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Full text of "Bethany College Bulletin 1841-42"



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CATALOGUE, 



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CERTAIN DETAILS 



OF 



BETHANY COLLEGE. 




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SESSION FIRST. 



Jw/y 4th, 1842. 



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BETHANY, VA. 

PRINTED BY A. CAMPBELL. 
1842. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bethanycollegeb184142beth 



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TRUSTEES OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



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ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, President. 

BUCKNER H. PAYNE, 

Pecan Grove, East Feliciana Parish, La. 
MAJOR J. JOHNSON, 

Woodville, Wilkinson county, Mi. 
JOSEPH VV. CLAY, 

Nashville, Davidson county, Tc. 
L. A. SANDIDGE, 

May's Lick, Mason county, Ky. 
ALBERT G. EWING, 

Clarington, Monroe county, Ohio. 
ADAMSON BENTLEY, 
Orange Burnets Comers, Cuyahoga county, Ohio? 

JOHN ANDREWS, M. D. 

Steubenville, Jefferson county, Ohio. 
JUDGE CHARLES SUMNER, 

Akron, Portage county, Ohio. 
SAMUEL CHURCH, 

City of Pittsburg, Pa. 
JAMES T. M'VAY, 

City of Pittsburg, Pa. 
ROBERT H. FORRESTER, 

City of Pittsburg, Pa. 
HENRY LANGLY, 

Borough of Washington, Pa. 
MATTHEW M'KEEVER, 

Washington county, Pa. 
WILLIAM DABNEY, 

City of Richmond, Va. 
R. L. COLEMAN, 

Charlottesville, Albemarle county, Va.. 
DR. JONAS CRUMBACKER, 

Wheeling Ohio county, Va. 
JOHN C. CAMPBELL, Esq. 



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Wellsburg, Brooke county, Va. 
ROBERT NICKOLS, 

Wellsburg, Brooke county, Va. 
CAMPBELL TARR, 

Wellsburg, Brooke county, Va. 
SAMUEL GRAFTON, M. D. 

Wellsburg, Brooke county, Va. 
WILLIAM STEWART, Esq. 

Stewartsville, Brooke county, Va. 
THOMAS CAMPBELL, 

Bethany, Brooke county, Va. 
R. Y. HENLEY, 

Bethany, Brooke county, Va. 
ROBERT RICHARDSON, M. D. 

Bethany, Brooke county, Va. 



i*H 



FACULTY. 



A. CAMPBELL, 

President, and Professor of Mental Philosophy, including Logic and 
JVietoric, Moral Science, Political Economy, and Sacred History. 

A. ROSS, 

Professor of Jlncieni languages and Ancient History as connected 
with Grecian and Roman Literature, 

CHARLES STEWART, 

Professor of Mathematics. 

W. K. PENDLETON, 

Professor of Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, and Natural History. 

DR. R. RICHARDSON, 

Professor of Chemistry 

W. W. EATON, 

Professor of English Lileralurr* 




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A CATALOGUE OF THE MATRICULATES 

OF BETHANY COLLEGE, DURING THE FIRST 8E83ION, COMMENCING 
THE Jit NOVEMBER, 1841, AND TERMINATING THE 4lb JULY, 1849. 



Anderson C. W. 
Baxter Wil* jam, 
Beaslby Robert B. 
Bellomy John, 
Bickham W. D. 
Black James, 
Bonsel John, 

BOHANNON LfROY, 

Bryan R. S. 
Cable J. C. 
Campbell James C. 
Carle John M. 
Carothers William H 

CHRI8TOPHER HlRAM, 

Church William, 
Cox James F. 
Craig John L. 
Crumbacker J. H. 
Dearborn J. A. 
Dew Thomas R. 
Divine W. A, 
Fades W A. 
Hades Charles H. 
Fall James S. 
Forsyth Robert, 
Forsyth William, 
Frisbie Jambs J. 

FUNKHOUSER DAVID, 

Garrard Israel L. 
Garrard Kknner, 
Garrard Lewis H. 
Goe John S. 
Grafton Nathan H. 
Groom B. B. 
Hagan W. H. C. 
Harvey Samuel H. 
Hayden Thomas C. 
Hewitt James W. 
Hooe James M. 
Johnson John T. 
Johnson Cyhus R. 
Jesse T. J 
Jf.TER John W. 
Jones Peter F. 
Keith John R. 
Kennarb Joseph M. 
Kino John N. 
Kino O. Dennisthi, 
King David^ 



1* 



Belleville, JetTerson county, N. Y, 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

Thornsburg, Va. 

Todd countj, Ky. 

Cincinnati, O. 

Nashville, Te. 

Brooke county, Va. 

Matthews county, Va* 

Bourbon county, Ky. 

Steubenville, O. 

Brooke county, Va. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Ohio county, Va* 
Louisville, Ky. 
Wheeling, Va. 
Bourbon county, Ky. 
King and Queen, Va. 
Woodford county, Ky. 
Bourbon county, Ky. 

il 44 tt 

Frankfort, Ky. 
Wheeling, Va. 

(4 44 

Wayne county, Ky. 
Shenandoah county, Va* 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

14 U 

41 44. 

Brownsville, Pa. 

Brooke county, Va. 

Winchester, Ky. 

Brooke county, Va. 

Clinton county. Pa. 

Nicholasvillp, Ky. 

Louisville, Ky. 

Klizabetlitown, Va. 

Lexington, Ky. 
44. 44 

Woodford county, Ky, 
Amelia county, Va. 
Brooke county, Va. 
Augusta, Ky. 
Warren county, Te«. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Warren, Ohio* 



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Leslie Jamm, 
LoBinoicm Jacob, 
M* Knight George S. * 
M'Kbkubt Henry F. - 
M'Kennet W. W. 
M'KeeverT. Campbell, 
Milet Joel, 
Mims William W. 
Moohe Robert, 
Nuckols John M. 
Ogle James, 
Oliphant David, 
Parrisu Richard M. - 
Paull James, 
Paxtow George W. 
Paxton E. W. 
Pendleton Philip B. - 
Perrv W. H. 
Phillips Gilbert H. - 
Pickett B. M. 

Portch Y. E. 

Poston John, 

Price Albert, 

Rennolds Daniel, 

Richards B. 

Robert William, 

Robertson John B. 

Robertson S. Peyton, - 

Robertson Alexander C. 

Robertson F. J. 

Ross Archibald, 

Runyon Daniel, 

SlauOhter George C. 

Smith Thaddeus, » 

Spindle James, 

Starr John, 

Stewart Daniel, 

Stone James C. 

Stroud Bartlet S. 

Stroud Marsdell P. A. 

Tarr John C. 

TlBBETTS GeOROK W. - 

Trabue. B. F. 
Ulrich Charles Frederick, 
Vivion H. J. 
Vivion Flavel C. 
Walker Norvel, 
Wells Ephraim, 
Williams B. F. 
Williams John H. 
Woods Robert B. 
Woods James H. 

YOUNO J AME8 A. 



Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Westmoreland county, Pa. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

Spottsylvania county, Va. 
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Washington county, Pa. 
Shenandoah county, Va. 
Erwinton, S. C. 
Washington county. Pa. 
Woodford county, Ky. 
Somerset county, Pa. 
Canada. 

Lake Providence, La- 
Wheeling, Va. 



King and Queer, Va. 
Wellsburg, Va. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Maysville, Ky. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Winchester, Ky. 
Woodford county, Ky 
Essex county, Va. 

it it it 

Erwinton, S. C. 
Nashville, Te. 



Fredericksburg, Ohio. 
May's Lick, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Woodford county, Ky. 
Essex county, Va. 
Jefferson county, Ohio. 
Canada. 
Richmond, Ky. 
Warren county, Te. 

it ii it 

Brooke county, Va. 
t'leaveland. Ohio. 
Glasgow, Ky. 
Wheeling, Va. 
Howard county, Mo. 
it »t ii 

Nashville, Te. 
Brooke co'inty, Va. 
Bourbon county, Ky. 
Woodford county, Ky, 
W heeling-, Va. 
WoodforA county , Ky. 
Russolsville, Ky. 




[7] 



RECAPITULATION. 



Flrom Virginia, 
Kentucky, 
Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, - 
Tennessee, * 
South Carolina, 
Missouri, 
Canada, 
Louisiana, 
New York, - 



32 
31 
12 
10 
9 

a 

2 

2 

1 
1 



102 



It will be seen from the above recapitulation, that there have been, 
during the session, 102 matriculates of Bethany College. All of these, 
however, have not been at the College at any one time — some of them 
not having entered till a considerable portion of the session had elap- 
sed, and others of those who commenced with the beginning of the 
session having, from sufficient reasons, left before it expired. The 
Students now in attendance are divided off into 24 classes, 1C in the 
regular collegiate course, and 8 in the English Department; all of 
which recite one hour each per day. Besides this, the class of Sacred 
History, which all the members of the College are required to attend, 
meets every morning in the week for one hour — thus making an aggre* 
gate of 25 hours per diem devoted to the instruction of the classes. 

In presenting this catalogue of the Students of Bethany College for 
the first session, the Faculty are gratified to be able to state, that in 
point of good order, morality, diligence to study, and general good 
demeanor, the Students of this institution have more than equaled 
their warmest expectations. In effecting this desirable end, however, 
many difficulties presented themselves, which of course required time 
and some acquaintance with the materials on which and with which 
they had to operate, before they could be entirely surmounted and 
removed. 

The peculiarity of some of the regulations of Bethany College, and the 
rigid observance of the Kules, at all times arid by all persons required, 
especially those connected with good older and morality, have had the 
most beneficial influence in curbing every feeling of insubordination, 
and have produced in the minds of the Students themselves so perfect 
and thorough a conviction of the utility and expediency of good order 
and decorum, that the Faculty have b* en warranted in committing into 
their own hands the entire control and management of the internal 
police of the Steward's Inn, where they study, board, and }©dge. 
Accordingly the rooms are distributed into wards or districts— over 
which are appointed governors or councilman, with other appropriate 
officers, and a President of the whole, all elected by themselves, and 
exercising their authority with the sanction and support of the Faculty 
—to whom all cases of insubordination are promptly referred. 

All improprieties, the detection and punishment of which are not 
conferred upon the officers appointed by the Students, are reserved to 
the supervision of the Faculty, whose prompt and decisive action is 
required by the By-Laws of the College, in order, not only to detect 



[8] 

and punish, but by all means warranted to prevent violations of the 
Rules. Superadded to this, general provision for the good order and 
morality of this institution, the Faculty are -required to hold a meeting 
every Saturday morning, at which every Student who has missed a 
recitation during the week past, is required to attend to gt*e an account 
for the same, and receive such admonition or rebuke as may be deemed 
necessary. 

In ord^r to secure the comfort and cleanliness of the Students, the 
Steward is required frequently to visit their rooms and to see that they 
are kept well ventilated, and that every thing necessary to comfort and 
cleanliness be attended to. The President is also charged with a 
special supervision over the internal and domestic arrangements of the 
Steward's Inn, with power to prescribe whatever, in his discretion, 
may be conducive to the health and comfort of the Students. 

No Student is permitted to leave the precincts of the College with- 
out specia.1 permission; and, a9 the location b in the country, removed 
from sources of temptation and vice, there is but little opportunity, 
even were there the disposition, to indulge in any of those vicious and 
wicked practices, which are so justly the dread o r parents, sending 
their children from under their own guardianship and care. 

fly* For funher particulars as to the discipline and police of Bethany 
College, the public are referred to the "By-Laws," 



A! •" 



ORDER OF EXAMINATION?. 

K Any Student who shall exhibit proficiency in nnv ofthe following schools, or porHons 
of schools, may be declared n graduate ami entitled to a diploma in such schools or por- 
tions of school* vix — Ancient or Modern Lanzua«rs and their Literature: English Lan- 
guage and its Literature; Pure Mathematics; Mixed Mathematics; Moral Philosophy; 
Natural Philosophy; Chemistry. 

2 In tho#e schoo's in which, according to the regulations of the Faculty, there are 
different branches of study which may he attended separately, a certificate of proficiency 
may he given to any Student who shall, on examination, give satisfactory evidence of a 
competent acquaintance with any of these branclx p. 

3 The candidates for jra^luntion in any school in (Icthany Cnlh-ge, shall make known 
to the Professor of that school, wilhiH one month from the commencement, or the time 
of Iheir matriculation, their intention to offer for graduation therein; and oh failure so 
to do, shall not he .permitted to become candidates hut by special consent of the Faculty. 

4» There shall be two special examinations of the candidates for graduation in each 
tthool in which they may offer, at such times, near the middle &»d end of the session at 
the Faculty may decide. 

5 TltePreci lent shall appoint, to nftVinte with himself as a committee, at the examine 
ttODI of each school, the Professor of that school and one other Professor; and they shall 
decide upon the proficiency of the candidates. 

6. Each candidate shuM be examined singly and alone, hy the Professor of the school la 
which he Is a candidate, or by questions propounded through him. 

7. No Student shall he permitted to grnduate. or receive a certificate of proficiency In 
any school or part ofsehool in Bethany Collage, who shall not have been in attendance at 
bast one session previous thereto 

8. Absence fiom lecture or recitation morn than onee-amonth during the section, shaH 
prevent any Student from graduating, unless it be excused for good reason by lh* Faculty. 

0>. A graduation fee of three dollars shall be paid by each graduate to the Professor In 
whose school he may jraihmte; also, a fee not evc.eedins two dollars for each certificate 
of proficiency to the Professor In whoso school U may he conferred. No fee thai I h« 
Charged tor the title of A B. and A. M. 

10. It shall he the duty of t he Professor, at the daily examinations of his class, to ex 
s>iatnc candidates for graduation with especial strict ness, and to keep an account of their 
siate of preparation at these examinations, and lay it before the Faculty at their monthly 
meetings. The dally stale of preparation of each candidate for graduation shall be token 
tstfo the account In deciding upon his qualifications for degrees 




r»i 



11. Win. 11 any Student shall have graduated in all the schools of Bethany College, It*- 
sliall then have conferred upon him the title of "Bachelor of Aria of Bethany College." 

19. Upon inch graduate* as thai! give satisfactory evidence, after leaving Bethany 
College, of a constant and unwavering perseverance In the prosecution of literature and 
science, and the practice of virtue and morality, the Faculty may, in addition to the title 
of Bachelor of Arts, confer the still higher honor of Master of Aria of Bethany Collegi ; 
provided, that iishull be conferred upon noue who have not previously obtained the title 
of"A B .»' 

13. In conferring degrees and granting certificates of proficiency, the Faculty will 
bear constantly in mind the necessity of making these honorary distinctions the rewards 
of real rneiil; and in no case confer ihem, except as testimonials not only of high literary 
and intellectual attainments, but also of high moral excellence and virtue. 

14. Besides the examination of candidates for graduation, there shall be two other 
general examinations — an intermediate one, to take place about the middle, and a final 
onendout the end of each sessiot., at such times as the Faculty may decide. 

15. All the Students, except the candidates for graduation, shall be required to attend 
the intermediate and final examinations; each one in those schools to which he may 
belong. 

16. From these examinations no Student shall absent himself without leave of the 
Faculty, under pain of any punishment, not exceeding dismission from the College. 

17. The President shall appoint to officiate with himself, as n committee, in the exami- 
nation of Hie classes of each school, — the Professor of each school and one other Profes- 
sor, — and they shall decide upon the relative merits of the Students examined. 

18 The Professor of etch school shall propound the questions addressed to his class, 
and the result of the examination shall be arranged by him, with the concurrence of llu> 
committee, in the form of a Report, for the President, as follows:— Heshall establish four 
degrees of distinction, which shall form the basis of four classes, in one of which he shall 
place each Student examined, according to his proficiency— those Ibat exhibit the first 
degree of proficiency, in the first class— and 90 on. 

19 At these examinations the committee may at discretion exclude from the room all 
Students not belonging to the class to be examined. 

20. The result of these exn mi nations, as well as those for graduation, shall be entered 
In the circular of each Student, so far as it may concern him, and forwarded to his parent 
or guardian. 

21. On the last day ofearh session the public shall be Invited to attend The Faculty, 
Students, Trustees, and Public shall assemble in the College Hall; and alter the delivery 
of graduation and such other addresses as the Faculty may prescribe, the honors of tie 
College shall be conferred in accordance with the results of the prevlousexaminatioti. In 
conferring upon candidates their respective degrees the President shall deliver to each Ins 
diploma; and in doing so, he shall pronounce uloud, in the language in which the diplo 
ma shall be written, the character of the honor $o conferred. 

22. A* soon as convenient a concise report of this day's proceedings shall be prepared 
by the President, and inserted in one or two public newspapers. 

The Faculty shall meet once every week, and every Stuibnt who shall have been 
absent during the week previous, whether from-good cause or not, shall appear without 
special summons to give account for such absence to the Faculty. 




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COURSE OF STUDIES. 

Candidates for graduation in the College Proper Department must 
have studied the following course, or an equivalent, in order to receive 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts of Bethany College- — 

Latin Grammar, (Andrews & StoddardV;) Liber Primus; Corne- 
lius Nepos; Cesar's Commentaries, (?ix books;) Sallusf; Livy, (five 
books;) Virgil; Cicero de Natura Deorum; Horace; Cicero's Select 
Orations; Tacitus; Koman History; Ancient Geography; Antiquities 
and Mythology. 

In the Greek — Greek Grammar, (Fisk's;) Greek New Testament, 
(four Gospel?;) Jacobs' Greek Header; Greeca Majora; Homer's 
Illiad, (eight Books;) Euripides, (Medea;) Longinus de Sublimitate; 
Grecian History; portions of ihe Septuagint. 




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f 10] 

la Mathematics — Algebra, (Harney's;) Geometry, (Playfair's;) 
Mensuration, (Bonny castle's;) Plane Trigonometry; Survey incr, (Gum- 
mere;) Conic Sections, (Bridges';) Fluxions; Civil Engineering; 
Navigation. 

Id Natural Science — Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, Natural His- 
tory, Chemistry, Geology, and Botany. 

In Moral Science — Logic, Rhetoric, Mental Philosophy, Political 
Economy, Moral Philosophy, and Sacred History. 

The Normal School and the Academy of Arts and Sciences have 
not yet been organized. They will be, however, so soon as the neces- 
sities of the community require and the means of the College permit. 



SESSION— VACATION— EXPENSES. 

The session of Bethany College begins on the first day of Septem- 
ber and terminates on the fourth day of July following — making a 
term of ten months — without intermission. From the 4th of July to 
the 1st of September, the weather being hot and unsuited for study- 
ing, there is allowed a vacation. As, however, many of the Students 
from a distance may not desire to leave the College during vacation, 
and it is not proper that they should be left free of all restraint, there 
will be provision always for affording such as remain occasional in- 
struction in their studies, as well as for preserving their morals and 
habits, as during the regular collegiate course. 

The expenses for the session of ten months — for boarding, washing, 
lodging, fuel, and tuition, are one hundred and fifty dollars. Students 
who remain during vacation will be subject to no extra charge, with 
the exception of twelve dollars for boarding and lodging during the 
time of vacation. 

The expenses of the collegiate year will be required to be paid in 
advance — the first half, or 75 dollars, at the time of matriculation, and 
the balance on the first day of February. 

A matriculation fee of ten dollars will be required of each new 
Student — that is, of such as have not before been Students of Bethany 
College, for the purpose of purchasing a Library, Apparatus, &c. 

Students entering College after the collegiate year has commenced 
shall not be required lo pay board only for the time unexpired. 

The fare shall be plentiful, plain, served neatly and well dressed, 
and of good and wholesome viands. 

The laws of the State of Virginia allow Students of Colleges no 
credit on their own responsibility. They must have a license from the 
President, or some Officer of the Institution, in order to their obtaining 
any credit. No Officer of this College will consent to grant such 
license beyond the depositee in hand for that purpose, with instruction 
from the parents or guardians of the Student as to its disbursement.— 
Students ought not to be furnished with much spending money. 



■J 



It is but two years since the first brick was moulded for the erec- 
tion of Bethany College. During this time a College Proper, four 




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[in 

•lories, 83 by 45; a Steward's Inn, equal to 107 feet by 36, 4etorie* — 
have been completed; and one wing of a Mansion House, 73 feet by 
24, two stories, will be completed about the 1st of September. Besides 
the College Common Hall, a Room of 80 by 42 in the clear, and two 
Society Class Rooms, large enough for 100 Students each, there will 
be for the accommodation of Students some 75 or 80 Rooms furnished 
this Fall, affording ample accommodation for 150 or 160 Students in 
the College precincts. Two Literary Societies have been formed 
with the nucleus of two Libraries. An incipient College Library 
and considerable Chemical and Philosophical Apparatus will be in 
requisition next session. The whole subscriptions to this Institution 
amount to $17,788 25, of which $7,923 66 have been collected. The 
buildings erected and furnished, together with that in progress, and 
certain purchases of apparatus amount to about 23,000 dollars. Every 
donation, large and small, is recorded, and from time to time printed 
exhibits are to be made. It is the paramount object of this Insti- 
tution to educate the youth of the community placed under its care in 
harmony with the genius of human nature and in accordance with the 
whole constitution of man, as a physical, intellectual, and moral being* 
Its demands on the benevolent for aid in the prosecution of its schemes 
of improvement, as we conceive, possess more than ordinary authori- 
ty upon their liberality; and nothing but the unexampled pressure of 
the times could have accounted to its friends for the lack of those 
timely aids and facilities which an object of such magnitude and im- 
portance would seem to require. Some forty or fifty Students more 
than the present applicants can be accommodated next session. 

A. CAMPBELL, 

Treasurer of Bethany College, 






• 



This is a reprint of the "catalogue and certain details of Bethany College" which was 
printed by Alexander Campbell in Bethany, Va., in 1842. The 12-page publication includes 
a listing of the Trustees of the College, the Faculty, and the matriculates during the first 
session which began Nov. 1, 1841, and terminated July 4, 1842. Regulations, the order of 
examinations, course of studies, session, vacation and expenses are part of the document, 
as is a statement concerning college buildings, societies and financial condition. 

This reprint was made for distribution on Founder's Day in March of 1991 as the College 
completed a year-long observance of its Sesquicentennial.