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Full text of "Benson woman's club cook book, containing over four hundred of our own and our friends' choice recipes, collected and comp"

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Senson Ottoman's Club 

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BENSON 
WOMAN'S CLUB 

Cook Book 



Containing over Four Hundred of our 
own and our friends' Choice Recipes 

Collected and Compiled 
by 

Benson Woman's Club 

ii 

1915 

COPYRIGHTED 1915 

OFFICERS 

Mrs. Silas Wright ------ President 

Mrs. Robert Beasley ... - Vice-President 

Mrs. John Hooper Secretary 

Mrs. Kirby Parker Treasurer 

□ = □ 

Douglas rf^ Sx^pi Printing Co. 



^ 



Gas Range Service 

Enables you to do your cooking 

Quicker, Better and Cheaper 

than in any other way. 



The cost of Cooking and 

Water heating is low 

if you use a 

Gas Range and Gas Water Heater 



Omaha Gas Co. 

1509 Howard , Tel. Douglas 605 

•' 

— 2 — 

^-3/,9/5 ©CU398214 

2c© f 






FOREWORD 



We take pleasure in presenting to our friends this excellent 
collection of tested recipes, for we feel that the usefulness of 
the book will justify its appearance in the company of house- 
keepers' aids. 

The compilers bespeak a liberal patronage for the adver- 
tisers whose ready co-operation has made this book possible, 
and for the recipes they ask the confident use which the names 
of the contributors justify. 

THE COMPILERS. 



—3 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




WHAT DOES COOKING MEAN? 



"It means the knowledge of Medea and of Circe, of 
Calypso and of Helen, of Rebecca and of the Queen of Sheba. 

"It means the knowledge of all fruits, and herbs and 
balms and spices, and of all that is healing and sweet in fields 
and groves, and savory in meats. 

"It means carefulness and inventiveness, and watchful- 
ness and willingness and readiness of appliance. 

"It means the economy of your great grandmother and the 
science of modern chemists. 

"It means much tasting and no wasting. 

"It means English thoroughness, French arts and Arabian 
hospitality. It means, in fine, that you are to be perfectly and 
always 'ladies' — loaf-givers — and as you are to see impera- 
tively that everybody has something pretty to put on, so also 
must you see , that your cooking is not only done well, but 
garnished prettily.'' — Selected. 



4 — 



Every Home 
Should Have in it— 
WHAT ? 

STER-IL 

Water- Proof 

Sheeting 

WHY? 

Because, Urine will not penetrate it. 

It is water proof. It is germ proof. 

It is sanitary. It is sterilizable. 

It is durable. 

It is made in Nebraska by 

Steril Waterproof Fabrics Co. 

3906 N. 24th OMAHA Tel. Web. 6813 
Contains no Rubber 



TH i L » E l c . H S2 RD CHINA PAINTING 

SCHOOL OF - 

432 Paxton Block, Omaha, Neb., Tel. Red. 4942 

The simplest and most complete methods used. Reg- 
ular weekly classes. Coover's Outlines for sale. Firing- 
Daily. All classes under the supervision of RUTH LETCH- 
FORD, Pupil of Anlich and Leykauf. 



Octavia Heights 

Private School and Home for Children. Most Healthful 
place in Omaha. It is high and dry. Fine place for 
Children that are not strong-. Give your children a chance to 
get pure and fresh air in their lungs — then watch them grow. 
Private School at our home. Rates Reasonable. Call 
me up and get acquainted, Walnut 1541-4. 



Sta. B. R. P. D. No. I 



MRS. J. A. HERSHY 



OIR AIM IS TO PLEASE 
YOU 

The Benson 

Transfer 

TELEPHONE BENSON 118 
ORDER 

Blue River Brand 
PURE fOODS 

MARSH & MARSH 

314-16-18 So. Nth Street 

OMAHA, NEB. 



Conrad A. Swanson 

GENERAL PAINT CON- 
TRACTOR 

and INTERIOR DECORATOR 



5844 MAIN STREET BENSON. 

SUBSCRIBE FOR 

Every Child's 
Magazine 



GRACE SOPENSON 
Editor 



Omaha, Nebr. 



INDEX 



SOUPS 

Page 

Cream of Celery 13 

Cream of Corn 13 

Cream Tomato . 13 

Mrs. Tracy's Cream Tomato 15 

Vegetable 15 

Mrs. Tracy's Vegetable. ... 13 

Fruit 15 

Noodle 15 

Chicken 16 

Chicken Bouillon 16 

Asparagus 16 

Cream Asparagus 17 

Brown 17 

Barley 17 

FISH, OYSTERS, EGGS, ETC. 

Baked Fish and Onion 

Dressing 2 3 

Salmon Box 21 

Lobster Newburg 21 

Codfish Balls 23 

Mrs. Thies' Escalloped 

Salmon 23 

Salmon Balls 21 

Welsh Rarebit 2 3 

Breakfast Omelet Rolls.... 24 

Salmon Loaf 24 

Mrs. Wulff's Escalloped 

Salmon 2 5 

Mrs. Wilcox's Salmon Loaf. 2 4 

Cold Eggs for Picnics 2 7 

Omelets 2 8 

Escalloped Eggs 23 

Fried Oysters . ." 2 5 

Escalloped Oysters 2 8 

Oyster Fritters 2 7 

Panned Oysters 2 8 

Halibut 2 5 

Fried Fish 2 5 

Oyster Cocktails 27 



MEATS AND POULTRY 

Page 

Chicken Cutlets 31 

Veal Loaf 31 

Beef Loaf 31 

Beef Loaf, No. 2 . 33 

Baked Beek Steak 31 

Chicken Baked in Milk .... 33 

New England Hamburger. . 3 3 

Roast Pork Tenderloin .... 33 

Tenderloin with Mushrooms 34 

Breaded Pork Chops 33 

Ham Souffle 34 

Chili Con Carne 33 

Fricadillos 3 5 

Veal Stew with Pimento . . 3 5 

Spanish Stew 35 

Sweet-Sour Tongue 3 5 

Veal Birds 3 4 

Stuffed Veal Breast 3 7 

Boiled Ham 37 

Ham Baked in Cider 37 

Fried Sweet Breads 38 

Chili Con Carne (No. 2) . . . 34 

Left Overs 38 

Left Overs (No. 2) 38 

Left Overs (No. 3) 39 

Chicken Pie 39 

Chicken Paprika 41 

Dumplings 41 

Mrs. Spring's Dumplings ... 41 

Mrs. Iredale's Dumplings . . 41 

Cold Domma (Swedish).. . . 39 

Baked Veal Cutlets 41 

Wienies with Apple Sauce. . 42 

VEGETABLES 

Boston Baked Beans 4 5 

Green Tomatoes Fried .... 49 

Baked Bananas 4 5 



Page 

Corn Fritters 46 

Italian Spaghetti 46 

Sweet Potatoes 47 

Panned Sweet Potatoes .... 47 

Celery Ramekins 4 7 

Famous Chicago Spaghetti. 4 9 

Potato Cobbler 49 

Baked Beans 46 

Macaroni and Tomatoes.. . . 49 

Macaroni and Cheese 49 

Creamed Macaroni 50 

Swiss Chard 50 

Mushrooms 50 

Cheese Souffle 50 

Rice with Cheese 51 

Spanish Rice 51 

Stuffed Potatoes 51 

Dutch Cheese 52 

Southern Sweet Potatoes . . 47 

Corn Fritters (No. 2) 46 

Boiled Cabbage (English) . . 51 

SALADS AND SALAD 
DRESSING 

Bean 55 

Salmon 5 5 

Apple and Celery 55 

Apple and Nut 59 

Egg and Lettuce 57 

German Potato 57 

Potato with Bacon 57 

Tuna Fish 60 

Plain Potato 57 

Poinsetta 59 

Kidney Bean 57 

Tomato with Gelatine.. . .59-60 

Tomato-Chicken 60 

Stuffed Tomato 59 

Fruit 60 

Pear 61 

Sheldon 61 

Mayonnaise Dressing 61 

French Dressing 61 

Russian Dressing 61 



Page 

Cream Dressing 63 

Salad Dressing (with Onion) 63 

Salad Dressing (No. 1) . . . . 63 

Salad Dressing (No. 2) . . . . 63 

Salad Dressing (No. 3) . . . . 64 

Simple Salad Dressing 64 

BREAD, BISCUITS, BREAK- 
FAST CAKES, ETC. 

Drop Biscuit 67 

Southern Biscuits 67 

Biscuits 67 

Cinnamon Rolls 68 

French Rolls 68 

Sweet Rolls 68 

Potato Pancakes 68 

German Potato Cakes 68 

Griddle Cakes 6 7 

Rolls 69 

Whole Wheat or Graham 

Bread 69 

Graham Bread 69 

Graham Gems 69 

Corn Bread 68 

Corn Cake 71 

Corn Bread (No. 2) 71 

Quick Coffee Cake 71 

Breakfast Muffins 71 

Plain Muffins 69 

White Flour Muffins 71 

One Egg Muffins 71 

Salt Rising Bread 72 

Corn Meal Muffins 72 

Muffins (No. 2) 72 

Nut Brown Bread 72 

Nut White Bread 72 

Nut Bread with Raisins. ... 73 

Omaha Nut Bread 73 

Miss Totman's Nut Bread. . 73 

Nut Bread (No. 1) 73 

Nut Bread (No. 2) 75 

South Omaha Brown Bread. "|6 
Boston Brown Bread 

(No. 1) 75-76 



Page 
Boston Brown Bread 

(No. 2) 75 

Bran Bread 75 

Steamed Brown Bread .... 76 

Baked Brown Bread 76 

Brown Bread (No. 1) 76 

Brown Bread (No. 2) 75 

Cheese Straws 76 

Waffles 77 

Economical Waffles 77 

SANDWICHES 

Denver Club 79 

Egg Pimento 79 

Cheese Filling 79 

Veal 79 

English Walnut 79 

PUDDINGS 

Grandma's Steamed 80 

Corn Starch 80 

Graham . . . . 81 

Economy 81 

Breaded Apple 83 

Steamed 83 

Poor Man's 83 

Apple 8 

Lemon 81 

Caramel 81 

Summer 83 

Potato 83 

Buckeye 84 

Blueberry 84 

Carrot 84 

Wheat-Graham Suet 84 

Mrs. Wright's Suet 84 

Suet (No. 1) 85 

Suet (No. 2) 8 5 

Suet (No. 3) 85 

English Fruit 8 5 

PASTRY — PIES 

Never Fail Pie Crust 87 

Custard 8 7 

Cream 87 



Page 

Raisin 87 

Brown Sugar Cream 88 

Banana Cream (No. 1) . . . . 88 

Banana Cream (No. 2) . . . . 89 

Lemon 91 

Chocolate 89 

Chocolate (No. 2) 89 

Butterscotch 87 

Snow 89 

French Cream 91 

Date Cream 91 

Rhubarb Meringue 91 

Banana (No. 1) 88 

Banana (No. 2) 88 

Mock Cherry 93 

Lemon Filling (No. 1) . . . . 92 

Lemon Filling (No. 2) . . . . 92 

Mother's Mince Meat 92 

Mince Meat (No. 1) 92 

Mince Meat (No. 2) 93 

Mince Meat (No. 3) 93 

Apple Dumplings 9 5 

Pineapple 93 

CAKES 

Mrs. Bumpus' Angel Food. 97 

Angel Food 97 

Chocolate Loaf 97 

Lady Baltimore 98 

Layer-Spice (No. 1) 98 

Layer-Spice (No. 2) 98 

Economical-Spice 9 8 

Plain Economical 98 

Spice (No. 1) 99 

Spice (No. 2) . 99 

Sponge Cake 99 

Mahogany 99 

Brown Stone Front 101 

Brown 99 

Mrs. Beasley's Brown 101 

Burnt Leather 101 

Burnt Sugar 101 

Delicious Potato 102 

Potato 101 



Page 

Mrs. Iredale's Potato 102 

Layer or Loaf Chocolate. . .103 

Molasses Loaf 102 

Jam 103 

Chocolate with Chocolate 

Icing 103 

Cream-Chocolate 103 

Chocolate-Coffee 103 

Council Bluffs Devil's Food. 10 5 

Devil's Food (No. 1) 105 

Devil's Food (No. 2) 105 

Devil's Food (No. 3) 105 

Dark Apple Sauce 106 

Apple Sauce 106 

Spiced Apple Sauce 106 

Mrs. Armstrong's Apple 

Sauce 106 

Economical Apple Sauce .. .107 

Light Apple Sauce 106 

White Fruit 107 

Pork 107 

Yeast 107 

Coffee 107 

Lemon-Filled 109 

Corn Starch 109 

Never Fail 109 

Milk 109 

Delicate 110 

Delicate (cheap but good). Ill 

Snow 110 

Velvet Sponge 110 

Mrs. Hodder's Sunshine ... 110 

Sunshine Ill 

Mapleine Ill 

Eggless Ill 

Eggless (with Sour Milk).. 113 

Mock Angel Ill 

Strawberry Short Cake . . .113 
Mrs. Knudsen's Short Cake. 113 

Plain Short Cake 113 

Banana 113 

Prune Layer 114 

Fort Crook Cherry 114 

Cherry 114 

Apple Tea 114 

Buttermilk Spice 114 

Easy Sponge 115 

Plain Sponge 115 

White (with Caramel Icing) 115 
White (with Chocolate Fill- 
ing) 115-118 

White (with Cocoanut Fill- 
ing) ; 115 

Two-layer White 117 

Plain White 117 



Page 

Simple White 117 

Cocoa 117 

Chocolate Spice 117 

Mrs. Welch's White 118 

Rich Fruit 118 

Layer Fruit 119 

Large Fruit 119 

A Good Fruit 121 

Fruit 119 

Mrs. Gould's Fruit 118 

Mrs. Loechner's Fruit . . . .121 

Mrs. McArdles' Fruit 119 

English Fruit 121 

Coffee Filling for Cake. . . .122 
Mocha Filling for Cake. . . .121. 

Caramel Frosting 121 

Easy Chocolate Frosting . .122 

Chocolate Frosting 122 

Cranberry Filling 122 

COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS, 
GINGERBREAD 

Plain Doughnuts 125 

Doughnuts in Rhyme 12 5 

Raised Doughnuts 12 5 

Mrs. Wright's Doughnuts. .12 7 

Easy Doughnuts 127 

Sugared Doughnuts 12 7 

Fine Doughnuts 127 

Mother's Molasses Cookies. 127 

Baker's Cookies 128 

Dandy Cookies 12 8 

Pennsylvania Cookies 12 8 

Filled Cookies 128 

Plain Cookies 127 

Oatmeal Cookies 12 8 

Drop Oatmeal Cookies . . . .129 
Rich Oatmeal Cookies ... .129 
Mrs. McCully's Oatmeal 

Cookies 129 

Rocks 131 

Molasses Drop Cakes .... .132 

Hermits 132 

Brownies 132 

Fruit Cookies 131 

Mrs. Ranz' Fruit Cookies.. 131 
Sugar Cookies (with Fruit). 131 

Dandy Fruit Cookies 129 

Fruit Bars 131 

Hoska (Bohemian Cakes).. 132 
Old Mission Cry Babies.. . .133 

Jumbles 133 

Cocoanut Kisses 136 

Nut Macaroons 133 



—10- 



Page 

Springily 133 

Frosted Creams 135 

Sour Cream Cookies 13 5 

Jelly Roll Cake 13 5 

Jelly Roll 136 

Cream Puffs . ., 136 

Apple Fritters 136 

Mrs. Mead's Gingerbread.. .137 

Soft Ginger Cake 137 

Gingerbread 136 

Mrs. Atack's Cookies 135 

Hermits (No. 2) 132 

DESSERTS AND BEVERAGES 

Pineapple Fluff 141 

Cranberry Sherbet 139 

Fruit Dessert 139 

Cup Custard 139 

Marshmallow Cream 139 

Lemon Milk Sherbet 140 

Grape Wine 143 

Grape Juice .\ 140 

Blackberry Cordial 14 3 

Dandelion Cordial 141 

Philadelphia Ice Cream. . . .141 

Neapolitan Ice Cream 141 

Pineapple Snow 140 

Mapleine Tapioca 14 

Tapioca Pudding 140 

Lemon Tapioca Pudding. . .141 
Raspberry Vinegar 143 

CANDIES 

Pecan Brittle 144 

Divinity 144 

Nougat 144 

Best Fudge 144 

Chocolate Creams 14 5 

Peanut Brittle 145 

Pinoche •. ... 145 

Uncooked Fondant 147 

Boiled Fondant 147 

PICKLES, PRESERVES, ETC. 

Pickled Onions 149 

French Pickle 149 

Grape Sweet Pickle 14 9 

Small Cucumber Pickle .... 149 

Mustard Pickle 151 

Spanish Pickle 151 

Dutch Pickle 151 

Mustard Mixed Pickle 152 

Cucumber Relish 152 

Cucumber Pickle 153 

Chicago Hot 153 



Page 
Chow Chow (without Cu- 

cucumbers) 152 

Bordeaux Sauce 155 

Pepper Hash 153 

Mustard Chow Chow 153 

Piccallilli . .155 

Chili Con Carne 155 

Ripe Tomato Chow Chow. . . 156 

Cold Relish 155 

Corn Salad (No. 1) 156 

Corn Salad (No. 2) 157 

Chopped Pickles 156 

Fresh Cucumbers in Winter. 156 

Canned Corn 157 

Pickled Apples, Peaches, 

Etc 157 

Mrs. Tracy's Pickled 

Peaches 159 

Tomato Catsup 157 

Cold Catsup 157 

Pickled Beets 156 

Grape Catsup 159 

Uncooked Tomato Catsup. .159 

Omaha Chili Sauce 160 

Simple Chili Sauce 159 

Plain Chili Sauce 159 

Chili Sauce (No. 1) 160 

Chili Sauce (No. 2) 160 

Chili Sauce (No. 3) 160 

Raw Chili Sauce 160 

Grape Conserve 161 

Mrs. Mason's Grape Con- 
serve 161 

Gooseberry Conserve 163 

Pineapple Conserve 161 

Grape Marmalade 163 

Mrs. Speedie's Orange Mar- 
malade J 64 

Boston Orange Marmalade . 161 
Plain Orange Marmalade. . 161 
Mrs. Tuttle's Orange Mar- 
malade 163 

Raspberry Jelly 164 

Canned Cold Pineapple. . . .163 
Pumpkin Chips 164 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Smelling Salts 167 

Cake Baking Hint 167 

Prepared Mustard 167 

Salted Almonds 169 

Quantities for 2 5 guests. . .167 
Quantities for 40 guests. . .169 

Simple Remedies 169 

Household Hints 169 



— 11- 



EMPLOYS 

$100,000.00 






A LA CARTE 

$70.00 in Gold a Year Paid on each $1,000 Share 
7.00 in Gold a Year Paid on each $100 Share 
.70 in U. S. Coin a Year Paid on each $10 Share 



TABLE DE HOTE 

A MODERN BUNGALOW 
Served with All Accessories, Complete 



Wants 

$100,000.00 

More 



IN 

HOME 

BUILDERS 



'Just as You Like it' 



MONEY 

Needed to Pay for Construction 

Special 



Par Excellent 



A COOK BOOK 
B. W. C, 1915 



Potpourri 



UNDER HOME BUILDERS' PLAN 



Your Savings will grow g&~ IN 

Your Profits will make more gjT HOME BUILDERS 
Your Savings Plus Profits in Home Builders will look 
good to you some day. 

7/yi Believe it— you are spending- what you will 

/O need some day more than NOW. 

' Your money is guaranteed 1% interest plus 

your share of Builders' profits. 

You can get one or more shares weekly as desired. Present price 
$1.14 each. Every surplus profit, added every six months, increases the 
value of shares. 



GET 
A 

NEW 
HOME 

ALL 
YOUR 

OWN 



Get Home Builders' , New Plan Book 

Let Home Builders give you a better house 
and "just as you like it" for your money 
We furnish architect's working plans free 
and any money needed — no commissions 
charged— you pay us back about like rent. 

Ask for our booklet "The New Way' for 
full particulars. 



Douglas 
5013 



American Security Co. 
Fiscal Agents 



—12- 



SOUPS 



"The turnpike road to people's hearts, I find, 
Lies through their mouths or I mistake mankind.' 



CREAM OF CELERY. 

Cook together for one hour, 1 bunch of celery, cut fine, 1 
large onion chopped, 1 teaspoonful of salt, % teaspoonful of 
pepper, and 1 pint of water. Strain, return to fire, add 1 pint 
of milk, 1 large spoon of butter and thicken with 1 tablespoon- 
ful of flour, moistened with a little milk. 

Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



CREAM CORN. 

One can of corn, 1 quart of milk, 1 cup of cream, 2 table- 
spoons of butter, 1 tablespoon of flour. Boil corn and part of 
milk together, then strain. Work butter and flour together, 
add gradually the corn and rest of milk and cream, and when 
ready to serve, sprinkle with chopped English walnuts and 
parsley. Season with salt and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. C. L. Carlson. 



CREAM TOMATO. 

Take one pint of fresh or canned tomatoes, slice fine a 
small onion, put on the stove for ten or fifteen minutes, then 
add a pinch of soda, dissolved in a little hot water. Put in 
another quart of sweet milk and as soon as it is boiling hot, 
remove, add tomatoes, a small piece of butter, salt and pepper 
to taste. Serve at once. Mrs. Carl Spring. 



VEGETABLE. 

Twenty-five cent soup bone, boiled until the meat sep- 
arates from the bone. Remove the meat, and skim off the 
fat. Add to this stock, 1 cup of chopped potatoes, 1 cup of 
chopped cabbage, % cup of chopped onions, y 2 cup of carrots 
and 2 cups of chopped tomatoes. Boil until vegetables are 
very tender. Strain or not, as desired. Mrs. Chas. Tracy. 

—13 — 



BUTTER -FAT 

Is the only fat from live animals. 

All other fat is from 
dead animals or dead plants. 



To get the highest food value, and the 

most delicate flavor in your cake 

or any baked goods, use 

"DIADEM BUTTER" 

AND 

"FAIRMONT CARTON EGGS" 



The Domestic Science teachers tell us, 

that no substitute for butter and eggs 

(no matter how cheap) has equal 

food value compared with cost. 



The Fairmont Creamery Co 

12th and Jones Streets 



-14- 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



CREAM OF TOMATO. 

One quart of tomatoes, 1 quart of rich milk, 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, 1 small onion cut fine, 
1/2 level teaspoon of soda. Cook tomatoes and onions together 
ten minutes. Place milk in double boiler, and bring to a boil- 
ing point. Add salt and pepper and flour made into a smooth 
paste with a little water, and cook until slightly thickened. 

When ready to serve, add soda to tomatoes and pour slowly 
through a sieve into the milk, stirring constantly, to avoid 
curdling. Always blend tomatoes with the milk, and do not 
boil after blending. Mrs. Chas. Tracy. 



VEGETABLE. 

Four pounds of soup bone, the shanks preferred. Cook 
meat and onions together, then about an hour and a half before 
serving, grind about % of the meat, and add 1 small head of 
cabbage, chopped fine, 1 dozen of diced potatoes, 1 dozen car- 
rots, 1 can of tomatoes, season to taste. 

Mrs. K. R. Parker. 



FRUIT. 

Two quarts of water with a lemon sliced. Let boil about 
one hour, then add 5 tablespoonfuls of sago, and 1 cup of rais- 
ins, and a few currants, 1 cup of nice prunes, sweeten to taste. 

Mrs. K. R. Parker. 



NOODLE. 

Two pounds of soup meat in 1 gallon of cold water, with 
1 tablespoon of salt. Boil two or three hours, slowly, adding 
hot water to replenish when necessary. One hour before tak- 
ing from fire, add 1 small onion, 1 medium potato, 1 piece of 
celery, and a small piece of parsley, all chopped fine together, 

— 15 — 



and fifteen minutes before serving, add noodles made as fol- 
lows : 1 egg, beat well and season with a pinch of salt. Add as 
much flour as will make a stiff dough, roll out thin, then roll 
up and cut in fine strips. Leave dry an hour or so before using. 

Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 



CHICKEN. 

Take 1 gallon of stock, obtained from boiling a chicken 
slowly several hours, add small amount of fine chopped celery 
or celery salt, also salt and pepper to taste. Then add 1 cup 
of barley or rice previously soaked over night, and boil all 
together slowly for two hours. Noodles may be added if de- 
sired. Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 



CHICKEN BOUILLON. 

One large soup bone, 2 pounds, 1 chicken, 1 small slice of 
ham, 1 soup bunch, 3 cloves, pepper and salt, 1 gallon of cold 
water, whites and the shells of two eggs. Boil chicken, beef 
and ham slowly for five hours, adding soup bunch and cloves 
the last hour. Strain soup through a flannel bag and let re- 
main over night, then remove all the fat and take out jelly, 
avoiding settlings. Mix.it with the beaten whites of eggs and 
shells, boil quickly a couple of minutes, skim carefully and 
strain through a jelly bag. When heating to serve, add 2 
teaspoons of caramel for coloring. 

Caramel : Boil % pound of sugar and tablespoon of water 
in porcelain kettle until a bright brown, add 1 teacup of 
water, boil a few minutes, cool and strain. 

Anonymous. 



ASPARAGUS. 

Wash 2 bunches of asparagus, cut in small pieces. Put to 
cook in a quart of boiling water, and simmer gently till per- 
fectly tender, when there should remain 1 quart of liquid. 
Rub through colander, except hard portion. To a pint of 
mixture, add salt, 1 cup of cream with 1 pint of milk. Boil up 
a few minutes and serve. Anonymous. 

—16— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 

Benson 100 Benson 100 




CREAM ASPARAGUS. 

Two pounds of veal knuckles, and 2 pounds of asparagus, 
one-third cup of butter, and a third of a cup of flour, yolks 
of 2 eggs, fourth of a cup of cream. Cook the knuckles slowly 
for two hours, with a tablespoonful of salt, in 3 quarts of 
water, removing scum as it rises. Strain. Have the asparagus 
boiled, melt butter and when bubbling, add the flour. When 
well mixed, add gradually the soup, stirring constantly. If 
carefully done, other straining should not be necessary. Put 
asparagus and the water in which they are boiled into the 
soup, heat until boiling point. Just before serving, pour grad- 
ually soup over well beaten eggs and cream, stirring constantly. 

Mrs. Fred Brodegaard. 



BROWN SOUP. 

. Two pounds of veal knuckles or shanks, 2 pounds of round 
steak, 5 carrots, 1 celery stalk, 1 onion, salt and pepper. Cook 
knuckles slowly for one hour in 3 quarts of water, removing 
scum as it rises. Cook vegetables one-half hour in 1 quart of 
water. Brown meat in very hot frying pan. Add gradually 
some of the soup. When dark brown, add this to remaining 
soup and boil slowly for one hour, then strain and add vege- 
table soup. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with the 
carrots cut in small pieces. Mrs. Fred Brodegaard. 



BARLEY SOUP. 

Take 1 gallon soup stock, or enough beef extract, dis- 
solved in boiling water to make that amount. Steam % pint 
of barley until thoroughly soft, then put through a fine sieve 
so it is thoroughly disintegrated. Add barley then to boiling 
stock, and cook up for a few minutes. Add salt and pepper 
to suit taste. Mrs. E. F. Brailey, Omaha, Neb. 

—17 — 



—18— 



— 19- 



20- 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



Fish, Oysters, Eggs, Etc. 

"But still I must cry, when the Pike is at home, 
mind the cookery." — Barker. 



SALMON BOX. 

Line a buttered bread pan or a mold with warm steamed 
rice, putting a can of salmon or cold boiled salmon steak in 
the center. After seasoning salmon, cover with the rice, and 
steam one hour. Before serving, pour over it the following 
sauce : 1 cup of butter, 3 level tablespoons of flour, l 1 /^ cups 
of hot water, salt and pepper. Melt butter, stir in flour, and 
slowly add the well beaten yolks of two eggs, and juice of 
% a lemon. Mrs. Chas. Haffke. 



LOBSTER NEWBURG. 

Put in blazer, 1 tablespoon each of butter and flour, i/2 
tablespoonful of salt, and a dash of paprika. When butter 
melts, and mixes with the other ingredients, gradually add a 
cup full of rich milk, stirring until smooth. Add the lobster 
well picked to pieces, cover, slip hot water pan underneath 
and cook for five minutes. Add more seasoning if necessary. 
If liked a tablespoonful of sherry may be added. This is for 
four servings. Serve on hot buttered toast. 

Mrs. E. F. Brailey, Omaha, Neb. 



SALMON BALLS. 

Chop cold boiled potatoes and canned salmon in equal 
quantities, season with salt and pepper, shape in flattened 
cakes, roll in cornmeal and fry with small quantity of grease. 

Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 

—21 — 



Have Your Feather Mattreis Made Like This HaVe You a 

Feather 
Mattress 

or a 

Down Cover 

In Your House? 

Or have you 

ever had any 

dealings with the 

Omaha Pillow- 

Company? 

If you have please tell your friends, if not call us 
now. Our feather mattress has a summer and winter 
side. It makes the most comfortable bed, conveniently 
handled and easily rolled up to be transferred to 
sleeping porch or summer resort. 

We furnish new pillows, mattresses and box 
springs to your order, or remake your old ones. We 
also handle all grades of feathers and down. 

Telephone us at any time and we will have a 
representative call on you. 




Omaha Pillow Co. 



Douglas 2467 



1907 Cuming Street 



—22— 



BAKED FISH AND ONION DRESSING. 

Take any nice fish and rub it over with salt, then make 
a dressing of V-> loaf of dry broad, x /-> teaspoonful of pepper, 
4 onions chopped fine, salt to taste and mix well. Stuff the 
fish, sew it up, put a few slices of bacon over and bake for 
two hours. Mrs. K. R. Parker. 



CODFISH BALLS. 

Pick fine IV2 cups of codfish. Peel and slice enough raw 
potatoes to fill 3 cups, and boil together until potatoes are 
done. Mash fine, add pepper to taste, 2 tablespoons of but- 
ter and 1 egg not beaten, then beat altogether until light. 
Shape with spoon and drop by spoonfuls into the boiling lard. 

Mrs. Robt. Beasley. 



SCALLOPED SALMON. 

Take 1 can of salmon. Place in 2 quart sauce pan, a layer 
of cracker crumbs and bread crumbs and alternate with layer 
of salmon and crumbs, placing occasionally some butter, salt 
and pepper, cover with hot water, and bake in a slow oven. 

Mrs. F. C. Thies, Omaha, Neb. 



WELSH RAREBIT. 

Butter a granite pan, put in 1 cup of milk, and when hot, 
add 1 cup of bread crumbs, salt, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 cup of 
ground cheese. Then fold in the whites of eggs, set in oven 
and brown. Mrs. F. C. Thies, Omaha, Neb. 



SCALLOPED EGGS. 

Moisten bread crumbs with meat or milk broth, place a 
layer of this in a well buttered dish, slice some hard boiled 
eggs, and dip the slices in some thick drawn butter sauce, to 
which has been added a well beaten egg. Put a layer of eggs 
on the crumbs, then a layer of minced ham, veal or chicken, 
then bread. Have bread crumbs on top. Bake until well 
heated. Mrs. C. J. Ringer. 

—23— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

" The Good Coals People ' ' 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




BREAKFAST OMELET ROLLS. 

Soak 2 small slices of bread (with crust removed) in y* 
cup of milk. Separate 3 eggs, and heat yolks and whites sep- 
arately. Add beaten yolks to the soaked bread, with a tea- 
spoonful of baking powder well mixed. Then fold in the 
whites, and have omelet pan well heated and greased with but- 
ter. Pour in batter, cook on one side, slipping a knife around 
the sides to prevent sticking. Then set in the oven to brown. 
When done, roll as you lift from the pan. Serve on a hot 
platter with a garnish of parsley. 

Mrs. Emma G. Murdock. 



SALMON LOAF. 

Mix a can of salmon and % cup of cracker crumbs with 
a tablespoon of butter and 3 well beaten eggs. Season with 
salt to taste and a little lemon juice. Pack closely in a pan. 
Put in the oven long enough to cook the egg. Serve hot. 

Mrs. Carl Spring. 



SALMON LOAF. 

4 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, y 2 cup of cracker crumbs, 
pepper and salt, and finally 3 well beaten eggs. Put in a but- 
tered mold, (an oatmeal cooker is good), and set in a pan of 
hot water. Cover and steam one hour, watching the water 
dish to see that it is well filled with boiling water. When done, 
set the dish in cold water for a minute, and turn out. Sauce : 
Heat 1 cup of milk to boiling, and thicken with a tablespoon of 
cornstarch, wet first in cold water. Add a spoonful of butter, 
the salmon liquor and 1 beaten egg. Take from the fire, sea- 
son and stand in the hot water three minutes covered. Add 
juice of x /<2, of a lemon and pour over the loaf on the platter. 

Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 

—24— 



SCALLOPED SALMON. 

One can of salmon, Vl* cup of milk, 2 eggs, 2 cups of stale 
bread crumbs, softened with the milk, salt and pepper to 
taste. Pack in a pan and bake three-fourtbs of an hour in a 
pan of hot water. Serve with egg sauce. Salmon Dip : 3 table- 
spoons of butter, 3 tablespoons of flour, 2 cups of hot water, 
salt and pepper. Melt butter, stir in the flour, add hot water, 
cook until smooth. Slice 2 hard boiled eggs in this. 

Mince 1 can of salmon, saving liquor for sauce. Put in 

Mrs. II. 0. Wulff. 



HALIBUT. 

One tablespoonful of Parmesan cheese, 1 tablespoon of 
corn starch, a /2 cup full of mashed potatoes, 2 cupfuls of 
cream or milk, 2 cupfuls of cooked fish, 2 tablespoons of but- 
ter, yolks of 2 eggs, salt and pepper to taste. Beat potatoes 
until light and creamy with the yolk of 1 egg. Melt 2 table- 
spoonfuls of butter, add cornstarch, stir until smooth, add 
cream, stir until the sauce thickens. Take from the fire and 
add the remaining egg yolk, fish and seasoning. Fill a greased 
baking dish with alternate layers of potatoes and fish, cover the 
top with bread crumbs, mixed with the cheese, and the re- 
maining butter melted, cook for twenty minutes in a quick 
oven. Mrs. W. H. Loeclmer. 



FRIED OYSTERS. 

Take nice large oysters and drain from the juice and dip 
in the following : 2 well beaten eggs, 1 teaspoon of salt, V2 
teaspoon of pepper. Roll in cracker crumbs and fry in a deep 
fat until nice and brOwn. Mrs. K. R. Parker. 



FRIED FISH. 

Wash and split, or cut in the size pieces you wish to serve. 
Season well with salt and pepper and dredge with flour. Have 
skillet with hot deep grease, (% Crisco and y 2 lard), and when 
hot, place the fish into it. Let fry until a golden brown crust 
forms, then turn, and when the same on that side, pick up. 

Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 

—25— 



Bird Brand Coffee 



A Western Product for Western People 




The coffee with the "Bird'' on the package 
is high in quality and reasonable in price. 

We firmly believe that if you once try Bird 
Brand, you will use it always. In flavor, 
strength and aroma, it will not fail you. 

Bird Brand Tea, Spices and Extracts are 
every bit as good as Bird Brand Coffee. Try 
them today. A pleasant surprise awaits you. 



German American Coffee Co. 

Omaha, Nebraska 



—26— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



OYSTER COCKTAILS. 

Serve in ice shells or large claret glasses, 5 small oysters 
for each glass. For y 2 dozen plates, allow 7 teaspoons each of 
prepared horseradish, tomato catsup and vinegar, 10 tea- 
spoons of lemon juice, and 1 of tabasco sauce. Thoroughly 
mix dressing, and put equal quantities in each glass. Both 
oysters and dressing should be very cold. Anonymous. 



COLD EGGS FOR PICNIC. 

This novel way of preparing cold eggs for the lunch bas- 
ket fully repays one for the time required. Boil hard several 
eggs, halve them lengthwise, remove the yolks and chop them 
fine with cold chicken, lamb, veal or any tender roasted meat, 
or with bread soaked in milk, and any salad or parsley, onion 
or celery, the bread being half of the whole or with grated 
•cheese, a little olive oil, drawn butter flavoring. Fill the cavity 
in the eggs with either of these mixtures, or any similar pre- 
paration, press the halves together, roll twice in beaten egg 
and bread crumbs and dip in boiling fat or lard. When the 
color rises delicately, drain them and they are ready to use. 

Mrs. C. J. Ringer. 



OYSTER FRITTERS. 

One pint of oysters, % cup of flour, % cup of butter, 1 
pint of chopped mushrooms, 2 beaten egg yolks. Scald oysters 
in hot water five minutes, then put through the food chopper. 
Mix with % cup of strained oyster liquor, and heat to a scald- 
ing point. Stir in flour and butter, mix smooth and cook till 
thick and smooth. Add mushrooms mixed with beaten yolks 
of eggs and season to taste. Turn out on buttered platter and 
leave until cold and firm. Cut in slices, wrap in thin slices 
of bacon, dip in batter and fry in hot lard. Anonymous. 

—27 — 



PANNED OYSTERS. 

Use individual granite pans or shells, and in each one 
place 5 or 6 oysters seasoned with salt and pepper, and a 
piece of butter. Put in hot oven until frizzling hot, (about 
twelve or fifteen minutes). Serve in the dishes they are cooked 
in. To be eaten with salted crackers. 

Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Two cups of oysters, Vi cup of cream and 2 tablespoons 
of oyster liquor, IV2 cup of cracker crumbs, 4 tablespoons 
of butter melted, salt and pepper, chopped parsley and celery 
salt. Butter a baking dish, sprinkle with the crumbs which 
have been mixed with the butter, pour in half of the oysters, 
drained and creamed, sprinkle with salt and pepper, parsley 
and celery salt, add another layer of crumbs, the rest of the 
oysters, season the remainder of crumbs, pour over these the 
liquor and bake thirty minutes in a hot oven. 

Mrs. H. 0. Wulff. 



OMELETS. 

Six eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, % P m t of 
milk, 6 teaspoons of cornstarch, 1 teaspoon of baking powder. 
Add the whites beaten to a stiff froth, cook in a little butter. 

Mrs. C. J. Ringer. 



-29- 



—30— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People'* 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




Meats and Poultry 

''There's no want of meats, sir. Portly and cur- 
ious viands are prepared, to please all kinds of ap- 
petite. ' ' — Massenger. 



CHICKEN CUTLETS. 

Cook one-half cup flour and one-third cup of butter. Add 
1 cup of stock and a third cup of cream, a beaten egg, and 1 
pint of chopped chicken, season, when cold form into cutlets, 
dip in egg and bread crumbs and bake till brown. 

Anonymous. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Two pounds of raw veal chopped fine, 2 coffee cups of 
bread crumbs or cracker crumbs, 2 eggs, 1 even tablespoon of 
salt and pepper, a little butter, sage to taste. Bake about one 
hour. Slice thin. Mrs. E. J. McArdle. 



BEEF LOAF. 

Two pounds of raw steak run through a meat cutter. Sea- 
son. Add 2 eggs well beaten, 4 tablespoons of milk, 1 cup of 
cracker crumbs. Mold in a loaf and keep about half covered 
with water so that there will be enough for gravy. If no fat 
on the beef, add a lump of butter when partly done. 

Mrs. G. W. Sowards. 



BAKED BEEF STEAK. 

Place a nice flank or round steak in baking pan, salt and 
cover with a good rich dressing of bread crumbs, egg and sea- 
soning well mixed. Bake in a hot oven from one-half to three- 
fourths of an hour. Mrs. Robt. Beasley. 

—31— 



To Add Attractiveness to 

any Dainty Dish Serve 

The Famous 




Specialties 



You have a variety to choose from. 

Common Crackers to Fancy, beautifully 
made and delightfully flavored Biscuits 
and Sugar Wafers. 

All baked in our sanitary thousand 
window bakeries. 

Your dealer will supply you. 



IopsE-\yiLES Biscuit (ompany 

BAKERS OF SUNSHINE BISCUITS 
— 32— 



BEEF LOAF NO. 2. 

Two pounds of round steak, ^4 pound of salt pork, grind 
together. Add 2 eggs, 1 cup of milk, 1 cup of cracker crumbs, 
1 small onion sliced. Mold in pan and lay sliced tomatoes on 
top, or canned tomatoes and a few slices of bacon. Bake about 
one and a half hours. Mrs. F. 0. Thies, Omaha, Neb. 



CHICKEN BAKED IN MILK. 

Clean chicken, cut in pieces, put in baking dish and cover 
with mixture of half milk and half cream with pepper and salt 
to taste and bake. By the time milk has cooked away, the 
chicken will be tender and delicious. Anonymous. 



NEW ENGLAND HAMBURGER. 

Cover hamburger with water and cook until well done, 
adding salt and pepper. Thicken with flour, and pour into 
baking dish. Cover with riced cooked potatoes, dotted with 
butter and set in the oven to brown. 

Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



ROAST PORK TENDERLOIN. 

Split tenderloin lengthwise and fill with well seasoned 
dressing. Bind up with cord, sprinkle with salt and pepper, 
put slices of bacon on top, roast one hour. 

Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 



CHILI CON CARNE. 

One pound of sirloin steak, 1 pound of pork butts, chop 
fine and add 1 can of tomatoes. Cook one hour, then add 1 can 
of kidney beans, and chili powder to taste, and cook one-halt* 
hour longer. Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



BREADED PORK CHOPS. 

Pound the pork chops as you would beef steak, roll in egg 
and bread crumbs, fry brown in part butter in covered frying 
pan. Season with salt and pepper if liked. 

Mrs. E. C. Fuller. 

—33— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



TENDERLOIN WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Two pounds of tenderloin, beef or pork, slice an inch thick, 
let brown in butter twenty to twenty-five minutes, place then 
on a warm dish. Add in the pan 1 tablespoonful of flour. 
Let brown a little, then add % pound of canned button mush- 
rooms, with their own juice, cook a few minutes longer and 
brown on steak. Mrs. G. W. Sowards. 



HAM SOUFFLE. 

One and a half cups of ground ham, 4 eggs, 1 cup of milk, 
% cup of flour, 2 /4 cup of butter, salt and pepper. Stir beaten 
yolks of eggs into ham, add the milk, flour, salt and pepper 
and beaten whites of eggs. Use butter to grease the casserole. 
Set casserole or baking dish in a pan of water and bake about 
twenty-five minutes. Mrs. E. A. McGlasson. 



CHILI CON CARNE NO. 2. 

After browning a slice of onion in some good dripping, 
turn in 1 pound of steak after it has been put through the 
grinder, and stir till brown. Then pour in 1 quart of tomatoes, 
and let cook about one-half hour. Season with salt and chili 
powder to suit taste, then about ten minutes before taking up 
stir in a ten cent can of red kidney beans or a pint of cooked 
red kidney beans. Mrs. E. C. Fuller. 



VEAL BIRDS. 

Two pounds of veal steak, 8 thin slices of bacon. Cut veal 
in 8 equal parts, take pieces of veal and wrap with slices of 
bacon and fasten with tooth picks. Put a pinch of salt on 
veal, place them in the pan upright, add a half pint of water 
and bake thirty minutes in a hot oven. 

Mrs. 0. S. Brooks, Omaha, Neb. 

—34— 



FRICADILLOS. 

Ten cents each of pork, veal, and round steak ground, V-z 
cup of cracker crumbs, % cup of water, yolks of 2 eggs, salt 
and pepper to taste, y 2 cup of butter. Mix thoroughly and then 
beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and last thing, form 
into cones and roll in cracker crumbs. Put in pan with plenty 
of butter and bake. When done set on the top of the stove, 
pour over a cup of sweet cream and let it boil up. 

Mrs. Robt. Beasley. 



VEAL STEW WITH PIMENTO. 

Two pounds of lean veal, 2 pounds of fresh ham, half a 
bunch of celery, 1 can of peas, 1 can of pimentos, 3 eggs. Cook 
meat and celery thoroughly, then remove and cut into small 
pieces. Thicken stock, and return the meat to it, add the peas 
and pimentos cut fine, and last drop in the eggs, and beat 
Season with salt and cayenne pepper. 

Mrs. R. L. Cams, R. R. No. 6. 



SPANISH STEW. 

Two pounds of boiling meat, 1 quart of canned tomatoes, 
4 small Spanish peppers, 1 onion if desired, 1 teaspoon of salt. 
Dredge the meat heavily with flour and fry \ery brown in 
frying Dan. If onion is used, slice and add to meat while fry- 
ing, turn into the kettle, add salt and a small amount of water, 
and cook slowly for one hour. Then add tomatoes and pepper, 
rooking slowly an hour and a half. Add more water if neces- 
sary, use broth for gravy adding thickening if desired. 

Mrs. Clyde Farris. 



SWEET SOUR TONGUE. 

One beef tongue, boiled in salted water until tender. Take 
part of stock and part vinegar, and ground spices to taste. 
The spices are cloves, allspice and cinnamon. Then melt in 
cold water about 6 ginger snaps, stir it in the stock and vine- 
gar while boiling, and then add a small handfull of raisins. 
Slice the tongue and put it in, and then let it all come to a 
boil and stir. Mrs. W. H. Sackriede. 

—35— 



MILLER 8 HUXHOLD 

GROCERY AND DEPARTMENT STORE 

Benson, Nebraska 
5746 Main Street Phone 374 J 

We Give Green Trading Stamps 

OSCAR J. NEWMAN CARL A. NEWMAN 

NEWMAN BROS. 

FANCY MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Swedish Delicacies 

Fresh Bakery Goods Delivered With Your Goods 

2404 CUMING ST. Phone Douglas 444 OMAHA, NEB. 

Harding's Ice Cream 

The Cream of all 
ICE CREAMS 

Phone Douglas 97 

Wedgwood Creamery Butter 

—36— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People'* 

Benson 100 Benson 100 




STUFFED VEAL BREASTS. 

Have butcher fix pocket in the veal breast weighing five 
or six pounds. Use following dressing, take a half loaf of dried 
bread, remove crust, soak the bread in water a few minutes, 
until soft. Grind or chop real fine 2 onions, 2 stalks of celery, 
1 or 2 green peppers (seed to be removed) 1 tablespoonful of 
raisins. Add to the bread, salt and pepper to taste, a little 
sage and a good tablespoonful of melted butter. Mix well and 
fill pocket, sprinkle pepper and salt and flour over the meat, 
also 3 cups of water. Bake three-fourths of an hour. An 
onion or celery top placed in the pan with the roast adds to 
the flavor. Beef heart is delicious cooked in the same manner. 

Mrs. W. H. Loechner. 



BOILED HAM. 

Take a 14 to a 16 pound ham, wash off nicely with warm 
water, put in porcelain or aluminum kettle, cover with cold 
water and allow to come to a boil. Then boil slowly for four 
hours. Remove from fire, and allow to cool in the water ham 
was boiled in. Hams weighing less than 15 pounds, subtract 
ten minutes from each pound down to 10 pounds, making time 
for ten pound ham about three hours. Never cook ham in tin 
kettle, as it tends to turn ham brown. 

Mrs. W. H. Loechner. 



HAM BAKED IN CIDER. 

Secure a small lean ham. Wash thoroughly and soak over 
night. Next morning wipe perfectly dry and sprinkle over 
the flesh side, a tablespoon of chopped onion, a teaspoon of 
ground cinnamon, the same of allspice, % teaspoon mace and 
same of cloves. Make a paste of flour, roll it out and cover 
the flesh side of ham, packing it down close to the skin. 

—37— 



Put the ham, skin side down, in a baking pan. Pour into 
the pan 2 quarts cider, to which add % teaspoon white pepper 
and % teaspoon paprika. Cover with another pan and bake in 
a moderate oven two hours, basting every twenty minutes. 

At the end of this time remove the upper pan and bake the 
ham two hours. 

When ready to serve, remove carefully the paste, 
then the skin. Trim the bone neatly, brush the skin side with 
beaten egg, dust it thickly with bread crumbs and chopped 
parsley, and put it in a quick oven to brown. Skim the fat 
from the cider, boil it down until you have one pint, which turn 
ino a sauce bowl. "When the ham is browned take from oven, 
garnish bone with a quill of paper and serve in bed of cress. 

Mrs. Zachary T. Lindsey. 



FRIED SWEETBREADS. 

Parboil for about five minutes, after which wipe dry and 
lard with strips of salt white pork. Have frying pan well 
greased with lard or butter, turn often while frying, and when 
fully cooked, they will then have a crisp, brown appearance. 

Mrs. W. H. Loeclmer. 



LEFTOVERS. 

Two cups of cold dried meat, 3 cups of brown gravy, 
rather thin, 1 cup of milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons of butter, 1 
cup of flour, 2 level teaspoons of baking powder, 2 level tea- 
spoons of salt. Mix as for pancake batter, add meat to gravy 
and have boiling hot. Pour batter over, and bake from fifteen 
to twenty minutes. Mrs. A. Anderson. 



LEFTOVER NO. 2. 

This is roast veal or stewed chicken run through a grinder, 
seasoned well and mixed with gravy. Make a rich biscuit 
dough, roll thin and cut in pieces, (three by five inch pieces), 
place a spoon in the meat on one side, wet the edge, pinch 
together and bake together twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Chas. Pennoyer. 

— 3 8 — 



CHAS. H, SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



LEFTOVER NO. 3. 

Roast beef or lamb run through the grinder, season well 
with a little gravy, take sweet green peppers, cut out the 
stems and seeds, drop in boiling water over a slow fire, twenty 
minutes, then drain and fill with the meat. Cover with cracker 
crumbs and bake thirty minutes. 

Mrs. Chas Pennoyer. 



CHICKEN PIE. 

Put chicken on to boil in cold water, covered with enough 
water to have four cups of broth when finished. When half 
done, salt the liquor to taste and finish cooking. Remove from 
bones in large pieces, putting in a little skin. Put in the bot- 
tom of the baking dish, and prepare sauce as follows : 3 table- 
spoons of melted butter, 3 tablespoons of flour and a little 
pepper. Mix well and add four cups of broth, warm (not hot 
or cold), cook well, add one cup of cream or rich milk, cover 
meat with this, reserving a portion for gravy. Make crust as 
follows : 2 teaspoons of baking powder, 1 teaspoon of salt, 2 
tablespoons of shortening, rubbed through the flour. To this 
add 1 beaten egg, in which has been stirred 1 cup of milk. 
Spread over chicken and bake ten minutes or until done. 
Scraps of cold turkey or roast meat can be prepared in a sim- 
ilar manner. Mrs. G. W Sowards. 



COLD DOMMA (SWEDISH) 

Two pounds of meat, beef or pork, ground as per meat 
loaf, 2 eggs, 2 crackers rolled, 1 onion chopped fine, salt pepper 
to taste. Roll into balls. Boil 1 head of cabbage twenty min- 
utes, then wrap and tie each meat ball in a leaf of cabbage and 
fry slowly in plenty of butter for one hour in a covered 
skillet. Mrs. Chas. Gustafson. 

—39 — 



THE J. P. COOKE CO. 



Rubber Stamps 
Stencils & Seals 



1111 Farnam St. 



Omaha, Neb. 



C. C. Williams ^Always Open 
Studebaker Phone 209W 

Automobiles Benson, - Neb. 



Defiance Starch 

is constantly growing 
in favor because it 

Does not stick to the Iron 

and it will not injure the finest 
fabric. For laundry purposes it 
has no equal. 16 oz. package 10c. 1-3 more 
starch for same money. DEFIANCE 
STARCH CO., Omaha, Nebr. 

— 40 



Dolly Hospital 

Room 52 Douglas BIdg. 

Corner 16th 
and Dodge 



Omaha 



Nebraska 



CHICKEN PAPRIKA. 

Take a chicken, clean it well and disjoint it, and leave 
the breast whole. Then tab with salt and dust liberally with, 
paprika. Let it stand over night if possible. Take a kettle, 
put in a spoonful of fat, let it get very hot, add one onion cut 
in fine pieces, and lay in your chicken and let it simmer. Shake 
it well, and let stew slowly. Add from time to time a little 
stock. When done, add a little flour to thicken the gravy. 
Chop some parsley fine and let boil with gravy. 

Mrs. M. Gross. 



BAKED VEAL CUTLETS. 

Dip cutlets in cracker or bread crumbs, season, place in 
baking pan and brown in hot fat on top of fire. Then cover 
and bake in oven until tender. 

Mrs. James Ferguson, Grennadine, N. D. 



DUMPLINGS. 

Half a sieve of flour, % a teaspoon of salt, 2% teaspoons 
of baking powder, mix either with milk or water. 

Ruth E. Parker. 



DUMPLINGS. 

When beef, veal or chicken have been stewed until done, 
remove the meat or fowl, thicken the gravy a little, and when 
boiling add the following: beat 1 egg till light, add 6 table- 
spoons of cold water, 1 tablespoon of melted butter, a little 
salt and 3 teaspoons of baking powder. Sift. baking powder 
with a cup of flour, add as much more flour as is needed to 
make a stiff batter, drop from the spoon and steam from five 
to ten minutes. These are inexpensive and fine. 

Mrs. Carl Spring. 



DUMPLINGS. 

The following dumpling recipe is especially easy and is 
sure to be good, requires no covered vessel, can be stirred, and 
will always be light. Use either beef, veal or chicken liquid 

—41— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




after stewing or frying them, adding water. When liquor is 
boiling, add dumplings made by beating 1 egg till light, add- 
ing 6 tablespoons of cold water, 1 teaspoon of melted butter, 
salt to taste, 3 teaspoons of baking powder sifted with 1 cup 
of flour, and as much more flour added as will make a batter 
stiff enough to drop from a spoon. Let cook five or ten min- 
utes. Mrs. George Iredale. 



WIENIES WITH APPLE SAUCE. 

Wash and slice crosswise some red skinned apples, stew 
with very little water and sugar enough to sweeten, until 
tender. For a few minutes, put some wienies into the apple 
sauce, which have been boiled in some water. Take out the 
wienies and pour the apple sauce over them and serve hot. 

Mrs. Chas. Speedie. 



— 42- 



—43- 



"Of All Good Candies Made 
We Make the Best" 

Dinning's 

Swiss Style and Mazeppa 
Chocolates 



OUR SPECIALTIES 



Hand Rolled Bitter-Sweet Chocolates 

Chocolate Dipped Caramels 

Maplebutterscotch 

Salted Nuts 

We have a full line of fine and staple 
Candies for all dealers 

"Kept Popular by Quality" 



The Voegele & Dinning Co 

Manufacturing Confectioners 
OMAHA, NEBR. 



—44— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



Vegetables 



We must not forget that our kitchen gardens 
are indebted to many lands for their variety of vege- 
tables. Carrots and turnips are thought to be indig- 
enous to France, cauliflower came from Cypress, arti- 
chokes from Sicily, peas from Syria, beans from 
Persia, spinach from Western Asia, radishes from 
China and Japan, onions from Egypt, rhubarb from 
Tartary, sweet potatoes from South America, parsley 
from Sardinia and lettuce from Cos. 



BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Soak a quart of small beans over night in fresh water. 
In the morning put them in a kettle of water, sufficiently to 
cover and parboil until the skin is shriveled. Pour off the 
water, add salt to the beans. Place in the middle of the 
beans a piece of bacon. Mix in a cup, a tablespoon full of 
molasses or brown sugar, % a teaspoonful of soda and % a 
teaspoon of mustard. Add this to the beans, cover with warm 
water and bake five hours, keeping watch that the water does 
not dry out until the beans are thoroughly cooked. 

Mrs. Carl Spring. 



BAKED BANANAS. 

Six ripe bananas, cut lengthwise in quarters. Lay in bak- 
ing dish, crossing alternate layers. Juice and grated rine of 
a half a lemon, butter side of an egg and 1 spoonful of sugar. 
If bananas are not very ripe, bake one-half hour. Serve from 
casserole with meat course. Miss Ruth Gustafson. 

—45— 



BAKED BEANS. 

Wash beans and put on in cold water, and bring to a 
boil. Then put in a good pinch of soda, and let boil until the 
skins blow back off the beans. Then drain and wash in a 
.colander with cold water. Prepare your bean pot, by placing 
2 or 3 strips of salt pork in the bottom, then a very small 
onion, sliced thin, laid there, also salt and pepper, and the 
beans. Turn into the pot. To 1 quart of beans take a table- 
spoon of Coleman's mustard, 2 tablespoons of Karo syrup or 
brown sugar, and about a quart of boiling water. When dis- 
solved pour on the beans, and put in a liberal quantity of salt 
pork, cut in squares. Put in oven and bake all day. Keep 
covered with boiling water till the last hour, then remove the 
cover of the pot and let brown down. Eat with catsup. 

Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



CORN FRITTERS. 

Two cups of grated corn, 1 cup of flour, 1 teaspoon of 
baking powder, 2 eggs (beaten separately), 1 teaspoon of salt, 
dash of pepper and % cup of finely chopped celery. 

Mrs. C. W. Bromfield. 



CORN FRITTERS NO. 2. 

One can of corn or equal quantities of fresh creamed 
corn. To this add enough of rolled cracker crumbs to mold 
in patties, adding salt and pepper. Mold in small cakes, to 
fry on griddle in a small quantity of lard. 

Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 



ITALIAN SPAGHETTI. 

One package of spaghetti boiled as per directions on the 
package, 1 quart of cooked tomatoes, 6 slices of bacon fried 
and cut or chopped in very small pieces. Chop fine 5 medium 
onions and fry in bacon fat. Season with salt, black pepper 
and a pinch of paprika. Mix altogether and let come to a 
boil. Mrs. Chas. Gustafson. 

— 46 — 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




SWEET POTATOES. 

Boil potatoes and slice while hot. Butter a dish and put 
in a layer of potatoes. Sprinkle with sugar, salt and pepper 
and dots of butter and fine bread crumbs. The last layer 
should be crumbs, well buttered. Then pour in 4 tablespoon- 
fuls of warm water, cover and bake half an hour. Remove 
cover and brown. Emma G. Murdock. 



PANNED SWEET POTATOES. 

Peel and slice in half. Choose a shallow, large bottom 
pan, and lay the potatoes all over the bottom. Sprinkle over 
with a half cup of bro^, season with salt and put in x /2 cup 
of Crisco. Just cover the bottom of the pan with hot water, 
then cover tightly and set on the back of the stove an hour 
before serving and let simmer. When they begin to brown, 
turn till they are nice and brown all over. 

Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



SOUTHERN SWEET POTATOES. 

Boil until partly done, peel and slice, put in layers in a 
baking dish, sprinkle with brown sugar and bits of butter 
on each layer, add hot water, bake in a moderate oven until 
soft and transparent. Mrs. J. A. McCulley, Omaha, Neb. 



CELERY RAMEKINS. 

Boil two slices of bread in a little sweet milk. When 
smooth add flour, a tablespoonful of celery cut fine, and 2 
tablespoons of butter. When heated, remove from the fire and 
add beaten yolks of 2 eggs, salt and pepper to taste. Stir in 
the stiffly beaten whites and bake fifteen minutes. 

Emma G. Murdock. 

—47 — 



ADVO JELL 

THE JELL THAT WHIPS 



The favorite dessert in thousands of 
of homes. Economical and delight- 
fully good, fresh and wholesome. 

There's none better made. There's 
none so satisfying on the luncheon 
or dinner table or in the sick room. 

It is so sweet, pure and has so many 
beautiful uses that the demand is 
increasing daily. 

Have you tried our new whipping 
receipts? Ask your grocer for the 
new booklet. 



McCord- Brady Co. 

Manufacturers 



—48- 



GREEN TOMATOES FRIED. 
Wash the tomatoes without peeling, slice crosswise, dip 
each slice into flour, and Pry in hot butter. Season with salt 
and butter. Mrs. J. A. Starrett. 



FAMOUS CHICAGO SPAGHETTI. 

One onion chopped fine, 2 sweet green peppers, chopped 
fine, 3 slices bacon diced, fried brown in 1 tablespoon butter. 
Add to above 1 pound hamburger or ground veal. Mix above 
with 1 can tomatoes, seasoning with 1 blade garlic, a pinch 
of Gephart's chili powder, salt and black pepper to taste. Add 
a can of mushrooms, let boil up and simmer one hour. Serve 
over boiled spaghetti. Miss Carrie Burford. 



POTATO COBBLER. 

Cut raw potatoes into dices. To 2 quarts of raw potatoes 
add 1 raw egg, 4 tablespoonsful of flour, % a cup of water and 
1 cup of chopped suet. Season with salt and pepper, stir all 
well together, put in the buttered baking dish and bake two 
hours. When brown, cover and continue to bake slowly. Turn 
out of baking dish and serve. Mrs. M. Gross. 



MACARONI AND TOMATOES. 

Half a package of macaroni, 1 can of tomatoes, with the 
juice of 6 large onions, 1 large tablespoon of butter, 1 tea- 
spoon of salt, and a /2 a salt spoon of cayenne pepper. Steam 
macaroni till tender, blanch with cold water, chop onions fine 
and fry in butter until yellow, mix together, and put in a 
covered disli and bake four hours, in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. S. L. Wright. 



MACARONI AND CHEESE. 

Four tablespoons of flour, 4 tablespoons of butter, and 2 
cups of milk. Mix together and pour over a half a package 
of macaroni, which has been boiled till tender. Bake entire 
mixture in medium oven for half an hour. 

Mrs. H. 0. Wulff. 

—49— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



CREAMED MACARONI. 

Boil 24 sticks of short macaroni in salt water for twenty 
minutes. Drain and pour on cold water to blanch. Make a 
dressing as follows : 2 tablespoonsful of butter melted, 2 table- 
spoonsful of flour, 1 teaspoonful of salt, l 1 /^ cups of sweet milk 
(pour in slowly), and two-thirds of a cup of grated cheese. 
Cook till smooth. Alternate a layer of macaroni and a layer 
of cream, till dish is full. Cover with a layer of cracker 
crumbs and cook till brown. Mrs. G. W. Lutton. 



SWISS CHARD. 

This vegetable is a variety of beets, in which the leaf and 
midrib have been developed instead of the stock. It is cul- 
tivated like spinach, and the green, tender leaves are prepared 
exactly like this vegetable, covering and cooking for ten min- 
'utes, then mincing and adding small pices of butter and salt 
to taste, or it can be creamed. The midribs of the full grown 
leaves are boiled until tender, then creamed like asparagus or 
celery. Mrs. Harriet McMurphy, Omaha, Neb. 



MUSHROOMS. 

Peel and carefully look over and wash the mushrooms, so 
as to wash away all gritty substance. Place in pan with lib- 
eral pieces of butter, and salt and pepper to taste. Cover and 
let simmer from a half to three-fourths of an hour. It im- 
proves them very much to add cream just before removing from 
lire. Can also be simmered with steak, in the same manner 
as onions. Mrs. John W. Hitch. 



CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

Two tablespoons melted butter. Add 4 tablespoons flour. 
Mix until smooth and add 1 cup milk or cream. Cook until 

—50— 



thick, then add yolks of 3 eggs beaten, and 6 tablespoons of 
grated cheese, pepper and salt to taste. Beat the whites and 
stir in last. Bake from ten to fifteen minutes in buttered dish 
in a quick oven. Mrs. Zachary T. Lindsey. 



RICE AND CHEESE. 

Fill a shallow baking dish with hot boiled rice, and cover 
with crumbs prepared as follows : 1 cup of bread crumbs, 1 
cup of thinly sliced cheese, seasoned with salt and pepper 
and a little butter. Rub thoroughly together between the 
hands, spread over the rice thickly, and brown in the oven. 
A good substitute for meat. Mrs. J. V. Starrett. 



SPANISH RICE. 

Fry slices of onion in bacon dripping or part butter. Pour 
in % cup of rice after it has been well washed. Keep stirring 
all the while till brown. Then turn in 1 quart of tomatoes. 
Let cook until done. Season with salt and chili powder to 
taste. As the rice is apt to settle and scorch, it should be stir- 
red frequently. A little water should be added, too, if it be- 
comes dry. Mrs. E. C. Fuller. 



ENGLISH BOILED CABBAGE. 

Take one head of fresh cabbage and cut in four, taking 
out the core. Place in salt water and let stand for half an 
hour. Have a large pan of boiling water ready and place the 
cabbage in it, having salted the water first. Let boil with lid 
off for half an hour or till tender. Take out and drain the 
water off through a colander, season with pepper and but- 
ter and chop fine. Serve hot. Mrs. Arthur Atack. 



STUFFED POTATOES. 

Bake smooth potatoes in the oven till mealy. Take out, 
cut open inside, remove inside part without tearing- the skins, 
season this with salt and pepper and plenty of butter, refill, 
close up and brown. Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 

— 51— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People' 1 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




DUTCH CHEESE. 

Set crock of sour milk without disturbing clabber. When 
whey has separated, remove and drain on cloth laid in a 
colander, being careful not to break the curd. When wanted 
to serve, chop curd with spoon and add sweet cream. Season 
with salt and pepper. Secret lies in not getting sour milk too 
hot. Mrs. Robt. Beasley. 



Do You Need Insurance? If So Call 

J. Y. HOOPER, 3129 N. 57th St. 

Phone Benson 294 Benson, Nebr. 

and I Will Call And Talk It Over With You 

"Every Known Kind of Insurance" 



— 52 — 



-53— 



—54 



Salads and Salad Dressings 

"To make a perfect salad there should be a miser 
for oil, a spendthrift for vinegar, a wise man for salt, 
and a madcap to stir the ingredients up and mix 
them well together." — Spanish Proverb. 



BEAN SALAD. 

Measure beans before cutting, string and cut beans in 
small pieces, then cook until tender in salted water. Then 
put in with beans a small onion or large one cut up and let 
stand a few minutes. Drain off all the water. The quantity 
for 1 gallon of beans and a dozen of small onions and the 
dressing to be cooked is 1 quart of vinegar, (if very strong, 
dilute), y 2 a cup of flour, y 2 a cup of mustard, ] teaspoon of 
tumeric, 1 egg well beaten, 1 teaspoon of black pepper, ^4 cup 
of butter and 2 cups of white sugar. Pour over the beans 
while hot, and stir thoroughly. Seal while hot. 

Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



SALMON SALAD. 

One can of salmon, 1 stalk of celery, V2 a cup of English 
walnuts. Mix with mayonnaise dressing. 

Mrs. Harry Knudsen. 



APPLE AND CELERY SALAD. 

Use equal parts of celery and Jonathan apples, diced 
small. A quantity of white grapes, halved and seeded, im- 
proves it also. Mix with the following salad dressing and then 
sprinkle each individual serving with broken walnut meats. 
Two eggs, 3 rounding teaspoons of sugar, 1 scant cup of vine- 
gar, 1 level teaspoon of salt, 1 tablespoon of butter and a 
sprinkle of pepper. Beat the eggs and seasoning thoroughly, 
and lastly add the vinegar. Stir constantly while cooking. 

Mrs. J. V. Starrett. 

—55— 



An Invitation 



\^OU are invited to visit and inspect our new 
-*■ Modern Dairy Home at Twenty-sixth and 
Leavenworth Streets at your convenience. A 
trip through this Wonder of Dairyland will be 
beneficial, regardless of where you receive your 
supply. 



ALAMITO SANITARY DAIRY CO. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 409 

FarrelPs Wedding Breakfast 

CANE AND MAPLE SYRUP 
The Best Made for the Table 

FarrelPs White Syrup 

Leads all others for candies 



MANUFACTURED BY 

FARRELL & CO. 

(30 Years in the Business) 

OMAHA, NEB. 

.and for Sale by all Good Grocers 

— 56— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



EGGS AND LETTUCE. 

Prepare 2 or 3 bunches of lettuce and cut into shreds. 
Four or five hard boiled eggs, sliced. Mix thoroughly, add % 
teaspoon each of salt, white pepper and sugar and serve with 
salad dressing. Mrs. J. W. Parsons. 



GERMAN POTATO. 

Slice cold boiled potatoes and one onion, then stir in the 
following mixture. Cut up bacon in small cubes, fry out, then 
add tablespoon of flour, browned. Add equal parts of vine- 
gar and water. Garnish with parsley and cold boiled eggs. 

Mrs. J. T. Beatty. 



POTATO WITH BACON. 

Slice five boiled potatoes, dress them with vinegar, salt 
and pepper, add 1 onion and 2 hard boiled eggs. Fry 4 or 5 
slices of bacon crisp. Break this in small pieces and add the 
salad with part of the fryings. Serve on lettuce leaf. 

Mrs. 0. McGuire. 



PLAIN POTATO. 

Potatoes sliced fine and salted and peppered to taste. Cut 
celery fine. Dressing, V2 cup of cream, salt and pepper, % a 
teasponful of mustard, 1 egg. Let warm, add y 2 cup of 
white vinegar, stir till it comes to boil and pour over potatoes. 
Decorate with hard boiled eggs. Mrs. Mike Chalupsky. 



KIDNEY BEAN. 

One can of red kidney beans, 3 hard boiled eggs. Thor- 
oughly wash the beans and drain, cut the eggs and add salad 
dressing. Mrs. E. C. Hodder. 



—57— 



SAVE MONEY by buying your 

Hardware, Kitchen Utensils 
and Stoves of 

Hardware Q. C. JOHNSON Stoves 



Phone Benson 141 -J 



5846 Main Street 



V. K. BELDA 

Tailor 

Suits made to order, $15 and up 
Also do Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing 
and all kinds of Alterations are 
given special attention. 

Come up and see my samples 

5905 Main Street 

Above Bank of Benson 



Phone Benson 480 

C.C. FILLER 

Painting and Paper Hanging 
Interior Decorating 

All Work Guaranteed 

6020 Main Street 

Benson - Nebraska 



Window Shades Cleaned 

An efficient, up-to-date method of cleaning, renewing win- 
dow shades at low cost. Window shades collect dust and in- 
jurious germs and are difficult to keep clean. Our method is 
thorough and inexpensive. 

Before you make up your mind you need new window 
shades this year let us figure on renovating your old shades 
and prove that we can save a considerable amount of money 
to you. 

We also manufacture all kinds of window shades. Our 
long experience in handling shades has enabled us to select 
cloth that we do not believe can be equalled. 

Satisfaction fully guaranteed. 

Mid-West Shade Factory 

Manufacturers and Cleaners of Window Shades. 
4010 Hamilton Street. Walnut 3191 

—58— 



APPLES AND NUT SALAD. 

Three apples and V% of a bunch of celery, chopped to- 
gether. Half a cup of nut meats. Dressing, yolks of 3 eggs, 
•/£ a cup of vinegar, 2 teaspoons of sugar, V2 teaspoon of mus- 
tard, little salt and Y% a cup of sour cream. Boil till thick- 
ened, and mix with apples just before serving. 

Mrs. Matilda Ranz. 



POINSETTA. 



Peel and thoroughly chill as many tomatoes as needed. 
When ready to serve, cut into eighths, not quite severing the 
sections. Open like petals of a flower on a crisp lettuce leaf. 
Fill the center of each tomato with green peas, (the canned 
variety; drained and served with dressing that blends well 
with tomatoes). The following dressing is delicious with the 
above salad: 1 cup of vinegar, (diluted with water if strong), 
Yi a cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon of flour in the sugar, 1 teaspoon 
of salt, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon of mustard and a dash of 
red pepper. Boil a few minutes, stirring, constantly. Add 
butter the size of an egg. If too thick, thin with cream just 
before serving. Mrs. E. A. Henely. 



TOMATOES WITH GELATINE. 

One can of tomatoes, contents of a small envelope of Knox 
gelatine. Moisten the gelatine with a little of the tomato 
liquor, then stew the balance of the tomatoes, adding as usual 
salt to taste. Strain and pour over moistened gelatine. Stir 
well and pour into your molds. When ready to serve turn 
out on lettuce leaves and garnish with a spoonful of salad 
dressing. Mrs. F. A. Nissen, Omaha. 



STUFFED TOMATO SALAD. 

Equal amounts of cucumbers, cabbage and onions. Season 
with salt, pepper and sugar. Stuff tomatoes and put salad 
dressing over. Mrs. H. J. Grove. 

—59— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People'* 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




TOMATO CHICKEN SALAD. 

Take nice ripe tomatoes, peel and put on ice. Cut out in- 
side, and fill with chicken salad. Place each on a lettuce leaf 
and put a tablespoon of mayonnaise dressing on each one. 

Mrs. Charles Pennoyer. 



TUNA FISH. 



One can of tuna fish minced. Add an equal amount ol 
shredded lettuce and 1 dozen chopped olives. Mix with French 
dressing and garnish with hard boiled eggs. 

Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



TOMATO SALAD. 

Soak one package of white unflavored Advo gelatine, in 
Yz cup of cold water two or three minutes and stir thoroughly. 
To 1 pint of tomato juice taken from a strained can of tomatoes 
add 1 teaspoonful of sugar, a dash of pepper and plenty of salt. 
Mix together with the juice of ^ a lemon. Heat this seasoned 
juice to the boiling point, remove from the fire and stir into 
it the soaked gelatine. Pour into six molds and when it be- 
gins to congeal, mix with some shredded pimentos and diced 
fine celery. Serve on a lettuce leaf, each serving topped off 
with a dab of salad dressing. An ornamental salad, as well 
as good. Mrs. J. V. Starrett. 



FRUIT SALAD NO. 1. 

Three dozen of large white grapes cut in halves and seeded. 
Four large apples chopped, 2 bunches of celery cut in very' 
small pieces, and 1 cup of English walnuts, chopped. Serve 
with mayonnaise dressing on a crisp lettuce leaf. 

Mrs. E. A. Henely. 



PEAR SALAD. 

Stew large pears cut in halves with the cores removed. 
Place on lettuce leaf, core side up, fill with chopped nuts and 
cover with a sweet salad dressing. 

Mrs. Charles Pennoyer. 



SHELDON SALAD. 

One can of pineapples, 4 oranges, 2 bananas, V2 pound of 
white grapes, and V12 pound of candied cherries. Cut the 
fruit fine add juice of j)ineapple, 1 tablespoon of cornstarch, 1 
cup of English walnuts and 1 cup of water, boiled and poured 
over salad when cold. Mrs. G. W. Iredale. 



MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

Warm well 1% .pints of vinegar and 1 cup of sugar. Re- 
move from the fire, and add 1 cup of butter and 1 tablespoon 
of mustard mixed with a little water. Stir until the butter is 
melted. Beat well the yolks of 8 eggs. Add V2 cup of sweet 
cream, first, then 1 tablespoon of salt, and 1 salt spoon of red 
pepper. Stir well and add to vinegar mixture. Put over fire 
and cook slowly, stirring all the time until light cream. 

Mrs. Jos. McGuire. 



FRENCH DRESSING. 

One and a half tablespoons of sugar, 1 big teaspoon of 
flour, add yolks of 2 eggs, % cup of milk, y 2 a teaspoon of 
salt, 1 teaspoon of mustard, a pinch of red pepper, a table- 
spoon of butter and */4 cup of vinegar. Cook in a double 
boiler until it thickens. Mrs. C. F. Anderson. 



RUSSIAN SALAD DRESSING. 

Three tablespoons of olive or peanut oil, 1 tablespoon of 
malt vinegar, a dash of paprika, % teaspoon of salt, % teaspoon 
of sugar, 2 teaspoons of Worcester sauce, 2 tablespoons of 
tomato catsup, 1 teaspoon of horseradish and a dash of cinna- 
mon. Whip all together in a bowl with an egg beater. 

Mrs. Frank Hechtman. 

—61— 




The Make - Over Feather Shop 

All kinds of Feathers repaired 
Irak. cleaned, dyed and curled 

Hats cleaned aud re-blocked 

BERTHA KRUGER 
429 Paxton Block 

Phone Douglas 8394 
Omaha 

go to E. MEAD'S 
The Clifton Hill Hardware Store 

For Builders' Hardware, Tin Work, Furnaces 
Fencing and a General Line of Hardware 

Phone Web. 12S6 Burdette & Military Ave. 

National Life Insurance Co. 

Organized 1848 
Insurance in force $194,625,366 

Assets $61,509,789 

Surplus 3,161,358 

Nebraska Investments 3,850,000 

Investigate our policies. Let us show you the kind of 
"Old Line" Insurance you ought to buy 

J. V. STARRE1T, State Agent 

401-2-3 Paxton Bldg. OMAHA Tel. Douglas 126 

J. W. POLCAR G CO. 

Carpet Cleaning 

Rug manufacturing 

Silk Portiers, Rag Carpets, Etc. 

Tel. Doug. 2321 OMAHA 1548 South 24th St. 

—62— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 1 24 



CREAM DRESSING. 

One heaping teaspoonful of butter, 1 heaping tablespoon 
of flour, 2 heaping tablespoons of sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt 
and 1 teaspoon of mustard. Melt flour and butter together 
in a stew pan, mix sugar, salt and mustard, stir in 3 eggs, add 
1 cup of water and V2 cup of vinegar. Then pour in a pan 
with the butter and flour and stir hard until cooked thick. 
This makes one pint. Mrs. L. D. Dickinson. 



SALAD DRESSING WITH ONIONS. 

Soak slices of onions in large cup of vinegar over night. 
Put on stove and when it boils add the following mixture : 
1 level teaspoon of mustard, 1 heaping teaspoon of salt, 6 heap- 
ing teaspoons of sugar and 2 tablespoons of flour. Let boil 
and take from fire and add 2 or 3 well beaten eggs and olive 
oil or butter. Thin as you use it, with cream. 

Mrs. A. R. Cuyler. 

SALAD DRESSING NO. 1. 

Yolks of 7 eggs, 2 cups of sweet milk, 1 teaspoon of mus- 
tard, 1 tablespoon of butter, 1 cup of hot vinegar, 2 tablespoons 
of flour, 1 teaspoon of salt and V2 teaspoon of white pepper. 
Beat yolks and add sugar and salt, mustard, pepper and flour. 
Mix well and then add the milk slowly, then hot vinegar. Cook 
in double boiler till as thick as thick cream. Remove from 
fire, add butter and stir till butter is melted. If a mild dres- 
sing is desired, add one-half or one cup of thick cream to this 
mixture. Will make one quart of dressing and if bottled will 
keep till needed. Mrs. H. J. Grove. 



SALAD DRESSING NO. 2. 

Two eggs well beaten, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of vinegar, 
—63— 
P 



1 teaspoon of flour, y* teaspoon of mustard, one-third teaspoon 
of salt and pepper. Thicken over fire, thin with sweet or sour 
cream. Will keep in a cold place indefinitely. 

Mrs. Vincent Kenny. 



SALAD DRESSING NO. 3. 

Half a cup of vinegar, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 1 tablespoon 
of prepared mustard, y± cup of milk or cream, 1 tablespoon of 
olive oil or butter, yolks of 2 eggs well beaten. Let vinegar 
come to a boil, then add ingredients excepting the eggs. When 
this again boils, add yolks of eggs to thicken and beat while 
boiling to make smooth. S. E. S. 



SIMPLE SALAD DRESSING. 

One egg, y% a cup of sugar, % a cup of vinegar, 1 tea- 
spoon of butter, a pinch of salt, mustard to suit taste. 

Mrs. Ernest H. Tindcll. 



—64— 



—65— 



How to Hake a Bread- Winner 

Take a boy or girl. 

Sift through the Public Schools. 

Add a High School course if you can afford it. 

Sprinkle in some good home training. 

When the ambitions begin to rise, take to The Van Sant 
School and have moulded into proper form for use in the busi- 
ness world. 

The products of this school command a high price on 
the market. 

The Van Sant School 

A Training School for Stenographers. 
Wead Building, 18th and Farnam. IONE C. DUFFY, Prop. 

A. HOOGE 

FLORAL DESIGNS 

STORE, 503 South 16th St., 
Phone Douglas 2986 

GREENHOUSES, 3517 South 20th Avenue 
Phone Tyler 934 

COFFEE COFFEE COFFEE 

Fresh Roasted Every Day Steel Cut and Sifted 

at the transfer, 2411 Cuming St. 

We also deliver in Benson 

Frank H. Gibson Company 

Try once for your own good Phone Douglas 5320 

—66 — 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. £ 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




Bread, Biscuits, Etc. 



"One simple little song we sing 
To brides but newly wed — 

Just make the best of everything. 
Especially of bread" 



DROP BISCUITS. 

Two cups of flour, 2 heaping teaspoons of baking powder, 
^4 teaspoon of cream of tartar, y± teaspoon of salt, 1 table- 
spoonful of lard or butter, l 1 /^ cups of sweet milk. Sift together 
salt, flour, cream of tartar and powder, add lard and mix well 
with hands. Stir in the milk with a spoon and beat wgll. Drop 
into well buttered gem pans and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. 0. Lynn McGuire. 



SOUTHERN BISCUITS. 

One cup of flour, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, 1 teaspoon 
of lard, Yz of a teaspoon of salt, milk to make a soft dough. 
Don't roll, just pat. Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



BISCUITS. 

Two cups of flour, 4 teaspoons of baking powder, 1 tea- 
spoon of salt, 2 tablespoons of shortening, % of a cup of milk. 

Mrs. C. H. Burrell. 



GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One egg well beaten, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 cup sour milk, 
1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon soda. y 2 teaspoon salt. 

Mrs. Chas. Sprague. 

—67— 



FRENCH ROLLS. 

Two cups of scalded milk, y 2 cup of butter, V2 cup of 
sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 cake of yeast. Mix soft for yeast. 
Let rise, then mix stiff, and raise again. Make in rolls or bis- 
cuits and raise, then bake fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. E. A. Mason. 



CINNAMON ROLLS. 

Two and % cups of bread sponge, and two-thirds cup of 
butter and lard. One small cup of sugar, 1 egg. Mix stiff 
enough to roll, let rise. Then roll out and spread out with the 
following mixture, 1 teaspoon each of sugar, butter and flour, 
warm with 2 tablespoons of milk added. Spread this on, 
sprinkle over it a little sugar and cinnamon ; roll, cut in slices 
and let rise, then bake in a slow oven. 

Mrs. G. W. Sowards. 



SWEET ROLLS. 

One pint of milk, luke warm, 1 compressed yeast cake, 
add flour to make rising. After rising, add a cup of lard, 1 cup 
of sugar, 2 eggs and a grated rind of one lemon. Add flour, 
then make rolls and let raise before baking. 

Mrs. C. W. Bromfield. 



POTATO PANCAKES. 

Six large potatoes grated, 1 teaspoon of salt, 2 eggs well 
beaten, flour enough to make a nice batter, 2 teaspoons of 
baking powder. Fry in butter. Mrs. M. Gross. 



GERMAN POTATO CAKES. 

Grate six large potatoes and 1 onion, then add 1 egg, V-> 
a cup of milk and 1 cup of flour. Bake same as pancakes in 
lard, nice and brown. Mrs. J. T. Beatty. 



CORN BREAD NO. 1. 

Fourth cup of butter, a /4 cup of sugar, 1 cup of sweet milk, 
1 cup of corn meal, 1 cup flour, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon of baking 
powder and salt to taste. Mrs. J. W. Welch. 

—68 — 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 1 24 



ROLLS. 

One pint of milk, butter the size of an egg, x /2 a teaspoon 
of salt, ( a /2 a cup of sugar and 1 yeast cake. Scald milk and 
add butter, salt and sugar. When hike warm add yeast that 
has been dissolved in a little hike warm milk or water, and 
sufficient flour to knead. Let the dough rise, double in size, 
knead again and roll to a half an inch. Spread with butter, 
cut with cutter, fold and let rise again until double in size 
and bake. Mrs. E. M. Jacobberger. 



WHOLE WHEAT AND GRAHAM BREAD. 

Three cups of whole wheat or graham flour, 1 cup of 
molasses, either dark or light, 1 cup of sour milk, 1 cup of 
raisins, 1 teaspoon of baking powder. Bake about one hour. 

Mrs. William Sackriede. 



GRAHAM BREAD. 

Two and a half cups of sour milk, y 2 a cup of sugar, % of 
a cup of molasses, salt, 2 level teaspoons of soda, 4 cups of 
graham flour. Let rise one hour and bake in a slow oven. 

Mrs. G. H. Tuttle. 



GRAHAM GEMS. 

One egg, 1 cup of milk, IV2 teaspoons of baking powder, 
1 tablespoonful of sugar, 1 tablespoon of lard melted, salt, a 
little graham flour and a little white flour to make a medium 
stiff batter. Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



PLAIN MUFFINS. 

Three cups of sweet milk, 3 tablespoons of butter, 3 eggs, 
3 teaspoons of baking powder, 1 teaspoon of salt, 3 tablespoons 
of sugar and 5% cups of flour. Mrs. C. C. Beavers. 

—69— 



Ideal Button and Pleating Co. 



Novelties in Fashionable Pleating 
Buttons— all Sizes and Styles 
Hemstitching and Picot Edging 



OVER 

107-109-111 So. 16th Street 



Tel. Douglas 1926. 



OMAHA, NEB. 



National Life Insurance Co, 

MONTPELIER, VERMONT 

Ninety-seven married men out of every hundred fail to leave 
their families above want at their death. This demonstrates the neces- 
sity for insurance. The results of insurance in the case of the other 
three prove its value. 



(3laude Jl* \3oyle 

Violin Instructor and Lecturer 

UPON THE 

HISTORY. THEORY AND PSYCH- 
OLOGY OF MUSIC 

IN THE 

OMAHA SCHOOL OF ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTS 

ASSISTANT TO 

ZHenry Given (Box 



Will. L Hetherington 

Violinist 



Instructor at Bellevue College 

ASSISTANT TO 

ZHenry (Box 

Studio 3rd Floor Patterson Blk. 
17TH & FARNAM 

Telephone Red 1424 OMAHA, NEB 



-70- 



CORN CAKE. 

Two eggs beaten very light, 1 cup sugar, IV2 cups corn 
meal, two-thirds cup melted butter, 2 cups sour milk, 2 cups 
flour, 1 teaspoon each of soda and salt. Mix in order named, 
sifting flour, soda and salt. Bake in moderate oven twenty or 
thirty minutes. Mrs. Chas. Sprague. 



CORN BREAD NO. 2. 

One cup of flour, 1 cup of corn meal, 1 egg, 1 pint of sour 
milk, 1 teaspoon of soda, 1 tablespoon of melted butter in pan. 
Pour batter in and bake. Mrs. Chas. Tracy. 



QUICK COFFEE CAKE. 

Four tablespoons of butter, % cup of sugar, 2 eggs, 2 
cups of flour, 3 teaspoons of baking powder, 1 cup of milk, 2 
tablespoons of cinnamon. Cream, butter, sugar, eggs, beat hard, 
add flour and baking powder, and milk. Bake twenty min- 
utes in a quick oven. Mrs. William Sackriede. 



BREAKFAST MUFFINS. 

One cup of sugar, 1 egg, 1 tablespoonful of melted but- 
ter, 1 pint of sweet milk, 3 cups of flour, 1 teaspoon of salt, 3 
teaspoons of baking powder. Mrs. Chas. Haffke. 



WHITE FLOUR MUFFINS. 

One egg beaten light, 1 dessert spoon of sugar, 1 cooking 
spoon of melted butter, pinch of salt, 3 /4 cup of sweet milk, 1 
cup of flour, 1 heaping teaspoon of baking powder. Sift this 
in the flour. Beat thoroughly and drop in muffin pan and 
bake at once. Cora A. Totman. 



ONE EGG MUFFINS. 

One and one-half cups of flour, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 3 
teaspoons of baking powder, Yi teaspoon of salt, 1 egg, 1 cup 
of milk, 1 tablespoon of melted butter. 

Mrs. Arthur N. Howe. 

—71 — 



SALT RISING BREAD. 

Two or 3 tablespoons of corn meal, ground ginger the 
size of a grain of corn, same amount of salt and half as much 
soda. Mix batter with salted water, and set it where it will 
keep a regular heat until it rises. With 1 pint of warm water 
mix enough flour to make a thick sponge, with salt and a little 
soda. Put the raised meal into this and beat well. Set it 
where it will keep a regular heat. When light mix a dough 
with a little milk, and with flour as in ordinary bread. Knead 
very fast and not long. Put loaves in pan and set to rise in 
regular heat. The secret of salt rising bread is fast kneading 
and regular heat, from beginning to end of the process. 

Mrs. Robt. Beasley. 



MUFFINS NO. 2. 

Two eggs, 2 cups of water, 2 tablespoons of lard, 1 cup of 
sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, 4 cups of flour, 4 teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder. Makes 2 dozen. Mrs. Frank L. Bumpus. 



NUT BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups of graham flour, 1 cup of white flour, 1 cup of 
sour milk, 1 teaspoon of soda, l 1 /; cups of molasses, 1 cup of 
raisins, 1 cup of chopped nuts. 

Mrs. E. A. MacGlasson. 



CORN MEAL MUFFINS. 

Cream % cup of butter, and % cup of sugar, add 2 well 
beaten eggs, then alternately add 1 cup of milk, 2 cups of 
flour and 1 cup of corn meal, to which has been added 2 heap- 
ing teaspoons of baking powder and a /2 spoon of salt. Bake 
twenty-five minutes in a well greased iron muffin pan. 

Mrs. E. A. MacGlasson. 



NUT WHITE BREAD. 

Three eggs, 1 cup of milk, 1 cup of sugar, a pinch of salt, 
4 cups of flour, sifted and level, 4 teaspoons of baking powder, 

—7 2— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




3 and a third cups of chopped nuts. Make in two loaves, let 
raise twenty minutes and bake three-fourths of an hour. 

Mrs. H. C. Miller, Omaha, Neb. 



NUT BREAD WITH RAISINS. 

Six cups of flour, white or graham, 1 scant cupful of mo- 
lasses, 1 scant cupful of sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 teaspoon 
of soda dissolved in 3 cups of sour milk. Mix thoroughly and 
add 1 cup of raisins and 1 cupful of nuts. Bake about one 
and a half hours. This makes three loaves. 

Mrs. A. Peacock. 



OMAHA NUT BREAD. 

Three-fourths cup of sugar, 1 cup of milk, 1 cup of nut 
meats, 3^ cups of flour, 1 egg, 3% cups ottbaling powder, 
V2 teaspoon of salt. Brush loaf with melted butter, cover and 
let stand twenty minutes. Bake, an hour. 

Mrs. Louise Kolb, Omaha, Neb. 



NUT BREAD. 

One egg well beaten, salt (a pinch), 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup 
of sweet milk, 2 x /2 cups of flour, 2 large teaspoons of baking- 
powder, 1 cup of chopped English walnuts. Rise twenty min- 
utes and bake forty. Miss Cora Totman. 



NUT BREAD NO. 1. 

One cup of sugar, l 1 /^ cups sweet milk, 4 cups flour, 1 cup 
chopped nuts, 2 eggs, V2 teaspoon of salt, 4 teaspoons baking 
powder. Beat eggs well, add sugar and other ingredients, 
stir well, put in pan, set in warm place and raise twenty min- 
utes. Bake one hour. Mrs. Eaf Anderson. 

—73— 



WHEN YOU EAT AT 




Lunch Rooms or Quickserve Cafeteria 

219 South 16th Street City National Bank Block 

1408 Farnam Street 16th and Harney Street 

1406 Douglas Street Down Stairs 

You eat the same quality of food that Mr. Welch buys for 
his home use— THE BEST. 

This is as Good as Can be Bought in Omaha 



^>- j££m. 



C. C. BEAVERS, Real Estate 

FIRE AND TORNADO INSURANCE 

Telephone Douglas 2450 760 Omaha Nat'l Bank Building 

MEISINGER & SPRING 

Complete Line of 

Celebrated Estate and Alcazar Ranges, 

Bon Ami and Clark Jewell Oil Stoves 
Tools, Builders Hardware and Cutlery 

PHONE BENSON 313W BENSON. NEB. 

—74— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



NUT BREAD NO. 2. 

Two cups of flour, y 2 cup of sugar, V2 teaspoon of salt, 
2 good teaspoons baking powder, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 egg. 
Sift flour, sugar and baking powder together, then beat other 
ingredients well and add 1 cup of chopped nuts. Let rise 
twenty minutes and bake forty. 

Mrs. F. B. Oliver. 



BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

One cup each of white and graham flour, sift and measure 
2 round teaspoons of baking powder, 1 teaspoon of salt, % of a 
cup of molasses, 1% cups of sour milk, y 2 teaspoon of soda. 
Steam three and one-half hours. 

Mrs. John Polian, South Omaha, Neb. 



BOSTON BROWN BREAD NO. 2. 

Two cups corn meal, 2 cups graham flour, 2 cups white 
flour, 2 cups New Orleans molasses, 2 cups buttermilk, 1 cup 
raisins, 2 teaspoons soda, 1 teaspoon salt. Steam three hours. 

Mrs. H. F. Knudsen. 



BRAN BREAD. 

One and one-half cups of sweet milk, % cup of New Or- 
leans molasses, 1 teaspoon of soda, 1 teaspoon of salt, 2 cups 
of graham flour, 1 cup of bran. Bake forty-five minutes. 

Mrs. C. H. Burrell. 



BROWN BREAD NO. 2. 

One cup of flour, 1 cup of graham flour, 2 cups of corn 
meal, 1 cup of molasses, 2 cups of sour milk, 1 teaspoon of soda. 
Dissolve soda in a little hot water, add V2 teaspoon of salt. 
Steam three hours. Emma G. Murdock. 

—75— 



BOSTON BROWN BREAD NO. 1. 

Mix well together 1 beaten egg, y 2 cup of molasses, and 
1 pint of sour milk. Sift in 2 level teaspoons of soda, stir well 
and add iy 2 pints of graham flour, and 2 /i teaspoon of salt. 
Turn into greased mold and steam four hours. 

Mrs. E. Mead. 



STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

One cup of sour milk, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of raisins, 
1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of corn meal, 1 cup of graham flour, 
x /2 cup of white flour, y 2 teaspoon of salt, 2 teaspoons of soda. 
Mix 1 teaspoon of soda with molasses and 1 teaspoon with milk. 
Mix raisins with flour, add corn meal, salt, molasses and milk. 
Mix and pour into buttered tins and steam four hours. Finish 
in oven. Mrs. Nellie V. Speedie. 



BAKED BROWN BREAD. 

One cup of sour milk, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of brown 
sugar, 1 egg, 1 cup of raisins. Dust heavily with white flour, 
1 teaspoon of cinnamon, 1 teaspoon of soda, 1 teaspoon of bak- 
-ing powder, pinch of salt, from 2 to 3 cups of graham. Bake in 
a slow oven forty-five minutes. 

Mrs. Charles Martensen, Omaha, Neb. 



BROWN BREAD NO. 1. 

Two cups of graham flour, salt, 1/3 cup of sugar, 1 cup of 
sour milk, with 1 teaspoon of soda (stirred in sour milk), 1/3 
cup of molasses, raisins, 1 egg, yolks and whites being beaten 
separately. Fill cans two-thirds full and steam two hours. 
This makes two and one-half pounds baking powder cans full. 

Mrs. H. E. McCandless, Rollo, Mo. 



CHEESE STRAWS. 

One cup of grated cheese, 1 cup of flour, scant y 2 cup of 
butter, !/2 teaspoon of salt, Vs teaspoon of paprika, yolk of 1 
egg, 3 or 4 tablespoons of milk. 

Mrs. W. H. Loechner. 

—76— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People'* 

Benson 100 Benson 100 




WAFFLES. 

One pint of sour milk, 5 eggs, white and yolks beaten sepa- 
rately, 2 tablespoons of melted butter, 1 teaspoon of soda, flour 
to make a thin batter, whites of eggs last. Bake in waffle iron. 

Mrs. C. Austin, Omaha, Neb. 



ECONOMICAL WAFFLES. 

Two cups of flour, 2 cups of milk, 2 eggs (whites beaten 
separately), 2 tablespoons of melted butter, y 2 teaspoon of salt, 
2 teaspoons of baking powder. Beat well, add whites of eggs, 
bake on hot waffle iron. Mrs. Louis Kolb, Omaha, Neb. 



•77— 



ANYTHING 

YOU WANT IN MY 

LINES^ I GUARANTEE 

BOTH GOODS AND PRICES 

RIGHT. OR REFUND MONEY 

GHTuttix. 

Furniture 6 Undertaking 

Benson. Neb. 

. jy specialties: 
good window shades 

AND 
SATISFACTION 



Ladies', Men's and Children's 

Furnishings 
and Shoes 

M. J. CHALUPSK.Y Tel. Benson 183J BENSON, NEB. 



FRED A. BAILEY 



GUSS A. WULFF 



The Bailey Mercantile Agency 

Cheap Western Lands 

Acreage, Loans, Collections, Exchanges, City Property. 

ASK FOR OUR CATALOGUE 
5821 Main Street Benson, Nebraska 

—78— 



Sandwiches 



"If you prepare a dish carelessly, do not expect 
Providence to make it palatable. " 



DENVER CLUB SANDWICHES. 

Butter sliced of bread. Chip crisp bacon and small amount 
of onion over bread, add very thin slices of tomato and 
sprinkle with salt. Mrs. 0. S. Brooks. 



EGG PIMENTO. 

Grind 1 can of pimentoes in food chopper, also 6 slices of 
bacon which have been fried brown. Chop fine 6 hard boiled 
eggs and mix with other ingredients. Season with salt, pepper, 
sugar and vinegar. Ground pickle may be used for flavoring 
instead of the vinegar if desired. Mrs. G. W. Sowards. 



CHEESE FILLING FOR SANDWICHES. 

Melt slowly together x /2 pound cheese, 1 lump butter and 
1 tablespoon milk. Mix together 1 egg, pinch of salt and 1 
teaspoon mustard. Add to above ingredients, and season with 
1 tablespoon vinegar added last. Mrs. G. H. Tuttle. 



VEAL FILLING. 

One pound veal, 1 pound pork butts. Boil until tender and 
grind through food chopper. Add salt, pepper, cream and 
chopped pickles. Mrs. G. "W. Lutton. 



ENGLISH WALNUT SANDWICHES. 

Chop fine 1 cup of English walnut meats and add enough 
cream cheese to make a moist paste. Add salt and a dash of 
cayenne pepper, and spread on thin slices of bread which have 
been lightly buttered. The slices of bread may be round or 
any fancy shape desired. Mrs. J. V. Starrett. 

—79— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



Puddings 



Josh Billings' Philosophy — "We should be keer- 
ful how we cncurridge luxuries. It is but a step 
forard from hoe cake to plum puddin', but it's a mile 
and a half by the nearest road, when we have to go 
back again." 



GRANDMA'S STEAMED PUDDING. 

One egg, 2 tablespoons sour cream, I/3 cup sugar, % tea- 
spoon soda, about a handful of raisins, flour to make quite a 
stiff batter. Flavor with vanilla and steam in cups. Serve with 
whipped cream. Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



CORNSTARCH PUDDING. 

Two cups of cold water, 1 cup sugar, juice of 1 lemon, 2 
rounding tablespoons of cornstarch, whites of 2 eggs. Boil 
water and sugar, remove from stove and add lemon juice and 
cornstarch mixed with a little water. Boil until thick, stir- 
ring continuously. Remove from the fire and add the beaten 
whites of eggs and beat the mixture ten minutes. Serve plain 
or with whipped cream. Mrs. E. Huntington, 

Council Bluffs. 



APPLE PUDDING. 

One cup sifted flour, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 heaping tea- 
spoon baking powder, % cup milk, ] /4 teaspoon salt, 1 egg, 1 
pint apples sliced. Place apples in a deep pan, spread butter 
over them. Bake and when done reverse, cover with sugar, 
butter and nutmeg, and serve with cream or cream sauce. 

Mrs. C. C. Beavers. 

—80 — 



GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Two cups of graham flour, 1 cup white flour, 1 cup mo- 
lasses, 1 cup sour milk, 1 cup raisins, V2 cup butter, 1 teaspoon 
soda. Steam two and one-half hours. 

Sauce. 

One cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, the well beaten yolks 
of 2 eggs, 1 cup of hot water, the grated rind and juice of 1 
lemon. Cook together, and while cooking, add the beaten 
whites of the eggs. Mrs. Charles Martensen. 



ECONOMY PUDDING. 

Soak 2 quarts of bread, cake or cookie crumbs in water 
or milk, add 1 package raisins, V2 grated nutmeg, ^ teaspoon 
cloves, V2 teaspoon soda and flour to stiffen. Steam three hours. 
If all bread is used, add % cup of butter and 1 cup sugar. If 
half bread, ^4 cup butter and Y2 cup sugar, and if all cake is 
used, omit butter and sugar. Serve with any preferred sauce. 
One made from 1 cup sugar, Y± cup butter and 1 egg, beaten 
together to a cream is very nice. Mrs. J. F. Beattie. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

To the grated rind and juice of 1 lemon add 1 cup sugar 
and 3 tablespoons flour. Mix well and add V/2 cups boiling 
water. Cook until clear. Beat whites of 5 eggs until stiff, then 
beat into the hot mixture. Beat well and serve cold. 

Sauce. 

Boil together V/2 cups milk and three rounding table- 
spoons sugar. Beat yolks of 3 eggs and stir the hot milk and 
sugar into the eggs. Pour back into the pan and scald. Be 
careful of curdling. Flavor with vanilla. Byra Brooks. 



CARAMEL PUDDING. 

One-half cup white sugar, V2 cup brown sugar, 1 pint milk, 
% cup flour, 1 egg. Sift sugar and flour, add milk, then the egg 
beaten separately. Flavor with vanilla. Cook five minutes 
and serve with whipped cream. Mrs. F. B. Oliver. 

— 81— 



To Get Results When Cooking 

it is essential that you have the right kind of ingred- 
ients, these can be found at our store where we carry 
a full line of 

Groceries and Meats 

We also carry a full line of 

General Merchandise Shoes 

New Diamond Disc Edison Phonographs 

Electric Washers Electric Irons 

Frank Rouse & Co. 



Res. Phone, Benson 735-J Office Phone, Doug. 3025 

Dentist 

DR. W. W. WARD 

Suite 501 PAXTON BLK. 16TH AND PARNAM 



HOUSEWORK MADE EASY 

My years of experience in the field of electric devices for lightening 
housework, fits me far above all others to be useful to you in plan- 
ing- ways to make housework easy* I am a Specialist in the lines of 

Electric Washers Vacuum Cleaners Ironing Machines 

Dish Washers, etc. Cash or Payments. Free Trials 

E. B. WILLIAMS, woo'ffiSBSrc. 

308 South 18th Street Phone Tyler 1011 

—82— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People' 1 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




BREADED APPLE PUDDING. 

Pare and slice several apples. Place layer of apples in 
baking dish, sprinkle with dry bread crumbs, nutmeg, sugar 
and butter. Add remainder of apples, and sprinkle the same 
as above. Pour over just enough water to bake. Serve with 
dip or fruit sauce. Mrs. 0. Lynn McGuire. 



STEAMED PUDDING. 

One cup suet chopped fine, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup of currants 
chopped, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, 2 tablespoons 
baking powder, 2 cups flour. Steam about two hours. This 
may need a little more flour. Mrs. Ed. McArdle. 



POOR MAN'S PUDDING. 

One cup our, % cup molasses, y 2 cup sweet milk, % cup 
raisins, % teaspoon soda, % teaspoon ginger, % teaspoon all- 
spice, y 2 teaspoon salt. Steam two hours. Serve with any de- 
sired sauce. Mrs. Louis Kolb, Omaha, Neb. 



SUMMER PUDDING. 

Combine as in making cake 1 cup sugar, % cup butter, % 
cup milk, 2 cups flour, 1 level tablespoon baking powder and 
whites of 4 eggs. Turn into well buttered cups and steam one- 
half hour. Serve with any preferred sauce. 

Emma G. Murdock. 



POTATO PUDDING. 

Boil 6 medium sized potatoes, mash, add salt and a piece 
of butter the size of an egg, % cup of sugar and 2 cups milk, 
y 2 a grated nutmeg. Stir all together and bake until well 
browned. Mrs. C. 0. Falk. 

—83— 



BUCKEYE PUDDING. 

One cup molasses, % cup hot water, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 cup 
raisins, 1 teaspoon soda, flour to make a stiff batter. Steam 
three hours. 

Sauce. 
One tablespoon butter, creamed with 1 cup powdered su- 
gar and 1 teaspoon hot water. Beat in the whites of 2 eggs just 
before serving. Flavor as desired. 

Mrs. J. A. McCulley. 



BLUEBERRY PUDDING. 

Rub thoroughly % cup butter with 1% cups sugar, add 
1 cup sweet milk, 2 eggs, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking pow- 
der. After adding 1 cup flour, stir in 1 pint of berries, then 
the remainder of the flour. To be eaten hot with butter. 

Mrs. Charles Haffke. 



CARROT PUDDING. 

One cup carrots ground fine, 1 cup Irish potatoes ground 
fine, 1 cup flour, 1 cup seeded raisins, 1 cup granulated sugar, 
1 lump butter size of egg, 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg, 1 tea- 
spoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon soda, pinch salt. Mix together 
thoroughly and steam three hours. Use butter or hard sauce. 

Mrs. Edwin Hindley. 



WHEAT-GRAHAM SUET PUDDING. 

One cup suet, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup milk, 1 cup seeded 
raisins, 2 cups graham flour, 1 cup wheat flour, 1 teaspoon 
baking powder. Steam three hours. Mrs. E. Mead. 



MRS. WRIGHT'S SUET PUDDING. 

One cup black molasses, 1 cup suet well chopped, 1 cup 
sweet milk, 1 cup raisins, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 
1 teaspoon cloves, % teaspoon nutmeg, 2% cups flour. Mix 
together, fill cans two-thirds full and steam two hours. 

Mrs. Sadie L. Wright. 

—84— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



SUET PUDDING NO. 1. 

One cup suet, 2 cups flour, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup milk, J/3 
cup brown sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
1 teaspoon cinnamon, 2 eggs. Steam three hours. 

Mrs. Arthur N. Howe. 



SUET PUDDING NO. 2. 

One-half cup suet, 1 cup sour milk, 1 egg, V2 cup molasses, 
1 big teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon salt, 1% cups flour, fruit and 
spices to taste. Mrs. Eaf. Anderson. 



SUET PUDDING NO. 3. 

One cup suet, 1 cup sorghum, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup rai- 
sins, 1 cup currants, 3 cups flour, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 tea- 
spoon cloves, 1 teaspoon soda. Steam two hours. Use scant 
cups in measuring. Mrs. A. B. Prior. 



ENGLISH FRUIT PUDDING. 

One loaf stale bread cut fine, mix with 1 pint sweet milk 
and add 3 eggs, V2 cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup cur- 
rants, 2 cups raisins, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 nutmeg, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon, 1 teaspoon soda. Steam three hours. 

Sauce — Three-fourths cup butter mixed stiff with pow- 
dered sugar and flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. Charles Pennover. 



J. H- SGHMIDT 
flrfsniption grgggjjj 



24th and Cuming Sts. 



The Transfer Corner 



Phone Douglas 044 



DOUGLAS 



PRINTING 



COMPANY 



1 



1 



314-16 So. 19th Street 



RODSTROM 

Photographs 

Artistic, Natural and 
Pleasing 



1811 Farnam 



Doug. 5622 



Phone Douglas 4749 

Ida C. Stockwell 

Corset Specialist 

208 South 17th Street 
Brandeis Theatre Bldg. Omaha 



E.M. Clark & Son 
SIGNS 

For Every 
PURPOSE 



113 So. 16th St. 



Omaha 



GO TO 

The Parisian Cloak Co. 

When you want to pur- 
chase ladies' high class 
wearing apparel. 

GORTON ROTH 

2316 N. 60th Ave., Benson 
Phone Benson 186 J 

Fire, Tornado, Accident, Health, 
Liability, Burglary, Plate Glass 

and Automobile Insurance, 

and Bonds in Old and Reliable 

Companies only. 

Call me up or drop me a line 
when in need of protection 

Better be Insured than Sorry 



—8 6— 



Pastry — Pies 



"What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye! 
What calls back the past like the rich pumpkin pie!" 

— Whittier. 



NEVER FAIL PIE CRUST. 

One cup flour, 2 tablespoons lard, 3 tablespoons water. 

Ruth E. Parker. 



CUSTARD PIE. 

Line a pie plate with light crust. Beat 3 eggs together, 
add % cup sugar, pinch of salt, 2 cups milk. Pour into crust 
and sprinkle with nutmeg. Bake one-half hour. 

Mrs. F. C. Thies. 



CREAM PIE. 

Two eggs (yolks), IV2 tablespoons cornstarch, V2 cup su- 
gar, piece of butter size of a walnut, 2 cups sweet milk. Boil 
milk, stir in the other ingredients. Whip whites of eggs with 
1 tablespoon powdered sugar. Spread over pie and brown in 
oven. Add lemon flavor or cocoanut. 

Mrs. Frank L. Bumpus. 



RAISIN PIE. 

One cup raisins, 4 crackers, 1 cup sugar, yolks of 2 eggs. 
Cook raisins until done, add sugar, crackers and egg yolks. 
Line pie pans with crust, pour in the filling and bake. Beat 
whites of eggs until stiff, add 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 drops 
vanilla, spread over pie, return to oven and brown. 

Mrs. Oliver Rouse. 



BUTTER SCOTCH PIE. 

Yolks of 2 eggs, J/3 cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar. Cream 
together and add a little vanilla, 3 heaping tablespoons flour, 
5 tablespoons milk, 1 cup boiling water. Beat the two whites 
for top. Mrs. Ernest H. Tindell. 

—87— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People*' 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




BROWN SUGAR CREAM PIE. 

Two-thirds cup brown sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 table- 
spoons milk, cook until waxy. Mix smoothly yolks of 2 eggs, 
1 heaping tablespoon flour, 1% cups milk, add to above in- 
gredients and cook until thick. Add vanilla and put in baked 
crust. Use whites of eggs for meringue and brown in oven. 

Mrs. Phil. Meisinger. 



BANANA PIE NO. 1. 

Make a custard of 1 pint milk, 3 tablespoons sugar, 1 table- 
spoon cornstarch, yolks of 2 eggs, small piece of butter, pinch 
of salt. When cold add 2 sliced bananas. Pour into baked 
crust and use the white of eggs for meringue. 

Mrs. Harry Knudsen. 



BANANA PIE NO. 2. 

Stir together 2 heaping tablespoons flour, 3 tablespoons 
sugar, pinch of salt, small lump of butter, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 
pint sweet milk. Cook in double boiler. When cold, slice 2 
or 3 bananas on bottom of baked crust. Beat up the egg 
whites and add a little sugar for frosting. 

Mrs. G. W. Iredale. 



BANANA CREAM PIE NO. 1. 

Crust — One cup flour, V2 teaspoon salt, 1 heaping table- 
spoon lard. AVork thoroughly together with a fork. Gradually 
sprinkle enough cold water over it to hold together. This will 
make enough for two shells. Prick each with a fork before 
placing in oven to prevent puffing up. 

Filling — One pint sweet milk, Yi cup sugar, 2 heaping 
tablespoons cornstarch, butter size of small egg, 2 egg yolks. 
Take an extra half cup of milk in which stir the cornstarch, 

—88— 



add it to the pint of milk, sugar, butter and well beaten yolks 
of eggs, and stir constantly while cooking. Slice a banana in 
each shell, spread over it the filling and meringue made of the 
2 egg whites beaten stiff and sweetened with y> cup sugar. 
Brown in the oven. A little banana extract improves the fill- 
ing. Mrs. J. V. Starrett. 



BANANA CREAM PIE NO. 2. 

Three eggs, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, 1 teaspoon butter, 
1 pint milk, 1 cup sugar, 3 bananas. Beat eggs, mix cornstarch 
with a little milk and eggs and stir in milk, sugar and butter. 
Put in double boiler and cook until thick. Have crusts ready 
baked. Slice a layer of bananas, pour in filling, add a layer 
of bananas, then more filling. Have ready the whites of two 
eggs whipped to a stiff froth and sweetened to taste. Spread 
over the filling and set in oven a minute to brown. This is for 
two pies. . Mrs. 0. McGuire. 



SNOW PIE. 

Two rounding tablespoons cornstarch, wet with cold water. 
Pour over 1 pint boiling water, cook a few minutes add % cup 
sugar and some cocoanut. Let cool. Whip whites of 2 eggs 
and stir in mixture. Pour filling into baked crusts and cover 
with nuts and whipped cream. 

Mrs. Charles Nordin, Omaha. 



CHOCOLATE PIE NO. 1. 

One cup milk, 1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons grated chocolate, 
yolks of 4 eggs, pinch salt, flavor vanilla. Mix eggs, sugar and 
chocolate together, and add to boiling milk. Use whites of 
eggs for frosting. Mrs. Bromfield. 



CHOCOLATE PIE NO. 2. 

One-half cup sugar, 1 tablespoon grated chocolate, 1 table- 
spoon flour, 1 egg yolk, 1 cup sweet milk. Cook until thick. 
Pour into baked crust and make frosting with whites of 2 eggs. 

Mrs. C. C. Beavers. 

—89— 



g>L %mke'g jfatgrnttij Sfogpitai 



Regular licensed ethical home for women 
during pregnancy and confinement. 

With best medical care, nursing and 
protection. 

A home found for the infant by adoption. 

All publicity avoided. 

Patients may come at any time during 
this period. 

Telephone Webster 1111 
2121 Lake Street Omaha, Neb. 



It brings the smile that bids the 
wrinkle good bye 


LADIES! 

Alcona Nonalcoholic Ex- 


The RE -LAX SHOE 


tracts and Toilet Prepara- 
tions give great satisfaction 


A 


TRY THEM 


■mm 


J. CREWS 

Sole Agent for Benson 


oHiyH' i«i 


Res. 2422 61st St. 




Telephone Benson 385J 


Um 


Phone Benson 566 


MuJ^ 


Effie McGlumphy 


m^^ 


DRESSMAKER 


Ask your dealer for it 

HAYWARD BROS. SHOE CO. 


Embroidery Classes 


OMAHA 


• 6035 Main St. Benaon, Neb. 



-90— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



LEMON PIE. 

Crust — One cup flour, V> teaspoon salt, Yi cup lard, 5 
tablespoons water. Bake till brown. 

Filling — Grated rind and juice of 1 lemon, 1 small piece of 
butter, 1 large cup sugar, 2 heaping tablespoons cornstarch. 
Cook until smooth. When cool add yolks of 2 eggs. Pour in 
crust and cover with the beaten whites of 2 eggs, sweetened 
with 1 tablespoon sugar. Brown in oven. 

Mrs. G. W. Lutton. 



FRENCH CREAM PIE. 

One cup sugar, 3 eggs, 3 tablespoons hot water, V/2 cups 
flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder. Beat egg yolks thoroughly, 
add sugar, hot water, flour and baking powder, and lastly the 
beaten egg whites. Add any desired flavor and bake in jelly 
pan. When cool split through center and spread with Ailing 
composed of 1 pint milk, V/2 cups sugar, 1 egg, 2 tablespoons 
cornstarch, butter size of an egg. Boil milk. Add sugar, egg 
and butter mixed well, and the cornstarch dissolved in a little 
milk. Cook until thick. Flavor and when cool, spread between 
sections. Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



DATE CREAM PIE. 
Bake a single rich crust in a deep pie plate, pricking it 
thickly to prevent rising and blistering. To each 8-inch pie 
plate allow V/2 cups stoned and chopped dates, mixed with 
sufficient sweetened and flavored whipped cream to fill. Cover 
top with meringue, brown lightly. Dot with cherries or jelly. 

AI.s. F. W. Paugh. 



RHUBARB MERINGUE PIE. 
Pour boiling water over 2 cups of rhubarb, cut fine. Let 

—91— 



stand five minutes and drain. Mix 1 cup sugar and 2 table- 
spoons flour, add yolks of 2 eggs, tablespoon of melted butter 
and 3 tablespoons water. Beat well, add to rhubarb and bake 
in single crusts. When done, cover with meringue and brown. 

Mrs. E. H. Orchard, Omaha. 



LEMON FILLING NO. 1. 

Five eggs, 1% cups sugar, 2% tablespoons cornstarch, 1 
cup water, juice and grated rinds of 2 lemons. Dissolve corn- 
starch in a little water and boil until thick. Save out the 
whites of 2 eggs and beat stiff, adding 1 teaspoon sugar for 
the top of pie. Put in oven to brown. 

Mrs. L. D. Dickinson. 



MOTHER'S MINCE MEAT. 

One-third meat (6 pounds), two-thirds apples (1 peck), 2 
pounds raisins, 2 pounds English currants, 1 pound suet, 1 
cup butter, 2 tablespoons cinnamon, 1 tablespoon cloves, 1 
tablespoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon pepper (even), 1 teaspoon 
ginger, 1 cup vinegar, 1 cup whiskey or brandy, salt to taste, 
sugar and molasses to taste. Cook slowly about one hour. 

Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



MINCE MEAT NO. 1. 

Three bowls of chopped meat (7 pounds), 5 bowls chopped 
apples, 1 bowl molasses, 1 bowl vinegar, 2 of sweet cider, 1 of 
chopped suet, 2 of raisins, 4 of sugar, 2 tablespoons cinnamon, 
nutmeg and cloves, 1 tablespoon each of salt and pepper. Boil 
until the raisins are tender and pour on the meat and spice. 

Mrs. E. J. McArdle. 



LEMON FILLING NO. 2. 

One cup sugar, 2 tablespoons flour, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 
egg yolks, 1 cup boiling water, 1 large or P/2 small lemons. 

Mrs. Frank Rouse. 

— 92— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 

Benson 100 Benson 100 




MINCE MEAT NO. 2. 

Four pounds loan cold boiled meat chopped fine, pounds 
apples chopped fine, 1% pounds suet chopped fine, 3 pounds 
raisins, 2 pounds currants, y 2 pound citron chopped fine, 5 
pounds sugar, 10 teaspoons cinnamon, 3 teaspoons cloves, 5 
teaspoons mace, 1 teaspoon black pepper, 6 tablespoons salt, 1 
quart cider and vinegar mixed with molasses. Mix all and 
add juice and grated rind of 2 lemons. Instead of cider, 
vinegar and molasses, 1 quart sherry and 1 quart brandy may 
be used. Mrs. Charles Martensen. 



MINCE MEAT NO. 3. 

Two pounds lean meat boiled tender and chopped fine, 1 
pound of beef suet cleaned of sinews and strings, cut fine, 5 
pounds of apples, chopped fine, 2 pounds seeded raisins, 2 
pound currants, 1 pound sultana raisins, 1 pound citron, 
chopped fine, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 powdered nutmeg, y 2 
teaspoon each of mace, cloves and allspice, 1 tablespoon fine 
salt, 2!/2 pounds brown sugar, 2 quarts boiled cider. 

Mrs. Frank Heckman. 



MOCK CHERRY PIE. 

One cup cranberries cut in two, y 2 cup seeded raisins, % 
cup sugar, level teaspoon butter, teaspoon vanilla. Stir into 
1 cup boiling water 1 tablespoon flour, wet with a little water. 
Cook until it is a transparent paste. When cool add berries, 
raisins, butter and flavor. Bake with two crusts in moderate 
oven. Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 



PINEAPPLE PIE. 

Two eggs, 1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, 1 cup 
grated pineapple, grated rind, and juice of 1 lemon, butter size 

— 93— 



Little Farms Joining Benson on Main Street 
$10 Cash, $10 a Month 

Buy an acre or two in our new addition — "Benson 
Gardens," part of the Post Farm. This tract is only six blocks 
to car and school. 

ON PAVED ROAD 

Do you realize what you can make on an acre of ground? 
You can raise poultry, garden truck and fruit. This location 
is ideal for poultry ; close to Omaha, where you can always get 
top market price, never an over supply. We can give you the 
names of many who are making their entire living expenses 
with a limited number of hens. 

THIS IS THE SOLUTION OF THE HIGH COST OF LIVING 

Why not consider making a change now? Send for our 
Free Illustrated Literature. 

HASTINGS & HEYDEN 

1614 Harney Street Phone Douglas 1606 

National Life Insurance Co. 

Montpelier, Vermont 



"Ninety-Seven Married Men out of every Hundred fail to leave their 
families above want at their death. This demonstrates the necessity 
for insurance' The results of Insurance in the case of the other three 
prove its value." 

J. V. STARRETT, State Agent 
401-2-3 Paxton Block Omaha, Nebraska Phone Douglas 126 



The Benson Times 

High Grade and 
Artistic Commercial 

PRINTING 
Telephone Benson 600 

—94— 



Try 

Morton's Cigar 
Store 

5921 Main Street 

Benson Nebraska 



of walnut, 1Vi> cups boiling water. Beat egg yolks. Add sugar, 
lemon, pineapple, butter and cornstarch. Pour mixture into 
boiling water and cook in double boiler until thick. Pour into 
a baked shell, cover with meringue made of the beaten egg 
whites, 2 tablespoons of sugar and a few drops of lemon extract. 
Set in oven to brown. Mrs. Mart. Armstrong. 



APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Make rich biscuit dough, pare and core 1 large apple for 
each dumpling wanted, roll out dough and place four quarters 
of apple in each piece, leaving top open. Place in a deep bake 
pan and to 6 dumplings use V/o cups sugar, 1 cup flour, V2 
teaspoon cinnamon. Put mixture over dumplings, cover with 
boiling water and bake in a moderate oven until apples are 
done. Mrs. E. F. Brailey, Omaha. 




—96- 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



Cakes 



''Aye to the leavening, but here's yet in the word 
hereafter — the kneading, the making of the cake, the 
heating of the oven, and the baking. Nay, you must 
stay the cooling, too, or you may chance to burn your 
mouth. ' ' — Shakespeare. 



ANGEL FOOD. 

Twelve eggs, whites only, beaten until dry ; IV2 cups gran- 
ulated sugar, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla. Sift sugar and flour together nine times. Put cream 
of tartar in eggs. Mrs. Frank L. Bumpus. 



ANGEL FOOD. 

One and one-half cups sugar, 1 cup flour. Sift each four 
times. Whites 12 eggs beaten stiff, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 
sifted with flour, pinch of salt. Bake forty-five minutes. 

Mrs. Phil. Meisinger. 



CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, IV2 cups sugar, 2 cups flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, y± teaspoon salt, V2 cup milk, 4 eggs, 
4 ounces chocolate, dissolved in 5 tablespoons boiling water, 1 
teaspoon vanilla. Mix flour, salt and baking powder, cream 
butter and sugar, add egg yolks, vanilla and dissolved choco- 
late. Alternate the milk and flour and beat hard, add whipped 
whites, turn into a buttered loaf pan, lined with three thick- 
nesses of paper. Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. Frank Rouse. 

—97— 



LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, scant l 1 /-. cups sugar sifted, 1 cup cold 
water, 3 even cups of Swansdown cake flour, sifted three times 
before measuring ; 2 rounded teaspoons baking powder, whites 
of 4 eggs. Flavor with y± teaspoon almond extract and y 2 tea- 
spoon vanilla. Cream, butter and sugar, add one-third of the 
water with 1 cup flour, beat thoroughly and add second cup 
of flour ; continue beating into last cup of flour, sift the baking 
powder and add as the others. Then add the rest of the water, 
flavor and fold in the beaten whites of eggs. This will make 
three lays 12 inches square or two 14 inches square. 

Mrs. Frank Rouse. 



LAYER SPICE CAKE NO. 1. 

One-half cup butter, 2 cups brown sugar, 3 eggs, 1 cup 
sour milk or cream, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 
teaspoon cloves, 2y> cups flour. Mrs. Joe McGuire. 



LAYER SPICE CAKE NO. 2. 

One cup brown sugar, V^ cup butter, 1 cup sour milk 
(preferably thick), 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 
teaspoon cloves, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, 2 eggs, 2 cups flour, 
level. Bake in two layers. Put together with white frosting. 

Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



ECONOMICAL SPICE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, % cup butter, 1 cup sour milk, yolk of 1 
?gg, V-2 teaspoon cloves, 1 cup seeded raisins, 2V± cups flour, 
1 rounding teaspoon soda, V2 teaspoon cinnamon. Combine 
ingredients and bake in loaves. Frost with boiled frosting. 

Mrs. E. M. Jaccobberger. 



PLAIN ECONOMICAL CAKE. 

One cup sugar, piece of butter and lard, 2 eggs, 1 cup 
water, 2 cups flour, 2 tablespoons baking powder, flavoring. 
Beat the eggs separately. Mrs. C. 0. Falk. 

—98— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

' ' The Good Coals People ' ' 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




SPICE CAKE NO. 1. 

Two eggs, Vii eup butter, l 2 /i cups sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 
2Vi> eups flour, 3 level teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon cin- 
namon, !/> teaspoon allspice, % teaspoon cloves, % teaspoon 
nutmeg. This makes a very good jam cake by adding a little 
less sugar and using one cup jam. Mrs. Ben Morton. 



SPICE CAKE NO. 2. 

One cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 cup sour milk, 1 
teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon and cloves, 2 cups 
flour, yolks of 2 eggs. Use the whites of the eggs for frosting. 
Add nuts and raisins if desired. Mrs. C. C. Beavers. 



SPONGE CAKE. 

Two eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon baking pow- 
der. V2 cup boiling water. Eat warm. 

Mrs. C. C. Beavers. 



MAHOGANY CAKE. 

One and one-half cups white sugar, y 2 cup butter, 2 eggs, 
V2 cup sweet milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 cups flour. Boil until 
thick y 2 cup grated chocolate, % cup sweet milk, and stir in 
last. Mrs. Joseph McGuire. 



BROWN CAKE. 

One teaspoon butter, % cup sugar, yolk of 1 egg, % cup 
milk, pinch salt, 1 cup flour, y 2 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon bak- 
ing powder, 3 teaspoons cocoa. Beat white of egg stiff and 
add last. 

Filling — One cup powdered sugar, 1 teaspoon butter, y> 
teaspoon vanilla, 1 tablespoon coffee, 1% teaspoons cocoa. 

Mrs. Phil Meisinger. 

—99— 



R 



ford 



um 

THE WHOLESOME 

BAKING POWDER 

It is essential in the making of raised foods that you choose a 
leavener that not only raises the cake, biscuit or roll just 
right, but also adds to their nutritive value. 

Rumford accomplishes this by restoring- to the flour, in part 
the nutritious phosphates of which fine white flour has been 
deprived. It will make your cake of that even texture, 
flavor and appetizing appearance sought for by all good 
cooks. Its use insures 

SUCCESSFUL HONE BAKING 

Mailed Free — The New Rumford Home Recipe Book, 

Including Fireless and Casserole Cookery. 

Rumford Company, Providence, R. I. 

Scalzo & Holmgren 

(Successors to L. Lieff) 

Ladies' Tailoring 

and Dressmaking 

Wead Bldg., Cor. 18th and Farnam OMAHA, NEB. 

Entrance on 18th St. Phone Tyler 1917 

GEO. A. BURR'S 
MARKET 

Meat Department in Wulff& Sowards Store 

Phone Benson 222 Benson, Neb. 

— 100— 



MRS. BEASLEY'S BROWN CAKE. 

Beat 2 eggs, add % cup milk and 1 square unsweetened 
chocolate and cook together until thick; 1 cup sugar, 3 table- 
spoons melted butter, Yo cup milk, 1 level teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in it, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 



BURNT LEATHER CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, V2 cup butter, 3 eggs, 1 cup 
water, 3 tablespoons caramel, 3 teaspoons vanilla, 3 teaspoons 
baking powder, 2^2 cups flour. Bake in three layers. 

Filling — Boil iy 2 cups sugar and 2 A cup water until mix- 
ture threads, pour it over beaten whites of two eggs. Add 
vanilla and 1 tablespoon of caramel. 

To Burn Caramel — Put 1 cup sugar in a pan and burn 
until a nice light brown. Add 1/3 cup water, or enough to 
make syrup and cook a little longer. Byra Brooks. 



BURNT SUGAR CAKE. 

One cup sugar, V2 cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup sour milk, 14 
teaspoon soda, IV2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 1 /o cups flour, 
2 tablespoons burnt sugar, vanilla. 

Directions for Burning Sugar — Let 1 cup granulated sugar 
burn without water on it until it is a thick black syrup, then 
take from stove and add % cup cold water. 

Mrs. G. H. Tuttle. 



POTATO CAKE. 

One cup sugar, V2 cup butter, l /o cup mashed potatoes, 
% cup sweet milk, 1 cup flour, 2 eggs, 1 square chocolate, % 
cup walnuts, % teaspoon cinnamon, V2 teaspoon cloves, 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder. Mix sugar and butter first, then add 
eggs and flour and milk. Last mix the warm mashed potatoes 
and chocolate. Then add spices and walnuts. 

Mrs. Eaf Anderson. 



BROWNSTONE FRONT CAKE. 

One cup sugar, 2 eggs, % cup butter, 1 teaspoon soda, % 
— 101 — 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



cup water, 2 cups flour. Dark part, 1 cup grated chocolate, V2 
cup sugar, yolk of 1 egg, V2 cup water. Boil until smooth, 
cool, then pour into other part. Bake in layers. 

Mrs. C. C. Beavers. 

DELICIOUS POTATO CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, % cup butter, 1 cup hot mashed potatoes, 
% cup sweet milk or cold water, 2 cups flour, 4 eggs, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, 2 squares grated chocolate, 1 cup 
chopped English walnuts, 1 teaspoon powdered cinnamon and 
cloves, two teaspoons grated nutmeg. This is a delicious cake 
and the potatoes keep it fresh and moist. Cream the butter 
and sugar together, add yolks of eggs well beaten, then the 
flour mixed with baking powder and spices, then the milk. Add 
the potatoes mixed with the chocolate and walnuts, and the 
whites of the eggs beaten stiff. The potatoes must be hot when 
mixed with the chocolate. Bake in layers or in a loaf and 
frost with white frosting. Mrs. Henry Nielson. 



MRS. IRED ALE'S POTATO CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, V2 cup butter, V2 cup sweet milk, 1 cup 
mashed potatoes prepared for table, 2 cups flour, 1 cup chopped 
nuts, 1 cup chopped raisins, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 4 eggs, 
1 teaspoon each of cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon and vanilla, 1 
square chocolate. Cream sugar and butter, beat eggs separately, 
then add chocolate, patotoes, flour, nuts, raisins and spices. 

Mrs. G. W. Iredale. 



MOLASSES LOAF CAKE. 

Two cups flour, one cup molasses, two tablespoons lard 
and butter, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 egg. Mix well together, then add 
1 cup boiling water. Mrs. C. W. Bromfield. 

— 102 — 



LAYER OR LOAF CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
Four tablespoons chocolate, Vi cup sweet milk, V2 cup 
butter, V/3 cups flour, 4 eggs, 1 teaspoon vanilla, iy 2 cups 
sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder. Dissolve chocolate in 5 
tablespoons boiling water. Beat butter to a cream, add sugar 
gradually, beating all the time, add the yolks of eggs, beat 
again, add milk, chocolate and flour. Beat well. Beat whites 
of eggs and add to mixture add vanilla and baking powder. 
Mix quickly and turn into greased pans. Bake in layers or 
loaf. Mrs. C. F. Hotchkiss. 

CHOCOLATE COFFEE CAKE. 

One-half cake chocolate, 1 cup coffee, 1 teaspoon soda. 
Mix chocolate, soda and coffee and heat — do not boil. When 
cool add to cake. One-half cup butter, V2 cup sugar, 3 eggs, 
1 teaspoon baking powder, 2 cups flour. 

Mrs. John Polian, South Omaha. 



JAM CAKE. 

One cup sugar, V2 cup butter, 3 eggs, 9 tablespoons milk, 
1 level teaspoon soda, Y^ teaspoon baking powder, 2 cups flour, 
1 cup jam (added just before baking), 1 teaspoon each allspice, 
cloves and cinnamon. Mrs. John Polian, South Omaha. 

CREAM CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, % cup butter, V2 cup milk, 3 eggs, 2 cups 
of flour (four siftings), 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 squares 
chocolate in Vo cup of boiling water. Let cool before adding. 

Filling for Cake — One-half cup pow T dered sugar, y± cup of 
butter and cream together, 2 tablespoons of sweet cream, flavor. 

Mrs. Nellie V. Speedie. 



CHOCOLATE CAKE WITH CHOCOLATE ICING. 

One-half cup butter, scant, 1 cup sugar, V2 cu p hot water, 
IV2 cups flour, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Bake in a 
square tin. Spread chocolate icing over the top. Cut in 
squares Mrs. R. L. Robinson. 

— 103 — 



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P. F. PETERSEN, Pres. 

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104- 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People'* 
Benson 100 Benson 100 



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COUNCIL BLUFFS DEVIL'S FOOD. 

Two squares chocolate, 1 cup sugar, *4 cup butter, 1 egg, 
14 cup sour milk, Vl> cup hot water, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla, 1 large cup flour. Mrs. Frank Yost, 

Council Bluffs. 



DEVIL'S FOOD NO. 1. 

One cup grated chocolate or cocoa, 1% cups sugar, 14 cup 
milk, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Boil until a thick custard. V2 cup 
butter, iy 2 cups sugar, creamed together. Add yolks of three 
eggs? Y2 cup milk, 2 cups flour, 1 level teaspoon soda dissolved 
in boiling water, custard and the whites of eggs beaten stiff. 
One cup each of raisins and nuts may also be added. 

Cream Filling — Two and one-half cups powdered sugar, 
butter size of an egg. Mix with the hands. Add beaten white 
of 1 egg, 1 teaspoon of vanilla and 1 teaspoon of lemon flavor- 
ing. Thin with cream. Mrs. F. C. Thies. 



DEVIL'S FOOD NO. 2. 

One-fourth cake chocolate (2 squares), 2 cups brown sugar, 
V2 cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup sour milk, 2 cups 
flour. Dissolve the chocolate in % cup of boiling water, mix 
other ingredients and then beat in the chocolate. 

Filling — Two cups brown sugar, butter size of an egg, % 
cup milk. Let come to boil, and then beat well. 

Mrs. G. H. Tuttle. 



DEVIL'S FOOD NO. 3. 

Two cups sugar, Y 2 cup butter, y 2 cup sweet milk, 3 eggs, 
2 cups flour, 2 tablespoons vanilla, y 2 teaspoon soda (scant), V2 
cake Baker's chocolate dissolved in % cup boiling water and 
stirred in the last thing. Mrs. AV. H. Loechner. 

— 105 — 



DARK APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, y 2 cup lard or butter, 2 cups apple sauce 
(thin), 1 teaspoon soda, 3 cups flour, 3 tablespoons ground 
chocolate, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon 
nutmeg, 1 cup nut meat, 1 cup raisins. Bake in layers. 

Byra Brooks. 



APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, V2 cup butter, 1Vi> cups cold apple sauce, 

1 cup raisins or dates, 1 cup English walnut meats, 1 table- 
spoon hot water, 1 teaspoon each of soda, cloves and cinnamon, 

2 cups flour. Mrs. F. M. Paugh. 



SPICED APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, V2 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 cup raisins, IV2 cups 
stewed apples, 2 level teaspoons soda dissolved in the apple 
sauce, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, V2 teaspoon each of cloves and nut- 
meg. Mrs. Ben Morton. 



MRS. ARMSTRONG'S APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

Cream together 3 cups unsweetened apple sauce, 2 tea- 
spoons soda, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup chopped nut 
meats, 1 cup currants, 1 cup raisins chopped and floured, 1 tea- 
spoon each cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves, 2 or more cups flour. 
Beat five minutes and bake in a moderate oven 45 minutes. 

Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



LIGHT APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

Cream together % cup butter, 1% cups sugar, add yolks 
of 3 eggs, 1 cup unsweetened apple sauce, 1/3 cup water and 
2V2 cups cake flour sifted with % level teaspoon soda, 1 round- 
ing' teaspoon baking powder and a level teaspoon each of cin- 
namon and nutmeg. Lastly add the stiffly beaten whites of the 
eggs. Beat the mixtures until light and smooth. This will 
make large layers. Put together with a filling made of 2 cups 
pulverized sugar, whites of 1 egg and 1 tablespoon lemon juice. 

Mrs. C. L. Carlson. 

—106— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



ECONOMICAL APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, IV2 cups apple sauce, cold, y^ cup butter, 
1 cup walnut meats, 1 cup raisins, cut fine, 1 tablespoon hot 
water, 1 teaspoon each soda, cloves and cinnamon, 2 cups flour. 

Mrs. Frank Rouse. 



WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

One-half pound butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 3 
cups flour, whites of 7 eggs, 2% teaspoons baking powder, V2 
package seeded raisins, 1 package figs, ^4 pound citron. Flavor 
with almond extract. Bake two hours in slow oven. 

Mrs. C. 0. Falk. 



PORK CAKE. 

One pound fat pork ground fine, 1 pint boiling water 
turned on pork, 2% cups brown sugar, 2% cups molasses, 1 
tablespoon soda, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, 1 tablespoon cloves, 3 
eggs, 2 nutmegs, 1 pound seeded raisins, 1 pound currants. 
Mix quite stiff. Mrs. E. Mead. 



YEAST CAKE. 

One cup sugar, V2 cup butter, 1 cup soft bread sponge, 1 
egg, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup seeded raisins, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 
1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, flour to make soft batter. 

Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



COFFEE CAKE. 

Without Butter, Milk or Eggs. 

Cook the following ingredients about five minutes : V2 cup 
lard or crisco, 2 cups raisins, chopped, 1 cup black coffee, 1 
cup brown sugar, 1 cup black molasses, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 

—107— 



Wouldn't You Like 
To Have All of These 
Conveniences in Your 
Home? iMi 



A built in Kitchen Cabinet 
Medicine Cabinet 

Linen Closets with drawers, wide and deep. 
China Cabinet built in a convenient corner or wall. 
Book Cases beside the fire place or in the Colonade. 
Beam Ceilings. 

Built-in Buffet in dining room. 
Window Seats in various cozy corners. 

Mirror Doors in your dressing room and in coat closet door. 
Plenty of nice large closets. 

Open stairway of hardwood, artistically finished, or any other 
built-in convenience or effect. 



The Only Way to Get What You Want 
in Your Home, is, to Make Plans in Ad- 
vance and Have Your Home Built 
Just as You Want It. 

We'll be pleased to have you call and talk your 
Building Plans over with our architect or to 
have him draw your plans to suit your individ- 
ual ideas. 

We'll Famish the money and build your home 
and you repay us on Easy Payment Plan 

R ankers Realty Investment C ompany 

Ground Floor Bee Bldg. Omaha, Neb. 



108- 



1 teaspoon allspice, 14 teaspoon nutmeg, V4 teaspoon salt. 
When cool, add 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in 1 tablespoon water, 
1 teaspoon baking powder and 2 1 /-} cups flour. Beat well and 
bake in a moderate oven 45 minutes. 

Mrs. Silas Wright. 



LEMON FILLED CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, IV2 cups sugar, 2 /i cup milk, 2*4 cups 
flour, 2 level teaspoons baking powder. 

Filling — 1 cup sugar, 2% tablespoons flour, 1 egg, 1 tea- 
spoon butter, juice and grated rind of 2 lemons. Mix in order 
given. Cook, stirring constantly until the boiling point is 
reached. Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



CORNSTARCH CAKE. 

One cup sugar, 1-3 cup butter, % cup milk, 1-3 cup corn- 
starch, whites of 3 eggs, 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking pow- 
der. Cream butter and sugar, add milk and beat well. Add 
flour, cornstarch and baking powder, stirring constantly, and 
lastly well beaten white of the eggs. 

Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



MILK CAKE. 

Two eggs, 1 teaspoon butter, 1 cup sugar, % teaspoon 
lemon extract, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, % cup 
boiling water or milk. Beat eggs well, add sugar, then the 
flour mixed and sifted, with the baking powder twice. Add 
hot milk, with butter melted in it and flavor as desired. 

Mrs. J. W. Parsons. 



NEVER FAIL CAKE. 

One cup sugar, break two eggs in a cup and then fill with 
sweet milk, 3 tablespoons melted butter, 1% cups flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, pinch salt and flavoring. Mix all to- 
gether in a bowl and beat well. Bake in two layers. 

Miss Cora Totman. 

— 109— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




SNOW CAKE. 

One-fourth cup butter, 1 cup white sugar, 2 egg whites, 
!/2 cup milk, IV2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, % tea- 
spoon vanilla. Cream butter, add gradually the sugar and 
vanilla, beat the egg whites to a stiff froth and add. Sift the 
flour and baking powder together, add to first mixture alter- 
nately with the milk. Bake in a moderate oven 45 minutes. 
Cover with boiled frosting. Mrs. Edwin Hindley. 



VELVET SPONGE CAKE. 

Grease the pan first, also flour same. Beat 2 eggs, 1 cup 
sugar, % cup sifted flour, then V2 cup sifted flour with 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder. Beat well. Add % cup boiling water, 
1 teaspoon orange extract. Frost with frosting made of pul- 
verized sugar mixed with cold water and lemon juice. 

Mrs. E. Huntington, Council Bluffs. 



DELICATE CAKE. 

Whites of 6 eggs beaten stiff, 3y 2 cups flour, 1 cup milk, 1 
cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla. Mrs. S. E. Button. 



MRS. HODDER'S SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of 7 eggs, yolks of 5 eggs, 1 cup granulated sugar, 
sifted, V2 teaspoon orange extract, 1 cup Swansdown cake 
flour, !/3 teaspoon cream of tartar, pinch of salt. Sift seven 
times the flour, measure and set aside. Separate the eggs, put- 
ting the yolks in a small bowl and the whites in mixing bowl. 
Beat the yolks very light. Beat the whites to foam, then add 
cream of tartar and whip until dry and stiff. Add sugar to 
the whites and carefully fold in. Add yolks and fold in. 

—110— 



Flavor, and lastly add the flour, folded in lightly. Put in 
ungreased pan and bake thirty minutes. 

Mrs. E. C. Hodder. 



DELICATE CAKE. 

(Cheap, But Good.) 

One cup sugar, 2 tablespoons butter beaten to a cream, 
% cup milk, white of 4 eggs, well beaten, 1VL> cups flour, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, flavoring. Bake in a loaf or in 
layers. Mrs. Vincent Kenny. 



SUNSHINE CAKE. 

One cup flour (scant), V/4 cups sugar, pinch of salt, 7 
eggs, J/3 teaspoon cream of tartar, 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Mrs. F. S. Bumpus. 



MAPLEINE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups granulated sugar, 1/3 cup butter, 
1 cup milk, 2 eggs beaten together, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder, 1 cup chopped black walnuts, dusted heavily 
with flour, 1 teaspoon Mapleine. Bake in loaf. 

Mrs. Chas. Martensen, Omaha. 



EGGLESS CAKE. 

Two-thirds cup sugar, % cup butter, 3 cups flour, V/4 cups 
milk, 1 cup molasses, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup currants, 1 tea- 
spoon cinnamon, other spices if desired. 

Mrs. Ben Morton. 



MOCK ANGEL FOOD. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 1 cup hot milk, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder, 2 whites of eggs, pinch of salt. Sift flour, 
sugar, baking powder and salt together four times. Add hot 
milk and beat well for several minutes. Fold in the well 
beaten egg whites, add flavoring and bake in a moderate oven. 
Frost with white frosting. Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 

—Ill— 



Just try 
this cotfee 




In 1, 2 and 3 pound cans. Never in 
bulk Ground, Unground or Pulverized. 



SOLD BY KNUDSEN GROCERY COMPANY, 



KNUDSEN GROCERY CO 



THE CASH STORE 



"Good Things to Eat" 



5909 Main St. Phone Ben. 390 

—112— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



EGGLESS CAKE WITH SOUR MILK. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup sour milk, 1 cup chopped raisins, 
V'l cup butter, 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, y L > teaspoon 
nutmeg, % teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in 1 
tablespoon hot water. Mrs. E. J. McArdle. 



STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

One quart flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, pinch of salt. Sift all the above together, add 2/3 C up 
butter, mix with above ingredients. Add just enough water to 
make a soft dough that may be spread in the pan with a spoon. 
After baking, butter and put on the strawberries and sugar. 
This will make two lavers. Mrs. C. W. Bromfield. 



MRS. KNUDSEN'S STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

Two and one-half cups sifted flour, 1% rounding teaspoons 
baking powder, V2 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons sugar, V2 cup 
shortening, 1% cups milk. This will make a thin batter. Put 
in two well greased pans and bake in a moderate oven for 
twenty minutes. Mrs. Harry Knudsen. 



PLAIN SHORTCAKE. 

One cup flour, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon 
lard, y 2 cup milk, 1 heaping teaspoon baking powder. 

Mrs. Ernest H. Tindell. 



BANANA CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, V2 cup butter, 4 eggs, beaten 
well, 1 cup milk, 2 cups Swansdown flour, 2 tablespoons corn- 
starch, 2 teaspoons Royal baking powder, 1 teaspoon banana 
flavoring. Put bananas between layers. 

Mrs. H. F. Knudsen. 

—113— 



PRUNE LAYER CAKE. 

One cup sugar, V2 cup butter and lard, 3 eggs, y> cup sour 
milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons nutmeg, 2 teaspoons cinna- 
mon, 2 cups flour, 1 cup prunes, stewed but not sweetened. 

Mrs. Fitzsimmons. 



FORT CROOK CHERRY CAKE. 

Three-quarters cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, 1 cup 
cherries, 1 teaspoon soda, 4 tablespoons milk, 1 teaspoon cin- 
namon. Mrs. Harry Thompson, 

Fort Crook Boulevard. 



CHERRY CAKE. 

One cup sugar, % cup butter, 3 eggs, 4 teaspoons sweet 
milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon, allspice, 
cloves and baking powder, 2 cups flour, 1 cup pitted cherries. 
Bake about forty minutes in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



APPLE TEA CAKES. 

One pint flour, % teaspoon salt, 3 teaspoons baking pow- 
der, a few grains of cinnamon, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 table- 
spoon butter, 1 egg, 1 scant cup milk,. 5 medium size apples. 
Mix and sift dry ingredients, work in butter, add milk grad- 
ually and then the well beaten eggs. Spread in well buttered 
baking pans, cut apples in eighths, and stick in dough. Sprinkle 
with sugar and cinnamon. Serve with butter. 

Mrs. E. M. Jacobberger. 



BUTTERMILK SPICE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, % cup butter, y 2 cup lard, 2 eggs beaten 
well, IV2 cups fresh buttermilk, y 2 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon 
ginger, 1 teaspoon allspice, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon cin- 
namon, 3 teaspoons cocoa, 1 /l> teaspoon baking soda, 2 1 / 1 > cups 
flour. Sift and set aside the flour, baking soda, spices and 
cocoa, heat well together the sugar, butter, lard and eggs. Add 
buttermilk and flour and spices, then mix. This makes two 
loaf cakes. Mrs. John Nelson. 

—114— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 



"The Good Coals People'* 
00 Benson 100 




PLAIN SPONGE CAKE. 

Yolks of 6 eggs, beaten light, add 2 cups sugar and beat 
well. Add 1 cup boiling water, 2% cups flour and 1 level 
teaspoon baking powder. Flavor with lemon. Add whites of 
3 eggs beaten stiff and make in three layers. Use remaining 
three whites for boiled frosting. Mrs. J. W. Hitch. 



WHITE CAKE WITH CARAMEL FROSTING. 

Two cups granulated sugar, y 2 cup butter, 1 cup milk, 3 
cups flour, 3 level teaspoons baking powder, 2 teaspoons 
vanilla, whites of 7 eggs. Mix sugar and butter to a cream, 
then add milk and flour, baking powder and vanilla. Lastly 
stir in the beaten whites of eggs. 

Caramel Icing. 

One cup dark brown sugar, 1 cup white sugar, cover well 
with water, add 2 tablespoons sweet cream and 1 large tea- 
spoon butter. Beat thoroughly until cool enough to spread 
Flavor with vanilla just before spreading. 

Mrs. Harry Knudsen. 



WHITE CAKE WITH CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

Two cups sugar and y 2 cup butter creamed together, add 
1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, and 
lastly the well beaten whites of three eggs. This may be baked 
in loaf or layers. 

Chocolate Filling— 2 cups brown sugar, V> cup sweet choc- 
olate, butter size of walnut. Boil slowly. The chocolate may 
be omitted. Mrs. H. J. Grove. 



EASY SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon baking pow- 
der, flavoring. Mrs. Ben Morton. 

—115— 



DANCING 

all the Old and New Dances 
taught at 

Mackie's 

1816 HARNEY STREET 

Freak and Stage Dancing is not 
taught or indulged in. 

Graceful Ballroom 
Dancing Only 

Classes, Monday, Thursday, Friday 
Price Per Term 

Ladies, 12 lessons - $5.00 
Gents, " " - $6.00 

Public Dancing Wednesday and Saturday Evenings 

—116— 



TWO LAYER WHITE CAKE. 

Cream !/> cup butter with 1 cup granulated sugar, add 1 
cup sweet milk, 1 teaspoon extract, 1% cups flour, IV2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, beaten whites of 4 eggs. This makes a 
two layer cake. Mrs. Joseph McGuire. 



PLAIN WHITE CAKE. 

Cream l 1 !' cups granulated sugar and % cup butter. Add 
1 cup lukewarm water, 2 cups flour. Beat this well for five 
minutes. Then stir in 2 teaspoons baking powder and flavor- 
ing as desired. Beat lightly. After cake is well beaten add 
the beaten whites of eggs and fold into batter. Do not beat 
cake after eggs are put in. Bake about twenty minutes in 
good oven. Mrs. E. Mead. 



SIMPLE WHITE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, % cup butter, 1 cup milk, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 2 level cups flour, flavor to taste. 
Beat all together and add the well beaten whites of 5 eggs. 

Mrs. C. C. Beavers. 



COCOA CAKE. 

Cream together 1 cup sugar and Vi cup butter, 1 or 2 
eggs, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 cups flour with 1 level teaspoon soda 
and 1 level teaspoon baking powder, sifted with flour, y 2 cup 
sugar and one scant cup cocoa, dissolved in water, boiled to 
form a paste. Pour into cake mixture. Bake in layers. 

Mrs. Charles Martensen, Omaha. 



CHOCOLATE SPICE CAKE. 

One cup grated chocolate, 2 cups sugar, y 2 cup butter, 1 
cup sour milk, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon each cinnamon and cloves, 
3 cups flour, 1 teaspoon soda. Cream butter and sugar, add 
egg yolks and flour, sour milk in which soda is dissolved, then 
the well beaten egg whites. Stir in gradually the chocolate 
and spices. Mrs. J. A. McCulley. 

— 117— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



WHITE CAKE WITH COCOANUT FILLING. 

One heaping cup sugar, piece of butter size of eggs (large), 
rub to a cream, 2 A cup sweet milk, 2 cups sifted flour," 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, whites of 3 eggs beaten to a stiff froth 
and added last. Pinch salt. Flavor to taste. Bake in layers. 
Put together with cocoanut filling. Mrs. Totman. 



MRS. WELCH'S WHITE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar well sifted, 3% cups flour (reserve 1 cup 
flour, to which add 2 teaspoons baking powder), 1 scant cup 
butter, whites of 7 eggs. Cream butter and one cup sugar, add 
remaining sugar, add flour and milk alternately, beaten whites 
of eggs, and 1 cup flour with baking powder. Bake in layers, 
and use any desired icing. Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



RICH FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound flour, 1 pound sugar, 1 pound butter, 2 pounds 
raisins, 1 pound citron, V2 pound currants, 1 cup molasses, 1 
cup almonds, chopped, 10 eggs, 2 tablespoons milk, 1 teaspoon 
soda dissolved in milk, 1 glass brandy or jelly, 1 nutmeg, 1 
teaspoon each ground cloves and cinnamon. Flour the fruit 
used and add beaten whites separately. Bake in slow oven a 
long time. Mrs. Charles Martensen, Omaha. 



MRS. GOULD'S FRUIT CAKE. 

Cream % pound butter with 2 cups sugar, add yolks of 
5 eggs, 1 cup sour milk, 1 cup molasses, grated rind of 1 
lemon, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon and nutmeg. Wash, dry 
and roll in flour 2 pounds raisins and 2 pounds currants, 1 cup 
English walnuts chopped fine, 1 wineglass brandy, 3 cups flour, 
1 teaspoon soda and lastly the whites of 5 eggs. Bake in slow 
oven one hour. Mrs. M. P. Gould. 

—118— 



LAYER FRUIT CAKE. 

One cup sugar, two eggs, y 2 cup butter, l 1 /^ cups cooked 
raisins, j/3 cup sour milk filled up with coffee, juice and rind of 
one lemon, 1 teaspoon soda, 3 cups flour, all kinds of spices, 
including ginger. Bake in two layers. Very good. 

Mrs. A. B. Prior. 



MRS. M'ARDLE'S FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound butter, 1 pound sugar, 1 pound flour, 3 pounds 
raisins, 2 pounds currants, % pound citron, 10 eggs, 1 cup 
molasses, 1 ounce cloves, 1 ounce cinnamon, V2 ounce mace, 
V 2 pint brandy. Beat sugar and butter to a cream. Beat the 
whites of eggs to a froth, add the yolks well beaten. Add the 
brandy by degrees. Mrs. E. J. McArdle. 



LARGE FRUIT CAKE. 

Two pounds flour, 2 pounds butter, 2 pounds sugar, 3 
pounds currants, 2 pounds raisins, chopped, 1 pound citron (cut 
in slices), add 6 eggs to each pound flour, 1 tablespoon cin- 
namon, small tablespoon cloves, either 1 tablespoon cream 
tartar mixed with flour and 1 small teaspoon soda dissolved 
in a little warm water, or 2 tablespoons baking powder. AVet 
the sugar with the yolks of the eggs and stir to a smooth paste. 
Beat flour and butter together and add eggs and sugar. Then 
add the spices and whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Stir 
well and add fruit by degrees. Bake three hours. This makes 
a very large cake which will keep indefinitely. 

Mrs. C. P. Sheffer. 



PLAIN FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound flour, 1 pound brown sugar, 1 pound butter, % 
pound citron, 2 pounds raisins, 1 pound currants, 1 pound figs, 
1 pound dates, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup sweet milk, 10 eggs, 1 
teaspoon saleratus, pinch salt, nutmeg and any other spices 
desired. Bake 2% hours if in one large cake. 

Mrs. Frank Heckman. 

— 119— 



For 

FURNITURE, RUGS, 

Draperies, Stoves, 

etc., see 

F. J. BENGELE 

25 Years Experience 

Now at 

UNION 01TNTTIN0 CO. 

Home of AKSARBEN BREAD 

Located at Omaha's Largest 
Transfer Point 

DOMESTIC BAKERY 

Andrew Mehus, Prop. 

Baker of Breads, 
Cakes and Pastries 

Phone Douglas 5068 
2406 Cuming Street Omaha 



National Life 
Insurance Co. 

Montpelier, Vermont 



"THE LAW gives a widow 
one-third. 

LIFE INSURANCE gives it 
all. 

Often its three-thirds saves the 
other third. 

There is nothing like LIFE 
INSURANCE for family sav- 
ings." 



J. V. STARRETT, State Agt. 

401-2-3 Paxton Block 
Phone D. 126 Omaha. Neb. 

—120- 



GRANT L. FOX 

Home-made 

Concord Wine 

Phone 
Florence 188 







Try a DOMESTIC VACUUM CLEANER. 
Does the Sweeping and Vacuum at the 
same time. Will stand more wear, last 
longer and easier operated than any 
Vacuum Cleaner made. 

t#. L. Purcupile 

214 So. 18th Street Omaha 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People'* 

Benson 100 Benson 100 




A GOOD FRUIT CAKE. 

Three cups White sugar, 1 cup strong coffee, strained, 1 
cup butter, 1 cup milk, 1 cup shortening, 6 cups flour, 3 heap- 
ing teaspoons soda, 1 pound seeded raisins. Make into four 
loaves and bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. R. L. Robinson. 



ENGLISH FRUIT CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, 1% cups butter or lard, 4 eggs, 3 cups 
flour, 2 cups raisins, 1 cup currants, citron, 1 teaspoon each of 
cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg and soda, 2 cups sour milk. Dissolve 
soda in hot water before adding. Mrs. James McClung. 



MRS. LOECHNER'S FRUIT CAKE. 

One-half pound brown sugar, V2 pound butter, V2 pound 
flour (3/s mixed with fruit), 1 pound raisins, l 1 /^ pounds cur- 
rants, a /2 cup molasses, 5 eggs, 14 cup brandy, % pound citron, 
% teaspoon soda, V2 teaspoon each cinnamon and cloves. 

Mrs. W. H. Loechner. 



MOCHA FILLING. 

Two cups powdered sugar, butter size of an egg. Mix with 
hands. Dissolve with 4 tablespoons strained coffee, 4 table- 
spoons cocoa and 1 tablespoon vanilla. 

Mrs. F. C. Thies. 



CARAMEL FROSTING. 

Two cups dark brown sugar, V2 cup water, white of one 
egg. Cook water and sugar until the mixture forms soft ball 
when dropped in water. Pour slowly over beaten white of egg 
and beat till ready to spread on cake. 

Mrs. G. W. Lutton. 



EASY CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

One egg, powdered sugar enough to thicken, 1 tablespoon 
cream, % teaspoon vanilla, 1 tablespoon grated chocolate, 
melted over steam. Mrs. Jos. McGuire. 



CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

One cup granulated sugar, 5 tablespoons water, let boil a 
few minutes, then add a cup grated chocolate, boil few minutes 
longer. Cool before spreading on cake. 

Mrs. C. 0. Falk. 



CRANBERRY FILLING. 

Make a rich cranberry jelly or marmalade with skins 
removed and spread on layers of cake when both are cold. The 
cake should be covered with pink icing. Make a plain boiled 
icing and color with a little cranberry juice. This makes a 
pretty filling for a white cake. 

Mrs. Charles Nordin, Omaha. 



COFFEE FILLING. 

One-half cup butter, 2 cups powdered sugar, 2 tablespoons 
cold coffee, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 2 teaspoons cocoa. 

Mrs. C. L. Carlson. 



— 122 — 



CHAS. H, SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 1 24 



—123— 



—124— 



Cookies, Doughnuts, Gingerbread, Etc. 

"It is the bounty of nature that we live, but of 
philosophy that we live well." — Seneca. 



PLAIN DOUGHNUTS. 

One cup sugar, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons melted butter, 2 /i cup 
milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder, a little salt and nutmeg. 
Flour enough to roll. Mrs. C. H. Burrill. 



DOUGHNUTS IN RHYME. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 

Two eggs fine as silk, 

Salt and nutmeg (lemon will do), 

Two teaspoons baking powder. Lightly stir flour in. 

Roll on pie board not too thin. 

Drop with care the doughy things into fat 

That briskly swells evenly the spongy cells. 

Watch w T ith care the time for turning. 

Fry them brown just short of burning. 

Roll in sugar, serve when cold. 

Mrs. F. M. Paugh. 



RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

Boil 2 cups milk and let cool. 1 cup sugar, 1 cup lard, a 
little salt and 3 eggs, 2 cups yeast, a little nutmeg. Flour to 
stir stiff with spoon. Let raise and work not very stiff. Let 
raise again and then make the doughnuts and let raise. Then 
cook in lard not very hot. Roll in sugar. 

To Make Yeast for Above. 

Two tablespoons flour. Cook about 3 potatoes. Pour 

water from them over flour. Mash potatoes and put in with the 

water and flour 2 tablespoons sugar and 1 teaspoon salt. Put 

one yeast cake in soak and add when other compound is cool. 

Tracie AVulff. 

—125— 



R. A. ZIKA 

Wiring and Electrical 
Repairs of All 
Kinds 

5744 Main Street, Benson 
Tel. Benson 464 J 



HAIR DRESSING MANICURING 

MASSAGING 

Marinello Hair Dress- 
ing Parlors 

309-310 PAXTON BLOCK 

Take elevator on 16th Street Side 

PHONE DOUG. 4671 

Electrolysis and Chiropody 

Children's Hair Cutting 

M. KAISER 

Wall Papers 

Painter and Decorator. Full line 

of Paints, Oils, Brushes, 

Glass, etc. 

Phone Benson 263 

BENSON ICE & GOAL CO. 

Dealers in 

Hard and Soft 

COAL 

Guarantees full weight and all 
coal as recommended. Your 
patronage appreciated. 

PHONE BENSON 487 



Good Coffee 

"Silver Brand" is one of 
our favorite Blends. It is a 
rich, fragrant coffee of a 
mild strength and fine flavor. 
We recommend it. 

Grand Union Tea Co. 

OMAHA, NEB. 
516 So. 16th St. Phone Red 1775 



Tflaoaitra 

High Class Feature Photo 
Plays. 

Projection that is projection. 

Chas. Sonde 

5314 Military Ave. 



Bedding Plants 

Nursery Stock 

Landscape Gardening. 

CHIROPODY AND MANICURING 

Chiropodist 

CARRIE J. BURFORD 

Scientific Foot 
Massage and 
all Ailments 
of the Feet. 
Office Phone 
Red 4587. 
Room 620 Paxton Block, Omaha, Neb. 




—126- 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 

Benson 100 Benson 100 




MRS. WRIGHTS DOUGHNUTS. 

Two eggs, 1 cup sugar, % cup lard or butter, '/3 nutmeg, 
2 cups sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda. Roll Vr inch thick, cut in 
strips and twist. Fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. Sadie L. Wright. 



EASY DOUGHNUTS. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 3 eggs, 2% tablespoons melted 
butter, 3 level teaspoons baking powder. Flavor to taste. Mix 
and leave stand for 35 to 60 minutes. Mrs. C. J. Ringer. 



SUGARED DOUGHNUTS. 

Three eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 3 teaspoons melted 
butter, 3 teaspoons baking powder. Flour enough to make a 
soft dough. Add nutmeg and cinnamon. Fry in hot lard. Put 
3 tablespoons powdered sugar in paper bag, drop in doughnuts 
and shake. Mrs. Thos. Ranee, Omaha. 

FINE DOUGHNUTS. 

One-half cup sour cream, */> cup buttermilk, 1 cup sugar, 
2 eggs, % teaspoon soda, V2 teaspoon baking powder, pinch of 
salt and flavor with nutmeg. Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



MOTHER'S MOLASSES COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup shortening (% cup butter, V> cup 
lard), 1 cup New Orleans molasses, y% cup coffee, 2 teaspoons 
soda, 1 teaspoon ginger. Salt. Mix stiff enough to roll out 
(rounded). Miss Cora Totman. 



PLAIN COOKIES. 

One cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, 2 eggs, lemon 
juice and rind. Mrs. C. H. Burrill. 

— 127— 



BAKERS COOKIES. 

Two cups sugar, \y 2 cups butter, % cup butter, milk or 
sour cream, 1 teaspoon soda in milk, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der. Flour to roll out, about 5 cups. Mix altogether. When 
cream is used, less butter or shortening will be necessary. 

Mrs. C. P. Sheffer. 



DANDY COOKIES. 

One and one-half cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 3 eggs, 4 cups 
flour, 2 tablespoons water, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Flavor 
with nutmeg or vanilla. Roll thin and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. J. T. Beattie. 



PENNSYLVANIA COOKIES. 

Three cups brown sugar, 1 cup shortening, 3 eggs, 1 cup 
sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda stirred into milk, y 2 teaspoon each 
of cloves and allspice, 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Raisins. Enough 
flour for soft dough. Mrs. Charles Plotts, Omaha. 



FILLED COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, y 2 cup lard, y 2 cup milk, 3% cups flour, 
1 teaspoon cream tartar; y 2 teaspoon soda. Mix, roll thin, 
place a teaspoonful of filling on each, place another cookie 
gently on top and bake in usual way. 

Filling — 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 / 2 cup boiling water, y> 
cup sugar, 2 level tablespoons flour. Mix sugar and flour to- 
gether, stir in hot water, not boiling. When thoroughly 
blended, allow to boil. Add raisins, stir well and allow to cool 
before using. Mrs. E. M. Jacobberger. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

Three cups oatmeal, 2 cups flour, % cup lard, % cup sugar, 
1 teaspoon salt, Vi» cup sweet milk, 1 level teaspoon soda in 
milk, y 2 cup raisins, nutmeg. Mix thoroughly like pie crust, 
then add gradually milk and soda last. Roll and cut with 
cookie cutter. Mrs. R. Bauer. 

— 128 — 



CHAS. H, SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



DROP OATMEAL COOKIES. 

Two cups rolled oats, 1 cup Crisco (very scant). Mix and 
let stand 1 hour. Then add 1% cups sugar, 2 well beaten eggs 
V-2 cup chopped raisins, V2 cup chopped nuts, 1 rounded tea- 
spoon nutmeg, 1 rounded teaspoon cinnamon, 1 level teaspoon 
soda, 2 cups flour, 6 tablespoons hot water or 2 /$ cup sour milk. 
Drop 1 teaspoonful for each cookie on pan and bake in hot 
oven. Mrs. Clyde Farris. 



RICH OATMEAL COOKIES. 

One-half cup butter, 1 cup light brown sugar, 2 eggs, 2 
cups flour, 1 level teaspoon soda dissolved in 4 tablespoons hot 
water, 1 teaspon cinnamon, 1 cup rolled oats, 1 cup seedless 
raisins, 1 cup chopped nuts. Drop on pan and bake. 

Mrs. Fred Thies. 



MRS. M'CULLEY'S OATMEAL COOKIES. 

Three eggs, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups oatmeal, 2 cups flour, 2 
cups raisins, 1 cup English walnuts, 1 cup lard and butter 
mixed, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon and allspice, 6 tablespoons 
sweet milk, 1 teaspoon soda in 2 of milk the last thing. 

Mrs. J. A. MeCulley. 



DANDY FRUIT COOKIES. 

Two cups granulated sugar, Yi cup butter and lard mixed, 
2 eggs, 1/0 cup molasses, 1 small teaspoon soda dissolved in hot 
water. Work soda and water into molasses and pour over eggs 
and sugar, 1 pound dates, 1 pound figs, small piece of citron, 
all chopped together and mixed with flour. Use enough flour 
to roll out and bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. C. 0. Falk. 

— 129— 



Garage Phone Benson 183-W 

Residence Benson 616 



Wulff Garage 

5801-5803 Main St. Benson 

Auto Livery and Repairing 

Automobile Accessories 

Charges Reasonable 

GUSS A. WULFF 



BENSON 

CANDY KITCHEN 

5829 MAIN STREET 

Fine Home Made Candies and 
Ice Cream our Specialties 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, MAG- 
AZINES, NEWSPAPERS 
TEL. BENSON 458-J 



Compliments of 

JOS. McGUIRE 

& SON 



MONEY TO LOAN AT ONE- 
HALF USUAL RATES 

Reliable Credit 
Company 

Suite 308 Paxton Block, 217 So. 16th Sr # 
PHONE DOUGLAS UU 

—13 



EAT SHOP 

When in Benson Eat 
at the 

Benson Cafe 

Everything Up-to-date 

MRS. L. BURRIS, Prop. 



FLOUR, FEED 

and Poultry Supplies 

i i 
BON & GALLAGHER 

2925 Military Avenue 
Phone Benson 232 BENSON 



FOR HIGH CLASS PHOTO 
PLAYS GO TO THE 

Clifton Theatre 

The Social Center of the 
Clifton Hill People. 

Corner 45th Street and Military Avenue 

J. MARKS, Prop. 

Take Your Prescriptions 
to 

HALLE R ' S 

Drugs 

Candy y Cigars, Stationery, etc. 

Prescriptions a Specialty 
Haller's Pharmacy, Phone Ben. 123 

0— 



ROCKS. 

One and one-half cups sugar (light brown), 1 cup butter, 
2V2 cups flour, 3 eggs well beaten, 1 teaspoon soda in warm 
water (about V\ cup), 1 teaspoon cinnamon, pinch of salt, 1 
pound seeded raisins cut in half, 2 pounds English walnuts cut 
in pieces (not chopped). Drop from spoon. Bake on bottom 
of pan. Miss Cora Totman. 



FRUIT BARS. 

One cup white sugar, 1 cup brown sugar, % cup butter, 
2 eggs, 3 /4 cup sour milk, y± teaspoon soda, 2% cups flour, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 cup each of chopped raisins, cur- 
rants and nutmeats, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon, nutmeg and 
vanilla. Bake in bread pan and cut in bars. 

Mrs. S. L. Miller. 



FRUIT COOKIES. 

One-half cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, 1 tablespoon 
milk, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, V2 teaspoon salt. 
Flaroring and raspberry jam. Rail thin and cut in rounds, 1 
teaspoon jam on half the rounds. Cover with other half, press 
edges together. Bake as other cookies. 

Mrs. Louis Kolb, Omaha. 



MRS. RANZ' FRUIT COOKIES. 

One and one-half cups sugar, V2 cup butter worked to a 
cream, add 3 eggs, well beaten, % cup molasses, 1 teaspoon 
soda dissolved in cold water, 1 cup raisins seeded and chopped, 
1 cup currants, 1 teaspoon of all kinds spices, flour to roll. Good. 

Mrs. Matilda Ranz. 



SUGAR COOKIES (With Fruit). 

Two cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 cups chopped raisins, 2 
eggs, 4 tablespoons sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, V2 teaspoon each 
of nutmegs, cloves and cinnamon, 1 teaspoon baking powder 
in flour enough to roll. Mix quite stiff and bake quickly. 

Mrs. E. Mead. 

—131— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People'' 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




BROWNIES. 

One cup sugar, V2 cup flour, 6 cups broken walnuts, 2 eggs, 
Y2 cup melted butter, 2 squares chocolate. Mix and bake in 
a shallow pan, garnishing the top with nuts. Cut in squares. 
Use hot flame. Mrs. E. M. Jacobberger. 



MOLASSES DROP CAKES. 

One cup molasses, V2 cup butter, V2 cup water, 3 cups flour, 
2 teaspoons ginger, 1 teaspoon soda. Beat ingredients well 
together and drop from spoon. Mrs. A. R. Cuyler. 



HERMITS. 

One and one-half cups brown sugar, % cup butter, 2 eggs, 
% cup milk (sweet), 1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup currants or raisins. 
Cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg to taste. Flour to make stiff as 
Johnny cake. Bake in gem pans. 

Mrs. A. R. Cuyler. 



HERMITS NO. 2. 

Two-thirds cup butter, iy L > cups brown sugar, 2 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in hot water, 1 cup (mixed) raisins, figs, 
dates and English walnuts or any one. Flour that will make 
a batter that will drop nicely. 

Mrs. Ernest H. Tindell. 



HOSKA (Bohemian Cakes). 

One cake compressed yeast, 1 quart milk, full i/o cup 
butter melted in the milk, 1 cup sugar, also melted in milk, 
yolks of 2 eggs mixed with milk, good pinch of salt and part 
of rind of 1 lemon. Mix in just enough flour to be able to be 
beat until it pops and does not stick on pan. AVooden paddle 
preferable. Let it raise and then make 4 large loaves and 

—132— 



braid. Stick full of raisins and almonds and pinch together. 
When ready for oven, rub over with yolk of egg and a little 
milk and bake slowly for a little over 1 hour. When putting 
rolls together, rub over with a little water so as to make them 
stick well together. Mrs. J. W. Hitch. 



JUMBLES. 

One and one-half cups sugar, 1 cup butter, yolks of 4 eggs, 
1 pound chopped nuts, 1 pound chopped figs, 3% cups flour, 1 
teaspoon soda. Then add whites of 4 eggs beaten stiff. Drop 
small spoonful of dough on well buttered pans and bake. 

Mrs. J. W. Hitch. 



OLD MISSION CRY BABIES. 

Two eggs, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup white sugar, 1 cup butter, 
2- teaspoons each cinnamon and ginger. Stir altogether, then 
put 2 teaspoons soda in a cup and fill with hot strong coffee. 
Stir well into the batter, then add 1 teaspoon vinegar and a 
pinch of salt. Add flour, 4% cups before sifting. Drop from 
spoon on buttered tins and bake in a slow oven. 

Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



NUT MACAROONS. 

White of 1 egg, 1 cup pecan nut meats, 1 cup brown sugar, 
% teaspoon salt. Beat white of egg until light and add grad- 
ually, while beating constantly, sugar. Fold in nut meats finely 
chopped and sprinkled with salt. Drop from tip of spoon one 
inch apart on an unbuttered sheet and bake in a moderate oven 
until delicately browned. Mrs. C. L. Carlson. 



SPRINGILY. 

Eight eggs, 2 pounds sugar, 3 teaspoons baking powder 
and annis seed to taste. Beat eggs, sugar, annis seed and 
baking powder, then add flour to make a stiff dough. Knead 
flour in with hand, then roll out, cut and press any desired 
mold on it. Let stand all night and bake in the morning till a 
light brown. Mrs. Wm. Sackriede. 

—133— 



DRS. MACH & MACH 

Dentists 

Associates: DRS. WILCOX and SCOUTKN 



THIRD FLOOR, PAXTON BLOCK 



Largest and Best Equipped Dental Office 

in Omaha 



Popular Prices Phone Douglas 1201 

Xobrman 

The Reliable Ladies' -Tailor 

Rooms 

433-35 Paxton Block OMAHA, NEB. 

K^fre e n ^fa 6/es ^ f *"'• 9 \ ® aiU9 

sjanitonium 

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

A Park of twenty five acres, large brick and stone 
buildings, with the best of everything. 

Write for Information. 

—134— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



FROSTED CREAMS. 

One cup butter and lard, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup mo- 
lasses, 1 cup coffee, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, i/» teaspoon ginger. 
Boil above, when cool add yolks of 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 
2 1 / 4 cups flour. Bake in shallow pans in sheets. Frost with 
boiled white frosting. Beat butter well. 

Mrs. J. W. Welch, Cherrycroft. 



SOUR CREAM COOKIES. 

One and one-half cups sugar, 1 cup lard, 1 cup sour cream, 
2 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Put all 
ingredients together and add flour to make a soft dough, as 
can be handled with as little kneading as possible. Bake in a 
well heated oven. Mrs. Mary E. Parker. 



MRS. ATACK'S COOKIES. 

One cup raisins, 2 cups sugar, 3 eggs, % cup butter, 1 cup 
rich cream (sour), 14 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 14 teaspoon of mace and cloves, V2 
teaspoon salt, 3 J/3 cups flour. Mix butter and sugar together, 
add eggs and seasoning. Dissolve soda in 2 teaspoons water. 
Add flour, baking powder and raisins, beat together. Take 
small quantity, place on tins and bake in hot oven. 

Mrs. Arthur Atack. 



JELLY ROLL CAKE. 

Beat stiff 1 cup sugar and 3 eggs, then add 1 cup flour, 
stirring it in gently. Line pan with paper and bake in medium 
oven 20 or 30 minutes. Turn out on paper that is sprinkled 
with powdered sugar, spread with jelly and roll. 

Mrs. J. T. Beattie. 

—135— 



COCOANUT KISSES. 

One-half cup cocoanut, V2 cup sugar, whites of 4 eggs 
beaten stiff, 3 heaping tablespoons flour. Drop on buttered 
heavy paper and bake in quick oven. Mrs. J. W. Hitch. 



JELLY ROLL. 

Three eggs beaten separately, 1 cup sugar, 1% cups sifted 
flour, 1 rounding teaspoon baking powder, J/3 cup milk. Sift 
flour once, then measure and add baking powder. Beat whites 
stiff. Fold in sugar, then fold in beaten yolks. Bake in hot 
oven. Mrs. Phil Meisinger. 



CREAM PUFFS. 

One cup hot water and 1 cup butter boiled together, and 
stir in 1 cup flour. When cooked take from fire, stir free 
from lumps and until like paste. Cool, stir in 3 eggs without 
beating, one at a time, and when well mixed, drop by spoonful 
on buttered tins and bake 25 minutes. If taken from oven too 
soon, will fall. Let cool before filling. 

Cream for Above — Cook together until thick 1 cup each of 
milk and sugar, 1 egg, beaten light, 3 tablespoons flour and a 
pinch of salt. Flavor as desired. 

Mrs. Chas. Martensen, Omaha. 



GINGER BREAD. 

One-half cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, % cup butter, 1 tea- 
spoon each of cinnamon, ginger and cloves, 2 teaspoons soda 
dissolved in a cup of boiling water, 2^2 cups flour, add 2 well 
beaten eggs the last thing. Mrs. J. AA r . Hitch. 



APPLE FRITTERS. 

One cup flour, 1 rounding teaspoon baking powder, 1 egg, 
V2 cup milk, 14 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons sugar. Sift dry 
ingredients, add beaten eggs and milk, beat until smooth. Core 
and slice 4 large apples, put in batter, cover apples well with 
batter, drop each piece separately into deep dish of hot lard 
and fry. Sprinkle with sugar when taken out. 

Mrs. C. H. Burrill. 
—136 — 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




MRS. MEAD'S GINGER BREAD. 

One cup dark brown sugar, 1 cup molasses, % cup lard, 
1 cup boiling water, 1 teaspoon soda in water, 1 teaspoon 
ginger, 3 eggs, 4J/2 cups sifted flour. Bake quickly. 

Mrs. E. Mead. 



SOFT GINGER CAKE. 

One-half cup molasses, V2 cup sugar (scant), 1 tablespoon 
butter and lard, 1 egg, pinch of salt, 1 teaspoon ginger, V2 
teaspoon cinnamon, 2/3 teaspoon soda dissolved in V2 cup hot 
water, 1% cups flour. Mrs. A. M. Totman. 



—137 



Photographs 

From those that's good to 
the Very Best. 

Copying- and Enlarging, De- 
veloping and Finishing for 
amateurs at 

Barr's Studio 

BENSON, NEB. 



Ideal Plumbing 
and Heating Co. 

W. E. WILLIAMS 

Proprietor 

BENSON, NEB. 

Mrs. Alice Johnson 
OSTEOPATH 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. 

2 to 5 p. m. 

and by appointment 

736-8 Brandeis Theatre Bldg. 

OMAHA 

WHEN YOU WANT 

Pure and Fresh 
Groceries 

Phone Benson 660 

Wulff & Sowar ds 

—13 



Telephones:— Office, Benson 209 W 

Residence, Walnut 1721 

Residence 
3024 Fifty- second Street 

Frank Thompson, Jr. 

Sidewalks, Cisterns, Cesspools, Etc. 

Real Estate, Rentals 

and Collections 



Benson 



Nebraska 



Piano (Sttstructton 



Office Tel. B156 Res. Tel. B250 

E.H.OLSON 

Builder of 

Modern Homes 

Office 
5826 MAIN STREET 

SEE 

WAGNER BROS. CO. 

FOR 

Farm Machinery 

1215 Leavenworth St. 
OMAHA, NEB. 



Desserts and Beverages 

"An't please your Honour," quoth the peasant, 
"This same dessert is x^vy pleasant." 



CRANBERRY SHERBET. 

Cook 1 quart cranberries and put through sieve. To this 
add a syrup of 1 pint sugar and 1 quart water boiled together. 
When eool and ready to freeze add juice of 2 lemons and 
beaten whites of 2 eggs. Serve with meat. 

Mrs. Arthur N. Howe. 



FRUIT DESSERT. 

Four bananas in fourths, 3 oranges in small pieces, a few 
white grapes and 2 pears cut in pieces, % can shredded pine- 
apple. Mix together and pour over enough grape juice to 
moisten well. Mrs. H. J. Grove. 



CUP CUSTARD. 

Four cups hot milk, 4 eggs, y 2 cup sugar, % teaspoon salt 
and a little nutmeg. Beat eggs slightly, add sugar and salt, 
then pour in slowly hot milk. Strain mixture into cups. Place 
cups in pan of hot water and sprinkle a few gratings of nut- 
meg over each one. Bake over a low flame until custard is 
firm and a knife can be inserted and removed without custard 
sticking to it. Do not let water in pan boil or custard will 
whey. Mrs. E. M. Jacobberger. 



MARSHMALLOW CREAM. 

Whip 1 pint rich cream, add V2 cup sugar and vanilla to 
taste, stir in gently V2 pint soft marshmallows broken in pieces, 
y± pound candied cherries, ^ pound English walnuts cut in 
pieces. Stir altogether gently, place on ice and leave 3 hours. 
Boil together 1 cup sugar and % cup water, cool and add 1 
cup preserved cherries or shredded pineapple. Serve with 
cream. Anonymous. 

—139— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



LEMON MILK SHERBET. 

Juice of two lemons, add 1 pint sugar. Stir well, then add 
1 quart rich milk and 1 teaspoon lemon extract. Freeze im- 
mediately. Anonymous. 



PINEAPPLE SNOW. 

One pint heavy cream, 3 /i cup powdered sugar, % box 
gelatine, 1 large can shredded pineapple, 1 shredded orange, 
whites of 3 eggs. Put gelatine to soak in enough water to 
make with the gelatine % cup. When soft, melt by setting in 
a vessel of hot water. Whip the cream, fold in sugar and fruit 
and add gelatine whipped light. This will make 2 quarts. 

Mrs. Mart Armstrong. 



TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One cup tapioca, 6 cups water. Let soak over night. In 
morning add 2 cups brown sugar and a pinch of salt. Bake 
40 minutes. When cool add 1 tablespoon vanilla. Serve with 
whipped cream and chopped walnuts. 

Mrs. H. C. Miller. 



MAPLEINE TAPIOCA. 

Boil minute tapioca in hot water to cover till clear, then 
add sugar to sweeten to taste, also mapleine to taste — about 1 
teaspoonful to a quart usually. Serve cold with either plain 
or whipped cream. Mrs. George W. Iredale. 



GRAPE JUICE. 

Crush and bring to a boil, Concord grapes. Add % cup 
sugar to each quart of juice, strain, bottle and seal. 

Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 

—140— 



PINEAPPLE FLUFF. 

One pineapple chopped fine with 1 cup English walnuts, 
V± pound marshmallows quartered with scissors. Mix nuts, 
pineapple and marshmallows with a very little whipped cream 
and serve in sherbet glasses, with whipped cream poured over 
each. , Mrs. J. V. Starrett. 



LEMON TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One-half cup minute tapioca, soaked in 2 cups cold water, 
add juice of 2 lemons, 1 can shredded pineapple, V2 cup warm 
water and cook, stirring gently all the time until tapioca is 
clear. Then add ,1 cup sugar and bring to boiling point. Take 
off fire and pour over beaten whites of 3 eggs, beating vig- 
orously all the time until mixture is light and thoroughly 
mixed. Serve cold with whipped cream. 

Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



PHILADELPHIA ICE CREAM. 

One quart sweet cream, 1 large cup sugar, 1 small table- 
spoon flavoring. Mix and freeze. Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 



NEAPOLITAN ICE CREAM. 

Beat separately 4 eggs. Beat 1 cup sugar into the yolks, 
add beaten whites and flavoring. Scald 1 quart cream in 
double boiler, stir in egg mixture, beating rapidly. Cook to 
consistency of soft custard. Cool and freeze. 

Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 



DANDELION CORDIAL. 

One peck dandelion blossoms, 3 pounds brown sugar, 3 
gallons boiling water, 3 sliced oranges, 3 sliced lemons. Crush 
fruit and cover with sugar, add 25 cloves, 6 sticks of cinnamon. 
Put in stone jar, pour on boiling water, let stand 6 days in a 
warm place, stir frequently, strain and return to jar. Add 
1 cake compressed yeast, cover with cheese cloth and when 
perfectly clarified, bottle. For elderberry cordial, use elder- 
berry blossoms in place of dandelions. Anonymous. 

—141— 



Manicuring Scalp 
Facial Massage Treatments 
Children's Haircutting Chiropody 

Miss Cecilia Burns 

Hairdresser and Hair 
Goods Manufacturer 

338 Paxton Block 
Phone Doug. 6263 16 & Farnam 


Develop the Bust 

USE 

Prof. Lloyd 9 s French 

Galeco Tablets 

Send for Circular 

WESTERN CHEMICAL CO. 
Paxton Block, Omaha 


MISS JOHNSTON 

Superfluous Hair and Moles 
removed by Electricity 

338 Paxton Block 
Work Guaranteed Phone D. 6263 


Emil Carlson 

PLIMBING= 

-AND- 

= HEATING 

5742 Main St. 
Phone Benson 140 


James Allan 

Private Detective 
Service 

312 Neville Block Omaha 
Phone Tyler 1136 


Briefs Depositions 

ETHEL B. PATTERSON 

PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER 

201 Omaha National Bank Building 

Phone Doug. 7114 Notary Public 


Combs-Agncw 
Optical Co. 

Consultation without charge 

1520 Douglas St. 
Omaha 


E. C. Hodder 

ATTORNEY AT 
LAW 

Suite 645 

Omaha National Bank Bldg\ 

OMAHA, NEB. 

Phone Doug-las 2244 



142 — 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 

Benson 100 Benson 100 




GRAPE WINE. 

One gallon' grapes off stems, V2 gallon water, 3 pounds 
sugar to each gallon. Mash or run grapes through meat 
grinder, then put in water and let stand 3 days, stirring each 
day. Strain the third day and add suga^. Let stand till it 
stops fermenting, then bottle. Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 



BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

To 1 quart of blackberry juice, add 6 sticks of cinnamon, 
50 cloves and boil with 1 pint of sugar 10 minutes. Add % 
ounce ginger root. Bottle for use in sickness. 

Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 



RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

To one pint of vinegar, add 3 pints raspberries. Let stand 
two or three days, mash and strain through a cloth. Add 1 
pound sugar to each pint of vinegar and cook 20 minutes. 
Use y± cup of the raspberry vinegar to % cup water when 
serving. Mrs. Charles Smith. 



1 4 



Candies 



"A surfeit of the sweetest things, the deepest loth- 
ing to the stomach brings." 



. PECAN BRITTLE. 

One cup chopped nuts, 1 tablespoon butter, 3 cups light 
brown sugar. Put dry sugar in pan, placing on fire and stir- 
ring constantly until it melts and browns into caramel. Add 
butter and put in nuts. Stir briskly, letting mixture boil sev- 
eral minutes or until it rolls away from pan. Put on wet slab 
in thin sheets. Mrs. John W. Hitch. 



DIVINITY. 

Two cups sugar, % cup syrup, !/> cup water, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla, % cup chopped nuts, whites of 2 eggs and a pinch of 
salt. Boil sugar, syrup and water together until a little 
dropped in cold water forms a soft ball. Pour the hot mixture 
over the stiffly beaten whites of eggs (add a pinch of salt to 
the eggs when beating them). Beat mixture while pouring. 
Add nuts and vanilla and beat vigorously till candy stiffens. 
Pour in buttered pan and cut in squares. 

Gladys M. Anderson. 



NOUGAT. 

Boil together 2 cups sugar and i/> cup water until it 
becomes brittle. Cover bottom of buttered shallow pan with 
nut meats of different kinds, strips of cocoanut, bits of figs and 
dates. When syrup is done, add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and 
pour over contents of pan. When cold mark in squares. 

Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 



BEST FUDGE. 

Into the hot water pan of your chafing dish put 2 cups 
granulated sugar, 1/3 cup cream, 1/3 cup cold water. Stir well 

—144— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



until sugar is melted and when it just begins to bubble, stir in 
2 heaping tablespoons cocoa or chocolate. Then from this time 
when it boils all over the surface, let it cook exactly 6 minutes 
with the flame but half way up. After 6 minutes add about a 
tablespoon of butter and stir well, being careful that the candy 
does not adhere to the bottom of the pan. After the butter has 
boiled exactly three minutes, extinguish the light and then add 
2 teaspoons vanilla. Beat the candy well till it begins to 
thicken rapidly, which will be about a minute, and then pour 
into a buttered tin. Mrs. A¥. A. Wilcox. 



PEANUT BRITTLE. 

Place 2 cups granulated sugar in an iron skillet over fire, 
stirring constantly until sugar is all melted, when it must be 
immediately removed, % teaspoon soda then being added. 
Have peanut meats distributed over greased pan, pour syrup 
over and when cold break in pieces. 

Mrs. W. H. Kellogg, Omaha. 



PIONOHE. 

Two cups brown sugar, % cup milk, 1 cup nut meats, 4 
tablespoons butter, 15 drops vanilla. Boil sugar, milk and but- 
ter until a soft ball can be formed in cold water. Remove from 
fire, add nut meats and vanilla, beat until creamy and pour 
into buttered pans to cool. Cut in squares. Butter may be 
omitted and 1 cup milk used instead of % cup then. 

Mrs. R. 8. Beasley. 



CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

Use either cooked or uncooked fondant as per recipes fol- 
lowing. Mold fondant into small balls, set in cool place to 
harden for at least 1 hour. Melt unsweetened chocolate in a 

— 145 — • 



Benson's First and 
Only Cash Grocery 

TEAS AND COFfEES 

A SPECIALTY 

ALEORD & GOODIN 

6123 Main St. Tel. Benson 595W 

McRAE 

Furnishes Waiters 

Sets Tables 

Cooks for Weddings, parties 

and all public occasions 

Phone 
Walnut 3112 

USE 

Booth's Oysters 

Natural Flavor 
Delicious 

Booth Fisheries Go. 



The Flower and Vegetable 
Garden should be planted 
with our Standard Seeds. 

Catalog mailed for the asking. 

Phone Douglas 977 

Stewart's Seed Store 

119 North 16th Street (Opp. P. 0.) 
Omaha, Neb. 



Established 1892, Incorporated 1902 
Telephone Douglas 844 

Tracy Bros. Company 

Wholesale Tobacconists 

1415 Douglas Street 
Omaha, Neb. 

Phone Douglas 3548 
Home Portraits a Specialty 

Jttlw J*ll JUittrf 

PORTRAITURE 

20th and Farnam Streets 

Rembrandt Studio 

Omaha 

MtB. H. K Zabriakte 

Violin Piano Organ 

Room 20, Baldrige-Wead Bldg. 

20th and Farnam Streets 

Residence Telephone Harney 6061 

RATES -One H.ur or Two Half Hours a Week, $2.00 

(No single half-hour lessons) 

Pupils registering in September will 

have their choice of hours 
Lessons missed must be paid for; they 
may be made up at the conven- 
ience of the teacher 
Orchestra Rehearsals Friday Evenings, 
beginning September 11th 

TAFT'S 
DENTAL ROOMS 

1517 Douglas Street 
Omaha, Neb. 

Care of Teeth a Stamp 
of Refinement 



14 6- 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People' 1 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




double boiler, thoroughly, place each fondant ball on the end 
of a long hat pin, dip quickly into melted chocolate, which has 
been removed from fire, and when coated place on paraffin 
paper in a cool place. 



Uncooked Fondant. 

Put white of one egg in a glass and add to it an equal 
amount of either cold water or thick, sweet cream. Beat mix- 
ture well, then add enough XXXX confectioner's sugar to 
make dough stiff enough to mold. Knead thoroughly, add any 
flavoring and coloring desired, and mold. 



Boiled Fondant. 

Boil 1 pint sugar with milk or water enough to dissolve, 
till a spoonful in cold water makes a firm ball, not crisp. Set 
dish immediately in cold water. When it begins to cool nicely, 
beat to a cream, mould into a loaf and set away in a cool place 
to ripen. While beating, add any coloring desired. 

Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 

Benson, the Best Place to Live 



If you want your money's worth 
call 

Benson Tea & 


B. W. C. 


Coffee Co. 

For Your Groceries 
& Supplies 


Always 
for 


We Give Premiums 
5738 Main St. Phone Benson 399 


Improvements 



•147- 



-148— 



Pickles, Preserves, Etc 



"Here's fruit for an epicure meet, 
Canned and pickled and smothered in sweet, 
The wealth of summer's mellow prime 
To cheer the dearth of winter's rime." 

PICKLED ONIONS. 

Select small silver skinned onions, remove all outer skins 
so that each onion will be perfectly white and clean. Put them 
into a brine that will float an egg, for 3 days, then drain, place 
in a jar first a layer of onions 3 inches deep, then a sprinkle of 
horseradish, cinnamon bark and a little cayenne pepper. Re- 
peat until jar is filled in proportion of V2 teaspoon cayenne 
pepper to 2 teaspoons each of chopped horseradish and cloves 
and 4 tablespoons cinnamon bark to a gallon of pickles. Bring 
vinegar to boil, add 2 heaping cups brown sugar (a quart to 
a gallon) and pour over onions. Mrs. A. R. Cuyler. 



FRENCH PICKLE. 

One peck green tomatoes (chop fine). Put over fire with 1 
cup salt and 2 cups vinegar. Boil 5 minutes, take off and drain 
through colander. Add enough vinegar to cover, 4 pounds 
sugar, 4 tablespoons mustard, 2 tablespoons mustard seed, 2 
tablespoons celery seed and spices to taste. Cook 15 minutes. 
Seal in jars. Mrs. A. Peacock. 



GRAPE SWEET PICKLE. 

Put 10 pounds grapes in bunches into a jar, removing all 
bad ones. Dissolve 6 pounds sugar in 1 quart vinegar, add 1 
stick cinnamon, boil till thick, pour syrup boiling hot over 
grapes and seal. Emma G. Murdock. 



SMALL CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

One gallon small cucumbers covered with boiling water 
and left 12 hours, then drained thoroughly. Put in glass jars, 



— 149 — 



Robert S, Beasley 

CONTRACTOR 
and BUILDER 



Residence and Office Phone Benson 

3109 North FiftyEighth Street 319W 



^anoberq Or (bitner 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Studio 107 South 16th Street OMAHA, NEB. 

TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 2387 

TREES and SHRUBS 

A full line of Shade and Ornamental Trees, 
Fruit Trees, Small Fruit, Shrubs and Roses. 
Let us figure with you before buying- elsewhere. 
Home grown nursery stock will surely grow for 
you. 

BENSON-OMAHA NURSERIES, P. J. FLYNN, Prop. 

Nurseries Benson and Keystone Park. Office and Sales- 
ground 61st and Rigg Sts. Phone Benson 434. 

—150— 



cover with boiling syrup made of 1 quart vinegar, 2 table- 
spoons sugar, 1 tablespoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper berries, y<> 
teaspoon alum and 1 teaspoon mustard. 

Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 



MUSTARD PICKLE. 

Two quarts small whole cucumbers, 2 quarts large cucum- 
bers sliced, 2 quarts green tomatoes sliced, 2 quarts small but- 
ton onions, 2 large cauliowers, divided, and 4 green peppers. 
Remove seeds and cut fine. Salt in layers over night. In the 
morning drain and heat in 2 parts water and 1 part vinegar, 
enough to scald. Drain again. Mix one cup flour, six table- 
spoons ground mustard, 2 cups sugar and 1 gallon vinegar. 
Boil, mix until it thickens and is smooth, stirring all the time. 
Then add the vegetables and cook until heated through. 

Mrs. Thomas Ranee, Omaha. 



SPANISH PICKLE. 

Four dozen cucumbers, 4 dozen medium onions, 30 green 
peppers. Cut all in slices. Remove seeds from peppers. Salt 
over night. In the morning drain perfectly dry. Put on 
vinegar to cover, 4 cups sugar, 14 pound celery seed, x /4 pound 
mustard seed, 1 tablespoon turmeric, 2 sticks cinnamon, some 
whole cloves. Cook until they can be pierced with a straw. 
"Will keep without sealing. Mrs. Sadie L. Wright. 



DUTCH PICKLE. 

One quart yellow cucumbers, 1 quart green tomatoes, 1 
quart small white onions, 1 large head cauliflower, 1 small 
head cabbage, 9 green peppers, 1 red pepper. Cut all up or 
run through food chopper, then cover with V2 cup salt and 

1 quart water, hang in a bag and let drain ; 10 tablespoons 
mustard, 2 teaspoons turmeric, 3 cups brown sugar, 1 cup flour, 

2 quarts vinegar. Mix mustard and flour with vinegar. Cook 
all together for about 15 minutes. Let vinegar, flour and mus- 
tard cook first, then add the pickle and cook about 10 minutes. 

Mrs. M. P. Gould. 

—151— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



MUSTARD MIXED PICKLE. 

One quart cucumbers, 1 quart green tomatoes, 1 quart 
onions, 1 quart green beans, 4 whole green peppers, 1 large 
cauliflower. Cut all in small pieces and soak over night in brine 
of 1 pint of salt to 1 gallon of water. In morning drain about 1 
hour, then scald in weak vinegar, about J/3 vinegar to % 
water. Then pour this off and add dressing. 

Dressing — 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 6 level tablespoons 
dry mustard, 1 tablespoon turmeric powder. Cook the dressing 
separately and pour on hot, have the vegetables hot also. Put 
in jars and seal. Mrs. Ben Morton. 



CUCUMBER RELISH. 

Three dozen large green cucumbers. Pare, take out seeds 
and chop 1 dozen white onions, chopped and mixed with salt, 
and let stand over night. In the morning, chop 2 red peppers, 
and mix with cucumbers 2 tablespoons mustard seed, 2 table- 
spoons celery seed, sugar to taste and % cup grated horse- 
radish. Boil % gallon white wine vinegar and set aside to 
get cold. When cold, mix all together and seal tight. 

Mrs. E. J. McArdle. 



CHOW-CHOW (Without Cucumbers). 

One peck green tomatoes, 6 large onions, 1 dozen green 
peppers, 1 large cabbage. Slice tomatoes, sprinkle over them 
1 cup salt, let stand over night, drain off the liquor, chop fine 
and add onions, cabbage and peppers, also chopped fine. Put 
on fire to cook with enough cider vinegar to cover, then add 
black pepper, cinnamon, cloves and allspice to suit taste. Cook 
until tender, then cover closely in jars. Will keep without 
sealing. Mrs. R. L. Robinson. 

—152— 



CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Use medium size cucumbers, cut lengthwise in 5 or 6 slices 
and soak in ice water 3 hours. Place slices of white onions in 
jars, and fill with cucumbers and a few stalks of celery. Invert 
jars and let drain well. Pour over the following : Boiling 
vinegar, in which is put 1 cup sugar and % scant cup salt to 
each quart vinegar. Mrs. Jos. Gochenouer, Blair. 



CHICAGO HOT. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, peeled, chopped fine and drained, 
2 cups each of chopped celery and onion, 2 cups sugar, % cup 
salt, 1 cup white mustard seed, 4 medium size red peppers, 4 
medium size green peppers, 4 cups cold vinegar. Mix well 
and seal. Mrs. N. H. Tyson. 



PEPPER HASH. 

Twelve each of large green peppers, large red peppers and 
large onions. Remove pepper seeds and chop all. Pour on 
boiling water and let stand 5 minutes. Drain very dry in 
colander. Put in a kettle 1 quart vinegar, 4 small tablespoons 
salt, 2 cups sugar. Let boil, then add peppers and onions and 
let come just to a boil. Can when cold. 

Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



MUSTARD CHOW-CHOW. 

One quart green tomatoes, sliced, 1 quart small pickles (if 
fresh ones cannot be obtained, bottled ones will do, but do not 
soak them in brine), 1 quart small white onions, peeled, 3 heads 
cauliflower, separated in small pieces, 4 red peppers, cut fine, 
without seeds, 1 quart green string beans, cooked until tender. 
To 4 quarts water, add 2 cups salt, and let stand on above 
vegetables 24 hours. Then heat in this brine and drain dry. 

Dressing for above as follows: 1 cup flour, 4 tablespoons 
mustard, 1 tablespoon turmeric powder, 1 cup sugar. Mix 
above ingredients into a smooth paste with a little water. Add 
2 quarts hot vinegar and pour over vegetables. Cook until 
heated through. It does not take long, as they get too soft 
if boiled in this dressing. Mrs. Frank Hickman. 

—153— 



Arlington Block Telephone 

1511.. Dodge St. Red 4143 

Goodwai Dickerman 

Voice Culture 
Singing and Speaking Voice 

Director 
Dickerman School of Acting 

Voice and Expression OMAHA, NEBR. 

Your Patronage Invited Phone Douglas 6969 

Miss Anna Sistek 

Exclusive Ladies Man Tailored Suits and Gloaks 



Gowns and 201-2-3 City National Bank Bldg. 

Dressmaking OMAHA 



Repairs for STOVES, FURNACES and BOILERS 

Prompt Services* Reasonable Prices, 

Omaha Stove Repair Works 

Phone Tyler 20 Omaha, Neb. 

National Life Insurance Co. 

Montpelier, Vermont 

U THE BEST FAMILY REMEDY, 
because it works when all medicines 
have ceased to act, or have acted, is 
LIFE INSURANCE" 

J. V. STARRETT, State Agent 
401-2-3 Paxton Block Doug. 126 Omaha, Neb. 

— 154 — 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




BORDEAUX SAUCE. 

Chop 1 quart green tomatoes, 2 quarts cabbage, 1 red 
pepper, i/> teaspoon each of turmeric and whole spice, 1% tea- 
spoons celery seed, 2 teaspoons salt, 1 quart vinegar, 2 cups 
sugar. Boil all together 30 minutes and can. 

Mrs. John W. Hitch. 



PICCALILLI. 

Chop fine 1 peck green tomatoes, 1 dozen medium size 
onions, 2 or 3 red peppers, 1 medium head cabbage. Cover with 
1 pint salt and drain over night tied in a cloth. Cook part of 



the amount in % gallon cider vinegar. When tender, drain off 
the vinegar and put the balance in and cook until tender. 
Throw that vinegar away, then add 1 pound sugar, 1 table- 
spoon each of whole cloves, black pepper, allspice, celery seed 
(tied in a bag), or mixed pickle spices, and % cup grated 
horseradish to enough hot vinegar to cover it. When thor- 
oughly heated, seal in jars. Miss Cora Totman. 



CHILI CON CARNE. 

One dozen large tomatoes, 2 large onions, 3 green peppers, 
1 cup vinegar, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon salt, 1 teaspoon 
each of celery seed and mustard seed, cloves and cinnamon. 
Boil well and can. Mrs. John W. Hitch. 



COLD RELISH. 

One peck tomatoes (not too ripe), 12 medium sized onions, 
3 large green peppers, Vi> cup salt. Chop and let drain several 
hours, then add 3 cups sugar, iy 2 quarts vinegar, 1 tablespoon 
cinnamon, y 2 tablespoon cloves, 2 ounces white mustard seed. 
Keep in sealed fruit jars. Mrs. J. W. Welch. 



-155- 



RIPE TOMATO CHOW-CHOW. 

One gallon each of ground ripe tomatoes and cabbage, V2 
gallon ground onions, 3 quarts vinegar. Cloves, pepper, salt, 
cinnamon and sugar to taste. Cook % hour and seal. 

Mrs. S. E. Button. 



CHOPPED PICKLES. 

Sprinkle salt over 4 quarts finely chopped green tomatoes 
and let stand 2 hours. Drain. Add 4 quarts chopped cabbage, 
2 quarts chopped onions, 4 chopped peppers, 1 ounce ginger, 
V2 ounce each of mace, cloves, cinnamon, 3 pounds brown sugar, 
1 ounce celery seed, 3 ounces turmeric. Cover with vinegar. 
Mix well. Cover closely and boil 1 hour. 

Mrs. E. Mead. 



FRESH CUCUMBERS IN WINTER. 

Fill glass jars with cucumbers that have been slightly sea- 
soned with salt. Cover with water. Remove all bubbles by 
passing a fork through them. Put tops on jars, turn them 
upside down and let stand a while as test that there is no 
leakage. When put up thus, cucumbers taste as fresh as if 
gathered right from vines. Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 



PICKLED BEETS. 

Boil young, tender beets till well done, place in mason 
jars and pour over them boiling hot vinegar to which has 
been added when placed to boil, J/3 cup sugar and 1 scant table- 
spoon salt for each quart vinegar. If vinegar is very strong, 
dilute with water. These are fine and will keep sealed for 
years. Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 



CORN SALAD NO. 1. 

One dozen ears sweet corn, 1 head cabbage, 2 red peppers, 
4 large onions, 1 bunch celery, 1 cup sugar, 1 quart vinegar, 
2 tablespoons each of mustard and flour, 1 tablespoon salt, 1 
teaspoon turmeric. Cook until corn is well done and seal in 
mason jars. Mrs. John W. Hitch. 

—156— 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



CORN SALAD NO. 2. 

One dozen ears corn, 1 large head cabbage, 4 onions, 2 cups 
brown sugar, 2 red peppers, salt to taste, 2 tablespoons ground 
mustard, 1 tablespoon turmeric powder, 1 tablespoon celery 
powder, vinegar to cover. Mix and boil % hour. Put in jars 
and seal. Mrs. ¥m. Sackriede. 



CANNED CORN. 

Nine cups corn, 1 cup sugar, % cup salt. Add water to 
cover and boil about % hour. Seal in jars. Always add boil- 
ing water when you need to. Mrs. Wm. Sackriede. 



PICKLED APPLES, PEACHES, ETC. 

One cup vinegar, 2 cups sugar, few pieces whole cinnamon, 
mace and cloves. Stick 5 or 6 cloves in each piece of fruit. 
Drop in syrup and cook till tender. Seal. 

Mrs. Fred Thies. 



TOMATO CATSUP. 

Boil 1 bushel ripe tomatoes and strain through a sieve. 
Add 2 quarts vinegar, 3 pounds brown sugar, y 2 cup salt, *4 
ounce allspice, % ounce cayenne pepper, V4 ounce black pepper, 
2 ounces cloves. Put spices in a bag. Use a little mace. 

Mrs. R. L. Robinson. 



COLD CATSUP. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, chop and then drain through sieve 
till quite dry. Add 2 cups grated horseradish, % cup salt, 1 cup 
mustard seed, 2 large peppers chopped fine, 2 bunches celery 
chopped fine, 1 cup onions chopped fine, 1 cup sugar, 1 table- 
spoon black pepper and 1 quart vinegar (boiled and cooled). 
No cooking required. Mrs. C. F. Hotchkiss. 

—157— 



You will like the pure foods 
baked fresh every day in the 
Iten Snow White Bakeries 



because they taste so good, are so 
satisfying and so easily digested. 

Why? Only the best and purest 
materials used-— skillfully prepared 
by our own perfected methods- --then 
baked just right and packed just 
right under strictly sanitary conditions 

Your own good taste will approve Iten Quality 
Products. Just order from your grocer a dime package 
of Fairy Soda Crackers, Iten's Graham Biscuit, Iten's 
Creme Sandwich, Iten's Alpine Creams, Iten's Cheese 
Wafers or Iten's Fig Bars. 

One trial will surely please you. 

Iten Biscuit Co. 

Snow White Bakery 
OMAHA - U. S. A. 

—158— 




GRAPE CATSUP. 

Wash 2 quarts grapes and remove from stems. Put in 
granite pan, pour over 1 quart vinegar, cook until soft and 
run through colander. To this pulp add \ ] A pounds brown 
sugar, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, cloves and pimento, */2 table- 
spoon salt, Vii. teaspoon cayenne pepper. Cook to consistency 
of tomato catsup. Bottle and seal. 

Mrs. J. A. McCulley. 



UNCOOKED TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, pared, chopped and drained, 1 
cup each of chopped onion and celery, iy 2 cups chopped red 
peppers, y 2 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons each of salt and mustard 
seed, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves and black pepper, 1 
quart vinegar. Seal cold. Mrs. W. W. Gamble. 



MRS. TRACY'S PICKLED PEACHES. 

Seven pounds whole peaches, 4 pounds granulated sugar, 
1 pint vinegar, 2 ounces stick cinnamon (broken), % ounce 
whole cloves, % ounce whole mace in inch length. Tie spices 
in bag and boil with syrup. Boil sugar, vinegar and spices 15 
minutes. Then put in some peaches and boil till they can be 
pierced with a straw. Skim carefully and put in jars, then 
proceed with rest of peaches in the same syrup. 

Mrs. Charles A. Tracy. 



PLAIN CHILI SAUCE. 

Eighteen large ripe tomatoes, 6 white onions, 3 large 
peppers, 5 cups vinegar, 3 teaspoons salt, 10 teaspoons sugar. 
Add enough cayenne pepper, allspice and cloves to suit taste. 
Cook 3 hours. A. E. S. 



SIMPLE CHILI SAUCE. 

Thirty-six large tomatoes, 9 green peppers, 1 red pepper 
(remove seeds from peppers), 4% cups granulated sugar, 4yo 
cups vinegar. Salt to taste. Cook slowly 2 1 / 1 > hours. 

Mrs. E. C. Hodder. 

—159— 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People'* 

Benson 100 Benson 100 




OMAHA CHILI SAUCE. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, Yl peck or ions, y± peck red 
peppers, 3 cups sugar, 10 cups vinegar, 2 Iflblespoons salt, 1 
tablespoon mixed spice. Peel and cut tomatoes in quarters, 
peel onions and seed peppers and run them through a food 
chopper. Tie spice in a sack. Cook whole until thick and 
bottle. Mrs. E. F. Brailey. 



RAW CHILI SAUCE. 

Chop fine 1 peck ripe tomatoes, 1 dozen sweet green 
peppers, 1 dozen white onions, 3 heads celery, 1 cup nasturtium 
seed. Add 1 cup white mustard seed, 1 pint brown sugar, 1 
pint good vinegar, V2 cup salt. The secret of this recipe is 
drain, drain, drain. Salt and drain over night, then toss to- 
gether, add sugar and lastly vinegar. It is not cooked, but 
bottled and sealed. Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



CHILI SAUCE (NO. 1). 

Eight quarts ripe tomatoes, 6 peppers (partly green and 
ripe), 8 onions, 3 cups sugar, 1 pint vinegar, 1 tablespoon salt, 
nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon, allspice and ginger to suit. Boil 
three hours. Mrs. R. L. Robinson. 



CHILI SAUCE (NO. 2). 

Twelve large, ripe tomatoes, 1 green pepper, 2 onions. 
Chop all fine. Add 2 tablespoons salt, 2 tablespoons sugar, 
1 tablespoon cinnamon, 3 cups vinegar and some celery. Boil 
3 hours. Mrs. E. Mead. 



CHILI SAUCE (NO. 3). 

One peck ripe tomatoes, 12 medium size onions, 2 large 
red peppers (cut in two), 4 cups vinegar, 4 cups sugar, 1 



160— 



small cup salt, 2 tablespoons each of allspice and pepper. Boil 
from 3 to 4 hours slowly on cook stove. Mrs. Andreson. 



GRAPE CONSERVE. 

Two quarts grapes, pulp them. Cook pulp, and when soft, 
rub through colander. Put skins and pulp together and cook 
10 minutes. Add juice and rind of 1 orange, 6 cups sugar, 1 
cup chopped raisins. Boil 20 minutes. When done, add 1 cup 
English walnuts. Mrs. Arthur N. Howe. 



MRS. MASON'S GRAPE CONSERVE. 

Five pounds grapes, 3 pounds sugar, 1 pound seeded 
raisins, 1 pound English walnuts. First separate skins from 
pulp, then cook pulp and put through a sieve. Then mix skins, 
pulp, sugar and raisins, cook a few minutes, then add nuts. 

Mrs. E. A. Mason. 



BOSTON ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Six lemons, 12 oranges (6 sweet, 6 sour). Slice very thin 
and cover with 4 quarts cold water. Let stand 36 hours, then 
boil 2 hours. Add 8 pounds white sugar and boil 1 hour longer, 
or until thick enough, stirring often. 

Cora Adele Totman. 



PINEAPPLE CONSERVE. 

Four large pineapples, 5 pounds sugar, pulp of 5 oranges, 
1 grated orange peel, juice of 1 lemon. Cut pineapple in small 
pieces, add sugar and let stand over night, then add orange 
pulp, grated orange peel and lemon juice. Cook from 30 to 
45 minutes. Miss Cora Totman. 



PLAIN ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Five large oranges, 2 large lemons. Cut fine and cook in 
3 quarts water for V2 hour. Then add 3 quarts sugar and cook 
% of an hour or until it jells. If the orange peel seems too 
bitter, only put the grated yellow in. Be careful not to get 
any seeds in. Mrs. H. B. Von Nilson, Omaha. 

—161— 



Ask Your Dealer For 

Dreibus 9 Everpure Candy 

Try Our 

Ben Hur and 
Milk Chocolates 

In l /2, 1 and 2 lb. boxes 

DREIBUS CANDY CO. 

OMAHA 

Jfarmers $c iUrrrfjattta Sank 

Benson, Nebraska 



A Home Bank For Home People 



Deposits in this Bank protected by the Depositors Guarantee Fund 
of the State of Nebraska 

Interest Paid on Time and Savings Deposits 

Rent one of our Safety Deposit Boxes for Your Valuable Papers 

We solicit your Business and assure you fair, liberal 
and courteous treatment 

Herman O. Wulff, President T. Hermanson, Vice-Pres. 

Bert C. Ranz, Cashier Wm. F. Hinz, Ass't Cash. 

— 162 — 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



GOOSEBERRY CONSERVE. 

Five pounds gooseberries (4 boxes), 5 pounds sugar, 5 
oranges, 2 pounds raisins (seedless), chopped. Boil rind of 
3 oranges 20 minutes, putting same to cook in cold water, 
drain and chop fine. Squeeze juice of oranges over sugar, add 
raisins, rinds and berries. Boil 20 or 30 minutes. 

Mrs. Arthur N. Howe. 



GRAPE MARMALADE. 

Remove seeds and use skins and pulp of one "grape" 
basket of grapes. Grind rather fine 2 oranges and 1 lemon, 
and add to grapes. Use one cup sugar to each cup of the 
above mixture. Cook until juice forms a light "jelly." Just 
before removing from fire add 1 cup English walnuts and % 
pound raisins, chopped lightly. Mrs. W. W. Gamble. 



MRS. TUTTLE'S ORANGE MARMALADE. 

One-half dozen oranges, 4 lemons. Shave thin and add 
3 times as much water as fruit. Let stand till same time next 
day, when it is put on stove and boiled 10 minutes. Then let 
stand (in cool place) another day. Then measure and add as 
much sugar as juice and cook till like jelly. Use rinds and all. 

Mrs. G. H. Tuttle. 



CANNED COLD PINEAPPLE. 

Cut pineapple in small slices. Take 1% pounds sugar to 
1 pound fruit, place layers in stone crock over night in a dark 
place. Next day fill glass jars with pineapple and pour over 
their own juice, which has been drawn out over night. Seal 
jars air tight and place in a dark place. A tablespoonful of 
sherry or brandy may be added. 

Mrs. R. S. Beasley. 

— 163 — 



MRS. SPEEDIE'S ORANGE MARMALADE. 

One orange and 1 lemon. Each fruit must be quartered 
and shredded with a sharp knife. To each measure of fruit 
allow 3 full measures of water. Place in a preserving kettle 
and set away in a cool place to soak until the same hour next 
day. Then set the kettle upon the stove and let it boil hard 
for 10 minutes. Again set in a cool place until the same hour 
the following day. Measure the mixture and to every cup of 
mixture allow the same amount of cane sugar. Put on stove 
and cook until it jells. This makes 5 glasses. 

Mrs. Nellie V. Speedie. 



RASPBERRY JELLY. 

Add the strained juice from 1 pint of raspberries to enough 
apple juice to make ten glasses of jelly and make the jelly in 
the usual way. The raspberry juice colors and flavors it. 

Mrs. J. V. Starrett. 



PUMPKIN CHIPS. 

One medium sized pumpkin, 2 lemons, 6 measuring cups 
of sugar. Cut pumpkin in small cubes. Slice lemons in fine 
bits, leaving out white lining of rind. Mix thoroughly with 
sugar and let stand over night. Cook two hours. 

Mrs. F. B. Oliver. 



— 164 — 




Rivett Lumber & Coal Co. 

"The Good Coals People" 
Benson 100 Benson 100 




Miscellaneous 



" Wretched cooking makes weary sickness, and 
slow waste brings speedy poverty." 



SMELLING SALTS. 

One dram oil of cinnamon, V2 dram oil of cloves, % dram 
oil of lavender, % dram oil of wintergreen. Place above in 
1 ounce bottle and shake well. Fill bottle with aqua ammonia. 

Mrs. G. W. Thompson. 



CAKE BAKING HINT. 

After baking a cake, stand the tin directly you take it 
from the oven, on a cloth which has been wrung out of hot 
water. Leave a few minutes, and then turn out. The cake 
will come out without trouble. 

Mrs. Edwin Hindley. 



PREPARED MUSTARD. 

Two dessertspoons mustard, 1 dessertspoon flour, 2 tea- 
spoons sugar, 1 teaspoon salt. Mix thin with water and cook 
until thick. Then thin with vinegar. 

Mrs. Frank Bumpus. 



QUANTITIES FOR GUESTS. 

Lunch for 25 persons : 8 pounds ham, 3 pints oysters, 
2 quarts pickles, 1 gallon salad, 3 loaves bread, V2 pound but- 
ter, 1 quart cream, 1 pound sugar, % pound best grade of 
coffee, 2 cakes, 5 quarts ice cream. Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 

— 167— 



NOTICE 



H^HE Formulas and 
Recipes in this 
book will do you no 
good unless your teeth 
are good and your 
mouth is in a sanitary 
condition. 



BAILEY The Dentist 

706 City National Bank :: Omaha 



—168— 



SALTED ALMONDS. 

Blanch by pouring boiling water over and removing skins, 
then dry. Fry in hot lard like doughnuts. Drain, add a little 
butter and sprinkle with salt. Anonymous. 



QUANTITIES FOR 40 GUESTS. 

Four ordinary loaves of bread, 2 pounds butter, V/3 pounds 
best coffee, 1V2 gallons ice cream, 4 cakes, V/ 2 gallons salad, 
6 pounds solid meat. Mrs. W. A. Wilcox. 



SIMPLE REMEDIES. 

Castor oil taken in a spoon with a bit of lemon or orange 
juice will go down without protest. 

When children suffer from earache, dust a little pepper on 
a bit of cotton, wet in warm oil and insert in the ear. Repeat 
if the pain does not soon cease. 

Pineapple juice with honey is an excellent cough medicine, 
and good also for sore throat. 

An old fashioned but good remedy for colds is made by 
cutting up an onion in small pieces and simmering in plenty 
of water for % hour or so, adding sugar enough to make syrup. 
If a spoonful is taken often, will soon break up a severe cold. 

To stop nose bleed, place an ice pack on back of neck and 
press the blood vessel which leads to the side of the nose. 

Mrs. J. Y. Hooper. 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

Take off silver tarnish by soaking in sour milk. 

Squares of cotton batting baked in a hot oven 20 or 30 
minutes make filling for sofa pillows as light as down. 

Clean graniteware with sand paper, then scouring powder. 

Castor oil on the roots is good for ferns. 

Never leave a spoon in anything cooking. 

Grease top inside of vessel in which jelly is to be boiled, and 
its contents will not boil over. 

Swallow a whole fresh egg without shell to remove fish 
bone from the throat. 

— 169 — 



CHAS. H. SPRAGUE, Druggist 

Benson, Neb. 5905 Main Street Phone Benson 124 



Olive oil and salt will remove white spots from furniture. 

Put dry soda on fresh grease spots on the floor, let stand 
a few minutes, pour boiling water over, let stand 15 minutes, 
longer and wash up. 

For fresh spilled ink, use blotter, then sweet milk. 

A slice of a lemon put in a boiler when boiling clothes 
makes them whiter and removes stains. 

In absence 'of a bodkin, a safety pin may be used instead 
for drawing tape or elastic. 

Wax paper from cracker boxes is excellent for fiat iron 
polisher. 

Peroxide of hydrogen removes ink, scorch or fruit stains. 
Wet two cloths, put one over, the other under, and leave 15 
minutes, then rinse in clear water. 

Butter rubbed on the edges of cream pitcher prevents 
cream dropping. 

Scald peaches before peeling, and the skins will slip off 
easily. 

Grease pans, then dust with flour, and anything baked in 
them, such as bread, cakes, etc., will come out easily. 

A little sugar added to cream prevents its turning to but- 
ter while whipping. 

Iron embroideries on the wrong side on Turkish towels. 

Camphor gum among silver prevents tarnishing . It also 
drives away ants. 

Boiling water poured through material will remove tea and 
many fruit stains. — Selected. 



—170- 



WEIGHTS AND MEASUREMENTS. 

4 saltspoonfuls 1 teaspoonful 

4 teaspoonfuls 1 tablespoonful 

2 teaspoonfuls 1 dessertspoonful 

2 dessertspoonfuls 1 tablespoonful 

8 tablespoonfuls, liquid 1 gill 

6 tablespoonfuls, dry 1 gill 

2 gills 1 cupful 

2 eupfuls or 4 gills 1 pint 

4 eupfuls, liquid 1 quart 

4 eupfuls, Hour 1 quart 

2 eupfuls solid butter 1 pound 

2 eupfuls granulated sugar 1 pound 

2y 2 eupfuls powdered sugar 1 pound 

2 cups milk or water 1 pound 

1 tablespoonful butter 1 ounce 

2 tablespoonfuls flour 1 ounce 

2 tablespoonfuls coffee 1 ounce 

Butter size of an egg means 2 ounces 

A tablespoonful melted butter is measured after melting. 

A tablespoonful butter, melted, is measured before melting 



TIME FOR COOKING. 

Loaf bread 50 to 60 minutes 

Rolls and biscuits 20 minutes 

Cake loaf 20 minutes 

Fruit cake 2 to 3 hours 

Steam pudding 1 to 3 hours 

Custards 15 to 20 minutes 

Apple pie 30 to 40 minutes 



—171— 



-172— 



Do You Make the Telephone 
Work for You? 



How do you shop? Does it take you away 
from your housework to a wearying tramp 
through shops and streets? Or do you tele- 
phone and save time and care? 

You can lift a lot of housekeeping worry by 
making the telephone do your shopping and 
your errands; and, too, add to your comfort, 
and pleasure, and happiness. 

The Bell telephone is in more homes in 
America than there are telephones in the 
homes of all the other countries in the world 
combined. American methods of low rates, and 
efficient and courteous service have brought 
comfort to the American home. 

"Bell Telephone Service has set the 
Standard for the Rest of the World." 




NEBRASKA 

TELEPHONE 

COMPANY 



—173- 



TffE n PRC/DENT MAAT G/VES AffS 
WIFE A BANfCxmmACCQUNT. 




Every woman should have a bank account so that she 
can pay her bills with checks and keep a "Check on her 
bills." A bank account teaches everyone, who has one, 
to be business-like, and to ECONOMIZE. 

Then no pleasure is greater than seeing the balance to 
your credit GROW and GROW. 

A woman will SAVE MONEY for her husband if he 
will only give her a chance. 

Make OUR bank YOUR bank 

We pay 4 per cent interest on Savings Accounts 

Bring Your Money to the 

Bank of Brnson 

BENSON, NEBRASKA, AND WATCH IT GROW 
Capital and Surplus, $30,000.00 



-174— 



Toast for the Kiddies 

-and the Grown Ups 

Made right on the table — fresh and hot 
as you like to eat it — that's the electrical 
way. 

Keep out of the kitchen this summer all 
you can. You can cook your entire break- 
fast, toast, eggs and coffee — on the table 
if you have electricity in your home. 

Electricity Will Make Your 
Summer Really Enjoyable 

It will keep you cool, cook your meals, 
wash and iron your clothes and light your 
home. Electricity will do this and more, 
economically, quickly, cleanly and safely. 

Omaha Electric Light 
& Power Co. 

"DO IT ELECTRICALLY" 

— 17 5 — 



—176— 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




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