


















U 


(■) 




385 
(■) 


205 


180 
(') 


172 
0) 


84 
(') 


88 
(') 


12 


(') 

(') 

4,294 
172 


(') 
C) 

(') 

1,431 

1,42C 


(') 
(') 

(') 
916 
40 
223 


13 
14 


14 
1 
8 
104 
57 
41 

0) 
11 






i 

12 
3 


9 
2 


3 

1 


6 
3 


6 
3 




1 






2 






3 












120 

32 

1 
(') 


71 

25 

1 
(') 


49 
7 

(') 


4 










70 

1 
0) 


40 

1 
(') 


30 






5 


78 

C) 

20 


(') 






850 


4, 900 

(■> 

1,10- 


21,200 

(') 
20.692 


6 


(') 


(■) 


7 
8 


















rs. 









92 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



CONNECTICUT— Continued. 

Litchfield: 

Connecticut George Junior Republic. 

Motn«T Carmel: 

Mount Carniel Children's Home 



New Britain; 

Polish Orphanage 

Gold St. 
The Children's Home 

Rocklitle Heights. 
New Haven; 

New Haven Orphan Asylum 

610 Elm St. 

St. Francis Orphan Asylum 

Whitney Ave. and Highland St. 
Newington; 

Virginia T. Smith Home for Crippled 
and Incurable Children. 
Cedar St. 

NORWALK; 

Fairfield County Temporary Home — 

Westport Ave. 
Norwich; 

New London Countv Temporary Home 

Smith Ave. 
Rock Nook Children's Home 



Orange: 

New Haven Countv Temporary Home. 
Campbell A ve. ( West Haven P.O.). 
Putnam: 

Windham County Temporary Home- . . 
Bo.x 58. 
Stamford; 

Children's Home 

938 East Main St. 
Vernon: 

ToUand Coimty Temporary Home 

Rockville, R. D. 1. 
WrasTEn; 

WUliam L. Gilbert Home 

Williams Ave. 

DELAWARE. 
Clayton: 

St. Joseph's Industrial School tor Col- 
ored Boys. 
Delaw.are City: 

St. James' Protectory 

Wilmington: 

Delaware Orphans' Home and Indus- 
trial School. 
P. O. Box 181. 
Home for Friendless and Destitute 
Children. 

St. Peter's Female Orphan Asylum 

600 West St. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Wa.shington: 

Bell Home 

.\nacostia (Station H). 
Children's Temporary Home 

607 Howard Place NW. 
German Orphan .\sylum 

Anacostia. 
Home for Friendless Girls 

2533 Si.xth St.NW. 
Industrial Home School 

2525 WL=:consin .\.ve. NW. 
Industrial Home School for Colored 
Children. 

Blue Plains. 
St. -\nn's Infant .\sylum 

2300 K St.NW. 
St. John's Orphanage 

1922 F St. NW. 
St. Joseph 's Male Orphan Asylum 

924 H St. NW. 
St. Rose's Industrial School 

California Ave. and Phelps Place, 
NW. 
St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

Edgewood. 

1 Not reported. 



Supervised or conducted by — 



Connecticut George Junior 
Republic Association. 

Private corporation 



Bernardino Sisters of St. 

Francis of Assisi. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Sisters of Mercy 



Cormecticut Children's Aid 
Society. 



County of Fairfield., 



Coimty of New London. 
United Workers 



County of New Haven. 
County of Windham . - . 

Private corporation 

County of ToUand 

Private corporation 



Class of children received. 



Sisters of St. Francis. 

Sisters of St. Francis . 
Private corporation . . 



Private organization.. 
Sist«rs of Charity 



Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Private organization 



Private corporation . 



Woman's Union Christian 

.-Vssociation. 
District of Columbia 



District of Columbia. 



Sisters of Charity. 



Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Sisters of the Holy Cross 



Sisters of Charity. 
Sisters of Charity.. 



Wayward boys.. 



Homeless children from 3 
to 12. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 
Destitute children 



Orphan, neglected, and des- 
titute children. 

Orphan, homeless, and des- 
titute children. 

Mentally bright but crip- 
pled and ailing children. 



Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Temporarily homeless chil- 
dren. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 



Neglected children 

Orphan and homeless boys. . 



Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Homeless children 



Orphan and homeless boys. 



Orphan and destitute boys. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Friendless and destitute 

children, and boarders. 
Orphan girls 



and 



Foundlings, orphan 

homeless children. 
Delinquent, indigent, and 

neglected children. 
Dependent children from 3 

to 12. 
Orphan, indigent, and im- 

protected girls, 5 and over. 
Dependent and delinquent 

children. 
Destituteand wayward boys 



Orphan children and found- 
lings. 

Orphan, homeless, and des- 
titute children. 

Orphan boys 



Orphan and homeless girls 
from 14 to 18. 

Orphan girls from 4 to 14 



1904 

1896 

1904 
1903 

1833 
1852 



1884 

1884 
1879 

1884 

1883 

1895 

1883 

1889 



1879 
1898 

1864 
1829 



1887 
1861 
1907 

1860 
1870 
1854 
1868 

1814 



Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
(■') 

No. 
No. 



No. 

(=) 
No. 

(') 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 



CHILDREN received FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



12 
4 

32 

14 

50 
128 



29 
13 

102 

30 

7 

9 

73 



(■) 

16 
i 

0) 

20 
7. 
6 



20 

8. 
2 . 



2 Included in report of Connecticut Children's Aid Society, Hartford. 



32 

42 

s Colored only. 



Through— 



S^ 



10 



GENERAL TABLES. 



93 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDBEN IN THE IKSTITVTION AT 
CLOSE or TEAH. 


CmiDREN 

OUTSIDE BUT 


CHTT.DREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDEEN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DUBINQ 
YEAR. 


VALtTE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF TEi.S.. 




3 

o 


6 

s 


a 

1^ 


Dependent. 


o 

e. 

o 

1 


1 

cr 

a 

O 


SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DURING TEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from — 


^ 

^ 


■a 
a . 
""a 
co.g 

|1 
fto 

O 


1 

9 

•a 

II 

"3 
> 


.CI 
o 

< 




"3 


"3 

a 
S 


i 

o 


a 


S 


"3 
O 

(') 

2 

6 
13 

27 
151 

10 

(') 

25 

14 

78 
6 
1 
6 
9 

12 

10 

1 

25 
18 

2 
(') 
13 
6 
67 
73 

65 
18 
28 
30 

43 


"3 

a 
(■) 

2 

4 
11 

14 
93 

4 

(') 

17 
0) 

(') 

3 

1 

4 

7 

12 
10 

17 

(') 
7 

44 
73 

37 

8 
28 


1 

2 
2 

13 

58 

6 

0) 

8 
(') 

(') 

3 

2 
2 

1 

8 
18 

2 

(') 



6 

23 

28 
10 

30 

43 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 

. "^s ^ 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 
a 
o 

3 

a 


2S 

27 

24 

1 

79 

126 
365 

108 

(') 

91 

2l' 

249 
08 
18 
50 

252 

80 

70 
50 

70 
39 

60 
66 
44 
20 
137 
48 

87 
87 
98 
85 

130 


28 

15 

IS 
52 

69 
232 

49 

(') 

54 
13 

151 
39 
18 
33 

145 

80 

70 
29 

(') 

25 
31 
26 

85 
48 

55 
45 
98 












28 


$8,050 

9,045 

8,887 
12,012 

27,839 
57,781 

(') 

(') 

12,704 
4,304 

35,987 
7,125 
4,226 
5,592 

41,497 

17,850 

(■) 
6,189 

16,484 
(') 

11,400 
(') 

6,310 

1,150 

26,500 

16,475 

9,694 
4,637 
7,065 
18,222 

13, 103 




$4,300 
7,433 


$1,470 
1,294 

2,214 
27,673 

m 


$3,750 

142 

7,593 
281 

23,002 
22,099 

m 
(') 


$8,000 

7,184 

8,738 
11,673 

23,361 
47,871 

(') 

12,704 
4,318 

35,987 
8,302 
4,226 
3,592 

43,097 

17,000 

2,400 
6,189 

14,071 
(') 

3,593 

P) 

6,860 

1,150 
26,500 
10, 475 

9,568 
5,413 
6,865 
18, 918 

13, 158 


$7,000 

4,813 

8,640 
6,140 

20,494 
38,349 

(^) 

(') 

12,704 
4,318 

35, 987 
8,302 
4,226 
5,292 

41,497 

13,000 

2,000 
6,189 

9,780 
(') 

3,593 

(=■) 

6,860 

1,150 
25,000 
15,975 

9,368 
5,413 
6,865 
18,918 

13, 158 


$1,000 

2,371 

98 
5,533 

2,867 
9,522 

C) 
(■) 

300 
1,600 

2,000 
400 

4,291 

1,500 
500 


$20,000 

13,100 

20,000 
23,000 

491,323 
565,000 

(.') 

(■) 

20,000 
43,279 

200,000 
35,000 
54,439 
20,lM.l 

730,000 

108,000 

40,000 
10,500 

154,100 
0) 

03,000 

C) 

(') 
250 
342,550 
147,000 

100,000 

119,337 

75,000 

225,000 

(') 


$15,000 

12,000 

20,000 
10,000 

75,000 
500,00(1 

(') 

20,000 
10,000 

200,000 

35,000 

15,000 

20,000 

80,000 

100,000 

40,000 
8,000 

49,100 
(') 

63,000 

(•) 

(') 
250 
342,550 
147,000 

100,000 
80,000 
75,000 

225,000 

150,000 


9 


12 

6 

27 

57 
133 

59 

(') 

37 
8 

98 

29 

17 
107 

21 

(■) 
3D 

35 
25 
18 
20 
52 


27 

16 
67 

73 
265 

(') 
17 








1 




1 








10 


98 


8 
12 

53 
100 

10 

(') 

74 
21 

235 
68 
12 
40 

252 

14 
10 












11 






5 
3! 


2 
16 


3 
15 


6 

12 
81 

3 


4 

6 
25 

1 


2 

6 
56 

2 


$2,500 
2,500 

(') 

(') 
12, 704 

35,987 


11,731 

123 
5,509 

m 
(') 


12 






13 






14 












15 


(') 


(■) 








16 


136 


58 


78 


48 


23 


25 


17 






548 


1,115 


2,641 


18 


4 


10 






292 
77 


151 
40 


141 
37 


292 
28 


151 
15 


141 
13 


19 








7,065 
708 


60 

1,930 

221 

17,256 

8,400 

200 
250 

13,174 
(') 

400 
(?) 
5,330 

2,500 
365 

2,894 
1,693 
4,521 
13,904 

(') 


20 


6 
10 








5,371 


1,588 


21 






14 
116 


7 
55 


7 
61 


14 

60 


7 
26 


7 
34 


?2 








24,241 

450 
150 

1,987 


23 


65 

60 
50 


1 






(') 

PJ 

23,000 
16, 110 

5,400 


9,000 

475 
5,939 

1,323 
(') 

1,000 


1 


















, 






2 
80 


2 
53 


27 


2 
21 


2 
12 


9 


3 




(') 






4 


39 
60 








5 










5 

(') 

13 

2 

1^ 


2 

(■) 

8 

11 


3 
(0 
5 
2 
3 








1 




56 






0) 

5 
2 
14 


2 
11 


(') 
3 
2 
3 


2 


44 
14 
88 








545 
800 


435 

350 

1,000 


3 


1 
4 


6 

37 

5 






4 




11 
39 


5 
6 


32 
42 

85 
130 


87 
87 
98 
85 

130 


75 


49 


26 


17 


8 


9 


500 
2,944 


900 

2,544 

258 

(') 


7 










8 






















9 






















400 


2,000 
0) 


10 
















4 




* 


11 










i 











1 Exclusive of $33,000 for new building. 



' Included in report of Board of Children's Guardians. 



94 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE' 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— Continued. 



Washington— Continued. 

Washington Cit v Orptian .\syluin. , 

1739 Fourteenth St. NW. 
Washington Home for Foundlings. . 

1715 Fifteenth St. NW. 
Working Bovs' Home 

230CSt.'NW. 



FLORIDA. 
Aecadu: 

Florida Baptist Orphanage 

Belleview: 

Belleview Orphan's Home 

J-VCKSON\aLLE: 

Orphans' and Industrial Home '. . 
1628 Franklin St. 

St. Mary's Home 

427 Ocean St. 
Orange Hill: 

Nettie's Colored Orphans' Home. 
Chipley, R. D. 3. 
Pensacola: 

Pearl Eagan Home 

70S East Jordan St. 
Tampa: 

Children's Home 

North Florida Ave. 



GEORGIA. 
Atlanta: 

Carrie Steele Orphanage.. 
901 East Fair St. 



Hebrew Orphans' Home 

478 Washington St. 
Leonard Street Orphans' Home. 

39 Leonard St. 
Southeastern Orphanage 



Supervised or conducted by- 



AUGnsTA: 

Augusta Orphan Asylum 

Railroad .\ve. and Harper St. 

Shiloh Indust rial Orphanage 

Carnes Road (Harrisonville). 
Columbus; 

Girls' Orphan Home 

Fourth Ave. and Fifteenth St. 
Covington: 

Reed Home and Industrial School- ... 
Decatur: 

North Georgia Conference Orphans' 
Home. 
Hapeville: 

Georgia Baptist Orphans' Home 



Or- 



Macon: 

Appleton Church Home 

649 College St. 
Georgia C^olored Industrial and 
phans' Home. 

Hephzibah Orphanage 

South Georgia Conference Orphans 
Home. 
121 Pierce St. 
MEANS^^LLE: 

Bethlehem Home 

Route 1. 
St. Simons Mills: 

Anson Dodge Home 



Savannah: 

Bethesda Orphans' Home 

R.D.I. 
Episcopal Orphans' Home 

309 Liberty St., west. 
St. Mar5''s Home 

Thirtj'-second and Habersham Sts. 
Savarmah Female Orphan Asylum 

425 West Oglethorpe Ave. 
Thomas\ille: 

Vashti Industrial School 

East Clay St. 

Washington: 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 



Private corporation , 
Private corporation . 



Working Boys' Home and 
Children's Aid -Association 



Baptistchurches of Florida. . 

Woman'sMissionary Society. 

Orphans' and Industrial 

Home -Association. 
Sisters of St. Joseph 



Private organization . 
Private corporation , . 
Private corporation . . 



Private corporation . 



Independent Order of B'nai 

B'rith. 
Private corporation 



National Benevolent -Asso- 
ciation of Christian Church, 



Privat e corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Ladies' Benevolent Society. 



Private corporation . 



Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

Private corporation 



Private corporation 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 



Private organization . 



Private organization (Epis- 
copal). 



Union Society 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

Sisters of Mercy 

Private corporation 



Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, M. E. Church, 
South. 

Sisters of St. Joseph 



Class of children received. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Foundlings and boarders 

Working and destitute boys. 



Orphan children from 3 to 10. 
Orphan children 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 
Orphan girls 



I Not reported. 



! Colored 



Foundlings and orphan chil- 
dren. 

Indigent orphan children. . 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 



Foimdlings and crippled, 
delinquent, and homeless 
children. 

Orphan children 

Orphan and homeless girls. . 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children 

Orphan children 

Orphan and destitute girls. . 

Destitute children 

Destitute children 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan girls from 2^ to 10 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren from 4 to 14. 

Needj' children 

Indigent orphan children. . . 

Dependent or friendless chil- 
dren. 

Destitute boys 

Needy boys 

Orphan and de^titu te girls.. . 

Orphan girls under 14 

Orphan and destitute girls. . 

Homeless girls 

Orphan boys 

only. 



1812 
1870 
1885 

1904 
1901 
1894 
1S86 

1S94 

1893 

1898 

1890 

1889 
1890 
1904 

1852 
1899 

1840 

1884 
1869 



1870 
1899 



1900 
1872 



1894 

1740 
1854 
1876 
1801 

1903 



No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

i-) 

C-) 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
C-) 

(■) 

C-) 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 



(>) 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



60 



(■) 

6 
80 



5 
128 



28 
17 
39. 

4 
1 



(') 



12 
11 
5 

7. 
5 



25 20 

5 
52 



1876 No 6 18 18 

» Temporarily closed in 1910. 



Through- 



(') 



1~ J.S 



(■) 



(') 



(') 



C3^ 

— 1 CI 



(') 



(■) 



(') 



19 
3 
(') 
(') 



GENERAL TABLES. 



95 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Dependent. 






CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BOX 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



(') 



(') 



(') 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURINQ 

YEAR. 



(') 



(■) 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR 



40 
2 
24 

(■) 



(') 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



S16,520 
7,807 
6,030 

6,151 
900 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



$5,400 
(■) 



(') 



Dona- 
tions. 



$2S' 
678 
(') 

6,151 
(') 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



Otlier 
sources 



$1,858 
1,569 
(') 



814,375 
160 



C) 



(') 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 



820, 976 
8,287 
6,355 

4,791 
900 



$15,976 
8,287 



4,791 
900 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses 



For 
perma- 

nent 

im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$5,000 



(■) 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



$439,625 
144,000 
30,000 

37,533 
1,000 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$191,5.?S 
140,000 
(') 

37,533 
1,000 



94 
63 
30 

89 
59 

(■) 

38 
(') 

206 

39 

115 

60 
135 



(■) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(■) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



0) 



(') 



16 
5 

7 



(') 



(■) 



0) 



0) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



18 

10 



(') 



26 



7 
10 



(') 



." (') (•) 
< Exclusive of donations other than cash. 



C) 
(') 

1,603 
4,565 



(■) 

19,000 

4,387 

<2,250 

21,03(i 
3,026 

(') 

(') 
30,950 

28,000 

2,693 

7,269 

7,856 
11,000 

7,000 
3,200 

10,312 
5,073 

11,877 
6,002 

10.000 
(') 



90 
2,400 



(') 
(') 

1,309 
1,288 

(■) 

18,000 

2,930 

■'1,950 



(') 



204 
877 



(') 



751 
300 



1,000 

706 



(■) 



2,000 

600 

1,1 

1,1 



..3,000 
(■) 

800 
30,500 

28,000 

293 

6 6,569 

(') 
11,000 

4,000 

200 

312 

499 

3,285 

920 

3,000 



(') 
(') 



21,036 
26 

(') 

(') 
450 



2,400 



(') 



(') 



570 



3,000 

3,000 

8,000 
4,574 
6,942 
4,002 

7,000 



180 
1,662 
4,408 

3,120 

20,000 
4,925 
(') 

13,358 
(') 

(') 

1,200 
23,528 

28,000 

2,693 

'7,219 

7,856 
11,000 

7,500 
2,500 

10,000 

(') 
12,247 

6.363 

10,000 



0) 



(■) 

ISO 
1,662 
3,722 

3,020 

18,000 
4,815 
(') 

13,358 
1,000 

(') 

1,200 
IS, 127 

28,000 

2,693 

7,219 

6,929 
8,000 

6,500 
2,500 

10,000 
4,413 

12,247 
6,363 

9,500 



C) 



686 

100 

2,000 
110 
(') 



(■) 
(') 



5,401 



927 
3,000 



1,000 



0) 



(') (') (') (1) 20,000 (>) 

s Includes $3,583, value of goods. 



(') 
2,035 
4,750 

16,000 

(') 

120,000 
7,000 
5,000 

241,004 
9,000 

(') 

6,975 
136,000 

200,000 

70,538 

17,200 

16,000 
100,000 

8,000 

40,000 

(') 
(') 
125,000 
95.000 

30,000 
0) 



(') 

2,035 
4,750 

16,000 

(') 

100,000 
7,000 
5,000 

105,092 
9,000 

(') 

6,975 
130,000 

200,000 

35,000 

17,200 

16,000 
100,000 

8,000 



150,000 
(') 
50,000 
35,000 

30,000 



96 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table 1 INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



IDAHO. 

Boise: 

Receiving Home 

740 Wannspring Ave. 
LEmsTON: 

Receiving Home lor Nortii Idaho.. 
1806 Eigliteentli Ave. 



ILLINOIS. 
-Addison: 

German Lutiieran Orplaan Asylum.. 

.Alton: 

Roman Catliolic Orphanage 

417 Prospect St. 
.\ndovee: 

Swedish Lutheran Orphans' Home. , 
Ljrnn Center P. O. 
Belleville: 

St. John's Catholic Orphanage 



Bloomington: 

Girls' Industrial Home 

State and Taylor Sts. 
Caibo: 

Cairo Children's Home 

320 Twenty-fifth St. 
Caelinville: 

Bethel Holiness Orphanage 

736 West Main. 
Chicago: 

Angel Guardian Orphan .Asvlxun, 

2001 Devon -\ve. 
Chicago Homes for Bovs 

1506 West ,\dams 'St. 
Chicago Nursery and Half Orphan 
Asylum. 

1932 Burling St. 
Chicago Orphan .Asylum 

5120 South Park Ave. 
Danish Orphans' Home 

3320 Evergreen .\ve. 
Home for Jewish Friendless Children.., 

5228 Ellis .Vve. (Hyde Park). 
Jewish Orphan Home , 

6208 Dre.xel Ave. 
Juvenile Detention Home , 

771 Ewing St. 
Louise Juvemie Home for Dependent 
Children. 

6124 -\da St. (Englewood). 
Lutheran Children's Home 

1352 Rockwell St. 
Marks Nathan Je^'ish Orphan Home... 

1243 .Vorth Wood St. 
St. Joseph's Providence Orphan .Asylum 

3018 North Fortieth -Vve. 
St. Mary's Home for Children 

2822 Jackson Boulevard. 
St. Vincent's Infant .Asylum 

721 La Salle -Vve. 
Uhlich Lutheran Orphan .Vsvlum. . . 

2014 Burling St. 
Danville: 

Vermilion County Children's Home.. 

Logan .Ave. and Williams St. 
Dover: 

Dover Deaconess Home 

DuquoDJ: 

Receiving Home 



Edison Paek: 

Norwegian Lutheran Children's Home. 
Norwood Park P. O., R. D. 1. 
Elgin: 

Larkin Home for Children 

320 South State St. 
Etanston: 

Receiving Home 

8'26 Ridge Ave. 
Flanagan: 

Salem Orphanage 



Fkeepoet: 

St. Vincent '.s Orphan Home 

7 Jefferson St. 
Glenwood: 

Glenwood Manual Training School. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Private corporation (Luth- 
eran). 

Sisters of the Precious Blood. 
Augustana Synod 



Sisters, Poor Handmaids of 
Jesus Christ. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation 

Holiness Christian Church. . . 

Private corporation 

Protestant Episcopal Church 
Private corporation 



Private corporation 

Danish Lutheran Church in 

-America. 
Associated Jewish Charities. . 

Associated Jewish Charities. . 

County of Cook 

Private organization 



German Missouri Synod. . 

Private corporation 

Sisters of St, Joseph 



Sisters of St. Mary (Epis- 
copal). 
Sisters of Charity 



St. Paul's Lutheran Church 



Private corporation . 



Congregational Church 

Illinois Children's Home and 
Aid Society. 

Norwegian Lutheran Chil- 
dren's Home Society. 

Private corporation 



Illinois Children's Home and 
.\id Society. 

Defenseless Mennonite 
Church. 

Franciscan Sisters of the 
Sacred Heart. 

Private corporation 



Class of children received. 



Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, homeless, and 
abused children. 



Orphan children. 



Catholic orphan children 
from 2 to 12. 

Scandinavian orphan chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Dependent girls 



Dependent and delinquent 
children. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren from 2 to 12. 

Orphan children 

Homeless bovs 



Orphans and working wo- 
men's children. 

Orphan children 



Danish orphan children from 

1 to 14. 
Homeless Jewish Children. . . 

Orphan children 



Dependent, truant, and de- 

Imquent children. 
Dependent children 



Dependent children for tem- 
porary care. 
Jewish orphans from 5 to 11 

Orphan and destitute boys. 

Dependent children 



Foundlings and destitute 

children under 7. 
German Lutheran orphan 

children. 

Homeless, neglected, and 
delinquent children. 

Dependent orphan children . 

Dependent children 



Norwegian orphan and de- 
serted children. 

Destitute and dependent 
children from 3 to 16. 

Dependent children 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Foundlings and orphan chil- 
dren under 12. 

Normal, dependent boys . . . . 



1908 
1908 

1873 
1883 

1867 

1879 

1889 

1902 

1906 

1866 
1899 
1861 

1849 
1883 
1901 
1893 
1906 
1907 

1908 
1905 
18S9 
1895 
1872 
1867 

1894 

1902 
1908 

1899 

18S9 

1907 



1896 

1887 



Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

(■) 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 
(') 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

(■) 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 



11 



CmLDBEN EECErVED FOE nsST 
TQIE I.S- 1910. 



(') 
29 
83 

141 
4 

276 

38 

3444 

30 

73 
39 
73 
97 
1000 
13 

96 



97 
22 
10 

217 
20 
35 

226 



(') 
29 
43 

78 
3 
150 
25 
2594 
18 

48 
28 
73 
14 
431 
11 



Through- 



o 



3444 
8 

73 



330 



C) 



361 



.21 

03 .S 



C) 



Not reported. 



' Includes report of St. Vincent's Maternity Hospital. 



153 ... . 
3 Included in report of Illinois Children's Home and -\id Society. 



(') 



18 



GENERAL TABLES. 



97 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF TEAR. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING TEAR. 


PAYMENTS DDl 


SING 


VALUE or 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 




3 

O 


_2 
S 

20 
6 

15 
67 
26 
108 

23 

11 

(') 
102 
70 

104 
14 
65 
94 
2636 
17 

(') 
105 
65 
14 

17S 
42 

10 

2 
18 

48 

(') 

25 

43 

36 

343 


a 

a 

24 

8 
43 
17 
86 
28 
31 
16 

(0 

54 

96 
10 
72 
74 
873 
37 

(') 
58 

105 
72 
42 

9 

8 

8 

37 

(') 

11 

33 

2S 


Dependent. 


"3) 

m 

& 

.g 

18 


a 
§ 

a 

a 

8 
3 


SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DUKINO TEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from— 




i 


a . 
"& 

11 

P.5 

o 

14 

4 

23 
38 
43 
194 


o 

S 

CD 

■V 

u 

> 

a 

4 
1 


1 

o 

< 
5 


o 

234 
4 

74 

(') 

21 


S 
78 



38 

(') 

16 


1 

156 

2 

36 

(') 
5 


O 

155 
4 


1 

73 
2 


.2 

82 

2 


3 


d 

s 

32 
3 


& 

60 

2 

4 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Otlier 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 

3 

a 

c 
o 
3 

3 

1 


44 
13 

23 
110 

43 
194 

28 

54 

27 

5/4 
102 
124 

200 
24 
137 
168 
3509 
54 

(.') 
163 

65 
119 
250 

84 

19 

10 
26 

85 

22 

36 

76 

64 

343 


92 

2 

7 


$33,924 
5,918 

9,754 

11,185 

8.0% 

10.331 

2,973 

1,562 

1,584 

18,527 
22,361 
25,915 

47,225 
2,896 
21,363 
29,910 
37,200 
651 

2,700 
29,111 
14,914 
25. 575 
' 48, 737 
31,034 

3,644 

948 
» 3,933 

8,273 

(') 

» 10,412 

6,716 

8,000 

66, 698 


$30,000 
2,263 

200 
(') 
2,285 

360 


$3,924 
3,255 

9.035 
2.248 
3,268 
(') 

58 
1.141 
1.58) 
8,322 






$33,924 
3,516 

7,284 

8,992 

22.633 

10. 147 

3.255 

1.658 

1.584 

(') 

22,361 
24,551 

38,059 
2,980 
21,363 
28, 109 
41,518 
1,450 

2,500 
29,028 
15,298 
23,481 
> 48, 737 
26, 165 

7,592 

712 
'3,933 

7,159 

2,400 

« 10,412 

6,765 

5,000 

66,698 


$10,924 
3,516 

6,985 
6,524 
14,836 

(') 

3,255 

1,558 

1,584 

(') 
14.314 
24.551 

33,147 
2,980 
18,082 
28,109 
37,200 
1,450 

2,500 
28.948 
14.141 
16.591 
36,648 
14, 1.15 

(') 

512 
3,933 

7,159 

2,400 

10,412 
5,765 
5,000 

66,698 


$23,000 


$63,000 


$63,000 


1 


$719 
2.789 

230 
(') 

429 


$400 

6.148 

4.398 

(') 

201 

61 


? 


299 
2,468 
7,797 
(') 

100 

(') 
8,047 

4,912 
3,281 
4,318 

80 

1,157 

6,890 

12,089 

12,050 

(') 
200 

1,000 


42.000 

85,000 

69,750 

{') 

9,000 

3,600 

1,866 

C) 

50,000 
234,371 

626,981 
21,600 
175, 808 
238,256 
200,000 
4,675 

20,000 
62,316 
132,300 
101.900 
2 200.000 
281,934 

37,600 

7,600 
3 13, 894 

30,000 

4,500 

3 53,974 
73,400 
20,000 

494,990 


42,000 

85.000 

69. 750 

25.000 

9,000 

3,600 

1,866 

(■) 

50,000 

20,000 

357,600 
21,600 
130,608 
138,232 
200,000 
3,000 

20.000 
60.000 
132,300 
91,900 
200.000 
275.000 

32,306 

7,600 
13,894 

30,000 

4,500 

63,974 

73,400 

20,000 

344,990 


1 




42 






41 
21 


24 
16 


17 
5 


2 






6 
56 
30 

9 


2 
27 

4 


4 

29 

30 

5 


3 










4 




28 
16 
7 












11 




11 


5 


32 

19 

574 
91 
124 

187 
22 


1 




6 


37 


14 


23 


6 








7 


















(■) 
19 
94 

117 

2 

221 

34 

3434 


19 
54 

69 

1 

100 

20 

2583 


(') 

40 

58 

1 

121 

14 
851 


10,205 
6.100 
6.577 

11.029 

520 

1.253 


16,261 
13,658 

17,789 

2.683 
28,660 


, 8 


1 






4 


1 


1 




1 


1 




9 


37,200 
100 

12,000 

1^121 
108 

500 
26,839 


5,680 

18,407 
2,376 

17,427 
1,250 


10 




13 












4 

7 


2 
1 


2 
6 


11 




2 








12 




137 
22 
742 










13 


146 




















14 




2767 
3 














15 


49 

(■) 
163 
(.) 

59 
230 

84 


2 














1 

2,000 
29,036 
12,940 

9,477 
16,603 

1,106 

1,367 

200 
3,933 

1,534 

10,412 
2,592 
1,500 

16,996 


650 
600 

9.453 
11,466 
3,901 

382 

440 


75 

1.968 

6.645 

8,668 

26,027 

774 

200 


16 


(') 


(') 














23 
38 
189 


15 
189 


8 
11 


17 
















IS 




(') 
60 
20 












9 

7 
265 


9 
125 


7 
140 


19 












20 






1200 


593 


607 


595 
14 

(■) 


374 
10 

(■) 


221 
4 

(') 


21 






22 




19 






(') 


(■) 


(') 


2 


(') 


2 


23 


10 

(') 

60 
22 

C) 

42 

64 

251 








24 




25 






(') 


(•) 


(») 


(*) 

7 


3 


4 


25 






2,056 


4,683 
500 


26 


















27 




(') 
34 






5 


4 


(') 

1 


(') 

1 


(') 


1 


6 60 

3 

31 

209 


35 

15 

209 


25 
3 
16 


28 






1,095 
3,600 
11,911 


3,029 
10,952 


29 






30 




92 












10 


10 




31 



* Included in report of Evauston Home. 



6 Inuiudes statistics of Duquoin Home. 



9531°— 13- 



98 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



ILLINOIS— Continued. 

Harrison: 

Winnebago Farm School 

Shirland P. O. 
Harvey: 

Amanda Smith Orphan Home 

305 One hundred forty-seventh St. 
Hotleton: 

Hoyleton Orphan Home 



Ievington: 

Hudelson Baptist Orphanage. 



Joliet: 

Guardian Angel Home 

117 BueU Ave. 

Lutheran Orphanage 

Rowell Ave. 
La Grange: 

Illinois Masonic Orphans' Home. . 

Lake Bujff: 

Methodist Deaconess Orphanage. 
Scranton Ave. 
Lake Villa: 

Allendale Farm 



Lincoln: 

Odd Fellows' Orphans' Home of DUnols. 
Wyatt Ave. 
Lisle: 

St. Joseph's Bohemian Orphanage 

1641 Allport St., Chicago (office). 
Maywood: 

Central Baptist Orphanage 

604 First Ave. 

Home for Disabled Children 

902 South Eighth Ave. 
Metamora: 

St. Mary's Orplianage 

Morgan Park: 

Bacon Home for Missionaries' Children . , 

Morrison: 

Mount Carmel Faith Home 

R. D. 5. 
Nachusa: 

Nachusa Lutheran Orphanage 



Norual: 

Illinois Soldiers' Orphans' Home. 
Beech and Lincoln Sts. 



Mason Deaconess Home and Baby Fold, 

Onaroa: 

BethelHome 



Paris: 

Edgar County Children's Home 

R.D.I. 
Peoru: 

Home for the Friendless 

Knoxville Ave. 

Lutheran Orphans' Home 

227 Malone Ave. 
Quinct: 

St. Aloysius' Orphans' Home 

Twentieth and Vine Sts. 
Woodland Home for Orphans and 
Friendless. 
2707 Maine St. 
Rock Island: 

Bethany Home 

Thirty-si-xth St. and Fifth Ave. 
Rocktord: 

Boys' Club .\ssociation of Rockford 

204 South Madison St. 

Children's Home of Rockford 

306 Sixth St. 
Springfield: 

Orphanage of the Holy Child 

220East.^,damsSt. 

Springfield Home tor the Friendless 

1300 South Seventh St. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Private corporation. 

Private corporation. 



German Evangelical Synod 
of North .\.merica. 

Private corporation(Baptist) 



Sisters of St, Francis. 
Augustana Synod 



Masonic Grand Lodge of Illi- 
nois. 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Allendale .Association 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Bohemian Catholic churches. 



Private corporation (Baptist) 

National Children's Home 
Society. 

Sisters of St. Francis 



.\merican Baptist Foreign 
Mission Society. 

Private corporation 



General Synod of the Luth- 
eran Church. 

State of Illinois 



Methodist Episcopal Chtn-ch 

Western Seamen's Friend 
Society. 

Private corporation 



Woman's Christian Home 

Mission. 
Lutheran Children's Friend 

Society, 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Bethany Protective -Associa- 
tion. 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Protestant Episcopal Church 
Private corporation 



Class of children received. 



1 Indeterminate. 

2 Not reported. 

3 Equipment. 

' Colored only. 



Delinquent and dependent 
boys. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 



3rpl 
dr( 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Needy children between 2 
and 15. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 
Swedish Lutheran orphans .. 



Masons ' orphan children . 



Foimdlings and orphan and 
homeless children. 

Dependent, friendless, and 
neglected boys. 

Mentally sound orphan chil- 
dren of Odd Fellows. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren from 3 to 14. 

Dependent children 



Crippled, deformed, and dis- 
abled children. 

Orphan children 



Missionaries' children from 
7 to 18. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren imder IS. 

Orphan children 



Soldiers' and sailors' orphans 
and other dependent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children under 3 



Defective children... 
Dependent children. 



Orphan and deserted chil- 
dren. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 



Orphan children 

Orphan children under 12. 



Dependent and neglected 
children. 



Street boys 

Dependent children. 



Orphan girls 

Orphan, dependent, and de- 
linquent children. 



1907 

1S93 

1895 

1903 

1897 
IS91 

1885 

1894 

1897 

1893 

1898 

1895 
1908 

1888 
1893 

1900 

1904 

1869 

1905 

1875 

1898 

1875 
1902 

1853 
1850 

1899 

1907 
1906 

1881 
1863 



(■) 
0) 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 



m 



m 



113 



(') 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



2 

56 

26 

1 

18 

10 42 
55 

12 
50 



75 
9 

0) 



10 24 
24 

4 
16 



Through- 



65 



1 
26 
11 

1 

5 

i"18 
31 



33 



1 . 

5. 

10 7 
39 



(=) 



(') 



23 



26 



10 35 
13 

9 
50 



& Includes receipts from care of inmates. 

8 Included in donations. 

' Exclusive of cash balance. 

8 Includes $'25,000 Grand Lodge appropriations. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



99 



CAKE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDKEN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



163 
105 

67 
142 

62 
158 

28 

107 
6 

55 
17 

26 

22 

314 

18 

15 

44 

66 
60 

27 
37 



387 
18 

18 
76 



56 



O 



Dependent. 



375 



CHn,I>EEN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



23 



CHILDKEN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



29 



"81 



49 



CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 
DURING YEAR 



17 



(') 



(») 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



»6,022 

3,696 

9,754 

6,506 

10,108 
11,066 

85,367 

17,632 

22,678 

'32,487 

72, 769 

7,366 
1,870 

5,235 
5,240 

1,000 

7,554 

78,576 

2,709 

2,498 

2,930 

8,550 
7,797 

2,311 
6,411 

4,694 

5, 
4,163 

m 

8,928 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



tl,838 



470 
1,512 



1,175 
222 



277 
117 



300 
"500 

(») 
2,236 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 



S3, 913 

475 

7,489 

3,243 

3,874 
5 11,066 

85,367 

11,874 

17,308 

8 28,184 

11,194 

2,881 
1,750 

620 
2,065 

600 

7,494 



2,382 

2,^98 

711 

2,148 

5.047 

150 
2,300 

3,523 

3,221 
1,443 

2.093 



Other 
sources 



S2,621 
2,265 

3,448 



3,881 
2,527 



1,049 

3,758 
120 



3,176 



382 
1,902 



539 
1,108 

1,171 

891 
252 

m 

1,212 



;251 
600 



2,159 
1,274 



1,877 
2,843 
4,303 
60,526 

727 



4,289 



4,278 
2, 750 

1,345 
2,886 



1,481 
" 1,968 



3,387 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 



P) 

$1,117 

9,579 

5,906 

9,948 
9,618 

63,997 

17,683 

21,086 

37,478 

24,782 

6,920 
1,850 

5,360 
5,240 

1,200 

7,194 

81,029 

2,312 

773 

<=) 

5,785 
8,6«8 

2,275 

7,254 

5,893 
4,498 

(') 
9,695 



For 
run- 
ning 

ex- 



Kor 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$.3,199 

1,01 

5,613 

5,906 

9,948 
5,796 

6,3,997 

17,683 

20,926 

29,380 

3,886 

.6,497 
1,850 

5,360 
5,240 

1,200 

2,194 

69, 953 

2,012 

773 

(=) 

5,551 
5,188 

1,877 
4,500 

7,254 

5,166 
3,666 

(') 
6,763 



(2) 
$100 
3,966 



3,822 



160 

8,098 

20, 896 

1,423 



."■,,000 

n,076 

300 



C-) 

234 
3,600 

398 

m 



727 
832 

2,842 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
inv csted 
funds). 



3 $200 

.35,000 

30, 931 

29,500 

61,772 
37,070 

98,500 

60,600 

214,923 

77,883 

44,000 
600 

50,225 
10,000 

6,000 

15,000 

360,000 

10,000 

15,000 

18,000 

79.000 
14,. 663 

45,000 
67,000 



16,500 
9,800 

m 

49,211 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



a $200 

3.6,000 

29,400 

23,600 

51,772 
37,670 

98,500 

60,000 

61,904 

177,446 

29,896 

40,000 
600 

50,226 
10,000 

6,000 

16,000 

360,000 

10,000 

15,000 

11,000 

2.6,000 
14, 663 

25,000 
19.000 

15,800 

9,000 
9,800 

(') 
6,200 



32 

33 

34 

35 

36 
37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

4a 

44 

45 
46 

47 

48 

4» 

60 

51 

62 

53 
54 

55 
56 



58 
69 

60 
61 



9 Boarders. 
"Estimated. 
u Only one occupied. 



12 Exclusive of county board. 

" Includes county board and bequests. 

" Includes those returned to friends and relatives. 



100 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



ILLINOIS— Continuod. 

Urbana: 

Cunningham Children's Home. 
Cunningham Ave. 
Whitehall: 

Receiving Home 



Woodstock: 

Chicago Industrial Home for Children. 



Anderson: 



INDIANA. 



Madison County Orphans' Home. . 
2515 Columbus Ave. 
Buttpton: 

Wells County Orphans' Home. . . . 



Boonville: 

Warrick County Orphans' Home. 
Bridgeport: 

Pentecost Orphanage 



Beookvtlle: 

Franklin County Children's Home 

R.D.7. 
Columbus; 

Frances Comfort Thomas Home 

127 Cherry St. 

CeAWFOR DSVILLE : 

Montgomery County Orphans' Home. 

Evan.sville; 

Evansville Orphan .\sylum 

West Indiana St. 

Receiving Home 

507 Lincoln Ave. 
Fort Wayke: 

Allen Countv Orphan's Home 

Bluflton'Road. 

Fort Wayne Orphan Home 

St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

Wells St. and Archer Ave. 
Franklin: 

Johnson County Orphan Asylum 



Greencastle: 

Greencastle Orphans' Home.. 
Hadlev: 

Hadley.Uome' '. 



Indianapolis; 

Colored Orphans' Home 

319 West Twenty-first St. 
German CJeneral Protestant Orphans' 
Home. 
1404 State Ave. 

German Lutheran Orphans' Home 

:«10 Washington St. 

Guardians' Home 

5751 University Ave, 

Indianapolis Orphans' Asylum 

4107 East Washington St. 

St. Joseph's Training School 

72.5 South Alabama St. 
Jefpersonville: 

Jeffersonville Orphans' Home 

832 Meigs Ave. 
Knigiitstown; 

Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' 
Home. 



KuiGHTSvn.LE; 

Clay County Orphans' Home. 
Brazil, R. D. 8. 
Lafayette: 

St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum. . 



County of Lagrange . 
County of Cass 



Tippecanoe Count v Children's Home... 
Tenth St. 
Lagrange: 

Rogers Orphans' Home 

Logansport: 

Cass County Orphans ' Home 

Pleasant Hill. 
Madison; 

Jefferson County Children's Home 
707 East Main St. 

1 Included in report of ^Vhitehall Orphans' Home Society. 

2 Not reported. 

3 Separate home under same supervision. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, M . 1*: . Church. 

Whitehall Orphans' Home 
Society. 

Free Methodist Church 



Private corporation . 
County of Wells 



County of Warrick 

Pentecost Band of the AVorld 



County of Franklin 

County of Bartholomew. 
County of Montgomery.. 



Cla.ss of children received. 



Private corporation 

Board of Children's Guard- 
ians. 



Countv of AUen. 



Reformed Church in U. S . . . 
Sisters, Poor Handmaids of 
Jesus Christ. 

Countv of Johnson 



Private corporation 

Children's Home Society of 
Indiana. 



Friends Church 

Private corporation. 



Synod of Missouri, Ohio, and 
Other States. 

Board of Children's Guard- 
ians. 

Private corporation 



Sisters of Providence. 
Private organization. 
State of Indiana 



County of Clay. . 



Sisters of St. Francis. 
Private corporation . . 



County of Jefferson.. 



Orphan girls, and bovs un- 
der S. 

Homeless and dependent 
children. 

Orphan, dependent, and 
homeless children. 



Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Orphan and foundling chil- 



Jrp] 
ar( 



Orphan children 

Fo'mdling and orphan chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren under Iti. 

Orphan and dependent 

cnildren. 
Neglected and dependent 

cnildren. 

Abandoned and neglected 

children. 
Orphan children. 



OiT)han and dependent girls 
from 2 to 14. 

Orphan, dependent, neg- 
lected, and abandoned 
children. 

Orphan children 



Orphan and neglected chil- 



Jrpl 
dr 



Dependent and delinquent 
children. 

Orphanand delinquent chil- 
dren. 



German Lutheran orphan 
and destitute children. 

Deserted and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan girls over 12 



Destitute children, and 
boarders. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' de- 
pen d e n t children and 
grandchildren. 

Neglected children 



Orphan, defective, delin- 
quent, and homeless boys. 

Orphan and homeless cliil- 
ciren. 

Dependent children under 1 4 . 

Orphan and abandoned chil- 



Jrph: 
ore 



Neglected and orphan chil- 
dren. 



1S95 
1902 

1889 

1882 

1898 

1896 
1903 

1888 

1892 

18S4 

1866 
1900 

1895 

1884 
1886 



1895 



1869 
1807 

1883 
1889 
1850 
1890 

1870 

1887 

1897 

1869 

1SS7 

1871 
1875 

1883 



Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes.< 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 



Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOB FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



3 

35 
154 
12 

2 

61 



25 



28 



15 

m 

2 
3 



35 



m 



m 



Through- 



154 



(') 



m 



20 



(') 



< Owned by Vanderburg County. 

^ Included in report of Board of Children's Guardians. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



101 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE or YEAB. 



20 



Dependent. 



43 42 

lou 



8.5 



a I 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



m 



(') 



m 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR 



(=) 



18 
11 



(') 



(}) 



m 



m 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



S 10, 438 

11,288 

5,100 

1,800 

022 
2,500 

1,200 

4,316 

2,752 

4,934 



13,600 

m 

2,150 



•1,000 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria 
tions. 



S205 



1,200 

3,721 
2,752 

4,095 

(') 

7,638 



Dona- 
tions. 



$10, 438 
(') 
3,548 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



$559 



5,100 



Otlier 
sources 



$6, 976 



1,800 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAB. 



Total. 



13,000 



600 



(2) 



4,000 



$10,438 
(') 
11,288 

5, .164 

2,300 

1,051 
2,500 

1,100 

3,729 

2,938 

m 

7,438 
13,600 



(') 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 



$6,763 
(■) 
6,538 

5,564 

1,800 

1,051 
2,500 

1,100 

3,638 

2,938 

5,188 

(») 

7,438 
10,600 

2,000 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments 



$3, 675 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



C^) 



3,000 



150 



^') 



$47,120 
(') 
30, 479 

12,000 

15,000 

6,000 
30,000 

m 

17, 90: 

15,000 

•30,360 

26,000 
100,000 

3,500 

70,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$47, 120 
C) 
25,729 

12,000 

15,000 

6,000 
30,0(X) 

{"■) 

17,907 

15,000 

< 30, 360 

26,000 

100,000 
(2) 



10,000 



62 

63 



3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 
12 



14 
13 

16 
17 

IS 
19 
20 
21 

22 

23 

24 

25 
26 

■27 

2S 

29 



15." 



(=) 



m 



(^) 



m 



{') 



m 



m 



m 



m 



« 



m 



« 



m 



(') 



w 



39 



8,000 
30,624 

'4,561 
{») 
17,941 

c-> 

2,687 
107, 142 

2,200 

9,731 
2,933 

2,019 
2,875 

2,348 



m 



m 

9,852 

m 

2,200 
107, 142 

2,200 



849 
3,322 

m 

2,974 



961 



28,814 



4,294 
(=) 



821 



775 
800 



454 
620 



8,502 
13 



2,019 
2,000 

2,34.S 



102 



7,500 
29, 447 

' 3, 823 

m 

17,236 

m 

3,350 
107, 142 

2,200 

11,933 
3,274 

2,019 
2,876 

2,348 



25,947 

3,823 

(") 

16,278 

m 

3,360 
103,613 

2,200 

9,699 
3,134 

2,019 
2,876 

2,220 



(2) 
3,500 



16,000 
325,000 



15,000 
185,000 

60,000 



(») 

95; 

(■') 



3,529 



2,334 
140 



76,200 
(') 

21,400 

314,231 

7,500 

145,000 
9,600 

24,000 

m 



75,000 
('J 

17,500 

314,231 

7,500 

105,000 
9.000 

24,000 
15,000 



• Included in report of CliUdren's Home Society of Indiana, Indianapolis. 
' Includes report of German Lutheran Orphans' AssociatioD. 



8 Included in report of Marion County Board of Children's Guardians. 
> Includes 3 boarders. 



102 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAUE AND LOCATION. 



IN DIANA— Continued. 

Marion: 

Grant County Orphans' Home. 



MUNCIE: 

Delaware County Children's Home.. 
Yorktown Pike. 
New AlbanV: 

Cornelia Memorial Orphans' Home. . 
Ekin Ave. 
Newport: 

Colletl Home for Orphans , 

Patoka: 

French Orphans' Home 

Peter-sburg: 

Thornton Orphans' Home 

Plymouth; 

Julia E. Work Training School 



Uicbuond: 

Wernle Orphans' Home . 

Rockport: 

Veatch Orphans' Home . . 



Shelbyville: 

Gordon Children's Home 

R. D. 12. 
Spicelakd: 

Henry and Rush County Orphans' 
Home. 
Terre Haute: 

Rose Orphan Home 

Twenty-fifth St. and Wabash Ave. 

St. Ann's Orphanage 

Thirteenth St. and Fifth Ave. 
Vigo County Home for Dependent Chil- 
dren. 
R. D. 5. 
Vdjcennes: 

Knox County Orpiians' Home 

1620 Fairground Ave. 

St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

R. D. 4. 
Wabash: 

White's Indiana Manual Labor Institute 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation. 
Private corporation. 



Class of children received. 



Private corporation. . 

County of G ibson 

County of Pike 

Private organization. 



Synoi 
Ohio and Other States. 

County of Spencer 



County of Shelby 

C-ounties of Henry and Rush. 



Private corporation 

Sisters of Providence 

Board of Children's Guard- 
ians. 



Coimty of Kno-x 

Sisters of Providence. 



Society of Friends... 
Private corporation. 



Winchester: 

James Mooi-man Orphans' Home 

IOWA. 
Beloit: 

United Norwegian Lutheran Orphans' 
Home. 
Boone: 

Children's Christian Training Home. . . 
906 West Second St. 
Cedar Rapids: 

Home for the Friendless 

519 North Fifteenth St. 
Council Bluffs: 

Christian Home 

Davenport: 

Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home ' State of Iowa 

2800 Eastern Ave. 

St. Vincent's Home 

Gaines St. 
Des Moines: 

Des Moines Home for Friendless Chil 
dren. 
2018 High St. 

Iowa Children's Home 

2340 East Ninth St. 

Polk County Juvenile Home 

Fifteenth St. and Hull Ave. 
Dubuque: 

St. Mary's Orphan Home 

Davis Lane. 
Elk Horn: 

Elim Orphans' Home 



Dependent and homeless 
children. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Orphan and friendless chil- 
dren. 



County orphan children. 

-\bandoned children 

Dependent children 



Dependent and delinquent 
children. 

Lutheran orphan children 
from 2 to 12. 

Orphan, neglec ted ,and aban- 
doned children. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Orphan, neglected, or de- 
pendent children. 

Dependent orphans between 
Sand 13. 

Dependent Catholic girls 
from 3 to 12. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 



Orphan and dependent chil- i 

dren. 
Dependent boys from 3 to 12. 



Dependent and wayward 
children. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 



ITnited Norwegian Lutheran 
Church. I 

Christian Missionary Alli- 
ance. " ! 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation. 



Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected children. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 



Fort Dodge; 

Lutheran Orphanage 

Eighteenth St. and Sixth Ave., 
south. 
Ottumwa; 

Receiving Home 

507 West Fourth St. 



Sistersof the Holy Humility 
of Mary. 

Private corporation 



Homeless children . 



Iowa Children's Home Soci- 
County of Polk 



Sisters of St. Francis. 



United Danish Lutheran 
Church. 

Synod of Missouri, Ohio, 
and Other States. 



American Home Finding 
Association. 



Homeless children under 16. 

Soldiers' and other orphan 
and dependent children. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan. dependent, and de- 
linquent children. 

Dependent, neglected, and 
delinquent children. 

Orphan and destitute 
children. 

Danish orphan children 



Orphan, friendless, and 
neglected children. 



Homeless and friendless 
children. 



1887 
1883 

1873 

1893 
1882 
1892 
1899 

1878 

1899 

1891 

(') 

1884 
1848 
1903 

1892 
1851 

1852 

1&S9 

1890 

1908 

1884 

1883 
1S62 
1896 

1886 

1888 
1909 

1878 

1890 

1901 

1899 



Yes., 



No. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

(') 

No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 



(') 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



28 

40 
139 

27 
39 



(') 



19 


11 


8 


29 


15 


14 


30 


(') 


(■) 


125 


(') 


(') 


183 


103 


80 


27 


17 


10 


45 


20 


25 


206 


109 


97 


69 


37 


32 


54 


34 


20 


4 


2 


2 


19 


8 


U 


127 


67 


CO 



Through- 



27 



68 



36 



39 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(•) 

19 

29 

30 

125 
89 
16 

45 

I 
103 30 



L Not reported. 



' Equipment. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



103 



CARB OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



46 

91 

146 

(') 

157 
16 
31 

202 

5S5 
142 

50 

27 

8 

169 
4 
1 



O 



Dependent. 



(') 



(') 



(') 



102 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



30 



(■) 



2,274 



21 



22 12 10 22 49 27 22 140 75 71 1 

' Included in report ot Iowa Children's Home Society. 



250 



(') 



49 



12 



(') 



200 



(') 



1,160 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



(') 



24 



(■) 



10 



(') 



14 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DUBINQ YEAR 



(') 



35 
0) 



63 

22 

30 
(') 



(') 

103 
46 



(') 

14 
64 

79 

2 

1 



0) 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$10,054 

4,289 

2,5S3 

3,500 

3,198 

3,382 

20,850 

7,200 

2,337 

3,112 

(') 

21,160 
2,700 
11,704 

6,181 
6,383 

23, 137 

C) 

21,922 

2,895 

5,432 

66,416 
84,692 
8,035 

6,955 

m 

11,495 
12,686 

2,288 
3,446 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



$9, 426 
3,S95 
2,313 



3,198 
3,382 
20,850 



2,260 
3,112 
(') 



2,700 
11,704 

6,181 



C) 



2,644 



84, 192 
792 



11,290 
1,128 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 



$41 
25 
25 



6,000 



(') 



4,583 



C) 

14,070 

17 

1,400 

65,416 
500 
646 

1,88 



915 
1,328 
3,250 



Other 
sources 



$307 



(') 



276 
14,924 
(') 

1,184 
1,021 



2,812 



m 



$68' 

62 

245 

3,500 



680 
87 



21,160 



1,525 
8,213 

C) 

7,852 

1,694 

367 



3,786 
5,064 



206 



10,643 
199 761 
196 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



rotal. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


$6,483 


$6,283 


4,078 


4,078 


2,763 


2,473 


3,000 


2,000 


3,198 


3,198 


3,235 


3,236 


18,932 


16,932 


7,200 


7,200 


2,600 


2,061 


3,112 


3,112 


(') 


(') 


17,586 


16,289 


2,700 


2,700 


11,704 


11,000 


6,181 


6,181 


6,383 


6,636 


23,067 


19,631 


(') 


(') 


21,452 


16,690 


2,911 


1,846 


6,423 


4,858 


71,387 


71,387 


95,734 


88,694 


7,892 


7,282 


« 


(') 


C) 


« 


6,289 


6,289 


10,555 


10,655 


2,288 


2,188 


3,388 


2,413 


C) 


C") 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$200 



290 
1,000 



2,000 



1,297 



704 



747 
3,536 
(') 

4,762 
1,065 
1,565 



',040 
610 






100 
975 



YALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



$21,600 

25,000 

22,000 

86,000 

5,000 

2800 

80,000 

74,000 

2,400 

10,000 

(') 

618,236 
50,000 
60,000 

20,000 
40,000 

95,000 

C) 

90,075 

4,600 

35,000 

262,000 
380,538 
40,000 

16,500 

15,000 
91,000 
8,000 
9,475 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$21,500 

25,000 

15,000 

25,000 

6,000 

2800 

80,000 

69,000 
2,400 

10,000 

8,300 

264,296 
50,000 
60,000 

20,000 
40,000 

75,000 

(') 

81, 173 

4,600 

20,000 

262,000 

380,538 

40,000 

11,500 

m 

10,000 
75,000 
8,000 
9,100 



(<) (<) (') CO (<) c<) c<) (') (') (<) 13 

' Included in report ot the American Home Finding Association. 



104 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



IOWA— Conttaued. 

Sioux City: 

Boys' and Girls' Home 

Twenty-sixtti and Douglas Sts. 

St. Anthony's Home 

Twenty-fourth and Ross Sts. 
Stanton: 

Swedish Lutheran Orphans' Home 

Taboe: 

Children's Home 

Waverlt: 

Iowa Lutheran Orphans' Home 

KANSAS. 
Atchison: 

State Orphans' Home 

Chandte: 

Children's Home 

1215 South Central Ave. 
Clebtiene: 

Lutheran Orphans' Home 

Fort Scott: 

Goodlander Home 

105 Blair Ave. 
Holiness Industrial Children's Home. . . 
Franklin St. 

HiLLSBORO: 

Industrial School and Hygiene Home 
for the Friendless. 
Iola: 

Children's Home 

606 South Fourth St. 
Kansas City: 

Children's Home 

Eighth St. and State Ave. 

Orphan Children's Home 

852 Washington Boulevard. 
Leatentpokth: 

Colored Orphan .Asylum 

R. D.6 

St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

Limit St. 
Topeka: 

Topeka Orphans' Home 

234 FUlmore St. 
Wichita: 

Helen Gould Orphan Children's Home 
1447 River St. 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 

1400 South Hillside Ave. 

Wichita Children's Home 

3855 East First St. 
Wdjfield: 

Lutheran Home for Friendless Children 
411 Park Ave. 

KENTUCKY. 

Bardstown: 

St. Thomas' Orphan Asylum 

Clay City: 

Highland Orphans' Home 

Cold Speino: 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 

Covdjqton: 

Covington Protestant Children's Home. 
1407 Madison Ave. 

St. John's German Orphan Asylum 

Horsebranch Road, R. D." 
Frankfort: 

Mary K. Williams Home for Orphan 
Girls. 
Washington St. 
Lexington: 

Children's Home 

Fifth and Upper Sts. 

Lexington Orphan .\sTlum 

611 West Short St. 
Louisville: 

Children's Home ; 

2630 Montgomery St. 

Colored Orphans' Home 

Eighteenth and Dumisnil Sts. 

German Baptist Orphans' Home 

923 Cherokee Road. 

1 N"ot 



Supervised or conducted by — } Class of children received. 



Private corporation 

Sisters of St. Francis 

Augustana Synod 

Hephzibah Faith Missionary 
Association. 

Private corporation 

State of Kansas 

Chanute Benevolent Society . 

Augustana Synod 

Private corporation 

Church of God 

Crimean Mennonite Brethren 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Oblate Sisters of Providence 
Sisters of Charity 

Private corporation 

Private organization 

Sisters of St. Joseph 

Private corporation 

Private corporation (Luth- 
eran). ' 



Sisters of Charity of Nazareth 

Presbyterian Church in U. S . 
St. Boniface's Society 

Private corporation 

St. John's Orphan Society . . 

Ascension Protestant Epis- 
copal Church. 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Church of Christ 

Orphans' Home Society 

Southern German Baptist 
churches. 

reported. 



Neglected children under 16. 

Homeless and neglected 
children from 2 to 14. 

Orphan and destitute 
Swedish children. 

Homeless and friendless 
children. 

Orphan and destitute 
children. 

Dependent children 

Orphan children 

Destitute orphan children. . 

Destitute children 

Orphan, destitute, and de- 
serted children. 

Orphan, homeless, and des- 
titute children. 

Orphan, dependent, and 
neglected children. 

Orphan, abandoned, and 

neglected children. 
Orphan and destitute 

children. 

Homeless and destitute 

children. , 

Orphan children , 

Orphan children under 12. . , 

Orphan children 

Orphan, abandoned, and 

destitute girls. 
Orphan, abandoned, and 

neglected children. 

Orphan, homeless, and 
abandoned children. 



Orphan and destitute 
children. 

Orphan children ' 



Roman Catholic children 
from 2 to 17. 



Destitute children 

German orphan children... 



Orphan girls. 



Illegitimate, abandoned, and 

neglected children. 
Orphan children 



(■) 
Orphan children . 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



1894 
1910 

1881 

1892 

1863 

18S7 
1906 

1880 

1891 
1903 

1889 

1903 

1900 
1901 

1889 
1866 

18SS 

1899 
1894 
1888 

1902 



1908 

1877 

1882 
1850 



1SS9 
1833 

{') 
1878 
1S71 



Yes. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
(') 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

(=) 
No. 
No. 

No. 



(>) 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

(') 
Yes. 

No. 



(■) 



CHILDREN received FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



129 

81 



11 

24 

86 
14 

12 
129 
13 



(') 

24 

12 

55 
15 



44 
23 

(') 
(>) 



49 



66 



Through— 



o 



(■) 



(') 



— o 



(') 



(') 



^ Colored only. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



105 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDBEN IN THE INSTITCTION 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 


AT 


CHILDREN 
OUT,SIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURrNQ 


1 
TEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 




s 

o 


S 

"3 

S 

(') 
64 

19 

9 

46 

145 
4 

18 
10 
11 

6 
(') 

13 
25 

65 
61 

60 

(') 

27 
9 

(') 

12 
65 

21 

3e 

3( 
I 

(■) 


(') 

27 
16 
16 
31 

63 
2 

14 

7 
6 

4 

(■) 

14 
35 

27 
48 

68 

(■) 
25 
18 

6 

(') 

12 
4C 

15 
29 

3 

14 
1£ 

(') 
(') 


Dependent. 


o 

>^ 

o 

.9 

M 
o 

17 


a 

§ 

.9 


(') 


SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
TEAR. 


DURING TEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from — 




i 


a . 

-a 


(') 


1 
II 

a 
> 
q 

(') 


<s 

.a 
o 

< 
64 


3 

o 
H 

19 


_2 
"3 

a 


"3 

a 


3 
o 

16 


"3 

a 
(■) 


*3 
1 


i 

o 
104 


•3 

a 
(■) 


a 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


-¥« <" Other 
mates. ^''"'^'^ 


Total. 




Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 
a 

■3 

B 

1 


35 
81 

35 

25 

77 

198 
6 

32 
17 
17 

9 

(■) 

27 
60 

92 
99 

128 

5 
25 

45 

15 

(') 

24 
105 

36 
65 

3 

44 

23 

(') 

0) 
I! 


$10,207 
2,650 

5,973 

514 

12,607 

40,803 
526 

4,000 

1,545 

843 

2,814 

1,712 

3,419 
850 

8,800 
7,884 

1,455 

230 
1,400 
4,490 

3,171 

(') 

C) 
7,529 

4,500 
6,903 

1,200 

4,555 
3,530 

(') 
C) 
4,222 


S4,130 
550 

39,700 

600 
400 

500 

600 

1,168 
170 

500 
500 

860 

180 

820 

1,300 


$1,800 

1,661 

372 

7,205 


$740 
300 

100 


$5,337 

4, 152 

142 

5,402 

1,103 
203 

1,425 


$10,207 
2,500 

5,973 

518 

9,618 

41,769 
713 

4,000 

1,483 

795 

2,740 

1,266 

3,122 

864 

8,800 
7,884 

1,317 

230 
1,400 
4,373 

3,743 

(') 

2,000 
7,118 

5,000 
11,940 

1,100 

4,989 
2,990 

(') 
C) 
3,430 


$8,189 
1,900 

5,473 

494 

9,109 

39,045 
395 

3,200 

1,160 

587 

2,740 

1,256 

3,122 
699 

6,000 
7,884 

92^ 

230 
1,090 
4,373 

3,232 

(') 

SOO 
6,220 

6,000 
6,004 

1,100 

(■) 
2,76C 

(') 
(') 
3,43f 


$2,018 
600 

500 

24 

509 

2,724 
318 

800 
323 
208 

165 
2,800 

393 


$39,000 
50,000 

51,961 

3,000 

45,850 

300,000 
2,760 

40,000 
3,808 
3,000 

20,000 

C) 

13,354 
2,500 

50,000 
(■) 

9,800 


828,500 
50,000 

51,961 

3,000 

45,850 

300,000 
2,500 

40,000 
3,800 
3,000 

20,000 

(') 

12,000 
2,500 

50,000 
(') 

7,000 


14 
15 


35 
19 
58 

24 






3 
4 
12 

281 


1 

1 
11 

165 


2 
3 
1 

126 








5 
2 
6 

28 

7 

4 


3 

1 
5 

15 

4 

1 


2 
1 
1 

13 
3 

3 


16 


4 


6 
19 

170 
6 

6 












17 






12 

95 
1 




11 

47 


1 

48 
1 


IS 






1 






93 

1,800 
711 
843 


230 

275 
434 


2 


24 
17 
14 

9 

(') 

27 
41 

92 
98 

128 

2 
25 
21 

7 

(') 

24 
105 


2 












3 


















4 




3 






3 

5 

(') 

72 

1 

3 


2 

5 

(■) 

38 

3 


1 

(') 

34 

1 


4 

3 

3 

6 
6 

6 


3 
3 

1 
6 


1 

3 

6 
6 


5 
2 

(') 

33 
0) 

0) 
(■) 

48 


3 

2 

(■) 

(') 
(') 

(') 
(■) 

23 


2 

(') 

(') 
C) 

C) 

(■) 

25 


5 






613 

138 

940 
192 

2,000 
700 

132 


1,195 

974 

514 
365 

300 
250 


506 

788 
123 

6,000 
6,684 

213 

50 

1,057 
1,637 

(■) 

(') 
5,290 

1,587 
6,627 

1,200 

50 
2,460 

(') 
(') 
450 


« 


(') 


(■) 


0) 


(■) 


7 
8 




12 




7 


9 

10 


1 








11 








56 

20 
5 

{■) 

165 
(') 


26 
11 

(') 
81 

(') 


31 

9 

5 

C) 

84 
(') 








12 








3 


20 

10 

(') 

24 
(') 


11 

C) 
16 

(') 


9 
10 

(') 

8 
(') 


M 








11 
43 

12 

(') 

5 
15 

52 
6 

3 

16 

(') 

(') 

C) 


23 
3 

(■) 

3 
9 

34 
1 

11 
(') 

(■) 
0) 


11 
20 

9 

(') 

2 
6 

18 
6 

3 

4 
{■) 

(') 
(') 


448 
233 

1,363 

(') 

500 
644 

2,913 
276 


132 
1,900 

171 

(>) 
1,595 


310 

511 

1,500 
898 

6,936 


0) 

224 

(>) 

(■) 




35,000 
15,000 

6,000 

(■) 

8,000 
35,000 

100,000 
70,841 

20,000 

(') 
52,000 

(') 
(') 
2O,0OC 


35,000 
15,000 

6,000 

(') 

8,000 
35,000 

65,000 
60,000 


14 


2 

2 

(') 


22 
6 






15 






16 


(>) 


(') 


1 
2 
















4 

(■) 

(') 

8 


2 
(') 

1 


2 
(■) 

(') 
7 


3 




36 
4 






(') 
6 


(■) 
4 


2 


4 


61 

3 

2C 
(') 

(■) 

(') 

IS 








i 






6 


... 


24 












3,500 
900 

(') 
(') 


8C 
67 

(') 
(■) 
3,621 


925 
103 

(') 
(') 
15C 


(>) 
12,00C 

C) 
(') 
10,00C 


7 












t 




(0 
(■) 


0) 


(') 


C) 

(■) 

73 


(') 

(') 

3f 


(■) 

(■) 

37 


(') 

(') 

73 


0) 

3( 


(') 
37 


9 

10 
11 



















• From the mountains exclusively. 



106 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



KENTUCKY— Continued, 

LomsviLLE — Continued. 

German Protestant Orphans' Home. . . 

1232 Bardstown Road. 
Home of the Innocents 

106 West Broadway. 
Kentucky Home for Colored Children! 

807 Sixth St. 
Louisvilla Baptist Orphans' Home 

1022 South First St. 
Methodist Orphans' Home 

812 South Fifth St. 
Orphange of the (.Jood Shepherd 

U18 Morton Ave. 
Orphans' Home 

2'25 East College St. 
Presbyterian Orphans' Home 

Ills South Preston St. 
Protestant Episcopal Orphan Asylum. 

211 East College St. 
Receiving Home^ 

1086 Baxter Ave. 
St. Joseph's Oiphaus' Home 

Frankfort and Bayley Ayes. 
St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

2120 Payne St. 
Newport: 

Campbell Cou»ty Protestant Orphans' 
Home. 

Home Ato. 
Versailles: 

Cleveland Orphan Institution 



LOUISIANA. 

Baton Rouce: 

Protestant Orphans' Home. . . 

1219 Main Si. 
St. Joseph's ( )rphan,Asylum. . 
Fifth and > lorida Sts. 
Lake Charles: 

Louisiana Baptist Orphanage. 



New Orleans: 

Children's Home 

609 Jackson .\ve. 
Colored Industrial Home 

Gentilly Ave. 
Destitue Orphan Boys' Home 

5220 St. Charles .\ve. 
German Protestant Orphan Asylum . 

920 State St. 
Immaculate Conception Asylum . . .. 

3.503 Rampart St. 
Jewish Orplians' Home 

5342 St. Charles Ave. 
Lafou Orphan .Vsylum for Colored Boys 

Gentilly Road. 
Lutheran Bethlehem Orphan Asylum. . 

5413 North Peters St. 
Mount Carmol Orphan Asylum. . . . 

729 Piety St. 
New Orleans Female Orphan Asylum . 

1404 Clio St. 
Newsboys' Home 

349BaronneSl. 
Poydras Asylum 

5o^4 Ma!^'azine St. 
Protestant Orphans' Home 

3020 MaRazine St. 
Receiving Home of Louisiana S. P.C.C. 

642 Jordan Ave. 
Sacred Heart Orphan Asylum 

3400 Esplanacie Ave. 
St. .'\lphonsu3 Orphanage 

2709 Saratoga St. 
St. Joseph's Orphan .\sylum 

Josephine and Laurel Sts. 
St. Mary's Catholic Orphan Boys' 
Asylum. 

4111Chartr6sSt. 
St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 

1S07 Magazine St. 
Ursuline Orphanage : 

4580 Dauphlne St. 
Shbeveport: 

Genevieve Orphanage 

864 OUve St. 



Supervised or conducted by — 



Private corporation 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

Kentucky Home Society for 
Colored Children. 

Baptist churches of Ken- 
tucky. 

Methodist Episcopal Chiu-ch, 
South. 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

Christian Church ( Disciples) . 

Presbyterian Orphans' 

Home Society. 
Protestant Episcopal Church 

Kentucky Children's Home 

Society. 
Private corporation 



Sisters of Charity. 



Private corporation . 



Private corporation . 



Private organization . 
Sisters of St. Joseph. . 



Missionary Baptists of Lou- 
isiana. 

Protestant Episcopal Chiu-ch 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Sisters Marianites of Holy 

Cross. 
Private association 



Sisters of the Holy Family. 

Lutheran Church, South 

Sisters of Mount Carmel 

Sisters of Charity 



Conference of St. Vincent de 

Paul. 
Female Orplian Society 



Private corporation . 



Louisiana Society Preven- 
tion of Cruelty toChiidren. 
Sisters of the Sacred Heart. 



Sisters of Mercy 

School Sisters of Notre Dame 



Sisters Marianites of Holy 
Cross. 



Sisters of Charity. 
Ursuline Nuns , . . , 



Private corporation . 



Class of children received. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Homeless and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Destitute and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Baptist orphan children 



Orphan children from 2J to 

13. 
Indigent boys over 6 , 



Orphan children from 2 to 

12. 
Dependent children , 



Orphan girls. 



Dependent, neglected, and 
homeless children. 

CathoUc orphan and desti- 
tute children. 

Orphan and dependent girla. 



Orphan children from 3 to 
18. 



1851 
1875 
1908 
1869 
187» 
1869 
1872 
1855 
1836 
1895 
1849 
1832 

1884 



Orphan girls. 



Orphan and destitute girls. . 
Destitute orphan girls 



Orphan children. 



Orphan children 

Homeless and destitutechil- 

dren. 
Destitute orphan boys 



Orphan children 

Orphan girls 

Jewish orphan ctuldren. 



Homeless and neglected or- 
phan boys. 

Orphan childreu from 3 to 
12. 

Homeless and destitute girls. 



Orphan girls 

Newsboys, working and 

homeless boys. 
Orphan and destitute girls. . 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Delinquent, homeless, and 
dependent children. 

Orphan and destitute girls. . 

Orphan and homeless cliil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren over 2. 

Orphan boys 



Fomidlings, orphan and in- 
digent chddren. 
Orphan girls 



I Includes report of Kentucky Home Society for Colored Ctiildreu. 



Orphan children , 
■ Not reported. 



1842 
1868 

1903 

1853 
1902 
1824 
1866 
1856 
1853 
1893 
1881 
1869 
1836 
1879 
1817 
1853 
1892 
1893 
1876 
1853 
1835 

1868 
1727 

1900 



No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
(=) 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 



m 



C) 



m 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOE FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



14 
20 
31 
34 
19 

4 
17 
14 

6 

146 

29 

10 



5 
4 

52 

18 
70 
15 
22 

2: 

24 
16 
15 

30 
100 
30 

m 

301 
24 

77 



342 



10 



Through — 



■a . 
" o 
.- o 

1.9 
o 



68 146 
13 13 
10. 



(=) 



5. 

4. 

22 

16 
24 



m 



33 



16 



m 



m 



m 



(') 



(^) 



' Includes report of the Kentucky Children's Home Society. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



107 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF TEAR. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BCT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING 


TEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 




3 

o 


3 




Dependent. 


s 

O 

o 


a* 

.9 

"9 

Q 


StJPEBVlSION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DURING TEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from — 




i4 

S 

a 
a 



■a 
o g 

Co 




3 

u 

> 

a 


o 

< 


3 

o 




•a 
a 

(4 


•a 
1 




a 

at 


3 

o 


1 




Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


70 


31 


39 


70 










1 


3 










25 


13 


1? 


$22,807 
6,062 




$6,941 
4,952 


$2,511 
160 


$13,365 
650 


$22,596 


$8, 127 
5,760 


$14,469 


$206,607 


$136,699 


17 


37 


IS 


19 


15 




0-5 


















10 


4 


6 


$300 


5,750 


37,332 


24,000 


13 


1 


1 




1 










3 


? 


1 


14 


6 


H 


3 


1 


2 


3,717 


3,387 


330 






4,255 


4,255 




(=) 


(') 


14 


SS 


22 


36 


58 










3 




3 


70 


36 


34 


7 


3 


4 


26, 152 


8,818 




17,334 


32,044 


18,502 


13,542 


. 310,700 


100,000 


15 


39 


20 


19 


39 
















14 


7 


7 


1 


1 




10,526 




2,000 




8,526 


8,393 


8,393 




93,173 


36, 500 


16 


30 
34 


30 
13 


?1 


15 
34 




15 


















5 
3 


5 


3 


4,353 




2,3SS 




1,965 


4,333 

1 


4,333 


(2) 


34,495 
25,000 


20,000 
25,000 


17 






T> 


IS 


54 


IS 


9 


12 

3 


(') 




IS 


27 
34 


7 


20 
34 


14 

?5 


.... 


13 
9 






3 
•> 


2 


1 

? 


21 
3 


4 


2 


2 


3,370 
4,500 
49, 127 

17,284 
3,525 


144 


300 




2,926 
4,500 


3,000 

6,800 

49,378 

15, 142 

4,025' 


2,736 

6,000 

49,378 

12,309 

4,026 


264 
800 


103, 800 
(') 


100,000 


19 






16, 000 20 


83 
129 

SI 


41 
69 


42 

60 
51 






83 
31 

48 






1184 
6 


525 
2 


659 
4 


303 


122 


181 


102 

18 


55 
10 


47 
8 


32, 138 

107 


511 

15,602 

134 


1,575 
286 


16, 478 
3,105 


2,833 


42,988 
75,000 
12,000 


42,988 
75,000 
12,000 


21 


98 

1 


1 






22 




1 








23 


25 


18 


7 


?5 










6 


4 


2 


6 


4 


2 


4 


3 


1 


2,500 




2,500 






1 
2,900 


1,900 


1,000 


20, 600 


12,500 


24 


W 




m 


(=) 


C^) 


C=) 


(-) 


(=) 


m 




(») 


m 




(2) 


(') 




(=) 


m 


m 


m 


m 


(') 


(') 


m 


(.') 


(=) 


(^) 


25 


2.S 




2.5 


2,5 






















('-) 




m 


895 


120 


775 






875 


875 




10,000 


10,000 


1 


96 
84 


38 


56 
46 


56 

79 






















6 

13 

53 


(■=) 


6 

13 
24 


1,190 
9,072 


240 


140 

9,072 

6,510 
1,040 

(=) 




810 


1,654 
9,072 


1,654 
9,072 




12,000 
20,000 


12,000 
20,000 


2 


4 






1 


1 


1 




(2) 


0) 

14 
3 


f2> 


1 


82 
78 
67 


3 
42 
67 


79 
36 


82 
32 

?1 










12 
10 
5 


6 
5 


12 

4 


2 

22 

3 


2 

8 


29 


9,889 
3,498 


504 
1,200 


832 


2,875 
426 


7,985 
10,220 


6,477 
3,720 
(2) 


608 
6,500 


m 

75,000 


75,000 


4 


3 


43 
40 






5 






6 


93 


54 


39 


93 






















25 


11 


14 


12,407 


600 


7,852 


353 


3.602 


8,010 


6,965 


1,045 


74,500 


4,500 


7 


67 
120 


sn 


67 
40 


63 
103 


4 




















7 
20 


10 


7 

in 


1,084 
03, 387 


528 
504 


556 
13,512 




2,000 
64,932 


2,000 
64, 932 




9,000 
410,899 


9,000 
200, 000 


8 


17 


















49,371 


9 


S9 


59 




56 


?, 






1 








1 


1 




4 


4 




3,123 




116 


20 2.987 


3,373 


3,073 


300 


m 


30, 000 


1Q 


83 
84 


37 


46 
84 


83 
84 






















13 
25 


3 


10 

?.5 


3,377 
1,610 


204 
900 


350 


1,2^ 
360 


1,883 


4,644 
3,650 


4,644 
3,650 




48,000 


48,000 
(2) 


1, 
















10 




10 


12 


123 




123 


86 


2 


35 


















90 




90 


6,775 


1,500 


824 


102 


4,349 


6,521 


6,171 


350 


160,000 


150, 000 


13 


100 


inn 














iOO 


5ni> 




! 






32 


c-> 




21,896 




1,036 


C-') 
5O0 


(-) 


(') 


C) 


C-) 


C^) 


C-) 


14 


88 




8S 


14 


1 


7' 


















3' 


300 


20,000 


20, 896 


18,000 


2,896 


C) 


m 


15 


82 


30 


5? 


72 


3 




















m 


'm 


m 


m 


900 


1,071 


671 


C=) 


13, 108 


13, 108 




< 100,000 


< 100,000 


16 


157 
94 


157 






5 


17 
U 


23 


112 








6 


5 


1 


255 
33 


255 


33 


17,265 


11,070 
0) 


857 


(=) 


5,338 


16,320 


16, 320 


m 


50,000 


50,000 


17 


94 


78 








18 


77 


30 


47 


43 








34 














43 


6 


37 


5,260 


1,800 


1,200 


360 


1,900 


5,000 


3,000 


2,000 


550,000 


6 50,000 


19 


167 
340 


95 
340 


62 


133 
340 




24 


















42 
108 


25 

ins 


17 


3,793 
17, 028 


792 
7,200 


300 
2,770 


358 


2,641 
7,299 


3,607 
17,323 


2,493 
17, 323 


1,114 


76,000 


76,000 
165,000 


2n 


















21 


347 


158 


189 


315 


3 


29 






45 


21 


24 


45 


21 


24 


235 


114 


121 


16,459 


6,000 


3,560 




7,899 


16,489 


13,668 


2,821 


M6,000 


• 46, 000 


22 


38 




38 


38 




























W 




(') 


(=) 




m 


P) 


(2) 


("■) 


(') 


23 


33 


m 


(') 


33 










m 


m 


(') 


2 


1 


1 


8 


' 


5 


m 


27,000 


(-) 


{■■) 


(=) 


m 


(=) 


30,000 


100, 000 


100,000 


24 













I Exclusive of improvements. 



& Projjerty owned by Redemptorist Fathers. 



« Includes value of St. Joseph's Maternity Hospital. 



108 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MAINE. 
Augusta: 

Maine Children's Home 

129 Sewall St. 
Bangor: 

Bangor Children's Home 

Ohio St. 
Bath: 

Military and Naval Orphan .\sylum. . . 



Belfast: 

Belfast Girls' Home 

53 Northport Ave. 
Fairfield: 

Good WiU Farm 

Hinckley P. O. 
Gardiner: 

House of the Good Shepherd 

Lincoln St. 

LEWI.STON: 

Girls' Orphanage 

Sabattus St. 
Healey Asylum 

81 Ash St. 
Portland: 

Female Orphan Asylum 

62 State St. 
Maine Home for Friendless Boys. 

13.S3 Forest Ave. 
St. Elizabeth's Orphan .\sylum.. 

87 High St. 
York Village: 

Lucas Home 



MARYLAND. 

ANNAPOLIS Junction: 

National Junior Republic. 



Baltimore: 

All Saints Home for Children 

1701 Warwick Ave. 
Baltimore Manual Labor School 

Relay P. O. 
Baltimore Orphan .\sylum 

215 North Strieker St. 
Boys' Home Society 

350 North Calvert St. 
Christ Church Asylum 

Twenty-first St. and Guilford Ave. 
Dolan Children's Aid Asylum 

1709 Gough St. 
Egenton Orphan Asylum 

C«dar Ave. and Fortieth St. 
German Orphan Asylum 

224 Aisimith St. 
Hebrew Children's Protective Associa- 
tion Home. 

24 North Broadway. 
Hebrew Orphan Asylum 

Rayner Ave. 
Home of the Friendless 

1315 Draid Hill Ave. 
JohnsHopkinsColored Orphan Asylum . 

Thirt\*first St. and Remington Ave. 
Kelso Home for Orphans 

Forest and Garrison Aves. (Forest 
Park P. O.). 
Orphans' Home 

1707 Gough St. 
St. Anthony's Orphan Asvlum 

927 North Central .\ve. 
St. EUzal>eth"s Home 

317 St. Paul St. 
St. Frances' Orjihanage 

East Chase St. 
St. James' Home for Boys 

301 North High St. 
St. John's Orphanage for Boys 

Fair Oak Ave. (Waverly). 
St. Joseph's School of Industry 

Charles and Twenty-eighffh Sts. 
St. Mary's Female Orphan .\sylum 

Colli Spring Lane (Roland Park 
P.O.). 
St. Mary's Home for Little Colored Boys. 

1601 West Presstman St. 
St. Paul's Industrial School for Girls. . . 

2411 North Charles St. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
State of Maine 



Children's .\id Society of 
Maine. 



Private corporation 

Protestant Episcopal Church 
Sisters of Charity 



Sisters of Charity (Grey 
Nuns). 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Sisters of Mercy 



Private organization. 



Private associat ion . 



All Saints Sisters of the Poor . 

Private corporation 

Private coiporation 

Private corporation 

Christ Church (Episcopal)... 

Young Catholics Friend 

Society. 
First Presbyterian Church . . 

Private corporation 

Hebrew United Charities — 

Feder^ed Jewish Charities.. 

Private corporation 

Johns Hopkins Hospital . . . . 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Sisters of the Holy Cross 

School Sisters of Notre Dame 

Franciscan Sisters 

Oblate Sisters of Providence. 
Xaverian Brothers 



St. John's Church (Episco- 
pal). 
Sisters of Charity 



Sisters of Charity . 



All Saints Sisters of the Poor. 

St. Paul's Church (Episco- 
pal). 



Class of children received. 



Homeless, neglected, and 
dependent children. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Soldiers' and sailors' orphan 
children and grandchil- 
dren. 

Destitute and homeless girls . 



Normal, needy, and im- 
periled children. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren under 13. 

Orphan and neglected girls 

from 3 to 18. 
Orphan boys 



Orphan children 

Orphan and homeless boys. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Dependent or orphan chil- 
dren. 



Incorrigible and wayward 
children. 

Orphan and homeless girls . . 

Indigent boys from 5 to 14... 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Worthy homeless boys 



Destitute girls 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren from 4 to 12. 
Orphan and destitute girls 



Jrp 
from 4 to IS 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Cirphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Indigent orphan children — 

Orphan and abandoned 

children. 
Orphan girls 



Orphan girls from 4 to 12. 



Orphan and dependent boys 
fi-om 6 to 12. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Foundlings and destitute 
children. 

Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected girls. 

Indigent boys 



Orphan boys 

Orphan girls 

Orphan and destitute girls . . 



Destitute boys 

Orphan and destitute girls. 



1899 
1836 
1886 

1895 

1889 

1.890 

1878 
1893 

1828 
1893 
1873 

1898 

1899 

1899 
1840 
1778 
1866 
1839 
1872 
1860 
1864 
1901 

IS72 
1852 
1867 
1873 

1860 
1852 
1879 
1866 
1878 
1883 
1865 
1816 

1880 
1801 



No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

(') 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 



(') 



children RECErVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



25 

8 

22 

23 

39 

5 

4 

4 

20 

20 

30 

60 

4 

6 

3 
33 
167 

15 
65 

3.| 
48 

9 
5 



24 



16 



1 
4 . 

15 
9 

13 

27 
4 
6 



Through- 



40 






1 Not reported. 



> Only two occupied. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



109 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURmO 
YEAR 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF TEAR. 




o 
H 

50 
33 
64 

0) 
173 
15 

114 

180 

35 
25 
156 

8 

47 

20 
50 
110 

(■) 
25 
32 
30 
123 
49 

98 

120 

61 

42 

19 
100 
US 
106 

62 
9 

72 
202 

31 

39 


a; 

■a 
s 

31 
14 
33 

143 

8 

180 

11 

25 

6 

46 

50 

40 

0) 

0) 

60 
29 

5b 
0) 

19 
55 

42 

i 

3 
... 


a 

19 
19 
31 

(') 

30 

7 

114 

24 

156 
3 

1 
20 


Dependent. 


3 

o 

m 

tit 

O 


a 
<i> 

a 

.a 

1 


SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
TEAR. 


DURING TEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from — 




S 


a 
a . 

D 

49 
28 
64 

(') 

158 

(') 

86 
180 

35 
20 

148 

6 

11 
17 


1 
3 


5 


"3 
o 


a 


1 


■a 

52 
6 


■a 
a 

25 
2 


a 
« 

27 
4 


"3 
1 

2 

14 

(') 
29 
3 

32 

{•) 

12 
10 
10 


.2 

a 

2 

(') 

8 

23 

(') 

4 
10 


6 

1 

(') 
6 

0) 
6 
3 
32 

8 
10 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- Car^ »' 
""■"• mat'es.* 


Other 
ources 


Total. 


Si- p^™r 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


1 

a 

a 
o 

3 

1 
t-1 


$7,365 
9,582 
8,500 

(■) 

34,549 

2,257 

4,074 
7,500 

5,655 
2,900 
(') 

829 

15,530 

3,082 
5,583 
9,693 
11,550 
3,829 
2.971 
11,495 
20,400 
12,000 

19,576 

16,671 

11,340 

8.603 

1.668 
4,303 
16,846 
3,000 
5,401 
1,334 
(') 
0) 

3,112 
7.00) 


$1,250 

750 

8,500 

1,500 

500 
1,000 

2,000 
(') 

4,600 

1.500 

. 2,000 

2,000 


$5,915 
510 


$1,004 


$200 
7,318 


$6, 448 
8,955 
8,497 

(') 

36,715 

2,243 

7,613 
15,555 

5,307 
3,147 
0) 

905 

15,530 

3.082 
8,322 
9,835 
12.695 
3,523 
3,153 
10,909 
13,094 
13,000 

20,393 
17,822 
11,340 
8,192 

1,786 
7,046 
16,833 
3,300 
5,600 
1,434 
(>) 
C) 

3,031 
7,000 


$6,379 
8,955 
8,497 

(') 

33,342 

2,243 

7,613 
(') 

4,905 
2.947 
(') 

905 

14,5.30 

3.082 
7,316 
9,022 
12,695 
2,977 
2,056 
10,909 
12,015 
12,500 

18.336 

17,822 

11,340 

7,692 

1,604 
5,068 
16,194 
3.000 
5,600 
1,434 

(>) 

(') 

3,0,'if 
7.00C 


$69 

(') 
3,373 

(') 

402 
200 


$6,500 

(') 

(') 

7,000 

425,407 

(') 

35,000 
65,000 

41,000 
18,000 
(') 


.$6,500 

(') 

(') 

7,000 
206,100 
(') 
35,000 


1 




5 










2 












3 


(') 


(') 
15 

(') 
28 


(■) 


(') 


15 




15 








(') 

15,413 

721 

97 
753 

580 
300 
0) 

829 


(•) 
12,174 
516 
3,392 

794 
300 
(■) 


(') 

6,962 

1,020 

85 
5,747 

4,281 
300 
(') 


4 








5 












2 
2 




2 
2 


6 






9 




9 


7 






65,000 8 






















26.000 
12,000 
(') 


9 


2 






3 


6 


(') 


6 


27 
1 


27 


1 


10 


8 
2 




11 






12 




36 














15 

8 
4 
15 
10 
3 
3 
4 
17 


14 

,: 

1 

10 


1 
8 

9 

3 
2 

4 

7 




10,930 

435 
4,083 
6,469 
5.000 
1,240 
1,901 
11,495 
6,319 


1.000 

1.006 
813 

546 
1,097 

1,079 
500 

2,057 

500 

1S2 

1,978 

f>39 

300 

(■) 



17,000 

13,750 

90.000 
170.000 
100,000 

41,000 

(') 
325,000 

(') 

65,000 

205,000 

(') 

63,271 
140,000 

37,000 
50,000 
100,000 
150,000 
50,000 
29,801 
(') 
0) 

43,00f 
0) 


17,000 

10.000 
40,000 
60,000 
40,000 
25,000 

(') 
75,000 

(') 
65,000 

100,000 
(•) 

63,271 
60,000 

10,000 
50.000 
100,000 
150,000 
50,000 
10,000 
(■) 
(') 

25,00C 
0) 


1 




3 
50 
















1.417 


1,230 


.1 


















3 


70 

25 
C) 
30 
63 
20 

42 

C) 

61 

42 

45 
7C 

loe 

... 

72 
202 

3t 


110 

(') 
25 
30 
30 

123 
47 

98 

{') 

61 

12 

19 

7- 

9C 
41 

i 
72 
15J 

2, 
3! 








17 


14 


3 


8 


3 


5 


616 

SiiO 

2,589 

689 


608 
4,000 

321 


4 


(') 


(') 


0) 


(') 


5 


(') 




(') 








6 




2 






3 


2 


1 


7 












8 










45 


45 










2.500 
3.000 

2,997 
5.414 


11.5S1 
9.000 

10,777 
1,721 




9 








2 










10 




















24 

33 

4 

6 

4 
12 
61 


16 
(') 

4 

6 


8 

(') 

4 

6 

6 
51 


876 


5,802 
8,660 
11,340 
6,199 

1,348 
1,597 
9,739 


11 




(') 








1 




17 
9 


(') 


9 


12 












13 
















1.000 

4.922 

500 

(') 

(') 

50t 



1,729 

320 
510 

1,683 

2,500 
931 
37f 

0) 

{■) 

1,98S 


675 

1,196 
502 


14 






















15 


a 
... 


23 
115 

le 

1 


















16 






27 
18 


2 


24 
18 


27 
18 
15 


6 

la 


21 

18 


17 






18 


... 


2 


95 
6 
8 

73 

13 
5 


95 

la 


8 
73 




4,39f 
333 
0) 
(') 




134 
625 

(') 

623 
7.000 


19 








20 










164 




164 


21 
61 




21 
61 


21 


... 


4f 
( 






22 






23 


















24 































■ Colored only. 



110 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MARYLAND— Continued. 

Baltimoke— Continued. 

St . Peter's Asvlum for Female Children 

12)9 Myrtle Ave. 
St. Peter Calvers' Industrial School tor 
Colored Girls. 
416 West Biddle St. 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 

Division st. and Lafayette Ave. 

Samuel Ready School 

North and Harford Aves. 
Universal Progressive School for Orphan 
and Destitute Colored Children. 

1132 Pennsylvania .\ve. 

BuCKEY.'iTOWN: 

Buckingham Industrial School 

Easton: 

Home for Friendless Children 

FiLucoTT City: 

Maryland Home for Friendless Colored 
Children. 
Frederick; 

Episcopal Orphan House 

Loats' Orphan Asylum 

East Church St. 
Hagerstown: 

Washington County Home 

407 South Potomac St. 
TowsoN: 

St. Vincent's Male Orphan Asylum 

York Road and Five Mile Lane. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
Avon: 

Lutheran Orphans' Home 

Boston: 

Church Home 

North and Fourth Sts. (South 
Boston). 
Daly Industrial School 

Ill Train St. (Dorchester). 
Farm and Trades School 

Thompson's Island (Box um). 
Homo for Destitute CathoUc Children . . 

7SS Harrison Ave. 
Home lor Destitute Jewish Children ' . , 

Canterbury St. (Dorchester). 
House of the Angel Guardian 

85 Vemon St. (Ro.xbury). 
Hunt Asylum for Destitute Children . . . 

10 Eden St. 
Industrial School for Girls 

Centre St. (Dorchester). 
Leversidge Institution of Industry 

291 River St. (Mattapan). 
Martin Luther Orphans' Home 

Baker St. (West Roxbury). 
Massachusetts Infant Asylum 

1013 Chestnut Ave. (Jamaica Plain). 
Mount Hope Home 

Bourne and Florence Sts. (Roslin- 
dale). 
New England Home for Little Wan- 

202 West Newton St. 
Nickerson Home for Children 

14 Tyler St. 
St. Mary's Infant .\sylum 

90 Cushing Ave. (Dorchester). 
St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

Camden St. and Shawmut Ave. 
Temporary Home 

43 Mount Vemon St. 

Cambridge: 

Avon Home 

309 Mount Auburn St. 
Fall RrvER: 

Children's Home of Fall River 

427 Robeson St. 
St. Joseph's Orphanage 

66 Bassett St. 
St. Vincent's Home 

2860 North Main St. 

1 Not renorted. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



St. Peter's Church (Episco- 
pal). 

Institute of MLssion Helpers 
(Catholic). 

Sisters of Charity 

Private corporation 

Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 

Private corporation 

Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 

Private organization 

All Saints Church (Episco- 
pal). 

General Synod of the Luth- 
eran Church. 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Mercy 

Augustana Synod 

Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 

Sisters of St. Joseph 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Charity 

Federation of Jewish Chari- 
ties. 
Brothers of Charity 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private organization 

Synodical Conference 

Private corporation 

Boston North End Mission . . 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Charity 

Massachusetts Society Pre- 
vention Cruelty to Chil- 
dren. 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Charity (Grey 

Nuns). 
Private corporation 



Cla.ss of children received. 



Orphan and indigent girls. . . 
Homeless girls 

Foundlings, and infant, or- 
phan, and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Normal orphan girls from 5 
to 13. 

OrphaUj destitute, and in- 
corrigible children. 

Indigent boys 

Fricndlets girls 

Homeless children from 3 io 
10. 

Orphan girls 

Orphan girls from 6 to l.'^ 

Orphan and friendless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and neglected bovs 
from 6 to 12. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected children. 

Deserving girls from 12 to 

18. 
Worthy poor orphan and 

other boys from 10 to 14. 
Neglected cliildren 

Destitute children 

Orphan, homeless, and way- 
ward boys and boarders. 
Destitute Protestant chil- 
dren. 
Dependent girls 

Destitute and homeless boys. 

German orphan children 

Infants under 2 years 

Orphan and needy children 
from 2 to 14. 

Homeless and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, homeless, and des- 
titute children. 
Dependent children 

Orphan girls 

Neglected or delinquent chil- 
dren. 

Destitute children 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 



lS4j 
1893 



1SS7 
1902 



1S9S 
1870 



1837 
1881 

1S.S:! 

1838 



law 

1899 
1814 
1864 
1899 
1851 
1833 
1853 
1881 
1871 
1.867 
1867 

1865 

1835 
1901 
1843 
1878 

1874 

1873 
1890 
1886 



No. 
Yos. 



No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 



No. 

(') 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 



(') 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



38 

33 

830 

30 

390 

3 

4 



263 

27 



23 
467 
125 
213 



22 
232 
44 



(') 



(') 



38 



Through- 



6 -a 
o 



{') 



(') 



.3,M 



(■) 



20 



2 Includes report of St. Vincent's Maternity Hospital. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



Ill 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CmLDBEN IN THE INSTITXITION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



20 
38 

617 

{■) 
(') 

60 
30 



368 



0) 



(') 



m5 
as 



77 



Dependent. 



(') 



(') 



64 



CraLDREN I 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



(') 



100 
2237 



100 
1184 



(') 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



(•) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



330 



(') 



(') 



CHILDBEN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR. 



1 
22 

195 

15 
22 



0) 
1 

7 
40 



15 

(') 

23 

555 

28 

455 

3 

13 

9 

12 

226 

19 

172 



(■) 

78 

27 
297 



0) 



J2 



(■) 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



81,011 
(') 

2 31,439 

(') 
2,923 

15,096 
3,312 



2,300 
3,781 

4,000 

17,257 

6,071 
30,017 



47, 418 

4,069 

'40,418 

13,023 

3,425 

13, 926 

9,016 
28,525 
14,570 



Derived from- 



Ap- 

pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



S300 
9.004 



1,210 



1,250 
6,095 
(') 



1,800 
2,! 



Dona- 
tions. 



$106 
0) 

2,775 



$10,906 



3,500 
355 

310 

0) 



7,290 



4,733 



19,302 



5,722 
7,567 
9,753 
22,081 
549 
2,1 



2,242 
8,375 
6,009 

17,238 

1,645 

39,576 

1,641 

3,327 

803 

1,642 

1,458 

28 



Other 
sources 



333 



(') 



1,554 

753 
4,368 



568 
6,293 
2,350 

2,218 

1,975 

491 

8,258 



3,270 



21,360 
1,742 



$905 
(') 

8,754 

0) 
873 

11.596 
1,707 

5,140 

(') 
3,781 

2,200 



9,101 

7.515 
16,350 
28,412 



6,996 
1,507 
5,822 
19,765 
1,915 
9,951 
1,652 

27,9152 

449 

351 

3,124 

98 

9,863 

7,974 
5,70; 
12,800 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


$1,001 


$1,001 


(') 


0) 


! 31,408 


26,485 


(') 


0) 


2.971 


2,971 


15,065 


15,065 


3,100 


2,801 


10.641 


2,951 


2,081 


1,827 


2,850 


2,060 


3,555 


3,186 


11,885 


11,303 


6,035 


6,443 


16,539 


16,639 


9,279 


9,279 


48,022 


38,250 


31,120 


27, 620 


9,500 


9,600 


48,970 


15,657 


1,662 


1,652 


7,951 


7,951 


20,642 


20,642 


4,468 


4,468 


36,564 


35,564 


10,824 


10,824 


38,723 


38,723 


4,350 


3,585 


MS, 423 


38,088 


18,681 


16,373 


3,347 


3,347 


13,012 


13,012 


7,758 


7,758 


28, 478 


18, 102 


13, 1.52 


8,306 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



0) 

$4,923 
(') 



299 

7.590 

264 
800 

369 

582 

592 



9,772 
3,500 



33,313 



766 
10,335 
3,308 



10,376 
4,846 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 

(includ- 
ing 
invested 
fund.s). 



$27, 105 
(■) 

2 220,000 

(') 
2,000 

116,003 
33,160 

(') 

(') 
56,400 

91,000 
(') 

15,500 
247,232 



127, 
277, 
226, 

12, 
245, 

22, 
137, 
463, 

36, 
198, 

52, 



794,390 

24, 16' 
'91,000 
124,000 

67,000 

210, 803 

129,000 
135,000 
73,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$17,626 
C) 

220,000 

(•) 
2,000 

77,332 
9,000 

(>) 

(') 
29,250 

16,000 
(') 

15,500 



100, 
62, 

140, 
12, 

245, 
5, 
20, 

236, 
25, 
51, 
16, 



145,900 

10,000 
91,000 
124,000 
57,000 

36,700 

33,000 
135,000 

73,000 



25 
26 



28 
29 

30 
31 

32 

33 
34 

35 

36 



10 
U 
12 
13 



15 
16 
17 

18 



20 
21 

22 



■ Formerly known as Helping Hand Home (Ro.xbury). 



* Boarders. 



* Includes report of St. Mary's Lying-in Hospital. 



112 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MASSACHUSETTS— Continued. 

Fitchburg: 

Fitchburg Union Aid Home Tor Chil- 
dren. 
27 Holt St. 
FoXBORo; 

St. Augustine's Children's Farm and 
Convalescent Home. 
Holyoke: 

Holy Family Institute 

Springfield Road. 

Mount St. Vincent 

Htde Park: 

New England Peabody Home for Crip- 
pled Children. 
Hale St. 
Lawrence: 

Child ren 's Home 

76 Howard St. 

Protectory of Marv Immaculate 

1S9 Maple Ave. 
Longmeadow: 

Doane Orphanage 

17 Longmeadow St. 
Lowell: 

Children's Home 

60 Kirk St. 

Faith Home for Children 

249 Westford St. 

French-.\merican Orphan Asylum 

St. Peter's Orphan Asvlum . ." 

38S Chelmsford St." 

Theodore Edson Orphanage , 

13 Anne St. 
Malden: 

Volunteer Children's Home 

42 Sea View Ave. 
Millbuet: 

St. Joseph's Industrial School 



Supervised or conducted by— 



Newburyport: 

Home for Destitute Children 

9 Court St. 
Newton: 

Pomrov Home 

24 Horey St. 

Working Boys' Home 

Winchester St. (Newton Highlands), 
Newton Center: 

Home for Missionaries' Children 

1136 Center St. 
Revere: 

Ingleside Home 

148 Prospect Ave. 
Salem: 

Salem Seamen's Children's Home 

7 Carpenter St. 
Springfield: 

Springfield Home for Friendless Women 
andChUdren(Children'sDepartment).^ 
37 Buckingham St. 
Taunton: 

Bethlehem Home 

71 Summer St. 
Welle sley Hills: 

Convalescent Home of the Children's 
Hospital. 
Forest St. 
Westfield: 

Shurtleff Mission to the Children of the 
Destitute. 
Franklin St. 
Worcester: 

Orphanage of Our Lady of Mercy 

46 High St. 
St. Ann's French Canadian Orphanage. 
73 Granite St. 



MICHIGAN. 
AssiNiNS: 

St. Joseph's Asylum 

Battle Creek: 

Haskell Home 

156 Hubbard St. 
Bay City: 

Children's Home 

1800 Columbus Ave. 
Lutheran Children's Home.. 
1203 Tenth St. 



Private corporation . 



Society ofSt. John the Evan- 
gelist. 



Sisters of Providence. 
Sisters of Providence. 
Private corporation . . 



Ladies' Union Charitable 

Society. 
Sisters of Charity (Grey 

Nuns). 

Private corporation , 



Class of children received. 



Needy chUdren. 



Orphan children . 



Infants and orphan and des- 
titute boys under 14. 
Orphan girls 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Charity of Nazareth 

St. Anne's Church (Episco- 
pal). 

Volimteers of America 



Xaverian Brothers. 



Sisters of Charity of Nazareth 



Private corporation . 
Xaverian Brothers.. 



Woman's Baptist Foreign 
Missionary Society. 

Private corporation , 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Sisters of Mercy 

Children's Hospital (Boston> 

Private corporation 



Destitute cripples under 12. 



Orphan and neglected girls 

from 2 to 12. 
Orphan, abandoned, and 

needy children. 



Orphan children . 



Homeless and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, neglected, and des- 
titute children. 

Orphan children 

Orphan girls from 4 to 1 4 



Orphan boys from 2 to 5. , 
Needy children 



Orphan, incorrigible, and 
destitute boys. 

Orphan children 



Destitute girls 

Wayward and neglected 
boys. 

Foreign missionaries' chil- 
dren. 

Wayward girls from 13 to 18. 
Destitute children , 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren under 2. 

Convalescent children 



Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy. 

Sisters of Charity (Grey 
Nims). 



Sisters of St. Agnes.. 
Private corporation. 



Private corporation. . . 
Synodical Conference.. 



Destitute children from 3 to 9 



Orphan , neglected , and 
abandoned children. 

Homeless children from 3 to 
12. 



Orphan children 

Orphan and dependent ehil- 



'Z 



en. 



* Not reported. 



* Colored only. 



Homeless and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected children. 

• Exclusive of summer visitors. 



1901 

1892 
1881 
1894 

1875 
1868 



1902 

1883 

1908 
1S77 

1875 

1901 

1900 

1892 

1872 
18S3 

1879 

1896 

1839 

1865 

1909 
1869 

1.S95 

1876 
1S91 

1843 
1894 

1886 
1899 



Yes. 

(') 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

(') 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 



(') 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR HRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



»22 

319 

108 

10 

9 
159 

20 

125 
1 

124 

45 

1 
10 
54 
25 



198 

6 

5 

13 

46 

22 
902 



Through— 



0) 



(') 



42 



(') 



16 
4 1 



198 



20 



(') 



12 



902 



« Women received at 136 William St. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



113 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



cnn.nREN m the institution 

CLOSE OF TEAR. 


AT 


CHILDREN 
OVTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING TEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 








1 


Dependent. 


3 

be 

o 

:t 
o 

5 

1-1 
o 




SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DURING YEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from— 




<D 


•a 
. 
"&, 

11 

o 


i 

"a 
a 


.a 
o 

< 


o 
6h 


.2 

a 


a 


*3 
o 


■a 
a 


a 


o 


.2 

a 


— 

a 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care o( 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
fund.s). 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 
o 

1 


U 


R 


3 


4 










? 


1 


1 


? 


1 


1 


23 


16 




$1,067 

2,300 

30,200 
9,491 




$671 
1 700 


$331 


$66 
386 


$1,444 

2 300 


$1,444 
1 800 




(') ■ 
$5 000 


(') 
$5,000 




11 


4 


7 


11 






























214 


$500 


24 


181 


17<l 


? 


15t 




?? 




4 














306 


306 








17,711 


4,393 




23,535 
9,452 
9,905 

2,380 
13, 171 


6,627 


100,000 
50,000 
116 000 


'J"i 


127 




1''7 


1?7 










14 




14 


14 




14 


59 




w 








50,000 2,'i 
36 OOQi '''-7 


30 


IS 


n 




3n 




















7 


4 


3 


12 852 




3 925 


302 


8,625 
810 


12 716 


2,811 
100 


19 




11 


1? 
















3 




3 


S 




R 


2,480 
18,704 

6,310 

1 978 




344 


1,326 


2,480 
15,822 

4,576 

1 640 


17,620 
114,600 

22,000 
7 600 




•JS 


383 


171 


?l? 


l-?6 




?S7 


















141 


Vi 


Rl 




2,901 
5 256 


14,039 


1 824 


2,661 


114,600 
17,000 

ni 


04) 


30 


13 


17 


30 






















11 


6 


5 




774 


280 


4,575 

1,243 

2,249 

9,128 
4,674 

1,791 
3 131 


30 


41 


m 


f'1 


f'1 


f'1 


CI 


en 


(') 


('1 


(') 


(') 








4 


3 


(■) 
1 




305 


1 673 




397 


. 


13 


in 


3 


1? 




1 












2,254 

10,613 
5,805 

2,485 
2,814 
11 464 




(') 

1,481 
1 735 


(') 

5,767 
3,353 


{') 

3,340 
717 


2,249 

9,627 
7,574 

1,791 




7,000' 32 
75, 000 33 


117 
66 


42 


75 
66 


117 






















19 
38 


4 


15 

38 


$25 


499 
3,000 


75,000 
29 600 


1 








1? 




12 


I? 




1? 


4 500 31 


S 


s 




S 






















3 


3 






668 


1,817 




25, 500 3.1 


18 


7 


11 


K 




in 


















13 


S 


=i 




2,221 
738 


558 


35 


3 131 




5,000 
18,000 
(') 
37 281 


5,000 
18 000 


36 


99 


<W 




7i 








?8 


1 


1 




? 


1 




48 


48 






3,409 
1 381 


7 317 


11 449 


10, 094 
1 320 


1,355 


37 


30 


11 


19 


3n 






















24 


in 


14 


1,3S1 
2 727 








1,320 

3,347 

27, 760 


(') 
10 000 


38 


12 




1'' 


11 




1 






3 




3 








1 




] 




1,432 
4,537 

(') 
8,637 


139 


1 156 


2,578 


769 


:iq 


94 


<M 




30 




41 




11 














126 


1?6 




30,242 
(') 
9 608 




6,215 
(') 
826 


19,490 
(•) 
145 


1,022 


150,000 

10,085 
143 032 


150,000 40 


25 


II 


14 


75 






























(') 

4,048 
7 406 


(') 

4,048 
7 406 




3,000 
22,700 

11,000 


41 


14 




14 










14 














21 




1'' 






4'' 


41 


in 


34 


44 










4 




4 


■) 




? 


q 


8,007 
C>) 

7,452 
28,812 

2,571 

» 19, 992 




1,266 
855 


6,741 




43 


37 


16 


?1 


? 




3S 






■> 


1 


1 


5 


3 


2 


47 


?n 


■'7 




6,597 
10,077 

282 


7,321 


(*) 
7,321 


« 


11,000 


44 


25 


14 


11 


2.'^ 






















30 


17 


13 




45 


(') 


01 


f'l 


(') 


0) 


(') 


0) 
















(') 
8 


(') 

4 


4 




3 473 


15 262 


28,001 
2 297 


28,001 
2 114 




319, 351 
31 240 


117,424 46 


10 




1 


1 




q 




















432 


1 857 


183 


6,654 
106,300 


47 


I?.fl 


66 


M 


S'l 




31 












'l 




F, 


106 


60 






5,879 
(1) 


9,630 
(') 

1 800 


4,483 


6 12, 563 


11,380 
19, 743 


1,183 


« 117,926 

50,000 
55,629 

20,000 


48 


240 


120 


i?n 


WX 




S'' 


















1''4 


13 


71 


(1) 


(•) 


19 743 




50 000 


4'l 


8S 


40 


48 


RS 
















IS 


s 


10 








9,800 
4 516 


8,000 
122 


9,800 
4,816 

3,200 

(') 


9,800 
4 549 




1 


3S 


•'7 


II 


17 


1 


''n 












3 


2 


1 


1 


1 






467 


3,927 

185 


■'67 


31,694 
15 000 


3 


13 


1 


4 


1-' 




1 


















30 


Ti 


10 


2 273 


000 


395 


1 093 


3,000 
(') 


■'00 1 


3 


131 


5 


8 


•> 


1 


9 




I 


55 


36 


19 


16 


9 


7 


1 




1 


(') 




(') 








(I) 


4 











' Included in report of adult department. • lucludes report of St. JosepJi's Uome for Business Girls. ' Included in report of the Lutheran Children's Friend Society. 
9531°— 13 8 



114 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MICHIG AN^Continued. 

BoTNE City: 

Beulah Land Farm for Boys . . 

Coldwatee: 

State Public School 



Detroit: 

Felician Sisters' Home for Orplians.. 

St. Aubin Ave. 
Home of the Friendless 

33 Warren Ave. west. 
Protestant Orphan Asj'lum 

9S8 Jefferson Ave. 
St. Agnes'sHome for Girls 

20(i Ilorton Ave. 
St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

137 McDougall Ave. 
Farmtngton: 

Ford Republic 



Grand Rapids: 

D. A. Blodgett Home for Children. 
66 Cherry St. 

St. John's Home 

163 East Leonard St. 
Highland Park: 

St. Francis Home 

3190 Woodward .\ve. 
Holt: 

Rocky Beach Orphanage 



Houghton: 

Good Will Farm . 



Kalamazoo: 

Children's Home 

901 South West St. 
Juvenile Detention Home. 
819 Clinton Ave. 



Muskegon: 

Muskegon Children's Home 

248 Terrace St. 
Owosso: 

Dorcas Home 

800 North Hickory St. 
Saginaw: 

Home for the Friendless 

Howard and McCosky Aves. 

St. Vincent's Orphan Home 

160 Howard St. 
St. Joseph: 

Receiving Home 

1424 South State St. 



MINNESOTA. 
Duluth: 

Children's Home 

Fifteenth Ave. east and Fifth St. 

St. James's Orphan Home 

Woodland St. 
Lake Park: 

Lake Park Orphans' Home 



Little Falls: 

St. Otto's Orphanage 

Second St. 
Mankato: 

Sacred Heart Home 

827 South Baker Ave. 
Minneapolis: 

Catholic Orphan .\sylum 

Chicago .\ve. and Forty-sixth St. 

Sheltering Arras 

Forty-fourth St. and Riverside 
Boulevard. 
Washburn Memorial Orphan Asylum, 
Nicollet Ave. and Fiftieth St. 
Minnetonka Beach: 

Glen Lake Farm .School for Boys 

Hopkins P. O. 
Owatonna: 

State Public School ; 

State .\ve. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Private organization . 
State of Michigan 



Felician Sisters 

Private corporation. 

Private corporation . 

Girls' Friendly 

(Episcopal). 
Sisteis of Charity.. 



Society 



Boys' Home and D'Arcam- 
bal Association. 



Private corporation. . . 
Sisters of St. Dominic. 



Sisters of St. Joseph. 
Private corporation . 

Private corporation . 

Private corporation . 
Juvenile Court 



Muskegon Humane Union . . 
Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Sisters of Charity 



Michigan Children's Home 
Society. 



Private corporation 

Sisters of St. Benedict.. 



United Norwegian Lutheran 
Church. 

Franciscan Sisters of the Im- 
maculate Conception. 

Calced Carmelite Nuns 



Sisters of St. Joseph 

Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 



Private corporation . . 
County of Hennepin . 
State of Minnesota . . . 



Class of children received. 



and neglected 



Homeless 

boys. 



Dependent, ill-treated, and 
neglected children under 
14. 

Orphan and indigent girls. . 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren from 2 to 12. 

Orphan, delinquent, and 
neglected girls. 

Orphan and destitute girls. , 



and homeless 



Delinquent 
boys. 

Foundlings, orphan and 
homeless children. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren from 3 to 16. 

Orphan boys 



Orphan, abandoned, and il- 
legitimate children under 
14. 

Dependent and homeless 
children. 

Homeless girls from 5 to 14. . 

Dependent and delinquent 
children pending court ac- 
tion. 

Orphan, neglected, and de- 
pendent children. 

Homeless and delinquent 
children. 

Friendless and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Curable, physically defec- 
tive, and dependent chil- 
dren under 12. 



Orphan and needy children. 
Catholic orphan children 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Destitute orphan children. . . 

Orphan and dependent boys. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



1883 
1907 
1885 
Not reported. 2 Only 8 occupied. ' Exclusive of donations other than cash. < Includes amount paid by diocese for salaries, fuel, and improvements. 



Orphan children 

Delinquent boys 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 



1882 
1862 
1836 
1909 
1851 

1903 

1887 
1888 

1828 

1S90 

1899 

1867 
1908 

1887 

1897 

1S71 
1875. 



1S83 
1900 

1895 

1895 

1879 

1878 
1880 



No. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 



Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes.. 
Yes. 



Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 



children received for hrst 

TIME IN 1910. 



58 
289 

65 
111 

64 

9 

109 

147 

180 
40 

232 

12 

50 

22 
34 

60 

13 

202 
3 



97 
154 

7 

34 

3 

69 
76 



13 

85 

239 



(>) 



Through— 



o 



34 



(') 



" to 

£1 

O 



«£ 



GENERAL TABLES. 



115 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE TOSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



32 
197 

79 
CO 

106 
13 

200 



77 
148 

278 

10 

33 
(') 

96 

10 

59 
120 






(') 



Dependent. 



100 



(■) 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

ITNDER 
SUPERVISION 



1438 



6S 



(') 



200 



15 



532 



(') 



139 



29 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FA MILIE3 

DURING 

YEAR. 



w 



(') 



(') 



(') 



204 



(') 



C) 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR 



4 
S3 

125 

116 



292 



14 

48 

3; 

10 

139 
(') 

23 

70 
71 



22 

2 

62 
4 



C) 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$3,928 
46,751 

3 2,800 
12,240 
16,324 

2,285 

(') 

16,319 

12,003 

8,000 

9, 860 
179 

11,193 

(') 
2,694 

4,79'; 
3,035 

9,178 

(') 

(') 

11,966 
4,340 

11,026 

5,000 

11,394 

6,838 
9,072 

25,359 

15,000 

85,108 



Derived from- 



Ap. 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



$40,500 



2, 094 



(«) 



(') 



15,000 



84,319 



Dona- 
tions. 



(') 



'$2,800 
4,198 
2,860 
2,285 
3,000 



2,430 

6,000 

5, .860 
179 

8,164 
(') 



61 

1,000 

80 
(') 

(•) 

3,084 
2,420 

8,420 

4,500 

2,329 

6,83 
(■) 



Other 
sources 



(') 



$3,195 
3,927 



(') 

161 

3,705 
3,000 



2,236 



304 

1,000 

2,119 
(') 

C) 

5,219 
1,920 

574 

600 



(>) 



$6,261 



4,847 
8,537 



10,723 
5, 



803 



4,427 

600 

6,979 
(') 

(») 
3,213 



1,343 



25,359 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 



$3,928 
46,7) 

3 2,800 
11,006 
13,416 
2,285 
13,000 

15,799 

11,450 

4,900 

» 22,000 
200 

10,886 

2,6S 

5,196 

3,100 

7,688 
C) 

C) 

11,098 
6,584 

19,000 

4,600 

13, 30' 

6,388 
7,994 

24,635 

16,000 

78,686 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$3,928 
46,211 

3 2,800 
10,004 
11,443 

2,285 
13,000 

16,616 

11,317 
2,400 

<20,000 

200 

10, 144 

(') 
2,694 

4,370 
2,600 

7,688 

(') 

(«) 

10,669 

4,i 

10,000 

4,500 

0,761 

5,888 
7,994 

23,929 

(>) 

59,933 



$500 



1,002 
1,973 



183 

133 

2,600 

2,000 



742 



825 
500 



429 
1,728 

9,000 



6,546 
500 



706 
18,753 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
in vested 
lunds). 



$8,000 
282,279 

60,000 
138,000 
147,714 



50,000 

65,415 

238, 194 
76,000 

215,000 



15,000 



151,000 

6,000 

101,964 
(■) 

54,300 
175,000 

50,000 

30,000 

40,000 

141,000 

(■) 

615,923 

28,000 

293,633 



Land, 

build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$8,000 
281,279 

60,000 
50,000 
60,000 



50,000 
55,415 

157,025 

75,000 

215,000 



15,000 
(>) 



15,000 

5,000 

25,000 
(■) 



(«) 

60,000 
175,000 

47,000 

30,000 

40,000 

141,000 

(•) 

141,686 

28, 000 

293,533 



9 
10 
11 



13 

14 

1$ 
Ifi 

17 

18 
19 

20 

21 

22 
23 



1 

2 

1 

« 
i 

« 

7 

S 

» 
10 



s Includes 63 boarders. 



• Included in report ol the Michigan Children's Home Society. 



116 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



mNNESOTA— Continued. 

St. Paul: 

Catholic Oqihan Asylum , 

933 Carroll St. 

Protestant Orphan Asvlum 

fi70 Marshall Ave. " 
St. Joseph's German Catholic Orphan 
Asvlum. 
Randolph St. 
Twin Valley: 

Wild Rice Orphanage 



Vasa: 

Vasa Orphans' Home. 



Wabasha: 

St. Joseph's Orphanage. . 

MISSISSIPPI. 
CoLUMiurs: 

Poliner Orphanage 



Jackson : 

Methodist Orphanage 

West St. 

Mississippi Baptist Orphanage 

Bailey Ave. 
Meridian: 

Masonic Orphans' Home 

Twenty-third Ave. and Twentv- 
Gfth St. 
Natchez; 

Devereux Hall Asylum 

Protestant Orphan Asylum 

North Union St. 
St. Mary's Female Orphan Asylum. . . 
Jeftcrsou and Rankin Sts. ' 

MISSOURI. 
Conception: 

St. James' Industrial School 

Des Peres: 

German Lutheran Orphan Home 

Webster Groves, R. D. 5. 
Kansas City: 

Detention Home 

514 Oak St. 

Gillis Orphans' Home 

Tvpenty-second St. and Tracy Ave. 

Kansas CitV Bovs' Orphan Home 

922 Wcstport Ave. 

St. Anthony's Home for Infants 

Twenty-third St. and College Ave. 

St. Joseph's Orphan Home 

Thirty-first and JelTerson Sts. 
Nevada: 

St. Francis Academy 

R. D. 1, Box 2. 
Normanpv: 

St. Frances Orphan Asyhim 



St. 



Patton^'ille: 

Baptist Orphans' Home 

St. Louis P. O. 
St. Joseph: 

Home for Little Wanderers 

SOI North Twenty-eighth St. 
North Western Colored Orphanage 

ISir. South Sixth St. 
Sheltering Arms of St. Joseph 

Main and Pauline Sts. 
Louis: 
Bethesda FoimdUng Home 

3651 Vista Ave. 
Christian Orphans' Home 

2951 North Euclid Ave. 
German (ieneral Protestant Orphans' 
Home. 

44-17 Natural Bridge Road. 
German Protestant Orphans' Home... 

St. Charles Rop'k Road (Wellston). 
German St. Vincent's Orphans' Home. 

1421 HoganSt. 
Girls' Industrial Home 

5501 Von Versen Ave. 
Methodist Orphans' Ilome^ 

43S5 Maryland A-ve. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Sisters of St. Joseph . 
Private corporation. 
Private corporation. , 



Norwegian Lutheran Synod 



Swedish Lutheran (Augus- 
tana Synod). 

Sisters of the Sorro\vful 
Mother. 



Presbyterian Synods ©f 
Louisiana and Mississippi. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 
Mississippi. 



Brothers of the Sacred Heart. 
Private organization 



Sisters of Charity (St. V^in- 
cent de Paul). 



Benedictine Sisters.. 
Private corporation. 



County of Jackson 

Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 
Sisters of Charity 



Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of St. Joseph. 



Sisters of St. Francis. 



Oblate Sisters of Providence 



Missouri Baptist General As- 
sociation. 

Ladies' Union Benevolent 

Association. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation. 



Private corporation 

National Benevolent Associ- 
ation of Christian Church. 
Private corporation 



German Ev angelical 

churches. 
Sisters of Christian Charity. 

Private corporation 



Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 



Class of children received. 



Orphan and abandoned girls. 

Orphan children , 

Orphan children 



Dependent, indigent, and 
neglected children. 

Orphan children 



Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 



Destitute orphan children- 



Destitute orphan children, 

from 2 to 11. 
Orphan cliildren 



Masons' orphan children, 
from 2 to 14. 



Orphan boys, from 2 to 14. . . 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, abandoned, and 
destitute girls. 



Orphan girls from 2 to 16 

Orphan children 



ISiJO 


Yes 


1865 


No. 


1S77 


No. 


1898 


Yes 


1865 


Yes 


1908 


Yes 



1893 
1908 



1865 
1816 



Delinquent cliildren, under 

17, pendin!^ tri^l. 
Orphan children 

Orphan boys 



Orphan, destitute, and aban- 
doned children under 2. 
Orphan and neglected girls. 



Indigent children . 



Orphan, destitute, and aban- 
doned girls, from 3 to 12. 

Orphan and indigent ctiil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren over 2. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Foundlings, and orphan and 
homeless children. 

FountUings and orphan chil- 
dren under 3. 
Orphan children under 12. . . 

Orphan children under 14. . , 



Orphan children 

Orphan children from 2 to 14. 
Orphan and destitute girls. . . 
Destitute orphan children. . . 



1892 
1868 

1906 
1870 



1899 
1879 

1893 

1882 

188S 

1S94 
1903 
1906 

1SS9 
1889 
1877 

1858 
1850 
1854 
1867 



No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

(=) 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 



25 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



313 
26 
30 

20 
9 
13 



(■) 



10 

27 

1,102 
48 
120 
117 
250 

123 

15 

57 

0) 
42 
39 

205 
108 
22 

» 

"l 

25 
111 



Through— 



(') 



32 



168 



G) 



(') 



24 



Not reported. 



2 In addition to main building. 



3 Exclusive of income from farm and wood shop. 



i Includes report of Maternity Hospital. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



117 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued , 



CHILDREK IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAE. 



w g 

So 

O 



Dependent. 



72 I 

(il 

42 



68 



43 43 

46 115 



50 


30 


24 


10 


44 


24 


98j 


42 


H 


72 


82^ 

1 


37 


230 


135 


238 


140 


86 




130 


73 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(>) 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDEE 
SUPERVISION. 



24 



(') 



21 



211 



(') 



105 



(■) 



CHaDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAE. 



(') 



16 



(■) 



106 



38 



(') 



(') 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURINQ YEAR. 



320 
25 

8 

9 
15 



(') 



(■) 



22 



6 
28 

212 

18 
126 
110 
(■) 



7 
45 
(') 

31 

50 
102 
23 

5 
29 
24 
90 



56 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



(') 
19,800 
10,100 

15,488 

10,816 

4,924 

7,000 

45,602 
' 19, 260 



4,331 
(■) 

3,617 



(') 
11,400 

13,680 
11,603 

8,000 
•9,461 

6,500 

5,202 

(') 

21,010 

5, 172 
16,200 
5,750 

m 

14,184 
12,506 

21,400 
18,944 
7,900 
16,913 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



81SS 



13,680 



(«) 



Dona- 
tions. 



(') 

17,500 

2,000 

15,000 

100 

4,924 

7,800 

45, 502 
18, 260 



2,544 



5,837 



340 

1,000 
3,705 
(') 

200 

C) 

17,995 

241 
15,000 
5,120 

(') 

8,804 

5,178 

4,500 
3,699 
2,500 
(') 



Other 
sources 



$290 
1,050 
2,800 

300 
584 



412 

(') 
1,948 



2,411 

4,000 
2,952 
(■) 

5,002 

480 

1,890 

72' 
300 
630 

(') 

3,786 

1,500 

6,900! 
1,235 
1,000 
(') 



J600 
1,260 
5.300 



16, 132 



1,000 
6,432 



1,170 
(') 

2,630 



(') 
3,616 



8,852 
3,000 
2,804 



350 

1,125 

4,204 
900 



1,594 
6,828 



PA'i'MENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 



$3,000 
8,800 
11,300 

15,488 
13, 123 

4,842 

7,000 

45,602 
26, 260 

21, 749 



3,963 
(') 

3,581 



(') 
10,400 

13,680 
13, 732 

8,000 
< 8, 776 

5,500 

6,167 

4, 

21,010 

4,204 

(■) 

4,911 

(•) 
13,818 
13,413 



For 
run- 
ning 
e.x- 
penses. 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$3,000 
8,000 
10,600 

9,000 
9,045 

4,842 

6,000 

14,563 
10, 260 

9,242 



3,963 
(') 

3,681 



(') 
10,400 

13,680 
13,732 
6,000 

8,697 
5,500 

5,071 

4,199 

9,174 

4,204 
(') 

4,418 

(«) 
12,902 
9,661 



ISOO 
800 



6.488 
4,078 



1,000 

30, 939 
16,000 

12,607 



(') 



(') 



2,000 
1 



86 

500 

11,836 



493 



916 
3,852 

2,000 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
inve,sted 
funds). 



' Colored only. 



« Included in report of I^ethesda Incurable Ilospitiil. 



10,000 20,0(«(i 18,000 

14,010 13,776 13,775 

4,400 7,843 7,843! 

3,375 16,913 16,913J 

Includes branch at .3533 Laclede 



(') 
(■) 
$100,000 

46,500 
2.8,000 
72,000 

25,000 

130,000 
125,000 

157,032 



60,000 
(') 



(') 
50,000 

(') 
116,833 

15,000 
< 76,300 

(') 

25,000 
14,000 
125.344 
(') 



Land, 
buOd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



(') 
$75,000 
100,000 

46,000 
28,000 
50,000 

25,000 

130,000 
125,000 

64,682 



60,000 
(') 

20,000 



(') 
50,000 

{') 

60,833 
15,000 
75,300 
(■) 

25,000 

14,000 

95,000 



(') 



9,000 9,000 



52,000 
135, 000| 
135,000, 

300, 000 
(') 
130,000 
165,000 

.\venu«. 



52,000 
135, 0(X) 
75,<m 

300,000 
40,000 
75,000 



11 

12 
13 

14 
15 
16 



11 
12 
13 

14 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 



166,000, 20 



118 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MISSOURI— Continuod. 

St. Louis— Continued. 

Mission Free Scliool 

3B9 North Taylor Ave. 
Mothers' and Babies' Home 

3(>i7 North Taylor Ave. 
Mullanphy Orphan Asylum 

Taylor and Maryland Aves. 
Orphans' Ilome 

1711 Lafayette Ave. 
Receiving nome 

4427 Margaretta Ave. 
St. Joseph's Male Orphan Asylum 

4701 South Grand Ave. 
St. Louis Colored Orphans' Home 

4316 Natiual Bridge Road. 
St. Louis Protestant Orphan Asylum . 

Church Ave. (Webster tlroves). 
St. Mary's Female Orphan Asj-lum. . . 

Emerson and Harney Aves. 
St. Philomcna's Technical School 

Huron and Cabanne .\ve3. 

SPHtNGFIELD; 

Protestant Children's Home 

Hawthorne Ave. 
Wakkenton: 

Central Wesleyan Orphan Asylum 



MONTANA. 
Butte: 

Paul Clark Home 

207 South E.xcelsior Ave. 
Helena: 

St. Joseph's Orphan Home... 
Montana Ave. 
TwTN Bridges: 

State Orphans' Home 



NEBRASKA. 
Benson: 

St. James' Orphanage 

Orphanage Ave. 
Fremont: 

Lutheran Orphan Home. . 
1544 MUitary Ave. 
Holdrege: 

Christian On>hans' Home. 
R. D. 3. 
Lincoln: 

Detention Home 

746 Rose St. 
St. Thomas' Orphanage... 



State Public School 

944 H St. 
Omaha: 

Bethlehem Children's Home 

Thirty-fourth St. and Fowler Ave. 

Child Saving Institute 

Forty-second and Jackson Sts. 
York: 

Mothers' Jewels' Home 



NEVADA. 

Carson City: 

State Orphans' Home... 



Supervised or conducted by- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Concord: 

Orphans' Home. 



Unitarian Church of the 

Messiah. 
Clu-istian Woman's National 

Benevolent Association. 
Sisters of the Sacred Heart . . 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 

Children's Home Society of 
Missouri. 

Sisters of St. Joseph 



Private corporation. . 
Private organization. 

Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Charity 



Private corporation 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Charity 

State of Montana 



orphan 
dren. 



Sisters of Mercy 

Missouri Synod 

Private corporation Orphan children 



CUkss of children received. 



Dependent and neglected 

ciiildren. 
Babies under 3 and children 

with their mothers. 
Orphan girls 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Homeless and dependent 
children. 

Orphan, destitute, and 
homeless boys. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children 



Orphan, destitute, and home- 
less girls. 
Orphan girls 



Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children, from ;3 to 12. 
Orphan ciiildren over 4 



Orphan, destitute, and aban- 
doned children. 

Neglected and dependent 
children under 16. 



Orphan and dependent chil- 






Homeless and dependent 
children. 



County of Lancaster 

Sisters of Charity (Grey 

Nuns). 
State of Nebraska 



Lutheran Augustana Synod. 
Private corporation 



Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, M. E. Church. 



Rolfe and Rumford Asylum 

15 Hall St. 
Dover: 

Dover Children's Home 

Locust St. 
St. Mary's Orphanage 

38 C'ourt St. 
Frankun: 

New Hampshire Orphans' Home 

Webster Place. 
Manchester: 

Asylum of Our Ladv of Perpetual Help 

222 Hanover St." 
Hospice St. Vincent de Paul 

253 Lake Ave. 
Manchester Children's Home 

135 Webster St. 



State of Nevada. , 



Protestant Episcopal 

Church. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Sisters of Mercy 



Private corporation . 



Sisters of Mercy 

Sisters of Charity of Provi- 
dence. 
Private corporation 



Dependent, neglected, and 
dt^Unquent children. 

Catholic orphan and depend- 
ent children. 

Mentally sound, dependent 
children under 16. 

Swedish orphan children . . 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Orphan children 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 



Orphan, indigent, and neg- 
lected children. 
Orphan and homeless girls . 



Destitute children and 
boarders. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Oi phan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Orjjhan children 

Orphan children 



Indigent and neglected Prot- 
estant on>han children. 



1836 
1899 
1827 
1843 
1891 
1835 
1888 
1834 
1843 
1834 

1894 

1864 

1899 
1881 
1894 

1874 

1892 

1889 

1907 
1904 

1881 

1901 
1896 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 



1890 


No. 


1870 


Yes. 


1S66 


No. 


I8.sn 


No. 


1892 


Yes. 


1SS8 


Yes. 


1S71 


Yes. 


1902 


(') 


1892 


No. 


1884 


No. 



CmLDBEN BECEITED FOB RBST 
TIME m 1910. 



513 

253 

4 

29 
114 
96 
22 
41 
61 
(') 

(') 



125 

46 

16 

137 
20 
54 

2 

217 



14 
25 

60 

32 
100 
24 



(') 
10 

15 
45 

54 

73 

(') 

10 

98 
16 
33 

1 
120 

10 



1 . 
3. 

f 
(') 

23 

16 
50 

(') 



Through- 



o 



an 



Not reported. 



• Twenty-three mothers in institution at close of year. 



3 Included in report of Children's Home Society of Missouri. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



119 



CARE OP CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHaDBEN IN THE INSTITUTION 
CLOSE OF YEAE. 


AT 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURINC 


YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURINQ 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 










Dependent. 






SUPER VISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DUEraa YEAE. 




Derived from — 






s 

o 


1 






to 
.ill 











Total. 




1 








a 

a 
a 

a 

1 


13 
. 




c ?; 

> 
a 


1 
< 


t 

t* 


•i 


.2 


3 


•i 


(D 


S 




6 




Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
fions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


('are of 

In- 
mates. 


Otlier 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


43 


18 


?5 






43 






14 


5 


9 


14 


8 


6 


,502 


243 


?59 


S6,543 




$440 




$6,103 


36,953 


$6,595 


$358 


$176,000 


$50,000 


21 


277 


(') 


20 






77 






?5? 


(■'■) 


C) 








190 


('1 


01 


6,643 




3,460 


$1,640 


643 


8,893 


6,754 


2,139 


6,000 


6,000 


n 


20 


20 
















4 




4 


3 




3 


(') 


(') 


C1 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


0) 


(') 


23 


96 


41 


51 


<t4 


1 




















43 


?7 


16 


16,473 




673 


1,059 


14,841 


15, 197 


14,512 


686 


350,000 


50,000 


?4 


32 


17 


15 


12 








20 


S.W 


.■iflO 


S.'iO 


179 


93 


86 


16 


9 


7 


(") 


(') 


(') 




(=) 


(') 


« 


(») 


(=) 


(=) 


2,6 


225 


225 




IS 


2 


185 


.... 


20 


56 


65 




12 


12 




112 


112 




19,345 




11,614 


4,815 


2,916 


18,031 


15,689 


2,342 


203, 176 


203, 176 


26 


33 

77 


24 
51 


9 
26 


33 
77 










2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 

49 


37 


2 

12 


2,150 
13,692 




588 
761 


947 
2,654 


616 
10,277 


2,302 
13,592 


1,986 
13,592 


316 


6,200 
300,000 


6,200 
200,000 


?7 










2S 


206 
(■) 




206 


20 
(') 


2 
(') 


184 
(•) 






61 




51 


13 
(■) 


.... 


13 
(') 


66 




66 


19,286 
(') 


(■) 


11,075 
(') 


4,620 


2,991 
(>) 


17,881 


17,464 


417 


182, 575 
(■) 


182, 676 
(■) 


29 


(') 


(') 


30 


50 


(0 


(') 


(*) 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(<) 


(') 


(*) 


(') 


W 


(') 


3,583 




2,343 


526 


714 


3,680 


3,546 


134 


14,075 


10,000 


31 


98 


M 


44 


9.S 










5 


4 


1 








8 


6 


2 


9,000 




6,800 


2,200 




10,000 


7,500 


2,500 


85,000 


56,000 


32 


48 


'<•) 


?'i 


4K 




























9,480 




9,480 






9,602 


9,602 




100,000 


100,000 


1 


17fl 


7H 


100 


126 


1 


49 


















99 


49 


50 


18,290 


$1,200 


6,720 


6,429 


3,941 


17,817 


15,283 


2,534 


86,000 


86,000 


2 


1?1 


CI 





CI 




('1 


















(') 


(■'1 


(') 


34,297 


32,000 




497 


1,800 


38,297 


34,297 


4,000 


92,000 


92,000 


3 


70 


51 


121 








16 


10 





10 


10 


fi 


64 


3,5 


29 


10,648 




5,127 


2,762 


2,769 


8,821 


7,860 


961 


60,000 


60,000 


1 


5 


? 


3 






■i 






(') 
2 

(') 

2 

115 

1 
344 


(') 
2 

(') 

1 

70 

1 
180 


(1) 


35 


16 


19 


1 




1 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


? 


56 
137 


39 
4<t 


17 


56 












i 






22 

(') 
5 
33 

3 
144 


14 


8 


11,839 
5,000 


5,000 


8,735 


1,283 


1,821 


11,500 
4,951 


9,500 
4,951 


2,000 


50,000 
8,000 


60,000 
8,000 


3 








SI 


(1) ' m 


(') 

1 

54 

1 
40 


(') 

1 

34 

48 


4 


65 
127 

20 
41 


45 
73 

6 
23 


20 
54 

14 
18 


52 
23 

17 
24 


7 


13 
97 

3 

5 17 






1 

45 
1.58 


2 

88 

1 
88 


2 
22 

1 

77 


3 
11 

2 
67 


8,000 
22,912 

2,691 
14,550 


21,780 


5,000 

2,028 
12, 0«'>4 


2,000 
80 

624 
2,486 


1,000 
1,052 

39 


8,000 
16,086 

1,849 
14,673 


7,000 1,000 
12,086 4.000 


50,000 
2,000 

5,284 
(') 


60,000 
2,000 

4,600 
(') 


5 






A 






1,849 
14,673 




7 






8 


74 


37 


37 


74 






















IS 


11 


7 


8,000 




(') 


(') 


(') 


8,000 


(') 


(') 


100,000 


100,000 


9 


01 


44 


47 


65 




?fi 


















19 


11 


g 


19,000 

8,726 


19,000 








23,917 


21,417 


2,500 


60,000 


60,000 


1 


42 


7A 


18 


20 




Mfi 










3 


2 


1 


10 


5 


5 


420 


3,050 


1,182 


4,074 


8,538 


4,772 


3,766 


94,848 


24,000 


I 


20 

37 

2ti 


23 


20 
14 


17 

26 
''O 




3 

11 

6 


















3 
4 


3 


3 

1 


9,476 

6,618 

(') 








9,476 

906 


5,884 

4,662 
1,200 


4,792 

4,343 

1,200 


1,092 
319 


208,500 
29,029 


10,000 
10,000 

(') 


? 






3 


1 


2 


3 




3 


1,883 

1,200 


3,094 

(') 


736 


3 






4 


101 


110 


51 


118 




37 




6 


397 


(') 


(■) 


37 


21 


16 


25 


14 


11 


20,247 




2,504 


10,479 


7,264 


18,214 


16, 176 


2,038 


437,967 


264,341 


5 


32 


Ifi 


10 


30 




2 












1 


1 




12 


8 


4 


3,979 


300 




3,679 




3,155 


3,155 




(') 


(') 


6 


100 


V) 


50 


ino 






















(■) 
23 


(') 
(■) 


(■) 
(') 


9,198 


(') 


(') 


(1) 


(') 


10,000 


10,000 




{') 


35,000 


7 


46 


20 


25 


45 
















1 




1 


52 


2,018 


7,128 


5,626 


5,626 




' 120,000 


40,000 


« 
















1 





* Records destroyedby fire. 



^ Includes 15 boarders. 



« Includes .'i placed in the Home to be educated. 



' ludeterniinato. 



120 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— rontinued. 

Makchester— Continued. 

Mercy Home 

86 M-immoth Road. 
Notre Dame Orphanage 

Notre Dame Ave. ' 
St. Josephs Boys* Home 

Hanover St. 
St. Patrick's Orphanage 

IS4 Hanover St. 
St. Peter's Orphanage 

55 Kelley St. 
Nashua: 

King's Daughters' Day Nursery and 
Children's Home. 

76 Kinsley St. 
Protestant Orphanage 

16 Burritt St. 
St. Joseph's Orphanage 

293 Main St. 

PORTSMOUTn : 

Chase Home for Children 

358 Court St. 

NEW JERSEY. 
Arlington: 

St. Anthony's Orphan Asylum 

Passaic and Midland Aves. 
Atlantic CiT'i : 

Children's Sea-Shore Home 

Annapohs and Atlantic Aves. 
Camden: 

Camden Home for Friendless Children. 
Haddon Ave. 

West Jersey Orphanage 

SLxth and Mechanic Sts. 
East Orange: 

Orphan Home 

197 Harrison St. 
EuzABETn: 

Elizabeth Orphan Asylum 

41 Cherry St. 
Englewoop: 

Daisy Fields Home and Hospital lor 
Cruipled Cliildren. 
Central Ave. 
Flemington Junction: 

George Junior Republic ' 

Flemington P. O. 
Gladstone: 

St. Bernard's School 

Hackensack: 

Bergen County Children's Home 8 

125 Essex St. 
Hoboken: 

Receiving Home 

502 Bloomfleld St. 
Hopewell: 

St. Michael's Orphan Asylum 

Hopewell St. 
Jersey City: 

Children's Home. . - 

134 Glenwood Ave. 
Christian Home for Orphan Children. . . 
178 Magnolia Ave. 

Home of the Homeless 

26G Grove St. 
Orphans' Homeof the Children's Friend 
93 Nelson Ave. 

St. Joseph's OriJhan Asylum 

81 Yor'K- St. 

St. Mary's Orphan Asylum 

561 "Jersey Ave. 

St. Michael's Orphanage 

Pavonia Ave. and Erie St. 
Kearney: 

Catholic Protectory 

Arlington P. O. 

Italian Protectory 

Harrison P. O. 
Lodi: 

Immaculate Conception Orphanage 

South Main. 
MoNTCLAnt: 

Children's Home : 

21 Gates Ave. 
St. Vincent's Nursery and Babies' Hos- 
pital. 
45 Elm St. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union. 
Sisters of Charity , 



Sisters of Mercy . . . 
Sisters of Mercy . . . 
Sisters of Charity . 



King's Daughters' Benevo- 
lent Association. 



Private corporation . 
Grey Nuns 



Private corporation . 



Missionary Sisters of the 
Sacred Heart. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 

Private corporation . 

Private corporation . 

Private corporation. 



George Junior Republic As- 
sociation of New Jersey. 

Private corporation 



Bergen County Children's 
Aid, and S. P. C. C. 

United Aid Society and 
S. P. C. C. 



Sisters of St. Francis. 

Private corporation . . 
Private corporation . . 
Private corporation . . 



Lutheran Ministerium of 

New York. 
Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace. 

Sistera of Charity 

Sisters of Charity 



Sisters of Charity 

Pallotme Sisters of Charity. . 



Felician Sisters.. 



Private corporation . 
Sisters of Charity 



Class of children received. 



Unprotected friendless girls 

under 14. 
Orphan girls 



Orphan, destitute, and 

abandoned boys. 
Orphan, destitute, and 

abandoned girls. 
Orphan, destitute, and 

abandoned boys. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren from 2t to 12. 

Orphanand abandoned chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 



Orphan and destitute girls.. 



Debilitated or diseased indi- 
gent city children. 



Needy children. 

Tph 
are 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
Tcn. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 



Jrphat 
dren. 



Invalid and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Delinquent, wayward, and 
tniant boys. 

Worthy boys of school age... 

Orphan, destitute, and 
homeless children. 



m. 



Homeless, dependent, and 
abandoned children. 



Destitute and 
children. 



friendless 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children 



Orphan and abandoned chil- 
dren. 
Orphan and neglected girls. . 

Orphan children 



Wayward and destitute 

boys from 14 to IS. 
Orpliau and homeless boys.. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 



jrphan 
clren. 



Orphan children 

Foundlings and destitute in- 
fants. 



1890 
1883 
1886 
1873 
1902 

1894 

1902 
1891 



1900 

1872 

1865 
1874 

18.54 

1S5S 

1893 

1910 

1900 
1900 

m 

1898 

1864 
1900 
1SS3 
1904 
1887 
1862 
1880 

1872 
1901 

1909 

18S2 
1899 



Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

(■') 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

C) 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 



m 



CinLDREN received FOE FIRST 
TIME IN 1910 



44 
3 

30 

19 



20 
66 



12 
27 
30 

32 
35 

59 
29 



1287 
26 

IS 
IC 



73 



32 
1601 



(=) 



Through - 



7. 

5. 
11 
10 



(=) 



10 



(=) 



28 



18 
2186 



« 



m 



' Included in report of Notre Dame Hospital. 
' Not reported. 



3 Includes 22 boarders. 

* Includes S31,466 from the permanent fund. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



121 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDBEN IN THE raSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



78 

16 

56 
«20 

66 

65 

18 



Dependent. 



"■9 



18 



34 



CHILDEEN 

OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



210 



m 



210 



<.') 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DDRINQ 

TEAR. 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DUEINa YEAR. 



29 

2872 
28 



1278 
20 



15 
10 



m 



29 

1594 

8 



m 



RECEIPTS DURING TEAR. 



Total. 



$7,390 

C) 
(.') 

(') 

1,949 

6,574 
11,429 

3,351 



73,231 

5,774 
6,208 

17,946 

7,243 

6,865 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



(') 



(') 



S594 



1,890 



250 



(') 



(I) 



(') 
$099 

153 

1,569 



2,426 

<53,685 

1,996 
5,026 

9,400 

4,080 

C) 



Other 
sources 



(') 
C=) 
(') 
(') 

.?G05 

1,158 

7,970 



4,196 

77S 
438 



C=) 



S7,390 
(') 
(=) 
(=) 
(') 

51 

5,263 



2,748 
744 

5,959 

3,163 



PAYMENTS nURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 



87,205 
(') 

(■) 

1,840 

2,954 
12, 776 



4,140 

41,765 

5,470 
5,702 

14,660 

6,427 

7,524 



For 
run- 
ning 

ex- 
penses. 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments 



$7,205 
(') 
(') 
(.') 
(■) 

1,840 

2,954 
9,171 

2,772 



3,417 

40,909 

4,903 
2,495 

14,078 

5,684 

7,524 



(■) 



0) 



$3,605 



729 

855 

56' 
3,207 

588 

743 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF I'EAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
lunds). 



S20, 341 
CO 
(') 
(-) 
(■) 

5,276 

6,500 
90,000 

86, 013 



17,150 

550,000 

70,000 
25,000 

140,604 

90,000 

15,000 



Land , 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$15,000 
(') 
C-) 
C-) 
(') 

4,000 

5,000 
90,000 

6,500 



17,150 

300,000 

30,000 
10,000 

85,000 

75,000 

15,000 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 



15 

16 



9 

10 

11 

12 

13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
IS 
19 

20 
21 

22 



46 

323 

35 



30 

276 

62 

99 

180 

75 



O 



(') 



(=) 



C=) 



23 



m 



79 



32 

m 

19 



10 



28,300 
9,328 

C-) 

12,912 

7,525 
6,389 

m 

5,857 

m 

2,937 
10,000 

40,500 
7,993 

3,746 

6,965 
8,850 



4,755 

(■) 

2,867 



25,000 
2,294 

300 

3,407 

3,541 

(-■) 

4,591 

(=) 



3,000 
1,221 

(-•) 
1,330 



1,034 



20,000 
3,557 

920 

5,618 
7,166 



2,780 
(=) 

S37 
2,500 
1,003 
(') 

2,500 
2.092 



1,2M 
1,6S4 



300 
1,058 

(•) 

8,415 

4,118 
68 

(=) 

429 
(') 



18,000 
2,344 

2,558 

63 



28,000 
9,389 

(=) 

12,560 

5,165 
4,775 
3,300 

17,410 
(.') 
2,906 

10,200 

42,500 
7,112 

3,746 

5,986 
10,849 



15,000 

8,221 

(•) 

12,560 

3,832 
4,433 
3,200 
2,410 

r-) 

2,615 

(=) 

38,000 
5,,S62 

2,727 

5,210 
9,079 



13,000 
1,168 

(■) 



1,333 

342 

100 

15,000 

(') 
291 

C') 

4,500 
1,250 

1,019: 

776 
1,770 



60,000 
11,000 

(0 

215,000 

144,30 
50,000 
29, 500 
30,000 
(=) 
40,000 

(') 

225,000 
70,000 

30,000 

41,29' 
38,300 



50,000 
11,000 

C-) 

215,000 

50,000 
.W.OOO 
I.'i.OOO 
30,000 
(-) 
40,000 
150,000 

225,000 
70,000 

30,000 

35,000 
38,300 



* Colored only. 
8 Average. 



' Not in active operation in 1910. 

B Includes report of Children's Aid and Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. 



122 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NEW JERSEY— Continued. 

Mount Hollt: 

Burlington roimty Children's Home. 

Pine St. 
New Brunj^wtck: 

Children's Industrial Home 

190 Somerset St. 
Colored Industrial School 

llOComstock St. 
St. Mary's Orphan Asylum 

Easton Ave. 
Newark: 

Eighth Avenue Baby Shelter and Day 
Nursery. 

61 Eighth Ave. 
Foster Home 

2S4 Belleville .\ve. 
Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asy- 
lum. 

6.34 Clinton Ave. 
Home fir the Friendless 

South Orange Ave. and Bergen St. 
House of Detention 

New St. 
Newark Orphan Asylum 

3-23 High St. 
Ridgely Home for Orphans 

20 Halleck St. 

St. Mary's Orphan Asylum 

South Orange Ave. 
St. Peter's Orphan Asylum 

21 Livingston St. 
Parsippanv: 

Morris County Children's Home 

PAS.SAIC; 

Passaic Home and Orphan Asylum 

64 River Drive. 
Patebson: 

Children's Home 

848 Market St. 

Paterson Orphan Asvlum 

Market St. 

St. Josenh's Orphan Asylum 

(Totowa.) 
Plaintield : 

Children's Home 

Jackson and Westervelt Aves. 
Somerville: 

Memorial Children's Home 

Box 112. 
South Amboy: 

Christ Church Home 

Mam St. 

StJMMIT: 

Blind Babies' Home 

Pine Grove Ave. 
Fresh Air and Convalescent Home 



Trenton: 

McKinley Receiving Home 

Brunswick Ave. (R. D. 2.) 
West Hoboken; 

Holy Rosary Institution 

317 Spring St. 

St. Francis Orphan .isylum 

327 Central Ave. 

NEW MEXICO. 



Albuquerque: 

Harwood Industrial School, . 
405 North Fourteenth St. 
Santa Fe: 

St. Vincent's Orphan Home.. 



NEW YORK. 
Albany: 

Albany Orphan .\sylum 

New Scotland and South Lake .\ves. 
Frances Elliott Austin Infants' Home. . 

95 Elm St. 
Holy Cross House 

72 Orange St. 
House of Detention 

80 Howard St. 
St. Francis de Sales Asylum 

Clinton and Catherine Sts. 
St. Margaret's House 

Hawk and Elk Sts. 



Supervised orconducted by — 



Private corporation. 



Private corporation. . 
Private corporation. . 
Sisters of St. Francis. 

Private corporation. . 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 

Private corporation. 

County of Essex 

Private corporation . 



Independent Order of Odd 

Fellows. 
Sisters of Charity 



School Sisters of Notre Dame. 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation . 



Passaic County S. P. C. C. 

and Children's Aid. 
Private corporation 



Sisters of Charity., 



Private corporation . 



Judson Memorial Church, 
New York. 

Private organization 



International SuiLshine So- 
ciety. 
Private corporation 



New Jersey Children's Home 
Society. 

Pallotine Sisters of Charity. . 

Franciscan Sisters of the Im- 
maculate Conception. 



Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, .M. E. Church. 

Sisters of Charity 



Private corporation. 
Sisters of Charity 



Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 

Mohawk and Hudson River 
Humane Society. 

Sisters ol Charity 



Coming Fotmdation. 



Class of children received. 



Homeless and dependent 
children. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Orphan children over 6 



irph 
dren under 7. 

Children under 8. 



Orphan children from 3 to 9.. 
Orphan children 



Orphan children 

Delinquent children.. 
Orphan children 



Orphan children of Odd Fel- 
lows or Rebekahs. 
Orphan children 



Orphan children. 



Indigent children , 

rpt 
dren. 

Homeless children 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Orphan children 



Destitute children.. 



Foundlings, and orphan and 
homeless children. 

Orphan and destitute girls.. 



Blind children too young to 
enter other institutions. 

Children convalescent or 
needing preventive care. 

Normal destitute children. . . 



Orphan girls 

Orphan and indigent girls. 



Mexican girls 

Mexican orphan girls. . 



Destitute and dependent 
childrpji. 

Orphan and destitute in- 
fants. 

Abandoned and friendless 
children. 

Delinquent and neglected 
chilaren. 

Orphan and abandoned 
children under 6. 

Orphan, homeless, and other 
infants. 



1864 

1876 
1897 
1893 

1892 

1848 
1861 

1872 
1910 
1849 
1895 
1858 
1868 

1881 

1882 

1905 
1864 
1851 

1877 

1893 

1857 

1909 
1887 



1906 
1904 



1S96 



IS29 
1909 
1903 
1902 
1886 
1883 



No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 



No. 
No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

(«) 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 



(') 



children RECErVED POR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



6 

29 

126 



21 
6 

45 
928 
27 
7 
50 
37 

15 
12 

53 
33 
C) 

(■) 

15 

1 

9 
(') 

93 

30 
4 



29 
45 

85 

51 

20 

603 

55 
121 



(') 



Through- 



(') 



928 



o 



0) 



28 
o 



(■) 



— a 



0) 



• Not reported. 

> Included in report of Passaic County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. 



« Included in 
* Includes 1 9 



report of New Jersey Children's Home Society, 
boarders. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



123 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDBEN IN THE INSTITOTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



52 
114 

54 

115 

56 

63 
27 

87 

17 

240 

203 

78 
31 

29 
96 
105 

(') 
33 

14 

17 
(') 

50 

85 

85 



Dependent 






^'^ 



(') 



(') 



(•) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION, 



100 



{') 



(') 



(') 



25 



(') 



(■) 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



29 



12 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



12 



(') 



(') 



(') 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR 



0) 



I 

16 
13 

160 
19 
6 

(') 

14 

2 

0) 

(■) 



(') 

(') 
(') 

153 
34 
2 
(') 
47 
HI 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURINO YEAR. 



Total. 



$6,750 

8,790 
2,321 

6,803 

10,083 

14,832 
25,983 

8,393 

(■) 
3,574 
2,592 
12,862 

4,422 

11,400 
4,106 

(=) 
11,583 
(') 

3,588 

7,047 

2,388 

8,702 
8,622 

(=) 

7,200 

(■) 



2,600 
(') 

104, 938 

w 

3,970 
(') 

6,279 
15,043 



Derived from- 



Ap. 

pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



$1,400 



1,422 
2,000 



(') 



5,716 



0) 



(■) 



20,439 

(■) 
(') 

6,137 
4,204 



Dona- 
tions 



$1,220 

5,016 

3D 

1,406 

1,146 

683 
21,091 

1,520 



3,434 
1,633 
5,535 
1,271 

3,225 

2,548 

(') 

648 
(') 

1,552 

4,346 

(0 

8,702 
2,707 

W 
3,055 

C) 



200 
(') 

75,507 
(•■) 
(') 
(') 

142 
4,829 



Care ot 

in- 
mates. 



$1,454 

29 
2,246 
848 

l,i 
1,503 



140 

706 

7,181 

3,151 



Other 
sources 



$4,076 

2,07 

45 

3,127 

5,050 

12,646 
4, 

6,873 



1,054 



(') 

778 
2,439 
(') 



2,881 

m 

2,945 
(') 

1.000 
(>) 






253 
146 



2,459 
504 



10,935 
(') 

1,25.9 

262 

(') 



3,034 
0) 

1,200 
(') 

1,400 
(') 

8,992 
(.') 
(') 
C) 



3,540 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


$6,881 


$6,881 


23,627 


4,627 


3,361 


2,561 


6,763 


5,438 


U),083 


8,015 


15, 192 


15,192 


23,224 


23,224 


6,691 


6,691 


(') 


(■) 


11,498 


11,498 


2,348 


2,348 


13,702 


13,702 


4,311 


3,736 


12,000 


10,938 


3,639 


3,086 


(') 


W 


10,851 


9,599 


(>) 


(') 


3,541 


3,177 


7,530 


7,530 


0) 


(■) 


7,284 


5,566 


10,775 


9,631 


(') 


(.') 


6,119 


4,919 


(') 


(■) 


2,600 


2,000 


(■) 


(') 


33,771 


31,758 


(=■) 


(>) 


3,787 


(') 


(') 


(') 


4,360 


4.366 


f5,738 


13,738 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$19,000 

800 

1,325 

2,068 



(') 



575 

1,062 
553 

(.') 
1,252 

(') 
364 



(') 

1,718 
1,144 



1,200 



600 

(') 

2,013 



(') 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



(') 

$61,500 

5,000 

40,000 

33,000 

(') 
70,000 

(') 
(') 
103,519 
26,000 
(') 
40,000 

72,38 
23,400 

286,011 
(') 

54,000 

7,600 

(') 

25,000 
61,042 

0) 

60,000 
(■) 



20,000 
(') 

402,025 

w 

26,000 
(') 
60,000 
79,000 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



(') 

$50,000 

5,000 

40,000 

25,000 

(') 
51,000 

(') 
(') 
100,000 
26,000 
(') 
40,000 

20,000 
15,000 

(') 
160,000 
(') 

20,000 



(■) 

25,000 
30,000 

(>) 

60,000 
(■) 



20,000 

(') 

200,000 
(') 
20, OOP 
(') 
60,000 
4,5,000 



25 

28 
27 
28 



30 
31 

32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 

38 
39 

40 
41 
42 

43 

44 

45 

46 
47 

¥ 

49 
50 



» Included In report ot Maternity Hospital. 



• Colored only. 



' Included in raport o( Mohawk and Hudson River Humane -Societ}'. 



124 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NEW YORK— Continued. 

Albany— Continued. 

St. Vincent's l''emale Orphan Asylum. 

106 Elm St. 
St. Vincent's Male Orphan Asylum. . . 
391 Western Ave. 
Amstekdam: 

Children's Home 

81 Spring St. 
Aubukn: 

Cayuga Asylum for Destitute Children 
66 Owasco St. 
Bath: 

Davenport Home tor Female Orphan 
Children. 
Binghamton: 

St. Marv's Orphan Home 

Chestnut St. 

Susquehanna Valley Home 

Home Ave. 
Blauvelt: 

Asylum of the Sisters of St. Dominie. . 

Bkook H.aven, L. I.: 

Suffolk County Children's Home 

Yaphank P.O. 
Brookltn.2 
Buffalo: 

Buffalo Orphan Asylum 

403 Virginia St. 
Children's Aid Society's Boys' Home. . 

261 Delaware ave." 
German Roman CatholicOrphan Asylum 
664 Dodge St. 

Immaculate Heart of Mary Asylum 

William and Kennedy Sts. (East 
Buffalo, P.O.) 

Lutheran St. John's Orphan Home 

Mineral Springs Road (West Sen- 
eca). 

St. Agnes Training School for Girls 

3233 Main St. 

St. Marv's Infant Asylum 

126 Edward St. 
St. Vincent's Female Orphan Asylum. . 

USSEllicott.Rt. 
Working Boys' Home of the Sacred 
Heart. 
35 Niagara Square. 

CAN.tND.UGL'A: 

Ontario Orphan Asvlum 

Main St. 
Chaklton: 

Charlton Industrial Farm School 

Claekstown: 

St. -Vgatha Home for Children 

Nanuet P.O. 
Cooperstown: 

Orphan House of the Holy Savioiu" 

3 Beaver St. 
Cortland: 

King's Daughters' Home for Children. . 
240 Port Watson St. 
DoBBS Ferry: 

St. Christopher's Home 

DUNKIEK: 

St. Mary's Home and School 

319 Washington Ave. 
ELMraA: 

Southern Tier Orphans' Home 

300 Franklin St. 
Fkeeville: 

George Junior Republic 

Garden City, L. I.: 

House of St. G iles the Cripple 

Geery: 

Geny Homes (Orphanage Dept.) 

Habtsdale: 

St. Mary of the Angels 

Hastincs upon Hudson: 

Now York Orphanage 

Hawthorne: 

Hawthorne School 

1 Not reported. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Sisters of Charity 

Brothers of the Christian 
Schools. 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Sistere of St. Joseph 

Private corporation 

Sisters of St. Dominic 

County of Suffolk 

Private corporation 

Buffalo Children's Aid So- 
ciety. 

Sistere of Third Order of St. 
Francis. 

Felician Sist«rs of St. Francis 

Lutheran churches of Buffalo 
and vicinity. 

Sisters of Our Lady of Chari- 
ty of Refutie. 
Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of St. Joseph 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Charily (St. Vin- 
cent de Paul). 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

King's Daughters 

Methodist Episcopal Chiu'ch. 

Sisters of St. Joseph 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Protestant Episcopal Church 
Free Methodist Cliurch 

Sisters of Misericorde 

Orphan Asylum Society in 
tne City of New York. 

Jewish Protectory and .\id 
Society. 

2 See New York City. 



Class of children received. 



Orphan and destitute girls 
under 16. 

Orphan, destitute, and way- 
ward boys. 

Orphan and ne^dy children. . 



Homeless and destitute chil- 
dren from 2 to 12. 

Orphan girls from 5 to 9 



Orphan and destitute chil- 



Jrphar 
dren. 



Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Destitute and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Destitute children 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Working hoys from 10 to 18. . 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Oiphan and homeless chil- 
dren from 2 to 12. 

Delinquent girls 

Orphan children under 5. . . 

Homeless girls 

Homeless working hoys 



C)rphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Homeless and wayward boys 
Orphan and destitute chil- 



Jrph: 
ore] 



Orphan and destitute chil- 



Jrpl 
dri 



Oiphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Dependent and destitute 
children. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 



't\ 



Dependent children from 2 
to 16. 

Destitute, neglected, and de- 
linquent children. 

Cripple children , 



OriJlian and homeless desti- 
tute children. 



Destitute children 

Destitute orphan children. 



Delinquent Jewish boys. 



1S17 
1S.54 

18S3 

lSo2 

1S63 

1S7S 
1869 

1878 

1879 

1837 
1870 
1874 
1S95 

1S64 

1007 
1852 
1848 
1800 



1896 

1885 

1S70 

1906 

ISSl 

1858 

im;S 

1895 

1890 
ISS6 

18S7 
1806 



No- 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 



1- 



C) 



No. 
» Includes report of St. Mary's Maternity Hospital. 



children received fob PTE3T 
TIME IN 1910. 



31 
9 

41 

81 

189 
48 

149 
156 
176 
113 

13 

35 

495 

64 

60 

28 

g 
167 

33 

49 

22 

59 

41 

101 

22 
53 

6 528 
43 



60 



6268 
24 



98 

14 

27 

15 

33 

IS 

21 

16 
23 

6260 
19 



Through- 



e-9 

O 



3 o 

Zi M 



(') 



32 
19 

59 

11 

37 

6115 



(') 



GENERAL TABLES. 



125 



CARE OF CHILDREN: ] 910— Continued. 



CHaOKEN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF -i-EAR. 


CniLDBEN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
BAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS 


DURING YEAR 




PAYMENTS DU 


Rmo 


VALUE OP 

PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAH. 




1 

175 
93 

29 

52 

70 

163 
155 

043 

5S 

124 

70 

3.50 

264 

78 

64 
102 
191 

47 

60 

31 

525 

71 
39 

120 
82 
31 

156 

48 
65 

'203 
225 

301 


•i 

a 

92 
20 
26 

88 
99 

285 

36 

55 

70 
205 
154 

45 

46 
47 

37 

31 
239 

34 

25 

50 

40 

22 

102 

2S 
32 

5105 
120 

301 


175 

9 

20 

70 

75 
56 

358 

22 

69 


Dependent. 


.U 
o 

& 

.g 


1 

a- 

"3 

P 


SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
TEAK. 


DURING YEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from — 




o 


Sa 

n 

no 
5 

118 
42 

29 


1 

a 


o 

a 

< 

57 
30 


o 


.2 

a 


a 


3 

o 


1 


03 


o 


.S 
110 

s 

22 

28 
44 

121 

10 

80 
105 
94 


S 

a 

5S 

3 
14 

8 

10 
24 

98 

17 

95 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care Of 

in- 
mates. 


other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
c.-c- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
build- 

ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 
a 

■B 

a 
a 


58 
110 

11 

30 

8 

44 

08 

219 
33 

152 
10.^1 
189 


$19, 900 
30, 07,1 

23,715 

12,565 

22,838 

18, 930 
20,973 

92,846 

4,937 

21,005 

8,430 

41,581 

22,462 

14,511 

9,946 

3 25,005 

20,678 

5,523 

8,995 

10,018 
77,120 

13,031 
7,699 

26,458 

12,748 
6,845 

26,887 

15,228 
5,990 

m 

81,100 
88,289 


517,516 
27,006 

254 

5,000 


$820 
1,34.5 

21,248 

9.S0 


$227 
243 

1,145 

840 


81.397 
1,481 

1,068 

5,739 

22,838 

10 
S04 

2.943 

55 

12,775 
1, 19S 
5,970 

10,530 

4,178 

2,367 
5,616 
1,235 
3,874 

6,937 

1,893 
738 

3,881 

3,813 

9,344 

5,348 

3,255 

10,646 

7,903 
320 

(») 
81,000 

845 


819,900 
29,418 

23,137 

11,959 

24,339 

18,923 
20,433 

95,337 

4,77i 

17,982 

8,334 

33,997 

22,462 

14,511 

7,642 

8 24,045 

20, 117 

6,553 

8,995 

9,969 
77,236 

13,031 
7,656 

26,372 

13,491 
7,835 

68,669 

13,548 
5,930 

{•) 
01,146 

'101,837 


SIS, 510 
24,482 

4,827 

11,959 

18,654 

16,422 
20,433 

93,007 

4,778 

17,982 
8,334 
30,474 
15,572 

14,511 

0,590 
22,414 
20, 117 

5,851 

8,326 

7,156 
77,236 

13,031 
3,392 

26. 141 

13,091 
7,835 

59, 170 

13,286 
5,536 

(«) 
60,888 

'89,607 


$1,456 
4,936 

18,310 

6,085 
2,501 

2.330 

3,523 
6,890 

1,046 
1,631 

702 

669 
2.813 

4.264 
231 
400 

9,499 

202 
400 

m 

258 
12,230 


$75,000 
121,500 

37,570 

113,687 

683,535 

80,000 
53,700 

217, 000 

15,000 

341, 346 

90,490 

274, 134 

200,000 

170,377 

20,804 

3 150,000 

17,500 

100,000 

130,482 

112,189 
103,300 

70,285 

14,700 

288, 000 
47,500 
60,345 

148,215 

65,010 
W 

C) 
018,767 

572,500 


$75,000 
121,500 

30,000 

40,000 


7 


.... 


20 








1 
1 


1 
1 




S 








9 




62 












10 


70 

103 
68 

336 

22 

50 














1 

2 
25 


11 


1 

2 
14 


192, 8i0 11 










44 


25 


10 


17,52S 
19,972 

S5,9S5 

4,500 

0.205 

157 

17,751 

5.22S 

1,500 
3,010 
9,641 

577 

974 
08,113 

6,517 

1,521 

5,934 

2,815 

4,283 

7,180 
2,412 

(') 
40,941 


1,242 
197 

3,647 

90 
1,582 
7,092 
3,835 

7,524 

3,641 

4,718 

6,976 

26 

252 

7,000 
7,501 

1,44S 

1,695 

10,001 

130 

75 

1,223 

1,307 

(<■) 
100 

40,503 


150 

270 
382 

2,595 
5, 19B 
10, 708 
2,809 

2,809 

2,438 

11,661 

2,826 

1,623 

1,229 

151 
768 

1, IM 

070 

1.11.-! 

1,330 

700 

10,735 

145 
1,951 

C) 


80, 000 
53, 700 

217,000 

15,000 

95.000 

72.000 

274.134 

200.000 

107,500 

IS, 500 
150,000 

17,500 
100,000 

20,987 

40,000 
103,300 

37,500 

14,700 

150,000 

"47,500 

40,145 

1 IS, 215 

37.000 

{') 

(«) 
618,767 

866,310 


12 




87 

307 

30 

OS 
15 
02 






13 












14 






10 

1 

18 


5 

1 

IS 


5 


10 

9 


5 


5 
2 


15 






Ifi 


55 




17 


145 
110 

33 

G-1 
56 
191 


2S8 
264 

74 

32 
102 
191 






30 


13 


17 


IS 












19 




4 
3 


















13 

20 

370 

35 

35 

10 

1 

179 


6 

1.S5 
35 

8 

1 
75 


7 

20 
191 
35 

2 
104 


20 




29 


3 




3 








-'1 


17 


10 


7 


■)■) 
















23 






47 
















24 


23 

286 

37 

14 

76 

42 

9 

54 

20 
33 

S9S 
105 


60 

359 
71 
11 
98 
47 



9.-- 

■51 








1 


1 




3 




3 


25 




17 
100 




12 


26 














27 






S 
20 


7 
5 


1 
15 


12 
13 


s 

2 


4 
11 


28 


1 

is 


28 
28 
35 
25 
5 






20 
12 
39 
32 
SO 

33 

37 

363 
13 

(') 


10 

4 
21 
IS 
62 

IS 

l.S 

202 
(') 


10 

8 

IS 

14 

24 

15 
19 

101 
6 


29 
30 












1 



1 

2 


4 


:u 






4 
SO 




3 

24 


32 


1 


52 


33 
34 


43 
'53 






4 


3 


1 


5 


4 


1 


.35 


'149 
225 


'1 






36 






5 


2 

0) 


3 


10 


7 


9 


37 








301 


38 














1 









* Iniluded In report of Home Dopartment. 

6 Also re]x)rte."l under MLsericordia Hospital, New York. 



6 Included in report of Mlsericordia Hospital, New York. 
' includes 520,000 payment of nioitgage. 



126 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Tabie I.— institutions FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NEW YORK— Continued. 

HiCKSVILLE, L. I.: 

St. John's Piotectory 



Hudson: 

Hudson Orphan Asylum 

400 State St. 
Ithaca: 

Ithaca Children's Home 

618 West Seneca St. 
Jamestown; 

Gustavus Adolphus Orphans' Home. . . 

Kings Park, L. I.: 

St. Johnland Home 



Kingston: 

Industrial Homeof the City ot Kingston . 
East Chester St. 
Lackawanna: 

Our Lady of Victory Infant Homo. . 



St. John's Protectory 

Ridge Road. 

St. Joseph's Male Orphan Asylum 

Ridge Road. 
Lockport: 

Home for the Friendless 

Lake Ave. 
Middletown: 

Children's Home 

Kidge St. 
MiNEOLA, L. I.: 

Children's Home 

Willis Ave. 
Mount Vernon: 

Wartburg Orphans' Farm School 

East Lincoln Ave. 
New York Citt: 
Bronx and Manhattan Boruughs: 

Asylum of St. Vincent de Paul 

•215 West Thirty-ninth St. 

Colored Orphan Asylum 

West Two hundred and fiXty-ninth 
St. (Riverdale-on-Hudson). 
Darrach Home for Crippled Children. . . 
118 West One himdriMj and fourth St. 
Dominican Convent of Our Lady of the 
Rosarv. 
329 East SLxty-thiid St. 

Five Points House of Industry 

442 West Twenty-third St. 
Forty-fourth Street Boys' Lodging 
House. 
247 East Forty-foiu-th St. 

Hebrew Infant .\sylum 

One hundred and sLxty-flrst St. and 
p^agle Ave. 

Hebrew Orphan Asylum 

Amsterdam Ave. and One hundred 
and thirty-seventh St. 
Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society of 
N. Y. Orphan .Vsylum. 
One hundred and fiftieth St. and 
Broadway. 

Home for Crippled ChUdren 

3740 Broadway. 
Home for Destitute Crippled Children . . 
141 West Sixty-first St. 

Homo for the Friendless 

936 Woody Crest Ave. 



Howard Mission 

225 East Eleventh St. 
Institution of Mercy ^ 

1075 Madison Ave. 
Messiah Home for Children 

East One hundred and seventy-sev- 
enth St. and Aqueduct Ave. 
Mission of the Immaculate Virgin 

375 LafavetteSt. 



Supervised or conduoted by- 



Roman Catholic Orphan 
Asylum Society ot Brook- 
lyn. 



Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Lutheran Augustana Synod. 

Society of St. Johnland 

Private organization 



Sisters of St. Joseph 

Society for the Piotecticu of 

DestituteCathohc Children 

Sistciscf St. Joseph 



Private coi-poration . 
County of Orange. . . 
Private corporation . 



Private corporation (Luth- 
eran). 



Sisters Marianites of Holy 

Cross. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation . . . 
Sisters of St . Dominic . 



Private corporation 

Children's Aid Society . 



Private corporation . . 
Private organization . 



Hebrew Sheltering Guar- 
dian Society. 



Sisters of the Annunciation 

(ICpiscopal). 
Private corporation 



American Female Guardian 
Society and Home for the 
Friendless. 

Private corporation 



Sisters of Mercy 

Private corporation . 



Mission of the Immaculate 
A'hgin for the Protection 
of Homeless and Destitute 
Children. 

Private corporation 



Class of children received. 



Friendle.ss Catholic boys. . . 



Destitute children . 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
'en. 



Drph; 
ore: 



Orphan and friendless chil- 
dren. 



Homeless children. 



Foundlings, and orphan and 

homeless children. 
Homeless and destitute boys 

from 7 to H. 
Orphan boys 



Homeless and orphan chil- 
dren uudei 16. 

Dependent children 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children from 4 to 10. 



Destitute orphan children . 
Destitute children 



Crippled children. . . 
Dependent children. 



Dependent children from 2 

to 14. 
Homeless boys 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren under 5. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren from 5 to 12. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Crippled and incurable girls. 

Destitute crippled children. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Children of self-supporting 
parents. 

Homeless and destitutechil- 
dren. 



New York Nursery and Child's Hos- 
pital (Boaiding-out Department). 
161 WestSixty-flistSt. 

1 Included in report of Roman Catholic Oiphan Asylum Society, Brooklyn. 

2 Included in report of St, John's Home, Brooklyn. 

8 Includes report of Sunset Cottage and St. John's Inn. 
* Exclusive of value of 500 acres of land. 



1890 

1^3 

1885 

1883 

1866 

1876 

1908 
1864 
1849 

1871 

1881 

1884 

1864 

1858 
1837 

1899 
1876 

1850 
1876 

1895 

1860 

1879 

1893 
1903 
1834 

1860 
1846 

1885 

1870 



Homeless and indigent chil- 
dren. 



6 Not reported. 
' Includes special 
'Corporate name 
1075 Madison Ave., 



Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Y'es. 

Y'es. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Y'es. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

(') 
No. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 



No. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



17 

■20 

4 

24 

31 

284 
394 
130 

69 

16 

23 

36 

57 
83 



305 
1084 

84 

319 

27i> 

9 

1 
158 

7 
246 
(') 

(«) 



(.') 



1 
16 

IS 

172 

394 
130 

30 

12 

15 

19 

28 
49 

4 
222 

180 
1084 

45 

189 

177 



Through- 






(.') 



238 



(«) 



ell's 

O 



18 



33 



«* 



w 

8... 
19 

1 

24 

21 

239 
165 

95 

10 



17 
1084 



donation of $26,080. 

Includes report of St. Joseph's Home for Girls, 
N. Y., and Home for Boys, Tarrytown, N. Y. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



127 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREK IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF TEAR. 



139 
1205 
696 

24 
22 
19.'i 

15 
862 
(') 

(») 






P.S 

o 



Dependent. 



(•) 



24 



99 



(') 



CHILDEEN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDEE 
SUPERVISION 



544 



239 



SS3 



20 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DUEINQ 

YEAR. 



CHILDKEN 

DISCHARGED 

DURIUa TEAR. 



2; 

r 

10 

37 

47 

145 
461 
107 

44 

3 

20 

24 

63 
91 

(') 
311 

248 
1073 

97 

392 

283 

5 

4 

125 

15 
319 
(') 

(») 
665 



28 
51 

(') 
203 

128 
1073 

55 

232 

169 



EECEIPT8 DURINO TEAS. 



Total. 



(') 

S8,161 

3,119 

5,763 

' 41, 182 

5,900 

13, 775 
123,452 
26,938 

9,554 

6,585 

10,440 

32, 270 

26,605 
•99,636 

4,705 
134,368 

50, 245 
10, 610 

50,657 

327, 650 

151,868 

40,526 

5,232 

201,278 

5,971 

119,276 

9,302 

9412,500 

(10) 



Derived from- 



Ap. 
pro- 
pria- 
uons. 



(') 

J3,034 

36 

1,918 



(=■) 
19,751 
5,412 

3,218 

6,585 



9,50; 
35,072 



23,626 
4,060 

(') 

157,674 

106, 766 



115,078 



164,286 



(10) 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



(') 

$30 

1,429 

3,117 

7,317 

1,934 

(') 
15,36' 
188 

1,509 



450 
23,801 

1,303 
"31,439 

(=•) 
2,880 

7,991 
1,720 

(') 

118,428 

34, 713 

18, 275 
3,107 
45, 151 

3,053 
1,181 
2,220 



(.0) 



Other 
sources 



$368 

621 

110 

6,460 

2,638 

m 

4,062 
1,898 

1,160 



5,693 
6,748 

6,355 
1,424 



1,522 
3,791 

(') 



46 
3,613 



1,588 
3,203 

20,443 

(10) 



C) 

$4, 709 
702 
618 

27,405 

1,328 

(') 
84, 272 
19,440 

3,667 



4,297 
1,721 

9,440 
31,701 

(>) 
7,055 

17,106 
1,039 

(') 

51,448 

10,125 

22,251 

2,079 

40,345 

2,918 
1,429 
3,879 

227, 771 

(10) 



PAYMENTS DUEmO 
YEAR. 



Total. 



$7, 61S 
2,754 

11,983 

Ml, 182 

5,164 

13,716 
123, 452 
26,833 

11,345 

6,591 

11,336 

29,973 

24,903 
72, 595 

5,166 
133, 181 

50, 245 
10, 610 

39,484 

383,972 

157,758 

39,054 

5,053 

165, 121 

5,093 
116,846 
(') 

'407,734 

(.0) 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses , 



lor 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



S6,870 
2,754 
7,357 

37,047 

5,164 

13,716 
114, 720 
26,468 

10,651 

5,533 

10, 156 

25,594 

21,594 
64,465 

(') 
133, 181 

49,494 
10,610 

(') 
383, 972 
152,606 

16,905 

4,852 

165, 121 

5,093 
113,555 
<'^) 

397,652 

(10) 



(') 



S74S 



4,626 
4,135 



8,732 
365 

694 

1,058 

1,180 

4,379 

3,309 
8,130 



751 



m 



22, 149 
201 



3,291 
(=) 

10,082 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF Tl'EAE. 



Total 
(includ, 

ing 
invested 
lunds). 



$118,806 
31,093 
53,120 

< 279, 543 

28,000 

154, 993 
424,818 
110,333 

100,683 
25,000 
65,448 

506,000 

259,214 
1,183,500 

29,500 
571,703 

463, 160 
110,000 

380,000 

1,399,240 

214,100 

181,600 
67,766 
615,902 

98,095 
491,769 
(.') 

'1,774,040 

(.0) 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
eqmp- 
ment. 



$47,121 
18,500 
53,120 

< 50, 743 

25,000 

154,993 
424,818 
110,333 

63,270 

25,000 

45,000 

500,000 

208, 7-14 
515,000 

29,500 
571,703 

347,012 
110,000 

567,000 

200,000 

180,000 

27,848 

336,250 

43,599 
491,769 

1,741,540 

(10) 



39 

40 
41 
43 
43 

44 

45 
46 
47 

48 

49 

50 

51 

sa 

53 

54 

55 

56 
57 

58 

59 

60 

61 
62 
63 

64 
65 

66 

67 



■ Statistics for inmates reported under branch institutions. 

» Includes finances (or St. Elizabeth's Home for Girls, St. Joseph's Asylum tor Blind Girls, and St. Joseph's Home for Boys, Mt. Loretto, S. I. 

"> Included in report ot New York Nursery and Child's Hospital (Hospital Department). 



128 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NEW YORK— Continued. 

New York City— Continued. 
Bronx, and Manhattan Boroughs — Contd. 

Newsboys' Lodging House ^ , 

14 New Cliambers St. 

New Yorli Cattiolic Protectory - 

Westchester!'. O. 

Orplians' Home and Asylum 

168 Convent Ave. 

Protestant Ilall Orphan Asylum 

110 Manhattan Ave. 

Roman Cathohc Orphan Asylum 

Sedgwick Ave. and Kingsbridge 
Road. 

St. Joseph's .^.sylum 

Eighty-ninth St. and Avenue A. 

St. Joseph's Home (or Girls'.." 

1075 Madison Ave. 
St. Philip's Home for Industrious Boys, 
417 Broome St. 

SeviUa Home for Children 

Hunt's Point (Bronx). 

Sheltering Arms 

504 VV est One hundred and twenty- 
ninth St. 
William H. Davis Tree Industrial 
School for Crippled Children. 
471 West Fifty-seventh St. 
Brooklyn Borough — 

Angel (luardian Home ^ 

Twelfth Ave. and Sixty-fourth St. 

Broo:;lyn Baptist Orphanage 

1502 Coney Island Ave. 
Brooklyn Hebrew Orphan Asylum — 

373 Ralph Ave. 
Brooklyn Howard Colored Orphan 
Asylum. 
1550 Dean St. 

Brooklyn Orphan Asylum 

1435 Atlantic Ave. 
Brooklj-n Training School and Home 
for Young Girls. 
1483 Pacific St. 
Children's Society ( Receiving Home) . . 
105 Schermerhom St. 



Convent of the Sisters of Mercy " 

273 Willougliby Ave. 
Home for Destitute Children 

217 Sterling Place. 
Kallman Scandinavian Orphanage 

SLxty-seventh St. and Eighteenth 
Ave. 
Orphan Homo of the Dominican Nuns, 

153 Graham Ave. 
Orphan House 

Albany Ave. and Herkimer St. 
St. John's Home 

992 St. Mark's Ave. 

St. Joseph's Female Orphan Asylum.. 
WilJoughby and Sumner Aves. 



St. Malaohy's Home i« 

Atlantic and Van Siclen Aves. 
St. Paul's Industrial School 

C-ongress and Clinton Sis. 



Sheltering Arms Nursery 

157 Dean St. 
Queen!,- Borough — 

College Polnt(L. I.)— 

Bethlehem Orphans' Home 

Second .Vve. 
Jamaica {L. I.) — 

OttiUe Orphan -Vsyliim 

Kaplan and Degraw .Vves. 
Richmond Borough — 
Qreen Ridge (S. /.)— 

St. Michael's Home 

424 West Thurty-fourth St., N. 
(office). 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Children's Aid Society. . . 
Roman Cathohc Church. 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Board of Managers, Roman 
Cathohc Orphan Asylum. 

School Sisters of Notre Dame 

Sisters of Mercy 



New Y'ork Cathohc Protec- 
tory. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation . 



Private corporation . 



Sisters of Mercy 

Private corporation(Baptist) 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation . 



Brooklyn Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 

Sisters of Mercy 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation. 



Sisters of St. Dominic 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

Roman Catholic Orphan 
Asylum Society of BrooK- 
lyii. 

Roman Cathohc Orphan 
Asylum Society of Brook- 
lyn. 

Sisters of St. Joseph 



Roman Catholic Orphan 
Asylum Society of BrooiC- 
lyn. 

Protestant Episcopal Church 



Private corporation (Lu- 
theran). 

Private corporation (Ger- 
man Reformed and Pres- 
byterian). 

Presentation Nxms 



Class of children received. 



1 Temporary shelter. 

2 Delinquent inmates included in Report on Juvenile Delinquents also. 
'Not reported. 

* Boarders. 

* included in report of Institution of Mercy. 



Homeless working boys 

Dependent and delinquent 

children. 
Orphan children 



Protestant half-orphan 

children. 
Orphan children 



Orphanchildrenfrom2to 16 

Girls from 2 to 16 

Dependent boys 

Indigent girls from 5 to 10. . 
Homeless children 



Crippled cliildren. 



Destitute children 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren from 2 to 16. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Destitute girls from 12 to 16. . 



Destitute, neglected, and 
delinquent cliildren. 

Destitute children and home 

less mothers with infants. 

Destitute children 



Scandinavian orphan and 
indigent children. 

Orphan, neglected, and in- 
digent children. 
Orphan children 



Destitute Cathohc boys. 



Cathohc orphan girls. 



Dependent children. . 
Catholic orphan girls. 



Destitnte children over 1 
month old. 



Orphan children. 



Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 



1S54 
1S63 
1852 
1835 
1817 

1857 



1902 
1S89 
1864 

1900 



1893 

1878 
1868 

1833 
1889 

ISSO 

1855 
1854 
1S97 

1868 
1852 
1834 

1873 

1876 
1839 

1870 

1886 
1892 



Destitute Roman Catholic 1884 
children under 16. 



Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 



Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 



No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 



4 
64 
41 

37 
6 

43 

92 

49 

6 

135 

17 
(.8) 

(13) 

65 

(IS) 

22 

13 
15 



CHILDUEN UECEfVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



3677 

1700 

25 

44 

171 



100 
29 
83 



7 
244 
47 

111 
42 



613 
123 
33 

235 

57 

11400 

16 200 



(") 
82 

28 
46 



3677 

1474 

9 



188 



100 



38 



162 

25 



3231 

248 
76 
17 

148 
34 

»400| 



195 



365 
47 
16 

87 
23 

16200 

191 
(") 



Through- 



1653 



96 



39 



(?) 
2301 



235 

30 

l«317 

16150 

386 



a 

Si 



27 
"83 

15 50 



61 

28 
22 



(») 



6 Indeterminate. 

' Included in report of the Convent of the Sisters of Mercy. 

8 Includes 11 boarders. 

» Includes S;.2.so paid on mortgagf. 

i» Included in report of Brooklyn Society for the Prevention olCruelt y to ChudreH. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



129 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



118 

2.347 
83 
157 
99; 



118 

1822 

36 

94 



526 471 
483 264 



Dependent. 



Cq 



«81 



118 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURLNQ 

YEAR. 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR. 



3559 

1966 
10 
49 
149 

290 



3559 

1703 

4 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$20,077 

349,573 

28,006 

29,210 

(') 

96,554 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



$3,496 
327, 151 



2,550 

(') 

85,180 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 



$1,799 
3, 
2,006 
4,940 

(») 

6,358 



Other 

sources 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



$2,117 
3,510 



9,257 
(») 

3,835 



Total. 



$12, 665 

15,043 

26,000 

12,463 

(') 

1,181 



$20,077 

414,965 

28,006 

29, 770 

(') 

78,012 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses 



For 
perma- 
nent 

Im- 
prove- 
ments, 



$20,077 

379,056 

23,670 

27, 770 

(') 

71,61i: 



$35,909 
4,336 
2,000 
(.") 

6,401 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds) 



$294,000 

2,352,815 

875, 137 

544,651 

« 

970,000 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$214,000 

2,235,811 

225,000 

252,894 

970,000 



37 
61 
176 



37 



61 
103 

25 



46 



198 



198 



39 



47 



15,037 
29,140 
56, 570 

12,800 



8,32; 

125 

22,485 

800 



3,917 



406 
29,015 
30, 168 

12,000 



15,044 
33,206 
40,341 

12,000 



15,044 

26, 748 6, 458 

33,710 6,631 



10,000 



2,000 



984, 127 
999,433 

97,000 



310,000 
376,000 

27,000 



22 
505 
255 

117 
63 

36 

21489 
167 
68 

202 

106 

"1270 

IS 005 

349 
(") 

78 

124 
109 



13 
297 
143 



503 
93 
34 

112 

54 

1270 



160 
61 

136 

61 
958 

313 

349 
(") 

34 

124 
94 



(") 



104 
83 

119 
24 



572 
134 
21 

357 

45 

"428 

15 24: 

335 
(") 



23 



63 
43 

68 

1941 

219 

77 
12 

206 
26 
428 

186 



353 

57 

9 

151 
19 

245 

149 
(") 

36 

10 
11 

38 



3,643 
75,433 
96,522 

44,428 
12, 590 

(10) 

235,636 
97,372 

8,888 

100,672 
13,656 

(18) 
(13) 

115,760 
(") 

10, 295 

10, 751 
18,652 



47, 396 
29,350 

21,197 
4,169 

(10) 



33, 797 



96,104 
8,379 

(13) 

(.") 
105,608 

(13) 

5,468 



24,221 



1,171 

26, 180 

7,626 

9,463 
2,514 

(10) 

15,7821 
10,239 
2,220 

350 
436 
(1.1) 

(13) 

4,193 

(13) 

703 

5,976 
1,566 



1,56) 

4,518 
1,036 



?2, 931 
4,846 
1,954 

3,756 
1,498 

(18) 
(13) 

2,124 

(13) 

601 

3,924 
2,387 



2,372 

1,857 

57,985 

9,250 
4,871 

(10) 

46,923 

48,490 

4,714 

362 
3,343 

(13) 
(13) 

3,836 
(18) 

3,523 

851 
8,993 



3,176 
267,057 
83,003 

83,662 
'12,690 

(10) 

181,587 

68,989 

8,888 

100,672 
13, 473 

(13) 
(13) 

143,745 

(13) 

11,469 

14,824 
12,988 



108 26,211 



3,176 
68,748 
79,623 

44,700 
'10,292 

(10) 

169, 890 

52,401 

8,268 

97,783 
13,473 

(13) 

(") 
111,473 

(13) 

11,459 

12,544 
12,988 



24,839 



208,309^ 
3,385 



38, 962 
2, 298* 



11,697, 

6,588 
620' 

2,789 



(13) 
(13) 

32,272 

(18) 



2,280 



17,750 
430,000 
136,000 

420,000 
29,493 

(10) 

567,600 

451,850 

49,500 

377,390 
162,254 

(18) 

(13) 

713, 724 

(13) 

104,100 

32,000 
150,000 



1,372 73,023 73,023 



17, 760 
425,000 
120,000 

250,000 
23,000 

(10) 

567,600 
252,000 
49,600 

377,390 
94,800 

(18) 
(13) 

713, 724 

(13) 

37,000 

30,000 
150,000 



87 



u Includesreportof the Angel Guardian Home, Twelfth Ave. and Sixty-fourth St., 
Brooklyn, and St. Mary of the Angels Home. Syo,sset. L. I. 
•^ Exclusive of 33 homeless mothers with infants. 
^3 Included in report of Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum ^^ot:iety, Brooklyn. 

9531°— 13 9 



1' Includes inmates of St. John's Protectory, Hicksville, I>. I. 

16 Includes inmates of St. Paul's Industrial School. 

■« Includes report of St. Malachy's Orphan Home, Rockaway Park, L. I. 

" Included in report of St. Joseph's Female Orphan Asylum. 



130 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



NEW YOKE— Continued. 

New York City — Continued. 
Richmond Borough— Continued. 
Mount Loretto (S. /.)— 
St. Elizabeth's Home for Girls ' Mission of the Immaculate 



I 



Prince Bay P. O. 
St. Joseph's Home for Boys 

Pleasant Plains P.O. 
New Brighton, (S. /.)— 
Home for Seamen's Children 

Castleton Ave. 
Richmond County S. P. C. C. Home. . . 

Castleton Ave. 

Newburgh: 

Children's Home 

High St. 
Newburgh Home for the Friendless... 
165 Montgomery St. 
Ogdensburg: 

United Helpers' Home 

250 State St. 
Oswego; 

Oswego Orphan .\.sylum 

Ellen St. 

St. Francis' Home 

Syracuse Ave. 
Peekskjll: 

Noyes Memorial Home for Convalescent 
and Incurable Children. 
636 Main St. 
St. Ann's Home for Destitute Children . . 
Mount Florence. 

St. Joseph's Home 

250 South St. 
Peterboro: 

Peterboro Home 

Plattsburg: 

Home for the Friendless 

9 Broad St. 
Poet Jefferson, h. I.: 

Brooklyn Home for Blind, Crippled, 
and Defective Children. 
Pobt Jervis: 

St. Mary's Home 

56 Ball St. 
Pouqhkeepsie; 

Home for the Friendless 

91 South Hamilton St. 
Randolph: 

Children's Home 



Red Hook: 

St. Margaret's Home. 



Rensselaer: 

St. John's Orphan Asylum 

Lawrence St. 
Rochester; 

Jewish Orphan Asyliun 

924 St. Paul St. 

Rochester Orphan Asylum 

11S3 Monroe Ave. 

St. Joseph's Orphan .\sylum 

305 Andrews St. 

St. Mary's Boys' Orphan Asylum 

409 West Ave. 
St. Patrick's Orphan Girls' Asylum. . 
160 Clifton St. 
RocKAWAY Park, L. I.; 

St. Malachv's Orphan Home * 

Rye: 

St. Benedict's Home for Destitute Col- 
ored Children. 
Saratoga Springs; 

Hawley Home for Children 

64 Ludlow St. 

St. Christina Industrial School 

Ballston Ave. 
Schenectady: 

Children's Home 

1216 State St. 

Spring Valley: 

Cherry Tree Home 

South Main St. 
Syosset, L. I.: 

St. Mary of the Angela Home ^ 



Virgin. 

Mission of the Immaculate 
Virgin. 

Society for the ReUef of Des- 
titute Children. 

Richmond County Society 
for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 



City of Newburgh. . . 
Private corporation . 



Society of United Helpers 

Private corporation 



Sisters of the Third Order of 
St. Francis. 

Sisters of St. Mary (Epis- 
copal). 

Sisters of the Good Shep- 
herd. 

Missionary Sisters of the 
Third O'rderof St. Francis. 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Daughters of Wisdom. 

Sisters of Charity 

Private corporation . . . 



Class of children received. 



Western New York Society 
for the Protection of Home- 
less and Dependent Chil- 
dren. 

Protestant Episcopal 
Church. 

Sisters of Mercy 



Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Notre Dame. 

Sisters of St. Joseph 

Sisters of St. Joseph 



Sisters of St. Joseph 

Mission of the Immaculate 
Virgin. 



Private corporation 

Sisters of the Holy Child 
(Episcopal). 

Private corporation 



Salvation Army., 



Homeless and destitute girls . 
Homeless and destitute boys. 



Seamen's destitute children 

from 2 to 10. 
Ill-treated children, pending 

court action. 



Dependent children 

Orphan and needy children. 



Orphan, destitute, and 
homeless children. 

Orphan, delinquent, and 
homeless children. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Convalescent and incurable 
children. 

Destitute, orphan, and indi- 
gent girls. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Neglected children 



Sisters of Mercy. 



Destitute and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Mentally and physically de- 
fectivechildren under 16. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Homeless and dependent 
children. 



Orphan girls. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Orph 
dre 

Orph: 
ore; 



ihan and destitute chQ- 
ren. 

ihan and destitute cbil- 
■en. 
Orphan children 



Orphan boys from 4 to 14 

Orphan and destitute girls 
and infants. 



0) 
0) 

1846 
1880 

1885 
1861 



1852 
1895 



1857 
1869 

1871 
1874 



1875 



Dependent children 

Destitute and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Normal children from 3 to 10. 

Girls who must become self- 
supporting. 

Orphan, homeless, neg- 
lected, or indigent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Homeless boys from 5 to 14. . . 



1871 

1880 
1837 
1S54 
1S04 
1841 



1SS6 

1888 
1.8.85 



1895 



No. 
No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

C) 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 



No. 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



(') 



Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 



32 



CHILDREN RECErVED FOE FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



144 
346 

42 
(') 

10 
31 



161 

402 

8 
11 



... 144 
346 



24 



63 



Through- 



(') 



- i 

o 



20 






I Not reported. 

! Included in report of Mission of the Immaculate Virgin, New York City. 

3 Included in report of St. Mary's Free Hospital for Children, New York City. 

* Includes 57 boarders. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



131 



CARE OF CniLDRBN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YE.M!. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 




3 


4 


_2 


Dependent. 


.tl 
o 

O 

.3 
o 

is 


1 
1 

Q 


SUPERVISION. 


DURINO 
YEAR. 


DURING YEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from — 




1 
a 
a 
3 
a 

1 


■a 
a . 

£■•2 

o 


1 

■c 

11 

a 


i 

o 


o 


a 


a 


o 


.2 

a 


a 


3 

o 
H 

209 
465 

28 


1 

466 
(') 


_2 

B 

209 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


495 
1106 

112 
153 

39 
28 

38 

31 

67 

20 

401 
1118 

48 
30 

166 

158 
45 
118 

13 

71 

26 
120 
115 
206 
138 


1106 

54 
(') 

21 
15 

22 

14 
32 

9 

624 

26 
14 

85 

74 

25 

73 

41 

15 

67 

68 

205 

5 


495 






495 
1106 

112 
153 

14 
(') 

19 

15 
26 






m 

$22,367 
1,700 

7,063 
4,941 

7,545 

4,694 
6,620 

11,408 

46,315 
166,304 

6,033 
4,970 

31,493 

14,952 
9,440 
28,089 

C) 
6,157 

13,415 
127,880 

32,402 
5 61,670 

38,303 


(=) 

$1,000 
6,690 

975 

lOO 
3,462 

43,3.50 
140,565 

4,879 
328 

23,759 

7,837 

719 

1,325 


m 

$916 
103 

760 

2,256 

1,125 
1,537 

2,774 
712 


m 

$1,055 

373 
323 

3,935 

2,459 
1,131 

2,756 
3,588 


m 

$20,396 

597 

3,858 

379 

1,010 
470 

8,634 

209 
20,439 

1,154 
2,310 

1,361 

1,264 

6,273 

1,925 

(') 

183 

11,136 
112,885 
20,907 
43,967 
27,042 


m 

(.•■) 

$21,408 
2,018 

7,063 
4,481 

31, 196 

5,445 
5,900 

6,734 

47,226 
163, 434 

6,033 
4,720 

37,553 

14,962 

8,603 

26,314 

4,622 

6,182 

9,740 
20,785 
36,452 
61,107 
37,747 


(^) 

$19,810 
2,018 

6,253 
4,101 

6,196 

6,445 

5,116 

4,253 

46,025 
151,144 

5,747 
4,720 

12, 776 

14,083 

8,430 

26,314 

2,522 

5,613 

9,152 
18,773 
15,534 
20,527 
13,536 


(-) 
$1,598 

810 

380 

26,000 

784 

2,479 

2,200 
12,290 

286 

24,777 
879 
173 

2,000 

569 

588 

2,612 

20,918 

40,640 

24,211 


$302,500 
6,000 

14,810 
101,206 

49,271 

42,600 
16,007 

m 

330,000 
330,000 

40,992 
26,686 

125,000 

52,664 

148,000 

186,932 

C) 
20,000 

89,568 
323,626 

76,000 
171,000 
126,600 


{■') 
(-) 

$5,000 
6,000 

14,810 
20,000 

40,000 

25,000 
13,000 

(=) 

330,000 
330,000 

24,837 
14,000 

125,000 
62,664 
23,000 

112,151 

10,000 

20,000 

15,000 
138, 455 

35,000 
171,000 
125, .500 


inn 






















101 


58 
(') 

18 
13 

16 

17 
35 

11 

401 
494 

22 
16 

81 

81 

20 

45 

13 

30 

11 
53 
47 

133 






















ine 






















ina 


24 
(') 

19 

11 

40 

20 


1 
(0 






40 


21 


19 


2 
23 
14 


3 

2 

10 

7 


13 


27 
22 

27 

34 
26 

9 

129 
297 

16 

8 

18 
46 
25 
75 


15 
10 

12 

23 
14 

3 

174 

10 
4 

9 

18 

17 

44 


12 
12 

16 

11 

11 

6 

129 
123 

6 
4 

28 

8 

31 


104 


(') 


(') 


in.'i 


15 


6 


9 


106 




5 

1 


107 








108 














109 




'401 






100 




100 


34 




34 


IID 


HIS 

17 
17 

153 
2S 
38 

13 

71 

20 
116 

97 
166 

94 








lU 


166 
3 


31 
13 






8 


5 


3 


10 


7 




112 






1,355 
5,282 
3,888 
2,448 
7,158 


977 

891 

1,963 

17,681 


113 












1 






114 


5 

17 
52 












115 






2 
108 


1 
66 


1 
43 


2 
23 


1 
10 


13 


116 




25 


117 
118 
















4 


4 




8 

7 
29 
45 
70 


3 

4 

13 
17 
70 


5 

3 
16 
28 


4,292 

2,001 

.5,341 

6, .367 

13,392 

8,715 


195 

203 
6,074 
700 
726 
273 


1,487 

76 
3,380 
4,428 
3,486 
2,273 


lit 


2 


6 

18 
40 
44 












120 


2 
















121- 










2 
4 
51 


2 

4 
2 


49 


122 












123 






11 




11 


124 












125 


148 

12 
48 

35 

86 


63 
6 

21 

47 


85 

6 
48 

14 
39 


112 

,2 

12 

21 
61 




36 












2 
2 




2 
2 


3S 

11 
20 

29 
23 


19 

5 

19 
12 


19 

6 
20 

10 
11 


25,650 

5,193 
13,353 

5,994 

10. 125 


9,297 
632 

2,384 


14, 875 

2,464 
7,581 

2,042 

13,9.39 


894 

957 
1,893 

1,499 
2,186 


584 

1,140 
3,879 

69 


25,564 

3,412 
10,534 

5,644 
16,126 


23,161 

3,201 
10,534 

5,644 

16, r25 


2,403 
211 


70,000 

38,750 
(') 

27, 124 
60,000 


70,000 

21,000 
60,000 

27, 124 
60,000 


126 












127 




36 
14 

25 












128 






1 
30 


13 


1 








129 






1 


1 




130 






iSl 



' Includes $.33,000 borrowed to pay for new building. 

« Included in report of St. Malachy's Home, .\tlantic and Van Siclen Aves., Brooklyn. 

' lucluded in report of Convent of the Sisters of Mercy, Brooklyn. 



132 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME ANB LOCATION. 



Supervised or conducted by— 



NEW YOKK— Continued. 

Syracuse: 

House of Providence 

1420 Weat Onondaga St. 
Onondaga Orphans' Home 

1007 East Genesee St. 
St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum . . 

120 Madison St. 



Taerytown: 

Home for Boys 2 

Tivou: 

Watts de Peyster Industrial Home 

Madalin P. O. 
Teoy: 

Catholic Male Orphan Asylum 

Hanover and Bedford Sts. 
, Guardian Angel Home 

Peoples Ave. and Eleventh St. 
Humane Society Home 

77 Fourth St. 
St. Joseph's Home 

Thompson St. 
St. Vincent's Female Orphan Asylum . 

180 Eighth St. 
Troy Orphan Asylimi 

SpriBg A\'e. 
U'nCA: 

House of the Good Shepherd 

704 Genesee St. 
St. John's Catholic Orphan Asylum... 

80 John St. 
St. Joseph's Infant Home 

Green and .\ddison Sts. 
Utica Orphan Asylum 

475 Genesee St. 
Valhalla: 

Brace Farm School 

Jennie Clarkson Home for Children 



Verbank: 

Hope Farm 

One hundred and seventy-first St. 
and Fulton Ave., N. Y. (office). 
Watertown: 

Jeflerson County Orphan Asylum 

506 Franlilin St. 
Watekvuet: 

Fairview Home 

Boght Road, R. D. 
St. Colman's Industrial School and Or- 
phan Asylum. 
West Pare: 

Sacred Heart Orphan -Vsylum 

Manresa. 
Yonkers: 

Lake and Watts Orphan House 

463 Hawthorne Ave. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Asheviile: 

Children's Home 

Woolsey. 

Eliada Orphanage 

R. D.3. 
BaEfour: 

Mountain Orphanage 



Barium Springs: 

Presbyterian Orphans' Home. 



Belmont: 

Sacred Heait Orphanage 

Chaelotte: 

Alexander Home 

303 South McDowell St. 
St. Michael's Tiaining and Industrial 
School. 
Mint and West HUl Sts. 

Thompson Orphanage 

East Ave. 
Crescent: 

Nazareth Orphans' Home 



Elon College: 

Christian Orphanage.. 

Marion: 

Elhanan Orphanage. 
Elhanan P. O. 



1 Not reported. 2 Included in report of Inst 



Sisters of Charity (St. Vin- 
cent de Paul). 
Private corporation. 

Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Mercy 

Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, M. E.Chm-ch. 

Private corporation 

Sisters of the Good Shep- 
herd. 

Mohawk and Hudson River 
Humane Society. 

Sisters of St. Joseph 

Sisters of Charity (St. Vin- 
cent de Paul). ' 
Private corporation 

Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 
Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Charity 

Private corporation 

Children's .Md Society 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

State of IS'ew Y'ork 

Missionary Sisters of the 
Sacred Heart. 

Private corporal ion 

Cotmty of Buncombe 

Private corporation 

Presbyterian Church in the 
United States. 

Presbyterian Church in the 
United States. 

Sisters of Mercy 

Presbyterian Church of Chai- 
lotte. 

Private organization (Epis- 
copal). 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 

Reformed Church in the 
United States. 

Southern Christian Conven- 
tion. 

Private organization 

itution of Mercy, New Y'ork 



Class of children received. 



Destitufe and abandoned 
boys and boarders. 

Destitute and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, destitute, and 
abandoned girls from 2 to 
14. 

Destitute boys from 2 to 16. . , 

Orphan, homeless, and des- 
titute girls. 

Orphan and destitute boys. . 

Abandoned, neglected, and 

delinquent girls. 
Delinquent and neglected 

children. 
Foundlings, and orphan and 

homeless children. 
Destitute girls 



dr 



ihan and destitute chil- 
ren. 



Neglected and destitutechil- 
dren under 10. 

Orphan and homeless girls 
from 5 to 16. 

Orphan and destitute in- 
fants. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Homeless boys 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren from 4 to 16. 
Orphan children 



Orphan and destitute girls. . 
Orphan children 



Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Homeless and neglected 
children. 

Homeless and destitutechil- 
dren. 

Orphan children 



Orphan girls 

Needy children 

Neglected children , 



Orphan, defective, 
homeless children. 



and 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Foundlings, and orphan and 
destitute children. 



1873 
1839 
1860 



1894 

1852 
1908 
1897 
1892 
1848 
1833 

1872 
1834 
1893 
1830 



1893 
1892 



1888 
1881 



1891 
1906 

1903 

1888 

1894 
1895 
1884 

18.87 

1906 

1907 



18p8 
City. ' Included in report of Molia 



No. 
Yes. 

No. 



No. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
Y'es. 
Yes. 

Yes. 



Yes. 

No. 



No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

P) 



19 



15 



children received fob FIB9r 

TIME IN 1910. 



121 
87 
92 



100 
42 

377 

136 
33 

133 

56 
47 
133 

59 



1258 
9 



35 

117 

41 
178 



(■) 
65 



100 



258 



69 



1258 
5 



No. 2 9 18 12 6 2 15 

No. 2 5 2 2 2 

No. 1 4 12 3 9 

No. 2.... 40 21 19 

wk and Hudson River Humane Society, .Mbany 



22 



Through— 



(') 



25 



1258 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(>) 



GENERAL TABLES. 



133 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITOTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



203 

192 
222 





,n a 




ad 




.ati 




0.0 


1^ 


O 



Dependent. 



CHILDREN 

OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



(•) 



(') 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

TEAR. 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR. 



58 
93 

144 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$14,687 
29,231 
26,788 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



$8,93' 
11,8.33 
15,277 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 



$1,544 
10,896 
4,646 



Other 
sources 



$2,396 
3,701 
3.520 



$1,810 
2,801 
3,345 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 



$11,643 
33,711 
26,614 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses 



$11,643 
,31,432 
23,626 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments 



$2, 279 
2,98S 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



$175,000 
151,91 
123,500 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$175,000 
116,446 
123,500 



132 
133 
134 

135 
13« 

137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 

143 
144 
145 
146 



147 
148 



149 



151 

152 

153 
154 



244 

i 
80 



181 



268^ 

1 

206 

244 

I 
130 

159 

139 

148 



146 

64 

90 

178 

227 

86! 

(') 
23 

54 

ISO 

i 

25 

l.s' 
80| 

59j 

22l 



60 



(') 



45 



(') 



29 

(') 
78 
57 

129 

73 
28 
113 
49 



565 
2 



44 

47 

123 
2 



20 



20 



(') 



0) 



0) 



(') 



(') 



8,100 

39, 224 
12. 7fil 
(') 

21,926 
25,67 
80,650 

24, 773 
20,123 
16,402 
32,190 



30,438 
14,260 



66,140 

21,580 

21,615 
20,552 

28,402 

45,324 

1,800 
5,083 

1,042 

3,324 

2,000 

1,850 
9,387 
2,500 
4.430 
«5,208 



30,763 
2,113 
P) 
20,43' 
22, 682 
30, 316 

17,808 
15,995 
14,180 
11,990 

3,451 



2,850 

10,643 
17,574 

9,9 



1,800 



7,600 

993 

1,970 

(») 

294 

661 

8,532 

1,368 

85 

1,219 

4,809 



102 
114 



47, 67) 

14,003 

811 
2,978 

10,487 



1,369 
1,498 



500 

6,099 
7,180 
(=) 



1,195 

874 
1,568 

2,568 
971 
992 

3,305 

1,784 



564 

2,566 
2,072 



(■) 



5,083 

1,042 

2,234 

375 
(•) 
1,650 

7,871 

2,500 



200 



234 



» 2, 758 



1,460 
40,234 

3,029 

3,072 

11 

12,0.% 



25,101 
14,146 



1,331 

2,161 
8, 



2,698 
44,364 



1,625 
(■) 



1,282 



7,850 

36,637 
12,761 
« 

19, 476 
25,607 
121,326 

24,600 
19,84' 
15, 762 
32,190 



30,438 
37,513 



22,211 

21,558 
20,237 

27, 262 

42, 616 



2,300 
5,058 

1,026 

22,450 

2,000 

(') 

1,850 

9,156 

2,500 

4,430 

5,108 



7,350 

32,572 
8,850 
(=) 
18,561 
24,355 
40, 787 



500 

4,065 
3,911 



916 

1,252 
80,639 



24,312 288 
19,B47 



14, 77C 
27, 498 



25,700 
15,473 



39,349 

22,211 

21,472 
14,277 

26, 472 

41,41)6 



1,800 
1,961 

1,026 

21,950 

2,000 

(>) 
1..H50 

8,156 

2,400 

4,030 

3,10S 



4,738 
22,940 



24,266 



86 
5,960 

790 

1,160 



500 
3,097 



600 



(■) 



1,000 
100 
400 

2.000 



60,000 

128, 739 
74,000 
f) 
75,000 
176,075 
563,000 

225, 127 
45,000 
45,000 

349,554 

154,950 
426,000 

180,000 

72,892 

186,257 
76,000 

108,000 

(') 



7,600 
14,000 

6,000 

53,000 

8,000 
C) 
10,000 

87,000 

10,000 

18,500 

55, 000 



60,000 

128,739 
74,000 

(») 

75,000 

156,075 

330,000 

123, 678 
30,000 
45,000 
94,010 



74, 950 
125,000 



150,000 

31,079 

75,000 
75,000 

108,000 

614,778 



7,500 
14,000 



52. (KKI 

8,000 
5, 000 
10.000 

75,000 

10.0011 

17,500 

.'1,000 



5 
6 
7 

8 

9 

10 

U 



* Includes 43 boarders. 



» Colored only. 



« Exclusive of donations ottier man cash. 



134 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I — INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NORTH CAROLINA— Continued. 



Nazareth: 

Catholic Orphanage 

Oxford: 

Colored Orphan Asylum. 

Oxford Orphan Asylum.. 



Raleigh: 

Methodist Orphanage. 



Thomasville: 

Thomasville Baptist Orphanage . 
Winston-Salem: 

Colored Orphan Home 

502 East Fourth St. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 
Fargo: 

North Dakota Children's Home. 
804 Tenth St., south. 

St. John's Orphanage 

Seventh Ave. 



OHIO. 
Akron: 

Summit County Children's Home. . . 
264 Arlington St. 
Allunce: 

Fairmount Children's Home 

Box 525. 
Ashland: 

Ashland County Children's Home. . . 
R. D.8. 
Ashtabula: 

Children's Home 

37 Main St. 
Athens: 

Athens County Children's Home 

Bellefontaine; 

Logan County Children's Home 

Sidney Pike. 
Berea: 

German Methodist Orphan Asylum. 
193 Center St. 
BmumcHAM: 

Light and Hope Orphanage 

Amherst P.O. 
Cadiz: 

Harrison Countv Children's Home. . 
Cambridge ; 

Guernsey Coimty Children's Home. . 
274 Highland Ave. 
Canal Dover: 

Tuscarawas Children's Home 

Tuscarawas Ave. 
Cincinnati: 

Boys' Home of Cincinnati 

B26 Sycamore St. (Box 819). 

Children's Home 

Ninth Ave. and Plum St. 



Cincinnati House of Refuge 

Box 66. 
Cincinnati Orphan Asylum 

Wellington Place(Mount Auburn). 
German Protestant Orphans' Home 

Highland Ave. (Mount Auburn). 
House of Mercy 

1409 Freeman Ave. 
Jewish Foster Home 

718 West SLxth St. 
New Orphan Asylum for Colored Youth 

Spillito and Emery Bts. 
Protectory for Boys 

Station F. 
St. Aloysius' Orphan Asylum 

Reading Road. 
St. Joseph's Infant Asylum 

Tennessee Ave. (Station H). 
St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum 

Blue Rock and Cherry Sts. (Sta- 
tion A). 
St. Vincent's Home for Boys 

926 Bani St. 
Working Boys' Home 

518 West Ninth Ave. 



Supervised orconducted by — 



Sisters of Mercy. 



Private corporation 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 
North Carolina. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 



Baptist churches 

Private organization . 



North Dakota Children's 

Home Society. 
Presentation Sisters 



County of Summit. 



Counties of Stark and Co- 
lumbiana. 

County of Ashland 



Private corporation . 



County of .\thens. 
County of Logan. . 



Methodist Episcopal Church. 



Private corporation . 



County of Harrison . . 
County of Guernsey. 



County of Tuscarawas. 



Private corporation (Catho- 
lic). 
Private corporation 



Department of Public Safety 

Private corporation 

Private organization 

Sisters of Mercy 

United Jewish Charities 

Private corporation 

Franciscan Brothers 

Sisters of Notre Dame 

Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Charitv 



Franciscan Brothers. 



Private corporation (Prot- 
estant). 



Class of children received. 



Orphan boys 

Orphan children 

Destitute, dependent, and 
homeless children. 

Homeless and dependent 
orphan children. 

Indigent orphan children 

Normal orphan children 



Dependent and neglected 

children. 
Orphan children 



Dependent children. 



Destitute and needy chil- 
dren under 16. 

Normal children imder 16. . 



Destitute and dependent 
children. 



Destitute children. 
Destitute children. . 



Orphan children . 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Normal indigent children. . . 

Destitute and dependent 
children. 

Destitute children 



Homeless and friendless 
boys. 

Orphan, neglected, home- 
less, and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Delinquent and dependent 
children from 3 to 16. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Protestant orphan children. . 

Orphan and destitute girls. . 

Temporarily homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and abandoned 
children. 

Indigent homeless boys 



German Catholic orphan 

children. 
Girlsimder6,boysimder4.. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Indigent homeless boys 



Homeless working boys 
imder 18. 



1882 
1872 



1900 

1885 
1903 

1890 
1897 

1880 

1876 

1907 

1886 

1880 
1886 

1864 

1892 

1890 
1884 



1885 
1864 

18S0 
1832 
1849 
1858 
1896 
1845 
1886 
1837 
1873 
1829 

1905 
1900 



No. 



Yes. 

No. 



No. 

No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 



(') 



CHILDEEN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



55 



(') 

34 
10 



(') 

87 

111 

10 

35 

24 
19 

15 

6 

59 
11 



165 
S757 

175 

150 

17 

28 

70 

0) 

11 

81 

297 

141 

99 
45 



(') 



Through— 



19 



(') 



49 2 

145 26 
58 21 

19 
16 



3 

V, O 
(3 

3 



(■) 



(') 



21 



10 



(') 



15 



24 



(') 



' Not reported. 



' Included in report of North Dakota Children's Home Society. 



' Exclusive of amount covered into county treasury. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued . 



135 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



201 
314 



386 
36 

19 
102 

63 

139 

1 

33 

62 
34 

120 

9 

25 
42 

103 

70 
6 147 

391 
95 

ss 

45 

39 

(■) 

120 

86 

358 

298 

200 
14 



a 



55 



Dependent. 



55 



(') 



(■) 



(') 



0) 



CHILDREN 
OUTSniE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



340 



(■) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



20 



150 



(■) 



(') 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



C) 



(') 



CHILDREN 
DISCiLARGED 
DURING YEAR. 



31 

(') 
46 
2 
10 
2 



(') 



140 
61097 

179 

60 

21 

2 

80 

(') 

20 

17 

(■) 

141 

62 
100 



C) 



RECEIPTS DUKINO YEAR. 



Total. 



$10,000 

6,697 
32,026 



24,455 

52,239 
2,391 



(■) 

10,280 

27,820 

3,676 

4,309 

6,378 
6,496 

14.296 

4,000 

7,764 
7,526 

14,571 

19,875 
27, 840 

78,860 
19,501 
19,431 

1,147 

5,254 

(') 

2,900 
46, 840 
12,351 
40, 436 

(') 
2,423 



Derived trom- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



$5,000 
10,000 



m 



>9,147 

32!, 696 

s 3, ISO 

3,615 

3 6,654 
3 4,800 



3 5,14 
3 7, 145 



78,860 



(') 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 



$8,000 

1,000 
5,87' 



30,942 
2,391 






170 



14,296 
350 



2,299 
14,083 



3,001 

10, 197 

100 

5,254 

(') 

200 

625 

11,342 

2,169 

(') 
1,500 



Other 
sources 



$49 



m 



< 1,133 

I 2, 156 



524 
<418 



<2,617 
<334 



336 
1,554 



1,336 

2,381 

330 



(') 

1,500 

1,010 

1,009 

3,509 

(') 
923 



$2,000 



697 
16,100 



21,347 



m 



* 1,968 
<496 



<306 
< 1,696 



3,500 



M7 

7,406 

16, 022 
13, 757 



16,165 

6,853 

717 



(') 

1,200 
45,205 



34, 768 



(') 



PAYMENTS DURINO 
Y-EAR. 



Total. 



$10,000 

8,465 
33,117 



24, 455 

66,119 
2,391 



(') 

10,280 

27,820 

3,676 

4,609 

6,378 
5,502 

14,296 

4,000 

7,764 
7,526 

13, 756 

17,386 
22, 467 

77,6 
20.012 
13, 440 
6 1,147 

5,254 

C) 

800 
38,449 
12,351 
31,613 

(') 
1,700 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$9,000 



8,465 
32, 859 



14,217 

47,940 
1.291 

m 

(') 

10,120 

25,995 

3,676 

4,609 

5,961 
5,127 

12,278 

3,750 

(') 
7,029 

13, 756 

13,839 
21,188 

75,089 

19, 374 

12, 267 

1,147 

5,254 

(') 

800 

23,932 

10,192 

25,728 

(') 
1.500 



$1,000 



258 

10,238 

7,179 
1,100 

m 
(') 

160 
1,825 



417 
376 

2,018 

250 

(■) 



3,647 
1,279 

2,485 

638 

1,173 



(') 



14,51 
2,159 
5,885 

(') 
200 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



$46,000 
182,891 



143,098 

238,925 
10,000 



(') 

32,000 

347,600 

16,000 

15,000 

15,000 
30,000 

196,000 

45,000 

35,000 
40,000 

80,000 

45,000 
■i50,000 

630,000 
379,673 
317,200 

10,000 
7,000 

C) 
150,000 

(') 

50,000 
1S7, 100 

(') 
10,000 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$45,000 
157,118 

110,000 

135,915 
10,000 

m 

(') 

32,000 
347,500 

16,000 

15,000 

15,000 
30,000 

160,000 

45,000 

35,000 
40,000 

80,000 

45,000 
160,000 

630,000 

80,000 
150,000 

10,000 
7,000 

(') 
150,000 

(') 

50,000 
180,000 

(') 
10,000 



12 



13 
14 



16 
17 

1 
2 

1 

2 

3 

4 

S 
6 



12 
13 

14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 

24 

26 



'Covered into county treasury. 



6 Includes cMldren in day nursery department. 



•Exclusive of hfiit. light, laundry, and water rent. 



136 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



OHIO— Continued. 

Circle ville: 

Pickaway County Children's Home 

R.D.3. 
Cleveland: 

Children's Industrial Home and School. 

1IM27 Detroit Ave. 
Cleveland Christian Orphanage 

10907 Lorain Ave. 
Cleveland Jewish Orphan Asylum 

5000 Woodland Ave. 
Cleveland Protestant Orphan Asylum.. 

5000 St. Clair Ave., NE. 
Infants' Rest 

9014 Cedar Ave. 
Jewish Infant Orphans' Home 

2200 East Fortieth St. 
Jones' Home for Friendless Children. . . 

3518 West Twentv-fitth St. 
St. Ann's Infant Asylum 

3409 Woodland Ave. 
St. Joseph's Oq>han Asylum 

6431 Woodland Ave. 
St. V*rncent's Orphan Asylum 

3315 Monroe Ave. 
CoLtrMBUs: 

Franklin County Children's Home 



Hare Orphans' Home 

2104TuUer St. 

St. Aim's Infant Asylum 

1555 Brvden Road. 
St. Joseph's Orphan Home 

821 East Main St. 
St. Vincent's Orphan .\sylum 

1490 East Main St. 
Dayton: 

Children's Home 

528 South Summit St. 
HoUoway Children's Home 

267 Dimbar Ave. 
St. Joseph's Orphan Home 

St. Paul Ave. 
Defunce: 

Defiance County Children's Home. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Delaware: 

Children's Home of Delaware . . . . 
Sandusky St. 
Eaton: 

Preble County Children's Home. 
Fdjdlat: 

Findlay Orphan's Home 

West Park St. 
Flat Rock: 

Ebenezer Orphan .\sylum 



Gallipolis: 

Qallla County Children's Home 

R. D.2. 
Geoeoetown: 

Brown County Orphan Children's 
Home. 
Home St. 
Glendale: 

Bethany Home for Boys 

Grand Ave. 

Bethany Home for Girls 

Albion Ave. 
Granville: 

Fannie Doane Home for Missionaries' 
Children. 
Broadway. 
Greenville: 

Darke County Children's Home 



Hamilton: 

Children's Home 

South D St. 

HlLLSBORO: 

Highland County Children's Home. 
East Main St. 
Ibonton: 

Lawrence County Children's Home. 
Vernon St. 
Lancaster: 

Fairfield County Children's Home. . 



Lebanon: 

Warren County Orphan Asylum. 

1 Not reported. 



County of Pickaway 

Children's .\id Society of 
Cleveland. 

National Benevolent Asso- 
ciation of Christian Church . 

Independent Order of B'nai 
B'rith. 

Private corporation 

Cleveland Humane Society. . 

Federation of Jewish Chari- 
ties. 
Private corporat ion 

Sisters of Charity of St. Au- 
gustine. 

Lad ies of the Sacred Heart of 
Mary. 

Sisters of Charity of St. Au- 
gustine. 

County of Franklin 

Private corporation 

Sisters of St. Francis 

Pontifical College of Josephi- 

num. 
Sisters of St. Francis 

County of Montgomery 

Private corporation 

Sisters of the Most Precious 
Blood. 

Coimty of Defiance 

Private corporation 

County of Preble 

Private organization « 

Evangelical Association 

County of Gallia 

Countvof Brown 



Sisters of the Transfigura- 
tion (Episcopal). 

Sisters of tiie Transfigura- 
tion (Episcopal). 

American Baptist Foreign 
Mission Society. 



Class of children received. 



Orphan and dependent chil- 
clren. 

Destitute children 

Orphan, neglected, and 

homeless children. 
Orphan children from 5 to 12. 

Orphan, dependent, and 
neglected children. 

Abandoned .dependent . and 
neglected children under 2. 

Indigent Jewish children 
under 5. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Foundlings and orphan chil- 
dren. 

Orphan girls 

Orphan, abandoned, and 
neglected boys. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 
Indigent children 

Dependent children under 5 

Destitute boys 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren under 16. 

Orphan children over 2 

Dependent children from 1 
to 16. 

Homeless and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children 



Destitute boys 

Orphan and destitute girls. 



Foreign missionaries' chil- 
dren from 7 to 18. 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 



County of Darke 

Private corporation 

Private corporation .... 

County of Lawrence 

County of Fairfield 

County of Warren 

' Included in report of Cleveland Humane Society, 



Orphan, destitute, and neg- 
lected children. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Foundlings, homeless, and 
dependent children. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren under 16. 

Orphan and homeless de- 
pendent ciiildren. 



1906 

1864 
1902 
1868 
1852 
1873 
1901 
1887 
1873 
1851 
1850 

1880 
1860 
1908 
1876 
1875 

1843 
1903 
1849 

1884 

1881 

1884 
1893 

1866 

1884 

18,S5 

1909 
1898 

1909 

1S«9 
1869 
1898 
1874 
1.S83 
1869 



Yes. 

(■) 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

m 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

(') 

No. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 



0) 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



(') 

72 

78 
206 

69 
103 

71 
834 
135 
132 

67 
18 
100 
18 
89 

64 
25 
41 

14 

37 

6 
34 

37 

11 

21 

3 
19 



Through- 



(') 



(■) 



18 



(■) 



(') 
64 

78 
19' 103 
50 



101 



. (') 



7 ... 
18 



(') 



» Colored only. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



137 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



42 

(') 

43 

500 

7S 

14 

5G 

73 

132 

265 

275 

108 
39 

150 
35 

300 

HI) 
44 
(') 

20 

45 

30 
38 

12-; 

21 
24 

19 
85 



Dependent. 



(') 



(') 



(■) 



(>) 



(') 



(■) 



CHILDREN 

OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



25 



31 

26 
' E.xclusive of amount covered into county treasury. 



(■) 



38 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



(•) 



35 



(■) 



(') 



(■) 



35 



(') 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING ^TiAR. 



(') 

47 
78 
75 
22 
95 
54 



77 
138 

26 
16 
80 
17 
70 

78 
2 
(') 

1 

(■) 



22 
W 
3 



(') 



20 



RECEIPTS DURING TEAR. 



Total. 



SO, 206 

(') 

7,641 
110,523 
31,968 
2 3,929 

(') 

8,965 
10,111 
17, 356 
21,000 

13,221 
3,894 
(') 
(■) 

24,288 

20,065 

694 

0) 

2,491 

5,294 

8,613 
3,721 

20,000 

3, 489 

3,718 

5,179 
10,900 

6,700 



Derived from — 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



S5, .SOI 



(■) 



(■) 
12,854 



20,065 
429 



<2,310 

300 

* 8, 378 
3,069 



•3,363 
<2, 



< 11,293 
9,539 
3,260 
5,463 

1 10,060 
7, 204 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 

in- 
mates 



(') 
$3, 544 
80,236 



(') 

2,264 
2,000 
14, 739 

(■) 



872 
(1) 
(■) 
17,590 



250 



51 
10,000 



2,157 
3,326 

2,175 



96 
300 



3,560 
5,463 
10, 283 
9,564 
s Covered into county treasury 



Other 
sources 



$361 

C) 
2,780 



986 



(') 
3,01' 
1,239 
2,617 



(') 
(■) 
6,698 



15 

(') 

'153 

4,751 

5 216 
599 



S44 

(') 

1,317 
30,287 
30, 982 

3, 121 

(') 

3,684 

6,872 



(•) 

367 
3,022 

(1) 
(1) 



6 28 

243 

5 19 
2 

8,000 

6 126 

5 912 

2,755 
7,574 



2,350 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



For 
run- 
ning 

ex- 
penses. 



$6, HI 

(') 

7,898 
93,413 
26,141 
2 3,929 

(>) 

9,621 
14, 894 
16,700 
21,000 

16,23: 
3,846 
(') 
(') 

24,288 

20,065 
694 

(') 

3,611 

4,70; 

6,764 
3,616 

18,000 

3,489 

3,718 

4,465 
10,900 

6,700 

11,392 
8,723 
3,200 
5,463 

10,283 
9,554 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



10,111 

(■) 

7,898 
88, 124 
23, 436 

3,793 

(•) 

7,299 
14,394 
16,700 

(') 

13,221 
3,846 
{') 
(■) 

18,444 

17,409 
694 
C) 

3,430 

4,407 

6,343 
3,616 

15,000 

3,489 

3,333 

1,900 
8,900 

6,700 

9,821 
8,723 
3,000 
5,284 
9,135 
7, .302 



(') 



S5, 289 
2,705 

136 
(') 
2,322 

500 



3,016 



(') 
(') 
5,844 

2,656 



(1) 
181 
300 
421 



3,000 



385 

2,565 
2,000 



1,571 



200 

179 

1,148 

2,252 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



(') 

(') 
$25,000 
836,833 
635,500 

(2) 

(■) 



19,000 
50,000 
« 

135,000 
27,500 
C) 



100,000 
50,000 



,6 Semi-count 



(') 

8,000 

3,000 

65,000 
6,000 

160,000 

21,000 

20,000 

12,500 
5,000 

20,000 

50,000 
45,000 
12,000 
20,000 
52,300 
72,000 
y home. 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



(') 

(■) 
$25, 000 
356, 687 
305,500 



19,000 
50,000 
00,000 

125,000 
8,000 
(') 



100,000 
50,000 



8,000 



26 

27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 

37 
38 
39 
40 
41 

4e 

43 
44 

45 



2,500 46 



60,000 
6,000 

60,000 

21,000 

20,000 

7,500 



20,000 

50,000 
45,000 
12,000 
20,000 
52,300 
25,000 



47 
48 

49 

50 

51 

52 
53 



55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 



138 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



OHIO— Continued. 
Lima: 

Allen County Children's Home 

Box 498. 
Lonbon: 

Madison County Children's Home. . 
R. D. 7. 
LomsvniE: 

St. Louis Orphanage 



McArthue: 

Vinton County Children's Home . . 

Malta: 

Morgan County Children's Home. 



Mansfield: 

Richland County Children's Home 

259 Hedges St. 
Marietta: 

Washington County Children's Home. 
Marion: 

Marion County Children's Home 



Martstille: 

Union County Children's Home. 
R. D. 3. 
Massillon: 

Charity Rotch School < 

Maitmee: 

Lucas County Children's Home. 
Millersburg: 

Painter Children's Home 



Mdjster: 

St. Mary's Institute 

Mount Ephe.um: 

Children's Temporary Home 

New Lexington: 

Perry County Children's Home. . 
Mill St. 
Noewalk: 

Norwalk Children's Home 

143 Benedict St. 
Oberun: 

Lorain County Children's Home . 
538 East CoUege St. 
Pomeeot: 

Meigs County Children's Home. . 

Portsmouth: 

Scioto County Children's Home.. 
Sandusky: 

Erie County Children's Home.. . . 
Sycamore Line. 
Sidney: 

Shelby County Children's Home . 
R. D. 3. 
Smithfield: 

Children's Bethel 



South Euclid: 

Rainbow Cottage 

Green Road. 
Springfield: 

Clark County Children's Home. . 
Home Road. 

Oesterlen Orphans' Home 

R. D. 10. 
Ohio Pythian Home 



Tacoma: 

Belmont County Children's Home. 



Tiffin: 

National Orphans' Home 

River Road. 
Toledo: 

Lucas County Juvenile Detention Home 
418 Erie St. 



St. Anthony's Orphanage. 

2327 Cherry St. 
Toledo Boys' Home 

737 Ontario St. 
Teot: 

Knoop Children's Home. . 

R. D. 6. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Connty of Allen 

County of Madison. 



Sisters of Charity of St. 
Augustine. 



County of V^inton 

County of Morgan 

County of Richland. , 



County of Washington. 
County of Marion 



County of Union. 



Private corporation. 

Coimty of Lucas 

County of Holmes. . . 



Sisters of the Precious Blood. 

County of Noble 

County of Perry 



Private organization . 
County of Lorain . . . . 
County of Meigs 



County of Scioto . 
County of Erie.. . 



County of Shelby. . . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
County of Clark 



Private corporation (Luth- 
eran). 
Knights of Pythias of Ohio . 



County of Belmont. 



Junior Order United Ameri- 
can Mechanics of Ohio. 

County of Lucas 



Sisters of Charity (Gray 

Nuns). 
Private corporation 



Coxmty of Miami. 
I Exclusive of amount covered into county treasury. 



Class of children received. 



Indigent children. 



Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and abandoned boys 



Homeless and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 



Indigent children . 



Indigent children imder 16. . 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 



Indigent children. . . 
Dependent children. 



Orphan, neglected, and de- 
pendent children. 



Orphan girls 

Dependent children. 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Destitute and dependent 
children. 

Orphan and abandoned chil- 
dren under 16. 

Dependent children 



Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children 



Neglected and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Needy, convalescent, and 
crippled children. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 
Orphan children from 4 to 10. 

Knights of Pythias' orphan 
children. 

Orphan, neglected, and de- 
pendent children. 

Orphan children of members 
of the order. 

Delinquent and dependent 
children pending action of 
court. 

Orphan and abandoned chil- 
dren. 

Working boys 



Orphan, neglected, and de- 

3ii]' 



linquent children, 
- Covered into coimty treasury 



1S93 

1898 

1883 

1885 

1880 

1880 

1866 
1900 

1884 

1826 
1888 
1888 

1888 
1898 
1885 

1882 

1899 

1880 

1877 
1901 

1896 

1905 

1891 

1878 
1904 
1894 

1881 

1896 

1907 

1854 
1891 



Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

'Not 



5 
24 

10 

32 

2 

15 
5 

1 16 
reported. 



CHILDEEN received FOE FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



87 
2 

10 
6 
13 

13 

43 

15 

22 
2' 

12 

23 

140 

21 

3 

35 

34 

57 

678 

no 

181 



63 



Through— 



140 



(') 






m 



(') 



181 



< Temporarily closed. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



139 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



87 
2 

30 
12 

8 

18 

44 

35 

33 
34 

12 

33 

161 

42 

22 

203 

41 

298 

m 

255 
(») 

33 



1 = 



Dependent. 



19 



255 



22 



m 



m 



m 



CHILDREN 

OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



86 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



CmLDREN 

DISCHARGED 
DURING YEAR. 



3 
3 

m 
11 



83 



4 

4 

50 

3« 

29 

i 
119 



m 



RECEIPTS DURINQ TEAR. 



Total. 



512,150 

4,965 

9,912 

2,326 

2,409 

5,800 

8,828 
10,778 

3,636 

5 2,008 

32, 714 

2.910 

1,400 
1,000 
2,653 

2,70: 

7,708 

4,300 

5,466 
9,004 

6,585 

3,300 

15, 253 

9,182 
10,800 
42.129 

7,975 

45,000 

m 

j 

29,050 

I 

3,i5i; 

11,725 



6 From rental and invested funds. 



'10,955. 
* Additional buildings and tents used in summer. 



Derived from — 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



> 57, 728 
4,965 



12,188 

2,409 

' 4, 733 

' 8,572 
19,276 

1 2, 771 



129,508 
1,711 



1,000 
1 2,342 

2,374 

1 6, 593 

14,094 

15,428 
18,684 

1 6, 143 



9,182 



■6,403 



(») 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 

in- 
mates 



Other 
sources 



S,524 



283 



1,800 
12,637 



10,000 
42,129 



23,513 
1,471 



2 $4, 028 



2 927 

2 48 
M,502 



1,400 



2253 

50 

3 1,102 

= 206 



1,500 
182 



2 415 



"$394 



2 138 



2 140 
2208 



2851 

'2,008 
2 106 
1,199 



2,434 



800 



5,537 



'1,157 



1,680 
= 770 



PAYMENTS DUBINO 
YEAR. 



Total. 



812,150 

4,965 

10,106 

2,326 

2,363 

5,800 

8,828 
9,726 

16,813 

202 
32, 714 

m 

1,800 
1,000 
2,653 

2,158 

7,708 

4,300 

4,175 
7,704 

6,585 

3,300 

16, 145 

9,569 
14,300 
39,085 

8,463 

45,000 

(») 

28,126 
3,151 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 



$11,437 
4,123 

8,662 

2,326 

2,330 

5,800 

8,341 
6,000 

2,613 

62 
32, 714 

(») 

1,800 
1,000 
2,653 

2,158 

7,708 

4,190 

4,175 

7,478 

6,585 

1,800 

15,626 

9,182 

4,300 

33,674 

7,359 

.39,000 

« 

20,238 
3,151 

11,111 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



»713 

842 

1,444 



487 
3,726 

14,300 

140 



m 



1,500 

520 

387 
10,000 
5,411 

1,104 

6,000 

m 

7,8 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
mvosted 
funds}. 



614 60,000] 60,000 
' Includes $132.68 covered into count}' treasury. 



$150,000 
41,000 

6,000 

12,000 

60,000 

45,000 
90,000 

36,000 

59,855 
200,000 
13,000 

8,000 

10,000 

12.000 

50,000 

18,000 

50,000 
22,500 

80,000 

10.000 

80,980 

20,000 

43,000 

326,000 

60,000 

200,000 

P) 

196, 100 
13,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



S150,000 

41,000| 

(') 

6,000 

12,000 

60,000 

45,000 
90,000 

36,000 

25,000 

200,000 

13,000 

8,000 
W 
10,000 

6,000 

50,000 

18,000 

50,000 
22,500 

80,000 

10,000 

34, 544 

20,S00 

30.000 

325.000 

60,000 

200,000 

(') 

190,000 
7,000 



61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 

eg 

69 

70 
71 

72 

73 

74 
75 

76 

77 
78 
79 



83 

84 
86 



90 
91 

92 



140 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



OHIO— Continued. 
Urbana: 

Champaign County Cliildren's Home,. 

Warren: 

Trumbull County Children's Home . . . 
East Market St. 
Washington Couut House: 

Fayette County Children's Home 



Waverlt: 

Pike County Children's Home. 
West Liberty: 

Mennonite Orphan's Home 



West Park: 

Home of the Holy Family. 
Puritas Springs Road. 
West Union: 

Wilson Children's Home. .. 



Wilmington: 

Clinton County Children's Home 

WOODSFIELD: 

Monroe County Children's Home 

Wooster: 

Wayne County Children's Home 

Xenia: 

Greene Coimty Children's Home 

Dayton Pike. 
Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' 
Home. 

Youngstown: 

Glenwood Children's Home 

Glenwood ave. 
Zanesville: 

John Mclntiie Children's Home 



OKLAHOMA. 

Bacone: 

Morrow Indian Orphans' Home. 

Guthrie: 

Children's Receiving Home * 



Oklahoma City: 

Baptist Orphans' Home.. 



Oklahoma Orphanage 

R. D. 4, Box 167. 
Sunbeam Orphans' Home.. 

431 East Eighth St. 

OREGON. 
Beaveeton: 

St. Mary's Home 



Oswego: 

St. Mary's Home for Girls 

Parkplace': 

St. Agnes' Foundling Asylum 

Portland: 

Baby Home 

East Thirty-sLxlh and Ellsworth 
Sts. 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society Home 

" East Twenty-ninth and' Irving Sts. 
(Station C). 

Children's Home 

Corbett and Gaines Sts. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Chamberseurg: 

Children's Home 



Cheltenham: 

Industrial Home for Jewish Girls 

Jenkintown Road and Chelten Ave. 
Chester SpraNGs: 

Soldiers' Orphan School 

COENWELLS: 

Holy Providence House 

Maud P. O. 

E ASTON: 

Easton Home for Friendless Children . . 
1440 'Washington St. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



County of Champaign. 
County of Trumbull... 
County of Fayette .... 



County of Pike 

Mennonite Church . 



Private con^oration . 
Private corporation. 



County of Clinton. 
County of Monroe. 

County of Wayne. 
County of Greene.. 
State of Ohio 



County of Mahoning. 
Private corporation . . 



American Baptist Home 
Missionary Society. 

Oklahoma Children's Home 
Society. 

Missionary Baptist Church. . 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Sistere of St. Mary . 



Sisters of the Holy Names. . 

Sisters of Mercy 

Private corporation 



Boys' and Girls' Aid So- 
ciety. 

Ladies' Relief Society 



Children's Aid Society of 
Franklin County. 

Council of Jewish Women.. . 



State of Pennsylvania. 



Sisters of the Blessed Sacra- 
ment. 

Private corporation 



Class of children received. 



Dependent and delinquent 
children. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Homeless and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Normal orphan children 



Dependent, homeless chil- 
dren under 12. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children 



Normal, indigent, children 
under 16. 

Orphan children 



Homeless and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Soldiers' and sailors' orphan 
children and others need- 
ing education. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren under 3. 



Indian orphan children. 



Normal, homeless, and de- 
pendent children under 15. 

Part Indian and white or- 
phan children. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Needy and helpless children. 



Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected boys. 

Fotmdlings and orphan girls 

Indigent children under 5 . . 

Homeless children under 3 . , 



Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Orphan and other needy 
children. 



Homeless , indigent . and neg- 
lected children. 

Dependent girls 



Soldiers' orphan children 

Indicent and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children from 2 to 10, 



1891 

1«S9 

1885 

1SS7 
1S96 

1S95 

1884 

1884 
18S8 

1881 
1883 
1870 

1900 
1880 

1902 

1900 

1903 
1S9S 
1910 



1908 
1901 



1S.S5 
1S67 



1SS5 



Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 



No, 
No, 
No. 



No, 
Yes. 



ISSS Yes, 



Yes. 
Yes. 



1884 


Yes. 


1904 


No, 


1864 


Yes, 


1891 


m 



<.') 



32 



CHILDREN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



15 
15 

64 

47 
45 

106 
160 
56 

18 

6 

77 
41 

59 



Through- 



(.') 



(») 



C) 



20 



29 



' Exclusive of amount covered into county treasury. 



2 Covered into county treasury. 



' Not reported. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



141 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



63 

19 

24 

22 
70 

44 

24 

29 
S 

38 
50 
634 

13 
39 

40 



0.0 

O 



22 



Dependent. 



29 



40 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



23 



25 



22 



14 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



37 



CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 
DURING ^-EAR. 



m 



15 
128 



m 



m 



RECEIPTS DURINO YEAR. 



Total. 



$10,922 

3,690 

5,547 

1,500 
2,340 

6,613 

4,771 

3,413 
600 

6,649 

6,000 

224,000 

9,716 
12,423 



Derived from- 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



'S7,906 
3,690 

1 2, 557 
1,500 



3,226 

2,476 
600 

6,649 

6,000 

1221,689 

9,716 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 

in- 
mates 



2$2, 188 



S107 
2,500 



817 



Other 
sources 



2 154 



2,233 
1,362 



2 $828 



2 2,836 



2,751 

1,545 

937 



2 2,311 



12,423 



883 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 



$12,290 

3,690 

6,559 

1,600 
2,099 

6,645 

4,771 

3,413 

710 

6,649 

6,000 

244, 746 

9,716 
10, 306 

6,589 



For 

run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$10,922 

3,690 

5,547 

1,600 
2,099 

4,556 

4,481 

3,413 
600 

6,060 

6,000 

212, 931 

9,309 
9,888 

4,589 



$1,36S 



1,012 



2,089 
290 



31,816 

407 
418 

2,000 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTi' AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



$45,000 

40,000 

79,000 

10,000 
20,000 

2,500 

95,000 

40,000 
20,000 

50,000 

(») 
.500,000 

70,000 
326,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$45,000 

40,000 

79,000 

10,000 
20,000 

2,500 

60,000 

40,000 
20,000 

50,000 

(') 

500,000 

70,000 
80,000 

m 



93 

94 

95 

96 
97 

98 

99 

100 
101 

102 
103 
104 

103 
106 

1 
2 

3 

4 
5 



15 
15 
25 

104 

145 
SO 
106 

58 

70 

10 

17 

324 
151 

29 



29 



10 



(») 



« 



395 



130 



21 

17 



4 
16 

21 

17 

... (») 



36 



154 

28 



11,000 
1,000 
3,642 

5,537 

(») 

2,600 
13,799 

C=) 

14,575 

2,099 

2,126 

58, 182 

m 



1,786 

« 

2,000 

3,000 



1,410 



58, 182 



4,443 



11,000 

300 

3,642 

1,250 

m 

300 
9,364 

(') 



200 500 



300 
1,105 

(") 



589 
375 



252 



251 



2,208 



330 
(*) 
14,575 

100 
1,500 



804 



10,000 
1,000 
3,682 

7,0 

W 

2,600 
13,799 



w 


6,795 


1,592 


6,985 


58, 182 


17,190 


7,367 



8,000 
1,000 
3,582 

6,093 

(») 

2,600 

9,163 

(') 
6,795 

1,558 

4,800 

53,424 
17,190 

7,367 



50,000 
44, 750 



50,000 
40,000 



1,000 



4,636 



34 

2,185 
4,758 



16,171 

30,000 
45,500 

(') 
283,920 



12,676 
23,500 



16,171 

30,000 
40,000 

(») 
46,500 



9,876 
15,000 



34,733 



26,200 



< Included in report of Olilahoma Children's Home Society. ' Included in report of Boys' and Gii-ls' Aid Society of Oregon. • Colored and Indian only. 



142 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



Supervised or conducted by — 



Christian Brothers . 



PENNSYLVANIA— Continued. 

Eddington: 

St. John Orplian .Vsylum 

Emsworth: 

Orphan Asylum of the Holy Family. . . Sisters of the Holy Family 

■ of Nazareth. 
Erie: 

St. Joseph's Orphan Asvlum Sisters of St. Joseph. 

Third St. 
Greenville: 

St. Paul's Orphans' Home 



Grove City: 

George Junior Republic. 
R.D. 



Harrisbttrg: 

Children's Industrial Home 

Nineteenth and Swatara Sis. 

Messiah Orphanage 

lis.i Bailey St. 
Sylvan Heights Home for Orphan Girls. 
Derry St. 
Jonestown: 

Church Home and Orphanage 



Lanca.ster : 

Children's Home 

South Arm and Chester Sts. 
Langhorne: 

Fouike and I^ong Institute for Orphan 
Girls. 
Eden P. O. 
Lotsville: 

Tressler Orphans' Home 



Mars: 

St. John's Lutheran Orphanage. 

Marwood: 

Lutheran Concordia Home 



Meadowbrook: 

Seybert Institution 

419 .South Fifteenth St., 
phia (olhce). 
Meadville: 

Odd Fellows' Home 

408 North Main St. 
Middletown: 

Emaus Orphan House 

New Derry: 

Seraphic Home 

North Springfield: 

Ehnwood Home 

Oakdale: 

Boys' Industrial Home 



Philadelphia: 

Baptist Orphanage 

Fifty-eighth St. and Thomas Ave. 
Belhesda Children's Cliristian HoiHe... 

Willow-Grove and Stenton .^ves. 
Burd Orphan Asylum 

SLxty-third and Market Sts. 
Catholic Home for Destitute Children. . 

1720 Race St. 
Church Home for Children 

Baltimore Ave. and Fifty-eighth St 
Foster Home 

Twenty-fourth and Poplar Sts. 
Friends' Home for Children 

4011 Aspen St. 
Girard College 

Girard and Corinthian Aves. 
Haddock Memorial 

806 Pine St. 
Hebrew Orphans' Home 

Twelfth and Greene Lane Sts. (Lo- 
gan Station). 
Hebrew Sheltering Home and Day 
Nursery. 

510 Nforth Fourth St. 
Home for Destitute Colored Children.. 

Fifty-fourth and Berks StS. 
Home for Orphans of Odd Fellows of 
Pennsylvania. 

Twentieth and Ontario Sts. 



the 



Reformed Church 
United States. 

George Junior Republic .\s- 
sociation of Western Penn- 
sylvania. 

Private corporation 

Brethren in Christ 

Sisters of Mercy 



Private corporal ion ( Episco- 
pal). 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 



General Synod of the Luth- 
eran Church. 

Joint Synod of Ohio and 
Other States. 



Synodical Conference. . 
Private organization . . 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows of Pennsylvania. 



Private corporation 

Seraphic Work of Charity . . . 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Private corporal ion(Baptisl) 
Private corporation 



St. Stephen's Church (Epis- 
copal). 
Sisters of St. Joseph , 



Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Private corporation 



Private corporation. . 
Private organization. 



Tnistees of Mrs. Daniel 

Haddock Endowment. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows of Pennsylvania. 



Class of children received. 



Orphan boys 

Orphan children over 18 
months old. 

Dastitute and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Normal orphan children 



Delinquent and wayward 
children. 



Orphan and homeless chil- 



Jrpl 
tin 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Orphan and indigent girls. . 



Orphan and homeless chil- 



Jrphan 
dren. 



Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren from 3 to 12. 

Orphan girls 



Destitute orphan children. . 

Orphan and deserted chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children 



Odd Fellows' orphan chil- 
dren from 3 to 12. 

Orphan children from 6 to 12. 

Indigent and destitute hoys. 

Incorrigiide boys under 16. . . 

Homeless and neglected 
boys from 8 to 16. 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 
Destitute children 



Orphan girls from 4 to 8 

Orphan and destitute girls 
Orphan and destitute girls. . 
Orphan children 

Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Indigent orphan boys from 
6 to 10. 

Orphan children under 3 

Orphan children from 6 to 10. 

Destitute and horaele.ss chil- 
dren. 

De.stitute children 



Odd Fellows' orphan chil- 
dren. 



1885 
1900 

1865 

1867 

1909 

1875 
1900 
1902 

1S7S 

1860 

1S86 

1868 
1S93 
1SS3 
1883 

1872 

1806 
1910 
1909 
1900 

1879 
1.S59 
1863 
1863 
1857 
1839 
1881 
1848 
1900 
1897 

1902 

1856 
1.8S3 



Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 
(») 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
Y'es. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 



36 



CHILDIIEN KECErVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



32 
52 
26 
145 

19 
21 
3 

108 
11 
10 
15 

202 

6 

30 



Through- 



20 



(■) 



(') 



(■) 



' Not reported. 



> Indeterminate. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



143 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHODBEN m THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOaE OF TEAR. 



32 

24 
18 
144 

107 
(') 
56 

194 
87 
88 
26 
1,455 
13 

127 

51 
36 



44 

17 

1,455 

3 

94 

25 

36 
32 



«=£ 



o 



Dependent. 



lO; 

(') 
56 
65 
87 
88 
12 
1,455 
13 

127 

18 

36 
69 



Si ' 



(•) 



37 



(•) 



33 



(■) 



(') 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



(') 



(') 



(■) 



(') 



CHILDREN 

PLACED IN 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



(') 



(■) 



(') 



CHILDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR, 



(') 

68 
36 
21 
11 

33 
3 
30 

7 

24 

22 



14 

7 
20 
(') 
102 

14 
0) 

2 
101 
9 
12 
19 
210 



30 



27 



RECEIPTS DURINQ TEAR. 



Total. 



$03,074 
10,979 

17,991 

16,694 

(') 

8,21! 
2,709 
11,790 

5,718 

12,129 

20,521 

24,755 

m 

5,i 
171,209 

11, 179 

5,800 

5,187 

5,262 

35,512 

34,256 

(') 
32,371 

8,900 
17,095 
14,921 

7,544 
2,401,414 

5, 
18,677 

8,720 

12,290 
15,712 



$5,000 



Derived from — 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



0) 

4,092 
1,000 
3,000 



11,706 



(') 



25,267 



852 



(') 



2,250 



2,000 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



(') 
$2,680 

1,479 

6,800 

(') 

37 
1,409 
8,790 

4,385 



7S0 
16,755 

4,40.5 



2,338 
3,221 
2,608 

17,053 
(') 



1,364 
4,200 
2,280 
1,82: 



370 
18.677 

2,819 

5,873 
15, 712 



Other 
sources 



(') 
$2,205 

4,092 

3,703 

(') 

1,452 



4.503 

4,000 
(») 
4.50 



319 
2,041 
1,448 



(■) 



2,540 

475 

2,070 

1,31' 



$1,034 
12,420 
0,131 

(') 

2,030| 
30o' 



1.133 

423 

15, 238 

4,000 
(") 
443 
171,209 



5,8001 
1,078 



0,129 

17,203 

(') 
32,371 
2,740 
12,414 
10, 559 
2.400 
2,401,414 
4,906 



3,784 
6,417 



PAYMENTS DURING 
^■EAR. 



Total. 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 



$03,074 
21,902 

17, 788 

16,306^ 

(') 

9,130 
2,709 
7.893 

5,817 

11,492 

19, 586 

23,550 

5,450 
171,475 

16,434 

5,800 
4,*744 
(') 
34,654 

27, 101 

(') 
31,719 
12,279 
17,600 
15,965 

5,914 
O;) 1,579 

5,445 
10,415 

8,695 

12,244 
14,651 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$43,074 
21,902 

17,788 

13,206 

(') 

6,994 
2,709 
7, 

5,689 

11,492 

19,586 

22,550 
(') 

5,450 
171,475 

14,774 

5,800 

4,744 

(') 

27,944 

20,597 

(') 
18,737 
12, 279 
17,000 
14,158 

5,914 
503,341 

5,445 
16,000 

8,695 

11,672 
8,574 



$20,000 



3,100 



2,136 



1,000 



0,710 

0,504 

(') 
12,982 



1,807 



08,238 



572 
6,077 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLO.SE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



$500,000 
245,000 

73,000 

128,156 

(') 

34,000 

8,101 

(•) 

24.600 

73,050 

379,642 

120.000 

(=) 

15,000 

1,592,163 

52,700 



100, 
U, 

10, 
«0, 

191, 
(') 
944, 
150, 
343, 
212, 

17, 
26,467. 
30, 
50, 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



4,500 

(■) 
190, ( 



$500,000 
245,000 

73,000 

103,000 

(') 

33,000 
5,000 
(') 

12.000 

05,000 

75,000 

100,000 

C=) 

15,000 
327,653 

52.700 

100,000 
< 1.000 
10,000 
60,000 

67,000 

(') 

250,000 

150,000 

75,000 

45,000 

11,500 

18,987,482 



11 
12 
13 

14 

15 

16 

17 
18 
19 
20 



22 
23 
24 
25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 



18,000 34 
50,000 35 

4,500 36 



(') 
60,000 



37 
38 



3 Included in report of St. John's Lullieraii Home. 



4 Equipment. 



144 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



PENNSYLVANIA— Continued. 

Phil ahelphu— Continued. 

Honio of the Merciful Savior for Crip- 
pled Children. 

4400 Baltimore Ave. 
House of St. Micliael and All Angels. . . 

613 North Forty-third St. 
House of the Holy Child 

625 North Forty-third St. 
Howard Institution 

1612 Poplar St. 
Jewish Foster Home and Orphan .Asy- 
lum. 

700 Church Lane (Germantown). 
Lincoln Institution and Educational 
Home. 

324 South Eleventh St. 
Methodist Episcopal Orphanage 

Monument Ave. 
Northern Home for Friendless Children 

Twenty-third and Bro^Ti Sts. 
Philadelphia Home for Infants 

461S Westminster Ave. 
Presbyterian Orphanage 

Fifty-eighth St. and Chester Ave. 
St. John's Orphanage 

1722 Rittenhouse St. 
St. Joseph's Female Orphan Asylum 
and Gonzaga Memorial. 3 

862 Chirrch Lane (Germantown). 
St. Joseph's House 

727 Fine St. 
St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum ' 

700 Spruce St. 
St. Martin's College , 

713 Catherine St. 
St. Mary Magdalen de Pazzi's Orphan- 
age. 

730 Montrose St. 
St. Vincent's Home 

Twentieth and Race Sts. 
St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum 

Tacony Station. 
Shelter for Colored Orphans 

Forty-fourth and Wallace Sts. 
Southern Home for Destitute Children. 

Broad and Morris Sts. 
Western Home for Poor Children 

Forty-first and Baring St5. 
Widener Memorial Industrial Training 
School. 

North Broad St. and Ohiey Ave. 
Young Women's Union, Nurserv and 
Home.' 

422 Bainbridge St. 
Pittsburgh: 

Children's Temporary Home 

2044 Centre Ave. 
Christ Church Home for Babies 

Harker St., West End. 
Coleman Industrial Home for Colored 
Boys. 

2816 Wylie Ave. 
Day Nursery and Temporary Home for 
Children. 

3035 Perrysville Ave. 
German Protestant Orphan Asylum. . . 

Pauline St. 



Home for Colored Children 

Termon Ave. 
Home for the Friendless 

423 East Park Way. 
Industrial Home for Crippled Children . 

1426 Denniston Ave. 
Pittsburgh Home for Babies , 

2503 Centre Ave. 
Pittsburgh Home for Girls 

3456 Bouquet St. 
Pittsburgh News Boys' Home 

Stevenson and Locust Sts. 
Protestant Home for Boys 

330 North Ave., North Side. 
Protestant Orphan Asylum 

Perrysville Ave. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Private corporation. 



Private organization 

Private corporation 

Association of Women 
Friends. 

Federation of Jewish Chari- 
ties. 

Protestant Episcopal Church 



Private corporation (Metho- 
dist Episcopal). 
Private corporation 



Private corporation 

Private corporation (Pres- 
byterian). 

Trustees of J. Edgar Thom- 
son Endowment. 

Sisters of Charity 



Catholic Diocese of Phila- 
delphia. 
Sisters of Charity 



Church of the Evangelists.. 

Missionary Sisters of St. 
Francis. 



Sisters of Charity 

School Sisters of Notre Dame 

Society of Friends 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private individual 



Federation of Jewish Chari- 
ties. 



Pittsburgh Association for 
Improvement of the Poor. 

Young Woman's Guild of 
Christ M. E. Church. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation . 



Private corporation (Ger- 
man Evangelical Protes- 
tant). 

Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 
Private corporation . 



Class of children received. 



Homeless crippled children 

Crippled children 

Homeless children 

Homeless girls from 10 to 18 

Orphan and neglected Jew- 
ish children. 

Orphan boys from 5 to 9 



Destitute orphan children 
from 4 to 10. 

Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected children. 

Orphan children under 4, 
and boarders. 

Orphan children 



Railway employees' orphan 

girls. 
Orphan girls 



Homeless and destituteboys. 

Orphan girls from 4 to 7 

Destitute boys from 8 to 14. . 
Italian orphan girls 



Destitute infants and foimd- 

lings. 
Catholic orphan children 

Orphan and homele.ss girls 

from 2 to 7. 
Destitute children , 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 
Crippled children 



Orphan and working moth- 
ers' children. 



Destitute and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Indigent and neglected chil- 
dren under 3. 

Delinquent and dependent 
boys, and boarders. 

Working mothers' children. , 



Orphan homeless and neg- 
lected children. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Neglected and deserted chil- 
dren. 

Crippled children from 3 to 
12. 

Orphan and neglected babies 
under 1. 

Delinquent and dependent 
girls. 

Newsboys, waifs, and home- 
less boys. 

Working boys from 14 to 21.. 

Protestant orphan children.. 



1881 

l>ts6 
1896 
1853 
1855 

1866 

1879 
1853 
1873 
1878 

1SS2 



1890 
1798 
1905 
1874 

1,858 
1856 
1822 
1849 
1850 
1906 

1SS5 

1874 
1909 
1909 

1SS6 

1887 

l&SO 
1861 
1902 
1904 
1901 
1884 
1886 
1833 



No. 

(?) 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 



CHILDBEN RECEIVED FOB FIBST 
TIME IN 1910. 



(') 
< 

21 
12 
29 



45 
25 
(■) 



222 
109 
24 
42 
31 
5 

162 

11 
45 



(') 



Through- 



(') 



45 
(') 

109 
57 

21 
22 

(■) 

i 

(') 
38 

40 



0) 



20 



(') 



(') 



(') 



29 



(') 



(■) 



20 



1 Not reported. 

2 Colored only. 

3 Included in report of St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum, 700 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

* Includes report of St. Joseph's Female Orphan Asylum and Gonzaga Memorial 862 Church Lane, Philadelphia. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



145 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



cbudeen in the institution at 
close of yeak. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACEP IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING 


i-EAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 




2 

(') 

28 
32 
34 
189 

30 

134 
168 
54 
125 

18 


(') 

5 
7 

112 

30 

54 
100 
32 
45 


a 


Dependent. 


J2 
.tl 

bo 
o 

o 

b£ 

.9 

u. 
o 


i 
1 

to 

o 


SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DURING Y-EAR. 


Total. 


Derived from — 


1 

3 
1 


■o 

a . 

Si 

o 


1 
> 

a 


3 

o 

< 


o 


1 


.2 
S 


s 

o 


S 




12 
36 
10 
22 

(') 

13 

17 

48 

4 

1 


C) 

4 
10 

13 
(') 

7 
15 
25 

2 


.2 

1 

(■) 

8 
25 
10 

9 

6 

2 

23 

2 
1 


Ap. 
pro- 

pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
nm- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 

im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


(') 

23 
25 
34 
77 

80 
68 
22 
80 
IS 


(') 

21 
10 
146 

30 

134 
168 
54 

125 

18 


(■) 

27 


J 
11 


(') 


(') 


$27,754 

5,069 

6,628 

4,605 

30, 181 

7.438 

57,794 
21,368 
8,596 
22,700 
12.079 


$6,250 
1.731 


$14,366 

2,612 

4,715 

918 

22,478 

326 

794 

900 

1,930 

9,500 


$410 

1,699 

804 

12 

2,063 
1,200 


$13,398 

2,047 

214 

2,883 

7,703 

7,100 

57,000 
14,218 
2,868 
12,000 
12,079 


$46,557 

4,723 

5,698 

4,605 

34,187 

8,509 

61,131 

24,993 

8,312 

27,276 

11,439 


$38,751 

4,723 
5,698 
4,364 
33,370 

7,017 

30,117 
21,390 
8,312 
26,276 
11,439 


$7, 806 

241 

817 

1,492 

31,014 
3,603 

1,000 


(') 

$48,000 
27,000 
43,900 

370,000 

(') 

1,450,000 

290,533 

62,223 

176,000 


(') 

$13, 000 

19,000 

9,200 

200,000 

(■) 

250,000 
123,000 
23,000 
100,000 


39 








40 












1 




1 


41 




24 








42 




43 




67 

0) 

4 

38 


46 

C) 

4 

28 


21 
10 








43 






C) 

1 

25 


(■) 
1 

18 


7 


44 










45 










46 










47 










7 


5 


2 








48 
















49 


































50 


170 
150 
35 
24 

482 
280 
53 
71 
60 
94 

66 

46 
26 

26 

43 

40 

59 
114 
44 

36 

39 
158 

26 
186 


170 
36 

190 
144 

33 
39 

58 

(') 

27 

<') 

26 

33 

IS 

36 

66 
19 
21 

158 
25 
88 


150 


120 
150 






60 




(') 


(') 










75 
25 
(') 

1 

139 
66 
16 
47 
21 
1 

{') 

46 

1 

23 

1 


75 
(') 

82 
(') 

28 

13 

1 

(') 

27 

0) 

23 

1 


25 

1 

57 

0) 

16 

19 

8 

(') 
19 


22,000 

(') 
12,970 

(') 

28,017 
24,932 
10,999 
11,479 
6,420 
'87,180 

12,742 

4,341 
4,389 
3,326 

3,447 

6,539 

15,686 
20,859 
17,801 
6,181 
4,088 
25,985 
6 5,854 
42,766 


3,000 
1,500 

2,000 

6,000 
3,000 
6,000 
3,107 
3,363 
7,500 


22,000 

(') 
12,470 

(■) 

18,842 
9,522 
2,281 
1,520 
1,643 
'87, 180 

' 10,221 

2,183 
1,334 

415 

1,360 

1,799 
1,014 
4,164 
482 
725 
3,209 
•391 
1,062 






21,019 

(') 

13,369 
2,276 

29,603 
23,932 
10,963 
11,300 
6,591 
87,180 

12,984 

4,077 
3,714 
3,326 

6,672 

,' 6,361 

12,068 

24,376 

17,801 

5,901 

4,568 

41,801 

6,024 

45,066 


19,698 

(') 
13,369 

(') 

29,603 
18,432 

9,788 
10,900 

5,802 
87,180 

11,584 

3,920 
3,714 
3,326 

5,138 

5,312 

12,068 

24,376 

17,801 

5,901 

4,398 

29,123 

5,024 

40,347 


1,321 
W 

« 

5,500 

1,175 

400 

789 

1,400 
167 


150,000 
(') 
(') 
(') 

350,000 
40,000 
226,000 
400,000 

91,200 
2,000,000 

66,341 
25,506 


160,000 
(') 
(') 
(') 

350,000 

40,000 

75,000 

200,000 

61,050 

2,000,000 

50,000 
25,506 


51 














(') 

35 

5,613 

3,893 

76 

2,138 


(') 

500 
(■) 

562 
10,017 
8,643 
9,959 
2,737 


62 




35 


















53 


24 

292 
136 
63 
38 
21 
36 

(') 

19 

(') 

10 
25 

23 

68 
26 
15 
39 


24 

253 

280 

53 




















64 




229 


















55 


















56 










6 

(') 

1 


(■) 


6 

(') 

1 


2 




2 


67 




71 

42 






58 


18 

56 

12 
16 

7 

40 
40 

36 

28 

11 

20 
146 


94 






1 




1 


59 






60 








(') 


(>) 


(■) 


(■) 
1 


(>) 

1 


(') 


1,495 

140 
1,403 
2,204 

1,447 

944 

301 
2,392 
1,089 
1,339 


1,026 

2,018 

1,662 

707 

4,235 

8,586 
14,463 
7,548 
1,253 


61 


3 


34 
9 

1 






62 












63 




IS 








1 


1 










64 


2 

3 

7 
35 


3 

4 

20 


2 


1,634 
1,049 

170 
12,678 

4,719 


24,000 

48,200 

201,000 
390,611 
151,500 

12,000 

(') 
196,600 

70,000 
1,032,000 


24,000 
41,000 

35,000 

81,758 
108,600 

12,000 

(') 
180,000 

60,0(JO 
200,000 


65 














66 


2 
44 


21 
86 






3 
15 


5 
3 


1 


6 
2 


19 

38 
6 

15 
(') 
136 
(') 

70 


9 
24 
6 
6 

136 

(') 

30 


10 
14 

10 

(') 

40 


67 






68 






69 


25 


















70 




19 


351 


351 


(') 


4 


4 


(') 


71 


4 




8 
26 


1,683 
2,435 
4,225 


13,693 

3,028 

37,479 


72 
73 


97 


185 








38 


IS 


20 


26 


12 


14 


74 













' Institution maintained bv Mr. P. A. B. Widener. 

' StatLstics of inmalos are for Day Nursery and Temporary Shelter; finances are for entire orgauiiation. 

' Includes $9,000 from Federal ion of Jewish Charities. 

8 Exclusive of donations other than cash. 



9531°— 13- 



-10 



146 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table 1.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



PENNSYLVANIA— Conliuued. 

PinsBURGn— Continued . 

St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum 

Troy Uill Road (Ewalt Station). 
St. Joseph's Protectory for Homeless 
Bovs. 
652 Vine St. 
St. Michael's German Roman Catholic 
Orphan Asylum. 
55 Pius St. 

St. Paul's Orphan Asylum 

Crafton Station (Idlewood). 

St. Peter's C)rphans' Home 

Robinson Road. 

Sunshine Home 

3532 California Ave. 
United Presbyterian Orphans' Home . . 
Monterey St. 

POTTSVILLE: 

Children's Home of Pottsville 



QtnNCY: 

Quincj' United Brethren Orphanage . . . 
Radnor: 

Home and Hospital of the Good Shep- 
herd. 
Garrett Hill P. O. 
Reading: 

Home for Friendless Children 

1016 Centre Ave. 
St. Catherine's Female Orphan Asylum. 
1026 Franklin St. 
Redinqton: 

William T. Carter Junior Republic 

Scotland: 

Soldiers' Orphans' Industrial School. . . 

Scranton: 

St. Patrick's Orphanage 

1425 Jackson St. 
Sooth Bethlehem: 

Children's Home of South Bethlehem . . 



Sonbury: 

Odd Fellows' Orphans* Home.. 
R. D. 2. 
Topton: 

Lutheran Orphans' Home 



Villa Maela: 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 

R.D. 2 (via LowellviUe, Ohio). 
Wallingford: 

Philadelphia Orphan Society 

Warminster: 

Christ's Home for Children 

983 North Fifth St., Philadelphia 
(office). 
Washington: 

Children's Home '. 

R. D. 10. 
Waynesburg: 

Greene County Children's Home 



Wilkes-Barre: 

Home for Friendless Children. 
3:!5 South Franklin St. 
WiLUAMSBtmo: 

Industrial Training Home 



Williamsport: 

Boys' Industrial Home 

617 B:ast Third St. 
Girls' Training School 

131 East Third St. 
Goldy Home 

819 Meade St. 

WOMELSDORF: 

Bethany Orphans' Home, 



York: 

Children's Home 

East PhUadelphia St. 
Zelienople: 

Orphans' Home and Farm School. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Sisters of Notre Dame 

Diocese of Pittsburgh (Ro- 
man Catholic). 

Sisters of St. Francis 



Sisters of Mercy 

St. Peter's Evangelical Lu- 
theran Chiu"ch. 
Private corporation 



United Presbyterian Wo- 
men's Association. 

Pottsville Benevolent Asso- 
ciation. 

United Brethren in Christ. . . 

Church of the Good Shep- 
herd (Episcopal). 



Private corporation. 
Sisters of Charity 



Private organization. . 
State of Pennsylvania. 



Sisters of the Immaculate 
Heart of Mary. 

Private corporation 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows of Pennsylvania. 

General Council of the Lu- 
theran Church. 

Sisters of the Holy Humilit j- 
of Mary. 



Private corporations 
Band of Workers 



County of Washington . 



County of Greene. 



Private corporation . 
County of Blaii- 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 



Reformed Church in the 
United States. 

Private corporation 



Institution of 
Deaconesses. 



Protestant 



Class of children I'eccived. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Homeless and dependent 
boys from 12 to 20. 

Orphan and needy children 
of St. Michael's Congrega- 
tion. 

Homeless and neglected chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children 

Children of working mothers. 
Orphan children 

Destitute, neglected, and 
homeless children. 

Orphan children 

Convalescent or healthy 
homeless children. 

Orphan, destitute and neg- 
lected children. 
Indigent girls 

Homeless incorrigible boys . . 

Soldiers' destitute orphan 
children. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Destitute children from 2 to 
14. 

Odd Fellows' orphan chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan girls 

Orphan children from 2 to 9. 

Homeless and destitute chil- 
dren. 



Indigent, dependent, and 
neglected children. 

Neglected and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Homel&ss and needy chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, wayward, and 
homeless boys. 

Orphan, homeless, and neg- 
lected girls. 

Homeless children 



Orphan, friendless, and des- 
titute children. 

Orphan, homeless, and indi- 
gent children under 12. 

Destitute orphan children. . , 



1849 
1895 

1873 

1840 
1890 
1906 

1878 

1872 

1903 
1874 

1884 
1872 

1898 
1905 

1875 

1882 

1896 

1897 

1864 

1814 
1903 

1883 
1884 
1862 
1901 



1863 
1865 
1S54 



Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No, 

No, 

No, 

No, 
Yes, 

Yes, 
Yes, 

No, 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 



CHILDBEN RECEIVED FOE FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



95 
24 

12 

557 

25 
29 

9 

9 
19 

32 

20 

21 

144 

85 

17 

21 

18 

10 

16 
26 

86 
32 
59 
24 

15 

4 
15 

38 

33 

16 



Through- 



' Not reported. 



- Presbyterian, Episcopalian, and Friends, 



GENERAL TABLES. 



147 



CARE OP CHILDREN: 1910— Continued . 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE or YEAR. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED m 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAH. 




3 




1 


Dependent. 


■U 
be 

to 

1 

.g 





SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DURING TEAR. 


Total. 


Derived from— 




9 


a . 

n 

5 


1 


.a 

a 
< 




1 

a 


.2 
(4 





s 




s 




a 


a 

at 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care ot 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


1 

For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
mvcsted 
funds). 


Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 
.0 


280 


144 


136 


?80 










5 


5 










105 


65 


40 


S21,831 
11,421 




$1,002 
3,405 


$5,348 
4,041 


$15,481 
3,975 


$16,454 
12,679 


$l5,179 


$3,275 
663 


$113,750 


$105, 000 


75 


64 


64 




36 


1 


10 




17 


4 


4 




i 


4 




16 


16 






12,016 


40,000 


40,000 


76 


32 


13 


19 


32 










2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 








2,818 




2,349 


469 




2,781 


2,664 


117 


32,000 


32,000 


77 


1108 


599 


509 


700 


7 


401 












75 




75 


402 


225 


177 


73, 743 
2,500 
(') 
7,408 




65,578 

1,400 

733 


8,165 




72,958 


52,958 
1,500 
3,420 
7,097 

2,493 


20,000 


700,000 


700,000 
12,000 
16, IX)fl 


78 


21 
41 


13 

0) 

?5 


8 

(') 

'3 


21 

41 
















4 


4 












300 
1,582 


800 
(') 
4,358 

169 


2,000 
3,620 
7,097 


500 
200 


17.000 
16,000 


79 
























SO 


48 


4S 










3 


"> 


1 


3 


■> 


1 


16 


9 


„ 




1,235 


1,815 




(') 


(') 


81 


23 


16 


7 


?3 










5 


3 


? 


1 




1 


3 




3 


2,680 

1.3,611 
7,443 


$1,175 


489 


847 


2,493 
11,420 





1,500 




82 


72 


47 


?5 


7? 






















1 


1 






5,371 




8,240 
2,020 


8,420 
7,225 


3,000 


56,607 
60,000 


56,607 


83 


36 


IS 


IS 


30 


1 


5 


















23 


9 


14 




4,612 


811 


7,226 


20,000 


84 


71 


41 


30 


38 




33 






(') 


en 


f) 


1? 


10 


■) 


19 


1' 


7 


8,603 
3,653 

6,794 


5,134 
449 


521 


1,062 
819 


1,886 


8,607 
3,553 


7,580 
2,993 

6,587 
69,857 

11,500 

3,898 


1,027 


83,000 


43,400 
(1) 


Si 


80 




SO 


66 




14 


















8 




8 


707 


1,678 
17 


560 


35,000 


SO 


25 


?5 








13 




1'' 














22 


7> 






6 000 




6,587 
90,676 

11,500 

3,898 




35,000 
176,000 


87 


376 


2?4 


15? 


376 






















110 


65 


45 


90,676 


90,676 








20,819 


176,000 
50,000 


SS 


160 


85 


65 


150 






















60 


?5 


35 


11,500 


325 


9,975 
1S8 


1,200 






50,000 


89 


40 


22 


18 


32 




8 






5 


? 


3 


3 


1 


2 


16 


9 


7 


3,018 


900 


1,508 


422 




11,000 


11,000 


?!0 


118 


69 


49 


118 






















12 


10 


2 


14,594 

13,615 

362 




14, 594 
11 100 






14,925 


14,229 

4,500 

830 


696 


55,297 
65,000 
12,000 


50,000 
65,000 
12,000 


91 


106 


(Y> 


43 


105 










IS 


n 


7 


IS 


11 


7 












2,516 


12,369 
1,041 


7,869 
211 


9? 


39 




39 


39 
















1 




1 


10 




10 




150 


212 


93 


86 


36 


50 


86 










■? 


■5 










16 


10 

20 


4 

14 


16,835 
11,398 

11,617 




79 


171 


16,585 


16, 149 


16 149 




0) 
2.5,000 

75,000 


(■) 
26,000 

75,000 


94 


97 

76 


48 

44 


49 
33 


67 

40 


3 

2 


27 
32 


















14 

34 


11,200 


11,398 




9,728 
11,614 


9,728 
11,614 







95 




2 


55 


28 


27 


.33 


18 


15 


226 


191 


96 


39 


(') 


('■> 






39 


















20 


13 


7 


8,447 

3,332 

3,956 

8,000 
3 506 


8,447 








8,447 

14,324 

3,956 

11,500 

3,743 

600 


C) 
2 482 


11,842 
547 


36,900 
123,476 
36,000 


36,900 


97 


40 


2? 


18 


40 










45 


13 


32 


?4 


IS 


6 












3,332 


79,801 


98 


29 


IS 


11 


fl 


1 


17 




2 


8 


3 


5 


8 


3 


5 








3,956 






3,409 


20,000 


99 


40 


40 




20 




10 




10 














4 


4 




2,000 
2,604 




2 000 


4,000 


8,300 
3 743 


3,000 


30,000 
12,600 
1,000 

187,621 

140,650 

65,000 


30,000 


100 


9f. 




W 


3 




?5 


















4 




4 


869 


33 


12 500 101 


7 


3 


4 


















1 


1 




11 


c 




GOO 


50 




.550 


600 




1 000 102 


170 


98 


7? 


170 










14 


13 




7 


5 


■> 


19 


15 




3 18,460 
13,491 
11,109 








6,816 
11,808 
2,169 


18,804 
12,818 
11,109 


15,934 
12 818 






36 


19 


17 


22 




14 






70 


39 


31 








13 


7 


6 


875 


808 






64,500 
65,000 


104 


105 


S5 


50 


105 
















16 


(') 


(•) 










4.500 


4,440 






105 



























' Exclusive of donations otlicr than cash. 



148 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



KHODE ISLAND. 



Baeeington; 

St. Andrew's Industrial ScUool. 



Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Bristol: 

Bristol Home for Destitute Children. . .' Churches of Bristol 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Trovidenck: 

Children's Friend Society 

23 Tobey St. 
Providence Shelter for Colored Children. 

20 OUve St. 
Rhode Island Home for Working Boys. 

42 Park St. 
Rhode Island S. P. C. C. Receiving 
Home. 

98 Doyle Ave. 
St. Aloysius' Home 

473 Prairie Ave. 
St. Mary's Orphanage 

128 Fifth St. (East Providence). 
St. Vincent de Paul's Infant Asylum 

Regent Ave. 
State Home and School 



Woonsocket: 

Day Nursery and Ch ildren's Home . 

Cass Ave. 
Franciscan Sisters' Orphanage 

48 Hamlet Ave. 
St. Vincent de Paul's Home 

62 Pond St. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Abbeville: 

Farm Homes < 



CllAKLESTON: 

Charleston Orphan House . 
160 Calhoun St. 

Jenkins' Orphanage 

20 Franklin St. 
Clinton: 

Thomwell Orphanage 

Broad at. 
Columbia: 

Epworth Orphanage 



Industrial Home . 



fjREENWOOD: 

Connie Maxwell Orphanage. 



Greenville: 

Odd Fellows' Orphans' Home . 
R. D. 7. 
Mount Pleasant: 

Home for Destitute Children. . . 



YORKVILLE: 

Church Home Orphanage . . . 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

BEEEsroRD: 

Bethesda Orphans' Home.. , 



Sioux Falls: 

Receiving Home 

Tenth St. and Sherman Ave. 



TENNESSEE. 
Brighton: 

Willam H. Dunlop Orphanage. . 
R. D. 1. 
Chattanooga: 

Children's Refuge 

115 West Terrace St. 

Steele Orphanage 

1 Strait St. 
Vine Street Orphans' Home . . . 
240 Vine St. 
Claeksville: 

Odd Fellows' Home 

R. D.4 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Rhode Island Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 

Sisters of Mercy 



Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Sisters of Divine Providence, 



StateofRhodc Island.. 
Private corporation. . . 



Franciscan Missionary Sis- 
ters. 
Sisters of St. Francis 



Private corporation. 

City of Charleston . . 
Orphan Aid Society - 



Presbyterian Church in the 
United States. 

Methodist E p iscopal Church , 

South. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 

Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows of South Carolina. 



Private organization 

Protestant Episcopal Church 



Hanges' Norwegian Luth- 
eran Synod. 



South Dakota 
Home Soc ety 



Children's 



Associate Reformed Pres- 
byterian Church. 

King's Daughters and Sons . 

Private corporation 



Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 



epe: 
ello 



Fellows of Tennessee. 



Class of children received. 



Orphan, neglected, and in- 
digent boys. 

Friendless and destitu techil- 
dren. 

Indigent children 



Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 
Orphan boys 



Neglected, abused, and aban- 
doned children. 



Orphans from C to 12 

Needy children imder 8 

Orphans and abandoned 

children under 6. 
Dependent, neglected, and 

abused children. 

Orphan children from 2 to 12. 

Orphan children 

Orphan children 



Mothers with or without 
children, and homeless 
children. 

Orphan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Indigent orphan children — 



Orphan children 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren from 1 to 14. 

Normal orphan children — 



Odd Fellows' orphan chil- 
dren. 

Homeless and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and working chil- 
dren. 



Orphan, neglected, and 
needy children. 

Neglected, dependent, and 
needy children. 



Orphan, homele.ss, and neg- 
lected children. 



Destitute children 

Destitute ch ildren undor 14 . . 
Destitute orphan children. .. 



Odd Fellows' orphan chil- 
dren. 



1875 

1835 
1838 
1898 

1882 

1850 
1879 
1891 
1885 

1889 
1904 
1905 



1897 



1790 
1891 



1896 
1899 



1905 



lS9ti 



19(J3 

1S88 
1884 
1878 

1898 



Ye^. 

(') 

No. 

Yes. 

(') 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 

(') 



No. 

No. 

P) 

No. 

No. 

(>) 

No. 
No. 

(') 
No. 

m 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



children received for first 

TIME IN 1910. 



(') 

19 
10 

(') 

115 

211 
16 

193 
82 

11 

56 



('). 



Through- 



o 



(■) 



(') 



32 



2.S 



(') 



(S* 



(■) 



(') 



I 



20 



4- 
54. 



(1) 



(') 



(') 



' Not reported. 

« Included in report of Rhode Island Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Chudren. 



' Indeterminate. 

* Includes branches at SummerviUe and Charleston. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



149 



CARK OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



35 
(') 

65 
21 
(') 
8 

211 
61 
144 
183 

20 
116 

49 



221 
106 

316 

208 
29 

225 

51 

12 






Dependent. 



!2+^ 



(') 



0) 



{') 



0) 



(■) 



(■) 



(') 



(') 



32 



CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 

UNDER 
SUPERVISION. 



(■) 



(•) 



254 



(') 



(■) 



(') 



34 



CHILDREN 

PLACED m 

FAMILIES 

DURING 

YEAR. 



(') 



{■) 



(') 



(■) 



(■) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



CnlLDREN 

DISCHARGED 

DURING YEAR 



(') 
11 

12 
(') 
91 

218 
12 

116 
10 

2 

45 

1 



(') 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$12,516 

(■) 

13,289 
6,170 
(1) 

14,800 
13, 
12,500 
32,642 

2,266 
8,000 
3,066 



1,591 

24,181 
14,272 

35,538 

28,784 
768 

32,821 

5,000 

1,750 

4,726 

9,984 
(') 

1,630 

945 
12, 0-15 
3,957 

15,207 



Derived from — 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 



(') 






$2,500 
32,500 



8,99' 
1,000 



404 
1,500 
1,353 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 

in- 
mates 



$6, 581 
(>) 
340 



(') 

(') 

800 
8.SS 
10,000 



239 

500 

1,753 



1,591 



5,833 

29,226 

23,471 
496 

25,300 

5,00fl 



8,305 
(') 

855 

344 
4S9 
466 



Other 
sources 



?1,424 

(■) 

1,781 
309 
(') 

m 

2,000 
1.449 



1,117 
4,750 
1,303 



107 

50 

341 



14,511 
(') 

11,168 
5,861 
(■) 
(>) 

12,000 
3,442 



142 

610 

2,750 

10 



15,184 
7,138 

6,312 

5,313 
272 

7,521 



875 
726 

1,67 
(') 

775 

90 

10,000 

1,' 



PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 



Total. 



For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 



S12,067 
(') 

12,897 
5,186 
(') 
4,246 

14,800 
13,272 
12,500 
32,642 

1,98S 
7,13; 



1,530 

24, 181 
13,593 

35,628 

17,633 
925 

34, 178 

5,000 

800 

5,109 

10,253 
(') 

1,345 

1,204 
12,550 
3,954 

15,841 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$11,469 
(') 

10,459 
5,186 
(') 
3,857 

14,800 
13,272 
12,500 
32,642 

i; 

6,786 
3,8; 



1,530 

24,181 
12,957 

30,102 

12,408 
925 

26,233 

5,000 

800 

4,679 

6,797 
(') 

1,345 

1,204 
12,045 
3,750 

13,862 



(') 



2,438 



389 



351 
179 



636 
5,426 
5,225 



7,945 



430 



3,456 
(') 



505 
204 

1,979 



VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 



$132, 758 
(') 

278,311 

20,500 

(') 

9,000 

(') 

93,724 
(>) 
125,000 

13,850 
40,000 
15,000 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$40,000 
(') 

62,130 
16,000 
(■) 
9,000 

C) 

25,500 
(') 
125,000 

3,850 
40,000 
15,000 



(') (■) 2 

31,028 50,000 3 



1 

2 

3 
4 

5 

6 

8 
9 
10 

11 
12 
13 



340,400 

200,000 
7,000 

171,000 

31,000 

2,500 

36,450 

75,000 
V) 

9,000 

7,000 
40,000 
31,791 



67,641 



213,400 

161, 100 
7,000 

150,000 

31,000 

2,500 

25,000 

75,000 

(') 

9,000 

5,500 2 
40,0(!0; 3 
25, Olio} 4 

60.000, 5 



^ Colored only. 

' In addition to central receiving building. 



' Included in report of SouUi Dakota Cliildren's Home Sociely. 



150 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



KAME AND LOCATION. 



TENNESSEE— Continued. 

Knoxville; 

Children '3 Mission Home 

120 West Cumberland Ave. 

St. John's Orphanage 

2403 East Linden Ave. (R. D. 4).. 
Marytille: 

Blount County Industrial Home 

Memphts: 

Church Home 

750 Jackson Ave. 
Day Nursery and Half Orphanage . . . 
763 Walker Ave. 

Leath Orphan Asylum 

850 Manassas St. 

St. Peter's Orphanage 

Poplar St. and McLean Ave. 
Nashville : 

Monroe Harding Orphanage 



Protestant Orphan Asylum 

Waveriy Place. 
Tennessee Baptist Orphans' Home. 

Delaware Ave. 

TEXAS. 
Austin: 

Children's Home 

1206 East Eleventh St. 
Corsicana: 

State Orphans' Home 



Dallas: 

Buckner Orplians' Home 

R.3. 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 

OakCUflP. O 

.St. Matthew's Home for Children . 
Grand Ave. 
Fort Worth: 

Fort Worth Benevolent Home 



Galveston: 

Galveston Orphans' Home 

Center .St. and .'V venue M. 

Home for Homeless Children 

1019 Avenue K. 

St. Mary's Orphanage 

Forty-first St. and Avenue E. 
Grand Prairie: 

Juliette Fowler Christian Home 



Houston: 

Bayland orph.ans' Home. 



De Pelcliin Faith Home 

1918 Chenevert St. 
Infants' Home 

1920 Oak St. 
Itasca: 

Presbyterian Home for Orphans . 



Luling: 

Bell Haven Orphans' Home.. 
Peniel: 

Peniel Orphans' Home 



San Antonio: 

Protestant Home for Destitute Children 

Kentucky Ave. 
St. John's Orphanage 

West Houston St. 
St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum 

Miiitarv Plaza. 
Waco: 

Methodist Orphanage 

901 Herring Ave. 

UTAH. 
Murrav: 

Lund School for Boys 

Lund Ave. (R. D. 4). 
.Salt Lake City: 

Keam's St. Arm's Orphanage 

Twelfth St. S. and Fourth St. E. 
Orphans' Home and Dav Nursery. . . 
Twelfth St. S. and tenth St. E. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Private organization 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 



Coimty of Blount 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Charity of Nazareth 



Presbyterian Church in the 

United States. 
Private corporation 



Baptist Denominational 
Board. 



Helping Hand Society. 



State of Te.-?as., 



Private corporation 

Sisters of Charity of the In- 
carnate Word." 
Private corporation 



County of Tarrant. 



Private corporation 

Society for the Help of Home- 
less Children. 

Sisters of Charity of the In- 
carnate Word. 

National Benevolent Associa- 
tion of Christian Church 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Presbyterian Church in the 
United States. 



Church of Christ . . 
Holiness churches. 



Private corporation 

Sisters of Charity of the In- 
carnate Word." 

Sisters of Charity of the In- 
carnate Word. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 



Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter Day Saints. 

Sisters of the Holy Cross 

Private corporation 



Class of children received. 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 
Orphan children 



Destitute children. . 
Orphan children. . . 



Foimdlings, and destitute 
and neglected children. 

Orphan, destitute, and neg- 
lected children. 

Orphan children 



Orphan children. 



Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 
Destitute orphan children.. 



Working women's children. 



Indigent and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Destitute orphan and other 

needy children. 
Orphan children 



Orphan children from 3 to 9. 



Dependent and indigent chil- 
dren. 



Orphan children 

Homeless children 

Orphan children over 2. . 



Orphan children from 3 to 12, 



Indigent orphan clilldren 

from 6 to 18. 
Orphan children 



Illegitimate infants. . 



Destitute orphan children. . 



Orphan children . 



Orphan and abandoned chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, destitute, and neg- 
lected children. 
Orphan boys imder 14 



Orphan girls . 



Destitute orphan children 
from 2 to 13. 



Wayward and dependent 
boys over 8. 



Indigent cluldren . 
Orphan children . . 



1890 
1873 

1894 
1867 
1900 
1852 
1841 

1893 
1844 
1892 

1902 

1889 

1879 
1907 
1900 

1885 

1880 
1894 
1869 

19(M 

1866 
1892 
1896 

1905 

1899 
1901 

1880 
1890 
1870 

1894 



1908 

1891 
1883 



No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

(') 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

0) 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 



No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 



(') 



(') 



(') 



10 



CHILDBEN RECEIVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



37 
10 

13 

82 

(') 

172 

100 

(') 



44 

51 

(') 
4 
12 

67 

(') 
27 
23 

1 

4 

65 
145 



163 

24 



(') 



Through- 






o 



(') 



(■) 



2! art 



(') 



(1) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



1 Not reporletL 



GENERAL TABLES. 



151 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN tSr THE INSTITUTION AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSIDE BUT 


1 

CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDRE 
DI3CHARG 


N 

ED 

AR. 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 
"i'EAR. 


VALUE or 

PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 




O 
(-• 

36 
36 

26 
76 
48 
90 
170 

39 
(') 
57 

24 

308 

(') 
69 
40 

24 

(') 
31 

46 

67 

21 

68 

7 

79 

55 
26 

55 
105 
109 

130 

32 

175 

56 


a 

12 
11 

7 
20 
(') 
37 
80 

21 

(') 
22 

11 

139 

(') 

38 

(') 

1^ 

(') 

(') 

33 

29 

9 

4 

36 

12 
11 

25 
105 

66 

32 

80 
(') 


s 

24 
25 

19 
55 
(M 
53 
90 

18 

(') 

35 

13 

169 

(') 

31 

(') 

(') 

(') 

13 

38 

12 

C) 

3 

43 

43 
15 

30 

109 
64 


Dependent. 


•S 
.tl 

U} 

t> 
o 

t-> 

o 

.9 

o 


.g 
a 


aUPEKVISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DURING YE 


Total. 

$1,500 
(') 

1,708 
7,855 
(') 

0,840 
10,150 

3.600 
13,933 

1,717 

52.000 

(■) 

5,910 

4.500 

3,450 

(■) 

(') 

7,518 

2,277 
4,938 
1,707 

23,015 

3,000 
2,700 

4,200 

(') 

(') 

18,700 

5,650 

11,600 
5,492 


Derived from— 


S 


3 

i 

D 

32 
3G 

13 
75 

(') 
81 

170 

39 
') 
57 

24 

274 

(') 
69 
40 

16 

(') 

46 
67 

20 

« 

7 

79 

55 
26 

55 
105 
109 

130 


i 

■a 
> 

a 


O 
i 


o 


3 




o 


3 


i 


3 

34 


(') 
66 
20 
57 

(>) 

1 

(') 
6 

3 
34 

(') 

21 
(') 

43 

(') 
21 


22 
2 

(') 
27 

(') 
25 

C) 

(') 

1 

12 

(') 

9 

(') 

28 

(') 
8 


6 

12 
4 

(■) 

39 
(•) 

32 

(0 
1 

(') 

5 

3 
22 

(') 

12 

(') 

15 

C) 
13 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 
)erma- 
nent 

im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 

. ">? , 

mvested 
funds). 


Land, 
tmUd- 

ings, . 

and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 
a 


$1,408 
75 

(') 

62,000 

(') 
58 

2.800 
(') 

m 

100 

(') 

0) 

700 


$1,500 
(') 

300 

2,010 

(') 

007 

10,000 

3,600 
0) 
13.933 

1,493 






$1,225 
4,450 

1,125 
7,855 
4,250 
6,517 
9,950 

4,500 
(') 
13,933 

1,691 

52,000 

(') 

5,910 

4,500 

3,450 

(') 

(') 

7,367 

3,379 
5,159 
1,380 

22, 313 

(') 
2,700 

4,900 

<■) 

(') 

18,000 

4,189 

11,600 

(') 


$1,225 
3,750 

970 
6,139 
4,000 
5,289 
9,000 

4,500 
(') 
6,000 

1,670 

45,000 

(') 

5,520 

4,000 

3,450 

(') 

(') 

6,391 

3,379 
5,046 
1,380 

11,239 

(') 
1,500 

4,000 

(') 

(') 

16,000 

3,622 
10,000 








6 




















(') 


$700 

155 
1,716 

250 
1,228 

950 

(•) 
7,933 

21 

7.000 

(') 
390 
500 

(') 

976 
113 

11,074 

(') 
1,200 

900 
(') 
(') 

2,000 

567 

1.600 
0) 


$54,000 

3,000 
C) 

7,500 

229,500 

75,000 

25,000 
28.000 

3,000 

150,000 

(') 
8,000 
19,000 

25,000 

(') 
W 
(') 

30,000 

52,500 
15,000 
4,000 

40,000 

25.000 
12,500 

70,000 
(') 
(') 

105,000 

15.000 

160.000 
50.001 


$50,000 

3,000 
(') 

7,500 
100,000 
75,000 

25,000 
(') 
28,000 

3.000 

150,000 

(') 

8,000 
18,000 

20,000 

(') 

(') 

30,000 

27,500 
15,000 
4,000 

40,000 

25,000 
12,500 

50,000 
(') 
(') 

105,000 

15,00C 

85,00C 
50,00C 


7 




13 






(■) 


(') 


(■) 


(■) 


(■) 


(') 


K 






$3,078 
{') 
233 
150 


$2,737 
(■) 
6,000 


9 


3 


(') 
9 


















10 






43 


17 


26 


11 
12 


5 
4 


6 
8 


11 






12 










13 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


CO 


(') 


(') 


14 

15 






















224 




I 


9 


25 
0) 


















2 


(') 


(■) 


• 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 

5,052 
3 

250 

(') 

m 

(') 

6,585 

579 
3,714 
1,707 

18, 209 

3,000 
1,700 

2,000 

{') 
18,000 

4,189 


(') 
800 
250 

(') 

120 
1,224 


0) 

4,247 
400 
(') 

(') 

933 

1,578 


3 

4 










(') 
8 

(■) 
9 


5 

(') 
1 


(') 
3 

(') 
8 


(') 

15 

(') 


C) 
11 


4 
(') 





1 

(■) 
1 


30 






6 


(') 


0) 


7 
8 






16 
21 


5 
5 


11 
16 


9 










15 


4 


11 








10 


1 
1 








2 
11 
19 

17 

0) 
6 

(') 
30 
22 

2 
(■) 


1 
(') 
(') 

10 

(') 
5 

(') 
30 

2 
(') 


1 
(') 
(') 

7 

(') 
1 

(') 
22 


11 


61 




1 


(') 


(') 


(') 


124 


(■) 


0) 


12 
13 


















4,806 


14 
















C) 


(') 


(■) 


15 
















200 
(') 
(') 


1,000 
1,900 

(') 


10 






















17 






















18 










(■) 




(■) 








19 










36 


9 


27 


20 








32 


(') 


(') 




1,221 

3.600 
1,754 


240 

S.OOO 
500 


1 


95 

(■) 


175 
56 
















2 






















(') 


(') 


(') 


1,550 


1,6.S8 


3 



s Included in report of Society for the Help of Homeless Children. 



152 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



VERMONT. 

BimLINGTON: 

Home for Destitute Children 

Shelbume Road. 

St. Joseph's Orphanage ^ 

North Ave. 
St. Albans: 

Warner Home for Little Wanderers. 
High St. and Chauncey Place. 
Westminster: 

New England Kurn Hattin Homes 3. 

VIRGINIA. 

Alexandku: 

Children's Home 

406 Duke St. 
Bon Aib: 

Bethany Home Orphanage 

South Richmond R. D. 3. 

BOYDTON: 

Bethany Home 



Supervised or conducted by — 



Danville: 

Danville Orphanage 

1015 North Main St. 
Fkedericksdukg: 

Assembly's Home and School 

Prince Edward and Charlotte Sts. 

Female Charity School 

Twellth and Main Sts. 
Hampton: 

Weaver Orphan Home 



LTNCHBtJRG: 

Lynchburg Female Orphan Asylum. . 
Odd Fellows' Home 



Presbyterian Orphans' Home 

K'. D. 4. 
Noefolk: 

Boimey Home for Girls « 

13 Boissevain Ave. 
Day Nursery and Children's Home, , , . 

511 Chapel St. 
Holt Street Orphan Asylum 

203 Holt St. 
Jackson Orphan Asylum 

112 Charlotte St. 
St. Marv's Orphan Asvlum 

172 Chapel St. 
Turney Home for Bovs 

268 Bank St. 
I'eteksp-ubg: 

Petersburg Female Orphan Asylum. . . 

237 South Sycamore St. 
Portsmouth: 

Portsmouth Orphan Asvlum 

603 North St. 
Richmond: 

Female Orphans' Home 

703 East Leigh St. 
Foundling Hospital 

425 North Thirty-second St. 
Friends' Orphan Asvlum 

112 West Charity St. 
Holy Innocent Foundling Asylum 

709 North First St. 
Masonic Home 



Methodist Orphanage 

Station A. 
Richmond Male Orphan Asylum.. 

Amelia St. 
St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum 

Fourth and Marshall Sts. 

St. Paul's Church Home 

506 East Leigh St. 
Virginia Home for Infants 

100 West Clay St. 
Roanoke; 

Ebenezer Home 

Ninth Ave. and Seventh St. 

St. Vincent's Male Orphanage 

Salem: 

Baptist Orphanage of Virginia 



Lutheran Orphan Home . 



Private corporation 

Sisters of Charity of Provi- 
dence. 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Allison Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union. 

Private corporation 



Colored Orphan Relief So- 
ciety. 

Private corporation 



Presbyterian Church in the 
United States. 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 

Tidewater Orphan Associa- 
tion. 



Private corporation 

Independent Order of Odd 

Fellows of Virginia. 
Presbyterian Church in the 

United States. 



Private corporation . . 
Private organization . 



Female Orphan Society of 
Norfolk. 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 

Sisters of Charity 



Private corporation. 



Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 
Private corporation . 



Class of children received. 



St. Joseph's Society for Col- 
ored Missions. 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 
Virginia. 

Methodist EpiscopalChurch, 
South. 

Private corporation 



Sisters of Charity 

St. Paul's Protestant Epis- 
copal Church. 
Private corporation 



Private organization 

Sisters of Charity of Nazareth. 

Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 
United Synod in the South. . 



Destitute children. . 
Destitute children.. 



Orphan, homeless, neglect- 
ed, and indigent children. 

Homeless boys from 7 to 14.. 



Helpless and destitute chil- 
dren from 4 to 12. 

Orphan children from 2 to S. 
Colored orphan children 



Homeless children. . 



Ministers' orphans and mis- 
sionaries' children. 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Orphan, dependent, and 
neglected children. 



Orphan girls from 3 to 8 

Odd Fellows' orphan chil- 
dren. 
Orphan children 



Indigent girls over 5 

Orphan and dependent chil- 
dren. 
Orphan and homeless girls. . 

Orphan and destitute girls. . 

Orphan girls from 3 to 13 

Homeless bovs 



Orphan girls from 3 to 13 

Destitute orphan children. . . 



Neglected and dependent 

girls from 3 to 12. 
Foundlings 



Orph 
are 



phan and abandoned chil- 
dren. 
.\bandoned colored infants. . 

Masons' dependent orphan 
children. 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and dependent boys. 

Indigent and neglected girls. . 

Dependent and neglected 
girls. 

Indigent and abandoned in- 
fants and boarders. 

Orphan and needy children. 

Orphan boys from 4 to 12 

Orphan children 



Orphan and needy children 
from 5 to 12, 



1S65 
1854 

18S1 

1.S94 

1902 

1894 

1903 

1896 

1893 
1802 

1904 

1849 
1902 

1902 

1910 
1909 
1804 
1856 
1834 
ISSrt 

1.S48 

1856 

1805 
1S94 
1872 
1895 
1S90 
1900 
1844 
1S34 
1S59 
1908 

1910 
1893 
1892 
1888 



Yes. 1 (') 
Yes. 



Yes. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

(') 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

(') 

No. 

No. 

No. 

(') 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
0) 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(•) 



CHILDREN BECELVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



(') 



24 
34 

12 

20 

(•) 

11 

7 
4 

3 

13 



(') 



3 
8 
6 
(■) 
3 

22 
14 
15 
3 
13 

39 
9 
5 

21 



0) 



(^) 



(') 



4 
2 

(') 

1 

16 

14 



(') 



(■) 



Through- 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



4 
(') 

3 
22 
14 



(0 



(') 



(') 



(') 



1 Not reported. 

2 Included in report of Providence Orphan -\sylum and Hospital. 

3 Includes two homes, at Westminster and Rockingham, respectively. 



* Colored only. 

* No children received since fire in 1909. 
8 Not opened imtil 1911. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



153 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN ra THE INSTITXJTION AT 


CHILDREN 


CHILDREN 




RECEIPT.S 


DURING YEAR 


































VALITE OF 






OUTSIDE BUT 
UNDER 


FAMILIES 
DURING 


DISCHARGED 
DURING YEAR. 












YEAR. 


PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 


































Dependent. 


c 






1-EAE. 






Derived from— 












i 


t3 


1 

-a 

■a -a 












































» 


a . 

3^ 


A 




to 

.g 








6 






uj 






cj 


Total. 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 

ex- 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 


1 


o 

(') 


S 


a 


o 

(■) 


(0 




< 


> 


a 

a 


(■) 


a 

a 


i 



(') 


1 


a 





a 


i 
(■) 












penses. 


ments. 


funds). 


ment. 




(■) 


(■) 


(') 


(') 


C) 


(') 


(') 


(■) 


(') 


(') 


1 
2 


35 


17 


18 


13 




■)•) 






? 




? 








25 


13 


1? 


$4,246 




$340 


$1,516 


$2,390 


$4, 335 


$4,188 


$147 


$66,000 


$27,000 


3 


78 


78 




fiO 




18 






1 


1 




15 


15 




3 


3 




14,427 




10, 196 


1,202 


3,029 


17,651 


14,850 


2,801 


85,000 


66,000 


4 


14 


CI 


fM 


4 


1 


9 












ni 


C1 


(') 


5 


4 


1 


(') 


(') 


700 


(1) 




180 


180 




5,000 


5,000 


1 


47 

(■) 


30 
(■) 


17 


47 






















3 


2 


1 


4.500 


(') 


4,000 


(■) 


500 


3,750 
0) 


3,500 


200 


6,000 
(■) 


6,000 
{') 


2 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


3 


34 

49 
8 

35 

78 
114 

32 


14 
29 

11 

""62 
20 


20 

20 
8 

24 

78 
52 

12 


32 

49 
6 

3 

78 
114 

32 


2 














7 


5 


2 


4 

s 

14 
3 

8 


1 

5 
(') 

2 

""'i 

3 


3 

3 
(>) 

5 

14 
2 

5 


3,194 

18,000 
1,200 

873 

18, 763 
29,003 

20,000 


$900 


2,174 

18,000 
100 

401 




120 


3,052 

18,000 
1,200 

911 

• 17,216 
27,358 

15,000 


3,052 

15,000 
1,200 

911 

17,216 
27,358 

12,500 


3,000 
2,500 


29,000 

40,000 
6,200 

10,000 

444,936 
84,629 

75,000 
350,000 


27,500 

40,000 
5,000 

10,000 

126,636 
84,629 

75,000 
40.000 


4 














5 




2 
32 


















447 


1,100 

25 

18,763 
27,524 


fi 






11 


2 


9 








7 












s 










1 




1 










1,479 
20,000 




9 
















10 


























11 


17 
32 
(1) 


9 


8 
32 


11 
32 




6 






23 


9 


14 


23 


9 


14 








840 
2,189 
1,840 




100 

1,200 

'1,840 


288 
458 


452 
531 


840 
2,575 
2,451 


.840 
2,575 
2,341 




12 






4 
3 




4 

3 


110 


20,828 
24,500 


20,828 
7,000 


13 




f) 


















14 


.W 




m 


41 




14 






3 




3 


2 




2 


5 




5 


(') 




(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


15 


(■) 


(') 




(') 


(•) 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 




(') 


(■) 


.... 


(') 


(') 




(') 


0) 


(■) 


(■) 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


16 


13 

19 

67 
9 
17 

(') 


5 

6 

8 
(') 


13 

14 

57 

3 

9 

(') 


13 

19 

49 

9 

16 

(') 










5 




5 


5 
6 


4 


5 
2 








2,920 

2,027 

6,700 
1,760 
926 
(■) 




2,600 




420 

2.027 

6,700 
1,200 


1,947 

2,732 

6,700 
1,605 
817 
(') 


1,947 

2,732 

6,700 
1,605 
817 
(>) 


(') 


24,500 

44,600 

25,000 
46,500 
8,000 
(') 


15,000 
10,000 

25,000 
4,000 
8,000 

(') 


17 
















IS 




8 












3 

7 


4 


3 
3 








19 






183 


75 


108 








200 
150 


75 
776 
(') 


285 


20 


(') 


1 






4 


2 

(■) 


2 
(■) 


21 


(') 


(•) 


(') 


(') 


(') 


0) 


(') 


(') 


(>) 


{') 


22 


fi3 


34 


29 


6.3 










? 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


I 




16,208 




14,526 




1,683 


13,522 


11,456 


2,066 


55,467 


30,000 


21 


115 

45 
fiO 


54 
45 


61 
fiO 


80 
45 
60 




35 












24 


13 


11 


2 
14 

10 


1 

14 


1 

in 


17,428 
4,207 


(') 


17,428 
241 

(') 






13,421 
4,864 
(') 


11,058 
4,400 

(') 


2,363 
464 


181,000 
(') 
(') 


175,000 
(') 


24 












50 


3,916 


2.1 










,50 




.50 








26 


20 

15 




20 

8 


18 
15 


1 


1 












2 

1 


1 


2 


2 
1 


1 


2 


2,400 
3,575 








2,400 
2,000 


2,000 
3,575 


2,000 
3,200 


375 


(') 
250 


(') 
250 


27 














75 


1,500 


28 


22 


1? 


10 


79 










<■) 
(■) 


(■) 
(') 


(') 


(') 


(■) 


(') 








8 721 




» 721 






762 


752 








29 


28 


fff 




?8 










2 







(') 
30,628 
6,512 


(') 


30, 628 


(') 


(1) 


(') 


(') 


(1) 


(1) 


(') 


30 


IM 


80 


85 


165 


















12 


5 


7 




34,217 


24, 196 


10,021 


100,000 


100,000 


31 


80 


37 


43 


80 






























95,912 


(.0) 


600 


6,512 


5.912 


600 


50,000 


40,000 


32 































' Includes Income from invested funds. 
8 Exclusive of donations other than cash. 



9 Includes receipts from care of inmates. 
1" Included in donations. 



154 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I.— INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



WASHINGTON. 
Everett: 

Orphans' Home 

Twentv-second and Highland Sts. 
Parkland: 

Lutheran Children's Home 

POULSBO: 

Martha Marie Orphans' Home 

Seattle: 

Detention Home 

500 Ninth Ave. 

Seattle Children's Home 

West Ninth and McGraw Sts. 

Seattle Parental School 

Mercer Island ( East Seattle). 

Seattle Receiving Home 

Sixty-filth and Jones Sts. 
Spokane: 

C-hxu-ch Home for Children 

East 307 Empire Ave. 

Home of the Friendless 

Hemlock St. and EucUd Ave. 

Orphans' Home of Spokane 

East 127 Bridgeport Ave. 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 

Superior St. 

Spokane Receiving Home 

605 North River St. 
Tacoma: 

Children's Industrial Home 

South Thirtieth and Washington Sts 
Walla Walla: 

Northwestern Home < ( Orphan Depart- 
ment.) 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Charleston: 

Davis Child's Shelter 

1118 Washington St. 
Elkins: 

Elkins Children's Home 

Elm Grove: 

Manual Training School 

St. John's Home 

St. Vincent's Home 

Huntington: 

Coloied Orphans' Home 

R. D. 2. 

PARKERSBtJRG: 

Henrv Logan Children's Home 

2406 Murdock Ave. 
Wheeling: 

Children's Home 

Woodsdale. 
St. .\Iphonsus Orphan -Vsylum 

2126 Market St. 

WISCONSIN. 
Appleton; 

Children's Receiving Homo 

Dousman: 

Farm School for Boys 

Elm Grove: 

Visitation Orphanage 

Green Bay: 

St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum 

La Crosse: 

St. Michael's Orphan -Asylum 

R. D. 1. 
Milwaukee: 

Detention Home 

Eleventh and Galena Sts. 

Protestant Orphan Asylum 

North and Prospect Avcs. 
St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum 

Thirteenth and Euclid .\ves. 
St. Rose's Orphan Asylum 

Lake Drive and East North Ave. 
St. Vincent's Infant .\svliun 

483 Greenfield Ave." 

' Not reported. 
2 Indeterminate. 



Supervised or conducted by- 



Snohomish Coimty Orphan- 
age .\ssociation. 

Norwegian Lutheran Synod, 

Norwegian Lutheran Dea- 
coness Institute of Minne- 
apolis. 

County of King 

Ladies* Relief Society of 

Seattle. 
Seattle PubUc Schools 

Washington C h i 1 d r e n's 
Home Society. 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Ladies' Benevolent Society. 

Private organization , 

Sisters of St. Francis 

Washington Children's 
Home Society. 

Private corporation 

Northwestern Christian Be- 
nevolent Association. * 



Children's Home Society of 
West Virginia. 

West Virginia Humane So- 
ciety. 

Xaverian Brothers 

Sistei-s of St. Joseph 

Sisters of St. Joseph 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Divine Providence. 



Children's Home Society of 
Wisconsin. 



Private corporation. 



School Sisters of Norte Dame. 
School Sisters of Notre Dame, 

Franciscan Sisters of the Per- 
petual Adoration. 

County of Milwaukee 

Private corporation 

Felician Sisters 

Sisters of Charity 

Sisters of Charity 



Class of children received. 



Orphan children. 



Orphan and homeless chil- 
dren. 

Orphan children 



Neglected and delinq_uent 
children, pending action of 
court. 

Orjihan and indigent chil- 
dren. 

Truant boys 

Dependent children for 
adoption. 

Dependent children 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 
(') 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Dependent children for 
adoption. 

Orphan, abandoned, and in- 
digent children. 

O rphan and otherdependent 
children. 



Homeless children from 1 to 
12. 

Orphan, dependent, neg- 
lected, and homeless chil- 
dren. 



Orphan boys over 10 

Orphan boys 

Orphan girls from 3 to 12 



Orphan and abandoned chil- 
dren 



Destitute and friendless chil- 
dren. 

Destitute and friendlass chil- 
dren. 

Orphan and neglected chil- 
dren. 



Normal dependent children 
for "homing." 

Dependent and iiomeless 
boys. 



1858 
1877 



Destitute girls 

Orphan and destitute chil- 
dren. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

DeluKiuent and dependent 

children pending action of 

court. 
Orphan, homeless, and neg- 

lectcfl children. 
Orphan children from 3 to 16. 

Orphan and destitute girls. 

Foundlings, orphan, and de- 
pendent children under 5. 

3 Included in report of Washington Children' 
< Temporarily discontinued in 1910. 



1900 
1902 
1891 

1909 

1885 
1900 
1896 

1904 
1S86 
0) 
1S90 
1896 

1890 

1908 



1896 



1904 
1S88 

1887 



1885 

1870 
1890 



1905 

1S50 
1907 
1848 
1877 



Yes. 

(») 
(') 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 
(') 
(') 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 



No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 

(') 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



children RECErVED FOR FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 



(') 
49 
10 

307 

72 
114 
217 

80 
45 
(') 



30 
20 



130 

25 

8 
77 

60 

(') 

36 
61 



18 
11 



95 
s Home So ciety. 



65 



Through- 



(') 






(') 



0) 



(■) 






(') 



(') 



(') 



GENERAL TABLES. 



155 



CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continueil. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTION AT 




CHILDREN 




RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


i 








CLOSE OF -i-EAR. 


OUTSmE BUT 
UNDER 1 


PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 
DURINQ 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 
DURING YEAR. 




PAYMENTS DURING 
YEAR. 


VALUE OF 

PROPERTY AT 

CLOSE OF YEAR. 




























Dependent. 


"5 






YEAR. 






Derived from — 








C 


*rt 








o 
w 

1 


1 

1 

a. 








Total. 










'K 


a 
a . 

ll 


i 


o 












1 





•3 


"3 

S 



Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona-'^Yn"' Other 
"°°5- mat'es.^uf'^^ 


Total. 




Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
oquip- 
ment. 


a 

e 

1 


e 


S 


(H 





3 


<!•, 


> 


« 


t^ 


s 


ta 


H 


y 


t^ 


B 


M 


i^ 
















] 






t-l 


(>) 

51 
65 

9 

60 
68 
19 

(■) 

100 

(') 


(') 
30 

47 

6 

37 
6S 
14 

(•) 

58 

(') 


(') 

21 
18 

3 
23 


(') 

51 
65 










(') 


C) 


(>) 


(') 


(') 


(■11 


(') 


(>) 


Cl 


(') 


(') 








("1 


(') 


. 


$22,200 


$20, 1100 


1 












28 


20 


8 


$3,228 
6,978 

4,522 

11,601 
22, 889 

m 

2,585 


$4,522 
22,455 


S2,172 
2,449 


81,056 
1,283 


$3,246 


$3,354 
6,968 

4.522 

5,714 
21,872 
(») 

1,965 


$2,963 
4,968 

4,522 

5,496 
18,962 

m 

1,781 


$391 
2,000 

21s 

1 

2,910 

184 


7,000 
20,000 

(') 

149,363 
40.000 

(') 

4,100 


7,000 
20,000 

(') 

143,363 
40,000 
(=) 

4.100 


2 






















3 








9 














307 

51 
49 

48 

(') 


168 

25 
49 
23 

m 


139 
26 

25 

f'1 


4 


27 




33 










3 


2 


1 


480 
56 


2,411 
434 

(') 

1,599 


8,710 
930 


5 




68 


49 

598 


49 
308 




6 


5 

(■) 
42 
(•) 


8 




11 

(■) 
51 

(') 




290 


242 


113 


129 


7 




. 


8 


49 


(') 






10 
(') 


6 
(') 


4 
(■) 


(>) 
0) 


(') 
(') 


(') 

(') 


102 

(') 


49 
(') 


53 
(■) 


6,454 
(') 


2,400 

(') 


1,998 

(') 


1,600 

(') 


456 


6,241 
(') 


5,241 
(>) 


1,000 

(■) 


85,000 
(■) 


75,000 

(>) 


9 


(') 


(■) 


10 


145 
16 

106 


73 
13 

56 


72 
3 

50 


145 
9 

102 






















41 
15 

96 


23 

7 

40 


18 
8 

56 


5,769 
(') 

8,903 


2,190 
357 


2,219 
(») 

2,946 


1,360 
2,7.S4 


(■') 
2,816 


5,4S! 
(■') 

6.739 


5,343 
(») 

5,530 


140 
(") 

1,209 


125,000 

e) 

53,000 


125,000 
(=) 

50,000 
(») 


11 




7 
4 






6 
(') 


4 

(') 


2 
(') 


81 


46 


35 


12 






13 












14 


25 

48 

7 
65 
92 

74 
0) 


11 

(') 

7 
65 

47 

(■) 


14 

C) 

"92 
27 

(') 


21 

(■) 

7 
65 
92 

70 
(■) 


3 
(>) 






1 
0) 


338 


166 
(■) 


172 
0) 


68 


31 
{') 

8 
15 

{') 


37 
(') 


11 


5 


6 
(') 


10,000 

8,062 
5,144 
7,901 

4,465 
(•) 


(') 
10,000 

3,240 

(') 


(') 






(') 
10,865 

8,062 

5,171 

22,071 

6,911 


10,865 


(') 


(') 
18,000 


(') 
18,000 


1 


0) 


(') 






'» 




8 
15 
5 

1 
(') 




5,143 

215 

1,175 

415 

(') 


1,3.59 

1,049 

755 

7S0 

0) 


1,560 
3,850 
5,971 

(>) 


8,062 
4,541 
7,071 

5,454 

(■) 


' "1536 
15,000 

1,457 


45,000 
70,000 
30,000 

30,000 
(.) 


45,000 
70,000 
30,000 

30,000 
(■) 


3 
















"5 

1 

(■) 


20 
13 

9 

(') 


20 


13 

9 

(') 


4 










10 
14 




10 
5 

(') 


d 


4 
(') 








6 


0) 


(') 


(') 


7 


79 
17 


(■) 
9 


(') 
8 


79 
17 
















37 
1 


17 
1 


20 








5,500 
2,019 




3,000 
2,019 




2,500 


5,402 
1,718 


5,402 
1,718 




93,000 
25,000 


45,000 
25,000 


8 
















9 


22 

42 

21 
217 

175 

17 


12 
42 

123 
90 
12 


10 

21 
94 

85 

5 


22 

28 

21 
160 

139 

XI 










1195 
2 


(>) 
2 


0) 


0) 


(') 


(■) 


3 


13 

36 

IS 
(') 

2: 


(') 

7 
41 

24 

(') 
11 


17 754 


1 300 


16 354 




100 


17,676 

11,842 

(') 
13,891 

10,158 

3,592 


17,676 








1 




14 






13 

7 
77 

42 

(') 

33 


11,842 

(>) 
16,218 

11,429 

4,000 

18,990 


(') 
4,00c 


10,120 

(') 
12,436 

8,720 


522 

C) 
3,782 

2,573 


1,200 
(') 

136 


10,342 

0) 
13,891 

9,675 

3,592 


1,500 
(') 

483 


29,604 

(') 
100,000 

110,000 


29,604 

(>) 
100,000 

110,000 


2 






3 




48 
36 


















4 






62 


27 


3o 


11 


4 


7 


S 




g 


6 


90 


5n 


35 


V 






















9,787 


3,243 


5,960 


15,016 


13,715 


1,301 


160,200 


48,000 


7 


99 


33 


fif 


7P 




20 


... 
















(■1 


(M 


f) 


7,221 




564 


694 


5,963 


8,031 


6,721 


1,310 


9O,00C 


90,000 


8 


111 




111 


7? 


,=i 


33 


















25 




35 


9,091 




6,035 


1,59C 


1,460 


8,416 


7,817 


599 


91,725 


61,725 


9 


120 


5S 


65 


91 




28 






40 


r. 


28 


58 


2C 


38 


43 


If 


25 


10,967 




3,245 


7,722 




11,238 


11,23£ 




30,00f 


30,OOC 


10 









t Auxiliary to National Benevolent Association of Christian Church. 

8 Included in report of Northwestern Home (Aged Department), Walla Walla. 



T Included in report of Children's Home Society of West Virginia. 



156 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table I INSTITUTIONS FOR THE 





NAME AND LOCATION. 


Supervised or conducted by— 


Class of children received. 


i 

■a 

g 


> 

i 

•g 

1 


2 

t 

1 
o 

1 

a 

2; 


o 

"E 
B 

Ph 


CHILDREN RECEIVED FOE FIRST 
TIME IN 1910. 


i 


3 

o 

8 
87 
141 

12 

34 

(') 

1 

292 
46 

13 


6 

a 

8 
87 
73 

7 

17 

(■) 

1 

178 
30 

9 


e 


Through— 


1 
g 

1 


.a 

o 

6 

O 

3 


l-s 




a 

ii 


°2 

8 
87 


i 

3 
o 




WISCONSIN— Continued. 
Polonia: 




Orphan and indigent boys. . 

Orphan and neglected boys. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 

Orphan, horaeless.neglected, 
and indigent children. 

Homeless children under 11. . 

Orphan, neglected, and de- 
pendent children. 

Orphan children from 2 to 10. 


1S74 
1N45 
1S86 

1880 

1904 

1903 

1899 

1S98 
1896 

1909 


No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 






\o 


St. Francis: 

St. Aemilianus Orphan Asylum 

Sparta: 




7 


23 
67 

10 

S 














68 
17 


141 
3 

15 






14 


Stoughton: 

Martin Luther Orphans' Home 

Superior: 


Norwegian Lutheran Synod. 




2 


7 

15 

(') 

1 


4 


16 


2002 Ohio Ave. 
Waukesha: 


Metropolitan Church Asso- 
ciation. 

United Danish Lutheran 
Chiu-ch. 

County of Milwaukee 

Lutheran Home Finding So- 
ciety of Wisconsin. 

Pi-otestant Episcopal Church 








Fountain Spring House. 
Waupaca: 


2 


5 

22 
6 

3 








18 


Berlin St. 
Wauwatosa: 


114 
16 

4 


292 
10 

4 






19 




Dependent, neglect«d, and 
abandoned children. 

Dependent and neglected 
children. 






32 
9 


4 


1 


WYOMING. 
Lab am IE: 

Cathpdral Home for Children 















' Not reported. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



157 



CARE OF CHILDREN; 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN IN THE INSTITUTUIN AT 
CLOSE or YEAE. 


CHILDREN 
OUTSUJE BUT 


CHILDREN 
PLACED IN 
FAMILIES 


CHILDREN 
DISCHARGED 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PA-S-MENTS DURING 


VALUE OF 
PROPERTY AT 




"3 
o 


.2 

a 

34 

148 
111 

43 
(') 
{■) 

14 

86 

7 

9 


.2 

i 

88 
30 

(') 

(1) 

11 

45 
10 

4 


Dependent. 


id 

b< 
O 
X 

o 

a 

1 


§ 

D 

cr 

a 
a 


SUPERVISION. 


DURING 
YEAR. 


DURING l-EAR. 


Total. 


Derived from— 




CLOSE or YEAR. 


^ 


a . 

i| 

o 

31 

111 

88 

44 
(■) 
0) 

24 

7 
17 

4 


1 

O ^ 
> 

a 

] 
0) 


S3 

o 
*^, 

37 
107 

20 

0) 

CO 

1 
118 


o 


3 


B 


*C3 

o 
H 

5 

15 

209 


IS 

3 

5 
IS 

125 


.2 

03 

84 


o 


a 


a 


Ap- 
pro- 
pria- 
tions. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources 


Total. 


For 
run- 
ning 
ex- 
penses. 


For 

perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total 
(includ- 
ing 
invested 
funds). 


Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


a 

i 

a 
S 


34 

148 
199 

73 

62 

(') 
25 

131 
17 

13 


1 
65 
16 

11 

39 

(') 

1 

315 

5 

4 


1 

65 
10 

6 

(') 

(') 

190 
3 

3 


6 

5 
(■) 

(') 
1 

125 

2 

1 


$966 
1,1,458 
80,235 

12,138 
4,375 
(') 
3,286 

39,400 

(') 






S60 


$900 
5,157 
1,629 

23 

722 

(') 

.3,50 


$876 
15,382 
80,236 

7,835 

4,049 

(') 

2,864 

41,816 
(») 

(') 


$876 
15,382 
67,663 

7,002 

4,049 


$12,572 
833 


$900 
100,000 
193,031 

36,800 

10,300 

(') 

5,000 

60,000 
(») 


$900 
85,000 
193,031 

35,00(1 

10,300 

(') 

5,001) 

60,000 


11 




5 
751 


5 
500 


251 


$258 
78,606 

1,125 

(') 

39,400 


$10,043 


1? 




3 


13 


10,788 
413 
(■) 
■-', 492 


1,327 
2,115 

444 


14 


(>) 


(') 














15 














(■) 
2,616 

32,403 

(-) 

(') 


(') 

248 
9,413 

(') 


16 






3 

233 
309 


2 

129 
158 


1 

104 
151 


4 


2 


2 


17 




6 


18 


45 
3 


29 

1 


16 

2 


(») 
(') 


(■) 

(■) 


(') 


ll 




9 






1 



















' Included in report of Lutheran Childien's Friend Society. 



158 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table II.— SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION 



S 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



ALABAMA. 
BmMiNGiuM: 

Birmingham Humane Society 

2019 Avenue G (Ensley P. O.). 

Boys' Club and Cliildren's Aid Society 

'206 South Fifteenth St. 

ARKANSAS. 
Little Rock: 

Arkansas Humane Society 

533 SouUiem Trust Building. 

CALIFORNIA. 
Fresno: 

Fresno County Humane Society 

905 S St. 
Loa Angeles: 

Children's Home Society of California 

2414 Griffith Ave. 
Pasadena: 

Pasadena Humane Society 

Room 5, City Hall. 
Riverside: 

Ri verside County Humane Society 

Cliamber of Commerce. 
Sacramento: 

Sacramento Society for Prevention of Cniellv to 
Children.' 
808 Tenth St. 
San Francisco: 

CaUfoniia Society for the Prevention of Cnielty to 
Cliildren. 
11 Jones St. 

Children's Agency 

1500 Jackson St. 

COLORADO. 



Colorado Springs: 

El Paso County Humane Society . . , 
City Hall (PoUce Department). 
Denver: 

Colorado Humane Society 

State House. 



CONNECTICUT. 
Hartford: 

Connecticut Children's .Vid Societv 

926 Main St. 

Connecticut Humane Society 

55 Prospect St. 

DEL.\WARE. 
Wilmington: 

Delaware Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 
1 West Seventh St. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Washington: 

Board of Children's Guardians 

District Building, Fourteenth St. and Pennsyl- 
vania Ave. 



FLORIDA. 
Jacksonville: 

Children's Home Societv of Florida. 
2029 Main St. 

IDAHO. 
Boise: 

Children's Home and Aid Society . . . 
740 Warmspring Ave. 



1910 
1903 



1894 
1891 
1903 
1S97 
1S96 

1870 
1907 

1896 
ISSl 

1892 
1880 



1883 



ILLINOIS. 
Chicago: 

Illinois Children's Home and -\id Societv . . . 
127 North Dearborn St. 

Jewish Home Finding Societv of Chicago 

720 West Twelfth St. 
Lutheran Home Finding Societv of Illinois., 
4840 West Byron St. 
f^UTNCT: 

Quincy Humane Society 

211 Hampshire St. 
Whitehall: 

Whitehall Orphans' Home Society 



1883 
1907 
1906 

1880 

1902 



I Not reported. 

~ Agents in 40 counties. 

3 Includes report of Victoria Home. 

^ Includes finances for protection of animals. 



(') 
Yes... 

No. . . . 

No.... 

Ye^ . . . 

Yes... 

(■) 



0) 
Yes.. 

Yes. , 
Yes., 

Yes., 
0) 

Yes 11 . 

No... 

No... 

Yes.. 

Yes . . 
No... 
No... 

(1) 
No.n. 



NtTMBER OF 

agent.s. 



(') 



13 



105 

(1) 

IS 

I 



6 
n,119 



S5 



SI 



CHILDKEN placed DURING TEAR. 



193 



42 

259 

S 

3 



80 



(') 



(') 
(') 



32 
336 



152 
81 



415 
115 



lOS 



4 
1,59 



10 
132 

(1) 
1 



19 

(') 



(') 



69 



224 
43 



46 



a ftS 



(■) 



56 



62 



Dependent. 



Jo "^ 4) be 

'"2d 



133 
3 



(') 



(') 



165 
73 



(') 



(') 



0) 



fT^ 



46 



42 

126 



C) 
(') 



(') 



(') 



2.50 
42 



(1) 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(1) 



(') 



0) 



19 121 



106 



■c2 



236 



^ Not in active operation, 

6 Includes amount supplied from general fund of .Associated Charities. 

^ Includes agents for protection of animals. 

s Included in receipts from " other sources," 



§1 

g 



1,33 



136 



GENERAL TABLES. 



159 



AND CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910. 



CHILDREN UNDER CARE AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



443 
1 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



In 

receiv- 
ing 
homes. 



203 
1 



In families — 



With 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 



With- 
out 

pay- 
ment 

ot 
board. 



In 
cus- 
tody 
else- 
where. 



RECEIPTS DURING l-EAR. 



Total. 



11,068 
5,648 

3,150 

1,41S 

3 28,831 

<3,072 

100 



Derived from— 



Appro- 
priations. 



?300 
1,883 



750 
143 



Dona- 
tions. 



Other 
sources. 



S3, 7.50 

1,000 

668 
6,438 



.S7C8 
15 



22, 270 
3,072 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



S945 
4,596 

2,900 

1,400 

3 28,993 

' 2, 714 

83 



For run- 
ning ex- 
penses. 



$945 
4,596 

2,900 

1,400 

22,981 

2,714 

83 



For per- 
manent 
improve- 
ments. 



$6,012 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT CLOSE 
OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$1,248 



3 40, 132 



Land, 
buildings, j^^^i^ 



and 
equip- 



$9,200 



funds. 



$1,248 



30,932 



(') 



437 



(') 



209 



(■) 
228 

(') 



(■) 



(■) 



0) 



(') 



233 
(■) 



179 



254 



1,652 



1,501 
.50 



332 



118 



136 



109 



1,061 



0) 



(') 



185 



147 



(') 



62 



(') 



908 



(■) 



1,424 
1 



(15) 



»590 



(') 



i«323 



2,581 
54,325 



2,483 
<9,831 



10 31,650 
13,551 



33, 828 

1,100 
7,800 

9,483 
2,000 



2,366 
« 12,148 



1,297 

(') 



15.272 
1.100 



215 
i,349 



»2,031 



6,123 
57,309 

2,044 
<9,674 



6,895 10 29,680 
10,451 , U,126 



20 



160 



72,928 

7,199 

49,300 

13 63,953 
13,923 
2,251 

1,014 

1' 18,828 



70, 710 



7,199 

27,250 

56,650 

13,923 

1,621 



18, 742 



3,883 



630 
1,014 

86 



1,429 



63,911 



7,047 



6,123 
57,309 



2,044 
9,674 



25,873 
14,126 






13 67, 794 
13,169 
2,115 

807 

" 12,650 



63,911 



7,652 

56, 522 
13, 169 
2,115 

754 

12,650 



40,848 



11,272 



10 61,900 
135, 706 



74,400 



13 86,980 



0) 
« 

1,150 



60,500 
23,750 



86,980 



21,800 



4.30O 



14,000 



2,250 



(') 



1 400 
111,956 



1,300 
7,800 
3,350 



Includes donations. 

10 Includes report of Virginia T. Smith Home for Crippled and Incurable 
Children, at Newington, Conn. 

ri In one of the two receiving homes. 
13 Including I976elf-supportlng. 



13 Includes report of Receiving Homes, at Evanston and Duquoin, 111. 

nThe society finds homes for them. 

'0 Included in column ''In custody elsewhere.'' 

10 Includes those in families without paynjent of board. 

" Includes report of Receiving Home. 



160 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table II.— SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION 





NAME AND LOCATION. 


•2 

a 

a 

u 


i 

> 

1-4 

a 

3 

1 

6 


number of 
agents. 


a . 

II 


3 

Si 

so. 
S£ 

z 

1 






CHILDEEN PLACED DURING 


YEAH. 




fe 


■a 


a 


3 

o 




d 

■a 
§ 


Dependent. 


3 

h 

a 

a 

O 


n 

a 


1 


■3 

a 

a . 
>■§ 
23 

o 

p. 

a 


a 

g 


g 
s 

a 
o 

£ 

M 


Xt3 

ass 

rtX! a 

e-sl 

o 


c 

►—1 


tfl a 

ill 

S3'S;3 
SS.S 


1 


INDIANA. 
Bedfokd: 

Lawrence County Board of Children's Guardians 

Bloomfield: 

Greene County Board of Children's Guardians 

Bloomington: 

Monroe County Board of Children's Guardians 

Bkookville: 

Franklin County Board of Children's Guardians 

Columbus: 

Bartholomew County Board of Children's Guardians. 
Decatue: 

Adams County Board of Children's Guardians 

303 North Third St. 
Evansville: 

Vanderburph County Board of Children's Guardians. 
507 Lincoln Ave. 
FOET Wayne: 

Allen County Board of Children's Guardians 

Lutheran Children's Friend Society of Indiana and 
Ohio. 
2322 Broadway. 
Fowler: 

Benton County Board of Children's Guardians 

Greenfield: 

Hancock Coimty Board of Children's Guardians 

237 North Main St. 
Greensbueg: 

Decatur County Board of Children's Guardians 

Huntington: 

Huntington County Board of Children's Guardians.. 
409 North Jeflerson St. 
Indlanapolis: 


1907 
1907 
1905 
(') 
1898 
1906 

1900 

1901 
1902 

1906 
1905 

1901 
1894 

1893 
1883 
1889 

1906 

1900 
1910 

1907 

C) 
1910 
1901 
1904 
1909 
1905 
1908 
1907 
1893 

1905 
1909 
1902 
1909 

1888 
1899 

1908 
1894 


(') 

No.... 
No..., 






12 
2 

15 
5 

31 
2 

44 

22 
15 

2 

6 

2 
25 

200 
22 
61 

9 

11 
3 

27 

16 

38 

25 

6 

31 

37 

8 

8 

119 

4 

4 

91 

3 

410 
147 

37 

169 


2 

1 

9 

2 

13 

.... 

18 

8 
11 

3 

2 

8 

103 
14 
26 

6 

6 

1 
11 

8 
19 
19 

3 
23 
23 

2 

3 

56 

2 
2 

42 
2 

196 
75 

17 
80 


ID 
1 
6 
3 

18 
2 

26 

14 

4 

2 
3 

17 

97 
8 
25 

3 

6 
2 

16 
.S 

19 
6 
3 
8 

11 

5 

03 

2 

49 
1 

214 

20 
89 


2 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


1 


11 

2 

8 




2 


1 






3 






5 
9 
2 

33 

13 
15 




15 

(') 

12 

(') 

38 

21 






7 
5 
9 
2 

33 

13 

15 


4 


No.... 








12 


(') 

2 




5 

(') 

6 


.5 


No.... 








16 


6 


6 


No.... 








7 


No.... 
No.... 


1 




1 


2 
9 


9 


S 


1 

14 

0) 

3 

1 
15 

55 
21 


..... 

(') 

3 
1 


9 


No . 




1 








10 


No.... 




3 

1 
10 

140 


(') 


(') 


2 

6 

2 
15 

1 
10 

4 


5 

5 

11 

2 

3 

11 


11 


Yes... 










12 


(') 
Yes... 


1 














13 






5 

189 
21 
41 

4 






5 

195 
21 
41 

5 


14 


No.... 
No 


4 




1 
1 
1 




2 


IS 


77 Baldwin r.uildinj;, l.')2 East Market St. 
German Lutlieran orjihans' Association 


IB 


3310 Ea-st \V■a^hlil^;lon St. 

Marion County Board of Children's Guardians 

171S Broadway. 
Lafayette: 

Tippecanoe County Board of Children's Guardians. . . 
40 Court House St. 
Laporte: 

Laporte County Board of Cliildren's Guardians 

Liberty: 

Union County Board of Children's Guardians 

LOGANSPORI: 

Cass County Board of Children's Guardians 


No.... 
Yes... 
Yes . . . 


2 
1 


1 


51 
3 
11 






17 


6 








IS 






19 


(') 
Yes 










3 

5 

16 

29 










3 
5 

11 

17 

- 25 

6 

14 
2 


20 








5 
22 








22 


22 
5 
19 


21 


Martinsville: 

Morgan County Board of Children's Guardians 

Mount Vernon: 

Posey County Board of Children's Guardians 

Mitncie: 

Delaware County Board of Children's Guardians 

Noblesville: 

Hamilton County Board of Children's Guardians 

Princeton: 

Gibson County Board of Children's Guardians 

Richmond: 

Wayne County Board of Children's Guardians 

Scottsburg: 

Scott County Board of Children's Guardians 














■T> 


Yes . 








1 


1 

25 

5 

8 
(') 




7 


23 


Yes... 

(') 
No.... 


1 






24 








1 
19 

(') 
6 

4 

(') 
3 

150 

26 
169 


3 








25 








(') 
12 
5 
8 
90 




1 


■26 

12 

6 

8 

100 


2B 


Yes. 








27 


No 










2 


28 


Seymour: 

Jack.son County Board of Children's Guardians 

Terre Haute: 

Vigo County Board of Children's Guardians 


Yes... 








8 
9 






29 


Yes... 

<') 
No 


3 




1 


110 






10 
4 


9 


30 


Court House. 
Tipton: 

Tipton County Board of Children's Guardians 

Versailles: 

Ripley County Board of Children's Guardians 

VlNCENNES: 

Knox County Board of Children's Guardians 


2 




31 








4 
56 








4 
56 


32 


(■) 
(■) 

Yes... 
Yes... 

(') 
Yes... 








(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


2 


33 
3 

7 
1 


33 


WiNAMAC: 

Pulaski County Board of Children's Guardians 

IOWA. 

Des Moines: 


7 
6 

1 


1 




1 


1 
1 


350 

lie 

33 
169 


147 


260 






396 
146 

33 
169 


7 
4 


2 


2340 East Ninth St. 
Ottumwa: 

American Home Finding Association 






1 


507 West Fourth St. 

KANSAS. 
Mcpherson: 

Child Rescue and Orphan Society of the Church of 
the Brethren. 
Topeka: 


11 






2 




1 




614 Kansas Ave. 















1 Not reported. 



3 Includes report of Receiving Home. 



3 Includes report of Hadley Home, at Iladley, Ind. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



161 



AND CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



cniLDKEN UNDER CAKE AT CLOSE OF YEAR.' 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 


VALUE OF PEOPERTY AT CLOSE 
OF YEAR. 




Tutal. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


In 
receiv- 
ing 
homes 


In families— 


In 

cus- 
tody 
else- 
where. 


Total. 


Derived from— 


Total. 


For run- 
ning ex- 
penses. 


For per- 
manent 
improve- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
buildings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


Invested 
funds. 


i 


With 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 


With- 
out 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 


Appro- 
priations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Other 
sources. 


a 

3 

a 

§ 
■a 

i 

a 


5 

(') 

(') 

8 
(') 

169 


(') 
(') 
(■) 
3 

77 


5 
0) 

C) 
(') 

5 
(') 

92 






1 
(') 
(') 
(') 


4 
(') 
(') 
(■) 

8 
(') 

138 


(■) 

$500 
(') 
600 
100 


(') 

$500 
(') 
600 
100 


(') 


(') 


S40 

100 

(') 

600 
100 


S40 

100 

(') 

600 

100 










1 


(') 
0) 












? 


(') 


(') 










3 










4 














5 


31 


(') 


(■) 














n 


2 5,500 

600 
825 


5,500 
600 






= 5,500 

600 
333 


5, 500 

600 
333 




2 $30, 000 


530,000 




7 














s 


6 

3 

7 

y 

653 
79 
72 

72 


3 

5 

(■) 
5 

344 
40 
46 

33 


3 

3 
2 

4 

309 
39 
26 

39 




6 






SS25 












9 




3 

7 

(') 
3 

6 
40 














10 




























11 


(') 


(■) 


(') 
6 

5S4 
31 
13 

32 


75 


7j 






40 


40 










1? 














13 


51 
43 
59 


12 


20,782 

s 7,389 

500 

50 
20 


8,319 

7,258 

500 

50 
20 


8,054 
(<) 
131 


$4, 409 


21,000 
0) 
6 7, 432 

191 

50 
20 


18,000 

6,707 

191 

50 
20 


S3, 000 
(') 
725 


6,000 


6,000 




14 


0) 


15 
16 










17 


















18 




























19 


27 


U 


16 






22 


5 














20 


























21 
















100 
342 
25 


100 
342 
25 






100 
342 


100 
342 










22 




























« 




























M 


37 
(') 

8 

(') 
99 


22 

0) 

(') 

66 


15 
0) 

6 
(•) 

33 






17 
(') 

6 
(') 


20 
(') 

2 
(') 


















25 


(') 


0) 


(>) 


(') 






(') 


(') 










26 














27 


99 


(') 






















28 


2,000 


2,000 


















29 
























30 


5 

30 
22 

1 

826 


3 

(■) 

1 

23 
12 

(') 


2 

0) 






5 
























31 


(■) 


(') 


(') 

1 

3 






















.32 


50 

'28,423 
! 19,310 

1,194 


50 

2,147 
200 






50 

» 28, 335 

> 18,851 

1,150 
12,886 


50 

27,791 
12,681 

1,150 
12. SS6 










;« 


7 
10 

1 


27 
22 






16, 169 
17,610 

1.104 
12,457 


10,107 
1.500 


544 

6.170 


'65,000 
2 32,000 


25,000 
32,000 


8 10. 000 


1 






2 




1 

826 




I 








429 










2 






1 "" 1 


1 













* Included in report of German Lutheran Orphans' Home. 
9531°— 13 11 



s Includes report of Guardians' Home, Indianapolis, lud. 



162 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table II.— SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



KANSAS— Continued . 

Wichita: 

Christian Service League of America . 

113 North Law. (Box 615.) 



KENTUCKY. 
Lodisville: 

Kentucky Children's Home Society ^ 

10S6 Baxter Ave. 
Kentucky Home Society for Colored Children " 
807 Sbtth St. 



MAINE. 
Portland: 

Children's Protective Society of Portland 

85 Market St. 

Maine Children's Committee 

City Building. 

MARYLAND. 
Baltimore: 

Henry Watson Children's -\id Society 

15 East Pleasant St. 
Maryland Society to Protect Children from Cruelty 
and Immorality. 
636 West Franklin St. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
Boston: 

Boston Children's .\id Society 

43 Hawkins St. 

Boston Children's Friend Society 

48 Rutland St. 

Boston North End Mission 

313 Ford Building. 

Boston Society for the Care of Girls 

184 Boylsfon St. 

Catholic Charitable Bureau 

43 Fremont St. 
Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute. 
279 Tremont St. 
Lowell: 

Lowell Humane Society 

71 Central St. 
New Bedford: 

New Bedford Children's .\id Society 

12 Market St. 
Springfield: 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association 

5 Court House Place. 
Worcester: 

Worcester Children's Friend Society 

390 Main St. 

MICHIGAN. 
Bay City: 

Lutheran Children's Friend Society 

1215 Tenth St. 
Detroit: 

Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.. 
606 Breitmeyer Building. 
St. Joseph: 

Michigan Children's Home Society 

1424 South State St. 

MINNESOTA. 
Alexandria: 

Douglas County Humane Society 

Duluth: 

Duluth Humane Society 

207 Court House Building. 
Minneapolis: 

Minneapolis Humane Society 

Court House. 
St. PAtJL: 

Children's Home Society of Minnesota 

2239 Commonwealth A\e. 
Lutheran Children's Friend Society of Minnesota... 

2022 Marshall -Vve. (Merriam Park.) 
St. Paul's Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 
Old Capitol. 
Winona : 

Winona County Humane Society 

476 West Fifth St. 



1907 



1903 
1909 



1860 
1878 



1S64 
1833 
1867 
1800 
1903 
1849 

1872 

1843 

1879 

1849 

1899 
1898 
1891 

1904 
1892 

1891 

1889 
1901 

1878 

(>) 



(') 



NUMBER OF 
AGENTS. 



Yes. 

No.. 



Yes... 
Yes... 



Yes... 

CO 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes. . . 
Yes... 

(') 
No.. 



(') 



No. 
Yes. . . 
Yes 



(') 
(1) 

(') 

Yes.. 

No... 

(■) 

Yes.. 



1 120 



CHILDREN PLACED DURING YEAR. 



297 

60 



240 
305 



439 

168 
27 
208 
172 
132 

57 

53 

SI 

147 

21 
511 
120 

1 
81 



105 
40 
51 



176 

28 



149 
156 



248 

79 
13 



103 
8.1 

M 

26 

34 
6S 

12 
250 
66 



ST 

M a 

a 0313 

•3 £•= 



Dependent. 



a g 



10 

(>) 



20 
96 
18 

101 

(') 
«5 

(') 
13 



(I) 



§■3- 

.all 

o 



(') 



287 



147 
305 



307 

53 

9 

79 

(') 
60 



(') 






(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 

2 
2 
5 



(') 






339 



» Not reported. 

2 Included in report of Receiving Home. 

3 Included in report of Receiving Home for Colored (.'hildren. 
* Included in report of Mount Hope Home. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



163 



AND CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDEEN UNDER CARE AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



38 



In 
receiv- 
ing 
homes. 



In families— 



With 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 



With- 
out 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 



CO 



In 
cus- 
tody 
else- 
where, 



RECEIPTS DURING TEAR. 



Total. 



$7,717 



Derived from- 



Appro- 
priations. 



SISO 



Dona- 
tions. 



$906 



Other 
sources. 



$6,681 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$8,412 



For run- 
ning ex- 
penses. 



$6, 12(i 



For per- 
manent 
improve- 
ments. 



82. 280 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT CLOSE 
OF YEAR. 



Toul. 



Land, 
buildings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$4,300 



Invested 
funds. 



219 

(') 

728 
81 



249 

142 
11.5 
164 
94 
1S3 



46 
112 
90 

7S 

1,119 

417 



(') 

(') 

19 
102 



131 



468 
30 



145 
63 
69 



260 

ai 



104 
79 
46 

164 
27 
90 



52 
(') 

63 
13 



170 
04 
3 

103 
94 

164 



146 
(') 

665 
15 



21 



018 
223 



20 
74 
49 

.32 
501 
194 



13 
105 
34 



9 
102 
IS 



62 

92 I 842 
350 



(■) 

(') 

14 
.17 



C) 



(') 



(') 






(') 
(') 
19 



3,606 
859 



18,233 
3,733 



52,892 
25,964 
.1,175 
49,056 
5,130 
' 61, 462 

1,411 

9,427 

4,857 

28,939 

M,500 

6,602 

' 25, 191 

12 
2,158 

9, .589 

16,311 
4,717 
3,189 

485 



1,000 
500 



55 
259 



7,595 
3,069 



23,054 
14,537 



66 



460 



1,560 
4,067 



<■ .-12, 800 

771 

863 

1,350 

16, 448 

1,500 

6,022 

22,818 

12 

598 



51 
600 



9,638 
104 



29,838 
11,427 

1,176 
48,990 

5, 1.30 
28,662 

640 

8,564 

3,607 

12,491 



.5,80 
1,913 



1,500 



14,966 



1,686 



125 



5,522 

1,346 

4,717 

103 



3,475 
859 

18,233 
5,057 



65,071 
19,883 

1,175 
25,775 

5,130 
« 36, 046 

1,420 

8,543 

2,476 

15,809 

2 I , iUO 

7,602 

' 25, S.SO 

26 
2,077 

9,411 

15,717 
4,717 
3.184 



3,300 
859 

18,233 
5,037 



56,071 
19,874 

1,175 
25, 775 

6,130 
• 35, 981 

1,420 

8,543 

2,476 

1.5,809 

1,400 

6,602 

26,980 

26 
2,077 

9,411 

16,717 
4, 629 
3,1S4 



1,000 



' Includes leRacy of $27,165 to iicrmanent fluid. 
■; Includes cost, of aiil tiivmi rliildren in their ovra homes. 
Includes report, of Rec^eiving Home and cost of aid given children in their own homes. 



175 



175 



100,550 
2,225 



203,500 
138, 550 

0) 
489,067 



489, 134 
14,001 

156,337 
28,372 

142,000 

> 2,000 

9,000 

2 23,000 

110 



75,370 
S.OOO 



550 
1,225 



23, .500 
37,000 



$100,000 
1,000 



180,000 
101,650 

(*) 
489,057 



2,193 



343, 734 
14,001 

154,144 
28,372 

142,000 



2,000 

9,000 

20,000 



3,000 



40,000 
8,000 



164 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table II SOCIKTIES FOR THE PROTECTION 



NAttE AND LOCATION. 



NTJMBEKOF 
AGENTS. 



a . 

2 t-. 



ri 



as 



3 

'"a 
a I 



CniLDEEN PLACED DURING YEAR. 



CO a 

o 



Dependent. 



o 



> 



'C 


■n 


g 


a 






a . 


fl 






>>" 


frS 


■d'-5 


d* 






o 

a 








H 


l^ 



MISSOURI. 
St. Joseph: 

Humane Society of St . Joseph and Buchanan County. 
Seventh and Messani Sts. 
St. Louis: 

Children's Home Society of Missoiui 

4427 Margarotta Ave. 

Humane Society of Missouri' 

620 Oiive St. 
Lutheran Society for Homeless duldren of Missouri . . 
1704 Marliet St. 

St. Louis Children's Aid Society ; 

1832 Carr St. 



MONTANA. 
Helena: 

Montana CUldreu's Home Society . 
Helena Ave. and Warren St. 



NEBRASKA. 
Omaha: 

Nebrasl^a Children's Home Society. . 
514 Brown Bloclj. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
Keene: 

Keene Humane Society 

Exchange Blocli, Main St. 
Nashua: 

New Hampshire Woman's Humane Society 

Crom Hill, 
Portsmouth: 

New Hampshire Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 



NEW JERSEY. 
Camden: 

Camden County Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 
725 Federal St. 
Elizabeth: 

Elizabeth Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children.* 
Room 25, Court House. 
Hacken.sack : 

Children's Aid and Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children.' 
79 Essex St. 
Hoboken: 

United .Md Society and Society tor the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 
1 Newark St. 
Jersey City: 

New Jersey State Board ol Children's Guardians 

15 Exchange Place. 
Morris TO WT^: 

Morris County Society for the Prevention of Cnielty 
to Children. 
21 Morris St. 

SpeedweU Society 

Newark: 

CathoUc Children's Aid Association of New Jersey — 

13 Central Ave. 
Cliildren's Aid and Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 
249 Mulberry St. 
Orange: 

Children's Aid and Protective Society of the Oranges . 
124 Essex Ave. 
Paterson: 

Passaic County Children's Aid and Society for the 
Prevention of Craeltv to Children. 
848 Market St. 
Trenton: 

New Jersey Children's Home Society 

Room 44, Forst-Richey Building. 

NEW MEXICO. 
Albuquerque: 

Cliildren's Home Society of New Mexico and Arizona. 
805 East Grand Ave. 



NEW YORK. 
Albany: 

Mohawk and Hudson River Humane Society. 
80 Howard St. 
B ATA via: 

Batavia Humane Society 

17 Ross St. 



1890 

1891 
1870 
1903 
1909 

1896 



1875 
1907 
1876 



1,898 

1900 

1906 

1899 

1898 

1902 
1903 
1868 

1899 
1879 

1894 



1887 
1903 



1 Not reported. 

2 Includes report of Receiving Home. 
' Both animal and child protection. 



No.... 

No.., 

Yes. 

No.. 

(>) 



Yes... 

Yes... 

(') 
Yes... 

(') 



Yes... 



No.. 
No.. 

Yes. 

(') 

Yes . . . 
No... 
Yes.. 

(■) 
Yes... 

Yes.. 

(') 

Yes.. 

(') 



" 118 
. 2 



179 
101 
29 
36 



50 

156 

36 

187 
548 



23 



170 



50 



1,374 



37 



93 

20 

(') 

288 
50 

(') 
12 



(•) 



(') 

(') 

(>) 
24 
36 



66 



59 
19 

0) 
118 
25 

(') 



0) 



29 



39 



(') 



(') 



(') 



32 



16 

91 

4 

(') 

363 

46 

(■) 
20 



(») 



(') 



(') 



(') 



5 

3 

(') 
67 
10 

(■) 



C) 



• AflUiated with Charity Organization Society. 

6 Includes finances of Charity Organization Society. 

s Included in report of Bergen CouBty Children's Home. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



165 



AND CAKE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued . 



CHILDEEN UNDER CAKE AT CLOSE OF TEAR. 


RECEIPT.S DURING TEAR. 


PATUENT3 DURING TEAR. 


VALUE OF PROPERTT AT CLOSE 
OF TEAR. 




Total. 


Uale. 


Fe- 
male. 


In 

receiv- 
ing 
liomes. 


In families — 


In 

cus- 
tody 
else- 
where. 


Total. 


Derived from — 


Total. 


For run- 
ning ex- 
penses. 


For per- 
manent 
improve- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
buildings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


Invested 
funds. 


o 


With 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 


With- 
out 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 


Appro- 
priations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Other 
sources. 


a 

a 

■B 

s 

a 


C) 

211 

18 

9 

20 

3 

3 

35 

6 


(') 

110 
6 
7 
5 

1 

12 
4 


(') 

101 
12 
2 
15 

2 

3 

23 
2 


32 


(') 


(■) 

179 
9 


(') 

9 
9 
1 

3 


SI, 537 

2 21,081 

7,983 

827 

1,258 

13,637 

10,326 

1,421 




$I,637' 

16,486 

4,604 

827 

1,164 

6,737 

(■) 

187 




$1,436 

1 21,927 

7,749 

649 

624 

13,640 

9,835 

1,436 
C) 


$1,436 

20,982 

4,811 

649 

624 

5,631 

(') 

1,436 
(') 










1 


82,647 
340 


82,848 
3,039 


$945 
2,938 


2 $.53, 500 
16,600 


$50,000 


$3,600 
16,600 










4 




7 


12 




94 
6,900 
0) 
1,234 










t 




8,009 


18,000 


18,000 








3 




(') 




1 




35 


2,000 




2,000 








6 


(■) 


















2,046 




2,046 




3 
4 


1 
3 


2 
1 






3 


C) 


296 
'4,508 




296 
4,508 




297 
M,433 


297 
4,433 








(') 


(■) 






























97 

852 
15 

25 

1,550 
107 

U 
199 

763 

178 

13 
(') 


(■) 

565 

8 

(') 
834 
53 

7 
109 

509 
100 

7 


287 

7 

0) 
716 
54 

7 
90 

254 

78 

6 


76 
C) 


14 

401 
3 

(•) 


8 

426 

12 

(') 
730 
79 

14 
9 

700 


25 

(') 
820 

161 

168 


1,839 

51,008 

' 1,594 

(■) 

6,128 
2,850 

2,467 
8 5,261 

"25,566 

10,500 

» 12,616 
0) 


260 
50,779 


637 


952 

229 
102 

(') 

6,152 

1,255 


4,384 

44,673 

' 1,586 

7,347 
5,761 
4,685 

2,461 
8 5, 137 

9 25,604 
10,500 

" 12, 109 

(') 


3,037 

44,673 

1,586 

7,347 
5,761 
3,518 

2,461 
5,015 

25,604 

5,500 

12,109 
(>) 


1,347 


9,600 
0) 


6,500 


3,000 
C) 


i 


1,492 

(') 

976 
1,595 

2,467 
5,261 

22,881 

5,500 

3,989 
C) 




1 


















40,000 




15,000 


f 


28 






1,167 


26,000 


c 




U 


29 
50 

10 

13 

0) 


13 






122 


8 14,000 
> 29, 641 

10,000 

" 108, 152 
0) 


14,000 
18,500 

10,000 

100,000 




1 




2,685 
5,000 
6,642 

C) • 


11,141 


1' 




6,000 








2,984 
(■) 


8,152 




(') 


(') 


(') 


(>) 


a 



^ Includes finances for prevention of cruelty to animals. 

8 Includes report of Cluldren's Home, 

*» Includes report of McKinley Receiving Home. 



>o Includes agents for protection of animals. 

1' Includes report of Albany and Troy Receiving Homes. 



166 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table II — SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION 



NAME AND LOCATION 



NEW YORK— Continued. 

Binohamton: 

Broome County Humane Society 

Municipal Building. 
Beooklyn.^ 
Buffalo: 

Luthera Children's Friend Society of New York 

480 Glenwood Ave. 
Queen City Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 
62 Delaware Ave. 
Cooperstown; 

Otsego c:ounty Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Children. 
Geneva: 

John Maciiay Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Children. 
764 South Main St. 
GotrvERNEUR: 

St. Lawrence County Society for the Prevention of 
Craelty to Children. 
Hornell: 

HomelLsville Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Children. 
Jamestown: 

Chautauqua County Society lor the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 
New York City: 
Bronx and Manhattan Boroughn — 
Catholic Homo Bureau for Dependent Children 

105 East Twenty-second St. 
Children's Aid Society (Placing Out Department). . 

105 East Twenty-second St. 
New Yorli Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 
297 Fourth Ave. 

State Charities Aid Association 

105 East Twenty-second St. 
Brooklyn Borough— 

Broolilyn Children's Aid Society 

72 Schermerhom St. 
Brooklyn Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 
103 Schermerhorn St. 
Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum Society in the 
City of Brooklyn. 
4 Court Square. 
Norwich: 

Chenango County Humane Society 

Municipal Building. 
OLE AN: 

Olean Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children . 
Oswego: 

Oswego Coimty Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to I children. 
119 West First St. 
Rochester : 

Children's Aid Society of Rochester 

409 Livingston Building. 
Rochester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 
90 P lymouth Aye., north. 
Rome: 

Rome Branch, Stevens-Swan Humane Society 

City HaU. ■ 

Seneca Falls: 

Seneca County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to ( hildren. 
Syracuse: 

Syracuse Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 
3 Clinton Block. 
UmCA: 

Utica Branch, Stevens-Swan Humane Society 

County Building, 
Wateetown: 

Jefferson County Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 
224 Massey Ave. 

YONKERS: 

Westchester County Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. 
45 Warburton Ave. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

GREEN.SBORO: 

North Carolina Children's florae Society 

' Not reported. 



1902 

1905 
1879 

1903 
1905 

1898 
1903 
1897 

1898 
1854 
1874 

1872 

1866 
1880 



1903 
1885 



1895 

1875 



1900 
1903 



(') 
1883 



(') 

No... 
Yes.. 

(') 
No... 

(') 
(') 
(') 

Yes.. 
Yes.. 

(') 

(') 

Yes . . 
Yes.. 



(■) 
Yes. . 

No... 
Yes. . 

(I) 
0) 



1881 1 (I) 



(■) 



1SS2 (1; 



1903 I (') 4 

! See New York Citv, 



NUMBER OF 

AOENT3. 



(') 



12 
43 

•230 



(') 

1 
1 

22 



■g 5 



(') 32 



(■) 



CHILDREN PLACED DUEINO YEAB. 



128 



1 
15 

2()2 

735 

2,8-23 

185 

471 
1,849 



5 
12 

130 
107 

'29 

3 

173 



(') 



139 

643 

1,963 

77 

274 
1,,520 



(') 



Dependent. 






2 5 

(') (■) 



(') 



262 
364 
120 

107 

218 



32 



(■) 



'^', 

^ o < 

ii *" 
j3 2 - 



(') (') 

7 
7 



2,703 

76 

233 

672 



0) (') 



(') 



(') (') 



20 



(') 



1,172 



(') 



22 



49 



(■) 



95 44 51 81 I 2 I 12 

' Includes report of Receiving Home. 



(') 



96 



(') 



101 



158 



2,546 

1 

32 
1,521 



GENERAL TABLES. 



167 



AND CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDBEN tJNDEK CARE AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



(') 



Male. 



(') 



Fe- 
male. 



In 

receiv- 
ing 

homes. 



0) 



(') 



In families — 



With 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 



(') 



With- 
out 
pa.y- 
ment 

of 
board. 



(') 



In 

cus- 
tody 
else- 
where. 



(') 



RECEIPT.S UURINQ YEAR. 



Total. 



$4,084 



9ei 
:,628 



Derived from- 



Api)ro- 

priations. 



$1,841 



3,500 



Dona- 
tions. 



SI, 161 



961 

582 



Other 

sources. 



SI, 082 



PAYMENTS DtmiNO YEAR. 



Total. 



$4,278 



390 
3,734 



For run- 
ning ex- 
penses. 



$4,278 

396 
3,734 



For per- 
manent 
improve- 
ments. 



VALCE OF PROPERTY AT CLOSE 
OF YEAR. 



Total. 



Land, 
buildings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$1,200 



12,500 



$1,200 



Invested 
funds. 



$12,500 



(') 



661 



(>) 



(') 



(') 



C) 



(') 



(•) 



0) 



C) 



(') 



1,481 
161 



281 
61 

1,970 



876 
93 
40 



168 
37 

1,310 



606 

58 
28 



113 
24 



116 

0) 



1,448 
8 
(') 

11 



16 
36 

1,875 



578 

42 
25 



33 
27 

(') 

3 
9 



(') 



34 



297 
12 



50 



(') 
20 

173 
6 



(■) 



0) 



(') 



(') 



131 





33 



0) 



C) 



50 



(') 



C) 



(') 



(') 



C) 

18, 260 
48,105 
116,995 

15,368 

42, 191 
' 43, 494 

' 296, 259 



40 
300 

19,338 
3,741 

142 

100 

2,932 

1,466 
(') 

3,600 



13,183 

1,103 

60,000 



18,004 
20,000 



300 



(1) 

4,384 
16,430 
39, 176 

14,735 

7,252 
11,887 



(■) 

693 
30,572 
17.819 

633 

16,935 
11,607 

41,784 
93 



40 
300 



18,504 
3,671 



107 



100 
800 



2,132 

1,316 
1,062 

1,850 



150 



(') 



3 12 3 7,847 7,838 

< Includes sisters, teachers, and lay help for all institutions under care of society. 



14,923 
48,105 
118,245 

15,852 

41,902 
> 43, 150 



263 

40 
300 

19,243 
3,811 

252 
100 

2.919 

1,201 
(') 



14,923 
48,105 
118.245 

15,852 

41,902 
43,150 



$23,218 



159,982 
290,478 

(') 

331,213 
'258,050 

=1,918,116 



3,651 3,051 



40 
300 

19,243 
3,811 

252 

100 
2,919 

1,261 



214,391 
(') 

70,913 
133,000 

1,918,116 



4,270 
10,000 



4,270 
10,000 



(') 



300 

100 

8,000 

47,800 



8,000 



159,982 
76, 087 

(■) 

260,300 
123,650 



100 



47,800 



7,232 7,232 2,725 2,600 225 

' Includes finances for all institutions under care of society. 



168 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table II.— SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NORTH DAKOTA. 
Faroo: 

North Dalcotfi Children's Home Society 

801 Tenth St., south. 

OHIO. 

Akkon: 

Akron Humane Society 

Mill and Main Sta. 
Bakbeeton: 

Barberton Humane Society 

nij Tus Ave. 
Cincinnati: 

Ohio Hvmiane Society 

24 East Ninth Ave. 
Cleveland: 

Cleveland Humane Society 

40G City Hall. 
Columbus: 

Children's Home Society of Ohio 

34 West First Ave. 
Lima; 

Allen County Humane Society 

5'20 South Pine St. 
Mansfield: 

Mansfield Humane Society 

Massillon: 

Massillon (Stark Coimty) Himiane Society 

309 Chestnut. 
Nokwalk: 

Huron County Humane Society 

Oxford 

O.xford Humane Society 

Port Clinton: 

Ottawa County Humane Society 

Ravenna: 

Portage County Humane Society 

Sandusky: 

Erie County Humane Society 2 

223 Decatur St. 
Springfield: 

Springfield and Clark Coimty Humane Society 

18 East Main St. 
Van Wert: 

Van Wert County Humane Society 

lOlJ East Main St. 
Youngstown: 

YoungstowTi Humane Society 

705 DoUar Bank Building. 

OKLAHOMA. 
Oklahoma City: 

Oklahoma Children's Home Society 

1539 West Twenty-fourth St. 
Stillwater: 

Child Saving Mission of Church of the Brethren of 
Oklahoma. 
002 West Tenth St. 

OREGON. 
Portland: 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society of Oregon 

East Twenty-ninth and Irving Sts. 

PENNSYLVANLV. 
Beaver Falls: 

Beaver VaUey Humane Society 

Butler: 

Butler County Branch Children's Aid Society of 
Western Peimsylvania. 
Clearfield: 

Clearfield County Branch Children's Aid Society of 
Western Pennsylvania. 

CORRY: 

Corry Humane Society 

Doylestown: 

Bucks County Children's Aid Society 

Emporium: 

Cameron Coimty Branch Children's Aid Society of 
Western Pennsylvania. 
Erie: 

Northwestern Pennsylvania Humane Society 

1218 HoUand St.. 
Huntingdon; 

Juniata Valley Children's Aid Society 

Eighteenth and Moore Sts. , 



1S90 



1902 

1870 

1873 

1893 

1910 

1884 
1870 

1897 
1903 
1902 
1885 
1886 

1872 

1902 

1895 



1885 



1905 
1SS7 

0) 

1898 
1884 
1892 

1893 



Yes.. 

w 

Yes . . 
Yes.. 
Yes... 
Yes... 

m 

Yes.. 
Yes.. 

(') 
W 
(') 
0) 
Yes.. 

0) 

0) 

(') 

Yes.. 
No... 

Yes.. 

(') 
(') 

(■) 

(■) 

Yes.. 

(') 

(') 

Yes.- 



NUMBER OF 
AGENTS. 



0) 



W 

3 
11 
(') 



^ £ 

as 



C) 



children placed during teas. 



62 

71 

14 

334 

118 



10 
'10 



0) 
8 

(') 
60 
44 



3 
1 

0) 



x: as 



Dependent. 






--.s 



01 



13 



(■) 



(') 



10 

'5 



6 

6 

19 

0) 
20 



(') 



1 Not reported. 

2 Includes report of Receiving Home. 

3 The society acts as an agent for the families assisted, incurring no expense on its own account. 
* Exclusive "of 554,091 paid in for support of minor children. 



58 

7 

222 

106 

10 

1 



(') 



21 
20 
30 

(■) 



15 



(') 



(') 



« 



(') 



« 



383 



GENERAL TABLES. 



169 



AND CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN UNDEE CARE AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



345 
31 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



In 

receiv- 
ing 
homes. 



(') 



192 
22 



(') 



19 



In familles- 



Wltli 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 



(') 



153 
8 



4 
3 

0) 



With- 
out 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 



328 



In 
cus- 
tody 
else- 
where, 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAH. 



22 



Total. 



2 814,544 

695 

O 

< 15,387 

5 17,626 

6,102 

655 

500 
540 

315 
51 
150 



Derived from- 



Appro- 
priations. 



$695 



2,250 
11,000 



490 

300 
540 



Dona- 
tions. 



$11,099 



4,409 
4,757 
6,102 



6 
51 
150 



Other 
sources. 



53,445 



8,728 
1,869 



165 
200 



PAYMENTS DURINQ YEAR. 



Total. 



! $16, 295 
525 

m 

I 7, 220 

' 16, 636 

6,033 

625 

480 
315 

315 
45 



For run- 
ning ex- 
penses. 



$12,205 
625 

m 

6,835 

16,636 

6,033 

625 

480 
315 

315 
45 



For per- 
manent 
improve- 
ments. 



$4,090 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT CLOSE 
OF YEAR. 



Total. 



2 $26, 790 



29,067 
'19,600 



Land, 
buildings 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$22,390 



20,050 
8,000 



Invested 
funds. 



$4, 400 



9,017 
11,500 



22 



0) 



636 



4 

'22 

'30 

1 

51 

'13 



C) 



2 

(■) 



(') 



282 

(') 
11 

6 

1 
26 

7 

C>) 
59 



(') 



(■) 



354 



11 



(') 



(') 



(■) 



(■) 



(■) 



{') 



(■) 



(') 



'15 
' 16 



25 
6 

(') 
34 



(1) 
IS 



0) 



30 
'13 

(') 



(') 



727 
£65 
806 

5,107 
1,025 

» 14,201 

300 
(') 

O 

115 
1,849 
(') 

1,619 

2.764 



887 
720 
640 
600 



4,221 
830 



4,885 



59 

7 

25 

187 

414 
195 

7,490 



C) 
(') 



1,799 
(') 

30O 

1.9112 



(') 
(') 



(') 
(') 



95 



185 



1,134 
264 



787 

56S 

1,137 

5,053 
1,090 

■16,871 

300 
(') 

(') 

96 
1,800 
(') 

1,129 

3,050 



69S 

787 

668 

1,137 

5,053 
1,090 

14,453 

300 
(') 

C) 

96 
1,800 
(') 

1,129 
2,750 



2,385 



12,000 



12,000 



s 133, 150 



83,000 



(0 
(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(') 



300 



14,570 



12,000 



^ Includes report of Infants' Rest and work of prevention of cruelty to animals. 

6 Includes report of Hoys' and (lirls' .Vid Society Home. 

' Included in report of Children's Aid Society of Western Pennsylvania. 



2,385 



50,160 



(') 



2,570 



170 BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table II.— SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION 





NAME AND LOCATION. 


i 
1 


i 

> 

£ 

a 
£ 
•o 

3 

U 

•a 
£ 

o 

a 


NUMBER of 

agents. 


i. 

If 

□ 

11 
D 


J3 

S_: 

:l 
|g 

a 

3 

z 






CHILDREN PLACED DURINO 


TEAR. 




4> 


•a 


t>. 

S 
a 

3 

> 


3 

o 




.2 
S 


Dependent. 


a 

C 





Si 

a 


1 

a 


■a 

a 
a 

p 

CS 

§ 

0. 


a 

a 
a 

Q 
o 

•c 

D 

s 

p 


as (3 
.. ti 

a os-D 



i 
■3 

is 

> 

a 


§2 = 

Iff 


9 


PENNSYLVANIA— Continued. 

Kennett Square: 

Chester Cbuntv Children's Aid Society 


1S84 
1887 

1908 

1906 
1885 

1SS7 

1SS2 
1900 
1877 

1885 
1894 
1874 

1893 

1892 

1879 

1889 

1909 

1882 

190C. 
1893 

1885 
1909 

1898 

1900 
1894 

1910 

1900 

1901 


Yes 








32 
6 

15 

3 
14 
11 

47S 
(') 
(') 

(') 
86 
(') 

06 

20 

28 

12 

16 

22 

2.8 
134 

19 

145 


35 

27 

= 45 

3 

44 

2 21 

480 

87 

738 

927 
82 
133 

273 

!22 

MO 

= 20 

16 

122 

28 
139 

23 
121 

185 


18 
2 

19 

3 
30 
12 

275 
69 
400 

0) 

39 

(■) 

141 

13 

36 

10 

11 

53 

16 
63 

14 

87 

(') 


17 
5 

26 


6 
0) 

2 21 


4 


IS 

(') 

2 24 

3 

(') 

2 11 

"62 

72 

(') 

52 

SO 

(■) 


(') 


10 


32 
!7 

245 

3 

42 
2 21 

478 

65 

503 

805 
82 
84 

76 
= 22 
= 28 
2 20 

10 

27 

28 
138 

19 

165 





3 


:o 


Kjttanning: 

Armstrong County Branch Children's Aid Society 
of Western Pennsylvania. 
Lock Uaven: 

Clinton County Branch Children's Aid Society of 
Western Peimsylvania. 
Medu: 

Delaware County Children's Aid Society 


No.... 








11 






12 


0) 
Yes... 
Yes... 












13 


Noeeistown: 


1 


15 




14 
9 

205 

18 

338 

(•) 
43 

0) 
132 
9 
4 
10 
5 

69 

12 

76 

9 
34 

(') 


0) 

2 10 

243 

10 

(■) 

875 

31 

0) 


5 
0) 

1 

(') 


(■) 






2 


14 


OVL City: 

Venango County Branch Children's Aid Society of 
Western Pennsylvania. 
Phuadelpiiu: 

Children's Aid Society of Pennsylvania 


15 


Yes... 

No.... 
Yes... 

Yes... 

No.... 
0) 

Yes... 

(') 
Yes... 


52 
3 
16 

2 
6 
4 

4 

(■) 




175 


1 
5 

54 


1 

17 

181 

122 


16 


1500 .\rch St. 
Juvenile .\id Societv 


24 


.... 


17 


516 North Fourth St. 
Pennsylvania Society to Protect Children from 
Cruelty. 
415 South Fifteenth. 

PrtTSBlTEGH: 

Children's Aid Society of Western Pennsylvania '. . . 

43 Fernando St. 
Children's Home Society of Pennsylvania ^ 


(') 


(') 


18 


25 


1 


19 






20 


719 Ferguson Building. 
Western Pennsylvania Ilumane Society 


(') 


273 


17 
197 


32 


21 


440 SLxth Ave. 
Sceanton: 

Associated Charities of Scranton 


5 
(■) 
C) 
(') 

1 

1 


'1 

1 
1 


22 


332 Washington Ave. 
Somerset: 

Somerset County Branch Children's Aid Society of 
Western Pennsylvania. 
Waeeen: 

Warren County Branch Children's Aid Society of 
Western Pennsylvania. 
Washington: 

Washington County Branch Children's Aid Society 
of Western Pennsylvania. 

Wn-LIAM-SPORT: 

Lycoming County Children's Aid Society 


2 20 
240 

2 10 




22 




23 








2 12 


24 


0) 
Yes. 







2 10 
12 

122 






25 




2 






1 


Sheridan St. and Pennsylvania Ave. 

RHODE ISLAND. 
Peovidence: 

Rhode Island Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Children. 
55 Eddy St. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Greenville: 

South Carolina Children's Home Society 


Yes... 

No.... 
Yes... 

Yes 


4 

3 
3 


6 


89 


1 


28 


; 






1 


SOUTH DAKOTA. 
Sioux Falls: 

South Dakota Children's Home Society 


1 


1 
1 




139 






23 
102 


1 


1 


Tenth and Sherman Ave. 

TENNESSEE. 
Chattanooga: 

Lewis Mission 


19 
(') 


(') 


(') 


102 


2 


322 Market St. 
Nashville: 

Humane Commission of Nashville 


No.... 


3 

(•) 


1 


85 Arcade. 

TEXAS. 
Fort Worth: 

Texas (hildren's Home and Aid Society 


(') 


1 


(') 


(') 


(') 




Polytechnic Heights. 
Galveston: 

Galveston Humane Society « 






ii 


Society for the Help of Homeless Children 


No.... 
No.-.- 
No. . . . 
Yes... 


5 
1 
3 

1 




1 


1 

5 

7 

17 


34 
20 
14 
49 


10 

7 
8 
15 


24 

13 

6 

34 






34 

6 

9 

(') 






1 

5 
7 
18 


33 

15 

31 


7 


4 


1019 Avenue K. 
Houston: 

Harris County Humane Society 


12 

4 

(1) 


1 




2 


5 


Fannin St. and Congress Ave. 
Paris: 

Bureau of United Charities 


1 


1 


B 


Twenty-second St. and Pine Bluff. 
San .Vntonio: 

San Antonio Humane Societv 


(') 


(') 




324 Hicks Building. 







1 Not reported. 

2 Included in report of Children's Aid Society of Western Pennsylvania. 



* Includes report of 23 county branches. 

* Includes report of Receiving Home. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



171 



AND CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN ITIDEE CAEE AT CLOSE OK YEAR. 



Total. 



178 
>7 

>31 

11 

60 
•42 

1,657 

65 

3,316 

927 
809 

22 
«70 
>64 
>35 

17 

611 



0) 



Male. 



103 
3 



(') 
(') 
22 

1,004 
(') 
(') 

(') 
354 
(') 

17 

(') 

53 

15 

10 



87 
0) 



Fe- 
male. 



75 
4 

16 

(') 
(') 
20 

653 
(') 

(') 

(') 
455 
W 



(') 






In 
receiv 

ing 
homes. 



109 



(') 



In families — 



With 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 



534 
65 
177 



(') 



2 70 

3 24 



0) 



With- 
out 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 



137 

J7 



J 29 
938 



929 



(') 



'28 
8 31 



(') 



In 

cus- 
tody 

else- 
where. 



2 10 
2 



2 13 
185 



2,210 

122 
700 

(') 



102 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



J3,960 

(') 

483 

2,021 

^') 

99, 178 
10,271 
68,466 

23,563 
9.205 
6,943 

3,388 

m 

3.500 
•17,149 



< 14, 152 

1,050 
1,798 

3,000 



Derived from- 



Appro- 
priations. 



$3,410 

m 

413 

1,847 
(') 

40,258 
1.960 
3,750 



2,000 
3,000 



3,625 



400 



Dona- 
tions. 



$500 

(.') 

6 

174 
C-) 

22,521 

318 

8.514 

6,810 
6,992 
2.982 

388 

m 
m 

3,500 
1.726 



13.422 



326 



3,000 



Other 

sources. 



S50 






64 



36.399 

7,993 

56.202 

7,767 
2,213 
1.961 



m 



730 



324 



PAY'MENTS DURING TEAR. 



Total. 



83,960 

m 

458 
2,024 

m 

98,506 

(') 

63,022 

26. 573 
9.502 
6,923 

5,287 

m 
m 

4,000 
< 9. 499 



1.075 
1.798 

4,000 



For run- 
ning ex- 
penses. 



$3,960 
(=) 

(.'■> 

45S 
2,024 

m 

98,506 
(') 
62,990 

26, 573 
8,025 
6.923 

5,287 

(=) 

m 

(>) 
4,000 

9,306 



4,665 



1,075 
1.70S 



4,000 



For per- 
manent 
improve- 
ments. 



(') 



$32 



1,477 



5,627 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT CLOSE 
or YEAR. 



Total. 






$3,250 

(=) 

92.604 



Land, 
buildings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



288,686 



10.000 
34,681 



1,200 
(?) 
(=) 
{') 

1,000 



1.000 






$3,000 



10.000 
3.000 



1,200 

m 

1.000 



1,000 



Invested 
funds. 



$250 



209,921 



31,681 



52,100 



32 



(') 



(') 



(') 



0) 



(') 



0) 



(I) 



'2,060 
1,208 
1,350 
2,228 



300 
375 
COO 



' General offices and temporary lodging. 



1,000 760 

833 
750 

2,228 
6 Temporarily discontinued. 



'2.S33 
1,208 
1,439 
2, 063 



2,833 
1,208 
1,439 
2,063 



' 11.000 



' Includes report of Home for Homeless Children. 



172 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table H.— SOCIETIES FOR THE PROTECTION 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



VIRGINIA. 
Noefolk: 

Norfolk Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 
139 Cumberland St. 
Richmond: 

Children's Home Society of Virginia 

2605 East Franklin St. 

WASHINGTON. 
Seattle: 

Washington Children's Home Society 

Sixty-fifth and Jones Sts. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
Chak lesion: 

Children's Home Society of West Virginia 

1118 Washington St. 

WISCONSIN. 
Milwatjkee: 

Badger State Humane Society 

72 Sentinel Building. 

Children's Home Society of Wisconsin 

204 Grand Ave. 
Oshkosh: 

Winnebago County Branch, Wisconsin Humane 
Society. 
61 Merritt St. 
Superior: 

Douglas County Humane Society 

Wacsau: 

Wausau Branch, W'isconsin Humane Society 

814 Second St. 
Waitwatosa: 

Lutheran Children's Friend Society 

> Not reported. 



1904 



1900 



1896 



1906 
1892 



No. . . . 
No.... 

Yes . . . 

No. . . - 

(') 
No. - . . 

0) 

No. . . . 
Yes... 



No. . . . 



KUMBER OF 
AGENTS. 



(') 






as 



34 



355 



193 



79 
179 

35 

30 

37 



CBILDEEN PLACED DUBDJO TEAR. 



101 



258 



Dependent. 



5 cza 



38 

136 



(0 
40 



cfTCJ 
3 oi* 

O 



16 









189 









2 Includes reports of Seattle and Spokane Receiving Homes. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



173 



AND CARE OF CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



CHILDREN UNDER CARE AT CLOSE OF TEAR. 


RECEIPT.S DURraO YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DtntING YEAR. 


VALUE OF PROPERTY AT CLOSE 
OF YEAR. 




Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


In 

receiv- 
ing 

homes. 


In families — 


In 
cus- 
tody 
else- 
where. 


Total. 


Derived from— 


Total. 


For run- 
ning ex- 
penses. 


For per- 
manent 
improve- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
buildings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


Invested 
funds. 


y 


With 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 


With- 
out 
pay- 
ment 

of 
board. 


Appro- 
priations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Other 
sources. 


9 

3 
§ 

■a 
3 
■a 
3 


18 

547 

1,152 

557 

(■) 
32 

14 

6 
26 

324 


3 

258 

615 

286 

<•) 
19 

4 

4 
21 

169 


15 

289 

537 

271 

0) 
13 

10 

2 
5 

155 


7 
24 

35 

25 

22 

6 

17 


2 
226 

10 

7 

6 


1 
523 

.824 

300 

(') 


8 

67 
232 
0) 


$4,356 
9,582 

2 31,811 

3 8,492 

2,000 
22,800 

975 

674 
ISO 

< 7,608 


$1,500 


$2,856 
9,582 

23,990 

8,429 

2,000 
22,800 

375 
5 




$5,157 
9,415 

2 31,811 

3 8,586 

2,000 
22,800 

975 

041 
65 

•5,356 


$4,176 
9,415 

29,811 

8,437 

2,000 
22,800 

700 

041 
65 

4,330 


$981 


$5,600 
15,000 

2 40,400 

3 35,000 


$5,600 
15,000 

40,000 

35,000 




1 






2 


4,870 
63 


$2,951 


2,000 
149 


$400 


1 
1 






1 








2,000 


2,000 






307 


(■) 

14 



600 

550 
150 




275 




3 


119 








4 










5 


6,436 


1,173 


1,020 


< 14,254 


12,000 


2,254 









3 Includes report of Davis Child's Shelter. 



* Includes report of Receiving Home. 



174 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CAKE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



ALABAMA. 
BmMINGHAM: 

Mercy Home 

2130 Eleventh Ave. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

109 South Twentieth St. 
Salvation Army Rescue Home 

Thirty-third St. and Avenue E. 
Cullman; 

.\labama Odd Fellows' Home 

R. D. 5. 
Mobile: 

Benevolent Home 

993 (iovernment St. 
Colored Old Folks and Orphans' Home . . 

Springfield Ave. and Mobile St. 

Home for the Aged 

Monterey St. 
Martha Home 

Adams St. 

Salvation Armv Industrial Home 

400 St. Louis Ave. 
Montgomert: 

Salvation Armv Industrial Home 

317 Whitman St. 
Mountain Creek: 

Confederate Soldiers' Home of Alabama. . 

ARIZONA. 
PnoENix: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

Frescott: 

Home for Aged and Infiim Pioneers* 

ARKANSAS. 
Batesville: 

Odd Fellows' Home 

Hot Springs: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

115 Crescent St. 

House of the Good Shepherd 

11*25 Malvern .Vve. 

Sunshine Home ^ 

Whittington Ave. 
Little Rock: 

Adeline M. Smith Industrial Home 

1101 IzMd St. 
M. W. Gibhs Old Ladies' Home 

2900 Center St. 
Florence Crittenton Home 

3600 West Eleventh St. 
Sweet Home: 

Confederate Home 

CALIFORNIA. 

CHULA VLiiTA: 

Fredericka Home for the Aged 

429 Timken Building, San Diego. 
Decoto: 

Decoto Masonic House 

Evergreen: 

Woman 's Relief Corps Home 

R. D. 5, Box 39 (San Jose P. O.). 

Los Angeles: 

Door of Hope 

116 West Twentv-flfth St. 
Florence Crittenton Home 

1632 Santee St. 
Hollenbeck Home 

573 South Boyle Ave. 
Home for the Aged 

2700 Fast First St. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

1312 Arlington St. 
Mercy Home 

West Washington St. , R. D. 7, Box 148, 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

127 Wilmington St. 
Salvation Armv Rescue Home 

"2670 North "GrilBn Ave. 

1 Not reported. 

' No rule against admission. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union. 
Salvation Army 



Salvation Army. 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Mobile Female Benevolent 

Society. 
Private association 



Little Sisters of the Poor. . . 
Trinity Parish (Episcopal). 
Salvation Army 



Salvation Army... 
State of Alabama. 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 



State of Arizona. 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Sisters of the Good Shepherd. 



International Sunshine So- 
ciety. 

Woman's Home Missionary 

Society, M. E. Church. 
Private corporation 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 



State of Arkansas. 



Private corporation . 



Masonic Grand Lod.ge of 
California. 

Woman's Relief Corps 



Private corporation 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Private organization 



Little Sisters of the Poor 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd - 

Sisters of Mercy 

Salvation Army 

Salvation Army 



Class of inmates received. 



Aged women and orphans 

Homeless unemployed men. . 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Odd Fellows, their widows 
and orphans. 

.\ged and needy women 



Homeless aged persons, de- 
linquent children, and or- 
phans. 

Aged poor persons 



Homeless families* 

Homeless unemployed men . 

Homeless unemployed men . 



Confederate veterans and 
their wives. 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 



.\ged pioneers. , 



Widows and orphans of Odd 
Fellows. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Homeless or fallen women 
and dejstitute or delinquent 
children. 

Aged women and children 



Young girls 

Homeless aged women 

Fallen girls and their infants . 



Confederate veterans, their 
wives and widows. 



,\ged men and women. 



Masons, and Masons' widows 



Mothers, sisters, widows, 
wives, and daughters of 
Civil War veterans. 

Needy women and their chil- 
dren. 

Fallon women and deserted 
children. 

Deserving aged persons 

Destitute aged men and 

women. 
Fallen girls 



Aged men and women 

Homeless unemployed men. 
Fallen women and children. 



1892 
1907 

l'.lil5 

1909 

1827 
1904 

1901 

1880 
190S 

1910 

1903 

1S97 
1911 

1898 



1905 
19 OS 

1898 



1884 
1831 
1903 

1890 

1909 

1898 
1887 

1902 
1890 
1890 
1905 
19U4 
1890 
1902 
1899 



(') 



sm 



(') 



(■•) 



81.7 



No. 

(=) 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

(■) 
No. 

m 

No. 



No. 

No. 
No. 



(«) 

(«) 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 

m 

Yes. 



inmates eeceivei> 
during year. 



168 
155 
115 

20 



(') 



(') 



(') 



19 
3 

115 
40 
19 
46 
25 
9 
37 
85 



(') 



155 



(') 



(') 



25 



3 Equipment. 

< Home consists of rent-free tenements. 



^ .Vccording to ability to pay. 
« Not opened until 1911. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



176 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 


VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 




Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Derived from — 


Total. 


For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land , 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


In- 
vested 
funds. 


1-^ 

<0 

B 

D 

1 
1 


3 

o 

1 
34 

18 

4 

14 
6 

(') 
6 
19 

12 

78 




_2 

s 

1 


Is 

03 C 

as. 

I- Q^ 

1 


as 

a& 


S . 


13 

o 

H 

95 


1 


-2 

a 


g-g 

o 


3 

a- a, 

r 


□ 

a 


Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources. 


34 

1 

(') 
3 
19 

12 

73 


95 


90 




5 


S5,607 
13,282 
2,342 

13, 587 

3,300 
318 

(') 
1') 
5,970 

102 

15,812 

(■) 


$2,680 


$2,624 




$303 
13,282 

3,000 

2,600 
103 

(') 
(') 
5,970 

102 

787 


$6,326 
11,491 
2,606 

12,000 

3,285 
432 

(') 

5,871 
1,051 
15,126 

(■) 


$5,126 
11,491 
2,506 

10,000 

3,285 
357 

(') 
(') 
5,871 

1,051 

15,126 

(■) 


$200 

2,000 

75 

(') 
(') 

(■) 


$27,000 

3 1,891 

6,500 

100,00(1 

30,000 
11,000 

(') 

6, 600 
' 1, 1.62 

3 643 

60,000 

12,000 


$25,000 

3 1,891 

6,5(X) 

100,00(1 


$2,000 


1 


34 




2 


18 
3 

14 

6 

(') 
3 




IS 


17 

77 


45 


17 

32 


77 


17 




1,312 


■ 443 

10,000 

700 
215 

(') 
(') 


$.587 
587 

(') 
(') 




3 


4 

14 

C 

(') 






4 












30,000 
11,000 




5 






3 
(') 


2 

(') 
3 


1 

(') 
3 


1 


1 

(') 




1 






6 


(■) 
6 
19 

12 


(') 




(') 

6,500 
3 1,152 

3 043 

60,000 

12,0011 


(') 


7 
8 




n 




























10 


5 
(>) 


78 
















15.025 








11 




(') 


(') 


(') 


(■) 


(') 






(') 


(') 




1 














2 


6 

8 
10 




6 

8 
10 


6 






12* 

6 
25 


55 
3 


68 

3 
25 


12! 
20 






22,000 

900 
5,585 




22.000 

500 
2,227 






19,000 

900 
4,951 


18,500 

900 
3,795 


500 
1,156 


176,000 

4,509 
18,000 


175,000 

4,500 
18,000 




1 




8 
3 


C 


5 




200 
732 


200 
2,626 




2 


1 


6 






3 






4 


98 
3 

8 

80 

34 
95 
18 

8 
47 
112 
145 
78 
66 
29 
21 


66 

15 
62 

19 
(■) 

38 
29 


98 
3 

S 

14 

19 
33 
18 

8 
47 
93 
(') 
78 
28 


3 


98 
















4,445 
300 
724 

30, 000 

8.635 

» 51, 125 

4.770 

1,949 
6,720 
42,618 
(') 

17,272 
19.720 
24,533 
3,659 




2,074 
150 
259 


2.371 
100 
165 


50 


4,446 

500 

1,200 

28,000 

9,347 
27,669 
5.170 

1,944 
3,577 
25,000 

(n 

16, 887 

18,206 

20,945 

3.619 


4,445 

500 

1,200 

28,000 

7,288 
27,669 
4,970 

1,944 
3,428 


2,059 
200 


16,000 
3,000 
8,000 

50,000 

31,200 

257,000 

22,422 


15,000 
3,000 
8,000 

50,000 

23,300 

257,000 

22,422 




5 




















6 




8 


4 


3 


I 


4 






300 
30,000 






SO 

34 
96 
18 










S 


















7,246 

61,125 

1,839 

796 
3,125 




1,389 


7,900 


1 




















2 


















1,263 


1.153 

562 

3.683 

13.513 


1,668 

38,935 

(') 
10.572 

4.636 

24.533 

025 




3 


8 


47 


8 
53 


3 


5 




3 
53 


5 






4 


1,033 


140 


16,000 
1,000,000 
(1) 

100,000 
"100,000 
119,049 
(>) 


16,000 

(') 

C) 
100,000 

50,000 
119,049 

(') 




5 


112 




25,000 - 


(') 


fi 


(') 


78 
















(■) 

6.300 

1..571 


(') 

15,887 
18,206 
20,800 
3,619 


1,000 
145 


7 














400 




S 


66 
















50,000 


9 


29 


















in 


21 




21 


22 


(') 


(') 


10 


4 


>j 


903 


1,354 


477 


(') 


11 






1 - 





' Closed temporarily. 
8 Colored only. 



9 Includes receipts for San Gabriel Masonic Uome. 

10 Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 



1' Includes value of Home of the Guardian Angel. 



176 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



CALIFORNIA— Continued. 

Oakland: 

Federation Woodyard and Men's Home 

360 SLxth St. 
German Old People's Home of San Fran- 
cisco. 
Home for Aged and Infirm Colored People... 

5245 Harrison ,\ve., R.D.I, Box 225. 
King's Daughters' Home for Incurables 

3900 Broadway. 
Old Ladies' Home 

393 Forty-fifth St. 
Our Lady's Home 

1810 Thirty-fourth Ave. 
Salvation .\rmy Industrial Home 

831 Weljster St. 
Salvation Army Rescue Home 

R. D. 1, Bo.x 224. 
Chabot School of Domestic .'Vrts 

66 Si.\th St. 
Pacific Grove: 

John Tennant Memorial Home 

Forest Ave. 
Sacramento: 

Marguerite Home 

1617 Seventh St. 
Mater Misericordife Home 

Twenty-third St. between Q and R Sts. 
Peniel Rescue Home 

1510 Third St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

920 Fifth St. 
San Diero: 

Helping Hand Home 

Fifteenth and .T Sts. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

940 Third St. 
San Francisco: 

Chinese Mission Home 

920 Sacramento St. 
Ellen Starl^ Ford Home 

2025 Pine St. 
Florence Crittenton Home 

344 Twentieth Ave. 
Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 

Howard and Twenty-first Sts. 
Home for the Aged 

Lake St. and Fourth Ave. 
Home for Aged and Infirm Lsraelites 

Silver Ave. and Mission St. 
Old People's Home 

2501 Pine St. 
Oriental Home for Chinese Girls 

940 Washington St." 
Protestant Episcopal Old Ladies' Home 

2158 Golden Gate Ave. 
St. Catherine's Home and Training School. . 

901 Fotrero Ave. 
St. Joseph's Home for the Aged and Infirm.. 

Buena Vista Ave. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

1271 Mission St. 
San Francisco Home for Inciu-ables 

1442 Fulton St. 
San Francisco Ladies' Protection and Relief 
Society Home. 

1200 Geary Place. 
University Mound Old Ladies' Home 

University and Bacon Sts. 
San Jose: 

Florence Crittenton Rescue Home 

942 Park Ave. 
Pratt Home and Sheltering Arms 

First and Humboldt Sts. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

573 South Market .'^t. 
Santa Monica: 

National Home for Disabled Volunteer Sol- 
diers. 

Soldiers' Home P. O. 
Stockton: 

St. Joseph's Home 

North CaUfomia St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Associated Charities. 
Private corporation. . 
Private corporation. . 
King's Daughters 



Ladies' Relief Society of 

Oakland. 
Sisters of Mercy 



Salvation Army.. 
Salvation Army. 



Tmsteesof Anthony Chabot 
Endowment. 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 



Private organization 

Sisters of Mercy 

Peniel Missionary Society. 
Salvation Army 



Private corporation. 
Salvation .\rmy 



Presbyterian Church, U.S. A. 

Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, M. E. Church. 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Private corporation 



Little Sisters of the Poor — 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asy- 
lum and Home Society. 
Private corporation 



Women's Home Missionary 
Society, M. E. Church. 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 

Sisters of Mercy 



Franciscan Sisters of the 

Sacred Heart. 
Salvation .\rmy 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation. 



Private corporation . 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Private organization 



Salvation .^rmy 

V. S. Government. 



Sisters of St. Dominic. 



Class of inmates received. 



' Not reported. 

3 For monthly patients only. 

3 Included in report of Children's Home. 

* Includes report of Children's Home. 

6 Average ma.ximum and minimum amounts. 



Homeless imemployed men . . 

Aged men and women 

Aged men and women 

Noncontagious incurables 

Aged women 

Aged men and women 

Homeless unemployed men . . 

Fallen women and their chil- 
dren. 
Unemployed women and girls . 

Aged men and women 



Homeless gentlewomen.. 
Aged men and women. . 



Destitute or fallen women 

and girls, and their infants. 

Homeless unemployed men . . 



Destitute women and children 
Homeless unemployed men . . 

Chinese and Japanese slave 

and homeless girls. 
Needy Japanese and Korean 

women and children. 
Fallen women and girls 



Aged men and women 

Destitute aged persons 

Aged and infirm Hebrews 

Aged men and women 



Chinese dependent women, 

orphan and slave girls. 
Aged Episcopalian women. . , 

Delinquent, dependent girls, 

and inebriate women. 
Aged men and women 



Homeless unemployed men . . 

Aged convalescents and non- 
contagious incurables. 

Needy women, orphan and 
homeless children. 

.\ged women 



Fallen women and girls 

.A.ged women 

Homeless unemployed men. . 



Disabled volunteer soldiers 
and sailors. 



Aged men.. 



1910 
1890 
1892 
1897 
1870 
1870 
1903 
1892 
1887 

1895 

1884 
1895 
1899 
1906 

1894 
1909 

1873 
1902 
1889 
1889 
1901 
1871 
1873 
1870 



1904 
1907 
1853 

1SS4 

1903 

1905 
1865 

1899 



$2,000 

500 

2,000 

1,250 



S893 

(') 

(») 



(") 



1,500 



1,120 

m 



(19) 



a 



$10.00 



(') 



■6.25 



(') 



(») 



l»75.00 
' 1.8S 
(») 



(15) 



9.00 

m 



(') 



Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 

m 

Yes. 
Yes. 

(«) 

No. 

(') 
Yes. 

(«) 

Yes. 

m 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 
(«) 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
(=) 
(") 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
(') 
(') 

Yes. 
No. 



^ No rule against admission. 

' Equipment. 

"* -\ccording to ability to pay. 

9 Confinement fee, if able. 

10 Per year; no weekly charge. 



(') 



inmates received 
during year. 



10,000 

19 

I 



(■) 
1 
11 
110 
95 
83 

(') 

1 
(') 
155 
21 

(') 
1 

20 
20 
42 

3 
96 

8 
184 

6 

1 
I 

(18) 

168 
50 
90 

1 

43 

95 
715 



10,000 



(■) 



5 
110 



(') 



(') 



(') 



(U) 
168 
22 
59 



95 
715 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



177 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 




RECEIPTS DUBING 


TEAR. 




PAYMENTS DURING 


YEAR. 


VALtJE or PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 






Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Derived from— 


Total. 


For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
huUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


In- 
vested 
funds. 


1 


o 


9 

3 


S 




IS 

o c 
45 


a 
P 
II 


o 




•a 

i 


Is 
e-p. 

o 


2 


a 

D 
C 
.S 
« 




Ap"pro- 

pri- 
ations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources. 


a 
1 


45 
96 
11 
72 
25 
90 
15 
22 
19 

8 

10 
(■) 
14 
5 

(') 
4 

S2 
9 
11 
21 

"307 

36 

163 

3 

31 

40 

100 

33 

20 

3 

22 

S 
0) 
4 

2,199 
27 


45 
41 

24 

40 
15 

2 

0) 

5 

4 

15 
153 
20 
52 

51 

33 

8 

(■) 
4 

2,199 
27 


$3,800 

52,588 
1,659 

69.404 
< 21.901 

(') 

13.164 
4,217 
5,299 

2.500 

4,924 
0) 

3,718 
3,750 

6,100 
4,464 

7,103 
4,500 
3,933 

16,156 

(') 

(13) 

55,500 

4,993 

13,529 

24,066 

(16) 

27,225 
13,551 
13,064 

6,015 

1,362 

3,823 
396,262 

m 




$976 
4,644 
1,059 
42,000 
3,052 
(') 


$1,437 
43,010 

27.404 
5,327 
(') 


$1,387 

4.934 

600 

10, 430 

(') 

13, 164 
132 

4.870 

1.500 

4,412 
(>) 

239 
3,750 

5,000 
4,464 

273 
11,231 
(') 

(13) 

10,000 


$3,800 

27,008 
1,640 

27,404 
< 22, 135 

(') 

12.203 
4.127 
3.467 

2.500 

6,725 
(') 

3,612 
3,570 

6,100 
4,672 

6,804 
4,600 
4,136 
55,118 
(') 

20,748 
52,000 
4,267 
10,046 
31,175 

(16) 

24,485 
11, 137 
25,775 

5,338 

1,413 

(■) 
3,794 

391,550 

(20) 


$3,577 

18,878 

C) 

27,404 

20,063 

(') 

12,203 
3.577 
3.467 

2,500 

6,726 
{■) 

3,263 
3,570 

6,100 
4,063 

6,804 
4,500 
4,136 
8,540 

0) 

12,578 

47,000 
4,267 
8,171 

(') 

(16) 

24,133 
11,073 
23,926 

5,338 

1,235 

3,426 
383,309 

(20) 


$223 
8,130 
(') 

2,072 
« 

550 



(') 
349 

609 

46,578 
(') 

8,170 
6,000 

1,874 
(■) 

(16) 

352 

64 

1,849 

178 
(') 
368 

8,241 

(20) 


$250 
222,750 
11,042 
45,000 
(') 
W 

'2,765 
7,500 
89,000 

31,500 

105,033 
(■) 

20,257 
'667 

10,000 
61,262 

65,000 

15,000 

10,000 

64,789 

(■) 

20,310 

405,000 
18,000 
43,000 

160,000 

(16) 

24,602 

15,109 

333,690 

100,000 

20,000 

'1,046 
1,648,460 

(20) 


$250 

150,000 

9,000 

45,000 

« 35, 000 

(■) 

'2,765 
7,600 
9.000 

15,000 

38,840 
(') 

20,000 
'567 

10,000 
51,252 

65,000 

15,000 

10,000 

53,578 

(■) 

20,310 

225,000 
18,000 
23,000 

160,000 

(16) 

24,502 




12 


55 
11 
48 
25 
50 


96 
11 

72 
25 
90 


















r2,750 
2,042 


13 




















14 






1 


1 


(=) 


1 








15 






(') 


(') 


$3,092 


(•) 


16 






17 


15 




















18 


22 
19 

6 

10 

(>) 

14 




22 


15 


9 


6 




15 




500 


2,051 


1.534 
429 

1,000 

612 
(■) 
1,619 




19 


8 
10 


19 


80,000 

16,500 

66,193 
(') 
257 


20 




















21 






















22 


(•) 


14 


0) 
11 


2 


9 


11 


(•) 


(') 


324 


(•) 
1,536 


23 
24 




5 

(') 
4 

52 
9 






25 


(') 


(') 




30 


12 


18 


30 






700 


400 






26 








27 


52 
9 
11 
6 
154 
16 
111 
3 
31 
40 
49 





11 


17 
24 

8 


1 
3 


17 

23 

5 


17 
24 








6,903 
4,000 
777 
4,925 
(') 

(13) 

7,600 

4,993 

11,077 

1,046 

(.6) 


200 

500 

1,582 

38,000 




28 










29 


8 




1,301 




30 


21 
307 

36 
163 

31 
14 
100 




11,211 

(') 

(13) 

180,000 


31 




















32 


















(13) 


33 


















34 


3 




37 




37 


37 








.35 








1,705 
22,888 

(■«) 


747 

(,») 

27,225 
7,413 
3,909 

4,909 

509 

3,823 
10,562 


20,000 


36 




26 


184 





184 


110 




74 


132 


37 




38 


33 




















39 


12 

3 

22 

5 


20 

3 

22 


















1,328 
372 

10b 

666 
0) 


4,810 
4,458 

1,000 

78 
(■) 


15, 109 
106,460 

60,000 


40 






117 


56 


61 


115 




2 


4,325 


227,230 

40,000 

20 000 
(■) 
' 1,046 

1,648,460 

(20) 


41 






42 




5 














109 


4.1 


(') 


4 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


44 

4S 




2,199 
27 
















■» 385, 700 








4(1 




















(20) 




47 


* 

























u VariGS, 

" Segregation estimated. 

" Iniluded in report of Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum. 

" Formerlv 1918 Universitv Ave., Berkeley. 

" From $5 to $15 per month. 



" Included in report of St. Joseph's Hospital, San Francisco. 

" Indeterminate. 

18 From U. .'^. Government. 

»• From $1,000 to $2,000 according to age. • 

" Included in report of St. Joseph's Hospital, Stockton. 



9531°— 13- 



-12 



178 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OP ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



CALIFORNIA— Continued. 



Thermauto: 

Odd Fellows' Home of California. 



YOUNTVILLE: 

Veterans' Home of California. 
Veterans' Home P. O. 

COLORADO. 



Colorado Springs: 

Salvation Army Industrial Home. 

120 East Huerfano St. 
Union Printers' Home 



Denver: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

4901 West Colfax ave. 

House of the CJood Shepherd 

South Cherokee St. and West Cedar Ave. 

Oakes Home ^ 

2825 West Thirty-second St. 

Old Ladies' Home." 

West Thirty-eighth Ave. and Quitman 
St. 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

1356 Larimer St. 
Monte Vista: 

Colorado Soldiers' and Sailors' Home 

PtJEBLO: 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

110 West D St. 

CONNECTICUT. 
Bridgeport; 

Burroughs Home 

Fairfield Ave. and Ellsworth St. 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

515 Housatonic Ave. 

Sterling Widows' Home 

351 Prospect St. 
Darien: 

Fitch's Home for Soldiers 

Noroton Heights P. O. 
Gboton: 

Odd Fellows' Home of Connecticut 



Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 
Private corporation 



Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Hartford Hospital 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 

Private corporation 



Hahtfoed: 

Church Home of Hartford 

123 Retreat Ave. 
Hebrew Ladies Old People's Home 

33 Wooster St. 
House of the Good Shepherd , 

170 Sisson .\ve. 
Old People's Home 

36 Jeflerson St. 
Open Hear th 

73 Grove St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

33 Spruce St. 
Shelter for Women 

76 Temple St. 
Widows' Home '^ 

133 Market St. 
Widows' Home of Farmlngton Avenue Con- 
gregational Church. 

210 Windsor Ave. 
Widows' Home of Park Congregational 
Church. 

216 Windsor Ave. 
Woman's Aid Society Home 

1 Pavilion St. 
Meeiden: 

Curtis Home 

380 Crown St. 

MiDDLETOWN; 

St. Luke's Home for -\ged and Destitute 
Women. 
Pearl St. 
New Britain: 

Erwin Home South Congregational Church 

Bassett and Ellis Sts. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

State of California 



Salvation Army 

International Typographical 
Union. 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Episcopal Diocese of Colo- 
rado. 

Ladies' Relief Society of 
Denver. 



Salvation Army. 



State of Colorado. 
Salvation Army.. 



Private corporation , 
Salvation Army 



Bridgeport Protestant Wid- 
ows' Society. 

Soldiers' Hospital Board of 
Connecticut. 

Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 
Private corporation 



Private corporation 

Woman's Aid Society of 
Hartford. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 



Class of inmates received. 



Odd Fellows, their wives, 
widows, and Rebekahs. 

Honorably discharged U. S. 
veterans. 



Homeless unemployed men. 

Aged, indigent, and sick 
union printers. 

Fallen girls and their infants. 

Wayward girls and depen- 
dent children. 
Consumptives 



Aged and destitute women. . . 
Homeless unemployed men . . 



Aged soldiers 

Homeless unemployed men. 



Indigent single women 

Homeless unemployed men. 
Needy widows 



Veterans. 



Odd Fellows, their wives and 
widows. 



Aged women 

Indigent aged Hebrews . 



Erring and dependent girls, 

and female inebriates. 
Aged men and women 



Homeless men, inebriates, 

and discharged prisoners. 
Homeless unemployed men. . 

Wayward girls, unemployed 

wbmen^ and children. 
Aged Episcopalian women. . 

Elderly deserving widows. . . 



Destitute widows. 



Friendless and fallen women. . 



Destitute aged women and 
needy children. 

Destitute and aged women. . 



Needy self-supporting women 



1895 
18S4 



l')05 
1892 

1893 
1883 
1894 
1874 

1900 

1889 
1905 

1904 
1907 
1883 

1887 

1892 

1876 
1903 
1902 
1873 
1889 
1903 
1891 
1854 
1867 

1867 



« 



S450 



1,000 



(') 
'SI. 63 
'16.00 

(') 



2.45 

(13) 

.50 
.50 



4.0O 
11 1.60 



No. 
Yes. 



Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

(') 
Yes. 

m 



No. 

m 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
(') 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 



1 Includes $305,859 from U. S. Government. 

a No rule against admission. 

' Equipment. 

* Not reported. 

6 Confinement fee, if able. 

B For court cases, S15 per month. 

' Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 

8 Includes report of Oakes Home, Heart ease, and Adams Memorial Home. 



100 



INMATES RECEIVED 
DtmiNO YEAR. 



437 



7 
83 

301 

244 

610 

10 



115 
11 



63 
1 

226 

8 



(') 

S 

22,424 

111 

315 

2 

1 

2 

28 

5 

1 



25 
437 



(<) 



260 



116 
11 



226 



(') 



3 
22,424 
11 



GENERAL TABLES. 



179 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued . 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 


RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING 


YEAR. 


VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLO.SE OF YEAR. 




Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Derived from— 


Total. 


For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 

im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


In- 
vested 
funds. 


E 
a 
1 

1 


1 


S 


■a 
a 


11 


~ c 

as 


e a 


O 


1 


6 

■3 

a 


II 

£.0. 
O 


.a 

i ■ 

ID QJ 


a 

P 


Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources. 


140 

979 

2 
122 

47 
110 
142 

68 

19 

220 

1 

23 

18 
29 

601 

30 

16 

9 

129 

66 
86 
25 
9 
24 
12 

12 

8 

29 

12 

27 


110 
979 

2 
122 

65 

19 

220 
1 

18 

501 
24 

3 

12 
86 
25 


30 

47 
110 
77 
68 


140 

979 

89 










$37,404 
1225,859 

1,850 
122,293 

8,015 
15, 198 
76,283 
11,427 

10,463 

1»62,000 
1,783 

10. 173 
7,056 
7,381 

131,609 

11,227 

7,198 

6,525 

20,119 

38,970 

12,810 

13,839 

2,729 

19,312 

488 

618 

853 

3,142 
2,220 




$37,404 






$35,351 
225,859 

1,733 
103,367 

10,436 
16,203 
93,426 
12,045 

9,966 

52,000 
1,665 

7,512 
8,885 
7,381 

131,505 

12, .W 

5,230 

7,517 

18,732 

21, 105 

12,. 596 

10,742 

2,395 

24, 165 

434 

240 

2,939 

(') 

2,917 

2,421 


-526,664 
205,859 

1,521 
(') 

8,740 
14,083 
93,426 
11,235 

9,715 

52,000 
1,463 

7,512 
8,885 
7,381 

130,562 

7,557 

4,378 

2,339 

16,297 

20,079 

12,596 

10, 742 

2,395 

1,005 

177 

240 

2,939 

(■) 

2,917 

2,421 


$8,787 
20,000 

212 

(<) 

1,696 
2,120 

810 
251 

212 

943 
5.000 

852 
5,178 
2,435 

486 

23,160 
257 


$50,000 
462,495 

M62 
1,000,000 

35,000 
100,000 
350,000 

85,000 

1,594 

175,000 
544 

208,241 
s 1,669 
119,053 

293,936 

82,816 

52,913 
11,600 
153,144 

67,859 
3 2,765 
7,000 
50,000 
14,000 

12,399 

2,054 

W 

41,757 

80,000 


$.50,000 
462,495 

3 462 

1,000,000 

35,000 
100,000 
350,000 

25,000 

1,694 

175,000 
544 

50,950 
3 1,669 
42,207 

257,336 

45.000 

(<) 

11,500 
153,144 
(') 

47,000 
3 2,765 
7,000 
50,000 
10,000 

6,000 




48 


















18225,859 








49 


2 
33 




















$1,850 




1 


















122,293 

3,810 
6,475 






? 


47 
110 


49 

168 


(') 


168 


49 
168 








$4,205 

4,628 

65,413 

5,560 


6,095 
10, 870 
3,009 

10,463 




3 














4 


41 


142 

27 

19 










5 
















2,741 


117 


$60,000 


A 


















.... 


220 
















i» 52,000 








S 


1 

1 

18 
9 

6 




















1,783 

7,926 
7.056 
4.554 

1,C«9 

8,177 

1,633 

3,683 
15,359 
10,500 
13,839 

7,112 

488 

271 
853 
(') 
825 

1,687 




9 


23 


22 




















2.247 


157,291 


1 




















? 


29 

6 

16 

6 

129 

54 


20 

490 

30 

16 
9 


















2,257 


570 


76,846 
36,600 
37,810 
(<) 


3 
















130,000 


4 
















46 

1,599 
6,268 

11,225 
2,316 


3,004 

3,966 

257 

1,009 

12,386 






















fi 




















7 




129 


12 




12 


12 






15,427 




8 


66 








2.89,671 
20,859 


9 


86 
25 
3 


















10 






















11 


9 
24 
12 

12 

8 

29 

12 

27 


24 
12 

12 


6 


3 

1 


2 


1 
1 


1 


2 

1 






2,542 
11,150 


187 
1,050 




12 






13 








4.000 
6,399 
2,054 

W 

22,674 

34,000 


14 






















247 


1.5 




8 


















16 


29 
12 




28 


9 


19 


28 










1,809 
533 


19,183 
46,000 


17 












508 


IS 


27 


















19 























' Boarders only; $15 to $20 per month. 
i» Include": $20,000 from U. S. Government. 

11 Per month; no weekly charge. 

12 Includes report of Widows' Home, 133 Market St.: Widows' Home, 13 South Hudson St.: Geo. Beach Home, 184 Welhersfleld Ave., and Kelsey Memorial, 193 
Wethersfleld Ave. 

I'' From $2 to $12 per month. 
" According to abUity to pay. 



180 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



CONNECTICUT— Continued. 

New Haven: 

First Church Home 

125 Wall St. 
Florence Crittenton Mission 

432 Oak St. 
Home for 1 he Aged 

238 Wiiithrop Ave. 
Home (or the Friendless 

118 Clinton Ave. 
St. Paul's Church Home for Aged Women. 

600 Chapel St. 
Salvation Armv Industrial Home 

362 Exchange St. 
Trinity Church Home 

406 Oak St. 
New London: 

Smith Memorial Home 

29 Masonic St. 
Noewtch: 

Eliza Htmtington Memorial Home 

99 Washington St. 

Johnson Home 

100 Town St. 

Sheltering Arms 

Harland Road. 
Stamford: 

St. John's Chujch House 

Woodland Ave. and Pacific St. 

WALLraCFORD; 

Masonic Home 



Waterburt: 

Salvation A rm v Industrial Home 

212 Meadow St. 
Southmayd Home 

885 North Main St. 
West Hartford: 

St. Mary's Home for the Aged 

Albany Ave. and Steele St. 

DELAWARE. 
Dover: 

Palmer Home 

American Ave. 
Wilmington: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

506 West Fifth St. 
Home for Aged Women 

1109 Gilpin Ave. 
Home for the Aged 

4 Grant Ave. 
Home of Merciful Rest 

Levering Ave. and Union St. 
Layton Home for Colored Persons 

Thirty-fifth and Market Sts. 
Minquadale Home 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

Second and French Sts. 
Sarah Ann White Home 

822 French St. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

Washington: 

Aged Woman's Home 

1225 Wisconsin Ave. 
Baptist Home 

3248 N St. NW. 
Bruen Home 

3300 St. NW. 
Christian and Eleanors Ruppert Home 

Anacostia (Good Hope Road). 
Edes Home 

Thirtieth and N Sts. NW. 
Epiphany Church Home 

1221 Massachusetts .\ve. 
Florence Crittenton Hope and Help Mission 

218 Third St. NW. 
Good Samaritan Home 

1617 L St. NW. 
Home for the Aged 

Third and H Sts. NE. 
House of Mercy 

Klingle Road and Rosemont Ave. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

Thirty-si.xth and Reser^■oir Sts. 

> Not reported. 

2 According to ability to pay. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private corporation (Congre- 
gational)^ 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Little Sisters of the Poor 



Private corporation 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 

Salvation Army 

Trinity Chiu-ch (Episcopal) 



Private corporation. 

Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 
United Workers 



St. John's Chtu-ch (Episco- 
pal). 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 
Coimecticut. 



Salvation Army 

Private corporation. 

Sisters of Mercy 



King's Daughters . 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Private corporation 



Little Sisters of the Poor. . 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 

Private corporation 



Class of inmates received. 



Union Benevolent Society . . 
Private corpora tion( Baptist) 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Epiphany Church 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Society of St. Vincent de 
Paul. 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Sisters of the Good Shepherd. 



Destitute aged women 

Fallen girls 

Destitute aged persons 

Aged women and homeless 

girls. 
.\ged Episcopalian women. . 

Homeless unemployed men . , 

Impoverished women 



Indigent aged women . 



Indigent gentlewomen 

Aged and needy women... 
Sick, aged, and infirm women. 

Aged w'omen and orphans.. 

Masons and their families . , , 



Homeless unemployed men . . 

Homeless, aged, and disabled 
women. 

Worthy aged men and women 



Aged men and women . 



Fallen, destitute, or homeless 

women. 
Destitute aged women 



Destitute aged persons . 



Noncontagious incurables (fe- 
males). 
Aged men and women 



Dependent aged couples and 

men. 
Homeless imemploy ed men . . . 

Blind and aged men and wo- 
men. 



Destitute aged women . . . 
Aged and infirm women. 



Homeless mothers and chil- 
dren. 
-\ged men and women 



-Vged and indigent widows . 
Needy aged women 



F.illen women and depend- 
ent children. 

Temporarily dependent men 
and wayward boys. 

Destitute" aged men and wo- 
men. 

Fallen girls and their infants . . 

Erring women and girls, and 
dehnquent cliildren. 



1868 
1901 
1901 
1867 
1903 
1900 
1862 

1881 

1872 
1905 
1877 

1882 

1889 

1898 
1898 



1907 

1883 
1865 
1903 
1901 
1894 
1891 
1905 
1894 



1868 
1880 
1896 
1897 
1906 
1858 
1888 
1895 
1871 



$100 

500 
500 



1,500 



300 



8 275 



300 
150 
(') 



(») 



54.00 



200 



(10) 



m 



5.00 



m 



2.00 



No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

m 
P) 



No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 
(») 
(») 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 



(') 



(■) 



INMATES RECEIVED 
DURING TEAR. 



332 
2 



12 

25 

123 
1 



(') 



0) 
(■) 



5 

5 

609 

419 

58 

14 

49 



15 
123 



C) 



(0 



(') 



76 
419 



' No rule against admission. 
« Equipment. 



6 Confinement fee. S25 if able. 

8 Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



181 





INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF TEAK. 




RECEIPTS 


DXTRING TEAR. 


1 


PATMENTS DURINQ TEAR. 


VALUE OF PROPERTT AT 
CLOSE OF TEAR. 




Adults. 




Children. 


Total. 


Derived from — 


Total. 


For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


In- 
vested 
funds. 


1 

g 


3 

a 




a 

&< 

10 
20 
90 
44 
12 


is 

10 


o C 

II 




3 





"3 
S 







a 

3 

a 




Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources. 


3 

d 

1 

1 


10 
20 
159 
44 
12 
31 
7 

14 

9 
11 
14 

1 

94 

17 

7 

169 

19 

13 

34 
89 
10 

22 
17 
16 
15 

12 
20 


69 
31 

43 
17 

50 

2 

41 

6 
17 
16 

3 




S3, 457 
4,349 

12,811 
8,050 

(•) 

12,121 
3,174 

9,500 

3,242 
7,390 
3,035 

5,111 

27. 198 

6,613 
3,126 

31,602 

2,149 

2,100 
4,995 
6,239 
12,688 

870 
2,985 
6,795 

901 

(') 
7,221 

12,191 
6,653 

10,186 
6,610 

11,611 
1,333 
7,997 
5,177 

12,211 


$2,809 


$7.50 

1,068 

12,811 

1,274 

(') 


$1,357 
31 


$1,350 
441 


$3,330 
3,503 

16,468 
7,712 

(') 

12,920 
2,498 

9,500 

3,168 
3,583 
5,063 

3,962 

20,434 

7,733 
3,387 

31,602 

2,198 

1,409 
7,300 
3,546 
10,943 
1,700 
3,286 
8,466 
875 

(') 
3,558 

13,190 
6,095 
9,545 
6,651 

11,611 
1,333 

0) 
4,752 

24,587 


$3, ISO 
3,301 

(') 
7,712 

(') 

12,920 
2,498 

(') 

3,168 
3,408 
4,324 

3,962 

18,672 

7,733 
2,684 

31,602 

2,198 

1,121 
7,000 
3,546 
3,358 
1,000 
3,286 
8,466 
816 

(') 
3,558 

13,190 
6,095 
7,245 
6,110 
9,887 
1,189 

(•) 

4,752 
9,213 


$150 
202 
(') 

(') 

175 
739 

1,762 
703 

288 
300 

7,585 
700 

50 

2,300 
540 

1.724 
144 

(■) 

15,374 


$48,270 
12,500 
(') 

124,848 
« 

<3,102 
40,000 

191,428 

80,000 
115,188 
29,010 

(') 

112,332 

*1,803 
29,053 

125,000 

18,000 

8,200 
95,000 
60,235 
18,000 
12,400 
33,644 
<2,191 

6,500 

(■) 

43,600 

(■) 

150, 700 
245,687 
148,894 

55,300 
<650 
8,383 

42,000 

24,824 


$20,000 

10,000 

C) 

35,905 

0) 
<3,102 


$28,270 
2,500 


20 




20 


4 




4 




4 




21 


159 
37 
12 




22 


4 


3 


5 


1 


4 


1 


4 






1.938 


4,838 
(■) 

12, 121 
2,000 

9,500 

3,242 
7,390 
1.012 

2,506 

22,330 

6,613 
830 

1,620 

474 

231 
3,645 


88,883 


23 




24 


31 


















25 


7 

14 

9 
11 
14 

1 

51 


7 

14 

9 
11 
14 

1 

94 


















654 


520 


40,000 

122,300 

70,000 
108,188 
23,010 

14,376 

65,399 


26 




















69,128 

10,000 
7,000 
6,000 

{') 
46,933 

1,803 
20,000 

125,000 

15,000 

8,000 
30,000 
60,235 
18,000 
12,400 
11,894 
< 2, 191 

6,500 

(') 

37,500 
(■) 

60,000 
54,801 
142,824 
55,300 
<650 

(') 

25,000 

24,824 


27 
























28 
























29 




















197 
1,971 
4,868 


1.826 
634 


30 






12 




12 


12 








31 












32 


17 


















33 


7 
119 

17 

13 
34 
48 

10 
16 


7 
169 

19 


















1,196 
125 

510 

1,819 
1,100 
6,239 
12,688 
100 
2, 165 


1,100 
29,857 

1,165 

50 
250 


9,053 


34 




















35 




















3,000 

200 
65,000 


1 




13 


6 


(') 


(') 








, 


2 


34 
89 
10 
22 
17 






3 




















4 


























5 




















150 


620 

820 

6,795 

287 

(') 

1,960 
4,485 
10, 186 
6,240 
5,465 




fi 




















21,750 


7 


16 


















8 


12 

12 
20 


15 

12 
20 


















261 

(') 
575 
725 

2,168 


350 

(') 

6,646 

9,506 




ft 


















(■) 


(') 
6,100 


1 


















2 






120 


(') 


(') 


120 








3 


29 
14 
22 
74 
18 
200 
20 
44 


7 

18 
98 


22 
14 
22 

74 

102 
20 

44 


29 
14 
22 

2 
200 












90,700 

190,886 

6,070 


4 




















5 




















371 
3,646 
1,333 
7,997 
2,612 

728 




A 


74 
15 


1 


37 


10 


27 


18 


19 




2,500 


7 




8 




















17,000 


9 




20 
44 


9 
31 


6 


3 
31 




9 


31 




515 
619 


2,050 
10,261 


10 






603 


11 















' Couples from $350 to $450; men from $200 to $300. 
' Residents, $150; nonresidents, $175. 



• Colored only. 

>o Cooflnement fee, $35 if able. 



182 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— Continued. 



Washington— Continued. 

Jewish Fosler Ilomei 

3213 Q St. NW. 
Lenthall Home for Widows 

Nineteenth and G Sts. NW. 
Louise Home 

1500 M.issachusetts Ave. NW. 
Masonic and Eastern Star Home 

Takoma Park (Sligo Mill Road). 
Methodist Home 

eoi M St. NW. 
Municipal Lodging House 

312 Twelfth St. NW. 
National Colored Home 

Eightli and EucUd Sts. NW. 
National Lutheran Home for the Aged . . 

Langdon. 
Presbyterian Home for the Aged 

1420MSt. NW. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

121 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Temporary Home . 

301 C. St. NW. 
Stoddard Baptist Home 

Hamilton Road. 
United States Soldiers' Home 



Washington Home for Incurables 

S and Thirty-second Sts. NW. 
Woman's Christian Home 

1719 Tliirleenth St. NW. 

FLORIDA. 
Jackson\'ille: 

Confederate Veterans' Home 

Daniel Memorial Orphanage and Home for 
the Friendless. 
1920 Hubbard St. 

Home for the Aged 

Laura and Eighth Sts. 
Pensacola: 

Woman's Home 

1310 North Da\is St. 
Tampa: 

Old People's Home 

Gamson St. 

Woman's Home and Hospital 

105 West Ross Ave. 



GEORGIA. 
Americus: 

Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home. 

Lee St. 
Atlanta: 

Carter Home 

185 West Mitchell St. 
Christian Helpers' League 

53J Decatur St. 
Confederate Soldiers' Home of Georgia . . 

Confederate Ave. 
Florence Crittenton Home 

Simpson St., R. D. 7, Box 99. 
Home for Incurables 

220 South Boulevard. 
Home for Old Women 

01 West End Ave. 
Home for the Friendle.ss 

221) Highland Ave. 
Salvation .'Vrmv Industrial Home 

158 Whitehall St. 
Augusta: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

1272 Druid Park Ave. 
Mary Warren Home for the Aged 

1589 Broad St. 
Tubman Home 

Milledgeville Road, R. D. 2. 
Widows' Home 

124 Greene St. 
Columbus: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

720 Front St. 
Macon: 

Door of Hope 

658 Arch St. 
Home for the Friendless 

266 Maple St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private organization 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 

Trustees of W. W. Corcoran 
Endowment. 

Masonic and Eastern Star 
Orders. 

Methodist Episcopal Church 



District of Columbia . 
Private corporation . . 



General Synod of the Luth- 
eran Church. 

Private corporation (Pres- 
byterian). 

Salvation Army 



U. S. Government. 



Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 
U. S. Government 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation. 



State of Florida 

Private corporation . 

Private corporation . 

Private corporation . 



Private corporation . 



Protestant 
Tampa. 



Class of inmates received. 



churches of 



Grand Lodge of Colored Ma- 
sons. 

Friendship Baptist Church. 

Central Presbyterian Church 

State of Georgia 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
King's Daughters and Sons. 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
King's Daughters 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Board of City Missions (M. 

E. Church, South). 
Private corporation 



1 Not opened unHl 1911. 

2 Per month: no weekly charge. 

3 Not reported. 

1 E.xdusive of proceeds from the institution. 



Mothers and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Dependent Episcopalian 
mdows and children. 

Destitute educated gentle- 
women. 

Masons, their famiUes. East- 
em Starsand their children. 

.Vged members of the church 

Homeless unemployed men ... 
DesHtute women and children 
Aged men and women 



Destitute aged members of 

the church. 
Homeless unemployed men . 

Veterans 



Homeless, aged, and infirm 
persons. 

Discharged soldiers of the reg- 
ular army. 

Incurables 



Transient and self-supporting 
women. 



Confederate veterans 

Friendless women and or- 
phans. 



Impoverished aged persons . 
Homeless women 



Aged and friendless men and 
women. 

Fallen and unemployed wo- 
men, and children. 



Widows and orphans of col- 
ored Masons. 

Needy aged persons 



Inebriates, ex-prisoners, and 

homeless men. 
Confederate veterans 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Incurables 



Impoverished aged women . . , 

Friendless women and chil- 
dren. 
Homeless unemployed men . . , 



Fallen women, and children. 

Dependent aged women 

Impoverished aged persons . . . 

Self-sustaining widows and 
children. 



Fallen women. 



Fallen girls and their infants. 

Friendless women and chil- 
dren. 



1911 
1883 
1871 
1902 
1890 
1893 
1862 
1890 
1906 
1903 
1888 
1901 
1851 
1888 
1870 



1890 
1883 



1888 

1901 
189S 

1900 

1897 
1908 
1901 
1890 
1901 
1905 
1888 
1906 

1907 
1901 
1888 
1871 

1807 

1896 
1893 



S200 



'17, 
200 



2$5. 00 



6 2.00 



(') 



(") 



(») 



2 8.00 



(1!) 

'4.00 



(') 



(13) 



2 5.00 

m 



m 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
(») 
Yes. 

(10) 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 



No. 
No. 



No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

(10) 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

m 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 



inmates eeceived 
diteing tear. 



S =3 



« 



5 Proceeds of woodyard; covered into treasury. 

For those admitted other than through Board of Charities. 
' .Vverage of maximum and minimum amounts. 

6 No rule against admission. 



2 
7 
2 
,5,040 
40 



181 
080 
4 
960 
25 
642 



m 



25 



■15 

m 

21 

960 
34 

126 
51 
25 

262 

198 

40 
3 
1 

e> 

35 
60 



5,040 
19 



(») 



C») 



900 
34 



P) 



P) 



ISl 




080 




2 


2 


960 






(•►12 


25 




(>) 


m 

2 
IE 



GENERAL TABLES. 



183 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Adults. 



S ft 



Children. 



o a 

S o 
frft 
O 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



Dona- 
tions. 



Care of 



Other 

sources. 



PAYMENTS DURINQ YKAR. 



Total. 



For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 



For 
perma- 
nent 

im- 
prove- 
ments. 



VALtTE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



1: 
40 
19 
40 
41 

5 

30 

(') 

38 

21 

9 

1,424 

53 

50 



22 



3 

(») 

38 

21 

2 

1,424 

11 



C») 



5 
30 



22 



1,424 
53 

8 



22 



(') 



(') 



(.') 



(■) 
25 
113 
21 
26 
20 
19 
23 

4 
5 
43 
34 

14 
4 



25 
113 



m 



(.') 



« 



113 



(') 



23 



"76 



34 



5 
11 



(■') 



36 



(.') 



(.'') 



0) 



« 



(=) 



(") 



» Equipment. 
'0 Colored only. 



SI, 600 

6,345 
7,663 
3,850 

11,650 

15, 877 
3,767 

19,222 
5,920 
1,211 
"725,225 

IS, 960 
9,013 



5,000 
2,608 



7,656 
1,051 

4,544 

2,800 

5,537 
25,000 
3,259 
6,333 
1,410 
7,133 
9,354 

475 
4,184 
6,000 

775 

1,565 
980 



$55 
,663 



•83,570 
2,604 



27 

8,287 

665 



5,920 



4,276 
260 



4,500 



1,165 



100 
1,200 



(») 



620 
2,500 
1,740 



25,000 
2,200 
2,692 

(') 

(') 



32 
922 






300 



175 
15 3,624 



{') 



150 

1,565 
500 



$700 



547 



$900 
(■') 
5,743 



8,068 
1, 125 



5 230 

851 

6,465 

3,102 

19,222 



4,955 
8,213 



1,371 
250 

(') 
24 



3,797 



"725,225 

5,013 

650 

500 
1,443 

6,285 

701 

2,700 

300 



900 
1,760 



127 
959 



« 



9,354 



560 



(.') 



5,000 
625 



$1,600 

4,647 
7,663 

3,858 
10, 777 
8,264 

m 

16,875 

5,920 

1,211 

655,923 

18, 266 



4,800 

3,r"- 



4,937 
642 

4,539 

2,800 

5,537 
25,000 
3,320 
6,783 
1,330 
7,602 
9,935 

1,067 

970 

5,400 

1,364 

O 

1,463 
480 



$1,000 

« 
3,500 
7,663 
3,766 
9,887 
8,264 

16,875 
5,920 
531 
390,555 
18,266 
8,338 



3,600 
2,263 



4,937 

592 

(') 
3,949 

2,000 

5,53' 
26,000 
3,156 
6, 7.39 
1,330 
7,602 
9,936 

1,067 
760 

4,800 
764 

(') 

1,447 
480 



$600 
1,14 



102 

890 



(») 



630 
265,368 



648 



1,200 
1,026 



50 



(') 



590 



800 



(■') 



164 
44 



210 
600 
600 



(») 



$30,000 

m 

32,844 

75,000 

20,000 

43, 602 

57,235 

20,000 

9 4,244 

S700 

10,000 

7,320,963 

108,000 

55,000 



25,000 
27,000 



50,000 

5,000 

(') 
16,000 

40,000 

1,000 

m 

10,000 
20,000| 
17,000J 
25,000 
9 1,531 

3,000 

11,604 

132,500 

31,610 

5,000 

8,000 



$30,000 
(.') 
27,000 
75,000 
20,000 
27,602 
19,935 
20,000 
'4,244 
'700 
10,000 
,386,699 

108,000 
45,000 



25,000 
15,000 



50,000 
5,000 

16,000 

40,000 

1,000 

10,000 
20,000 
15,000 
25,000 
9 1,531 

3,000 

4,000 

40,000 

21,000 

6,000 

8,000 



(«) 
$5,644 



16,000 
37,300 



3,434,264 



10,000 



12,000 



(=) 



(») 



2,000 



7,604 
92,500 
10,610 



" Includes deduction from soldiers' pay. 
'> According to ability to pay. 



13 Includes 36 boarders. 

I* Segregation estimated. 

" Exclusive ofdonations otherthan cash. 



184 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III — HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



GEORGIA— Ck)ntinued. 

Macon— Continued. 

Julia Parkman Jones Benevolent Home. 

512 Walnut St. 
Masonic Home of Georgia 



Nellie Troutman Home 

207 Rogers Ave. 
Tabernacle R escue Home 

565 Montpelier Ave. 
Savannah: 

Abrahams Home 

East Broad and Broughton Sts. 
Florence Crittenton Home 

R.D.I, 
Home for the Aged 

Thirty-seventh and Lincoln Sts. 
Louisa Porter Home 

Drayton and Charlton Sts. 
May Telfair Home 

President and West Broad Sts. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home. . . 

409 Liberty Sf. 

IDAHO. 
Boise: 

Idaho Soldiers' Home 



ILLINOIS. 
Alton: 

Alton Woman's Home 

North State St. 

Nazareth Home 

Central Ave. 
Arlington Heights: 

Lutheran Old Folks' Home. 



Aceoea: 

Old Ladies' Home 

421 Fifth St. 
Bensenville: 

German Orphanage and Old People's Home. 

Bloomington: 

Jessamine Withers' Home 

North Locust St. 
Champaign: 

Garwood Home 

Chicago: 

Bethany Home 

5015 North Paulina St. 
Chicago Foundlings' Home 

15 South Wood St. 
Chicago Home for Convalescent Women and 
ChUdren. 

1516 West Adams St. 
Chicago Home for the Friendless 

5051 Vincermes Ave. 
Chicago Industrial School for Girls 

4900 Prairie Ave. 
Chicago Refuge for Girls 

5024 Indiana Ave. 
Chicago Rest Cottage 

4356 LoweU Ave. 
Church Home for Aged Persons 

4325 EUis Ave. 
Colored Old Folks' Home 

510 West Garfield Boulevard. 
Danish Old People's Home 

Norwood Park. 
Florence Crittenton Anchorage 

2615 Indiana Ave. 
German Baptist Deaconess and Girls' Home 

1648 Superior St. 
German Baptist Old People's Home 

1S51 North Spaulding Ave. 
Home for Aped and Orphan Bohemians. . . 

5061 North Fortieth Ave. 
Home for Aged Jews 

Sixty-second St. and Drexel Ave. 
Home for the Aged 

Fullerton and ShefDeld Aves. 
Home for the Aged 

Harrison and Throop Sts. 
Home for the Aged 

5148 Prairie Ave. 
House of Providence 

1121 Orleans St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Christ Church (Episcopal).. 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 

Georgia. 
King's Daughters 



Tabernacle Baptist Church. 



Savannah Widows' Society. 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Little Sisters of the Poor. . . 



Private organization 

Savaimah Widows' Society. 
Salvation Army 



Stale of Idaho., 



Private association 

St. Mary's Catholic Church. 



Private organization (Lu- 
theran). 



Private corporation 

German Evangelical Synod.. 
Second Presbyterian Church 



Private corporation 

Swedish Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation. 

Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 
Private corporation. 



Protestant Episcopal Dio- 
cese of Chicago. 
Private corporation 



Private corporation 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
German Baptist churches. . . 

German Baptist churches. . . 

Bohemian Benevolent Asso- 
ciations. 
Associated Jewish Charities. . 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Sisters of St. Francis 



Class of inmates received. 



I Equipment. 

' Iiunates self-supporting; rent free. 
> Includes report of May Telfair Home. 
* Per month; no weekly charge. 
' Not reported. 



Indigent aged gentlewomen . 

Masons and their families 

Friendless aged women 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 



Indigent aged women 

Fallen women 

Destitute aged persons. . . 
Aged and infirm women. 



Indigent widows with chil- 
dren. 
Homeless unemployed men . . 



Veterans and State National 
Guard. 



Dependent aged women.... 
Homeless men and women. 



Homeless aged members of 
the church. 



Aged women. 



Needy aged persons, and or- 
phans. 

Aged women 



Homeless aged women. 
Aged men and women. 



Foundlings, and homeless 

mothers with infants. 
Convalescents 



Destitute women and chil- 
dren. 

Dependent girls committed 
Ijy the juvenile court. 

Erring women and delin- 
quent children. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Aged men and women , 



Aged men and women . 
Aged Danes 



Fallen women and homeless 

children. 
Unemployed deaconesses and 

girls. 
Aged English and Germans. . 

Aged Bohemians and Or- 
phans. 
Homeless aged Hebrews 



Destitute aged persons 

Destitute aged persons 

Destitute aged persons 

Self-supporting young women. 



1886 
1904 
1886 
1908 

1822 
1902 
1890 
1875 
1822 
1910 



1897 
1907 

1892 

1895 

1895 

1902 

1S99 
1SS9 
1871 
1902 

1859 
18S9 
1865 
1901 
1888 
1896 
1891 
1886 
1903 
1896 
1893 
1890 
1893 
1876 
1882 
1882 



'5400 



'400 



9 400 



9 400 
(."■) 



9 400 

100 

9250 



400 
300 
300 



O 



<$4.00 



10 4.00 
6.00 



"1.00 
4.00 



(13) 



(15) 

2.60 



'M.SO 



(") 



3.50 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
(') 



No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 



8 Included in report of Abrahams Home. 

7 No rule against admission. 

» Includes 513,000 from U. S. Govenunent. 

> Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 



INMATES RECEIVED 
nURING YEAR. 



4 

4 

105 

6 

28 
21 



P) 
P) 



460 
234 

1, 

216 

78 

52 

6 

3 

(') 

110 



7 

44 

9 

200 

212 

219 

1,723 



(') 



103 



m 



w 



2 
20 

4 
100 
112 
119 



5 

24 

5 

100 

100 

100 

1,723 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



185 



12 
5 
15 

42 
10 
66 
14 
(') 
10 

177 

18 
16 

75 

10 



13 

36 

56 

209 

"30 



85 
23 
68 
200 
212 
219 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Adults. 



(') 



(') 



« 



30 
11 
33 
100 
112 
119 



a n 



66 
U 



85 
23 
68 
200 
212 
219 



'S. >~ 



(') 



Children. 



(*) 



55 
71 

"183 

184 

105 

3 



« 



32 



m 



23 
(=•) 

(') 
184 
105 



o a 

2 a 

o 



(') 



23 
71 

183 
184 



P) 



RECEffTS DtnilNG TEAR. 



Total. 



$3,000 

6,800 

1,000 

950 

'6,747 
1,941 

27,651 
1,620 

(•) 
785 

8 31,000 

1,! 
1,548 

10,369 

2,079 

17,017 

940 

4,003 
9,301 
9,505 
5,711 

38,814 

W 

27,918 
1,751 
8,003 
1,333 

(=■) 
4,366 
3,199 

10,850 

25,444 

22,138 

(') 

(') 
7,968 



10 Per month; for county 
'I For orphans only, 
n All property owned. 
" Varies. 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



$1,000 
625 



(') 



» 28,000 

461 

288 



12,444 



(=^) 



4,500 



Dona- 
tions. 



$300 
600 

100 

237 

10,970 

200 



217 
300 

2,264 

1,655 

12,165 

550 



4,700 
2,187 
5,661 

6,703 

(=•) 

6,745 
400 

4,700 
538 

(') 

4,366 

2,272 

5,150 
20,746 
22,138 

« 

300 



$200 



940 
960 



2,868 



1,500 



(^) 



1,986 
300 



(') 



Other 
sources. 



$3,000 

6,800 

700 

150 

5,647 

1,079 

16,681 

1,000 

(') 
785 

3,000 
370 



8,105 
424 

1,984 

390 

2,503 

4,601 

7,273 

3 

32,111 
(') 

8,379 
1,351 
1,317 
495 
« 



927 
1,200 



PAYMENTS DtJRING YEAR. 






For 


Total. 


For 

running 

ex- 


permar 
nent 
im- 




penses. 


prove- 
ments. 


$2,500 


$1,800 


$700 


6,800 


6,800 




900 


600 


300 


950 


950 




» 4,222 


4,222 




1,394 


1,253 


141 


26,596 


26,596 




1,204 


1,143 


61 


(') 


(«) 




2,699 


2,699 




39,000 


30,000 


9,000 


1,933 


1,833 


100 


1,750 


1,450 


300 


8,004 


7,326 


678 


2,023 


2,023 




15,117 


9,591 


5,526 


825 


800 


25! 

1 


2,516 


2,516 


1 


9,301 


6,051 


3,250 


9,708 


9,708 




12,437 


4,959 


7,478 


38,072 


38,072 




(') 


(") 





23,520 


21,139 


2,381 


1,085 


722 


363 


6,870 


6,870 




1,724 


1,620 


104 


(') 


O 


{') 


3,085 


3,085 




3,002 


2,616 


386 


10,500 


7,500 


3,000 


16,677 


4,207 


12,470 


21,770 


21,770 




W 


C) 




(') 


W 




7,968 


7,968 




14,000 


12,000 


2,000 






" Estimated 

" From $5 to $10 per month. 

18 For girls. 

II From $1.50 to $2.50 for orphans. 



VAIUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$55,000 

40,000 

4,000 

■300 

'137,000 
5,000 
60,000 
37,000 
O 
> 1,294 

93,000 

23,950 
18,000 

86,379 

17,460 

38,000 

32,000 

77,525 
83,000 
168,157 
20,000 

900,000 

(=■) 
200,000 

12,000 

69,364 
2,200 

35,000 

13,500 
8,000 

85,000 

75,257 
402,000 

(') 

(') 

P) 
180,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$15,000 

40,000 

4,000 

1300 

10,000 
5,000 
60,000 
20,000 
(«) 
> 1,294 

93,000 

21,000 
18,000 

35,000 

10,000 

35,000 

25,000 

17,500 
42,000 
50,000 
20,000 

250,000 

(') 
175,000 

12,000 

29,000 
2,200 

« 

13,500 
7,000 

75,000 

62,257 
225,000 

(') 

m 

180,000 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$40,000 



127,000 



17,000 



2,950 



51,379 

7,450 

3,000 

7,000 

60,025 
41,000 
118,15 



650,000 



25,000 



32,364 



{') 



1,000 

10,000 

13,000 

177,000 



186 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



ILLINOIS— Continued. 

Chicago — Continued. 

House of the Good Shepherd 

1126 Grace St. 
Immanuel Woman's Home 

150.i La Salle Ave. 
McKiiilcy Home 

501 Ashland Boulevard. 
Methodist Episcopal Old People's Home 

1415 Foster Ave. 
Mimicipal Lodging House 

162 North Union St. 
Norwegian Old People's Home 

6058 Avondale Ave. 
Old People's Home 

Forty-seventh St. and Vincennes Ave. 
Olivet Institute Old People's Home 

f)6.S Gardner St. 
St. Anthony's Home 

2033 Frankfort St. 
St. Joseph's Homo for Aged and Crippled 
and St. Vincent Orphan Asvlum. 

2649 North Hamlin Ave. (togan Square 
Station). 
St. Joseph's Home for the Friendless 

IIOU South May St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

832 Washington Boulevard. 
Salvation Army Rescue Home 

1332 La Salle Ave. 
Susanna Wesley Home for Scandinavian 
Young Women. 

3,3.30 Indiana Ave. 
Swedish Home of Mercy 

2739 Foster Ave. 
Washingtonran Home of Chicago 

15.33 West Madison St. 
Women's Model Lodging House 

3040 Calumet Ave. 
Dan\tlle: 

National Home for Disabled Volunteer Sol- 
diers. 
Decatur: 

Anna B. Milliken Home and Macon County 
Industrial School tor G iris. 

200 North Oakland Ave. 
Illinois Pythian Home 



East St. Louis: 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

42.S Broadway. 
Elgin: 

Old People's Home 

State St. 
Evanston: 

Grove House for Convalescents 

1729 Livingston Ave. 

Old People's Home 

Pioneer Road and Grant St. 
FoEEST Park: 

German Old People's Home 

GlKARU: 

The Home 

Highland Park: 

Home tor Aged and Disabled Railroad Em- 
ployees of America. 



Hinsdale: 

Life Boat Rescue Home. 



Jacksonville; 

Old People's Home 

873 Grove St. 
Jouet: 

Salem Home for the Aged 

Rowell Ave. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home . 
113 South Joliet St. 
Libertyville: 

Colony Association 

Milwaukee Ave. 
Macon: 

Eastern Star and Masonic Hom.e . . 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Sisters of the Good Shepherd. 

Private corporation (Lu- 
theran). 
Volunteers of America 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

City of Chicago 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Olivet Memorial Presbyte- 
rian Church. 
Polish Catholic Chm-ch 

Sisters of St. Francis 

Sisters of the Immaculate 

Heart of Mary. 
Salvation Army 

Salvation Army 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Swedish Evangelical Mission 

Covenant. 
Private corporation 

Women's Clubs of Cook 
County. 

U. S. Government 

Private corporation 

ICnights of Pythias 

Salvation Army 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Swedish Societies 

Private corporation 

Church of the Brethren 

Brotherhoods of Locomotive 
Engineers, Firemen, and 
Enginemen, Order of R. 
R. Conductors and Broth- 
hood of R. R. Trainmen. 

Private corporation 

National Benevolent Asso- 
ciation of Christian Church 

Lutheran Augustana Synod. 

Salvation Army 

Private corporation 

Order of the Eastern Star 



Class of inmates received. 



Delinquent girls 

Unemployed working wo- 
men. 

Self-supporting yoimg wo- 
men with small wage. 

Helpless aged members of the 
church. 

Homeless unemployed men 
and boys. 

Aged men and women 

Aged women 

Aged poor persons 

Homeless men, women, and 
orphans. 

Aged persons, dependent chil- 
dren, and cripples. 

Young working girls 

Homeless imemployed men.. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Convalescent young women 
seeking employment. 

Dependent aged persons 

Inebriates 

Needy women and children . . 

Disabled volunteer soldiers 
and sailors. 

Aged women and orphan 
girls. 

Knights of Pythias and their 
families. 

Homeless unemployed men.. 

Aged men and women 

Convalescent women and 

children. 
Aged Swedes 

Aged Germans 

Aged persons and needy chil- 
dren. 

Aged and disabled railway 
employees. 



Homeless women, fallen girls, 
and their infants. 

Aged members of the chiu-ch 



Aged Swedes 

Homeless unemployed men. 



Persons with epileptic, ner- 
vous, and mental diseases. . 

Eastern Stars, and Masons' 
wives, daughters, sisters, 
and widows. 



1859 
1907 
1903 
1898 
1901 
1896 
1873 
1903 
1897 
1895 

1876 
1899 
1895 
1907 

1886 
1863 
1893 

1865 

1892 

1906 



1901 

1902 
1900 

1885 
1905 
1890 



1893 

1900 

1905 
1899 

1902 

1896 



S300 



300 

300 

1250 



m 



'20 



(") 
300 



100 

500 



1 S3. 75 
3.50 



11.60 



13.50 



5.00 



1.00 



(I.) 



15.00 



13.13 



5.00 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

(') 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No, 

No. 

(=) 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 



Yes. 

No. 

No. 
(») 

No. 

No. 



inmates received 
dutmng yeah. 



295 

391 

1,107 

13 

12,104 

36 

4 

5 

5 

66 

233 
487 
239 
250 

12 

1,061 

727 

995 

53 

39 

3 

237 
12 



16 



w 



■a 



12,ll>4 
13 



487 
57 



4 
920 



w 



(=) 



295 
391 

i,io; 

13 



1 Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 
3 According to ability to pay. 
3 No rule against admission! 



* Equipment. 

6 Not reported. 

• Included in report of Swedish Covenant Hospital. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



187 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF TEAR. 



Adults. 



316 
24 
25 
56 

349 
86 
72 
15 
13 
6S 

130 
110 

21 
(') 

61 
46 

58 

2,428 



(-) 
21 

(>) 
46 

120 
20 
44 



110 



2,42S 



(') 



Se- 



3,428 
4 
9 



45 






(») 



(.') 



(=) 



Children. 



(.<■) 



(') 



(') 



0-73 

2 3 

p.0. 



(") 



is 



(*) 



(=) 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$75,409 
4,543 
4,398 

18,669 
7,000 

22,630 

324,508 

1,161 

2,684 

28,094 

30,305 
40,991 
7,343 
2,000 

(•) 
31,357 

374,449 

4,248 

18,300 

6,105 

5,685 

6,471 
17,618 

54,296 
3,275 
27,604 



3,433 

5,500 

9,524 
5,520 

m 

13,965 



Derived from- 



.\ppro- 

pri- 
atioDS. 



J7,000 



1366,225 
240 



Dona- 
tions. 



$8,561 

1,199 

569 

6,242 



233,828 

1,011 

2,684 

14,205 

8,499 



3,524 
200 



(«) 



W 



2,354 
18,000 



1,757 

31,307 

475 

27,604 



1,625 
4,325 
6,619 



Care of 



Other 
sources 



33,344 
3,829 
4,765 



13,126 
850 
150 



4,114 



9,384 



1,498 
1,400 

(«) 

21,390 
1,762 



421 
10,450 

9,930 
2,800 



2,905 



(■'■) 



$06,848 



9,504 
89,830 



9,775 

12,422 

40,991 

2, 321 

400 

C) 

9,927 
90 

8,224 

1,115 

300 

6,105 

5,585 

6,050 
5,411 

13,059 



277 
1,175 



5,520 
12,996 



PAYMENTS DCKINO TEAK. 



I Includes medical treatment and board for two weeks. 

8 From U. S. Government. 

9 For women only. 



Total. 



$75,207 
4,853 
4,303 

12,232 
7,000 

40,425 

334,597 

1,749 

2,684 

32, 162 

29,921 
38, 894 
6,989 
2,000 

(•) 

29,420 

3,000 

354,693 

4,131 

18,000 

5,725 

6,499l 

6,274 

I 
4,169, 

52,296 

3,100 

120,419 



2,953 

5,500 

7,259 
5,383 

m 

16,555 



For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 



$75,207 
4,853 
4,303 

12,232 
7,000 
7,026 

18,109 
1,749 
2,426 

24,312 

15,384 
36,690 
6,989 
2,000 

m 

24,750 
3,000 

344,887 

3,526 

9,000 

5,609 

6,053 

6,274 
4,169 

17,839 
3,100 
16,729 



2,248 

5,500 

7,259 
5,291 

P) 
fi,932 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$33,399 
316,488 



258 
7,850 

14,537 
2,204 



4,670 



605 

9,000 

116 

446 



34,457 



103,690 



705 



92 
9,633 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$45,205 
7,500 



138,782 
30,000 
75,000 

779,093 



10,000 
75,900 

75,000 

< 12, 829 

2,500 



(») 

348,900 

1,500 

1,372,906 

43,419 

400,000 

<158 

130, 103 

12,000 
50,000 

310,470 
25,000 
130,089 

14,933 

27,500 

28,220 
<750 



53,500 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$45,205 
7,500 



40,000 

30,000 

75,000 

3.35,026 



10,000 
75,900 

75,000 
' 12, 829 
<I,.500 



m 

250,000 



1,372,906 

41,219 

200,000 

< 158 

48,857 

12,000 
50,000 

100,000 
25,000 
121,632 

14,933 

20,000 

28,220 
<750 



50,000 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$98,782 



444,067 



1,000 



98,900 
1,800 



2,200 
200,000 



81,246 



210,470 



7,500 



3,500 



'» From 50 cents to $1 for girls only. 
" All property owned. 



188 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table HI.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



ILLINOIS— Continuod. 



Mattoon: 

Odd Fellows* Home of Illinois . 



Maywood: 

Baptist Old People's Home 

Morgan Park: 

Swedish Baptist Home for the Aged . 
1140 Crescent Ave. 
Mount Morris: 

Old People and Orphans' Home 



Ohio; 

Mercy Home 

Park Ridge: 

Illinois Industrial School for Girls. 



Peoria: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

415 Richmond Ave. 
Guyer Memorial Home 

703 Knoxville Ave. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

517 Starr St. 
John C. Proctor Endowment Home 

Spring St. and Glendale Ave. 
St. Joseph's Home for the Aged 

405 Smith St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

901 State St. 
Qdincy: 

Anna Brown Home for the .\ged 

1507 North Fifth St. 

Illinois Soldiers' and Sailors' Home 

Lindsay Church Home 

2.34'North Fourth St. 
Old People's Home 

418 Washington St. 
St. Vincent Home 

1340 North Tenth St. 
Riverside: 

Scottish Old People's Home 

Eockford: 

Jennie Snow Home for Aged Women 

525 Kent St. 
Winnebago County Home for the Aged. 

408 North Horsman St. 
Rock Island: 

Prince Hall Masonic Home 



Springfield: 

King's Daughters' Home for Women. 

641 Black Ave. 
Lincoln Colored Home 

427 South Twelfth St. 
St. Joseph's Home 

801 South Sixth St. 
Springfield Redemption Home 

427 South Eleventh St. 
Sullivan: 

Illinois Masonic Home 



Technt: 

St. Ann's Home 

Wilmington: 

Soldiers' Widows* Home of Hlinois. 



Woodstock: 

Old People's Rest Home. 
Glen Ellyn P. O. 



INDIANA. 
A villa: 

Old People's Home 



EvANS^^LLE: 

Home for the Aged 

Lincoln Ave. 

Home for the Friendless 

2215 Fulton Ave. 
Rathbone Memorial Home for Aged and 

Infirm. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

230 High St. 
Fobt Wayne: 

Rescue Home and Mission 

lis East Columbia St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

231 West Main St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



Private corporation( Baptist) 
Swedish Baptists of America. 



Church of the Brethren . 

Sisters of Mercy 

Private corporation 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Private corporation 



Class of inmates received. 



Aged Odd Fellows, their 
wives and widows, and 
Rebekahs. 



Aged men and women . . . 
Aged and needy Swedes. 



Homeless, destitute aged per- 
sons, and orphans. 

Aged men and women 



Sisters of the Good Shepherd. 

Trustees of John 0. Proctor 

Endowment. 
Sisters of St. Francis 

Salvation Army 



Private corporation . 



State of Illinois 

Episcopal churches of 

Quincy. 
German Conference M. E. 

Church. 
Sisters, Poor Handmaids of 

Jesus Christ. 

Illinois St. Andrew Society. . 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Grand Lodge 
Masons. 



King's Daughters 

Private corporation . . 
Sisters of St. Francis . 
l^rivate corporation. . 



of Colored 



Masonic Grand 
Illinois. 



Lodge of 



Sisters of the Holy Ghost . 
State of Illinois 



Free Methodist Church. 



Franciscan Sisters of the 
Sacred Heart. 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 



I'rivate corporation . 
Salvation Army 



Dependent girls committed 
by the juvenile court. 

Fallen girls and women, and 

dependent children. 
Impoverished aged persons. . . 

Fallen women and unpro- 
tected young girls. 
Worthy aged persons 



Homeless aged persons 

Homeless imemployed men. 

Aged men and women 



Veterans and their wives 

Aged members of the church. 

Aged members of the church . 

Aged persons 



Aged Scotch persons 

Aged women 

Dependent aged persons . 



Colored Masons and 
families. 



their 



Dependent worthy aged 

women. 
Aged women, dependent and 

delinquent children. 
Aged men and women 



Fallen women, their infants, 
and illegitimate children. 

Masons and their families 



Worthy aged persons. 



Wives, widows, mothers, and 
daughters of veterans. 

Homeless aged persons 



Aged men and women . 



Dependent aged persons 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants . 
Aged women 



Homeless unemployed men. 



Unemployed men 

Homeless unemployed men . 



1907 
1903 

1893 

1901 

1877 

1902 
1889 
1891 
1905 
1.892 
1899 

1898 

1885 
1873 

1890 

1885 

1846 
1906 
1904 

1S93 

1893 
1898 
1903 
1903 

1904 

1902 
1895 

1904 



1896 

1882 
1869 
1884 
1905 

1902 
1906 



8500 
1225 



(=) 



500 



<400 



500 



300 



200 
300 



(10) 
u 2: 

(«) 



800 



(') 



$5.00 



14.50 



(«) 



5.00 



(.2) 



No. 



No. 
No. 



No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
(•) 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

(') 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

(') 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

(») 

No. 
(') 



' Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 

' Varies. 

3 Confinement fee, $25 if able. 



* And all property owned. 

^ Not reported. 

6 No rule against admission. 



inmates received 
during year. 



28 



6 
45 

57 
2 
62 
) 
34 
16 

2 

649 



m 



16 
12 
106 



38 

112 

2 

47 



w 



16 



m 



C) 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



189 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Adults. 



14 

11 

31 

148 

107 

4 

20 

1,772 
3 

56 

87 



92 
33 
15 
6 

(') 



39 

4 



(') 



as. 






11 

4 

148 

id: 



,772 
3 



90 



So 



(') 



33 



Children. 



147 
23 



103 



147 
6 



103 



O B3 



14; 

13 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



«30,397 

1,500 
15,177 

2,685 

4,321 
40,075 

1,563 
4,880 
12,987 

13,368 
4,316 

8,992 

223,591 
C) 

16,7 

10,554 

4,292 
8,631 
10,875 

700 

4,680 
3,872 
9,194 
4,104 

23,296 

11,801 
22,500 

1,942 



4,623 

(») 
2,729 
6,700 
2,921 

(') 
3,056 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



' Equipment. 

'According to ability to pay. 

• Indeterminate. 



$10,000 



920 



223,591 



554 



332 



22,500 



1,200 



Dona- 
tions. 



$29,315 



2,685 

478 
6,000 

349 

250 

4,010 



5,248 



12,974 
3,000 



2,432 

300 

410 

172 

790 

3,772 

23,296 

2,600 



900 
300 



(') 



Care of 



Other 

sources. 



$4,000 



3,529 



490 
1,500 



8,768 



1,500 
7,000 

464 
203 



1,746 
8,404 



7,301 



96 

3,723 
100 



600 



(') 



$1,082 

300 
11,177 



314 

24,073 

724 
3,136 
8,057 

3,400 
4,316 

3,744 



(") 
2,304 



3,828 
8,428 
8,443 

400 

4,270 
954 



2,000 



1,313 



1,529 
6,100 
2,921 

(') 
3,056 



PAYMENT.S UURING 


YEAR. 


Total. 


For 
riinning 

ex- 
penses. 


For 

perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


$24,816 


$2,500 


$22,316 


1,500 


1,500 




14,924 


3,968 


10,956 


2,199 


2,199 




3,796 


3,632 


164 


40,075 


21,075 


19,000 


1,193 


933 


260 


2,790 


2,796 




12,989 


11,695 


1,294 


W 


(») 


(.<■) 


10,548 


9,748 


800 


4,032 


4,032 




6,137 


6,137 




223,591 
216 


223,591 
216 




10,636 


7,923 


2,713 


10,260 


7,460 


2,800 


4,491 


4,491 




6,604 


6,604 




1,800 


1,800 




700 


700 




4J371 


4,371 




2,887 


2,699 


188 


10,606 


6,120 


5,486 


4,104 


3,101 


1,003 


23,296 


21,086 


2,210 


5,332 


5,332 




24,224 


21,597 


2,627 


1,679 


1,460 


229 


4,095 


.3,795 


900 


W 


(') 


(') 


2,729 


2,538 


191 


5,500 


5,200 


300 


3,042 


3,042 




(') 


(') 


(') 


2,975 


2,975 





'» Residents, $300; nonresidents, $600. 

»> For women. 

u Night's lodging, 16 cents. 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAH. 



Total. 



$188,500 

14,500 
22,566 

32,000 

15,000 
260,000 

15,000 

54,100 

71,000 

(') 

75,000 

' 1, 153 

115, 700 
860,000 

m 

78,739 
62,000 

35,686 
125,000 
25,400 

10,000 

69,450 
9,000 
45,000 
12,000 

160,000 

(') 
66,598 

23,889 



60,000 

50,000 

16,000 

130,000 

5,710 



(') 



'515 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$148,500 

5,000 
22,566 

32,000 

15,000 
125,000 

15,000 
28,000 
71,000 
« 
75,000 
' 1, 153 

64,000 

860,000 
(') 

45,000 

52,000 

35,686 
15,000 
12,000 

10,000 

40,000 
9,000 
45,000 
12,000 

100,000 

66,598 
23,889 



60,000 

50,000 
16,000 
30,000 
5,710 

(') 

'515 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$40,000 



9,500 



135,000 



26,100 



(') 



51,700 



33,739 



110,000 
13,400 



29,450 



(») 



100,000 



(') 



190 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



INDIANA— Continued. 



Greensburg: 

Odd Fellows' Home. 



Honey Creek: 

Aged Persons' Home and Orphan Asylum. 
Middletown P. O., H. D. 2. 

INDLANAPOLIS: 

Alpha H ome 

1940 Darwin St. 
Door of Hope of Indiana 

1200 Chicago St. 
Faith Home 

1523 Southeastern Ave. 
Friendly Inn 

526 West Market St. 
Hartwig-Kalley Home for Aged People 

2521 Chestnut St. 
Hebrew Ladies' Shelter House 

808 South Illinois St. 
Home for the Aged 

East and Vermont Sts. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

Ill West Raymond St. 
Indianapolis Homo for Friendless Women.. 

1731 .\orth Capitol Ave. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

1125 East Tenth St. 
Shelter House 

22(i North Adelaide St. 

jEFFERSOK\ ILLE: 

Old Ladies' Home 

330 West Market St. 
Lafatette: 

Indiana State Soldiers' Home 



Martha Home 

515 Alabama St. 
Old People's Home 

131 Park Ave. 

St. Anthony's Home 

Twenty-second and Cason Sts. 
Laporte: 

Ruth C. Sabin Home 

1603 Michigan Ave. 
Logansport: 

Logansport Home for the Friendless 

630 Race St. 
Madison; 

DrusiUa Home 

Broadway. 
Marion: 

Emilv E. Flinn Old Ladies' Home 

615 West Twelfth St. 
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Sol- 
diers. 
Mexico: 

German Baptist Old Folks' and Orphans' 
Home. 
New Albany: 

Old Ladies' Home 

704 East Main St. 
Newburg: 

Thornton Home 

R. D. 15. 
Newcastle; 

Indiana Village for Epileptics 

Richmond: 

Margaret Smith Home 

Seventeenth and lilain St5. 

Richmond Home for Friendless Women 

306 South Tenth St. 
South Bend: ■ 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

Hill St. and Colfax Ave. 
Terra Haute: 

I lorence Crittenton Home 

1923 Poplar St. 

Friendly Inn 

912 Chestnut St. 
Warrfn; 

Methodist Memorial Home for the Aged 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Church of the Brethren 



Private association 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private organization 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd. 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 

Pentecost Bands 



Private corporation. 
State of Indiana 



Woman's Christian Home 

Association. 
Private organization 

Sisters of St. Francis 



Trustees of Ruth C. Sabin 
Endowment. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation. 



Twentieth Century Club.. 
U. S. Government 



Church of the Brethren. 



Trustees of W. S. Culbertson 
Endowment. 

Board of Relief, Presbyter- 
ian Church, U. S. A. 



State of Indiana 

Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Class of inmates received. 



Salvation Army. . 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Terra Haute Society for Or- 
ganizing Charity. 

Methodist Episcopal Church 

' Adnlts, $2.50; children, $1.50. 

2 Includes 2 boarders. 

3Coloredonly. 

* For 60 days, $25; 50 cents a day thereafter. 

6 Accordmg to ability to pay. 



Odd Fellows and their fami- 
lies. 

Aged persons and children . . . 



Homeless aged women 

Wayward girls 

Fallen girls and their infants. 

Homeless unemployed per- 
sons. 

Aged, blind, crippled, and 
incurable men and women. 

Homeless persons 



Impoverished aged persons. . 
Erring women, and orphans. 

Aged gentlewomen 

Homeless unemployed men . . 
Homeless persons 



Homeless women. 



Veterans, their wives and 

widows. 
Friendless or erring women 

and children. 
Aged women 

Aged persons 

Aged women. 



Crippled and homeless wo- 
men. 

Homeless aged women 



Aged gentlewomen 

Disabled volunteer soldiers 
and sailors. 

Aged persons and orphans 

Aged gentlewomen 



Aged ministers and their fam- 
ilies. 



Epileptic men. 
Aged women. . . 



Friendless women and chil- 
dren. 

Homeless unemployed men . . 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Friendless persons 



Worthy aged persons . 



1900 

1883 

1885 
1894 
1906 
1882 
1899 
1902 
1873 
1S73 
1867 
1904 
1908 

1905 

1896 
1897 
1905 
1903 

18S3 

1896 

18S4 

1900 
1865 

1889 

1873 

1891 

1905 

1888 
1S6S 

1905 

1907 
1882 

1909 



$25 
(<) 



250 



12 350 



500 






100 



300 



(') 






(10) 



13S3.50 



2.50 



12 4.00 



3.00 



(19) 



(') 



No. 
Yes. 

(') 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 

(") 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

(") 

Yes. 
Yes. 



No. 



6 Not reported. 

' Includes wood yard. 

8 Equipment. 

9 From $4 to $10 per month. 

10 Weekly, $2; monthly, $5. 



23 



INMATES RECEIVED 
DURING YEAR. 



51 

23 

12 

72 
38 
2,800 
47 
295 
160 
(«) 

79 
4,100 



273 

60 

1 

45' 

1 

54 

1 

6 
617 

60 

3 

14 

22 
4 
61 

164 

49 
1,492 



2,500 

18 

285 

90 

(«) 



4,000 



(«) 



617 
38 



m 



GENERAL TABLES. 



191 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR, 



Adults. 



15 

14 

12 

(') 

23 

19 

150 

125 

28 

16 

50 

12 

975 
5 
5 

45 

23 
15 



18 
1,753 



116 
12 
17 

38 

12 
(«) 



in 

a p. 



(•) 

8 
19 
90 



404 



1,753 

6 



38 



(•) 



o a 

eg- 



Children. 



84 

> 11 

15 



12 
975 



5 
45 

23 

15 

12 

18 
,753 

22 

9 

11 

116 
12 
11 



(') 



(•) 



(•) 



(') 



(•) 



(») 



(•) 



(») 



95 



30 



m 






gi3 
rf a 

P.O. 



•p c 



&a SJ 



(•) 



95 



m 






(') 



(•) 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



II No rule agaiiLst admission. 

'2 Average of maximum and minimum 

'3 For boarders. 

" Residents, $200; nonresidents, $500. 

" From U. S. Government. 



t44,907 

1,960 

2,85' 
3,240 
1,300 
'4,200 
3,573 
634 
(«) 
(«) 
4,471 
6,462 
1,900 

2,064 

174,235 
1,218 
1,186 
5,514 

2,844 

3,386 

700 
289, 157 

11,375 

(•) 
5,350 

53,396 
3,728 
2,034 

3,739 

2,074 
2,900 

6,20ol 
amounts. 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



{300 
800 



600 



1,600 



500 



174,235 

55 



''•282,800 



"50,584 



810 



600 
600 



Dona- 
tions. 



$44,907 



1,154 
1,525 
1,300 



238 
634 



m 
(•) 



552 



1,400 
150 



1,000 
1,100 



1,700 



2,000 
300 



3,450 



65 



2,000 
3,200 



Care of 

in- 
mates 



$1,541 



2,584 



(») 



674 



87 



8,671 



400 
909 



Other 
sources. 



$419 
1,403 



'3,600 
751 



(•) 
(«) 

2,319 
6,462 



5,339 

2,200 

1,386 

400 
6,357 

2,704 



1,90(1 

18 2,812 

3,328 

250 

3,739 

1,408 
300 

3,000 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR, 



$25,712 

2,169 

2,853 
5,092 
1,300 
4,000 
3,319 
493 
2,895 

4,850 
7,196 
1,900 

1,200 

177,343 

927 

1,067 

5,672 

7,023 

2,700 

1,570 

1,560 
265,497 

11,333 

(«) 

4,560 

53,396 
3,097 
2,178 

3,485 

1,798 
2,900 

4,533 



For 
running 

e-'!- 
penses 



$25,712 

1,677 

611 
5,092 
1,300 
3,750 
3,319 

293 
2, 

m 

4,856 
7,196 
1,900 

1,000 

168,223 

927 

1,06; 

5,672 

5,445 

2,200 

1,570 

1,500 
265, 497 

10,983 

(•) 

3,930 

34, 67S 
3,097 
2,178 

3,485 

1,583 
2,900 

3,033 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$492 
2,242 



250 



200 



(•) 



200 
9,120 



1,578 
500 



350 

(•) 

630 
18, 718 



1,500 



VALUE OF PROPERTT AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



$300,000 

25,800 

7,000 



• Children only. 

' Exclusive of amount covered into stati 

'Covered into state treasury. 

' Varies. 



(•) 
«2,000 

100,000 
2,500 

100,000 
(•) 
53,800 
8 2,232 
25,000 

5,000 

632, 784 
4,000 

(«) 
50,000 

119,502 

33,000 

16,834 

35,100 
922,000 

40,800 

85,000 

39, 740 

257,535 
71,893 
13,000 

8 1,84; 

8,000 
11,000 

62,188 
I treasurr 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$300,000 
22,300 
7,000 



m 

8 2,000 
100,000 
2,500 
100,000 
(«) 
45,000 
'2,232 
25,000 

4,000 

632, 784 

3,500 

(•) 

50,000 

47,000 

5,000 

5,000 

35,100 
922,000 

15,800 

35,000 

21,370 

257, 535 
18,309 
8,000 

8 1.1 

8,000 
6.000 

52,188 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$3,500 



(') 



8,800 



,000 



(«) 



72,502 
28,000 
11,834 



25,000 
50,000 
18,370 



53, 584 
5,000 



5,000 
10,000 



192 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



IOWA. 

Boone: 

Eastern Star Masonic Home . 



Cedak Rapids: 

Home for Aged Women 

206 North Twelftli St., west. 

Sunshine Mission 

101 South First St. 
Charles City; 

. Starr Home for the -Vged 

Grand Ave. 
Davenport: 

Cook Home for the Friendless 

Pine and Bowditch Sts. (West Daven- 
port). 

Fejervary Home for Old Farmers 

Grand Ave. 

Salvation Arm v Industrial Home 

515 Brady St. 
Des Moines: 

Home for the Aged 

2S23 University Ave. 

Salvation .\rmv Industrial Home 

117 West Wahiut St. 

Salvation Army Rescue Home 

Main and Indianola Koads (South Des 
Moines). 
Dubuque; 

Dubuque Rescue Home 



House of the Good Shepherd 

Alta Vista St. 

Iowa Home for the Friendless 

Mt. Pleasant Ave. 

St. Anthony's Home for Aged People 

Asbury Road, R. D. 

St. Francis Home for the Aged 

Davis Lane. 
FoET Dodge: 

Benedict Home 

R. D. 3, Bo.x 5(1. 
Fruiiland: 

Elizabeth Hershey Orphan and Old Peo- 
ple's Home. 
Iowa City: 

St. Anthony's Home for the Aged 

222 Van Buren St. 
Keokuk: 

Birge Benevolent Home 

Bank and Seventh Sts. 
Lamoni: 

Saints Home and Liberty Home 



Marshalltown: 

Iowa Soldiers' Home 

Station A. 

Old Folks' Homo 

R. D.5. 
Mason City: 

Iowa Odd Fellows' and Orphans' Home. 

Muscatine: 

Old Ladies' Home of Muscatine 

1119 Mulberry Ave. 
Sioux City: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

Twenty-cighth and Court Sts. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

Twenty-fourth and Court Sts. 
St. Benedict's Home 

812 Douglas St. 

KANSAS. 
Ellsworth: 

Mother Bickerdyke Home 



Manhattan: 

Rebekah Odd Fellows' Home. 
R.D.I. 

Fort Dodge: 

Kansas State Soldiers' Home... 



Fort Scott: 

Rose-Tillotson Home for the Aged. 
424 South Margrave St. 
Lawrence: 

Old Folks' Home 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Order of the Eastern Star. . 



Private corporation. 



Private corporation (Prot- 
estant churches). 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Trustees of Nicholas Fejer- 
vary Endowment. 
Salvation .\rmy 



Private corporation . 

Salvation Army 

Salvation Army 



Private corporation 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Mercy 

Sisters of St. Francis 



Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union. 

German Lutheran Society of 
Christian Charities. 



Sisters of Mercy 

Benevolent Union., 



Reorganized Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints. 



State of Iowa 

Church of the Brethren. 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Rebekahs. 

Private corporation 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Sisters of St. Benedict 



State of Kansas . 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Rebekah 
State Assembly. 

State of Kansas 

Church of God 



Colored Baptist State Con- 
vention. 

1 Not reported. 

2 Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 

3 No rule against admission. 



Class of inmates received. 



Eastern Stars and their chil- 
dren. 

.\ged women 



Homeless women and chil- 
dren. 

Aged men and women 



Indigent aged women. 



Aged and needy farmers 

Homeless unemployed men . 

Aged men and women 

Homeless unemployed men . 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 



Fallen girls and homeless 
babies. 

Erring women and delin- 
quent children. 

Homeless women and chil- 
dren. 

Aged men and women 



Homeless aged persons. 



Fallen girls 

Aged persons and orphans . 

Aged men and women 

Aged women and children . . 
Aged men and women 



Soldiers, their wives, widows, 

mothers, and army nurses. 

Impoverished aged persons . . . 



Odd Fellows, Rebekahs, and 
their children. 



Aged women. 



Fallen girls and abandoned 

infants. 
Erring girls 



Aged persons.. 



Soldiers' widows, and their 
children. 

Odd Fellows, their widows, 
Rebekahs. and orphans. 



Civil War veterans and their 
families. 



Destitute aged persons . . 
.\ged and infirm persons . 



18.S7 
18% 

1900 



1892 
1899 

1S96 
1S99 
1899 

1896 
1903 
1S74 
1898 
1903 

18S2 

1894 

1902 

1890 

1895 

1887 
1906 

1903 

1895 

1894 
1903 
1907 

1897 
1906 

1890 
1910 
1906 



$600 



= 650 
100 
100 



'500 



(') 



500 



(') 



m No. 

$2.00 No. 



No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 

m 

Yes. 



(«) 
' 10.00 
2 3.75 



210.00 

3.00 

2 2.50 



3.00 
10 5. 00 



(■') 



5.00 






No. 
No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

(') 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

m 
(11) 



< Equipment. 

6 According to ability to pay. 

* Children, $1 per week; women, 38 per month. 



inmates received 
during year. 



51 
27 
35 
22 

17 

15 

91 



0) 



222 



14 

1 

141 
32 
(') 

27 
28 

204 
15 
6 



41 
1 

(') 
158 



« 



GENERAL TABLES. 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



193 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF TEAR. 



Adults. 



(') 



850 
14 

22 

5 

23 
35 
21 

67 
23 

501 
15 
4 



271 
9 
1 



42 



07 
10 

230 
8 
3 






1 
21 

07 
23 

601 
15 
4 



o a 



(') 






Chiklreii. 



(') 



43 



(') 



(') 



(') 0) 



(') 



(■) 
50 
23 



o 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$7,492 

4,005 
4,078 

2,381 

400 

3,369 

6,876 
5,259 
2,677 

1,800 
11,432 

5,160 
« 

12,588 

7,663 
7,675 

(?) 
1,451 

10,285 

163,287 
2,763 

17,060 

l,i 

4,557 
15,859 
1,488 

19,930 
14,043 

105,400 

1,016 

770 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pii- 
ations. 



(') 



$400 



724 



163,287 



19,930 



105,400 



50 



Dona- 
tions. 



S6, 784 

586 
4,078 



(') 



1,280 
1,600 
1,471 



4,764 
1,573 



(') 



1,601 

15,756 

492 



1,018 
200 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



Other 
sources. 



$667 
600 



400 
150 



3,225 



366 

4.50 

400 

1,488 

(') 

11,864 



765 



(») 



(■) 



354 
1,304 



1,596 

236 

1,488 



9531°— 13- 



' For ndults. 

» Indeterminate. 

9 Included in report of Mercy Hospital, Iowa City. 

— 13 



$41 
2,919 



1.386 



3,219 

(') 

2,935 

5,259 

814 

90 
9,03: 
2,201 

(') 



2.899 
5,337 
(') 

334 
(') 



2,311 

14,749 



520 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$5, 508 

3,995 
4,073 

900 

6,000 

3,744 
(') 

9,126 
5,325 
3,722 

1,800 
11,025 

4,661 
C) 
11,220 

3,838 

6,237 

P) 
1,451 

11,438 

176, 194 
2,592 

14,276 

1,030 

4,642 
16,693 
1,488 

20,311 
14,043 

106,400 
723 
720 



For 

running 

e.\- 

penses. 



$5,608 

3,573 
4,073 



6,000 

2,136 
(') 

9,126 

5,24 

2.572 

1,694 
10, 52; 

4,661 
(') 

7,256 

3,176 
5,568 

(») 
1,400 

11,438 

1C6, 194 
2,592 

1.3, 44' 

965 

4,542 

15,361 

1,488 

13,273 
9, 17fi 

80,600 
523 
420 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$422 



1,608 



78 
1,150 



106 
500 



3,964 
662 
66!) 



10,000 



S29 
65 



7,038 
4,867 

24,800 
200 
300 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAH. 



$28,020 

61,763 
30,310 

23,000 

(') 

57,000 
* 1,168 

115,663 
< 1,671 
16, 000 

9,500 
67, 500 
53, 120 

(') 
84,000 

23,000 

79,000 

(') 

12,000 

61,639 

347,825 
19,000 

160,000 

19.300 

35,000 
45,350 
16,000 

100,000 
77,035 

105,400 
2,000 



5,000, 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$27,000 

26,000 
30. 000 

10,000 

100,000 

20,000 
* 1,168 

48, 039 
< 1,671 
15,000 

8,000 
67, 600 
20,000 
(') 
84,000 

23,000 

70,900 

(') 

5,000 

61,639 

347,825 
19,000 

150,000 

4,000 

35,000 
45,360 
16,000 

100,000 
77,035 

105,400 
2,000 
5,000 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



" Per month: no weekly charge. 
II Confinement fee, $25 U able. 
"Colored only. ' 



$1,020 

36,763 
310 

13,000 

0) 

37,000 



67,524 



33,120 

CI 



1,000 



7,000 



15,300 



9 

10 

11 
12 
13 

14 
15 

10 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 
22 

23 

21 

25 
26 
27 

1 

2 

3 
4 
5 



194 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table HI.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



KANSAS— Continued. 

Leavenworth: 

Kansas State Protective Home 

610 Firth Ave. 
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Sol- 
diers. 
William Small Memorial Home for Aged 
Women. 
719 North Broadway. 
Parsons: 

Parsons' Home and Hospital 

2329 Grand Ave. 
Topeka: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

Quinton Heights. 

Florence Crittenton Home 

Twenty-third and Jefferson Sts. 

IngJeside Home 

Wichita: 

Kansas Masonic Home 

Maple and Seneca Sts. 



Sedgewick Home 

223 West Third St. 
Wichita Rescue Home 

1021 Lafayette Ave. 

KENTUCKY. 
Covington: 

Home for Aged and Indigent Women . 
Seventh and Garrard Sts. 

Wayfarers' Rest 

1014 Russell St. 
FOET Thomas: 

House of the Good Shepherd 



Lexington: 

Home of the Friendless 

522 West Short St. 
House of Mercv 

519 West Fourth St. 
MacAlestcr Home of Christ Church Cathedral 

Third and Wahiut Sts. 
Odd Fellows' Widows' and Orphans' Home 

511 West Sixth St. 

Pentecostal Church Home 

441 Kinkead St. 
Pythian Home of Kentucky 

R. D. 5. 
Louis\ille: 

All Prayer Foundlings' Home 

1622 Story Ave. 
Church IIcMiie and Infirmary 

1508 Morton Ave. 
Cook Benevolent Insl itution 

622 We:st Kentucky St. 
Henrie Barret Monfort Home 

413 Broadway. 
Home for Friendless Women 

512 West Kentucky St. 

Home for the Aged 

622 South Tenth St. 
Hope Rescue Mission 

808 West Jefferson St. 
House of the Good Shepherd 9 

518 Soiith Eighth St. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

2214 Bank St. 
King's Daughters' Home for Incurables 

Stevens Ave. and Norris Place. 
Louisville Protestant Altenheim 

936 Barrett Ave. 
Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home 

Second St. and Avery Ave. 
O'Learv Home 

904 Barrett Ave. 
Parr's Rest 

978 Third St. 
St. James Old Folks' Home 

3031 Greenwood Ave. 
St. Lawrence Institute for Working Boys. . . 

233 East College St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

915 We-st Broadway. 
Wayfarers' Lodge , 

212 Pearl Ave. 
Owensboro: 

Mary Kendall Home 

306 Thii-d St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private corporation . 
U. S. Government. . 
Private corporation . 



Private corporation.. 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Minion. 

Private corporation 



Kansas Masonic Grand 
Lodge and Eastern Star 
Order. 

Associated Charities 



Pentecostal , Church of the 
Nazarene. 



Private corporation. . 
Associated Charities., 



Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Private corporation 

Private corporation , 

Christ Church Cathedral 

Independent Order of Odd 

Fellows. 
Pentecostal Power Church. . 

Knights of Pythias of Ken- 
tucky. 



Private corporation 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Private corporation 



Private corporation , 

Private organization 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 
Sistersof the Good Shepherd. 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd. 

King's Daughters , 

German Protestantchurche,s, 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 

Kentucky. 
Sisters of Charity 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 

Associated Charities 



Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 



Class of inmates received. 



Aged persons and orphans 

Disabled volunteer soldiers 

and sailors. 
Homeless aged women 



Homeless men and women.. 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Aged women 



Masons, Eastern Stars, and 
their families. 



Homeless persons . 
Fallen women 



Impoverished aged women. . , 

Homeless, incurable men and 
women. 

Aged, dependent, and erring 
women, and orphan girls. 

Dependent aged women 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Indigent parishioners 



Widows and orphans of Odd 
Fellows. 

Homeless widows and or- 
phans. 

Widows and orphans of 
Knights of Pythias. 

Fallen women and thoir in- 
fants, and foundlings. 
Homeless aged persons 



Impoverished aged women. 
Young working women 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Destitute aged persons 



Homeless men , 

Wayward and orphan girls. . 
Wayward and orphan girls. . . 

Incurables 

Indigent aged persons 



Masons' widows and their 

children. 
Needy unemployed men 



Indigent aged gentlewomen. , 

Aged men and women 

Homeless working boys , 

Homeless unemployed men.. 
Homeless men and women . . 



Wayward girls, destitute or 
erring women, and children. 





M 

O 

a 

1 

o 

S 






o 


INMATES HECEIVED 




■i 
% 

a 
o 

a 
-1^ 


1 

O 

1 
1 

o 


8 

■3 
t 


DURING YEAE. 


o 


1 


1 


1887 






(') 

Yes. 

No. 




30 


7 


23 


1865 
1892 






515 

7 


1,192 

1 


1,192 


1 


$500 




1896 




(') 


No. 


3 


23 


12 


11 


1901 






No. 


■' 


19 




19 


1905 


5 


$2.00 


(') 




30 





30 


1880 


300 




No. 


6 


{■') 


(') 


(=) 


1896 






No. 





14 


11 


3 


1909 
1894 






No. 

Yes. 


6 


1.048 
50 


850 


198 
50 


35 




1886 


(•) 




No. 


6 


6 




6 


1894 


(■') 


(i) 


(') 


(») 


o 


("•) 


(') 


1876 






No. 


A 


30 




30 


1876 






No. 


1 


8 




8 


1895 






No. 


1 


27 


(>) 


1880 
1898 






No. 
No. 


1 
14 








10 




21 


10 


11 


1909 
1907 

1905 
1884 






Yes. 
No. 

No. 
No. 


8 

1 
12 


12 
16 

27 
7 


4 

8 


12 
12 

19 

7 












'4.50 


1837 
1871 






No. 
No. 


3 

3 


7 
400 




7 
400 




3.00 


1876 
1869 
1900 
1842 
1867 
1909 
1906 






No. 
Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 
No. 


2 

1 

7 
5 
2 


91 

99 

1,629 

130' 
19 
4 


6 

60 

1,629 

10 

1 


85 
39 

30 

130 

9 

3 






















250 




1S67 
1898 
1909 
1.887 






No. 

No. 

No. 

(') 


28 
1 
4 

1 


72 

8 
1 
(') 


8 


20 
1 










100 




1908 




2.00 


No. 


3 


58 


58 




1905 
1885 






No. 


5 

5 


38 
2,118 

41 


38 








2,063 


55 


1904 




(<) 


No. 


2 


41 



1 Colored only. 

2 Includes value of donations other than cash. 

3 From U . S. Government. 



* According to ability to pay. 

<» Not reported. 

6 Residents, S300; nonresidents, $500. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



195 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OP YEAR. 



Adults. 



2,595 

28 

20 

17 

8 

24 

36 

W 



35 

(') 

170 

14 

8 
4 

1 
C 
2 

3 
56 
19 
37 
18 
220 
77 



2,595 



20 



W 



« 



125 
7' 



2,595 

2S 



Be- 



24 
3Ci 



35 



220 



2-0 

o a 

H 



(') 



S37 






Children. 



13 



49 



{=•) 



(') 



146 

310 

1 



291 



23 



28 



(=•) 



(«) 



(') 



(') 



176 



23 



27 



80 



(=) 



47 
4 
31 



146 

310 

1 



28 



Ct3 
P. P. 



(■■') 



80 



60 

130 

1 



291 



23 



21 



(') 



('■) 



w 



(») 



RECEIPTS DURING TEAR. 



Total. 



2 $1, 182 

447, 819 
5,700 

2,302 

1,926 

836 

3,000 

19,200 

2,900 
975 

4,601 

(') 

26,000 

1,200 

2,223 

320 

72,226 

9,480 

1,747 

10,472 

6,435 

2,500 

2,023 

8,606 

3,239 

15,500 

25,271 

11,318 

7,908 

W 

(') 

(<■) 

S46 

4,4.58 

7,550 

"1,852 

(=) 



Derived from— 



Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 



$600 

» 437,657 

.500 

500 

711 
541 



900 
000 



(') 



800 
800 



10,000 



(.") 
W 



(') 



Dona- 
tions. 



= $285 



200 



1,150 
203 



(') 

240 

200 
70 

120 
(') 
(') 
9,480 

1,74 

62 
1,000 
2,000 
980 
8, 606 
3,239 
(■••) 

1,057 
1,318 
6,612 
(') 
('■) 

689 
2,699 



(=■) 



Care of 



' Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 

f Boarders. 

» Includes report of St. Peter Claver's Colored School. 



$2,000 



1,000 



(') 



2,134 



1,296 



(■'■) 
('■) 

96 
1,599 



{») 



Other 

sources 



$397 
10,162 
3,000 



65 

42 

3.000 



2,000 



4,a52 

24,700 

200 

1.333 

200 

(') 
(') 



2,829 

5, 435 

.500 

1.037 



22,080 



01 

160 

7,550 

HI, .852 



PAYMENTS DURING TEAR. 



Total. 



$1,182 

434,220 

0,300 

1,466 

1,895 

836 

3,600 

25,500 

1,100 
1,200 

4,359 

26,000 

1,200 

2,192 

332 

100,392 

734 

17,200 

1,74 
10,457 
4, 
4,000 
3,528 
8, 451 
3,131 
16,000 
25,271 
8,682 
2,965 
W 
W 
W 

752 
4,429 
8,282 
2,274 

(') 



For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 



$1,182 

426,844 

4,800 

1,334 

1,895 

836 

3,600 

12,500 

1,100 
1,200 

4,144 
(') 

19,000 

1,200 
2,192 

332 
15,562 

734 
9,299 

1,500 

(=■) 
4.962 
4,000 
3,528 
8,451 
3, 131 

16,000 

25,271 
4,055 
2,003 

(') 

W 

W 

606 
4,429 
8,282 
2 274 

(.<■) 



For 
perma- 
nent 

im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$7,382 
1,500 



215 

V-) 

7,000 



84,830 



7,901 



(■■■> 



4,627 
962 

(') 

0) 

W 
140 



(') 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$3,0001 

1,147,182 

50,000 

10,000 

6,000 

1,600 

(■') 

330,000 

4,000 
4,000 



24,000j 

<') ! 

200,000 

4,010 

6,000 

10,500 

154,392 

r-) 

60,000 

205 

000 
473 
000 
328 
000 
559 
.500 
000 
OIX) 
000 
000 



190, 
91, 
50, 
42, 

100, 

11, 
38, 

313, 
11, 
15, 

200, 

(») 

(') 

7, 

4, 

n 2 



(') 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$3,000 

1,147,182 

50,000 

10,000 

6,000 
1,600 

300,000 

4,000 
4,000 

12,000 

(') 

200,000 

4,010 

6,000 

7,000 

149,392 

60,000 



125,000 
7,500 

(') 

15,000 
100, 0«1 

9,000 

38, .500 
313,000 

11,000 

15,000 

W 

(') 

(') 

6,000 



"2,207 



(■■) 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



JO No rule against admission. 

" Equipment. 

" Includes wood yafd. 



('■) 
$30,000 



12,000 



3,500 
5,000 



205 
65,000 
83,973 

27,328 



2,559 



(») 

1,500 
4,000 



W 



196 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— H0ME>S FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AMD LOCATION. 



KENTUCKY— Oontmued. 

Paducah: 

Home of the Friendless 

Fourteenth and Burnett Sts. 
Pewee Valley: 

Kentucky Confederate Home 

Shelbyyille: 

Old Masons' Home of Kentucky. . 



LOUISIANA. 

New Orleans: 

Bethany Home 

Nortli Claiborne Ave. and Allen St. 
Fink .\sylum 

3fj43Camp St. 
German Protestant Home for the Aged and 
Infirm. 

5919 Magazine St. 
Home for Homeless Men 

325S Chippewa St. 
Home for Homeless Young Women 

1434 Polymnia St. 
Home for the Aped 

Johnson and La Harpe Sts. 
Home for the Aped 

361S Prytania St. 
House of the Oood Shepherd 

2000 Bienville St. 
Lepers' Home 

Conti and Chartres Sts. 
Liner's Harvest Home 

2538 Delachaise St. 
Maison Hospitaliere 

822 Barracks St. 
Memorial Home for Yoimg Women 

803 Washington Ave. 
New Orleans Convalescent Home 

2804 Carrollton Ave. 
New Orleans Home for Incurables 

612 Henry Clay Ave. 
St. Anna's Asylum 

1823 Prytania St, 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

617 St. Charles St. 

Soldiers' Home of Louisiana 

Thorny Lafou's Home of the Holy Family, 

Hospital and Tonti Sts. 
Sheeveport: 

Home for the Homeless 

Jordan St. and Division Ave. 



MAINE. 
Aubden: 

Auburn Home for ,\ged Women 

13 South Oofl St. 
Augusta: 

St. Mark's Home 

57 Wlnthrop St. 
Bangor: 

Good Samaritan Home 

105 Third St. 

Home for Aged Men in Bangor 

181 State St. 

Home for Aged Women 

277 State St. 

King's Daughters' Home 

89 Ohio St. 
Bath: 

Home for Aged C^juples and Old Men. 
Harvard St, 

Old Ladies' Home 

800 High St, 
Belfast: 

Belfast Home for -\ged Women 

24 Cedar St. 
Lewiston: 

Lewiston Home for Aged Women 

507 Main St. 
Portland: 

Home for .\ged Men 

119 DanforthSt. 

Home for Aged Women 

64 Emery St. 
Mary Browii Home. 



15 Capisir St. (Woodfords P.O,). 

Joseph's Home and Hospital 

120 Walton St. (Woodfords P.O.). 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private corporation . 



State of Kentuckv . 



Masonic Grand Lodge of 
Kentucky. 



German Protestant Beth- 
any Society. 
Private orgauizat ion 



Private corporation , 



Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Little SLsters of the Poor, , , 
Little Sisters of the Poor, , , 
Sisters of the Good Shepherd, 

State of Louisiana 

Private corporation 

Private corporat ion 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 



State of Louisiana 

Sisters of the Holy Familj' . 

Private corporation 



Private corporation 

St. Mark's Epicopal Church 

Private corporation 

Private corporation . , , , 

Private corporation 

King's Daughters 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation , 

Private corporation. 

Private corporation. 

Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 
Private corporation. 
Sisters of Mercy 



f'la.ss of Inmates received. 



> Not reported. 

- According ta ability to pay. 

a Colored only. 



Homeless women and chil- 
dren. 



Confederate veterans 

Masons and tlieir wives. 



.\ged and Infirm persons 

Profpstant widows and chil- 
dren. 
Aged persons 



Homeless men . 



Destitute women and chil- 
dren. 
Destitute aged persons 



Aged persons.. 



Fallen women and wayward 

girls. 
Lepers 



Destitute families 

Needy gentlewomen. 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Needy convalescents 



Incurable women and chil- 
dren. 

Destitute women and tlieir 
children. 

Homeless unemployed men , 



Confederate veterans . , , 
Aged men and women. 



Destitute aged persons , 



Dependent iiged women. 
Aged gentlewomen 



Fallen women, wayward 

girls, and cliildreu. 
Indigent ageti men 



-\ged women 

Homeless unprotected girls. 

Aged men and couples 



Homeless aged women , 



Impoverished aged women, , . 

Homeless aged men 

Aged women 

Women needing recupem t ion. 

Aged, incurable, and con- 
valescent women. 



1902 
1901 



is;4 
1.S85 

1907 
1880 
1S40 
18S2 
1859 
1894 
1876 
1893 
18S8 
1SS9 



1893 

1S47 

1908 

1S82 
1848 



l.SSH 

1S71 

1902 
1903 
1872 
1891 

1892 



Impoverished aged women, . . 1875 



1902 

1884 
1854 
1894 
1882 



m 



(•■) 



i$200 



50 
200 
100 



100 
100 



(') 

10 2001, 

M75!, 



'84.00 

(») 



No, 

No. 

Yes, 
No, 
No. 
Yrs. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

(') 

No. 

No. 

No. 
I 
'2.50 No. 



No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yo.<. 
Yes. 

{■■') 
No, 
No, 
No. 
No. 
No. 

(') 

No. 
Yeii. 



* No rule against admission. 

5 Equipment. 

6 And all property owned or acrjuircd thereafter. 



inmates received 
during tear. 



(') 



4 
6 
12 

110 
169 
64 
44 
203 



(') 



20 

4 

18 

133 

10 

14 

71 

20 
46 



(•) 



42 
2 
(') 
280 

1 



(') 



110 
23 
34 

12 



(') 



(') 



(') 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



197 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF VEAR. 



237 

20 

16 
55 
S3 

35 

9 

200 

192 

204 

66 

22 

32 

8 

17 

34 

56 

17 

122 
81 

(') 



12 

( 

5 
16 

6 

13 

13 

27 
14 
30 



Adults. 



237 
20 



35 



0) 



(') 



(') 



{') 



Sa 



n © c3 o! 



2.3' 
20 

16 
53 
53 

25 

1 

200 

192 



32 



(') 



12 

(') 

6 
0) 



(') 



0) 



(■) 



(') 



Children. 



(') 



(') 



P) 






(') 



C) 



0) 



RECEIPTS DUHINQ YEAR. 



Total. 



$3, 450 

41,000 
11,440 

1,391 

0,309 
4,705 

4,000 

793 

(') 

(') 

« 

20,277 

162 

920 

2,734 

2,598 

7,411 

8,714 

3,539 

28,900 
4,466 

<■) 

1,581 

3,128 

2,998 
3,267 
(') 
3,732 

3,050 
3,090 

1,603 

2,109 

0) 

7,148 
4,047 
3.728 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
atjons. 



S3, 250 
41,000 



360 

2,000 
300 



(') 

18,000 
120 
616 
504 

(') 

1,000 
351 



28,600 
1,960 



(') 



1,200 



500 
175 



(') 



Dona- 
tions. 



S200 



9,640 

75 

42 

1,461 

1,000 
214 
(') 
(') 
(') 

2,277 
42 



2,230 
(') 

2,411 
444 



300 
363 



(') 



372 
127 
46S 



0) 



298 
40 



395 
600 



(') 



659 
3.S2 
,S00 



Care of 



S420 



0) 
(') 
0) 



(>) 



{■) 



1,991 
1,3.30 



C) 
1,967 



(') 



2,630 
2, 428 



Other 
sources. 



$1,800 

896 
6,267 
2,714 

1,000 
279 
(') 
(') 



(') 

4,000 
7,919 
3,639 



2,142 
(') 

1,209 
1,010 



3,26' 
(') 
967 

2,835 
3,090 

1,208 

1,509 

(') 

6,489 

1,029 

.500 



PAVMENT.S DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



S4,287 

41,000 
11,018 

1,175 
6,111 
3,881 

2,000 
766 
(') 
12,000 
(') 

20,277 
(') 
570 

2,050 
(') 

7,000 
17,914 

5,073 

35,000 
6,788 

(■) 



1,626 

3,068 

3,015 
2,671 

(') 
2,905 

2,275 
2,i 

1,560 

2,100 

(■) 
6,739 
4,486 
3,780 



For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 



S4,28; 

41,000 
7,248 



1,075 
6,111 
3,465 

2,000 

711 

(■) 

8,000 
(') 
20,277 
(■) 
670 

1,800 
(') 

6,000 
10, 708 

5,073 

36,000 
2,74- 

(') 



1,626 

2,800 

2,306 
2,671 
0) 
2,905 

2,275 
2,891 

1,560 

1,956 

(') 
6,739 
4,486 
3.' 



For 
perma- 
nent 

Im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$3,772 



100 



426 



65 
(') 
4,000 



P) 



250 

(') 

1,000 

7,206 



(') 



268 
709 



0) 



(') 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$1,200 

45,000 
47,600 

24,350 

292,472 

68, 700 

1,000 

10,000 

(') 

76,000 

(') 

50,000 
1,800 
7,000 
3,500 
2,590 

(') 
195,300 

5 1,190 

50,000 
(') 

(') 



14,019 

15,000 

6,000 
84,500 
(') 
26,912 

40, 69' 
70,000 

13,000 

1,5,000 

(') 
154,710 
32,000 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$1,200 

45,000 
47,000 

20,000 
50,000 
40,001 1 

1,000 
5,000 

(') 

75,000 

(') 

50,000 
1,800 
7,000 
3,500 

(') 

40,000 

55,500 

5 1,190 

50,000 
30,000 

2.5,000 
4,500 



6,000 
l.".,000 
(') 

6,000 

7,000 
10,000 

6,000 

8,000 

23,000 
20,000 



S600 

4,350 
242,472 
28,700 



5,000 



(') 
139,800 



(') 
(') 

9, 519 
l.'i.OOO 



69, 500 



20, S12 

33,597 
60,000 

7,000 

7,000 

C) 
131,710 
12,000 



' -Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 
' From SI. .50 to $3; boarders only. 



5 Resident.><, S2(X): nonresidents, 
"> And all property owned. 



$500. 



198 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table IU.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 





NAJIE AND LOCATION. 


Sup6r\Tsed or conducted 
by- 


Class of inmates received. 


1 


1 

s 
s 

d 

c 

1 

< 


i 
p. 

c 

o 

B 


o 

1 


o 

<D 

2 

a 


INMATES RECEIVED 
DURING YEAR. 


is 

\ 


1 


.2 
S 


_2 
1 


IS 


MAINE— Continued. 

Portland— Continued. 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 


Salvation Armv- - - 


Homeless unemployed men. . 

Fallen girls, homeless women, 
and children. 


1901 
1882 

1900 

1878 

1865 

1889 

1870 
1811 
1892 
1900 
1905 
1890 
1908 
1896 
1894 
1881 
1900 

1906 
1891 
1867 

1869 
1883 
1S69 
1868 
1S66 
1892 
1896 
1901 
1881 
1908 

1902 

1891 

188S 
1894 
1903 
1895 






Yes. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 

(') 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

(') 
No. 

(') 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 


6 
6 

2 

4 

428 

2 

2 

6 

5 

16 

1 

4 

(') 

2 

12 

7 

2 

1 

7 
4 

2 
13 

17 

3 
2 
12 
4 

6 

2 

9 
8 
1 
2 


161 
49 

1 

4 

565 


161 

16 

565 


33 
1 
4 


Ifi 


Milk and Silver Sts. 
Temporary Home for Women and Cliildren. 
Powsland St. 
Rockland: 

Home for Aged Women 


Private corporation 


3 $10 

100 
150 


'$4.50 


17 


Private corporation. 


18 


148 North Main St. 
Saco: 

Wardwell Home for Aged Women 


Private corporation 


Aged women 


19 


43 Middle St. 
TOGUS: 

National Home for Disabled Volunteer 
Soldiers. 
National Soldiers' Home. 

MARYLAND. 
Annapolis: 

Chase Home 




Disabled volunteer soldiers 
and sailors. 

Destitute aged women 


1 


Protestant Episcopal Church 
Methodist Episcopal churches 


100 

150 
(») 
(<) 


4.00 


2 


22 Maryland Ave. 
Baltimore: 

Aged Men and Women's Home 


4 
11 

3 

64 

2 

52 

101 

143 

3,021 

12 

532 

50 
IS 
6 

151 
4 

82 

15 
102 
121 

96 

309 

4 

42 

1 

1 

17 
4 

8 
5 


1 
3 
3 

33 

3,021 

4 

334 

13 
6 
3 

40 
4 

309 
2 

17 
2 


3 

8 

64 
2 

52 
101 
110 

8 
198 

37 
9 
3 

151 
4 
42 
11 
102 
121 
96 

4 

40 

1 
1 

4 
8 
3 


3 


1IJ22 Druid HUi Ave. 


Impoverished aged persons... 
Aged persons and orphans . . . 

Women and girls receiving 
less than SS per week. 

Widows of Confederate vet- 
erans. 


4 

5 


Lexington and Callioun Sts. 
Augsburg Home for Orplians and the Aged. . 

746 'West Le.Nington St. 
Bennett Home 


Lutheran Synod of Missouri, 
Ohio, an<i Other States. 

Trustees of Margaret J. Ben- 
nett Endowment. 

Private corporation, . . . 






6 


Confederate Women's Home 


7 


1020 Linden Ave. 
Daughters in Israel of Baltimore City 

1200 East Baltimore St. 
Emergency Homo lor Destitute Women 

11.5 North CreeneSt. 
Florence Crittenton Mission 


Federated Jewish Charities.. 




2.50 


8 


Destitute women and children 
Fallen girls and then- infants. 


9 


National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 






10 


837 Iloliins St. 
Friendly Inn 






11 


307 South Sharp St. 
General German Aged People's Home 

Baltimore and Pavson Sts. 
German Immigrant Home and Seamen's 
Mission. 

130S Beason St. 
Guild of St. George 


Private corporation 


Homeless aged persons 

Immigrants and seamen 

Fallen girls and their infants. 
Homeless men and women . . . 
Needy aged persons 


150 


5.00 
3.50 


12 
13 


German Evangelical Synod 
of North America. 

Private organization 

Private corporation 


14 


1404 East Chase St. 
Hebrew Friendly Inn and Aged Home 

Ill Aisquith St. 
Hebrew Hospital and Asylum (Home De- 
partment). 

East Monument St. 
Home lor Fallen Women of Baltimore City. . 

5 North Exeter St. 
Home for Incinables of Baltimore City 

Twenty-first St. and Guilford Ave. 
Homo for the Aged 


IS 


Hebrew Federated Charities. 

Private organization 

Private corporation 




(') 


16 


Fallen women 


17 


Incurable women 


500 




IS 


Little Sisters of the Poor. . . . 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 
Salvation Army 


Destitute aged persons 

.Vged members of the chiu-ch. 

Fallen women and neglected 
children. 

Fallen women and delin- 
quent girls. 


19 


Preston and Valley Sts. 


200 




?n 


Fulton Ave. and Franldin St. 
House of the Good Shepherd 


51 


Mount and Hollins Sts. 
House of the Good Shepherd 






n 


Calverton Road. 




2.50 


?»i 


735 West Lexington St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 


Homeless unemployed men. . 

Dependent aged persons 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Impoverished aged women. . . 

Impoverished aged gentle- 
women. 


24 


Montgomery and Sharp Sts. 
Shelter for Aged and Infirm Colored Persons 

517 West Piddle St. 
Star of Hope Rescue Home 


Private corporation 


150 




25 


International Apostolic Holi- 
ness Union. 

Counties of Caroline and 
Talbot. 


?fi 


333 North Fulton Ave. 
Easton: 

Home for Aged Women 


200 
250 




27 


Fkederick: 

Home for the Aged 


28 


Record St. 
Pikesville: 

Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers' Home. . 
Poet Deposit: 

Silver Cross Home for Epileptics 




29 


King's Daughters and Sons. . 




250 
300 


ns.75 


an 


Salisbury: 

Salisbury Home for the Aged 


Impoverished aged persons.. 
Aged members of the church. 


31 


^\'ESTMINSTER: 


Methodist Protestant Church 




Main St. 



1 No rule against admission. 

2 Equipment. 

< If a hospital case, (50. 



< Not reported. 

6 For borders only. 

6 From U. S. tiovernment. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



199 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Contmued. 



INMATES PBESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Adults. 



(') 

17 
1,751 

12 

17 
120 
16 
02 
11 
27 
(•) 
11 
72 
65 



10 
47 
34 

9 
41 

290 
100 
145 
71 
(') 
55 
24 
22 

19 

17 

103 
20 
19 
15 



20 



1,751 



150 
16 



(') 



(<) 



So. 



o a 



(<) 
5 
17 
1,751 



41 

290 
100 



19 

17 

103 
20 
19 
15 



«"0 



62 



Q3 <S 



(') 



22 



Children. 



(<) 



11 



276 
50 
(') 



(') 



(•) 



(<) 



(') 



276 
50 
(<) 



i, 
•a . 



(<) 



11 



276 



(<) 



(') 



(<) 



(') 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



J8, 795 
4,078 

1,429 

5,140 

391,838 

2,633 

3,121 
19,817 

3,739 
17,601 

1,477 

6,039 
(') 

2,993 
10, 593 
10, 254 

2,634 

3,780 
8,424 

(10) 

3,653 

6,449 
26, 027 
37, 123 
30, 647 
28, 598 

1,933 
23,102 

3,874 
929 

3,663 

5,346 

14,574 
3,304 
4,625 
2,942 



^ Colored only. 

> Residents, S20IJ to S:!00; nonresidents, $500 addtional. 

> Varies. 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



SI, 500 



« 379, 675 



125 

500 
3,000 



1,000 
500 



1,000 

733 

1,500 



1,500 

(10) 

1,040 
2,500 



8,183 

7,040 

500 



500 



3,000 



12,750 

750 

2,625 



Dona- 
tions. 



.?36 

999 

4,256 



215 

19 
1,018 
1,390 



450 
25 

1,700 
1,644 

1,685 
1,586 

3,600 
6,290 

(10) 

859 

1,725 

26,027 

5,139 

8,641 

147 



711 
912 

242 

323 

1,824 



1,442 



Care of 



SI, 359 



312 

750 
3,550 



9,302 



2,957 



(10) 



3,400 



885 
505 



2,546 



l,.™ 



Other 
sources. 



$8,795 
1,183 

430 

884 

12,163 

1,981 

1,852 
12,249 
2,349 
8,299 
27 
2,557 
(') 

293 
8,216 
7,069 

761 

180 
634 

(10) 

1,600 
2,224 



28,584 
13,823 
20,526 
928 
23, 102 
2,663 



421 
5,023 



8 
2,000 



TAVMENTS DURING TEAR. 



Total. 



$8,092 

4,i 

1,000 

2,618 

373,261 

2,412 

2,. 347 
17,739 

3,479 
17,417 

1,47' 

6,039 

(') 
2,921 

11,903 
10, 250 
2,669 

3,564 
9,869 
(10) 

3,045 
11,923 
24,746 
13,361 
33,648 
28,598 

1,419 
18,700 

3,603 
888 

3,666 

3,582 

15,722 
2,982 
2,750 
2,029 



For 

running 

ex- 
penses. 



For 
perma- 
nent 
Im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$8,092 
4,848 

1,000 

2,618 

351,098 

2,218 

2,347 
17,739 

3,479 
16,496 

1,477 

5, 169 
(') 

2,921 
11,903 

7,750 

1,602 

3,564 
9,869 

(10) 

3,045 
11,923 
24,746 
15,361 
28,423 
21,706 

1,319 
18,700 

3,603 
888 

3,404 

(<) 

15,722 
2,705 
1,500 
1,717 



$22, 163 



194 



2,500 
1,067 



(10) 



5,225 

6,892 

100 



262 



(') 



277 

1,250 

312 



VALUE or PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OP YEAR. 



Total. 



'$2,528 
...38,410 



9,000 
57,347 
839,608 

34,000 

(') 
261,852 

32,872 
251,477 



18,000 
(<) 
10,000 
46,650 
116,557 
15,000 

6,500 
20,631 

(10) 

1,000 
89,000 
174,557 
325, 83' 
150,000 
140,000 



8,325 
6,000 
2 100 

11,500 

94,833 



5,364 
16,000 
12,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
higs, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



2 $2, 526 
15,000 

4,000 

25,000 

839,608 

20,000 

(<) 
80,000 
15,000 
78,795 



8,000 

10,000 
37,750 
50,000 
15,000 

6,500 
20,631 

(10) 

1,000 
60,000 
174,55' 
100,000 
150,000 
140,000 



8,325 
6,000 
2 100 

11,500 

13, 933 



5,000 
16,000 
12,000 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$23,410 
5,000 
32,34 



181,852 

17,872 

172,682 



8,900 
66,55; 



(10) 



29,000 



225,837 



80,900 



364 



'» Included in report of Hebrew Hospital and Asylum (Hospital Department). 
" Average of maximum and minimum amounts.' 



200 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table IU— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Clciss of inmates received. 



INMATE9 RECEIVED 
DUEING YEAR. 



M.\SSACHUSETTS. 

-Amesbuky: 

Amesbury and SaKsbury Home for .\ged 
Women. 
276 Main St. 

.VUBDRND.U.E: 

Walker Home for Missionary Ctiildren 



Beverlv : 

Old Ladies' Home 

12 Lovett St. 
Boston: 

I'.enotli Israel Sheltering Home 

15 Cooper St. 
Boston Home for Incurables 

2019 Dorchester Ave. 
Boston Industrial Homo 

17 Darts St. 
Bumap Free Home for Aged Women 

38 Pleas.ant St. (Dorchester). 
Channing Home 

198 Beilevue St. 
Cliurch Rescue Mission 

10G6 Washington St. 
City Temporary Home 

Chardon St. 
CreUis Consumptives' Home 

560 Blue Hill Ave. (Grove Hall Station). 
Florence Crittenton League of Compassion. , 

701 Massachusetts Ave. 
Free Home for Consumptives 

428 Quincy St. (Dorchester). 
Frencli Women's Christian Home 

212 WeslNewlonSt. 
Hebrew Ladies' Home for Aged 

21 Queen St. (Dorchester). 

Home for Aged Colored Women 

22 Hancock St. 

Home for Aged Couples 

409 Walnut Ave. (Roxbury). 
Home for Aged Men of lioston 

133 West Springfield St. 

Home for A ged Women 

64 Bartlett St. (Roxbury). 
Home for Aged Women 

108 Revere St. 
Home for Friendless and Unfortunate Wo- 
men. 

4 Hawthorn St. 

Home for the Aged 

424 Dudley St. 
House of Mercy 

244 Townsend St. ( Roxbury). 
House of the Good Shepherd 

841 Huntington Ave. 
Immigrants' Homo 

72 Marginal St. (East Boston). 
John Howard Industrial Home 

660 Massachusetts -Vve. 
Lutheran Immigrant Home 

9 Henry Rt.JEast Boston). 
Massachusetts Home for Intemperate Wo- 
men. 

2 Binney St. (Fenway Station). 
Mount Pleasant Home 

69 Elm Hill Ave. (Grove Hall Station). 
Phineas Stowe Seamen's Home 

8 North Bennett St. 
Rachel L. Allen Memorial Home 

135 South Huntington Ave. 
Roxbury Home for Children and .\ged Wo- 
men. 

5 Burton Ave. (Roxbury). 

St. Francis Home and Orphanage 

Fuldaand Ellis Sts. (Roxbury). 
St. Joseph's Home 

41 East Brooldine St. 
St. Luke's Home for Convalescents 

149 Roxljury St. (Roxbury). 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

134 Hampden St. 

Salvation Army Rescue Home 

103 Train St. (Dorchester). 
Scandinavian Sailors' and Immigrants' 
Home. 

Ill Welister Street (East Boston). 
TaUthaCumi Matemitv Home 

206 West Brookline St. 



Private corporation. 



American Board of Commis- 
sioners for Foreign Mis- 
sions. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation- . . . 
Private corporation. . . . 
Private corporation. . . . 

Private corporation 

Private corporation. ... 
Episcopal City Mission- 
City of Boston 

Private corporation 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Young Ladles' Charitable 
Association. 

French Congregational 
Church. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation. . 
Private corporation. . 
Private corporation. . 
Ladies Unity Club . . . 
Private corporation. . 
Private organization . 



Little Sisters of the Poor 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Woman's Home Missionary 

Society, M. E. Church. 
Private corporation 



Lutheran Augustana Synod, 
Private corporation 



Private corporation 

Boston Ladies' Bethel Soci- 
ety. 
Trinity Church 



Private corporation. 



Holy Trinity Church. 
Sisters of Charity 



Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Salvation .\rmy 



Salvation Array.. 



Eastern Missionary Associa- 
tion. 

New England Moral Reform 
Society. 



1 -Vverage of ma-ximum and minimum amounts. 

2 Not reported. 

3 Exclusive of tubercular, cancer, and mental cases. 



Homeless aged women . 



Foreign missionaries and 
their children. 



Destitute aged women. 



Homeless Hebrew travelers 

and immigrants. 
Incurables' 



Homeless men and women.. 

Impoverished aged women. . 

Consumptive women and 

girls. 
Homeless unemployed men . . 

Homeless women and chil- 
dren. 
Indigent consumptives 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Indigent consumptives 



Working girls 

Indigent aged Hebrews. 
Indigent aged women . . . 

Aged couples 

Homeless aged men 

Homeless aged women. . 



Indigent aged American wo- 
men. 

Fallen or homeless women 
and their infants. 

Destitute aged persons 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Fallen women and unprotec- 
ted girls. 

Needy immigrants , 



Discharged prisoners. 



Immigrants, seamen, and 

emigrants. 
Intemperate women 



Worthy aged persons. . 
Deep-sea sailors 



Aged female members of the 

church. 
Aged women and homeless 

children. 

Aged women and orphans 

Unemployed women 

Needy convalescent women. . 

Homeless unemployed men . . 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Scandinavian sailors and im- 
migrants. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 



1874 



1900 

1891 
1884 
1877 
1878 
1857 
1894 
1862 
1864 
1903 
1892 
1901 
1905 
1860 
1884 
1861 
1902 
1S49 
1878 

1870 
1890 
1867 
1888 
1890 
1905 
1871 

1901 
1846 
ISSS 
1855 

1891 
1865 
1872 
1903 
1893 
1901 

1836 



SlOO 



1S4.25 



(') 



(«) 



400 
150 
500 
150 



»300 



m 



3.50 



'2.00 



14.00 



6.00 
4.00 



2.00 
3.00 



11.25 
3.50 



Yes. 
(=) 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
(') 
No. 

w 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
(•) 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 



< Varies. 

6 .\ccording to ability to pay. 

8 Includes woodvard. 



37 

2,100 
7 

2,611 
3 
37 

l,i 

65 
134 
108 
126 

12 



25 

52 
(') 
476 
652 
559 
750 
115 

12 
100 



10 

1,002 

277 

273 

135 

83 



14 

(=) 
2,100 



1,9 



7,926 
271 
34 



74 



(=) 



336 
559 
485 



3 
100 



1,207 



10 
1,002 

277 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN : 1910— Continued. 



'^^^^ 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF TEAR. 


RECEIPTS DURING 


YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 


VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 




Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Derived from— 


Total. 


For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


In- 
vested 
funds. 


a 

a 

o 
*^ 

1 


1 

i 


•a 
a 




11 

1^' 


o 3 


a 

P 
II 

5^ 


■a 




a 


6 
■a . 

P 
o 




a 

D 

o> 

.S 

■s 

Q 


Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
source^^. 


6 
8 

7 

10 
41 
125 
19 
19 
37 
14 
25 
31 
27 

7 
52 
18 
50 
46 

8 
88 

5 

215 

28 

341 

6 

40 
25 
56 

44 
10 
17 
29 

10 
51 
16 
90 
28 
35 

21 


10 

11 
(') 

37 

13 

18 

22 

25 
46 

lOO 

m 

40 
23 

7 
10 

90 
35 


6 

8 

7 

30 

19 
19 


6 
2 

7 

10 
41 

19 
19 


















$2,073 
13,491 

3,664 

2,457 

22,732 

« 42, 706 

5,407 
10,392 

m 

7,439 
22,861 
19,200 
14, 163 

2,826 
14,481 

8,832 
143, 791 
69,935 

m 

48,550 
3,020 

11,482 

m 

77,421 

4,237 

9 26,594 

7,732 

15,538 

32,421 
2,483 
6,879 

14,053 

2,757 
10,163 
18,310 
41,683 

6,813 
12,936 

9,207 




$324 
6,500 

2,143 

2,457 
490 
1,450 
4,731 
3,361 
C-) 

16,041 

12, .838 

14,163 

547 

5,136 

460 

115,691 

27, 786 

(=) 


SlOO 
5,000 


51,649 
1,991 
1,521 


$1,577 
13,491 

1,698 

2,227 

19,249 

9 42,383 

3,544 
11,639 
(=) 

7,439 
22, 890 
19,284 
10,931 

2,805 
14,181 

8,377 
40, 194 
74,394 

m 

62,109 
3,000 

13,662 

81,846 

4,237 

9 22,042 

6,952 

15,256 

33,841 
2,483 
6,682 

13,714 

5,770 
6,372 
9,509 

31,124 
6,900 

12,203 

9,407 


$1,577 
6,991 

1,698 

2,227 

13,480 

9 41,462 

3,644 
10,816 

7,439 
22,890 
13,361 
10,931 

2,805 
12,681 

2,199 
15,874 
46,824 

(') 
64,941 

3,000 

12,517 

68,865 

4,237 

9 22,042 

6,877 

13,106 

17,127 
2,483 
5,582 
9,734 

5,628 
5,007 
9,131 
31,124 
5,510 
9,005 

9,107 


$6,500 

5,769 
921 

823 
5,923 


$48,886 
60,460 

30,887 

8,600 
457,934 
9 58,617 

35,000 
174,379 

(') 

100,000 
201,065 

35,000 

64,000 


$11,000 
22,000 

6,000 

8,500 

26,000 

« 58, 500 

20,000 

30,000 

(=) 

100,000 

185,399 

35,000 

64,000 


$37,886 
38,450 
24,887 


1 


6 




16 


11 


5 


7 


9 






2 




» 




















4 






9 


1 


8 


9 








1,640 
4,710 

430 
3, 690 


20,602 

9 36,546 

676 

7,031 

(=) 

6,820 
2,666 


432,934 

117 

15,000 

144,379 


G 


125 










« 


















7 






3 




3 


3 








8 


37 
14 








57,009 


9 


14 

12 

31 

9 

7 
30 
18 
25 

8 

88 

5 

115 

28 

341 

« 


25 




4 

5 
4 
3 


2 
2 

4 


2 
3 

3 


2 

5 
4 
3 


2 




10 


15,666 


11 




31 








12 


27 

52 

60 
46 
8 
88 












13 


7 










2,041 
919 

2,300 

1,405 
20 


238 
8,426 
8,372 
25,800 
42, 149 
(') 
47, 145 




14 


















1,600 

6,178 
24,320 
28,670 

(=) 

7,168 


46,000 
177,030 
767,014 
846,826 

16,000 
1,117,824 


40,000 
20,000 

139,100 
50,000 
10,000 

234,378 


5,000 
167,030 
617,914 
796,826 

5,000 
883,446 


15 


IS 


















16 


















17 




















18 




















19 




















20 




5 
















3,000 
11,482 

r-) 

2,703 
3,622 
11,389 
2,297 
4,699 

23,199 

618 

3,946 

2,946 

203 
1,227 
5,338 


21 


215 


















1,045 

m 

12,981 

75 
2,150 

16,714 

1,100 
3,980 

142 

1,366 

378 

1,390 
3,258 

300 


104,100 

m 

406,000 
11,500 

9 28,024 
21,066 
45,000 

112,883 

7,000 

40,000 

182,702 

29,700 
18,000 
193,278 
"0,842 
12,900 
30,000 

81,799 


104,100 

405,000 
11,500 

9 22,250 
21,056 
35,000 

96, 124 

7,000 

40,000 

20,000 

29,700 
18,000 
27,620 
"6,842 
12,900 
30,000 

12,778 




22 




28 
224 


23 

175 


(') 


175 


175 


23 




(') 


n 

615 

4,936 
608 

1,652 
1,845 
2,933 

2,297 
6,682 


V) 
74,718 

9 15,205 

499 

10, 231 

7,570 
20 

11,108 

257 

2,254 

12,972 

41,583 

2,349 

1,908 


(=) 


23 


63 


64 
5 
40 
26 
56 


24 










^■ 


















5,774 


26 


2 
66 

37 


44 


















27 


















10,000 
16,759 


2S 


















29 


10 


















30 


17 
29 

10 

51 
16 


17 
29 

10 




















31 




















162,702 


32 






26 


13 


13 


26 








Xi 


51 
16 
90 












34 


















165,658 


35 


















36 


28 




28 


14 


i') 


(.'■) 





14 






4,464 

4. osr 
6,229 


8, 150 
2,070 




37 




35 


100 




38 


21 




VI 


3 


1 


1 




3 




69,021 


3S 










\ - 







7 For State wards only. 

8 Confinement fee, if able. 

No rule against admission. 



10 And all property o\vned. 
» Equipment. 



20G2 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MASSACHUSETTa-Continued. 

Boston — Continued . 

Temporary Home lor ^^'o^king Women 

453 Shawmut Ave. 
The Refuge 

32 Rutland St. 
Washington Home 

41 Waltham St. 
Wayfarers' Lodge 

30 Hawkins St. 
Welcome House 

9 Florence St. 

Winchester Home for Aged Women 

10 Eden St. 
Bbainteee: 

Abbie Crafts Wade Home 

29 Quincy Ave. (East Braintree). 
Beocton: 

Wales Home for Aged Women 

553 North Main St. 
Cambridge: 

Baptist Home 

308 Brookline St. 

Cambridge Homes for Aged People 

360 Mount Auburn St. 
Chelsea: 

Old Ladies' Home 

3 Washington Square. 

Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts 

CmcoPEE: 

Sherman Rest Home 

259 Chicopee St. 
Concord: 

Concord's Home for the Aged 

22 Walden St. 
Danvers: 

Danvers Home for the Aged 

Park St. 
Fall Rn-ER: 

Fall River Rescue Misson 

63 Fourth St. 

Girls' Industrial Home 

29 Berkeley St. 

Home for Aged People 

116S Highland Ave. 
Fitchburg: 

Fitchburg Home for Old Ladies 

14 Cedar St. 
Feamingham: 

Home for Aged Men and Women in Framing- 
ham. 
Worcester and Pleasant Sts. 
Gaedner: 

Gardner Home for Elderly People 

162 Pearl St. 
Geoegetown: 

Carleton Home 

North St. 
Gloucester: 

Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons . 
1 Western Ave. 

Himtress Home 

110 Prospect St. 
Haverhill: 

Haverhill Deaconess Home 

Lowell Ave., E. D. 2. 

Old Ladies' Home 

119 Main St. 
Holtoke: 

Beaven- Kelly Home 

Springfield Road. 
Father Harkin's Home 

Elm St. 
Holyoke Home for Aged People "> 

Morgan St. 
Laweence: 

Lawrence Home for Aged People 

Berkeley St. 
Salvation Armylndustrial Home 

28 Medford St. 
Leomlnstee: 

Leominster Home for Old Ladies 

16 Pearl St. 
Lowell: 

Ayer Home 

Pawtucket St. 
Battles Home 

15 Belmont St. 

' For State wards only 
' .\verage of maximum 
' Includes $47,800 from 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

City of Boston 

St. Stephen's Church 

Private corporation 

Private individual 

Private corporation 

Private corporation (Baptist) 
Private corporation 

Private corporation 

State of Massachusetts 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Fall River Deaconess Home 
Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Trustees of George H. Carle- 
ton Endowment. 

Private corporation 

City of Gloucester 

New England Deaconess 
Association of Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

Private corporation 

Sisters of Providence 

Sisters of Providence 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



and minimum amounts 
U. S. Government. 



Class of inmates received , 



Unemployed women and girls 

Erring girls 

Inebriate men 

Unemployed men 



Erring young women, chiefly 

court cases. 
.\ged women 



Invalid men and women. 
Needy aged women 



Aged members of the church . 
Impoverished aged persons. . 

Impoverished aged women. . 

Veterans 

Working women and girls. . . 

Impoverished aged persons.. 

Worthy aged persons 



Destitute or degraded men . 

Homeless young girls 

Worthy aged persons 



Indigent aged women . 



Indigent aged men and wo- 
men. 



Aged Protestant Americans . . 

Impoverished aged persons. . . 

Indigent and aged persons 

Indigent aged women 



Working girls and fresh-air 
children. 

Needy aged women 



Aged men 

Aged women 

Worthy aged persons.. 



Needy aged persons 

Homeless imemployed men . . 

Indigent aged women 



Young women and children. 
Aged men 



1878 
1818 
1857 
1878 
1906 
1.S65 

1889 

1893 

1891 
1887 

1887 
1882 
1903 

18S6 

1899 

1895 
1907 
1891 

1883 

1886 

1894 

1902 

1889 
18S9 

1902 

1856 

1909 
1899 
1911 

1895 
1903 

1891 



$10 



200 
300 



* 100 
200 



•200 

'200 

150 

150 

•100 

300 



= 750 
500 

«250 



200 



1870 

1901 I 200 



'$3.00 
22.00 
10.00 



'8.50 



4.50 



(») 



4.00 



(») 



2 4.25 
2 4. 00 



Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

(') 
{') 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 
(') 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

(') 

No. 
(') 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 



inmates received 
during tear. 



533 

13 

834 

25,478 

198 

6 

5 

2 

3 

5 

1 

330 
19 

1 

2 

2,001 

38 

1 

1 



1 

1 

1 
1 

S40 

4 

17 
23 



834 
25,478 



330 



2,001 
2 
1 



(•) 



17 



* And all property owned. 
s Night's lodging, 10 cents. 
« Equipment. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



203 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



20 
18 

22 
64 
34 
33 

14 

18 

33 
41 

9 
541 



32 



as. 



33 
41 

9 
541 



o B 

B « 



20 






Children. 



29 



o a 

J2 CD 

O 



29 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



t$,020 
3,917 

15,087 

11,694 
8,557 

11,464 

3,100 

2,323 

13,871 
17,748 

4,342 

' 143, 800 

130 

2,919 

2,397 

4,634 
2,611 
10,991 

2,565 

4,043 

4,107 

1,707 

3,573 
2,433 

(») 

10,487 

6,496 
3,067 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



$11,694 



M39,800 



Dona- 
tions. 



tl,075 



6,703 

44S 



10,695 
1,578 

1,329 

6,000 
15 

1,* 

1,144 

1,600 
211 

5,090 

317 
1,961 



300 
404 

2,076 

5,800 
848 



Care of 



$412 

461 

13,042 



1,138 

3,100 

570 

600 



200 
384 



(») 

800 

4,311 
3,067 



Other 
sources, 



S6,5:i3 
3,456 
2,045 



1,854 
9,878 



635 

2,576 
16, 170 

3,013 



115 

1,620 

1,053 

2,650 
2,400 
5,901 

2,248 

2,082 

4,107 

1,409 

3,273 
2,029 

(») 

3,8.87 

1,337 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$6,094 
2,' 
14,681 

11,' 

7,640 
8,935 

2,900 

3,664 

7,839 
11,995 

2,909 

143,800 

163 

1,87 

1,645 

5,019 
2,611 

3,014 
3,473 



1,537 
2,872 

(') 

8,810 

6,626 
2,814 



For 

running 

ex- 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 


penses. 


prove- 
ments. 



$6,094 
2,980 
13,368 
11,694' 
7,640 
8,935 

2,800 

3,664 

7,718 
11,995 

1,824 

143,800 

163 

1,790 

1,601 

5,019 
2,611 
7,667 

3,014 

3,473 

2,808 

838 

1,537 
2,872 

C) 

7,839 

6, 626 
2,814 



$1,313 



1,085 



(») 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$75,361 

82,400 
77,090 



43,682 
149,211 



9,764 

47,414 
276,874 

70,000 

442,000 

5,752 

46,309 

23,890 

«900 
30,000 
161,212 

65, 174 

48,899 

87,000 

37, 575 

80,738 
28, 287 

12,000 

100,000 

75,000 
20,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$15,000 
45,000 
30,000 



25, 682 
30,000 



675 

10,000 
76,631 

10,000 

442,000 

3,500 

7,500 

6,000 

6 900 
5,000 
50,000 

26,000 

12,500 

10,000 
2,500 
9,031 



12,000 

10,000 

75,000 
20,000 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$60,301 
37,400 
47,090 



18,000 
119,211 



9,089 

37, 414 
200,243 

60,000 



2,252 
38,809 

17,890 



25,000 
111,212 

39, 174 

36,399 

77,000 

35, 071 

71, 70: 
28,28; 



90,000 



10 

g 

18 
4 



(') 



(') 



(') 



100 



(•) 



(») 



26,965 

5,' 

2,852 

14,951 
1,641 



7, 624 



6,627 



2,360 
1.357 



12,714 
5,769 

2,852 

12,591 
284 



10,505 
5,998 

2,852 

12,693 

I 

1,438, 



10,505 
5,998 

2,852 

11,511 
l,4a8 



1,182 



127, 660 
»520 

76,861 

342, 534 
8,000 



40,000 
«520 

18,575 

25,200 
6,000 



87,660 



58,286 

317,334 
2,000 



' No rule against admission. 
' Varies. 



'Not reported . 

' Not opened until 1911. 



204 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table HI.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MASSACHUSETTS— Continued. 

LOWELI^ Continued . 

Old Ladies' Home 

520 Fletcher St. 

St. Patricli's Home 

Cross St. 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

Liberty Square. 
Lynn: 

Lynn Home for Agen Men 

34 Forest St. 

Lynn Home for Aged Wbmen 

197 NorLh Common St. 

Lynn Workingmen's Home 

13 Commercial St. 
Maiden: 

Maiden Home for Aged Persons 

526 Main Street Park. 
Medford: 

Medford Home for Aged Men and Women.. 
66 South St. 
Methuen: 

Henry C. Nevins Home for Aged and Incur- 
ables. 

Broadway. 
Milton: 

Leopold Morse Home 

100 Blue Hill Parkway (Mattahan). 



Milton Convalescent Home 

Edge Hill Road. 
New Bedford: 

Mariners' Home and Seamen's Bethel 

15 Bethel St. 

New Bedford Home for Aged 

396 West Middle St. 

St. Mary's Home 

Keiiipton and Liberty Sts. 

Workingmen's Home and Wood yard 

25 South Water St. 
Newburitort: 

Home for Aged Men 

333 High St. 

Old Ladies' Home 

75 High St. 
Newton: 

Newton Home for Aged People 

Elliot St. (Newton Upper Falls). 
Noefolk: 

King's Daughters' and Sons' Home for the 
Aged ill Norfolk County. 
Wrontham P. 0? 

NORTnAMPTON: 

Lathrop Home 

236 South St. 
Peabody: 

Charles B. Haven Home for .\ged Men 

109 Lowell St. 

Sutton Home for Aged Women 

143 Main St. 
Pitt.spield; 

Berkshire County Home for Aged Women. . 
89 South St. 
Plymouth: 

Ryder Home for Old People 

65 High St. 
Qdincy: 

National Sailors' Home 

Wallston P. 0. 



Sailors' Snug Harbor of Boston 

PaUner P. O. 
Reading: 

Reading Home for .\ged Women 

68 Linden St. 
Salem: 

Bertram Home for .\ged Men 

114 Derby St.. Box 263. 
City Orphan As\'lum 

215 Lafayette St. 
Home for .\ged and Destitute Women. 

180 Derby St. 
Salval:ion .'Vrmv Industrial Home 

234Bndge'St. 
Somerville: 

Bethsaida Rescue Home .' 

45 Temple St. 
Home for the Aged 

IS6 Highland Ave. 
Somer\TlIe Home for the .\ged 

7 Grandview .\ve. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Class of inmates received. 



Private corporation . 
Franciscan Sisters... 
Salvation Array 



Private corporation 

Priva^ corporation 

Volunteers of America. 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Private Corporation and 
Boston Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities. 

Private corporation 



New Bedford Port Society . . 

Woman's Loyal Union 

Sisters of St. Francis 

Ladies' City Mission Society. 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Private corporation 

King's Daughters and Sons. 



Private corporation , 

Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Private corporation . . 

Private corporation . . 

Private corporation . . 

Private corporation . . 

Private organization . 

Private corporation . . 

Sisters of Charity 

Private corporation. . 
Salvation .\rmv 



Private organization 

Little Sisters of the Poor... 
Private corporation 



-Vged women 

Homeless women 

Homeless unemployed men . , 

Aged men 

AgQd American women 

Unemployed men 



Aged Protestant Americans. 

Aged Americans 

Aged persons 



Indigent Hebrews and theii- 
children. 

Convalescent women and 
children. 



Homeless seamen 

.\ged men and women . 

Destitute persons 

Homeless men 



Indigent aged men 

Aged Protestant women. 

Aged persons 

Aged persons 



Impoverished aged women. . 



Aged men. 



Aged Protestant American 
women. 

Aged women 



Aged and indigent men and 
women. 

Disabled sailors, mariners, 
and other emplovees, U. 
S. N. 

Aged American seamen 



Aged Protestant women.. 
Aged men 



Aged women, invalids, and 

homeless children. 
Aged and destitute women. . . 

Homeless unemployed men, . . 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Destitute aged persons 



Worthy aged persons. . 



1867 
189G 
1905 

1890 

1874 
1902 

1892 

1901 

1906 

1S88 

1888 

1830 
1897 
1S94 
1853 

1886 
1835 

1S9S 

1899 

1884 

1903 
1890 

1890 

1891 

1865 

1852 

1899 

1877 
1S66 
1860 
1908 

1907 
18S9 
1898 



2.50 
250 



275 
(«) 
150 



C'J 



100 
50 

250 

300 



100 
100 

300 

200 



200 



200 



1 S3. 00 



13.60 
1 1.25 



1.60 
3.60 

' 4.75 



(') 



No. 

Yes. 

(') 

m 

Yes. 
Yes. 

V-l 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Nil. 

No. 

(=) 

N». 



12.25 No. 
Yes. 

No. 



No. 

(M 

No. 

(•) 



w 



INMATES received 
DURINQ YEAH. 



4 
274 

152 

2 

1 
300 



4 

383 

267 

12 

130 

1,600 

2 
2 

1 

4 



•a 



162 
2 



{') 



12 
89 

12 

144 

4 



6 
207 



60 
1,500 



(') 



1 .\verage of maximum and minimum amounts. 

2 No rule against admission. 



= Single persons, $200; couples, J300. 
' Not reported. 



GENERAL TABLES. 



205 



OR ADUXTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PEE3ENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 


RECEIPTS DURING 


YEAR. 


PAYMENT.S IIURINU 


YEAR. 


VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAH. 




Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Derived from — 


Total. 


For 
running 

e.x- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


In- 
vested 
funds. 


i 


1 

o 


a 

S 

30 

6 

10 

2 
14 

3 

5 

65 
6 

2 

3 

1 
11 
28 

15 

15 

120 
3 


to 

•a 

s 
« 

42 
60 


a| 

if 
ll 

42 

8 


■r 

as 

asr 


I. 
a 


1 


.2 


1 


4. 

e.P. 

o 




s 

1 




Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Othor 
sources. 


a 

a 
o 

3 
1 


42 
60 
30 

6 
22 
10 

24 

8 

50 

5 

10 

5 
5 
10 
65 

6 
18 

15 

15 

9 

3 

8 

25 

7 

11 

28 

10 

15 
(') 
31 
15 

3 
295 

1.- 






$22, 477 
9,242 
11,483 

8,^5 

7,451 

700 

7,251 

1,787 

15,318 

12,371 

5,658 

3,035 

2,126 

9,190 

8 6,799 

3,061 
4,698 

6,179 

3,104 

3,159 

2,814 
7,847 

8,267 

5,471 

18,204 

11,390 

2,630 

8,265 

. {') 
115, 134 

7,687 

420 
7,857 
7,603 




$15, .800 


$311 
9, 242 


$0, 366 

11,483 

3, 296 

5,087 

400 

6,212 

20 

15,318 

1.694 

11 

2,189 
1,121 

«fl,519 

2, 653 
3,638 

2, 476 

567 

1,329 

2,654 
3,886 

5, 4,38 

4.647 

18,138 

11,390 

2,107 

8,265 
(•) 

30,088 
7,687 


$8,099 
8,048 
14,006 

5,340 

4,678 

800 

7,251 

2,334 

15,318 

13, 198 

6,153 

2,355 

1,407 

33,983 

« 16, 650 

2,405 
4,651 

5,638 

3,448 

2,900 

1,652 
6,039 

8, 139 

1,842 

21,743 

S,2S1 

1,674 

6,671 
(') 
107,310 
5,451 

417 
13,399 
3,480 


$8,099 
8,155 
14,006 

2,816 

4,678 

800 

7,251 

2,334 

8,850 

12,695 

6,153 

2,355 

1,254 

9,190 

5 6,650 

2,060 
4,302 

5,638 

3,448 


$493 



2,524 


$127,868 
53,500 
12,753 

76, 147 
120,400 


$41, 150 
53, .500 
12,753 

13,424 
24,100 


$86, 71S 


74 


52 
30 


















75 




















70 


22 


6 
22 


















3, 785 

2,364 

300 

1,039 

1,767 


1,464 


62,723 
96,300 






















78 


10 


















79 


24 

6 

36 

2 
10 


24 
S 
50 

5 


















6,468 
503 

153 
26, 793 
10,000 

355 
349 


103,939 
7,000 
(') 

94,462 

1,964 

45, 540 
55,060 
76, 793 
10,000 

78,221 
100, 789 

51,500 

26,949 

29,500 

30,235 
51,309 

143, 772 


52,000 

6,500 

125,000 

61, 179 


51,939 
500 
(') 

33, 283 

1,964 

35,910 
24,732 


80 




















81 




















S? 






57 
3 


29 
1 


28 
2 


57 
3 






$3.80 


10,297 

5,301 

846 

472 

5,064 

180 

1,060 
3,703 
1,887 

807 

10 
3,961 

2, ,829 

824 

66 


346 

485 

4,126 

100 

399 

6.50 

1,023 
150 


83 


10 
5 








84 








9,630 
30, 328 
76. 793 
10,000 

17,322 
23,600 

1,500 

14,300 

4,600 

6,600 
9,110 

40,050 


8,5 


6 
10 


5 
10 
















48 


86 






172 


87 


S5 


172 






87 


65 










88 


IS 
15 
13 

9 

8 
25 
6 

10 

m 

31 


6 
IS 

15 

15 

9 

3 

8 

23 
7 
11 
28 
10 
15 

.31 


















60,899 
77, 189 

50,000 

12,649 

25,000 

23,635 
42, 253 

103,722 


89 




















90 




















91 




















9? 




















2,130 

1,652 
2,515 

8,139 

1,842 

' 15, .367 

1 

8,281 
1,674 

6,671 
(') 
12,727 

5,461 

417 
13,399 
3,486 


824 
3,524 


93 




















94 




















95 




















96 




















97 




















6, 376 



(•) 
94,583 


276,428 

275,795 

15,359 

166,441 

(') 
334,531 

8 1,092 

8200 

90,000 
34,954 


60,000 

40,000 

4,500 

7,500 
(') 

58,000 
8 1,092 

8 200 
90,000 


226,428 

235,795 

10,859 

158,941 

270,531 


98 




















99 




















523 




100 




















101 


C) 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(<! 


f) 


m 


(') 


(<) 


84,440 


(') 


102 
103 


15 


















104 


3 

175 

12 




3 


2 




2 




2 






347 

2,457 

608 


79 




105 


295 
15 








5,400 
6,895 




106 




















13,000 


21.954 


107 

























s Residents, $150; nonresidents, $200. 
5 Includes wood yard. 



' For boarders. 
8 Equipment. 



206 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MASSACHUSETTS— Continued. 

Spkingfield: 

House of the Good Shepherd 

Wilbraham Road. 
Salvation .\rmy Industrial Home 

li;4DmghtSt. 
Springfield Home for Aged Men 

7-1 Walnut St. 
Springfield Home for Aged Women 

471 Chestnut St. 
Springfield Home for Friendless Women and 
Children (Adult Department).' 

130 William St. 
Springfield Rescue Mission Home 

30 Willow St. 
Taunton; 

Home tor A ged and Indigent Females 

96 Broadway. 
Wakefield: 

Wakefield Home lor Aged Women 

5 Bennett St. 
Waltham: 

Leiand Home lor Aged Women 

21 Newton St. 
Watertown: 

Sunny Bank Home 

240 School St. 
Westfield: 

Sarah liillett Home for Aged People 

41 Broad St. 
Winchester: 

Home for Aged People 

2 Kendall St. 
Woburn: 

Wobum Home for Aged Women 

74 Elm St. 
Worcester: 

Poor of Hope 

15 Salem St. 
Home tor Aged Colored People 

10 Liberty St. 
Home for .\ged Men 

II'HJ Main St. 
Home for Aged Women 

1183 Main St. 
Odd Fellows' Home of Massachusetts 

North Ave. 
St. Francis Home 

37 Thome St. 
St. Joseph's Home for Business Girls 

fO HiqhSt. 
St. Vincnt Home 

7.1 Vernon St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

134 Southbridge St. 
Temporarv Home and Day Nursery 

10 Edward St. 

MICHIGAN. 
Alua: 

Michigan Masonic Home 



Ann Arbor: 

Old Ladies* Home of -\nii Arbor . 
403 North State St. 
Battle Creek: 

James White Memorial Home 

37 Aldrich St. 
Bat City: 

Old Ladies' Home 

923 North Monroe St. 
Byron Center: 

Michigan Home for Girls 

R. D. 64. 



Detroit: 

.\mold Home for Old Ladies 

lUSelden Ave 
Florence Crittenton Mission 

1.S7 East EUzabeth St. 
German Protestant Home for Orphans and 
Old People. 

1852 West Grand Boulevard. 
Home for the Aged 

45 Scott St. 
House of the Good She|)lierd..: 

792 Fort St., west. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Salvation .\rmy 

Private corporation 

Private organization 

Private corporation 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 
Private corporation . 



Massachusetts Homeopathic 
Hospital. 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation . 



Private corporation. 

Private corporation . 
Private corporation. 
Private corporation . 
Private cori>oration. 



Independent Order of Odd 

Fellows. 
Little Franciscan Sisters of 

Mary. 
Sisters of Mercy 



Sisters of Providence. 

Salvation Army 

Private corporation . . 



Masonic Grand Lodge of 
Micliigan. 



Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



Woman's Association of 
Charity. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation 

National Florence Crittenton 

Mission. 
German Evangelical Synod 

of North America. 

Little Sisters of the Poor... 
Sistors of the Good Sliepherd 



Class of inmates received. 



Fallen women and wayward 1S93 

girls. 
Homeless unemployed men. . 



Aged American men. 

Aged women 

Homeless women 



Homeless unemployed men . 
Aged women 

Aged Protestant women 



Aged -American women. 
Convalescents 



Worthy aged persons.. 
-\ged persons 



Aged Protestant women . 



Fallen women and unpro- 
tected girls. 
Homeless aged persons 



Aged men 

Indigent aged single women. 

Odd Fellows and their familie: 

Aged persons 

Young business women 

Aged persons 

Homeless unemployed men. 

Temporarily dependent 
women arid children. 



Masons, their families, 
mothers, and sisters. 

Impoverished aged women.. 



Aged persons.. 
.\ged women.. 



Homeless orincorrigible girls, 
fallen women and their 
infants. 

Aged women 



Dependent or erring women 
andcliildren. 

German Protestant aged per- 
sons and children. 

Destitute aged persons 



Fallen women and unpro- 
tected children. 



1901 
1897 
1SS4 
1S65 

1892 

1829 

1892 

1879 

1887 

1899 

1894 

1886 

1894 
1900 
1874 
1869 
1892 
1.S89 
1905 
1894 
1903 
1887 



1900 
1893 
1886 
1903 

1900 
1897 

1894 

1874 
1889 



$400 
500 



250 
200 
300 



'200 
200 

150 
200 
250 



1900 



1 800 



(") 

Sou 



•a 



1 S2. 25 



> 1.25 



1 11.00 



I 4.00 
' 3. .50 
' 4.50 



2.00 



Yes. 

m 

Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No, 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 
(') 
Yes. 



(10) 



inmates received 
during tear. 



(") 



2.00 



No. 


3 


Yes. 


3 


No. 


5 


Yes. 


1 


No. 


m 


Yes. 


6 


No. 


10 


Yes. 




Yes. 


8 



1 Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 

2 No rule against admission. 

3 Equipment. 

' Includes report of Cliildren's Department. 



' Children receive^ at 37 Buckingham St. 

8 Not reported. 

' And ail property owned. 



184 
15S 



4 
251 

200 

15 



1 
U5 

(•) 



2 
14 

81 
105 
19 
84 
228 

7 
3 



357 
2 

66 
240 



156 



200 



W 



84 



94 
1 

34 .32 

240 



GENERAL TABLES. 



207 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1010— Continued. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Adults. 



11 
16 
9 

(') 
39 
25 

201 
174 



15 
111 



a a 



(») 



25 
201 



ta 



Children. 



174 



149 



149 



S g 



44 



10.5 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



SM,741 
13, 766 
3,698 
21,455 

'25,206 

26,817 

12,987 

8,400 

2,192 

1,1 

4,529 

1,862 

3,519 

1,216 
6K1 
16,389 
24,713 
30,718 
24,249 
(«) 

m 

16,326 
4,420 

12,668 
3,300 
4,099 
2,835 
1,13' 

(1!) 

6,737 
10,475 

8,7 

m 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



$21,035 



(«) 



8 Included in report of Orplianage of Our Lady of Mercy. 

9 Included in report of St. Vincent Hospital. 
" According to aoility to pay. 



Dona- 
tions. 



$4,664 



12,690 
1,206 

2,946 

10,375 

7,529 



343 

1,081 

156 

11,510 

17,250 

3,1 

1,945 

(») 

(') 



3,528 

12,668 
2,000 



362 
42: 

(.2) 

3,836 
3,101 

8,777 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



$1,960 



1,518 



1,086 

4,043 

200 



680 



13,463 

(») 
(•) 



133 



300 

1,6.38 

123 

126 

2,701 



Other 
sources. 



$19,117 
13, 766 

3,1 

8,765 
22, 482 

2,836 

2,612 

871 

2,192 



486 

700 

3,176 

135 
525 

4,879 

6,783 
26,770 

8,841 

(') 

C) 

16,326 
759 



1,000 

2,461 

2,350 

585 

(1!) 

200 
7,374 



m 



PAYMENTS DURLNG TEAR. 



Fotal. 



$25,540 
11,407 
2,486 
8,915 

* 19,422 

5,431 
12,987 
1,870 
1,965 
4,092 
4,529 
1,750 
3.519 

1,287 
354 

2,383 
11,060 
22,266 
22,534 

m 
(') 

13,374 
35,634 

12,366 
2,100 
2,043 
2,800 
1,137 

(12) 

9,294 
10,374 

7,6 

m 





For 


For 


perma- 


running 


nent 


ex- 


im- 


penses. 


prove- 




ments. 



$18,602 
11,407 
2,219 
8,915 
11,222 

5,431 

4,601 

1,743 

1,809 

4,092 

4,389 

1,760 

3,059 

1,287 
327 
2,383 
10,629 
21,861 
22,534 
(•) 
(') 
13,374 
4,288 

12,366 

1,800 

2,043 

2,725 

709 

8,294 
9,612 

6,318 



$6,938 



8,200 



8,386 
12' 
156 



431 
405 






31,346 



300 



75 
428 

1,000 
762 

1,290 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


$96,400 


$96,400 


3 3,818 


3 3,818 


72,600 


8,600 


208,774 


54,000 


'178,017 


40,000 


50,000 


50,000 


64,241 


14,300 


27,874 


6,000 


63,385 


23,000 


20,000 


20,000 


33,682 


33,215 


19,204 


5,000 


65,158 


9,000 


3,469 




1,800 


1,800 


133,822 


19,900 


191,058 


49,700 


240, 130 


160,000 


81,428 


81,428 


(») 


(«) 


(») 


W 


'3,839 


s 3,839 


59,631 


40,200 


(") 


(') 


8,000 


5,000 


8,0.S4 


6,000 


23,000 


5,000 


7,000 


7,000 


(12) 


(12) 


8,000 


8,000 


44,000 


44,000 


151,169 


150,000 


C) 


(.') 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$64,000 
154, 774 
138,017 



49,941 

21,874 
40,385 



467 
14,204 
56, 158 
3,469 



113,922 
141,358 
80,130 



m 



(•) 

3,000 
2,0S4 
18,000 



1,161 



108 
109 
110 
111 
112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 

119 

120 

121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
128 
130 

1 

2 
3 



11 Varies. 

12 Included in report of .\rnold Hospital for Incurables. 
"Conflnement fee, $35if able. 



/ 



208 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MICHIGAN— Continued. 

Detroit— Continued. 

Phyllis Wheallev Home 

176 East Elizabeth St. 
St. Luke's Hospital Church Home and 
Orphanage. 
1287 Fort St.. west. 

Salvation A rm v industrial Home 

330 Lafayette Ave. 

Salvation Army Rescue Home 

896 Fort St. west. 

Thompson Home for Old Ladies 

Cass Ave. and Hancock St. 
Fenton; 

Baptist Ministers' Home 



Grand Rapids: 

Clark Memorial Home.. 
704 Sherman St. 



Holland Home 

North College Ave. 
Home for the Aged 

I5S Lafayette St. 
House of the Good Shepherd. 

315 Walker Ave. 

Michigan Soldiers' Home 



Rest Cottage , 

779 East Fulton St. 
Richard A lien H ome 

195 Bates St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home. 

167 William' St. 
Salvation Army Rescue Home , 

1230 Soulh Division St. 
Woman's Home and Hospital , 

69 Bostwick St. 
Jackson: 

Handy Slate Missionary Home 

1317 North Lansing Ave. 
Jackson Friendly Home 

North St. 
Odd Fellows' Home of Michigan. . . 



Makengo: 

Dulcenia Home for Aged and Indigent Fe- 
males. 
Marshall P.O. 
Monroe: 

Old Folks' Home (Altenheimj 



MINNESOTA. 
Anoka: 

Ladies of G. A. II. Home 



Belle Plaine: 

Evangelical Lutheran Home. 



CincAGo City: 

Bethesda Old People's Home 

Dover: 

Bethesda Homes 

Willmar P. O. 
Duluth: 

Bethel Rescue Home 

430 SLxth Ave., east. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

1605 Michigan St. 
Minneapolis: 

Bethany Home 

3719 Bryant Ave., south. 
Florence Crittenton Home 

2014 Twenty-sixth Ave., south. 
Home for Children and Aged Women. 

3200 Stevens Ave. 
Home for the Aged 

215 Broadway. 
Jones-Harrison Home 

Cedar Lal^e Boulevard. 
Lutheran Hospice 

82S Sixth St., south. 
Minnesota Soldiers' Home 



Salvation Armv Industrial Home. 
115 North First St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private corporation 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 



Salvation Army 

Salvation Army 

Private coiporation. 



Baptist Ministers' Aid So- 
ciety. 

Methodist Episcopal Chiurch, 



Private corporation , 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd, 



State of Michigan 

International Apostolic 

Holiness Union. 
Woman's Loyal Bible 

League. 
Salvation Army 



Salvation Army 

Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union. 

African Methodist Episcopal 

Church. 
Private corporation 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Private corporation 



Lutheran Missouri Synod.. 



Ladies of the G. A. R. of 
Minnesota. 

United Lutheran Synod of 
Wls., Minn., Mich., and 
Other States. 

Lutheran Augustana Synod , 

Lutheran Free Church 



Duluth Bethel Society. 
Salvation Army 



Private corporation 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Private corporation 



Little Sisters of the Poor 

Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

Lutheran Tuner Mission 
Society. 

State of Minnesota 



Salvation Army. 



Class of inmates received. 



1 No rule against admission. 

2 Equipment. 

3 Not reported. 

* Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 



Aged colored women , 

Aged persons and orphans 

Homeless unemployed men.. , 

Fallen women and their chil- 
dren. 
Aged women , 



Baptist ministers, mission- 
aries, and their families. 

Aged ministers, their wives, 
and aged members of the 
church. 

-^ed persons 



Destitute aged persons 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants, and delmquent chil- 
dren. 

Veterans, their mothers, 
wives, and widows. 

Homeless girls and fallen 
women and their infants. 

Homeless women and chil- 
dren. 

Homeless unemployed men. . . 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Homeless aged women 



Aged ministers, their wives, 
and other worthy persons. 

Homeless women, and chil- 
dren committed by court. 

Odd Fellows and theu: fami- 
lies. 

Impoverished aged women . . 



Aged men and women . 



Soldiers' widows, mothers, 
and sisters. 



Lutherans from the Synod. . . 



Aged persons 

Aged persons and orphans . 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Homeless unemployed men. 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Young girls committed by 
court. 

Aged women and children . . . 



Indigent aged persons 

Aged Protestant women. 



Working girls, transient, and 
convalescent women. 

Veterans, their mothers, 
wives, and widows. 

Homeless unemployed men . . 



1S97 

1861 

1904 
1900 

1875 

1SS7 

1906 

1S92 
1884 
1904 

1885 
1905 
1907 
1906 
1896 
1886 

1906 
1878 
1904 

1898 
1893 



189S 
1S9S 

1904 
1898 

1902 
1910 

1S76 

1S97 
ISSl 
1889 

1887 
1907 

1887 
1899 



S300 



7 150 



(') 



a 



S2.00 



3.00 



(10) 






{■■') 


"300 


"1.50 


41)0 


<3.63 







Yes. 
No. 

(') 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

(') 

No. 
Ye.s. 
No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 

(=) 
(') 

Yes. 

Yes. 

('•) 
No. 
No. 

(') 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

(•) 

Ye.s. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

(') 



IKMATES HECEIVED 
DURING YEAR. 



& Colored ouly. 

« Estimated.' Records destroyed by fire. 

' For persons other than ministers or their wivas. 



225 
144 



11 
30 
13 

612 
20 
30 
59 
94 
35 

1 
30 



10 

IS 

92 

22 

111 

45 

175 

40 

2 

828 

149 

152 



e) 



124 

152 



GENERAL TABLES. 



209 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Adults. 



28 

25 
14 
32 

14 

13 

S2 
153 

7 

1,221 
7 
'2 
20 
13 
16 

3 
31 

41 



25 



32 
10 

12 
12 

70 
14 
20 

135 
28 
25 

528 
42 



1,078 



12 



75 



445 
42 



1,221 



la 



32 . 

hI. 

13 . 

52 
153 



20 
135 



S g 



Children. 



65 



15 



(=) 



(') 



« 



m 



65 



(=) 



1 

47 



64 



97 



63 



60 



RECEIPTS DtJRING YEAR. 



Total. 



82,500 

5,056 

17, 151 
6,745 
9,589 

13,648 

4,917 

7,750 
13, 136 
17,311 

175,000 
1,106 
6 480 
10,088 
2,718 
2,661 

823 
2,300 
16,433 

4,707 

7,355 

3,180 
2,400 

7,871 
5,379 

2,515 
1,995 

6,337 
1,110 

49,419 
5,548 
6,019 
7,382 
'3 94,750 

12,270 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



$2,000 



175,000 



198 



200 



2,500 



Dona- 
tions. 



$500 
38 



5,873 
1,404 

7,081 

m 

1,000 



1,106 
M80 



2,718 
460 

522 

800 

16, 433 

200 

1,600 

680 
1,200 



4,354 



1,400 



" 94, 750 



425 
952 



5,448 

1.' 
1,425 



Care of 



9531°— 13- 



8 And all personal property. 

8 Varies. 

■0 Coufmemeut fee, $25 if able 

-14 



$79 



2,500 



6,200 



301 
1,200 



5,155 



5,992 
125 

1,083 



2,400 
156 



5,9o; 



other 
sources. 



$4,939 

17, 151 

872 

5,685 

6,567 

(') 

550 
13, 136 
17,311 



10,088 



100 



4,507 



600 



1,200 

1,879 
900 

32 
1,995 

512 

2 

49,419 



4,124 

50 



12,270 



r-AVMENTS DURING TEAR. 



Total. 



$3,000 
9,978 

13,976 
7,126 
7,135 

8,923 

4,541 

7,250 

17,466 
17,165 

175,000 
1,098 
6 357 
10,886 
2,814 
2,307 

6,000 
4,600 
16,433 

3,339 

7,152 

2,800 
2,750 

7,426 
5,148 

2,514 
2,069 

7,500 
1,175 
19,821 

6,400' 

5,495 

I 

7,292 

I 

98,958 

11,675 



For 
running,' 



penses. 



$3,000 
9,353 

13,976 
3,881 
7,135 

8,923 

4,541 

7,250 
17,466 
17,165 

175,000 
1,098 
6 177 
10,886 
2,814 
2,003 

6,000 
4,500 
11, 60; 

2,929 

6,877 

2,500 
2,300 

4,826 
4,148 

2,514 
2,069 

6,500 
1,175 
19,821 
3,999 
5,495 
6,466 
98,958 
11,675 



For 
perma- 
nent 

Im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$625 



3,245 



6 180 



304 



410 

1,275 

300 
450 

2,600 
1,000 



1,000 



2,401, 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$6,000 
109,500 

»5,277 

11,000 

164,321 

66,996 

92,990 

8,000 
49,072 
50,000 

427,050 
5,000 

m 

8,138 
4,200 
15,624 

10,000 
44,600 
89,095 

69,445 

27,802 

20,000 
21,600 



Land, 
huild- 
insrs, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$6,000 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$109,500 



2 5,277 
11,000' 
50,000 

18,900 

53,800 

8,000 
49,072 
50,000 

427,050 
5,000 

8,138 
4,200 
13,000 

10,000 
40,000 
89,095 

26,751 

27,802 

20,000 
11,000 



114,321 
48,096 
39,190 



21,000;, 15,000 
30,000 1 30,000 



7,000 
2 1,000 

(') 

3,634 
300,000 
75,000 
88,928 
35,000 
500,000 
» 3,290 



7,000 
> 1,000 

(') 
3,500 
40,000 
75,000 
50,000 
35,000 
500,000 
23,290 



2,624 



32,694 



10,500 



6,000 



3,800 

134 

260,000 



38,928 



u For women. 
12 For children. 
"Includes $34,750 from V. S. Govemmsnt. 



210 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



MINNESOTA— Continued. 

Minneapolis— Continued. 

Scandinavian Home of Shelter 

3428 Oakland Ave. 

Travelers' Aid Home 

1714 Stevens Ave. 
New Ulm: 

St. Alexander Old People's Home 

Noethfield: 

Odd Fellows' Home and Orphan Asylum 

St. Cloud: 

St. Joseph 's Home ■. 

R. D. 1. 
St. Paul: 

Church Home of Minnesota 

687 Fuller St. 
Colored Orphanage and Old Folks' Home. 

1537 Randolph St. 
Home for the Aged 

90 Wilkin St. 
Home for the Friendless 

469 Collins St. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

Milton and Blair Sts. 
Jewish Home for the Aged 

75 Wilkin St. 
St. Paul Bethel 

316 Wabasha St. 
Salvation Axmy Industrial Home 

55 West Third St. 
Salvation Aimy Rescue Home 

480 North St. 
Woman 's Christian Home 

Albany and Hamlin Sts. 

MISSISSIPPI. 
Gulfport: 

Jefferson Davis Beauvoir Soldiers' Home.. 



Mebidlvn: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

Fifteenth St. and Twenty-second Ave. 



MISSOURI. 
Hannibal: 

Home for the Friendless 

501 North SLxth St. 

HiGGINSVILLE : 

Confederate Soldiers' Home of Missouri. 



Kansas City: 

Armour Home 

Tracy Ave. and Twenty-second St. 
Florence Crittenton Home 

3003 Woodland Court. 
Geo. H. Nettleton Home for Aged Women. 

626 Penn St. 
Helping Hand Institute 

408 Main St. 
Home for the Aged 

Thirty-first and Locust Sts. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

Twentieth St. and Cleveland Ave. 
Kansas City Industrial Homo for Girls 

2940 Highland Ave. 
Old Folks' and Orphans' Home 

2446 Michigan Ave. 
Rest Cottage 

2033 Brighton St. 
Salval ion Army Industrial Home 

1709 Walnut St. 
Libeett: 

Odd Fellows' Home of Missouri 



Mexico: 

King's Daughters' Home 

St. James: 

Federal Soldiers' Home of Missouri. 



St. Joseph: 

Memorial Home for Aged People. . 

1120 Maine St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home. 

Seventh and Messanie Sts. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private corporation 

Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

St. Alexander Hospital 

Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Sisters of St. Benedict 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 
Private corporation 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Private corporation 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd 

Private corporation 

Bethel Association 

Salvation Army 

Salvation Army 

Minnesota Magdalen Society 

State of Mississippi 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 



Private corporation. 
State of Missouri 



Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Private corporation 



Private corporation 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd 
Private corporation 



Colored People's Christian 

Charity Association. 
Private Corporation , 



Salvation Army. 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

King's Daughters and Sons. 

State of Missouri 



Ladies' Union Benevolent 

Association. 
Salvation Army 



Class of inmates received. 



1 According to ability to pay. 

2 Not reported. 

8 Included in report of St. Alexander's Hospital. 
* From $16 to $35 per month. 



Fallen women 

Girls seeking employment 
and women traveling. 

Aged persons and children 

Odd Fellows and their fami- 
lies. 

Aged men and women 



Aged women . 



Homeless aged persons and 

children. 
Indigent aged persons, . 



Destitute women and chil- 
dren. 

Fallen women and unpro- 
tected girls. 

Aged men and women. 



Working men and women, 

and needy persons. 
H meless unemployed men.. 

Fallen women and their chil- 
dren. 
Fallen girls and their infants. . 



Confederate veterans, their 
wives, widows, and war 
body servants. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 



Friendless women and chil- 
dren. 

Confederate veterans and 
their families. 

Impoverished aged couples. 

Unprotected girls, fallen 

women and their infants. 

Destitute aged gentlewomen. 

Homeless unemployed per- 
sons and children. 
Aged persons 



Fallen women and dependent 
girls. 

Homeless undisciplined girls 
and children. 

Destitute aged persons and 
orphans. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Homeless unemployed men. 

Odd Fellows and their fami- 
lies. 



Aged women 

Civil War veterans, their 
wives and widows. 

Aged men and women. 

Homeless unemployed men. . 





a 






"o 


INMATES RECEIVED 




M 


•a 




DUHINO YEAR. 




s 


S 

fe 


S 


u 
































1 


i-i 


rt 










^ 






s? 








© 


(=1 




S 


s>' 








'^ 


o 






a. 








o 

1 


o 

a 


o 

s 


1 


S 
H 


2 


■a 


S 


JH 


< 


<! 


o 


&< 


B 


s 


l^ 


1907 






No. 
Yes. 


2 
4 


25 
1,200 




25 
1,200 




(') 


1884 


m 


S6.00 


Yes. 


34 


169 


87 


82 


1900 




1.25 


No. 


7 


13 


6 


7 


1900 




(') 


No. 


6 


54 


31 


23 


1894 




S3.75 


No. 


4 


3 




3 


1903 




M.88 


Yes. 


4 


25 


11 


14 


1883 
1867 






No. 
No. 


5 


36 
2 


19 


17 
2 


m 




1868 
1908 






Yes. 
No. 


5 
3 


77 
2 


1 


77 
1 


$200 




1872 




'1.25 


Yes. 


12 


4,700 


3,500 


1,200 


1904 
1898 
1873 






Yes. 
Yes. 


9 
5 
3 


136 

231 

60 


136 
101 


130 
60 








(12) 


1903 






Yes. 


?4 


81 


64 


17 


1899 






No. 


('-) 


20 




20 


1882 




.50 


No. 


3 


100 


14 


86 


1891 
1904 






No. 
No. 


30 
3 


57 
6 


42 
3 


15 
3 


■3 600 




1896 


50 




No. 


1 


44 


(=) 


(') 


1890 


300 




No. 


7 


5 




5 


1894 




(») 


Yes. 


47 


7,171 


6,845 


326 


1882 


(=) 


m 


C) 


« 


m 


m 


m 


1887 
1894 






Yes. 
No. 


4 
2 


300 
65 




300 

65 




2.00 


1888 
1904 
1899 

1895 

1905 






(.6) 

No. 

(10) 

No. 

No 


1 

12 
19 
.1 


38 

44 

346 

23 


18 

346 
14 


20 
44 

9 














300 




1896 
1874 






No. 
No. 


36 

5 


116 

1 


84 


32 

1 


400 




1899 






(10) 


3 


52 


52 









£• Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 

6 For residents, $300; nonresidents, $600. 

7 Includes '* care of inmates." 

8 Included in " donations." 



GENERAL TABLES. 



211 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



36 
20 



137 
19 

175 
10 

260 
31 
20 
18 

180 

S 

3M 

17 

13 

29 

215 

m 

70 
4 

13 
S 

54 

56 

12 
220 

29 
7 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR 



Adults. 



6 

244 
31 



145 



275 



213 



35 



(.-) 



Sa 



3 

6 

137 

19 



180 



324 



16 



12 
220 



2l3 
O C 

D « 



m 



3 O- 



(^) 



Children 



7 
28 



m 



m 



108 



(^) 



(') 



(=) 



o 



(=) 



3 
13 



n 



(-) 



(=) 



(^) 



C'') 



o fl 



28 



(^) 



(=) 



(») 



(') 



« 



RECEIPTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$1,049 
2,407 

O 
17,542 

4,794 

3,045 
1, 

5,735 
24,700 

2,65 
26, 650 
12,416 

3, 

3,201 

47,406 
C-) 

(=) 

55, 350 

4,627 
6,664 
9,865 

26,588 
C) 

14,240 

4,200 

1,230 

910 

34, 949 

62, 582 

2,430 
86,354 

5,089 
5,164 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



' For room. 

10 No rule against admission. 

" Equipment. 

» No weekly charge; S65 for four months. 



(») 



$47,406 



C-) 
55,350 



200 
2,700 



86,354 

420 



Dona- 
tions. 



$851 
1,261 



469 

(=) 

3,000 
24,700 
'2,65 

1,050 



1,911 
677 



(-) 



C-) 



288 
6,664 
6,088 
9,575 

5,040 

4,200 

737 

910 



2,400 



300 



Care of 



$966 
3,443 



C«) 



1,602 
2,412 



m 



7,648 
200 



810 



Other 
sources 



$198 

180 

{») 
14,099 

2,300 

1,452 
549 

2,735 



25, 600 

12,416 

292 

112 



(') 



2,539 



3,577 
6,665 

9,000 



34,949 



30 



3,559 
5,164 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$1,032 

2,328 

(=) 
12,552 

37,115 

2,548 

1,! 
(^) 

5,127 
24,575 

2,048 
24,550 
11,745 

3,690 

3,310 

47,396 

53,660 

4,675 
7,502 
6,322 
27,318 

14, 140 

2,966 

1,230 

907 

29,940 

52,776 

2,400 
86,354 

4,720 
5,519 



For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 



$1,032 
2,328 

(=) 
12,552 

11,735 

2,548 
1,43' 

(') 
5,127 

20,630 
2,048 

22,550 

11,201 
3,690 
2,995 

34,990 

800 

C-) 

43,650 

4,676 
1,102 
6,322 

17,318 

(■) 

12, 640 

1,965 

930 

907 

28,782 

28,264 

2,400 

83,477 

4,720 
5,403 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$28,000 

0) 



25,380 



3,945 



2,000 
544 



12,406 

(=) 

(') 
10,000 



6,400 



10,000 
(=) 

1,500 

1,000 

300 



1,158 
24,512 



2,877 



116 



13 For each couple. 

n Lodging 10 and 15 cents per night. 

16 Colored onlv. 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAH. 



Totjll. 



$4,500 
18,000 

(-) 
87,719 

44,600 

10,000 
11,000 

60,000 
150,000 
10,000 
65,000 
"2,764 



31,000 

125,000 

8,000 

(=) 

136,658 

106,000 
20,000 
38,080 
21,631 

80,000 

8,000 

6,000 

800 

"6,794 

350,000 

10,500 
105,000 

(') 
" 1,283 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$4,600 
10,000 

(=) 
78, 143 

44,600 

10,000 
10,000 
(=) 
10,000 
150,000 

10,000 

56,000 
" 2, 764 



30,000 



125,000 



8,000 



135,658 

55,000 
20,000 
16,000 
21,631 

m 

80,000 

8,000 

6,000 

800 

» 6, 794 

360,000 

10,000 
105,000 

» 1,283 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$9,576 



60,000 



(=) 



22,080 



(^) 



48,000 



212 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table HI.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AMP LOCATIOK. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



t'lass of inmates received. 



to 
o 

p. 



INMATES RECEIVED 
DURING YEAR. 



MISSOURI— Continued. 

St. Louis: 

Bethany Home 

4205 North Eleventh St. 
Bethosda Old People's Home 

3600 Rutger St. 
Church Mission Home for Convalescent 
Women. 

100 North Leffingwell Ave. 
Colored Old Folks' Home 

9837 Eugenia St. 
Hephzibah Rescue Home 

3014 Morgan St. 
Home for Aged and Infirm Israelites 

3652 South Broadway. 
Home for the Aged 

2209 Hcbert St. 
Homo for the Friendless 

4431 South Broadway. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

3801 Gravois Ave. 
Jewish Orthodox Old Home 

1438 East Grand Ave. 
Lutheran Altenheim 

1906 Lafayette Ave. 
Masonic Home of Missouri 

5351 Delmar Boulevard. 
Memorial Home 

2609 South Grand Ave. 
Nonsectarian Old People's Home 

3426 Franklin Ave. 
St. Ann's Widows' Home 

5301 Page Boulevard. 
St. Louis .\ltonheim 

5408 South Broadway. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

13 North Third St. 
Salvation Aniiy Rescueand Maternity Home 

3740 Marine Ave. 
Second Home for the Aged 

Cherokee St. and Grand Ave. 
Young Girls* Home and Industrial School 

'Twenty-second and Morgan Sis 

MONTANA. 

Columbia Falls: 

Montana Soldiers' Home 

Helena: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

Hauser Boulevard (Kenwood). 



House of the Good Shepherd 

Montana Odd Fellows' Home 12. 



Pentecostal Training Home. 

Private corporation 

Protestant Episcopal Church 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Jewish Charitable and Edu 

cationalUnionof St. Louis. 
Little Sisters of thePoor. . 



NEBRASKA. 
Blair: 

Crowell Memorial Home. . . 



Grand Island: 

Nebraska Soldiers' and Sailors' Home., 
Burkett P. O. 
Lincoln: 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

1428 O St. 
Milford: 

Nebraska Industrial Home 



Soldiers' and Sailors' Home. 



Omaha: 

House of Hope 

95S North Twenty-seventh Ave. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

Fortieth and Jones Sts. 
Nazareth Home for the Aged and Invalid . 

Thirty-fourth St. and Meredith Ave. 
Old People's Home 

2214 Wirt St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home 

2734 CalweU St. 
Salvation Army Rescue Home 

3824 North Twenty-fourth St. 
Plattsmouth: 

Nebraska Masonic Home 

1319 Elm St. 



Private corporation 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd 
Private corporation 



Private corporation (Luth- 
eran). 

Masonic Grand Lodge of Mis- 
souri. 

St. Louis Woman's Christ- 
ian Association. 

Private individual 



Sisters of Charity 

Private corporation 

Salvation Army 

Salvation Army 

Little Sisters of the Poor. . . 
Sisters of Mercy 



State of Montana.. 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Sistersofthe Good Shepherd 
Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



Methodist EpiscopalChurch, 

State of Nebraska , 

Salvation Army 

State of Nebraska 



State of Nebraska. 



Private corporation 

Sistersofthe Good Shepherd 

Lutheran Augustana Synod 

Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 
Salvation Army , 

Salvation Army 



Fallen girls and their infants 
Aged women 



Convalescent women and their 
children. 



Aged persons 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Aged Hebrews 



Masonic Grand Lodge of 
Nebraska. 



Destitute aged persons 

Impoverished aged women... 

Fallen women and delinquent 

children. 
Destitute aged Hebrews 



.\ged members of the church. 

Masons and their families 

Respectable aged persons.. 

Indigent aged persons 

Aged women and foundlings. 

Aged men and women 

Homeless unemployed men.. 

Fallen women and their chil- 
dren. 
Destitute aged persons 



Working girls and homeless 
children. 



Veterans and their wives. . 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants, and dependent chil- 
dren. 

Fallon women 

Odd Fellows and their fami- 
lies. 



Aged ministers and members 
of the church. 

Veterans, their wives and 
widows, and army nurses. 

Homeless unemployed men . . 



Homeless fallen women and 
their infants, and depen- 
dent children. 

Civil War veterans, their 
wives and widows. 



Aged persons 

Fallen or dependent women., 

Aged, invalid, and incurable 

persons. 
Aged men and women 



Homeless unemployed men. 

Fallen women and their chil- 
dren. 

Masons and their families . . . 



1S98 
1890 
1899 

1903 



1853 
1849 
1906 
1906 
1886 
1882 
1900 
ISS3 
1900 



1900 
1856 



1895 
1902 



1889 
1910 



1906 

1887 

1899 

1889 

1895 

1906 
1894 
1903 
1883 
1899 
1896 

1903 



(.') 



$150 



(') 



2,000 
250 



87.00 



(10) 



(") 



m 



6.00 



300 



No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
(.') 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 



Yes. 
No. 



Yes 
No. 



No. 
Yes. 
(') 
Yes. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 
No. 
(') 
Yes. 

No. 



1 Not reported. 

2 According to ability to pay. 

» Included In report of Bethesda Inotirable HospitaL 



61 



0) 
6 
134 



4 
62 
10 

111 
7 
10 
24 
12 
(') 

767 
12 

320 

227 
56 

462 



(') 



56 
132 



< From $5 to $25 for nonresidents. 

' Single persons, S200; couples, $.300. 

' Includes statistics of inmates for St. Ann's Foundling Asylum. 



(■) 



(■) 



4 

5 
16 

(■) 

182 

5 

320 

30 

35 



(■) 



GENERAL TABLES. 



213 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



10 
43 

16 

15 
20 
26 

20O 
79 
89 
24 
30 
81 

103 
36 
65 
62 
57 
22 

175 
47 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAE. 



Adults. 



13 
14 
33 

(') 
12 



86 



17 



as. 



an o 

oa 5S 
ftS ? S 

E3 ft wz: 



25 
200 
79 
40 
24 
30 
81 
103 
29 
65 
62 



91 



29 



20 



49 



Children, 



169 



26 



230 



(') 



40 



(') 



S a 
3 ° 

g.ft 

o 



C) 



230 



30 



(') 



(') 



230 



KECEIPTS DUMNQ YEAR. 



Total. 



(■) 
(") 

$1,674 

300 
4,148 
2,150 
(') 
15,449 
(') 

9,077 

5,900 

46,86' 

14,641 

760 

'53,846 

18, 188 

19,599 

2,732 

(') 

6,971 



32,181 
3,: 



13,500 
C'5 



3,072 
86,000 

3,870 

19,600 

22,890 

5,000 
30,401 
8,119 
5,449 
4,645 
4,685 

22,018 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 






(') 



(') 



$1,472 



0) 



20,000 

1,572 

4,500 



78,000 



19,600 
22,890 



Dona- 
tions. 



(.') 
$1, 538 

300 
4,148 
1,490 
0) 

5,664 
(>) 

3,194 
2,400 
38,804 
12,782 
600 
3,680 
4,834 



1,8^ 
(') 



1,800 



500 



(') 



2,272 



Care of 



(■) 



$36 



0) 

2,142 
4,070 
1,413 



9,926 



(■) 

1,900 

(') 



820 



150 

36,785 

6,288 



884 
(') 
6,221 



800 



(') 



943 

600 



1,179 

410 



Otlier 
sources. 



(') 



S660 
(') 

7,895 
(') 
.5,883 
2,680 
8,063 
1,859 



11,909 

7,066 

19. .599 



(') 



12, 181 



8,500 



8,000 
3,870 



0) 
28,259 
3,106 
3,436 
4,645 



11,682 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



C) 
i') 

$2,027 

800 
3,699 
5,139 

(') 

18,822 

(') 
8,802 
4,645 

35,678 

12, 464 

1,200 

' 52, 491 

12,046 

19,536 
2,723 

(') 
6,921 



26,917 
7,500 



20,000 
('5 



3,000 

126,000 

4,265 

19,534 

22,890 

5,000 
30, 107 
7,176 
5,449 
4,298 
4,586 

20,149 



' Includes financial statistics of St. Ann's Widows' Home, Foundling Asylum, and Maternity Hospital. 
" No rule against admission. 
■ Equipment. 



For 
running 


For 
perma- 
nent 


ex- 


im- 


penses. 


prove- 
ments. 



(') 
m 

$2,027 

600 

3, 

6,139 
(■) 
17,005 
(') 

4,802 

4,545 
35, 678 
12,464 

1,200 
47,791 
11,498 
19,236 

2,723 
(') 

6,721 



24,707 
3,500 



20,000 



2,700 

106,000 
4,019 
13,910 

22,; 

5,000 
27,731 
2,176 
4,809 
4,298 
3,828 



7,902 



(■) 



$200 



1,817 

(') 

4,000 



4,700 
548 
300 



(■) 



200 



2,210 
4,000 



W 

300 

20,000 

236 

5,624 



2,376 

5,000 

640 



758 
12.247 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$30,000 



2,500 
10,000 
43,000 
(') 

240,500 
C) 

14,720 
25,000 
311,1.53 
155,000 



'500,000 
154,175 
9 3,845 
10,000 
(') 
75,000 



85,000 
6,500 



100,000 
48,931 



80,000 

250,000 

M,031 

51,600 

100,000 

10,000 
135,000 
41,800 
28,875 
9 2,480 
7,500 

68,368 



Land, 
Ijuild- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



(■) 
$30,000 



2,500 

10,000 

27,000 

0) 

100,000 

(') 

14,200 

25,000 

19,000 

100,000 



500,000 
107,347 
8 3,845 

10,000 

(') 

75,000 



85,000 
6,500 



100,000 
36,931 



80,000 

250,000 

9 1,031 

51,500 

100,000 

10,000 
135,000 
40,000 
10,500 
»2,4S0 
7,500 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



41,358 



(■) 



$16,000 

(') 
140,500 

(') 
520 



121, 153 
65,000 



46,828 



(') 



12,000 



1,800 
18,376 



17,000 



19 From $2.50 to $3.50 for girls; children, $1.50. 
11 Confinement fee, $25. if able. 
" Opened December, 1910. 



214 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME ANll LOCATION. 



Supervised or conducted 



NEBRASK A— Continued. 



West Point: 

St. Joseph Home for the Aged. 
York: 

Odd Fellows' Home i 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
Concord: 

New Hampshire Centennial Home for the 
Aged. 
96 Pleasant St. 

New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home 

Pleasant and Minot Sts. 
Dover: 

Wentworth Home for the Aged 

795 Central .\ve. 
Keene: 

Invalids' Home 

361 Court St. 
Laconia: 

Laconia Home for the Aged 



Manchester: 

Gale Home 

133 Ash St. 
House of St. John 

Clark and Ray Sts. 
Masonic Home 

813 Beech St. 
St. Patrick's Home for Aged Women 

222 Hanover St. 
Women's Aid Home 

180 Pearl St. 

N.4SHLIA: 

John M. Hunt Home for Aged Couples and 
Men. 
334 Main St. 
Protestant Home for Aged Women 
104 Walnut St. 
Newport: 

Newport Home for Aged Women 

Main St. 
Portsmouth; 

Home for Aged Women 

63 Deer St. 
Rochester: 

Gafney Home for the .Vged 

90 Wakefield St. 
Tilton: 

New Hampshire Soldiers' Home. . .'. 

Winter St. 

NEW JERSEY. 



Atlantic City: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

1216 Adriatic Ave. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home. 
12 North Ohio Ave. 
Beverly: 

St. Joseph's Home 

Magnolia. 
Boonton: 

New Jersey Firemen's Home 

Burlington: 

Home for Aged Women 

Union St. 
Masonic Home and Orphanage 



Camden: 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

West and Washington Sts. 
Cedar Grove: 

Montclair Fresh Air and Convalescent Home. 
Ridge Road. 
Collingswood: 

Methodist Home for the Aged 

Elizabeth: 

Home for Aged Women 

1073 East Jersey St. 
Hackensack: 

Old Ladies' Home of Bergen County 

Passaic St. and Clarenden Place. 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

20 State St. 
Hoboken: 

Widows' Home 

815 Bloomfleld St. 

1 Not opened until 1911. 
• Average of maximum 
J Not reported. 



Franciscan Sisters of Charity 

Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



Private corijoration 

Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Private corporation 

Private coiporation 

Private corporation 

Trustees of Mary Gale En- 
dowment. 
Sisters of Mercy 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 

New Hampshire. 
Sisters of Mercy 

Women's Aid and Relief So- 
ciety. 

Trustees of John M. Hunt 
Endo^vment. 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 

State of New Hampshire 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Salvation Army 

Sisters of St. Francis 

State of New Jersey 

Private corporation 

Masonic Grand Lodge of 
New Jersey. 

Salvation Army 

Private corporation 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Privatecorporation 

Private corporation 

Salvation .\rmy 

Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 

and minimum amounts. 



Class of inmates received. 



Aged men and women 

Odd Fellows, their families, 
and Rebekahs. 



Impoverished aged persons . . 

Odd Fellows and their fami- 
lies. 

Impoverished aged persons.. . 

Invalids and convalescents. . 

Homeless aged men and 
women. 

.\ged and destitute women. .. 

.\ged men 

Masons and their families. 

Aged women 

Aged and infirm women . . 



.\ged couples and men 

Homeless aged women 

Impoverished aged women. 
Impoverished aged women. . . 

Aged men and women 

Veterans 



Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 
Homeless unemployed men. , 



Indigent aged persons. 



Aged volunteer firemen 

Aged women 

Masons and their families 

Homeless unemployed men . . 

Fresh air children, their 
mothers, and convalescents. 

Aged members of the church. 

Aged women 



Age4 women and couples . . . . 
Homeless imemployed men. . 



Aged widows . 



1905 
1911 

1876 

1886 

1883 

1874 

1910 

1889 
1908 
18S3 
1S79 
1S74 

1895 

1876 

1903 

1877 

1904 

1890 

1906 
1910 

1887 

1900 



1903 

1902 

1890 
1871 

1896 
1908 



$300 



200 



.300 
200 



100 
100 
200 
(') 
500 



150 
200 



S5.00 



2 4.00 



1.50 
(') 



m 



Yes. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

(=) 

No. 

Y'es. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No 
(«) 
Yes. 



No. 
(«) 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 

m 

No. 

« 
No. 

No. 

m 

No. 



Si 



inmates received 

DURING VEAK. 






139 

62 



15 

193 

200 

2 
2 

4 
38 



(') 



193 
125 



38 



' According lo ability to pay. 

6 All property owned. 

B No rule against admission. 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



215 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAB. 



Adults. 



39 



20 19 



is 
a ft 



39 






a) CT" 



Children. 



S a 

.u a. 
ftft 



RECEIPTS DUBtNG TEAK. 



Total. 



$5,772 



Derived from- 



.\ppro- 

pri- 
ations. 



Dona- 
tions. 



$732 



Care of 



$5,000 



Other 
sources. 



$40 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



$5,540 



For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 



$3,840 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$1,700 



VALUE OP PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$35,000 



Land, 
buUd- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$30,000 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$5,000 



13 
14 

1 
2 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 
8 
9 
10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 



11 



40 

22 

33 

10 

13 

lb 
11 

14 
28 
3i 

15 

17 

2 
12 

7 
94 94 



4 3 



11,332 
7,130 
9,507 
3,738 
9,404 

2,000 
(') 

6,000 
(') 
37, 052 

(=) 

3,596 

2,540 

1,800 

2.714 

'23,025 



2.960 
1.109 



3,475 

38 

215 

3,414 



756 
1,923 

5,875 



(•) 



« 



275 



i') 



$510 



2,050 



'23,025 



4.752 

13, 186 

994 

30.188 

11.935 

2,030 

27, 778 
9,431 

4,359 
5,582 



1,974 

1,300 

600 

1,710 



1,477 



12,000 
400 



' Includes $8,025 from 
» Equipment. 



1.607 
U. S. Government. 



3.222 



172 
24,257 



2,030 

27,478 
1,164 

1,290 



151 



130 



599 



300 



(») 



10, 473 
3,6.55 
8,713 
1,600 
115 
2,000 

5,725 

(=>) 

34, 492 

1,622 

1,240 

1,200 

853 



853 
1,109 

931 

1,186 

422 

5,931 

11,935 



480 



8,267 

'» 3, 069 
6,582 



9,586 
7,132 
9,507 
3,006 
1,819 
2,000 

6,000 

10, 516 

C) 
3,098 
2,540 
1.800 
2,191 

23, 020 



9,500 
4,047 

4,635 

12, 567 

1,713 

35, 124 

13,371 

3,932 

28,537 
5,709 

3.292 
5,264 

1,378 



8,474 
7,132 
6,526 
2,856 
1,819 

2,000 
{') 

6,000 
(=) 

8,917 

e) 

3,098 

740 

1,800 

2.191 

23,020 



2,300 
4,047 

4,635 

9,634 

1,713 

30,041 

13, sn 

2,132 

5, 362 
4,456 

2,376 
5,284 



1,112 



2,981 
150 



(=) 



1,599 



1,800 



1,378 



7,200 



2,933 



5,083 



1,800 

23, 175 
1.253 



209,234 

100,000 

229,933 

45,000 

54,000 

(') 
« 
35,600 

230, 000 
(■') 
44, 574 
13,500 
47,000 
31,670 
50,000 



5,000 
14,11 

83,512 

9,100 

211,102 

8 718 

16,600 

40,000^ 
17,052, 

26,000 

8 533 

33, 700 



60,000 
50,000 
25,000 
15,000 
50,000 
50,000 

28,000 

30,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

15,000 

50,000 



5,000 
14,115 

(■') 

75.000 

8,000 

124,000 

8 718 

16.600 

40,000 
10,600 

15,000 
"533 

8,000 



149,234 
50,000 

204,933 

30,000 

4,000 

(') 

m 

7,600 



200,000 

39,574 
8,500 
42,000 
16,670 



8,512 

1,100 

87,102 



6,452 
11,001 



25,700 



9 
10 

11 

12 

13 



* Included in "other sources.' 
" Includes "care of inmates." 



216 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 



Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NEW JERSEY— Continued. 

lEvmGTON: 

Bethany Home for the Aged 

Park and Springfield Aves. 
Colored Aged Home and Orphanage.. 

Park and Stuyvesant Aves. 
JEESEY City: 

German Pioneer Home 

Garfield Ave. and Dwight St. 
Home for Aged Women 

657 Bergen Ave. 
Home for Girls 

41 Belmont Ave. 



Newman Industrial Home and Mission. . 
421 Johnson Ave. 

St. Katherine's Home 

32 Reservoir Ave. 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

Fourteenth and Erie Sts. 
Keaeney: 

New Jersey Home for Disabled Soldiers. 
Belgrove Drive. 
Laweenceville: 

Morris Hall — Home for Aged 

Longpoet: 

Bide- A- Wee Home for Incurables 



Metdchen: 

Uctuchen Home 

Maple Ave. 
Moeblstown: 

Old Ladies' Home 

3 Mount Kemble Ave. 
New Brunswick: 

Francis E. Parker Memorial Home , 

Easton Ave. 
Newaek: 

Baptist Home for the Aged 

2S5 Rcseville Ave. 
Christian Refuge 

109 Mechanic St. 
Daughters of Israel Home for the Aged 

54 Stirling St. 
Florence Crittenton Home 

305 Elizabeth Ave. 
French Industrial Home for Men 

51 Plane St. 
Home for Incurables and Hospital 

102 Couri St. 
Home for the Aged 

Warren and South Eighth Sts. 
Home for Respectable Aged Women 

225 Mount Pleasant Ave. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

Thirteenth Ave. and South Eighth St. 
Job Haines Home for .\ged People 

Watsessing and Bloomfield Aves. 
Newark Rescue Home 

15 Spring St. 
Salvation Army Indxistrial Home 

303 New Jersey Railroad .\ve. 
Newton: 

Merriman Home 

1319 Walnut St., Philadelphia (office). 



Oeange: 

Fair Haven Rescue Home 

21 Commerce St. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

88 Henry St. 
Patebson: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

700 East Eighteenth St. 
Holland Home for the Aged 

110 Iowa Ave. 
Home for the Aged 

70 Dey St. 
Old Ladies* Home 

271 Totowa Ave. 
St. Dominic's Home 

276 .\tlantic St. 
Salvation Army Industrial Home. 

42 Mill St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private corporation . 
Private association. . 



German Pioneer V^erein. 
Private corporation 



Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union. 



Private corporation 

Protestant Episcopal Church 
Salvation Army 



State of New Jersey . 



Sisters of St. Francis 

New Jersey Shut-In Society 

I'rivate corporation 



Private corporation . 



Private corporation . 



Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 
Private corporation 



Private organization . 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Private corporation 

Private organization 



Little Sisters of the Poor. 

Private corporation (Prot- 
estant churches). 
Sis lets of the Good Shepherd 



Class of inmates received. 



Private corporation. 
Private corporation . 



Salvation .\rmy. . 



Board of Ministerial Relief 
(Presbyterian). 



Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union. 

Private corporation (Epis- 
copal). 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 
Private corporation 



Little Sisters of the Poor. 

Private corporation 

Private organization 

Salvation .\rmv 



> Separate room, $1,000; roommate, S500. 

2 Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 

' Not reported. 



Aged men and women . 
Aged men and women . 



Aged German Americans . . . 
Homeless aged women 



Homeless, dependent, or 
erring women and their 
children. 

Homeless men and boys 



Fallen girls and their infants. 
Homeless unemployed men. 

Veterans 



Aged men and women 

Noninfectious and noncon- 
tagious incurables. 

Homeless aged persons 



Aged women 

Incurables and convalescents, 

.\ged members of the church. 

Fallen women and wayward 

girls. 
.\ged Hebrews 



Fallen girls and their infants 
Homeless unemployed men . . 

Incurable women 

Needy aged persons 

.\ged women 



Fallen women and unpro- 
tected girls. 
Dependent aged persons 



Homeless unemployed men . . 
Homeless unemployed men. . 

Presbyterian ministers, their 
families, and female mis- 
sionaries. 

Homeless unemployed men . . 

Impoverished aged persons. . . 



Fallen girls and women 

Needy aged persons 

Destitute aged persons 

Impoverished aged women. . . 

Aged women and dependent 

children. 
Homeless unemployed men . . 



1901 
1S93 

1888 
1868 
1901 

1887 
1889 
1898 

1S65 

1905 
1909 

1888 

18S5 

1907 

1891 
1891 
1907 
1902 
1896 
1881 
1878 
1867 
1874 
1897 
1897 
1899 

1876 

1887 
1890 

1899 
1895 
1901 
1875 
1893 
1901 



(') 
2 $175 



■810. 00 



5.00 
2 2.13 

= 4.75 

(') 

2 6.63 



200 



(") 



200 
300 



.00 



2.00 



5.00 



10 2.00 



No. 
Yes. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
No. 

(«) 

Yes. 

No. 
(') 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Yes. 

m 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
No. 
No. 

m 



- S 



* Includes woodyard. 

» Per month: no weekly charge. 

' No rute against admission. 



INMATES RECEIVED 
DURING YEAR. 



14 
1 

8 
6 
So 

1,460 
21 
873 

196 

3 

84 



3 

52 

5 
73 
18 
101 
19,907 
32 
54 



30,000 
283 



W 



10 
215 



•a 



1,460 
6 

873 

196 



19,907 



30,000 
2S3 



135 

m 

14 

4 
29 



215 



GENERAL TABLES. 



217 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 


RECEIPTS DURING 


YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DCKING 


TEAK. 

1 


VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 




Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Derived from — 


Total. 


For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


In- 
vested 
funds. 


g 


1 

o 
H 

81 
14 

39 
30 

62 

76 
12 

75 

656 

68 
36 

12 

17 

23 

30 
15 
23 

m 

60 

41 
230 

54 
141 

44 
119 

64 

20 

22 
26 

13 
25 
150 
21 
13 
19 


a 


•a 
a 

52 
9 

m 

30 
62 


11 

81 
14 

39 
30 
20 


? a 

§•1 


a 


i 

o 


•3 

a 


•3 

a 


•o . 

O 


J3 


a 

3 

a 
O 


Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 


Dona^ 
tions. 


Care Of 

In- 
mates. 


Other 
soiu-ces. 


1 

1 


29 

5 

76 

75 
556 

16 

17 

8 
3 

7 

60 

105 

8 
119 
64 

4 

22 

5 

13 
76 

19 














812,921 
3,818 

12,058 

6,674 

715 

< 15,600 
2,862 
44,824 

' 87, 703 

14,428 
4.861 

3,304 

2,136 

5,439 

8,063 

3,514 

3,500 

2,099 

23,545 

17,627 

12,074 

8,900 

30,164 

12,249 

4 12,500 

35,083 

2,481 

4 11,250 
8,329 

1,926 
2,400 

13,877 

4,768 

135 

10,126 




$1,879 
1,668 

8,178 

1,756 

675 

600 
2,291 


$7,140 
551 

237 


$3,902 
2,150 

3,329 

,4,918 

40 

4 15,000 

334 

44, 824 


$13, 1S4 
2,525 

6,061 

7,908 

789 

17,000 
3,176 
46, 897 

87,703 

13. 797 
10, 401 

3,086 

1,981 

6,035 

36,425 
3, 158 
5,500 
3,043 
23,553 
14,118 
11,098 
12,500 
30, 159 
11,600 
12,500 
32,598 

7,272 
11,011 

1,913 
4,000 
22,648 
4,990 
600 
9,557 


$12,410 

2,141 

6,061 

6,291 

789 

17,000 
2,476 
46,897 

87,703 

13, 797 
9.997 

3,0.86 

1,981 

6,035 

6,42.5 
3,158 
3,300 
1,976 
23,053 
12,611 
11,098 
12,500 
24,000 
10,000 
12,500 
32,598 

6,103 
11,011 

1,913 
3,200 

4,990 

400 

9,557 


$744 
384 

1,617 


$57,183 
7,000 

100,795 
66,950 


$50,348 
7,000 

54, 045 
35,000 


$6,835 


14 




















15 




















46,750 
31,950 


16 




















17 


20 
76 


22 


8 


6 


2 


8 








IS 








700 
404 

30,000 

2,200 

1,067 

500 

1,507 

6,159 
1,600 

1,169 

(=) 

800 
(') 

200 


22,000 
20,340 
66.092 

281.900 

125,000 
41,000 

6,000 

73,100 

88,450 

63,500 

24,000 

15,000 

12,000 

30,584 

49,000 

300,338 

190,000 

200,000 

105,000 

9 2,500 

23,598 

99,000 

4,250 
8,575 

16,000 
10,000 

87,247 
10,000 
'4,004 


22,000 
16,000 
66,092 

281,900 

125,000 
41,000 

0.000 

40,000 

52,000 

.5.5,000 
24,000 
15,000 
12,000 
28,635 
35,000 

300,338 
40,000 

200,000 
40,000 

» 2,500 
23,598 

30,000 

4,250 

{') 

16,000 
10,000 

32,000 
10,000 
'4,004 




19 


12 




12 


9 


6 


3 


9 








4,340 


20 




75 








21 


52 
19 

12 

17 

15 

27 
15 
16 

m 


556 

68 
36 

1 

17 

23 

30 
















' $87, 703 








22 


















6,728 
2.598 


5,287 
2,251 

3,086 

2,775 


2,413 
12 

218 

1,4,87 

1,920 

3,094 
3,514 




23 






6 


6 


1 


6 










24 


11 












2,5 


















649 

744 

4,969 


33,100 

36,450 
8,500 


26 






1 




1 


1 








27 












28 




15 


9 


4 


5 




9 






29 


23 






3,500 
1,769 
6,6.85 

544 
ffl 
1,400 

300 
3,000 






30 




e) 


(') 


(.') 


(') 




(=) 






330 

704 

8,589 

2,800 


16,1.56 

.8,494 

(=) 

7,500 
29,864 

9,249 
4 9,700 
35,083 

2,4,81 
4 11,250 

m 

777 




31 




60 




1,949 
14,000 


32 


41 
125 

54 
141 

36 


41 

230 

54 

3 

44 


















33 




















34 




















150,000 


35 


51 


87 


148 




148 


39 


30 






.36 




65,000 


37 


119 
64 


















38 


























39 


16 


20 






















69,000 


40 


22 






















41 


21 

13 
12 
74 
21 
13 


26 

3 

25 

150 

21 

13 


















1,149 
2,400 
« 

1,759 
25 





m 


42 


5 


5 


7 


7 





7 








43 










44 




















75 


3,009 

35 

10,126 


55,247 


45 




















46 






4 




4 


4 








47 


19 












48 































' Includes $35,656 from U. S. Government. 

8 Inmat&s must have income of at least SIO per month to buy food. 

' Equipment. 



i» For children boarded. 

" According to ability to pay. 



218 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NEW JERSEY— Continued. 

Pladtfield: 

St. Joseph's Home 

39 Manning Ave. (North Plainfleld). 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

434 East Fourth St. 
RroGEWoon: 

House of Divine Providence 

Skillman: 

New Jersey State Village for Epileptics... 
Tenafly: 

Mary Fisher Home ot New Jersey 

Jay St. 
Trenton: 

Florence Crittenton Home 

West State St. 
Odd Fellows' Home 



Salvation Army Industrial Home 

East CarroU St. 

Widows' and Single Women's Home 

Spring St. 
Vdjeland: 

New Jersey Home for Disabled Soldiers, 
Sailors. Marines, and their Wives. 
West Hoboken: 

Fritz Reuter Altenheim 

Hudson Boulevard. 



NEW 

ROSWELL. 

Odd Fellows- 



MEXICO. 

Home 8 

NEW YORK. 



Albany: 

Albany Guardian Society and Home for the 
Friendless. 

553 CUnton Ave. 

Home for Aged Men 

Home for the Aged 

391 Central Ave. 
Home for Respectable Women 

SS6 Madison Ave. 
House of Shelter 

52 Howard St. 
House of the Good Shepherd 

582 Central Ave. 

Open Door Mission and Deaconess Home. .. 
3 Columbia Place. 

Salvation .\rmy Industrial Home 

60 Dalliiis .St. 
AmitwillEj L. I.: 

Brxmswick Home 

Broadway. 

St. Catharine's Infirmary 

Amsterdam: 

Sarah Jane SanJord Home lor Elderly 
Women. 
69 Spring St. 
Adbvrn: 

Auburn Home for the Friendless 

46 Grant Ave. 
Barnard: 

St. Ann's Home for the Aged 

Boulevard. 
Bath: 

New York State Soldiers' and Sailors' Home 

BiNGHAMTON. 

Home for Aged Women 

68FairviewAve. 

House of Good Shepherd 

74 Conklin Ave. 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

6 State St. 

The Rufuge 

64 Fairview Ave. 
Brooklyn. 11 
Buffalo; 

.Vsyium of Our Lady of Refuge 

" 4S5 Bast St. 
Church Charity Foundation Church Home. 
835 Front Ave. 

Erie County Lodging House 

29 Franklin St. 
German Deaconess Home and Hospital 
(Home Department). 
218 Kingslev St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Sisters of Mercy.. 
Salvation Army., 



Sisters of Charity 

State of New Jersey. 
Private corporation . 



National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Salvation Army 

Private association 



State of New Jersey . 



Private association. 



Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



Private corporation . 



Private corporation 

Little Sisters of the Poor 



Dominican Sisters 

Private corporation 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd 



Woman's Home Missionary 

Society. M. E. Church. 
Salvation .\.rmy 



Private corporation. . . 
Sisters of St. Dominic. 
Private corporation. . . 



Private corporation. 

Private corporation . 

State of New York . . 
Private corporation . 



Class of inmates received. 



Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 
Salvation Army 



Private corporation . 



Sisters of Charity of Refuge 
Protestant Episcopal Church 

County of Erie 

German Protestant churches 



1 Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 

2 No rule against admission. 

3 Equipment. 

i Exclusive of tubercular, epileptic, and mental cases. 



Working girls 

Homeless unemployed men . 

Homeless aged incurables *. . 
Epileptics 

Dependent brain workers. . . 

Homeless or fallen women. . . 

Odd Fellows, their wives and 

widows. 
Homeless unemployed men. . 

.\ged gentlewomen 

Veterans and their wives. . 
Aged Germans 



Odd Fellows and their fam. 
ilies. 



Friendless women 

Indigent aged men 

Needy aged persons 

Needy women and working 
girl's. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants. 

Fallen women and their in- 
fants, and delinquent chil- 
dren. 

Unemployed women 

Homeless unmployed men . . , 

All classes of incurables, ex- 
cept insane. 
Aged persons and incurables . 

Aged women 

Impoverished aged women. . 

Deserving aged persons 

Civil War veterans 

Impoverished aged women. . 
Aged Episcopahan women . . 
Homeless unemployed men. . 
Fallen girls and their infants 



Inebriate or fallen women 

and wayward girls. 
Aged persons and dependent 

children. 
Homeless unemployed men. 



Aged Germans. 



1897 
1908 

1891 
1898 
1899 

1805 
1908 
1900 
1854 

1898 

1898 



1878 
1871 

1.S80 

1868 

1884 

1899 
1904 

1887 
1893 
1897 



1898 

1878 
1893 
1870 
1904 
1893 

1855 
1858 
1908 
1895 



C^) 



S500 
25 



300 



(') 



W 



5.00 



(») 



300 
300 



(10) 



300 



500 



■17.50 
5.00 



3.00 
3.00 



"1.80 



No. 
(') 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 
No. 

m 

No. 
Yes. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 

m 

Yes. 
Yes. 
(•) 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

No. 

P) 

m 

Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 
No. 



25 



& According to ability to pay. 

« Not reported. 

' Includes $8,181 from U. S. Government. 



inmates receited 
during year. 



65 
41 

94 
54 
22 

47 

19 

161 

5 

58 

5 



32 



(') 



33 
50 

400 

188 

79 

41 

2 



1,099 
1 



128 

90 

1,722 

1 



(«) 
37 
6 

(«) 
11 
161 



32 
9,722 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



219 



12 
16 

210 
24« 
2S 

5 
46 
18 
20 

293 

55 



INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF TEAR. 



Adults. 



16 

(•) 
134 
5 



101 
22 






210 
246 



20 

293 

55 



Childron. 



° s 

g-o 

2 o 

e-p. 

o 



RECEIPTS DUEING TEAR. 



Total. 



S2,6S0 
7,273 

W 
126,481 

8,998 

2,695 
15,835 
8,543 

(«) 

'75,481 
7,400 



Derived from- 



Appro- 

pri- 
ations. 



$118,324 



Dona- 
tions. 



8228 



(«) 



3,365 

1,879 
15,835 



m 

997 
5,000 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



$1,641 



(») 

3,625 

5,633 

566 



(0) 



Other 
sources. 



8.S11 
7.273 

(•) 
4,532 



8,543 



2,400 



PATMENT3 DUKINO TEAE. 



Total. 



$2,317 
6,455 

66,508 

171,123 

8,191 

2,600 
10,275 
9,114 

(«) 

73,072 
6,316 





For 


For 


perma- 


runnmg 


nent 


ex- 


im- 


penses. 


prove- 




ments. 



$2,317 
6,455 

m 

127,362 
7,832 

2,600 
10,275 
8,574 

m 

62,218 
6,316 



$43,761 
359 



540 

(«) 

10,854 



VALUE OF PROPERTT AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



$7,900 
"1,639 

(•) 

730,716 

10,441 

20,000 
62,536 
= 1,633 

(«) 

157,803 

m 



Land, 
build- 
ings, 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$7,900 
3 1,639 

(«) 

728,716 

9,500 

20,000 
60,643 
3 1,633 

m 

167,803 



In- 


1 

a 


vested 


a 


funds. 


•S 



$2,000 
941 



(«) 



50,000 



36 



39 
160 



40 



25 
1,853 



119 

76 
2:) 

35 

145 

1,853 
14 
12 



34 



50 



9,562 

10,835 
6,232 

(«) 

4,169 

33,354 

2,479 
10,931 

53,626 
14,450 
3,764 

8,669 

24,690 

319,021 
3,097 
1,332 
6,493 
1,627 

40,962 
29,626 
17,341 

(13) 



1,598 
6,188 



3,199 

1,947 
6,232 

(«) 

465 

15,021 

2,479 



6,363 
7,138 



m 



119 



1,987 
12,145 



7,293 



5,034 
319,021 



3,949 
(«) 

375 
3,536 



53,095 
3,208 
(') 

4,929 



10, 931 



531 



3,365 
7,154 



323 
183 



3,018 

1,921 

17,341 

(13) 



807 



3,233 
5,288 



733 

934 
6,287 



1,268 
1,149 
6,493 

8' 

33,777 
16, 130 



(13) 



(1!) 



(13) 



8,862 

10,835 
5,628 

m 

3,632 
24,000 

2.342 
10, 1.87 

46,808 
15,798 
3,469 

7,956 
19,313 

319,021 

2,87 
1,468 
6,752 
1,460 

40,813 
26,363 
17,341 

(13) 



8,127 

8,837 
5,628 

(•) 

3,632 

24,000 

2,342 
10,187 

44,208 
14,78' 
(«) 

7,461 

16,563 

287,453 
2,812 
1,395 
6,752 
1,460 

24,010 
23,324 
17,341 

(13) 



(«) 



2,600 
1,011 
(«) 

495 

2,750 

31,568 
64 
73 



16,803 
3,039 



176,754 
95,000 

74,700 
200,000 

9,300 
12,704 

100,000 
38,080 
(•) 



150,000 

67J,525 
36,000 
18,500 
10,684 
11,000 

175,000 
417, 100 



15,000 

30,000 
95,000 

(=) 

43,000 

200,000 

8,000 
12,704 

100,000 
38,080 
80,000 



150,000 

672, 525 
12,000 
10,000 
10,684 
10,000 

175,000 
217,060 



(13) 



(13) 



• Not opened until 1911. 

* For residents, 8250; nonresidents, $500. 
'" Residents $25; nonresidents, $50. 



156,261 
146,754 



(») 
31,700 



(») 



28,575 



24,000 
8,500 



1,000 



200,040 



(13) 



" See New York City. 

" For ch'ldren. 

" Included in report for German Deaconess Home and Hospital (Hospital Department). 



220 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table HI.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



NEW YORK— Continued. 



Home for the Friendless 

1500 Main St. 

Homestead Lodging House 

SO Llovd St. 

Ingleside Home 

70 Harvard Place. 

King's Daughters' Home 

134 Manner St. 
Lutheran Church Home for the Aged and 
In fi rm. 
217 East Delevan Ave. 

Salvation Army Rescue Home , 

69 Cottage St. 

St. Ehzabeth's Home 

73 Pme St. 

St. Francis Asylum 

337 Pine St, 

Salvation Army Industrial Home 

97 Seneca St. 
Canandaigxja: 

Clark Manor House 

318 Fort Hill Ave. 
Catskill: 

Home for Aged Women in Greene Coimty.. 
CoHOEs: 

Homo for Aged Women 

100 Vliet St. 
East Aurora: 

Havens Home for the Aged 

229 Center St. 
East view: 

Loeb Convalescent Home 

356 Second Ave., N. Y. (office). 
Ebene:!er: 

E benezer Altenheim 

Elmira: 

Helen L. Bullock Industrial School 

955 College Ave. 

Home for the Aged 

Grand Central Ave. 
Fairport: 

Baptist Home of Monroe County 



Forks: 

German Evangelical Church Home.. 



Fredonta: 

Home for Aged AVomen. 
134 Temple St. 
Ga.rdenville: 

St. Francis Home 



Geneva: 

Chiorch Home 

82 Pulteney St. 
Gerry: 

Gerrv Homes (Home Department). 
Glens Falls: 

Glens Falls Home 

106 Warren St. 
Hawthorne: 

Rosary Hill Home 



Homer: 

Cortland County Home for Aged Women 

Main St. 
Hudson: 

Home for the Aged 

Volunteer Firemen's Home 

Howard Ave. 
Ithaca: 

The Home 

514 South Aurora St. 
Johnstown: 

Willing Helpers' Home for Women 

Madison Ave. 
King's Park, L. I.: 

Home for Aged Women 

St. John's Inn 

Sunset Cottage 

Lakemont: 

Aged Christian Ministers' Home 

Main St. 



Supervised or conducted 
by- 



Private corporation 

Christian Homestead Asso- 
ciation. 
Private corporation 



King's Daughters 

Private corporation (Luth- 
eran). 



Salvation Army 

Catholic Aid Society. 



Sisters of Third Order of St. 

Francis. 
Salvation Army 



Private corporation. 

Private corporation . 
Private corporation . 



National Benevolent Associ- 
ation of Christian Church. 

Private corporation 



Class of inmates received. 



The Evangelical Association. 

Private corporation 

Private corporation 



Private corporation (Bap- 
tist). 

German Evangelical 
churches. 

Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion. 

Sisters of Third Order of St. 
Francis. 

Trinity Church (Episcopal). 



Free Methodist Church. . 
Private corporation 



Sisters of St. Dominie. 



Private corporation . 



Private corporation 

Firemen's Association of the 
State of New York. 

Ladies Union Benevolent 
Society. 

Private corporation 



Society of St. Johnland. 
Societv of St. Johnland. 
Society of St. Johnland. 



American Christian Conven- 
tion. 



Homeless aged women 

Lake sailors and other home- 
less men. 

Aged or erring women, fallen 
girls and their infants. 

Convalescent and imem- 
ployed working girls. 

Aged members of the church . 



Fallen women and their chil- 
dren. 

Unemployed women and 
girls. 

Homeless men and women. . 

Homeless unemployed men. 
Aged men and women 



Indigent aged women . . . . 
Aged Protestant women.. 



Destitute aged persons. . . 

Convalescents 

Aged and infirm persons. 



Wayward girls and depend- 
ent children. 
Aged men and women 



Aged members of the church 

Aged men and women 

Dependent gentlewomen 

Homeless aged persons 

Aged women 



Homeless aged persons. . . 
Dependent aged women., 



Destitute persons with incur- 
able cancer. 

Homeless aged women 



Aged men and women 

Indigent volunteer firemen. 



Impoverished aged women . 
Aged women 



Homeless aged women. 

Homeless aged men 

Aged couples 



Ministers, 
widows. 



their wives and 



1868 
1891 
1S69 
1S96 
1896 

1900 
1906 
1862 
1904 

1900 

1908 
1894 



1904 

1897 
1890 
1872 

1904 



1893 

1902 

1880 

1886 
1899 



1883 
1890 



1872 
1866 
1866 

1894 



$250 



300 
300 



I $3. 50 
2 1.00 



300 



(10) 

300 



500 
200 



3.85 



(^) 



2 1.50 



(«) 





2 2.25 


(13) 




200 




300 




::;::: 


4.85 
(») 
M.34 


(16) 






Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
No. 

m 

No. 

No. 
W 

No. 

Y'es. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 

Yes. 

No. 



No. 
No. 



No. 
No. 



No. 

m 

No. 
No. 



13 



INMATES RECEIVED 
DUKIKG YEAH. 



4 

76,928 
118 
272 



231 
22g 



290 
2 



1,425 

4 
10 
6 

10 

20 



> For boarders only. 

« Averapo of maximuni and minimum amount. 

> Confinement fee, S55 if able. 
< Equipment. 



1 

100 

15 



(») 



& Not reported. 

^ According to ability to pay. 

' Includes rejjort of St. Francis Homes at GardenviUe and WilliamsviUe. 

8 No rule against admission. 



52 
290 



631 

2 



(") 



m 



GENERAL TABLES. 



221 



OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



INMATES PKESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Adults. 



61 

221 
40 
10 
32 

38 

9 

269 

43 

14 

(') 
21 



42 
34 
35 

28 

40 

23 

163 

10 

32 
22 

52 

2S 



>, ■ 

a n 



32 



269 



(=) 



o c S cr 



32 



38 



Children. 



30 



65 5 
14 



16 



W 



(') 



og 
2 a 

.£3 <v 
£.0. 
O 



RECEIPTS DURraO YEAR. 



Total. 



$17,304 
11, .823 
4,400 
1,569 
8,213 

9, 

« 

'90,418 

13,334 

6,568 

2,8 

3,277 

34,150 

4,065 
5,203 
6,857 

9,830 
10,605 

6,341 
(») 

2,849 

■> 15,368 
4,587 

19,014 

2,554 



17,223 
21,452 



6,426 
3,042 



Derived from — 



Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 



5,929 

(ISJ 

(") 
1,546|| 



Dona- 
tions. 



$700 
400 



12,362 



(') 



C) 



$6,394 



510 
1,090 

1,238 
3,195 



6,400 
2,880 

m 

300 

10,902 

1,697 
1,166 
1,311 

3,022 



2,212 



2,487 

(") 

214 

3,258 
1, 

19,014 

211 

5,457 



Care of 

in- 
mates. 



$659 

9,891 

500 

504 

4,526 



Other 
sources 



$10,251 

1,932 

3,200 

155 

1,999 

7,893 

46,372 
13,334 



(') 



744 
2,365 



^l 



520 



1,645 

1,861 
354 
338 

6,675 

5,692 

2,005 

C") 

771 

4,300 



1,363 



310 

2,977 

21,603 

507 
3,673 
5,208 

133 

3,615 

1,849 

(") 

1,864 

5,598 
3, 



PAYMENTS DURING YEAR. 



Total. 



200 



1,98 
(») 



6,886 
21,452 



5,482 

677 



3,943 

(15) 

776 



$12, 133 

12,03 
1,200 
1,.398 
8,142 

10,069 

(=•) 

'70,495 

14,224 

6,580 

2,168 

(') 

2,995 

35,975 

14,304 
5,174 
5,207 

9,973 
13,265 

3,097 
(") 

2,1 

n 12,489 
5,217 

17,751 

2,502 

7,717 
19,803 

6,650 

3,037 

4,767 
(") 

m 

1,009 



For 
running 



penses. 



$12, 133 

12,03' 

1,200 

1,398 

5,634 

9,627 
(») 
66, 118 
14,224 

6,580 

2,168 
W 

2,995 

35,475 

4,162 
4,928 
4,874 

9,973 

6,616 

3,097 

(") 

2,1 

11,461 
5,217 

14,786 

2,502 

6,645 
16, 739 

2,822 

2,816 



4,257 

m 

794 



For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 



$2, 508 
442 



4,377 



W 



500 

10,142 
246 
333 



6,649 



(") 



2,965 



1,072 
3,064 



3,828 
221 



500 
(■=•) 

(16) 



VALUE OF PROPERTY AT 
CLOSE OF YEAR. 



Total. 



$228,000 

30,000 

85,000 

'500 

44, 785 

42,000 



'500,000 
33,060 

23,199 

6,000 
8,000 

15,000 

784,497 

32,244 
43, 105 
68,000 

35,000 

37,120 

43,000 

(") 

(') 

12 62,605 
96,016 

60,000 

53,688 

164,000 
135,095 

42,478 

25,641 

93,600 

13,500 



Land, 
build- 
ings- 
and 
equip- 
ment. 



$110,000 

30,000 

85,000 

<500 

43,000 

42,000 



500,000 
33,060 

1.5,000 

6,000 
5,000 

15,000 

284,49' 

28,900 
20,000 
50,000 

28,000 

37,120 

■ 12,000 

(") 

« 

53,505 
35,000 

60,000 

33,000 

21,000 
117, 128 

10,250 

10,000 



20,000 

(16) 

3,000 



In- 
vested 
funds. 



$118,000 



1,785 



3,000 



500,000 

3,344 
23,105 
18,000 

7,000 



9,100 
61,016 



20,688 



143,000 
17,967 



32,228 
15,641 



73,600 

(16) 
(16) 

10,500 



23 

24 
25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 

33 
34 

35 

36 

37 
38 
39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 
46 

47 

4S 



49 
50 



51 
52 



S3 

54 
55 

5S 



• Adults, $5; children, $3. 
10 Residents, $300; nonresidents, $500. 
" Included in report of St. Francis Asylum, Bullalo. 
" Includes report of Orphanage Department. 



" From $300 to $500, and all property owned, 
n No weekly charge; $170 per year. 
i» Included in report of St. Johnland Home. 
i« For ministers, $150; wives or widows, $100. 



222 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.- HOMES FOR THE CARE OP ADULTS 





NAME AND LOCATION. 


Supervised or conducted 
by- 


Class of inmates received. 


i 


■s 
1 

o 

1 

o 

B 


P. 

■s 


i 

> 

i 

s 

p. 

■s 
s 

o 


o 

% 

|i 

ft 

9 

1 


INMATES EECEPVED 
Dt;EING YEAR. 


1 

i 


i 

o 


a 


_2 

a 


(i7 


NEW YORK— Continued. 
Lockport: 


Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Midnight Mission, New 
York. 


Odd Fellows and their fami- 
lies. 


IS93 

1887 

1884 

1895 

1891 
1888 
1898 
1877 

1906 

1898 
1869 
1872 

1869 
IS97 
1863 
1901 
1883 
1870 
1888 
1873 
1S86 

1895 
1896 

1907 

1890 

1870 
1815 
1866 

1880 

1872 
1881 
1890 
1903 

1871 
1S97 
1899 






No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
(') 

m 

Yes. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

No. 
Yes. 


12 

3 

7 

4 

3 
6 
3 
9 

3 

8 
20 
10 

16 
25 
9 
5 
7 
4 
4 
8 
21 

3 
9 

14 

10 

39 
35 
146 

21 

23 
8 

15 

8 


12 

26 

4 

5 

2 

41 

4 

444 

4 

4,070 

10 

2,780 

11 

69 
284 
738 
410 

36 

399 

4,959 

49 

624 
5 

850 

3,183 

61 
16 
116 

17 

15 

4,000 

101 

111 

72 
18 
72 


9 

13 

2 

444 

3,470 

2 

2,780 

2 

189 





1,845 

26 

2 

850 

2,598 

34 

40 

11 

2,320 

49 

38 

30 
t 


3 

26 

4 

5 

2 
28 
2 

4 

600 
8 

9 

69 
284 
549 
410 

36 

399 

3,114 

23 

624 
3 

585 

27 
16 
76 

17 

4 

1,680 

52 

73 

36 
12 
72 


W 


Mamaeoneck: 


59 


63 Mount Pleasant Ave. 
Middletown: 

Orange County Home for Aged Women 

27 South St. 
Mohawk: 

Herkimer County Old Ladies' Home 

Main St. 
MotrNT Vernon: 


Destitute aged women 

Homeless aged v.-omen 

Impoverished aged women. . . 

Aged men and women 

Aged members of the church . . 

Tnohrintp.q 


$250 

300 

500 
600 
500 


$7.00 


60 
fil 


Private organization 


W. 


356 Franklin Ave. 




53 


315 Grama tan Ave. 




64 


East Lincoln Ave. 
New York Christian Home for Intemperate 
Men. 
Gramatan .\ve. 
New Rochelle: 


Private corporation 


fi5 




Impoverished aged women . . . 
Immigrants. . . 


400 

300 
500 


4.20 
<1.00 

5 3.00 
1.50 


66 


Clinton and Coligni Aves. 
New York City: 
Bronx and Manhattan BoTOughs — 


Austrian Society of New 

York. 
Private corporation(Baptist) 

Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation. 

Private corporation . . 


67 


S4 Broad St. 
Baptist Home .... . 


Aged members of the church . . 
Destitute men 


68 


116 East Sixty^jighth St. 
Bowery Branch of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. 

163 Bowerv. 
Chapin Home for the Aged and Tnfirm 

1.51 East SLxty-sLxth St. 
Clara do H irsch Home for Working Girls 

225 East SLxty-third St. 
Elizabeth Hotel for Girls 


69 


Indigent aged persons 


70 


Trustees of the Baroness de 

H irsch Endowment. 
Children's Aid Society 

Children's Aid Society 

National Florence Critten- 
ton Mission. 

Private corporation (Protes- 
tant Evangolica!). 


71 


Homeless working girls 

Homeless women and their 
children. 

Fallen women and their chil- 
dren. 


72 


307 East Twelfth St. 
Emergency Shelter for Women with Children 
311 East Twelfth St. 


73 






74 


21 Bleeker St. 






75 


23 East Eleventh St. 
French Evangelical Home for Yaung Women 
341 West Thirtieth St. 


Unemployed educated French 
women. 

German Lutheran immigrants 
and emigrants. 

Odd Fellows and their fami- 
lies. 

Unemployed girls 




5.00 
6.00 


76 




77 


4 State St. 


Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

German Baptist churches. . . 

Grace Church (Episcopal) . . . 

Children's Aid Society 

Hebrew Sheltering and Im- 
migrant Aid Society. 


78 


Havemeyer and Treniont Aves. (Union- 
port). 
Girls' Home (Madchenheim) 


'125 


5 3.75 
■'2.00 


79 
80 


217 East Sixty-second St. 
Grace Hospital (llome for the Aged and Tem- 
porary Home for Children). 
414"East Fourt«enth St. 


Aged persons and indigent 
children. 

Homeless boys 


81 


136 East One hundred and twenty- 
seventh St. 
Hebrew Sheltering aud Immigrant Aid 
Society's Home. 
229 East Broadway. 


Hebrew immigrants and way- 
farers. 










121 West One hundred and fifth St. 




Indigent aged gentlewomen. . . 


300 


'9.00 


84 


891 Amsterdam Ave. 






Third Ave. and East One hundred and 
eighty-second St. 


Private corporation (Episco- 
pal). 




86 


One hundred and eighty-ninth St. and 
Riverside Drive. 

Home for Old Men and Aged Couples 

1060 Amsterdam Ave. 

HoTTip for Rcnndinfivia.p Tmmifn-j^nt.tj 


Aged men and couples 

Scandinavian immigrants 

and emigrants. 
Indigent aged persons 

Destitute aged persons 

Indigent aged persons 

Homeless aged Hebrews 

Destitute women with incur- 
able cancer. 


300 


5.00 


87 


Swedish churches . 




24 Greenwich St. 


Little Sisters of the Poor 

Little Sisters of the Poor 

Little Sisters of the Poor 




213 East Seventieth St. 






90 
91 
92 


Belmont -Vve. and East One hundred and 
eighty-thiid St. 






135 West ne hundred and sLxth St. 






302 East Broadway. 


Private corporation ( Roman 
Catholic). 






6 Perry St. 







1 Not reported. 



2 Included in " other sources." 



3 Includes "care of inmates.' 



* Meals additional. 



GENERAL TABLES. 

OR ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 1910— Continued. 



223 





INMATES PRESENT AT CLOSE OF YEAR. 


RECEIPTS DUKINa 


YEAR. 


PAYMENTS DURING TEAR. 


VALUE OF PBOPEKTT AT 
CLOSE OF VEAR. 




1 

Adults. 


Children. 


Total. 


Derived from — 


Total. 


For 
running 

ex- 
penses. 


For 
perma- 
nent 
im- 
prove- 
ments. 


Total. 


Land, 
buUd- 
ings 
and 
equip- 
ment. 


In- 
vested 
funds. 


i 


S 
o 

40 
57 

27 

24 

14 
17 
26 
50 

8 

(') 
92 
71 

65 
139 


a 

30 



9 

11 

50 

(') 
4 
71 

12 


a 

b< 

10 
57 
27 
24 

14 

8 
15 


>, ■ 

is 

40 


o a 


a 

u 

rt CO 


o 
7 


1 
4 


a 

3 


o 


|g 
3 


g 


Appro- 
pri- 
ations. 


Dona- 
tions. 


Care of 

in- 
mates. 


Other 
sources. 


a 
o 

s 

1 

t-l 


118,787 

9,586 

3,117 

7,763 

6,753 
9,421 
6,327 

11,288 

1,573 

9,359 
22, 750 
28,153 

29,604 
40,775 
10,753 
3,186 
9,143 
4,665 
4,620 
15,814 
25,587 

4,594 
6,030 

16,027 

35,654 

60,860 
46,625 
274, 641 

20,034 

33,141 
10,837 
17, 175 
21,062 

20,403 

39,273 

9,764 








$18,787 

6,557 

2,079 

1,262 

3 2,752 

2,368 

690 

3,556 

600 

7,673 
13,824 
8,814 

13,237 

40,775 

8,393 

3,143 

2,350 

1,881 

34 

6,424 

12,058 

741 
4,370 

6,118 

7,778 

5,531 
41,628 
38,986 

5,190 

9,201 

87 

17,175 


$15,696 

8,568 

5,413 

2,986 

7,272 
8,798 
3,534 
20,859 

796 

8,331 
22,750 
28, 136 

22,426 
38,851 
10,753 
3,186 
9,143 
4,007 
4,358 
15,814 
29,062 

3.259 
5,955 

16,027 

35,989 

59,253 
53, 197 
141,589 

17,813 

21,765 
10,500 
18,090 
11,538 

14,888 
46, 349 
8,501 


$13,381 

7,932 

5,413 

2,915 

6,472 
8,648 
3,534 
(') 

796 

8,331 
21,434 
28,136 

22,426 

38,851 

10,753 

3,186 

9,143 

4,007 

4,358 

11,516 

21,062 

3,169 
5,955 

16,027 

35,989 

53,585 
51,187 
134,789 

17,813 

21,765 
9r850 

18,090 
8,754 

11,235 
31,164 

8,126 


$2,315 
636 

71 

800 
150 

(■) 
1,316 

4,298 
8,000 

90 

5,668 
2,010 
6,800 

650 

2,784 

3,653 

15,185 

375 


$101,100 

(') 

(') 

37,365 

53,050 
17,500 
43,050 
160,000 

56,917 

2,400 

201,918 

88,700 

190, 250 
644,458 
107,000 

45,000 

35,000 

(') 

25,600 
200,000 
179, 250 

16,000 
(') 

154,052 

46,317 

526, 163 
1,200,000 
1,370,000 

290, 771 

397,557 
60,000 
(') 

342,000 

C) 

155,000 
64, 124 


$101, 100 

(') 

17,071 

15,000 

19,000 

7,500 

35,000 

100,000 

46,917 




57 




57 








$2,387 

1,038 

6,159 

4,001 
3,476 
3,587 
5,798 

973 

254 
8,926 

4,898 

10,657 


$642 
1,342 

m 

3,577 
2,050 
1.934 

1,432 

14.441 
5,710 


$70,800 

C) 

22,365 

34,050 
10,000 
8,050 
60,000 

10,000 

2,400 

101,918 

11,700 

(') 
454,230 
24,000 
25,000 


58 


27 

24 

14 

7 

26 


















59 




















60 




















til 


10 


















62 


















63 


50 


















64 


8 

(') 
88 


g 


















65 


92 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 


(') 




66 




100,000 
77,000 

(') 
190, 228 
83,000 
20,000 
35,000 
(') 

25,000 
200,000 
154,402 

16,000 
(■) 

154,052 

46,317 

425,485 
450,000 
500,000 

175,000 

161,000 
60,000 
(') 

342,000 

(■) 
155,000 
36,000 


67 


71 


















68 


53 
139 


65 


















69 


139 


















70 




33 
8 
9 

28 


33 


8 
9 
28 


33 

28 






$1,631 


89 

43 

6,793 


640 


71 


10 
24 




10 
24 




10 


24 


8 
9 




72 




73 






2,844 


600 


74 


21 
10 
70 

24 

17 

81 

29 

304 
105 

295 

59 

S8 
30 
280 
180 

300 
185 
38 


8 
44 

8 
81 
24 
167 

122 

38 

19 

114 

60 

115 
80 


21 

2 

26 

24.- 
9 


70 

17 


21 
10 








708 
2,086 
3,9.57 

104 
1,660 

213 

27,876 

55,329 

4,997 

158, 349 

14,844 

23,940 
1,279 


3,878 
7,304 

3,749 

5,538 

77,306 
9,471 


75 




32 
121 


17 
61 


15 
60 


121 


32 






76 


9,572 


24,848 


77 


0.] 








78 






8 


3 


5 


8 








55,000 


79 


81 
29 








4,158 


80 


5 

137 
105 
173 

59 

20 

11 

166 

120 

185 
105 
38 


304 
105 
295 

59 

58 

280 
180 

300 
185 
38 




2 




2 




2 






81 




100,678 
750,000 
870,000 

115,771 

236,557 


82 




















83 




















84 






10 




10 


10 








85 












86 


30 


















87 




















88 




















21,062 

6,189 
21,301 
2,464 






89 




















2,279 


11,935 

17,882 

448 




90 






















91 


















6,852 


28,124 


92 





















6 Average of maximum and minimum amounts. 



' No rule against admission. 



' For adults. 



224 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS, 1910. 

Table III.— HOMES FOR THE CARE OF ADULTS 



NAME AND LOCATION. 



Supervised or conducted 
by— 



NEW YORK— ContinuoJ. 

New York City— Continued. 
Bronx and Manhrittan Boroughs— Continued. 

House of Mercv 

Two hundred and totu-teenth St. and 
Bolton Road. 

House of Rest for Consumptives 

Bolton Road. 

House of the Good Shepherd 

East Ninetieth St. 

House of the Holy Family 

136 Second Ave. 



Immigrant Girls' Home 

9 State St. 
Industrial Christian Alliance 

170 Bleecker St. 
Isaac T. Hopper Home 

110 Second Ave. 
Isabella Heimath 

Amsterdam Ave. and One himdred and 
ninetieth St. 
Jeanne d'.^rc Home 

251 West Twenty-fourth St. 
Leo House for German Catholic Immigrants. . 

6 State St. 

Lutheran Pilgrim House 

8 State St. 
Margaret Strachan Home 

103 West Twenty-seventh St. 
Methodist Episcopal Church Home 

Ninety-second St. and Amsterdam Ave. 
Mission of Our Lady of the Rosary 

7 State St. 

Mimicipal Lodging House 

432 East Twenty-fifth St. 

New York Foundling Hospital 

175 East SL-^ty-eighth St. 
New York Home for Convalescents 

433 East One himdred and eighteenth St. 
New York Magdalen Home 

Dyckman St. and River Road. 
Peabody Home for Aged and Indigent 
Women. 

2064 Boston Road. 
Presbyterian Home for Aged Women 

49 East Seventy-third St. 
St. Barnabas House 

304 Mulberry St. 
St. Francis Hoine f